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Full text of "The Ferguson family in Scotland and America"

929.2 

F3811f 

1192430 



GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01238 9679 



Jy/lf^'-' lit ^fi^4^:"/'#-r^>| 




THE FERGUSON COAT OF ARMS. 




JAMES FERGUSON, K. C, SHERIFF OF ARGYLE, 
EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND. 



THE 
FERGUSON FAMILY 



IN SCOTLAND AND 
AMERICA 



/ 1 , \ r ex- j < --"' I 



The Times Presses, 

Canandaigua, New York, 

1905. 



\-. 



PREFACE. 1192430 



On the eighth day of November, 1901, the last member of the fifth 
generation of the Maryland branch of the Ferguson family in the State of 
New York passed away. There immediately sprang up among the 
younger generations of the family in Ontario County, New York, an 
interest in their ancestors and a desire to know something of their gene- 
ology. An investigation was begun by the author, making General James 
Ferguson of the English Army the key to the inquiry. After about a 
year's search, a clue was obtained through James Ferguson, K. C, of 
Edinburgh, Sheriff of Argyle. 

The following traditions in regard to the family in Scotland have 
been handed down from generation to generation in the American family: 
That the family was descended from Fergus, the lirst King of the Scots ; 
that there was a noted sea captain in the family who died leaving a large 
property, and that the family in America were among the heirs ; that one 
member of the family was in the Scottish Parliament, and another was a 
noted general who lived in the time of Oliver Cromwell ; that one member 
of the family saved a portion of the people of Scotland from starving 
during a famine, and that he was the business man of a Duke ; that a 
noted Colonel was killed on King's mountain in the Revolutionary War, 
and that the family in America was founded by three brothers who came 
to America at an early date, one settling in the New England States, one 
in the Southern States, and the other, Robert, in Maryland, on land 
where the City of Washington, D. C, is now located. 

All these traditions have been traced back to their proper source, and 
have been found to be substantiated by facts found in the " History of 
the Ferguson Family in Scotland," which forms the first part of the book. 

" The History of the Maryland Branch of the Ferguson Family in 
America," forms the second part of the book. Many facts there recorded 
have been taken from public records. Great care has been taken to 
make the geneology of the family in America as nearly perfect as 
possible. 

Seneca Falls, N. Y. M. L. FERGUSON. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

Part I. 
Chapter. Page. 

No. 1— Clan and Name of Ferguson. . , 9 

No. 2— In Support of Traditions 13 

No. 3— Robert Bruce, the King and the Fergusons 16 

No. 4— Location of the Ferguson Families 19 

No. 5— Ayrshire Fergusons 21 

No. 6— Drumfrishire Fergusons 23 

No. 7— Fifeshire Fergusons 26 

No. 8 — History of Inverurie, Royal Burgh 31 

No. 9— William P'erguson, of Crichie 41 

No. 10— William Ferguson, of Badifurrow 43 

No. 11— Robert Ferguson, the Plotter 46 

No. 12— William Ferguson, Head of the Pitfour Family 50 

No. 13 — John Ferguson, of Stone Hou.se 55 

No. 14 — Major General James Ferguson 56 

No. 15— William Ferguson, Representative of the Kinmundy Family. . 63 

No 16— Walter Ferguson, of Badifurrow 68 

No. 17— Jannett Ferguson 70 

No. 18— George Ferguson, Factor of the Duke of Perth 72 

Part II. 

No. 1— Family Traditions 77 

No. 2 -Three English Soldiers ' 79 

No. 3- Sons of the Pioneer, Robert 82 

No. 4— Three Revolutionary Soldiers 84 

No. 5 — Ann Ferguson, of Montgomery County, Maryland 86 

No. 6— William Ferguson, of Bladensburg, Maryland 87 

No. 7— Business Life of William Ferguson 90 

No. 8— James Ferguson and his Descendants 92 

No. 9-Catheriue Ferguson and her Descendants 100 

No. 10— Ann Ferguson and her Descendants 101 

No. 11— Jane Ferguson and her Descendants 103 

No. 12 —Robert Bell Ferguson and his Descendants 110 

No. 13— Rev. John Ferguson and his Descendants. 132 

No. 14— William Ferguson and his Descendants 136 

No. 15 — David Ferguson, of Baltimore 139 

No. 16 — Levi Ferguson and his Descendants. . 141 



TJISTORY of the Ferguson 
^ ^ Family in Scotland, by 
James Ferguson, King's Coun- 
cil of Edinburgh, Sheriff of 
Argyle. 

(Author of Name and Clan of Ferguson; Robert Fer- 
o-uson, the Plotter; The Two Scottish Soldiers.) 



THE CLAN FERGUS(S)ON SOCIETY. 

OFFICE BEARERS. 

PRESIDENT. 

William Ferguson, of Kinmundy, Aberdeenshire. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS . 

Alexander A. Ferguson, Bothwell Park, Bothwell. 

Alexander A. Ferguson, 11 Grosvenor Terrace, Glasgow. 

Rev. Fergus Ferguson, M. A., D. D., No. 4 Craigpark Terrace, Den- 

nistoun Glasgow. 
Ex-Provost George Ferguson, Trinidad Villa, Ibrox. 
Rev. R. Menqies Ferguson, M. A., Logie Manse, Bridge of Allan. 

COUNCIL. 

Daniel Ferguson, National Bank House, Stirling. 

D. MacGregor Ferguson, No. 13 Carnarvon Street, Glasgow. 

James Ferguson, Jr., of Kinmundy, No. 10 Wemyss Place, Edinburgh. 

James Ferguson, No. 16 Robertson Street, Glasgow. 

James Haig Ferguson, M. D., No. 25 Rutland Street, Edinburgh. 

Very Rev. John Ferguson, The Deanery, Elgin. 

Rev. John Ferguson, B. D., The Manse, Aberdalgie, Perth. 

John Ferguson, Burgh School, Alloa. 

Dr. Peter Ferguson, Norwood, Pollokshields. 

Peter Ferguson. No. 15 Bute Gardens, Hillhead, Glasgow. 

Peter Ferguson, Mains Gardens, Milngavie. 

Robert Ferguson, No. 17 Douglas Street, Stirling. 

Robert Ferguson, Muirlaggan, Lochearnhead Station. 

TREASURER. 

W, M. Ferguson, No. 116 St, Vincent Street, Glasgow. 

SECRETARY. 

Alex. J. Ferguson, C. A,, No. 190 West George Street, Glasgow. 

The following are the objects of the "Clan Ferguson" Society, as 
defined by Article II. of the Constitution. 

"The objects of the Society shall be the reviving, conserving, and 
promoting the interests, sentiment, and associations of the Clan; the 
cultivation of social intercourse among the members; the collecting and 
pre,serving of records and traditions relating to the history of the Clan; 
the encouragement of Celtic education; the assisting of decayed Clans- 
men; and any other objects which the Society may from time to time 
determine." 



TITLED ESTATES AND THEIR PROPRI- 
ETORS IN THE YEAR 1873. 

In Perthshire: — 

John Ferguson, of Easter, Dalnabreck. 

Samuel R. Ferguson, of Middlehaugh, Pitlochry. 

Thomas Fergusson, of Baledmund. 

Margret Fergusson, of Dunfallandy. 
Aberdeenshire: — 

William Ferguson, of Kinmundy. 
Aberdeenshire and Banffshire: — 

Colonel George Arthur Ferguson, of Pitfour. 
Ayrshire: — 

Sir James Fergusson, of Kilkerran, Bart. 

John Ferguson, of Fulwood, Stewartton. 
Dumfriesshire and Kirkcudbrightshire: — 

R. Cutlar Fergusson, of Craigdarrock, Moniaive, 

R. S. D. Fergusson of Isle, 
Fife, Elgin, and Ross Shires: — 

Ronald Crawford Munro Fergusson, of Raith and Novar. 
Kincardineshire: 

Mrs. Jane Ferguson, of Altens. 
Peebleshire: — 

Sir William Fergusson, Bart., of Spittalhaugh. 
Lanarkshire: — 

James Ferguson, of Auchinheath. 
Wigtownshire: — 

The Trustees of the Ferguson Bequest Fund. 

A PARTIAL RECORD OF THE FERGUSON LINE OF DESCENT IN 
SCOTLAND. WITH THE "DATE WHEN LIVING. 

Date when living. 

Fer.i'-us, of Caledonia, first King of the Scots A. D. 500 

Baion Fergus, of Athol 1200 

Walter Fergus, Baron of Crichie 1300 

William Fergus, Baron of Crichie 

William Ferguson, Officer in the English Army in the Reign of 

Charles 1 1600 

William Ferguson, of Badifurrow, Public Official 1625 

George F'erguson, of Old Meldrum, Factor of the Duke of Perth 1650 

Robert Ferguson, of Old Meldrum, Lieutenant in tne English Army, 

in Oueen Ann's Reign, and Pioneer to America 1675 



CHIEF SEAT OF THE CLAN, 

The chief seat of the Fergusons as a Highland clan was undoubtedly 
in Athol, where they are placed in the map of the clans and where was 
the residence of their recognized chief. When the roll was made up in 
the year before the Spanish armada sailed on its great enterprise, the 
Chiefship was in the ancient family of Dunfallandy, long designed as of 
Derculich, whose head appears as Baron Ferguson and as the Laird of 
Ferguson in State documents. The date of the original settlement of the 
Fergusons in Athol is lost in the mists of the distant past. The house of 
Dunfallandy is undoubtedly of very great antiquity, and it is recognized 
in the district as one of the oldest territorial families. A tradition has 
been handed down in one of the Ferguson families of the district to the 
effect that the common ancestor of their stock and of the house of Dun- 
fallandy had fled from Ayrshire to the North in the year 1329 and was of 
the family of Kilkerran. 

The Baledumid tradition is that their race was originally of the stock 
of Craigdarroch, in Dumfrieshire. In the male line, as representing 
Ballyoukan, they seem to be descended from an Aberdeenshire man, so 
it is probable that the clan had been established in the district at a much 
earlier period. 

In the Thirteenth century Duncan, son of Fergus, witnessed a char- 
ter of Malise, Earl of Strathearn. 

In the twenty-fifth year of King James V., Robert Ferguson, of Der- 
culich, had to make legal process to recover a large number of charters 
and other writs which had been retained from him, though he claimed 
them as heir of his nephew, the Baron of Downey, and among these 
was specified a charter of our most noble predecessor. King John, to 
Adam Ferguson, of the Lands of Cluny. Now the only King John known 
to Scottish analists is King John Balliol. and this at once carries us back 
to the year 1200. 

The Clan Ferguson were probably among the gallant Atholerians who followed the banner 
of Montrose in the Civil wars, and formed the original nucleus, of the victorious Cavalier 
army. They are stated to have joined Viscount Dundee's army, immediately after Killiecrankie, 
and many allusions in the extracts from public documents and private papers which follow 
show that they formed an important part of the fighting strength of the Dukedom of Athol and 
Earldom of Strathardle. 

The descent of the Dunfallandy family can be substantially, if not absolutely, traced from a 
generation which had passed away before 1489, to the present time, but even at the date when 
it can first be identified in the State documents it was, according to the local tradition of the dis- 
trict, an old family, and corroboration is to be found in the documents that are described. 



THE SCOTTISH BRANCH. 



CHAPTER I. 

THE CLAN AND NAME OF FERGUSON. 

Taken from an address of James Ferguson, of Kinmundy , Scotland, before 
the Ferguson Historical Society, 

The above title has been selected for the following notes, because I 
have felt the difficulty of defining, in the case of a surname of undoubted 
Celtic origin, but of frequent occurrence in the Low Country, how much 
should be included in the term Clan. If it was clearly of Saxon deriva- 
tion, and taken from an occupation, as Baxter or Baker, Webster, 
Wright and many others which can easily be imagined, there was no 
presumption of a common origin or clan connection with others similarly 
designed. However, if it was a clan name, and especially if it were one 
of the recognized Highland patronymics, there was a presumption in 
favor of a common origin, recognized by the official guardians of gene- 
ology and its hand-maid, heraldry, in Scotland. 

It must on the other hand be admitted that we Fergusons are, I fear, 
"a broken clan," and that the traces of our common ancestor are at least 
indistinct. 

The seat of the Fergusons, as a Highland clan, recognized among the 
Septs, was almost in the center of Scotland, in Athol, and on the banks 
of the Isla. But as the name has been found certainly from the days of 
the War of Independence, in Aberdeenshire in the north, and in Ayrshire 
and Dunfriesshire in the south, I think you will agree with me that it is 
safest, as well as most accurate, to follow the example of the old chron- 
icler of the House of Forbes, and to embrace what fragments of tradition 
and history we can recover, under the correct and comprehensive title of 
the "Clan and Name of Ferguson." 

My aim is, therefore, to submit to you, what I have been able to find 
in books about the Fergusons as a Clan, to supplement it by some 
general notes, indicating the leading families of the name who appear in 
local history, and to add a few facts about individuals who may have 
done some service to their country, and some credit to their name, 



10 

The names of Fergus, MacFhearghusa, or Ferguson, are really the 
saiue, and indeed down to two centuries ago, the forms Fergus and Fer- 
guson were used indiscriminately in some families. The name is some- 
times derived from feargachus, wrathful, or of a fiery disposition, fearg 
in Gaelic signifying anger, or wrath, and feargach.one of bold, irascible, 
haughty, or imperious temper. According to Logan, it is a personal 
appellation, in its secondary sense implying a hero, but primarily signi- 
fying a spearman, or heavily armed warrior, among the Highlanders. 

"The name," says that author, "may vie with any in point of 
antiquity and honor, for who has not heard of the renowned Fergus, the 
founder of Scotland's monarchy?" 

We shall not insist on the existence oi the first of the name, whose 
era is placed 300 years before the advent of Christ ; it is a matter of no 
slight pride to be able to authenticate the reign of a second prince who 
flourished 1300 years ago. The Kinglet of Dalriada was formed in the 
north of Ireland in 210, when the Scots had been forced to abandon their 
native isle, and in 503 Fergus, the son of the then King, came over to 
Argyle and re-established their dominion in Caledonia. From him, as 
the first and most distinguished of his name, the Fergusons assert their 
origin, a descent in which "the most noble of the land may glory." 

Logan may not be absolutely accurate as to the precise year of the 
arrival of the historic King Fergus, which later historians place in 498 
A. D. 

The Irish pedigrees also deduce "the stem of the Ferguson family" 
from the old royal race of Ireland, and subsequently of Scotland. In 
Hart's Irish Pedigrees the Septs are traced, not from "Fergus the First, 
absolute King of Scotland of the Milesian race," as he is termed in the 
annals of the Four Masters, but from his uncle, another Fergus. 
"Fergus," says Hart, "a son of Eoghan, who is No. 88 of the O'Neill of 
Tyrone pedigree, was the ancestor of MacFearghusa, anglicised Mac- 
Fearghus, Fergus, and Ferguson. Eoghan was the son of Niall Mor, or 
said to be the 126th Monarch of Ireland. From Fergus his son (No. 89) 
the generations are given by name down to No. 105, Fearghus, and No. 
106, his son, Aodh MacFearghusa, the Fergus who founded the line of our 
Scottish Kings, the deep attachment of their people to whom is so 
quaintly expressed by the old Covenanter Baillie, when he says: "Had 
our throne been void, and our voices sought for the filling of Fergus's 
chair, we had died ere any other hadsittend own on that fatal marble but 
Charles alone." 

It is curious that the Scottish and Irish traditions should agree so nearly 
in deducing the Ferguson stock from the old Royal House of Ireland. The 



11 

name was undoubtedly a favorite one among the Scots, though it is also 
found among the Picts, and it may perhaps be interesting to quote the 
physical characteristics of the true Milesian race, in opposition to the 
other elements of the Irish population, from a passage taken from an old 
book, and preserved in O'Curry's "Memoirs and Customs of the Ancient 
Irish:" "Every one who is white of skin, brown of hair, bold, honor- 
able, daring, prosperous, bountiful in the bestowal ot property, wealth 
or rings, and who is not afraid ot battle or combat, they are the descend- 
ants of the sons of Miledh in Erin." 

We may, I think, conclude that the original stock of Fergusons was 
of the unmixed Scottish race. In Scotland the Clan, if not a numerous 
one, is certainly very widely spread. 

The late Dr. MacLachlan, an eminent authority on Celtic tradition 
and literature, once told me that he had come across old women of the 
name living in Highland huts, whose circumstances were of the poorest, 
but who rejoiced in pedigree which put to shame not only the best 
Norman descent, but even the blood of many Chiefs of Highland Clans. 
The Tartan of the clan is one of the most beautiful of all of the Scottish 
Tartans, the set being a dark purple blue, traversed by black and green 
bands, and upon the green a sprainge, or white strip edged with black, 
and two red stripes, one on either side of the white. A badge given by 
the books is the little sun-flower (a rock rose). I have, however, heard 
it said that the poplar was used as a badge. 

In a volume entitled, " Mclan's Costumes of the Clans in Scotland," 
illustrated by James Logan, a figure is introduced, called a Spearman, 
clad in one of the oldest garments peculiar to the Celts. This was called 
the Leincroich, or saffron colored shirt, which was the habit of peo- 
ple of distinction, and, as its name imports, was dyed of a yellow color 
from that plant. This vestment resembled a very ample belted plaid, of 
saffron colored linen, being fastened around the middle, and was formed 
of sufficient breadth to fall below the knees when so required. The 
usual number of yards which it contained was twenty-four, but there 
was sometimes more. The Leincroich was not peculiar to the Fergusons, 
but was worn by gentlemen of every clan. 

'J'he arms which are always given as those of the clan, are the silver 
buckle and the golden boar-heads upon a blue field, borne by the house 
of Kilkerran, and with appropriate differences by the Aberdeenshire 
families. The earliest entry I can find in the "Lyon Register," of arms 
of families now represented bearing the boar-heads, is that of Major 
Ferguson, of Balmakelly, in 1691. Those of Kilkerran are entered in 
1719, and those of Pitfour, between 1734 and 1755. The Fergusons 



12 

also, in some instances, carry a lion, as Craigdarroch. To this class of 
bearings belong those of Raith and Spittalhaugh. The Craigdarroch 
arms are registered in 1673, and those of the descendants of the famous 
divine, David Ferguson, who bandied witticisms with the Scottish 
Solomon, which show the boar-heads, between 1672 and 1678. 

It has been stated that the clan MhicFhearguis of Athol, along with 
the MacDiarmids of Glenlyon, are admitted by all authorities to be the 
oldest clan known in the Highlands The vicinity of Dunkeld and the 
confines of Perth and Forfar were undoubtedly their special habitat as a 
Highland clan. It is interesting to compare the numbers of the clan with 
those of other well known Scottish surnames. The most numerous 
name both in England and Scotland is Smith. In a report submitted 
by the Registrar-General in 1869 some interesting statistics were given 
of Scottish nomenclature. It was estimated that in 1863 there were 
44,268 Smiths, 36,624 Macdonalds, 30,212 Campbells, 14,476 Fergusons, 
10,444 McGregors, and 9,520 Gordons. 

The Laird of Ferguson appears among the roll of landit men, drawn 
up in 1590. On the 11th of November, 1590, caution was given by Sir 
John Murray of Tullibardin, for certain men in Athol, among whom 
was John Ferguson of Darcloch, alias Baroun Fergussoun, that they 
should find the required caution by the 10th of December next. 

It is recorded of the name in Perthshire that the Fergusons always 
followed the Earls of Athol, and that in battle of Inverlochy, in 1347, 
between the Earls of Athol and Mar, Baron Ferguson and 260 of his 
clan fought with great bravery. 

"At a recent excavation at the old historical place known as Tara- 
Hill, where generations of Irish Kings held their seats, an old banqueting 
hall was uncovered, 360 ft. long, and 40 ft. wide, capable of seating a 
thousand of Ireland's nobles, and in the great depression which marks 
its site is the great stone chair on which the proud monarchs of early 
Erin were seated, with golden crowns on their heads and golden chains 
across their arms. Warriors, with bright bared swords in their hands, 
lined the walls. The tombs of the Irish warriors, who fell in battle 
against the barbarian invaders, have been unearthed, and the dust of the 
sleepers has been scattered to the winds." 

The oldest manuscript in Ireland, preserved in Dublin, has a careful 
description of Tara. During the time it remained the seat of royalty, 
136 pagan and six Christian kings reigned in its hall. 

It was abandoned in 565, but has ever since been enshrined in the 
national affections as a reminder of Ireland's faded glories. 




TARA HILL, IRELAND, 

Where generations of Irish Kings held their seats. One Inmdred and 
thirty-six Pagan and six Christian Kings reigned in its halls. The stone 
at the right is the Lia Fail, or Stone of Destiny. The monument is St, 
Patrick, Ireland's Patron Saint. 



13 



CHAPTER II. 
IN SUPPORT OF TRADITIONS. 

It is interesting- to consider what probable confirmation is afforded to 
these traditions, by what is known as to the early history of the families 
referred to, and by the historical facts recorded about the Battle of 
Inverurie. 

Highland traditions describe the clan Ferguson, known to the bards 
as having from time immemorial claimed to be the most ancient clan 
known in the Highlands, a claim which the old clans of the district have 
never disputed, the second place being given to the old McDiarmids of 
Glenlyon; and the universal tradition being that they, the Fergusons of 
Athol, are descended from King Fergus the First. Curiously enough, the 
only modern clan name recognized in the ancient Irish tract on the Men 
of Alban, which describes the descendants of Fergus Mor, the founder of 
the Monarchy of the Scots, is that given where it says: "Here branch oE 
the clan Fegus a Gail, the son of Eachach Buidhe, son of Aidan, (the 
warrior King for whom his kinsman Columba prayed), and great-grand- 
son of Fergus Mor, the leader of the Scottish Dalriads." Among the 
descendants of Lorn, brother of Fergus Mor, also appear the cinel Fergus 
Salach, and while the armed muster of the cinel Lorn is stated at 700 
men, it includes the cinel Fergus, 60 houses. It has been said that, in 
Robert Bruce's time, the Fergusons owned every third ridge in Athol. 
Coming to more tangible elements than the mists of early Celtic centuries 
afford, it is remarkable to find that in times when Heraldry was still 
regarded as a true outward and visible sign of an actual and common 
origin, the arms borne by the house of Derculich, and Dunfallandy in 
Athol, by that of Kilkerran in Ayrshire, and by those of Kinmundy and 
Pitfour in Aberdeenshire, were the silver buckle and three gold boar- 
heads on an azure field; while the Fergusons of Craigdarroch, in Dum- 
friesshire, whom the tradition of their own neighborhood has described 
as the oldest family in Scotland, and between whom and the northern 
Fergusons no legend of original kinship exists, had quite different bear- 
ings, the principal change being the azure lion rampant of the old Celtic 
Princes of Galloway. In Athol and Ayrshire there are also links with 
the fortunes of King Robert First; and the first undoubted charter of 
the House of Kilkerran was granted in 1466 to Fergus Ferguson. He 
is supposed to have descended from a Ferguson of Fergus, to whom 



14 

King Robert the Bruce gave a charter of Ardrossan. The family of 
Durculich aud Dunfallandy in Athol, whose head appears in 1587 as 
Baron Ferguson in the roll of the clannies on whom the captains 
and chieftians depended, and in the roll of the landit men drawn 
up in 1590 as the Laird of Ferguson, had a charter of Clunny before 
King Robert's accession, from John Baliol, and charters of Clunny and 
Kinnard from King Robert the Bruce himself. 

It was Strath Trummel, in the Ferguson country, in Athol, with 
whom the King took refuge after the disastrous fight at Methven; and it 
is at least a curious coincidence that the same Celtic family name should 
be established in the Earldom of Athol, with which the King had a con- 
nection by marriage, and whose Earl was executed in his cause; in the 
Earldom of Carrick, in which he succeeded his mother; and in the Earl- 
dom of the Garrioch in the north, which he inherited along with his right 
to the Crown of Scotland from the gallant David, Earl of Huntington 
and Garrioch, whose example as a crusader had been followed by the 
Earls of Athol and Carrick. 

It may be also more than a coincidence that the poet Burns refers to 
the Fergussons of Craigdarroch as a line that had struggled for freedom 
with Bruce; and that another family represented by Sir James R. 
Fergusson, of Spittalhaugh, Peeblesshire, whose arms correspond with 
those of Craigdarroch, held property in Lochmaben, Dumfriesshire, for 
many generations traditionally from the days of Robert the Bruce. 

Lochmaben was the burgh that had grown up around the paternal 
castle of the Bruces of Annandale, and there the King seems to have 
followed a similar policy to that adopted in Inverurie, giving to the 
kindly tenants of Lochmaben perpetual grants of land as at Inverurie. 
Similar possessions of the burgh lands, holding directly of the crown, 
were given to the Fergusons and Bainzies. 

That the Athol Fergusons were on the side of the crown in the stern 
contest with the House of Cumine, is also indicated by another incident. 
A geneology of the Farquharsons (Records of Invercauld) states that 
"Shaw of Rothiemurchus, being dispossessed by Cumin, Lord Strathbogie 
and Badenock, when he was killed, left behind him one son. His relict 
married Baron Farquhanen (Ferguson) in Athol, whose sons when 
come of age, assisted the representatives of the Rothiemurchus family 
with a considerable number of men against the Cumins, killed Cumin 
himself and most part of his retinue between Rothiemurchus and 
Strathbogie, in a place since called Lag n' Cuminich, or the Cumin's 
grave. Cumin was then a rebel against King Robert Bruce." 

Shaw, in his "History of Moray," tells the same story, stating how- 



IS 

ever, that the dispossessed Shaw "had married a daughter of Baron 
Fergusson in Athol;" and that the younger Shaw, whom the Fergussons 
assisted, and who in later life is said to have commanded the thirty 
champions of the clan Chattan in the famous combat on the North Inch 
of Perth, "by a daughter of Macpherson of Clunie, had seven sons, 
James, the eldest, Farquhar, ancestor of the Farquharsons," etc. It is 
remarkable that Duncan Macpherson, of Clunie, in the time of Robert 
Bruce, "had, for his special services against the Cumins, a hand and 
dagger added to his armorial bearings;" that "the hand and dagger" in 
the Farquharson arms was certified by the Lord Lyon in 1687 as 
commemorating "one of his predecessors, called Shaw of Rothiemurchus, 
killing Cumin of Stratbogie at Lag n' Cuminich;" and that the crest of 
the Fergusons of Dunfallandy is a hand holding a dagger. 

Two other pieces of evidence in support of the old tradition are 
furnished from Athol. In a manuscript of the 18th century it is 
recorded that in the middle of the 17th century, upon the male line of the 
Fergusons of Balyoukan failing, the clan sent to Aberdeenshire for a 
Ferguson to marry the heiress. She died without issue, and the land 
passed from him to his children by a second marriage. "But Balyoukan" 
Cnow represented by Mr. Ferguson of Balemund) , saysAdam Fergusson, 
late minister of Molin, writing in 1773, "considers himself and is 
considered by all the clan in Athole as the family of which Baron 
Fergusson is the stem." 



16 



CHAPTER III. 
ROBERT BRUCE THE KING AND THE FERGUSONS, 

In a manuscript written by Walter Ferguson, writer in Edinburgh in 
1787, it is stated tliat "when King Robert Bruce marched his army 
north to suppress a formidable rebellion, he lodged at Crichie, belonging 
to Walter Fergus, who with his three sons went with the King to battle 
at the town of Inverurie, where he gained a complete victory; and 
Walter Fergus for his loyalty and bravery, got a grant of considerable 
lands in the neighborhood, of which his descendants have been possessed 
ever since; and at this moment I retain a part which at my death will 
belong to your father." From the above battle of Inverurie, 1308, the 
estates of Crichie and the lands of Inverurie continued in the family of 
Walter Fergus from father to son till after 1640, when the heir, having 
raised a troop of horse on his own expense and joined King Charles I.'s 
army, was by this and the other misfortunes of the times reduced and 
obliged to sell the estate of Crichie; and William Fergus, his son, after 
the King's restoration, 1660 (in fact, 1665), purchased a small estate 
called Badyfurrow, near Inverury. 

In another document in possession of a branch of the family settled 
in Poland towards the end of the 18th century, the tradition was 
similarly given that "Walter of Crichie received hospitably in his own 
house the great avenger of his country, King Robert Bruce, setting out 
into that part of the kingdom to curb the rebels; and with his three sons 
and dependents in the memorable battle of Inverury in the j^ear 1308, 
afforded ready and manly aid, on account of which distinguished assist- 
ance. King Robert Bruce gave him ample possessions of the adjacent 
lands of Inverury. 

"Previousto this battle, Bruce was taken with a serious illness, and was 
slowly wasting away. His ever faithful followers became alarmed. If 
the King died, the hope of Scotland was lost. 

"On coming to the river Don, a council was held and a decision 
rendered, that the King must go to the seaside, although it would be 
attended with great danger from the vigilant hoards of England. 

"While being surrounded by his loyal Knights, tidings arrived that his 
great enemies, Buchan and Comyn, had taken advantage of the King's 
illness and had already driven in the out-posts; some of them had been 
slain. This attack aroused the spirits of Bruce and he immediate^ 



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lURU S EYE VIEW UF INVERURIE, AND THE RI\ER DON, 



17 

called for his war horse and arms, and ordered his men to prepare for 
battle. His friends protested against this effort; but Bruce declared to 
them that his enemies had cured him. Heading his troops he came upon 
the enemy between Inverury and Old Meldrum, and after a desperate 
tight, Buchan and his confederates were defeated. Bruce now marched 
into the territory of Comyn, and laid waste the whole country by fire and 
sword, the very forests being destroyed." 

The same manuscript states, with some flourish of language, that his 
descendant, Wm. Ferguson, "flourished with military reputation in the 
17th century, nor with less devotion toward the King, as Colonel of a 
squadron of horse did he stand in battle for King Charles I., against 
the impious and rebellious citizens in 1648. ' ' As Walter Ferguson records 
that "five of the family at one time were officers in the army of Gustavus 
Adolphus in Germany, and one of them rose to be a General," it is very 
probable that his eldest brother, and perhaps Bradifurrow himself, had 
brought experience gained in the Swedish service in the "thirty years" 
war to the banner of their own Sovereign. Both sides in the civil war 
relied greatly on the military skill of Scottish officers trained in the Low 
Countries and "Hie Germanie." 

In another letter dated in 1786, Walter Ferguson stated: "The family 
of the Fergusons in the Garioch were for many years preceding the 17th 
century proprietors of the lands of Crichie, and particularly were so in 
1308, when King Robert Bruce came to that corner and lodged at the 
house of Crichie, from which he marched and fought the battle of 
Inverury. But at what time they sold the lands of Crichie I cannot 
say, nor am I possessed of any writings concerning these plans. 

"This intelligence I had from my father, a remarkable geneologist and 
antiquarian, and I remember particularly the first time I heard it was in 
the summer of 1730, when passing the lands of Crichie on our road to 
Fetternear to witness the interment of James Leslie, Esq., of Balquhain, 
whose corpse was brought from France to be buried in his own burial place 
there. At diflierent times afterwards my father repeated the same history 
of our family being possessed of the lands of Crichie. In the year 1730 I 
was about 16 years of age, and my father died in the year 1753." 

Among the Pitfour manuscripts is the following curious memorandum , 
written by a George Scott, who had succeeded his father as town clerk of 
Inverurie, had a double matrimonial connection with the Fergusons, and 
in his old age had settled in Buchan: 

"George Scott remembers to have seen the bed in the house of Stone- 
house that belonged in property to John Ferguson, Bailie of Inverury, 
where King Robert Bruce lay in a fever before the Battle of Barra. It 



18 

was a plain wainscot bed, with an inscription on the front of it in large 
alphabets of an unknown character to the vulgar. It was in this bed the 
King seed the spider crawl up the back post, which he considered a good 
omen, and immediately thereafter marched off with his army that were 
then lying on the burrow Muir of Inverury to meet the Cumines, who 
were then on the hill of Barra, and prevailed against them." This is 
signed by George Scott, Pitfour, Sth of November, 1788. 

The ti-adition I have always heard is that this bed belonged to a 
Ferguson at the time the King lay in it, and that after the battle he gave 
this Ferguson, who forded the water before him, some land about 
Inverurie as a recom[)eiise, of which part now belongs to Mr. Ferguson 
of Pitfour, and Mr. Walter Ferguson, G. S. 

In the "Records of Argyle," Lord Archibald Campbell, in giving the 
Aryllshire legend of Bruce and the spider, mentions that the incident is 
also handed down as having happened at Inverurie in Aberdeenshire. 



19 



CHAPTER IV. 
LOCATION OF THE FERGUSON FAMILIES. 

Let us now look more in detail at the various families of the name 
who appear in our Scottish records. It is a very curious fact that, while, 
so far as I have been able to ascertain, no definite link of connection can 
be traced between them, four families, found located respectively in 
Dumfriesshire, in Ayrshire, in Perthshire, and in Aberdeenshire, all 
cherished independent traditions, connecting their fortunes with King- 
Robert the Bruce. 

Our national poet, Robert Burns, describes the Fergussons of 
Craddarroch as "a line that has struggled for freedom with Bruce." 

King Robert the Bruce granted a charter of land in Ayrshire to 
"Fergusio Filio Fergusii," who was the ancestor of the family of Kil- 
kerran. The representative of one of the Perthshire families once 
informed me that his family possesses charters dating also from the days 
of King Robert. 

The Aberdeenshire families of Piifour and Kinmundy, and I believe 
another now represented by the Rev. .lohn Ferguson, the Dean of Moray, 
trace their descent from a family established in the Garioch for more than 
300 years prior to the Civil Wars of the 17th century, which is said co 
have received possessions there from King Robert on account of services 
rendered to him when he defeated the Comyns at the battle of Inverurie 
in 1308. 

A curious old document narrates that "one Walter Fergus or Fergu- 
son of Chichie received hospitably in his own house the great avenger of 
his country, King Robert Bruce, setting out in that part of the country 
to curb the rebels, and with his sons and dependents in the memorable 
battle of Inverurie, in the year 1308, afforded ready and manly aid." 
Whatev^er may be the value of this document, the tradition was firmly 
held by various branches of the family in existence in the last century, 
that the connection of their ancestors with Inverurie and the vicinity went 
back to the period of the War of Independence; and that they fought at 
the battles both of Inverurie and of Harlaw. The name is frequently 
found in the old records of the locality; and when the Marquis of Huntly, 
the King's lieutenant in the north, hoisted the royal standard at 
Inverurie during the troubles in 1644, he staid in the house of the William 
Ferguson from whom most of the Aberdeenshire families claim descent, 



20 

and who subsequently represented Inverurie in the Scottish Parh'ainent of 
1661. 

The lordship of the Garioch had descended to the Bruces of Annan- 
dale, from their ancestor, David, Earl of Huntingdon and Garioch, the 
brother of King William the Lion, through whom they claimed the 
Scottish crown; and before the battle of Inverurie King Robert was rest- 
ing on his own estates. 

The policy which he pursued was to settle his supporters upon the 
forfeited lands of his opponents, and he planted many families from 
the south in the north. vSuch were the Irvins of Drum, the Burnetts of 
Crathes, as well as the noble houses of Gordon, Keith, and Hay. The 
name Johnstone was common in the Bruce country in Annandale, and 
is also found in the Garioch. Not a few of King Robert's followers bore 
Celtic names, and it is possible that the Ferguses or Fergusons followed 
the Bruces to the north before, or at least did so when every available 
i^assal had to be brought to combat the great house of Comyn. 

It is very probable that the race crossed over from Scottish Dalriaqa 
to Carrick; spread to Dumfriesshire on the one hand, and northward on 
the other; followed the banner of the Bruce to the north; profited by the 
forfeiture of the ancient Lords of Athole; and were, as the old tradition 
records, rewarded for good service at the Battle of Inverurie. 



21 

CHAPTER V. 

AYRSHIRE FERGUSONS. 

The Ayrshire Fergusons were located in the south of Scotland. We 
have seen that this family was settled at Kilkerran in the time of Robert 
the Bruce. A later charter was granted by King James Third in 1466 to 
Fergus Ferguson and Jenet Kennedy, his spouse. 

"The family," says Nisbet, "suffered much by their loyalty in the 
reign of King Charles the First. 

"Sir John Ferguson, of Kilkerran, having after he had contracted 
great debts for the service of the King, and had his estates sequestrated 
by the usurper, retired abroad till the restoration; a short time after 
which he died. The present house of Kilkerran are descended from a 
younger son of this Sir John; the elder branch, the Fergussons of 
Auchinblain, having made over their estates in 1700 to their cousin, Sir 
John Ferguson, who had a distinguished and fortunate career at the 
Scottish bar. His family, upon the extinction of the elder branch, 
became the lineal representatives. In 1703 he was created a baronet, and 
his son. Sir James, followed his profession with even greater distinction. 
He became a member for the County of Southerland in 1734, was a 
compiler of Kilkerran's decisions, and in 1735 was raised to "The Bench" 
as Lord Kilkerran, being regarded as one of the ablest lawyers of his 
time. His eighth son also became a judge, under the title of Lord Her- 
mand. He is described as one of the last of the old race of Scottish 
advocates, and his vast store of anecdotes, and amusing stories, with a 
vein of dry, caustic humor peculiarly his own, rendered his society most 
fascinating. He died in 1827. His elder brother, Sir Adam Fergusson, 
represented Ayrshire for eighteen years, and the city of Edinburgh for 
four; and in the present head of the family the name of Fergusson is 
represented, not only in parliament, but in the government of the 
Queen." 

In Ayrshire there were also the Fergussons of Monkwood, one of 
whom was the author of "Useful Works on Certain Departments of 
Scottish Law;" while another, John Fergusson, of Doonholm, an enter- 
prising Indian merchant, left a bequest which was the germ of the 
Ayr Academy. 

Among other men of the name, who by their actions or writings 
have benefited their generation and maintained the credit of their clan, 



22 

was James Fergusson, minister of Kilwinning, in Ayrsiiire, from 1643 to 
1667, who was sprung from the house of Kilkerran, and is described as "a 
man of eminent piety, much admired for his great and singular wisdom 
and prudence, being reckoned one of the wisest men in the nation, most 
fit to be a counselor to any Monarch in Europe;" John Fergusson, of 
Cairnbrock, born in 1787, died in 1856, was the founder of the Fergusson 
bequest fund; also William G. Fergusson, born in 1633, died in 1690, was 
a painter of still life, who spent most of his years in Holland; William 
Fergusson, born in 1820 was a botanistand entomologist, who pursued his 
researches in Ceylon; William Fergusson, M. D., was born in Ayr, became 
Inspector General of military hospitals, and wrote some useful medical 
treatises; his son, James Fergusson, was an eminent writer on archaeology 
and architecture. 




Courtesv of McClure's Magazine. 



MAXWELTON HOUSE. 



23 

CHAPTER VI. 
DUMFRIESSHIRE FERGUSSONS. 

The Dumfriesshire Fergnssons were located in the south of Scotland. 

This family also were among the followers of Bruce. 

Nisbet records having seen a charter granted to John Fergusson, 
undated, but from the names of the witnesses, it must be referred to the 
earlier half of the 14th century. In 1717 the representative of the family 
married Annie, daughter of Sir Wm. Laurie, of Maxwelton, whose 
unsuccessful suitor, Douglas of Fingland, composed the original song of 
"Annie Laurie." Their descendant, Alexander. Fergusson, of Craig- 
darroch, "famous for wit, worth and law," was the hero of Burns's ballad 
of the Thistle. 

His son, Robert Cutler Fergusson, went to the English bar, and 
being concerned in the escape of some persons charged with treason in 
the closing years of the last century, was tried and sentenced to a year's 
imprisonment. He afterwards went to Calcutta, became the head of 
the bar there, and returned in 1826 to this country. He was elected 
member for Kirkcudbright, appointed Judge Advocate General in 1834, 
and died in 1838. 

The story of Annie Laurie from Frank Pope Humphrey follows: 

Most people suppose that Annie Laurie is a creation of the song 
writer's fancy, or perhaps some Scotch peasant girl, like Highland Mary, 
as are most of the heroines of Robert Burns. In either case they are 
mistaken. 

Annie Laurie was bornin the purple, so to speak, at Maxwelton House, 
in the beautiful glen of the Cairn — Glencairn. Her home was in the heart of 
the most pastorally lovely of Scottish shires, that of Drumfries. She was 
born December 16, 1682. Her father was Sir Robert Laurie, First Baronet, 
and her mother vvas Jean Riddell. Maxwelton House was originally the 
castle of the Earls of Glencairn. It was bought in 1611 by Stephen 
Laurie, the founder of the Laurie family. This castle was partially 
burned in the last century, but the great tower is incorporated in the new 
house, and also a considerable portion of the old walls was built in. The 
picture shows the double windows of the tower. In places its walls are 
twelve feet thick. The lower room is a gun room, and the little 
room above that in the next story is alwaj's spoken of in the family as 
Annie Laurie's room. This room of Annie's has been opened into the 



24 

drawing room, by taking down the wall and forms a charming alcove, its 
stone ceiling showing its great age. In the dining room, a fine, large 
apartment, is again found the old wall, six feet thick. In this room hang 
the portraits of Annie Laurie and her husband, Alexander Ferguson, 
being half-length life size. Annie's hair was dark brown, with full dark 
eyes, the nose long and straight, under lip full; a true Scotch face; a 
type to be seen in any Scotch town; she is in an evening dress of white 
satin; she wears no jewels but the pearls in her hair. 

Alexander Ferguson, the husband of Annie Laurie, has a handsome, 
youthful face, with dark eyes and curling hair. His coat is brown, and 
his waist-coat blue, embroidered with gold; and he wears abundant lace 
in the charming old fashion. 

It was at Maxwelton House, Annie's birthplace, that I came across 
the missing link in the chain of evidence, that fixes the authorship of the 
song upon Douglas, of Fingland. Douglas was a somewhat near 
neighbor of Annie. 

The Fergusons are a much older family, as families are reckoned, 
than the Lauries. 

The Fergusons of Craigdarrock were attached to the courts of William 
the Lion, and Alexander the Second, 1214 to 1249. 

The present proprietor of JVIaxwelton House is Sir Emilius Laurie, 
formerly rector of St. John's, Paddington, where he was known as Sir 
Emilius Bayley. He took the name of Laurie, when he succeeded to 
the family estates. Sir Emilius is a descendant of Sir Walter, Third 
Baronet and brother of Annie. The music of the song is modern, and 
was composed by Lady John Scott, aunt by marriage of the present 
Duke of Buccleuch. 

Maxweltoq House sets high upon its braes, painted white, and built 
around three sides of a sunny court. Ivy clambers thriftily about it. 
Over the entrance of the door of the tower, and above the window of the 
opposite wing, are inserted two marriage stones, the former of Annie's 
father and mother,, the latter of her grandfather and grandmother. They 
are about two feet square. The initials of the bride and groom, and the 
date of the marriage are cut upon them, together with the family coat of 
arms. Below the grandfather's marriage stone, is cut in the lintel the 
following: "Except the Lord build the house, they labor in vain who 
build it." 

Looking up the glen from Maxwelton, the chimneys of Craigdarrock 
House are seen, at a distance of about five miles; and Annie had not far 
to remove from her father's house, to that of her husband. She was 
twenty-eight at the time of her marriage. Craigdarrock House stands 




ANNIE LAURIE FERGUSON. 

Courtesy of McC lure's Magazine. 




ALEXANDER FERGUSON. 

Courtesy of McClure's Magazine. 



25 

near the foot of one of the three glens whose waters unite to form the 
Grain, the hills drawing together here, and giving an air of seclusion to 
the house and grounds. The house is large and substantial, and lacks 
the picturesqueness of Maxwelton. There is plenty of fine timber on the 
ground; beeches and great firs are especially to be named, ancient 
larches, with knees and elbows like old oaks, given to the proprietor by 
George ihe Second, when the larch was first introduced into Scotland. 

The present proprietor of Craigdarrock is Capt. Robert Ferguson, of 
the fourth generation in descent from Annie Laurie. 

General Sir James Fergusson, G. C. B., born in 1787, died in 1865. 
was a cadet of Craigdarrock, served with honor in the Peninsular war, 
especially distinguishing himself at the storming of Badajoz, and the 
assault of Ciudad Rodrigo, and was afterwards Governor of Gibraltar. 
Napier, in describing the taking of Badajoz, speaks of the hardiness of 
Fergusson of the 43rd, who having in former assaults received two deep 
wounds, was here, his former hurts still open, leading the storraers of his 
regiment, the third time a volunteer, and the third time wounded. 



26 



CHAPTER VII. 

THE FIFESHmE FE%GUSSONS. 

Tlie Fifeshire Fergussons were located in the north of Scotland. 
The present faraily of the name are said to have possessed the estate of 
Raith since 1707. Four of them have represented various local constit- 
uencies in Parliament, and one of them, Sir Ronald Crawford Fergusson, 
was a general officer under the Duke of Wellington, specially distin- 
guished himself at the battles of Rolica and Viraiera, where he com- 
manded a brigade. 

The kingdom of Fife was the home, even if Dundee was the birth- 
place, of the distinguished Scottish divine, the Rev. David Fergusson, 
minister of Dunfermline ("to which charge he was appointed in 1560), 
one of the leading Scottish reformers. He describes himself as " one of 
the six who fir.'Jt put their hands to the work." 

He was a Moderator of the General Assembly in 1573, and again in 
1578, and is said to have been remarkable for his combination of sagac- 
ity, firmness, and knowledge, with a pleasant and humorous disposition, 
which made him a useful representative of the Kirk in negotiations with 
the Court. He is said to have begun the history of the Church of Scot- 
land, which was carried out by his son-in-law. Row, and the perusal of a 
sermon of his by John Knox, upon his death bed, produced the quaint 
and emphatic recommendation from the old reformer, "With my dead 
hand but glad heart praising God that of his mercy he leaves such light 
to his Kirk in this desolation." 

David Fergusson was not a voluminous writer, but he has left some 
ecclesiastical publications, which have been printed by the Bannatyne 
Club. He was the author of the first collection ot Scottish proverbs, for 
which he had a great liking and it was said that he both spoke and 
preached in proverbs. 

It is, however, by his wise and witty observation, especially when 
interviewing King James, that he is best known. It was he that gave to 
the bishops appointed, while the revenues of the Sees were drawn by lay- 
men, the name of " Tulchan bishops," and who answered King James, 
when he asked why the master of Grays house shook during the night, 
"Why should the Devil not rock his ain bairns?" 

He describes the proposals for the reintroduction of Epi.scopacy, as 
like "the busking of the brave horse, or the over-throw of Troy." In an 
interview with the King, referring to the feuds that were prevalent, he 



observed that it was the surnames that made all the commotion. "If 
you go to surnames," he said, jocularly, " I will reek with the best of 
you in antiquity, for King Fergus was the first King in Scotland, and I 
am Fergus's son; but always, Sir, because you are an honest man, and 
have the possession, I will give you my right." This, it is said, put 
King James in a good humor, and he exclaimed, "See, will you hear 
him?" 

The Robert Fergusson who represented Inverkeithing in the Parlia- 
ment of 1572 and 1587, was very probably a relative of his. It is interest- 
ing to trace, if not a blood connection, yet a link as strong as that of 
adoption, which, in the days of old Rome, connected the elder and the 
younger Scipios, between this old reformer and other distinguished men 
of his name. 

The last male descendant of the minister of Dunfermline was Mr. 
David Fergusson, Minister at Strickmartin, whose arms were registered 
between 1672 and 1678, who was one of the Episcopal ministers ejected at 
the Revf)lution, and who died shortly after. 

In the memoirs of Mr. Adam Ferguson, minister at Logierait, he 
stated that he, when a young man, was recommended to Mr. David 
Fergusson, "who had considerable stock in money, but who had no child 
to enjoy it, except a brother's daughter, and being very clannish, was 
very much inclined to be beneficial to any of the name of Fergusson that 
were thought capable of liberal education, especially after his only son 
was lost on the ice in the north Loch, at Edinburgh." Mr. David Fer- 
gusson was thus drowned on the 11th of February, 1682. 

Owmg largely to David Fergusson 's influence, a connection of whom 
was his Professor, "and did reckon Mr. Adam his relation that way," 
Mr. Adam made a good start in life. 

Adam Fergusson 's parents are said to have descended from tlie Fer- 
gussons of Dunfallandy, an old family in Athole. 

It is said that they had for generations pursued the vocation of 
smiths, an honorable one in a Highland village, "the first of them being 
John, son of Fergusson of Drumachoir, who was at the Battle of Pinkie, 
and relieved Stuart of Balnakeillie from five Englishmen that were 
assaulting him." Adam was subsequently settled at Crathie, and after- 
wards at Logierait and was the leader of the Synod of the party opposed 
to the Erskines, at the time of the first secession. The youngest son of 
the young man whom the descendant of the reformer had befriended, was 
Dr. Adam Ferguson, the famous Professor of Moral Philosophy in 
Edinburgh. 

Dr. Adam Ferguson, born in 1724, died in 1816, was the youngest of 



28 

his family. He is said to have changed the spelling of his name by omit- 
ting the second "s" on the ground that it was unnecessary, and therefore 
unworthy of a philosopher. 

When a young man, he was appointed Chaplain of the Black Watch, 
(the 42nd. Highlanders), recently raised, on account of his knowledge of 
Gaelic, and at the Battle of Fontenoi is said to have seized a broad sword 
and insisted, in spite of his commanding officer, on charging with the 
regiment. 

He was for some time Professor of Natural Philosophy, and after- 
wards of Moral Philosophy in the University of Edinburgh; and was 
selected by the government as Secretary to the Reconciliation Commis- 
sion, which was sent out to America during the Revolutionary War. His 
principal works were the History of the Roman Republic, The Essay on 
Civil Society, Institutes of Moral Philosophy, and The Principles of 
Moral and Political Science. 

Perhaps we may trace a touch of the clannish feeling which had done 
so much for his father, in his Memoir of Colonel Patrick Ferguson, the 
young officer from Aberdeenshire, who fell at King's Mountain. The 
friend of Adam Smith, Hume, Blair, and Gibbon, Adam Ferguson was 
one of the best known figures in the intellectual society of Edinburgh. 

A most interesting description of him is given by Lord Cockburn, in 
his memoirs. He had a severe illness when in his SOth year, but strict 
care, and a vegetarian diet enabled him to live for nearly fifty more. At 
72, he set ofT in a strange sort of carriage with no companion but his 
servant James, to visit Italy for a new addition to his history. He had to 
pass through a good deal of war, but returned in about a year, younger 
than ever. 

In his latter years his life was practically sustained by the great 
interest he took in the great war, and in the words of Sir Walter Scott, 
" The news of Waterloo acted upon this aged patriot as an inspiration." 

His son. Sir Adam Ferguson, was "the intimate friend and country 
neighbor at Huntley Burn," so constantly referred to in Sir Walter Scott's 
journal. He had served in the Peninsula, and Scott is said to have l)een 
greatly pleased on hearing that, when the "Lady of the Lake" first came 
out, Capt. Ferguson, who was with his regiment in the lines of Torres 
Vedras when the work reached him, read the whole description of the 
battle in Canto G to his company, while lying on the ground exposed to 
the fire of the enemy's artillery. Another son was an Admiral, and the 
present representative of the family is the son of the late Dr. Robert 
Ferguson (1799-1865), son of Robert Ferguson of Glen Islay, Perthshire 



29 

(a nephew of the historian), who wrote on natural history and medica] 
subjects, and was for a long time Physician to the Queen. 

James Ferguson, the astronomer, was born in 1710, died in 1776. In 
the Banffshire herd-boy, who studied the stars when in the field by night, 
who is still remembered in our schools as "the boy who made the wooden 
watch," and who for a long time supported himself and his family by 
making portraits in India ink, we have one of the greatest self-taught 
mechanicians that Scotland has produced. His works on mechanics and 
astronomy were numerous, but the most enduring interest in his life is 
found in the charming little auto-biography which recounts his early 
efforts and struggles, and in the domestic calamity that over-shadowed 
his latter years, after he had won fame and honor and had been elected a 
Fellow of the Royal Society of London. A full life of him has been 
published by Henderson, and it may be not uninteresting to note that my 
own family possesses three pictures painted by him about 1740, being 
those of James Ferguson of Kinmundy, his wife, and son. 

Robert Ferguson, born in 1750, died in 1774. If the North country 
astronomer was known as the "Scottish Franklin," we can also claim 
"the fore-runner of Burns." 

Robert Ferguson was the son of William Ferguson, who came orig- 
inally from Tarland in Cromar, Aberdeenshire. 

Curiously enough, the poet also owed his education to a Bursary 
founded at Dundee by Mr. David Ferguson, of Strathmartin, who had 
assisted the father of Adam Ferguson, the philosopher. 

The circumstances of his short and troubled life and his sad and 
solitary end, are well known. It was left to Robert Burns to erect a stone 
to his memory, with the inscription :■ 

"No sculptur'd marble here, nor pompous lay, 

'No storied urn, nor animated bust;' 
This simple stone directs pale Scotia's way 

To pour her sorrows o'er her Poet's dust." 

One cannot fail to be struck with the sensibility, the command of 
language, and the power of versification of Ferguson's poems. It is, 
however, in his Scotch pieces that he is at his best, and perhaps, if it 
had not been for Burns, whose genius he awakened, he would have 
remained a greater popular favorite. 

From poet to piper, is perhaps a natural transition, especially when 
their origin is in the same northern region. 

Donald Ferguson, from Corgarff in Mar, was a cheerful volunteer in 
Prince Charles Edward's array, in 1745. 



30 

When a party of the government troops were made prisoners at 
Keith, Donald was thrown in the skirmish off the bridge into the Isla, 
but kept blowing with vigor, and his inflated bag sustained him until he 
was rescued. He used afterwards to say that so long as he could blow 
up his muckle pipes he should neither die nor drown. 




BASS ROCK, 
rhe Rallying Point for Scotland's Armies. 



31 



CHAPTER VIII. 
THE HISTOW OF INVERURIE, %OYAL '=BURGH, 

The Home of the Ferguson Family of Aberdeenshire, the Ancestors of the American Branch 
of the Ferguson Family. 

Some sixteen miles from Aberdeen, hard by the main line of the 
great North of Scotland Railway, and overlooking the storied waters of 
the Don and the Ury at the point where they commingle, a conical 
mound of verdant sward uprises from a triangular field of forty acres. 
The mound is the "Bass" of prophetic fame, of which "Thomas of 
Ercildoune" has rhymed. 

And the triangular piece of ground is the Stanners. These bear silent 
witness to the conditions of life in the Garioch long before the dawn of 
authentic history. They are, indeed, the starting point of the history of 
Inverurie, and to the geologists the mound speaks of a time, thousands of 
years before the Roman legionaries penetrated the fastnesses of Aberdeen- 
shire. 

According to one theory the Bass is a memorial of the glacial period 
and the "Stanners" is so called on account of the stony nature of the 
ground. The history of Inverurie and the Garioch, as told by antiqua- 
rian finds of the stone age, is that of the history in Britain generally. 
Flints, stone axes, stone circles, cairns, sculptured monoliths, barrows, 
and stone coffins turned up accidentally by the plow share, or unearthed 
by the exertion of the antiquary, are eloquent testimony that the ancient 
inhabitants of Aberdeenshire and the Garioch, and in particular around 
Inverurie, fought and fell, and lived and died, and were buried in much 
the same way as the ancient Britains in other parts of this Island. 

Nor is the unwritten history untinged by the superstitions of pre- 
Christian worship. These lingered after the dawn of Christianity, and 
are to be found embodied in many a place name. 

For centuries after Christianity had been introduced a central portion 
of the "Stanners" was left uncultivated, under the name of the "Good 
man's croft." And according to all historical speculations this was the 
fortress of Inverurie. 

Here, too, passed the Roman iter. Here the Romans must have 
forded the Don on their expedition to Ultima Thule. Here was probably 
the prison and death chamber of the unfortunate Monarch, Eth, where 



32 

Syric, or Guy , defeated him in battle at Strathallan, in August, A. D. 878, 
and down the centuries the Bass was still the rallying point in the making 
of the history of the Garioch, and for the matter of that, of Scotland. 
Before 1176 its slope was crowned by the Castle of Inverurie, the chief 
seat of the Royal Earldom of the Garioch. Malcolm, the son of Bartolf, 
held it as constable for his friend David, Earl of Huntington, and the 
Garioch from whose daughter the Royal houses of Bruce and Stuart and 
the reigning dynasty of Great Britain are all descended. 

The ancient Royal Burgh has indeed been through all the "strut and 
strife," common to the feudal chiefs and families of the district ; has been 
through "the melting pot of history, civil and ecclesiastical.'' It had its 
share of Reformation troubles; it saw the Duke of Cumberland's Red 
Coats filing over the hill of Kintor, and past the southwest corner of the 
Stanners, on their way to Culloden. Long before that, when it was a 
rude hamlet of huts, and its primitive inhabitants supported themselves 
on the produce of the chase, the Eagles of the Roman Legions waved 
over it. 

Still later it came under the influence of Celtic civilization, and Celtic 
Christianization. 

And when the Danes from over the seas attempted to make good 
their footing on the Cruden coast, the rude shock of the tide of invaders 
was felt even in the haughs of the Don and Ury; tor tradition makes the 
name Denysburn, in Keith hall, commemorative of a great defeat inflicted 
upon the Danes at Kinmuick, where a large range of fields bears the 
name of Blair Hussey, or the field of blood; but any historical sketch ot 
Inverurie would be incomplete without reference to the part it played in 
the Scottish War of Independence, and that historic field is perpetuated 
in balad and song, and even by the street names of the ancient burgh, as 
the "Bloody Harlaw." 

It was the year after King Edward's triumphal progress through 
Aberdeenshire that Sir Willam 'Wallace visited Fetternear, where the 
name "Wallace Tower," attached to a portion of the house of Fetternear, 
now removed, commemorates his residence there; and tradition points to 
the Kirkyard of Bourtie as the last resting place of Sir Thomas Delongue- 
villfc, who as a pirate was overmastered by Wallace and became ever 
after the devoted adherent of the Scottish patriot. 

And when Wallace had bled and died for his country, and Robert 
the Bruce had risen to the occasion by throwing off the yoke of the 
usurper, the Garioch was again the theater of many stirring incidents in 
the War of Independence. 

The fugitive King had fared his worst. His wanderings in the west- 



33 

ern Isles had at last come to an end. The turning point in iiis career 
had been reached. Loudon Hill had been fought and won. But it was 
only the thin end of the wedge. Opposition was still rampant; and no- 
where more so than in Buchan, where his arch enemy, the Earl, held 
lordly sway. But in the Garioch and Strathbogie, Bruce found a safe 
refuge. Unfortunately, at Inverurie he was taken ill, and, along 
with his brother, Sir Edward Bruce, he removed to Drumbhide, there to 
await his recovery. The fortunes of Bruce were indeed still at a low ebb. 
With body debilitated by illness and the neighboring province of Buchan 
overrun by the followers of the Comyn, it said much for the strength 
of mind and indomitable will of King Robert that he arose above it all. 

The devotion of his brother. Sir Edward, and the loyalty of Garioch 
and Strathbogie, were indeed bright spots in the lowering clouds of mis- 
fortune. From the fastnesses of Strathbogie the royal party again 
sought the fertile settlement of Inverurie. 

This was iu 1308, and the place names of Bruce's retreat on the lands 
of Crichie (Ferguson) still speak of his sojourn there. 

"Bruce's Camp," is still pointed out on the Hill of Crichie (Fergu- 
son). "Bruce's Cave" is still identified as the indentation in the face of 
a precipitous bank across the Don from Ardtannies; and near the road 
from Kintore to Inverurie a long trench, eight feet deep, was known 
about 1790 as "Bruce's Howe." 

It must have been a picturesque scene that was enacted towards the 
end of 1308. 

Round the litter of the sick King stood groups of his faithful follow- 
ers. Lord James Douglas was there, "he who followed and died by the 
kingly heart among the Moorish hordes." 

Sir Robert Keith, the hereditary Marshal of Scotland, was there, still 
faithful as he had been through all the adverse fortunes of his royal 
master, and forming a bright example for the imitation of his illustrious 
descendant who fell some four or five centuries later at Hochkirchen. 

Sir James de Garoiach, the ancestor of the lords of Caskieben, and 
Thomas de Longueville, now the faithful follower of Bruce, as he had 
been tfie sworn friend of Wallace, were also there. 

A messenger arrived foot hot from the outlying district. His news 
was important. Comyn, Earl of Buchan, with his nephew. Sir David of 
Brechin, and Sir John the Moubra, taking advantage of the King's con- 
dition, were advancing on the Garioch. The effect on the King's con- 
dition was electrical. It was in vain that his followers represented that 
he was not yet recovered. "This their boast has made me hale and fer," 
was the reply. 
5 



34 

The little army was marshalled, and forthwith set in motion. At 
Barra, near the present castle of that name, about three miles from 
Inverurie, Comyn's thousand men were overtaken. A tight both fierce 
and fell ensued. But victory rested with the King; and so sweeping was 
its consequences that he was enabled to carry the war into Buchan, the 
country of the Comyns. 

The battle of Bannockburn was the grand culmination of Bruce's 
fight for freedom, but undoubtedly the battle of Inverurie paved the way 
for the greater victories that followed. It shattered the power of the 
Comyns; it enabled the fugitive king to assume the aggressive; and on 
that account, and also because of the fact that Inverurie and the Garioch 
formed a safe retreat for King Robert the Bruce, the ancient and royal 
burgh must justly be regarded as playing no inconsiderable part in 
securing the independence of Scotland. "Comyn's Camp," the "King's 
Hill," the "King's Burn," and the "King's P'ord," are to this day 
pointed out by the finger of tradition, and the popular imagination has 
invested the battle with a legend similar to that told of the Hays of 
Luncarty and the plough yoke. 

The story goes that in the battle of Inverurie the King received 
valuable support from a farmer named Benzie and his eleven sons, and 
that he rewarded them by dividing a part of the Inverurie lands among 
them. 

For over one hundred years following the battle of Inverurie, the 
history is of feudal wars and the ups and downs of feudal families. 
After the battle of Bannockburn, fifteen years were left to King Robert 
the Bruce to set his Kingdom in order; and Inverurie may be said to have 
profited in common with the rest of Scotland by his wise and strong rule. 
The Earldom of the Garioch had returned to the crown by inheritance; 
and, as a mark of affection and reward, the King bestowed the dignity in 
1326 upon his sister, Christian, widow of the Earl of Mar, then married 
to her third husband, Sir Andrew of Moray; but her descendants by her 
first husband, Gartney, Earl of Mar, became the lords of the Garioch, 
and superiors of the Inverurie and other lands of the earldom. Thusthe 
Earldom of Mar was joined with the Earldom of the Garioch. With the 
death of King Robert in 1329, and the accession of David II., a child of 
four years, Scotland once more "fell upon evil days." Randolph, Earl 
of Moray, who was Warden of Scotland in the minority of David, died in 
1331; and the Scottish parliament elected Donald, Earl of Mar, son of 
the Lady Christian Bruce by her first husband, Gartney, Earl of Mar, 
Warden in his stead. The change from the wise rule of that sturdy 
patriot, the great King Robert, to the administration of one who had spent 



3S 



1192430 



his early years as a prisoner in England, and had given signs of his 
English up-bringing by fighting against his own countrymen under 
Edward II., at Bilaw, was soon apparent. He was called upon to beat 
back the invasion of Edward Baliol at Dupplin, and he paid the penalty 
of his military incompetency. 

Ultimately Scotland was freed for good from the oppression of 
English minions, but her own turbulent nobles were slow to let her gather 
strength. The remaining years of David II., and the reigns of Robert II. 
and Robert III., form a record of internal dissension, of Baron against 
Baron, and even defiance against the King himself. The vacillating 
reigns of Robert II. and Robert III., which gave scope for the intrigues of 
the Regent, Albany, proved an iinhappy enough period for Scotland; 
but it was not until five years after Robert III. died, and while Albany 
was still Regent, during the captivity of James I., in England, that the 
Garioch and the neighborhood of Inverurie was once more the scene of a 
national event. The battle of Harlaw was more than a mere feudal fight, 
it was a trial of strength between the Highlands and the Lowlands; and 
it has been the theme of three ballad narratives. 

The Duke of Albany was the cause of this, as of other needless 
spilling of Scottish blood. On the Earldom of Ross being resigned in his 
favor by Eupheraia, Countess of Ross, when, without heirs, she retired 
to a convent, he secured it by royal charter to his own son, John Stewart, 
Earl of Buchan. Then the wife of Donald, the Lord of the Isles, was 
the rightful heiress should Euphemia die without issue; and accordingly 
the great Highland chieftain disputed the legality of the action of the 
Crown. 

Redress was refused; and Lord Donald had recourse to the sword. 
With Hector Maclean of Duart, as his second in command, and also 
accompanied by the Chief of Macintosh, the great Island chieftain 
crossed to the mainland with his horde of ten thousand sturdy clansmen. 
The Earldom of Ross submitted almost without a blow. Dingwall made 
some show of resistance; but Inverurie opened its gates at his bidding. 
Thence he issued a summons that all the fighting men of Enzie and the 
Boyn should join his standard. Moray and Strathbogie succumbed to 
the Celtic invaders. In the twinkle of an eye he would have been 
thundering at the gates of Aberdeen itself, which he had boasted he 
would give to the flames. But the Garioch proved an insurmountable 
barrier to the impetuous valor of the Gaels, as it had to the persistent and 
dour attacks of the Comyns in the days of the good King Robert. 

The savior of the Lowlands was Alexander Stewart, an illegitimate 
son of the Earl of Buchan, the Wolf of Badenoch, who had assumed the 



36 

title and dignities of the Earl of Mar, on the death of his wife, the 
Countess Isabel. She was the daughter of the Countess Margaret, and a 
sister of James, Earl of Douglas, who fell at Otterburn in combat with 
Henry Percy. The Countess Margaret was the sister of Thomas, Earl of 
Mar, and the daughter of Donald, Earl of Mar, who was slain at Dup- 
plin. The Countess Isabel, the wife of Alexander Stewart, had been 
married before to Sir Malcolm Drummond, designated the brother of 
Robert III. as having been the brother of the wife of that monarch; and it 
is an interesting fact that with her death the line of the surname of Mar, 
holding the two honors of Mar and the Garioch, came to an end. All 
subsequent claimants have sought to prove themselves Heirs to her. 
Through the failure of her two marriages just specified, and by a decision 
in the case of the Mar Peerage, pronounced Feb. 25th, IS75, by the House 
of Peers, the ancient Earldom of Mar was assumed by the Judges to have 
terminated on the decease of Thomas, the 13th Earl, in or before 1377. 

Into the romantic career of the hero of Harlaw we cannot enter at 
length. As a soldier of fortune and a famous Knight of the tourney, he 
upheld the honor of Scotland in many foreign wars and in many a tilt. 
And when adventures by land had failed, he turned pirate and with a 
small squadron scoured the coast from Berwick to Newcastle in search 
of English prizes. Such was the romantic figure Donald, Lord of the 
Isle, found opposed to him with a small but well equipped following, 
little more than a tenth of the Highland host of ten thousand clansmen. 

The issue of the battle has been told and retold times without num- 
ber. The part played by Provost Davidson and the Burgesses of Aber- 
deen is one of the proudest traditions of the granite city. The Irvings, of 
Drum, the Leiths, the Leslies, the Gordons, the Keiths, and the Forbeses, 
fought shoulder to shoulder. The battle was long and bloody; but when 
night fell on the scene of carnage, where limbs of steel-clad men-at-arms 
and horses had been hacked through by Highland claymores, Mar, with 
the remnant of his army, still held the field, while Donald, Lord of the 
Isles, was in full retreat toward the west. The victory was dearly bought. 
The constable of Dundee, the provost ot Aberdeen, and the mass of their 
followers were slain; the sheriff of Angus also, Sir Alexander Irving, Sir 
Robert Maule, Thomas Moray, William Abernethy, Alexander Striton, 
James Lovel, Alexander Stirling, Gilbert de Greenlaw, and about five 
hundred men-at-arms, including the principal gentry of Buchan, lay dead 
upon the field. By this terrible trial of strength at Harlaw, the supremacy 
of Lowland authority was permanently secured. The only monumental 
record of the memorable fight is the upper half of the tombstone of 
Gilbert de Greenlaw, within the roofless walls of the once richly orna- 



37 

merited templar church of Kinkell. A farm house of Harlaw is said to 
mark the large Whinstone monolith, about two hundred yards westward 
of the burial place of the females who had followed the Highland host 
and perished. 

The century and a half which followed the struggle at Harlaw was a 
more tranquil, but still a highly interesting, period in the history of the 
Garioch. A new genealogical formation begins in it, which, by the time 
of the Reformation, had developed into wide spread families, while some 
of the earlier surnames became extinct. 

The settlement of new names in the Garioch at this period indica- 
ted a change; and social order also assumed a different phase. The sub- 
ordination to law, established by the last of Scotland's powerful kings, 
which, after his death, came to depend upon the isolated or combined 
action of patriotic nobles, and in the Garioch had always the advantage 
of being upheld by a strong Lord Superior of the Regality, was provided 
for in that district, after the line of its feudal lords of Regality had 
terminated, by the appointment of a King's Lieutenant, or hereditary 
sheriff. 

Burgh life in Inverurie begins to show itself to the antiquarian stu- 
dent a little before the battle of Harlaw. The town was probably, in 1400, 
all within sight and cry of the Cross, and the Cross Well may have served 
the whole community. Not long after Harlaw was fought, we find names 
on record which enable us to reconstruct at least the skeleton of a town 
council. 

In Inverurie the date of the Reformation was coincident with that of 
the resuscitation of the municipal life of the burgh. Queen Mary having 
granted it a new charter in 1558. This document narrated that Inver- 
urie's ancient evidence had been lost through pestilence, troubles, and 
negligent keeping; but that it had been a burgh beyond the memory 
of man. The charter records and confirms the privileges which had 
been enjoyed from time immemorial by the burgh. These privileges 
included the right to erect a JMarket Cross and hold two weekly markets, 
on Wednesday and Saturday, and two annual fairs, each continuing eight 
days. The burgh, which possessed the right to elect a provost and 
baillies, did not, for at least a century after the new charter was granted. 
Belief in demoncraft was, in 1SU4, so prevalent that ministers and elders 
were directed by the church to make all efforts to put an end to fche 
superstitious practice of leaving a "good man's croft" uncultivated on a 
farm or estate. It was a piece of ground left to the occupation of super- 
natural beings, in honor of whom the tillers of the soil threw stones upon 
it with some ceremonies. Inverurie furnished examples of this practice. 



38 

The efforts of the church appeared to have little effect, for we find this 
order repeated a century afterwards. 

Two years after the charter was granted to Inverurie, the Scottish 
Parliament sanctioned the reformed doctrines, and the General Assembly 
of the Reformed Church met. But the Reformation spread slowly in 
Aberdeenshire, a fact clearly indicated by the celebration of mass, in 1562, 
in the chapel of the Garioch, when Queen Mary was present. During the 
first generation after the Church of Rome was established, in 1560,itmust 
have proved nearly as difficult to find school masters for the schools as it 
was to have the parishes served by competent clergymen. The readers, 
who very defectively supplied the place of parish ministers, may generally 
have acted, as they certainly in some cases did, as school masters, orcon- 
firming priests. 

In 1601 schools were very deficient, for the General Assembly in that 
year complained of the decay of the schools, and of the imperfect educa- 
tion of the youth in the knowledge of good letters and Godliness. 

During the Civil war that ended in the deposition and death of 
Charles I., Inverurie was dragged into the struggle, the burgh being 
repeatedly visited by Montrose and his deadly foe, Argyll. After chasing 
Argyll into the sea at Inverlochy, Montrose was supreme in the north. 
He made his headquarters at Elgin, where he was joined by the Laird of 
Grant, and punished the covenanting Barons, especially harrying the 
lands of the Earl of Findlater, and the Laird of Frendraught. 

He marched from Frendraught to Kintor, Kinkell, and Inverurie, in 
which neighborhood his army was quartered. He himself lodged in the 
house of Mr. John Cheyne, minister of Kintor. 

The earliest minutes of the Kirk session of Inverurie present the 
minister, in 1650, engaged every Wednesday, in his tumble down 
thatched kirk, examining the people, and swearing them to fidelity to the 
solemn league and covenant. 

When Charles II. returned in 1760 to his native land, the face of 
society had changed considerably in the Garioch, and his reign was to 
see still more of the disintegration and reconstruction belonging to all 
national revolutions. 

The most marked historical feature of the restoration in Scotland was 
the reintroduction of Episcopacy as the national form of church. The 
most impressive outward change that marked the end of the Covenanting 
rule was that all the surviving ministers of the preceding Episcopacy, 
who had been removed by the Covenanters, were at once replaced in their 
parishes. 

Quakerism made its appearance in the Garioch in 1663, and the 



1 



Presbyterres were obliged to give up the names of all suspected persons. 
But repressive measures failed to suppress the new sect. 

It is suggestive of the rougher completion of the period, to find 
several in the list of town councilors or of elders, who had their only 
previous publicity in prosecutions for the rudest offence which came under 
reprehension. Old offenders turned up in time as magistrates or as 
ecclesiastical overseers. They do not, however, seem so much out of 
place at a time when Episcopal ordinances had to be issued against 
violent carrying away of offenders. 

In 1677 Sir John Keith was created Earl of Kintor, and the Inverurie 
community hastened to do him honor in the somewhat humble way of 
electing, not himself, but his servitor, to the magistorial bench. It was 
the town council of 1677 that recalled the Cross of Inverurie back again 
to the place where it stood anciently. 

Improvements effected by Sir John Keith included a bowling green, 
for the formation of which the council minutes of Inverurie record that 
the baillies, in 1673, sold him the scruff of the Kirk green and Stream- 
head. Monmouth's rebellion had a special interest in connection with 
Inverurie, because Robert Ferguson — "Ferguson the Plotter" — who didso 
much to bring it about, was the eldest of the six sons of William Fergu- 
son, of Crichie. William assumed the fantastic sign of mourning, not 
uncommon in that cause, of never shaving his beard after the defeat of 
the Royal Stewarts. The burgh, in 1696, possessed four merchants, three 
tailors, six masons, .seven shoemakers, three smiths, and one wright. 
Fifteen of its householders had servants. Then followed a period of 
comparative quietude, and in the beginning of the last century the state 
of the place is thus described: 

"Inverurie had none of the characteristics of a town. It was a mere 
village, the houses of which were scattered along the high road from 
Aberdeen to Banff". Its population was chiefly agricultural. There 
were manufactures only for home use. The population in 1804 was 
under 500. In 1821 it was 755. In 1831 it had increased to 944, with 
199 houses. 

"After passing the reformed act, the population increased so that in 
1871 there were 390 houses and a population of 2,593. The population at 
the last census was 3,153, but that was just before the first contingent of 
tho,se employed at the railway works had arrived. 

"In the early years of the century, Inverurie was a little village. 
Three important events in the history of the burgh during the last cen- 
tury, were the building of the bridge over the Don, in which a member 
of the Ferguson family took a deep interest; the erection of a bridge over 



40 

the Urie at Keith Hall; and the opening of the Aberdeenshire canal 
between Aberdeen and Inverurie. 

"Trade was considerably increased by these works, the effect of tlie 
opening of the canal especially being shown in the fact that the popu- 
lation of the place advanced from 400 to 2,000 in 50 years. In time the 
canal gave place to the railway, and now it is the great source of the 
burgh's prosperity. There seems to be in store for Inverurie an even 
greater measure of success. To this its favorable situation, surrounded 
as it is by peculiarly productive agricultural districts, has powerfully con- 
tributed; but perhaps the main factor is to be found in the energetic and 
strenuous character of its people." 

Inverurie has been favored with a number of royal visits. As far 
back as 881 A. D. we have mention of King Aodh, a Pictish monarch, 
son of Kenneth Macalpine, being there. Having died after the battle of 
Strathallan, he was buried at the Coning Hill of Inverurie, in the 
picturesque tree covered mound which is to be seen opposite the parish 
church manse. 

In 1308 King Robert Bruce took up his quarters at Inverurie for a 
short time. 

More than 250 years later, in September, 1563, Mary, Queen of Scotts, 
passed through Inverurie. 

There was a lapse of 300 years before the next royal visit, which was 
that of the late Queen Victoria and the Prince consort, on Wednesday, the 
14th of October, 1857. Along with them on that occasion were the Princes 
Royal and the Princess Alice. They drove from Balmoral to Haddo 
house, a distance of 60 miles, on a visit to the Premier, the Earl of Aber- 
deen, at Haddo house, the route being by Ballater, Tarland, Bridge of 
Alfred, Inverurie, and Old Meldrum. 

At Port Elphinstone there was a magnificent arch of flowers, and at 
the market square of Inverurie, another gigantic and most beautiful 
floral arch, 30 ft. in height, with five spans, had been erected. 

The inhabitants of the town gave the royal party a most enthusiastic 
reception, and not the least cordial in their reception were the Keith Hall 
tenantry. 



41 



CHAPTER IX. 
WILLIAM FERGUSON OF CRICHIE. 

The oldest manuscripts (Records of Clau and Name of Ferguson, 
Vol. 11.) state the tradition as to the origin of the name of Aberdeen- 
shire and the Garioch. The tradition about the Fergusons settling in 
Aberdeenshire is that two younger sons of Baron Ferguson of Athole, in 
an affray with a neighboring chieftain, killed him, after which they were 
obliged to abscond. One of them settled near Inverurie, and was the 
ancestor of the families of Pitfour and Kinmundy; the other went to the 
shire of Ayr and is said to be the predecessor of Kilkerran and Aucinblain; 
and this is said to have happened upwards of 400 years ago. 

Walter Ferguson, who is doubtless a direct ancestor, went forth, 
with his three sons as a guide, to assist Robert Bruce, the King, in 
lighting the battle of Inverurie. The full particulars have already been 
given in the history of Inverurie. No other name in the line of descent is 
given until we come to William Ferguson, of Crichie. With the uncertainty 
which characterized the spelling and even the form of Scottish surnames, 
the family seemed to have used several indefinitely, the form of Fergus 
or Ferguson being indiscriminately used in the Inverurie records. Locai 
tradition also records grants of land within the capacious boundaries of 
the royal burgh, and by the 17th century there were several Fergus or 
Ferguson families, more or less residents in the burgh or vicinity. 
Tradition has it that one of the Fergusons fought at the Battle of 
Harlaw. 

William Fergus had holdings of land within the extensive limits of 
the burgh of Inverurie, which, according to the family tradition, had 
been in possession of the family for over three hundred years. 

William Ferguson, of Crichie, was born in the latter part of the 16th 
century. He was a military officer of some note. It is recorded that five 
of the family at one time were officers in the army of Gustavus Adolphus 
of Germany and that one of them arose to be a general. It is very 
probable that his elder brother and perhaps Badifurrow himself had 
brought experience, gained in the Swedish service in the Thirty Years 
war, to the banner of their own sovereign. 

It is recorded that on the 6th of June, 1608, William Ferguson, of 
Crichie, a horseman sufficiently in arms, conformed to the proclamation 



42 



and was one of the mounted men present at a wapinschaw, and that 
there was also present Alexander Fergus. 

In 1619 William Fergus was censured for "adding to and building 
farder nor the rest of the town, contrary to the laws of the burgh, and 
likewise for disobeying the Bailie's command." 

About 1640, William Fergus raised a troop of horse on his own 
expense, and joined King Charles 1. army. He was by this and other 
misfortunes of the times reduced, and was obliged to sell the estate of 
Crichie. 

William had five sons: 

Alexander — who accompanied Montrose in all of his wars. Died 
unmarried. 

Robert — lived in Inverurie and had considerable property. He had 
sons. 

William— lived in Inverurie. Was the great-grandfather of the 
present representatives of Pitfour and Kinmundy. Was Laird of 
Badifurrow. 

James — James was town clerk in Inverurie, from 1645 to 1673. 

John — John resided in Stonehouse and was the father of John, who 
married Janette Ferguson, his cousin. 

The younger John, in 1663, chose his uncles, James and William, as 
his curators, and was in 1675 a Burgess of Inverurie. 



43 



CHAPTER X. 
WILLIAM FERGUSON, LAIRD OF BADIFURROW. 

William Ferguson was the head of one of the families of Aberdeen- 
shire. The connection of the Ferguson families, of which William Fer- 
guson of Kinmundy is now, 1902, the representative, with the royal burgh 
of Inverurie, and now recalled and revived by the presentation to him of 
the Freedom of the Burgh, was one continued more or less intimately for 
a period of about 500 years, from the era of the Scottish War of Indepen- 
dence to that of the times of the French Revolution. From the William 
Ferguson, of Badifurrow, who represented Inverurie in the Scottish 
Parliament in 1661 and 1663, were descended some seven families, allnow 
extinct in Scotland with the exception of those of Pitfour and Kinmundy 
and a representative of his daughter, but in all of which in the last cen- 
tury, the tradition of the connection of the burgh and of the gift by King 
Robert Bruce, of the burgh lands, then in possession of the family, was 
handed down. Badifurrow was a mansion situated on the braes which 
sloped down to the Don, and not very far from that prominent feature of 
Aberdeenshire landscape. 

It is recorded that William Ferguson, of Badifurrow, was living on the 
estate of Crichie in 1645, and that he purchased the estate of Badifurrow 
in 1655 (we conclude of his father.) It contained a house and consider- 
able holdings of land within the extensive limits of the burgh of Inverurie, 
which, according to the family tradition, had been in possession of his 
family for over threehundred years. Walter, William Ferguson's sixth son, 
says the Kinmundy manuscripts, lived and died in Inverurie in the house 
where his father, grandfather and great-grandfather were born, a fine 
house where his progenitors had been for upwards of 300 years. (Clan 
Ferguson Records, Vol. 1, Page 283.) 

The old house had witnessed stirring scenes in the troublous times of 
the great Civil War. Spaulding records that when the Marquis of Hunt- 
ley mastered the northern cavaliers and hoisted the royal standard at 
Inverurie on the 11th of April, 1644, he stayed in "unkill William Fer- 
gus' house." He stayed Saturday and Sunday, and then assembled a 
force of two thousand five hundred men, of whom four hundred were 
cavalry. 

On that very Sunday, the Marquis was excommunicated in St. Giles 



44 

church, Edinburgh. A week later he was there again, staying in Baillie 
William Ferguson's house on Wednesday and Thursday. 

Tradition also says that the great Marquis of Montrose enjoyed 
hospitality under the same roof in the course of his meteor-like campaign. 
It is certain that when, after the restoration, the remains of the great 
Marquis and those of Sir William Hay, of Dalgety, executed at the same 
time, were exhumed from the burrough Muir of Edinburgh, and buried 
with great pomp and full heraldic honors in the Montrose Isle, in the 
Cathedral church of St. Giles in Edinburgh, among those who took part 
in the ceremony was William Ferguson of Badifurrow, who is recorded 
as carrying the gumphion before the bier of Delgathy. 

St. Giles cathedral was built by Alexander the First of Scotland, in 
1120. It is nearly certain that it replaced a building as old as 854 A. D. 
It was a massive Norman structure similar in extent to the present build - 
ing. It was partially destroyed in 1385 by an invading British army. It 
was rebuilt in 1460; but a complete restoration was made b}' Dr. William 
Cambers at his own cost in 1879. 

The remains of the great Marquis of Montrose, who was executed in 
1650, whose limbs had been scattered in different parts of Scotland, were 
reverently collected after the Restoration and deposited in the Montrose 
Isle. 

The Athole Fergusons were, like the elder brother of the Laird of 
Badifurrow, constant followers of the great Marquis of Montrose in his 
cavalier campaigns; while Sir John Ferguson, of Kilkerran, was also at 
Louden Hill with Montrose, and embarrassed his estate by his sacrifices 
in the cause of the King. 

William Ferguson, of Badifurrow, was a member of the Scottish 
Parliament in 1861 and 1863, representing Inverurie; and appeared at 
Edinburgh, in 1661, as commissioner to supplicate the enrollment. He 
signed the letter to King Charles the II. in 1661. His name appears as 
Bailie of Inverurie, in 1664. In 1666, he was requested, along with John 
Johnson, on the recommendation of the Lord Bishop, to become an elder; 
but he was infirm in so far that at times, especially in the winter, he was 
unable to come to church, which, he said, he had signified to the Lord 
Bishop. He purchased the estate of Badifurrow and disposed the fee to 
his second son, William. In the same year a discharge and renunciation 
was granted by Robert Ferguson (his oldest son, the Plotter), to William 
Ferguson, his father, of his portion and birthright in consideration of a 
sum paid down. He again appeared as Bailie in 1677. In 1669 William 
Ferguson, the elder, and his son, William, were among the heritors of 
Inverurie, who signed the Presbytery minutes of agreement, dividing the 



45 

Church. The Badifurrow seat in the church is said to have adjoined on 
the eastward that which had formerly belonged to the Council, and was 
afterwards occupied by the Earl ofKintor. In 1740 George Scott, writing 
to Mr. Ferguson of Pitfour, sent him a copy of the arms of his great- 
grandfather's desk in the church. In 1680 William Ferguson disposed 
of the old house in Inverurie and large holdings of the burgh roads, to 
his youngest son, Walter. He w^s alive in 1686, and in 1699 his grand- 
son, James, obtained letters of general charge against his uncle, Robert 
Ferguson, minister in London, to enter heir to his deceased father. 

It is said of William Ferguson that he was so grieved because Robert 
went with the enemies of King Charles the First, that he refused to shave, 
and wore a full beard to the day of his death as a sign of mourning. 

William Ferguson had seven children, six sons and one daughter, 
born in the middle of the 17th century: 
Robert (the eldest son) was known in history as Robert the Plotter; 

descendants in England. 
William (second son) was the head of the Pitfour family; descendants 

in Scotland. 
James (fourth son) was of Bellmakelly. A major general in the Eng- 
lish army, and head of the Kinmundy family; descendants in Scot 

land. 
George (fifth son) was of Old Meldrum, a factor of the Duke of Perth, 

descendants in America. 
John (third son) was of Stonehouse. Baillie for Inverurie for many 

years; descendants in Austria. 
Walter (sixth son) inherited Badifurrow. Was Baillie of Inverurie; 

descendants in Poland. 
Janette (daughter) married her cousin, John Ferguson; descendants in 

Scotland. 



46 



CHAPTER XL 
ROBERT FERGUSON, THE PLOTTER. 

Robert, the eldest son of William Ferguson, Laird of Badifurrow, 
known to history as "The Plotter," was one of the most preplexing 
characters that has ever crossed the pages of English history. It would 
be impossible even to sketch his career in the limits of this paper. I will 
refer those who care to pursue it to his biography, by David Douglas, 
Edinburgh. 

He went to England before the Restoration, and the connection with 
his father's family seems, for years, to have been completely severed. 
The property passed to the next brother, and then to his eldest son, who 
afterwards became the first of the Fergusons of Pitfour. The "Plotter" 
began life in England as an independent clergyman, and wrote two or 
three able treatises on theological subjects. But, taking to politics, he 
became an active political writer, and was mixed up with the most danger- 
ous and turbulent episodes of the period between the Restoration and 
the accession of the House of Hanover, especially the Rye House plot. He 
has been denounced by historians, particularly by Macaulay, but recent 
years have brought to light a narrative by himself of the Rye House plot, 
preserved in the state paper office, which puts a very different complexion 
upon his share in that transaction. 

Having examined most carefully the whole of the evidence relating to 
the whole conspiracy, I came to the conclusion that there was nothing in 
the real facts previously known inconsistent with this narrative, and that 
it fitted in most accurately with, and explained much that was obscure 
and inexplicable upon, the previous information. But it is impossible to 
claim "The Plotter" as a creditable representative of his clan. 

But the tones of his private papers are high; and if his own account of 
these transactions is correct, he certainly saved his country from a great 
calamity, and the Whig party of those days from a dark crime. He has 
been described by one of his cotemporaries as "a man by himself, and of 
as odd a make and mixture as the age has produced." It is said that 
during the western insurrection the Duke of Monmouth's army was atone 
time very badly oflf for provisions. The Duke was very dejected; and 
Ferguson offered, if the Duke would give him the command for five 
minutes, to provide for the next day. He immediately issued an order, 



47 

that the army should observe the next day as a solemn fast, and pray for 
success. 

Referring to the tradition that the Fergusons of Inverurie derived 
their origin from the Fergusons of Athole, the same writer says: "Mr. 
Adam Ferguson, late minister of Logierait, told me an anecdote he had 
from the first Duke of Athole, who, we well know, also treated him with 
peculiar attention and confidence, that Robert Ferguson, often called 
'The Plotter,' had come to him at London, and informed him of a 
design some rival courtiers had to involve him, the Duke, in some real or 
sham plot. 

'Robert himself was privy to it or connected at the time with the per- 
sons who were against him, but he could not restrain himself from giving 
him notice, and setting his Grace on his guard. 

"Robert gave for his reason that he considered himself as having a 
connection with Athole. The Duke told that he found the informa- 
tion of use and not to have been without foundation." 

The plot referred to was "the Scots Plot" of 1703, and it is a matter 
of history, that "The Plotter" on that occasion not only warned the Duke 
of Athole of the intrigues of Simon Fraser, Lord Lovat, but set by the 
ears the Whig House of Lords and the Tory House of Commons, a char- 
acteristic sequence of cause and effect. 

The notorious Simon Fraser, afterwards Lord Lovat, in the course of 
his mysterious intrigues, which he had been for some time carrying on, 
which perplexed the courts of both St. James and St. Germain and 
procured him a lodging in the Bastile from the most Christian William, 
had made the acquaintance of Robert Ferguson, "The Plotter," in Lon- 
don. 

According to Lovat, the "Old Plotter," who had, if not the more 
natural talent for intrigue than Lovat, at least more experience in 
the art, suspected his associate of being more intent on gratifying his 
personal hatred than in advancing the Jacobite cause. 

He gradually unraveled the tedious thread of the conspiracy to ruin 
the Duke of Athole (Ferguson), and by the disclosure of which, at the 
right time, he managed to spoil a very pretty piece of mischief, and thus 
discredit the existence of the alleged Jacobite design, known as the 
"Scott Plot." Before, however, the unraveling process had been completed, 
the intriguers parted with mutual protestations of friendship and esteem, 
and Ferguson gave Fraser a letter of recommendation to his brother. 
Major General Ferguson, who had entered into the service of King Wil- 
liam, who at that time commanded the Scottish regiment in garrison 



48 

at Bois leDuc, entreating him to render the same service to Lord Lovat, 
as he would to himself in his situation. 

This letter was the means of saving Lord Lovat's life about a fort- 
night later, while traveling through Holland. He, being a suspected 
person, found himself in great danger among the Dutch. 

In this situation he remembered the letter he had received from old 
Mr. Ferguson, of London, to his brother, Major General Ferguson, who 
commanded the troops at Bois leDuc With this recommendation, he 
determined to set out for that fortress. Lovat, his brother, and Major 
Fraser, having disguised themselves in the uniform of Dutch officers, 
arrived in the evening. He waited upon General Ferguson, who read his 
brother's letter, entreating him to communicate to Lord Lovat respecting 
the interest of the King and bestow upon him all the attention in his power, 
and who invited that nobleman to sup with him alone, observing that he 
could inform him of several things of importance to both courts. When 
Lord Lovat waited upon him in pursuance of his invitation, the General 
assured him that he had been obliged to enter into the services of King 
William and the Dutch Republic; but he had always been at heart faith- 
fully attached to King James. Lord Lovat was with General Ferguson 
until after midnight, and the General told him that he would send his 
Valet de Chambre to introduce him again by a private door. 

In the morning, however, the Commander found his garrison alarmed 
and mutinous. Some of the officers of the regiment of Orkeney and 
Murray, relatives of Lord Athole (Ferguson), understood that Lord Lovat 
was in town and had addressed several soldiers of the Frazin clan, who 
had enlisted in the regiment. These gentlemen immediately spread a 
report that he had come to debauch the Scottish garrison and induce 
them to desert. Upon this event, General Ferguson dispatched immedi- 
ately a message to bring Lord Lovat to his headquarters. He told him 
with concern the great danger he was in, and that it was necessary that he 
should disguise himself and set out upon the spot, since, if the Dutch had 
the least rumor of the intelligence which had been spread by the Scottish 
officers, it would be impossible for him to save his life or hinder him from 
being cut into a thousand pieces. Lord Lovat thanked General Fergu- 
son with great warmth and told him that he was ready to set out 
immediately, providing he had the meams of assuring his safety to 
Antwerp. The atl'air was difficult, but General Ferguson accomplished 
it by means of a sum of money and by the assistance of a rich Dutch 
Roman Catholic merchant, whom he knew to be deeply attached to the 
Fi-ench interests. The merchant brought to General Ferguson a Catholic 



49 

postilion, which he used when he went to Antwerp and Brussels in time 
of peace. 

The postilion had three saddles and one draught horse. He agreed 
to conduct Lord Lovat and his brother to Antwerp upon two of the 
saddled horses, he himself being mounted on the third, oiTering his little 
cart to carry Major Fraser and Lord Lovat's page. At the same time he 
demanded ready money upon the spot for the risk of his horses and $50.00 
for the risk of his life, both of them being forfeited in case of discovery. 
Lord Lovat counted down the money required, and, by the device of Gen- 
eral Ferguson, disguised himself like a carter in order to drive the cart out 
of town. In this disguise he passed all the gates and redoubts of Bois 
leDuc. 

Why General Ferguson aided Lord Lovat to escape is a mystery, 
unless to get rid of a troublesome visitor as easily as possible. 

It is perhaps a coincidence worthy of notice, that when in 1746 Lord 
Lovat was seized hiding in a hollow tree on the island Loch Morar by a 
posse of soldiers from the Campbell militia, the naval part of the force 
was commanded by Captain John Ferguson, a grand-nephew of the (xen- 
eral who had entertained at Bois leDuc. He met with less courtesy 
now, for as the sailors marched him off to the ship, the pipers of the 
Campbells played the Lovat march. 

Robert was noted for his hair-breadth escapes. He is said to have 
crossed to Holland in an open boat after the battle of Sedgemore, in 
which he had taken an active part and of which he has left an account 
not devoid of touches of dry humor. It is said that he was once in Edin- 
burgh when a proclamation arrived offering a reward for his appre- 
hension. The gates were shut and diligent search made, but he had 
taken himself to the rooms of an acquaintance in the old Tolbooth (the 
public prison), which he thought rightly, under the circumstances, was 
the safest place. 

His family consisted of a wife and two daughters. His descendants 
are supposed to be in England. He was born in the 17th century, about 
1640, and died in 1714. 



50 



CHAPTER XII. 

WILLIAM FETiGUSON, HEAD OF THE TITFOUR FAMILY IN SCOT- 
LAND, 

It has already been stated that Robert's birthright was conferred 
upon William Badifurrow's second son. William appears as bailie in 
lf>77, but there is no evidence that he was a man of note. But we may 
infer that in his day he was prominent in church work. There were 
many brilliant men in his line of descent. 

James, his only son, became an eminent advocate at the Scottish 
bar and SheritT Substitute of Aberdeenshire. It is said of him that he 
had a distinguished career. He sold Badifurrow, we conclude, to his 
grandfather and purchased Pitfour in Buchan. James's son was also an 
eminent advocate at the Scottish bar, and was raised to the bench as 
Lord Pitfour. A distinguished successor, Lord President Blair, described 
Pitfour and Lockhart as " the two greatest lawyers that ever did honor to 
this court, men who stood long unrivaled at the head of the bar, and 
whose characters were equal to their legal knowledge." 

The eldest son of the judge became the Father of the House of 
Commons, in which he served the people for 30 years, from 1790 to 1820. 

His third son was Governor of Tobago. His second son, Patrick 
Ferguson, was lieutenant colonel in the British army. He was born in 
1744. His mother's name was Annie Muray, daughter of Lord Elibank. 

Brigadier General James Muray, who was known as Old Minorca, 
was the brother of his mother. The Colonel was said to be the best 
marksman in his regiment. March 17th, 1776, he patented a breech 
loading rifie which went into general use. He reached his crisis at King's 
Mountain in South Carolina, in the American Revolutionary war. 

It is said of him that he once saved the life of George Washington. 
This story was published in the New York Mirror, the 16th of April, 1831, 
on authority of Major John P. Delancey. 

Delancey was second in command of Ferguson's riflemen, and had 
seen Washington in Philadelphia the year before the outbreak of the war. 
Ferguson had been wounded in the arm. While Captain Delancey was 
occupied in arranging the sling for Fei'guson's arm, it was reported that 
an American officer of rank, attended only by a mounted orderly, had 
ridden into the open ground and was within point blank rifle shot. 



51 

Two or three of the best marksmen desired to bring him down. 
Ferguson emphatically refused. The mounted officer saw his enemies, 
drew his reins, and sat looking at them attentively for a few moments. 

A sergeant now offered to hit his horse without injuring the rider, but 
Ferguson withheld his consent, affirming that it was Washington recon- 
noitering, and that he would not be the means of placing the life of so 
great a man in jeopardy by such unfair means. 

The horseman turned and rode slowly away, To his last moment 
Ferguson maintained that the officer whose life he had spared was 
Washington. 

Colonel Ferguson was of middle stature, slender make, possessing a 
serious countenance; yet it was his peculiar characteristic to gain the 
affection of the men under his command. He would sit down for hours 
and converse with the country people on the state of public affairs, and 
point out to them, from his view, the ruinous effects of the disloyalty of 
the ringleaders of the Rebellion. 

He was as indefatigable in training them in his way of thinking as he 
was in instructing them in military exercises. This condescension on his 
part was regarded as wonderful in a King's officer, and very naturally 
went far to secure the respect and obedience of all who came within the 
sphere of his almost magic influence. 

At the same time his energy in action and tenacity of purpose was 
such as to gain from his comrades the epithet of "Bull dog Ferguson," 
while those who met him in battle and felt the vigor of the onset which 
he led, alluding to his disabled right arm shattered at Brandywine, 
spread in the Carolinas an unfeigned respect for one distinguished among 
the fierce inhabitants of these wild regions as "The one-armed Devil." 
Colonel Ferguson was killed at King's Mountain, bravely leading his men 
into battle. Lord Cornwallis commenced his march towards North Car- 
olina, having attached Ferguson to the Western confines of South 
Carolina. Colonel Ferguson had with him, variously estimated, from 
four hundred to twelve hundred men. His orders were, says Washington 
Irving, "to skirr the mountain country between the Catawba and the 
Yadkin, harass the Whigs, inspirit the Tories, and bring the people under 
the royal banner." He had been chosen as being calculated to gain 
friends by his conciliating disposition and manners. 

His address to the people was in that spirit. He came not to make 
war upon women and children, but to give them money and relieve their 
distresses. He hoped that they would excuse him if, meeting with their 
husbands or brothers in the field, he should use them a little more 
roughly. While in the region of the old Fort, it is said that a party, 



52 

which Ferguson personally commanded, halted at the house of Captain 
Lytle, a noted Rebel leader. Mrs. Lytle appeared at the door in her best 
attire, and when the Colonel rode up and inquired- for her husband, 
invited him to come in. He thanked her, but said his business required 
haste; that the King's army had restored his authority in all the Southern 
provinces; that the rebellion was virtually quelled; and that he had 
come into the valley to see Captains Lytle and Hempthill, and a few others 
who had served in the Rebel army against the King; and that he was the 
bearer of pardons for each of them. Mrs. Lytle's reply was that her hus- 
band was away from home. He earnestly asked if she knew where he 
was. She said: "I only know that he is with others of his friends, whom 
you call Rebels." Then said Ferguson: "I have discharged my duty; I 
felt anxious to save Captain Lytle, because I learned that he is both 
brave and honorable. If he persists in rebellion and comes to harm, his 
blood be upon his own head." The lady replied that her husband 
would never desert his country. The Colonel rejoined that he half way 
admired her zeal in a bad cause. "Give my regards to Captain Lytle," 
he said. "He will not be asked to compromise his honor. His verbal 
pledge not to take up arms against the King is all that will be asked of 
him." He then bowed to Mrs. Lytle and led off his troops. On the 30th 
of September, the news of the imminent invasion reached Colonel Fergu- 
son, who realized at once the gravity of the situation. He halted and 
commenced to fall back towards Cornwallis. Finding his members 
scanty and threatened by a force much superior in numbers and fierce 
in hostility, he endeavored to increase his force and collect the Royalists 
for one final effort. He issued an order to arouse the Tories. The 
storm clouds seemed to have demoralized the Royalists in that section. 
He dispatched a messenger to Cornwallis to inform his Lordship of what 
had passed, of the enemies he had to deal with, and of the route he had 
taken to avoid them, and stated that he should halt at the King's Moun- 
tain, hoping that he might be supported by a detachment from his Lord- 
ship and saved the necessity of any further retreat. The letter, having 
been intercepted, gave notice to the enemy of the place where Ferguson 
was to be found. A duplicate was sent the following day, which was 
received by Lord Cornwallis, but it came too late to prevent the disaster 
which followed. 

It was in the evening of Friday, the 6th of October, that Ferguson 
took post on King's Mountain to await the expected aid, and if necessary 
to make a stand and fight it out to the last. The mountaineers were 
anxious for their prey At Cowpens on Broad River, the western army 
had been joined by Colonel Williams, one of the American leaders, with 




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53 

450 horsemen, who had been acting against Ferguson. The combined 
force has been described by an officer as "a swarm of backwoodsmen; 
the wild and fierce inhabitants of Kentucky, and other settlements west- 
ward of the mountain." 

On the 6th of October, the Americans arrived at Gilbert Town with 
3,000 men, determined to push on and attack the Royalists before they 
could be relieved. Major Ferguson's force was estimated at 800. The 
position, writses Washington Irving, was a strong one. 

King's Mountain rises out of a broken country and is detached on 
the north from inferior heights by a deep valley with sloping sides 
excepting on the north. The mountain was covered for the most part 
with lofty forest trees, free from underwood, interspersed with boulders 
and masses of gray rock. The forest was sufficiently open to give free 
passage to horsemen. As the Americans drew near, they could see 
the glittering of arms along a level ridge forming the crest of King's 
Mountain. The morning had been wet and stormy, but the weather had 
cleared and it was a beautiful afternoon. When the Americans came 
within striking distance of King's Mountain, screened by the surrounding 
forest, they dismounted and formed themselves into at least four main 
columns; those on the right and left were to pass around the British 
position and to attack the mountain from the rear, while the central 
columns advanced to the assault in front. 

In this order they arrived within a quarter of a mile of the British 
position before they were discovered. For ten minutes a furious and 
bloody battle was kept up with the two central columns alone; then the 
others chimed in and the attack was delivered from all points of the 
compass. For fifty-five minutes more, the firing was heavy and almost 
incessant. The mountain was covered with fire and smoke. Ramsey, 
the American historian of the Revolution, speaks with the highest 
respect of the British commander and relates that when the pickets were 
driven in on the main body, Colonel Ferguson, with the greatest 
bravery, ordered his men to charge. The charge had no sooner been 
made with effect than the Americans poured in a well directed fire. The 
British bayonet was again successful, and caused them to fall back. 

Another relay of adversaries ascended and renewed the attack from 
that eminence. Colonel Ferguson, whose conduct was equal to his 
courage, presented a new front and was again successful; but all his 
efforts were unavailing. In all ot these charges he seems to have had his 
men perfectly in hand. Having driven back the Americans at the point 
of the bayonet, they poured a rifle volley after them; then slowly with 
precision retreated, loading their rifles as they retraced their steps, as 



54 

they had learned very skillfully to do by the example and instructions of 
Colonel Ferguson. But in these short retreats they suffered severely 
from the hidden marksmen in the cover below. 

Many of the British bullets rattled over the heads of the Americans, 
shredding the twigs from the trees; while the loyalists, distinctly seen 
above, stood exposed in the open, and owing to their situation on the 
summit, could be fired at freely from all sides. It has been claimed by 
an American authority that they drove back the enemy seven times 
before the final catastrophe. Washington Irving writes that Ferguson, 
exasperated at being hunted into his mountain fastness, had been chafing 
in his rocky lair, and meditating a furious sally. He rushed out with his 
regulars, made an impetuous charge with the bayonet, and dislodging 
his assailants from their coverts, began to drive them down the mountain. 
He had not proceeded far when a flanking fire was opened by one of the 
other divisions. Facing about and attacking this, he was again success- 
ful, when a third fire was opened from another quarter. Thus, as fast 
as one division gave way before the bayonet, another came to its relief, 
while those who had given way rallied and returned to the charge. 
Ferguson found that he was completely in the hunter's toils, beseiged on 
every side; but he stood bravely at bay until the ground was strewed 
with the killed and wounded, picked off by the fatal rifle. His men were 
at length broken, and retreated with confusion along the ridge. He 
galloped from place to place endeavoring to rally them, when a rifle ball 
brought him to the ground, and his white horse was seen careering 
down the mountain without a rider. He had, says his biographer. Dr. 
Adam Ferguson, two horses killed under him, while he remained un- 
touched himself; but he afterwards received a number of wounds, of 
which, it is said, anyone was mortal,, and, dropping from his horse, 
expired while his foot yet hung in the stirrup. The spirit which refused 
to be subdued being now no more, the officer on whom the command 
devolved, though brave and equal to the trust, was compelled to accept 
quarter for himself and the few that remained under his command. 
The battle of King's Mountain, inconsiderable as it was in the numbers 
engaged, turned the tide of Southern warfare. The victory of King's 
Mountain, in its influence on the spirits of the American soldier, changed 
the aspect of the war. Cornwallis had hoped to step with ease from one 
Carolina to another, and from these to the conquest of Virginia; he had 
now no choice but to retreat. 

The Historical Society of Tennessee has in its possession the sash, 
sword, and field glasses of Col. Patrick Ferguson. 



55 



CHAPTER XIII. 
JOHN FERGUSON, OF STONEHOUSE. 

There appears to be a doubt which one of the six brothers occupied 
the third place in tliis family. Some authors claim that it was James, but 
a recent and more reliable account gives him the fourth place. 

George is spoken of as one of the younger sons of the Laird of Badi- 
furrow. Walter was the youngest. So we conclude that John was the 
third son of William Ferguson, of Badifurrow. 

The record of this family is very brief. He was for a long time 
bailie of Inverurie, and was generally associated with his younger 
brother, Walter. He purchased the southern part of the Inverurie rood, 
called Stonehouse, about 1676. In 1696, he was sole commissioner for 
the poll tax in Inverurie parish, his youngest son, George, acting as clerk 
and collector. The eldest, William, sold Stonehouse to the Earl of 
Kintor. Another, James, entered the Austrian service and attained a 
good station, afterwards serving as captain in Spain and governor in 
Panama. This line of descent is extinct in Scotland; the descendants 
are settled in Europe. The last trace of the family in Scotland we get 
from Dr. Davidson's enumeration of the property holders in the burgh. 

In the latter part of the 17th century, the large property on the 
southern extremity belonged to John Ferguson (son of Badifurrow), who 
about 1675 held the old Leslie roods on both sides of the King's Gate. 
In 1681, he sold the part most north of his upper rood, 125 to 130 High 
street, and the rest was afterwards sold to the Earl of Kintor. Two other 
roods, Knights Lane and 30 High street, belonged to Marjory Ferguson, 
heir to her grandfather, John Ferguson, (Geneology) registered in 1761. 

John Ferguson lived and died in Inverurie; married Barthia Carr. 
They had three sons, William, James and George. William married a 
Miss Keith; they had one son, Alexander, and five daughters, Henrietta, 
Margaret, Catherine, Bothia, and Isabel. 

James entered into the Emperor of Germany's army, but it is not 
known if he married. 

George, John's youngest son, died in his youth. 



56 



CHAPTER XIV. 
MAJOR GENERAL JAMES FERGUSON, OF BALMAKELLY, 

The Head of the Kinmundy Family in Scotland. 

James Ferguson, of Balmakelly, Major General, Colonel of the 
Cameronian regiment, was the fourth son of William Ferguson, Laird of 
Badifurrovv, who represented Inverurie in the first Scottish Parliament 
after the Restoration, remembered for its demonstrative loyalty as the 
"Drunken Parliament." James was the younger brother of Robert, 
known as "The Plotter." He appears to have entered the Scots Brigade 
in the pay of Holland, probably as a gentleman volunteer. Sometime 
during the reign of Charles H., he received his first commission, that of 
quartermaster in Colonel MacDonald's battalion of the brigade, and dated 
June the 12th, 1677. He became ensign in the battalion in September, 
1678, and lieutenant in February, 1682. This battalion was one of those 
brought over to England in 1685, at the time of Monmouth's Rebellion. 
He became captain in 1687 and in 1688 landed with William of Orange at 
Torbay. His regiment, then known as Balfour's, afterwards as Lauder's, 
was one of the first landed and was soon after dispatched from London 
to Heith under MacKay. The fight at Killiecrankie, where he is 
said to have been taken prisoner, left him a regimental major, 
and in March, 1690, he was dispatched by General MacKay, who 
described him as a resolute, well efi:ected officer, in whose discretion 
and diligence he had full reliance, at the head of six hundred men to 
reduce the Western Isles, a service he accomplished satisfactorily with the 
aid of the Glasgow authorities and the co-operation of Captain Pottinger, 
of the Dartmouth frigate. 

In 1692, he was appointed Lieutenant Colonel of Monros (late Angus, 
now the first Cameronians, Scottish Rifles), which at the time was in the 
Dutch pay. Ferguson led the regiment at the battle of Laden, and at the 
seige of Namer, on the 25th of August, 1693, he had been appointed 
colonel, which office he held up to his death. 

Owing to the reduction after the peace of Ryswick, the regiment 
was retained in Holland; but in December, 1700, it was finally transferred 
to the British service and was brought to Scotland. Ferguson went with 
his regiment to Holland, under Marlborough, in 1702. 




MAJ. GEN. JAMES FERGUSON, OF BALMAKELLY, 
Head of the Kinmundy Family in Scotland. 



57 

In 1703, he was in command at Bois le Hue, with the rank of 
brigadier general. In the campaign of 1704, he commanded a Ijrigade 
which led the attack on the heights of Schellenburg, and at Blenheim 
shared with Rowe's brigade the protracted fighting around tlie strongest 
part of the enemy's position. Here he ascended to the lie glit of his 
fame. In the campaign of the year following, he had a brigade at the 
facing of the enemy's lines in Brabant, and afterwards commanded with 
the rank of major general. 

"If there be," said Lord Beaconsfield, "any epoch of history more 
glorious, more satisfactory than another, it is the reign of Queen Anne. 
Then were our armies most brilliant with success, then were our 
victories most glorious; for even Waterloo, the most famed of battles, 
has not obliterated the memory of Blenheim." Certainly the year of 
1704 was one of the most stirring in the annals of Great Britain. The 
forces were vast and wielded by rare genius and the adversary was that 
of bold France. The real interest at stake in the wars was the Protestant 
religion and the balance of power, and in Marlborough and Prince 
Eugene, its issue was to be determined by men equal to the occasion. 
Hitherto the war had dragged on without any decisive achievements, but 
now the crisis was at hand. A great scheme had been developed to 
strike at the heart of the Empire; and IMarlborough had resolved on a 
decisive effort to meet it, on which hung the fate of the civilized world. 

Throughout this campaign, the Duke seems to have relied greatly on 
the experience and energy of Brigadier Ferguson, whenever there was 
special work to be done. He was to commit the care of his base and the 
defense of the line of the Meuse and the Low Countries to Dutch troops. 
He reviewed these forces in a body before embarking on his great 
enterprise 

The Holland garrison marched out of Maestricht, and left the keep- 
ing thereof to Brigadier Ferguson with the English detachment, and 
joined a great body of their own and auxiliary troops on Peter's Hill, on 
the west side of the town. For about five weeks Ferguson seems to have 
commanded the garrison of Maestricht, and they must have been weeks 
full of occupation. The Duke of Marlborough reached Maestricht on the 
10th of May, where he remained until the 14th, actively employed in 
assembling and organizing the army. 

He reviewed the army. Little was known of the ultimate aim of the 
General. It was evndent that the result of the campaign just o])ening 
must be either unequaled triunaph or complete disaster. 

The military ascendency of France in Europe had been for years un- 
questioned and the prestige of the French soldiery was yet unbroken, 



58 

It may not be uninteresting to notice that Brigadier Ferguson, amid all 
the bustle of preparation for the march, found time to review and regu- 
late his private alTairs and settle their disposal in the event of his falling 
in the battle about to be fought. 

The 12th of May, 1704, was the date of a settlement of accounts be- 
tween him and his nephew, Mr. James Ferguson, of Pitfour, an advocate 
at the Scottish Bar, who managed his afifairs in Scotland for him. His 
will bears the above date, headed in the following language: "Beit 
known to all men present, Mr. Brigadier James Ferguson, of Balmakelly, 
for as much as nothing is more certain than death, nor more uncertain 
as the time and manner thereof, and I, being most earnest and desirous 
to leave my worldly affairs clear whenever it please God to remove me 
from this transitory life, and being at present in perfect health of body 
and soundness in mind, do therefore make this my latter will and testa- 
ment: (to-wit) I bequeath my soul to God Almighty, to be saved alone 
by the merits of his only Son and my Lord and Redeemer, and I recom- 
mend my body to be decently and honourably interred when it please 
God to call me, and my worldly substance to dispose of them in the fol- 
lowing manner," etc. 

Two days later, a bulletin dated May 14th, 1704, gave this announce- 
ment : "A detachment under command of Brigadier Ferguson will 
march from hence tomorrow, and my Lord Duke of Marlborough, with 
the Generals here, will follow on Friday, and on Sunday we will join all 
the English troops at Bedbarg, near Cologne, and so pursue our march 
towards Coblenz." On Friday, Marlborough caught up with Fergu- 
son's detachment and marched with them to Bedbarg, when they 
joined the English forces and a train of artillery under General Churchill. 

Ferguson'scommand was composed of abattalion of the Firstguards, 
a battalion of Orkney's regiment, the 23rd. or Welsh's fusileers. It was 
a fine brigade and bore the brunt of the fighting in the operations that 
followed, for it led and sustained the attack on the Schellenberg and at 
Blenheim shared with Rowe's brigade the protracted struggle around the 
strongest part of the French position. 

Without delay Marlborough pressed forward the execution of his grand 
design, marching from Bonn early in the morning and resting during 
the heat of the day. He proceeded up the left bank of the Rhine, at 
Coblenz. He crossed the river and advanced to Mayence, where the 
troops were reviewed before the Elector, who remarked: "These gentle- 
men appear to be all dressed for the ball." At last at the end of June, 
the allied army found itself in front of the fortified heights of Schellen- 
l)erg. This position, strong by nature, was occupied by a Gallo-Bavariari 



59 

force of 12,000 men. Marlborough determined to lose no time in attack- 
ing, and without waiting for the arrival of the main body of the Imperi- 
alists, selected a picked body of 1000 men to lead the assault. Brigadier 
Ferguson leading up the first line of foot, Count Howe and other Gen 
erals bringing up the rest. 

Lieut. General Goor commanded the whole. They pressed forward, 
exposed to a storm of grape from the entrenchments in front and a flank- 
ing fire from the works of Donauwerth. The enemy did very great exe- 
cution. The first discharge of musketry struck down General Goor and 
many other officers. The enemy came out of their trenches with their 
bayonets, but they were quickly obliged to return to them again, for the 
guards stood their ground bravely, and the rest of Ferguson's brigade 
coming at this critical moment rushed forward to their support. But 
though the enemy were driven back into their lines, they were not yet 
won; and the defense was so vigorous that the assailants were twice re- 
pulsed, and the carnage was great. 

The Lord John Hay dismounted his dragoons (the Scots Grays) 
and brought them up to the aid of the infantry, and the Imperialists 
forcing an entrance, he called to them to meet the principal attack, and 
the whole lines pressed forward. The entrenchments were carried and 
the enemy fled in confusion. The Duke of Marlborough, coming in 
with the first of our squadrons, found them on foot pursuing the enemy. 
He ordered Brigadier Ferguson to keep them to their column and to con- 
tinue upon the field of battle. In this action, which Marlborough de- 
scribed as the warmest that had been known for many years, the regi- 
ments composing Ferguson's brigade suff'ered more than any others. 

The victory was complete, though its lustre soon paled before that 
of Blenheim. The Emperor of the House of Austria, conscious that his 
kingdom had been saved from destruction, might well write to Marlbor- 
ough: "This will be an eternal trophy to your most serene Queen. The 
victorious arms of the English nation have never penetrated so far since 
the memory of man." A month passed in marches and negotiations. 
The combined troops of Marlborough and Eugene confronted the united 
forces of Marshal Fallard and the Elector. 

The allied Generals on that morning advanced, accompanied by the 
battalion of guards from Ferguson's brigade, and preparations were 
made to attack the enemy the next day. 

The French and Bavarian armies largely outnumbered the allies. 
The steep banks and marshy bottom, through which Nebel followed 
down to the Danube, presented an obstacle to the assailants, and several 
villages lent additional strength to the defense. Of these the most im- 



60 

porlant was Blenheim, on the right of the French position. Pollard, 
throwing so many men into Blenheim, weakened his center, which 
largely contributed to the losing for him of the battle. The British army 
moved forward from their encampment early in the morning of the 13th. 
Lord Cntts had command of the 9th column, composed of Rowe'sand 
Ferguson's brigades, Halsen's Hessian infantry, and the British cavalry, 
and Wood and Ross. Lord Cutts had orders with these troops to attack 
the village of Blenheim under heavy artillery fire. 

The British soldiers established line bridges over the Nebel at mid- 
day, hearing that Prince Eugene was ready. Marlborough ordered Lord 
Cutts to commence the attack on Blenheim. Rowe, whose brigade was 
leading, gave the order to fire, but in a few minutes he fell, mortally 
wounded. His Lieutenant Colonel and Major were killed trying to carry 
him otf. One-third of his men had dropped, and the brigade, scattered 
and disordered, fell back on the Hessians. But notwithstanding this 
destructive fire, the brigade of Ferguson and Halsen crossed near the 
lower water mill and advanced in front of the village. The enemy met 
the attack with such vigor that, after three successive repulses, the as- 
sailants halted under cover of the rising ground. 

Ferguson, commanding, attacked the village of Blenheim on the 
left, but with no better success. Rowe's and Ferguson's brigades 
crossed the Nebel. Colonel Philip Dormer was on the right of Fergu- 
son's brigade, and they ascended the ridge which at first concealed them 
from the view of the troops. In Blenheim they found themselves oppo" 
site the center of that village, exposed to the direct musketry fire of its 
garrison. The soldiers, reserving their fire, steadily advanced in the 
most intrepid manner toward the palisades by which it was defended, but 
a deadly volley at thirty paces distant, struck down many a gallant fel- 
low, while the rest rushing forward attempted by sheer strength to drag 
away the palings. They fired through intervals, or struck at the French- 
men with their swords and clubbed muskets wherever an opportunity 
offered itself, but all efforts were unavailing. Dormer, commanding the 
battalion, was killed Mordaunt lost an arm. 

The French charged the right of Rowe's disordered troops, and in 
turn were charged by the British horse, who, coming under the fire of 
Blenheim, fell back behind the Hessians. In the meantime Ferguson's 
brigade, with the first guard, assisted by the Hanovarians, renewed 
their attempt upon that village. Their efforts were again unavailing, 
and they stood exposed to the murderous fire of the garrison, until Marl- 
borough desired Lord Cutts to withdraw for a time under the shelter of 
the rising ground. Baffled though they were in their endeavors to force 



61 

an entrance, the troops of Lord Cutts held the ground they had won. 
For the tenacity with which he stood his ground in front of the village 
in spite of the storm of bullets, Lord Cutts received the designation of 
the "Salamander that lives in fire." The French center was driven off 
the field in confusion. General Churchill took part in the rear of the 
village. Lord Orkeny approached from the north, while Lord Cutts 
with Ferguson and Rowe's brigade threatened it from the side of Nebel. 
The French proposed to capitulate, but as General Churchill insisted 
upon an unconditional surrender, no resource remained. To resist was 
hopeless, to escape was impossible. With despair and indignation, the 
French troops submitted to their fate. Twenty-four battalions and 
twelve squadrons surrendered themselves prisoners of war, and thus 
closed the mighty struggle of this eventful day. 

The trophies of this victory saved the Austrian Empire, and for the 
time destroyed the power of France in Central Europe. The trophies 
consisted of one hundred guns, twenty-four mortars, one hundred and 
twenty-nine columns, one hundred and seventy-one standards, seventeen 
pairs of kettle drums, and thirty-six hundred tents. The loss of the enemy 
in men was very great, and the number of prisoners and deserters raised 
the total casualties to more than forty thousand men, before the dispirited 
remains of the French army reached Strasburg. Lediard, after mention- 
ing the officers of high rank who especially distinguished themselves, 
said that Rowe, Ferguson and Burnsdorff, Brigadiers of Foot, deserved 
particularly to be mentioned for their great bravery and prudent con- 
duct. Old Mixonn includes Ferguson in a similar list of those "whose 
names ought to live with honor as long as history can preserve them." 

General Ferguson was married twice. His first wife was Helen, 
daughter of James Drumond, of Perthshire, by whom he had a son and 
daughter, and his second wife was Hester Elizabeth, daughter of Abra- 
ham Hibelet, pastor of the Walloon church, a woman of Dutch family, 
by whom he had one daughter. His second wife remarried Capt. Hen- 
drik Dombach. His daughter married Gerard Vink, advocate at Bois 
le Due in 1730. James, his son, sold the estate of Balmakelly and Ker- 
tonhill and bought those of Kinmundy and Kaynach. Aberdeenshire is 
now held by his descendants. The present representative of the family 
is William Ferguson, of Kinmundy, LL.D., chairman of the great North 
of Scotland Railroad Company, Honorary Burgess of Inverurie. 

Soon after he received his commission for Maior General, he died very 
suddenly, October 22nd, 1705. An old manuscript states that he served in 
four reigns, still maintaining the character of a brave, valiant and 
prudent officer, until his fame raising envy in the breast of the then 



62 

commanding officer, he was cut off by sinister means. Contemporary 
writers are discreetly silent on this ugly story, but all agree in regretting 
his loss as a brave and experienced officer. He was buried in St. Jan's 
Kirk, Bois leDuc, where there is a small tablet to his memory. 




WILLIAM FERGUSON, LL. D. 
Present Representative of the Kinmundy Family in Scotland, 



63 



CHAPTER XV. 
WILLIAM FERGUSON, LL. D. 

Present Representative of Kinmundy. and Chairman of the Great North of Scotland Rail- 
way Company. Honorary Burgess and Guild Brother of Inverurie. The Presentation 
of the Freedom of the Burgh to William Ferguson, February 10. 1892. 

The 10th of February, 1892, was the occasion of the opening of a new 
railroad station in Inverurie, Scotland, when the freedom of the royal 
burgh was presented to Dr. Ferguson. Provost Jackson was accom- 
panied to the platform by Mr. Ferguson with the magistrates and 
councilors of Inverurie. Previous to the speaking, instrumental music 
was played by the band. Provost Jackson was met with a very hearty 
reception. In addressing the assembled company he said: "We meet 
today to celebrate the beginning of an important era in the history of 
this ancient royal burgh. The first mention of Inverurie being a burgh, 
is found in a bill by Pope Celestine the Third, issued in 1195, confirming 
the Abbey of Lindores in Fifeshire, in the possession of a revenue for a 
toft of land in the burgh of Inverurie granted by the Earl of Huntington. 
Tradition says that Inverurie was created a royal burgh by King 
Robert Bruce, after the battle of Inverurie in 1308, at which time ready 
and manly aid was received from Walter Fergus of Crichie, who with his 
three sons and some dependents fought on the side of the King. It may 
be that Inverurie is indebted to the family of Fergus, or Ferguson, of 
which our guest. Dr. Ferguson, is a descendant. The charter was lost 
during the troublesome times which followed. There is in existence two 
charters of confirmation, namely: one by Mary, Queen of Scotts, dated 
June 22nd, 1558, and one by King James VI., dated July 29th, 1587. 

"For many years Inverurie is described as a small town or village, 
until the erection of the bridge over the Don, and the one over the Ury 
at Keith Hill. The roads through the town were often impassible by 
reason of the united inundation of the two rivers. The erection of these 
bridges gave great impetus to trade, and the opening of the Aberdeen- 
shire canal some years later was also a great benefit to the town, bring- 
ing as it did great strings of carts from all quarters, laden with grain to 
be exchanged at the canal head for coal, lime, and feeding stuflf, with 
generally a goodly quantity of current coin of the realm, a portion of 
which would find its way to the tills of the Inverurie merchants for value 



64 

received. The bridges remained; but the canal after a brief existence 
had to give place to the railway. Many were the prophecies of dire 
disaster to business on the closing of the canal. 

"Merchants, however, soon adapted themselves to the new order of 
things. New sources of business were opened up to them by the railway, 
which in course of a short time made up for any loss caused by the pass- 
ing away of the old order of things. To show the progress of the burgh, 
I may state that in 1804 the population was under 500, in 1821 it was 735, 
in 1831 it was 994, in 1851 it was 2,593, in 1881 it was 2,669, in 1891 it was 
3,153. We expect by Whit Sunday, the population will be 4,000 

"If Dr. Ferguson will permit me, I would like to give an outline of his 
personal history as far as it bears on the honorable position which he 
holds among us today. Dr. Ferguson's education was completed at 
Marischal College at Aberdeen, in 1840. His business training began in 
Heith and Glasgow, from 1840 to 1852; then he emigrated to Liverpool, 
where he remained a couple of years. In 1854 we find him a partner of 
Robert Benson & Co., American bankers and general merchants, in 
London, in which business he continued for eight years, after which he 
returned to Liverpool as a partner in the business of Messrs. Croppen, 
Ferguson & Co., and later by himself. He conducted the business in 
Liverpool from 1862 until 1872, when he retired toKinmundy, to which he 
succeeded in 1862, on the death of his father. Dr. Ferguson is an LL. D. 
of the University of Aberdeen, and a Deputy Lieutenant and Justice of 
the Peace of the county, besides being a Fellow of two learned societies 
and a valued member of the General Assembly of the United Free 
Church, from 1873 to 1900, without a break. 

"He has written a useful and interesting guide to the Great North of 
Scotland Railway, and has contributed many papers to societies and 
articles for magazines. Such a varied experience m business has 
qualified Dr. Ferguson in an eminent degree for the position as a 
director of the Great North of Scotland Railway, to which he was 
appointed in 1867. Before I finish I desire to give a short account of the 
ancient connection which existed between this burgh and Dr. Ferguson's 
ancestors. It is recorded in the late Dr. Davidson's book, 'Inverurie and 
the Earldom of Garioch,' that there were at least three brothers, sons of 
William Fergus or Ferguson, at whose house the Marquis of Huntley lodged 
during his occupation of the town in 1644. One of the brothers' names 
was James; he held the office of town clerk of Inverurie from 1645 to 
1673. John took up his abode at Stonehouse. William, the other brother, 
is described as William Fergus of Crichie, Bailie of Inverurie and Laird 
of Badifurrow, now a part of the estate of Manar. This William Fergu- 



65 

son married and became the father of six sons and one daughter. James, 
the third son, adopted the profession of arms. During his long period of 
service, extending over four reigns, from James II. to Queen Anne, he 
attained the rank of Brigadier General. He married and settled down for 
a time on his estate in the Merns. By his first wife he had an only sou 
and daughter. After the death of the Brigadier General, his son, James, 
who succeeded to the estates, sold them and bought Kinmundy in 
Buchan, which estate has been handed down from father to son and is 
now in possession of our respected guest, whom we trust will long be 
spared to enjoy it. I may state that Dr. Ferguson had a family of one 
son and one daughter, the son filling the honorable and responsible 
position of Sheriff of Argyll. It gives me the greatest possible pleasure 
in being permitted to take part in this renewing of an ancient and honor- 
able connection which existed between the burgh and the family of which 
Dr. Ferguson is so distinguished a representative." 

At Inverurie, the 10th of February, 1892, at a meeting of the provost 
magistrates and councilors, which day was the occasion of the opening of 
a new railway station at Inverurie, William Ferguson, Esq., LL. D., of 
Kinmundy, was admitted and received a free Burgess and Guild Brother 
of the Royal Burgh of Inverurie, in recognition of his long, admirable 
service as chairman of the directors of the Great North of Scotland Rail- 
way Co., and in appreciation of his high character and attainments 
(extracted from the council records and the seal of the burgh affirmed by 
H. G. L. Mollinor, town clerk.) It may be mentioned that the seal is 
enclosed in silver and is attached to the scroll with the seal and is 
enclosed in a magnificent morocco case. The Lord Provost handed the 
burgess a ticket for Dr. Ferguson amid enthusiastic cheering, the 
audience rising in mass and waving hats and handkerchiefs. 

Dr. Ferguson, on rising to reply, met with a very hearty reception. 
He said: "Lord Kintor, Provost, Councilors, Ladies and Gentlemen; it is 
difficult for me to express in any adequate way the great honor that I 
feel the burgh of Inverurie has done me on this occasion. There are 
three points that occur to me that I might simply touch upon. First of all 
there is the honor which has been done me, and my sense of it. The 
burgh of Inverurie, as you have just heard from your Provost, as an 
ancient and royal burgh, has great claims on the respect and admiration 
of all who know anything about it, as you have no doubt gathered from 
the very clear account of its history submitted by your Provost. 

"Therefore you will understand that I thoroughly appreciate the posi- 
tion in which I am placed by the generosity of your town council and 
esteem that honor in a very high degree. The diploma that you have 



66 

heard read touches two points as a reason why you have conferred this 
honor upon me. The first is the personal aspect of the case, and the 
other is the position in which I am today placed as Chairman of the 
Great North of Scotland Railway Co. 

"I could dilate at some length on the personal aspects of the case, if 
that were desirable, which is not at this particular time, for I have long 
looked back upon my family connections with Inverurie with pride. Of 
course there are certain historical references of today, and we have cer- 
tain traditional ones which are interesting to us. 

"One of tnese traditions is that my direct ancestors entertained the 
famous Sir Robert Bruce on the occasion of his visit to Inverurie, and al- 
though, as you perhaps know, the very pretty story of the spider has been 
controverted by Sir Herbert Maxwell in his book on Sir Robert Bruce, 
yet we retain the tradition that it occurred with ourselves and with this 
burgh of Inverurie. Of course the ordinary idea is that it happened on 
the coast of the Island Arran^ off the north of Ireland, on the occasion 
when he was about to make a seventh attempt to replace his fortunes in 
this country. That while lying where he saw a spider attempting to spin 
its web in the loft, it attracted his attention and he counted the number 
of times it made the effort, one, two, three, four, five, six, scarcely the 
number which he had made himself. The seventh time he made a spas- 
modic effort, and succeeded in crossing the aperture and taking hold of 
the other side; and it is said Bruce took courage from that, as it was the 
turning point of his fortune. 

"Well, the tradition is, that he slept the night before the Battle of 
Inverurie in Mr. William Ferguson's house, which is or was on the site 
a few yards in front of the town hall. The story of the spider is that it 
attached its web from one side of the post to the cross beam on the other. 
There is a letter existing at Pitfour, I saw it not long ago, in which one 
of the old retainers, Sandy Scott, wrote that he has seen the bed where 
this event took place. Well, seeing is believing. 

"The Provost has touched upon the famous Mr. William Ferguson; 
he had six sons and one daughter. It is from the fourth of these sons, 
not the third, as the Provost says, but the evidence recently given to us 
shows that it is the fourth son, James, the first of the seven or eight 
Jameses who have lived at Kinmundy; and as he told you he became a 
soldier. I think that Mr. William F'erguson, of Crichie, must have been 
a man of considerable means. We know nothing about that, but he 
seemed to be able to set the six sons out in the world with some degree 
of means. The eldest of all became a political agent, and on account of 
his having changed from the politics of his father, of the family for gen- 



67 

erations, his father of Crichie required him to give up his right to the 
estate, and the deed is in existence in which he renounces that right. But 
I have to do with the fourtli son, James, who was the founder of the 
family 1 now represent, and the history from that time until now is un- 
broken. We know the story or the record of the family, so you will see 
that the personal element of my connection with this burgh is very 
strong, and it is very good that the diploma should allude to it, and for 
that I can only briefly thank the Council. The Provost Magistrates have 
alluded to my personal character and I can only say they have made 
more of me than I deserve. 

"The representative character is the real character on which I felt 
from the beginning that I was honored by receiving this honor, and on 
which I could cordially accept it. I stand before you as the representa- 
tive of the Great North of Scotland Railway, and I accept this great 
honor which I feel is conferred on the Railway company rather than on 
myself. I am very proud to receive this honor on behalf of the Great 
North of Scotland Railway." 

William Ferguson, LL. D.,of Kinmundy, Scotland, died September 
11, 1904, having attained to the age of 81 years. His son, James 
Ferguson, of Edinburgh, K. C, succeeds him as the representative of 
the family in Scotland. James is now living on the estate of Kinmundv, 
and has been transferred as Sheriff, from Argyll to Inverurie. 



CHAPTER XVI. 



WALTER FERGUSON, OF BADIFURTiOW. 



In 1680, William Ferguson, of Badifurrow, disposed of the old house 
in Inverurie and large holdings of the burgh roods to his youngest son, 
Walter, who for a long time was bailie of the burgh, and died in 
Inverurie in 1728. Walter married Margaret Panton, by whom he had 
four sons, James, William, John, and George; and five daughters, 
Margaret, Janet, Mary, Barbara, and Bathia, Walter's second and 
youngest son went to Poland, since which no notice has been had of 
him. Walter's third son, John, was a wine merchant in Bath and died 
without issue. William married, in 1716, Catherine Concordia Tepper, 
sister of Peter Tepper, of Warsaw. James, Walter's eldest son, was 
born in 1681, died in 1753. He married Isabel Scott, daughter of George 
Scott, town clerk of Inverurie. He had four sons, Walter, James, John 
and Anthony, and three daughters, Margaret, Mary, and Janet. Walter 
conveyed the estate to William, his second son. The property finally 
passed to his grandson, Walter Ferguson, of Kinnaird, writer in Edin- 
burgh. One of Walter's youngest sons became Colonel in the Russian 
army. One branch of Walter's descendants settled in Prussia, where one 
of them became Fort Major at Breslau in the army of Frederick the 
Great, while another branch, settling in Poland, prospered greatly, in the 
18th century, a grandson becoming a member of the Polish diet and 
banker of the Empress Catherine of Russia, his father having married a 
Polish heiress. He assumed the additional name of Tepper and received 
a letter of congratulation from the King of Prussia on the purchase of an 
estate in his dominion. 

The German army list of 1870 contained the name of a Ferguson 
Tepper, and the estate of his family was called Trezeban Ferguson. 

This family is now extinct in Scotland. Walter Ferguson, of Kinnaird, 
writer in Edinburgh, grandson of the elder Walter, son of William of 
Badifurrow, redeemed the Inverurie common lands which his father had 
bonded to their relative Pitfour, and left them to his widow, Katherine 
Swinton, who sold them to the Earl of Kintor in 1798. "The ancestral 
seven lower roods and one sixteenth common lands of the Fergusons," 



69 

says Dr. Davidson, "were the last remaining link to this family to Inver- 
urie." The sixteenth measured about 16 acres, forty-two roods Scot. 

Walter Ferguson, of Kinnaird, for a long time kept up a correspon- 
dence with Mr. William Davidson, parish minister of Inverurie, and sev- 
eral of his letters indicate the interest which was taken by himself and 
by his brother, James, a captain in the Royal Navy, who had received 
very high compliments from Admiral Rodney and from Lord Howe on 
his conduct in the sea fight of the time, and was Lieutenant Governor of 
Greenwich hospital. On the 18th of June, 1791, Walter Ferguson, of 
Kinnaird, writing to Mr. Davidson, said: "I now have the pleasure to 
inform you that I have made an elegant plan of buildings upon my 
ground, which, if it please God I live to see finished, will be acknowl- 
edged to do credit to the town of Inverurie. I am happy to hear that 
the bridge over the Don is finished and gives satisfaction. I am now 
anxious to see the bridge of Ury begun, and when that is also finished I 
shall hope my native burgh will prosper, as I have a very great attach- 
ment to it, and am very much pleased to hear its improvements are begun 
and hope it will raise a spirit of trade and manufacture." 

On the 8th of February, 1796, he announces the final abandonment 
of his scheme: " I wrote you before that I had made a plan for an ele- 
gant building on my grandfather's possessions, but that is now entirely 
dropped by the death of my brother, the Governor, without lawful issue, 
and as to my brother Anthony, he is now settled for life in another coun- 
try and will never inquire about it." 

In his last letter, dated July the first, 1796, he says: "I am determined 
to part with Inverurie immediately and give you a power to treat with 
people upon the subject, but not to finish anything without acquainting 
me. I never spoke to any person but Pitfour alone and it is a thing I 
never intended, after the landlord had been about five hundred years 
in my family from father to son." 

Walter Ferguson, of Kinnaird, died in May, 1797, and the property so 
long held by the family passed from his widow to the Earl of Kintor. 

Walter Ferguson's geneology is not complete — among his descend- 
ants are the following grandchildren: James, governor of Greenwich 
hospital; Anthony, settled in Poland, received the additional name of 
Tepper Ferguson; Walter of Kinnaird, arms registered in 1779. 

With the above generations', this line of descent became extinct in 
Scotland. 



70 



CHAPTER XVII. 



JANET FERGUSON, THE ONLY DAUGHTBl^ OF THE LAIRI) OF 
BADIFURWW. 

Janet Ferguson was born in Scotland about the middle of the seven- 
teenth century. She married her cousin, John Ferguson, a Polish mer- 
chant. 

This line of descent has a representative in Scotland at the present 
time, but the record of the family is very brief. 

A younger son, Alexander Ferguson, became bailie in Inverurie about 
1723. In the uprising of 1745 the tov^rn clerk sent a complaint to Moir, of 
Stanwood, then commanding under Lord Louis Gordon, of the conduct 
of a party of Jacobite soldiers under the command of a Mr. Taylor. 
They attacked Bailie Ferguson's house in search of arms; the Bailie 
received a personal injury, and blood was shed on that occasion. It was 
a great surprise, for the royal burgh had always been loyal. In Doctor 
Davidson's record of property holders in Inverurie, we find that George 
Scott sold his property to his cousin, Alexander Ferguson, who falling 
into pecuniary difficulties sold this property under redemption to the Earl 
of Kintor, from whom it was recovered by his son. Smith Ferguson, but 
only to be re-sold. 

This Alexander Ferguson is the author of the following letter, which 
is pleasing evidence of the interest that the members of the family took 
in the ancient burgh with which they had been so long connected: 
To the Honorable Magistrates of Inverurie: 
Gentlemen : 

The great regard and affection I have for the good town of Inve- 
rurie, where so many of my friends and relatives have lived and died, 
and where I have enjoyed so many happy days, naturally prompted 
me at my leisure to look into the Parliament of Scotland and conventions 
of the royal burrows, to see at what period it claimed a vote in the laws 
of our country. 

From each of these records I have taken such excerpts as related to 
the representatives of your burrow, as none are so much interested in 
that representation as you who have the honor to be the administration. 



71 

I hope it will not be disagreeable for you to see who your predeces- 
sors thought proper to intrust in that capacity. I have therefore enclosed 
a copy of the excerpts from each of the records. 

1 am, with very earnest wishes for the good and prosperity of the 
town, gentlemen, your most obedient and very humble servant, 
Edinburgh, June 6th, 1768. Alexander Ferguson. 

Alexander had at least one older brother who was known as Robert 
Ferguson, of Peterhead. He owned the property two roods north of 
George Ferguson before 1727. 



CHAPTER XVIII. 

GEORGE FERGUSON, FcACTOR OF THE DUKE OF PE^TH, cAN^ 
HIS "DESCENDANTS IN SCOTLAND. 

George Ferguson, the fifth son of William Ferguson, Laird of Badi- 
furrow, lived and died in Old Meldrura, which is situated about four 
miles from Inverurie and about seventeen miles from Aberdeen. He was a 
man of great executive ability, and had the entire control of the business 
afifairs of the Duke of Perth. He was noted for his generosity. During 
the famine of 1696 in Scotland, he and a friend are recorded as having 
purchased twelve hundred barrels of bere (a species of barley) to sell 
to the people in the north of Scotland, and as having applied to the 
Privy Council for protection for their cargo from the French privateers. 
The price to the people was fixed by the authorities, "they having no 
desire of profit but for the keeping of the poor in the shire from starving. ' ' 

George Ferguson was twice married. He first married Jane Forbes, 
and then Christian Stephens. By his first marriage he had four sons, 
Robert, John, William, and George, and five daughter, Jane, Janet, 
Mary, Christian, and Magdalen. William, the third son, married and set- 
tled in Scotland. Robert, John, and George entered the English army, 
in which Robert and John attained the rank of lieutenant and George 
the rank of corporal. There is no record in Scotland of these three 
brothers having returned to their native land. They are recorded as 
having died unmarried. But it is now believed they left the army and 
went to America in the early part of the eighteenth century. Of the 
daughters of George Ferguson, Jean, Janet, Christian, and Magdalen 
died unmarried, and Mary married a Mr. Milure, a merchant of Old 
Meldrum, aqd had two daughters. By his second marriage George 
Ferguson had three daughters, Margaret and Elizabeth, both of 
whom died unmarried, and Isabel, who married a Mr. Murdock, of Old 
Meldrum, but had no issue. 

William Ferguson, the third son of George Ferguson, lived in Troch 
in Aberdeenshire, and being a "man of sound judgment and quick pen- 
etration," was familiarly addressed as " Judge." He married Mary 
Panton, and had two sons, George and John, and two daughters, Eliza- 
beth and Mary. 



73 

Elizabeth Ferguson, the elder daughter of William Ferguson, mar- 
ried a Mr. Jardine, an officer of excise, son of Sir A. Jardine, of Apple- 
garth, of Drumfrieshire; and had three sons and one daughter. Mary 
Ferguson, the younger daughter, died unmarried. 

George Ferguson, the elder son of William Ferguson, lived at Kel- 
mory and was married to Margaret Tullock, a member of one of the 
most ancient families in the county of Moray. He had one son, William, 
a merchant in London, and one daughter, Mary, who died unmarried. 

John Ferguson, the younger son, was a captain in the Royal navy. 
He married Lydia Chambers and had four children: John, who was a 
captain in the navy; William, who was a captain in the army; Lydia, 
who married a Mr. Sheridan and who appears on record as an authoress; 
and Marion, who married a Dr. Smith. 

John Ferguson, Senior, was called the "Black CajDtain of the Forty- 
fifth." He was a most active officer. The Jacobite writers describe him 
as "a most active emissary of the Hanoverian party." He more than 
once narrowly missed capturing the fugitive prince. It is recorded as a 
coincidence that the arrival of his ship on the coast of Sher in hot pur- 
suit of Prince Charles was foreseen by a Highland seer. It was by that 
ship that the "Flora MacDonald" was captured, and the Campbell militia 
seized only a lesser prize in the capture of Lord Lovat. The following 
notice of John Ferguson is given in Charmock's "Biographia Navals." 
This gentleman in the early part of the year 1746 was commander of the 
boat, "Turace," then employed as a cruiser off the coast of Scotland. 
He seized 800 stand of arms of McDonald of Banasdale House in the Isle 
of Rosay; he rendered himself so conspicuous on that station by his activ- 
ity, diligence and general conduct, that on the sixth of October in the 
same year he was promoted, it is said, in consequence of the express 
interference of the Duke of Cumberland, to be captain of the "Nightin- 
gale," a new frigate just then launched. 

During the ensuing year he was probably stationed on a cruising ves- 
sel. In the month either of September or October, he again distinguished 
himself by the capture of a French ship of somewhat superior force, 
called the "Dauphin Royal," carrying twenty-two guns and one hundred 
fifty men. The enemy made a running but very obstinate fight and 
was not overpowered until after a contest of ten hours' continuance. No 
further mention is made of him until the year 1753, when we find him 
commanding the sloop "Porcupine" on the coast of Scotland, and being 
very active in scouring that quarter and preventing the return of the rebel 
chiefs who had escaped to France, it being rumored that many of them 
were on the point of attempting to return to their native country in hope 



74 

of inciting anotrier revolt. He was not long afterwards appointed regu- 
lating officer of this same station. 

There is no account of him from this time until the year 1758. In 
that year he was captain of the "Prince of Orange," a fourth rate ship 
of sixty guns, which was one of the ships sent on the expedition against 
Lewisburg. He probably remained in the same station for some time, for 
there is no mention of himself or his ship until the year 1762, when the 
"Prince of Orange" was one of the Channel fleet under the orders of Sir 
John HawKes and his Royal Highness the Duke of York. After the war 
he was appointed to the command of the "Firews," a fourth rate ship of 
sixty guns. 

The following anecdote is related of Captain John Ferguson during 
the expedition against Lewisburg. The coast in the neighborhood of 
Lewisburg was so strongly fortified both by nature and art that to effect 
a landing was considered by the officers generally almost an impossibility. 
The Admiral took the advice of each captain separately and, to use the 
historian's own words, "when it came to the turn of Captain Ferguson, 
an old, brave and experienced officer, whom the Admiral had requested 
from the Lord's Admiralty to attend him in the service, and on whose 
opinion and conduct in the most trying occasions he placed great con- 
fidence, the Captain delivered himself in the most respectful terms in 
regard to the opinion of his brethren, but he despised the arguments 
drawn from danger connected with the landing. He advised an attempt 
to land and to force the enemy's forts with all the arts and strength in 
their power. He advised the Admiral for his own honor and the glory of 
his country to exert that power with which he was invested and not to 
leave it to the uncertain resolutions of a council of war, which had been 
so fatal at Minorca, at Rochfort, and even at Halifax, to the disgrace 
of all concerned and to the extreme loss of the nation." The Admiral 
acquiesced in the justice of the Captain's observation on a council of 
war. He resolved to call no council of war, but strictly to adhere to his 
instructions, which were to land the troops on the island of Cape Breton. 
Captain John Ferguson died June 13th, 1767. His two sons are supposed 
to have been lost either during the American or French Revolution, so 
that when the Captain died he left a large estate in Scotland without 
heirs. This heirship was traced to the Maryland branch of the American 
family, but not being able to establish a claim, the records of the family 
having been lost in a fire, this estate we suppose went to the Crown of 
England. 

With the death of Captain John Ferguson, this line of descent 
became extinct in Scotland, 



TTISTORY of the Maryland 
^ ^ Branch of the Ferguson 
Family in America, by Martin 
Luther Ferguson, of Seneca 
Falls, New York. 



THE MARYLAND BRANCH. 



CHAPTER I. 
FcAMILY TRADITIONS. 



The following eight traditional stories have been handed down from 
generation to generation in certain related but widely separated families 
by the name of Ferguson in America. 

These traditions have been collected and have been traced back to 
their proper source in Scotland. They have been found to agree in sub- 
stance with facts found in the foregoing history of the family and descend- 
ants of William Ferguson, Laird of Badifurrow. 

These traditional stories are as follows: — 

1st. That the family was descended from the Royal House of Scot- 
land, from Fergus, first King of the Scots. 

2nd. That some of the ancestors of the family were among the landed 
aristocracy of Scotland. 

3rd. That one of the ancestors was a member of the Scottish Parli- 
ament. 

4th. That the family descended from a family in Scotland in which 
there was a noted general, who lived in the days of Oliver Cromwell. 

5th. That there was an ancestor who saved a portion of the people 
of Scotland from starving during a famine. 

Gth. That there was a noted sea captain in the family who died in 
Scotland without heirs. 

7th. That three brothers, Robert, John and George, came to Amer- 
ica at an early date, one settling in New England, one in Maryland and 
one in Georgia. 

Sth. That the head of the Maryland branch of the family was Rob- 
ert Ferguson, an English army officer, who settled where the city of 
Washington, D. C, is now located, and whose residence at that time was 
opposite to where the White House now stands, and just back of Jack- 
son's monument. 

Referring these traditions to the foregoing history of the family and 



78 

descendants of William Ferguson, Laird of Badifurrow, it is found that 
they are substantiated by the following facts: — 

1st. That the family was descended from Fergus, First King of the 
Scots. 

2nd. That some of the representatives of the family possessed titled 
estates. 

3rd. That William Ferguson, Laird of Badifurrow, represented Inve- 
rurie in the Scottish Parliament in 1661 and 1663. 

4th. That General James Ferguson lived durmg the latter part of 
the 17th century, and the forepart of the 18th century, he being the only 
one of the name who attained to that distinction. 

5th. That George Ferguson, the Factor of the Duke of Perth, saved 
many people from starving during a famine in Scotland iu 1696. 

6th. That Captain John Ferguson, a noted sea captain, died in 
Scotland without heirs. 

In 1875 an agent visited America to look for the heirs of this cap- 
tain. The records of the family in America having been destroyed by a 
disastrous conflagration, the claim could not be established, and the 
estate reverted to the Crown. 

7th. That George Ferguson, the Factor of the Duke of Perth, had 
three sons, Robert, John and George. These brothers entered the mili- 
tary service and no record is found of them after 1706. They were sup- 
posed to have been killed in battle. 

When the above traditions in the American family are thus referred 
to the corresponding facts in the history of the Scottish family, no 
doubt can exist but that these two families are from one and the same 
line. 




w oi 

2 « 

W o 



79 



CHAPTER II. 
THE TH%EE ENGLISH SOLDIERS, %OBER% JOHN, cAND GEORGE. 

The pioneers in America are believed to have been the sons of 
George Ferguson, of Old Meldrum. They were born the latter part of 
the 17th century. In the year 1693 they entered the English army, under 
the command of their uncle, Colonel James Ferguson. John was 
appointed ensign in 1700, lieutenant in 1702. There was another John 
Ferguson, a cousin of the first, who was said to have been the hand- 
somest man in King William's army. George Ferguson was a corporal. 

Records are found of three soldiers by the name of Robert Ferguson, 
who were in the army at the same time, and all of them nephews of Col- 
onel James Ferguson. 

One of these Robert Fergusons was in Colonel Lauder's regiment of 
Scotch brigade, of which his uncle. General James Ferguson, was then 
major. He was promoted to captain, May 7th, 1694. When General Fer- 
guson was transferred to the Dutch service in Holland in 1697, this Rob- 
ert Ferguson resigned. The second Robert Ferguson is known to have 
been in the army as early as 1692. He was promoted to lieutenant in 
1693, and was transferred with his regiment to the Dutch service in 1697. 
He was in the battle of Blenheim, where he was dangerously wounded 
and was not expected to live. He was sent to London, where he 
recovered. He returned to the army, and was promoted to captain in 
1706, and major in T717. In 1730 he retired from the army and took his 
invalid wife and family into Ireland, where he died in 173S. 

The third Robert Ferguson has been identified as the brother of John 
Ferguson, and the son of George Ferguson. He entered the army in 
1693, and was made first lieutenant in the Cameron regiment under his 
uncle, then Colonel James Ferguson. He was wounded at the battle of 
Blenheim, but must have remained in the army, for his record, and those 
of his brothers, John and George, have been traced until the year 1706, 
after which year no trace of them can be found. These three brothers 
are recorded in Scotland as having died in the army, unmarried. It is 
now believed that this is not a true record. It is believed they did not 
die in the army, but after the death of their uncle, General James Fergu- 
son, on whom they probably depended for promotion, they left the mili- 
tary service and accepted the first opportunity oftered to seek their for- 
tunes in what was then known as the New World. In fact it is now 



believed that these brothers were the three traditional brothers, Robert, 
John and (ieorge, who were the pioneers of the Ferguson family in Amer- 
ica. 

This conclusion is reached from the similarity between the tradi- 
tional stories found in the American families, and the historical records 
of the descendants of William Ferguson, Laird of Badifurrow, and from 
this additional fact, that there was but one member of that family who left 
descendants, the third son, William, which line of descent became extinct 
in the fourth generation, which fact is on record in the records of the 
Names and Clan of Ferguson. These three brothers, Robert, John and 
George Ferguson, according to the tradition in the American family, 
landed at Baltimore the latter part of the 17th, or the forepart of the 18th 
century, and settled in Maryland. There is a tradition, in the New Eng- 
land branch of the family, that the three Ferguson brothers went to 
Ireland before they came to America, and that the head of the family in 
America went from Prince George county, Maryland, to Pelham, Massa- 
chusetts, about the year 1740. Another brother settled in Georgia, and 
one remained in Maryland. Each of these brothers became the 
origin of a long line of descendants, thus establishing the three branches 
of the family, the New England branch, the Southern branch, and the 
Maryland branch, in each of which are related the same or similar tradi- 
tions. 

A destructive conflagration having destroyed the records of the first 
three generations of the family, but little can be learned of the earlypio- 
neers. In the records of Prince George county, Maryland, where these 
brothers first settled, a mention is made of John Ferguson as early as 
1713; and there is also a record of his marriage to Mary Williams in 1715. 
No trace of Robert or George can be found. 

There is a strong probability that John Ferguson, the Pioneer, went 
from Prince George county, Maryland, to Pelham, Massachusetts, about 
1740, and became a prominent man in that locality. He had four sons, 
William, James, Samuel, Robert. Among his descendants are the Thorn- 
ton family, descendants of Matthew Thornton, one of the signers of the 
Declaration of Independence, the Ralph family, of Watertown, N. Y., 
and the family of Stephen Ferguson, near Rushville, N. Y. There is a 
tradition in this branch of the family that the three brothers went to the 
North of Ireland, and afterwards came to America. 

Two sons of "The Pioneer," Robert, have been identified, Robert 
and David; and it is thought there was another son whose name is lost to 
the family. Robert, the Pioneer, probably passed away at the old home- 
stead where the city of Washington, D. C. , is now located. It is uncertain 



1 



m--^ '^ 




1^0" 








IPP 


A 

i 










^^^ferizz 


' S 


4 




M 


1 










ny 



u < 



81 

under whose control the estate went; but it is believed to have Hnally 
come into the possession of Edward Peerce, who married Ann Ferguson, 
the daughter of William Ferguson, and the grand-daughter of David 
Ferguson, the son of "The Pioneer," Robert. 

Another tradition is that all the Ferguson families in Virginia, 
Maryland, and Mississippi, are of the same line of descent, one of the 
members of the Pioneer family having located where one of the parks in 
Washington, D. C, now stands. This evidently refers to Robert 
Ferguson . 

The Hon. Thomas B. Ferguson, Governor of Oklahoma, who belongs 
to the Maryland branch of the family, relates that his grandfather held a 
tradition that his grandfather held a claim with other relatives to the 
land where the city of Washington, D. C, is now located. This claim 
was never satisfied. 

The following incidents show that the three branches of the family 
were aware of their relationship within a recent date, and also show that 
they held the same traditions in regard to the three brothers who founded 
the family in America. 

Robert B. Ferguson, formerly of Orleans, N. Y., often told that he 
distinctly remembered when correspondence was kept up with the 
Southern branch of the family; and that at one time a cousin of his 
grandfather, a fine appearing, well to-do gentleman, came to visit them 
from Georgia, making the journey on horseback, with two colored ser- 
vants as attendants, and remained nearly a week. John H. Ferguson, 
formerly of Canandaigua, N. Y., the son of Robert B. Ferguson men- 
tioned above, had a friend by the name of Stephen Ferguson, of Rush- 
ville, N. Y., whose ancestors were from New England. There was a 
striking resemblance between these two families ^ They held the same 
traditional stories, especially those in regard to the three brothers who 
settled in America. 



82 



CHAPTER III. 
THE SONS OF ROBERT FETiGUSON, " THE PIONEER/' 

Founder of the Maryland Branch of the Family. 

Robert Ferguson.— Little is known of this son of "The Pioneer." 
He is mentioned in the Record of Maryland, in 1769, as the owner of three 
parcels of land, over three hundred acres of which were sold about that 
date. The next mention found of him is in Frederick, Md., where he was 
engaged in the mercantile business. He died in 1780, leaving one son, 
Cumberland. 

David Ferguson. — This son of "The Pioneer" was born the fore 
part of the eighteenth century. This name, David, here enters into the 
family for the first time. It is^quite remarkable that in six successive and 
fully recorded generations of the family in Scotland, but seven different 
names are found, namely: William, Alexander, Robert, George, James, 
John and Waller. In the first three generations in America only six 
different names are found; three of the names recorded in Scotland, 
Alexander, George and Walter, are dropped, and two, David and Leyi, 
are added. For ten successive generations the names William, Robert, 
James and John occur, except in the fourth or pioneer generation, in 
which the name James is not found. In the ninth and tenth generations 
the names George and Walter again appear as family names, so that all the 
names of the sons of William Ferguson, Laird of Badifurrow, are in the 
family of today. This fact goes far in establishing the line of descent. 

From the evidence at hand, it is thought that David Ferguson must 
have lived in Bladensburg, Md., across the Potomac from the present 
city of Washmgton. He was a planter and an owner of slaves. During the 
Revolutionary War he was a patriot and used all his influence in assisting 
the colonists in their struggle for independence. A tradition has been 
lianded down in the family that he held for a time an official position 
under the Colonial government. It is now known that he held such a 
position. 

In a list of prominent men by the name of Ferguson, gathered from 
the records of several of the Southern States, appears the name of David 
Ferguson of Maryland. He was appointed a member of the Council of 
Safety in 177G, which Council had the authority to transact public busi- 



82 



CHAPTER III. 
THE SONS OF ROBERT FERGUSON, ' ' THE PIONEER, ' ' 

Founder of the Maryland Branch of the Family. 

RoBKRT Ferguson.— Little is known of this son of "The Pioneer." 
He is mentioned in the Record of Maryland, in 1769, as the owner of three 
parcels of land, over three hundred acres of wh^ch were sold about that 
date. The next mention found of him is in Frederick, Md., where he was 
engaged in the mercantile business. He died in 1780, leaving one son, 
Cumberland. 

David Ferguson. — This son of "The Pioneer" was born the fore 
part of the eighteenth century. This name, David, here enters into the 
family for the first time. It is quite remarkable that in six successive and 
fully recorded generations of the family in Scotland, but seven different 
names are found, namely: William, Alexander, Robert, George, James, 
John and Walter. In the first three generations in America only six 
different names are found; three of the names recorded in Scotland, 
Alexander, George and Walter, are dropped, and two, David and Leyi, 
are added. For ten successive generations the names William, Robert, 
James and John occur, except in the fourth or pioneer generation, in 
which the name James is not found. In the ninth and tenth generations 
the names George and Walter again appear as family names, so that all the 
names of the sons of William Ferguson, Laird of Badifurrow, are in the 
family of today. This fact goes far in establishing the line of descent. 

From the evidence at hand, it is thought that David Ferguson must 
have lived in Bladensburg, Md., across the Potomac from the present 
city of Washmgton. He was a planter and an owner of slaves. Duringthe 
Revolutionary War he was a patriot and used all his influence in assisting 
the colonists in their struggle for independence. A tradition has been 
handed down in the family that he held for a time an official position 
under the Colonial government. It is now known that he held such a 
position. 

In a list of prominent men by the name of Ferguson, gathered from 
the records of several of the Southern States, appears the name of David 
Ferguson of Maryland. He was appointed a member of the Council of 
Safety in 1776, which Council had the authority to transact public busi- 



ROBERT FERGUSON. 

"The Pioneer." 
Founded Maryland E 



-Robert Ferguson. 



—David Ferooson. 



-John Bell Ferguson. 
married Elizabeth White, 
married Sarah Ferguson. 



-David Bell Ferguson, 



-John Ferguson, 



I Thomas Wood. 



—Thomas Wood. 



83 

ness during the interval between the Colonial Congresses. He was at one 
time in the Colonial army, serving under Generals Wayne and Small- 
wood. 

In the fore part of the nineteenth century, David Ferguson's resi- 
dence burned to the ground. The ruins can be seen even to this day. 
How long he resided in Bladensburg, or where he died, cannot be ascer- 
tained. It is known that the family left this locality and settled at 
Baltimore, near where a statue of a horse is now placed. There is no 
further record of them. 

The following public record is proof that David Ferguson was alive 
in 1805. 

Book I. R. N., page 207. Indenture made the 20th of June, 1N05, 
between William Ferguson, of Ontario County, N. Y,, of the one part, 
and David Ferguson, of Prince George County, Maryland, of the other 
part, witnesses that for $800.00 paid, William Ferguson sells land in 
Washington County, D. C, which was deeded by William Conn to 
William Ferguson in 1780, called Barbadoes. The children of David 
Ferguson, as far as they are known, were: David, William, James, John 
and Ann. 



84 



CHAPTER IV. 
THE CHILD%EN OF 'DAVID FERGUSON, OF 'BLADENSBURG. 

Three Revolutionary Soldiers. David. James, and John. 

Among the many men, soldiers, lawyers, physicians, and clergymen, 
and others, whose names the Ferguson family have given to history, 
none stand out more prominently than those who made warfare their 
business in life. It was Walter Fergus and his three sons who brought to 
the family a position and prestige which has endured for many genera- 
tions. They went forth with Bruce to the battle of Inverurie which 
brought about the final independence of Scotland, and their services on 
that day were rewarded with land grants from the King himself. 

And they were not the last Fergusons to take up arms. There have 
been many since who have fought for their country. The American 
families point with pride to three soldiers of the American Revolution, 
David, James, and John, grandsonsof "The Pioneer," Robert. 

David was born about the middle of the eighteenth century and "was 
enrolled by S. Chew with all Maryland," the 25th of July, 1775. His 
identification is made complete by the fact that there was but one David 
Ferguson in the Maryland enrollment. And from the following records he 
would seem to have figured both in the land and naval service. On the six- 
teenth of November, 1776, David Ferguson, Second Lieutenant of Marines 
on the galley Conqueror, resigned his commission. Later, on June 17th, 
1777, he enlisted in a company, called the Gallant Conquerors, and was 
appointed SeciHid Lieutenant on April 2nd, 1778, having with that com- 
pany taken the oath of fidelity and support to the State according to law, 
and received his certificate. 

The public records afford no information as to his residence or death. 
The facts concerning the younger brothers, James and John, are much 
more scarce. While David was often mentioned by name, the same does 
not occur with his two brothers. They would seem to have dropped 
from the knowledge of the family The public record affords the follow- 
ing information concerning them. James and John Ferguson were mem- 
bers of a company of which Andrew Beall was Captain, organized April 
12th, 1776, in Bladensburg, Md., the petition for which was signed by 
forty-eight persons. There is a tradition that these two brothers were 



85 

killed in battle; but there seems to be nothing in the public records to 
confirm such a story. It is known that in 1789, in the neighborhood of 
Bladensburg, "the estate of one Ruth, widow of James Ferguson, was 
settled." It is believed that Sarah Ferguson, who in later years became 
the wife of her cousin. Rev. John Ferguson, was a daughter of James 
and Ruth Ferguson above mentioned. 



CHAPTER V. 
cANN FERGUSON, OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD. 

Ann Ferguson, the only daughter of David Ferguson, was born at 
Bladensburg, Md., June 15th, 1756. But little information can be found 
concerning her early life. She was married to Thomas Wood, a farmer, 
of Montgomery, Md. 

Mr. Wood was a Revolutionary soldier, and for sixty years is said to 
have carried an English bullet under his shoulder. He moved to New 
York State probably in 1803, and settled on a farm two miles southeast 
of Clifton Springs. He built a house facing the Orleans road on the 
south side of his farm, near a very high hill. Some indications of this 
primitive home can still be found. In later years a more substantial 
residence was built on the opposite side of the hill. This building is still 
standing. Though this farm was sold over thirty years ago, it is still 
known as the Wood Farm. 

Mrs. Wood was a plain, unassuming woman, neat and precise. Those 
who knew her, refer to her in terms of highest praise and respect. She 
died December 8th, 1842, in her 86th year. Her husband, Thomas Wood, 
died December 8th, 1840. Many of their descendants are living in 
Orleans and Ontario counties, N. Y., and in the State of Ohio. The 
children of Mrs. Wood born in Maryland were: Elisha, John, Thomas 
and Nancy. 

The fifth generation of this family in America are: Elisha Wood; John 
Wood, of Clifton Springs, N. Y., who married Mary Williams; Rebecca 
Wood, of Orleans County, N. Y., who married Walter Sherwood; Eliza- 
beth Wood, Sarah Wood, and Spencer Wood. 



87 



CHAPTER VI. 
WILLIAM FERGUSON, OF BLADENSBURG, MD. 

William Ferguson, of Bladensburg, Md., grandson of "The Pioneer," 
Robert, and the son of David Ferguson, was born about 1750, in Bladens- 
burg, Md. He was a planter and owner of slaves. He married Elizabeth 
Bell, daughter of Robert Bell. About the beginning of the 19th century, 
there was an extensive emigration from Prince George county, Md., to 
the Genesee Valley in New York State, then thought to be the "Garden 
of the New World." When one family went there was an inducement 
for others to follow, and in some cases nearly the entire neighborhood 
went to New York State. It was a long and tedious journey of some 
twenty days, the luggage being hauled over the mountains in wagons 
drawn by four horse teams, the men and women riding on horse-back. 
William Ferguson, with his wife and four unmarried sons, Robert, William, 
David, and Levi, made this journey in the year 1803, and settled one mile 
east of Clifton Springs, near what is now called "Tillot's Corners," on the 
Phelps road. He brought with him twenty-one slaves, who were set at 
liberty soon after their arrival, those who were past laboring being cared 
for by the family. 

James Ferguson, the oldest son, and Jane, who had married Henry 
Wirt, soon after followed their parents into the new country. In the year 
1807, a sad incident took place. William Ferguson was a man who would 
not be imposed upon, proud and spirited. In a controversy with one of 
his hired help he was struck with a knife. The wound proved fatal, and 
he died in his S7th year and was buried at Phelps, N. Y. His wife 
declared she would no longer live among barbarians, so she sold her 
property to her son, William, and went back to Maryland, taking with 
her two of her sons, David and Levi. She lived to a good old age and 
was buried in Washington, D. C. 

William Ferguson and his wife were dignified people, and stood high 
in society. Mrs. Ferguson's china closet contained a rare collection. It came 
into the possession of her grandson, Levi Ferguson, who prized it so 
highly that no one was allowed to handle it. Among the colored people 
who came to New York State with William Ferguson was a William 
Riley. His daughter married a colored man by the name of County. As 
long as this family lived, they kept a sacred guard over the grave of their 



former master. This may be considered an index to William Ferguson's 
character. He won the love and respect of the colored people about 
him by his kindness and by the interest he took in their welfare. 

BLADENSBURG, MARYLAND. 

Bladensburg, the former home of the Ferguson family, is situated on 
the Annacosta river. Formerly it was a port of entry for vessels of con- 
siderable tonnage and was of more importance commercially than the 
city of Washington. But the river has fast filled with sand, and now in 
many places is but two feet deep. The town has been the scene of many 
stirring events. It was a chosen spot for the settlement of disputes by 
dueling. At the present time its inhabitants are mostly negroes, and the 
buildings old and dilapidated. There is a hotel in the town once called 
the Indian Queen, but now known as the George Washington House. It 
is an ancient looking building with an inscription near the top of one of 
the walls, "George Washington, 1732." 

During the war with England, in 1812, a battle was fought here 
under General Winder. The British were victorious. The Americans 
retreated in some confusion in the direction of Georgetown. The city of 
Washington was then at the mercy of the enemy. The British crossed 
the Potomac, fired the Navy yard, Capitol, State, War and Treasury 
buildings, besides many private residences. At last they came to the 
White House. President Madison had prepared a feast for the army 
officers on their return; but the British officers were partakers of what 
had been provided. They then fired the White House, President Madison 
having hastily departed before the arrival of the English army. 

WILLIAM FERGUSON'S WILL. 

In the name of God, Amen — I, William Ferguson, of the County of 
Ontario, and State of New York, considering the certainty of death, and 
the uncertainty of the time thereof , do therefore make and request this my 
last will and testament, in manner and form as follows, that is to say: 
first and principally I commit my soul into the hands of Almighty 
GOD, and my body to the earth, to be decently buried by direction of my 
executors hereinafter named; after my debts and funeral charges are sat- 
isfied, I desire and bequeath as follows: 

I give and bequeath to my beloved wife, Elizabeth Ferguson, one-fifth 
part of my real estate, which is in the county aforesaid, which one-fifth 
part of the said lands is to be laid oft" so as to include my dwelling house, 
together with the other buildings, such as barns, sheds, stables, and 
other houses adjoining thereto, which said fifth part of my lands, together 



with the improvements thereon, it is my will that my said wife, Elizabeth, 
have peaceful and quiet possession and free use thereof during her life, 
and after the death of my wife, Elizabeth, I give and bequeath unto my 
youngest son, Levi Ferguson, his heirs and assigns forever, all the above 
described one-fifth part of my land; and the remaining part of my lands, 
being four-fifths, 1 give and bequeath to my four sons, namely Robert 
Bell Ferguson, John Ferguson, William Ferguson, and David Bell Fergu- 
son. To them that are my last named sons, their heirs and assigns for- 
ever, and as touching my personal estate, it is my will that my above 
named wife, Elizabeth, have the free use and benefit of all my goods 
and chattels, and personal estate of every kind whatsoever, during her 
life, and after the death of my wife it is my will that all my children have 
an equal part of the personal estate, share and share alike, agreeable to 
value. The names of my children, which are to share in my per- 
sonal estate, are as follows : 

James Ferguson, Catherine Witherall, residing in the District of 
Columbia, the wife of John Witherall, Ann Pierce, wife of Edward 
Pierce, residing in Maryland, Robert Bell Ferguson, John Ferguson, 
William Ferguson, David Bell Ferguson, and Levi Ferguson, also Jane 
Wirt, the wife of Henry Wirt. These my nine above named children to 
have equal share alike of all my personal estate after the death of my 
wife. Lastly I constitute and appoint my beloved wife, with my sons, 
Robert Bell Ferguson and David Bell Ferguson, executors. This my last 
will and testament thereby ratifying and confirming this my last will 
and testament, and revoking all others, in testimony whereof I have here- 
to set my hand and seal this the 12th day of May, 1806. 

WILLIAM FERGUSON. [Seal.] 
Signed, sealed and acknowledged by William Ferguson, the testator of 
his last will and testament, in the presence of us at his request, and in his 
presence and in the presence of each other, subscribed our names as 
witnesses. WILLIAM BUCHAN, 

JOHN SHECKEL, 
THOMAS EDMONSTON. 



90 



CHAPTER VII. 

BUSINESS LIFE OF WILLIAM FERGUSON, AS TAKEN FROM THE 
VU'^BLIC 'RECORDS. 

Washington deeds, book C. , No. 3, page 441. Indenture made the 16th 
of May, 1798, between William Ferguson of Prince George county, State 
of Maryland, of one part, and John Tompson, of Georgetown, Montgom- 
ery county, State of Maryland, of the other part, witnesses that William 
P'erguson for $100.00 paid by John Tompson sells lands being in Hol- 
mead's addition of Georgetown, in Montgomery county, in the State of 
Maryland, beginning near the northeast corner of Dunbarton and West 
Streets, 30 feet in front, with a depth of 120 feet. 

WILLIAM FERGUSON. 
Witnesses: CHAS. A. BEATTY, 
THOS. CORCORAN. 

Washington, D. C, deeds, book K., No. 10, page 328. Indenture 
made the 2nd day of May, 1804, between William Ferguson, of Prince 
George county, State of Md., of the one part, and John Laird, of George- 
town, D. C, of the other part, witnesses that William Ferguson for 
$394 paid by John Laird sells a tract of land, being a part of the land 
called Barbadoes, and part of Scotland enlarged, situated and being 
partly in Prince George county, and partly in Washington county, D. C, 
beginning at a stone at the root of a white oak, one hundred yards north- 
ward of a main road that leads from Bladensburgh to Georgetown, the 
said stone being the end of the first line of the aforesaid tract, and also 
the beginning of a parcel of land conveyed to said William Ferguson by 
a certain William Conn, by deed dated about the 11th of November, 1780, 
said land laid out for 78 acres, and 124 perches. 

WILLIAM FERGUSON. 
Witnesses: GEORGE FRENCH, 
HENRY WIRT. 

Washington, D. C, deeds, book L., No. 11, page 322. At the request 
of David Ferguson the following power of attorney, the 17th of Novem- 
ber, 1804, was recorded. Know all men that whereas William Ferguson, 
late of the District of Columbia but now of Ontario county, N. Y., owner 



91 

of a certain tract of land situated and lying near the city of Washington, 
D. C, and in Prince George county, Md., known by the name of Barba- 
does, and Scotland enlarged, containing 135 >4 acres and occupied by one 
Ed. L. Butler. Now know ye, that I the said William Ferguson and 
Elizabeth his wife have appointed and by these presents do make, consti- 
tute and appoint our son, David Ferguson, our true and lawful attorney, 
to sell and dispose of the said tract of land. Dated the 29th of September 
1804. 

Signed: WILLIAM FERGUSON, 

ELIZABETH FERGUSON. 
Witnesses: WM. HOW CAYLER, 
JACOB M. HATTELL. 

Washington, D. C, deeds, book O, No. 14, page 67. Indenture made 
the 23rd of December 1805, between David Ferguson, of Ontario county, 
and State of New York, now on a visit to his friends in Washington 
county, D. C, and Prince George county, Md., where he has business to 
transact, of the other part, and William Tompson, of Washington, D. C, 
of the other part, witnesseth that David Ferguson for $620.00, paid by 
William Tompson, sells a tract of land called Barbadoes and part of Scot- 
land enlarged, lying in Washington county, D. C, sold by the late Wil- 
liam Conn to William Ferguson, father of said David Ferguson. Dated 
the 11th of November, 1780. Recorded in Liber No. 1, page 100 and 101, 
Prince George county, containing 13SX acres of land. 

Signed: DAVID FERGUSON. 
Witnesses: GABRIEL P. VAN HORNE, 

GEORGE PAGE, 

THOMAS CORCORAN, 

JOHN OTT. 

It will be observed that two men by the name of David Ferguson 
transacted business for William Ferguson. David Ferguson, of Prince 
George county, Md., was the father of William, but David, of Ontario 
County, N. Y., was William's son. 



92 



CHAPTER VIII. 
JAMES FERGUSON ANT) HIS DESCENDANTS. 

The Ferguson Family in Orleans County. New York State. 

(I.) James and Catherine, the oldest children of William and Eliza- 
beth Ferguson, were twins. They were born in Bladensburg, Md., about 
1771 and received the best education that could be procured for them at 
that time, the period just after the Revolutionary War. James Fergu- 
son became a miller. He married early in life, Mary Wevlie and settled 
in the District of Columbia. The following public records in Washing- 
ton, D C, make it possible to locate his place of business quite accu- 
rately: 

Deeds, Book R., No 17, page 106. Indenture made November 
11th, 1806, between Asa Lanlian,of Prince (leorge county, of the one part, 
and James Ferguson, of Washington, D. C, of the other part, wit- 
nesses that Asa Lanhan for $100.00 paid by David Ferguson sells lands 
near Rock Creek containing 84 acres. 

ASA LANHAN. 
Witness: MARCUS ROBINSON, 

Deeds, BookL., page 311. Received December 11th, 1803, of Mr. 
James Ferguson, the sum of $100.00, in full satisfaction for all my rights, 
titles, claims, and interests in a tract of land near Rock Creek in the ter- 
ritory of Columbia, the property and residence of my late father, Notley 
Lanhan, containing eighty-two and one-quarter acres. 

Rock Creek passes through the northwest portion of that part of the 
city of Washington that separates it from Georgetown. In all proba- 
bility James Ferguson owned a mill on that Creek within the limits of 
the District of Columbia. 

If the above property was in the Ferguson family at the present 
time, it would be worth a fortune of many millions. 

The glowing accounts which James Ferguson received of the Gene- 
see country from his parents and brothers who had settled there, induced 
him in 1807 to seek his fortune as a pioneer in the western part of the 
State of New York. The journey was made on horseback, Mrs. Fer- 
guson carrying her fir.st born in her arms. The family settled at Orleans, 
a little hamlet about three miles south of his father's land. 



E E 

I 



92 



CHAPTER VIII. 
JAMES FERGUSON ANT> HIS DESCENDANTS. 

The Ferguson Family in Orleans County. New York State. 

(I.) James and Catherine, the oldest children of William and Eliza- 
beth Ferguson, were twins. They were born in Bladensburg, Md., about 
1771 and received the best education that could be procured for them at 
that time, the period just after the Revolutionary War. James Fergu- 
son became a miller. He married early in life, Mary Wevlie and settled 
in the District of Columbia. The following public records in Washing- 
ton, D C, make it possible to locate his place of business quite accu- 
rately: 

Deeds, Book R., No 17, page 106. Indenture made November 
11th, 1806, between Asa Lanhan,of Prince George county, of the one part, 
and James Ferguson, of Washington, D. C, of the other part, wit- 
nesses that Asa Lanhan for $100.00 paid by David Ferguson sells lands 
near Rock Creek containing 84 acres. 

ASA LANHAN. 
Witne.ss: MARCUS ROBINSON, 

Deeds, BookL., page 311. Received December 11th, 1803, of Mr. 
James Ferguson, the sum of $100.00, in full satisfaction for all my rights, 
titles, claims, and interests in a tract of land near Rock Creek in the ter- 
ritory of Columbia, the property and residence of my late father, Notley 
Lanhan, containing eighty-two and one-quarter acres. 

Rock Creek passes through the northwest portion of that part of the 
city of Washington that separates it from Georgetown. In all proba- 
bility James Ferguson owned a mill on that Creek within the limits of 
the District of Columbia. 

If the above property was in the Ferguson family at the present 
time, it would be worth a fortune of many millions. 

The glowing accounts which James Ferguson received of the Gene- 
see country from his parents and brothers who had settled there, induced 
him in 1807 to seek his fortune as a pioneer in the western part of the 
State of New York. The journey was made on horseback, Mrs. Fer- 
guson carrying her first born in her arms. The family settled at Orleans, 
a little hamlet about three miles south of his father's land. 



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ORLEANS COUNTY BRANCH. 



Fifth Generation m America. 




A mi ISDN f,AGK. 




Z\HETH ^riKClISON ('.ACili. 





FLOYD BENTON. MAKV J. i-KKGUSUN BENTON. 



ORLEANS COUNTY BRANCH. 



Fifth Generation in America 





GEORGE WASHINGTON FERGUSON. KOSEITA L. FER(iUSON. 





HENRY ROOT. AMANDA FERGUSON ROOT. 



93 

Mr. Ferguson soon became one of the leading business men of the 
place. A few years later, seeing better opportunities at Albion, New 
York, he moved there with his family and became the principal miller of 
the town, as well as a successful farmer. He died in 1829, when about 
sixty years of age. His wife lived for thirty years after his death and died 
in 1861, having completed her four score years. 

James Ferguson was a very generous man, greatly beloved by his 
family. He loaned money willingly to his friends, much of which was 
never returned. He left a considerable fortune to his family. His wife 
is said to have been a beautiful and aristocratic woman. She considered 
it beneath her dignity to display any irritability, no matter what the occa- 
sion. She made friends among all classes of people. 

The children of James Ferguson and his wife are as follows: Ann 
Julina, Amanda Weylie, William Henry, George Washington, Elizabeth 
Sophia, Mary Jane, Edgar Preston, and Edwin Patterson. 

THE CHILDREN OF JAMES AND MARY FERGUSON, AND THEIR DESCENDANTS. 

(H.) Ann Julina Ferguson and her descendants. 

Ann Julina Ferguson was the oldest child of James and Mary Fergu- 
son. She was born in 1806 in the District of Columbia, and was brought 
to the State of New York in her infancy. She received the best educa- 
tion that could be procured for her. She married Walter Sherwood, who ' 
was a farmer by occupation. She was a woman greatly admired for her 
sympathetic manner and her loving character. She was considered a 
superior woman by all who were fortunate enough to come under her 
influence. Besides her own children, she had the care of three girls at 
different times in her life. She died in 1854, her husband in 1868. The 
children in this family were: Ophelia Rosmond, James Ferguson, Mary 
Jane, and William Harrison. 

(III.) Ophelia Rosmond, the oldest child of Walter and Ann Julina 
Sherwood, was born near Albion, New York. She married Philo D. 
Ferris. They settled at a town called Lyden, near Stocton, where Mr. 
Ferris was employed in a flouring mill for a number of years. At this 
place Ophelia died. Mr. Ferris then went to Texas for a short time, 
then returned to Orleans county, New York, where he died. They had 
one daughter, Eva Jennie, who was born near Medina, New York. She 
married William F. Fisher. At present Mr. Fisher is an organizer of 
"Woodmen of America" life insurance lodges, and is considered a man 
of ability. 

(III.) James Ferguson, the oldest son of Walter and Ann Julina 
Sherwood, was born near Albion, New York. He first married Caroline 



94 

(ioodale, a resident of Orleans, Ontario county, New York. They 
resided in Orleans county a short time, then went to California and set- 
tled near San Francisco. Here Mr. Sherwood had the misfortune to 
lose his wife and child by drowning. Mr. Sherwood's health became 
greatly impaired, so he made his home with his sister, Mrs Ferris, at 
Lyden, until he was fully recovered from the shock occasioned by the 
death of his family. He then entered the mercantile business in a small 
town near Lyden. He afterwards moved to Westminster, in Los Angeles 
county, California, where he engaged in the grocery business and mar- 
ried his second wife, Mary McFadden. He finally moved to Los Angeles, 
where he was employed in a flour mill. He was a member of the Con- 
gregational church at Los Angeles, and at one time was a deacon of the 
church. He died in 1890. By his second marriage, Mr Sherwood had 
four children, Walter, Charles, Bertie, and May. 

(HL) Mary Jane, the second daughter of Walter and Ann Julina 
Sherwood, was born near Medina, New York. She married George D. 
Anderson, a successful and independent farmer of the the town of Gaines, 
Orleans county. New York. They are now living on the farm which 
came into the family from the Holland Land Company in 1814. Their 
residence is built of cobblestone and it is furnished with all the modern 
conveniences. They have two sons, Robert wSherwood and Howard 
Reid. 

(IV.) Robert Sherwood Anderson was born in the town of Gaines, 
Orleans county, New York. He was graduated from the Buffalo Com- 
mercial College. He married Clara Byrd, of Fern Hill, a suburb of 
Tacoma, Washington State. Miss Byrd is a descendant of the royal 
Stewart family, of England- Their home is at Olympia, the capital of 
Washington. They have one child, Alexandra S. Anderson. Mr. 
Anderson has a fine position as a bookkeeper. 

(IV.) Howard Reid Anderson was born in Gaines, Orleans county. 
New York. He is a plumber and an installer of gas generators, and 
makes his home with his parents. Mr. Anderson is a literary man, and 
has traveled in the Holy Land and in Europe. He is a prominent Pro- 
hibitionist. 

(III.) William Harrison Sherwood, the youngest child of Walterand 
Ann Julina Sherwood, was born in Medii>a, New York. He married 
Anna Truesler. Mr. Sherwood is a farmer, and lives near Iowa Falls, 
Iowa. He is a veteran of the Civil war, in which he served for three 
years in the 8th Heavy Artillery of New York. He was taken prisoner at 
Cold Harbor and endured the hardships of Southern prison life, being 



ORLEANS COUNTY BRANCH, 

Sixth Generation in America. 




GEORGE G. ANDERSON 
Is an independent farmer. Resides in Orleans County, New York. 



ORLEANS COUNTY BRANCH. 

Sixth Generation in America. 




IMARV J. ANDKRSUX, 
The Wife of Geori^e G. Anderson. 



95 

confined most of the time at Salisbury, North Carolina. He returned 
home shattered in health. There were three children in this family, 
George, Leon, and Mary Jane. 

Mary Jane Sherwood married Mr. Thompson and lives in the State 
of Ohio. 

AMANDA WEYLIE FERGUSON AND HER DESCENDANTS. 

(II.) Amanda Weylie Ferguson, the second daughter of James and 
Mary Ferguson, was born in New York State. She married November 
29th, 1835, Henry King Root, a farmer residing in Orleans county, New 
York. Mrs. Root is said to have been a woman of intelligence and a 
very capable business woman. She was a great factor in securing for the 
family a fine property. There was but one child born in this family, 
Floyd Ferguson Root. Mrs. Root died in Knowlesville, New York, 
March 11th, 1876, in her sixty-ninth year. Mr. Root died February 2Sth, 
1897, having completed his ninetieth year. 

(III.) Floyd Ferguson Root, the only child of Amanda and Henry 
Root, was born in Orleans county. New York. On May 12th, 1867, he 
married Henrietta Kendall, of Clifton Springs, New York, who at that 
time was living with her aunt, Mrs. Levi Ferguson. Mr. Root inherited 
the property of his parents. During his active life he was a farmer. He 
is living at the present time at Knowlesville, New York. There were five 
children in this family, Henry Kendall, Alma L., Levi Ferguson, Gertrude 
D., and John J. H. 

(IV.) Henry Kendall was born in Orleans county. New York. He 
married Lottie Peachey, October 18th, 1891. Mr. Root is a house decor- 
ator and resides in Rochester, New York. They have four children, 
Henry B., Orene C, Bertie, and Mary C. 

Alma L Root was born in Orleans county, New York. She married 
Charles Cutts, September 23rd, 1891. Mr. Cutts is a blacksmith and owns 
a fruit evaporator He resides at Eagle Harbor, New York. They have 
had two children, Robert E. and Ora V. Robert E. Cutts died October 
17th , 1898, at the age of six years. Ora V. Cutts is living with her par- 
ents at Eagle Harbor. 

Levi Ferguson Root was born in Orleans county, New York. He 
married Edith Dome, December 30th, 1892. Mr. Root is a farmer by 
occupation and lives near Watkins, New York. 

Gertrude was born in Orleans county. New York. She married 
Albert A. Root, December 5th, 1901. Mr. Root was an inventor and pro- 
moter. He died October 26th, 1903, at the age of fifty years. There was 



96 

one child in this family, J- Kenneth Root. Mrs. Root and her son reside 
at Knowlesville, New York. 

John J. H. Root, the youngest child, was born at Knowlesville, New 
York, where he lives at present. 

WILLIAM HENRY FERGUSON. 
(II.) William Henry Ferguson, the oldest son of James and Mary 
Ferguson, was born in Orleans county. New York. He died in early 
life. He is said to have given great promise of a useful life. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON FERGUSON. 
(II.) George Washington Ferguson was the second son and fourth 
child of James and Mary Ferguson. He was a farmer by occupation, 
and resided in Orleans county, New York. He married, first, Rosetta 
Woodruff. After her death, he married Sophia Wirt, the widow of Henry 
Wirt. Mr. Ferguson was a capable business man. He was industrious 
and frugal, and generous in many ways. He was a friendly and hospitable 
man, and always appeared to be delighted to meet his relatives and 
friends. He accumulated a large property. He had no descendants, 
but adopted in childhood George Washington Ferguson, the oldest son of 
his brother Edwin, and made him his principal heir. Mr. Ferguson 
died in the year 1894. 

ELIZABETH SOPHIA FERGUSON AND HER DESCENDANTS. 

(II.) Elizabeth Sophia Ferguson, the third daughter of James and 
Mary Ferguson, was born in Orleans county. New York, May 23rd, 1813. 
She married Addison Gage in 1836. Mr. Gage was a farmer by occupa- 
tion and resided in Orleans county. New York. Mrs. Gage was a very 
sociable woman, having a very wide acquaintance. She was well quali- 
fied to discharge the duties which she found during her life. She died 
May 10th, 1870, having completed her fifty-seventh year. Mr. Gage died 
April 17th, 1877, in his sixty-third year. They had a family of six child- 
ren; Helen Jenette, Hanah Mariah, William Harrison, Melissia Melvina, 
Alice Jane, and Taylor Addison. 

(III.) Helen Jenette, the oldest child of Addison and Elizabeth 
Gage, was born in Orleans county. New York; married Richard Shaw 
November 23rd, 1862. He made his residence in Knowlesville, New 
York. Mr. Shaw was a farmer. The family still own the farm, which 
was taken from the Land office by Mr. Shaw's father. Richard Shaw 
died January 14th, 1904. There were two children in this family: Jessie 
Leon and Melvin Elijah. 



ORLEANS COUNTY BRANCH, 

Seventh Generation in America. 




H. READ ANDERSON, 

Resides with His Parents in Orleans County, New York. Is a Plumber 
and Installs Gas Generators. 



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97 

(IV.) Jessie Leon Shaw was born in Orleans county, New York, and 
married Ellsworth McGillivray. They reside with Mrs. McGillivray's 
mother in Knowlesville, New York. 

(IV.) Melvin Elijah Shaw was born in Orleans county, New Ycjrk. 
He is president of the Kittridge Medicine company, in which concern he 
is the majority stock holder. He resides with his mother in Knowlesville, 
New York. 

(ni.) Hanah Mariah Gage, the second daughter of Addison and 
Elizabeth Gage, was born in Orleans county, New York. She married 
John Weld, February 22nd, 1860. Their residence is in Medina, New 
York. Mr. Weld is a farmer, an extensive peach grower, and is said 
to have the largest orchard in New York state. Mrs. Weld died May 
25th, 1903, in her sixty-third year. They had two children, Frank and 
J. Leon. 

(IV.) Frank Weld died in childhood. J. Leon Weld was born in 
Medina, New York. He married Emma E. Chesebrough, February 22nd, 
18S8. Mr. Weld's residence was formerly in Rochester, New York. He 
was in the railroad and shipping business and has held the positions of 
general passenger agent and secretary of the Rochester and Sodus Bay 
railroad. He died September 1st, 1S9S. There were three children in 
this family, John Warren, Lawrence Peter, and Louis Chesebrough- 

(V.) John Warren Weld died in infancy. 

Lawrence Peter was born in Albion, New York, and lives in Medina. 

Louis Chesebrough was also born in Albion, New York, and resides 
in Medina. 

(III.) William Harrison, son of Addison and Elizabeth Gage, was 
born in Orleans county, New York. He married Marette Gibson, and 
resides in Albion, New York. Mr. Gage was for two years a soldier in 
the Civil war. Corporal in Company D., 151st New York Regiment. On 
his return from the war he became a farmer, but has since retired. 

(III.) Melissa Melvlna Gage, the third daughter of Addison and Eliza- 
beth Gage, was born in Orleans county, New York. She married Henry 
Harrison Holt, and resides at Albion, New York. Mr. Holt is a contrac- 
tor and carpenter. 

(III.) Alice Jane Gage, the fourth daughter of Addison and Eliza- 
beth Gage, was born in Orleans county. New York. She married John 
H. Post, who owns a cooperage and saw mill. They reside at Kendall 
Mills, New York. They have a family of three children, J. Casiraer, 
Minnie Elizabeth, and Fred. 

(IV.) J. Casimer Post was born at Kendall Mills, New York. He 
entered the cooperage business, and married Lena B. Webster, November 



98 

l^-lth, 1892. They have two children, Lillian Caroline and Clinton 
Casimer. 

Minnie Elizabeth Post was born at Kendall Mills, New York. She 
married Newel J. Gary, June 16th. 1892, Mr. Cary is in the commission 
business. They have two children, Jesse Post and Gilbert. 

Fred Post was born at Kendall Mills, New York. He is an engineer. 
He married Kate Duffy, and has three children, John Richard, Lulu, 
and Salin. 

(III.) Taylor Addison Gage, the youngest child of Addison and 
E^lizabeth Gage, was born in Orleans county, New York. He married, 
first, Althea E. Gates, December 22nd, 1874. Mrs. Gage died November 
20th, 1892. Mr. Gage then married Gertrude Parks. Their residence is 
on Poseville avenue, Newark, New Jersey. Mr. Gage is a manufacturer. 
He formerly lived in Cortland, New York. 

MARY JANE FERGUSON. 
(II.) Mary Jane Ferguson was the fourth and youngest daughter of 
James and Mary Ferguson. She married Floyd Benton, a farmer resid- 
ing in Orleans county. New York. Mrs. Benton was an invalid the 
greater part of her life, but a very capable woman. She looked after her 
business interests though confined to her bed most of her time. She 
died without descendants. Her husband is still living at Albion, N. Y. 

EDGAR PRESTON FERGUSON. 
(II.) Edgar Ferguson was a twin brother of Edwin Patterson Fer- 
guson, the youngest children of James and Mary Ferguson. He was an 
invalid throughout his life. In spite of his afflictions he was very ambi- 
tious and industrious, and passed a useful and cheerful life. His only 
regret was that he had not been able to accomplish more. 

EDWIN PATTERSON FERGUSON. 

(II.) Edwin Patterson Ferguson, the twin brother of Edgar Preston 
Ferguson, was born near Albion, N. Y. He was a great lover of society, 
a genial, kind hearted man. He was a farmer by occupation, and lived 
at Big Sowamica, Wisconsin. He married Mary Derimeau, who died 
early in life, leaving one son, George Washington Ferguson, who was 
adopted by his uncle, after whom he was named. Edwin Ferguson mar- 
ried a second time, Litia Purdy. They had a family of six children, Etta, 
Amine, Harrison, Lavina, Melva, and Floyd. 

(III.) George Washington Ferguson, the only son of Edwin Patter- 
son and Mary Derimeau, was born in the State of Michigan. He was 
adopted shortly after the death of his mother, by his uncle, George 



ORLEANS COUNTY BRANCH, 

Seventh Generation in America. 




ROBERT SHERWOOD ANDERSON, 
A Bookkeeper. Resides in Olympia, State of Wasbiington. 



ORLEANS COUNTY BRANCH, 



Eighth Generation in America. 




ALEXANDRA PA'RD ANDERSON, 
Is the Daughter of Robert Sherwood Anderson, 



99 

Washington Ferguson, of Orleans county, N.Y. He married Mary Stock- 
ton, and settled on his uncle's farm. He resides at Albion, N. Y., and 
has a winter home at Daytona, Florida. 

(HI.) Etta Ferguson, the oldest child of Edwin Patterson and Litia 
Purdy Ferguson, was born in Wisconsin. She married a Mr. Crooks, a 
farmer by occupation, and resides in Sowamica, Wisconsin. 

Amine Ferguson was born in Wisconsin. Married George Ide, a 
farmer, who resides near Albion, N. Y. 

Lavina Ferguson was born in Wisconsin. She married a Mr. Bos- 
well, who was a mason by trade, and resides in Manonrine, Michigan. 

Harrison Ferguson was born in Wisconsin. He is a farmer by occu- 
pation, and resides at Sowamica, Wisconsin. 

Floyd and Melva Ferguson were born in Wisconsin, where they reside 
at the present time. They are engaged in the furniture business. 



100 



CHAPTER IX. 
WASHINGTON BRANCH-L 

Catherine Ferguson and Her Descendants, The Witherall Family. 

(I.) Catherine Ferguson was the twin sister of James Ferguson, 
and the oldest daughter of William and Elizabeth Ferguson. 

She was born in Bladensburg, Maryland, about 1771. No knowledge 
of her early life can be found. She married John Witherall, of Prince 
George County, Maryland. Mr. Witherall was a planter and owner of 
slaves. From Robert B. Hartley Marcellus, of the (;:ongressional Library, 
at Washington, D. C, it is learned that his wife, Mrs. Elizabeth Marcel- 
lus, is supposed to be the only living grandchild of Catherine Witherall, 
who was familiarly known in the family as Aunt Kattie. Mrs. Witherall 
died in 1843, and was buried in Washington, D. C. 

THE CHILDREN OF JOHN AND CATHERINE FERGUSON WITHERALL. 

(11.) Richard Witherall, who resided in Washington, D. C, and died 
in J839. 

(II.) John Witherall, who resided in Washington, D. C, and died 
in 1832. 

(II.) Samuel Witherall, of Maryland, who died in 1853. 

(II.) Mary Witherall, who married Mr. Glover and died in 1860, and 
who was the mother of Mrs. Elizabeth Hartley Marcellus. 

(II.) Ann Witherall, who married John Conley, and who resided in 
Illinois. 

(II.) Elizabeth Witherall, of Washington, D. C, who died at the 
age ot eighteen years. 

The following records are to be found at Washington, D. C, Book 
P., No. 15, page 381: Know all men by these presents that I, John With- 
erall, of Georgetown, Washington County, for $600.00 paid me by David 
Ferguson, of Ontario County, N. Y., but now in the District of Colum- 
bia, sell all my household stuff and implements. Dated July 3rd, 1806. 

Washington, D. C, Deeds Book O., No. 16, page 252. Indenture 
made July 23rd, 1806, between John Witherall, of Prince George county, 
Maryland, of the one part, and David Ferguson, of Ontario county, 
N. Y., of the other part, but now in the said District of Columbia, wit- 






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101 

nesses that John Witherall, for $600.00 paid by David Ferguson, sells 
lots Nos. 3 and 4, in Holmead's addition to Georgetown, fronting south 
of Dunbarton Street, 60 feet, with a depth of 120 feet. 

Signed: JOHN WITHERALL. 

Witnesses: 

RICARD PARROTT, 
THOMAS CORCORAN. 



CHAPTER X. 
BALTIMORE BRANCH- 1. 

Ann Ferguson and Her Descendants — The Peerce Families. 

(I.) Ann Ferguson, the second daughter of William and Elizabeth 
Ferguson, was born in Bladensburg, Maryland, about the year 1773. She 
was educated in Maryland and became the second wife of Edward 
Peerce, a southern planter. Mr. Peerce was a native of Bristol, Eng- 
land. On his voyage to America he was shipwrecked on the Island of 
St. Kitts, of the West Indies. 

Mr. and Mrs. Peerce settled on the land supposed to have been the 
homestead of Robert Ferguson, "The Pioneer," where the city of 
Washington is now located, on land opposite to where the White House 
stands and in the rear of Jackson's monument. Mr. Peerce sold this 
property to the United States Government and moved to Baltimore. His 
deed is the oldest on record for this property, but the officials in the land 
office state that he was not the first settler on this land. 

After he went to Baltimore, he purchased of Daniel Dullaney a fine 
farm at the head of a beautiful valley in Baltimore county, Maryland, 
called Dullaney's Valley, from its former owner. 

Mr. and Mrs. Peerce were blessed with two sons, William and James. 
Mr. Peerce had one daughter, Lizzie, by his first wife. Mr. Peerce was 
noted for his generosity He furnished the land and built the Trinity 



102 

church, where his descendants worship to this day. Mr. and Mrs. Peerce 
are buried near Trinity church on land taken from the farm. 

(II.) Lizzie Peerce, the daughter of Edward Peerce, by his first wife, 
married Oswald Gerkins and settled in Dullaney's Valley, where she died 
without descendants. 

(II.) James Peerce, the youngest son of Edward and Ann Ferguson 
Peerce, died early in life. 

(II.) William, the oldest son of Edward and Ann Ferguson Peerce, 
inherited his father's estate, including some five hundred acres of land. 
He married a widow, Louisa Smith, of Dullaney's Valley. He prospered 
and accumulated a large property, mainly through cattle grazing. He 
was a very liberal man and a true friend. He had four sons, Edward, 
George, Henry and Thomas, and one daughter, Rebecca. William 
Peerce died in 1878, his wife in 1865. 

(III.) George and Henry Peerce died early in life. 

(III.) Rebecca Peerce married John Lipincott, of Pittsburg, Pa. 
They lived in Goverston, Maryland. Mr. Lipincott recently died. They 
had six children: Laura, Katie, Rebecca, Edward, John, and Maude. 

(III.) Edward Peerce married Laura Stumps. They have two 
children, Mary and William. 

(III.) Thomas Peerce married Emma Childs. They have four chil 
dren living: Margaret, Robert, Mary, and Thomas. 



ALBION BRANCH. 

Sixth Generation in America. 




MRS. ELLA WIRT APPLETUN. 

Mrs. Ella Wirt Appleton, the Wife of Rev. F. G. Appleton, 

Longmont, Col. 



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103 



CHAPTER XL 
ALBION "BRANCH. 

Jane Ferguson and her Descendants. 

(I.) Jane Fers^uson was the third daughter of William and Elizabeth 
Ferg-uson. She was born in Bladensburg, Maryland, about 1775. She 
was given a good education and is said to have been received in the best 
society of her day, in which she was a general favorite. There is a tradi- 
tion in the family that she received an offer of marriage from a young 
military officer, but as he was stationed at a post on the frontier, her 
parents refused to give their consent to their daughter's going among the 
Indians. 

This young military officer became the Hon. William Henry Harri- 
son, the ninth President of the United States. The portrait of himself, 
which he gave to Jane Ferguson at the time of his proposal, was greatly 
cherished by her, and was preserved for many years. 

There is a record in St. John's Parish, Prince George county, Mary- 
land, where Robert Ferguson, the son of ''The Pioneer," Robert Fergu- 
son, dwelt, of the marriage of Henry Wirt and Jannette Ferguson, April 
30th, 1795. Mr. Wirt was in the mercantile business. They lived in 
Maryland for several yesLVS, where three of their children were born, 
William Harrison, James, and Elizabeth. 

About the year 1803, Mr. Wirt moved to New York state with his 
family, following his father-in-law, William Ferguson, into the Genesee 
country. He settled in the town of Phelps, east of Clifton Springs, near 
what is now known as "Tillot's Corners." Mr. Wirt brought with him 
from Maryland several slaves that were soon after liberated by the laws 
of the State. Three children were born to Mr and Mrs. Wirt in New 
York State, John, Delilah, and Henry Jewell. Henry Wirt was a devot- 
ed Christian gentleman. Is is said that his home was the home of the 
itinerant ministers of the Methodist church. 

Jane Ferguson Wirt died about 1815, and Mr. Wirt then married 
a Mrs. Adams, who was an estimable woman. She cared for Mr. Wirt's 
children as though they were her own; and these children cherished the 
memory of their stepmother throughout their lives. 

About 1826, Mr. Wirt's second wife died, and after several years he 
married a Mrs. Rouse. This proved to have been an unfortunate mar- 



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103 



CHAPTER XI. 
ALBION '^BRANCH. 

Jane Ferguson and her Descendants. 

(I.) Jane Fersjuson was the third daughter of William and Elizabeth 
Ferguson. She was born in Bladensburg, Maryland, about 1775. She 
was given a good education and is said to have been received in the best 
society of her day, in which she was a general favorite. There is a tradi- 
tion in the family that she received an offer of marriage from a young 
military officer, but as he was stationed at a post on the frontier, her 
parents refused to give their consent to their daughter's going among the 
Indians. 

This young military officer became the Hon. William Henry Harri- 
son, the ninth President of the United States. The portrait of himself, 
which he gave to Jane Ferguson at the time of his proposal, was greatly 
cherished by her, and was preserved for many years. 

There is a record in St. John's Parish, Prince George county, Mary- 
land, where Robert Ferguson, the son of ''The Pioneer," Robert Fergu- 
son, dwelt, of the marriage of Henry Wirt and Jannette Ferguson, April 
30th, 1795. Mr. Wirt was in the mercantile business. They lived in 
Maryland for several years, where three of their children were born, 
William Harrison, James, and Elizabeth. 

About the year 1803, Mr. Wirt moved to New York state with his 
family, following his father-in-law, William Ferguson, into the Genesee 
country. He settled in the town of Phelps, east of Clifton Springs, near 
what is now known as "Tillot's Corners" Mr. Wirt brought with him 
from Maryland several slaves that were soon after liberated by the laws 
of the State. Three children were born to Mr and Mrs. Wirt in New 
York State, John, Delilah, and Henry Jewell. Henry Wirt was a devot- 
ed Christian gentleman. Is is said that his home was the home of the 
itinerant ministers of the Methodist church. 

Jane Ferguson Wirt died about 1815, and Mr. Wirt then married 
a Mrs. Adams, who was an estimable woman. She cared for Mr. Wirt's 
children as though they were her own; and these children cherished the 
memory of their stepmother throughout their lives. 

About 1826, Mr. Wirt's second wife died, and after several years he 
married a Mrs. Rouse. This proved to have been an unfortunate mar- 



riaye and a separation soon followed. Mr Wirt soon after sold his farm 
in the town of Phelps and went to Orleans county, where he purchased a 
farm and lived the remainder of his days with his youngest son, Henry 
Jewell Wirt. 

THE CHILDREN OF JANE FERGUSON WIRT AND THEIR DESCENDANTS; ELIZABETH 
WIRT AND HER DESCENDANTS; THE LEONARD AND WHITE FAMILIES. 

(II.) Elizabeth, the oldest child of Henry and Jane Ferguson Wirt, 
was born in Maryland, and was brought to New York State by her par- 
ents in early childhood. She married William Leonard, a farmer by 
occupation, who settled in Orleans county, New York. They had one 
daughter, Mary Leonard. Mrs. Leonard's husband died and she mar- 
ried Mr. Elisha White. There was one daughter by this marriage, Delia 
Ann White. Mr. and Mrs. White were buried in Orleans county, New 
York. 

(III.) Mary Leonard, the daughter of William and Elizabeth Wirt 
Leonard, was born near Albion, New York. She married Olander Bond. 
They reside at Eagle Harbor, and have three children, Amanda, Anna, 
and Earl. 

(IV.) Amanda, the first child of Olander and Mary Leonard Bond, 
married Eber Wells. They have four children, William, Loren, Cora, 
and Josie. 

(III.) Delia Ann White, the only daughter of Elizabeth Wirt by her 
second marriage, married Reuben Thompson. 

(IV.) William Wells has been twice married: his first wife left 
three children, Minnie, Myrtle, and Jerome. Mr. Wells then married 
Little Howard. Loren Wells married Sarah Edgar and resides in Albion, 
New York. Cora Wells married Celestia Hudson and resides in Albion, 
New York Josie Wells married Clarence Howard. Amanda, the wife 
of Eber Wells, married for her second husband, Jerome Warner, and 
they reside in Albion, New York. 

(IV.) Anna, the second daughter of Olander and Mary Leonard 
Bond, was born near Albion, New York. Shemarried Clinton Smith, of 
Albion, New York, who was a farmer by occupation. They have eight 
children, Jessie, Minnie, Nellie, Obed, Ida May, Clara, and Lorenzo. 

Jessie Smith marrieu ''Alfred Bull and resides in Niagara Falls, New 
York. Minnie Smith married Clarence Sangland and resides in Albion, 
New York. Earl Wells is married and lives in Rochester. 

JAMES WIRT AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 
(II.) James Wirt, the second son of Henry and Jane Ferguson Wirt, 
was born in 1799, and was brought to New York State by his parents in 



105 

early childhood. He married Rachael Rathburn, and settled in Catta- 
raugus county, New York. They had five children, William, Henry 
Jewell, Jane, Permelia, and Delilah. The girls died early in life. Mr. 
Wirt moved with his family to Michigan and settled in what was then the 
wilderness, enduring the privations and hardships of pioneers. Mr. Wirt, 
died August 20th, 1854, in his fifty-fifth year. Mrs. Wirt married again 
and after the death of her second husband, made her home with her 
youngest son, Henry Jewell Wirt. She died December 28th, 1885, at the 
age of seventy-five. 

(III.) William Wirt, the oldest son of James and Rachel Wirt, 
was born in Cattaraugus county. New York, August 15th: 1827. At the 
age of eleven years he went to Orleans, Ontario count}", New York, and 
made his home with diflferent farmers in that region until he was twenty- 
one years of age. In 1850 he went to Medina town.ship, Michigan, and 
purchased two hundred acres of land. He married Amanda Salisbury 
in 185n, who died July 5th, 1861, leaving one daughter, Clara. 

After the death of his first wife Mr. Wirt married Eveline Curtiss, of 
Hudson, Michigan, November 4th, 1861. By this marriage he had seven 
children. Mr. Wirt united with the Methodist Episcopal church at the 
age of ten years, and later in life became a member of the Congrega- 
tional church at Canandaigua, Michigan. Towards the latter part of his 
life through an attack of la grippe, Mr. Wirt unfortunately became insane. 
He was placed in an asylum at Hillsdale and later at Kalamazoo, Michi- 
gan, where he died April 18th, 1892, and was buried at Medina. 

Three of Mr. Wirt's children by his second marriage are living, 
Edwin, Grant, and Julia. 

(IV.) Clara Wirt, the daughter of William Wirt by his first mar- 
riage, married a Mr. Persons. Julia Wirt, a daughter of William Wirt 
by his second marriage, married a Mr. Sainor. 

(III.) Henry Jewell Wirt, the youngest son of James and Rachel 
Wirt, was born in Cattaraugus county. New York. He went with his 
parents when they moved to Michigan. He married Mary Salisbury and 
settled over fifty years ago in Medina township in the midst of the 
wilderness. He is still living on the land that he cleared. The first wife 
died, leaving three children, Minnie Ella, Nettie Amelia, and Hattie 
Amelia. Three years after the death of his first wife, Mr. Wirt married 
Carrie Amelia Fox, of Hudson township. He has one daughter by this 
marriage, Mary Elizabeth Wirt. 

(IV.) Minnie Ella Wirt, the oldest daughter of Henry Jewell Wirt 
by his first marriage, was born in Medina township, Michigan, and mar- 
ried Gerrey L. Acker. They reside in Fayette, Ohio. Mr. Acker is a 



106 

dealer in farming irapleraents and also has farming interests. They have 
three children, Henry Wirt, Harold, and Marie. 

(IV.) Nettie Amelia Wirt, the second daughter of Henry Jewell 
Wirt by his first marriage, was born in Medina township, Michigan. She 
married Henry Middleton, of Dover township, Michigan. Mr. Middleton 
is a farmer by occupation. They have one daughter, Reho Middleton. 

(IV.) Hattie Amelia, the third daughter of Henry Jewell Wirt by 
his first marriage, was born in Medina township, Michigan. She mar- 
ried Camp Saw3'er, a farmer by occupation. They reside in Hudson 
township, Michigan, and have two children, Fern and J. C. Sawyer. 

(IV. ) Mary Elizabeth Wirt, the only child of Henry Jewell Wirt by 
his second marriage, was born in Medina township, Michigan. She is 
unmarried and makes her home with her father. 

(II.) William Harrison Wirt, the oldest son of Henry and Jane Fergu- 
son Wirt, was born in Maryland, and was brought to New York state by 
his parents in 1803. He is said to have been a promising young man, 
but died when but eighteen years of age, and was buried at Phelps, 
New York. 

(II.) John, the third son of Henry and Jane Ferguson Wirt, was 
born in the town of Phelps, New York, and died in early childhood. 

DELILAH WIRT AND HER DESCENDANTS, THE SILL FAMILY. 

(II.) Delilah Wirt, the second daughter of Henry and Jane Fergu- 
son Wirt, was born in the town of Phelps, Ontario county, N. Y., July 
20th, 180S. When she was ten years of age, her mother died and her 
father soon after married a Mrs. Adams. This woman had an excellent 
influence over Delilah, who always cherished the memory of her step- 
mother. In the year 1831 Delilah Wirt married Russell Sill, a farmer 
of the town of Yates, Orleans county, N. Y. During her married life 
Mrs. Sill resided in the town of Yates. She was a very religious woman 
and took great interest in the affairs of her church. Her home, like her 
father's, was a "Haven of Rest" to the weary pastors and their families 
for days and weeks at a time; no needy person was ever turned away from 
her door. She died in the year 1893, her husband in 1879. There were 
five children in this family, William, John, Andrew, Mary and Ann. 

(III.) William Sill, the oldest son of Russell and Delilah Wirt Sill, 
was born in the town of Yates, Orleans county, N. Y. He died in the 
year 1860. 

(HI.) John Sill, the second son of Russell and Delilah Wirt Sill, 
was born in the town of Yates, Orleans county, N. Y., November 24th, 
1S34. He is a farmer by occupation, and resides at Lyndonville, N. Y. 



107 

He married Merneiva Dunham. They have two children, Clara and Irv- 
ing. Clara Sill married Henry Potter, in 1889. They reside in Lyndon- 
ville, N. Y., and have two children, Lucy and Lyell. 

(HI.) Andrew Sill, the third son of Russell and Delilah Wirt Sill, 
was born June 10th, 1837. He was a farmer by occupation, and resided 
in the town of Yates, Orleans county, N. Y. Hemarried Emeline Royce, 
in 1864. They resided at Eagle Harbor, N. Y., and have two daughters, 
Nellie and Hattie. 

Hattie Sill married a Mr. Hathway and has one daughter, Frances, 
living. A daughter, Ethel, died in 1902. 

(III.) Mary Sill, the oldest daughter of Russell and Delilah Wirt Sill, 
was born in Orleans county, N. Y. She married William Grimes and 
resides in Lyndonville. There are three children in this family, Gertrude, 
Russell, and Delia. 

(HI.) Anna Sill, the youngest daughter of Russell and Delilah Wirt 
Sill, was born in Orleans county, N. Y. Married Wilbur Foster and 
resides in Kalamazoo, Michigan. 

HENRY JEWELL WIRT AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 

(II.) Henry Jewell Wirt, the youngest son of Henry and Jane Fer- 
guson Wirt, was born in the town of Phelps, N. Y. He married Per- 
melia Pratt and settled in Orleans county, N. Y., where Mrs. Wirt died, 
leaving two children, William and Caroline. After the death of his wife 
Mr. Wirt married Mrs. Elizabeth J. Southerland, a very capable and 
intelligent woman and a great worker for her church. There were four 
children by this marriage, Frances, Ella Louise, Maude and Annie Grace. 
After the death of his second wife, Mr. Wirt married Mrs. Sophia 
Phipps, a woman greatly respected for her many admirable traits of char- 
acter. She is still living at Albion, N. Y. 

After the death of his father, Henry Wirt, who had made his home 
with his son during his later years, Henry Jewell Wirt sold his farm and 
moved to Albion, N. Y. Mr. Wirt was a man of strong religious prin- 
ciples. He was a member of the Methodist church, in which he was a 
great worker. During the days of slavery, he was an Abolitionist of the 
radical kind. He died May 27th, 1885. 

(III.) William Wirt, the oldest son of Henry Jewell Wirt by his 
first marriage, was born in Orleans county, N. Y. He was a farmer 
by occupation. Hemarried Elizabeth Ferris, and settled near Albion, 
N. Y. He had two children by this marriage, Maude and Earnest. 



108 

The latter died in early life. After the death of his wife, Mr. Wirt mar 
ried Ann Adams. They have one son, Henry Jewell Wirt. They reside 
at Oak Orchard, N. Y. 

(III.) Caroline Wirt, the only daughter of Henry Jewell Wirt by 
his first marriage, was born near Albion, N. Y. She married Calvin 
Ferris and had two children, Albertis and Permelia Ann. Albertis 
Ferris died in childhood. Permelia Ann Ferris married John 
Harrington and resides in Denver, Colorado. There were two 
children by this marriage, Edith and Louise. Edith died at the age of 
18 years. Louise married Knight Brown and resides in Denver, Colo- 
rado. 

(HI.) The oldest child of Henry Jewell Wirt by his second marriage, 
Frances Wirt, married Charles Elliott, of Albion, N. Y. She died June 
21st, 1874. 

(III.) Ella Louise, the second daughter of Henry Jewell Wirt by his 
second marriage, was born near Albion, N. Y. She was a very talented 
singer. Her voice was carefully trained in her youth. She was for some 
time the soprano in the choir of St. Peter's Church, Rochester, N. Y., 
and afterwards held the same position in the Episcopal Cathedral, Buf- 
falo, N. Y. She married the Rev. F. G. Appleton, September 24th, 1885. 
They have two children, Francis and Harold. The family reside in Long- 
mont, Colorado. 

(III. J Maude, the third daughter of Henry Jewell Wirt by his second 
marriage, was born near Albion, N. Y. She spent two years studying 
art in Berlin and Paris, and one year in New York. She married J. B. 
Thompson , who was at that time a banker and hardware merchant. They 
reside in Longmont, Colorado. 

(III.) Annie Grace, the youngest daughter of Henry Jewell Wirt by 
his second marriage, was born near Albion, N. Y. She was graduated 
from Syracuse University in 1884, and during the three years following 
was the preceptress of the State Normal School at Mansfield , Pa. She then 
went abroad and studied German and French in Berlin and Paris, and on 
her return to America was appointed preceptress of the Genesee Wesleyan 
Seminary at Lima, N. Y., where she remained three years. The follow- 
ing year was spent in traveling abroad and in the study of German and 
French in the best institutions in Europe. On her return she accepted 
the position of Instructor in German at the Free Academy at Norwich, 
Connecticut. The following year she was recalled to Lima Seminary, 
where she taught German and French during the next two years. The 
trustees of Denver University, Denver, Colorado, recognizing Miss Wirt's 
ability, offered her the position as Professor of German in Denver Univer- 



ALBION BRANCH. 

Sixth Generation in America. 




ANNA c;RACE WIRT. 
Anna Grace Wirt, Teacher m Denver College. 



109 

sity. This position she accepted and holds at the present time. In 1896 
Miss Wirt received a leave of absence from Denver University and studied 
for two years in the University of Berlin and Geneva, Switzerland. In 
1902 she received a second leave of absence and studied for one year at 
the University of Berlin. 



110 



CHAPTER XII. 
RO'BE'RT BELL FERGUSON AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 

Ontario County Branch. New York State. 

(1.) Robert Bell Ferguson, the second son and fifth child of William 
and Elizabeth Ferguson, was born in Bladensburg, Maryland, January 
5th, 1777. He received as good an education as could be obtained in the 
public schools of the time in which he lived. 

He began his business life hauling stones, which were to be used in 
building the first National Capitol, at Washington, D. C. 

At the age of twenty-six he went to New York State with the family, 
when they moved to the Genesee country. 

The next year after the untimely death of his father, he married Mary, 
daughter of Henry Baggerly, who also came from Maryland. She was 
twelve years younger than Mr. Ferguson, having been born August 10th, 
1789. This marriage took place December 2Sth, 1808.' Mr. and Mrs. Fer- 
guson located one and one-half miles from Clifton Springs, on a farm now 
known as the "Fox Hill" farm. 

Here were born to them twelve children, five of whom died at this 
place, three of them in infancy. Mr. Ferguson provided for seven of the 
colored people who came with the family from Maryland, who were freed 
by the laws of New York State, and who were too old to work. Some 
amusing stories are told of these former slaves. One of them, Sarah 
Boone by name, lived to a great age. She lived in a house a short dis- 
tance from the Ferguson home. When she had passed her 80th year, a 
colored man by the name of Jacobs came to see her. They had formerly 
been acquainted in Maryland. In the course of their conversation he 
made a proposal of marriage. He said to the old woman, "I have come 
to hear your word." "What 'er word?" was the reply. "Whether you 
will marry me or not." "Oh! no, I promised the good Lord, when my 
husband died, I never would be troubled with another nigger." 

This colored woman was very useful in helping to care for the chil- 
dren during their infancy, some of whom became greatl}' attached to her. 
It is said that she lived fio be nearly one hundred years of age. 

Mr. Ferguson volunteered with others to go to Buffalo to defend that 
city against the attacks of the British Red Coats in the War of 1812. 






1 E 



XI c c — 



E .£ E 



§ E ^ 



CHAPTER XII. 
RO'BE'JiT BELL FERGUSON AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 

Ontario County Branch. New York State. 

(1.) Robert Bell Ferguson, the second son and fifth child of William 
and Elizabeth Ferguson, was born in Bladensburg, Maryland, January 
5th, 1777. He received as good an education as could be obtained in the 
public schools of the time in which he lived. 

He began his business life hauling stones, which were to be used in 
building the first National Capitol, at Washington, D. C. 

At the age of twenty-six he went to New York State with the family, 
when they moved to the Genesee country. 

The next year after the untimely death of his father, he married Mary, 
daughter of Henry Baggerly, who also came from Maryland. She was 
twelve 3'ears younger than Mr. Ferguson, having been born August 10th, 
1789. This marriage took place December 25th, 1808.' Mr. and Mrs. Fer- 
guson located one and one-half miles from Clifton Springs, on a farm now 
known as the "Fox Hill" farm. 

Here were born to them twelve children, five of whom died at this 
place, three of them in infancy. Mr. Ferguson provided for seven of the 
colored people who came with the family from Maryland, who were freed 
by the laws of New York State, and who were too old to work. Some 
amusing stories are told of these former slaves. One of them, Sarah 
Boone by name, lived to a great age. She lived in a house a short dis- 
tance from the Ferguson home. When she had passed her 80th year, a 
colored man by the name of Jacobs came to see her. They had formerly 
been acquainted in Maryland. In the course of their conversation he 
made a proposal of marriage. He said to the old woman, "I have come 
to hear your word." "What 'er word?" was the reply. "Whether you 
will marry me or not." "Oh! no, I promised the good Lord, when my 
husband died, I never would be troubled with another nigger." 

This colored woman was very useful in helping to care for the chil- 
dren during their infancy, some of whom became greatly attached to her. 
It is said that she lived bo be nearly one hundred years of age. 

Mr. Ferguson volunteered with others to go to Buffalo to defend that 
city against the attacks of the British Red Coats in the War of 1812. 



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ONTARIO COUNTY BRANCH. 

Fourth Generation in America. 



'-> W% 



•^^ 



ROr.KRT P.HLL AXD .MARY ]5A(iGERLV FERGUSON. 

Robert Bell Ferijuson, Deceased, Formerly Farmer in the Town of Phelps, 

Ontario County, N. Y., and His Wife, Mary Baggerly Ferguson. 



Ill 

After the danger was over he returned to his home. 

In the fall of 1841, Mr. Ferguson sold his farm to William Fox, of 
Seneca Falls, N. Y., and moved with his family to Clifton Springs, N. Y. 
He contemplated settling m the West and sent his son, John, prospecting 
through the State of Michigan, for a farm. 

A location was determined on near Medina, on land that is now the 
center of that city. But on John Ferguson's return, it was learned that 
the old homestead of Henry Baggerly, with some three hundred acres of 
land, was for sale, it then being the property of David Skates, of Water- 
loo, N. Y. To please his wife, the daughter of Henry Baggerly, Mr. 
Ferguson purchased this property, and in the spring of 1842 took posses- 
sion of the south farm with two hundred acres of land, his son, John, 
occupying the north farm containing about one hundred acres. About 
the same time, Mr. Ferguson loaned $3000.00 to a man who was supposed 
to possess considerable property; but he having died, his estate was 
found to be bankrupt and Mr. Ferguson never realized one dollar of 
this amount. This financially crippled the family; but the two younger 
sons gave their services to their father for twelve years, and thus enabled 
him to pay for the farm. On June 3rd, 1844, the family met with 
another severe affliction in the death of the oldest daughter, Paulina. 

In 1856 one of the younger sons married. Mr. Ferguson, having 
passed his days of labor, moved for a time to Orleans, N. Y. His son, 
John, had entered the mercantile business in that place. The two younger 
brothers purchased the farm of their brother, and Mr. Ferguson soon 
after returned to the north farm. The family then consisted of Mr. 
Ferguson, his wife, their son, Edwin, and daughter, Ann. 

On February 25th, 1858, Robert Bell Ferguson died in his 81st year, 
and was buried in the family cemetery on the farm where he had so long 
lived. 

Mr. Ferguson was not a successful business man. Among the 
descendants of William Ferguson, two prominent characteristics stood 
forth, one a business apitude, the other a religious zeal. Mr. Ferguson 
possessed the latter gift. It was said of him that he was too honest and 
unsuspecting to succeed in the atTairs of this world. He was a shining 
mark for dishonest and designing men; but in religious affairs he had few 
equals among the laymen of the church. He could talk with ability upon 
religious themes, his favorite subject being that of the Atonement. He 
was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

In 1807 the Episcopalians began to build a church just east of Clifton 

Springs, N. Y., but not being able to finish the work, they offered in 

809 to deed this property to the Methodist Episcopal Society, provid- 



112 

ing they completed the structure, reserving the privilege of using the 
church for worship when not occupied by the Methodists. The offer 
was accepted; the building was completed, and the First Methodist 
Episcopal Church of the town of Phelps, was organized. The Fergu- 
sons and Baggerlys were important factors in founding this society. The 
following were the members of the first board of trustees: Hezekiah 
Baggerly, Peter Baggerly, Robert Bell Ferguson, William Ferguson, 
Jr., and Jarrad Knapp. Peter Baggerly and Levi Ferguson were exhor- 
ters. 

In 1840 this church was burned and was rebuilt where the present 
church now stands, on land joining the Foster Sanitarium property. 

When the Ferguson family moved to the Henry Baggerly farm, 
they transferred their membership to the church in Orleans, N. Y. 

Mr. Ferguson's wife was graduated from a select school in Mary- 
land. She possessed a strong mind, with industrious habits and remark- 
able powers of indurance. She was a very capable woman and was a 
great help to her husband in his struggle to maintain and educate a 
large family of children. Her Christian fortitude sustained her through 
the declining years of her life. She made the remark at her husband's 
death, that she had lived with him for fifty years and that he had never 
spoken an unkind word to her. Before she died she requested that her 
husband's remains be moved to the Clifton Springs cemetery. She 
passed away October 18th, 1866, in her 78th year. The following are the 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Ferguson: William Lacy, Paulina, 
John Henry, Amerisa Tyson, Ann Eliza, Mary Elizabeth, Robert Bell, 
Edwin Peter, Julina Jane, Kiziah, Permelia, and David. The three latter 
died in infancy. 

THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF ROBERT BELL FERGUSON, OF PHELPS, 
ONTARIO COUNTS, N. Y. 

I, Robert B. Ferguson, considering the uncertainty of this mortal 
life and being of sound mind and memory, blessed be Almighty God for 
the same, do make this and publish this my last will and testament in 
manner and form following: 

First I give and bequeath unto my wife, Mary Ferguson, for and 
during her natural life, twenty-five acres of land lying on the north of the 
farm deeded to my two sons, Robert Bell Ferguson and Edwin Fer- 
guson, and being a part of said farm bounded on the north by lands 
owned by John H. Ferguson, on the east by the same, on the south by 
lands deeded by me to Robert B. and Edwin Ferguson, on the west by 
Flint Creek, to contain twenty-five acres of land, be there more or less; 



ONTARIO COUNTY BRANCH, 



Fifth Generation in America. 




JOHN HENRY FERCUSON. I.OIUSA WHEAT FERCUTSON. 

Resided in Canandaigua, N. V. 




JAMES CUER. MARY E. FERGUSON CUER. 

Resided in Shortsville, N. V. 



also all the household goods subject to her disposal. I will to my daugh- 
ter, Ann, four hundred dollars, to be paid out of my property. 

1 will to my daughter, Mary Cuer, two hundred and fifty dollars, to 
be paid within three years after my death. 

I will to my daughter, Julina Runyon, eighty acres of land lying in 
the State of Indiana and in the county of Steuben, and fifty dollars in 
money, to be paid out of my property. 

I will to my grandson, Robert L. Ferguson, fifteen dollars, to be 
paid out of my property. 

1 will to my son, John H. Ferguson, five dollars to be paid out of my 
property. 

I will to my two sons, Robert B. Ferguson, Jr., and Edwin Fer- 
guson, all rav personal property, except the household goods willed to my 
wife, and all the real estate belonging to me at my death, except the eighty 
acres of land willed to my daughter, Julina Runyon, lying in the State of 
Indiana, and the twenty-five acres willed to my wife for her use during 
her natural life and at her death to come into possession of said land. 

I hereby appoint Robert B. Ferguson, Jr. , and John H. Ferguson, 
the sole executors of this my last will and testament, hereby revoking all 
former wills by me made. 

Witness whereof I hereto set my hand and seal, the twenty-third day 
of February, in the year of the Lord one thousand and eight hundred 
and fifty-eight. ROBERT B. FERGUSON. [Seal.] 



The above instrument, consisting of one sheet, was subscribed by 
Robert B. Ferguson, the testator, in the presence of each of us, and was 
at the same time declared to be his last will and testament, and we, at 
his request, signed our names herewith as attesting witnesses. 

HIRAM WARNER,. Phelps, Ontario county. New York. 
W. W. WILLIAMS, Phelps, Ontario county. New York. 
I certify the foregoing to be a true copy of the last will and testa- 
ment of Robert B. Ferguson, deceased, proved before me, recorded and 
compared, this the fourth day of March, 1867. 

E. M. MORSE, Surrogate. 

THE DESCENDANTS OF ROBERT BELL AND MARY BAGGERLY FERGUSON. 
WILLIAM LACY FERGUSON AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 

(II.) William Lacy Ferguson, the oldest child of Robert Bell and 
Mary Ferguson, was born September 21st, 1809, on what is now known as 
the Fox Hill farm, near Clifton Springs, N. Y. 



114 

He was a farmer b^^ occupation. He married in the year 1832 
Eveline Griffith, a daughter of John Griffith, of Phelps, N. Y. She 
was a woman greatly respected for her friendly traits of character. They 
lived with their parents the greater part of their married life. One child, 
Robert Lester, was born to them in the year 1833. Lacy, as Mr. Fergu- 
son was familiarly called, was known as Captain William L. Ferguson 
from the fact that he was in command of a company at the general 
trainings which were held in those days. He is said to have made a fine 
appearance when on military duty. Mr. Ferguson never possessed a 
strong constitution. At thirty years of age his health began to fail, and 
he died June 29th, 1839, and was buried at Clifton Springs cemetery. 
After Mr. Ferguson's death his widow married Caleb Wirts, a farmer, 
and moved to the state of Michigan. After a few years, Mr. Wirts died 
and Mrs. Wirts made her home with her son, Robert Lester Ferguson. 
She died February 17th, 1904, at the great age of ninety years, the last 
member of the family of her generation. 

(in.) Robert Lester Ferguson, the only child of William Lacy and 
Eveline Griffith Ferguson, was born near Clifton Springs, N. Y., in 
the year 1833. He was married and had five children, all boys, William, 
Howard, Orvilla, John Lacy, and George. He was a farmer by occupa- 
tion. Mr. Ferguson's wife died in the year 1892. Her maiden name 
was Esther Deline. Mr. Ferguson died October 8th, 1901, in his sixty- 
eighth year. Howard and John Lacy Ferguson died on the same day in 
the year 1877. 

(IV.1 William Ferguson is a farmer and resides near Alma, Michi- 
gan. He married Ella Hass and has two children, Howard and Ethel. 

(IV.) Orvilla B. Ferguson married Margaret Gleason. He is a rail- 
road man and resides at Port Huron, Michigan. He has two children, 
Millard and John. 

(IV.) George Ferguson is a barber and resides at Detroit, Michigan. 
He married Lillian Rhonemus, of Detroit, Michigan. 

PAULINA FERGUSON. 

(II.) Paulina Ferguson, the second child and oldest daughter of 
Robert Bell and Mary Ferguson, was born July lltli, 1811. She had a 
frail constitution, but was one of the most industrious and useful members 
of the family. She was a seamstress and was never idle when there was 
work for her to do. She was a Christian woman and possessed a cheer- 
ful nature. She gradually failed in health and when no longer able to 
niove about, she continued to work for the family as long as her strength 



ONTARIO COUNTY BRANCH. 



Fifth Generation In America. 





ROBERT BELL FERGUSON. MARIAH WARNER FERGUSON. 

Resided in Phelps, Ontario County, N. Y. 




ISAAC RUN YON. JULINA I. FERGUSON RUN YON 

Resided in Sliortsville, N. Y. 



ONTARIO COUNTY BRANCH. 



Fifth Generation in America. 




L.L1ZA ANN FERGUSON 

Resided in Plielps, Ontario Ccninty, N. Y 



Sixth Generation in America. 





ROBERT LESTER FERGUSON. ESTHER DELINE FERGUSON. 

Resided near Alma, Mich. 



115 

lasted. When she had completed her last work on earth, she handed it to 
a friend saying, "That is the last I can do for you." She sank into a 
peaceful rest, June the 3rd, 1844, in the thirty-third year of her age. 

The minister officiating at her mother's funeral made the following 
remark: "The last time Paulina Ferguson ever attended divine worship, 
her parents brought her to church in a chair which was placed near the 
altar; her complexion was as white as marble, and in the midst of the dis- 
course her countenance was lighted with a radiance which revealed her 
heavenly frame of mind. In all my experience I have never seen before 
a human being with such an angelic appearance." 

JOHN HENRY FERGUSON AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 

(II.) John Henry Ferguson, the second son and third child of Rob- 
ert Bell and Mary Ferguson, was born August 5th, 1813, one and one- 
half miles southeast of Clifton Springs. 

He received his early education at Clifton Springs and completed his 
studies at Lima Seminary. At the age of twenty-seven he married 
Louisa, daughter of Benjamin and Louany Wheat, August 30th, 1837. 

He located on his father's farm in the house in which he was born, 
his father having built a larger residence to accommodate his large and 
growing family. 

Mr. Ferguson commenced his business life burning lime with Joel 
Tillot, who lived one mile east of Clifton Springs. He also assisted his 
father on the farm. When the farm was sold in 1841, both families 
moved to Clifton Springs, occupying the same house. The family decided 
to move west and John Ferguson was sent to the state of Michigan, pros- 
pecting for a farm. He obtained the refusal of land near Medina, but 
on his return home he found that his father had decided to purchase the 
farm once owned by Henry Baggerly, the father of his wife. So John 
Ferguson gave up the idea of going west and settled on the north farm 
of this property, where he prospered and accumulated wealth. Had the 
farm near Medina been purchased, it would have brought a fortune to the 
family for now it is the center of a thriving city. In the winter of 1835, 
through the influence of Rev. "Billy" Jones, Mr. Ferguson joined the 
Methodist Episcopal Church and became a prominent and liberal mem- 
ber. About the year 1842 his health began to fail him and he went to 
Michigan for a change of climate and entered the store of George Ashley, 
a brother-in-law, as a clerk. Here he remained at least one winter. 
Soon after his return his father-in-law, Benjamin Wheat, died, leaving 
his youngest son, Corydon Wheat, a farm at the foot of what is called 
"Wheat Hill." Corydon being yet under age, Mr. Ferguson was appoint- 



116 

edhis i^iiardian. He moved on this farm, where he remained until about 
18S1, when he built a new house on his own farm and lived there for 
several years. He then sold his farm to his brothers, Robert and 
Edwin P'erguson and entered the mercantile business at Orleans with a 
life long- friend, John VV. Sheriff, as partner. In this venture he at once 
built up a large business for so small a place, selling on an average over 
$^30,000 worth of goods a year. But soon one trouble after another 
followed. His partner lost his wife and soon went into a decline and 
also died. About this time Mr. Ferguson lost his youngest and favorite 
child, a very promising boy of six years, which loss nearly crushed Mr. 
Ferguson with grief. Serious church troubles came and he dropped 
out'of the society. He continued the mercantile business after the 
death of his partner, doing a credit business, and appeared to prosper 
until the financial stringency of 1857. He was unable to make his col- 
lections and in October, 1859, he made a general assignment for the 
benefit of his creditors, appointing Richard Sheckel and William H. 
Wayne assignees. The business was continued under the firm name of 
R. B. & E. Ferguson until 1864, when Mr. Ferguson closed up the 
business and moved with his family to Canandaigua, N. Y., March 
loth, 1865, and entered the emplo}^ of John Raines, now State Senator, 
as a fire insurance agent among the farmers. About the year 1868, 
while driving with a son of Mr. Raines, the horse took fright and Mr. 
Ferguson was thrown from the wagon, striking with great force on his 
head. He was carried to his home in an unconscious condition and 
remained in a critical state for several days. From this shock he never 
fully recovered. His mind became affected; he continued to grow 
worse, and it became a trying task to watch and care for him. Upon 
the advice of friends and physicians, Mr. Ferguson was, in the year 
1889, committed to the State hospital at Willard, N. V., where 
he died, December 13th, 1891, in his seventy-ninth year. The funeral 
services were held at the home of his daughter, Mrs. S. M.Newland, 
Clifton Springs, N. Y., and he was buried in Woodlawn cemetery 
Canandaigua, N. Y. 

Mr. Ferguson was possessed of a rich social nature and most gener- 
ous impulses, and he won for himself in the days before his mind became 
clouded and impaired a host of friends. It can be truthfully said of him 
that he died without an enemy. He was a man of ability, and was in 
his younger days a strong debater and lecturer. 

Mrs. Louisa Wheat Ferguson, wife of John Henry Ferguson, was a 
devoted Christian woman possessed of remarkable faith. The following 
article written by her pastor and published at the time of her death sets 
forth her life in an admirable manner : 



ONTARIO COUNTY BRANCH, 

Sixth Generation in America. 




MARTIN L. FERGUSON. 
Life Insurance Agent in Seneca Falls, N. Y, 



117 

Mrs. Louisa Ferguson died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. 
S. M. Newland, in Seneca Falls, N. Y., May 24th, 1894. Mrs. Ferguson 
was born in the town of Phelps, N. Y., near the village of Orleans 
December 18th, 1814. The home of her childhood is still standing. In 
1837 she was married and settled within a mile of her father's home, 
where many years of her life were spent. She was converted early in 
life and became a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Being a 
woman of more than ordinary intellectual strength, and having a relig- 
ious experience of unusual depth and fervor, she became prominent in 
her community and in church work. Soon after she united with the 
Methodist Church at Canandaigua, N. Y., Rev. F. G. Hibbard, D. D. 
her pastor, organized a class of young people for the study of Palestine. 
Mrs. Ferguson, being then over fifty years of age, entered upon this study, 
receiving a diploma at her examination. Her teacher made the remark 
"that in all his experience as a minister of the Gospel he had never before 
met with a woman with family cares who was so faithful in the pursuit 
of this line of study. It proved to be a preparation for her in after years , 
for she in a quiet way became a teacher of the deep things of experimen- 
tal religion." If any apology were needed for the publication of so 
extended a notice as this of this woman, it would be found in the remark- 
able character of her life in the camp meetings at Oaks Corners, N. Y., 
into which work she entered with that air of Christlikeness, patience, and 
tenderness that abode with her to the end of her journey. 

"She was steadfast, unmovable, always abounding in the work of 
the Lord." Her favorite song was "For the Lion of Judah will break 
every chain, and give us the victory again and again." 

Mrs. Ferguson lived in Canandaigua until 1889, when age and infirm- 
ity compelled her to give up her home and share the kind ministrations 
of her daughter, Mrs. S. M. Newland, who then resided in Clifton 
Springs, N. Y., and later on in Seneca Falls, N. Y. Both in Clifton 
Springs and Seneca Falls, friends old and young, regardless of denomi- 
national ties, gathered about her, and she was known as "Mother Fergu- 
son." No discerning spirit could come into her presenee for a moment 
without feeling the influence of the atmosphere of love in which she 
seemed constantly to live. When it was remarked in her presence when 
near the end "that it was strange that God should allow a Christian to 
pass through such great pam," she replied "God ivill have a tried 
people. " 

MARTIN LUTHER FERGUSON. 
(III.) Martin Luther Ferguson, the oldest child of John Henry and 



118 

Louisa Ferjjuson, was born at the old homestead of his grandfather, near 
Clifton vSprings N. Y. He was of delicate health in his youth and early 
manhood. At the age of sixteen he entered the store of his father as a 
clerk, which occupation he followed in Orleans and Canandaigua for 
many years, occasionally acting as a book agent. 

In April, 1890, he went to Washington, D. C, for his health, where he 
remained for over two years. Having recovered his strength, he returned 
to Seneca Falls, N. Y., in the autumn of 1893. 

On the 15th of January, 1894, he entered the employ of the Prudential 
Life Insurance Co., of America, as an agent. 

On the 5th of February, 1895, he received the appointment as an 
assistant superintendent and was stationed at Canandaigua, N. Y. 

In the fall of 1896 he resigned this position, and, October 18th, 1897, 
returned to Seneca Falls, N. Y., but continued in the employ of the 
Prudential Insurance Co. 

On the 15th of January, 1904, he completed his tenth year in a con- 
tinuous service for this company. Mr. Ferguson has always been a 
prominent member of the Methodist Church. He is unmarried and 
makes his home with his brother-in-law. Rev. S. M. Newland, pastor of 
the First Baptist Church, of Seneca Falls, N. Y. 

HARRISON BAGGERLY FERGUSON. 

(III.) Harrison Baggerly Ferguson, the second child of John Henry 
and Louisa Ferguson, was born April 22nd, 1842. 

He was educated at the Lima Seminary. After leaving school he 
entered the store of O. H. AUerton, at Newark, N. Y., as a clerk. 

He served in the Civil war in Company F., 126th Regiment of N. Y. 
Infantry, and received a commission as Second Lieutenant. He was 
wounded in the battle of the Wilderness, and until the end of the war, 
held a position as clerk in the War Department at Washington, D. C. 
At the end of the war he married Ellen Clara Wader, the daughter of 
Jacob A. Wader, a Baptist minister, and settled in Canandaigua, N. Y., 
engaging in the insurance business, and later on in the book business. 
He was connected for several years with the First National Bank at Can- 
andaigua, N. Y., was one of its directors, and acted as cashier for a 
number of years and assisted in closing up its affairs. For many years 
he was .secretary and treasurer of the Canandaigua Gas Light and the On- 
tario Light and Traction companies, and was at onetime general manager 
of these companies. He has served seventeen years as treasurer of the 
Canandaigua Union Free School. In the year 1884 Mr. Ferguson, with 
several others, founded Woodlawn cemetery in Canandaigua, N. Y., and 



ONTARIO COUNTY BRANCH, 



Sixth and Eighth Generation in America 





HARRISON BAGGERLY FERGUSON. 
Real Estate Agent, Canandaigua, N. Y. 



riioAiAS in<:R(;uS()N iienson. 

Son of Robert and Clara Ferguson Henson, 
Geneva, N. Y. 



ONTARIO COUNTY BRANCH. 

Seventh Generation in America. 




PROF. JOHN AKDEN FERGUSON, 

Of Rutgers College Preparatory School, 
New Brunswick, N. J. 




DR. HARRISON WADER FERGUSON. 
Dentist at Mahatfey, Pa. 



119 

the wonderful success of the venture was broupjht about hirgely through 
Mr. Ferguson's skill in selling the burial plots and careful financial man- 
agement. He is a member of the First Presbyterian Church of Canan- 
daigua, N. Y., and assisted in founding that institution. In politics Mr. 
Ferguson is a Republican and has been honored by his party in being 
elected Clerk of the Town of Canandaigua, N. Y., and Treasurer of 
the County of Ontario, N. Y., for two terms. His activity has contributed 
in many ways to the growth of Canandaigua and its important institu- 
tions. There are four children in this family, Clara Louise, Julia May, 
JohnArden, and Harrison Wader. 

{IV. ) Clara Louise Ferguson, the oldest daughter of Harrison B. 
and Ellen C. Ferguson, was born in Canandaigua, N. Y. She was 
graduated from Granger Place School in Canandaigua, N. Y., and from 
the Albany Normal College in the class of 1891. She taught school at 
North Tonawanda, N. Y., for one year. She married Robert W. Henson, 
a contractor and coal merchant, of Geneva, N. Y. 

They have had three children, Clara Louise, Robert, and Thomas 
Ferguson. Robert Henson died in the year 1900. 

(IV.) Julia May Ferguson, the second child of Harrison B. and 
Ellen C. Ferguson, was born in Canandaigua, N. Y. She is an accom- 
plished musician and social favorite, has traveled abroad extensively, is 
unmarried, and resides with her parents in Canandaigua. 

(IV.) John Arden Ferguson, the third child of Harrison Baggerly 
and Ellen C. Ferguson, was born in Canandaigua, N. Y., December 
23, 1873. He was graduated from Canandaigua Academy and Hamilton 
College in the class of 1896, receiving the degree of A.B. He is a member 
of the Chi Psi fraternity. He received the degree of A. M. from the 
same college in 1902. He is at present an instructor in Rutgers College 
Preparatory School, New Brunswick, N. J. 

(IV.) Harrison Wader Ferguson, the youngest child of Harrison 
Baggerly and Ellen C. Ferguson, was born at Canandaigua, N. Y. He 
was graduated from the Philadelphia Dental College in the class of 1903. 
He is now located at MahafFey, Pa. 

JULIA A. FERGUSON, 
(HI.) Julia Ann Ferguson, the third child of John Henry and 
Louisa Ferguson, was born at the old homestead of her great-grand- 
father Baggerly. She was educated at Lima Seminary, and on leaving 
school married Oscar Moore, the only son of William and Sarah Moore, 
February 28th, 1865. Mr. Moore died October 12th, 1872. and Mrs. 
Moore remained with his parents after his death. On June 12th, 1878, 



120 

she married Rev. S. M. Newland, a Baptist minister, who organized the 
First Baptist Society of Clifton Springs, N. Y., in the year 1887, with 
fourteen members. He built a substantial church, served the society 
four years, and left the church with eighty members. 

Mr. Newland then went to Seneca Falls, N. Y., on the first of April, 
1892, to serve the First Baptist church of that place. This church had 
less than one hundred members when he first went there and at the pres- 
ent time, 1904, the membership has increased to 238. 

Their home is at No. 32 Miller street. They have one son, William 
Everett Newland and one adopted daughter, Carol Elizabeth Newland. 

(IV.) William Everett Newland was born at Clifton Springs, N. Y. 
He was educated at Mynderse Academy, Seneca Falls, N. Y. He con- 
templated the study of a profession, but being afflicted for several years 
with poor health he was obliged to change his plans. He entered the 
employ of the Gould Manufacturing Co., at Seneca Falls, in a clerical 
position, and is at present connected with this firm. He married June 
26th, 1901, Mae Lockwood, of Savannah, N. Y., a school teacher. They 
have two children, Marjorie Louise, born April 16th, 1902, and Robert 
Samuel Newland, born July 2nd, 1904. 

(IV.) Carol Newland was legally adopted by Rev. S. M. and Julia 
Newland, in March, 1894, at the age of three years. She has made 
rapid progress in her studies and is a promising young lady. 

EDWIN CORYDON FERGUSON. 

(III.) Edwin Corydon Ferguson, the youngest child of John Henry 
and Louisa Ferguson, was born at the home of his uncle, Corydon Wheat, 
at the foot of what is known as the "Wheat Hill." He was an unusu- 
ally bright boy. He died October 8th, 1854, in his sixth year. He was 
buried at Woodlawn cemetery, Canandaigua, N. Y. 

AMERISA TYSON FERGUSON. 

(II.) Amerisa Tyson Ferguson, the fourth child of Robert and Mary 
Ferguson, was born on what is now known as the "Fox Hill" farm, in 
the year 1815. He was a blacksmith by trade and was located at Orleans, 
N. Y. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Clifton 
Springs, N. Y. He was always spoken of as an upright, conscientious 
young man. He is said to have been engaged to marry Lewezer War- 
field, of Manchester, N. Y., but he died February 3rd, 1841, as the result 
of a cold which he contracted at his place of business. He was buried 
at the Clifton Springs cemetery. 



ONTARIO COUNTY BRANCH, 

Sixth Generation in America. 




REV. SAMUEL MILTON NEWLAND. 
Settled Pastor of the First Baptist Church, Seneca Falls, N. Y. 



ONTARIO COUNTY BRANCH, 



Sixth Generation in America. 




MRS. JULIA A. FERCU'SON N?:\VLAND. 
The Wife of Rev. Samuel M. Newlaud. 



121 



ELIZA ANN FERGUSON. 



(II.) Eliza Ann Ferguson, the second daughter and fifth child of 
Robert Bell and Mary Ferguson, was born at the old homestead at Clif- 
ton Springs, N. Y., March 22nd, 1818. She is said to have been a very 
handsome woman in her youth. She occupied her time as a seamstress 
for the family. She was unmarried. 

Her parents are said to have objected to an engagement made early 
in life, and being a woman of a strong will she declared that if she could 
not have her choice she would remain single to the end of her days. 
This she did, refusing many offers of marriage. 

After the death of her mother in 1866, she became the housekeeper for 
her brother, Edwin, who was also unmarried. They adopted a niece, 
Ophelia Cuer, and a nephew, John Runyon, and made them their heirs. 
Eliza Ann was the strangest character in the family. She was intelligent, 
industrious, economical, and was noted for her neatness. She was gen- 
erous and friendly with her neighbors, but she ruled her household with 
a firm and unyielding hand. 

She was a great lover of children, and no mother was prouder to 
dress up and appear in public with children than this woman; but the 
children were made to know that bounds were set and over them they 
must not pass. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
at Orleans, N. Y. Her physical sufferings were great during her life, yet 
she endured them with remarkable fortitude. She was always dying; her 
friends were called together many times expecting that she was near her 
end, yet she lived to be 72 years of age, dying March 24th, 1890. She 
was buried with the family at Clifton Springs, N. Y. 

MARY ELIZABETH FERGUSON AND HER DESCENDANTS. 

(II.) Mary Elizabeth Ferguson, the sixth child of Robert Bell and 
Mary Ferguson, was born March 25th, 1820, at the old homestead near 
Clifton Springs, N. Y. She was educated at the public schools. She 
pursued a course preparatory to teaching at a select school at Newark, 
N. Y. She became a successful school teacher, excelling as a governess. 
She was a member of the Methodist Church, at Orleans, N. Y., and 
afterwards at Clifton S^prings, N._ Y., and South Sodus, N. Y., and 
became one of the charter members of the church at Shortsville, N. Y. 
She married James Cuer, a shoe dealer, a man of more than ordinary intel- 
ligence, well posted on the general topics of his day. He was a member of 
the Methodist Church, and was a charter member of the little church at 
Shortsville, N. Y., being almost indispensable to its organization. He 



122 

was very decided in his views. He followed the shoe business in Clifton 
Springs; became for a time a farmer near Lyons, Wayne county, N. Y., 
and afterwards a merchant at South Sodus, N. Y. 

About 1871 he moved to Shortsville, N. Y., where he was a shoe 
dealer. He died March 19th, 1888, in his 76th year, and was buried in 
Shortsville. His wife, Mary Elizabeth Ferguson Cuer, was greatly re- 
spected for her Christian character and her gentle and amiable dispo- 
sition. She died March 1st, 1895, in her 75th year. She was buried at 
Shortsville. They had five children, Robert F'erguson, Ann Ophelia, 
Samuel Edward, Mary Ella, and Antoinette Elizabeth. 

ROBERT FERGUSON CUER. 

(HI.) Robert Ferguson Cuer, the oldest son of James and Mary 
Ferguson Cuer, was born at Clifton Springs, N. Y. He received his edu- 
cation at South Sodus and entered a drug store at Lyons. He then went 
to Detroit, Michigan, where he was in the clothing business. His health 
failing him there, he moved to Cleveland, Ohio, and from there to Indi- 
anapolis, Indiana, where he is now located. 

On September 24th, 1873, he married Mary L. Reed, of Kingsley, 
Ohio. They have two children, Fannie Rhen Cuer, born in Detroit, 
Michigan, and James Edward Cuer, also born in Detroit, Michigan, 
and now located at Chicago, Illinois. 

ANN OPHELIA CUER. 

(III.) Ann Ophelia Cuer was the oldest daughter of James and Mary 
Ferguson Cuer. She was born at Clifton Springs, N. Y. She went with 
her parents when they moved near Lyons, N. Y., and later to South 
Sodus, N. Y. She was adopted early in life by her uncle, Edwin Fer- 
guson, and her aunt, Eliza Ann Ferguson. After the death of her aunt she 
became the housekeeper of Edwin Ferguson, and remained thereuntil the 
marriage of her cousin, John Runyon, when she went to Shortsville, 
N. Y. She lives at present with her sister at the old homestead. 

EDWIN SAMUEL CUER. 

(III.) Edwin Samuel Cuer, the second son of James and Mary 
Cuer, was born near Lyons, N. Y. He was educated at South Sodus, 
N. Y., and entered the employ of the New York Central and Hudson 
River railroad company as baggage master at Shortsville, N. Y. Later 
he became ticket agent in the employ of the same company at Middle- 
port Station, N . Y. 



ONTARIO COUNTY BRANCH. 

Seventh Generation in America. 




WILLIAM EVERETT XEWLAND AND WIFE, 

MAE LOCKWOCJD XEWLAND. 

Clerk in Office of Gould's Manufacturing Establishment of Pumps, in 
Seneca Falls, N Y. 



ONTARIO COUNTY BRANCH, 



Eighth Generation in America. 




MARJORIE LOUIvSE NEWLAND. 
Child of William Everett and Mae Lockwood Newland. 



ONTARIO COUNTY BRANCH, 

Eighth Generation in America. 



t 



-r- 



ROBERT SAMUEL NEWLAND. 

Child of William Everett and Mae Lockwood Nevvland. As Far as Known 
the Youngest Male Descendant of the Ferguson Family. 



ONTARIO COUNTY BRANCH, 



Sixth and Seventh Generations in America. 




ROBERT FERGUSON CUER. 

Dealer in Gentlemen's Furnishing 
Goods, Indianapolis, Ind. 




JAMES ALONZO KIPP. 

Shortsville, N. Y. Student at Cor- 
nell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 



123 

He is now located at Geneva, N. Y., in the undertaking business. 
He married September 29th, 1878, Anna CaroUne Van Buren. They had 
six children, all born at Shortsville, N. Y., Willard James, Robert Bell, 
Edna Luella, Marvin Sutherland, and Frank Durand, the last two being 
twins. Frank Durand Cuer died in infancy. 

(IV.) Willard James Cuer enlisted in the Spanish war, in the 3rd 
New York Infantry, Company F., and was stationed at Washington, D. C. 
He was honorably discharged after serving his term, and returned home. 
He re-enlisted in the 6th New York Siege Artillery Battery, Company E., 
and was sent to the Philippines and stationed at Manila. This company 
was engaged in China during the Boxer rebellion, and was later sta- 
tioned at Guam island. Mr. Cuer is at present living at Geneva, N. Y. , 
with his parents. 

(IV.) Robert Bell Cuer was a soldier during the Spanish War in the 
3rd New York Infantry and was stationed at Porto Rico. He at present 
lives at Hornellsville, N. Y. He is a tailor by trade. 

(IV.) Edna Luella Cuer is married to Thomas Day, a pruner and 
trimmer of grape vines. Located at Barker's, Niagara county, N. Y. 

(IV.) Marvin Sutherland Cuer is living with his parenl.:; at Geneva, 
N. Y. He is a tinsmith by trade. 

MARY ELLA CUER. 

(HI.) Mary Ella Cuer, the second daughter of James and Mary 
Ferguson Cuer, was born near Lyons, N. Y. She went with her parents 
to South Sodus, N. Y., where she completed her studies at the Sodus 
Academy. She lived with her parents, and at the death of her mother 
came into the possession of the homestead property at Shortsville, N. Y., 
where she is living with her sister, Ophelia. 

ANTOINETTE ELIZABETH CUER. 

(III.) Antoinette Elizabeth Cuer, the youngest child of James and 
Mary Ferguson Cuer, was born in South Sodus, N. Y. She finished her 
education at Shortsville. She married, September, 1875, Fletcher Kipp, 
an iron moulder in the employ of the Empire Drill factory, at Shorts- 
ville, N. Y., the proprietors of which were Mr. Kipp's uncles. 

After one year they moved to Kansas, where Mr. Kipp became a far- 
mer. He was appointed door keeper of the legislature of Kansas for two 
terms. Mr. Kipp's dwelling was destroyed by a cyclone and his family 
was blown a distance of two hundred yards and barely escaped with their 
lives. The family returned to Shortsville and Mr. Kipp again entered the 



124 

employ of the Empire Drill Company, but on account of ill health he left 
the ■concern and is now employed by the government in the Rural Free 
Delivery service at Shortsville, N. Y. They have six children: James 
Alonzo, born at Neosho Falls, Kansas; Mary Ella, born at Neosho Falls, 
Kansas; Grace Aseneth, born at Arkansas City, Kansas; Roger Cuer, born 
at Arkansas City, Kansas; Bernetta Bell, born at Sodan, Kansas; and 
Lowana Julina, born at Shortsville, N. Y. 

(IV.) James A. Cuer is attending a preparatory school at Ithaca, 
N. Y. Mary Ella Kipp is engaged in a millinery establishment at Roch- 
ester, N. Y. The younger members of the family are still living with 
their parents at Shortsville, N. Y, 

ROBERT BELL FERGUSON. JR., AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 

(II.) Robert Bell, the fourth son and seventh child of Robert and 
Mary Ferguson, was born on what is now called the "Fox Hill" farm 
near Clifton Springs, N. Y., August 25th, 1822. He finished his educa- 
tion at Genesee Wesleyan Seminary at Lima, N. Y. When he was 
eighteen years of age his father sold his farm and he went with the fam- 
ily to Clifton Springs, N. Y. In the spring of 1842, he moved with the 
family on the farm formerly the property of his grandfather, Henry Bag- 
gerly, on which he worked during seed time and harvest, and taught 
school and sold books during the winter months. On December 8th, 
1855, Mr. Ferguson married Mariah Warner, daughter of Hiram and 
Mary Warner. They located on the homestead farm, his father moving 
with his family into Orleans, Ontario county, N. Y. About this date he 
formed a co-partnership with his brother, Edwin, under the business 
name of R. B. & E Ferguson, John Ferguson having gone into the 
mercantile business, the two brothers purchased his farm. In the year 
1858 Robert B. Ferguson, Sr., died, and the homestead farm came to 
R. B. &' E. Ferguson by will. Robert Ferguson was never very strong, 
so he became the business man and his brother, Edwin, attended to the 
farm work . The family consisted of six children, Sumner Jay, Mary 
Bell, Alice May, Margaret Clay, Clara Ann, and Everett Warner. The 
two brothers purchased what was known as the "Hen Peck" farm for 
the oldest son, Sumner Jay. This brought about a separation of the 
two brothers, Robert retaining the homestead property and Edwin the 
farm once the property of his brother, John. Everett, the youngest son, 
when he became twenty-one years of age, worked the homestead farm, 
and his father entered upon what might be called a "green old age." 

The loss of his wife was a great trial to him and to the entire family. 
Mrs. Ferguson was a home mother in the truest, noblest sense of the 



ONTARIO COUNTY BRANCH, 

Fifth Generation in America. 




RUHERT BELL FERGUSOX. 

Robert Bell FeryusoD, Deceased, formerly Farmer in the Town of Phelps 
Ontario County, N. Y. 



125 

term. It was said of her that she was a queen among women, and her 
home was her throne. But when the time came to leave the home, it 
found her ready and glad to accept the will of her Heavenly Father. 
vShe was buried in the family lot at Clifton Springs, N. Y. 

Mr, Ferguson, while throwing off many of the cares of life, still was 
interested in what was going on about his home, indoors and out, visit- 
ing among his relatives and friends, attending conventions and confer- 
ences, both in Church and State, until too feeble to leave his home. He 
took great interest in the politics of his day. He was first a Whig and 
afterwards a Republican, and probably there was no man in his town 
who attended more conventions and whose advice was more often 
sought than tliat of Robert B. Ferguson. He was not an office seeker. 
We do not remember of his ever accepting an office, except that of 
Assessor, which office he held a few years. In the winter of 1858 he 
united with the Methodist Episcopal Church, and became at once a 
prominent and influential member, and was on the official board to the 
day of his death. 

About the year 1880 the Orleans society broke up through the death 
and removal of its members, and he went with his family to the Seneca 
Castle Church, in whose fellowship he died, November 8th, 1901, having 
more than completed his seventy-ninth year. He was buried at Clifton 
Springs, N. Y. 

SUMNER JAY FERGUSON. 

(in.) Sumner Jay Ferguson, the eldest son of Robert and Mariah 
Ferguson, was born in the town of Phelps, N. Y. Married Ida M. 
Detrude and settled on the first farm south of the homestead property. 
Mr. Ferguson has been a successful farmer. Like his father he takes 
great interest in politics- He has held the office of Commissioner of 
Highways in the town of Phelps, N. Y. Mr. Ferguson is considered a 
man of good judgment and safe business qualifications. He is friendly 
and generous by nature and a man highly respected in the community in 
which he lives. 

BELL MARIAH FERGUSON. 

(HI.) Bell Mariah Ferguson, the eldest daughter of Robert and 
Mariah Ferguson, was born in the town of Phelps, N. Y. She finished 
her education at Clifton Springs, N. Y. She married Clarence Ottley, a 
farmer and general dealer in farm produce. 

Mr. Ottley is an influential public man and is at present Supervisor of 
the town of Seneca. He resides at Seneca Castle. They have one 



126 

daughter, Alice Ottley. She attended school at Canandaigua three or 
four years, was then at Cornell University, and is now an assistant to 
Professor Margaret C. Ferguson in Wellesley College. 

ALICE MAY FERGUSON. 

(III.) Alice May Ferguson was the second daughter of Robert and 
Mariah Ferguson. She was born in the town of Phelps, and finished her 
education at Clifton Springs, N. Y. When about twenty-two years of 
age she was taken with a sickness and was an invalid for several years. 
She died at the home of her parents September 5th, 1891, having com- 
pleted her 29th year, and was buried in the family lot at Clifton Springs, 
N. Y. 

MARGARET CLAY FERGUSON. 

(III.) Margaret Clay Ferguson, the third daughter of Robert and 
Mariah Ferguson, was born at the homestead. She was a bright, inter- 
esting child, and readily took to her studies. While attending school at 
Orleans, N. Y., she was placed over the primary department to take the 
place of a teacher who proved to be a failure. Margaret was at that time 
only fourteen years of age. She received a salary of $2.00 per week. 

At the age of sixteen she was employed to teach the school at the 
old brick school house in the home district in the Town of Phelps, N. Y. 
Afterwards she went to the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary at lAma, N. Y., 
from which institution she was graduated after four years, in the year 
1885. During this time she taught one year in a small District school, 
keeping up her studies in the Lima Seminary at the same time and 
attending the examinations at the end of the year. She boarded herself 
during the four years except one term, feeling that she must economize 
on account of the large family to which she belonged. She was valedic- 
torian of her class. After graduating, she received a position in the 
High School at Solomon City, Kansas, where she remained one year. 
She would have remained there longer, but her mother desired that she 
live nearer home. On her return she became Assistant Principal of the 
Public School at Shortsville, N. Y. At the close of the year she was 
invited by the Board of Trustees to become the Principal of this school, 
but the opportunity for greater influence and larger salary had come all 
unsought. It appeared to her that it was an open door and she dare not 
refuse to enter. She entered Wellesley College that she might be 
better equipped as a teacher. She remained at Wellesley as a student 
from the fall of 1888 to the spring of 1891 . During this time her beloved 
mother was called to her heavenly home. She remarked that it was her 



ONTARIO COUNTY BRANCH, 



Sixth and Seventh Generations in America. 




UR. .MARGARET CLAY FERGUSON 

A Teacher of Botany in Wellesley Col 
lege, Mass. 



ALICE :\L\RL\H OTTLEV. 

Assistant Teacher in Wellesley Col- 
lege, Mass. 



127 

blessed privilege to care for her during her illness; and she often says 
that her noble mother's character has been through life her constant 
inspiration. Whatever she has been able to do in this world she believes 
was through the power of the life which her mother lived, a power best 
known and appreciated by her children. For two years after leaving 
Wellesley College, from 1891 to 1893, she had charge of the Science 
department of Harcourt Place Seminary, Gambier, Ohio. 

In the fall of 1893 she left Harcourt Place and returned to Wellesley 
College as an Instructor in Botany. In the spring of 1896 she went to 
Europe for travel and to become better acquainted with the German and 
French languages. In the fall of 1897 she entered Cornell University for 
study. She received the B. S. degree from that university in 1899. 
During the years 1899 and 1900, she was Fellow in Botany at Cornell 
University. 

In June, 1901, she took the Ph.D. degree at Cornell. The following 
summer, and each summer since, she has returned to the University as 
Instructor in Botany during the summer season. In the fall of 1901 she 
went to Wellesley as Instructor in Botany. In February, 1904, she was 
appointed as Associate Professor in Botany at Wellesley College. Scien- 
tific societies have elected her to membership, and she has been frequently 
called upon to present papers on scientific subjects. In 1899 she was 
made a member of the Alpha Chapter of the Sigma Xi society. 

She is a member of the Society of Plant Morphology and Physiology, 
and of the Boston Society of Natural History. In August, 1898, she read a 
paper before the Botanical Society of America at its Boston meeting, also 
before this society in 1899 at New York, and in the same year and place 
another paper before Section G. of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science. She read a paper in 1901 before the Society of 
Plant Morphology and Physiology at its winter meeting in New York. 

In 1902 she read a paper before Section G. of the A. A. A. S. in 
Washington, and during the past winter one before the Boston Society of 
Natural History. She has published two papers based upon an original 
investigation of pines, in the Annals of Botany, published at Oxford, 
England, one in June, 1901, and the second in September. A Physiologi- 
cal paper based on a study of the germination of Mushroom spores 
was published as a Government bulletin at Washington in the spring of 
1902. 

Several shorter papers have been published in Science. On Decem- 
ber 30th, 1903, she submitted a paper to the Association for Maintaining 
the American Woman's Table at the Zoological Station at Naples and 
for Promoting Scientific Research by Women. 



12S 

This paper received special honorable mention, and the cornmitteein 
charge procured the means for its publication by the American Academy 
of Science, Washington, D. C, at a cost of not less than $1200.00. The 
subject of this paper is "Contributions to the Life History of Pines, with 
special reference to Microsporogenesis." Miss Ferguson is not only 
intellectual, but also has a spiritual power in moulding the character 
and fitting her students for future usefulness. 

CLARA ANN FERGUSON. 
(III.) Clara Ann Ferguson, the fourth daughter of Robert and 
Mariah Ferguson, was born in the town of Phelps, N. Y. She finished 
her education at Clifton Springs, N. Y. After her mother's death in 1890, 
she became the housekeeper for her father, until her marriage to Mar- 
shall King. They settled two and one-half miles southwest of the vil- 
lage of Phelps. They sold this farm and located near Geneva, N. Y. At 
present Mr. King is in business at Phelps, N. Y., where the family now 
reside, They have two children, Margaret Ferguson King and Marion 
Bell King. 

EVERETT WARNER FERGUSON. 
(III.) Everett Warner Ferguson, the youngest child of Robert and 
Mariah Ferguson, was born in Phelps, N. Y. He finished his education 
at Lima Seminary. He married Ina Beal, a school teacher, and settled on 
the homestead farm. He has a second farm near Seneca Castle. He is 
a successful business man, generous in manj' ways. They have one son, 
adopted, Earl Ferguson and one child of their own, George Everett Fer- 
guson. Mr. and Mrs. Ferguson are both active members of the Metho 
dist Church at Seneca Castle. 

EDWIN PETER FERGUSON. 

(II.) Edwin Peter, the fifth son and eighth child of Robert and Mary 
Ferguson, was born on the Fox Hill farm, near Clifton Springs, N. Y., 
December 23rd, 1824. He was cared for during his infancy by Sarah 
Boone, the colored woman heretofore mentioned. He was a great reader 
in his younger days, history being his favorite study. He was a farmer 
by occupation, and his chief pleasure was in work; and it is very prob- 
able that he did more hard work during his life time than any other per- 
son in the community where he lived. He took no responsibility upon 
himself in business life, but left the management to his brother, Robert, 
and in his latter years to his nephew, John Runyon. 

At his father's death he received a half interest in the homestead 
farm. After the purchase of their brother John's farm, Robert and 



129 

Edwin Ferguson worked under the firm name of R. B. & E. Ferguson. 
Edwin Ferguson was never married. His sister, Eliza Ann, also single, 
acted as his housekeeper after the death of his mother in 1866, until her 
death in 1890, when Ophelia Cuer, his niece, became his house- 
keeper, until his nephew was married. He united with the M E. Church 
in 1858. When that society became extinct, he united with the Presby- 
terian Church and was made one of its Deacons. This Church also broke 
up. He then united with the M. E. Church at Seneca Castle, where he 
remained to the end of his days. He was honest, sincere, and truthful, 
and had the respect and confidence of all who knew him. Socially he 
was pleasant and entertaining. If he thought a man was not worthy of 
his respect, he would have nothing to do with him. The farm at his death 
became the propert}^ of his nephew, John Runyon, Ophelia Cuer, his 
niece, having her portion in money. He died July 27th, 1899, having 
more than completed his seventy-fourth year. He was buried in the fam- 
ily lot at Clifton Springs, N. Y. 

JULINA JANE FERGUSON. 

(II.) Julina Jane Ferguson, the ninth child of Robert and Mary 
Ferguson, was born on Fox Hill farm, near Clifton Springs, N. Y., June 
13th, 1827. She received a common school education, was intelligent and 
entertaining. When about twenty years of age she wentto Newark, N. Y., 
and learned the dressmaking trade 

While there she became acquainted with Isaac Runyon, a cabinet 
maker, whom she married March 12th, 1852. Shortly after her marriage 
her husband went to California in search of gold. She remained with 
her parents until his return, which was about 1857. 

They first settled in Newark, N. Y., where they remained until 1864, 
when they sold their property and went to Shortsville, N. Y., and pur- 
chased another home, where they lived, with the exception of two years 
in Orleans, N. Y., until the end of their days. Mr. Runyon worked for 
Brown & Co., in the drill factory. He was noted for his sprightliness, 
industry, and economy. He possessed a remarkable constitution down to 
old age. He was a great help to the "Little Church" in Shortsville, 
looking after the finances of the society. 

They had seven children, Edwin, George, John, Minnie, Frank, Fred, 
and Julia. Fred died in infancy. Edwin died in childhood. Julia died 
October 29th, 1889, having completed her 20th year. Mrs. Runyon was a 
member of the Methodist Church in Orleans. She transferred her 
membership to Newark, N. Y. 



130 

Upon her removal to Shortsville she united with the Presbyterian 
Society, where she remained until the organization of the M. E. Church, 
when she became one of its charter members. She continued a worthy 
member until death. 

Mrs. Ruuyon mingled but little in society on account of her great 
infirmities. She was a sincere, devoted Christian, and l.ad the respect 
and confidence of the church and community. She was devoted to her 
family, and they returned her love with a tender regard for her welfare. 
She died July 5th, 1901, having completed her seventy-fourth year, and 
was buried in the family lot at Shortsville, N. V. 

After Mrs. Runyon's death, her husband began to fail, and he died 
August 28th, 1903, having just completed his eighty-second year. He 
was buried in the family lot at Shortsville, N. Y. 

GEORGE LEWIS RUNYON. 

(III.) George Lewis Runyon, the second son of Isaac and Julina 
Runyon, was born in Newark, N. Y. He went with his parents to 
Shortsville, where he finished his education. Mr. Runyon has been 
employed the most of his business life in the Empire Drill factory at 
Shortsville, N. Y , as a painter. At the present time he Is employed in 
the Anti-Rust Tin factory at Canandaigua, N. Y. He is unmarried and 
is the owner of his parents' homestead property. Mr. Runyon is a prom- 
inent member of the Methodist Church at Shortsville, N. Y. 

JOHN HENRY RUNYON. 

(III.) John Henry Runyon, the third son of Isaac and Julina 
Runyon, was born in Newark, N. Y. He went to live with his uncle, 
Edwin Ferguson, when a small child. Mr. Runyon received a common- 
school education. He married Emma Brown, the daughter of H. N. 
Brown, of Orleans, N. Y. He is a farmer and the owner of his uncle's 
homestead property, at which place he resides. He has the reputation of 
being an honorable man and a successful farmer. 

MINNIE ANN RUNYON. 

(III.) Minnie Ann Runyon, the oldest daughter of Isaac and Julina 
Runyon, was born in Newark, N. Y- She went to Shortsville, N Y., 
with her parents, where she was educated. She married Zadoc Warfield, 
a retired farmer. Mr. Warfield has also worked in the Empire Drill 
factory in Shortsville, N. Y. The family now reside at the Runyon 
homestead, 



ONTARIO COUNTY BRANCH. 

Sixth Generation in America. 




FRANK FERGUSON RUNVON. 
Manager of Faxon, Williams & Faxon Store, in Buffalo, N Y 



ONTARIO COUNTY BRANCH^ 



Sixth Generation in America. 




■.^^ 



LULU RUNYON. 

Wife of Frank Ferguson Runyon. Descendant of the Ferguson Family in 
Maryland. 



ONTARIO COUNTY BRANCH. 



Sixth Generation in America. 




GEORCiE LEWIS RUNYON. 



Emploj'ed in Anti-Rust Tin Factory in Canandaigua, N. Y. 
Residence in Shortsville, N. Y. 



131 



FRANK FERGUSON RUNYON. 



(III.) Frank Ferguson Runyon was born and educated at Shorts- 
ville, N. Y. He entered a store as a clerk in his early teens. In later 
years he went into the employ of HoUister Grimes, at Canandaigua, 
N. Y. After a few years he went to Buffalo and entered the employ of 
Faxon & Co., fruit dealers. He married Lula Raubenstein, and they 
settled in Buffalo, where they now reside. 

HARRY FERGUSON RUNYON. 

(IV.) Harry Ferguson Runyon was born in Shortsville, N. Y., in 
November, 1888, where he is being educated. He resides with the family 
at the Runyon homestead. 



132 



CHAPTER XIII. 
WASHINGTON BRANCH- 11. 

Rev. John Ferguson and His Descendants. 

(I.) John Ferguson, the third son of William and Elizabeth Fergu- 
son, was born in Bladensburg, Md., May 21st, 1779. He was educated in 
Maryland and early in life entered the Christian ministry and became 
one of the founders of the Protestant Methodist Church, his labors being 
carried on mainly in the city of Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Ferguson was a talented man and one of the most exemplary 
men of his generation. He was appointed Chaplain of the Penitentiary 
Alms House and occupied this position for several years, and he also served 
for a time as Commissioner under the city government. The same year 
that his father went to New York State, he married Elizabeth White, 
October 8th, 1803. She died early in life, leaving two sons, Alfred Bell 
and Thomas Bell, who were twins. 

Mr. Ferguson married, the second time, Sarah Ferguson, a cousin, 
February 4th, 1808. She died July 18th, 1840, leaving six children, Ann 
Jane, Elizabeth Ruth, John Wesley, James Reed, William Pierce, and 
Sarah. Rev. John Ferguson died in Washington in 1861, in his eighty- 
third year. 

THE CHILDREN OF REV. JOHN FERGUSON AND THEIR DESCENDANTS. 

(II.) Thomas Bell Ferguson, the son of Rev. John Ferguson by his 
first marriage, went to sea and was never heard from afterwards. 

(II.) Alfred Bell Ferguson, the other so«i of Rev. John Ferguson by 
his first marriage, married Catherine Fuggett, September, 1836. They 
had two daughters, Emeline and Elizabeth Franc. 

iIII.) Emeline Ferguson married a Mr. Anderson; she is living at 
the present time, in 1904. Mr. Anderson is a lumber dealer in Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

(III.; Elizabeth Franc Ferguson married a Mr. Millstead. She is 
dead. 

(II.) Ann Jane Ferguson, the eldest child of Rev. John Ferguson 
by his second marriage, married John Price, November 10th, 1835. She 
resided in Washington, D. C, and died in 1869, leaving no descendants. 



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132 



CHAPTER XIII. 
WASHINGTON BRANCH- 11. 

Rev. John Ferguson and His Descendants. 

(I.) John P'erguson, the third son of William and Elizabeth Fergu- 
son, was born in Bladensburg, Md., May 21st, 1779. He was educated in 
Maryland and early in life entered the Christian ministry and became 
one of the founders of the Protestant Methodist Church, his labors being 
carried on mainly in the city of Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Ferguson was a talented man and one of the most exemplary 
men of his generation. He was appointed Chaplain of the Penitentiary 
Alms House and occupied this position for several years, and he also served 
for a time as Commissioner under the city government. The same year 
that his father went to New York State, he married Elizabeth White, 
October 8th, 1803. She died early in life, leaving two sons, Alfred Bell 
and Thomas Bell, who were twins- 

Mr. Ferguson married, the second time, Sarah Ferguson, a cousin, 
February 4th, 1808. She died July 18th, 1840, leaving six children, Ann 
Jane, Elizabeth Ruth, John Wesley, James Reed, William Pierce, and 
Sarah. Rev. John Ferguson died in Washington in 1861, in his eighty- 
third year. 

THE CHILDREN OF REV. JOHN FERGUSON AND THEIR DESCENDANTS. 

(II.) Thomas Bell Ferguson, the son of Rev. John Ferguson by his 
first marriage, went to sea and was never heard from afterwards. 

(II.) Alfred Bell Ferguson, the other so«i of Rev. John Ferguson by 
his first marriage, married Catherine Fuggett, September, 1836. They 
had two daughters, Emeline and Elizabeth Franc. 

(III.) Emeline Ferguson married a Mr. Anderson; she is living at 
the present time, in 1904. Mr. Anderson is a lumber dealer in Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

(HI.) Elizabeth Franc Ferguson married a Mr. Millstead. She is 
dead. 

(II.) Ann Jane Ferguson, the eldest child of Rev. John Ferguson 
by his second marriage, married John Price, November 10th, 1835. She 
resided in Washington, D. C, and died in 1869, leaving no descendants. 






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133 

(II.) Elizabeth Ruth Ferguson, the second child of Rev. John Fer- 
guson by his second marriage, married John A. Davis, January 15th, 
1839. She died in 1843. Her descendants died in early life. 

(II.) John Wesley Ferguson, the oldest son of Rev. John Ferguson 
by his second marriage, was born in Washington, D. C, where he 
received his education. He was a builder and contractor by occupation. 
He married May 16th, 1843, Ellen Prather. They had one son, Robert 
Benedict Ferguson. Mrs. Ferguson died early in life. Mr. Ferguson 
married a second time Minerva Prather, a sister of his former wife. She 
also died in early life, leaving one son, Octavio, who died in childhood. 
Mr. Ferguson married, the third time, Sarah Hurrey. By this union he 
had one child, who died in infancy. 

(III.) Robert Benedict Ferguson, the son of John Wesley and Ellen 
Ferguson, was born in Washington, D. C, where he was educated. He 
became a druggist on Capitol hill, Washington, D. C, near where the 
Congressional Library now stands. He married Virginia Falkner, a dis- 
tant relative on his mother's side. They had four children, Robert, 
Elizabeth, and Virginia, and the youngest child, who died in infancy 
Mrs. Ferguson died in early life, and Mr. Ferguson married, the second 
time, Alice Lightner. They had four children, Bertie, Hattie, Warren, 
and Love. The family reside in Washington, D. C. 

(IV.) Robert Ferguson, the son of Robert Benedict Ferguson by his 
first marriage, was born in Washington, D. C. He married Ida Keithley. 
They have children. Mr. Ferguson is a lawyer by profession. 

Elizabeth and Virginia Ferguson, daughters of Robert Benedict 
Ferguson by his first marriage, were both born in Washington, D. C, 
where they were educated. They are in the employ of the U. S. (rovern- 
ment at Washington, D. C. 



134 

(II.) James Reed Ferguson, the second son of Rev. John Ferguson 
by his second marriage, was born in Washington, D. C, and received his 
education in that city. He was a builder and contractor and was at one 
time in the employ of the U. S. Government. He married, April 30th, 
1839, Elizabeth Dooley, a half sister of John Wesley Ferguson's first two 
wives. They had six cliildren, Mary, Milton, Alvin, Laura, Elizabeth 
and William. 

(III.) Mary Ferguson married John Slater. They have one child, 
James R. Slater, who is married and has children. 

Milton Ferguson married and has one child, Libbie, who is married 
and has children. 

Alvin Ferguson died in his youth. 

Laura and Elizabeth Ferguson are unmarried and are in the employ 
of the U- S. Government, at Washington, D. C. 

William Ferguson is married and lives in New York city. 

Sarah Ferguson, the youngest child of Rev. John Ferguson by his 
second marriage, was born in Washington, D. C. She died September, 
29th, 1828, in her eighth year. 

(II.) Captain William Pierce Ferguson, the youngest son of Rev. 
John Ferguson, was born September 9th, 1817. He received his education 
in Washington, D. C. He married Eliza Jane Ferguson, of St. Mary's 
county, Maryland, February 26th, 1839. He was a man of brilliant 
mind. He was in the employ of the U. S. Government for many years. 

He was in the Civil war; was Captain of the Third Maryland regi- 
ment, Company F., of the National Guards. He served two and one- 
half years and then resigned on account of his health. He served several 
terms in the city council, in 1856, in 1857, in 1864, and in 1867. He was 
a very social and genial man, well posted on all subjects of interest to 
the general public. He died, December, 1900. His children were: Samuel 
Tucker, John Bell, Elizabeth Ann, William Edmund, James Rufus, 
Virginia, David Alexander, Janette Bell, and Ruth Halsey. 

(III.) Samuel Tucker Ferguson, the oldest child of William Pierce 
and Eliza Ferguson, was a Protestant Methodist minister in Maryland. 
He married Emma Reese Cromwell, of Baltimore, Md., granddaughter 
of Dr. John S. Reese, a leading physician of Baltimore. 

They had five children, Richard Cromwell, William Eddy, Catherine, 
Elsie Jane, and John. 

(IV. J Richard Cromwell Ferguson is the owner of a box and crate 
factory at Poconoke City, Md. 



WASHINGTON, D. C, BRANCH— IL 



Fifth Generation in America, 




CAPT. WILLIAM PEERCE FERGUSON. 



Veteran of the Civil War. Was Captain of the Third Maryland Regiment, 
Company P., of the National Guards. 



WASHINGTON, D. C, BRANCH-IL 



Sixth Generation in America. 




REV. SAMUEL FERGUSON. 

Protestant Methodist Minister, Now Deceased, Formerly of 
Baltimore, Md. 



WASHINGTON, D, C, BRANCH-IL 



Sixth Generation in America. 




MRS. EMMA REESE FERGUSON. 
Wife of Rev. Samuel Ferguson. Now Resides in Baltimore, Md, 



135 

William Eddy Ferguson is in the real estate business in Baltimore. 
He married Ina Kint^sbury, of Washington, D. C. They have one son, 
an infant. 

Catherine Reese and Elsie Jane are both graduated trained nurses 
and reside in Baltimore. 

John Ferguson, the youngest child, died in his youth. 

(III.) John Bell Ferguson, the second son of William Pierce and 
Eliza Ferguson, was a pattern maker in the Navy yard at Washington, 
D. C. He married Nellie Scott. He has one sou, William Pierce 
Ferguson. 

(IV.) William Pierce Ferguson is a bookkeeper in the (jovernment 
printing office. He married a Miss Mann They have two children, 
John and Nettie. 

(III.) Elizabeth Ann Ferguson, the eldest daughter of William 
Pierce and Eliza Ferguson, was born in Washington, D. C. She married 
William Penn Westwood, of Baltimore, Md., a contractor and builder. 
He is Supreme Chancelor of the Knights of Phythias. They had nine 
children, Henry Pierce, Elizabeth McComas, William Ferguson, Charles 
Jerome, Nellie Coleman^ Emily Jane, Susan Eliza, William Penn, and 
Baajamin Howard. All died in infancy except Emily Jane, who lived to 
see her twenty-first yp . 

(HI.) William Edmund, the third son of William Pierce and Eliza 
Ferguson, was born in Washington, D. C. He married Miss Bailey. 

Mr. Ferguson is dead. They had one son, who is a tailor by occu- 
pation. 

(III.) James Rufus Ferguson, the fourth son of William Pierce and 
Eliza Ferguson, is in the gas and electric fixture business at Washington, 
D. C. He married Matilda Middleton, the daughter of a prominent 
business man of Washington, D. C. They had three children: 

(IV.) Ann Bell Ferguson, who died in infancy; Florence May Fergu- 
son, who is living with her parents in Washington, D. C; and Edmund 
Ferguson, who died in infancy. 

(III.) Virginia Ferguson, the sixth child of William Pierce and Eliza 
Ferguson, died in childhood. 

(III.) David Alexander Ferguson, the seventh child of William 
Pierce and Eliza Ferguson, is a carpenter and resides in Washington, 
D. C. He is unmarried. 

(III.) Janette Bell Ferguson, the eighth child of William and Eliza 
Ferguson, died in infancy. 

(III.) Ruth Halsey Ferguson is unmarried and resides with her 
brother David, 



136 



CHAPTER XIV. 
CLIFTON SPRINGS BRANCH. 

William Ferguson. Junior, and his Descendants. 

(I.) William Fera;uson, Jr., the fourth son and seventh child of Wil- 
liam and Elizabeth Ferguson, was born in Bladensburg, Maryland, 
December, 1780. He received his education in Maryland and went to New 
York State with his parents, when they moved to the Genesee country. 

After the sudden death of his father, he purchased the homestead 
property of his mother, who returned to Maryland. William became a 
farmer. He married Sarah Benham, a Christian woman of sterling qual- 
ities, who died early in life, leaving one son, Levi Benham Ferguson. Mr. 
Ferguson then married Hester Price, a woman of refinement, who was 
greatly respected for her Christian character and friendly disposition. 
William Ferguson, Jr. , was a quiet, unassuming man, and a Christian 
gentleman. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of 
Clifton Springs, N. Y., in which he held an official position nearly to the 
end of his life. During his latter years he made his home in Clifton 
Springs, where he died in 1862, at the age of 82 years, and was buried in 
the family lot at Clifton Springs. After the death of her husband, Mrs. 
Ferguson made her home with her eldest daughter, Sarah. She was 
buried beside her husband in the family lot. Mr. Ferguson had six chil- 
dren by his second marriage, Sarah, Almira, Hester Ann, Lucinda, Wil- 
liam, and Delilah. 

THE CHILDREN OF WILLIAM FERGUSON, JR., AND THEIR DESCENDANTS. 
(H.) Levi Benham Ferguson, the only child of William Ferguson 
by his first marriage, was born near Clifton Springs, N. Y., where he 
received his education. He married, late in life, Catherine, the only 
daughter of Allen Kendall, of Clifton Springs, N. Y. 

Mr. Ferguson remained on his father's farm for some time after his 
marriage and then moved to Clifton Springs, N. Y., where he resided 
with his father-in-law and became a real estate and fire insurance agent. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ferguson had no children of their own, but adopted a 
daughter, Elizabeth, who married George R. Garrison and moved to 
Colorado, where she died December 5th, 1903, leaving one child, John 
Ferjfuson Garrison 



D C 



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f Id 
o E 



CLIFTON SPRINGS BRANCH. 



Fourth Generation in America. 




WILLIAM FERGUSON. 
Formerly a Farmer, East of Clifton Springs, Now Deceased. 



CLIFTON SPRINGS BRANCH, 



Fourth Generation in America. 




HESTER PRICE FERGUSON. 
Deceased. Wife of William Ferguson. 



CLIFTON SPRINGS BRANCH. 



Fifth Generation in America. 




LEVI BENHAM FERGUSON. 

Deceased. 

Resided at Clifton Springs, N. Y 



KATE KENDALL FERGb'.S(Ji\. 




HAKKLSON liAGGERLV. ALMIRA FERGUSON I3AGGERLY 

Deceased, Deceased. 

Resided South of Clifton Springs, N. Y. 



CLIFTON SPRINGS BRANCH. 



Fifth Generation in America. 




HESTER FERGUSON GARLOCK. 

Deceased. 





CHARLES LA DUE. 

Deceased. 



SARAH FERGUSON LA DUE. 

Deceased. 



CLIFTON SPRINGS BRANCH, 



Sixth Generation in America. 




FRANK FERGUSON BAGGERLY. 

Frank Ferguson Baggerly, of Chicago, 111., is a Traveling Salesman, 

Giving Art Exhibits in the Principal Cities. 



CLIFTON SPRINGS BRANCH. 



Seventh Generation in America 




HARRISON COATS BACxGERLY. 

Harrison Coats Baggerly, Chicago, 111., Traveling Salesman, givinj 

Art Exhibits in the Principal Cities. 



137 



(II.) wSarah Ferguson, the oldest daughter of William Ferguson, Jr., 
by his second marriage, was born near Clifton Springs, N. Y., and 
received her education in that place. She married Charles LaDue, a man 
of intelligence and influence. He was a farmer by occupation and set- 
tled on a farm across the road from the farm where William Ferguson, 
his wife's father, lived. Here they remained till after William Ferguson 
moved to Clifton Springs, when they sold their farm and moved to that 
village. Mr. LaDue was a man who took great interest in politics and 
the affairs of his town. He held the position of Postmaster for three 
terms, and also held other posiiions of trust among the people. He was 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is still living at the 
age of 91. His wife was by nature a proud woman. She was gifted with 
more than ordinary intelligence. She was a member of the Methodist 
Church. She died at Clifton Springs, where she was buried. They had 
one child, Florence. 

(III.) Florence LaDue was born near Clifton Springs, N. Y. She 
married a Mr. Pardee, a photographer, who at that time lived in Clifton 
Springs. They later on moved south. Mrs. Pardee at present is caring 
for her aged father at Clifton Springs, N. Y. 

(II.) Almira Ferguson, the second daughter of William Ferguson, 
Jr., by his second marriage, was born near Clifton Springs, N. Y., in 
which town she was educated. She married Harrison Baggerly, a farmer 
by occupation. They settled on the first farm south of Clifton Springs. 
They were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mrs. Baggerly 
died early in life, leaving one son, Frank Ferguson Baggerly. Mrs. Bag- 
gerly was a woman greatly respected for her kindly nature and Christian 
character. After the death of his wife, Mr. Baggerly married Susa Doug- 
lass, of Newark, N. Y. They have one son, Barlow Baggerly. 

Harrison Baggerly was a very congenial man. He delighted to 
mingle with his relatives and friends. He died, January, 1904, in his 86th 
year. His widow is still living at the homestead with her son. Barlow. 

(III.) Frank Ferguson Baggerly, the only child of Harrison Bag- 
gerly by his first wife, was born near Clifton Springs, N. Y. He was 
educated in the school of that village. He married Laura Coates, of 
Manchester, N. Y. They reside in Chicago, 111. Mr. Baggerly is a travel- 
ing salesman. They have one child, Carl Harrison Baggerly. 

(III.) Barlow Baggerly, the only child of Harrison Baggerly by his 
second marriage, was born at Clifton Springs, N. Y. He received his 
early education in the school at Clifton Springs, N. Y., then went to the 
Lima Seminary. He married Bertha Johnson. They have one child, 



138 



Douglas Baggerly, who is being educated at Cornell University, Ithaca, 
N. Y. 

(II J Hester Ann Ferguson, the third daughter of William Ferguson 
by his second marriage, was born at Clifton Springs, N. Y., in which vil- 
lage she received her education. She was a woman of great refinement 
and of a tine appearance. She married Cyrus Garlock, a lumber dealer, 
who aiade his home at Port Gibson. Mrs. Garlock died without descend- 
ants. 

Lucinda, William, and Delilah Ferguson died in childhood. 



139 



CHAPTER XV. 
BALTIMORE BRANCH— 11. 

David Bell Ferguson. 

David Bell Ferguson, the fifth son of William ard Elizabeth Ferg-n- 
son, was born in Bladensburg, Maryland, about the year 17S3. He was 
educated in Maryland and was taken to New York State by his parents in 
1803, when they went to the Genesee cou^tr3^ 

He was sent to Maryland as an attorney to transact business for his 
parents, and remained in Washington, D. C, for a time, and afterwards 
went to Baltimore, where he lived the remainder of his life. He married, 
early in life, Mary Buchanan, a sister of James Buchanan, a noted lawyer 
of Philadelphia. 

An identification has been secured by the public records in Baltimore: 

Baltimore Deeds, W. G., No. 159, page 130. Indenture made November, 
1820, between Francis Buchanan, of Baltimore, of the one part, and 
David B. Ferguson, of the same place, and Mary, his wife, of the other 
part. Witnesses that David B. Ferguson and Mary, his wife, by indent- 
ure made April 17th, 1818, and for the sum of $920 00, and confirmed 
to the said Francis Buchanan, all that lot of land of Cole's Harbor, or 
Todd's range, lot No. 26 on the west side of Calvert Street, 29 by 120. 

Signed: DAVID B. FERGUSON, 

MARY FERGUSON. 

Mr. Ferguson was a soldier during the war of 1812, with England. 
While walking in the streets in Baltimore he met General Stansbury. The 
(leneral told Mr. Ferguson that he was looking for a paymaster, and 
asked him if he would accept the position with the rank of a lieutenant. 
Mr. Ferguson accepted the offer and retained the situation to the end of 
the war. 

Mr. Ferguson held the position of Justice of the Peace and Convey- 
ancer in Baltimore for many years, the great number of public records 
showing the extent of his business transactions. He was a public spirited 
man, and received the distinguishing name of Mayor. He was a great 
trafficker in anything he thought would bring him money. He accumu- 
lated wealth and at one time was considered a wealthy man. He was the 
proprietor of a dry goods establishment in Calvert street, Baltimore. 



140 

Mr. Ferguson's first wife died, and he married again Miss Mary Evans, 
a lad}^ with property. They spent their winters in the Bermuda Islands, 
for many years. In his latter years, Mr. Ferguson unfortunately became 
a partner with Mr. Joseph Arrey in the dry goods business in Augusta, 
Georgia, and lost nearly all of his money. He died at the age of seventy- 
nine years, and was buried in DuUaney's Valley, on the William Peerce 
farm, with other relatives. 

He left no descendants. His property was divided among his heirs. 



BALTIMORE BRANCH— III. 



Fourth Generation in America. 




ELIZA BARTON FERGUSON. 
Deceased Wife of Levi Ferguson, Sr., Deceased. 



I 

DC 
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PQ 
W 

O 



PQ 





BALTIMORE BRANCH-in. 



Sixth Generation in America. 




HARRY W. PATTERSON. 



BALTIMORE BRANCH-EL 



Seventh Generation in America. 




KATHERINE PATTERSON. 
Daughter of Harry W. and 
Mary E. Dance Patterson. 



ELIZABETH FERGUSON PATTERSON. 
Daughter of Harry \V. and Mary E. Dance Patterson. 



3 E 



W o 'C 



141 



CHAPTER XVI. 
BALTIMORE BRANCH- III, 

Levi Ferguson and hJs Descendants. 

Levi Ferguson, the youngest son of William and Elizabeth Ferguson, 
was born in Bladensburg, Maryland, in the year 1787. He received his 
early education in Maryland, and at the age of sixteen he was taken to 
New York State by his parents, when they moved to the Genesee coun- 
try. 

After his father's tragic death he returned to Maryland with his 
mother, where he lived until his death. He became a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, at Clifton Springs, N. Y. He took a great 
interest in the affairs of the church, and was soon appointed a Methodist 
exhorter. After his return to Maryland, he became a local preacher in the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, but was never made a regularly ordained 
minister. He is said to have been a very pleasing and forceful speaker, 
his discourses abounding in witticisms. He married Eliza Barton, whose 
family at one time owned the property where now stands the Navy yard 
at Annapolis, Md. 

Asa Barton, the grandfather of Eliza Barton, was a son of Captain 
Barton, who took an active part in the Revolutionary war, and who made 
a prisoner of war of General Prescott of the British army. The Barton 
family trace their lineage through the General George Washington family. 
Levi Ferguson and his wife made their home about fourteen m iles from the 
city of Baltimore, on the road from Baltimore to Trinity Church, which 
road passes through the manor. They died and were buried in Dullan- 
ey's Valley on the William Peerce farm. They had three children, David, 
Levi, and Elizabeth Ann. 

THE CHILDREN OF LEVI AND ELIZA BARTON FERGUSON AND THEIR 
DESCENDANTS. 

David and Levi Ferguson, the sons of Levi and Eliza Barton 
Ferguson, became farmers and settled on the heights above Chesapeake 
Bay. They possessed valuable farms, and, in accordance with the good 
Southern custom, everything about them was of the most durable and 
substantial kind. Their homes were among the most beautiful in the 
locality. David Ferguson is living in Baltimore, Maryland, a venerable 



142 

and much respected man of four score years and three. Ht never mar- 
ried. 

Levi Ferguson is living about ten miles from Baltimore, Maryland. 
He has retired from active business life, in which he was considered most 
capable. He married Keziah B. Jessop, the daughter of Charles Jessop. 
She died in September, 1892, leaving no descendants. Mr. Ferguson has 
always been a radical Democrat in politics. His life has ever been such 
as to win the confidence and respect of the entire community where he 
resided. 

The following extract was taken from the history of Baltimore 
county, Maryland: 

"Levi Ferguson, a well known and successful farmer and fruit grower 
of the Eleventh district, began his earthly career in 1824at Unionville, in the 
same district, and is a son of Levi and Eliza Barton Ferguson. On both 
sides he is descended from good old Revolutionary stock. His parental 
great-grandfather served in the Continental army under General Wayne 
and General Smallwood, while the maternal Asa Barton was a son of 
Captain Barton, who also took an active part in that struggle and cap- 
tured General Prescott of the British army. The Ferguson family is one 
of the oldest in Maryland." 

Elizabeth Ann Ferguson, the only daughter of Levi and Eliza Barton 
Ferguson, was born in Maryland and educated in the schools of that State. 
In 1855 she married Milton Dance, of Dullaney's Valley. The wedding 
took place at the Ferguson home, Donnell's Camp, near Chesapeake Bay. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dance settled in Dullaney's Valley, where they have always 
lived. Mrs. Dance died in March, 1893, in her 65th year, and was buried 
in Hosford Baptist Church cemetery. There were three children in this 
family, but one of whom lived. 

Mary E. Dance, the daughter of Milton and Elizabeth Ann Ferguson 
Dance, was born and educated in Maryland. She married Harry W. 
Patterson, of Phoenix, Baltimore county, Maryland, November, 1883. 
They have a beautiful home at the head of Dullaney's Valley, 
commanding an extensive view of the country around. They have 
three children, Catherine M., Elizabeth E., and William Patterson.