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Full text of "In the field : the bulletin of the Field Museum of Natural History"

WINTER/SPRING 2012 



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LI I ^^ THE FIELD MUSEUM MEMBER MAG 



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Come see the new exhibition, 
Genghis Khan, and learn 

about this charismatic leadei 
vast empire, military feats, 
cultural influences, and . 



It's hard to believe that we're already in a new year! 
That means more exciting new exhibitions at the Museum. 
Please be sure to save the date for our annual Members' 
Nights on April 12 and 13. (See back cover for more.) 

Also on the horizon are many exciting new exhibitions. 
Genghis Khan, an in-depth look at the 13th century 
ruler of the vast Mongol empire, opens on February 24. 
With beautifully recreated scenes, engaging videos, and 
the largest collection of Mongolian artifacts ever assembled 
outside Asia, this exhibition will engage you in the story 
of a legendary warrior. Read more on pages 4 and 5. 

In addition to GenghisKhan, the Museum is mounting 
many other special exhibitions this year. We spoke with 
Gretchen Baker, Exhibitions Planning and Operations 
Director, to learn all about them. See page 3 for the 
exciting details. 

One of the biggest draws to The Field Museum is Inside 
AncientEgypt. Adults and children alike love to explore 
the mastaba, view our many mummies, and learn what life 
was like for everyday ancient Egyptians. For the Egyptophiles 
among us, we have two interesting articles in this issue 
that you will love. On pages 14 and 15, learn how scanning 
and imaging technology helped researchers reveal 
secrets about the Museum's mummies. 

As always, we thank you for your continued support and 
hope to see you soon. 



MICHELLE CLAYTON 

Director of Membership 




Opening at the Field Museum in 2012 

A preview of upcoming exhibitions 



BLOOD/STONES: BURMESE RUBIES 

January 13 through May 13, 2012 

Among the most lucrative of Myanmar's natural resources 
are its legendary gemstones. This temporary exhibition 
provides a glimpse into the world of ruby extraction and 
examines how such a beautiful and coveted product comes 
at a great human cost. On display are photographs by 
Christian Hoist who has traveled extensively in Myanmar 
capturing images of the gem trade. 

OPENING THE VAULTS: MUMMIES 

February 17 through April 22, 2012 

Field Museum researchers recently established new 
information about the Museum's mummy collection using 
CT scanning technology. This non- 
invasive process provided a wealth of 
data on individual mummies including 
age, sex, and apparent diseases. See 
some of the real artifacts alongside 
spectacular CT imagery for a view inside 
the sarcophagus. (See pages 14 and 
15 for more.) 

GENGHIS KHAN 

February 24 through September 3, 2012 

Discover the history, technological innovation, and culture 
of one of the world's greatest conquerors. View more than 
200 artifacts from the reign of Genghis Khan including 
gold jewelry, weaponry, silk robes, and religious relics. 
(See pages 4 and 5 for the complete story.) 

SCIENCE ON THE HALF SHELL 

March 23 through August 13, 2012 

Did you know that there are over 20,000 different species 
of clams, scallops, oysters, and mussels living today? 
Discover the world of bivalves through touchable models, 
real specimens, and hands-on activities. (See page 16.) 




nature's toolbox: 
biodiversity, art, and invention 

May 7 throuahVecember 4, 2012 

Biodiversity is fundamental for human existence — 
it provides us with food, medicine, oxygen, and energy. 
This exhibition features contemporary works of art that 
interpret how biodiversity contributes to the quality of 
our lives. Displayed alongside the artwork will be content 
reflecting the biological and evolutionary systems that 
inspired the featured artists. 

EXTREME MAMMALS 

May 25, 2012 throuahjanuary 6, 2013 

Explore the surprising and often extraordinary world of 
extinct and living mammals. Featuring spectacular fossils 
and vivid reconstructions, the show examines the ancestry 
and evolution of numerous species, ranging from huge 
to tiny, from speedy to sloth-like. Come see the biggest, 
smallest, most amazing mammals of all time. 




MAHARAJA: THE SPLENDOR OF 
INDIA'S ROYAL COURTS 

October 17, 2012 through February 3, 2013 

The word maharaja or "great king" conjures up a vision 
of splendor and magnificence. This temporary exhibition 
re-examines the world of the maharajas and their extraordi- 
narily rich culture. On display will be over 250 magnificent 
objects, many on loan from India's royal collections for 
the first time, itf 



WINTER/SPRING 2012 



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She Museum! 



y Nancy O'Shea, Public Relations Director 



AN UNRIVALED CONQUEROR WHO CHANGED 
THE COURSE OF WORLD CULTURE IS THE SUBJECT OF A NEW 
EXHIBITION AT THE FIELD MUSEUM. 



Genghis Khan (opening February 24) showcases 
the largest single collection of 13th century 
Mongolian artifacts ever assembled and takes 
visitors on an unforgettable journey into Khan's 
legendary empire. The exhibition features more 
than 200 stunning objects including gold jewelry, 
weaponry, silk robes, religious relics, and the 
newly-discovered mummy and tomb treasures 
of a Mongolian noble- 
woman—all capturing 
the essence of Genghis 
Khan's empire, his military 
prowess, cultural influence, 
and lasting legacy. 







Through compelling artifacts, engaging videos, and 
immersive installations, the exhibition tells the story of 
Genghis Khan's life: an epic tale filled with brutality, cunning, 
and intrigue. Born in 1162, and called Temujin, he endured 
early hardships including his father's untimely death, his 
own imprisonment and torture at the hands of a warring tribe, 
the kidnapping of his young wife, and a deadly rivalry with 
a sworn blood brother. In 1206, he successfully united the 
many Mongol clans and earned the title of Genghis Khan, 
meaning "Oceanic Ruler." He established a code of law 
and a written language that brought order to the Mongolian 
steppes and prepared the tribes he united to wage war 
with civilizations beyond Mongolian borders. 



A traditional Mongolian nomad dwelling — 
called a ger—made of a wood frame and covered 
in heavy felt. 



IN THE FIELD 




Genghis Khan's place in history is fraught with paradox. His warriors 
reduced cities to ash, eliminated entire populations, and incited fear 
throughout medieval Europe and Asia. Yet, he was an innovative leader 
who brought stability and unity to a vast and varied empire, encouraged 
education and a meritocracy, and opened trade between Europe and Asia. 

Visitors to the exhibition can explore how nomads lived on the grasslands 
of 13th century Central Asia and learn about Genghis Khan's early influences. 
They can view a life-size cjer (traditional Mongolian dwelling), learn about 
the role of a shaman, and view elaborate robes and ritual objects used by 
spiritual leaders. 

The rapid expansion of the Mongol Empire was due to the military genius 
and charisma of its leader. An animated floor map illustrates the vast reach 
of the empire, which at its peak, stretched from the Pacific Ocean to the 
gates of Vienna. Murals and video projections place visitors in battlefields 
to experience the sight and sound of warriors on galloping horses. Visitors 
will find magnificent weapons, equestrian objects, leather armor and 
chain mail, and other battle gear including a full-scale replica of a traction 
trebuchet (used for throwing large stones) and a giant siege crossbow. 



Above: Reconstruction ofKublai Khan's summer retreat at Shangdu, also known 
as Xanadu (left); and examples of armor and weapons used fay Genghis Khan's 
Mongolian warriors (right). 



GENGHIS KHAN'S LEGACY 

Genghis Khan's empire changed the world. The great 
conqueror is credited with creating a passport and postal 
system, establishing diplomatic immunity, and wilderness 
preservation parks. 

He died in 1227 but is still revered as the founding spirit 
of the Mongolian nation. 

Genghis Khan's burial place is one of the greatest archeo- 
logical mysteries of our time. One imaginative account 
states that 800 horsemen trampled repeatedly over the 
burial site to obscure its location. Other soldiers then killed 
the horsemen so they could not disclose the grave site. 

Genghis Khan's third son and successor, Ogodei, established 
the city of Karakorum, on the Mongolian steppes, as the 
empire's cosmopolitan capital. Visitors get a glimpse of life 
in this city through a recreated setting and collection of 
new archaeological discoveries including jewelry, ceramics, 
coins, seals, instruments, and textiles. 

In the final section of the exhibition, visitors can trace the 
events that led to the fall of the Mongol Empire and learn 
about Kublai Khan, the most famous of Genghis Khan's 
grandsons, whose own life as a warrior and statesman laid 
the foundation of modern China, itf 



iducedby Imagine Exhibitions Inc. 



lead Sponsor: Allstate 



WINTER/SPRING 2012 




Extracting Benefits 
from Venomous Fish 

By Leo Smith, Assistant Curator of Zoology and Head of Fishes 

THERE ARE MORE SPECIES OF VENOMOUS FISHES (OVER 3,000) THAN 
VENOMOUS SNAKES AND SCORPIONS COMBINED. THE STUDY OF VENOMOUS 
FISHES PROMISES TO YIELD NEW SOURCES OF PHARMACEUTICALS. 



Most people conjure up snakes or scorpions when they think 
of venomous creatures, but my recent work, has demonstrated 
that there are at least 15 times as many species of venomous 
fishes than previously estimated. 

Venomous fishes are captivating. They range from the 
Red Lionfish (Pterois volitans) and Reef Stonefish (Synanceia 
verrucosa) to the Poison Fang Blenny (Meiacanthus grammistes) 
and the Palette Surgeonfish (Paracanthurus hepatus), made 
famous by Ellen DeGeneres as Dory in finding Nemo. 
Venomous fishes can provoke fear, but their toxins may 
contain pharmaceutical benefits for humans. 

Using the predictive evolutionary framework that resulted 
from my studies, I'm now beginning to explore fish 
genomes to identify and characterize the genes associated 
with the fish venom system. The Museum is hopeful that 
this exploratory research will discover numerous biochemical 
leads resulting in new pharmaceuticals. Identifying and 
characterizing venom and venom-related compounds has 
been successful in every other venomous group that has 
been studied. These compounds have led to scores of drugs 
in various levels of FDA approval or commercial production. 





Palette Surgeonfish 
(Paracanthurus hepatus) 

Even though our knowledge of venomous 
fishes is in its infancy, it is clear that fish 
venoms represent a possible new source 
of pharmaceuticals because of their 
incredible diversity and moderate levels 
of toxicity. My collaborators and I have 
demonstrated that venom has evolved 
more than ten separate times in fishes. 
This suggests that each evolution of 
venom in fishes contains unique properties. 
And each provides an independent starting 
point from the venoms of snakes and 
scorpions which have only evolved one 
time in each lineage. This diversity presents 
researchers with a wealth of possible 
pharmaceutical or cosmetic sources that 
may be highly effective in humans, itf 

This research has been supported by The National Science 
foundation, The Grainger foundation, The Hegaunee 
foundation, and several generous donors through 
The field Museum's Women's Board 



Nature's defense system: 

On the left, a tooth from the Poison Jang Benny (Meiacanthus grammistes) 

On the right, a spine from the Reef Stonefish (Synanceia verrucosa) 



IN THE FIELD 



Navigating 

The Field Museum's IMeW Website 



By Jessica Abra Sandy, Web and Digital Media Projects Mana 



THE FIELD MUSEUM IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE the relaunch of fieldmusem.org, the first complete 
redesign of our web presence since its initial unveiling. The relaunch allows our scientists and professional staff 
to directly engage with the public. Below is a quick look at some of the new features. 



% Field 




— Rotating Banner 



The main banner on the Museum's new 
home page now features a rotating selection 
of exhibitions, research projects, and events. 

Exhibitions 

See which exciting new exhibitions 

are "Happening Now" and "Coming Soon." 



— Scientist Blogs 



Sign-up for Museum scientists' blogs 
and get updates on fascinating research 
and fieldwork. 

Social Media 

Like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter. 
Share photos of your favorite Museum 
exhibitions on Flickr. 

News 

Catch up with the latest news stories and 
television spots covering newsworthy events 
at the Museum. 

Multimedia 

Only a click away from the Museum's home 
page is an array of multimedia content including 
videos, photo galleries, and podcasts. 

Keep checking fieldmuseum.org as we 
unveil more new and intriguing Field Museum 
stories and features on the site, itf 



WINTER/SPRING 2012 




eggy Macnamara: 

Museum Artist-in-Residence 



By T-ranck Mercurio, Associate Editor, In The Field 

AS THE MUSEUM'S OFFICIAL ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE, PEGGY MACNAMARA 
OFTEN HAUNTS THE MUSEUM'S EXHIBITION HALLS, DRAWING AND PAINTING 
THE MANY OBJECTS ON DISPLAY. 



It is an exercise that has a long tradition in the history 
of art; from the time that museums first came into existence, 
artists have visited art collections and natural history 
collections to copy the masters and draw from nature. 
Drawing is a way of recording, and as such, has parallels 
with the first steps in the process of scientific inquiry: 
observation and measurement. It is a lesson that Peggy 
imparts to her students at the School of the Art Institute, 
many of whom can be seen intently observing and drawing 
the wide variety of objects exhibited at The Field. 

Peggy began drawing and painting at the Museum 30 
years ago. At the time, she was fascinated by the Museum's 
neoclassical interiors and traditional displays. She was 
especially intrigued by the Malvina Hoffman sculptures, 
a series of life-size bronze figures that were originally 
displayed in the Museum's Hall of Man (1931-1971), but are 
now located throughout the Museum. Eventually, Peggy 
became more interested in painting the "frozen wildlife" 
on display in the animal halls, especially the bird specimens. 





Peggy describes herself as a non-illustrator meaning she 
doesn't create scientific illustrations in the traditional sense. 
Instead, her approach is more immediate, more intuitive, 
and less belabored. Peggy has eighteen of her works on 
permanent display in the museum and has published other 
illustrations in books including Painting Wildlife inWatercotor 
(2003) published by Watson-Guptill. Her latest book, 
The Art of Migration will be released later this year by the 
University of Chicago Press. It is a look at the migratory 
birds and insects of the Mississippi Flyway. Several Museum 
zoologists are serving as consultants including John Bates 
(Bird Division), James Boone (Insect Division), and David 
Willard (Collections), itf 



Peggy Macanamara is guest curating the I 
Nature's Toolbox: Biodiversity, Art, and In 



mporary exhibition, 
sntion, opening on May 7. 



IN THE FIELD 



Same SUE, 
New Discoveries 



By Nancy O'Shea, Public Relations Director 




A NEW STUDY— LED IN PART BY FIELD MUSEUM SCIENTIST, PETER M AKOVICK Y — USED HIGHLY 
ACCURATE 3-D LASER SCANS OF FOSSIL SKELETONS TO REVEAL THAT TYRANNOSAURUS REX 
GREW MORE QUICKLY AND BECAME MUCH HEAVIER THAN PREVIOUSLY ESTIMATED. 



Earlier estimates of the weight of an adult T. rex were 
developed by building scale models or using equations 
related to body weights of other animals. The new study 
used accurate 3-D laser scans of T. rex fossil skeletons 
as a template for constructing digital models with 
flesh wrapped around the bones based on anatomical 
information from the living relatives of dinosaurs. 

By comparing different T. rex specimens, including 
our famous SUE — the world's largest and most complete 
T. rex — an international research team concluded that 
the "king tyrant reptile" must have grown about twice 
as fast as previously estimated. 

According to the study, SUE weighed over 9 tons 
when fully grown — 30 percent heavier than scientists 
previously estimated. "We knew she was big, but 
the 30 percent increase in her weight was unexpected," 
says Makovicky. The study also showed that T. rex grew 
as fast as 3,950 pounds per year during the teenage 
growth period. 

The study also concluded that the locomotion of T. rex 
slowed as the animal grew. This is because its torso 
became longer and 
heavier while its limbs 
grew relatively shorter 
and lighter, shifting its 
center of balance forward. 




Thus T. rex wasn't the fastest of land animals. The study 
supports the relative consensus among scientists that big 
tyrannosaurs could run at peak speeds of about 10 to 25 
miles per hour. 

The study used a forensic laser scan of SUE performed 
by the Chicago Police Department, supplemented with CT 
scans provided by Loyola University Medical Center. 

The study is titled "A computational analysis of limb and 
body dimensions in Tyrannosaurus rex with implications for 
locomotion, ontogeny, and growth." It was published in 
the online journal PLoS One in October 2011. itf 




Adding flesh to SUE's bones: 

Starting with SUE's skeleton, 
scientists modeled SUE's 
body volume using different 
levels of "fleshiness" 




The skinniest version 

In green and 
the fattest in grey. 




WINTER/SPRING 2012 



Scientists o 
Seven Continen 




Compiled by Tranck Mercurio, Associate Editor, In The Field 

THE FIELD MUSEUM IS AN INSTITUTION WITH GLOBAL REACH. 

During any given year, more than 60 Museum scientists travel around the world to conduct 
research and fieldwork. Here is a sampling of seven curators who are making scientific discoveries 
on seven continents. 



SOUTH AMERICA 

MATT VON KONRAT 

Adjunct Curator and Collections Manager, 
Department of Botany 



NORTH AMERICA 
JANET VOIGHT 

Associate Curator, 
Department of Zoology 

Along with my colleague, 
Leo Smith, I recently chartered a research 
vessel for 72 hours of trawling in the 
Pacific Ocean off San Diego, California. 
This area, called the Southern Californian 
Bight, contains diverse marine life that 
thrives in these nutrient-rich waters. 
Our crew of nine, including colleagues 
from Scripps Institute of Oceanography 
and The Ohio State University, worked 
onboard 24 hours a day, dragging our net 
through the water or across the bottom 
to a 5,000-foot depth. The specimens 
recovered — including benthic octopuses, 
mid-water cephalopods, and fishes- 
enhance our Invertebrate and 
Fishes collections. 





I am participating in a field program in the Cape Horn 
Archipelago region of southern Chile. The Field Museum collaborated 
with the New York Botanical Gardens and several Chilean institutions on 
this project. The 2011 expedition was the first in a four-year effort to 
document the diversity and distribution of an enigmatic group of plants 
called bryophytes — including mosses, liverworts, and hornworts — found 
throughout the southern tip of South America. Increased understanding 
of bryophytes will greatly add to the conservation of this critical 
biodiversity hotspot. 

ANTARCTICA 
PETER MAKOVICKY 

Associate Curator and Chair, Department of Geology 

Last winter, I led a fossil dig with Museum geologist 
Nathan Smith at the highest latitude and altitude dinosaur 
quarry on the planet: Mt. Kirkpatrick in the Central Transantarctic 
Mountains. During the Early Jurassic (200 to 175 million years ago), 
this area of the Antarctic was temperate and forested — and inhabited by 
dinosaurs. Over five weeks, the team extracted bones of the 25-foot 
carnivore Cryolophosaurus, and the herbivore Glacialisaurus. Bone-bearing 
rock was quarried into blocks weighing 200 to 700 pounds which were 
slung from a helicopter for transport back to camp. Two other dinosaurs, 
including one new to science, were also discovered. 




10 IN THE FIELD 






WILLIAM A. PARKINSON 

Associate Curator of Eurasian 
Anthropology, Department 
of Anthropology 



I conduct archaeological field work 
aimed at understanding how Neolithic and 
Bronze Age villages evolved in southeastern 
Europe between 7000 and 1000 BC. 
I directed two archaeological projects 
in 2011 that investigated how these early 
agricultural villages grew into politically 
and economically complex chiefdoms and 
states. My research on the Great Hungarian 
Plain in the Carpathian Basin and on the 
Mani Peninsula of southern Greece involves 
researchers from the US, Greece, Hungary, 
and Canada, each of whom bring their own 
specialty to the projects. We are discovering 
that several factors — including trade and 
safety — encouraged early villagers to 
settle in specific spots. 



AFRICA 

CHAP KUSIMBA 

Curator of African Anthropology, 
Department of Anthropology 

Guided by a philosophy that trade makes us human, I have 
spent the last 25 years studying how ancient transoceanic interactions 
between Africa, Asia, and Europe have shaped global history. The cultivated 
landscape — including the diverse foods we grow and eat everyday — provides 
testimony to the predominantly peaceful interactions between people 
over time. My recent archaeological research has been in Mtwapa, Kenya. 
Multiple grants are enabling my colleague Sloan Williams (U.I.C.) and me 
to do more fieldwork in Manda, Kenya, where we will explore the full 
impact and meaning of trade, migrations, and other ancient interactions 
in shaping the East African cultural mosaic. 



m 



ASIA 

OLIVIER RIEPPEL 

Rowe family Curator of Evolutionary Biology, 
Department of Geology 

Since 1999, I have collaborated in fieldwork and research 
on Triassic marine reptiles that lived between 247 and 230 million years ago 
in southern China. I conducted excavations in Guizhou, Yunnan, and Anhui 
provinces. Fieldwork in China typically relies on recruiting local farmers and 
requires permission from state, county, and township officials. As a result 
of our efforts, a geological park has been constructed near Guanling; 
another is planned for Luoping. Most notable amongst the great variety of 
our discoveries is the ancestral turtle, Odontochelys, and the long-necked 
protorosaur, Dinocephalosaurus. 



| 



AUSTRALIA 
CORRIE MOREAU 

Assistant Curator, Division of Insects, 
Department of Zoology 



One of the places where I conduct fieldwork is Queensland, 
Australia. While there, I collaborate with local scientists and collect ants 
from all parts of the Australian Wet Tropics to determine how these diverse 
animals have responded to past climatic events, especially fluctuations 
in their rainforest habitat. Back at the Museum, I conduct DNA-based 
research to unlock the information stored within each ant's genome to tell 
the story of the past. I try to spend about one month a year in Australia 
and will be heading back for more fieldwork in June 2012. itf 



WINTER/SPRING 2012 11 



In the Spotlight: 

Su-Lin, 

America's First Panda 

By Bruce Patterson, MacArthur Curator of Mammals, Department of Zoology 




INSIDE THE HALL OF MAMMALS, IN "CARNIVORE CORNER," a young giant panda sits 
in half recline. Like every specimen in the Museum's encyclopedic collections, it has fantastic stories to tell. This one 
hailed from Sichuan, the first live panda ever to be seen outside China; it arrived at Brookfield Zoo on February 8, 1937. 
Named Su-Lin ("A little bit of something precious"), the baby panda attracted huge crowds from around the world- 
lier antics chronicled in countless articles, radio shows, and news reels. 

When Su-Lin died of pneumonia 15 months later, her remains came 
to The Field Museum. In July 1938, Museum taxidermist C.J. Albrecht 
unveiled the mount that still greets visitors today. For months, the panda 
was on display in Stanley Field Hall, before moving to the Mammals 

of the World hall. 

But the rest of Su-Lin came upstairs, incorporated into the scientific 
collections. Here, Chicago's celebrated zoo animal was found to be 
a male! Zoology curator D. Dwight Davis analyzed our 13 giant pandas 
in a 1964 monograph entitled The Giant Panda: A Morphological Study 
of Evolutionary Mechanisms. Systematic comparisons of pandas to related 
carnivores showed how adapting to a low-calorie diet of bamboo had 
transformed the panda's teeth and skull, paws, and even its reproductive 
and digestive systems. Davis correctly identified the panda as an 
aberrant bear, a contentious proposition confirmed by DNA evidence 
decades later. His remarkable inferences about evolutionary mechanisms 
from the study of Museum specimens inspired Stephen J. Gould, 
the Harvard evolutionist, to entitle one of his books The Panda's Thumb, 
a lasting tribute to Davis' discovery of the elongated wrist-bone that 
enables a panda to hold bamboo shoots while it chews. 

Su-Lin and his kin continue to inspire and instruct Museum visitors and 
evolutionists alike. About 25 populations of giant pandas persist in China 
today, most with fewer than 20 individuals, totaling about 1,600 pandas 
(2004 census). Although pandas are sometimes poached, the greatest 
threat to their survival is continued loss and degradation of habitat, itf 



Su-im today at 
The Field Museu 




12 IN THE FIELD 






Museum Youth Design Team: 

Teens Take The Field! 

By Johanna Thompson, Digital Learning Specialist, Education Department 

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN TEENS INVADE THE MUSEUM FOR A SUMMER? 

CAN YOU IMAGINE GUMBY AS A RECENTLY EXCAVATED DINOSAUR FROM ANTARCTICA? 
OR WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN MUSICALLY IF LADY GAGA MARRIED A PALEONTOLOGIST? 
THEN YOU HAVE AN INKLING OF THE YOUTH DESIGN TEAM. 



Youth Design Team (or YDT) is the newest 
program offering from the Education 
Department for high school youth. These 
intensive summerteen internships and 
school-year course options are based on 
the teaching concept of a design studio. 
The program gives youth a design 
challenge and provides the content and 
tools necessary to solve the problem 
creatively. It allows teens to tinker, play, 
mock-up, imagine, and learn. It also lets 
them teach that same content in ways 
that are surprisingly innovative — and 
builds their self-confidence, critical 
thinking, and technical skills. 

YDT is anything but traditional, so don't 
expect lectures, boring discussions, 
or assigned homework— unless it is the 
teens assigning themselves homework. 
Last summer, YDT participants built 
computer games on environmental issues and ancient cultures; produced 
and recorded original music based on their interactions with Museum 
scientists and collections; recorded humorous and scientifically accurate 
podcasts; interviewed staff to tell the behind-the-scenes story of how 
the Museum works; created choose-your-own-adventure, live-action, 
and claymation movies; and wrote graphic novels. They even developed 
an online persona, TakeTheField. You can like them on Facebook and 
follow them on Twitter! 




YDT summer participants also saw their 
work displayed in the public space of the 
Museum. You can view their work here: 
fieldmuseum.org/schools/takethefield. 

Or head up to the 3-D Theater and watch 
teen-produced videos on the screen while 
you wait for the show to begin. 

YDT academic courses take place one 
afternoon a week during the school year, 
offering course credit to qualifying 
10th— 12th graders from participating schools. 
Academic year 2012-2013 applications will 
be available in Spring 2012. itf 




Want to get in on the YDT 2012 Summer action? 

Apply NOW by going to fieldmuseum.org/happening/youth-design-team 

to download an application! 



WINTER/SPRING 2012 13 




Revealing 



This cat mummy (right) was 

photographed and X-rayed at 

The field Museum in 1331. 

Mummified cats, birds, and 

other animals were often given 

as temple offerings fay the 

ancient Egyptians. 





Pioneering X-Ray 
Technology of the Past... 

By Jranck Mercurio, Associate Editor, In The Field 

FOR MORE THAN 85 YEARS, THE FIELD MUSEUM HAS USED 
IMAGING TECHNOLOGY, LIKE X-RAYS AND CT SCANS, TO LOOK 
INSIDE OBJECTS SUCH AS EGYPTIAN SARCOPHAGI AND 
MUMMY WRAPPINGS. 

In 1926 the Museum established its first Division of Reontgenology (or radiology) 
headed by Anna Reginald Bolan, an assistant professor at the University of Chicago. 
Stanley Field, then president of the institution, donated the first X-ray equipment to 
the Museum. This novel way of seeing inside artifacts was immediately popular with 
the public and scientists alike. 

In 1931 Museum curator Berthold Laufer collaborated with British medical doctor, 
Roy L. Moodie, to publish some of the Museum's first X-ray images of human mummies 
in Tieldiana, the Museum's scientific journal. Included were images of Egyptian 
animal mummies such as the mummified cat pictured here. Many animal mummies 
are currently on display in the Museum's permanent exhibition, Inside Ancient Egypt. 

Today, human and animal mummies in the Museum's collection are yielding even 
more secrets, thanks to modern CT (computed tomography) X-ray technology. 

Traditional X-ray equipment creates two-dimensional images providing limited 
information when used on complex specimens such as mummies. Modern CT machines, 
however, create three-dimensional digital images that can be manipulated to show 
information in great detail and high resolution. 

"What's great about CT is that it gives us the opportunity to look inside without having 
to be destructive, without having to be disrespectful, without having to unwrap the 
mummy or make any cuts or incisions," said JP Brown, leader of the Museum's latest 
mummy scanning project. Read JP's article on the next page to discover what new 
secrets modern CT scanning is revealing about the Museum's collections, itf 



14 IN THE FIELD 




...and Modern CT Technology of Today 



By JP Brown, Collections Manager, Anthropology Department 



THIS PAST SUMMER, A MEDICAL CT SCANNER MOUNTED IN A SPECIALLY ADAPTED 
TRUCK WAS BROUGHT TO THE MUSEUM, set up in the West Parking Lot, and used to generate scans of 

large specimens, including Egyptian and Peruvian mummies and Pacific Island effigy figures. Under normal circumstances, 
these objects would have been transported to a hospital for what scientists call "non-destructive examination in three 
dimensions with computed tomography" or CT scanning. This process works well for smaller, more robust objects. 



Above: CTscan of a Ptolemaic 

era mummy {circa 200 BC) 

revealing, the skull of a woman 

about 40 years old. 

Below: Museum interns and 

staff members move a 

Marquesan temple drum from 

storage to the portable 

CT scanner. 



But the cost and difficulty of transporting large, fragile 
objects can be prohibitive. So, instead of bringing the 
artifacts to the scanner, this time the scanner was brought 
to the artifacts. 

In all, seven Egyptian mummies, three 
major Pacific Island pieces (including a 
seven-foot, 220-pound temple drum from 
the Marquesas Islands), and three Peruvian 
mummies were scanned. In addition, nine 
smaller, but nonetheless important, pieces 
from the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, 
and Asia were scanned. Most of the large 
pieces required multiple 
scans to reveal all the 
details: a total of 61 
CT examinations were 
performed over six 
working days creating 
a total of 21 GB of data. 




The CT scans were analyzed and rendered on the 
Anthropology Department's workstations in the 
Regenstein Laboratory. My research team — including 
interns Sophie Hammond Hagman and Hannah Koch, 
and volunteer Ellis Caspary— established reliable 
information about the individual mummy remains: 
age, sex, dental condition, diet, disease, and trauma. 
For example, CT scans indicate that one mummy 
was a 40-year-old female with an arthritic back. 

Images of the CT scans are available for viewing 
on the Museum's web site. Several will be on display 
in a new temporary exhibition, Opening the Vaults: 
Mummies, from February 17 to April 22. itf 

The CT scanner was provided through the generosity oj Robert Dakessian, 
President and CEO of Genesis Medical Imaging. The project was also 
made possible by several anonymous donors. 



WINTER/SPRING 2012 15 



Science on the Half Shell 




wrapp 



Above: Lion's paw (Nodipecten fragosus) 
Below: Mossy Ark clam (Area imbricata) 




Tropical corals with a 

ant clam nestled among 

the colorful branches. 



at The Field Museum 

By Rudiger Bieler, Curator oj Zoology 

BIVALVES INCLUDE MANY FAMILIAR MEMBERS such as oysters, 
mussels, and clams. But they also include odd groups such as freshwater mussels- 
some of the most endangered group of invertebrates on this planet— shipworms, 
and galeommateoidea (clams that have moved the shells inside their bodies 
and glide around like slugs). Roughly 20,000 species of bivalves live today, 
but despite their enormous economic and ecologic importance, we still 
know little about their interrelationships and how they connect to 
the animal Tree of Life. How and when did they evolve? What were the 
key innovations along the way that allowed them to become so incredibly 
abundant and successful in the world's fresh and salt waters? 

To address these questions, I have teamed up with colleagues from other 
research institutions including Harvard University, the Smithsonian Institution, 
and laboratories in the United Kingdom, Germany, and Australia, under the auspices 
of the National Science Foundation's "Assembling the Tree of Life" project. Together, 
we are collecting bivalve specimens from around the world, studying their anatomy 
and DNA, and analyzing this data to infer relationships and reconstruct a family 
tree of bivalves. At the same time, the project team is encountering and answering 
numerous research questions, training a new generation of specialists, and developing 
educational tools for students and teachers. 

From the beginning, we wanted to make our work accessible to the general public. 
But how do we explain the steps that scientists take to understand the evolution of this 
group? With the help of the Paleontological Research Institution in Ithaca, New York, 
the project team developed a traveling exhibition to do just that: present museum 
visitors with a series of modules that explain our work and allow them to learn the key 
analytical steps. The exhibition, Science on the Half Shell, will feature an amazing 

diversity of bivalves, present video travelogues of 
our collecting sites, and include hands-on interactives 
so visitors can share in the excitement of scientific 
discovery themselves, itf 

Science on the Half Shell is organized by the Paleontological 
Research Institution and made possible by a grant from the National 
Science foundation 



SCIENCE ON THE HALF SHELL OPENS 
AT THE FIELD MUSEUM ON MARCH 23 
AND CLOSES AUGUST 19, 2012. 



16 IN THE FIELD 







Connect with The Field Museum 

on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+! 

by Jane Hanna, Social Media Strategist, Museum Enterprises 

Our online community enjoys exclusive daily content and fun features like Mammal Mondays and 

Insect of the Week. Discover astounding photos, watch behind-the-scenes videos, answer trivia questions, 

and voice your opinions. Ask questions, share your own photos and memories, and meet your fellow 

citizen scientists. We're your up-to-the-minute source for Museum news and information, 

and we want you to join the conversation! 

Scan this code with your smartphone or visit: 
Facebook: www.facebook.com/fieldmuseum 
Twitter (@fieldmuseum): twitter.com/fieldmuseum 
Google+: http://bit.ly/rpD3bO 







Corporate Relations Program 

The Corporate Relations Program at The Field Museum offers 
member companies FREE employee general admission, discounted 
rates to limited-time special exhibitions, and a customized 
Corporate Family Day for every employee and their family. Member 
companies also receive a rental fee waiver for corporate meetings 
or events, invitations to private exhibition opening receptions, 
and much more. For further information, contact Julia Kittle, 
Corporate Relations Program Officer, at 312.665.7668 or email 
atjkittle@fieldmuseum.org. 



I museum _„ oi „ hh 
campus ne ' 9hb 



Field Museum 
Memberships 

Time to renew your membership? 

Call 312.S65.7700 • Mon.-frl, S-'3oam-4. j 3opm 
Visit fieldmuseum.org/membership 

field memberships also make great gifts'. 



ors 




SHEDD AQUARIUM 

No bones (or blood, or brains) about it, sea jellies might 
be 95 percent water, but they're 100 percent amazing. 
See diverse species at Shedd Aquarium's special exhibit, 
Jellies, through May 2012. During Shedd's Community 
Discount Days in January and February, Illinois residents 
can enjoy free general admission. For discount information, 
visit www.sheddaquarium.org. 



ADLER PLANETARIUM 

Take off on a Deep Space Adventure at the Adler 
Planetarium! A new immersive space experience inside 
Deep Space Adventure is the Grainger Sky Theater, which 
offers audiences the most technologically advanced theater 
experience ever developed. Encounter the Universe at a level 
of realism that can only be surpassed by actual space travel. 
Visit adlerplanetarium.org for more information. 



WINTER/SPRING 2012 17 



Program Tickets + Info 312.665.7400 



General Museum Info 312.922.9410 

calendar 



January 



. y Artists and Authors* family program 

1.21, 11am-2pm > Join local artist Malwina Bardoni in the 
Crown Family PlayLab to learn about winter animals and the homes 
that they live in, and then create your own bears' den. 



february 



(jj Artists and Authors* family program 

2.18, 11am-2pm > Meet author Jen Cullerton Johnson as she reads 
from her award-winning book, Seeds of Change, and shares Wangari 
Maathai's story. An environmentalist, scientist, and women's rights 
activist, Wangari Maathai inspired her native Kenya to plant 30 million 
trees and became the first African woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize. 
Johnson will lead children in a seed planting activity echoing Wangari's 
message of harabee, which means "let's work together." 



march 



ffy Artists and Authors* family program 

3.17, 11am-2pm > Come celebrate St. Patrick's Day in the Croum family 
PlayLab] Hear your favorite tales from Ireland during our Story Time 
program and listen to traditional Irish music. Stop in the Art Studio 
to create a unique piece of artwork centered on the country and culture 
of Ireland. 

Leakey Lecture: Dr. Ofer Bar-Yosef* adult program 
3.24, 1pm > Join Dr. Bar-Yosef, world-renowned expert in paleolithic 
archaeology, as he discusses the dispersal routes and origins of modern 
humans. Learn about the current genetics and archaeological evidence 
that has been uncovered in Eurasia and Australia. Discover what this 
evidence tells us about past inter-breeding and colonization patterns 
in the entire vast terrestrial continent from the Atlantic to the Pacific 
coasts and the islands. 



april 



Banff Mountain Film Festival adult program 

4.11, 7pm > Join us when the Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour 
brings the spirit of outdoor adventure to Chicago. Traveling to exotic 
landscapes and remote cultures, while bringing audiences up-close 
and personal with adrenaline-packed action sports, the 2012 World Tour 
is an exhilarating and provocative exploration of the mountain world. 
These award-winning and audience favorite films that are chosen to 
travel the globe can be seen in Chicago at The Field Museum. 
$10, $8 for Museum members. 

fji Artists and Authors* family program 

4.21, 11am-2pm > Come get wrapped up with us in the Crownjamily 
PlayLab\ Hear a story about mummies and create your own wrapped 
treasure to take home with you. 

*FREE with Museum Admission 
in the Crown family PlayLab 



u _ DOZINI 

overnights «"no« 

at the museum 




Then spread your sleeping bag 



SUE the T. Rex is having a 
sleepover! Join us for a night 
of family workshops, self-guided 
tours and hands-on activities. 
Explore ancient Egypt by 
flashlight, prowl an African 
savannah with man-eating lions, 
and take a stroll through the 
Royal Palace in Bamum, Africa, 
amidst some of our most popular 



exhibitions. The event includes an evening snack and breakfast 
in the morning. 

Overnights begin Fridays at 5:45pm and end Saturdays at 9am 
and are only available for families and groups with children 
ages 6-12. Space is limited so reserve your sleeping spots now! 
For ticket options, see below. For information about the event, 
including a sample schedule and frequently asked questions, 
please visit our website, fieldmuseum.org/overnights. 

Standard Overnight Tickets: $63, $51 for Museum members 
and groups. 

Premium Package 1: $75, $65 for Museum members. 
Premium Package 1 tickets allow guests to sleep upstairs in 
the Evolving Planet exhibit— with the dinosaurs! 

Premium Package 2: $87, $77 for Museum members. Premium 
Package 2 guests sleep upstairs in the Evolving Planet exhibit and 
go on a behind-the-scenes tour with a Field Museum scientist. 

January 20* • February 3,* 10* & 17 • March 9 & 16 
April 20 • May 4 • June 15 

*sold out! 



®| 



k Crown 



Family 



KS5BG 




Sign up for the Crown JamiJy PlayLab L-News! 

This e-newsletter is an early science literacy resource geared towards 
families with young children ages two through six. To start receiving emails, 
please contact playlab(a)jieldmuseum.org. 



fieldmuseum.org 

event details are available online! 



, attn: _ 

teens! 



Digital Planet 

Summer 2012 > Are you ready to 
uncover the real story of science? 
In this week-long digital video camp, 
you'll explore the current research of 
The Field Museum's fearless scientists 
Equipped with digital media, you'll 
interpret science for the silver screen 
like never before! Registration begins 
in winter 2012. For more information 
please visit bit.lv/DP2012 or email 
jthompson@fieldmuseum.org. 





Youth Design Team Summer Internship 

Summer 2012 > Part digital design studio, 
part summer Museum internship, and part 
behind-the-scenes Museum Studies program, 
this program is designed for high school 
students who want to get museum experience 
and develop mobile media for youth visitors 
to the Museum. Teens with digital skills are 
encouraged to apply; however, these skills are 
not required for participation. To learn more, 
see page 13, visit bit.ly/YDT2012 or email 
jthompson@fieldmuseum.org. 



ummer 

programs 

egister now! 

Summer World's Tour > ages 5-10 

Summer World's Tour offers a week of adventures in Chicago's premier 
museums for children ages 5 to 10 years old. Campers will explore exciting new 
worlds at the Adler Planetarium, discover some of nature's most extreme mammals 
at The Field Museum, and become explorers of the aquatic realm at the Shedd Aquarium. 
Activities include investigating exhibits, creating original art projects, playing 
learning games and having lunch along the shore of Lake Michigan. 

Register for one of the following four week-long sessions: 

1: July 9-13 2: July 16-20 3: July 23-27 4: July 30-August 3 

Registration is held through the Adler Planetarium and will occur in late January. 

Dino Camp > ages 3-4 

I spy a dinosaur, do you? Join us for two days of dino discovery where we 
will learn how to spot a dinosaur, see SUE's skull, and dig for dinosaur bones! 
This is an early childhood camp, designed expressly for young explorers 
ages 3-4 with their caregivers. 

Program takes place from 9am-Noon in the Crown family VlayLab. 
Choose from the following two-day sessions: 



1: Mondays, June 4 & 11 
2: Tuesdays, June 5 & 12 
3: Wednesdays, June 6 & 13 
4: Thursdays, June 7 & 14 

S75 general, $65 for Museum 

per camper). Registration begins February 1, 2012 online 

at fieldmuseum.org or by phone, 312.665.7400. 



5: Mondays, June 18&25 
6: Tuesdays, June 19&26 
7: Wednesdays, June 20 & 27 
8: Thursdays, June 21 & 28 



nbers (one adult included in the price 




Don't miss these 
exhibitions before 
they close! 

Whales: Giants of the Deep 

Through January 16, 2012 
Immerse yourself in the vibrant underwater 
world of whales and discover the many ways 
in which these magnificent creatures continue 
to intrigue, astound, and inspire us. 



1 of New Zealand 
made possible through 



Developed and presented by the Muse 
Te Papa Tongarewa. This exhibition w 
the support of the Hew Zealand Gover 

Vroud Major Sponsor: Wells Jargo. 



Travelogues and Technologies— from 
Small Sketches to the Biggest Book 

Extended through April 15, 2012 
Discover how technological advancements 
have changed how we document explorations 
of the world as you follow Field Museum 
expeditions from the 1890s to present day. 
Uncover extraordinary stories of travel, 
scientific discovery, and rare encounters. 

Travelogues and Technologies — from Small Sketches to 
the Biggest Book is organized by The field Museum 

Natural Wonders: 

A Roman Mosaic from Lod, Israel 

Through April 22, 2012 

With its depictions of exotic animals, 
fantastical fishes, and ancient Mediterranean 
ships, the Lod Mosaic is one of the world's best 
preserved and most unique Roman mosaics. 
Study the mosaic's intricate detail and uncover 
the stories hidden in its imagery. 

Lod Mosaic is organized by the Israel Antiquities Authority. 



Getting to The Field Museum 




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to The Field 


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nformation, call 888.Y0URC7A or 


vis 


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Visit ww\ 


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for 


regio 


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nformath 







What do you think about In The Field? 

Jor questions about the magazine, call 312.665.7707, 
email ewaldren(3>jieldmuseum.org or write Emily Waldren, 
Editor, for general membership inquiries, including 
address changes, call 866.312.2781. 

always be discovering. 



jjy.Fi eld 

Museum 



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Field 



useum 

1400 South Lake Shore Drive 
Chicago, IL 60605-2496 




3 9088 01630 7316 



'N-PROFIT 
\JIZATION 
OSTAGE 
'AID 
.CAGO, IL 
PERMIT NO. 2309 




Members' Nights 

You are invited to the most exclusive and engaging event at The Field 
Museum: Members' Nights! At Members' Nights explore our vast collections, 
interact with our curators and staff, and witness behind-the-scenes work that 
defines The Field Museum as a cultural and scientific institution. Members' 
Nights are scheduled for Thursday, April 12 and Friday, April 13. The event 
will be Museum-wide and held from 5-10pm. 

Reservations are required for this event. Please contact Membership 
Services at 312.665.7705 M-F 8:30am-4:30pm or make your reservation 
online at fieldmuseum.org/support/reserve-membership-tickets. 



Shop for Treasures from Eurasia 

Visit the Genghis Khan Store to continue your exploration of treasures from the vast Mongolian Empire. 
Learn more about this fascinating and complex realm as you discover riches from the central Asian 

steppes to the Sea of Japan, and from Mongolia itself south into the Indian subcontinent. 
We've shopped far and wide to bring you stunning pieces like this contemporary 
necklace featuring a hand-carved pendant from Afghanistan created by local 
Chicago jeweler, Kass Sigel. As always, you'll find gifts and toys to excite your 
little ones, an array of books for the whole family, and much more. 

Shop the Museum Stores 24 hours a day at fieldmuseum.org. 

Remember that all proceeds from the Stores directly support 
the Museum's public and scientific programs, and that all 
Field Museum members receive 10 percent off their purchases 
in the Museum Stores.