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Full text of "The Fayettevillian"

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TO EVERYTHING THERE IS A SEASON 




FAYETTEVILLIAN 1999 

FAYETTEVILLE STATE UNIVERSITY 

FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 

VOLUME 42 



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A time to begin^ time to end 
A time to be /fffiFerent, a time to co 
A time townee, a time to mourn 
A time toHead, a time to follow 
A timdto spend, a time to save 

To (j^^thing there ie a season 
And a time to every purpose under heaw 
Aitlme to study, a time to party 
|time to unite, a time to stand alone 
time to cram, a time to be tested 

[everything there is a season 
[id a time to every purpose under h 
A?time to love, a time to leave 
A time to embrace, a time to challenge 
A tM^to win, a time to lose 
A tiiBto speak, a time to listen 
A timwo read, a time to write 




To everytH^ there is a season 
And as thes^i^ne turn at FSU 
We live, look baa tand remember . 





Fayetteville State University is tlie liome of the mighty bucl<ing 
Broncos. There's no doubt about it, we Broncos are a proud and 
spirited bunch! In our q^uest for understanding the world and 
ourselves, one o|uestion seems to rise more frecjuently than any 
other Why are we here? At first analysis, one might be swayed 
to say, "for an education!' However, the answer goes much far- 
ther than earning one's degree. We're here to be better people 
than we were the days before we avfw/ed on campus. Fayetteville 
State University is cultivating better human beings. The chal- 
lenge that one must overcome, is to be the better Bronco-the 
better self! 




\eadereW\p is not a face that a 3ronco wears m the lime liglit 
\or when someone important is watcliin^, One who obeervee 
.our campus leaders will note that the &ronco motto, res non 
verba, deeds not words, is more than the mere wishful thinking on 
the part of our predecessors. Those who came before us were 
pioneers, making a difference in the lives of young African- Ameri- 
cans, And in that tradition, we also lead. As the days turn into 
years, and years into centuries, it has been a primary goal to instill 
in each student a since of responsible obligation. We leave 
Fayetteville State University and find our respective destinies in 
the world with an intrinsic motivation to make a difference in the 
lives of our peers and within our community. 





GUcuu^ello^ 




Dr. Willis B. McLeod 



Chancellor & First Lady, 
Mrs. Jacqueline McLeod 



StuaU*U Q(Ujijen4Ufte4ii /Jddociatian 

A TIME TO LEAD 



The Student Government Aeeodat'ion serves 
as the official voice of the student body. 
Elected to serve, these able body leaders 
devote countless hours addressing student 
issues and concerns. 

During the ]99S>-99 academic year, the 
Association addressed campus safety, 
sponsored a Financial Aid forum, and attended 
theCIAA Leadership Conference. Their activity 
on campus is only rivaled by their tenacious 
involvement at NC Association of Student 
Governments and NC Black Student 
Government Association. 

This year, Keren James served as 5GA 
President. James, the first non American to 
man the helm of the SGA, is a Junior, 
Chancellor's Scholar majoring in Music 
Education. His home is Trinidad, in an effort 
to diversify student experiences and to share 
his culture with the students, '(^eron sponsored 
a trip to NCCU's honorary program for the 
Trinidadlan born Miss Universe. 



Keron James 



SGA President 





Executive Officers: James Davis. Attorney General: Carmen Jackson. Treasurer: Marcelle 
Smith, Vice-President: Stianta Cobb. Secretary: Kelvin Tliompson. President Pro Tempore. 




Seated l-r Alicia Bronchi. Erica Fuller. Kelvin Thompson. Ishia Craven. Dexter Pearson. 

Standing l-r Marcelle Smith. Shanta Cobb, James Davis Shenika Davis. Brandon Ramcharan. Shauna Jones. Michael McDw, ,c'd. 

Sonia Blanks, Anthony Raphael. Nichelle Sullivan, Charnelle Green, Carmen Jackson, Mr. James Scurry, Advisor 



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St^iOCH^ ActUMtieA. Q044^HXlii 

A TIME TO MAKE IT HAPPEN 



The Student Activities Council is at the 
heart and soul of Bronco Pride. Each mem- 
ber possesses the energy and creativity to 
keep the momentum, that is SAC, going. To 
ensure its longevity, the new members must 
successfully complete SAC college, a rigor- 
ous training course on planning, program- 
ming, policy and procedure. Every year, the 
Council does its very best to enhance the 
quality of student life. 

Fixed on laying the foundation for incoming 
freshmen, SAC introduced the new students 
to the bronco way. During Freshmen Orien- 
tation, SAC presented: "Are You Ready to 
Rumble?" It gave indepth information on 
clubs & organizations and the appropriate 
manner in which &ronco5 represent the white 
and blue. Each new Bronco left knowing we'll 
always expect the best. 

The Student Activities Council'e major re- 
sponsibilities include sponsoring Welcome 
Back Week, Homecoming, and the Rodeo. 
Each of these week-long events is jammed 
pack with safe alternatives for collegiate fun. 
Bronco Cinema, Hip Hop Bingo, Super Free 
Play, Bowling, the Dating Game, Coffee 
House, Mardi Gras, The Blu-au, and Carnival 
are just a few ways SAC livens up FSU's cam- 
pus. They really made it happen one last time 
in '99! 




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C A ^ Top to Bottom/Left to Right: Monica Jones. Regina Nowling. LaShonda Maxfield. Demetna White. 
^^^^^ Kathna Mattison. Joanna Lowe. Carmen Jackson. Allonease Readdy. Kelvin Ttiompson. Marcelle Smitii. 

Ronaid Stewart. Samanthia Parl<er. Antwaunn Stiaw. Tony Reese. Keren James. Not pictured: Brandon 

Ramcfiaran. Shieiiy Robinson. 



Publicity Coordinator 



Tony Reese 




Adminietrative Assistant 



LaStionda Maxfield 



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ATIMETO REIGN. . . 

Afldd ^cufeUedUiU State ^i^4AM/iA4i4f 



RUSHAUNDA RAMEY 



Rushaunda Antoinette Ramey as- 
sumed the title of Miss Fayetteville State 
University in December. A junior Criminal 
Justice Major from Raleigh, North Carolina, 
Rushaunda reigned with qvaoe, poise awd 
style. Rushaunda is a Chancellor's Scholar, 
president of the Illusions Model'mq Club and 
a member of the Criminal Justice Club. She 
represented the University at numerous pro- 
qrams and activities to Include: Martin 
Luther King Birthday Celebration, SGA Black 
History Month Froqram, Black History 
Month Fashion Show, CIAA leadership Con- 
ference, Alumni Breakfast, Founders' Day, 
Nick Geralds Elementary School Talent 
Show, Ferguson Elementary School Charm 
Workshop, Youth Motivational Task Force and 
the Miss Fayetteville State University 
Scholarship Pageant. 





JOHN SMITH 



John Smith, a native of Charlotte, 
North Carolina, represented the Univeristy 
with the upmost in Bronco Pride as Mr F5U. 
John is a Chancellor's Scholar, Drum Major 
of the Marching &ronco Express, Resident 
Assistant and member of the Black 
Millenium Modeling Club. He participated in 
numerous proqrame and activities to in- 
clude: Homecoming Coronation, Varade, and 
Game; Mr 71st High 5choo\ Competition- 
judge, Martin Luther King Jr Varade and 
Birthday Celebration, CIAA Leadership Con- 
ference, Alumni Breakfast, Youth Motiva- 
tional Task Force, Founders' Day, Miss 
Fayetteville State University Scholarship 
Pageant and the American All-Star Band 
Camp. Most noteworthy, John served as 
the youth spokeperson for the Cumberland 
County, NC Cooperative Extension Service 
Baby Think It Over Program, a teen pregnancy 
prevention proqram. John conducted work- 
shops which explored the emotional, finan- 
cial and social coneec^uencee of teen 
parenting to area teenagers. 




The time of classroom lectures, homework, late niight 
studyiriig, o^uestions, research and examinations is put 
first before that of laughter and danc'mq^, for we must 
first sow in scholarship and reap in joy. To be a senior meane 
a great deal of time and effort were put to use in the pur- 
suit of a dream. Earning a degree, or getting your papere 
(as it is commonly referred to by underqraduat-e students) 
can be tantamount to a regular thai by ordeal. Graduation 
day is the culmination of those four {or five or six) years of 
exceptionally challenging mental gymnastics. Like a cross 
country match, the finish line is in sight. It is the bronco 
Intent to reap the gold. For our families and for the future 
/'t is time to reap success. 






ALKE ABBEY 

BIOLOGY 

BERLIN, GERMANY 



ALEXANDER ALCALA 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



MARK ALLEN 

SOCIOLOGY 

FAYTTEVILLE, NC 



AISHA ALSTON 

PSYCHOLOGY 

WARRENTON, NC 




STACEY ARMSTRONG 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

FAYETTEVILLE. NC 



DENNIS ARNETTE 

SOCIOLOGY 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



BENITA ARRINGTON 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



LAKEITHA ARRINGTON 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 




VALERIE AUTRY 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

RAEFORD, NC 



ANGELA AVANT 

ACCOUNTING 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



JAMES BAINES 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



SHARON BAINES 

BIOLOGY 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 




NIKKI BAKER 

SOCIOLOGY 

FAYETTEVILLE. NC 



KAREN BALLARD 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

LELAND, NC 



PATRICE BAROS 

NURSING 

SPRING LAKE, NC 



MONICA BARRETT 

SOCIOLOGY 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



13 



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TONYA BARRETT 

SOCIOLOGY 
FAYETTEVILLE.NC 



VERONICA BEAMON 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



TORREY BEATTY 

MATHEMATIC5 

LELAND. NC 



RENCIA BENNETT 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 




TRACY BENSON 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

SPRING LAKE, NC 



SYLVIA BIGGETT 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

BRONX, NT 



DONTA BLACKWELL 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

TARHEEL. NC 



MELISSA BLODGETT 

SOCIOLOGY 

FORT BRAGG. NC 




SHARONDA BLUE 

SOCIOLOGY 
FAYETTEVILLE. NC 



THOMAS BRACY 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



JIMMY BRADLEY 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

FAYETTEVILLE. NC 



CHERYL BRADY 
MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION 

ROCKINGHAM. NC 




ALICIA BRANCH 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

KINSTON. NC 



TAKEESHA BRANCH 

MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION 

KINSTON. NC 



SHIRLEY BRAXTON 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

FAYETTEVILLE. NC 



EBONY BRICKHOUSE 

PSYCHOLOGY 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



14 




AKISHA BROWN 


TANYA BROWN 


JACQUELINE BRYLEY 


WILLIAM BURNS 


BIOLOGY 


HEALTH EDUCATION 


SPEECH/THEATER 


PSYCHOLOGY 


ROWLANP, NC 


FORT BRAGG, NC 


FAYTTEVILLE, NC 


SHANNON, NC 




CLINTON BURNSIDE 

PSYCHOLOGY 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



EYRA CAPORETTE 

SPANISH 
HOPE MILLS, NC 



ANTUAN CALDWELL 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



SAMANTHA CARSON 

PSYCHOLOGY 

CHAPEL HILL, NC 



NIKKI CARTER 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



ANNIE CASH 

MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



LLOYD CALHOUN 

SOCIOLOGY 
WILMINGTON, NC 




KIMBERLY CANNONIER 


MACIO CARLTON 


ERVIN CARR, JR. 


MARCIE CARROWAY 


PSYCHOLOGY 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


SOCIOLOGY 


BIOLOGY 


MURFREESBORO, NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 


ABERDEEN, NC 




HENRY CASTON, JR. 

ACCOUNTING 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



15 




iim^ 



ABDOULIE CE5SAY 


VIVIAN CHANCE 


JAMES CHANDLER 


NYDIA CHANZA 


ACCOUNTING 


PSYCHOLOGY 


GEOGRAPHY 


CRIMINAL JUSTICE 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 


CAMERON. NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 


FAYETTEVILLE. NC 




TED CHERRY 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

WINDSOR. NC 



TIFFANY CHERRY 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

ROCKY MOUNT NC 



ARENDA CHESTNUTT 

PSYCHOLOGY 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



JONATHAN COBB 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 




MARY COLE 

PSYCHOLOGY 

LUMBERTON, NC 



JOY COLEY 


ISHIA CRAVEN 


ANE5SIA CRAWFORD 


PSYCHOLOGY 


CRIMINAL JUSTICE 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


FAYETTEVILLE. NC 


LEXINGTON. NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 




ALLYN CREWS 
MATHEMATICS 
COLUMBIA, MD 



LINDA CROSBY 

HISTORY 

FAYETTEVILLE. NC 



ANDRONICA CROUELL 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



ROBYN CROWELL 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

CHARLOTTE. NC 



16 




SHERRY CUEN 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



LUJUANA DANIELS 

SOCIOLOGY 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



JANELL DAVIS 

3USINESS ADMINISTRATION 

RAEFORD, NC 



VIVIAN DAVIS 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

TURKEY NC 




MALCOLM DENNIS 

ECONOMICS 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



REGHEENA DIXIE 
GEOGRAPHY 
HAMLET, NC 



EBONI DOUGLAS 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



GENEVA DUNN 

SOCIOLOGY 

WINTER PARK, FL 




ELLEN EDMONSON 

NURSING 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



ARNETTA EDWARDS 
SPEECH/THEATER 
BURLINGTON, NC 



DAVID EDWARDS 

EDUCATION 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



BIANCA ELLIS 

ENGLISH LITERATURE 

SPRING LAKE, NC 




VERONICA ELLISON 

SOCIOLOGY 
FAYETTEVILLE. NC 



MARCUS FARMER 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
GOLDSBORO, NC 



JERMAINE FORD 

CHEMISTRY 
FAYETTEVILLE. NC 



LOLITA FOSTER 

ENGLISH 

FAYETTEVILLE. NC 



17 



5iSI 




TERESA GAINEY 


MELODY GARLANP 


SONYA GARNER 


TONYA GARRETT 


CRIMINAL JUSTICE 


GEOGRAPHY 


MATHEMATICS 


ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 


FAYETTEVILLE , NC 


FAYETTEVILLE. NC 


SANFORD, NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 









DENISE GARVIN 


BOBBY GETTERS 


TERRAIN GILL 


EARNEST GRAYSON 


PSYCHOLOGY 


PSYCHOLOGY 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


PSYCHOLOGY 


DUNN, NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 


LOUISBURG, NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 




RAYMOND GRIFFIN 


AIRAINA GRIFFITH 


ALBERT GSELL 


MICHELLE HALL 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


PSYCHOLOGY 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 


SPRING LAKE, NC 


FARKTON. NC 


HOPE MILLS, NC 


BEAULAVILLE. NC 




TONYA HALL 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



TORNALD HALL 
GENERAL STUDIES 
FORT BRAGG, NC 



ANGELA HARRIS 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

LILLINGTON, NC 



HARRY HARRIS 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

WINSTON-SALEM, NC 





EDNA HARRISON 

NURSING 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



JACQULINE HATCHER 

SOCIOLOGY 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



5HARIFF HAWKINS 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

HENDERSON, NC 



JUSTIN HENAGER 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 




DOROTHE HENDERSON 

ENGLISH 

FAYETTEVILLE. NC 



LYNN HENDERSON 
SOCIOLOGY 
SANFORD, NC 



CATHY HENRY 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

CLINTON, NC 



JOE HERRING 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

BALTIMORE, MP 




DOROTHY HEYWARD 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

FORT BRAGG, NC 



SABRINA HICKS 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

FAYETTEVILLE,NC 



SHARON HIGH 

PSYCHOLOGY 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



GLORIA HILL 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

RAEFORD, NC 




LAWANDRA HINTON 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

NEWPORT NEWS, VA 



SERENA HODGES 

SOCIOLOGY 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



KATRINA HUMPHREY 

BIOLOGY 

HOPE MILLS, NC 



RAHSAAN HUNTER 

BIOLOGY 
ROCKY MOUNT, NC 



19 



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AMY ISHAM 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

SNYDER, NY 



ANDREA JACKSON 

ENGLISH 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



ANTHONY JACKSON 

BIOLOGY 

R055VILLE, TN 



TANYA JACKSON 

ACCOUNTING 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 




DEBORAH JEFFERSON 

PSYCHOLOGY 

FORT BRAGG. NC 



VIVIAN J. WASHINGTON 

MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



ISHANTI JOHNSON 

PSYCHOLOGY 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



5HAANA JOHNSON 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

ALEXANDRIA, VA 

m 




THERESA JOHNSON 
SOCIOLOGY 
POPE AFB. NC 



ADRIAN JONES 

BIOLOGY 

FAYETTEVILLE. NC 



ANTONIO JONES 

BIOLOGY 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



TAHE5HLA JONES 

MATHEMATICS 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 




CHENITA JOYNER 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

LAGRANGE, NC 



DEIRDRE JUSTICE 
SOCIOLOGY 
FALEIGH. NC 



KAREN POOLE 

PSYCHOLOGY 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



LIONEL KATO 

SOCIAL SCIENCE EDUCATION 

POLLOCKSVILLE. NC 



20 




DAWN KELLER 

ACCOUNTING/ECONOMICS 

FORT BRAGG, NC 



TELLY KELLY 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

BUNNLEVEL, NC 



KIA KENT 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

LUCAMA, NC 



JACQUELINE KING 

SOCIOLOGY 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 




NICOLE KIRKPATRICK 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

CHARLOTTE, NC 



MAURICE KNIGHT 

ECONOMICS 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



MICHELLE LACASE 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

SPRING LAKE, NC 



NYKKYTTA LANE 

PSYCHOLOGY 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 




CYNTHIA LATSON 

SPEECH/THEATER 

DETROIT Ml 



THUY LAWLER 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



KATHY LAWRENCE 

NURSING 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



JOYCESONIA LAWSON 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

ALBANY NY 




RODERICK LEAK 

BIOLOGY 
FAYETTEVILLE. NC 



PATRICIA ROBINSON 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



THOMAS LEGRAND 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

LILE6VILLE. NC 



5HER0NDA LENNON 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

WHITEVILLE, NC 





y^ 



MARCUS LINEN 


THOMAS LITTLE 


SARAH LOMAX 


TYRONE LUINES 


CRIMINAL JUSTICE 


CRIMINAL JUSTICE 


SOCIOLOGY 


SOCIOLOGY 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 


WILMINGTON, NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 




BRENDA LUNA 

PSYCHOLOGY 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



REGINA LYLES 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

5ANF0RD, NC 



DIANA MALLOY 

PSYCHOLOGY 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



DONALD MATHIS 
MATHEMATICS 
WARSAW, NC 




TONYA MAULT5BY 


TODDRA MAYE 


SONYA MBUA MBUA 


NATTLIE MCARTHUR 


SOCIOLOGY 


CRIMINAL JUSTICE 


SOCIOLOGY 


CRIMINAL JUSTICE 


BLADENBORO, NC 


KINSTON. NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 


WADE, NC 




KRISTINA MCCAIN 


TARA MCCORMICK 


NAOMI MCDUFFIE 


ERI5HIA MCFADYEN 


PSYCHOLOGY 


MATHEMATICS 


MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 


WALLACE, NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



22 




DAWN MCGEE 


TONEKA MCINNI5 


TAMIKA MCINTYRE 


RENEE MCKOY 


BIOLOGY 


ECONOMICS 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 


DILLON, eC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 


COUNCIL, NC 




TAMARA MCLAURIN 

SPEECH-THEATER 

ROSEBORO, NC 



DAWN MCPEEK 
PSYCHOLOGY 
CAMERON, NC 



PAUL MCPHERSON 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



CADETRUS MCRAE 

SPEECH-THEATER 

RAEFORD, NC 




DOMINIQUE MELVIN 


IRIS MIDDLETON 


LATANYA MILES 


AUDREY MITCHELL 


CRIMINAL JUSTICE 


SOCIOLOGY 


SOCIOLOGY 


CRIMINAL JUSTICE 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 


FAYETTEVILLE. NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 




RUSSELL MOE 


CARRIE MONTE 


EUGENE MOORE 


SAMUEL MORANT 


BIOLOGY 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 


CRIMINAL JUSTICE 


ST CROIX, VI 


SPRING LAKE, NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



23 



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LATONIA MORRISON 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

HOPE MILLS, NC 



5HAKICHA MURPHY 

PSYCHOLOGY 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



VANESSA NICHOLS 

SOCIOLOGY 

HALLSBORO, NC 



ANGELIQUE NORTON 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

RAEFORD. NC 




FREDRICK OKUMU 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



CRYSTAL OXENDINE 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

GOLP HILL, NC 



ZURMARIE PAPILLA-RAMIREZ 

SOCIOLOGY 

HOPE MILLS, NC 



DEXTER PEARSON 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

FAYETTEVILLE. NC 




MICHELE PETERSON 


KARDIA PINCKNEY 


GEORGIE PORTER 


COLLINS PRAYER-GREEN 


MUSIC EDUCATION 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


SOCIOLOGY 


SOCIOLOGY 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 


SPRING LAKE, NC 


FORT BRAGG, NC 




HELEN PROCTOR 


HERMAN QUILLOIN 


IKEISHA RELIFORD 


THEODORE ROBBINS 


PSYCHOLOGY 


ENGLISH/POLITICAL SCIENCE 


CRIMINAL JUSTICE 


PSYCHOLOGY 


RAEFORD, NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 


SPRING LAKE, NC 



24 




ADARRYL ROBERTS 

ACCOUNTING 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



LORI ROBINS 

SOCIOLOGY 

FT LAUDERDALE. FL 



DEIDRA ROBINSON 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



LAMONT ROBINSON 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

BROOKLYN, NY 




LATARSHA ROBINSON 


LATONYA ROBINSON 


LUCY ROBINSON 


DANNY SADLER 


HISTORY 


COMPUTER SCIENCE 


SPEECH/THEATER 


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 


FAYE'^EVL.E. NC 


ATLANTA, GA 


RIEGELWOOD. NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 




ZULMA 5ALDANA 

SPANISH 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



LAKESHIA SAUNDERS 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



SUSAN SELF 

NURSING 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



JAHA 5HADEE 

ACCOUNTING 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 




ANTWAUNN SHAW 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

TEMPLES HILL, MD 



DERWIN SHEPPARD 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



LESLIE SINCLAIR 

SOCIOLOGY 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



KIMBERLY SINGLETARY 

BIOLOGY 

RAEFORD, NC 



25 




ERICA SMITH 
PSYCHOLOGY 
BALTIMORE, MD 



LAURA SMITH 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

ROSEBORO, NC 



KIMBERLY SNEAD 

BIOLOGY 
FAYETTEVILLE. NC 



ANDREW SNOWDEN 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

WASHINGTON, DC 




ROY SPEAKS 

PSYCHOLOGY 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



CRYSTAL STANLEY 

PSYCHOLOGY 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



TAMARA STANLEY 

ECONOMICS 

NEW BERN, NC 



JAMIE STEWART 

VISUAL ARTS 
CHARLOTTE, NC 




RONALD STEWART 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

WASHINGTON, DC 



SHERI STEWART 

BIOLOGY 
FORT BRAGG, NC 



LAKENYA STILES 

SOCIOLOGY 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



MI'SHAUN STINNETT 

SOCIOLOGY 

MANASSAS, VA 




kJ'Jt 




MONICA STIN50N 


JO STONE 


NATASHSA SUTTON 


DEJUAN TAYLOR 


SOCIOLOGY 


EDUCATION 


ACCOUNTING 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


RAEFORD, NC 


BUNNLEVEL. NC 


MOREHEAD CITY, NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



26 




ROBERT TAYLOR 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



ANETRICIA THOMAS 

ENGLISH 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



PERCY THOMAS 

SOCIAL SCIENCE EDUCATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



KELVIN THOMPSON 
SPEECH-THEATER 
CHARLOTTE, NC 




SHANTE THOMPSON 

MATH/COMPUTER SCIENCE 

WHITE VILLE,NC 



GUISELA TORRES 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



lONATHAN TUPUOLA 

MATHEMATICS 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



SACOLA TURNER 

SPEECH COMMUNICATIONS 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 




JOANA VINCE 

HISTORY 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



EBONY VINSON 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



KAREN WADE 
BIOLOGY/CHEMISTRY 

LILLINGTON 



GLORIA WALKER 

SOCIOLOGY 
FAYETTEVILLE. NC 




TIFFANY WALLACE 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

FAYETTEVILLE. NC 



DOMINIQUE WARD 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

POLLOCKSVILLE, NC 



SAMUEL WASHINGTON 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

DENMARK, NC 



TOMMY WASHINGTON 

PSYCHOLOGY 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



27 




RAMONA WATTS 


PAUL WEST 


DEMETRIA WHITE 


JAMES WHITE 


SOCIOLOGY 


CRIMINAL JUSTICE 


CRIMINAL JUSTICE 


SOCIOLOGY 


FAYETTEVILLE. NC 


ORANGEBURG, 5C 


CHARLOTTE, NC 


FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



&^VJ ^^ ^t^ 






MADGALENE WILKINS 

PSYCHOLOGY 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



ANGELA WILLIAMS 

MIPDLE GRADES EDUCATION 

MOUNT OLIVE, NC 



LACHRYSTAL WILLIAMS 
CRIMINAL JUSTCIE 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



TARUIS WILLIAMS 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



VADA WILLIAMS 

3USINE55 ADMINISTRATION 

CLINTON. NC 



RICKY WILLIAM, JR. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

WASHINGTON, DC 



MAIEA WILLIAMS 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

FAYETTEVILLE. NC 




SHANIDA WILLIAMSON 

HISTORY/POLITICAL SCIENCE 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 




ALONZO WILSON 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



JEFFREY WILSON 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



PETRONIA WILSON 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

WILSON, NC 



ROBERT WILSON 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



25 




WALTER YOUNG 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
FAYETTEVILLE. NC 



MICHELLE DE'ANGELO 

SOCIAL SCIENCE EDUCATION 

FAYETTEVILLE, NC 



u» 



lass History: The Best for Last 




It was only four ^eare aqo, 1995 when the last class of the millennium left from high school yards to the hallowed halls of 
Fayetteville State University. As students, we were to be challenged to be the very best aic\d the brightest academically. 
Society dared us Qroncoe to make the best use of our time and to conclude successfully. The opportunities were bounds 
less. While the country awaited the 0. J. verdict, we were busy. It was time to prepare for tomorrow. 



1 



In the 1995-96 academic year, as the freshmen class, we were off to a remarkable beginning. We met the onset of the new year anxious 
to be counted. Our voice would be heard with Tiffany Brown, Demetria White, LaTysha Bolden, and Taurus Slnqleton as Freshman Class 
President, Vice President, Secretary, and Queen respectively. Rotimi Ariyo, Douglas Barnes and l^elvin Thompson also represented the 
class as senators in the 5GA. This year we would organize with Wayne X Hodges, Student Body President, and head to Washington, 
D.C. for the Million Man March. Kelvin Thompson and Demetria White were trailblazers by becoming the first freshmen ever to be 
elected to SAC! 

During our sophomore year it was plain to see we would continue in the Bronco tradition of "bucking the system." Though we remained 
an active voice within the student government and under/graduate politics, some of our peers felt too restricted by the current policies 
with reference to spontaneous gatherings on campus. After leaving one of the more liberal off campus parties, thrown by the Bryant 
Hall Clioiye, some students insisted, "Hey, the party ain't over!" When the party continued in Bryant Hall's Parking lot, campus police 
insisted that it was. To make a long story short, it took in excess of 20 Fayetteville city policemen and a pair of fire trucks to cool the 
party off. This incident had the potential for disaster, however, it brought about lots of discussion, including students' first amend- 
ment rights. In the final analysis, students were /^ranted the express permission of the chancellor to assemble spontaneously on the 
yard. It was a time for victory. 

Junior year presented the class of '99 with exciting and new opportunities. It was a year of firsts. After playing Las Vegas and 
venturing up the east coast for tour, this year the Concert Choir, Brass, Choral and Jazz Ensembles embarked on a European Tour. 
They performed for capacity crowds in both Paris, France and Brussels, Belgium. Upon return, the Jazz Band was off to perform on the 
Royal Caribbean Cruise Ship. This was the first time in FSU history that our musical organizations would assume the role of interna- 
tional ambassadors from bronco Country. In the spring semester we would also elect the first Trinidadian Student Body President, 
Keren James. This certainly was a time to innovate. 

With Senior year upon us, there was little time to waste. We quickly got our affairs in order, but for many there was a hold up. The 
Office of Financial Aid. Students waited for many months, some with major financial responsibilities, for their federal aid to be 
awarded. At the end of the day there was only one resounding cry: Show me the Money! Refund Check; Bronco Pride! After 5(5A 
initiated town hall styled meetings, long talks, and the attention of the press the issue was resolved and eventually rectified. 
On a more serious note, this year was also marred with tragedy. Several students were slain by their trench coat adorned peers in 
Columbine, OK at Columbine High. Fayetteville State University is an institution whose legacy is one of educating educators. This year, 
prospective teachers were forced to redefine what their role in life would be. Putting oneself in jeopardy to give the gift of education to, 
America's youth is proving daily to truly be a labor of love. 



Kp' 



I 



The class of 1999 will end its journey at FSU on May 15, 1999, in the Felton J. Capel Arena, but we will always cherish the memories of 
id White and Blue. To those who chose to follow, it is time. 




Anyone who has ever complained, "There is noth 
ing to do" was sadly mistaken. From the very 
start of the school year SAC or The Student 
Activities Council kicks off the neivyear with welcome 
back week. A great time is to be had by all at this week 
long campus wide event. SAC also provides the stu- 
dent body a plethora of fun activities to participate in 
during the year. Movie nights, dances, coffee houses, 
comedy jams. Bronco Beach, Bowling, game shows, 
karaoke, and Las Vegas night. Campus clubs, Greek 
lettered organizations, and social fellowships have pro- 
grams including speakers, panel discussions and off- 
campus parties. Which ever events you choose to take 
part in, you're sure to find students with similar inter- 
est and various backgrounds with whom you can con- 
nect. 





30 



MiM, ^cufeiieMiU State l^mue^iUiu Paaeani 

DANCING IN THE STREETS: MUSIC, MELODY AND AAACIC 



0<n Saturday, April 2b, 199S Bron- 
cos ^ere Invited to retreat back to a time 
filled with music, melody and magic— the 
Motown Era. Akia Victor, Miss FSU 1997; 
Daniel Wright and Aisha Oaks in true "Su- 
preme" tradition, and the contestants 
commanded that the audience pm them 
for a roaring good time of "Dancing in the 
Streets" during the opening number which 
featured a melody of Motown hits. 

Eleven dynamic ladies fiercely com- 
peted for the coveted title in the five 
phases of competition: student vote, in- 
terview, sportswear, talent, and evening 
qown. Joanna Lowe, a Chancellor's 
Scholar from Madison, NC, was crowned 
Miss Fayetteville State University 1995. 
Kushaunda Kamey was selected First 
Runner Up and Carmen Jackson was se- 
lected Second Kunner Up. Alicia branch 
was selected Miss Congeniality by her 
fellow contestants. 




31 




Alicia 3ranch 



Rusliaunda Ramey Demetria White 




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JOANNA LOWE 



Joanna Lowe served as Miss 
Fayetteville State University during the Fall 
1998 Semester. She is a Junior majoring 
in Biology with a minor in Medical Technol- 
ogy. Joanna has been actively \nvo\ved in nu- 
merous activities. Most notedly, serving 
as Chief Justice of the Student Judicial 
Board. While actively serving as Miss FSU, 
she was also a valuable member of the Stu- 
dent Government Association, the Student 
Activities Council and University Choir. Miss 
Lowe is a Chancellor's Scholar from Madi- 
son, North Carolina. 

During her reign as Miss FSU, Joanna 
sang and spoke as the University's official 
hostess on several occasions. She partici- 
pated In Orientation programs and activi- 
ties, competed In the National Black Colle- 
giate Alumni Hall of Fame Pageant, Fall Con- 
vocation, and Homecomlnq festivities. 




34 



^nde^itaiUui, & Welcome. I^ach Week 



A TIME TO BEGIN 




It was the best of times— Orientation 
for the Class of 2002. These 549 eaqier Bron- 
cos arrived on campus full of anticipation and 
excitement ready to begin their time at F5U. 
In addition to profile exams, new stu- 
dents also learned about the rich history of 
Fayetteville State and various components of 
the University. A highlight of orientation was 
Spirit Night. At the Chancellor's request-- Bill 
Pinckney and the Original Drifters were invited 
for a command performance. It was a night 
to remember as the University family— upper- 
classmen, faculty, staff, alumni and the com- 
munity, officially embraced the new Broncos. 

YJelcome Back Week began at the conclu- 
sion of the Orientation activities. Sponsored 
by the Office of Student Activities and the 
Student Activities Council, the week served 
as means for upperclassmen and new stu- 
dents to bond. Some of the activities in- 
cluded: dronco Cinema; a 3ow\in0 Farty, Stu- 
dent Center Super Free Flay, bronco Street 
Carnival; bronco beach and Welcome back 
Dance. 




35 



f^^BBSm 



A TIME TO COME TOGETHER 



Commuter Appreciation Week, eponeored 
by the Office of Student Activities and the 
Student Activities Council, spotlighted the 
numerous programs and services offered by 
various components of the Division of Student 
Affairs and other University offices. The 
activities took place under a "big tent" 
strategically placed on campus to attract the 
large commuter population. The theme for the 
week was "Student Affairs: The Greatest Show 
on Earth'.' 

The week included the following activities: 
a Kick Off activity which showcased the new 
AUTOS Commuter Association; the 4th Annual 
Club and Organization Fair; a Health Fair; 
Campus Resource Tables; Noon Pay Cafe' ; a 
Coffee house which featured a band, poetry 
readings, and refreshments; and a dance. 





36 



^^H 




37 



TO GOOD TO BE TRUE 



^ror\co'a gathered in Capel Arena could not 
take their eyes off the six young men competing 
for the distinguished title of Mr. F5U. Paul 
McPherson, Chris Will<s, Jeff Smith, Lamont Spar- 
row, Kelvin Thompson, and John Smith recognized 
that it was their time to claim their rightful place 
upon the throne. 

Tameka Kenan and Rod Woods, both Junior 
Communication majors, served as the Mistress and 
Master of Ceremonies. The night was filled with 
enthusiasm and excitment from the moment the 
contestants stepped on stage and boldly presented 
themselves during their opening routine to Lauryn 
Hill's rendictlon of "Can't Take My Eyes Off of You". 
Four talented divas: Joanna Lowe, Simone Dickey, 
Shontae Henry and Akia Victor also enlightented 
the evening with their musical talents. 
The contestants competed in five categories: Stu- 
dent Vote, Casual Wear, Athletic Wear, Self Expres- 
sion and Formal Wear. Atthe conclusion of the com- 
petition John 5m\th was crowned Mr. ^^51). Lamont 
5parrow was selected First Runner- Up and Jeff 
Smith was named Second Runner-Up. Chris Wilks 
was voted Most Supportive by his fellow contes- 
tants. 

As the kick off event for Homecoming '93, the 
5rd Mr. FSU Competition set the tone for a week 
full of &ronco Pride. 




Contestant #1 
Paul McPherson 



Contestant #2 
Lamont Sparrow 




Contestant #3 
Chris Wilks 



Contestant #4 
Jeff Smith 



38 



Contestant # 5 
Kelvin Thompson 



Contestant # 6 
John Smith 




39 



CANT HIDE "DAT" BRONCO PRIDE 



Stand back! That '^mncd'b bucking! Notliing 
compares to tlie bucking good times of a 
&ronco Homecoming. Everyone is excited and 
tinis is definitely a time to celebrate. For one 
week in tlie fall semester, The Student 
Activities Council would flood the campus with 
bronco Pride, leaving all fakers in a blue and 
white haze. 

Festivities kicked off on Sunday, October 25. 
The men on campus took center stage as 
they vie for the title of Mr FSU. On this night, 
the Capel Arena was full of onlookers 
wonderinq who would walk away with the 
crown. To his surprise fate would have Joanna 
Lowe, Ms. FSU '9& to crown Mr John Smith 
as our new Mr FSU. 

The party continued on Monday with the blue 
and White dance. With DJ Base on the Wheels 
of Steel we couldn't go wronq. Everyone wae 
ewe to wear the school's colors for fear of a 
hefty admission price. As Demetria White, 
SAC Program Director would say, "FIVE 
DOLLARS!" 

Tuesday and Wednesday allowed the student 
body to take a more active role in the fun. 
Black Millennium Modeling Club S'tponsored 
Showtime at Seabrook. Truly no one could 
have prepared for the good, the bad, and the 
down right ugly that night. That evening 
worked the same way as the popular style of 
talent shows made popular m Harlem, NY The 
next night several students took the hot seat 
in "You Lau^h, You Lose." In this live game 
show comedians tried their very best to make 
us laugh. 

The week was getting off to a tremendous 
start and yet there was still more to come. 




40 



r- 



ON TOP OF THE WORLD 



"\Ne re just tryinq to do the beet do'mq 
what we qot to do-- Cauee 3ror\coe know 
that we are sitting on top of the world". 
These worde resounded radiantly through 
Capel Arena as Miss Fayetteville State Uni- 
versity, Joanna Lowe and Mr FSU, John 
Smith, presented the more than 50 campus 
(Queens and kings during the annual Home- 
coming Coronation. 

This year there was a new twist to 
the premiere homecoming event. For the first 
time in FSU history a Mr Homecoming was 
added to the circle of S>ronco royalty. Max 
Fawapootanont, Antwaunn Shaw, Konald 
Stewart and Andre' Whitehead campaigned 
for the title of Mr Homecoming 1995. 
Antwauun Shaw, a senior from Temples Hill, 
MD, was crowned FSU's first Mr Homecom- 
ing, Ronald Stewart was first runner up, and 
Andre' "Whitehead wae second runner up. 

Fourteen lovely young ladies were can- 
didates for the title of Miss Homecoming 
1995. Niya Carr, a junior hailing from Char- 
lotte, NC was named Homecoming Queen, 
Demetria White was first runner up and Tif- 
fany/ Green wae second runner up. 

Lynette Anderson performs. I Believe In You & Me. 

Miss FSU. Joanna Lowe and Mr FSU. John Smith 
present the campus organization queens and kings. 

Coronation Dancers:Rlta Mclver. Ebony Singleton. 
Rudina Thompson. LaTonya Lewis. & Joshlyn 
Connor 





Miss Freshmen 
Eddrina Clark 



Miss Sophomore 
Kisha Sinclair 



Miss Junior 
LaKeisha Stewart 



Miss Senior 
Demetria White 



42 



First Runner Up.Demefria White : tviiss 
l-iomecoming. Niya Cam and Tiffany Green, 
Second Runner Up. 

First Runner Up. Ron Stewart: Mr. Homecoming, 
Antwauun Shiaw: Second Runner Up, Andre' 
Whiifeliead. 

IVIiss Illusions Modeling Club. LaShaunda Hardy 




Max Pawpootnant Mr 
AUTOS. 

Chancellor & Mrs McLeod 
and the Homecoming 
Court. 

Keron James & Company 
perform a crowd p/eas/ng 
rendiction of "Weak". 



43 



!J^!Honmmmy&9\/k!Honmmmig 




I Niya Carr & 

I Antwaunn Shaw 



44 





Miss Alpha Kappa Alpha 
Alisha Barnes & Willis Fr/e 



Miss Alpha Phi Alpha 
Lynn Holmes & Angela McQueen 



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a.U,-. :■ '. ■■ ^ -r'j Sigma Jheta 
Ishanti Johnson & Marion Boyce 



Miss Kappa Alpha Psi 
Lucy Robinson 




Miss & Mr. Pan-Hellenic Council 
Saichelle McNeill & Christopher Wilks 




1 


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1 



Miss & Mr. Phi Beta Sigma 
Shenika Carroll & Jeffery Smith 



Miss Zeta Phi Beta 
Jennifer Long & Jason Childress 



45 




^^I^^^^^^^^^&jB 


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1 Ji 




Miss Alpha Kappa Mu 
Cadetrus McRae & Anthony Raphael 



Miss AUTOS Commuter Assoc- Mr AUTOS Commuter Assoa Miss Beta Kappa Chi 

Ravette FennellS William Vann Max Pawapootanont & Michele Anderson Sherri Stewart & Roderick Stewart 





Aliss Illusions Modeling Club 
.aShaunda Hardy S Andrae Rice 



Miss & Mr Math Computer Science Miss Middle Grades Education 

Elizabeth Walker & Joseph Evans Gemette Cox & Anthony Netty- Ma rbell 



MissSMrimACP 
Tiffany Best S Riciiard Corley 




\ 


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Miss & Mr Phi Beta Lambda 
Kardia Pinckney & Antoine Jones 



Mr Physical Education Major 
Derwin SheppardA Kimia Williams 



Miss & Mr Science Club 
Kim SingletaryS Kenneth Thompson 



Mr SITE 
Michael Shepard & LaKisha Sacks 




Miss SNCAE-NAE 
Tamara WhittedS Sean Henry 



Miss Student CEC 
Takeesha Branch & David Whitehead 



Miss Student Council on Diversity 
Soma Blanks S Shawn Morgan 



Miss Varsity Cheerleaders 
Keisha McKinnon Si William Tatum 



47 




Miss & Mr Bryant Hall 
LaTonia Mclntyre & Antwaunn Shaw 



Mr Honors Hall 
Paul McPherson & Keisha Crawford 




Miss Hood Hall 
La Tanya Miles & Rotimi Ariyo 





Miss Joyner Hall 
Tara McCormick & Julius Pipken 



Miss New Residence Hall 
Evette Clark & Jason Gardner 




Miss Smilh Hall 
Toya Moore S Samuel Washington 



Miss Vance Hall 
Niya Can & Rapheal McNeill 



Miss Williams Hall 
Tiffany Sfatford & Andrew Snowden 



48 



"ON TOP OF THE WORLD" 




Qo^UU^Xltl04t 



50 





'^ " ATIMETOLAUCH 






Outeide, d.ov^r\ the stairs, around the co'r'(\er, and into 
the parking lot of the Cape! Arena stood many anxious patrons 
in a quadruple file line. Each was waiting to get their laugh on 
with the comedy styling of Michael Colyar, Pierre, Bruce Bruce, 
and Chocolate. That's right. The Student Activities Council 
was throwing their biggest Comedy Jam ever 

Opening the show was the Smile Band, out of DC. They 
played their slammin' renditions of the latest R&B and Hip Hop. 
Just when we thought they were through, they gave us some 
more! The crowd was hyped and everyone was feeling the band. 
It would only be moments before we would bring on the Comedy. 

Yall ready for your first comedian, say yeah. Pierre was 
so funny. His show was not one for the whole family, but the 
college crowd wae m stiches. This not so tall man got some 
very big laughs. Next on the roster, was Bruce Bruce, the big 
daddy of them all. His lively style of comedy caught some of 
the audience on the ooky doke. Some hecklers thought he would 
endure some of their rhetoric. However, this was not the case. 
He quickly shut them up and continued to rock the house in his 
own way. The only female comedian in this group was Chocolate. 
She was straight hilarious from the beginning. A seasoned 
artist, her mix of narrative comedy and one liners was a winning 
combination. Now, Michael Colyer was a complete character 
His show Included social commentary, political awareness, and 
everyday common since comedy. When the jam came to an end, 
everyone was completely laughed out. 

The night was a definite success by any measure and it 
was only Friday. There was still more time to celebrate. 



51 



Pa/vcuAe 

A TIME TO STRUT 



^ande marched, (Queens waved, danc- 
ere 'pranced a\\ to the deWq^ht of'Xhe hun- 
dreds of spectators who lined the tradi- 
tional yarade route. It was obvious to a 
who attended the 1995 F5U Homecoming 
Parade that we simply "can't Hide that 
Bronco pride". 

F5U retirees, Dr. & Mrs. Henry 
Eldridge, served as the qrand marshails 
for the 6l5t homecoming parade. 




fBBBmmmam 



€^aMeco¥fUHa Gomc 
ATIMETOFIGI 



54 




hundreds of students, alumni, family 
and friends filled Bronco Stadium to watch 
the F5U ?}roncoe take on the Bowie State 
Bulldogs. 

The football game was filled with stellar 
defense and a solid offensive effort by the 
droncos; however, the Bulldogs would not be 
denied. Despite the 10-7 defeat, Broncos 
enpyed a wonderful homecoming. 

A highlight of the game was the Half 
time festivities . Following the Bowie State 
Marching Band performance, the Mighty 
Bronco Express brazingly marched onto the 
field and let it be known that this was Bronco 
Terrltoryl The fesitivties concluded with the 
presentation of Dr. Dallas freeman, F5U 
National Alumni President; Brenda Thomas 
74 , Miss Alumni; Niya Carr, Miss Homecom- 
ing; Antwaunn Shaw, Mr. Homecoming; 
Joanna Lowe, Miss F5U; John Smith, Mr FSU 
and Chancellor McLeod '64. 




55 



A TIME TO THRO' DOWN 



The Capel Arena was packed to ca- 
pacity forthe annual FSU Pan-Hellenic Coun- 
cil Homecoming Step Show. The crowd was 
in for a real treat as the sororities ar\d fra- 
ternities stepped forth to demonstrate their 
skills. 

It was a night for high steps and top 
hats as each orqan\zat\on qraced the stage 
with their presence and style. The ladies of 
Alpha Kappa Alpha dazzled the crowd with 
their tribute to the frate as they fouqht hard 
to retain 1st place for a second year in a row. 
Zeta Phi Beta's ripples and acrobatics dis- 
tinguished them as a main contender for the 
crown. Pelta Sigma Theta commanded the 
attention and respect of all when they hit 
the stage in their red satin pants with 
matching ties, suspenders and top hats. 

The Kappas straight out of "Nupe 
Kounty Penitentiary", a maxium security fa- 
cility for pretty boys, left us calling for more 
as they whirled and twirled their amazing 
canes. Phi Beta Sigma, always a crowd 
pleaser, donned top hate and went back to 
the old school. Alpha Phi Alpha left the au- 
dience wondering, "Who were the masked 
brothers decked out in complete ninja gear 
that didn't miss an opportunity to throw 
down at every beat?" 

The envelope please. . . 




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56 



A TIME TO RUN THE YARD 



The ladies of AE0 walked away 
with the first place trophy for their 
a'Hard winning routine. The soul step- 
'ing sorors of Delta Sigma Theta, 
impressed the judges with their pre- 
cision a'nd energy. These ladies did a 
tribute step to Omega Psi Phi that 
left everyone spell bound. 

The mighty brothers of (t>BS 
claimed first place for the fourth year 
in a ro'H. Taking a bite out of the old 
school by paying tribute to the God 
Father of Soul, James Brown, the 
brothers of Phi Beta Sigma had the 
cvo'Hd on their feel with their exit step 
to "Please, Please, Please" and "I Got 
That Feeling". 




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SHOWTIME ^ 





61 



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Black MitletuuiMK 

ATIMETO SHINE 




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PLAYTIME 



It was "play time" in the Helen T. Chick 
3w\d\nq for the first Sexiest Man on Campus 
cor\te5t sponsored by the Omeqa Beta Chapter 
of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. The eleven men 
vying for bragging "rites" were judged by various 
members of each sorority in sportswear, swim suit 
and best pick up line. 

Trey Scott was voted best swim wear even 

though Officer Clay had to ask him to cover up to 

the dismay of the mostly female audience. Ron 

Stewart received the head nod from the judges 

for best sportswear Bobby Hill wowed them over 

with the best pick up line , " Do you mind if I ask 

you a question. . . Can I have you?" 

I At the end of the evening Senior Kon 

t" Nothing t?ut the Dog In Me" Stewart wae pro- 

^ clamed the sexiest man on campus. 




64 



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65 



Gn/Mmmcf, <^Mi6^ ^i^ '99 

ONCE UPON ATIME 



Rushaunda Ramey was crowned Miss 
Fayetteville State University 1999 on Januan/ 
26, 1999 in the Feiton J. Cape! Arena. Puring a 
special dinner held in her honor prior to the 
crown'mq ceremony, 5GA President Keron James 
recognized her beauty, poise and grace. Carmen 
Jackson, attendant to Miss FSU, gave the oc- 
casion and Marcelle Smith, 5GA Vice President 
presented the official Miss Fayetteville State 
University trophy and gifts from the Student 
Government Association. 

;ron James, Marcelle Smith, Chancel- 
lor Willis B. Mcleod, John Smith, Mr FSU; Mrs. 
Olivia Chavis, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; 
and Carmen Jackson participated in the crown- 
ing ceremonies during half-time of the FSU vs 
W5SU basketball game. Ms. Ramey graciously 
greeted the crowd as Keron James serenaded 
our lovely o^ueen with "My, My, My." 




66 




/^noHca Rodeo- 

ONE LAST TIME IN '99 

The Student Activities Council kicked it one 
last time in '99 during tlie ar\nua\ &ror\co Kodeo. 
Broncos partted throughout the week to celebrate the 
official end of the y99&-\999 academic year. It had 
been a year of bucking harder, reaching farther to 
attain a greater success. 

► Monday, April 19: Another 'Bout At Club Lilly 

► Tuesday, April 20: 3ronco Darbe<\ue 

► Wednesday, April 21: S>ronco Cinema 

Enemy of the State 
*■ Thursday, April 22: Comedy Jam 

featuring: Montana Taylor, Taj Cross, Afflon 

^ Friday, April 23: Las Vegas Night 

► Saturday, April 24: last Jam 



Bfumco- Rodeo- ONE LAST TIME IN '99 




TV TIME 



MTV Koad Rules rolled on to campus 
during the month of April. Free games, pizza, 
and of course music topped the charts for this 
fun day of activity. Broncos also were treated 
to the new Coke product, "Citra". Although the 
beverage didn't make the hit list, free MTV Koad 
Rules tee-shirts and cape were a &ronco favor- 
ite. 






thletics has always been a source of pride and renewed 
;liool spirit at tliis, tlie liome of tlie Broncos. Winning has 
llong been a &ror\co tradition. A world class institution of 
iiigher learning, Fayetteville State University, has always positioned 
itself in a class of champions. S>ronco Basketball, Cross Country, 
Golf, Football, Softball, and Volleyball each serve the University with 
the best of sportsmanship. They represent the very best about the 
3lue and White. One can find the very highest in CIAA sports enter- 
tainment right here. At Fayetteville State University you'll encoun- 
ter some of the finest college educated athletes. One can surely 
count on Broncos to know the precise time to score. 




73 



■M^^K^BSZZ 



^maamm 



ATIMETO CHEER 




Niya Can . Captain Angela Branch 



Angle Mcknight 



Tamlka Knock 






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74 




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A /tPfea Bizze// 



Shawn Jones 



Kenya Brown 




Chanel Coleman 




1st Row: LaKeisha Stewart, Eboni Singleton, Daimen Garner, Devon Cross, Sophie Dini<lns 
2nd Row: Venrta Farmer Alicia Branch, Shauna Jones, RonataGodbolt,Meesha Cameron 



75 



VolUuJfoU 

A TIME TO CONQUER 




76 




Time for Championship Rings. 



11 



HK 



A TIME TO ATTACK 








N 



\ 



\ 






HRHB 



m 



A TIME TO DOMINATE 





Natflie Pearson 

m 



Stephanie Barksdale 



Captains 



Ctiristol Smitti 



Ebony Ingram 



NIciMorgan 



Michelle Dent 



80 




Rhoshawnnah Clark Schavonne Brown Carissa Ingram-Hall Marian Moore Shenlque Walker 





Kandice Brooks 



81 



wmBmm 



Men '6. HaJeeikall 

ATIMETO REBUILD 




Tim Reels Hugh Prentice Anthony Campbeii Brian Steriin Cory Barbour 




Rodney Morning 
83 



■■H^ 



IBH 



A TIME TO ADVANCE 




MonicaJacobs 



A TIME TO EXCEL 




Q»U 



Lee McLauren 



Terrain Gill 





Joshua Lee 




Christopher Blanton 



U'UUUlU^ DUKei 



Dale Webber 



85 



6W^ Q(M>ni^tf, & '^^ack 

A TIME TO RUN 




] st Row: Michelle , Trey, Vanessa, Mike 2nd Row: Shamonica. Shaunda. Mii<e 
3rd Row: Mii<e, Tavoiis. Rolo 



86 



Spo^ld^ jHla^matioit & Medicine 

A TIME TO ASSIST 




Katiina Matfison Toya Moore Shaunda Robinson Sonya Gamer 




Ajaya Mitchell Leon Chittams Ametta Edwards 




Tony Reese 




Charlene Butler Zaki Simon Ctiantina Cleveland 



87 



AtJueiic &a4iatiet 

A TIME TO ACKNOWLEDGE 



The Annual NiHeWc Banc^uet was held in 
the Felton J. Capel Arena on April 25, 1999, G\ 
bert Baez, WTVI3' News Channel! 11, served as the 
keynote speaker. The theme for this year's ban- 
quet was. Excellence Without Excuse . Approxi- 
mately 150 student athletes, cheerleaders and 
sports information staff were honored during the 
bant^uet. Schavonne 3rown, a member of the 
Women's Basketball Team and Volleyball Team, was 
named female Player of the Year. Jarvis Davis, a 
member of the dronco Football Team and Bas- 
ketball Team, was named male Flayer of the Year 
Reeshemah Parkinson was honored for being se- 
lected the 1993 Woman of the Year for the State 
of North Carolina by the NCAA. 




Bel(^*uf> 



CLUBS 6. 
ORGANIZATION 




Anything one can do alone, can be done better as a group. The 
bronco family works together in a supportive atmosphere to 
add culture and substance to the campus. Clubs and organi- 
zations are the vehicle for getting things done. At F5U each stu- 
dent has the opportunity to belong, excel and to lead. Each group 
serves a purpose and enriches the quality of life on campus. It's 
perfectly normal to have one's own thoughts and to function as an 
individual. However, campus organizations exist as reminders that in 
the Bronco Family, no one is alone. It is time to belong. 









90 




A TIME TO MAKE MUSIC 




Drum Majors: John Smith 
Laurent Jones 
Harold Arnold 



91 



immsBm 



Ma/icJu4i/f^ l^^umco- C^^x/pAe6A^ 




92 




93 



' 



I^H 



ATIMETO SING 




Concert Choir 

1st Row L to R: Luanda Walker. Ash/a Battle. D'Ardeatiss Bryant. Lisa Dunston. Karia Glass. Shontae Henry, 
Rachel Morris. Twana Blow. Aacia Oaks 

2nd Row L to R: Ervin Robinson. Rotlml Arlyo. Manu Edwards. Laconia Higgs. Perry Parker Leon Harris. 
Lament Sparrow. Corey Perry Brandon Perry James KInsey. Dr Curtis 




Choir Ensemble 

1st Row L to R: Dionne Willis. Stacy By rd. Charnelle Green. Bryan Lyons. Maven Lewis. Theresa Campbell. 

Eushanda Stancil 

2nd Row L to R: David Mason. Arthur Sobers. Michael McDuffle. Larry Ashley Athony Hill 



94 




95 



A TIME TO TRAIN 



1st Row: Ebony L incoln. Nixomar Santigo. 

Shachell McNeil. 

2nd Row: Shameka Tolbert, Johnle Evans. Rico 

Coole. Carmen Jackson 

3rd Row: Jarnous Brooks. Michael Sellers. Carper 

McMillan 




1st Row: Onassis Bridgers. Richard Cunningham. 

Anne Mane Peters. Ian Yu. Racquel Cummins. 

Tamika Nock 

2nd Row: Monique Nichols. Shahidah Muqtasid. 

Sandra Carroll. Chanel Coleman. Derrick Pettiford 

Row 3: Roy Williams. Anthony Raphael. Charlene 

Butler Ricky Crump. C.J. Savage 

Row4: Julius Pipkin. William Munn. Myisha 

Houssell 

Row5:Shauna Williams 




Row 1: Shauna Williams. Adarryl Roberts. Max 

Pawapootunont. Gabrielle Bryant 

Row 2: Shameka Tolbert. Laconia Higgs, Shelly 

Robinson. Amilcar Melendez Cruz. Willie Allen 

Row3: Jamie Nash. Jeffrey Smith. Nathan 

Puflwalozoski. 

Row 4: Harris Heslip 



Row 1: Shannon Mornson. Laura Gurganus. 
Stacy Lewrow, Christopher Simmons. Arthur 
Sobers 

Row 2: Fric Waddell James Rainier Vachell Fant 
Tonshanika Moore. Natasha Shepard 
Row 3: Vernon Ellis. James Roush. James 
Kinsey Octavis Sams. Lament Knight 
Row4: Willie Allen 









97 



ACCOUNTING SOCIETY 




Shanita Saunders, President; Chris- 
topher Will<s, Vice President, 
i\/1ichelie Donegain 




ALPHA KAPPA MU HONOR SOCIETY 



1st Row: James Kent Anessia 
Crawford, President; Carleen 
Edwards. Tamel<a Kenan, Shaana 
Johnson. George l-logan. l\4onica 
Joacobs, Chenita Joyner, Dex- 
ter Pearson. Secretary 
2nd Row: Yolanda Baldwin, 
Andre' Whitehead, LaTonya Carr, 
Samuel Hairston. Sheronda 
Lennon, Lakisha Taylor 




98 




AUTOS 

COMMUTER STUDENT ASSOCIATION 



Ms. Smith, Advisor: Carmen 
Jacl<son. President: Kimilla Floyd. 
Garrett Steedly, Lucinda Walker 





ETA KAPPA CHI HONOR SOCIETY 




l8t Row: Sherl Stewart Vice 
President: Rahsaan Hunter, 
Shante'Thompson, President 
2nd Row: Andre 'Whitehead. 
Yoianda Baldwin, Dr Waddle, 
Advisor 



99 



mBBomm 



BLACK MILLENNIUM MODELING CLUB 



Andrew Snowden, Founder: De Shonda 
I Simmons. Hamona D. Davis. President: 
j Carmen L. Nicliois. Brandie Meel<ins. Tiffany 
I Davis. Devon Cross - Model Trainer Shawn 

Arnold. Joshoyn Deal. Camerman: Laytonya 
\ McNeill. Advisor:Joseph Fasano, Karol 
'. Gilmore. Rosita Williams. Kim Carter Ashia 

■ Battle. Ravette Fennell Renisha Johnson. 
\ Stachia Garner, Donald Bryant . Production 
\ Manager; Yasrim Leak. Jamia Paylor, Chaka 
\ ' Davis, Melinda Quick, Angela Holmes, An- 
! gela Henderson, James Kinsey, Catrina 
i Wilkins. Janine Coaxum. Jamaine Walker 
I JoiNorfleet. Tasha Johnson. Melissa Bizzell, 
\ Rosalind Applewhite. Kenya Jones, Daimen ^tf^'"'- 

Garner Shelton Smith. Ayana Moultrie, 

■ Odell Graham. Rudina Thompson. Jeanette * 
: Staton. Falarria Fisher, Kenneth Mathews. . 

i Rashan McCormick. Regina Locust. Keisha ' 
'■■ Sinclair. William Brown. Keisha 
1 McKinnon.Secretary 




COMMUNICATIONS CLUB 



Rudina Thompson. Queen: 
Tameka Kenan, Secretary: Melody 
Soto, Treaurer: Jotin Finger. Vice 
President: Gilber Alvarado, Twan 
Bryan, President: Jay Brown, l\/lr 
Corpening, Advisor 





CRIMINAL JUSTICE CLUB 



1st Row: Jessica Peterson, 
Talteisiia Robinson, l\/iiciiaei 
McDonaid, Carleen Edwards. 
LaDeana Farmer, Sturae' - 
Meyers, Susan Potter 
2nd Row: Josepii Pipitone. 
Niya Carr Annis Gratiam. 
Kenya Brown, Mr Coieman, 
Advisor, Kimberly Keiiam 
SrdRow: Dr OI<erel<e, Advisor: 
Dr Pearson, Advisor; Raven 
Neai , Laldstia Taylor, Ricky 
Cooper Sfierry Ray nor, Jamaal 
George 



101 




ELECTION BOARD 




ludma Thompson, Shaunda 
Robinson, Chair; Phillip Brice, 
Charlene Williams, Larry Ashley. 
Syrena Maynor. Richard Serman 




102 





FUTURE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



1st Row: Kanisha Jones, 

Demetria White 

2nd Row: Monica Jones. 

Eddrina Ciarfc, Jakita Strong, 

Toys Moore 

3rd Row: Soptiie Din/dns. Niya 

Cam Mrs. Peggy Devane, 

Danyetta Jacl<son. Amy Mitctieli 

4th Row: Miranda Cox, Andrea 

Mciinigtit, Samantfia Parl<er, 

Phillip Boague 





HARRIS HALL ASSOCIATION 



Karin Starr, LaDeana Farmer, 
LaShanda Nealey, President 



103 



HISTORY CLUB 



Istmw: Dr. Dianne Oyler, 
Advisor: Ariella A very. 
S'nameika Mc Arthur. Daysha 
\f.awrence, Tamara Dial, Dr 
■^ Jo tin Brooks, Advisor 
2nd row: James Graves, Calvin 
Lett, Candace Wade, Patrick 
Ethington. 








HOOD HALL ASSOCIATION 



Istmw: Kanisha Jones, Vice 

President; Shankia Holden, 

Alternate Senator: Eddrina ClarK, 

Treasurer 

2nd row: Colisia Plymouth, 

Secretary; Danyetta Jackson, 

President 

3rd row: Latonya Miles, Miss 

Hood Hall; Lashonda Parker. 

Crime Prevention Representative 




104 



HONDA CAMPUS ALL-STAR TEAM 



NeKeith Brown, Deonte' Tho- 
mas, Katrina Tunstall, Dan 
Geiger, Ron Stewart, Mr 
Carroway. Advisor 




HONORS HALL ASSOCIATIONI 



1st Row: James Davis, President 
2nd Row: Monica Jones, Secre- 
tary; Keisiia Crawford, Larry 
Ashiey Treasurer 




105 



maaam 



ILLUSIONS MOPELIN6 CLUB 



Bottom: Done// Brown. Dona/d 
l^at/i/s, Qu/ncy Wa//<er. 
First Row: Lanetta /[/IcKoy. Octav/a 
George. Be/ton /[Monroe, Sonya 
Garner, Doug Barnes. Ta/<e/ta 
W/ietstone, T/m Adams, Lisa 
Brancti. Jeff Cof/e/d, S/iermon/ca 
Farrow. Edw/n Lew/s, Tara 
/i//cCorm/c/<. Rus/iaunda Ramey 
President: Rot/mi Ar/yo, Shaunda 
Rob/nson, Soph/e Din/</ns, t^/randa 
Cox, LaKe/sfia Stewart, V/ctor 
G/over, Ni/</<i C/ar/<. Leon Chittams, 
Son/a B/an/(s, Redd/c/< /\4ac/(, 
/Viar/an Moore, Jamie /\^cKinnon, 
Jason Chi/dress, Juwan Jones 




OYNER HALL ASSOCIATION 




W/c/a Branc/i. Sfierita Crews. 
La/</a Perry N/co/e E///s. Tara 
McCorm/c/<, Natasfia Kersey 



106 





MIDDLE CRAPES ASSOCIATION 




Jorris Edge. Treasurer: Cheryl 
Brady. Eddra Wilson, Felisha 
Williams. Takeesha Branch, 
Archie Williams. Secretary: Sylvia 
Clegg. President 



107 



NAACP 



1st row: Dexter Pearson. 

Keisha Crawford. Richard 

Corley. President: Yolanda 

Baldwin 

2nd row: Landon Hadley. 

Advisor: Miranda Cox, RotimI 

Ariyo, Rayshone Hodges 




%JEW RESIDENCE HALL ASSOCIATION 



April Williams, Demetrai White, 
Shelly Robinson. Katrina 
Mattison. Stephanie Barksdale, 
Nichole Washington, Nikki Clark, 
LaShanna Clair, Sophie DInkins, 
Nichelle Sullivan, Stephanie 
Marshall, Sherain Teel. Dionne 
Gilmore, April Reich, Melissa 
McNeill Latashia Pender 





108 



PHI BETA LAMBDA BUSINESS FRATERNITY 



1st Row: Kimberly Bonds. 
Shanita Saunders. Treasurer; 
Ka/e/e Monte. President 
2nd Row Thereisha Doyle. 
Shavon Dixon 

3fdRow: Demetria l^cAlllster, 
Rencia Bennett. Vice President: 
Winifred Astiford 




PHI ETA SI6MA FRESHMEN HONOR SOCIETY 




Andre WMtehead President; 
Katrina H/1attison, Vice Presi- 
dent Anna Owens. Secretary; 
Yoianda Baidwin. Treasurer; 
Kimberiy Keiiam. Parlimentarian 



109 



PSI CHI PSYCH0L06Y HONOR SOCIETY 



t St Row: Clinton Burnside, 
President; Dr. Moultrie, Advisor; 
Tamara Henderson, Secretary 
2nd Row: Dr Maxwell Twum, 
Advisor: Lisa Purcell. Elijah 
Fulcherlll. Lakisha Taylor, Mary 
Malorzo, Janelle Woods 





PSYCHOLOGY CLUB 



1st Row: Bertha Conley, Belinda 

Bryant, Treasurer: Larry Ashley 

2nd Row: Karin Starr, Campus 

Recruiter; LaKisha Taylor 

President Janine Coaxum, 

Secretary 

3rd Row: Rayshone Hodges, 

Secretary; Josly Wright Vice 

President Clinton Burnside, Kla 

Degree 

4th Row: Jerome Melvin. 

Parlimentarin; Weckea Lilly 



n^ 




SCIENCE CLUB 



1strow:Amiee Thompson. 

Rashida Shivers. Keisha 

Crawford, Yolanda Baldwin 

2ndmw: Ebony Hernandez, 

Bob Gonzalez. Tara Brum field, 

Joy Rogers 

3rd mw: Benita Artis, Paul 

McPherson. Felicia Mack, Andre' 

Whitehead 

4th Row:Lamonte 'Sermon, 

Kantrell West. N. W. Tyson. 

Rahsaan Hunter ^ 



STUDENTS IN FREE ENTERPRISE 




1st Row: Shanita Saunders, 
Treasurer: Kamillah Best, 
Secretary Nichole Eilliott 
2nd Row: Vanessa Davis. Asst. 
Secretary: Shackeba Maddox, 
Dinita Robinson, Neron 
Ferguson. President 
3rd Row: Tonya Terry LaToya 
Bozier Nikkia L Nixon, Michael 
Sheppard 



SIC^MA DELTA PI SPANISH HONOR SOCIETY 




Marta Lucas, President; 
,1! Moncia Livingston, Vice Presi- 
dent; Jacqueline Castro, 
Secretary; Daniei Gutierrez, 
Treasurer 



"^ ^^ ^ 





S\C^\A TAU DELTA EN6LISH HONOR SOCIETY 




mmma 



SOaOLOCY CLUB 



Istmw: LaToya Barber. Tinika R. 
Greene, Tiffany Lashea Green, 
Eddrina T.Clark. 

2nd row: James R White, Serena 
Hodges, Daysfia IW. Lawrence. 
Kanisfia R. Jones, Angela Branch, 
Emily Taitt, Monica Stinson, Karol 
Gilmore. Dr AkbarAghajanlan, 
Sean Dalton. Kelvin L. Thompson, 
Joslyn Wright. Iris C. Middleton, 
Tonya Fisher, Samantha Parker, 
Latonya Miles. 
3rdmw: Dr Louis Ross, 
Sharhonda Blue. Nakenya Cox, 
Cynthia Fils-Aime', Geneva A. 
Dunn. Yvonne Reid, BrisolJ. 
McCormick 





STUPENT NC ASSOCIATION OF EDUCATORS 




Ist mw: Jorrls Edge, Wendy 

Merrltt. Tamara Whitted. 

Takeesha Branch 

2nd row: Tremayne Johnson, 

Richard Corley Lament 

Sparrow 




114 







STUDENT SAFETY SQUAD 


p © 






La 'Shanda Nealy, Zekina R. 
Johnson. Sheri Johnson. Kanisha 
R. Jones, Gabrielle Bryant, 
Supervisor 


^^Hh 


i&9 j 


s>M.^^^^^Br^^^^^^^^^ 




fS 


HHj^^^B^^^-JH 


iH 







^ir»i-.PL«i>s.vT;i-»mj«a3pii 




:nic^.-.ic<c,»»«it^gai.^ 




115 



WILLIAMS HALL ASSOCIATION 



Takeisha Robinson, Vice Presi- 
dent; Princess Jacl<son. Trea- 
surer: Laura McKay, Secretary, 
Tiffany Stafford, President 




H/iiciieile P OS ley. Vice President: Soma Bianl<s. 
President: Jason Ctiildress. Treasurer 



Rayshone Hodges. Vice President: Dionne C. 
Giimore. Secretary: Christopiier Simmons. Presi- 
dent 



16 




1st Row Cheryl Brady. Secretary: Katrina Tunstalt Tamara Diai Ratisaan Hunter f^^y, \3ou 

2nd Row: Stiannan Brown. Ctiristoptier Wilks. IVIr Pan-Hellenic Council; Allstia Barnes Howard University 

3rd Row: Sheronda Lennon. Raymond McDougai President 

4tti Row: Tony Reese. IVIarlon Boyce Willis Frye pi » /_ 

1956 



Ray McDouqa\d 
Gampud- Jleade^: 

'oGK President 
K.eron James, OBZ 

SGA Vice President 
Marcelle Smith.OBZ 

SAC Business Mana{^er & 
Ivir Homecoming 
Antwaunn Sliaw, KAH* 

SAC Publicity Coordinator 
Tony l?eese. OBZ 

Miss Homecom'mq 
Niya Carr, AX0 

Spring '99 Salutatorian 
Sheronda Lennon, AKA 




117 




December 4, 1906 
Cornell University 

Epsilon Zeta 

GkofUe^ed: 

November 3, 1951 

Frankie Wheeler 
Slack & OW Gold 



1st Row: Malcolm Denn/s ken Thompson. Dejuan Taylor Tim Gibson Nasser All. 
Lance Turner Tricky Cooper 

2nd Row: Cortley West. Angela McQueen, TremaineJotinson. Anttiony Robbs. Frankie 
Wtieeler. Brandon Ramctiaran. Eddie Gratiam. Jeffrey Williams 





118 



mi '• -^ 


lA 


I 



bH^H 




Seated: Michelle Hawkins Ellen Edmondson Tara Brumtield Kyesha Russell 
Standing: Monica Jacobs, Rastilda Shivers, SherondaLennon Alisha Barnes, 
Deona McLeod, Shannon Brown, DIedra Robinson, Lynn Holmes 





founded: 

January 15. '\90& 
Howard Univereity 

Gkapiefi,: 

Delta Alpha 

GUa^deAed: 

March 1. 1952 

Pi&iid&tit: 

Shar\r\an S>rowr\ 

Salmon Pink & Apple Green 



■ 




L 


^dEiJS 




/ 



1 


9 

k 

h 

i 


a 



119 




January 5, 1911 
Indiana University 

QkapieA,: 

Epsilon Beta 

Gkafden>e<i: 

April 14, 1962 

Willis Frye 

G<UmA: 

Crimson & Cream 



1st Row: Willis Frye President; Raymond McDougai 

2nd Row: Ratisaan Hunter, Marion Boyce. Christoptier Wilks 




120 





Center: Princess Jackson 

L-R: Chantrese Leak. Anessia Crawford, Tara McCormick. Renee Byers. Tinera Sloppy 

Lucy Robinson. Erica Joseplis. Arenda Chestnut. Tamara Diai 




January 13, 1915 
Howard University 

Gkapien>: 

De\ta Xi 

Gkaniefied: 

November fi>, 1952 
Gabrielle Bryant 
Cnmeon & Cream 





bounded: 

Januarys, 1914 
Howard University 

Pi Chapter 

GkoAtened: 

October, 1954 

P^eUd&iit: 

Ricl<y Williams 

GoloM,: 

Blue&Wliite 





Istrow: ToriL'. ■■ /". •■ - .:•' Ricky Williams Jr^.Keron James. 

ChrisStewart iori\ iiiocsu Leon Cliitfoms. 

2nd row: Don Mathls, Marcelle Smith. Antonio Thomas Thomas Bracy. John Herring, 
Jeft Smith Thomas LeGrand. Shariff Hawkins. 



122 








Shenika Carroll, Angela Henderson, MIchele Peterson, Salchelle McNeill. Jennifer ^fujj^.r/,a^ • 
Long, Nicole Washington fMUtoea. 

January 16, 1920 
Howard University 

Omega Beta 

GkcuU&ned: 

May 17, 1952 

Michele Petersen 
Blue & White 





123 




An education from Fayetteville State University 
means the ability to compete in this advanced 
society. Graduates are equipped to be profes- 
sional in their respective fields and to continue their 
education in masters and doctorai proqrame. F5U 
provides a equality, affordable education to approxi- 
mately 4,000 undergraduate and graduate students. 
Our faculty of over ZOO focus on qood teaching in the 
classroom, amonq them you will find award-winninq 
authors, those who have won the highest honors in 
the state for excellence in teaching, and professors 
whose research is funded by such agencies as NASA 
and the US Department of Education. The University's 
main goal is to ensure that we graduate with the skills, 
knowledge and confidence we need to succeed in the 
21st century workplace. 




124 



^eacke^ o^ the' Ifea^ 

DR. PHILLIPH MUTISYA 




"Students first." With a motto such 
35 this, it is no wonder that Dr. Philliph 
Masila Mutisya is Fayetteville State 
University's 199&-99 Teacher of the Year. 
Dr. Mutisya is an Associate Professor of 
Education in the Department of Middle, 
Secondary, and Special Education. It is his 
belief that the "future of our world rest with 
teachers of tomorrow, and the teachers of 
tomorrow need to support, guide and chal- 
lenge students in a way that will assure their 
ability to apply and transfer their knowledge 
to ever-changing challenges. " 

Dr. Mutisya received a Masters of Edu- 
cation in International Education-Training 
and Development and an Educational Doc- 
torate in Instructional Leadership Educa- 
tion from the University of Massachusetts 
at Amherst. He has several scholarly publi- 
cations to his credit. They include: Demy- 
thologization and Demystification of Afri- 
can Initiation Kites: A Fositive and Mean- 
ingful Educational Aepect of Heading for 
Extinction, How Teachers can Secome 
"Jacks of all Trades and Masters of None 
and Gain Empowerment as Frofessionals. 



125 



Vice. Gka4i42ieLUn^ 




Mrs. Olivia Cliavis 

Vice Clianceilor 
for Student Affaire 





Dr. Ferry Massey 

Provost & Vice Cliancellor 
for Academic Affairs 




Mr. Frani< Toliver 

Vice Cliancellor 
for Business & Finance 



Dr. Denise Mahone-Wyatt 

Vice Chancellor 
for University Relations & Development 



Zbean4^ 




f 





Dr. Bertha Miller 

Dean 
College of Arts & Sciences 



Dr. Charles Davis 

Dean 
School of Business and Economics 




Dr. Joseph Johnson 

Dean 
School of Education 



Dr. LaDelle Olion 

Dean 
Graduate Studies 



127 



A TIME TO EXPLORE 



The College of Arts & Sciences Is com- 
prised of seven departments and the Nursing 
Froqram. The College contributes to the edu- 
cation of all students because It has the pri- 
mary responsibility for the core curriculum 
courses. The University College provides as- 
sistance to students from the time they en- 
ter the University until they complete all re- 
c|uirements for acceptance Into their major 
degree program. Students gain the basic aca- 
demic skills and general knowledge necessary 
for success in their respective academic ma- 
jors. The College offers major degree proqrame 
in English, the mathematical, natural, social 
and behavioral sciences and in the humanities 
and fine arte. Dr. Bertha Miller serves as the 
Dean, 





129 



A TIME TO INVEST 



Under the direction of Dr. Charles Davis, 
the School of Business & Economics is commit- 
ted to preparinq and educating students to be 
visionan/ business professionals. The Bachelor of 
Science deqree is offered in seven undergraduate 
proqrame: Accounting, Business Administration, 
Economics, Office Administration, Basic Business 
Administration, Comprehenisve Business Educa- 
tion and Marketing Education. At the graduate 
level, a Master of Business Administration deqree 
is offered. 




130 



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131 



A TIME TO TEACH 



For more than 151 years, Fayetteville 
State has maintained its commitment to the 
training of teachers. It is from the humble begin- 
nings of the State Colored Normal School, a 
teacher training institution, from which 
Fayetteville State University has grown. 

The School of Education continues to edu- 
cate and prepare Indlvlduale at the undergradu- 
ate and graduate levels. Under the direction of 
Dean Joseph Johnson '&&, the School offers de- 
grees in four academic departments: Elemen- 
tary Education, Curriculum and Instruction; Edu- 
cational Leadership and Secondary Education; 
and Health, Physical Education and Human Ser- 
vices. 




132 





133 



A TIME TO BEGIN 

The 1993 Fall Cor\yoG3X:\o'(\ ceremomee 
were heW on September 10, 1995 in the J. W. 
Seabrook Au^^litoriuni. This was a momentous 
event which included greetings from various 
members of the community. The University choir 
and band set the mood for the occa5\on with 
beautiful selections such as "War March of the 
Priest" and "Total Praise". Mr. H. Martin 
Lancaster, president of the North Carolina 
Coummunity College System, served as the key- 
note speaker. Mr. Lancaster expounded about 
the importance of developing good minds. He 
encouraged us to cherish our youth by making 
the most of the many opportunities and experi- 
ences offered at F5U. 



Mr. Martin delivers ttie l<evnote 
address. 



SQA President. Keron James, 
brings greetings on betiaifofttie 
student body. 




Dr. Mufisya. Teaclierofttie Year 
ieads ttie Convocation Proces- 




134 



Air Force ROTC cadets post 
colors. 

The crowd recognizes. Joanna 
Lowe, iviissFSU 1998. 




Ctianceilor IVicLeod ft)anl<s Mr. 
L ancasfer for an inspiring address. 



135 



A TIME TO GRADUATE 



After many long years of hard work 
and sacrifice, 283 students realized a dream 
that it was finally time to graduate at the 
Ninth Winter Commencement held in the 
Felton J. Capel Arena or\ Saturday, Decem- 
ber 12th. 

Mr Benjamin S. Ruffin, Vice President 
of Corporate Affairs for R. J. Reynolds To- 
bacco Co., the domestic tobacco subsidiary 
of RJR Nabisco, Inc., served as the keynote 
speaker. Mr Ruffin shared an inspiring poem, 
"Be Strong. You're not here to dream, to 
drift. You have hard work to do and heavy 
loads to lift. Shun not the struggle, face it- 
- tis God's gift." 

Ramona E. Watts was recognized as 
valedictorian and Katrina Humphrey, was 
salutatorian. 





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136 



MJlK BlnikdoM Qeleknatkui- 
A TIME TO DREAM 



The annual student Mart'm Luther King, 
Jr. Birthday Celebration was held m the Stu- 
dent Center on January 14, 1999. Kelvin Thomp- 
son, SGA President Pro Tempore, presided. 5GA 
President, 'keror\ James reflected on the Impor- 
tance of celebrating Dr lying's life. Pushaunda 
Pamey, Miss FSU and John Smith, Mr FSU pre- 
sented the making of a holiday. Lance Turner, a 
member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, served 
as the keynote speaker 





A CELEBRATION OF AFRICAN AMERICAN 

PERFORMERS 



n celebration of Black History Month, 
the Office of Student Activities sponsored Ju- 
bilation: A Celebation of African- American Fer- 
formere. Jubilation chromcied African- American 
performers, composers and writers from the 
1930's-1960's. Styles presented ranged from 
the Harlem Renaissance to the Motown era in- 
cluding jazz, opera, R& B and poetry. The pro- 
gram featured performers from the NC Insti- 
tute for the Performing and Visual Arts and FSU 
students, Rod V^oods, Kelvin Thompson, Calvin 
Torres, and Rita Mclver 




139 



A TIME TO APPLAUD 



The Annual Honors and Awards Convo- 
cation wae held on Thursday, April &, 1999 in 
Seabrook Auditorium. Mr Konald G. Fenn^/, Di- 
rector of State Fersonnei, delivered the keynote 
address. Mr Penny challenged broncos to use 
their education to make a difference. 

The Honors and Awards proqram, a 
momentus occasion for more than 42 years at 
Fayetteville State, provides an opportunity for 
faculty and staff to recognize students for out- 
standing achievement. Academic honors. De- 
partmental, and Leadership awards were pre- 
sented to those students who demonstrated 
dronoco Pride in its upmost form through their 
diligent pursuits of academic knowledge and ser- 
vice to the University and the community. 



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140 





141 



ATIME TO REMEMBER 



The 132nd Founders' Day ConvocatAon was held 
on Sunday, April 11th in the Seabrook Auditorium. This 
annual event pays homage to the seven founding fa- 
thers of FSU and chronicles the University's illustri- 
ous history. 

Dr. Mary Ivlicahels Pohlmann '64 , the first 
white student to attend the historically black insti- 
tution since it opened its doors in 1667 as the 
[toward School, served as the keynote speaker Dr. 
Pohlmann, a physican in the Student Health Service 
at Southern Illinois University, urged the audience of 
student, alumni and faculty to not "tolerate bigotry 
in yourself or in your associates. Be a positive force 
for goodwill. Teach and the lesson will be taught." 

Founders' Day was also a time to recognize 
the Chancellor's Certificate of Merit Recipients; Dr. 
James Baldwin, Mr John A. Penix '51, Mr. Leonard 
Hedgepeth, Mr John E. Raper, Jr, and Mr Frederick 
Waddell. The Family of the Year, the David O'Berry 
and Maggie Darden Bell Family of Fayetteville, NC, 
was also honored. 

The Founders' Day Froqram also included the 
dedication ceremonies for the Joseph L. Knuckles Sci- 
ence Annex. 



Above: Dr. Mary Pohlmann addresses the 
audience at the 132nd Founders 'Day Con- 
vocation. 

Right: Miss FSU. Rushaunda Ramey and 
Miss Alumni. Brenda Thomas, enjoy the 
Founders ' Day program. 




Right: Dr McLeod recognizes 
family members of Dr Joseph L. 
Knuckles. 




142 



Left: Keron James. SGA President pays homage to the Founding 
Fathers of Fayetteville State University. 

Below: Chancellor's Certificate of Merit Recipients. 



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Middle: Chancellor McLeod and Dr Pohlmann '64 un- 
veil the portrait of Dr Knuckles. 

Left: Mr James Paige '56. Chairman of the FSU Board 
of Trustees and Chancellor McLeod participate in the 
dedication of the Joseph L Knuckles Science Annex. 



143 



ineemmudita 
A TIME TO PERFORM 



Treemonleha wae the Department of Fer- 
forming and Fine Arts second operatic produc- 
tion of the year. Written by Scott Joplin in the 
\&00'5, the hietoric black opera was not only 
entertaining but served to reinforce and affirm 
the talents of early African-American artist 
and writers. A jazz musician and composer, 
Joplin'5 work made for an interesting blend of 
sound and colors. Audience members were sure 
to hear the "jazzy" chorda and ear poppin' melo- 
dies abound. 

Treemonisha was set in a small village 
where everybody knew everybody and none was a 
stranger, It's the story of young woman who is 
the only one in her village with schoolin' and af- 
ter a kidnappinq and a daring rescue finds that 
she was born to lead her people. The opera, 
though written nearly two hundred years aqo 
still remains poingent with issues of today. 




144 




145 



A TIME TO TAKE CHARGE 



Following the Spring Student Government 
Elect'ione, officers were installed to their re- 
spective offices during the annual 5GA In- 
stallation Ceremony. Dr Willie Snipes served 
as the keynote speaker. Newly elected SGA 
President, Marcelle Smith inspired student 
leaders with his inaugural address. Other 
officers installed included SAC Program Di- 
rector, LaShonda Maxfield; SGA Treasurer, 
Chris Wilks and SAC Adminstrative Assis- 
tant, Monica Jones. 



Mrs. Olivia Chavis, Vice Ctiancellor for Stu- 
dent Affairs administers tfie oath of office 
to SGA officers with assistance from Chan- 
cellor McLeod and Mr Jim Scurry, Dean 
of Students. 



SAC officers. LaShonda Maxfield and 
Monica Jones take the oath office with 
assistance from their advior Ms. Juanette 
Council. 




146 



Left: Newly elected SGA President Marcelle Smith, outlines his objectives for the 
upcoming year 

Below: Marcelle Smith presents Kelvin Thompson with the outstanding 
leadership award. 




Above: Keron James thanks Nichelle 
Sullivan for her contribution to the Student 
Government Association. 
Left: Ray fVlcDougal is recognized for his 
dedication to SGA. 



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Left: Keron thanks Mrs. Lisa Wallace and Mrs. Judy 
Fish for their support during the 1998- 1999 academic 



147 



^pAlna Qcrnimencement 
A TIME TO EMBRACE 



The 152nd Spr'mq Commencement Exercises 
were held on May 15, 1999 in the Felton J. Capel Arena. 
The Honorable Bob Etheridge, US Congressman, deliv- 
ered the keynote addreee. Kimberly D. Cannonier, 
Valedictorian, and Sheronda R. Lennon, Salutatorian 
were recoqnlzed for their outstanding academic per- 
formance. 

The 543 graduates cheered and shouted be- 
cause it was time to reap the benefits of the many 
years of hard work and sacrifice. As they listened to 
the words of advice from the numerous speakers, they 
reflected upon their journey at F5U, no doubt the 
moment was finally here-- It was time to go out and 
con(\uer the world! 



Top: Bob Etheridge addresses 
the graduating class. 

Mlddle:Dr Denise l\/latione 
iA/yatt reviews ttie program for- 
mat witti Senior Class President 
Shawn Jones. 



Right: It's Time . 
ate! 



To Gradu- 




Left: Chancellor McLeod con- 
gratulates the graduates. 




Chancellor McLeod pre- 
sents Mayor J. L. 
Dawk Ins with a Honor 
Doctor of Laws degree. 



Left: Keemla Hurst . .Right on Time. 



149 




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And a Ume to- e^/^^ pM/m&de ande/i kecw-en. 



A TIME TO BECIN. A TIME TO END 





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154 



A TIME TO SPEND, A TIME TO SAVE 




A TIME TO SPEAK. A TIME TO LISTEN 



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A TIME TO CHALLENCE 




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156 




A TIME TO LOVE, A TIME TO LEAVE 




A TIME TO STUDY, A TIME TO PARTY 




157 



A TIME TO REMEMBER 





Dr. Joseph Knuckles 

1924-1998 



Dr. Phillip McGuire 

1940-1998 



159 



A Note of Thanks 

First we would like to thank alt of those who have givt i 
support to the 96-99 FayettewH/an. We realize that it may 
have seemed like this edition would newer be printed. No fingers 
can be pointed atone particular person or reason rather to the 
skeem of the hetic life in which live. We encountered many, 
many obstacles and problems, both work related and personal 
and we really felt like forgetting it. Then we thought about yci, 
the student body, and we kept working, We kept trying to ge* 
pictures taken, trying to figure out a way to produc- 
undergraduate photographs from the ID Card System (Ye-:' 
the company assured us that we could do this and it worked 
so well in the test demonstration) and trying to produce a 
book that captured the moments that we shared. But life 
doesn't always go as planned and so we realized that it was 
time for us to change the things that we could change and 
accept the things that we could not change. So as we end the 
20th Century, we look back and remember the way we lived, who 
we loved, the challenges we faced and the victories we won. 

THE FAYETTEVILLIAN STAFF 



General Information 




MONICA COTTON, EDITOR 

ZACQUES GRAY 

JUANETTE COUNCIL 

KELVIN THOMPSON 

MARCELLE SMITH 



UNIVERSITY PHOTOCRAPHER 

DENNIS MCNAIR 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 

ALLONEASE READDY, PAUL MCPHEARSON, AND 
ZACQUES D. CRAY, JUANETTE COUNCIL 



The Fayettevillian, the yearbook of Fayetteville State 
University, is published annually, thle years yearbook consisted of 160 
pages. The Fayettevillian office is located in the Rudolph Jones 
Student Center Fayetteville, NC 2&301, (910) 466-1406. 

Volume 42 was printed by the Herff Jones Company, P.O. Box 
1013, Charlotte, North Carolina 26201, (704) 647-9601. Our 
represenative was Brent DeWeese. Darlene Cooper served as our "life 
saving" Plant Customer Service Representative. 

DESIGN ANP LAYOUT INFORMATION 

All layouts were designed by The Fayettevillian staff. Al 
layouts were produced on a Hewlett-Packerd computer using Aldus 
Pagemaker 6.0 and Corel WordPerfect 6.1 for Windows. Layouts, 
including all copy, were submitted on disk to the printer. 

fonts used Include Kaufman, Lithos Regular, Tekton, and 
Modern. Slack and white photos were submitted to Herff Jones where 
they were laser scanned and enlarged/reduced to specifications. 

All color photographs were taken by The Fayettevillian staff 
members except for the senior portraits which were taken by Thorton 
Studios of New Yorl< and the football team picture which was taken by 
Paul Harris. 



ADVISORS 

ZACQUES D. CRAY 
H. JUANETTE COUNCIL 



SPECIAL THANKS 

STUDENT CENTER STAFF 

MRS. OLIVACHAVIS 

MRS. YVONNE ROBINSON 

MS. CONSTANCE CRAWFORD 

OFFICE OF THE VICE CHANCELLOR FOR 
STUDENT AFFAIRS 

WOLFE CAMERA 

THORNTON STUDIOS 



Fayetteville 5tate University is a Constituent Institution 
of the University of North Carolina. 



THE FSU STUDENT BODY 
FOR YOUR PATIENCE & UNDERSTANDING 



160 





A TTie comedy Shakespeare in 
M Love, starring Ben Affleck 
yf and Gwyneth Paltniw. 
celebrated vShakespeare's genius 
and won Golden Globes for Best 
Screenplay and Best Comedy 
I ilni 



^^^^ Friends gained momentum bree/ing tlirough anotlier 
successful season by adding story lines about Ph(x;be giving birth. Ross 
and Emily's divorce, and Monica and Chandler's new relationship. 

fk Cameron Diaz turned heads and stomachs in the summer 
I J surprise blockbuster There's Something About Mary with Ben 
^ Stiller and Matt Dillon. There was also a huge demand for the 
movie's scene-stealing Border terrier in a cast. Twentieth Century 
Fox made only 820 of the stuffed dog promotional items. The hit 
made more than .$220 million. 



mmm 





^r^^ Audiences and critics alike responded to the brilliant 
characters, witty wordplay, and physical humor found in Frasier. 
The show won an Emmy for Outstanding Comedy Series and 
Kelsey Grammer and David Hyde Pierce both won Emmys for 
their portrayals of the Crane brothers. 



Adam Sandler's movie 



The WB's comina-of- 



career soared. He followed the age-drama. FeUcity, drew high 

success of The Wedding Singer ratings among 1 8 to 34-year-olds 

with Waterboy. a comedy that in upper income households, 
made $122 million. 



2 Television and movies • Television and movies • Television and movies • Television and movies • Television and moviri 



^^^^ Jim C;im?> won a 
Golden Globe for besi actor in Ihe 
Tniinan Show. The movie was 
;ilso noniinaled for three Osc;irs. 



^^^^ Dawson s Creek 

continued to keep the attention of 
\ iewers with its handsome cast 
and controversial subject matter. 




^^^^ Saving Private Ryan 

j;a\ e a graphic account of the 
violence of World War II and 
earned Steven Speilberg 
Golden Globes for best director 
and best film. The blockbuster 
took in $1 88 million the first 
time, and was re-released in 
Februar>. It received an Oscar 
nomination for best picture. 




^^^^ Fast-talking Chris Tucker prov ed himself to be star 
material as a Los Angeles Police detective in Rush Hour. He teamed 
with Jackie Chan in this action comedy that made more than S 1 .'^9 
million. 



^^^fc Fo.xs Ally McBeal 
remained a favorite for its 
oftteat humor and received a 
Golden Globe Best Comedy 
Series Award. 



Top 10 movies of 1998: 

Saving Prtvaie Ryan 

There's Somediing About Mary 

The Truman Show 

Shakespeare in love 

A Bug's lite 

The watertioy 

Rush Hour 

Armageddon 

lethal Weapon 4 

Enemy ol the Stale 



Gus Van Sanl recreated Alfred 
Hitchcock's 1960 Psycho w'lih 
Vince Vaughn as Norman 
Bales and Anne Heche 
playing the shower \ ictim. 
Favorites that continued to 
earn high ratings included 
Just Shoot Me, the X-Files, 
Dhanna and Greg. Touched 
By An Angel, Spin City, JAG, 
and Everybody Loves 
Raymond 

New shows such as Jesse. 
That '70s ShoH\ Sports 
\ight.dnd Will and Grace 
were popukir with fans 
and cntics. 

We bid farewell to one of 
TV's greatest shows, Seinfeld. 
The last episode aired 
M.i\ 14. 

\hchael J. Fox walked away 
trom the Golden Globe 
Awards as best actor in a 
comedy/musical senes. Fox 
revealed earlier in the year 
that he had been suffering 
from Parkinson's disease for 
the past se\en years. 
The 1st annual TV Guide 
.^wards. where winners were 
i-htKen by \ iewers in a mail-in 
^uncN. was held in Febnjar>'. 
r\ s most eiiytblc bachelor. 
Today's Mall Lauer. tied the 
knot w ith Annette Roque. 
Fihan Hawke and Uma 
Thumian mamed May 1 in 
Manhattan. Home Alone star. 
17-year-old M^icaulay Culkin. 
said "I do" to Rachel Miner, 
also 17. 



ievision and movies • Television and movies • Television and movies • Television and movies • Television and movies 3 



^^^^ George Clooney left 
the very successful drama ER to 
puisue more movie opportunities. 
He plans to produce some 
television shows and make guesi 
appearances on ER next season. 



^^-^ '^^ summer bkKkbusler Annageddon was well received by movie audiences. Bruce Willis 
Li\ Tyler, Ben Affleck, and a killer asteroid kept audiences on the edce ot their seats. 




^^^^ The ABC law dramii. 
TIte Practice, won a Golden 
Globe and an Emmy tor Best 
Dramatic Series. Star Dylan 
McDennott took home a Golden 
Globe, while Camryn Manheim 
earned an Emmy and Golden 
Globe for Best Supporting Actress. 





^^^ Fans crowded theaters to see Mel Gibson and Danny 
Glover together once again in IjUhal Weapon 4. Hong Kong liiartial 
arts star Jet Li made his American debut in the film while comedian 
Chris Rock added coniic relief as Glover's future son-in-law. 



bib 



liX 



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^^^^ Hollywoid put tlie spotlight on in.secLs Uiis yeiu' witli tlie tvlease 
of /I Bug's Life and/l/i/.-. A Bug's Ufe t(X)k in mort- thiui $148 million. ;uid 
opened with the highest grossing Tliiuik.sgnving wcx-kend in history 



• Ptiil Hartnian. best known for 
Saturday Night Live and 
News Radio, died. Puppeteer 
Shan Lewi.s and funny man 
Flip Wilson lost their battles 
with cancer. We said goodbye 
to Roy Rogers, Gene Autrey, 
and TV's well-known dad. 
Robert Young. Gene Siskel, 
of the movie critic team 
Siskel & Ebert, died in 
February, 

• Sarah Michelle Cellar's 
career skyrocketed. TVs 
Huffy the Vampire Slayer 
mi.xed typical teenage crises 
with supernatural deception 
and horror. Gellar starred in 
two mo\ ics. Simply Irrestible 
.iitd Cruel Intentions. 

• Today's Katie Counc battled 
to educate Americans about 
colon cancer after losing her 
husband to the deadly disea.se 
last year. Couric's place at 
NBC remained firm with a $7 
million contract. 

' After more than 10 years of 
marraige. Demi Moore and 
Bruce Willis called it quits. 
Rosie O'Donnell's live daily 
talk show continued to win 
the hearts of viewers. It won 
an Emmy for Best Talk Show 
as well as a TV Guide Aw;u-d, 



4 Teleuision and movies • Television and movies • Television and movies • Television and movies • Television and movieL 



^k^^ At 1 7. Monica released 
her second successful album. The 
Boy is Mine. The Georgia nati\ es 
ciireer has riK'keted since her first 
iilbuin. Miss Viang. With her new 
mature sound, success seems to he 
her destiny. Teaming with BRUids 
on the single. The Boy is Mine. 
the duo won a Grammy for Best 
R&B Performance By A Duo. 



^^^^ Tim McGraw scored 
his eighth number one single 
w ith Where the Green Grass 
Grows. He won the Country 
Music Association's Award for 
Album of the Year for his album 
Everywhere which produced six 
singles. He and wife Faith Hill 
also became parents for the 
second time. 



^^^^ Toronto's Bareniiked Ladies became extremely popular 
with their album. Stiint. They were part of the suminer's H.O.R.D.E. 
tour and their single. One Week, went to number one on the 
Billboard Hot 100. 





The MiseducaOon ol Lauryn Hill 

Oaurvn Hill) 

Surfacing (Sarah McLachlan) 

Come On Over (Shania Itoain) 

Backstreet Boys (Backstreet Boys) 

Yoursen or Someone Like You 

(Matchbox 20) 

Third Eye Bhnd (Third Eye Blind) 

Wide Open Spaces (Dixie Chicks) 

So Much tor die Afterglow 

(Everclear) 

lie to Me (Jonny Lang) 

N Sync (N Sync) 



A Brandy had a gtxxi year with 
r I the success of her Never Say 
W Never album released in the 
spring of 1 998. The album 
included a duet with Monica TJie 
Boy is Mine. She also made her 
big- screen debut with / Still Know 
Wliat You Did iMst Summer. 




'Ijisic • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music 5 



• • • • • 



^ 



Ahmi-. Mo 



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Liihuin. Supposed Fonner 
Injiitiiation Junkie, sold 
4IM ).( K « ) copies Its tii^t week of 
release. Hersonjj. i'minited. 
won Graniniys tor Best Roek 
Song and Best Female Rtvk 
Vocal Pertonnajiee. 
' Gen Halltwell's June 
announcement to lease the Spice 
Girls was a shock to fans, 
especially since it was made the 
night betbie the beginning of 
their Norlh American tour. 
Jennifer Love Hewitt's single. 
How Do I Deal i .IT the / StiU 
Know WJua You Did Last 
Summer soundti'ack was 
popular. She is one of many 
television and movie stars to 
enter the music industry. 
WiU Smith won three American 
Music Awards in January 1 999 
for Favorite Male Artist, 
Favorite Album, and Fa\ dnte 
Male Soul/RtVB Artist. He 
received a Griuiiniy for Best 
Rap Solo Perfomiance with 
Gettin 'Jiggy Wft It. He also 
won two honors at the MTV 
Music Video Awards. 
Silkk the Shocker's Made Man 
sold an impressive 2-4t.).(XX) 
copies its first week in stores, the 
highest sales so far in 1 999 for a 
single iilbum. 
Garth Brooks hit the road 
touring and grossed S."^.^ million 
while his album Sevt 



HI weeks 



IlllXM 



s|ieni 
■on the 



Counuy chLuis His Double 
IJve .uid Untiled Seiies albums 
also hit the ilie luimberone slot, 
making him the first lulist in 2} 
years to land three albums at 
number one in one year. 
Legendary musician James 
Taylor was awarded the 
Century Award, Billboard's 
highest honor. 
F-ans w ere shocked when Tom 
Braxton filed for bankruptcy itfter 
se\er.d successful years in music. 
Le.Ann Rimes' h\\ How Do I Live 
set a reel trd lor longest time on the 
BillhoanJHol l(X) with h9 weeks. 
Groups like Siiiiinel Nut Zippers. 
Chenv Poppin Daddies, and the 
Bnaii .Setyer Orchestra revived 
the Swing movement. 
Sheryl Crow received a 
Grammy for Best RiK-k Album 
for The Globe Sessions. 




• ••••••• 



OThe Dave Matthews Band 
albiiiii. Before These 
Ciitwded Streets, debuted at 
niimbof otic la.st May. The band 
wa.s the second 1 998 top concert 
money e;imer. with more than 
S4() million. 

^^^^ Madonna's music and 
appearance have softened since 
motheihixxJ. She won Grammys 
for her albtini Ray of Light which 
received Best Pop Albuiri iind the 
single, Ray of Light, w hich 
received Best Dance Recording. 




^^^ In 1998. Jewel stayed 
busy with her album Hands 
which sold 10 million copies. She 
also released a poetry book, A 
Night Without Armor, which 
sold more than 50(),0(X) copies. 

A Just a week after its release, 
1 1 Lauryn Hill's debut solo 
W album. Tlte Misediication of 
iMuryii Hill, climbed to the top ot 
the Billboard charts. Hill wrote 
and produced the entire album 
which received 10 Grammy 
noininations. Hill won ."^ 
Grammys, including one tor Best 
R&B Album and Best New Artist. 




6 Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Mu^ 



^^^^ The Backstreet Boys sold more than 22 million records 
worldwide. With hits like / '// Never Break Your Heart and All I Have 
To Give, their fresh faces and dance club music have teens and even 
some adults screamine for more. 



^^^^ With her album Come 
On Over selling 18.5 million 
copies and her song Still the One 
receiving a Grammy for Best 
Female Country Vocal Perfor- 
mance, Shania Twain had quite a 
year. The Canadian took in $34 
tnillion in concert revenues and 
earned more American Music 
Award nominations than any 
other musician. 




C'%i ri f 1 w 1 



|[iva& 





•••••••••• 



a&ii 



BuXa 



• Celine Dion appeared m VH I's 
Diva-s Live along with pop divas 
Mariah Carey, Aretha Franklin, 
Carole King, and Shania Twain. 
Dion earned $55..'i million and 
sold 28 million albums. She won 
two Grammys for My Heart Will 
Go On. 

• tj3ng-time legend Elton John wa.s 
in the number one spot for conceit 
sales, earning 346.2 million. 

• The all-male pop group 'N Sync 
had two top 40 hils. / Want You 
Back and Tearing Up My 
Heart. Their self-titled album 
went platinum. 

• Multi-pIatinum recording artist 
Sarah McLachlan put together the 
second Lilith Fair lisstival, which 
celebrated women masicians. 

• Britney Spears, 17, found 
success with the single , ..Baby, 
One More Titne. The song 
landed at number one on 
Billboard's chart. 

• Altliough the Goo Goo Dolls 
ha\ c been together since the 80s, 
they scored their first number one 
hit with Iris, which received 
thiee Grammy nominations. 
Their album, Dizo' Vp the Girt. 
went platinum. 

• Barbra Streisand. .s6. and James 
Brolin. 58, exchanged vows. 

• Linda McCartney, wife of Paul, 
lost her battle with breast cancer 

• The music world also said 
farewell to Carl PerkiiB, Tainmy 
WyneRe, Eddie Rabbit, and 
Junior Wells, 

• ••••••••• 




^r^^ Australian-bom Natalie hiibmglia doiiuiialed airways lor ; 
year with her first single. Tom. Her album. Left of the Middle, sold 
more than five million copies. 



^^^W The Di.xie ChicLs three-part hiumony mixed classic country 
sound with contemporary style. Their album. Wide Open Spaces, made 
them one of the biggest selling new acts of 1998. They took home the 
Horizon Award at the 32nd annual Country Music Awards. They scored 
big at the Grammys, winning Best Country Album with Wide Open 
Spaces and Best Country Pert'omi;mce By A Duo for Tliere's Your Trouble. 



lAusic • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music • Music 7 



OOn December 19, PresideiU 
William Jefferson Clinton 
became only the second 
President in history to be 
impeached by Congress. Kenneth 
Starr's investigation culminated 
with the House of Representa- 
tives being presented with four 
articles of impeachment. Tlie 
House adopted two of the articles 
and the stage was set for a Senate 
trial. The impeachment trial 
lasted five weeks and ended on 
February 12 with Fh-esident 
Clinton's acquittal on charges of 
peijury and obstruction of justice. 




^^^^ On FebRiary 29. 1962, John Glenn became the first 
American astronaut to orbit the earth. Glenn. 77, tot)k his second space 
voyage on October 29. 1998, aboard the shuttle Discovery. Returning 
after nine days, Glenn found readjusting to gravity to be the greatest 
challenge of the mission. He was welcomed back to earth with a New 
York City ticker tape pai'ade. 





IMnUEVMlS 



^^^^ On his S5th pastoral trip outside of Italy. Pope John Paul 11 
tra\eled to the United States and Mexico. His return to Mexico was 
significant because it was the country where he made his first foreign 
tnp as Pope. His \ isit to St. Louis u as his tlrst trip to the Gateway To 
the West. 





u hen 4 1 -ye;u-old Russell Westi 
chiuged into tlie L'.S. Capitol 
btiilding ;ijid opened fire. Weston 
had a histoiy of mental instability 
and violence. He was caught ;uid 
charged with murder The victims. 
Officer Jacob Chestnut (top), and 
Special Agent John Gibson 
(bottom), were called heroes for 
theii" bravei"v ;ind sacrifice. 



^^^9 None of the 229 people 
on hoard Swiss Flight 1 1 1 
sun i\ed the September 2 crash 
on the coast of Canada's Nova 
Scotia. The cause of the crash 
was reported to be faulty wiring. 



8 World Euents • World Events • World Events • World Events • World Events • World Events • World Events • World Events • World EveM 



^^^^ Jordan's King Hussein. 
63. died of cancer. He ruled 
Jordan since 1952. longer than 
any other leader in the middle 
east. Hussein played a crucial 
role in the peace prtxress between 
the Palestinians and Israelis. His 
funeral procession v\ as attended 
by nearly a million people. His 
son. 37-year-old Pnnce Abdullah, 
is heir to the throne. 



^^^^ Newt Gingrich 
resigned as .Speaker of the 
House after the Republicans 
five seats in the House of 
Representati\es in the 
November elections. 



^^^^ F(xxl u as a pow ertul 
weapon in .Stidan's l.'i-yeiirciNil 
wiu: Ofticials of tlie llunine-plagued 
country allowed an ;iirdrop of IikkJ 
fntm the LIN., but it was impossible 
to feed all of the hunin^. 




^^^fc Even after promising full cooperation. Iraq's .Saddam Hussein continued to fmstrate and restrict 
U.N. amis inspectors. The United States and Great Britain joined forces in a December 17 strike against 
military targets in Iraq. In the months following the attack. Hussein increased military activity and went on 
the offensive with dog fights in the "no-fly" zone. 



What was the most 
significant event to 
you? 



I 




ODr Jack Ke\ orkian made 
headlines once again when 
CBS's 60M/«i/toaireda 
\ ideotape of the Michigan doctor 
assisting a suicide. He was 
arrested ;md ch;irged with first 
deirree murder. 




^^^^ Enc Rudolph, the 
prime suspect in the January 29. 
1998. bombing of a Birmingham. 
Alabama, abortion clinic that 
killed one person and senously 
injured another, remained on the 
loose a.s one of the F.B.I.'s Most 
Wanted fugitives. Rudolph was 
believed to be hiding in the hills 
of North Carolina. The fact that 
he wus an avid outdoorsman has 
led searchers to think it may be a 
lona time before he is found. 



4rld Events • World Events • World Events • World Events • World Events • World Events • World Events • World Events • World Events 9 



•••••••••• 



aL 



• In Texai. James Byrd Jr. a 44- 
year old Aftican American, was 
dragged by his ankles behind a 
truck driven by three white 
men. all of w horn v\ ere charged 
with murder 

■ Three Utah sisters all gave hinh 
on the same da>. \kirch 1 1 . 
despite almost mipossible odds 
.Strangely enough, the h.ih\ that 
was due last was bom lirsl 

• Former Governor ot Alabama 
and tbur-Ume presidential 
candidate George Wallace died 
in September 

• A large number of people 
contracted e-coli in 1998. It 
was discovered in water 
supplies, meat products, and 
various water parks across 
America. Two-year-old McCall 
Akin died after contracting 
e-coli at an Atlanta water park, 

• University of Wyoming 
freshman Matthew Shepard 
was beaten and left to die 
October 1 2 after leaving a 
campus hangout with Russell 
Henderson, 2 1 . and Aaron 
McKinney, 22. Shepard's death 
ignited an outpounng ot 
sympathy and protests from 
gay rights activ ists. 

• ••••••••• 




^^^^ Indone.siun President 
Stihaito stepped down from a 32- 
year reign in May after a three- 
day protest outside of Parliament. 
Although Vice President B.J. 
Habbie wa.s sworn in until 2003, 
conditions did not improve and 
protests continued. As a result. 
Parliament agreed to hold new 
elections in the spring. 



^^^^ Houston's Nkem 
Chukv". u became the first woman 
to give birth to a surviving set of 
octuplets. The first baby was bom 
December 8 and the rest came on 
December 20. Seven of the eight 
babies have survived. 



^^^^ Thousands were wounded and 224 killed when the U.S. 
embassies in Nairobi and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, were bombed. 
Saudi exile Osama bin Laden was suspected of being behind the 
terrorist attacks. President Clinton retaliated with a missile strike. 
Seven men were arrested in connection with the bombings. 




(Extensive fires cau.sed by 
long-term-drought forced 
70,000 people to flee their 
Florida homes in July. The 
National Guard, Marines, and 
firefighters from across the nation 
battled the flames. 



10 World Events • World Events • World Events • World Events • World Events • World Events • World Events • World Events • World Evei^ 



^^^^ HiiiTicane Mitch's tlin' hit hard, killiiii; nwvc than 1(),(X)0 
peiiple ill Honduras, Guatemala. El Salvador, and Nicaragua and 
leaving some two million homeless. Eight days of rain and 1 80-mile- 
an-hour winds followed the hurricane which was said to be the 
deadliest sionii in the Atlantic in 2(K) years. 



^^^^ Jesse "The Btxiy" 
Venttira became the governor of 
Minnesota in January, Ttie 
former Navy SEAL and 
professional wrestler pulled off a 
stunning upset in November 
winning the governor's race as a 
member of the Reform party. 



^^ ClintHallam,a4S- 
yeiir-old New Zealander, was the 
recipient of the world's first hand 
transplant. Unfortunately, after 
the September surgery in Lyons. 
France. Hallum disappeared and 
broke all contact with the diK'tors 
on the transplant team. 





9 The GM stnkes that idled 
161.000 workers and shut 
down nearly all GM 
production plants in North 
America came to an end July 29. 

MBob Livingston 
succeeded Newt Gingrich 
as Speaker of the House 
then abruptly resigned after 
confessing to marital infidelity. 
Si.x-temi Illinois Congressman 
Dennis Hasten was chosen to 
replace him. 




^^^^ El Nifio was blamed for extremely hot and rainy weather 
around the world. The unusual weather patterns were caused when 
ocean currents and winds began changing in early 1997. In Africa, the 
weather was deadly, causing a spread of Rift Valley fever. The disease, 
transmitted by mosquitos. killed 89,(XX) people. 



^^"^fc Russian democracy 
advocate Galina Starovoitov a was 
killed in St. Petersburg. Tlie 
country 's leading liberal legislator 
appeared to be the victim of a 
professional assassin. Moscow's 
political class expressed outrage 
and despair over the rampant 
corruption in politics. 



• •••••••• 



B^ 



• Some 9,000 jobs were 
expected to he lost worldwide 
with Exxon's purchase of 
Mobil for $73.7 billion in 
stock, making il the richest 
deal ever. 

• On February I. a powerful 
explosion in the Dearborn. 
Michigan. Ford Motor plant 
left one dead and inan> 
injured. It was belie\ed that 
one of the boilers in the 
powerhouse plant was 
responsible for the explosion. 
The plant was Ford's largest 
concentration of factories. 

• A magnitude-6 earthquake hit 
Amienia. Colombia in 
.lanuary. leaving thousands 
homeless and killing over 
MOn people. 

• The largest industrial merger 
in history took place when the 
world's number six car 
company, Chrysler, joined 
with number 15 Daimler- 
Benz to create the fifth largest 
car ctimpany in the world. 

• Former three-pack-a-day 
sim>ker Patncia Henley was 
awarded S5() million in 
pnniiive damages after suing 
Phillip Moms. The 52-year- 
old was diagnosed with 
inoperable lung cancer last 
year and blamed the tobacco 
company for getting her 
addicted to cigarettes at a 
young age and misleading 
her about the dangers of 
smoking. 

• ••••••••• 



lorld Euents • World Euents • World Evenis • World Euents • World Events • World Events • World Events • World Events • World Events 11 



■I 



Trends & 



^^^^ Americans were "ready 
to nimble" this year with the 
popukirity of professional 
wrestling on the rise. There was 
much debate between wrestlers 
from the old school who fight to 
prove they are the best and 
newcomers who believe in more 
intense entertainment. 



Technology 



A A talking chihuahua proxed 
II to be a great marketing tool 
W for Taco Bell. His catch 
phrase, "Yo quiero Taco Bell" 
(meaning "I want some Taco 
Bell,") saucy voice, and 
swaggering strut made him an 
especially hot dog! 




^T^ March 9, 1999, marked 
Barbie's 40th birthday. The 
number one teenage fashion 
model was honored by Mattel 
with the introduction of Crystal 
Jubilee Barbie and the Gala 
Edition 4()th Anniversary Barbie. 




^^"^fc Fashion designers looked to the past to create the newest trends in clothing. C'alf-lcngth skirts and 
capri pants, elbow length shirts, carpenter pants, spaghetti strap dresses and tops, and clunky shoes were 
seen everywhere. Long, straight hair and the bob began to coine back. Adidas, GAP, Old Navy, and 
Abercrombie & Fitch were some popular name brands with teens. 



^F^^ Tlie "must haw" tos lor 
Chnstmas this ye;u' was the Fuitiy, 
a sm;ill, furry bundle that speaks. 
The furby's v(x;abul;iry increased 
over time, and it interacted by 
sneezing, giggling, or speaking. 



12 Trends a Technology • Trends a Technology • Trends & Technology • Trends & Technology • Trends & Technology • Trends & Technoloi 



^^^ The controversial Russian Mir space station made headlines 
as it conducted experiments with mirrors in space. Scientists were 
attempting to bring light to northern countries such as Russia and 
Canada diinni; the dark w inter months. 





A The country began to jump. 
ri ii\e. and wail as swing 
V dancing returned. Tlie music 
and dance has an upbeat sound 
and moveinent not seen since 
the 1940s. 

^^^^ Another big hit for 
children tliis year were 
Telembbies. brightly colored 
characters with televisions in 
their tummies. The foursome 
originated in England and 
enchanted children everywhere. 



^^^fc Apple introduced its 
iMac computer, translucent with a 
round mouse. The fast, inexpensive 
computer hit stores in August with 
a 233-MHz G3 chip, a 24X CD- 
ROM drive, and a 15-inch monitor 



^^^^ Henna tattoos were a 
hot trend, giving people the 
opportunity to decorate their 
bodies without the permanance 
of regular tatoos. They could 
even be done at home with a kit. 





1998 Trends: 

Volkswagon Beetle 
Henna lanoos 
Swing dancing 
Furbys 
Teletubbies 
Cargo panis 
Professional wresting 
iMac computer 
Flat television screens 
Palm Pilots 



3E 



• Palm Pilots were popular with 
consumers. The newest 
\ersion. the Palm Pilot V. 
made the already convenient 
Item even t>etter It had an 
anixlized aluminum case and 
an ad\ anced LCD screen w ith 
hthium-ion hatienes that could 
be recharged in minutes. 

• Saturn introduced tlie w iirtd's first 
three-dc»ir coupe. The third door 
did not raise the cost of the car. 
making it even mott atlracDve, 

• Emily Rosa 1 1 , of Colorado 
made news when she published 
a paper in the Journal of the 
American Medical Association 
that presented the results of 
her two-year study on 
therapeutic touch 

• Philips inu^oduced the 42" Flat 
Plasma Television. The 4..s" 
\\ ide set w us formatted to be 
hung on the wall and had a 
160 \ lewing .ingle. An 
expected one million units are 
to he made h\ the year 2IKK1. 

• Wnteahle CDs became more 
mainstream, allow ing computer 
users to sa\ e liirge amounts of 
data, up to 64() megabytes. 

• Lymenx. a vaccine developed 
by SmitliKline Beecham. was 

found to prevent Lyme disease. 
The disease was expected to 
» reach a record high this year as a 
result of El Niiio's warmer 
temperatitres and extra moisttne. 

• «*••«•*«•• 

OGame Boy got better with 
Game Boy Colon They came 
in solid or transparent purple, 
and the screen display was color 
Pre-existing games could be 
played in color also. 



»' 



g (lends & Technology • Trends a Technology • Trends & Technology • Trends & Technology • Trends & Technology • Trends & Technology 13 



^^^^ Olympic tnple gnkl 
medalist and tractv superst;u' 
Florence Griffith Joyner. 38. died 
from a cardiac condition. Her 
track records have remained 
unbroken. 



i;^'':,M§ 



V 



W- 



^^"^fc Jeff Gordon began 
1999 in the best way possible by 
winning the Daylona ^(XJ. It was 
Gordon's second Daytona 300 
win in three years. 




^^^^ The University of Kentucky won its second national 
basketball championship in three yeiu's with new coach Tubby Smith. 




^m 



s.^ 



France upset lir.iyil .Votowm 
Its firsl Will Id Cup. 
Gartli Brooks mtended tile San 
Diego Padres spring training in 
hopes of playing pro ba.se ball. 
After playing in 154 
consecutive majors. Jack 
Nicklaus announced that he 
would retire in the year liW. 
hie Janzen won the U.S. Ofien 
golf title for the second time. 
The NBA found itself in a lcx:k 
out that lasted through the new 
year and pre\'ented players 
from representing their country 
at the World Championship. 
Joe DiMaggio died at 84. His 
56-game hitting record 
still stands. 



^^_^p Scottie Pippen and the 
Chicago Bulls won their sixth 
NBA championship in eight 
years. Micheal Jordan's last shot 
in the NBA beat the Ut;ih Jazz in 
the last seconds of the came. 





^ 11 




1^ 


m~ 


F 



^^^fc Randy Johnson was 
not affected by his mid-season 
trade to the Houston Astros. He 
won 10 of 1 1 starts and posted an 
ERA of 1 .28. 



^^"^fc Tennessee had a \M) year which led ihem lo the Fiesta 
Bowl. They beat Florida .State 2}-\b for the national cliaiiipionship. 



14 Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • I, 



^^^^ The New York Yankees pulled off a winning year with a 
great roster of veteran pitchers and hitters. The strong team led the 
Yankees to the earliest playoff spot in history and a World Series 
sweep of the Padres. 



^^^^ Mark O'lVleiira was the PGA plaver of the year after 
winning tlie Masters and the British Open. He had the distinction of 
being the oldest player in PGA histon- to win iwo niaiors in one vear. 




Race hoiNC Real Quiet had 
hopes of a Tnple Crown after 
winning both the Kentucky 
Oerby and Preakness. Those hopes 
faded as Victory Gallop won the 
Belmont Stakes run on June 6. 

^^^^ Female bo.xing gained 
popularity. Women brought a 
freshness to the sport which may 
soon become a part of 
mainstream boxina. 



' Cynthia Cooper, the 
guard for the Houston Comets, 
led her team to a second 
consecutive WNBA title and won 
her second MVP award while 
averaging 27 points per game. 



' Ijm Bird won the NBA 
OuchofllieYearundHas 
inducleiJ into ilie H;ill cif Fajne. 
Fonner tieaww eight fighter 
Mike T\ son made headlines 
when he sued Don King for 
SKK) million, and when he lost 
his temper in the hearing to 
regain his hoxing lieense. 
Ken Griffey. Jr. hit 19 home raas 
over three niunds of the All-Star 
home run hitting contest. 
The Sail Antonio ,Spurs 
enjoyed their title as the 
greatest turnaround in NBA 
history. The Spurs won 56 
games this year. 
NBA star Dennis Rodman 
married MTV host Carmen 
Electra in a spur-of-the- 
moment wedding. 
After 25 years with tlie 
University of Nebraska fwitball 
coaeh Tom Osbome reUred. 





After a 1 4-year basketball 
career, superstar Michael 
Jordon retired in January. 
Considered by many to be the 
greatest basketball player in 
history, he won five MVP awards 
and six NBA Championships 
with the Chicago Bulls. 

Chinese gymna.st Sang Lan 
was p;iralyzed while wamiing 
up for the Goodwill Games in 
New York. Her Olympic dreams 
u ere shattered, but she found 
comfort witli tlie family that cared 
tor her tintil her own could amve. 



I • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports 15 



^^^^ John Elw;i\ led tlic Deiner Broncos to a second consecutive 
Super Bowl victory. The Broncos defeated the Atlanta Falcons 34-19. 
Quarterback Elway was unsure if he would return for another season 
to try to win a record-setting third conseculixe Super Bowl. 




^^^fc Detroit heal Washington 4-0 in the Stanley Cup finals, 
winning their second consecutive title. Tlie Red Wings were honored 
when 1 .2 million fans celebrated in downtown Detroit. 

^^^fc The St. Louis Cardinal's Mark McGwire beat Roger Maris' 
^^"^fc record of 61 homeruns in a single season. McGwire ended 
the seascm with 711 homeruns. 



^^^^ 20-year-old Se Ri Pak 
from Korea won the U.S. Women ':■ 
Open in Wisconsin. This was one 
of two major wins, and she set ;ui 
LPGA tournament recortl 



^^jflJi^M ' 91 






2i A 







Top 10 performers in 1998: 

Maik McGwire 
Sammy Sosa 
UsaLesfe 
lenGoidon 
MnBway 
CymMa Cooper 
SeRiPak 
Venus WBams 
MaikO'Meaia 
Mctiaei Ionian 



^*^ ^ 








Sammy Sosa was close 
behind Mark McGwire and 
also broke Roger Maris' 
ingle-.sea,son homemn record. 



Sosa ended the season with 
66 homers. 




^^"^fc The Williams sisters. Venus and Serena (left to right), 
breathed new life into tennis with their strong personalities and big- 
hitting games. Venus stayed in the top ten list of players and sister 
Serena remained in the up[XT teens. 



16 Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Spons • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports • Sports H HERFF JONES 




161 



DOUBLE TIME 







162 



'"•■''• »^Z:ZT^ "-"'4 





163 



■RHHI 




164 




FAYETTE .^uE STATE ViuWE\^S\T\ t ^ . 

C' 1st Annual C- •' aH'^^ 





166 




168 



^n 




169 



^g^B 



^BIB 



£St}lA,RC 



.if^oV :• V *«?V,