(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "In the field : the bulletin of the Field Museum of Natural History"

SEUM MEMBER MA 



FALL 2011 

SEPTEMBER-DECEMBER 



EDITOR 

Emily J. Waldren, The field Museum 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

franck Mercurio, mercurio-exhibits.ct 

PHOTO CONTENT SPECIALIST 

Nina Camming, The field Museum 

DESIGN 

Georgia Bockos, Bockos Design, Inc. 

All images © The Field Museum 
unless otherwise specified. 
IN THE FIELD (ISSN #1051-4546) 
is published three times a year 
by The Field Museum. Annual 
subscriptions are $20; $10 for 
schools. Museum membership 
includes IN THE FIELD subscription. 
Opinions expressed by authors are 
their own and do not necessarily 
reflect the policy of The Field Musei 
Notification of address change 
should include address label and 
should be sent to the membership 



POSTMASTER 

Send address changes to: 
Membership, The Field Museum 
1400 South Lake Shore Drive 
Chicago, IL 60605-2496 

ON THE COVER 

A dose-up photograph of 
a Common Birdwing Butterfly 
(Troides helena) from the new 
permanent exhibition Abbott Hall 
of Conservation Restoring Earth. 




Luseum 



Chicago, IL 60605-2496 

312.922.9410 

fieldmuseum.org 

The Field Museum salutes 
the people of Chicago for their 
long-standing support of the 
Museum through the Chicago Park 
District. Programming is partially 
supported by the Illinois Arts 
Council, a state agency. 



Another exciting yet busy summer has passed, filled with 
fun and informative exhibitions at The Field Museum. But just 
because summer is over, doesn't mean the fun stops. If you 
haven't seen Whales: Giants of the Deep (page 7), there's 
just a short time left to check it out. Believe me, you don't 
want to miss it! 

It's going to be a busy fall at the Museum with an exhibition 
opening literally every month from September to December. 
In remembrance of the 10th anniversary of 9/11, we will 
open GroundZero 360 (page 3), a photography exhibition 
created by a former New York City policeman and his wife. 

We're also bringing back one of our most popular exhibitions 
highlighting everyone's favorite sweet treat. Chocolate Around 
theWorld (page 10) opens on Oct. 8. Learn how this much- 
loved food has evolved from a bitter drink enjoyed by the 
Aztecs to a multi-billion dollar industry reaching nearly every 
corner of the world. 

On Nov. 4, we'll open Abbott Hall of Conservation Restoring 
Earth, our newest permanent exhibition. The exhibition 
features the exciting work of Field Museum scientists who 
spend time in the field protecting the environment here in 
Chicago and around the world. Read our Q&A with curator 
Debra Moskovits and project manager Anna Huntley (page 4). 

Finally, on Dec, 9 we'll display the Lod Mosaic, a significant 
Roman mosaic found in 1996 in Israel (page 8). This large- 
scale work of art dates to AD 300 and is one of the best- 
preserved mosaic floors ever uncovered. 

It's clear that The Field Museum is the 
place to be this fall and over the holiday 
season. We hope to see you soon and, 
as always, thank you for your support. 

MICHELLE CLAYTON 

Director of Membership 




v... 





Ground Zero 360° 

A rescue worker's perspective, a photojournalist's eye 

By Janet Hong, Project Developer, Exhibitions Department 





fjflk' 






^y 



ON SEPTEMBER 11, 2001, a young police 
inspector in New York City named Paul McCormack 
participated in the rescue and recovery effort at the World 
Trade Center. In the aftermath of the disaster an Irish 
photojournalist named Nicola McClean took thousands of 
photographs throughout New York, capturing the chaos 
engulfing the city. She tirelessly documented the work of 
emergency medical technicians, welders, firemen, and 
police like McCormack. 

McCormack and McClean met 
and eventually married. Because 
of injuries sustained at the World 
Trade Center site, McCormack 
retired from the police force, and 
he and McClean moved to Ireland 
to raise a family. 



Inspector Paul McCormack in the 
aftermath of September 11. 




Together, McCormack and McClean have created an 
exhibition called Ground Zero 360°, which portrays the story 
of September 11 from their distinctive view points. The 
pair's simple, powerful exhibition is now open in The Field 
Museum's Marae Gallery and runs through January 1, 2012. 

McClean's large-scale, previously unpublished photo- 
graphs from the days following September 11 place viewers 
in the middle of the catastrophe. Visitors can hear the city's 
original emergency radio calls from that morning ten 
years ago and touch a fragment of steel I-beam from the 
World Trade Center. The exhibition also presents personal 
artifacts from emergency workers, an American flag of 
a New York Police precinct that lost 23 officers, and steel 
crosses that welders cut on-site at Ground Zero. 

Whether you were an adult or a child when it happened, 
September 11 was a defining moment for all of us in the 
United States. Help commemorate the tenth anniversary of 
September 11 by viewing this exceptional exhibition, itf 

Ground Zero 360° is organized fay Paul McCormack and Nicola McClean. 

Ground Zero 360° Inc. is a not-for-profit organization committed to remembering 
and honoring all victims of September 11. 



FALL 2013 



Abbott Hall of Conservation 

Restoring Earth 



The Interview 



ON NOVEMBER 4 THE ABBOTT HALL OF CONSERVATION RESTORING EARTH OPENS 

TO THE PUBLIC. IN THE FIELD MAGAZINE TALKS TO TWO KEY PLAYERS 
IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THIS NEW PERMANENT EXHIBITION: 

Debra Moskovits 8c Anna Huntley 

Senior Vice President Exhibition Project Manager 
Environment, Culture, and Conservation Exhibitions Department 




WHEN DID ECCO START? 
WHAT ARE ITS GOALS? 

DM : What is now ECCo — Environment, Culture, 
and Conservation — began as an experiment 
during the Museum's centennial celebration in 
1995. We wanted to bring the Museum's tradition 
of rigorous science to bear on current, urgent 
challenges in conservation and cultural under- 
standing. Field Museum scientists have excelled 
in discovering species, studying cultures, and 
decoding evolution for more than a century. 
Today ECCo deploys this expertise— along with 
the powerhouse of information in our collections 
—to secure biological and cultural diversity for 
the future. ECCo's dedicated team of scientist- 
explorers and educators work here in Chicago 
and in the wildest, most diverse place on 
the planet: the headwaters of the Amazon. 

WHAT ARE SOME CURRENT 
ECCO PROJECTS? 

DM: A key ECCo program is the Rapid Social 
and Biological Inventories. We document an area's 
biological diversity, its cultural strengths, and 
its residents' aspirations. We just completed our 
24th inventory this summer with the Wampis 
and Awajun peoples in northern Peru. 



WHAT MAKES THE EXPERIENCE OF RESTORING EARTH 
SO DIFFERENT FROM OTHER EXHIBITIONS? 

A H : Restoring Earth tells a new kind of story— one that our visitors are 
a part of —so I'm very excited to be able to share such vibrant and relevant 
content. The exhibition will be like nothing you've ever seen. It's a great 
mix of artifacts and specimens, stunning photographs, and great media. 
And when I say media, I don't mean a dark room with a movie; I'm talking 
about screens that surround you, letting you fly over the jungle, or stand in 
the middle of a prairie burn, and funny digital animations that unpack big 
scientific ideas like how coral reefs work and what we can learn from 
cultures that flourished thousands of years ago. 

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE EXHIBITION? 

D M : I have several favorites, but the rapid inventory theater may be at 
the top of my list. This is the closest visitors will get to being transported 
to stunning, remote forests and to seeing how crucial these forests are for 
the livelihoods and well-being of local residents. I hope the theater lets 
people experience, even if just for a few minutes, the magic and intensity 
of the forest and the overwhelming beauty of its biodiversity. 



IN THE FIELD 




'&%&; 



***# : 





WHAT WERE SOME OF THE CHALLENGES OF DEVELOPING 
RESTORING EARTH? 

AH: One of the most challenging things about creating Restoring Earth is the whole idea 
of "conservation." This word means many things to many people and trying to express 
the HUGE variety of stories that visitors will encounter in Restoring Earth. ..well, it's tricky. 
These are amazing stories, and I'm excited to share them all. 



WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PART OF 
THE EXHIBITION AND WHY? 

AH : The visual impact of this exhibition is incredible. 
We are using images called "supergraphics" which are 
8 feet wide by 14 feet tall. These are my favorite part of 
the exhibition. They are high resolution, super zoomed-in 
digital images of the natural world. (See magazine cover.) 
They will take your breath away— and that's the goal. 
We want everyone who experiences Restoring Earth to 
leave thinking, "Wow, our planet is amazing!" Just that 
one step— appreciation— can change how we understand 
our role as individuals, part of a community, and part of 
an ecosystem. 



Above., clockwise from left: Design rendering of Restoring Earth; 
Herpetologist Pablo Venegas examines a lizard during a rapid 
inventory in Peru; Close-up view of a butterfly wing. 

Opposite, bottom: ECCo scientists work in ecologically important 
forests of South America. 



WHAT MAKES CONSERVATION SO IMPORTANT TODAY? 

DM: Conservation has always been important. As the pace of habitat 
destruction increases, it becomes even more urgent for us to find effective 
ways to protect the integrity of diversity and the opportunity for nature and 
cultures to thrive. I am privileged to work in a science, collections-based 
institution that can have an immediate impact in securing diversity for 
future generations. 

AH: It's the path forward — our future is one where science, art, and 
communities come together to respect nature and celebrate the ways that 
we can live with nature, not ojjof it. It's not humans AND nature— we ARE 
nature, and the possibilities of that future are exciting and limitless. 

WHAT DO YOU HOPE VISITORS WILL TAKE AWAY 
FROM RESTORING EARTH? 

D M : I hope people walk away with a sense of awe and respect for nature 
and recognition of the role we— humans — play in the ecosystem. And I hope 
visitors become curious about how they can become engaged in conservation 
efforts and in the joys of nature in their own backyards, m 



AbbottHailofCot 



■ ring Earth is made possible through the generosity of Abbott 



FALL 2 011 



From Superstition to Science: 



Understanding Meteorit 



By James Holsteln, Collections Manager for Meteorites and Physical Geology, 

The Robert A. Pritzker Center for Meteoritics and Polar Studies 




EVERY METEORITE HAS A STORY TO TELL. THESE FASCINATING OBJECTS 
PROVIDE INSIGHT INTO THE FORMATION OF PLANETS. THEY ALSO HOLD CLUES 
ABOUT OUR GALAXY BEFORE THE BIRTH OF OUR SOLAR SYSTEM. 




Above: Hand-colored woodcut showing 
the fall of the Ln si sheim meteorite. 



Top, right: The Ensisheim Meteorite (ME 1739) 



meteoroid 

a chunk of planetary 

debris floating through our 

Solar System 



meteor 

a meteoroid that has 

entered Earth's atmosphere 

creating a visible path of light 

(a.k.a. "shooting star") 



meteorite 

a meteor that has fallen to 

Earth and survived as a chunk 

of "space rock" 



But meteorites also have a very human component. How many times have people 
throughout the ages wished upon a shooting star? When a meteorite blazes through 
the atmosphere it conjures images of a world outside of our own. Superstition and the 
supernatural were used to explain these "fireballs from heaven" before science 
determined what meteorites actually are. 

Accounts of meteorites date back to 1900 BC when Sumerian texts describe a piece 
of metallic iron, now thought to be a meteorite. The Chinese and Greeks documented 
two separate meteorite events around 650 BC. In fact, we have the Greeks to thank for 
the word meteor which comes from the word meteoros, meaning "high in the air." 

The Elbogen Meteorite (ME 1) is the museum's first catalogued meteorite and is from 
one of the oldest recorded falls. Landing in the village of Loket, Czech Republic, in the 
year 1400, this 230-pound iron meteorite became known as the "bewitched burgrave" 
of Elbogen Castle. According to legend, a cursed count— known for his cruelty- 
was transformed into a solid piece of iron (the meteorite) that not even the hottest 
furnace could melt. 

Another human story centers on the Ensisheim Meteorite (ME 1739). This 280-pound 
stony meteorite landed in a wheat field near the town of Ensisheim in Alsace (in today's 
France) in 1492. The residents of the town broke off pieces as good luck talismans. 
The Emperor Maximilian, upon hearing of this event, ordered the stone placed in the parish 
church as a testament of a divine omen. It was secured with iron clamps to prevent 
the rock from departing in the same way in which it arrived! 

In 1794, Ernst Chladni, a German physicist and lawyer, argued that meteorites were 
extraterrestrial in origin. Although his theory was met with disbelief at first, the idea that 
meteorites are in fact samples of other solar system bodies eventually gave rise to 
the science of meteoritics. 

Proof of sorts came in 1795 when a meteorite fell in the village of Wold Cottage, England. 
The 50-pound stone fell out of a clear, blue sky refuting the idea that meteorites are 
products of atmospheric phenomenon. As the new science of meteoritics grew, 
scientists started to research earlier stories of supernatural events, eventually replacing 
superstition with scientific understanding, itf 



IN THE FIELD 



Deeper into 
the World of Whales 




IT'S NOT TOO LATE to experience Whales: Giants of the Deep! 
This traveling exhibition from the New Zealand national museum, Te Papa, 
continues its run at The Field Museum through January 16, 2012. Featuring 
fully articulated whale skeletons, dramatic videos, and hands-on activities, 
the exhibition presents some of the latest scientific discoveries of whale 
biology, evolution, and even "cetacean communication." Come and discover 
why these giants of the deep continue to intrigue and inspire, itf 

Developed and presented by the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongareiva. 

This exhibition was made possible through the support of the New Zealand Government. 

Proud Major Sponsor: Wells Fargo 



Killer Regalia 

By franck Mercuric*, Associate Editor, In The Field 

A BIG PART OF Whales: Giants ofthe Deep explores 
the relationships between people and whales with a special 
focus on the Maori of New Zealand. Just as the Maori 
have cultural ties to whales and whaling, so too do many 
indigenous peoples of North America. The Field Museum's 
Alsdorf Hall of Northwest Coast and Arctic Peoples contains 
objects that reflect the importance of whales to traditional 
lifeways. These include Inupiat whaling charms from 
Alaska, a Nootkan hat depicting a whaling scene, and 
a Tsimshian blanket woven with designs of killer whales. 

But one object stands out from the rest: a killer whale 
headdress created on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, 
by an unknown Kwakiutl [kwa-kee-ooh-tl] craftsman 

during the 19th century. 

On permanent display 

in the Alsdorf Hall, the 

headdress has been part 

of The Field Museum's 

collections since the 

1890s. Originally, it was 

worn in the Tlasula or 

"Weasel Dance," a ritual 





celebration that featured dancers dressed as different 
animal spirits during the annual Winter Ceremonies. Using 
a set of cords, the dancer could move parts of the head- 
dress—including the jaw, tail, and pectoral fins— animating 
the whale and giving life to the dance performance. 

Killer whales {Orcinus orca) figure prominently in the history, 
art, and spiritual beliefs ofthe peoples ofthe Northwest 
coast. Pods of killer whales navigate the waters of the 
Pacific coast from Oregon to Alaska. These highly social 
animals are known as fierce hunters, eating salmon, sea 
lions, and sometimes sharks and other whales— and they 
hold an important place in native lore, itf 

FALL 2011 



Natural Wonders 

A Roman Mosaic from Lod, Israel 

By Jranck Mercurio, Associate Editor, In The Field 




IN 1996 A ROAD CONSTRUCTION CREW WORKING IN ISRAEL made an unexpected discovery 
Beneath the town of Lod, they uncovered a Roman-era mosaic of exceptional size, quality, and preservation. 
Measuring nearly 27 feet wide and 50 feet long, the mosaic depicts an amazing variety of mammals, birds, and fish. 

Archaeologist Miriam Avissar from the Israel Antiquities 
Authority excavated the site. She and her team uncovered 
pottery and coins that helped date the mosaic to the late 
Roman period, about AD 300. The archaeological remains also 
indicate that the mosaic floor was part of large private 
residence belonging to a wealthy (and at this time, unknown) 
citizen of the ancient town. 

In Roman times Lod was known as Diospolis. Located on 
the main overland trade route between Jerusalem and the 
Mediterranean port of Joppa (modern-day Tel Aviv-Yafo), 
Diospolis was a city of merchants. Indeed, this part of the 
world stands at the crossroads of Asia, Africa, and Europe — 
and the animals depicted in the Lod Mosaic suggest 
connections to those places: giraffe, rhino, and elephant 
from Africa; tiger, water buffalo, and peacock from Asia. 




Curiously, no humans are shown. This is unusual for 
Roman mosaics which often depict mythological stories 
or scenes of daily life. Instead, the Lod Mosaic contains 
mostly images of animals. The few man-made objects 
(ships, baskets, urns) imply the presence of humans 
without actually depicting them, perhaps an influence 
from traditional Jewish art. 

The mosaic depicts dozens of fish — including bream, 
mullet, sea bass, and snapper— could these be early 
Christian symbols? or simply representations of seafood? 
(Lod is, after all, only a few miles from the sea.) Scholars 
are still studying the mosaic and its archaeological context 
to answer these questions. 

What seems clear is that the mosaic's owner had a 
fascination with the biodiversity of the ancient world. 
Most of the depicted animals contain enough detail to be 
identified by scientists. Nearly all appear to be wild— few, 
if any, are domesticated. And many of the mammals and 
birds do not represent local species, but those from more 
distant regions. These exotic animals were probably known 
to ancient Romans through the wild animal contests held 
in amphitheaters and coliseums throughout the empire. 

Today, the town of Lod is building a new museum to 
house the mosaic. While the center is under construction, 
the Lod Mosaic will travel to venues across the United 
States including The Field Museum from December 9, 2011 
to April 22, 2012 in the Gary C. Comer Family Gallery. rr» 

The Lod Mosaic will be on loan from the Israel Antiquities Authority 
and the .Shelby White and Leon Levy Lod Mosaic Center. 



IN THE FIELD 



2 

1] 



V- 



£ £ 



iS 



L 




a 



0) 



- «1 




in^vl 


Fa| jM 




L^l 




^k^S 


«MM> " 






September 



^ Artists and Authors: Puppets* family program 

9.17, 11am-2pm > Join us in the Crown family PlayLab and 
make your own wooden puppet doll in celebration of Hispanic 
Heritage Month. View puppets from Guatemala, Mexico, 
Puerto Rico and Costa Rica, then have fun painting your own 
puppet as you learn about Latino cultures around the world. 
This program is for families with children ages 2-6. 



October 




Leakey Lecture: Dr. Nina Jablonski* adult lecture 
10.1, 1pm > We expose it, cover it, paint it, tattoo it, scar it, 
and pierce it. Skin mediates the most important transactions 
of our lives, all while protecting us, advertising our health, 
our identity, and our individuality. In this lecture, Jablonski 
will explore the unique biological 
and cultural aspects of human skin 
and its importance as a key element 
of human adaptation. 

Dr. Nina Jablonski is Professor 
and Head of Anthropology at 
Penn State. Her research on human 
skin has been featured in National 
Geographic, Scientific American, 
and other publications. 

Educator Open House educator program 
10.11, 5pm-8pm > The Field Museum invites educators of 
all subjects and grades to celebrate the start of the 2011-2012 
school year. Explore vast collections with Museum experts, 
meet scientists and learn about cutting-edge research, and 
view the temporary exhibition, Chocolate. Get connected 
through the Museum's digital learning programs and gather 
a wealth of information and materials to start your school year 
right. Earn 3 CPDU's for attending. 

Pre-registration is required; you can register on-line or by 
phone; visit fieldmuseum.org/schools or call 312.665.7500 
by Monday, October 3. 

% Them Bones, Them Bones!* family program 

10.29-10.31, 11am-2pm > No bones about it! Join us as 
we celebrate Halloween and the Day of the Dead through art 
masterpieces in the Crownjamily PlayLab's Art Studio. 






DOZIIMI 
overniqht. ^DIIMOS 



"^t the museum 



november 



Badge Day at The Field boy scout program 
11.19, 8:30am-3pm > Boy Scouts: Earn your merit badges 
at The Field Museum! Explore science and culture at The Field 
Museum with a variety of hands-on activities and tours, 
including a special behind-the-scenes tour allowing scouts 
access to restricted collection areas of the Museum. Merit 
badges offered include Environmental Science, Indian Lore, 
Mammal Study, and Geology. Registration fee includes 
program supplies, a behind-the-scenes tour, Basic Admission 
to The Field Museum, a "Badge Day at The Field" patch, and 
free parking in Soldier Field. $25 per scout; rate discounted 
to $20 per scout with attendance at 2 or more programs, 
chaperones free. 

For questions or registration information, please email 
scouts@fieldmuseum.org. 

^ Artists and Authors: Tim Magner* family program 

11.19, 11am-2pm > Tim Magner's books engage, entertain, 
and enlighten children with the wonders of nature. In addition 
to reading and signing copies of his books, Tim will also share 
fun art and science activities to encourage outdoor play. 
Books will be available for purchase at this event. 




SUE the T. rex is having a sleepover! Join us for a night 
of family workshops, tours, and performances. Explore 
ancient Egypt by flashlight, prowl an African savannah with 
man-eating lions, and take a stroll through the Royal Palace 
in Bamum, Africa. Then spread your sleeping bag amidst 
some of our most popular exhibitions. The event includes 
an evening snack and breakfast in the morning. 

Overnights begin Fridays at 5:45pm and end Saturdays at 
9am. Overnights are only available for families and groups 
with children ages 6-12. Space is limited, so reserve your 
sleeping spots now! For information about pricing, see 
below. For information about the event, including a sample 
schedule and frequently asked questions, please visit: 
fieldmuseum.org/happening/programs/overnights. 

Standard Overnight Tickets: $63, $51 for Field Museum 
members and groups. 

Premium Package 1 
Tickets: $75, $65 for 
Field Museum members. 
Premium Package 1 tickets 
allow guests to sleep 
upstairs in the Evolving Vlani 
exhibit— with the dinosaurs 

Premium fZaek&es 7 
Tickets: $87, $77 for 
Field Museum members. 
Premium Package 2 
guests sleep upstairs in the Evolving Planet exhibit and go on 
a behind-the-scenes tour with a Field Museum scientist. 

January 20 • February 3, 10, & 17 • March 2, 9, & 16 
April 20 • May 4 • June 15 





december 



?.l Story Time* family program 

Saturdays & Sundays, 11:30am & 1:30pm > Join us in 
the Crown }a mi ly PlayLab to hear a story and make a project- 
all in 20 minutes! 

Artist at Work: Mosaic Demonstration* artist demo 
12.10, 11am-3pm > Watch as a professionally trained artist 
demonstrates her mosaic methods, using the classical hammer 
and hardie cutting technique. Display includes examples of 
various methods and materials highlighting the ancient roots 
or "grammar" of mosaic making. Finished artworks, work in 
progress, tools, books and a resource hand-out are featured. 





f£ in the Crown family PlayLab 



•FREE with Museum Admission 



fieldmuseum.org 

event details are available online! 



psfar 



o 



a celebration! 



Colossal Chocolate Creations 

Encounter one-of-a-kind chocolate inspired creations in Chocolate Around the World. 
Chicago-area artists and pastry chefs will draw inspiration from chocolate-focused 
holiday celebrations as well as Field Museum and Chicago icons to create 
colossal-sized sculptures made from chocolate and candy wrappers. 

October 8 & 29 • November 25 & 26 • December 26-30 

Admission to Chocolate exhibition required. 

Featured Opening Month Programs: 

10.8, 11am-3pm > A sculptural showpiece will be created from chocolate, 
presented by Chicago's Palmer House Hilton. 

10.29, 11am-3pm > Watch Chicago-area artist Ian Sherwin fabricate a large-scale 
Halloween-inspired origami sculpture from candy wrappers. 

• Jflfe Jttik. JHBk. HtL 
W <P w w 



Sign up for the Crownjamily PlayLab E-News! 

This e-newsletter is an early science literacy resource geared towards families withyoung 
children ages two through six. Each quarterly issue will feature theme-based, downloadable 
activities and articles designed to encourage outdoor exploration, creative play, and self- 
expression. Email us at playlab(5)f\eldmuseum.org to start receiving emails. 





W 

O 

53" 

< 5 

" 2. 

N -h 

(D 

D 
(D 
CD 



3 2, 
8 Z 






r?i 



If * S? 

<§ < a (D 

§ ». o to 

P.f § ff 

!§- * = 

<* «' Z -h 

I 3 O 

g. S < 1 

^° S r; 

s f " < 

?. s » 3 

§ 2- 12 

-■ u' 

! ! 



z 
c 
> 

III 5 



3 if * 

s | § 

g « a. 

i w o 

2 S <a 



a 
(A 

't 

M (ft 

(A 



o °- 






E 
CD 
(A 

B) 

3 

a 
5 1 


, =" 

-I 

T 

(D (fi 

(Q I 

CD ' 
CD 

% 

00 




7? 



I 



3 
(fi 



Empowering Teachers 

The Early Elementary Science Partnership 

By Jessica Hankey, School Partnerships Manager and Sandra Aponte, Lady Elementary Science Partnership Administrator 



THE FIELD MUSEUM IS CHANGING THE FACE OF SCIENCE EDUCATION in Chicago's public 

schools through the Early Elementary Science Partnership (E2SP). This city-wide initiative is improving science literacy 
by preparing educators to teach science to younger students. Partner institutions include: Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, 
Lincoln Park Zoo, Chicago Children's Museum, Chicago Public Schools Office of Teaching + Learning / Office of Science, 
Northwestern University, and University of Chicago. 

The United States has reached the tipping point in science 
education. Research shows that American students rank 
17th in science tests compared to young people in 29 
industrialized countries.* Addressing this disparity requires 
a multi-pronged approach and a nationwide solution. 
For its part, The Field Museum is diversifying its portfolio 
of programs aimed at learners of all ages including 
elementary students. 

Introducing science into kindergarten through 3rd grade 
classrooms provides the foundation for future student 
achievement in the sciences. E2SP helps to improve 
educators' ability to teach science in schools and museums 

by creating a community 

of highly-skilled elementary 

teachers who can better 

prepare our next generation 

of innovators. 




skipped 

aching science 
most every day.. 




Through E2SP, educators 
participate in professional 
development connected to 
Chicago's museums, zoos, and 
universities. Teachers deepen 
their science knowledge through 
exhibition tours, engagement 
with scientists, and behind-the- 
scenes experiences. They take 
what they've learned back to 
the classroom and then return 
to a local museum or zoo for 
field trips with students. 



Change is happening. Teachers are improving their science 
knowledge and becoming more confident in their practice. 
One teacher shared: "[Prior to E2SP] I skipped teaching 
science almost every day, because I really just had no clue. 
I didn't know where to start. Then last year, we had E2SP. 
I came to the E2SP meeting to see how they did the lesson... 
This year, I was more confident. I started to teach science 
the second week of school. I was ready." 

E2SP students are thrilled about doing science. Some were 
so excited that they held their first school-wide elementary 
"science celebration" in which students toured each other's 
classrooms to view science projects. 

Building on the last two years of success, E2SP will continue 
its work thanks to generous funding by the Searle Funds at 
The Chicago Community Trust, the Polk Bros. Foundation, and 
Motorola Solutions Foundation. For more information, please 
visit fieldmuseum.org/schools/school-partnerships. itf 



*The Trends in International Mathematics 
and Science Study, produced by the National 
Center for Education Statistics, 2007. 



FALL 2011 



Chocolate Around the World 

Back by Popular Demand Starting October 5 

By Nancy O'Shea, Public Relations Director 

JUST IN TIME FOR THE HOLIDAYS, THE FIELD MUSEUM BRINGS BACK ITS POPULAR 
CHOCOLATE EXHIBITION THAT RECEIVED RAVE REVIEWS WHEN IT PREMIERED IN 2002! 

Chocolate Around the World is better than ever— with space for public programming, demonstrations, 
and special events. Come enjoy this sweet experience that will engage all your senses and reveal facets 
of chocolate you may never have thought of before. 

Imagine a unique tree in a lush tropical environment. A seed so precious it was used as money. A spicy 
drink and a sweet snack. A strong craving and a sublime pleasure. Chocolate is all this and much more. 
Chocolate Around the World (October 5, 2011 through January 8, 2012) explores the fascinating relationship 
between human culture and this rainforest treasure. 




LIQUID GOLD FROM THE RAINFOREST 

Bon-bons, hot fudge, frozen chocolate bars. Most of us know chocolate 
today primarily as a candy or a sweet dessert. But it wasn't always so. 
The ancient Maya of Central America knew it as a frothy, spicy drink, made 
from the seeds of the cacao tree and used in royal and religious ceremonies. 
How did humans first come to taste these bitter seeds, found deep in the 
pulp of a large, rough pod the size of a football? 

No one recorded the event. But, says, Jonathan Haas, The Field Museum's 
MacArthur Curator of North American Anthropology, it was an intensely 
human thing to do. "Human beings are tinkerers," Haas says. "We like to 
try things. And when most of your diet comes from corn, you're going to be 
looking for variety." So the Maya let the seeds ferment, dried them in the 
sun, roasted them, crushed them, added water and spices. ..and drank! 

The fascinating first section of the exhibition concerns the cacao tree, 
its lowland rainforest ecology, and how it's grown today. Because cacao 
grows only in the rainforest, it was coveted by other societies— in particular, 
the Aztec. It soon became a valuable article of trade; the seeds served as 
a form of money, and the drink became a luxury for the elite. When the first 
Europeans reached the Aztec capital, instead of gold they found treasure 
troves of cacao seeds. 

When chocolate reached Europe, it was mixed with sugar and a new craze 
began — cafes serving hot chocolate sprang up in every city (much like 
ubiquitous high-end coffee shops of today.) The exhibition explains how the 
insatiable European demand for this new treat made chocolate a commodity 
and fueled the use of forced labor on colonial plantations. 



10 IN THE FIELD 




In the center of each cacao pod sit 30 to so almond-sized seeds. 
One pod can produce about seven milk chocolate candy bars. 



A GLOBAL COMMODITY AND A CULTURAL ICON 

Though humans have now taken cacao from its native home in 
the Americas to grow it in West Africa, Indonesia, and other tropical 
lands, the plant remains rooted in its rainforest ecosystem. Today, 
many cacao farmers and scientists are working together to find ways 
to grow cacao profitably without destroying the rainforest habitat. 

Technological advances and mass production — not to mention 
enormous amounts of advertising— have made chocolate part of 
the global market economy. 

Cacao seeds are traded on the commodities market right along with 
pork bellies and soy. A futures stock ticker display showing cocoa 
prices on the world market brings this point home. 

Although chocolate is big business today, it still retains vestiges 
of its ceremonial history. Mexicans today use it as an offering on 
the Day of the Dead in the form of beans or prepared as mole. Foil- 
wrapped chocolate coins are given to children as "Chanukah gelt." 
In fact, chocolate has a place in nearly every holiday celebration: 
heart-shaped boxes of chocolate for Valentine's Day, chocolate 
bunnies for Easter, wrapped candies for trick-or-treaters at 
Halloween, and cups of hot cocoa to warm Christmas carolers, itf 

Chocolate and its national tour were developed by The field Museum, Chicago. 

Lead Sponsor: Kra/t foods foundation 

This project was supported, in part, by the National Science foundation. 




Two Sweet fiucnts 

Chocolate for Breakfast! 

As a valued member, you are cordially invited to an exclusive 
event on Saturday, October 29. 

Come join us for a continental, chocolate-themed breakfast 
from 8am to 9am, followed by a talk in James Simpson Theater 
with Gary Feinman, curator of Chocolate 
Around the World. Hear about the origins 
of chocolate, and its evolution to the sweet 
treat we all know and love today. 

Reservations to this special event are 
required and can be made by contacting 
312.665.7705, Monday through Friday 
from 8:30am to 4:30pm. 

Celebrate Your 
Sweetest Anniversary 

If you and your spouse are celebrating your 50th anniversary 
in 2011, then you are invited to celebrate your "Sweetest 
Anniversary" at The Field Museum on Saturday, December 3. 

By showing proof of marriage in 1961 (marriage certificate, 
wedding invitation, or dated newspaper clipping), visitors will 
be entered in a raffle to win romantic prizes and celebrated 
with a toast and wedding cake. All attending couples are invited 
to renew their wedding vows at 1pm. 

Visit Chocolate Ground the World with your sweetheart and 
celebrate 50 years of marriage. Reservations are encouraged. 
Call 312.665.7107 for more information. (Event is free to 

members; non-members with proof of 
marriage receive free basic admission with 
purchase of Chocolate ticket.) 



- — /^' 



FALL 2011 11 



Hidden Gems 



Compiled fay Jranck Mercurio, Associate Editor, In The Field 



at ' 'he Field 



OF THE 24 MILLION OBJECTS IN THE FIELD MUSEUM'S COLLECTIONS, ONLY ABOUT 1% ARE 
ON PUBLIC DISPLAY. SOME ARE FAMOUS — LIKE BUSHMAN (SEE PAGE 14) — WHILE OTHERS ARE 
MORE OBSCURE. EVER WONDER WHICH OF THESE "HIDDEN GEMS" ARE THE FAVORITES 
OF THE MUSEUM STAFF? 



CANNONBALL TREE 
THORSTEN LUMBSCH 

Associate Curator and Chair, Department of Botany 

a At the entrance to Plants of theWorld, 
there is a masterpiece of wax modeling 
central to this permanent exhibition: 
the Cannonball Tree model. Its large, 
round fruits look like cannonballs, 
hence the name. This plant thrives in the wet tropics of 
South America, including the Amazon basin. In nature, 
the flowers attract a certain species of bee for pollination. 
The Cannonball Tree model looks especially real, since 
it shows the plant in a natural setting, growing in soil with 
dead leaves on the ground. The tree's leaves, flowers, and 
characteristic fruits 
are also realistically 
modeled. It's one 
of the largest— and 
most amazing- 
plant reproductions 
in the museum. 






NORTHERN SHRIKE 
JOHN BATES 

Chairman, Department of Zoology 
Associate Curator, Bird Division 

My "hidden gem" in the exhibition 
halls is not really hidden, just easy to 
by-pass. I admit it is a little morbid, but 
it expresses the exquisite detail that 
one might overlook when studying 
the Museum's wonderful dioramas. It also illustrates why 
these dioramas still stir one's imagination in today's 
computer driven world. My hidden gem is the Northern 
Shrike in the "Birds in Winter" diorama of Nature Walk/ 
Messages from the Wilderness. At first glance it is another 
robin-sized bird in a bush— but look more closely. You can 
see that the gray, black, and white bird with a strong black 
bill is feeding on the remains of a dead mouse that the 
bird has impaled on a thorn. This is a habit of these shrikes, 
who breed in northern Canada and appear in the Chicago 
region only in winter. (One was documented at Northerly 
Island this past January and February.) A few drops of 
blood, below the bird and its prey, are visible in the snow. 
It is a wonderfully detailed presentation of the biology of 
these birds and their prey. 



12 IN TH E FIELD 





CASEA BROILII 
KENNETH ANGIELCZYK 

Assistant Curator ofValeomammalogy, Geology Department 

It's easy to overlook the small, 
brown skeleton of Casea broilii that's 
on display in the synapsid section 
of Evolving Planet. It's much smaller 
than dinosaurs like Apatosaurus or 
Parasaurolophus. It lacks Sue's impressive teeth, and 
doesn't even have a sail along its back like its cabinet- 
mate Dimetrodon. However, the history and scientific 
importance of this specimen make it a hidden gem in 
The Field Museum's exhibitions. Casea is part of a large 
group called Synapsida, which includes living mammals 
and their extinct relatives. That means Casea is more 
closely related to you and other mammals than to any 
reptile, bird, or amphibian, and Casea's position as one 
of the most primitive synapsids makes it very important 
for learning about some of our earliest ancestors. It was 
also a pioneer when it came to its diet; Casea was one 
of the first plant-eating tetrapods, paving the way for 
future vegetarians like horses, elephants, and antelope. 
Casea is about 275 million years old, which means it lived 
about 35 million years before the first dinosaurs. 





MANGOSTEEN 

JAAP HOOGSTRATEN 

Director of Exhibitions 

When I need to clear my head, I often take 
a walk through the Botany Hall (a.k.a. Plants 
of the World.) The craftsmanship of the plant 
models is inspiring to me, and I fantasize 
about how I could enliven the beautiful 
but traditional exhibitry. I always stop to look at the model of 
the mangosteen fruit in the back corner. I grew up mostly in 
Southeast Asia, and the mangosteen is my favorite fruit. Sweet, 
tangy, and juicy there really is nothing like it. Unfortunately, 
it is not available in this country, so the closest I'm going to get 
to it is the delicious looking model in the Botany Hall. 

NORTHWEST COAST TOTEM POLES 
GRETCHEN BAKER 

Director of Temporary and Traveling Exhibitions 

Tucked away inside The Field Museum is 
an unexpected sight: a forest of cedar trees. 
But these aren't typical trees. Where there 
were once branches, an eagle spreads 
its wings. Where there was rough bark, 
a smooth complexion holds deeply set eyes. No physical roots 
remain, but you can detect a deep spiritual anchor. Artists of 
various Northwest Coast peoples carved trees to memorialize 
important people and protect important places. These totem 
poles have been on display since the Museum first opened its 

doors and are one of its hidden 
gems. When I enter this forest 
of totem poles, however, 
it is I who become hidden- 
dwarfed by their size and lost 
in their details such as the 
human faces that emerge from 
a grizzly bear's paws, itf 





FALL 2011 13 



In the Spotlight: 

Bushman 




By Phoebe Duvall, Writer 



I DARE YOU! STARE INTO THE PIERCING GAZE of one of the most popular primates ever! 

Meet Bushman, the lowland gorilla— described as "the greatest of his kind"— and discover why millions visited him 

at the Lincoln Park Zoo and continue to visit him today at The Field Museum. 

• In 1930, Bushman was brought to the Lincoln Park Zoo from 
Cameroon, Africa for a fee of $3,500. He was billed as the 
first of his kind "West of the Potomac River." Although there 
are no official records, it is speculated that Bushman's mother 
was killed, most likely by gorilla poachers, and was then 
captured, raised, and sold by the hunters. 

For many years, Bushman was the patriarch gorilla at the 
Lincoln Park Zoo which developed the nation's first captive 
breeding program for lowland gorillas. Forty-five successful 
births occurred at the zoo between 1970 and 1998. 

During the prime of his life, Bushman stood at 6-feet 
2-inches and weighed 547 pounds. He amazed spectators 

with his surreal strength— bending tires as though they were 
rubber bands. He ate up to 26 pounds of vegetables, fruit, 
and milk each day. 

Bushman's size, personality, and rarity won the hearts of 
his numerous admirers. No other animal has drawn more 
crowds than Bushman. On a single day, when he was thought 
to be dying, 120,000 people filed into the zoo to see the 
beloved gorilla. 

After Bushman's death in 1951, his body was prepared 
for display at The Field Museum by taxidermists Leon Waters 
and Frank Wonder and artist Joseph Kristolich. They made 
the face and feet of celluloid, a technique needed to make 
Bushman's hairless skin look life-like. 

Western lowland gorillas, like Bushman, are currently listed 
as critically endangered on the IUCN (International Union 
for Conservation of Nature) Red List of Threatened Species. 




Sister and brother, Carolyn and David Riske, 
confront Bushman in 1363. 









h 






14 IN THE FIELD 



Children's 

Holiday Celebration 

SAVE THE DATE FOR THE WOMEN'S BOARD ANNUAL 
CHILDREN'S HOLIDAY CELEBRATION! 
THURSDAY • DECEMBER 8 - 4:00-G:30pm 

At this festive event, children and adults are invited to explore and celebrate the 
many cultures of Chicago and the world. Activities include a scavenger hunt, 
crafts, live entertainment, and a visit with Santa Claus— all to create a memorable 
afternoon of holiday fun. 

Tickets are $17 for adults or $15 
for adult museum members and 
$10 for children ages 13 and 
under. Reservations are limited 
and tickets will not be sold at the 
door. For tickets and further 
information please call 
312.665.7145. itf 





always be discovering. 

Thr. Fi el 

Museum 



campusf ,e,9hbors 



Field Memberships: 
The perfect gift! 

A Field Museum membership is the perfect 
gift for the explorers on your list— especially 
at a holiday discount rate! Every level of 
a Field Museum membership includes benefits 
such as free basic admission and special 
exhibition tickets, an invitation to our annual 
Members' Nights and discounts at our 
stores and eateries. 

Call 312.665.7700 • Mon.-Jri,, 8.'3oam-4.-30pm 
Visit fkldmuseum.org/membero//er 



Getting to The Field Museum 

Many buses and rail lines provide access to The Field 
Museum, for more information, call 888.YOURCTA or 
visit www.transitchicaao.com. Visit www.rtachicago.com 
for regional transit information. 



What do you think about In The Field? 

For questions about the magazine, call 312. 665.7107, 
email ewaldren(S>jieldmuseum.org or write Emily Waldren, 
Editor. Tor general membership inquiries, including 
address changes, call 866.312. 2781. 



ADLER PLANETARIUM 

Don't miss Deep Space Adventure, a new, immersive 
space experience like no other in the world! Deep Space 
Adventure takes you aboard the observation deck of a 
starship where you are surrounded by the larger-than-life 
phenomena of our Universe. Encounter the Universe at 
a level of realism that can only be surpassed by actual space 
travel. For more information or to plan your visit, go to 
www.adlerplanetarium.org. 



SHEDD AQUARIUM 

Be transported to the beautiful and mysterious world of sea 
jellies in Shedd Aquarium's new special exhibit, Jellies. You'll 
discover the intriguing ways in which these pulsing, translucent 
animals survive— and thrive— in the world's oceans. Learn how 
a jelly can devour enough food to double its weight each day, 
or how sea nettles hunt by trailing their long stinging tentacles to 
paralyze prey upon contact. Jellies runs through May 28, 2012. 
For more information, visit www.sheddaquarium.org. 



X 



to 



Field 



useum 

1400 South Lake Shore Drive 
Chicago, IL 60605-2496 



SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION LIBRARIES 



3 9088 01630 7308 



CHICAGO, IL 
PERMIT NO. 2309 




Holiday Shopping at The Field 

there's something for everyone this holiday season. 

Whether you are shopping for family or friends, for young or old, The Field Museum Stores 

have you covered. 

Mark your calendars for the Museum Stores' annual member double-discount days 

starting November 28 and running through December 4. All members will receive a 20 percent 
discount on all purchases from the Museum Stores, so plan to visit the Museum and bring 
your shopping list. Shopping opportunities include our four permanent stores, as well as our 
two temporary exhibition stores: Chocolate Around the World and Whales: Giants of the Deep. 
Remember that all proceeds from the Museum Stores directly support The Field's public 
and scientific programs. 

As always, you can shop 24 hours a day at fieldmuseum.org/store. 



Whales Store 

Visit the Whales store through January 16 
to explore the beauty and natural history 
of these giants of the deep. Here you can 
discover toys, books, and more for kids. 
Also find jewelry, gifts, and amazing 
hand-crafted objects from Mexico, Japan, 
Indonesia, Canada, Alaska, and the American 
Southwest. The Whales store also contains 
a collection of hand-carved wooden totems 
from indigenous communities near 
Ketchikan, Alaska, including this 
fine piece (pictured, left) that depicts 
the tale of the "Whale's Song." 



Chocolate Shop 



For hundreds of years, humans have been fascinated with 
the delicious phenomenon that we call "chocolate." Get the 
complete story behind this tasty treat that we crave in the 
exhibition Chocolate Ground the World. Then visit the Chocolate 
Shop where you will find something for everyone who loves 
chocolate. From childhood favorites to bold new flavors from 
around the world, there 
will be tasty treats to 
engage your senses as 
well as chocolate-inspired 
accoutrements for every- 
one in the family. 



EAT 
CHOCOLATE 



£fea 



******&& ♦ * a-ee^