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Full text of "Fertilizing tobacco"

S B 




3D? 5M2 



WORKS 




AGRIC. DIP i 



FERTILIZING 



FERTILIZING TOBACCO. 




PUBLISHED BY 

GERMAN KALI WORKS, 

IV 

New York, N. Y. Baltimore, Md. Chicago, III. 



NOTICE. 

Every farmer can obtain, free of charge, a copy of the 
following agricultural books: 

FARMERS' GUIDE 

POTASH IN AGRICULTURE 

PRINCIPLES OF PROFITABLE FARMING 

TRUCK FARMING 

PLANT FOOD 

THE COW PEA 

COTTON CULTURE 

SUGAR CANE CULTURE 

SUGAR BEET CULTURE , fl ^ 

TOBACCO CULTURE 

TROPICAL PLANTING 

VALUE OF SWAMP LAND 

STRAWBERRY CULTURE 

ORANGE CULTURE 

WHY.THE FISH FAILED 

" % * V* V*; * 

* ** * -, '. 

State whi eft 6 the. 'above -mentioned publications you 
desire, and it will be' mailed tO i you free of charge. 

ADDRESS: 

GERMAN KALI WORKS. 

NEW YORK, N. Y. BALTIMORE, MD. CHICAGO, ILL, HAVANA, CUBA 
93 Nassau St. Continental Bldg. 562 Monadnock Blk. Empedrado, 30 



Fertilizing Tobacco. 



TOBACCO is a rank, rapid growing, and heavy-feeding 
plant, and requires liberal supplies of plant food. Th* 
careful experiments of Dr. Goessman, of the Massachusetts 
(U. S. A.) Experiment Station, and of Prof. Stockbridge, of 
the Florida Experiment Station, furnis-h information of 
great practical value to the planter. 

As a result of these investigations, the quantities of 
Phosphoric Acid, Nitrogen and Potash per acre, suggested 
by these two authorities, are as follows: 

PHOSPHORIC ACID NITROGEN POTASH. 

Dr. Goessman, 60 Ibs. 100 Ibs. 300 Ibs. 

Prof. Stockbridge, 73 Ibs. 180 Ibs. 300 Ibs. 



Average per acre, 67 Ibs. 140 Ibs. 300 Ibs. 

A mixture of 600 Ibs. of high-grade Sulphate of Potash, 
(96$), 850 Ibs. of Nitrate of Soda and 550 Ibs. of Acid Phos- 
phate (12$) would just about furnish the amounts of 
Phosphoric Acid, Nitrogen and Potash mentioned above. 

The plant food found by chemical analysis in the 
tobacco plant, furnishes a fair guide in determining the 
kind and amount of fertilizer to use. Of course, not only 
the leaf, but the whole plant must be accounted for in 
figuring out the actual plant food taken up. While the 
leaf is the object of tobacco growing, the leaf cannot be 

274392 



4 FERTILIZING TOBACCO 

grown without the stalk, roots ,etc, The analyses of the 
whole plant made by Prof. Stockbridge indicate the follow- 
ing plant food requirements. He found the average 
Florida tobacco plant to contain: 

PHOSPHORIC ACID NITROGEN POTASH 

0.99 per cent. 2.58 per cent 4.34 per cent. 

This indicates that the crop requires its plant food in 
the proportion of 260 Ibs. of Nitrogen and 440 Ibs. of Potash 
for every 100 Ibs. of Phosphoric Acid actually taken up by 
the plant. As Phosphoric Acid is apt to change into 
insoluble forms in the soil, allowance must be made for 
such losses in making up special fertilizers. Again, many 
soils accumulate supplies of Nitrogen through the growth 
of legumes in rotation, and a too free supply of Nitrogen in 
the fertilizer, may prove very undesirable by inducing a 
too rank growth of leaf. For these reasons, many experi- 
enced tobacco growers use a higher proportion of Phos- 
phoric Acid, and a lower proportion of Nitrogen than the 
chemical composition of the crop would seem to require. 

Prof. Stockbridge's recommendation for fertilizer appli- 
cation is based on these conditions, and his formula sup- 
plies the necessary plant foods, (as shown by the analyses) 
which will be removed from an acre of land by a fair crop 
of tobacco. 

The conclusions of accepted authorities may be thus 
stated; The demands of the crop for Phosphoric Acid are 



FERTILIZING TOBACCO. 5 

small, for Nitrogen they are large, but the greatest demand is 
for Potash, in fact, greater than that of any other cultivated 
plant. 

The general rule for practice for tobacco planters to 
follow may be stated thus: Nitrogen 4 to 6 parts, Potash 
8 to 15 parts, and Phosphoric Acid i to 3 parts. 

This may be more concisely expressed as follows: 

Ammonia, . . . 4 to 5 per cent. 
Potash, . . . 8 to 9 per cent. 
Available Phosphoric Acid, 2 to 4 per cent. 

Commercial fertilizers are valuable as plant food onl) 
to the extent that they contain Nitrogen, Potash and avail- 
able Phosphoric Acid, provided always that proper propor- 
tions of these ingredients are used. An excessive amount 
of any one of these three plant foods in a fertilizer will not 
make up the loss caused by the lack of either of the other. 

The sources from which the different forms of plant 
food are obtained is of the utmost importance in affecting 
the results. In selecting Potash, Sulphate of Potash should 
always be applied; that grade known as 96$ Sulphate of 
Potash would be the best suited for the purpose. The 
forms of Potash such as Muriate of Potash and Kainit, 
both of which contain large quantities of chlorine, should 
never be used for tobacco, as they exert an injurious influ- 
ence on the burning quality of the leaf. 

To make a fertilizer of the composition recommended, 



6 FERTILIZING TOBACCO. 

t 

that is, 5$ of Ammonia, 9$ Potash and 4$ Available Phos- 
phoric Acid, which is a well balanced mixture for tobacco, 
the following materials can be used to make a ton. 

Cotton Seed Meal, . . noolbs. 
Sulphate of Potash (96$), 350 Ibs. 
Acid Phosphate, . . 550 Ibs. 



2000 Ibs. 

As to the amount of the above mixture to be applied 
per acre, this varies in different countries. On an average, 
though, from 1000 to 1500 Ibs. per acre could be used to 
advantage. In Connecticut, the tobacco planters as a rule, 
use as much as 3000 Ibs. per acre of a fertilizer of even 
higher grade than that above recommended. A little experi- 
menting on the part of each planter, however, will soon 
indicate the amount which can be used with the greatest 
profit. 




TOHACCO UNFERTILIZED. EXPERIMENT FARM, SOUTHERN PINES, N. C. 




TOBACCO. FERTILIZED WITH POTASH, PHOSPHORIC ACID AND NITROGEN 

(COMPLETE FERTILIZER) EXPERIMENT FARM, SOUTHERN PINES, N. c. 



FERTILIZING TOBACCO. 



Composition of Fertilizer Haterials Used 
as Sources of Nitrogen. 





Nitrogen. 
Per Cent. 


Equivalent 
in 
Ammonia. 
Per Cent. 


Potash 
(K 2 0.) 
Per Ct. 


Phosphoric 
Acid 
Total. 
Per Cent. 


Nitrate of Soda 


1 5 to 1 6 


18 to ig- 






Sulphate of Ammonia '. 


JO 22 


23 " 26 






Dried -Blood (high grade) . . 


12 I2\ 


I4i " I7i 






Dried- Blood (low grade). 


IO II 


12 " 14! 




^ to z 


Concentrated Tankage 


II 14^ 


i3i " 15 




I "2 


Tankage 


5 6 


6 " 7i 




II " 14. 


Tankage 


74 Q 


9 " ii 




8A " ioA 


Dried Fish Scrap ' . 


qi ii 


IT i " i3i 




6 " 8 


Cotton Seed Meal 
Castor Pomace 


6* 7i 
5 6 


8" 9 
6 " 7| 


Itf 
l 


2% 
2% 


Tobacco Stems 


2 3 


24- " 4 


5 to 8 


about i% 













Composition of Fertilizer flaterials Used 
as Sources of Phosphoric Acid. 





Nitro- 
gen. 
Per Ct. 


Equiv- 
alent in 
Ammo- 
nia. 
Per Ct. 


Potash 
(K 2 0.) 
Per Ct. 


Phosphoric Acid. 


Total. 
Per Ct. 


Available 
Per Ct. 


Insoluble 
Per Ct. 


So. Carol'a Phos. Rock 
So. Carolina Acid 
Phosphate 








26 to 27 

13 " 16 

33 " 35 

26 " 32 

14 " 19 
34 " 39 

14 " 19 

32 "35 
17 " 19 

20 " 25 
15 " 17 

10 " 15 


12 tO 15 


26 to 27 

I " 3 

33 " 35 

26 " 32 

i " 3 
34 " 39 

i " 3 
32 " 35 

I " 2 
15 " 17 
2 " 3 
2 " 7 








Florida Land Rock . . 








Florida Pebble Phos- 
phate 








[3 to i 6 
13 to 16 


Florida Acid Phos- 
phate 








Tennessee Phosphate 
Tennessee Acid Phos- 
phate 














Bone-Black (spent). . . 








Bone Black(dissolved) 








i 6 to 17 

5 " 8 
13 " 15 

8 


Bone-Meal 


2ito 4 i 
2 "3 
6 " 10 


3 to 5^ 

2*"34 

7i"i2 




Bone (dissolved) 
Peruvian Guano 




rito 4 





FERTILIZING TOBACCO. 



Composition of Fertilizer flaterials Used as Sources of 

Potash. 





Pure 
Potash 
(K,0.) 
PerCt. 


Lime 
Per Ct. 


Nitro- 
gen 
Per Ct. 


Ammonia 
PerCt 


Phosp'ric 
Acid, 
Total, 
Per Cent. 


Chlorine 
Per Cent. 


Muriate of Potash .... 


50 










AC. tO 4.8 


Sulphate of Potash 
(high grade) 


c oto^5 










Q <J ' ' T C 


Sulphate ot Potash 
Magnesia 


27 "30 


o 85 








I.c "2.5 


Carbonate of Potash 
Magnesia 


i8)t 












Kainit 


I2f 


1. 12 








ao " 72 


Manure Salt 


2O 










4O "45 


Cotton - Seed - H u 1 j 
Ashes. 


20 " ^o 


IO 






7 to 8 




Nitrate of Potash 01 
Saltpeter 


43 "45 




>3toi4 


16 to 17 






Wood - Ashes ( un- 
leached) 


2 "8 


3oto55 






I tO 2 




Wood- Ashes (leached 


I "2 


35 "40 






I tO l 




Tobacco Stems 


5 "8 


3.5 


2 to 3 


2i tO -U 





















Average Composition of the Host Important 
Farm Manures. 



FARM MANURES. 


Nitrogen 
Per Ct. 


Equivalent 
in 
Ammonia 
Per Ct. 


Potash 
(K,0) 
Per Ct. 


Phos- 
phoric 
Acid 
Total 
Per Ct, 


Lime 
(CaO) 
Per Ct. 


Cow-Manure (fresh).. . 


0-34 


0.41 


0.40 


o. 16 


0.31 


Horse-Manure (fresh). . 


0.58 


0.70 


0-53 


0.28 


O. 21 


Sheep-Manure (fresh) . 


0.83 


I.OO 


o 67 


0.23 


o-33 


Hog-Manure (fresh). .. 


0-45 


0.54 


0.60 


o.. 9 


0.08 


Hen-Dung (fresh) 


1.6 3 


1.98 


0.85 


1-54 


o 24 


Mixed Stable Manure. . 


0.50 


0.60 


0.63 


0.26 


0.70 



'iv Yott 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY 
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OCT 2 1*51 




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