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Full text of "A family history comprising the surnames of Gade--Gadie--Gaudie--Gawdie--Gawdy--Gowdy--Goudey--Gowdey--Gauden--Gaudern--and the variant forms, from A. D. 800 to A. D. 1919. Compiled from authentic public and private records .. embracing a compendium of family history, genealogy and biography covering a period of eight hundred years. Supplemented by an appendix of gleanings ... illustrated with portraits, views of family seats .."

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HON. MAHLON M. GOWDY. 



COMPRISING THE SURNAMES OF 

GADE-GADIE-GAUDIE-GAWDIE-GAWDY 

GOWDY - GOUDY- GOUDEY- GOWDEY 

GAUDEN-GAUDERN — AND 

THE VARIANT FORMS 

FROM A.D. 800 TO A.D. 1919 

Compiled From Authentic Public and Private Records; Documents; Parish 

Registers; Town and County Files; Church Records; Journals; Mortuary 

Inscriptions and Correspondence; Embracing a Compendium of 

Family History, Genealogy and Biography Covering a 

Period of Eight Hundred Years 

Containing Many Unclassified Names and Statements 
Not Found in the Body of the Book 



ILLUSTRATED WITH PORTRAITS, VIEWS OF FAMILY SEATS, 

MONUMENTS, CHURCHES, FACSIMILES OF ANCIENT 

DOCUMENTS, AND HERALDIC INSIGNIA 



"Knowledffe of an honorable ancestry should be an incentive 
to personal emulation." 



By Hon. Mahlon M. Gowdy 

Providence, R. I. " 
And Edited by 

Rev. G. T. Ridlon, Sr. 

Portland, Maine 



1919 
Journal Press, Lewiston, Maine 




If II 

V.I 



Copyright, by Hon. Mahlon M. Gowdy. 1919. 
All rights reserved. 






ji/)rr-^ 




MYRON F. GOWDY, ESQ. 



3tt Memotiam 



3ln Mrmarg 

of 

Mg Hate 3Fattfer 

^an. Hgran 3[ifUl& (^omlig 

Sli}i0 tmlurne is affecttanatelg itp^iicated 

As an acknowledgment of esteem to him whose 

companionship and advice have been 

my inspiration through life. 

MAHLON MYRON GOWDY. 



TITLE PAGE 

IN MEMORIAM —DEDICATION 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION 

READERS' DIRECTORY 

THE ILLUSTRATIONS IN THIS WORK 

COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY 

DERIVATION AND MUTATION OF SURNAME. 

THE FAMILY HERALDRY 

THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND 

Fragments 

A Gawdt Pedigree 

Calendar of Deeds 

Bargain and Sales 

Inquisitions Post Mortem 

Gawdy Obituary 

Gawdy Marriages 

Memorial of Gawdy Family in Temple Church. . . 

Ancient Will 

The Gawdy Correspondence 

For the Gawdy Correspondence 

Gawdy Manuscript in British Museum 

A Remarkable Pedigree 

The Pedigree Proper 

The Gawdy Watch 

HOMES OF THE GAWDYS IN ENGLAND 

Harleston 

Gawdy Hall 

Manor op Coldham 

Bassingbourne Manor 

Manor op Woodhall 

Manor op West Herling 

Manor op Astwick 

Manor op Scotnetts 

Manor of Woodwards 

Ashpield Manor 

Framlingham Castle 

Manor of Crowes Hall 

Manor op Abbotts Hall 

Claxton Manor 

Claxton Hall 

Saxlingham . 

Manor of Thorp Hall 



Page 

I 

. . Ill 

.. IV 
.. IX 
.. XII 
..XVI 
. XVIII 

1 

.. 27 

.. 30 

.. 35 

.. 57 

.. 58 

. . 59 

. . 59 

.. 60 

. . 60 

. . 60 

. . 61 

. . 62 

. . 62 

. . 68 

, .. 70 

, .. 71 

, .. 72 

... 73 

. .. 75 

... 76 

... 76 

... 77 

. .. 77 

... 78 

... 78 

. .. 78 

... 79 

... 79 

... 79 

. .. 79 

. .. 83 

. . . 85 

. .. 86 



87 
88 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Manor of Netherhall, 88 

Walsingham Priory Manor 88 

Shouldham Manor 89 

BiDWiLL Hall 89 

Bond Hall Manor 89 

Garboldsham 89 

West Herling 89 

Wenham Parva 90 

THE GAUDEN FAMILY IN ENGLAND 91 

Samuel Gauden 91 

Samtjel Gauden, Esq 92 

Rev. John Gauden 92 

The Right Reverend John Gauden 92 

LuKENOR Gauden 94 

Charles Gauden 94 

John Gauden , 95 

William Gauden 95 

Mary Gauden 95 

Annie Gauden 95 

Chesham Church, Buckingham 95 

White Church, Buckingham, Eng 95 

Sir Dennis Gauden, Knt 96 

Charles Gauden, Esq 97 

Chesham Common 97 

Sarah Gauden 98 

Samuel Gauden 98 

Benjamin Gauden 98 

Jonathan Gauden 98 

AN INTERESTING PICTURE 99 

A REMARKABLE GAUDEN DOCUMENT 99 

WINSTON CUM PULHAM 100 

WILL OF JOHN GAUDEN 101 

WILL OF DENNIS GAUDEN '. 104 

WILL OF CHARLES GAUDEN 104 

MARRIAGES 105 

THE MANOR OF FROYLE 105 

ADDENDA 106 

GAWDY-GAUDIN-GAUDENS 107 

THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND 109 

THE BRAEFIELD FAMILY 110 

Admiralty Appointment 113 

Works op Gilbert Gowdy 116 

GOUDIES IN NEW ZEALAND 116 

THE GOUDIES OF MONTFIELD 117 

THE GOUDIES OF SAND 117 

THE GOUDIES OF SOTRIGARTH, SHETLAND 117 

GOWDIES OF LERWICK AND DUNDEE 118 

GOUDIES OF SWINISTER AND OVERLAND 118 

GOUDIES OF AITHSTING, SHETLAND 120 

GOUDIES OF TOLLOB, SHETLAND 122 



VI TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

A SHETLAND CROFT 123 

MARRIAGES AND BIRTHS IN SHETLAND 124 

GOUDIES OF SANDWICK, SHETLAND 130 

GOUDIES OF WIESDALE, SHETLAND 134 

SHETLAND GOUDIES IN CANADA 134 

PARLIAMENTARY VOTERS IN SHETLAND 136 

THE GOWDIES IN THE ORKNEY ISLES 137 

HOMES OF THE ORCADIAN FAMILIES 139 

MARRIAGES IN BIRSEY, ORKNEY 139 

BAPTISMS IN BIRSEY, ORKNEY 139 

BAPTISMS IN OPHIR, ORKNEY 141 

MARRIAGES IN OPHIR, ORKNEY 142 

PECULIAR CHARACTERS 142 

A DOCTOR'S PROMISE 143 

THE GAWDIE FAMILY IN AYRSHIRE 145 

GOUDIE AND BURNS FAMILIES 145 

GOUDIES OF OLD AYR MILL 146 

GALSTON PARISH AND RECORDS 146 

BIRTHS IN GALSTON PARISH 147 

GALSTON MARRLA.GES 149 

THE POET GOUDIE 150 

And Can Thy Bosom, Etc 151 

A FAMILY OF CLERGYMEN 152 

GRADUATES OF EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY 153 

JOHN GOUDIE OF GALSTON 154 

GOUDIE-GOLDIE OF ORCHILTREE, SCOTLAND 155 

GOUDIE FAMILY IN AYR VILLAGE 158 

PRESENTATION TO MR. JOHN GOUDIE 159 

DEATH OF " MILLER GOUDIE" 160 

THE LATE "MILLER GOUDIE" 161 

RECORD OF BIRTHS IN AYRSHIRE, SCOTLAND 163 

MARRIAGES IN AYRSHIRE, SCOTLAND 181 

DEATHS IN AYRSHIRE, SCOTLAND 188 

BIRTHS IN KIRKMICHAEL PARISH 192 

MARRIAGES IN KIRKMICHAEL PARISH 197 

DEATHS IN KIRKMICHAEL PARISH 200 

INSCRIPTIONS ON TOMBSTONES 201 

THE NEW CEMETERY, AYR 202 

WALLACETOWN BURYING GROUND 203 

DALRYMPLE CHURCHYARD 204 

MAYBOLE NEW CEMETERY 205 

KIRKOSWALD CEMETERY 207 

KIRKMICHAEL CHURCHYARD 207 

ST. ANDREWS BURYING GROUND, KILMARNOCK 208 

RICARTON OLD BURYING GROUND 208 

CRAGIE BURYING GROUND 209 

ROCHILTREE BURYING GROUND 209 

OLD CUMNOCK CEMETERY, AYRSHIRE 209 

NEW CUMNOCK CEMETERY. AYRSHIRE 210 

APPENDED NOTES 211 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. VII 



GOUDIE-GOLDIE OF CRAIGMORE 212 

GOUDIE-GOLDIE OF GOLDIELEA 216 

GOUDIES AND GOUDYS IN AUSTRALIA 217 

GOUDIES IN NEW ZEALAND 218 

BURIALS IN GREYFRIARS CHURCHYARD 218 

COMISERAT, GLASGOW 219 

MARRIAGES IN EDINBURGH 219 

ISOBEL GOWDIE, WiTCH 219 

GADE AND VON GOUDY 220 

GOWDY FAMILIES IN ULSTER, IRELAND 222 

THE GOWDYS OF NEWTOWNARDS, IRELAND 222 

SCOTCH-IRISH MINISTERS 224 

Rev. John Gowby 224 

Rev. Alexander Goudy 224 

Rev. Robert Gottdy 224 

Rev. James Goudy 225 

Rev. Robert Goudy 225 

John Goitdy 225 

Rev. Andrew Goudy 225 

Rev. Alexander Porter Goudy 225 

TEMPLE PATRICK CHURCHYARD 230 

THE BALLYSILLAN BRANCH 231 

SCOTCH-IRISH BRANCH 232 

CANADIAN FAMILIES 234 

A QUEBEC SHIPBUILDER 235 

GOUDIES FROM AYRSHIRE 239 

GOUDIES FROM MODOCK TOWNSHIP 242 

GOUDIE-GOLDIE FROM KIRKMICHAEL 243 

GOUDIE-GOLDIE OF AYR, ONTARIO 244 

GOUDYS FROM NEWTOWNARDS, IRELAND 261 

ANOTHER CANADIAN BRANCH 264 

GOUDIES IN MONTREAL, CANADA 265 

THE GOUDEY FAMILY IN NOVA SCOTIA 266 

Main-Mains-Means Families 266 

GOWDY FAMILY IN CONNECTICUT 288 

ALEXANDER BRANCH 361 

GOWDY FAMILY IN CONSTANTIA, N. Y 372 

GOUDY FAMILY IN BRISTOL, MAINE 395 

GOUDY FAMILY IN MARBLEHEAD, MASS 431 

GOUDEY FAMILY IN ROME, NEW YORK 449 

GOUDEY FAMILY IN ORANGE COUNTY, N. Y 452 

GOWDEY FAMILY IN NEW YORK CITY 459 

MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS FROM PENNSYLVANIA 463 

GOWDY FAMILY IN CUMBERLAND COUNTY, PENN 468 

GOWDY FAMILY IN CRAWFORD COUNTY, PENN 470 

THE EARLY FAMILIES IN PENNSYLVANIA 476 

GOWDY FAMILIES IN XENIA, OHIO 480 

GOUDY FAMILY IN DALTON, OHIO 498 

GOWDY FAMILY IN CLARK COUNTY, OHIO 510 

GOWDY FAMILY IN COLUMBUS, OHIO 527 



VIII TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



GOUDY FAMILY IN JEROMEVILLE, OHIO 530 

GOWDY FAMILY OF SUGAR CREEK, OHIO 534 

GOUDY FAMILY OF GALLIPOLIS, OHIO 539 

GOWDY FAMILY IN INDIANA AND ILLINOIS 541 

GOWDY FAMILY OF TENNESSEE AND ILLINOIS 549 

GOUDY FAMILY, LINN GROVE, IOWA 571 

VARIOUS BRANCHES FROM IRELAND 584 

MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS 586 

UNCLASSIFIED GLEANINGS 589 

GowDY Family op North Cave, Eng 589 

Abstracts op Gawdy Wills 589 

Rev. Edward Gatjden 590 

Thomas Gawdy op Claxton, Eng 590 

Joan Gotjdrie op Pitchcote 590 

Hatfield-Woodhall 590 

Gawdy Knights 590 

Musgrave Obituaries 591 

GouDiEs in New Hampshire 591 

Soldiers in the Union Army 592 

Connecticut Family Addenda 601 

Fragment 603 

Various Notes 603 

Biography 604 

Addenda, New Hampshire Branch 605 

North Carolina Family 605 




yist 0f |Uitstratt0ns, 



portraits. 

HON. MAHLON MYRON GOWDY Frontispiece ^^^* 

MYRON FIFIELD GOWDY Facing III 

BISHOP JOHN GAUDEN, D.D 92 

GILBERT GOUDIE, SR 112 

GILBERT A. GOUDIE 113 

GILBERT GOUDIE, ESQ 115 

JAMES MOUAT GOUDIE 117 

JAMES TOLLOCK GOUDIE 117 

WILLIAM PAYNE GOUDIE 118 

SAMUEL GOUDIE 118 

REV. WILLIAM GOUDIE 122 

REV. JOHN GAWDIE, "PRINCIPAL GAWDIE" 152 

JOHN GOUDIE, "TERROR OF WHIGS" 154 

FRANZ VON GAUDY 221 

REV. ALEXANDER P. GOUDY, D.D 225 

HENRY GOUDY, A.M., D.C.L 230 

JOHN GOLDIE 245 

JOHN GOLDIE, ESQ 249 

JAMES GOLDIE 251 

JESSIE McEWAN 253 

MARY E. (McEWAN) ARMSTRONG 253 

DAVID GOLDIE 254 

WILLIAM GOLDIE 257 

HENRY GOWDY 310 

ELI GOWDY 313 

TUDOR GOWDY. 313 

MELINDA (HENRY) GOWDY 313 

EDRICK GOWDY 319 

MARIA A. (GOWDY) MIXTER 344 

CHARLES H. GOWDY 345 

HARRIET A. (THRALL) GOWDY 346 

SARAH MELINDA (GOWDY) FARNSWORTH 349 

REVILO T. GOWDY 35I 

HARRY M. GOWDY 35I 

ELLEN SOPHRONIA (GOWDY) FARNSWORTH 352 

ROBERT GOWDY 356 

ARTHUR W. GOWDY 357 

ADDIE M. (CHAPIN) GOWDY 357 

CYNTHIA M. (COMAN) GOWDY 357 

HAZEL B. (GOWDY) WRIGHT 359 

DONALD M. GOWDY 359 



X LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 

GRACE B. (GOWDY) (CHAPMAN) NYE 359 

JENNIE B. (GOWDY) SIMONS 380 

ETOILE B. SIMONS, PH.D 380 

DR. AUGUSTUS S. GOWDY 381 

FAMILY OF FRANKLIN J. GOWDY 383 

GOWDY (GROUP) 383 

FRANK M. GOWDY, M.D 384 

FRANKLIN GOWDY 388 

HERBERT W. GOWDY 389 

CAPT. JAMES H. GOUDY 417 

LEWIS A. GOUDY. 418 

DR. JACOB W. P. GOUDY 421 

JOHN M. GOWDEY 439 

SARAH M. GOWDEY. 439 

GEORGE C. GOUDEY 442 

REV. GEORGE E. GOWDY 495 

THE GOUDY TWINS 508 

HARRY ("HANK") GOWDY 528 

HON. FRANK C. GOUDY 532 

HON. JOHN K. GOWDY 537 



Ji^sibmtial ^utos. 



STIFFKEY CASTLE 51 

REDDENHALL MARKET SQUARE 75 

GAWDY HALL 76 

FRAMLINGHAM CASTLE, OLD VIEW 79 

FRAMLINGHAM CASTLE 81 

FRAMLINGHAM VILLAGE 81 

"MARK" HOUSE, LONDON 97 

BRAEFIELD HOUSE, SHETLAND 112 

HOME OF JAMES MOUAT GOUDIE 117 

HOME OF WILLIAM PAYNE GOUDIE 118 

OLD GAUDIE HOUSE, ORKNEY 139 

OLD GAUDIE HOUSE, ORKNEY, INTERIOR VIEW... 139 

THE "GORE," ONTARIO.^ 254 

RESIDENCE OF WILLIAM GOLDIE 257 

HILL GOWDY HOMESTEAD, "TWIN OAKS" 302 

ROBERT GOWDY HOMESTEAD 304 

HOME OF TUDOR GOWDY 314 

HOME OF MYRON F. GOWDY, TWO VIEWS 347 

OLD GOUDY BRIDGE AND MILL 395 

OLD GOUDY BRIDGE AND RESIDENCE 396 

AMOS GOUDY HOMESTEAD 406 

HOME OF JAMES H. GOUDY._ 417 

HOME OF DR. JACOB GOUDY 421 

ROBERT GOWDY HOMESTEAD, XENIA, 491 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. XI 



GAUT MONUMENT 2 

OLD DERRY CHURCH 24 

GAWDY ARMS 31 

GAWDY ACCOUNTS._„ 70 

GAWDY WATCH 73 

ST. MARY'S CHURCH, REDDENHALL. 77 

ST. MARY'S CHURCH, INTERIOR VIEW 78 

OLD CHURCH, CLAPHAM COMMONS 97 

GAUDEN MONUMENT 99 

HEADSTONES OF SAMUEL AND ABIAH GOWDY 298 

HEADSTONES OF ROBERT AND CONTENT GOWDY 304 

GOWDY MONUMENT 348 



t 



\nd Pistom oi C^ts §00!%. 



The numerous branches of the family bearing the surname in its variant 
forms of orthography will find pleasure in learning something definite con- 
cerning the history of this work and the causes that obtained during its de- 
velopment, and the result of the undertaking would not appear well-equipped 
without an attempt to meet this natural desideratum. 



On the 21st day of April, 1853, Myron Fifield Gowdy and Harriet Amelia 
Thrall were united in wedlock. In 1902 their son, Mahlon Myron Gowdy, 
anticipating the event of the jubilee of this marriage, conceived the idea of 
compiling a record of the ancestry of his parents to appear in pamphlet form 
and to be distributed among their friends on that eventful day; but the 
inscrutable mandate of Nature interposed, and Mr. Gowdy died suddenly 
on January 30, 1903, a short three months prior to the anticipated gathering 
of relatives and friends to commemorate the anniversary of the marital union. 
Disappointed in his first plans, the compiler's thoughts turned to the erection 
of some permanent monument to honor his father; and knowing that there 
had been no attempt made for the publication of a history and genealogy of 
the Gowdy race, and that with the passing away of the present generation 
much valuable historical data and record-information would be lost beyond 
recovery, and that with the passing of time there would be a growing curiosity 
among the descendants to learn something authentic concerning their ancestry, 
his plans expanded to the publication of this elaborate work as a most suitable 
memorial to his honored father. 

Immediately following his decision he instituted a general inquisition 
in the form of printed questionaires which were circulated among all known 
relatives of the family during the leisure hours when his business activities 
would admit; and, moreover, he, saw the importance of obtaining the services 
of some person whose experience in this class of research qualified them to 
prosecute a scientific method of investigation; and through the mediation of 
his kinsman, Hon. Lewis A. Goudy, of Portland, Me., he formed the acquaint- 
ance of the Editor of this work. At the meeting which soon followed, an 
arrangement was entered into by which an extensive investigation was launched 
for the purpose of procuring all possible historical information and records 
relating to the remote ancestors of the race and those branches of the family 
early planted in the American Colonies; also for the completion of the ped- 
igrees of the families in the United States and British Provinces. 

The more than fifty years of research in America and his extensive investi- 
gation in Europe while compiling previous books on history and genealogy, 
had made him familiar with numerous sources of information and qualified 
him in a peculiar way for the successful prosecution of this project; and his 
established acquaintance with numerous correspondents of wide knowledge in 



EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION. XIII 

foreign fields aflforded influence that has been indispensable during his connec- 
tion with this publication. Immediately on his engagement in the year 1914, the 
Editor instituted the search through Great Britain and Continental Europe, 
while the author continued his investigation relating to the American branches; 
and all data, with the notes and papers, were turned over to the Editor, who 
completed the work. 

While travelling in Europe several years ago and on an excursion to the 
Shetland Isles the Editor had learned something of the family of Goudie so 
early settled in that Northern Land, and this resulted in forming the acquaint- 
ance of Gilbert Goudie, Esq., of Edinburgh, Scotland, a Shetlander by birth 
and an antiquary and historian of learning and distinction, and immediately 
communicated with him concerning the prospective publication and asking 
him, at the same time, what information he could supply relating to the remote 
ancestry of the various European branches of the family. This gentleman 
instantly manifested a deep interest in the genealogical enterprise and for- 
warded an extensive manuscript comprising the authentic history and many 
statistics of the far-away progenitors reaching back to the Scandinavian Viking 
days. In this treatise he alluded briefly to the English branches of the family 
and others early settled in Scotland. 

The acquisition of this remarkable and valuable historical pedigree proved 
an incentive for a more exhaustive investigation for the purpose of discovering, 
if possible, more particulars and records relating to the ancient ancestors and 
the baronial families once so distinguished among the legal celebrities of 
England. The Editor immediately visited the great libraries in the New Eng- 
land cities and spent weeks at different times in searching through hundreds 
of great leather-bound tomes of British history. This method proved highly 
successful and voluminous notes were procured reaching backward to the 
Norman Conquest; yea, far beyond, into the history of the Norman peoples 
and to Scandinavian annals and the Sagas. Very full pedigrees and biog- 
raphies relating to the baronial branches were soon in hand; while the search 
disclosed other branches once resident in England and Scotland. Meanwhile, 
the search embraced the wish to find portraits of distinguished representatives 
of these ancient families along with views of the most stately seats where for 
generations they had domiciled. This desire was also gratified, and many 
pictures both personal and residential were procured; some of these having 
been engraved in copper-plates for the County histories published more than 
a hundred years ago. This "Editor's Introduction" will not attempt to 
present a detailed account of the many portraits and residential views discov- 
ered and acquired during the years of search; this will be done more at length 
in another section of the book. 

The sources from which information and family statistics were reached 
are too numerous to be catalogued here. They were almost interminable 
and discovered in distant lands and made available through persistent effort. 
Correspondence has been carried on with historians, antiquaries, librarians, 
recorders, and ofiicials in various departments of life; civil, political, judicial 
and ecclesiastical. County and parish records in England, Scotland, Ireland, 
Isle of Man, Orkney, Shetland, and in Scandinavia have been examined, and 
whenever data relating to the families was discovered, copies and abstracts 
have been procured. Inquiries were forwarded to the Librarians and Custo- 
dians of the Departments of Manuscripts of the British Museum, in London, 



XIV EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION. 

and the National Library of France, in Paris. In these institutions valuable 
data was found and some of it procured. The remarkable and numerous 
"Gowdy Letters" were learned about in the British Museum and a part of 
them, in published form, were purchased through the Roxburgh Club in 
London. Other printed works were found and procured. One of these was 
the Life of Rev. Alexander Porter Goudy, D.D., a distinguished Presbyterian 
minister in Ulster, Ireland; this was presented by his son. Prof. Henry Goudy, 
of Oxford College, England, to the author. Another work discovered in 
Scotland was a book containing mention of the "Contemporaries of Robert 
Burns" in which there is a very good, old-styled, engraved portrait of John 
Goudie and several pages devoted to his life and publications. 

Research in America has been nearly exhaustive; every source of pros- 
pective information having been approached and investigated. This has been a 
laborious and persistent task and has reached from the Atlantic to the Pacific 
coast; it has crossed the boundary and protruded itself into the Canadian 
provinces; yea, it has been pushed overseas to far-away Australasia, the 
confederational union of the several states in Australia, wherto some of the 
families had gone many years ago to try their fortunes; being offshoots of the 
Scottish and Shetlandic stock. Probate, Registry of Deeds, Court Files, Tax- 
lists, old letters, family Bibles, church records, tombstones, and numberless 
old documents have been made tributary to this work. But research has not 
been exhausted and, time being given, it is believed that much more could 
have been discovered that would have supplemented and enhanced the value 
of this history. The task is practically endless and no published work of this 
class was ever perfected. If the search were to be continued indefinitely the 
present generations of the family would all be dead and their names and 
records be chiseled in the enduring stone. 

The Editor feels that the work he has accomplished should receive some 
recognition and employs this medium for stating to the family-at-large that 
he has applied the experience gained in genealogical research and extensive 
travel in foreign lands faithfully for the promotion of this literary undertaking; 
indeed, he has become so closely identified with it personally that his enthu- 
siasm has expanded with the progress of his work and the interesting acquisi- 
tions of information till he almost feels as if he was a member of the Clan- 
valiant and invested with some of the red, rushing blood of the Goudie race. 
However, as he has handled over the manuscripts and observed the imperfec- 
tion of the pedigrees he has formulated, he is impressed with a sense of dis- 
satisfaction and a desire for more time for the prosecution of the investigation. 

In closing this introduction the Editor wishes to give expression to his 
profound respect for Mahlon M. Gowdy, Esq., his employer, and to recognize 
his uniform courtesy and business promptitude, and for the many pleasant 
hours passed in his company. His pressing commercial engagements have 
prohibited giving the personal attention to the work that was desirable, but 
he has maintained an unabated interest in its progress and has assumed the 
entire financial responsibility of its support. 

To the many custodians of public institutions who have freely made 
available the books and documents entrusted to their care, the Editor tenders 
his grateful acknowledgments. He also remembers with feelings of deep 
appreciation the kind responses and prompt assistance rendered by many 
persons who were in no way connected with the families involved. Many of 



EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION. XV 

these individuals have with painstaking devotion searched for information and 
supplied much that was essential to the success of the undertaking. It would 
afford the Editor great pleasure also to mention bynames the numerous persons 
of official influence who have rendered valuable aid in the development of 
the work; but limited space prohibits this attempt. 

There are hundreds of persons bearing the family names recorded within 
this volume, besides those connected by marriage, whom I would cheerfully 
mention with feelings of profound gratitude, who have been ever ready to 
contribute any service toward its success; and this statement bears evidence 
of my appreciation. The names of some of these will appear associated with 
the genealogy of the families to which they belong. 

Especial mention should be made of the printers and proof-readers asso- 
ciated with the Lewiston Journal Press for their painstaking and faithful 
handling of the manuscripts placed in their hands by the Editor and their 
infinite patience when changes were necessary for the more euphonious reading 
of the pages of the book. Without this devotion to the interests of the author 
and publisher much that is now presentable would have been wanting in the 
work. 

It is fondly hoped that all members of the family-at-large will properly 
appreciate and be ever grateful to the author who conceived this literary under- 
taking and who has so generously financed it to its completion at an expense 
of several thousand dollars for the preservation of the family history. 

G. T. RiDLON, Sr. 
Portland, Me., March 14, 1919. 



In a work of this class comprising so many thousands of personal names 
and dates furnished by nearly as many individuals representing numerous styles 
of chirography, some of which was insufferable, errors are unavoidable; and 
many such must remain unknown to the author and his Editor unless discov- 
ered and designated by those who are familiar with the history, genealogy and 
biography of the branches of which they are members; consequently, the 
compiler respectfully requests all persons into whose hands these volumes fall 
to observe and report any names, dates or statements in the various pedigrees 
that are known to be misleading or palpable errors (also any omissions), and 
all such corrections that are forwarded with proper references to family, page 
and paragraph will be printed on light-weight paper and inserted between the 
leaves of a copy of the book kept especially for that purpose. If many such 
errors or omissions are discovered they will be printed and forwarded to all 
subscribers to this work. Address 

Mahlon M. Gowdy, 

19 Dewey Street, 

Providence, R. I. 



Genealogies and pedigrees are published in nearly as many forms and 
with as great a variety of classifications as they have authors and compilers. 
Fach writer has his own ideal and composes accordingly. The Editor of this 
work has examined nearly all of the family histories deposited in the British 
and American public libraries, comprising very comprehensive arrangements 
of family pedigrees, but has adopted the present form which differs in several 
respects from all others. Nearly all such works contain almost numberless 
repetitions and their detached conditions make it very difificult to trace the 
connections between them. In seeking to trace any branch of the families 
recorded in this memorial the reader should first consult the Table of Contents, 
for there he will find the titles by which each branch of the family is denomi- 
nated. In most instances the title will represent the town, or district, where 
the ancestors settled or where a majority of the families resided. Under these 
captions each family will be classified by generations, beginning with the name 
of the person heading the list and running down to the youngest children. The 
various sections will be suitably divided by sub-titles, such as "second gener- 
ation" and "third generation." Supplementing this heading there will appear 
a small figure above the type-line called a "superior," which denotes the gener- 
ation to which this person belongs. The succeeding generations will follow 
in the regular order. By this arrangement it will be observed that first cousins, 
being of the same generation, will stand in the same section, but their names 
and families will be separated in paragraphs. 

There will also appear a heavy-faced figure in parenthesis (4) following 
each person's name, at the head of each paragraph, which denotes the number 
of persons in that particular branch of the family bearing the same Christian 
name; in every instance applied to the first name of the individual. Thus, 
Nathaniel* (5), son of Nathaniel* (4), will show that in this family there had 
appeared four persons of this name before the one first mentioned, and that 
three generations had been previously recorded. By this simple arrangement 
there need be no confusion in the identification of any person's name, as in 
no instance will these names appear associated with the same figures either in 
parentheses or above the type-line. 

The Table of Contents will designate the different branches of the 
family and the pages where they will be found recorded. There will be an 
Index of Surnames which will contain the names of all who have been inter- 
married with the families under notice. In wishing to find and trace any 
person, if the reader can remember the maiden name of a wife, or mother, 
his search will be facilitated by running down the alphabetical index of sur- 
names till he reaches the one desired; then, by noting the number of the page 
set against that name, the births, marriages, biographies and deaths of that 
family will readily be found. Names of families intermarried will be made 
conspicuous in the index by larger type. 



READERS' DIRECTORY. XVII 

There will appear in the last part of the volume an Appendix, containing 
the record and all that is known of detached and unclassified families. This 
department of the work will be found important and many who consult it 
will doubtless recognize their kindred and know where they should have been 
connected in the body of the work. These fragments, or short sketches, have 
been gathered from numerous sources and were considered important as pre- 
serving the names and statistics of the families represented. 



^rratxtm. 

Page 308, bottom. Clarissa E. Hancock, born about 1828, was married 
January 31, 1854, in Springfield, Mass., by Rev. Samuel Osgood to Marcus 
Rice. 

Page 311. Winthrop Allen, fourth child of Delane, is an error and should 
be omitted. 

Page 316. Daniel Gowdy, Jr., married in Enfield, Conn., not in New Jersey. 

Page 337. Martha Alice Gowdy. For Grogan, N. Y., say Crogan. 

Page 337. Add fourth child born March 1, 1876, in Detroit, Mich., died 
in January, 1910 or 1911. 

Page 346. Myron F. Gowdy. For Tudor (2) should be Tudor (1). 

Page 366. Orasemus Noble Gibbons married Sept. 30, 1880; not 1881. 

Page 369. Martin Gowdy Parks died January 5th and not the 3d. 

Page 373. John Gowdy. See original sketch, page 300. 

Page 415. For Daniel Soule read David Soule. 



l^^ 



ik2iJ 



Cl^t IllustnitioiTS in Cl^is Wioxh, 



The illustrations found in this family history were procured by persistent 
search and ingenious expedient; many of them at a heavy cash expense. Por- 
traits representing the remote generations of the family in England and Scot- 
land were rare and difficult to obtain. Those that appear in this book were 
discovered after patient search through several hundred volumes of English 
and Scottish publications; some of them were copied from old-fashioned copper- 
plate engravings made more than two hundred years ago. The portrait of 
Bishop Gauden was found in a history of the county of Norfolk, England, and 
is supposed to have been copied from his monument in Worcester Cathedral. 
Three portraits of the Bishop are extant. In his principal work, "Tears and 
Sighs of the Church of England," there is a very small whole-length portrait. 
There is also a very rare and curious portrait prefixed to Milton's (Greek) 
Eikon Basilike, London, 1649. 

It was hoped that portraits of some if not all of the members of the English 
families of Gawdy who were so distinguished as Baronets and Chief-Justices 
would be found in some English work; but although their biographies have 
been published they were not, in any edition yet seen, attended by portraits. 
This seems the more singular when it is known that one of the titled members 
of the Baronial family was a portrait painter of no mean ability. 

There was also indulged the hope that a portrait of Sir Dennis Gauden, 
Knight, the distinguished Commissary of the British Navy and Sheriff of 
London, would be found; but although the search has been continued with 
persistency, no such likeness has been discovered. 

The portrait of John Goudie, called by Burns "Terror of the Whigs," 
was published in a work titled "The Contemporaries of Burns," and has been 
somewhat modernized and improved by the halftone process. In the original 
the Essayist was sitting before a large globe. 

The portrait of Principal Gawdie of the Edinburgh University was pre- 
sented by Gilbert Goudie, Esq., of that city. He has also furnished the por- 
trait of his venerable father as well as of several other distinguished represent- 
atives of the family. The portrait of Dr. Goudy, the eminent divine of Ireland, 
was copied from his published biography, a volume of which was presented to 
the author of this work by his son. Prof. Henry Goudy of Oxford College, 
England. The portrait of Baron Gaudy, the German poet, was found in a 
volume of his published books. Protracted search has been projected into 
every source where there was any hope of finding portraits of the distinguished 
military officers of Scotch extraction who served with valor in the Prussian 
army, but the dislocating influences of the World-war now in progress has 
prohibited the examination of works in foreign libraries, and these desirable 
illustrations have not been discovered. 

Through the kindly intervention of ex-Minister Hon. W. W. Thomas, now 
of Stockholm, Sweden, search has been instituted with hope of finding in the 



THE ILLUSTRATIONS IN THIS WORK. XIX 

extensive collections of rare books in the libraries of that country, or in Chris- 
tiania, Norway, or Copenhagen, Denmark, portraits of the distinguished per- 
sons bearing the names of Gade and Gaud in those countries. We regret to 
report that the attempt was a failure. 

The residential views that appear in this work have been largely copied 
from old English books. The county history of Norfolk produced two views 
of Framlingham Castle; another was found in "Gross's Antiquities." The 
picture of Framlingham Village and Castle was derived from a work on the 
Cities and Towns of England, the title of which was not recorded. The orig- 
inals from which many of these views were copied were but coarse wood engrav- 
ings made more than a hundred years ago and were not as attractive as could 
be desired; however, they represent the houses fairly well and greatly enhance 
the value of the books. 

It may be worthy of mention in this connection that the view of Gawdy 
Hall, the only ancient residence of the Baronial family now standing, was 
considered to be a sine qua non for this family history; consequently extraor- 
dinary means were employed to discover and procure such a picture. Every 
work on Norfolk, in which county the ancient seat is located, was examined 
with discriminating care, but without avail. Again it was thought likely that 
a view of such a well-known baronial seat would be found in some work devoted 
especially to such illustrations, and a search covering numerous books of this 
class was carefully gone through with the same fruitless result. Investigation 
was instituted in the British Museum, that almost exhaustless repository of 
rare books and pictures, but the search proved abortive. When these expe- 
dients had all failed it was thought that a view might have been published in 
some magazine, and hundreds of volumes of English serials were turned leaf 
by leaf without the discovery of the desired view. At length the Librarian 
of the Norwich City Library was communicated with and his influence used 
to aid in procuring a photograph of the seat as it now appears, but it is under- 
stood that the proprietor "curtly refused" to have the view made. When all 
of these means had proved unavailing the good offices of the Lord-Mayor of 
Norwich, England, were solicited, but the result has not been reported. At 
last the American agency of B. F. Stevens & Brown in London was employed 
to take up the search, and they soon found in a bookstore the two card-views 
from which the illustrations appearing in the family history were copied and 
enlarged. Excelsior! 

Nearly exhaustive search has been prosecuted in England for some kind 
of a picture of the Mansion erected by Sir Dennis Gauden intended for his 
brother, the Bishop, if appointed to Winchester, on Clapham Common, a 
suburb of London, but without the desired result. The view of this Common 
as it appears in this work may possibly comprise this residence, as it was 
engraved about the time the mansion was dismantled, but it is not certain. 
This copy was made, with that of the ancient Clapham Church, from a work on 
the Cities and Towns of England, the title not recorded. 

The reproduction of a view of the ancient and remarkable monument in 
the Isle of Man sculptured by Gaut was procured from a gentleman in that 
country, P. M. C. Kermode, F. S. A., of Ramsey, the greatest authority on 
Runic crosses and antiquarian matters in the Isle of Man. 



XX THE ILLUSTRATIONS IN THIS WORK. 

The fac-simile of the "Gawdy Correspondence" and the Title Page of the 
"Account of Household Expenses," were produced from the originals by the 
rotograph process. Considering the remote time when this writing was done 
these fac-similes are of great interest and appropriate for publication in this 
work. 

Views of Stififkey Hall, the seat of the Bacon-Gawdys, and of Mark House, 
the residence of Charles Gauden, Esq., of London, were copied from a work 
on the old family seats of the English gentry found in the Atheneum Library 
in Hartford, Conn. 



CampcniJunn d Jfamiln pbtarn 

COVERING A PERIOD OF 800 YEARS. 



m 



The origin and distribution of the races of mankind present a subject that 
invites the attention of the general historian, and when the survey is more par- 
ticularly directed toward those families from whom we derive our personal existence, 
to discover their origin, follow their migrations, and analyze the formative elements 
that have developed and moulded their characters, our interest is naturally stimu- 
lated and the desire to obtain all the information available intensified. The irre- 
vocable laws of heredity have reproduced in us many physical and mental charac- 
teristics that were inherent in the ancestors from whom our families sprung; and 
it should be a pleasing diversion from the wearing activities of commercial and 
political life to look backward to the period of time when our earliest progenitors 
lived and to familiarize ourselves with the events that transpired contemporary 
with their history; to project our research to the distant fountain-head and follow 
downward the current of lineal descent, observing in our mental investigation the 
tributary influences that have affected the physical and intellectual peculiarities 
that were conspicuous in every generation and in every branch bearing the name. 

During the course of human events there appeared upon the stage of action the 
progenitors of a family under a distinctive title that has, by the evolutions of time, 
assumed variant forms, but in the remote beginning of their history was found 
in the simple name of "Gade"; and, from this initial appellation it has developed 
into a variety of etymological fashions until we have made record of about twenty 
different spellings. The object of this literary undertaking is to trace from its 
source the origin of this family of every generation and branch and into every land 
to which they have gone; and the results of the compiler's research will be inter- 
woven in chronological order of record and rhetorical sequence as a succinct and 
intelligible history worthy of the reader's attention. With this end in view the 
author of the work has found it necessary to investigate the earliest history of the 
Scandinavian races and familiarize himself with the conditions of the country where 
they settled, and the customs of the times in which they lived; to consider the 
forces that have stamped indelibly upon the descendants those unmistakable traits 
and habits that were conspicuous in every generation and cadet of the ancient 
sept; to pause in the pathway of this survey and contemplate the lives of indi- 
viduals who have figured prominently in the events that have occurred during the 
period of their migrations and vicissitudes, all of which will be conserved within 
the pages of this memorial. 

In the present case there have appeared very fortunate circumstances, quite 
unusual circumstances, to contribute to the acquisition of knowledge concerning 
the remote history of this family. The research was begun far back in the dim 
semi-historical Eddas and Sagas produced by the Norse peoples and was supple- 
mented by the enduring records carved in tables of stone; in the runic inscriptions 
found in ancient Scandinavian monuments; and it is a singular incident that one 
of the earliest known sculptors of the race should become the intelligent medium 
of transmitting the name of the ancestors to his descendants by the application of 
his art and leave chiseled in the enduring memorials of stone the unmistakable 
record of his name and employment. This man was a Norseman who had early 



COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 



removed to the Isle of Man in the Irish Sea and as a member of that pioneer colony 
from the Viking-Land he became the recorder in stone of the earliest events in 
their history. For centuries there stood irt the town or parish of Kirk Michael a 
stone monument beautifully carved with ornamental braids and links and inscribed 
in the runic characters in vogue at the time, his own and his contemporaries' 
names, for after finishing the sculptures relating to others he subjoined the state- 
ment that "Gaut carved this as all others in Man." 

From a study of the ancient Norse literature supplemented by that of the 
archaeological discoveries now on exhibition in the museums of Christiania, Stock- 
holm, and Copenhagen, we are enabled to reproduce the lives of the most remote 
progenitors of the families from whom the Gauts and Gades descended. There, 
fragments of the clothing worn by them are still preserved; there, are many articles 
to prove their skill in the handling of iron and the precious metals; there, are 
remains that illustrate their domestic economy and home life; indeed, we may 
form reliable mental pictures of this race of people as they went down to the sea 
in ships; as they went forth in their bold excursions after booty; as they invaded 
the coasts of nearly every country in Europe; as they returned to their homes 
laden with the trophies of the chase; see them when they had become an agricul- 
tural people as they cultivated their "Riggs" of rye and barley upon the hills that 
rose above the shining waters of the deep bays where they established their places 
of abode. 

At the period when we are introduced to this people we find them either Vikings 
or the retainers of the Sea-kings. The inhabitants of Norway were at that time 
assembled into communities under the government of petty rulers acting inde- 
pendently of each other and with no attempt to form a confederation. These Vikings 
established themselves upon the shores of the fiords and under the protecting 
shoulders of the towering mountains near the coast and lived in great halls built 
of the timber from the almost interminable forests that covered the land. In 
these "Royal Houses" there were high seats, heavy tables, looms for the weaving 
of servants, and on the timber walls shields, battle-a.xes, and swords were displayed. 
Sometimes a neighboring Viking would be guest at the table and together with 
his host would feast on a roast pig with dessert of wild cherries, and entertained 
meanwhile by the recitation of the Scald who rehearsed the deeds of valour per- 
formed by their ancestors. The houses of the retainers, or vassals, of these sea- 
kings were built on some table-rock near the waterfront and not distant from the 
Viking Hall. 

These subjects of petty royalty were subservient to the wish and will of their 
overlord and were ready at a moment's warning to embark with him on any adven- 
ture that he might suggest. They shared in the dangers of those bold excursions 
and were partakers of the spoils of achievement on their return to their homes. 
The houses inhabited by the servitors were long, low-posted, broad-gabled, timber- 
built places of abode, warmed by great wood-fires kindled upon broad stones laid 
down in the center of the rooms. There were no chimneys and the smoke coiled 
in blue spirals through an opening in the roof. The plenishing was rude, heavy 
and home-hewed. Weapons for the chase, harpoons for the sea-hunt, coils of 
cordage and reels wound with many fathoms of fish-line were suspended upon the 
walls. The indoor life of these Norse families was very primitive and crude, but 
perhaps not more so than in many of the homes of their descendants in the Shetland 
Isles of to-day; indeed, the same rude interior, the same fashion of furniture, the 
same arrangements for fires and cooking, the same accessories on the walls, the 




GAUT MONUMENT. 



COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 



same simplicity of domestic habits and manner of every-day life, seem to have been 
perpetuated in hundreds of the homes of the peasantry still to be found in these 
North Sea Islands. The building materials are different, but all the essential 
features of life are nearly the same. The "Quern," or hand-mill, for grinding the 
rye and barley meal was in use among the Norse ancestors and may still be seen 
in the lowly homes of the crofters and fishermen at the present time. The clothing 
of the families during the faraway period was home-spun and home-woven; it was 
cut and seamed by the hands of the wives and mothers from the wool of the flock 
and the flax of the field. In the earliest period they were clad in the skins of 
animals taken in the chase during the cold of winter. The cooking was done then 
as to-day in the Shetlander's cottage. The kettles were suspended upon sooty 
chains hanging from the roof; the fires were then of wood but burned upon the 
stone hearth just as the peat fires burn in the crofters' home in many Shetland 
neighborhoods now. An abundance of wholesome food was taken from the sea 
in the wild fowl and finny tribes. Crusty oat-scones were baked on forged griddles 
over the coals then as they are now baked over the bank of peat coals by many a 
Shetland lassie. 

When Harold the "Fair-hair" had subdued the many petty kings in Norway 
and had formed a confederation of the population, those who refused to be subju- 
gated or absorbed in the general mass under this autocratic and imperious govern- 
ment were driven from their homes to seek their fortunes in other lands; and these 
exiles turned the prows of their long galley-boats toward the shores of the western 
isles where they established settlements; hence the inhabitation of the Shetlands 
and Orcadees by the refugees of the Scandinavian race. And we are not to lose 
sight of the fact that in this running survey of the movements and history of these 
Norsemen we are following the migrations of the ancestors of the Goudie and 
Gawdy family. 

Governed by a knowledge of the foregoing facts and to gratify the instinctive 
desire inherent in all families to know their origin and the events that impelled 
them in their migrations and distribution in the countries where they established 
homes, the compiler has deemed it appropriate in an epitomized form to produce 
a compendium of history embracing the whole period of their existence from the 
earliest known mention of the name to the present time. 

The remote ancestors of this branch of the ancient Aryan race removed from 
the shores of the German Ocean and established themselves on the northern 
peninsula now comprising Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Denmark. This 
Teutonic people were invested with exhaustless energy and restless activity, and 
their insatiate passion for adventure impelled them to undertake those daring 
excursions that served to contribute their rich, red, rushing blood as a vital prop- 
erty into many lands and among many races. They were dreamers of countries 
yet unknown and were probably impelled to their sea-roaming by the hope of 
booty and the discovery of new sources of livelihood. The vast forests that then 
covered the rugged mountains of these north lands abounded with wild game 
and the deep and long fiords that intersected the country teemed with fowl and 
fish. During such visits these adventurers evidently discovered the exhaustless 
deposits of iron with which the soil was underlaid, so necessary for the forging of 
weapons to be used in the chase and for the rude instruments of husbandry adapted 
to the primitive methods employed by them during the early stages of their set- 
tlement. The country afforded every inducement for the establishment of a race 
of people in a semi-civilized state. 



COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 



Of the character and conditions of these pioneer colonizers of the Scandinavian 
country we have but little definite knowledge, till they had passed from a nomadic 
to a residential and agricultural state. The personal appearance and characteris- 
tics of the three branches of the Norse race, the Norwegians, the Swedes, and the 
Danes, were the same. Broad-shouldered, deep-chested, long-limbed with slender 
waists, their forms told of strength and endurance. They were a blond people 
and were described by a modern writer as having eyes "as blue as the azure canopy 
and hair as yellow as the dawn." Among them a dark complexion was considered 
to be the mark of an alien race and was looked upon with suspicion and disrespect; 
hence, any that were not fair-born were not well-born and were neglected and 
exposed that they might die; thus the undesirable were weeded out and blond 
became the standard and popular complexion. 

The ordinary dress of the Norsemen as worn by both sexes was nearly the 
same. A short kirtle girded at the waist served for a coat or gown; an armless cloak 
completed the raiment of the men. Their feet were protected by heavy "rivlins" 
fastened with thongs about the ankles. The underclothing was of homespun 
linen; the outer garments were of wool dyed black, or blue, or red; the latter 
the most highly prized. When dressed for war the chiefs wore shirts of mail and 
for defence carried long shields covered with leather having an iron rim and bosse. 
Their weapons were the sword, the spear, and the battle-axe. Their ships were 
long, half-decked galleys propelled by sails and oars. Amidships where the rowers 
sat, the hull was low to give the oars free play. The bow and stern were high 
and terminated with the figure-head and tail of some beast — the dragon being 
the most commonly represented; and thus these singular ships from a distance 
had the appearance of some dreadful monster with open jaws moving over the 
sea. The sails in earlier times were made from the skins of animals taken in the 
chase, but were afterwards hand-woven of coarse linen gay with stripes of blue, 
green and red. The elevated prows of these "Dragon-Ships "served for a stand- 
ing-place for the warriors. On the stern-deck were the chiefs in command, and 
behind them the helmsman who steered the ship, his gear inscribed with runes 
to charm away evil and secure good luck. When in action the rowers were pro- 
tected by plank bulwarks. A gangway extended all around the ship from which 
the seamen boarded an enemy's ship. 

The sturdy frames and muscular vigor of these Norsemen equipped them 
in a peculiar way for the conditions of existence and future destiny. The daily 
struggle for a livelihood in an inhospitable country and climate invested them 
with constitutional hardihood and contempt of danger. They possessed unyield- 
ing independence and a haughty mien; indeed they exhibited in their conquests 
and frequent warfare a cold-blooded ferocity. However, while tracing the move- 
ments and excursions of this race we are impressed with the constant evidence 
of their versatility and adaptability. Wherever they planted their feet they read- 
ily adjusted themselves to the conditions existing in the countries whither they 
went. They were discoverers, conquerors and colonizers, but were not originators. 
They soon adopted the language, religion, and customs of the inhabitants where 
they sat down, and stimulated and developed the industrial, political and edu- 
cational institutions existing in the lands to which they migrated. Their natural 
activity and energy gave impetus to every movement for the advancement of 
literature and art. They quickly became the leading spirits and their presence 
deeply affected the inhabitants with whom they came in contact; they fostered 
improvements and perfected everything with which they were identified. 



COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 



Impelled by the increase of the population and the scarcity of food in a country 
of limited resources, and by a restless spirit of activity and inherent love of ad- 
venture, conjoined with the hope of obtaining rich booty, these bold sea-rovers, 
called Vikings by reason of their living on the shores of the vies and voes; i.e. the 
bays and fiords, they turned the prows of their long sea galleys toward England, 
Scotland, Ireland, and the western Isles as early as 780 A.D., but passing their 
invasion and settlement in these countries, I shall for obvious reasons direct my 
attention more particularly to the more formidable excursions and investments 
of Rollo the "Ganger", afterwards the Duke of Normandy, who received his 
title because of his gigantic proportions which constituted him too heavy a burden 
for the small horses then in use. History assures us that this Viking Chief 
entered the river Seine in France A.D. 876 with as many as seven hundred 
galleys and forty thousand followers. Invading and overrunning the country he 
compelled the king to cede to him the whole Province of Normandy (since 
so-called) a territory enriched with great fertility of soil and that was soon 
brought into a state of remarkable fruitfulness by the new settlers. How- 
ever, although these Northmen adjusted themselves to unfamiliar environments, 
and adopted many of the prevailing customs of the French people, they did not 
forfeit their inheritance of character, but from generation to generation exhibited 
the peculiarities stamped upon them by their Scandinavian ancestors. They were 
sturdy of build, intelligent and full of energy; they were warm-hearted and pa- 
triotic; they were ambitious and progressive, but time and change of conditions 
could not subdue their restless nature and passion for adventure; they had visions 
of wonderful possibilities in other lands and were ever ready to force their heroism 
into the scale and risk the consequences of a new enterprise. 

After receiving this extensive and rich concession of territory, Rollo divided 
the Province into counties and departments and distributed the lands among 
his followers who had assumed the dangers of his adventure and were instrumental 
in the achievement of his success. In his adopted country he exhibited the most 
distinguishing characteristics of his race in his ability as an organizer, his promo- 
tion of the enterprises already established, and the paternal influence he exerted 
over his people; and thus the fame of the dreaded sea-rover was exchanged for 
that of the titled legislator and protector of his countrymen. He lived for five 
years after resigning in favor of his son, rounding out a life of more than four- 
score years comprising a history of remarkable events and startling deeds of wide 
contrasts which resulted in changes that contributed many pages to the history 
of Europe. He was the progenitor of a long line of kings and illustrious person- 
ages, and his blood flows onward in the veins of the English people, asserting itself 
in innumerable channels and giving character to the principles and conduct of 
thousands of the rulers and inhabitants of the country. 

Here we are tempted to epitomize the history of events that occurred between 
the death of Rollo and William the Conqueror who was one of the most remark- 
able characters whose name appears among those of the famous men recorded 
on the historic page; a man in whom all the heroic attributes of his Scandinavian 
progenitors were duplicated and concentrated. In the army raised by him for the 
invasion of England were the representatives of many Norman families whose de- 
scendants have figured conspicuously in the government of the country over 
which he became the ruler. The currents of blood transmitted from the ancient 
Norsemen to the settlers in Normandy were communicated to those who estab- 
lished places of residence in England following the Conquest. It should be con- 



COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 



stantly borne in mind by the reader that in producing an outline of the history of 
the race from which the family under notice sprung, the compiler has been tracing 
the movements of the faraway ancestors of this people, for among those who were 
in the Conqueror's train and who afterwards acquired estates in England were 
persons named Gade, Gaude, Gauden or Gawda to whom the various branches of 
the family in Britain are indebted for their existence and titles; the mutations 
thereof having resulted from the removal from one nation to another and the 
consequent changes from one language to another; sometimes, possibly, from per- 
sonal fancy or to distinguish the various branches of the family. The appearance 
of the surname among the Norsemen as already mentioned in its primitive form 
and its reappearance in Normandy during the early history of that country, where 
it has been perpetuated till the present, affords sufficient proof of the derivation 
and antiquity of the English and Scottish branches of the family. 

It has been stated elsewhere that the first recorded head of the baronial families 
of Gawdy in England was a prisoner from France and that he was naturalized and 
settled in Suffolk, and by a careful examination of reliable historic authorities 
concerning the remote inhabitants of the English shires the compiler has found 
that the family of Gawdy and of Gauden were early intermarried with other 
Normans who had come into the country soon after the Conquest, and that there 
were evidently representatives of the family there a considerable time before the 
appearance of Sir Breuse Gawdey the knight in 1352. This man having derived 
his surname from an intermarriage with this distinguished house of Norman 
nationality so illustrious afterwards both in England and in Scotland, affords 
sufficient evidence of their social standing. The two families were represented in 
William's army at the battle of Hastings and were rewarded with grants of land 
in England; they were associated before leaving Normandy, were foimd together 
immediately after their settlement in England, and continued their intercourse 
after the removal to Scotland. The relations between the families of Breuse and 
Gauden and the association of the Gawdys with both, points to the commingling 
of blood in all of these families. 

From the earliest Norman history it was ascertained that the ancestors of 
the English branches of the Gawdy and Gauden family were at one time dwell- 
ing in their Chateaux surrounded by extensive territorial possessions and main- 
tained a style of living commensurate with their social standing and wealth: 
that they were from a very early period of Norman history prominently identi- 
fied with the political, military and ecclesiastical affairs of the country, and 
were subsequently distinguished for their ability in literature and art. During 
modern times these families, bearing the names Gaudy and Gauden, have attained 
positions of great eminence in the political, military and social interests in Nor- 
mandy where they were honored by their sovereigns and compatriots by placing 
them in positions of responsibility during long terms of office in which they 
acquitted themselves of their trust with satisfaction and honor. The reader is re- 
ferred to the biographical section of this work for proof of the foregoing statements. 

It is a well-known fact that many of the followers of the Conqueror to whom 
he granted lands in England returned to Normandy and reoccupied their delightful 
homes in that sunny land; but they continued their intercourse with their kindred 
without interruption and were frequently found passing from one country to the 
other. Some of these bestowed their newly acquired lands upon their sons who 
became permanent residents in England. This may have been the case with the 
Gawdvs and Gaudens. 



COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 



By perusing our historical survey it will be found that the families of Gawdy 
and Gauden maintained their prestige unimpaired after their settlement in England. 
They were connected by marriage with many of the lordly houses there for genera- 
tions and occupied an elevated position in the social fabric of the country. Almost 
immediately after their establishment upon their estates they were honored by 
knighthood and acted a conspicuous part in the political, judicial and religious 
movements of the time. In the sacred system of the country they were exalted 
to its higher offices and in the legal profession they were elevated to the King's 
Bench and sat as commissioners at some of the most important tribunals of their 
day. Some of them were knighted by their sovereigns and received the baronial 
title. Many representatives of the family were called to Parliament and filled 
important positions in the Government for several terms. Some of them had their 
names recorded in the annals of literature and art. 

The heads of the baronial branches of the family in England acquired extensive 
landed estates, erected mansions of elegance and maintained a style of living on an 
equal plane with their titled neighbors. Adding to their original homesteads many 
of the environing manors these baronets and chief justices laid out broad orna- 
mental parks which they embellished with rare foliage and flowers that diffused 
their shade and fragrance over the grounds. Long, meandering avenues extended 
through these domains, while refreshing fountains and chaste statuary were placed 
at attractive positions here and there to invite admiration and enhance the beauty 
of the scene. Their seats were stately, spacious and commanding; they were fur- 
nished in a style appropriate to the wealth and social standing of their owners, 
and within their walls were entertained many persons of distinction and high 
official honors. These families availed themselves of the best educational advan- 
tages of the times; their sons were placed under the most efficient tutors who fitted 
them for their university courses and they were graduated with many honors in 
the classes where they acquired their diplomas. The daughters were instructed 
in all the arts and recreations suitable for their sex and were young ladies of refine- 
ment and culture. The best horses to be found, of breeds adapted to the saddle 
and carriage, were in the Gawdy stable. Vehicles and panoply of the most lux- 
urious qualities were provided and grooms were employed to keep all in readiness 
for immediate use. Each young lady was taught the equestrian art and was pro- 
vided with a palfry of her own. Among the pastimes of the day none were more 
popular than the sports of the chase and hawking. The Gawdy correspondence 
proves that the family indulged in these diversions; they had their hounds and 
both ladies and gentlemen rode to them. These were gala days when by appoint- 
ment the Gentry with their ladies assembled at some stated place accompanied 
by their "dog-whips" and packs of hounds to participate in the popular sport of 
hunting. Here were seen the finest "mounts" that the competitive rivalr>' could 
produce and the costumes worn were of the most brilliant and attractive kind. 
The men were clad in jackets of velvet, close fitting and bespangled with buttons 
of silver; the ladies in graceful habits surmounted with plumed hats. When all 
were ready, at the blast of the hunter's horn, the hounds were slipped from their 
leash and away the party rode with dashing gaiety after the bellowing pack. With 
shout, jest, and banter they hailed each other and rode recklessly over the hills 
and moors exulting in their skill of horsemanship and speed; they leaped the ditches 
and hedges with great contempt of danger and boasted of their chivalry. In the 
performance of these dare-devil feats accidents were of frequent occurrence and 
many a Gawdy was thrown from his horse to become the subject of raillery. When 



8 COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 

the day was done and the sport ended the hunting party found themselves far 
from home, but in the most hilarious spirit rode leisurely along the highways, the 
lady highest in rank wearing the brush of the captured fox upon her hat. 

At the period when the Gawdy-Gauden families flourished upon the crest of 
the social wave, hawking was a favorite sport among the gentry, and those of 
whom we write were no exception to the rule. A word sometimes serves as a key 
that opens treasuries of information; thus in the "Gawdy Correspondence" we 
find the authority for our statement concerning the sports of hunting and hawking 
practised by the family. It is there announced that Sir Bassingbourne Gawdy was 
possessed of "two good sling hawks" and a skilful falconer; and "a very strong 
lusty falcon too full of mettle for a woodland country." The sport of Hawking, 
sometimes called "Falconry", is of very ancient origin, having been traced to a 
period before the Christian era. In Britain the practice was coeval with the 
dawn of history. In the celebrated Bayeux tapestry Harald is represented with 
a hawk on his hand. An attempt has been made in England to restore the 
sport and this experiment has been attended with increasing success. The term 
is applied to the training of certain falcon tribes to the pursuit and capture of 
birds on the wing, and a servant called the "Falconer" was employed for the 
express purpose of managing the sport. The amusement was engaged in with 
the greatest enthusiasm and called together large assemblies of people from the 
country-sides to witness the aerial chase. These falcons were remarkably in- 
telligent and exhibited great sagacity in their exploits. They were bred with 
skill and trained with the utmost care. There were competitive "falconings" 
and heavy wagers laid between the owners of some of the choice birds. Follow- 
ing this preamble by way of introduction and instruction in a backward vision 
we shall fancy the appearance of the Gawdy families when indulging in the amuse- 
ment of "Falconry". Sir Bassingbourne will be present on the field with his 
"sling hawks", or his "lusty falcon", attended by his expert falconer and sur- 
rounded by his retainers, family, and competing sportsmen. The trained birds in 
chains and hoods are ready for the "Zeppelin raid", and like a flash of light they 
dash through the air. The herons and pigeons see the approach of their enemy 
and their pitiful screams are borne upon the breeze to the ears of the spectators. 
The falconer blows his shrill whistle and the pursuit is on. Great excitement 
prevails amid the assembled throng of witnesses. Sir Bassingbourne views the 
chase with eagerness and shouts when the falcon has caught his prey. And thus 
the sport goes on till scores of dead birds lie upon the field as trophies of the winged 
chase; an example of cruel amusement for the gratification of the sporting pro- 
pensities of the aristocratic representatives of the family whose history we are 
recording for the delectation of a widely scattered and inquisitive posterity. 

We shall now invite the reader's attention to a scene in retrospect in which 
one of the most eminent members of the English branch of the Gawdy family 
conspicuously figured as a spectacle in one of the most notorious tribunals of which 
history has preserved an account. This was the occasion of the trial of Mary, 
Queen of Scots, at Fotheringay Castle on the 14th of October, 1586. The great 
hall of the castle had been fitted up for the trial and in the morning at 9 o'clock 
the Queen, who had languished there by the unmerciful decree of Queen Elizabeth 
her cousin, for fifteen years, entered the hall dressed in black velvet, with a veil 
of white lawn thrown over her. After bowing to the assembled lords she exclaimed, 
"Alas! here are many counsellors; yet there is not one for me". Around a table 
placed in the centre of the room sat the commissioners by whom she was to be 



COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 



tried. After the usual formalities of a court of justice, Francis Gawdy as Judge 
of the Queen's Bench, dressed in long flowing robes of black and under a great 
powdered wig, rose to his feet and with impressive gravity began to read the charges 
that had been preferred against Mary; and as he was proceeding he was several 
times interrupted by her denying the accusations in the batch of forgeries he was 
holding in his hands. Never in the history of court procedure was the account 
of a greater farce than was witnessed at this mock trial. Mary was brought 
before a board of commissioners prejudiced against her and who were predeter- 
mined to condemn her to death; she had no one to defend her and was completely 
at the mercy of her enemies. There was no semblance of justice administered during 
the trial and the judges found no reason for hesitation in their condemnation, 
and finally Francis Gawdy gave judgment against her in the Star Chamber in 
London. Historians have preserved a vivid description of the scene in the great 
hall at Fotheringay and some personal mention respecting those who composed 
the assembly there on the occasion of the trial, but we must be contented with 
a brief notice of the transaction in its relation to the history of the family we are 
recording. 

Turning our attention from a consideration of those common pastimes of the 
Gawdy families and their contemporaries, which has required no elasticity of the 
imagination to illuminate, the picture may now dissolve upon the screen of fancy 
and give place to one of more serious lights and shades as we contemplate through 
the cameric powers of the mind the austere "Father in God", Bishop Gauden, 
dressed in his sacerdotal robes and ministering at his cathedral altars. Here we 
may behold that "learned and ingenious divine" standing at his reading desk 
with dignified mien and saintly solemnity and hear him as he recites the ritual 
with melodious intonations while the interim is filled with holy chant by his vested 
choir. Stern of visage, grave of countenance and with articulate monotone he 
delivers his profound discourse. From this scene in the sacred fane we may accom- 
pany the bishop to the assembly of his synod of ministers where he presides with 
self-conscious dignity over the deliberations of the subordinate counsel and guides 
and controls their weighty discussions with graceful decorum into channels of 
wisdom and prudence as becometh the solemnity of the occasion. Acknowledg- 
ing their bishop's supremacy by reverential courtesy, his ministers address him 
as their spiritual lord and render obedience to his imperious mandate when his 
conference is adjourned. Leaving the Synodical counsel chamber we will attend 
the great ecclesiastic to his audience with royalty and overhear through the res- 
ponsive centuries that have intervened his conversation with the King; an inter- 
view that perhaps involved the promise of his appointment to the See of Win- 
chester which he so much desired and the anticipation of which led to the erection 
of the elegant mansion on Clapham Common by his knighted brother. Sir Dennis 
Gauden, intended for his occupancy when the coveted prize should be secured; 
but we know that "the best laid schemes o'mice and men gang aftagley" and 
the aspiring bishop was obliged to submit to the disappointment of refusal and 
accept the less desirable appointment and enthronement at Worcester. It has 
been assumed by authors of ability that as the result of this disappointment Bishop 
Gauden wrote his "Eikon Basilike" which became the cause of a long, heated 
and caustic controversy respecting its authenticity. Be this as it may, he soon 
closed his professional career without the expected occupancy of the great mansion 
built by his brother and it was finally dismantled and removed to give place for 
more important buildings. 



10 COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 

THE GAWDIES IN SCOTLAND. Branches of the Gawdie-CTOudie family 
so early planted in Scotland seem to have come through diflferent channels; some 
from Norway through Shetland; others from Normandy through England. We 
have had occasion hitherto to mention the intermarriages between the families of 
Bruise and Gawdy and the frequent allusion in the ancient documents to their 
affiliation soon after the Conquest; and we find them associating and allied after 
the settlement in England and living in the same neighborhood after their removal 
to Scotland. These mutual relations continued for so many years and in so many 
lands indicates the intermingling of blood through numerous generations; and this 
tie of relationship was evidently the cause of the existence of the Gawdie families 
in Ayrshire, Dumfrieshire, and Kirkudbrightshire, where they appeared as early 
as 1450. The family of Bruise (Bruce) lived at Carrick in Ayrshire as neighbors 
to the Gawdies, but the latter seem to have been a quiet, peace-loving people who 
preferred to devote their attention to the more humble pursuits of life rather than 
to those entanglements in which their kinsmen became involved by their political 
relations. If the Gawdies were less fortunate in the acquisition of wealth and 
fame than the families of Bruise, De-Haye and De-Soule that removed fromEngland 
with them, they escaped some of the losses and dishonor that resulted from the 
political and religious disturbances in which they figured. 

The first historical and documentary information concerning the family of 
Gawdie and Goudie in Scotland places them in the parish of Galston in Ayrshire 
as millers on a small stream called the Cessnock and celebrated by the poet Burns 
in his song, "On Cessnock's banks there lives a lass". This picturesque stream 
takes its source on the Auchmannoch Muir nine hundred and eighty feet above 
sea-level, runs five miles southwestward along the boundary between Galston and 
Cragie, and forms a confluence with the river Irvine about three miles from Kil- 
marnock. The lands through which this river meanders is broken and romantic 
and is interrupted by many cascades and rapids. Upon its banks dwelt the 
lassie alluded to in the before-mentioned lines "with sparkling, roguish een." 
Here, then, the ancestral Gawdies took a lease of the Cragie Mill and established 
themselves more than four centuries ago; and continued in uninterrupted possession 
during this long period, the title descending from generation to generation, the 
passing waters of the stream lulling them to sleep at night and the rumbling mill- 
wheel making music for them during the day. 

This mill was situated in the center of a rich agricultural district from which 
the country people brought their grain to be reduced into flour and meal; some 
conveyed it in carts drawn by horses; some packed upon the hacks of sturdy ponies, 
and some upon the shoulders of the men. 

At this time, before the advent of the daily newvspaper, this old mill constituted 
the mart around which the surrounding farmers foregathered to discuss the relig- 
ious and political questions of the day; and it was a picturesque scene when 
groups of these rough-clad, opinionated yeomen assembled and in their "braid 
Scotch" dialect entered into such heated debates as excited the populace at the 
period. Meanwhile the Goudies were feeling the warm meal within the mill and 
calling each one in his turn to take his sack, minus the "multures". 

A locality that was the established home of one family for four hundred years 
and from which sons and daughters went forth to engage in the various pursuits 
of life and to propagate their race and leave the imprint of their influence upon 
the people with whom they associated, is worthy of more than a passing notice. 
Such an extended residence of a family in the same place, and the perpetuation of 



COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 11 

the same employment by them, is very unusual if not unequalled, in the annals of 
any country, unless in the case of some old titled family upon an entailed estate. 

In a cursory survey covering the period of these four centuries when the Gawdie 
family lived at Cragie Mill on the Cessnock, we shall find that those were seasons 
of startling events and revolutionary struggles; times of political strife and religious 
persecution, and that the location of their residence was within the very vortex of 
these exciting experiences; and this fact authorizes us to state that the Gawdie 
family could scarcely have avoided the results of these turbulent events; indeed 
the traditions of their descendants have preserved an account of the sufferings 
through which these families passed during the days that tried men's souls. How- 
ever, we must now pass to notice the fact that during these eventful centuries the 
ancient parent stock had produced numerous branches that were planted in other 
parts of Scotland, Ireland, and in lands beyond the seas; and that from this 
fountain-head, as well as from its branches, men of distinction and great usefulness 
have risen whose honored names stand engraven on the tablets of history. Some 
of these were prominent in the learned professions while others were conspicuous 
as military commanders. Others descended from these humble millers were skilled 
craftsmen and sturdy yeomen who acted a noble part in the settlement and develop- 
ment of new lands and stamped the seal of their character upon the generations 
with whom they affiliated. 

At the time when these ancestors of the Gawdies removed from England to 
Scotland, history informs us that the peasantry lived in a very primitive condition; 
and there is no reason for believing that these families enjoyed any advantages 
superior to their neighbors. To quote from an early writer: "The commonality 
are poor and uneducated. Their houses are built without lime and in the villages 
are roofed with turf. A cow's hide supplies the place of a door. The towns are 
unwalled. The inhabitants cultivate but few sorts of grain, but have abundance 
of flesh and fish. Bread is a dainty. The men are small of stature and the women 
comely and prone to the pleasures of love. The horses are mostly small, ambling 
nags and neither currycombs or bridles are in use." 

Two centuries later these peasant families had advanced to a more comfortable 
rural state of existence. They were dwelling in low-walled houses built of stone 
and laid up with lime-masonry. As was customary, the roofs were thatched with 
straw. Strong doors and small windows were then afforded. Many of the floors 
were of earth and the fires were built upon large flat hearthstones in the center of 
the rooms. Heavy plank-seats were placed against the walls. The beds were 
permanently fixed and like the berths of a ship. Food was cooked in the most 
simple manner but wholesome. Nearly all families kept flocks and raised flax 
and from the wool and "lint", homespun, by the wives and daughters, the clothing 
was made. Washing was done at the burnside and heavy fabrics beaten with a 
paddle. The domestic life was simple and pleasant. The music of the spinning- 
wheel and loom was heard in every home. Every farmer had his shepherd dog 
who was accorded as good a place in the house as any member of the family. 

Surrounded by the wild grandeur of their Lowland homes, composed of moun- 
tains and glens and intersected with numerous streams, the Gawdies of Cragie Mill 
handled the farmers' grain for the "multures" and pastured their flocks on the 
environing hills. Mingling with the resounding noise of the revolving millstones 
was the lowing of kine, the bleating of lambs and the musical tinkle of the sheep- 
bells. These families were in constant touch with nature and familiar with all 
her modes; they looked with awe upon the darkened heavens when the elements 



12 COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 

were at war and noted the gilding of the evening horizon by the descending sun. 
Moreover they were a God-fearing people and those who went to the hills with their 
flocks carried their Bibles with them and seated upon some mossy ledge under an 
overhanging tree while wrapped in their heavy shepherds' plaid, they perused the 
sacred volume till they were familiar with all its holy precepts. What wonder 
then that these men should become devout worshipers of the Infinite! They were 
priests in their own families and trained their children with careful attention con- 
cerning their moral character and deportment. Born in such homes and educated 
under such restraints these families had stamped upon them the indelible seal of 
faith ; a faith which stood them in good stead amid the suffering for righteousness* 
sake that was part of the experience of all Presbyterian families living on the 
Scottish border during those days of distress of body and anguish of mind. 

The Gawdie families were among the most strenuous followers of Richard 
Cameron and many of them probably heard his clarion voice as he preached the 
doctrine of the Covenant when standing on the hills of Galloway and Ayrshire 
and became fired with zeal for its defence. When the bloody Claverhouse was 
turned loose upon the Protestants and the most distressing persecution was begun, 
some of the families of Gawdie shared the common fate of their brethren and 
neighbors and were compelled to flee from their homes and dwell among the moun- 
tains and glens and in caves and moss-haggs like wild animals exposed to all the 
sufferings of mind and of body imposed by such hardships. Some of the 
members of the Gawdie families evidently signed the Service Book against the 
Prelates in 1636 and appended their names to the " Immortal Covenant" in 1638; 
and undaunted by their enemies they defended the blue banner at Airdmoss and 
Bothwell Bridge. The blood of this family was represented among those who were 
imprisoned in the Greyfriars' Churchyard, Edinburgh, for five months with no 
covering but the blue vault of heaven and no place to rest but among the graves. 
Some of those surviving were sentenced to banishment and herded in the hole of a 
ship to be deported to New Jersey, Barbadoes, and Jamaica. These exiles were 
not permitted to see their friends and some money that was raised for them was 
withheld. The space in the ship was so small that only those who were ill were 
permitted to lie down. After a very stormy voyage the ship reached the Orkney 
Islands during the month of December and was driven by the fury of the tempest 
upon the coast where it parted amidships and the mast fell upon the rocks. Some 
of the prisoners having cut a hole through the deck would have escaped but were 
pushed overboard by the sailors and only 40 out of 2,200 reached the shore alive. 
The bodies of those washed upon the beach were carried by the humane Orcadian 
fishermen to an elevated piece of ground called Scarvesting and there buried. 
For many years these graves of the Covenanters were only marked by rude stones 
gathered from the hills, but a suitable monument has been erected to designate 
the spot within recent years. 

The drawing up and signing of the National Covenant was the result of an 
attempt by King Charles I., who was a bigoted Catholic, to force the Episcopal 
Service Book upon the Protestant population of Scotland, but he failed to appre- 
hend the zeal and temper of the class of people with whom he had to do. This 
Covenant consisted of a renunciation of the Pope and the Catholic forms of religion 
and the subscribers thereto bound themselves "before God, His angels and the 
world" to defend the Presbyterian faith and forms of worship with their fortunes 
and lives and to resist all innovations whatsoever. On the 6th of March 1638 
this parchment covering fifteen square feet was carried to the Greyfriars church- 



COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 13 

yard in Edinburgh for signatures; and spread upon a flat tombstone. There were 
thousands who pressed forward to write their names. With uplifted hands and 
with tears streaming down their cheeks these Godly people took the most solemn 
oath to defend their religion, and some, opening the veins in their arms, signed 
with their blood, supplementing their names with the words "till death". When 
the principal parchment had been filled to its edges with the names, copies were 
sent to all the large towns in Scotland for signatures; and venerable men, too infirm 
with years to walk, were put upon the backs of ponies and thus carried to the places 
where the Convenant was exposed and with trembling hands appended their 
names. When Charles I. received the news of this transaction he was astonished 
and highly indignant; and he immediately sent a commissioner to Scotland who 
demanded all to renounce the Covenant within six weeks. This mandate the 
Presbyterians refused to obey and with haste prepared themselves for what they 
knew would inevitably follow. They were proclaimed rebels and an army raised 
to subdue them. Following this edict John Graham, known as Claverhouse, was 
commissioned by the King to suppress the revolting Covenanters and with his 
deputized emissaries pursued them from parish to parish and from house to house. 
The Presbyterians were ordered to attend the services held by the Prelates and 
were forbidden to have worship in their own houses, and when they were driven 
from their homes they assembled in the fields and forests to engage in their devo- 
tions; and when the Sabbaths dawned these saints of the Most High gathered at 
some appointed place to listen to the clarion voice of Cameron as he earnestly 
defended their cause and urged them to stand unafraid against their enemies. 

When at last the strife out of the religious controversy had been subdued by 
the bold stroke of William of Orange, some of the Goudie families who had been 
compelled to expatriate themselves emerged from their wretched dwelling places 
in the wilderness and came back to their homes, and a writer who was conversant 
with the existing conditions informs us that some of these wanderers were nearly 
naked, their hair and beard were unshorn and hung in weird locks over their 
bodies. The women had grown prematurely old and were clad in filthy and 
tattered garments. Children born in the mountains and moors were emaciated 
and dwarfed. Some of the survivors, venerable and patriarchal in appearance, 
sitting under snowy locks at their firesides related again and again to their grand- 
children the experiences of suffering through which they had passed. Some of 
these had listened to Richard Cameron, the preacher of the Covenant, and were 
never weary of relating stories of his courage and eloquence in defending the 
Protestant cause in Scotland; and these descendants were taught to regard the 
characters of those who had followed this Christian martyr with unbounded 
veneration. Inspired by this spirit and embracing the same faith, these sons and 
daughters punctually attended to family worship and taught their children to 
regard the Bible as the criterion upon which they should mould their characters. 

During this prolonged persecution of the Covenanters, eighteen thousand 
persons suffered death or some form of penal affliction on account of their faith. 
About two thousand were banished to other lands of which many perished by cruel 
treatment and shipwreck. Three thousand suffered all the horrors of imprison- 
ment in the most loathsome dungeons while others were subjected to tortures 
shocking to humanity. Seven thousand went into voluntary exile. Six hundred 
were killed in encounters with soldiers. Five hundred were put to death in cold 
blood, and four hundred murdered under the forms of law. Multitudes were 
reduced to circumstances of the most abject misery, while others perished from 



14 COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 

cold, hunger and fatigue when driven to the wilderness to live in caves and dens of 
the earth. At Airdmoss, a morass in Ayrshire, there was a sharp battle between 
Cameron and his followers and a detachment of dragoons on July 20th, 1680, and 
there this intrepid minister and Christian hero fell. At this spot where the strife 
was the most deadly a monument consisting of a large flat stone was laid down 
many years ago, and upon this were the names of the Covenanters who fell, and 
the figures of an open Bible and of a hand grasping a sword. A modern monument 
has superseded this. The following lines were written concerning this place: 

"In the dreams of the night I was wafted away 
To the moorland of mist where the Martyrs lay: 
Where Cameron's sword and his Bible are seen, 
Engraved on the stone where the heather is green." 

Scattered through the old churchyards of Ayrshire, Dumfrieshire, Galloway, and 
Kirkudbright the graves of the Goudies may be seen; aye, the graves of the family 
are thickly strewn throughout many of the burial grounds in Scotland, as many as 
twenty, 1623 and 1696, being found in the Greyfriars Cemetery alone. 

THE GOUDY FAMILIES IN IRELAND. In the year 1603, King James com- 
menced the undertaking of planting six counties in Ulster, in the North of Ireland, 
with his Scottish subjects. He had been successful in crushing the Irish rebellion, 
had confiscated more than two million acres of land in that province and conceived 
the idea of sending his own countrymen to colonize the newly acquired territory. 
For some time, however, the Scotch people did not view this enterprise favorably 
and the venture threatened to prove abortive. Finally James issued a procla- 
mation in which he announced his "Unspeakable love" for his Scottish subjects 
and proffered such strong inducements that a few families from the Western High- 
lands removed to Ulster in 1612. Considering the original lands the King said: 
"They have now been disburdt of the former rebellious and disobedient inhabit- 
ants thereof who in the justice of God, to their shame and confusion, are now over- 
thrown." However, the Highlanders who had made an attempt to settlement 
"were as restless as waves of the sea around their shores," and did not prove an 
acceptable class of pioneers; then the Commissioners procured a new list of names 
of applicants and the King was assured in a letter that the "Inland Scots" (since 
known as Lowland Scotch) were much superior to the first consignment, being 
"of better stuff" and coming with "better port" 

The conditions of settlement were very strict and the care exercised by the 
Commissioners great. But a small number of those who had registered as appli- 
cants for lands were accepted. As a precaution against imposition deputies were 
sent into the Lowlands of Scotland to investigate the abilities and financial respon- 
sibility of those who had signified their desire to settle in Ulster, and it appears 
that these deputies had known previously something about those who had applied 
for lands. Each undertaker was required by his bond and contract to build a large 
house for his residence and erect around this a bawn for the protection of the 

NOTE. — The compiler has employed a scribe to visit every principal churchyard in Ayrshire to search 
for and make copy of all inscriptions made in memory of the numerous families interred bearing the 
Goudie name, and this eiFort has resulted in the acquisition of the long list found in this book. Many 
of the kindred families of those whose monuments were seen are now residents in Canada and the con- 
nection was discovered through the names on the gravestones in the vicinity of their early homes. 
Many, if not all, of those whose names were copied were descended from the ancient family of Millers 
so long established at Cragie Mill on the Cessnock in Ayrshire. 



COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. IS 



cattle. He was to allow timber to his tenants for building purposes for the 
space of three years, and plant on his land "not less than eight able-bodied men of 
eighteen years or upwards, born in the inward parts of Scotland." He must have 
in his castle, or house, muskets, calivers and hand weapons sufficient to arm twenty- 
four men. He was to hold six hundred and sixty acres in demense and to alienate 
all of the remainder; was to pay for his allotment of two thousand acres an annual 
rent of ten pounds, thirty shillings and four pence; was not to alienate or demise 
any of the lands to "mere Irish" or to others who would not take the oath of 
supremacy. The undertaker was to be present in person, or by his representative, 
during the space of five years after the feast of St. Michael the Archangel, 1610, 
and none of the lands were to be alienated during those years save to his colonists 
who were to become permanent settlers. Leases were not to be granted for less 
than twenty-one years, and the Scotch tenants were to be prevented from marrying 
with or fostering with the Irish natives. 

It will be observed by the foregoing that this was to be a select community. 
It was to be an assembly of pure-blooded Scotch families transplanted, so to speak, 
into Ireland. This Scotch blood was to be kept uncontaminated and was not to 
commingle with that of the Celtic inhabitants any more than that of the Hebrews 
was to commingle with that of the Canaanites. Let the reader here, once for all 
time, disabuse himself of the idea that has been so long entertained by many that 
the so-called "Scotch-Irish" were an amalgamated race produced by the inter- 
marriage between a Scotchman and an Irish woman or vice versa. They were 
pure-blooded, Scotch-born people who had emigrated to Ulster, Ireland, and were 
careful to preserve the vital current clear from any foreign tributaries. Macaulay, 
the eminent historian, says: "They sprung from different stocks. They had 
different national characteristics as strongly opposed as any two races in Europe. 
They were in widely different stages of civilization. Between two such populations 
there could be no sympathy, and centuries of wrong and calamity had engendered 
a strong prejudice and antipathy. The Celtic race were called Irish and adhered 
to the church of Rome. On Ireland's soil resided two hundred thousand Colonists 
proud of their Saxon blood and Protestant faith. There could be no equality 
between men who lived in comfortable circumstances and houses and those who 
dwelt in filthy sties, between those who spoke the language employed by philoso- 
phers, orators and poets, and men who communicated with each other in a chat- 
tering jargon with a brogue at each end of every word, between men who subsisted 
on bread and those who fed on potatoes." 

In removing from Scotland across the channel to Ireland the lowlanders carried 
their broad Scotch dialect with them and held on to it as a precious legacy; they 
transmitted it to their children unadulterated and unimpaired. In Ireland they 
sang Scotland's sacred hymns as sang their Covenanting ancestors in the Lowland 
glens, and the songs composed by Scottish poets awakened echoes on Ireland's 
moors. This beautiful Scotch dialect once employed was indestructible; it sur- 
vived as clear cut for a century in Ulster as when first imported from its original 
source and was carried from Ireland's shores to the American Colonies without 
eliminating one of its charming qualities. 

The plantation opened in Ulster in 1606 was patronized by James Hamilton 
and Hugh Montgomery, who represented two of the most distinguished families in 
the Lowland country. These undertakers invited Scottish emigrants to settle in 
the County Down, where they occupied the whole district, appropriating the 
arable lands and leaving the hills to the native Irish. From the "Montgomery 



16 COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 

Manuscripts" we learn that the lands around Newtown and Donaghadee, known 
as the "Great Ards" were almost exclusively settled by families from Ayrshire 
and Renfrewshire. Some of the pioneers crossed from their old homes into Ulster 
in 1606. When these planters entered the new possessions they found the lands 
uncultivated and fallow. The first dwellings erected by them were mere huts 
built close to the castles and great houses of the land-proprietors for protection. 
Large flocks of wolves roamed about at night and made havoc of their flocks unless 
driven into the bawns. And the native Irish, especially those called "Wood- 
kerne," were worse than the wolves. 

However, with a nominal rent, their clothing homemade from wool and flax, 
with horses to ride and cattle to sell, these Scottish settlers soon began to thrive. 
Wages for a ploughman was only six shillings and eight pence a quarter. A 
servant maid had ten shillings a year. Laborers received twopence and tradesmen 
sixpence a day. A good cow was worth one pound, and a horse two pounds. 
The chief sustenance came from the cattle, the food being milk, butter, and 
"scurvey-grass." These Colonists drained the swamps, cut down the woods, 
sowed wheat and planted potatoes. The land after so long a rest brought forth 
abundantly. Barley was raised and pounded into coarse meal in stone troughs, 
while other corn was ground in the quern mill which was found in every house. 
From the very beginning a plot of ground was set apart for flax and the "lint" 
was properly cured and spun and woven into cloth. The domestic life was quite 
primitive and rude but moral in all its qualities. These families were in constant 
communication with their kindred in Scotland, and when the prosperity of the 
Ulster families was assured others followed to the new plantation and the vacant 
lands were soon taken up and the settlements increased apace. The woodman's 
axe rang in the forests and the ploughman turned broad furrows of the fruitful 
soil. Among these emigrants were members of the Gowdie family from Ayrshire. 
How early the first families of this name removed from Scotland we do not know, 
but we have the names of John Gowdy, schoolmaster, and of William Gowdy, 
who went to Ulster and settled in County Down during the years 1681 and 1688. 
This last date coincides with the settlement of the Rev. John Goudy, who became 
a minister for the Presbyterian church at Ballywalter, and may have been the 
same man. 

The history of the Presbyterian church forms an important part of the story 
of the Scot in Ulster. As the chief period of the struggle between the Protestants 
and Catholics followed immediately after the Revolution of 1688, it seems probable 
that the majority of the Gowdie families emigrated to the Ulster plantation about 
this time. It is patent to all familiar with the history of this section of the country 
that the very foundation of society in Ulster was Scotch; this was the solid granite 
on which it rested. In the district of country sixty miles from the Ards, in Down, 
to the mouth of the Foyle, the dialect of the peasantry proves their Scottish origin. 
The original settlement of the Scotch in this locality fixed the moral and religious 
tone of the whole community. In 1715 it was estimated that fifty thousand 
Scotch families had settled in the Province of Ulster since the Revolution. 

The removal of the Gowdies from their old homes in the Scottish Lowlands to 
the settlements in Ulster was, in many ways, a misfortune. To adopt an old New 
England proverb it was like "jumping out of the frying-pan into the fire." They 
escaped from the land of their nativity to avoid religious persecution and oppression 
only to encounter as malignant hatred in their adopted country. The native Irish, 



COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 17 

who had been dispossessed of their prospective inheritance, resorted to the vast 
forests then covering a great extent of the lands in Ulster and became "Wood- 
kerne," or robbers, who subsisted by blackmail or ransoms paid for the liberty of 
such as they had carried off belonging to the Scotch families. These Woodkem 
were so numerous that they hung upon the skirts of every settlement and infested 
every neighborhood where the Protestants sat down. They destroyed their har- 
vests, drove off their flocks and cattle, burned their buildings and treated their 
families with shameful indignity and insult. This persecution was continued for 
many years and instances could be cited where the Catholic Irish have practiced 
the same inhuman abuse upon their Protestant neighbors within the last century. 

In the year 1640 a conspiracy was set on foot which aimed at the complete 
extermination of the Protestant population of Ireland, and was so far successful 
that no less than forty thousand were suddenly massacred in different parts of the 
country. A contemporary has written: " No condition, no age, no sex, was spared, 
and death was the slightest infliction by the rebels. All the tortures which wanton 
cruelty could devise, all the lingering pains of body, the anguish of the mind, and 
the agonies of despair could not satiate the revenge of the Irish. At length, how- 
ever, Cromwell avenged the blood of these slaughtered saints and crushed the 
insurrection. 

After the Restoration in the year 1660, James, a brother of King Charles, was 
appointed Viceroy of Scotland, and being a bigoted Catholic, the Presbyterians 
became the objects of his hatred and he let loose upon them the dogs of war and 
drove hundreds of them into exile. Large numbers escaped into Ireland and 
joined the remnant of their brethren who had preceded them. Still there was no 
peace for these Protestant families so long as the inhabitants around them were 
hostile to the principles they held sacred. 

Such constancy, steadfastness, and perseverance as was exhibited by the Scotch- 
Irish people in their endeavor to maintain their foothold upon the soil of their 
adopted country has seldom, if ever, been known, but all their suflferings and sac- 
rifices did not avail. They held the troops of James in check while they defended 
the last stronghold of William of Orange in Ireland. At Londonderry and at 
Boyne-water, in the Logan forces and at Enniskillen, they poured out their blood 
most freely and endured every hardship for their faith and the protection of their 
homes, only to meet disappointment under the bloody policy of their enemies. 

One writing in the year 1727 says: "Londonderry was besieged nearly half a 
year (1689) by the army of King James, when he had subdued all Ireland but 
Derry and a little place hardby. The besieged Presbyterians defended themselves 
till they were so pinched with hunger that a dog's head was sold cheap enough at 
half a crown. And yet God sustained these devoted heroes until King William 
sent them relief by two ships with men and provision from England, at which 
sight, before the ships had reached the city and landed their men, the besiegers 
moved their camp and fled to the west of Ireland where, after two hard-fought 
battles, the Papists were subdued." 

To the plantation of Ulster may be traced the awful scenes and events of the 
ten years' civil war commencing in 1641, the horrors of the revolutionary struggle 
in 1690, and the reawakening of those horrors in 1798 — not to mention the less 
notable phases of the contest during the intervals between these disastrous eras. 

In his address before the Scotch-Irish Congress, the Rev. John S. Macintosh 
said of his people: "Peculiar and royal race; yes, that indeed is our race! I shrink 
not from magnifying my house and blood with deep thanskgiving to God who 



18 COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 

made us to differ and sent His great Messenger to fit us for our great earth task, 
a task as royal as the race itself. I shame me not because of the Lowland thistle 
and the Ulster gorse, of the Covenanters' banner or the Ulster man's pike. We 
Scotch-Irish people are a peculiar people who have left our own broad, distinct 
mark wherever we have come. To-day we stand out sharply distinguished in 
a score of points from all other races. These marks, like ourselves, are strong and 
stubborn. Years do not change them. The passing decades leave them unmod- 
ified. Contact with other people and new fashions have never rubbed down the 
angles nor eliminated any of the elements. Crossing channels or seas, residence 
in new countries, have left our people as distinct as before. The same methods, 
the same tough faiths, the same unyielding grit, granite hardness, closemouthed 
self-repression, clear-cut speech, blunt truthfulness. God-fearing honesty, loyal 
friendship, defiance of death — these are some of the traits of the Scotch-Irish. 
These are birthmarks and indelible. They are great soul features. They are 
principles of four classes; religious, moral, intellectual and political." 

In the Lowlander and the Ulsterman the same traits are conspicuous. There 
is the same racial pride, the same hauteur and self-assertion, the same close mouth, 
the same firm will. The Scotch expression, "The stout heart for the steek brae" 
applies to the Scotch-Irish still. And they insist that "We are no Eerish, but 
Scoatch". All of the old traditions, tales, songs, poetry, heroes and home ways 
are of the Lowland order. The clan spirit was no less marked in the families of 
Ulster than in the Scotch neighborhoods of Ayrshire. They were settled where 
kinsfolk, neighbors, and countrymen might live in communities; where there 
could exist harmonious faiths, forms of worship, customs, friendships and family 
ties. 

This family likeness is the same the world over. There are the typical face, 
the rugged form, the pronounced movement, habits of thought, granitic faith, 
fixed purpose, adherence to principle, strict honesty, rigid truthfulness, undying 
friendship, unyielding fortitude, fearless heroism, defiance of fate and tranquil 
resignation to Providence that distinguish the Scotch-Irish people wherever they 
have settled; and no better blood was ever introduced into any country or com- 
munity than that which animated the frames and sustained the intellectual facul- 
ties of this grand people. In the American Colonies the families who hailed from 
Ulster exhibited these peculiar features in a remarkable degree. There was the 
same pride of race, the same lofty adherence to principle, the same hauteur and 
tenacity of purpose, the same unbending devotion to duty, as were displayed by 
their Covenanting ancestors among the mountains, moors and glens of Scotland, 
where amid sufferings indescribable they upheld the banner of the Cross and where 
many had yielded up their lives upon the altar of devotion to the cause they had 
espoused. 

The moral atmosphere of their homes was unmistakable. The same austere 
quality of religious faith was manifest. Strict discipline was maintained, unques- 
tioning obedience on the part of children required. They were a God-fearing, bible- 
reading, psalm-singing people, and every expression of their moral principles bore 
the stamp of the Calvinistic mint. They were loyal Protestants of the Presbyterian 
faith and sustained the church, the school and every institution and movement cal- 
culated to promote the well being of society. It may be truthfully said of this 
race that they were conservatively-progressive. They held to old forms when 
considered essential and were ready to adopt any improvements that did not 
interfere with their religious code. These families of Gowdy were not yeomen 



COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 19 



when they removed to Ireland; they were assigned a certain tract, or "Gort" of 
land but paid an annual rent for its use. They had exchanged the Udal law of 
their Norse ancestors for the restrictions of the Feudal system. They were how- 
ever, tillers of the soil and obtained their livelihood by honest toil. In crossing 
the channel between Scotland and Ireland, about thirty miles, these families 
carried with them their customs and methods of husbandry. The traveler visiting 
the two sections would observe but little change in the architectural features in 
their buildings or in the appearance of their fields. There were the same long, 
narrow, lowbrowed cottage forming one side of a square courtyard fronting out- 
ward, and flanking this were the cart-houses, tool-sheds, granaries and byres. 
At one side of the enclosure there would be a broad gateway for the entrance of 
teams. Within the courtyard, which in later times was paved with " whin-stones," 
was the well and tall pump. At the rear of the house there were stone slabs upon 
which the dairy utensils were put out to air and sweeten. The cottage would have 
two rooms below, the "butt and ben", separated by a narrow hall or passage 
extending from the front to the back doors. In the early days the butt end of the 
house would have no floor. In the center a large flat stone would be laid down 
for the hearth upon which the fires were kindled; in more modern times there were 
lums for the passage of the smoke. 

These Gowdy families in Ulster had flocks and herds, and fields of flax in the 
"bloe" adorned the hillsides. Every house had its loom and other simple appli- 
ances for the dressing of the wool and "lint", and the clothing worn by male and 
female was homespun, coarse and unsheared. The furnishing of these homes was 
plain and substantial; everything made for use; nothing for ornament. Their food 
was homely, wholesome and bone-making. The home life in the domestic circle 
was simple and regular. The reading of God's word was not neglected ; devotions 
were attended to and grace said at the family board. The children were trained 
in all that was moral and practical. They availed themselves of such privileges at 
school as the times afforded and went forth to meet the duties of a strenuous life 
well equipped for its responsibilities. 

MODERN ULSTER HOMES. More attractive rural scenery than exists 
in the province of Ulster could scarcely be found in the British Isles. The broad 
undulating lands are divided and bordered by neat walls or green hedges and orna- 
mented here and there with noble trees. The brilliant green of the hillsides is 
relieved and beautified by fields of flax in "the bloe", and to give a pleasing variety 
to the landscape the moorlands are adorned with purple heather and golden broom. 
Extensive bleach-fields covered with long webs of snow-white linen add novelty 
and attractiveness to the rural scene. Here and there as the traveler passes on 
his way his thoughts will be diverted from the predominating agricultural character 
of the country to the days of antiquity by the ivy-grown ruins of some old crumbling 
castle that raises its stained and stately towers beside the way. When visiting 
the well cultivated farms in Ulster, one will find the same arrangement of the mod- 
ern buildings as prevail across the channel in the Scottish Lowlands. The houses 
that fleck the hillsides and stand by the highways present the same appearance 
of solidity and homelike comfort, and their arrangement in their relation to the 
outstanding buildings, are practically the same; enclosing a square space where 
under the shade of some widespreading tree much of the domestic work is per- 
formed. Along the stone benches within this humble courtyard long rows of 
culinary and dairy tins will be exposed to sun and air for sanitation. Along the 



20 COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 

walls without there will be a platoon of nicely trimmed straw stacks that resemble 
giant bee-skelps. Hereabouts will be found the wife and daughters of the farmer 
with bare feet and high-tucked skirts, rosy-cheeked, robust and merry-hearted, 
attending to their dairy work and the preparations for the noon-day meal. 

If the visitor should enter the house he would find everything as it would appear 
in the Lowland farmer's dwelling. In the kitchen the fire will be burning in an 
open grate with the iron oven at one side. A long shelf at one side, above the 
dresser and doors, extending the whole length of the room, will be decked out with 
an array of divers sizes and forms of metal tea-urns and a variety of large figured 
bowls. The two principal rooms below stairs are still called in Scotch form the 
"Butt" and "Ben". In the "ben-end" of the house will be found some plain, 
substantial furniture. The large round table will be supplied with a few books 
and a number of pictures will adorn the walls. Some ornaments will be displayed 
on the mantel and brackets, and the windows will be draped with dimity curtains. 
All will suggest thrift, frugality, simplicity and comfort. 

The domestic scene at evening time will be typical of the " Cotter's Saturday 
Night" as described by the poet Burns. The husbandman has come home from 
the fields or hills, where he has been cultivating the soil or tending his flocks and 
herds, and reads his newspaper or some instructive book at the fireside, his shep- 
herd dog lying at his feet. The venerable and demure granddame will be seated 
in the high-backed resting chair, her stooping shoulders caped and her head envel- 
oped in a voluminous frilled mutch (cap) while she gazes upon the glowing coals 
in the grate and dreams of other days and scenes. The gude-wife and her 
contingent of buxom daughters will be busy with the reels and mickle wheels 
dressing the "lint" (flax) and sing Scotch songs and banter. The closing evening 
scene will further illustrate the description of the poet, consisting of the reading 
of a Psalm and the solemn family devotions; then the "guid-nichts" are spoken 
and all hie away to their places of rest. 

"Compared with this how poor religion's pride. 
In all the pomp of method and of art. 
Where men display, to congregations wide. 
Devotion's every grace, except the heart". 

The present inhabitants of Ulster are a hardy race, intelligent, conservative 
and industrious. They cling tenaciously to the faith of their fathers and are slow 
to accept any new habits of life or methods of work. They are as loyal to the 
Presbyterian Church as were their Covenanting forefathers among the glens of 
Scotland. They are simple in their fashions, thoughtful, slow to speak, discreet, 
prudent and practical. They encourage every institution that is calculated to 
advance the religious and moral condition of the community in which they live. 
Schools are supported and their children required to make the most of every educa- 
tional privilege. The physical appearance of the Ulsterman represents that of his 
Scottish ancestors. He is sometimes tall and rawboned, but seldom corpulent. 
His head is rather large, his facial features coarse and rugged. His mouth and 
chin are broad and his lips full and close-shut. The cheekbones are prominent 
and the complexion florid. In character he is scrupulously truthful and strictly 
honest. His word is taken without discount by all who know him. He is not 
quarrelsome but will contend for his rights and fight for them when necessary. 



COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 21 

All of the typical physical and mental characteristics so accurately described in 
another section of this "Compendium" are now as conspicuously developed as 
when exhibited one hundred years ago. He is "Scotch-Eerish" to the "barck 
bane" and no mistake, 

GOUDY-GOWDY FAMILIES IN AMERICA. There were secular as well 
as religious reasons for the extensive emigration of the Scotch-Irish families 
to the American Colonies. Probably the religious persecution with which 
these Protestants had been so persistently pursued was the principal motive for 
leaving Ireland about the time the earliest families came to our shores; but at 
a later day there were temporal concerns that proved an incentive to these indus- 
trious farmers to expatriate themselves from the land where they or their fathers 
had made an adopted home. The first Undertakers who were instrumental in the 
plantation of Ulster were required to give bonds not to grant any leases to the 
Scottish settlers extending more than twenty-one years. Many of these leases 
had expired or were near maturity, and the land superiors took advantage of the 
circumstances to advance the rent of the farms; this increasing financial burden 
was made more obnoxious by a rise in taxation, and the exactions by the govern- 
ment and the landlords made it impossible for the farmers to cultivate the soil 
with any profit. Those who controlled the land cared nothing for the moral or 
religious character of the communities and sold the leases of those who had occu- 
pied the farms to the Catholic Irish, a class with whom the Protestants did not 
wish to live as neighbors. These combined unfavorable conditions caused the 
Presbyterian families to remove to a country where they could have freedom of 
worship and the privilege of owning the soil on which they lived. But in conse- 
quence of the various periods of settlement in the Ulster plantation their leases 
did not expire during the same years, hence their leaving Ireland coincided with 
those dates. The beginning of the greatest exodus of the Scotch-Irish was in the 
year 1680, and as the religious and secular conditions in Ulster became more 
intolerable the ratio of increase in emigration was rapid. This extensive removal 
from Ireland to America was one of the most striking features of that country and 
one which had a marked effect upon the history of the American Colonies, which 
drew so much of its best blood from the Presbyterians who came from the Ulster 
plantation. After 1718 about forty-two hundred men and women left the North of 
Ireland within three years. In 1740, in consequence of the great famine, twelve 
thousand left annually for the American plantations. From 1771 to 1773 the 
emigration from Ulster was estimated at thirty thousand, of whom ten thousand 
were weavers. Thus was the Province drained of the young, the enterprising and 
most desirable class of its population. They left the land that had been saved by 
their fathers' swords, and crossed the sea to escape the galling tyranny of the 
bishops whom England had made the rulers of the country; then they settled in a 
new and better land where they founded homes, built churches, peopled commu- 
nities and maintained their religious faith, but here they had to draw the sword to 
save from England the land they had adopted. 

Nearly all of the families removing from Ayrshire to the Province of Ulster in 
the North of Ireland changed their names from Goudie to Goudy and Gawdy 
and their descendants have perpetuated these forms of spelling till the present time. 

From early records connected with ecclesiastical affairs and from the land 
records and the vital records we have found numerous forms of spelling the name; 
among these made note of were the following: Gaut, Gade, Gaud, Gaute, Gaudie, 



22 COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 

Gawdie, Gawdy, Gowdy, Goudy, Goudey, Gaudry, Gauden, Gaudern, Gawdern, 
and Goudin. Some of these spellings were evidently errors by those who handled 
the pen. 

From many corresponding circumstances and harmonious traditions there are 
reasons for believing that these heads of the American families were not closely 
related, although descended from a common stock, originally, in Scotland. Had 
they come from the same district, or neighborhood, in Ireland they would probably 
have followed the trails of those who preceded them and the clannish spirit so char- 
acteristic of this race would have drawn them together in a consolidated commu- 
nity. But though they came over in company with old neighbors and collateral 
kinsmen, they were widely separated in their places of settlement and are not known 
to have had any communication with each other. 

The traditional elements interwoven with the vital extant statistics lend to the 
history of these early generations of the several branches of the Goudy and Gowdy 
families in the American Colonies a feature of uncertainty, a feature found in all 
traditionary and legendary information that has been transmitted orally by several 
generations of venerable persons whose memories were defective. All such recita- 
tions contained a seed truth and sometime the family history was well known and 
fresh in the minds of the families who came to our shores; but through the friction 
of the passing decades these traditionary statements have changed angles and 
become transformed until, at the present time, they are often very misleading. 
However, the experienced historian and the genealogist have learned caution by 
the comparison of "auld wives' fables" told at the hearthstones of bygone genera- 
tions with the authentic contemporary records and becomes suspicious of any 
statement that has not been fully sustained by unquestionable documentary proof; 
and he winnows the chaff of error from the grain of truth without hesitancy, and 
with unsparing hand deposits each in separate bins. He conserves the residuary 
traditional matter, however, for what it may be worth, culling therefrom all that 
tallies with the more authentic records. 

It seems somewhat singular that the published lists of emigrants contain but 
one name of this family; this was Henry Goudy, who had embarked for Bermuda 
in the West Indies. Probably many of the early lists of the Scotch-Irish emigrants 
were lost. Among the first known to have come to New England were the Goudys 
who settled about Dover, Newcastle, and the Isle of Shoals in New Hampshire, 
whose names appear as early as 1710 and 1715. Amos Goudy, probably from the 
Newcastle family, appeared in the town York, in Maine, as a landowner in 1722. 
A James Goudy of New Hampshire was a married man at the time of the French 
war and was killed at the siege of Louisburg. The records of Boston, Medford, 
Medfield, Marblehead, Taunton, and Lynn show that families of the name were 
in those towns as early as 1712. Simon Gowdy. a resident of Boston, must have 
been born before the dawn of the nineteenth century. James Gowdy and Hill 
Gowdy were contemporary with this Simon Gowdy and were evidently his kindred. 
Some of these were married and had children born in the towns mentioned, but 
finally removed to Connecticut and became the heads of the numerous families 
there. See biographical sections of this work for more particulars. 

Among the pioneers of the American colonies there were no better families than 
those who came from the north of Ireland. These descendants of the pure-blooded 
Scotch settlers in the province of Ulster brought with them the same physical and 
mental characteristics so conspicuous in their experiences when dwelling in the 
glens and mountains of Scotland. As the Gowdys in America were evidently from 



COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 23 

the northern counties of Ireland it seems appropriate for this work to present an 
epitomized verbal picture of the salient features of the race. The prevailing con- 
ditions in Scotland, both political and religious, had produced a peculiar class of 
people. The conflict of faiths, the contentions for freedom of thought and liberties 
in forms of worship, the sufferings endured for conscience sake for generations, had 
developed strong principles and purposes amongst this race. At the time of the 
plantation of the Scotch pioneers in Ulster one of the principal land-owners said 
of them that they came with "better port" than the English settlers. They were 
a select class. 

The commissioners in Ulster at the time of settling the country with Scotch 
families were careful to gratify them in their clannish preferences; that old neigh- 
bors and kindred born in Scotland might dwell in communities. From the allot- 
ment of the land we find that in the county Armargh the barony of Fewes fell to 
the Scotch. In county Tyrone the two baronies of Mountjoy and Strabane fell to the 
Scotch. In county Donegal the baronies of Portlough and Boulagh fell to the Scotch. 
In county Fermanaugh the baronies of Knockninnie and Magheraboy also fell 
to the Scottish families. This same principle obtained in the American settle- 
ments. The Scotch-Irish came as families, churches and communities; they were 
connected by blood or intermarriages and would not sever the ties that had bound 
them together in their old homes. There is scarcely an instance known where, 
among the early emigrants from Ulster, a Scotch-Irish family lived isolated; 
and it will only be necessary to consult the genealogical sections of this family 
history to prove that those emigrants were careful to associate themselves in such 
a collective community that the inherent clannish spirit might be preserved. 
The surnames of those intermarried with the Goudys show that they formed alli- 
ances only with those of their own race. 

The pioneer families bearing this name brought with them all of these physical, 
intellectual and moral features, and when established in their new homes con- 
tributed strong and beneficial elements to society in the communities where they 
sat down. They had to encounter all the conditions of a pioneer settlement in an 
almost unbroken wilderness when hewing out for themselves and their children 
the homes they inhabited; they rolled back the forests and opened to the genial 
sunshine broad fields that were soon covered with billows of golden grain. They 
assisted in the founding of churches, schools and colleges; they became substantial, 
progressive and useful citizens, sharing in all of the means necessary for the develop- 
ment of the country and leaving the impress of their moral character upon the 
generation of their contemporaries. The mothers acquitted themselves of the 
obligations laid upon them with faithfulness and devotion and sent forth their 
sons and daughters with the holy benediction of a pure example and prudent 
counsel. Like their remote Norse ancestors on the shores of the Baltic Sea these 
pioneer families built their virgin homes in the wilderness of the materials proflFered 
by the treasuries of the forests and hillsides, of timber and stone, and their lives in 
the new country was one of toil and frugality; they denied themselves the luxuries 
enjoyed by those who had the advantages of a more advanced community and 
were content with such wholesome fare as the game in the forests and fruit 
of the fields afforded; however, when prosperitv had crowned their exer- 
tions and plenty filled their garners, they provided more pretentious home- 
steads and furnished them with greater comfort md attractiveness. All of these 
general statements will be abundantly verified in the personal history and 
biography of the several families. 



24 COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 

Among the New England pioneer families named Gowdy there were examples 
of industry that took their initiative in the far-away lands from whence the inter- 
mediate generations sprung; they were lovers of the sea and hugged its shores; 
they plied the fisherman's craft as their progenitors had done on the fiords and 
wicks of Norway and Shetland; they went forth upon the restless waves to receive 
Neptune's baptism of spume-drift while luring the finny denizens of the deep; 
they built their houses upon the elevated bluffs overhanging the ocean and gazed 
from their door-stones upon the white sails that flecked the distant waves. Some 
of these coming early to the seacoast towns of New Hampshire and Maine, sat 
down upon the bays and river-mouths, built their fisher-huts, launched their boats 
and spread their nets upon the rocks to dry. In the towns of Newcastle and 
Old York; away in the eastern townships, called "the jumping-off-place" these 
sons of Neptune stimulated by the Viking blood that coursed through their veins 
plied the piscatorial art and established homes. When means had been acquired 
they purchased extensive lands farther inland, erected more substantial homes 
and devoted themselves to agricultural pursuits. Some there were who saw the 
advantages of the water-powers that bordered their farms and built mills for 
their own and the accommodation of their neighbors. Scions of these pioneer 
families soon became prominent members of society and were honored by their 
compatriots with positions of trust in which they served with devotion to the 
public weal and the satisfaction of their supporters. 

From the year 1680, the Scotch-Irish began to dispose of their lands, leave 
their homes and embark for the American Colonies. As the conditions in Ulster 
became intolerable their kindred followed them, the ratio of emigration constantly 
increasing, until thousands of these Protestant families were scattered along the 
coast from New England through Delaware, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia 
and the Carolinas. Having become settled and a degree of prosperity having 
been secured by the pioneers of this race, they forwarded letters to those left 
behind in which the lands, forests, rivers and lakes were described in such glowing 
colors that early in the nineteenth century several shiploads of Presbyterian families 
from Ireland were landed on our shores. A typical letter written by the head 
of an American family to his friends in Ulster lies before me as I write. Among 
these emigrants came the families of Goudy, some of whom settled in New England, 
some in Pennsylvania, and others in the Carolinas. 

The stories told around the firesides in the American homes concerning the 
experiences of persecution and sufferings endured in Scotland and in Ireland deeply 
impressed the minds of the children from generation to generation, and those 
traditions were not suffered to die out. In many of the pioneer homes of the 
Scotch-Irish in the American Colonies the Bible and such books as "The Cloud 
of Witnesses" and "The Scots Worthies" would lie side by side upon the tables. 
All of these associations and influences served to foster a love for the Presbyterian 
Church among the young and they were taught to believe the doctrines of this de- 
nomination were the fundamental precepts for the formation of character and con- 
duct. In the new settlements the Presbyterian ministers who preached to the pioneer 
families were nearly all Scotch or Scotch-Irish; and having been educated in the 
schools and colleges of their native land were familiar with the history of the times 
when the Covenanters were driven from their homes to the wilderness; and their 
sermons were often an echo from those far-away scenes and sights. When the 
population was limited to clusters of families on the borders of the wilderness the 
churches were a long distance away and considerable journeys were necessary to 



COMPENDIUM OF FAMILY HISTORY. 25 

reach the places of worship; however these families managed to be present on the 
Sabbaths and with reverence listened to the gospel. 

In our study of the elements of character as exhibited in their various positions 
in life while we have followed them in all their movements and migrations for a 
period of eight centuries, we should summarize our estimation of the salient 
features of the family character about as follows: all the foreign tributaries of 
blood that have flowed into the veins of these Gowdys have not quenched the 
ancient fires that burned in the souls of their Viking ancestors; the inherent 
elements of character so conspicuous in the lives of these sea-rovers have sometimes 
slumbered like smothered fires only to crop up in all their intensity under such 
circumstances as fanned them into a flame. The same hardihood, the same 
heroism, the same contempt of danger, the same restless temperament and 
inclination to roam; the love of adventure and association with new scenes; the 
ability to adjust themselves to altered conditions and to develop new institutions; 
a love for learning and in process of time and events to rise into professional and 
official positions until they became the leading spirits in the communities where 
their lot was cast. They have exhibited the same inflexible will power, the same 
tenacity of purpose, the same adherence to principle, the same thoroughness in prep- 
aration and devotion to duty, the same fearlessness in speaking the truth and in the 
defence of what they believed to be right. Certainly the Gowdys and Goiidys 
have shown great individuality, originality and independence of character. The 
minority of numbers on the side of a proposition never swayed them from their 
purpose, and if they stood alone they would win or die in the conflict. The Norse, 
the Norman, the Englishman, the Scotchman, the Ulsterman and the American 
— all of these nationalities have blended in the family temperament, but each 
peculiarity inherited by them during the passing centuries has become so stereotyped 
in their mental fabrics that each attribute stands out with the same prominence 
as if it had not been associated with modifying forces. It has been said by one 
noble-hearted and pronounced old representative of the family, that a Gowdy 
would be born, would live, would die, and would be buried in a fashion to please 
himself. We shall leave this statement for the consideration of those who, 
possessing the Gowdy temperament, can vouch for the truthfulness of the assertion. 



|leribatiaii antr lilutatinu aiil^t ^xmxmm. 



SURNAMES did not come into general use until about the middle of the tenth 
century when they appeared in Normandy; and at the time of the conquest 
(1066) they were introduced into England and Scotland. It is a matter of history 
that many of the Norman adventurers who came over in the army of William 
the Conqueror had adopted the local names of their seats or chateaus which were 
preceded by the preposition "de". Also that only a small number of those who 
were rewarded with lands in England for their services at the battle of Hastings 
remained in that country; many returned to their estates in Normandy, having 
bestowed their newly acquired territorial possessions upon their sons who came 
over and settled on them; then applied their personal names to the seats founded 
by them in England. When, however, the Norman-French language disappeared 
from England, in nearly all instances the prefix "de" was discarded and the English 
substitute "of" adopted — unless retained for euphony. 

In Scotland, where surnames did not come into general use till the 12th century 
and were for a long time variable, they had a different designation for such as 
had adopted the names of their places of residence, using the title "Of that Ilk". 

The assumption of surnames by the common people is everywhere of a later 
date than that of the gentle families. 

Surnames may be divided into several classes; such as personal, mechanical 
and territorial. The surnames Walker, Springer, Sleeper, Armstrong, Goodman, 
Longstaff, Lockhart, Douglass, Broadhead, Cruikshanks and Longfellow, were 
derived from some peculiarity of those to whom they were first applied. The 
following are some of the mechanical surnames common among the families of the 
present time. Carpenter, Turner, Wheelwright, Weaver. Webster, Brewer, Boulter, 
Butler, Wheeler, Gardner and Usher. Among the local surnames we may mention 
Bowerbank, Fairbank, Burnham, Bradbury, Mansfield, Merryfield, Littlefield 
and Butterfield. 

The reason for the adoption of surnames is obvious. In localities where there 
were dwelling several individuals bearing the same Christian names it became 
necessary to apply some distinguishing title to represent each, such as "John the 
Wheelwright" and "John the Carpenter"; and in time these appellations became 
fixed surnames for their descendants. This custom of affixing a distinguishing 
title to a Christian name is as ancient as "Bible-times". Simon surnamed Peter 
was dwelling with one Simon a tanner by the seaside. John and James were 
surnamed Boanerges and Judas Iscariot was so-named to distinguish him from 
another Judas of more honorable reputation. To distinguish two persons bearing 
the same Christian names locally they were designated as "Williams of Fairbank" 
or "William of Woodbridge". An individual well-known for his great stature 
was called Longfellow and his neighbor whose strength of arm was locally known 
was called "John the Armstrong". A man with bow-legs was known as Samuel 
the Crookshanks. All of these names finally became fixed as family surnames 
and were transmitted from father to son and from mother to daughter. 

The derivation of the varient forms of the surname by which the families 
represented in this book have been known, may have had a double origin; or, 



DERIVATION AND MUTATION OF SURNAME. 27 

different branches of the family brought the title from widely divergent sources 
into England and Scotland. If we look to Scotland we shall find the word Gowde 
is defined as a clip or fist; hence among the pioneers of Scottish descent in New 
England when a man had become offensive and was being punished those who 
approved of the chastisement shouted "Give him Gowdy". If we should seek 
in the Low Countries for the derivation of the name we might be told that it was 
from the town of Gouda where the celebrated cheese was made. We must look, 
however, across seas to Norway and Denmark for the origin of the family titles 
that now concern our inquiry. The name in its earlier forms was both local and 
personal, and was derived from the Norse word "Gade" or "Garde". The word 
Gard is in English equivalent to Yard, meaning an enclosure; hence "Ostergard" 
or the Eastern Farm. But there were and now are persons bearing these names. 
Gilbert Goudie Esq., born in the Shetland Isles and a competent Norse scholar 
who has investigated the family history, says: "The first form in which, so far 
as can be gathered, the name Goudie or Goudy is to be found, is in the Scandina- 
vian Gaut or Gaute (later Gjaute) a personal name which gradually became fixed as 
a surname. In this original form, phonetically, it was long continued, as in the 
Gawdy families in England, Gadie or Gaudie families in Shetland and Gade in 
Denmark and Norway. "This gentleman has recently found while visiting in 
Norway several persons occupying respectable positions named Gade; proving 
that the ancient orthography is still perpetuated in the old homeland." 

The editor of this work through an examination of the early records in the Orkney 
Islands has found the name spelled as in the Shetlands by the pioneers, "Gadie", 
but later as "Gawdie" and "Goudie". 

Gilbert Goudie also assumes that the first known to have adopted the change 
from Goudie to Gawdie was Professor John Gawdie of Edinburgh University from 
1753 as will be shown afterwards and this form or its equivalent, "Goudie" or 
"Goudy," is now in almost universal acceptation. 

Recent examination of ancient documents relating to the ancestors of the English 
Baronial families proves that they used the form "Gawdie" and later "Gawdy." 
It is therefore plausible to assume that Principal Gawdie had investigated the 
ancestral history of his family and finding the name "Gawdie" in the old docu- 
ments, adopted that orthography. 

Quoting further from Gilbert Goudie: "In the Isle of Man, that strange little 
almost independent state in the Irish Sea, once the Scandinavian "Kingdom" of 
Man, the richly sculptured cross at Kirkmichael, presumably of the 9th or 10th cen- 
tury, bears an inscription in Runic characters to the effect that Gaut carved it and 
all the other stones in the island. Gaut girthi thana auk alia Maun, and in the 
Orkneyinga Saga, in a narrative of proceedings in the 12th century, Gaute of 
Skeggbjarnstadir is introduced as a prominent personage. 

Unless in the case of Archbishop Gaute or Gowte of Dromtheim, in Norway 
(Deeds of 1490-1532) and of Hemming Gadde, Bishop of Lincopine in Sweden, 
(1504) little more is recorded of the name until the middle of the 16th century 
when the family of Gawdy of Claxton Hall, Harling, and other properties in the 
county of Norfolk, is found as one of distinction in England." 

>fOTE — While visiting in Norway in the year 1914, Gilbert Goudie Esq. of Edinburgh, Scotland, 
found no less than seventeen persons bearing the family name spelled "Gade". The terminal "E" 
being accented as a syllable, making the pronunciation "Gad-e". These Norwegian Gades were all 
filling respectable positions. He also found several persons in Oopenha.?en, Denmark, belonging to 
this family using the same orthography. These discoveries prove that the ancient forms of the sur- 
name have been perpetuated in the Scandinavian countries. 



28 DERIVATION AND MUTATION OF SURNAME. 

Continuing, Gilbert Goudie says: "The origin of this Gawdy family in England 
does not now appear to be known; but looking to what has already been said as 
to the Norse derivation of the name, it is not improbable that they were repre- 
sentatives of some Norman-French family which may have found its way to British 
ground in the train of William the Conqueror in the 11th century, or in the time 
of some of his early successors on the throne of England; or, they may have de- 
scended from some one of the original invaders from Scandinavia who, in the Viking 
Age, or at earlier date, conquered and settled on the east coast of England, where 
personal names and place names in many instances give unmistakable evidence 
of a Scandinavian origin". 

Recent investigation and search pursued has revealed that the head of the 
baronial families in England was a Frenchman, or a Norman, who was taken 
prisoner at the battle of Gascony. He was a knight named Sir Bruise Gawdy. 
He was naturalized and settled in Suffolk, England, as early as 1352. He married 
a daughter of William Hammond of Swaflfham, Bulbeck, Cambridge. This his- 
torical fact is supported by the pedigree on Vellum compiled for Sir Framlingham 
Gawdy and now preserved in the British Museum. This ancestor of the Gawdy 
families in England evidently represented the ancient French-Norman house of 
Gaudin so long distinguished in the official life of France; a family still numerous 
and respectable in that country. 

The transition from Goudie to Goldie was easy. Gold in the Lowland Scotch 
dialect is invariably called "Goud" or "Gowd" and the modernized form of the 
surname, Goldie, is still spoken as Goudie. Whether the change of spelling is con- 
sidered an improvement we cannot say. An example of the spelling and Scotch 
pronunciation is found in the lines by Burns the poet where he has said, 

"The rank is but the guinea stamp. 
The man's the Goud for a' that". 

BRUISE— BRUESE—BROUSE— BRUCE— BRUS. 

This is the surname of an illustrious family of Norman extraction, the English and Scottish 
branches being descended from Robert de Brus, a Norman knight who accompanied William the Con- 
queror to England in 1066 and died soon after, leaving a son Adam de Brus who became the ancestor 
of the Breuses and Bruses of Britain. 

It will be seen that the Breuses were associated with the Gawdys and Gaudens both in Suffolk and 
in Surrey, and also that members of the families of Gawdy and Gauden owned lands in the same 
parish of Denbenham, Norfolk. Sir Dennis Gauden Knt, acquired the land on Clapham Common, on 
which he built his mansion of the Breuse family. The Gawdy family at Redenhall were descended 
maternally from the Breuses in Normandy and were intermarried with them in England in later 
generations. As the Breuse family were the lords of the Manor of Redenhall, in Denbenham, soon after 
the Conquest, and as Sir Breuse Gawdy, Knt., derived his first name from them and settled in Reden- 
hall along with them, it seems probable that this Gawdy family inherited some of their lands from 
the Breuses as their heirs. 

These Breuses were possessed of estates in Normandy long after their coming to England and Scot- 
land where they were granted extensive lands. In the absence of any historical evidence to the con- 
trary, I shall assume to say that the Gawdys living in the Border Shires of Scotland migrated from 
England with their kinsmen the Breuses, and with the Norman families of Le Haye, Comyn and 
Soulis. 

A correspondent writing for the Genealogical Department of the Boston Transcript has produced 
the following information concerning the Brus, -Bruce, -Bruise,-Brouse families. This article is so com- 
prehensive and evidently based on good authority, that the Editor of this Family History has, with 
the proper credit, made use of it. 

Percy. A correspondent interested in certain Neville and Percy connections with the Beckwith family 
asks for certain information, which I will attempt to give in part: 

Emma who married Hugo de Malebisse, ancestor of the Beckwiths, was daughter of Willam da 
Percy and Adelaide de Tonbridge (AJeliza de Tunbrigg, according to the "House of Percy"), daugh- 
ter of Richard third Earl of Clare. He was fourth Baron Percy (bom 1112, died 1168) son of 
William de Percy, third baron (died 1133) and his wife Alice, daughter of Everard, Baron de Ros. 
He was son of Alan de Percy, second baron (bom about 1069, died 1120) and Emma, daughter of 
Gilbert de Gaunt, Baron of Folkingham, and thus grand -daughter of Baldwin, Count of Flanders, and 
through him descendant of Alfred the Great. He was son of William de Percy styled "Als-Gemons," 
first baron, a Norman knight who settled in Yorkshire, 1067. and married Emma de Port, a Saxon 
Lady, heiress of Semar by Scarborough. The Beck\vith family connects with the Percy family too 
early to have other royal lines. 



DERIVATION AND MUTATION OF SURNAME. 29 

The connection with the Bruces is more complex and dilticult. Genealogists must bear in mind 
that Bruces are plentiful. "Li sires de Breux" who came to England are said to have been two 
hundred in number, and forty-three manors in East and West Riding of Yorkshire and tifty-one 
manors in North Riding were their reward. Robert de Brace I. (died 1094?) got forty thousand 
acres and located his seat at Skelton in Cleveland, near Whitby. His son Robert de Bruce II. (born 
1078(?), died 1141) got from David I., King of Scotland, a charter for Strath Annan or Annandal* 
in 1124. He married Agnes Pagnel, daughter of Fulk Pagnel of Cherlton, and had two sons, Adam 
de Bruce, who received Skelton and the otlier English estates of his father ; and Robert de Bruca 
III. (died 1180?), founder of the Scottish branch, who held Annandale during the reigris of David I., 
Malcolm IV. and William the Lion. The charter of Annandale was conflnned to him in 1166. This 
Robert de Bruce III. had two sons: Robert de Bruce IV. (died before 1191), who married, 1183, Isa- 
bel, daughter of William the Lion by a daughter of Robert of Avenel. Dying without heirs, he left 
his estate to his brother, William de Bruce, who held it till his death in 1245, William's son, Robert 
de Bruce V. (died 1245), married Isabel, second daughter of David, Earl of Huntington, younger 
brother of William the Lion. He was a powerful noble on account of his royal connections. His son 
Robert de Bruce VI. (1210-1295,) had the estate of Ann.indale and ridded ten knight's fees in 
Enj^land on the death of his mother in 1251. He married, in 1244, Isabel, daughter of Gilbert de 
Clare, Earl of Gloucester, became first chief justice of England in 1268, and left a son, Robert de 
Bruce VI i. (1253-1304), called Earl of Carrick in right of his wife, Margery, Countess of Carrick, 
daughter of Nigel, second Earl of Carrick by Margery, daughter of Walter the steward of Scotland. 
This Robert had brothers: Barnard and John, and left children: Robert de Bruce VIII., who became 
King of Scotland ; Isabel, who married Eirik of Nonvay, in 1293 ; Edward de Bruce, Lord of Gallo- 
way, "King of Ireland," killed at Dundalk, 1318; Thomas; Alexander; Nigel, all three executed in 
1307 ; Mary, Christian, Matilda, Margaret and possibly two others, all married to Scotch nobles and 
landed men. Robert de Bruce VIII. or Robert I., king of Scotland (born July 11, 1274, died of 
leprosj- at Cardross, June 7, 1329) married first, Isabella, daughter of Donald, Earl of Mar, and had 
one child, Margery, who married Walter, hereditary steward of Scotland, and had a son, Robert II., 
king of Scotland, "first of the Stuart line of kings ; married second, about 1304, Elizabeth de Burgh, a 
sister of the Earl of Ulster, and had by her, first, John, who died in infancy ; David II., who mar- 
ried Johanna, sister of Edward, king of England : Matilda, married Thomas Ysaak, a simple esquire ; 
Margaret, wife of William Earl of Simderland. He had also illegitimate children : Sir Robert, who 
fell at Duppelin ; Walter, who died before his father ; Nigel, steward of Carrick ; Margaret, wife of 
Robert Glen ; Elizabeth, wife of Walter Oliphant, and Christian. 

Adam de Bruce (died 1161), founder of the Skelton line, had son Adam de Bruce (died 1185), who 
had a son Peter de Bruce (died 1211), whose son Peter de Bruce (died 1240), accordng to Nicholas, 
but "in the Holy Land, 1247," according to the Visitation of Shropshire, married Hellewysa (Eloise) 
de Lancaster, daughter of William de Lancaster, Baron of Kendall, and had a son Peter and four 
daughters. When this Peter de Bruce, sherift of Scarborough, died without heirs the estate went to 
the four sisters, one of whom, Luca de Bruce, married Marmaduke Thwing. 

It must be apparent from this sketch that there is no place for Lady Dame Eeckwith, daughter of 
Sir William Bruce, or Jane, daughter of Sir William Bruce. 

The National Directory of Biography says that Lady Beckwith was daughter of William Bruce of 
Pickering. I am unable to identify this member of the family. As to Jane who married Richard de 
Percy, it must be noted that this is one of the generations of the Visitations which both Nicholas's 
Peerage and the History of the House of Percy reject. If such a person as Jane, daughter of Sir 
William Bruce, existed at all, it must have been of an earlier Sir William than any in the above 
famous line of Robert, head of the family at the Conquest. 

There was however a William de Braose (undoubtedly of the same geographical group, Braose being 
an English rendering of Breaux), Lord of Braose near Falaise in Normandy, who received states in 
England at the Conquest. This family located at Brember in Sussex. Of this family Nicholas records 
William de Braose (living 1075) whose son Philip de Braose was dispossessed of his lands in 1163. His 
son William de Braose (died 1210) married Maud St. Valerie and had sons: Giles, Bishop of Hereford; 
Reginald de Braose (died 1221) whose son William de Braose (died 1229) left four daughters as his 
heirs. I do not find these daughters' names. John de Braose, nephew of Giles, Bishop of Hereford, 
evidently son of a brother not named by Nicholas, was Lord of Gower and died 1231. His son William 
de Braose (Brus in the Visitations) married Eva, daughter of William Marshall senior. Earl of 
Pembroke, and had three sons, William, Peter and Thomas. William de Braose (Brus) (died 1322) 
left heirs his two daughters : Aliva, wife of John de Mowbray, and Joan, wife of John de Bohun of 
Midhurst. Peter had sons. Johannes Bruce of Shocklock, County Chester, father of Agnes, wife of 
Urim St. Piers: and George (died without issue) and William de Braose (Brus) whose son Peter left 
as heir a daughter Alice, wife of Sir Ralph St. Owen. Thomas de Braose (Brjs) succeeded as Lord 
of Gower, but died in 1361, leaving John (died without issue), Thomas (died young) and Joane (died 
without issue). 

There are a number of Williams in this family and it is difficult to place daughters of a Sir William 
Bruce without more facts. 

A Matilda de Bruce of Brecknock (died 1210) who married Lord Griffith ap Resi is called "filia 
Willimi, Domini Bruce" by the Shropshire Visitations. Because of Brecknock and the Welsh marriage 
she may be of this Bruce of Gower family. 

The Percy family connects with the Bruces at one other point. Isabel, daughter of Adam de Bruce, 
pretty certainly the second Adam of Skelton, married Henry de Percy, 'ion of Agnes de Percy and 
Jocelyn de Louvain, and thus descendant of (Charlemagne and Alfred the Great. Other questions I 
cannot answer at present. 

J. W. S. A. 









F ■ "« 






£^ 



All ancient nations mentioned in history, wore some kind of defensive armor 
when engaged in battle; sometimes of leather, of brass, of iron, and of steel. 
Some of the more noble and distinguished had their coats of mail and their helmets 
richly ornamented with gold and silver. The sacred historians who wrote the 
Scriptures were familiar with shields, breastplates and helmets, and Paul admon- 
ished his brethen to "put on the whole armor of God". When coats of armor 
were made from thick leather, they were padded with some elastic material that 
would deaden the blow of sword or spear. Scale armor was composed of plates 
of brass, iron, or steel, so formed and joined as to adapt itself to the necessary 
movements of the soldier's body. Armor originally only covered the head and 
shoulders, but in the time of William the Conqueror, men of war were clothed 
from crown to toe in an encasement of plates or rings of steel. In process of time 
the old knights and chieftains had devices on their shields which represented their 
prowess and were significant of their family name or places of residence; then a 
crest was worn on the helmet, well known to the followers of a commander that 
could be seen in battle and served as ensign. The symbols and devices painted 
on the shields were of endless variety, "from the highest things celestial to the 
lowest things terrestrial." Sometimes sur-coats of leather were worn over the 
polished armor of brass and steel to protect the soldier from the heat of the sun; 
then the devices painted on the shields were also embroidered on these overgar- 
ments, and thus the arms became visible to every beholder when in battle without 
a standard. From this method of displaying the emblems and armorial bearings, 
arose the term, Cote armure, or coat-of-arms. 

Many of the monumental sculptures and effigies in the churches of England 
represent men dressed in armor, covered with a sur-coat on which are their armo- 
rial bearings, exactly corresponding with those on their battle shields. In the 
middle ages, armorial devices had become so systematised that they formed a lan- 
guage understood by the common people. The learned and the plebeian could 
read the symbolic picture, which was presented to the eye in a thousand ways 
till the system was interwoven with the character and teaching of the people- 
at-large. The noble families decorated their mansions and carnages with armorial 
insignia; the ancestry of these families was known by the shields in the upper 
parts of the windows. 

The church favored armorial bearings. The old knights took their banners to 
be blessed by the priests before going to engage in the Crusade wars, and on their 
return, these trophies, covered with honorable decorative charges, were suspended 
in the chapel-lofts, and being of a perishable nature, the distinctions were in time 
permanently displayed in the glass of the windows, the frescoes of the walls, or 
carved in the stone of the building itself. 

In the infancy of the heraldry, every knight assumed such armorial distinction 
as he pleased, without consulting his sovereign. Animals, plants, imaginary 
monsters, things artificial, and objects familiar to pilgrims, were adopted; and 
frequently the object chosen was suggestive of the name of the person or family. 
These were called by the French "armes parlantes" or speaking arms. The Apple- 




GAWDY ARMS. 



THE FAMILY HERALDRY. 31 

tons had three apples in their shields; the Bells had three bells; the Masons had 
three trowels; the Watermans had three "millrinds"; the Swans three birds of 
that species, and the Ryedales, three ears of rye. 

As coats-of-arms became more numerous confusion often arose from the use by 
different knights, of the same symbols; and this confusion was augmented by the 
practice of feudal chiefs in allowing their followers to bear their arms in battle as 
a mark of honor. In consequence of this practice many of the coats of arms 
so closely resembled each other, that it was imperative, for distinction's sake, 
that some restrictions and regulations should be laid down respecting the character, 
number, and position of the figures represented on the shields. This necessity 
led, in course of time, to the development of a regular system of heraldry, and the 
ancient rules show that the process was going on in the thirteenth and fourteenth 
centuries. 

In England, the asumption of arms by private persons was first restrained by 
a proclamation from Henry V. which prohibited every one who had not borne 
arms at Agincourt to assume them, except in virtue of inheritance or a grant from 
the Crown. To enforce this ruling, herald visitations were instituted, and con- 
tinued from time to time for several centuries. AH persons claiming the right to 
bear arms were warned to assemble at some stated place in the district, and to bring 
with them all arms, crests, and pedigrees, for examination by the herald 's deputy 
and present evidence of their genuineness. So strict were the laws relating to coats- 
of-arms at this time, that a man who had assumed certain armorial bearings with- 
out proper authority, lost one of his ears as the penalty. 

In the United Kingdom of Great Britain, no person is entitled to bear arms 
without a hereditary claim by descent, or a grant from the competent authority, this 
jurisdiction being executed by Herald's College in England, the Lyon Court in 
Scotland, and the College of Arms in Ireland; and it is illegal to use not only a 
coat-of-arms, but a crest. 

The passion for outward distinctions is so deeply implanted in human nature that 
in America, where all differences are repudiated, many families known to have been 
descended from an ancestry who were granted arms, have ornamented their homes 
with the ancient historic memorials representing the bearings described in the work 
on heraldry; these devices are becoming more popular every year as the interest 
in genealogy increases, and are frequently seen on the doors of carriages and printed 
on stationery. There are no laws to prevent any person from having in his house 
a picture of the arms and crest borne by his ancestors, and the interest in them is 
perfectly natural and commendable. 

As many who may read this book have not been favored with the opportunity 
for making themselves familiar with the "language of heraldry", the foregoing 
comprehensive description will prove of interest and value, and may help them 
to understand and appreciate more fully the heraldic verbal representation con' 
cerning the arms of the family under notice. 



SIR THOMAS GAWDY OF HARLESTON. 

Quarterly 1 and 4, a tortoise passant Argent and gold, on a fesse Gobernated 
gules and argent between three estoiles sable, a demi-lion rampant and two fleur- 
de-lis counterchanged 3 gyrony of 8, gold and gules. 



32 THE FAMILY HERALDRY. 

GAWDY OF HARLESTON. 

Quarterly: 1 4. Vert, a Tortoise Argent. 2 and 3 Gyrony of 12 Gold and 
Azure. Crest — On a Chapeau Gules, turned Ermine, two Swords erect Argent, 
hilts and pomels Gold. 

HARLEAN MANUSCRIPT. 

Vert, a Tortoise Argent. Crest — A Wolf passant per pale Argent and Gold. 

THOMAS GAWDY OF HARLESTON. 

By Baker, Garter-at-Armes, London. 
Ornate. On a Fesse Garbonny of 4 Gules and Argent, a Demi-Lion between 
Fleur-de-lis Gold. All between 3 Estoiles Sable. Crest — A lion's paw erect 
and erased. Argent armed. Azure grasping a lure the top fretty Gold, the line 
about the paw and ring Gold. 

THOMAS GAWDY OF GAWDY HALL. 

Confirmation of Arms and Grant of Crest by Sir G. Detick, Gar ter-at- Arms. 

25th Nov., 2d of Elizabeth. 
Vert, a Tortoise Argent. Crest a Wolf passant, per pale Argent and Gules. 

NOT ASSIGNED. 

Vert, a Tortoise passant Argent. Crest — A wreath Argent and Gules. A 
Chapeau turned up Ermine on which are two Daggers in pale Argent, hilted Gold 
mantled Gules doubled Argent. 

IN PARLOR WINDOWS, BIDWELL HALL. 

1 Framlingham. Argent. A Fesse Gules between three Cornish Crows, proper. 

2 Gawdy. Impaling Bassingbourne, Gyrony of 12 Gold and Azure. Bassing- 
bourne Gawdy (1593) impaling Framlingham and his quarterings, viz: — 

I. Lee, Sable, a Chevron Ermine between three Cresicents Argent. 

II. Bome, Sable, a Chevron Gules between three Unicorns, heads erased 
Argent. 

III. Tiploft. Argent, a Saltire engrailed. Gules. 

rv. Charleton. Gold a lion rampant. Gules. 

V. Holland (No description). 

VI. Inglethorpe. Gules a Cross engrailed. Argent. 

VII. Bradston. Argent a Canton Azure, a Rose Gold. 

VIII. De-La- Pole., with an Annulet. 

IX. Framlingham. Impaling Neville and his quarterings. 

IN STIFFKEY CHURCH. 

There were six colored shields in alabaster, the sixth, Vert a tortoise for Gawdy 
impaling Bacon. 

8. Argent, a Chevron engrailed between three Hurtz each charged with a Lion's 
gamb erased at the first, Hogan. Vert a Tortoise passant in Fesse Argent, Gawdy. 

9. Quarterly, 1 and 4 Gawdy; 2 and 3 Gyronny of 12, Azure and Gold, — Bass- 
ingbourne; impaling quarterly, 1 and 4 Argent, a Wyvern displayed Sable between 

3 holly leaves Vert. — Onsley. 

10. Gawdy, impaling. Gules, two Lions passant in pale Argent, debruised by 
a bend let Gold, — L' Estrange. 

11. Gawdy impaling Bassingbourne. 

12. The same. 

13. Gules two Bars and a Chief indented Gold, — Hare; impaling Bassingbourne. 

14. Gold on a Fesse of 6 Gules and Argent between three Estoiles of six points 



THE FAMILY HERALDRY. 33 

Sable, a demi-Hon rampant between three Fleur-de-lis, all counterchanged, Gay; 
impaling Gawdy. 

15. Gules on a Fesse, between 3 Estoiles of six points Argent, as many mullets 
Sable, Everard ; impaling quarterly, Gawdy and Bassingbourne. 

FOR WILLIAM GAWDY, CLAXTON. 

Monument on the North wall of chancel with three colored shields. 
1. (Defaced) Vert, a Tortoise passant Argent with a crest for difference. 
Gawdy of Claxton. 

2. Quarterly; — 1 and 4 Gawdy, per fesse Argent and Gules; in a chief two 
Mullets Sable (Bacon) Gules on a Chief Argent two mullets pierced. Sable. 

3. Gawdy. 

ON A SLAB IN CANTLY CHANCEL. 

Gawdy. Vert. A Tortoise passant argent; impaling a Chevron between three 
Squirrels sejeant (Lovell) On a Chevron Azure between 3 Squirrels Gules, for Lovell. 

ON A SLAB IN LODDON CHURCH. 

A Tortoise displayed in Fesse (Gawdy) impaling an Heraldic Tiger passant 
Gold, manes and tufted Argent. Crest. - A Wolf passant per pale Argent and Gules. 



Arms Quartered. (1) Framlingham, (2) Lee, of Sussex-Sable, a chevron Erm. 
between crescents Argent. (3) Home-Argent, a chevron Gules, between three uni - 
corns' heads Azure. (4) Neville-Argent, a saltire Gules, a label gabony Argent 
and Azure. (5) Montacute-Argent, three fusils in force Gules. (6) Mountermer-Or 
an eagle displayed Vert, beak and legs Gules. (8) Charlton de Powys-Or a lion 
rampant Gules. (9) Holland-Azure, seme de lis, a lion rampant guardant Argent. 
(10) Edm. de Wodestocke, Earl of Kent, England — Gules three lions passant-guard- 
ent in pale Or within a bordure Argent. (11) Wake-Or two bars Gules in chief 
three to'rteaux Sable. (12) Estoteville-Barry often Argent and Gules, surtout 
a lion rampant Sable. (13) Friglethorp-Gules, a cross engrailed Argent. (14) 
Bradstone-Argent, sue canton Gules, a rose Or. (15) De la-Pole-Azure, a fesse 
between 3 leopards' heads Or, an annulet for difference. (16) Burg-Argent, on a 
fesse dancette Sable, three bezants. (17) Geoffery-Or a chevron Sable, between 
3 goldfinches proper. (18) Sotham-Azure (Sable) three pheons Argent". 

The shield is surmounted by his crest, a cornish clough, volant Sable. Beneath 
the shield: — "Ma Force et Mon Amour Est Au Createur". 

At the east end of the tomb is a shield, Framlingham and his quarterings im- 
paling Heigham, viz: Quarterly, 1 and 4 Heigham; 2 and 3 Francys. 

At the west end of the tomb is another shield, Framlingham and his quarterings, 
impaling Barnardston, viz: quarterly 1 and 4 Azure a fesse dancette Ermine, 
between six cross-crosslets Argent; 2 and 3, Havering, Argent, a lion rampant 
double queued Gules. 

Gauden On a slab in Froyle Church, Hampshire. A shield bearing a chevron 
ermine between three leopards' faces, all within a bordure ermine. Crest, a leopard 
face ermine crowned. Bishop Gauden 's Arms. 

GAUDEN ARMS— FRENCH. 

Gaudin D'Or. An pal azure chevron d'or; a la bordure d 'azure semee de 
Besants d'or et d 'argent alternes; an franc-quartier brochant des comtes ministres 
a intereaur; comtie 1818. 



34 THE FAMILY HERALDRY. 

Gaudin En Normandie. D 'azure an chevron d'or accompagne de tries 
Aigles d 'argent 2 and 4 an chief de gules, fretted d 'argent. 

Gaudin De Gaete. D'or an pal d 'azure dierrounne d'or; a bordure d 'azure, 
semee de besants d'or, et d 'argent, alternating; an chief de gulessemee de estoi- 
les d 'argent. 

Gaudin Pierre Simon. D 'azure a la licorne d'or; a la bordure de gules 
chargee du signe des chevaliers Hgio naires. 

Gaudin en Bretagne. D 'azure semee de fleur-de-lis d'or an lion de meme, 
brochante. 

Gaudin De La Grange. D 'azure, an lion d'or. 

TRANSLATED FROM THE FRENCH. 

Gaudin in Brittany. Azure sprinkled with fleur-de-lis gold, surmounted 
with a lion of the same. 

Gaudin in Normandy. Azure a chevron gold, with three eagles 2 and 4 in 
chief gules fretted argent. 

Gaudin de la Grange. Azure a lion gold. 

Gaudin de Gaete. Or in pale azure Or. A bordure azure semee 

besants gold and argent alternating; chief gules semee with estoiles argent. 

Gaudin Azure a unicorn or; bordure gules; charged with the emblem of the 
Knights of the legion. 




^)^t ^atobg Jfamilits in dBnglmxtr. 



BARONIAL BRANCHES. 



Created 1 July, 1663. Extinct 10 Nov., 1723. 

This ancient and distinguished family was derived from a Scandinavian an- 
cestry early removed from Norway to France and descended maternally from the 
Norman family of De Bruise, since spelled Bruce, and illustrious both in England 
and Scotland. The Gawdy family and that of De Bruise were intermarried before 
leaving France and were frequently allied and affiliated with each other after 
their settlement in Britain. 

Sir Bruise Gawdy or Gawdie, the head of this branch of the family in England, 
was reputed a French Knight who was taken prisoner at the battle of Gascony 
and having become naturalized established his residence in Suflfolk. He married 
a daughter of William Hammond of Swaffam, Bulbeck, Cambridge, subsequent 
to 1352, by whom he had issue that became truly great. Representatives of his 
posterity appreciating the advantages of education were favored with the means 
of acquiring its legacy and ornaments. For several generations the sons were 
fitted for their college courses under the best qualified tutors and sent to the Uni- 
versities from which they graduated in due season with honors. These scholars 
continued correspondence with their parents and relatives while in college and 
the "Gawdy Correspondence" filed in the British Museum throws much light 
on the customs and fashions of the times which will enhance the value of this 
family memorial. 

For succeeding generations representatives of this family were honored with 
Knighthood. Several of them were eminent in the legal profession and were 
elevated to the position of Serjeants-at-Law, Commissioners, and Judges of the 
King's Bench. Two branches of the family were created Baronets, but after the 
succession of a few generations failed of male heirs and the baronies became extinct. 

There seems to be a link missing from the pedigree between Sir Bruise Gawdy 
and Sir Robert Gawdy the first, as evidenced by the disparity in dates; and from 
the appearance of the second Robert Gawdy there has been perplexity and irrec- 
oncilability among genealogists when attempting to harmonize the records; and 
writers of equal authority have assumed with assurance to publish the descent 
of the family from generation to generation without the documentary evidence 
upon which to establish their claims. (It is hoped that a copy of the ancient 
pedigree which has been applied for at the British Museum in London may clear 
away the obscurity and enable the Editor to present a well-connected descent 
from Sir Bruise Gawdy down to the extinction of the male lines of the family.) 

The Bruise Family. As the blood of the Bruise family commingled with that 
of the Gawdies for several generations through a number of alliances, it seems 
very proper to present a comprehensive account of these maternal ancestors. 
The several lines of descent in this family were derived from one or two Norman 
barons who accompanied William the Conqueror to England. In a roll of the 

NOTE — Tlie editor of the letters of Philip Gawdy has written in his Introduction in the printed 
volume, "The existing pedigrees of the Gawdy family, especially of the generations preceding the first 
Bassingboume Gawdy, are so conflicting, and my attempt to reconcile the difterences have been so 
discouraging, that I offer the table (a tabular pedigree inserted in the volume of letters) without any 
convincing hope on my own part that I have solved the difficulties with absolute correctness." 



36 THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 

Knights who participated in the Conquest mention is made of "li sires de Breaux 
e due sens des Homez" — the lords of Breaux two hundred men. These "Sires" 
were believed to have taken their names from the lands of Bruise, Brouse or Breaux 
(found spelled in 25 different forms) between Cherbourg and Villanges where the 
understructure of an ancient castle remains. One of the "Sires" who followed 
William the Conqueror to England was named William de Bruise who became 
Lord of Brember in Sussex, in which county he had 40 lordships besides 12 lord- 
ships in Dorsetshire, and others in Hants and Surrey. "Sire" Robert de Bruise, 
another Norman baron who assisted in the Conquest, received a princely reward 
for his services in the grant of 94 manors extending to 40,000 acres in Yorkshire. 
He died in 1094. Through Adam de Bruise, the son of Robert de Bruise just 
mentioned who acquired the Yorkshire estates, was descended another Robert de 
Bruise, of Cleveland, who was a companion in arms with Prince David of Scotland, 
and was rewarded with the lordship of Annandale. From this representative 
of the family descended the Kings of Scotland whose history is too well known 
to have repetition here. The Bruises and their kinsmen the Gawdies removed 
from England to Scotland contemporaneously and were finally settled in Ayrshire; 
the former as Earls of Carrick and the latter at Cragie Mill in the parish of Galston. 
The English branch ended there in co-heirs. Robert de Bruce was born at Turn- 
berry Castle on the coast of Ayr, his mother's residence, July 11, 1224, 

1. Sir Bruise GawdyS the first known ancestor of this family in England, 
was a French or Norman Knight taken prisoner at the battle of Gascony, 26 Edward 
HI. (1352-1353) who was naturalized and settled in Suffolk. He was evidently 
born as early as 1330 and was descended maternally from the ancient and illustrious 
family of Bruise (afterwards Bruce) whose representative came over at the con- 
quest. This Sir Bruise Gawdy was probably descended paternally from some 
member of the Scandinavian family of Gade who went ta France in the train 
of Rollo the Ganger and settled in Normandy; and of the same stock as the dis- 
tinguished families named Gaudin of latter and modern times. He married the 
daughter of William Hammond of Swaffam, Bulbeck, Cambridge, and was the 
progenitor of the two baronial families of Claxton and Harleston. He was 
succeeded by 

2. Sir Robert Gawdy^, descended from Sir Bruise Gawdy but not in the first 
degree. He was the first known to have settled at Redenhall, county of Norfolk, 
England, in the year 1433; who married Elizabeth Denholt by whom he had issue. 

3. Robert Gawdy^ of Redenhall whose wife was Catherine Peak and who died in 
the year 1467, leaving a son. 

C^£ ^aiobgs of Parkstott. 

(LINEAGE.) 

1. Thomas Gawdy* (1), 1491, son of Robert and Catherine (Peak) Gawdy' (1), 
resident at Harleston, county of Norfolk, was three times married; possibly, four 
times. One pedigree makes his wife Joan Lenwick, or Lerrick, while in another 
account the name of first wife was given as Elizabeth without her other name 
or reference of parentage. The second wife was named Rose Bennett, the daughter 
of Thomas Bennett of Rushall, by whom issue. The third wife, according to this 
authority, was Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Schyres, by whom he also had issue. 
As intimated in the introductory section of this work, there are irreconcilable 



THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. Z7 

discrepancies in the published statements found in the English books and the 
compiler assumes no responsibility. 

2. Thomas Gawdy^ (2), son of Thomas Gawdy^ (1), by his first wife, Elizabeth 
(her parentage and surname not known). There were so many in the family 
bearing this Christian name that, in consequence of deficiency of dates, much 
confusion has resulted and several writers have confounded them. A modern 
authority of reputation for accuracy, says this Thomas Gawdy had three sons 
named Thomas by as many wives, which he designates as follows: "Thomas 
theserjeant-at-law;Thomas the Judge, and another Thomas (so christened) whose 
name was changed to Francis at his confirmation". If this assumption be true 
it shows a most singular preference for an old Apostolic title. This Thomas Gawdy 
was of the Inner Temple and serjeant-at-law, as was his son of the same name. 
I cannot give the biography of this man with the desirable assurance. He was 
styled in one published pedigree as "of Redenhall". His first wife was Anne, a 
daughter of John Bassingbourne Esq. of Hatfield, Woodhall, in the county Norfolk. 
His second wife was a widow Stanyings, daughter of John Harris, of Devonshire. 
His third wife, dame Catherine Hastings, widow of — Strange of Hermiston, county 
of Norfolk, by whom there was no issue. He died in August, 1566, and his virtues 
were recorded in a joint Latin epitaph with those of Richard CatUne, which will 
appear, subjoined. 

" Munre Gauweo Justus, virtye, labor e. 
Tempenbus, patria, fortuna, annis, 
Funere conjunctus, terras Catalina reliquit. 
Felicis ambo pariter quos vita beatos 
Facerat, et finnile pariter mors funere missit, 
Compore major eras Gaudae minusque timebas, 
Castere cum focis focius Catalina tenebat, 
Orbis fuis Norfolcia moesta Patronis. 
Et dolet amissabas genminto vulnere vires. 
Hos Mareia regni florentes viderit anmes 
Tirtins, Augustus conjunxit funere mensis. 
Vos, quibus est juris nostratis propria curs, 
Vivite justitiae memores mortisque futurae, 
Gratea non violet, non ulla potentia leges, 
Ut Catalina facet fV e caetera turba jacebit." 

3. Thomas Gawdy Esq.® (3) , second son of Thomas® (2) , by his wife Rose Bennett, 
daughter of Thomas Bennett, of Rushall, in Norfolk. After some education in 
this University (Cantabri), probably in Gonville Hall, he went to the Inner Temple, 
and in due course was called to the bar. In Lent 1553, he was appointed reader 

Unclassified Notes. 

l.'iSS. Received for Thomas Gawdy's grave six shillings eight pence ; the farm of the town-house 
of Redenhall, sixteen shillings. 

1594. Received two deeds of the house called the Chapel to be kept to the use of the town; the 
Chapel and Cross-Chambers. 

1693. Received a fragment made of the Chapel and Chamber and Town-close, which contained 
three acres, and was let at 41 shillings per annum, said to be given by the Gawdy family. The profits 
to be given to the poor on every Christmas. Old Church Warden's Book. 

Manor of Bootne, Suffolk. There was a fine of this manor levied against Sir Thomas Cornwall by 
Thomas Gawdy, in 1554. 



38 THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 

of the Inner Temple but refused to read and was therefor amerced. He was re- 
turned from Arundel to the parliament of Oct. 5, 1553. In that which met Jan. 
20, 1557-8 he served for the city of Norwich, being on that, as on other occasions, 
designated "Thomas Gawdy senior" to distinguish him from others, his kinsmen, 
bearing the same name. He was called to the degree of serjeant-at-law in October 
1558, but before the return by the death of Queen Mary, and several years elapsed 
before he attained the dignity. In Lent 1559, he appears to have been double 
reader at Lincoln's Inn, of which house he served the office of treasurer in 1562. 
This was Thomas, "younger" son of Thomas^ (2) and Rose Bennett. He 
was elected recorder of Norwich in 1563, and in 1566 he and his son, Henry 
Gawdy, purchased the Manor of Claxton in Norfolk, where, it was said he thence- 
forward usually resided. In the Easter term (1567) he was called to the degree 
of serjeant-at-law, and on Nov. 16, 1574, was constituted one of the Justices of 
the court of the Queen's Bench. On May 31, 1575, he with others, made an award 
for determining some differences between the town of Great Yarmouth and the 
Cinque Ports. On her Majestie's progress through Norfolk in August 1578, he 
received the honor of Knighthood. His name occurs in the special commission 
of oyer and terminer for Middlesex, Feb. 20, 1584-5, under which William Parry, 
LL.D., was tried and convicted of high treason, although it does not appear that 
he was present in person at the trial. His name also appears in a like com- 
mission for Sussex Feb. 12, 1585-6, for the trial of William Shelby for the same 
offence. He was one of the commissioners who, in October 1586, sat upon the 
trial of Mary Queen of Scots at Fotheringay, and gave judgment against her 
in the Star Chamber. (?) He died Nov. 4, 1588, and on the 25th of that month his 
half-brother, Francis Gawdy (ultimately chief-justice of Common Pleas) was 
appointed his successor on the judicial bench. He was buried at Redenhall (which 
parish embraced the greater part of Harleston his native place), and in the north 
chapel of that church there is an altar- tomb to his memory. It appears from an 
inquisition taken after his death that he died seized of numerous valuable estates 
in Norfolk, Suffolk, and Berkshire. He was lord of the following-named estates: 
Claxton, Helgeton, Ashby, Charleton, Harleston, Rockland, St. Peters, Saxlingham, 
Cartfield, Surlingham, Bamerton, Frenge, Shipdam, Tasborough, Cantley and 
Gawdy Hall. On Nov. 4th in the 31st year of the reign of Queen Elizabeth 
it was found by an inquisition post mortem taken at London August 19th fol- 
lowing, that Henry Gawdy his son by Etheldreda, daughter of William Knightley 
Gent, of Norwich, was then aged 36 years. There is a discrepancy regarding 
the number and names of his wives. He married first Audry or Etheldreda, 
daughter of William Knightly of Norwich, Gent., by whom six children; second, 

In 1591 there was a fine levied by Thomas Gawdy against Thistledon Hall. Sir Henry Felton quar- 
relled with his cousins, the Gawdys, and seems to have had some trouble with Parliament in conse- 
quence of certain charges he had brought against Mr. Gawdy. (Harlean Mss.) 



(Addenda) 

"April 5, 1681. John Thomson of St. Martin's-in-the-field, citizen and mason of London, widower, 
about 38, to Mrs. Utrecia Gawdy of St. Andrews, Holbom, London, Spinster, about 27, at her own 
disposal. 

Sir John Snelling married Gawdy. 

Elizabeth Newdigate married Gawdy. 

Thomas Gawdy married Anne, daughter of Edmund and Dorothy Bushall. 

Wentworth Gameys married 1st, Anne, daughter of Sir Charles Gawdy of Crowes Hall, Denbenham, 
who died in 1681 ; secondly, Mary, daughter of Sir Thomas Addy. 

Isaac Wincold married Marj', daughter of Sir Thomas Gawdy of Gawdy Hall, in Norfolk, Justice 
of the Queen's Bench. 

Mary Lamb, daughter of Fitz Noone and Elizabeth Crofts, was married to Gar. Gawdy. 

Henry Everard of Linstead, married Katherine, daughter of Thomas Gawdy of Gawdy Hall, Norfolk, 
by whom a son, Thomas Gawdy Everard. 



THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 39 

Frances Richers of Kent, by whom issue. These may have been wives of his 
brother Thomas Gawdy of Redenhall. His legal arguments were reported by Dyer, 
Plowden, and Cole, and the latter terms him "a most reverend judge and sage 
of the law, of ready and profound judgment, and venerable gravity, prudence 
and integrity". For names of children see forward. 

Sir Francis Gawdy® (1), the son of Thomas^ (1), and his third wife, Elizabeth, 
daughter of Robert Shyres, born about 1532 and therefore half-brother of Thomas 
Gawdy, serjeant-at-law, who died in 1566, and o f Thomas Gawdy, Knight. This 
Francis Gawdy was christened by the name Thomas also, but by the advice of all the 
judges his name was changed, 36 reign of Henry VIII. and this name was used in all of 
his grants. He was admitted as a student of the Inner Temple on May 8, 1549, 
being described in the register as of "de Harleston in county Norfolk". He was 
reader there in 1556 and 1557, in which latter year he was elected treasurer. He 
was elected bencher of that society in 1558. He was also, according to Browne Willis, 
returned to parliament for Morpeth the same year. In Michealmas term (1577) 
he was called to the degree of serjeant-at-law, and on May 17, 1582, he was ap- 
pointed Queen's serjeant. In that capacity he opened the case against Mary, Queen 
of Scots, on the occasion of the proceedings against her at Fotheringay, Oct. 14,1586, 
on the charge of complicity in Babbington's conspiracy. He also took part in the 
proceedings against Secretary William Davidson in whose indiscretion in parting 
with the Scottish Queen's death-warrant without express authority, Elizabeth sought 
the means of relieving herself of the odium of the execution. On Nov. 25th, 1589, 
he was appointed justice of the Queen's Bench somewhat against his will, according 
to his nephew, Philip Gawdy. On the death of Sir William Hatton in 1591, he 
was nominated one of the commissioners to hear cases in chancery during the 
vacancy of the oflfice of the chancellor. The first trial in which he took part was 
that of Sir John Perrot in June, 1592. He was a member of the commission that 
sat at York House in June, 1600, for the trial of Essex and was one of the 
advisers of the peers on the trial of Essex for high treason in February, 
1600-1. In 1602 he went to the home circuit with Serjeant Heale, being instructed 
to substitute for capital punishment servitude in the galleys. In letters from his 
nephew, Philip Gawdy, to his brother, Bassingbourne Gawdy, written in 1603, 
Francis Gawdy is said to have disdained to be made a knight, nevertheless his 
name appears in the list of Knights made at Whitehall on July 23, 1603. He was 
a member of the court that tried Sir Walter Raleigh for high treason in November 
1603. He was Lent reader in 1566, and in Lent 1571 he was appointed duplex 
reader and treasurer to the society. Being called to the degree of coif in 1577, 
he was made one of the Queen's Serjeants on May 17th, 1582, and was present at 
Fotheringay on the trial of Mary Queen of Scots, but no duty appears to have 
devolved upon him. On the arraignment of Secretary Davidson in 1587, for 

EAST HALL — This Hall was sold by Sir Roger Townshend in the 16th year of reign of Queen 
Elizabeth to Serjeant Gawdy and he united it to Lovela Manor. Scales Manor was also possessed 
by him. 

NOTE — "In 1588 Sir Thomas Gawdy, Kt., died seized of Poringland Manor and left to his son 
Henry Gawdy. In 1623 Sir Robert Gawdy of Claxton, Knt., had them continued in the family till 
sold by Thomas Gawdy, Esq., when mortgaged to Mr. Crewe. 

1630, May 1. In the will of Drake William Pla\-ters of Norfolk, legacy to one Elizabeth Gawdy. 
In the will of Katherine Playters, July 13, 16.59, "To Elizabeth Gawdy, my old servant, £35 due her 
in wages for divers years. In the will of Anne Playters, June 13, 1699, the witnesses were William 
Gawdy and Francis Gawdy. 

NOTE — Francis Gawdy held Middle Herling of Robert Barney as of his Manor of Bergham by the 
service of half a fee and 50 shillings per annum. In 1564 he purchased Seaford Manor in West 
Herling. All the manors in West Herling, and Gatesthorp, came to the Gawdys. He was buried at 
Herling July 9, 1594. 



40 THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 

forwarding the warrant for that unfortunate lady's execution, he was said to have 
"joined in the solemn farce with as serious a face as any of the other actors." (See 
State Trials, 1, 1173, 1233.) On the death of his brother, Sir Thomas Gawdy, 
he was nominated his successor as judge of the Queen's Bench on Nov. 25th, 1588. 
In none of the criminal trials on which he was a commissioner, either in the reign 
of Queen Elizabeth or of King James, by whom he was continued in his place 
and knighted, is he represented as taking any part except in that of Sir Walter 
Raleigh, when he was made to say, "The statute you speak of concerning two 
witnesses in case of treason is found to be inconvenient, therefore by another law 
it was taken away ". It seems not improbable that he owed his elevation to the bench 
to Elizabeth's favorite Chancellor, whose nephew, Sir William Newport, alias 
Hatton, about six months after it took place, married the judge's only daughter, 
Elizabeth Gawdy. He was also perhaps indebted for his next promotion to the 
marriage of his granddaughter, Frances, the only issue of the above union, to 
Robert Rich, second Earl Warwick. These nuptials were in February 1605 (Nichols 
Hatton, 478,503) and on the 26th of the following August Sir Francis was raised 
to the post of Chief Justice of the Common Pleas. He enjoyed this high position, 
for which he is said to have paid at a dear rate, less than a year. He was stricken 
with apoplexy at his chambers at Serjeant's Inn about Whitsuntide 1606, and 
was taken to his mansion at Easton Hall, Wallington, Norfolk; "but having 
converted the parish church into a hayhouse or dog-kennel, his body was obliged 
to be buried in the neighboring church of Rungton." His wife was Elizabeth, 
the oldest daughter of Christopher Coningsby, son of William Coningsby the 
Judge. Christopher Coningsby Esq. killed in the battle of Muscelburg, Scotland, 
in the first year of the reign of Edward VI. left by Ann, daughter of Sir Roger 
Woodhouse of Kimberly, three daughters and co-heirs and in the right of the 
eldest Francis Gawdy became lord of Easton Hall and Thorpland. In the 20th 
year of the reign of Queen Elizabeth Francis Gawdy bought of Sir Thomas Mild- 
may the manor of Sybeton in this town. Sir Henry Spilman says that having 
this manor in right of his wife he induced her to acknowledge a fine thereof, on 
which she became a distracted woman, and continued so to the day of her death, 
and was to him for many years a perpetual affliction. (See history of Sacrileges 

Thomas Chapman of Saxlington, Norfolk, had livery of the Manor of Thorphall in 1558, after the 
death of Alexander his father, and in 1556 sold it to Thomas Gawdy. 

NOTE — "William Coningsby Esq., slain at the battle of Muscelborongh, Scotland, left by Anne, 
daughter of Sir Roger Woodhouse of Kimberly, three daughters. Elizabeth was married to Francis 
Gawdy, Esq., who in her right became Lord of Eston Hall, and Thorpland. He was the third son of 
Thomas Gawdy, Esq., of Harleston in Norfolk, by his third wife Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas, or, 
as some say, Oliver Shyres and who in the 30th of the reign of Elizabeth was serjeant-at-law, and 
Queen's serjeant, May 17, 15S2, and in the 20th of the reign of said Queen, bought of Sir Thomas 
Mildmay, the manor of Syberton in this town. In 1589 he was made judge of the King's Bench, and 
Aug. 25, 1605, chief Justice of the Common Pleas, being then knighted. He died of apoplexy at 
Serjeants Inn, London, before he had sat one year and was buried in the neighboring church of Rung- 
ton. Sir Henry Spilman says, that having this manor in right of his wife, he induced her to acknowl- 
edge a fine thereof on which she became a distracted woman and continued so to the day of her death. 
He had by her an only daughter and heir, Elizabeth Gawdy who was married to Sir William Hatton, 
who died "also without male issue, and left a daughter and heir, Frances, brought up by her grand- 
father the judge, and was secretly married against his will to Sir Robert Rich, afterwards Earl of 
Warwick. He was suddenly stricken with apoplexy and died without male issue, ere he had continued 
in his office one whole Michaelmas term, and having made his appropriate parish church a hay-house 
or dog-kennel, his corpse being brought from London to Walslngton, could for many days find no place 
of burial, but growing very offensive, he was at last conveyed to the church of Rungton, and buried 
without ceremony with so small a covering as a few paving-stones. No stone was erected over him as 
a memorial and "but for this account it would not have been known that he was buried here. 

"ThLs village with that of Thorpland. thus brought by Judge Gawdy's granddaughter into the War- 
wick family, on the death of Robert Earl of Warsvick (who left three daughters and co-heirs) came 
by marriage to Essex, the third daughter, to Daniel Finch, Earl of Nottingham, who sold it to 
Philip Bell, Esq., from whom it descended to hLs nephew Philip Bell, Esq., whose son was last lord. 
The Hall is the only house now standing, the town having been depopulated by the Judge Gawdy to 
make a park". 



THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 41 

p. 251). He had an only daughter and heir, Elizabeth Gawdy, who was married 
to Sir William Hatton, who also died without male issue but left a daughter and 
heir, Frances Hatton, brought up by her grandfather the Judge, and was secretly 
married to Robert Rich, Earl of Warwick, and on his death, it came by the marriage 
of Essex and the third daughter of Daniel Finch. The Hall was the only house 
standing in 1803, the town having been depopulated by the Judge for the purpose 
of making it a park. See Homes of the English Gawdys in this work. 
5. Thomas Gawdy^ (4), son of Thomas* (3) and Anne, daughter of John Bassing- 
bourne Esq., was styled of "Gawdy Hall in the parish of Redenhall, Norfolk". 
He married Honor, daughter of Walter Steynings of Honeycroft in Somersett, by 
whom he had issue five children, of whom presently. • Thomas, Owen, Ralph, 
Katherine and Mary. The pedigree supplies no dates by which this member of 
the family can be distinguished from the others bearing the same name in the 
biographical section of this work. Some writers assume that this was Thomas 
Gawdy tne Knight. 

S^beirtlj # emratbn . 

1. Bassingbourne Gawdy" (1), eldest son of Thomas® (2), was buried at 
Redenhall, 5th of July 1559, (Parish Registers). 

2. Bassingbourne Gawdy ^ (2), second son of Thomas^ (2) and Anne, daughter of 
John Bassingbourne Esq., was a Knight and was styled "of West Herling in Nor- 
folk". He married Anne, daughter of John Wotten of Tuddington in Norfolk, 
by whom he had issue; second, Margaret Sulyard, widow of Thomas Darcy of 
Tolleshunt-Darcy, Dec, 1588; she buried Aug. 15, 1590. He kept his first court 

NOTE — In 1588, eighteen months after the death of his mother, Anna Wotten, the letters of Philip 
Gawdy show that his father, Bassingbourne Gawdy the elder, married Margaret, widow of Thomas 
Darcy, the daughter of Eustice Syliard of Flemings in Runwell, county Essex. The following from 
one of the letters of Philip Gawdy is significant : "The marriage day is now appointed and not' now 
to fayle, it shall be at Mr. Syliards howse uppon Monday comsennight after the date hereof. . . . 
I have mourning clothes for my father and my uncle Anthony but neither of them can be at the 
funeral for it is at the tyme of the Mariag, and the greater Nayle ever dryves the lesse". The funeral 
here mentioned was that of Sir Thomas Gawdy, the judge, who was buried at Redenhall early in 
December of that year. 



Bassingbourne Family Pedigree. 

* 1. John Bassingbourne married Anne, daughter and heir of Robert Passeley? 

2. Thomas Bassingbourne married Katherine, daughter of Sir .John Say, Kiit. 

3. John Bassingbourne married Ethelra (or Audrey), daughter of Sir Thomas Cotton, County 
Cambridge, Knt., and had issue. 

Anne, daughter and co-heiress, was married to Thomas Gawdy Esq., Serjeant-at-law, Obt. 
Aug. 4, 1558. He also married 2d, Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Robert Le Strange, Knt. of 
Hunstanton, and widow of Sir Hugh Hastings. By first wife he had issue. 

1. Thomas Gawdy married Honor, daughter of Steynings. He was heir. 

2. Sir Bassingbourne Gawdy, Knt. of West Harling, county Norfolk, who died Jan. 28, 
1569. He married Anne, daughter and co-heiress of John Wooten Esq., widow first of Sir 
Thomas Woodhouse, and 2d of Henry Reppes Esq., 1556. 

3. Katherine Gawdy married Henry Everard. 

The Manor of Carmock was in the possession of the family of Bassingbourne in the time of King 
Edward III. On the 15th of July in the 22d year of this king, Warin de Bassingbourne held the 
manor by the demise of Rosamund de Hoe. After her death he held it without any right or title. 
Rosamund held it for her life only, so that after her death the estate should have gone to Robert 
Bassingbourne, son of said Rosamund and the heirs of his body. 

On June 27, 1690, there was a deed by Rev. William H. Sewell of Yaxley, Vicar, for his love for 
the inhabitants of the parish of a certain meadow called Cookes meadow. One of the Granters was 
Bassingbourne Gawdy Esq. to hold in trust. This Bassingbourne Gawdy was Guardian to Henry 
Felton, a minor, Sept. 26, 1626. 

In 1401 Richard de Bukenham held the Priory farmhouse at Rush Hall at a quarter of a fee of the 
heirs of Robert. This was so named for having belonged to the Priory of Buckingham. At the disso- 
lution it went to the Crown, and Queen Mary granted it to Thomas Gawdy. It was afterwards owned 
by .Vnthony Gawdy and Anne his wife, who conveyed it to Sir Bassingbourne Gawdy, Knight. 

She ux Johannis Wotton of Tottingham, Co. Norfolk; 2dlv Thomas Gawdy of Harleston, Serjeant- 
at-law, died 1564, Tuddington. 



42 THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 

at West Herling, and held Middle Herling of Robert Berney as of his Manor of 
Bergham. by the service of half a fee per annum. He was afterwards knighted. In 
1564 he purchased Seaford manor; and then all the manors in West Herling, Mid- 
dle Herling and Gatesthorpe, came to the Gawdy family. He was twice sheriff 
(High) of Norfolk; afterwards until 1654, with continuation until 1675 after the 
death of Sir William Gawdy. He was frequently mentioned in the Gawdy corre- 
spondence. Among the Egerton manuscripts there is, as we find in 1557, a warrant to 
Sir Bassingbourne Gawdy for felling oaks at Middleton Hall, and an agreement of 
his respecting the Hall itself. It appears from the Historical Commitee that the war- 
rant or license as it was then called, was given by the remainder-man under the will 
of Henry Reppes by John Reppes to Bassingbourne Gawdy and that said Gawdy held 
the estate in the right of his wife. Davy says: "After the death of Bassingbourne 
Gawdy and Anne his wife this estate went to the Berdwells". He died 
Jan. 25, 1569, seized of many manors, among them Lisbourne, Homersfield, Rend- 
ham and Drayton Hall. The manor of Lisbourne from Thomas Howard, Duke of 
Norfolk to his grandson Thomas who sold in 1565 to Bassingbourne Gawdy. Suck- 
ling says: "In 1567 James, son of Edward Berdwell, of Wrentham, and heir-male 
of his family released Lisbourne to Bassingbourne Gawdy". Page says the manor 
came to the Gawdys by the marriage of Bassingbourne Gawdy to Anne Wot- 
ten, the heiress of the Berdwells. This marriage of Bassingbourne Gawdy and 
Anne Wotten occurred Sept, 26, 1558, at Redenhall. These had two sons, Bas- 
singbourne and Philip. 

Bloomfield in his History of Norfolk says," Elizabeth-Anne Wooton had three 
husbands. (1) Sir Thomas Woodhouse of Eaxham by whom no issue; (2) Henry 
Reppes of Mendham, Esq. by whom no issue; (3) Bassingbourne Gawdy, 2nd son 
of Thomas Gawdy, sergent-at-law, who kept his first court and held Middle Herling 
of Robert Berney as of his manor of Bergham. In 1564 he purchased Secford 
manor, and then all the manors in West Herling, Middle Herling and Gatesthorp 
came to the Gawdies. This Sir Bassingbourne Gawdy, Knight, died Jan. 25, 1589-90 
seized of all the manors, together with Limbourne, in Homersfield, Rouelham, 
Drayton Hall & Co., leaving two sons, Bassingbourne and Sir Philip, who married 
Bridget Strangman by whom he had Francis his son and heir, who died without 
issue, and five daughters, the last born in 1614. Anne Gawdy was buried at Herling 
July 9, 1594. One author says this Bassingbourne Gawdy was killed in the battle 
of Maestricht, a Dutch city on the Meuse and one of the strongest fortresses 
in Europe. 

NOTE. — The following was found in an English book in the Boston City Library and as it relates 
to the above-mentioned famDy we publish for what it is worth. "The Gawdy wills and pedigrees are 
alike silent on this Anne Gawdy, supposed wife of William Howell and reputed daughter of Thomas 
Gawdy of Harleston by Anne Bassingbourne his second wife. If she ever existed she lived several gen- 
erations later than her husband, for her brother, Thomas Gawdy, and her sister, Katherine Everard, 
were alive in 1581. There was indeed, an Anne Gawdy who did rnarry Hovell alias Smith, 
but she was granddaughter of Anne Bassingbourne and is one of the devisees of Honor Gawdy her 
mother, in her will of May 21, 1601, now in the Probate registry of Ipswich. Robert Hovell alias 
Smith, the husband of Mehitabel Knapp, so far from being heir to William Hovell and the mythical 
Anna Gawdy, was as his widow and children testified officially in 1612, the son of Thomas Hovell 
alias Smith. We read again of Hugh Hovell, the 4th son of Anne Gawdy, who dwelt in Maryland 
and died s. p. 

NOTE — The following was found in an English book in the Boston City Library: "Katherine, 
daughter of Thomas le Strange by Anne, was married 1st to Sir Hugh Hastings of Elsing in the 
countv' of Norfolk ; 2nd to Thomas Gaw'dy. Her sister Elizabeth was married to John Watton of 
Tudenham in the county of Norfolk." Did she become secondly the wife of Thomas Gawdy? 

NOTE — Thomas Gawdy (1569) married Anne, daughter of Edward Bushnell and his wife Anne, 
daughter of Charles Cargrave of Norfolk. 



THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 43 

1. George Gawdy^ (1), son of Thomas*^ (3) and his second wife, daughter of Richen, 
was frequently mentioned in the records of Norfolk. There was a bargain and 
sale by Sir Robert Gawdy of Claxton, Knt., to George Gawdy, Esq. of Norwich, 
of the manors of Saxlington, Nether Hall and Saxlington-Verdon, with all rights, 
liberties etc., of date July 25, 1621. Another bargain and sale by George Gawdy, Esq. 
of Norwich, to Charles Suckling, Esq. of Woodton, the Manor of Saxlington alias 
Saxlington-Netherhall, the advowson of Saxlington-Thorpe, Saxlington-Verdon ex- 
cepting 100 acres of wood, a mill, parcels of meadow etc. of date Sept. 28, 1622. There 
was a grant by George Gawdy, Esq. to William Cougham of Weller-next-the-Sea, 
merchant, the manor of Bacon Hall, with rights and members of the rectory and 
patronage of the church of Dickleborough, of date Jan. 2, 1634. Grant by George 
Gawdy, Esq. joined by Robert Gawdy of Claxton Knt., and Anne, widow of Henry 
Gawdy Esq. to William Castleton Esq. of Badwell, Ash and others of the lordship 
of Shipdam, Shipdam Park, Lords Close and Westaw Wood, with other messu- 
ages and lands. Bargain and sale by George Gawdy of Norwich, Esq. to Matthew 
Weld of Brakenashe, gent., of the manor of Taysburg. I have found no record 
of his marriage or death. 

2. Clispby Gawdy''' (I), second son of Thomas® (3) and wife (daughter of Richen 
or Richess) married Mary, daughter of George Brooke of Aspall, in the county of Suf- 
folk, Esq., who was executrix of the will of her first husband,William Breuse of Little 
Wenham in the county of Suffolk, Esq., mentioned in the will of Thomas Breuse 
22d Feb. 1593-4; supervisor of his father's will, who died Aug. 5, and was buried 
at Little Wenham 8th August, 1599. Will dated 3d August, 1599; proved 10th 
August, 1599, by Mary Breuse his relict. This marriage was at Little Wenham 
28th January, 1599-1600, to Sir Clispby Gawdy, Knight, by whom she had issue 
and was executrix to his will 11th January, 1630-1. His will was dated 24th De- 
cember, 1628; proved 10th February, 1629-30, by Edmund Munderford the son- 
in-law. Soon after 1436 St. Mary's church, Redenhall, Norfolk, passed to Robert 
Clifton, and in 1481 Thomas Breuse was lord in right of his wife Elizabeth. In 
1621 John Breuse sold this Manor of " Hawkers-cum-Shacklocks " to Tobias 
Frere, but it was conveyed in 1627 to Sir Clipsby Gawdy, Knt. and Mary his wife 
and afterwards joined to the Capital Manor. After the Conquest, Rolf Gawder, 
Earl of Norfolk, had Hawkers Manor and gave it to his Hawker or Falconer. In 
1627 John Breuse and Tobias Frere, conveyed it to Clipsby Gawdy, Knt. and 
Mary his wife, and their heirs; and so it became joined to the other manors. On 
Nov. 14th, 1618, there was an Indenture between Sir Clipsby Gawdy of Little 
Wenham, Co. Suffolk, Knight, dame Mary his wife, and John Breuse of Little 
Wenham, Esq., son of Dame Mary of the one part, and Dame Alice Payton of Great 
Bradley, Co. Suffolk, widow of Sir John Payton of Iselham, Co. Cambridge, Knt. 
and Bart., Sir Edward Payton, of Iselham, knight and baronet, and Sir George 
le Hunt of Little Bradley, Co. Suffolk, knight, of the other part. It is agreed 
that in consideration of a marriage shortly to take place between John Breuse 
and Susan Payton, daughter of Dame Alice Payton, and a large sum of money 
received as portion, John Breuse is to place in the hands of Sir Edward Payton 
and Sir George le Hunt the manors of Little Wenham, Overhall, Vauxhall and 
Jermines to be held in trust for the issue of such marriage". With this is the 
signature of Clipsby Gawdy and Mary Gawdy, with the seal of the arms and the 
tortoise. Of date 1629-30 the following was found: "I Mary Lady Gawdy of 
Gawdy Hall, in Redenhall in the county of Norfolk, widowe. To be buried in 
the chappel of Reddenhall church neere my husband Sr. Clippsby Gawdy, Knight. 



44 THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 

Son-in-law Edward Mondeford, esquire, to be guardian of son Thomas Gawdy 
as desired by Lady Frances Gawdy his grandmother deceased. To Frederick 
Tilney and Elizabeth Tilney, the children of Elizabeth my daughter the now wife 
of John Kemp, Esquire £200 each at the age of 21. To my son Thomas Breuse 
(Sir) Knight, my long carpet of Turkey-work of grape-work & co. To my daughter- 
in-law, Lady Susan Breuse, my apron embrothered with gold twist and set with 
gold ores & co. To my cousin, wife of my cousin George Gawdy, 40 s. To Mary, 
Alice, and Penelope, daughters of Sir John Breuse, a green chest and its contents." 
Mentions Elizabeth now wife of Frances Claxton, sometime wife of Thomas 
Breuse Esq.; my aunt Wade, cousin Mr. James Tirrell. This will was witnessed 
by Thomas Gawdy and others, Dated 24th Dec. 1628; proved 10th Feb. 1629-30. 

From the parish registers of Little Wenham the following was copied: 1610, 
June 20, Thomas son of Clippsby Gawdy, Knight, was baptized. 1616, May 
20, Francis, son of Clippsby Gawdy, Knight, and Dame Marie (Mary) his wife, 
was baptized. 

In the Norfolk "Chancery Inquisitions", and the Court of Ward Inquisitions 
Clippsby Gawdy Knt. mentioned as dying in the 18th year of the reign of King 
James I. 

On April 28th in the 15th year of the reign of James I. Sir Clipsby Gawdy of 
Little Wenham, Knt., exchanged land with Christopher Foster, Gent., with a seal 
of Arms, three fleur-de-lis impaling Gawdy. 

In 1609 the manor of Kersey was vested in Clipsby Gawdy and Mary his wife, 
who, in 1614, obtained license to alienate it to Robert Rolf from which it passed 
to his son Robert. 

1. Catherine Gawdy^ (1), daughter of Thomes^ (2) and Anne, daughter of John 
Bassingbourne Esq., was married to Henry Everard of Lynstead in Suffolk by whom 
she had a son named for his great-grandfather, Thomas Gawdy Everard and a 
daughter Katherine the wife of Henry Brampton, son of Thomas and Elizabeth 
(Rockwood) Brampton. There were sixteen children in this family, one being 
Ashley Brampton "who attended to the affairs of Mr. Gawdy of West Herling". 
Gawdy Brampton born in 1589, married Anne Vincent who died between 1654 
and 1656. There are portraits of Gawdy Brampton and his wife Dorothy in Vol. 
18 of the publication of the Norfolk Archiological Society. It appears that this 
Gawdy Brampton had married second, Dorothy, daughter of John Brisco, of Hack- 
ney, in the county of Middlesex, and that she was afterwards married to John 
Bert of London, gentleman. 

1. Elizabeth Gawdy^ (1), was the only daughter of Francis^ (1), and his wife 
Elizabeth, daughter of Christopher Coningsby, who was killed in the battle of 
Mucelburg, Scotland, in the first year of the reign of king Edward VI. and left 
by Ann, daughter of Sir Roger Woodhouse of Kimberly, three daughters and 
co-heirs. She was married to Sir William Hatton alias Newport, and died without 
male issue, but had a daughter and heir, Frances Gawdy, brought up by her grand- 
father the judge, and was secretly married to Robert Rich, Earl of Warwick, and 
on his death, the estate of this family of Gawdy passed to heirs bearing other names. 
1. Thomas Gawdy^ (5), son of Thomas^ (2) and his wife Honor Staynings, 
married Ursula Bolton, daughter of Francis Bolton of Burston, in Norfolk, and had 
issue five children of whom presently. He was styled "Thomas Gawdy of 
Waybred". 



THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 45 

2. Owen Gawdy' (3), second son of Thomas' (2) and his wife Honor Staynings, 
married Frances Bolton, daughter of Francis Bolton of Burstonin Norfolk, sister of 
Ursula his brother's wife. 

3. Ralph Gawdy^ (3), third son of Thomas' (2) and his wife Honor Staynings, 
died sine prole. 

4. Catherine Gawdy^ (2), daughter of Thomas' (2) and his wife Honor Stayn- 
ings. 

5. Mary Gawdy^ (3), daughter of Thomas' (2) and his wife Honor Staynings. 

1. Bassingboume Gawdy* (2), son of Bassingbourne^ (1), gentleman, deceased, 
of West Harling, Norfolk, born in Gelderland (Teile in Geldria'). He was educated 
at St. Edmunds, under Mr. Stephenson for three years; and at Gresshall, under 
table, Jan. 22, 1648-9. His surety was a Mr. Foster. He obtained a pass to 
France, Oct. 15, 1657, with a son of the Earl of Desmond, and two ser\'ants. See 
Calendar of State Papers. The will of this Bassingboume Gawdy was proved 
at Bury St. Edmunds in 1692. According to Davy (Suffolk Pedigrees) his father 
was killed at the siege of Maestricht, of 1652. Another writer has said he was 
29 years of age at the death of his father Jan. 25, 1669. If the latter statement 
be correct he was born in 1640. This Bassingboume Gawdy Esq. held West- 
Herling of the Earls of Arundel; Middle-Herling of the Queen, as of her honour 
of Richmond, at half a fee; Seaford of the dissolved Abby of Bury, at three shillings 
rent yearly; Draton-Hall of Lady Morley, and Gasthorpe of Philip Knevit. He 
was thrice Sheriff of Norfolk, viz. 1573, when he was esquire only, and 1593, 
when he was a Knight, and in 1601. He was twice married. His first wife was 
Anne, daughter of Sir Charles Framlingham of Denbenham, by Dorothy his 
wife, the daughter of Sir Clement Heigham, Knt., to whom married May 17, 1586. 
She was an heiress and brought the whole estate of Framlingham, viz., the Mfinor 
of Crowes Hall, Sceotneys, Harborough, and Denbenham, with the advowsons, 
Mandeville Manor in Stemfield, Abbits Hall, and Ashfield manor and advowson. 
Sir Charles Framlingham outlived her, and died July 23, 1594, leaving Framling- 
ham Gawdy, his grandson, his sole heir. By this wife he had two sons. His second 
wife was Dorothy, daughter of Sir Nicholas Bacon of Redgrave, who held Gas- 
thorpe Manor for life; and after his decease, she was married to Sir Henry Pelton 
of Fakenham. She died Feb. 1, 1653, and was buried at West Harling by the side 
of her first husband who died May 23, 1606, leaving two sons and two daughters. 

On November 27, 1563, John Reppes (brother of Henry Reppes, deceased) 
of Walpole in Marshlands, to Bassingboume Gawdy. He asks a loan of £5, 6s, 8d. 
and enclosed his bill for 20 marks. Sends a crane with two mallards which is 
all the fowl they can get, it is so scarce. Has spoken for Knot, which will cost 
5 shillings the dozen. These fowl are commonly taken at Terrington, where 
has been such great loss of sheep, owing to the last storm breaking their banks, 
that the fowlers have no time to lay for fowl. Thanks for the "cheese-fatt" 
and cheese. 

2. Philip Gawdy* (1), second son of Bassingboume^ (1) and Anna, daughter of 
Sir Charles Framlingham, Knt., was bom at West Harling (baptized) July 13, 1562. 
He went to London with his elder brother, Bassingboume Gawdy, and was ad- 
mitted to the Inner Temple in November, 1578. They took up their residence 



46 THE GAIVDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 

at Cliffords Inn the following May as proven by a letter from Bassingbourne. 
While in London this Philip Gawdy wrote numerous letters to his father, mother, 
brothers, sisters and other members of the family, in which much information 
had been gleaned concerning the relationship and family conditions. This cor- 
respondence also reveals much of the character of the writer. He expresses 
great affection for his parents and especial filial regard for his mother and a will- 
ingness to conform to her teachings concerning his moral conduct and choice of 
companions while absent from home. He was a volunteer in 1591, going with 
the fleet of seven ships under command of Lord Thomas Howard for the purpose 
of intercepting the Spanish ships from the Indies. He was on board the " Revenge " 
when, after an engagement with 15 Spanish ships, and among the English prisoners 
at the surrender of that ship. A letter written by him Feb. 9, 1592, shows that 
he was in Lisborn Castle. He was ransomed by the payment of £200 by his 
brother Bassingbourne. From a Herald visitation we learn that he married 
Bridget Strangeman, evidently the daughter of Bartholomew Strangeman of 
Hadleigh who died in 1580. This alliance did not bring Philip Gawdy any estate 
and he constantly complained of the contrast between his lot and that of his more 
fortunate brother who had married a daughter of Sir Nicholas Bacon of Redgrave. 
He was a member of Parliament continuously from 1588, when he was returned 
from Thetford, representing Eye in 1593-7, and 1597-1601 for Thetford again. 
In the last Parliament of Queen Elizabeth he sat for Sudbury. There are reasons 
for believing that he sat for Eye or some other borough of which the returns are 
missing, for in his letter of July 3, 1604, he says, "This night a hundred of the 
best of us of the parliament house made a great supper at Merchant Taylers Hall". 
From an old bond given by Framlingham Gawdy and Charles Gawdy it appears 
that an arrangement had been made for Phillip Gawdy to visit Jerusalem, but 
it is claimed that he did not go to Palestine. In the Gawdy Correspondence it 
appears that he had an annual income from the estate at Harling and mentions 
his "rents" which he asks to be forwarded to him in London. He also mentions 
his horses which were to be sent to him that he may ride "gallantry". He was 
frequently entrusted with commissions for the purchase of articles for the different 
members of the Gawdy family. He had one son, Francis Gawdy, who died without 
issue, and five daughters, the last of them born in 1614. He was buried at St. 
Dunstans in London, May 30, 1617. 

CHILDREN OF PHIUP AUD BRIDGET STRANGMAU GAWDY. 

1. Francis Gawdy^ (2), eldest son of Philip' (1) and Bridget (Strangman) Gawdy, 
was living in 1649. He died without issue. He was heir. 

2. Rev. Anthony Gawdy^ (2), son of Philip' (1) and Bridget (Strangman) Gawdy. 
Was sent to school at Boteddale, Suffolk, under Mr. Frules and at Bio Norton, 
Suffolk, under Mr. Wright. His age was 18 years. He was admitted to college as 
pensioner, March 21, 1620-1. His Surity and tutor was Mr. Mitchell, fellow. He 
was B.A. 1625-6. Scholar Michaelmass, 1622 to L. Day 1627. He was deprived 
for assaulting the dean, who had struck him. He was ordained a priest Feb. 21, 
1629-30 Was rector at Garboldsham, Norfolk, 1634-7; of Sternfield, Suffolk, 
1652, and curator vicar of Aspall, Suffolk, 1632-1652. He was buried at Aspall, 
March 8, 1652-3. His wife Margaret died in 1649. His father had some venture 
at sea in the ship "Revenge" under Sir Richard Grenville. 



THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 47 



[til of g^nt^oniT (iahj!trg. 



Abstract of the will of Rev. Anthony Gawdy, son of Philip Gawdy and his wife 
Bridget Strangman, by whom there were two sons and four daughters. The name 
of this man's wife is not known; she was probably deceased at the time this will 
was made as he mentions only his sister Dorothy and his three daughters Mary, 
Alice, and Margaret. 

"To Mary Gawdy, Alice Gawdy, and Margaret Gawdy, my daughters, all 
my lands lying in Garblesome in the county of Norfolk, to be equally divided 
between them. Also the revercon of all those lands, tenements and herredita- 
ments wherein one Henry Cushion now dwelleth, being in Keninggale in the 
Countie of Norfolk aforesaid, of the value of £14 a yeare, from and after the death 
of Dorothy Gawdy of Keninggale, spinster, to be equally divided between them. 
To Jane Flott, my servant, 40 shillings. 

Residuary Legatees and Executrixes: — My said three daughters, Mary 
Gawdy, Alice Gawdy and Margaret Gawdy. 

Overseers: — Framlingham Gawdy Esq., Mr. Richard Woodward and Dor- 
othy Gawdy, my sister. 

Witnesses: — Joh: Stonnard, Robert Newson, Cor: Holmes. 
Proved 10 June 1653 by Mary Gawdy, now the wife of Thomas Rous, 
one of the Executrixes named, power reserved to Alice Gawdy and Margaret 
Gawdy the other executrixes." 

3. Bridget Gawdy' (2), eldest daughter of Philip* (1) and Bridget (Strangman) 
Gawdy, is mentioned in the family pedigree. 

4. Dorothy Gawdy' (3), second daughter of Philip* (1) and Bridget (Strangman) 
Gawdy, was mentioned in the will of her brother Rev. Anthony Gawdy in the 
year 1652, and probably unmarried. 

5. Elizabeth Gawdy (3), third daughter of Philip* (1) and Bridget (Strangman) 
Gawdy, is mentioned in the family pedigree. 

6. Mary Gawdy (3), fourth daughter of Philip* (1) and Bridget (Strangman) 
Gawdy, is mentioned in the family pedigree. 

7. Lettice Gawdy (2), fifth daughter of Philip* (1) and Bridget (Strangman) 
Gawdy, is mentioned in the family pedigree. Bom 1614. 

CHILDRBN OF ANTHONY AND MABGARKT GAWDY. 

1 . Mary Gawdy^" (1 ) .eldest daughter of Anthony' (2) and Margaret, was mentioned 
as one of the executors of her father's will in 1652 and one of the legatees to lands 
in Garblesome in Norfolk. Wife of Thomas Rous. 

StemGeld. In one document this was called Mandeville in SternGeld. In the year 1546 this 
manor had passed to the Framlingham family and was held by Francis Framlingham who died in 
1544, when it passed to his son and heir, Sir Charles Framlingham who died in 1595, when this 
manor passed to his grandson, Framlingham Gawdy, who married Lettice, daughter and heir of Sir 
Robert Knolls. Thus was Sterrifield brought to the Gawdy family by Anne Framlingham and so passed 
down to Rev. Anthony Gawdy, who by his will of 1652 conveyed it to his three daughters. 

NOTE — We shall see in another place that Anthony Gawdy married a Parker. The record reads 
as follows : "Anthony Gawdy of St. Margarets, Westminster, Esq., bachelor, about 32, and dame Wine- 
fred Parker, widow of the third baronet of Gemston Hall, Timley, Suffolk, about 30, at Timley 15 
Dec. 1665. This record would make his birth in 1642. The Anthony Gawdy Esq. whose epitaph will 
appear elsewhere died March 30, 1642, consequently could not have been identical with the Anthony 
mentioned above. In the will of Nathan Parker of East Berghault, county of Suffolk, dated Aug. 
5, 1684, he mentions "My nephew-in-law Anthony Gawdy Esq. and my godson Anthony Gawdy, son 
of the aforesaid and his sister Winefred Gawdy". This would indicate that the wife of Anthony Gawdy 
Esq. was his niece, and that by her he had a son bearing his name ; hence several Anthony Gawdys. 



48 THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 

2. Alice Gawdyi" (1), second daughter of Anthony* (2) and Bridget, was a legatee 
to lands in Garblesome and one of the executors of the will. 

3. Margaret Gawdy^" (1), third daughter of Anthony' (2) and Bridget, was men- 
tioned as one of the legatees of her father's will to lands in Garblesome in 1652. 

1. Sir Henry Gawdy® (1), eldest son of Thomas' (2) and his wife Etheldreda, 
daughter of William Knightly, of Norwich, was a knight of the Bath and was 
styled "of Claxton". His first wife was the daughter of Richardson and widow 
of Charles Framlingham. He married second, Elizabeth, daughter of Robert War- 
ner, Esq., of Milden Hall. 

Benhall St. was granted by Queen Elizabeth to Sir Thomas Gawdy and The- 
ophulas Adams. Henry Gawdy, eldest son and heir of this Sir Thomas, jointly 
with the said Adams, conveyed the manor Nov. 7, 1595, to Nicholas Jefferson 
and George Leicester. 

He was created a Knight of the Bath on the coronation of King James I. 
June 19, 1566, and was Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk during the 6th year of 
the reign of that monarch. In 1566 he and his father purchased the Manor 
of Claxton in Norfolk. By an inquisition post mortem on Nov. 5, 1587, on the 
death of his father this Henry Gawdy, son and heir, was 36 years of age, con- 
sequently he was born in 1551. In 1609 Sir Henry Gawdy, Knight of Claxton, and 
other inhabitants of Saxlingham (who had purchased several parcels of the demeans) 
were found to hold Verdon Manor at one fee of Forest Manor. In 1636 Sir Henry 
Gawdy and Sir William Paulet had this estate, and afterwards it belonged to 
Judge Gawdy in whom all the manors and advowsons were joined. He was patron 
of Saxlingham-Thorp in 1608 when Robert Robinson, the rector, certified that 
there were 147 communicants in the parish. On the 12th of October in the 33d 
of the reign of Queen Elizabeth, Ramsey Abbots, or Popenhow Manor, was conveyed 
by Richard Catlyn of Honingham, Esq. to Sir Henry Gawdy of Claxton in Norfolk. 
On Sept. 30th 1618 Grant by Sir Henry Gawdy of Claxton, Knt., to Sir Robert Gaw- 
dy, Knt. his son and heir apparent, of a capital messuage called Ledleyes with houses, 
lands, pastures &c. in the parishes ofSoowood and others to the use of Edward Gawdy, 
youngest son of Sir Henry, and Frances his wife and their heirs. Wolveston Manor 
passed to Henry Gawdy from his father at his death Nov. 1, 1588, he being then 36 
years of age. On his father's death Wybred Manor went in dower to his widow, dame 
Frances Gawdy, for life and then to his son Henry of Wybred. He was a M.P. 
in 1608; died in 1620. By Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Warner, he had (besides 
six other sons and daughters) Robert (Sir) of whom more presently. 

On Feb. 18, 1592-3, conveyance by Robert Sallison Esq. of Laughtoune in 
Lincoln to Henry Gawdy Esq. of Claxton, and a moiety of the Manor of Saxling- 
ham- Netherhall, with lands and tenements & co. He was 73 at time of death. 

2. Thomas Gawdy* (6), second son of Thomas^ (3) and Etheldreda, daughter of 
William Knightley of Norwich. 

Thomas Gawdy of Claxton in Norfolk, Bachellor, about 21, and Anne Gibbs 
of Norwich in said county. Spinster about 17, with consent of her father, Thomas 
Gibbs of Furnivale Inn, Gentleman, at St. Clements, Danes, was married July 12, 
1662. 

3. Anne Gawdy* (1), eldest daughter of Thomas^ (3) and Etheldreda, daughter 
of William Knightley of Norwich, was married to Thomas Reede in Suffolk, the 
son of John and Ursula (Cooke) Reede. She was the mother of Clipsby Read 



THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 49 

of London, Grocer, being the third son. She had also Henry Read, Edward Read, 
Audry Read and Dorothy Read. Audry Read was married to Astley Brampton 
of the Exchequer. 

4. Isabel Gawdy' (1), daughter of Thomas' (3) and Etheldreda, daughter of 
William Knightley, of Norwich, and his co-heir, was married to John Mingay of 
Armingall, in Norfolk. The following funeral Certificate of John Mingay is of inter- 
est : Gawdy arms with those of Mingay. "John Mingay of Armingdale in the county 
of Norfolk, Gent., departed this mortal life at Armingdale, 6th of October, 1622, and 
was interred without escutcheon in ye chancel of the parish church of St. Stephen, 
in the city of Norwich, with gravestone as yet without inscription. He was the 
eldest son of William Mingay, mayor of the city of Norwich, Anno the 4th of 
Elizabeth, 1561, and of Jane his wife, the daughter of Stephen Greene, mayor of 
Norwich Anno 23d of Henry VHI. 1529. He married Isabel, one of the daughters 
of Sir Thomas Gawdy, Knight, one of the Judges of the King's Bench, and had 
issue, Thomas, Henry, and Frances." 

5. Juliana Gawdy^ (1), a daughter of Thomas' (3) and Etheldreda, daughter 
of William Knightley of Norwich, was married to Sir Thomas Berney of Redham, 
Co. Norfolk, Knt., by whom two sons, William and John Berney. 

6. Elizabeth Gawdy* (2), a daughter of Thomas' (3) and Etheldreda, daughter 
of William Knightley of Norwich. 



1. Henry Gawdy* (2), eldest son of Thomas' (5) and Ursula Bolton, married 
a daughter of — Rushbrook of Suffolk and settled in Ireland where his posterity 
flourished. See the Gawdy family in Ulster, Ireland. 

2. Francis Gawdy* (2), second son of Thomas' (5) and Ursula Bolton. 

3. Thomasine Gawdy* (1), daughter of Thomas' (5) and Ursula Bolton. 

4. Daughter Gawdy* (0), daughter of Thomas' (5) and Ursula Bolton. 

5. Daughter Gawdy* (0), daughter of Thomas' (5) and Ursula Bolton. 

NOTE — Sir Henry Gawdy purchased for twelve pounds and two shillings a "Jerkin" and two "Jer- 
fawcans". A valuable hawk ranked amongst a country gentleman's most cherished possessions in 
Norfolk, large sums of money being often paid for them. 

NOTE — In the will of William Firmage of date 1st of November 1621, he gave to his sister Gawdy 
£40 and a watch. To nephews Thomas and Edward Gawdy each £20. and to Edward Gawdy a 
"ring of gold". 

NOTE — Anne Gawdy, daughter of Thomas Gawdy of Claxton in county Norfolk, was married to 
Sir Thomas Jenkinson, Knight of the Bath. 

NOTE— "Anthony Gawdy of S. Margarets, Westminster, Esq., Bachellor about 32 and Dame Wine- 
fred Parker (Barker?), widow of the third baronet of Guemston Hall, Co. Suffolk, about 30, at 
Trimley, Dec. 15, 1665. 

In the time of Queen Elizabeth Rockford Hall Manor was vested in Thomas Gawdy, and among the 
Chancery Papers during her reign there was record of an action by Anthony Paennyge against 
Anthony Gawdy and others to set aside a claim to an annuity out of the plaintiff's Manor of Rock- 
ford (may have been Brockford) which Anthony Gawdy claims as charged thereon. 

The Mansion House of Wamhill (a farm house) was probably built in the time of Queen Elizabeth, 
in 1592, by Henry Warner, who bought the great tithes and advowson of the Vicarage of Sir Francis 
Gawdy, Knight. An interesting description of this house may be seen in "Manors of Suffolk", Vol. IV. 



so THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 

CHIIiDREN OF HESTRIT AITD EL.IZABETH VTARN^R. 

1. Sir Robert Gawdy' (3), eldest son of Henry^ (1) and his wife Elizabeth, 
daughter of Robert Warner Esq., married Winnefred, daughter of Nicholas Bacon 
of Stokeby, Norfolk, by whom issue, son Thomas Gawdy. 

2. George Gawdy' (2), second son of Henry^ (1) and Elizabeth, daughter of 
Robert Warner, Esq. 

3. Sir Anthony Gawdy' (2), third son of Henry^ (1) and Elizabeth, daughter 
of Robert Warner, Esq. He was a knight. He is mentioned as "Sir Anthony 
Gawdy" in the records. Only by the few dates found can we distinguish between 
this man and the other of the same name. The records of the Prerogative Court 
of Canterbury contain the will of this Rev. Anthony Gawdy, styled "of Sternfield, 
Suffolk, Clerk," and is of date Jan. 6, 1653. Lands in Norfolk. Will proved 
June 10, 1652-3 by Mary Gawdy, daughter (and then the widow) of Thomas 
Rouse Pr. daughters of Alice Gawdy and Margaret Gawdy. His name figures 
frequently in the documents and history of Norfolk county, England. He seems 
to have married one Winefred Parker. During the reign of Queen Elizabeth, 
Rockford Hall Manor was vested in Thomas Gawdy, and among Chancer proceed- 
ings in the time of the same Queen there was an action by Anthony Pennynge 
against Anthony Gawdy, and others, to set aside a claim to an annuity out of the 
plantiflf's manor of Rockford which Anthony Gawdy claimed as charged thereon. 
In the will of Nathan Parker of East Berghoult, county Suffolk, of date Aug. 5, 
1684, he mentions "My nephew-in-law, Anthony Gawdy Esq. and my godson 
Anthony Gawdy son of foresaid Anthony and his sister Winefred Gawdy". 
Grant by Anthony Gawdy of London, Gent., of the annuity of ;^20 granted by 
Thomas Woodhouse Esq. of Hicklinge. Bargain and sale by Anthony Gawdy, Knt., 
of Claxton. Anthony Gawdy of St. Margarets, Westminster, Esq. Bachelor, about 
32, and Dame Winefred Parker, widow of the third Baronet of Grimes Hall, of 
Trimely, Co. Suffolk, about 30, at Trimley, Dec. 15, 1665". The records of the 
Prerogative Court of Canterbury contains the will of Anthony Gawdy of Stern - 
field, Suffolk, Clerk, dated Jan. 6, 1653. 

INSCRIPTION 

ANTHONY GAWDY, KNIGHT. 
DECEASED MARCH 30th, 1652. 
Virtue, Justice, Goodness, Grace 
Are all interred within this place. 
With this good Knight so good was Fame 
That now in Heaven most glorious his Name 
Wheather he has gone to Christ his rock 
To sing Halaluias with His Celestial Flock. 



NOTE — Mrs. Lettice Gawdy, "a stranger", was buried at Bath Abbey, March 28, 1631. See her 
place in the pedigree. 

NOTE — A general certificate of all the forces and bands both of horses and of foot within the 
county of Norfolk 1626, Sir Robert Gawdy, Knight of the Hundred of Lodden, GO pikes, 90 muskets, 
250 pounds powder, 450 matchlocks, 200 bullets, 18 pioners, 4 carriages, 150 soldiers. 




^ in 

>• c 

P 



THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 51 



Stintlj ^entratioit. 



CHIIiDREN OF BASSINGB0T7RNE AND ANNE FRAMIilNGHAM. 

1. Framlinghani Gawdy'(l), eldest son of Bassingbourne^ (2) and his first wife, 
Anne, daughter of Sir Charles Framlingham, Knt., of Crows Hall, in Denbenham, 
by Dorothy, daughter of Sir Clement Heigham, Knt. He was born Aug. 8, 1589, 
married Lettice, daughter and co-heir of Sir Robert Knowles, Knt., who was his 
guardian and as such kept court in 1606, and by her who was buried at West Harl- 
ing Dec. 3, 1630, had six sons and two daughters. He was buried Feb. 25, 1654. 
On the death of Sir Charles Framlingham Ashfield Manor and Thorpe passed to 
this grandson. He was succeeded by his son of whom hereafter. Sir Drue Drurey 
gave security of Montfort Manor to Framlingham Gawdy, Esq., to indemnify 
himself and his heirs against any claims that should be made for any part of £10 
out of the said demeans, fold-courses, or barley-rents, which were conveyed to the 
said Framlingham Gawdy who in 1629 sold off 40 combs, 3 bushels, 2 pecks and 
a half to Richard Pead. This estate continued with the Gawdy family till Sir 
Bassingbourne Gawdy, the last of the name, or his executors, sold it to Robert 
Haylet. This same Sir Drue Drurey sold Bois's alias Up Hall to Framlingham 
Gawdy Esq. in which the estate continued till Sept. 14, 1666, and then Sir William 
Gawdy of West Harling settled all his property on Mary his only daughter to raise 
£2500 for her fortune, and made Framlingham Gawdy Esq. her uncle, Executor, 
who sold the Garbolderham lands to Wentworth Gurneys Esq. of Boyland Hall 
in Moning Thorpe, whose heirs enjoyed it till 1736. 

2. Sir Charles Gawdy^ (1), second son of Bassingbourne* (2) and his first 
wife Anne, daughter of Sir Charles Framlingham, Knt. of Crows Hall, in Denben- 
ham, by Dorothy, daughter of Sir Clement Heigham, Knt. He was born in 1591; 
married Judith, daughter of Sir William Waldegrave of Smallbridge, by whom 
issue a son who became the head of the Baronial family styled "of Crows Hall." 

In 1627 he served the office of Sheriff for Norfolk and was afterwards appointed 
one of the deputy-lieutenants of the county by a commission from Henry Earl 
of Northamton, then Lord Lieutenant. He sat in Parliament for Thetford, 
Norfolk, 1620-21, 1623-4, 1625-6, and 1640, and through the "Long Parliament." 
He was buried by the side of his wife who had been buried at West Harling Dec. 

3. 1630. He left "Notes of what passed in Parliament 1641, 1642", preserved 
in the British Museum, London. Several of his and his wife's letters are in the 
same place. 

3. Bassingbourne Gawdy' (3), third son of Bassingbourne^ (2) and his second 
wife, Dorothy, daughter of Sir Nicholas Bacon of Redgrave, who afterwards was 
married to Sir Henry Felton and died at Fakenham, Feb. 1, 1563. He died sine 
prole and was buried in West Harling in 1650. 

4. Bacon Gawdy' (1), was the fourth son of Bassingbourne* (2) and his 
second wife, Dorothy, daughter of Sir Nicholas Bacon of Redgrave, who after- 
wards was married to Sir Henry Pelton. This son died sine prole and was buried 
in the church or chapel at West Harling in 1650. 

NOTE — Anne Bacon, daughter of Sir Nicholas Bacon of Stiffkey Hall in Norfolk, was married to 
Sir Thomas Townsend, Knight, to whom the estate descended. When Sir Nicholas Bacon placed the 
inscription in the church in anticipation of his own death and fo preserve the remembrance, as con- 
nected with himself, of his children, Ladv Townsend had been a widow for some years ; her husband's 
tragic death in 1603 was the result of a" duel. He left two children, the eldest a boy eight years ol 
age. She survived her husband 27 years. 



52 THE GAIVDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 

5. Dorothy Gawdy' (1), was the second daughter of Bassingbourne* (2) by 
his second wife Dorothy, daughter of Sir Nicholas Bacon, Knt. of Redgrave, who 
was afterwards married to Sir Henry Pelton. She died young unmarried and was 
buried in West Hading in 1659. 

6. Frances Gawdy' (1), was the third daughter of Bassingbourne' (2) and his 
second wife, Dorothy, daughter of Sir Nicholas Bacon, Knt., of Redgrave, who was 
afterwards married to Sir Henry Pelton, Knt. Like her sister this young woman 
died unmarried and was buried in West Harling in 1626. 

CHILJ>R£N OF FRAMLINGHAM AND LETTICE GA"WDY. 

1. Sir William Gawdy^" (3), eldest son of Framlingham' (1) by Lettice, daughter 
of Sir Robert Knowles, Gentleman, was born at West Harling, in Norfolk, 1613; 
entered the school at Bury St. Edmunds under Mr. Dickenson when seven years 
of age, remaining for five years. He was admitted fellow commoner, April 30, 

1629. Security Mr. Eada. He was B.A. 1631-2. Admitted at the Inner Temple, 
Feb. 4, 1633-4. Was created a baronet July 13, 1663. He married Elizabeth, 
daughter of John Dufitield, Gentleman, of East Wrentham, in Norfolk, and by 
her who was buried June 10, 1663, had issue four sons and one daughter. Previous 
to creation as a baronet he had been only an esquire. (I think there may be some 
mistake about this William Gawdy. A William was buried in the body of the 
Temple Church on the Inner Temple side, upon Wednesday night, being the 20th 
February, 1660-1.) 

2. Framlingham Gawdy^" (2), second son of Framlingham^ (I) by Lettice, 
daughter of Sir Robert Knowles, was born at West Harling, Norfolk; was sent 
to Bury St. Edmunds school under Mr. Dickenson for seven years. His age was 
seventeen years. He was admitted pensioner to the bachellor's table, Jan. 31, 

1630. Security Mr. Eade. He was admitted to the Inner Temple May 3, 1634. 
He lived at Bury St. Edmunds. By his father's will proved in the Prerogative 
Court of Canterbury, he received £1400. See William Gawdy, 1629. He died 
of small pox at his lodgings in the Inner Temple and was buried in the body of 
the Temple church upon Wednesday night, being the 7th February, 1660-1. 

3. Bassingbovime Gawdy^" (4), son of Framlingham* (1) by Lettice, daughter 
of Sir Robert Knowles. Gentleman, was born at West Harling in 1 614; was sent 
to school at Bury St. Edmunds, under Mr. Dickenson seven years. Admitted 
April 19, 1632. His age was 17 years. Pensioner to the bachellor's table. Security 
Mr. Eade. He was the third son. Inherited by his father's will, proved in the 
Prerogative Court of Canterbury (1656) lands in Sternfield, Suflfolk. He died 
unmarried, of small pox, while at the Inner Temple and was buried on Monday 
night, being the 25th February, 1660-1, in the body of the Temple church. 

4. Thomas Gawdy^" (4), fourth son of Framlingham^ (1) by Lettice, daughter 
of Sir Robert Knowles, Gentleman, was born at West Harling, 1617, in Norfolk; 
was sent to school at Bury St. Edmunds under Mr. Dickenson for five years. His 
age was 18 years. His security Mr. Moore. He was admitted to the scholars 
table May 16, 1636. He died unmarried. He had inherited a messuage In Stern- 
field, Suffolk, by his father's will, proved in the Prerogative Court at Canterbury, 
J une 16, 1656. See William Gawdy, 1629. 

5. Charles Gawdy^" (2), fifth son of Framlingham' (1) by Lettice, daughter of 
Sir Robert Knowles, Gentleman, was born at West Harling 1618, in Norfolk; 



THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 53 

was sent to school under Mr. Ward at Thetford five years. His age was 17 years. 
He was admitted to the scholars table July 2, 1637. Security Mr. Moor. He was 
in some way crippled or disabled and did not long remain in college. 

6. Robert Gawdyi" (2), sixth son of Framlingham» (1) by Lettice, daughter of 
Sir Robert Knowles, Gentleman, was born at West Herling 1620; was sent to 
school at Thetford under Messrs. Smith and Ward, seven years. His age was 16 
years. He was admitted to the scholars table Feb. 4, 1638-9. Security Mr. 
Moore. He was B.A. 1642; M.A. 1646. Scholar Christi 1639 to Michaelmas 
1645. 

7. Lettice Gawdyi" (2), eldest daughter of Framlingham' (1) by Lettice, daughter 
of Sir Robert Knowles, Gentleman. Died Feb. 8, 1622. 

8. Anne Gawdy^" (3), second daughter of Framlingham^ (1) by Lettice, daughter 
of Sir Robert Knowles, Gentleman. Died June 29, 1622. 

Robert Gawdy died in 1639. By Winefred, daughter and co-heir of Nathaniel 
Bacon of Stiflfkey, he had George and Henrj', both of whom died during his lifetime, 
and Dorothy, daughter and heir, who was married to Sir Philip Parker of Erwarton, 
Suffolk. 

1. Sir Charles Gawdyi" (2), was the son of Charles^ (1) and Judith, daughter 
of Sir William Waldegrave of Smallbridge, and was created a baronet April 20, 
1661. He married Vere, daughter and co-heir of Sir Edward Cooke, of Gedde 
Hall, Essex, by whom there were four sons and one daughter. See forward. 
He had been knighted some time before his creation as baronet. He died Nov. 10, 
1650. There was a brass plate in the vault of the chancel of the parish church 
containing the following inscription: 

"This is the body of Charles Gawdy, Knt., sonne and heire to Charles Gawdy 
of Crows Hall, in the county of Norfolk, Knt., who in his lifetime was blessed 
in the choice of a most virtuous wife by name Vere Cooke, the youngest of the 
two daughters and co-heirs of Edward Cooke of Guildhall in the county of Essex, 
Knt. ; a lady to say no more, severely modest and of a most pure and unblemished 
conjugal affection; by her he left a hopeful issue, five sonnes and one daughter". 
He lived and died a zealous professor of the Reformed Religion, settled and 
established in the Raygne of Elizabeth by act of Parliament. A lover of Mon- 
archy and of an undaunted loyalty to his Soverayne, Charles First; which he fre- 
quently manifested by espousing his cause and quarrel to the uttermost hazard 
of his life and fortune. Having sojourned heire the space of thirty-eight years, 
or thereabouts, the 10th of November, 1650, being the Lords daye, about twelve 
at night, he departed. I cannot say he died; for by a voluntary, cheerful and 
devout resignation of himself into the hands of the Almighty (to the astonish- 
ment of the beholders) though hee prevented not the stroke yet hee felt not 
the bitterness of death". 

Above this inscription were the arms of the family, for a description of which 
see "Family Heraldry" in this work. 

On Oct. 6th, 1646, he was fined as a delinquent at Goldsmith Hall in the sum 
of £1789, by the Commissioners of Composition with such purchased for increase 
of maintenance, to the Minister of Ashfield, Thorpe, Denbenham, and Kenton 
to settle the Rectory and tithes, valued at £150 per annum; for which was de- 
ducted £1,260, which reduced it to £529. The estate fell to his son and heir. See 
forward. 



54 THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 

(iBlcbcntb feneration. 

•J 

CHIU>REN OF WILLI AM AND ELIZABETH DTJFFIELD. 

2. Sir John Gawdy" (3), second son of William^" (2) and Elizabeth, daughter 
of John Dufifield, Gent., of East Wrentham, succeeded to the baronetcy on the 
death of his father in 1666. He was born Oct. 4, 1639. This gentleman was a 
mute, but was possessed with remarkable ability and attained to no small degree 
as a painter. He was described by one writer as "a very handsome person and 
a very fine artist. He was so civil and well bred that it was impossible to discover 
any imperfection in him". He was very "intelligent by signs" and exhibited 
great perception and alertness. He married Anne, second daughter and co-heir 
of Sir Robert de Grey of Martin, Knight, in the county of Norfolk, and Elizabeth his 
wife by whom he had issue, a son and daughter. He died in 1699. See forward. 
He sold the Manor of Abbots Hall with the advowson for £400 to William Johnson. 

3. William Gawdy" (3), third son of William^" (2) and Elizabeth, daughter of 
John Dufifield, Gent., of East Wrentham, died unmarried. 

4. Framlingham Gawdy" (3), fourth son of William^" (2) and Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of John Dufifield, Gent., was of the Bury School. 

5. Anne Gawdy" (3), only daughter of William^" (2) and Elizabeth, daughter 
of John Dufifield, Gent., died unmarried. 

CHILDREN OF CHARLES AND VERE (COOKE) GAWDY. 

1. Sir Charles Gawdy^^ (3), was the son and heir of Charles^" (2), by Vera, 
daughter and co-heir of Sir Edward Cooke of Gedde Hall, Essex. He married first, 
Mary, daughter of George Fielding, Earl Desmond, by Bridget, daughter and co- 
heir of Sir Michael Stanhope; she was born Sept. 8, 1791, at Denbenham. He 

married second Elizabeth . Having sold the estate of Crows Hall, he was 

buried at Romford with his mother's family. His will was made April 15, 1699; 
proved Jan. 10, 1710-11. In 1699 he mentions his wife Elizabeth as being in 
Holland. He was succeeded by his son and heir in 1707. 

2. Sir Framlingham Gawdy" (4), was the only son of Charles^" (3) and 
Mar\% the daughter of George Fielding, Earl Desmond. He succeeded to the 
Baronetcy in September, 1707. He was of infirm mind and died unmarried at 
Havering, county of Essex, when the title became extinct. 

Cfajtlftlj ^tneratton. 

CHILDREN OF JOHNll (3), AND GREY. 

1. Bassingboume Gawdy^^ (6), was the only son of John" (3), and succeeded 
to his father's estate and the title of Baronet. His mother was Anne, daughter 
of Sir de Grey of Merton, in the county of Norfolk. He died unmarried on Thurs- 
day, Oct. 10, 1723, from an injury received by the stumbling of his horse when 
mounting. He was wrapped in searcloth, and buried in a leaden cofifin in our 
Lady's chapel, and his grave raised with bricks over it, was to be seen in 1805 in 
the church-yard, on the south side where the chapel stood. 



NOTE — July 1, 1691. Charles Gawdy of Crowes Hall, county Suffolk, Esq., Bachellor, aged about 
30, and Mrs. Eleanor Gage of St. Giles-in-the-Fields, Middlesex, Spinster, about 22 years, with con- 
sent of her parents ; at St. Giles, Cornhill, or St. Martin's, Ludgate, London, or St. Clements Danes, 
Middlesex. 



THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 55 

2. Anne Gawdy^^ (4), only daughter of John" (3), was married April 6, 1685, 
to Oliver Le Neve of Great Winchingham, in Norfolk, Esq., and had issue nine 
children whereof only three survived; Isabella, who was not married in 1725; 
Anne, wife of John Rogers of Stamford, Esq., and Henrietta, wife of Edward 
Le Neve Esq., who both had living issue in 1725, "but I know nothing more of 
them since that period". 

I. Oliver Le Neve ^ho died sine prole, in 1686. 
IL Isabella Le Neve. 

III. Anne Le Neve was married to John Rogers of Stanford, "licentiate in 
Physic". 
IV. Henrietta Le Neve was the wife of Edward Le Neve Esq., a citizen of 
London. 
These joined and conveyed the whole estate received as the heirs of Sir Bassing- 
bourne Gawdy, their uncle, to Joshua Draper Esq., who sold the property to Richard 
Gipps Esq. 

Notes on Le Neve. 

"Here lyeth Oliver Le Neve Esq.. faithful subject of the King, an obedient son 
of the church, a stout patron of justice, and a true lover of his country, no friend 
to popery or presbytery, but a zealous eflferter of the church of England, as the 
nearest to primitive Christianity and the very functionary of the English interest, 
liberty and prosperity; he was for his intellectuals of a most sound, solid, deep 
and piercing judgment; for his morals, of a most prudent, sober, grave, just, gener- 
ous and every way obliging, virtuous conversation, wherein he eminently excelled, 
and was therein constant to his death, which was Jan. 21, 1678." 

May his posterity immortalize his name by imitation of his virtues. 



"Near this stone lyeth the dust of Oliver Le Neve Esq., late one of the justices 
of the peace, and captain of a foot company of the militia of this county; second 

son of Francis Le Neve, gentleman, and citizen of London, and of Avice his 

wife, daughter of Peter Wright of London, Merchant. He died 23 17 

and was buried on the 26th of the same month, leaving his wife, Ann, only daughter 
of John Gawdy of West Herling in this county, Bart, (who lyeth by his side) , three 
daughters and co-heirs, Isabella, Ann, and Henrietta Le Neve, who caused this 
(stone) to be laid. As also what remains of Elizabeth his 3d wife, daughter and 
co-heir of Robert Sheffield Esq. of Kensington, grandson of Edmond Earl of Mul- 
grave. She died suddenly on the 8th day of Nov., 1707, without a child, and was 
buried here on the 12th day of the same month." 



A gravestone for Anne, wife of Oliver Le Neve Esq., only daughter of Sir John 
Gawdy of West Harling, Bart., who died Feb. 10, 1695, aged 31 years; with the 
arms of Le Neve and Gawdy. 

"Here lyeth the body of Oliver Le Neve Esq., who died Jan. 23, 1658." 
"Here lyeth the body of Anne Le Neve, daughter of Oliver Le Neve of Win- 
chingham Esq., and Anne, sole daughter of Sir John Gawdie of West Harling in 
this county, Bart., who died Nov. 29, 1689. 

Sir Charles Gawdy, Knight, married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir William Wal- 
grave, who died in 1613. 



56 THE GAIVDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 

Notes. 

In the 18th year of the reign of Elizabeth, Sir Henry Capell granted a lease 
unto Thomas Gawdye, one of the justices of the Queen's Bench, of one hundred 
acres of marsh rendering yearly seven pounds. 
. Philip Gawdy was buried at St. Dunstans in the West, London, May 30, 1617. 

Sir William Hatton, Knt., nephew to Sir Christopher Hatton of Haldenbye in 
Co. North, Knt., married 1st, Elizabeth, daughter and sole heir apparent of Francis 
Gawdy of Wallington in the county Norfolk Esq., one of the Justices of the King's 
Bench, and by her had Frances their only daughter and heir, who in 1596 was 
about 17 years of age. From his funeral certificate. 

"April 5, 1681. John Thompson of St. Martins-in-the-field, citizen and mason 
of London, widower, about 38, to Mrs. Utrecia Gawdy of St. Andrews, Holborn, 
London, Spinster, about 27, at her own disposal, at St. Andrews. 

John Troutbeck, of Westminster, Doctor of Physic, widower, and Frances 
Gawdy, of St. Olave, Hart St., London, Spinster, 26, at her own disposal. 

Sir John Snelling married — Gawdy. 

Eliza Newdigate married — Gawdy. 

Thomas Gawdy married Anne, daughter of Edmund and Dorothy Bushall. 

Wentworth Garneys married 1st, Anne, daughter of Sir Charles Gawdy of Crows 
Hall, Denbenham, who died in 1681; secondly, Mary, daughter of Sir Thomas 
Addy. 

Isaac Winchol married Mary, daughter of Sir Thomas Gawdy of Gawdy Hall, 
in Norfolk, Justice of the Queens Bench. 

Mary Lamb, daughter of Fitz Noone and Elizabeth Crofts, was married to 
Gar. Gawdy. 

Henry Everard of Linstead, married Katherine, daughter of Thomas Gawdy 
of Gawdy Hall, Norfolk, by whom a son, Thomas Gawdy Everard. 

William Gawdy, Esq., was buried in the body of the Temple Church, on the 
Inner Temple side, upon Wednesday night, being the 20th Feb., 1660-1. 

Bassingbourne Gawdy of the Inner Temple, gent., was buried in the body of 
the Temple Church, on Monday night, being 25th February, 1660-1. Small pox. 

Framlingham Gawdy of the Inner Temple, gent., was buried in the body of the 
Temple Church upon Wednesday night, being the 7th February, 1660-1. 

Mary Gawdy was buried in the body of the Temple Church, on the Inner side, 
13th October, 1671. 

Henry Gawdy of the Inner Temple, Esq., was buried in the middle aisle, the 
15th January, 1677-8. He was called to the bar Nov. 1, 1676. 

Thomas and Robert Gawdy, sons of George Gawdy Esq., "jurisconsultus", 
born at Claxton, Norfolk. School there under Mr. Chapin, seven years. Ages 
16 and 15 years. They were admitted to the Scholars table, June 10, 1631. Surety 
Mr. Moore, a fellow. Thomas admitted to the Inner Temple, Feb. 10, 1632-3. 
He succeeded to the estate of his uncle, Sir Robert Gawdy, at Claxton, in 1639. 
Robert B.A. 1634-5. Scholar Christi 1631 to L. Day 1636. 

In his will of date May 1, 1531, W. Keye of Garboldesham, gave as follows: 
" Item, I gif half an acr of land lying in Lapham furlong, to fiind yerely evermore 
V. Gawdyes brennyng before our Lady (in the chansel of St. John the Baptist, 
at every antiphon of our Lady) at masse of the same festey evermore; howbeit 
I will that whosoever shall hold my place and lands, shall have this occupacon 



THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 57 

of the said land, and the keeping of the said V. Gawdys, and they onys (ones) 
to be renewed every yere". 

Margaret Lady Mortimer had issue by Robert Home, a daughter and sole heir 
named Anne, who was married to Sir James Framlingham of Crows Hall, Co. of 
Suffolk Knt., and their grandson, Sir Charles Framlingham, who died in 1596, 
had one son Clement, and one daughter Anne, both dying before him, the son 
without issue, but the daughter was married to Bassingbourne Gawdy, afterwards Sir 
Bassingbourne Gawdy, Knt., and left two sons, Framlingham and Charles. From 
Framlingham descended Sir Bassingbourne Gawdy, Bart., his grandson and heir, who 
died unmarried in 1723, leaving nieces his heirs, daughters of his sister Anne who 
was married at Rockland St. Peters, Nov. 3, 1635, to George Gawdy, auditor; July 
8, 1606, called to the bar; Steward to readers' dinner. 



Jfnignieuts. 

Francis Gawdy, serjeant-at-law 1577; Judge of Queen's Bench, 1588; Chief 
Justice Common Pleas, 1605; obituary 1606. 

Oct. 13, 1571. Inner Temple Records. Order for special Admission Mr. Henry 
Gawdy, Mr. Serjeant Gawdy's son. Special admission of Henry Gawdy of Claxton 
in the county Norfolk, gent. 

Order for general admission of Mr. Thomas Gawdy, another son of Mr. Gawdy. 

Jan. 26, 1577, Owen Gawdy, gent., was reader for Lent. 

Oct. 16, 1580, Order that Bassingbourne Gawdy and Philip Gawdy, be pardoned 
for their absence from the last Summer vacation because their sickness was well 
known, upon condition that they shall serve another vacation for the same. 

Feb. 9, 1594-5 Parliament, Special admission of Mr. Clipsby Gawdy, eldest son 
of Sir Thomas Gawdy, gratis. 

Special admission of Mr. Thomas Gawdy, the eldest son of Mr. Henry Gawdy, 
paying only 40 shillings. 

General admission of Mr. Robert Gawdy and Henry Gawdy, two other sons 
of Mr. Henry Gawdy, paying 20 shillings each. 

Thomas Gawdy the elder, serjeant-at-law 1552, died 1566. 

Attorney or reader. 

Auditor for church warden. 

Auditor for Steward. 

Auditor for treasurer. 

Called to the bench. 

Churchwarden. 

Reader, Serjeant-at-law. 

Thomas Gawdy the younger, son of Thomas (Serjeant-at-law 1567. Judge of 
the Queen's Bench 1574, died 1588.) 

Reader. 

Auditor for steward. 

Auditor for treasurer. 

Called to the bench. 

Reader. 

Steward for reader's dinner. 

Treasurer. 

Vere, daughter of Sir Edward Cooke, baptized at Romford July 4, 1612; was 
married to Sir Charles Gawdy. Bassingbourne, her son, was buried at Romford 
July 2, 1652. 



58 THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 

Dec. 1, 1559. Robert Crykennaye being before presented to be a sufficient 
workman is appointed and fully admitted, by Mr. Thomas Gawdy, Recorder, to 
ocupie and sett upp his ocupacion of hat-making according to the statute. 

Quartered with the Bacon arms was those of Gawdy, "the tortoise on the grass". 

The three daughters of Sir Nathaniel Bacon. One married Sir John Townsend 
(Anne) ; one Thomas Knyvett of Ashwell-Thorpe; Winefred was the wife of Robert 
Gawdy of Claxton. 

In an old History of Norfolk, Hartford Atheneum Library, (Vol. 6, page 66), 
there is a view of Stiffkey House, darker shade than the one copied from the Arch- 
eology of Norfolk, Vol. 8, part 3. 

St. Botolphs. Thomas Gawdy, an infant, was buried Dec. 21, 1716. 

Richard Gauday and Mary Grice were married there July 20, 1735. 



To aid in arranging the several generations of the English families of Gawdy 
which have long been confusing, the following names have been taken from a tabular 
pedigree compiled by Isaac Herbert Jeayes, editor of the Letters of Philip Gawdy, 
1579-1616. 

1. Thomas Gawdy^ (1), serjeant-at-law 1553, died 1556. He married three 
wives; first, Eliza Hallows, by whom a son named Thomas; second, Rose Bennet, 
by whom a son named Thomas, but changed to Francis; third, Elizabeth Shires, 
by whom there was no issue. 

2. Thomas Gawdy^ (2), styled senior of Redenhall, died in 1566? He was three 
times married. First, to Anne daughter of John Bassingbourne , Co. Hertford , 
by whom there were three children, Bassingbourne (1), Bassingbourne (2) and 
Katherine; second, to Elizabeth Steynings nee Harris, by whom two sons, Anthony 
and John; third, to Katherine Hastings nee Strange of Estrange, by whom there 
was no issue. 

3. Thomas Gawdy® (3), styled "junior", son of Thomas^ (1) and Rose Bennett. 
He was also serjeant-at-law 1567, judge 1575, died 1588. He was twice married; 
first to Audrey or Etheldreda, daughter of William Knightly, by whom three 
sons and three daughters; Henry, Thomas, George, Isabel, Anne, and Mary; 
second, Francis Richess of Kent. Had sister Margaret. 

4. Thomas Gawdy® (4), so named but had name changed to Frances at majority. 
He was born about 1532. Was Judge of the Queen's Bench 1589; Lord Chief 
Justice 1605; died 1606. See biography. Had sister Katherine. 

5. Bassingbourne Gawdy^(l), son of Thomas® (2)andAnne(Bassingbourne)Gawdy, 
buried at Redenhall, Harleston, Norfolk, July 5, 1559, as per Parish Registers. 

6. Bassingbourne Gawdy^ (2), son of Thomas® (2) and Anne (Bassingbourne) 
Gawdy, was Sheriff of Norfolk 1573. Was twice married. First to Anne, 
daughter of John Wotten and widow (1) of Sir Thomas Woodhouse, (2) of Henry 
Reppes, to whom married Sept. 26, 1558, buried June 9, 1587. He was buried 
Jan. 25, 1589-90. His second wife was Margaret Sulyard, widow of Thomas Darcy 
of Tolleshunt Darcy, to whom married in December, 1588. He was buried Aug. 
15, 1590. Had sister Katherine. 

7. Thomas Gawdy^ (5) , son of Thomas® (5) and Anne (Bassingbourne) Gawdy, 
was of Redenhall. He married Honor Stenyings and had issue, Thomas, Owen, 
Ralph, Katherine and Mary. 



THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 59 

8. Bassingbourne Gawdy^ (3), eldest son of Bassingbourne'' (2) and Anne Wotten? 
Born May 19, 1560. Sheriff of Norfolk 1593, 1601; Knighted 1597; died 1606. 
He was married twice. First to Anne, daughter of Sir Charles Framlingham of 
Crows Hall, July 17, 1586; buried June 9, 1594. By this union he had two sons, 
Framlingham and Charles. His second wife was Dorothy, daughter of Sir Nicholas 
Bacon, by whom he had Bassingbourne, born 1596, Bacon, Dorothy, and Frances. 

9. Philip Gawdy* (1) , second son of Bassingbourne' (2) and Anne Wotten, born 
July 13, 1562, member of Parliament 1588, buried May 29, 1617. He married 
Bridget Strangeman, daughter of Bartholomew and Maria (2nd husband) Dudley 
Fortescue of Faulkbourn, about 1597, and had issue Francis, Anthony, Bridget, 
Dorothy, Elizabeth, Mar>', and Lettice. He it was who wrote so many letters 
now published. 

10. Framlingham Gawdy^ (1), eldest son of Bassingbourne^ (3) and Anne 
(Framlingham) Gawdy, born in 1589, died 1654, and was sole heir to his grand- 
father. Sir Charles Framlingham. He married Lettice Knowles, by whom Sir 
William Gawdy, Bart., 1663. 

11. Sir Charles Gawdy, Knight, second son of Bassingbourne^ (3) and Anne 
(Framlingham) Gawdy, was father of Sir Charles Gawdy, 1st Baronet of Crows 
Hall, 1661. 

Calmbar of g^^bs, florfolk. 

Thomas Gawdy conveyed a fourth part of the Manor of Capledike, pur- 
chased of Godsalne on 11 Oct. 3 of Elizabeth. 

Thomas Gawdy Esq. of Rockland, the reversion of the Manor of Rollesbye 
with rights, liberties, and the advowson of the church. Sept. 2d of Elizabeth. 

Thomas Gawdy Esq. of Harleston, conveyed to John Copledike a fourth 
part of the Manor of Wynyetts, with all the lands and tenements, Sept. 26, 1662. 

Francis Gawdy Esq. by grant received from Richard Southwell Esq. of 
Horsham, the Manor of Brancester, with lands, tenements etc., security for the 
performance, condition of the will of Sir Richard Southwell. 

Anthony Gawdy of London gent., of the annuity of £20 granted by Thomas 
Woodhouse, Esq. of Hicklinge, Jan. 14, 1589-90. 

Anthony Gawdy (Sir) bargain and sale by Jan. 4, 1611-12. Of Claxton. 

Thomas Gawdy, one of the Justices of the Queen's Bench, received a 
lease from Sir Henry Capell and Henry Capell of one hundred acres of marsh, 
rendering yearly seven pounds, 18th of Queen Elizabeth. 



Philip Gawdy of St. Dunston, in the West, London, was buried May 30, 
1717. 

Henry Gawdy Esq. Thomas his son was buried from the house of Mr. Cox, 
May 20, 1596. 



JBiirgitht aittr Saks. 

Sir Robert Gawdy Esq. of Claxton, Knt., bargained and sold to George 
Gawdy Esq. of Norwich, the Manor of Saxlington, Netherell (Netherhall) and 
Saxlington-Verdon, with rights, liberties etc., July 25, 1621. 



60 THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 

George Gawdy Esq. of Norwich conveyed to Charles Suckling Esq. of Wood 
ton, the Manor of Saxlington alias Saxlington-Netherhall, the advowson of 
the Rectory of Saxlington-Thorpe, SaxHngton-Verdon excepting 100 acres of 
Wood, a Mill, parcels of Meadow etc., Sept. 28, 1622. 

George Gawdy Esq. of Norwich (and others) conveyed to William Cougham 
of Weller-next-the-sea, merchant, the Manor of Bacon Hall with rights and the 
Rectory and patronage of the church of Dickleborough, Jan. 2, 1634. 

Sir Henry Gawdy, Knt., received grant by Clement Boult of Wells, yeoman, 
of his messuages, tenants, etc., in Westwick, Slolie, and Worstead, Jan. 9, 1609-10. 

Sir Henry Gawdy of Claxton, Knt. , to Sir Robert Gawdy, Knt. , his son and 
heir apparent, of a capital messuage called Ledleyes with houses, lands, pastures 
etc. in the parishes of Soowood and others to the use of Edward Gawdy (Sir Henry's 
youngest son) and Frances his wife and their heirs. 



jH£jutstttons P^st Stortem. 



1. Bassingboume Gawdy, obit. 1 Sept. 1632, Inquest at Dis, 18 April 10 Car. 

1. Norfolk. John's son and heir, age 7 years, 23 August, 1633. 

2. Thomas Gawdy, obit. inp. s.p. 6 August, Car. I. 1636. Inquest at Norwich 
13 Jan. 12 Car. I. Norfolk. Jane and Margaret, sisters and co-heirs. 

3. John Gawdy, obit. 90 ct. ult. inquisition at Norwich 8 Jan Car. I. Norfolk. 
Thomas son and heir age 9 months. 

4. Bassingboume Gawdy, Knt. Obit. 17 May, 4 Jac. I. 1606. Inquisition at 
Wymondham 12 June 4 Jac. I. Norfolk. Framlingham son and heir aged 17 years. 

5. Charles Gawdy, Knt. Obit. 13 Dec. 1629. Inquisition at Bury St. Edmunds 
17 Marc. 5 Car. I. Suffolk Charles son and heir, aged 17 years. 26 Dec. 1629. 

6. Thomas Gawdy, Knt. Will I. Nov. 30 Elizabeth. Obit. 5 Nov. 30 Elizabeth. 
Inquisition at Loddon 9 Aug. 31 Elizabeth. Norfolk. Suffolk. Berkshire. Henry 
son and heir aged 36 years. 

(iatobu #brtuaru. 

Bassingboume Gawdy, son of Sir William Gawdy, died at West Harling, Norfolk, 

23 Feb., 1660. 

Framlingham Gawdy, cousin of Bassingboume Gawdy, died 26 Feb., 1660. 

Sir John Gawdy, baronet and M.P. for Middlesex, died in Jan., 1708. 

Sir William Gawdy of Norfolk, died in 1663. 

Sir John Gawdy, baronet and painter, died in 1690. 



John Thompson of St. Martins-in-the-Field, Citizen and Mason of London, 
Widower, about 38, and Mrs. Utrecie Gawdy of St. Andrews, Holborn, London, 
Spinster, about 27, at her own disposal; married at St. Andrews aforesaid 16 
March, 1681. 



THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 61 

Bassingbourne Gawdy Esq. of the Inner Temple and Anne Framlingham, Spinster, 
daughter of Sir Charles Framlingham, were married 24 May, 1586. 
John Troutbeck, of Westminster, Dr. of Physic, Widower, and Frances Gawdy 
of St. Olaves, Hart Street, London, Spinster about 26, at her own disposal; mar- 
ried at St. Olave or any other church in the diocese of London, 16 Nov., 1668. 
Charles Gawdy of Crowes Hall, county of SufTolk, Esq., Bachellor, aged 25, and 
Mrs. Elinor Gage of St. Giles-in the-Fields, Middlesex, Spinster, about 22, with 
consent of her parents; married at St. Peters, Cornhill, or St. Martins, Ludgate, 
London, or St. Clements, Danes, Middlesex, 2 July, 1691. 

Margaret Bassingbourne, daughter of Giles Bassingbourne, was married to 
Walter Colville of Bytham, by whom Robert. Between 1575 and 1691. 
John Bassingbourne married Audry Cotton, by whom daughter Anne, wife of 
Thomas Gawdy, between 1575 and 1619. 

Isabel! Gawdy, daughter of Sir Thomas Gawdy, Knight, was married to John 
Mingay of Aminggale, by whom she had (1) Thomas Mingay, (2) Henry Mingay; 
(3) Frances Mingay. 



" In ye middle of this Church lyes ye body of Mrs. Mary Gaudy (only Daughter 
of Sir William Gaudy of West Herling in ye County of Norff : Bart.) who dyed 
ye 11th of Octob: in the yeare 1671 at or near the age of 22 yeares whose virtuous 
& unblamable conversation here gave her great hope, if not assurance (through 
the mercies of God in Christ,) to obtaine eternall life. Her desire was to be buryed 
here by her two brothers & cozen, Bassingbourne Gaudy ye eldest dyed ye 23d 
of February. Willm Gaudy ye 3d the 21st of Febr. both in the yeare 1660. Fram- 
lingham Gaudy her cozen (2d son of Sr. Charles Gaudy of Crows Hall, Denbenham 
in ye County of Suflf : Knt.) dyed in ye same yeare on ye 26th of the same moneth 
all within 6 dayes of each other of the small pox: Nor could this inocent virgin 
escape ye same Disease, Now grown ye common fate of ye family. She is lineally 
descended from Thomas Gaudy Serjt at Law, eldest of the three brothers who 
were in their generation all eminent Lawyers of this Hon'ble Society. This Monu- 
ment sacred to ye memory of her was erected by Framlingham Gaudy Esqre 
her Unkle and Exector". 

"This faire young Virgin for a nuptial Bed 
More fit, is lodged (sad fate) amonge ye dead. 
Stormed by rough Windes, so falls in all her pride 
The full blowne rose design'd to adorne a Bride". 



NOTE — In the will of William Femiage, Nov. 1, 1621. "To my sister Gawdy forty pounds, also 1 
give unto her my watch. To my nephews Thomas Gawdy and Edward Gawdy to each of them twenty 
pounds. To Mr. Edward Gawdy five pounds and a ring of gold with death's head and this poesy, 
Melioris ianus vitiae." 

NOTE — April 19, 1637. Grant of Sir Thomas Gawdy of Gawdy Hall, in Redenhall, Knt., to Henry 
Bemey Esq., Norwich, a capital messuage called Gawdy Hall alias Redenhall, with buildings, gardens 
and land, a tenement with 17 acres of land and meadow in Redenhall; for the sum of £400. 

April 21, 1639, there was a regrant of the same property as above for £464. 



62 THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 

%nm\\i Will 

"Richard Gowdey of Colchester (England) , Saymaker. Will made 25 March, 
1651; proved 5 April, 1651. I give my son Thomas Gowdey of Halstead, 
weaver, £30 and all my wearing apparel and my say loom. To my three grand- 
children in Holland, viz: to Edward Chatterton £20, and to his two sisters £5 
apiece at 21 and a bond for the payment thereof shall be given to Thomas Raynold 
of Colchester, woolen draper. If they all die, my daughter Susanna Chestertoti 
shall enjoy these three legacies. My will is with this proviso that my executer 
shall pay my son Thomas Goudey but £25 and my grandchildren but £15, in case 
my daughter Mary be living that went to New England, to which I give £10. 
In case that they hear not that my daughter is alive by way of cirtificat or the like 
in two years space, then my will is that they shall have the £5 apiece again. All 
the rest of my goods I give to my wife Elizabeth whom I make my executor. Wit- 
nesses Thomas Robinson, James Martin, OUife Shelling. 

Archdeaconry of Colchester 1650-2. No. 106." 



^h #ab!£rg Cornspcntrena. 



The correspondence and papers of the Gawdy family in the possession of the 
Department of Manuscripts in the British Museum are contained in eighteen 
volumes. The first five volumes were purchased in 1866, and consist of three 
volumes of letters (1579-1713) and two of household accounts. The next acquisi- 
tion by the British Museum was obtained in 1889. These had originally passed 
from the Gawdy family on the marriage of Ann, only daughter and sole heiress 
of Sir John Gawdy, 2d Baronet (who died in 1699), with Oliver Le Neve, of Great 
Witchingham. On the death of the latter in 1711 the letters passed to his brother, 
Peter Le Neve, and afterwards to "honest Tom Martin" who had married the 
widow; thence to a London second-hand bookseller; thence to the British Museum. 
These are entitled "Egerton MSS. 2713-2722". Another collection of Gawdy 
letters was acquired by the Museum in 1896, and now form the volume " Egerton 
MSS. 2804". This collection is almost entirely composed of letters of Philip Gawdy. 
Again in 1904 the Museum acquired another batch of the Gawdy correspondence. 
These letters are now known as "Additional MSS. 36989, 36990". This collection 
of letters and family documents constitute one of the most remarkable manuscript 
acquisitions in the British Museum and should be considered of great value and 
interest to the various branches of the family. The letters show much of interest 
relating to the social standing of the fanyly and the relationship existing between 
the numerous persons bearing the same name as well as an illustration of the 
customs and fashions of the times when they were written. 

NOTE — "This family were landowners in the Counties of Norfolk and Suffolk, and Thomas Gaudy, 
the Sergent-at-Law, referred to in the inscription, had a residence in the city of Norwich, the site of 
which is still pointed out. He was, on belialf of Queen Elizabeth, the prosecuting Counsel in the trial 
of Mary, Queen of Scots, in 1586, when she was condemned to death. The papers of the family, 
mostly a selection of letters to and from royal and noble correspondents, were printed by the Histori- 
cal Manuscripts Commission in 1885, in a volume entitled "Keport on the Manuscripts of the family 
of Gaudy formerly of Norfolk." The family is now extinct. 

There was in the County of Norfolk and in the City of Norwich a large Danish settlement in the 
10th Century, and later of Normans, after the Norman. 

NOTE — Gaudy. This will was said by the late Mr. Lothrop Witherington, who discovered it, to fill 
a small gap in the Saltonstall records. There was some connection between the Gawdey and Salton- 
stall families (see Waters Gleanings), but the writer has been unable to find any clue to the gap 
which the will might fill. The mention of a daughter Mary, in New England, suggests the direction 
in which to look, but no other reference has been found. Henry W. Belknap. 



THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 63 

From existing documents it appears that all branches of the ancient English 
family of Gawdy were descended from a common ancestor, one Sir Breuse Gaudi, 
a French Knight, who was taken prisoner by the English in Aquitaine in 1352, 
and becoming naturalized, married the daughter of William Hammond of Swaflfham 
Bulbeck, in the county of Cambridge. Here the Gawdy family resided for a 
hundred years, before they migrated to Redenhall, near Harleston, in Norfolk, 
where they acquired the manors of Coldham and Holebrok. The manor-house 
at the latter place was pulled down and a new one built called Gawdy Hall and 
still standing. From this time the main line of the family was designated as "Gawdy 
of Gawdy Hall" or Redenhall. The letters under notice, however, were produced 
by members of the branch of the family which settled at West Hading, a village 
four miles from Thetford. 

It was Bassingbourne Gawdy, Sr., who acquired the estate at West Harling 
through his wife Anne, daughter of John Wotton and his wife Elizabeth, heiress 
of the Berdwell family, possessors of that manor since the 11th century. This 
Bassingbourne Gawdy became Sheriff of Norfolk in 1573. He had two sons, 
Bassingbourne, born in 1560, and Philip, born in 1562. (Bloomfield has made a 
mistake that should here be corrected. He assigned 1569 instead of 1589 as the 
year of the death of the first Bassingbourne and consequently was obliged to iden- 
tify the second Bassingbourne with the Sheriff of 1573, in which year the lad was 
only 13. These misstatements were repeated by other writers and caused great 
confusion.) 

The existing pedigrees of the Gawdy families, especially of the generations 
preceding the elder Bassingbourne Gawdy, are conflicting and the many author- 
ities that have tried to harmonize them seem to have failed. 

The second marriage of the first Bssingbourne Gawdy has recently been proven 
by the editor of the letters of Philip Gawdy, through the parish registers of Tolles- 
hunt Darcy. This alliance was with Margaret, widow of Thomas Darcy, and 
the daughter of Eustace Syliard of Flemings in Runwell, county of Essex, In 
his letters at this time Philip Gawdy mentions the marriage as occurring contempo- 
rary with the funeral of Sir Thomas Gawdy, the judge, who was buried at Redenhall 
in December, 1588. 

This Philip Gawdy, the author of the letters, was the second son of the first 
Bassingbourne Gawdy. Baptized July 13, 1562, he went to London with his 
only brother, Bassingbourne second, and both were admitted to the Inner Temple 
in November, 1578. They took up their residence at Cliffords Inn the following 
May as proven by a letter from Bassingbourne Gawdy. The first letter of Philip 
Gawdy was dated Oct. 19, 1579. Between the years 1581 and 1587 there are 
no letters from either of the brothers. During this interval Bassingbourne Gawdy 
had left London and married a rich wife named Anne Framlingham, daughter 
and heiress of Sir Charles Framlingham of Crows Hall, Denbenham, the date 
being July 17, 1586. We may conjecture, by their settling at West Harling, that 
his mother was in failing health, and for that and other obvious reasons a young 
and well-endowed daughter-in-law was not an unwelcome addition to the family. 
This mother was a daughter of John Wotton of Tuddenham, and had been twice 
married before becoming the wife of Bassingbourne Gawdy Sr. in 1558. The last 
letter from Philip Gawdy to his mother of date May 26, 1787, shortly before her 
death, (she died or was buried at Harling June 9, 1587). It must have been a 
great consolation for her to be assured that her advice had been complied with. 
He mentions that a letter had been delivered to him that he should take heed 



64 THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 

how to live in this dangerous world and especially as to what company he should 
keep and replying he wrote: " I do asuer yow I do desire to satisfy you thus muche. 
That I do euery morning use the bricke, and wormwood as a remedy agaynst 
all, pestilence and infection that may happen to the body, and I haue long synce 
layed up your motherly good counsayle that I do euery day meditate vppon as 
a medicine agaynst all bad company and all other badd actions whatever. But I 
have learned this lesson of late by the advise of them that are very well able to 
instructe, not to be over familiar with anye, for that may breed jelousye; not 
to be tyed to any, for that shewes servility; not to depend wholy of any, for he 
that leaneth with all his force vppon one stake, if that breake or be vndermined, 
his fall must needes be very great with all. But to be courteous to all shewes 
the true disposition of gentility; to live as not to be upbrayded by good turnes 
is the highe waye to a happy thowhte, and to stand firmly vppon a true ground 
not leaning any wayes is a perfect marke of a true conscience, which will never 
fayle when all other vanytyes shall decaye". 

For the next two years Philip Gawdy's letters are pretty equally divided be- 
tween his father and brother, with an occasional one to his sister-in-law, for whom 
he expressed a considerable attachment. "I protest to you", he says, "that if 
I had twenty sisters thay all severally cold not drawe that affection from my heart 
that yowr self doth". Of his law studies little was written. He had many friends 
about the Court but he had evidently become dissatisfied with the monotony 
and inactivity of his life. He had an opportunity to go abroad in June 1588, when 
Lady Willoughby, who had offered him "wonderful great frenshipp and kyndness", 
was about to join her husband. Lord Willoughby de Eresby, who was in 
command of the English forces in Flanders. She had expressed a desire to take 
Philip Gawdy with her and in forwarding her letter to his father he says, " I will 
vndertake no journey witout your wonderfull well approving therof and I desire 
to be satisfyed in that sort that I remayne in her favor. You may well gesse 
at the cause that keapes me heare in England, otherwise I should have had greater 
desire to have seen foreign places." The cause was of course, want of means 
for it is evident from frequent allusions in his letters that he suffered the usual 
lot of the younger son of a younger son. He constantly contrasts his own position 
with that of his elder brother who had been so fortunate as to marry an heiress. 
He was, however, destined soon to have a startling change and adventure. In 
the spring of 1591 a fleet of seven ships, under the command of Lord Thomas 
Howard, left Plymouth with the purpose of intercepting the Spanish ships from 
the Indies. Reaching the Azores, the little fleet anchored at Flores and for six 
months awaited the approach of the treasure laden ships. Philip Gawdy had 
joined the expedition as a volunteer and was assigned to the " Revenge", command- 
ed by the Vice-Admiral, Sir Richard Grenville. There were four letters of Philip 
Gawdy at this time; the first written at the time he was leaving London for Ply- 
mouth. He says he is "hastened a thousand wayes", but thanks God that he 
goes with "good creditt" and "hopes to winn much honor." At this time the third 
letter was written dated April 3, 1591, which was a very interesting one and contains 
an account of their adventures since they set sail from Plymouth. They were 
then 39 leagues west from Cape St. Vincent on the way to the Azores. On July 
6, 1591, he says: "We stay and pray every day hartely for the Spanish fleetes 
coming, and if they come not sodeynly I thank God we are and shall be sufifycy- 
antly provided to look for their longer coming". The encounter, when it came, 
was not with the treasure ships but with the more formidable fleet of 55 warships 



THE GAIVDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 65 

sent to convey them home. On August 31st the English squadron had news of 
their approach, and considering that a great number of the English were already 
disabled by illness, there is no doubt that Lord Thomas Howard acted wisely in 
giving orders for the ships to put out to sea. The Revenge, however, was unable 
to get away and bore the attack of 15 Spanish ships. She eventually surrendered 
but foundered a few days later with 200 Spanish on board. Among the English 
prisoners, of whom the most were severely wounded, was Philip Gawdy. 

His next letter was written in Lisbon Castle Feb. 9, 1592. By this time nearly 
all of his fellow prisoners had been exchanged or ransomed, and the delay in his 
case was the result of an exaggerated idea which his captors had formed of his social 
standing and importance at home. Apprehending that his letters would be read 
before being forwarded, he begins with an adroit reference to the insignificance 
and poverty of his family. He says he had been represented as "the sonne of the 
chief Judge of London or else of my L. Mayor of London, or else of some other 
noble house", while in reality his father was a "poor man of the country, a younger 
brother, and dead two years since". His artifices seem to have succeeded, for 
in a letter written in 1593 we learn that he had been ransomed in the sum of £200 
which amount was advanced by his brother Bassingbourne. 

The next event of importance was the death, in June, 1594, of Philip's sister- 
in-law, Anne Gawdy. Her father, Sir Charles Framlingham, outlived her for 
a few months, and having no other children, young Framlingham Gawdy, the eldest 
son of Bassingbourne and Anne, became his heir. Philip Gawdy is still in close 
attendance at Court. There were two letters between 1594 and 1597. In one 
of these he first mentions his wife Bridget, and we learn from a Herald Visitation 
that her name was Strangeman, probably the daughter of Bartholomew Strangeman 
of Hadleigh, who had died in 1580. Her mother married the following year Dudley 
Fortescue of Faulkebourne. This wife did not bring to Philip any estate and he 
never ceased to complain of his poverty and to compare his lot with that of his 
more favored brother, Bassingbourne Gawdy, who had married for second wife 
Dorothy, a daughter of Sir Nicholas Bacon of Redgrave. 

Bassingbourne Gawdy had been Sheriff of Norfolk in 1593-4, and in 1597 he was 
knighted. He was again Sheriff in 1601-2, and sat in Parliament for the borough 
of Thetford, the first of James L In a letter written after the death of the Queen, 
he says to his brother: I pray make suer with Sir Nicholas Bacon that I may be 
Burgesse of Aye or in your right for Thetford for we shall have a parliament present- 
ly and I speake in tyme hoping that you will respect me afore a stranger". 

Philip Gawdy had been a member of Parliament continuously from 1588, when 
he was returned for Thetford, representing Eye in 1593-7, and 1597-1601 Thetford 
again ; in the last Parliament of Queen Elizabeth he sat for Sudbury. He evidently 
sat in Parliament for Eye or some other borough of which the returns are missing, 
from the passage in a letter of date July 3, 1604, in which he says, "This night 
a hundred of the best of us of the parlement howse made a great supper at Mer- 
chant Taylers Hall". 

The few letters in the collection written subsequent to the death of his brother 
in 1606 are addressed to his nephew, Framlingham Gawdy. In his last two letters 
to his brother he had given some account of a visit this nephew had made to London. 
The latter, a lad of seventeen, had apparently become entangled with some undesir- 
able person at Harling named "Mistress Havers", and to break off the connection 
a journey to the city was planned. Here his uncle Philip took him in hand, showed 
him "the lyons and the tombs at Westminster", introduced him at Court, reports 



66 THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 

to his father that " he is mended in his carriage and behaviour wonderfull muche, 
and was very well lyked and beloved of many worthy gentlemen", and expresses 
the opinion that "he will prove a courtier". 

This Framlingham Gawdy was a person of considerable consequence, being 
not only his father's heir but having also succeeded to the estate of his grandfather, 
Sir Charles Framlingham, and eventually married in 1608, Lettice, daughter 
of Sir William Knollys, and their son was created a baronet in 1663. 

From the following document it appears that a journey had been planned to 
Jerusalem; but such an expedition was never made. 

"Be it knowne to all men by these presents that we Framlingham Gawdy, of 
West Harling in the County of Norfolk, esquire, and Charles Gawdy of the same, 
esquire, do aknowlege our selves to owe and be indebted unto John Nvnne of 
Burye St. Edmonds, Esquire, the some of threescore powndes of lawfuU english 
money to be payed unto the sayed John Nvnne his executors administrators or 
assigns within twentye dayes after the Return of Philip Gaudye, esquire, from 
Jerusalem in Pallestyne within the Countrye of Judea, into the Realme of England 
and hath lawfully proved, shewed and declared unto the sayed Framlingham and 
Charles, their executors or assignes by cirtificate or testimoniall under the seale 
of the sayde Cytye of Jerusalem or by other sufficient prooffes that the sayed 
Philip Gawdy hath bene personally at the sayd citye of Jerusalem, at or in the 
newe dwelling house of the sayd John Nvnne in Bury abovesayd. For the true 
and faythfull payment wherof we bynde vs and eyther of vs, our heirs, executors 
and administrators fyrmlye be these presents. In wytness wherof we have here- 
vnto set our hands and seales the xxith day of October in the yere of our Lord 
God one thousand sixe hundred and eleven. 

Sealed and delivered Framlingham Gawdy. 

to the use of the above Charles Gawdy. 

named John Nvnne in the 
presence of 

Henry Fortescue Endorsed "My Cosin Framlingham and my Cosin 

Ant. Raillyn Charles Gavdy their bands, Ixii." 

Tho Muryell. 
In several of his letters Philip Gawdy alludes to the report that the second wife 
of Sir Charles Framlingham (Elizabeth Barnardiston) was to become a mother. 
This was a matter of great importance to the Bassingbourne Gawdy whose wife 

NOTE. — There are a series of letters published in the Archaeology of Norfolk Vol. V. which are 
too long and of minor importance to publish in their entirety here. These were written by Sir Edmond 
Moundeford to his kinsman Framlingham Gawdy Esq. at a critical period of English history when 
Charles the First and his Conmions were beginning the trial of strength which ended so disastrously 
for the former ; when the third Parliament was refusing supplies and seeking redress of grievances ; 
and the Thirty Years War was raging on the Continent, made the names Tilly and Wallenstein, Spain, 
Sweden, and Austria, as much the anxious subjects of a news-letter, as loans, subsidies, impeachments 
and imprisonments, the King's prerogatives and the people's grievances, at home. Friends who could 
write were scarce and to read was an accomplishment ; orthography was unknown ; therefore a bud- 
get of news, leaving "Ye horse and sure in ye Strande" and "reaching West Harlvng" in ye same 
week, was no doubt a high-prized novelty, to be eagerly received and spelled out and discoursed by 
the family for many days, vmtil another equally fresli and veracious, might be expected to follow It. 

As an example of the forms usual at that time in the correspondence of nearest relatives, these 
letters are not without interest. A cousin is addressed as "Thrice noble Sir", and as "My ever 
honoured kinsman". Sir Edmond Moundeford, senior, the writer of the first three letters, was knighted 
in 1603. and married Frances, daughter of Sir Thomas Gawdy, of Claxton. He was buried at Felt- 
well May 6, 1620. His son Edmond was one of the members of Parliament for Thetford from 1627 to 
1639, and was the writer of the remaining letters to his kinsman, Framlingham Gawdy. He married 
Penelope, daugiiter of Thomas Brewse of Wenham, cmnty of Norfolk, and died v/ithout issue in 1643 
and was buried at Feuwell on May 11th of that year. (In a letter from the King the address was: 
"To the right worshipful Sr. Bassingbourne Gawdy, More Honour". 



THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 67 

was the only daughter of Sir Charles, and the fear of the Gawdys was well expressed 
in another letter: "What if my Lady commethe forthe with a boye". As a 
matter of fact there was no child born of this marriage, and the wife of Bassing- 
bourne was served heir to her father. 

Philip Gawdy was often entrusted with commissions from members of his family 
and he frequently mentions various kinds of valuable cloths he had purchased 
for them in London. He had purchased "mourning cloths" for some when Sir 
Thomas Gawdy died in 1588 — for his father Bassingbourne and his uncle Anthony 
who was a half-brother to his father. 

Francis Gawdy was made one of the Queen's Serjeants May 17, 1582, and in 
this character was present at Fotheringay on the trial of Mary Queen of Scots. 
On the death of his half-brother Sir Thomas Gawdy he was nominated his succes- 
sor as a judge of the Queen's Bench Nov. 23, 1588. In 1605 he became Chief Justice 
of the Common Pleas, and died in 1606, the following year. 

Philip Gawdy mentions his horses that were to be sent up to London that he 
might "ride gallantly". 

He constantly alludes to his great affection for his parents, brother and others 
of the Gawdy family. He especially shows a deep and tender love for his mother; 
a filial attachment and respect for her wishes that shows a noble attribute of his 
character. 

He was allowed a hundred pounds a year from "rents" and asks that this may 
be sent to him. 

Had sent his brother a doublet of fustian, tafifeta. lace, silk and buttons fitting 
the same. He mentions the collar, "for I do not think there is a better collar, 
or better fustian in England. It will wear as soft and well as velvit or sattin. 
I am warrented that the collar shall not change. My Lord Admiral, and some 
others have suites of the same, and trymmed in the same kynde. Indeed I have 
made choice of all these things as waryly and well as a thief at the gallows would 
keep himself from hanging." He mentions a seal that he was having made — probably 
the Gawdy arms. "I have sent you down the rest of the buttons which come 
to forescore and one dozen, which maketh up just sixscore. I have sent besydes 
XXVI yardes of the lace which wayeth just five ounces and a half, so that all the 
lace togather commeth to xxiiij ounces and a half. I have sowed them within 
a sheepskin where you shall find ii bookes and a combe besydes". 

Sends four yards and a half of velvit tawny, "for goodness and newness of colour 
the best I cold find in London, and yet I saw in twenty places. It cost xxi shillings 
the yard. All kinds of silk are very dear. I went to St. Martins and desired 
to see the best laces I cold come to of tawny and gold. I found all bynding and 
gallown laces stale, heavier than this which I desired and not commonly worn. 
And I hope that both the color silk and gold is of the best. I have sent down 
fore score and two yards of the lace which you will find by measure, which wayeth 
just sixtene ounces and which you will fynd upon tryal to be true. There must 
be four and thirty yards more for all the cloakes besides myne, which I shall send 
down by some messenger. I could get no more lace done at this time. 

"I have sent down (his brother) nine and thirty dozen buttons of tawny gold 
and silver at ninepence halfpenny the dozen, the rest shall be down for the cloaks 
just the proportion for four and twenty as fast as may be. They will all take 
just sixscore dozen. I have sent you down besides iiij ounces of styching sylke, 
and I J of sowing sylke." 



68 THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 

Jfor tbc 6aiobu Corrcsponbcmc. 

GILBERT GOUDIE'S COPY. 

The manuscripts of this family consisting of 1200 letters, from one of the Reports 
of the Historical Manuscripts Commission, published in London and presented 
to both Houses of Parliament by Command of Her Majesty Queen Victoria, in 
1885. These letters, known as "The Gawdy Papers", show the position of the 
family, the extent of its social ramifications and the historical value of its wide- 
spread correspondence from A.D. 1509 to the death in 1606 of Sir Bassingbourne 
Gawdy, twice High Sheriff of Norfolk; thereafter until the death of his son Fram- 
lingham Gawdy in 1654, with continuation until 1675 for some time after the death 
of Sir William Gawdy. This extensive correspondence, highly interesting and 
important though it be, cannot be loyally dealt with here, but a few of its items 
may be noticed: 

Thomas Gawdy of Harleston is stated to have had three families by three wives. 
From the eldest Thomas Gawdy (of Shottsham and Reddenhall of the Inner Temple, 
Sergeant-at-law 1552, Obitt 1556), sprang the family of Bassingbourne Gawdy. 
The second Thomas Gawdy was Sergeant in 1567 and a Judge of the King's Bench 
1574. He died in 1588 and from him came the Gawdys of Claxton Hall. The 
third Thomas Gawdy changed his name at his Confirmation to Francis; was 
Sergeant in 1577, Judge of King's Bench 1588 and died 1606. Another son was 
called Anthony. 

On 10th September 1554 Thomas Gawdy of Shottesham writes to his son Bas- 
singbourne "at my Lord Chancellors Blackfriars, Norwich", a letter of which 
the following is given as the import: — 

"My Lord of Norfolk has written to the Lord Chancellor for the latters pleasure 
concerning the late Duke his grandfathers burial; let Bassingbourne get himself 
sent back to my Lord from the Chancellor that it is "Most meetest" for Lady 
Survey to have the ordering of her daughters. Lady Jane and Margaret Howard. 
Brooke has untruly informed the Lord Chancellor and my Lord of Norwich that 
Thomas Gawdy was present when the late Duke was asked if he would have "my 
Lord that now is", to be one of his executors and "at the holding up of his hand". 
Gawdy in fact neither saw nor spoke with him within ten days before his death. 
Will wait on the Chancellor on Saturday. Commendations to my Lord of Ely". 

In 1570 he has a petition to the Queen (Elizabeth) and Privy Council to be 
excused from lending the Queen 100 marks on privy seal. Alleges he lent the late 
Queen (Mary of England) £10 which has not been repaid. Has since then been 
at great charge in building and has borrowed from friends, merchants in London 
and elsewhere 1000 marks to complete a purchase for the said building and to 
support his wife and many children. Moreover he has had no advancement 
from his ancestors, neither is he "any great meddler in the trade of the law". 

In 1661 William Gawdy Esq. (afterwards Sir William of Bury St. Edmunds) 
is a minister of Parliament and in 1663 Knight and Baronet. In 1663 John Gawdy 
married Anne de Grey, daughter of Sir Robert de Grey of Merton. On 13th July 
1580 Bassingbourne Gawdy is addressed by Sir John Fortense (?) his brother- 
in-law, begging him to release from prison a poor man who owes him £20, of which 
£6.13.4 had been paid. 

In 1582 a proposition made for marriage of " Bes" the daughter of Arthur Throck- 
morton, Beaumont, to Bassingbourne Gawdy junior, was delayed on account of 
the "unmeetness" of the young lady in age and growth etc. Besides this, the 



THE GAIVDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 69 

young people had not yet met. Bassingbourne Gawdy senior at this time has 
his carriage with two coach horses, but many demands are made upon him and 
he is troubled with the "outcries of shameless and unthrifty fellows," connections 
of his own. Six years later his son married, not to "Bes" Throckmorton, but 
to Anne, daughter and heiress of Sir Charles Framlingham of Denbenham, Suffolk. 
Young Bassingbourne's cousin, Anthony Gawdy, writing at this time from his 
lodgings at "Wilsons in the Strand", complains of the world being dangerous and 
himself highly discontented with life in London. They are happiest who have 
good wives and can live in the country. The Court is such a new world .... I 
know not how to bestow myself in it. Plenty of news, but dangerous to send 
letters being searched everywhere, — a significant glimpse of the court of Elizabeth 
at the time. Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, the Queen's special favorite and 
other courtiers, appear in the letters, but all with discreet silence as to court in- 
trigue. While all Europe was ringing with the story of the Spanish war and the 
"Invincible Armada" of 1588, scarcely any trace is found in the Gawdy letters. 
But in May of that year Anthony Gawdy was at Bergenop-Zion in the Netherlands 
and writes to his nephew Philip Gawdy, at his lodgings Fleet Street by the " Hanging 
Sword" that he has had a safe passage to Flushing in two days, coming next day 
to Bergen, which is " full of Captains and good soldiers in want of money and appar- 
el". Sir William Downey hath a great command and well. Ostend is sieged, 
none were to relieve it from hence. . The money comes to the walls. In 1591 
this Philip Gawdy sailed under Sir Richard Granville in Lord Thomas Howard's 
fleet and was captured on board the " Revenge" at the celebrated fight in the Azores, 
where Sir Richard died after engaging a large Spanish fleet for 15 hours. Philip 
Gawdy was imprisoned at Lisbon and afterwards released on a ransom of £200 paid. 

In 1590 there is recorded a summoning of the Sheep Stock on various holdings 
belonging to Bassingbourne Gawdy numbering 3838 in all; and in 1593 he received 
from his cousin Henry, son of Sir Thomas Gawdy of Claxton Hall, seven hogs- 
heads of beer. This Bassingbourne was knighted before 17 January 1598 and 
elected to Parliament in 1601. While wealth and honours appeared thus to have 
flowed in upon this whole family connection, one member of it at a later date 
came to financial grief. This was another Henry Gawdy who writing to his chief 
friend " Framlingham Gawdy, West Harling, High Sheriff, confesses the extrav- 
agance of his former life, from which he has awakened as from a trance and 
(a fter some amazement) collected his senses and brought himself within the limits 
of his own Center. He had been in prison for about two years "In distress unspeak- 
able". 

Indications are given that some members of the family were fond of sport. Sir 
Bassingbourne Gawdy was possessed of "two good sling hawks" and a skilful 
falconer; and a "very strong lusty falcon too full of mettle for a woodland country" 
is offered to him for £5. 6s-; and in 1626 Sir Anthony Gawdy, Sir Charles Gawdy 
and their mother arrange for a hunt at Lowescroft. 

Several members of this wide-spread family attained to high distinction in the 
law, as High Sheriffs and Judges and as such one of them took part in one of the 
great tragedies of the world, though no hint of this appears in the Gawdy letters. 
At the trial of Mary Queen of Scots at Fotheringay in 1586 Sir Francis Gawdy, 
Sergeant, spoke as the leading counsel for the prosecution and was only too success- 
ful in securing her condemnation, the warrant by his mistress, Queen Elizabeth, - 
for the execution of the unfortunate prisoner, following. 

In the Uniform of the Temple Church, London, an inscribed monument to one 



70 THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 

of the eminent lawyers of the family may still be seen. See history and genealogy. 

After the death of Framlingham Gawdy, son of Sir Bassingbourne Gawdy the 
younger, the letters are mostly addressed to Lady Gawdy, up to 1675, when the 
Gawdy period terminates. The heiress of the family was married to Oliver le 
Neve through whom the papers passed into the hands of Peter le Neve, Norra 
Herald. 

Gilbert Goudie Esq. further says: "The origin of this Gawdy family in England 
does not appear now to be known; but looking to what had already been said 
as to the Norse derivation of the name, it is not improbable that they were repre- 
sentatives of some Norman-French family which found its way to British ground 
in the train of William the Conqueror in the 11th century or in the time of some 
of his early successors on the throne of England or they may have descended from 
some one of the original invaders from Scandinavia who, in the Viking age, or 
at an earlier date, conquered and settled on the east coast of England, where per- 
sonal names and place-names in many instances give unmistakable evidence of 
a Scandinavian origin. 

^atotrg gtmntscrtpts hi i\t §ntis^ S^ustwm 

ACQUIRED SINCE 1900. 

Add: 37535. "Gawdy Pedigree". These genealogies or descents were made 
the year 1611 for the Reight Worshippfull Fremlingham Gawdy and Lettis his wyfe, 
being the eldest daughter and co-heir of Sir Robert Knollis, Knight of the Bath, 
to King James. By W. Lowther. This pedigree or series of genealogies traces the 
lines of Gawdy, Bodrygan, Pakenham, Fremlingham, Furnyvall, Bardwell, Parre, 
Sergeulex, Blackett, Passeley, Bassingbourne, Bullaine, Baskerville, Howard, 
Knollis, from Sir Bruise Gawdy, Knight, taken prisoner in Gascony 26 Edward 
HI. (1352-1353); with arms in colors for each match, and at the foot the arms 
in color of Gawdy and Knollis, each with twenty quarterings, recited. (For a 
list of the quarterings of the Gawdy family see also, Add. MS. 5522, ff 170-171^. 
This pedigree roll is 7 feet 6 inches x 2 feet 9 }4 inches. 

Add: 36990. "Deeds, bonds, acquittances, accompts etc. of the family of 
Gawdy, belonging to the same five successive holders of West Harling. 1540- 
1681. A large portion are household, college, rent and farm accompts. Proof of 
the marriage in 1609 and marriage license. 

Add: MS. 36989. Correspondence of the Gawdy of Norfolk family, 1540-1703. 

There are innumerable other Gawdy letters and papers in the British Museum, 
but those listed above were all acquired since 1900. 

Add: 27395-7. Correspondence of the family of Gawdy, baronets, of West 
Harling, Norfolk; from the latter part of the 17th century to 1713. 3 Vol. folio. 

Add: 27398. Household book of inventories and expenses of Bassingbourne 
Gawdy at West Harling and Mendham, co. Norfolk. 1570-1588. 

Add: 27399. Household expenses of Bassingbourne Gawdy, 1582-6, and of 
Framlingham Gawdy, his son, 1626-8, 1633, 1634, 1638, 1639. 

Add: 36989. Correspondence of the family of Gawdy of West Harling etc. 
1579-1703. The writers are almost all immediate relatives of the successors of 
the property; Bassingbourne Gawdy I. (died 1589); Sir Bassingbourne Gawdy 
H. (died 1606); Framlingham Gawdy (died 1655); Sir William Gawdy, bart. (died 
1669); Sir John Gawdy, bart. (died 1708). The largest part of the correspondence 
is between Sir William Gawdy and his brother Charles. Few events of public 










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THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 71 

interest are recorded. Many of the letters were from junior members of the family, 
as students at Cambridge and London, to their parents. 

Egerton MSS. 2713-22. Correspondence and papers of the family of Gawdy, 
baronets, of West Hading, 1509-1751. 10 Vols. 3276 letters. The Historical Manu- 
script Commission published over 1200 letters and papers relating to the Gawdy 
family from this collection. 

Egerton MSS. 2804. Original letters (126) from Philip Gawdy to members 
of his family, chiefly to his father, Bassingbourne Gawdy of West Harling and 
his brother Sir Bassingbourne Gawdy, 1574-1616. Also pedigree. 

There are also "Letters of Philip Gawdy" published by the Roxburgh Club, 
1906, the material mainly taken from this collection. 



% gemarhctble ^ebtigre^. 



As the result of particular research instituted in the British Museum in London 
for "Anything and everything relating to the families of Gawdy and Gauden" 
the deputy employed discovered a very remarkable and in some respects import- 
ant pedigree which may be properly designated a Genealogical-Heraldic Chart, 
written and illuminated in colors and metals comprising all of the intermarriages 
between "The Right Worshipful Framlingham Gawdy and Lettis his wife, being 
the eldest daughter and co-heir of Sir Robert Knolls, Knight of the Bath to King 
James". 

This enormous Genealogical and Heraldic chart was inscribed and painted on 
Vellum as a foundation, being seven feet and six inches long and four feet and four 
inches in breadth. The list of names inscribed on the head of this parchment 
comprises the following: Gawdy, Bodrigan, Parkenham, Framlingham, 
Vaughan, Baskervill and Furnyvall. 

The names and genealogical connections of the intermarried families were 
written in a series of rings or double-lined circles to which were suspended the arms 
of all the families who were allies with those of Gawdy and Knolls for many 
descending generations. The shields and crests were hand-painted on parchment 
in artistic fashion, displaying all the ordinaries and charges in all the heraldic 
tinctures and metals and present a variety of brilliant colors and gold and silver 
that constitutes the whole arrangement an attractive and fascinating picture. There 
are a series of colored lines connecting the genealogical rings with the shields 
belonging thereto with the authorized titles, beginning with the date 1611. 

Below the pedigrees and individual arms there were emblazoned two large 
Coats-of-Arms, beautifully crested, helmed and mantled, comprising all of the 
Quarterings and sub-divisions represented in the separate shields assigned to the 
intermarried families. Subjoined under these large coats-of-arms are inscribed 
all of the names of the families as represented in the divisions of the shields, viz: — 

1. Gawdy. 6. Walesbern. 11. Valloignes. 16. Framlingham. 

2. Bassingbourne. 7. Fitz Allen. 12. Creke. 17. Lee. 

3. Passeley. 8. WoTTON. 13. Glanville. 18. Horne. 

4. Sergenfex. 9. Bardwell. 14. Blundus. 19. Jeffres. 

5. Bodrigan. 10. Pachenham. 15. Winchingham. 20. Southam. 
The crest of this coat-of-arms two upright swords. 

In the second Coat-of-Arms comprising the emblazon of the families allied 



72 THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 

with and descended from the Knolls family are twenty divisions in the shield 
designated as follows: 

11. PaSSEY. 16. LUSTOFF. 

12. Fevan ApRees 17. Devreux. 

13. MiLBORNE. 18. Baskervill. 

14. Evifford. 19. Blackett. 

15. Furnivall. 20. Skedmore. 
The crest of this coat-of-arms an Elephant charged with a crescent. 

This Genealogical-Heraldic chart has been copied in black-and-white by the 
rotograph process in fourteen sections which were accompanied by a diagram by 
which these could be conjoined as in the original pedigree on vellum. The Gawdy 
lines in this chart run unlike all others as found in the English genealogies. See 
the following arrangement. 



1. 


Knollis. 


6. 


PiTCHARD. 


2. 


Debrow. 


7. 


Bedwarden, 


3. 


Vaughan. 


8. 


Devreux. 


4. 


Fevan Ap Rees. 


9. 


Whitney. 


5. 


Baskervill. 


10. 


V^ISHAN. 



S^be ^cbigrefi proper. 



1. Sir Bruise Gawdy, Knight, taken prisoner in Gascony 26th year of the 
reign of King Edward III. He married the daughter of Hamond of Sapham, 
county of Suffolk. 

2. John Gawdy Esq. lived anno. 2nd .... and lyeth buried at Sapham-bulbeck 
in the county of Cambridge. He married Anne daughter of Huson of Sapham- 
bulbeck. 

3. Sir Gawdy, Knight, lived in the time of King Henry. He lieth buried at 
Barony Green, county Cambridge. His wife was a daughter of English, 

4. Sir Robert Gawdy, Knight, anno 1439. He lyeth buried at Barony Green, 
county of Cambridge. He married Elizabeth, daughter of William Dunholt. 

5. Sir Gawdy lived anno 5th of the reign of King Edward IV. He lyeth 
buried at Sapham St. Mary, county Cambridge. He married a daughter of 
Park. 

6. William Gawdy lived anno 1490. He was buried at Sapham St. Mary, 
county Cambridge. He married Jeane, daughter of Robert Kenrick. 

7. Thomas Gawdy, Knight, of Harleston in the county of Norfolk, married 
to his first wife Elizabeth, daughter of Helhouse (or Helwise) ; 2nd to Rose, 
daughter of Thomas Bennett; 3d, to a daughter of Oliver Shires. By these unions 
he had issue. 

8. Sir Thomas Gawdy, Knight, Judge of the King's Bench and the son of 

Rose Bennett. He had two wives, the first a daughter of Knightly; 

second, Polyon (?) daughter of .... Riches. 

9. Sir Francis Gawdy, Knight, Lord Chief Justice of Common Pleas, anno 
King James; third son. 

10. Thomas Gawdy, Serjeant-at-Law in ye time of King Edward IV. His 
\\-ives were, 1st, Anne, daughter and co-heir of John Bassingbourne of Hatfield, 
county of Hertz; 2nd wife Elizabeth, daughter of John Harris in the county 
Devon, widow of Staynings. He was buried at Redenhall, Suffolk. 

11. Sir Henry Gawdy, Knight of the Bath to King James, son and heir of 
Sir Thomas Gawdy No. 8, and daughter of Knightly. He married Elizabeth 
daughter of Robert Warner and his son and heir was 




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THE GAWDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 73 

12. Sir Robert Gawdy who married Winefred, daughter of Sir Nathanweli 
Bacon, Knight. 

13. Thomas Gawdy, eldest son of Thomas No. 10, and Anne Bassingbourne, 
married Honor Staynings, by whom a son. 

14. Thomas Gawdy, who married Ruth, daughter of Francis Boulton of Briston, 
county Norfolk. His sister 

(1) Katherine Gawdy was married to Henry Everard of Lynstead. 

(2) Bassingbourne Gawdy, a brother, married Anne, daughter of VVotton 
and co-heir to the Bardwell lands. He was buried at Hading, Norfolk, anno 
1589. He was father of 

15. Sir Bassingbourne Gawdy, Knight, who died 7th May, 1605, and was buried 
at West Harling. He was twice married. His first wife was Anne, daughter 
and sole heir of Charles Framlingham, Knight; his second wife was Dorothy, daugh- 
ter of Sir Nicholas Bacon of Redgrave. 

16. Philip Gawdy was the second son of Bassingbourne and Anne Wotton, 
born 13th July, 1562. He married Bridget, daughter of .... Strangeman, who 
was buried at Westminster 1609. He had with other issue a son, 

17. Framlingham Gawdy was a son and heir of Bassingbourne and his wife 
Anne Framlingham of West Harling. He married 16th February, 1608, Lettis, 
eldest daughter and co-heir of Robert Knolls, Knight of the Bath, 10th year of 
King James. 

18. Charles Gawdy, second son, born 13th May, 1591, married Judith, daughter 
of Sir William Walgrave. 

19. Bassingbourne Gawdy, third son of Bassingbourne and Dorothy Bacon, 
was born 3d of September, 1596. 

Thus ends the descent as given in the Genealogical-Heraldic chart. All of the 
shields representing the Gawdy Families bear the Tortoise. See and compare 
the other pedigrees in this work. 



This beautiful watch was discovered about the year 1794 secreted in a recess 
behind the tapestry, which then covered the walls, in the Dining-room of Gawdy 
Hall. Together were found with it two Apostle spoons and some papers relating 
to the troublesome period of Cromwell. From the inscription inside the watch 
"David Ramsay, Scottis Me. Fecit", there is little doubt that the treasure repre- 
sents the workmanship of the famous David Ramsay, Horologer to James I., in 
whose shop the opening scenes of "The Fortunes of Nigel" are laid. 

This watch is in the form of a star, or, rather of an Heraldic mullet of six points. 
The surface of the case on either side is flat, with a broad beveling down the rim 
of the lids. These surfaces are elaborately chased. On the front is the represent- 
ation of the Holy Christ in the manger at Bethlehem; on the reverse side, that 
of the adoration of the wise men. In the interior of the lids are engraved in like 
manner, the Annunciation and the Salutation. Round the sides of the case from 
angle to angle is a scroll-work, containing figures of animals, admirably chiseled, — 
the fox, goat, hare, hound, bear, unicorn etc. 

The material of which the case is made is silver of a peculiarly fine quality; 



74 THE GAIVDY FAMILIES IN ENGLAND. 

the rims and sides are gilt. On raising the front lid the face of the watch is dis- 
closed; it is of chased silver, having in the centre a representation of the Temple; 
and in the angles figures of angels. In the uppermost corner is the legend, "Dex 
Heck Sculp". On a gilt circle, raised slightly, are the hours marked by one diag- 
onal pointer. 

On opening the lid on the reverse side the outer frame of the works is seen, bear- 
ing the inscription before mentioned, "David Ramsey, Scottis, Me. Fecit". By 
pressing together the two little pegs on the face of the watch, which acts upon the 
springs, the whole of the works become detached from, and slip out of, the case. 
The movement is vertical ; the mechanism is of a very simple and primitive char- 
acter. There is no central wheel and the balance wheel is remarkably small. 

Such is a description of this beautiful work of art. It was once evidently the 
property of the last of the Gawdys of Gawdy Hall. About the year 1650, Charles 
Gawdy mortgaged the estate to Tobias Frere, M.P. for Norwich, who afterwards 
seized it by sequestration; and there was a tradition current that it was not 
till after a regular siege that he gained possession of the Old Hall. It is probable 
that in the confusion of that event, this watch with other valuables, was secreted. 
From Tobias Frere the estate of Gawdy Hall passed to the Wogans; and from them 
to their descendant, Mr. Sancroft Holmes, in whose family the watch remained. 

The size of the watch is in breadth from point to point, an inch and three fourths; 
in thickness three quarters of an inch. 

It was the opinion that this remarkable watch was designed to commemorate 
the advent of the saviour and its form represents the star that stood over the place 
of his birth. 



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From the history of the Manors of Norfolk, Suffolk, and Essex, in England, the 
compiler has found the names of the members of the Gawdy families so interspersed 
with the descriptive and local matter that it seems desirable to retain them as they 
appear and leave them as references to enhance the personal notices in the genea- 
logical and biographical sections of this work. The Gawdy families were the 
owners of very extensive territorial estates in several counties in England and were 
the patrons of the churches situated on their manorial lands. Many members of 
the baronial branches were buried in the churches, chapels and church-yards near 
their family seats, and a description of their monuments will appropriately appear 
associated with an account of these places of residence. 

Harleston. This was anciently called " Horolfstun ", being named for Horolf, 
one of the Danish leaders who came into England with Swain, King of Denmark, 
about A.D. 1010 in order to subdue the East Angles and bring them under his 
power; and this Horolf evidently settled here and gave his name to the place 
which was always of small extent, containing no more than 25 acres within its 
bounds, which at the Conqueror's survey, was divided and since continued into 
two parts; 13 acres of it held by Erode, being added to Mendham, as the other 12 
acres does to the hundred of Earsham on which the chapel and town stood, being 
the middle-row only; the residue, though commonly called Harleston, being in 
the parish of Redenhall, to which parish this is a chapel-at-ease. The manor 
always attended the hundred of Earsham in the Norfolk family; and the houses 
were all copyhold, except those called Stone-Houses, or cross, which Richard 
de Horolveston, about A.D. 1109 settled, and took his name from hence. The 
chapel of St. John the Baptist was a free chapel founded by John de Herolveston 
for his own use; this never had any institution, but was always dependent upon 
its mother church at Redenhall, the rector of which served here a part of every 
Sabbath. At the east end of the Market-Cross, which with the chapel, was rebuilt 
in 1726; it is tiled and has one good bell and a clock. In 1688, being almost 
useless and deserted for want of endowment, William Sancroft, Archbishop of 
Canterbury, bestowed upon it £54 toward its repair. Harleston is represented 
as a small market town in the liberty of the Duke of Norfolk, upon the north side 
of the river Waveney, about seven miles south-west of Bungay and ten north-east 
of Diss. In the centre of the place there is a block of black stone of considerable 
size which, on rebuilding the wall by which it stands, was found to reach far below 
the surface of the surrounding ground. This was called " Horolf 's Stone", and 
from it was derived the name of the family of Korolfstone to which belonged Sir 
John Horolfstone, who in the reign of Richard II. quelled a rebellion in Norfolk 
and the surrounding country. 

Redenhall Manor. This ancient Manor derives its name from Rada the Dane, 
who was Lord in the time of Edward the Confessor, and held it of Edric. It is 
a mile and a half long and a half mile and three perches broad. In 1558 it was 
granted to Tipper and Dawe, and soon after came to the Gawdy family; and so 
it was joined to the manors of Hawkers, Holbrook, and Coldhamhall and passed 
into the possession of J. Sancroft Holmes. 



76 HOMES OF THE GAWDYS IN ENGLAND. 

Manor of Holbrook. This Manor was held of the honour of Richmond at half 
a fee. It derived its name from the situation of the Manor-house, being in a hol- 
low by the brook side; the adjoining hills still retain the name of Holbrook Hills, 
and are on the left hand side of the road leading from Harleston to Yarmouth 
near to Wortwaledore, but this was pulled down by the Gawdys when the house 
called Gawdy-Hall was built. In 1570 Thomas Gawdy Esq. purchased this manor 
of Edward Bacon Esq. and so it was joined to the other manors. 

The Church here was dedicated in honor of the Assumption of the blessed Virgin 
Mary; it was a good and regular building having the nave, porch and two aisles 
covered with lead and the chancel tiled; was rebuilt with freestone; hath a noble 
square tower very large and lofty; hath neat battlements and four freestone spires. 
This edifice was begun about 1460 and finished in 1520. In the north Chapel, 
which belonged to Gawdy Hall, are buried several of the family to which the 
Manor belonged. The church seems to have been founded by the Breuse family, 
for anciently the Gawdys were buried in the middle alley, where on a stone under 
the portraiture of a man and woman was the following inscription: 

"Oraare pro animabus Johannes Gawdy e Alice Boris sue, qui inmo die Mail 
Ano Dni. M. b, E, r. quorum animabus proprietur deus Amen". 

On another stone are the following: 

"Pray for the Soule of Mrs Anne Gawdye {que Obiit. ribo die Sept) in the 

year of God 1530". 
"Orate pro anima Agentis Gawdye que obiit. ribo die Sept. Ano die Mcccc er 
crius anime proprietur deus Amen". 

Turning to another reference we find that soon after 1436 this church passed 
to Robert Clifton, and in 1481 John Breuse was lord in the right of his wife. In 
1621 John Breuse sold the manor of "Hawkers-cum-Shacklock's" to Tobias Frere, 
but it was conveyed in 1627 to Sir Clipsby Gawdy, Knt. and Mary his wife, and 
afterward joined the Capital Manor. 

Gawdy Chapel is on the north side of the church and contains many monuments 
to the Gawdy family. Between the chapel and the chancel there is an altar-tomb 
of Sir Thomas Gawdy who was buried in 1688 which in 1848 had a hele hanging 
over it. The roof of the chapel, in the north-east corner, has panels painted alter- 
nately in red and green, with double-headed eagles, black with white touches, 
and white eagles with black touches. The floriated portions were green, red, 
t white and yellow. Many of the heraldic figures in the windows were brought 
from the old Gawdy Hall. There was at one time over the doorway of the chapel 
the arms of Gawdy; these were removed, but on the door itself are three crests 
carved in oak. 

Gawdy Hall. The present castellated residence known as Gawdy Hall is in 
the parish of Redenhall and about one mile from Harleston in the county of Nor- 

A Family of Bell Ringers. 

In reference to the celebrated peal of bells at Redenhall, the following is of interest: "During the 
last century in a village close b.v there was a ringer who had a large family of which seven were 
sons and all became ringers. On one occasion all seven were at Redenhall and rang in the same peal. 
There were seven churches. During the ringing of the first peal one of the seven brothers went for- 
ward to the second church to have the tower opened before the arrival of his brothers ; then another 
to the third, and so on, till Redenhall was reached, when the final peal was rung. In this singular 
excursion seven churches were visited and the time taken was nearly twelve hours. The bells in each 
instance were "raised" and "ceased" in peal. The ringers were afterwards entertained at a banquet 
in the well-known "Cherry-Tree" Inn. 




en "5 



HOMES OF THE GAWDYS IN ENGLAND. 77 

folk and near the Suffolk boundary on the East coast of England. The seat is 
situated in an abrupt bend of a river or considerable stream upon a low and level 
plateau and is surrounded by extensive ornamental grounds and gardens. The 
lawns are shaded by wide-spreading old trees and graceful swans are disporting 
upon the placid waters of the shining river. The mansion has many crow-stepped 
gables terminating with pinnacles, while turrets and clusters of chimney-stacks 
rise far above the roofs, enhancing the beauty of the residence. The whole archi- 
tectural effect is harmonious, stately and imposing, presenting a scene of rural 
loveliness unsurpassed among the baronial estates in the county. This seat 
seems to have succeeded an older house which was dismantled while this was 
being erected. One writer has intimated that the earlier residence was a " round 
castle". It was here that the singular "Gawdy Watch" was found behind the 
tapestry on the wall. See the views in this work. 

Manor of Coldham Hall. This Manor was granted in 1551 by Philip and 
Mary to Lord North; and was subsequently purchased by the Gawdy family. 
In connection with the brief history of this estate we have found important evidence 
of the succession from father to son in the pedigree of the Gawdy family and which, if 
authentic, discloses the errors existing in the introductory statements found in other 
accounts concerning the family history. This relation will be given in full; it is as fol- 
lows: " In 1510, John Gawdy of Harleston was buried in Redenhall church, and gave 
his estate to Thomas Gawdy the younger. In 1523, Thomas Gawdy of Worthall 
Gent, obtained a manumission of all his lands in Mendon, Metfield, and Withers- 
dale, held of the Manors of Metfield priory and Kingshall of Simon the Prior of 
Mendham. In 1545, Thomas Gawdy of Redenhall, senior, was buried here leaving 
Agnes his wife, James Marsham of Norwich, merchant, and John Calle of Bale 
his Executors. In 1556, Thomas Gawdy junior, Esq. of Harleston, was buried 
in Redenhall church by his first wife, and Elizabeth his relict was buried by him 
in 1563. He left sons Thomas and Frances Gawdy, and three daughters viz: 
Eliza Southall, Margaret Aldrich, and Catherine Gawdy. In 1570, Thomas Gawdy 
their eldest son purchased Wybred Manor of William Calthorp, Esq. and in 1583 
he sold this manor to his cousin, Thomas Gawdy, Knt., and he settled it on William 
Brand who was trustee of Elizabeth, daughter of Helwise his wife, and her heirs. 
He married Frances (daughter of Richers) for his second wife, and was one of the 
King's Judges, but dying in 1658, was buried here, being seized of Claxton, Hel- 
lington, Rockland, Porningland & Co., leaving Henry Gawdy his son and heir, then 
26 years of age; and in 1615, Sir Henry Gawdy, and Sir Clipsby Gawdy, Knights, 
were lords of the Manors. 

Bassingboxime Manor. There was a castle in Cambridgshire by this name. 
Bassingbourne Hall stood about a mile northwest of this church in the parish 
of Takeley, Essex. At the time of the Survey (Doomsday) it belonged to Bauraria; 
in King Edward's time a freeman was lord of it under the protection of Edric, 
but was deprived of it. This manor derived its name from the Bassingbourne 
family. They were enfeoffed of it. Warine de Bassingbourne was sheriff of the 
counties of Cambridge and Huntington in 1170. Some of the name were settled 
here in the reign of Edward III., for in 1239 a fine was passed between Alexander 
de Bassingbourne and Aldreda de Bassingbourne, impatient, of one curucate of 

land in Takeley and Stansted, Right of Alexander Bassingbourne and his heirs; 

remainder to Stephen Bassingbourne his brother. John de Bassingbourne held 
a quarter of a Knight's fee in Takele, or Takeley, under Giles de Playz, who died 



78 HOMES OF THE GAIVDYS IN ENGLAND. 

in 1303. The heirs of John de Bassingbourne held the same under Richard de 
Playz and in 1327 Nicholas Bassingbourne held the same under Giles de Playz 
the younger, who died in 1360. The Manor continued in the Bassingbourne 
family down to the reign of King Henry VI. 

Manor of Woodhall. In the time of Edward I. (28th year of his reign) John 
de Bassingbourne had a charter of free Warren in his Manors of Hatfield, and 
Redburn, in Hertfordshire, and in Mandon and Rettendon, in Essex, which was 
of the fee of the Bishop of Ely. He was constituted Sheriflf of this county and 
Essex, anno 32d Edward I.; also for the last half of the 34th of Edward I. from 
whom this manor came to John de Bassingbourne, who was Sheriff of Hertford- 
shire and Essexshire anno 45th Edward III. He also served his country in two 
Parliaments, one held anno 45th of Edward HI., the other at Westminster, in the 
47th of Edward III. This manor continued in this family till it came to John 
Bassingbourne, who had two daughters. Audry Bassingbourne was married to 
Thomas Gawdy, serjeant-at-law. She was possessed of the manor in the time of 
Queen Mary; she levied a fine hereof, and his free Warrine, anno the third and 
fourth years of the reign of Philip and Mary to the use of the second Thomas 
Gawdy and his heirs. From Thomas Gawdy, this manor descended to his son 
Thomas Gawdy, who married Honour Stanyings, and was sold by him and not 
by his father as has been asserted by one writer. 

Manor of West Herling. Bassingbourne Gawdy married 1st, Anne, the daugh- 
ter of John Wotten and Elizabeth his wife. He married secondly, a daughter 
of Nevill Lord Abergaveny, widow of Lord D'Acres. By Elizabeth Nevill he 
had an only daughter, Anne, whose wardship Mimmicent (?) Esq. sold in 1545 
to Sir Anthony Rouse, and it belonged to him as lord of Bergham Manor. 
In 1556 Bassingbourne Gawdy, second son of Thomas Gawdy serjeant-at-law, 
her third husband, kept his first court there, and held Middle Herling of Robert 
Berney as of his manor of Bergham, by the service of half a fee, and five shil- 
lings per annum. He was afterwards knighted. In 1554 he purchased Seaford 
Manor; and thus all the manors in West-Herling, Middle-Herling and Gates- 
thorpe, came to the Gawdys, The church at West-Herling was dedicated to 
St. Mary. In the chapel there was but one inscribed stone, and that being taken 
up, was placed in an altar tomb in the church-yard. This was the inscription: 

"Here lieth the body of Anne Le-Neve, daughter of Oliver Le-Neve of 
Witchingham Esq.; and Anne, sole daughter of John Gawdy of West- 
Herling in this county Bart, who died 29th Nov. 1689". 

The most of the Gawdys were buried in this chapel. The founder's tomb ap- 
peared on the outside wall; it had an arch turned over it, and the gravestone, 
or lid of the coffin, was about two feet from the ground. In the window over 
the tomb were the Gawdy arms, quartering Bassingbourne and impaling Wotten 
Bardwell, Walcote, Parkenham, Furneux and Witchingham. The townland was 
£5. a year which was given by Mrs. Margaret Gawdy to clothe the poor widows, 
if there be any; if not for any poor people. It lies in Kenningshall and Benham, 
and the rent was received by the rectors and church wardens. 

Manor of Astwick. This manor was part of the inheritance of the Bassing- 
bourne family. John Bassingbourne Esq. the last of the name who held this 
estate, had two daughters, his co-heirs, of whom Anne married Thomas Gawdy, 
Esq. Serjeant-at-law, and had the estates of Hatfield-Woodhall as part of her 



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HOMES OF THE GAWDYS IN ENGLAND. 79 

inheritance. Katherine married Sir Nicholas Hare, Knt., who in her right became 
lord of this manor. This Nicholas Hare, Knt. of Brusyard in the county of Suf- 
folk, obt. 31 Oct. 1557, was buried in the Temple Church under the altar; Kath- 
erine Bassingbourne his wife, obt. 21 Nov. 1557, was buried with her husband. 
These had six children. 

Manor of Scotnetts. This was the lordship of Gilbert de Hawe about 1307 
and later of Peter Talbut. In 1428 Davy assigns it to Gilbert de Haugh or Dil- 
haugh, and after him to Robert Butland with query. In about 1498 the manor be- 
came vested in John Framlingham, who died in 1498 ; from which time it has passed 
in the same course as the Manor of Crowes Hall in Denbenham. Sir Charles 
Gawdy had the lordship in 1549, and there is among the 'Additional Charters' 
in the British Museum an extract of a memorial roll of this lordship 6th October 
1649. The manor is specifically mentioned in the fine said to have been levied 
in 1589 by T. Weychock against Sir Charles Framlingham, and in the inquisition 
post mortem of Sir Charles Gawdy Knt., who died 13th Dec, 1629. Post mortem 
17th March, 1629-30. 

Manor of Woodwards. This was the Lordship of Thomas de Ulveston about 
1332, and passed to his son and heir, John de Ulveston. The manor belonged 
to John Woodward, and subsequently became vested in Framlingham Gawdy, 
from whom it passed to his brother, Sir Charles Gawdy, who died in 1529. 

Ashfield Manor. Frances Framlingham died seized of this manor 20th Sept. 
1544. The Framlingham family had long been connected with the parish, a 
John Framlingham, who died in 1425, was buried in the church here with his wife 
Margaret. Davy in his Suffolk Collections, has Lionel Talemach down as lord 
in 1548, but adds "perhaps trustee". Sir Charles Framlingham Knt. was lord in 
1546, and the manor passed on his death to his grandson Framlingham Gawdy, 
who was succeeded by his brother. Sir Charles Gawdy Knt., who died 13th Dec, 
1629, and from that time to the present the manor has passed in the same course 
as the Manor of Crowes Hall in Denbenham in the Hundred, and Great Thornham, 
in Hartismere Hundred, and is now vested in Lord Henniker. 

Framlingham Castle. There is a fine view of this ancient castle in a work en- 
titled "The Manors of Suffolk". In 1397 John Framlingham purchased an an- 
cient estate called Crows Hall owned in 1287 by one John Crowe. The quaint writer, 
Leland, says: "One Henry Framlingham, commonly called by office 'Henry Sur- 
veyor', was a stout fellow and had a fair land in and about Framlingham towne". 
There were two small villages of this name at the time of the Conquest; Fram- 
lingham-Parva or Little Framlingham, and Framlingham-Magna or Great Fram- 
lingham. Mr. Le-Neve says the name signifies the seat or abode of Fram, who 
was a Saxon of great note in these parts. In 1470 the Manor of Scotnetts was 
held by John Framlingham, who died in 1498. There is a brass in the church 
in Denbenham inscribed to John Framlingham and wife dated 1434. The stone 
on which the figures are fixed lies in the floor of the church; and there were 
formerly below him the figures of three sons, and below the figure of his wife the 
figures of five daughters, and between the children a single figure. Over their 
heads, in the centre, were the arms and crest, and at each corner a shield. These 
figures were reaved long ago. This John Framlingham bought Crows Hall in 
Denbenham in the 21st year of the reign of king Richard II. 1397; and his son 
John Framlingham who married the daughter of Lee in Sussex, died June 12, 1425, 
and was buried in Denbenham; to these latter the figures on the brass were ap- 



HOMES OF THE GAWDYS IN ENGLAND. 



propriated. This family continued at Crows Hall till 1595, when Sir Charles 
Framlingham, Knt., died leaving by Dorothy his wife the daughter of Sir Clement 
Heigham, an only daughter, Anna, married to Sir Bassingbourne Gawdy of Mar- 
ling in the county of Norfolk, Knt. In a pedigree in Vincents Suffolk, in which 
there is a collection of arms, John Framlingham before mentioned is called the son 
of Henry Framlingham by Agnes Neville, and grandson of William Framlingham, 
Alderman of London. Sir Charles Framlingham married the only daughter and 
heir of Bassingbourne Gawdy, of West Hading, in Norfolk, Knt.; second Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Sir Thomas Barnardston. He died July 28, 1593, and devised 
his manors of Crows Hall, Denbenham, Scotnetts, and Abbottshall to his youngest 
grandson. Sir Charles Gawdy, in special entail with cross remainders. Sir Charles 
Framlingham was buried in the church at Denbenham, and in the south aisle of 
the chancel is an altar-tomb with his recumbent figure and that of his wife, Dame 
Dorothy, daughter of Sir Clement Heigham, Knt. Letters of Sir Charles Fram- 
lingham to Bassingbourne Gawdy may be found in the Report of the Commitee on 
Historical Manuscripts, dated Oct. 11, 1580, Nov. 17, 1580, and of Dec. 7th and 
18th, 1580. 

On the death of this Sir Charles Framlingham difficulties arose in consequence 
of the heir being an infant. Anne, the last holder of the estate, was the wife of 
Bassingbourne Gawdy, of Harling, in Norfolk, and having died leaving Framling- 
ham Gawdy, under age, the Queen claimed the right to possession during the 
minority, of all the lands of the deceased, which he held in Capite under the Crown, 
and the Lord High Treasurer Burleigh, having given the benefit of it to Thomas 
Heigham, he transferred his right to the father of the infant by the following agree- 
ment: 1595. "Articles of agreement indented, concluded and made between 
Thomas Heigham, gent., second son of Sir John Heigham, Knt., on the one part, 
Sir Nicholas Bacon ,Knt., on the other part, the 26th day of July in the 37th year 
of the reigne of our Soverigne Lady Queen Elizabeth, in manner and form following 
viz:- Whereas it hath pleased the Right Honourable the Lord Burleigh, Lord 
High Treasurer of England, Mr. (Minister) of the Wards (awards) to bestow 
upon the Sayd Thomas Heigham, his servant, the lease of the lands to her highness 
by the death of Sir Charles Framlingham, Knight, deceased. The sayd Thomas 
Heigham for the consideration hereinafter expressed, hath covenanted and granted 
by these presents to and with the sayd Nicholas Bacon, that after the office found 
of and for the sayd lands that the sayd Thomas Heigham shall for and in the name 
of Bassingbourne Gawdy Esquire, and upon the payment of the fine by the sayd 
Bassingbourne at or before the feast of St. Andrew next ensuing, sue out and 
obtain the lease of the lands aforesayd, and deliver yt to the sayd Bassingbourne 
or his assigns. In consideration whereof the sayd Sir Nicholas Bacon shall con- 
tent and paye or cause to be contented and payed to the sayd Thomas Heig- 
ham, on Thursday next, being the last day of July, at the house of the sayd 
Sir John Heigham, in Darrow, in the county of Suffolk, two hundred pounds 
of good and lawful money of the realm. And shall also enter his bonds 
obligation to the sayd Thomas in the penal sum of one hundred pounds, 
for the true payment of Ixvil.xiij S, iiid. of lawful money of England, in and 
upon the last day of October next ensuing at the places aforesayd. In witness 
whereof the P'ties abovesayd have to these presents putte our hands and seales the 
day and year above-mentioned. 

(Signed) 

Thomas Heigham". 






a 

< 



HOMES OF THE GAWDYS IN ENGLAND. 81 

Among the "Additional Charters" in the British Museum there was a Crown 
Grant for rent from this and Scottnetts and Harborough Manors, 7th May, 1631 
to Sir Edmund Moundeford and Framlingham Gawdy. Sir Charles Gawdy the 
devisee of his grandfather Framlingham who died seized of it 20th Sept. 1544 on 
whose death was vested in his son and heir, Sir Charles Framlingham, who died 
seized of it 1595 when it descended, like the manor of Crows Hall in Denbenham, 
to Framlingham Gawdy, son and heir of Bassingbourne Gawdy, and from him 
it passed in 1617 to Clipsby Gawdy, Knt., and Thomas Wright, and thus vested 
in Sir Charles Gawdy, brother and heir of Clipsby, who had license to alienate 
it in 1620 to Aslack Lang and John Pulham, probably by way of settlement, for 
it was mentioned in the inquisition post mortem of Sir Charles Gawdy, who died 
13th Dec. 1629, when it was inherited by his son and heir, of the same name, who 
sold the Manor to Daniel Meadows of Chattisham. 

This noble fortress, Framlingam Castle, is said to have been founded by Red- 
wald, or Redowold, one of the most powerful Kings of the East Angles, between 
599 and 624 A.D. It belonged to St. Edmund, one of the Saxon monarchs 
of East Anglia, who upon the invasion of the Danes in 870, fled from Dunwick 
or Thetford, to this castle, from which being driven, and overtaken at Hegilsdon, 
was martyred because he would not renounce his faith in Christ, by the Danes 
binding him to a tree and shooting him to death with arrows. The castle remained 
in the hands of the Danes for fifty years, until they were subdued by the Saxons. 
William the Conqueror and Rufus his son retained the castle in their possession; 
the third son of William, Henry I. granted it, with the Manor of Framlingham, 
to Roger Bigod. The ancient Castle was built about 1170 on the site of a still 
more ancient one. 

This lordly fortress stands upon a low hill on the north of the town of Framling- 
ham, about thirty miles from the coast in Suffolk county, England. The present 
remains of the castle consist of an imposing circlet of walls, somewhat oval in shape, 
covering an area of one acre and a quarter. The surrounding walls are 44 feet in 
height and 8 feet thick, flanked by thirteen square towers, which overtop the walls 
by fourteen feet, all nearly entire. Close to the walls was the inner moat, beyond 
which were two other broad belts of water encircling all but the west side, where 
the fortress was rendered inaccessible by a far-reaching marsh. 

" Bloody Mary" lodged here. In 1639 all the lodgings, halls, chapel and offices 
were dismantled and with the materials some charitable houses were built within 
the walls. 

The ruins are now embosomed in shrubbery, are nearly mantled with ivy and 
form a very picturesque feature in the landscape as viewed from a distance. 

Framlingham Castle. 
Mr. Bird the poet, from whom we have already quoted, has told in fervid verse 
the historic renown of the venerable and majestic ruin: — 

"Castle of ancient days! in times long gone 
Thy lofty halls in royal splendour shone! 
Thou stood'st a monument of strength sublime, 
A giant laughing at the threats of time ! 
Strange scenes have passed within thy walls, and strange 
Has been thy fate through many a chance and change ! 
Thy towers have heard the war-cry, and the shout 
Of friends within, and answering foes without. 



82 HOMES OF THE GAIVDYS IN ENGLAND. 

Have rung to sound of revelry, while mirth 
Held her carousal, when the sons of earth, 
Sported with joy, till even he could bring 
No fresh delight upon the drooping wing". 
I touch my lyre, delighted thus to bring 
To thee my heart's full homage while I sing, 
And thou, old Castle — thy bold turrets high, 
Have shed their deep enchantments to mine eye. 
Though years have changed thee, I have gazed intent 
In silent joy on tower and battlement. 
Where all thy time-worn glories met my sight, 
Then I have felt such rapture and delight. 
That, had the splendour of thy daies of yore 
Flashed on my view I had not loved thee more. 
Scenes of immortal deeds, thy walls have rung 
To pealing shouts from many a warriors' tongue; 
When first thy founder, Redwall of the spear. 
Manned thy high towers, defied his foemen near, 
When, girt with strength, East Anglia's King of old. 
The sainted Edmund, sought thy sheltering fold, 
When the proud Dane, fierce Hinguar, in his ire. 
Besieged the King and wrapped thy walls in fire. 
While Edmund fled, but left thee with his name 
Linked, and forever, to the chain of fame; 
Thou wast then great! and long in other years 
Thy grandeur shone — thy portraiture appears, 
From history's pencil like a summer night. 
With much of shadow, but with more of light. 

Pile of departed days! my verse records 

Thy time of glory, thy illustrious lords, 

The fearless Bigods - Brotherton - De Vere, 

And Kings who held there in their pride, or fear. 

And gallant Howards, 'neath whose ducal sway 

Proud rose thy towers, thy rugged heights were gay 

With glittering banners, costly trophies rent 

From men in war, or tilt, or tournament, 

With all the pomp and splendour that could grace 

The name and honour of that warlike race. 

Howard! the rich, the noble, and the great, 

Most brave, unhappy, and unfortunate! 

Kings were thy courtiers — Queens have sued to share 

Thy wealth, thy triumphs — e'en thy name to bear. 

Tyrants have bowed thy children to the dust, 

Some for their worth, and some who broke their trust! 

And there was 07ie amongst thy race who died. 

To Henry's shame, his country's boast and pride; 

Immortal Surrey! offspring of the Muse! 

Bold as the lion, gentle as the dews 

That fall on flowers to wake their odorous breath, 



HOMES OF THE GAWDYS IN ENGLAND. 83 

And shield their blossoms from the tomb of death. 

Surrey! thy fate was wept by countless eyes, 

A nation's woe assailed the pitying skies, 

When thy pure spirit left this scene of strife, 

And soared to Him who breath'd it into life; 

Thy funeral knell pealed o'er all the world — thy fall 

Was mourned by hearts that loved thee — mourned by all — 

All save thy murderers — thou hast won the crown; 

And thou, fair Framlinghaml a bright renown. 

Yes, thy rich temple holds the stately tomb 

Where sleeps the Poet in his lasting home. 

Immortal Surrey! hero, bard divine. 

Pride, grace, and glory of brave Norfolk's line, 

Departed spirit ! -oh, I love to hold 

Communion sweet with lofty minds of old. 

To catch a spark of that celestial fire 

Which glows and kindles thy rapturous lyre. 

Though varying themes demand my future lays 

Yet thus my soul a willing homage pays 

To that bright glory which illumes thy name. 

Though nought can raise the splendour of thy fame". 

— James Bird. 

In 1546 Sternfield Mandeville Manor passed to the Framlingham family and 
was held by Francis Framlingham, who died in 1544, when it passed to his son 
and heir Sir Charles Framlingham, who died in 1595, when the Manor passed 
to his grandson, Framlingham Gawdy, who married Lettice, daughter and co- 
heir of Robert Knowles. 

Manor of Crowes Hall. This manor is styled "Crowes Hall alias Woodwards" 
in the work on the "Manors of Suffolk". This was the lordship probably of 
Robert Aquillers in 1221 when an order was made to the sheriff as to the Marked 
in Denbenham, granted by the King to the said Robert. In 1287 the manor 
seems to have passed to John Crowe, against whom and Marion his wife a fine 
of the manor was levied by Roger de Aspale this year; but in 1331 the manor 
was vested in Peter Talbut, of Hintlesham, and Matilda his wife under a fine 
levied by them that year against Walter de Wauncey, parson of Grunddisburg 
church. Later Sir Edmund de Talbut, of Hintlesham, no doubt son of Peter, 
enfeoffed Robert de Roxford and others, with remainder to Edmund de Tal- 
but. In 1397 John Framlingham bought Crowes Hall. "And after him came 
one Jenkin Framlingham, and purchased a faire Lordship and Manor Place 
about Denbenham Market from some one in Suffolk. This Manor Place stondeth 
on a praty Hille and a Wood about it a little without Denbenham Market, and 
is cauled Crowes Haule, for one Crow a Gentleman who was owner of it. This 
Jenkin (Framlingham) lyeth in Denbenham Chirche; and sins the Framlinghams 
hath bene Lords of the Towne of Denbenham. The Framlinghams of late exchanged 
with the Lords of Norfolk and Wingefield for their lands in Framlingham self, 

NOTE — Here the family continued their residence for a hundred years, and then migrated to 
Redenhall, near Harleston, in Norfolk, acquiring there the manors of Holebrook and Coldham. In 
the course of time Holebrook manor house was pulled down and a new one erected called Gawdy Hall. 



84 HOMES OF THE GAWDYS IN ENGLAND. 

and in some other parts very nere it. There be none of the Framlinghams that 
be men of lands there but the onely Framlingham of Denbenham". On John 
Framlingham's death he was succeeded by his son and heir, John Framlingham 
who married Margaret Lee, and died 12th June 1425, when the manor passed to 
his son and heir, John Framlingham who married Mary Walles. On his death 
the manor passed to his son and heir John Framlingham who married Anne, daugh- 
ter of Sir Robert Wingfield and died in 1498, when it went to his son and heir 
Sir James Framlingham. He married 1st the daughter and heir of John Walworth, 
and 2ndly Anne, daughter and heir of Robert Home, by Margaret, daughter and 
co-heir of John Marquess of Montague. This alliance brought a number of quarter- 
ings to the Framlingham shield, for this Marquess Montague was a Neville, 3rd 
son of Richard Neville, Earl of Salisbury, and Alice his wife, sole daughter and heir 
of Thomas de Montacute, who had married one of the daughters and co-heirs of 
Thomas Holland, Earl of Kent, the son of Thomas de Holland, K.G., summoned 
to Parliament as Baron Holland in 1353, and Joan Plantagenet, called the "Fair 
Maid of Kent", the daughter of Edmond Plantagenet, surnamed de Wodstocke, 
Earl of Kent, the son of Edward I. by his 2nd wife Margaret sister of "Philip the 
Fair", of France. Sir James Framlingham died in 1519, when the manor passed 
to his son and heir, Thomas Framlingham, who died without issue, whereupon 
the manor devolved upon his brother and heir, Francis Framlingham, who married 
Anne, daughter of Sir Philip Tilney, and died 20th Sept. 1544, when it passed 
to his son and heir, Sir Charles Framlingham. 

We find among the Chancery Proceedings of this period an action by Sir Charles 
Framlingham against Nicholas Garneys and others to ascertain lands and recover 
manorial rents "lately held by Laurence Awood, deceased, belonging to plaintiff 
late parcel of the possession of the dissolved monastery of Butley", and also 
"lately held by John Wyeth, of the Manor of Crowes Hall and land lately held 
by one Wyeth of the Manor of Abbots Hall and Crowes Hall, both of which 
manors belonged to the plaintiff". 

Sir Charles Framlingham married 1st, Dorothy, daughter of Sir Clement Heigh- 
am, Knt., and had issue one son, Clement, who died before him under age without 
issue, and an only daughter and heir, Anne, married to Sir Bassingbourne Gawdy, 
of West Harling, in Norfolk, Knt. Sir Charles Framlingham married 2ndly Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Sir Thomas Barnardson, but had no issue by her. A fine 
was levied of the manor in 1589 by J. Wrydock against Sir Charles Framlingham. 
He died 28th July 1595, and devised the manors of Crowes Hall, Denbenham, 
Scotnetts, and Abbotshall to his youngest grandson. Sir Charles Gawdy, in 
special tail with cross remainders over. 

Sir Charles Framlingham was buried in Denbenham church, and in the south 
aisle of the chancel is an altar-tomb with his recumbent figure and that of his 
wife Dame Dorothy. He is clad in Armour girt with a sword having gauntlets 
on his hands, which are joined in the attitude of prayer, his head resting on his 
helmet. She is in the habit and large ruff of the times, her head being supported 
by a cushion. Against the wall above the monuments, is a tablet with the 
following inscription: "Here lyeth the bodie of Sir Charles Framlingham, Knt., 
who dyed the 28th daye of July Anno 1595. The sayd Syr Charles had two 
wives, the first named Dorothy, daughter of Sr. Clemt. Heigham, Knt., and by 
her he had issue a son Clement, that dyed without issue; and Anne, that was 
married to Sir Bassingbourne Gawdy, Knight; and for his second wyfe he had 



HOMES OF THE GAWDYS IN ENGLAND. 85 

Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Thomas Barnardson, Knight, which second wyfe 
overlived the sayd Syr Charles, and caused this monument to be erected Anno 
1598." 

Manor of Abbotts Hall. In 1586 this manor was granted by Henry VIII. to 
Charles Brandon, Duke of SuflFolk, but shortly afterwards passed to Francis, 
son and heir of Sir Charles Framlingham who died in 1595, when the manor passed 
to his grandson, Framlingham Gawdy, who died Feb. 25, 1654-5, when the manor 
passed to Sir William Gawdy the first Baronet, so created July 13th, 1663, who 
married Sept. 1, 1636, Elizabeth, daughter of John Duffield of East Wrentham, 
in the county of Norfolk, and died in August, 1669, when the manor passed to his 
son and heir Sir John Gawdy, 2d Baronet, who married Anne, 2d daughter and 
co-heir of Sir Robert de Grey of Merton, in Norfolk, and died in January, 1708-9. 
Sir John Gawdy, however, in his lifetime, sold this manor with the advowson for 
£400 to William Johnson. 

This was the estate of Brictnall in the days of the Confessor, and of Hervies 
Bilturmeencier at the time of the Survey. In 1310 the Abbot of Leiston had 
lands here of the gift of Gilbert de Peche, and there is a confirmation of a 
grant here to the Abby in the time of Henry III. Among the 'Additional 
Charters' in the British Museum, In 1316 Robert de Montalt held under 
the abbot. He died in 1329 when the interest in it of Robert de Montalt seems 
to have continued to the family, passing in the same course as the manor of Frams- 
dery, in this Hundred, for in 1391 we find the same in Roger Montalt. No doubt 
the chief lordship was retained by the abby of Leiston, and this on the dissolution 
of the house vested in the Crown. This manor descended to Francis Framling- 
ham, who died seized of it 20th Sept. 1544, on whose death it vested in his son 
and heir, Sir Charles Framlingham, who died seized of it in 1595, when it de- 
scended, like the manor of Crowes Hall, in Denbenham, to Framlingham Gawdy, 
son and heir of Sir Bassingbourne Gawdy, and from him it passed in 1617 to 
Clipsby Gawdy, Knt., and Thomas Wright, and then vested in Sir Charles Gawdy, 
brother and heir of CHpsby, who had license to alienate it in 1620 to Aslack 
Lang and John Pulham. It is mentioned in the inquisition post mortem of Sir 
Charles Gawdy, who died 13th Dec. 1629, when it passed to his son and heir, 
Sir Charles Gawdy, who sold the manor to Daniel Meadows, of Chattisham. 

The following document seems to belong to this section of the family history. 
"The Right WorshipfuU Sir Charles Framlingham of Crows Hall in the paryshe 
of Denbenham in the county of Suffolk, Knight, married to his first wife Dorothy, 
daughter of Sir Clement Heigham of Barrow in the same county of Suffolk, Knight, 
and by her had issue Clement Framlingham who died without issue (his only son) , 
and Anne Framlingham his only daughter and heir, both dead before their father ; 
which Anne was married to Bassingbourne Gawdy, son and heir of Bassingbourne 
Gawdy of Harling in the county of Norfolk, Esquire, who had issue Framlingham 
Gawdy his eldest sonne and heir apparent, and Charles Gawdy, second sonne. 
After Sir Charles Gawdy married his second wife, Elizabeth daughter of Sir Thomas 
Barnardson of Keddingston, in the county of Suffolk, Knight, widow to John 
Everard of Brandashe, in the county of Suffolk, Esquire, by whom she had 
issue Mary her only child who died without issue; but by Sir Charles, her second 
husband, she had no issue. He ordained the Lady Elizabeth his wife and Mr. John 
Wolmer, Executors of his last will and testament. He departed this life at Crows 
Hall aforesayd on St. Peters day the 29th of June, 1595, and was worshipfully 



86 HOMES OF THE GAWDYS IN ENGLAND. 

buried according to his estate at Denbenham the 3d day of August next following* 
at which burial Sir Thomas Barnardson, Knight, Master Anthony Wingfiield and 
Mr. Bassingbourne Gawdy, Esquires, were Chief mourners. Mr. Thomas Sher- 
man bare the standard, Mr. Thomas Beddingfield bare the Pennon of Arms, 
John Raven alias Rongdragon bare the helmet and crest, and Richard Lee, alias 
Clarencieux King of Arms bare the Coate, sword and targe, and ordered the whole 
funeral. In witness that all this is true, we whose names do follow, have here- 
unto set out handes the day and year of the buryal aforesayd. 

Thomas Barnardson. 

J. Heigham. 

Elizabeth Framlingham. 

Claxton Manor. On Sept. 10th and in the 5th year of the reign of Philip and 
Mary, Edward Lord North had letters patent to hold Claxton in capitate; late 
in the possession of Charles Duke of Suflfolk, and the same year had license to 
alienate it to John Throckmorton Esq. and his heirs who conveyed it to Thomas 
Gawdy and Henry Gawdy his son in the 8th of the reign of Queen Elizabeth. This 
Thomas Gawdy Esq. was afterwards knighted and was a Judge of the Common 
Pleas. He was the son of John Gawdy ? gent, of Harleston in Norfolk, by Rose, 
the daughter of Thomas Bennett, and this John Gawdy was the son of Thomas 
Gawdy of said town. The Judge resided at the manor house of Claxton, and 
was also lord of Hegel ton, Ashby, Charleton, Harleston, Rockland, St. Peters, 
Saxlingham, Surlingham, Cartfield, Bamerton, Frenge, Shipdam, Tasborough, 
Cantley and Gawdy Hall; and he died seized of these numerous estates Nov. 4, 
in the 31st of the reign of Queen Elizabeth as was found by an inquisition post 
mortem taken at Lodden August 19th following. Henry Gawdy, son of this 
Thomas by Etheldreda his first wife, daughter and heir of William Knightley, 
Gent, of Norwich, then aged 36 years. His second wife was Frances, daughter 
of Robert Riches of Kent. This Henry Gawdy was created a Knight of the Bath 
on the coronation of King James L and was sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk during 
the 6th year of the reign of said King. His wife was Elizabeth, daughter of Robert 
Warner Esq., of Milden Hall, in Suflfolk. His son, Sir Robert Gawdy, enjoyed 
Claxton Hall and lived at Claxton Castle in 1624; by Winefred his wife, the 
daughter of Sir Nathaniel Bacon of Stifkey in Norfolk, he had a son Henry Gawdy 
who married the daughter of Sir John Heveringham and died sine prole. Sir 
Robert Gawdy had a daughter and heir named Dorothy, who became the wife 
of Sir Philip Parker of Arwarton, to whom she brought a considerable estate, and 
Sir Robert her father settled on her the manor of Stanfield in Windham, in 1631. 
On the death of Sir Robert Gawdy without leaving male issue, this lordship de- 
scended to Thomas Gawdy, son of George Gawdy, which Thomas was of Claxton 
in 1644, and his son Thomas Gawdy, was Captain of the Horse in the Lord Wind- 
sor's regiment, and died in Ireland; he was the last of the Gawdys who enjoyed 
the lordship. Thomas Brereton was lord in 1697, and was said to have purchased 
it of Thomas Gawdy. 

Claxton Hall. In 1330 William de Claxton, prior of Norwich, seems to 
have been the head of this family. In 1476 Hamond Claxton was sheriff of Nor- 
wich and mayor in 1485. In 1619 Thomas Claxton was alderman of Norwich. 
In 1559 Hamond Claxton the elder was much in favor with Thomas Howard, 
Duke of Norfolk. 



HOMES OF THE GAWDYS IN ENGLAND. 87 

John Trogmorton Esq. conveyed this manor to Thomas Gawdy Esq. and Henry 
Gawdy his son in the 8th year of the reign of Queen Elizabeth. 

Thomas Gawdy Esq. was afterwards a Knight, and Judge of the Common Pleas. 
Son of John Gawdy ? Gentleman of Harleston, in Norfolk, by Rose his 2d wife, 
daughter of Thomas Bennett; and this John Gawdy was the son of Thomas Gawdy 
of said town. 

The Judge resided at this Manor House of Claxton and was lord of Helgeton, Asby, 
Carleton, Helveston, Rockland, St. Peters, Saxlingham, Bramerston, Catfield, 
Frenge, Shipdam, Tasborough, Cantly, and Gawdy Hall in Harleston, and died 
seized of the same Nov. 4, in the 31st year of the reign of Queen Elizabeth as was 
found by an inquisition taken at London on Aug. 4th following, leaving Henry 
Gawdy his son, heir, by Etheldreda his first wife, daughter and co-heir of William 
Knightly, Gentleman, of Norwich, aged 36 years. His second wife was Frances, 
daughter of Richess, of Kent. 

Sir Robert Gawdy his son enjoyed it and lived at Claxton Castle in 1624; his 
wife was Winefred Bacon by whom he had a son Henry Gawdy who married a 
daughter of Sir John Hevingham and died sine prole. 

Hevingham died s.p. Dorothy, daughter and heir of Sir Robert Gawdy, was 
married to Philip Parker of Arwarton to whom she brought considerable estate, 
and Sir Robert settled on her the manor of Stainfield in Windham in 1631. 

Sir Philip Parker received the honor of Knighthood 10th Nov. 1624. He married 
Dorothy, daughter and heir of Sir Robert Gawdy, of Claxton, in Norfolk, Knt. (by 
Winefred his wife, daughter and heir of Sir Nathaniel Bacon of Stiffkey in Norfolk) 
and dying 22d June 1675 the manor of Erwarston passed to their only surviving 
son and heir, Philip Parker, who was elevated to the dignity of a baronet 13th 
Charles H. He married twice; 1st, to Rebecca, daughter of Walter, sister and 
evidently heir of Sir Walter Long, of Whaddon, in Wiltshire, Bart, and secondly. 7th 
Nov. 1661, Hannah, daughter and heir of Philip Bacon of Woolverstone, widow 
of Thomas Beddingsfield, son of Sir Thomas Beddingsfield of Darsham, Knt. 

The church at Claxton has a nave with a north aisle, and a chancel and square 
tower. On the north wall of the chancel there was a neat monument that was 
much damaged by the falling of a ladder, with the arms of Gawdy Argent, a tor- 
toi.se Vert. 

"MAGISTRAUS EST LEX LOQUENS 
''LEX NONQUAM IRASCITUR". 

" Monumentum Henri Gawdey Equitis aurati, militis balney, qui his vice comos 
mort. Ter survus patriae in Parlimento, semper amator patriae et semper amatus 
insignis natu, insignis sabole, Pat. Bob. et Antolij Gawdy, Georgeii et Edward Gaw- 
dy Armig, et Annae Dominae Jenkinson obit, ano 1620. Septuagesimo tertia aetatis 
tnemohae patris ejus stronxit Rob. Gawdy, Miles Filus promoginitus ano. 1637. 
Pias memonae avi parentis, et avanculorum dedicaoit hane inscrita in tabulan Tho. 
Gawdy, Armiger filius Georgii Anno-vivit post funera virtus '\ 

Here were the effigies of a man of full stature of plaster work (afterwards broken 
in pieces) on an altar-tomb adjoining, and on the body of it, a man and wife, with 
a reading desk between them, and the arms of Gawdy and Bacon, quartered 
and enclosed with iron railes. 

Saxlingham. This manor was named for a person called Sax of the Saxons, 
which name was continued till after the Conquest, where Richard the son of Sax is 
mentioned. The town was divided into two sections, called Nethergate and Over- 



88 HOMES OF THE GAWDYS IN ENGLAND. 

gate, and were united ; to the former the advowson of Saxlingham-Nethergate be- 
longed; to the latter, that of Saxlingham-Thorpe. In 1609 Sir Henry Gawdy, 
Knt. of Claxton and other inhabitants of Saxlingham (who had purchased several 
parcels of the demeans) were found to hold Verdon manor at one fee of Forest 
Manor. In 1636 Sir William Pawlet and Sir Henry Gawdy had it and afterwards 
it belonged to Judge Gawdy by whom all the manors and advowsons were joined. 

Saxlingham-Thorpe was a rectory of which Thomas Gawdy, Knt. was the patron, 
valued in the Kings Books at £6, 13s, 4d, and paid 16d syndals, and 7s, 6d, of arch- 
deacons procuration. He held Nethergate also by personal union. In 1608 
Robert Robinson, then rector, certified that there were 140 communicants in the 
parish, and that Sir Henry Gawdy was a patron. 

Manor of Thorpe Hall. This manor belonged to the Abbot of Holme at the 
Conquest. The hamlet belonged to Rungton and the Abbot of Bury and takes 
its name from its low and moist situation. The rector had 80 acres of land valued 
with Rungton. Cassandra de Holme had the lands in the reign of (12th year) 
King Henry III. Thomas Chapman held it in 1561, and in 1566 sold it to Thomas 
Gawdy, Knt. of Claxton and Frances his wife, and his heirs and Henry Gawdy 
his son joined it to Verdon. 

Manor of Netherhall. A Saxon thane named Ralph StaIre held this estate. 
Soon after the Doomsday survey it was granted from the Crown to the noble 
family of De Gourney descended from Hugh De Gourney a Norman baron and a 
witness to the foundation deed of the Abby of Caen in Normandy in 1084, founded 
by William the Conqueror. In the third and fourth years of the reign of Philip 
and Mary, on January 2d of said year, this lordship was given to Thomas Gawdy 
Esq., who presented it to this church in 1564. Sir Thomas Gawdy, Knt., Judge of 
the Common Pleas, died seized of it in the 30th of the reign of Queen Elizabeth; 
who was the father of Henry Gawdy, afterwards a Knight of the Bath. In 1650 
Thomas Gawdy Esq. was lord and presented. Another writer has assumed that 
Netherhall was sold by Sir Thomas Lavell to the Gawdy family. The church 
here was dedicated to All Saint and was an ancient building constructed of flint 
and boulder. The nave was 36 feet in length and 25 feet in bridth, covered with 
thatch. At the west end was a square tower of the same materials with four 
pinnacles of freestone surmounted by a spire of wood covered with lead ; this was 
erected in 1416 A.D. The chancel was also covered with thatch and the com- 
munion table was railed in. A cross on the spire was removed in 1644. A drawing 
of this church was made by a man named Gully. 

Walsingham Priory Manor. This was the ancient seat of the family of 
Udedale or Dovedale in the time of the Conqueror. On the dissolution of this 
priory it came to the crown and was granted together with the unappropriated 
rectory on March 22d in the 7th year of the reign of Edward VI. to Thomas Gawdy 
Esq. who in the same year had license to convey it to William Goslyn. There 
was a place called "Wallingham", possibly identical with this "Walsingham", 
denominated in the Doomsday book " Wallinghtuna", that is, a town with mounds 
or walls fencing it against the watery meadows. In the time of Edward the Con- 
fessor it was in the possession of Thurston, a freeman, who had an hundred acres 
of land and fifteen acres of meadow, valued at 12 shillings and was only under 
protection. Here was a church with 26 acres. It comprised the manors of Sydeton 
Hall and Eston Hall in the village. 



HOMES OF THE GAWDYS IN ENGLAND. 89 

Shouldham Manor. This was the seat of the ancient family of de Shouldham, 
lords of the manor. Shouldham-Thorpe was written in the Doomsday Book 
" Carboisthorpe " from a cold stream of water running to Fincham church; this 
church was dedicated to St. Mary and had a nave and chancel covered with lead ; 
the tower at the west end containing three bells, fell down in 1724. Thomas Mild- 
may sold Shouldham-Thorpe to Judge Gawdy and as with Wallington, Nisbits 
and other estates it went to the Earl of Warwick. 

Bidwill Hall. This was a fine old embattled stone building surrounded by a 
moat. It was demolished in 1725. There was a family chapel in it anciently, 
and the parlor windows were ornamented with the arms of the Gawdy family and 
those of several distinguished houses with which they were intermarried. See 
Family Heraldry in this work. There was a very old musket barrel hanging on 
the wall bearing the following quaint inscription: "Turvis je svis, mats sans Fev, 
je ne puis", which being translated into English reads: 

"Full I am, 'tis true, of ire, 
But can do nothing without fire". 

Bonds Hall Manor. In Queen Elizabeth's time this manor was owned by Sir 
Thomas Gawdy who was afterwards a knight and judge of the Common Pleas, 
as also was Wolverston, descended from one Philip Wolverston who was married 
there and sold the manor to Thomas Gawdy in 1580. He died in 1588 and this 
estate, with other properties, passed to his son and heir, Henry Gawdy. This 
proprietor of so many manors also held Holbrook, Northwood, Fathingstone, 
Wybred, Stonehams, Busshes, Thornham, Horham, Hinton, Chickering and several 
other outlying territorial possessions, that were incorporated in his ornamental 
park. 

Garboldisham. Gerbodes, or Gerbolds Town, so called by Saxon who was owner 
of the place, ham signifying a house or village. This capitol Manor in 1045 belonged 
to the abbey of Ely. The Earl of Arundell sold this manor and its foldcourse 
for 300 sheep and their followers, as Garboldsham and Keninghall and all the barley- 
rents to Framlingham Gawdy Esq. of West-Herling and his heirs; and he sold off 
in 1629, 40 combs, 3 bushels, 2 pecks and a half to Richard Reed of Bury St. Ed- 
munds. The remainder continued in the family till Bassingbourne Gawdy, the 
last of that name, or his executors, sold the property to Robert Haylet. Framling- 
ham Gawdy Esq. till Sept. 14, 1666, and then Sir William Gawdy of West-Herling 
settled all his estate on Mary his only daughter to raise her fortune of £2500, 
and made Framlingham Gawdy Esq. her uncle, executor, who sold Garboldisham 
lands to Wentworth Garney Esq. whose family held it in 1736. The rectors of 
the parish of St. Johns in Garboldisham were (two of them) Rev. Gawdy Bolton 
May 3, 1609, and Rev. Anthony Gawdy Nov. 19, 1634. 

West-Herling. So called to distinguish it from the other Herlings. At the 
Doomsday survey this manor was a berewick belonging to Kenninghall manor 
and was granted to a member of the Albanys. Bassingbourne Gawdy purchased 
it, being then of Mandham in Suffolk. The Manor House hath been down for 
many ages, for in 1398 A.D. the lord of the manor lived at Seckford and had a 
pond or pool in the late site of the seat, called Seckford Hall- Yard Close in West- 
Herling. 

William Berdwell of Herling Esq. married Margaret, daughter of John Fram- 
lingham of Crowes Hall in Denbenham. Both died in one week A. D. 1508 



90 HOMES OF THE GAIVDYS IN ENGLAND. 

seized of Drayton Hall manor, Kaelling, Salthouse, Gasthorpe, West and Middle 
Herling manors and advowsons and were buried together in the nave of the church; 
his effigies bareheaded, with that of his wife by him with their escutcheons still 
remain. These left nine children of whom James Berdewell of Sandcroft and 
Long Stratton released Lisborn manor to Bassingbourne Gawdy, Esq. Berdwell 
Hall was a fine old embattled stone building, moated round, but was demolished 
in 1725. There was a family chapel in it anciently and there were nine 
escutcheons in the parlour and other windows when it was pulled down. 

Wenham Parva. In 1336 John de Brewse, then parson of the church of Strad- 
brook, and William de Brewse, parson of the church of Little Wenham and of 
Brent Wenham. Of this family were Sir John de Brewse who died in 1584; will 
made in 1582, to wife afterwards vested in his eldest son Thomas Brewse who leav- 
ing two daughters passed to his brother William Brewse. (View of Little Wenham 
Hall in "Manors of Suffolk", page 110, Vol vi.) Little Wenham is a fine specimen 
of domestic architecture of the 13th century. The Flemish bricks, or wall tiles, 
and bricks stamped with the cross-crosslets of the Brewses, are here seen. Sir 
Thomas de Brewse was lord of the manor, and resided at Wenham in 1500. Sir 
Robert Brewse succeeded in 1514. About 15 acres in settlement 18th June 
1660 between William Brewse and his son Sir John Brewse, Knight, and John 
Brewse 2nd, son of said John Brewse. The hall of Little Wenham estate was 
separated from the Manor in 1682. 

1599 Sir John Bruise was an infant at the time of his father's death and six 
courts were held by Gowdy on his behalf as follows: 11th Oct. 1603; 22d April 
1606; 18th April 1610; 28th April 1612; 7th June 1613: 29th Aug. 1614. 

Wentworth John Garney married 1st Ann, daughter of Sir Charles Gawdy, of 
Crowes Hall, Denbenham, who died 1681, and 2d, Mary, daughter of Sir Thos. 
Abdy of Felix Hall in Essex. He died in 1685 without issue. 

Court held 26 Sept. 1626 by Elizabeth Lady Felton. John Goswold and Bassing- 
bourne were guardians of Henry Felton, 2nd Baronet, a minor. 

A fine levied in 1591 by Thomas Gawdy against Thomas Rous, Kersey Manor 
1609, vested in Clipsby Gawdy and Mary his wife, who in 1614 obtained a license 
of it to Robert Rolfe. 

1576, fine by Thomas Gawdy of the manor of Newhall and Barneys. 

A manor called Stoneham in Brockford expectant on the death of Anne Warner, 
seems to have been sold by Sir Thomas Gawdy in time Queen Elizabeth. 

NOTE — The Gawdy family obtained the manor of West Herling by marriage in the reign of Edward 
VI. Fraralingham Gawdy Esq. was the son of Bassingbourne Gawdy by the first wife, Anna, daughter 
of Sir Clement Heigham, Knt., and was buried at West Herling Feb. 25th, 1654, aged 64 years. 

William Da%'y speaks of his mother and cousin Webb as living, 1637. He writes to Framlingham 
Gawdy Esq. of West Harling, from W. Basham, 14th Dec. 1637, and calls him his "Assured friend 
and kinsman." 

NOTE — Breuse. A knightly family long of Topecroft. One branch ended with William Bruise who 
died in 1489, leaving two daughters co-heirs, who were the wives of Sir Thomas Hansard and Sir 
Robert Townsend. The other was Sir Richard de Bruise who died in 1323, leaving two daughters who 
were the wives of Sir John Wayland and Sir John Howard. Another branch was of Wenham in Suf- 
folk, and also ended in a co-heir. 



Cbe (Sautrcit Jfitmiln in ^nghinb. 









There are ample reasons for believing that this branch of the Gawdie-Gawden 
family was of French or Norman origin. The chapter on the "Derivation and 
Mutation of Surnames" will fully explain this question. The name first appears 
in Hampshire, England. From what has been discovered in the early records 
and in the County Histories of England it appears that the Gawdies, Gawdens 
and Bruises were intimately associated and connected before they came into Britain; 
thay were allied by marriage in France and subsequent to their removal; they 
were settled in the same counties and communities and had frequent transactions 
in land-sales. The Gauden families settled in the Shetland Isles were from England ; 
and one writer has assumed that the ministerial head of the branch at Tingwall 
was the father of Principal Gawdie of Edinburgh University; an assumption that 
has not been supported by any authentic records. Protracted investigation in 
all prospective sources of information has resulted in but meagre acquisitions of 
historical materials concerning this branch of the family. The distinguished 
position occupied as an ecclesiastical official by Bishop Gauden and the prominence 
of his brother, Sir Dennis Gauden, afforded sufficient interest to inspire a thorough 
search for every mention of the name, and the somewhat detached and fragmentary 
results are here presented to the reader. As search is still continued it will be well 
to refer to the supplementary part of the volume for any belated items that will 
be relegated to that section. 

Samuel Gauden was lord of the Manor of Froyle in Hampshire, England. 
On a slab in Froyle church there is a shield bearing as his coat of arms a chevron 
ermine between three leopards faces, all within a bordure ermine. For Crest, a 
leopard's face ermine, crowned, with the following inscription: "Here lieth the 
body of Samuel Gauden Esq., late Lord of this Manor, who died the first day 
of September, the year of our Lord 1613, in the 59th year of his age". From 
this inscription we learn that this man was born in the year 1554. He may have 
been a brother of the Reverend John Gauden, father of the Bishop, and Sir Dennis. 

On a similar slab, with the same arms, -"Here lieth the body of Jonathan Gauden 
Esq., late Lord of this Manor, who died the 5th day of May, in the year of our 
Lord 1705, in the 58th year of his age". His birth was in the year 1647. 

On a blue slab, -"Here lieth the body of Frances Draper, daughter of Gauden 
Draper Esq., Lord of this Manor, who died the 29th of March 1721, in the 19th 
year of her age". 

On a smaller slab with a shield bearing the Draper arms impaling a lion passant 
a chief indented. Crest, - On a wreath a bucks head, "Here lieth the body of 
Mrs. Mary Draper, late wife of Gauden Draper Esq. who departed this life on 
April ye 3d in ye year of our Lord 1727, in the 64th year of her age". Born in 
the year 1663. 

On a similar slab bearing the Draper arms: -"Here lieth the body of Gauden 
Draper Esq., late Lord of this Manor, who died the 14th of August, in the year 
of our Lord 1710, in the 43d year of his age". Born in the year 1657, 

On another slab, - "Here lieth the body of Elizabeth the wife of William Salmon 
Esq., and daughter of Jonathan Gauden, Gent. She departed this life the 21st 
day of February, 1698, in the 29th year of her age". Born in 1672. 



92 THE GAUD EN FAMILY IN ENGLAND. 

Samuel Gauden Esq. of Froyle in Hampshire, married Elizabeth, daughter of 
George Garth Esq. and she was afterwards the wife of William Gardiner Esq. 
of Fishberry, Hertfordshire. Her mother was Jane, daughter of Sir Humphrey 
Bannett of Shaldon in Hampshire. She died July 17, 1719, in her 48th year 
This Samuel Gauden was admitted to Exeter College, where he matriculated 
July 25, 1655; was Bachelor of Arts Feb. 19, 1667-8. He was a student at Lin- 
coln's Inn in 1657, and was recorded the son of Dennis Gauden of Clapham, Surrey, 
E^q. Here is an error as the dates indicate. This could not have been the Samuel 
Gauden of Froyle Manor nor was he his son. Jonathan Gauden was evidently 
the son and successor of that Samuel Gauden, and the male line having become 
extinct, the estate went to Gauden Draper whose mother was probably a Gauden. 
But I cannot understand why the two Samuel Gaudens were styled "of Froyle". 
There must have been some family connection. 



Rev. John Gauden. The College catalogue in which the name of the John 
Gauden afterwards Bishop of Worcester, was recorded as a student, states that 
he was the son of the Rev. John Gauden, a minister of the church in Mayland, 
Essex, and that he was born there, or somewhere in that county. This is about 
all we have been able to glean from the English records concerning this man or 
his antecedents. The name of his wife, or records of the births or baptisms of 
his children, have not been found. 



The Right Reverend John Gauden was a son of Rev. John Gauden of May- 
field, Sussex, where he was said to have been born in 1590; but this date does 
not agree with his age as given in the record of his death. He was educated in 
the Grammar School at Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, and afterwards when about 
sixteen years of age, he was admitted to St. Johns College under Mr. Wright, 
where, making great proficiency in academical learning, he took the degree in arts. 
In 1630 or thereabouts, he was removed to Wadham College in this University, 
where he became tutor to Francis and William Russell, sons of Sir William Rus- 
sell, Bart, (into whose family he finally married) and after their departure to 
other gentlemen of quality, while he continued there. The greatness of his parts 
were much improved by the greatness of his industry, he bestowing the most 
part of the day, and the night too, in the study of divine matters. He was B.A. 
1622-3; M.A. 1626; B.D. from Wadham College, July 22, 1635; D. D. July 8, 
1641. Vicar of Chippenham in the county of Cambridge; chaplain to Robert, 
Earl of Warwick; rector of Brightwell, Berkshire; dean of Bocking, Essex, 1643; 
preacher of the Inner Temple, 1660-62, and afterwards, May 23, 1662, of Worces- 
ter. Another account says he was elected bishop Nov. 3, 1660; confirmed Nov. 
17th, 1660 and consecrated the following day. He was enthroned on Dec. 11th, 
1660. Dr. Gauden was promoted to the living at Bocking in 1641, and held his 
first presentation from parliament, but not considering it safe held for so great 
and reputable a benifice, which was called a deanery, he, by the intercession of 
friends, at last procured a presentation from Archbishop Laud, the rightful patron 
to it, then in the Tower. 

When the assembly of divines was to be settled in 1643, he was nominated one 
of them to the parliament by Sir Duella North and Sir Thomas Chickley, Knights, 
from Cambridgeshire, to serve in the Long Parliament and to sit among them, 
but by some trick Mr. Thomas Goodwin was substituted in his place as a person 
more fit for the great design then carrying on, as one may see in Dr. Gauden 's 




BISHOP JOHN GAUDEN. 



THE GAUDEN FAMILY IN ENGLAND. 93 

book entitled, "Anti-Baal", printed in London, 1651. At that time the Pres- 
byterians and fanatical people generally affirmed that he was a Covenanter, though 
positively denied by himself, and he was denounced as a traitor to the church. 
He kept his place at Bosking during the time of the usurpation, and was, at Bright- 
well and elsewhere, much resorted to for his most admirable and edifying art 
of preaching. 

After the death of Brownrig, Bishop of Exeter, which was in December 1659, 
he became preacher to the Temple in London, and after the Restoration of King 
Charles IL who having noticed that he, upon all occasions, had taken worthy 
pains in the pulpit and in the press, to rescue his Majesty and the church of Eng- 
land from all the mistakes and heterodox of several and different factions, as also 
from the sacrilegious hands of these false brethren, whose scandalous conversation 
was consummate in devouring the church lands and then with impudence to make 
sacrilege lawful; for these services, his Majesty conferred upon him the bishop- 
rick of Exeter, to which being consecrated in St. Peter's church at Westminster 
on the second day of December (being the first day in Advent) in the year 1660, 
sat there but little more than a year and a quarter. He was afterwards translated 
to Worcester in the beginning of the year 1662, where he soon after ended his 
course; having been esteemed by all who knew him, as a very comely person, a 
man of vast parts, and one who had been strangely improved by unwearied labors. 

Dr. Gauden was a prolific writer and published some sixteen books, of which, 
however, only one appeared before the execution of the King. Soon after his 
appointment to the See of Exeter, he privately laid claim to the authorship of 
Eiken Basalike, a work that had been commonly attributed to King Charles L 
This claim Dr. Gauden put forth in a correspondence with the Lord Chancellor 
Hyde, Earl of Clarendon, and the Earl of Bristol, from the 21st of December, 1660 
to the 31st of March, 1662. This claim opened a long and heated controversy 
between the different factions and much was published for and against the 
assumption. 

In the year 1695, Mr. Arthur North of London, whose wife was a sister to the 
wife of Charles Gauden, the doctor's son, published a series of letters found among 
the papers of his sister-in-law which added materially to the strength of the bishop's 
claim. 

Whally said: "Gauden was a false son of the church' of England", while his 
friends and admirers eulogised him as a man of "ingenuity and learning". In 
a work titled "Curious Letters of Abraham Hill Esq." he disproves the fanatical 
stories concerning the death of bishop Gauden, which purported that it was caused 
by his disappointment in not being appointed bishop of Worcester. 

Dr. Gauden married Elizabeth Russell, daughter of Sir William Russell, of 
Chippenham, Cambridge, barrister, by whom he had four sons and one daughter. 
He died 20th September 1662, and was buried in Worcester Cathedral, where 
there is a monument erected to his memory which was removed in 1812 from 
the back of the altar screen to our Lady's chapel. In a concave oval wrought 
in marble there is a half-length figure of the bishop, holding in his right hand a 
book, supposed to represent the Eiken Basilike. See engraving in this work. 

After his death his widow wrote a letter to her son, John Gauden, who was 
called by one writer, "her darling son", on the subject of the so-called "King's 
Book", and enclosed in it a narrative of the whole claim. Bishop Gauden left 
will which is now in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. This document now 
copied throws some additional light upon the family; especially the names of 
his five children which had not been discovered. 



94 THE GAUDEN FAMILY IN ENGLAND. 

While rector of Booking he gave four hundred pounds to purchase an endowment 
for a Charity School, and some part of this fund was expended for a tenement or 
messuage in the Church Lane for a dwelling-place for the school-master and for a 
place to study for the students. The remainder of the gift was devoted to the 
purchase of a farm and lands in a place called Much Lees, or Langlands. Sixteen 
pounds a year from the profits of the estate were to be assigned to the schoolmaster 
for his maintenance and the remainder, if any, to be paid into the hands of the 
dean of Bocking. 

There is a flat stone in Worcester Cathedral upon which is carved the Gauden 
arms. A bordure and chevron ermine between three leopards' faces, impaling 
a fesse in chief three roses and in base a lion rampant, with the inscription- 

" Elizabeth Gauden juxta marite Resurreftiones Candidatea Guilielmi Russell 
de Chipman in Comtatu Cantugrigienens Baronette Filia, Johannis Gauden Episcope 
Wigorniensis omnium Calcule disideratisimi olim Uxor. Formae renustae, For- 
tunae aplae, affectus nee non obiequii amplioris; tirtutis undenque amplissimae, 
Non Gemmis, fed moribus honestata; decorate Matrona, Antistitis Procastantis-simi 
deralicta Vidua praestanttissima, maerore tahesceus fate defuncta Mar. 21, Aetatis 
anno 56. MDIXXr. 

One writer has said: "Had not Gauden been disappointed of Worcester he 
would never have pleaded his merit in this affair; nor would his wife have written 
her narrative, had King Charles IL bestowed a one half year's rent on her after 
her husband's decease; which upon her petition, and considering her numerous 
family, none could imagine would be refused. She said in her plea that it had 
cost her husband two hundred pounds to remove from Exeter to Worcester. 

In Dr. Gauden's principal work, "Tears and Sighs of the Church of England", 
there is a very small full-length portrait. There is also a scarce and curious por- 
trait prefixed to a label of Miltons (Greek) Eikon Basalike, London, 1649. It is 
the engraved frontispiece to this pamphlet, which represents a curtain drawn up 
by a hand, and discovers Gauden looking out. At the top are the following words: 
" Spectatum admissi, risum teaneatis." 
Underneath are the following lines :- 

"The curtain's drawn; all may perceive the plot, 
And him who truly the black babe begot. 
Whose sable mantle makes me bold to say, 
A Phaeton Sol's chariot ruled that day; 
Presumtuous priest, to skip into the throne. 
And make his King his bastard issue own!" 

CHILDREN OF BISHOP JOHN GAUDEN. 

1. Lukenor Gauden, eldest son of Bishop John and Elizabeth (Russell) Gauden, 
mentioned in his father's will of date July 23, 1660 as his eldest son, and to whom 
he gave a "double portion" and "my Bookes". The name of this son appears 
also in a published pedigree of the family. 

2, Charles Gauden, the second son of Bishop John and Elizabeth (Russell) 
Gauden, was mentioned in his father's will of date July 23, 1660, and received 
the legacy a "Coppyhold of Land called Mathewes Farme in Bocking". See the 
will for details. The following is from the records in London: Charles Gauden, 
son of the Right Rev. Father-in-God, John Gauden, late Bishop of Worcester, 
Merchant, Bachellor, about 28 and Mrs. Mary Brett of St. Marys-le-Bone, London, 
Spinster, about 22, her parents dead, alleged by John Gauden of All Hallows 



THE GAUDEN FAMILY IN ENGLAND. 95 

Stanying, London, Merchant; married at St. Botolphs Gate, May 30, 1675. 
His wife's father was Charles Biett of Heatherly in Gloucestershire. Charles 
Gauden Esq. was styled "of Mark House". See the view of this ancient mansion 
in this work. It appears on record that a daughter of this marriage, Elizabeth 
Gauden, was married to another Charles Brett, in 1731, and there are tombs of the 
family on the west side of Leyton church. This Elizabeth Gauden was married 
to Charles Brett of Cowley, county Gloucester, Oct. 31, 1707. She was called the 
"only daughter" in the record of her marriage. 

3. John Gauden, third son of Bishop John and Elizabeth (Russell) Gauden, 
was mentioned in his father's will of date July 23, 1668. One writer has styled 
him "his mother's darling". Some of his father's papers were left in his hands. 
I find no record of his marriage. 

4. WilUam Gauden, fourth son of Bishop John and Elizabeth (Russell) Gauden, 
was mentioned in his father's will of July 23, 1668, and this is the only record 
found in which his name figures. 

5. Mary Gauden, a daughter of Bishop John and Elizabeth (Russell) Gauden, 
was married to Richard Stane who died 15th January 1747, aged 84 years, leaving 
a son and heir, William Stane Esq., whose wife was Alice, daughter of Felix Hall 
Bart, and had by her William Stane Esq. Her father in his will says, "To my 
sonne-in-Law Richard Stanes 40 shillings to buy him a ring. And I give as much, 
to my daughter Stanes for a like mourning ring". 

6. Annie Gauden is mentioned in the will of Bishop Gauden in the language 
following: "For my daughter Anne God hath liberally provided for her nor may 
she expect any more of mee or her mother". How shall we reconcile this with 
the statement that the Bishop left four sons and one daughter? It will be seen 
that his daughter Stanes was mentioned in the will and this was Mary Gauden. 
Anne Gauden is mentioned in distinction in another paragraph of the document. 

Chesham Church, Buckingham. "The gift of John Gaudry, 1670: three pounds per annum, 
to twelve widows and widowers, in the waterside, between his house and Chesham, yearly, on St. 
John's Day, in Christmas, at the George Inn, out of the rents of g^-ass-mead or meadow". 

NOTE — We find that Lady Gauden, widow of Bishop Gauden, assumed the care of a parish protege 
named Eliza Clapham for eight years on consideration of receiving the sum of thirty shillings 
annually. 

NOTE — Having communicated with the rector of Sywell Church, Northampton, England, concerning 
the Gauden family of that county, I received as reply that the Registers for the years 1671 to 1747 
were all comprised in one book containing Baptisms, Marriages and Burials ; from this record without 
making a thorough search he copied from a fly-leaf the following names : 

"1693. Mice, wife of Stephen Gaudem, was buried in Wooten Nov. 15th." 

"Stephen Gaudem Gent, was buried Jauy 23, 1711-12." 

"William Penred of Rathville in the County of Catherton, Ireland, Gent, and Elizabeth Gaudem of 
this parish were married March 18, 1703." 

"Anne Gaudem the daughter of Stephen Gaudem farmer and Katharine his wife, baptized Feb. 20, 
1703-4." 

Edward Gaudem, son of Stephen Gaudem of Barton, Northamptonshire. Gent, was a student at 
Queens College where he matriculated July 14, 1707, aged 15 years. He was B. A. 1716 from Peters 
House, Cambridge, 1710 ; rector of Sywell, Northampton, 1710. 

White Church, BuckinKham, Eng. 

In the chancel of this church the following memorials are preserved : "Under the east window, on 
an oval tablet of stone, affixed to the wall : 

"The body of Bennet Gaudry, deceased the 29th August, 1666, and resteth here". 

A hand carved in relief points to a sepulcral slab in the pavement, with the initial letters B. G. 

On a similar tablet : 

"The body of Martha Gaudry, the wife of Bennett Gaudry, deceased the 25th of September, 1656, 
and resteth here." 

<)n a slab within the rails, on the south side: 

"Here lies the body of Mr. Benedict Gaudry, of the pari.sh of Christlow, who died July-1717, aged 
33 years ; also the body of Elizabeth Gaudry. wife of the aforesaid Benedict Gaudrj-, who died Dec. 
27, 1747, aged 66 years". 

On a concave oval brown stone, against the east wall : 

"The body of Anne Gaderen, deceased the 9th of June 1669, and resteth here." 



96 THE GAUDEN FAMILY IN ENGLAND. 

Sir Dennis Gauden, Knt., was a son of Rev. John Gauden of Mayfield, 
Essex, where he is supposed to have been born. He was a resident of Clapham, 
in Sussex, a suburb of London, where he died July 2, 1688. There is a charter in 
the British Museum of a sale dated 12th January 1651 by Richard Moyse of Den- 
benham, Gent., to Dennis Gauden, citizen and cloth-worker, of London, of his 
Manor House of Winston Hall and the Manor of Winston cum Pulham. This 
manor was formerly an estate belonging to the church of Ely and when this estab- 
lishment was dissolved was placed in the custody of trustees who were authorized 
to dispose of the same. See forward to the copy of the Indenture. Sir Dennis 
Gauden, sheriff of London, was knighted at the Royal Exchange, Oct. 23, 1667. 
Upon the Restoration the victualing of the Royal Navy was placed in the hands 
of Dennis Gauden as contractor. In 1668 two responsible persons were appointed 
by the King to be associated with him, but after a fair trial this system did not 
prove satisfactory and Dec. 10, 1683, a commissioner was appointed. 

William de Bruise died seized of two Knights fees in Clapham, Surry, in the 19th 
year of the reign of King Edward I. A. D. 1291, and these lands were part of the 
estate which in the 17th century belonged to Sir Dennis Gauden. Here he caused 
to be erected a stately and magnificent mansion upon Clapham Common. Dr. 
Gauden, brother of Sir Dennis Gauden, was promised the appointment to the See 
of Winchester but was put ofT with that of Worcester, and it was in expectation 
of the first appointment that this great house was built in the name of Sir Dennis 
Gauden, while it was really intended for the home of the bishop. This was a beautiful 
mansion, commensurate in its designs and capacity for the requirements and dig- 
nity of the anticipated occupant. Some of the rooms were wainscotted with Japan, 
and a spacious gallery extended its whole length above and below stairs. The 
estate consisted originally of 432 acres in 1666. The situation of the house was 
on the left side of the Chase, with very extensive grounds laid out in Dutch style, 
reaching to the Cedars property and to the Wandsworth-Road. The actual site 
of the house seems to have been more precisely where the Terrace and Victoria- 
Road are now. 

John Evelyn, of Wotten, has left an interesting account of this property of date 
June 25, 1692. "I went to Mr. Hewers at Clapham, where he has an excellent, 
useful and capacious house on the Common, built by Sir Dennis Gauden, and by 
him sold to Mr. Hewer, who got a very considerable estate in the navy." This 
property was also described as "A very noble and sweet place." 

Pepys, in his diary gives an account of his visit to this place, of date July 25, 1663. 
"Having appointed Mr. Creed to come to me to Fox Hall I went over thither 
and after some debate, Creed and I resolved to go to Clapham to Mr. Gauden's. 
When I came there, the first thing was to show me his house, which is almost 
built. I find it a very regular and finely contrived mansion, and the gardens and 
offices about it as convenient and as full of good variety as ever I saw in my life. 
It is true that he has been cursed for laying out so much money, but he tells me he 
built it for his brother, who is since dead, when he should come to be Bishop of 
Winchester, which he was promised, and he did intend to dwell there. By and 
by to dinner. I saluted his lady (Mrs. Creed) and the young ladies, and his 
sister, the bishop's widow, who, I find to be very well bred and a woman of excel- 
lent discourse". He further remarked that Mrs. Gauden's little spaniel followed 
them on their journey. 

This great mansion was the residence of Sir Dennis Gauden and family for 
many years. He seems to have purchased this large estate some time after the 



THE GAUDEN FAMILY IN ENGLAND. 97 

acquisition of the extensive Manor of Winston Hall in Suffolk. Whether he 
ever settled on that property or what disposition he made of it we have not 
learned. The will of Sir Dennis has been found, from which much has been 
learned concerning his family which is of infinite interest as material for this 
sketch. The Gauden mansion was pulled down about the year 1762 after the 
death of Mr. Hewer. One writer has informed us that Sir Dennis Gauden had 
a very valuable library here, with collections of engraved portraits, models of 
ships, and matters of all sorts relating to the city of London with the drawings 
to illustrate them; and frontispieces of all the gravers in Europe. He was styled 
"Our great Clapham magnate". He owned three houses in Ipswich, and is known 
to have paid taxes in Kent. 

In the will of Simon Smith of Stepney, merchant, London, 3d of October 1665, 
was 'the statement: "Owing me by Squire Dennis Gauden his Majestie's Vict- 
ualler of the Royal Navy, on account of my wharf and buildings at Deptford 
the lease whereof I have sold him for £1600, whereof he hath paid me £500, so 
there remains due me £1100." 

While Sir Dennis Gauden was Victualler of the Navy he caused to be constructed 
a great establishment of warehouses and storehouses; and this plant was known 
as "The Red House". It was situated north-west of Deptford and constructed 
of red brick, and hence its name. There were more than 100 storehouses within 
a length of 870 feet by 35 feet in breadth. 

He was buried July 1, 1688, in the ancient church on Clapham Common. 
A view of this church will appear in connection with this sketch. 

Charles Gauden Esq. of London, son of Bishop John Gauden, was a merchant. 
He died at his seat, Mark House, in 1679. He married Mary, daughter of George 
Brett of Heatherly, in Gloucestershire, by whom he had a daughter who became 
the wife of Charles Brett Esq., 1731. The record reads as follows: "Charles 
Gauden, son of Dr. John Gauden, Merchant, Bachelor, about 28 (1675) son to 
the Rev. Father-in-God, John Gauden, late Bishop of Worcester, and Mrs. Mary 
Brett of St. Marys-le-Bone, London, Spinster, about 22, her parents dead allege 
by John Gauden of All Hallows, Stanying, London, Merchant; married at St. 
Botolphs, Bishopgate, May 30, 1675." On the west (side) wall of Leyton church, 
there are tombs of the above named persons. 

Elizabeth Gauden of St. James, in the county of Middlesex, was married to 
Charles Brett of Cowley, county of Gloucester, Oct. 31, 1707. 

Richard Stane Esq. died 15th January 1747 aged 84 years, leaving his wife 

NOTE — EveljTi wrote that Sir Dennis Gauden was "Very handsomely and friendly to everybody". 
He was often guest at his table. Pepys, writing July 25, 1663, in his diary says, "Sir Dennis Gauden 
died here a few months after the fall of the Stuarts". 

Anne Gauden was married to Hugh Davis at St. Marys, Aldermary, England, Oct. 21, 1590. 

Ephemia Gauden was married to Rev. William MacDowall, Prebendary of Peterborough, by whom 
a son John Critchon Stuart MacDowall of New Freaugh, N. S. W., who married 1st, Helen-Maiia, 
daughter of R. A. Fitzgerald ; 2nd, 1S64, Susan-Mary, daughter of Rev. Edward Martigan. Issue by 
firrt marriage, William S. Sherland, Rector of Orsden, Suffolk. 

Clapham Common, a parish and suburb of London in Surrey, lends a fine interest to the history of 
the Gauden family in consequence of its having been the principal seat of Sir Dennis Gauden and his 
family. This semi-rural outlying district of the metropolis was the place of residence of several men 
of distinction contemporary with this gentleman who were neighbors and associates. His residence 
was one of unusual elegance and notable because intended for the occupancy of Bishop John Gauden, 
the brither of Sir Dennis. The extensive lands on which this stately mansion stood embraced an area 
of 432 acres and bordered on the lands of the ancient Church in which he wa-s buried. Here he enter- 
tained his distinguished friends with a lavish hospitalitj- ; here he was familiar with every object in 
the landscape ; here his children sported upon the Common and were educated in the local schools. 

Derived its name from Osgod Clapa'a, Danish lord and ancient proprietor. Sometimes found in early 
documents as "Clappenham". In the Doomsday survey it was called "Clopenham". 



98 THE GAUD EN FAMILY IN ENGLAND. 

Mary, daughter of Dr. John Gauden, Bishop of Worcester, his son and heir, William 
Stane Esq., who married Ahce, daughter of FeUx Hall, Bart., and had by her Wil- 
liam Stane Esq. Richard Stane built an elegant house at Forest Hall. 

Mrs. Sarah Gauden of Clapham or Batersea, county Surry, about 16, with 
consent of her father, Dennis Gauden Esq. of Clapham, was married to Cresheld 
Draper of Cranford, Kent, Esq., Bachelor, about 20, March 24, 1661. 

Joan Goudrie, daughter of John Gouderie of Pitchcote, was married to Robert 
Bolesworth of Leighton Buzard, who died in 1624. 



CHILDREK OF SIK DENNIS GAUDEN, KNIGHT. 

1. Sarah Gauden, evidently only daughter of Sir Dennis, was mentioned in her 

father's will and received a legacy of £100 "which is all I leave her because 

I have made ample provision for her as I have also for my eldest sonne Samuel 
Gauden". The following is from the English records: "Mrs. Sarah Gauden of 
Clapham, Surry, Spinster, about 16, with consent of her father, Dennis Gauden 
Esq. of Clapham or Battersea, county of Surry, to Cresheld Draper, of Cranford, 
Kent, Esq. Bachellor, about 20, were married 24th March 1666. The title "Mrs." 
was frequently used for single ladies in the early records. 

2. Samuel Gauden, eldest son of Sir Dennis, was mentioned in his father's will 
of date Sept. 12, 1684, in which he states that he had already made ample provision 
for him previously. He was educated first at home under Mr. Talents, three 
years; afterwards under Mr. Martyn, then an undermaster in the college, for two 
years; and at Eton College, under the same instructor, one year and a half. 
Admitted Feb. 17, 1673-4, age 17 years. Tutor Mr. Jenks. Admitted to the 
Inner Temple July 26, 1676. He presented Piso's Natural and Medical History 
of India, to the College Library. This note from a Biographical History of Gon- 
ville and Gains College, 1349-1897. Samuel Gauden, son of Sir Dennis Gauden 
of Clapham, admitted to Lincoln's Inn, Nov. 12, 1657* 

3. Benjamin Gauden, second son of Sir Dennis, was mentioned in his father's 
will of date Sept. 12, 1684, and was appointed one of the executors. Of this son 
we have found no other account, and probably died unmarried and without issue. 

4. Jonathan Gauden, third son of Sir Dennis, was mentioned in his father's will 
of date Sept. 12, 1684. He was appointed as one of the executors. The reader 
is referred to another section in this work for further information concerning 
this son. 

Henry Gauden was master of the ship "Abigail" from Weymouth, England, 
Feb. 23, 1628. 

Anne Gauden was married to Hugh Davis at St. Marys, Aldermary, England, 
Oct. 21, 1590. 

Ephemia Gauden was married to Rev. William MacDowall, Prebendary of Peter- 
borough, by whom a son John Crichton Stuart MacDowall of New Freaugh, 
N. S. W., who married 1st, Helen-Mara, daughter of R. A. Fitzgerald; 2nd, 1864, 
Susan-Mary, daughter of Rev. Edward Martigan. Issue by first marriage, Wil- 
liam Sutherland, Rector of Orsden, Suffolk. 

•Samuel Gauden of Froyle, county of Southampton, bachellor aged 40 and Mrs. Elizabeth Garth of 
St. James Clerkenwell, Middlesex, Spinster, with consent of her mother, married July 31, 1691. i'rom 
Licenses Archbishop of Canterbury. This may have been of another family. 




Mstratusto/ii^^^^^eSVS QHmS^rVS: o^mnist^^e^ 



Land^ni ir^inteiJ^oir^niiCiTu (Jrooke.. t ^ j* ^r . 



•^ ''^L'^- ■'•■''^fif' . 






GAUDEN MONUMENT. 



THE GAUDEN FAMILY IN ENGLAND. 99 

The halftone illustration appearing in this section of the Gauden history was 
discovered in the British Museum, London, by direction of an especial search by 
the Editor. No knowledge of its existence was before known. The commission 
given the searcher in the Museum comprised anything and everything pertaining 
to the history and genealogy of the Gawdy and Gauden families, and this inves- 
tigation resulted in finding some very important materials pertinent to the object 
considered. This symbolical picture was designed for a frontispiece or illustra- 
tion for a book written by Bishop Gauden entitled "A Defence of the Ministers 
of the Church of England", but he died and it was not published. So far as we 
know this is the first time this drawing has appeared in any book. The symbols 
comprised in the design require study. At the summit of the monument the sun 
breaks through the clouds and the scriptural quotation, " God is a sun and a shield" 
appears. Within the clouds that seem to have parted around the Throne many 
faces of angels appear with the sacred declaration, "The angels desire to look into 
it". At the base of the monument or, possibly, the Throne, there are two personal 
figures. On one side stands a divine evidently intended to represent Bishop 
Gauden, dressed in his cap and robes holding a book in one hand and the corner 
of a shield with the other. By his side to represent meekness stands a lamb. Be- 
hind him there is a tree bearing fruit. On the left-hand side of the altar stands 
a man, probably to represent the King, dressed in armor holding a drawn sword 
by whose side stands a lion symbolizing strife. Behind this man in armor there 
is another tree bearing fruit. To delineate the whole design is more than can be 
assumed. The whole work was well and artistically produced and the picture is 
clear and distinct. 

The discovery of this ancient design is considered to be quite remarkable at a 
time so near when the present literary undertaking was entering the press; and 
the acquisition of the reproduction is prized highly for its pictorial interest and 
appropriate setting already prepared and in which it finds a welcome and per- 
manent abiding-place. 



"Additional Charters". 
"This Indenture made the Twelvth day of Januarie in the year of our Lord 
God one thousand six hunred fiftie and one Between Richard Moyse of Denben- 
ham in the Countie of Suffo. Gentleman of the one parte. And Dennis Gawden 
Citizen and Clothmaker of London of th'other parte-witnesseth that the said 
Richard Moyse for and in consideration of the some of One thousand three hundred 
fowerscore and three pounds of lawful money of England to him in hand paid by 
the said Dennis Gawden at and before th'ensealing and delivery of these presents, 
The receipt whereof the said Richard Moyse doth hereaby acknowledge, and him- 
self therewith fully satisfied contented and paid and thereof and every part and 
parcel thereof doth clearly acquite and discharge the said Dennis Gawden his heirs, 
executors, administrators and assignes and every of them forever by these presents 
Hath granted bargained sold alienated and confirmed And by these doth for him 
and his heirs absolutely grant bargain sell and alien and confirm unto the said Dennis 
Gawden his heirs and assigns forever, All that the Manor of Winston cum Pulham 
with all and singular the rights members appurtenances thereof in the County of 



100 THE GAUDEK FAMILY IN ENGLAND. 

Suffolk, And all Quit rents, rents of assize, old rents, chief rents, free rents, cop- 
piehold and customary rents to the said Manor belonging or in anywise apper- 
tayninge, And all Court Leete Lawdaies, Views of framkpledge, Courts Baron, 
and all other Courts whatsoever, services, franchises, customes custome works, 
Forfeitures, escheats reliefs, herriots, fynes, issues, amereciaments, perquisites, 
and profits of Courts and Leetes issues, postfynes, fynes of descent and aliena- 
cions, rivers, streams, waters, watercourses, stanks, ponds, fishings, hawking, hunt- 
ing, fowling, commons, grounds used for commons, wasts, waste-grounds, waifes 
deodants, goods and chattels of fellons and fugitives, felons of themselves out- 
lawed and condemned persons convicted and of persons put in exigent, rights, 
royalties, jurisdictions, liberties, privileges, immunities, profits, commodities, ad- 
vantages, emoluments, possessions and hereditaments whatsoever with their and 
every of their appurtenances of what nature or qualitie soever they bee to the 
said Manor belonging or in any wise appertayning. And all that Capital messuage, 
Manor Place or Mansion House with th'appurtenances commonly called Winston 
Hall scituated lying and being in the Parish of Winston in the said County of Suf- 
folke, north and east of the Churchyard of Winston aforesaid, And alsoe the scite 
ground and soyle of and belonging to the said Capitall messuage, manor place 
and Mansion House, Togather with all houses, edifices, structures, buildings, barnes, 
stables, dovehouses, orchards, outhouses, gardens, yards, courtyards, backsides, 
and cartillages thereunto belonging with their and every of their appurtenances 
contanyning altogeather by estimacion two acres more or lesse, And all that close 
of pasture ground with th'appurtenances commonly called Little Imphegh abut- 
ting upon the Lands of William Hunt on the east, upon the woodpightle on the 
west, and Create Impage on the north contayning by estimacion eight acres more 
or less, And all that other close of pasture ground with th'appurtenances commonly 
called greate Imphegh togather with a Little Sponge thereunto adjoining abutting 
on the Land of William Hunt on ye east, upon ye meadow commonly called 
Tufts Meadow on the west, and Broadoaks meadow on the north contayn- 
ing by estimacion fowerteen acres and two roodes more or lesse, And all that Little 
Sponge of Wood ground with th'appurtenances abutting upon the Lands of William 
Hunt on the east, Greate Impage on the west and Little Impage on the south, 
contayneing by estimacion one acre and Two roodes more or lesse. And all that 
Peece or parcell of arrable Land meadowe and pasture ground with the appurte- 
nances commonly called the Broadoakes meadowe, abutting upon Mr. Barnabys 
Moyes on the east, upon greate broadoake on ye west, and upon sheepwash mead- 
owe on the north contayning by estimacion fowerteen acres more or lesse. And 
all that other parcell of arrable Land and pasture ground with the appurtenances 
commonly called greate Broadoakese contayning by estimacion ten acres. And 
all that parcell of ground newly laid down called Little Broadoakes abutting on 



Winston Cum Pulham. 

The most ancient records show that this Manor consisted of a curucate of land and 40 acres, 
villeins, 4 borders and two Plouehlands in Demesne and 3 belonging to the men, 6 acres of meadow, 
and sufficient wood to support 100 hogs. Also a church with 8 acres, 2 rouncies, 4 beasts, 20 hogs, 
and 50 sheep, valued at £4. When the great survey was taken this manor was still held by the 
abbot, there was 1 ploughteam only in demesne and wood sufficient only for the support of GO hogs, 
the valuation being £4,10. Also a penance added to this manor, had .30 acres as a manor in the 
abbots soc and commendation, also 2 borders and a plough team, valued at £1,10. The manor land 
was a league long and 3 quarentens broad and paid in gelt 13 and a half pence. 

The Manor of Winston Hall was the estate of St. Etheldred at the time of the Confessor and the 
Doomsday Survey. Hervey, 1st Bishop of Ely, assigned or confirmed it to the Monks of Ely (1109- 
1131). A claim by the Bishop of Ely to the jurisdiction in Wiaston under charter will be found in 
the Close Rolls in 1339. In the Dean and Chapter of Ely the manor remained certainly since 1316. 
In 1.587 there was a grant or confirmation of the manor by the Queen. 



THE GAUD EN FAMILY IN ENGLAND. 101 

ye house and lands of Mr. Bond on the north contayning by estimacion fower 
acres more or lesse, And all that close of pasture ground with the appurtenances 
commonly called Tufts abutting upon Little Broadoakes on the east, and upon a 
certain peace or parcell of gleebeland of the Vicears on the west contayning by 
estimacion tenne acres more or lesse, And all that other close of meadowe ground 
with th'appurtenances commonly called Tufts meadowe, abutting upon Broad- 
oake meadowe on the east, and upon the drift leading from the Manor howse unto 
the close commonly called the Tufts on the west contayning by estimacion eight 
acres more or lesse. And all those two closes of pasture ground with their and 
every of their appurtenances commonly called Wood pightle abutting upon the barne 
on the south, Little Impage on the east, and the Drift way leading to the Tufts 
on the west, contayning togather by estimacion fower acres more or less. And all 
that peece or parcel of pasture ground with th'appurtenances commonly called 
Driftway abutting upon Tufts meadowe, and the homestall on the east, and Chap- 
pell close on the west, contayning by estimacion one acre and two roodes more 
or less, and all that other close of arrable Land with th'appurtenances commonly 
called Chappelle Close, abutting upon the Driftway next to the howse on the east 
upon the farme Lands commonly called Cuttings on the west, and the Vicears 
glebeland in parte on the north, contayning by estimacion twelve acres more or 
lesse. And all that other close of pasture ground with th'appurtenances commonly 
called Hall close abutting upon Rutt Lane on ye east, upon a peece of Land of 
the said Richard Moyse commonly called Paddock on ye west, and upon Chappell 
Close on ye north contayning by estimacion eleven acres more or lesse. And all 
that peece or parcell of pasture ground with appurtenances commonly called 
Rutt Lane abutting upon the Pound on the north, Hall Close on the west, and 
Calnes pightle in parte on the east contayning by estimacion three acres more or 
less, And all that other close with th'appurtenances commonly called Calnes pightle, 
abutting upon Mill field on the south, Rutt Lane on the west, and a certain close 
of Isaac Phillipps on the east contayning by estimacion three acres more or lesse, 
And all that close of pasture ground with th'appurtenances commonly called 
Millfield abutting upon the Land of Barnaby Campe on the east, upon Thomas 
Earmeham Rutt Lane on the west, and Calnes pightle on the north contayning 
by estimacion twelve acres more or lesse. And all that other close of pasture ground 
with th'appurtenances taken out of Millfield aforesaid with th'appurtenances 
commonly called Little Millfield Close abutting upon the Lands of Allen Catch- 
poole widowe on the east abutting upon the tenament of the said Allen (Ellen?) 
Catchpoole widowe on the west, and Middle Millfield on the north contayning by 
estimacion eight acres more or lesse, And all those two other peeces or parcells 
of arrable Land and pasture ground as the same are now divided with their and 
either of their appurtenances commonly called Andrews Fields, abutting upon the 
Land of James Witches on the east and upon Certain Lands now or late in the tenure 
or occupation of Henrie Blomestedd on ye west contayning by estimacion togeather 
thirtene acres more or lesse. And all inclosed ground with th'appurtenances com- 
monly called Langham Wood being part arrable, and part pasture, and partly 
Spring of Wood ground now or late in the tenure or occupation of Barnaby Moyse, 
abutting the Lands of John Goddard and Mr. Dade on the south contayning by 
estimacion tenn acres more or lesse, And all ways, passages, easements, commons 
and common of pasture, watercourses profits, commodities advantages and appur- 
tenances whatsoever to the said Capitall messuage, Manor or Mansion howse 



102 THE GAUDEN FAMILY IN ENGLAND. 

Lands and premises, and to every and any of them or any part or parcell of them 
belonging or in anywise appertayning which said Manor place Capitall messuage 
or Mansion Howse Lands and premises are lying and being within the Manor of 
Winston cum Pulham aforesaid in the said County of SufTolke, and all which premises 
were late parcell of the possessions of the late Deane and Chapter of the late cathe- 
dral Church of the holie and undivided trinitie of Ely, And all the tymber trees 
and other trees woods and underwoods standing and growing & being in and upon 
the lands and premises above mencioned. And all other the Messuages, Lands 
tenaments, and heriditaments which were conveyed unto the said Richard Moyse 
his heirs and assigns forever by the trustees appointed by act of Parliament for 
sale of the late Deane and Chapter Lands & co by Deed indented inrolled in the 
High Court of Chancerie bearing date the twelfth daie of November in the yeare 
of our Lord God one thousand six hundred and fiftie, And alsoe all the state right 
title and interest revercions remainders & remainders clayme & demand what- 
soever of him the said Richard Moyse of in and to the premises and every part 
thereof To have and to hold the said Manor Capital Messuage Lands tenaments, 
heriditaments and all other the premises before in and by theis presents men- 
cioned or intended to be granted bargained, held, aliened, and confirmed and 
every part and parcell of them and every of them with all their and every of 
their appurtenances unto the said Dennis Gawden his heirs and assigns forever 
to the onely use and behoof of the said Dennis Gawden and of his heirs and 
assigns forever. And the said Richard Moyse for him his heirs executors and 
administrators and for every of them doth Covenant promise and grant to 
and with the said Dennis Gawden his heirs, executors, administrators and 
assigns and to and with every of them by these presents that the said Dennis 
Gawden his heirs and assigns shall & may from henceforth forever herafter peace- 
ably & quietly have and hold and occupy possess and enjoy the said Manor Capitall 
Messuage Landes tenaments & heriditaments & all other the premises before in 
& by these presents mencioned or intended to be granted bargained, held, aliened 
& confirmed and every part of them & and every of them with all their appurte- 
nances without ye let sute trouble, inturruption, clayme or demand of or by the 

said Richard (sic) Moyse of heirs or assignes or any of them, or of or by any 

other person or persons lawfully clayming by from or under him them or any of 
them, And that the said premises & every parte therof now are and be free & 
clears and sol at all tymes forever hereafter shalle remayne & continue and he 
had holden & enjoy and by the said Dennis Gawden his heirs and assignes free & 
cleare & and freely & clearly acquitted, exonerated & discharged of & from all & 
all manner of former and other guifts, grants, bargains, sales, uses, wills, intayles, 
joyntures, dowers, judgements, statutes, entents, executions, & and of and from 
all other estates, titles, charges & incumbrances whatsoever had made and com- 
mitted or donne by the said Richard Moyse his heirs or assignes or any of them, 
or of or by any other person or persons lawfully clayming by or under him them 
or any of them. And further that he the said Richard Moyse and his heirs shall 
and will from tyme to time hereafter at and upon every reasonable request and 
at the costs and charges in ye Lawe of the said Dennis Gawden his heirs and as- 
signes make due acknowledgement leinie suffer & execute, and cause & procure 
to be made done acknowledge leinie, suffer & execute all and every such 
further & other lawful and reasonable as to deeds & things Conveyances and 
assurance in the Lawe whatsoever for ye further and better conveying assuring 
& confirming of all the said premises and of every part therof unto the said Dennis 



THE GAUDEN FAMILY IN ENGLAND. 103 

Gawden his heirs and assignes forever Bee it by fyne fefment, release confirmacion 
or otherwise howsoever As by the said Dennis his heirs assignes or his or 
their Councell learned in ye Lawe shall be reasonably desired or advised and 
requires soe as such further assurance include noe further Warrantee and Cove- 
nants than as abovesaid, And it is lastly covenanted, granted, condis-cended, 
declared & agreed by and between the said parties to these presents for them and 
their heirs That all fynes, fefments, conveyances & assurances whatsover to be 
had made, levied, suffered or executed of the aforesaid premises, or any part therof 
by or between the said parties to these presents or either of them shall be and 
enure & shall be deemed, expounded, construed & taken to be & to enure to and 
for the onely use and behoofe of the said Dennis Gawden & of his heirs and assignes 
forever, And to and for none other use intent or purpose whatsoever. In witness 
whereof ye said parties to yese Indentures interchangeably have set their hands 

& seales the dale & yeare first above written " 

(signed above the seal) "Acknowledged ye day of ye date hereof 

"Rich. Moyse". before me Dr. of Law Mr. in Chancery 

Robt. Aylett.' 
Endorsed outside: 
"Inrolled in the close Rolles in Chancery the fourteenth day of January in 
the year within written, 

By Humfrey Jaggard 
Moyse and Gawden." Examined. 25 s. 



lill 0f Jo^n #autrm. 



In the Name of God. ... I John Gauden Doctor in Divinitye of Bockinge in 
Essex. 23 July 1660. 

I desire to be decently buried, without any pompe or ostentation further than 
civilitye requires, if there bee any Sermon at my funerall my will is that it bee not 
to any prayse of mee but of that God who hath done great things for mee. 

All my "wordly estate" to my wife Elizabeth Gauden, for her sole use, during 
her life, both my Lands and goods, intreating her to bestow such portions of my 
estate and of hers upon my fower sonnes, Lukenor, Charles, John and William. 
That the eldest may have a double portion and my Bookes. And whereas there 
is a yard of Coppyhold Land called Mathews Farme in Bockinge which is taken 
up and setled in Court upon my second sonne Charles which Land and house 
stand mee in neare fower hundred pounds, my will is in case the Land actually 
descend to the said Charles that it be esteemed at soe much as part of his porcon 
my other Lands and goods I leave to the disposing of my Wife, to sell or keep 
them as shee sees best for my Children I mean the fower sonnes for my daughter 
Ann "God hath liberally provided for her nor may she expect any more of mee 
or her mother". 

To the Lady Townshend, my wifes daughter, £20, to buy her some rings. 

To the Town of Bocking, if I die and bee buryed there, £10, to bee added 
to the Stock for a Free School, which I am to make good to that Towne of that 
charity received from severall benefactors which with other my debts must bee 
made good out of my estate. 

And my will is that not onely the rent of Mathews Farme bee disposed to that 
use, during the minority of my sonne Charles but that when he is twenty-one 



104 THE GAUD EN FAMILY IN ENGLAND. 

hee release that Land and settle it in Lawe if it can bee done uppon the Towne 
of Booking for the use of a Free Schoole. . . . My other little parcel of Land in Book- 
ing called Jacobs well I give to my wife in order to satisfye other moneys I owe 
to the Towne. 

To my Sonne in Law, Richard Stanes, 40s to buy him a ring. And I give as 
much to my daughter Stanes for a like mourning ring. 

Sole Executrix: — my said Wife Elizabeth. 

Witnesses '.-William Robinson, Matthew Mootham, Thomas 
Wade, Sam Johnson, William Hanson. 
Overseer, my friend Mr. Michaell Dickenson, gentleman. 

John Gauden now Bishop of 
Worcester Sept. 10th, 1662* 
Proved 21 Feb. 1662 (-3) by Elizabeth Gauden, the relict and 
Sole Executrix named. 

* Dated previously 23 July 1660. Signed 

"John Gauden", 
Dated secondly 10 days before death (according to Diet. Nat. Biog. which 
gives 20 Sept. 1662.) 

Mill 0f gmnis #aix!trm. 

In the Name of God .... 12 Sept. 1684 

I Dennis Gauden of Clapham, 

in the County of Surrey, Knight, 

To my daughter, Sarah Draper, now Wife of Cresall Draper, of Crayford in the 

County of Kent, £100, "which is all I leave her. . . . because I have made ample 

provision for her as I have also done for my eldest sonne Samuel Gauden." 

All my estate, both reall and personall, goods and other estate whatsoever 
in Lambeth, Clapham and Battersea, to and between my two sonnes Benjamin 
and Jonathan Gauden, their Heirs, Executors and Administrators. 

Executors: — William Hewes, Esq. and my said two sonnes 

Benjamin and Jonathan Gauden. 
Witnesses: — El. Rice, John Fothering, Richard Wright, William 

Ayworth, servt. to John W^est, scr. 
Proved: — 17 Augt. 1688 by Benjamin Gauden the son and one 
of the executors named, power reserved to William Hewes and 
Jonathan Gauden, the other Executors named. 



Will oi Cljarles ^aubrn. 

" In the name of God, I Charles Gauden, of Walthampton, in the County of 

Essex, Merchant do make this my last will. 

I bequeath all my lands, tenements, houses, goods, ready money, debts and all 
that I can lay claim to, to my wife, Mary Gauden, and appoint her my sole 
Executor. 

Dated 21 July, 1676. 

Witnesses: — Mary Jordan, Katherine Jordan. 
Proved 21 Dec. 1679, by Mary Gauden, Relict and Sole Legatee 
and Executrix named." 

(Signed) Charles Gauden. 



THE GAUDEN FAMILY IN ENGLAND. 105 

Edward Gawdem, of St. Sepulcre, London, Clothworker, Bachellor, about 
23, and Mary Smith of St. Martins, Ludgate, Spinster, about 17, with consent 
of her brother Ralph Smith, of Grays Inn, Middlesex, married 24 Jan. 1664. 

Edward Lightfoot of Christ's Church, London, Merchant Tailor, Bachellor, 
about 24, and Elizabeth Gawden of St. Sepulcre, London, Confectioner; at St. 
Giles, in the Fields, or Acton, Middlesex, or St. Andrews, Holborn, London, were 
married 8 May 1663. 

Charles Gauden, Merchant, Bachellor, about 28, son to ye Rt. Rev. Father 
in God John late Bishop of Worcester and Mary Brett of St. Mary le Bon, London, 
Spinster about 22, her parents dead; alleged by John Gauden of All Hallows, 
Stayning, London, Merchant; at St. Botolphs, Bishopgate, London, May 30, 1675. 

Samuel Gauden of Froyle, county Southampton, Bachellor, about 40, and Mrs. 
Elizabeth Garth, about 20, of St. James, Clerkenwell, Middlesex, with consent 
of James Garth; at St. James aforesaid, married 31 July 1691. 

Cresheld Draper of Crayford, Kent, Esq., Bachellor, about 20, and Mrs. 
Sarah Gauden of Clapham, Surrey, Spinster about 16, with consent of her father, 
Dennis Gauden, Esq.; were married at Battersea or Clapham, or Windsor, or 
Berkshire, 24 March 1665. 

C^e gtanors of Jfrogk. 

The parish of Froyle is situated on the northern side of the valley of the Alton 
branch of the river Wey. The village called the Upper Froyle lies to the north-east 
of the London and Gosport road as it traverses the southern side of the parish, 
which is the side bounded by the Wey. The parish of Long Sutton is in the main 
boundary of Froyle parish on the north; Bentley bounds it on the east and Holy- 
bourne on the west. Froyle place stands near the Froyle church in a wooded park 
of 150 acres, the property of Sir C. J. Hurbert Miller, bart., lord of the Manor. 
This house is of modern construction. Adjoining the park is Froyle House, the 
residence of Walter T. E. Bentick. 

The following are some of the place-names that occur in the rental for the year 
1415: North Froyle, Burydonfield, Wykehill, Bowmansditche, Spolicombe and 
Sunneybury. In 1539 occur: Brandenham, Brambleham, Motys, Berryfroyle, 
Church Froyle, Great Penley, Isynghurst and Collingbourne. 

At the time of the Doomsday Survey the manor of Froyle belonged to the abbey 
of St. Mary at Winchester and it remained part of the possession of that nunnery 
till its dissolution in 1539. In 1541 the King, for the sum of £1,505, 175-4d and 
an annual rent of £4-13-5, granted the manor to William Jephson, in whose descend- 
ants the possession continued till 1652. Four years later John Fiennes was lord of 
the manor, and he, together with his brother Robert, sold it in 1666, to Samuel 
Gauden Esq. of Lincoln's Inn. 

The descent from this time till the manor became the property of the Miller 
family, at the close of the 18th century, has not been ascertained, but the following 
persons presented to the living: William Salmon, in 1697; Gauden Draper, in 1706; 
Marion Draper, widow and guardian of William Draper her son, in 1719; William 
Draper, in 1733; Mar>' Nicholas "this turn" in 1772; Johanna Logging, in 1773; 
and Sir Thomas Miller, in 1800. 



106 THE GAUDEN FAMILY IN ENGLAND. 

There was in this parish another manor of Froyle, and it was held of the chief 
manor. This property belonged, in 1363, to Sir John Brocas. In 1415 the property 
is described as 6 virgates of land, and was in the tenure of William Brocas. In 
1507 William Brocas died seized of the Manor of Froyle, described as held of the 
abbess of St. Mary's of Winchester, leaving two daughters his co-heirs. In 1583 
a fraction of this manor belonged to Margery, widow of Francis Cotton. Litigation 
followed, but Sir John Jephson, lord of the chief manor of Froyle, is mentioned as 
having purchased the sub-manor. 

This manor seems to have been called Husseys and is mentioned as early as 
1262-63; a tenement consisting of a mesuage, mill and curucate of land, was then 
acquired by Walter Hussey (Heuse) of his brother William. This manor came also 
to the Jephsons and was purchased in 1666 by Samuel Gauden Esq., and the mano- 
rial rights have presumably remained in the subsequent owners of the manor of 
Froyle. 

ADDENDA. 

During the time when Sir Dennis Gauden was Victualer for the Royal Navy the 
following was recorded concerning him in county Suffolk, England. 

Warrant to Dennis Gauden for payment of money (for cheese and butter) deliv- 
ered at Leith for the army in Scotland, 1651. 

Warrant to permit Dennis Gauden to ship 60 tons of cheese and 400 firkins of 
butter free of customs from London to Yarmouth for the army in Scotland. 

Warrant to pay Dennis Gauden in full £1000 for 737 cwt 2 qrs 5 lbs cheese 
and 700 firkins of butter for the army in Scotland and lost at sea. 

Warrant to Dennis Gauden for payment for Suffolk cheese shipped for the army 
in Scotland, 1650. 



liji 



3S 



C^atab}T-6a:ubm-#aubms. 



FRENCH FAMILIES. 






Baron-Frantz-Bemhard-Henrich Gawdy was a German poet and litterateur 
of Scottish extraction, born at Frankfort-on-the-Oder in 1800. He published a 
number of lyrics and tales, and made a translation from the Polish writers Mickie- 
wiez and Niemeewicz. He died in 1840. See portrait. 

Martin-Mlchel-Charles Gaudin, Duke of Gaeta, an able French financier, 
born in Saint- Denis, near Paris, in 1756. He was one of six commissioners of the 
treasury appointed by the Assembly in 1791, and was minister of finance from 
Nov. 10, 1799, until April. 1814. This protracted official career was almost without 
example among French financiers. He was noted for his skill, honesty and industry. 
He was created Duke of Gaeta in 1809. The restoration of the national credit 
was ascribed to him. He was a governor of the Bank of France from 1820 to 1834. 
He was the author of several treatises on finance. His death occurred in 1844. 

Jean Gaudin, a French grammarian and Jesuit, born in Poitou in 1617. He 
published a "Latin Grammar" and "Dictionary of the Latin, Greek, and French 
Languages" (1680). He died about 1690. 

Marc-Antoine Gaudin, a French chemist, was born at Saintes in 1804. He 
invented in 1827 an air-pump which compresses air and reverses that process at 
will; also discovered a method of converting beef into a substance like milk. 
Among his books are a "Practical Treatise on Photography" (1845) and one on 
"The Grouping of Atoms" (1847). He died in 1881. 

Comel)is-Van Gauda, a skilful Dutch painter, was born at Gouda, Holland, 
about 1550. 

Ltiis-Pascal Gaudin, a Spanish painter of historical subjects, was born at 
Villa Franca in 1556; died 1621. 

Pierrille Gaudens. New Norman letters. Considerations on the grandeur 
and the decadence of the profession of proctor; its origin and its evolution. 

Gaudy of Geneve. Glossary of Geneve, an Etymological grouping of which 
the dialect of Geneve is composed, together with the principal locution and defects. 

Monden Gaudens. A brief treatise on the abuse of sulphide (sulphate) of 
potassium in the thermo-sulphurous waters of Bagneres-de-Luchon, Toulouse. 

August Gaud. A religious student on the Existence of God, the Immortality 
of the Soul and Prayer. 

Gaudy (Francois- Antoine-Felix), a French senator, was born March 3, 1832. 
He was a rich landowner, and mayor of the Commune of Buillafans (Doubs). He 
was the founder of a newspaper, "The Republican of the East". He was elected 
a representative to the National Assembly in July, 1874, and was enrolled in the 
ranks of the Republican union of the assembly and accepted as a whole the Consti- 
tutional laws. He was re-elected Feb. 20, 1876, in the second district Besancon. 
After the act of May 16, 1877, he was one of the 363 deputies of the United Left 
who refused a vote of confidence to the Broglie ministry, and was re-elected the 
14th of October following by 8697 votes, the official candidate, M. Vantherin, 
receiving but 5419. He was re-elected again Aug. 21, 1881, in the second district 



108 GAWDY-GAUDIN-GAUDENS-FRENCH FAMILIES. 

of Besancon against the 3818 given to the monarchial candidate. Inscribed on 
the republican list of the department of Doubs at the triennial gathering of the 
Senate of Jan. 25, 1885, he was elected. M. Gaudy represented the Canton of 
Orleans at the general council of Doubs. 

Gaudin de Villaine. (Adrian G. de V. C), general of brigade at Versailles at 
the Chateau de Bois-Fetrand, by St. Hilary du Harcourt. Arms of Normandy: 
Azure a chevron or, with thiee eagles argent 2 and 4. Chief gules, fruited, argent. 

Gaudin (Simon-Pierre), chevalier of the Empire by letters patent of March 
13, 1813; recipient (2000) on the Trasimene Aug. 15, 1809; soldier (1792), sub- 
lieutenant (1795), colonel of infantry (Aug. 12, 1810); chevalier de St. Louis; 
born at Nuaille (Charente-inferieure) October, 1773; died at Nuaiile May 18, 
1837; son of Simon Gaudin and his wife Renee Rondin. 

Gaudin (Martin-Michel-Charles), count of the Empire by letters patent of 
April 26, 1808; duke of Gaete, by letters patent of Aug. 15, 1809; recipient of 
(125,000) in Westphalia and in Hanover, March 10, 1808, in the Kingdom of Naples, 
Aug. 15, 1809; on the Canal du Loing, Jan. 16, 1810; in Ulyrium and in the depart- 
ments of the Stura and the Arno, Jan. 1, 1812; chief of the bureau of contributions, 
commissioner of the national treasury (1791); born at St. Denis Jan. 19, 1756, 
died at Genne-Villiers Nov. 5, 1841; married April, 1822, Marie-Anna-Summar- 
RIPA, who died at Paris, Nov. 16, 1855. Their only daughter, Athenais-Laura- 
Pauline Gaudin, born at Paris, died there Aug. 3, 1871, married Ernest Stanis- 
laus, count of Girardin, senator of the second Empire. Arms: Or, in pale azure 
a chevron or; bordure azure sprinkled with besants or and argent alternating; 
franc-quarter surmounted by emblem of the counts, ministers of the interior; 
count, 1808. Same arms (less the frank-quarter) charged in chief with the dukes 
of the Empire, 

Gaudin (Theobold) was styled in the manuscript history of the taking of Acre 
"Monk Gaudin". He was elected Grand of the Temple by those who were 
rescued from the hands of the Saracens at the capture of that place, and retired 
with them to the island of Cyprus. 

Gaudintius, Archbishop of Caesarea . . at the Synod which was held at Antioch 
in the month of December, 1143 A.D. 



Querards La Frans Letlearre Catagreom. — Gaudins. 
Gaudin (le P. Jean). 
Gaudin (dom Alexis). 
Gaudin (Jacq.). 
Gaudin (J.). 

Gaudin (Martin-Michel- Charles). 
Gauden (Em.). 
Gaudin (A. P.). 

Gaidin (de la Grange). 

Gaudin (Paul). 
Gaudin (Pierre-Paul). 

Gaudin (Severe). 

Goudy (Apollon). 

Goudy (Frans-Bamhard-Henrish-Willielm). 

Goudy (Le Fort). 




Cbe #0ubits in S^rfhmb. 



The Shetland Islands, lying beyond Scotland in the North Sea, were conquered 
and colonized by Norwegians under King Harold Haarfagr in the 9th century. 
For about 600 years thereafter they remained an appendage of the Crown of Nor- 
way and were ceded to Scotland, in 1468, merely by way of pawn for the unpaid 
portion of dowry of the Princess Margaret, daughter of Christian I. King of Den- 
mark and Norway, on her marriage to King James III. of Scotland. This portion 
is still unpaid though it has been more than once offered; always to be treated 
by the authorities of Scotland with equivocations and delays; and the redemption 
of the Islands by Norway is still an open question, though not likely again to be 
seriously moved. Few of the pedigrees of the native families can now be traced 
further back than 300 or 400 years, one insuperable difificulty being the patronymic 
changes of surnames in succeeding generations; but most of those families are 
of direct Norwegian descent, speaking the Norse language until a comparative 
recent date and ill affected for long to the domination by Scotland which used 
every effort to destroy the old native laws and usages of the Islands. 

It has already been mentioned that in the 12th century Gaute of Skeggbjarnar- 
stadir was a man of some standing in the Orkney Islands contiguous to Shetland. 
A few of the name are still to be found in that group, some as Gawdie, the original, 
and some as Goudie, the modern form. The first on record in Shetland was Gawane 
Gadie of Langsetter, in the parish of Dunrossness, who appeared in 1576 as one 
of the native complainants, with his own Bill of Complaint, in the famous trial 
of Lawrence Bruce of Cultemalindie, the instrument of oppression of Lord Robert 
Stewart, Earl of Orkney and Crown donatory of the islands at that time. Of the 
list of householders of every parish then given this Gawane (Gavin) is the only 
person of the name apparently then living in the islands. This was only 15 years 
after the Reformation settlement of 1560 in Scotland, so that he must have been 
reared under the old Catholic regime and indeed may be assumed to have been 
conversant in his early days with persons who had been living in the time of the 
direct Norwegian sovereignty of the islands which terminated only about a century 
earlier, in 1468. The name Gawane is itself as ancient as the Arthurian Romances, 
in which "Sir Gawane" appears as one of the heroes of the Round Table. It 
appears again in the 16th century, in Scotland, in the person of Archbishop Gavin 
Dunbar (1524-1547) son of Sir Alexander Dunbar of Westfield, Morayshire, and 
in the great house of the Douglasses, Earls of Angus. The famous Gavin Douglas, 
son of Earl Archibald, was born in 1474. His father did not appreciate the love 
of letters among his descendants, and is reported to have exclaimed : — 

"Thanks to St. Bothan, son of mine 
Sane Gawin ne'er could pen a line." 

But this same Gawin, or Gavin, it was who became Bishop of Dunkeld and was 
one of the pioneers of literature in Scotland by his translation of the Aeneid of 
Virgil into the Scots vernacular. The present Marquess of Breadalbane is Gavin 
Campbell and Gavin Hamilton is the name of the present Lord Hamilton of Dalzell. 
But, generally speaking, the name of Gavin may be said to be as rare as it is ancient. 



no THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 

Even in Shetland at the present time it is of seldom occurrence, only four household- 
ers in the county bearing the name, as appears by the official list of Voters for Par- 
liament, year 1893-1894; and of these, three are in the parish of Dunrossness and 
all presumably more or less remotely connected with the original family of the 
name there — the Goodies of Braefield (see forward). The introduction of the 
name at an early period in so remote a region as the Shetland Islands and its con- 
tinuance in this one small family and its collaterals, from that time to the present 
day, is a circumstance peculiar and unexplained. Even the family surname 
of Goudie is also rare, though a little more distributed as time went on. In the 
course of the 19th century the original rendering of "Gawdy" in England and 
of "Gadie" or "Gaudie" in Shetland became modernized into the form now com- 
monly in use, first adopted by Professor Gowdie of Edinburgh in the previous 
century, as already shown under his name, and first followed by persons of the 
name of Gaudie or Goldie in Ayrshire. The family of Gauden (or Goudie) in 
Swinister in Shetland, originated in the Reverend John Gauden, minister of the 
parish of Tingwall in the 17th century, is now extinct, but its pedigree will be given 
in this work. 

Gavin Goudie*, in ancient documents "Gawane Gadie", of Lugansetter, in the 
parish of Dunrossness, the first of this family, which may claim to be of native 
origin, mentioned on record, was one of the udallers of Shetland who had the 
courage to resist the oppression of Lord Robert Stewart and boldly impeached 
Lawrence Bruce of Cultemalinda, the Earl's Deputy, by a special Bill of Complaint 
before the Commission appointed by the Regent Morton, 1576, to inquire into 
the tyrannies of that person. He married Helen Mowat, who survived him and 
died his widow in March 1603. The inventory of her personal estate was confirmed 
by the Commissary of Orkney and Zetland on 18th August 1613, when her sons 
John and Erasmus were confirmed executors to her. See forward. 

OHIIiDREN OF GAVTN AND HEIiEN (MOWAT) GOXJDIE. 

John Goudie^ (1), son of Gavin^ (1) and Helen (Mowat) Goudie, carried on 
the family. About the year 1600, he and his brother Erasmus removed to Clumlie, 
at which place the family has since remained. Along with Gavin, his son, he was 
witness to a charter, dated 24th November 1623 of land in Clumlie, granted by 
Magnus Magnusson of Troswick to James Sinclair of Quendale. 

Gavin Goudie'' (2) second son of Gavin^ (1) and Helen (Mowat) Goudie, in 
Clumlie was witness with his father, to the above mentioned charter, on 24th 
August 1630. In the Commissary Books on 27th August 1630, is found "The 
Testament Dative and Inventor of the Guides geir soumes of money and debts 
quhilkis perteinit to umquhile Gayn Gadie in Clumlie within the parochin of 
Dunrossness quha deceist in the month of October 1629, faithfuUie maid and 
given up be Jewdeth Mowat, relict in the name of Mans, John and Oliver Gadie 
their lauchfull bairnes and executors datives decernit to the defunct be decriet 
of the Commissar". He left three sons of whom with third generation. See 
forward. 

The burial place of the family in Dunrossness has been partly in the old church- 
yard of Levenwick and partly at Quendale; and for the last 100 years in the parish 
churchyard of Dunrossness, where successive monuments stand. 



THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. Ill 

In the Bruce Pedigree, Shetland Isles, Gilbert Bruce of Muness in Dunrossness 
married Margaret Bruce of Sumburg, and their daughter Marjory became the 
wife of John Goudie. 

Clrirtr ^tmxKiian. 

o 
CHILDREN OF GAVXN AWD JTJDITH (MOWAT) GOT7SIE. 

Magnus Goudie' (1), eldest son of Gavin' (2) and Judith (Mowat) Goudie, of 
whom we have no other information. He may have become the ancestor of another 
branch of the Goudie family removed to other parts of Shetland. 

John Goudie' (2), second son of Gavin' (2) and Judith (Mowat) Gowdie, carried 
on this family and appears to have been the father of Gavin Goudie whose descend- 
ants' names will presently appear. 

Oliver Goudie' (1), third son of Gavin'^ (2) and Judith (Mowat) Goudie, of 
whom we have no other mention. 

Jfourt^ ^tmxKiion. 

CHIIiX) or JOHN AND WIFE. 

Gavin Goudie* (3), eldest son of John* (2) and his wife who, 

along with his brother William, paid scat duty for one half of the township of 
Clumlie, then held by them as per rental of the Lordship of Zetland for corp 1716- 
1717. He was living in 1738, and had issue four sons, of whom more with fifth 
generation. 

Jfift^ ^mtxRiian. 

CHIIiDREN OF GAVTN AND WTPE. 

Gilbert Goudie* (1), eldest son of Gavin* (3) and his wife whose name does not 
appear, died about 1775. By his wife, Isabel Henrys, daughter of Robertson of 
Deepdale, he had issue seven children. See forward. 

Gavin Goudie* (4), second son of Gavin* (3) and his wife whose name does not 
appear, was an English interpreter in Russia. 

William Goudie' (1), third son of Gavin* (3) and his wife whose name has not 
been discovered, was of Troswickness, and father of John Goudie, Navy Contractor, 
Edinburgh. 

Magnus Goudie* (2), fourth son of Gavin* (3) and his wife whose name does 
not appear, removed to Catfirth in Nesting(?). 

SxjtI^ ^mtxRiion, 

CHUiDREN OP GIIiBERT AND ISABEL ^HENRT) G017DIE. 

Gavin Goudie' (5), eldest son of Gilbert* (1) and Isabel (Henry) Goudie, born 
in 1748, was of Clumlie. He married Sept. 4, 1792, Margaret, George's daughter, 
by whom issue as will presently appear. He was ordained an elder of Dunrossness 
parish by Rev. John Mill on the 23d October, 1791. In 1781 and the following 
years he was engaged at Fort Charlotte, Lerwick, Shetland, then being repaired 
and rebuilt. He died in 1812, his last words being "I thank God that my cradle 
is from the fire", i.e. that he was not leaving his children in helpless infancy. He 
had issue five children. See forward. 

Olla Goudie' (1), daughter of Gilbert* (1) and Isabel (Henry) Goudie. 

Henry Goudie* (1), second son of Gilbert* (1) and Isabel (Henry) Goudie, born 
Oct. 14, 1762, died young. 



112 THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 

Jane Gou(iie«(l), daughter of Gilbert' (1) and Isabel (Henry) Goudie. 
Agnes Goudie' (1), daughter of Gilbert' (1) and Isabel (Henry) Goudie. 
Martha Goudie* (1), daughter of Gilbert' (1) and Isabel (Henry) Goudie. 
Marion Goudie* (1), daughter of Gilbert' (1) and Isabel (Henry) Goudie. 

u 
CHILDREN OF GAVTN AND MARION (aEORG-E'S DAUGHTER). 

Gilbert Goudie^ (2), eldest son of Gavin' (5) and Marion (George's daughter), 
born Feb. 20, 1796; married Jane Black, daughter of George Black, who died 
Sept. 12, 1878. He built the house at Braefield in 1863-4, the present residence 
of the family, a large and substantial seat, where he died Dec. 10, 1891. He had 
issue ten children, of whom with eighth generation. See portrait. 

George Goudie^ (1), second son of Gavin' (5) and Marion (George's daughter), 
born July 17, 1799, died in Edinburgh in 1842, aged 43 years. 

Andrew Goudie^ (1), third son of Gavin' (5) and Marion (George's daughter), 
born June 6, 1802, died Oct. 10, 1870. He was a watchmaker in Lerwick. After 
being trained in London he carried on business in Shetland for a number of years, 
but his later life was devoted to philanthropic work, especially as a Homeopathic 
medical practitioner, among the poor in Lerwick. He left in manuscript some 
folio volumes containing his views on "War and Alcohol". 

Gavin Goudie^ (6), fourth son of Gavin' (5) and Marion (George's daughter), 
was a builder, Edinburgh, Associate of the Architectural Institute of Scotland. 
He died Dec. 31, 1869. 

Margaret Goudie^ (1), daughter of Gavin' (5) and Marion (George's daughter), 
bom Dec. 23, 1793, was married to Gavin Goudie, merchant, Lerwick, Shetland, 
and died at South Shields, England, in September, 1878. She had eight children 
named as follows: — 

I. Peter Gilbert Goudie*, Nanquaski, Japan, died Nov. 22, 1864. un- 
married. 
II. William Spence Goudie*, died at Shields, England, unmarried. 

III. John Cririe Goudie*, of the Union Bank of Scotland, Edinburgh, 
died in Australia, unmarried. 

IV. James Catton Goudie*, London, married Margaret Louisa William- 
son and died in London May 28, 1893. 

v. Margaret Goudie*, married Basil Johnston, merchant. Yell, Shetland, 
and had issue as follows: — 

(1) Mary Ann Johnston*, married Alexander McManus. 

(2) Margaret Johnston', married Thomas Johnston. 

(3) Martha Goudie Johnston*. 

Braefield House. 

This mansion and residence of the Goudie Family of Braefield, in the parish of Dunrossness, Shet- 
land, is of coniparatively modem erection by Gilbert Goudie in 1863-64. As represented by the view 
appearing in this work the house is seated on a moderate elevation and hence its name of Braefield. 
It is a large and commanding residence of solid stone masonry ; capacious and comfortable, and the 
outbuildings are commensurate with the requirements of the family. The former residence of this 
family was in the neighboring village of Olumlie (with its church dedication to Columba perhaps 
1000 years ago), having been occupied doubtless with many rebuildings, by the family for 300 years. 
This property is not to be termed an "estate." In the olden time of northern life all properties were 
small, the "conquest" of strong men who transmitted them to their families. But during the last 300 
years most of the properties of the old Norwegian stock, like that of Goudies, has been swallowed up 
by the Scottish settlers in greedy depredation, and what is now possessed, a very beautiful place, was 
acquired in the course of the last century. 




GILBERT GCUDIE. 



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GILBERT GOUDIE. 



THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 113 

(4) JoHAN Frances Johnston^ married George Reid Tait, of 
Helendale, merchant, Lerwick, and had issue, Frances-Evelyn 
(deceased); Edwyn-Seymore, merchant in Lerwick; Ethel-Mar- 
guerite; Florence-Montgomerie (deceased); Georgie; Peterina- 
Jane-Sharp, married Robert Millar, teacher, Lerwick, Shet- 
land. 
VI. Mary-Ann Goudie", died unmarried. 

VII. Martha Goudie*, married 1st, Gilbert Henderson and had issue 
Gilbert-Gavin Henderson, merchant, Shanghai, China; 2d, Capt. 
Andrew Blanch. 
VIII. Elizabeth Yates Goudie*, born in 1826; married Oct. 17, 1850, Mit- 
chell Moncrief, South Shields, and had issue as follows: — 

(1) Margaret Moncrief^, born March 30, 1852 ; died Oct. 23, 1865. 

(2) Robert Peter MoNCRIEF^ born Oct. 2, 1854; married Janet 
Somerville Affleck of Threepland, Gosforth, Newcastle-on- 
Tyne. 

(3) Wtlimina Jane MoNCRIEF^ born April 16, 1857. 

(4) Mary Moncrief^, born July 10, 1861; was married to Isaac 
Carr, Member of the Institute of Civil Engineers, of Birchfield, 
Widness, and has issue four sons and five daughters. 

(5) John Moncrief*. 

CHILDREN OF GILiBERT AND JANE (BLACK) GOUDIE. 

1. Gavin Goudie^ (7), eldest son of Gilbert^ (2) and Jane (Black) Goudie, born 
Nov. 1, 1820; died July 31, 1848. 

2. Jane Goudie^ (2), eldest daughter of Gilbert^ (2) and Jane (Black) Goudie, 
died July 11, 1907. 

3. Mary-Anne Goudie* (3), second daughter of Gilbert' (2) and Jane (Black) 
Goudie, was married to Thomas Mouat of the customs, Williamstown, Victoria, 
and had issue as follows: — 

I. Thomas Gilbert Gosset MouAT^ now of Cleveland, Ohio, U. S. A., 
Chairman of the Mouat-Squires Engineering Company. He married 
Laura Mouat, daughter of S. T. Mouat, of Detroit, Mich. 

4. George Goudie^ (2), second son of Gilbert' (2) and Jane (Black) Goudie, of 
Braefield, parish of Dunrossness, Shetland, born there Sept. 13, 1830, removed to 
Australia in 1854. He married Caroline Ashton (born at Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia, Aug. 11, 1842) at Amherst, Victoria, Sept. 10, 1861. He died at Birchip, 
Victoria, May 16, 1906. He had issue as follows: — 

I. Gilbert Gavin GouDIE^ eldest son of George* (2) and Caroline (Ashton) 

Admiralty Appointment— Lieut. -Colonel Moncrieii. 

The Deputv-Comtroller for AuxiUarv Shipbuilding (Admiralty) has appointed Lieut.-Colonel 
Mitchell MoncriefF, R. S., to be Director of Engineerin.; Work to deal generally with all civil-engineor- 
insc matters which mav arise in connection with that Department. Lieut.-Colonel (formerly Major) 
MoncriefF is a well known member of the Institution of Cixdl Engineers, and has hitherto earned on 
an extensive practice as a consulting engineer for docks, shipyards, river and harbor developments, 
etc. Colonel MoncriefT has already taken up his new duties. . 

Colonel Moncrieff's grandfather was Gavin Goudv, for some time in the navy and later m the early 
part of the last centurv well known as a merchant in Lerwick. His father was Mitchell Moncneff 
of South Shields, and his mother, Elizabeth Yates Goudy, a first cousin of Miss Johnson (of Messrs. 
E. S. Reid Tait & Co.) and Mrs. R. Miller of Edgecott, Lerwick, and of Mr. Gilbert Goudie, t^din- 
burgh, and of the Seniors of the Braefield family still surviving. ,,„,., 

— Shetland News, 27 September 1917. 



114 THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 

Goudie, born at Timon, Victoria, June 29, 1862; married Feb. 3, 1897, 
Margaret Johnston, daughter of George Johnston of Lubeck, Vic- 
toria. A retired farmer. He resided at Birchip, Victoria, but has sold 
his lands and is now (1915) living at Ultima, Australia, his post address 
being Sea Lake, Victoria. He has had issue five children as follows: — 

(1) Mary Ashton Goudie^", born at Birchip, Victoria, April 4, 1899, 

(2) Florence May Goudie^", born at Melbourne, Victoria, May 24, 
1902. 

(3) Gilbert George Goudie^", born at Birchip, Victoria, Aug. 19, 
1905; married in Oct. 1910 (?) Edith Glover of Ultima and 
has issue. 

(4) John Gavin Goudie^", born at Easternwick, Victoria, July 30, 
1911. 

(5) Gary Goudie^", born at Ultima, Victoria, May 29, 1914. 

II. Sarah Jane Goudie*, eldest daughter of George* (2) and Caroline 
(Ashton) Goudie, born at Adelaide Head, Victoria, April 30, 1864. 

III. George Louis Goudie*, second son of George* (2) and Caroline (Ashton) 
Goudie, born at Hornbush, Victoria, March 30, 1866; married Sept. 9, 
1890, Alice Maud Watson of Birchip, Victoria, and is a merchant and 
farmer. Issue as follows: — 

(1) FREDGouDiEi",bornJulyl2, 1891 ;marriedApril8, 1914, Adelaide 
Harris of Melbourne, Victoria. He is connected with the Elec- 
trical Branch of the Melbourne Postal Department. 

(2) Lewis Goudie^*^, born May 18, 1893. Farmer at Speed, Victoria. 

(3) Percy Gilbert Goudie'", born July 14, 1895. Farmer at Speed, 
Victoria. 

(4) Joseph Goudie^'', born Aug. 10, 1897. Farmer at Speed, Victoria. 

(5) John Ashton Goudie'", born Aug. 30, 1910. 

IV. Carey Ashton Goudie*, third son of George* (2) and Caroline (Ashton) 
Goudie, born at New Teron, Maryborough, Victoria, July 9, 1868. He 
was a farmer at Birchip, Victoria, but retired and was studying for the 
ministry of the Church. He died Oct. 5, 1902, at Maryborough, Vic- 
toria, where he was buried. 

V. Irvine Ainsley Goudie*, fourth son of George* (2) and Caroline 
(Ashton) Goudie, born at Stirling East, South Australia, Feb. 21, 1870; 
married March 3, 1897, at Laen, Victoria, Mary Ellen Hillgrove. 
He was a farmer at Birchip, Victoria. He died Dec. 10, 1907. Issue 
as follows: — 

(1) Jessie Caroline Goudie'", born May 9, 1898. 

(2) Rowxand William Goudie'", born Feb. 7, 1900. 

(3) Ellis Goudie'", born July 17, 1902. 

(4) George Hillgrove Goudie'", born Aug. 27, 1907. 

VI. John Charles Goudie*, fifth son of George* (2) and Caroline (Ashton) 
Goudie, born at Timor, Victoria, Jan. 14, 1874; in 1915 was a farmer 
at Sea Lake, Victoria, Australia. 
VII. Robert Henry Goudie*, sixth son of George* (2) and Caroline (Ashton) 
Goudie, born at Ararat, Victoria, Oct. 18, 1876; married in 1906 Eva 
Ethel Mudge of Kaneira, Victoria. Farmer, Sea Lake, Victoria. 
Issue as follows: — 




GILBERT GOUDIE, ESQ. 



THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 115 

(1) Henry George Goudie^", born July 14, 1907, at Kaneira, 
Victoria. 

(2) Robert Francis John Goudie^**, born Feb. 19, 1912, at Kaneira, 
Victoria. 

VIII. David Goudie', seventh son of George* (2) and Caroline (Ashton) 
Goudie, born at Ararat, Victoria, Jan. 27, 1885. 

5. Margaret Goudie* (2) , third daughter of Gilbert^ (2) and Jane (Black) Goudie, 
was married to Thomas Mainland, Trebister, Shetland, and had issue a son and 
two daughters. 

6. Andrew Goudie* (2), third son of Gilbert^ (2) and Jane (Black) Goudie, mar- 
ried Jemine Thomson, daughter of John Thomson, and resides at the family seat, 
Braefield, Dunrossness, Shetland. Has issue as follows: — 

I. Gilbert Peter Goudie', living at Mount View Ranch, South Dakota, 

U. S. America. 
II. Martha Umphray Goudie'. 

III. John James Goudie'. 

IV. Jane Maria Goudie 'was married to Horace Dobell Saxby, Transvaal, 
South Africa, son of Henry L. Saxby, M.D., Dec. 12, 1910. 

7. Peter Goudie* (2), fourth son of Gilbert^ (2) and Jane (Black) Goudie, died 
in Australia, 1853, aged 17 years. 

8. EUzabeth Goudie* (2), fourth daughter of Gilbert^ (2) and Jane (Black) 
Goudie, died April 13, 1912. 

9. Gilbert Goudie* (4), fifth son of Gilbert^ (2) and Jane (Black) Goudie, died 
in infancy. 

10. Gilbert Goudie* (5), sixth son of Gilbert^ (2) and Jane (Black) Goudie, born 
April 23, 1843; married Sept. 7, 1881, Anna Anderson, daughter of John Anderson 
of Horselaw, and widow of William Ross of Greenside, both in the County of Fife. 
He is a Fellow of the Scottish Antiquarian Society, and late banker in Edinburgh; 
and is a well known antiquary, authority on Shetland history, and Scandinavian 
scholar. By numerous papers read before the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, 
afterwards published under the title of "the Celtic and Scandinavian Antiquities 
of Shetland," in 1904; his editing of the "Diary of the Rev. John Mill" and his 
translation from the Icelandic, in conjunction with Mr. Jon A. Hjaltalin, of the 
"Orkneyinga Saga," he has laid all students of the history of these Northern isles 
under a debt of gratitude. 

Mr. Goudie has for many years been an active member and office-bearer of the 
Society of Antiquarians of Scotland, and has also been connected with learned 
societies of similar kind in Scandinavia and in France and elsewhere. He has 
traveled in Iceland and in most of the countries of Europe. In 1872 he was received 
in semi-private audience, in the Vatican, by the Pope, Pius the Ninth. In 1912 
he had the honor of being presented to the King of Denmark in the Amalienburg 
Palace, Copenhagen, and he recently received the cordial acknowledgment of the 
King of Norway for his book" The Celtic and Scandinavian Antiquities of Shetland," 
a subject in which His Majesty is much interested. Mr. Goudie retired from 
active duty as a banker in 1909. 

Mr. Goudie was educated in Shetland and in Edinburgh, and at the University 
of that city. His principal publications are as follows: — 



116 THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 

tlorhs of mhtxi (^oubic. 

1. The Orkneyinga Saga. Translated from the Icelandic by Jon A. Hjaltalin 
and Gilbert Goudie. Edited with Notes and Introduction by Joseph Anderson, 
LL.D., Edinburgh. Edmonson and Douglas. 1873. 

2. The Ancient Local Government of the Shetland Islands. Universitets Isbi- 
leets Danckle & Saamfund, Copenhagen. 1886. 

3. Glossary of Shetland terms (in " Broken Lights, Poems and Reminiscences of 
Basil Ramsey Anderson"). Edinburgh, R. & R. Clark. 1888. 

4. The Diary of the Reverend John MiU, Minister of Dunrossness, Sand wick, 
and Cunningsburgh, Shetland, 1740-1823, with selections from local records and 
original documents relating to the District. Edited with Introduction and Notes 
by Gilbert Goudie, F. S. A. Scot., Edinburgh. Printed by F. & A. Constable for the 
Scottish History Society. 1889. 

5. The Ancient Church in Shetland. (The Scots Magazine, March, 1891.) 

6. The Norsemen in Shetland. (Saga Book of the Viking Club, London, 
1895-96.) 

7. The Celtic and Scandinavian Antiquities of Shetland. By Gilbert Goudie, 
F. S. A. Scot. William Blackwood & Sons, Edinburgh and London, 1904. 

8. David Laing, LL.D. Memoir of His Life and Literary Works. By Gilbert 
Goudie, F. S. A. Scot., with introduction by Lord Guthrie. Edinburgh, F. & A. 
Constable, 1903. 

Numerous papers contributed, during more than forty years from 1871, to 
the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland and printed in their "Proceedings." 

Notices in the "Scottish Historical Review," from time to time, of Danish, 
Norwegian, Swedish and Icelandic books, when issued, etc., etc. 
He has issue as follows: — 

I. Gilbert John Goudie«, born Dec. 31, 1884, died April 26, 1899. 
II. Mary Matilda Goudie', born June 20, 1886, died in infancy. 
Mr Goudie married, secondly, on 18th November, 1916, Anna Margarita 
Jean Young, daughter of James Young, M.D., 14 Ainslie Place, Edinburgh. 



^Dutrtcs in |Tthj ^tulanb. 

Robert Goudie, son of a Shetland man, was born in Glasgow, Scotland, Jan. 
28, 1859, married Jane (Rankin?) and died Feb. 25, 1889. Wife born in Glasgow, 
Scotland, June 1857, living in 1915, aged 66. Issue: 

note. — Miss Anna Margarita Jean Young, as above, is descended from the family of Erskine of 
Mar and Balgownie, who was 9th in descent from Robert, fourth Lord Erskine (dejure 15th Earl of 
Mar) who was slain at Flodden, 1513. This Lord Erskine, grandfather of the Earl of Mar, Regent of 
Scotland, was 11th in line from Sir John Erskine of Erskine, who was liv'.ng in 1252. By her great- 
grandmother Agnes Moncrief, wife of Robert Cunningham of Balgownie, and grand-daughter of the 
Rev. George Lyon of Wester Oeil, Mrs. Goudie is also descended from the Lords Lyon, Earl of Strath- 
more and Kinghorne. The direct ancestor of that family. Sir John Lyon of Glamis, married the princess 
Johanna Stewart, daughter of King Robert II. and great-granddaughter of King Robert the Bruse, 
conqueror at Bannockburn, 1.314. 

John Cunningham of Balgownie, first cousin of Mrs. Goudie's mother. Captain 12th Hussars, mar- 
ried in 1866 Helen Rebecca, daughter and co-heiress of MacDonell, Chief of Glengary. 

See Burke's "Peerage" and "The Lyons of Cossins and Wester Ogil, Cadets of Glamis," by Andrew 
Ross, Marchmont Herald. Edinburgh, 1901. 

LETTER. — "My brother here and his family are the heads of the family on the old ground. I 
therefore think that the pedigree should end there, beginning anew with a separate heading of the 
Austrahan branch, though it is really of the eldest brother. You will understand so well what I mean 
that I shall not explain farther — ". As shown above, George Gaudie, the eldest son, removed to Australia 
in 1854. — Gilbert Goudie. 




JAMES MOUAT GOUDIE. 




JAMES TOLLOCH GOUDIE. 



THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 117 

1. Grace Rankin Goudie, living, age 40, married. 

2. Christina Goudie, living, age 38, married. 

3. Jeanie Goudie, living, age 36, married. 

4. Alexander Goudie, aged 34, railroad man, Auckland, New Zealand. 

5. John Hardie Goudie, living, age 32. A boiler maker. Single man. 

6. Robert Goudie, single, aged 29. Boilermaker. 

7. Sinclair Goudie, married, aged 26. Railroad man, Auckland, New Zealand. 



Clje 6oubus of Iflontfieltr, Shtlatttr. 

Robert Goudie? son of Robert Goudie\ Schoolmaster of Cunningsburgh, Dun- 
rossness, was a descendant of the old family at Braefield. He was a merchant 
in Lerwick, Shetland. He married Janet Mouat, daughter of James Mouat of 
Wadbister, and had surviving issue: — 

James Mouat Goudie^, born May 6, 1851. He is a merchant, Justice of the 
Peace, Honorary Sheriff Substitute and late Chief Magistrate of Lerwick. 

Margaret Johanna Goudie^, born May 29, 1855. 



James Tolloch Goudie^ (1), of Sand and of Oakleigh Park, Pollockshields, 
manufacturer in Glasgow, .Scotland, the son of Robert Goudie and Grace Bruce 
Tolloch, CulHster, and grandson of Gavin Goudie^ of Bigton, Dunrossness, pur- 
chased the estate of Sand, the property in the 18th century of the Mitchells of 
Westshore and Sand (Sir John and Sir Andrew, Baronets) and died at Cannes in 
France, March 31, 1896, aged 54. He married Jane Nicholson, daughter of 
Rev. John Nicholson and had surviving issue named as follows: — 

1. Margaret Goudie* (1), eldest daughter of James' (1) and Jane (Nicholson) 
Goudie, born March 10, 1870. 

2. John Nicholson Goudie'' (1), second son of James' (1) and Jane (Nicholson) 
Goudie, born May 20, 1871, married Ruth Alice Morton Feb. 29, 1908. 

3. James Tolloch Goudie* (2), third son of James' (1) and Jane (Nicholson) 
Goudie, born June 15, 1873, married Sept. 6, 1902, Ethel Mary Maidlaw, young- 
est daughter of James Topham, stockbroker, London. He founded the extensive 
business of J. T. Goudie & Co., Manufacturers and Merchants, Glasgow, London, 
and Edinburgh, now amalgamated with the Leyland & Birmingham Rubber Co., 
Ld., of which James Tolloch Goudie is the Managing Director. He has issue as 
follows: — 

I. Violet Florence GouDIE^ born Aug. 27, 1903. 
II. Eric James Topham GouDIE^ born April 29, 1908. 

4. GraceBruce Goudie* (1), second daughter of James' (1) and Jane (Nicholson) 
Goudie, born Nov. 3, 1875; was married Oct. 29, 1903, to James Colville, M.D., 
of Belfast, Ireland, and has issue a son, James Goudie Colville, born Dec. 15, 1904. 

5. EUza Catherine Goudie* (1), third daughter of James' (1) and Jane (Nichol- 
son) Goudie, born April 25, 1878; was married Oct. 6, 1906, to John Maitland 
Thomson, Optician, Dundee, Scotland. 



118 THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 

6. Albert Nicol Goudie'' (1), fourth son of James^ (1) and Jane (Nicholson) 
Goudie, born Sept. 3, 1881 ; married Leah Gerbonde Morton, and had issue: — 
I. Dorothy Nicholson Goudie, born May 2, 1911. 
Gavin Goudie** (1), another son of Robert' and Grace Bruce Tolloch and grand- 
son of Gavin Goudie of Bigton, Dunrossness, is the senior member of the firm of 
Goudie & Whittier, Merchants, Glasgow, Scotland. See portrait and view of his 
residence. 



Cl^c #oubtcs of Sotrigurtb. Sljctlanb. 

Peter Goudie^ of Sotrigarth, in the parish of Sandwick, Shetland, had issue 
two sons, viz: — 

Gavin Goudie^ (1), whose son was Signalmaster in the Royal Navy, and 

Walter Goudie^ (1), who married Ursula Irvine and had a son and three 
daughters. 

Peter Goudie^ (2), son of Walter, just mentioned, of Lunabister, Dunrossness, 
married Hannah Irvine and had issue three children, a son and two daughters, 
of whom presently. He married second, Elizabeth Johnson, by whom he had 
issue five children, of whom more. 



C^trb ^meratton. 



"WilliamPayneGoudie*(l),eldestsonof Peter^(2) and Hannah (Irvine) Goudie, 
B.A. (London University), Tutor, Derby, married Lydia H. Kaye, daughter of 
Abraham Kaye, and has issue: — 

I. ZiLLAH GouDIE^ B.A. (London University), Teacher of Science (in 

Spanish) in the "Lyceo" at Punta Avenas, Chili. 
II. Elizabeth Goudie^, B.A. London, conducts a private school at Irvine 

House, Derby. 
HI. Peter GouDIE^ sub-Editor of the "Nottingham Guardian," married 

Rose Flanders and has issue William Goudie^ and Zillah Goudie^ 
IV. Walter Dunross GoudieS head of Engineering work in British 
Columbia. 

2. John Goudie* (1), a resident of Philadelphia, Penn. See his record. 

3. Peter Goudie* (3) married Ann Leslie and had issue: — Jemina^ Elizabeth*, 
Peter^ Zillah^ Robert", and William^ 

4. Janet Goudie* (1), married Christian Christensen of New York, U. S. A. 

5. Elizabeth Goudie* (1), died unmarried. 

6. Margaret Goudie* (1), married to J. Garriock of Cunningsburgh, Shetland. 



Samuel Goudie^, son of James Goudie^ of Lerwick, is descended from the old 
Dunrossness race. Born in Lerwick in 1855 and educated there, he entered the 
ser\'ice of the Commercial Bank of Scotland Ld., in which he has held several im- 
portant appointments and is now, as agent, in charge of the business of the bank in 




WILLIAM PAYNE GOUDIE. 



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SAMUEL SMITH GOUDIE. 



THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 119 

the city of Dundee. He is a Justice of the Peace for the county of Caithness and 
a director in Scotland of the Norwich Union Fire Insurance Co., Ld. He married 
Marion Brown Aitken, Dalkeith, and has issue four sons, viz: — Arnold-James^, 
Samuel-Herbert^, Alexander-George-Aitken' and Harold-Olrig^, and a daughter 
Annie Smith. See portrait of this Samuel Smith Goudie of Dundee, Scotland. 



doubles of ^l"ahtistcr antr #h^rlanir, S^ttlarttr. 

Rev. John Gauden, M.A.^, son of Thomas Gadie^ and his wife Mary Stuart of 
Campston, was born in 1650. He matriculated in the university of Edinburgh 
in 1664 as "Joannes Gaudie" and obtained his degree of M.A. in 1668 and became 
the minister of the parish of Tingwall in Shetland. He was known throughout 
his professional life as the Reverend John Gauden, the terminal "en" having 
in all probability, been adopted in imitation of the name of Dr. John Gauden, 
Bishop of Exeter and afterwards of Worcester, who was in great prominence in 
England about that time, as has been explained in another section of this work. 
He was minister of Tingwall from April 18th, 1675, till his death on May 25th, 
1688. He lived and died respected. His wife, Margaret Sinclair, said to have 
been the daughter of John Sinclair of Quendale, survived him and had issue, of 
whom presently. 

His tombstone, with armorial bearings and inscription in Latin, is still in a good 
state of preservation in the churchyard of Tingwall. The arms are — a cross 
engrailed; in the second quarter a Galley; in the fourth quarter an estoile of 
seven points; surmounted by an Esquire's helmet with mantling. The letters 
"M.J.G." stand for Majister Joannes Gauden and "M.S." for Margaret Sinclair 
his spouse. The Latin inscription beneath the cross is partly defaced. 
1. John Gauden^ (1), son of Rev. John^ (1) and Margaret (Sinclair) Gauden, 
was his father's heir to the lands of Overland in the island of Fetlar, Shetland; 
also acquired lands in Swinister, in 1684 for £500, from Mr. Robert Ramsey, 
minister of Yell, Shetland, and Margaret Sinclair his spouse, the only child of 
Hercules Sinclair, minister of Northmavin, Shetland. He acquired some other 
lands from John Cheyne of Esselmont in 1703. He married Marjory Bruce, 
eldest daughter of Gilbert Bruce of Clivocast and Munes in Shetland. In 1710 
Mr. Gauden disposed to his wife, Marjory Bruce, his 10 merk udal land of Swinister, 
with the manor place thereof, also 21 merks more in the parish of Tingwall, 6 merks 
in Weesdale and 12 merks in Baccasetter in the parish of Dunrossness, reserving 
his life rent of the same. Gilbert Bruce, the father of this Mrs. Gauden, was the 
last heir in possession of the Muness estates which were acquired by Lawrence 
Bruce of Cultemalindie before 1598, when he began to build the Muness Castle. 
It is thus curious to note that by this marriage the line of Cultemalindie ended, 
merged in the family of Gauden (or Gaudie) of Swinister, while one of the most 
strenuous opponents of Cultemalindie in the beginning of his oppressions in Shetland 
at his trial in 1576, was Gawane Gadie of Langsetter in the parish of Dunrossness. 
Gilbert Bruce's other daughter, Ursula, was married to John Scott of Voesgarth 
in the island of Unst. 

Gilbert Gauden^ (1), son of John'^ (1) and Margaret (Sinclair) Gauden, was 
of Overland and Swinister, and had a renunciation of these lands from his brother, 
John Gauden, April 21, 1734. In 1761 he made over these lands to William Mouat, 
merchant in Unst, a grandson of Mr. Robert Ramsay, minister of Yell, who had 



120 THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 

formerly possessed them. He married Ursula Bruce, daughter of William Bruce 
of Urie, and had issue seven children, of whom more presently. 

I. John GAUDEN^ drowned in Holland. 

II. Andrew Gauden^ 

III. Charles Gauden''. 

IV, William GaudenS the fourth son, died at Overland June 15, 1789. He 
had married Katherine Sinclair of Still, daughter of Henry Sinclair, 
who died Oct. 17, 1839, and had issue as follows: — 

(1) Gilbert GAUDEN^ born Nov. 10, 1779, married Janet Ross, 
the daughter of John Ross, of Scarpoe. and had issue as follows: 
(married April 11, 1811). Last of his name. 

(a) Mary-Ann8, bapt. April 11, 1811. 

(b) William GAUDEN^ bapt. July 14, 1812. 

(c) William GAUDEN^ bapt. July 14, 1813, died April 21, 
1868, the last of his name. 

(2) John Andrew Gauden^ 

(3) Thomas-Charles Gauden^ 

(4) Barbara Gauden^ 

(5) Ursula Gauden^ 



Peter Goudie^ (1) lived and died at Hestating Croft in the parish of Aithsting, 
Mainland of the Shetland Isles. His ancestry and family are unknown, but were 
probably connected with other branches early settled in the Islands. His wife's 
name has not reached his descendants. He had two sons and two daughters. 
See forward. 

Setontr 6mtntti:on. 

chiIjSren or petek gotjdie and "wife. 

1. Thorvel Goudie^ (1), eldest son of Peter^ (1), was married and had 

a son and daughter. Capt. Peter Goudie sailed out of Liverpool. The daughter 
was married to a Mr. Jameson and resided in Liverpool. 

2. Lawrence Goudie^ (1), second son of Peter^ (1), was married 

and had eight sons, three of whom died in childhood; the remaining five will have 
attention presently. 

3. Mary Goudie^ (1), a daughter of Peter^ (1), was married to a 

Mr. Jameson and resided in Liverpool, England. She had two daughters, one 
of whom was married to Mr. Rutherford, the other to Capt. Williamson who 
has sailed out of Liverpool. 

4. Margaret Goudie^ (1), a daughter of Peter^ (1), was married 

to Mr. Nicholson and resided in Shetland. 

Cljirtr (i^cneratton. 

CHILDREN OF LA"WRENCE GOUDIE. 

1. Peter Goudie'^ (2), son of Lawrence^ (1), married Oct. 14, 1872, Elizabeth 
Robertson at Linkhouse, Midyell, Shetland, by whom he had two sons and two 
daughters named as follows: — 

I. Jane Wilhelmina Goudie^, born at West Sandwick, Yell, Shetland, 
Nov. 28, 1874; was married June 20, 1907, to William Smith, son of 



THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 121 



Twins. 



George and Janet (Shewan) Smith of the parish of Dunrossness, Shetland, 
who was born March 18, 1861. This family resides in Bellevue Cottage, 
Lerwick, Shetland. They have four children as follows: — 

(1) Elizabeth Robertson SMITH^ born in Lerwick, Shetland, Sept. 
20, 1911; died Sept. 25, 1911. 

(2) John Alexander SMITH^ born at Lerwick, Shetland, 
July 7, 1913. 

{Vt Peter Frederick SMITH^ born at Lerwick, Shetland, 

July 7, 1913. 
(4) Katherleen Mary SMITH^ born at Lerwick, Shetland, Dec. 

20, 1914. 

II. Lawrence GoudieS born Jan. 26, 1877, is married and has seven 
surviving children, Isabella, Catherine, Mary, Agnes, Barbara, Maggie 
and Lawrence. Isabella is married to a Mr. White and resides in 
Leith. His wife was Catherine Campbell. He is attached to the 
Secretary's Department in the General Post Office, Edinburgh. 

III. Robert John GouDIE^ born Aug. 26, 1878. He is a partner in the 
wholesale drug business, residing at Ryehill Avenue, Leith, Scotland. 
He married Jemina Catherine Tait and has four children. 

IV. Catherine GoudieS born March 16, 1880; was married to John 
Sinclair, Ship Officer, and resides at 12 Gosport Place, Edinburgh, 
Scotland. He is commanding the steamship "Reval." One child. 

2. Lawrence Goudie^ (2), second son of Lawrence'^ (1), was married and had 
seven surviving children, Isabella, Catherine, Mary, Agnes, Barbara, Maggie and 
Lawrence. Isabella is the wife of a Mr. White and resides in Leith, Scotland. 

3. John Goudie^ (1), third son of Lawrence^ (1), was married and is now retired 
in consequence of poor health. He was employed with the Leith Dock Commis- 
sion. There are two sons and two daughters. 

I. Peter Goudie^, is married and has two children. He is at present 
attached to the Canadian Expeditionary Force (1916). 

II. John Goudie^ is in Ottawa, Canada. 

III. Elizabeth Goudie* is employed in the Drapery line. 

IV. Catherine Goudie^ is employed in the Drapery line. 

4. James Goudie^ (1), fourth son of Lawrence^ (1), is married but has no family. 
He is in the service of the Professional and Civil Service Stores, Edinburgh. 

5. Thomas Goudie^ (1), fifth son of Lawrence* (1), was married and died last 
year (1914). He has five surviving children named as follows: — • 

I. Clementine Goudie^ is married to a Mr. Frazer who is now with 
the British Expeditionary Force in France. 

II. Helen Goudie*. 
hi. Elizabeth Goudie*. 
IV. Jane Goudie^ 

V. Lawrence Goudie*. 

Lawrence Goudie is a member of the United Free Church and has been for many years a prominent 
Christian worker, occasionally occupying various pulpits both in Leith and Edinburgh. 

Robert John Goudie is connected with the Established Church and has been particularly interested 
in work among the children and poorer classes. 

Both sisters, Jane and Catherine, are connected with the Established Church. 



122 THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 

Clje 6oubu5 of Collob, Sljcllattb. 

William Goudie^ (1), a resident of Tollob, Dunrossness, Shetland, was born 
in 1748 and died in 1823, leaving issue as follows: — 

^ccontr ^tmxniion, 

1. William Goudie^ (1), a resident of Tollob, Dunrossness, Shetland, son of the 
preceding, born in 1773 and died in 1836, was a mason by trade, had issue four 
sons and four daughters. See forward. 

Cbrrb (icncmtroiT. 

1. Robert Goudie^ (1), a resident of Sandwick, had issue four sons as follows: — 

I. William Goudie'*. 
II. Thomas Goudie*. 

III. John Goudie*, who settled in South America. 

IV. Robert Goudie^, died young. 

2. William Goudie^ (2), a resident of Tollob, was born in 1804; married in 1826, 
died in 1881, leaving three sons and two daughters. 

I. Rev. William GouDIE^ eldest son of William just mentioned, was 
born in Shetland and after undergoing a course of education and Theo- 
logical training at Richmond College was appointed to India in 1881 
as a Missionary of the Wesleyan Missionary Society. On his return 
to this country (England) in 1906, his administrative abilities and his 
practical knowledge of the mission field led to his appointment to the 
position which he now occupies as one of the Secretaries of the Society. 
Mr. Goudie has contributed extensively to the magazines and to the 
daily press on subjects with which his long residence in the east has 
made him familiar, namely, Indian religion, poetry and philosophy, 
education, land tenure, the social disabilities of the lower castes and med- 
ical provisions. He resides in London, England. He was born in 1829 
and carried on this family, having five sons and four daughters, all of 
whom were recently living. See forward. 

II. John GouDIE^ brother of Rev. William just mentioned, was born in 
1804; married and had two sons and seven daughters of whom as 
follows: 

(1) William GouDIE^ residing in Edinburgh, Scotland. 

(2) John GouDIE^ residing in Edinburgh, Scotland. 

III. Lawrence GouDIE^ brother to the preceding. 

jfourtb (^mtxnimx. 

■^ 'J 

CHILDREN OF REV. ■WIIiLIAM GOUDIE. 

1. William Goudie^ (3), born 1857 (possibly the clergyman), had issue three sons 
and three daughters named as follows: — 
I. William-John Goudie^ 
II. Helen-Maude Goudie^ 

III. Frank-Leslie Goudie^ 

IV. Nancy Catherine Goudie^ 

V, Alexander Malerton Goudie*. 




REV. WILLIAM GOUDIE. 



THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 123 

2. James Goudie'* (1), born in 1861, is a minister of the Wesleyan Methodist 
denomination. He has two sons and one daughter, named as follows: — 

I. William Britton Goudie^ 
II. Donald Goudie^ 
III. Kathleen Goudie^ 

3. John Goudie* (1), born in 1863, is now in the United States Navy. 

4. Henry Goudie'' (1), born in 1873, was married and had daughter Mary Goudie. 

5. Robert Goudie'' (1), living in Durham, England. 



The Shetlanders Croft. — As Shetland has been the home of numerous families 
bearing the Goudie name from an early period of their history it seems eminently 
proper to present a comprehensive description of the domestic conditions and habits 
of the peasant people of that interesting country. Having visited these far-away 
islands and traveled among the crofter and fishermen class of the inhabitants 
the writer's information was procured direct and can be given to the reader with 
assurance. 

The lives of the peasant classes of Shetland have not changed very materially 
during the last century. The majority of the population are small farmers and 
spend much of their time on the sea. The crofter's and fisherman's house is one 
and the same. The ancient Norse land system is still in vogue in the Islands. 
The holdings are nearly all of small area. The typical Shetland house in long, 
low-walled, of stone and rudely built. The roof is thatched with straw and straw- 
ropes crossed over it and held down with whin stones at the eaves to keep it from 
blowing off during the strong winds that sweep the islands. There are usually 
but two rooms, called in theadopted language of the Scotch the "but" and the "ben." 
In nearly all of the houses the living room is without a floor and the fires built 
upon large flat stones laid upon the ground. Long chains are suspended from 
the roofs upon which the kettles hang when the cooking is being done. There 
are few chimneys and the smoke from the peat, the universal fuel, finds its way 
through an old barrel fixed in the roof. Oars, nets and fishlines are in evidence 
around the walls. The women in the crofters' home are all workers in wool and 
the hosiery industry constitutes the principal employment of these nimble-fingered 
housewives and daughters. The "Kairds," the "Spinnie" and the "Swerie" are 
seen in every house. Through the spare hours of the day and by the evening 
firelight these industrious women apply themselves to carding, spinning and knit- 
ting the wool from the "perie sheep" of the islands and thus produce the dainty, 
graceful white lace shawls for which they are noted. Not only are these fragile 
fabrics produced but numerous "haps" or heavy wraps knitted from the native 
colors of wool with wavy borders beautifully inwrought by the skillful knitters. 
Bright-colored and warm stockings are also turned out in great numbers. No 
time is allowed to run to waste. From the early dawn till late in the evening 
the humming wheel is heard and this plaintive music is accompanied by the snap- 
ping of the needles. 

These Shetlanders are the lineal descendants of the Scandinavian Vikings and 
are almost universally blond with fair hair and blue eyes. The typical features 
are of the Norse mould and the temperamental characteristics distinctively those 
of the people from which they descended. They are hospitable and kind but very 
inquisitive and still superstitious. Many of the maidens are e.xceedingly pretty 
and winsome in manners. The common dialect is a commingling of Norse and 



124 THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 

Scotch and the accent plaintive and pleasing. From early life the Shetlanders 
are acquainted with the sea and challenge Neptune in all his moods. From these 
humble crofters' homes the best sailors in the world are sent forth. The girls 
are not afraid of the "spume-drift" and may often be seen sitting on the gunwales 
of their fathers' boats many leagues from the land. 

In just such homes as these briefly described in the foregoing lines were many 
of the families bearing the Goudie name reared and they will verify the statements 
herein given as they peruse these accounts; and with some there will be waking 
dreams of the old crofter hearthstones and the glimmering peat-fires smouldering 
upon the stone as looked upon from the great "resting chair" when wee lassies 
in the care-free days of childhood. 

While the above delineation applies to the great majority of the inhabitants 
in the rural districts the writer is not insensible to the fact that there are a few 
families in the Shetlands who claim to belong to the aristocratic class and rank 
among the landlords there. Some of these families are descended from ancestors 
who emigrated from the Scandinavian countries at a ver>' early period of the history 
of the Islands and the main lines have supported a higher style of living than the 
average crofters. There, more extensive land-holders still collect rents and assume 
superior prestige, but there are hundreds of the small crofts owned by the peas- 
antry th at have been in possession of the family for several centuries of uninterrupted 
tenure as entailed by the Norse land laws, and every one of these crofters considers 
himself a gentleman and every wife and daughter a lady — so long as they behave 
as such. They claim upon the best grounds that the rank is but the Guinea stamp 
and that the man's the gold for all that. It is gratifying to believe that the inhabit- 
ants of the civilized world are coming more and more to regard character as infin- 
itely above all claims to titles and outside pretensions; that truth is a cardinal 
virtue that cannot be dispensed with in the associations of our fellow-men. 



The Shetland Sailor. If the traveller from a foreign land thinks the Shetland 
crofter and seaman does not esteem himself of some importance let him approach the 
average "Skipper" when walking abroad in his double-breasted " Reefer" under his 
flat-topped cap and his pipe-stem on an angle of forty-five degrees with the airs of the 
pretentious assumptions of the American dandy and he will soon be made to under- 
stand the meaning of haughty independence and self-assertion of the finest grades. 
When the Shetland seaman has returned from his voyage and is at home he assumes 
all of the airs of the aristocrat and walks with his head up and his shoulders thrown 
back as if he was monarch of all he surveyed and it would be presumptuous for 
any person crossing his track to attempt to play fast-and-loose with him. The old 
Viking blood smoulders in his veins and what if it be already kindled I 



glarriagcs anb girtljs tit Sanbtokk. 

Malcomb Goudie of Rumpa, son of Thomas and Grizel (Mainland) Goudie, to 
Janet, daughter of James and Janet (Halcrow) Flaus, of Rumpa, Nov. 20, 1856, 
and had issue as follows: — 

Gavin Goudie of Ireland Shetland to Margaret Southerland, March 8, 1855 ; 
son of Thomas. 

Janet Goudie of Linds, daughter of William and Ursula Jamieson of Linds, to 



THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 125 

Lawrence McPherson, son of James McPherson, Jan. 3, 1856. These had issue 
as follows: 

I. Thomas Goudie, born at Lochside, June 23, 1858, 
II. Jessie Goudie, born at Lochside, Aug. 15, 1859. 

III. Girzel Goudie, born Dec. 8, 1862. 

IV. Malcolm Goudie, born July 2, 1869. . _ . 

Twins 



'■} 



V. Jean Goudie, born July 2, 1869. 
Janet Goudie of Du nrossness, daughter of William and Barbara (Leslie) Goudie, 
to Thomas Jamieson, son of Jeremiah and Elizabeth (Scott) Jamieson of Channer- 
wick, Dec. 11, 1856. 

James Goudie of Cunningsburgh, son of James and Helen (Duncan) Goudie, 
to Catherine Jamieson, daughter of Lawrence and Agnes (Smith) Jamieson of 
Cunningsburgh, Dec. 24, 1857, and had issue. 

I. James Goudie, born at Aithsetter, May 23, 1859. 
Lawrence Goudie of Scarpness, son of James and Helen (Goodlad) Goudie, to 
Marion Thomson, daughter of Walter and Janet (Duncan) Thomson of Scarpness, 
Oct. 13, 1859, and had issue as follows: 

I. Walter Goudie, born at Scarpness, Aug. 17, 1860. 
II. James Goudie, born in Ireland, March 5, 1862. 
III. Helen M. Goudie, born in Ireland, Sept. 9, 1864. 
Robert Goudie of Williamsetter, son of Thomas and Ursula (Sinclair) Goudie, 
to Ursula Sinclair, daughter of Henry and Ursula (Henderson) Sinclair, Dec. 20, 
1860. 

Robert Goudie of Lebitton, son of Robert and Margaret (Harper) Goudie, to 
Mary Tolloch, daughter of Matthew and Janet (Halcrow) Tolloch of Libiton, 
Jan. 10, 1861, and had issue as follows: — 

I. Janet Goudie, born at Liberton, Dec. 10, 1861. 
II. Robert Goudie, born at Liberton, Sept. 8, 1863. 
James Goudie of Cunningsburgh, son of James and Helen (Duncan) Goudie, to 
Janet Williamson, daughter of Lawrence and Ann (Christie) Williamson of Cun- 
ningsburgh, Dec. 4, 1862, and had issue as follows: — 

I. Lawrence Goudie, born at Cunningsburgh, Dec. 19, 1863. 
II. Robert Goudie, born at Cunningsburgh, Aug. 8, 1866. 

III. Peter Goudie, born at Cunningsburgh, Sept. 21, 1868. 

IV. John Goudie, born at Cunningsburgh, Aug. 25, 1870. 

Barbara Goudie of Veister, daughter of Robert and Grace (Tolloch) Goudie, 
to John Duncan of South Sand, son of William and Elizabeth (Smith) Duncan, 
Jan. 7, 1864. 

Ursula Goudie of Williamsetter, daughter of Thomas and Ursula (Sinclair) 
Goudie, to Adam Lawrenson of Yafifield, son of Malcolm and Janet (Malcolmson) 
Lawrenson, Feb. 18, 1864. 

Joseph Goudie of Levenwick, son of Lawrence and Mary (Johnson) Goudie, 
to Barbara Leslie, daughter of Lawrence and Jane (Leslie) Leslie of Levenwick, 
Oct. 16, 1865, and had issue as follows: 

I. Lawrence Goudie, born at Levenwick, Oct. 27, 1869. 

George Goudie of Linds, son of William and Ursula (Jamieson) Goudie, to 
Margaret Malcolmson, daughter of James and Marion (White) Malcolmson of 
Setter, Dec. 7, 1865, and had issue as follows: 



126 THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 

I. George Goudie, born at Linds, Oct. 19, 1867. 

II. Mary Ann Goudie, born at Linds, Dec. 11, 1869. 

III. William Goudie, born at Linds, April 17, 1872. 

IV. Jane Goudie, born at Cottage, Sept. 24, 1874. 

V. Margaret Goudie, born at Cottage, Sept. 9, 1877. 
VI. Thomas Goudie, born at Cottage, Aug. 9, 1879. 

Thomas Goudie of Lochend, son of Gavin and Margaret (Ridland) Goudie, 
to Adrina Mullay, daughter of Arthur and Janet (Henderson) Mullay of Braes, 
Jan. 10, 1867, and had issue as follows: — 

I. Thomas Goudie, born at Lochend, Nov. 18, 1867. 
II. Margaret Goudie, born at Lochend, July 16, 1869. 
Grace Goudie, daughter of Gavin and Janet (Goudie) Goudie, of Ireland, to 
Lawrence Smith, son of Lawrence and Ann (Mouat) Smith, Dec. 14, 1867. 

Gilbert Goudie, son of James and Jane (Gilbertson) Goudie of Levenwick, to 
Agnes Johnson, daughter of James and Williamina (Crawford) Johnson of Leven- 
wick, Jan. 2, 1868, and had issue as follows: — 

I. James Goudie, born at Levenwick, June 15, 1868. 
II. Gilbert Goudie, born at Levenwick, May 16, 1870. 

III. William Goudie, born at Levenwick, Feb. 23, 1872. 

IV. George Goudie, born at Levenwick, July 10, 1873. 
V. Henry Goudie, born at Levenwick, Dec. 26, 1877. 

VI. Gavin Goudie, born at Levenwick, Sept. 15, 1878. 

Susanna Goudie, daughter of James and Janet (Gilbertson) Goudie of Leven- 
wick, to Lawrence Work, son of Robert and Marion (Johnson) Work of Hoswick, 
Dec. 16, 1879. 

James Goudie, son of William and Ursula (Jamieson) Goudie, of Linds, to 
Jane Sinclair, daughter of Magnus and Margaret (Mail) Sinclair of Channer- 
wick, Dec. 12, 1870, and had issue as follows: — 

I. Jane Goudie, born at Linds, Aug. 14, 1875. 

James Goudie, son of William and Jane (Colvin) Goudie, of Levenwick, to 
Margaret Mouat, daughter of John and Susanna (Mouat) Mouat of Levenwick, 
Feb. 21, 1871, and had issue as follows: — 

I. Susanna M. Goudie, born at Levenwick, Aug. 26, 1873. 
II. William Goudie, born at Levenwick, July 16, 1876. 
III. Margaret Goudie, born at Levenwick, Feb. 24, 1879. 

James Goudie, son of Lawrence and Mary (Johnson) Goudie of Levenwick, 
to Barbara Goudie, daughter of James and Barbara (Johnson) Goudie of Hoswick, 
Dec. 14, 1871. 

Janet Goudie, daughter of James and Barbara (Johnson) Goudie of Hoswick, 
to James Duncan, son of John and Jane (Smith) Duncan of Greenmow, Dec. 14, 
1871. 

Jane Goudie, daughter of Gavin and Margaret (Ridlon) Goudie, of Lochen, 
to Malcolm Malcolmson, son of Malcolm and Margaret (Halcrow) Malcolmson of 
Channerwick, Nov. 7, 1872. 

James Goudie, son of James and Janet (Gilbertson) Goudie, of Levenwick, 
to Margaret Sutherland, daughter of Thomas and Barbara (Leisk) Sutherland 
of EUister, Jan. 9, 1873, and had issue as follows: — 



THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 127 

I. James Goudie, born at Levenwick, Aug. 25, 1876. 

II. Thomas Goudie, born at Levenwick, June 17, 1878. 

III. Margaret Goudie, born at Levenwick, Jan. 4, 1883. 

IV. Gilbert Goudie, born at Levenwick, Jan. 10, 1885. 
V. Barbara Goudie, born at Levenwick, June 2, 1888. 

Jane Goudie, daughter of William and Jane (Colvin) Goudie, of Levenwick, 
to James 1\Iou.\t, son of James and Janey (Colvin) Mouat of Levenwick, Jan. 27, 
1874. 

William Goudie, son of Robert and Grace (Tolloch) Goudie of Vister, to Jane 
Halcrow, daughter of Thomas and Marjorie (Sandison) Halcrow of Channerwick, 
Jan. 27, 1876, and had issue as follows: — 

I. M.^RiAH J. Goudie, born at Swinnister, Aug. 1877. 
II. Jane Goudie, born at Sandbraes, April 18, 1878. 

III. Willl\m R. Goudie, born at Swinnister, July 23, 1879. 

IV. James J. Goudie, born at Manse Cottage, May 20, 1881. 
v. Henry Goudie, born at Manse Cottage, Jan. 19, 1884. 

VI. Janey Goudie, born at Manse Cottage, Feb. 2, 1886. 
vii. W1LLI.A.M Goudie, born at Manse Cottage, Sept. 7, 1891. 

James Goudie, son of John and Barbara (Adamson) Goudie of Moors, to Jane, 
daughter of Henry and Jane (Sandison) Halcrow of Sandwick, Oct. 28, 1876. 

Marion Goudie, daughter of George and Margaret (Jamieson) Goudie of Leven- 
wick, to Gavin, son of James and Janet (Colvin) Mouat of Levenwick, Dec. 28, 
1876. 

Margaret Goudie, daughter of George and Margaret (Jamieson) Goudie of 
Levenwick, to Robert, son of Adam and Janet (Morrison) Johnson, Jan. 31, 1878. 

Marion Goudie, daughter of James and Janet (Gilbertson) Goudie, of Leven- 
wick, to Henry, son of Henry and Maly (Halcrow) Sinclair, Feb. 7, 1878. 

John Goudie, son of John and Barbara (Adamson) Goudie of Moors, to Joan, 
daughter of Jeremiah and Christina (Hay) Leslie of HuUand, Aug. 1, 1882, and 
had issue as follows: 

I. Christina Goudie, born at HouUand, Dec. 28, 1883. 

II. Bruce B. Goudie, born at Houlland, Aug. 23, 1884. 

III. James G. Goudie, born at Moors, Nov. 27, 1888. 

IV. Jeremiah T. Goudie, born at Moors, March 27, 1891. 
V. Johanna N. Goudie, born at Moors, July 8, 1893. 

VI. Margaret H. Goudie, born at Hoswick, March 7, 1896. 
VII. George J. Goudie, born at Hoswick, May 7, 1898. 
VIII. Lawrence Goudie, born at Hoswick, April 14, 1903. 
Grace M. Goudie, daughter of Malcolm and Janet (Flaws) Goudie, of Lochside, 
to James, son of William and Catherine (Shewan) Johnson, of Sandwick Feb. 26, 1885. 
George Goudie, son of John and Barbara (Adamson) Goudie, of Moors, to 
Margaret, daughter of Jeremiah and Christina (Hay) Leslie, Jan. 29, 1885. 

Walter Goudie of Scalloway, son of Lawrence and Mary (Thompson) Goudie, 
to Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas and Barbara (Jamieson) Lawrenson of Yafifield 
Nov. 26, 1885, and had issue as follows: — 

I. Mary E. Goudie, born at Yafifield, Sept. 5, 1886. 

II. James L. Goudie, born at Yafifield, June 17, 1889. 



128 THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 



Robert Goudie, son of Robert and Grace (Tolloch) Goudie of Cullister, to 
Margaret, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Halcrow) Tait of Stove, Dec. 
24, 1885, and had issue as follows: — 

I. Robert Goudie, born at Cullister, Sept. 22, 1886. ) . 

II. Gavin Goudie, born at Cullister, Sept. 22, 1886. i" ^^*"^- 
III. Isabella Goudie, born at Stove, March 25, 1888. 

Barbara Goudie, daughter of Robert and Grace (Tolloch) Goudie of Cullister, 
to Henry, son of Malcolm and Ann (Goudie) Halcrow of Hoswick, Jan. 21, 1886. 

Lawrence Goudie, son of Lawrence and Adrina (Scheen) Goudie of Ghoster, to 
Barbara, daughter of John and Mary (Halcrow) Tait of Gulberwick, Jan. 21, 1886. 

James Goudie, son of William and Ursula (Jamieson) Goudie, of Swinister, to 
Sarah, daughter of Adam and Sarah (Smith) Smith of Swinister, Feb. 11, 1886. 

Ursula Goudie, daughter of Malcolm and Joan (Davidson) Goudie, of Linds, 
to James, son of Robert and Margaret (Smith) McPherson of Blosta, Jan. 17, 1889. 

William Goudie, son of George and Margaret (Malcolmson) Goudie of Setter, 
to Margaret, daughter of Alexander and Jemima (Tolloch) Smith of Whirley. Feb. 
20, 1896, and had issue as follows: — 

I. Jemima Goudie, born at Sandbrae, Dec. 19, 1897. 

II. William Goudie, born at Annfield Cottage, Nov. 8, 1899. 

III. George Goudie, born at Annfield Cottage, May 11, 1901. 

Davina Goudie, daughter of Malcolm and Joan (Davidson) Goudie, of Linds, 
to James, son of James and Mary (Smith) Halcrow, of Stove, Feb. 21, 1907. 

James Goudie, son of James and Catherine (Jamieson) Goudie, born at Aith- 
setter, May 23, 1859. 

Hittlasstfietr §irt^s. 

CHIIiDREN OF JAMES AND CHRISTINA (ROBERTSON) GOUDIE. 

1. Mary Goudie, born at Levenwick, Maj' 17, 1855. 

2. James Goudie, born at Levenwick, Sept. 22, 1856. 

3. James Goudie, born at Levenwick, Aug. 4, 1859. 

4. John Goudie, born at Levenwick, Jan. 27, 1864. 



CHILiDREN OF JAMES AND JANET (GILBERTSON) GOUDIE. 

1. Marion Goudie, born at Levenwick, April 3, 1855. 



CHILDREN OF WILLIAM AND JANE (COLVIN) GOUDIE. 

1. LiLLAS Goudie, born at Levenwick, April 29, 1855. 

2. Grizel Goudie, born at Levenwick, July 22, 1858. 

3. Janet Goudie, born at Levenwick, Nov. 18, 1861. 



CHILDREN OF MALCOLM AND JOAN (DAVIDSON^ GOUDIE. 

1. Thomas Goudie, born in Cunningsburgh, July 29, 1855. 

2. Joan Goudie, born in Cunningsburgh, June 3, 1857. 

3. Ursula Goudie, born in Cunningsburgh, May 20, 1859. 

4. Margaret Goudie, born in Cunningsburgh, July 30, 1861. 

5. Janet Goudie, born in Cunningsburgh, May 29, 1865. 

6. Davina Goudie, born in Cunningsburgh, May 3, 1868. 

7. Malcolm Goudie, born in Cunningsburgh, Jan. 16, 1871. 



THE GOV DIES IN SHETLAND. 129 

CHILDREN OF 'WIU.IAM AND ISABEIiliA (JAULESOK) QOVOTE. 

1. Jemima Goudie, born in Channerwick, Aug. 26, 1855. 

2. William Goudie, born in Channerwick, May 6, 1857. 

3. Jeremiah Goudie, born in Channerwick, Dec. 24, 1861. 

4. John Goudie, born in Channerwick, March 29, 1865. 



CHILJ>R£N OF JOHN AND BARBARA (ADAMSON) GOUDIE. 

1. James Goudie, born in Linds, Sept. 23, 1856. 

2. John Goudie, born in Linds, Dec. 7, 1858. 

3. George Goudie, bom in Moors, Feb. 6, 1861. 

4. Barbara J. Goudie, born in Moors, May 28, 1863. 

5. Lawrence Goudie, born in Moors, Dec. 31, 1865. 

6. Ursula Goudie, born in Moors, Feb. 12, 1868. 

7. Lawrence Goudie, born in Moors, Jan. 28, 1870. 

8. Ursula Goudie, born in Moors, Nov. 18, 1872. 



CHIIiDREN OF JAMES AND BARBARA (JOHNSON) GOXTDXB. 

1. Elizabeth Goudie, born in Hoswick, Dec. 14, 1856. 

2. Robert T. Goudie, born in Hoswick, Aug. 3, 1859. 



CHILDREN OF JOHN AND MARGARET (INKSTER) OOXTDIE. 

1. Jane Goudie, born in Valster, Sept. 7, 1879. 

2. Laurina Goudie, born in Valster, Jan. 17, 1881. 

3. James Goudie, born in Valster, Nov. 7, 1883. 



CHILDREN OF GAVIN AND GRACE (JOHNSON) GOUDIE. 

1. Janet E. Goudie, born at Clay pots, Aug. 1, 1880. 

2. Grace E. Goudie, bom at Clay pots, March 27, 1882. 

3. Barbara A. Goudie, bom at Claypots, May 4, 1884. 

4. Gavin Goudie, born at LevenAvick, April 21, 1886. 

5. James W. Goudie, born at Levenwick, April 18, 1888. ) ^ . 

6. Catherine Goudie, born at Levenwick, April 18, 1888. i ^^'"^• 

7. Mary A. Goudie, born at Levenwick, Jan. 20, 1889. 

8. William J. Goudie, born at Levenwick, Aug. 4, 1891. 

9. Gavin Goudie, born at Levenwick, May 3, 1894. 



CHILDREN OF SINCLAIR AND MARGARET (MORRISON) GOUDIE. 

1. Maria Goudie, born at Runn, May 11, 1885. 

2. Catherine Goudie, bom at Runn, Oct. 11, 1887. 

3. Margaret Goudie, born at Runn, Aug. 11, 1890. 

4. Robert L. Goudie, born at Runn, Aug. 10, 1895. 

5. Mary Goudie, born at Runn, June 11, 1898. 



CHILDREN OF ROBERT AND JANET (LEI8K) GOUDIE 

1. Robert A. Goudie, born at EUister, Nov. 14, 1888. 

2. Robert A. Goudie, born at EUister, Dec. 27, 1889. 

3. Bella Goudie, born at EUister, Nov. 11, 1892. 



CHILDREN OF JAMES J. AND GEORGINA (SMITH) GOUDIE. 

1. James Goudie, born at Hillside Cottage, Oct. 28, 1899. 

2. William B. S. Goudie, bom at Sandwick, Jan. 3, 1903. 



130 THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 

3. Janet Goudie, born at Houlland, Dec. 16, 1905. 

4. John Goudie, born at Victoria Cottage, May 13, 1907. 

5. Henrietta Goudie, born at The Rocks, July 1, 1909. ) t- • 

6. John S. Goudie, born at The Rocks, July 1, 1909. C 

7. George Goudie, born at The Rocks, Jan. 22, 1911. 

8. Allan S. Goudie, born at The Rocks, March 3, 1912. 

9. Jeremiah T. Goudie, born at The Rocks, Nov. 5, 1915. 

CHILDREN OP GEORQE AND EMILY (DXTNCAN) GOTTDIE. 

1. Catherine M. Goudie, born in Setter, Dec. 2, 1901. 

2. Emily Goudie, born in Setter, Jan. 4, 1904. 

3. George S. Goudie, born at Northern Cottage, Jan. 27, 1906. 

4. Emily Ann Goudie, born at Northern Cottage, June 22, 1910. 

5. Henry Goudie, born at Manse Cottage, Jan. 22, 1916. 



CHILDREN OF THOMAS AND GRACE (MAIL) GOUDIIC. 

1. Grace E. Goudie, born at Claypots, March 27, 1882. 

2. Thomas Goudie, born at Claypots, Aug. 17, 1883. 



Lawrence Goudy, born at Valster, June 15, 1868, son of Lawrence and Jane 
Inkster. 

Janet Goudie, born at Claypots, Feb. 9, 1869, daughter of Elizabeth 

Goudie. 

Margaret Goudie, born at Levenwick, Feb. 24, 1879, daughter of James and 
Margaret (Mouat) Goudie. 

James A. Goudie, born April 4, 1884, son of William and Jane (Halcrow) Goudie. 

James L. Goudie, born at Yarfield, June 17, 1889, son of Walter and Elizabeth 
(Lawrenson) Goudie. 

Lawrence Goudie, born at Hoswick, Jan. 18, 1892, son of Lawrence and Maggie 
(Bain) Goudie. 

Ann E. Goudie, born Jan. 25, 1895, at Setter, daughter of George and Ann 
(Smith) Goudie. 

Lawrence Goudie, born at Manse Cottage, Jan. 11, 1898, son of Thomas and 
Jane Goudie of Stove. 

Alexander T. Goudie, born at Annfield, April 7, 1914, son of William and 
Margaret (Smith) Goudie. 

Jennie Goudie, born at Hoswick, Feb. 24, 1915, daughter of James and Martha 
(Sinclair) Goudie. 

(ioubus oi Sanbttrick — §fdih%. 

Robert Goudie, son of Robert and Marion (Leslie) Goudie, died at Greenfield, 
Dec. 1, 1855, aged 84 years. 

Robert Goudie, son of Robert and Margaret (Harper) Goudie, died at Lebitton, 
April 10, 1864, aged 28 years. 

James Goudie, son of James and Marion (Mouat) Goudie, died at Levenwick, 
June 13, 1868. 



THE GO U DIES IN SHETLAND. 131 

Walter Goudie, son of Oliver and Barbara (Robertson) Goudie, died at Hos- 
wick, Nov. 2, 1869, aged 77 years. 

James Goudie, son of Thomas and Grace (Mainland) Goudie, died at Claypots, 
July 21, 1870, aged 45 years. 

William Goudie, son of Oliver and Barbara (Robertson) Goudie, died at Linds, 
Dec. 22, 1872, aged 75 years. 

Lawrence Goudie, son of John and Margaret (Jamieson) Goudie, died at Leven- 
wick, Sept. 21, 1872, aged 61 years. 

Walter Goudie, son of James and Barbara (Johnson) Goudie, died at Hoswick, 
Dec. 8, 1875, aged 21 years. 

Robert Goudie, son of James and Barbara (Johnson) Goudie, died at Hoswick, 
Sept. 29, 1876, aged 17 years. 

Barbara Goudie, daughter of James and Barbara (Johnson) Goudie, died at 
Hoswick, Jan. 16, 1876, aged 33 years. 

William Goudie, son of Malcolm and Joan (Davidson) Goudie, died in Cunnings- 
burgh, Nov. 5, 1877, aged 23 years. 

Gavin Goudie, son of John and Agnes (Robertson) Goudie, died at Claypots, 
Oct. 15, 1879, aged 90 years. 

Gavin Goudie, son of Thomas and Grace (Mainland) Goudie, died at Lochend, 
April 1, 1882, aged 72 years. 

Thomas Goudie, son of Lawrence and Catherine (Brown) Goudie, died at 
Valster, Nov. 30, 1883, aged 76 years. 

Robert Goudie, son of Robert and Ursula (Sinclair) Goudie, died at William 
Setter, May 4, 1883, aged 17 years. 

George Goudie, son of James and Marion (Mouat) Goudie, died at Levenwick, 
Feb. 18, 1885, aged 72 years. 

Catherine Goudie, daughter of Gavin and Agnes (Gordon) Goudie, died at Clay- 
pots, June 21, 1886, aged 70 years. 

Malcom Goudie, son of Thomas and Janet (Helcrow) Goudie, died at Sand- 
wick, May 8, 1888, aged 75 years. 

Thomas Goudie, son of Thomas and Adrina (MuUay) Goudie, died at Maywick, 
Jan. 3, 1892, aged 24 years. 

James Goudie, son of John and Agnes (Colvin) Goudie, died at Levenwick, 
March 4, 1893, aged 80 years. 

William Goudie, son of William and Ann (Mouat) Goudie, died at Levenwick, 
June 18, 1896, aged 85 years. 

James Goudie, son of Walter and Margaret (Davidson) Goudie, died at Hoswick 
Dec. 6, 1899, aged 84 years. 

WiUiam Goudie, son of James C. and Margaret (Mouat) Goudie, died at Leven- 
wick, Sept. 19, 1900, aged 24 years. 

James C. Goudie, son of William and Jane (Colvin) Goudie, died at Leven- 
wick, July 1, 1903, aged 65 years. 

James Goudie, son of William and Ursula (Jamieson) Goudie, died at Linds, 
June 26, 1905, aged 64 years. 

John Goudie, son of James J. and Georgina (Smith) Goudie, died at Sandwick, 
June 15, 1907, aged 1 month. 



132 THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 

Malcom Goudie, son of William and Ursula (Jamieson) Goudie, died at Linds, 
April 20, 1908, aged 83 years. 

James Goudie, son of Thomas and Ursula (Sinclair) Goudie, died at Plenty, 
May 2, 1909, aged 71 years. 

Henry Goudie, son of James and Jane (Halcrow) Goudie, died at Manse Cottage, 
June 30, 1909, aged 25 years. 

Margaret H. Goudie, daughter of John and Johann (Leslie) Goudie, died at 
Hoswick, Oct. 3, 1909, aged 13 years. 

Helen Goudie, daughter of James and Jane (Halcrow) Goudie, died at William 
Setter, June 29, 1912, aged 50 years. 

Grace Goudie, daughter of William and Jane (Colvin) Goudie, died at Leven- 
vvick, Jan. 31, 1913, aged 54 years. 

John Goudie, son of William and Ursula (Jamieson) Goudie, died at Moors, 
Dec. 11, 1913, aged 84 years. 

Alexander T. Goudie, son of William and Margaret (Smith) Goudie, died at 
Sandwick, April 24, 1914, aged 16 days. 

Robert Goudie, son of Robert and Grace (Tolloch) Goudie, died at Stove, 
June 14, 1914, aged 64 years. 

Robert Goudie, son of Gavin and Agnes (Gordon) Goudie, died at Viester, 
Sept. 21, 1875, aged 57 years. 

James Goudie, son of John and Margaret (Inkster) Goudie, died at Valster, 
Jan. 15, 1915, aged 31 years. 

Marjory Goudie, daughter of John and Martha Goudie, died at Wart, June 16, 
1857, aged 81 years. 

Thomas Goudie, son of Malcolm and Janet (Flause) Goudie, died at Lochside, 
July 18, 1858, aged 1 month. 

Robert Goudie, son of Robert and Mary (Tolloch) Goudie, died at Lebitton, 
Jan. 22, 1864, aged 4 months. 

Barbara Goudie, daughter of David and Janet (Colvin) Goudie, died at Leven- 
wick, Nov. 30, 1867, aged 95 years. 

Lawrence Goudie, son of John and Barbara (Adamson) Goudie, died at Moors, 
April 6, 1869, aged 3 ^ years. 

Ursula Goudie, daughter of John and Barbara (Adamson) Goudie, died at 
Moors, April 5, 1869, aged 14 months. 

Jane Goudie, daughter of Thomas and Grace (Mainland) Goudie, died at Stove, 
Dec. 10, 1872, aged 45 years. 

Robert Goudie, son of William and Elizabeth (Leslie) Goudie, died at Lebitton, 
Sept. 21, 1875, aged 78 years. 

Barbara Goudie, daughter of James and Barbara (Johnson) Goudie, died at 
Hoswick, Jan. 16, 1876, aged 33 years. 

Thomas Goudie, son of Thomas and Grace (Mail) Goudie, died at Claypots, 
March 11, 1881, aged 7 months. 

Ann Goudie, daughter of William and Jane (Colvin) Goudie, died at Leven- 
wick, April 21, 1881, aged 41 years. 

Marjory Goudie, daughter of James and Ellen (Goodlad) Goudie, died at Braes, 
Jan. 8, 1881, aged 49 years. 



THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 133 

Elizabeth Goudie, daughter of James and Barbara (Johnson) Goudie, died at 
Hoswick, May 7, 1883, aged 26 years. 

Martha Goudie, daughter of Gavin and Marion (Stuart) Goudie, died at 
Stove, May 5, 1885, aged 70 years. 

Janet Goudie, daughter of James and Janet (Gilbertson) Goudie, died at Leven- 
wick, June 20, 1886, aged 35 years. 

Catherine Goudie, daughter of Gavin and Grace (Johnson) Goudie, died at 
Levenwick, April 27, 1888, aged 8 days. 

John Goudie, son of James and Christina (Robertson) Goudie, died at Leven- 
wick, Jan. 29, 1888, aged 28 years. 

Margaret Goudie, daughter of James and Christina (Robertson) Goudie, died 
at Levenwick, Feb. 15, 1890, aged 47 years. 

Margaret Goudie, daughter of Thomas and Adrina (Mullay) Goudie, died at 
Lochend, Aug. 11, 1894, aged 25 years. 

Ann E. Goudie, daughter of George W. and Emily (Duncan) Goudie, died at 
Setter, Aug. 31, 1902, aged 7 years. 

Emily Goudie, daughter of George W. and Emily (Duncan) Goudie, died at 
Setter, April 16, 1904, aged 3 months, 

Jane Goudie, daughter of James and Jane (Halcrow) Goudie, died at Manse 
Cottage, May 18, 1904, aged 18 years. 

James Goudie, son of John and Barbara (Adamson) Goudie, died at Manse 
Cottage, July 17, 1904, aged 47 years. 

Barbara Goudie, daughter of James and Margaret (Southerland) Goudie, died 
at Levenwick, May 7, 1905, aged 24 years. 



Oliver Goudie, resident of Sandwick, Shetland, had a son — 
William Goudie who married Cecilia Jamieson and had issue: — 

1. John Goudie, born 1827, married Barbara Adamson in Sandwick, 

Shetland, Dec. 27, 1851, born in Sandwick in 1828, and had issue. 

1. John Goudie, born in Shetland, Grocer's clerk, Hoswick, married 

in Sandwick, Shetland, born in Dunrossness 1861. He born 1859. 

Was married 1881 to Johann Leslie, born in Dunrossness. Children 

as follows: — 

I. Christiana B. Gowdy, born 1882. In Camdon, Falkirk, Scot- 
land. 

II. Bruce B. Goudie, born in Sandwick, Shetland, Aug. 23, 1884. 
Clerk, residence 5802 May St., Chicago, Ills.; married there April 
28, 1909, Anne Russell, born in Falkirk, Scotland, Aug. 1, 1887. 
One child, Isabella Robertson Goudie, born in Chicago, Ills., Feb. 
16, 1910. Returned to 10 Vicar St., Falkirk, Scotland. 

III. John W. Goudie, born in Sandwick, Shetland, 1886. 

IV. James G. Goudie, born in Sandwick, " 1888. 
V. Jeremiah T. Goudie, born in " " 1890. 

VI. Johann C. Goudie, born in " " 1892. M. Dec 15, 

1910. 
vii. Margaret H. Goudie, born " " 1894; died Oct. 3, 

1909. 



134 THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 

vm. George St. C. J. born " " 1897. 

IX. Laurence born " " 1892. 

2. James Goudie. 

3. George Goudie. 

4. Laurence Goudie. 

5. Barbara Goudie, 

6. Cecilia Goudie. 

7. Bettie Goudie. 



^outrus of Mhsiralc. 

James Goudie, parents' names unknown, was supposed to have been born in 
Wiesdale, Shetland, about 1818. He married Mary-Ann Smith of London, 
England (born in 1820), June 14, 1842. He died in or about 1878; the latter in 
1902. These had issue as follows: — 

1. Agnes Goudie was married to Erasmus Irvine and died in Australia. She 
had issue four sons. She married secondly George Cameron by whom no issue. 

2. James Arnold Goudie married Elizabeth Maria Rutledge, by whom a son 
and daughter. He married second Jeannie Smith now living but no issue. Mr. 
Goudie has deceased. 

3. John Smith Goudie married Ursula Colvin by whom sons and daughters. 
He lives in New Zealand. 

4. EUzabeth Maria Goudie was married to Thomas Nelson by whom issue 
one son named Thomas. Both parents are deceased. 

5. Mary Ann Goudie was married to Charles Spence and had issue five sons 
and two daughters. 

6. Samuel Smith Goudie was born in Lerwick, Shetland, in 1855; married 
Marion Brown Aitken of Dalkieth, Scotland, born in 1855, daughter of John 
Aitkin, M.R.C.V.S. and Ann Smith. He was educated at Lerwick and entered 
the service of the Commercial Bank of Scotland Ld., in which he has held several 
important appointments, and is now, as Agent, in charge of the bank in the city 
of Dundee, Scotland. He is a Justice of the Peace for the county of Caithness and 
a director in Scotland of the Norwich Union Fire Insurance Co. Ld. See portrait. 
He has issue four sons and one daughter as follows: — 

I. Annie Smith Goudie, born in 1881; was married to Alexander 
Proctor, Merchant in Russia in 1913, and had issue a son, Allan 
Proctor, born March 31, 1915. 

II. Arnold James Goudie, born in 1883, now in Rhodesia. 

III. Samuel Herbert Goudie, born in 1886, now at Montevideo. 

IV. Alexander George Aitken Goudie, born in 1888, now in 
Calcutta. 

V. Harold Olrig Goudie, born in 1890, now in Bahia Blanca, South 
America. 



^oubtts m Canada. 

7. Martha EUza Goudie married to Laurence Williamson and had issue four 
daughters and three sons. 

Magnus Goudie (2), son of Gavin (1) and Barbara (Goudie) of Scasborough, 
Dunrossness, Shetland Isles, born June 5, 1821; married Elizabeth William- 



THE GOUDIES IN SHETLAND. 135 

SON, daughter of George Williamson, born April 15, 1818 and died in Lisbon, N. H., 
at the home of her son Lawrence Oct. 7, 1901, where she had lived for 16 years. 
Mr. Goudie had died in Martinville, P. Q., June 29, 1883, and she was carried to 
that place and buried beside him. This family came from the Shetland Isles to 
Canada in 1869 and finally settled on a farm in Martinville. There were nine 
children named as follows: — 

1. Ann Goudie, born in Scousborough, Dunrossness, Shetland, Jan. 16, 
1844; was married to Malcolm Mouat in her native parish and died 
there 1915, leaving issue of whom more. 

2. Barbara Goudie, born in Scousborough, Dunrossness, Shetland, June 
5, 1846 and died Oct. 25, 1882. She was the wife of Malcolm William- 
son by whom issue of whom more. 

3. Gavin Goudie, born in Scousborough, Dunrossness, Shetland, July 18, 
1849, came to Inverness, Canada in 1869, and to Martinville, P. Q., in 
1873. He married Ella Parsons Feb. 21, 1883, and resides as a farmer 
in Martinville. Three children, Blanche-Anne, born May 30, 1884, was 
married Sept. 14, 1910 to Herbert Rollins; Beatrice A., born Nov. 
20, 1889, and a daughter died in infancy. 

4. Sarah Goudie, born in Scousborough, Dunrossness, Shetland, April 18, 
1852; died , buried in Martinville, P. Q. 

5. Lawrence W. Goudie (1), second son of Magnus (1) and Elizabeth 
(Williamson) Goudie, born in Scousborough, parish of Dunrossness, 
Shetland Isles, April 2, 1855, came to Canada in 1869. He removed to 
Lisbon, N. H., where he still resides. He married Alma Clough, born 
in Lyman, N. H., daughter of William Thornton and Betsey Bishop, 
who died in Lisbon, N. H., April 7, 1893, aged 42 years, 10 months and 
21 days. These had issue three sons. 

6. George Goudie, born in Scousborough, Dunrossness, Shetland, Oct. 
14, 1857; died June 19, 1873, and was buried in Martinville, P. Q. 

7. Elizabeth Goudie, born in Dunrossness, Shetland, April 8, 1860; was 
married in Martinville, P. Q., March 3, 1891, to Albert H. Clough, son 
of Jeremiah and Martha (Buck) Clough, born in Bath, N. H., Dec. 14, 
1851. Carpenter by trade. Issue: — 

I. Jere. Magnus Clough, born in Bath, N. H., March 31, 1894; 

mariied Oct. 11, 1915 Rose Scudder, born July 25, 1895, and 

has issue Lawrence Albert Clough, born in Whitefield, N. H., 

July 28, 1916. 

II. Roy Lawrence Clough, born in Lisbon, N. H., Dec. 22, 1891. 

8. Sarah Goudie, born May 10, 1864, died April 18, 1885. 



136 



THE GOV DIES IN SHETLAND. 



Iparliamentari) 0ot^i-s {§oxxBthal))zx% anb |loit-Eisibent 
|1r0prbt0rs) in it^ttkntr. 

1893 



Andrew Goudie, 
Gavin Goudie, 
James Goudie, 
Peter Goudie, 
Thomas Goudie, 
Gilbert Goudie, 
Laurence Goudie, 
William Goudie, 
George Goudie, 
John Goudie, 
Olla Goudie, 
Robert Goudie, 



James Goudie, 
George Goudie, 
George Goudie, 
James Goudie, 
James Goudie, 
James Goudie, 
James Galvin Goudie, 
John Goudie, 
Malcolm Goudie, 
Robert Goudie, 
Thomas Goudie, 
William Goudie, 



Braefield. 

North Scousbro. 

Brake. 

lunnabister. 

Berwick. 

Edinburgh. 

goesetter. 

Semblister. 

scatness. 

Tolob. 

Waterbrough. 

ViRKIE. 

Saitbfoick ^aris^. 

Beddied, Levanwick. 

LiNDS. 

Setter. 

HOSWICK. 

South End Levanwick. 

Grind. 

Uppertown. 

Moors. 

LiNDS. 

Williamsetter. 

LOCHEND. 

Uppertown. 



#%r f arisbs. 



Hay Goudie, 
Robert Goudie, 
James Goudie, 
Walter Goudie, 
John Goudie, 
James Tolloch Goudie, 
Arthur Goudie, 
James Goudie, 
John Goudie, 
James Goudie, 
James Mouat Goudie, 
William Goudie, 
John Goudie, 



Calfirth, Nesting. 
Calfirth, Nesting. 
Skellister, Nesting. 
Scalloway, Tingwall. 
Breck, Whiteness. 
Sand House, Sandsting. 
Upper Sound, Gulberwick. 
Essex, LERwacK. 
Australia, Lerwick. 
Hillhead, Lerwick. 
MoNTFiELD, Lerwick. 
Hangcliff Lane, Lerwick. 
Annsbrae Place, Lerwick. 



Ck 6atoi)ics in t\)t #rhnxiT Ms\t$. 




About contemporary with the settlement of the ancestors of the families in the 
Shetland Isles the Gadies or Gawdies established thenselves in the Orcadian main- 
land. They were never very numerous there, however, and the branches of whom 
we have obtained authentic information were principally located in the parishes 
of Sandwick, Harray, Cairston and Ophir. The existing traditions held by the 
few remaining families ascribe the origin of their race to a Scandinavian source. 
Some assume to say there were two brothers who came from Norway and that one 
of these settled in Shetland, the other in Orkney. James Spence Gaudie writing 
from Netherhall, Marwick, Birsey, Orkney Isles, says, " I would like to point out that 
all of our families in Orkney spell the name "Gawdie, " but there are not more 
than four or five households now in the Islands. My own people are supposed 
to have been here 600 years and old records seem to prove that our ancestors 
have occupied our present farm for 300 years. The vital records of our family, 
the births, marriages and deaths, will be found in the Church Registers of the 
parishes of Birsey and Harray; and there should be some account of the family 
in the Estate Books of the Dundas and Morton families, from whom the Gawdies 
have held their farm-lands for many years." 

Mr. W. H. Groundwater, of Sackford, England, and an Orcadian, who can 
remember back for 70 years, says: "The Orkney Goudies were from Norway. 
I recall but one family of this name, however; this composed of two sons of one 
George Goudie, named George and Peter. Both were old men and one of them 
was a bachellor. The other was married and had a son also named Peter who 
was a 'Shellback' (Sailor) and died abroad. The father of these brothers was 
dead long before my time. These were farmers and lived in the township of Ces- 
train, in the parish of Ophir. There were other families of Gawdies or Goudies 
who earlier lived in the parish of Sandwick. From about 1820-50 a Gilbert Goudie 
lived in Stromness. The ancestors must have come ven.' early to Orkney, for 
there is a small farm near the village of Stromness still called ' Gaudiesback, ' 
though no person of the name has been known to have lived there. The Scandina- 
vians have left a greater impress on Scotland, and even in England, than is generally 
supposed. Some of the Highlanders are pure Norse, and in England, Cumberland 
and portions of Yorkshire the people show strong Norse characteristics. If ever 
a Goudie came into Scotland from Suffolk or Norfolk, he must have been left 
there by the receding tide of some Norse invasion. A river in Aberdeenshire is 
named 'Gadie' and may have some connection with the family." 

Mr. Peter Goudie of Newhouse, Ophir, communicating his knowledge on this 
subject by letter, says: "We are the only family in Orkney named Goudie. About 
40 or 50 years ago there were two or three families of the name in Stromness, but 
there are none now. There was a family in Stennis but all are gone; all have died 
or emigrated. There are several families of Gaudie in Orkney ; some in the parish 
of Stromness, some in Birsey and some in the parish of Holm. The Gawdies 
and Gowdies are understood to be quite distinct. The Goudie family to which I 
belong came from Caithness 1780-1800. The first of that name was a John Goudie 
who was my grandfather's father, so I am only the fourth generation of this branch. 
This John Goudie came here to serve for a man who lived at the Hall of Cestrain, 



138 THE G AW DIES IN THE ORKNEY ISLES. 

and was connected \vith the family in Stromness. I do not know where my great- 
grandfather or my grandfather were born, but my father was born in Cestrain 
in 1825 and died in 1908 aged 83 years. My grandfather was 72 years of age 
when he died". 

Mrs. G. Wright, Dundas Street, Stromness, Orkney, writing of the family says: 
"My grandmother's name was Margaret Goudie, my great-grandfather being 
Baker Goudie who came from the parish of Ophir and settled down in the small 
town of Stromness as a blacksmith. He died in the year 1831 at the age of 69 
years. My grandfather was 72 years of age when he died. My father also had 
an uncle James Goudie who went to Australia and died there. 

Ellen Flett, writing from Stone Hall, Grimbister, Firth, Orkney, says: "My 
father was the eldest son of Mary Gowdy. I have heard my father say there 
were two Gowdy brothers who came with Scandinavian emigrants. One brother 
went to Shetland and the other settled in Orkney. Both married but I cannot 
tell how many children the one who went to Shetland had. The one who remained 
in Orkney had two daughters and one son. The two daughters were married ; 
one of them had three sons and one daughter; the other, with whom I am connected, 
had five daughters and six sons. I am sorry to say that the name Gowdy has 
entirely died out of Orkney. The parishes in which they flourished were Firth 
and Stennis, and I think their records will be found in the Firth Registers". 

Mr. A. W. Johnson of the "Viking Society", London, writing to the Editor of 
this volume, says: "I have only a note of one Gadie in Ophir, Orkney, of date 
1603. The families bearing the name have never been with the ' upper ten' in the 
Islands, and those I have known were local characters, eccentric beggars, etc. 
A George Goudie of my father's days never took his clothes off and whenever he 
was presented with any he put them on the top of what he already had on, in- 
cluding hats. He had been seen when on a tramp wearing three or four hats, one 
surmounting the other. He sometimes slept in the styes with the swine. If asked 
to say grace where he was given a meal he would recite the whole Decalogue and 
no one could stop him except Mr. Petrie the factor of Grameshall. When the serv- 
ants were tired of his fathers they sent for Mr. Petrie who would place his hand 
on Goudie's shoulder and say, 'That will do, George,' which brought him to a full 
stop. Before commencing to eat he would drop several spoons on the floor, with 
the remark that one was for his father, mother, etc." 

The foregoing statements abstracted from correspondence contain examples of 
the conflicting traditions held by the families still living in the Orkney Isles. These 
traditions are irreconcilable but probably emanated from a seed historical fact 
that has been changed in passing from generation to generation and from mouth 
to mouth. All documentary evidence points to a Scandinavian derivation for the 
Orcadian branches of the Gawdie-Goudie families and their settlement in the 
Islands as nearly coeval with that of their kindred in Shetland. 

The following authentic vital records copied from the Parish Registers verify, 
in part, the statements in the foregoing correspondence, and show that the families 
must have been quite numerous in Orkney at an early day. There are chasms 
covering years in the Registers when no entries were made; and these breaks 
prohibit the making of perfect connections between the generations and families. 
It affords a sense of satisfaction to the Editor of this work in having found ample 
proof of the existence of so many families in the Islands when those whose knowl- 
edge of the ancestral history should have qualified them to produce more definite 
information concerning it. The causes that have reduced the numbers in the 
Orcadian families are evidently the same that have prevailed in the Shetlands, 
namely the loss of so many young men at sea. 



1 



THE G AW DIES IN THE ORKNEY ISLES. 139 

P0ims of iht (Drratrian (iautrbs. 

The early homes of the Gaudies in the Orkneys in the early years were nearly 
the same as in the contiguous islands in Shetland. However, the crofter-class in 
Orkney has advanced to a greater degree in agricultural improvements than those 
in the more northerly group. More of the rudely built old-fashioned houses have 
given place to modern-styled places of residence. Cultivation by the spade has 
been supplanted by that of the plow. A revival of the spirit of thrift has been 
apparent throughout the Orcadian group and general prosperity has resulted. 
But there remain still many very primitive houses whose interiors are no improve- 
ment on those of two hundred years ago. There are the same earthen floors, 
the same stone hearths, the same peat fires, the same methods of cooking; while 
the old-fashioned boxed beds and heavy hand-made furniture are in use. The 
spinning wheels are everywhere in evidence. Many of the crofters still follow 
the sea several months in the year and bring home an abundance of fish for winter 
use. Churches and schools have been well supplied and the peasant population 
is fairly well educated. Many of the young men are sailors and during late years 
many families have removed to the Canadian north-west where they have estab- 
lished homes. Kirkwall and Stromness are the two principal towns where there 
are large and well furnished stores and manufactories. 



Starrtag^s m §irsag, #rkmg. 

1696 February 6th George Gadie was married with Agnes Breck. 

1730 January 6th John Gady was married with Anna Mouat, in Stromness. 

1733 July 30th Hary Gadie contracted with Margaret Twatt; they were 

married 1733 September 12th. 
1756 January 25th Catherine Gadie and John Wallion. 
1772 February 8th Margery Goudie and James Taylor, Cowherd, contracted; 

they were married the 9th, it being the Sabbath. 

1784 November 20th John Gaudie in Marwick was booked with Margaret 
Tolloch in Harray. They were married Nov. 25 th. 

1785 May 8th Janet Gaudie in Marwick was booked with Alexander Huntor, 
pawn consigned. They were married the 16th inst, pawn returned Feb- 
ruary 22, 1786. 

1787 November 5th George Gaudie was booked with Jean Irvine, pawn con- 
signed. They were married Dec. 2d; pawn returned to himself Nov- 
ember 24, 1788. 

1792 October 27th. Janet Gawdie in Marwick and Magnus Garson resident 
in Sandwick were booked, pawn consigned. Married Nov. 23d, rests m. 
m. pd. Aug. 18th and he received his pawn. 

1821 February 4th Margaret Gaudie was contracted with John Kirkness in 
Marwick. They were married the 20th instant. 



ttsms in §irsan, #rkmg. 

1733 August 8th John Gadie, Marwick, had a son baptised who was called John. 

1734 September 7th Hary Gadie had a daughter baptised called Catherine. 
1738 June 24th Hary Gadie in Marwick had a son baptised named Hary. 



140 THE G AW DIES IN THE ORKNEY ISLES. 

1739 September 16th John Gadie in Marwick had a child baptised named 

Marjory. 
1747 September 7th Margery Harvey, lawful daughter of George Harvey and 

Catherine Gaudie in Haan was baptised. 
1750 February 25th, To Hary Gadie in Marwick a son named John. 
1754 February 3d. To Hary Gadie in Marwick a daughter called Jannet. 
1762 Aug. George lawful son to Henry Gaudie in Marwick was baptised 20th. 
1769 March 28th John Spence lawful son of William Spence and Janet AUeine 

at the palace was baptised. Witnesses, John Loutit schoolmaster, Kathe- 

RiNE Gaudie and Elizabeth Cumlaquoy. 
1769 August 5th. Thomas Tait lawful son to Thomas Tait and Isabel Gaudie 

in Marwick, was baptised at the Manse. Witnesses, Hary Gaudie and 

George Irvine. 
1769 September 27th. Marion Staingarth lawful daughter of Thomas Stains- 
garth and Barbara Johnston at Langskaill was born the 26th inst. and 

baptised this day. Witnesses, James Johnston in Boardhouse and Kath- 

erine Gaudie. 
1769 October 29th. Marjory Velzian lawful daughter of Andrew Velzian and 

Margaret Gaudie in Hundland was baptised before the Congregation. 
1769 October 9th. Margaret Moar, lawful daughter of William Moar and Janet 

Spence was born this 9th day and baptised Wednesday 11th. Witnesses 

Katherine Gaudie and Margaret Moar. 
1771 March 24th. Andrew Velzian, lawful son to Andrew Velzian in Lochend 

of Kirkbister and Margaret Gaudie was baptised. 
1773 February 25th. Drummond Taylor, lawful son to James Taylor the Herd 

and Marjory Gaudie, was baptised. 
1776 February 24th. Janet Taylor, lawful daughter of James Taylor at Bewan 

and Marjory Gaudie, was baptised. 
1776 July 15th. Katherine Broachie, natural daughter of John Broachie and 

Elizabeth Gaudie, was baptised. 
1786 January 31st. Jean Gaudie lawful daughter of John Gaudie and Margaret 

Tolloch in Nether Skaill in Marwick, was baptised. Witnesses, William 

Taylor and Isabel Huntow. 
1789 January 19th. George Gaudie, lawful son to George Gaudie, and Jean 

Irvine in Nether Skaill in Marwick, was baptised. Witnesses, George 

Midhouse and George Brecke. 
1789 March 28th. Catherine Gaudie, lawful daughter of John Gaudie and 

Margaret Tolloch in Marwick, was baptised. 
1791 February 28th. John Gaudie, lawful son of John Gaudie and Margaret 

Tolloch in Nether Skaill, Marwick, was baptised. 
1791 March 23d. Elspet Gaudie, lawful daughter of George Gaudie and Jean 

Irvine, in Nether Skaill in Marwick, was baptised. 
1791 Aug. 7th. George Hunter, lawful son to Alexander Hunter, who died at 

Christmas last and Janet Gaudie in Ritquoy was baptised, George Hunter 

its grandfather being sponsor for it. 
1793 March 20th. Margaret Gaudie, lawful daughter of John Gaudie, and 

Margaiet Tolloch in Nether Skaill, Marwick, was baptised. 
1793 May 20th. Janet Gaudie, lawful daughter of George Gaudie and Jean 

Irvine, in Nether Skaill in Marwick, was baptised. 



THE G AW DIES IN THE ORKNEY ISLES. 141 

1795 February 11. William Gaudie lawful son to John Gaudie and Maigaret 
Tolloch, in Marwick, was baptised. 

1796 May 9th. James Gaudie, lawful son to George Gaudie and Jean Ir\'ine 
in Nether Skaill in Marwick, was baptised. 

1798 November 25th. Peter Gaudie lawful son to George Gaudie and Jean 
Irvine in Nether Skaill in Marwick, was baptised. 

1799 April 8th. James Gaudie lawful son to John Gaudie and Margaret Tolloch 
in Marwick, was baptised. 

1801 March 5th. Graham Gaudie lawful son to John Gaudie and Margaret 
Tolloch, in Nether Skaill in Marwick, was baptised. 

1801 October 16th. Elizabeth Gaudie lawful daughter to George Gaudie and 
Jean Irvine in Nether Skaill, in Marwick, was baptised. 

1802 December 20th. Peter Gaudie lawful son to John Gaudie and Margaret 
Tolloch in Nether Skaill, Marwick, was baptised. 

1804 June 24th. John Gaudie lawful son to George Gaudie and Jean Irvine 
in Nether Skaill in Marwick, was baptised. 

1804 August 26th. Isabel Gaudie lawful daughter of John Gaudie and Mar- 
garet Tolloch in Nether Skail in Marwick, was baptised. 

1806 December 18th. Mary Gaudie lawful daughter of George Gaudie and 
Jean Irvine in Nether Skaill, Marwick, was baptised. 

1809 April 8th. Marion Gaudie lawful daughter of George Gaudie and Jean 
Irvine in Nether Skaill in Marwick, was baptised. 



baptisms in #p^ir, #rhmjj. 

1709 September 29th. Robert Gadie, lawful son to George Gadie and Agnes 

Tait, was baptised. 
1768 January 25th. Joseph Gaudy in Claistown had by his wife Grisal Calldell 

a child baptised named Patrick. Witnesses at the baptism William Hay, 

John Cursitter and others. 
1772 December 22d. Joseph Gaudie in Clistron had by his spouse Grizell Calder 

a child baptised named William. 
1774 March 27th. Joseph Gaudie in Ireland had by his spouse Grizell Calder 

a child baptised named John. 
1781 March 26th. Joseph Gaudie in Clairstron, by his spouse Grizal Calder 

had a child baptised named Jonathan. Witnesses, John Cursitter, Peter 

Clouston and others. 
1784 March 7th. Joseph Gaudie in Clairstron had by his spouse Grizal Calder 

a child baptised named Margaret. Witnesses, Peter Clouston and 

Nichol Sinclair. 
1794 February 10th. John Gaudie in Clairstron had by his spouse Isabel Sletter 

a child baptised named Joseph. Witnesses Joseph Gowdie and Nichol 

Sinclair. 
1798 August 27th. John Gawdie in Clasitran had by his spouse Isabel Sletter 

a child baptised named John. Witnesses Joseph Gawdie his father 

who stood sponsor and Peter Clouston; himself being in Hudson's Bay. 
1844 December 17th. Margaret Gowdie in Claistron had her late husband's 

George Sinclair's child baptised Margaret Glen. Witnesses Joseph Gow- 
die and Andrew Tait. 



142 THE G AW DIES IN THE ORKNEY ISLES. 

1805 October 21, John Gowdie in Clairstron had by his spouse Isabel Sletter 
a child baptised named Catherine. Witnesses, Andrew Tait and William 
Slater. 

1808 December 4th. John Godwie in Longwell had by his spouse Isobel Slater 
a child baptised named Isobel, before the Congregation. 

1818 October 18th. Joseph Gowdie in Claistran had by his spouse Margaret 
Sinclair a child born the 29th September and baptised the 18th of October 
1818 named John. Witnesses, John Gowdie and George Sinclair. 



damages m #plji;r, #rhmB. 

1709 November 26th. George Gady was contracted Agnes for the 

man Patrick Groundwater the woman Robert Ballantine in No — 

They were married the first — . (the records torn). 

1793 August 23d. John Gowdie and Isbel Slettar both in this parish were 
contracted in order to marriage; cautioners for the man William Sinclair 
and George Slettar for the woman. They were married 12th September. 

1802 August 2d. George Sinclair and Margaret Gowdie both in this parish 
were contracted in order to marriage and were married Aug. 17th. 

1818 January 29th. Joseph Goldie and Margaret Sinclair both in Claistran 
were married. 



Ipetultar Cl^araders. 

Geordie Goudie. Mr. Duncan MacLean, a native of Kirkwall, Orkney, writing 
from America to the Editor of "Around the Peat Fires" has stated: "I marvel 
that some of your auld folk have not taken notice of Geordie Goudie, who was 
a noted tramp seventy years ago. He was about five feet eight inches in height, 
weighed two hundred pounds, was well proportioned, with red hair and whiskers 
sprinkled with grey, an open manly cast of countenance and large expressive blue 
eyes. In his youth he must have been one of the best looking men of his day. 
He wore a Scotch cap, a brown monkey jacket, and was trim in his rig throughout. 

He wandered aimlesly over the islands, rarely remaining more than one day 
in a place. Occasionally he turned up at Kirkwall, took a look at the shipping, 
visited the Auld Kirk, lingered lovingly in the graveyard, and among the ruins 
of the Earls Palace. The boys who were always on hand for a 'lark' with odd 
characters, rarely troubled him, for he was genial and kind, and when spoken to 
answered courteously but briefly, for he was a man of few words. The boys having 
learned that he detested the sight of money, especially silver coins, occasionally 
offered him a sixpence; then he sprang at them in wrath, and they were soon non est. 

He was a native of North Ronaldshay, where he had a brother and sister well- 
to-do folk, with whom he lived when out of kelter, and who were very kind to him 
for they had shared his prosperity when in luck. When a boy he entered the 
Royal Navy^ at a time when 'gold chains and wooden legs' were served out; the 
gold to the officers and the wood to the shellbacks. Shortly after the peace of 1815 
he returned to Orkney and became a wanderer, but even his brother and sister 
knew not the cause. 

Many years afterwards when serving in the navy myself, I became shipmate 
with a man who knew him well in his prime, then one of the most dashing, daring 
and handsome men afloat. He had serv^ed with Nelson at the battle of St. Vincent, 



THE GAWDIES IN THE ORKNEY ISLES. 143 

at the Nile, Copenhagen, and Trafalgar, and on board the Pallas frigate, under 
Lord Cochran when he burned the French fleet in Basque Roads. Most of the time 
he was Quartermaster; belonging to Nelson's barge, and had been complimented 
by Lady Hamilton as the finest looking fellow in the great Admiral's barge. Nelson 
himself, a rare specimen of manly beauty, had his barge and gig manned by the best 
looking men in his ship. 

George Goudie having excellent character, received employment in the Ports- 
mouth dock yard, which assured him a good living while able to work, and a pension 
when invalided. He had been lucky in prize money and saving of his wages, so 
that he had over one thousand pounds on hand when he left the sea. His life 
for a plain, unlettered man, had then been a complete success; he knew his duty 
and did it man-fashion. The old saying, "never call a man lucky till he is under 
ground", was painfully illustrated in his case. Unfortunately he fell in love with 
a beautiful girl, the daughter of a shipmate, pious after a fashion and bore an un- 
blemished character. They were married, and lived lovingly together a whole 
year, until she had control of his money when she disappeared, money and all. 
He did not make any outcry, but sold his furniture, paid what little he owed, resigned 
his place in the dock yard, packed up his clothes and came to the home of his brother 
and sister where he left his chest and some fifty pounds of money obtained from the 
sale of his effects and the last instalment of his pay. He remained about a week 
at home, and then took to wandering. Wheresoever he brought up at night he 
was kindly received and hospitably entertained. He seemed to know by instinct 
where to go. During the warm months of summer he slept in the fields, and 
was sure to receive something to eat when he was hungry. 

When the Whalemen came to Stromness to complete their crews, he boarded 
them, had a draw of the clay and a glass or two of grog, for he seemed to love 
the men of the sea and little children, though he was never seen to smile. No 
doubt regarding money as the cause of his bad luck, he literally abhorred the very 
sight of it. When his clothes were worn out and he felt he needed to refit ship, 
he came home but never remained longer than a few days. I think he was still 
living and wandering in 1828 when I left Kirkwall; but he is no doubt now in heaven, 
for the last old shellback who was sent to the other place could not get in; it was 
chock full, and land-sinners were sitting with their legs out of the windows. Like 
an omnibus, in which there is room for one more, it is to be hoped that this faithless 
rib is one. " 



% gattor's ^rumts^. 

Magnus Goudie and his sweetheart, Jean Linklater, were servants to George 
Delday in Halley and during press-gang times Goudie was without friends among 
them and had to be wary. The shores near Halley are well provided with caves 
suitable for hiding places. The cave and castle of the "Repenting Stools" were the 
chief resort of those in Kirkbuster who fled from the press-gangs. This is a cave 
of peculiar form and can be entered from above and below. Yet two men in it 
can defy a thousand. Descending from above by a steep slope, we come to a hole 
a few feet in diameter almost perpendicular, with rock and clay forming its sides. 
From a side of the hole an opening passes to another outlet in the floor of the cave 
and the roof of another. On the rocky platform between these holes fugitives 
often rested. A ledge furnishing a seat was little comfort to the many men hiding 
there. In this cave Magnus Goudie found three men from Midhouse, one from 



144 THE G AW DIES IN THE ORKNEY ISLES. 

Harris, and some others. Food was lowered down to them from above or placed 
in the lower cave by a boat and they were secreted there for several weeks. This 
being seedtime, these men were sadly missed at home, and it seemed doubtful 
if the sowing could be done in season. 

Dr. Groat, Navy physician for Orkney, was the proprietor of Halley, and came 
on a visit when Goudie was hiding. Seeing Delday sweating at the ploughing, 
sowing and harrowing and asking why he was toiling alone was told that help 
could not be obtained for love or money until the press-gangs went away. "Get 
your servant man to come and work, and I will certify that he is unfit for service". 
Tnisting in this promise Magnus Goudie came home; but soon after the press- 
gang put in appearance, but Jean Linklater was prepared to give them a warm 
reception. Suspecting their approach one night, she put on the muckle-pot and 
when they came to the door she met them with a ladle filled with hot water and 
dared any one to enter. For a long time she held them at bay, but Delday believ- 
ing in the doctor's promise, bade her let them come in and poor Goudie was soon 
in the hands of the gang and on the road to town, while Delday on horseback 
was on the way to remind the doctor of his promise. When Goudie was brought 
before the doctor for examination he asked, "Where are your sons that you bring 
such a man as that to me"? This was too much for John Foubister's temper 
and he replied "When we bring men you will not keep them so we will bring no more ". 
Replying the doctor said, "Hold your tongue, or I will send you on board tender 
yourself, for you are fit for service". Soon after this adventure Magnus Goudie 
was married to his faithful Jeannie and they walked happily together. 



¥m 



d-: 



CI^c (Satobic Jfamiltcs in ^nrsljiit. 



^ 5, ■'* 



In the Compendium of Family History found in the introductory section of this 
work we have had occasion to mention the ancestors of the Ayrshire branches of 
the Gawdie family in a general way, but did not attempt to elaborate the particulars 
that are invited by domestic inquisition; these pertinent elements are herewith pre- 
sented in as comprehensive a form as consistent with the scope of the book. Under 
the general head of "The Gowdies of Ayrshire" we shall treat the several branches 
believed to have been descended from this ancestry with suitable sub-heads. As 
intimated, the ancestors of the families so long settled in Ayrshire removed from 
England in company with the Bruises, De-la-Hayes and De-Soules. These fore- 
fathers of the Gawdie families in the South of Scotland were settled at Cragie 
Mill on the Cessnock stream in the parish of Galston for 400 years. 

Among the Scottish families it was long a custom for the sons to adopt the pro- 
fession or craft of their fathers, and this fashion was especially emphasized and made 
conspicuous by the Gawdie family living at Cragie Mill; and this employment was 
not confined by them to the main line of the family on the Cessnock where the 
business had been passed down from generation to generation in regular succession, 
but the younger sons, having acquired proficiency in the miller's craft, went forth 
from the old home to lease other mills and engage in the same business. A member 
of this family leased the Old Dutch Mill and continued there for some years, then 
leased the Old Mill in New Cumnock about 1820 and held it till 1890 when the title 
was surrendered and they removed to a farm in Galloway. This mill is situated 
on the Afton water, a stream celebrated by Burns containing the lines, "Flow 
gently, sweet Afton, among thy green braes". This was the mill burned to the 
ground on the morning when John Goudie, the old Miller, was buried. Afton 
water is a rivulet of New Cumnock parish in the south-eastern section of Ayrshire, 
running nine miles northward by rapid current along the lovely valley of Glenaf ton 
and falls into the Nith near the New Cumnock church, in the yard of which the 
Goudie family were interred. See inscriptions in this work. 



#atotrie aixb §tints Jfamili:es. 

From an examination of the vital records as disclosed in the parishes of Ayr- 
shire we are constantly impressed with the fact that these Gawdie families were 
in life and in death closely associated with that of the poet Burns. The "Gawdie 
Period" in Ayrshire was so early entered upon that the prolific families bearing 
the name had become distributed into nearly every parish in Ayrshire and even into 
the adjoining parishes, and some of these were neighbors to William Burns, father 
of the poet. It is a well known fact that John Goudie the essayist was the projector 
of the publication of the Kilmarnock edition of the poems and that the poet him- 



NOTE. — Mr. John Goudie of Thornhill, Dumlrieshlre, Scotland, informs the author of this work that 
the Old Ayr Mill where he and his father so long wrought is situated on the edge of the Ayr River and 
that the town now extends some distance beyond it. This is not a large mill as compared to some 
modem establishments, but it is still running. 



146 THE GAWDIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

self was a frequent visitor at his house where many of the proof-sheets were revised; 
and singular to relate, a John Goudie was for long occupant of the Burns cottage 
and an acquaintance of the bard. Many of the Goudies were married in the 
"Auld Kirk" of Alloway and their children baptised there. Millers for many 
generations in many branches of the family, nearly all of the ancient mills were 
carried on by members of the Gawdie families, and when they died some of them at 
least, were laid down beside the remains of members of the Burns family. The 
" Dutch Mill " was managed by the Gawdies and it was a tradition, falsely assumed, 
that the family derived its name from a native of Holland who built the establish- 
ment. The Gawdies were the "Milners" at Alloway Mill, at the old Cumnock 
Mill that was burned down the day of the burial of "Miller John Gawdie", the 
old Ayr Mill still standing, and the Craigie Mill on the Cessnock stream. These 
families of Gawdie and Goudie were familiar with all the haunts and scenes made 
historic and immortal by the poet and had trod the banks of Ayr and through 
Avon's vales; they had attended divine services in the old kirks mentioned in the 
writings of Burns and listened to the preaching of, and been married by, the 
ministers there. Associated with the Goudie names in the vital records of Ayr 
are the names of ministers Hunter, McDermit and Hamilton and several who 
served in some of the adjoining parishes. 



Thomas Goudie, great-grandfather of Thomas Goudie of Ballagan, Thornhill, 
Dumfriesshire, Scotland, was a Miller. His son whose name follows was also a 
Miller. 

James Goudie, grandfather of Thomas Goudie of Ballagan, was also a Miller. 
His son whose name follows was a Miller. He married Mary Ross. He was twice 
married. 

Thomas Goudie, son of the preceding, succeeded his father as lessee of the 
old Ayr Mill. 

Thomas Goudie, son of the preceding, went to take charge of the old Mill 
on New Cumnock, Ayrshire, when he was 10 years of age, with his father and 
held the lease till he was 80 years of age. 

Thomas Goudie, son of the above, succeeded his father at the old Mill and re- 
mained there till his 40th year and gave up the lease; the first to resign the mill 
during 400 years. He then leased a farm in Galloway for fifteen years, his father 
accompanying him, his mother having died three years previously. His father 
died in January', 1893, in his 83d year. This fifth Thomas Goudie is now living 
with his daughter and only child at Ballagan Farm, Thornhill, Ayrshire, which her 
husband holds of the Duke of Buceleuch. Thomas married Mary Black. His 
daughter is a Mrs. Muir. Thomas the second left the old Mill about 1821 and went 
to a farm called Girvan Mains. 



dalston l^artslj mxia Jitcarbs. 



The parish and town of Galston in Ayrshire, Scotland, stands chiefly on the 
Southern bank of the beautiful river Irvine. Its site is low and is surrounded 
by gentle rising grounds and overhung by the braes and woods of Loudon. With 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 147 

its charming environments it presents a delightful appearance. This place is the 
centre of an opulent agricultural district. Along the banks of the river there is 
a border of level alluvial and highly fertile land. The streams in the parish of 
Galston are the Avon, the Cessnock and the river Irvine which flows ten miles 
westward. It has not been settled concerning the location of the old Goudie 
Mill. It may have been upon some of the smaller streams in the parish. 

William Gowdie, born Jan. 28, 1672. Mother, Agnes Gowdie. 

Alexander Gowdie, born April 9, 1672. Father's name James Gowdie. 

John Goudie, born May 27, 1694, in Overlean, Riccerton. 

John Gowdie, born Aug. 30, 1702. 

William Gaudie, born 1703. 

John Gaudie, born .... 1705. 

William Gaudie, born 1706. 

William Gaudie, born .... 1710. 

John Gaudie, born .... 1713. 

William Gaudie, born .... 1713, 

John Gaudie, in Watland Friend, occurs in 1732. 

Matthew Gaudie, in Know, occurs in 1750-1754-1760-1775-1777-1779-1782. 

John Gaudie, in Greeholm, occurs in 1769-1772. 

John Gaudie, weaver, occurs in 1797-1798-1799 and from 1801 to 1815. 

As these Gaudies were in the parish of Galston, Ayrshire, they were probably 
of the Miller family. 

An old resident of Dumfriesshire says there was a Thomas Goudie, "Miller of 
the Meal Mill" in the parish, who many years ago went to America and was not 
afterwards heard from. 



lUrlbs in ^arisfj 0f #dston, %ms\mt, Srotlaiitr. 

1672. Jan. 2. George Goudie, in Riccarton, had a lawfuU child baptised, 
called William. 

1672. Jan. 28. William Goudie, in Riccarton, had a lawfull child baptised, 
called Agnes. 

1672. April 9. Alexander Goudie, sometime in Loudon, now in Galston, 
had a lawful child baptised, called James. 

1677. Mar. 4. John Goudie in Overloan in the parish of Riccarton, had 
two lawful children baptised, the one called Agnes, the other, Isabell. 
Record blank from 1677 to 1685. 

1693. April 23. William Goudie in Auchrugland had a son baptised called 
Matthew. 

NOTE. — Mr. James Hyslop who was employed to visit the Churchyards in Ayrshire and copy the 
inscriptions on the tombstones of the Gawdie, Goudie and Goldie families, has informed me as follows : 
"An old gentleman who was brought up near "Cessnock Mill" on the Cessnock stream, says that in his 
boyhood days it was always called "Cragie Mill" as it was in Cragie Parish ; and the Goudies were 
probably buried in "Cragie Churchyard" or "Loudon Old Burying-ground" and not in "Galston Parish". 
This venerable man also says that many years ago the estate the Mill was on was called "CaimhiH", 
but when the present proprietor purcliased it he changed it to "Camel" ; and at the same time the 
name of the old Mill was changed from "Cragie Mill" to "Cessnock Mill". 

If the foregoing statement is correct the facts account for the absence of the Goudie name in the 
burial records of Galston Parish. 



148 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

1693. April. William Goucie in Auchrugland, had a son baptised called 
Matthew. 

1693. Oct. 15. George Gouuie at Bar-Mill, had a daughter baptised called 
Agnes. 

1694. May 27. John Goudie in Overloan in Riccarton, had a lawful son 
baptised called John. 

1702. Aug. 30. John Goudie in Milnerighill, had a laAvful son baptised at 
Galston, called Archibald. 

1703. Aug. 26. William Goudie in Speartoune, had a lawful son baptised 
called John. 

1706. Mar. 18. John Goudie in Ladybard, had a lawful daughter baptised 
called Agnes. 

1706. May 19. William Goudie in Clouchard, had a lawful daughter 
baptised, called Margaret. 

1711. March 25. William Goudie in Clinchyeard, had a lawful son baptised 
called John. 

1713. March 1. John Goudie in Barmilln. had a son baptised called George. 

1713. June 7. William Goudie in Clousyeard, had a daughter baptised 
called Agnes. 

1715. Dec. 11. George Goudie, in Little Sorn, had a son baptised called 
James. 

1719. Sept. 8. Matthew Goudie inWestlandfine, had a son baptised called 
William. 

1722. Sept. 10. Matthew Goudie in Lornfiend, had a daughter baptised 
called Jean. 

1730. March 1. John Goudie, in Westlandfiend, had a son baptised called 
John. 

1732. March 5. Matthew Goudie in Guilly-hill, had a lawful son baptised 
called Matthew. 

1735. May 25. Matthew Goudie in Goodiehill, had a lawful daughter 
baptised called Janet. 

1749. June 11. Mary Goudie, daughter of Matthew Goudie in Know, was 
baptised. 

1750. Sept. 29. George, son to John Goudie in Galstoun, was born and 
baptised, Oct. 7, 1750. 

1750. Oct. 25. William, son to William Goudie in Gouchalland, was 
baptised. 

1754. May 3. James, son to John Goudie, indweller in Galston, was baptised. 

1754. May 3. James, son to John Goudie, indweller in Galston, was baptised. 

1760. May 4. George, son to William Goudie, in Gouchiland, was baptised. 

1766. Aug. 5. John and Andrew, sons to John Goudie, in Windyhills, 
baptised. 

1769. July 13. Isabell and Jean, lawful daughters of John Goudie in 
Greenholm, were born; bapt., 14th. 

1772. May 4. Margaret, lawful daughter of John Goudie in Greenholm, 
was born and was bapt. 10th. 

1775. Nov. 23. William, lawful son to Matthew Goudie in Galston, born 
on Thursday about half-past one in the afternoon. 

1776. Feb. 21. Jean, lawful daughter to John Goudie in Greeholm, born 
on Wednesday; bapt., 25th. 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 149 

1777. Feb. 11. John, lawful son to Matthew Goudie in Galston, born and 
bapt. the 16th. 

1779. July 27. Janet, lawful daughter to Matthew Goudie in Galston, was 
born and bapt. the 18th. 

1782. Nov. 24. Matthew, lawful son to Matthew Goudie in Galston, born 
Sabbath 24th about 11 o'clock forenoon; baptised the same day. 

1785. Jan. 2. Jean, lawful daughter of Matthew Goudie in Galston, was 
born and baptised the 9th. 

1787. June 1. Margaret, lawful daughter of Matthew Goudie, laborour, 
and Jean Baird, was born and baptised the 17th. 

1792. Aug. 8. George, lawful son to Matthew Goudie and Jean Baird in 
Galston. was born and baptised the 12th. 

1795. Oct. 9. Mary, lawful daughter of John Goudie and Helen Pedan 
at East Satersyles, was born and baptised Nov. 1, 1795. 

1797. Oct. 2. Jean, lawful daughter of John Goudie, weaver in Galston, 
and Sarah Smith, was born and baptised the 22d. 

1798. Feb. 11. William, lawful son of John Goudie, weaver in Galston, and 
Helen Pedan at East Satersyles, was born and baptised the 18th. 

1799. March 14. Margaret, lawful daughter of John Goudie, weaver in 
Galston, and Sarah Smith, was born and baptised the 17th. 

1799. Oct. 16. James, lawful son of John Goudie and Helen Pedan at East 
Satersyke, was born and bapt. 31st. 

1801. Aug. 9. Helen, lawful daughter of John Goudie and Helen Pedan 
at East Satersyke, was born and baptised the 19th. 

1806. Feb. 8. John Veitch, lawful son to John Goudie, in the Argyle Militia, 
and Sarah Smith, was born in Galston and baptised the 27th. 

1809. Sept. 24. George, lawful son to John Goudie and Sarah Smith in 
Galston, was born and baptised Oct. 3d, 1809. 

1811. Feb. 4. Elizabeth, lawful daughter of John Goudie and Sarah Smith 
in Galston, was born and baptised March 17, 1811. 

1814. April 3. Alexander, lawful son of John Goudie, soldier in the Argyle 
Militia, and Sarah Smith, was born in Galston and baptised the 22d. 

1815. Oct. 15. Sarah, lawful daughter of John Goudie, weaver in Galston, 
and Sarah Smith, was born and baptised the 22d. 

1813. March 2. John, son and first child of John Goudie, butler, Shawhill, 
and Margaret Richmond, was born and baptised the 20th. 

1832. Nov. 14. Mary, daughter and 2d child of John Goudie in Galston, 
and Margaret Richmond, was born and baptised Dec. 14, 1832. 

1834. July 6. Andrew, lawful son and 3d child of John Goudie, butler, 
parish of Yarrow, and Margaret Richmond, spouse, was born and baptised the 17th. 

1837. March 20. Matthews, son and 4th child of John Goudie, butler, 
at present in Galston, and Margaret Richmond, spouse, was born and baptised 
May 7th, 1837. 

#aIston 5larnag^s. 

1698 April 25. Alexander Goudie, in the parish of Riccarton, and Joannett 

Gries, in this parish, were married. 
1701 Feb. 17. William Goudie and Janet Thompson, both in this parish, were 

married in Galston. 



150 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

1707 July 3. John Goudie and Agnes Peterson, both living in Hols in 

this parish, were married at Galston. 
1719 Dec. 18. Matthew Goudie and Isabell Dooch, both in this parish, 

were married. 
1725 Nov. 18. Allan Brown in Kilmarnock parish and Margaret Goudie 

in this parish, were married. 
1729 Nov. 24. Matthew Goudie and Jean Miller were married. 
1736 July 8. William Goudie and Agnes Peterson, both in this parish, 

were married. 

Blank from 1795 to 1806. 

1821 July 15. John Smith, in the parish of Kilmarnock and Mary Goudie, 
at Satersyke in this parish were proclaimed for the first time in order 
to their marriage on Sabbath as above date. 

1822 June 2. John Cook Jr. and Janet Goudie, both in Galston, were pro- 
claimed for the first time in order to their marriage on Sabbath as above 
date. 

1825 Nov. 27. Robert Drinnan and Helen Goudie, both in this parish, 
were proclaimed for the first time in order to their marriage on Sabbath. 

1829 April 11. Galston. Mr. McKnought, you will proclaim Andrew Goudie 
in this parish of Loudon and Elizabeth Hutchinson in this parish, 
three different Sabbaths. (Signed) Rob. Hutchinson. 

1829 April 12. John Goudie and Margaret Richmond, both in this parish, 
proclaimed thrice on one Sabbath. 

1840 March 8. William Goudie and Agnes Walker, both in this parish. 

1847 May 29. James Goudie in Sattersyke in this parish and Ann Dickie 
in Auchentiber, parish of Stuartown, two Sabbaths proclaimed. 



C^e ^oH #0lbk. 



John Goldie or Goudie, was a short-lived poet of much promise. He was 
born in Ayr, Scotland, Dec. 22, 1798, being the son of John Goldie, a respectable 
shipmaster, and was a descendant of the ancient family of Gaudie so early settled 
at Craigie Mill in the parish of Galston, in Ayrshire. He obtained an ample 
education at the Academy of his native town, and became, in his fifteenth year, 
assistant to a grocer in Paisley; afterwards he held a similar situation with a 
stoneware and china dealer in Glasgow. In 1821 he opened, on his own account, 
a stoneware establishment at Ayr; but proving unfortunate in business, he aban- 
doned the concerns of trade. Having been from his boyhood passionately fond 
of literature, he now resolved upon its cultivation as a means of support. He was 
already known as an occasional contributor, both in prose and verse, to the public 
press. He received the appointment of assistant editor of the A yr Courier and shortly 
afterwards obtained the entire literary superintendence of that journal. He 
had published a pamphlet of respectable verse in 1821; and in the following year 
appeared as the author of a duodecimo volume of "Poems and Songs", which he 
inscribed to the Etrick Shepherd. Of the composition in the latter publication 
the greater portion, he intimated in his preface, "were composed, chiefly between 
the years of sixteen and twenty"; and as a production, the volume is altogether 
creditable to his genius and taste. 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 151 

Deprived of the editorship of the Courier, in consequence of a change in the 
proprietary, Goldie proceeded to London, in the hope of forming a connection with 
some leading newspaper in the metropolis. Unsuccessful in his efforts, he formed 
the project of publishing The London Scotsman, a newspaper to be chiefly devoted 
to the consideration of Scottish affairs. Lacking the encouragement necessary 
for the ultimate success of this adventure, he abandoned the scheme after the 
third publication, and in very reduced circumstances returned to Scotland. He 
then projected the Paisley Advertiser, of which the first number appeared Oct. 9, 
1824. The editorship of this newspaper he retained till his death, which took 
place suddenly on Feb. 27, 1826, in his twenty-eighth year. 

Possessed of a vigorous intellect, and invested with a correct literary taste, 
Goldie offered excellent promise of eminence as a journalist. As a poet and song- 
writer, a rich vein of humor pervades certain of his compositions, while others 
are marked by a plaintive tenderness. Of a social and generous disposition, he 
was much esteemed by a circle of admiring friends. His personal appearance 
was pleasing and his countenance wore the aspect of intelligence. We subjoin 
a sample of his poetic production. 



^ntr Can Cl^g §osom 1 

Air — "Loudon's Bonnie Woods and Braes". 

And can thy bosom bear the thought 

To part frae love and me, laddie? 
Are all those plighted vows forgot, 

Sae fondly pledged by thee, laddie? 
Can'st thou forget the midnight hour. 

When in yon love-inspiring bower. 
You vowed by every heavenly power 

You'd ne'er lo'e ane but me, laddie? 
Wilt thou — wilt thou gang and leave me — 

Win my heart and then deceive me? 
Oh ! that heart will break, believe me, 

Gin ye part with me, laddie. 

Aft ha'e ye roosed my rosy cheek, 

Aft praised my sparkling ee, laddie, 
Aft said nae bliss on earth ye 'd seek. 

But love and live wi ' me, laddie. 
But soon those cheeks will lose their red, 

Those eyes in endless sleep be hid. 
And 'neath the turf the heart be laid 

That beats for love and thee, laddie. 
Wilt thou — wilt thou gang and leave me — 

Win my heart and then deceive me? 
Oh ! that heart will break, believe me. 

Gin ye part frae me, laddie. 

You'll meet a form mair sweet an' fair. 
Where rarer beauties shine, laddie. 



152 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

But, oh! the heart can never bear 

A love sae true as mine, laddie. 
But when that heart is laid to rest — 

That heart that lo'ed ye last and best — 
Oh ! then the pangs that rend thy breast 

Will sharper be than mine, laddie. 
Broken vows will vex and grieve me, 

Till a broken heart relieve me, 
Yet its latest thoughts, believe me, 

Will be love an'thine, laddie. 



% Jfamtlg of Clergmmit. 

1691. Rev. John Gawdie, transferred from (Jedburgh Presbytery), called 
the 17th, admitted 28th May; was a member of the Assembly 1692 and got (not 
clear) 50 marks from the town council of Edinburgh 8th July same year. He died 
between October 19th and December 3d, 1702. 

1704. Rev. John Gowdie, D.D. This eminent minister of the gospel was de- 
scended from the old Ayrshire family, but the names of his remote ancestors are 
not certainly known. His name was spelled by himself as were the Goudies of 
Ayrshire during the earlier generations and precisely as were some of the English 
branches in old documents discovered in the Bristish Museum, "Gawdie". In 
the Register of Matriculations of the University of Edinburgh he was entered 
in 1696 as "Joan Gaudie", but when passing M.A. in 1700 his name appears in 
the Register of Laureates as "Joannes Goudie", and in his later life he was known 
as "John Gawdie". He was licensed to preach by the Presbytery of Kelso, Jan. 
27th, 1702; called 6th April and ordained 9th Aug., 1704; translated to Lady 
Yesters Church, Edinburgh, June 3, 1730. He was transferred to the new North 
Church, Edinburgh, in 1732. He was for many years preacher to the church at 
Earlston, where the record of his marriage and the baptism of his children was 
found. He was elected Moderator of the General Assemby of the Church of Scot- 
land in 1733 and in the same year Professor of Divinity in the University. In 
1734 he was appointed Principal and died in 1763 — "a grave and learned man". 
He had been appointed Chaplain Inordinary to King George II. in 1735 and was 
deprived in 1744. After the meeting of their commission 16th of November when, 
according to their instructions, a motion was made for proceeding with the four 
disobedient brethen, and another for delay, the former being carried by his cast- 
ing vote; then being released from their benefices, and declared no longer ministers 
of the Established Church, they shortly after formed the Association or succeeding 
Presbytery. Professor Gawdie had the D.D. conferred March 13, 1750, and was 
elevated to the PrincipaHty of the University Feb. 22, 1754. He died Feb. 19, 
1762, in his 80th year and the 59th of his ministry. His first wife was Jean Deas 
and the records of Earlston are as follows: "1705, Dec. 8. The Revd. John 
Gowdie, minister at Earlston, and Mrs. Jean Deas, daughter of Alexander Deas, 
merchant-burgher in Edinburgh, were married"; but another record makes their 
marriage occur "Jan. 3, 1706". This wife, the mother of his children, died 
May 16, 1736, and he married second, Anne, eldest daughter of Walter Ker 
of Littledean, who died May 21, 1764. His publications were: 

1. A Sermon preached at the opening of the General Assembly, Edinburgh, 
1735, 8 vo. 







REV. JOHN GAWDIE 
Principal Edinburgh University. 



THE GAIVDIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 153 

2. Propagation of the Gospel and the blessed effects thereof, Edinburgh, 
1735, 8 vo. 

3. Salvation of Souls the desire of every faithful minister. Edinburgh, 1736, 
8 vo. 

He was appointed Chaplain-in-Ordinary to His Majesty 1735 by King George 
II. 1735 and deprived in June, 1744. 

CHILDREN OF JOHN OA'WDIE AND JEAN (DEAS) GAWDIE. 
BORN IN EAKIiSTON, SCOTLAND. 

1. 1707 July 27, John Gowdie, son to Mr. John Gowdie, minister, was born. 

2. 1709 July 21, Alexander Gowdie, son to Mr. John Gowdie, minister, was 
born. 

3. 1711 January 21, Helen Gowdie, daughter to the Reverend Mr. John 
Gowdie, minister, was born. 

4. 1713 June 16, Agnes Gowdie, daughter to Rev. John Gowdie, minister 
of the gospel, was born. 

5. 1715 Sept. 18, James Gowdie, son to the Reverend Mr, John Gowdie, minister 
of the gospel, was born. 

6. 1717 May 19, Elizabeth Gowdie, daughter to Revd. Mr. John Gowdie, 
minister, was born. 

7. 1718 August 3, Jean Gowdie, daughter to Mr. John Gowdie, minister, 
was born. 

Major General Francis Gawdie of the Honorable East India Company's service 
was a grandson of Rev. John Gawdie and a son of either James or Archibald Gawdie. 
His son, Major John Gawdie of the 7th Dragoon Guards, who died about the middle 
of last century, at his property of Prior Bank, Melrose, Scotland, is supposed to 
have been the last of this family. 

1730. Rev. John Gawdie, son of the preceding, licensed by the Presbytery 
Oct. 23, 1728; presented by King George II. in August and ordained Oct. 15th, 
1730. He got a church built in 1736, and died in London, June 6, 1777, in his 
70th year and the 47th of his ministry. He had married Katherine Scott, who 
died Feb. 5, 1780, by whom he had a son, John Gawdie, licensed to preach by the 
Presbytery Aug, 6, 1760, 

It is remarkable that these John Gawdies representing three generations, 
father, son and grandson, all preached in the church at Earlston on one Lord's 
Day; and before twelve months had passed away, both the elder and the younger 
had been carried to their graves. It is doubtful if another such case could be 
found in the history of the ministry, 

drabuates ^bmburglj l^nitrersitiJ, Srotlanb. 

1660 Robert Gaudie. 

1668 John Gaudie, 

1675 John Gaudie, 

1696 John Gaudie, 

1697 John Gaudie, 

1733 John Goudie. Feb. 16th, Prof. Divinity, 
1754 John Goudie, Feb. 6, Principal University. 
1870 Henry Goudie, grad. A.B., LL.B., 1871. 



154 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

|0ljn CDOubic of Ralston, Scothtntr. 

John Goudie or Goldie, was born at Craij^mill in the parish of Galston, 
Ayrshire, Scotland, in 1717, on the premises where his forefathers had been millers 
for more than four hundred years. He had little or no education in the schools, 
but after his mother had taught him to read he soon learned to write, and early dis- 
played much taste for mechanics. Before he was fifteen he constructed a miniature 
mill, which would grind a boll of pease in the day. He then began business as a 
cabinet-maker at Kilmarnock where he made a beautifully engraved clock-case of 
mahogany, which was purchased by the Duke of Hamilton, and was placed in the 
Hamilton Palace. He soon made enough money to buy a large wine and spirit 
shop in the same town, where he carried on a thriving trade. He eagerly studied 
Euclid and Astronomy at the same time, and learned to calculate mentally in a sur- 
prisingly short time, the most difficult arithmetical problems; but his views 
grew moderate and he became almost a deist. He took part in the theological 
discussions between the adherents of "the new and auld licht". Burns wrote an 
epistle to him which begins — 

"O Goudie, terror of the Whigs, 
Dread of the black coats and reverend wigs" 

and tells that enthusiasm and orthodoxy are now at their last gasp, adding — 

" 'Tis you and Taylor are the chief, 
Who are to blame for this mischief". 

While condemned by the orthodoxy, Goudie made many friends in consequence 
of his sterling honesty and good sense. He was on intimate terms with most of the 
clergymen in the district, and would often argue with them. When the poet Burns 
was about to emigrate to the West Indies, Goudie, to whom he had read some 
poems in manuscript, encouraged him to stay in his native land, and introduced 
him to several friends, who, with Goudie, became surety to Wilson for the printing 
of the first volume of his poems (1786). Burns was an almost daily visitor at 
Goudie 's house, where he corrected the proof-sheets and wrote many of his letters. 
After this he engaged in quite extensive coal speculations, by which he lost heavily, 
and was cheated by his partner. He practically set on foot a scheme for connecting 
Kilmarnock with Troon by canal, and even made a survey of the line; but the 
expense proved insuperable. Late in life he became abstracted in manner, and 
was known as the "Philosopher". In the year 1809 he took cold by sleeping in a 
damp bed in Glasgow, and died three weeks afterwards at the age of 92, upholding his 
own opinion and retaining his faculties to the last. He left many manuscripts and 
letters from Burns, Lord Kames and other celebrated men; but they were unfor- 
timately lost, or destroyed, during his son's absence at sea. Sillar and TurnbuU 
followed Burns in writing poems on him. 

But, for one incident of vast significance in literary history the world is indebted 
to this John Goudie, namely, the publication of the first and now almost priceless 
edition of the Poems of Burns, Kilmarnock, 1786. The circumstances are thus 
related : 

"One day Goudie having occasion to be in the neighborhood of Mossgiel (Burns's 
farm), he called in passing; and in the course of his visit, Burns and he saUied out 
to the fields, sitting down behind a stook of corn — for it was the reaping season. 
The Poet read over one or t^vo of his manuscript poems. Goudie was highly de- 




JOHN GOUDIE. 



THE GAWD IE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 155 

lighted with the pieces, expressing his astonishment that he did not think of print- 
ing them. Burns at once unbosomed his circumstances — he was on the eve of 
setting out for the West Indies, and Wilson of Kilmarnock would not run the 
hazard of pubUcation. 'Weel, Robin,' said Goudie, 'I'll tell you what to do. 
Come you wa's down to Killie some day next week and tak' pot-luck wi' me. I 
hae twa or three guid friens that'll be able to set the press agoing.' Burns was 
of course true to his appointment; and after dinner they were joined in a bowl or 
two of toddy by the friends whom his entertainer had purposely invited. * * * 
In the course of the evening Burns read several of his pieces and so delighted 
were the company that they at once became security to Wilson for the printing 
of his work." 

Thus was launched the famous Kilmarnock first edition, from which spring 
the author's immortal fame. 

Goudie was a small but well formed man. His portrait, with a globe behind 
him, was painted by Whitehead, and is said to have been an admirable likeness; 
this may be seen engraved in the "Contemporaries of Burns". Goudie became 
famous for his "Essays on Various Important Subjects, Moral and Divine, being 
an attempt to distinguish True from False Religion, 1799". This was announced 
as being in three volumes, but it is not known that more than one was published. 
The style of all Goudie's work is prolific and laboured, but the Essays achieved 
great popularity as a reaction from the stern Calvinism then raging in the Scotch 
pulpits. On the appearance of the second edition of his "Essays" in 1785, Burns 
wrote a congratulatory epistle. He next wrote "The Gospel Recovered from its 
Captive State and restored to its original Purity". 6 volumes, London, 1784. 
These essays treat of prophecy, the Resurrection, dialogues between a Jesuit and 
a gentleman Christian on the gospel, and the like. His last work was "A Treatise 
upon the Evidence of a Deity", 1809. For the last forty years of his life he 
devoted himself to Astronomy, and prepared a work which was almost ready for 
the press at his death, in which he is said to have corrected some prevailing 
misapprehensions. 

(Goudie's Works: Gentlemen's Magazine Vol. Lxxix. part 1. Notes and Queries 
3d series, iii, 208, 336; Patterson's Contemporaries of Burns, 1840. Appendix 3; 
A. MacKay's History of Kilmarnock, 3d edition, 1864, pp. 165-168.) 



Ayrshire Branch. 

This family was an oflfshoot of the ancient stock so early settled at Cragie Mill 
on the Cessnock in the parish of Galston, Ayrshire, Scotland. It is said that 
Robert or James Goudie, or Goldie, was of Auchenleck, belonged to the family 
of Dunfries Goldies. This branch of the Goldie family is supposed to be very 
closely related to the Canadian family settled about Ayr, Guelph and Gait, 
Ontario. He married Mary Telfer and had several children, of whom the 
names following have reached us: 

1. Robert Goldie'- (1), settled in Jamaica in 1813. 

2. John Goldie" (1), who died in Ayr, Scotland, in 1839 or 1840, leaving some 
children who went to Canada. In a letter written by George Goldie to his brother 
James Goldie of Ochiltree Farm, Ayrshire, Scotland, and dated at Montreal, 



156 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

Canada, June 1833, he asks what William Goldie is going to do with John's children; 
whether he is going to send them or not. 

3. James Goldie* (1), married Mary Wright of Blachhill Farm, Ochiltree, Ayr- 
shire, Scotland, in 1807. Mary Wright his wife, died at Orchil tree April 30th, 1825, 
aged 54 years. Under the names are chiselled the words: 

" 'Blessed are the dead 
that die in the Lord '. 

This monument was erected by their only and affectionate daughter, 

MARY" 

There were eight children in this family. See forward for records. 

4. William Goldie* (1), died in Paisley, Scotland. 

5. George Goldie* (1), went to Canada and had issue three sons and a daughter, 
their names being John, William, George, Robert and Margaret. 

6. Marion Goldie* (1), who died unmarried. 



^Ijxrtr ^eiieratbii. 



CHILDREN OF JAMES AND MARY "WRIGHT GK>IiDIE. 

1. Robert Goldie' (2), eldest son of James* (1) and Mary (Wright) Goldie, born 
at Orchiltree, Ayrshire, Scotland, Nov. 20, 1807; removed to England where he 
married Mary Roach, or Roch, by whom he had issue two sons. He died March 
18, 1882, and was buried at Dorchester. 

I. Robert Goldie, died unmarried at Dorchester. 

II. James Goldie, married Susan and had three sons, Robert, William 

and Walter, all living. 

2. James Goldie' (2), second son of James' (1) and Mary (Wright) Goldie. born 
at Orchiltree, Ayrshire, Scotland, April 26, 1809. 

3. John Goldie' (2), third son of James* (1) and Mary (Wright) Goldie, born 
at Orchiltree, Ayrshire, Scotland, June 16, 1811; died Oct. 24, 1838. 

4. William Goldie' (2), fourth son of James* (1) and Mary (Wright) Goldie, 
born in Orchiltree, Ayrshire, Scotland, March 10, 1815; died May 10, 1906; 
went to England Feb. 20, 1836; married Jane Stone Paine in January, 1848, 
and resided at Sherborne Dorset, Bowden, Henstridge, Ashmore Farm, Shafts- 
bury. He died at Compton Abbas May 10, 1906. His wife died at Shaftsbury 
Dorset Dec. 13, 1901. These had six children. 

5. Mary Goldie' (1), only daughter of James* (1) and Mary (Wright) Goldie, 
born at Orchiltree, Ayrshire, Scotland, July 1, 1817; was married to Thomas 
Chapman and died June 9, 1865, without issue and was buried in Dorchester 
Cemetery, England. She erected the monument at the graves of her parents in 
the Orchiltree Cemetery. 

6. Alexander Goldie' (1), fifth son of James* (1) and Mary (Wright) Goldie, born 
in Orchiltree, Ayrshire, Scotland, Jan. 17, 1820; removed to England in March, 
1840; died May 5, 1870, and was buried in Dorchester Cemetery. 

7. James Goldie' (3), seventh son of James* (1) and Mary (Wright), born in 
Orchiltree, Ayrshire, Scotland, Sept. 19, 1835; died July 4, 1841. 



THE GAWD IE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 157 

t'ourtlj feneration. 

CHILDREN OF "WILLIAM AND JANE STONE PAINE GOLDIE. 

1. Mary Jane Goldie^ (2), eldest daughter of William' (2) and Jane (Paine) 
Goldie, born at Sherborne Dorset, Dec. 2, 1848; was married to George Kirk 
and died Jan. 11, 1913, without issue. 

2. Emily Goldie^ (1), second daughter of William' (2) and Jane (Paine) Goldie, 
born at Sherborne Dorset; was married to Albert Hill and had four children 
named Hilda, Rupert, Maurice, and Archibald. 

3. William Goldie'' (3), eldest son of William' (2) and Jane (Paine) Goldie, 
born Jan. 28, 1853; married Mary Ann Hooper, but has no children. 

4. Sarah Stone Goldie^ (1), third daughter of William' (2) and Jane (Paine) 
Goldie, born March 15, 1855; was married to Rev. A. M. Macphial, M.A., by 
whom four children, Margaret, Dorothy, Kenneth, and Allan. 

5. George Goldie^ (2), second son of William' (2) and Jane (Paine) Goldie, 
born Oct. 27, 1856, at Howden Faren Henstridge; married Fanny Burt of Devizes 
Wilts, June 18, 1879, and had issue ten children of whom hereafter. 

6. James John Goldie'' (4), third son of William' (2) and Jane (Paine) Goldie, 
born Oct. .19, 1858; married Agnes Edgar and had two sons, John Mervyn and 
Wallace. He went to Alliston, Ontario, Canada, in Dec. 1887. 

Jftftlj feneration. 

CHILDREN OF aEORG-E AND FANNY BTTRT GOLDIE. 

1. Oswald Goldie- (1), eldest son of George^ (2) and Fanny (Burt) Goldie, born 
April 13, 1880; married Alice Hare and has one son, Leonard George. He is now 
serving in the British army in the European war. 

2. Lillian Margaret Goldie^ (1), eldest daughter of George^ (2) and Fanny (Burt) 
Goldie, born May 30, 1881, now unmarried. 

3. Marcia Mary Goldie^ (1), second daughter of George^ (2) and Fanny (Burt) 
Goldie, born Sept. 28, 1882; unmarried. 

4. Elizabeth Jane Goldie^ (1), third daughter of George" (2) and Fanny (Burt) 
Goldie, born Sept. 19, 1884; married to Leonard Loch and has four children, 
Gladys. George, Ronald, and John. 

5. William-George Goldie^ (5), second son of George'' (2) and Fanny (Burt) 
Goldie, born May 10, 1886; married in Australia Dorothy Scammel and has two 
children, Beryl and John. 

6. John Clark Goldie* (3), third son of George* (2) and Fanny (Burt) Goldie, 
born May 11, 1888; is unmarried and now (1917) serving with the Dorset Yeomanry 
in Egypt. 

7. A. Bernard Goldie^ (1), fourth son of George'' (2) and Fanny (Burt) Goldie, 
born July 25, 1889; is unmarried and now serving with the Canadian Expedition- 
ary Force in the British army. Went to Canada May 1, 1912. While in Canada 
he visited Roswell Goldie at Guelph, Ontario, where he was received as a kinsman 
and his father wrote a letter of appreciation expressing his gratitude for the 
entertainment and care during his illness. His father wrote: "He is a good 
lad and I think has done his best to make his way in the world". 



158 THE GAIVDIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

8. Mildred Frances Goldie^ (1), fourth daughter of George* (2) and Fanny 
(Burt) Goldie, born April 23, 1884; unmarried. 

9. Ursula Fanny Goldie^ (1), fifth daughter of George* (2) and Fanny (Burt) 
Goldie, born Nov. 10, 1887; unmarried. 

10. Katharine Telfer Goldie^ (1), sixth daughter of George* (2) and Fanny 
(Burt) Goldie, born Nov. 2, 1900. Unmarried. 



The beginning of the authentic history of this branch of the ancient Ayrshire 
family must be at a tombstone in the old cemetery there, where stands an 
obelisk on four sides of which are inscriptions as follows: 

ROBERT GOUDIE 

Shoemaker 

Died 14th November, 1857, aged 86 years. 

WILLIAM GOUDIE 

of H. M. Stationery Office, London, 

Died 15th September, 1861, aged 28 years. 

ROBERT GOUDIE 

Writer 

Died 13th July, 1869, aged 72 years. 

JOHN GOUDIE 

Solicitor 

Died 13th May, 1868, aged 29 years. 

These inscriptions are supposed to represent the family of the present solicitor 
resident in Ayr, Scotland. This gentleman replying to an inquiry respecting 
his ancestors and family connections has written, "My father, Robert Goudie, 
was the Sheriff Clerk of this County at his death which occurred on 11th May 
1902, at the age of 70 years. His father, who was also named Robert Goudie, 
was a writer in Ayr and his forbears for three or four generations were I understand 
connected with the leather trade in Ayr. I am the eldest son of my father and 
practice here as a Solicitor. My brother, Mr. Paul Goudie, is a wine merchant 
here, and my youngest brother, Robert Goudie, who is an engineer, is connected 
with the firm of Messrs. Loudon Brothers Limited, Engineers, Glasgow and John- 
stone, of which he is one of the principals and a director. I have also a sister 
who resides here. I am sorry I cannot give you any further information or tell 
you where the family originally came from, but perhaps you may be able to throw 
some light on this. There are other families in Ayr of the name of Goudie, but 
are not related to my family". 

The following was received from his brother: 

Robert Goudie, Taudlehill, Milliken Park, Renfrewshire, business, Clyde 
Engineering, Johnstone, Born at Ayr, Scotland, 28th May 1876, son of Robert 

NOTE. — GSeorge (Joldie, writing from Manor Farm, Compton Abbar, Shaftsbury, England, in 1916, 
says: "Had my father been alive he would have been so pleased to have heard news of the family of 
his late uncles. He often spoke about them even in his old age. He had a wonderful memory and 
his intellect was quite clear up to the last. He came up from Ayrshire in 1S37. He died in his 93d 
year". 



THE GAWD IE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 159 

Goudie, Sheriff and Commissary Clerk of Ayrshire. In 1904 married Mary 
Sinclair Crawford, daughter of Archibald Crawford J. P., Pollockshields, Glas- 
gow. He is a Director of Loudon Brothers Limited, of Glasgow and London. 
Member of Institute of Mechanical Engineers, London. Member of Institution 
of Engineers and Shipbuilders in Scotland ; and Machine tool makers and Machin- 
ery exporters. His children as follows: 

I. Margaret Goudie, born September, 1906. 
II. Marion Goudie, born August, 1908; died May, 1910. 

The following deaths found in the Ayr Churchyard are supposed to have been 
members of this family: 

"In Memory of William Goudie, late Flesher, Ayr, erected by his son Robert 
Goudie, to whom this burying ground belongs. 

In the New Cemetery, Ayr, Scotland, the following was found: 

In Memory of 

ISABELLE TAYLOR 

wife of 

Robert Goudie 

Solicitor and Commissary Clerk of 

Ayrshire 

Who died 7th July 1879, aged 42 years. 

Also the above 

ROBERT GOUDIE 

Sherifif and Commissary Clerk 

of Ayrshire 

Who died 11 May, 1902, aged 70 years. 

Also their children 

Robert, Helen-Baird, Thomas-Grainger-Taylor, Isabella Taylor 

and William. 



presentation to glr. Jfoj^n (Bah'xt. 

(Excerpts from "Cumnock Express".) 

On Friday evening last between thirty and forty of the friends of Mr. John 
Goldie entertained him at supper in Mrs. Kerr's. Mr. Whiteford ably discharged 
the duties of the chair, and Mr. James Haddow those of croupier. During the 
evening a handsome writing desk was presented to Mr. Goldie. With song and 
sentiment a most enjoyable evening was spent. 

On Tuesday evening a number of farmers and friends of Mr. Goldie met in 
Thomas Kirkland's to make a suitable presentation to him on the occasion of his 
leaving his native parish, to enter on a lease of the farm of Buttknowe, Darly, 
Galloway. To the regret of all, the weight of four score years made it impossible 
for "The Miller" to be present. However, he was represented by his two sons 
and his daughter-in-law. After the usual preliminaries Mr. Stirling, who occupied 
the chair, made apology for the absence of Mr. Goldie, who himself had hoped 
to be present until the afternoon of that day, when he felt so shak>' that he could 
not face up. But (proceeded the chairman), he will be well represented in his 
sons here, so >'ou will just have my speech as if we had the miller with us. You 
must all have remarked in taking a survey of the world of nature how much the 



160 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

interest of the landscape is increased by the presence of the ruins of an ancient 
castle, a mouldering church, or an aged tree round which we've played in sportive 
youth in other days. Tf this be true of the dead world of nature, how much more 
so when we add the living element I What is this grove without the feathered song- 
sters? What is the green fields without the browsing cattle, the limping hare 
or the scudding rabbit? What the steep hillside without the sheep and lambs? Yes, 
gentlemen, what to any are the early scenes of early youth and boyhood — yea, 
the old home itself — if the kind and loving faces, the fond hearts, that always 
meet us with love and fervor, be gone forever, and their cheery voices heard only 
in the echoes of memory? Our worthy and much respected guest of this evening Is 
associated with one of the most pleasing and picturesque objects in any landscape, 
the Auld Meal Mill with its gaunt and varied buildings, its splashing wheel, its 
dam, and roaring water. These are things of which we never tire. But what 
is the mill without the miller, and what will our old mill be without Miller Goldie? 
The chairman continued in a lengthy speech to speak of his venerable guest, who, 
he said, in a sense has come down through three generations in the well earned 
respect of all by his kindly heart and peaceful habits, his honest-dealing and manly 
spirit having earned the character of a staunch man and true friend. It was 
therefore a great pleasure to him, to the gentlemen present, to the many subscribers 
this night to offer their acknowledgment of long friendship in this handsome arm- 
chair, which he hoped he would be long spared to enjoy, this cane-built American 
fishing rod, itself quite a novelty, these pebble-eyed glasses, meerschaum pipe, etc., 
these slippers to keep his feet comfortable and this sturdy handsome staff to keep 
him sicker whene'er he took walk abroad. In these he was to see the tokens of 
respect of many old neighbors, who fondly trusted that when he went to his new 
home that God would prosper him in all his ways. Mr. Somerville, Mansfield 
Mains, then in a neat little speech, presented Mrs. John Goldie with a beautiful 
silver tea-pot and cream jug to match. Both presents were feelingly acknowledged 
by Mr. Goldie Jr. 



Landlord of Burns's Cottage. 

In our Obituary this week will be found the death of a most extensively known 
individual — "Miller Goudie" — the landlord of Burns's Cottage. Few of the 
countless thousands who have visited that far-famed cradle of genius but must 
remember that ready welcome of him "who often walked in glory and joy" before 
the cottage door where Coila's Bard first saw the light. He had attained his 84th 
year, having been born in the parish of Riccarton, in 1758. His father and grand- 
father were both millers. When he first came to this district he occupied the Dutch 
Mill, where he resided till he removed to the Cottage, in which, in the good old 
times, he and his then youthful and pretty spouse Flora were wont to entertain 
parties of the leading "honest men of Ayr" in the true Meg Dodd's style, with 
"reaming swats that drank divinely" from the spirit unknown to the victim of Auld 
Mahoun. Though low in stature, "the Miller" was well knit, and possessed an 
excellent constitution. About the end of the autumn, however, his health began 
to decline, and he has ever since been falling off, till last Friday when he gently 
made his exit from the "land of Burns", but ages will yet pass away ere his memory 
shall be doomed to oblivion. "The Miller" has been landlord of the Cottage for 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 161 

more than forty years, and may be said to have been without exception the most 
ardent admirer of Burns that ever existed; for during that period he has pledged 
more bumpers to the memory of the Bard than any man living. Despite the temp- 
tations to which he was thus exposed, the Miller attained the above venerable 
age, and bore a hale and hearty appearance almost to the last. The writer was 
told by the deceased little more than a year ago, that, notwithstanding the many 
"random bouts o' fun and drinking" it had been his lot to engage in, his faculties 
were in full vigor and he had never felt the slightest touch of disease — not even 
a headache. He was fond of speaking of the Poet, and often told about the "Twa 
gills" they had together in the Dutch Mill, above the Old Bridge of Doon. From 
this single interview, however, he seemed to have retained but a slight recollection 
of the Poet, who, like many other men of genius, was gay or gloomy according 
as he was lionized or unappreciated — hence the Miller's opinion that he was 
eccentric, or, in his own homely phrase, " no that ritch in the head ". Many anecdotes 
might be related of the Miller, but his brief acquaintance with Burns, his inhabiting 
the Cottage where the Bard was born and his reverence for his memory, were the 
leading features in his long life. As connected with the Land of Burns, his name 
has been well bruited abroad, and his eccentricities have furnished a theme for many 
an eager tourist, as well as several eminent characters in the world of literature 
whose mention of him is a security that his name, associated with that of Burns, 
will be handed down to posterity. His death will cause a blank that can never 
be filled up in that classic and interesting locality of which he has been so long 
a denizen. The stranger who may visit the monument at the Cottage will look 
in vain for the cheering welcome of the upright, well-proportioned little man 
who had conversed with the great magician that, by the power of his mighty 
spell, has forever hallowed the place of his birth. The Cottage must forever 
remain the birth-place of the Poet — AUoway's 'auld haunted kirk' may withstand 
the storm of ages, but the jolly old Miller, with his respectful bow and his gleesome 
laugh, we shall never see more. "Alas, poor Yorick". His remains were interred 
in Alloway Kirkyard, followed by upwards of one hundred friends and relatives. 
His thrifty and respectable widow still occupies the Cottage, the business of which 
she has for so many years conducted with so much credit to herself and satisfaction 
of the public. 

— From the Ayr Advertiser, Thursday, July 7, 1842. 



%\t fate SlilUr #0ubu. 

By the death of the late Miller Goudie one of the links which bound the in- 
habitants of this place to the past has been severed. Although not a native of 
New Cumnock he spent fully seventy years of his life among us, and he had there- 
fore become closely identified and associated with the every-day life of the town 
and parish. The Miller was come of milling stock, his father being miller in the 
Ayr Mills, and his grandfather — the crony of Burns — being lessee of the Dutch 
Mills at Alloway Brig. When Mr. Goudie first came here he was ten years of age, 
and when quite a young man he took up the work of "the Auld Mill". Since 
that time until about two and a half years ago, when he went to live with his son 
near Dairy in Galloway, he successfully carried on the business. Before leaving 
he was made the recipient of many valuable presents from his New Cumnock 
friends, by all of whom he was held in high esteem. He was a stout Conservative 



162 THE GAWDIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

in his lifetime, even when his landlord was a Liberal. "The Miller", as he was 
affectionately called, was of a genial disposition and a lover of good company. 
He was often heard to remark that he did not know whether his "Auld Mill" or 
himself would be done first, and it was a coincidence that on the day of his burial 
the Mill should be destroyed. He was pre-deceased by his wife five years ago. 

Miller John Goudic of the Burns Cottage fame went there from the " Dutch Mills" 
near the Burns Monument about one mile from the Cottage in 1821-2. His rel- 
atives entered on a lease of the "Ayr Mill" on the river Ayr and in the Burgh 
of Ayr, which is still working as in their time; this was gifted to the town of 
Ayr by Queen Mary of Scots, and the "Taxmans" name, that is, the Lease-holder, 
was Thomas Goudie Jr. and his father was cautioner for him. Finding the mill 
was not paying they gave it up and went up to New Cumnock Mill which is the 
one that was burned down on the day of the funeral of the old man, being the father 
of Mr. John Goudie now of Balagan, Thornhill, Dumfrieshire, who was born at 
New Cumnock about 70 years ago. 

John Goudie of Balagan, Thornhill, Scotland, writes to correct a statement in 
the Ayr Advertiser: "My great-grandfather Thomas Goudie left Ayr Mills about 
1820-22 and it was then left to Andrew Smith who with his descendants have run 
it ever since, being now managed under the title of "Andrew Smith & Son, Grain 
Merchants". 

It was the Old Mill at New Cumnock driven by the Afton water which John 
Goudie and his father left in 1890. His grandfather, James Goudie, son of Thomas 
Goudie of Ayr Mills, took the lease of Old Mill, New Cumnock, about 1820. His son 
succeeded him and retained the mill till 1890, and on the day of his funeral two years 
and eight months afterwards: they passed the old Mill on the way to the cemetery 
when it had been burned to ashes, nothing but the bare walls standing. This was 
rebuilt and is now owned by the Marquis of Bute. 

This Goudie line runs thus. Thomas. James, Thomas, John the present man. 



John Goudie, best known as "Miller Goudie", an acquaintance of the Poet 
Burns and tenant of the cottage at Alloway Kirk, died in 1842, aged 84. 

"For forty years, it was his lot 
To share the Poet's humble cot. 
And sometimes laughin', sometimes sobbin'. 
Told his last interview wi' Robbin". 

At the date of Burns' epistle to "Goudie, terror of the Whiggs" the Essayist 
was 68 years old. Whether the Poet introduced himself by this means or had 
previously known him, it is impossible to tell; but certain it is that the Bard 
relied much on Goudie 's friendship and advice during his visits to Kilmarnock 
while his poems were in press. He survived till 1811. 



NOTE. — The milling business was not restricted however to the Gawdie families in Ayrshire and 
the surroimding neighborhoods, but was carried across seas and established in the United States and 
in Canada, where extensive plants were erected by persons bearing the name for the milling of flour 
and other grains ; and these mills in Ontario have grown from small beginnings to large business 
capacities and are recognized as some of the most extensive and best equipped plants in the Dominion. 
In the western states, also, descendants of the Ayrshire families have engaged in the flour-milling busi- 
ness and carried it on for several generations. It would seem from this brief account of the industrial 
activities of this branch of the race that wherever one of them planted his feet he left a track of flour 
and meal to mark his progress, and if there was ever such a possibility as having "meal in the blood" 
certainly the Goudie family could justly claim the distinction. 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 163 

|,Utortr of lUrtbs in %m, ^cotlimtr 

1665 — 1854. 

Preamble. If numbers are to be accepted as evidence the records of births, bap- 
tisms, marriages and deaths disclosed by the Parish Registers of Ayrshire supplement- 
ed by the inscriptions found on church-yard monuments certainly corroborate the 
published statement that this branch of the Gawdie family were settled on the Scot- 
tish Border as many as 400 years ago; and the assumption that the principal employ- 
ment of the male persuasion was that of Milling for 400 years strengthened by the 
numerous records in which they were mentioned as located by some Mill, as "John 
Goudie in Cornmill" and "Alexander Goudie in Bairdmill". The vital statistics 
relating to the Gawdies and Bruses indicate their contemporary residence in Ayr- 
shire and sustain the assumption of their kinship and time of settlement. 

1665. January 8th, Elizabeth Goudie, natural daughter of John and Jane 
(Rogers) Goudie. Baptised Jan. 29th, 1665. 

1665. February 1st, Alexander Goudie, lawful son of Alexander and Elizabeth 
(Ramsey) Goudie. Baptised Feb. 5th, 1665. 

1666. May 28th, Elizabeth Goudie, lawful daughter of Alexander and Eliza- 
beth (Ramsey) Goudie. Baptised April 3d? Father styled " burgess and shoemaker". 

1668. March 5th, John Goudie, lawful son of John Goudie, "maultmaker in 
Ayr" and Margaret Holmes his spouse. Baptised March 8th, 1668. 

1668. July 30th, Margaret Goudie, lawful daughter of John Goudie merchant 
burgess in Ayr and Jane Rogers his spouse. Baptised Aug. 9th, 1668. John 
Rogers grandfather of said child a witness. 

1668. Sept. 8th, Janet Goudie, lawful daughter of William Goudie shoemaker 
burgess in Ayr, and Isabella Pollock his spouse. Baptised Sept. 20th, 1668. 

1668. Sept. 1st, David Goudie, lawful son of John Goudie maultman in Ayr, 
and Margaret Holmes his spouse. Baptised Sept. 5th, 1668. 

1670. January. Agnes Goudie, daughter lawful to William Goudie, shoe- 
maker in Ayr and Isabel! Poak his spouse, born Friday the 21st day of January, 
1670, and baptized on Sunday the 30th day of that month. Witness. William 
Crawford, merchant, and Matthew Moor, carpenter, burgers within said burgh. 

1670. March. William Goudie, sone lawful to John Goudie, merchant and 
Jane Rodgers his spouse, born Friday the 4th day of March, 1670, and baptized 
on Sunday the 15th day of the month. Witnesses. John Rodgers grandfather, 
John Goudie maltman. 

1671. November. John Goudie, son lawful to the late John Goudie, merchant 
in Ayr, and Jane Rodgers his spouse, was born upon Wednesday the 1st day of 
November, 1671, and baptized upon Sunday the 5th day of that month. Wit- 
nesses, John Rodgers, grandfather to the child, and William Millar, carpenter 
in Ayr. 

1672. February. William Goudie, son lawful to William Goudie, shoemaker 
in Ayr and Isabell Poak his spouse, was born upon Saturday the 17th day of Feb- 
ruary', 1672, and baptized upon Sunday the 25th day of that month. Witnesses 
William Brisban, apothecarie, and William Crawford, merchant. 

1672. February. Adam Goudie, sone lawful to John Goudie, maultman in 
Ayr and Margaret Holmes his spouse, was born upon Thursday the last of Feb- 



164 T?IE GAWD IE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

ruary 1672, and baptised upon Sunda>' the 3d day of March. Witness, Robert 
Holms, Allan Gardner and Adam Holms. 

1673. November. Martha Goudie, daughter lawfull to John Goudie, malt- 
man and Margaret Holms his spouse, was born on Tuesday the 11 th day of Novem- 
ber, 1673, and baptised on Sunday the 16th day of that month. Witness, Adam 
Holms grandfather, and Robert Holms, uncle to the child. 

1675. January. James Goudie, sone lawfull to William Goudie, shoemaker in 
Ayr, and Isabell Poak his spouse was born on Tuesday the last day of November 
1674, and baptised on Sunday the 3d of January 1675. Witness, W^illiam Logad 
presenter of the child and John Goudie maltman, Matheus Mure. 

1679. February. Helen Goudie, daughter lawfull to John Goudie, miller in 
the parish of Maybole and Margaret McQuhinzie his spouse was born on Sunday, 
February 9, 1679 and baptised on Sunday the 17th. Witness. John Neil in Brid- 
gend and John Neil in Blairstown. 

1681. May. Sarah Goudie, daughter natural to John Goudie, merchant in 
Ayr and Janet Gordon was born on Tuesday May the 3d, 1681, and baptised on 
Sunday thereafter. Witness, John Cummine miller in Ayr, and John Rankine 
miller there. 

1681. June. John Goudie, sone lawfull to John Goudie, in Burrowfield and 
Isabell Miller was born on Friday, June 10, 1681, and baptised on Sunday there- 
after. Witness, Andrew Goudie, grandfather, and William Goudie, uncle of the 
child. 

1682. August. Janet Goudie, daughter lawfull to John Goudie, land laborer 
in Ayr and Isabell Miller his spouse was born on Wednesday August 23, 1682 
and baptised on Sunday next thereafter. Witness, William Gillispie and Andrew 
Goudie, grandfather of the child. 

1685. May. John Goudie. sone lawfull to William Goudie, maltman in Ayr 
and Agnes Kennedy his spouse was born on Tuesday May 26, 1685, and baptised 
on Sunday the last of that month. Witness, John Goudie, uncle of the child and 
Matthew Calhoun, goldsmith in Ayr. 

1685. September. Elizabeth Goudie, daughter lawfull to John Goudie, malt- 
man in Ayr, and Margaret Gardner, his spouse, was born on Saturday, September 

12, 1685, and baptised on Sunday the 28th of that month. Witness, Robert 

weaver in Ayr, and James Garner, taylor there. 

1685. September. William Goudie, sone lawfull to John Goudie, land laborer 
in Ayr and Isabell Miller his spouse was born on Thursday Sept. 17, 1685 and bap- 
tised on Sunday the 27th of that month. Witness, Andrew Goudie, godfather 
and John Goudie, uncle to the child. 

1687. February. John Goudie, sone lawfull to William Goudie. maltman in 
Ayr and Bessie Campbell his spouse was born on Wednesday Feb. 23, 1687, and 
baptised on Sunday the 27th of that month. Witness, Joseph Baird, post in Ayr 
and Robert Bain, merchant there. 

1688. January. Martha Goudie, daughter lawfull to John Goudie in Ayr 
and Margaret Gairner his spouse, born Jan. 15, 1688, and baptised 21st ditto 
by Mr. Alexander Stevenson. Witness, Alexander Gairner and Robert Campbell. 

1689. June. Isabell Goudie, daughter lawfull to William Goudie, maltman 
in Ayr, and Bessie Campbell his spouse, born June 23d, baptised 27th ditto by 
Mr. Eccles. Witness, John Gibson, couper. 



THE GAVVDIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 165 

1690. August. IsABELL GouDiE, lawful! daughter to John Goudie, land la- 
borer in Brestoune in Burroughfield, and Isabell Miller his spouse, was born on 
Friday August 15th, 1690, and baptised on Sabbath 17th of that month by Mr. 
William Eccles. Witness, Andrew Goudie, grandfather to the child, and William 
Goudie, uncle to the child. 

1691. September. Janet Goudie, daughter lawfull to William Goudie, malt- 
man in Ayr and Bessie Campbell vspouse, was born on Sabbath Sept. 27th, 1691, 
and baptised on Thursday thereafter by Mr. Eccles. Witness, Andrew Ramsay, 
baker in Ayr, and John Campbell, merchant there. 

1692. March. Janet Goudie, daughter lawfull to Andrew Goudie, maltman 
in Ayr, and Jane Morries his spouse, was born on Tuesday, March 22, 1692, and 
baptised on Sunday thereafter by Mr. Eccles. Witness, William Smith, smith 
in Ayr, and William Goudie, maltman there, brother to the presenter of the child. 

1692. April. John Gouldie, son to John Gouldie dyer in Ayr and Marion 
Campbell his spouse, was born on Tuesday April 19, 1692, and baptised on Sabbath 
thereafter by Mr. Eccles. Witnesses, John Gouldie, maltman, grandfather to 
and presenter of the child, and Robert Campbell younger, deacon of the glovers 
and uncle of the said child. 

1693. March. Margaret Goudie, daughter lawfull to David Goudie, malt- 
man in Ayr and Elizabeth Boyd his spouse, born on Wednesday the 29th day of 
March 1693, and baptised on Sunday the 2d day of April 1693 by Mr. William 
Eccles. Witnesses, Thomas McNeilly, merchant in Ayr, John Ferguson, the writer 
there and John Fothie, grandfather to the said child, and maltman there. 

1693. September. Janet Goudie, daughter lawfull to John Goudie, milner 
in Allowav milne and Agnes McLure, spouse, was born on Sabbath, Sept. 3d, 1693, 
and baptised on Sunday the 17th of the same month by Mr. William Eccles. Wit- 
nesses, Robert McConnell, schoolmaster in AUoway, and John Neil, in Nether- 
toune in Alloway. 

1693. September. William Goudie, sone lawfull to William Goudie, malt- 
man in Ayr and Betsey Campbell spouse, was born on Sunday Sept. 17, 1693, 
and baptised on Sunday thereafter by Mr. Eccles. Witnesses, John Gibson 
present deacon of the coupers in .Ayr, and Robert Campbell elder glover there. 

1693. November. Robert Goudie, son lawfull to John Goudie, dyster in 
Ayr and Marion Campbell his spouse, was born on Thursday the last day of Novem- 
ber 1693, and baptised on Sabbath 10th day of December 1693, by Mr. William 
Hunter. Witnesses, John Goudie, maltman in Ayr, and grandfather to the child 
and James Gairner, taylor there. 

1694. August. John Goudie, sone lawfull to David Goudie, maltman in Ayr 
and Elizabeth Boj'd his spouse, was born on Monday the 6th of August 1694, 
and baptised on Sabbath thereafter by Mr. Patrick Liston. Witnesses, William 
Boyd maltman in Ayr, and Robert Holms, weaver there, granduncles to the child. 

1694. August. John Goudie, son lawfull to John Goudie, land laborer in 
the burnfoot in the parish of Maybole and Margaret McLure his spouse, was born 
Tuesday, August 30, 1694, and baptised 9th Sept. 1694 by Mr. Patrick Liston. 
Witnesses, Thomas McLure, in Greenan milne, and John Small in the holmes of 
Greenan. 

1695. May. Thomas Goudie, son lawfull to John Goudie, milner in Alloway 
milne and Manse McLure his spouse was born on Thursday, May 11,1695 and bap- 
tised on the 19th of the same month by Mr. Patrick Liston. Witness, Robert 



166 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

McConnell schoolmaster in Alloway, uncle to the child and William Goudie in 
Alloway. 

1696. March. David Goudie, son lawfull to John Goudie, dyester in Aire, and 
Marion Campbell his spouse, was born on Monday March 30, 1696, and baptised 
on Sunday thereafter by Mr. John Hunter. Witness, John Swan, dyer in Ayr, 
and David Goudie, maltman there, uncle to the child. 

1696. April. William Goudie, son lawfull to David Goudie, maltman in 
Aire, and Elizabeth Boyd his spouse, was born on Monday, April 6, 1696, and 
baptised on Sunday, thereafter, by Mr. Patrick Liston. Witnesses, William Boyd 
and Robert Ker, land laborer in Townhead, uncles to the child. 

1696. November. Andrew Goudie, son lawful to William Goudie, mault- 
man in Ayr, and Bessie Campbell his spouse, was born on Monday November 
2, 1696 and baptised on Sunday thereafter by Mr. John Hunter. Witness, Andrew 
Ingliss, merchant in Ayr, and John Gibson present conveener there. 

1697. July. John Goudie, son lawful to John Goudie, miller in .Alloway 
millne and Agnes McClure his spouse, was born on Tuesday July 6, 1697, and was 
baptised on Thursday July 15, 1697 by Mr. John Hunter. Witnesses, Robert 
McConnell schoolmaster in Alloway and Thomas McLure miller in Greenan mill, 
uncle to the child. 

1698. February. Isabell Goudie, daughter lawfull to William Goudie, shoe- 
maker in Aire and Janet Donald his spouse, was born on Tuesday, February 15. 
1698, and baptised on Sunday thereafter by Mr. Hunter. Witnesses, Joseph 
Rankine, milner in Aire, and Robert Campbell elder glover there. 

1698. October. David Goudie, son lawfull to David Goudie, maultman in 
Ayr and Elizabeth Boyd his spouse, was born on Saturday Oct. 22, 1698, baptised 
by Mr. John Hunter. Witnesses, Robert Holmes, weaver in Ayr, granduncle 
to the child, and George Goudie, comber there, uncle to the child. 

1699. April. Margaret Goudie, daughter to George Goudie, in Aire and 
Martha Barber his spouse, was born March 27, 1699, and baptised 2 April 1699, 
by Mr. John Hunter. Witnesses, David Goudie, maultman in Aire, uncle to the 
child, and John Barber, mason there, grandfather to the child. 

1699. May. Agnes Goudie, daughter lawfull to John Goudie, in Alloway 
mill and Agnes McClure his spouse, was born on Thursday May 11, 1699, and 
baptised on Sabbath May 21, 1699 by Mr. Patrick Liston. Witnesses, Robert 
McConnell schoolmaster in Alloway, and John Criechtoune in Walkmine of 
Alloway. 

1700. June. James Goudie, lawful son of John Goudie, milner in Alloway 
Milne and Agnes McClure his spouse, was born on Saturday June 8, 1700 and 
baptised on Thursday June 21, 1700 at Alloway Kirk by Mr. John Hunter. Wit- 
nesses, John Ferguson, skipper in Ayr, and John Crawford, merchant there. 

1700. December. William Goudie, son lawfull to William Goudie, present 
deacon to the Shoemakers in Ayr, and Janet Donald his spouse, was born Tuesday 
December 3, 1700, and baptised on the Sabbath thereafter by Mr. John Hunter. 
Witnesses, Joseph Rankine, milner in Ayr, and Robert Campbell elder glover there. 

1701. April. Robert Goudie, son lawfull to David Goudie, maultman in 
Ayr and Elizabeth Boyd his spouse, was born Tuesday April 29, 1701, and baptised 
on Sabbath thereafter by Mr. Hunter. Witnesses, David Ferguson, deacon of the 
weavers in Ayr, George and John Goudie, uncles of the child. 

1701. April. Elizabeth Goudie, daughter lawfull to George Goudie, wool 
comber in Ayr, and Martha Barber his spouse, was born Wednesday 30, 1701 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 167 

and baptised on Sabbath thereafter by Mr. Hunter. Witnesses, David Ferguson, 
late deacon of the weavers in Ayr, John and David Goudie there uncles to the child. 
1701. December. David Goudie, son lawfull to William Goudie, land laborer 
in Ayr and Bessy Campbell his spouse, was boin on Saturday December 6, 1701 
and baptised on Thursday thereafter by Mr. John Hunter. Witnesses, John 
Borland, late deacon of the hammermen of Ayr, and Robert Baird merchant there 

1701. June. Agnes Goudie, daughter lawfull to John Goudie in Alloway 
milne and Agnes McLure his spouse, was born on Monday June 8, 1702, and bap- 
tised on Tuesday June 23, 1702 at Alloway Kirk by Mr. Hunter. Witnesses, 
Thomas and James McLure, uncles to the child. 

1702. October. Janet Goudie, daughter lawfull to John Goudie, indweller 
in Ayr and Jean Hill his spouse, was born on Monday Oct. 19, 1702, and baptised 
on Sabbath, November first 1702, by Mr. Hunter. Witnesses, David Goudie, 
maltman in Ayr, and Thomas McCullie, glover there. 

1704. September. (Entered in 1706). Robert Gaudy son lawfull to John 
Gaudy in Alloway milne and Agnes McLure his spouse, was born on Sept. 15 
1704, and baptised on at Alloway Kirk by Mr. Hunter. Witnesses 

1705. January. Anna Goudie, daughter lawfull to John Goudie indweller in 
Ayr, and Jean Hill his spouse, was born on Friday January 26, 1705, and baptised 
on Sabbath February 4, 1705, by Mr. John Hunter. Witnesses, David Goudie 
capmaker in Ayr, and David Ramsay, late deacon of the shoemakers there. 

1705. February. Hugh Goudie, son lawfull to David Goudie, maultman in 
Ayr, and Elizabeth Boyd his spouse, was born on Wednesday February 14, 1705, 
and baptised on Sabbath February 25, 1705, by Mr. Hunter. Witnesses, John 
Goudie, dyer in Ayr, and William Boyd, land laborer there, uncles to the child. 

1705. April. John Gaudy, son lawfull to William Gaudy shoemaker in Ayr 
and Janet Donald his spouse, was born on Wednesday, April third 1705, and bap- 
tised on Sabbath April 15, 1705, by Mr. Vetch. Witnesses, George Brown, shoe- 
maker in Ayr, John Mcllvain, weaver there. 

1706. May. Margaret Gaudy, daughter lawfull to William Gaudy, mault- 
man in Ayr, and Bessie Campbell his spouse, was born on Friday May 17, 1706 
and baptised on Sabbath thereafter by Mr. Hunter. Witnesses, Adam Gibson, 
late deacon to the taylors and William Speir, shoemaker. 

1708. September. Mary Gaudy, daughter lawfull to John Gaudy officer in 
Ayr and Jean Hill his spouse, was born on Friday the 24th of September 1708 
and baptised on the third of October (Sabbath) next thereafter, by Mr. Andrew 
Fullerton, minister. Witnesses, Zachariah Crawford, taylor in Ayr, and James 
Boud, officer there. 

1712. January. Martha Gaudie, daughter lawfull to John Gaudie, officer in 
Ayr, and Jean Hill his spouse, born on Thursday 3d January, and baptised the 13th 
by Mr. John Hunter, minister. Witnesses, Robert Hemphill, dyster in Air, and 
Thomas McCullie, glover there. 

1712. March. George Gaudie, son lawfull to William Gaudie, land laborer 
in Ayr, and Marion Boyd his spouse, was born on Saturday the first of March 
1712, and baptised on the 9th by Mr. John Hunter. Witnesses, Robert Boyd 
grandfather, and Thomas Boyd, smith, uncle to the child. 

1713. July. Robert Gaudie, son lawfull to William Gaudie, land laborer in 
Air, and Marion Boyd his spouse, was born on Monday the 13th of July 1713, 
and baptised on Sabbath 26th of that month by Mr. John Hunter. Witnesses 



168 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

Robert Boyd, grandfather. Thomas Boyd, uncle to the child and Adam Reid, 
carier in Ayr. 

1713. November. Katherine Gaudie, daughter lawfull to James Gaudie, 
of Haughyate and Elizabeth Allan his spouse, born 12th Nov. 1713, and baptised 
22d of the same month by Mr. John Hunter. Witnesses, Samuel Moor of Park, 
late provost of Ayr, and Mungo Campbell, present bailie there. 

1715. March. Adam Gaudie, son lawfull to William Gaudie, land laborer in 
Ayr and Marion Boyd his spouse, born 1st March 1715, and baptised 13th of that 
month by Mr. John Hunter. Witnesses, Robert and Thomas Boyd, smith, uncles 
to the child and Adam Reid, carier in Ayr. 

1715. February. Anna Gaudie, daughter natural to Robert Gaudie, weaver 
in Ayr and Janet Brown now his spouse, born 26th February', and baptised 13th 
March 1715 by Mr. John Hunter. Witnesses, Andrew Brownes elder and younger, 
grandfather and uncle of the child. 

1715. June. Hugh Gaudie, son lawfull to John Gaudie, miller in Alloway 
mill and Agnes McLure his spouse, born 28th June 1715, and baptised at Aire 
17th July thereafter by Mr. Thomas Findley, minister at Prestoune. Witnesses, 
Robert Neill in Nethertoun of Alloway, and Thomas McLure of Greenan mill, 
uncle to the child. 

1717. March. Isabel Gaudie, daughter lawfull to Robert Gaudie, weaver in 
Ayr and Janet Brown his spouse, born 16th and bapt. 17th March, 1717 by Mr. 
John McDermeit minister. Witnesses, Andrew Brown, weaver in Ayr, grandfather 
and William Gaudie, weaver, uncle to the child. 

1717. June. John Gaudie, son lawful to William Gaudie, weaver in Air, and 
Jean Crombie his spouse, born 16th and baptised 23d June 1717 by Mr. John 
McDermeit minister. Witnesses, William Gaudie, sheriff officer, granduncle and 
Robert Gaudie, weaver, uncle to the child. 

1718. January. William Gaudie, son lawfull to Thomas Gaudie, miller of 
Air and Marion Hanna his wife, was born 13th and baptised 23 January 1718 by 
Mr. John McDermeit minister. Witnesses, John Potter, merchant in Air, and 
William Hanna of Gy 11 tree mill, grandfather to the child. 

1718. March. William Gaudie, son lawfull to Robert Gaudie, weaver in 
Air and Janet Brown his spouse, born 25th and baptised 30th March 1718 by Mr. 
John McDermeit, minister. Witnesses, Andrew Brown, weaver in Air, grandfather 
and William Gaudie, weaver there, uncle to the child. 

1718. March. Thomas G.audie, son lawfull to William Gaudie, land laborer 
in Air and Marion Boyl his spouse, bom 28th March, and baptised 6th April 1718 
by Mr. John Hamilton minister. Witnesses, Robert Boyle, carier, grandfather 
and Thomas Boyle, smith, uncle to the child. 

1720. January. Willl\m Gaudie, son lawfull to Miller in Air and Marion 
Hanna his spouse, born 3d and baptised the 14th January 1720, by Mr. John 
Hunter minister. Witnesses, John Potter, merchant in Air, and William Hanna in 
Gyltree mill, grandfather to the child. 

1723. May. J.anet Gaudie, daughter lawfull to Robert Gaudie, weaver in 
Ayr and Janet Brown his spouse, born 26th May 1723, and baptised by Mr. Hunter 
the same day. vVitnesses, Robert Murdock, and William Gaudie, weaver in Ayr. 

1723. June. Elizabeth Gaudie, daughter lawfull to John Gaudie, fiesher in 
Air and Margaret Bowman his spouse, born 15th and baptised 20th June 1723 
by Mr. John McDermeit. Witnesses, Robert and David Gaudie, uncles to the child. 



THE CAW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 169 

1724. February. Helen Gaudie, daughter lawfull to William Gaudie, coal- 
hewer in Ayr and Marion Bolle his spouse, born 20th February 1724, and baptised 
by Mr. John Hunter, Sabbath thereafter. Witnesses, Hugh Wallace and William 
Bolle, grandfather to the child. 

1726. January. Robert Goudie, son lawfull to Robert Goudie, weaver in 
Ayr and Janet Brown his spouse, born 3d January 1726, and baptised Sabbath 
thereafter by Mr. John Hunter. Witnesses, Robert Murdock, present deacon 
of the weavers in Ayr, and William Goudie, weaver there and uncle to the child. 

1726. February'. John Goudie, son lawfull to John Goudie, flesher in Ayr and 
Margaret Bowman his spouse, born 25th Feb. 1726. Baptism witnessed by David 
Goudie, and Robert Goudie, uncles to the child. 

1726. May. James Goudie, son lawfull to William Goudie and Marion Bolles 
his spouse, born 6th May 1726. Witnesses to the baptism, Robert Boyle, grand- 
father to the child, and James Boyle, granduncle. 

1727. September. Agnes Goudie, daughter lawfull to Robert Goudie, flesher 
in Ayr and Agnes McNeight his spouse, born 1st September 1727. Witnesses 
to baptism Sabbath thereafter by Mr. Andrew Rodgers, minister at Galston, 
Patrick McNeight of Barns, uncle to the child, and Thomas Boyd, land laborer. 

1727. September. Charles Goltdie, son lawfull to Thomas Goudie, taylor in 
Dykehead of Alloway and Kath. Craik his spouse, born 23d Sept. and bapt. 30th 
Sept. 1727. Witnesses, Robert Goudie, miller in Alloway mill, and John Galloway 
in Alloway. 

1727. October. Marion Goudie, daughter to William Goudie, indweller in 
Ayr and Marion Boyle his spouse, born the 13th and baptised the 29th October 
1727. Witnesses, John Andrews, merchant in Ayr, and John Speer, taylor and 
church officer. 

1728. July. Hugh Goudie, son lawfull to John Goudie, flesher in Ayr and 
Margaret Bowman his spouse, born 2d and baptised the 14th July 1728. Wit- 
nesses, Robert Goudie, weaver and David Goudie, flesher, uncle to the child. 

1728. August. David Goudie, son lawfull to Robert Goudie, weaver in Ayr, 
and Janet Brown his spouse, born 21st August 1728. Witnesses to baptism Robert 
Murdock late deacon to the weavers and William Goudie, weaver and uncle to the 
child. 

1728. December. Anna Goudie, daughter lawfull to Robert Goudie, flesher 
in Ayr and Agnes McNeight his spouse, born 12th Dec. 1728. Witnesses to the 
baptism, Patrick McNeight of Barns, uncle to the child, and John Goudie, flesher, 
uncle to the child. 

1729. June. Janet Goudie, daughter lawfull to Thomas Goudie, in Dyke- 
head, in Alloway, and Katherine Craig his spouse, born 11th baptised 19th June 

1729. Witnesses, James Neill, in Alloway, and John Tennant, smith at Bridge 
of Dune. 

1730. February. Janet Goudie, daughter lawfull to David Goudie, land 
laborer, in Ayr, and Janet Boyle his spouse, born 8th and baptised the 15th February 

1730. Witnesses, Hugh Boyle, uncle to the child, and John Douglass weaver. 
1730. March. Patrick Goudie, son lawfull to Robert Goudie, flesher in Ayr, 

and Agnes McNeight his spouse, born 19th March 1730, and baptised the same date. 
Witnesses, Patrick McNeight, and David Goudie, uncle to the child. 

1730. May. John Goudie, son lawfull to Robert Goudie, weaver in Ayr, and 
Janet Browne his spouse, born 23d and baptised 31st May, 1730. Witnesses, 
William Goudie, weaver and uncle to the child, and John Mitchell weaver. 



170 THE GAWD IE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

1730. November. Barbar.\ Goudie, daughter lawfull to James Goudie, in 
Knowhead, in the parish of Maybole, and Mary Oliver his spouse, was born 6th 
Nov. and baptised at Alloway 19th Nov. 1730. Witnesses, John Goudie, and 
Thomas Goudie, uncles to the child. 

1730. October. David Goudie, son lawfull to William Goudie, indweller in 
Ayr, and Marion Bell his spouse, born Oct. 15, 1730, and baptised 19th Nov. 1730. 
Witnesses, William Ronald, and John Speer Kirk, officer and taylor. 

1731. March. John Goudie, son lawfull to Thomas Goudie, in Dykehead, in 
Alloway and Katherine Craik his spouse, born 3d March and baptised 16th 1731. 
Witnesses, Robert Goudie, and Andrew Goudie, cousins to the child. 

1731. March. Elizabeth Goudie, lawfull daughter to Robert Goudie, flesher 
in Ayr, and Agnes McNeight his spouse, born 29th March 1731. Witnesses to 
the baptism, David Hamphie, flesher in Ayr, and Patrick McNeight of Barns, 
uncle to the child. 

1731. November. Andrew Goudie, lawfull son to Robert Goudie, weaver in 
Ayr, and Janet Brown his spouse, born 27th Nov. and baptised 5th Dec. 1731. 
Witnesses, William Goudie, uncle to the child, and Andrew McBernie officer. 

1732. April. James Goudie, son lawfull to John Goudie, in Park of St. Quivox 
parish and Agnes Lemont his spouse, born 25 th March and baptised 13th April 
1732. Witnesses, Hugh Stewart, smith at Bridgend of Ayr, and John Lemont, 
grandfather of the child. 

1732. May. Janet Goudie, daughter lawfull to James Goudie, in Bridgehouse 
and Mary Oliver his spouse, born 13th May 1732. Witnesses to baptism, John 
Lachland. and Thomas Goudie, uncle to the child. 

1732. October. Robert Goudie, son lawfull to Robert Goudie, flesher in Ayr 
and Agnes McNeight his spouse, born 5th Oct. 1732. Witnesses to baptism, 
Patrick McNeight, and John Goudie, uncles to the child. 

1733. February. Margaret Goudie, daughter lawfull to John Goudie, flesher 
in Ayr and Margaret Bowman, his spouse, was born 12th Feb. 1733. Witnesses 
to baptism, David and Robert Goudie, uncle to the child. 

1733. October. David Goudie, lawfull son to David Goudie, flesher in Ayr 
and Janet Boyle his spouse, born 15th and baptised 28th Oct. 1733. Witnesses, 
William and John Boyle, uncles to the child. 

1734. February. Patrick Goudie, lawfull son to Robert Goudie, flesher in 
Ayr and Agnes McNeight his spouse, born the 3d and baptised the 4th Feb. 1734. 
Witnessses, Patrick McNeight of Barns, uncle to the child, and John Goudie, 
uncle to the child. 

1734. April. Robert Goudie, son lawfull to James Goudie in Bridgehouse, 
and Mary Oliver his spouse, born 18th April, and bapt. 1st May 1734. Witnesses, 
John Meikle, elder baker in Ayr, and John Goudie, uncle to the child. 

1734. June. John Goudie, lawfull son to Andrew Goudie, millner in Alloway. 

1734. April. Robert Goudie, son lawfull to James Goudie, in Bridgehouse 
Mill, and Elizabeth Rodgers his spouse, born 21st and baptised 27th June 1734. 
Witnesses, Thomas Patterson, and Robert Goudie, uncles to the child. 

1734. July. Agnes Goudie, daughter lawfull to Robert Goudie, millner in 
Ayr and Agnes Dick his spouse, born 22d July 1734, and baptised same day at 
Gylltreehill by Mr. James Lawrie, minister at Kirkmichael. 

1735. January. William Goudie, lawfull son to John Goudie, shoemaker in 
Ayr and Jane Sars his spouse, born 6th and baptised 19th January 1735. Wit- 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 171 

nesses, William Goudie, late deacon of the shoemakers, grandfather to the child, 
and John Speer taylor in Ayr. 

1735. February. Elizabeth Goudie, lawfull daughter to Thomas Goudi^, 
deceased in Dykehead in Alloway, and Katherine Craig his spouse, born 8th and 
bapt. at Alloway 28th Feb. 1735. Presented by John Goudie in Mains of Green- 
and, uncle to the child. 

1735. November. William Goudie, lawfull son to James Goudie, in Bridge- 
house and Mary Oliver his spouse, born 18th Oct. and bapt. 6th Nov, 1735. Wit- 
nesses, John and Robert Goudie. 

1736. April. Martha Goudie, daughter lawfull to Andrew Goudie, millner 
at Alloway Mill and Elizabeth Rodgers his spouse, born 21st and baptised 29th 
April 1736. Witnesses, James Neill and Robert Rodgers, uncles to the child. 

1736. July. Robert Goudie, lawfull son to Robert Goudie, millner in Ayr 
Mill and Agnes Dick his spouse, born 8th July 1736. Witnesses to baptism, 
Andrew Goudie, miller in Alloway, uncle to the child, and David Campbell baker 
in Ayr. 

1736. October. Mary Goudie, daughter lawfull to John Goudie, shoemaker 
in Ayr and Jane Sars his spouse, born 7th Oct. 1736. Witnesses to baptism, John 
Speer, and John Love, taylors in Ayr. 

1737. January. Agnes Goudie, daughter lawfull to Robert Goudie, flesher in 
Ayr, and Agnes McNeight his spouse, was born 5th and baptised the 6th Jan. 
1737. Witnesses, Peter McNeight of Barns, uncle to the child, and William 
McNeight, uncle to the child. 

1738. April. Agnes Goudie, daughter lawftill to Andrew Goudie, millner at 
Alloway Mill and Elizabeth Rodgers his spouse, born 23d April 1738. The wit- 
nesses to the baptism, James Neill in Alloway, and Robert Goudie, millner in 
Ayr, uncles to the child. 

1738. May. John Goudie, lawfull son to John Goudie, shoemaker in Ayr 
and Jane Sawers his spouse, born 14th May, 1738. Witnesses, John Speer, taylor 
in Ayr, and Bruce Rodgers, town officer there. 

1738. August. Margaret Goudie daughter lawfull to Robert Goudie, mill- 
ner and Agnes Dick his spouse, born 27th of August 1738, and baptised same day. 
Witnesses, Robert McDermeit, writer in Ayr, William Dunlop, coppersmith, and 
Andrew Goudie, uncle to the child. 

1738. October. Robert Goudie, lawfull son to John Goudie, flesher in Ayr 
and Margaret Trotter his spouse, born 17th, baptised 22d Oct., 1738. Witnesses 
Robert Campbel, late deacon to the Taylors in Ayr, and William Boyd, present 
deacon of the Hammerman. 

1739. July, William Goudie, lawfull son to Robert Goudie, flesher in Ayr, 
and Agnes McNeight his spouse, born 26th June and baptised 1st July 1739. Wit- 
nesses, Patrick McNeight and William McNeight, uncles to the child. 

1739. July. William and Janet Goudie, children lawfull to George Goudie, 
land laborer in Ayr and Janet Goudie his spouse, were born 13th July 1739. Wit- 
nesses to their baptism, William Goudie, grandfather to the children, and Robert 
Burns malster. 

1739. July. Janet Goudie, daughter lawfull to John Goudie, shoemaker in 
Ayr and Jane Saars his spouse, born 21st July, 1739. Witnesses to baptism, 
Andrew Wood, workman in Ayr, and John Speer, taylor. 



172 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

1739. October. Agnes Goudie, daughter lawfull to Robert Goudie, millner 
in Ayr and Agnes Dick his spouse, born 10th and baptised 14th Oct. 1739. Wit- 
nesses, David Campbell baker in Ayr, and John Rob, there. 

1740. September. Robert Goudie, lawfull son to Andrew Goudie, millner 
in AUoway Mill and Elizabeth Rodgers his spouse, was born 23d and baptised 
at Alloway 25th Sept. 1740. Witnesses, James Neill and Robert Goudie, uncles 
to the child. 

1740. December. Robert Goudie. lawfull son to Robert Goudie, fiesher in 
Ayr and Agnes McNeight his spouse, born 7th Dec, 1740. Witnesses to baptism, 
Patrick McNeight of Barns, and William McNeight, uncles to the child. 

1741. February. Elizabeth Goudie, daughter lawfull to Robert Goudie, 
milner, and Agnes Dick his spouse, born 28th Feb., 1731, baptised 1st March 1741. 
Witnesses, Andrew Goudie, millner and Robert Dunlop, sailor, uncles to the child. 

1741. March. Janet Goudie, daughter lawfull to Adam Goudie, weaver, and 
Anna Goudie, his spouse, born 21st and baptised 22d March, 1741. Witnesses 
William Goudie, and Robert Goudie, grandfathers to the child. 

1741. May. Robert Goudie, lawfull son to George Goudie, land laborer in 
Ayr and Janet Goudie, his spouse, born 18th May 1741. Witnesses to baptism, 
W^illiam Goudie, grandfather, and Adam Goudie, weaver, uncle to the child. 

1741. November. Thomas Goudie, lawfull son to Thomas Goudie, soldier, 
and Janet Curry his spouse, born 22d October and baptised 1st Nov. 1741; the 
witnesses to the baptism, William Jameson, glassier, and William Wilson, mason, 
who also presented the child in the absence of the parent. 

1742. February. Margaret Goudie, daughter lawfull to John Goudie, flesher 
in Ayr and Margaret Trotter his spouse, was born 4th and baptised 14th February, 
1742. Witnesses, David and Robert Goudie, uncles to the child. 

1742. June. Elizabeth Goudie, daughter lawfull to Andrew Goudie, mill- 
ner in Alloway and Eliz. Rodgers his spouse, born 19th and baptised at Alloway 
24th June, 1742. Witnesses: James Neill in Alloway, and Robert Goudie, millner, 
uncles to the child. 

1743. February-. John Goudie, lawfull son to George Goudie, land laborer 
in Ayr, and Janet Goudie his spouse, born 27th Feb. and baptised 6th March 1743. 
W^itnesses, William Galloway, land laborer in Ayr, and William Goudie, land 
laborer there, grandfather to the child. 

1744. January Goudie, lawfull to Andrew Goudie, milner, in 

Alloway mill and Elizabeth Rodgers his spouse, was born and baptised 14th 

of said month 1744. Witnesses, Robert Goudie, milner and uncle to the child. 

1744. July. Katherine Goudie, lawfull daughter to William Goudie, cooper 
in Ayr, and Elizabeth Goudie his spouse, born 22d and baptised 26th July 1744. 
Witnesses, John Meikle, merchant in Ayr, and Robert Goudie, milner, and uncle 
to the child. 

1745. September. George Goudie lawful son to George Goudie landlaborer 
in Ayr and Janet Goudie his spouse, born 6th Sept. 1745. Witnesses to the bap- 
tism, Thomas and John Goudie, uncles to the child. 

1746. February. Agnes Goudie, lawful daughter to William Goudie, present 
deacon of the coopers in Ayr and Eliz. Goudie, his spouse, born 17th Feb. 1746. 
Witnesses to baptism, Thomas Dick, weaver and Andrew Goudie, uncle to the 
child. 

1746. December. McRae Goudie, lawfull daughter to Andrew Goudie. 
milner in Alloway mill and Elizabeth Rodgers his spouse, was born 8th and bap- 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 173 

tised 24th December, 1746. Witnesses, Robert Goudie, milner in Ayr, uncle to 
the child and Robert Dunlop, sailor there. 

1747. September. Thomas Goudie, lawfull son to George Goudie, land laborer 
in Ayr and Janet Goudie, his spouse, born 25th and baptised 30th Sept. 1747. 
Witnesses, William Galloway, and Thomas Goudie, uncle to the child. 

1748. June. Ebenezer Goudie, lawfull son to William Goudie, present dea- 
con of the coopers in Ayr and Eliz. Goudie his spouse, born 29th June, baptised 6th 
July 1748. Witnesses, Robert and Andrew Goudie, uncles to the child. 

1748. July. Joseph Goudie, lawfull son to Joseph Goudie, sailor in Ayr and 
Margaret Crawford, his spouse, born 9th and baptised 10th July 1748; presented 
by Robert Campbell, younger taylor in the absence of the parents. Witnesses, 
Patrick McNeight of Barns and William Goudie, deacon of the coopers in Ayr. 

1748. November. James Goudie, lawfull son to George Goudie, land laborer 
in Ayr and Janet Goudie his spouse, born 15th and baptised 24th Nov. 1748. 
Witnesses, Willam Galloway, land laborer there and Thomas Goudie, uncle to the 
child. 

1749. February. John Goudie, lawfull son to David Goudie, flesher in Ayr 
and Jane Stewart, his spouse, born 15th and baptised 19th Feb. 1749. Witnesses, 
John Goudie, grandfather to the child and Thomas Dick, weaver. 

1750. June. David Goudie, lawfull son to David Goudie, younger, flesher, 
and Jane Stewart his spouse, born 20th baptised 24th June 1759. Witnesses, 
David Goudie, elder, and John Goudie, flesher, grandfather to the child. 

1750. June. Agnes Goudie, lawfull daughter to Joseph Goudie, sailor, and 
Margaret Crawford, his spouse, was born 27th and baptised 28th June 1750. 
Witnesses, Robt. Campbell, taylor, and Thomas Dick, weaver. 

1751. April. Janet Goudie, lawfull daughter to Thomas Goudie, land laborer 
in Ayr, and Katherine Hanna, his spouse, born 29th April and baptised 5th May 

1751. Witnesses, George Goudie, uncle to the child, and John Boyle, land laborer 
in Ayr. 

1751. July. Elizabeth Goudie, lawful daughter to William Goudie, late 
deacon to the coopers and Elizabeth Goudie, his spouse, was born 12th and bap- 
tised 18th July 1751. Witnesses. Robert Goudie, milner in Ayr and Andrew 
Goudie, milner in Alloway, uncles to the child. 

1751. July. Janet Goudie, daughter to the said Andrew Goudie and Eliza- 
beth Rodgers, his spouse, born 12th and baptised at Alloway, 18th July 1751. 
Witnesses, James McNeill and Robert McConnell in Alloway. 

1751. September. George Goldie, lawfull son to George Goldie, land laborer 
and Janet Goldie his spouse, born 19th and baptised 26th Sept., 1751. Witnesses, 
Da. Goldie, flesher, and Thomas Goldie, land laborer. 

1752. June. Margaret Goldie, lawfull daughter to David Goldie flesher, 
and Jean Stewart his spouse, was born 12th June and baptised the 14th 1752. 
(No witnesses.) 

1752. November. Elizabeth Goldie, lawfull daughter to Joseph Goldie 
sailor and Margaret Crawford his spouse, bom 26th Nov. and baptised 3d Dec. 

1752. Witnesses, Robert and David Campbell. 

1753. October Goldie, lawfull to Andrew Goldie, miller and 

Elizabeth Rodgers his spouse, born 8th and baptised 13th Oct. 1753. Witnesses 
Robert Goldie, and Da. Campbell. 



174 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

1754. February'. Marion Goldie, daughter lawful! to Thomas Goldie, and 
Katherine Hannah his spouse, born 8th and baptised 18th Feb. 1754. 

1754. December. Ann Goldie, lawfull daughter to Joseph Goldie, sailor, 
and Margaret Crawford, his spouse, was born and baptised 29th Dec. 1754. 

1758. January. William Goldie, lawfull son to Joseph Goldie, sailor, and 
Margaret Crawford, his spouse, born 1st and baptised 6th January, 1758. Wit- 
nesses, Robert and David Campbell. 

1758. August. Janet Goldie, lawfull daughter to David Goldie younger, 
and Marj' McClure his spouse, was born 16th and baptised 20th Aug. 1758. 

1759. December. Thomas Goldie, lawfull son to Thomas Goldie and Kath- 
erine Hannah his spouse, was born 12th and baptised 19th Dec. 1759. 

1760. September. Agnes Goldie, lawfull daughter to David Goldie and Mary 
McClure his spouse, was born 29th Sept. and baptised 2d Oct. 1760. Witnesses, 
David Goldie elder and Da. Campbell. 

1762. February. Janet Goldie, lawfull daughter to Robert Goldie, shoe- 
maker, and Margaret Mcllman his spouse, born 13th and baptised 14th Feb. 1762. 

1762. April. James McClure Goldie, lawfull son to Thomas Goldie, carrier, 
and Katherine Hannah his spouse, was born 14th and baptised 15th April, 1762. 

1762. Alexander Goldie, son of John Goldie and Mary Morrison, born 
13th and baptised 15th May 1762. 

1763. March. Mary Goldie, lawfull daughter to David Goldie, flesher in 
Ayr and Jean Stewart his spouse, was born the 4th and baptised 6th March, 1763. 

1763. July. Marion Goldie, lawfull daughter of Robert Goldie, shoemaker 
in Ayr and Margaret McMyne his spouse, was born the 12th and baptised 17th 
July 1763. 

1764. Mary Goldie, daughter of John Goldie and Mary Morrison, born 
13th and baptised 15th Aug. 1764. All of Wirculie. 

1765. March. George Goldie, lawfull son to Gowdie, shoemaker in Ayr 
and Elizabeth Key his spouse, was born 22nd and baptised 24th March 1765. 

1766. May. George Gowdie, lawfull son to John Gowdie, shoemaker in 
Ayr and Elis. Lush his spouse, was born 4th and baptised 8th May 1766. 

1767. James Goldie, son of John Goldie and Mary Morrison, born 12th and 
baptised 14th April 1767. 

1767. August. William Goldie, son lawfull to John Goldie, shoemaker, 
and Agnes Rankine his spouse, born 29th and baptised 30th August 1767. 

1768. Janet Goldie, lawfull daughter to John Goldie, land laborer and Janet 
Wylie his spouse, was born the 6th and baptised the 9th Oct. 1768. 

1769. October. James Goldie, lawfull son to John Goldie, shoemaker, and 
Eliz. Lusk his spouse, was born the 4th and baptised the 5th Aug. 1768. 

1769. May. Robert Goudie, lawfull son to William Goudie and Jean Gallo- 
way his spouse, born 12th and baptised 24th May 1769. 

1769. December. John Goudie, lawfull son to Robert Goudie, shoemaker and 
Elizabeth Key his spouse, born 22d and baptised 29th Dec. 1769. 

1770. June. Crawford Goldie, lawfull son to William Goldie, flesher and 
Jean McCormick his spouse, born 16th and baptised 17th June 1770. 

1770. August. George Goldie, lawfull son to William Goldie, carrier, and 
Janet Boyle his spouse, was born 26th and baptised 27th August, 1770. 

1770. November. John Goudie, lawfull son to John Goudie and Janet Wylie 
his spouse, born 12th and baptised 15th Nov. 1770. 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 175 

1771. February'. Janet Goudie, lawfull daughter of John Goudie, shoemaker 
in Ayr and Elisa. Lusk his spouse, was born 19th and baptised 20th Feb. 1771. 

1772. April. Robert Goudie, lawfull son of William Goudie, flesher, and 
Jean McCormick his spouse, was born 26th April and baptised 3d May, 1772. 

1772. August. Helen Goudie, lawfull daughter of Ebenezer Goudie and Jean 
McClure the mother, was born 27th Aug. and baptised 3d Sept. 1772. 

1773. March. William Goudie, lawfull son of William Goudie, carrier and 
Janet Boyle his spouse, was born and baptised 4th March 1773. 

1773. April. Andrew Goudie, lawfull son of Robert Goudie, shoemaker in 
Ayr and Elizabeth Kay his spouse, was born the 6th and baptised the 10th of 
April 1773. 

1773. July. Elizabeth Goudie, lawfull daughter of John Goudie, shoe- 
maker and Elizabeth Lusk his spouse, was born 1st and baptised 4th July 1773. 

1773. October. Hugh Goudie, lawfull son of James Goudie, shipcarpenter 
and Mary Parker his spouse, was born Sept. 29th and baptised 3d Oct. 1773. 

1774. June. William and Katherine Goldie, twin children of William 
Goldie, flesher and Jean McCormick his spouse, was born 4th of June 1774. 

1774. November. Robert Goudie, lawfull son of Andrew Goudie, weaver 
and Elizabeth Reid his spouse, born 7th and baptised the 10th Nov. 1774. 

1775. July. Mary Goudie, lawfull daughter of James Goudie, shipcarpen- 
ter and Mary Parker his spouse, born 6th and baptised 11th July, 1775. 

1775. September. John Goudie, lawfull son of John Goudie, shoemaker and 
Elizabeth Lusk his spouse, born and baptised 27th Sept. 1775. 

1775. October. John Goudie in Barrhill and Mary Morrison his spouse had 
Janet Goudie, born 30th Nov. and bapt. 7th Dec. 1769. 

John Goudie, born 20th and baptised 28th Aug. 1772. 
William Goudie, born and bapt. 20th Oct. 1775. 

1776. June. Robert Goudie, lawfull son of William Goudie, carrier, and 
Janet Boyle his spouse, born 23d June 1776 and baptised the same day. 

1776. August. Agnes Goudie, lawfull daughter of William Goudie and 
Jean McCormick his spouse, was born the 17th and baptised 19th Aug. 1776. 

1777. January. Margaret Goudie, lawfull daughter of Andrew Goudie, 
weaver, and Elizabeth Reid his spouse, born 18th and bapt. 19th Jan. 1777. 

1777. March. Margaret Goudie, lawfull daughter of John Goudie, town 
herd, and Janet Wilkie his spouse, born 6th and baptised 9th March, 1777. 

1778. January. Mary Goudie, lawfull daughter of John Goudie, shoemaker 
and Elizabeth Lusk his spouse, born 13th baptised 18th Jan. 1778. 

1778. June. George Goudie, lawfull son to James Goudie, ship carpenter, 
and Mary Parker his spouse, born 12th, baptised 17th June 1778. 

1780. February. James Goudie, shoemaker, and Elizabeth Lusk his spouse 
born 20th, and baptised 24th Feb. 1780. 

1780. June. Mary Goudie, lawfull daughter of Robert Goudie, shoemaker, 
and Elizabeth Reid his spouse, born the 9th, and baptised the 12th June 1780. 

1780. June. John Goudie, lawfull son of James Goudie, ship carpenter and 
Mary Parker his spouse, born and baptised 12th June, 1780. 

1781. May. Margaret Goudie, lawfull daughter of George Goudie, laborer, 
and Elizabeth Ross his spouse, born 21st and baptised 27th May, 1781. 

1782. May. Agnes Goudie Gray, lawfull daughter of John Gray, copper- 
smith and Katherine Goudie his spouse, born 18th, and baptised 19th May, 1782. 



176 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

1782. August. Robert Goudie, lawfull son of John Goudie, shoemaker, and 
Elizabeth Lusk his spouse, born the 1st, and baptised the 4th Aug. 1782. 

1782. November. Marg.\ret Goudie, lawfull daughter of James Goudie, 
ship carpenter, and Mary Parker his spouse, born the 6th, baptised 10th Nov. 1 782. 

1783. February. Katherine Goudie, lawfull daughter of Robert Goudie and 
Elizabeth Ross his spouse, born and baptised 3d Feb. 1783. 

1783. April. Elizabeth Goudie, lawfull daughter of Robert Goudie, and 
Elizabeth Key his spouse, born 2d, and baptised 6th April 1783. 

1784. February. Elizabeth Goudie, lawfull daughter of Joseph Goudie, 
mariner, and Margaret Parker his spouse, born the 4th and baptised 7th Feb. 1784. 

1784. August. James Goudie, lawfull son of Andrew Goudie, and Elizabeth 
Reid his spouse, born 12th and baptised 15th Aug. 1784. 

1784. August. Ebenezer Goudie Gray, lawfull son of John Gray, copper- 
smith in Ayr, and Katherine Goudie his spouse, born and baptised 31st Aug. 1784. 

1785. January. Robert Goudie, lawfull son of George Goudie, land laborer 
and Elizabeth Ross his spouse, born 14th, baptised 16th Jan. 1785. 

1786. July. John Goudie, natural son of John Goudie, shipmaster in Ayr 
and Mary Mitchell the mother, born 16th July, baptised 29th July 1786. 

1786. August. Robert Goudie, lawfull son of Thomas Goudie, weaver in 
Ayr, and Agnes Templeton his spouse, born and baptised 6th Aug. 1786. 

1787. March. James Goudie, lawfull son of James Goudie, ship carpenter 
in Ayr and Mary Parker his spouse, born 27th Feb. and baptised 1st March, 1787. 

1787. April. David Goudie, lawfull son of John Goudie, late flesher now 
shipmaster in Ayr, and Helen Campbell his spouse, born 21st and baptised 23d 
April, 1787. 

1787. April. Thomas Goudie, lawfull son of George Goudie, land laborer in 
Ayr, and Elizabeth Ross his spouse, born 7th, baptised the 8th April, 1787. 

1787. March. Janet Goudie, lawfull daughter of Andrew Goudie, weaver in 
Ayr, and Elizabeth Reid his spouse, born 19th and baptised 20th March, 1787. 

1788. Ocotber. Agnes Goudie, lawfull daughter of John Goudie, shipmaster, 
and Helen Campbell his spouse, born 21st and baptised 22d Oct. 1788. 

1789. March. Joseph Goudie, lawfull son of James Goudie, shipbuilder, 
and Mary Parker his spouse, born 29th and baptised 31st March, 1789. 

1790. March. Margaret and Elizabeth Goudie, twin daughters of George 
Goudie, carrier, and Elizabeth Ross his spouse, born 11th, baptised 12th March, 
1790. 

1790. December. David Goudie, lawfull son of John Goudie, shipmaster, 
and Helen Campbell his spouse, born 15th and baptised 17th Dec. 1790. 

1790. June. James Goudie, lawfull son of John Goudie, miller, and Flora 
Hastings his spouse, born 12th and baptised 16th June, 1789. 

1791. May. John Goudie, lawfull son of John Goudie, miller, and Flora 
Hastings his spouse, born and baptised 3d May 1791. 

1791. June. John Ferguson Goudie, lawfull son of James Goudie, wright, 
and Jean Bryen, born 17th baptised 18th June, 1791. 

1792. March. Robert Goudie, lawfull son of George Goudie, laborer in Ayr 
and Elizabeth Ross his spouse, born 9th and baptised 11th March, 1792. 

1792 September. James Goudie, natural son of Hugh Gowdie, shipcarpen- 
ter in Ayr and Isobel Hunter the mother, was born 3d and baptised 10th Sept. 1792. 

1793. October. Helen Gowdie, lawfull daughter of John Gowdie, sailor in 
Ayr, and Helen Campbell his spouse, born 4th and baptised 20th Oct. 1793. 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. \77 

1793. July. IsOBELL Gowdie, lawfull daughter of John Gowdie, miller in 
the Dutch Mill and Flora Hastings his spouse, born 20th and baptised 31st July 
1793. 

1793. October. Robert Go\vuie, lawfull son of Robert Gowdie, shoemaker 
in Ayr and Jacobina White his spouse, born and baptised 10th Oct. 1793. 

1794. February. Mary Gowdie, lawfull daughter of James Gowdie, ship- 
carpenter in Ayr and Mar>' Parker his spouse, born 6th and baptised 9th Feb. 1794. 

1795. March. John Gowdie, lawfull son of George Gowdie, shoemaker and 
precenter in Ayr and Mary Blackwood his spouse, born 24th and baptised 26th 
March 1795. 

1795. June. Silas Gowdie, lawfull son of John Gowdie in the Dutch Mill 
and Flora Hastings his spouse, born 5th and baptised 9th June 1795. 

1795. August. William Gowdie, lawfull son of George Gowdie, land laborer 
in Ayr and Elizabeth Ross his spouse, born 29th baptised 30th Aug. 1795. 

1795. November. Mary Gowdie, lawfull daughter of John Gowdie ship- 
master in Ayr and Helen Campbell his spouse, born and baptised 2d Nov. 1795. 

1796. February. James Gowdie, lawfull son of James Gowdie, shipmaster 
in Ayr and Mary Parker his spouse, born 17th and baptised 19th Feb. 1796. 

1796. July. Mary Gowdie, lawfull daughter of George Gowdie, shoemaker 
and precenter in Ayr and Mary Blackwood his spouse, born 4th, baptised 5th 
July 1796. 

1797. June. Mary Gowdie, lawfull daughter of John Gowdie in Dutch Mill 
and Flora Hastings his spouse, born 19th and baptised 24th June 1797. 

1797. July. Andrew Gowdie, lawfull son of John Gowdie, shipmaster in Ayr 
and Helen Campbell his spouse, born 14th and baptised 15th July, 1797. 

1797. September. Peter Goudie, lawfull son of George Gowdie, land laborer 
in Ayr and Elizabeth Ross his spouse, born 13th and baptised 17th Sept. 1797. 

1798. May. William Gowdie, lawfull son of George Gowdie, precenter in 
Ayr and Mary Blackwood his spouse, born 26th and baptised 27th May, 1798. 

1798. December. John Gowdie, lawfull son of John Gowdie, shipmaster in 
Ayr and Helen Campbell his spouse, was born 22d and baptised 23d Dec. 1798. 

1799. February. William Gowdie, lawfull son of Robert Gowdie, wright, in 
Ayr and Ann Love his spouse, born 21st and baptised 23d Feb. 1799. 

1799. September. John Goudie, lawfull son of George Gowdie, land laborer 
in Ayr and Elizabeth Ross his spouse, born 14th and baptised 15th Sept. 1799. 

1800. June. John Gowdie, lawfull son of George Gowdie, precenter in Ayr 
and Mar>' Blackwood his spouse, born 31st May, and baptised 1st June 1800. 

1800. December. Elizabeth Gowdie, lawfull daughter of Robert Gowdie, 
shoemaker in Ayr and Jacobina White his spouse. 

1800. December. Robert Gowdie, lawfull son of Robert Gowdie, wright in 
Ayr and Ann Love his spouse, born 30th and baptised 31st Dec. 1800. 

1801. July. Jean Gowdie, lawfull daughter of John Gowdie, shipmaster in 
Ayr and Helen Campbell his spouse, born 16th July and baptised Uth Oct. 1801. 

1802. June. George Gowdie, lawfull son of George Gowdie, precenter in Ayr 
and Mary Blackwood his spouse, born 13th June 1802. 

1802. September. Margaret Gowdie, lawfull daughter of John Gowdie, ship- 
master in Ayr and Helen Campbell his spouse, born 2d and baptised 3d Oct. 1802. 

1802. October. Marion Gowdie. lawfull daughter of Robert Gowdie, shoe- 
maker in Ayr and Jacobina White his spouse, born 2d and baptised 3d of Oct. 1802. 



178 THE GAIVDIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

1802. December. Agnes Gowdie, lawful! daughter of George Gowdie, land 
laborer in Avr and Elizabeth Ross his spouse, born 27th and baptised 31st Dec. 
1802. 

1803. April. William Gowdie, lawfull son of Robert Gowdie, late wright in 
Ayr and Ann Love his spouse, born and baptised 13th April 1803. 

1804. August. Jacobina Gowdie, lawfull daughter of Robert Gowdie, shoe- 
maker in Ayr and Jacobina White his spouse, born 2d and baptised 5th Aug. 1804. 

1804. August. Robert Gowdie, lawfull son of Francis Gowdie, serjeant in the 
Battery of Reserve and Elizabeth Spence his spouse, born 22d and baptised 24th 
Aug. 1804. 

1804. September. Robert Gowdie, lawfull son of George Gowdie, precen- 
ter in Ayr and Mary Blackwood his spouse, born 30th Sept. and bapt. 2d Oct. 
1804. 

1805. November. Janet Gowdie, lawfull daughter of Robert Gowdie, carter 
in Ayr and Ann Love his spouse, born and baptised 22d Nov. 1805. 

1806. April. Ann Gowdie, lawfull daughter of Robert Gowdie, late wright 
in Ayr and Ann Love his spouse, born 10th and baptised 11th April 1806. 

1807. December. Elizabeth Gowdie, lawfull daughter of George Gowdie, 
precenter in Ayr and Mar>' Blackwood his spouse, born the 10th, bapt. 12th Dec. 
1807. 

1807. February. Janet Gowdie, lawfull daughter of George Gowdie, now 
laborer in Ayr and Elizabeth Ross his spouse, born 23d and bapt. 27th Feb. 1807. 

1807. September. W'illiam Goudie, lawfull son of William Goudie, flesher 
in Ayr and Elizabeth McLie his spouse, born 24th and bapt. 27th Sept., 1807. 

1807. October. George Goudie, lawfull son of Robert Goudie, now laborer 
in Ayr and Ann Love his spouse, born 17th bapt. 19th Oct. 1807. 

1809. January. Elizabeth Goudie, lawfull daughter of Thomas Goudie, now 
in Greenock and Ann Lockhart his spouse, born 21st Dec. 1808 and baptised 
7th January, 1809. 

1810. June. W'ILLIAmina Goudie, lawfull daughter of Alexander Goudie, coal- 
cutter in this parish, and Jean Ballantine his spouse, born 13th and bapt. 21st 
June 1810. 

1810. Margaret Goldie, daughter of William and Catherine Goldie. (Blank 
in the parish record.) 

1810. October. Daniel Goldie, natural son of Daniel Frazer Goldie, book- 
binder in A}T and Janet McNeight the mother, was born 6th and baptised 20th 
Oct. 1810. 

1814. July. Jane Goudie. lawfull daughter of George Goudie, shoemaker in 
Ayr and Elizabeth Whann? born 2d and baptised 8th July 1810. 

1814. July. Agnes Goudie, lawfull daughter of Thomas Goudie, laborer in 
Ayr and Janet Milwrick, born 6th and baptised 10th July, 1814. 

1814. October. Thomas Goudie, lawfull son of Alexander Goudie, gentle- 
man's serv^ant and Agnes McQuistin his spouse, born 10th baptised 16th Oct., 1814. 

1816. September. Elizabeth Goudie, lawfull daughter of George Goudie, 
shoemaker, and Elizabeth Whann? born 25th, baptised 29th Sept. 1816. 

1817. November. Janet Goudie, lawfull daughter of James Goudie, miller 
and Mary Ross his spouse, born 4th and baptised 9th Nov. 1817. 

1818. May. Katherine Blain, lawfull daughter of John Goudie, miller, 
and Bethia Blain his spouse, was born 13th and baptised 17th May, 1818. 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 179 

1818. July. Jane Goudie, natural daughter of Peter Goudie, tinsmith, and 
Isobel Boyd the mother, born 1st July and bapt. 28th Dec, 1818. 

1819. March. Alexander Goudie, lawfull son of Alexander Goudie shoe- 
maker and Agnes McQuestin his spouse, born 14th March and bapt. 11th April, 
1819. 

1820. April. Thomas Goudie, lawfull son of John Goudie, miller, and Bethia 
McBlain his spouse, born 9th and bapt. 16th April 1820. 

1820. August. George Goudie, natural son of Archibald Goudie, miller, and 
Elizabeth Hutchinson the mother, born 17th Aug. and baptised 17th Sept., 1820. 

1820. August. Elizabeth Thompson Blair, natural daughter of Archibald 
Blair, weaver, and Agnes Goudie, the mother, born 24th Aug. and bapt. 30th 
Oct. 1820. 

1820. November. Elizabeth Goldie, lawfull daughter of John Goldie, gard* 
ner, and Margaret Smith his spouse, born 9th and bapt. 23d Nov. 1820. 

1821. January. Thomas Goldie, lawfull son of David Goldie, miller, and 
Janet McGill his spouse, born 3d Nov. 1821, bapt. 1st April 1822. 

1821. January. Archibald Goudie, lawfull son of James Goudie, miller, and 
Mary Ross his spouse, born 7th and bapt. 21st Jan., 1821. 

1821. April. Thomas Goudie, lawfull son of David Goudie, miller, and Janet 
McGill his spouse, born 3d Nov., 1821 and bapt. 1st April, 1822. 

1821. October. John Goldie, lawfull son of John Goldie, merchant, and Jane 
McCargow his spouse, born 30th Oct. and bapt, 18th Nov. 1821. 

1822. April. Robert Goudie, lawfull son of John Goudie, sawer, and Mar- 
garet Farquhar his spouse, born 15th April and baptised 28th April, 1822. 

1822. Ma}'. John Goudie, lawfull son of John Goudie, miller, and Bethia 
McBlain his spouse, born 7th April and bapt. 12th May, 1822. 

1823. January. Catherine Goudie, natural daughter of John Goudie, miller 
and Barbara Dodds the mother, born 26th January, 1823. 

1823. February. Adam Goldie, lawfull son of John Goldie of Courier Office 
and Jean McCargow, his spouse, born 25th Feb., baptised 2nd March, 1823. 

1823. July. John Gowdie, lawfull son of John Gowdie, miller, and Bethia 
McBlain, born 13th June and bapt. 13th July, 1823. 

1824. July. Robert Goudie, natural son of Robert Hunter, shoemaker, 
and Janet Goudie, the mother, born 2d July, 1824. 

1825. March. George Goudie, lawfull son of William Goudie, shoemaker, 
and Agnes Grant his spouse, born 31st Dec, 1824, bapt. 10th March, 1825. 

1825. September. Bethia Goudie, lawfull daughter of John Goudie, miller, 
and Bethia Blain his spouse, born 21st and bapt. 25th Sept. 1825. 

1827. April. Jane Goudie, lawfull daughter of John Goudie, gardner, and 
Margaret Smith his spouse, born 12th and bapt. 27th April, 1827. 

1827. July. John Goldie, lawful son of William Goldie, shoemaker, and 
Agnes Grant his spouse, born 24th and bapt. 29th July, 1827. 

1829. January. James Goudie, natural son of James Goudie, soldier, 26th 
Reg't. and Agnes McWhirter the mother, born Jan. and baptised 3d March, 1829. 

1829. December. Margaret Goudie, natural daughter of Robert Goudie 
and Elizabeth Anderson the mother, born 14th Dec. 1829 and bapt. 9th Jan. 1830. 



180 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

1830. April. Elizabeth Ross, lawfull daughter of William Goudie, and Agnes 
Grant his spouse, born Uth and baptised 18th April 1830. 

1831. January'. Margaret Marshall, natural daughter of Archibald Marshall, 
laborer, and Catherine Gouldie, the mother, born 29th Jan. and bapt. 28th Feb. 
1831. 

1831. July. Christina Anderson, natural daughter of Hugh Anderson and 
Margaret Goudie the mother, born 7th July, and bapt. 9th Dec. 1831. 

1831. December. Robert Goudie, lawfull son of Robert Goudie, writer in 
Ayr and Helen Baird his spouse, born 1st and bapt. 25th Dec, 1831. 

1832. March. Elizabeth Goudie, lawfull daughter of John Goudie, flesher 
and Jean Wylie his spouse, born 20th Feb., bapt. 4th March, 1832. 

1832. August. Agnes Goudie, lawfull daughter of William Goudie, shoe- 
maker, and Agnes Grant his spouse, born 17th Aug. and bapt. 4th Oct. 1832. 

1833. January. George Goudie, lawfull son of Alexander Goudie, innkeeper 
and Margaret Miller, his spouse, born 26th Jan., bapt. 10 Feb. 1833. 

1834. January. William Goudie, lawfull son of Robert Goudie, writer in 
Ayr and Helen Baird his spouse, born 31st Jan. 1834. 

1835. December. William Goudie, lawfull son of William Goudie, shoe- 
maker, and Agnes Grant his spouse, born 4th Dec. 1835. 

1836. March. Peter Peterson, lawfull son of Robert Goudie, writer in 
Ayr, and Helen Baird his spouse, born 27th Feb. and bapt. 20th March 1836. 

1838. November. Robert Goldie, lawfull son of William Goldie, tailor 
and Agnes Paton his spouse, born 6th and bapt. 18th Nov. 1838. 

1839. April. Thomas Goudie, lawfull son of William Goudie, shoemaker, 
and Agnes Grant his spouse, born 17th March and bapt. 28th April 1839. 

1841. February. William and Christina, lawfull twin children of William 
Goudie, tailor in Ayr, and Agnes Paton his spouse, born 10th and baptised 21st 
Feb. 1841. 

1842. October. Catherine Goudie, lawfull daughter of William Goudie, 
shoemaker in Ayr, and Agnes Grant his spouse, born 2d of Oct. and bapt. 11th 
of Dec. 1842. 

1843. December. John Goudie, lawfull son of David Goudie, ploughman 
and Mary Thompson his spouse, born 30th Dec. 1842, and bapt. 22 Jan. 1843. 

1844. December. John Goudie, lawfull son of Robert Goudie, writer in Ayr 
and Helen Baird his spouse, born 18th Aug. and bapt. 2d of Sept. 1838. Paul 
Goudie, lawfull son of the same parents, born 25th June and bapt. 2nd July, 1842. 

1846. April. Thomas Goudie, lawfull son of William Goudie, shoemaker 
in Ayr, and Agnes Grant his spouse, born 4th April and bapt. 3d May, 1846. 

1848. April. Margaret Goudie, lawfull daughter of John Goudie, flesher in 
Ayr, and Martha Little his spouse, born 2nd and bapt. 30th April, 1848. 

1851. November. James Goudie, lawfull son of William Goudie, post driver 
in Ayr, and Isabella Kennedy his spouse, born 29th Nov. and bapt. 8th Jan. 1852. 

1854. March. John Young, illegitimate son of John Young Jr., Vulcan 
Foundry, Newton, and Isabella Kerr Goudie, born at Ayr 13th of March 1854 
and baptised by Rev. Mr. Wilson, Episcopalian minister in Ayr. 



THE GAWD IE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 181 

Carriages in %m, Srotlantr. 

1690. December 10. George Mortoun, land laborer in Ayr, and Anna- 
bell GouDiE, daughter lawfull to Neil Goudie, maltman in Ayr, gave in 
their names to be proclaimed in order to marriage and consigned a piece 
of gold and were married 1st January 1691, by Mr. John Wallace, late 
minister at Largs. 

1691 October. John Goudie, dyer in Air, son lawfull to John Goudie, mault- 
maker in Air, and Marion Campbell, late servant to Joseph Bygate 
in Air, gave in their names to be proclaimed in order to marriage; they 
consigned 10 lit and were married 1st Dec, 1691, by Mr. Eccles. 

1692 May 21. David Goudie, son lawfull to John Goudie, maultman, and 
burgess in Air, and Elizabeth Boyd (at present sowitrix with John 
Ferguson younger writer in Air) gave in their names to be proclaimed 
in order to marriage, consigned a ginney, and were married at Air 16th 
June 1692 by Mr. Eccles. Got up consignment March 18, 1692. 

1693 Dec. 23. Joseph Rankine, one of the milners of Air, son lawfull to 
late Andrew Rankine, milner in Alloway milne, and Agnes Goudie, 

daughter lawfull to late Goudie, shoemaker in Air, gave in their 

names to be proclaimed in order to marriage, consigned a ginney, were 
married January 16, 1694, by Mr. Eccles. Got up his consignment 1 
Dec. 1694. 

1694 November 3. John Yeaman, widow pypemaker in Air, and Janet 
Goudie, indweller there, gave up their names to be proclaimed in order 
to their marriage, consigned four rings belonging to widow Smith elder, 
were married 19 Nov., 1694, by Mr. Patrick Listone. Got up consigna- 
tion 14 Aug., 1695. 

1697 April 3. William Goudie, shoemaker in Air, and Janet Donald at 
present servitrix to William Cochran there, gave up their names to be 
proclaimed in order to their marriage, consigned ten pounds, viz: fyve 
40 s. pieces. Were married on Tuesday April 20th 1697 by Mr. Patrick 
Liston, Feb. 19, 1698, got up consignation. 

1698 May 20. George Goudie, comber in the citydale, and Martha Barber 
daughter to John Barber, mason in Air, gave in their names to be pro- 
claimed in order to their marriage, consigned four rings belonging to 
Elizabeth Moor, spouse to David Young, merchant in Air. Were mar- 
ried 6th of June 1698, in the old church of Air by Mr. John Hunter. 
The said George got up the consignation on 10 March, 1699. 

1700 March 1. John Beatty, maultman in the citydale of Air gave in his 
name to be proclaimed with Betsy Goudie, at present servant to the 
Laird of Crawfordland in the parish of Kilmarnock, in order to mairiage. 
Consigned three rings value ten pounds. Were married on Thursday, 
April 4th 1700 in the old church of Ayr by Mr. John Hunter. Sept. M, 
1701, he got his consignation. 

1701 Dec. 5. John Goudie, chapman in the parish of Maybole, and Jean 
Hill indweller in Ayr in this parish, gave up their names to be proclaimed 
in order to their marriage. Consigned a Jacobus. Were married on 
Tuesday, Dec. 30, 1701, by Mr. Hunter. October second, he got up his 
consignation. 

1707 March 22. Robert Bo\-d, land laborer in Air, and Janet Goudie, 
relict John Yeoman, fruiterer there, gave in their names to be proclaimed 



182 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

in order to marriage and consigned a stoned ring and one enamelled 
and a broken ring, and were married 30th April thereafter. They got 
up their said consignation afterwards. 

Record blank from 13th Feb. 1708 to Aug. 1714. 

1714 August. William Wilson, servitor to Thomas Farrie in Mott and 
Isabel Goudie, daughter lawful to the deceased Jo. Goudie in Prestoun, 
gave in their names to be proclaimed in order to marriage; they consigned 
a bill of ten pounds, and after orderly proclamation were married. Their 
consignation was not forefalted. 

1716 Oct. 8. Robert Dunlof, sailor in Ayr, and Janet Goudie, daughter 
to John Goudie, in Alloway miln. gave in their names in order to marriage; 
consigned a bill of ten pounds and after orderly proclamation were mar- 
ried. . . .their consignation not forefaulted. 

1720 July 9. John Goudie, flesher in Ayr and Margaret Bowman in the 
parish of St. Quivox, gave in their names in order to marriage; they 
consigned a ten lit. and after orderly proclamation were married 26th 
July, 1720. Consignation not forefaulted. 

1722 April 21. James Goudie, of Haughyeat and Mrs. Janet Blair, daughter 
of the deceased Laird of Adamtown gave in their names to be proclaimed 
in order to marriage and after proclamation were married April 30th 
by Mr. McDermit. Consignation not forefaulted. 

1723 Dec. 12. Samuel Bettson, sailor in the board of John and Robert in 
Ayr and Agnes Goudie, daughter to the deceased John Goudie, milner 
in Alloway mill, gave in their names to be proclaimed in order to marriage; 
they consigned a bill of ten lit scots and after proclamation of banns 
they were married by Mr. John McDermit, 22d Dec, 1724. 

1725 Nov. 26. Robert Wilson, son to William Wilson, mason in Ayr, and 
Anna Goudie, daughter to John Goudie, town ofificer, gave in their names 
to be proclaimed in order to mairiage; they consigned a bill of ten lit 
scots, and after orderly proclamation of banns were married by Mr. 
John McDermit, Dec. 20, 1725. 

1726 Nov. 5. Robert Goudie, flesher, son to the deceased David Goudie 
maultman in Ayr, and Agnes McNeigiit, daughter to the deceased 
William McNeight, land laborer in Barns of Ayr, gave in their names 
to be proclaimed in order to marriage; they consigned a bill of ten lib 
scots and after orderly proclamation were married by Mr. John McDermit 
the 1st day of December, 1726. 

1729 Jan. 24. David Goudie, son to the deceased David Goudie, malster 
in Ayr and Janet Boyle, daughter to the deceased William Boyle land 
laborer there, gave up their names to be proclaimed in order to marriage; 
they consigned a bill of ten lib. scots; thereafter they were married by 
Mr. John McDermit, Feb. 12, 1729. 

1729 Oct. 31. Mathew Jack, hammerman in Ayr, and Mary Goudie, 
daughter to John Goudie, town officer, gave up their names to be pro- 
claimed in order to marriage; they consigned a bill of ten pounds scots 
and after orderly proclamation they were married by Mr. John McDermit 
Nov. 21, 1729. 

1730 April 11. Mr. John McDermit, minister of the gospel at Ayr, and 
AIargaret Goudie. daughter to the deceased James Goudie, of Haugh- 
yeat gave in their names to be proclaimed in order to marriage and after 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 183 

orderly proclamation were married at Dundonald by Mr. Hamilton 
Kennedy, minister there, April 27, 1730. 

1731 May 22. Adam Lees, baker, son to William Lees, St. Quivox parish 
and Agnes Goudie, daughter to the deceased John Goudie, milner in 
Alloway mill gave in their names to be proclaimed in order to marriage; 
they consigned a bill of ten pounds scots and after orderly proclamation 
were married 11 June, 1731, by Mr. John McDermit. 

1732 Sept. 16. Robert Goudie, milner in Ayr, and Agnes Dick, daughter 
to Robert Dick in Gylltreehill of Kirkmichael parish, gave in their names 
to be proclaimed in order to marriage; they consigned a bill of ten pounds 
scots, and after orderly proclamation were married at Gylltreehill by Mr. 
James Laurie, minister at Kirkmichael, 5th Oct. 1732. 

1733 June 15. John Goudie, son to William Goudie, shoemaker in Ayr and 
Jane Sawrs, present servitrix to John Speer, taylor there, gave in their 
names to be proclaimed in order to marriage; they consigned a bill of ten 
pounds scots and after orderly proclamation were married July 11, 1733 
by Mr. John McDermit. 

1733 June 29. Andrew Goudie, milner in Alloway mill, and Elizabeth 
Rodgers, daughter to the deceased John Rodgers in Nethertown of Allo- 
way, gave in their names to be proclaimed in order to marriage and con- 
signed a bill of ten pounds scots, and after orderly proclamation were 
married July 20th 1733 by Mr. John Hunter. 

1736 Feby 21. William Galloway, land laborer in Ayr, and Mary Goudie, 
indweller there gave in their names to be proclaimed in order to mar- 
riage; they consigned a bill of ten scots and after orderly proclamation, 
they were married March 10, 1736 by Mr. John Hunter. 

1736 Oct. 9. John Smith, soldier in General Whittains's Regiment of Foot 
and Margaret Goudie, daughter of the deceased John Goudie, milner 
in Kirkmichael parish, gave in their names to be proclaimed in order 
to marriage; and after orderly proclamation were married by Mr. John 
Hunter, 25th Oct. 1736. 

1737 May 27. John Goudie, flesher in Ayr and Margaret Trotter, at 
present residing in St. Quivox parish, gave in their names etc., and were 
married 16th June 1737 at St. Quivox by Mr. George Reid, minister 
there. 

1737 July 9. Mathew Jack younger, hammerman in Ayr and Martha 
Goudie, daughter to the deceased John Goudie, town officer, gave in 
their names etc., and were married July 27th 1737 by Mr. George Reid, 
minister at St. Quivox. 

1738 Sept. 29. George Goudie, lawful son to William Goudie, land laborer 
in Ayr, and Janet Goudie, servant to John Muir of Blairston, were 
married Oct. 8, 1738. 

1740 May 23. Adam Goudie, weaver in Ayr, and Ann Goudie, daughter 
to Robert Goudie, weaver in Ayr, gave in their names etc., and were 
married June 11, 1740. 

1741 Feby. 7. James Watson, staymaker in Ayr, and Margaret Goudie 
daughter to John Goudie, late deacon of the weavers in Glasgow, gave 
in their names and were married at Glasgow, 9th Feby., 1741. 



184 THE GAWD IE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

1742 March 11, Patrick McNeight of Barns and Marion Goudie, daughter 
to the deceased William Goudie in the parish of Kirkmichael, were mar- 
ried 26 of March, 1742. 

1743 August 26. William Goudie, cooper in Ayr and Elizabeth Goudie 
daughter to the deceased John Goudie in Alloway mill, gave in their names 
etc., and were married Sept. 16, 1743. 

1746 August 1. David Moody, son to the deceased Thomas Moody in Cair- 
lerg, and Christian Goudie, in the parish of Kirkoswald gave in their 
names etc. and were married at Maybole, 21 August, 1746. 

1747 Sept. 19. Joseph Goudie, sailor in Ayr and Margaret Crawford, daugh- 
ter to the deceased Hugh Crawford, late schoolmaster in Machhne, gave 
in their names etc., and were married 25th Sept., 1747, 

1747 Dec. 11. Thomas Goltjie and Katherine Hannay, both in Ayr, were 
married 30th Dec. 1747. 

1748 March 26. David Goudie, son to John Goudie, flesher in Ayr, and 
Jane Stewart, present servant to Serjeant Goudie, gave in their names 
. . . .and were married 13th April, 1748. 

1748 Oct. 4. James Sheerer, land laborer in Ayr, and Anna Goudie, daugh- 
ter to the deceased Robert Goudie, flesher in Ayr, gave in their names. . . . 
and were married 9th Nov. 1748. 

1749 June 3. Thomas Miller and Elizabeth Goudie were married June 
14, 1749. 

1749 Dec. 16. Thomas McClure, malster in Ayr, and Margaret Goudie, 

servant to John Hutter, chosen elder, merchant, were married 

Dec. 22, 1749. 

1750 June 2. Andrew Taylor, writer in Ayr, and Katherine Goudie, daugh- 
ter to the deceased James Goudie of Haughyeat were married 8th 

June, 1750, at Dalrymple. 

1751 Dec. 2, John Neill, son to the Robert Neill in Alloway, and Janet 
Goudie, daughter to David Goudie, Deacon of the Fleshers in Ayr 
were married. 

1751 June 26. D.avid Rodgers, son to James Rodgers, indweller in the New- 
town of Ayr, and Elizabeth Goudie, daughter to the deceased Robert 

Goudie, late Deacon of the Fleshers in Ayr were married 10th July 

1751. 

1753 June 15. James Templeton, son to John Templeton, land laborer in 
Ayr and Agnes Goldie, present servant to John Templeton, land laborer 
in Ayr and Agnes Goldie, present servant to Patrick McNaught of 
Barns, were married accordingly. 

1754 May 31. William, son to the late Alexander Lees in Gateside, and 
Janet Goldie, daughter to Robert Goldie, weaver in Ayr. .. .were. . 
married. 

1754 Nov, William Goldie, late Deacon of the weavers in Ayr and Margaret 
Patterson, servant to Master John Muir of Old Gadgrith, were married. 

1757 Nov. 19. David Goldie and Mary McClure, both in Ayr, were mar- 
ried 30th Nov. 1757. 

1760 Dec. 19. Thomas Jamieson, gardner, and Mary Goldie, daughter to 
James Goldie in Maybole. . . .were married. 

1760 Dec. 24. Robert Goldie and Margaret McIman were married in 
Ayr. 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 185 

1761 July 11. John Goldie, son to James Goldie, in Maybole parish and 
Mary Morrison in this parish were married. 

1762 Feb. 24. Joseph Goldie, sailor, and Margaret Parker, both inhabit- 
ants in Ayr, were married. 

1762 Dec. 10. John Goldie, shoemaker in Kirkmichael, and Agnes Rankine 
in Ayr, were married. 

1763 Dec. 9. Robert Goldie, shoemaker in Ayr, and Elizabeth Key from 
Cumnock, were married. 

1764 June 16. Robert Goldie, shoemaker in Ayr, and Ann Reid of the 
same, were married. 

1764 Dec. 19. John Goldie, land laborer in Ayr, and Janet Wylie, daughter 
to James Wylie, land laborer in Ayr, .... were married. 

1765 Dec. 7. John Goldie, son to George Goldie, land laborer in Ayr, and 
Elizabeth Lush of the same place, were married. 

1767 Oct. 17. John Wilson, shipmaster in Greenock, and Agnes Goldie 
in Ayr, were married. 

1768 Jan. 15. George Goldie, land laborer, and Barbara Blackwood in 
the parish of Coylton, were married. 

1768 Aug. 23. Adam Fergison, baker, and Janet Goldie, both in Ayr, 
married. 

1768 Nov. 3. William Goldie, farmer, and Jean Galloway, both in Ayr, 
married. 

1769 July 15. William Goldie, flesher in Ayr, and Jean McCormick, 
married. 

1769 Oct. 14. William Goldie, carrier, and Janet Boyle, both in Towhead 
of Ayr, were married. 

1770 Dec. 3. James Goldie, ship carpenter in Ayr, and Mary Parker, 
married. 

1772 April 24. Robert Campbell, late soldier, and Janet Goudie, both 

in Ayr, were married. 
1777 April 12. William McKinzie, cooper, and Margaret Goldie, both 

of the palish of Ayr, were married. 

1777 July 12. John Gray, coppersmith, and Katherine Goldie, both in 
Ayr, were married. 

1778 July 18. John Goudie, town herd, and Margaret McSkimming, in 
Quivox parish were married. 

1778 Aug. 23. George Goudie in Ayr and Jean Robb in the parish of St. 

Quivox, were married. 
1780 July 29. George Goudie, land laborer, and Elizabeth Ross, both in 

Ayr, were married. 

1783 July 12. Thomas Goudie in the parish of Carmichael and Jean McKil- 
LOP in Ayr, were married. 

1784 Dec. 25. John Goudie in this parish and Florence Hastings, in the 
parish of Caspharn, were married. 

1785 Jan. 22. Thomas Goudie and Agnes Templeton, both in Ayr, were 
married. 

1786 Oct. 6. William Wright, soldier in 12th Regt., and Mary Goldie, 
both in the parish of Ayr, were married. 

1786 Oct. 20. John Goudie, shipmaster in Ayr, and Helen Campbell, 
gave in their names and were married. 



186 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

1790 Aug. 14. James Goudie, wright, and Jean Bryon of Ayr, gave in their 
names and were married. 

1793 Feb. 6. Robert Goudie, shoemaker, and Jacobina White, both in Ayr, 
gave in their names and were married. 

1794 Sept. 27. George Goudie, shoemaker, and Mary Blackwood, both 
in Ayr, gave in their names and were married. 

1795 Jan. 31. Robert Boreland, sailor, and Janet Goudie, both of Ayr, 
gave in thier names and were married. 

1796 Nov. 26. James Shaw, weaver, and Jacobina Goudie, both in this 
parish, gave in their names and were married. 

1797 April 1. Robert Thompson, soldier, in 1st of Grant Regiment of Fenci- 
bles and Katherine Goudie gave in their names and were married. 

1800 Dec. 5. John Goudie Skinner and Margaret Whitside-Blacklock, 
both in Ayr, gave in their names and were married. 

1801 Oct. 24. James Ford, soldier in the 15th Regiment of Foot, and Jean 
Goudie in Ayr, gave in their names and were married. 

1804 April 20. John Campbell, tailor, and Elizabeth Goudie, both in Ayr, 

gave in their names and were married. 
1806 Sept. 6. Thomas Goudie, weaver, and Janet McCulloch, both in 

Ayr, gave in their names and were married. 
1808 Jan. 2. The Rev. James Mather of the Burgher Associate Synod, 

Maybole, and Agnes Goudie in Ayr, gave in thier names and were married. 
1808 Jan. 2. William Goudie, tinsmith in Ayr, and Elizabeth Gray in the 

Abby parish of Paisley, gave in their names and were married. 

1810 Feb. 23. John Symmington and Agnes Goudie, both in Ayr, gave in 
their names and were married. 

1811 March 9. James Murdock, mason, and Catherine Goudie, both in 
Ayr, gave in their names and were married. 

1811 June 1. Alexander Guthrie, merchant, and Helen Goudie, both in 

Ayr, gave in their names and were married. 
1813 Oct. 30. George Goudie, shoemaker, and Elizabeth McWharr, both 

in Ayr, gave in their names and were married. 

1813 Nov. 19. James Smith, sailor, and Elizabeth Goudie in Ayr, gave in 
their names and were married. 

1814 June 18. Daniel Frazer Goudie, bookbinder in Ayr, and Mary Niel- 
SON in Coylton, gave in their names and were married. 

1814 Dec. 2. Robert Goudie, weaver, and Janet Tinnock, both in Ayr, 
gave in their names and were married. 

1814 Dec. 9. William Goudie, farm servant, and Jean Kennedy, both in 
Ayr, gave in their names and were married. 

1815 June 3. Hugh Paterson, weaver in St. Quivox, and Agnes Goudie 
in Ayr, gave in their names and were married. 

1815 Nov. 11. John Goudie, gardner, and Margaret Smith, both in Ayr, 
gave in their names and were married. 

1816 Jan. 5. David Smith, carter, and Isabell Goudie, both in Ayr, gave 
in their names and were married. 

1816 Jan. 3. John Jack, bookbinder, and Agnes Goudie, both in Ayr, gave 
in their names and were married. 

1817 Dec. 6. Alexander Leckie, soldier in the Ayrshire Militia, and Mar- 
garet Goudie, both in Ayr, gave in their names and were married. 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 187 

1818 Nov. 28. James Goudie, carter, and Janet Thompson, both in this 
parish, gave in their names and were married 30th Nov. 

1820 Nov. 18. John Goudie, merchant in Ayr, and Jane McKerrow in 
Paisley, gave in their names and were married 20th curt. 

1821 Jan 13. John Goudie, sawerinOld Cumnock, and Margaret Farquher 
in Ayr, gave in their names and were married 15th curt. 

1822 Aug. 31. James Lockhart and Marion Goudie, both in Ayr, gave in 
their names and were married. 

1822 Oct. 26. David McEwen, grocer, and Margaret Goudie, both in Ayer, 
gave in their names and were married. 

1823 Feb. 22. Archibald Blair, weaver, and Agnes Goudie, both in this 
parish, gave in their names and were married. 

1824 Dec. 18. William Goudie and Agnes Grant, both in Ayr, gave in 
their names and were married. 

1825 Jan. 29. James Dunsmore, woolspinner, and Agnes Goudie, both in 
this parish, gave in their names and were married. 

1825 Dec. 16. Thomas Goudie in the parish of St. Quivox and Jean Roger 
in Ayr, gave in their names and were married. 

1826 Feb. 25. John Boyle and Mary Goudie, both in Ayr, gave in their 
names and were married. 

1827 Oct. 27. Robert Gray Hunter, shoemaker, and Janet Goudie, both 
in Ayr, gave in their names and were married. 

1829 Dec. 12. William Goudie in Ayr, and Janet McCoskrie in St. Qui- 
vox, gave in their names and were married. 

1830 Feb. 12, John Goudie, flesher in Ayr, and Jean Wyllie in Newton, 
gave in their names and were married. 

1830 Oct. 23. Robert Goudie, messenger, and Helen Baird in Newton, 
gave in their names and were married. 

1831 July 2. James McNab, spirit-dealer, and Margaret Goudie, both in 
Ayr, gave in their names and were married. 

1833 Dec. 13. Hugh McMichael in Cumnock and Mary Goudie in Ayr, 
gave in their names and were married. 

1834 Nov. 29. Alexander Templeton and Mary Goudie, daughter of 
John Goudie, Burns Cottage, both in this parish, gave in their names 
and were married. 

1835 Feb. 28. George Teney, miner, and Margaret Goudie, both in this 
parish, gave their names and were married. 

1835 July 4. John Campbell in the parish of Newton, and Agnes Goudie 
in Ayr, gave in their names and were married. 

1835 Aug 8. Robert McJanet in Ayr and Janet Goudie in St. Quivox, gave 
in their names and were married. 

1836 April 9. Thomas Anderson and Margaret Goudie, both in Ayr, gave 
in their names and were married. 

1836 Oct. 1. David Dick, farm serx-ant, and Lillias Goldie, both in Ayr, 
gave in their names and were married. 

1838 Aug. 3. William Goudie in the parish of Maybole and Margaret 
Brown, daughter of John Brown, horseshoer, in Ayr, gave in their names 
and were married. 

1839 May 24. William Turner, servant, and Martha Goudie, both in 
Ayr, gave in their names and were married. 



188 THE GAWD IE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

1839 July 6. Alexander Struthers in Slaphouse, and Flora Goudie, 
daughter of John Goudie, Burns Cottage, gave in their names and were 
married. 

1840 July 11. David Hastings, Sessionfield, and Lillias Goudie, daughter 
of John Goudie of Burns Cottage, gave in their names and were married. 

1841 Dec. 25. James Wyllie, sadler in this parish, and Grace Goudie in the 
parish of St. Quivox, gave in their names and were married. 

1842 Jan. 29. David Hill in this parish and Agnes Goudie in the parish of 
Kilwinning, gave in their names and were married. 

1842 June 4. David Goudie in this parish and Mary Thompson in the parish 

of Ochiltree, gave in their names and were married. 
1842 June 17. Thomas McCandish in Glasgow and Janet Goudie in this 

parish, gave in their names and were married. 
1842 June 17, John Bain, farmer. Old Toll, and Janet Goudie, both in this 

parish, gave in their names and were married. 

1842 William Hopeson, baker in this parish, and Agnes Goudie in the parish 
of Maybole, gave in their names and were married. 

1843 Dec. 16. Robert Goudie in the parish of St. Quivox, and Agnes Clark 
in this parish, gave in their names and were married. 

1844 Feb. 3. Patrick Harvey and Jean Goudie, both in this parish, gave 
in their names and were married. 

1846 April 4. Samuel Goudie, baker in this parish, and Jean Galbraith in 
the parish of Newton, gave in their names and were married. 

1846 April 25. Alexander Porter Goudie of Strathbane, Ireland, and 
Isabella Kinross in this parish, gave in their names and were married. 

1848 Nov. 26. William Nicholson in the parish of Mauchline, and Jane 
Goudie in this parish, gave in their names and were married. 

1850 Nov. 30. John Goudie and Emma Massa, both of this parish, gave 
in their names and were married. 

1851 Dec. 21. William Goudie and Isabella Kennedy, both in this parish, 
gave in their names and were married. 

1852 May 23. Hugh McKinnon in the parish of St. Quivox and Elizabeth 
Goudie in this parish, gave in their names and were married. 

1852 Sept. 19. John Goudie and Agnes McKinley, both in this parish, 
gave in their names and were married. 

1852 Dec. 19. David Caldwell and Agnes Goudie, both of this parish, 
gave in their names and were married. 

1853 July 3. Thomas Goudie and Margaret Carren, both in this parish, 
gave in their names and were married. 

1853 Sept. 25. John Goudie in this parish and Mary Smith in the parish 
of Newton, gave in their names and were married. 



g^atb of (Sautrbs irt %^x, <§totlantr. 

1767 Janet Goudie, spouse of George Goudie, land labourer, aged 54. 

Consumption. Jan. 15. 
1769 John Goudie, flesher, aged 74. Flux. March 27. 
1769 James Goudie, son of John Goudie, aged 1 year. Small pox. Aug. 18. 
1769 Janet Goudie, daughter of John Goudie, aged 1 year. Hives. Oct. 29. 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 189 

1770 Robert Goudie, son of Robert Goudie, shoemaker, 1 year and 1 month. 

Hives. March 20. 
1770 Margaret Goudie, spouse of Charles Murdock, aged 43. Childbed. 

Nov. 10. 

1770 Marion Goudie, spouse of Peter McKnight, Barns, aged 55 years. 
Dec. 20. 

1771 Margaret Goudie, aged 80. April 6. 

1771 Crawford Goudie, son of William Goudie, flesher, aged 1 year. Apr. 30. 

1772 George Goudie, son of William Goudie, aged 1 year, 3 mo. Fever. 
Jan. 1. 

1772 David Goudie, flesher, aged 74. Nov. 15. 

1773 John Goudie, shoemaker, aged 76. Palsy. July 16. 

1773 James Goudie, son of George Goudie, 1 year 4 mo. Teething. July 16. 

1774 Helen Goudie, aged 53 years. Oct. 26. 

1774 Robert Goudie, Kirk Officer, aged 70 years. Nov. 11. 

1775 Janet Goudie. relict of John Rowan, aged 85 years. Feb. 26. 

1775 William Goudie, son of William Goudie, flesher, aged 6 months. 
Fever. Sept. 30. 

1775 Robert Goudie, son of Andrew Goudie, weaver, aged 1 year. Smallpox. 
Dec. 14. 

1776 Margaret Goudie, daughter of James Goudie, aged 1 year 5 mo. Chin- 
cough. Dec. 8. 

1777 Agens Goudie, aged 74 years. March 16. 

1778 Mary Goudie, spouse of John Niel, sawer, aged 47 years. Feb. 4. 

1778 Janet Goudie, spouse of John Niel, sawer, aged 47 years. Waste. May 8. 

1779 William Goudie, flesher, aged 36. Fever. April 29. 

1779 Janet Goudie, natural daughter of aged 20. Wastering. July 27. 

1780 Margaret Goudie, daughter of Andrew Goudie, soldier, aged 3 years. 
Jan. 16. 

1780 James Goudie (poorhouse), aged 78 years. July 28. 

1781 Mary Goudie, relict of Matthew Jack, smith, age 73 years. Jan 9. 
1781 George Goudie, land labourer, aged 69 years. Frailty. March 20. 

1781 Agnes Goudie, spouse of William Ramsay, aged 70 years. Sept. 11. 

1782 Elizabeth Goudie, daughter of George Goudie, 7 years. Fever. May 26. 

1783 David Goudie, aged 63 years. Wasting. May 23. 
1783 Elizabeth Goudie, aged 72 years. Wasting. June 7. 

1783 Margaret Goudie, a child, 1 year 1 month. Fever. Dec. 17. 

1784 Robert Goudie, a child. Feb. 1. 

1784 Andrew Goudie, bellman, aged 80. Frailty. Oct. 29. 
1786 James Goudie, aged 1 year, 7 months. Fever. April 3. 

1790 David Goudie, son of John Goudie, sailor, 3 years 3 weeks. Fever. 
May 13. 

1791 Margaret Goudie, daughter of George Goudie, carrier, 10 mo. Small 
pox. Jan 16. 

1792 Goudie, son of John, mariner. Feb. 6. 

1793 Joseph Goudie, son of James Goudie (carpenter), 4 yrs. 5 months. 
Frailty. Sept. 21. 

1793 Margaret Goudie, relict of Samuel McBeath, soldier, age 87. Frailty. 

Nov. 17. 
1795 William Goudie, labourer, aged 69. Asthma. Feb. 11. 



190 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

1795 James Goudie, son of Andrew Goudie, aged 43. Wasting. March 16. 

1796 Aug. 6. John Goudie, son of George Goudie, shoemaker, 1 year 4 months. 

1797 George Gowdie, son of James Gowdie, ship carpenter, aged 18 years 
and 7 months. Swelling. Jan. 16. 

1798 Elizabeth Gowdie, relict of Craig, aged 68. Wasting. Jan. 10. 

1798 Andrew Go\vdie, son of John Gowdie, shipmaster, aged 10 months. 

May 19. 
1798 James Goudie, son of James Goudie, carpenter, aged 2 years 6 months. 
Aug. 17. 

1801 Thomas Gowdie, late carrier, aged 82 years. Palsy. March 28. 

1802 William Gowdie, son of Robert Gowdie, aged 2 years. Jan. 11. 

1803 Marion Gowdie, in the poor house, aged 75 years. Gangrene, April 26. 

1803 Elizabeth Gowdie. July 15. 

1804 Agnes Templeton, spouse of Thomas Gowdie, weaver. Dropsy. Aug. 19. 

1805 Jean Gowdie, daughter of William Gowdie, flesher, 2 years. Jan. 1. 
1805 Agnes Rankin, relict of William Gowdie, shoemaker. Frailty. March 1. 
1805 RoBiNA Gowdie, daughter of Robert Gowdie, shoemaker. Small pox. 

March 1. 
1817 John Gowdie, son of George, presenter, aged 17 years. Consumption. 
Sept. 2. 

1819 Catherine Gowdie, daughter of John Gowdie, labourer, 1 year, 1 
month. June 25. 

1820 Widow Gowdie, wife of William Gowdie, letter carrier, 89. June 20. 
Frailty. 

1822 John Gowdie, son of Gowdie, 1 year and 5 months. Inflam- 
mation. Aug. 15. 

1822 George Goudie, son of Thomas Goudie, shoemaker, aged 9 months. 
Sept. 23. 

1822 Ebenezer Goudie, Esq., of Highlees. Frailty. Nov. 6. 

1823 Elizabeth Goudie, daughter of John Goudie, skinner, aged 21 years. 
Feb. 1. 

1823 James Goudie, son of James Goudie, mason, 3 years. Inflammation. 

Aug. 14. 
1823 James Goudie, late carpenter, aged 74 years. Frailty. Sept. 20. 
1823 Jean Goudie, natural daughter of William Goudie, shoemaker, aged 1 

year. Water in the head. Oct. 23. 
1825 George Goudie, presenter in Ayr, aged 60 years. Palsy. Aug. 10, 
1827 Margaret Goudie, daughter of John Goudie, miller, aged 1 year. 

Feb. 12. 
1827 Agnes Goudie, wife of John Dick, bookseller, aged 38. Heart. 

March 17. 
1827 Elizabeth Goudie, daughter of John Goudie, inkeeper, aged 10 months. 

July 4. 

1827 Mrs. Jane Goudie, aged 59. Cause unknown. Oct. 26. 

1828 Margaret Farquhar, wife of John Goudie, sawer, aged 44. Liver. 
June 1. 

1828 Jacobina Goudie, aged 86 years. Dysentery. 

1829 Jean Goudie, daughter of Daniel Goudie, bookbinder, aged ? years. 
Jan. 26. 

1829 George Goudie, labourer, aged 75 years. Palsy. May 15. 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 191 

1829 Agnes Goudie, wife of John Symmington, inkeeper, aged 46 years. May 22. 

1829 A Child of Daniel Goudie, watchmaker, stillborn. Dec. 5. 

1830 Robert Goudie, inmate of the poorhouse, aged 64 years. Frailty. Jan. 1. 

1831 John Goudie, son of the late J. Goudie, editor of newspaper, aged 10 
years. Water on the brain. Oct. 19. 

1832 Mrs. Goudie To\\t^head, widow. Aug. 16. 
1832 George Goudie, Isle Lane. Aug. 16. 

1832 John Goudie, tanner, Townhead. Aug. 17. 

1833 David Goudie, farmer, 69 years. Natural decay. Feb. 10. 

1834 Isabella Goudie, wife of John McClure, baker, aged 25. Fever. Feb. 7. 

1834 Robert Goudie, letter carrier, aged 62. Palsy. Oct. 6. 

1835 Jean Goudie, wife of John McHallum, soldier, age 64. Decay. July 9. 

1836 Robert Goudie, deacon, of Weavers, aged 64. Died suddenly. Mar. 11. 

1837 Peter Paterson Goudie, son of Robert Goudie, writer, cause not 
known. Oct. 15. 

1838 Janet Goudie, daughter of William Goudie, letter carrier, aged 1 jear 
and 8 months. Cause unknown. March 27. 

1839 James Goudie, coach painter, aged 29. Cause unknown. Aug. 4. 
1841 Thomas Goudie, son of John Goudie, shoemaker, aged 2 years, 1 month. 

April 8. 
1841 Janet Goudie, wife of Robert Hunter, shoemaker, aged 49. Childbed. 
May 16. 

1841 Isabella Goudie, Holmstone, aged 30 years. Inflammation. Dec. 20. 

1842 Mrs. Goudie, widow of the late Capt. Goudie, aged 90 years. Decav. 
May 17. 

1842 William Goudie, tinsmith, aged 78. Decay of nature. May 25. 

1842 Mary Goudie, wife of Alexander Templeton, aged 44. Fever. Oct. 29. 

1843 Robert Goudie, tailor, aged 2>?> years. Fever. March 19. 
1843 Mrs. Goudie, aged 76 years. Natural decay. April 14. 
1843 William Goudie's daughter, stillborn. July 2. 

1843 Robert Goudie, aged 2 months, 1 week. Cause unknown. Sept. 12. 

1844 W'lLLiAM Goudie, Cross Street, aged 44. Consumption. June 29. 

1846 Daniel Goudie, Content, aged 62. Water in the chest. July 7. 

1847 John Goudie's daughter, High Street, stillborn. Sept. 6. 

1848 Agnes Goudie or Maxwell, High Street, aged 76. Consumotion. 
Feb. 6. 

1848 Mrs. Goudie, Crawford's Close, aged 76. Cause unknown. April 10. 

1848 Elizabeth Goudie, Content St., Newton, aged 18 years. Fever. Dec. 6. 

1849 James Goudie, Content, aged 26 years. Apoplexy. Dec. 25. 

1851 John Goudie, New Market, aged 4 years. Bowel complaint. July 11- 

1851 Agnes Goudie, New Market, aged 3 years. Bowel complaint. July 23. 

1851 Thomas Goudie, New Market, aged 1 year. Bowel complaint. July 22. 

1851 Robert Goudie, Isle Lane, aged 86. Cause unknown. Nov. 14. 

1852 Mrs. Mary Goudie, High Street, aged 83. Decay of nature. Dec. 4. 

1853 Mrs. Goudie, Hope Street, age not given. Cause unknown. April 13. 
1853 Robert Goudie, Hugh Street, aged 48. Cause unknown. May 30. 

1853 Agnes Goudie, New Market, aged 1 year and 2 months. Bowel 
complaint. Sept. 26. 

1854 Jess Goudie's daughter. Mill Street, stillborn. March 12. 
1854 Elizabeth Goudie, boat vennel, age not given. June 5. 



192 THE GAWD IE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

girths iit ilirhmu^acl Ipartsb, %^x. 

1640—1800. 

1640. January 15th, Nanis Goudie, daughter of John Goudie in Harmill. 
Witness, Gilbert Goudie and John Dick. 

1640. June 6th, Thomas Goudie, son of John Goudie in Thornhill. Witness 
to baptism, Millie and Andrew Goudie. 

1640. Dec. 6th, William Goudie, son of Gilbert Goudie. Witness to baptism, 
William Moore in Cloncarde, John Goudie and Nellie Goudie elder. 

1641. April, John Goudie son of John Goudie in Glensyde. Witness to baptism 
John Goudie and Gilbert Goudie. 

1643. April 2d. Thomas Goudie son of Gilbert Goudie in Arnsow. Witness 
to baptism John Goudie and Thomas McFadzearn in Drumsurole. 

1643. Oct. 15th, Jannet Goudie daughter of Andrew Goudie at Kirkmichael 
Mill. Witnesses, Neill Goudie and John Goudie. 

1644. February Uth, William Goudie son of John Goudie in Glensyde. 
Witnesses to baptism, William Moors and William Shircla. 

1643. September 10th, Jannet Goudie daughter of Hew Goudie. Witnesses to 
baptism Neill Goudie and Thomas Fultoune. 

1643. September 19th, William Goudie and Janet Goudie, son and daughter 
of John Goudie, deacon. Witness to baptism Neill Goudie and Andrew Goudie. 

1644. August 25th, Margaret Goudie daughter of William Goudie in Cassillis 
Mill. Witnesses to baptism Neill Goudie and John Goudie. 

1644. December 23d, Helene Goudie daughter of Gilbert Goudie in Arnsow. 
Witnesses to baptism Neill Goudie and John Goudie. 

1646. May 2d, Margaret Goudie daughter of John Goudie. Witnesses to 
baptism Neill Goudie and Andrew Goudie. 

1646. May 24th. Margaret Goudie daughter of Henry Goudie. 

1647. May 30th, John Goudie son of William Goudie. Witnesses to baptism 
John Fulton and Thomas Fulton. 

1647. August 22d. Janet Goudie daughter of John Goudie in Glensyde. 
Witnesses to baptism, John Kennedy and John Goudie. 

1648. January 10th. Gilbert Goudie son of Andrew Goudie. Witnesses to 
baptism, John Goudie and Neill Goudie. 

1648. June 29th. Andrew Goudie son of Gilbert Goudie. 

1648. June 29th. Neill Goudie son of John Goudie. Witnesses to baptism 
John Goudie and Andrew Goudie. 

1649. February 5th. Annabel Goudie daughter of Andrew Goudie. Witnesses 
to baptism, Neill Goudie and John Goudie. 

1649. February 25th. Marion Goudie daughter of Henry Goudie. Witnesses 
to baptism, Thomas Fulton and Thomas Orr. 

1649. May 25th. Agnes Goudie daughter of John Goudie. Witnesses to 
baptism, Gilbert Ross and Gilbert Goudie. 

1651. March 23d, John Goudie son of John Goudie in Dumfrad. Witness to his 
baptism, Andrew Goudie. 

1651. August 17th, Helene Goudie daughter of Andro Goudie. Witnesses 
to her baptism, John Goudie and Neill Goudie. 

1652. January 6th. Helene Goudie daughter of John Goudie. Witnesses to 
her baptism, John McKerrell and William Cylmont. 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 193 

1653. March 1st. Isabell Goudie daughter of Henry Goudie. Witnesses to 
her baptism, Gilbert Moore and Thomas Fulton. 

1653. December 6th. Andrew Goudie son of John Goudie. Witnesses to his 
baptism, Andrew Goudie and Walter Hunter. 

1654. July 16th, Jannet Goudie daughter of Andrew Goudie. Witness to 
her baptism, John Goudie. 

1655. November 18th, William Goudie son of John Goudie in Thorniehill. 
1655. December 11th, Katherine Goudie daughter of John Goudie in Drumfad. 

Witnesses to her baptism, Richard Kennedy and Andrew Goudie. 

1657. August 23d, Agnes Goudie daughter of Andrew Goudie, in Craighead. 
Witness to her baptism, John Goudie. 

1658. June 6th, Margaret Goudie daughter of John Goudie in Drumfad. 
Witnesses to her baptism, John Goudie and Andrew Goudie. 

1659. February 1st. John Goudie son of Henry Goudie in Darraik. Witnesses 
to his baptism, Richard Kennedy and John Goudie. 

1660. November 22d, Janet Goudie daughter of John Goudie in Drumfad. 
Witnesses to her baptism, Hugh Campbell and Richard Kennedy. 

1663. April 19th, William Goudie son of John Goudy in Drumfad. 

1663. July 5th, Janet Goudie daughter of Henry Goudy in Bairdmill. Wit- 
nesses to his baptism Walter Hunter and Robert Kennedie. 

1664. December 18th, John Goudie son of Henry Goudie in Bairdmill. Wit- 
nesses to his baptism, Walter Hunter and Gilbert Baird. 

1665. August 8th, Gilbert Goudie son of John Goudie in Drumfad. 

1665. October 15th, Anne Goudie daughter of Andrew Goudie in Cultermill. 

1666. October 28th, William Goudie son of Henry Goudie in Bairdsmilne. 

1667. September 29th, Janet Goudie daughter of John Goudie younger in 
Glenside. Witnesses to her baptism, Gilbert Dick and John MacKay. 

1668. December 22d, Helen Goudie daughter of Henry Goudie, in Bardorah. 
Witnesses to her baptism John Smith and Robert Kennedy. 

1669. May 30th, Jean Goudie daughter of John Goudie in Drumdarrach. 
Witnesses to her baptism, William Gibsone and Gilbert Dick. 

1671. February 5th, John Goudie son of Henry Goudie, in Bairdsmilne. Wit- 
nesses to his baptism, John Moore and William Gibsone. 

1671. December 3d, John Goudie son of John Goudie, in Trochen. Witnesses 
to his baptism, John Campbell and John McKael. 

1672. November 26th, Gilbert Goudie son of Henry Goudie in Bairdsmilne. 
Witnesses to his baptism, Gilbert McClement and John Moore. 

1674. December 27th, Margaret Goudie daughter of John Goudie in Little 
Dalterran. Witnesses to her baptism, John McKale in Wynterhill and John 
Campbell in Glenside. 

1675. Januar>' 19th, John Goudie son of John Goudie younger in Thorniehill. 
Witnesses to his baptism, John Moors in Barely and David Lockhart, Tranew. 

(Register blank August 5th 1677 to March 30th 1686) 
1686. May 23d, Janet Goudie lawful daughter of John Goudie in Thornie- 
hill. Witnesses to her baptism, John Goudie in Arnsowe and John Goudie in 
Corn-Millne. 

1686. August 3d, Andrew Goudie lawful son of John Goudie in Corn Millne, 
Witnesses to his baptism, John Goudie and Andrew Goudie, in Arnsethe. 
(Register blank Sept. 9th 1688 to Sept 10, 1693) 



194 THE GAWD IE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

1693. December 31st, John Goudie son of John Goudie in — 

1694. March 25th, James Goudie son of William Goudie in Rutherglen in the 
parish of Kirkoswald. 

1696. March 1st, Thomas Goudie son of William Goudie in Carsloe. Wit- 
nesses to his baptism, Thomas McClymont in Carsloe and Thomas Mcllvean in 
Blackquarter. 

1698. January 16th, Bessie Goudie daughter of William Goudie in Priestland. 

1698. December 6th, John Goudie son of William Goudie in Dalcurr. 

1705. November 18th, William Goudie son of Gilbert Goudie, in Bairdsmilne. 

1708. April 18th, Agnes Goudie, daughter of Gilbert Goudie in Bairdsmilne. 

1710. February 26th, Gilbert Goudie son of William Goudie, in Carpin. 

1715. March l7th, Anna Goudie daughter of John Goudie in Killhouse, born 
and baptised 20th by James Lawrie minister of Kirkmichael. 

1722. January 23d, Jean Goudie daughter of Gilbert Goudie in Bairdsmilne. 
Born and baptised the 28th. 

1727. September 10th, William Goudie natural son to Margaret Goudie, 
baptised same day. 

1728. April 29th, Dickson Goudie son of William Goudie gardener at Ulon- 
card was born. 

1732. September 10th, Marion Goudie daughter of John Goudie in Straitton 
with a line from Mr. Kennedy, baptised Sept. 10th. 

1737. December 16th, Samuel Goudie son of John Goudie shoemaker in 
Glestron was born. 

1737. Dec. 25th, John Goudie son of John Goudie shoemaker in Glestron, was 
born the 16th and baptised the 25 th. 

1742. June 13th, Mary Goudie daughter of John Goudie in Milne of Blairquha 
baptised by Mr. Cupples in Kirkoswald. 

1743. October 9th, John Goudie son of Gilbert Goudie in Carpine was born and 
baptised. 

1743. October 23d, Sanders Goudie son of John Goudie in Pennyland was 
baptised by the ordinary minister. 

1754. April 7th, Agnes Goudie daughter of Gilbert Goudie in Carpine was 
born and baptised the 14th by Mr. James Laurie. 

1754. September 8th, Jean Goudie daughter of William Goudie was born; 
she was baptised the 9th, by Mr. James Lawrie. 

1756. June 27th, Margaret Goudie daughter of Gilbert Goudie in Carpine 
was born; she was baptised July 4th by Mr. James Lawrie minister of the Gospel 
in Kirkmichael. 

1757. August 26th, William Goudie son of William Goudie in Brigend of 
Carpine was born; baptised the 28th by Mr. James Lawrie minister. 

1759. May 9th, Margaret Goudie daughter of John Goudie in Threave was 
born and was baptised by Mr. James Lawrie minister of the Gospel at Kirkmichael. 

1761. May 19th, Henry Goudie son of William Goudie cooper was born and 
was baptised the 24th. 

1762. January 22d, Thomas Goudie son of William Goudie cooper born, and 
was baptised Jan. 23d by James Lawrie, minister. 

1766. November 5th, Mary Goudie daughter of Alexander Goudie and Mar- 
garet Hunter (unman) child, was born. Baptism by Rev. John Ramsey, minister. 

1770. August 14th, John Goudie son of Alexander Goudie in Drumfairn born 
and baptised Sept. 3d, by Mr. John Ramsey, minister of the Gospel at Kirkmichael. 



THE GAWD IE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 195 

1773. June 14th, Alexander Goudie son of Alexander Goudie, was born; 
he was baptised by Rev. John Ramsey June 15th, He was minister at Kirkmichael. 

1774. September 30th, Margaret Goudie daughter of John Goudie in Threave 
was born; was baptised Oct. 1st by Rev. John Ramsey. 

1775. May 12th, Elizabeth Goudie daughter of Alexander Goudie of Drum- 
fair was born; she was baptised May 17th by Rev. John Ramsey. 

1777. July 14th, Quintin Goudie son of Alexander Goudie of Threave was 
born; was baptised by Rev. John Ramsey July 15th. 

1779. October 10th, Margaret Goudie daughter of Alexander Goudie of 
Threave was born; was baptised by Rev. John Ramsey the 11th. 

1781. December 3d, Peter Goudie son of Alexander Goudie of Threave was 
born; was baptised by Rev. John Ramsey the 6th. 

1783. November 21, Jane Goudie daughter of Alexander Goudie in Park- 
fairn was born; was baptised by Rev. John Ramsey the 24th. 

1783. May 8th, James Goudie son of Thomas Goudie, miller, in Corn Mill 
was born and baptised same day by Rev. Mr. Ramsey. 

1785. November 19th, Archibald Goudie son of Thomas Goudie in Cornmill 
was born; was baptised by Rev. John Ramsey the 21st. 

1786. March 13th, Isabell Goudie daughter of Alexander Goudie in Park- 
fairn was born; was baptised by Rev. John Ramsey the 14th. 

1787. January 17th, Isabell Goudie daughter of William Goudie in Robert- 
toun was born, and baptised by Mr. Ramsey. 

1787. May 4th, Agnes Goudie daughter of Alexander Goudie was born, and 
baptised by Mr. Ramsey. 

1789. May 12th, Thomas Goudie son of Thomas Goudie in Cornmill was born; 
was baptised the 15th by Mr. Ramsey. 

1789. January 19th, Thomas Goudie son of William Goudie in Robinstoun 
was born and baptised. 

1791. February 12th, John Goudie son of Thomas Goudie in Cornmill was 
born; baptised by Rev. John Ramsey same day. 

1791. November 9th, James Goudie son of Alexander Goudie, was born; was 
baptised the 20th by Rev. John Ramsey. 

1794. January 3d, Thomas Goudie son of Alexander Goudie in Parkfairn 
was born; and baptised the 6th by Rev. John Ramsey. 

1794. November 21st, David Kennedy Goudie son of Thomas Goudie Miller 
in Cornmill, was born; was baptised the 23d by Rev. John Ramsey. 

1795. May 20th, David Goudie son of John Goudie in Berrickis of Trochain, 
was born; was baptised the 22d by Rev. John Ramsey. 

1795. January 27th, Jannet Goudie daughter of Thomas Goudie in Cornmill 
was born; she was baptised the 28th. 

1796. January 27th, Mary Goudie daughter of Henry Goudie cooper, was 
born; she was baptised December 4th. 

1797. April 25th, Margaret Goudie daughter of Thomas Goudie in Cornmill 
was born; was baptised the 27th. 

1797. June 9th, Adam Goudie son of John Goudie weaver, Bankhead, Dirock, 
was born. 

1799. July 27th, James Goudie son of John Goudie weaver in Bankhead of 
Dirock, was born. 

1800. January Uth, Henrietta Goudie daughter of Thomas Goudie miller 
in Cornmill was born; baptised the 14th. 



196 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 



1801. Feb. 20. Euphemia, daughter of Alexander Goudy in Parkfavin 
was born and baptised the 24th by Rev. Mr. John Ramsay. 

1803. June 25. Margaret, daughter of Alexander Goudy in Parkfavin 
was born and was baptised July 1st by Rev. Mr. David Kennedy. 

1803. Oct. 15. William, son to Goudy in Bankhead was born and was 
baptised by the Rev. Mr. John Ramsay, minister of Kirkmichael. 

1804. July 11. David Kennedy Goudie, lawful son to James Goudie in 
Drumfairn, was born and baptised the 12th by Rev. David Kennedy, minister of 
Kirkmichael. 

1810. Oct. 14. Elizabeth Goudie, daughter of Peter Goudie and Margaret 
McGarroch, was born at Old Killikie and baptised the same day by Rev. David 
Kennedy. 

1811. July 31. Elizabeth, daughter to William Goudie, and Janet Aitkin 
in Burnton of Kilmore was born and was baptised Aug. 3d by Rev. David Kennedy. 

1811. Aug. 24. Agnes, daughter of John Goudie, and Marion Arthur in 
this village was born; and baptised the 25th by Rev. David Kennedy. 

1813. April 20. Margaret, daughter of Peter Goudie. and Margart Mc- 
Garroch was born; and was baptised by Rev. David Kennedy same day. 

1813. Sept. 21. Charles, son to James Goudie, and Anne McCubben in 
Fardenwilliam was born; and baptised the 24th by Rev. David Kennedy. 

1815. June 22. William, son of James Goudie, servant in Fardenwilliam, 
and Anne McCubbin; and baptised the 24th by Rev. David Kennedy. 

1815. Dec. 13. Alexander, son to Peter Goudie, laborer at Crossbill, and 
Margaret McGarroch his wife was born; baptised the 17th by Mr. David Kennedy. 

1817. March 15. Agnes, daughter of Peter Goudie, laborer at Crossbill 
and Margaret McGarroch was born; baptised the 16th by Mr. David Kennedy. 

1820. Aug. 1 Jane, daughter of Peter Goudie, carrier at Crossbill, and 
of Margt. McGarroch his spouse, was born; was baptised the 6th by Rev. Mr. 
David Kennedy, minister here. 

1821. March 15. David, son of William Goudie, in this village and Jane 
Moir his wife, was born; was baptised the 18th by Rev. David Kennedy. 

1823. Nov. 13. Jane, daughter of William Goudie, late weaver in this village, 
and Jane Muir his spouse, was born; was baptised the 23d by Rev. David Ken- 
nedy, minister of this parish. 

1824. July 7. Janet, daughter of Peter Goudie, Crossbill, and of Margaret 
McGarroch his spouse, was born and baptised the 9th by Rev. Mr. Kennedy, 
minister of this parish. 

1837. July 1. Agnes, daughter of James Goudie, mason in Crossbill and Jane 
Couper his spouse, was born ; was baptised the 3d by Rev. John McEwen, minister 
of this parish. 

1839. Arpil 14. Alexander, son to James Goudie, mason in Crossbill, 
and Jane Couper his spouse, was born; was baptised the 14th by Rev. John Mc- 
Ewen, minister of this parish. 

1839. May 28. Grace Matilda Cunningham, daughter of James Goudie, 
gardner, at Cassillis, and of Marion Ramsay his spouse, was born; and was 
baptised July 11th by Rev. John McEwen, minister of this parish. 

1841. May 2. James, son of James Goudie, mason in Crossbill, and Jane 
Couper his spouse, was born; was baptised the 11th by Rev. John McEwen, 
minister of this parish. 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 197 

1844. Sept. 1. William, son of James Goudie, gardner, Cassillis, and of 
Marion Ramsay his spouse, was born; was baptised the 23d by Rev. John McEwen, 
minister of this parish. 

1851. July 26. Marion, second daughter of James Goudie, mason, Crosshill 
and of Marion Fulton his spouse, was born; and was baptised the same day by 
Rev. Mr. Maule, minister at Crosshill. 

1852. Dec. 29. Jane, third daughter of James Goudie, mason, Crosshill, 
and Marion Fulton his spouse, was born; and baptised same day by Rev. James 
Crawford, minister at Crosshill. 



Starriacjes m Jlirkmirbatl |3ari:slj, %m. 

1638 1850 

1638 Nov. 17th. John Goudie in this parish and Marion Dick in Straton. 
1638 Dec 15th. Thomas McHaffie and Isabell Goudie both in this parish. 

1641 Jan. 4th. John Smith younger in Dalrimple parish and Janet Goudie 
in this parish were married. 

1642 Andrew Goudie and Helen Kennedie both in this parish. 

1646 Feb. 10th. John Smith younger in Hattone and Janet Goudie both in 
this parish were married. 

1647 Jan. 23d. Thomas Kennedie and Janet Goudie both of this parish. 

1647 Nov. 18th. Gilbert McTaggart and Isabell Goudie, both in this 
parish. 

1648 July 22d. John Goudie and Margaret Goudie married 24th August. 

1649 Dec. 22d. Neill Goudie in this parish and Jean Moir in the parish of 
St. Quivox? married in the Kirk of Ayr. 

1653 April 23d. David Bryan in the parish of Corspairne and Janey Goudie 

in this parish, married 11th June 1653. 
1655 April 28th. John McCornock in Maybole parish and Margaret Goudie 

in this parish, married July 3d 1655. 
1660 Nov. 17th. Thomas McMartein in Straton parish and Margaret Goudie 

in this parish; married 4th Dec. 1660. 
1662 June 27th, Henry Goudie and Elspeth McKerrell both of this parish; 

married 15th July 1662. 
1666 April 28th. Thomas Campbell and Margaret Goudie both in this parish 

were married 12th June 1666. 

1666 March Uth. John Goudie and Margaret Dick both of this parish 
were married 27th Dec. 1666. 

1667 May 11th. J.\mes Cathcart and Janet Goudie both in this parish, 
they were married 18th June 1667. 

1671 Nov. 10th, John Dick and Jannet Goudie, both in this parish; they 

were married 28th Dec. 1671. 
1673 July 1st. John Barski wine merchant in Ayr and Nans Goudie in this 

parish; married 7th Aug. 1673. 
1673 Dec. 14th. John Goudie and Helen Goudie both in this parish; they 

were married 13th Jan. 1674. 
1676 July 6th. Neill Goudie in Maybole parish and Catherine Goudie in 

this parish; they were married 10th August. 



198 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

1676 Sept. 29th. Peter McCairgour and Annabel Goudie both in this 

parish; they were married 30th Nov, 1676. 
1694 Dec 14th. William Goudie in the parish of Maybole and Jean McKer- 

RELL in this parish. Married 17th January 1695. Witnesses John and 

William Dicks in Garpine. 
1698 Dec. 17th. William Hunter and Margaret Mitchell of this parish; 

they were married 10th Jan. 1699. 
1706 Nov. 30th. William Goudie and Janet Fultoun both of this parish; 

were married 24th Dec. 1706. 
1714 July 19th. James Shaw in the parish of Maybole and Janet Goudie in 

this parish; were booked and married the 30th by Mr. Alexander Fair- 
weather, minister of Maybole. 
1719 July 30th. John Mitchell and Margaret Goudie booked and married 

28th June by Mr. James Lawrie minister of Kirkmichael. 

1725 Dec. 4th Thomas Goudie in the parish of Maybole and Janet Eaglis- 
ham in this parish booked 4th Dec. and married 30th. 

1726 May 13th William Goudie in this parish and Agnes McCrotchart in 
Straiton booked May 13th; married June 2d. 

1728 March 23d. William Goudie in this parish and Catherine Thompson 
in the parish of Maybole booked March 23d, married April 11th. 

1731 Nov. 1st. John Goudie and Agnes McNab both in this parish; married 
Nov. 1st, 1731. 

1732 Oct. 4th, Robert Goudie in Ayr parish and Agnes Dick in this parish; 
married Oct. 4th. 

1737 Dec. 27th, John McFadzen and Jean Gowdie both in this parish. 

1739 Nov. 29th, Adam Campbell in the parish of Straiton and Jean Goudie 
in this parish, were married. 

1740 April 3d. Hugh Goudie and Barbara Corrie were booked and married. 
1753 Nov. 22d, Neal Craig and Agnes Goudie both in Balgougan were booked 

in order to marriage and married Dec. 13th 1753. 

1761 June 19th, Gilbert Ramsey amd Marion Goudie both in this parish 
were booked in order to marriage and married July 2d, 1761. 

1762 Dec. Uth John Goudie in this parish and Agnes Rankine in the Town 
of Ayr booked in order to marriage and married Dec. 22d, 1762. 

1769 Oct. 21st. Alexander Goudie and Margaret Murdoch both in this 
parish booked in order to marriage and married Nov. 2d, 1769. 

1771 Aug. 24th, Alexander Gray and Agnes Goudie both in this parish 
were booked in order to marriage and married Sept. 5th 1771. 

1773 April 17th, Matthew Gray and Grizel Goudie both in this parish were 
booked for marriage and married April 26th, 1773. 

1773 Nov. 19th. John Goudie in this parish and Isabell McClellan in the 
parish of Maybole, booked in order to marriage and married Dec. 2d. 

1774 April 22d. Thomas Alexander in the parish of Dailly and Jean Goudie 
in this parish, booked in order to marriage and married May 2d. 

1775 April 8th Thomas McMaster and Marion Goudie both in this parish 
booked in order to marriage and married April 25th, 1775. 

1775 April 22d. Alexander Polson and Jean Goudie both in this parish 
booked in order to marriage and married May 4th, 1775. 

1776 June 8th, William Reid and Isabell Goudie both in this parish booked 
and were married June 20th, 1776. 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 199 

1783 July 12th, Thomas Goudie in this parish and Jean McKillop in the 

parish of Ayr booked and married. 
1792 June 9th, John Goudie in the parish of Straiton and Marion Arthur 

in this parish booked and were married June 19th, 1792. 
1799 Dec. 6th, Alexander Goudie in this parish and EuphemiaMcNairn in the 

parish of Minnigoff booked and married 18th Dec. 1799. 

1803 Aug. 13. James Goudie and Ann McCubbin, both in this parish, were 
booked and married the 26th by Mr. David Kennedy. 

1804 Feb. 18. Gilbert McKerney and Mary Goudie, both in this parish, 
booked and married the 20th by Rev. David Kennedy. 

1805 Aug. 22. James Foulton in this parish and Margaret Goudie in the 
parish of Maybole, booked and married Sept. 3d, by Rev. David Ken- 
nedy. 

1807 June 21. Andrew Dykes and Isobel Goudie, both in this parish, 

booked and were married at Parkhaven 3d July by Rev. David Kennedy, 
1809 Dec. 10. John Kill and Jane Goudie, both in this parish, were married 

at Crossbill 22d Dec. by Rev. David Kennedy. 
1811 March 4. James Aird and Agnes Goudie, both in this parish, married 

at Crossbill by Rev. David Kennedy. 
1811 April 23. William Goudie, of the parish of Dalrymple, and Janet 

Aitkin in this parish, booked, and married at Brunton of Kilmore by Rev. 

David Kennedy. 

1816 Feb. 12. John Henderson, millwright at Bridge-end in this parish, 
and Anne Goudie, farmers' daughter, Low Blairbowie, also in this parish, 
booked 10th and married 12th by Rev. David Kennedy. 

1818 May 23, John McBlane, servant in Low Blairbowie, and Margaret 
Goudie, farmers' daughter there, both in this parish, were married 5th 
June by Rev. David Kennedy. 

1820 Oct. 20. William Goudie, weaver in this village, and Jane Muir, 
both in this parish, booked in order to marriage the 7th and were married 
the 20th by Rev. David Kennedy, minister of this parish. 

1821 June 20. Samuel Goudie, weaver in this parish, and Elizabeth David- 
son in the parish of Dailly, booked 16th and were married 29th by Rev. 
Mr. Hill, minister there. 

1828 April 22. John Goudie, and Margaret McConnell, both in this 
parish, booked 17th and were married 22d by Rev. David Kennedy, minister 
of this parish. 

1833 Aug. 16. John Ferguson in the parish of Dreghorn and Elizabeth 

Goudie in this parish, booked the 3d and were married 16th August, 

by Rev. D. Kennedy, minister of this parish. 
1833 March 29, Hugh Cowan in this parish and Elizabeth Goudie in the 

parish of Dalrymple, booked 16th and were married 29th, by Rev. Mr, 

Wallace, minister there. 

1835 Feb. 23. James Goudie and Jane Couper, both in this parish, booked 
19th and were married 23d by Rev. Mr. Gray, minister at Maybole. 

1838 Nov, 10. James Goudie and Marion Ramsay, both in this parish, 
booked and were married. No other data. 



200 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

1841 Dec. 31. John Goudie, in the parish of Maybole. and Mary McFad- 
ZEAN in this parish, booked the 18th and were married 31st by Rev. James 
Smillie, minister at Crossbill. 

1842 Dec. 9. James Liviston and Agnes Goudie, both in this parish, booked 
26th Nov. and were married Dec. 9th by Rev. James Smellie, minister 
at Crossbill. 

1844 March 24. William Esdale and Margaret Goudie, both in this parish, 
booked the 8th and were married the 11th March, by 

1845 July 16. Robert Consar in the parish of Mauchline. and Isobel Goudie 
in this parish, booked 24th May and were married. 

1849 May 26. James Goudie in this parish, and Marion Fulton in the 
parish of Kirkoswald, booked the 24th and were married 26th May by 
Rev. Mr. Maule, Crossbill. 

1849 July 16. James Brydon and Helen Goudie, both in this parish, booked 
the 14th and were married 16th July by Rev. Mr. Maule, Crossbill. 

1849 Dec. 14. Thomas McConnell and Janet Goudie, both in this parish, 
booked the 1st and married 14th by Rev. Mr. Strong of Dailly. 

1850 Dec. 31. James Rutherford, weaver, and Sarah Goudie, both in this 
parish, booked 21st and married at Crossbill 31st by Rev. John McEwen, 
minister here. 



g^at^s in JUrkmifljael. 

1818. June 28, Annie Goudie, wife of John Henderson, wright, at present 
at Blairbowie, died there of inflammation after delivery and was buried 
30th June, aged 28. 

1819 Sept. 30, Adam, son of John Goudie, weaver here, died of a diseased 
liver and was buried in Straton churchyard, 2d Oct., aged 22. 

1835 April 3, John Goudie, weaver, Maybole, cause decline, aged 49. 

1836 Jan. 14, Janet Goudie, laborer. Crossbill, cause, decay of nature, aged 
87, a native of Crossbill. 

1838 April 20. Thomas Goudie, baker's son, Crossbill, cause unknown, aged 3. 

1839 Nov. 1. Thomasina Goudie, smith's daughter. Crossbill, cause, small 
pox, 5-12. 

1845 June 11. Alexander Goudie, child. Crossbill, worm fever, 9 years. 

1846 Jan. 31, John Goudie, child. Crossbill, scarlet fever, age 2 years. 

1847 Oct. 2, Henry Goudie, Crossbill, Cooper, of old age, 89 years. 

1848 March 24, James Goudie, mason's child. Crossbill, Bolehive, age 3 mo. 
1848 April 4, Mrs. Goudie, mason's wife. Crossbill, consumption, aged 34 years. 
1848 Sept. 5, William Goudie, mason's child, Crossbill, water in head, age 3. 

1851 Dec. 4, Margaret Goudie, spinster. Crossbill, frailty, age 72 years. 

1852 June 4, Margaret Goudie, weaver's wife, village, cause paralysis, 74. 
1852 July 1, John Goudie, blacksmith. Crossbill, frailty, aged 71 years. 
1854 Oct. 6, James Goudie, weaver's child. Crossbill, aged 5 months. 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 201 

Inscriptions on Cambstcncs. 

%m #Itr Cburclrnarb. 

There are several stones erected in memory of Goudies, viz., an obelisk on four 
sides of which are the following inscriptions: — 

ROBERT GOUDIE, Shoemaker, 
died 14th November, 1857, aged 86. 
WILLIAM GOUDIE, 
of H.M. Stationery Office, London 
died 15th September, 1861, aged 28. 
ROBERT GOUDIE, Writer, 
died 13th July, 1869, aged 72. 
JOHN GOUDIE, Solicitor, 
died 13th May, 1868, aged 29. 



Quite near the above stone there is a plain monument with this record on one side: 

Inscribed 

By 

JOHN GOUDIE. 

To the memorv of his Father, 

DANIEL GOUDIE, 

His Sisters, Jane, 

Who died 26th January, 1829, aged 5 years, 

and Elizabeth, 

Who died on 14th December 1849, aged 18 years, 

And His Brothers, James, 

Who died 25th December, 1849, aged 34 years, 

and Robert, 

Who died on 29th May, 1853, aged 31 years, 

And of his Mother, Mary Neilson, 

Who died on 20th December, 1872, aged 87 years. 

On the opposite side of this stone is the following inscription: — 

Erected to the Memory of 

JAMES GOUDIE, 

Late Ship Builder in Ayr, 

Who died on 4th Sept. 1823. 

By Mary Parker, his Spouse, 

Who died on 18th May, 1842, in 

the 90th year of her age. 

Here are also interred six of their children. 



On the wall beside this stone there is a marble slab inserted with the following 
inscription : — 

In Affectionate Remembrance of 

JOHN GOLDIE, S.S.C. 

Who died at Edinburgh on 11th August, 1883. 



202 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

In Memory of 

WILLIAM GOUDIE, 

Late Flesher in Ayr, 

Erected by his son Robert Goudie, 

To whom this burying ground belongs. 



On another stone now prostrate, and the upper part illegible, is the following 
inscription : — 

Likewise the above 

WILLIAM GOLDIE, 

Who died 1st of February, 1808, aged 60 years. 



Erected 

by 

John Goudie 

and 

Mary Smith 

in Memory of their son, 

JOHN 
Who died 13th July, 1877 
Aged 23-1 years, 

The above 

MARY SMITH 

Who died 2nd March, 1881, 

Aged 47 years. 

ALEXANDER SMITH, 

Who died 23d April, 1866, 

Aged 21 years. 

The above 

JOHN GOUDIE 

Who died 3d July, 1900, 

Aged 70 years. 



In Memory of 

ISABELLA TAYLOR, 

Wife of Robert Goudie, 

Solicitor and Commissary clerk 

of Ayrshire, 

Who died 7th July^ 1879, aged 42 years. 

Also the above 

ROBERT GOUDIE 

Sheriflf and Commissary Clerk of Ayrshire, 

Who died 11th May, 1902, 

Aged 70 years. 

Also their children, 

Robert, Helen-Baird, Thomas-Grainger-Taylor, Isabella-Taylor and William. 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 203 

Erected by 

Janet Goudie, 

In memory of her husband, 

EDWARD-HUNTER-BLAIR BUCHANAN, 

Late of Crossbill, Maybole, 

Who died at Gowanlea, Ayr, 7th December, 1897, aged 74 years. 

The above 

JANET GOUDIE, 

Died at Gowanlea, 23d August, 1905, aged 79 years. 



In 
Loving Memory of 

ISA 

Eldest daughter of 

Alexander Porter Goudy, D.D. 

Strabane, Ireland, 

Who died 2nd March, 1901 

and of 

ISABELLA GOUDY, 

his wife. 

Who died 11th June, 1906, aged 82 years. 



Sacred 

to 

the Memory of 

JOHN GOUDIE, Blacksmith, 

Who died at Ayr, 8th March, 1914, aged 78 years. 

Also of his five sons and one daughter 

Who died in childhood. 

Also his wife 
AGNES WALKER, 
died 18th December, 1912, 
Aged 77 years. 



Jn Mdkatoton |Utri)ing ^r0imj£r, %^x. 

Erected by 

Christina Goudie 

In Memory of her husband 

JOHN M'CRINDLE, 

died 11th February, 1859 

Aged 74 years. 

Erected in Memory of 

JOHN GOUDIE 

Who died 11th July 1861 

Aged 67 years. 



204 THE GAWDIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

Erected 

by 

Jane Bryan 

In Memory of her Husband, 

JAMES GOUDIE, Merchant, 

Who died 1st August, 1846, aged 80 years. 

JAMES M'CRAE, her Grandson, 

died 19th May, 1856, aged 21 years. 

MARIA LANG, her daughter-in-law, died 

24th September 1849. 

The above Jane Bryan, 

died 17th April, 1859, aged 89 years. 

Their son, John Goudie, 
died 20th May, 1871, aged 80 years. 



Erected By 

JOHN GOUDIE, BURNS COTTAGE 

To the Memory of his son 

JOHN, 

Who died in infancy. 

The above JOHN GOUDIE 

DIED 1st July, 1842, aged 84 years, 

Also 

FLORA HASTINGS, his spouse, 

Who died 20th September, 1843, aged 79 years. 



galrumpk Cburcbmxrb. 

Erected 

by 

James Dalziel 

in memory of his spouse 

JANE GOUDIE, 

Who died on the 18th January 1841 

Aged Years 

Also 
his daughter MARY 
Who died 13th October 18— 
Aged years. 



Erected 

by 

James Dalziel 

JANET 

his daughter, 

Who died 21st November, 1839, aged 45 years. 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 205 

Also 

Archibald Goudie, 

late gardener, Dogmasfield, Hamshire, 

who died at Dalr>'mple, 25th November, 1839 

Aged 78 years. 



Erected 

by 

John Campbell, 

late farmer in Danston, 

as tribute of respect 

to the Memory of 

ISABEL GOUDIE 

Who was 66 years his spouse 

and who died February 5th, 1831, 

Aged 87 years, 

also three of their children. 

The above 

JOHN CAMPBELL 

died 27th Sept. 1831 

Aged 88 years. 



Erected by 

JANET AITKIN 

in memory of her husband, 

WILLIAM GOLDIE 

Wright, Barbieston, who died 29th January, 1830 

aged 53 years, 

and their infant son, David 

(On the other side) 

JANES AITKIN, 

Wife of William Goldie, 

Who died 6th December, 1853, 

Aged 66 years. 

Also of 

JAMES GOLDIE, 

his son, who died in Kyle Street, Ayr, 

Aged 77 years. 



In loving memory of 

JESSIE M. C. GOUDIE 

Who died 18th of March, 1862, aged 8 years. 

WILLIAM HENRY GOUDIE 

died 10th Januar}-, 1890, aged 32 years. 



206 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

JESSIE NEWALL CAMPBELL 

wife of Andrew Goudie 

died 8th of April, 1892, aged 73. 

ANDREW GOUDIE 

died 11th November, 1910, aged 83 years. 



BAILIE JOHN GOUDIE, 

died 25th October, 1819, aged 55 years. 

JOHN GOUDIE 

who died 14th of July, 1821, aged 69 years. 

Also his spouse 

MARION BRYCE, 

who died 23d March, 1825, aged 69 years, 

and of 

DAVID KENNEDY 

who died 8th of August, 1872, aged 77 years. 

and his wife 

ELLEN GOUDIE, 

who died 15th April, 1878, aged 77 years. 

and of 

MARGARET GRAY GOUDIE, 

who died 28th May, 1861, aged 69 years. 

Also of 

JAMES GOUDIE, 

who died 15th December, 1881, aged 88 years. 



Erected by 
WILLIAM GOUDIE, 
in memory of his wife, 
HELEN POLLOCK, 
who died 7th August, 1835, aged 43 years. 
And of their children, 
John, who died 22d May, 1824, aged 1 year. 
Jane, who died 22d May, 1824, aged 6 years. 
John, who died 17th April. 1829, aged 9 years. 
Henry, who died 26th May, 1829, aged 7 years. 
Mar>', who died 25th Feb., 1852, aged 16 years. 
Helen, who died 1st July, 1832, aged 3 years. 
Robert, who died 14th March, 1840, aged 16 years. 
Margaret Brown his second wife 
who died 10th May, 1841, aged 38 
The said William Goudie (the other words 
undecipherable) 

WILLIAM GOUDIE? 
Died 2nd October, 1881, aged 79. 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 207 



Memorial Stone 

Erected by 

WILLIAM GOUDIE, 

in memory of his wife, 

JANE KENNEDY? 

Who died at Girvan 14th November, 1863, aged 58 years. 

Also 

WILLIAM GOUDIE 

his son 

Who died at Girvan, 19th December, 1861, aged 26 years. 

Also 

DAVID GOUDIE 

his son 

who died 4th January, 1866, aged 23 years. 

Also the above 

WILLIAM GOUDIE, 

who died at Girvan, 22d April, 1889, aged 86 years. 

JAMES GOUDIE 

son of the above 

died at Girvan, 19th June, 1904, aged 63 years. 

Also 

MARGARET GOUDIE? 

Youngest daughter and last member of this family of the said William who died 

at Girvan 26th April, 1911, aged 72 years. 



HiR Lyes the Corps of Margrat McVhiny and Janet Goudy, Wife and 
DocHTER of John Goudy, Margrat Goudy, Late Wife of Cornmill, 

KiRKMICHAEL, 1713. 

Erected 

by 

WILLIAM GOUDIE 

in memory of 

Gilbert Goudie, his father, 

late farmer in Tradunnock, 

who died 4th January, 1769, aged 59 years. 

and 

AGNES GOUDIE 

his mother 

who died October 9th, 1788, 

and JEAN, his daughter 

who died 29th December, 1812, aged 10 months. 

Also the said 

WILLIAM GOUDIE 

died 28th April, 1813, aged 60. 

also his wife 

JANET McLURE 

died 25th January, 1837, aged 69. 



208 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

Erected to 

the memory of 

JAMES GOUDIE, mason, Crossbill, 

who departed this life 

12th April, 1871, aged 76 years. 

Also 

AGNES GOUDIE, 

daughter of the above 

died at Crosshill, 

25th August, 1909. 



SI. i^ntrntos §urutng ^rountr, |liInmniorK. 

Erected by 

JEREMIAH GOLDIE 

In memory of his son, 

WILLIAM, 

who died 7th November, 1869, aged 22 years. 

(On the same stone) 

Erected by 

WILLIAM GOLDIE, 

In memory of his wife, 

MARGARET SMITH, 

who died 25th February, 1855, aged 75 years 

also their daughter, 

JANET, 

who died 22d September, 1854, aged 31 years. 

the above 

WILLIAM GOLDIE, 

who died 14th August, 1856, aged 72 years. 



Erected by 

Margaret Goldie, 

in memory of her husband. 

JOHN MINFORD, 

who died 25th January, 1872, aged 32 years 



giccarton; #Itr guromg Olroimb. 

Erected 

by 

James Wright, 

in memory of 

LILLIAS GOLDIE, his spouse, 

Who died the 24th December, 1823, 

Aged 73 years. 

The above 

JAMES WRIGHT, 

died 1st March, 1833. aged 92 years. 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 209 

In memory of 

HELEN GOLDIE 

wife of William Steven, Loanfoot, aged 62 years. 

Also their children, 

Margaret, William, and Elizabeth. 

The above William Steven died 

(the date below ground) 



€xvL%xt §urDmo[ #rounb. 

To the memory of 

JAMES GOLDIE, 

who died 20th September, 1894, aged 92 years. 

Also his children, 

Annie, born 12th Feb., 1828, aged 16 years. 

William, born 18 Aug., 1848, in his 2nd year. 

Annie, born 9th June, 1851, in her 2nd year. 

James, died 24th July, 1861, aged 25 years. 

Interred in Plumstead Cemetery, Woolwich. 

Isabella, died 5th February, 1870, aged 35 years. 

Interred in Sighthill Cemetery, Glasgow. 

Also his wife, 

Isabella Brown, 

who died 7th December, 1839, aged 83 years. 



#rl^ilte §urgmig ^rountr. 

In memory 

of 

JAMES GOLDIE 

who died 15th April — (broken off) 

Aged 71. 

MARY WRIGHT 

his wife, 

died 30th April, 1825, 

Aged 54. 
"Blessed are the dead 
that die in the Lord". 

This 

was erected in 1860 

by their 

aflfectionate and only daughter 

MARY 



#Ib Cumitork Ctmtl^rg, g^grs^m. 

(On one side) 

To the memory of 

GEORGE GOLDIE, his father, 

who died 18th October, 1838. 



210 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

AGNES MILLER 

his mother 

who died 1st March, 1874. 

John, his brother, 
who died 14th March, 1886. 

Elizabeth, his sister, 
who died 16th July, 1888. 

Hannah, his sister, 

who died 19th October, 1893. 

(On the other side) 

Erected by Mrs. H. Kerr 

In memory of my father, 

JAMES GOLDIE, 

who died January 10th, aged 50 years, 

and of my mother, 

ELIZABETH BROWN, 

who died June 23d, 1860, aged 38 years. 

Of my uncle, 

WILLIAM, 

who died in 1833, aged 40 years, 

Also George, 

who died aged 42 years. 

and my grandfather, 

who died in 1858, aged 72 years. 

and my grandmother, 

who died 26th May, 1868, aged 78. 

(On front of stone) 

Erected by 

George Goldie, engineer, Cumnock, 

in memory of 

EUPHEMiA McCartney, 

His faithful and beloved wife, 

who died 15th November, 1894, aged 78 years. 

her uncle, 

JOHN BALLANTINE, 

Cheese merchant, Edinburgh, 

who died in Cumnock, 26th Oct., 185L 

Her mother, 

FLORA BALLANTINE, 

who died 5th Feb., 1876. 

The above 

GEORGE GOLDIE 

died 16th August, 1896, in his 82d year. 



ptto Cumnock €m\t\n^, %m%\nxt, 

Erected by Thomas Goldie, 

in 

Memory of his son John, 

who died 20th November, 1841, aged 5 years. 



THE GAWD IE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 211 

MARTHA 

his daughter 

who died 23d December, 1850, aged 6 months. 

His mother 

MARY ROSS, 

who died 26th February, 1857, aged 72 years. 

His father 

JAMES GOLDIE, 

who died 5th April, 1858, aged 72 years. 

MARTHA, 

his daughter 

died 24th September, 1876, aged 23 years. 

MARY SEATON 

his wife, 

who died 26th December, 1887, in her 77th year. 

The above THOMAS GOLDIE 

Who died 19th January, 1893, aged 82 years, 

beloved for her many excellent qualities. 



No. 18, same as No. 14 in note attached to Wallacetown inscriptions, was a son 
of No. 2)2) and grandson of No. 32. There are notes attached to this. 

No. 24, who was a son of No. 3, was Provost of Ayr from 1873 to 1879. He was 
also Convenor of the " Deacons Court" and various other bodies. Three sons and 
a daughter live here. The eldest is John T. Goudie Esq., solicitor. No. 7 Wellington 
Square, Ayr. 

No. 72, James Goldie, was a farmer in the place called "Black O'Hill", Ochil- 
tree, and left tliere in 1841 and went to live in the village of Ochiltree. His son 
went to England and his granddaughter is the widow of the Rev. McPhail who 
died in 1916 in London. 

Mr. John Goudie, Registrar, Hurlford, with his brothers and two sisters all 
over 65 and unmarried, says that their grandfather was born in Maybole and died 
at the age of 84, and was buried in St. Andrews, Kilmarnock. This would probably 
be No. 67. Their father was born in Monkton, four miles from Ayr, and died 
at the age of 87 years. He was buried in Riccarton. Both were shoemakers by 
trade. There are quite a number of Goudies buried in Maybole. Andrew Goudie 
was for many years a weaver's agent on a large scale in Maybole and was succeeded 
by his son who died a few years ago and a draper's business is carried on by his widow. 
This was Andrew Goudie No. 44. 

No. 52, William Goudie, was a Wood Forester on Dalquharan estate in Dailly 
Parish, but left there and took up a public house in Girvan where he remained 
for many years. The reason why they were all buried in Kirkoswald, eight or 
nine miles from Girvan, was that Jane Kennedy, his wife's father was a sexton 
in Kirkoswald and had ground of his own there. This family had a relative 
who went from Crossbill near Maybole to Ontario, Canada, where he had Flouring 
Mills. He went by the name "Goldie" after his removal. 

There was another family of Goudie at "Stepends" in the parish of Kirkoswald. 
The head of this family was a blacksmith and went to Dalmellington and from 



212 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

there to a farm in Galloway named "Flatto of Cargen"; afterwards to the farm 
of "Preistlands". He died about 1858 and is buried in "Froqueer", Dumfries. 
He left two sons and three daughters; one of the sons being the Rev. William 
Fullarton Goudie, minister of the South U. F. Church, Stirling. The other son 
died in Canada. 

No. 80. "Came out" and became a dissenter in 1843 along with the ministers 
and many more. He acted as precenter to the "New body" at a salary of £10 
a year which he always put back in the plate on communion Sabbath. 

"Loudon" old graveyard and two others in Galston have been visited and where 
several inscribed tombstones were looked for not one was to be found inscribed 
to a Goudie. Craigmill on the Cessnock stream where the family of millers 
so long lived was also visited and several aged residents interviewed, but they 
could not even remember a miller of the name in the district. One old gentleman, 
a Mr. Boeland, said his grandmother was an Agnes Goudie belonging to Allaway 
and he remembered when his own father went to her funeral there. This may have 
been No. 34. 

Mr. John Goudie of Balagan, Thornhill, says his great-grandfather went from 
Riccarton to the "Dutch Mills" near the Burns Monument on the river Doon. 
John Goudie (No. 34) he thinks would be a nephew of his great-grandfather. 
When they left the "Dutch Mills" they came to "Ayr Mills", and according 
to the Town Council records they left the Ayr Mills in May, 1822. The family 
then went to New Cumnock and some of them to "Haugh Mills", near Mauch- 
line; that is, the grandfather of John Goudie of Balagan. James Goudie, brother 
of John of Balagan, was in Kirkconnell for eighteen years, then emigrated to Amer- 
ica, since when, though often written to, he has not been heard from. Is probably 
dead. Thomas Goudie, another brother, was partner in the firm of John McCart- 
ney & Co., millwrights, in Old Cumnock, Ayrshire; and his son is now on the staff 
of the "Scotsman", Edinburgh. 

#oubu-(^0lbu of Craigmuu, Srotlanb. 

Inharmony of tradition exists concerning this branch of the Goudie or Goldie 
family. We know that the two forms of spelling were used interchangeably by 
the families of the South of Scotland, and believe the ancestors of this branch 
came from England with the family of Breuse or Bruce, and first sat down in Ayr- 
shire, being of the same stock as the Goudies who fixed their residence at Craigmill 
in the parish of Galston, where they were represented for about 400 years, and some 
of whom adopted the name Goldie. It has been assumed that two brothers named 
Goldie came from England at a much later date during the civil wars in the reign 
of Charles I. 1640 and 1650, and that old papers in the family sustain the assump- 
tion; but whatever the date of their coming into Scotland they evidently descended 
from the same old Norman stock as the other families bearing the name. 

Edward Goudie^ (1), purchased Craigmuie from Col. James Douglas of the 
Scottish Guards in 1679, and he obtained a charter of resignation from William, 
Earl of Queensbury, dated 6th February 1680. The superiority, however, was 
retained as on the 22d October, 1695, James Duke of Queensbury, son of William, 
had retour. This is, however, the last direct record in connection with the Douglas 
family and this estate. Edward Goudie was the new proprietor. He is said to 
have come from Closeburn in Dumfrieshire, and that he had a brother, James 
Goudie, who purchased the farm of Muirbreck in Carspairn parish. Edward Goudie 



THE GAWD IE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 213 

at first resided for some time at Auchinleck, Closeburn, and 1676 became tenant 
at Craigmuie, and afterwards purchased the land in 1679. He then took up his 
residence at Craigmuie. He married Jean, daughter of John Brown in Branetrig 
and Gateslack, parish of Darisdeer, and had issue. He died in 1691 and was 
succeeded by his eldest son of the same name. 

CHIIJ}REN OF EDWARD AlfD JEAN BROWN GOXTDIE. 

1. Edward Goudie^ (2), eldest son of Edward^ (1) and Jean Brown, was born 
about 1675 and was served heir to Craigmuie by special retour on the 11th May, 
1697, in five mercatis terrarum antiqui extentus de Craigmuie, & Co. and also 
in September following, he obtained a precept of Clare Constant from the Duke 
of Queensbury. He married, 1 February, 1701, Mary, second daughter of Sir 
Alexander Gordon of Earlston, and had issue of whom presently. He died in 1711, 
aged 35 years, and was succeeded by his son as will appear. 

2. John Goudie^ (1), second son of Edward' (1) and Jean Brown, was educated 
as a surgeon, but afterwards became a lieutenant in a regiment of dragoons, and 
was killed in the battle of Malplaquet, under the Duke of Marlborough in 1709, 
aged about 30 years. Shortly before embarkation in 1708, he wrote to his brother 
Edward, referring to an expected invasion of Scotland by the French: "I cannot 
expect to hear from you while here, for I desygne to go to fflanders next week. 
You may all be easy now, for the French have returned to Dunkirk, having been 
out on a fool's errand, so our campaign is likely to be in fflanders instead of 
Scotland. I shall long to hear from you, direct to me garrison at Bruges in fflanders. 
Tell Earlstoun I could not goe by brimigane, it being 60 miles out of ye road, and 
I was hastened up with the pretended invasion. I sent this letter by post," etc. 

3. Robert Goudie^ (1), third son of Edward' (1) and Jean Brown, was a mer- 
chant in Edinburgh. He married and had issue three daughters, but this family 
is now extinct. He wrote his brother Edward in March, 1705, about the proposed 
union with England. "As for England, it is thought we must either fight you, 
or else be your slaves, wch I believe none will yield to". 

4. Jean Goudie (1), only daughter of Edward (1) and Jean Brown, died young. 

C^rrtr (§tmxRixon, 

CHIIiDREN OF EDWARD AND MART GORDON. 

1. John Goudie^ (2), eldest son of Edward^ (2) and Mary Gordon, was born 
in 1708. He was appointed in 1734, Commissary of Dumfrieshire, which position 
he held for upwards of forty years. In 1738 he acquired the land of Over Miny- 
buie, and Paulstar or Polinzart; and in 1743, Waterhead of Dalquaharnochan, 
of which he had sasine on the 27th May of that year. In January, 1748, he was 
appointed substitute Steward of the ten parishes which He to the east of the river 
Urr, and was reappointed in 1756. He was greatly interested in antiquarian and 
historical researches. He corresponded for many years with Joseph Nicolson of 
Hawksdale in Cumberland, the author of the still highly valued work on the antiq- 
uities of Cumberland. He was also an intimate friend and frequent correspond- 
ent of Dr. Waugh, Chancellor of Carlisle, and afterwards Dean of Worcester. 
The "Excerpta De Registro Abbatiae de Holm Cultran in Cumberland", which 



214 THE GAWDIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

he took in 1748 of various ancient charters of land in Galloway which had been 
granted to that ancient monasten*'. He married in August 1735, Jean, daughter 
of James Corrie of Speddoch (by his first marriage) who was for some time Provost 
of Dumfries, and had by her eleven children of whom five survived him. Mr. 
Goudie died in 1776. 

2. Janet Goudie^ (1), daughter of Edward^ (2) and Mary Gordon, was married 
to Edward Maxwell of Hills, parish of Lochrutton. He died in 1720 without 
issue. She was married secondly in 1721, to James Corrie of Speddoch, provost 
and merchant, Dumfries. He died in 1742 and she in 1762. They had issue: — 

I. Archibald Corrie, who died in America. 
II. Hugh Corrie married a daughter of the Rev. Collie. 

III. Grizel Corrie was the wife of Dr. Ebenezer Gilchrist, and had 
issue. 

IV. Ann Corrie was married to Benjamin Bell, merchant in Dumfries; 
issue. 

V. Jane Corrie was the wife of James Jardine, merchant in Dumfries; 

issue. 
VI. Margaret Corrie was not married. 

VII. Mary Corrie was married to her cousin, James Gilchrist, merchant 
in Dumfries, and had a son. 

3. Jean Goudie' (2), second daughter of Edward^ (2) and Mary Gordon, was 
married to Joseph Corrie, writer and town clerk, Dumfries, and had issue. 

4. Mary Goudie' (1), third daughter of Edward^ (2) and Mary Gordon, was 
married to Baillie James Gilchrist, Dumfries, and had issue. 

Jfourt^^ (§tmxRimx, 

CHILDREN OF JOHN AND JEAN COKRIE. 

1. James Goudie* (1), eldest son of John' (2) and Jean Corrie, predeceased his 
father, dying in 1763. He was one of those who first applied science to agri- 
culture, and in 1761 at an early age, was appointed chamberlaine and factor to 
the Duke of Queensbury. 

2. Joseph Goudie* (2), second son of John' (2) and Jean Corrie, was a surgeon 
in the 8th regiment of Infantry. He retired in 1767, and resided in Liverpool. 

3. Thomas Goudie* (1), third son of John' (2) and Jean Corrie, succeeded his 
father as Commissary of Dumfriesshire. He married, in 1782, Helen, daughter 
of Hugh Lawson of Girthhead, by Jean Johnston, the eldest of four daughters, 
heirs portioners of Girthhead, Dumfriesshire, with whom her father acquired that 
property. Hugh Lawson was a merchant in Dumfries. Thomas Gouldie pur- 
chased in 1789 the adjoining land of Slavigdell or Fell from — Cannon of Bar- 
lochan. It was Mrs. Goudie who communicated to Sir Walter Scott the story of 
Helen Walker, which narrative is given in the Preface to the " Heart of Midlothian". 
The date of the death of Thomas Goudie has not been ascertained. He was suc- 
ceeded by his daughter of whom presently. 

4. Archibald Goudie* (1), fourth son of John' (2) and Jean Corrie, was of Shawa 
in Tinwald. He married Marion, daughter of Ebenezer Stott, minister of Minni- 
gafif, and had issue. 

I. John Goudie^, who died unmarried. 
II. Archibald GouDIE^ middle-named Watson, W. S. Edinburgh. He 



THE GAWDIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 215 

married Frances, daughter of Darcy Lever of Arklington Hall, York- 
shire, and had issue, Frances Elizabeth Lever, who married her second 
cousin, Thomas Gouldie Scott, of Craigmuie. Also three daughters, 
one of whom was married to Samuel D. Young of Gullyhill. 

5. Mary Goudie* (2), eldest daughter of John^ (2) and Jean Corrie, died unmar- 
ried in 1723. 

6. Catherine Goudie'* (1), second daughter of John^ (2) and Jean Corrie, was 
the wife of David Corrie (?), parish of Berwick. 

fxiih Clenenition. 

CHILDREN OF THOMAS AND HELEN LAVTSON. 

1. Jean Goudie^ (3), eldest daughter of Thomas^ (1) and Helen Lawson, of 
whom no other information. 

2. Mary Goudie^ (3), second daughter of Thomas^ (1) and Helen Lawson, was 
married to Major Patrick Blair, Madras Artillery, and had issue, John Blair 
who was in the Church of England. He married his cousin, Harriet- Ann Kenne- 
dy, and had several children, the eldest of them being Rev. George Blair, Middle- 
borough, Yorkshire. 

3. Helen Goudie^ (1), third daughter of Thomas* (1) and Helen Lawson, was 
the wife of William Scott, M.D., H.E.LC.S. She succeeded to Craigmuie. Her 
husband who had the liferent of Craigmuie, died in 1863, when it passed to his 
son, Thomas Goudie Scott. 

4. Patrick George Goudie^ (1), eldest son of Thomas* (1) and Helen Lawson, 
Lieut. -Colonel, Bengal Army, married Elizabeth, daughter of James Stewart of 
Cairnsmuir, parish of Minnigaff. 

5. Robert-Francis Goudie^ (2), second son of Thomas* (1) and Helen Lawson, 
was rector of Farnborough. 

6. Margaret Goudie* (1), fourth daughter of Thomas* (1) and Helen Lawson, 
was married to Walter Dickson. 

7. Grace Goudie* (1), fifth daughter of Thomas* (1) and Helen Lawson. 

8. Catherine Goudie* (1), sixth daughter of Thomas* (1) and Helen Lawson. 

9. Janet Goudie* (2), seventh daughter of Thomas* (1) and Helen Lawson. 



Thomas Goudie Scott*, son of Thomas* (1) and Helen Lawson, was Deputy 
Inspector General of Hospitals. He entered the Army as Assistant Surgeon, 13th 
Regiment, Light Infantry. Afterwards for two years in the 48th Regiment; and 
next as Surgeon in the 79th Highlanders, until he retired as Deputy Inspector 
General. With the latter Regiment he served in the Crimea, and the Mutiny in 
India. He was an elder in his parish, and attended the General Assembly of the 
Church. He died 25th June 1874, much respected, and was succeeded by his son. 
The farms are Craigmuie and Craigmuie Moor. The other portions of property, 
viz., Fell, Waterhead and Upper Monybuie, passed to Margaret Goudie, and her 
issue by her marriage with Walter Dickson. The local name Craigmuie was some- 
times spelled "Kraigmuy". It should probably be Craig Muli, the latter being 
the Norse word for a jutting crag. 

Thomas Goudie Scott married Frances-Elizabeth Lever Goudie, the only 
child of Archibald Watson Goudie, Edinburgh, and had issue: — 



216 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

I. Archibald Scott. 

II. William Scott. 

III. Thomas Scott. 

IV. D 'Archy Scott. 

V. Frances-Amelia Scott. 

VI. Helen-Dorothea Scott. 

VII. Mary-Stephana Scott. 

See biographies of the General Gaudies 



doiibb-^oltru of 6oltrulca. 

The name of this place seems to have been given to it by the proprietor in the 
eighteenth century, Major General Thomas Goudie^ He married Amelia, daugh- 
ter and co-heiress of John Leigh of Northcourt, Isle of Wight, and by her had issue: 

1. Thomas GouDiE-, who entered the army and rose to the rank of Colonel. 

2. Alexander Goudie^ entered the army and rose to the rank of Lieut.- 
General of the Nunnery, Isle of Man. 

3. Basil Goudie^ 

4. Patrick Heron Goudie^ Captain in the army. 

5. George Leigh Goudie^, General in the army, made K.C.B. 

6. John Leigh Goudie^, Major in the army. 

7. Elizabeth Goudie^, died unmarried. 

8. Mary GouDIE^ died unmarried. 

9. Catherine GoudieS married 1st, Colonel Donald, 3d Regiment 
(Buffs) and of Glenlaggen; 2ndly, Major Silver, 88th Regiment. 

10. Amelia Goudie^, married J. Grove. 

11. Margaret Goudie^, died unmarried. 

12. Anabella GouDIE^ was married to Rev. R. R. Bloxham, Chaplain 
R. N., and Rector of Harlaston. Of this marriage, Amelia married 
J. Gibson Starke, younger of Troqueer Holm, and Elizabeth Goudie 
married Captain Lennock, 33d Regiment. 

13. Charlotte Goudie-, of whom no other information. 



{Daily Chronicle, English paper, April 15, 1896.) 

"Mr. Y. H. D. Goldie, the famous Cambridge Stroke who just died, comes of a 
very distinguished race, which traces its origin to Craigmuir, a parish in Dumfries- 
shire adjacent to Craigenputtock. The name was originally spelt ' 'Goudie", Goud 
being the Lowland Scots for gold, and during the Thirty Years War one adventur- 
ous member of the family went to Germany where he fought under the banner of 
Gustavus. Settling in Germany he was ennobled as Baron Von Gaudy of Craigmuir 
and one of his descendants acted as aide-de-camp to Frederick the Great during 
the Seven Years War. At the present time several of the name are serving as 
officers in the Prussian Guards. One of the name achieved fame as a German 
Poet and Novelist. 

Sir George Taubman Goldie represents the branch of the family which settled 

in the Isle of Man; he was chairman of the Niger Company While the parent 

Scotch stem is represented by Mr. Goldie Dickson of Edinburgh, Scotland. 



THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 217 

Sir George-Dashwood-Taubman Goldie, descended from the Ayrshire family 
of Goudie and the youngest son of Lieut.-Colonel John Taubman Goldie. Taubman 
was born May 20, 1846, at the Nunnery in the Isle of Man. His father was speaker 
of the House of Keys, and his mother Caroline, daughter of John E. Hovenden 
of Hemingford, Cambridgeshire. Sir George resumed his paternal name, Goldie, 
by royal license in 1887. He was educated at the Royal Military Academy, Wool- 
wich, and for about two years held a commission in the Royal Engineers. He 
travelled extensively in Africa and obtained a comprehensive knowledge of the 
continent. Visiting the country of the Niger in 1887 he conceived the idea of add- 
ing to the British empire the then little-known region of that country; and for 
twenty years his efforts were devoted to the realization of that conception. Under 
his influence the commercial interests of the British nation were combined in the 
United African Company. In 1905 he was elected president of the Royal Geo- 
graphical Society and held the office three years. In 1906 he was chosen alderman 
of the London County Council. He was created K.C.M.G. in 1887 and a privy 
councillor in 1898. He became an F. R. S. honorary D.C.L. of Oxford University 
(1897) and honorary LL.D'. of Cambridge (1897). He married in 1870 Matilda- 
Catherine, daughter of John-William Elliot of Wakefield. He died in 1898. 

Major-General Alexander John Goldie (Goudie). He was Colonel of the 6th 
Dragoon Guards. In Feb. 1787 this officer was appointed Cornet in the 5th dra- 
goons, from which he was removed to the 18th; 11th May 1791 Lieutenant in the 
5th Dragoons; Captain 30th April 1794; Major 1st June 1797; Lieut.-Colonel 17th 
Feb. 1798 in same Corps. He was actively employed during the rebellion in Ire- 
land; and the 8th April 1799 was removed from the 5th dragoons to the 6th dra- 
goon Guards; the 25th April 1808 he received the brevet of Colonel; and the rank 
of Major-General 4th June 1811. 

Dr. Charles Fleming, son of Dr. Charles and Mary Montgomery Fleming of 
Montgomeryfield, married Millicent, youngest daughter of General Goudie, who 
survived him. No issue. 



The following list of family names was forwarded by Gilbert Goudie, Esq., 
of Edinburgh, Scotland. All have been written to, but only six of the number 
replied to the inquiries forwarded. Many of those whose names appear in the city 
directories there had probably changed their residences. 

Alexander Goudie, Heath Hill, Victoria, Australia. 

Alexander C. Goudie, Yarraville, Victoria, Australia. 

David Goudie, Yarraville, Victoria, Australia. 

Gilbert Goudie, Melbourne, Australia. 

John Charles Goudie, Sea Lake. 

James Goudie, Thorna. 

James Goudie, Winton, N. 

James Goudie, Beresford, St. Chesterfield. 

John Goudie, Footsway. 

Thomas Goudie, Thoona. 

WiLLiAxM Goudie, Heath Hill, Victoria, Australia. 

Miss A. Goudie, Royal Arcade, Melbourne. 



218 THE G AW DIE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 

Miss M. Goudie, St. Kilda. 

GouDY& KoRT, Collins St., Melbourne. 

Alexander Goudy, Castlemain. 

Arthur N. Goudy, Pratt St., M. Ponds. 

Hector Goudy, Fibgray. 

Mrs. C. Goudy, Ballowat, E. 

Samuel Goudy, Ballowat. 

Mrs. J. Goudy, Ballowat. 

William Goudy, Morime side, Queensland. 

John Goudy, Wynot, West End, West Australia. 

L. GotHDY, Bouldex Road, Kilgoorlie, So. Australia. 

Peter Goudie, Port Adelaide. 

R. \\i. Goudie, Petersburg. 

W. S. Goudie, Glanville, New South Wales. 

Alexander Goudie, 58 Read St., Waverly. 

Mrs. Anna Goudie, 30 Stantly St., Campardon. 



Goudie and Stickney, Victoria Arcade. 

M. Goudie, Brunswick St., Victoria Arcade. 

H. A. Goudie, Wharkarewaverwa. 

John Goudie, Barclay St., Duneden. 

John Goltdie, Sr., Napier. 

J. R. Goudie, Napier. 

Mrs. Christina Goudie, Port Chalmers. 

Mrs. Jessie Goudie, High St., Dunedin. 

Peter Goudie, Waikumete. 

Thomas Goudie, Cheltonham, Davenport. 

William Robert Goudie, Kingsland. 



^bmburoflj, Srotlantr. 

Agnes Goudie, Dec. 24, 1623. 

Robert Goudie's widow, Isabel Anderson, June 12, 1627. 

Alexander Goudie. Sept. 17, 1668. 

Allan Goudie, Turnkey Cannongate, March 17, 1696. 

David Goudie, his child, Jan. 1, 1666. 

David Goudie, buried June 22, 1667. 

David Goudie, buried Oct. 2, 1667. 

David Goudie, buried March 25, 1668. 

Janet Goudie, buried Dec. 17, 1670. 

John Goudie, buried March 28, 1660. 

John Goudie's widow, Alison Ross, Sept. 27, 1675. 

John Goudie, Feb. 21, 1696. 



\ 



THE GAWD IE FAMILIES IN AYRSHIRE. 219 

John Goudie, Aug. 4, 1669. 

Robert Goudie, Feb. 27, 1675. 

Robert Goudie, Aug. 10, 1675. 

Robert Goudie, Oct. 7, 1684. 

Eliza Goudie, his wife, Nov. 29, 1697. 

John Goudie's widow, Janet Anderson, Nov. 22, 1698. 

James Goudie, tailor in the Cannongate, and Janet, daughter of late William 
Smith, indweller there, not in N. E. parish, were married in Edinburgh, Nov. 
16, 1714. 



Cflmmb^rat (ilasgoto, Scotland. 

David Goudie, in Ayr, Dec. 30, 1765. 
Gilbert Goltdie, late in Dunoon, Sept. 1, 1769. 
James Goudie, of Maybole, March 11, 1624. 
James Goudie, of Haugheatt parish in Ayr, July 29, 1726. 
James Goudie and son Robert, July 14, 1733, and Oct. 26, 1759. 
Janet Goudie, spouse of John Meikle, portioner of Newmills, Oct. 17, 1770. 
John Goudie, gardener, in St. Leonards, March 22, 1757. 
Robert Goudie, son of late Robert, wright, apprentice to Samuel Gurthrie, 
May 27, 1622. 



[arriagjjs iit ^btnburg^. 



James Goudie, tailor, Canongate, and Janet Smith, daughter of the late Will- 
iam Smith, indweller in the Canongate, now in the N. E. parish, married Nov. 
16, 1714. 

Mr. John Goudie, minister at Earlstown, and Jean Deas, daughter of the late 
Alexander Deas, Merchant-burger, married Jan. 3, 1706. 

John Gaudie, servitor to Lady Napier, and Marion Kerr, daughter of James 
Kerr, sailor in Fisherrow. 



ISOBEL GOWDIE, WITCH. 

NOTE. — From Pitcaim's Criminal Trials we have abstracted the following: At Auldearn, in Nain- 
shire, Scotland, the notable witch case of Isobel Gowdie came before a tribunal composed of the sheriff 
of the county, the parish minister, seven country gentlemen, and two of the townsmen. She was a 
married woman ; her age does not appear, but, fifteen years before, she had given herself over to the 
devil, and had been baptized by him in the parish church. She was now extremely penitent, and 
made an unusually ample confession, taking on herself the guilt of every known form of witchcraft. 
She belonged to a company of witches consisting of thirteen females like herself, who had frequent 
meetings with the Evil One. She claimed that she and her companions were sometimes transformed 
into various kinds of animals and were chased by hounds. They had charms by which, in the name 
of the devil, they cured diseases. They also could deprive the cows of their milk, cause schools of 
fishes to come into a net and cause the children of their enemies to die. She said, the devil supplied 
them with elf-arrows which they shot at both men and cattle. In her confession she involved several 
of her associates in witchcraft, among them one Jane Braidhead. The particulars of this confession 
are too long and complex to find space here. Suffice it to say that Chambers in his Domestic 
Annah of Scotland has published a long account of the trial of these women, but says he 
is not informed of the fate o< the two ; then adds, "but there can be no doubt that they perished at 
the stake". This whole affair proves to us to what extremes among an illiterate and superstitious 
people such hallucinations and dreams could be believed ; but that such misguided persons were not 
confined to the ignorant classes the transactions connected with the Salem witchcraft in which many 
educated and highly respectable persons were involved, bear witness. And there are as irrational 
impositions practiced upon the credulity of the public today by those who assume to be highly intelli- 
gent and respectable persons. 




6aire antr IJoit 6autrg. 



^ 



In Norway and Denmark the name still survives to a limited extent. During 
the latter part of the last century Herr J. T. Gade of Bergen in Norway was at 
the head of the merchants of that city. Gade the Danish composer, is a well-known 
name of high professional repute; and Mr. Felix Gade lately attained to an eminent 
position in musical circles in Edinburgh. At the present time Dr. F. A. Gade 
is the Corresponding Member for Norway in the Norse-Scottish Committee of the 
Scottish Exhibition at Glasgow (1911). 

In Germany apart from the cognate name of Goethe, the immortal, there were 
Von Goudys who attained to rank and fame and their story may best be told in 
the words of the late T. A. Fischer, in his work "The Scots in Germany", published 
by Messrs. Otto Schultze & Co., Edinburgh, 1902. He says: "Of the officers under 
King Frederick the Great of Prussia, there was one named Gaudy or Von Gaudy, 
who attained no little fame. The Gaudys were originally Goldies or Gowdies 
and hailed from Ayrshire or Dumfriesshire, one Andrew Gaudie from Craigmere 
parish adjacent to Craigenputtock, the temporary home of Carlyle, entered 
the service of Prince Ragozz in Hungary (1641), who sent him as ambassador 
to Hamburg and employed him in various military capacities. He was present 
in several of the later battles of the Thirty Years War. In 1650 he bought estates 
in Eastern Prussia and in 1660 exchanged into the service of the Elector of Brand- 
enburg as Major General. From this Gaudie spring quite a number of famous 
Prussian Military' leaders. One of them is mentioned by Frederick the Great, 
in his Memoires de Brandenburg in connection with the siege of Stralsund, then oc- 
cupied by the Swedes under Charles XII., as the Prussian officer who facilitated 
the attacking of the Swedish trenches. It appears that Gaudy recollected having, 
in his school days at Stralsund, bathed in the arm of the sea near the ramparts, 
finding it neither deep nor muddy. To make sure of the matter, however, he sound- 
ed it in the night and found that the Prussians might ford it, turn to the left of the 
Swedish trenches and thus take the enemy in flank and rear. This was success- 
fully done and the merit of defeating such a renowned soldier as Charles XII. was 
due, in part at least, to a man of Scottish origin. 

Another Gaudy, son of the above, was attached to the staff of Field-Marshal 
Keith. He was a most intelligent officer and wrote a Diary of the Seven Years 
War in ten folio volumes of manuscript still preserved, but unpublished, in the 
Archives of the "General Stab" at Berlin. He also wrote treatises on fortification. 

A third representative of this branch of the family was Fred W. Leopold Von 
Gaudy, Lieutenant-Colonel of Infantry and Knight of the Order pour le Merite 
in 1809. His son became the famous soldier-poet Franz Von Gaudy, who was 
called, though not very aptly, the "Burns and Beranger of the Fatherland rolled 
into one". The simplicity and sweetness of his lyrics is still much admired in 
Germany. See portrait. 

Descendants of this old Ayrshire family are still to be met with in the Prussian 
Army Lists. 

Elsewhere in Germany the following names were recently to be found, viz: 

In Konigsburg, Adolpe Gode and Robert Gode. 




BARON VON GOUDY. 



GADE AND VON GAUDY. 221 

In Leipzig, C. G. Gaudig, Chemist, 
In Magdeburg, Gust Goede. 

Baron Von Gaudy, Franz-Bernhard-Henrich-Willielm Von Gaudy, a German 
author, was born in Frankfort-on-the-Oder in the year 1800. He was descended 
from the family of Goudie at Craigmuir, Dumfriesshire, Scotland, and from a 
military ancestry of renown in Prussia. In 1818 he entered the Prussian army, but 
resigned from the service in 1833 to follow a wholly literary career, and at Berlin was 
a friend of Chamissa, with whom he edited the Deutscher Musenslmonach for 
1839. His best-known work is his humorous and frequently epigrammatic verse. 
Some of his poems became widely popular. The more important of his writings 
appeared at Berlin in 1853 (8 vols.), edited by Arthur Muller. See his portrait 
in this work. He died Feb. 5, 1840. 






60lx)irn Jfamilbs in Ulster, |itlantr, 



C^e #otobbs of P^tototoitartrs, |r^kntr. 

Prologue. As Newtownards and the immediate neighborhood was the place 
v/here many of the families that removed from Ayrshire, Scotland, settled and 
from whence their descendants emigrated to the American colonies, it seems appro- 
priate to present a comprehensive description of the locality before proceeding 
with the history of the several families in particular. The district was and is 
locally known as "The Ards". Newtownards proper is a market town in the county 
of Down in the province of Ulster, in the north of Ireland, which has had a variable 
population, and in 1871 it was estimated as 9837. A well-informed writer has 
stated that the Ards consisted of a peninsula eighteen miles long which was an 
ancient country of the O'Neills which is now the most Presbyterian district in 
Ulster. Long before the settlement in the seventeenth century which planted a 
new people, a new faith, and a new civilization in the country, the Ards had been 
swept clean of the old Celtic race by war. So complete had been the efTacement 
that the names of the old parishes and ecclesiastical divisions had been obliterated 
from the minds of the present inhabitants, and nothing remains to tell of its old 
possessors but the ruins of a few abbeys and churches. The Ards has a pictur- 
esque beauty of its own, which it derives mainly from its situation between the 
two seas. Lough Strangford on the one side, with its scattered islands and castles, 
and the Irish Sea on the other, with its constant sea-going commerce. The surface 
is curved and sloped and undulating, with fertile corn lands, wide pastures and 
stripe of bleak moor covering its whole extent. There is a dearth of trees, except 
at gentlemen's seats, which are surrounded by ornamental culture, for the farmers 
of the Ards cultivate nearly all of the soil. The country is dotted over with 
neat farm-houses which bespeak the industrious, thrifty and contented character 
of the peasantry. 

The people of the Ards are Scotch in blood and character and there is no interrup- 
tion in the continuity of the race between the peoples on the two sides of the chan- 
nel that separates Ireland from Scotland. The very isolation of the peninsula 
has preserved its primitive distinction and the language brought from the Lowlands 
of Ayrshire, Kirkudbrightshire and Dumfriesshire remains the same Doric as 
used by Burns. The inhabitants exhibit all of the characteristics of the Scot- 
tish peasantry, shrewd, cautious, tenacious of purpose and thoroughly Scotch in 
the possession of dry humor. But the peoples of the Ards have their serious 
as well as their humorous side. All roads lead to the meeting-house as any 
observer would admit as he saw the families wending their way to the sanctuary 
on every Sabbath morning, and the homes of the sturdy farmers are radiated with 



NOTE. — To show the zeal and courage of the women of the Scotch-Irish race in Ulster we have only 
to relate how an Episcopalian minister was sent to replace a Presbj-terian in the county Down. The 
coming of this minister was so obnoxious to the Presbyterians of the parish that the women assembled 
at the church and pulled him from the pulpit, tearing his white surplice into ribbons. At their trial 
one of the female witnesses delivered herself as follows : "An maun 1 tell the truth, the haile truth, 
and nathing but the truth" ? This you must do, answered the Court. "Well, then", was her fearless 
avowal, "These are the hands that poo'd the white sark ower his head". 



GOIVDV FAMILIES IN ULSTER, IRELAND. 223 

the unostentatious piety so beautifully pictured by Burns in his "Cotter's Saturday 
Night". 

In this district the Goudies from Ayrshire sat down and still lived in constant 
touch with their kindred and old neighbors on the other side of the channel. The 
town was settled under the patronage of Sir Hugh Montgomery and became a 
fine market for supplying the Scotch settlers from the Ayrshire parishes. To this 
town the farmers from those sections shipped their meal and oats, and it may be 
assumed with plausibility that many a consignment from the old Cragie Mill 
was sent over by the Goudie family and sold to their kindred who had settled 
in Newtownards. A writer in the "Montgomery Manuscripts" said, "1 have 
heard honest old men say that in June, July and August, 1607, people came from 
Stranraer four miles, and left their horses at that port and after their passage, 
hired horses at Donaghadee, came with their wares to Newton in the Ards and sold 
them; dined there, staid two or three hours, and returned to their homes the same 
day by bedtime, their land-journey being but twenty miles. Such was their 
encouragement for a ready market, and their kind desire to see and supply their 
kindred and friends". 

The town of Newtownards of to-day is well built; contains a courthouse, town- 
hall and market-square; it has quite extensive muslin, flax-spinning and weaving 
factories. There are seven Presbyterian meeting-houses and these indicate the 
strength of that denomination in the community. 

From this locality and such influences came the Scotch-Irish families that were 
early planted in the American colonies, and the characters of their fathers were 
perpetuated among their children and posterity. 



Sc0trb-|risb Mrnistcrs, 



CS' 






Rev. John Gowdy was the first of the name settled as pastor over the Presby- 
terian church at Ballywalter. In a work titled "The Scotch-Irish in North Britain 
and North America", we learn that John Gowdy was schoolmaster from the parish 
of Galston, Ayrshire, Scotland, and taught in the county of Down, Ireland, from 
1681 to 1688. As the latter date was that of the ordination of Rev. John Gowdy 
as minister of Ballywalter, we shall assume that the two were identical. The des- 
ignation of the place of his nativity is of especial interest because it proves that 
he was descended from the ancient family of Millers at Cragie Mill in the parish 
of Galston, Ayrshire. From a "History of the Presbyterians in Ireland", by 
Withrow, the following was taken: "John Goudy became the minister of Bally- 
walter in 1688. He survived the revolution, and the debates of the non-Subscrip- 
tion Controversy, and died 20th of March, 1733. He is said to have published 
a sermon preached at the administration of the Lord's Supper. If any copy of this 
exists, I have not seen it. That it once existed, I only know through the MS, 
Catalogue of Dr. Reid. 

Tradition speaks of him as "Goudy the Prophet" by way of distinction among 
the ministers of this name connected with Ballywalter. In a letter from Rev. 
Robert Jeffrey of Greyabbey, under date 25th of June, 1875, he says: "I have 
inquired more fully into the 'Prophet'. He foretold the death of Queen Antie, 
on a certain day, and on that day she died. He foretold the ruin of the Eclilin- 
ville (a local) family in a particular way, and it happened, as foretold. He foretold 
the 'Split' in his own congregation, and it happened. These are samples of things 
which gained for him the name by which he is altogether known here now. They 
are too absurd to write about seriously, but they are worth giving as curious speci- 
mens among others, as furnishing the basis of a name which has survived for more 
than a century". 

Tradition has brought forward in the district many quaint expressions spoken 
by "Prophet Goudy" of which the following touching the rigid sectarian spirit 
that existed among the different factions in the Presbyterian church is one: "An 
extreme subscriber would not hoe corn with a non-subscriber." His son, Rev- 
Robert Goudy, joined the non-subscribing Presbytery of Antrim. 

He had the honor extended to very few indeed, that of being interred within 
the walls of the ancient Abbey of Greyabbey. The following is a copy of the 
inscription on his tombstone: "Here lyes ye body of ye Rev'd Mr. John Goudy: 
who departed this life March ye 26th, 1733, in ye 78th year of his age: minister 
of ye congregation of Ballywalter & Greyabbey nigh ye space of 40 years. Also 
of his wife Margaret Goudy: who departed this life, March ye 2nd 1725 in ye 
58th year of her age, with six of their children". 

Rev. Alexander Goudy was ordained at Donaghadee, Ireland, March 14, 1780; 
resigned June 30, 1791; deposed in August, 1804, and went to America. He was 
under the care of the Bangor Presbytery and then a native of the "Ards." 

Rev. Robert Goudy in Dunover, near Milli He was executed in New- 

townards June 1798 for complicity in the Rebellion. Family connection unknown. 




REV. ALEXANDER P. GOUDY, D.D. 



SCOTCH-IRISH MINISTERS. 225 

Rev. James Goudy was ordained at Clontilew, Ireland, March 25, 1790, and 
died Sept. 10, 1826. He was third son of John Goudy of Newtownards, County 
Down, in Ireland, and father of a James Goudy, a student there in 1821-22. 

All of the ministers above named were natives of the Ards Peninsula, except 
"the Prophet." It is believed that he was a native of Ayrshire, Scotland, and 
formerly a schoolmaster. 

Rev. Robert Goudy, son of the preceding, was the minister of the Presbyterian 
congregation of Ballywalter from the year 1734 till that of 1761. He seems to have 
been his father's successor. Nothing concerning his character or his ability as 
a preacher has been found. He was a man of education, however, or he would 
not have been called to officiate as pastor of a Presbyterian church at the time 
of his incumbency. 

John Goudy, of the same family, was a sturdy, industrious farmer, a God- 
fearing man so typical of the Scotch-Irish pioneers of Ulster, and lived in the 
Townland of Cunningburn, at a distance of three miles from Newtownards and 
Greyabbey, respectively, along the shores of Lough Strangford. He trained his 
family to follow the path of virtue and truth. 

Rev. Andrew Goudy, son of the preceding, was ordained in Ballywalter on 
the third Tuesday of December, 1802. Of his subsequent life little is known. 
He was a large and powerful man who labored faithfully for seventeen years in a 
quiet but important field and died suddenly when in the prime of life from typhus 
fever contracted while in the performance of his pastoral duties, Dec. 8, 1818. 
He was buried in the old grave-yard of Whitechurch which lies a quarter of a mile 
from Ballywalter. In an obituary notice that appeared in a Belfast newspaper 
at the time of his demise, he was mentioned as "an amiable man who possessed an 
independent and discerning mind, and a generous, affectionate and feeling heart". 
His conduct was guided from principles and marked by integrity while the example 
of his life was an invitation to all who mourned his sudden removal that they should 
become " followers of those who through faith and patience inherit the promises". 
The old house in which he had lived and in which his children were born was stand- 
ing in 1887 and in a good state of preservation. This dwelling was described as 
of two storys, slated, and with bay-windows. A small field intervened between the 
Manse and the seashore. It was attached to a small farm, or glebe, of 30 acres 
which the minister had cultivated. There is a beautiful beach of smooth, yellow 
sand picturesquely dotted with scattered stones which extends for a mile southward 
to Ballyobican, where the old Goudy house stands. There were six children, four 
sons and two daughters, in this family. The sons were Alexander P., the clergyman ; 
John, who went to America and was not afterwards heard from; James, who went 
to America and was not heard from; and Henry, who went to his uncle, Hon. Alex- 
ander Porter, U. S. senator, and died with scarlet fever. All were single men. 

The daughters were named Anna and Matilda. The former was married to 
George Herdman, flaxspinner of Sion Mill, county Tyrone, Ireland, and had a 
large family. Matilda was not married. 

Rev. Alexander Porter Goudy, D.D., was the youngest son of Rev. Andrew 
Goudy of the preceding sketch. His mother was Matilda Porter, daughter of the 
Rev. James Porter, of Greyabbey, who was executed in 1798 for the supposed or 

James Gowdy was a ruling Elder at Newtownards in 1714. 
John Gawdy was a ruling Elder at Drumbo, Down, 1713. 



226 SCOTCH-IRISH MINISTERS. 

real complicity in the conspiring of the United Irishmen of that time. He was 
born in the very heart of one of the oldest Presbyterian settlements in the Ards, 
beside Ballywalter, in February, 1809. This small town, on the eastern side of 
the peninsula, bordering on the sea with its quiet, industrious population of farmers, 
tradesmen, fishermen and sailors, was settled by the Presbyterians during the 
first years of the 17th century. Mrs. Goudy was very young at her father's death 
and remembered little of the terrible tragedy on the Greyabbey Green. She was 
of a buoyant temperament and kept all around her alive and stirring; she was 
the loving centre of everything kind, good and true, to make all labor light and 
duty pleasant. All loved her and vied with each other in doing her honor. The 
minister's home at Ballywalter, must have been a happy retreat, full of quiet 
pleasure, healthful activity, and gentle charities forming the purest elements in 
which a young life could develop and receive its first impressions of truth and duty. 
In this family there were four sons and two daughters, the latter being at home 
with the mother in 1887. The three eldest sons went to America in their young 
manhood to join their uncles, the Porters, and soon died. The youngest was 
Alexander Porter Goudy, named in honor of his uncle the American Judge. He 
had no teacher but his father until his tenth year; indeed his father kept a school 
several years for the benefit of his children. Young Alexander was a true "son 
of the manse". His uncle in the United States used every inducement to have 
him study law and seek a wider career, but he adhered to his inclinations and 
sought to prepare himself for the sacred calling. He was a quiet, studious boy, 
rather shy and sensitive among strangers and addicted to solitude and the society 
of books. He was fond of resorting to a ledge of rocks just behind his father's 
house at Ballyobicon where he would sit for hours with his book. He was possessed 
with a richly observant nature and his youthful mind became the receptive treasury 
of everything useful. While young he was placed in the preparatory department 
of the Belfast Academical Institution. Through the good offices of a friend the 
Goudy boys were provided with lodgings in Hercules Street, Belfast, and here 
they had the society of their venerable grandmother, Mrs. Porter, who through 
the kindness of her sons in America had been transferred from Greyabbey to the 
city of Belfast. Here young Goudy remained for twelve years. After four years 
in the preparatory studies at the Belfast Institution, Alexander P. Goudy passed 
the entrance examination of the Belfast College in Greek and Latin in 1823 and 
was formally enrolled as a student on its books. He was fortunate during his 
college days in having the instruction of eminent educators and the history of his 
life there shows how quickly he responded to all of the best influences about him. 
He was twice prizeman in Hebrew; he was awarded a prize in elocution in 1824 
and received the medal for reading in 1830. He was thus preparing to take his 
place as one of the orators of his day. In 1827 he obtained his general certificate, 
which represent,ed at that time the degree in arts of a university, and at the same 
time won a faculty prize for an essay on "Instinct". During this period of his 
career he was engaged in debate with Hagan almost every week and here he began 
to manifest the sharp and refreshing wit which delighted his audiences in after 
years. In one of these intellectual encounters he won a prize offered by the 
society (a handsome edition of Johnson's Lives of the Poets) which has since 
been treasured by his family in Ayr, Scotland. In 1828 he appeared before the 
Theological Examining Committee with the purpose of entering the theological 
class. In the ensuing year Alexander P. Goudy entered the class of systematic 
Theolog>', and finished his collegiate course in 1830. His career as a student 



SCOTCH-IRISH MINISTERS. 227 

was prophetic of greater things to come. He had kept up the most affectionate 
relations with his Ballywalter home during the twelve years of his life in Belfast, 
and when making a visit to his mother and sisters, always carried some well-chosen 
present as an expression of his considerate love for them. His mother said he had 
never given her a moment's anxiety, and his sisters almost adored him. 

He was licensed to preach Dec. 29, 1830, by the Bangor Presbytery, and in 
September 1831, he received a call from the congregation of Gastry, in the Ards, 
and thus became a minister of the Synod of Ulster. For more than two centuries 
the Presbyterians had held this ground, the whole surrounding country was given 
to agriculural pursuits and his congregation was largely composed of a shrewd 
discriminating class of farmers and their families. The meeting house was an old- 
fashioned structure, uninviting in exterior appearance and cruciform in shape. 
Here Mr. Goudy resided with his mother and sisters at Ballyobicon House, near 
Ballywalter, and rode over three miles to Glastry every Sabbath morning to 
minister to his admiring fiock. A wealthy farmer who appreciated the young 
pastor, presented him with a horse and carriage to help him. His congregation 
rapidly increased and several very influential Episcopalian families often frequented 
the church. The tradition of the neighborhood represented Mr. Goudy as an 
able and attractive preacher. He preached two sermons each Sabbath, writing 
out his thoughts and committing them to memory. He was an ardent advocate 
of the cardinal doctrines of his church and was cordially upheld by hi? congregation. 
However, the labor of preparing and preaching two sermons was too severe and 
he sought for a change which was soon opened up for him at Strabane. His call 
to the new field was voted on the 17th of February, 1833, and his installation on 
the 20th of March following. He was then only twenty-four years of age. He 
was most cordially received by his congregation. His aggressive preaching suited 
them. He was well posted in theology and never afraid to speak the truth. We 
must pass with mere mention the great controversy of a theological and political 
character in which Dr. Goudy was prominently engaged to give our attention to 
a banquet held in his honor that showed, notwithstanding the strong prejudice 
excited against him in consequence of his determined attitude upon the questions 
discussed by him, a large number of the local population about Strabane rose 
superior to such considerations and manifested a public spirit of confidence and 
generosity. On the 1st of September, 1854, he was presented with a tea and 
coffee service of solid silver and a purse of two hundred sovereigns. An able 
address was given on the occasion in the Town Hall in the name of the congregation 
in which they gave expression to their estimation of the professional and private 
life of their minister. We present an extract. 



Dr. Goudy as a Minister. 

"In the intercourse of private life, we have ever found you the dignified yet 
affable and cheerful companion, the kind and confidential friend, maintaining 
the bearing of the educated and accomplished gentleman, combined with the 
graces of the Christian. At a time when so much dishonor is brought upon religion 
by exhibiting the form without the power of godliness, we rejoice to recognize 
in you that piety which indicates itself rather by practice than profession, and 
which is not too elevated to be allied to the humble essential virtues of truth, in- 
tegrity, and high-toned Christian principle. Your private demeanour among us 



228 SCOTCH-IRISH MINISTERS. 

had faithfully reflected your public teaching. Your doctrine and your life, co- 
incident, have exhibited lucid proof that you are honest in the sacred cause. As 
a pastor and teacher, your congregation highly appreciate your exposition of 
evangelical truth, and your earnest inculcation of Christian obligation and duty. 
In common with all the lovers of sound doctrine in this community, they acknowl- 
edge with gratitude your untiring and successful efforts to raise and uphold the 
standard of orthodoxy, and to expose and refute the errors which aim at its sub- 
version. In the routine of parochial visitation, and in the instruction of the youth 
of your charge, whether in daily or in Sabbath schools, they have ever found you 
most attractive; while at the bedside of the sick, and in the house of the mourning 
you have acted the part of a sympathizing comforter". 

To this complimentary address, the Doctor responded in a reply, couched in 
words of truth and power, in which he gratefully acknowledged their kindness, 
and took occasion to reiterate the well-known sentiments, already associated with 
his name. It appears patent that certain persons in his congregation had used 
some financial influence to cause a compromise of principle or expression, and the 
sentiment he enunciated shows the mettle of which he was composed. 

"I abhor and repudiate such a spirit (Sectarian). I would desire ever to 
contend, not against persons but against principle . . not for the triumph of party, 
but for the faith delivered to the saints. To expose and condemn a man's errors 
is not sectarianism, but charity; instead of displaying hatred, it is the test and 
touchstone of true affection. Why should I be regarded as a man's or a church's 
enemy because I tell them the truth? I rejoice that I have always lived in friendly 
social relations with my fellow-men of all creeds and classes. I expect to continue 
to do so. I hold it to be not only right but the sacred duty of all, but especially 
of ministers of the gospel, to canvass freely, and if necessary, to denounce the 
opinions of men and the claims of churches. I respect conscientious conviction 
wherever I find it, even when I believe it is wrong; and I shake hands cordially 
with all who hold the head over the barriers of our denominational distinctions. 
I reserve my contempt, deep, settled, and immovable, for those who stifle convic- 
tion at the call of self-interest and meanly desert, from worldly considerations, that 
faith which their fathers have handed down to them, and which the blood of 
many martyrs have sealed." 

The evening dinner was a joyous affair. Dr. Goudy was the centre of attraction, 
and, in response to the toast of his health, he made another speech, closing with 
the following grateful and manly words: 

The valuable present they that day had given him, would be handed down 
to his children's children, who would ever prize it as their father's most precious 
legacy; and when the rank grass waved over them whom he now addressed, his 
descendants would proudly point to that splendid gift and say: "On the 1st of Sep- 
tember, 1854, with this was our ancestor honored by the generous people of Strabane 
and the true-hearted Presbyterians of Ireland". In conclusion, let them always 
hold fast by the Presbyterianism of their fathers, let them never sully the 
blue banner of the Covenant. Come what might, happen what would, let them 
ever stand by their beloved Zion; and no matter how governments frowned upon 
them, no matter how enemies defamed them, even if poverty and persecution 
stared them in the face, they would still hold by the true-blue Presbyterianism 
for which Henderson and Melville suffered . . the religion of him over whose grave 
was pronounced the eulogy which they ought to be able to say of every Presbyte- 
rian: "He never feared the face of man". 



SCOTCH-IRISH MINISTERS. 229 

In 1857 Mr. Goudy received the highest mark of honor from his brethen which 
it was in their power to bestow. He was appointed Moderator of the General 
Assembly. No man who ever filled that chair presided with more dignity and 
grace. He was courteous to all and exercised his authority with impartiality. 
Every one listened with admiration to his classic language and with interest to 
his wit. 

As an orator Mr. Goudy was endowed with many excellent parts. He was 
dignified in manner, literary in style, ardent in feeling, able when excited to let 
loose upon a meeting a whole torrent of rhetoric, while he had this quality dominat- 
ing all others, that so long as he believed his case was to be good he did not fear 
the face of any man. He was gifted with a noble presence, fine address, and a 
clear and musical voice. He had an infinite fund of wit and humor in his nature, 
and, when occasion provoked it, his oratory burst out into a strain of invective 
that was overwhelming and irresistible. 

To show the character of the man the following episode which occurred during 
one of the discussions in the General Assembly, is illustrative: Dr. Cook had made 
some remark that seemed to reflect upon Dr. Goudy, and rising in his seat, demanded 
that the Moderator request the offender to retract, when that member retort- 
ing. Dr. Goudy said: "Moderator, if you don't call upon Dr. Cook to retract the 
epithet I will fasten upon him a designation that will be more inconvenient, for 
I am determined that I, for one, will not submit to the characteristic and perpetual 
slang and buffoonery of Dr. Cook ". This produced great excitement in the Assemb- 
ly and some of the members asked that the Moderator request Dr. Cook to retract, 
but the offending clergyman said, "I retract and am sorry", and the storm abated. 

He preached his last sermon on Dec. 5th, 1858, and being taken suddenly ill 
while in Dublin, died on Dec. 14th following. The immediate cause of his death 
was the thickening of the upper plate of his skull and consequent pressure upon 
the brain, interfering with its normal action. This sad event took place in the 
Verdon Hotel. Eminent medical skill was brought into requisition, but without 
avail; the malady was incurable. His wife had been sent for, the message was 
delayed and she did not arrive until a few minutes after his death. The unex- 
pected news of the death of Dr. Goudy was the cause of deep and wide-spread 
sorrow throughout the whole north-western section of the country where his work 
and character were so admired. 

From some of the discourses preached on the day of his burial the following 
extracts were taken: " Duty was his guide. All men knew that self-interest, lucre, 
popularity, even private friendship, could not bend him one inch from the straight- 
foiAvard path of duty. He had respect to the recompense of reward, and there- 
fore he was no respecter of persons. Some may have blamed him because he spoke 
out all his mind, but it was in the simplicity and godly sincerity of an honest heart; 
he could not connive at injustice, he could not extenuate error, he could not sell 
the truth which Christ bought with a price, he could not betray his friend, he could 
not make traffic either of his conscience or his country, he could not barter the 
independence of his church for a mess of pottage. Yet how frank, and generous, 
and kind-hearted was this true man in his intellectual strength! With the might 
of a giant he had the innocent playfulness of a child. Neither the scowl of the 
bigot, nor the harsh sternness of the ascetic, sat upon his ample and open brow. 
Grace sanctified his mighty gifts and rare accomplishments. He was a chosen 
vessel fit for the Master's service, a polished shaft, swift, keen, irresistible as the 
lightning of heaven". 



230 SCOTCH-IRISH MINISTERS. 



Mr. Goudy was a man of humorous temperament, and had an intuitive faculty 
of seeing the ludicrous side of men, or of an incident, or of a situation, and never 
failed to find words that gave expression to his feelings. This was not cultivated 
but burst forth spontaneously. He would come out with a pun, or an epithet, 
which was always relished by all except the man whom it touched. When he had 
received a letter which the writer said contained "a coppy" of a certain document 
Dr. Goudy remarked that the gentleman had sown his peas too thickly, for which 
offence he should be rodded and not the peas". When passing a cemetery and 
hearing the soft tones of a piano floating over the tombstones, he said to a fellow- 
traveller, "this must be grave sweet music". At one time the news reached him 
that a woman who had an unamiable temper and who had married late in life, 
had given birth to a son. The Dr. remarked that "though she had been intolerable 
she had not passed bearing". On listening to an orator whose hair had a way 
of standing on end Dr. Goudy remarked that "his head was an infuriated besum". 
But he was prudent and wisely eliminated all such remarks from his pulpit services. 
After the death of Dr. Goudy the family removed to Ayr where Mrs. Goudy 
found a home with her son, Henry Goudy esq., an eminent lawyer, now professor 
of Law in Oxford College, England. Mrs. Isabella Goudy died in Ayr, Scotland, 
11th June, 1906, aged 82 years. See page 203. See portrait. 

Rev. Alexander Porter Goudy married Isabella Kinross, daughter of John 
Kinross, grain merchant of Ayr, Scotland. 

Henry Goudy, A.M., D.C.L., Oxford, England. Honorable LL.D. Edin- 
burgh. Regius Professor of Civil Law, Oxford, since 1893, and Fellow of All 
Souls College. He was born in Ireland Sept. 16, 1848; eldest son of the late 
Rev. Alexander Porter Goudy, D.D., of Strabane, County of Tyrone. Is un- 
married. Education: in private schools; Glasgow, Edinburgh, and Konigsburgh 
University. Advocate of the Scottish Bar; elected Professor of Civil Law, Edin- 
burgh University, 1889; editor Judicial Review from its foundation till 1893; 
official Curator of the Bodlein Library. Publications: joint author of a Manual 
of Local Government in Scotland, 1880; a Treatise on the Law of Bankruptcy 
in Scotland, 1886 (3rd Edition 1903) ; Inaugural Lecture on the Fate of the Roman 
Law north and south of the Tweed, 1894; edited 2nd edition of Muirhead's Private 
Law of Rome, 1898; translated, with notes and additions. Van Jherings' Juris- 
prudence d. tag Lebens, 1904; Trichotomy in Roman Law, 1910; contributor 
of various articles to the Encyclopedia Britannica, etc. Recreation: golf, angling. 
Address: All Souls College, Oxford; Strathmore, West Malvern. Clubs: Reform, 
National Liberal. 

Professor Goudy has manifested an unfaltering interest in this work on the 
family history and genealogy since he was first informed of its prospective publi- 
cation, and has contributed to it such information concerning his own branch of 
the race as he was able. See portrait. 

Jfrom t^£mpk ^atrirk C^iirt^garb. 

"Here lieth the body of Alexander Goudy, son of George Goudy of Ballyespland 
(County Down, Ireland), who departed this life June 30, 1786, aged 25 years; also 
Jenney Hill, wife to George Goudy, who died July the 29th, 1787, AE. 60 years; 
also George Hill, who died June the 22d, 1797, AE. 66 years. 

The above inscription was from the "Journal of the Association for the Preser- 
vation of the Memorials of the Dead in Ireland." The churchyard mentioned 
was near Donaghadee, County Down, Ireland. 




PROF. HENRY GOUDY. 



BALLYSILLAN BRANCH. 231 



^iilbsillan: ^ninxfj. 



Hugh Goudyi (1), of Ballysillan, near Belfast, Ireland, married Rebecca 
Hamilton and was Land Stewart on an estate situated at the junction of the 
Ballymartin and the Shankhill roads now in the borough of Belfast, County of 
Antrim, supposed to have been owned by a Mr. Moore. Hugh Goudy died there, 
but his wife at the house of his son on Rowan Street, Belfast, Ireland. There were 
born to this pair three sons and one daughter, all of whom died at Ballysillan, 
near Belfast. Their names were Thomas, Hugh, William, and Mary. 

CHILJ)REN OF HUGH AND REBECCA HAMILTON GOtTDY. 

1. Thomas Goudy^ (1), son of Hugh^ (1) and Rebecca (Hamilton) Goudy, 
married Sarah Barber and had six children, viz: Mary, Margaret, Hugh, Sarah, 
Rebecca and Jane. 

2. Mary Goudy^ (1), only daughter of Hugh' (1) and Rebecca (Hamilton) Goudy, 
died at Ballysillan, Ireland, a spinster. 

3. William Goudy^ (1), second son of Hugh' (1) and Rebecca (Hamilton) Goudy, 
died unmarried at Ballysillan, Ireland. 

4. Hugh Goudy' (2), third son of Hugh' (1) and Rebecca (Hamilton) Goudy, 

married in Ireland, Margaret Murdock, daughter of John and (Skelton) 

Murdock, who was born in 1834 and died in Chicago, 111., Jan. 13, 1903. Hugh 
was born in 1832 and died in Ballysillan, Ireland, May 5, 1877. These had issue 
six children of whom a daughter died in infancy. He was a flax-dresser by occu- 
pation. The other children were named, William, John, Mary, Jane, Hugh, and 
Margaret-Ann. 

CHILDREN OF THOMAS AND BARBARA GOXTDY. 

1. Mary Goudy' (2), daughter of Thomas^ (1) and Sarah (Barber) Goudy, was 
the wife of John Bain. 

2. Margaret Goudy' (1), second daughter of Thomas' (1) and Sarah (Barber) 
Goudy, was the wife of William Ogle. 

3. Hugh Goudy' (3), a son of Thomas' (1) and Sarah (Barber) Goudy, went to 
Queensland, Australia, about 1880. 

4. Sarah Goudy' (2), daughter of Thomas' (1) and Sarah (Barber) Goudy, is 
said to have been married and living in Canada. 

5. Rebecca Goudy' (1), daughter of Thomas' (1) and Sarah (Barber) Goudy, 
deceased. 

7. Jane Goudy, daughter of Thomas' (1) and Sarah (Barber) Goudy, is deceased. 

CHILDREN OF HUGH AND MARGARET MURDOCK. 

1. William Goudy' (2), eldest son of Hugh' (2) and Margaret (Murdock) Goudy, 
born Aug. 21, 1865, was married and went to Queensland, Australia, in 1885 and 
died at Mount Morgan near Rockhampton, Nov. 16, 1898, leaving a wife and 
children. 



232 SCOTCH-IRISH BRANCH. 

2. John Goudy' (1), second son of Hugh* (2) and Margaret (Murdock) Goudy. 
born Dec. 6, 1867, came to America in 1882, married Margaret Callan in 
1893 in Chicago, 111., and has four children. Occupation is that of Steam and 
Refrigeration Engineer, his residence (1916) in Chicago. See forward for record of 
children. 

3. Mary- Jane Goudy^ (3), daughter of Hugh^ (2) and Margaret (Murdock) 
Goudy, born March 16, 1870, died unmarried in Chicago, 111. 

4. Hugh Goudy' (4), third son of Hugh^ (2) and Margaret (Murdock) Goudy, 
born Sept, 21, 1874, married Lizzie McGuinnis, born in Ireland, April 8, 1877, 
in Belfast and had issue two children: Margaret Goudy, b. in Ireland, Jan. 20, 
1893; Mary, b. in Ireland, Apr. 1, 1895. His wife is dead. He is employed at 
the Stock Yards in Chicago. 

5. Margaret Goudy' (2), daughter of Hugh* (2) and Margaret (Murdock) 
Goudy, born April 8, 1877, was married to Samuel Stewart in Chicago and has 
a large farm in Wisconsin. 

Jfnurtb Reiteration. 

CHrLDREN OF JOHN AND UAHaARET CAUJAK. 

1. William Goudy^ (3), eldest son of John' (1) and Margaret (Callan) Goudy, 
died when one year of age in Chicago, 111. 

2. Ethel-Margaret Goudy* (1), eldest daughter of John' (1) and Margaret 
(Callan) Goudy, is now (1916) assistant librarian at Hood River, Oregon. 

3. Elmer Raymond Goudy* (1), second son of John' (1) and Margaret (Callan) 
Goudy, is now in High School in Chicago, 111. 

4. Norman Goudy* (1), third son of John' (1) and Margaret (Callan) Goudy, 
is now attending the Normal School in Chicago, 111. 



^r0trj)-|rblj ^rmtrl^. 



Arthur Gowdy* (1), son of Alexander* (1) and Sarah (Lorimer) Gowdy, was 
born in Lisborn, Ireland, of pure Scotch-Irish stock, and came to New York City, 
N. Y., where he was employed as a professional gardener. He married in Ireland 
before his emigration Sarah Hogg, of Scotch descent. He died at West Farms, 
N. Y., about 1862, aged 63 years. There were seven children. See forward. 

1. Ann Gowdy' (1), daughter of Arthur* (1) and Sarah (Hogg) Gowdy, born 
March 8, 1836. 

2. Arthur Gowdy' (2), son of Arthur* (1) and Sarah (Hogg) Gowdy, born Oct. 

7, 1838, married and died in Paterson, N. J., leaving one son, Arthur 

Gowdy, living at 262 Hamilton Ave. in said city. 

3. Susan Gowdy' (1), daughter of Arthur* (1) and Sarah (Hogg) Gowdy, born 
Sept. 29, 1840, was married to Craigen. 

4. Alexander Gowdy' (2), son of Arthur* (1) and Sarah (Hogg) Gowdy, born 
June 2, 1842 ; came to New York, N. Y., and engaged in business as a feed merchant. 
He married in West Farms, N. Y., May 4, 1866, Charlotte Briggs, who was 
born in New York, N. Y., Aug. 25, 1841. Alexander Gowdy enlisted at the first 



SCOTCH-IRISH BRANCH. 233 

call to arms when but 18 years of age and registered as 21 years to get into the 
regiment. He took part in the battles of Gettysburg and Antietam. His daugh- 
ter does not know the regiment in which he served. He was made a prisoner 
sometime during the war and was confined in the Rebel prisons of Andersonville 
and Libby; and while in the latter prison was taken with typhoid fever and after 
his exchange received furlough to return home to recuperate. He died in New 
York City May 1, 1908. Children named as follows: — ■ 

I. Fannie Harris Gowdy^ born at West Farms, N. Y., Sept. 18, 1867; 
was married there May 5, 1891, to Millard Fillmore Miller, son 
of Edward and Charlotte (Austin) Miller, born at said place Oct. 6, 
1856. Address, Spring Valley, Rockland Co., N. Y. One child, Edward 
Alexander Miller, b. April 19, 1896. 
II. Charlotte Gowdy^ born at West Farms, N. Y., Nov. 23, 1874; died 
March 8, 1875. 

III. Nellie Briggs Gowdy', born at West Farms, N. Y., July 26, 1876; 
died May 6, 1879. 

IV. Edith Edson Gowdy', born at West Farms, N. Y., June 9, 1879; was 
married May 29, 1906, to Walter Sherwood; residence, 54 Christie 
St., Ridgefield, Park, N. J. One son, Walter Sherwood Jr. 

5. James Gowdy^ (1), son of Arthur^ (1) and Sarah (Hogg) Gowdy, born Sept. 
2, 1848, in Belfast, Ireland; came to America; married in Rahway, N. J., Nov. 
7, 1875, Mary A. Cox, who was born there May 3, 1849. His place of residence 
was (1916) 1496 Hoe Ave., Bronx, N. Y. Carpenter by trade. Children as follows: 

I. Eva C. Gowdy', born in New York City, N. Y., Oct. 18, 1876; was 

married Sept. 30, 1900, to William Wiedenhauft, of Dunellen, N. J. 
II. James Arthur GowDY^ born in New York City, N. Y., Oct. 29, 1882; 
married Nov. 29, 1906, Martha Philips. Residence, Ridgefield 
Park, N. J. 

III. Everet a. Gowdy', born in New York City, N. Y., Aug. 6, 1887; 
was living at home, 1496 Hoe Ave., N. Y., in 1916. 

IV. Sarah F. Gowdy', born in New York City, N. Y., Dec. 25, 1890; living 
at home, 1496 Hoe Ave., N. Y., in 1916. 

6. John Gowdy ' (3), son of Arthur^ (1) and Sarah (Hogg) Gowdy, born 

7. Sarah Gowdy' (2), daughter of Arthur^ (1) and Sarah (Hogg) Gowdy, born. . 



Canabiait ifamilics. 



The Canadian Families. The Dominion Government has long held out such 
liberal inducements to emigrants that hundreds of Scottish families left their 
native land and removed to the Canadian "Bush" where in the wildeiness they sat 
down and established new homes. The conditions of payment were easy and 
every assistance rendered to enable the families of the pioneers to get a footing 
on the soil. As the concessions of land were taken up the emigrants who came 
in at a later period had to go farther back from the older settlements to find 
unoccupied lands, and consequently were deprived of many of the conveniences 
and comforts of the more improved lands and thickly populated districts; the 
dwellings were rude log-houses destitute of every feature of attractiveness. The 
roofs were covered with large "Squares" of bark peeled from the great birches 
with which the forests abounded and were as well protected from the rain as if 
slated. The interior was as rude as the outside. The floors were of hewed timber 
and levelled with the adze. For the "dresser" a few shelves made of boards 
brought from the nearest sawmill were laid upon trenails driven into the log walls. 
The seats for the family were frequently only sawblocks or, at best, clumsy chairs 
filled with strips of elm bark or "splittings" from the coarse-grained ash. The huge 
chimneys were laid up of undressed stones and the broad fireplaces spanned with 
equally broad hearths consumed an enormous quantity of wood and diffused a 
cheerful light and warmth through the room. The few cattle roamed about the 
borders of the clearing and the " tinkle-tonkle " of the cowbells echoeing through 
the forest made merry music for the pioneer families as they toiled at their land- 
clearings. The first crops were grown amongst the blackened stumps and consti- 
tuted the larger part of the settlers' food. However, the pioneer life of these settlers 
was filled with contentment and a sense of rude independence. Exposure to the 
out-of-door air and healthful exercise invested these families with excellent health 
and their simple lives conduced to a happy spirit. 

The foregoing brief picture presents a scene witnessed in many of the pioneer 
homes of the Goudy and Goudie families in the Canadian back-woods during the 
earlier years after their removal from Scotland and Ireland ; but this delineation of 
the first years was soon changed by the improvement of the land and buidings to a 
more pleasing and comfortable state of existence. The forests were rolled back; 
the fields expanded; pastures were extended over the hills; herds of cattle and 
flocks of sheep multiplied; larger and more pretentious houses and out-buildings 
were erected and prosperity crowned the toil of the Canadian husbandman and 
his thrifty family. Early training in frugality and industry bore good fruit in the 
new clearings. Everywhere evidences of these qualities were observed. Luxuries 
common in more advanced settlements were dispensed with till means warranted 
their use. And yet there were many kinds of food available to the pioneers that 
would be considered choice viands among the rich. The forest abounded with game 
and the streams with fish; the new lands opened to the sunlight and showers pro- 
duced wild berries spontaneously and supplied the tables with most delicious food. 

The settler's home presented a scene of pioneer industry from morning till 
night. The wool of the flocks and flax from the fields were dressed by the hands 



CANADIAN FAMILIES. 235 

of the wives and daughters and made into comfortable clothing for the family. 
The spinning-wheels and hand-looms were seen in every house and their music 
passing through the open windows in the summer days cheered the toilers in the 
fields and forests. 

Venerable members of the Goudie families have written the author of this 
work many interesting reminiscences concerning their experiences in their early 
homes on the frontier settlements of Ontario; of some of the hardships and depri- 
vations of the pioneer days when their fathers had to travel long distances to 
mill and market. After their clearings had become sufificiently productive to supply 
a surplus of wheat loads of this grain were drawn by slow-moving teams of oxen 
thirty and forty miles to be sold or exchanged for family supplies. Churches 
were far away and reached on foot or, at best, on long buckboards. Children 
were instructed in the simple rudiments of education at the firesides by their mothers 
and were so well trained in all of the household arts that they were qualified to fill 
the places of the farmer's wife with credit and faithfulness when they were installed 
in homes of their own. The moral atmosphere of these pioneer homes was a 
type pictured by Burns in his "Cotter's Saturday Night". Strict obedience to 
parental government was required. Every precept contained in the scriptures 
was enjoined. Family worship was maintained. Attendance at the sanctuary 
was expected and continued when the state of the roads and conditions of the 
weather permitted. From such home-influences the children went forth into the 
great outside world well qualified to meet its activities and reinforced to resist 
its temptations; they proved to be the best material for a useful citizenship and 
became the founders of homes that were the very basis of a stable government 
and national prosperity. The moral influence emanating from those firesides has 
been passed down to succeeding generations and is felt to-day among the descendants 
of those pioneer ancestors. May it never grow less in the homes of the Goudie 
families of America. See picture of typical home-scene. 



(To the Editor of the Morning Chronicle.) 
"Dear Sir; — Permit me through the medium of your largely circulated paper to 
offer to your readers something which may prove interesting to many of them; 
reminiscences of recollections of the war of 1812 to 1816, being an authentic ac- 
count of the war vessels built during that period by the late John Goudie, ship- 
builder of Quebec. He settled in Canada about the year 1795; commenced ship- 
building in Quebec at the early age of twenty years, and was very successful up to 
1813. And as it may not be generally known who built the fleet of war vessels 
on the different lakes, and being in possession of the facts in the shape of all contracts 
entered into between him and the British Government at that time, it might prove 
interesting to your many readers to know the number of vessels built by them. 
As I am not aware that it has ever been recorded in the History of Canada, I 
have taken upon myself to give the accounts from the actual copies of contracts 
in my possession, as well as letters from Noah Freer, Esq., who was secretary 
of the late Sir Provost, which should prove sufficient vouchers for the truth of 
my assertions of the following remarks: — 

"This then shall be a review of the events of the memorable days of 1812 to 1816, 
of the navy made to cope with the Americans at Kingston, Lake Ontario, and 
Isle aux Noix, Lake Champlain. 



236 CANADIAN FAMILIES. 



"My late father being most earnestly solicited by the late Sir George Prevost, 
Captain General, and then Governor-in-Chief of British North America, to engage 
in building and constructing of the navy; and in June of the year 1813, he in a 
most loyal manner for the good of his country's cause, leaving his own extensive 
shipbuilding operations, went to work, engaging four hundred men as ship-carpen- 
ters, under the express conditions of going personally along with them, and under 
the most trying circumstances of unparalleled difficulty in consequence of his 
destination being the immediate seat of war. Under his immediate direction they 
proceeded to Kingston, then Upper Canada, in order to equip such merchant ships 
as might be found suitable to carry guns to cope with the American fleet, then said 
to be hovering about the lake ready to bombard the town. The fleet being ready, 
he was engaged to go to Kingston to build a ' frigate ' and for such other services 
in the line of his profession as a ship-builder, as might be considered most essential 
and conducive at that most critical period for the security and preservation of the 
Province. 

"Few, if any, of your readers will recognize the difficulties then to be encountered 
in a new and unsettled country, without any or little facilities for transit. ,It was 
a most hazardous and difficult undertaking, having to travel and make the journey 
from Montreal in flat-bottomed boats named 'Batteaux' along the St. Lawrence, 
towing by manual labor for many miles up the numerous and swift rapids, and 
in many parts subject to the annoyance of the enemy's fire from the opposite shore. 

"Although my father had the precaution to have his carpenters dressed in mili- 
tary uniform to deceive the enemy, still that did not deter them when the oppor- 
tunity offered to let them have a shot at long range by way of compliment. It 
required at that time two weeks at least to perform the journy from Montreal to 
Kingston, U. C, which can now be done in a few hours, such is the progress of 
this enlightened age. 

"However, on his and their arrival at Kingston, he took the necessary measures 
for accelerating with all possible dispatch and expedition the preparation and fit- 
ting out and preparing for actual service, the whole of the available merchant 
vessels to form His Majesty's navy in that quarter, and this too was accomplished 
without any fixed arrangement as to remuneration, showing his zeal for the cause. 
The fleet being fully completed, sailed on the lake, and was out on the 30th Sept., 
1813. 

"In the year 1813 he commenced and laid down the frigates 'Prince Regent' 
and 'Princess Charlotta'. They were launched on the 14th day of May, 1814. 
Also the frigate 'Confidence'. This gave to the British the balance of power 
on Lake Ontario. In the meantime, store and barrack accommodation had been 
built at the yard. He also contracted to build another warship at Kingston, to 
mount one hundred and twenty guns, to be named the 'Royal George.' But 
I believe she was named the 'St. Lawrence.' She had to be launched in May, 
1815. She was built and launched, but never went into actual service. A number 
of vessels were left on the stocks unfinished. Her dimensions were 170 feet keel, 
53 feet beam and measured two thousand one hundred and fifty tons. She was 
in all probability the largest vessel ever built to this day on Lake Ontario. I was 
informed that this immense ship was sold at auction with other Government 
property for the very small sum of £50, or $200. A gentleman brewer of King- 
ston was the purchaser. This vessel had three flush decks; two were taken off for 
the sake of the iron bolts, and she was then sunk on the lake shore as an accommo- 
dation to the brewery, to pile cordwood on her during the years 1814, 1815 and 1816. 



CANADIAN FAMILIES. 237 



"John Goudie contracted and built at Isle aux Noix, Lake Champlain, in 1814. 
three frigates; also eleven gunboats and one provision vessel, the whole to be 
launched in May, 1816. He also built six gunboats in his own yard, St. Roach's, 
Quebec, and a schooner of 120 tons. This, then, concluded his building for the 
Government, as peace was proclaimed, and many vessels remained on the stocks 
until rotten and worthless. 

"From my father's indefatigable exertions, I think, he helped largely to save 
the Province from invasion, and I am not aware if it has ever been noticed in the 
history of Canada of what he had accomplished for the cause at that critical period 
of the war. He should certainly deserve from his country something more than a 
passing notice, and stamp him as one of the benefactors of his adopted country. 
He died at the early age of 49 in the year 1824. 

"He was of Scotch descent. It is strange to say Henr>' Eckford, Esq., the New 
York ship-builder, served his time in Quebec, in the ship-yards of his uncle, Mr. 
John Black. At the age of 21 Mr. Eckford settled in New York, and became the 
builder for the American Government on the lakes. He was a great personal 
friend of my father. I trust it will not be out of place to say, not only did my 
father serve his country faithfully, and in a most loyal manner, but he proved 
himself an enterprising and spirited citizen. 

"The most valuable improvements which he was the means of introducing into the 
city of Quebec, besides his large and extensive ship-building operations, I think may 
not be out of place to mention; as a self-made man, showing his energy and perse- 
verance under the most trying circumstances, working himself up to one of the 
foremost men of his days. In business transactions he proved himself very 
successful. 

"The first enterprise after the war was the building of a steam flour and sawmill 
connected; it was the first steam mill erected in Canada, having been built in the 
year 1815. This was a first-class mill in every respect. The flouring department 
had four run of stones, and all the fittings to make it a success. The sawmill was 
also on the most extensive scale for sawing all kinds of lumber. It had four gangs 
of upright saws containing 22 saws in each gang, also a number of circular saws for 
sawing shingles, laths, etc. He also introduced machinery for the manufacture 
of cut-nails, the first of its kind to be imported into this country. The surprise 
amongst carpenters was great when it was found that nails could be driven into 
wood without the use of a gimlet, and the word was passed around from one to 
another, we shall have no more use for the gimlet. This, then, was one of the won- 
derful improvements of that age now almost forgotten. 

"The fly wheel connected with the mill was another astonishing sight of the time. 
The engine, which had a large walking beam, was 48 horse power, but it could be 
made to reach a much higher force. The three very large boilers were brought 
from Scotland on the deck of a ship. These were plugged and floated to the mill, 
being the first iron vessels floated in Canadian waters. Considering the fact that 
there was no foundry in the country capable of casting any of the machinery and 
that every part had to be imported, even the workmen and engineers to set it up 
came from Glasgow. When any part of the machinery was broken, duplicates had 
to be procured from Scotland to replace it, causing a delay of several months. 

"Besides these difficulties he had to contend with the opposition of the laboring 
classes who exhibited much dissatisfaction at the introduction of steam power for 
sawing purposes, as he introduced the sawing of square timber into plank for his 
ship-building purposes. This work had been done by whip-sawyers placed above 



238 CANADIAN FAMILIES. 

and below the timber and was looked upon as an infringement upon their craft; 
and so vehement was the opposition that his mill was several times set on fire, 
and it was ultimately destroyed with all its contents, resulting in a loss of 
£10,262-15-8. He afterwards rebuilt the sawmill which after his death in 1824 re- 
mained idle for some time; then was sold with the rest of his estate and went to 
ruin. The brick chimney, over one hundred feet in height, was left standing as 
the only monument to mark the spot where he had built so many vessels. 

"John Goudie also built the first steamboat in Quebec for the Montreal passen- 
ger trade, named the ' Quebec. ' The launching operations were then novel. Her 
two engines were fitted up and completed on the stocks, and when ready for launch- 
ing steam was raised and she slid into the water and sailed down to the Lower 
Town, where a number of invited guests went on board and took a trip around the 
Island of Orleans, and returned to the city well pleased with the conduct of the 
first steamer ever launched in Canada with the steam up. She was at one time 
commanded by the well known Captain Hall. 

"Mr. Goudy also built the first stern ferry boat, a double-ender, having a rudder 
at both ends; this was named the 'Lawson' and plied between Quebec and Point 
Levis in 1819. This enterprise and the building of the large hotel at the town oppo- 
site the city known as the 'MacKenzie Hotel', and the landing wharf and its 
floating slip, was due in a great measure to the enterprise of our subject and was 
evidently the starting point of the present 'Town of Levis.' He also built the 
first deep water wharf in the city of Quebec, known as the "Gibbs Wharf. " It 
would seem, though unmeaningly, that not a bit of fame in history was to be 
accorded him; not even the name of the wharf was allowed to remain to his credit, 
or the name of the street, in the suburbs of 'St. Roach', which he had mainly 
been instrumental in settling with inhabitants, by contributing later for their sup- 
port. It was considered at that time a hazardous undertaking to build a deep- 
water wharf on the St. Lawrence beyond what is known as the bank, especially 
as the pressure of ice in winter was menacing, but Goudie was not daunted by 
public opinion, which strongly denounced the project as 'Goudie's Folly', but the 
structure has stood over sixty years with the necessary repairs. AH the deep- 
water wharves have been built since this experiment ; hence he may be considered 
the inventor and pioneer in this line of structural wharfage. 

"The floating slip in the wharf for the accommodation of landing passengers, was 
also a great convenience, it rising and falling with the tide. The ferry-boat proved 
a great success, thousands crossing to the Point Levis shores for recreation and 
pleasure; particularly when the Indians were in camp there waiting for their pres- 
ents all dressed in their gay attire. He built the first diving bell at Quebec. This 
was constructed for the purpose of removing lost anchors from the harbor, but 
the work was abandoned for want of experienced divers. He also rented the King's 
posts, Labrador, and fitted out a small armed vessel to coast along the shore and 

keep out the smugglers I might say that I am the son of John Goudie, and 

have followed shipbuilding for many years in Quebec, my native city, where I 
was born Dec. 19, 1809. (Signed) James Goudie Sr., North Evanstown, Ills., Jan. 
24, 1883." 



CANADIAN FAMILIES. 239 



#oui)us ill Caitatni from liwrsbiw, Scotlantr. 

Stauffville Branch. 

Hugh Goudie^ (1), farmer, was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, June 12, 1792, and 
was descended from the ancient family for four hundred years settled at Cragie 
Mill on the Cessnock water in the parish of Galston, in the same county. He 
married in his native country in 1815, Jane Aird. He came to Canada in the year 
1828 and settled on a farm near the city of Guelph in the county of Wellington, 
province of Ontario. Later, about 1850, he went to live with his son David in 
Waterloo county, Ontario, where he died Dec. 16, 1874, aged 82 years, 11 months 
and 4 days. Jane (Aird) Goudie, wife of Hugh Goudie, born in Ayrshire, Scotland, 
January 1792, came to Canada with her husband and family and died in January, 
1855, aged 63 years. These had a family of seven children, named: Margaret, 
David, John, Martha, Jane, Janet, and Agnes. 



^^fontr #mtrati0it. 

1. Margaret Goudie^ (1), eldest daughter of Hugh* (1) and Jane (Aird) Goudie, 
born in Ayrshire, Scotland, was married to William McConnell. They came 
over to Canada in the year 1828. They settled on a farm in Garafaxa Township, 
Wellington county, Ontario, where they died. Their six children, nearly all born 
in Canada, were named as follows: Quintin, Hugh, John, Archibald, David, and 
Jennie. 

2. David Goudie* (1), eldest son of Hugh* (1) and Jane (Aird) Goudie, born 
in Ballantrae, Ayrshire, Scutland, May 28, 1816, came to Canada in the year 
1828. He married June 17, 1841, Sarah Fathers, who was born Oct. 16, 1822, in 
South Cayuga Township, Haldiman county, Ontario, and died Oct. 28, 1842, 
aged 19 years, 10 months and 12 days. Mr. Goudie married 2nd, Dec. 18, 1843, 
Nancy Warner, near Hespeler, Waterloo county, Ont., where the family lived 
on a farm till the spring of 1879, when, being too feeble to longer continue the care 
and labor he sold out and removed to Berlin, Ont., where he bought land and 
resumed his old occupation, farming near Breslaw, Ont., where he died Dec. 25, 
1896, aged 80 years, 6 months and 26 days. Nancy (Warner) Goudie, born Feb. 
27, 1825, near Hespeler, Waterloo, Ontario, died Nov. 20, 1906, aged 81 years, 
8 months and 23 days. Children's names as follows: Emily, Benjamin, John, 
David, Henry, Isaac, Abram, Tobias, James, Jacob, and Samuel. See forward. 

3. John Goudie^ (1), second son of Hugh* (1) and Jane (Aird) Goudie, was 
a seaman. He was married and had issue, but we have no particulars concerning 
him. His four children were named: David, Joseph, Mary, and Matilda. 

4. Martha Goudie- (1), second daughter of Hugh* (1) and Jane (Aird) Goudie, 
was the wife of James Dickson, but aside from the names of their children we 
have no particulars concerning their home and lives. Six children named as 
follows: John (Rev.), Jennie, Hugh, Matilda, James, and Maggie. 

5. Jane Goudie* (1), third daughter of Hugh* (1) and Jane (Aird) Goudie, was 
married to Frank Diggins, and both died in Gait, Ontario, without issue. 

6. Janet Goudie* (1), third daughter of Hugh* (1) and Jane (Aird) Goudie, 
was married to a Mr. McCursic and was the mother of two children, viz. 



240 CANADIAN FAMILIES. 

I. Jane McCursic, who was married to Robert Douglass and had a 
large family now scattered through the Canadian North-west, Michigan 
and other sections of the United States. 
II. Martha McCursic, of whom nothing more. 
7. Agnes Goudie^ (1), fourth daughter of Hugh* (1) and Jane (Aird) Goudie, 
was married to Thomas Tucker, by whom two children. Both parents deceased. 
Children, Thomas and Jenny. 

Cl^irb #emralion. 

CHrLBREN OF HA.'VTD AKS SARAH (FATHERS) GOUDIE. 

1. Emily Goudie^ (1), eldest daughter of David^ (1) and Sarah (Fathers) Goadie, 
born in South Cayuga, Ontario, May 18, 1842, was married to Samuel Warner, 
and had two sons named as follows: — 

I. David Warner is married and has a family near Goodrich, Ont. 
II. George Warner is married and resides in Bay City, Mich. 

2. Benjamin Goudie^ (1), eldest son of David^ (1) and Sarah (Fathers) Goudie, 
born in Waterloo County, Ont., Oct. 9, 1844, died Aug. 22, 1846. 

3. John Goudie^ (2), second son of David^ (1) and Sarah (Fathers) Goudie, 
born in Waterloo county, Ont., Sept. 3, 1846, married Cober, near Hespeler, Ont., 
and is a farmer. He has two sons and a daughter, named as follows: — 

I. RoMANDUS Goudie^, lives in the Canadian North-west. 
II. Walter Goudie'', lives in Broun City, Mich. 
HI. Mary Goudie*, died when about 19 years of age with diphtheria. 

4. David Goudie^ (2), third son of David* (1) and Sarah (Fathers) Goudie, 
born on the old Goudie homestead, near Hespeler, Ontario, Sept. 12, 1848; mar- 
ried Maria Holm who died in Toronto, Can., Dec. 16, 1893. He married 2nd, in 
December, 1894, Mrs. Martha Resor of Markham Township, Ont. At one time 
he resided at Kitchener where he was a merchant and farmer. He died at his 
home at Laurel Hill February 14, 1918. He is survived by his widow, a daughter 
and three sons; also by seven brothers. He was a member of the Menonite 
Brethren Society and a man of the most exemplary Christian character. The 
pall-bearers at his funeral were his grandsons and nephews. A large assembly of 
relatives and friends were present. Children by his first wife as follows: — 

I. Mary GouDIE^ born Oct. 20, 1871, near Hespeler, Ont.; was married 
Oct. 20, 1891, in Berlin, Ont., to Oliver Pannabecker and died in 
Toronto, Can., Sept. 12, 1914, leaving four children as follows: — 

(1) Harold Pannabecker, born in Sept. 1893, is now a missionary 
in .Shonga, Africa. 

(2) Roy Pannabecker, born in Toronto, Can., in 1896, lives at 
home. 

(3) Mildred Pannabecker, is living at home. 

(4) Earl Pannabecker, born in 1912, is living at home. 

II. Matilda A. Goudie*, born in Waterloo county, Ontario (probably in 
Berlin or Hespeler), Jan. 16, 1865; was married in Toronto, Can., Dec. 
13, 1894, to Rev. J. N. Kitching, son of Thomas and Elizabeth-Ann 
(Stover) Kitching of Shrigley, Ont., who was born June 10, 1869. He 
was brought under the influence of a Christian home, and entering the 
ministry of the Menonite Brethren was ordained when 25 years of age. 
He served as assistant pastor for three years at Bright, Ont., Wetzel, Yale, 



CANADIAN FAMILIES. 241 



and Brown City, Mich. ; then was sent to Port Huron, Mich. He has re- 
turned to Canada where, after regaining his health, he entered the Cana- 
dian Conference again and was elected City Mission President and held 
the position for more than six years, living the most of the time at Owen 
Sound, Ont. He then went to Berlin, now Kitchener, and then, after 
three years, settled in Toronto, October, 1916, where he now resides. 
His first wife, by whom he had three daughters, died in Brown City, 
Sanlac county, Mich., July 15, 1903, and he married 2nd, Miss Hannah 
Little of Kalamazoo, Mich., by whom he has two more children. Names 
of children as follows: — 

(1) Verdella-Mariah Kitching, born at Bright, Ont., Jan. 27, 
1896; died in Brown City, Mich., Jan. 15, 1903. 

(2) Vere-Ruth Kitching, born in Wetzel, Mich., Nov. 26, 1898. 

(3) Bertah - Almon Kitching, born near Yale, Mich., Feb. 5, 
1902; died at Owen Sound, Ont., Jan. 23, 1908. 

(4) Edna-Elizabeth Kitching, born at Shrigley, Ont., Feb. 9, 
1907; died June 13, 1912. 

(5) John-Alvin Kitching, born at Port Owen Sound, Ont., Jan. 
28, 1909. 

hi. William Goudie,^ born near Hespeler, Ont., died in Berlin, Ont., aged 

6 yrs. 
IV. Alfred Goudie, born near Hespeler, Ont., died in Toronto, Can., Feb., 

1912. 

V. Minnie GolTDIE^ born near Hespeler, Ont., was married to Rev. W. P. 
Mendell, now residing in Flora, Ont. Two daughters. 

VI. George GouDIE^ born near Berlin, Ont., married a Miss Adams of 
Toronto, Can., and is now living at Calgary, Alberta. 

vii. Ida Goudie\ born near Berlin, Ont., was married to Charles Hutchins 
of Forgot, Saskatchawan, farmer, July 1, 1905, and died June 28, 1906. 
viii. Orlando Goudie^, born in Berlin, Ont., married Miss Evelyn and 
resides in Detroit, Mich. One child. 
IX. Stanley Irven GoudieS born in Berlin, Ont., April 6, 1891; married 
a Miss Brittain of Toronto, Can. One child. 
5. Rev. Henry Goudie' (1), fourth son of David^ (1) and Sarah (Fathers) 
Goudie, born near Hespeler, Ont., Jan. 16, 1851; married Sarah Wildfang. 
He resides (1917) at Didsbury, Alberta. Seven children named as follows: An- 
gelina, Alzina, Addah, Nancy, Emerline, Royal, and Hezekiah. 

I. Angelina GoudieS was married to Arthur Glendenen, blacksmith, 
of Markham, Ont., and has three children, viz.: Pearl, Rigland, James; 
all at home. Cedar Grove, Ont. 
II. Alzina GouDIE^ was married to Edward Glendenen of Markham, 
Ont., who is a farmer. One son, Ray, at home in Toronto, Can. 

III. Addah GouDIE^ born in Fort Elgin, Ont., was married to Thomas 
Hilts, a farmer, and lives at Northwestern Canada. Several children. 

IV. Nancy GoudieS born in Bedin, Ont., was married to Arthur Evans 
of Stayner, Ont., and has issue Dorothy and Ruth. 

V. Emerilla Goudie\ born at New Dundee, Ont., died at Newmarket, Ont. 

VI. Royal GouDIE^ born at Stayner, Ont., Dec. 5, 1886; married Alice 
White, near Didsbury, Alberta. One child. 

VII. Helkiah GouDIE^ born in Markham, Ont. 



242 CANADIAN FAMILIES. 

6. Isaac Goudie' (1), fifth son of David^ (1) and Sarah (Fathers) Goudie, born 
near Hespeler, Ont., June 26, 1853; married Susanna Witmer near Preston, 
Ont., in 1883. He is in the grocery business. Has five children named: Arthur, 
Russell, Robert-James, Alice, Janet, and Estella. 

7. Abram Goudie' (1), sixth son of David^ (1) and Sarah (Fathers) Goudie, born 
near Hespeler, Ont., Feb. 15, 1856; married Lydia Snyder of Freeport, Ont., in 
1878. He is a teamster. Three children, viz:- Percy, Ada, and Wilfred. 

8. Tobias Goudie' (1), seventh son of David^ (1) and Sarah (Fathers) Goudie, 
born near Hespeler, Ont., April 17, 1858. No other information. 

9. James Goudie' (1), eighth son of David^ (1) and Sarah (Fathers) Goudie, 
born near Hespeler, Ont., May 22, 1860; married in 1881, Miss Caroline Snyder. 
He is a farmer. Three children, Harvey, Ethel, and Elton. 

10. Jacob Goudie' (1), ninth son of David^ (1) and Sarah (Fathers) Goudie, 
born near Hespeler, Ont., Sept. 17, 1863; married Rebecca Hambling and is 
occupied as a laboring man. Three children: Lucy, Willie, and Minnie. 

11. Rev. Samuel Goudie' (1), tenth son of David^ (1) and Sarah (Fathers) 
Goudie, born near Hespeler, Ont, Aug. 11, 1866; married Miss E. J. Smith 
in Greenwood township, St. Clair county, Mich., March 20, 1889. He resides 
at Stauflfville, Ont. There were three children in this family, viz: 

I. Pearl S. Goudie*, born March 20, 1892, at Port Elgin, Ont.; died 

March 20, 1910, at Stauffville, Ont. 
II. Fletcher S. GouD^E^ born July 24, 1895, in Maryborough, Ont. 
III. Howard A. GoudieS born June 23, 1898, in Vineland, Ont. 



doubbs ai Utoboc fiotoits^i|r. 

Canadian Branch. 

John Moffat Gowdie, son of William and Janet (MacVicker) Gowdie of Ayr- 
shire in Scotland, born July 12, 1809; married Mary Graham, daughter of William 
and Marion Graham m Glasgow, Scotland, and removed to Modoc Township, 
Canada, in 1843. He was a silk-weaver by craft, but relinquished his loom in 
exchange for the plough and general agriculture after his settlement in the 
Dominion. He was a staunch Presbyterian in religious faith and belonged to the 
I. O. O. F., and the Orange Lodge was his delight. He died in Modoc Township in 
the year 1859. His brothers and sister were named William, Andrew, Adam, and 
Margaret. John and Mary Gowdie had eleven children, some of whom were still- 
born. In the pioneer days, while clearing away the forest and toiling for sub- 
sistence, family records were neglected and only detached traditionary fragments 
now remain. Issue as follows: 

William Gowdie, son of the preceding, was born April 22, 1837, in Glasgow, 
Scotland, and died Feb. 22, 1838. 

NOTE. — Mary Graham was the daughter of William and Marion Graham. She had three 
sisters. Marion Graham married William Anderson of Glasgow, a wine-merchant. Agnes Graham mar- 
ried Mr. Gonthill of Glasgow. Elizabeth Graham married a Highlander named MacLean. Mrs. Marion 
Gowdie Blakeley of Queensboro, Canada, believes her grandfather's name was Wm. Gowdie who mar- 
ried Janet McVicker. He had sons, William Gowdie, Andrew Gowdie and Adam Gowdie, and a daugh- 
ter, Margaret Gowdie. 



CANADIAN FAMILIES. 243 



Marion Anderson Gowdie, sister of the preceding, was born Feb. 22, 1839, 
in Glasgow, Scotland. Was married July 3, 1860, to William J. Blakely, a farmer 
in Modoc Township, Can., and has supplied information for the family history. 
Children as follows: 

I. John Gowdie Blakely, born April 14, 1861, now a contractor and 

builder in Chatham, Ont. 
n. Edward Morrow Blakely, born Aug. 7, 1864; now a farmer in Bloom- 
field, Ont. 
in. Mary Amber Blakely, born Jan. 16, 1871; now Mrs. James Love, 

farmer in Modoc Township, Can. 
IV. Nancy Bell Blakely, born March 26, 1876; now widow of T. C. Broad, 
Engineer, who went overseas with the First Canadian Contingent in 
Oct. 1914 and was killed in action May 24, 1915, at Festnbert. 
V. Sarah Dean Blakely, born October 3, 1878; is now Mrs. John Delyea, 
farmer in Modoc Township, Can. 

Ann Chambers Gowdie, sister of the above, was born July 14, 1841; died 
Dec. 23, 1841. 

Janet Gowdie, sister of the above, was born in Glasgow, Scotland, Dec. 19, 
1842; died on the sea when coming to Canada and was buried at Groose Isle. 

James Brown Gowdie, brother of the preceding, was born at Bloomfield, 
Prince Edward County, Canada, March 7, 1845, and is now at Grenfell, Sask. 

Andrew Gowdie, brother of the above, was born in Modoc, Canada, June 
11, 1857; died March 5, 1858. 



#oubu-(§0lbh of lUrkmif^atl, Scotlantr. 

Canadian Branch. 

The following notice was published in the Glasgow Weekly Herald several 
years ago: "John and David Goudie emigrated from the parish of Maybole, Ayrshire, 
about 1790. John was a miller but it is not known what occupation David followed. 
Their brother James was a farmer at Plairbuie where their mother died. Any- 
thing known regarding them or their families (if any) will be received by James 
Goudie. Reply to this office". Roswell Goldie of Guelph, Ontario, Canada, 
says these Goudies were not related to his branch of the family. The parishes 
of Kirkoswald, Kirkmichael, and Maybole were close together and it appears 
evident that those brothers must have been of the same stock as those who settled 
in Canada. They were, however, born earlier than the John and David who came 
over later. 



Graham Family.— The children of William and Marion Graham, brothers and sisters of Mrs. Gowdie, 
were: Marion, who was the wife of William Anderson, wine merchant of Glasgow; Agnes, wife of Mr. 
Conthill of Glasgow ; Elizabeth, who married a Highlander named MacLean ; William, and a brother, 
name not known, who was a soldier In India for a number of years and died soon after his return ; 
George, when last heard from was in Philadelphia, U. S. A. 



244 CANADIAN FAMILIES. 



^oubu-#o(bu 0f %m, (Bnhno. 

KiRKOSWALD Branch. 

The earliest mention of this branch of the Goudie-Goldie family was found in 
the ancient church-yard of Kirkoswald, which is a coast village in the Carrick 
district in Ayrshire, Scotland, where some of the ancestors lie buried. In this 
church-yard were also interred the mortal remains of several characters mentioned 
in connection with the life of the poet Robert Burns, among them,"Tam O'Shanter" 
and "Souter Johnnie," In this old and picturesque hamlet Burns spent his 
seventeenth summer in the study of mensuration and made good progress. 

The inscriptions were copied from the church-yard of Kirkmichael : 

Erected 

by 

WILLIAM G0UDIE2 

in memory of 

GILBERT GOUDIE his father, 

late farmer in Tradunnock, 

who died 1st January, 1769, aged 59 years. 

and 

AGNES GOUDIE 

his mother 

who died October 9th, 1788. 

and JEAN his daughter 

who died 20th December, 1812, aged 10 months. 

also the said 

WILLIAM G0UDIE2, 

died 28th April, 1813, aged 60. 

also his wife 

JANET McCLURE 

died 25th January, 1837, aged 69. 

Erected to the memory of 

JAMES GOUDIE^ 

mason, Crosshills. 

who departed this life, 12th April 

1871, aged 76 years. 

also 

AGNES GOUDIE^ 

daughter of the above 

died at Crossbill 

25th August, 1839. 

There is a "Memorial Stone" in the Kirkoswald Cemetery, Ayrshire, erected 
by a William Goudie in memory of his wife, Jane Kennedy, who died at Girvan 
14th November, 1863, aged 26 years. Also William Goudie his son who died 
at Girvan 19th December, 1861, aged 26 years. Also David Goudie his son who 
died 4th January, 1866, aged 23 years. Also the above William Goudie, who died 
at Girvan, 22d April, 1889, aged 86 years. James Goudie, son of the above, died at 
Girvan 19th June, 1904, aged 63 years. Also Margaret Goudie, youngest daughter 




JOHN GOLDIE 
(Botanist). 



CANADIAN FAMILIES. 245 



and last member of this family of the said William Goudie, who died at Girvan 
26 April, 1911, aged 72 years. 

This was evidently the William Goudie, brother of those who removed to Ontario, 
Canada, and his family. The ages correspond with the dates in the Canadian 
families. See inscriptions from the church-yards in Ayrshire. 
The authentic history of this family begins with the name of one: 
Gilbert Goudie^ (1), whose tombstone is in the Kirkmichael church-yard in 
Ayrshire, Scotland; but there can be no doubt of its being descended from the 
ancient family of millers so long settled at Cragie Mill on the Cesnock in the parish 
of Galston; a family that has produced many distinguished men in Scotland 
and its representatives in other lands have given a good account of themselves. 
This Gilbert Goudie was a farmer in Tradunnock, Ayrshire. The inscription 
on his monument shows that he died 4th January, 1769, aged 69 years, and that 
Agnes his widow died 9th October, 1788, aged 88 years. The number of his 
children is not known. 

CHILDREN OF G-ILBERT AITD AGKBS GK>T7I>IE. 

William Goudie* (1), son of Gilbert* (1) and Agnes was buried in the 

church-yard of Kirkmichael in the same lot as his parents, and the inscription 
say3 he died 28th April, 1813, agad 60 years. His wife, Janet McClure*, died 
28th January, 1837, aged 69 years and was buried by his side. He it was who 
erected the monument in memory of his father and mother in this ancient church- 
yard. There were no less than seven children in this family, named as follows: 
John, William, David, Gilbert, James, Mrs. Farquair and Mrs. Glover. 



CHUiDREN OF ■WILLIAM AND JANET McOLXTRE. 

1. John Goldie' (1), son of William* (1) and Janet (McClure) Goudie, was born 
in the parish of Kirkoswald, Ayrshire, Scotland, March 21, 1793. in early life 
he was a great lover of the plants and flowers of the fields and forests, and 
to make a collection of them, drying and preserving them, and classifying them 
with proper names, was his delight. After securing a good education in the 
local schools he served an apprenticeship as a gardener, and he afterwards 
entered into the Glasgow Botanic Gardens and there received a thorough scien- 
tific training in botany. He finally entered the University and turning his 
attention to languages became a fair linguist. The Greek and Latin classics were 

The above brief memorandum of some incidents in the life of the late John Goldie, botanist, was 
compiled mostly from memory. Nearly all of his journals, sketches and incidents of his travels were 
vmfortimately lost by the destruction of his residence in a fire soon after he came t© Canada to reside. 
This memorial is necessarily abridged but will be of interest to all who bear the Goudie-Goldie name. 

NOTE. — From a letter received from Mr. David McClure of Fulton, N. Y., in relation to the kinship 
between the Goudies or Goldies and McClures I leam that the latter hailed from the neighborhood of 
Girvan, KUkerran, Maybole and vicinity. His father, John McClure, was first cousin of Mr. G<>udie of 
Girvan and his children, Maggie and James (both deceased) were first cousins of the Goldies in Guelph, 
Ontario, that is, of Mr. James Goldie, lately deceased, his mother being a McClure. John McClure 
married Margaret McClellan of Kirkcudbright, Scotland, a family from which Gen. George B. McClel- 
lan came. David McClure of Fulton, N. Y., is the last of this family, his son, Malcolm Foster McClure, 
having died seven years ago at the age of 25 ; and had made a reputable name in journalism. 

—EDITOR, 



246 CANADIAN FAMILIES. 



his favorites, but he also acquired some proficiency in Hebrew and in modern lan- 
guages. On the 18th of June, 1815, the day the Battle of Waterloo was fought, 
he was married to Margaret Smith, daughter of James Smith of Monkwood 
Grove, a famous botanist and florist of his day. 

The Government having resolved to send an expedition to the coast of Africa 
to explore the Congo River, Mr. Goldie applied for the position of botanist, and 
obtained the appointment conditional on passing an examination in botany, and 
on the day of marriage he left for Edinburgh to undergo the test. Having satis- 
fied his examiners he proceeded to London to join the expedition, but at the last 
minute, through political wire-pulling he found himself superseded and therefore 
returned home. In this disappointment he was most fortunate. The coast fevers 
were too much for the European, and the expedition was shortly forced to return 
to England, minus its botanist and many of the officers and crew. 

In the spring of 1817 by advice of Dr. Hooker, Mr. Goldie sailed from the port 
of Leith for America, accompanied by his brother-in-law Robert Smith ; but through 
stress of weather the ship was forced to put into the harbor of Halifax. Having 
left the ship here he explored the country for some distance around and collected 
specimens of the new and rare plants in the vicinity; then he proceeded to explore 
the north shore of New Brunswick. He made numerous sketches of the coast 
scenery with notes on the geology and botany of the various places he visited, 
but these were lost in the conflagration alluded to. 

He often mentioned the "Calypsa Borealis" found near the Bay of Chaleur. 
Having pretty well examined that part of the country he thence proceeded to Mont- 
real and Quebec. While in the former city he met with Mr. Frederick Pursh the 
botanist, who presented him with a copy of his work on American plants and 
who gave him much useful information in regard to his future movements and 
investigations. From Montreal he travelled on foot to Albany, carefully examining 
the productions of the country. He had letters of introduction to the Governor 
of New York State by whom he was kindly received, and from him obtained such 
information as greatly forwarded his researches. He then became acquainted 
with the late Dr. John Torrey, the eminent botanist, then a young man and an 
ardent student. 

Ater remaining in New York and vicinity for a time exploring and collecting, 
he turned his attention to New Jersey. This state he often spoke of, as the finest 
field for the study of botany that he ever travelled. A certain locality in the neigh- 
borhood of Quaker Bridge in South Jersey was particularly rich in rare plants. A 
great part of the state was gone over, and a large collection of plants made and 
carried to New York for shipment home. This was never heard of afterwards. 
During the winter of 1818 Mr. Goldie taught school in Amsterdam, a town in the 
Mohawk Valley in the state of New York. Proceeding in the spring to Montreal, 
and thence in June 1819 to Pittsburgh, Penn., he travelled on foot most of the 
way for the purpose of investigating the botanical treasures of the various dis- 
tricts he would pass through. Having returned to Montreal in the fall of the year 
he sailed for Scotland, taking all his botanical collections with him. 

In the year 1824 Mr. Goldie was employed to gather and take charge of a large 
collection of plants, trees and shrubs for the new Botanical Gardens that were 
then being formed at St. Petersburg, Russia. After his engagement terminated, 
he desired to inviestigate the productions of the country as far as the time at his 
disposal would allow. With the assistance of Dr. Fisher, the Director of the 
Botanical Gardens, who was an old college friend of his, he was able to get pass- 



CANADIAN FAMILIES. 247 



ports to visit all parts of the country, and was thus enabled to make good use 
of his time in collecting. When he returned to Scotland he took with him a number 
of plants which had not been introduced into that country; among those were the 
"Pinus pichta" (now the "Abies Siberia"), a gigantic heracleum which was form- 
erly used as a forage plant for cattle; he took with him also the double-flowering 
"Paeonia tenufolia" and many novelties of his discovery. 

About the year 1830 Mr. Goldie again visited Russia and spent considerable 
time travelling about. The Government at this time wishing to make use of his 
skill and knowledge in botany, requested him to investigate and report to it upon 
the flora of some of the more recently acquired territory. This was a notable 
attestation of his proficiency in this subject. He was, however, compelled to decline 
the task. He had begun a business as florist before leaving home and consequently 
could not be absent for so long a time as would be necessary. In the autumn 
of the year he returned to Scotland. In the course of his wanderings through 
Canada he formed a favorable opinion of the country, and came with his family 
in 1844, settling in Ayr, Ontario, where he continued to reside until his death in 
June 1886, being in his 94th year. His change of home did not modify his love 
for the flowers of the field and forest, and though no longer professionally he still 
made many collecting tours through the country-side, often accompanied by 
botanical friends. 

A wood fern was discovered by John Goldie and named by Hooker "Aspidium 
Goldianum". 

His family consisted of eight children, four sons and four daughters, all of whom 
are now (1917) dead. 

2. William Goudie' (2), son of William^ and Janet (McClure) Goudie, was of 
Girvan, Scotland. 

3. Gilbert Goudie' (2), son of William^ (1) and Janet (McClure) Goudie, settled 
in the western section of the United States. In a letter written by John Goldie 
the botanist of date March 1854 he refers to his brother, Gilbert Goudie, who seems 
to have come to America earlier than the other families of this branch. He was 
writing to his son James in Paterson, N. J., when on his way to Ayr, Ontario, to 
come by way of the Erie Road, and stop off at Olean which was about sixty miles 
from Dunkirk or Buffalo and make inquiry about his uncle Gilbert, but to remember 
that he would be known by the name of Goudie. He lived there several years, 
married a woman of Dutch or German extraction and had to do with a sawmill. 
It may be about twenty years since we heard from him. About four years ago 
we heard he had moved to Iowa but did not procure his address. His wife's 
relatives still live about Olean. You will find some one about the mills who knew 
him when there. Mrs. Mary E. Armstrong whose mother was a Goudie of the 
Canadian branch says she remembers of a visitor to her grandfather (the botanist) 
named Joseph Goudie who while there mentioned a sister Cornelia. He was to 
have come from Iowa. This Joseph must have been a son of Gilbert Goudie. 

4. James Goudie' (2), son of William^ (1) and Janet (McClure) Goudie, was 
styled "Mason of Crossbill" in the parish of Kirkmichael, Ayrshire, but the family 
in Canada say their James was "of Dunbarton." Why, then, we ask, was the monu- 
ment to James Goudie, mason, of Crossbill erected in this family lot? This James 
was twice married. The parish records contain the following: "James Goudie 
and Jane Couper both of this parish were booked the 19th and married at Cross- 
hill 23d Feb. 1835, by Rev. Mr. Gray of Mabole. " By this union there were 



248 CANADIAN FAMILIES. 

three children as will hereafter appear. She died April 4, 1848, of consumption, 
aged 34 years. His second wife was Marion Fulton of Kirkoswald with whom 
he was booked the 24th and married the 25th of March 1849, by Rev. Mr. Maule. 
He died 12th April 1871, aged 76 years. Children as follows: — 

I. Agnes Goudie, eldest daughter of James Goudie of Crosshill, mason, 

and Jane Couper was born July 1st, and baptized 3d, 1837, by Rev. 

John MacEwan. 
II. Alexander Goudie, son of James Goudie of Crosshill, Kirkmichael, 

mason, and Jane Couper, born April 7th and baptized 14th by Rev. 

John MacEwan; 

III. James Goudie, second son of James Goudie, mason in Crosshill, and 
Jane Couper, born May 2d and baptized 5th 1841 by Rev. John Mac- 
Ewan. Died March 24, 1848. "Mason's child." 

IV. Marion Goudie, daughter of James Goudie, mason, Crosshill, and 
Marion Fulton, born July 26th, and baptized by Rev. Mr. Maule. 

V. Jane Goudie, 3d daughter of James Goudie, mason, Crosshill, and 
Marion Fulton, born Dec. 29, 1852, and baptized by Rev. James Craw- 
ford. 

VI. William Goudie, "mason's child," Crosshill, died Sept. 5, 1848. 

5. Geils Goudie^ (1), daughter of William- (1), was married to John Traquair, 
farmer, Cardross, who died there in 1876, by whom she had six children. She died 
in January, 1891, aged 91 years. Children named as follows: — 

I. James Traquair*, born Dec. 22, 1830; married Elizabeth Ewing 
Edmond and had issue, Helen Geils, John, James, Peter, Edmond, 
Alexander- Ferrier, William-Edmond ; all residing at MacDonald Mills, 
Sask., Canada. Thomas Edmond Traquair is now with the Canadian 
Scottish in France. With the removal of these brothers from Cardross 
the name ceases to exist in that parish. At one time there were five 
families, all cousins in that district. 

II. Agnes TRAQUAIR^ born April 3, 1833; was married to James Miller 
who was outside manager of the William Denny Co., shipbuilders, Dum- 
barton, Scotland, for many years. He was a man of exceptional charac- 
ter, his place of residence being Dalreoch Cottage, Dumbarton. She 
died in March, 1903. He died in December, 1914. No issue. 

III. Helen Traquair*, born Dec. 11, 1837, was married to Alexander 
Ferrier, Cardross Mill, Cardross. Owing to their position as millers 
and grain merchants they were well known and respected in the com- 
munity. She died Dec. 9, 1809. He died January, 1916. 

iv, Jean Traquair*, born July 31, 1835, and died unmarried in 1847, 

V. John Traquair, born Oct. 1, 1840, died a bachellor and farmer in 1907. 

6. Janet Goudie' (1), daughter of William^ (1), was married to Richard Glover, 
a weaver in Kilmarnock and who died June 26, 1891, aged 87 years. She had two 

daughters, Jean who died unmarried and who was the wife of McClt-LY, 

and had three sons, viz: Richard now residing at Cardross, Dumbartonshire; 
Robert, whose business is Cooper, Dennison & Walkden, Bath St., Glasgow, and 
Hugh, now deceased. 

7. David Goudie' (6), son of William^ (1) and Agnes Goudie, was born in 

Ayrshire, Scotland, in 1809; marriid Aug. 19, 1833, to Jessie McCall of Ayr, 
Scotland, by whom two children born there. In 1844 the family removed to Mont- 




JOHN GOLDIE, ESQ. 



CANADIAN FAMILIES. 249 



real, Canada, where Mr. Goudie engaged in the last-making business. On Sept. 
13, 1846, he was drowned in the St. Lawrence River at Montreal. His age was 
37 years. His widow soon returned to Ayr, Scotland, to make a home for herself 
and children with her parents, but only remained one year when she returned 
to Montreal where they lived till 1853. In 1858 they moved to Ayr, Ontario. 
For childien see forward. 



^anxtb ^^ntration. 



CHIIiSREir OF JOHN AND MARCrARET SMITH GOLDIK. 

1. William Goldie^ (4), probably eldest son of John' (1) and Margaret (Smith) 
Goldie, died unmarried and was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, Westchester Co., 
N. Y. He was a gardener by occupation; a Presbyterian in religious conviction. 

2. John Goldie^ (2), second son of John' (1) and Margaret (Smith) Goldie, was 
born in the parish of Kirkoswald, Ayrshire, Scotland, 1823 and received what 
little education he had at the school in Kilroy, a small village near his home. When 
quite young, he was apprenticed to Mr. James McNab, of Old Toll, to learn the trade 
of millwright. While serving his time the railway between Ayr and Glasgow was 
built and Mr. McNab secured the contract for building the cars, in the construction 
of which he was ably assisted by his young apprentice. The family came to 
America in 1844, being preceded by a few years, by William, the eldest son, and 
James of Guelph, Ontario. They came direct to and settled at Greenfield near Ayr, 
where John Goldie obtained employment from Mr. George Baird, a well-known 
contractor of Blanford Township, with whom he worked for over a year. He 
subsequently worked as pattern-maker in Montreal for eighteen months. Returning 
he worked as millwright. He put all the machinery into his father's mill at Green- 
field, which was subsequently burned. He then went into partnership in a saw- 
mill in Esquesing Township where he remained for several years. He returned 
to Gait in 1859 and with Hugh McCuUoch formed a partnership and bought out 
the foundry business of James Crombie. 

The Dumfries Foundry. 

Then 22 hands were employed, but the record of the firm of Goldie & McCulloch 
has been one of steady progress, scarcely a year passing without an addition in 
building or new lines of machine-making being made to their rapidly increasing 
business until it has assumed the present vast proportions and is now the largest 
in the Dominion. While residing in Equesing, he married Elizabeth Alexander 
who died leaving one son John who died at the age of twelve years. On Sept. 
29, 1870, he married Miss Mary Rodgers, daughter of Alexander and Rebecca 
(Wells) Rodgers who was born near the village of Ayr, Ontario, in 1839 and survives 
her husband. He died in Gait, Ont., April 12, 1896, in his 74th year. He was one 
of the oldest, best known, most worthy and highly respected citizens of that city, 
where the greater part of his life was spent. He was always ready to do all in his 
power for the advancement and development of the city and lived to see it one 
of the greatest manufacturing centres in the Dominion. His life was careful, 
correct, temperate and methodical in all his habits, and from these reasons was 
singularly free from illness. He was a man of sterling qualities, firm but not 
obstinate in his convictions, energetic and reliable in all of his business dealings and 
thoroughly honorable in every relation of his life. While he was a man of public 
spirit and deeply interested in current events, he did not covet political preferment 



250 CANADIAN FAMILIES. 

and declined to serve in office. He was head of one of the largest and most success- 
ful business firms in Canada. Quiet, unassuming and domestic, he was modest 
about his benefactions and concealed his acts of benevolence. 

While he was strictly devoted to his business interests he found time for recreation 
and study. He was a deep reader and careful student, an observer of more than 
ordinary ability. He combined in himself the scholar, the scientist and the man 
of business. He was interested in the Astronomical Society of Ontario, and had 
a well fitted observatory of his own in which he spent many happy hours. He was 
a supporter of the Mechanics Institute of Gait, and was for several years Vice- 
President of the Hospital Trust. He was an honored member of the Presbyterian 
Church and a consistent Christian. 

"After a while life's rush shall cease. 

This throbbing heart find sweet release. 

After a while this throbbing brain 

Shall rest from sorrow, toil and pain. 

After a while this burdened Soul 

Shall reach in Heaven the long-sought goal". 

At the time of his decease the Town Council passed Resolutions of Condolence 
by a unanimous vote taken standing, and attended the funeral, one of the largest 
ever seen in the city, in a body. Employees of the business house also attended 
in a body as did the members of the Curling Club. The pallbearers were six 
nephews of the deceased. The stores and other places of business were closed, 
and the bells on Trinity church and on the Town Hall were tolled. At his funeral 
the words of Shakespeare were quoted as appropriate to the character of Mr. Goldie: 

"His life was gentle; and the elements 

So mixed in him, that Nature might stand up 

And say to all the world, This was a man". 

By his second wife John Goldie had two children, viz : 

I. Alexander Rodgers Goldie^ who married in 1897 Nora Gibson 
of Berlin, Ontario, and has three children. 

(1) John Gibson Goldie®, born in 1899. 

(2) Alexander Gibson GoLDIE^ born in 1903. 

(3) Mary MacDonald Goldie®, born in 1906. 

His wife having died in 1906 he married in 1911 Grace 
Elizabeth Wilson of Burford, Ont., by whom he had two 
more children as will presently appear. Mr. Goldie succeeded 
his father as head of the manufacturing business styled the 
"Goldie & McCulloch Company Limited" and resides in the 
city of Gait, Ontario, Canada. 

(4) Wilson Rodgers Goldie® born in 1916. ) ^ . 

(5) Margaret Elizabeth Goldie® born in 1916. ) 

II. Charlotte Eleanor Goldie* was married in 1903 to J. C. Brecken- 
ridge and has three children. She resides in Gait, Ontario. 

(1) John Goldie Breckenridge®, born in 1905. 

(2) Ronald Campbell Breckenridge®, born in 1908. 

(3) Margaret Eleanor Breckenridge®, born in 1913. 

3. Elizabeth Goldie" (2), eldest daughter of John^ (1) and Margaret (Smith) 
Goldie, born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and died May 12, 1854. She was the wife of 




JAMES GOLDIE, ESQ. 



CANADIAN FAMILIES. 251 

Sydney Smith who was born near London, England, and died Sept. 15, 1878, aged 
66 years. Her daughter believes she was about 34 years of age at the time of her 
demise. They lived at Gait, Ontario, and belonged to the English Church. 
Both buried in Gait, Ont. Their only child is Anne M. Anderson of Windsor, 
Ontario, formerly Miss Anne Marion Smith; born Aug. 19, 1852; was married 
to James Anderson Nov, 26, 1874. 

4. James Goldie* (2), third son of John* (1) and Margaret (Smith) Goldie, was 
born in Monkwood Grove, Ayrshire, Scotland, Nov. 6, 1824; married Francis 
Owen in the city of New York. He was educated in his native village, where 
he took a great interest in botany, gardening and floriculture, following in his 
love of nature the example of his father, a trait that was with him to the end of 
his long life, as the beautiful grounds of his residence still testify. In 1842 he came 
to America, landing in New York, where for some time he had charge of the grounds 
of the late Roswell L. Colt, of Paterson, N. J. He was later in the flour and 
lumber business in Utica, N. Y. 

In 1860 he came to Guelph, Ontario, Canada, where he built the "Speedvale 
Mill", better known as "Pipes Mill". Here he managed the business success- 
fully till 1868. When the "People's Mills" were burned down he purchased 
the site and erected much larger mills, which have since been added to and are now 
among the foremost in Ontario. This plant he successfully conducted personally, 
making a splendid reputation for their goods, until 1898, when it was formed 
into a joint stock company, "The James Goldie Company Limited", of which 
he was the president. So extensive was his reputation as a miller that he was 
at one time elected to the presidency of the Canadian Millers Association. 

His executive ability was also shown in other lines. He was president of the 
Millers and Manufacturers Insurance Company of Toronto since its organization, 
and was a director for years of the Gore Mutual Fire Insurance Company of Gait. 
As a citizen of the city of Gait he always took deep interest in the Guelph General 
Hospital, for several years serving on the Board of Directors of that institution 
where his business ability, his shrewdness and other splendid qualities made his 
services very valuable. 

In the lines affecting the health and beauty of the city he manifested enthusi- 
astic interest. His love of nature was shown in his encouragement of the beautiful, 
he taking an interest in the Guelph Horticultural Society, and his residence was 
a concrete example of what was beautiful. He was a fellow of the Royal Horti- 
cultural Society of England, the ruling authority on botany and horticulture. His 
love of nature also extended to natural history, and his collection of pheasants 
and other birds, including the swans which for years sailed on the waters of the 
Speed above the dam, opposite his residence, was a valuable one. 

Fraternally, he was a Mason, having joined the body in Utica, N. Y., during 
his residence there. Shortly after his arrival in Guelph, Speed Lodge, A. F. and 
A. M., was organized, he being one of the charter members. 

Politically the late James Goldie was for many years a Liberal, but in 1876 
he joined the Conservative party, on the "National Policy", and was afterwards 
a staunch member of that organization, contesting South Wellington in 1876 
against Mr. Donald Gurthrie, and in 1878 and 1882, against the late James Innis, 
though unsuccessful on each occasion. 

He was a staunch member of the Congregational Church, of which he was a 
trustee and an honorary deacon, the latter appointment having been made as a 
tribute to his valued services in connection with the church. 



252 CANADIAN FAMILIES. 



He was married at New York in 1848 to Frances Owen, of Montgomeryshire, 
Wales, the union proving a most happy one, only being broken in 1908 when she 
passed away, loved and regretted by every member of the family. Mr. Goudie 
died at the Guelph Hospital Nov. 3, 1912, it being on the Sabbath, at the age 
of 88 years, of which 52 had been spent in Guelph. He had been very active up 
to the time of his death, all his faculties being unimpaired except a slight deafness, 
but advanced age claimed its own and he passed peacefully away without apparent 
suffering. 

Resolutions of condolence were passed at a meeting of the City Council and 
by several organizations with which he had been identified, in which his character 
was beautifully delineated and sympathy for the family expressed. His funeral 
was attended at his late residence, "Hafod", the pallbearers being members of the 
Goldie family connection. 

His family consis ed of eight children of whom hereafter, their names being 
James 0., William, Roswell, Lincoln and Margaret. 

5. Jane Goldie'* (2), second daughter of John^ (1) and Margaret (Smith) Goldie, 
was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, in 1828; was married in 1847 in Ayr, Ontario, 
to Andrew McEwan*, son of Walter and Janet (Craig) McEwan. He came to 
Canada in a sailing vessel during the "early forties", being six weeks on the voyage. 
He took up a large farm and was one of the pioneers in the Township. He being 
the only musician in the community, he was often pulled out of bed to play the 
violin at the rural dances. He was also a good bass singer and could read music 
well. Having the only horse in the neighborhood he was often called to move 
families from place to place and was wont to tell his children of thus transporting a 
newly-wedded couple with all their belongings to their new home in the clearing. 
He was a great reader and possessed of a fruitful memory. In his last letter, written 
when 91 years of age, he stated that he was writing " by the rule of thumb ". When 

*A REMARKABLE AGE, 

MR. ANDREW McEWAN CELEBRATES HIS 95th BIRTHDAY. 

In this age of rapidly recurring events, it requires something of remarkable import to leave its 
impress on the mind. Of events of more or less magnitude this community usually has its full share, 
but on Saturday evening last a number of citizens had the pleasure of attending a function of unusual 
interest. Birthday parties are common enough, to be sure, yet few people have the honor and pleasure 
of participating in a 95th anniversary. The citizen who attained that patriarchal age on March 27th, 
1910, was Mr. Andrew McEwan, a gentleman who has resided here or in the immediate vicinity for 
the greater part of his life. The subject of the brief reference is truly a remarkable man. Of Low- 
land Scotch nativity, he inherited the brawn and sinew of that hardy race in a marked d^ree and has 
seldom experienced even a day's illness throughout his long life. What is quite as remarkable he still 
retains almost all his faculties comparatively unimpaired and joined in the festivities and 
rejoicings of the evening with quite as much zest and animation as the yoimgest member of the party. 

C!oming to his adopted country while a young man, he readily adapted himself to local conditions 
and passed through all the vicissitudes incident to pioneer life, hewing out for himself a home in the 
primeval forest and enduring all the hardships of the early settlers. Later in life he was employed 
in business pursuits, serving as manager and bookkeeper for many years with the late David Goldie. 
It was not, in fact, until after he passed his 90th birthday that Mr. McEwan began to feel the weight 
of years on his shoulders, and even to-day may truly be said to be the most remarkably well preserved 
man of his age to be met with anywhere. Not only is he physically strong and rugged, but his mental 
faculties are bright and keen, his whole bearing giving the impression of one in the early seventies. 
Starting out in life with a good education, he has been a keen observer of current events. _ His reading 
has also been of a wide and thoughtful character, and there are few subjects with which he is not 
thoroughly conversant. 

Under such circumstances and environments it was not surprising that the host of friends who 
gathered to congratulate Mr. McEwan on this particular anniversary indulged in tmrestrained merri- 
ment. Not only did they make the welkin ring with song and jest, but a trio of Ayr's grandfathers 
drew sweet strains from piano and violin, and were heartily encored by the veteran lover of good 

music. The program was as unique as it was pleasing To add to the enjoyment of the 

evening refreshment was ser\'ed and not one of the number assembled wUl soon forget Mr. McEwan's 
95th anniversary of his natal day. That he may have many returns of the happy event is the wish 
of a wide circle of friends. — Canadian Paper. 




JESSIE McEWAN. 







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MARY E. ARMSTRONG. 



CANADIAN FAMILIES. 253 



his farm had become productive he would take a load of wheat to Dundas, a distance 
of 35 miles, and exchange it for family supplies. After leaving the farm he was 
employed as bookkeeper for his brother-in-law, David Goldie, in his extensive 
milling business. Mrs. Jane (Goldie) McEwan was a most beautiful woman. 
Her only portrait was painted by an artist named John McCurdy in Scotland 
who had become enamored of her. Years after her sister made diligent search 
for this picture but failed to find it. She was of a very amiable disposition and 
excellent in the use of the needle and in the making of most delicate embroideries, 
always tracing her own patterns. Mr. McEwan died in 1911 and was buried by 
the side of his wife, who had died in 1862 when a young woman, near Ayr, Ontario. 
There were seven children named as follows: — 

I. Margaret McEwan, born March 17, 1848, in Ayr, Ontario; was married 
in 1880 to Thomas Hunter who was born near Lauder, Berwickshire, 
Scotland, came to America in 1873, settled near Richmond, Va., and 
lived there until his death in 1883. His widow is now living at New 
Haven, Conn. The Hunters were of an old Scotch race and removed 
to Ulster, Ireland where they were "Gentlemen Farmers" and raised 
great numbers of sheep for the market. They were Protestants and 
were hated by the Catholic Irish. Thomas Hunter had "death heads" 
and "crossbones" sent him as a warning and finally sold out and emi- 
grated to Virginia where he purchased a large plantation and engaged 
in stock raising. One of his brothers was shot from behind a hedge 
during the "Irish Risings" when returning from market. 
II. Walter McEwan, born Jan. 6, 1850, near Ayr, Ontario; married in 
1874 to Dorcas Anderson, an English lady, and resides in Gait, Ont. 
Millwright. 

III. John McEwan, born Oct. 1, 1851, died Sept. 6, 1871. 

IV. Jessie McEwan, born Nov. 1, 1853, is now living in New Haven, Conn., 
unmarried. 

V. Mary E. McEwan, born Aug. 4, 1856, near Ayr, Ontario; was married 
July 7, 1888, in Weymouth, Mass., to Andrew Brown Armstrong, who 
was born in Selkirk, Scotland, May 16, 1869. He was a descendant of the 
old Border family of Armstrong sometime of " Gilnockie Tower". They 
resided in Weymouth, Mass., for several years and then went abroad. 
He died March 11, 1911, in Manchester, England, and was buried there. 
A few months later his widow returned to America and is now living 
at Tenafly, N. J. 

VI, Elizabeth-Jane McEwan, born Dec. 25, 1858; was married to Robert 
Anderson, born in Ayr, Ontario, March 11, 1856, son of *Walter and 
Mary Anderson who came to Canada about 1835 and died in Ayr, 
Ontario. This family now resides in Westminster, British Columbia. 
Their oldest son, Goldie Anderson, named for his grandfather, died in 
France, a soldier, in 1916. Mr. Anderson is a hardware merchant. 

*Mr. Anderson was bom in a cottage between Insbielaw Inn and Etrick Kirk. When he was a 
boy Sir Walter Scott was a frequent visitor at his mother's hoxise and wrote down notes from her 
recitation, concerning interesting facts she possessed relating to the district, and when a boy Mr. 
Anderson had many opportunities of meeting the great poet. He was also familiar with James Hogg 
the Etrick shepherd and poet. His wife was bom near Mosspaul but he made her acquaintance 
in Canada. At the time, 1835, several families decided to emigrate. He sailed from Annan, an 
unlikely place and friends and neighbors for six weeks previous to their departure rendered all 
necessary assistance in baking oatmeal cakes. The cart in which, with their belongings, they were 
conveyed to Annan, also transported no less than six barrels of oatscones, which were to keep them 
hale and hearty for the long voyage of fifty days across the Atlantic. 



254 CANADIAN FAMILIES. 



VII. Frances Owen McEwan, born May 17, 1860: is living unmarried 
in Westminster, British Columbia. 

6. Margaret Goldie^ (2), daughter of John' (1) and Margaret (Smith) Goldie, 
was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and came to Canada with her parents in 1844, 
where she was married to William Caven who was born in Kirkcolm in Wigton- 
shire, Scotland, Dec. 26, 1836. His family emigrated to Canada and he spent his 
boyhood days on a farm near Ayer, Ontario. He graduated from the Theological 
Seminary of the United Presbyterian Church, Toronto, Canada, in 1859. He 
entered the ministry and became professor of Exegetical Theology and Biblical 
Criticism in Knox College, Toronto, in 1866, and principal of the institution in 
1873. He was prominent in the movement which led to the union of the various 
branches of the Presbyterian Church in Canada. His son is Dr. James G. Caven 
of Toronto. A persistent effort was made to procure the full record of this family, 
but the letters forwarded were not replied to. 

7. David Goldie^ (2), youngest son of John' (1) and Margaret (Smith) Goldie, 
was born in Kirkoswold, Ayrshire, Scotland, in the year 1832, came to Canada 
with his parents in the year 1844 and settled near the village of Ayr, Ontario. 

The following appreciation written by an intimate friend and associate of David 
Goldie by especial request of the family, comprises so much that is beautiful that 
it has been accepted as perfectly proper for the biography of this branch of the 
Goudie-Goldie family. 

"Coming to Canada in 1882, 1 lived for the next twelve years — until his death — 
on the most intimate personal and business relations with Mr. Goldie, most of the 
time as a member of the household, and during this time there grew up an intimacy 
and friendship between us such as I believe is seldom attained between two men 
and which gave me an opportunity of studying the character, aye the very soul, 
of the man as is rarely given by one man to another. 

"At the time of my arrival the new system of roller milling was just being estab- 
lished in Canada and with his usual enterprise Mr. Goldie was among the first 
to remodel and enlarge his plant and in due course reaped the reward in business 
profits which in a few years made him one of the leading manufacturers of the 
Province. This did not mean a large fortune as fortunes go nowadays, but gave 
him ample means for his modest ambitions. About this time it became necessary 
for Mr. Goldie to build a new house for his large and growing family, and to this 
end he secured a site between the mill and the village of Ayr on a bluff overlooking 
the river Nith. On this he erected a spacious house and laid out the grounds 
in such a manner with lawns and flowerbeds, trees and shrubs, that in a few years 
'The Gore' became a place of beauty unsurpassed by any residence in Western 
Ontario. The house itself while not elaborate was, as intended, commodious and 
homelike and furnished in good taste. Works of Art were not numerous, for 
Mr. Goldie was a lover of Nature rather than Art and his idea of a house was 
more of a place where his large family of ten should grow up in comfort and freedom 
rather than in an Art Museum. 

" Mrs. Goldie was a devoted wife and mother, and their family life among 
their children was as full of happiness and as nearly ideal as believed is ever given 
mortals to enjoy. 

" Mr. Goldie's school education was interrupted by the removal of the family 
to Canada when he was eleven years of age, where work even of the youngest was 
a necessity, and the means of further schooling were limited. But David Goldie, 
naturally of keen intelligence, did not become a drudge like many under pioneer 




DAVID GOLDIE, ESQ. 



CANADIAN FAMILIES. 255 



conditions, but under the influence and stimulus of educated and refined parents 
carried on his education by means of reading which made him, if not a scholar in the 
strict sense of the word, a broad-minded man with a wide outlook in life which 
with a large-heartedness and generous nature produced a man such as one rarely 
meets in any walk of life. Modest and unassuming even in the days of prosperity 
he was loved, respected and honored by a whole countryside as well as by those 
who knew him in wider fields. 

" In business his integrity was unquestioned. His word was as good as his bond. 
But business with him was not mere money making, and for those who say there 
is no room for sentiment in business, I could tell many a tale of the sympathetic 
helping hand held out to the struggling and needy never told beyond his office. 

"Outside his business David Goldie's interests were first of the country, agri- 
cultural and horticultural, and if he had any hobby it was horticulture and botany — 
an inheritance from his father and shared by his brother, the late James Goldie 
of Guelph. He loved to ride behind a good horse, but had no liking for ostentation 
even in this matter. 

"But his interest was not confined to the country. By constant reading he 
knew what was going on in the great world outside and took a deep interest in 
all social reforms, in politics, and in religion, for he was essentially a religious man, 
but in no narrow sense of the word, and could always appreciate other points of 
view than his own. A staunch Presbyterian and a generous supporter of his church, 
his sympathies were wider than sect. 

"In politics nothing could better illustrate his broad-mindedness and the confi- 
dence in him of those who knew him best than the fact of his having been oflfered 
the election without contest to membership in the House of Commons at Ottawa 
by both political parties at the same time for his home constituency of South 
Waterloo. This mark of esteem deeply touched him, but he had no love for 
public life and after due consideration he declined the honor. 

" During a busy life he had less opportunity for travel than he would have 
desired, for few men saw more or appreciated more when abroad than Mr. David 
Goldie. Besides various trips in Canada and the United States, he however, 
enjoyed several voyages to Europe and once visited the West Indies. 

" I have written at greater length than I intended, but I have been led on by my 
heart as well as my recollections to write so of one whom I knew and loved and one 
of whom I feel as I have felt these thirty years, 

" * He was a man, take him for all in all 
I shall not look upon his like again'. 

R. Neilson." 

He married in Greenfield, Ayr, Ontario, December 31, 1869, Isabella Moray 
Easton, born in Langholm, Scotland, April 14, 1848, being the daughter of 
George Easton and Mary Hetherington of Edinburgh, and whose present home 
is in Ayr, Ontario, Canada. Children as follows: — 

I. John Goldie*, born Oct. 25, 1870, in Greenfield, Ayr, Ontario, Canada; 
married there June 28, 1905, Florence Margaret Donaldson, but 
has no children. He is now superintendent of Lake of the Woods Mill- 
ing Co. and his place of residence Keewatin, Ontario, 
n. George E. GoLDIE^ born May 10, 1872, in Greenfield, Ayr, Ontario, 
Canada; married in Worcester, Mass., Sept. 8, 1904, Lydia Maud 
Barton. He is now (1917) inspector of the Imperial War Office flour 



256 CANADIAN FAMILIES. 



shipping from Canada with residence at Montreal. His home address 
is Ayr, Ontario, Canada. One child, David Goldie. 

III. William GoLDIE^ born Dec. 15, 1873, at Greenfield, Ayr, Ontario, 
Canada, and is now a physician living at 86 College st., Toronto, Canada. 

IV. Herbert GoLDIE^ born at Greenfield, Ayr, Ontario, Canada, Jan. 11, 
1876; married at Petrolia, Ont., Nov. 2, 1904, Katherine Jane Mac- 
kenzie. He is now engaged in the flour-milling business with the 
Lake of the Woods Manufacturing Company. 

V. James GoLDIE^ born at Greenfield, Ayr, Ontario, Canada, Nov. 4, 1877; 
married in Toronto, Canada, Feb. 20, 1913, Jessie Ross. He is now 
living at Okanagan Centre, British Columbia, where he is engaged 
in apple-growing. Has two daughters and one son. 
VI. Anna Maria GoLDIE^ born in Greenfield, Ayr, Ontario, Canada, Oct. 
4, 1879; was married in Ayr Oct. 31, 1907, to Frederick Adam Cleland 
and lives at Toronto, Canada. Her children are as follows: 

(1) Isabel Easton Cleland, b. Sept. 4, 1908. 

(2) James Goldie Cleland, b. Aug. 11, 1911. 

(3) Esther Crosby Cleland, b. June 1, 1915. 

(4) WiNNEFRED Cleland, b. Nov. 25, 1916. 

vii. Esther GoLDIE^ born May 20, 1882, at Greenfield, Ayr, Ontario, 

Canada. She is living in Ayr, unmarried. 
VIII. Edward Crosby Goldie*, born April 30, 1884, in Greenfield, Ayr, 
Ontario, Canada; married June 21, 1916, at London, England, Mar- 
garet Martyn Mills. He is now a Major in the Canadian Expedi- 
tionary Force and has charge of the construction of light railroads on the 
Canadian Sector in France. 
IX. Theresa Louisa GoLDIE^ born Sept. 30, 1889, at Greenfield, Ayr, On- 
tario, Canada; was married at Ayr, Ont., Feb. 11, 1913, to Walter 
Arthur Chamberlin, who died of his wounds in France, May 6, 
1917. She is living at Ayr, Ont., with her only child, James Arthur 
Chamberlin. 
X. David GoLDIE^ born in Ayr, Ontario, Canada, Oct. 31, 1891, and was 
drowned May 22, 1912. 

8. Mary Goldie* (3), daughter of John' (1) and Margaret (Smith) Goldie, born 
July 3, 1834; was married April 9, 1862, to Andrew McIlwraith, who was born 
Feb. 11, 1831. He was an accountant and a Presbyterian. She died April 19, 
1911, and buried in Gait, Ontario. The following copied from an obituary notice: 
"Mary Goudie, relict of Andrew Macllwraith, died at Gait, Ontario, in her 77th 
year. She came from Ayr, Scotland, with her parents in 1844 and settled in Green- 
field, near Ayr, Ontario. She was the youngest of her father's family, and was 
predeceased by her husband nine years. She had lived in Gait for a number of 
years and was well known and highly esteemed. In religious faith she was a 
devout member of the Presbyterian church. Interred in Mount View Cemetery." 
Eight children as follows: — 

I. Margaret McIlwraith*, born Dec. 15, 1863; was married to Charles 

Turnbull, who was born Dec. 19, 1858. 
II. William Forsyth McIlwraith*, born March 9, 1867; married Amelia 

Chubb. 

III. Jean Carrick McIlwraith*, born April 10, 1870. 

IV. John Goldie McIlwraith*, born March 21, 1872, deceased. 




WILLIAM GOLDIE. 



CANADIAN FAMILIES. 257 



V. Thomas Steele McILWRAITH^ born July 27, 1873, deceased. 
VI. David Goldie McIL\VRAITH^ born Dec. 27, 1874. 
VII, Andrew Caven McILWRAITH^ born Dec. 5, 1875, deceased, 
viii. Mary Elizabeth Owen McIlwraith^, born Dec. 14, 1876; was married 
to Albert Henry Nichol who was born Oct., 1869. 



The Cragie Family. The Cragies were an old Scotch family and lived for about 
300 years on a farm called Big Middupplay in Neilson parish and not distant 
from Barrhead where Andrew Armstrong was born. The old writers describe this 
locality as comprising a most beautiful landscape. The lands were early possessed 
by the family of Crock for whom Crookston Castle was named. 

CHIIjDREN of DAVIDS (6). 

1. William Goldie'' (7), son of David'' (6) and Jessie (McCall) Goldie, was born 
in Ayrshire, Scotland, April 27, 1835, and came to Montreal, Canada, with his 
parents in 1844, where he learned the cooperage business. He married Nancy 
Mai.one of Ayr, Ontario, in 1862 and in 1864 removed with the family to Fenton, 
Genesee Co., Mich., where he engaged in the stave and cooperage business. On 
Oct. 30, 1874, his wife, by whom four children, died, and on Dec. 20, 1876, he 
married Emma Hall, also of Fenton, Mich. 

During this time he had been very successful in his business affairs and had 
accumulated a good deal of property, but in the panic of 1879 much of this was 
swept away by the failure of New York firms with whom he dealt. In 1880 he 
removed to Bay City, Mich., where he engaged very extensively in the lumber 
business and in the purchase and sale of timber lands. In 1881 his factories were 
burned and he was so badly injured by a fall that he was incapacitated for business 
for six months, and lost all he had gained. 

Being possessed with an inventive proclivity he determined to try and recuperate 
his finances by the application of this attribute; and took up the improvement of 
wood-working machines for cutting shingles, veneers and staves, and spent about 
three years in the development of machinery along these lines of invention, from 
which he received a fair compensation. About this time his attention was called 
to the need of a railroad spike that would not mutilate the fibre of soft wood tile 
which the railroads were then beginning to use. He experimented for about a 
year before he discovered one that was satisfactory, but that was only the first 
step, as it was six years before he developed a machine that would do the work 
well and cheaply enough to be a success commercially. When this was done he 
had to sell out a number of interests in the patents and organized a company 
for holding the patent, in which he retained the control. In 1889 these were leased 
to Dilworth Porter Company on royalty and the proceeds divided equitably to 
the stockholders. He also took out during this time a great number of patents 
on tie-plates for use on the railroad tracks, and the same firm manufactured these. 
These inventions proved very successful, the royalties paid by Dilworth Porter 
amounting to considerable over a million dollars. His patents all expired in 1914, 
and he has since had no connection with the steel business. He is now principal 
stockholder and president of the following corporations, viz : — The New Kensing- 
ton Stone & Sand Company, Wilkinsburgh, mills at Cabot, Pa.; The Goldie 
Manufacturing Company of Wilkinsburg, cement building blocks and concrete 
specialties: The Piqua Flour Company, Piqua, Ohio, flour, grain and feed. After 
passing through the common vicissitudes of a business career Mr. Goldie finds 



258 CANADIAN FAMILIES. 



himself the owner of valuable estates and abundant financial means. He has 
a fine, stately residence at Wilkinsburg, Pa., and a beautiful summer seat at Martha's 
V^ineyard Island. Notwithstanding his age (82 years) he is in splendid health and 
as actively engaged in business as ever. See portrait in this work. Children's 
names presently. 

2. Jeannie Goldie^ (3), daughter of David' (6) and Jessie (McCall) Goldie, was 
born in Ayrshire, Scotland, Dec. 12, 1838; was married in 1861 to Albert Eusley, 
and had ten children whose names will presently appear. It is known in the families 
of the descendants of David Goldie who was drowned at Montreal, that this daugh- 
ter Jeannie was blessed with a very remarkable memory. She frequently went 
to church and having heard the sermon would return home and repeat it almost 
"word for word". She was a woman of superior intelligence and very fond of read- 
ing. She died at Toronto, Canada, in August, 1911. John F., William, Anna, 
Alfred, Jennie, Albert, Charles, George, Bessie and Garfield, the children, are 
all living. 

Jfift^ ^emratroiT. 

CHUiSKEN OF JAMES* (3) AND FRANCES OWEN GOLDIE. 

1. Thomas Goldie^ (1), eldest son of James* (3) and Frances (Owen) Goldie, 
born in Paterson, N. J.; married in Nova Scotia in 1877 Emma Jane Mitchell, 
daughter of John Mitchell, and sister to City Clerk Mitchell and Robert Mitchell, 
barrister, Guelph, Ont. By this union there were born two sons and three daughters 
of whom hereafter. He was educated in the local schools of Guelph and the 
College of Montreal. He subsequently took a course of study at the Business 
College in Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Thus equipped he joined his father and brothers 
in the milling business into which he threw the hard work, energy and business 
ability which shone brighter as the business expanded. He became the leading 
member and practical manager of the firm which had a Dominion reputation. 
To him the business owes its position as being one of the largest and most successful 
commercial enterprises of its kind in Canada. He was always a leading spirit 
among the millers of the Dominion, and had been elected to the Presidency of their 
Association, the duties of which he discharged with such faithfulness as to win 
him many warm encomiums. He was President of the Conservative Association 
of South Wellington for four years, and had been a most energetic leader in the 
local ranks for a long time previously. He directed the organization and controlled 
all of the details, and was a great source of strength to the party in the city of 
Guelph. He was also one of the ablest and most trusted of the Provincial Conserv- 
ative leaders. 

Though his business interest demanded his undivided attention yet, in obedience 
to the wishes of his friends, he represented St. David's ward as alderman in 1881, 
1882, 1884 and 1885 and was almost invariably returned at the head of the poll. 
In 1890 he came in again to the Council as a representative of St. John's ward, 
and in 1891 ran for the Mayoralty, defeating his opponent by over .500. He was 
elected by acclamation for his second term on the year of his death. He was al- 
ways looked upon as one of the most advanced members of the board in modern 
municipal matters, and his term as Mayor was distinguished for his advocacy of 
permanent improvements in the city. He also serv-ed a term on the School 
Boards in the seventies. 

He was a great lover of athletic sports and was never happier than when engaged 
in or promoting baseball and cricket. He was one of the directors of the old 
JMaple Leaf baseball club, and for several years had been President of the Ontario 



CANADIAN FAMILIES. 259 



Cricket Association. He was generally present at the international matches and 
accompanied the Canadian eleven to Philadelphia the year previous to his demise. 
He was also fond of fishing. 

He was for many years connected with the Knox church and took an active 
interest in its affairs, being the chairman of the Board of Managers and one of 
the trustees of the church, and occupied the chair at the annual meeting a week 
before his death. 

He was a charter member of the Guelph Lodge, No. 163, A. 0. U. W. 

In commenting on the sad event the editor of the Guelph Mercury in the issue 
of Feb. 4, 1892, said: "The city of Guelph is bowed in grief to-day, as it has not 
been of late years, because a citizen who was filling the highest office in the gift 
of his fellows, and the active, genial presence of one of her most representative 
and able men has passed away from among us forever. When it was known 
that Mayor Goldie's indisposition had developed into something serious the uni- 
versal concern and anxiety throughout the city testified to the deep hold Thomas 
Goldie had on the affections of the people, and as the news of his death spread 
abroad there were many sad hearts and sad faces as the people wended their way 
to their work, and deep and tender were the expressions for the bereaved family. 

Children as follows: — 

I. Francis O. Goldie«, born Feb. 20, 1879. 
11. Ruth M. Goldie«, born March 25, 1881. 

III. Thomas Leon Goldie^, born Nov. 6. 1882, was Gunner in the 16th 
Canadian Field Artillery, 4th Brigade, and served in France for over 
a year. He died in Manchester, England, Aug. 28. 1916, from effects 
of disease contracted in the trenches. 

IV. RoswELL T. GoldieS born Oct. 24, 1887. 

V. Emma Gw'endolyn Goldie^, born April 29, 1890. 

2. John Goldie^ (4), second son of James^ (3) and Frances (Owen) Goldie, born 
in Paterson, N. J., May 17, 1852; married Elizabeth Budd, the Rev. Principal 
Cavan* performing the ceremony in Guelph, Ont., and from this union there were 
born six children of whom presently. The following abstracts were taken from 
the Daily Herald of Guelph, issued Dec. 8, 1904. At the age of nine he came to 
this city with his parents and other members of the family. When a young man 
he became connected in the milling business with the "James Goldie Company 
Limited" and continued to labor in its interests untiringly and successfully. Lat- 
terly, however, his state of health necessitated his removal from active duties and 
for some time he was not prominently identified with the concern. 

Mr. Goldie was a member of the Congregational Church and held the position 
of Deacon. He took an active part in church work so long as his health per- 
mitted. He was a man of the most sterling qualities; he, if any one, deserved the 
poet's praise: 

"A friend to truth — O soul sincere! 

In action faithful, and in honor clear. 

Who broke no promise, served no private end. 

Who gained no title, and who lost no friend." 

•WILLIAM cavan, 1830-1904. A celebrated Presbyterian Divine, was born at Kiykcelm, Wigton- 
shire, Scotland, Dec. 26, 1830 ; graduated at the Theological Seminary of the United Presbyterian 
Church, Toronto, Canada, in 1352. He entered the ministry, became Professor of Exegetical Theology 
and Biblical Criticism, Knox College, Toronto, in 1866, and Principal of the College in 1873. He waa 
prominent in the movement which led to the union of different branches of the Presbyterian churches 
in Canada. 



260 CANADIAN FAMILIES. 

He was the incarnation of honor and integrity. This was the key to his whole 
life, and with it he combined a spirit of self-abnegation and consideration for others 
which endeared him to all. Unassuming, courteous, thoughtful and kind, his 
influence was always good. These noble qualities made intercourse with him 
delightful, and his whole social and business life will long be remembered in the 
city of Guelph, 

From a lad he took part in the amateur athletic sports. When the Maple 
Baseball Club made a name for itself all over the continent, John Goldie was one 
of the mainstays of the team; at the bat reliable, in the outfield fast and sure. 
He was a highly cultivated man, and took the greatest pleasure in literature and art; 
and any movement in aid of these subjects was sure of his active sympathy and 
hearty support. He was exceedingly fond of out-door life, and never neglected 
an opportunity to get away into the country where his wide reading and intimate 
knowledge of natural history made every object of interest to him. 

Commenting on the life and character of John Goldie, the editor of the Daily 
Herald published in the city of Guelph, said: "The deceased gentleman will be 
greatly missed ; his quiet, gentle, dignified greetings to his friends which was an index 
to his fine character, will be theirs no more. 

" 'None knew thee but to love thee. 
Nor named thee but to praise.' " 
Children as follows: 

I. Jennie 0. Goldie«, born Oct. 15, 1882; was married to John C. Reader, 
and resides in Chilwack, N. B. 

11. Nellie C. GoldieS born July 31, 1884, now in Toronto, Canada. 

III. William B. GoLDIE^ born July 1, 1887, now at Ladysmith, B. C. 

IV. Marjory M. Goldie®, born Aug. 11, 1890. 

v. James A. Goldie®, born Sept. 19, 1893; now on the battle-line in France. 
VI. John E. Goldie®, born Sept. 21, 1898; now on the battle-field in France, 
both in Canadian Artillery. 

3. James Owen Goldie^ (5), third son of James* (3) and Frances (Owen) Goldie, 
born in Paterson, N. J., Aug. 8, 1854. He resides in Guelph, Ontario, and is 
president of "The James Goldie Company Limited, Flour Mills." Congrega- 
tionalist. A Free Mason. Unmarried. 

4. William Goldie^ (6), fourth son of James* (3) and Frances (Owen) Goldie, 
born in Paterson, N. J., May 12, 1856; died June 1, 1856. 

5. David Goldie^ (4), fifth son of James* (3) and Frances (Owen) Goldie, born 
in Paterson, N. J., April 13, 1857; died April 15, 1857. 

6. Roswell Goldie^ (2), sixth son of James* (3) and Frances (Owen) Goldie, 
born in Guelph, Ont., March 26, 1862. He is the secretary of the James Goldie 
Company Limited, Guelph, Ontario. Unmarried. Congregationalist. 

7. Lincoln Goldie^ (1), seventh son of James* (3) and Frances (Owen) Goldie. 
born in Guelph, Ont., Nov. 11, 1864; married in 1902 Miss E. A. Bricker of 
Waterloo, Ont., and is Vice-President of the James Goldie Company Limited. He 
is a Presbyterian. Children: — 

I. James L. Goldie®. 

II. Margaret Goldie®. 

8. Margaret Goldie^ (3), daughter of James* (3) and Frances (Owen) Goldie, 
born in Guelph, Ont., Feb. 26, 1867; died March 11, 1867. 



CANADIAN FAMILIES. 261 



CHILDREN OF WILI.IAM'l (7J AND NANCY MAI/)NE OOLDIE. 

1. Jessie Goldie^ (3), eldest daughter of William^ (7) and Nancy (Malone) Goldie, 
born in Fenton, Mich., Aug. 2, 1865; was married Dec. 31, 1889, to Henry W. 
Kennedy at Bay City, Mich., where they now reside. Mr. Kennedy is interested 
in the manufacture of railroad supplies. They have four daughters named as 
follows: — 

I. Lucille Kennedy^, born Feb. 25, 1891 at Plainwell, Mich., was married 
to Claud Buyyard at Bay City, Mich., Oct. 19, 1914. Mr. Buyyard 
is in the office of the President of the Fere Marquet Railroad and located 
at Detroit, Mich. They have one daughter, Margaret-Elizabeth, born 
March 14, 1917. 
II. Florence Kennedy^, born in Plainwell, Mich., June 28, 1892; was 
married May 9, 1916, to Frank B. Yourison of Wilkinsburg, Pa., at 
Bay City, Pa. Mr. Yourison is interested with his father in the manu- 
facture of dry paints, at Pittsburgh, Pa. They have one daughter, 
Ruth-Eleanor, born June 5, 1917. 

III. Ruth Kennedy®, born in Shipshewana, Ind., Feb. 14, 1894, is living 
at home in Bay City, Mich. 

IV. Maria Goldie Kennedy', born in Shipshewana, Ind., Nov. 11, 1895, 
is still living at home in Bay City, Mich. 

2. Mary Goldie^ (4), second daughter of William^ (7) and Nancy Malone 
Goldie, born Nov. 4, 1868; was married June 4, 1907, to James J. McAffee, of 
Pittsburgh, Pa. He is engaged in the practice of law in Wilkinsburg, Pa. One 
child, Mary Goldie McAffee, born Jan. 17, 1909; died Jan. 30, 1909. 

3. Eva Goldie* (2), third daughter of William* (7) and Nancy (Malone) Goldie, 
born Aug. 25, 1872; was married June 5, 1894 at Wilkinsburg, Pa., to Edward 
Arthur Potter, by whom there were five children as follows: — 

I. William Goldie Potter®, born Nov. 1894, died Dec. 1894 at Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 
II. Edna-Elizabeth Potter®, born Feb. 13, 1896. 

III. Arthur-Benerton Potter®, born Feb. 12, 1898. 

IV. Florence-May Potter®, born Feb. 27, 1900. 
v. Howard Potter®, born Aug. 30, 1907. 

All reside at 209 Trenton Ave., Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

4. William Goldie* (8), son of William^ (7) and Nancy (Malone) Goldie, born 
Oct. 21, 1874; married at Bay City, Mich., in Oct., 1902, to Mary Danskin, where 
he is interested in the manufacture of the Goldie Railroad specialties. 

5. Bessie Goldie* (2), daughter of William* (7) and Emma (Hall) Goldie, born 
July 11, 1879; was married April 18, 1910, to Anboris R. Guimaraea of Rio 
De Janeiro, Brazil. One child, Mary Elizabeth, born Aug. 7, 1911, resides with 
her parents and grandparents at 106 Trenton Ave., Wilkinsburg, Pa. 



Canadian Branches. 

From an inscription on a monument in the Moville Graveyard, Ireland, we 
trace this branch of the Scotch-Irish family. This reads: "By William Goudy of 
the demense of Newtownards in memory of his father John Goudy who departed 



262 CANADIAN FAMILIES. 



this life 22d Dec. 1852, aged 67 years; also his brother Robert Goudy, surgeon 
of Comber, who died 8th April, 1837, aged 39 years. This tombstone also bears 
the following lines: 

"To save in misery's darkest hour 
High science chose him as its son. 
Before him fled contagion's power, 
Yet weep not at his fall, his struggles done. 
Death round him long his arrows showered. 
Untouched he entered peans abode. 
The orphan's home he sought, then was his hour. 
Deeply mysterious are the ways of God". 

There are also the lines, "Also his mother Elizabeth Goudy alias Stewart who 
died 25th Sept., 1847, aged 82 years". Then follows the inscription: — 

"Erected by William Goudy in memory of his daughter JANE who died 
15th Feb., 1884, aged 9 years. Also his daughter MARY who died 
6th Sept., 1852, aged 20 years. Also his son JAMES who died 8th April, 
1874, aged 22 years. Also the above WILLIAM GOUDY who died 5th 
July, 1882, aged 77 years. Also his wife JANE THOMPSON who died 
13th Nov., 1889, aged 80 years". 

It will be seen by the dates on this stone that John Goudy was born in 1775; 
that Robert Goudy was born in 1798; that Elizabeth Stewart, wife of John Goudy, 
was born in 1765; that Jane Goudy was born in 1875; that Mary Goudy was 
born in 1832; that James Goudy was born in 1852; that William Goudy was 
born in 1804 and his wife, Jane Thompson, w!as born in 1809. 

John Goudy, merchant, now of Newtownards, says: "Besides the names on 
our stone of the two oldest dead and our youngest brother, there were two sisters, 
Anne who was married to a Mr. Crawford and who died without issue, and Jane 
who was the wife of Mr. McDowall who also died without a family. Our younger 
brother, James, was at college intended for the ministry of the Presbyterian church, 
but he caught cold and did not recover. From what could be gathered from 
John Goudy, the children of this family were named as follows: William Goudy, 
born in 1826 and went to Canada; John Goudy, merchant in Ireland; Hugh Goudy, 
farmer in Ireland; James Goudy, who died in 1874; Robert Goudy, farmer in Ire- 
land; Jane Goudy, married Mr. McDowell, and Anne Goudy, married Mr. Craw- 
ford. The following sheets will contain the genealogy of the Canadian family. 

Robert Goudy, married Margaret McMurry. 

Anna Crawford Henry Crawford. "Erected by his widow in loving memory of 
Henry Crawford, Ballyharry, who died 3d March, 1884, aged 49 years. Also the 
above widow, Anne Crawford alias Goudy, who died 20 Sept., 1885, aged 55 years. 
No issue." 

Hugh Goudy, married Letitia Reed. 

Jane Goudy, married William-John McDowell. No issue. 

John Goudy, married Catherine Harris. 

John Goudy. Is this the one who went to Canada? 



CANADIAN FAMILIES. 263 



Canadian Branch. 

William Goudy^ (1), son of John^ (1) and Elizabeth (Stewart) Goudy, was born 
in that section of Ulster, Ireland, called Newtownards, locally known as "The 
Ards", in August, 1826; was married in 1846 to Eleanor McCann, who was born 
in October, 1828. About the year 1847 this family emigrated to Cold Springs, 
Ontario, Canada, and settled on a farm. Mr. Goudy was a man of industrious 
and frugal habits and a quiet, unobtrusive townsman. He was affiliated with the 
Congregational church of which he and his family were worthy members. His 
wife died in February', 1892. He survived till December, 1915. There were ten 
children in this family, named as follows: — 

1. James Goudy^ (1), eldest son of William^ (1) and Eleanor (McCann) Goudy, 
born in Ireland (probabljO in March, 1847, and died the same year. 

2. Mary Goudy^ (1), eldest daughter of William^ (1) and Eleanor (McCann) 
Goudy, born at Cold Springs, Ontario, Canada, June 19, 1849; was married to 
John Sandercock, a farmer, and died without issue in February, 1911. 

3. Annie Goudy^ (1), second daughter of William^ (1) and Eleanor (McCann) 
Goudy, born at Cold Srpings, Ontario, Canada, Aug. 27, 1851; was married to 
Mr. William Glover, a railroad employee, of Newtonville, Ont, No issue. 

4. Jane Goudy^ (1), third daughter of William^ (1) and Eleanor (McCann) 
Goudy, born at Cold Springs, Ontario, Canada, March 10, 1854; was married 
Dec. 30, 1880, to George Clark of Port Hope, Ont., where she resides. Their 
children were named as follows: — 

I. Mabel Clark, born at Port Hope, Ont., June 23, 1882; died Dec. 

8, 1898. 
n. William J. Clark, born at Port Hope, Ont., July 24, 1883; died same 
year. 

III. Isabella Clark, born at Port Hope, Ont., Dec. 19, 1884; was married 
in 1899 to Thomas Crossley, farmer. No issue. 

IV. George A. Clark, born at Port Hope, Ont., Nov. 10, 1887; is a Baptist 
minister, now (1916) serving in the British army in England. 

V. Walter Clark, born at Port Hope, Ont., April 30, 1889; married in 

1905 to G. Carey. He is a teacher in High School. 
VI. James M, Clark, born at Port Hope, Ont., April 8, 1892. Printer, unm. 

5. Eleanor Goudy' (1), fourth daughter of William^ (1) and Eleanor (McCann) 
Goudy, born at Cold Springs, Ontario, Canada, is now (1916) a teacher, unm. 

6. Martha Goudy' (1), fifth daughter of William^ (1) and Eleanor (McCann) 
Goudy, born at Cold Springs, Ontario, Canada, May 24, 1859; was married Feb. 
17, 1885, to Joseph Greer of Cobourg, Ont., a farmer. Congregationalist. Her 
children named as follows: — 

1. William D. Greer, born at Cold Springs, Ont., Nov. 10, 1887; mar- 
ried in June, 1912, A. Carson. Farmer at Cobourg, Ont. 
II. Oscar G. Greer, born at Cold Springs, Ont., June 16, 1889. Farmer. 
Unmarried. 

III. Marwin J. Greer, born at Cold Springs, Ont., Sept. 6, 1892. Now a 
soldier in the British army. 

IV. Mary E. Greer, born at Cobourg, Ont., May 29, 1897. At home, unm. 

7. Isabella Goudy' (1), sixth daughter of William'^ (1) and Eleanor (McCann) 
Goudy, born at Cold Springs, Ontario, Canada, Dec. 16, 1861; was married in 



264 CANADIAN FAMILIES. 



1887 to William W. Brook. Blacksmith; Methodist; now (1916) a Militiaman. 
Issue: — 

I. Ida Brook, born at Cobourg, Ont., April 14, 1888; was married to Allan 

Cragie. 
II. Edgar Brook, born at Cobourg, Ont., May 23, 1890. Killed in France 

Oct. 8, 1916. 
III. Mary Brook, born at Cobourg, Ont., May 30, 1892. At home. 

8. Charlotte Goudy' (1), seventh daughter of William^ (I) and Eleanor (McCann) 
Goudy, born at Cold Springs, Ontario, Canada, Aug. 16, 1864; was married June 
11, 1889, to James M. Ellenborough of Cobourg. She is a dressmaker. 

9. Sarah Goudy' (1), eighth daughter of William^ (1) and Eleanor (McCann) 
Goudy, born at Cold Springs, Ontario, Canada, May 14, 1867; was married in 
November, 1906, to John Tenney, farmer. Methodist. She, a dressmaker. Child- 
dren as follows: — 

I. Charlotte Tenney, born at Cold Springs, Ont., Feb. 14, 1907. 
II. Frank Tenney, born at Cold Springs, Ont., Jan. 4, 1909. 

10. Letitie Goudie' (1), ninth daughter of William- (1) and Eleanor (McCann) 
Goudy, born at Cainborne, Ontario, Canada, July 16, 1870. A teacher in her 
native place. 



J^natljer Caitatrian Jfamilg. 

Scotch-Irish Branch. 

William Goudie' (1) is believed to have been born in Canada — probably in 
Toronto — but his parents' names are not certainly known. His father or grand- 
father was a native of the North of Ireland, but the date of his emigration to Canada 
is unknown. The family was descended from that branch of the ancient Ayrshire 
stock so early planted in Ulster, Ireland, from which so many American families 
have sprung. Mr. Goudy was a master builder or contractor. He married Mary 
Ann Wiggin, who was born in Toronto. He died in the year 1841 when his 
daughter was but one year old and her mother when she was twelve; consequently 
she does not know much about her family. 

S^cnntr ^meration. 

Emma Jane Goudy^ (1), daughter of William^ (1) and Mary J. (Wiggin) 
Goudy, was born in Toronto, Canada, June 30, 1840; she was married to John 
Levey of Levey & Company, machine manufacturers, Malinda St., Toronto, 
Canada, July 3, 1863. She is still living in the home of her daughter at Royal 
Oak, Victoria, British Columbia. She has three living children as will hereafter 
appear. The family belonged to the Church of Ireland; whatever that means. 
I. Francis Edward Levey of Tes^ale, Sask., was born in Toronto, Can., 
July 18, 1864. 

II. Alice Rebecca Levey, now Mrs. James Gorden of Cambridge, Ont., 
was born in Toronto, Can., July 25, 1866. 

III. Laura Lavinia Levey, now Mrs. John Jewell of Royal Oak, B. C, 
was born in Dakville, Ontario, Feb. 15, 1868. 



CANADIAN FAMILIES. 265 



diouhbs in Jlontr^al, CanaDa. 

John S. Goudie, parents' names unknown, was born in Montreal, P. Q., where 
he followed the occupation of a farmer. He married in Dewitt, Abrutan Co., 
la., Jan. 1, 1851, Emeline Rawlings, who was born in Lawrence county, 111., 
Jan. 1, 1856. He died in Taylor Co., la., April 24, 1887. He was evidently of 
Scotch or Shetlandic descent and may have been of the same family as others in 
the Dominion. This pair had issue as follows: — 

1. Nathan Sherman Goudie^ (1 ),son of John' (1) and Emeline (Rawlings) Goudie, 
born in Dewitt, la., Nov. 20, 1851; married in Page Co., la., 1878, Etta McKown 
who was born in Indiana, 1856, and died in Taylor Co., la., July 16, 1889. 
These had issue as follows: — 

I. Clinton Melvin GouDIE^ son of Nathan and Etta (McKown) Goudie, 
born in Newmarket, la., Aug, 10, 1884; married in Chicago, 111., June 
30, 1907, Beryl Harris, daughter of James T. and Lena (Ashley) 
Harris, who was born in California May 22, 1889. Issue as follows :- 

(1) Merrill Vaune GoudieS born April 22, 1908. 

(2) Clyde Durward GouDIE^ born Nov. 3, 1908. 

(3) Veone Elzno Goudie*, bom Jan. 21, 1911. 

II. Ruby Alice GouDIE^ born about 1880 in Taylor Co., la., died July 
16, 1889. 

III. Jella Goudie', born Sept. 1888, in Tresue Co., Cal., died in May, 1889. 

IV. Ruby Nettie GouDIE^ born July 14, 1893, in Taylor Co., la., died in 
the state of Idaho in 1906. 

2. Adolphus Gustavus Goudie,^ son of John' (1) and Emeline (Rawlings) 
Goudie, born in Hawleyville, la., June 17, 1860; married in Taylor Co., la., March 
15, 1881, Alice May Dunn, daughter of Jeremiah and Irene (Parker) Dunn, who 
was born in Taylor Co., la., Sept., 1868. These had issue one child. 

I. Arvilla Goudie, born in Taylor Co., la.. May 7, 1892. 



Hht 6outJcn ifitmilics in Ikba ;^toti;i; 



The Goudey families in Nova Scotia originated in Marblehead, Massachusetts, 
and removed to that province in the year 1775. There is evidence, however, 
to show that they had been there fifteen years earlier. The heads of the Eastern 
families were probably Royalists and at the breaking out of the Revolution deemed 
it policy to settle in the King's dominions alongside of many other neighboring 
families. The town records of Marblehead disclose but little concerning this fam- 
ily; only a few abstracts having been procured. There is an old tombstone there, 
however, bearing an inscription to Elizabeth Goudey, who was probably the wife 
of the George Goudey who was first known to have settled in the town. This an- 
cestor of the families in the British province was a native of Ulster, in the North 
of Ireland, and from ardent Presbyterian stock. He was in the New England 
colony contemporary with others of the name, and was born as early as 1715. 
After their establishment in Nova Scotia as pioneers, they devoted themselves to 
agriculture and navigation. They were shipbuilders and captains of their own 
vessels. Some members of this family were owners of as many as fourteen vessels 
and carried on an extensive business as mariners. They were also prominently 
identified with the insurance and banking business, holding stock in several com- 
panies and being officers therein. Members of this branch of the family have 
developed the same general characteristics so conspicuous in the other families 
settled in America. Like their ancestors in the "Covenanting Days", they have 
been interested in ecclesiastical affairs and many have held official positions in the 
church. 

The ancestors of the Nova Scotia branch of the Goudey family furnished more 
seamen and master mariners than any other, and their experience of service and 
exposure upon the ocean developed fine qualities of heroism and hardihood which 
were many times called into requisition amid their battles with Old Neptune upon 
the tempestuous deep. Certainly they were as brave a set of men as ever trod 
a quarter-deck and as skillful navigators as ever held a quadrant. The inhala- 
tion of salt spray toned up their blood and invested them with unyielding grit 
and nerves of steel. If the motion of their ships when tossing upon the waves 
gave these Goudeys an ungraceful gait when on shore they planted their feet firmly 
and turned aside to none. Like their kindred, the Shetland seamen mentioned in 
another place, they considered themselves gentlemen of some importance when 
on the land and expected those who met them to show to them proper deference 
and conduct. Within a somewhat rough exterior there were warm hearts beating 
and no danger was too great to prevent them from risking their lives to save a 
fellow-sailor from drowning or hinder them from dividing their last crust with a 
hungry comrade. 

These families have been allied by marriage with some of the most intelligent 
and respectable residents in the province, and have held the confidence and esteem 
of their associates for sLx generations. The following genealogical treatment will 
reveal the personal history of each family from the first progenitor to present time. 

George Goudey^ (1), the first known member of this family, was married at 
Marblehead, Mass., Jan. 15, 1736, to Elizabeth Morgan of that town, and was 



THE GOUDEY FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 267 

the father of three sons whose names have come down to us. The name of George 
Goudey appears in a Billiting Roll of Capt. Samuel Glover's Company raised for 
the intended Expedition against Canada, his rank not given. He enlisted May 
8, 1728, on which date the roll was made up. He served 20 days. His signature 
was made over a "mark", consequently we assume that he was uneducated. A 
receipt appears for the total amount of the roll as given by Capt. Glover to Col. 
Joseph Williams, and is dated Roxbury, Feb. 13, 1759. The name of George Goudy 
appears, Feb. 12, 1759, on a muster roll dated Boston, as a soldier in a company 
of foot in his Majesty's service under Capt. Samuel Glover in Col. Joseph Williams' 
regiment raised in the province of Massachusetts Bay for the reduction of Canada, 
his residence being given as Marblehead. He was a private. He entered the 
service the 8th of May and served till Oct. 12th; the length of service being five 
months and eighteen days. Days travel, 24. Reported discharged Sept. 19th. 
Endorsed 1758. These records found in the Archives of Massachusetts may have 
been somewhat duplicated, but are given as they appeared in the manuscripts. 

CHIIiDREK OF GEORGE AND ELIZABETH KORGAN. 

1. George Goudey^ (2), eldest son of George^ (1) and Elizabeth (Morgan) Goudey, 
was born in Marblehead, Mass., Dec. 25, 1759, and married Hannah Hubbard. 
I have not found any other reference to this man and wife. 

2. Philip Goudey^ (1), second son of George^ (1) and Elizabeth (Morgan) Goudey, 
born in Marblehead, Mass., Feb. 6, 1766, married Sarah Main. He removed 
to Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, 1775, probably as a Royalist. With his brother 
James he settled on the shores of the Chebogue River where there were extensive 
tracts of salt marsh which ofifered winter fodder for the cattle and because the 
lands there were better adapted to tillage than those upon Yarmouth Harbor. 
In consequence of this settlement the Chebogue Road became the great thorough- 
fare in that section. Philip Goudey was a farmer and navigator. He had issue 
seven children whose names will appear with those of the third generation. 

3. James Goudey^ (1), third son of George' (1) and Elizabeth (Morgan) Goudey, 
was married May 10, 1769, to Elizabeth Potter of Marlborough, Mass., after- 
wards of Annapolis county. Nova Scotia. He died Aug. 20, 1829. He was born in 
Marblehead, Mass. Removed to Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, in 1775. Mrs. Eliza- 
Main-Mains-Means Families. As several branches of the Goudey family of Marblehead descended 

maternally from the family of Main through Sarah Main of that town we shall present here a general 
note containing some information concerning them. The ancestors of these families were Scotch of 
excellent lineage. A branch of the sept removed into Ulster, Ireland, at the plantation of that Province 
and several generations were bom there. A family of this name settled in York, Maine, as early as 
1693 and probably came with the colony that settled in that district of the town known as "Scotland 
Parish" which was principally settled by people of Scotch blood. As 1 found the Goudeys affiliating 
with the Main families in York I assume that those in Marblehead were of the same stock. A Robert 
Means came to New England with the 1718 colony among other Scotch-Irish families, being but 16 
years of age and settled in Falmouth alongside of James Armstrong, who married his daughter, and 
continued there for five years ; then, for two years he dwelt in a log-house near Stroudwater meeting 
house ; then, for about ten years at the Purpooduck ferry. He finally removed to Saco where he died 
"suddenly," Sept. 3, 1769, aged 79 years. His widow died Feb. 18, 1789, aged 89 years. Major 
Thomas Means, son of the above, was killed by the Indians in Freeport, Me., May 5, 1756, while defend- 
ing his family, and his wife was wounded by a bullet that instantly killed the infant in her arms ; 
and she and her sister were carried away captive. Thomas Means was for manj' years a very prominent 
and useful citizen in Freeport, and descendants sur\-ive. As some of the old families at Saco removed 
to Marblehead during the Indian wars I had thought that Sarah Main might have been a scion of that 
branch of the family and search persisted in may reveal this assumption well founded. This was a 
family of good repute and none need be ashamed to carry their blood along with them in the 
Goudey families. 

—EDITOR. 



268 THE GOUDEY FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 

beth (Potter) Goudey was born June 22, 1738 and died Jan. 29, 1831. She was the 
mother of nine children whose names will appear with the third generation. 

Clrirtr dlmeration. 

CHILDREN OF PHILIP AND SARAH MAIN GOUDE'S'. 

1. Philip Goudey' (2), eldest son of Philip* (1) and Sarah (Main) Goudey, bap- 
tized in Marblehead, Mass., Nov. 27, 1768, died young, unmarried. 

2. John Goudey' (1), second son of Philip'^ (I) and Sarah (Main) Goudey, was 
baptized in Marblehead, Mass., Sept. 23, 1770, and died young, unmarried. 

3. Tbomas Morgan Goudey' (1), third son of Philip" (1) and Sarah (Main) 
Goudey, born Aug. 7, 1775; m. Elizabeth Harris, daughter of David Harris, 
and died in Nova Scotia, B. N. A., Dec. 20, 1853. He had issue seven children 
of whom with fourth generation. 

4. Lena Goudey' (1), eldest daughter of Philip- (1) and Sarah (Main) Goudey, 
born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, March 21, 1777. 

5. George Goudey' (3), fourth son of Philip^ (1) and Sarah (Main) Goudey, born 
in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, June 7, 1779, married Anna Crosby, daughter of Capt. 
Theophilus Crosby 1st. Issue, see fourth generation. 

6. James Goudey' (2), fifth son of Philip" (1) and Sarah (Main) Goudey, born 
in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, March 31, 1781, died unmarried. 

7. Sarah Main Goudey' (I), second daughter of Philip" (1) and Sarah (Main) 
Goudey, was married 1st to John Sollows, son of Willoughby Sollows, s. p.; 
2d to Lemuel Crosby, son of Lemuel, s. p. 

8. Deliverance Morgan Goudey' (1), third daughter of Philip" (1) and Sarah 
(Main) Goudey, was married to Thomas Pierce 1st. 

I. Thomas Pierce, married 1st, Mehitable Parry, daughter of Cyrus 
Parry 1st; 2d, Anna Shaw, daughter of Nathan Shaw. 

II. James Pierce, married Joanna Butler, daughter of Stephen Butler; 
died May 14, 1888. 

III. John Pierce. No other record. 

IV. George Pierce, was lost at sea May 28, 1840; unmarried, 
v. Benjamin Pierce, died Nov. 29, 1851, aged 38 years. 

9. Hannah Goudey' (1), fourth daughter of Philip" (1) and Sarah (Main) Goudey, 
was married to William Jenkins 1st, son of Griffith Jenkins. Issue : 

I. Hannah Jenkins, was married to Joseph Trask, son of Capt. John 
Trask 3d. 

II. Mary Jenkins, was married Sept. 23, 1845, to Joseph Sollows, son 
of Walter. 

III. William H. Jenkins, married April 25, 1840, Elizabeth Corning, 
daughter of Jonathan Corning 4th. He died May 5. 1864. 

IV. Robert Jenkins married Zilpah Raymond, daughter of Jonathan 
Raymond 1st. 

v. Sarah Jenkins was married to John Storry of Essex, Mass. 
VI. John Jenkins married in 1848, Jan. 8, Mary Jane Cann, daughter 

of Capt. George Cann. 
VII. Griffith Jenkins married, Oct. 19, 1849, Helen Rust, daughter of 
Samuel. 



THE GOUDEY FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 269 

VIII. Susan Jenkins was married to Anthony Jenkins, son of James 
Jenkins 1st. 
IX. George H. Jenkins married 1st, Clarissa Saunders; 2d, Gertrude 

A. Raymond, daughter of William S. Raymond. 
X. Harriet Jenkins. No other information. 

CHIIiSBEN OF JAMES AND ELIZABETH POTTER OOVTfErZ. 

1. Elizabeth Goudey^ (1), eldest daughter of James^ (1) and Elizabeth (Potter) 
Goudey, was married to Isaac Marshall, son of Anthony Marshall of Digby 
county, Nova Scotia. These had a daughter Rachel who was married to Thomas 
Bacon, of Digby. 

2. James Goudey^ (3), eldest son of James^ (1) and Elizabeth (Potter) Goudey, 
died June 12, 1794, unmarried. 

3. Hannah Goudey^ (2), second daughter of James^ (1) and Elizabeth (Potter) 
Goudey, was the wife of Prichard, and issueless. 

4. Thomas Goudey^ (2), second son of James^ (1) and Elizabeth (Potter) Goudey, 
born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Jan. 25, 1779, married Edith Porter, daughter 
of George Dudley Porter, by whom two children who died in infancy. 

5. Sarah Goudey^ (3), third daughter of James* (1) and Elizabeth (Potter) 
Goudey, born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Feb. 27, 1782; died Feb. 8, 1784. 

6. Benjamin Goudey^ (1), third son of James* (1) and Elizabeth (Potter) Goudey, 
born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, in 1783, married Mary Scott, daughter of David 
Scott, and died Dec. 27, 1862. 

7. Sarah Goudey' (4), fourth daughter of James* (1) and Elizabeth (Potter) 
Goudey, born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, March 8, 1784, was married to Thomas 
Whitby and died July 1, 1864. 

8. Stephen Goudey' (1), fourth son of James* (1) and Elizabeth (Potter) Goudey, 
born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Aug. 23, 1787; married Mary Haskell, daughter 
of William Haskell 2d; died in 1870. 

9. George Goudey' (4), fifth son of James* (1) and Elizabeth (Potter) Goudey, 
born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Oct. 10, 1789, married 1st, Mary Telford, 
daughter of Samuel Telford; 2d, Hannah Clements, daughter of William 
Clements; died Sept. 25, 1853. 



Jfourtb dmtmtioiT. 



CHIiaJKEN OF THOMAS M. AND ElilZABETH (HARRIS) GOTTDEY. 

1. Andrew Goudey^ (1), eldest son of Thomas' (1) and Elizabeth (Harris) 
Goudey, born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, July 27, 1801, married April 30, 1829, 
Eliza Shaw, daughter of Zebina Shaw, and had issue nine children, of whom with 
fifth generation. He died Feb. 21, 1885. 

2. James Goudey^ (4), second son of Thomas' (1) and Elizabeth (Harris) Goudey, 
born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, in 1803, married Susan Cameron, and died July 
4, 1855. 

3. Ashel Goudey^ (1), third son of Thomas' (1) and Elizabeth (Harris) 
Goudey, bom in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, married Agnes Muir, of Shelburn, and 
died Jan. 12, 1891. He had issue nine children of whom with the fifth generation. 



270 THE GOUDEY FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 

4. Thomas Goudey* (3), fourth son of Thomas' (1) and Elizabeth (Harris) 
Goudey, married Elizabeth Raymond, daughter of Daniel Raymond, Sept. 1, 
1833, by whom six children, of whom with fifth generation. He died March 18, 1885. 

5. Sarah M. Goudey* (5), only daughter of Thomas' (1) and Elizabeth (Harris) 
Goudey, born in 1818, was married in October, 1839, to Thomas F. Soulis; died 
Feb. 9, 1854. 

6. Capt. Aaron Goudey* (1), fifth son of Thomas^ (1) and Elizabeth (Harris) 
Goudey, married March 20, 1842, Ellen Crosby, daughter of Dea. Thomas 
Crosby, and died May 23, 1883. He was a master mariner and ship-owner. At 
one time he was the owner of thirteen schooners, five brigantines, two brigs, nine 
barks, five ships and two steamers; in all thirty-six vessels with a tonnage of 
12,805. He was a man of prominence in his county. He was treasurer of Hiram 
Lodge of Masons in 1879; subscribed $200 tow^ard a school building in Yarmouth 
county. Nova Scotia; was owner of three shares in the Marine Insurance Company 
in 1837; was a director in the Arcadian Insurance Co. in 1860; was director from 
1858 to 1879, a term of twenty-one years. He was the owner of five shares in the 
Commercial Insurance Company established in 1861; also shareholder in the 
Atlantic Insurance Company in 1865; owner of three shares in the Oriental Insur- 
ance Company in 1874. He was one of the directors in the Yarmouth Exchange 
Bank in 1874 and 1879; was the president and part owner of the Commercial 
Wharf Company in 1866. He was the owner of two shares in the Eastern State 
Steamship Company in 1855; was a director in the Yarmouth Marine Railway 
Company in 1880. His wife died Nov. 26, 1890, aged 71 years. Seven children, 
of whom with fifth generation. 

7. Israel Goudey^ (1), sixth son of Thomas' (1) and Elizabeth (Harris) Goudey, 
was married to Hilton; died in 1844. 

CHILDREN OF GEOROE AND ANNE CROSBT GOXTDEY. 

1. John Goudey^ (3), eldest son of George' (3) and Anne (Crosby) Goudey, 
born in Yarmouth county. Nova Scotia, Dec. 12, 1802. No other information. 

2. George Goudey^ (6), second son of George' (3) and Anne (Crosby) Goudey, 
born in Yarmouth county. Nova Scotia, Nov. 13, 1804; married Joanna Butler, 
daughter of Eleizer Butler 2d. He had issue as will appear hereafter. 

3. Nancy Goudey^ (2), eldest daughter of George' (3) and Anne (Crosby) Goudey, 
born in Yarmouth county. Nova Scotia, March 26, 1806; was married to Robert 
Parry, son of Cyrus Parry 1st, by whom she had issue as follows: — 

I. Miner PARRY^ born Oct. 16. 1825, married Jan. 10, 1850, Sarah Tel- 
ford, daughter of Capt. Jack Telford 2d. 

II. George W. PARRY^ born March 22, 1827, Captain, married Sept. 30, 
1849, ZiLPAH Anne Durkee, daughter of Joseph R. Durkee. 

in. Anne PARRY^ born March 22, 1829, was married to Ainsley Porter, 
son of Josiah Porter 3d. 

IV. Mehitable PARRY^ born Sept 12, 1831, was married to Timothy 

McCarthy of Boston, Mass. 
V. Mary J. PARRY^ born Oct. 11, 1833, was married to Horatio G. Pope, 
of Mass.; had a daughter Mary C. Pope. 

VI. John G. PARRY^ born Nov. 19, 1835, married May 27, 1860, Helen 
Augusta Raymond, daughter of William S. Raymond. 



THE GOUDEY FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 271 

VII. Maria Alice PARRY^ born March 20, 1838, was married 1st, Nov. 
14, 1853, to John Whitfield Currey, son of Elipahlet Currey; 2d, 
to Jesse King. 
VIII. LoviLLA PARRY^ bom June 24, 1840, died young. 
IX. Margaret E. PARRY^ born June 15, 1842; was married to Charles 

Hayward, of Massachusetts. 
X. Eliza A. PARRY^ born Aug. 7, 1844, was married to Alonzo Radcliffe 

of Massachusetts, 
XI. William W. Parry^, born April 16, 1847, died unmarried. 
XII. Charles H. PARRY^ born April 6, 1850; married Ella Forest, of 
Massachusetts. 

4. Maria Goudey^ (1), second daughter of George' (3) and Anne (Crosby) 
Goudey, born in Yarmouth county. Nova Scotia, June 23, 1808; was married 
1st, to John Killam, son of Eliakim Killam 1st; second, Feb. 10, 1842, to Cyrus 
Parry 2d, son of Cyrus Parry 1st. She died March 11, 1892. John Killam 
died Aug. 20, 1840. She had issue by both husbands. 

I. Margaret KILLAM^ was married 1st, to Norman Parry, son of 

Cyrus Parry 2d; then to Clement Parry, son of William Parry 1st. 
II. John KILLAM^ was lost at sea. 

III. Maria Anne KILLAM^ died Oct. 24, 1844, unmarried. 

IV. Sarah KILLAM^ was married to Levi Myers; died May 15, 1851. 

V. Miner W. PARRY^ married Jan. 1, 1870, Almina B. Porter, daughter 

of Benjamin Porter. 
VI. Julia PARRY^ was married Jan. 17, 1867, to William Stayley Porter, 

son of William Corning. 
VII. Eliza A. Parry^ was married to J. Ambrose Piper, son of Foster Piper. 

5. Lavinia Goudejr* (1), third daughter of George' (3) and Anne (Crosby) Goudey, 
was married 1st to Miner Parry, son of Cyrus 1st; 2d to Abijah Raymond 
on June 18, 1843, son of Daniel Raymond 1st. She died March 17, 1891. She 
had issue by both husbands as will appear presently. 

I. Matilda PARRY^ was married Dec. 2, 1847, to James Moses, son of 

Edward Moses. She died May 2, 1859. 
II. Ansel G. PARRY^ married July 17, 1858, Jane E. Porter, daughter 

of Benjamin 1st. He died April 10, 1897. 
in. Freeman C. PARRY^ married Jan. 1, 1858, Martha Cann, daughter 

of Harvey Cann 1st. 
IV. Watson B. Raymond*, born in 1844, died April 3, 1900. 
V. Anthony Raymond^ married Deborah Rogers, daughter of Capt. 

Joseph Rogers. 
VI. Augusta RAYMOND^ was married to Edward B. Steele. 

6. Mary Goudey* (2), fourth daughter of George' (3) and Anne (Crosby) Goudey, 
was married 1st to William Britt; 2d, Jan. 7, 1849, to Samuel Vickery 2d, 
son of Moses Vickery 2d. She died May 4, leaving issue by both husbands as 
will now appear. 

I. Mary Emma BRITT^ died Feb. 26, 1850, aged 13 years. 
II. Emily VICKERY^ was married to George Foote, son of Capt. Isaac 
Foote. 

7. Ansel Goudey* (1), third son of George' (3) and Anne (Crosby) Goudey, married 
1st, Alice Bain, daughter of Capt. Alexander Bain 1st; second, Oct. 1, 1861, 



272 THE GOUDEY FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 

Mary Eliza Sullivan, daughter of James Sullivan 2d. These had issue of whom 
with sixth generation. 

CHI1.DBEN OF BENJAMIN AND MAKY (SCOTT) GOXTDEY. 

1. Maiy Jane Goudey^ (8), eldest daughter of Benjamin' (1) and Mary (Scott"> 
Goudey, born in Nova Scotia, B. N. A., in 1809; was married Feb. 22, 1828, to 
LoRAN D. Cann, son of Hugh Cann 1st. She died April 10, 1900, having had 
issue eight children as follows: — 

I. Adelaide Murry CANN^ born Dec. 9, 1828; was married Nov. 9, 1854, 
to James A. Peters, son of James Peters of Westport, N. S. 

II. Mary Elizabeth CANN^ born May 5, 1832, twin to Elizabeth Mary, 
was married April 13, 1854, to Capt. George H. Goudey, son of 
Stephen 1st. 

III. Elizabeth Mary Cann^ twin to Mary Elizabeth, born May 5, 1832, 
was married 1st, to Samuel Durkee, son of Capt. Samuel Durkee: 
2d, 1863, Dec. 16, to Christopher Roop, son of James Roop, of Digby, 
N. S. 

IV. Harriet Jane Cann*, born Dec. 10, 1834; was married April 10, 1859, 
to Capt. William Hibbard, 2d son of Capt. William Hibbard. She 
died Aug. 9, 1869. 

V. LoRAN Cann\ born Feb. 12, 1837; died July 17, 1868, unmarried. 

VI. Almira F. Cann*, born Aug. 31, 1840; was married Dec. 28, 1859, to 
Maurice Peters, son of James of Westport, N. S. 

VII. Stayley B. Cann*, born Jan. 1, 1843, married March 12, 1872, Lydia 
Letherington, daughter of Everard Letherington. 

VIII. Miner C. Cann*, born Dec. 12, 1845; married July 16, 1874, Isabella 
C. Haley, daughter of Capt. Oliver Haley; died Jan. 26, 1900. 

IX. Edward B. Cann*, born June 5, 1847; married Aug. 1, 1872, Elizabeth 
G. Raymond, widow of Jacob A. Raymond. 

2. Miranda Goudey^ (2), second daughter of Benjamin^ (1) and Mary (Scott) 
Goudey, born March 5, 1813; was married May 10, 1832, to Charles Telford, 
son of Capt Jacob Telford; died April 13, 1891, leaving issue as follows: — 

I. Jacob Telford*, born April 20, 1833; married Jan. 7, 1856, Sophia 

C. Corning, daughter of Joseph Corning. 
II. Benjamin Telford*, born July 23, 1835; married 1st, April 27, 1862, 

Harriet Shaw, daughter of Allan Shaw; 2d, Mary Hibbard, daughter 

of Rufus Hibbard 2d. 

III. Charles F. Telford*, born Nov. 12, 1838; married Oct. 28, 1863, 
Isabel MacCain. 

IV. John Telford*, born Jan. 10, 1842; married Aug. 8, Jane Wiley, 
daughter of Robert Wiley, M.D. 

V. Alfred Telford*, born Nov. 15, 1844; married April 10, 1874, Re- 
becca Henderson, daughter of Robert Henderson. 

VI. Harvey G. Telford*, born Jan. 5, 1848; married Jan. 2, 1871, Martha 
Ellen Goudey, daughter of Thomas Goudey. 

VII. Mary Telford*, born March 30, 1851; died unmarried. 

VIII. Annie Telford*, born Sept. 4, 1855; was married July 17, 1879, to 
Benjamin Symonds, son of Rufus H. Symonds. 

3. Harriet Goudey^ (4), third daughter of Benjamin' (1) and Mary (Scott) 



THE GOUDEY FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 273 

Goudey, born in 1815, was married to Samuel Bain, son of John Bain 1st. She 
died March 4, 1886. Issue as follows: — 
I. Norman Bain, died unmarried. 

4. Sarah Goudey^ (8), fourth daughter of Benjamin^ (1) and Mary (Scott) 
Goudey, born in 1817, was married 1st, Nov. 6, 1838, to Ebenezer Parry, son 
of Cyrus Parry, 2d; second, to James Roop, of Digby Co., N. S.; 3d, to Caleb 
SuLis (SouLis) of Digby Co., N. S. She died Nov. 4, 1901. Mr. Parry died 
Jan. 29, 1850. Two sons: — 

I. Bowman F. Parry. 
n. Augustus Parry. 

5. Benjamin Goudey^ (4), eldest son of Benjamin^ (1) and Mary (Scott) Goudey, 

born ; married 1st, Feb. 10, 1842, Jane Bain, daughter of Capt. Alexander; 

2d, Sarah (Perry) Jeffery, widow of Joseph Jeffery, and had issue as follows:— 

I. Mary GoudeyS was married to Amos B. Brown, 3d son of Amos B. 
Brown 1st. 

II. Augustus B. Goudey', married 1st, Hannah Corning, daughter of 
Zachariah Corning 2d; 2d, Oct. 5, 1898, Arabella H. (Parry) Tel- 
ford, widow of Henry Telford. 

6. John Goudey* (5), second son of Benjamin^ (1) and Mary (Scott) Goudey, 
married Sarah Daley, adopted daughter of Sergeant Samuel Graham, of Brooklyn. 

CHII.DREH OF STEPHEN AST) UART (TTARTTT-.T.T.j GKJTTSET. 

1. William H. Goudey* (4), eldest son of Stephen^ (1) and Mary (Haskell) 
Goudey, born Aug. 31, 1811, married 1st, Sarah R. Ellis, daughter of Benjamin 
Ellis 1st; 2d, Dec. 20, 1856, to Sophia (Shaw) Corning, widow of George D. 
Corning. He died March 9, 1895, leaving issue of whom with fifth generation. 

2. Thomas Goudey* (5), second son of Stephen' (1) and Mary (Haskell) Goudey, 
born in Nova Scotia, B. N. A., July 18, 1813; married Feb. 2, 1838, Abigail 
Crosby, daughter of Lemuel Crosby 3d. He died Dec. 28, 1884. He had issue; 
see forward. 

3. Almira Goudey* (3), eldest daughter of Stephen' (1) and Mary (Haskell) 
Goudey, born in Nova Scotia, B. N. A., in 1815; was married 1st, to Nathan 
Landers, son of Jabez Landers 2d; married 2d, to John Churchill, son of 
Ephraim Churchill; 3d, to Samuel T. Bain, son of Samuel Bain 1st. She died 
Sept. 23, 1890. 

4. Mary Goudey* (6), second daughter of Stephen' (1) and Mary (Haskell) 
Goudey, born in 1817; was married 1st, to Dltdley Porter Corning, son of 
Richard Corning; 2d, Sept. 14, 1864, to George Sollows 1st, son of Joseph 
SoUows 1st. She died Feb. 25, 1895. Issue as follows: — 

The Soulis Family. — The ancestors of the Soule-Soulis-Sulis families from which the Nova Scotia 
branches were descended came from Normandy and settled first in England ; but persons removed to 
Scotland and became distinguished barons and extensive owners of land in Annandale on the Border 
and in other sections of the "Land 0' Cakes". The surname has been usually spelled Soulis in Scot- 
land but a recent examination of ancient documents shows that the name was as often spelled "Soule" 
which was the original Norman orthography and that most commonly used by the families in America. 
It has been assumed that the Scottish branches were extinct but tliere seems to have been a remnant 
saved through a family settled very early in Ireland. Another branch of the Soulis or Sulis family 
as Huguenots came early to New Rochelle, N. Y., and sat down there among the other families of 
Protestant faith ; and the Nova Scotia families were descended from this stock through a Daniel Sulis, 
who removed from New York State. The Editor of this book has about 5000 letters containing infor- 
mation relating to the Sole-Soule-Soulis-Sowle families. 



274 THE GOUDEY FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 

I. Alica Jane Corning^, born Jan. 10, 1837; was married Nov, 22, 1856, 

to Capt. Israel Goudey, son of Ashael Gowdey; died Sept. 3, 1897. 
II. George W. CoRNING^ born Jan. 16, 1840; married Sept. 7, 1861, Hannah 

Parry, daughter of Cyrus Parry 3d. He died March 18, 1895. 
III. Abner B. CoRNING^ born April 10, 1849; married Oct. 23, 1873, Sarah 
Parry, daughter of Cyrus Parry 3d. He died May 8, 1890. 

5. Stephen Goudey^ (2), third son of Stephen^ (1) and Mary (Haskell) Goudey, 
born in 1819, married Dec. 19, 1844, Mahala Crosby, daughter of Lemuel Crosby 
2d, by whom he had issue two daughters, 

I. Anna Goudey^ married David C. Crosby, son of Moses Crosby. 
She deceased. 

II. Agnes GouDEY^ married John Sollows, son of John SoUows. 

6. Sarah H. Goudey^ (9), third daughter of Stephen' (I) and Mary (Haskell) 
Goudey, born in Nova Scotia, B. N. A., in 1821; was married 1st, Jan. 27, 1842, 
to William C. Porter, son of Josiah Porter 3d; 2d, Sept. 24, 1847, to 
Thomas W. Curry, son of Eliphalet Curn.-. She died June 25, 1899. Mr. 
Porter died Sept. 25, 1843. Her issue by both husbands as follows: — 

I. William Stayley Porter*, born Nov. 7, 1842; married Jan. 17, 1867, 

Julia Parry, daughter of Cyrus Parry 3d. 
II. Almira Agnes PoRTER^ born May 5, 1844; was married March 18, 
1866, to Aaron S. Corning, son of George Dudley Corning. 

III. George M. Curry\ married 1st, April 30, 1871, Maria A. Crosby, 
daughter of David Crosby; 2d, Mattie Lockery of St. Martins, N. 
B.; 3d, April 25, 1887, to Bertha A. Crosby, daughter of Jacob Knowles 
Crosby. 

IV. Charles Howard CuRRY^ married Mary Eliza Raymond, daughter 
of Eleizer Raymond. 

7. Capt. Joseph Goudey^ (2), fourth son of Stephen' (1) and Mary (Haskell) 
Goudey, born in Nova Scotia, B. N. A.. Sept. 16, 1856; married Sarah A. Telford, 
daughter of William H. Telford, and had issue five children of whom hereafter. 

8. Mercy Anne Goudey^ (7), third daughter of Stephen' (1) and Mary (Haskell) 
Goudey, born in Nova Scotia, B. N. A., Dec. 31, 1846. She was married to Aaron 
Jeffery, son of David JefTery; 2d, to Hadassah Porter, son of James Porter 
1st. She died Nov. 13, 1873. 

9. George H. Goudey^ (7), third son of Stephen' (1) and Mary (Haskell) Goudey, 
born in Nova Scotia, B. N. A., married April 13, 1854, Mary Elizabeth Cann, 
daughter of Loran D. Cann. He died Nov. 13, 1890. 

10. Margaret Goudey" (7), fifth daughter of Stephen' (1) and Mary (Haskell) 
Goudey, married Dec. 18, 1853, James Crosby, son of James Crosby 2d, and 
had issue as follows. 

I. Arthur W. CROSBY^ born March 1, 1855; died July 28, 1855. 
II. Mary E. Crosby*, born June 8, 1856; was married in Sept. 1875, to 
Thomas Eldridge, son of Capt. Elislia Eldridge. 

III. Robert A. Crosby*, born Oct. 13, 1858; died Dec. 25, 1859. 

IV. Florence N. Crosby*, born Nov. 11, 1860; died Dec. 30, 1863. 

V. Edith N. Crosby*, born Nov. 27, 1864; was married Feb. 24, 1887, 
to George W. Landers, son of John Nelson Landers. 

VI. Emily A. Crosby*, born Feb. 16, 1868; was married Jan. 2, 1895, to 
Harvey G. Churchill, son of John Churchill. 



THE GOUDEY FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 275 

VII. Ormond S. Crosby^ born Aug. 3, 1872; married in June, 1895, Bessie 
Odell. 

Jfiftb (imcratwn. 

CHILDREN OF ANDREW AND ELIZA (SHAW) GOUDEY. 

1. Zebina Goudey^ (1), eldest son of Andrew^ (1) and Eliza (Shaw) Goudey, 
born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Feb. 28, 1830; married Dec. 23, 1856, Almira 
A. Welch, of Westport; died Nov. 22, 1887. This man was quite extensively 
engaged in navigation and was a prominent and useful citizen. He was at one time 
the owner of fourteen vessels; two schooners, ten barks, and two ships, with a 
tonnage of 10,610. He built and owned the "Perlermo" of 799 tons, of which he 
was the captain. He was a justice of the peace in Yarmouth in 1883; grand juror 
in 1889; was director of the Arcadian Insurance Company for ten years from 
1871 to 1880 inclusive. He was the owner of three shares in the Oriental Insurance 
Company. He had issue six children. Mrs. Goudey died Oct. 5, 1884, aged 76 
years. 

2. Edwin Sterns Goudey^(l), second son of Andrew^ (1) and Eliza (Shaw) Goudey, 
born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, March 17, 1831; married Dec. 23, 1861, Sophia 
Knowles, daughter of John Knowles 2d, of Barrington, N. S., and had issue 
eight children of whom hereafter. 

3. Eliza J. Goudey^ (1), eldest daughter of Andrew* (1) and Eliza (Shaw) Goudey, 
born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Jan. 15, 1834; was married Nov. 30, 1854, to 
Charles W. Sealey; died April 24, 1891. She was tlie mother of three children 
as follows: — 

I. Edward SEALEY^ born July 16, 1857; died Dec. 5, 1865. 
II. Annie Sealey^ born July 25, 1859; was married June 21, 1882, to 

Marcellus p. Sringer, of Newton, Mass. 
HI. Ormsry G. SEALEY^ born Feb. 16, 1861; married June 1, 1891, Maude 

Burns of Somerville, Mass. 

4. Susan H. Goudey^ (2), second daughter of Andrew* (1) and Eliza (Shaw) 
Goudey, born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, March 28, 1836; was married Dec. 19, 
1864, to John A. Abbott, son of John Abbott, of Digby, N. S., by whom six children 
named as follows: — 

I. Charles VV. G. ABBOTT^ born Oct. 16, 1864; was married Jan. 10, 

1864, to Ella Chesley, of Bridgetown, N. S. 
II. James Ormsby ABBOTT^ born April 28, 1866; died July 30, 1875. 

III. John Gordon Abbott^, born Jan. 22, 1872; died Aug. 25, 1893. 

IV, Margaret Eliza Abbott^ born June 12, 1873. 

V. Harry Hilton ABBOTT^ born March 31, 1877; was married Sept. 20, 

1900, to Angeline Myrtle Lee, of Aylesford, N. S. 
VI. Howard Locke ABBOTT^ born July 22, 1880. 

5. Wentworth Moody Goudey^ (1), son of Andrew^ (1) and Eliza (Shaw) Goudey, 
born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Sept. 14, 1839; married Sept. 1, 1874, Mary Louisa 
Crowell, daughter of Levi Crowell, of Barrington. N. S., by whom he had issue eight 
children. He evidently married a second wife named Mary Louisa Nickerson after the 
genealogy of the Nova Scotia families was published in the Yarmouth Herald, as there 
were children assigned to her. He was a farmer in Barrington, N. S. 

6. Charles W. C. Goudey^ (1), fourth son of Andrew* (1) and Eliza (Shaw^ 



276 THE GOUDEY FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 

Goudey, born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Jan. 15, 1842; was wounded in battle 
during the civil war in the United States, and died in Washington, D. C, May 
24, 1864. 

7. Israel H. Goudey* (2), fifth son of Andrew^ (1) and Eliza (Shaw) Goudey, 
born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, July 15, 1844; married Nov. 12, 1873, Margaret 
Crosby, daughter of Capt. Samuel Crosby, by whom two children as follows: — 

I. LuELLA B. GouDEY^ born May 10, 1874; was married June 17, 1896, 
to James Henry Marsh, of Boston, Mass. 

II. S. Ernest Goudey*, born April 22, 1878. 

8. Albert J. Goudey* (1), sixth son of Andrew* (1) and Eliza (Shaw) Goudey, 
born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Oct. 6, 1847; died Jan. 7, 1868, unmarried. 

9. Sarah H. Goudey* (6), third daughter of Andrew* (1) and Eliza (Shaw) 
Goudey, born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, March 30, 1849; was married 1st, June 
17, 1874, to Waitstill Hilton, son of Stephen Hilton; 2d, Jan. 1, 1900, to Capt. 
Bradford R. Hilton, son of Capt. Stinson Hilton. 

CHirj)R£I7 OF ASHEIi AND AGKES (UT7IR) GOITDIZ:. 

1. John M. Goudey* (4), eldest son of Ashel* (1) and Agnes (Muir) Goudey, 
born in Nova Scotia; married July 2, 1854, Emily Jane Rose, daughter of James 
K. Rose 1st, and had two children as follows: — 

I. Emily H. Goudey*, born in 1856, was married to Adelbert Durland, 
son of William Durland; died July 2, 1895. 

II. Henry Goudey*, died in April, 1870. 

2. Sarah Isabella Goudey* (7), eldest daughter of Ashel* (1) and Agnes (Muir) 
Goudey, was married 1st, Nov. 26, 1859, to Nathaniel Perry, son of Samuel 
Perry ; 2d, to James Galvin, of Westport, N. S. 

3. Mary Jane Goudey*(3), second daughter of Ashel*(l)and Agnes (Muir) Goudey, 
was married to Capt. Holland H. Foote, son of Capt. Zachariah Foote, 2d. 

4. Capt. Israel Goudey* (3), second son of Ashel* (1) and Agnes (Muir) Goudey, 
was married 1st, Nov. 26, 1856, to Alice Jane Corning, daughter of Dudley P. 
Corning; 2d, to Hannah Corning, widow of George W. Corning, and had issue 
as follows: — 

I. George Goudey*; died. 

II. Hiram G. Goudey*. 

III. Alice A. Goudey*. 

IV. Ida E. Goudey*. 

5. Samuel M. Goudey* (1), third son of Ashel* (1) and Agnes (Muir) Goudey, 
was married 1st, Oct. 10, 1863, to Elizabeth J. Foulis, daughter of Capt. Thomas 
T. Foulis; 2d, Grace Bruce Shelburn, and had issue: — 

I. Annie Louisa Goudey*, was married to Capt. Collin Thompson, of 
Westport N. S. 

II. RuFus Goudey*. 
HI. Grace Goudey*. 
IV. Charles Goudey*. 

6. William Goudey* (1), fourth son of Ashel* (1) and Agnes (Muir) Goudey, 
died a single man. 

7. Ashel Goudey* (2), fifth son of Ashel* (1) and Agnes (Muir) Goudey, mar- 



THE GOUDEV FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 277 

ried 1st, Oct. 14, 1867, Mary Harris, daughter of William Sutdiff Harris; 2d, 
Ruth Gillis, and had issue as follows: — 
1. William Goudey^, died. 
II. Estella Goudey®, died. 
III. And four children by second marriage. 

8. Thomas L. Goudey^ (4), sixth son of Ashel^ (1) and Agnes (Muir) Goudey, 
married 1st, Mary A. Reed of Cornwallis; 2d, Minnie Sollows, widow of Frank 
Sollows, and had issue as follows: 

I. William Goudey®, married Jennie Mullen. 

II. James Goudey*. 

III. Jennie Goudey®, was married to Albert Wilson. 

IV. Emma Goudey®, died. 
V. Frank Goudey®. 

VI, Emma F. Goudey®, born Sept. 11, 1874; died Dec. 16, 1897. 

9. Agnes Goudey^ third daughter of Ashel* (1) and Agnes (Muir) Goudey, 
was the wife of Charles Cleveland. 

CHIIiDREN OF THOMAS AKD ELIZABBTH KATUOND GOTTDBT. 

1. Capt. Edgar Goudey^ eldest son of Thomas^ (3) and Elizabeth (Ray- 
mond) Goudey, was born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, in 1835; married Mary 
Saunders, daughter of David and Mary (Curry) Saunders, born in Hebron, N. S., 
June 26, 1836. The marriage was in May, 1858. He died in the summer of 1864. 
She died in Lynn, Mass., Oct. 8, 1915. He was a seafaring man and captain oa 
his last voyage. Issue as follows: — 

I. Alva Goudey®, born in 1859, was married April 11, 1881, to Clarence 
Benton Thyng, merchant tailor, and resides in Revere, Mass. She 
has issue as follows: 

(1) Edgar Thyng^, born 1882, manager Fairbanks Scale Co., 
Boston. He married April 30, 1913, to Abby Grace Murray 
of Roxbury, Mass. 

(2) Vivian Thyng^ born 1886, now (1916) secretary to the mayor 
of Revere, Mass. 

II. Edgar Goudey*, born in 1860; died in 1863. 

III. David Goudey®, born in 1862; died in 1864. 

2. Capt. Edward Eangsley Goudey^ (2), son of Thomas^ (3) and Elizabeth 
(Raymond) Goudey, born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, May 14, 1839; married 
July 27, 1863, Delia Cavanaugh, daughter of Simon Cavanaugh, and became 
a seaman. His wife, Delia Churchill Cavanaugh, was born in Nova Scotia Nov. 
16, 1848. He ran away and went to sea when he was about 13 years of age and 
when 25 years old was a sea captain and followed the sea until he was struck by 
lightning at the age of 37 years. Lived 3 years. Was a high Free Mason, belonged 
to the Grand Lodge of Ireland and was a fine man. Everybody liked Kings- 
ley Goudey, as they called him. He sailed on the bark Cora Lynn in 1863 
when he was first captain. His son Eddie, of Portsmouth, has the bark he first 
sailed in. Edward sailed for his uncle Aaron Goudey of Yarmouth. He went 
to Antwerp on one trip. Wentworth, Biney, Andrew, Aaron, Arthur and Simon 
were all cousins of Edward. He was in Havana, Cuba, when the battleship 
"Maine" was blown up, his family being on board his ship of which he was 
master. While sailing up the harbor the ship was struck by a Spanish man-of- 
war and a large hole under the bow was made. Great fear was experienced, as 
they expected to sink. Captain Goudey ordered all hands on deck. His daughter 



THE GOUDEY FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 



Minnie, then only a child, had been left below and her mother ordered the colored 
steward to go and bring her on deck, but he was too much frightened and the mother 
went and got her child. The carpenter repaired the broken ship and all were 
saved. The first time the family of Captain Goudey went to sea with him the 
vessel was wrecked off the Scottish coast near Ardness. His wife was taken off 
and sent away dressed in oilskins while he remained on board. His ship was saved. 
He was seriously injured by a thunderbolt while at sea but lived three years after- 
wards, dying in Tuskett, Nova Scotia, in the year 1864. He was far advanced 
in Masonry and a man "well spoken ofif". His children were named as follows: — 
I. Minnie Alice GouDEY^ born in Yarmouth, N. S., May 14, 1864; 

married James A. Cambpbell, and lives in Lynn, Mass. She has five 

daughters as follows: — 

(1) IzETTA CAMPBELL^ born Sept. 24, 1887, was married to Asa 
G. Kimball and lives in East Lynn, Mass. (married April 
2, 1904). 

(2) Vanessa Campbell^, born Sept. 9, 1888, was married to Grover 
C. Kimball and lives in West Lynn, Mass. (married Nov. 
5, 1904). 

(3) Gladys Campbell^, born May 8, 1891, was married June 30, 
1915, to Carl H. S. Hunt and lives in Lynn, Mass. 

(4) Effie H. Campbell^ born May 4, 1899, remained single; 
died April 6, 1895. 

(5) Emma Lockwood Campbell^, born July 4, 1900. 

II. Edward Arklow Goudey® son of Edwin and Delia Cavanaugh Goudey, 
married Effie Hammond but has no issue. He resides in Portsmouth, 
N. H. He was born on the ocean while his father was sailing near 
Scotland, and the register of Edinburgh contains the date. 
III. James Henry Goudey®, son of Edwin and Delia Cavanaugh Goudey, 
died at the age of ten months. 

3. Thomas F. Goudey^ (6), third son of Thomas^ (3) and Elizabeth (Raymond) 
Goudey, born in Nova Scotia, 1840; joined the U. S. army and died a prisoner 
in Georgia, Sept. 12, 1864. 

4. Mary Goudey^ (5), daughter of Thomas^ (3) and Elizabeth (Raymond) Goudey, 
of whom no other information. 

5. Martha Ellen Goudey^ (2), second daughter of Thomas^ (3) and Elizabeth 
(Raymond) Goudey, was married to Harvey Telford, son of Charles Telford. 

6. Rev. George H. Goudey^ (5), fourth son of Thomas^ (3) and Elizabeth 
(Raymond) Goudey, born in Dearfield, N. S., Nov. 29, 1843; married Caroline 
Raymond, daughter of Jonathan Raymond, at Beaver River, N. S., who was born 
there April 25, 1849. He was a Baptist minister in 1885 at Argyle and Tusket, 
N. S., but when last heard from was a painter in Beverly, Mass., where he resides. 
He is said to have been the father of a large family, but he has not replied to the 
several letters of inquiry forwarded and his family history may not be correct. 
See sketch of his son which follows. 

Irving R. Goudey®, son of George and Caroline (Raymond) Goudey, born 
in Malfville, N. S., June 18, 1875; married Nov. 14, 1900, in Beverly, Mass., 
Jennie H. Dodd, daughter of Jacob M. and Hannah Jane (Glover) Dodd. She 
was born in Marblehead, Mass., Jan. 3, 1872. He is a paper-hanger in Beverly, 
Mass. Children named as follows : — 



THE GOUDEY FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 279 

I. Earle R. Goudey, born Nov. 17, 1901, in Beverly, Mass. 
II. LiNWOOD E. Goudey, born Jan. 12, 1903, in Beverly, Mass. 

III. Kenneth Goudey, born June 24, 1904, in Beverly, Mass. 

IV. Ruth J. Goudey, born March 8, 1909, in Fitchburg, Mass. Died 
May 12, 1909. 

Gertrude Gowdey died in Beverly, Mass., April 10, 1904. 

CHILDKEN OF CAPT. AABOIT AND EliLEN (CROSBY} GOTJDEY. 

1. Capt. Frederick Goudey* (1), eldest son of Aaron^ (1) and Ellen (Crosby) 
Goudey, married Sophia Esther Williams, of Dublin, Ireland; died Oct. 2, 1886. 
He had issue as follows: — 

I, Herbert Aaron Goudey^ married Catherine Gaudet. 
II. Arthur Goudey^, of whom no more information. 

III. Margaret Goudey*, was married to Melbourne Moses, of Carleton, 
Yarmouth Co., N. S. 

IV. Mary-Louisa Goudey®, of whom no other record, 
v. Annie-Sophia Goudey®, of whom no other record. 

VI. Robert-Leo Goudey®, of whom no more information. 
VII. Lizzie-Myrtle Goudey®, no more information. 
VIII. Kathleen Goudey®, of whom no more information. 

CHIUJREN OF GEORQE AND JOANNA (BUTLER) GOTTDEY. 

1. John Goudey* (3), eldest son of George* (3) and Joanna (Butler) Goudey, 
died at Turks Islands, Oct. 10, 1844, unmarried. 

2. Viola Goudey* (1), eldest daughter of George"" (3) and Joanna (Butler) 
Goudey. was married to Joel Allen, 2d, son of Joel Allen. Had Alice, married 
Hallond Foote. 

3. Stephen B. Goudey* (3), second son of George and Joanna (Butler) Goudey, 
born in 1827; married 1st, Jan. 12, 1854, Almira Bain, daughter of Alexander 
Bain 3d; second, Mary B. Bain Stanwood, widow of Capt. Enoch Stanwood. 
He died Feb. 22, 1898. He had issue as follows:— 

I. Almira B. Goudey®, was married Oct. 10, 1900, to Ralph H. Redding, 

son of Thomas G. Redding. 
II. Grace Goudey®. No other record. 

4. Emeline Goudey* (1), second daughter of George* (3) and Joanna (Butler) 
Goudey, was married April 16, 1849, to George C. Crosby, son of Enoch Crosby 
1st, and had issue as follows: — 

I. Emeline L. Crosby®, born May 14, 1850, was married July 16, 1878 

to Thomas M. Winter, son of Thomas Winter 2d. 
II. Joanna B. Crosby®, born April 4, 1853; died April 23, 1860. 

CHIIiDREN OF ANSEL, AND AXICE (BAIN) CSOtTDEY. 

1. George Russell Goudey* (8), eldest son of Ansel* (1) and Alice (Bain) Goudey, 
born Jan. 5, 1838; married Nov. 1, 1861, Alice Rodney, daughter of Capt. Jona- 
than Rodney. 

2. Henry Goudey* (2), second son of Ansel* (1) and Alice (Bain) Goudey, born 
July, 1840; married Jane Hopkirk, daughter of Capt. James Hopkirk. 

3. Joseph Goudey* (3), third son of Ansel* (1) and Alice (Bain) Goudey, born 
Jan. 30, 1843, twin to William; married Ephemia MacKenna, daughter of Capt. 
Jonathan MacKenna. 



280 THE GOUDEY FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 

4. William Goudey^ (5), fourth son of Ansel* (1) and Alice (Bain) Goudey, 
born Jan. 30, 1843, twin to Joseph. 

5. John Goudey* (6), fifth son of Ansel* (1) and Alice (Bain) Goudey, was 
lost at sea. 

6. Maurice Goudey, sixth son of Ansel"* (1) and Alice (Bain) Goudey, born in 
Dec, 1846, married in England and resides in that country. 

7. Robert Azor Goudey* (2), seventh son of Ansel* (1) and Alice (Bain) Goudey, 
born April 24, 1848. 

8. Zachariah Goudey* (1), eighth son of Ansel* (1) and Alice (Bain) Goudey, 
born Oct. 25, 1851, married Julia A. Durkee, daughter of John Durkee 4th. 

9. Edson Goudey* (1), ninth son of Ansel* (1) and Alice (Bain) Goudey, born 
1856, was lost at sea. 

10. Alice Goudey* (3), daughter of Ansel* (1) and Alice (Bain) Goudey, born 
in 1857, was married to Capt. James Durkee, son of John Durkee 4th. 

CHIIiDREN OP G-EORaE AND MAR? (TELiFGRD) GOUDEY. 

1. Henry Telford Goudey* (5), son of George* (4) and Mary (Telford) Goudey, 
born in Yarmouth, N. S., 1806; married Jan. 1, 1845, Lois Anne Hatfield, 
daughter of Capt. J. V. N. Hatfield who was born in Tusket, N. S., in 1812, and 
died in Guilford, Conn., 1904. He was a carpenter and builder living in Tusket, 
N. S. He died in San Francisco, Cal., 1876. Children as follows) — 

I. John Hatfield GouDEY^ born in Tusket, N. S., 1844. Has issue 
Clarence and Grace. Connected with the Associated Press in New York. 
II. Clarence Henry Goudey®, born in Tusket, N. S., 1846. In Seattle, 
Washington; a single man. 

III. Agnes M. Goudey®, born in Tusket, N. S., 1848; was married to 
RuFUS Lorenzo Judson, and died in Jackson, Mich. 

IV. George Wentworth Goudey®, born in Tusket, N. S., Aug. 29, 1850, 
married in Dedham, Mass., Sept. 15, 1875, Euna Antoinette Fisher, 
daughter of Charles and Hannah (Davis) Fisher, who was born in Gar- 
land, Me., Sept. 15, 1855. He is a commercial traveller residing in Boston, 
Mass. One child. 

(1) Percy Wentworth GouDEY^ born in Boston, Mass., Sept 
30, 1878; died Oct. 17, 1880. 
V. Gilbert Sanderson Goudey*, born in Tusket, N. S., 1852; died in 1897. 
VI. William Robbins Goudey®, born in Tusket, N. S., 1854; married Ann 

Newcomb, died in St. Paul, Minn., 1885. 
VII. Arthur Noble Goudey®, born in Tusket, N. S., 1856; died in 1901. 
VIII. Joseph Clinton Goudey®, born in Tusket, N. S., 1858; married Edna 

, 42 Broadway, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

IX. Oscar Lyon Goudey®, born in Tusket, N. S., Nov. 15, 1861; married 
in New Haven, Conn., Nov. 3, 1897, Wilmina Kendrick, daughter 
of Allan and Alexia (McKillup) Kendrick, and born in New Brunswick, 
B. N. A., July 2, 1868. He is a salesman in New Haven, Conn. Chil- 
dren as follows: — 

(1) Helen Harper Goudey^ born Aug. 3, 1898 in Boston, Mass. 

(2) Donald Kendrick GouT>EY^ born Aug. 6, 1900 in Guilford, 
Conn. 

(3) Lois Hatfield GouDEY^ born Nov. 8, 1905 in London, England. 



THE GOUDEY FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 281 

X. Edith May GouDEY^ born in Tusket, N. S., 1862; was married to 

Dr. West, of Guilford, Conn. 
XI. Edward Everett GouDEY^ born in Michigan 1864, in Portland, 
Oregon. 

2. Sarah Goudey^ (10), eldest daughter of George* (4) and Mary (Telford) 
Goudey, was manied to Gilbert Sanderson who died June 7, 1890, by whom 
issue as follows: — 

I. Elizabeth Ellen Sanderson', died May 4, 1841. 

II. George G. Sanderson', married Dec. 20, 1871, Fannie F. Manning, 
of Bridgewater. Had, Dora M., b. Dec. 30, 1879; d. Nov. 29, 1882; 
Claude L., b. March 13, 1883. 

III. Mary L. Sanderson', was married Nov. 11, 1869, to George W. Allen, 
son of Capt. Gilbert Allen. She died Oct. 8, 1881, leaving issue; 

(1) Gilbert Sidney Allen', born Feb. 2, 1871; died Aug. 12, 1893. 

(2) Elizabeth Killam Allen', born Aug. 2, 1872; died April, 1874. 

(3) Max White Allen', born July 16, 1874; married Oct. 10, 1900, 
Agnes Jolly, daughter of Thomas Jolly. 

(4) Mabel Emily Allen', born March 11, 1877. 

(5) Claire Louisa Allen', born Dec. 28, 1878. 

(6) Chester Arthur Allen', born Sept. 28, 1881; died in 1882. 

IV. Gilbert Ormsby Sanderson', died at Rio Janeiro, unmarried, 
v. Ellen Ormsby Sanderson', died April 10, 1851, aged 3 years. 

VI. Gilbert R. N. Sanderson', died March 28, 1851, aged 17 months, 
vii; Lois Hatfield Sanderson', married E. Johnson Manning, son of 

Solomon, 
viii. Myra B. Sanderson', was married June 10, 1886, to Clarence Rogers, 
son of Capt. Benjamin Rogers, 3rd. 

3. Elizabeth Potter Goudey^ (5), second daughter of George* (4) and Mary 
(Telford) Goudey, born June 27, 1814; was married Oct. 11, 1837 (s. p.), to Capt. 
Joseph B. Lovitt, son of Israel Lovitt; died Oct. 1, 1839. 

4. Caroline Augusta Goudey^ (2), third daughter of George* (4) and Mary 
(Telford) Goudey, born in 1815, was married (s. p.) to John Jenkins, son of James 
Jenkins 1st. She died June 17, 1833. 

5. George James Goudey^ (9), second son of George^ (4) and Mary (Telford) 
Goudey, born in 1818, married 1st, Jerusha Anne Seeley; 2d, Nov. 2, 1856, 
Louisa Butler, daughter of Robert Butler. He died June 16, 1863. Issue. 
See forward. 

6. Samuel T. Goudey^ (3), third son of George* (4) and Mary (Telford) Goudey, 
born in 1822, married Maria Crosby, daughter of Dea. Thomas Crosby. He 
died Sept. 18, 1855. Mrs. Goudey died Sept. 23, 1851, aged ^Z years. See forward 
for issue. He was a master mariner. 

7. Mary Agnes Goudey^ (11), fourth daughter of George* (4) and Mary (Telford) 
Goudey, born in 1826, was married (s. p.) Dec. 6, 1847, to Adam R. Noble, son 
of Robert Noble. She died April 30, 1849. 

CHILDREN OF -WILLIAJ!! D. AITD SARAK (ELLIS) GKJUDEY. 

1. John Edwin Goudey^ (7), eldest son of William* (4) and Sarah Ellis Goudey, 
born Oct. 18, 1834; died Oct. 20, 1856, unmarried. 



282 THE GOUDEY FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 

2. Caroline A. Goudey^ (3), eldest daughter of William^ (4) and Sarah (Ellis) 
Goudey, born Feb. 10, 1837; was married Feb. 5, 1859, to James E. Phillips, son 
of James Phillips. She died Dec. 4, 1893, leaving issue as follows: — 

I. Sarah P. PHILLIPS^ was married, 1st, Oct. 29, 1891, to Capt. Robert 
K. Rose, son of James Rose; 2d, June 1, 1895, to Thomas Uhlman, 
of Carleton, N. S. 
II. Ida PHILLIPS^ was married to George A. Adams, son of Elias Adams. 

III. Harry Phillips^ 

IV. Arthur Phililps^ 
V. George Phillips®. 

3. Benjamin Harley Goudey^ (3), second son of William^ (4) and Sarah (Ellis) 
Goudey, born Aug. 16, 1838; married 1st, Dec. 3, 1859, Elizabeth B. Trask, 
daughter of Jacob Trask; 2d, Augusta Bethune, daughter of Godfrey Bethune. 
He had issue as follows: — 

I. Mary Estella Goudey^ was married April 18, 1886, to Birtell E. 

PoRTER«, son of Elkanah T. Porter; died Oct. 1, 1888. 
II. Augusta GouDEY^ 

III. Susan Goudey^, was married to Wentworth Rose. 

IV. William Goudey®. 

V. Blanche Goudey®. 
VI. Clarence Goudey®. 

4. Margaret N. Goudey^ (3), second daughter of William* (4) and Sarah (Ellis) 
Goudey, born Aug. 16, 1840; died May 18, 1841. 

5. William Frederick Goudey^ (6), third son of William^ (4) and Sarah (Ellis) 
Goudey, born March 7, 1842; married Nov. 10, 1864, Sarah B. Trask, daughter 
of Jacob Trask, by whom he had issue children as follows: — 

I. Edith Goudey® was married to Rev. D. H. Simpson. 
II. Elizabeth Goudey® was married to .... Trask. 

III. Agatha Goudey®. 

IV. FoNA Goudey®. 

6. Margaret A. Goudey^ (4), third daughter of William* (4) and Sarah (Ellis) 
Goudey, born Feb. 16, 1844; was married May 24, 1862, to Capt. Robert K. 
Rose, son of James Rose, by whom she had issue children as follows. She died 
May 9, 1890. 

I. Helen Rose®, was married to William Symonds, son of Thomas 

Symonds. 
II. Bertha Rose®, was married to Jacob E. Crane, son of Charles Crane. 

III. Henry M. Rose®, married July 29, 1896, Anna Louisa Bingay, daughter 
of Capt. Thomas S. Bingay. 

IV. Rev. Charles W. Rose®, married July 10, 1901, Keziah Banks, daugh- 
ter of Dea. E. C. Banks. 

7. Frances A. Goudey^ (3), fourth daughter of William* (4) and Sarah (Ellis) 
Goudey, was married March 28, 1868, to David M. Chute, son of David M. 
Chute, by whom she had issue as follows: — 

I. Anna Chute® was married to Herbert Cox. 

II. Caroline Chute® was married to George C. Marrill of New Hamp- 
shire. 

III. George Chuie® married Alice M. Parry, daughter of Benjamin E. 
Parry. 



THE GOUDEY FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 283 

IV. Harriet Chute was married to Charles Evans of Newfoundland. 
V, Roy Chute married Nallie of Newfoundland. 

VI. Grace Chute married Beliveau. 

VII. Fred Chute. 

VIII. Willie Chute died. 

8. Joseph Henry Goudey^ (4), fourth son of William^ (4) and Sarah (Ellis) 
Goudey, born Aug. 1, 1848; married Elizabeth Parry, daughter of Jacob Parry, 
and had issue as follows: — 

I. Lannie D. Goudey^, was married to David S. Perry. 

II. Clifford S. Goudey*. 

III. Flossie Goudey^ 

IV. Blake R. Goudey"*. 

9. Alvira M. Goudey^ (3), fifth daughter of William^ (4) and Sarah (Ellis) 
Goudey, born Sept. 9, 1850, was married to Israel K. Trask, son of Jocob Trask, 
and had issue as follows: — 

I. Jacob K. Trask®, married Mary Sinclair, daughter of John Sinclair. 
II. George Trask*, married Lizzie Reynalds of Port La Tour. 

III. Benjamin F. Trask*, married June 5, 1901, Nettie M. Brown, daugh- 
ter of Thomas Brown 4th. 

IV. Ethel Trask*. 

V. Frank L. Trask*, married Hattie Perry, daughter of Alfred Perry. 
VI. Robert S. Trask*. 

VII. Gordon Trask*. 

VIII. Israel Trask*. 
IX. Douglass Trask*. 

X. Mary H. Trask*- 

10. Sarah A. Goudey^ (11), sixth daughter of William^ (4) and Sarah (Ellis) 
Goudey, born May 7, 1853, was married to Thomas Wetmore, son of Thomas 
Wetmore 1st, and had children named as follows: — 

I. Lenna Wetmore*. 
II. Bertha Wetmore*. 

III. Stayley Wetmore*. 

IV. Mary H. Wetmore*. 

11. Charles Randall Goudey ^ (4), fifth son of William^ (4) and Sarah (Ellis) 
Goudey, born April 1, 1855; married Julia Raymond, daughter of William Ray- 
mond, and had two daughters named as follows: — • 

I. Nellie Goudey*. 

II. Grace Goudey*. 

12. George M. Goudey^ (12), sixth son of William^ (4) and Sarah (Ellis) Goudey, 
born Oct. 2, 1857; married Annie M. Allen, daughter of Nathaniel Allen, and 
had two children as follows: — 

I. Roy Goudey^ 

II. Avard Goudey*. 

13. Egbert Goudey^ (2), seventh son of William^ (4) and Sarah (Ellis) Goudey, 
born Nov. 2, 1859; married Agnes M. Allen, daughter of Henry Allen, and had 
issue as follows: — 

I. Jennie Goudey*. 

II. Russell Goudey*. 

III. Lance Goudey*. 



284 THE GOUDEY FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 

14. Stayley P. Goudey^(l), eighth son of William* (4) and Sarah (Ellis) Goudey, 
born Aug. 12, 1861; married Aug., 1883, Alice M. Corning, daughter of George 
Corning, and had a son. 

Bernard Eugene Goudey', son of Staley P.^ (1) and Alice (Corning) Goudey, 
born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Dec. 15, 1884; married July 21, 1910, Abbie 
RosELLA, a daughter of Gardner Ridlon, born in West Lynn, Mass., April 2, 1887. 
He came to Boston, Mass., April 3, 1903, and was naturalized in Salem Court 
July 14, 1913. Residence West Lynn, Mass., where his principal work is on trans- 
formers in the General Electric Company. Children: — 

I. Ruth-Frances Goudey^, born in West Lynn, Mass., June 1, 1911. 

II. Alice Davis Goudey^, born in West Lynn, Mass., Dec. 17, 1915. 

CHUiDREN OF THOIXAS AITO ABIGAIL (CR03BT) O0X7DET. 

1. Mary Elizabeth Goudey^ (12), eldest daughter of Thomas* (5) and Abigail 
(Crosby) Goudey, born Feb. 26, 1839; was married Jan. 12, 1859, to Benjamin 
P. Pitman, son of Joseph Pitman. She died Jan. 27, 1860, leaving issue as follows: 

I. Thomas L. Pitman', born Nov. 11, 1859, who married, 1st, Charlotte 
Adams, daughter of Dominique Adams; 2d, Minnie Dimmell. 

2. Capt. Lemuel C. Goudey^ (2), eldest son of Thomas* (5) and Abigail (Crosby) 
Goudey, born July 2, 1841; married Sept. 15, 1865, Mary Susan Corning, daugh- 
ter of David Corning, and died Feb. 2, 1890. Issue as follows; see sixth generation. 

3. Stephen A. Goudey^ (4), second son of Thomas* (5) and Abigail (Crosby) 
Goudey, born Dec. 1, 1843; married in Oct., 1868 (s. p.), Harriet E. Parry, daugh- 
ter of Cyrus Parry, 3d. He was a master mariner. 

4. Gilbert Onnsby Goudey^ (2), third son of Thomas* (5) and Abigail (Crosby) 
Goudey, born Nov. 23, 1845; died in 1866, unmarried. 

5. Nathan L. Goudey^ (1), fourth son of Thomas* (5) and Abigail (Crosby) 
Goudey, born June 11, 1849; married 1st, Lucinda Sollows, daughter of George 

1st; 2d, Goodwin; 3d, Mullin, daughter of Alfred Mullin, and 

had issue as follows: — 

I. G. Ormsby Goudey', married Mat Durland, daughter of Adelbert 
Durland. 

II. May Goudey', adopted by Stephen Goudey. 

III. Robert Goudey'. 

IV. Edson Goudey'. 

6. Lois E. Goudey^ (1), second daughter of Thomas* (5) and Abigail (Crosby) 
Goudey, born Oct. 18, 1851; was married to Adoniram Sollows, son of Walter 
Sollows, and had issue as follows: — 

I. Lucinda Sollows'. 

II. Harriet Sollows'. 

III. Mildred Sollows'. 

7. Bowman Goudey^ (1), fifth son of Thomas* (5) and Abigail (Crosby) Goudey, 
born June 23, 1854; married Havl.ah Allen, daughter of Nathaniel Allen, and 
had issue as follows: — 

I. Stanley Goudey'. 
II. Clayton Goudey*. 

8. Capt. John Edwin Goudey^ (8), sixth son of Thomas* (5) and Abigail (Crosby) 



THE GOUDEY FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 285 

Goudey, born Feb. 11, 1857; married Ida May Parry, daughter of Clement Parry, 
by whom issue as follows: — 

I. Ethel Goudey^ 

II. Charlotte Goudey®. 
HI. J. Edward Goudey*. 

CHILDREN or CAPT. JOSEPH^ AND SARAH A. (TELFORD) GOTJDET. 

1. Frank Byrum Goudey^ (3), son of Joseph^ (2) and Sarah (Telford) Goudey, 
born at Port Maitland, N. S., May 31, 1864; married in Brockton, Mass., June 
14, 1897, Rose M. Japple, who was born in Dartmouth, N. S., June 7, 1874. Res- 
idence, Brockton, Mass. Occupation, teaming. Issue as follows: — 

I. Joseph Franklin Goudey®, born April 10, 1898, in Brockton, Mass. 

II. George Lawrence Goudey®, born Nov. 2, 1899, in Brockton, Mass. 

III. RiTTA May Goudey®, born May 19, 1902, in Brockton, Mass. 

IV. Frank Burwell Goudey®, born March 2, 1908, in Brockton, Mass. 
V. Dorothy Rosamond Goudey®, born Aug. 8, 1909, in Brockton, Mass. 

2. Burwell C. Goudey^ (1), son of Joseph* (2) and Sarah (Telford) Goudey, 
married Catherine Barr, of Liverpool, N. S. 

3. Annie J. Goudey^ (4), daughter of Joseph^ (2) and Sarah (Telford) Goudey, 
was the wife of George W. Churchill, son of Thomas Churchill. 

4. Bessie M. Goudie^ (3), daughter of Joseph* (2) and Sarah (Telford) Goudey. 

5. A. Gordon Goudey^ (1), son of Joseph* (2) and Sarah (Telford) Goudey. 

CHII.DREN OF ZEBINA AND ALUIRA (W^LCH; GOXTDE7. 

1. Hiram Goudey® (6), eldest son of Zebina* (1) and Almira (Welch) Goudey, 
born in Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia, Jan. 7, 1858; married Jan. 7, 1886, 
Georgie M. Churchill, daughter of John Churchill, of Ohio, U. S. A., and had 
issue as follows; 

I. Hazel A. GouDEY^ born Nov. 8, 1886. 
II. Reta GouDEY^ born Feb. 2, 1889. 

III. Myra W. GouDEY^ born Sept. 15, 1891. 

2. Harriet Goudey® (2), eldest daughter of Zebina" (1) and Almira (Welch) 
Goudey, born in Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia, Sept. 11, 1859; was married 
June 3, 1880, to Capt. John W. Anderson, son of John C. Anderson; died Feb. 
23, 1897. 

3. William E. C. Goudey® (3), second son of Zebina^ (1) and Almira (Welch) 
Goudey, born in Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia, June 13, 1861. He is President 
and General Manager, 124 Bellevue Ave., Melrose, Mass. Married March 25, 
1889, Charlotte May Converse, of Hartford, Conn., born in Stafford, Conn., 
June 13, 1869, daughter of Elonzo H. and Charlotte (Washburn) Converse, 
by whom he had issue as follows: — 

I. Marion Converse Goudey^, born Sept. 17, 1890, in Lynn, Mass. 
II. Alonzo Shaw Goudey^, born Nov. 25, 1892, in Boston, Mass. 

4. Frances H. Goudey® (1), second daughter of Zebina^ (1) and Almira (Welch) 
Goudey, born Jan. 5, 1864; was married July 26, 1886, to William C. MacKinnon, 
son of the Rev. William C. MacKinnon of Cumberland Co., N. S., and had issue 
as follows: — 

I. William Karl MAcKINNON^ born July 11, 1890. 



286 THE GOUDEY FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 

II. Jean Frances MacKinnon^, born Feb. 11, 1892. 
III. John Killam MacKinnon^ died in infancy. 

5. Minnie S. Goudey® (1), third daughter of Zebina^ (1) and Almira (Welch) 
Goudey, born in Yarmouth county, Nova Scotia, May 25, 1865; was married 
1st, to William Lovitt, son of William D. Lovitt; 2d, to N. D. Chase, of Kansas 
Cit>'; 3d, Sept. 17, 1900, to Henry N. Chandler, of Charlestown, Mass. 

6. Lillian Goudey^ (1), fourth daughter of Zebina^ (1) and Almira (Welch) 
Goudey, born in Yarmouth county, Nova Scotia, Dec. 6, 1867; died March, 1869. 

CHIIiDREN OF "WENT'WORTH M. AND MARY (CRO"WKLL) GOUDEY. 

1. Waitstill Hilton Goudey« (1), eldest daughter of Wentworth M.^ (1) and 
Mary (Crowell) Goudey, born in Yarmouth county, Nova Scotia, Oct. 2, 1875; 
was married Jan. 7, 1911, in Tremont Temple, Boston, Mass., to Anna L. Russell 
who was born in Charlestown, Mass., March 1885. He is a salesman in Roxbury, 
Mass. 

2. Mabel Young Goudey^ (1), second daughter of Wentworth M.^ (1) and Maria 
(Nickerson) Goudey, born April 4, 1879; was married March 8, 1899, to Aubry 
Cleveland Purdy, son of Daniel and Mary (Ross) Purdy of Villahedale, N. S., 
born at Port Clyde, N. S., July 30, 1872. She has issue as follows: — 

I. Francis Elma Morse Purdy^ born March 23, 1900, in Harrington, N. S. 
II. Stella Eunice Purdy^, born June 8, 1904, in Harrington, N. S. 
III. Mary Louisa Purdy^, born Sept. 12, 1912, in Harrington, N. S. 

3. Jennie Almira Goude]^® (2), third daughter of Wentworth M.* (1) and 
Mary (Crowell) Goudey, born in Yarmouth county, Nova Scotia, Sept. 30, 1879; 
died March 16, 1883. 

4. Stella M. C. Goudey^ (1), fourth daughter of Wentworth M.^ (1), born in 
Yarmouth county, Nova Scotia, July 20, 1881. 

5. Annie G. Spring Goudey^ (2), fifth daughter of Wentworth M.^ (1) and Mary 
(Crowell) Goudey, born in Yarmouth Co., N. S., Sept. 27, 1885; was married at 
Stoughton, Mass., Oct. 3, 1912, to Alfred Hartley Worthen, son of Benjamin 
D. and Athesa (Lakin) Worthen of Harrington, N. S., and grandson of Benjamin 
and Margaret (Blades) Worthen of Pumbico, N. S., and had issue as follows: 

I. Lenora Hilton Worthen^, born July 2, 1913. 
II. Mariam Frances Worthen^, born Aug. 16, 1914. 

6. Harriet A. Goudey^ (3), sixth daughter of Wentworth M.* (1) and Mary 
(Crowell) Goudey, born in Yarmouth county. Nova Scotia, Dec. 12, 1887. 

7. Alfred L. Goudey*' (2), second son of Wentworth M.^ (I) and Mary (Crowell) 
Goudy, born in Yarmouth county. Nova Scotia, April 28, 1890. 

8. Vesta L. Goudey^ (1), youngest daughter of Wentworth M^ (1) and Mary 
(Crowell) Goudey, born in Yarmouth county. Nova Scotia, March 1, 1892. 

CHIIiDREIT OF ISRAEL H. AND MARGARET (CROSBY) GOUDIE. 

1. Luella B. Goudey'^ (1), a daughter of Israel H.^ (1) and Margaret (Crosby) 
Goudey, born in Yarmouth county. Nova Scotia, May 10, 1874; was married 
June 17, 1896, to James Henry Marsh, of Boston, Mass., by whom she had issue 
as follows: — 

I. Malcolm Brown Marsh, born Jan. 22, 1900. 



THE GOUDEY FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 287 



CHILDREN OF EDWIN S. AND SOPHIA (KNOWLES) (JOUDEY. 

1. Elizabeth A. Goudey® (3), eldest daughter of Edwin S.^ (1) and Sophia 
(Knowles) Goudey, born at Barrington Pass, Shelburne Co., N. S., Dec. 1, 1863; 
was married Sept. 27, 1887, to Edward James Payson, born in Yarmouth, N. S., 
1864, son of Edward and Maria (Haley) Payson, and resides in Kitchener, Canada. 
He is a newspaper manager at Fredericton, Moncton, New Brunswick, Brockville 
and Kitchener, Ont. Children as follows: — 

I. Beatrice L. S. PAYSON^ born at Yarmouth, N. S., Aug. 8, 1888. Un- 
married. 

II. Dorothy Goudey PAYSON^ born Oct. 5, 1895. Unmarried. At home. 

2. Enos Gordon Goudey^ (2), eldest son of Edwin S.^ (1) and Sophia (Knowles) 
Goudey, born at Barrington Passage, Shelburne Co., N.S., Oct. 9, 1863; married 
Sept. 14, 1898, Miss Florence Goodwin, daughter of Harvey Goodwin, of Pub- 
nico, N. S. He came to the United States in 1881 and entered the employ of 
Jordan Marsh Company; then went to the Beeman Chemical Company, Cleveland, 
Ohio, promoters of the Beeman's Pepsin Gum in New England. Fifteen years ago 
the Beeman Chemical Company was merged and taken over with other concerns, 
forming the American Chicle Company, at present a $15,000,000 corporation. 
He still represents this firm in New England with an office at 170 Summer St., 
Boston, Mass. One daughter. 

I. Dorothy Harvey Goudey^, born Aug. 4, 1900. 

3. Frederick S. Goudey^ (2), second son of Edwin S} (1) and Sophia (Knowles) 
Goudey, born in Yarmouth county, Nova Scotia, Dec. 13, 1865. No other record. 

4. Charles M. Goudey^ (2).. third son of Edwin S.^ and Sophia (Knowles) 
Goudey. born in Barrington Passage, Shelburne Co., N. S., Aug. 31, 1868; married 
June 19, 1899, Alice Morgan. He represents the Brockton Cold Storage and 
Warehouse Company in Burlington, Vt. He has issue. 

I. J. Morgan GouDEY^ born Nov. 19, 1900. 

5. Frances E. Goudey® (2), second daughter of Edwin S.^ (1) and Sophia 
(Knowles) Goudey, born in Yarmouth county. Nova Scotia, April 13, 1870. 

6. Margaret L. Goudey® (2). third daughter of Edwin S.* (I) and Sophia 
(Knowles) Goudey, born in Yarmouth county. Nova Scotia, July 8, 1873; was 
married April 30, 1894, to Albert Barnes Cook, son of Albert Cook, by whom 
she had issue: — 

I. Lilian Hilton Cook'', born May 13, 1895. 
II. Velma Shirley CooK^ born Aug. 19, 1896. 

III. Frederick Washburn Cook^ born Aug. 5, 1899. 
I v. Gordon Goudey Cook^, born July 2, 1904. 

7. Eliza S. Goudey® (2), fourth daughter ot Edwin S.» (1) and Sophia (Knowles) 
Goudey, born in Yarmouth county. Nova Scotia, Feb. 11, 1875. 

8. Sarah H. Goudey® (8), fifth daughter of Edwin S.* (1) and Sophia (Knowles) 
Goudey, born in Yarmouth county. Nova Scotia, Feb. 26, 1879. 

9. Eva D. Goudey® (1), sixth daughter of Edwin S.^ (1) and Sophia (Knowles) 
Goudey, born in Yarmouth county, Nova Scotia, Nov. 2, 1883. 

CHILDREN OF CAPT. LEMUEL C. AND MARY S. WORNING) GOUDEY. 

1. Leonard Goudey®, died. 

2. Laura Goudey®, married Ernest Landers, son of William H. Landers. 



288 THE GOUDEY FAMILIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. 

3. Elizabeth Goudey^ married William M. Crosby, son of Jacob Knowles 
Crosby. 

4. Lemuel C. Goudey^ married, Oct. 16, 1895, Annie Irene Corning, daughter 
of Abner B. Corning. 



Elisha B. Goudey, son of George and Elizabeth (Seeley) Goudey, born at Bear 
River, N. S., was a sea captain. He married Mary Smith (another says Miller) 
of Bear River, N. S. He died in Brunswick, Ga., 1887. 

CHIIiBREN OF ELISHA B. AKTZ) MARY SMITH (JOUDEY. 

1. Ralph Cutter Goudey, a son of Elisha B. and Mary (Smith) Goudey, was born 
in Granville, N. S. He married in Boston, Mass., June 26, 1902, Catherine A. 
Melick, who was born in St. John, N. B., February, 1873. He is a merchant in 
Somerville, Mass. He has brothers named as follows: 

2. Frank B. Goudey, a son of Elisha B. and Mary (Smith) Goudey, was living 
in San Francisco, Cal. 

3. Ethel N. Goudey, a daughter of Elisha B. and Mary (Smith) Goudey, is said 
to have been the wife of Belleadean. 



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