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7^BRADSTREET 
of FILHDOM 




Vol. XI. No. 1 




Authority 



Friday, January 2, 1920 



Sherman Sues 

Lehrman for Accounting — Alleges 

Breach of Contract 

(Ihl Wire lu WJD'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles— Suit for attachment 
for alleged breach of contract was 
filed yesterday by Harry A. Sher- 
man against Henry Lehrman and the 
Henry Lehrman Prod. Inc. Attorney 
I'hilip Cohen representing Sherman 
instructed the sheriff to attach all 
moneys of Lehrman on deposit witji 
the Union Bank and Trust Co., the 
Lehrman Studios at Culver City, 
md the LeJirman residence on Frank- 
lin Ave., Hollywood. 

•Sherman, through his attorney, al 
cges that on March 13, 1919, Henry 
Lehrman entered into a written con- 
ract with Sherman and among other 
liings employed Sherman as his sell- 
"g agent for the purpose of selling 
iind exploiting a certain number of 
iliotoplays the defendant intended to 
i)roduce. Sherman's salary, states the 
■KTeement, was to have been $250 

week from March 1,^, to May 10, 

Sherman alleges tjiat he has not 

■reived his salary for many weeks, 

t he has endeavored to get a set- 

■ nent, but is unable to do so. 

According to the agreement Sher- 

an was to dispose of 12 comedies 

3r $40,000 each, and between March 

?. and April 25, last, Lehrman mod- 

led the terms of the agreement 

nder which Sherman was to sell the 

pmedies, whereby Sherman was 

thonzcd to sell the First Natl Ex- 

onnn^ Circuit the 12 comedies at 

y.OOO each, but that notwitIu,tand- 

g this fact Lehrman has not paid 

ii"i in full for his services. The 

^mplamt alleges that the Henry 

fhnnan Productions, Inc. is com- 

oniy known as a one man corpora- 

n and that said defendent Henrv 

prman owns probabl 





Price 5 Centi 




•^°"a"~?"'^ ^"P'^' the rascal, sentences Jennie for life— Norma Talmadge 
in "A Daughter of Two Worlds," her first picture for First NadonK 



ock. 



''" ..-mas Ince Staff 

V J u n-e to WW'S DAILY) 



I-os Angeles— Hunt Stromberg of 
; ihomas H. Ince organization 
'S appouued Norbert Lusk, former- 
Pp"? representative on the coast 
bo dwyn, eastern publicity rep- 

L Tu' ^"^ ^^^ I"'^^ organiza- 
F- -the appointment is effective 
^ coming Monday. 

nrilln ^''li^^ ^'" include the 
»dl>ng of all press matter sent east I 

f;/°'"berg. His headquarters 
P I'e in New York. j 



Price Gets Sub Film 

C. B. Price, Inc. has secured Amer- 
ican distribution of a film called "The 
Log of the U-3S" sliowing the activ- 
ities of the German snlimarine in 
sinking Allied vessels. 

The picture was taken primarily 
to push the German war loans and 
was designed for showing in Ger- 
many only. 

Price secured the film in London 
where it fell into the possession 
of the British Admiralty through the 
activities of one of its agents. 

The Capitol will show the picture 
beginning Sunday. Keith's in Wash- 
ington and the California in San 
Francisco have booked it. 

Price has sold "Love's Law" with 
Gail Kane, to the American-British 
Continental Film Co. for Great Brji- 
tain. Max Glucksman has secureid 
it for several South American couiL 
tries. 



English Star Here 

Mary Marsh Allen, one of Eng- 
land's prominent actresses has a'r- 
rived in New York from London. 
She IS stopping at the Biltmore. 

Miss Allen while in England ap- 
peared in films made by the Wind- 
sor Walturdaw Co., Lt.d, but has 
come to America because she be- 
lieves that English producers cannot 
compete with domestic producers in 
making pictures. 

Eve Balfour recently arrived in 
New York from England. 

I Hapiiy N>\v Year 

j "Behind the Door" at B'way 

"Behind the Door" a Thomas H. 
I Ince special featuring Hobart Bos- 
I worth will be the feature at the 
Broadway next week. 

The Parisian Fashion Frolic sche- 
duled to close this week has been 
held over. 

Happy N'eu- Year 

Fairbanks at Rialto 

Douglas Fairbanks will be feat- 
ured at the Rialto next week in 
"When the Clouds Roll. By " 



Hoover Film on B'wa\ 

Official Film Will Have Premiere a 
Manhattan Opera House on Jan. 9 

_ An eight reel production calh ■ 
Starvation" will have its premier 
at the Manhattan Opera House tii 
^Xe."'ng of Jan. 9. The productio 
which IS an official motion pictur 
record of Herbert Hoover and th 
American Relief organization is sai 
to be the only complete film recor 
of the work of the committee on 2 
odd countries of Europe. J 

The picture deals with Russia aij 
the Baltic lands and shows in iil 
timate detail the workings of '^ 
committee in feeding the star.,in 
countries of Europe. The lane 
in which Hoover operated are j 
follows: Russia, Poland, Lettvi 
Esthonia, Finland, Sweden, Denmar 
Holland, Belgium. France, Ital- 
Greece, Turkey, Rouinania, Hungar 
Austria, Germany, Ukrainia and Se 
bia. 

Distribution rights to the film ha> 

not as yet been decided upon. 

Happy New Year 

Griffith In Town 
D. W. Griffith arrived in New Yor 
yesterday from Florida wheprtTe-Tr 
shooting scenes on fuj^e produ 

tions. ^_y — 

na|>py NVw Year 

Metro Buys "Gorgeous Girl" 

Metro has purchased "The Go 
geous Girl" a story by Nalbro Ha 
ley, now appearing in the Saturd; 
Evening Post. 

It has not been decided for who 
it will be used. 

Happy New Year 

Mooney Returns 

Paul C. Mooney. general sales md 
ager for the Louis B. Maver Ft 
ductions starring Anita Stewart a! 
Mildred Harris Chaplin, arrived 
New York this week after a tour 
the principal cities from New Yq 
to the coast and back, arranging t 
special percentage presentations 
"In Old Kentucky" and establis 
ing the Mildred Harris Chaplin s; 
ies which will soon be initiated 
the new Mayer release through t 
First National Exhibitors' Circuit 
Happy New Year 

Adler in Cleveland 
(/i(/ Wire to Wilis h.tlLY) 

Cleveland— Bert Adler. explo- 
tion manager for Realart specials 
here. .Adler recently worked acr 
some effective stunts ii 
with "Soldiers of Fortu 
more and Richmond. 

He was given considerable spi 
ill the Baltimore dailies and while! 
Richmond arranged for a sped 
show for the orphans in that cit>i 



ivorked acr« 
in connect! 
une" in Baj 



Adler goes to Toledo from here 



'"riJay, January 2, 1920 




DAILY 




•L II N*. 1 Friday J «nuaVf2n920 Prict 5 Cents 

opyright 1919, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
BC Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
lew York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
ILM FOLKS, INC. 

C. C'Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 
rer; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 
nd Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 
usiness Manager. 

ntered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
t the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
le »ct of March 3, 1879. ^ . ^ 

em.s (Postage free) United States, Outside 
E Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 
anths, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
15.0&. 

Subscribers should remit with order 
ddr*ss all communications to WID'S 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 

York, N. Y. 
Telephone: Vanderbilt 4551-4552-5558 
' Hollywood, California 

ditorial and Business Offices: 6411 Holly- 
cod Bird. Phone. Hollywood 1603. 

Chicago representatives— Willis, Eckels 
nd Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 
hicago, 111. „ 



Quotations 

Bid Asked Last Sale 

amous Players .. 86/2 88^ 87^2 

•oldwyn — — 30^ 

oew's Inc 303^ 31 3^^ 303^ 

'riangle — — ,/4 

Init. Pict. Prod. 15 155/^ 15-H 

Vorld Film — — Vs 

llai>i»y ^'P"' Year 

ameron Gets Out Another Edition 
Jas. R. Cameron's second edition 
[ his Pocket Reference Book for 
rojectionists and Managers is just 
lit_aiid is being handled by the 
Heater^Cipply Co. of this city. It 
icl'ides all sorts of technical terms, 
iagrams, tables and discussions of 
itevest for those for whom it is 
[tended. 



Goldwyo-Stoll Again 

C. E. A. of England Gets Details of 
Controversy 

(Special to ]VIl>'S DAILY) 

London — The Cinematograph Ex- 
hibitors' Asso. of England received 
a full report of the controversy be- 
tween Goldwyn and Sir Oswald 
Stoll, who distributed Goldwyns in 
England, according to a report in 
the recent issue of the Kinemato- 
graph Weekly. 

The report was furnished by Jef- 
frey Bernard, attorney for the Stoll 
interests, who was recently in the 
United States. He told of several 
conversations he had with Mr. Gold- 
wyn regarding the renewal of the 
Stoll contract and how no settle- 
ment was reached owing to a cer- 
tain interpretation placed on a clause 
by Goldwyn and the insertion of an 
additional clause which the Stoll in- 
terests believed unfair. 

The reported producing venture of 
Goldwyn in England is also reported 
in Kinematograph but the general 
tone of the report might indicate 
that the C. E. A. looks upon the 
venture in an unfriendly attitude. 

Stoll's own producing plans are 
highly commended. 

Happy New Year 

Corbett Finishes Feature 

Rumor yesterday to the effect that 
IJames J. Corbett had stopped work 
in the middle of a serial at the Un- 
iversal western studio was denied 
at the ofifice by the statement "Cor- 
bett has just finished a feature and 
is not at present concerned in serial 
producton." 

Happy New Year 

"Oh Joy," Being Finished 
Ontario, Canada— Edna Hume and 
Albert E. H. Grupe are featured in 
"Oh Joy," the first of a series of 
one reel comedies now being finished 
in the Trenton Studios. Jean Horn- 
bostel directed. 



In the Courts 

A summons has been filed in the 
Supreme Court in a suit of Katsuze 
Kameo against Jules A. Brulatour. 
The nature of the suit is not shown 
in the papers. 



Samuel O. Siegel and Herbert H. 
Yudkin have filed suit in the Supreme 
Court against the J. Frank Hatch 
Enterprises for $25,000. The com- 
plaint alleges that they were engaged 
to render services ii connection with 
the films, "The Price Woman Pays," 
"Tempest and Sunshine," and 
"Forced to Wed," and were to get 
25 per cent, of the net receipts from 
the New York and New Jersey ter- 
ritory and 15 per cent, of the net 
receipts from the sale of all rights 
in the United States. 

Happy New Year 

Netter Buys "Blindness" 

Leon Netter of the Masterpiece 
Film Attractions, a Sol Lesser asso- 
ciate has purchased "The Blindness 
of Youth," for Ohio and Kentucky. 
The production is being handled by 
Foundation Film Corp. Murray 
Garsson, general manager. 

Happy New Year 

Exhibitors Visiting Montreal 
I (Special to WID'S DAILY) 

I Montreal, Can.— Several exhibitors 
lof other cities who have been in 
'town during the past fortnight are: 
jj. B. Robert of the Gaiety. Three 
1 Rivers: Joe Tardif of the Auditor- 
lium, Shawinigan Falls; Georgelsher- 
wood of the Isherwood, Temiskam- 
ing, Quebec; R. L. Vallee of the 
Wond'erland, Magog; H. Vance of 
the Laurier, Hull and Joe Ledden of 
the Victoria, Quebec. 

Happy New Year 

N. A M. p. I. Directors Meet To-day 

There will be a regular quarterly 

meeting of the National Association 

directors to-day. 



Hagerstown May Have Studio 

(Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Hagerstown, Md. — Capt. F. F 
Stoll, representing the United State; 
Photo Play Corp., and Dr. E. J. Mc 
Kenzie of Washington, D. C. wil 
be here shortly to consider the suit 
ability of this section for a motioi 
picture studio. 



LOUIS SHERWIN 

Continuity 

Screen Gutting and Titling 

Now Assistant 

to 

J. G. Hawks 

of 

Goldwyn 

Author of 

"BONDS OF LOVE' 

for 

Pauline Frederick 



Eight Years dramatic critic New 
York Globe, contributor Ameri- 
can, Metropolitan, Smart Set, 
Vanity Fair and other magazines. 



ALBERT E. SMITH 



Presents 



ALICE JOYCE 



in 



"SLAVES OF PRIDE " 

By William B. Courtney 
Directed by George Terwilliger 
Edited by Mr. and Mrs. George Randolph Chester 

January of the new year brings forth this Vitagraph special 
feature which the eleven months to follow will find hord to 
equal Radiant Alice Joyce at the pinnacle of her artistry, 
garbed in gowns of grandeur, a bewitching creature of shiftmg 
moods NEVER starred in a more powerful play than 
■ ' "SLAVES OF PRIDE" 



What Do You 
About That? 



Know 



F. A. A. Dahme 
the famous Title Artist 
of 220 West 42nd St. 
Bryant 6796 

Is Not Advertising 
Anymore. 



The exhibitor, as a citizen, 
may, or may not, favor 
the league of nations; — 
as an exhibitor, however, 
he is certainly in favor of 
RITCHEY posters. 

RITCHEY 

I.ITIIO. Ct>RP. 

406W.31>t St.N.Y., Phone ChelsM 8388 





DON T BE 
AN OSTRICH 



An ostrich hides away from true facts by putting his head under 
the sands— Think— Is your business in need of insurance— 
Don't hide away from facts-Get in touch with us immediately 
For your protection don't be an ostrich. 



REUBEN CXMUELS 



V- 



Jneurance 
Phone John 



ao Maiden Lane 




/ 




DAILY 



Friday, January 2. ]'j2{ 



Capital Has Phillips' Films 
Capital Film is hantlling "The Girl 
Suzanne." "Oh, Louise" and "The 
Midnight Girl," for New York State. 
These are Adolph Phillips Prod. 
Pennsylvania is being liandled 
through Capital Film of Philadelphia. 
Paul Phillips has secured world's 
rights on a lamp called the Excelsior 
Photo Lamp. The lamp is said to 
be in use at the Famous Players and 
caelznick studios. • 

Happy New Year 

Systematic Looting 

Hugo Riesenfcld has been robbed 
on the installment plan. Yesterday 
he checked up and found he was 
shy five suits of clothes — all he had 
except the one on his back — and two 
of the velour hats that have be- 
come his trade-mark on Broadway. 

Happy New Year 

Brice May Build Another 

Oklahoma City. Okla. — A new film 
house, costing $250,000 will be erected 
by H. C. Brice, proprietor of the 
Strand, which closed recently if a 
suitable site can be secured. Brice 
recently offered $9,996 per year for 
a 99 year lease on a plot of land. 

Happ.v New Year 

Elliott Managing Allen 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 
Winnipeg, Canada — Will M. Elli- 
ott is managing the Allen here, hav- 
ing resigned recently as manager of 
the Regent. Toronto. 

Happ.v New Y'ear 

Universal Releases 

Universal releases for the week of 
Jan. 5 include one special attraction, 
"The Day She Paid," with Francelia 
Billington; Universal serial, "The 
Inner Ring;" 5th of the Stage Wo- 
men's Reflief series with William 
Courtenay; A Lyons-Moran comedy, 
"Sweet Patootie" and several news 
reels. 

Happy New Y'ear 

Willard Mack has signed with 
Gibraltar Pictures to write scenarios 
for two years. Mack's first story 
will go into production early in 
1920. 



Rock Island to Have New House 

Rock Island, 111. — Brissman and 
Company of Moline have been 
awarded contracts to erect the Fort 
Armstrong for Rosenfeld, Hopp & 
Company at a cost of $400,000. 
Happ.v New Year 

New Jersey City Theater 

A new theater will be projected 
at Central Ave. and -Sherman Place, 
Jersey City, by the Standard The- 
ater Co. 

E. C. Home & Sons, Brokaw 
BIdg., are the architects. 

Ilapp>~ Nr« Y<'ar — — 

Chicago Briefs 
(Si>erial to WW'S DAILY) 
Chicago — Colvin Brown, advertis- 
ing manager of the Clark-Cornelius 
Corp. spent Christmas with his par- 
ents in Elgin, 111. and left for Calif- 
ornia Sunday afternoon. 



Winfield R. Sheehan, general man- 
ager of Fox Film was in Chicago 
last week. 

Happy New Y'ear 

Sennett Comedy at Grauman's 
{Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles — It is understood that 
"Down on the Farm," the latest fea- 
ture comedy from the Sennett stu- 
dios will play at Graunvm's the 
middle of next month. 

E. M. Asher, Sennctt's personal 
representative has delayed his trip 
east in order to arrange for the 
showing. He will leave for New 
York about the fifteenth. 



fT 



IT REQUIRES ORCANIZATION TO 
MANUFACTURE COODINCRAYirNS 

W[|IAYEBEEN(Nl(iANI7EDX898 

EpUIPPEDTODEUVERt^'BEITPOJIINE 
WORK IN THE LEASr«01SIBLE TINE 



THE STANDARD ENGmnC CO. 

PUOTO ENGRAVERS 

225 WEST 39™ STREET. NEW YORK 

AM90IC&N PDESS ASSOCIATION BLDO 



BESS MEREDYTH 



and 



WILFRED LUCAS 

Writing and Directing 

Australian Features 



Beauty Winner Starts Work 

Virginia Faire, winner of the Mo- 
I tion Picture Classic beauty contest 
i and now under a five-year contract 
; with Universal, will make her first 
j professional screen appearance in 
I support of Hoot Gibson in "Runnin' 
1 Straight." 
I Happy New Year 

Thomas Author Only 
Augustus Thomas did not prepare 
the scenario for "The Capitol," a 
Leah Baird production. The scen- 
ario was prepared by Mr. Walker 
bf the Hodkinson stafT and approved 
)y Mr. Thomas. 



Address 

Care Snowy Baker 

84 Oxford Street 

Sydney, N. S. W, Australia 

Cable Address 
"Snowing Sydney" 



FILMUSIC CUE SHEETS ARE GOOD FOR ALL THEA- 
TERS EVEN THOSE THAT USE ROLLS— AND LOTS OF 
THEM DO. 




riLRsnusic-co. 

. LOS ANGELES . 






1729 Highland Ave, . 


'",",.,-.> .Tr 






I 

] 

I 



Riesenfcld to Entertain Children . 

Hugo Riesenfcld will entertain ;4 
children at the Children's Thc.-i'-, 
on 63rd St. today. Each kiddie ^ 
receive a box of candy, a doll 
pair of stockings and a pair of ^1 i 




THE ACME 
PORTABLE 
PROJECTOR 

FOR— 

The Studio, The Cutting 
Room, The Editor, Home, 
School or Church. 

A demonstration Will Con- 
vince You. 

Howells Cine Equipment 

Company 

729 7th Ave. New York 

Phone, Bryant 1166 



TI/TLES, 

ILLUSTRATIONS 

andTITLE 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

Qy / 

LOUIS U^R 

220 V. /•'^ -"<:■' 



R0OM/'2004i 



BR.YA^T 7392 



riday, January 2, 1920 




DAILV 



_^ - Star in Two Reels 

.hicago, 111. — Alice Howell, for- 
erly with Universal will be 
,'rred in a series of two reel com- 
es, produced by the Emerald Film. 

Happy New Year 

Rothacker on Long Trip 

Chicago, III. — Watterson Roth- 

-"r, president of the Rothacker 

Co., will spend the first six 

of 1920 away from this city. 

"hat time he will visit Los 

, ^here he will start work on 

ew studio, New" York and Lon- 

■), in which cities he may build. 



All But Two Book "12:10" 

Repulilic reports that every the- 
ater but two on Broadway from the 
Capitol as far north as 110th St. 
has booked "12:10," the Marie Doro 
pro(hiction. 

Ilapp.v New Year 

Choynsky Building New House 

Chicago — Maurice Choynsky, pres- 
ident of the Allied Amusement Asso. 
will erect another large theater and 
business block on West Division St. 
The theater will seat 2,000 and will 
be known as the Biltmore. The 
building will cost $350,000. 





Start the New Year Right 



There are 30 Reasons 
why you should book 

*The 
Screaming 
Shadow" 

Watch for Reason No. 
1 Tomorrow. 

BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 




UNIVERSAL CITY 

Released through 



CAL. 




HALLMARK PICTURES 



130 W. 46th Street 



NEW YORK 




'Superlative-- 



That which is of the highest pos- 
sible excellence or eminence, or is 
superior tv^ all others of its kind." 
— The Standard Dictionary. 



The editors of this famous dictionary must have 
had Alice Joyce's new special production, 
aves of Pride," when they wrote the defini- 
tionljir ^PERLATIVRi? It's a picture of 
^"auty — a picture erf power. A great love story. 
\ great picture. 



\gt-e 

i 



Kealart Pictures have a special 
lobby Uisjilay for all their produc- 
tions now ready in their exchanges 
throughout the country for all 
their bookings. Look them over 
anil see liow tills enterprising con- 
cern will assist you in getting 
"them'' up to the box office. 
KBAUS MFG. Co. 
220 \V. 42nd St. 
17th Floor Tel. 3607 Bryant 



Book, the 

GIRLWtlOMADE 
THEWINKFAMOUS 




Producers and Direct- 
ors. Let us Kelp cast 
your next picture. We 
furnish Hieh-grade tal- 
ent, Tynes and better 
class of "extras." 

FILMCLAS CCiRP. 

Putnam Bailding 
Phooe: Bryaol 2187 

BILLY BOWMAN 
Casting Manager 



LEUMAS CARTOON SERVICE 

Producers of Animated 

Films forev'eiy purpose. 

17^. 45tk St. Tel.Bryaa:it - 6806 



NEGATIVE WANTED 

For 

America or World Rights. 

Address, Confidential, care 

Wid's. 



AR.T TITLES 

HAND LETTERING 



PHONE 2329 



JOHN J. LIVINGSTON 

Motion Picture Representative 

For 

STARS— DIRECTORS 

1440 Broadway New York 




New Black Theater for Portland 

{Special to WII>\S DAILY) 
Portland, Me. — Plans for the new- 
Alfred S. Black theater ^Qear Con- 
gress Sq. have been placc'S with the 
contractors for estimates. 



H. H. VAN LOAN 

Recent Releases 

Tom Mix in 

"The Speed Maniac" 

Earle Williams in 

"When a Man Loves" 

121 West Eulalia Street 

Glendale, California 

"If it is a Van Loan story it 

must be good" 

EDNA SCHLEY 

Representing the foremost 

Authors of America and 

England 

Markham Building 
Hollywood, Calif. 
Telephone 577941 

GEORGE ELWOOD JENKS 

Continuity and Specials 

"A Woman of Pleasure" 

Blanche Sweet Special 

"The Pagan God" 

starring H. B. Warner 

"Dangerous Waters" 

Original for Wm. Desmond 

JESSE D. HAMPTON 
Productions 

JACK CUNNINGHAM 

Associated with 

George Loane 

Tucker 

Productions 

Hollywood, Cal. 



Send Us Your 

Highes'tPri'ces JUHK T llHl 

INTERSTATE SMELTING 
<a REFINING COMPANY 

23 Commercial St. NEWARK. N J. 



7^BRADSTREET 
of ?IL^DOM 




7/^RECOCmZEC 

Authority 



J 



Vol. XI, No. 2 



Saturday, January 3, 1920 



Price 5 Ce- 

-i t 



Franchise Sold 

Jones, Linick & Schaefer Get $250,000 

from Balaban & Katz for First 

National Franchise 

l^Sfecial to WW'S DAILY) 

Chicago — Jones, Linick & Schaefer 
have disposed of their interest in 
the First National Exchange of Chi- 
cago, for a reputed sum of $250,000 
to Balaban & Katz, according to 
Ralph Kettering, general represen- 
tative for the former firm. 

In speaking for Mr. Jones and his 
partners, Mr. Kettering said: Seven 
years ago Jones, Linick & Schaefer 
organized the Central Film Co. to ex- 
ploit independent productions. This 
was at a time when the program- 
picture was at its prime. About 
three years ago, Jones, Linick & 
Schaefer sold one-half interest in the 
company to Ascher Brothers. When 
the First National Exhibitors Cir- 
cuit was formed, Aaron J. Jones and 
Nathan Ascher were the first to 
favor it. They secured the franchise 
for Illinois for their Central Film 
Co. and shortly afterward changed 
the name of it to the First National 
Exchange. 

"By the new arrangement Ascher 
retains his one-half interest and Bal- 
aban & Katz have purchased the 
one-half owned by Jones, Linick & 
Schaefer. Incidently, Aaron J. Jones 
has resigned as a director of the 
First National Exhibitors Circuit to 
take effect at once." 

This is one of the largest film deals 
ever executed in Chicago and it is 
the means of joining the vast Ascher 
Bros, circuit of theaters, with those 
directed by Balaban & Katz, thus 
cementing two of Chicago's largest 
exhibiting firms. 



Atkinson Reaches Hollywood 

W. E. Atkinson, Metro's general 
manager reached Hollywood yester- 
day. 

He will visit exchanges on the way 
east. 



Mitch Lewis Here 

Mitch Lewis was around the Astor 
shaking hands with everybody yes- 
terday. Lewis is in town for two 
weeks. He came east to take his 
mother to California with him. 



Rawlinson Through With Oliver 

Herbert RawHnson, despite reports 
to the contrary, has completed his 
contract with Oliver Films. His last 
work for Oliver was the series of 
Detective Flynn's stories, now being 
distributed through Republic. 




The little slum girl rewards the papa-in-law-to-be — Norma Talmadge's 
initial First National picture, "A Daughter of Two Worlds." 



Fight Over "12:10" 

Earl Carroll, claiming to be the 
author of "12:10" has filed suit in 
the Supreme Court for an injunction 
and accounting against the Republic 
Dist. Corp., Herbert Brenon, pro- 
ducer of the film, the British & Col- 
onial Kinematograph Co., Ltd., Ed- 
ward Godal, American agent of the 
British company, and the manage- 
ment of the Capitol Theater where 
the film was shown. 

Carroll alleges that prior to Feb. 
{Continued on Page 2) 



8 Per Gent Accurate 

Estimate Which J. D. Williams Ac- 
cepts as Correct for Broadway 
Ideas of Film Conditions 

J. D. Williams of First National 
has put a chip on his hefty young 
shoulder. Just back from a long 
trip through the country he says 
that New York film circles are just 
about eight per cent accurate; in 
their gauge of country-wide condi- 
tions in the film inCustry. 

[Continued from Page 2) 



Kohn Heads Realart 

Morris Kohn, who has been treas- 
urer of Realart since its inception 
has been elevated to the presidency 
of the corporation. Kohn has been 
acting as president since Arthur S. 
Kane stepped out a short time ago. 

"Tl'^'-e will be no change in the 
gener; policies of Realart" said Mr. 
Kohn yesterday. As I have stated 
several times lately our determina- 
tion is to make pictures of unusual 
excellence from successful book or 
play titles. The releases already 
made offer a fair indication of the 
sort of pictures I have in mind." 



Hall Buys New Serial 
Frank G. Hall has purchased for 
Hallmark release American and 
Canadian rights to "Wits vs. Wits 
the serial starring Marguerite 
Marsh produced by Grossman Pic- 
tures, Inc. at Ithaca. 



"The Copperhead" Jan. 25 

Famous Players will release "The 
Copperhead" with Lionel Barrymore 
on Jan. 25. It goes out as a special. 



Morosco to Produce 

Forming Units to Picturize H 
Plays — Famous Players Deal ' 
Not Affected 

Oliver Morosco is to return 
the picture producing field. Th 
report, which gained currency ; 
a rumor the other day, is a fji 
though no official announcement,' 
yet forthcoming from the MoroSi 
office. 

Mr. Morosco, it is said, has groi 
somewhat envious of the picti. 
producers who have been and «■ 
are at present, reaping profits frl' 
the picturizations of his plays ai 
sees no reason why this reven) 
should not come to him. i 

Morosco is at work forming p^) 
ducing units and, it is further s: 
distribution arrangements have 
ready been made. i 

The contract which Morosco h' 
with Famous Players-Lasky to su| 
mit to them copies of all his pla 
for consideration, will not interfp 
with his independent producing V6 
ture, it is understood. Rumor h 
it that he is somewhat amazed 
the decisions handed down by 
Famous Plaj^ers production depa 
ment on some of his plays, as si 
eral avowed stage successes h; 
been refused by them. 



Juanita Hansen in Town ' /' 
Juanita Hansen has arriv? 

New York. She is stopping 

Claridge. 

Miss Hansen is under contr 

with Pathe to appear in seri 

Production will be in the east, q' 



i 
"A 



Loew and Metro 



- 01 

w- 

■Di 

' a 

Marcus Loew within a / t 
days, so he said yesterday,/ ol, 
have something to say re{ 
ing the purchase of Met 
Pictures Corp. by the Loew, 
terests. 

It has been known tor soi'.; 
time that Marcus Loew vas 
interested in securing control' 
of Metro, but yesterday, after 
a vaudeville paper published a 
report that Loew might piv- 
chase Metro because of a row 
between Treasurer Joe Engel 
and Maxwell Karger, director 
of productions, Richard A. 
Rowland, president of Metro, 
stated that he had nothing to 
say at this time regarding the' 
Loew report. | 



/ 



r.turday, January 3. 1920 



* 



T^ A 



DAILY 




1IIR*.2 SalnrdaTJanaairS. 1920 Fria 5 CnU 

pyright 1919, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
c. Publiihed Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
ew York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
ILM FOLKS, INC. 

'("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 
r; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 
. Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 
siness Manager. 

tered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
« act of March 3, 1879. 

wins (Postage free) United States, Outside 
Greater New York, $1(X00 one year; 6 
tnths, $5.00; 3 montha, $3.00. Foreign, 
$.00. 

Subscribers should remit with order 
ddress all communications to WID'S 
DAILY. 71-73 West 44th St., New 

York, N. Y. 
Telephone: Vanderbilt 4551-4S52-S558 
Hollywood, California 
jitorial and Business Offices: 6411 HoUy- 
Ud Bird. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 
Chicago representatives— Willis, Eckels 
d Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 
icago, 111. 

Quotations 

Bid Asked Last Sale 

amous Players .. 88^4 92 92 

oldwyn — — 30f4 

oew, Inc 30^ 31 J^ 30-34 

riangle Film H H H 

nited Pict. Prod. ISK 15^ 15^ 

/odd Film — — % 



Franklin Specials for "U" 

Carl Laemmle has just signed a 
)ng term contract with Harry 
'rankiin, director, to supervise a 
ries of special productions. Frank- 
I's latest direction was in "Rouge 
d Riches" in which Mary Mac- 
*ren stars. 



WID'S 

"EAR BOOK 

1919-1920 

, NOW READY 

— A mine of Authentic 
Information for the 
Exhibitor. 

— Of Inestimable Value 
' to the Casting Direc- 

tor, Executive or 
Producer. 

' — Nearly 400 Pages of 
Live, Virile Matter 
of the Motion Picture 
Industry. 

PRICE. $1.00 



Prepaid 
Anywhere in U. 



S. A. 



8 Per Gent Accurate 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Relative to which, says J. D. after 
putting the chip in position: 

"And that eight per cent, of ac- 
curacy in New York born opinions 
that are supposed to be statements 
applying to the entire United States 
is no less because New York City, 
as a film territory, represents about 
eight per cent, of the gross revenue 
on the average release. 

"Moreover, no picture executive 
has either the right or the ability 
to assume the responsibility for di- 
recting the national destinies of a 
film concern unless he considers it 
a very important part of his success 
to visit the various territories at 
least once a year, and acts accord- 
ingly. A theater tour at least once 
every six months by film executives 
would be nearer to a practical dis- 
charge of executive duties. 

"Film conditions, according to the 
Broadway ideas, may be accepted, 
as an average, as being eight per 
cent, correct. Before Mr. Schwalbe, 
Mr. Gordon and I left New York 
we had heard countless opinions 
about what exhibitors were doing, 
what they intended to do, what 
trend the business would take in the 
year to come, what the big develop- 
ment the next twelvemonth would 
be, and, of equal volume in discus- 
sion, but of great inaccuracy and 
greater importance, the actual con- 
ditions now existant in all territor- 
ies, and which have a very material 
bearing on the immediate future. 

"The actual fact is that the ex- 
hibitors out in the territories read 
very little, and care less, about the 
changes in the administrative per- 
sonnels of the various film concerns, 
about the rumors that the president 
or general director of this company 
or that has resigned, or is about to 
resign, that a certain production was 
given a private showing atop the 
Grand Central train sheds to a se- 
lected audience copied from the Con- 
gressional Blue Book, that a direc- 
tor favorite in the Clarastor grill 
has taken a company to Jersey City 
or any other Southern point for ex- 
teriors, or that a film executive just 
imported from some other industry 
announces his candidacy for exhib- 
itor favor with an expose of his 
views of the motion picture business. 

"In personal talks with many keen, 
capable exhibitors there was not an 
instance when one ()f them requested 
any verification or denial of the 
choicest bits of gossip current in 
New York film circles. They did 
not appear at all interested in the 
personalities of the executive side of 
the producing and distributing 
branches. But they did ask innum- 
erable questions about matters that 
are directly pertinent to their own 
immediate affairs. 

"Everywhere there was voiced a 
genuine interest in the new Capitol 
Theater here. They wanted to know 
all about its appointments, what 
new architectural features it had, 
how its floor plan had been ar- 
ranged; the decorations in the lob- 
by and foyers; the type and kind of 
projection equipment, and the ar- 
rangement of the programs which 
Mr. Bowes creates. The reason for 



this interest was that the Capitol, 
as an unprecedented example of the- 
ater construction, offered sugges- 
tions and ideas for exhibitor use in 
improving their own properties. 
And there was a great deal of pride 
in being able to recommend many 
of its unique features. 

"Exhibitors did not ask for re- 
ports on the progress that produc- 
ing companies were making on trips 
heralded by much trade paper space, 
but they did manifest a sincere in- 
terest in the exploitation that has 
been given by the big first run 
houses to productions already re- 
leased. They want ideas on show- 
manship, on advertising, on novel, 
but practical, publicity stunts that 
will help them to attract more pat- 
ronage to their houses. They want 
to know what other exhibitors are 
doing to win the elusive 'occasion- 
als' among theater patrons. 

"The New York viewpoint on the 
industry as a whole is at least nine- 
ty-two per cent, short of being com- 
prehensive on the majority of sub- 
jects its elects to envision. Here 
we have a purely local condition of 
affairs, sponsored largely by devel- 
opments in the New York City ex- 
change and executive offices. This 
is constantly being stretched to un- 
supported national proportions, be- 
cause a certain number of the indi- 
viduals here operate on national 
lines. And being in daily touch 
with the strictly local affairs of 
Manhattan, they more often than 
not translate them into terms of 
nation-wide conditions." 



New Publicity Service Starts 
(Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Chicago — Ben Garetson and Paul 
Gerard Smith, two well known pub- 
licity men here, have joined forces 
and formed an advertising organiza- 
tion for the handling of advertising, 
publicity and exploitation for pro- 
ducers, exhibitors and exchanges. 
The firm will be known as Garetson- 
Smith, with offices at 39 W. Adams 
St.. 

Garetson has been general press 
representative for Jones, Linick and 
Schaefer while Smith has been with 
Select here. 



Diamond Buckle for Kirkpatrick 

The 26 branch managers, the field 
manager and the three supervisors 
of the Robertson-Cole Distributing 
Corp. tendered A. S. Kirkpatrick, 
vice-president and general manager, 
a platinum belt buckle studded with 
30 diamonds. The tribute was in the 
form of a Christmas gift. 

The front of the buckle is platinum 
and inlaid is a map of the United 
States. The back is of gold. 

The exchange centers are repre- 
sented on the platinum map with 
a large diamond. The four corners 
arc decorated with larger diamonds. 



R. C. First 1920 from Brentwood 

The first Robertson-Cole produc- 
tion for release during the new year 
will be "The Third Generation" from 
the Brentwood studios. It will go 
out as a "Superior" brand picture. 



Fight Over "12:10" 

(Continued from Page 1) 
7 last, before Herbert Brenon sailed 
for England he delivered the scen- 
ario of the film at the request of 
Mr. Brenon who told him he had 
seen Marie Doro about it and she 
had read it and agreed to appear in 
it. Carroll said that before a con- 
tract was made protecting his rights 
in the scenario, Brenon went to Eng- 
land and he has just learned from 
Mr. Godal that the British & Col- 
onial Films claims to have obtained 
the right to exhibit the film from 
Brenon. 

Answers filed in the case by Godal 
and the company he represents al- 
lege that the corporation bought the 
rights to the film from Brenon last 
March after he had represented that 
he had bought the rights from Car- 
roll. The defendant produced the 
picture with Marie Doro in the lead- 
ing role and on Nov. 19 last, the 
corporation sold the American rights 
to Milton C. Work as manager of 
the Special Picture Syndicate which 
in turn disposed of them to Republic. 

The answer alleges that the Re- 
public is only one member of the 
syndicate, having contributed $15,000, 
the others being F. A. Bachman & 
Co., $15,000, George A. Huhn, Jr., 
$5,000, and W. L. Neffert, $5,000. 
The defendants alleged that they 
acted in good faith and that the 
plaintiff waited too long to assert his 
right to the film. 



Triangle to Release Old Sennetts 

Triangle will release four of the 
Mack Sennett-Keystone comedies in 
January. These are as follows: "A 
Lunch Room Romance," Jan. 4; 
"Only a Farmer's Daughter," Jan. 
11; "Mabel's Speed Cop," Jan. 18; 
and "She Loved a Nut," Jan. 25. 
Included among those who appear in 
these subjects are Mabel Normand, 
Syd Chaplin, Chester Conklin, Mack 
Swain, Roscoe Arbuckle, Ford Sterl- 
ing and the old Sennett bathing 
beauties. 



"All the world loves ,3 
lover." — Especially as he 
is depicted in that charact- 
er on RITCHEY posters! 

RITCHEY 

LITHO. CORP. 

406W.3Ist St..N.Y., Phone Chebe. 8388 




^'^ 



I 



DAIUV 



Saturday, January 3, 19 



PatlieNews 

No .1 

L.SEN, BOHEMIA.— in honor of the 
Allies. The entire city turns out to at- 
tend the Interallied Fete held in the 
huge open-air theater. 

IN THE NORTHWEST.— VVealth of 
sport in Snowland's realms — winter ac- 
tivities are aplenty this year owing to 
the early arrival of cold spell. Slii ex- 
perts show wliat they can do. 

A REVIEW OF EVENTS IN 1919.— 
The year ,iust passed was fuU of events 
of great importance, and it Is interesting 
to recall the most significant ones. 

.\viation. 

Peace. 

Sport. 

Distinguished Foreign Visitors. 

"At Home." 

CHICOPEE FALLS, M.ASS.— Sale of 
wood alcohol which Itilled sixty people 
here being traced by police — the fatal 
barrel that took so many lives. Exclu- 
sive Pictures. 

NEWBUROH, N. Y. — »<ly on steel! Ice 
experts of the East compete for speed 
championship of Outdoor Amateur Speed 
Sliating Contest. 

Charles .lewtraw, winner of the quarter 
and half-mile races. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. — Mummers out- 
dazzle brilliancy of past years — fantastic, 
gorgeous, and humorous costumes vie in 
"pep" and originality at pageant of 10,000 



mummers. 

tod 



§^ 



Sees Theater Need 

Graham of Famous Players Says 

France and England Each Need 

1,000 Modern Houses 

John Cecil Graham, managing di- 
rector of the three EngHsh corpora- 
tions known as Famous Players 
Film Co., Ltd., Famous-Lasky Film 
Service, Ltd. and the Famous Play- 
ers-Lasky British Producers, Ltd. is 
now in New York. He sees an ur- 
gent need for 1,000 high grade thea- 
ters in England and as many more 
in France. 

"The English people have realized 
the importance and the possibilities 
of the motion picture as never be- 
fore," said Graham. 

"There is an urgent need in Great 
Britain today of at least 1,000 new 
high grade motion picture houses, as 
theater building was halted at the 
beginning of the war. 

"The building of new theaters is 
proceeding at a very satisfactory 
rate, notwithstanding the difficulty 
of obtaining materials and the dis- 
cussions as to housing classifica- 
tions. 

"I believe that the construction of 
at least 1,000 new theaters will solve 
to a great extent the problem of 
advanced booking now under dis- 
cussion in English film circles. 

"The industry in France is making 
rapid recovery from the effects of 
the war. France also needs at least 
1,000 new high grade theaters and 
the coming year will undoubtedly 
witness a great increase in theater 
building." 



Incorporations 

(Special to WW'S DAILY) 
Albany, N. Y. — The Cinema Corp. 
of the State of Delaware has been 
authorized to engage in all bia.p-'hes 
of the motion picture business in 
New York State. The corporation 
will be represented by W. H. Seeley, 
50 E. 42nd St., New York City. 

The Stereospeed Production 
another Delaware State concern was 
granted a charter to conduct busi- 
ness in this state. The company 
has a capital of $100,000 and will en- 
gage in the motion picture and the- 
atrical business. Garrett A. Storms, 
Walter L. Johnson and Earl H. 
Hopkins of 398 Fifth Ave., New 
York City are the principal stock- 
holders. Johnson is designated to 
represent the corporation. 

The Symphony Theater Co. of 
Binghamton, N. Y. and the Gates 
Theater Corp. of New York have 
filed notices of dissolution. 



Albany, N. Y. — The Stevens Phon- 
ograph Corp., Manhattan has been 
granted a charter to operate motion 
picture theaters. The concern will 
also manufacture phonographs. Cap- 
ital. $1,000,000. Stockholders: Clif- 
ford E. Stevens, Rose Stevens and 
Bela St. Georges, 46 Houston St., 
New York City. 



Albany, N. Y. — The Municipal 
Studios. Inc., Manhattan. Capital, 
$250,000. Directors: E. London, 
M. Elkin and C. Schwartz, 1451 
Broadway, New York City. 



Albany, N. Y. — Hyperion Prod., 
Manhattan. Capital, $25,000. Di- 
rectors: George H. Wiley, David 
W. Russell and Walter Richard 
Hall, 220 West 42nd St., New York 
City. 



Salem, Ore. — Joseph Reese, Jean 
Miller, O. C. Kottka, and R. E. Mil- 
ler have incorporated the Highway 
Film Co., capitalized at $5,000. 



Gregory of Copenhagen Here 

A. G. Gregory, general manager of 
the Scandinavian Film Agency, Ltd. 
of Copenhagen has arrived in New 
York. Gregory is making his head- 
quarters at the office of Chester Bee- 
croft. 

Scandinavian Film Agency, Ltd., 
owns the European rights with the 
exception of England, for nearly 
all of Robertson-Cole productions, 
some of the Hodkinson productions, 
Billie West and Billy Parsons Com- 
edies and others. 

Gregory is here to close his 1920 
contracts with producers. He pro- 
poses returning to Copenhagen about 
the middle of January. 



Coast Brevities 

{Special to IVID'S DAILY) 

Hollywood — Edgar Lewis has al- 
ready shot 10,000 feet of negative 
on "Sherry," his first production for 
Pathe. Pat O'Malley plays the Ir- 
ishman in the story. 



Harry Van Meter is in the cast 
of "Judah," supporting May Allison. 



C. S. Vidor has been appointed 
general manager of King Vidor Prod. 



Clyde Fillmore has signed a four 
years' contract with Famous Play- 
ers. 



Viola Vale is Bert Lytell's leading 
woman for "Alias Jimmy Valentine." 

Milton Sills will be Viola Dana's 
leading man in "Eliza Comes to 

Stay." 



Harold Goodwin who recently ap- 
peared in Mary Pickford's "Heart 
o' the Hills," has been engaged by 
King Vidor to play a prominent part 
in his forthcoming First National 
release. 



Cara Lee who for the past two 
weeks has been playing with Nazi- 
mova's "The Heart of a Child" is 
taking a vacation in San Francisco. 
She will assume her engagement 
upon her return to Hollywood. 



Vitagraph has completed prepara- 
tions for its special production of 
"The Great Divide," the drama by 
William Vaughn Moody in which 
Margaret Anglin and Henry Miller 
appeared as co-stars nearly 15 years 
ago. 



June Mathis is back at the Metro 
studio from Broadway. On her way 
back she had a conference with Vi- 
cente Blasco Ibanez in Chicago re- 
garding "The Four Horsemen of the 
Apocalypse," which she will pictur- 
izc for Metro. 



During the past year H. H. Van 
Loan has sold IS stories, among 
them "When a Man Loves" and "The 
Highest Card," for Earle Williams; 
"Three Gold Coins," and "The Red 
Terror," for Tom Mix, and "The 
G;-eat Redeemer," which Maurice 
Tuurneur is to produce as a special 
feature. Van Loan is preparing four 
D.dditional stories for Mix. 

GAUSMAN 



Alice Calhoun, now appearing in 
"Deadline at Eleven," starring Cor- 
iiine Griffith, has been engaged by 
Vitagraph as a member of that or- 
ganization's stock company, at the 
Brooklvn studio. 



H. TIPTON STECK 



W ishes his friends a Happy and P rosperous New Year and calls atten- 
tion to his latest screen adaptations: 

"The Forbidden Woman" "The Yellow Typhoon" 

Starring 
Clara Kimball Young 



Starring 
Anita Stewart 



Three Supreme Comedies Read 
Robertson-Cole has three Supr« 
comedies ready for release: "Ij 
lie's Millions," "A Four Cylin 
Frame-Up" and "Mollie's Mumj 
They feature Mollie Malone. 



Callahan Recovers 

Dallas — Dias Callahan, local Ri 
art manager is rapidly recover 
from his recent throat operatic 



Black May Build in Taunto'* 

{Special to IFID'S DAILY) ~ 

Taunton, Mass. — If a site is 
tainable, Black and Spitz, comp.- 
of Alfred S. Black, the Main f. 
ter man and Abe Spitz of Provid 
will build a $500,000 theater I 
It is planned to erect the the 
on Main St. c 
1 

Hyman to Open Office Here' 

{Special to If ID'S DAILY) ' 

Detroit — Arthur S. Hyman 
sent his special representative, T.j 
Braun to New York to open an , 
fice for the Arthur S. Hyman Attr 
tions. 




NEGATIVE WANTED o' 

For c.i 

America or World Rights ^ 

Address, Confidential, cart 3 

Wid's. t 

ol 




Send Us Your 

AnyQuanUi, Jyj^J^ Pi|jp, 



Highest Prices 

INTERSTATE SMEI 

®. REFINING COf 

23 Commercial St. NE^ 



, E 



day, January 3, 1920 



jMi 



DAILV 



s 

t 
t 

c 
wo 



u 



INOGRAMS 

•^e VISUAL News gf 

ALL THE WORLD 
■ELD GREAT SHIP CASTING IN 
)KS — Censors release pictures of re- 
liable feat performea in repairing the 
isport Northern raclflc. 
iVElilSH WABSHir VISITS AMEB- 
— For first time in twelve years ves- 
f nm navy of Scanclnavian country 
",» anchor in Hudson river. 
IITAV CAVALRY ON BORDER— 
' I riding fighters under Col. Lang- 
,Ii gallop to music of mounted band 
t Bliss, Texas. 

)X SHIBCSAWA HOLDS BECEP- 
-They call him the J. P. Morgan 
an. Famous as orient's foremost 
r ster poses at Tokyo. 
h LAIMING SWAMP FOB FABM- 
J'e iND — Big dredgins project is free- 
■million acres of fertile soil from 
waters near Choupique, La. 
TO FIX MINE WAGES— Commis- 
appointed by President AVilson 
^ in Washington to settle disputes 
I existed when coal strike was called 

i THE WILDS OF A, &KEAT CITY— 
lera hunter in San Francisco goes out 
r big game and finds a lot of it. 
;"E BO.ATS IN FIRST RACE- "Daisy" 
s easily when speedy craft starts over 
;wsbury river course at Bed Bank, 
r. 

liXICO'S CAMEBA — I'gnacio Bonillas, 
>asBador to the United States is said 
I 'C slated for Carranza's place. 
^ LOT OF WAY'S TO FILM A 
cNCHING — They pushed six ships in- 
ihe water one busy arternoon in Oak- 
'1, Cal. and our camera man did the 
t he could. 

DISTRIBUTED BY 
EPUBLIC DISTRIBUTING 
/ CORPORATION 

Present Album to Eastman 

Vt the quarterly meeting of the 
ectors of the Nat'l Ass'n yes- 
day, the directors were shown a 
fl album in which the resolution 
iiig George Eastman life mem- 
ship in the Association was con- 
led. 

'^illiam A. Brady and Jules Brul- 
ur will leave for Rochester to- 
to personally present the al- 
,1 to Mr.Eastman. 



Putting It Over 



Licenses Up 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 
cago — The city council in order 
ike up part of the $7,000,000 
n revenue through the closing 
oons, has increased the license 
) be paid by motion picture 
;rs. 

new rates, which are now 
^ nive operation, are as follows: 

f'ers charging not over 30 cents 
pay between $200 and $800 a 
r based on the seating capacity, 
ween 250 and 2,500 seats. Thea- 
i charging not over 49 cents will 
,> between $250 and $850. Houses 
arging $1 will be assessed $300 to 
50 depending on seating capacity. 
This raised the theaters from the 
to 18 cent class to 23 to 49 cent 
.ss, and is done the city fathers 
plain as a protection against fur- 
• increases in admission prices, 
.♦heaters which raise their 
^"■y migrate into the higher 
^t will act as a deterrent 
"^ against increased prices. 



Here is hoiu a brother exhib- 
itor put his shoiu over. Send 
along your ideas. Let the other 
fellow know hoiu you cleaned 
up. 



Hartford, Conn. — The Post is 
launching a contest, for the best es- 
say telling how a girl may earn $10,- 
000 in three months, the same being 
what Elsie Janis does in "A Regular 
Girl," which opens at the Strand on 
Jan. 5. Prizes are as follows: first, 
$50; second, $25. Girls between the 
ages of 15 and 21 years are eligible. 
Walter Griffith worked out the idea. 



Milwaukee, Wis. — More than a 
month before "Stronger Than 
Death," starring Nazimova was 
slated to open at the Merrill here. 
Manager E. C. Bostwick had lights 
bearing her name in large letters, in 
the lobby. In the daytime, the white 
letters against the dark plush back- 
ground were visible enough, and at 
night, it was lit up. In addition, a 
painting of one of the scenes, show- 
ing Nazimova feeding a peacock was 
placed in an advantageous pos'ition. 



Omaha, Neb. — Black cats rank with 
number thirteen, and other omens. 
The management of the Moon of- 
fered free admission to the first hun- 
dred youngsters who would present 
black cats, the emblem of the Mabel 
Normand picture, "Jinx," at the box 
office, free admission. The stunt 
was advertised in the local news- 
papers and on slides in the theater, 
and helped buldge the receipts. 



Blytheville, Ark. — Jimmie Boyd, 
manager of the Gem, has inaugurated 
a new system for securing patronage. 
He has a euphonium mounted on an 
a.'to and tours the countryside, 
serenading the people with tuneful 
melodies, after which he announces 
the features which are to be pre- 
sented at his house that week. The 
concerts are now expected and as 
music hath the power to sooth the 
savage breast, so does it seem to 
sooth the doubting mind, and the 
folks visit Boyd's house in turn. 



Grand Rapids, Mich. — A similarity 
contest, was a new exploitation 
scheme tried by the manager of the 
Majestic Gardens to put "The Thun- 
derbolt" over. A prize of $25 was 
offered to the girl who resembled 
the star most, ^nd there were second 
and third prizes of $15 and $10 re- 
spectively. Carl M. Saunders, photo- 
play editor of the Herald gave a 
good deal of publicity to the con- 
test, which incidentally was run by 
that newspaper, and a great deal of 
interest was aroused. 



Ohio Theater Chain Planned 
Columbus, O.^ — It is reported that 
James A. Maddox, manager of the 
Majestic, and I. Frankel of Cincin- 
nati, arc about to project a theater 
chain in Ohio. The report has it 
that two theaters will be built here, 
two in Cleveland and one in each of 
the following cfties: Akron, Canton 
and Lima. 



"Griff" Modest as Ever 

Talks of Adventure Off Florida 

Coast — Working On Last of 1st 

Nat'l Releases 

David W. Griffith was as modest 
ax ever yesterday in speaking of his 
adventure off the Florida coast. The 
producer arrived in New York on 
New Year's Day with Richard Bar- 
thelmess and Frank Lloyd, his per- 
sonal representative after hydroplan- 
ing from Nassau in the Bahamas to 
Miami where train connections were 
made for New York. 

Mr. Griffith explained that he did 
not fear another storm and that his 
reason for traveling through the air 
was in order to save time and reach 
God's country as soon as possible. 
No one in the party, said Griffith, 
quite realized the danger of the sit- 
uation at the time. He wishes to 
express his thanks through WID'S 
DAILY for the countless inquiries 
made as to his welfare and stated 
that he did not even begin to realize 
how important he was until the anx- 
ious queries of innumerable per- 
sons convinced him that his import- 
ance must be an actual fact. 

While in Florida, Mr. Griffith 
shot scenes for his remaining two 
First National productions. After 
their completion he will at once 
start work on his first picture for 
United Artists. This, he thinks 
will be in the late Spring. The first 
United Artists release is expected to 
be "Romance," with Doris Keane. 

Incidentally, Mr. Griffith intends 
remaining in the east for an indefin- 
ite period. It is learned that addi- 
tional land has been secured at Mam- 
aroncck and that increases will be 
made at the present Griffith studio. 



Special Showing for Sub Film 
C. B. Price, Inc. will hold a spe- 
cial showing of "The Log of the 
U-35," the official German war film 
in Miles projection room, Monday 
afternoon at 2:30. 



Next American Release Ready 

{Special to WID'S DAILY) 
Chicago, 111.— "The Valley of To- 
Morrow," from the pen of Stephen 
Fox, directed by Emmett J. Flynn 
with William Russell in the leading 
role, is the next American release. 



"The Web of Deceit," the first 
Pathe will be released Jan. 18. 



CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG 
Once more demonstrates her magnifi- 
cent art in 

"THE EYES OF YOUTH" 
We have made for this production a 
very artistic lobby display together 
with reproductions in fac-simile oil 
paintings from her latest poses in 
various sizes. 

KRAUS MFG. CO. 

220 West 42d Street 
17th Floor TeL 3607 Bryant 



Boofcthe 



THEiNKiiOUS 



JOHN J. LIVINGSTON 

Motion Picture Representative 

For 

STARS— DIRECTORS 

1440 Broadway New York 




Reason No. 1 




When I made 




^The Trail 

of the 

Octopus^' 

I did not state that It was 

the best serial ever made. 

MR. EXHIBITOR: 

Said that after he had ran 

the serial. 

Watch for Reason No 2 — 



Tomorrow. 




BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 

UNIVERSAL CITY CAL. 

Released through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 



130 W. 46th Street 



NEW YORK 




7^BltADSTREET 
of FILHDOM 




7^RECOCHlZED 

Authority 



VOL. XI. NO. 3 



Sunday. January 4, 1920 



Price 25 Cents 



-ADOLPH ZUKIOR jore^eTiis' 



BILLIE BURKE 

(Qy ARRANGE M E /^r \A/ITH FLOR.Et±ZZJ_ECFEJ-D^jRX:...u^.M. * ^^ 




PRESENTED BY 

MAYFLOWEFL 

PHOTOPLAY CORPORATION 



of the YE 




Overshadowin 



All the world loves a good mystery yarn and 
all the town will pay to see this EMILE 
GHAUTARD masterpiece, which has a love 
tangle that actually fascinates folks so that 
they come back to see it done over. 
Beautiful Ethel Grey Terry is the woman in 
the case, and George Cowl, Edmund Elton 
and Lorin Raker are the men. One of them 
may be an audacious and clever criminal, but 
it's this very question that keeps whole audi- 
ences on edge, racking their brains for the 
answer — until the last fifty feet of film shoot 
across your screen. 

REALART PICTURES CORPORATION 



469 Fifth Avenue 



New York City 



^BRADSTREETj 
o^FILHDOH 



[ZMImr ^M^ 7/^pecocnized 

lUtf ^^^ AUTHORITY 



Vol. XI. No. 3 Sunday, January 4, 1920 Price 25c. 



Copyright 1919, Wld's Film and Film Folks, Inc. 

Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., New York, N. Y., by 

WIDS FILMS AND FILM FOLKS, INC. 
F. C. ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treasurer; Joseph Dannen- 
berg, Vice-President and Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and Business 
Manager. 

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, at the post office 

at New York, N. Y., under the Act of March 3, 1S79. 
Terms (Postage free) United States, Outside of Greater New 
York, $10.00 one year; 6 months, $5.00; S months, $3.00. 

Foreign, $16.00. 

Subscribers should remit with order. 

Address all communications to 

"WID'S DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, N. Y. 

Telephone: Vanderbllt 4551-2 

Hollywood, California: Editorial and Business Offices: 6411 Hollywood 
Boulevard. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 

Chicago representatives: Willis, Eckels and Mack, 6tii Floor, Consumers 
Building, Chicago, 111. 



Features Reviewed 

Douglas Fairbanks in 

WHEN THE CLOUDS ROLL BY 
United Artists Page 3 

D. W. Griffith's THE GREATEST QUESTION 

First National Page 5 

Charles Ray in RED HOT DOLLARS 

Paramount-Artcraft Page 7 

Hobart Bosworth in BEHIND THE DOOR 

Paramount-Artcraft Special Page 11 

William Russell in . . . .THE LINCOLN HIGHWAY 
Fox Page 13 

Dolores CassinelU in THE WEB OF DECEIT 

Edwin Carewe Prod. — Pathe Page 15 

Mary MacLaren in ROUGE AND RICHES 

Universal Page 19 

Benjamin B. Hampton presents 

THE SAGEBRUSHER 
W. W. Hodkinson— Pathe Page 21 

Frank Keenan in BROTHERS DIVIDED 

Pathe Page 23 

William Farnum in HEART STRINGS 

Fox Page 25 

THE GREAT AIR ROBBERY 

Universal Page 27 

SHORT STUFF Page 30 



News of the Week 
in Headlines 

Monday 

Weekly financial review sees Wall St. interest edging 

towards picture industry. 
Realart secures distribution of R. A. Walsh specials 

to be produced by Mayflower. 
Bill in Congress will make carrying of stolen films 

across state borders a Federal offense. 
Adolph Zukor issues statement regarding theaters. 

Tuesday 

Cleveland concern offers stock at $1.00 a share; with- 
draw Maxwell Kargers name after announcing him 
as second vice-president. 

S.-L. productions to release through Metro. 

Seventeen franchises issued by Associated Exhibi- 
tors, Inc. 

Wednesday 

Dwight Macdonald planning to build an "eastern Hol- 
lywood" on Long Island. 

Censorship fight threatened in Virginia. 

Alfred S. Black affiliates with Abe Spitz of Providence. 

Enwood Feature Picture Co. to supply six produc- 
tions a year for Republic release. 

Jackson Film Studios Corp. building studio on West- 
chester Ave. 

Friday 

Harry A. Sherman sues Henry Lehrman for account- 
ing. 

C. B. Price secures American distribution of "The 
Log of the U-35." 

Mary Marsh Allen, prominent English actress, in 
New York. 

Hoover film, "Starvation," to play at Manhattan 
Opera House. 

Saturday 

Marcus Loew may take over control of Metro. 

Chicago First National franchise switched from Jones, 
Linick and Schaefer to Balban and Katz. 

Morris Kohn president of Realart succeeding Arthur 
S. Kane. 

Oliver Morosco to ented producing field. Has six units 
in formation. 

John C. Graham of London sees need for many the- 
aters in France and England. 



'Pardoning the bad is injuring the good" — Benjamin Franklin, 



Sunday, January 4, 1920 



jM^. 



DAIUV^ 



Great, Best This Star Has Turned Out in a Long While 



Douglas Fairbanks in 

"WHEN THE CLOUDS ROLL BY" 

United Artists 

DIRECTOR Victor Fleming 

AUTHORS Douglas Fairbanks, Torn Geraghty 

and Lewis Weadon. 

SCENARIO BY Fairbanks, Geraghty and 

Weadon. 

CAMERAMEN Harry Thorpe and William 

McCann. 

AS A WHOLE Best this star has turned out 

in long while. 

STORY Good plot holds all the stunts, romance 

and spectacular stuff together excellently. 

DIRECTION Generally showed imagination 

and presented star's stunts to best advantage 

PHOTOGRAPHY Fine 

LIGHTING Realistic 

CAMERA WORK Always good; dream se- 
quence when star is shown in slow motion 
excellent and brings great laugh. 

STAR Has some real work to his credit in this 

SUPPORT Kathleen Clifford, opposite; Frank 

Campeau again the villian. 

EXTERIORS Varied and good 

INTERIORS Suitable 

DETAIL Star interpolates a lot of particularly 

good comedy business. 

CHARACTER OF STORY Optimistic as usual; 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 5,900 feet 

Douglas Fairbanks has come through with a blue 
ribbon winner in "When the Clouds Roll By." It's 
a picture that shows ofif the famous stunt comedian to 
his best advantage and he gives some remarkable de- 
monstrations of his athletic ability, but what must con- 
cern many exhibitors even more than this is the mat- 



ter of the plot. This essential has been sadly lacking 
in s(Mnc of Doug's recent releases and the lack has 
been tlie just cause of complaint. 
./ The picture opens with Doug eating a heavy din- 
ner at mi(hiight and some great laughs arc registered 
when an "interior" of his stomach is flashed on the 
screen with figures representing lobster, welsh rare- 
bit, mince pie, etc., performing gymnastics below. 
-Subsequently Doug suffers a nightmare which is 
shown in the form of a weird chase. The scenes show- 
ing Doug fairly floating through the air (ultra-rapid 
camera stuff) and the flashes of him running around 
on the ceiling are uproarious. 

A lot of comedy is introduced due to Doug's var- 
ious superstitions and the action goes along merrily 
on this track for a while until he meets the girl. 
Here enters some fine rapid-fire romance stuff and 
quick preparations on Doug's part for a surprise wed- 
ding. Here the villainous forces begin work, how- 
ever, and in a melodramatic sequence Doug discovers 
that the girl believes him bent on swindling her 
father and that she has gone west with the idea of 
marrying the real swindler. 

Despair takes hold of him at first but he succeeds 
in bringing his optimism to the top and, forgetting 
all about his superstitions, he gives pursuit. The man- 
ner in which he catches the train is a fine thrill and 
then comes the big flood scene which provides a 
climax of many thrilling sensations and lots of com- 
edy. The story concludes with Doug and the girl 
married on the roof of a house after a preacher has 
floated into view on his church steeple./ 

This is certainly going to get every audience and 
there's not a disappointment in all its footage. An 
air of optimism pervades the story, the titles are 
bright and bring good laughs and the plot provides 
a real sustaining interest to hold everything together. 



You Can Safely Gall This One of Doug's Best 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



This can safely be called one of Doug's best in 
your advertising and you won't be stretching the point 
or splitting- hairs for it's so far and away ahead of 
anything he has done recently that everyone is going 
to be tickled to death with it. 

The title offers a scheme for attractive advertising 
which has been adhered to in the advertising matter, 
furnished bv the distributors. Additional' publicity 



may be derived from the fact that the star also had 
a big hand in the story and scenario. 

However, by terming this one of Doug's best and 
by a good display of the title you're just naturally 
going to pack them in. And after the first ci-owd has 
gone its way from your theater you'll have to get out 
the ropes and the old S. R. O. sign for "When the 
Clouds Roll By" is going to advertise itself by word 
of mouth. -And when a picture does that you can 
bet vour bottom dollar it's there. 



(NATIONAL 



PICTURES) 



Adapked f rom Eit^erie Walter Is 
powerfal domesbic dr^^ — 

DiiMtion-Uoward Hickman ScenarioKatherine Reed 



NATIONAL ncniRE THEATRES'^ 

Lewis J. Selznick 

President 



FOR JANUARY RELEASE 



t: 






*J%. 



tW:.,.*'^^^' 



t%*fe»a 



I 



fe 



IVIADE By 
NATIONAL 



>^> 



■^"^^V 



. 



DISTRIBUTED By 
SELECT 



."^5:^^^ 



<s 



Sunday, January 4, 1920 



jM ^^ 



DAILV 



Many Elements in This But Horror is the Dominating One 



D. W. Griffith's 

"THE GREATEST QUESTION" 

First National 

DIRECTOR D. W. Griffith 

AUTHOR William Hale 

SCENARIO BY D. W. Griffith 

CAMERAMAN G. W. Bitzer 

AS A WHOLE Exceedingly intense picturiza- 

tion of small town life, good romance but too 
much horror from villain and villainess. 

STORY Deals to a certain extent with life after 

death but contains also popular elements of 
success. 

DIRECTION Very realistic in every detail, 

brings out climaxes vividly and maintains 
wonderful degree of suspense. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Excellent 

LIGHTINGS Some more of those hazey close- 
ups from Bitzer; star always prettily lighted. 

CAMERA WORK Great landscape shots 

LEADING PLAYERS Lillian Gish and Robert 

Harron give very realistic performances. 

SUPPORT The best of Griffith's old stock 

EXTERIORS Always appropriate and unusual 

INTERIORS Plain and realistic 

DETAIL Griffith inclined to go too extensively 

into detail of picture's darker side. 
CHARACTER OF STORY Should appeal gen- 
erally but contains debatable points. 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 6,244 feet 

This picture is certainly gripping, intensely grip- 
ping, but at the same time it is not exactly pleasant 
entertainment. It seems too full of horror, of sordid 
things. There is sunshine in it but the shadows are 
predominant. For example, the terrible plight of 
Nellie Jarvis when she is in the power of the Scrub- 
bles, a couple near insanity. A mind at all sensitive 
is likely to revolt at the long, detailed action showing 



her at their mercy, showing her struck almost mad by 
their contemplated tortures of which rape and stab- 
bing out her eyes are not the least. It suggests Foe 
as a picture producer. But who would want to wit- 
ness a picturization of Foe's "The Pit and the Pendu- 
lum," with the swinging knife ever coming nearer the 
prone and helpless body of the victim? 

Griffith has made the spiritual reappearances of the 
drowned sailor-boy beautiful, the acting of Eugenie 
Besserer and George Fawcett helps splendidly to make 
them so, but it is hard to reconcile such sense of 
beauty with the climax of horror — and it is horror — 
not well wrought drama. 

The story is laid in a southern village, the kind of 
place that Griffith can screen in all its peculiar details. 
The Hilton family has adopted Nellie Jarvis, daughter 
of a peddler, and in time she sees that she is a burden 
to them and so hires out to the Scrubbles. Years be- 
fore when she was but a child she had seen the Scrub- 
bles commit murder and the scene haunts her memory. 
Scrubble's passions are aroused to the point of in- 
sanity by her beauty and his wife's to the point of an 
insane jealousy by her guileless innocence. Finally 
she recognizes them as the murderers. She tells them 
so. They attack her and are preparing to murder her 
in cold blood when Jimmie Hilton arrives. 

Counter to this plot there is the theme of the spirit 
of John Hilton, swept off a submarine deck and 
drowned, who returns to guide his parents to happi- 
ness and, it might appear, wealth. There is a comedy 
strain introduced by means of Uncle Zeke, an ancient 
negro, well played by Tom Wilson, but it amounts to 
little in the final summing up. 

Lillian Gish plays realistically as Nellie. Her fear 
of the Scrubbles is expressed in a pitiable frenzy. Rob- 
ert Harron is good as Jimmie and George Nichols and 
Josephine Crowell as the Stubbles are wierdly horrible. 
Ralph Graves is John Hilton. 



Play Up "Life- After Death" Theme; It Should Draw 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Life after death has been discussed largely in the 
papers recently. It is this angle of "The Greatest 
Question" that should be emphasized in the advertis- 
ing. It will attract many even though they come to 
scoff. This theme is a good one on which to base dis- 
cussion by way of newspaper letters if you are run- 
ning the picture for any length of time. 

Of course the name of Griffith and the principal 
players should be featured. They are popular. The 



horror of the picture, however, is a point that makes 
its exhibition before family audiences debatable. It 
seems to have little place in a picture that deals with 
things of the spirit as "The Greatest Question" pre- 
tends to do and it will not be at all pleasing to many 
picture goers. However, many may be willing to 
make allowances because of Griffith's name and the 
touching on the spiritual theme. 



A Really Amazing Success 



TOPICS of the DAY 



Selected from the Press of the World by 



iterarxD^i 




When "Topics of the Day" was first conceived it was reaHzed that it 
was more or less of an experiment, since the idea was absolutely new. 
Today "The Topics of the Day" is no experiment. It is a huge and 
amazing success. Exhibitors, vaudeville theatres, the press and the 
public unite in calling it so! Read the following, selected at random: 



AN EXHIBITOR SAYS: "Any manager of 
a picture theatre who does not include 
it in his pi'ogram, is NOT a showman. It 
grows on an audience and contains more 
genuine entertainment than the majority 
of comedies." John C. Green, Mgr, Re- 
gent Theatres, Gait and Guelph, Ont. 

A FAN MAGAZINE EDITOR SAYS : " 'Top- 
ics of the Day,' according to my observa- 
tion, is usually greeted with a ripple of 
joyousness." Jessie Burness, Editor of 
Film Fun. 



A NEWSPAPER EDITOR SAYS : " 'Topics 
of the Da3'' proves . . . that tiie force with 
which a subject is carried across the 
screen is much more powerful than any 
printed story could be. The outspoken 
way in which the audience rose to 'Topics 
of the Day' would have been balm of 
Gilead to the penners of those paragraphs 
could they have been there." Baltimore 
Sun. 

k CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SAYS : "As 
a screen attraction 'Topics of the Day' 
have Bill Hart, Doug Fairbanks, Mary 
Pickford and Charles Chaplin beaten to a 
fadeaway." The Tulsa Spirit, The Of- 
ficial Organ of the Tulsa, Okla. Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 



NO WONDER THAT " 'T' is A Mark of Distinction To Be An Ex- 
hibitor Of Topics Of The Day!" 



PATHE 



Distributors 




Sunday, January 4, 1920 




A Typical Ray Picture That Should Give Great Satisfaction 



Charles Ray in 

"RED HOT DOLLARS" 

Paramount — Artcraft 

DIRECTOR : Jerome Storm 

AUTHOR Julien Josephson 

SCENARIO BY Julien Josephson 

CAMERAMAN Chester Lyons 

AS A WHOLE Typical Ray stuff from first to 

last; should please all audiences. 

STORY Filled with down-to-the-ground comedy 

and sentiment; holds nicely throughout. 
DIRECTION Registers all high lights and inci- 
dents of story with skill. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Lyons again proves he's a 

big-league comeraman. 

LIGHTINGS Very good; some excellent rural 

shots. 

CAMERAWORK Highly satisfactory 

STAR His usual self; pleases constantly 

SUPPORT Gladys George Ray's new lead; cap- 
able members of Ince stock. 

EXTERIORS Full of atmosphere 

INTERIORS Ditto 

DETAIL All good; Ray's bashful business will 

surely register again. 

CHARACTER OF STORY Poor boy adopted 

by rich manufacturer; concerns his initiation 
into society and romance. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 4,847 feet 

Terming "Red Hot Dollars" a typical Charles Ray 
subject should clearly define it in everyone's mind. 
This is exactly what it is and take a crowded Christ- 
mas week house's word for it, that it's the real goods 
in the entertainment line. Julien Josephson has again 
given the star opportunity after opportunity to regis- 
ter those little human tricks for which he is loved 



the world over and Director Jerome .Storni has seen 
to it that every one of them' stands out like a rare gem. 
^.^-'This time the star assumes the rolc^of Tod Burke. 
one of many workers in a small town iron foundry. 
Peter Carton, the head of the works and a power in 
the financial world inspects tlie plant one day and 
by means of a well devised thrill the young hero 
saves his life at great risk of his own. When he re- 
covers Carton adopts him. 

There follows a string of sure-fire comedy scenes 
when Tod. now Theodore Burke Carton, comes to 
call on a girl he loves in his newly acquired automo- 
bile. Ray certainly gets over a lot of human stuff by 
liis attitude of mingled pride and embarrassment over 
his new acquisition before his old friends. Enter more 
plot when the girl's father, discovering that he has 
been adopted by Carton, refuses to let her see hir 
again, because of an old feud with Carton. 

Subsequently there is more great comedy when Tod 
is introduced to society by Carton's ambitious and 
snobbish sister. 

There is another good sequence when Tod hires 
the girl as his stenographer and chases another occu- 
pant of his office out on a fool errand so that he may 
go through one of the latest dancing steps with her. 
They are so engaged when Carton and his sister, v/hb 
have just been talking of social marriage for their 
ward surprise them. Then, of course. Tod has to 
chose between love and money. He decides on the 
former course but a complete happy ending is brought 
about through the patching up of his quarrel between 
Carton and the girl's father. / 

Cladys Ceorge is Ray's new leading woman and 
gives a satisfactory performance. Charles Mailes. 
William Conklin and Mollie McConnell complete the 
cast of principals. 



This Should Bring You a Good Many Red Hot Dollars 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



There has been a lot of talk about Rav becoming 
too much of a type; that he Ijrings no variety to his 
work. People hiay express all the opinion they want 
on this subject but it remains a fact that fans- want 
to see him in his usual role just as much as they want 
to see Fairbanks or Pickford or Hart in their usual 
roles. 

"Red Hot Dollars" is th? typical Ray jiicture, yet it 
pQSSesses enough plot and enough bunian interest 
groundw;.ork to make it a w inner. i-Jay's acting is go- 



ing- to be the source of great delight here just as 
it has always been and though some of his tricks mav 
be old they still register. 

You're safe in boosting "Red Hot Dollars" till 
the cows come home for there's hardly a patron that's 
going out of the theater dissatisfied after having seen 
it. Mention the author and the director and luce's 
name too as this trio is always associatc^d with the 
star and by this time their names should help bring 
tbe business. 




Qeo.E. 
Carpen-ter 

Eitipress. 
Utali. 



Pay^Lw ouHfc-Empyess - Sali Lake.UUti- ^ J^^->^ 



Many men believe that honesty is the best policy, 
except in business. A great many who adhere to that 
slogan have been successful, but George E. Carpenter 
is a showman who does not believe that the line should 
be drawn there. In his opinion, honesty, combined 
with sincerity and courtesy constitute the best policy 
at all times. Considering his achievements at the helm 
'Of the Paramount-Empress in Salt Lake City, Carpen- 
ter knows whereof he speaks. 

Years of experience with newspapers and in the mo- 
tion picture industry have enabled Carpenter to shape 
his policy. He knows the game from every angle and 
he is awake to the fact that the aid of press is indis- 
pensable to the show business. If you make the newspa- 
permen your friends, he believes a good portion of the 
battle is won. 



A statement of this nature from Carpenter is worth 
much, for he himself was a journalist for many years 
before he entered the theatrical profession and he un- 
derstands thoroughly the psychology of and every- 
thing else about the editors and reporters. 

Furthest from godliness is said to be the theater 
business, yet at mature age, Carpenter, the son of 
a minister, finds himself in it. Twenty-eight years 
ago, he came to the United States from South Africa. 
For fifteen years, he worked on various newspapers, 
occupying practically every position. And from the 
lowly position of leg-man to that of managing editor, 
no work connected with getting out a publication is 
unfamiliar to Carpenter. A year as manager of a 
magazine saw the close of his career, until the present 
at least, in that capacity. Applying his newspaper 



OA MIM^IOK DOULAR 
SERIMv BASEJD ON A_ 
mEMU ifl^ TO SERIAIiS 




J'ROBSIIT B411LIN 

atxe emirtent hypnotist 




^9 



JOHN W. GREY. President 

-1©3 WE BIT -^S^S-^s STREET 



c 





rente 





Im suvroma idaantQans' 
tke aay ofiha eAeapfu 
made, poorly produced serim 
passed out wiik the t/eaf*f9f9 
Qhe supreme idea oFi990 
is ike autfwrk supervision 
or fits own work . jr <jr jrjp 
^fiis kas already been aeeom- 
p(tsked in the mature field. 

zftis as new as t fie 'year* 

f990 in tfve seriaf fteut Jf' 

oAs autfuyrs of serials oyirlhur 

£'J!eeue ancfJofmW' Qrey 
are recognised supreme f 

^fie supreme idea^ is tfu^ir 
personal suveruision of 
tlieir own work.. ^ ^ dfp 



%^ 



STOCRATo/'SERlAI^ 



Sunday, January 4, 1920 



jM i 



DAIUY 



experience to the show business, Carpenter has made 
so great a success, that today he is one of the most 
talked-of showmen west of the Mississippi. 

One of the reasons for Carpenter's successs in get- 
ting patronage is that he understands the value of pub- 
licity. He was the first publicity man ever employed 
by a motion picture exchange in the world, with Louis 
Marcus in Salt Lake, with the Notable Feature Film 
Co. After that came long and valuable experience in 
conjunction with the Orpheum Circuit of vaudeville 
theaters. "Real t?-"-''-" is the title of a publication he 
got out for the JNotable Feature Film Company of 
Salt Lake City for two years. In it, he secured the 
confidence of the exhibitor, published circular letters 
and put over numerous advertising stunts. These 
paved the way for the success of many features put 
out by the company and furnished Carpenter with 
some more experience — a sort of link in the chain that 
represents his travel over the road from an insignifi- 
cant position with a newspaper to that of manager of 
one of the leading houses in the Mormon State — 
among the leading because Carpenter is at the head 
of it. 

Nor is the legitimate end of the business some- 
thing new to him. He acted as publicity man for 
many stock companies that came to the city by the 
briny lake and was associated with the Willard Mack- 
Marjorie Rambeau organization. He has been mana- 
ger of the Paramount-Empress for three years, serving 
at the same time, in the capacity of secretary of the 
Paramount Amusement Co. that operates the large 
chain of theaters of which the one he manages is a part. 

Carpenter believes in publicity — for everyone but 
himself. In spite of his multifarious achievements, 
he remains the same modest fellow and it was with 
reluctance that he was willing to make known for pub- 
lication the facts about his career here published. 



During his management of the house he has accom- 
plished two things. He has made the newspapermen 
his friends and he has established a reputation for 
honesty with his patrons, so that they know that 
when Carpenter promises them a big show they can 
pay in at the box ofBce with the knowledge that they 
are going to get their money's worth. 

Carpenter does not believe in catering to the wishes 
of the public as they are — he has taken it upon himself 
to shape those desires. Good music and good pic- 
tures rule at his house. Giving the audience good 
stuff will make it want more, he believes, and he goes 
smoothly along now with the confidence of the people 
of Salt Lake City not misplaced in him. 

Fair treatment for everyone is another idea in which 
he believes. By furnishing his patrons with courteous 
service and giving the producer a square deal, he has 
built up a reputation that has his rival exhibitors green 
with envy. 



CARPENTER'S COUNTERS 

Decide on your policy and then stick to it. 

If your hired help cannot cultivate smiles, 
get some who can. 

Look ahead. It is not always advisable to 
grab all of the loose change in sight today, be- 
cause there are other days to follow. By that 
I mean advertise honestly and then there is no 
come-back. 

Courtesy costs nothing and is a good invest- 
ment at all times. 

Never give something for nothing. The pub- 
lic appreciates what it pays for. 

You can't put anything over without adver- 
tising. 




Qhe FIFTH 






M'^«r^ 




y^fhe story thai: 
has thrilled and 
held spelh'howad 
vniRions in e]?ery 
cvOilized covuntrij 
in the t/Oorld ! 

VITAL! TREMEISr^ 
DOUS!! BRILLIANT!!!, 





Cyerscitlle 

BERT LYTELL 

in Sir Qilhert fiarh^rs moisterpiece 

e RIGHTgT WAY 

o/ida^ted by (Jwfie ^HsithisjTovn Sir filberts iVorldj'amous nvPel £f the same netme 

^Directed hij CJoick^ 'DiLlovt. 

METRO 

cMaxijOellJ-^arger'^Virector Qeneral. 



(Jwrijs 9niperiod \Pictwres, Iltniied, SxclustOe Vistributors throughout 
the ^British Simpire. *^^ Sir'WiUioanft fffwrij , cMana^ina^ 'pirecbor: 



Sunday, January 4, 1920 



jM k 



DAI1.Y 



11 



Ince Turns Out a Technically Perfect Picture, But Watch Out! 



Hobart Bosworth in 
"BEHIND THE DOOR" 

* 

Paramount — Artcraft Special 

SUPERVISED BY._ Thomas H. Ince 

DIRECTOR ' Irvin Willat 

AUTHOR Gouverneur Morris 

SCENARIO BY Luther Reed 

CAMERAMAN J. O. Taylor 

AS A WHOLE Exceptionally powerful study 

of sea captain's hate and manner in which he 

planned and achieved revenge. 
STORY Builds to a climax of terrific power 

which is so horrible to think of that it may 

sicken. 
DIRECTION A distinct dramatic triumph; all 

climaxes excellently handled and the final 

punch done with the power of a master. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Excellent 

LIGHTINGS Some wonderful effects 

CAMERA WORK Best water stuff yet 

STAR A wonderful come-back; expressions tell 

worlds of suffering. 
SUPPORT Wallace Beery a superb villain; Jane 

Novak good opposite to star. 

EXTERIORS Ocean stuff exceptionally good 

INTERIORS Include great submarine interiors 

DETAIL Everything technically perfect; 

should call this best picture ever produced 

from technical standpoint. 
CHARACTER OF STORY Questionable ; some 

people may be utterly appalled by it. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 5 969 feet 

This picture has never been equaled for thrills, sus- 
taining interest, accumulative force and terrific punch 
of climax. From first to last it is the tt-chnically per- 



fect picture. Luther Reed vvlio wrote the scenario 
and Irvin Willat who directed deserve bunches of 
credit for their work in their respective departments. 
The handling- is so deft that for the space of almost two 
reels the observer sits almost breathless anticipating 
something — wondering what is to happen but pos- 
sessing no inkling. And then it crashes on him with 
dynamic force. 

It's during the war. Oscar Krug, German-Ameri- 
can, fought with his fists to prove his patriotism and 
then enlisted to become captain of a transport. His 
wife stows away on board for the first voyage. The 
ship is torpedoed. The wife is taken aboard the sub- 
marine by the commander while Krug is turned adrift 
in a boat. The wife is ravished, first by the com- 
mander, then the crew fight over her. The remains 
arc thrust out of a torpedo tul)e. 

A year later and Krug, in charge of another vessel, 
captures the submarine commander. Takes him to his 
cabin. Draws the whole story out of him by feigning 
pro-Germanism. Flash to two other officers of the 
ship wondering what's happened. Eventually a sailor 
offers captain's compliments and invites them to coffee 
in his cabin. The submarine commander is where? 
"Look behind the door," cried Krug, "1 swore if I 
ever caught him I'd skin him alive but he died before 
I was through !" 

Hold fjist to voiir stoiiiiu-lis! There never was a more dynamic 
cliinax. Tliey don't show you the German's body but it doesn't 
take a vivid' imagination to see it there because they've certainly 
bu'lt this lip in Ihe most exiiert style. 

Hobart liosv orth is iinmense. His acting- where he draws the 
story of his wife's fate from the submarine commander, pretending 
gloa'ting <lelight the while it really tears his heart apart, is more 
powerful than aiivthing seen on the screen in a long time. And Wal- 
lace Tieery as tiie commander is a marvel. .lane Novak, James 
Gordon, .f. P. I.ocknev and Otto Hoffman are others. 

The scenes of the submarine submerging with Bosworth on the 
deck are wonderful. The final destruction of the undersea craft is 
Ai-oiiderful. The ttst fight in the beginning is wonderful. In fact is 
the technically perfect picture. 

If we were iii war it would recruit thousands. But we aren t. 



Let 'Em Know What's Coming; Then They Can't Kick 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Considering the character of the climax of this pro- 
duction the best policy to follow in advertising it is 
honesty ; tell the people to expect something that'll 
make 'em forget to sleep at nights. This doesn't and 
won't sound very attractive but at the same time it 
will lure a lot of people to your theater and they 
won't be able to register any kicks if the clima.x raises 
a little havoc with their stomachs. 

A suggested advertising reader is: "His wife had 
met a fate a million times worse than death from this 
man who now sat telling him the horrible details and 
gloating over them. He was in his power at last ! 



He had waited for this moment an eternity of years. 
What punishment he could mete out would be too 
severe, what torture too harsh? Death by inches 
would not be justice !" 

Accentuate that last line. Spring it in bold faced 
type. Prepare them for the worst. If you don't use 
this argument, use one that accentuates the same 
features. It's the only way. And another line might 
warn them to keep the children away. 

For the rest tell of Bosworth's marvelous perform- 
ance and of Willat and Ince and the technically per- 
fect work they have produced. 



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INDEPENDENT 
PRODUCTIONS 



- " , I wi"' 





PRESENTS 



SUSPICION 

GRACE DAVISON, 

WARREN COOK.WILMUTH MERKYL 




The 
'Tacts and Follies" Scries 



The Most Distinct and Unique 

Novelty in the Field of 

Short Subjects 



Kvery Woman a Venus 



One Keel a Mfeek — 52 a Year 



>.(iiie Territories still oi)en on these Pioneer Attractions 

EXHIBITORS— For all features get in touch with your Local Fion'eer Distributor. 



Pioneer Exchange 

130 West 46th Street 

New York City 

Pioneer Exchange 

53 Elizabeth Street East 

Detroit, Mich. 

Greater Stars Productions 

716 Consumers Building 

Chicago, 111. 

M. & R. Exchange 

730 South Olive Street 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Screenart Pictures 
Washington, D. C. 

Pioneer Exchange 

14,1 Franklin Street 

Buffalo, N. Y. 

Equity Distributing Co. 

403 Davis Street 

Portland, Ore. 

Masterpiece Film Attractions 

1235 Vine Street 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Pioneer Exchange 

812 Prospect Avenue 

Cleveland, O. 

Eastern Feature Film Co. 

57 Church Street 

Boston, Mass. 

Criterion Film Service 

67 Walton Street 

Atlanta, Ga. 

M. & R. Exchange 

107 Golden Gate Avenue 

San Francisco, Cal. 



STERLING FILMS, LTD., 166 BAY STREET, TORONTO. 



PIONEER FILM CORPORATION 

13 O W. 46 fli STREET NEW YORK CITY 



Sunday, January 4, 1920 



iM'^ 



DAILV 



1.1 



Great Mystery Picture With Interest Excellently Sustained 



William Russell in 
"THE LINCOLN HIGHWAYMAN" 
Fox 

DIRECTOR Emmett J. Flynn 

AUTHOR Paul Dickey 

SCENARIO BY Emmett J. Flynn 

CAMERAMAN Clyde De Vinna 

AS A WHOLE Great modern holdup man story 

in which identity of bandit is cleverly con- 
cealed until climax. 
STORY Excellently put together with strong 

vein of sustained interest and many thrilling 

moments. 
DIRECTION. .Shows great judgment and full 

realization of successful elements of this type 

of picture. 

PHOTOGRAPHY' ; ....... . ' Good 

LIGHTINGS ...: Some realistic night effects 

CAMERAWORK Commendable 

STAR Registers nicely as the hero; work here 

should add to his popularity. 

SUPPORT A capable cast and a very clever dog 

EXTERIORS Include good auto speeding shots 

INTERIORS Satisfactory 

DETAIL Good 

CHARACTER OF STORY. Modern road agent 

mystery story with nothing to offend. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION. .■ About 5,000 feet 

Every once in a while some producer slips one over 
on. his program that for sheer entertainment beats 
a lot of the specials all hollow. William Fox has 
done the trick in "The Lincoln Highwayman," the 
latest picture to star William Russell. Here's a pic- 
ture that surely is going to give everyone complete 
satisfaction in the entertainment line because it is so 
downright cleverly handled from pvery angle., 

To begin with the picture is of the mystery type, 
the action being centered around the workings of the 
Lincoln Highwayman, a modern bandit who holds up 



the auto travellers of the coast-to-coast highway. 
The identity of this fellow is not revealed until the 
climax and the picture has been handled so cleverly 
(luring its every twist and turn that it'll take a full- 
fledged Flynn or Burns to call the director's hand 
hefijre he shows it. 

Suspicion throughout is fastened on the. hero and 
the web of circumstantial evidence is gathered so 
close about him that ])eople are certainly going to 
wonder how he is going to clear himself. It was a 
great stunt to show him holding up the heroine and 
his rival just as a trick to prove a point of argument. 
After that you feel so certain that Jimmy Clunder is 
the real bandit tTiat the subsequent denouement 
comes as a distinct surprise. And after it's all over 
you find yourself going back and wondering how they 
tricked you, and tricked you without a flaw in con- 
struction in the entire story. 

The picture contains a lot of good, honest thrills, 
most of them generated by the highly sustained actioK- 
of the plot and "its various surprising climaxes. . 

There are a couple of sequences in the picture in 
which the action pivots about a dog that's the most 
human animal seen on the screen in an age. The 
sequence in which he assists Jimmy in the holding up 
of the heroine and the rival is, well, just too dog- 
gone clever for words. .^ 

The story has a nice vein of romantic interest and 
is to be specially noted for its absence of a conven- 
tional heavy. The real highwayman is not prominent 
in the action at all and he has no scenes with the 
heroine. All this is to be commended for the action 
has an air of reality that the omissioii-Qf thevj^am 
helps to foster. ■ 

Russell fits into the role of Jimmy excellently.j^nd 
his entire supporting cast does fine work. It'Jn- 
cludes Lois Lee, Frank Brownlee, Jack Connolly, Ed- 
ward Piel, Harry Spingler and Edwin Booth Tilton. 



Talk All You Want About This; It's Bound to Please 



Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



You can afford to spread out in advertising this for 
everyone is going to agree on it — that it's great. And 
the absence of all blood-and-thunder action is a strong 
point in its favor. There are some women w.ho refuse 
to see pictures of the hold-up man type because there 
is such a lot of objectionable action. Here there isn't- 
"^^ ^■''^ a bitv I,t;s llumail as well as thrllHng and' mystifying, 
.,and peopre are" just naturally going to eat it up. 



In advertising it a good talking point is the ni^jmer 
in which they've so cleverly kept the identity 6^ the 
highwayman a secret. This could be played up to 
advantage and it will attract people, specially those 
skeptics who believe they can, solve every story riddle- 
offered them. 

Russell of course should be given a play as should 
the author, Paul Dickey. 



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THOMAS H , INGE 

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:m^i- FAMOUS PLAYERS -LASKY CORPORATION ,^^ ,, 



Sunday, January 4, 1920 



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DAILY 



15 



Old-Time Meller Doesn't Hold and Lacks the Better Production Points 



Dolores Cassinelli in 
"THE WEB OF DECEIT" 
Edwin Carewe Prod. — Pathe 

DIRECTOR Edwin Carewe 

AUTHOR Finis Fox 

SCENARIO BY Coolidge W. Streeter 

CAMERAMAN Not credited 

AS A WHOLE Melodrama of the old school 

lacks a sustaining interest because the audi- 
ence know^s just what the next move will be. 

STORY Affords the star a chance to portray two 

different types but outside of that doesn't 
mean much. 

DIRECTION Straight stuff; allowed some bad 

slip-ups on the part of the players. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Not exceptionally fine 

LIGHTINGS Bad at times 

PHOTOGRAPHY Could have been much better 

STAR Got her characters badly mixed up at one 

time. 

SUPPORT Hugh Cameron has the strongest 

part and Mitchell Harris was a rather unim- 
pressive hero. 

EXTERIORS Some pretty shots of a country 

estate. 

INTERIORS A few had a "setty" appearance 

DETAIL Titles crowded in where they weren't 

necessary should be removed. 
CHARACTER OF STORY. .. .Old-fashioned meller 

dealing with lost daughter of wealthy man 
impersonated by girl crook. 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION. ..... .About 6,000 feet 

"The Web of Deceit" is a good title all right, and 
they go right to it along those lines but there isn't a 
single thing new about Finis Fox's story. There isn't 
a new twist to lift it out of the rut and things just 
happen along so natural-like, that you are never in 
doubt as to what is going to happen next. An interest 



that is sustained throughout is essential for picture 
entertainment — that something creating a desire to 
see it through. 

However, in "The Web of Deceit," after the first 
few hundred feet, you're sure of the ending. Through- 
out there is a continued presentation of old-time situa- 
tions — the dying confession in which the girl crook 
finds her opportunity to secure her heart's desire and 
the complications leading to the disclosure of her true 
identity and her final convenient death. 

Dolores Cassinelli plays the part of Wanda 
Hul:)bard and also that of her sister, Lucille, 
who in reality is the daughter of the wealthy Major 
Clark. 

As Wanda, Miss Cassinelli is leading a life very 
much dififerent from that pictured to her folks in the 
country. On a week-end visit home her mother dies, 
making a confession in which she discloses that Lu- 
cille is really the daughter of Major Clark. Wanda, 
however, switches the identity and presents herself 
to the Major as his long-lost daughter. 

Various incidents give Wanda much worry about 
her discovery and when Lucille arrives in New York 
she applies for instruction at Roger Barney's art school 
where she meets Wanda. Roger is sort of an adopted 
son of Major Clark and the object of Wanda's next 
move. Before Lucille has a chance to talk to him 
Wanda persuades her to leave because she fears their 
resemblance will bring about the discovery she is 
trying to avoid. 

Hugh Cameron, known as a pretty slick crook, re- 
turns from Arizona where he had gone for his health 
after a narrow escape from the police. He confronts 
his former pal, Wanda, in her room and in the strug- 
gle that follows she is killed and the wounded Cam- 
eron tells the story which the audience, knows all the 
time. Lucille is proclaimed the real daughter and they 
end up by having Roger and shero clutch. 



Use Your Own Judgment on This One and Be Discreet 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



As long as stories continue to be written and pic- 
tures to be produced, so do they continue to come forth 
with the old dyed-in-the-wool melodraama with all the 
old situations rehashed and done over, and most of 
the time there isn't the slightest semblance of a new 
twist. "The Web of Deceit" is just one of those 
things. 

And with it all there is a percentage of the so-called 
"movie fans" who like this sort of stuff'. If you can 



number enough of them among your "reg'ulars" you 
can probably get away with this one but if you are 
catering to a better class clientele who look for some- 
thing new, something worth while in picture produc- 
tion — well, just use your own judgment. 

Miss Cassinelli's name may have some drawing 
power in which case use her name in connection with 
the story and play up the fact that in "The Web of 
Deceit" she plays two distinct characters. 



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Arthur P. Beck> 

presents 



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^he picture ^irl beautiful 



From the notable stage success by 

AUGUSTUS THOMAS 

Directed by 

^ George Irving 



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SCREEM OPINIONS 

SAYS: 
"Capitol" Class A 

Producer — Artco Direction — Very Good; Geo. Irving 

Footage — 5,800 feet Photography —Very good 

Release date -December Star — Good; Leah Baird 

Distributor — Hodktnson Story— Good drama; family 

OUR OPINION 

Leah Baird has in her new production a story 
that has been splendidly produced and has a 
way of holding the attention steadfastly. 
There are a number of thrilling events that 
have been well handled without giving one 
the impression of a serial. The star is called 
upon to portray a triple role and in each of 
the roles she is sincerely convincing. While 
there is some double exposure, it has been 
handled in a, simple fashion that makes one 
forget that one person is portraying the two 
roles. Leah Baird has supporting her to good 
advantage Robert T. Haines, William B. 
Davidson, Alexander Gaden and Downing 
Clark. The story is an adaptation of the 
famous Augustus Thomas play and has been 
Jaid in the capital city of the country. The 
exteriors selected are beautiful and the interior 
'stagings have been handled in a splendid 
Wianner. 

¥.W. HODKINSON CORPORAnON 

527 Fifth Avenue, New YorkOty 

Distributing through PAIBf Exchange, Imarptmted 

Foreign Distributor. J. Eronk Brockliss lnc.729-7e Ave. 



Grif^ or DeMUe 
never made a better 



one: 



CHICAGO HERALD- EXAMINER 



^ WESTl 

NeWCOMBCABLTON^^"-^^ 



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UNION 



IV CHICAGO lU^. 
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HOH>OW W ore IB™'' * » jijc SMI- 

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KY 



J.PARKER READ JR. 

presents 



LOUISE Glaum 



THE CHICAGO HERALD EXAMINER says: "The Lone 
Wolf's Daughter" is a big sepia thriller, gorgeously photo- 
graphed; lavishly acted. Beautifully told by J. Parker Read, Jr. Griffith 
and DeMille themselves do no better than the maker of this new 
production. 

THE CHICAGO JOURNAL says: One of the most important 
productions of the year is "The Lone Wolf's Daughter" starring 
Louise Glaum. Its story value is unsurpassed on the screen. Louise Glaum 
is an actress to be reckoned with. 

THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE says: One quite understands 
the hold Louise Glaum has on her fans after witnessing "The 
Lone Wolf's Daughter." In it she is beautiful, gracious, appealing... 
She has a story that moves swiftly to a climax of fire, water, revenge and 
a strong love finale. --- . ■ i 



THE 

lONE WOLF'S 
DAUGHTER 

By 

Louis Joseph Vance 

Corribining tkefamous characters (f 



W.W.HODKINSON CORPORATION 

527 Fifth Avenue. New York Qtr 
Distributing through PATHE [ahange.hKorporatrd 
Foreign Distributor.: ApoUo Trading Corp. 



SaB^K44ilLj»a!c<St£S>. J<Str«"SSi» >*■•<:»•*■ ».^ 'Sji4£iSja**~;Sr*_W-» 



What They Think 
of Wid's Year Book 






This is the only manuel and collection of material 
in annual form that I have ever seen that pos- 
sessed particular value concerning our industry. 

FRED WARREN, 
Hodkinson Corp. 

It will be a very valuable addition to our refer- 
ence library. 

JEROME BEATTY, 
Famous Players-Lasky Corp. 

I congratulate you. 

OSCAR PRICE, 
President United Artists Corp. 

You are to be congratulated upon the complete- 
ness of this Year Book and I am sure it will 
prove of great value to the industry. 

WILLIAM J. CLARK, 
President Clark-Cornelius Corp. 

Will be given a prominent place in the club. 

FRIARS CLUB. 



Extremely useful. 



SAM E. MORRIS, 
Select Pictures Corp. 



Will be of great assistance and a very welcome 
addition to our library. 

RALPH BLOCK, 
Director of Advertising and Publicity Goldwyn 
Pictures. 

Will prove of great value to my organization. 

BRITON N. BUSCH, 
President, Republic Distributing Corp. 

One of the most complete publications ever got- 
ten out. 

FILM EXCHANGE BOARD OF TRADE OF 
DENVER. 

This is the finest thing of its kind which has 
come to our attention, and you are to be com- 
plimented and congratulated on the good work. 

BAUMER FILMS, INC. 

I have frequent occasion to use it because of 
its completeness and reliability. 

THEODORE C. DEITRICH, 
Pres., De Luxe Pictures, Inc. 

It is certainly a very creditable production and 
should have a wide circulation. 

MERRITT CRAWFORD, 
Publicity Director, Fox Film Corp. 



Congratulations on the wonderful amount of in- 
formation you managed to crowd between its 
covers. 

CHARLES VERHALEN, 
Advertising Manager, Robertson-Cole. 

Our congratulations upon the production of such 
an interesting and valuable piece of literature. 

COLVIN BROWN. 
Advertising Mgr. Clark-Cornelius Corp. 

I feel it will prove of value during the coming 
year. 

RALPH PROCTOR, 
United Artists Corp. 

An admirable reference book. 

INTERMOUNTAIN FILM BOARD OF 
TRADE. 



We consider it complete in all respects and it 
will be of valuable assistance to us at all times. 

J. MERRICK. 
Field Manager Robertson-Cole 

I know it will prove of great value during the 
coming year. 

JOS. L SCHNITZER, 
Equity Pictures. 

I wish to compliment you on the way it is gotten 

CHARLES R. ROGERS, 
Select Pictxires Corp. 

It certainly will be of service to me. 

WM. L. SHERILL, 
The Frohman Amusement Corp. 

There is no doubt it will prove its value during 
the coming year. 

UNIVERSAL FILM MFG. CO. 

Want to congratulate you upon it. 

SAN FRANCISCO FILM EXCHANGE BOARD 
OF TRADE. 



Price $l.Qp 

Prepaid anywhere in U. S. A. 

EDITION - - - LIMITED 



Sunday, January 4, 1920 



aji^>| 



DAILV 



19 



Old Time Chorus Girl Stuff Uninteresting and Tiresome 



Mary MacLaren in 

"ROUGE AND RICHES" 

Universal. 

DIRECTOR Harry Franklin 

AUTHOR W. Carey Wonderly 

SCENARIO BY Hal Hoadley 

CAMERAMAN Gus Peterson 

AS A WHOLE Theme that has been done to 

death ; has no new situations and the only 
response it can get will be laughs at the wrong 
time. 
STORY Adaptation of story by W. Carey Won- 
derly which appeared in "Live Stories;" weak 
screen material. 

DIRECTION Didn't make an effort to get away 

from conventional "movie" scenes. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Good 

LIGHTINGS Usually good 

CAMERA WORK Straight stuff 

STAR Won't cheer up even when she does land 

the millionaire she's after. 
SUPPORT Lloyd Whitlock well cast as the mil- 
lionaire; Wallace MacDonald satisfactory. 

EXTERIORS Seldom necessary 

INTERIORS Conventional studio sets 

DETAIL Allowed too much convenience; no 

serious mistakes. 

CHARACTER OF STORY Poor girl sets out 

in search of millionaire by way of the chorus 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 6,000 feet 

They'll certainly have to come better than this if 
they expect Miss MacLaren to be a drawing power. 
for such vehicles as have been handed out to her re- 
cently certainly won't add anything to her name as 
far as the box office is concerned. 

A good part of the action consists of the old time 
"behind the scenes" sets with the chorus in rehearsal. 



There is so much of this that it becomes tiresome. 
The characters are introduced in such rapid succes- 
sion that their identity is hard to establish. This is 
IKirticuIarly so in the case of Syn de Conde who fin- 
ally murders Dodo, one of the former chorus girls 
who liad already captured a millionaire. 

Mary MacLaren, as Becky, a former wealthy Vir- 
ginian, decides that she must have money and the 
surest way seems through the channels afforded by a 
Broadway chorus. Forthwith she journeys to the big 
city and lands in the front row of tlie "Oh, Oh, Omar" 
chorus, which has a very successful opening. 

Shero is recognized as a "new" one and between the 
acts is sought by Lloyd Whitlock, known well on 
Wall St. by day as he is on Broadway at night. Becky 
is getting along famously on her "thirty per" when 
her millionaire friend after lavish promises, fails to 
see the necessity of a marriage ceremony. Becky's 
hopes are shattered and she invites her dancing part- 
ner, Wallace MacDonald, to her home to talk things 
over. 

While they are discussing matters. Dodo, who, 
though married to a millionaire is really in love with 
Wallace, is murdered by a former suitor. Circum- 
stantial evidence points to Wallace as the assailant. 
Rather than tell where he was at the time of the mur- 
der and bring in the name of Becky, the accused man 
refuses to talk. 

Shero's millionaire, now truly in love with the girl 
and ready to marry her, discovers that she was with 
Wallace at the time of the murder and immediately 
proceeds to misunderstand the relation of the inter- 
view and leaves shero flat. Robert W^alker, shero's 
old sweetheart from the south turns up ; hero is cleared 
of the charge and the millionaire comes back so shero 
is confronted with her three lovers. However, she 
forgets her mercenary desires and accepts Wallace. 



May Get By as Small Town Stuff 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



This is just the sort of stuff that will go in small 
towns. They'll all turn out to see how the poor 
girl went to the city and joined the chorus, met a 
great millionaire and so on. If you have a theater 

in this sort of community you can go right ahead on 
this one. 

If, howe\ er, your audience consists of folks with a 
knowledge of the better possibilities of picture pro- 
duction today, "Rouge and Riches" won't make 
an impression. As already stated, it's all straight 



stuff', been done time and time again with not a new 
twist or even a bit of comedy relief to hold it up. 

If you want to use it try the following catchlincs: 
"She sought a millionaire by joining a Broadway 
chorus but when the opportunity finally presented 
itself, love had its way and she married her dancing 
partner." Or, "What would you do if you were con- 
fronted with three proposal at once? There was a 
millionaire, her childhood sweetheart and the man she 
loved. Who did she marry? See Mary MacLaren in 
'Rouge and Riches' at the blank theater." 




DISTIUBUTEDBY^ vft .^ 

SOL LESSER. 

LONGACRE BLDG.-NEW YORK CITY 



Sunday, January 4, 1920 



sH^ 



DAILV 



21 



Lacks Conviction for the Most Part But Will Make 
Satisfactory Program Offering 



Benjamin B. Hampton presents 
"THE SAGEBRUSHER" 
W. W. Hodkinson— Pathe 

DIRECTOR Edward Sloman 

AUTHOR Emerson Hough 

SCENARIO BY William Clifford 

CAMERAMAN John Seitz 

AS A WHOLE Has a few thrills but lacks con- 
tinued interest and slumps badly because of 
extreme waste footage. 

STORY Love and faith made basis of theme. 

DIRECTION Good for the most part but wasted 

too much time on sequences of less import- 
ance 
PHOTOGRAPHY Very good; unusual silhou- 
ette scene outside tent at night. 

LIGHTINGS Sometimes glary on players' faces. 

CAMERA WORK Acceptable 

PLAYERS Marguerite De La Motte very 

pretty ; Noah Beery handled character part 
well ; others satisfactory. 

EXTERIORS. Appropriate western country 

INTERIORS Proper 

DETAIL Ending unsatisfactory; could have 

made use of footage wasted in early reels. 

CHARACTER OF STORY Blind girl marries 

uncouth but faithful westerner who dies be- 
fore she recovers her eyesight. 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 6,000 feet 

In his story of love and faith, author Emerson 

Hough has truly human touch containing , all the 

•emotions to be expected in a theme bearing on love 

and faith. His character t\]iifyini; "laith" is a n>uL;h 



and ready westerner with little knowledge of worldly 
affairs and manners but having a big heart and all the 
finer qualities of a real gentleman. 

There is a rather tense moment when willun blows 
up the dam and floods the valley. They get in some 
rather good rescue stufif and ([uite a bit of realism. 
Marguerite De La Motte is a very pleasing shero and 
in all probability her performance in "The Sage- 
brusher" will win her many friends for she contributes 
a good share of pleasure to the production and 
•has a truly winsome personality and is surely pretty 
to look at. 

Noah Beery, "The Sagebrusher," has a friend Ar- 
thur Morrison, who advertises for a wife for Noah 
which results in Marguerite going west under the 
imi)ression that she is to be a housekeeper. By the 
time shero reaches her destination she has become 
stone blind and cannot see the ugliness of the man 
who meets her but his kindness and tender care causes 
her to have impHcit faith in him. 

Through a series of coincidences shero- believes 
that her husband is like Roy Stewart, a physician in 
the town, strong and handsome. This is brought 
about by Roy saving the girl when she is kidnapped 
by willun and lost in a forest fire. Then again when 
Noah marries Marguerite, he asks Roy to kiss the 
bride because he realizes the difference between them. 

There are several complications working out of the 
situation with willun getting in his handiwork. In 
the flood which destroys the valley town, Noah is 
lost and in the end they have hero Roy and Marguer- 
ite fall in love— which they should have done in the 
first place and not drawn the plot out to such a state 
of inconsistrncv. Also shero rcc:ains her sitrht. 



Wm. Horsley Film Laboratories 

Ideal Facilities for Samples and Release Prints 
Developing and Printing In All Its Branches 

Why not have your release prints made at the HORSLEY LABORATORIES, where the finished 
product can be approved by the STUDIO EXECUTIVES, DIRECTORS AND PHOTOGRAPH- 
ERS who are responsible for the picture. We are at present domg work for the FOREMObi FKU- 
DUCING COMPANIES on the COAST. 

PROJECTION AND CUTTING ROOMS FOR USE DAY AND EVENING 

Address: 6060 Sunset Blvd. Hollywood, California 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED 
IN THE HEART OF THE STUDIO SECTION OF HOLLYWOOD 

Phone No. Hollywood 3693. 



22 



jsitM 



DAILV 



Sunday, January 4, 1920 



Good Work on the Part of the Players Lifts This Considerably 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Benjamin B. Hampton presents 
"THE SAGEBRUSHER" 
W. W. Hodkinson — Pathe 

"The Sagebrusher" the first of the Emerson Hough 
novels to be picturized will, no doubt, satisfy from 
an ordinary viewpoint but there are incompatible sit- 
uations that will cause some discussion. However, 
the fundamental idea is a story of love and faitr 
which draws a realistic and, as far as the idea itself 
is concerned, convincing conclusion. • 

There are enough thrills to flavor and they should 
satisfy. A forest fire is very real and the flood scene? 



are all well handled to keep the interest sustained. 
The ending is rather abrupt and dissatisfying ana 
some superfluous footage in the early reels might well 
have been used for a better conclusion. 

If you have a clientele that goes in for the picturi- 
zation of novels be sure to tell them that "The Sage- 
brusher" is . the first Emerson Hough story to be 
filmed. Among westerners especially the rhatrimon- 
ial advertising idea is not uncommon and the situa- 
tions resulting from such transaction are not at all im- 
probable. You might make something of this by 
catchlines suggesting "he advertised for a wife." 



j\V*VV#V#V#V#V#* ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦<♦♦ ♦^♦♦♦^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦V* ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦•♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦>♦>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦^ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦?• 

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MITCHELL LEWIS 

ANNOUNCES 

To the Film Industry 

That he has no connection with any organization 
bearing his name. 



MITCHELL LEWIS 



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Sunday, January 4, 1920 



a!i^?l 



DAIL.Y 



2.S 



Grab It and Have the Distinction of Showing a Real Picture 



Frank Keenan in 

"BROTHERS DIVIDED" 

Pathe 

DIRECTOR Frank Keenan 

AUTHOR Gertrude Andrews 

SCENARIO BY Gertrude Andrews and E. Rich- 
ard Schayer. 

CAMERAMAN Kot credited 

AS A WHOLE Great audience-getting picture 

with good comedy stuff and heart interest 
moments. 

STORY Shows star in dual role and builds 

nicely to wholesome, sentimental conclusion 

DIRECTION Various episodes of s . 

generally well ; could have made Tom's son 
more human. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Very good 

LIGHTING Effective 

CAMERA WORK Double exposure stuff so good 

that fact of star playing dual role is forgotten 
STAR Gives two clearly defined characteriza- 
tions ; scores decisively in both. 

SUPPORT Generally good with nice types 

EXTERIORS Satisfactory even though some 

are obviously settings. 

INTERIORS Include shots of real prison 

DETAIL Good 

CHARACTER OF STORY Man wins through 

good deeds and generosity where brother 
failed by stinting. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 5,000 feet 

One of the cleanest, most wholesome, downright en- 
joyable features released — that's "Brothers Divided." 
And everyone owes Frank Keenan a vote of thanks 
for making it the delightful piece of entertainment 
property it is, for the star, besides appearing in a 
dual role, directed, and he certainly has done his three- 
fold job up good and brown. 

"Brothers Divided" contains a moral but it's not an 
obvious flaunting- moral constantly preached about 



and poked u]) under an audience's nose. Rather is it 
a moral that creeps on you slowly. Then, suddenly, 
at the finish, when the last scene has checked out of 
the machine, you warm all over particularly about 
the heart and feel like getting up and shouting, 
"Here's a picture !" 

The moral that good deeds and kind words get a 
person a deal more out of life than selfishness and a 
nasty temper. IMatthew King, played by Mr. Keenan, 
is a mill owner and a slave driver. He employs 
women and children in his plant and works them 
almost to death's door. In jail, under a life's sentence, 
is Tom King, also played by Mr. Keenan, who has 
learned from, long-suffering what it means to play 
fair and square. His sentence was partly unjust. 

Matthew has told Tom's son that his father is 
dead. Then one day Tom appears, having been par- 
doned because of his great work in handling the pris- 
oners during a fire. Fate will it that on the same day 
Matthew suffers a stroke of paralysis so Tom takes 
charge of the factory. 

His son is ashamed of him because he makes public 
his prison career as he wishes to start square with 
his workers. And so the son leaves town with a 
check furnished by his father to study music. All 
the mill workers love Tom for his honesty. They 
love him more when he refuses to employ old women 
and young children but Matthew thinks he's ruining 
the business. However, the business shows a clear 
profit after a time and everyone is happy. The picture 
ends with old Matthew's heart softened by the 
sight of the good deeds his brother has wrought and 
by and by an awakening in the mind of the son. 

Keenan gets the most from both of his roles, is 
thoroughly crabbish as Matthew and delightfully fine 
as Tom. Wallace MacDonald and Ruth Langston 
furnish a nice love interest while others are James O. 
Barrows, Gertrude Claire, Russ Powell, Mary Tal- 
bot, Paul Mullen and a number of actual prison in- 
mates and officers. 



They'll Mentally Shake Your Hand After This if Not Actually 



Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Man alive, they're going to love you for showing 
this to them. It's the real goods in the heart interest 
line and everyone is going to feel immensely better 
for it, and thoroughly well entertained after it has 
run its course. Don't let yourself see it at your com- 
petitor's house for he'll take a lot of credit for having 
run one of the most delightful pictures of the year. 

Yes, and "Brothers Divided" comes as a blessed 
relief after all these hokum pictures dealing with 



Labor and Bolshevism in which all the workers carry 
bombs in their hind pockets. You might point out 
that the solution of labor troubles, as reached in this, 

« 

is just plain, common, decency and open-mindedness, 
if you care to delve into such things. But "Brothers 
Divided" is pure entertainment. Book it for a long 
run and you'll find out that it reaches the heart and 
soul — and the pocketbook, too — of everyone. 



Is tki$ 

YOU 



THE EXHIBITOI^ 



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S. 



OR ONLY 

THE MAN 

WHO DIDN'T 

SEE" /72^ 



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DON'T BE A SECOND RATER. VARIETY 
SAYS:— 

"Every exhibitor should show "Blind Hus- 
bands" or consider himself at once the man- 
ager of a SECOND RATE house." 
DON'T BE BLIND to your big opportunity 
It's the greatest you ever had. And don't 
aelay. Book "Blind Husbands" TODAY. 



WONDER PLAY 

Presented by 

Carl Laemrale 

A UNIVERSAL- JEVEl PRODUCTION de LUXE 



Sunday, January 4, 1920 



bH^ 



DAIUV 



25 



Obvious and Far-Fetched Melodrama With Utterly Impossible Villain 



William Farnum in 

"HEART STRINGS" 

Fox 

DIRECTOR J. Gordon Edwards 

AUTHOR Henry Albert Phillips 

SCENARIO BY E. Lloyd Sheldon 

CAMERAMAN John W. Boyle 

AS A WHOLE Concluding sequences of this 

are so long drawn out and terribly stagey that 

the entire interest is lost. 
STORY Has a lot of loop-holes and could have 

ended several times before it does. 
DIRECTION Savors mostly of the cheaply 

melodramatic ; no subtleties evinced. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Average 

LIGHTINGS Mostly straight stuff 

CAMERA WORK Good 

EXTERIORS Generally satisfactory; include 

good setting of Canadian village street. 

INTERIORS Satisfactory 

STAR His usual self but too obvious at times 

SUPPORT Gladys Coburn and Paul Gazeneuve 

very good; Rowland Edwards as villain, bad. 

DETAIL Some bad slips in continuity of action 

CHARACTER OF STORY Man's ultimate re- 
venge on villain who wronged and persecuted 

sister. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 6,000 feet 

First impulse is to brand this as "ten, twenty, thoity" 
melo, but on second thought even those ancient works 
of the stage with a constantly "coising" villain and a 
much "poisecuted" pretty girl and long suffering hero, 
were managed so that the interest was well sustained 



until the last. "Heart Strings" has all the familiar 
characters of the "ten, twenty," including a violent 
villain who hurls the girl he wronged over a balcony, 
but none of the redeeming qualities of clever work- 
manship evidenced in those shows. It has the vices 
but none of the virtues. 

The picture starts off pretty well in a little Cana- 
dian village where Pierre, played by William Farnum, 
writes music and plays the violin, inspired by his sis- 
ter Gabrielle. Unknown to Pierre, Gabrielle has been 
wronged by Rouget. She believes he has married her. 
Pierre comes under the notice of Kathleen, a New 
York girl. Her fiance, Blake, resents her interest in 
him and plots with Rouget to discredit him in her 
eyes. 

Pierre has saved enough to take him to the city but 
on the eve of his contemplated departure, Rouget is 
arrested for stealing. At Gabrielle's plea, Pierre sup- 
plies the money and liberates him. Pierre promises 
Pabrielle not to maltreat her "husband" and so he 
suffers the taunts of Rouget until finally with La 
Touche, a pastry shop proprietor who is ambitious to 
become his impressario, he ventures to New York to 
try his luck. 

In the changed setting practically the whole busi- 
ness of Rouget's persecution of the girl and her brother 
is duplicated until finally Pierre learns that they were 
not really married. Then he sets out to find the mis- 
creant who has gone back to Canada and there the 
picture comes to an end, after Rouget has received a 
beating and reformed entirely. Blake's nastiness is 
also revealed to Kathleen and she and Pierre are 
married. 



Harry Ghandlee and William B. Laub offer 
producers and production owners who are 
editing as much as the direction, the star or 
failure of any motion picture. 
Productions shelved as failures frequently m 
of titles and scene arrangement; — mediocre 
cial productions. 

It is in this connection that Harry Chandl 
Service" — for the perfection of any picture: 
assembling of scenes; Titling, vv^hich is more 

Harry Ghandlee, 

Editing and Titles for: 

Bolshevism on Trial 
Carmen of the Klondike 
In the Mist, Etc. 



expert service in titling and editing to those 

alive to the fact that it is the titling and 

the story which determines the success or 

ay be brought to success by careful revision 
pictures may be raised to the dignity of spe- 

ee and William B. Laub offer "Perfection 
Editing, which is something more than mere 
than mere makeshift assistance to action. 

William B. Laub, 

Editing and Titles for: 

The Bli^idness of Youth 
The Golden Legend 
Social Ambition, Etc 



Address care of Wid's for consultation 



26 




-zB3iE^r^xxesESESiBm:misBasK, 



wvaasm 
Sunday, January 4, 1920 



Even Farnum Admirers Will Reseet This Story 

Box Of&ce Analysis for the Exhibitor 

WilUam Farnum in If it has to l:ie played a good musical program will 

"HEART STRINGS" help it out a lot during the first half as there are' many 

Fox scenes showing the star playing the violin. But it is 

Even the most dycd-in-the-wool Farnum fans will impossible to see how the last part and the climax can 

resent this story. The star has done some pretty fine be made to register. 

things in the past Ijut there are very few that will be So if you play this go easy in talking about it be- 

thrillcd or moved b\- this poorh' done and very ele- cause many people will be inclined to believe that this 

mental theme. is an old one- so old-fashioned is everything about it. 




Mr. State Right 
f ' Buyer! 

Here is your op- 
portunity 
Are you big 
enough to bring 
to the exhibitors 
of your territory 
Broadway's 
newest s e n s a- 
tion? 

WIRE! ! 

Territory Now 
Fast Selling 

Adolph Philipp Film 
Corporation 

11 East 14th St., New York Citjr 

Paul Philipp, 

General 
Representative 

A. A. MILLMAN 

General Sales Manager 



'inday, January 4, 1920 



— ft);<M 



DAILV 



n 



Spectacular Air Stunts Will Get This Through 



"THE GREAT AIR ROBBERY" 
Universal 

DIRECTOR Jacques Jaccard 

AUTHOR Jacques Jaccard 

SCENARIO BY Not credited 

CAMERAMAN Milton Mark Moore 

AS A WHOLE Has spectacular aeroplane feats 

as main appeal ; fair amount of suspense and 
a few thrills. 

STORY Made secondary in effort to get in air 

stunts. 

DIRECTION Might have put more force into 

the action on land. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Scenes of planes flying at 

night very fine. 

LIGHTINGS Exceptionally good 

CAMERA WORK Another step in moving pic- 
ture photography. 
PLAYERS Francelia Billington had little op- 
portunity ; Lieut. Locklear credited as the 
dare-devil flyer. 
EXTERIORS. ... Some striking views from the air 

INTERIORS Satisfactory when required 

DETAIL Could well omit some of the shots of 

planes ascending and landing. 

CHARACTER OF STORY SUght romance makes 

frail foundation for aeronautic manouevres. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 6,000 feet* 

"The Great Air Robbery" is chiefly a picture show- 
ing the possibilities and achievements of an expert 
flyer. Lieutenant Locklear performs some daring 
feats which have been caught by the camera with 
surprising exactness and realism. In fact, without 
the exceptional stunts of the reckless aviator, the 
production could hardly get by. 

The foundation upon which they' build up to the air 
stuft' is extremely weak and artificial. Shero loses a 
war cross given to her by her aviator sweetheart. 
Upon this slight fact they work up a great sequence 



without even having shero look for the souvenir, 
which should he the natural thing to expect. 

However, the.se little im])lausibilitie$ in the story 
may be lost sight of in view of the remarkable shots 
of the aeroplrinc in action. The idea of having the 
pirate ship boldly marked with skull and cross-bones, 
may get a laugh. It doesn't seem logical that pirates 
would advertise their profession so openly. 

You've got to give the producer credit for being up- 
to-date at any rate. It used to be the old stage-coach 
hold-up but now it's the "highwaymen of the air 
lanes" — presenting the old-fashioned pirates a la twen- 
tieth century. Even the titles are strictly 1920. Shero 
remarks, "I'll take a ship to town." Some scenes 
showing a U. S. Air Mail Service station are inter- 
esting. 

Allan Forrest, an aviator in the U. S. Mail Service, 
in love with Francelia Billington discovers the war 
cross he had given her in the possession of Ray Rip- 
ley. Believing that shero has given the cross to 
willun Ripley, Forrest, after gambling away his sav- 
ings to secure the croix de guerre, finally accepts 
willun's proposal to aid in holding up the midnight 
mail with the understanding that he will recover the 
cross which will be in the mails and handing over to 
willun the shipment of gold which is known will be 
aboard the plane. 

Lieut. Locklear, Allan's pal, learns of his friend's 
mad adventure and starts out in his plane, in search 
of him. When finally he locates the would-be pirate. 
Locklear finds that Forrest's co-workers have doubled 
crossed him and left him stranded and in danger of 
capture by the air patrol. Locklear insists that For- 
rest escape in his machine. Eventually Forrest loses 
control of his plane and it crashes to earth, killing him. 
In the meantime Locklear, after having been wounded 
by the bullets of the air force, makes his way back to 
Francelia who seems quite willing to accept him as a 
substitute for her dead swx-etheart. 



Play Up the "Thrill" Idea But Go Easy on the Story End of It 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 

The stunts and dare-devil feats of Lieut. Locklear bilities of motion picture photography and considering 

which make up the biggest part of the production, are the difficulty experienced in securing these photo- 

tlie pulling power in "The Great Air Robbery" and graphs the scenes presented in the production are in- 

you can probably get a big crow'd in by atilvertisi'ngj! -deed qtiite jwjioftdeHt^li. 

some of the stunts of thJs^clarihg' aviator. - His' lej^p'' If ybtir folks "Have not ah'eady seen some of the 

from one machine to another and his climb out to tjie air pictures presented, -in new^s weeklies, they will ap- 

rudder of the. ship, t<5 repair it whilff^fhbusandS''df'fcct •',0fe'ciate this '^one more readily and for' them the ac-. 

in the air, should give them something to marvel at. complishments of Lieut. Locklear should provide' 

The air jMctures show an advancement in the possi- somethingMiew Jn Jhe_\yay,£)t'.ii..."thriller.'' 



^^ Wt> ij'fh^ 



VICTOR KREMER 



Presents 



CHARLIE CHAPLIN 



IN 



^ ' 




A 
"BURLESQUE 
ON CARMEN" 

STATE RIGHT BUYERS 



It's the Biggest Chaplin Ever Made 
You Can Get Feature Rentals For It 
It Has Been Revised and Re-Edited 
It Has All New Art Sub-Titles 
It Is Chaplin At His Best 
It Is A Sure-Fire Money-Maker 

START THE 
NEW YEAR RIGHT 



WIRE OR WRITE 



VICTOR KREMER FILM FEATURES, Inc. 

SUITE 425 1476 Broadway, New York byrant 8352 



RELEASE DATES 

From October 1, 1919, of all Feature Productions 



EQUITY PICTURES CORP. 

Release Length 

Date Reels Reviewed 

Eyes of Youth (Clara Kimball Young) 7 11/16/19 

FAMOUS PLAYERS-LASKY CORP. 

2 Turning the Tables (Dorothy Gish) 11/9/19 

2 L' Apache (Dorothy Dalton) ...5 12/14/19 

9 Luck in Pawn (Marguerite Clark) 5.... ■ 

9 Crooked Straight (Charles Ray) 5 11/2/19 

9 What Every Woman Learns (Enid Bennett) 10/26/10 

16 Male and Female (DeMille) ...5 11/30/19 

16 23;^ Hours Leave (Douglas MacLean-Doris 

May) 5. . . . 11/2/19 

23 The Invisible Bond (Irene Castle) 5 

23 It Pays to Advertise (Bryant Washburn) 5 11/30/19 

23 The Miracle of Love (Cosmopolitan) 5.... 

30 Counterfeit (Elsie Ferguson) 5 11/30/19 

30 Scarlet Days (Griffith) 5 11/23/19 

7 Ah Adventure in Hearts (Robert Warwick). .5 

7 Victory (Tourneur) 5 12/7/19 

7 More Deadly Than the Male (Ethel Clayton). 5 12/14/19 

14 The Cinema Murder (Cosmopolitan) 5 

14 Behind the Door (Ince Special) 5.... 

21 His Wife's Friend (Dorothy Dalton) 5 

21 Hawthorne of the U. S. A. (Wallace Reid)...5 11/30/19 

21 A Girl Named Mary (Marguerite Clark) . ...5.... 

28 Wanted— A Husband (Billie Burke) 5 

28 Red Hot Dollars (Charles Bay) 5 

28 Everywoman (Super-Special) 5.... 

4 The Woman in the Suitcase (Enid Bennett) 

4 Too Much Johnson (Bryant Washburn) . ...5.... 

4 The Thirteenth Commandment (Ethel Clayton) 5.... 

11 Sand (William S. Hart) ,5 

11 On With the Dance (Special) 5 

18 Mary Ellen Comes to Town (Dorothy Gish). .5.... 

18 Huckleberry Finn (Special) 5.... 

18 The Tree of Knowledge (Robert Warwick). 5 

25 What's Your Husband Doing? (Douglas MacLean- 
Doris May) 5 

25 Dangerous Hours (Ince Super) 5 



Not. 

Not. 
Not. 
Nov. 
Not. 
Not. 
Not. 

Not. 

Not. 
Not. 
Not. 

N»T. 

Dec. 
Dec. 
Dee. 
Dee. 
Dee. 
Dee. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dae. 

Jaa. 
Jaa. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jaa. 

Jaa. 



FIRST NATIONAL 

The Thunderbolt (Katherine MacDonald) 5. 

Virtuous Vamp (Constance Talmadge) 5. 

Mind the Paint Girl (Anita Stewart) 6. 

Heart O' the Hills (Mary Pickford) 6. 

The Beauty Market (Katherine MacDonald) 6. 

In Wrong (Jack Pickford) 5. 

In Old Kentucky (Anita Stewart) 7. 

A Day's Pleasure (Charlie Chaplin) 2. 

The Greatest Question (D. W. Griffith's Prod.). 5. 
A Daugther of Two Worlds (Norma Talmadge) 5. 

The Inferior Sex (Milfred Harris Chaplin) 5. 

The Turning Point (Katherine MacDonald) . .5. 
The River's End (Marshall Neilan Prod.) 5. 



. . 11/23/19 

. . 11/30/19 

. . 11/30/19 

. . 12/7/19 



12/14/19 



FOX FILM CORP. 

William Farnum Series 

The Last of the Duanes 7 10/5/19 

Wings of the Morning 6 12/7/19 

Heart Strings 

The Adventurer 

Tom Mix Series 

The Feud 5 

The Cyclone 

The Daredevil 5 

Theda Bara Series 

La Belle Russe 6 9/21/19 

Lure of Ambition 6 11/16/19 

Fox Entertainments 

The Winning Stroke (George Walsh 5.... • 

Eastward Ho (William Russell) 5 11/23/19 

Thieves (Gladys Brockwell) 5 11/2/19 

The Devil's Riddle (Gladys Brockwell) 5 

The Lincoln Highwayman (Wm. Russell) ... .5 

The Devil's Riddle ((Gladys Brockwell) 5 

The Shark (George Walsh) 5 

Shod With Fire (William Russell) 5 

Flames of the Flesh (Gladys Brockwell) 5 

The Square Shooter (Buck Jones) 5 

Tin Pan Alley (Ray & Fair) 5 

Her Elephant Man (Shirley Mason) 5.... 

The Hell Ship (Madlaine Traverse) 5 



GOLDWYN DISTRIBUTING CORP. 

Release Leneth 

Date Reels Reviewed 

Star Series Productions 

Upstairs (Mabel Norman) 5 8/31/19 

Heartsease (Tom Moore) 5 9/14/19 

The Girl From Outside (Rex Beach) 7 8/24/19 

The World and Its Woman (Geraldine Farrar) 7 8/21/19 

Lord and Lady Algy (Tom Moore) 8 9/7/19 

Strictly Confidential (Madge Kennedy) 5 10/12/19 

Bonds of Love (Pauline Frederick) 5 

Almost a Hiisband (Will Rogers) 5 10/19/19 

Jinx (Mabel Normand) 5 9/28/19 

The Gay Lord Quex (Tom Moore) 5 

Jubilo (Will Rogers) .....5 12/14/19 

The Loves of Letty (Pauline Frederick) 5 

Flames of the Desert (Geraldine Farrar) 7 11/9/19 

The Cup of Fury (Rupert Hughes) 5.... 

Bennlson Star Series 

High Pockets 5.... 

A Misfit Earl 5 

HALLMARK PICTURES CORP. 

A Dangerous Affair (Herbert Rawlinson)... .5 

Wit Wins (Florence Billings) 5 

Love, Honor and ? (Stuart Holmes- Ellen Cassldy) 

5. . . . 

The Phantom Honeymoon (Margaret Marsh) . . .6. . . . 

The Heart of a Gypsy (Florence Billings) 5 

A Woman's Experience (Mary Boland) 

W. W. HODKINSON CORP. 

Distributing Through Pathe 
Benj. B. Hampton — Great Authors Pictures, Inc. 

The Westerners 7 8/10/19 

The Sagebrusher 7 

Zane Grey Pictures, Inc. — Benj. B. Hampton and Fltinge F. Warner 

Desert Gold 7. . . . 11/16/19 

The Desert of Wheat 6 

J. Parker Read, Jr., Productions 

Sahara (Louise Glaum) 7 3/23/19 

The Lone Wolf's Doughter (Louise Glaum) 7 12/14/19 

Deitrich-Beck, Inc. 

The Bandbox (Doris Kenyon) 6 11/30/19 

The Harvest Moon (Doris Kenyon) 6 

.4rtco Productions 

As a Man Thinks (Lea Baird) 5.... 

The Volcano (Leah Baird) 6 

The Capitol (Leah Baird) 6 

Cynthia on the Minute (Leah Baird) 

Robert Brunton Productions 

.\ White Man's Chance (J. Warren Kerrigan).. 5 4/20/19 

The Joyous Liar (J. Warren Kerrigan) 5 12/14/19 

The Lord Loves the Irish (J. Warren Kerrigan)5 

National — Billie Rhodes Productions 

The Blue Bonnet (Billie Rhodes) 6 8/31/19 

METRO PICTURES CORP. 

Nazlmova Productions 

The Red Lantern 7 5/4/19 

The Brat 7.... 9/14/19 

Stronger Than Death 6 

Screen Classics, Inc. (Specials) 

Lombard!, Ltd. (Bert Lytell) 6.... 9/28/19 

Please Get Married (Viola Dana) 6 11/9/19 

Fair and Warmer (May Allison) 6 10/19/19 

Should a Woman Tell (Alice Lake) 6 

The Walk-Offs (May Allison) 6 

The Willow Tree (Viola Dana) 6 

The Right of Way (Bert Lytell) 6 

The Best of Luck (Drury Lane Melodrama) 6 

PATHE EXCHANGE, INC. 

Oct. 5 Impossible Catherine (Virginia Pearson) 5.. 

Oct. 12 A Damsel in Distress (June Caprice) 5.. 

Oct. 12 Daddy Number Two (Baby Marie Osborne) . .2. . 

Oct. 19 The Moonshine Trail (Sylvia Breamer) 6.. 

Nov. 2 The Gay Old Dog (John Cumberland) 6.. 

Nov. 9 A Woman of Pleasure (Blanche Sweet) 7., 

Nov. 16 The Right to Lie (Dolores Cassinelli) 7. 

Nov. 23 Miss Gingersnap (Marie Osborne) 6.. 

Nov. 30 Dawn (Sylvia Breamer) 6. 

Dec. 7 Brother." Divided (Frank Keenan) 5.. 

Dec. 14 The A-B-C of Love (Mae Murray) 6. 

Dec. 21 The Prince and Betty (Wm. Desmond) 5. 

Jan. 4 My Husbands's Other Wife (Sylvia Breamer).. 6.. 

Jan. 11 Fighting Cressy (Blanche Sweet) 6. 



10/19/19 



10/26/19 
11/9/19 
9/14/19 
12/7/19 



12/7/19 

12/14A9 
12/14/19 



12/14/19 



lO 



Release Length 

J>ato Keels Keviewed 

American Film Co., Inc. 

Yvonne From Paris (Mary Miles Minter). . .;. . .H. . . . 7/6/19 

The Tiger Lily (Margarita Fisher) .:.... .'...5 7720/19 

This Hero Stufe (William Russell) 5.... 7/27/19 

Eve in Exile (Charlotte Walker) 7 12A4/19 

REALART PICTURES CORP. 

Soldiers of Fortune (Anna Q. Nilsson), 
Pauline Starke, Norman Kerry, Wallace 

Beery 7 11/16/19 

Anne of Green Gables (Mary Miles Minter) 6..,. 11/23/19 

Erstwhile Susan (Constance Binney) 5.... 12/7/19 

Mystery of the Yellow Room (Lorin Raker, 

Ethel Grey Terry, Geo. Cowl, Edmund 

Elton) 6. . . . 10/26/19 

ROBERTSON-COLE 

Specials 

The Open Door 6 10/19/19 

The Broken Butterfly 6 10/26/19 

The Beloved Cheater 5 11/16/19 

SUPERIOR PICTURES 

November Releases 

The Illustrious Prince (Sessue Hayakawa) 5.... 11/16/19 

A Fugitive from Matrimony (H. B. Warner).. 5 12/7/19 

The Blue Band.mna (Wni. Desmond) 5.... 

December Releases 

Seeing It Through (Brentwood Prod.) r>.... 

Beckoning Roads (Bessie Barriscale) 5.... 

The Tons Man (Sessue Hayakawa) 5 12/14/19 

January Releases 

Ihe Third Generation (Brentwood) 5.... 

The Beggar Prince (Sessue Hayakawa) 5 

The Luck of Geraldine Laird (Bessie Barriscale)5. . . . 

LEWIS J. SELZNICK ENTERPRISES 
SELZNICK PICTURES 

Distributed by Select Exchanges. 

A Regular Girl (Elsie Janis) 5.... 11/30/19 

The Country Cousin (Elaine Hammersteln) . .5 12/14/19 

Sealed Hearts (Eugene O'Brien) 5.... 

The Glorious Lady (Olive Thomas) .5 11/9/19 

Piccadily Jim (Owen Moore) 5 

Out Yonder (Olive Thomas) 5.... 

The Broken Melody (Eugene O'Brien) 5 

SELECT PICTURES 

Distributed by Select Exchanges. 

The Undercurrent (Guy Empey) 6 12/7/19 

Faith of the Strong (Mitchell Lewis) 5 9/21/19 

A Scream in the Night (Special) 5 10/26/19 

Isle of Conquest (Norma Talmadge) 5 11/9/19 

UNITED ARTISTS' CORP. 

Oct. 20 Broken Blossoms (Griffith) 6 5/18/19 

Dec. 2 When the Clouds Roll By (Fairbanks) 

UNITED PICTURE THEATERS 

Her Game (Florence Reed) 5.... 

The Eternal Mother (Florence Reed) 

The Corsican Brothers (Dustin Farnum) 



UNIVERSAL FILM MFG. CO. 

Release Length 

Date Keels 



Reviewed 



Jewel Features 

Paid in Advance (Dorothy Phillips) 6 11/16/19 

The Right to Happiness (Dorothy Phillips) . .8 8/24/19 

Blind Ilu.sbands (Eric Stroheim) 7 10/19/19 

Universal Features 

The AVoman Under Cover (Fritzi Brunette). .5 9/14/19 

The Sundown Trail (Alonroe Salisbury) 6.... 

Common Property (Robt. Anderson-Nell Craig) 6 

Loot (Ora Carew) 6 

Bonnie, Bonnie Lassie (Marv MacLaren) 6.... 

The Brute Breaker (Frank Mavo) 6 11/2.V19 

The Rider of the Law (Harrv Carey) 6 10/12/19 

The Trembling Hour (Helen Eddy) 6 10/19/19 

His Divorced Wife (Monroe Salisbury) 5 11/9/19 

Under Susnicion (Forrest Stanlev-Ora Carew) 5.... 11/23/19 

Lasca (Fdith Roberts-Frank Mayo) r> 11/2.V19 

A Gun Fighting Gentleman (Harry Careyl 6 11/30/19 

The Pointing Finger (Mary MacLaren) 5 12/7/19 

VITAGRAPH 

In Honor's Web (Harry Morey) 5.... 11/9/19 

A Fighting Colleen (Bessie Love) 5 11/16A9 

The Black Gate (Earle Williams) .5 

The Combat (Anita Stewart) 5 

The Golden Shower (Gladys Leslie) ,5 

The Tower of .Jewels (Corinne Griffith) 5 

The Darkest Hour (Harry Morey) 5.... 

Pegeen (Bessie Love) 5 

When a Man Loves (Earle Williams) 5 

The Sins of the Mothers (Anita Stewart) 5.... 

The Midnight Bride (Gladys Leslie) .5 

Human Collateral (Corinne Griffith) 5 

The Birth of a Soul (Harry Morey) 5 

Special Productions 

The Winchester Woman (Alice Joyce) fi 11/16/19 

The Climbers (Corinne Griffith) 6 11/9/19 

The Venge.ince of Durant (Alice Joyce) 6.... 

Slaves of Pride (Alice Joyce) 6.... 

WORLD PICTURES 

Oct. 6 The Oakdale Affair (Evelyn Greeley) 5 10/12/19 

Oct. 13 Woman of Lies (June Elvidge) 5 11/2/19 

Oct. 20 The Black Circle (Creighton Hale) 5 10/19/19 

Oct. 27 The Arizona Catclaw (Edythe Sterling) 5 

Special When Bearcat Went Dry 5 

Nov. 3 Me and Captain Kidd (Evelyn Greeley) 5 11/16/19 

Nov. 10 The Poison Pen (June Elvidge) 5 11/30A9 

Nov. 17 You Never Know Your Luck (House Peters). 5 

Nov. 24 Dad's Girl (Jackie Saunders) 5 

DECEMBER SHORT SUBJECT RELEASES 

Frohman Amusement Co. 

Gemini Ambrose (Mack Swain) 1.... 

All Wrong Ambrose (Mack Swain) 1.... 

The Heart of Texas (Texas Guinam) 2 

Spirit of Cabin Mine (Texas Guinan) 2 



C. I>. 



Chester 

No Coma in Acoma 1. 

The People in White 1. 

The Simple Life 1. 

Mr. Outing Gets a Pipe Dream 1. 

Famous PIayers-L,asky Corp. 

A Lady's Tailor (Sennett) 2. 

After the Circus (Briggs) 1. 

Push Car Trails in Formosa (Burton Holmes) 1. 



Some Short Reels 



"Why Men Go Wild," Christie starred in the one reeler which is quite funny, but 

Women are said to admire men who have the which has a theme that is far from new-. There is 

courage to use physical force in subduing them, much an unusual and creditable iinish, showing Vernon and 

after the manner employed by their ancesters who Vera Stedman executing a dive followed by a clinch, 

resided in caves and ate their meat raw. "Cave Man as a matter of fact, however, the picture would have 

StufT" figures very prominent in the story which was ])een quite complete without that bit wliich has been 

written bv W. Scott Darling. Bobbv Vernon is added after a similar shot, on land had been taken. 



Short Reels 



3) 



"Keeping Fit," Western Electric 

Shows the \an'ous ways in wliich employees of the 
company aniusi'd themselves on one of tlieir outings, 
and will prove of little interest to any hut those 
directly interested in the affairs of the company. Some 
of the shots were very good, in fact, the photography 
throughout was acceptable, but they can't call this 
anything I)Ut advertising stuff and it is not particular- 
ly valualjle from that angle either. 



"Screen Follies," No. 2 and 3, Capital 
Puns and Gags, coupled with cartoons, some well 
drawn, and others not so good, make up the new series 
of one reelers being turned out by Capital. The re- 
marks, are usually clever, although in a few cases 
they are rather old. What features the issue, however, 
is the fact that the manner in which the reels have 
been produced — the way in which they are introduced 
and closed, is distinctly novel and the entire offering 
unusual. With better judgment used in selecting the 
material for the one reelers and some more care exer- 
cised generally, these subjects can be put over with 
much to spare. 



"The Vagabond," Clark-Cornelius 

You can't beat the old Chaplins. Most of the folks 
have probably seen this before, but they'll laugh at it 
again. It shows Charlie displaying the walk that 
helped make him famous. The expression that few 
comedians have been able to imitate successfully is 
also there, and the story is one that in addition to sev- 
eral exceptional bits of comedy business, registers 
pathos that serves to bring out the humor much more 
forcibly, due t othe contrast caused. Combining a good 
story, commendable production and Chaplin, this will 
again prove a hit. 



Pathe Review, No. 31 

It opens with a tinted scenic study, after which 
comes a portion devoted to the wireless telephone. 
Albert P. Cutler, former billiard champion illustrates 
various difScult shots, which are then shown as per- 
formed at one eighth of the actual speed at which 
they are made. That ])art will interest cue enthusiasts, 
for the spin put on the balls and the manner in which 
the strokes are made, are shown clearly. An animal 
portion and scenes at a factory, showing some of the 
work on textiles round out the reel. 



"Tough Luck," Pathe 

Knotted-tailed black cats, broken mirrors, cross-eyed 
men, ladders that loom up over him as he passes — in 
short, almost all of the things that arc reputed to 
exert a malign influence on the person who is con- 
fronted with them, stare Snub Pollard in the face in 
this one reeler, directed by Fred Newmeyer. A con- 
siderable amount of chase stuff, much of it familiar 
is included in the offering, which has a poor story 
to begin with, if any story at all. It falls short of 
the standard set in most of the Pollard releases of this 
series. 



"Gemini Ambrose," Frohman Amusement Co. 

Comedies in which confusion is caused by similarity 
of appellations, are not so scarce, but in this one, 
the trouble is caused by the fact that two wives, twins, 
resemble each other so strongly that they cause a con- 
flict between their fond husbands. The leading woman 
in the picture plays a dual role and gives a satisfactory 
performance. Tom Buckingham turned the crank and 
the photography is quite commendable. Elsa Brad- 
ford furnished the story for the one reeler which should 
fit in on your program in a satisfactory manner. 






Reason No. 2 

The cast for 

"THE SCRE VMING SHADOW" 

is practically the same as appeared in "The Trai 
of the Octopus." Ben Wilson and Neva Gerber 
portraying the leading roles. 

Watch for Reason No. 3 Tomorrow 

BEN WILSON PRODUCTIONS 

UNIVERSAL CITV CALF. 

Released Through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street New York 





%^ 



VJB ^iTv 



Short Reels 



"A Story of Zinc," Ford-Goldwyn 

Zinc, the manner in which it is mined, smelted and 
then put through various other processes until the 
desired product is obtained, is dealt with in another 
Ford one reeler, which is much like the preceding 
industrial productions turned out by that organiza- 
tion. To screen properly some of the bits in this 
was probably a difficult matter, but the shots within 
the mine and other bits have been photographed in 
reasonably good fashion. 



"Charlie Gets a Job/' Century-Universal 

Charlie from the Orient, a Mongolian styled thus, 
and featured in this two reeler, gives an exceedingly 
clever performance in the leading role and helps 
greatly in holding this up. It will probably manage 
to hold its own in the smaller houses, for the little 
Chinaman certainly does do some very creditable 
work. There are a few bits of business that are 
funny, and the fellow who plays the chef, does some 
good work. Otherwise, there is little to recommend 
the production, which Jesse Robbins wrote and di- 
rected. 



"Innocent Ambrose," Frohman Amusement 

Fred Walters penned the story for "Innocent Am- 
brose," in which a mix-up is "caused by an eloping 
couple speeding away in an automobile and Ambrose 
in another machine clutching a store figure, with a 
dress for his wife on it. A village 'constabule' chases 
the eloping duo, following the instructions of the 
girl's mother and mistakes Ambrose for the other 
man. Following considerable excitement, all ends 
well, as usual and everyone's happy. The photogra- 
phy is excellent and the oflfering will do with much 
to spare. Mack Swain is starred and as usual, di- 
rected. 



"In the Soup," Universal 

Well written, replete with humerous bits and staged 
in a somewhat unusual manner, this one reel comedy 
which stars Chris Rubb, will undoubtedly score a hit 
on almost any program. It takes Rubb out of his 
usual element, placing him in far-ofif Africa, where 
he must capture a lion to win the hand of the girl 
whom he loves. He plans things so that a colored 
friend, dressed up like a lion, will allow himself to 
be captured. Unfortunately, the scheme does not 
work out, for a genuine lion appears and spoils mat- 
ters. Subsequently, Rubb is captured by a band of 
savages, and when he wins all of the king's possessions 
with a pair of dice, he is sentenced to be boiled. The 
lion appears, however, and after some comedy Rubb 
captures the animal and impresses the father of the 
girl sufficiently to win her hand. 



"Dutch Caps and Costumes," Educational 
Colored scenics are becoming quite popular and 
this one, consisting of shots of scenes in Holland 
and some of the populace, has much that will please. 
Unfortunately, however, the manner in which it has 
been tinted is exceptionally poor at times. The two 
closing shots are excellent and help somewhat, as do 
some of those showing the canal and wind-mills. 



"This Way Out," Model— Bulls-Eye 

A dog and youngster make it exceedingly difficult 
for Gale Henry, and her husband to secure lodging 
in this two reel ofifering which has several funny sit- 
uations and which is generally, a very satisfactory 
slapstick comedy production. The featured comed- 
ienne does some excellent work, and the support is 
up to the mark. Most of the scenes are laid in none 
too well furnished apartments, and the spectacle, al- 
though not particularly refreshing to the eye at all 
times, will probably draw forth laughter. 



" Bound and Gagged," Pathe 

Geoge B. Seitz and Marguerite Courtot are hap- 
pily united in the tenth and last episode of "Bound 
and Gagged," called "Hopely Takes the Liberty." 
Roger Hopely, Barlow's valet, is instrumental in 
bringing the two together after they have had a 
misunderstanding. Like many of the other episodes, 
this possesses much light comedy, and while generally 
foolish, offers the spectator a novel type of amuse- 
ment in serial form. The finish comes rather sud- 
denly and furnishes a satisfactory climax to the pro- 
duction. 



"All Wrong, Ambrose," Frohman Amusement Co. 

Not particularly strong in theme is "All Wrong 
Ambrose," and the incidents woven about the plot 
are not in themselves of sufficient merit to put this 
over. Mack Swain is his usual funny self in it and 
the supporting cast does some good work, but the 
manner in which this has been staged is not up to the 
standard set in some of the other Swain vehicles. 
Elsa Bradford wrote the story for the one-reel offering 
and Tom Buckingham was behind the camera. Swain 
directed. 



"The Little Green Devil," Universal 

Only one unusual feature is to be found in this slap- 
stick comedy, built on a common theme with hack- 
neyed incidents wrapped around it. There is a Swede 
comedian who figures prominently in the offering and 
does some good work. Three other principals are in- 
cluded in the cast and while their work is not bad, it 
is not at all times something about which to enthuse. 



^. 



HELLS BFLLS 

- 5At.OO N 

SODA FOUNTAIN 




mtm 



SAMUEL GOLDWTN 




> 



^ J 



-?lo 



V 



and not a 
drojp to drink ! 



PRE SE NTS 



WILL ROGERS 

WATERWATER.EVERYWHERE 



DiRECTEDBvCLARENCE BADGER 



GOLDWYN PICTVRES CORPORATION 



VvMVEL bOLDWlTf Ar/iasl 



u 



^ 




i 



CJK whal a IdnglGd web we WGdvc, 
When first we practise to deceive ! ' 

Edwir\ Carewe Productions'-^ 



presents 



OLORES 
CASSINELLI 



in 



cike 



^eh Q/^Deceit 



"AVhcn she sought lodGprivG thG girl 
who had been a sister to her of that- 
which was rightfully hcrS; when she 
sought to adorn a social life for which 
shG was not mGntally or morally fitted,, 
what a tangled web she wove ! • • * 



Personally ciirected by 

EDWIN CAREWE 



Story by 

FINIS FOX 




Pathe' 

Distributors 




:k 



7^BRADSTREET 
of FILMDOM 





T/cRECOCHIZEII 
AUTHORIT 




Vol. XI. No. 4 



Monday, January 5, 1920 



Price 5 Crit 



Metro Goes to Loew 

Richard A. Rowland Will Remain 

As President — Many Millions 

Involved 

Formal announcement of the tak- 
ing over of Metro Pictures Corp. by 
Loews, Inc. was made early this 
morning. Richard A. Rowland will 
remain as president of Metro. 

Details of the transaction which 
involves many millions will appear 
in to-morrow's issue of WID'S 
DAILY. 



Curwood and Hartfond Expected 
James Oliver Curwood, the auth- 
or and David M. Hartford, in charge 
of production for the Curwood 
stories arc expected in town to-day 
for a conference with First Na- 
tional and Ernie Shipman regard- 
ing "The Yellow Back" and other 
Curwood stories. 



Serial Episodes Arrive 

Prints of the first three episodes 
of the second Ben Wilson serial, 
"The Screaming Shadow" have ar- 
rived from the Coast. The three epi- 
sodes are titled, "The Scream in the 
Dark," "The Virgin of Death," and 
"the Fang of the Beast." 



Slide Advertising 

Awakes Interest from Exhibitor — 

Wants to Know Distributor's 
Statement. 

A prominent exhibitor of the Mid- 
dle West has sent out a letter which 
has been given rather wide distribu- 
tion regarding the use of the screen 
for advertising, saying in part: 

"I note that the Paraniount-Artcraft 
has gone into tlie advertising game very 
strongly. A few days ago, I saw a slide 
advertising Billie Burke in "The Mis- 
leading Widow" and across the bottom 
of the slide was the announcenient "She 
Uses George Washington Coffee," They 
are charging exhibitors 10c each for these 
slides. 

"I am also informed that the Kuppen- 
heimer clothing people are paying the 
Paramonnt a large sum in connection 
with some picture in which there is a 
scene showing a boy reading the Sat- 
urday Evening Post ana lie turns to the 
page of the Kuppenheimer ad. The Stutz 
car people, they telf nie, are also pay- 
ing the Paramount people real money 
for using Stutz cars in their films. 

"I understand that they have opened 
a department to solicit this type of 
advertising, and I think if this were 
brought to the notice of the exhibitors 
through the trade papers in the proper 
way, it would mean a lot for producers 
who are not taking this kind of adver- 
tising 

"What do you think about it? 

When the attention of John C. 
Flinn of Famous Players was di- 
rected to the communication he said: 

"It is a fact that the George Wash- 
{Continued on Page 2) 




Caught with "the goods" and Cupid is the stern Judge — Norma Tal- 
madge in her initial First National picture, "A Daughter of Two Worlds." 
— Advt. 



New Stock Offering 

The United States Photoplay 
Corp., producers of "Determination," 
"The Soul of Man," "The Home of 
Man" and "Deception," have closed 
a contract with A. J. Peyton & Co., 
a New York brokerage firm to un- 
derwrite the entire $1,000,000 stock 
issue of the corporation. 

The producing company is the 
present lessee of the E. K. Lincoln 
studio, Grantwood, N. J., for a term 
of two years. 

The Peyton company assumes the 
p --e General Fiscal Agency of the 
V Phbtoplay Corp.'s stock by 
writing it. Mr. Dorn, manager 
brokerage house stated on 
:: ly that $500,000 of the issue 

V. offered to the public. As 

ye nplete plans have not been 

made ir its disposal, but Dorn 
stated ti at the stock will either go 
on the Curb market or the Con- 
solidated Stock Exchange. 



Still Another Studio 

(By Wire to WID'S DAILY) 
Dover, Del.— The McKinley Stu- 
dios, Inc., with a capital of $300,000 
have been chartered here. Harry S. 
Hecheimer of New York City is 
mentioned as one of the incorpora- 
tors. 



Harry S. Hecheinier stated on 
Saturday that he had been retained 
as attorney by a company known as 
Fridgen, Bauer and Wallis of 20 
Wall St. He stated that the firm 
was a brokerage house but it was im- 
possible to secure any telephone 
number for them at the address 
given. 

Hecheimer stated that the com- 
pany plans to build a studio in New 
York City which will be run on a 
co-operative basis for independent 
producers. There has been nothing 
definite done regarding the location 
of the proposed plant. 



Loew in Chicago 

To Build in Conjunction with Jonef 
Linick and Schaefer — Combina- 
tion Hotel and Theater 
(Special to WIDS DAILY) 

Chicago — Marcus Loew, in assc 
ciation with Jones, Linick an 
Schaefer will build a 3,500 scat thi 
ater and a 3,000 room hotel in th 
"loop" district here. 

Although the project is admitte 
by Jones, Linick and Schaefer th 
exact location of the theater site hi 
not been revealed. The theater, 
is planned, will have four entrance 

Incidentally, Loew and Jones, IJ. 
ick and Schaefer are tied up by <. . 
tue of the fact that the latter 
interested in the Southern Loc 
Time, catering to 18 theaters sea 
tered through the middle west 
south. 



] 



Marcus Loew admitted on Sat 
day that he has plans under wa 
for a joint venture in Chicago --v 
(Continued on Page 2) 



IdLlUll 11 U. 

vas deci<f 
tivities d|. 



Frohman Votes Stock Increase 
At a special meeting of the stoc 
holders of the Frohman Amuseme 
Corp., it was voted to increase tl 
capital stock of the corporation fro. 
$500,000 to $1,600,000. 

At the same time it wj 
to increase production activit 
ing 1920. At least four big spec4', 
will be turned out. 



Brillant With International 
Arthur M. Brillant left Fame 
Players-Lasky Saturday and joi 
International to-day. Brillant 
handle publicity with Harry I. Di 
At Famous he was in charge of s 
vertising "tie-ups" and travelled t 
road on special business for Ado; 
Zukor. 



Roth Returns to America 



1 



Harry Roth, secretarj- and trei 
urer of the Forward Film Distrb 
tors. Inc., has just returned fro 
an extensive trip through Euro- 
where he consummated several co 
tracts for representation in tl 
country of foreign distributors. 



Denny Going to South Africa 

Orrin Denny, a cameraman wi 
Universal for several years leav 
on Friday for South Africa to i 
place Pliny Home as photograpji_ 
with the Universal Smithsonian 
pedition. Home is returning 
America. 



Monday, January 5, 1920 



m 



jM^v 



DAILV 




ol. II No. 4 Mondajr January 5. 1920 Price 5 C«nll 

opyright 1919, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 

»c. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 

lew York. N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 

ILM FOLKS, INC. 

. C. ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 

rer; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 

nd Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 

usiness Manager, 

ntered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 

t the post office at New York, N. Y., under 

le act of March 3, 1879. 

errns (Postage free) United States, Outside 

: Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 

onths, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 

i.OO. 

Subscribers should remit with order 
ddress all communications to WID'S 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Telephone: Vanderbilt 4551-4352-5558 
Hollywood, California 
ditorial and Business Offices: 6411 Holly- 
ood Bird. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 
Chicago representatives — Willis, Eckels 
id Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 
licago. III. 

Quotations 

Bid Asked Last Sale 

mous Players .. 9254 94 93^ 

Idwyn — — 30^4 

)ews, Inc 3034 31 K 31 

riangle Film — — M 

nit. Pict. Prod. 151^ 15^ 15% 

^orld Film — — 5^ 

Bickel Back With 1st Natl. 
(Special to WID'S DAILY) 
Dallas, Tex. — Leroy Bickel, who a 
lort time ago planned an exhibitors' 
i-operative movement for this ter- 
tory has gone back to First Na- 
)nal. 

L. T. Pellerin who was associated 
th Bickel in the short-hved venture 
s returned to Metro. 



WID'S 

fEAR BOOK 

1919-1920 

NOW READY 

— A mine of Authentic 
Information for the 
Exhibitor. 

— Of Inestimable Value 
to the Casting Direc- 
tor, Executive or 
Producer. 

— Nearly 400 Pages of 
Live, Virile Matter 
of the Motion Picture 
Industry. 

PRICE, $1.00 



Prepaid 
Anywhere in U. 



S. A. 



Loew ie Chicago 

(Cuntinued from Page 1) 

Jones, Linick and Schaefer. He 
stated that members of that firm will 
be in New York this week to con- 
fer with him on the project. 



Loew Dividend 

A dividend of 50 cents a share 
on the capital stock of Loew's, Inc. 
has been declared by the directors 
of the corporation. The dividend 
will be payable on Feb. 1 to stock- 
holders of record, Jan. 17. 



New Loew Subsidiary 
{Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Albany, N. Y. — Marcus Loew, 
David Bernstein and Nicholas M. 
Schenck of New York City are the 
principal stockholders of the Eighty- 
Third Street Theater Corp., which 
has been granted a charter by the 
Secretary of State. The corpora- 
tion is capitalized at $25,000 and will 
manufacture, deal in and exhibit mo- 
tion picture films, also maintain the- 
aters. The attorney for the corpor- 
ation is Elek J. Ludvigh, New York. 



Loews will build a theater at 83rd 
St. and Broadway as announced a 
short time ago. 



New Realart Exchange 
(Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles, Calif. — Realart Pic- 
tures, through its local branch man- 
ager Oren Freeland Woody, has 
just signed a ten year lease on the 
property at 812 So. Olive St., for 
the erection of an exchange building 
to cost approximately $100,000. A 
large frame structure was recently 
removed to permit of construction 
work on the building. It is claimed 
that one of the most modern 
equipped exchange buildings ever 
constructed will be built for Real- 
art's reception. It is anticipated that 
the building will be ready for occu- 
pancy March 1. The quarters will 
be jointly occupied by Pathe. 



Smith With Chamberlain Brown 

Jess Smith, is now manager of the 
picture department of Chamberlain 
Brown, Inc. Edith Rose is his as- 
sistant. 



Hammett With Selznick 

Melville Hamniett is now assistant 
to John Lynch, editor- of the Selz- 
nick scenario department. 

Charles Belmont Davis is also 
a member of the staff. 



Plan Small Chain for Toledo 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Toledo, O. — A newly formed com- 
pany known as the Community 
Amusement Co., capitalized at $200,. 
000 will build a chain of neighbor- 
hood theaters in Toledo. It is 
planned at this time to build and 
operate eight. 

The first of the string will be at 
Broadway and Knower Sts. It will 
seat 1,200 people as will the others. 



Chadwick's Paper, the Journal 

(Bij Wire to WID'S DAILY) 

Albany — The Film Bulletin Corp., 
is the name of a $10,000 corporation 
formed here by I. E., E. K. Chad- 
wick and F. J. Willis, of New York 
City. 



New Firm Builds Studio 
(Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Riverside, Cal. — Edwin Frazee is 
president and supervising director of 
Frazee Film Prod., which has erected 
a studio on New Magnolia Ave. 



The above company will be the 
publishers of the Motion Picture 
Journal, which is the name of the 
publication Chadwick will sponsor. 
The paper will cater to New York 
and New Jersey exhibitors. Tom 
Hamlin will be editor and first issue 
will be off the press Jan. 17. 



Talbot Buys Majestic, Tulsa 

(Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Tulsa, Okla.—Ralph Talbot has 
purchased the Majestic here from 
Dr. C. M. McCarthy. 

Glenn Condon at the same time 
resigned from the Majestic manage- 
ment and joined the forces of T. E. 
Larson who maintains a state right 
exchange here. 

Incidentally, Larson who already 
has offices in Tulsa, Minneapolis and 
Seattle will shortly invade the Tex- 
as territory. He has been in Dal- 
las with the purpose of opening a 
branch there. 



INSURANCE 

IS YOUR 

PROTECTION 




THE NEWSPAPERS SAY: 

Pay-roll Robberies Heaviest 
in History. 

The National Surety Com- 
pany reports that in the past 
sixty days there have been 
more payrool hold-ups than 
in any previous similar per- 
iod in the history of burglary 
insurance. 



Peuben CXmuels 



B /neumnce 

l> Phone .Jo/in 



Slide Advertising 

(Continued from Page 1 ) 
ington Coffee Co. used some slidej 
but we never had anything to 
with them. They were used in con- 
nection with the Billie Burke fea- 
ture, and were distributed by the 
coffee company to jobbers, grocers, 
and perhaps to theaters. I think, 
however, the grocers handled the 
slides. Certain it is that we neither 
distributed them nor charged for 
them. We inaugurated a double 
window display for grocers for the 
picture, and 50,000 were used for the 
benefit of the picture. Many gro- 
cers further co-operated with the 
theaters by buying tickets for the 
various theaters which showed the 
feature. 

"There is nothing to the Kuppen- 
heimer or Stutz matter mentioned. 

"It is true that we have an in- 
dustrial department that is making 
productions for manufacturers. One 
of these, for the Goodrich tire 
people, will be shown during the 
Automobile Show. But there is no 
connection between the industr'ial 
department and our features. Not 
the slightest." 



Three B'way Showings for Arbuckle 
H. H. Buxbaum, manager of the 
local Famous Players exchange has 
closed for "The Garage," the next 
Fatty Arbuckle comedy for a day 
and date showing, beginning Jan. 
11 at the Broadway, Capitol and Ri- 
voli. He has also signed a con- 
tract for a simultaneous showing of 
all the Arbuckle and Sennett com- 
edies at the Capitol and Rivoli. 

"Male and Female" is said to have 
been responsible for the heaviest 
bookings ever recorded through the 
New York exchange. It will play ; 
Moss' Hamilton and Jefferson, over 
U. B. O. time. Proctor's and Loew's. \ 
The latter has also booked "Every- 
woman" with a possible extension 
to some of the other circuits. The 
run for the DeMille film starts Jan. 
12. 



Every film is not a money 
getter, but any film can be 
made a box-office success 
through the use of RIT- 
CHEY posters. 



HITCHEY 

LITHO. CORP. 

406 W. 31>t St..N.Y., PhoDc Cbebe* 8388 







<BpriLi ;:riv ..■'ill 



Putting It Over 



Here is hoiu a brother exhib- 
itor put his show over. Send 
along your ideas. Let the other 
felloiv knoiu how you cleaned 
up. 



Progress Advance, the Famous 
layers house organ calls attention 
I the tour of Maurice Maeterlinck 
; connection with the company's 
-eduction of "The Bluebird." 
It is suggested that exhibitors 
3ok the film at the time Maeter- 
tick plays in the showman's city, 
is itinerary is as follows: 
January 7, New York, Carnegie 
all; 8, Brooklyn, N. Y., Academy 
■ Music; 9, Montclair, N. J., High 
:hool; 11, Washington, D. C, Shu- 
;rt Belasco; 12, Philadelphia, Pa., 
cademy of Music; 13, New York 
ty, private; 14, Boston, Mass., Sym- 
lony Hall; 16, New York City, 
eague for Political Education; 19, 
Worcester, Mass., optional; 22, Mon- 
eal. Monument National; 24, Tor- 
ito, Massey Hall; 25, Buffalo, Ma- 
stic; Theater; 27, Pittsburg, Syria 
Bosque; 30, Cleveland, hall not se- 
cted. February 1, Detroit, Orches- 
a Hall; 2, Toledo, Women's Build- 
g Auditorium; 4, Dayton, hall not 
Iccted; 6, Chicago, Orchestra Hall; 
Indianapolis, Murat Theater; 9, 
incinnati, Emery Auditorium; 10, 
vansville, Ind.. Central High 
:hool; 12, St. Louis, Odeon; 14, 
ashville, not definite; 18, Milwau- 
;e, not definite. March 1, Los An- 
:les, Trinity Auditorium; 3, Pasa- 
;na, High School; 8, San Francisco, 
:ottish Rite Auditorium; 12, San 
rancisco, Scottish Rite Auditorium; 
', Portland, Ore., City Auditorium; 
), Seattle, hall not selected; 22, 
lit Lake City, hall not selected; 26, 
maha, Brandeis Theater; 27, Lin- 
)ln. Neb., hall not selected. 



Denver, Col. — A. G. Talbot, man- 
ner of the America, used some clev- 
exploitation schemes to put over 
ree Realart pictures, each of which 
n for a week at his house. He 
:d up "Soldiers of Fortune" with 
e Red Cross drive current at the 
ne, giving a charity performance, 
id profiting by this advertising, 
fecial newspaper lay-outs, and a 
isely selected lobby display made 
^nne of Green Gables" pay, and the 
iccess of these two productions was 
llowed by a successful run of Con- 
ance Binney in "Erstwhile Susan." 



Cleveland, O. — I. Kuhn, manager 
' the Stillman and Liberty, Loew 
juses, put over "Anne of Green 
ables," by using a novel set of ad- 
;rtisements. Since much of the ac- 
Dn takes place in a schoolroom, 
uhn had ads consist of slates and 
her adjuncts of the classroom, with 
e announcements lettered accord- 
gly. In addition, an inexpensive 
)okmark was turned out and offered 
Christmas shoppers. The unusual 
ethod of exploiting the picture re- 
Ited in capacity business. 



Coast Brevities 

{Special to JVID'S DAILY) 

Hollywood — A. MacArthur, Jr., of 
the Moving Picture World, is here 
for a two months' visit. 



Sam Wood is directing Wallace 
Reid for Paramount-Artcraft. They 
will picturize a series of Byron Mor- 
gan stories entitled "The Bear Trap." 
This picture will be a sequel to "The 
Roaring Road." 



A motley collection of hoboes was 
gathered from the streets of Los 
Angeles to represent the bread-line 
scene which will appear in Madge 
Kennedy's forthcoming "Two Cents 
Worth of Humaneness." 



With the warm sand of Venice 
taking the place of a carpet of snow, 
and with Santa Claus dispensing 
presents in a bathing suit, the entire 
Christie comedy studio celebrated 
an old-fashioned Christmas in ad- 
vance, on the beach the afternoon 
before Christmas. 



The Maurice Tourneur Prod., Inc., 
are moving offices and production 
companies to an immense stage and 
private offices at Universal City. 
This step was found necessary when 
Tourneur decided to produce two or 
three pictures at the same time. De- 
tails are not forthcoming as yet who 
his co-directors will be or whom he 
will engage to play the leads in 
his different pictures. 

GAUSMAN. 



"WHERE PROMISES ARE SACRED*' 

LOUIS MEYER 

FORMERLY BRODA &c MEYER INC 

TITLES 

LETTERED - ILLUSTRATED - PHOrOGRAPHED 
ASK TO SEE OUR NEW 
PROCESS TITLES AND 
ILLUSTRATIONS 

A PHONE CALL WILL BRING '"SAMPLES 

BRYANT 7392 
220 WEST 42nd ST. - ROOM 2040 



Drastic Taxes in Savannah 
{Special to VVID'S DAILY) 

Savannah, Ga. — The City Council 
has adopted a stringent scale of taxei» 
to be imposed on theaters. 

Picture theaters will have to pay 
$500 a year, operators, $5; supply 
houses, $50, and schools, $50. 

The ordinance includes a number 
of amusements other than pictures. 



Brunton May Build Theater 
{"Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles — It is reported that 
Robert Brunton will erect a theater 
here. The project will involve about 
$500,000. 



Wyndham Standing and Agnes 
Ayres will appear in support of Hope 
Hampton in "A Modern Salome" 
now in production. 



D. W. GRIFFITH 



KNOWS 

The value of strictly high 
class people for the ensemble 
scenes of his productions. 

Wt AKL supplying him 
with only the most select 
good-looking and properly 
dressed people for his pro- 
ductions. 

"UK financial strength en- 
ables us to supply any num- 
ber of people. 

Select Motion Picture 
Bureau 

William W. Cohill, Manager 

1493 Broadway 

New York 

Telephones 

I 2389 
Bryant < 2390 

( 2391 



The difference between 
moving pictures and 
Goldwyn Pictures is the 
difference between 
speculation and invest- 
ment. 




THE ACME 

Portable 
projector 

FOR— 

The Studio, The Cutting 
Room, The Editor, Home, 
School or Church. 
A demonstration Will Con- 
vince You. 
Howells Cine Equipment 

Company 

729 7th Ave. New York 

Phone, Bryant 1166 



I 



lE^ 



THE HAL BENEDICT STUDIOS 



College Point, Long Island 



Monday, January 5, 1920 




DAiaJV^ 



Famous Interested 

Seeking Information from Exhibitors 

as to How They View Showing 

Industrials 

It is understood Famous Players 
is conducting a nationwide investi- 
gation for the purpose of ascertain- 
ing how exhibitors feel towards 
showing industrials. While the in- 
vestigation is far from complete it 
is further understood that so far the 
results show that many exhibitors 
still have antipathy toward sho\v- 
ing industrials because of what their 
patrons may object to. 



The M. P. E. of America recently 
announced a dea(l with Universal 
whereby exhibitors were to receive 
payment for showing industrials. 



Godal, ProdMcer of "12:10" 

Edward Godal is being congratu- 
ated on "12:10," the Herbert Brenon 
production, starring Marie Doro. 
Sodal's company is the British and 
Colonial of London. 



Another Play for Famous 

By virtue of their deal with George 
iroadhurst, Famous Players-Lasky 
icquire screen rights to "The Won- 
lerful Thing" which was placed in 
ehearsal last week. 



Transatlantic Goes South 

The comedy troupe making com- 
idies for Transatlantic is now on 
he way to Raleigh, N. C. to shoot 
xteriors for the comedies. 



Films and Religious Services 
{Special to WW'S DAILY) 
Winnipeg, Can. — Rev. George Sal- 
on, Methodist pastor, is screening a 
.ve reel feature each Sunday after- 
.oon and night, in connection vvith 
religious service in the Dominion 
heater. 



AllT TITLES 

HAND LETTERING 

:-^ri (One ii.u.icUv''J Jdifj .-) Daj^) vj. • 



..M.. PHONE 2329 BRYANT . 





The Loew Circuit has just bookec 
the Universal comedy "A Baby Dol 
Bandit" featuring the jungle queej 
Mrs. Joe Martin. 



CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG 

Once more demonstrates her magnifi- 
cent art in 

"THE EYES OF YOUTH" 
We have made for this production a 
very artistic lobby display together 
with reproductions in fac-simile oil 
paintings from her latest poses in 
various sizes. 

KRAUS MFG. CO. 

220 West 42d Street 
17th Floor TeL 3607 Bryant 



CHRISTIE SPECIAL COMEDIES 
The new Christie comedy for January "Save Me," 
into polite society. The scene shows Eddie Barry, 
Fay Lamport. 



brings 
Helen 



a cannibal 
Darling and 



"Miracle Man" Business 

{Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Winnipeg, Can. — Famous has 
closed contracts for $400,000 on "The 
Miracle Man" in Canada, and it is 
likely that the figures can still be 
boosted. 



LEUMAS GARTOON SERVICE 

Producers of AnimeLted 
Films for e^;e^y purpose. ■; 
17^ 45tli St. ■ TelBryant' - 6806 



IT REQUIRES ORCANIZATION TO 
NANUFACTURECOOD ENGRAVINGS 

Vlf[HAYEBEEN0li(iAIIIZED''HC^||}9g 

EpUIPPEDIODELIVIRtK^BEirPOJIIBtE 
WORK INTHE LEAST POSSIBLE TIME 



TUESTANDARDENCRAYinCCO. 

PUOTO ENGRAVERS 

225 WEST 39™ STDEET NEW YODK 

AMEO/CAN PDEJS ASIOCIATION BLDG 



What Do You 
About That? 



Know 




F. A. A. Dahme 
the famous Title Artist 
of 220 West 42nd St. 
Bryant 6796 

Is Not Advertising 
Anymore. 



MAKE YOU HEAR WHAT YOU SEE' 



FILMUSIC CUE SHEETS ARE GOOD FOR ALL THEA- 
TERS EVEN THOSE THAT USE ROLLS— AND LOTS OF 
THEM DO. 



riLRsnusic-co. 

. '. LOS ANGELES . ' . 



1729 Highland Av«. 




Reasons 



why you should book, 

'The 
Screaming 
Shadow* 

REASON No. 3 

J. Grubb Alexander who 
wrote "The Trail of the Octo- 
pus" with Harvey Gates, the 
author of many photoplay suc- 
cesses, is writing "The Scream- 
ing Shadow." Watch for Reason 
No. 4 to-morrow. 

BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 

UNIVERSAL CITY CAL. 

Released through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W, 46th Street NEW YORK 

Foreign Rights controlled by Apollo Trading Corp., 220W. 4gth St. 





of FILHDOM 




7y(cRECOCHIZED 

Authority 



Vol. XI, No] 5 



Tuesday, January 6, 1920 



Price 5 Ccnti 



Exhibitors Betrayed 

Clark of First Nat'l Claims Produc- 
ers Force Films Containing Ad- 
vertising on Them 

"American exhibitors have been 
deliberately betrayed by certain pro- 
ducers and distributors at a profit 
to the latter, for their unscrupulous 
l^reaches of faith and confidence, 
amounting to hundreds of thous- 
ands of dollars from the sale of 'con- 
venient' advertising possibilties in 
strictly entertainment film to na- 
tional advertisers, and for which ex- 
hibitors have been charged high ren- 
tals. This practice has grown to 
imazing proportions. It has become 
a stealthy, secret method of 'play- 
ing both ends against the middle,' 
a violation of all ethics, written or 
unwritten, which govern relations 
between manufacturers and consum- 
ers, and a dangerous form of cap- 
italizing exhibitor confidence with- 
3ut regard for the exhibitor's moral 
rights." 

This is the keynote of a statement 
luthorized this week by R. H. Clark, 
general manager of the New York 
Exchange for First National Exhibi- 
tors' Circuit, and a member of the 
Board of Directors for the national 
organization, in which he attacks 
the injection of "convenient" adver- 
tising into productions sold to ex- 
hibitors by producers and distrib- 
utors as being exclusively entertain- 
Tient film, and for which exhibitors 
Day the usual service rentals. The 
"acts which he outlines, and the al- 
egations he makes are the results 
Df information which he declares has 
Deen imparted to him 1)y exhibitors 
{Continued on Page 2) 



M. P. E. A. To Meet 

There will be a meeting of the 
Motion Picture Exhibitors of Amer- 
ca, Inc. at the Hotel Astor on Fri- 
iay. Reservation for a room on the 
eighth floor have been made. 




The little slum girl is introduced into New York's exclusive social set 
— Norma Talmadge in "A Daughter of Two Worlds," her initial First 
National picture. — Advt. 



Mabel Normand En Route West 

Mabel Normand left for California 
:he end of last week. Upon her 
irrival there, she will start work on 
•The Girl With the Jazz Heart." 



Tearle With Selznick 

It is expected that announcement 
will be made shortly of the placing 
sf Godfrey Tearle, half brother to 
Conway and late star of "Carnival" 
.nider contract with Selznick for a 
series of pictures. 



R. G. Gets Hall Films 

Latter Will Give Up Its Exchanges 

Is Report — Question About 

Chaplins. 

It is reported that Robertson Cole 
will hereafter control the physical 
distribution of the Hallmark product 
and that the chain of Hallmark ex- 
changes will cease to exist. 

The sales force of the latter, ac- 
cording to report will continue to 
operate but will concentrate its en- 
ergy upon the sales end of the Hall- 
mark product. 



The Clark Cornelius Chaplins are 
being handled by Hallmark. There 
was some question yesterday as to 
whether future distribution of these 
re-issues would be through the Rob- 
ertson Cole exchanges. It is un- 
derstood that Clark Cornelius arc 
looking for a new distributing con- 
nection. 



Woods Annexes Bara 

Erstwhile Film Star Turns to Le- 
gitimate Stag* — Picture Plans 
Undecided 

.'\l H. Woods has signed Theda 
Bara, to appear in a play called "The 
Lost Soul" a melodrama written bv 
George V. Hobart and John Willari. 

Miss Bara has not been appearing 
in films lately. An effort made yes- 
terday to ascertain just what she 
will do in pictures met with the state- 
ment "there is nothing to say at 
this time." 

However, it is interesting to note 
that there have been frequent reports 
lately that Woods was about to form 
his own film producing company. 
He is also affiliated with Goldwyn. 



Manrdlebaum and Lusk Here 

E. Mandlebaum, First National 
franchise holder in Ohio and Walter 
E. Lusk, general manager of the 
exchange in Cleveland are in New 
York on a business trip. 



Loew — Metro 

Considerable Gossip as to What Ef. 

feet Change of Control Willi 
Have 

There was considerable gossip ir 
film circles yesterday when the offi 
cial announcement appeared o 
Loew, Inc. securing control of Met 
ro Pictures Corp. 

According to the official state 
ment issued by Metro there will b' 
a close working arrangement be 
tween Loew, Inc., and Metro, ani 
the Metro Board of Directors wii 
be reorganized with several direc 
tors of Loew, Inc., appearing on th 
Metro board. i 

But some in the trade believe thi 
other important changes will tal 
place within the early future. Sonl 
believe that Richard A. Rowlan 
will leave the helm to others. Thl 
is denied by Rowland's friendj 
There is also talk of an importat 
change in the production end i 
Metro. Maxwell Karger is at prej 
ent director-general. Recently rt 
{Continued on Page 2) < 



Nate Ascher Here 

Nate Ascher of Ascher Bros., Ch 
cago and a vice president of N; 
tional Picture Theaters of Ameri« 
is in town. 



Cassinelli with Schomer-Ross 

Dolores Cassinelli will make of 
picture for Schomer-Ross Pro« 
Inc., while preparations for her ne: 
Capellani productino are complete 

The Schomer-Ross film wj 
started yesterday a tthe Victor st 
dios on 43rd St. 



MacLaren Through With "U" 
{Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Mary MacLarc' 
has completed her Universal co 
tract 

was a report current th 

re-sign with Laemmli; 

OTj, atiun but that it is said ■} 

be untrue. ;l 

Universal stated yesterday Ml 
MacLaren had finished her contra 
with them. 



More Vice-Presidents for Natior 

The following have been announc 
as vice-presidents of Nat'l Pictu 
Theaters: 

Charles Olson, Indianapolis; He 
tor M. E. Pasmezoglu, St. Louis; I 
Libson, Cincinnati; John Harij 
Pittsburgh; and Jake Wells, Ri< 
mond. Other previously named J 
Harry Crandall, Washington ai 
Nate Ascher, Chicago. 



Tuesday, January 6, 1920 



jsjtd^, 



AILV 



'^^g gfgjpte^ 



l^aL 1 1 No. 5 Tuesday Jannary 6, 1920 Price 5 Cent! 

Copyright 1919, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM- FOLKS, INC. 

•". C. ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 
urer; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 
and Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 
Business Manager. 

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms (Postage free) United States, Outside 
of Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00 

' Subscribers should remit with order 
Address all communications to WID'S 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 
York, N. Y. 
Telephone: Vanderbilt, 4551-4552-5558 
Hollywood, California 
Editorial and Business Offices: 6411 Holly- 
wood Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 

Chicago representatives — Willis, Eckels 
md Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 
Chicago, 111. 

Quotations 

Bid Asked Last Sale 

,'amous Players - 93 95 93 

joldwyn 30 32 31 

Lpew's, Inc 31^ 33 31 f^ 

Triangle Film — — H, 

Jnited Pict. Prod. 15^ 16 153^^ 

A^orld Film — — 54 



Seek Injunction 

^at'l Pictures Would Restrain Ex- 
hibition of "Blindness of Youth" 

National Picture Theaters — the 
selznick exhibitor movement — is 
eeking to enjoin the Foundation 
"ilm Corp. from further exhibiting 
The Blindness of Youth." 

National claims infringement of 
he copyright of the name "Blind 
('outh," a picture now in production 
n California. 

House, Grossman and Vorhaus, at- 
orney for Foundation Film will 
eek to prove that National has no 
ight to attempt restraint of a pro- 
uction now in circulation when the 
ormer has no picture as yet com- 
'leted. 

The hearing has been set for Fri- 
ay in the Federal Court. 

Hirsch Buys Argus Feature 

Nathan Hirsch of Aywon has pur- 
hased Greater New York rights 
"The House Without Children," 
n Argus feature, handled through 
lie Film market. 



Ince Appearing as Lincoln 
Ralph Ince is at present directing 

nd appearing as Abraham Lincoln 

1 a production now under way at 

le Selznick Fort Lee studio. 
Ince played the character in the 

Id days when he was with Vita- 

raph in Brooklyn. 
His first special "The Law Bring- 

rs" will be released on the Selz- 

ick program March 1. 



Wapaco, Wash. — Oscar Peterson, 
ilmpire, will build new house next 
pring to seat 400. 



Loew — Metro 

(Continued from Pof/e 1) 
ports from the Coast indicated that 
Karger intended to come East and 
produce under the name of Max- 
well Karger Prod. Karger brand- 
ed this report as "premature." 

One of Loew's closest associates 
in business is Joe Schenck, and it 
is said that Schenck may have an im- 
portant post with regard to the pro- 
duction end of the deal. Schenck 
is in charge of both the Norma Tal- 
madge and Constance Talmadge 
Prod., which are releasing through 
First National. 

Just how many millions passed on 
the deal no one will say. Reports 
vary the figure from three upwards. 
Rowland and his associates evidently 
felt very good over the deal. Row- 
land gave a champagne lunch at 
the Claridge last Saturday, but said 
it was "just some wine lefft over 
from New Year's." 

In the official statement issued by 
Metro it was pointed out that "the 
merger will mean the closest sort of 
co-operation between Loew and 
Metro, with the Loew houses fur- 
nishing a certain and permanent mar- 
ket for the Metro product, and Met- 
ro providing a permanent source of 
material." 

Loew at present is probably the 
largest individual exhibitor in this 
country. There are 119 houses 
owned and operated by Loew, Inc., 
39 building and between 30 and 40 
more whose policy and booking are 
controlled by the same corporation. 
Many of these are first runs. Next 
week the buildings on the north- 
east corner of Broadway and 4Sth 
Streets will be demolished to make 
room for his "State" theater. His 
lease on the New York theater and 
roof still has some time to run. His 
houses extend throughout the entire 
country, and there is no secret that 
he is after more houses, and intends 
to secure a considerable number, 
200 in the total, at least. Two 
months ago he closed a most import- 
ant deal with Ackerman & Harris. 

Because of the marriage of Loew's 
son to the daughter of Adolph Zuk- 
or, there has been much gossip over 
either a working alliance or an "ar- 
rangement" between the Loew or- 
ganization and Famous Players. But 
Marcus Loew has insistently and 
emphatically denied that there is 
any working connection between his 
organization and Famous Players. 



McCutcheon Story for Warwick 

Famous Players have purchased 
"The City of Masks" by George 
Barr McCutcheon for Robert War- 
wick. 



The Zukor-Loew Wedding 

The wedding of Miss Mildred Zuk- 
ox, daughter of Adolph Zukor of 
Famous Players to Arthur Loew, son 
of Marcus Loew, will take place to- 
day at the Ritz. 

Many prominent film folk from 
New York and out of town will at- 
tend the nuptials. It is understood 
that the gifts to the young couple 
include a tremendous collection of 
silver and cut glass. 



Exhibitors Betrayed 

(Continued from Page 1) 

in his particular territory, and which 
has been submitted to the home of- 
fice of First National by theater 
owners in practically all sections of 
the country. 

"It is a miserable, petty trespass on 
conditions which compel the majority of 
oxhibitors to book productions withou' 
screen examination," he continues. "Cash- 
ing in without regard for obligation 
seems to be the actuating impulse. 
These same producers and distributors 
bellow niighitly in the columns t)f the 
trade journals whenever a group of ex- 
hibitors in any territory proposes to meet 
;:n issue by joint action. In the same 
stenographer note books that contain 
the plaints against exhibitors you'll find 
letters to national advertisers," soliciting 
money in exchange for 'convenient' ad 
values in pictures they release to exhibi- 
tors on regular service contracts. 

"It is time that a few more organiza- 
tions like the Miami Valley Exhibitors' 
League and the Motion Picture Exhibi- 
tors' League for New York State took 
steps to prevent a continuation of the 
practice. There may be exhibitors who 
do not care, but they are very few. In 
this territory I know of more than a 
score of instances where exhibitors have 
complained to exchanges, after showing 
entertainment films booked at high rent- 
als, abo\it the flagrant advertising at- 
tempts in various scenes. Invariably, 
they tell me, they have been laughed at, 
in an obviously 'if you don't like go to' 
manner. 

"Would George Horace Lorimer, as edi- 
tor of the Saturday Evening Post, per- 
mit any author who produces a short 
story or serial for him, to specifically 
mention Stntz cars because the her.ime 
had to drive an automobile? Would he 
tolerate I lie publication of an illustration 
in which the hero stages a fight before 
a twenty-four sheet stand covered with 
a poster advertising George Washington 
Coffee'/ Would Mr. H. O. Davis, erst- 
while executive and producer in the mo- 
tion picture biisiness, permit, in his pres- 
ent cai)acity as editor of The Ladies' 
Home .lournal, the use of a line ben.'r.ih 
tiie n:inie of a prominent author, to ilie 
effect that the author used Pompeian 
Massage Cream? 

"There are at least tvi'o concerns in 
the industry that should be taken se- 
verely to task by exhibitors for the ad- 
vertising tricks they have deliberately 
slipped over in special feature produc- 
tions. One of them is yelling, now, at 
what it charges is an unfair exhibitor 
practice and a studied discrimination 
against its productions. I have before 
me a rejiort by an exhibitor organiza- 
tion in which it specifically charges this 
concern M'ith the very practices I have 
citeil. The report continues: 'They are 
now crying and begging you to run their 
films, and offer them to you free.' This, 
the report states, is the result of co- 
operative exhibitor organization. 

"An exhibitor told me, yesterday, that 
twice within a week he has shown pic- 
tures featuring well-known stars, and 
released as special production.^!, which 
contained convenient advertising by big 
concerns. Another theater owner showed 
Mie a slide, sent him by an exchange as 
part of the advance work on a speci.il 
lie h.'id booked with a popular star. At 
the bottom of the slide, so arranged that 
it could not be cut oif, was a line stat- 
ing that the star used a certain brand 
of coffee, which is regularly advertised 
in the national magazines. 

"Never! It is more than that. It is 
another phase of the 'to-hell-with-the- 
pul lie' attitude of men who seek au- 
t'lority, jurisdiction and confidence for 
the s;ke of exploiting it by means 'hat 
are verse than tuiethical. And exhibi- 
tors are confidentl.v expected to accept 
the bludgeon without a murmur. It 
would behoove the trade papers to in- 
strc.ct their reviewers to watch everv 
production they see for purposes of criti- 
cism, and to state, in their reviews, 
whether or not the pictures contain any 
forn of nnf;ni- advertising. Tli.s, ai 
least, would serve to warn exhibitors in 
advance, and it would put an effectual 
check on the practice. There are a num- 
ber of exhibitors in New York State 
who would subscribe to any medium 
which would tell them, honestly, whether 
variotis releases classified as entertain- 
ment had been sold out to advertisers.'' . 



22 Foreign Offices 

To Be Opened by Select in England 
and Continental Europe 
Select will open 22 branch offices 
in Engl and and Continental Eur- 
I ope. The countries which will have 
branches are England, France, Hol- 
land, Belgium, Spain, Italy and 
Switzerland. 

The South African Film Trust will 
handle the Selznick output in South 
Africa. 



Burlingham Back-Going to Far East 

Frederick Burlingham returned to 
New York yesterday from Florida 
and the South where, among other 
scenes, he picturized the Suwanee 
River, for the first time in film his- 
tory. He leaves Thursday for Cin- 
cinnati to see his folks, after which 
he departs for Borneo, Java, Siam 
and the Far East and will not be 
back in this country until some time 
next summer. He says he caught 
some splendid and unusual shots in 
the South. 



Osso Returns 

Adolph Osso is back in his office. 
He was in France for several 
months. 



Moore Going to California 

Owen Moore will produce his next 
Selznick picture in California. This 
will mark the third producing unit 
for Selznick on the west coast. 



Frankel Buys Out Stem 

Columbus, O. — Max Stern has sold 
his Majestic theater to I. Frankel 
of Cincinnati. The theater passed 
into the latter's hands on Sunday. 

Frankel owns a string of theaters 
in Cincinnati, among them being the 
Alhambra, the Lubin and the Hip- 
podrome. 



Children's Theater Closes 

Hugo Riesenfeld's Children's thea- 
ter at the 63rd Music Hall closed 
Sunday night. 

Dr. Rieaenfeld says he enjoyed 
himself in the operation of the thea- 
ter more than he has in years and 
found a real delight in making some 
of the citj^'s kiddies happy. 



Put a RITCHEY poster 
among other posters and 
it will loom up like an ele- 
phant in a herd of field 
mice 



RITCHEY 

LITHO. CORP. 

406 W.3Ut St.,N.Y., Phone ChelsM 8388 





I 



DAILV 



Tuesday, January 6, 1920 i 



On Broadway 

Rivoli — Norma Talmadge, "She 
Loves and She Lies." 

Rivoli Pictorial. 

Christie comedy, "Go West, 
Young Woman." 

Strand — Norma Talmadge, "A 
Daughter of Two Worlds." 

Strand Topical Reivew. 

Lloyd comedy, "From Hand to 
Mouth." 

"The Sinkings of the U-35." 
Rialto— Douglas Fairbanks, "When 
the Clouds Roll By." 

Rialto Magazine. 

Lloyd Comedy, "From Hand to 
Mouth." 

Cfepitol — Alice Lake^ /"Should a 
Woman Tell?" 

Capitol News. 

Prizma Colorland Review. 

Hy Mayer Cartoon. 
Loew's New York — Today: Robert 
Warwick, "An Adventure in Hearts." 

Wednesday: Tom Moore in "To- 
by's Bow." 

Thursday: William Russell "The 
Lincoln Highwayman." 

Friday: Albert Ray-Elinor Fair, 
."Tin Pan Alley." 

Friday: H. B. Warner, "Haunt- 
ing Shadows." 

Saturday: Elaine Hammerstein, 
■"Greater Than Fame." 

Sunday: Cecil DeMille's "Male 
I and Female." 

I Brooklyn Strand— D. W. Griffith's, 
■"The Greatest Question." 



Melford Starts "Round-Up" 

George Melford has started work 
on "The Round Up" with Fatty Ar- 
buckle. 



Strand — Zane Grey's, "Desert 
Gold." 

Rialto— Robert Warwick, "The 
Tree of Knowledge." 

Rivoli— Enid Bennett, "The Wom- 
an in the Suitcase." 

Brooklyn Strand — Norma Tal- 
madge, "A Daughter of Two 
Worlds." 

Capitol — Nazimova, "Stronger 
Than Death." 



I New Rivoli Record 

The latest Rivoli record goes to 

-Douglas Fairbanks and "When the 
Clouds Roll By." Not only were 
the Sunday and holiday records 
smashed but every week-day of last 

. week's run was a record, except 
Friday. 



Cummings Open Theater 

Joseph P. Cummings has opened 
his Times theater at 157th St. and 
Courtlandt Ave., the Bronx. 



NEGATIVE WANTED 

For 

America or World Rights. 

Address, Confidential, care 

Wid's. 



Send Us Your 
feSrS Junk Film 

INTERSTATE SMELTING 
<a REFINING COMPANY 

23 Commercial St. NEWARK. N. J. 



Hodkinson Film at Strand 

The Strand feature for next week 
will be Zane Grey's "Desert Gold" 
a Hodkinson release. 

This booking is of special interest 
in view of the fact that the film has 
had a considerable number of first 
runs and has played every territory 
in the country with the exception of 
New York. 



Opportunity Waiting in France 

There are great opportunities 
waiting in France for modern thea- 
ters, according to Joseph P. Lamy 
who has just received advices to 
that effect from his agent abroad. 

The large cities, especially need 
the big theaters, says Lamy who is 
in a position to get American thea- 
ter men in touch with French inter- 
ests. 



Pathe Rooster on Broadway 

The electric sign atop the Green- 
wich Bank building at 45th St. and 
Broadway representing the Pathe 
rooster is now in operation. Harold 
Lloyd comedies are now being ad- 
vertised but a change will be made 
monthly. 



Mildred Chaplin Film Delayed 

Los Angeles — Mildred Harris 
Chaplin's first production for First 
National will be "Polly of the Storm 
Country," and not "The Inferior 
Sex" as has been widely advertised. 

The switch is because of the fact 
that a storm washed away the walls 
of the cutting room which contained 
the negative of "The Inferior Sex" 
and badly damaged about fifty per 
cent, of the print. 

"Polly" was directed by Art Ros- 
son. 




CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG 

Once more demonstrates her magnifi- 
cent art in 

"THE EYES OF YOUTH" 
We have made for this production a 
very artistic lobby display together 
with reproductions in facsimile oil 
paintings from her latest poses in 
various sizes. 

KRAUS MFG. CO. 

220 West 42d Street 
17th Floor Tel. 3607 Bryant 



: Book the V 

GIRLWHOMADE 
THEWINKFAMOUS 



Larger Quarters for Pathe in Boston 

Boston — Pathe has leased the 
three story building in Stanhope St. 
to accomodate increased business. 
A. M. Holah is the manager. 



Lehrman At Work on New Film 
Culver City, Calif — Henry Lehr- 
man has started working on his 
third feature comedy production for 
the First National. 



Capitol to Show Safety Film 

On Saturday morning, "Care- 
less America," a production turned 
out by Universal's educational and 
industrial department, will be shown 
at a rally at the Capitol. The pur- 
pose is to educate the children as to 
the danger of deaths from passing 
automobiles. 



JOHN J. LIVINGSTON 

Motion Picture Representative 

For 

STARS— DIRECTORS 

1440 Broadway New York 



Brooklyn Theaters Change Handi 
The Adclphia and Concord thea- 
ters have been sold to M. N. Chryst* 
mos who owns the Alpha. It is un- 
derstood that a deal for the pur- 
chase of the Norwood is now pend 
ing. 



EVE UNSELL 

Scenario Writer 
Famous Players-Lasky Corp. 

"Eyes of the Soul" 

starring Elsie Ferguson 

"Sinners" 

starring Alice Brady 

"Cup of Fury" 

written by Rupert Hughes 

"The Great Shadow" 

starring Tyrone Power 




STUDIO FOR RENT 

Completely Equipped Studio 
Available Jan. 19th 

For Terms Apply 

430 Claremont Parkway 
or Phone Tremont 3766 

or Bryant 8946 





There are 30 Reasons 



why you should book, 

"The 
Screaming] 
Shadow" 

REASON No. 4 

Duke Worne who directed 
"The Trail of the Octopus" 
is also directing 

BEN WILSON 
in "The Screaming Shadow" 
Watch for Reason No. 6 
to-morrow. 

BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 





UNIVERSAL CITY 

Released through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK 

Foreign Rights controlled by Apollo Trading Corp., 220 W.4Sth St. 



CAL. 




Tuesday, January 6, 1920 ULr * ^\ DAklLy^^ 



sM^ 



Where are the independent oil refineries of 20 years ago? 

Wall Street gobbled them. 

Where are the independent meat packers of twenty years ago? 

Wall Street gobbled them. 

Where are the independent ore smelters of twenty years ago? 

Wall Street gobbled them. 

—and just as sure as God made little apples Wall Street 
will gobble the picture business if we don't watch out. 

Wall Street is reaching for them now. 

Exhibitors who fortify themselves with a First National franchise 
can't be gobbled up. The united power of thousands of exhibitors 
is as much greater than Wall Street as the united power of the world's 
Democracies proved greater than grasping autocracy. 

Eventually there will be a Franchise Holder in your town 
If you're alive and progressive it can be you. 

Write to-day to 

Elxhibitors Defense Committee 

composed of members of 
The First National Exhibitors Circuit, Inc. 

Address inquiries to 

Exhibitors Defense Committee, 

Care First National Exliibitors Circuit, Inc., 

6 W. 48tli St., New York, N. Y. 



7^BRADSTREET 
of FILMDOM 




7/^RECOCHIZE[i 

AuthoritV 



Vol. XI, No. 6 



Wednesday, January 7, 1920 



Price 5 Cent* 



Fight Over Print 

C. B. Price Issues Warning Regard- 
ing "Log of the U-35" to State 
Right Buyers 

Benjamin P. De Witt, counsel for 
C. B. Price Co., Inc., served notice 
yesterday on the Strand theater; 
Nathan Hirsh, Aywon Fihii Corp.; 
Standard Film Corp., of Kansas 
City, Herman Riskin of Boston, 
Mid-West Dist. Co. of Milwaukee, 
Standard Film Exchange, Detroit, 
Fitzpatrick and McElroy and J. L. 
Friedman of the Celebrated Players 
Film Corp. of Chicago, advising 
them that C. B. Price owns the neg- 
ative rights to "The Log of the 
U-3S" and that distribution of a 
print under any other title covering 
the same material will be subjected 
to legal difficulties. 

De Witt claims that Price bought 
the negative and print from John 
Olsen & Co. of Copenhagen and 
that prints under the name of "The 
Lost Empire" are being distributed. 
These, he alleges, are duped. 

Nathan Hirsh admitted yesterday 
that notice of the warning had been 
served on him by De Witt but add- 
ed that he had the rights for the 
film for New York and New Jersey 
and that he had received the print 
from J. L. Friedman of the Cele- 
brated Players. He maintained that 
he would continue distributing the 
film despite the warning. He said: 

"As I understand it, the negative 
of this material belongs to the Ger- 
man Government. We have as 
much right to use prints as any 
one else." 



"The Log of the U-3S" has been 
playing the Capitol since Sunday and 
Jack Eaton of the Strand has been 
playing a production entitled "The 
Lost Empire" this week. 

Price became aware of the simi- 
larity between the prints Monday 
night and immediately took action. 



Character Pictures 

New Company Formed — Will Make 
Six a Year 

A new company known as the 
Character Pictures Corp. has been 
formed with Albert W. . Plummer, 
New England exhibitor, Charles W. 
Buck, importer and manufacturer 
and David Shapiro, attorney as in- 
corporators. 

i The company will make six pro- 
ductions the first year. Rights to 
several novels have already been 
purchased. 




He had thought that she was in love 
something of the wiles of a woman, 
tional Attraction. — Advt. 



with him, but he came to learn 
From "Even as Eve," a First Na- 



PhilHps Leaves "U" 

(Special to WW'S DAILY) 
Los Angeles — It is reported per- 
sistently here that Dorothy Phillips 
has definitely left Universal and that 
Allen Holubar, her director and hus- 
band will folow her as soon as he 
cuts his latest production. 

It is rumored, as previously noted 
that Miss Phillips and Holubar had 
signed with Zukor and that she will 
be added t ■ *he Realart program. 



J. S. W' dy Ci Realart stated 
yestt ly tie had heard nothing of 
the matter. 



Dan Lederman of Universal said 

he had heard nothing about Miss 
Phillips leaving Universal and that 
he might have something to say 
when Carl Laemmle reaches town 
from the coast to-day. 



Kaufman to Produce 

(Special to fFID'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles — It is reported here 
that Al Kaufman will enter the field 
of independent producers. 

While abroad Kaufman secured 
screen rights to a number of well 
known books. Among these is "The 
Corinthians" which he is anxious 
to have William Russell appear in. 
The latter is under contract with 
Fox. 



Ralph Block Back 

Ralph Block of Goldwyn has re- 
turned to New York from Kansas 
City where he spent the holidays 
with his mother. 



Dowlan Through With Universal 

(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles — William C. Dowlan 
'he director, will complete his con- 
tract with Universal the end of this 
month. Dowlan before making any 
future connection will take a long 
deferred trip in his Loccmobile. 



Film Pirates Busy 

Lawrence Langner, Patent Attorney 

Says Picture Business Is Hard 

Hit 

Lawrence Langner, trade mark 
and patent expert of the American 
Manufacturers Export Ass'n stated 
yesterday that because of the care- 
lessness on the part of producers 
American film trade marks are be- 
ing pirated in a number of foreign 
countries. Langner is reputed as 
being an international authority on 
trade marks and patents. 

The Export Association at Lang-jl 
ner's request is appealing to the 
State Department to take action on 
the question of automobile pirating, 
but films are not included because, 
according to Langner the producers 
"are busy making money and don't 
give a damn!" 

Select and Selznick Pictures are 
in difficulty right now in Spain 
where pirating has been done. The 
Goldwyn trade mark was appropri- 
ated in Cuba, says Langner. 

It was pointed out that producers 
allow their foreign agents to regis- 
ter the trade mark in various coun- 
tries. The danger lies in the fact 
that in case of a difference between 
the agent and the producer the agent 
retains the trade mark in his terri- 
tory and the producer is powerless 
to transfer the business to some 
other agent for that country and sell 
his films on the old trade mark. 
Thus the original agent can hold 
the producer to an exorbitant sum 
for the trade mark privilege. 

The Argentine Republic is an un- 
usual source of trouble, said Lang- 
ner. In mentioning experiences 
there, he charged a very well knowa 
film man with pirating. 



Goldwyn Buys "Officer 666" 
Goldwyn has purchased screen 
rights to "Officer 666" in which Wal 
lace Eddinger starred some years 
ago. 



George Kleine made a screen ver- 
sion of "Officer 666" some years ago! 
but it is understood that all prints 
have been withdrawn from distri- 
bution. 



St. John's Theater Ready 

The St. John's theater at St. John's 
Place and Utica Ave. Brooklyn will 
be opened in a few days. Henry 
Haring is the owner. The house 
costs about $175,000. 



Wednesday, January 7, 1920 



ii 



zsli^^ 



DAILY 




VaLXINe.6 .Wednesday January 7. 1920 Price 5 C«ntl 

I T ■ I = 

Copyright 1919, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

F. C. ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 
urer; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 

' and Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 
Business Manager. 

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 

: the act of March 3, 1879. 

1 Terms (Postage free) United States, Outside 

f of Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 

I months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 

1 $15.00 

!( Subscribers should remit with order 

■ 'Address all communications to WID'S 

DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 

York, N. Y. 

Telephone: Vanderbilt, 4551-4552-5558 

I Hollywood, California 

("Editorial and Business Offices: 6411 Holly- 

I wood Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 

I Chicago representatives— Willis, Eckels 
and Mack, 6th Floijr, Consumers BIdg., 

iiOiicago, 111. 



Q« 



uotations 

Bid Asked Last Sale 

Famous Players .... 91 94 92 

Goldwyn 31 32 31 

Loew's Inc 31^ 31?4 3154 

Triangle Film — — ^A 

United Pict. Prod. 14^ 15^ 14^ 

World Film — — Ys 



Zukor-Loew Wedding Yesterday 

Mildred Zukor daughter of Adolph 
Zukor and Arthur Loew, son of 
Marcus Loew were married yester- 
day at the Ritz-Carlton. 



Price Men on Tour 

A. L. Ehrgott, R. Alexander and 
A. E. Smith have been sent on the 
road in the interest of the C. B. 
Price, Inc. productions. 



Harsten Sells Theater 

Al Harsten has sold his Harlem 
5th Ave. The theater will play 
vaudeville and pictures under the 
tie\^ management. 



New Kerrigan Film Ready 
Hodkinson announces for mid- 
fanuary release J. Warren Kerrigan's 
fourth Brunton production, "Live 
Sparks." 

Vincent Heads Directory 

At a meeting held last night of the 
M. T. D. A. the following were 
I elected officers: James Vincent, di- 
ector; Paul Scardon, assistant di- 
ector; George B. Seitz, technical di- 
rector; C. J. Williams, treasurer; 
Travis Vail, secretary; John Joseph 
Siarvey, inner-guard; William F. 
fiaddock, outer-guard, and J. S. 
Dawley, trustee for three years. 



Burkan Building Studio 
It is understood that Nathan Bur- 
can together with R. A. Walsh and 
^lorris Kohn of Realart is building 
I studio in Long Island City oppo- 
ite the present studio of Famous 
i'layers. 



In the Courts 

The V. B. K. Film Corp. has 
filed an answer in the Supreme Court 
lo the suit of Mrs. Sidney Drew to 
her suit for an accounting of sums 
alleged to be due from films made 
by her and her late husband for the 
defendant. The answer alleges that 
the corporation from time to time 
advanced moneys alleged by Mrs. 
Drew and her husband to be needed 
for the expense of making the pic- 
tures, but that they failed to produce 
vouchers for $1,100 advanced. The 
answer alleges that this sum was il- 
legally demanded and was not spent 
as represented. 

The Famoys Players-Lasky Corp. 
has filed an answer in the Supreme 
Court to the suit of Abraham L. Er- 
langer for the appraisal of the New 
York Theater stock owned by Klaw 
& Erlanger because Mr. Erlanger 
objects to the sale of the theater 
property to the Famous Players- 
Lasky Corp. The answer denies 
that the net consideration from a 
block of New York Theater stock 
was as great as 2,500 shares of com- 
mon stock of Famous Players-Las- 
ky, and also denies that the theater 
stock depreciated or that acts com- 
plained of were wrongful or that 
the plaintiff suffered any damage. 



On the ground that Aubrey M. 
Kennedy and Thomas J. Healy gave 
no consideration for the 1,000 shares 
of stock of the Kennedy Theaters, 
Inc., former owner of the Symphony 
Theater, the Van Beuren and New 
York Billposting Co. which has been 
unable to collect a judgment for 
$1,980 from the corporation, has 
filed suit in the Supreme Court to 
compel Healy and Kennedy to pay 
the judgment. The complaint al- 
leges that the entire 1,000 shares of 
stock was issued originally to Healy 
ana that the pretended consideration 
for the stock was the obtaining of 
the lease for the theater at $1,250 a 
week. Healy later gave half the 
stock to Kennedy. The complaint 
alleges that the rental of $1,250 was 
fair and reasonable. 



A RITCHEY trade-mark 


on a poster means that 


such a poster is as fine a 


piece of work as it is pos- 


s£,ble to make anywhere 


in the world. 


RITCHEY 


LITHO. CORP. 


406W.31.t St.,N.Y., Phone Cb«Uea 8388 


O^x^^^sv 



Martin With Selznick 
Irving J. Martin for the past two 
and a half years with Thomas H. 
Ince on the coast, and one of the 
best known art title men in the bus- 
iness has joined the Selznick staff at 
Fort Lee. Martin is just in from 
California. 



Leonard Serial, "Evil Eye" 
The Benny Leonard serial for 
Hallmark release has been named 
"The Evil Eye" Roy L. McCardell 
is the author and the director will 
be J. Gordon Cooper under super- 
vision of Wally Van. 



% 



ScenicsBeautiJur 

Produced by Robert CBruce 

It is one thing to photograph scenery — and quite another ■ 
thing to make "Scenics Beautiful." To get the better 
result requires the soul of an artist. A typical "Bruce" 
Scenic will bring the real beauty of Nature to your screen. 

iTOOTipNAL Films Cdrporahon 



129 rUVENUE 



NEW YORK, 



N.Y 



Values NOW 



Have you ever stopped to realize how your property has, 
increased in value recently? Are you adequately insured 
to cover that increase? Don't wait. To=morrow may be 
too late. See us To-Day — NOW. 



Peube/s ,5JXmuels 



/nyuirance 

*> Phone John 



so Maiden Lane 

54a y - 5426 - ?4ar - s^aa 



Samuek 



zsMkn 



DAII.Y 



Wednesday, January 7, 192 



PatkeNews 

No. 2 

NEW YOUK CITY— What is the popu- 
lation of the V. S. Enumerators tlirough- 
out country are busy canvassing all In- 
Iiabitants lor tlie 1920 census. 

Ell PASO, TEX. — When not pulling 
guns, they pull houses — tractors at Fort 
Bliss find a "peaceful" taslc, as they move 
a barrack building. 

WITH THE V. S. BIABINES IN HAITI 
— Marine keep watch over Haiti from the 
air — scenes of Portua-Prince, capita! of 
the little negro republic in West Indies, 
viewed from a Marine plane. 

BREST, FRANCE — Big U. S. base now 
deserted! Old Glory is lovverea as me 
A. E. F. "closes up" the camp through 
which 2,000,000 boys sailed to and from 
France. 

IN THE I^IMEIilGHT — Admiral Jelli- 
coe visits U. S. Nation greets the man 
who led Britain's fleet in famous Allied 
naval victory at Jutland. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO — Some chickens — 
real ones, this time! Humble hens and 
proud cocks complete for honors at Na- 
tional Poultry Show. 

NEW Y'ORK CITY — Nation-Avlde round- 
up by U. S. Secret Service hauls in 3,- 
500 "Reds" — simultaneous arrests are 
made throughout country of aliens in 
radical organizations. 




i^^i^: 



Decision Turns Against Kress 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Columbus, O. — It is the implied 
decree that Sunday shows are illegal 
in Ohio as a result of the decision 
handed down by the Supreme Court 
in the case of Harry W. Kress of 
I'iqua who was convicted in Miami 
county for keeping open his theater 
on Sunday. 

Fred Desberg declares that the 
fight will continue until some defin- 
i e ruling as to the status of Sab- 
l)ath shows is secured. 



Skouras Looking Around 

S. P. Skouras, president of the 
Skouras Bros. Enterprises, St. Louis 
is in New York for a few days. 



Price Going West 

C. B. Price will leave for Calif- 
ornia the end of the month to visit 
state right buyers. 



Lewis J. Selznick was a guest at 
the dinner of the New England 
society held last week at the Wal- 
dorf. 



LEOMAS CARTOON SERVICE 

Pfociucers of; i^imated 
• Films ■.for eA7ery . purpose. 
%^^4b^ St 'TeLBryant - 6806 



FOR RENT 
LINCOLN STUDIO 

Bergen Blvd. & Lafayette Ave. 

Grantwood, New Jersey 
Write or phone for particulars 



E. K. LINCOLN 

Phone— Bryant 5307 
110 West 40th Street New York 



Pioneer reports that its business 
during 1919 increased 600 per cent. 



Artist wanted. Qualified in 


an- 


imated technical drawings 


for 


school films. Educational 


de- 


partment, Universal Film 


Co., 


1600 Broadway, Room 


807, 


New York City. 






WANTED to Buy 
Ultra -Speed Camera 

Write Full Particulars With 
Price to 

EDUCATIONAL 
DEPARTMENT- 
UNIVERSAL 
FILM CO. 
1600 Broadway — Room 807 
N. Y. C. 



AT LIBERTY 

Studio Manager 
Assistant Director 

Box A-15 
WID'S DAILY 



"WHERE PROMISES ARE SACRED" 

LOUIS MEYER 

FORMERLY BRODA &: MEYER INC 

TITLES 

LETTERED - ILLUSTRATED - PHOTOGRAPHED 

ASK TO SEE OUR NEW 
PROCESS TITLES AND 
ILLUSTRATIONS 

A PHONE CALL WILL BRING 'SAMPLES 

BRYANT 7392 
220 WEST 42nd ST. ROOM 2040 



AKi iilLhb 

HAND LETTERING 

, r / (0/ie fiuadrcu Jitles -V Da^) ■ -r- 1 

O'V^LYNLU-f 

J. PHONE 2323 BRYANT X. 



Antrim Short and Winifred W« 
over are in the support of Em: 
Dunn in "Old Lady 31." 



The difference between 
moving pictures and 
Goldwyn Pictures is the 
difference between 
speculation and invest- 
ment. 



CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG I 

Once more demonstrates her magnifi- 
cent art in 

"THE EYES OF YOUTH" 

We have made for this production a 
very artistic lobby display together 
with reproductions in fac-simile oil 
paintings from her latest poses in 
various sizes. 

KRAUS MFG. CO. 

220 West 42d Street 

17th Floor TeL 3«07 Bryant 



IT REQUIRES ORCANIZATION TO 
NANUFAaURECdODENGRAVINCS 

Vlf[|IAYEBEEN0liCANiZ[Ds'H'18!» 

EpUIPPEDTODEllVIRToBEITPOillBif 
WORKIN THE LEAST POSSIBLE TIME 



THE STANDARD ENCRAVinCCO. 

PUOTO ENGRAVERS 

225 WEST 39™ STREET NEW YODK 

AMEOICAN PDESS ASSOCIATION BLDO 




iVednesday, January 7, 1920 



iaii4 ^ 



DAILY 



! ■ ■ ' wujj^niyu^ '■■'fcfinmr TT:-"*^: 



QNOGRAMS 

•@e VISUAL NEWS gf 

ALL TMF WORLD 
PUT NEW ENGI.ANS* REDS IN PKI- 
)X CAMP.— Radicals gathered by fed- 
:«1 asents are sent to «eer Island De- 
ntion station in Boston Bay. 
WHERE BLAST TOOK FIVE I.IVES. 
Cameraman wasn't welcome when he 
ent to Dupont powder mills wrecked 
r explosion near Hadgeley, Md. but 
) climbed a tree and made a picture. 
MtI.'»IMERS MARCH IN PEACE PAR- 

I)K. (Not used in New York and Phil- 

lelphia) in gay costumes throng of rev- 
ers help Quaker City officially greet 
; '20 

' PAY TRIBUTE TO FIELD MAR- 
[IAI>E wool). — Famous veteran is laid 

I rest with ceremony at Aldershot, Eng- 

. nd, British army chiefs attend. 
DEPORT RED WINE FROM PACIFIC 
3AST. (Not used in New England). 

' imeraman goes down to wharves in San 
rancisco to bid goodbye to a shipment 

California's best. 

COMES TO HELP WORLD FINANCE. 
Sir George Paish arrives in New York 

! discuss plans for a big loan to stabilize 
)rld markets. ^^ 

MAETERLINCK MEfiTS FIRST BLtTE 

; [RD. — Belgian poet greets actress in 

, ;w York who was first to play role of 

' rtyl (Not in Boston edition). 
GREAT OIL TANKER GOES ON 

)CKS. The J. A. Chanslor is wrecked 

- bleak coast near Badon, Wash, and 
'rtv-eight men of crew perish. 
irACK FROST STARTS ICE CARNI- 
JL. — Skaters in Chicago brave zero 
ather to compete for titles. Newburg, 
.Y. holds a big skating carnival. 

Vdmiral jellicoe here for a 

SIT. — Viscount of Scappa, hero of Jut- 
id is officially greeted in Washington 

a number of navy officers. 
•ROMINENT CHICIiENS ATTEND 
OW. — (New England only). Eight 
lusand entries are made at Mechanics 
ilding, Boston, for the annual poultry 
Tibition. 

?UT BIGGEST SIGN ON HIGHEST 
'•TEL. — Steel workers frolic with dan- 
"• as they erect big structure on top of 
vest New York hostelry. 
;NCLE SAM SETTLES INSURANCE 
SKS. — Big war bureau is busy at 
iShington rushing out checks to dis- 
ed soldiers. 

|UST KIDS AND SLEDS AND SNOW. 
"irst big fall of season in New York 
[s Central Park with happy throng of 
tngsters. 

INVEIL ROBERT BURNS MEMOR- 
L. — Scottish societies attend ceremon- 

when statue of poet is unveiled in 
ston. 

DISTRIBUTED BY 

vEPUBLlC DISTRIBUTING 

CORPORATION 




George Le Guere and Lucy Cotton enjoy a day in the country in Gerald 
F. Bacon's production "Blind Love" — State Righted by Nathan Hirsh, 
Aywon Film Corporation. 



Boston Club Opposes Censors 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Boston— The Film Club here has 
gone on record as unanimously op- 
posing the censorship bill which is 
expected to be introduced shortly. 



Rawlinson With Blackton 

Herbert Rawlinson will play the 
leading role in "Passers-By" which 
J. Stuart Blackton has purchased 
through Edgar Selden. Pathe re- 
lease. 




Timely Films, the Producer 

Through an oversight, the name 
I Timely Films, Inc. the producer 
'"Topics of the Day" was omitted 
m an advertisement which ap- 
'.red in Sunday's issue regarding 
5 feature. 



New Comedy Unit 

(Special to WW'S DAILY) 
OS Angeles — Cyrus J. WilHams 

Brtidbury Prod, has formed a new 
ducing unit under the name of 

Irk Prod. A series of comedies 

ituring Billie Brunton will be 

Ede. 




There are 30 Reasons 



why you should book, 

"The 
Screaming 
Shadow" 

REASON No. 5 

King Gray, who photographed 
"The Trail of the Octopus" is 
again handling the camera 
which Insures high class photo- 
graphy for "The Screaming 
Shadow." Watch for Reason 
No. 6 to-morrow. 

BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 

UNIVERSAL CITY CAL. 

Released through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK 

Foreign Rights controlled by Apollo Trading Corp., 220 W. 48th St. 






Two New Sterling Exchanges 

Sterling Films, Ltd. which handle 
the Pioneer attractions in Canada 
have opened two new exchanges; 
one in Montreal and the other in 
St. John's, N. B. 



What Do You Know 
About That? 

F. A. A. Dahme 
the famous Title Artist 
of 220 West 42nd St. 
Bryant 6796 

Is Not Advertising 
Anymore. 



Capable Scenario Writer 

Can Write Original Refined 

Comedy 

or 

Dramatic Continuity 

Just Released from Service 

Wants Offers 

Has Previous Staff Experience 

Box 22 

Wid's Daily 

Hollywood Office 



THE ACME 
PORTABLE 
PROJECTOR 

FOR— 

The Studio, The Cutting 
Room, The Editor, Home, 
School or Church. 
A demonstration Will Con- 
vince You. 
Howells Cine Equipment 

Company 

729 7th Ave. New York 

Phone, Bryant 1166 





WE NEVER DISAPPOINT^' 

LOMIX)W Film 



TELEPHONE BRYANT 5576 




INCORPORATED 

WEST 42 yp STREET 

/MEW YORK 



ALLAN A.LOWNES 
GEti. MGR. 





7^BI^DSTREET 
o/ FILMDOM 








7/cRECOCHIZEC 
AiiTUORITV 



Vol. XI, No. 7 



Thursday, January 8, 1920 



Price 5 Cer 




Trailers for Theaters 

Nat'l Screen Service Holds Exclu- 
sive Contracts for Material With 
Leading Producers 

The National Screen Service will, 
beginning Feb. 1 offer a novelty 
trailer service to the exhibitors of 
the country. 

National holds e.xchisive contracts 
with leading producers such as First 
National, Paramount, Selznick, Hall- 
mark, Goldwyn, United, and Univer- 
sal whereby these companies are to 
supply material of future releases far 
enough in advance to prepare the 
trailers. 

The service will be conducted on 
a contract basis with a specified sum 
payable each month. Exhibitors 
with any number of changes a week 
will be supplied as far ahead as de- 
sired. The trailer will include a strik- 
ing scene or close-up from a coming 
production which the exhibitor has 
booked for a certain date with an 
artistic sub-title. 

Included in the organization are 
Messrs. Fleckels and Weinberg as 
well as Leon J. Rubenstein, Joseph 
Pollak and Leon Lee. Louis 'F. 
Rogers formerly identified with the 
Lee Kiddies has been engaged as 
general manager. 

The new company, it is planned, 
will move from present quarters in 
the Longacre Bldg. to the fourth 
floor of the Leavitt Bldg. as soon 
as Fox vacates the premises. 



Famous Signs Jack Holt 

Jack Holt has signed with the Fa- 
mous Flayers-Lasky, for a long term 
of years. Holt will play leading 
roles, and will make his first ap- 
pearance under the contract in 
"Held By the Enemy." 



Jensen Group Coming East 

(iiy Wire to \VJ1>\S DAILY) 
Seattle, Wash. — J. Von Herberg, 
Jake Gottstein, F. V. Fischer, and 
Claude Jensen of the firm of Jensen 
and Von Herberg, First National 
franchise holders in the Northwest 
left here on Monday for New York, 
ostensibly to attend a meeting of 
the First National directors. It is 
also probable that there will be a 
series of conferences with big East- 
ern interests regarding building 
plans. 



First National officials were re- 
ticent yesterday when asked whether 
a director's meeting was scheduled 
for next week. It was intimated 
that something was in the wind al- 
though nothing definite would be 
admitted. 



The woman's age-old instinct of distrust for an unloved male warned 
her, innocent though she was, against this man who professed friend- 
ship for her. But she was already in his power, when his wife and 
her friends stepped in. From "Even as Eve," a First National Attrac- 
tion. — Advt. ~ 



Claims Breach and 

Demands Rights 

George Loane Tucker Brings Suit of Exceptional Significance — 
Makes Issue Between Independent Creators and Distrib- 
utor Who Produces Other Films — Hearing in Supreme 
Court Next Monday 

George Loane Tucker, producer of "The Miracle Man," in a 
voluminous bill, yesterday filed, in the Supreme Court, brought 
action against Mayfiower Photc^play Corp. and Famous Players- 
Lasky Corp. seeking redress for wrongs alleged to have occurred 
with regard to his production af "The Miracle Man." 

He seeks particularly to prevent any further distribution of 
the production save when that distribution is made in accord 
with a' clause of his contract which provides that he be given a 
certain definite advertising and publicity; seeks an accounting 
of the monies already collected for "The Miracle ?\Ian," and a 
judgment therefore against Mayflower: asks that the distribution 

{Continued on Page 2) 



Fear Foul Play 

Friends Worried Over Prolong 
Absence of A. J. Small, Can- 
adian Theater Man 
(B?/ Wire to WID'S DAILY) 

Toronto — A. J. Small, promin( 
theatrical man who recently 
ceived $1,000,000 in cash from t 
Transcanada Theaters, Ltd., for 1 
theatrical interests in Ontario a 
his booking agency for road sho 
has been missing since Dec. 2. Tl 
was two days after the deal w 
consummated and Small was 1: 
seen about three o'clock in the aft' 
noon in front of the Grand Op( 
House and said at that time 
was going home. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Tucker's Fight 

Can a distributor who is al- 
so a producer, attempt to in- 
dicate that he is the producer 
of a certain, definite success, 
when in reality he is but the 
distributor, and when, in fact, 
he had nothing whatsoever to 
do with the actual production? 

During its first 11 weeks 
"The Miracle Man" grossed 
over a half million. Tucker 
seeks abrogation of contract 
with Mayflower Film. Wants 
receiver appointed to protect 
his rights in "Ladies Must 
Live." 

Tucker claims Mayflower has 
made fraudulent written state- 
ments regarding monies due 
him and on January first ac- 
cording to Famous Lasky 
statements Mayflower owed 
him $40,000. 

Issue is raised that the direc- 
tor must be exploited to get 
recognition for his creation 
while star or player automat- 
ically gains recognition be- 
cause of their actual appear- 
ance on screen. 

Tucker claims neither Fam- 
ous Players nor Mayflower 
risk a penny with regand to 
the financing or distribution of 
his productions. Also that he, 
Tucker, was offered the same 
distribution contract direct 
from Famous Lasky before he 
finished "The Miracle Man," 
and before he had signed any 
contrac: for a series of produc- 
tions with Mayflower which, 
had he chosen to do so, would 
have eliminated the Mayflower 
entirely. 



'hursday, January 8, 1920 



jM ^^ 



DAILY 




II If*. 7 Thursday January 8. I£20 Price S Cents 

•yright 1919, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 

i. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 

V York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 

.Ml FOLKS, INC. 

I. ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 
Jr; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 
^>. Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 
!'iiness Manager. 

! ;ered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
i^.he post office at New York, N. Y., under 
i, act of March 3, 1879. 

I'ms (Postage free) United States, Outside 
il-Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 
ifiths, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
.'(00 
' fSubscribers should remit with order 

(Iress all communications to WID'S 
f DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 
If York, N. Y. 

Telephone: Vanderbilt. 4551-4552-5558 

' Hollywood, California 

I'torial and Business Offices: 6411. HoUy- 
i')d Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 
I'hicago representatives — Willis, Eckels 
|! Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 
'cago, 111. 



, QuoliU^ons 

Bid Asked Last Sale 
iious Players .... 92^ 92^ 92i/^ 

Idwyn 31 

'ew's, Inc 32 

angle ^ 

,=ited Pict. Prod. 14% 
3rld Film — 



32 
32 

15'/ 



30 

31^ 
H 

14M 



] Sign Clark and Bergman 

>ack and Harry Cohn have signed 
'idys Clark and Henry Bergman, 
;o have played the Keith vaude- 
!e houses with great success, oc- 
')ying a headline position, for a 
lies of two reel comedies. Jack 
|"hn will leave for the coast with 
^ team on Jan. 15 to supervise 
cir productions and the Hall Room 
fy Coniedies. 



COMING 

A ' 
REVIVAL 
OF 




TOWER FILM CORP. 

71 W. 23rdSt.,N. Y. 



Claims Breach 

[Conthiued jrom Fru/f I 
contract between Mayflower and 
Famous be cancel'ed with regard to 
all future Tucker productions; seek- 
ing an injunction against any at- 
tempt by the defendants to com- 
plete his production "Ladies Must 
Live"; asking for a receiver for that 
production to allow him to com- 
plete the picture; asking that his 
contract with Mayflower be annulled 
after he completes "Ladies Must 
Live" and to prevent the informa- 
tion being further given out that he 
is still under contract with May- 
flower. 

The bill was filed in behalf of 
Tucker by O'Brien, Malevinsky & 
Driscoll. Temporary as well as per- 
manent injunctions were asked for. 
and an order to show cause why 
these injuncfons should not be 
granted, was signed returnable Mon- 
day, Jan. 12. 

In coniunction with the bill were 
filed affidavits from Tucker as well 
as from F. C. "Wid" Gunning, of 
"Wid's Daily," who had been called 
in by Mr. Tucker for advisory coun- 
sel. -These affidavits make most in- 
teresting reading especially as to the 
various developments that resulted 
in the Tucker production of "The 
Miracle Man." 

Incidentally some interesting fig- 
ures relative to the business so far 
done by "The Miracle Man" are 
shown in the bill. Tucker's affidavit 
says that up to Nov. 29, 1919, the 
11th week of the distribution of the 
production, that Famous Players 
had collected a gross sum of $538,- 
891.49. Of this sum Mayflower was 
entitled, under its contract, to $304,- 
061.13. 

Tucker charges Mayflower with 
making written fraudulent statements 
to him of the sums alleged to have 
been received from Famous Players 
and charges them with failifig to 
remit properly to him, alleging that 
approximately $40,000 was due and 
unpaid Jan. 1st. 

The basic points of the battle be- 
tween Tucker and Mayflower and 
Famous Players go direct to the 
question uppermost in the minds of 



The majority of motion 
picture* fans have to be 
shown, The ^RITCHEY 
poster shows them. 

RITCHEY 

I>1TI10. COKP. 

406W.31>t St.N.Y., Phone Chdu* 8388 



^^ 



; many independent producers, stars, 
' rPrectors and writers: Has a pro- 
ducer, who is also a distributor, the 
rght to attempt by inference or sug- 
I r>-estion to create the general impres- 
sjion that a production especially 
made by some director or star work- 
ing as an independent producing 
unit and only distributed by the dis- 
tributor is pTrt of the usual program 
offering of that distributor and, has 
been produced by the distributor. 

Tucker alleges that under Clause 10 
of the distribution contract of May- 
flower with Famous-Lasky, made for 
his benefit, that he was to have cer- 
tain rights so far as advertising and 
publicity were concerned, all of 
wh'ch result in his prodiictions to 
be known as "George Loane Tucker 
Productions" with his name upon all 
occasions to be i" the same size tvpc 
as the title of the production "The 
Miracle Man." 

Mr. Tucker, as well as Gunning, 
in their affidavits insist that these 
specifications were violated on in- 
numerable occasions despite the 
clause in the distribution contract, I 
and insist that Famous Players, des- 
pite the clause of their contract to 
make "reasonable endeavors to con- 
trol exhibitors advertising" failed to 
make any such request in hundreds 
of cases. To support this conten- i 
tion they offer to file as evidence a 
tremendous mass of newspaper clip- 
pings and telegrams from exhibitors 
bearing out the contention made. 

Mr. Gunning, in his affidavit, makes 
the contention that by failing to live 



I up to Clause 10 of the contract, Fam- 
ous-Lasky sought constantly to in- 
fer that "The Miracle Man," was a 
I "ParamOunt^Artcraft Picture" in- 
I stead of a "George Loane Tucker 
I Prod." He pointed out that the 
' Press Book issued by Famous Play- 
ers-Lasky on "The Miracle Man" — 
' the exhibitors' guide, from which ad- 
vertising ideas and exploitation plans 
, were presented for use in reaching 
I the "fans" was particularly offensive 
in disseminating the idea that "The 
I Miracle Man" was a Paramount-Art- 
craft picture rather than a "George 
Loane Tucker Production." 

His affidavit says that the Tucker 
production was to be released on 
the Artcraft program, just as the 
Pickford and iFairljanks pictures had 
been released. There is no mention 
whatever in any of the contracts of 
Paramount Pictures. 

Mr. Tucker, in his affidavit, points 
out that his purpose in securing 
Clause 10 in the distribution contract 
"was in order that I might obtain 
for my work financial returns com- 
mensurate with my ability and talent. 
I had found that it was impossible 
and is impossible for me to secure 
financial returns commensurate with 
the talent and ability that I devote 
to luy work, save and except by cap- 
italizing my name through exploita- 
tion, advertising and publicity in a 
way that I might be able to create 
a trade mark or trade name for my 
productions so that the name George 
Loane Tucker would become synon- 
{Continued on Page 3) 



FOR SALE 

COMPLETELY EQUIPPED STUDIO 
EVERYTHING NEW AND UP TO DATE 



or 



Will sell electrical equipment separately — This 
includes latest type of lighting equipment as 
follows: — 

6 Tilting Lamps or counter balance stands 
2 Double Deck Equipments 

2 100-Ampere spot lights 

3 50-Ampere overheads 
2 Top lights with funnels 

Total capacity 650 Amperes. 

All equipment new and either D. G. or A. G., also 
a complete motor generator outfit of 1,000 Am- 
peres capacity. 

Address Box A-25, care of Wid's 




Thursday, January 8, 1920 



Claims Breach 

{Continued from Page 2) 

imous with motion picture produc- 
ions of a high class." Further he 
idds that it is his hchef that Famous 
layers by "endeavoring to approp- 
atc the capitalization value of the 
,vork that he put into 'The Miracle 
Man' did this to the end that they 
night secure the advantages result- 
ng from the success of 'The Mir- 
icle Man' to increase the prestige of 
nfcrior pictures manufactured and 
|)roduccd by it as Paramount Pic- 
nres and which cannot pass muster 
n their merits." 

Mr. Tucker further claims that the 
productions he was to make for 
Mayflower were sold at a guaran- 
teed profit by virtue of the distribu- 
tion contract which he, Tucker, ne- 
otiated. As the contract stands he 
maintains that neither Famous Play- 
rs nor Mayflower risk anything be- 
cause Mayflower by virtue of a con- 
tract made by Tucker, is guaranteed 
$15,000 on productions before Tucker 
can secure from Mayflower anything 
except his weekly drawing account 
and that Famous Players do not 
risk a dollar because they receive 
from exhibitors, advances on his pro- 
ductions before they are to pay any 
money to Mayflower, by virtue of 
their contract. 

Tucker further maintains that the 
distributing contract for "The Mir- 
acle Man" and his other produc- 
tions was offered to him direct by 
Famous-Lasky before he, Tucker, 
made his contract for a series of 
productions with Mayflower. In 
other words that had he, Tucker, 
desired, he could have distributed 
his productions without recourse to 
Mayflower. 

In his bill Tucker seeks relief from 
his contract with Mayflower because 
he claims he cannot, in view of their 
claim to his services, make a con- 
tract with other interests in the in- 
dustry because of any possible loss 
which might result should legal pro- 
ceedings develop because of the con- 
tracts which he had with Mayflower. 
In this connection he claims that al- 
though the defendants have violated 



LOUIS SHERWIN 

Continuity 

Screen Cutting and Titling 

Now Assistant 

to 

J. G. Hawks 

of 

Goldwyn 

Author of 

"BONDS OF LOVE" 

for 

Pauline Frederick 



Eight Tears dramatic critic New 
York Globe, contributor Ameri- 
can, Metropolitan, Smart Set, 
Vanity Fait and other magazines. 



tile contract, and that there is no way 
in which he can recover judgment 
for money damages because the dam- 
ages are irreparable and cannot be 
accurately estimated, that they are 
depriving him from making a living. 

Tucker's final contract with May- 
flower called for five productions to 
follow "The Miracle Man." Of 
these, one, "Ladies Must Live," is 
partially completed. 

Tucker alleges he demanded in his 
contract and received in specific de- 
tail absolute and complete domina- 
tion and control of every detail of 
the production and completion of 
these films. He maintains that he 
d d this purposely and with great 
care in order that the entire respon- 
sibility for the success or failure of 
his productions should rest entirely 
with him. 

The bill filed contains a duplicate 
of Mr. Tucker's contract with May- 
flower and especial attention is di- 
rected to the clause reading: "that 
the corporation (Mayflower) further- 
more agrees that no limitation, fin- 
ancial or otherwise shall be placed 
upon the said George Loane Tucker 
in the production of the pictures 
herein described." This, Mr. Tucker 
says applies directly to his claim 
for the right to finish "Ladies Must 
Live," without interference. It also 
makes clear the fact, he says, that 
he is solely responsible for the mak- 
ing of these productions whether 
they be successes or failures, which 
position he desires to assume with 
respect to his dealings with the ex- 
hibitors of the country. 

He says he feels by the placing 
of this responsibility upon the crea- 
tor, a direct benefit will result to 
both the exhibitors and the public. 



Triangle's release following "The 
Clodhopper," is "A Gamble in 
Souls," for January 4. 



D. W. GRIFFITH 



KNOWS 

The value of strictly high 
class people for the ensemble 
scenes of his productions. 

WE ARE supplying him 
with only the most select 
good-looking and properly 
dressed people for his pro- 
ductions. 

UUK financial strength en- 
ables us to supply any num- 
ber of people. 

Select Motion Picture 
Bureau 

William W. Cohill, Manager 

1493 Broadway 

New York 

Telephones 

I 2389 
Bryant \ 2390 

I 2391 



M. P. E. A. Meets 

Several officials of the Motion Pic- 
ture Exhibitors of America, Inc., in- 
cluding Alfred S. Black, Ernest 
Horstmann, Frank Rembusch and 
Peter J. Schaefer met at the Astor 
yesterday to discuss the slide ad- 
vertising situation. 



Do Not Heed Price Warning 

Fitzpatrick and McElroy of Chi- 
cago, who are distributors of the 
''Official Exploits of the German 
Submarine U-35" which is released 
in New York by Nathan Hirsh un- 
der the name, "The Lost Empire" 
have notified all state right buyers 
handling the film not to heed the 
warning issued by C. B. Price Co., 
Inc., who are distributing "The Log 
of the U-3S" to cease distribution of 
the subject. 

Fitzpatrick and McElroy have in- 
formed C. B. Price that if they insist 
on attempted restraint of the film 
that legal difficulties will result. 

C. B. Price alleges that "The Lost 
Empire" is a duped print of his 
subject. It is playing at the Strand 



is at the Cap- 



while the I'rice film 
itol. 

W. C. Cook, local representative 
for Fitzpatrick and McElroy is 
handling the matter for his con- 
cern. 







AT LIBERTY 

Studio Manager 

Assistant Director 

Box A-15 

WID'S DAILY 



FOR RENT 
LINCOLN STUDIO 

Bergen Blvd. & Lafayette Ave. 

Grantwood, New Jersey 
Write or phone for particulars 



E. K. LINCOLN 

Phone— Bryant 5307 

110 West 40th Street New^ York 



Thursday, January 8, 1920 



jM^ 



J Fear Foul Play 



m 

M 

r 

II 

•y 

I. 

V 



.ei 
th 



-hi 



{Continued from Page 1) 

Investigation failed to reveal any 
particulars of Small's whereabouts 
to date. His family and friends 
thought at first he had gone away for 
a short rest but after two weeks 
had elapsed a search was instituted 
to locate him. It has been during 
the past four days only that any 
publicity has been given the matter. 
No word has been received from 
him and his friends fear foul play. 

His wife authorized yesterday a 
reward of $500 for information lead- 
ing to his present whereabouts. 
Some advance the argument that 
Mr. Small went away for a complete 
rest while others believe the mental 
strain undergone in completing the 
sale of his theaters was too great 
and that a nervous break-down fol- 
lowed. 

The newspapers throughout the 
Dominion for the past three days 
have been trying to locate Small. 
He is well knoAvn in the theatrical 
business in the United States and 
information as to his whereabouts 
is requested by his friends. 



I Laemmle Due To-day 

' Carl Laemmle of Universal did 
nnot arrive in town yesterday as ex- 
Idpected. He will be in to-day. 



la 

(idl 

o 

;e 

|>> 

i( 

h 



'ly 



STUDIO FOR RENT 
Completely Equipped Studio 

Available Jan. 19th 

For Terms Apply 

430 Claremont Parkway 
or Phone Tremont 3766 

or Bryant 8946 



Kealart Pictures have a special 
lobby display for all their produc- 
tions now ready in their exchanges 
throughout the country for all 
their bookings. Look them over 
and see how this enterprising con- 
cern will assist you in getting 
"them" up to the box office. 
KRAU8 MFG. Co. 
220 W. 42nd St. 
17th Floor Tel. 3607 Bryant 




JOHN J. LIVINGSTON 

Motion Picture Representative 

For 

STARS— DIRECTORS 

1440 Broadway New York 



Ochs Returns 

Lee A. Ochs is back in town after 
a transcontinental trip in the inter- 
est of Second National. He is mak- 
ing his office temporarily with 
Charles Rosenthal, the attorney. 



New Play for Metro 

Metro has purchased world's 
rights to "The Marriage of William 
Asche" a play in which Grace 
George appeared in several years 
ago. 



Frec^e^|ick Burlingham has filed 
suit in the Supreme Court against 
the Attractions Distributing Corp. 
and Bernard P. Fineman. The pa- 
pers on file do not show the cause of 
action. 



Fineman had nothing to say about 
this matter yesterday. 



H. H. VAN LOAN 

Recent Releases 

Tom Mix in 

"The Speed Maniac" 

Earle Williams in 

"When a Man Loves" 

121 West Eulalia Street 

Glendale, California 

"If it is a Van Loan story it 

must be good" 

GEORGE ELWOOD JENKS 

Continuity and Specials 

"A Woman of Pleasure" 

Blanche Sweet Special 

"The Pagan God" 

starring H. B. Warner 

"Dangerous Waters" 

Original for Wm. Desmond 

JESSE D. HAMPTON 
Productions 

JACK CUNNINGHAM 

Associated with 

George Loane 

Tucker 

Productions 

Hollywood, Cal. 



Send Us Your 

HigheMp"ri'ca JlITiK r llRi 

INTERSTATE SMELTING 
<a REFINING COMPANY 

23 Commercial St. NEWARK, N J. 



DAILV 



MiiCTnnat^iifc.'i; 





There are 30 Reasons 



why you should book, 

'The 
Screaming 
Shadow* 

REASON No. 6 

The Miracle Man was a 
knockout and every exhibitor 
made money on it. 

Ben Wilson is the Miracle 
Man of the serials. Watch for 
Reason No. 7 to-morrow. 

BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 

UNIVERSAL CITY CAL. 

Released through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK 

Foreign Rights controlled by Apollo Trading Corp., 220 W. 48tb St. 






OPEN TO OFFERS 

A DIRECTOR 

Of International Reputation 

One of the Few Who Can Tell Exact 
Production Costs in Advance 



For Interview Address 



Principals 
Only 



Box A- 12, 
Wid's Daily 



7^BRADSTREET 
of FILMDOM 




7/^recochized 
Authority 



Vol. XI, No. 8 



Friday, January 9, 1920 



Price 5 Cem 



Foreign Deal Pending 

Australasian Films and J. C. Wil- 
liamson to Merge in Antipodes 
— Combine Has 60 Theaters 

It was learned yesterday that a 
deal is now pending, with the sign- 
ing of the contracts a question of 
days now, whereby Australasian 
Films, Ltd. and J. C. Williamson 
both operating in Australia will 
merge into one corporation. By it 
the seven theaters now owned by 
Williamson will be taken over by 
Australasian which now operates 53 
theaters there. 

Under the terms of the agreement, 
work on two new theaters, one in 
Sydney and one in Melbourne will 
be started at once. These will be 
modeled along the lines of the New 
York Strand. 

Millard Johnson, New York repre- 
p sentative of Australasian did not de- 
ny yesterday that the deal was under 
way but did say that he had heard 
nothing about the actual signing of 
the contracts. 

Sanger and Jordon, the local 
agents for Williamson maintained 
that they heard nothing about the 
deal. 



Another Meeting Held 

The officials of the M. P. E. A. 
continued their meeting at the As- 
tor yesterday. No statement as to 
the business transacted was issued. 



Regarding Tucker 

Wolper Expects Him to Finish Con- 
tract—Tucker Files Suit 
{Bxj Wire to WW'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles — The Los Angeles 
Times of Wednesday, Jan. 7 pub- 
lished an interview with Isaac Wol- 
per of Mayflower, in which Wolper 
is quoted as saying: 

"There is no truth in the report 
that Allan Dwan and George Loane 
Tucker will not complete their con- 
tracts. I have assurances from both 
that they will finish their present 
contracts, each having four produc- 
tions rctnaining. 

"Mr. Praeger of Mayflower and 
myself will leave for New York 
Friday and Tucker will return to 
the coast as soon as I arrive in New 
York." 



This report appeared in the Los 
Angeles Times of Wednesday morn- 
ing. About noon in New York City, 
George Loane Tucker, as noted yes- 
terday brought suit against May- 
flower and Famous Players-Lasky 
for alleged violation of contract. 




"Woman instantly places man in one of two classes — those she would 
marry and those she wouldn't," de clared the heroine in "Even as Eve," 
a First National Attraction. — Advt. 



Ghaplins Switched 

Go From Clark Cornelius to Repub- 
lic Distributing — Start Release 
Monday 

Briton N. Busch of Republic Dis- 
tributing announced yesterday that 
his company had taken over dis- 
tribution of the Chaplins heretofore 
released by Hallmark for Clark 
Cornelius. Republic will start dis- 
tributing these productions on Mon- 
day. 

The complete series is as follows: 
"The Rink," "The Adventurer," "The 
Cure," "The Vagabond," "Behind 
the Screen" "One A. M.," "Easy 
Street," "The Floor Walker," "The 
Immigrant," "The Pawnshop," "Tlr^ 
Count" and "The Fireman." 



Community Tie-Up With Republic 
The Community M. P. Burea^i 
which caters to a strictly non-thea- 
trical field has entered upon a con- 
tract with Republic Distributing 
whereby the latter will handle the 
physical distribtition of the bureau's 
product. 



Big Pow-Wow Sunday 

Many Important Film Folk Invited 

to Attend "Americanization" 

Program Meeting 

If all the film folk invited to meet 
Secretary of the Interior Lane, Sun- 
day assemble it will take all the 
spare room of the Waldorf. The 
secretary, as previously noted,, will 
discuss with film folk plans for put- 
ting over th,e "Americanization" 
idea in pictures. Practically every- 
body who is anybody in the indus- 
try, and located here, has been in- 
vited. 



"Starvation" Opens To-night 

"Starvation" the official Hoover 
film will open its run at the Manhat- 
tan Opera House to-night. 

It is understood that several of- 
fers for territorial rights have al- 
ready been received by the producer 
and that this is somewhat unusual in 
view of the fact that film has not 
as yet been shown to any one. 



Pollock's Idea 

That "No Picture Producer Has tl 
Remotest Idea of What Con- 
stitutes Drama" 

A few years ago, Channing Pc 
lock wrote a script which Met) 
bought under the title of "In Vain 
Later, in conjunction with Rennp 
Wolf it was rewritten and agal 
presented to Metro, under contra* 
with the title of "The Comc-Bacl< 
Metro held it for four years ai 
never produced it. 

Later Pollock used the basic id 
for the big scene at the end of at 
2 of "The Sign on the Door" whi« 
is proving one of the big dramat 
hits of the year, and for which 
is reported very large sums ha 
been offered for the picture righ' 

And now hear what Pollock say 

"About a month ago I decid 
that, to avoid any possibility 
trouble, I should buy back the sto 
of "The Sign on the Door" frc 
Metro. I went to them with tlj 
proposal, but the story had be 
forgotten and the manuscript lost, 
arranged the return of the rig! 
by an agreement by which I w 
to write two new scenarios in retu 
for the old one. Whatever "T 
Sign on the Door" may be as 
play, it certainly is amazingly eff( 
tive picture material. And its fc 
in the hands of a company that 
ready had paid for it seems to i 
an interesting demonstratio of i 
long insisted upon contenti n tl 
no motion picture producer s 1 
remotest idea of what cons.itu 
drama." 



Meeting Place, Atlantic City 

The meeting of the franchise ho 
ers of First National beginning n« 
week will be held in Atlantic Ct 
Just what hotel, the meeting will! 
held at, it has been impossible | 
ascertain. 



"U" Silent Regarding Phillips 
Carl Laeramle of Universal -^ 
reached New York yesterday fn 
the coast refused to comment on f 
reporte'd leaving of his company 
Dorothy Phillips and Allen Holub 



Alice Joyce at Broadway 
A "triple attraction program" 1 
been arranged for Moss' Broadw 
next week, consisting of Alice Jo: 
in "Slaves of Pride," a Vitagrg 
special; Fatty Arbuckle in "The G 
age." and the Parisian Fashion F 
lie, which will enter the 10th we 



!•* 



riday, January 9, 1920 




DAILV 




XI No. 8 Friday, January 9. 1920 Price 5 Cents 



pyright 1919, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
c. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
•w York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
LM FOLKS, INC. 

C. ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 
er; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 
d Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 
isiness Manager. 

itered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
5 act of March 3, 1879. 
rms (Postage free) United States, Outside 
Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 
inths, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 

I. ;,oo 

I'l Subscribers should remit with order 

I Idress all communications to WID'S 

•S DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 

ih York, N. Y. 

■^Telephone: Vanderbilt, 4551-4552-5558 
Hollywood, California 
itorial and Business Offices: 6411 HoUy- 
nd Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 
liicago representatives — Willis, Eckels 

, d Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 

i) Icago, 111. 

t i 

i( ■ 

1 



Quotations 



Bid Asked Last Sale 



I mous Players .. 90^^ 

,' )ldwyn 30 

'.[ )ew's, Inc 32 

^''riangle ^ 

Ipited Pict. Prod. UH 
jcorld Fikn — 



92 


905/^ 


32 


30 


32 


3134 


7/16 


3/8 


15 


143^ 



1 



'!!' 



Another Moss Theater 

3. S. Moss will start work on his 
:ond new Bronx theater, with a 
iting capacity of 3,500. The play- 
use will be constructed at Pros- 
:t Ave. and 161st St., and will 

called the Atlas. 
The policy will be a combination 

vaudeville and pictures. The 
ler new Moss theater under con- 
uction in the Bronx is the Grant, 
Tremont Ave. and 176th St. 



COMING 

A 

REVIVAL 
OF 



iz 



\= 




TOWER FILM CORP. 

71 W. 23rd St., N. Y. 



In the Courts 

Supreme Court Justice Greenbaum 
has decided that Dwight Macdonald 
treasurer of the New York Motion 
Picture Corp. ''must testify before 
trial in the suit by William N. Brew- 
er as a stockholder in which he al- 
leges miscondtict by the various of- 
ficers including failure of the officers 
to collect obligations due the cor- 
poration which made it necessary to 
borrow money at high rates of in- 
terest. For this reason the court, 
held that the examination of Mac- 
donald is proper. 



In the suit of Harry Samwick 
against the Blinderman & Cohen 
Amusement Co. a jury before Su- 
preme Court Justice Newburger gave 
a verdict for $3,088 for the plaintiff 
and the court refused to set it aside 
and grant a new trial. 



Supreme Court Justice Giegerich 
has dismissed the complaint in a suit 
by Darcy & Wolford, Inc., owner 
of the right to produce a play called 
"The Tidal Wave," against William 
Stoermer for an injunction to pre- 
vent him from using the words as 
the name of a moving picture film. 
The court however permits the 
plaintiff to bring a new action. The 
court says that because the char- 
acter of the two plays has not been 
shown in the evidence he is unable 
to hold that the title is fanciful 
rather than descriptive, and since 
the defendant's film is based on such 
a phenomenon of nature any other 
title would not be appropriate. 



Fight Pictures Barred 

There was considerable interest 
manifested by some film folk yes- 
terday over the offer of Wm. Fox 
to stage the Dempsey-Carpentier 
fight, offering $550,000 as a purse. 
Fox is to have the picture rights if 
the offer is accepted. Film folk 
point out that under the interstate 
act fight pictures are barred of ship- 
ment from one state to another, and 
can only be shown in the state in 
which the fight takes place. The 
foreign rights to the picture are ex- 
pected to hav.e a value, however. 



Northampton, Mass. — Frank H. 
Roberts will build on Crafts Ave. 



Texans Join M. P. T. A. 
(By Wire to WW'S DAILY) 

Dallas, Tex. — Texas Exhibitors 
Circuit co^mprising 80 exhibitors in 
Texas, at a meeting of the board 
of governors voted to tie tip with 
the Motion Picture Theater Owners 
of America for entire membership 
of Southwest. Also voted to include 
in its membership exhibitors in 
South Oklahoma and South Arkansas 
served by Dallas exchanges. It is 
thought this move will make the cir- 
cuit self sustaining. 



Ferret Bounid for France 
Leonce Perret sailed for France 
on board the "La France" Tuesday. 
Perret will be gone five weeks dur- 
ing which time he will combine bus- 
iness and pleasure. 

Before sailing he tendered a din- 
ner to his studio force at which time 
gifts of various natures were distri- 
buted. Perhaps the best of them 
all was several bottles of French 
wine — the real thing. 

Perret completed two pictures be- 
fore sailing . These are "A Modern 
Salome" a Hope Hampton Prod, 
and "Chains of the Past." 



Cohns to Switch 
It is reported that Jack and Harry 
Cohn state righting the series of 
Hall Room comedies produced by 
National Film are about ■ to break 
away from the organization. 



Mrs. Walton Laid to Rest 

Mrs. Holme C. Walton, wife of 
H. C. Walton, sales manager of 
American Cinema who died on Sun- 
day night as a result of a dangerous 
operation was buried Wednesday 
morning. 



Finis Fox has started the scenario 
of "Hearts and Trumps," the third 
Drury Lane melodrama Screen Clas- 
sics, Inc., will produce. 



A Film Executive 

is moving permanently to Cal- 
ifornia on Feb 1st and desires 
a permanent connection in his 
own line. 

A very valuable and reliable 
man for any concern seeking 
a man to look after financial 
interests or manage studio. 

Address Box-B-33— c/o Wid's 




Facts Count 



Facts and not theories count — When we talk insurance we talk 
facts backed by long years of experience in the theatrical and 
motion picture industry — and our advice is your for the asking. 



Reuben , CXmuels 

IV^AL iJWcJ ERVICE 

K ^/jeiirance "^-^ 60 Maiden Lane 

» I'hniic John 5-42 y - 542,6 • 9*Z7 - S^ZB 



Samuek 



^Ijgijgj/ 



SOLVED! 



Now you can tell your 
audience about your com- 
ing attractions in a man- 
ner that will keep iheui 
in their seats. 

Our . regular weekly 
service at your theater, be 
it a large or small house, 
supplies that final touch 
of class and efficiency 
which your house an- 
nouncements need! 

The price is so mod- 
erate that you really can't 
afford to hang on to tlie 
uncertain and inartistic . 
methods now in use. 

The neiv way is possi- 
ble 07ily through 

National Screen Service 

1476 Broadway, N. Y. 



When you see RITCHEY 
posters displayed on an 
empty street it only means 
that the crowds are all 
inside the theatre. 

RITCHEY 

LITHO. CORP. 

406 W. 31st St.,N.Y., Phone Chelie* 8388 




<eSE.^..i.'iiig 



sM^ 



DABLV 



Friday, January 9, 192C 



Deal Hanging Fire 

Peter J. Schaefer of Jones, Lin- 
ick and Schaefer of Chicago when 
asked last night whether the deal 
with Marcus Loew had been settled, 
stated: 

"Nothing definite has been done 
as yet." 

It will be recalled that Loew and 
the Chicago firm will build a the- 
ater and hotel in the "loop" district 
of Chicago. 

Mr. Schaefer said things were go- 
ing along nicely in Chicago. He 
will leave for New Orleans on Sun- 
day and then go to California. 

"Just looking around a bit," said 
Mr Schaefer, "and combining pleas- 
ure with a little business." 



Realart Pictures have a special 
lobby display for all their produc- 
tions now ready in their exchanges 
throughout the country for all 
their bookings. Look them over 
and see' how this enterprising con- 
cern will assist you in getting 
"them" up to the box office. 
KBACS MFG. Co. 
220 W. 42nd St. 
17th Floor Tel. 3607 Bryant 




Producers and Direct- 
ors. Let us help cast 
your next picture. We 
furnish High-grade tal- 
ent, Tyoes and better 
class of "extras.** 

FILMCLAS CORP. 

Putnam Building 

Phone: Cryant 2187 

BILLY BOWMAN 
Casting Manager 




Callahan En Route West 
{Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Chicago — Andrew J. Callahan, re- 
presenting the group of local cap- 
italists backing Bessie Love is en 
route to California where he will 
complete arrangements for taking 
over the star. 



BESS MEREDYTH 

and 

WILFRED LUCAS 

Writing and Directing 

Australian Features 



Address 

Care Snowy Baker 

84 Oxford Street 

Sydney, N. S. W. Australia 

Cable Address 
"Snowing Sydney" 



LEUMAS CARTOON SERVKIE 

"ProduGerS' of /friirnatedr; , ; 

Films lor : eA?ery; purpose. ,,' 

•17^:45^1 St: teLBryajtt - 680^^': 




The Acme 
Portable 
Projector 
For the 
Studio 

Cutting Room 
The Editor 
Home School or 
Church 



Demonstrated to You Anywhere 

Howells Cine Equipment Co. 

729 7th Ave. New York 

Phone Bryant 1166 



MAKE YOU HEAR WHAT YOU SEE 



FILMUSIC CUE SHEETS ARE GOOD FOR ALL THEA- 
TERS EVEN THOSE THAT USE ROLLS— AND LOTS OF 
THEM DO. 



riLiisnusic-co. 



A N C E L ES 



1729 HighUuid Ave. 



Muehleisen Sells Out 
{Sjjecial to WID'S DAILY) 

Washington — J. A. Muehleisen, 
formerly Secretary-Treasurer of 
Moore's Theatrical Corp. has left 
pictures to work in the motor field. 
He has disposed of his holdings in 
the corporation to Tom Moore. He 
owned several thousand shares of 
stock in the corporation. 




Capable Scenario Writer 

Can Write Original Refined 

Comedy 

or 

Dramatic Continuity 

Just Released from Service 

Wants Offers 

Has Previous Staff Experience 

Box 22 

Wid's Daily 

Hollywood Office 



Becker in Town ' 

Bruno J. Becker of the Mode 
Comedy Co. reached New York yes 
tcrday from Hollywood. He will at 
tend a meeting of Bull's Eye offi 
cials to be held probably on Mon 
-day. 




ART TITLES 

HAND LETTERING 

r (One //M/idmdJitles ^ Day) t 

ALYNLU"' 

. PHONE 2329 BRYANT 



FOR SALE 

GOMPLETELt EQUIPPED STUDIO 
EVERYTHING NEW AND UP TO DATE 



or 



Will sell electrical equipment separately — This 
includes latest type of lighting equipment 
follows'. — 



as 



6 Tilting Lamps or counter balance stands 
2 Double Deck Equipments 

2 100-Ampere spot lights 

3 50- Ampere overheads 
2 Top lights with funnels 

Total capacity 650 Amperes. 

All equipment new and either D. G. or A. G., also 
a complete motor generator outfit of 1,000 Am- 
peres capacity. 

Address Box A-25, care of Wid's 



i'riday, January 9, 1920 



jM i 



DAILV 



\^ Universal Signs Serial Director 

I'; Universal has signed Albert 
"■.erche, professionally known as Al- 
I I rt Russell to complete "The Lion 
i;_;lan" a serial. 

;?. WHERE PROMISES ARE SACRED" 

? LOU IS MEYER 

i^j'^ORMERLY BRODA & MEYER INC 

T I T L E S 

''nETTERED - ILLUSTRATED - PHOrOGRAPHED 

. ' ASK TO SEE OUR NEW 

'm PROCESS TITLES AND 

'■• ILLUSTRATIONS 

,i. PHONE CALL WILL! BRING SAMPLES 
BRYANT 7392 



1: '20 WEST 42nd ST. 



ROOM 2040 



' i( 



1 

; )' 

')( 

i; 

lii 

lO 



IT REQUIRES ORCANIZATION TO 
MANUFACTURE COODENCRAVINGS 

Vlf[|IAYEBEEN0li(;ANIZED><''C^i8!» 

EpUIPPEDTODEUVERf'BEiTPOJIIBlE 
WORKINTHE LEAST POiSIBLETIHE 



THE STANDARD ENCi^VIIKiCO. 

PUOTO ENGRAVERS 

225 WEST 391^ STREET. NEW YORK 

AMEDICAN PPESS ASSOCIA T/ON BLOC 



Fleming to Assist Schomer 

Carol Fleming will assist Abra- 
ham S. Schomer in the production 
of the feature with Dolores Cas- 
sinelli for Srhomer-Ross Prod. 



D. W. GRIFFITH 



KNOWS 

The value of strictly high 
class people for the ensemble 
scenes of his productions. 

WL AKb supplying him 
with only the most select 
good-looking and properly 
dressed people for his pro- 
ductions. 

"UK financial strength en- 
ables us to supply any num- 
ber of people. 

Select Motion Picture 
Bureau 

William W. Cohill, Manager 

1493 Broadway 

New York 

Telephones 

I 2389 
Bryant \ 2390 

' 2391 




FOR RENT 
LINCOLN STUDIO 

Bergen Blvd. & Lafayette Ave. 

Grantwood, New Jersey 
Write or phone for particulars 

E. K. LINCOLN 

Phone— Bryant 5307 
110 West 40th Street New York 



There are 30 Reasons 



why you should book, 

"The 
Screaming 
Shadow* 

REASON No. 7 

Mr. Exhibitor— The Box-office 
is your Thermometer of Success 
and a Ben Wilson serial keeps 
it above 100 degrees Fahrenheit 
at all times. Watch for Reason 
No. 8 to-morrow. 

BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 

UNIVERSAL CITY CAL. 

Released through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK 

Foreign Rights controlled by Apollo Trading Corp. , 220 W. 48th St. 







OPEN TO OFFERS 

A DIRECTOR 

Of International Reputation 

One of the Few Who Can Tell Exact 
Production Costs in Advance 



For Interview Address 



Principals 
Only 



Box A- 12, 

Wid's Daily 



7i^^BRADSTREET 
o/ FILMDOM 




7/cRECOCHIZED^ 
AUTHORITY! 



Vol. XI, No. 9 



Saturday, January 10, 1920 



Price 5 Cents 



Protection Abroad 

Langner Says Register Trade Marks 
Before Entering Foreign Field 

Motion picture producers who 
plan entering tlie foreign field should 
make it a point of registering their 
trade marks in foreign countries be- 
fore actively starting business. This 
is the opinion of Lawrence Lang- 
ner, international trade mark attor- 
ney. 

Under the terms of the Berne 
Trade Mark Convention the first 
party to register a trade mark is the 
sole distributor for the product reg- 
istered whether he is so authorized 
by the company or not. The coun- 
tries which are parties to the Berne 
Convention and the terms of years 
for which a trade mark is effective 
in each are as follows: Austria, 10; 
Belgium, 20; Brazil, 15; Cuba, 15; 
Spain, 20 France, 15; Hungary, 15; 
Italy, 20; Mexico, 20; Holland, 20; 
Portugal, 15; Switzerland, 20, and 
Tunis, 15. 

The point involved is that if pro- 
{Continued on Page 4) 



M. P. E. A. Meetings Over 

The meetings of the M. P. E. A. 
have been concluded. 

Alfred S. Black, president of the 
organization stated yesterday the 
meetings resulted satisfactorily for 
all concerned. He stated that it is his 
sole desire to perfect some scheme 
whereby the exhibitors of the coun- 
try can benefit from the showing of 
industrials. The M. P. E. A. con- 
tract with Universal does not pre- 
vent the taking on of additional 
agreements for the showing of in- 
dustrials manufactured by other 
companies. 



Goldwyn Again in Frisco 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles — S. L. Rothapfel and 
F. J. Godsol have returned from 
a trip to San Francisco where they 
looked over theater properties. 



It had been previously reported 
that Goldwyn had taken over the 
Savoy in 'Frisco but the home office 
knew nothing about it. Inquiry 
made yesterday resulted in the same 
answer. 



More Money for Chicago Operators 
{Special to fVID'S DAILY) 

Cihcago — The owners of the 375 
theaters in Chicago are voluntarily 
conceding a raise from 90 cents to 
$1.12^ an hour to, operators. The 
latter are asking $1.25 an hour. 

The increase will go into effect al- 
most immediately if accepted by the 
operators. 




"You shall not hurt him," she cried, and the woodland maid sprang 
between her lover and her irate f ath er.— From "Even as Eve," a First 
National Attraction. 



Osso Building Studio 

Has Plans for New Company to 

Produce in France — Acquired 

Four Theaters While Abroad 

Adolphe Osso, fresh from France, 
is not ready to divulge the details 
of a big deal he consummated while 
abroad. 

However, he admitted yesterday 
that he had succeeded in lining up a 
number of prominent French capital- 
ists and that a new company was 
now in process of formation to pro- 
duce in France. 

Osso while abroad acquired four 
theaters in Paris, ranging from a 800 
seat capacity up. He has also made 
{Continued on Page 3) 



Goldwyn Buys "Madame X" 

Goldwyn claims to have purchased 
world's rights for the .screen to 
"Madame X" from Henry W. Sav- 
age. No one has as yet been cast 
for the production. 

Harry Fields recently claimed 
having bought the rights, but the 
Savage office denied this. 



F. P. Shake-Up 

Reported Industrial Employees Dis- 
charged Pending Dissolution of 
Department. 

It was reported yesterday that Fa- 
mous Players had discharged ap- 
proximately 30 employees in the In- 
dustrial Dep't and that the company 
planned a dissolution of the entire 
department. 

When John C. Flinn of Famous 
Players was asked yesterday relative 
to the report he stated: 

"There is nothing I can say at 
this time relative to any change in 
plans." 



There has been considerable agi- 
tation recently relative to the show- 
ing of industrial films in theaters. 



Laemmle to Contest Holubar 

It is understood that Carl Laem- 
mle of Universal will start court pro- 
ceedings against Allen Holubar and 
Dorothy Phillips who are reported 
as having left Universal for another 
company. 



Karger Leaves Jan. 19 

Metro Director General Will Make 

"Four Horsemen" in the East 

(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Maxwell Karger, di- 
rector general for Metro will leave 
for New York about Jan. 19 to take 
up his duties at Metro's eastern 
plant. 

Karger will be temporarily re- 
placed by W. E. Atkinson, general 
manager of the company who is now 
here. He will stay for a month or 
two. It is understood that Clifford 
C. Butler, now general manager ol 
the studio will replace Karger her< 
permanently. 

Karger will go to New York anc 
then take a six week's rest in Flor 
ida. • He will produce "The Foui 
Horsemen of the Apocalypse" in thi 
East as well as several Bert Lytel 
productions. 

Accompanying Karger east will b< 
George McGuire, assistant director 
M. P. Staulcup, and June Mathis 
head of the scenario department. 



The Metro offices had heard noth 
ing of this from the Coast yestei 
day. 



Lasky Reaches New York 

Jesse L. Lasky arrived in Ne\ 
York on the 20th Century yesterdaj 
He has been in California for som 
time. Is here to attend Famou 
Players meeting Monday. 



Desberg in Town 
Fred Desberg of Cleveland, tl 
well known film attorney, who i 
also interested in affairs of Loev 
Inc. in Ohio, as well as the Alhan 
bra and Mall theaters, left Ne' 
York Thursday night after sever; 
days spent here on important bu; 
iness. 



Nat'l-Foundation Case Held Ovei 

Hearing on the application for a 
injunction to restrain Foundatio 
Film from further distributing a fil 
known as "The Blindness of Youtl 
sought by National Picture Theate 
was postponed in the Federal Cou 
yesterday until next Fridaj'. 



Court Postpones Hearing 

The court adjourned until ne 
week the hearing on the Marjoi 
Rambeau — Al Woods case. Woo 
seeks to enjoin her from appearii 
in pictures except under his manag 
ment. 



Saturday, January 10, f9'20 



f m 




DAILY 




I V«l II R*. 9 Saturda;. January 10. 1920 Pllo 5 OaU 



" Copyright 1919, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
\ Inc. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
'New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 

FILM FOLKS, INC. 
I F. C. ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 
^ urer; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 
■(and Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 
^ Business Manager. 
I Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 

at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
I'the act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms (Postage free) United States, Outside 

of Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 
I months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
; 515.00 

Subscribers should remit with order 

1 Address all communications to WID'S 

DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 
York, N. Y. 

2 Telephone: Vanderbilt, 4551-4552-5558 

Hollywood, California 
zEditorial and Business Offices: 6411 HoUy- 
■wood Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 

Chicago representatives — Willis, Eckels 
and Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 
Chicago, 111. 



Quotations 

Bid Asked Last Sale 

Famous Players .- 90 91 91 

Goldwyn 31 32 31 

Loew's, Inc 32 32% 32 

Triangle H Vs H 

United Pict. Prod. 14K' IS 14^^ 

World Film — — . Ji 



Incorporations 

Albany — Municipal Studios, New 
York City. Capital, $250,000. In- 
corporators: E. London, M. Elkin 
and G. Schwartz, 1451 Broadway. 



Dover, Del — McKinley Studios, 
Inc. Capital, $300,000. Incorpora- 
tors: Harry S. Hecheimer, Agnes 
Johnstone and Sylvia Swarthmore 
of New York. 



Albany — Film Bulletin Corp., New 
York City. Capital, $10,000. Incor- 
porators: I. E. and E. K. Chadwick 
and F. J. Willis of 130 W. 46th St., 
New York. 



Hodkinson Release Day and Date 

Louis Glaum in "The Lone Wolf's 
Daughter" a Hodkinson release has 
been booked for the Qapitol the 
week of Jan. 18. 

"Desert Gold" another Hodkinson 
release is playing day and date at 
the Strand. 



Plans Ready for Rockland House 
(Special to IVID'S DAILY) 

Rockland, Me. — Plans are practic- 
ally completed for the construction 
of a 1,500 seat cotiibination theater 
in here by Alfred S. Black of the 
Black circuit. This is Black's home 
town. 



David Butler Films Now 
{By Wire to WID'S DAILY) 

1^^ Los Angeles — David Butler, son of 
5^red J. Butler, stage director at 
-Morosco's theater will produce his 

Dwn films. The David Butler Elms, 

inc., have been chartered under the 

aws of New Jersey. 
I The company has leased studio 
I ;pace in Hollywood and the first 

)icture will be "Broadway or Bust." 



COMING 

A 

REVIVAL 
OF 




TOWER FILM CORP. 

71 W. 23rd St., N. Y. 



Albany — Rush-Lat Co., Schenec- 
tady. Capital, $5,000. Incorpora- 
tors: P. F. O'Neil, W. D. Lathers 
and J. L. Rush of Schenectady 



Albanj' — Hyperion Products, Inc., 
New York City. Capital, $25,000. 
Incorporators: G. H. Wiley, D. W. 
Russell, and W. R. Hall, 533 W. 

142nd St., New York City. 



Albany — Screen Art Pictures 
Corp., New York City. Capital, $50,- 
000. Incorporators: R. Fielding, J. 
Cahn and W. G. Willmann, 877 Park 
Place., Brooklyn. 



Piarrisbiirg, P.i. -— L'lterprise 
Amusement Co., Inc., Pittsburg. 
Capital, $100,000. Marks Browarsky, 
Ike Browarsk}' and Samuel Green, 
Pittsburg. 



Harrisburg, Pa. — York Theaters 
Co., York. Capital, $20,000. In- 
corporators: Nathan Appell, Louis 
Appell and William Honer of York. 



Albany — William Fox Associates, 
Inc., New York City. Capital, $500,- 
000. Incorporators: William Fox, 
B. Geller and M. Etman, 656 West 
162nd St. 



Columbus, Ohio — Community 
.^musement Co., Toledo. Capital, 
Henry Hirsch, Alexander Denes and 
Julius Tenner, 224 Lexington Ave., 



Albany — The Elk Film Mending 
Machine Co. of New York City. 
Capital, $26,000. Incorporators: 

$200,000. Incorporators: A. Hor- 
witz, Charles McKinley and Frank 
Kessel. 



Chicago First Runs May Change 
Chicago — It is expected that there 
will be several changes in the first 
runs in the loop district because 
of the passing of 50 per cent, of 
the interest of the First National 
franchise to Balaban and Katz from 
Jones, Linick and Schaefer. 

The change is expected to give 
preference jointly to the Riviera and 
the Central Park, with the theaters 
controlled by Ascher Bros, joining 
in an equitable agreement of dates 
which will result in an even division 
between the two circuits. 



] Sheffield Theater Bankrupt 
(Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Sheffield, Ala. — Motion pictures 
are not profitable for a Sheffield 
theater, for it has filed a voluntary 
petition in bankruptcy in the U. S. 
District Court. 

Charles Witters and Flora Wit- 
ters, who conducted the Liberty filed 
the petition, stating that their as- 
sets amount to $10,200, of which 
they claim an exemption of $200 on 
household goods and furniture, with 
their liabilities amovmting to ap- 
proximately $11,558.20. This is said 
to be the first moving picture bank- 
ruptcy filed in the federal court in 
considerable time. 




Maybe to-mor- 
row's meeting of 
film folk with Se- 
cretary of the Ini 
terior Lane, . mayi 
start something 
Who knows? 



New Marsh Film Almost Ready 

The second of the Alargucritc 
Marsh-Harry Grossman series is 
"Face to Face." 



Bell in Town 

Don J. Bell, formerly of the old 
firm of Bell & Howell, one of the 
pioneers of the industry is in New 
York stopping at the Astor. Mr. 
Bell has been out of the game for 
some years but is naturally very 
much interested in developments of 
the industry. 

He made predictions that the pre- 
sent prosperity would continue and 
that the peak would probably be 
reached in 1923-24 in view of the 
fact that the War Saving Stamps 
arc redeemable in 1923. "This will 
put in circulation approximately a 
billion dollars," said Mr. Bell, "and 
most of this money will be spent 
because the holdings of saving 
stamps are in the hands of the small 
investor or individual whose general 
tendency is to save on a small basis. 
Of course, the government may is- 
sue low priced bonds to take up 
some of the saving stamp funds, 
but the great bulk of this money 
can be expected to be spent." 



Character Pictures Chartererd 
(By Wire to WID'S DAILY) 

Albany — Character Pictures Corp 
has been chartered at $150,000. It;, 
corporators are: A. W. Plummer 
C. W. Buck, and D. I. Shapiro. 

Character will make six produo 
tions a vcar, as noted. 



Zierler Buys "Sacred Flame" 

Sam Zierler of Commonwealtl 
Film has purchased "The Sacrec 
Flame" with Emily Stevens ant 
Muriel Ostriche for New York anc 
northern New Jersey. 



Jans Buys Novel for Tell 

Jans Pictures, Inc., have purchasec 
"Nothing a Year" by J. Belmont 
Davis for Olive Tell. 



Knoles Signs Long Term Contract 

Harley Knoles, who is directing 
Dorothy Dalton in "Half an Hour," 
has signed a long term contract with 
Famous Players-Lasky to direct 
Paramount Artcraft pictures. 



Schallenberger in Los Angeles 

Los Angeles, Cal. — W. E. Schal- 
lenberger of Arrow Film is here ne- 
gotiating with independent pro- 
ducers for releasing contracts for 
1920. 



Siegfried Rose Dies 

Siegricd Rose, brother of Morris 
Rose, president of Pioneer died sud- 
denly yesterday in the Longacre 
Bldg. of heart disease. 



Bandit Stuff "Out" 
(Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Washington — Interstate transpor 
tation of "blood and thunder" mov- 
ing picture films or still pictures 
would be prohibited under identical 
bills introduced by Senator Gore, 
Democrat, Oklahoma, and Represen- 
tative Herrald, Republican, Okla- 
homa. Senator Gore said he pre- 
sented the measure by request. 

The bill would affect all pictures 
depicting the activities of former 
convicts, bandits, train robbers or 
other outlaws. Those violating its 
provisions would upon conviction be 
subject to fines of $5,000 to $10,000, 
or imprisonment. 



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Goldwyn Issues Booking Chart 

Goldwyn has issued broadcast to 
exhibitors a booking chart, pocket 
size with an outline of the Goldwyn 
program for 1920 and plenty of white 
space on which to take notes for 
each week's bookings. 



All the worthwhile pos- 
ter talent that shows itself 
in the moving picture pos- 
ter field is promptly ab- 
sorbed by the RITCHEY 
organization. Having 
reached the pinnacle of 
success we mean to stay 
there! 

RITCHEY 

UTHO. CORP. 

406 W. 31st St.,N.Y.. Phone Cbcbca 8388 




bM^ 



DAILY 



Saturday, January 10, 19i 



Patlle]SIe^vs 

No. 3 
KOCKlOltn, II.L.— This is not an A. 
K. V. cuniii at Archangel, but Camp 
<irant at zero weather. The boys in 
inid-wlnter array, line up for review by 
General Pershing. 

PASADENA, CAI..— Blossom pageant 
defies high cost of flowers — a most gor- 
geous floral parade marks the 31st An- 
nual Kose Tournament. 

CHICAGO, ILL.— AVorld's largest lift- 
bridge completed — it is 285 ft. above 
water, and is balanced by sy^ million- 
pound counterweights. 

JUAREZ, MEXICO— Mexican general 
greets U. S. Chief of Staff at Juarez. 
General Escobar received Colonel Glover 
at Headquarters. 

NEW YORK CITY- Over .500 aliens are 
held at Ellis Island for second "whole- 
sale deportation — scenes of "Red" pris- 
oner.s in mess hall. 

PASADENA, CAE.— East and AVcst 
clash on gridiron — Harvard's football 
team .iourneys across continent to play 
the University of Oregon. Over 30,- 
000 see the Big Game. 

NEW YORK CITY— Off for target prac- 
tice! Warships of the .\tlantic Fleet leave 
for winter maneuvers at Guantanamo 
Bay, Cuba. 

JERSEY CITY, N. J —75,000,000 quarts 
of whiskey 1 This is nation's present 
stock which distillers are making every 
effort to ship abroad. 

MEN'S STYLES FOR 1930— 

The Wet Belt. 

The Quart Hat. 

Up-to-date costumes now carry a 
unique innovation. 



Okmulgee Hands Strike 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 
Okmulgee, Okla. — Stage hands and 
operators at the Cozy and Yale thea- 
ters have gone out cm strike because 
of faihirc to agree on a new working 
contract. 

The men l:>elong to the stage hands 
union. 



tod 



ay 



To Build in Monroe 

Monroe, La. — Saenger Amusement 
Co. will erect a large house here, 
to cost about $250,000. 



"U-35", Alexander Film Release 

"Log of the U-,?S" the C. B. Price 
war iilm is the first release of the 
Alexander Film Corp. which takes 
over part of the fourth floor of the 
Lcavitt Bldg. Feb. 1. 

Alexander has New York and 
northern Jersey rights. 



Beyfuss Given Watch 

The Lew Cody Co., the Sydney 
Cohan Co. and L. J. Gasnier have 
just presented Alexander Beyfuss of 
Robertson Cole with a platinum 
watch, hexagon in shape in apprecia- 
tion of his co-operation. The watch 
was suitably inscribed. 



Moss Takes Over the Dyckman 

B. S. Moss assumes control of the 
Dyckman theater, at 207th St. and 
Sherman Ave. through arrangement 
with John G. Jermon. 

Extensive alterations will be made 
in the interior and exterior of the 
theater. The picture policy will be 
continued for the present but vaude- 
ville will be added later. 

This makes Moss's sixth theater 
in New York while four are under 
construction. 



Moss Unit Increases Capital 
{By Wire to WW'S DAILY) 

Albany— The B. S. Moss Theatri- 
cal Enterprises of Manhattan have 
increased capital from $500 to 
$50,000. 





There are 30 Reasons 

why you should book, 

"The 
Screaming 
Shadow' 

REASON No. 8 

Dempsey beat Willard but 
there are enough punches in 
one episode of "The Scream- 
ing Shadow" to put Dempsey 
to sleep. Watch for Reason 
No. 9 to-morrow. 

^BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 

UNIVERSAL CITY CAL. 

Released through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK 

Foreign Rights conlrolled by Apollo Trading Corp. , 220 W. 48th St. 






Osso Building Studio 

{Continued from Page 1) 
arrangements for the buHding of a 
studio in the Parisian suburbs that 
will cost' close to $1,000,000. 

The new company with its French 
interests will build theaters in 
France modeled along the lines of 
the theaters in this country. Osso 
has signed a star to go to France 
to produce but he is not at liberty 
to mention her name as she is still 
under contract to another producer. 
Osso himself will make two trips to 
this country yearly and spend the 
rest of the time in France where he 
has opened a projection room with 
modern appliances. He plans to take 
care of the foreign business of Amer- 
ican producers as well as his own 
activities. 



Increase Capital by $400,000 
{Special to IVID'S DAILY) 

Cincinnati, O. — An increase from 
$200,000 to $600,000 has been made 
in the capital stock of the Phoenix 
Amusement Co., and the highest 
amount of indebtedness is raised 
from $100,000 to $1,000,000. By 
amending the articles of incorpora- 
tion, two members have been added 
to the board of directors which now 
totals nine. John B. Elliott is pres- 
ident of the company which is re- 
ported to be negotiating for the 
Lexington and Ben Ali, here. 



Templar Saxe and William Eville 
have been added to the cast of "Oil," 
the new Gu}' Empey special. 



Cook Bros. Will Build 
Superior, Wis.— Cook Brothers, i 
Duluth, Minn., owners and operatd 
of the Grand plan to construct 
theater here to cost $500,000. 




FOR SALE 



COMPLETELY EQUIPPED STUDIO 
EVERYTHING NEW AND UP TO DATE 



or 



Will sell electrical equipment separately — ' This 
includes latest type of lighting equipment as 
follows: — 

6 Tilting Lamps or counter balance stands 
2 Double Deck Equipments 

2 100-Ampere spot lights 

3 50-Ampere overheads 
2 Top lights with funnels 

Total capacity 650 Amperes. 

All equipment new and either D. G. or A. G., also 
a complete motor generator outfit of 1,000 Am- 
peres capacity. 

Address Box A-25, care of Wid's 



'•aturday, January 10, 1920 



^^ 



DAILY 



ONOGRAMS 

t^e VISUAL NEWS gf 

I ALL THE WORLD 

■ HARVARD BEATS OREGON AT 
OOTBAEl, — Invaders win bier contest 
' aged at Rose Tournament at Pasadena, 
tlifornia. 

: REPUBLICAN WOMEN HOED SES- 

: (ON — Five liundred members of party 

„Jtend committee meeting in Chicago to 
scuss i>latform and candidates. 

,; PERSHING INSPECTS SIXTH DIVI- 
(ON — Head of A. E. F. makes call at 

;'»mp Grant, 111., and is welcomed by 

i en. Franklin Bell. 

, REOPEN "T" WHARF TO FISHER- 

,!S— BOSTON ONLY— Trawler Isly, for- 
' erly French mine sweeper comes into 

I ttston with first big catch. 
CAPITAL GOES SKATING— First near 
ro weather in two years freezes great 

i^ial basin and Washington turns out 
r sport. 

( SECRETARY BAKER IS COUNTED— 

i: ead of census bureau walks into office 
' war department head and asks a lot 
:; personal questions. 

; -ARMY ATHLETES DIP IN SEA— Four 
indred runners of Olympic Club, San 
rancisco troop down to ocean and keep 
S till they find themselves submerged. 
BABY DAY WITH 7th CAVALRY— 
rumpeter calls seven of regiments new 
ibes to cliristening ceremony at Fort 

JELLICOE MAKES OFFICIAL CALLS 

[Famous British Admiral calls on Sec- 
tary Daniels at Washington and makes 
/luaintance of Vice-President Marshall. 
HviLL STOP WOOD ALCOHOL SALE 
Col. Daniel C. Roper, commissioner of 
|ternal revenue, who besides wood al- 
,hol, keeps the country dry and gets the 
*> cream soda tax. 

UNVEIL MEMORIAL TO ROBEHT 
URNS — Not used in Boston edition, 
ottish societies march to Fenway to 
dicate statue to famous poet of tlielr 
.tive land. 

ATLANTIC FLEET SAILS FOR MA- 
jEUVERS — From New York, Boston and 
Hampton Roads the big vessels steam 
-uthward. Kinograms camera man 
:ikes trip. 

CANADIAN INVALIDS RUSH FOR 
EDICINE— Crowds of ailing folk at 
'ncouver, B. C, line up at government 
|uor store with prescriptions. 
, rOBOGGANING IN TORONTO— Win- 
'r sports are at their height in Canad- 
'■ city and hundreds make their way 
: the slides. 

DISTRIBUTED BY 

REPUBLIC DISTRIBUTING 

CORPORATION 



Protection Abroad 

{Continued from Page 1) 

ducers ve*t the right of registration 
in the agent who controls the pro- 
duct for a short period of years, 
after the expiration of the period the 
registration right is vested in the 
agent and not the company. Ac- 
cording to Langner, the product of 
that company cannot be imported in- 
to the country under the trade mark 
unless through the agent who origin- 
ally applied for the registration. 

Inquiries levelled at a number of 
the leading producers resulted in the 
information that the larger manu- 
facturers are aware of the peculiari- 
ties existing under the I^erne Con- 
vention and therefore insert a clause 
in all contracts requiring the trade 
mark to be registered in the name 
of the corporation. 

Apparently, Langner's warning is 
more aptly applicable to the smaller 
producers and distributors. 



Manitoba Censors Use Axe 
{Special to WID'S DAILY) 
Winnipeg, Can.- — The Manitoba 
censors have been cutting pictures 
with alarming regularity and exhib- 
itors are at their wits ends to know 
what to do to stop the menace to 
their trade. The mania is increasing 
while the exhibitors are doing their 
best to furnish the most excellent 
pictures. Not a picture is overlooked 
by the censors. The exhibitors and 
exchanges are preparing a reckon- 
ing with the Norris government 
when the time comes. 



New Houses Must Be Fireproof 
(Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Providence, R. I. — A new law 
issed by the City Council here 
akes it imperative for all who 
lild new theaters here to make 
lem fireproof. Exceptions are floor- 
g boards, cappings to balcony 
onts and the portion of the stage 
5or used in working scenery or 
:her mechanical apparatus. These 
ay be of wood. 



iorge Bros. House for Manitowac 

Manitowac, Wis. — George Bros. 
11 erect a theater, seating 1,000, to 
St $150,000. 




AT LIBERTY 

Assistant Director 

One who can take care of 
everything in the production 
of a feature. 

Address Box B-41— c/o Wid's 



JOHN J. LIVINGSTON 

Motion Picture Representative 

For 

STARS— DIRECTORS 

1440 Broadway New York 



CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG 

Once more demonstrates her magnifi- 
cent art in 

"THE EYES OF YOUTH" 
We have made for this production a 
very artistic lobby display together 
with reproductions in fac-simile oil 
paintings from her latest poses in 
various sizes. 

KRAUS MFG. CO. 

220 West 42d Street 

17th Floor TeU 3607 Bryant 



Send Us Your 
nihctPril Junk Film 

INTERSTATE SMELTING 
(SL REFINING COMPANY 

23 Commercial St. NEWARK. N. J. 



yVires for 


Wid's 




Following wire 
yestenday: 


was received 


"Have not yet received 
January fourth WID'S. 


my 


"Ed Brown. 
'•Pottsville, Pa 


w 





Lewis Leaves for Coast 

Mitch Lewis left for California 
yesterday with his mother. He will 
start work on his first production for 
Metro release upon his arrival there. 



Tanzer United Detroit Manager 

Detroit- — Alfred Tanzer who has 
been attached to the Milwaukee of- 
fice of United has been promoted 
to the managership of United here. 



Barbee's Loop Theater Delayed 

(Special to WID'S DAILY) 
Chicago— Delay in securing iron 
has delayed the opening of Barbee's 
Loop Theater, on Monroe Street. 
A large electric sign has been 
erected over the entrance and the 
house will be finished it is said by 
February 1. 



K. and B. Plans Indefinite 
A report published in a vaude- 
ville paper that the distribution of 
the "Big Five" product had been of- 
fered to Kessel and Bauman, was 
emphatically denied yesterday by 
James R. Grainger, personal repre- 
sentative of Marshall Neilan who 
stated that if the proposition had 
been tendered K. and B. he surely 
would have known about it. 

Adam Kessel, when asked about 
the report, stated: 

"We have been tendered a number 
of propositions but as yet we have 
decided upon nothing. Mr. Bauman 
and myself are going to Californiai 
some time toward the middle or end 
of the month, we don't know just 
when. It is quite sure that nothing 
will be definitely gotten under at 
months to come." 



Mahon to Build Studios 
(Special to WID'S DAILY) 
Salt Lake City. Utah — According 
to reports, John W. Mahon of New 
York, who is here, will build mov- 
ing picture studios near Culver City,. 
Cal., to cover 85 acres. There will 
be 14 studios seven of which wilE 
use artificial lighting. 




7^BDADSTREET 
of FILHDOM 




j^recocnized 
Authority 



Vol. XI, No. 10 



Sunday, January 11, 1920 



Price 25 Cents 



JESSE L.UlSKy 

presents 



BRYANT 



WASHBURN 




F^OSTAL TELEGRAPH - COMMERCIAL CABLES 



RECEIVED AT 
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NEW YORK CITY 

Tel«(il»nn: 5655, 5656. VANDERBILT 



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The PostalTelegrdph-CableCompany(lncorparatei;l)transmits and delivers this message subject to the terms sinif conditions printed an the back ot this blank. 



ia a faat Daii Telegram unlett otltcririse indicated »•" •■"'•-'J after the number ot u)OTda>-* 'N.Li " (Niahi i^ttergram) or -NittT (liight Telegram). II ISDbl— 2«9o: 



51 NYX 129 NL 



OMAHA NEB JAN 4tH 



J S WOODY 

GENL MGR REAL ART PICTURES CORPN 

469 FIFTH ATE NYC 

SOLDIERS OF FORTUNE OPENED AT THE SUN THEATRE 
TODAY AND PACKED THEM IN LIKE SARDINES ALL DAY 
AND EVF:NING STOP FROM ORCHESTRA PIT TO ROOF 
EVERY SEAT WAS CONTINUALLY FILLED MANY SITTING 
TWO IN A SEAT STOP OUR LARGE INNER AND OUTER 
FOYERS AND THE LOBBY WERE JAMIffiD AND IN THE 
EVENING THE CROWD BLOCKED THE SIDEWALK STOP 
MANY REMAINED TO SEE THE PICTURE TWICE STOP AP- 
PLAUSE AND CHEERING ALMOST CONTINUOUS STOP I 
WISH THAT YOU COULD HA\rE HEARD THE COMMENTS ON 
THE PICTURE STOP A FEW FOLLOW STOP I WOULD 
STAND IN LINE TWO HOURS TO SEE IT AGAIN STOP 
WE WILL COME AGAIN TOMORROW STOP THE GREATEST 
I HAVE EVER SEEN STOP CONGRATULATIONS ON THIS 
GREAT SUCCESS STOP THE PICTURE IS WELL NAMED 
ESPECIALLY THE LAST WORD 

HARRIS GOLDBERG 
OWNER SUN THEATRE 



PICTURES 



of FILHDOM ■ ■ llHl Tr^ AUTHORITY 



Vol. XI. No. 10 Sunday, January 11, 1920 Price 25c. 



Copyright 1920, Wirls Film and Film Folks. Inc. 



Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., New York, N. Y., by 

WID'S FILMS AND FILM FOLKS, INC. 
F. C. ("Wld") Gunning, President and Trea-surer; Joseph Dannen- 
berg, Vice-President and Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and Business 
Manager. 

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918. at the post office 

at New York, N. Y., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States. Outside of Greater New 
York, $10.00 one year; 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. 

Foreign, $15.00. 

Subscribers should remit with order. 

Address all communications to 

WID'S DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, N. Y. 

Telephone: Vanderbilt 4551-2 

Hollywood, California: Editorial and Business Offices: 6411 Hollywood 
Boulevard. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 

Ghicago representatives: Willis, Eclcels and Maci<, 6th Floor, Consumers 
Building, Chicago, 111. 



Features Reviewed 

Norma Talmadge in 

A DAUGHTER OF TWO WORLDS 
First National Page 2 

Viola Dana in THE WILLOW TREE 

Metro Page 3 

James J. Corbett in . .THE PRINCE OF AVENUE A 
Universal Page 7 

SKY-EYE 
Sol Lesser Page 9 

George Walsh in THE SHARK 

Fox Page 11 

Edith Roberts in THE TRIFLERS 

Universal Page 13 

Alice Brady in THE FEAR MARKET 

Realart Page 16 

Taylor Holmes in. .NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH 

Metro Page 17 

Corinne Griffith in.... THE TOWER OF JEWELS 

Vitagraph Page 19 

Norma Talmadge in SHE LOVES AND LIES 

Select — Selznick Page 21 

THE EXPLOITS OF A GERMAN SUBMA- 
RINE— U-35 

C. B. Price Co., Inc Page 23 

Edward Earle and Gladys Hulette in HIGH SPEED 

Hallmark Page 26 

SHORT STUFF Page 27 



News of the Week 
in Headlines 

Monday 

Loew takes control of Metro Pictures Corp. 

Loew to build in Chicago in conjunction with Jones, 
Linick and Schaefer. 

United States Photoplay Corp. offering stock for sale 
to exhibitors. 

Tuesday 

lliree millions involved in Loew-Mctro deal. 
Robertson-Cole take over Hallmark exchanges. 
Theda Bara to appear in stage production for A! 
Woods. 

First National official claims producers force films 
containing advertising on exhibitors. 
Wednesday 

C. B. Price claims duping in connection with official 
German submarine pictures. 

Lawrence Langner, trade mark attorney, says foreign 
trade marks of American producers are being pi- 
rated. 

Reported Al Kaufman will enter producing field as 
independent. 

Thursday 

George Loane Tucker, producer of "The Miracle Man," 
files suit against Mayflower and Famous Players, al- 
leging violation of contract, etc. 

A. J. .Small, Canadian theatrical man, missing. Friends 
fear foul play. 

National Screen Service to offer novelty trailer to 
exhibitors. Has exclusive contract with leading 
producers for material. 

Friday 

Australasian Films about to merge with J. C. William- 
son. Would give combine 60 Australian theaters. 

Clark-Cornelius Chaplins switched from Hallmark dis- 
tribution to Republic. 

Plans being perfected for meeting with Secretary of 
the Interior Lane regarding "Americanization" 
drive via films. 

Saturday 

Adolphe Osso completing details of big French com- 
pany. Building studio in Paris. 

Big producers protected on trade mark registration in 
foreign countries. 

Reported Famous Players will drop Industrial Dep't. 

Maxwell Karger of Metro coming east shortly. Will 
produce here. 



There is an index in this issue 



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DAllA^ 



Sunday, January 11, 1920 



Star Puts Over Initial First National Production in Good Style 



Norma Talmadge in 

"A DAUGHTER OF TWO WORLDS" 

First National 

DIRECTOR James Young 

AUTHOR Leroy Scott 

SCENARIO BY James Young and Edmund" 

Goulding. 

CAMERAMAN David Abel 

AS A WHOLE Gives the star a chance to dis- 
play considerable versatility and has been 
given satisfactory presentation. 

STORY Contains frequent conveniences and im- 

plausibilities that will get laughs; however, 
it does reach the high spots of emotion once 
or twice. 

DIRECTION Deserves credit for welding a 

none too impressive piece of fiction into a 
fairly attractive picture. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Very good 

LIGHTINGS Usually clear 

CAMERA WORK Several attractive close-ups 

STAR Made a striking appeal during emotional 

moments, especially; made the most of cir- 
cumstances. 
SUPPORT Jack Crosby not strong enough op- 
posite for star's personality; capable cast. 

EXTERIORS Didn't figure much 

INTERIORS Conventional 

DETAIL Unnecessary repetition in titles 

CHARACTER OF STORY. . . .Poor girl breaks into 
society after jumping bail on a forgery charge 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 

In "A Daughter of Two Worlds" Miss Talmadge 
makes her initial appearance under the First National 
banner and while the spectator will not be disap- 
pointed with the production or the work of the star 
herself, the picture really does not make the impres- 
sion that some of Miss Talmadge's former vehicles 
have. Perhaps this is due to the fact that the main 



efifort seems to have been given to the development of 
the plot. 

The action advances at a logical pace and although 
there are one or two convenient bits, it will be for- 
given for this is preferable to a session of tiresome 
and draggy sequences that add nothing but footage. 

As a whole "A Daughter of Two Worlds" will sat- 
isfy the majority and especially admirers of the star. 
There are minor points in production and detail that 
may not be noticed by the casual observer except in 
one scene — that in the court room — ^the judge asks for 
the parents of the prisoner and forthwith two men 
make their way to the front. This got a laugh at the 
Strand. The titles were childish and a continual ref- 
erence to "her other world" kind of jarred. 

Norma is mixed up in a forgery case at the opening 
of the story and in order that his daughter may grow 
up to live a life different from that in which she has 
been reared, her father, Black Jerry, the owner and 
proprietor of a notorious dance hall, affects her es- 
cape with the aid of Uncle George, a life-long friend 
who furnishes the bail. 

Shero is established in a fashionable boarding school 
where she is the room-mate of Sue Harrison. Norma 
and Sue become chums and during the holidays Norma 
is invited to Sue's home and hero pops up in the form 
of Sue's brother, Kenneth. As a result of the visit 
shero becomes engaged to Kenneth and on the eve of 
her wedding, her accomplice in the forgery case at- 
tempts to blackmail her but shero's father comes to 
the rescue. 

Kenneth's father is in the contracting business and 
Sam Conway, his silent partner, in order to save him- 
self from an exposition of his unscrupulous deals, kills 
the man who has threatened him and throws the guilt 
upon Harry Edwards. Norma had known Edwards 
in the old days and at the time of the murder was in 
his company. To save him from the chair shero dis- 
closes her past life to her fiance but love triumphs 
with the customary fade-out. 



Should Please Admirers of the Star and Win Her Some New Friends 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



For admirers of Miss Talmadge "A Daughter of Two 
Worlds" will be sure to please, for the part played by 
the star permits of unlimited opportunity for a display 
of versatility, first as the daughter of a dance hall 
keeper, then as a meek little school girl and finally as- 
suming a more mature demeanor when she is con- 
fronted with disaster. 

This is the star's first production for First National 
and while it is not ?>§ pretentious a§ some of her for- 



mer offerings, her work is quite satisfactory. It 
might be well, however, for First National to secure 
a better title writer than the one who wrote those in 
"A Daughter of Two Worlds." 

You have plenty of opportunity and material for 
catchlines and they can be used to advantage for at- 
tracting new fans for the star and strengthening those 
she has already won. Make a special appeal to the 
women, for they like this kind of stuff. 



Sunday, January 11, 1920 



jMi 



DAILY 



Exceptionally Artistic and Novel Adaptation of Stage Play 



Viola Dana in 

"THE WILLOW TREE" 

Metro 

SUPERVISED BY Maxwell Karger 

DIRECTOR Henry Otto 

AUTHORS J. H. Benrino and Harrison Rhodes 

SCENARIO BY June Mathis 

CAMERAMAN John Arnold 

AS A WHOLE A decided novelty with wonder- 
fully beautiful settings and wholly artistic at- 
mosphere. 

STORY Adaptation of well-known stage play; 

has barely enough force for photoplay ma- 
terial. 
DIRECTION Has shown individuality and in- 
genuity in artistry and technique. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Very beautiful 

LIGHTINGS Splendid; some marvelous effects 

CAMERA WORK Meritorious indeed 

STAR Tip-toes around like a true maid of the 

Orient; the part doesn't call for any excep- 
tional effort. 

SUPPORT Pell Trenton was in love with "poor 

butterfly" all right, but you'd never know it 
to look at him; Japanese characters all excel- 
lent. 

EXTERIORS A wealth of beautiful scenes of 

Japanese gardeners, bridges and by-ways. 

INTERIORS Afford a good deal of the novelty 

DETAIL Titles too "wordy"; art designs very 

pretty. 
CHARACTER OF STORY Japanese legend af- 
fords basis for slight love story. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 6,000 feet 

The popularity of the play and its star, Fay Bainter, 
will be one of the big pulling powers of the screen ver- 
sion of "The Willow Tree." And it is safe to say 
that Metro has given to the story a production lavish 
in settings and artistic effects. No effort has appar- 



ently been spared nor money stinted in a desire to 
make "The Willow Tree" the novel spectacle which 
the finished production presents. 

There is a strikingly realistic Japanese atmosphere 
to the entire offering — the interiors with their paper- 
like partitions and sliding doors ; the exteriors with 
their unique bridges and beautiful gardens. 

Some truly lovely lighting effects are particularly 
adapted to this sort of film ; notably the silhouette 
scenes. The photography is especially fine through- 
out and adds much to the splendor of the production. 

Pell Trenton is seeking forgetfulness in the land of 
the lotus where he chances in the shop owned by an 
image maker, O-Riu's (Viola Dana's) father. Pell 
greatly admires the carved figure of a beautiful girl 
which Tomotada, the image maker, refuses to sell be- 
cause of the mythical legend connected with the tree 
from which it was carved. 

But Tomotado has a son — a son of modern Japan — 
who aspires to a college career in America. A more 
or less comedy tint supposed to reflect upon the son 
falls flat of humor and the character seemed superflu- 
ous. Tomotado arranges a marriage for his daughter 
whereby he will secure the money necessary for his 
son's education. 

O-Riu disappears to avoid the marriage and in order 
to return the money which has already been spent, the 
image maker sells Pell the figure of the princess of the 
Willow Tree. O-Riu goes to Pell's home, hides the 
figure, and arranges herself in its place. Pell has been 
told that according to the legend the princess will 
come to life if a mirror is placed in her hands. At 
any rate hero is "from Mizzouri" and gets right at the 
experiment. 

The charm works and when the call to war comes, 
hero refuses to leave his new found love but accord- 
ing to the myth the princess goes back to her wooden 
self leaving hero free to go to war only to return four 
years later and find her waiting. 



An Especial Appeal to Those Who Admire Photoplay Novelties 



Box Office Analysis 

First of all it is safe to say that there are numer- 
ous possibilities for putting over "The Willow Tree." 
There is the title of a well-known stage play, the name 
of Viola Dana, star in the screen version, and many 
opportunities for bo.x office attraction and lobby dis- 
play. 

You can always number a goodly majority who go 
in for oriental flavor and regardless of its particular 
atmosphere you can go the limit on the novelty end 



for the Exhibitor 

of it. "The Willow Tree" is decidedly the most novel 
and fantastic piece produced in many months. 

Here's your chance to get in a musical score for 
there are numerous compositions, relating to the Ori- 
ent that your patrons will recognize and that fit in 
very well with the story, for instance, "Poor Butter- 
fly," the favorite of the Hippodrome show a few years 
ago, but still a pleasant memory. Japanese costumes 
for your ushers will dress it up some more and you 
can l)urn incense to add to the Oriental atmosphere. 



L 



ALDEPT E. SMITH 



PRESENTS 



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A PICTURE OF POWER 

Written by William B. Courtney 

Edited by Mr. and Mrs. 
GEORGE RANDOLPH CHESTER 

Directed by George Terwilliger 

A Great Love 5/orp 
A Vitagraph Special Production 

with the same cast of principals praised by press 
and public when seen in 

*'The Vengeance of Durand" 

More Than A Picture — 

a great, throbbing cross'section of LIFE. 
Its powerful truths fairly 

LEAP FROM THE SCREEN! 






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ALICE JOYCE 

never was more radiant than as "Patricia Leeds" 
in this superlative screen production which is des' 
tined to be one of the really big pictures of 1920. 

''Slaves of Pride'* 

is a powerful preachment against Love of Self. 

It breaks down the fence that people erect about 
the person of wealth. It arraigns false pride — 
it glorifies pride of the right fibre. 

"Slaves of Pride'* 

adds brilliancy to Alice Joyce's already bright 
stardom. 

It begins' the new year with a standard so high 
that the eleven months to come may not see it 
equalled. 






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COMMANDMENT 

jd Cparamount^rtcraft Q>iclure 

Look Out For Family Squabbles In Your Audience! 



HKHK'S a picture so true to life that husbands 
will say to wives, "That's you!" and before 
the picture's over the wives will think they've been 
complimented. Do you know men who spend 
more than they earn? Do you know any wives who 
spend more than their husbands earn? Or want 



to spend more? Or talk about other women who 
do spend more? Do you know any real, ordinary 
human beings like the most of us ? 
They're the kind of people who'll throng to see 
"Tile Thirteenth Commandment." And the whole 
world's full of 'em ! 



From the great romantic novel by Rupert Hughes 



D'wcclcd by 
Robert Vignola 



f. FAViOOS PLAYERS -lASia COKPORATION 

'V- — ^l UMILPtI l^OnOBniV JC^SSLt-ASKYlVrJVn CECIL BDEMIUZilnatr bN(n< 






Scenario hy 
Alice Eyion 



This is the three-column ad-cut ready at your exchange 



Sunday, January 11, 1920 



tM^ 



DAILV 



Very Stagey Production But Comedy and Star's Fight Will Register 

With Some 



James J. Corbett in 

"THE PRINCE OF AVENUE A" 

Universal 

DIRECTOR Jack Ford 

AUTHORS Charles T. and Frank M. Dazey 

SCENARIO BY Charles J. Wilson, Jr. 

CAMERAMAN John Brown 

AS A WHOLE Very stagey production but 

star's fight and comedy touches will get it by 
with transient audiences. 

STORY Plot is extremely elemental and fails 

to generate any great suspense. 

DIRECTION Never very realistic 

PHOTOGRAPHY Average 

LIGHTINGS Nothing unusual 

CAMERA WORK Good 

INTERIORS Satisfactory 

EXTERIORS "Avenue A" setting not at all 

modern. 

STAR Is interesting; beats up a dozen men 

single-handed in the climax. 

SUPPORT Average 

DETAIL Generally poor; all atmosphere striven 

for is terribly obvious ; star not mussed up at 
all after his fight; night scenes brilliantly 
lighted and not tinted. 
CHARACTER OF STORY More or less un- 
couth Irishman wins hand of mayoralty can- 
didate's daughter. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 4,500 feet 

Jack Ford produced "The Prince of Avenue A" out 
in California and from the looks of the east side New 
York scenes he had never been nearer the metropolis 
than the Hollywood studios when he staged it. The 
Avenue A setting is the stagiest one could imagine 
and what with its horse cars, a remnant of other days, 
and the modern clothes the leads wear, the spectator 
encounters a bad case of incongruity. 

This may not stand out before audiences outside the 
city but certainly most people are going to catch the 



terrible stagey atmosphere that shrouds the whole 
production. When there are more than two or three 
players on the screen at one time, the action imme- 
diately becomes stilted, obvious and very plainly "di- 
rected." There's little that is natural about the run- 
ning of the entire picture. 

However it is quite possible that the low-brow hu- 
mor introduced at various places during the action and 
the- fight staged by the star at the climax will appeal 
to those audiences who just want to be amused for a 
while before they catch their train or make another 
sale. There's nothing new about this comedy. Most 
of it occurs when Corbett as Barry O'Connor attends 
the society dance given by the heroine. Barry is a 
model of sartorial splendor in his evening clothes 
but he asks for dances without introductions, tells 
one female her dress is too high, chats with the but- 
ler and invites the maid to dance with him. After all 
tJTis the heroine orders him from her home! A most 
])olite thing for a society girl to do under the circum- 
stances — not. 

But it happens that Barry's father is a power in 
politics and that the heroine's father wants to be 
mayor of the city. So the senior O'Connor insists that 
the candidate bring his daughter to an Avenue A 
racket so that she may lead the grand march with 
Barry, thus wiping out the young man's humiliation. 
Then there's a riot when Barry's enemy insults the 
girl and Barry proceeds to clean up the place, felling 
at least a dozen of his opponents with his bare fists. 
After it's over his shirt front is still a spotless white 
and Barry has a scratch on his chin although his 
knuckles are unharmed. At this show of heroics 
heroine gives the air to the society fop who has been 
tagging around after her and goes to Barry's arms. 

Supporting Corbett are Richard Cummings, Cora 
Drew, Harry Northrup, Frederick Woom, Mark Fen- 
ton, George Fischer, Johnnie Cook and Lydia Yea- 
mans Titus. 



Not the Picture for a High-Class House With a Reputation 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 

Certainly this picture has no place on the screen of 



a high-class theater that has a reputation to uphold. 
Its many faults quite overbalance its few merits when 
such a theater is considered. 

On the other hand there is no denying that "The 

Prince of Avenue A" will have its appeal. And this 

appeal is directed largely to the low-brows and to a 

certain extent the transients. Of course, no exhibitor 

really likes to admit that his theater houses low-brows 



but many theaters do and before such audiences the 
picture will likely score and score with better eft'ect 
than would a more expensive release with a better 
story and more expertly staged. 

Transient audiences will also find something to their 
liking in this, mainly the comedy put over by the star 
during his initiation into society and the fight he 
stages during the climax which is also rather funny 
inasmuch as it is so impossible. 




SELECT((^)PICTURES 



Joseph M. Schenck presents 

NORMA TALMADGE 

in 

"SHE LOVES AND LIES" 

Adapted bij Grant CdrpontGi 6- ChcstOTMthci^ Gom the storvj bi^Wilkic Qjllins 
DiiGction— Chester Withci) 



I 



SELECT PICTURES CORPORATION 
Lewis J. Selznick 

President 



Sunday, January 11, 1920 



tMA 



DAILV 



Good Thrills Surrounded by Story and Production That are Jokes 



"SKY-EYE" 
William Steiner — Sol Lesser 

DIRECTOR Aubrey M. Kennedy 

AUTHORS. .Aubrey M. Kennedy and Louis Lewyn 

SCENARIO BY Aubrey M. Kennedy 

CAMERAMEN U. S. Army Photographers 

AS A WHOLE Several spectacular air stunts 

stand out in otherwise very poor picture. 
STORY Ridiculously funny with no continuity 

of action and little respect for plausibility. 
DIRECTION Misses fire from first to last; all 

scenes handled in crudest conceivable manner 
PHOTOGRAPHY Scenes in air fairly good; 

those on ground very poor. 
LIGHTINGS. ...... .Ground scenes generally bad; 

cameramen have paid no attention to sun. 
CAMERAWORK Special stunt stuff in week- 
lies has shown better camera work than this 

although all thrills are fairly well handled. 
LEADING PLAYERS Pretty poor actors, all 

of them; army officers have important roles 

in story. 
EXTERIORS Include shots of aviation grounds 

which interest. 

INTERIORS The real thing but lighting is bad 

DETAIL Picture might be improved by capable 

editing; a number of scenes show flocks of 

'planes in flight. 
CHARACTER OF STORY Villain's efforts to 

ruin father of girl who turned him down. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 5,500 feet 

There's nothing at all to commend this picture ex- 
cept several spectacular feats of daring performed in 
the air by Lieutenant Russel J. Hunt, who is seen in 
the title role. He certailny provides a lot of thrills 
by his daring which takes form in changing from one 
"plane to another by means of a rope, dropping oflf on 



to a moving train from his machine, climbing out on 
its wings time and again and rescuing the girl by the 
rope from a drifting launch. 

Outside of heartily commending all these thrills 
there is nothing to be said in favor of the picture. A 
story has never been more amateurishly contrived than 
has that which is the basis for "Sky-Eye." Any at- 
tempt to point out all its faults would necessitate 
paragraph after paragraph. Suffice it to say that it 
has a villain who is relentless in his persecution of 
the hero, who tries in divers ways to kill him and ruin 
the father of the girl who turned him down. 

But the plot is never cleverly developed, it possesses 
no semblance of continuity and the titles are forced 
into making outlandish statements to hitch the va- 
rious scenes together by the narrow thread that holds 
them. Few of the villain's various acts are convinc- 
ingly motivated and the manner in which he plays 
havoc with army rules and regulations is so ridiculous 
it's laughable. 

The actors consigned to play the various roles for 
the most part aren't. Harry Meyers is the best-known 
in the case. He appears as the villain but it looks as 
if nobody directed him and one is puzzled at times to 
interpret the meaning of his expressions. Lieutenants 
Hunt and Nutt of the army appear respectively as 
Sky-Eye and his friend. Both are nice looking fel- 
lows but neither is an actor. Others who appear are 
June Keith, Thelma Kenley and Peck Miller together 
with a number of other army officers who stand around 
and laugh at the camera. 

The photography of the ground shots is very poor 
and the work of the cameramen who photographed the 
air stunts has often been surpassed in special scenes 
enacted for news weeklies. A number of the scenes 
have been laid in the Texas oil fields and these, to- 
gether with the scenes shot at the aviation field, are 
interesting at first glance. 



Special Mention of the Thrills May Get the Crowds In 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Airplane pictures aren't common as yet and so you 
may be able to attract very large crowds by mention of 
the stunts performed in "Sky-Eye" and by following 
out the exploitation suggestions which the distributor 
has mapped out. 

And there are some crowds who may just feel good- 
natured enough to laugh at the poor make-shift of a 
story that they will see in the picture and applaud 
the thrills. 

But most audience^ have been educated up to better 
things than are shown in "Sky-Eye." Even thrillers 



must be treated with some expertness to drive home 
their full value. And it will probably be the opinion 
of most people that they have been cheated after the 
picture has run its course. 

Of course there is the possibility of filling your 
house by sensational exploitation but a full house, if 
it is dissatisfied, is even worse than an empty one. 
So even though "Sky-Eye" affords all sorts of exploi- 
tation possibilities, it will be best to treat it very care- 
fully. 




JUST A 
V/i 

yldaptcd from tKc plaij by 
tugeire iDciLter 

Direction '' >lou;circl Wickman 
Scenario l>i| XcitHerlne R_eecl 

NATIONAL PICTURE THEATRES inc. 







Le^vis J. Selznick 

President 



Maae bi| National 



Distributed bi| Select 



Sunday, January 11, 1920 



sMI 



DAIUY 



11 



Rapid Action Sea Story With Any Number of Genuine Thrills 



George Walsh in 

"THE SHARK" 

Fox 

DIRECTOR Dell Henderson 

AUTHOR Thomas F. Fallon 

SCENARIO BY Thomas F. Fallon 

CAMERAMAN Joe Ruttenberg 

AS A WHOLE Considerably better than any- 
thing this star has had in quite a while. 

STORY Rapid-action sea-story containing a 

number of good fist fights and a big thrill in 
dive of heroine from top mast of ship. 

DIRECTION Generally satisfactory; has 

speeded up the action to extent that story 
loop-holes are not noticed. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Very good 

LIGHTINGS Satisfactory 

CAMERA WORK Some pretty good sea shots 

STAR Registers well in a part calling for gen- 
eral agility and considerable use of fists. 

SUPPORT Good with a number of interesting 

character types 

INTERIORS Appropriate 

EXTERIORS Sea stuff generally good 

DETAIL A number of weak spots in story and 

a bad slip in direction but speed of action 
covers these. 
CHARACTER OF STORY Sailor saves shang- 
haied girl from brutal sea captain. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 5,000 feet 

This is a story of the sea and has been keyed at a 
very rapid pace throughout with the result that its 
loop-holes will doubtless be overlooked in the ex- 
citement generated by the action. Without a doubt 
it is the best picture in which George Walsh has ap- 
peared in some time. He has the role of a fighting 
sailor and his athletic prowess and general all-around 
agility are given ample play during the run of the 
picture. 

That the story, in some respects, approaches the 
ridiculous can not be denied upon a close inspection of 



its construction. That business men should see fit to 
discuss the important matters on a slumming party 
and request the jirivatc office of the proprietor of a 
notorious dive for tlicir work, the while leaving the 
licr(^in(\ tlie only woman in tlic party, "unregarded, is 
beyond an ordinary mortal's conception. 

Ilowever most people will pardon this impossibility 
with the excuse that "they do it in the movies," and 
will he content to concentrate their attention on 
the many tin-ills that the picture provides. Of these 
the star's fist fights winding up with his encounter 
with the l)rutal captain on the deck, are by no means 
the least. Spectacular indeed is the high dive taken 
l)y tlie heroine from the top mast of the schooner, to 
escape tlie vicious crew and the star's escape from 
the police over a railroad bridge, narrowly missing 
being- run down by a train, are further scenes that 
provide thrills of the heartiest physical type. 

Walsh is seen as Shark Rawley, a sailor on the 
vessel owned and captained by the brutal Sanchez. 
The two are ashore one night when Doris Selby, to- 
gether with her father and business associates, are on 
a slumming party. Sanchez makes off with Doris while 
Shark is attempting to rescue her from another, and 
immediately puts out to sea. Shark just manages to 
catch the boat ajid here begins a series of furious 
fights between the captain and his crew on one side 
and Shark on the other, over the girl. Eventually the 
ship catches fire (a fire which could have easily been 
put out) and all hands are forced to the water, from 
which some time later Doris and Shark are rescued. 

The fights are all very well staged particularly, as 
said, the one between the captain and Shark. When 
this is over and the captain lies prone oh the deck. 
Shark enters the cabin where the girl is hidden and 
she immediately knocks him out with a bottle. This 
scene is liable to get a laugh but otherwise the action 
should register as intended. 

Walsh is supported by Mary Hall, Robert Brod- 
erick, William G. Nally, James Mack, Henry Pem- 
berton and Marie Pagano. 



This Should Give General Satisfaction 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



While "The Shark" will not likely create a new box 
office record there doesn't seem to be any reason why 
it shouldn't give general satisfaction to most all pho- 
toplay audiences. The fights and the thrills key the 
action up to a good fast tempo and the inconsisten- 
cies of the plot are not glaring because of this. 

In advertising "The Shark" tell them that it is a 



story of the sea and that the leap of the heroine 
from the top mast and the burning of the schooner 
are among the picture's thrills. George Walsh has a 
certain following and should be featured, mainly be- 
cause in this picture he quite surpasses anything he 
has done recently. 



^^Jlw 



SIXTH! 



ja 000, 000 people 

saw it as a stage plai^! 

(]t ran for 2 years in JSjeu) O^rit. 
1 If ear in Qndton , ^ vviontKs iix 
Chicou^o, and hadi eqiwdlvj loinof 
runs in other hig cities in Dbnaeir'^ 
Lca, and Sitrope ! 




'e/AYLOR 

HOLMES 



directed bij Da\>id U-^rkland 




XPTHING 
hi^ihe TmiTn 



^<mdu£ed hij X, 
HOLIES Proi 



METRO 



ffuri/s, imperial ^Pictures, Jlmiied, SxclusLOe Tfistrilnutors thrcviqhout 
the ^British Swipire. *^— ' Sir 'William ^^wrij, cJlflanagln^ 'Director. 



Sunday, January 11, 1920 



VJijii 



DAILV 



13 



Simple and Obvious Little Picture With a Few Entertaining Spots 



Edith Roberts in 

"THE TRIFLERS" 

Universal 

DIRECTOR W. Christy Cabanne 

AUTHOR Joseph Franklin Poland 

SCENARIO BY Hal Hoadley 

CAMERAMAN John Leezer 

AS A WHOLE Very slow moving little picture 

with some entertaining moments but failing 
to reach any climax. 
STORY Simple, quite obvious and unable to in- 
trigue the attention constantly because of 
its primer-like simplicity. 

DIRECTION : Average 

PHOTOGRAPHY Very good 

LIGHTINGS Satisfactory 

CAMERAWORK Usual 

STAR. . . Registers with appeal, youth and prettiness 
SUPPORT David Butler brightest in cast; reg- 
isters three or four fine laughs. 

EXTERIORS Generally plain 

INTERIORS Include good hotel lobby scene 

DETAIL Fairly good 

CHARACTER OF STORY Poor girl discovers 

fast society she dreams of is shallow and in- 
sincere. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 5,000 feet 

Here is a picture that in its simplicity is almost 
primer-h'ke and wliicli, thous^h it has a few interesting 
and entertaining moments, fails to command tlic at- 
tention all the way through because of this. The 
story is well enough treated but a lack of illumining 
incident and an absence of a sustaining inteiest handi- 
cap it to no little extent. The whole st'jry is prettv 
obvious even before the author has gotten into jiis 
plot and so there's nothing to do Init sit and await 
the foregone conclusion. 



I (litli l\(jherts appears as Janet l\an<lan, a dej^arl- 
nieiit store girl who longs for a fling at h.igh society. 
Quite true to type she overlooks the- poor but honest 
lc\ e of Dan Cassidy of the traffic squad. When Ja- 
net's vacation time comes she goes to a fashionable 
hotel instead of to Sullivan lake and there at a dance 
slu- meets her idol, Monte Moreville. 

After four days Janet goes to settle her bill and 
finds it a hundred dollars. This is more than a sur- 
prise to her as she thought the $25 she was asked for 
her room covered a week instead of a day. Monte 
conies to her rescue with the money and a proposition, 
that she pose as his wife in order that he may the 
better handle a blackmailing lady who threatens a 
breach of promise suit. 

So then Janet tastes to the full of high life but finds 
to her disappointment that all its people are shallow 
and insincere and, after thus risking her good name, 
she goes back to the poor and still honest blue-coat. 

Even the story material in hand is not treated as 
well as it could be. The sudden change in character of 
Monte when he proposes in reality to Janet is not in 
the least convincing. And Monte's "fast" crowd 
doesn't act like a natural fast crowd at all. It con- 
stantly assumes a stilted attitude that almost ap- 
proaches on the conventional. 

Miss Roberts' characterization is really the dominat- 
ing thing about the production. Not a skilled actress 
by any means she, manages, however, to extract a 
good deal of sympathy and some humor from her role. 
David Butler's performance as the traffic cop stands 
out and it's a pity his part wasn't larger. He gets 
several legitimate laughs in the short space he's on the 
screen. Others are Forrest Stanley, Frederick Vroom, 
Lillian Langdon, Charles Arling, Oleta Ottis, Kath- 
erine Kirkham, Arthur Shirley. Ben Alexander. Nell 
Craig. Colin Kenny and Arthur Hoyt. 



Slip It In Quietly and There Won't Be Any Strenuous Kicks 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



If you find yourself shy a picture you can slip "The 
Triflers" in quietly and there won't be any strenuous 
kicks about it. There are some scenes in it that 
amuse and others that mildly interest and although 
the picture is far from being a solidly dramatic piece 
of entertainment, its good points will likely stand out 
and get it over averagely well. 



The central situation, that of a girl posing as the 
wife of a society rake, can be e'aborated upon in ad- 
vertising copy to advantage. Th's should attract con- 
siderably. Miss Roberts' name, togeth.er with that 
of David Butler should be featured. People are going 
to like this leading man a lot letter a'ter seeing his 
w< rk here. 



He Hocks Tbeir 




says:- 




Stomdlfieatie 




rath* ^iroKfine 
25 iVei 
New Yo; 

Oentlenen 

I tMny the Pi 

on having tba dlBtributl 

comedies, 

"BDKPIHG INTO 

that has played at the ? 

New York anfl Brooklyn he 

andlencea, and in Ita or 

titling, and in the who! 

to predict that Harold Lj 

th^ faTorite h** »afl In h| 

Yo 



»«WA<**T 17. 1919 

■-r 

tMtn^e lii to be ood^ retuleted 



^^ 



•tteTTe* two reel Harold Lloyd 




^ rrHK Marion 'j^hkatkk Co. 



Billy Connors 
of the Marion 
Jketifre says. 





bthe 



Distributors 





" was one of the btet eoBMsdler 
a long time. In both our 
WBB a riot of fun Tlththf 



y, the cleTemeea of Ite 
p of Ite fon. It In eafe 
m now on will be Jnet double 
€ reel relf aaf e 



DIRBCTOP. 



m 



Jack Eaton, says:^ 



Produced Xsy 

Hal S^pacli 





REC^IVEQ a 

KBl CH 31 COLLECT NITK 



1919 H07 27 AM 3 28 



SEATTU WASH HOV 26 

A33T DIRBCTOH OF KXCHAITCES PATffiE EXCHAUGE INC 25 W 45 NEWYORK NY 
BUUPING ItJTO BROADWAY EVERYTHIHO PATHE CLAMED AUDIKHCE HILARIOUS 
DURIUG TIUE IT IS S;!OTO EXTREMELY Finn^Y BUT CLEAN THROUGHOUT USED 
HALP PAGE AD ON OPENING THIS COJIEDY WELL PLEASED WITH RESULTS 
JAMES Q CLEMMER, 



UAe Og-den JheatTvse^^ 



sJaTues Q Qemmerjays. 



^ 




liihiTlft/'/Mu-atrf 
■Hie JfoMI/fi'i'i'il'dir' 



Novembei- 20, 1919 

Pathe Exchange, 
Indianapolis, Indiana. 

I think the Harold Lloyd comedy, 
"Bumping Into Broadway" is by far the 
best comedy that has ever been in. this 
house. It kept the house roaring from 
beginning to end. There is no dbubt in 
my mind that Lloyd is the cleverest 
comedian on the screen today. 



g^^ WESTEJp^ UNION 



CLUSW tCnvitl STMKk 



RECEIVED «t 

Bq07>IY3U 68 BLOB 

3ALTLAKK UTAH 1134A SOV 17 1919 

PATHE EXCHAIICB lUC 

tlYK 

WI'IE REAuraO A3 FOLLOWS JUST BECD FROM OGDEN THEATRE OODKH 

UTAH HAROLD LLOYD IS BOMPINO IHTO BROADWAY POSITIVELY GREATEST KNOCKOUT 

OF THE YEAR STOOD THBI OP FOR OVIB THREE HOURS 

WAOT TO THANK YOU FOR BOOKIHO US THE BIOOEST HIT OP 

THE 3EA30H STOP THIS HAKES US FEEL FIHE ESPBCIALLY CO.N'SIDaUNS. 

THE FACT THAT MISTER PEERY OF THE ABOVE THEATRE THOUGHT 

SURE HE HAD OVERSOLD Oil THESE SEW LLOYDS 

PATHE EXCHANGE INC 



Very truly yours. 



' \^ w t3 .Ti.CLt'^ai-^ 



B. W.Breittliiiger o/the 




16 



jM i 



DAILV 



Sunday, January 11, 1920 



Badly Handled Climax Spoils Good Effect of Picture's Body 



Alice Brady in 

"THE FEAR MARKET" 

Realart 

DIRECTOR Kenneth Webb 

AUTHOR Amelie Rives 

SCENARIO BY Clara Beranger 

CAMERAMAN George Folsey 

AS A WHOLE Interesting and lavish produc- 
tion of novel plot; works fascinatingly to cli- 
max which slumps badly. 

STORY Is motivated by a society scandal sheet; 

all the action has to do with a high-class un- 
derworld which is realistically pictured. 

DIRECTION Speaks pretty well for Webb but 

he should have treated climax with greater 
sense of the dramatic. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Very good 

LIGHTINGS Good effects when necessary 

CAMERAWORK Noticeably good 

STAR Is not given her usual big emotional op- 
portunities. 
SUPPORT Frank Losee as father has next larg- 
est part; all support very good. 
EXTERIORS Unusually appropriate and in- 
clude a number of Italian exteriors. 

INTERIORS Excellent 

DETAIL. .. .Star's make-up poor in many close-ups 
CHARACTER OF STORY Girl on trail of pro- 
fessional blackmailer finds he is her father. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 5,000 feet 

This ]>ictnre certainly starts off like a wliirlwind 
and gives promise of dcvelopinq- into something extra- 
ordinary. But the pace is not maintained through to 
the finish. In fact, it starts hitting the chutes at about 
its middle and when everything has l)een prepared for 
a smashing climax and you ha\ e been led to expect 
something unusually dramatic, they proceed to just 
walk through it and hand you a big disappointment 



instead of a thrill. 

The picture opens by introducing Stone and his con- 
federates, the owner and operators of a blackmailing 
society sheet. Large sums are paid into the company 
by fearful women to keep indiscretions, either inno- 
cent or real, irowi being printed. Stone's only love 
is his daughter, Sylvia, played by Alice Brady, whom 
he contrives to keep in Italy far awav from the scenes 
of his nefarious dealings. 

()f course it doesn't take a great stretch of the imag- 
ination to see to what end such a beginning is headed. 
Sylvia, vowing to put the paper out of business, be- 
cause it directly caused the suicide of one of her dear- 
est friends, enlists the aid of Oliver Ellis, publisher of 
a reputable paper, and works against the scandal sheet 
with the ultimate result that she discovers that its 
owner is her own father. 

The ending may be quite obvious at the outset but 
the interest is intrigued and held to the scenes imme- 
diately before the final sequence by the introduction 
of a wealth of interesting detail, all of which is staged 
and enacted exceedingly well. Subsequently, however, 
there comes a bad slump in the action due to padding 
taking the shape of scenes in which the players do a 
terrible lot of walking from one side of the room to the 
other, etc. Then the climax which has been ap- 
proached definitely from the first fails utterly in dra- 
matic power. They just walk through it. Sylvia con- 
demns her father, then promises forgiveness if he will 
kill the paper and the last scene shows her in the 
arms of Oliver. 

Aliss Brady has by no means her usual emotional 
opportunities in this and doesn't give as satisfactory 
an appearance as usual because of lack of makeup, 
principally on her neck. The supporting cast, headed 
1)\- Frank Losee, is very good and includes Richard 
llatteras. Henry Mortimer, Edith Stockton, Bradley 
Barker. Nora Reed, Fred Burton. Alfred Hickman and 
.Sara Biala. 



Star and Exploitation Possibilities Are Good 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 

From the point of advertising this is a very good "The Fear Market" too extensively in ad\ertising and 
drawing card for Miss Brady has come into great publicity inasmuch as it certainly will fail to live up 
popularity during the last year because of her com- *° expectations, ownig to the very poor way they 



bined screen and stage work. The name of the author, 
the title, and the interesting manner in which it lends 



handle the clima.x. 

You may be able to get cleanly by with it owing to 



the interesting subject matter and its unusualncss 
Itself to exploitation are still other points in the pic- i^n it is really one of those pictures that sends you 
ture s favor. home dissatisfied — just because they haven't gotten 

However, it wouldn't be good business to boost all they could from very unusual story material. 



Sunday, January 4, 1920 



jM^ 



DAILY 



17 



Comedy Dialogue Missed in Screen Version 



Taylor Holmes in 

"NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH" 

Metro 

DIRECTOR David Kirkland 

AUTHORS Frederic S. Isham and James 

Montgomery. 

SCENARIO BY Not credited 

CAMERAMAN Jake Badaracco 

AS A WHOLE Amusing comedy situations; 

runs along in light humorous vein but isn't 
uproarious at any time. 

STORY Adapted from the stage play but spoken 

dialogue is missed in screen version. 

DIRECTION Worked in some good bits of wit 

and managed to keep things going most of 
the time. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Good 

LIGHTINGS Satisfactory 

CAMERA WORK Quite pleasing 

STAR Good natured but gets into a whole lot of 

trouble by telling the truth. 

SUPPORT Ned Sparks good as English Lord; 

entire cast well selected. 
EXTERIORS Pretty shots of Long Island coun- 
try estate. 

INTERIORS The real thing 

DETAIL Too many titles and about two reels 

too long. 
CHARACTER OF STORY Embarrassing mo- 
ments grow out of a seemingly harmless bet. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 6,000 feet 

Like many adaptations of successful stage plays, 
more especially comedies, the screen presentation of 
"Nothing But the Truth" lacks the pep and the snap 
of the spoken dialogue. However, what the screen 
version misses in this way it gains in another for there 
is. greater opportunity for realism and detail. 



Complications developing out of hero's bet that he 
can answer truthfully every question put to him for a 
period of one week, afiford ample opportunity for 
comedy situations. And his troubles are many. For 
instance, a couple of suspicious wives ask some very 
compromising questions about their husbands, truth- 
ful answers to which pave the way for divorces. 

The director has handled the story effectively and 
made the most of the better spots, even working up a 
degree of excitement toward the end, but as a whole 
the interest isn't sufficient to hold at the same tension 
all through the six reels. As a result the production 
slumps badly in places and a good deal of footage is 
used up with chases and "in and out" stuff. 

The scene opens up at the Country Club where Bob 
(Taylor Holmes), a wealthy society idler and three of 
his friends are holding a truth telling discussion which 
ends in a wager between Bob and his friends, each of 
them betting $10,000 that hero cannot go a whole week 
answering every question that's put to him, with the 
truth and nothing but the truth. 

When a female member of the smart set appears on 
the scene Bob's friends start the ordeal going without 
delay by treading on delicate ground — a lady's age. 
They remark that she of the "fair and forty" variety, 
does not look her age and puts the embarrassing ques- 
tion to Bob but he overcomes the difficulty very nicely 
by answering in French that she looks as old as she is. 

The remainder of the picture deals with the hard- 
ships that Bob goes through during the week that he 
is on his truth-telling rampage. Things sure happen 
at a house party on Long Island. There is the usual 
assemblage — the society crook, the English Lord, etc., 
but in this case the Lord turns out to be a detective. 
Ned Sparks played the part very amusingly. In the 
end Bob wins the bet and, of course, a heart. 



Glean and Wholesome Offering Suitable to Family Trade Especially 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



The idea in "Nothing But the Truth" is compara- 
tively new to the screen and although it isn't quite 
strong enough to pull through six reels, you shouldn't 
have any trouble putting it over. There are many 
good comedy bits and some truly funny moments even 
if the humor never reaches the riot stage. 

You have plenty of exploitation ideas in the paper 
put out by the producer and the fact that the play ran 
for more than a season on Broadway is always a big 
asset in getting over the screen version. Recall to 
your folks that Willie Collier was the star in the 



stage production and if any of the road companies 
played your town, make a bid for the patronage of 
those who saw the play. 

It is safe to promise clean, wholesome comedy. It 
is the sort of picture that you need not worry about if 
you are catering to a family trade. Use catchlines 
along the following lines: "Could you manage to tell 
'Nothing But the Truth' for one week if there was 
$10,000 dependent upon it? See how Taylor Holmes 
does it in his latest production at the blank theater." 





And NEVER, has romance been staged in 
settings so thrilling, so beautiful, so astound- 
ing, so absolutely unparalleled as the love 
story of this Daredevil Ace and this scarcely 
less courageous girl, whom you, personally, 
will follow through every scene, in club 
room, country home, barracks and hangar 
until the tremendous climax comes two 
miles above the earth! 

Not a mere "stunt picture" — get that ! — 
the' it teems with darmg before which 
airmen who have brought down their 
Boches take off their hats — but a grip- 
ping heart story of the best there is in 
man and woman — of love and marvelous 
adventure. 

See it, and you'll beat the speed limit 
to book it. 




GREAT AlIL ^ 

ROBBEin^ 



TV^ITH 



THE DAREDEVIL OF THE $KIE$ 
UNIVERSAL-JEWEL PRODUCTION deLUXE 



Pi'e^eiited by 

_ CAUL LAEMMIjE 



Sunday, January 11, 1920 



ZBli^^ 



DAILV 



19 



Average Crook Melodrama With Good Concluding Mystery Touch 



Corinne Griffith in 

"THE TOWER OF JEWELS" 

Vitagraph 

DIRECTOR Tom Terriss 

AUTHOR Lucien Hubbard 

SCENARIO BY Lucien Hubbard 

CAMERAMAN Tom Molloy 

AS A WHOLE Crook melodrama of average 

type ; rather slight but well managed and in- 
teresting throughout. 
STORY Interest is well maintained throughout 

and touch of mystery in the final sequence 

nicely handled. 
DIRECTION Shows a keen appreciation of 

values of this type of story. 
PHOTOGRAPHY Good except for opening 

safe-breaking sequence. 

LIGHTINGS Average 

CAMERA WORK Some nice angles that help 

the realistic running of the story. 
STAR Plays sincerely and will attract because 

of her prettiness. 
SUPPORT Good; includes a number of fine 

types. 
INTERIORS Those in Barton's home particu- 
larly nice. 

EXTERIORS Appropriate 

DETAIL Subtitles contain considerable crook 

lingo. 
CHARACTER OF STORY Reformation of girl 

crook due kindly treatment of captor and his 

son. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 4,051 feet 

"The Tower of Jewels" is a nicely done crook melo- 
drama with a mystery twist at the end and may well 
be relied upon to furnish satisfactory entertainment 
to most audiences. It fails to get into the class of 
some of Tom Terriss' other Vitagraph subjects inas- 
much as the plot is rather slight and required a good 
lot of building to extend it out over five reels. Again 
it contains nothing of a spectacular nature or any- 
thing startlingly dramatic. On the whole it's one of 



those many pictures that may be classed as average. 
It hits this level all the way through. 

Corinne Griffith a])pears as Emily, known among her 
associates as the I'rincess of the DiamoruJs. Emily 
is one of the most respected of a large gang of crooks 
wliosc leader is Grimstead. She is caught while rob- 
bing the home of David Barton, a wealthy dealer, who 
has in his possession a famous diamond collar, known 
as the Tower of Jewels. Barton ofifers her a home 
and a chance to go straight and, touched by his kind- 
liness, Emily decides to break away from her old 
associates. 

Grimstead, however, is not willing and insists that 
she help him steal the diamond collar. She refuses, 
whereat he threatens to expose her past to Wayne 
Barton, her benefactor's son, who is unaware of her 
career of crime and with whom she is in love. 

On a certain night Grimstead and others of the 
gang surround the house and wait their chance to en- 
ter. Wayne's cousin, who is in love with him and 
jealous of Emily, removes the jewel case from the 
safe to throw suspicion on the girl. The crooks enter 
but are frightened away by the ringing of the bell. It 
is the messenger from Barton's client for the jewels. 
He goes to the safe and they are not there. 

Then the cousin confesses to having removed the 
case and Wayne confesses to having removed the col- 
lar itself as he felt sure the crooks would make another 
attempt at the safe. Grimstead is shot and mortally 
wounded when fleeing the police and with his dying 
breath relates of the gentle birth of Emily and says 
that she is just as good as the Bartons and fit to 
marry Wayne. 

The whole story is cut of somewhat familiar cloth 
but the mysterious disappearance of the diamond col- 
lar in the final sequence will have many guessing and 
the clearing up of the situation leaves everyone satis- 
fied. 

Miss Griffith receives commendable support from 
such popular members of the Vitagraph stock as 
Webster Campbell, Maurice Costello, Henry Stephen- 
son. Charles Craig and Charles Holton. 



Play Up the Mystery of Final Sequence and This Will Draw 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



This picture ought to give average satisfaction 
though it is by no means anything out of the ordinary. 
However there won't be any kicks on it and all you 
need to worry about is to get 'em in. 

A good advertising scheme would be to shape news- 
paper notices and any special advertisements about 
the mystery in the final reel. Relate of the disappear- 



ance ot the jewels, the various parties suspected and 
the ruin that will befall Emily if they are not found. 
Corinne Griffith has a certain popularity in Vita- 
graph pictures and her stardom is deserved. Maurice 
Costello, an old favorite is in the cast, and the men- 
tion of his name in the billing will doubtless attract 
the real picture fans. 



v;Pobert Brunton presents 



J. Warren 

KERRIGAN 



and his own company in 



Live Sparks 






By 

CADOLINE SAYRE 

Directed by 
EDNESTC. WADDE 






^IIJP^MF ^^^lEtft 



^^ 



This newest Kerrigan pro- 
duction is a fast, thrilling 
romantic melodrama of the 
oil fields. 

Swifter in its action than 
"The Lord Loves the Irish," 
"The Joyous Liar" or "A 
White Man's Chance." 

Another of the beautifully 
made and powerful produe- 
tions that are putting this star 
into big first run theatres, 
where an assured following 
always awaits him. 

Released everywhere Janu- 
uary 18. 

WW. HODIONSON CORPORSnON 

527 Fifth Avenue. New York QtV 
IHttrlbuttnff through PATHE [xchange. Incorporated 



*>^j 



i, ^ 



'■X 



> 



r '* 



Sunday, January 11, 1920 



jM ^c 



DAILV 



)i 



21 



Norma Talmadge in a Light Comedy This Time 



Norma Talmadge in 

"SHE LOVES AND LIES" 

Select — Selznick 

DIRECTOR Chet Withey 

AUTHOR Wilkie Collins 

SCENARIO BY . .Chet Withey and Grant Carpenter 

CAMERAMAN David Abel 

AS A WHOLE Very much lighter than most 

of this star's pictures but the trick twist of the 

plot and comedy touches get it over. 
STORY Gets away to a very poor start but picks 

up at half-way mark. 
DIRECTION Registers the comedy business 

successfully. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Very good 

LIGHTINGS Commendable 

CAMERAWORK Good 

STAR Hasn't her usual emotional opportunities 

but shines well in light comedy role. 

SUPPORT Conway Tearle very natural 

INTERIORS Appropriate 

EXTERIORS Few but very good 

DETAIL People may think husband blind for 

not recognizing his wife and June as the same 

woman; otherwise commendable. 
CHARACTER OF STORY Girl marries man 

disguised as an old woman, then wins his 

love as a young girl. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 5,555 feet 

Very good treatment of the comedy angles of this 
has made it a pleasing picture. Director Withey has 
injected a lot of spirit into the last half of the picture 



and the results are that it holds the interest, though 
through entirely different means than the majority 
of Norma Talmadge's pictures. "She -Loves and 
Lies" affords her none of the emotional opportunities 
tlian tlie authors of her previous subjects have been 
careful to contrive for her. 

Marie Callender, possessed of a small fortune left 
her by an aged admirer, hears that Ernest Lismore is 
tailing in business. Lismore had once rescued her 
from a Innming building but had never seen her face. 
Marie on the other hand is quite in love with him. 
She visits his office in the disguise of an old woman 
and proposes that he marry her to save his business 
and that she may come into possession of the rest of 
her money. Desperate, Lismore consents. 

He lives quite apart from his wife and Marie now 
finds herself in the position of loving a husband who 
is unaware of her real identity. So she poses then as 
June Daye, an artist, and manages very successfully 
to win his love in this guise. Then it's only a matter 
of letting Lismore know that his wife and June are 
one and the same and this is done with good humor- 
ous sense and the picture closes. 

Miss Talmadge makes a very charming figure of 
Marie Callender and of June Daye and is at first quite 
well disguised as the grand 6\d dame. But when she 
removes her spectacles and disregards her limp most 
people are going to fear for Lismore's eyesight as it 
seems impossible for him not to recognize her as the 
same June he is in love with. In this respect the pic- 
ture again savors of the one-reel comedy. 



Have your release prints made where you make the picture. 

Quality higher than eastern work. 
Capacity 750,000 a week. 

ploom Jf ilm ^aijoratoriesi 



7520 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 



Hollywood 4015 



22 



kM J 



man 



DAlUr 



Sunday, January 11, 1920 



Norma Talmadge's Name is Enough to Draw the Crowds 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Norma Talmadge in 

"SHE LOVES AND LIES" 

Select — Selznick 

Norma Talmadge's position in stardom is undis- 
puted and the mere showing of her name above a 
theater suffices to draw the crowds. It will draw here 
too, certainly when it is coupled with the splendid 
title, "She Loves and Lies." At the same time, how- 
ever, the title is somewhat misleading. It suggests 
an entertainment of a substantially dramatic order 
which the body of the pictflre fails to give. 



It would be diplomatic therefore to mention the fact 
that this picture is a comedy and tell the people to 
come and see that Miss Talmadge is every bit as good 
in a comedy role as she is in a heavy dramatic one. 
Catch lines written around the central situation of the 
story in a light style will also serve to attract atten- 
tion and bring people to the box office. Conway 
Tearle is a popular leading man, particularly among 
the women, so it might be a good idea to mention 
him in the billing. 



PHOTOGMPHED BY= ^ 





MEMBERS OF 

Atttprtrmt ^on^tg nf (Einrmatngraplirra 

( INCORPORATED) 

325-331 MARKHAM BUILDING 

HOLLYWOOD, 4404 

6372 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD HOLLYWOOD, CAL. 



J. D. JENNINGS 

Now Associated With 

FRANK LLOYD 

Photographing 
PAULINE FREDERICKS 
Goldwyn West Coast Studios 



ROY H. KLAFFKI 

Now Photographing 
MONROE SALISBURY 

Current Release 
"His Divorced Wife" 

DAL CLAWSON 

Now Photographing 

LOIS WEBER 

PRODUCTIONS 

JOHN ARNOLD 

Now Photographing 

"The Willow Tree" 

With 

VIOLA DANA 



William C. "Billy" Foster 
Now Photographing 
DUSTIN FARNUM 

Current Release 
"THE SILVER HORDE" 

L. GUY WILKY 

With 

WILLIAM C. DeMILLE 

Current Release 
"The Tree of Life" 

WILLIAM E. FILDEW 

Now Photographing 

"The Virgin of Stamboul" 

Current Release 
"Bonnie Bonnie Lassie" 

PAUL P. PERRY 

Now Photographing 
GEORGE H. MELFORD 

Current Release 
"Every woman" 



HENRY CRONJAGER 

Photographing for 

MARSHALL NEILAN 
"The Rivers End" 

CHARLES ROSHER 

Now Photographing 

MARY PICKFORD 
"Pollyana" 

E. G. PALMER 

Now Photographing 

George Loane Tucker 

Specials 

All 

CINEMATOGRAPHERS 

Read 

WID'S DAILY 



Sunday, January 4, 1920 



tMA 



DAILV 



23 



A Genuine Record of the Destruction Wrought by a German U-Boat 



"THE EXPLOITS OF A GERMAN SUBMARINE 

— U-35" 
C. B. Price Co., Inc. 

DIRECTOR Former German Government 

AUTHOR Former Admiral Von Tirpitz 

CAMERAMAN Official German photographer 

AS A WHOLE Ghastly closeup of horror of sea 

warfare. 

STORY The sinking of allied ships 

PHOTOGRAPHY Wonderful considering the 

circumstances under which the various scenes 

were photographed. 
LIGHTINGS Sufficient to catch all the horrible 

details. 
CAMERA WORK Marvelously close views of 

giant ships sinking beneath the water. 

STAR War 

SUPPORT Commander and crew of the U-35 

EXTERIORS All open sea shots 

INTERIORS None 

DETAIL Includes demonstration of how the 

U-boats worked during war. 
CHARACTER OF PRODUCTION Terrible 

but it will surely attract. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 1,800 feet 

These pictures, photographed by an official camera- 
man of the former German government during the war 
and intended only for the eyes of the German public, 
are the most gruesomely fascinating that have ever 
been shown on the screen. The two reels show the 
sinking of about six British merchant ships carrying 
svipplies to the allied armies in France, having put out 
to sea from various allied ports. The sinkings were 
photographed from the deck of the U-35, the under- 
sea craft which accounted for a hundred allied ships 
on one trip alone. 

The sinkings are all approximately the same. Each 
sequence begins showing the U-boat on the ocean's 



surface, the giant vessel having already surrendered. 
A boat puts out from the submarine to take ofif avail- 
able sujjplies of food and water and a bomb is placed 
in the hold. From the deck of the submarine the 
camera clicks ofif the moments until the bomb has 
done its deadly work and then the ship settles. 

It seems slow but in reality the entire bombing 
and sinking of the ship is done with miraculous rapid- 
ity. When the bombs fail on their mission of destruction 
the submarine's deck gun is trained on the helpless 
craft at the water line and a few shots into the boilers 
complete its destruction. Torpedoes are not often 
used on a ship as helpless as these. They are too 
expensive. 

Intermingled with shots of these half-dozen sink- 
ings are intimate views of the submarine's crew. It 
was under the command of Lieutenant Arnauld de le 
Perrc. The vie>vs include close-ups of the lieu- 
tenant and his aides crossing ofif the names of the 
ships they have destroyed from Lloyd's sea register 
and also scenes of the captured British captains air- 
ing themselves on deck. 

It is ghastly to think that from all the hundred 
ships sunk on the U-35's trip, only five prisoners were 
taken ! Considering this the scenes of the German 
crew disporting themselves in the water on a calm day 
strike one as rather satirical. 

The camera work in the sinking scenes is remark- 
able. The water is always calm and there is no rock- 
ing of the submarine. At times the camera seems so 
close to the doomed vessels that it would seem that 
the photographer could have reached out and touched 
their sides. The character of the photography, too, 
is clear and none of the morbid details of each sink- 
ing is lost to the spectator. 

The subtitling of the two reels was done by Terry 
Ramsaye and his wording of the inserts is approp- 
riate indeed. 



These Will Certainly Draw and Hold Crowds Breathless 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



These pictures will certainly draw the people. They 
will come for curiosity's sake if for no other. They 
will probably enter the theater with the idea that you 
are trying to put a fake over on them. But they 
will go out knowing that the scenes are as real as 
night and day. 

They are so unusual that it is not probable that any 
exhibitor will receive public censure for showing 
them. But they certainly don't make one feel at all 



happy. In fact they sort of sicken the spectator. 
But at the same time everyone is going to consider 
himself privileged at having seen them no matter how 
ghastly they are or how ghastly their effect is. 

Be sure to state in your advertising that the pictures 
are genuine, that they were taken only for German 
eyes, and that they were brought to this country quite 
b}" chance. 



24 



jM'^ 



DAILV 



Sunday, January 11, 1920 



Index from Sept. 28, 1919 to January 4, 1920 



There will be an index in Wid's every three months 






PATHE EXCHANGE, INC. 



Page 



Oct. 19 A Damsel in Distress (Capellani) 21 

26 The Moonshine Trail (Blackton ) 3 

Nov. 9 The Gay Old Dog (Henley Prod.) 21 

16 Desert Gold (B. B. Hampton-E. F. Warner-Hodkinson). . 21 

30 The Bandhox (Hodkinson) 5 

Dec. 7 Dawn (Blackton) 11 

The Right to Lie (Capellani) 18 

It Fighting Cressy (J. D. Hampton) 5 

.; The Prince and Betty (J. D. Hampton) 6 

The A. B. C. of Love (Acme) 11 

Eve in Exile (American) 21 

The Lone Wolf's Daughter (Hodkinson) 23 

The Joyous Liar (Hodkinson) 27 

21 The Capitol ( Artco-Hodkinson ) 25 

My Husband's Other Wife (Blackton) 29 

Jan. 4 The Web of Deceit (Carewe Prod.) 15 

The Sagebrusher (B. B. Hampton) 21 

Brothers Divided 23 



Page 

Wanted— A HusuoAd 30 

Everywoman 1' 

28 The Miracle of Love 17 

Jan. 4 Ked Hot Dollars 7 

Behind the Door 11 

ROBERTSON-COLE 

Oct. 12 The Dragon Painter (Haworth) S 

19 The Open Door (Artclass) 25 

26 The Broken Butterfly (Tourneur) 5 

Poor Relations (Brentwood) 19 

Nov. 16 The Beloved Cheater (Gasnier) 5 

The Illustrious Prince (Haworth) 17 

Dee. 7 A Fugitive from Matrimony 21 

The Heart of Juanita 27 

14 The Tong Man (Haworth) 15 

28 Beckoning Roads (B. B. Prod.) IS 



FIRST NATIONAL 



Nov. 9 Back to God's Country 27 

23 The Thunderbolt 9 

30 Mind the Paint Girl 15 

The Virtuous Vamp 28 

Dec. 7 Heart O' The Hills 7 

21 A Day's Pleasure 13 

In Wrong 23 

28 In Old Kentucky 25 

Jan. 4 The Greatest Question 6 



SELECT PICTURES CORP. 

Oct. 26 A Scream in the Night 13 

Nov. 9 Isle of Conquest 7 

The Glorious Lady 11 

30 A Regular Girl 27 

Dec. 7 The Undercurrent 15 

14 The Country Cousin 9 

21 The Last of His People 21 

28 The Broken Melody 23 



REALART PICTURES CORP. 

Oct. 26 The Mystery of the Vellow Room 21 

Nov. 16 Soldiers of Fortune 9 

23 Anne of Green Gables 20 

Dec. 7 Erstwhile Susan 5 



FAMOUS PLAYERS-LASKY CORP. 

Oct. 12 The Egg Crate Wallop 19 

His Offiical Fiancee 5 

The Life Line 18 

19 The Lottery Man 2 

In Mizzouri 17 

26 What Every Woman Learns 28 

The Teeth of the Tiger 23 

Nov. 2 Twenty Three and a half Hour's Leave 5 

Crooked Straight 18 

Why Smith Left Home 21 

9 Turning the Tables 23 

23 Scarlet Days 3 

•John Petticoats 11 

30 Male and Female 3 

Hawthorne of the V. S. A 13 

It Pays to Advertise 18 

Counterfeit 29 

Dec. 7 Victory 3 

14 More Deadly Than the Male 13 

L'Apache 19 

21 Luck in Pawn 11 



VITAGRAPH 

Nov. 2 The Gray Tower's Mystery 11 

9 The Climbers 6 

In Honor's Web 19 

16 The Winchester Woman 18 

A Fighting Colleen 23 

Dec. 14 The Vengeance of Durand 7 

21 The Golden Shower 15 

UNIVERSAL 

Oct. 12 The Rider of the Law H 

19 The Trembling Hour 27 

Blind Husbands 7 

Nov. 9 His Divorced Wife ,. 9 

16 Paid in Advance 25 

23 The Brute Breaker 18 

Under Suspicion 23 

Lasca 25 

30 The Gun Fighting Gentleman 11 

Dec. 7 The Pointing Finger 29 

14 The Day She Paid 26 

21 Marked Men 3 

Jan. 4 Rouge and Riches 19 

The Great Air Robbery 27 

GOLDWYN 

Oct. 12 Strictly Confidential 24 

19 Almost a Husband 19 

Nov. 9 Bonds of Love S 

Flame of the Desert 17 

16 The Misfit Earl 11 

Dec. 14 Jubilo 8 

21 The Gay Lord Quex 5 

28 Toby's Bow 9 

FOX 

Oct. 19 Sacred Silence 13 

26 Should a Husband Forgive? 17 

A Fallen Idol 25 

Nov. 2 The Lost Princess 8 

Thieves 19 

9 A Girl in Bohemia 13 

16 Lure of Ambition 8 

23 Eastward Ho I 17 

30 Vagabond Luck 19 

Snares of Paris 25 

Dec. 7 Lost Money 19 

Wings of the Morning 23 

21 The Web of Chance 9 

28 Flames of the Flesh 17 

Tin Pan Alley 27 

Jan. 4 The Lincoln Highwayman 13 

Heart Strings 25 



THE BIG 



SERIAL RELEASE 

OF THE NEW YEAR 




FEATURING 




S-^o/:^ Air A^9r/fa/> A 




AYWON FILM CORPORATION - NEW YORK 
SCREEN ART PICTURES CORP. • PHILADELPHIA 
EASTERN FEATURE FILM CORR • BOSTON 
CELEBRATED PLAYERS FILM CORP. • CHICAGO. 
MERRITT FILM CORPORATION - MINNEAPOLIS 

T.E. LARSON ATTPACTIONS - TULSA^ OKL 
REGAL FILMS, LIMITED - CANADA- 
EXPORT & IMPORT FILM CORR- FOREIGN RIGHTS 

GROSSMAN PICTURES. INC 

ITHACA, NEWYORK 



GROSSMAN PICTURESjNC. 

PRESENT 

MARGUERITE 

MARSH 

IN THE FEATURE PPODUCTION 

TO 

A DETECTIVE GTOPV 





THAT 



MOLDS YOU SPELLOOUND 
KEEPS YOU GUESSIN6* ^ 
THPILLS YOU '.-.*** 
ENTERTA.INS YOU t * 4 



THE FIP9TOFTHI95ERIE90P EIOUT FEATURES 

WITS vs WITS 

i9r-LIALLMAPI^ DICTUDC? W 

mt CODPODATION iH 



r-« A A «fc 



GROSSMAN PICTURESjNC 

110 WEST 42 !2S ST NEW YORK 



Junday, January II, 1920 %mj*^\ D^ll^^ 



Bl!^?l 



25 



Page Page 

WORLD J. FRANK HATCH ENT.— State Rights 

M^v . . . ... Nov. 'I 'Vhv l*ri<'«' Slu' l*:iy** 23 

JOct. I'i Tlu- Oakduir Aflair 21 

^N«v. '" :n::'^'::;:;j;'";:r,;i.w ;;::::;;:::::::::::::;:::;::::^ 1 mickey film coRP.-State Rights 

le ,.>lf and Caiitain Kidd 19 Nov. 2S The \Voman He ('Iii>k<- 5 

m .'{(• The roisdii Ten 7 

.u The Steel K,„« n HALLMARK 



' METRO '><■•■ " '''"' Heart of a (J.vpsy ((has. Miller Prod.) 2.5 

;::;'.:.';; ;:;^L;';t,^^::r;^;d:;::::::;::::;;:::::::::::::::::;;::: .1 republic pictures 

Dec. 28 Should a Woniaii Tell? 3 Dee. 28 12:10 11 

PUBLIC HEALTH FILMS— State Rights UNITED PICTURE THEATERS 

Oct. 12 The Knd of the Eioatl 16 Dee. 28 The Corsican ISrothers ((Jasnier) 21 

MONOPOL PICTURES— State Rights CURTISS PICTURES CORP. 

Oct. 20 rrinisoii Shoals 9 Oct. 2fi Who's Your Brother 7 



PLYMOUTH FILM CORP. EQUITY PICTURES CORP. 

Oct. 2e The Stream of Life Ifi Nov. 16 E.ves of Youth ((iarson) S 

SCHOMER ROSS PROD., INC. UNITED ARTISTS 

Nov. 2 The Sacred Flame 17 Jan. 4 When the Clouds Roll By 3 



Concerning Subtitles and Editing: 

A real knowledge of story construction and dramatic values is necessary to proper editing ; 
long familiarity with the craft of writing is necessary to proper titling. 

As authors of maiiy original photoplays and adaptations, and with the final editing and titling 
of some of the biggest specials to our credit, we ofifer expert service in constructive editing and 
titling. 

Let us review your production and submit schedule of suggestions. 

HARRY GHANDLEE WILLIAM B. LAUB 

Final Editing and Titles lor; Bolshevism on Trial, Blindness of Youth, The One Woman, Carmen of the Klon- 
dike, The Golden Legend, Social Amhition, etc. 

Originals and Adaptations: The Struggle, Bolshevism on Trial, The One Woman, Pegeen, God of Little Chil- 
dren, etc. 

Room 2004 CANDLER BUILDING Bryant 7392 



Invaluable for reference purposes. 



26 



jM^t 



DAIUY 



Sunday, January 11, 1920 



Nothing Much to Talk About Except Some Good Auto Racing Stuff 



Edward Earle and Gladys Hulette in 

"HIGH SPEED" 

Hallmark 

DIRECTOR Charles Miller 

AUTHOR Clinton H. Stagg 

SCENARIO BY ' John J. Glavey 

CAMERAMAN Not credited 

AS A WHOLE.. Works up to a fairly good 

climax but the end is obvious at the very 

beginning. 
STORY Features automobile racing and has 

slight romance that doesn't thrill ; drags badly 

at times. 
DIRECTION Deserves credit for the way he 

has handled the bigger moments and the rac- 
ing sequences. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Not the best 

LIGHTINGS Very bad at times 

CAMERA WORK Satisfactory 

STARS Carry on an annoyingly shy love affair; 

fill the requirements of their respective roles 

SUPPORT No one deserves special mention 

EXTERIORS Some good race track scenes 

INTERIORS Studio sets 

DETAIL Nothing terribly wrong 

CHARACTER OF STORY Hero suffers much 

hardship for the sake of a woman he doesn't 

know. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 4,636 feet 

The only thing that will save this is the racing- 
sequence for the director has put over a few good 
stunts. One bit particularly is very well handled and 
furnishes a momentary thrill. A small racer, making 
91 miles an hour, skids, dashes off the track and 
crashes into a tree. This has been well directed and 
the film has been cut so that the accident seems de- 



cidedly real and happens as unexpectedly as might 
occur in reality. 

The titles are hopelessly hackneyed and the attempts 
at comedy are pathetic. The writer must have had 
a bad case of "wordorites" and his humor ran som:- 
thing like this : "He can't catch it ; he can't even catch 
cold." 

And where do they get these heroes? Great 
stuff! Folks are going to wonder how they do it. 
Eddie Earle, winner of the "Vanderbilt Sweepstakes," 
gives up his title and loses his qualifications just be- 
cause some woman whom he doesn't even know, begs 
him not to expose the fact that her husband framed the 
race although hero had nothing to do with it. 

Besides having such an impossible hero it is the 
kind of a story that the audience has all doped out 
soon after the picture gets started because the minute 
Eddie comes to Gladys' rescue when she is attacked 
by her chauffeur, all the "movie hounds" will know 
that a romance between the two will eventually close 
the picture. 

Shero's father rewards Eddie, who is down and 
out, by employing him as chauffeur. Eddie finally 
tells his employer that he is Billy Brice, ex-speed king 
and disqualified from competing in any future races 
on account of an alleged acceptance of bribery. She- 
ro's father, manufacturer of the Rhodes automobile, 
has a car entered in the forthcoming race. Shortly 
before the big day an enemy contestant wrecks the 
racer and the driver is seriously injured. 

Gladys' married sister, the woman Eddie owes his 
hard luck to, arrives and confesses that she has begged 
Eddie not to deny the bribery charge which would 
expose some phoney work on the part of her hubby. 
This clears the winner's name and he gets his entry 
card in time to go in and win the race for the Rhodes 
company. 



Play Up the Sport Idea and Make Special Appeal to the Men 



Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



, An audience will probably pass this off as "fairly 
good" and the thing that you should confine your 
pi-omises to is the auto sequence which is the best 
thing in the production. You can say it contains some 
real race track atmosphere with all the excitement 
and confusion which is part of the big races. This 
part has been well photographed and there are some 
good shots taken on the track with the machines in 
action. 

Make your appeal to the men folks. They will 
be interested from the sport end of it and 



They will be interested from the sport end of it and 
for the women you can say something about hero 
winning the race and winning the girl, or work up 
some catchlines which you think are best suited to win 
your folks' attention. 

If you care to use the names of the players give, 
Edward Earle his share of publicity. In case you have' 
played any of Vitagraph's O'Henry pictures, your 
patrons will recall Earle as the pleasing hero of these 
films. Miss Hulette's name may be familiar although 
she has not done very much recently. 



\)J D / /; ko 



%V 



Some Short Reels 



"Paramount Industrial Magazine," Famous Players 

Industrial rods an> now being produciMl by Famous in 
conjunction with various orj^anizations and aro being i-e- 
leased to the exhibitors without cost. These productions are 
being distributed as advertising matter, and the first picture 
of the series concerns the three pointed suspension spring 
now used on automobiles. As a matter of fact, it Is more 
In the nature of a scenic production than an industrial one, 
for it consists almost entirely of shots showing the travel 
of the modern touring car over the trail used by gold seek- 
ers in the days of '49. Some of the stuff is quite Impressive 
and there is not too great a mention of the Overhind com- 
pany, which Is using this as publicity matter. A few of 
the shots, however, are not especially good. P. M. Felton 
furnished a short animated cartoon which is appended. 



"Red Hot Hottentots," Pathe 

Whatever the cause Is, most of the recent Snub Pollard 
releases seem to show a falling off In quality. This one has 
little that Is laugh provoking, there being few incidents or 
bits that measure up to the desired mark. For some reason 
or other, they have failed to get humor out of matter, which 
although not very new, can be handled so as to go across. 
This win find the going troublesome. 



Pathe Review, No. 32 

If you are in the habit of running some sort of a weekly 
magazine, made up of parts of different weeklies, you should 
find room for some of this. It starts with a colored scenic 
bit, after which comes some footage devoted to lighthouses, 
some stuff about steel and scenes showing the capture of an 
alligator and Its arrival In a pond in the New York Zoo. 



"The Speakeasy," Sennett=Paramount 

Mack Sennett has taken the speakeasy, the popular Indoor 
sport of prohibition times, and has contrived one of his best 
burlesques about it in this two-reeler. It will bring a lot of 
laughs due to the various wildly impossible contraptions that 
the proprietor of the speakeasy uses to serve his patrons, 
and due to the divers underhanded means by which his 
patrons attempt to get away with more than their share. 
While this phase is more inventive than the wild slapstick 
battle which takes place in the last reel, it remains for this 



old-fashioned knockabout stuff to bring the most laughs. 
The two phases combine! to make a typical Sennett comedy 
and most everyone will enjoy it. Charlie Murray is the 
proprietor of the speakeasy. Ben Turpin and Chester Conk- 
lln are two of the customers, with Kalla Pasha and Marie 
Prevost helping along in the fun. 



"The Chilkat Cubs," Educational 

Rali)h K. Yarger is credited with the manipulation of the 
camera during the screening of this Robert C. Bruce onc- 
reeler. which is interesting and novel. It is rich in the 
natural, mountain settings provided by Alaska, and concerns 
a pair of bear cubs. Numerous scenes, show these animals- 
frisking about, and are quite unusual. The titles are light, 
and have been written in fine style, there being n(> weak 
or overdrawn attemps at providing too much Ininnu-. Clos- 
ing are a few shots showing the quadrupeds r(jlling over 
each other. This will appeal, as will many other bits in 
the production, which is sure to hold its own, and will v\\- 
doubtedlj' strengthen your bill. 



"The Tiny Kingdom of Montenegro," Red Cross — Educa'l 

In many of the former issues included in the Red Cross 
Travel Series the photography has been little over which 
to become enthusiastic, but there is a great improvement in 
this. It has several interesting studies of the people of 
Montenegro, showing their condition at present, one of 
poverty. Audiences may not like the spectacle of the misery 
existing there, which is about the only drawback io hooking 
this. 



"Darn that Stocking," Goldwyn 

Iilnough material to make an acceptal)le one-reeler was 
included in this, but in stretching it another reel, they slowed 
up the story, and failed to make it more effective. As a mat- 
ter of fact, there is nothing startling about this, looked ui>oi' 
from any angle, and it is extremely doubtful as to whether 
it can get across. Neal Burns and Marie Eline are the fea- 
tured players and Jack Laver directed. It tells of a newly- 
wed couple, whose happiness is marred by one of the re- 
jected suitors of the young wife. The latter attempts to 
disrupt the little family, but is foiled after causing a quarrel 
between the bride and groom. 






There are 30 Reasons 

WHY YOU SHOULD BOOK 

"THE SCREAMING SHADOW" 

Reason No. 9 

A Blind exhibitor cannot see "THE SCREAMING SHADOW bu 
he can hear the dollars coming into the box-office. 

Watch for Reason No. 10 Tomorrow 

BEN WILSON PRODUCTIONS 




UNIVERSAL CITV 



CALIF. 



Releasey Through 



H ALL/HARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street New York 

Foreign Rights conlrolled by Apollo Trading Corp., ?20 W. 48th St. 




<y 



% 



v\^ 



nVVo 



Short Reels 



"The Little Dears," National — Uoldwyn 

Well ijhotogmplied and produced in good fashion, "The 
IJttle Dears," a two-reel comedy wliich features Mr. and 
Mrs. Carter De Haven, hiclvs a strong story. Although sev- 
eral incidents in it are funny, it is not up to the mark set 
in some of the other Carter De Haven sub.iects. The prin- 
cipals did their usually good work and William Seller who 
directed held up his end efficiently, but it is doubtful whether 
that will be enough to get this over. Incidentally, stories 
similar to this one have been used before, the idea oi bluffing 
th,e boss to go out on a hot day, and then being caught, not 
being very novel. 



"African Lions and American Beauties," Universal 

Jimmy Austin and Esther Woods are announced as the 
featured performers in this two-reel Century comedy which 
has some novelty in that three lions prowl about and act in 
a tame manner. Austin has very little to do in the produc- 
tion and the leading woman is also out of the foreground for 
a considerable part of the time. Fred C. Fishback is cred- 
ited with writing this, but it is difficult to see just what he 
wrote, for there is hardly any story at all — in fact, what 
little plot was begun, was left unfinished. This is nothing 
but a number of bits of business joined together into a sort 
of patchquilt. 



"Looking for Trouble," Pathe 

Fistic battles in which the hero first takes a beating, and 
then suddenly shoots over the sleep-producing blow, are not 
imusual in films, but in this. Snub Pollard, who has just 
that to do, puts over what is likely to prove a hit. The 
manner in which the reel has been put on, the various bits 
and all else combine in making it a most satisfactory offer- 
ing. Ending in a novel manner, this will please in spite of 
the fact that some of it is not new. It's good stuff 



"A Woman in Grey," Serico 

Beginning in a most mysterious manner, "A Woman in 
Grey," which stars Arline Pretty and features Henry G. 
Sell, becomes somewhat more complicated for a few reels' 
but after that evolves itself into a string of events that 
prolong the affair and furnish the material for the 15 epi- 
sodes. The camera work is very good most of the time. As 
far as the manner in which the different episodes end is 
concerned, there is little to be desired. After the first few 
reels, however, but one thing is really left to be cleared up 
—the Identity of Ruth Hope, the "Woman in Grey," played 
by Arline Pretty. The mystery attached to her will prob- 
ably serve to keep the spectator in suspense, especially as 
the solution is promised again and again, but cleverly de- 
l?7^r £• ,^- ''*"*^ ^- ^- Williamson wrote the story while 
Walter Richard Hall furnished the scenario and James Vin- 
cent directed. Included in the cast are James Heenan 
Margaret Fielding, Fred Jones, Ann Brody, Jack Newton! 
Jack Manning, Walter Chapin and others. The first five 
f.^'^^'^^? ^^^ ^''^"^*^' respectively, "The House of Mystery " 

K^nf'.^^f ^f^f ^r.T^^'" "^^^ ^^''^P °f St««l'" "Tbe Strangle 
Knot' and "The Chasm of Fear." 



"It's a Hard Life," Pathe 

Possessing a wealth of humorous incidents, "It's a Hard 
Life starring Snub Pollard, in spite of the fact that it does 

mfrfb''''Vi7''7 •^*''°°^ P'°^' *^ ^O""^ than likely to provoke 
mirth. Pollard is quite funny in this and the court scene, 
the barber shop portion and one or two others can be de- 
pended upon to cause your crowd to laugh heartily The 
photography is good and the production one that can fit in 
on most any bill. 



"Dawning an Uprising," Universal 

Lee Moran steps out of his usual character in "Dawning 
an Uprising," an offering in which Bolshevism has becomi 
a society craze and Eddie Lyons is instrumental in eliminat- 
ing the fad from the home of his sweetheart. Lyons hires 
fh^"^''^^^"^'''^^'^*^ ^y ^^*^^"^'^ the chief tramp, introducing 
i^,tt H," ^°l^.^'^^^^^'- »»?." the shabby gentry completely dis 
gust the ladies present but refuse to leave. At the sugges- 
veelev '' however, they quickly depart. A good one- 



"Stop That Wedding," Universal 

You will be perfectly safe in booking this single reel 
comedy, for it is one of the best Lyons and Moran have 
done in a long while. It is well acted, finely produced and 
possesses several laughs. Eddie Lyons is about to be married 
as the picture starts, and while he is facing the altar with 
his prospective bride, Charlotte Merriam, Lee Moran, the 
rejected suitor bursts into a fit of weeping. He is ejected, 
but returns and time and time again attempts to break up the 
ceremony so that he makes the girl his wife. After being 
tossed out for attempting in different ways to put an end to 
the wedding, Lyons, Moran, Charlotte Merriam and the 
preacher are escorted to jail. Lee has to look on while the 
matrimonial knot is tied. 



"No Coma in Acoma," Chester=Outing 

For a current release subject, C. L. Chester has selected an 
Indian village in New Mexico, and has screened it finely to- 
gether with its inhabitants. Unlike the "Injuns" usually 
seen on the screen, those in this production, except for their 
dark skins, bear quite a resemblance to white men. There 
are bits showing the children at play, at school, and then 
the people who reside in Acoma performing parts of the 
daily routine. Closing is a bit showing a little girl rolling 
her eyes, a la Theda Bara. 



Screenics No. i, Chester 

Remarks of a light nature, touching on current subjects, 
are rather common in films at present, there being several 
organizations turning out reels devoted exclusively to mate- 
rial of this nature. In conjunction with the Field and 
Stream Magazine, C. L. Chester is turning out a new one 
reeler, which consists of about 50 per cent, of these com- 
ments, but he has gained a march on the others by securing 
the services, for the first issue at any rate, of Don Marquis. 
The latter is a humorist whose wit is of the subtle sort, and 
comments on prohibition in the portion styled "Is Prohibition 
a Dry Subject?" "Hattie's Hoodoo,' 'a part dealing with 
one of the elephants in Central park, is of merit, several 
scenes of the animals in Africa adding novelty. 



"The Moon Riders," Universal 

Usually, some mystery furnishes the plot for a serial 
If there is no mystery, it is built about some sort of a search 
for hidden valuables. Almost always it includes some un- 
known quantity, that causes the person who sees it to pon- 
der over the identity of him, her or it, or the rendezvous of 
said quantity. However, "The Moon Riders," featuring 
Art Acord, possesses.no such element. It is a western of 
the type usually handled in five reels, and dealing with the 
struggle of a group of homesteaders against an unscrupu- 
ous band that desires to profit through obsolete Spanish 
land grants. It should score with serial patrons. At least 
'The Death Stampede," and "The Masked Maurauders," 
the first two episodes, give that impression. 



"A Lady's Tailor," Sennett — Famous 

There may have been just cause to feel a little bit disap- 
pointed at some of Mack Sennett's recent comedv releases 
He has seemed, recently, to have fallen out of his stride 
A Lady's Tailor," however, brings him back sprinting again 
and constantly throughout its considerable footage there is 
fla.sh after flash of the comedy incident, both spectacular 
and minor, that brought him the fame he enjoys today. 
The picture is divided into various sequences, each quite able 
to stand alone, and each one has some prominent element 
that makes for comedy success. The first sequence in the 
modiste establishment run by Ford Sterling reveals a num- 
ber of pretty models. There is some excellent trick photo- 
graphy showing Sterling draping his models bv throwing 
strips of velvet, chiffon, etc., at them from a distance Of 
course, they magically assume the proportions of gowns 
Leu Turpin as a spectator to these scenes brings a lot of 
laughs. Then there is a cabaret dancing scene, an auto 
chase and some manipulation of a search light on dark park 
benches, all of which are exceedingly, well handled and bring 
many laughs. *" 



Motion Picture Producing 
Company o/ America 

Incorporated 1919 

398 Fifth Avenue New York City 

Announces that it is producing a series of comedies 
at its studio, Dongan Hills, Staten Island, starring the 
well-known comedian 

SAMMY BURNS 

These comedies will be in two reels and will be 
released under the general title of 

KING COLE COMEDIES 

For Information Address 

JOHNSON & HOPKINS CO. 

398 Fifth Avenue 

New York City 



Finance 
Construction 



Capital 
Management 



1 



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S«4„». 



■^=^^^^:a*^ 



» <* 



*.H 



She iurned from a life 
of case and luxurif fo/Ae 
qrimif ioil of a shipifard 
worker. Once a draivinqroom 
favorite in Condon -She 
became a iosser of blading 
rivets in the bowels of an 
dmericaii' made ship. TVasH 
worth while ? 

IJour public is eagerly 
awaiting this first of the 
&m inent Au thors^ictures. 



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SAMUEL GOIDWTN AND REX BEACH PRESENT 

RUPERT HUGHES 



FAMOUS STOR.V 



THE CUP OF FURY, 

D1R.ECTED BV T. HAVES HUNTEIR^ 



GOLDWYN PICTVRES CORPORATION 



SAMVEL GOLDWYN Priwrfr" 



7/^BRADSTREET 
of PILHDOM 




7i(^RECOCHIZE[]^ 

Authority 



i 



Vol. XI. No. 11 



Monday, January 12, 1920 



Price 5 Cents 



Drive Opens Feb. 12 

Date Set for Opening of American- 
ization Campaign — Lane Confers 

Secretary of the Interior Lane 
conferred with heading fihn men yes- 
terday at the Waldorf regarding the 
Americanization drive via the films. 

The opening gun will be fired on 
Lincoln's Birthday and subsequently 
there will be additional drives at 
various intervals during the next few 
years. 

All of the leading producers 
pledged their support. Among those 
who addressed the gathering were 
D. W. Griffith, William Fox, Mar- 
cus Loew, Jesse L. Lasky, B. S. 
Moss, Alfred S. Black, Samuel Gold- 
wyn, Richard A. Rowland, J. Stuart 
Blackton and Carl Laemmle. 

In the forthcoming drive tlie 
American Legion has pledged its co- 
operation. 

A list of 224 mofion pictures suit- 
able for use in Americanization pro- 
grams has been prepared by the Na- 
tional Board of Review. This list 
may be obtained freely from the 
Board of Review, upon request ac- 
companied merely by postage. 



Wayburn to Leave Capitol 

It is officially announced that Ned 
Wayburn will letire as producing di- 
rector for the Capitol theater. 



In the issue of Dec. 8, WID'S 
DAILY published a statement as 
coming from Mr. Wayburn to the 
effect that his contract had a year 
to run and that he would not leave 
the theater. 



French Films Shown 

French motion pictures were 
sho vn in the ballroom of the Vin- 
cent Astor home on Saturday. The 
occasion was for war relief. 



Russell Coming to New \ . 
(By Wire to WID'S DAILY) 

St. Louis — David Russell of the 
Zella State Enterprises will be in 
New York to-morrow. He will stop 
at the Astor. 



Tearle a Star 

Harry Carson will star Conway 
Tearle in "Michael and His Lost 
Angel," now being produced at the 
Equity studio on the coast. Mr. 
Tearle has gained a reputation as 
leading man for a number of the 
screen's most popular feminine stars 
and his next appearance will be with 
Clara Kimball Young in "The For- 
bidden Woman." 




"A woman is a female first, her social veneer but thinly veiling her 
natural instincts." "Even as Eve" proves it. — A First National Attrac- 
tion. — Advt. 



Ban on Lurid Signs 

Chicago City Council Passes Law 
Exacting Fines for Violations 

Chicago — The local situation as 
affecting the display of lurid signs 
is expected to be remedied with 
the passing of an ordinance by the 
"■ o City Council which imposes 
a i..,v. upon theater managers or 
proprietors for misrepresentation in 
bill board advertising. 

The ordinance which has been en- 
dorsed by the N. A. M. P. I. im- 
poses a fine of not less than $10 
nor more than $50 for violations of 
the law. 

There have been many flagrant 
cases of exaggerated advertising by 
some of the smaller theaters here. 



Big Advertising for "Copperhead" 

Famous Players will back "The 
Copperhead" with a page ads in 31 
nationally circulated magazines. The 
special will be released Jan. 25. 



Gather For Confab 

First National Men Arriving in At- 
lantic City 
(Special to IVID'S DAILY) 

Atlantic City, N. J. — Members of 
the First National organizaton are 
here for the convention that opens 
this morning at the Traymore. 

Additional members are expected 
in town on the early trains this 
morning. All of the directors, fran- 
chise holders and more important 
exhibitor members arc expected for 
the meeting. 



RufFner Leaves Rialto 
(Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Portland, Ore. — Ralph Ruffncr is 
back home considering offers. He 
has just resigned as manager of the 
Rialto in San Francisco where he 
has been for severar months past. 



Bach in Town 

William A. Bach of the Famous 
Players Canadian organization was 
in town Saturday. In from Toronto. 

\ 



United-"T" Deal 

Former to Take Over Triangle's \ 
Exchanges in Key Cities i 

.\ deal has been consummated, it I 
is understood whereby the ex-^-' 
changes of Triang/e Dist/ibuting J 
Corp. will pass into the hands of 
United Picture Theaters of America. 

By virtue of the transaction, Un- 
ited will have its own distributing 
system, operative in the important 
key cities of the country. 

It is expected 1,hat official an- 
nouncement of the closing of the 
deal will be made today. 



i 



Safety Films at Capitol 

About 5,000 school children were 
guests at the Capitol theater on 
Saturday when "Careless America" 
produced by the Universal Industrial 
Department were shown. 

The campaign to reduce deaths 
due to accidents in the streets is be- 
ing backed by Secretary of State 
Francis M. Hugo. Secretary of War 
Baker addressed the children at the 
theater. 

Baker and Hugo posed for a spe- 
cial film which will be shown in a 
number of theaters in the state. 



Brenon Missing 

Cabled dispatches reaching this 
country early this morning told of 
the disappearance of Herbert Bren- 
on, who is producing for an Italian 
company in Sicily. Scenes were 
being shot on the slopes of Mt. 
Aetna. Nothing has been heard of 
the director for four days. 



Nat'l Convention for Famous 
Al Lichtman of ramous Piajers 
has issued a call for a national con- 
vention of the corporation's district 
managers, branch managers and ex- 
ploitation representatives to be held 
at the La Salle Hotel, Chicago, Jan. 
19 to 23. 

The convention will discuss mat- 
ters of general importance. All the 
home office executives will attend 
the meeting. 



Kane Returns 



.■\rthur S. Kane, former president 
of Realart returned to New York on- 
Saturday' after a trip that covered 
the key cities of the country. 

Mr. Kane found business "won- 
derful," as he expressed it. 

"I haven't anything to say right 
now that 'will rock the industry'. 
No. I haven't anj' plans as yet. 

"I suppose I'll have to look around 
and get a job," he said laughingly. 



Monday, January 12, 1920 



jMi 



DAILV 



m^i^m 



1 — ■ ..' — 

'VtLIlR«. 11 Monday. Januar; 12. 1920 Pilo 5 Centf 



^Copyright 1919, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 

' Inc. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 

"New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 

'iFILM FOLKS, INC. 

'!P. C. ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 

'urer; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 

'and Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 

, Business Manager. 

'Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 

"at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 

''the act of March 3, 1879. 

'Terms (Postage free) United States, Outside 

'of Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 

months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 

$15.00 
t Subscribers should remit with order 
^Address all communications to WID'S 

DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 
a York, N. Y. 
>i Telephone: Vanderbilt, 4551-4552-5558 
I Hollywood, California 
'Editorial and Business Offices: 6411 Holly- 
= wood Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 
J Chicago representatives— Willis, Eckels 
tand Mack, 6th Floo-t, Consumers Bldg., 
IChicago, 111. 

;; Quotations 

^ Bid Asked Last Sale 

JFamoiis Players .. 90 91 90^ 

Goldwyn 31 33 33 

"Loew's Inc 31.)4 32^ 32^ 

Triangle ¥?,¥?,¥& 

vUnit. Pict. Prod. 14^^ 14% 143/4 

sWorld Film — — Vi 



; McCarthy in With "Out of Dust" 

T John P. McCarthy of the McCar- 
'Ithy Prod., has arrived in New York 
"from Los Angeles with the print of 
r.'Out of Dust" which he will show 
:io the trade during the week. John 
«F. Power, owner of the Los An- 
(geles baseball club and a stockholder 
,<in the McCarthy company will also 
iferrive in town during the week. Mc- 
'Carthy is stopping at the Belmont. 



COMING 

A 

REVIVAL 

OF 

Time's 




TOWER FILM CORP. 

71 W. 23rdSt.,N. Y. 



In the Courts 

Kitty Gordon has filed particulars 
in the Supreme Court in her suit 
against World Film to recover dam- 
ages because of the premature ex- 
plosion of a bomb in the filming of 
a play in which she was starring. 
She alleges that the negligence of 
the defendant consisted in placing 
the bomb and the wiring to the 
switchboard unprotected on damp 
ground for two hours. She says her 
injuries consisted of burns on the 
left leg and arm and on the right 
side of her face, resulting in the 
loss of her eyebrows and eyelashes, 
bruises, and shock to her nervous 
system. Her permanent injuries 
consist of headaches from which she 
still suffers, she says. She spent 
$800 for medical treatment, was in 
bed one day, and was confined to 
the house eight days, she says. 



A judgment in default for $1,065 
has been entered in the City Court 
against the Cosmofoto Film Co. by 
George H. Callaghan. The plaintiff 
alleged that he was employed to sell 
the rights to "Dombey & Son," 
"Lady Windmere's Fan," "The Ly- 
ons Mail," and "Her Greatest Per- 
formance," at 10 per cent of the pro- 



ceeds, and says he brought about 
the sale to the Classical Motion Pic- 
ture Co. for $10,000. He sued for 
$1,000 and the case was not defended. 



Carl Harbaugh, who directed the 
William J. Flynn secret service films 
for the Oliver Prod., has filed suit 
in the Supreme Court against the 
Oliver company for $3,500. He al- 
leges he was discharged Nov. 1, al- 
though his contract was to run six 
weeks longer, for which he asks pay 
at $400 a week, and wants $1,000 
profits and $100 salary due. 



Larson Opens St. Louis Office 

{By Wire to WID'8 DAILY) 

St. Louis. — T. E. Larson, owner 
of Peacock Prod., Inc., with head- 
quarters in Tulsa, Okla., has opened 
an independent exchange here. He 
will handle Equity piciures in this 
territory. 

G. F. Hennessey has been ap- 
pointed district manager in charge 
of St. Louis and Kansas City. 



Larson will also open an office in 
Dallas, as noted. 



"The Dangerous Talent" is the 
title of Margarita Fisher's next 
American production. 



OPEN TO OFFERS 

A DIRECTOR 

Of International Reputation 

One of the Few Who Can Tell Exact 
Production Costs in Advance 



For Interview Address 



Principals 
Only 



Box A.12, 
Wid's Daily 



At Work on "Detective Jim" 

Harry Morey is at work on "D^ 
tective Jim," his forthcoming Vitg 
graph production. "The Birth of a' 
Soul" in which he is starred is ready 
for release in January. 



NOT FOR 
MR. FOG IE! 



You remembe r the clan 
who refused to go further 
than a piano and bass drum 
for picture music? 

You remember the fellers 
who thought they could run 
features with only one pro- 
jector in the booth? 

You remember the exhibit- 
ors whose ideal of picture 
showmanship was a nickel 
show? 

WHERE ARE THEY ALL 
NOW! 

Take the lesson to mind. 
Our mission is to make your 
advance screen announce- 
ments something your audi- 
ence will wait for. We do it 
in the motion picture's high- 
est art and on a regular ser- 
vice basis! 

Our arrangements with the 
producers ma,ke it possible 
and certain. 

This service will not appeal 
to the old fogies because it's 
PROGRESS! 

For others it is available 
only through 

National Screen Service 

1476 Broadway, N. Y. 



No matter how much a 
trade-mark is advertised, 
it will never attain value 
if it is frequently attached 
to worthless items. 
The RITCHEY trade- 
mark is valuable because 
it only appears upon the 
finest posters that it is 
possible to execute. 

RITCHEY 

LITHO. CORP. 

406 W. 31st St.,N.Y., Pbone Cbebea 838S 




New Officers 

For Board of Trade — Fob Presented 

to Graham 

(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Omaha, Neb. — -The Film Board of 
Trade in Omaha, Neb., concluded its 
first year last week and new officers 
were elected for 1920. The board 
more than proved its worth, says 
its members, and has contributed 
greatly to raising the standard of the 
motion picture industry in Iowa and 
Nebraska to a higher plane. Many 
exhibitors have expressed their ap- 
preciation of the activities of the 
board, says C. E. Holah, the new 
president. 

The 1920 officers are: President, 
C. E. Holah, manager of the A. H. 
Blank Enterprises, which is the 
Omaha First National Exhibitors' 
Circuit exchange; vice-president, C. 
L. Peavey, manager of the Famous 
Players-Lasky exchange in Omaha; 
secretary, Leo Delaney, manager of 
the Vitagraph exchange in Omaha; 
treasurer, Samuel Maclntyre, man- 
ager of the Metro exchange in 
Omaha. Additional members of the 
executive board are Sidney Meyers, 
manager of the Fox exchange in 
Omaha; Max Wintroub, manager of 
the Fontenelle States Right ex- 
change in Omaha, and C. W. Tay- 
lor, manager of the Omaha Selznick- 
Select exchange. 

A gold watch fob, bearing the in- 
signia of the Film Board of Trade, 
was presented to Harry Graham, 
manager of the Pathe exchange in 
Omaha, who concluded his year's 
term as president of the board, and 
a testimonial of gratitude was sent 
to New York to L. A. Getzler, for- 
mer manager of the Vitagraph ex- 
change in Omaha and former sec- 
retary of the board. 



*'The Simple Life" 

All simpletons 
are invited to 
view this Old 
Home Week 
picture. 

A 

CHESTER 

OUTING 




DAILV 



Monday, January 12, 1920 



Sobleman Denies Blue Mouse Sale 

St. Paul, Minn. — Billy Solik-inan 
of Mustard, Rowe and Sobleman 
who own the Blue Mouse denied the 
report tliat Ruben & Finkelstein bad 
bought that house. 



Announce Anita Stewart Releases 

The first of a series of five Anita 
Stewart re-issues for Vitagraph dur- 
ing the first half of the year will be 
"The Juggernaut." Others are "The 
More Excellent Way," "Clover's 
Rebellion," "The Message of the 
Mouse'" and "The Daring of Diana." 

"The Juggernaut" will be let out 
in February. 



Iowa Towns Close on Sunday 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Omaha — The people of Eagle 
(h-ove, Iowa, have voted to close 
the picture theaters on Sunday. Sim- 
ilar action was taken in Clarion, 
Iowa. 



LES 



A 1 . Ml Lh 

HAND LETTERING 
7 (C/ie hundred Mt&s ^ Da^j - 

i'ALYNLU' 

.A-,. PHONE 2323 BRYANT . 



Realart Pictures have a special 
lobby display for all their produc- 
tion.s now ready in their exchanges 
throughout the country for all 
their bookings. Look them over 
and see how this enterprising con- 
cern will assist you in getting 
"them" up to the box office. 
KBACS MFG. Co. 
220 W. 42nd St. 
17th Floor Tel. 3607 Bryant 




To Revise Trade Board Rules 
(By Wire to WW'S DAILY) 

St. Louis — Stanley Hatch of Se- 
lect, Tom Leonard of Triangle and 
Barney Fagan of the Standard Film 
Service have been appointed a com- 
mittee to revise the rules of the St. 
Louis Board of Trade. 



Phone Morningside 6945 

Autos to Hire 
To the Moving Picture 



Trade 



i^ '. m 




IDEAL AUTO RENTING CO. 




Baltimore, Md.— The Forest Pai 
opened here, with Robert Warwil 
in "An Adventure in Hearts" as tl 
attraction. | 



The difference between 
moving pictures and 
Goldwyn Pictures is the 
difference between 
speculation and invest- 
ment. 

^.'''j.i4i i iit ' ff i 'yi!!'Ohv'.'''i;r'i«ai 



Capable Scenario Writer 

Can Write Original Refined 

Comedy 

or 

Dramatic Continuity 

Just Released from Service 

Wants Offers 

Has Previous Staff Experience 

Box 22 

Wid's Daily 

Hollywood Office 



MAKE YOU HEAR WHAT YOU SEE 



FILMUSIC CUE SHEETS ARE GOOD FOR ALL THEA- 
TERS EVEN THOSE THAT USE ROLLS— AND LOTS OF 
THEM DO. 



riLiisnusic-co. 

. . LOS ANGELES .. 



1729 Highlaad Ave. 



THE HAL BENEDICT STUDIOS 



College Point, Long Island 



Monday, January 12, 1920 



b1i4^ 



DAILV 



Jack Hoxie has just signed a two- 
s' contract with National Film. 



> 



A 

\\ 

:l 

EF. 
fu 

1)2 

El 

^ TUESTANDADDENCRAVIIKiCO. 

ir 
\X 
'^ 225WEST39™STDgET.NEWY0DK 

j AMERICA N PPESS ASIOCIA T/ON BL DO 



IT REQUIRES ORCANIZATION TO 
MANUFACTURE COODENCRAVINCS 

EpUIPPEDIODELIVERTK'BESTPOJIIBIf 
WORK INTHEIEAST POSSIBLE TINE 



PUOTO ENGRAVERS 



lE. 



LEUMAS CARTOON SERVICE 

Producers o£ Animaited 
Films for e^^ery purpose. 



\7^. 45t}i St.; TelBiyant - 6806 



The Acme 
Portable 
Projector 
For the 
Studio 

Cutting Room 
The Editor 
Home School or 
Church 

^eDemonstrated to You Anywhere 
i'^ Howells Cine Equipment Co. 
ic;9 7th Ave. New York 

= Phone Bryant 1166 





GAYETY COMEDIES 
George Ovey and the Gay Golfers have no handicap in their new Gaye- 
ty Comedy, "Hits and Misses." Advt. 



"WHERE PROMISES ARE SACRED" 

LOUIS MEYER 

FORMERLY BRODA & MEYER INC 

TITLES 

LETTERED - ILLUSTRATED - PHOrOGRAPHED 
ASK TO SEE OUR NEW 
PROCESS TITLES AND 
ILLUSTRATIONS 

A PHONE CALL WILLI BRING TSAMPLBS 

BRYANT 7392 
220 WEST 42nd ST. ROOM 2(M0 





There are 30 Reasons 



why you should book, 

"The 
Screaming 
Shadow* 

REASON No. 10 
According to Hoyle it takes four 
of a kind to beat a full house. 
By booking Ben Wilson's new 
serial you will always have 
a full house beat on one of a 
kind. Watch for Reason No. 
!1 To-morrow. 

BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 

UNIVERSAL CITY CAL. 

Released through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK 

Foreign Rights controlled by Apollo Trading Corp., 220 W. 48th St. 






Wilkie, F. P. Man, in New York 

-A.. D. Wilkif, of the Lasky .studio 
publicity staflf is in New York to do 
some special exploitation work at 
the New York office. He will re- 
turn to California in about a month. 



Hensler With Hallmark 

Milwaukee, Wis. — F. C. Hensler is 
now manager of Hallmark's local of- 
fice. He was formerly connected 
with Pathe's Omaha office. 




D. W. GRIFFITH 




KNOWS 

The value of strictly high 
class people for the ensemble 
scenes of his productions. 

WL AKb supplying him 
with only the most select 
good-looking and properly 
dressed people for his pro- 
ductions. 

tlUK financial strength en- 
ables us to supply any num- 
ber of people. 

Select Motion Picture 
Bureau 

William W. Cohill, Manager 

1493 Broadway 

New York 

Telephones 

\ 2389 
Bryant \ 2390 

I 2391 







FOR SALE 

COMPLETELY EQUIPPED STUDIO 
EVERYTHING NEW AND UP TO DATE 

or 

Will sell electrical equipment separately — This 
includes latest type of lighting equipment as 
follows: — 

6 Tilting Lamps or counter balance stands 
2 Double Deck Equipments 

2 100-Ampere spot lights 

3 50-Ampere overheads 
2 Top lights with funnels 

Total capacity 650 Amperes. 

All equipment new and either D. G. or A. G., also 
a complete motor generator outfit of 1,000 Am- 
peres capacity. 

Address Box A-25, care of Wid's 



,7i^<>BRADSTREET 
of FILMDOM 




.1 



AuthoritV 



Vol. XI. No. 12 



Tuesday, January 13, 1920 



Price 5 Centc 



Elect Officers To-day 

Lieber Will Probably Head Two 

New First National Units — 

100 Members at Meeting 

{By Long Distance Phone) 

Atlantic City, N. J.— Approxi- 
matcly 100 franchise holders and 
others of First National assembled 
here yesterday for the first annual 
meeting of the C'rcuTt. 

There will be an election of ofifi- 
cers held to-day of the two organi- 
zations that have grown out of the 
original First National. These are 
the Associated First National Pic- 
tures, Inc., and the Associated First 
National Theaters, Inc., with an ag- 
gregate capital of $16,400,000. The 
activities of these bodies com- 
mences Jan. 19. , 

It is expected that Robert Lie- 
ber, now president of the ex- 
isting First National will be elect- 
ed president of the Associated First 
National Pictures, Inc., while N. H. 
Gordon, of Boston, who is chairman 
of the Exhibitors' Defense Com- 
mittee in all likelihood will head the 
Associated First National Theaters, 
Inc. 

J. D. Williams, manager of First 
National will undoubtedly become 
manager of the picture organiza- 
tion. It would come as no surprise 
if he were tendered an important 
position with the theater organiza- 
tion as well. 

Harry Schwalbe at present sec- 
retary and treasurer of First Na- 
tional, it is generally intimated will 
hold similar position with the two 
new units. 

The meetings will be continued 
to-day and to-morrow. Many mat- 
ters of general interest are ex- 
pected to be discussed. 

DANNENBERG. 



Goldwyn Buys "Stop Thief" 

Goldwyn has purchased "Stop 
Thief," the Cohan and Harris farce. 

No one has been cast as vet. 



Abrams Will Not Build 

Hiram Abrams* personal repre- 
sentative at United Artists denies 
that he is to build a theater at Bath, 
Me. The report started in a Bath 
paper. 



Selznick Sows Up Chicago 

Chicago — Lewis J. Selznick has 
signed Jones, Linick and Schaefer, 
Balaban and Katz, Lubliner and 
Trinz, Andrew Karzas, and Ascher 
Bros, for National Picture Theater 
service. 

This includes practically all of the 
big circuits here. 




"Thy hair is of gold and very beau tiful, so shall it be cut to make thee 
ugly in the sight of man, for love is a sin," said the prophet in "Even as 
Eve," a First National picture. — Ad vt. 



Ohio First Nat'l Acts 

Ratifies New Policies of Parent Cir- 
cuit — Sends Committee to Con- 
vention 
Cleveland — Ratification of the 
new policies launched January 19 
by First National Exhibitors' Cir- 
cuit and plans for increasing the 
exhibitor membership of their own 
state organization to include more 
than 300 additional theaters are 
among the important actions taken 
by 125 franchise owners represent- 
ing 150 theaters m the First Na- 
tional Exhibitors, of Ohio at a con- 
vention held here last week. 

This meeting was held to take up 
the expansion plans which become 
{Continued on Page 2) 



Tucker Case Postponed 

By request of the defendants, 
Mayflower Photoplaj' Corp. and 
Famous Players-Lasky Corp., the 
first hearing of the case filed in the 
-Supreme Court by George Loane 
Tucker has been postponed until 
Monday, Jan. 19. 



"T" Films in Deal 

United Deal Includes All Releases 

as Well as 18 Key City 

Exchanges 

Official announcement was made 
yesterday afternoon of the story 
published exclusively in WID'S 
DAILY of the taking over the Tri- 
angle exchanges by United. 

The deal gives <Jnited Picture 
Prod., affiliated with the theater 
company 18 exchanges located in 
Boston, Buffailo, Chicago, Cincin- 
nati, Cleveland, Denver, Los An- 
{Continued on Page 3) 



F. P. Meets To-day 

The annual meeting of the stock- 
holders of the Famous-Players- 
Lasky Corp. will be neld beginning 
noon to-dav. 



Selznick in Serial Field 

Selznick will produce a serial. 
The story for it will be written 
by Albert Payson Terhune and 
Robert Ellis will direct. Produc- 
tion will be in the east. 



Price Starts Action 

Applies for Injunction to Restrait 

Distribution of Alleged Duped 

Print 

C. B. Price Co., Inc., has begurt 
action in the Supreme Court for an 
injunction and accounting againsl 
the Celebrated Players Film Corp., 
Mitchel Mark Realty Co. .owners ol 
the New York and Brooklyn Strand 
and Nathan Hirsh, president of the 
Aywon Film Corp. The suit is in 
connection with "The Log of the 
U-35" owned by Price for United 
States and Canada and a film re- 
leased by Aywon in New York un- 
der the title "The Lost Empire." 

Price claims that the Aywon filrr 
is a duped print of the picture he 
owns. His film played at the Cap- 
itol last week while Hirsh's filrr 
was at the Strand. 

John Olsen and Co., who owr 
world's rights on the Price filn 
have joined the latter in an attemp 
to restrain further distribution o: 
the other production. 

Justice Davis of the Suprem« 
Court signed an order Saturday di 
recting the above named defendants 
to show cause wfty the injunctioi 
should not be granted. This wa: 
returnable yesterday. The defend 
ants requested an adjournmen 
which was granted. The hearing 
has been set for to-morrow. 

Hirsh could not be reached yes 
terday and no one in liis offict 
cared to comment on the action. 



Weadock Signs with Fairbanks 

Louis Weadock has joined Doug 

las Fairbanks' scenario departmeni 

where he will be associated witl 

Thomas Geraghty. i 



Now National Picture League 

The National Juvenile Motion Pic 
ture League, having enlarged th 
scope of its work, has changed it 
name to the National Motion Pictur 
League. 



American Cinema in Two Suits 
Two suits aggregating $13,00 
were filed in the Supreme Coui 
against the American Cinema CorJ 
as a result of the collapse on No> 
14 last of a gallery in the Mirror stu 
dio occupied by the defendant whei 
a barroom scene in "The Innel 
Voice" was being filmed. NelH 
Michel of 2688 Broadway asks $7,00 
because she will be incapacitated fc 
weeks and Lan Jee, a Chinese acto 
asks $6,000 because he was cut aboi 
the body and will be scarred fc 
life. 



13, 1920 




Ol'"opv right I'L'O, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
tei Inc.' Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
SCI New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 

pbfilm folks, inc. 

O: '. C. ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 

,in urer; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 

n. &nd Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 

RI Business Manager. 

S_ Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 

>rl It the post office at New York, N. Y., under 

St the act of March 3, 1879. 

-■A Terms (Postage free) United States, Outside 

^o trf Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 

al' months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 

: . S15.00 

(j; Subscribers should remit with order 
Address all communications to WID'S 
I DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 
York, N. Y. 
Telephone: Vanderbilt, 4551-4552-5558 
Hollywood, California 
Editorial and Business Offices: 6411 Holly- 
V wood Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 

Chicago representatives— Willis, Eckels 
md Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 
Qiicago, III. 



Quotations 



tA 

in 
>e 

ss 

E 

'ai 

»r, 

u^l 

fipFamous Players - 90 

"•-Goldwyn 32 

o,'-*Loew's Inc 3254 

c- Triangle 11/16 

>fJLJnited Pict. Prod. 15 
A^orld Film — 



Bid Asked Last Sale 



R 

tt; 

ie:. 

T] 
nit 



91 
34 
33 

\l' 



7/8 



903/^ 

33 

32Va 
Va 

163/ 



Pantages to Produce 
{Special to WID'S DAILY) 
..« San Francisco — It is reported that 
*f.\lexander Pantages will form a film 
^jt^oducing company in order to sup- 
D]t-ply his string of theaters with ex- 
cd<;lusive pictures. 

o^- 

g^ In its issue of April 25, 1919, 
c3,,WID'S DAILY indicated that Pant- 
•••(■ages was about to start a film pro- 
I ducing company. 

ET. 
r< 

r 

S( 
C( 

d 

n 

It 

r 
;i 



COMING 

A 

REVIVAL 

OF 

Time's 



i 




TOWER FILM CORP. 

71 W. 23rd St., N. Y. 



jsjtM 



DAILV 



Ohio First Nat'l Acts 

{Continued from Page 1) 

effective with the start of official ac- 
tivity by the Associated First Na- 
tional Pictures Inc., and the Associ- 
ated First National Theaters, Inc., 
the two new organizations formed 
recently by the Circuit with a com- 
bined capital of $16,400,000, to deter- 
mine their effect upon the present 
method of operation in Ohio, and 
to appoint a committee of nine ex- 
hibitors to meet with the directors 
and executives of the Circuit at At- 
lantic City this week. 

The committee of nine appointed 
a subcommittee who came to New 
York for a conference on Friday of 
last week, following which they went 
to Atlantic City. 

I. Lisbon of Cincinnati was named 
chairman of the main committee of 
nine. Members serving with Mr. 
Lisbon were Gus Sun, proprietor of 
the Fairbanks and two other thea- 
ters in Springfield, C. E. Renner of 
Youngstown, Charles K. Friedman 
of the Valentine, Toledo, M. B. Hor- 
owitz of the Fountain, Cleveland, 
William Slimm of the Marquee, 
Cleveland, Fred Desberg of Loew's 
Stillman, Cleveland, John Harris as- 
sociated with Mr. Libson, and Ben. 
L. Herdingsfeld, attorney for Lib- 
son-Harris interests. 

Under the leadership of E. M. 
Mandelbaum, president of the Ohio 
company, the state organization has 
grown from a small membership un- 
til today it includes every important 
first run theater in the state. 

A unique conversion of the time 
of the salesmen heretofore employed 
by the First National Exhibitors Co. 
of Ohio will be made with the in- 
auguration of the new national plan 
in that territory. The s^ib-fran- 
chise system will do away almost 
entirely with salesmen, with the dis- 
posal of the exhibitor in rights in 
each locality to specified theaters, 
but Mr. Mandelbaum announces that 
the sales staff will be retained, as 
salesmen to the public rather than 
to the exhibitors. 



First National officials stated yes- 
terday that the Ohio situation in- 
cluded practically every first run in 
the state. This, they say may be 
taken as an example of what is to 
be expected in every territory in the 
country. 



Norma Talmadge to Sail 

Norma Talmadge will leave for a 
two weeks' vacation in Havana, Cu- 
ba, on Saturday. From there she 
will go to Palm Beach where her 
mother and sister, Constance will 
meet her. 



Republic Gets Jose Film 

Republic Distributing has taken 
over "Mothers of Men" an Edward 
Jose production made for Film 
Specials, Inc. Claire Whitney and 
Lumsden Hare in the cast. 

Republic will re-open its New 
Orleans office Feb. 1 with J. F. 
Flaherty in charge. The Omaha of- 
fice will be opened about the same 
time with J. H. Hill as manager. 



More Territory on Chaplins Sold 

The following are the latest sales 
on the various Chaplin comedies be- 
ing handled by Victor Kremer: 

"A Burlesque on Carmen" to T. 
J. McAvey for Ohio and A. Glas- 
iiapp, Bowman, N. D. for the Dako- 
tas. The pictures "The Champion" 
"The Jitney Elopement," "Work" 
and "By the Sea" for West Pa. and 
W. Va. to Quality Film Corp., Pitts- 
burgh. 

Entire series to A. C. Bromberg, 
Atlanta for Ga., Fla., Ala., Tenn., 
North and South Carolina. 



1920 will be a prosperous 
year for the exhibitor who 
uses a large number of 
RITCHEY posters. 

RITCHEY. 

UTHO. CORP.i^ 

406 W.31at St.,N.Y., PIiodc OmIsm 838S 






Facts Count 



Did you ever stop to think of the many busi- 
ness failures that could have been avoided 
by insurance? 



Samuek 



REUBEN ,<rAMUELS 
^EAL iJN^ ERVICE 



JnyuvancQ 
• Phone John 



60 Maiden Lane 

54ay - S426 - 9427- J42« 



FILMGRAPHS, 
Inc. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Announces 

that 

Mr. J. Frank Martin 
is now in New York to ar- 
range for the distribution of 
BINGLES and BUNGLES 
First two reels of a series 
of comedy dramas featuring 

HANS WAGNER 

"Will average more laughs 
than the average comedy." 

— oOo— 

THE SILLY 

ENCYCLOPEDIA 

A short novelty subject for 

weekly release 

— oOo— 

JOKERGRAPHS 

The Screen's Comic Maga- 
zine for Weekly Release 

— oOo— 

FUNNYGRAPHS 

The Screen's Comic Sup- 
plement duplicating for the 
screen the Sunday News- 
paper Comic Supplement. 

— oOo— 

SUCH IS LIFE 
A series of serio-comic 
travelogs dealing with the 
habits, customs and envi- 
ronment of odd races and 
peoples in odd corners of 
every clime. 

— oOo— 

Live Distributor — State 
Right Dealer or New 
York Representative 
Desired 

Address all communications 

J. FRANK MARTIN 
Care of WID'S DAILY 



jM'^ 



I 



DAII.V 



Tuesday, January 13, 1920 



Big Coast Theater 

Ackerman and Harris Plan 3,000 

Seat House in Los Angeles 

{Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Arthur Letts, a well 
known merchant, has closed a lease 
for 99 years on his property at the 
southwest corner of Broadway and 
Seventh St. for a total of $12,500,000, 
the largest sum ever involved in a 
lease of Los Angeles property. 

The lessees are Ackerman & Har- 
riss, who have had plans prepared 
for a combined theater and office 
building, the cost of which will ex- 
ceed $1,500,000. 

The new theater, construction on 
which will start within 90 days, will 
be operated by Marcus Loew. The 
terms of the contract fixed the an- 
nual rental at $125,000, with an addi- 
tion of $50,000 in taxes to be paid 
also by the lessees. 

The property regarded as the pivot 
of the present downtown business 
district, has a frontage of 170 ft. on 
Broadway by a like frontage on 
Seventh St. It is considered the 
most valuable corner in Los Angeles. 

The structure will be twelve stor- 
ies high and finished in soft gray tile. 
There will be 425 offices in the build- 
ing. The theater will have a seating 
capacity of 3,000. 

The theater will be of two floors, 
orchestra and balcony. There will 
be two entrances, one on Broadway 
and one on 7th street. There will be 
a roof garden. 

It is expected to have the build- 
ing finished by January 1, 1921. 



Film Men Quit Omaha Chambers 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Omaha, Neb. — The Chamber of 
Commerce has accepted the resig- 
nations of ten film men and firms 
who resigned because the Chamber 
permitted its executive committee 
chairman to urge the closing of the 
houses even after the coal strike 
was settled. 

Those who resigned are: H. M. 
Thomas, manager, Rialto; C L. 
Peavey, manager Famous Players; 
C. W. Taylor, manager. Select; C. 
E. Holah, manager, A. H. Blank 
Enterprises; W. R. McFarland; S. 
H. Goldberg, W. H. Jones and Har- 
ry Rachman of the World Realty 
Co., owners of the Sun, Moon and 
Muse theaters. 

Just within the last week have the 
last few theaters that were closed 
throughout Iowa and Nebraska been 
permitted to open. 



Suing Horsley for $11,675 

William G. Farr, a cartoonist, has 
filed suit .in the Supreme Court 
against David Horsley to recover 
$11,675. The complaint alleges that 
the plaintiff is creator of the draw- 
ings, "Before and After" and "When 
a Man's Married," and agreed to 
furnish seven drawings a week to 
Oct. 1, 1922 at $75 a week. He 
delivered them for 14 weeks and al- 
alleges that $1,050 is due him. He 
asks $10,625 for the remainder of the 
contract period. 



"T" Films in Deal 

{Continued from Page 1) 

gelcs, Minneapolis, New York, Phil- 
adelphia, Pittsburgh, San Francis- 
co, Seattle, Detroit, Salt Lake City, 
Washington, New Haven, and Mil- 
waukee. United will organize ex- 
changes in Atlanta, St. Louis, Kan- 
sas City and Dallas. 

The company has been operating 
out of Republic exchanges but it 
is understood that Republic served 
cancellation notice on United and 
that the Triangle deal is a result of 
that action. 

The Triangle releases also pass 
into the hands of United together 
with the exchanges. The transfer 
takes place Jan. 18. 



Berst Buys King Film 

J. A. Berst of United Picture The- 
aters has purchased "Women Men 
Forget," a Mollie King production 
made by the American Cinema. This 
is the first announcement made of 
the sale of any of the American 
Cinema productions. 



Hyman Buys "Penny Philanthropist" 
{Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Chicago — Arthur S. Hyman of the 
Arthur S. Hyman Attractions has 
purchased the world rights to "The 
Penny Philanthropist." Peggy 

O'Neil is the star in this feature, 
which was adapted from the story 
by Clara Laughlin. Hyman has 
branches in Detroit, Chicago, and on 
February 1st is opening a branch 
to cover Cleveland territory. 



Attachment Against Waldorf 

An attachment for $842 has been 
filed in the Supreme Court in a suit 
of M. J. Wohl & Co., Inc., against 
the Waldorf Photo Plays, Ltd., of 
44 Bromfield Street, Boston. The 
plaintifif alleges that between Sept. 
16 and Nov. 10 last the plaintifif sold 
the defendant motion picture lamps 
and accessories amounting to $1,611 
on which the amount sued for is 
due. 




EVE UNSELL 

Scenario Writer 
Famous Players-Lasky Corp. 

"Eyes of the Sour- 
starring Elsie Ferguson 

"Sinners" 

starring Alice Brady 

"Cup of Fury" 

written by Rupert Hughes 

"The Great Shadow" 

starring Tyrone Power 



Buys Houses Adjoining Capitol 

Messmore Kendall, president of 
the Moredall Realty Corp., owners 
and operators of the Capitol has 
just purchased the two buildings 231 
and 233 West 50th St., immediately 
adjoining the theater, for scenic stu- 
dios, rehearsal rooms, the costume 
department and to house its mechan- 
ical staff. 



Mrs. De La Motte Dies 

Los Angeles — Mrs. Nellie De La 
Motte, mother of Marguerite De La 
Motte, is dead here as the result of 
injuries sustained in a recent auto- 
mobile smash-up. Funeral services 
for Mrs. De La Motte were con- 
ducted last Wednesday. 

Marguerite De La Motte is one of 
the featured players in "The Hope," 
a Metro production. 



Hans Wagner Comedies 

J. Frank Martin of Filmgraphs, 
Inc., Pittsburg, Pa., is in New York 
to place a series of two reel comedies 
starring Hans Wagner, baseball 
player, on the market. 

He is also is selling right on the 
Silly Encyclopedia, Jokergraphs. 
Funnygraphs and Such Is Life, com- 
edies series running from three to 
six hundred feet each. 



"The Clow^n" for Billie Burke 

Famous Playcrs-J^asky has pur 
chased "The Clown," an unproduced 
play by Avery Hopwood for Billie 
Burke. It is understood the pur- 
chase price was $10,000 which is con- 
sidered a record price for a play 
which has never seen the boards. 




OPEN TO OFFERS 

A DIRECTOR 

Of International Reputation 

One of the Few Who Can Tell Exact 
Production Costs in Advance 



For Interview Address 



Principals 
Only 



Box A-12, 
Wid's Daily 




■, Tuesday, January 13, 1920 



tM^ 



DAILV 



On Broadway 

Rivoli— Enid Bennett, "The Wo- 
man in the Suitcase." 
Rivoli Pictorial. 
.\rlnickle Comedy, "The Garage." 

Rialto— Robert Warwick, "The 
Tree of Knowledge." 

Rialto Magazine. 

Lehrman Comedy, "A Twilight 
Bal)y." 

Moss' Broadway — Alice Joyce, 
"Slaves of Pride." 

Parisian Fashion Frolic. 

Capitol — Nazimova, "Stronger 
Than Death." 

Capitol News. 

Prizma Colorland Review. 

Arbuckle Comedy, "The Garage." 

Strand — Zane Grey's "Desert 
Gold." 

Strand Topical Review. 

Chester scenic, "Back to Nature." 

Bray Cartoon. 
Loew's New York — Today: Hobart 

Bosworth, "Behind the Door." 

Wednesday: Gladys Brockwell, 
"Flames of the Flesh." 

Thursday: Dolores Cassinelli, 

"The Web of Deceit." 

Friday: Monroe Salisbury, "The 
Phantom Melody." 

Brentwood film, "The Third Gen- 
eration." 

Saturday: Charles Ray, "Red Hot 
Dollars." 

Sunday: Lucy Cotton, "The Mir- 
acle of Love." 



Next Week 

Capitol — Louis" Glaum, "The 
Lone Wolf's Daughter." 

Rivoli — Mary Pickford, "Polly- 
anna." 

Rialto — Marion Davies, "The Cin- 
ema Murder." 

Strand — Katherine MacDonald, 
"The Beauty Market." 

Brooklyn Strand — Zane Grey's 
"Desert Gold." 



Spanuth to Film Billy Whiskers 
Chicago — H. A. Spanuth, president 
of the Commonwealth Pictures 
Corp., Chicago, has started produc- 
tion of the Billy Whiskers series. 
These will be one reelers based on 
the "Adventures of Billy Whiskers," 
a series of children's books written 
by Frances Trego Montgomery. 

A trained white angora goat will 
enact the role of Billy Whiskers. 



CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG 

Once more demonstrates her Tnagnifi- 
cent art in 

"THE EYES OF YOUTH" 
We have made for this production a 
very artistic lobby display together 
with reproductions in fac-simile oil 
paintings from her latest poses in 
various sizes. 

KRAUS MFG. CO. 

220 West 42d Street 

17th Floor TeL 3607 Bryant 



Send Us Your 
feSrS Junk Film 

INTERSTATE SMELTING 
(Si REFINING COMPANY 

23 Commercial St. NEWARK. N. J. 



Ellis Joins Universal 

Don Carlos Ellis, film chief of the 
United States Department of Agri- 
culture, has resigned from his Gov- 
ernment post to take charge of peda- 
gogical production for the Educa- 
tional Department of Universal un- 
der the direction of Harry Levey. 

Ellis is now preparing the series 
of Appleton-Universal films for use 
as supplements to the school texts 
published by D. Appleton and Co. 



Iris on Trip 

Sales Manager John J. Iris of the 
Educational Films Corporation's 
New York Exchange, left Sunday 
to begin a trip through up-state ci- 
ties in the interest of "Educational" 
short-subjects. 

Mr. Iris will visit 30 or more cities, 
and will be out of town for about 
four weeks. 



Linbrook Damaged in Fire 

Norfolk, O. — Damages amounting 
to $4,000 were caused by a fire at 
the Linwood Square recently. Fifty 
people were in the house at the 
time, but all escaped without injury. 



Kremer-Chaplins at Rialto 

The Rialto has contracted for tl 
showing of the Essanay-Chapli 
production which Victor Kremer 
distributing. 




A l^OMAMCL Ol 
THE S^UNM/vS^OUtI 



JOHN J. LIVINGSTON 

Motion Picture Representative 

For 

STARS— DIRECTORS 

1440 Broadway New York 



An organization of 
authors, including 
two scenario edi- 
tors, will consider 
orders from first- 
class producers for 
continuities and 
original stories. 

Address 
XYZ, Wid's Daily 



FOR SALE 

COMPLETELY EQUIPPED STUDIO 
EVERYTHING NEW AND UP TO DATE 



or 



Will sell electrical equipment separately — This 
includes latest type of lighting equipment as 
follows: — 

6 Tilting Lamps or counter balance stands 
2 Double Deck Equipments 

2 100- Ampere spot lights 

3 50- Ampere overheads 
2 Top lights with funnels 

Total capacity 650 Amperes. 

All equipment new and either D. G. or A. G., also 
a complete motor generator outfit of 1,000 Am- 
peres capacity. 

Address Box A-25, care of Wid's 




There are 30 Reasons 

why you should book, REASON No. 11 
The 

Hope of every 
J^xhibitor 

S erial they say 





S ee the 

Customers 
R eturn and 
Enter 
Again 
Mightily 
I nterested 
Night after night 
Great 

BEN WILSON PRODUCTIONS chTcaI 
HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK 

^ ForeigD Rights controlled by Apollo Trading Corp. , 220 W. 4gth St. 



Heartily 
Appreciating the 
Daring deeds of the hero and 
Optimistically 

Waiting for the next episode 
Watch for Reason No. 12 To-morrow. 

Released through 
UNIVERSAL 




7^BRADSTREET 
of FILMDOM 




7/cRECOCHIZEIi 

Authority 



Vol. XI, No. 13 



Wednesday, January 14, 1920 



Price 5 Cents 



Declare Dividend 

On Famous Players' Preferred Stock 

— Directors Elected for Next 

Four Years 

The directors of Famous I'laycrs- 
Lasky who met yesterday at the an- 
nual meeting of the corporation de- 
clared a dividend of 8 per cent on 
preferred stock or 2 per cent for 
the period from Nov. 28, 1919 to 
F'ch. 1, 1920. The dividend is pay- 
ahle on Feb. 1 to stockholders of 
record at the close of Inisiness on 
Jan 21. 

The following were elected direc- 
tors of the corporation for four 
years: Adolph Zukor, Jesse L. 
Lasky, William H. English, Maurice 
Wertheim and Felix Kahn. Arthur 
S. Friend, treasurer of the corpora- 
tion said that a financial statement 
of the company's business would be 
issued as soon as it is completed 
by Price, Waterhouse and Co., ac- 
countants. This statement is to be 
sent to all the corporation's stock- 
holders. 

Emile Shauer, head of the foreign 
department exhibited a film vvhicii 
shows the foreign offices of the cor- 
poration in London, Paris, Copen- 
hagen, Stockholm, Buenos .A.ires, 
Santiago, Rio de Janeiro, Havana. 
Sydney, Melbourne and Wellington. 



Equity Holds Meeting 

Directors Discuss Company Busi- 
ness in Chicago — New Star 
To Be Named 
{By Wire to WW'S DAILY) 

Cliicago. — The directors of Equity 
Pictures held a meeting at the Black- 
stone yesterday. The rnceting will 
be continued today. 

Those present were Harry Gar- 
son, who came in from California, 
Her1)ert K. Somborn and Joseph 
Schnitzer, who were in from New 
York. 

At the termination of the busi- 
ness it is expected that the name of 
a new star will be announced. 



Powers in Chicago 

Chicago. — P. -A.. Powers, of Uni- 
versal, is in town. 



Kunsky Sells Equity Franchise 

John H. Kunsky has sold his 
Equity Picture franchise for Michi- 
gan to Messrs, Haines, Churchill 
and Weil, according to Harry Reich- 
cnliach. 

A new company known as the 
Equity Pictures Corp. of Michigan 
has been formed to handle the films 
in that territory. 




The false prophet follow ~d her to the cave and when he saw the 
treasure box the lust of gold fiUe^l bis heart and murder was in his clutch. 
From "Even as Eve," a First National feature. .\dvt. 



"Roxy" Returns 

No Longer to Manage California in 
Los Angeles — With Goldwyn Yet 

S. L. Rothapfel, — "Ro.xy" — has re- 
turned to New York from Los An- 
geles where he has been managing 
the California theater for Goldwyn 
for some time past. 

When asked last niglit whether he 
{Continued on Page 3) 



To Remodel Mecca Bldg. 

Tile Mecca Bldg. which houses 
Universal, Pathe, Robertson Cole 
and a numlier of additional film com- 
panies has passed into the hands 
of Chicago interests who plan to re- 
model the structure. 



Loew to Build in Newark 

Marcus Loew will build a business 
block and theater to seat 3,000 at 
Broad and New Sts., Newark. The 
total ground rental of the property- 
totals over $5,000,000. 



Kaufman Resigns 

Leaves Famous Players to Enter 
the Independent Producing Field 

Famous Players officially an- 
nounced yesterday that Al Kaufman, 
a director in the corporation and 
an official of the old Famous Players 
Film Co. had resigned from the 
company to enter the independent 
producing field. 

Kaufman who is now en route to 
the coast is expected to announce 
liis plans in detail shortly after his 
arrival there. 



20 Million in Theaters 

First National Plan Elaborated 

Upon From $6,400,000— Elect 

Officers To-day 

(By Long Distance Phone) 

.Atlantic City, N. J. — An import- 
ant development yesterday in the 
First National convention here was 
the announcement that the plan of 
Associated First National Theaters. 
Inc., would involve $20,000,000 and 
not $6,400,000 as originally planned. 

It was as a result of this large 
increase that some time was found 
necessary to smoothen out the de- 
tails which would naturally accom- 
pany the consummation of a deal of 
such magnitude. 

Election of officers did not take 
place yesterday as expected but it 
is generally thought that the officers 
vvill be named to-day. The conven- 
tion in all probability will end to- 
day. 

Some Details of the New Plan 

When the new order of things be- 
comes effective next week there will 
be some interesting changes fromi 
the existing operations of First Na-| 
{Continued on Page 2) 



Waldorf Recapitalizes 
{By Wire to WW'S DAILY) j 
Dover, Del. — Waldorf Photoplays,' 
Inc., have been chartered here with 
a $1,500,000 capitalization. The Cor-, 
poration Trust Co. put through the 
incorporation. I 



Waldorf is a Boston concern 
which releases through Republic. An 
elaborate version of "Kismet" is be- 
ing made in Florida. Other releases 
will be "Dad's Girl," "The Black 
Sheep" and "The Rider of the King 
Log." 1 



United in Triangle Offices 

It is expected that United, who 
has just closed a deal for the Tri-j 
angle exchanges and films will mov^ 
into the offices in the Brokaw Bldg. 
now occupied by the latter company. 
Triangle has been using quarters oix 
the eighth and eleventh floors. 



Character Films Through Selznick 

It is reported that the newlj- form- 
ed Character Pictures Corp. which 
will make six productions a year will 
be distributed through one of the 
Selznick outlets. 



National Meeting in Feb. 

There will be a meeting of the 26 
exhibitor directors of National Pic- 
ture Theaters in February. Produc- 
tion plans will be gone over. 



•joldburg Leaves Frohman 
Jesse J. Goldburg, secretary and 
general manager of Frohman Amuse- 
ment Corp., will resign from thai 
organization, effective Jan. 17, when 
his present contract expires. 

Future plans are as yet indefinitt 
but Goldburg will leave on Sundaj 
for a countrj'-wide tour. He vvil' 
go to the coast and visit exchange 
centers on his way east. His suc- 
cessor has not been named. 



Wednesday, January 14, 1920 



H 



jMi 



DAIUV 




V«L II H*. 13 Wednesdir, January 14. 1920 rriia 5 ObU 

^^^^ j^. il l ,, ■ j i 'ni )im \ I 1 

Copyright 1920, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

F. C. ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 
urer; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 
and Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 
Business Manager. 

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms (Postage free) United States, Outside 
<rf Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00 

Subscribers should remit with order 
Address all communications to WID'S 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 
York, N. Y. 
Telephone: Vanderbilt, 4551-4552-5558 
Hollywood, California 
Editorial and Business Offices: 6411 Holly- 
wood Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 

Chicago representatives— Willis, Eckels 
and Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 
Ciicago, 111. 

Quotations 

Bid Asked Last Sale 

Famous Players .. 88 89i^ 89^ 

Goldwyn 32 34 33 

Loew's, Inc 3VA 32^ 31^ 

Triangle 11/16 Vs ¥\ 

United Pict. Prod. 16'/$ 18 18 

World Film — — % 

Russell of St. Louis Here 

David Russell of the Zella State 
Enterprises, St. Louis, reached town 
yesterday. He is a state right buyer 
and is registered at the Astor. 

More Theaters for Topics 

Pathe reports that 500 new thea- 
ters were added to the list showing 
Topics of the Day as a result of a 
December drive. Timely Film, Inc., 
is the producer. 



COMING 

A 

REVIVAL 
OF 

Time's 




TOWER FILM CORP. 

71 W. 23rd St.. N. Y. 



"Bored" Walk Talk 

(Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Atlantic City. — Wh;at connection 
a romantic bridal suite can have 
with First National's pow-wow is 
puzzling the sophisticated Traymore 
staff. Joseph Von Herberg. owner 
of the First National franchise for 
Seattle is paying close to 100 berries 
per day for a set of modern parlor 
bed-room and bath innovations. 



Lee Goldberg and A. H. Bl^nk 
from Kentucky and Iowa respective- 
ly, gave the "bored" walk a severe 
trouncing — Nine miles in one day is 
a life record thus far. say they. 

If First National members don't 
think Marshall Neilan the greatest 
producer since Jimmie Grainger, 
"produced" some remarkable "pic- 
tures," Monday! 



A certain young publicity man 
from First National was heard to 
remark that his work is educational. 
"I've already learned a full house 
beats a straight," said he. 



So far the wheel-chair bug hasn't 
l)it the members. Among those who 
prefer walking to "African motors" 
are R. H. Clark, New York—E. 
Mandelbaum, Cleveland— J. S. Clark, 
Pittsburgh and Tom Moore, Wash- 
ington. 



"Watty" Rothacker is bemoaning 
only the loss of an hour's time so 
far. A member told him to take 
a salt bath and lather himself .gen- 
erously. "Watty" massaged a cake 
of soap for an hour "with^u; even 
a bubble" as he expressed it. 

Earl J. Hudson, who wields the 
facile First National puljlicity pen, 
brought his wife along and was 
smoking serenely when someone 
asked — "Who's shoeing the horse?" 
Earl sent the pipe back to New York 
insured. 



Among members of the home of- 
fice who "dropped" down for the 
"con"-vention are : W. J. Morgan, 
Steve W. McGrath, J. L. Hunter, 
George Grant. C. Lazarus, Sol S. 
Shernon, Paul M. Sarazan, Earl J. 
Hudson, Robert G. Hilton, C. H. 
Chandler and George R. Grant. 



A rationally inclined home office 
scribe was taking dinner with A. 
M. Fabian of New Jersey. The mod- 
est-lived young man scanned the 
foreign languaged bill like it was 
a Greek newspaper. "You order," 
he sighed, turning over the menu. 
"I can eat anything you can." 



"Moe" Mark of the Mark-Strands 
had his picture taken by George 
Blaisdell. He showed a wonderful 
overcoat back. 



And Max Spiegel wouldn't :ake 
off his hat for a good photo be- 
cause he feared catching cold. 

DANNENBERG 



O. Henry Story for Corinne Griffith 

Corinne Griffith's next Vitagraph 
production will be "The Memen- 
to," an O. Henry story. 



20 Million in Theaters 

(Continued from Page 1) 

ilonal. The present franchise will 
be turned over to the state organiza- 
tions which will pay their pro rata 
share for all productions. If for 
instance the Asso. First National 
Pictures, Inc. paid $200,000 for a 
production and it was turned over to 
tiTc Theaters the cost would be di- 
vided proportionately among the 
various districts an 8 per cent ter- 
ritory paying $25,000. In turn 
the cost would be proportioned 
among the members and the out- 
side theaters, the franchise holders 
agreeing to the percentages which 
the various houses should pay, scal- 
ing the prices down from first rim, 
etc. and the larger cities like New 
York, Chicago, Boston, St. Louis. 
Cleveland, being sub-divided into 
zones, with each zone given one 
house to be first, second, third run, 
etc., as its size and importance may 
determine. 

May Take St. John Comedies 

Some talk here of First National 
taking over the Al St. John Comed- 
ies made by the Warners. The first 
Al St. John comedy "Speed" was re- 
leased by Famous. It was shown 
at the Capitol. 

Abe Warner of the producing firm 
is here. 

Koplar in Franchise Deal 

It is reported here that a deal has 
b'.en consummated with the result 
that Col. "Bill" Sievers has disposed 
of the New Grand Central Theater 
in St. Louis ^o Koplar and Gold- 
man, who in turn also cut in on the 
First National franchise for St. 
Louis. 

DANNENBERG 



Gov't Again Suing General 

The Government has filed a claim 
for $4,433.91, agairtst the General 
Film in bankruptcy, claiming this 
to be a deficiency in the amount paid 
for the income tax of the company 
for the year 1915. 

This claim is on the same basis 
as the one field for $11,394 for al- 
leged deficiency in payment of in- 
come tax for 1914 as noted. 

Louis Weinberger, an att jraey i'or 
the trustee in bankruptcy of the 
General Film, has filed objections 
to both these claims on the ground 
that the items objected to by the 
Government, consisting of excess or 
additional footage charges, were de- 
ductable items, under the law. be- 
ing cost of operation and leasing of 
films. 



"Babylon" for General Release 

D. W. Griffith's "The Fall of Bab- 
ylon." one of the offerings in the 
Griffith repertory season at the Co- 
han Theater has been leased by D. 
W. Griffith Service. This feature 
was sent on tour with two special 
productions immediatiely following 
the repertory season, and played as 
a regular attraction in combination 
houses throughout the east and 
middle west, carrying a special or- 
chestra and other features. As a 
rental it is now being booked by 
Albert L. Grey, general manager of 
Griffith Service. 



Rogers, Sales Manager 

Louis F. Rogers is sales mana- 
ger of the National Screen Service. 
He has been with Famous Players 
and later with the Lee Kiddies. 



Dooley Opens Buffalo Branch 
(Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Buffalo. — The Dooley Exchange 
has opened a branch here, at 338 
Pearl St. John F. Kirsch is mana- 
ger. 

The company will probably open 
a branch in Albany. 



Tolstoi Pictures Formed 
(By Wire to WID'S DAILY) 

Dover, Del. — Tolstoi Pictures 
Corp. is the latest of the picture 
companies to be chartered. Capital 
is $100,000. Incorporators are rep- 
resentatives of the Corporation 
Trust Co. 



To Make Exteriors at Bayside 

Harry Morey and the company 
making "Detective Jim," for Vita- 
graph will spend about three weeks 
at Bayside, L. I., beginning next 
week if the weather is favorable. Ex- 
teriors will be taken there. 



More Kremer Sales 

The latest sales on the Kremer 
Chaplins are as follows: 

"Jitney Elopement," "Work," 
"Champion" and "By the Sea," for 
Kentucky to 1st National, Louis- 
ville; for Mississippi and Louisiana 
to A. C. Bromberg, Atlanta; for 
Ohio to Essenel Prod. Co., Cleve- 
land. "Burlesque on Carmen" for 
Louisiana and Mississippi to Brom- 
berg. Atlanta. 



Buys Rights to SuTjmarine Film 

The following have purchased 
state rights to "The Log of the 
U-35" from C. B. Price: Arrow of 
St. Louis for eastern Missouri, and 
southern Illinois Crescen of Kansas 
City for western Missouri and Kan- 
sas, Alexander of 130 W. 46th St., 
N. Y. for territory up to Albany, and 
northern N. J., Metro Pictures, Phila. 
for Eastern Penn. and southern N. 
J., and Equity, San Francisco, for 
Cal., Nevada, Arizona and Hawaii. 



Some people will only 
learn by experience, but 
from that class come the 
most enthusiastic support- 
ers, of the RITCHEY 
poster. Their experience 
has taught them that the 
RITCHEY poster invari- 
ably has the maximum of 
advertising value. 

RITCHEY^ 

LITHO. CORP. 1 
406W.31it St..N.Y., PboiK OmIm 8388 




^^ 



DAIIlV 



Wednesday, January 14, 1920 



No. 4 

SAN PEDRO, CAMF.— Navy adopts 
Daily Air Mail Service between war shipii 
and naval base. 

DIMANT, BKLGIUM — Notables re- 
united after visit to V. S. King Albert, 
Queen Elizabeth, Cardinal Mercler attend 
ceremony of Belgian martyrs. 

OAKLAND, CALIF. — Ship collides with 
bridge, a novel accident occurs as the 
schooner Tamalpais rams into steel draw 
bridge. 

WEI.LESLEY, IVIASS. — Will your piece 
of ice melt in size or price The early 
and continued cold spell result in big ice 
harvest. 

OMSK, SIBERIA — Continuous warfare 
of Bolsheviki and Kolchalc, drives peas- 
ant refugees to seelt slielter from severe 
weather in underground holes. 

ON-THE-AISNE — Americans make 
French kiddies liappy, sending carloads 
of toys to children in ruined towns of 
Aisne district. 

ALBANY, N. Y. — New York Legislature 
denies seats to five elected Socialists. 
Assemblymen pending an investigation 
of their loyalty. 

HOBOKEN, N. J. — No more U. S. 
Troops in France. V. S. George Wash- 
ington brings back last American sol- 
dier front "over there." 

FOKT-AC-rRINCE, HAITI — Marine 
Corp turns out dare devils in Haiti. 

today 



Coast Brevities 

(Special to fFID'S DAILY) 

Hollywood — William C. Dowlan 
has just finished "Locked Lips," the 
Universal photo-drama, starring 
Tsuru Aoki. The six reels required 
only twenty days in the filming. 



The King W. Vidor Company is 
on location at Sunland this week 
where scenes are being taken for 
Vidor's first picture for First Na- 
tional, temporarily titled "The Fam- 
ily Honor." Among the featured 
players are Florence Vidor, Roscoe 
Karns, Charles Meredith and Harold 
Goodwin. 



Marshall Neilan has announced the 
addition of Adele Farrington to the 
cast of his second independent fea- 
ture which is now in the course of 
production at the Fairbanks studio. 



The final scenes of "Let's Be 
Fashionable," the fourth Thomas H. 
Ince Production co-starring Doug- 
las MacLean and Coris May have 
been completed. 

GAUSMAN 



Busch, Chicago Republic Manager 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Chicago. — Paul Busch, manager of 
National Picture Theaters office, has 
been made manager of Republic 
Distributing. 

Busch fills the vacancy left by L.A. 
Rozelle. Rozelle has been head of 
the World office for the past five 
years, and became manager of the 
Republic since it took over the 
World exchanges. He resigned to 
enter upon other duties. 



"Roxy" Returns 

(Continued from Page 1) 

would go back to the theater he 
stated that he would not and that 
he had placed Robert H. Poole in 
his place. Rothapfel expects to stay 
in New York or some time. He in- 
dicated that his European trip had 
not been abandoned but that the 
tirne of sailing was at present inde- 
finite. 

"Please say that I am still with 
Goldwyn and that I expect to con- 
tinue there," said Mr Rothapfel. 

Incidentally, he stated that Gold- 
wyn would have an important an- 
nouncement to make in a few days. 
This, it is expected will be rela- 
tive to the theater operations of the 
company. Coast reports reaching 
New York have it that Goldwyn will 
build a 4,000 seat theater in San 
Francisco. 

It was impossible to reach anyone 
at the Goldwyn offices last night 
relative to Rothapfel's statements. 



New Series for Tyrad 

Tyrad Pictures, Inc., have secured 
world right's on a series of scenics 
called "Wonders of Natures." 



Grossman Film Through Hallmark 

"Wits vs. Wits," a Harry Gross- 
man film with Marguerite Marsh, 
will be distributed through Hall- 
mark. 



Moore and Pickford at Brunton's 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Hollywood. — Owen Moore, Selz- 
nick star, and Mary Pickford will 
both work at the Brunton studio. 
Miss Pickford makes ner pictures 
there and Selznick has an arrange- 
ment with Robert Brunton for stu- 
dio space at the plant. 



Committee Meets To-morrow 

The Committee on Regulation of 
Motion Pictures appointed by Mayor 
Walter R. Stone of Syracuse, will 
convene at the Waldorf tomorrow, 
for a two-day session. Censorship 
and general supervision of pictures 
in New York State will be discussed. 



Schoenstadts Scattering 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Chicago. — Henry Schoenstadt, Sr., 
head of Schoenstadt & Sons, Theat- 
rical Enterprises, operating a string 
of picture theaters in Chicago, ac- 
companied by Mrs. Schoenstadt, has 
left for a combination business and 
pleasure trip to the coast. Schoen- 
stadt is planning a 3,500 seat house 
for Chicago and he is going to look 
over all the big houses for» ideas. 
He will be gone about a month. 

Henry Schoenstadt, Jr., has left 
for the south and will visit New Or- 
leans, Hot Springs, Florida, and may 
take a run over to Cuba. 

The Schoenstadts are just com- 
pleting a 1800-seat theater at 43rd 
street and Kedzie, to be called the 
Brighton. The house will be opened 
about Feb. IS. 



Glenn Kunkel will assist J. Gor- 
don Cooper in the direction of the 
Benny Leonard serial for Hallmark. 



Hope Hampton on Metro List 

Mope Hampton's first production 
"A Modern Salome" will be released 
through Metro. 



Japs Form Theater Company 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Sacramento, Cal. — The Lafayette 
Investment Co., is the name of a 
$100,000 corporation formed, here, 
backed by Japanese capital. The 
company will deal in theatricals. 



Dorothy Dalton Starts New One 

Dorothy Dalton has begun work 
on "Half an Hour," by Sir James 
M. Barrie, her next picture for Fa- 
mous in which she will be directed 
by Harley Knowles. It is her first 
production under her new contract. 



Universal Field Changes 

Denver— Edward Armstrong, for- 
merly manager for Universal has 
been promoted to the Division Man- 
agement of the following offices; 
Denver, Salt Lake, Los Angeles and 
San Francisco. 



Butte, Mont. — George Burke, for- 
merly manager of the Universal of- 
fice has been promoted to the divi- 
sion management of the following 
offices: Butte, Spokane and Port- 
land. 



RALPH 
RUFFNER 



At Liberty 




OFFERS 
INVITED 



LEUMAS CARTOON SERVICE 

Producers of Animated 

Films for e<}evy- purpose. 

17^^. 45 tk St. TeLBryant - 6806 



Edgar Lewis Film Feb. 1 

The first Edgar Lewis film for 

Pathe release will be "Other Men'a 

Shoes." It will go out Feb. L 



Royal Film Buys "Atonement" 
Royal Film Service, of London, 
has purchased Great Britain rights 
to "Atonement" with Grace Davison; 
Deal closed with Pioneer. 



Drew Comedies in Series Only 

The series of Mrs. Sidney Drey 
comedies with, John Cumberland, 
will be sold in a series of eight only. 
The first will be released Feb. 22. 
through Pathe. 



Lopez Directing Kaufman Series 

John Lopez has been named to di- 
rect the remaining pictures in the 
Herbert Kaufman series being made 
by Selznick. 



The difference between 
moving pictures and 
Goldwyn Pictures is the 
difference between 
speculation and invest- 
ment. 



IT REQUIRES ORCANIZATION TO 
NANUFAaURECOODENCRAVIIKS 

V)f[IIAYEBEEN0ll(AfllZED'"'^M8!» 

ppPEDTODELIVERf'BEJTPOillUf 
WORK INTHE LEAST POSSIBLE TINE 



THE STANDARD ENCRAYIIKi CO. 

PUOTO ENGRAVERS 

225 WEST 39™ STREET. NEW YODK 

AMEDIC&N PPESS aSSOCIATIOS BLDO 




The Acme 
Portable 
Projector 
For the 
Studio 

Cutting Room 
The Editor 
Home School oj 
Church 



Demonstrated to You Anywhere 

Howells Cine Equipment Co 
729 7th Ave. New Yol 

Phone Bryant 1166 



ti Wednesday, January 14, 1920 



sM^ 



DAILV 



:kinograms 



Ws Visual News of 
ALL THE World 

MAKING A MIT>K IN 46 SECONDS— 
)tto AVaUter wins in speed demon mot- 
>r bike contest on Ascot Park's last 
rack at Los Angeles. 

BRYAN BACK AGAIN — "The Peer- 
ess Leader" sets the center of the stage 
it a meeting of Democratic chiefs in 
kTashington. 

STEAMSHIP RAMMED IN EOG — S. S. 
iVest Avenal is run down by a big liner 
n the fog bound liarbor of New York. 

THE FIVE N. Y. SOCIALISTS— The 
;tate assemljlymen wlio liave been ex- 
•luded from tlieir seats at the opening 
>f tile session in Albany address an out- 
loor meeting in New York. 

JOHN BARLEYCORN SAILS— Some 
'xcellcnt li<iuor is deported from the 
Jaltimore water front where it used to 
>e very very welcome. 

THE TALLEST ST.ATESMAN — Con- 
gressman Dan Anthony of Kansas who 
vho advocates conservation of news 
irint paper poses for KINOGRAMS in 
iVashington. 

THE ALASK.AN FISHING FLEET— 
I'wenty-eight trim sailing craft at Ala- 
iieda Calif, are being overhauled for 
lie coming season's voyage. 

V. S. OFFICERS MAKE CALL— Com- 
nanders of U. S. border district pay vis- 
t to Gen. Escobar Carranza leader at 
Fuarez Mexico. 

FIND SOVIET .AMBASS.ADOR V. S.— 
^udwig C. A. K. Martens is served with 
ubpoena to testify at Senate's Inves- 
igation of radical propoganda. 

SPORTSJIEN HOLD DUCK DRIVE— 
Ihooters after wild game for donation 
;o charity sweep waters at San Diego, 
~!al. with a cordon of boats. 
JUILD GREATEST BATTLESHIP— The 
'. S. S. Tennessee with 32,300 tons dls- 
>lacement nears completion at the Brook- 
yn Navy Yard. 

LIVING COST HITS DOBBIN— High 
>rlce of oats ad hay bring hunger to the 
itable and Horses Aid Society gives a 
.•harity feed. 

; FINISH FIRST SPAN ON NEW MOT- 
')R ROAD — Two million dollar concrete 
>ridge over Calcalsieu River at Lake 
Charles, La. is ready for autoists on Old 
Spanish Trail. 

CITT NEW ENGLAND'S CROP OF 
tCE — Winter furnishes big harvest at 
■(jake Cochituato near AVellesley, Mass. 
,NEW ENGL.AND ONLY'). 
i <iOV. COOLIDGE SWORN IN— Head of 
jiasachusetts government is inducted In- 
to office for second term at Boston State 
(House NKW KNOL.VND ONLY). 

DISTRIBUTED BY 

REPUBLIC DISTRIBUTING 

CORPORATION 



[( 



Pioneer in Non-Theatrical Field 

Pioneer is the latest unit to enter 
he non-theatrical field. Plans as 
/et have not hecn perfected but a 
lepartmcnt to serve that field will 
)e ultimately established. 



Roach Leaves Transatlantic 

Lewis Roach, president of the 

rnmsatlantic Film Co. of America, 
las resigned his position owing to 

11 healtli caused by four years of 
service in France. He will return 
o England on the Royal George on 
Ian. 24. 

No successor has been named to 
■eplace him. 



Vitagraph to Build in Dallas 

Dallas, Tex. — Vitagraph will build 
its own exchange here. The struc- 
ture will be a two-story affair and 
will be located on Commerce St. 
between St. Paul and Ervan Aves. 
It will cost $50,000. 



Allen's St. Clair Opens 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Toronto,— Jule and J. J. Allen 
opened the St. Clair, their seventh 
theater in Toronto on Monday, The 
opening attraction was Tom Moore 
in "Lord and Lady Algy." 

The St. Clair occupies a plot of 
ground 88 by 133 ft. and has a 'seat- 
ing capacity of 1800 with 1300 on 
the ground floor and 500 in the bal- 
cony. It is the largest exclusive 
picture theater in the city, and has 
been erected in a fast-growing sub- 
urb. The decorations are in old 
rose. French grey and ivory. An or- 
chestra of eight pieces provides the 
music. 

W. H. Edward, who has been 
manager of Allen's Bloor for the 
past six months, has been promoted 
to manager of the St. Clair. 



A (IT TITLE. 

HAND lettering; 

\W" (^^^ iLundjud Mies ^ Da^yr 

^•ALYNLU'* 

_ ^ PHONE 2329 BRYANT - 



MOTION 
PICTURE 
STUDIO 

Newly equipped includ- 
ing Excelsior Photo 
Lamps in the heart o\ 
New York City. 

FOR 
RENT 

For particulars apply 

PAUL PHILIPP 
11 E. 14th St. N. Y. City 



National to Expand Studios 

Hollywood. — National Film will 
increase its studio facilities. The 
iliechanical force is now at work. 

Jack Hoxie, who will appear in 
another serial for National, will then 
take over a unit and direct as soon 
as the new serial is completed. 

A new comedy unit will be started 
about Feb. 15. The series will be 
state righted. 



Phone Morningside 6945 

Autos to Hire 
To the Moving Picture Trade 


A 


i« » 


a 


IDEAL AUTO RENTING CO. 



"WHERE PROMISES ARE SACRED" 

LOUIS MEYER 

FORMERLY BRODA 6c MEYER INC 

TITLES 

LETTERED - ILLUSTRATED - PHOTOORAPHED 
ASK TO SEE OUR NEW 
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ILLUSTRATIONS 

A PHONE CALL WILL? BRING ''SAMPLES 

BRYANT 7392 
220 WEST 42nd ST. ROOM 2004 



CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG 

Once more demonstrates her magnifi- 
cent art in 

"THE EYES OF YOUTH" 
We have made for this production a 
very artistic lobby display together 
with reproductions in fac-simile oil 
paintings from her latest poses in 
various sizes. 

KRAUS MFG. CO. 

220 West 42d Street 

17th Floor Tel. 3607 Bryant 






There are 30 Reasons 



why you should book, 

"The 
Screaming 
Shadow" 

REASON No. 12 

Shadows do not scream but, Mr. 
Exhibitor will shout with de- 
light when he sees the crowd 
drawn by "The Screaming 
Shadow." Watch for Reason 
No. 13 To-morrow. 

BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 

UNIVERSAL CITY CAL. 

Released through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK 

Foreign Rights controlled by Apollo Trading Corp. , 220 W. 4gth St. 







WE NEVER DISAPPOINT 



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TELEPHONE BRYANT 5576 



/M EW YORK 



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7/pRECOCHIZEtf 

Author itV 



Vol XI, No. 14 



Thursday, January IS, 1920 



Price 5 Cents 



Split in Northwest 

Law Suit Seen as Wedge Dividing 

Gottstein Interests and Jensen 

and Von Herberg 

(By Wire to WW'S DAILY) 

Seattle — The impression seems to 
be prevalent here that a split is con- 
sidered certain between the Gotts- 
tein interests and Jensen and Von 
Herberg, partners in the Liberty 
[heater. 

It is reported here that J. L Gott- 
stein, who is vice-president of the 
Greater Theaters Co., Inc., operat- 
ing the Liberty Coliseum and Mis- 
sion theaters, has allied himself with 
Famous Players and that he will 
start a chain of theaters to combat 
Jensen and Von Herberg. 

The belief is further strengthened 
because of a law suit filed by Gott- 
stein and F. V. Fisher, secretary of 
;he company against Jensen and 
V^on Herberg. The suit alleges that 
the latter acquired the property for 
the Liberty without the knowledge 
oi the former and that Jensen and 
Von Herberg formed a company 
<nown as the Pioneer Securities Co. 
with dummies as trustees and bought 
the property on better terms than 
they reported to the plaintiffs. Gott- 
stein and Fisher ask that they be 
allowed to buy the property on the 
t«rms the defendants secured it or 
that they be allowed to take lease 
Dn terms offered to them by the for- 
mer owners. 



Gottstein and Fisher are in the 
East with Jensen and Von Her- 
berg to attend the First National 
:onvention at Atlantic City. 



Za Su Pitts Signed 

George H. Callaghan, New York 
representative of the R C. P. Smith 
Investment Syndicate of Los An- 
geles stated yesterday that his com- 
pany had placed Za Su Pitts under 
;ontract. The Smith contract will be- 
:ome effective at the expiration of 
rier Brentwood contract which has 
several months to run yet. 

Sarah Mason who collaborated on 
several of the King Vidor-Brent- 
wood stories will do continuities for 
the new series of stories. 



After "Big Five" 

It is expected that a number of of- 
ficials connected with Loew-Metro 
will leave for California next week 
where an effort will be made to se- 
:ure the distribution on ■ the Asso- 
:iated Producers — the" Big Five" — 
product. 




"To choose the best possible husbands for her children is a woman's 
right, and to do it she will go to any extreme," says the heroine of 
"Even as Eve," a First National attraction. Advt. 



Zukor Denies Famous Building Theaters; 
Says Wall St. Does Not Control Company 

In Interview Calls Talk of "Breaking" Exhibitor "Cheap Stuff"— 

States First National Forced Company to Tie-up With Houses 

— Expects to Remain as President Indefinitely 



75 Theaters Building 

By First National Members — Ince 

Fails to Arrive — Session Ends 

Tomorrow 

{By Long Distance Phone) 

Atlantic City, N- J. — First Nation- 
al members in various sections of 
the country have 75 theaters under 
construction, according to part of a 
statement issued by J. D. Williams, 
manager of the Circuit at 3.30 this 
morning. 

The officials were in session all of 
last night and the meeting was ter- 
minated at 3-22 this morning. The 
convention will last until tomorrow 
night. 

The discussion centered around 
the activities of the Associated First 
National Pictures, Inc., only, the 
theater organization not getting un- 
der way until sometime during the 
summer. 

Ince Fails to Arrive 

There was considerable disap- 
pointment over the failure of Thom- 
as H. Ince, president of the Asso- 
ciated Producers to arrive during 
the convention. Whether or not 
Ince's arrival here might have an- 
ticipated any deal between the First 
National and the new group of asso- 
ciated independent producers is a 
question, but there was an air of 
general disappointment over his fail- 
ure to arrive, and considerable gos- 
sip. Some of this was to the effect 
that the First National has the 
strongest chance of any of the dis- 
tributing companies to handle the 

{Continued on Page 7) 



Adolph Zukor, president. Famous 
Players-Lasky in an interview yes- 
terday took occasion to officially de- 
ny the reports which have been cur- 
rent for some time past that Famous 
Players was building theaters and 
that Wall St.. capital was in con- 
trol of the affairs of the corpora- 
tion. Mr. Zukor also stated that 
the report that Famous was out to 
"break" the exhibitor imless he sold 
his house to the company was "cheap 
stuff." 

In his talk, Zukor first explained 
the connection that Wall St. capital 
had with Famous Players. 

He stated that after several years 
of effort he had succeeded in in- 
teresting Wall St. men in the pic- 
ture business. Dominick and Dom- 



inick together with Hallgarten and 
Co. had underwritten a $10,000,000 
i.ssue of preferred stock. Those in- 
terests, however, cannot interfere 
with Famous, according to Zukor 
who stated: 

"The whole works are in i 
charge with Mr .Lasky in charge 
p.'oduction. They cannot attempt t 
dictate the affairs of this company.' 

Zukor then referred to H. D. H. 
Connick, who is chairman of the 
Finance Committee of Famous Play- 
ers: 

Regarding him, Zukor said, "When 
Kuhn, Loeb & Co. became interested 
iii Famous Players they sent Mr. 
Connick up to these offices to go 
over the balance sheets. I asked 
{Continued on Page 2) 



Dwan Says He'll Quit 

Will Leave Mayflower, According 

to Los Angeles Times 

{Special to fFID'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Allan Dwan _ will 
leave Mayflower when he finishes 
his next production, according to the 
Los Angeles Times of Jan. 9. 

The Times quoted Dwan as fol- 
lows: 

■vnnouncement that Allan Dwan 
i ) leave the Mayflower organiza- 
tii' proved unexpected develop- 
me t in view of the fact that Pres- 
dent Wolper had hardly finished 
issuring us that the director of 'The 
Luck of the Irish' was to remain 
with his organization. Mr. Dwan 
will sever his relations with May- 
flower, he says, on the completion of 
his next production. He will at once 
begin work, following the making 
of his next picture on his first pro- 
{Continued on Page %) 



a!i^^ 



DAILV 



Thursday, January 15, 1920 




VA1I»«.14 Tfaur»d«y,J«nuary 15.1920 TtimiCtwU 

Copyright 1920, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

F. C. ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 
tirer; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 
«nd Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 
Business Manager. 

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post oflFice at New York, N. Y., under 
(he act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms (Postage free) United States, Outside 
of Greater New York, $10.00 one year; .6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
JIS.CO 

Subscribers should remit with order 

Address all communications to WID'S 

DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 

York, N. Y. 

Telephone: Vanderbilt, 4551-4552-5558 
Hollywood, California 
Editorial and Business Offices: 6411 Holly- 
wood Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 

Qiicago representatives — Willis, Eckels 
and Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 
Chicago, 111. 

— ' — — —^^n— —— m— .— ij^^^-j^fT 

Quotations 

Bid Asked Last Sale 

Famous Players .. 84^ 89 85 

Goldwyn .-- 32 34 34 

Loew's, Inc 31 32 32 

Triangle ..._ 11/16 Vs Va 

United Pict. Prod. 17^ 18% 17% 

World Film — — \i 

Ince Going North amd West 

Ralph Ince now completing a two- 
reeler to aid in the Americanization 
campaign will shortly go to Canada 
to start work on "The Law Bring- 
ers" and then go to the coast to 
make "The Greatest of These." They 
will be Selznick specials. 

The two-reeler is "The Land of 
Opportunity," and is the film in 
which Ince plays the part of Lin- 
coln. 
■II '^ 



COMING 

A 

REVIVAL 

OF 

TitUe's 
PUNCTURED 




TOWER FILM CORP. 

71 W, 23rdSt.,N. Y. 



Zukor Speaks 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Mr. Connick how he liked the pic- 
ture business and whether he would 
like to join us. He is now an em- 
ployee of this corporation, nothing 
else, and because of his knowledge 
of financial affairs, chairman of the 
finance committee." 

Zukor then spoke of the entrance 
into the exhibiting field by Famous 
Players and undoubtedly referred to 
the First National Exhibitor's Cir- 
cuit when he said: 

"When the National Exhibitors 
met in Los Angeles last year, I at 
once saw that they were entering 
the producing field. They would 
go to a director who was under con- 
tract or perhaps underpaid and say 
to him, 

" 'Why don't you enter business 
for yourself? We will market your 
product.' 

"If that condition were to pre- 
vail, I saw at once that we would 
have to arrange for a theater in all 
of the key cities of the country to 
insure showings for our product. 
Let me say that we are not build- 
ing theaters. What we are doing is 
to perfect a tie-up with prominent 
exhibitors with a clause elastic 
enough to eliminate possibilities of 
our over-charging for our product 
while the exhibitor agrees to show 
our pictures. 

"I don't mind saying in that con- 
nection that we have been remark- 
ably successful. In my recent trip 
west, I had no trouble at all in 
convincing exhibitors of the advan- 
tages of the plan. 

"It makes no difference who owns 
the theaters in this business. Good 
pictures are the soul of this busi- 
ness. That is why we try every day 
to devise means of making better 
pictures for we know that with a 
good picture an exhibitor can make 
money. 

"I wouldn't take theaters if they 
were offered to me for nothing. 
Successful operation of a theater 
depends on the personal touch and 
cannot be operated by a corpora- 
tion as the United Cigar stores are 
operated. 

"There have been reports circu- 
lated that I have or am about to 
resign from Famous Players. . I 
would no more think of leaving this 
place than you would of leaving your 



home. I plan to stay here in charge 
until I get old and then I hope my 
son will be able to take over the 
business." 

Mr. Zukor planned going abroad 
the end of February, but the boat's 
sailing has been postponed until 
March 6. 



Change Title of Phillips Film 

"Ambition" has again been se- 
lected as the title for the Dorothy 
Phillips picture, the title of which 
was changed to "The Gorgeous Ca- 
nary." 



To Feature Harder Kiddies 

The Sunshine Film Co. will fea- 
ture the Harder Kiddies, Emil and 
Alec, respectively seven and three 
years old, in a series of comedies in 
1920. 



l^anheimer Buys Leonard Serial 

E. .S. Manheimer has purchased 
rights to "The Evil Eye" the Benny 
Leonard-Hallmark serial for the 
world with the exception of United 
States and Canada. 



Stewart With Capitol 

William G. Stewart has been 
named as stage director for the Cap- 
itol. He resigned from the New 
York Hippodrome to accept the po- 
sition with the Capitol. 



Ibanez Leaves for Coast 

Vincente Blasco Ibanez, the noted 
Spanish author left for California 
yesterday to confer with Metro of- 
ficials regarding the production of 
"The Four Horserrien." 



Price Case Postponed 

The hearing on the application for 
an injunction against Aywon Film 
by C. B. Price was postponed yes- 
terday until this morning. 



Chase, Universal District Manager 

M. A. Chase has been appointed 
district manager for Universal. He 
leaves for Minneapolis to-day. Re- 
cently returned from a tri^ to the 
Orient and Siberia for Universal. 



New Play for Metro 

Metro has purchased "The Girl 
Patsy," by J. Mauldin Fiegel for Vi- 
ola Dana. June Mathis played in 
the stage presentation several years 
ago. 



Your Protection During 1920 

The new year is with us. Protect yourself, your home, 
your company or star against misfortune without delay. 
1920 WILL be prosperous by providing against misfortune 
NOW. Insurance will do it — and our service awaits your 
call. 



Peuben C^ 

■ Veal k^^^ 

I ittFurance ^^"^ 3( 

m Phone John 5489 - 3 



EyBEN..CXMUELS 



^ ERVIC£ 



Samuek 



Col. Levy in Fight 

To Rid Feature Pictures of Scenes 
Containing Commercial Adver- 
tising 
Louisville, Ky. — Colonel Fred Le- 
vy, owner of the Birst National Ex- 
hibitors' Franchise for Kentucky and 
Tennessee and also president of the 
National Association of Retail Cloth- 
iers will present a resolution at the 
forthcoming convention of that 
body asking it and its members not 
to go to film producers or distrib- 
utors to place clothing advertise- 
ments but to deal with exhibitors 
directly. 

Mr. Levy states instances where 
exhibitors have been forced to pay 
money to distributors for pictures 
and for advertising matter, supposed 
only to advertise the pictures, which 
plainly advertise some merchandise 
product. 

The instances are parallel to 
those cited by R. H. Clark of 
First National in a statement 
published in WID'S DAILY, Tues., 
Jan. 6. 



Minneapolis, Minn. — Members of 
the E.xhibitors' Protective League, 
in convention here last week, de- 
clared themselves unalterably op- 
posed to the insertion of advertis- 
i'ng in entertainment features. 
Hereafter no picture will be booked 
by the members of the league un- 
less passed by its reviewer. 



Realart Signs La Rocque 

Rod La Rocque has signed with 
Realart to play opposite Constance 
Binney in her next production. 



Palace, Cincinnati, Opens 

Cincinnati, O, — The Palace^, the 
new $1,000,000 house, has opened, 
Mary Miles Minter in "Anne of 
Green Gables" was the initial at- 
traction. 



A party of convalescent soldieri 
from the Polyclinic hospital enjoyei 
yesterday's matinee at the Capiti 
as guests of Edward Bowes. T' 
boys were chaperoned by Red Crosj 
nurses. 



When RITCHEY posters 
are supplied with a photo- 
play, the exhibitor at once 
knows that it will be a 
money getter. They make 
film salesmanship easy. 

RITCHEY^ 

.LITHO.' CORP. j 

406W.31>t St.,N.Y., Pbonc OicUm 838S 




Thursday, January 15, 1920 



"VOt g^used to 6dti 





imtWiiiL* 



thousand DoUcus 



THE day after "Empty Arms" was turned over to us by Director Frank Reicher, a well-known 
distributor tendered us a point-blank offer of $100,000 guarantee on the sale. This offer did 
not appeal to us, because we had spent over sixty thousand dollars in producing the picture and 
were cognizant of the fact that, in it, we have one of those master productions that strikes the industry 
about every three or four years. But the distributor insisted that his offer was vevcly a guarantee; 
that the amount "Empty Arms" could command, might run close to seven figures. 



Then, in the course of the discussion, the head 
of our advertising department apologized for inter- 
rupting us, and said: ' It is peculiar that you 
should offer §100,000 for 'Empty Arms,' for I 
have here in my hand my Hundred Thousand 
Dollar Packet, which I was just about to hand to 
Mr. Park." 

"What is the Hundred Thousand Dollar 
Packet.'" asked the well-krfown distributor. 

It's nothing more than a book of printed sug- 
gestions that show the exhibitor who books 



'Empty Arms' how easily he can put it over, and 
I consider it worth §100,000," replied our adver- 
tising manager. 

At first, we must confess, we thought the A. M. 
had lost his reason. We knew that he had been 
working day and night inventing valuable promo- 
tion "stunts," but, after ten minutes of discussion, 
he convinced us that he was right. 

At parting, the well-known distributor raised his 
offer to a sum that the average independent pro- 
ducer would sell three pictures for; but in justice to 



EMPTY ARNS 

THE SENSATION OF THE CENTURY 

we were forced to reject. 

On the following pages, we publish a brief digest of the extraordinary history 
and superlative qualities of "Empty Arms," being thoroughly convinced that, 
among the intelligent film buyers of America, there is going to be the most 
spirited bidding in years. All exhibitors. States Right men and chain operators 
are invited to communicate at once with 



PHOTOPLAY LIBRARIES, 

(Exclusive Selling Agents) 

500 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK CITY 



I N C 




6du>ard Xyiiitesidc 




Thursday, January 1$, 1920 




Tibw Xester fork and 

Scbtford XPhiteside produced 

EHPTY ARMSV 



iiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiMniiiiiiniiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiini]! 



Ej I r.^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^n iiz 



AFTER a hundred or more stories suitable for screen production were submitted to 
us by the foremost authors of America, we selected the script of a young writer, 
Willard King Bradley, as the most original in the batch, and the most original 
we had seen in years. The story, dealing with the Gargantuan question of Mother- 
hood, demanded the finest artistic talent procurable. Frank Reicher, responsible for 
manv Paramount and Metro successes, was chosen to direct "Empty Arms," because 
we figured that he alone could handle a great number of its exceedingly difficult 
scenes, the majority of which were at once intensely dramatic and unusually delicate. 
Mr. Reicher immediately surrounded himself with the foremost technicians. Gail 
Kane, famous star of screen and stage, who had just closed in the Broadway success, 
"The Woman in Room 13," was signed to star; then a powerful cast, including 
Thurston Hall, J. Herbert Frank and other well-known screen celebrities, was 
engaged to support her. The picture was made; and, as we watched its progress, we 
believed that we had a master production. But we were not content to rest on our 
own judgment. We called in that famous editorial writer. Dr. Frank Crane, who 
contributed his unique services to the thought side of the picture. 

It is the easiest thing in the world for a producer to deal in twelve-cylinder adjectives, and to megaphone 
it from the housetops that his picture is supreme. We are so confident of the success of "Empty Arms" 
that wc are more than willing to simply place it in the hands of the buyers and exchange men, and let the 
screen do the talking. We are so certain that they will say that we have wW^rcstimated it, that we will stake 
our future success on it] Which is saying volumes. 



y 



Starrinq GAIL KANE 



THE production alone will stand on its merits. But there is something else 
we have to offer which makes "Empty Arms" a picture p/us. This "some- 
thing else" is tlie Hundred Thousand Dollar Packet, prepared by our advertis- 
ing department. 

If you are desirous of seeing the picture, wire or write for details. If 



WRITTEN BY 



Thursday, January 15, 1920 



bM^ 



DAIIlY 




DAILY 



Thursday, January 15, 1920 



iTi^i« 



ir#j!K«!ir« 



a:)o«ar ?ackct 



WHEN the advertising manager en- 
tered the conference immediately 
after the well-known distributor 
made his original offer, he said: 

"The idea in 'Empty Arms' is one never before 
touched. Its originality is worth a great deal. But the 
idea is of such importance at this time, that I find our 
picture can command over a hundred thousand dollars 
worth of advertising in every important city. 

"How do I know.? Well, I have written to news- 
paper editors, civic authorities, educators and men and 
women in public life, club officials, doctors, lawyers 
and other professionals. In every city, interest in the 
subject contained in 'Empty Arms' is so great, that, if 
we were to try to arouse this interest with paid adver- 
tising, it would cost over a hundred thousand dollars 
to do it." 

The Hundred Thousand Dollar Packet 
Tells the Whole Story; It Covers the 
Box-Office Possibilities of '■''Empty 
Arms" from Every Angle. A Copy oj 
It Will Gladly he Sent Only to Those 
Exhibitors and States Right Buyers 
Who Personally Sign On Their Busi- 
ness Stationery a Request for It. 

PHOTOPLAY LIBRARIES, Inc. 

( Excluiive Sellinz Agenti) 

500 FIFTH AVENUE 

NEW YORK CITY 



*'«._ 



'^^-^mnm^ 



I 



x^. 



■i_^^ 



Thursday, January IS, 1920 



jMi 



DAILV 



75 Theaters Building 

{Continued from Page 1) 

product of the new iiulcpeiidcMit or- 
ganization. 
Changes of Exchange Operation 
Under the new plan of operation 
of the First National it will not be 
surprising if the exchanges will 
change their method of operation. 
This is being talked of considerably 
in view of the fact that some of the 
more important key communities 
are expected to handle features in 
the first run houses on a percentage 
basis. This basis, if worked out and 
perfected, will call for the exhibitor 
to meet a certain guarantee, after 
that the producer will take a certain 
definite amount, and thereafter all 
receipts will be split on a basis of 
probably 50-50. If this is carried 
through there will be little for the 
exchanges to do save to physically 
handle the product and the branch 
managers will become out and out 
salesmen. 

Directors Named for Picture Unit 

The new board of directors of the 
Associated First National Pictures, 
Inc. are R. H. Lieber, H. O. Schwal- 
be, Nate H. Gordon, J. Von Hcr- 
berg, Jacob Fabian, Moe Mark, J. B. 
Clark of Pittsburg, E. B. Johnson, 
J. H. Kunsky, J. J. Allen Col. Fred 
Levy. This increases the new board 
to eleven instead of the old number 
of seven. 

Conspicuous in this new board is 
the absence of T. L. Tally of Los 
Angeles, Aaron Jones of Chicago, E- 
H. Hulsey of Texas and R. H. Clark 
of New York. 

Neilan Film First Release 

It became known yesterday that 
the first release of the new picture 
corporation will be Marshall Neil- 
an's production "The River's End," 
to be released sometime in the 
middle of February. The new the- 
ater organization with twenty mil- 
lion capital will in all likelihood not 
become efTective until sometime in 
the summer or early fall, the imme- 
diate program being only with ref- 
erence to the picture company. 
Reichenbach "Saw" Kunsky 

Harry Reichenbach of Equity Pic- 
tures came down to see John Kunsky 
about a contract. He lingered long 
enough to "see" Kunsky and to al- 
low a number of others to "see" 
him. And when they finished "call- 
ing" Harry departed cheerfully on 
his way. He says he doesn't ex- 
pectto miss any First National con- 
ventions in the future. They're 
such a good bunch of "see'ers." 

Paul Mooney, of the Anita Stew- 
art Prod, was Harry's business part- 
ner. Mooney likes Harry just at 
present. 

Rothacker's Dinner 

Watterson Rothacker who does 
all the First National printing gave 
a little dinner party Tuesday night. 
Regrets from many that he didn't 
give more. 

All of Paul Mooney's champagne 
gave out Sunday. And the red eye 
was available at spots at $40 per 
bottle. 

Koplar's Car 

Harry Koplar hired a chair Tucs- 
.day morning. "Jimmy" Grainger 



joined in the ride and there was a 
fine row when Jimmy wanted to ride 
one way and Koplar wanted to sec 
the other end of the walk. They ef- 
fected a compromise. They trailed 
Earl Gulick's car. But ask 'em why? 

Wid's in Demand, 

WID'S DAILY arrived late in the 
evening and was hungrily read by 
the film folk who hadn't had a bit of 
news of their industry since Sunday. 
And 24 hours without news in 
this business means something. The 
other papers in the trade promised 
to arrive. But none came. 

Mandlebaum Lucky 

E. M. Mandelbaum says Atlantic 
City is the luckiest spot in the world. 
He wants all First Natl, conventions 
held here. 

Col. Levy Missing 

Everyone missed Col. Fred Levy 
of Louisville. But the Colonel was 
too busy in Chicago at the conven- 
tion of the Natl. Asso. of Retail Clo- 
thiers where he will try to put 
through a resolution blocking the 
use of advertising on the part of 
national clothing advertisers unless 
the exhibitors receive benefit there- 
from. Thus taking the profit from 
the makers of and the distributors 
of certain kinds of industrial adver- 
tising. 

"River's End" and the Ocean 

James R. "Jimmy" Grainger of the 
Neilan organization is here talking 
about "River's End" even though he 
is on the edge of the Atlantic. Some 
of the exhibitors present were won- 
dering over his appearance until he 
began to tell them all about the 
first Neilan production. Then they 
began to understand. 

Those in Attemdance 

The following were in attendance 
at the convention: 

Jule and Jay J. Allen, Toronto; 

A. H. Blank, Des Moines; J. B. 
Clark, Pittsburgh; R. H. Clark, New 
York City; R. D. Craver, Charlotte, 
N. C; W. P. Devees, Vancouver, 

B. C; Jacob Fabian and A. M. Fab- 
ian, Paterson, N. J.; Frank Ferran- 
dini, Richmond, Va.; I. H. Rubin, M. 
L. Finkelstein, Minneapolis; Nath- 
an H. Gordon, Boston; Sam Katz, 



An organization of 
authors, including 
two scenario edi- 
tors, will consider 
orders from first- 
class producers for 
continuities and 
original stories. 

Address 
XYZ, Wid's Daily 



Chicago; J. H. Kunsky, Detroit; 
David P. Howells, New York; G. W. 
Trendle, Detroit; Robert Lieber, In- 
dianapolis; E. M. Mandelbaum, 
Cleveland; H. Lieber, Indianapolis; 
Tom Moore, Boyd Cunningham, 
Washington; Tom Saxe, Milwaukee; 
William Sievers, St. Louis; Harry T. 
Nolan, William H. Swanson, Den- 
ver; E. B. Johnson, secretary of the 
Turner & Dahnken Circuit, San 
Francisco; J. G. Von Herbcrg, Se- 
attle; Joe E. Rickards, Phoenix, 
Ariz.; Moe Mark, Max Spiegel, New 
York; H. O. Schwalbe, Philadelphia; 
J. D. Williams, New York; L. L. 
Goldberg, Louisville; Herbert Weil, 
Port Huron, Mich.; J. R. Grainger, 
New York; Claude Jensen, Seattle; 
F. V. Fischer, Seattle; F. W. Rey- 
nolds, Denver; Tom Boland, Okla- 
homa City; Joseph Skirboll, Pitts- 
burgh; Wdliam Hamm, Minneap- 
olis: E. E. Richards, Kansas City; 
Paul C. Mooney, New York; Jacob 
Gottstein, Seattle; Harry Koplar, 
/St. Louis; E. J. Hudson, W. J- 
Morgan, C F. Chandler, Paul Sara- 
zan, J. L. Hunter, New York; Har- 
ry and Abe Warner, New York; 
Harry L. Reichenbach and Earl Gu- 
lick were present in the double 
capacity of transacting business and 
pleasure. 

DANNENBERG 



Columbus, O. — James A. Maddox, 
manager of the Majestic, for the 
last five years, will become directing 
head of a local firm which will erect 
film houses. 



IDEAL STUDIOS 
FOR RENT 
Apply to 
JAMES J. REARDIN, 

General Manager 
Telephone Union 5067-68 



JOE DOWLING 

"The Miracle Man" 

has the title role 
in 



KENTUCim 
COLONEir 



Ready March First 
(We hope ) 



JOHN J. LIVINGSTON 

Motion Picture Representative 

For 

STARS— DIRECTORS 

1440 Broadway New York 



Familiar Names in Copperhead Ca8( 

Included in the ca.st of "The Cop- 
perhead," to be released by Famous 
on Jan. 25, besides Lionel Barrymor( 
in the stellar role arc Doris Rankin, 
in private life, Mrs. Lionel Barry] 
more, Arthur Rankin, William ?! 
Carleton, Frank Joyner, Leslie 
Stone, Richard Carlyle and Carolyr 
Lee. 



W. P. S. Earle will shortly finish 
direction on "The Woman Game,' 
with Elaine Hammerstein. A Selz- 
nick release. 





D. W. GRIFFITH 



KNOWS 

The value of strictly high 
class people for the ensemble 
scenes of his productions. 

WE ARE supplying him 
with only the most select 
good-looking and properly 
dressed people for his pro- 
ductions. 

OUR financial strength en- 
ables us to supply any nnm- 
ber of people. 

Select Motion Picture 
Bureau 

William W. Cohlll, Manager 

1493 Broadway 

New York 

Telephones 

\ 2389 
Bryant ^, 2390 

I 2391 



JM i 



DAIUV 



Thursday, January 15, 1920 



Coast Brevities 

(Special to WW'S DAILY) 
Hollywood — Casson Ferguson is 
; igain at work for the camera in 
he Lasky feature, "The Prince 
, Chap." 



Mark Larkin has resigned as Mary 
Pickford's publicist. 



Carroll McComas has left for New 
i^ork City. She will go back on the 
itage, but also plans to appear in 
several pictures 



Al Christie has completed "Her 
' 3ridal Night-Mare," which will be 
eleased in February. 



I ' - 
I 

r 
I 
1 



Harry Rapf announces that 
George Irving, director for the Web- 
;r Productions, Inc., one of the 
iclznick units, started producing on 
an. 5. Accompanying Mr Irving was 
Edith Hallor who will play the 
itar role of "Children of Destiny." 



:<' 



Robert Brunton, in conjunction 
vith Pathe has taken out tem- 
)orary insurance with a Los Angeles 
irm to the amount of $60,000 for 
ack Dempsey. The policy will 
lold good for the duration of Demp- 
ey's picture contract at the Brun- 
on Studios, where he is starring in 
. serial. 

GAUSMAN. 



Dwan Says He'll Quit 

(Continued from Page 1) 
luction for the Associated Pro- 
lucers." 

" 'My relations with the Mayflower 
^hotoplay Corp. have been most 
ileasant,' said Mr. Dwan, when seen 
t the studio, 'but I am very anxious 
o start work on my own produc- 
ions, which will go out through the 
Associated Producers. 

" 'There is a vast difference in 
landling other people's money and 
n finishing one's self. I want to 
nake still larger, more finished pro- 
luctions than heretofore.' " 



Arthur Butler Graham, Dwan's at- 
orney could not be reached for a 
statement last night. 



LOUIS SHERWIN 

Continuity 

Screen Cutting and Titling 

Now Assistant 

to 

J. G. Hawks 

of 

Goldwyn 

Author of 

"BONDS OF LOVE" 

for 

Pauline Frederick 



Eight Years dramatic critic New 
York Globe, contributor Ameri- 
can, Metropolitan, Smart Set, 
Vanity Fair and other magazines. 



Dintenfass to Leave for Florida 

Mark M. Dintenfass, who produces 
the Cuckoo comedies, will leave for 
his studio in Jacksonville, Florida, 
shortly. These two-reelers are re- 
leased through the United Picture 
Theaters. 



Organize Exploitation Department 

First National's New York Ex- 
change has organized an exploitation 
department with G. Horace Morti- 
mer in charge. The new department 
will aid exhibitors in putting over 
First National productions, suggest- 
ing various ways and means of ad- 
vertising, etc. 



Working on New Serial 

Six episodes of "The Fatal Thir- 
ty," the new serial to be released 
through Bull's Eye have been com- 
pleted and nine remain to be filmed. 
Grover James is the author of it, 
Henry Haskins directed and Johnny 
Hayes plays the leading role. It 
is a newspaper story and includes 
in its cast Fritzie Ridgeway, Lillian 
West, Carl Stockdale, Al Freemont, 
William Ryno and others. 



Form Emergency Film Service 
(Special to fflD'S DAILY) 

Dallas, Tex. — The Emergency 
Film Service has been organized in 
order to render service to exhib- 
itors of the Southwest, whose busi- 
ness has been harmed by late trains 
and in some cases the discontinu- 
ance of trains. Permanent headquar- 
ters have not yet been established, 
but the body will soon be working. 

Willard Mack has written a story 
which Myron Selznick has pur- 
chased for screen production. The 
new story is entitled "Prince O' 
Pines." 



Dana Back From Trip 

P. B. Dana, sales manager of Ar- 
row Film has returned from a Mid- 
dle Western trip. He found busi- 
ness flourishing. 



First Character Film 
Character Pictures Corp. has 

bought "The Frameup" the novel by 

Edward Everett Mathews. 

"The Frameup" will be a special 

all-star production and is scheduled 

for early making. 



Parisian Frolic Ends Engagement 

The Parisian Fashion Frolic will 
end its engagement at the Broad- 
way on Saturday night, after a ten- 
week run. The Moss offices say that 
375,000 persons have already seen 
the Frolic. 



Kelly to Manage United Branch 
James B. Kelly has been appointed 
manager of the Buffalo exchange of 
the United Picture Theaters. He was 
formerly assistant sales manager for 
Hallmark and more recently special 
representative for Universal. 



CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG 

Once more d'emonstrates her magnifi- 
cent art in 

"THE EYES OF YOUTH" 
We have made for this production a 
very artistic lobby display together 
with reproductions in fac-simile oil 
paintings from her latest poses in 
various sizes. 

KRAUS MFG. CO. 

220 West 42d Street 

17th Floor TeL 3607 Bryant 




Send Us Your 

HigheaiPriL Junk Film 

INTERSTATE SMELTING 
(& REFINING COMPANY 

23 Commercial St. NEWARK. N. J. 



H. H. VAN LOAN 

Recent Releases 

Tom Mix in 

"The Speed Maniac" 

Earle Williams in 

"When a Man Loves" 

121 West Eulalia Street 

Glendale, California 

"If it is a Van Loan story it 

must be good" 

GEORGE ELWOOD JENKS 

Continuity and Specials 

"A Woman of Pleasure" 

Blanche Sweet Special 

"The Pagan God" 

starring H. B. Warner 

"Dangerous Waters" 

Original for Wm. Desmond 

JESSE D. HAMPTON 
Productions 



JACK CUNNINGHAM 

Associated with 

George Loane 

Tucker 

Productions 

Hollywood, Cal. 



RALPH 
RUFFNER 

At Liberty 

OFFERS 
INVITED 

Address 

853 East Harrison St. 

Portland, Oregon 




There are 30 Reasons 



why you should book, 

"The 

Screaming 
Shadow'* 

REASON No. 13 

Ben Wilson's experience in the 
production of serials is a suf- 
ficient guarantee for "The 
Screaming Shadow". Watch for 
Reason No. 14 tomorrow. 

BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 

UNIVERSAL CITY CAL. 

Released through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK 

Foreign Rights coDtrolled by Apollo Trading Corp., 220 W. 48th St. 






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7/?recochized 
Authority 




Vol. XI, No. 15 



Friday, January 16, 1920 



Price 5 Cent; 



May Build New Studio 

As Addition to Present Metro 

Plant, Says Loew — Going West 
With Rowland and Engel 

Marcus Loew, Richard A. Row- 
land and Joe Engel of Loew-Met- 
ro leave for California on Sunday 
to look over general production at 
the Metro studio. 

Loew goes on a double mission, 
he explained yesterday. He wants 
ti) taniiliarize himself with the pro- 
duction end of the business and 
look after some pressing matters 
connected with the Ackerman and 
Harris string of theaters which he 
controls. 

It has been persistently reported 
that Loew-Metro officials are leav- 
ing to go after the distribution of 
the Big Five-Associated Producers 
product but when Loew was asked 
regar<ling that he stated: 

"There 'is nothing to that at all. 
I am going out to get fam liar with 
production and look over things 
generally. We may l)uild another 
studio, I don't know yet." 



Internat'l Pays $600,000 for Lease 

International Film is paying $600,- 
000 as a total rental figure for the 
Harlem River Park at 127th St. and 
Second Ave., which the company is 
using as a studio. The lease covers 
a long period of years. 



Decision Reserved 

Justice Finch in the Supreme 
L ourt yesterday reserved decision 
after the first hearing on the appli- 
cation for an injunction applied for 
l)y C. B. Price Co-, Inc., against 
Aywon Film Corp. The case re- 
volves around the ownersnip ol the 
{^ierinan submarine p.cturc the U-35. 



Frolic Over Moss Circuit 

I'lie Parisian Fashion Frolic will 
play Moss' Ham.lton for the week 
of Jan. 19th. 

Following the Hamilton, the 
I'Volic will open at the Regent for 
one week and will then go to the 
Jefferson. 



Brenon Safe 

Cables from Italy received in New 
^'ork yesterday advised of the fact 
that Herbert Brenon who disap- 
peared on the slopes of Mt. Aetna, 
in SiCily, was safe. Brenon was at- 
tacked by bandits and held for ran- 
som but wa.s later released when the 
bandits discovered he was a for- 
eigner and that his Government was 
pushing inquiries for his recovery. 





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Goldwyn-Ascher 

Former Reported Holdmg 50% c 
Circuit's Theaters in Chicago 
— No Effect on First National 
Goldwyn has purchasetl a fitly pe 
cent interest in the Aschcr Bros 
.chain of theaters in Chicago, ac 
cording to reliable information sc 
cured yesterday. The purchas 
price is $900,000'. 

Several efforts were made las 
night to secure Samuel Goldwy 
for a statement on the deal but a) 
attempts were unavailing. 

When Nate Ascher was aske> 
last night at the Ritz Carlto 
whether the report v/jas true, h 
said: 

"Why don't you go to Goldwj' 
for your information?" 

When further pressed lor eithe 
a denial or confirmation, he re 
peated: 

"I prefer you go to Goldwy 
for your information." 



"I'll plead guilty to burglary," he said, "if you can call it that for 

breaking into my own apartment"— Katherine MacDonald, the American 

Beauty, in the First National pict ure, "The Turning Point" — Advt. 



To Vote on Censor Aid 

Mass. Women's Clubs Hold Meeting 

Feb. 15 to Decide on Attitude 
Towards New Legislation 
(Spt^dol to WIDS l>AII,y\ 

Boston — The Committee on Legis- 
lation of the Massachusetts Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs will report 
to the parent body on Feb. 13 and 
at that time a vote will be taken by 
the Federation on its attitude tow- 
ard the proposed censor i)ill. 

Orrin G. Cocks of the National 
Board of Review has been here ad- 
dress ng the Committee on Legis- 
lation on censorship in its various 
phases. The board has been invited 
to send a representative to attend 
the February meeting. 

Recently the City Federation of 
(ConttnufJ on Faye 1) 



Meeting Closing 

First National to Complete Work 
To-day — Plans May Be An- 
nounced Next Week 
(By Long Distance Phone) 
.Atlantic City, N. J. — Although a 
number of members of First Na- 
tional are still here the bulk of the 
work taken up at the first annual 
meeting will probably be thrashed 
out by Friday afternoon when the 
remain ng officials expect to return 
to New V*>rk. 

The development of the .Associ- 
ated First National Pictures, Inc., 
has taken so much time that the di- 
rectors and executive committee 
hardly took up the .'\ssociated First 
National Theaters matter at all, but 
this will be finally consummated 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Rambeau Differences Settled { Feist in Omaha Tomorrow 

The differences between Al \ Omaha. — Felix Feist of Goldwyn 
Woods and Marjorie Raml>eau re- is expected here tomorrow. He will 
garding the latter's film activities stay over Sunday and Monday and 
with' Albert Capellani Have been then leave for Denver, where he 
amicably settled out of court. will also spend three dkys. 



Ascher Bros, with Balaban an 
Katz hold the First National fran 
chisc for Chicago. 

A First National official state 
over the long distance phone fror 
Atlantic City that the reporte 
Goldwyn deal would make abso 
lutely no difference in the status c 
the First National franchise- 



MacHugh Leaves Moss 

.\rthur E- MacHugh, for fof 
years in charge of the publicity fc 
the Moss Circuit of theaters has rt 
signed from that position to go wit 
the Hammersteins. He will handl 
"Tumble In" which is now playin 
in Boston and later handle a sho' 
here in New York. MacHugh, b« 
fore joining Moss was on the roa 
with a number of theatrical attra< 
tions. 



Keenan Going Abroad 
(Special to ff^lDS DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Frank Keenan wi 
leave for New York in a few day 
and from there go to France. R< 
ported he has been made an oflFe 
to produce abroad. 



The Pathe offices knew nothin 
about the above dispatch yesterda} 



Hammons Returns 

E. W. Hammons of Educations 
Films Corp., returned to this COUE 
try yesterday aboard the Laplan< 
He went to England about fou 
weeks ago on special business. 



at 



Friday, January 16, 1920 





, I irf. II H*. IS Friday, January lA 1920 Prin S C«ali 



."pyright 1920, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
■ ic. Published Daily at 71-73- West 44th St., 
sew York, N. Y, by WID'S FILMS and 
fLM FOLKS, INC. 

C. ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 
lii^r; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 
id Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 
business Manager. 

ntered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
U the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
;lie act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms (Postage free) United States, Outside 
'if Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 
iionths, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
15.00 
': Subscribers should remit with order 
\ddres9 all communications to WID'S 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 
York, N. Y. 
' Telephone: Vanderbilt, 4551-4552-5558 
'■ Hollywood, California 

'ditorial and Business Offices; 6411 Holly- 
's ood Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 
'• Chicago representatives — Willis, Eckels 
j'ld Mack, 6th Flodr, Consumers Bldg., 
hicago, 111. 



I' 



Quotations 

Bid Asked Last Sale 



"V'^amous Players .. 86 

i,i;,5oldwyn 33 

^nTriangle 11/16 

'nited Pict- Prod. 16 
5| VorJd Film — 



87^ 
33 

% 
18 



87 
33 

3 

17' 



tt 






Osso Has Film With Linder 



ic) 

L^i Adolphe Osso has brought back 

J'.rom France "The Little Cafe," a 



rature with Max Linder. The pro- 

■«! notion is now bein.s; cut and titled. 

D>:l ■ — 

f' ' C. A. Willat Goes West 

)■,: C- A. Willat left for California 
8 'uesday. It is understood he will 
u 'lake a feature under the direction 
f his brother Irvin Willat. 



COMING 

A 

REVIVAL 

OF 

Time's 
PUNCTURED 




TOWER FILM CORP. 

71 W. 23rdSt.,N. Y. 



To Vote on Censor Aid 

I Cnntinufd from Ptiyf I) 
Women's Clubs, representing 40.- 
000 women in Greater Boston voted 
not to go on record as favoring cen- 
sorship. /Ki that time Henry E. Jen- 
kins, of tlie New York C:ty Depart- 
mrnt of Education and a menilier of 
the executive committee of the 
Board of Review spoke to the clubs. 
The bill as it will l)e proposed is, 
in its condensed form as follows: 

1. There shall be ,i division of motion 
picture standards in the department of 
labor and industry, consisting of a boanl 
to determine standai-ds, with nine mem- 
bers, of whom at least three shall be 
women, a director and two nssociate di- 
rectors, at least one of the three to be a 
woman. ne(essar,y inspectors, clerks and 
assistants. 

2. The (iovernor sliall appoint the 
board and designate its diairman and 
secretary. The board shall meet at least 
once a month. It shall serve without 
pay. The Commissioner of labor and 
industry shall with the approval of the 
Governor and Council, appoint and fix 
the salaries of the director and asso- 
ciate directors and may appoint and re- 
move necessary inspectors and clerks. 

.3. The division shall establish stand- 
ards, examine every film to be exhibited. 
license such films as accord with its 
standards, and insi)ect exhibitions. 

4. Licensed films shall be stamped and 
numbered, and when exhibited the ap- 
proval of the department shall be shown 
on the screen. 

5. Tiie board shall formulate the 
standards to prevent the exhibition of 
films whicli are obscene, indecent, im- 
moral or inlmnian or tend to incite 
crime or (o impaii- the health or cor- 
rupt the morals of cliililren or adults. 
Hearing sliall be held as to standards. 
It may make regulations for their en- 
forcement. The director and associ- 
ates shall. i)erosnalIv or tlirough assist- 
.;ints. examine all films submitted and 
issue licenses, and miiy require excisions, 
amplifications or alterations as a con- i 
ilition of the license and may revoke li- 
censes. 

(>. The General Court shall make an 
annual ap|)ropriation for the division. 

7. Suitable i|uarters shall be iirovided. 

S. A fee of one dollar shall be charged 
for each reel of less than 1,000 lineal feet 
.•ind for each duplicate: two dollars for 
eacli reel in duplicate over 1.000 feet: the 
money to be paid into the Ire.-isury of 
tlie Commonwealth. 

'.). Whoever is aggrieved may nitpeal 
^n I he Superioi- Court, sitting iii equity, 
and the Couri may ri'voki". modify or 
confirm the action. 

10. ,\ny ])erson, firm or cori)oration 
"hich exhibits a film not licensed or 
- itliout the announcement provided in 
S-^i-tion A shall be punished by a fine 
of not less th.an %2'> no rmore than $-300 or 
imprisonment for not less than ;«) days 
or more than one year, or both such 

''"■ and imprisonment. 

11. Acts inconsistent herewith are re- 
oe^^led. 

12. The act shall take effect .July 1. 
^020. as to appointments and not be- 
fore October 1. 1020. as to the work of 

"' division. 



Realart Field Changes 

Realart yesterday aTinouncod the 
following field changes: 

M. E. Maxwell manager at 
Omaha has been made special rep- 
resentative in that territory. 

C. O- Kingsley, formerly at De- 
troit has been switched to Omaha 
while Ralph Quivc from San Fran- 
cisco to Detroit. 

Ben F. Simpson former field man- 
ager is in charge of the San i-ran- 
cisco office. 



Miller, Bowes' Assistant 

Frank O- Miller, former maiia.uer 
of the Manhattan Opera House has 
resigned from that position to be- 
come assistant to Managing Director 
Edward Bowes of the Capitol. 



"Milk, Not W;re" 

Is What Industry Needs — According 
to the American Banker 

In its issue of Jan. 5, tlic ".\mcri- 
can Banker" says: — 

"Wall Street money has always 
been easy picking for the promoter 
of motion pictures and on one or 
two occasions these pickings have 
almost put over a successful picture. 

"It is only recently, however, that 
the 'fifth largest indr.stry' has suc- 
ceeded in corralling large capital 
from bankers, whose names repre- 
.^^ent standing in Wall Street. 

"The latest combination of capital 
enlisted represents a tremendous 
.smn to be thrown into the coffers of 
an industry with a thorough record 
for mismanagement. The moving 
picture producer has never suffered 
for funds, he has sunk one fortune 
only to find another one ready to 
go into the hole unfilled by the first. 
He has had huge stock issues under- 
written, he has sold bonds, each 
representing nothing but promises 
and has played with funds furnished 
by individuals who had a personal 
interest in chorus .girls who wanted 
to be starred in the film. The 'Toot- 
sie Twoshoes Company,' the 'Nellie 
the Vamp Company,' and innuiner- 
able others of the same sort have 
i)Iazed in myriads of lights on Broad- 
way only to join their predecessors 
in oblivion because the story, pro- 
duction and star were refused by the 
public and what should have been 
enough money to make two good 
pictures was frittered away in one 
bad one. 

"The motion picture industry is in 
'ts infancy, it has a rosy future, it 
nmn1")ers a few intelligent producers, 
some capable directx)rs. a scant num- 
ber of attractive and sincere stars 
and very inferior manageifient. In 
other words art is present to a lim- 
ited degree but business ability is 
sadly lacking. It is pleasant for a 
banker to have an interest in a 
flock of 'movie queens' — as a recre- 
ation — but poor business as an in- 
vestment unless, with the capital sup- 
plied, these bankers also furnish the 
same sort of mana.gement they would 
demand of any industrial concern 
\^•hose preferred stock they under- 
wrote and offered to their clients as 
a profitable investment. 

"The motion picture industry is 
young in years but old in experience 
in squandering easily acquired for- 
tunes in tinsel, wasted footage, ex- 
pensive, undesirable actresses, and 
scenery and props and casts for 
stories that are unfit for presenta- 
tion to intelligent audiences, which 
those in movie houses now are be- 
coming. Capital should insist upon 
management, or else the investor will 
have stock certificates with the same 
decorative value as those of some 
oil companies long since forgotten 
by all excepting their hopeful stock- 
hoders. 

"What this moving picture infant 
needs is milk, not wine. Solid man- 
agement backed by the sturdy cap- 
italists recently announced should 
give us better pictures, better ac- 
tors, more realism, less vamps and 
sure income on our investment." 



Meeting Closing, 

{Continued from Pa<ie 1) 

within a brief t'me. At the moment, 
however, only the picture company 
affairs are being "ironca out." 

It is promised that sometime next 
week definite statements relative to 
the work taken up will be announced 
at which time the new officials of 
the picture corporation as well as 
the new executive comnmiec yyiil 
probably be announced. The slate 
as predicted in WID'S DAILY win 
in. all likelihood be carried out. 

DANNENBERG'. 



Mayor's Committee Meets 

The Committee on M- P. Regu- 
lation opened its two-day session at 
the Waldorf Astoria yesterday. 

The committee appointed four sub- 
committees one to investigate the 
state censorship questioii, one on 
local regulation, one on the work 
of the National Board qf Review 
and tlie fourth On d,xis(ling laws 
relative to indecent exhibitions. 

These committees will investigate 
in its own particular field and 
another meeting will be held in ,'\1- 
bany in about a montii at winch a 
definite policy for the Committee 
will be adopted. i 

The Talmad.ge and Famous Play- 
ers studios were visited yesterday. 
The conference will be coiitinued 
to-day. 



No Split in Northwest 

J. L. Gottstein, vice-president of 
the Greater Theaters Co., Inc., op- 
erating the Liberty in i Seattle stated 
yes'terday that the suit between Jen- 
sen and Von Herljerg and himself 
was merely for the purpose of ascer- 
taining property rights on the Lib- 
erty theater- It does not indicate, 
said he, a Ijreak between Jensen and 
Von Herlierg and himself as indi- 
cated in a Seattle dispatch to WID'S 
DAILY, published in yesterday's 
issue. 



Manchester, Me. — Fred Richards 
and a Portland man are dickering 
over the sale of the Majestic which 
the former owns. The house is not 
yet complete but can be finished in 
a few weeks. 



The number of admis- 
sions to motion picture 
theatres steadily increases 
and so does the consump- 
tion of RITCHEY post- 
ers. There is a very di- 
rect connection betwean 
these two facts. 

RITCHKX- 

I.lTMt>.! COUH.i' 

406 W. 31it St.,N.Y., Phone Chdic* S388 



f 



. 




\ 




DAllLY 



Friday, January 16, 1920 



Cibrario, President 

Jiicques Cibrario is president of 
ransatlaiitic Film Co., of America 
id lias been since late December. 
Lewis Roach who recently re- 
ined to return to England was 
cc-president of the corporation. 

Lewis Buys Danielson Theater 

{Special to fFID'S DAILY) 

Danielson, Conn. — John F. Lewis, 
anager of the Orphenm for the 
ist six years has pnrchascd the 
eater from William S. Brown. 
Lewis acted for the Lewis-Brown 
ircuit which owns the Princess in 
ristol and the Palace at Rockville. 



Another Loew Subsidiary 
(% Wire to WW'S DAILY) 
Albany. — The (Jates Operating 
Corp. has been formed here by Mar- 
cus Loew, David Bernstein and 
Nicholas Sclu-nck. 'I'lie company is 
chartered at $10,000. 



Theater Planned for Melbourne 
(Special to WlirS DAILY) 

Washington. — Commerce Reports 
sued by the Department of Com- 
erce report that two large thea- 
;rs, chiefly for pictures, are con- 
mplated for Melbourne, Australia, 
he costs of these two buildings arc 
itimatcd at $2,430,000 and $1,458,- 
)0. 



Christine Mayo has been engaged 
y Marshall Neilan for a prominent 
irt in his second production which 
now in the making at the Fair- 
inks studio. 




WHERE PROMISES ARE SACRED" 

LOUIS MEYER 

ORMERLY BRODA & MEYER INC 

riTLES 

ETTERED - ILLUSTRATED - PHOrOGRAPHBD 
ASK TO SEE OUR NEW 
PROCESS TITLES AND 
ILLUSTRATIONS 

L PHONE CALL WILL' BRING SAMPLE* 

BRYANT 7392 
20 WEST 42nd ST. - ROOM 2004 



LEUMAS CARTOON SERVICE 

!^*tilms: ■ for eK/ery ■ yis^iM.0 



Loew is building a theater at 
Broadway and Gates Ave., Brook- 
lyn. It is usually the custom for 
Loew to form a new holding com- 
pany fr)r every theater that he builds. 



Lottie I'ickford has begun work 
at the Brunton studio with her own 
company on her first independent 
production. 



Ethel Blande De Cordova 

Died 

Jan. 15, 1920 

Funeral Services 

Campbell's Funeral Church 

Sunday Morning 

Jan. 18, 9 a.m. 



John linierson and Anita Loos arc 
going to Palm Beach to supervise 
"The Love Expert," a Constance Tal- 

madge production. 



Kealart Pictures linvt a special 
lobby display for ;ill their prodiic 
tioDS now ready in tlieir exch;m(;<'K 
throughout the country for nil 
their bookings. Look them over 
and see how this enterprising con 
cern will assist you in geitiiig 
"them" up to the box office. 
KRArS MFG. Co. 
220 AV. 42nd St. 
17th Floor Tel. 3607 Bryant 



BESS MEREDYTH 



IT REQUIRES ORCANIZATION TO 
MANUFACTURE COODENCRAVINCS 

Vy[ilAYEBEEN0l»iANiZED''^'^l89a 

EQUIPPEDIODEUVtRr^'BEITPOillBlE 
WORK INTHE LEAST POSSIBLE TIME 



THE STANDARD Ef1CRAYin(i(0. 

PUOTO ENGRAVERS 

225 WEST 39™ STREET. NEW YORK 

AMEDICAN PD£S5 ASSOCIATION BLDO 



anc 



WILFRED LUCAS 

Writing and Directing 

Australian Features 



Address 

Care Snowy Baker 

84 Oxford Street 

Sydney, N. S. W. Australia 

Cable Address 
"Snowing Sydney" 




kKi Tl ILLS 

HAND LETTERING 
•, jri (One fiMiidriid JUlej ^-4 Day.) 

f ALYNLU'' 

A PHONE 2329 BRYANT . 





The Acme 
Portable 
Projector 
For the 
Studio 

Cutting Room 
The Editor 
Home School or 
Church 



Demonstrated to You Anywhere 

Howells Cine Equipment Co. 

729 7th Ave. New York 

Phone Bryant 1166 



MAKE YOU HEAR WHAT YOU SEE 



FILMUSIC CUE SHEETS ARE GOOD FOR ALL THEA- 
TERS EVEN THOSE THAT USE ROLLS— AND LOTS OF 
THEM DO. 



riLi!8nusic-co. 

..LOS ANCELES 



1729 Highland Ave. 



There are 30 Reasons 



why you should book, 

'The 
Screaming 
Shadow" 

REASON No. 14 
The Ben Wilson trademark on 
a serial is the same as Sterling 
on Silver. 

You are not buying a pig in a 
poke when you book "The 
Screaming Shadow." Watch for 
Reason No. 15 Tomorrow. 

BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 




UNIVERSAL CITY 
Released through 



CAL 




HALLMARK PICTURES 



130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK 

Foreign Rights controlled by Apollo Trading Corp., 220 W. 48th St. 




It' I* Friday, January 16, 1920 




The cave man lived an uncertain life 

He depended entirely upon his own prowess 

Most Exhibitors are mighty uncertain about their futures. Fhey 
have to fight each other and they have to fight the predatory 
producer-distributor gangs. 

The Big Idea is for the independent exhibitor to get into a gang 
of his own, a gang that won't skin him aHve, a gang in which 
he can be as big as any other man. 



The fellows in OUR GANG 
can take a vacation occasion- 
ally, because their franchise 
in our organization will pro- 
tect them. 



Our franchise holders can 
sleep o' nights because old 
policeman Franchise is always 
on the job. 



If you're a live one we want you in Our Gang 

Write today for our booklet 



"A FRANCHISE TO INDEPENDENCE 



99 



Exhibitors' Defense Committee 



Address 

Exhibitors' Defense Committee, 

Care The First National Exhibitors Circuit, Inc., 

6 West 48th St., New York, N. Y. 




7/<?BRADSTREET 
of FILHDOM 





1 



7/(«recochizeii 
AuthoritV 




Vol XI No. 16 



Saturday, January 17, 1920 



Price 5 Cents 



Coming Home 

First National Members Expected in 

Town To-day from Atlantic City 

(By Long Distance Phone) 

Atlantic City, N. J.— The First 
National convention is over. 

The franchise holders and direc- 
tors will leave town this morning 
and arrive in New York about mid- 
day- Some of the members left 
town yesterday. 

Announcement of the plans of the 
Associated First Nation Pictures, 
Inc. are expected to be made early 
next week. 



"Trade Review" Sold 

Passes From L. F. Blumenthal to 

A. B. Swetland— Identified With 

Class Journal Publishing Co. 

The Exhibitors Trade Review has 
passed from the control of Louis 
F. Blumenthal to L. W. Boynton 
and A. B. Swetland. The latter is 
known in the publishing field by vir- 
tue of his connection with persons 
identified wth the Class Journal 
Publishing Co., publishers of a con- 
siderable number of trade journals. 

Mr. Blumenthal stated yesterday 
that he understood that the control 
had passed into Swetland's hands as 
a personal venture. However, the 
transfer of the publication to the 
holdings of the Class Journal Co. in 
the future would not be surprising 
to some- Swetland figured last year 
in the purchase of "The Dramatic 
Mirror." 

Lesley Mason will continue as edi- 
tor but it is understood that some 
of his duties as publisher will pass 
into the hands of Mr. Boynton who 
will assume active charge of the bus- 
iness end of the publication. 



Foundation Case Argued 

The Foundation Film-National 
Picture Theaters' case was argued 
before Judge Knox in the Federal 
District Court yesterday. Decision 
reserved. 

National seeks an injunction to 
restrain further exhibition of "The 
Blindness of Youth" because that 
company has a film in preparation 
called "Blind Youth." 



Directors to Hold Dinner 

The M. P. D- A. — director's asso- 
ciation — will hold a dinner at the 
Friar's Club on Tuesday evening. 
The occasion is the welcoming of 
the newly elected officers. 



W. Scott Darling is now a scenario 
editor for Christie- 




Fear struck her to the heart, then a mounting glory and pride in the 
strength of the man she loved — Katharine MacDonald, the American 
Beauty, in the First National picture, "The Turning Point."— Advt. 



Laemmle To Fight 

To Make Phillips-Holubar a Court 
Issue — Claims Vaid Contract 

Universal announced yesterday 
that Dorothy Phillips and Allen Hol- 
ubar had definitely left Universal 
City. 

Carl Laemmle alleges that Miss 
Phillips and Mr. Holubar still under 
contract with Universal. In speak- 
ing of the matter, Laemmle stated 
yesterday: 

"Allen Holubar and Dorothy 
Phillips have left Universal City. 
Both of them have always been 
given every consideration possible 
with us. 

"They have a contract with u,; 
which is an honest and fair an agree- 
ment as was ever writen. This con- 
tract is legally binding. For th: 
principle of the thing I am going tn 
go to every extreme to see tha' 
both of them are forced to keep thei ■ 
written word. Their contracts hav • 
a year to run. 

"If this matter is allowed to gc 
{Continued on Page 4) ' 



MacLaren Celebrating Anniversary 
{Special to fflD'S DAILY) 

Jackson, Mch. — W. S. Maclaren, 
managing director of the Majestic 
theater here will celebrate the fourth 
anniversary of the opening of the 
theater, beginning Sunday- The cel- 
ebration will extend until the fol- 
lowing Sunday. 



Sellers Here With Macauley Film 

Ollie Sellers is in town, at the 
Commodore. Sellers came east with 
with a print of "The Gift Supreme" 
a feature starring Bernie Durning. 
It is a Macauley production and 
will be released through Republic. 



Irving Lesser Expected 

Irving Lesser is exepected in from 
the coast with a brand new batch 
of news as to Brother Sol's actvi- 
ties. 



Character Buys "The Stampede" 

Character Pictures have purchased 
"The Stampede" by Mack Arthur for 
production. 



Burr Making Comedies 

President and General Manager ol 
Master Films, Inc. 

Charles C. Burr, general man- 
ager of Arthur F. Beck is president 
and general manager of the Mas-i 
ter Films, Inc-, a new company pro-' 
ducmg a series of two reel com- 
edies starring Johnny Hines. Th« 
first comedy is based on a "Torchjr" 
story written by Sewell Ford. 

Connected with the new organiza^ 
tion are Sewell Ford, author of "Tor^ 
chy" stories upon which the com- 
edies will be based, Siegfried Hart, 
a manufacturer, and E. J. Clode, 
publisher of Ford's works and th« 
Louis Tracey stories. 



Leslie With Abramson 
Gladys Leslie, formerly with Vita- 
graph has been engaged to do om 
picture for Ivan Abramson. Thi 
film is "A Child for Sale." 



Spiro May Succeed MacHngh 

Gerald F- Spiro who has been 
handling some of the press matter 
for B. S. Moss is expected to re- 
place Arthur E. MacHugh as pub- 
licity representative. 



To Open Independent Exchange 

S- T. Stephens, formerly of Ex 
hibitors Mutual, will shortly open atl 
independent exchange to operate in 
Atlanta, New Orleans and Dallas,. 
under the name of the Diamond! 
Film Co. 



F. P. Foreign Business 

Famous Players-Lasky yesterday 
showed to the trade the picture deal ' 
ing with its foreign activities whicl 
was recenty exhibited at the annua 
directors' meeting as a part of th 
treasurer's report. 

The film gave some interesting fig- 
ures, notably that the total foreign, 
business of the corporation during' 
the first ten months of 1919 amount- 
ed to $4,500,000. This is 95 per cent 
in excess of the total foreign busi- 
ness done in 1919 and the 1918 fig- 
ure, in turn, is 100 per cent in ex- 
cess of the business done the yeai 
previous. 

The picture showed views of prac- 
tically every foreign office controlled 
by Famous Players-Lasky, including 
the branches in various Englsh cit- 
ies, Paris, Copenhagen, and cities of. 
South America, as well as many o 
the foreign theaters which regular 
ly show Paramount-Artcraft pic 
tures. 



• « 



III Saturday, January 17, 1920 



iM^ 



DAILV 




li'' Vtl. Il Ho. 16 Saturdty, January 17. 1920 Pri ce 5 C«Bt» 

■ •"' Copyright 1920, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
'• Inc. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
I'' New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
I' FILM FOLKS, INC. 

F C ("Wid") Gunning, President and Ireas- 
'i* urer: Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 

, ;Bnd Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 

' Business Manager. 
'.' Entered as second-class matter May^l, Wis, 
'^ .at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
li! ,the act of March 3, 1879. 
'■' Terms (Postage free) United States, Outside 

^ of Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 
:■ months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 

, ' $15.00 . V J 

'■■ Subscribers should remit with order 

^ Address all communications to WIU b 
• DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 

York, N. Y. 
' Telephone: Vanderbilt, 4551-4552-5558 

'• Hollywood, California 

I-" Editorial and Business Offices: 6411 Holly- 
^ wood Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 
• Chicago representatives— Wilhs, *^kels 
" »nd Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 
Ciicago, 111. 

Quotations 

Bid Asked Last Sale 



Famous Players - 85 

Goldwyn 

Loew's, Inc. 

Triangle 

United Pict. Prod 
World Film 



87 



V4 % 

16 1634 



853,-^ 
33 
31/2 
34 

16 
'A 



Gets Arrow Films for Canada 
Basil Horsfall of Horsfall Produc- 
tions Ltd. of Montreal, has secured 
the rights to several Arrow pictures 
for the Dominion. Included among 
these are twelve two reel North- 
woods dramas, featuring Edgar 
Jones; 12 two reel Northwest Police 
Stories which feature John Lowell, 
and these features: "The Chamber 
Mystery," "Miss Anzoria" and Ihe 
Mysterious Mr. Browning." 



i 



COMING 

A 

REVIVAL 

OF 

Time's 
PUNCTURED 




TOWER FILM CORP. 

71 W. 23rd St., N. Y. 



Coast Brevities 

(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Hollywood — Active work has been 
started on George H. Melford's pro- 
duction, with Roscoe Arbuckle, by 
arrangement with Joseph M. Schenck 
of "The Round-Up," Edmund Day's 
famous stage play, which will now 
be seen as a Paramount-Artcraft 
special. Tom Forman, who plays 
one of the leading roles, is author 
of the scenario. Mabel Julienne 
Scott plays the feminine lead. 



Frank Lawrence, film editor at 
Universal City, has been given gen- 
eral supervision over the immense 
photographic laboratory at Univer- 
sal City. 



Putting It Over 



Here is hoiu a brother 


exhib- 


itor put his 


show 


over. 


Send 


along your id 


eas. 


Let th 


e other 


fello-^' know 


hoiv 


you 


cleaned 


up. 









Famous has just completed a tie- 
up with Harper Bros., who will pub- 
lish a special photoplay edition of 
"Huckleberry Finn," Mark Twain's 
novel which will l)c a Paramount- 
.\rtcraft release. A total of 100,000 
copies of the book will be put out 
immediately and will be illustrated 
with stills from the production, 
which will be credited to the com- 
pany on the jacket of each volume. 



Florence Porter Parks, former 
dramatic editor of the Louisville 
Courier-Journal and for some time 
past feature writer for Camera, has 
joined the Brunton publicity staff to 
succeed Calvin C. Day. Rene R. 
Rivierre has taken over the director- 
ship. 



Jacques Jaccard will direct Tom 
Mix's next feature, "One Quarter 
Apache." 



Harry Rapf announces that "Just 
a Wife" is finished. It is now being 
assembled and cut and will be ready 
in a few weeks. The picture was 
directed by Howard Hickman and 
has Roy Stewart, Kathlyn Williams 
and Leatrice Joy in the cast. 



Walter McGrail who is under con- 
tract with .Selznick will play the 
leading role in "Blind Youth." He 
is being especially brought out from 
New York to play this part. 

GAUSMAN 



Davies Film at Broadway 

B. S- Moss has booked Marion 
Davies in "The Cinema Murder" for 
the Broadway after the film's Rial- 
to engagement as well as for all the 
Moss theaters. The Broadway pro- 
gram changes to-morrow. The Par- 
isian Fashion Frolic will be replaced 
by Cleveland Bronner's "Delights," 
a review with Ingrid Selfeng. The 
film for next week will be "Nothing 
but the Truth" with Taylor Holmes. 



Monopol has made up book 
matches on which are the names of 
"Crimson Shoals" and "Alma, Do 
\'ou Live," the productions of that 

organization. 



Billie Burke's picture is on the 
cover of the Pictorial Review issued 
Jan. 1. The portrait is in four col- 
ors. 



Juanita Hansen at Work 

Juanita Hansen has started work 
on "The Mad Talon," her Pathe se- 
rial. 



Williams to Manage Dunbar 

Philadelphia, Pa.— Grant Wil- 
liams, for sixteen years city editor 
of the Philadelphia Tribune, a sheet 
for colored people, and himself 
colored, will manage the new $400,- 
000 Dunbar. 



He Believes in Serials 

.-Mliance, O. — The New American 
theater here ran three Pathe seri- 
als on the same day. He showed an 
episode of "The Adventures oi 
Ruth." "Bound and Gagged" and 
"The Black Secret." 



William J. McKcnna has written 
a song called "Carmen" which will 
help exploit Charlie Chaplin's bur- 
lesque on "Carmen." Miniature 
cards, slides, etc., will also be used 
to liclp put it over. Victor Kremer 
is releasing the re-issue. 



Numa Pictures Corp., which is 
screening "The Return of Tarzan," is 
organizing a series of clubs for 
youngsters each of which is to be 
known as the Tribe of Tarzan. Ef- 
forts will be made to organize these 
societies in various towns and in- 
cidentally of course, will give the 
picture added publicity. 



New Bedford Firm Chartered 
KSUcial to fVWS DAILY) 

Nfw Bedford, Mass. — The Empire 
Theater Co., capitalized at $200,000 
has been chartered here and will 
build a house here seating 2,4,S0. 



Subscribe $300,000 Stock 

Grand Rapids, Mich. — Practically 
the entire issue of $300,000 of treas- 
urer's stock in the Regent has been 
sold. Work on excavating started 
last week. 



5=^ 




Advice IS 

Valuable 



Sell Jolly Comedies 

Film Specials have disposed o: 
the Jolly comedies for Eastern Penn. 
sylvania and Southern New Jerse) 
to the Square Deal Film Corp., o 
Philadelphia. Western Pennsylvanis 
and West Viigin.ia rights to thf 
Penn Film Service, Pittsburgh, Pa., 
and to Herman J. Garfield of Clevc 
land, Ohio, Kentucky and Michigai 
rights. 



Cinema Classics Releases 

Cinema Classics will distributi 
hereafter,, Chas. Urban's Movii 
Chats, and the Kineto Review. Thi 
former are a series of educationa 
subjects, each reel dealing with fron 
three to twelve topics. The latte 
is also an educational release, alway 
dealing with one topic. Each wil 
he released weekly. 



New Firm Locates in Kansas 

Wichita, Kansas. — Work on th 
initial production of the Popula 
Players Pictures Corp. will 
started here in the near future 
Among its players are included Nc 
dra Niris, Vyra Veeda, Warner Rich 
mond, and Joe Lertora. Frankly 
B. Coates is director general of th 
firm, which has a capital of $200,00 
and the president of which is Artht 
Ford who owns the Marple. Lieu 
Bert M. Hall is secretary and treas 
urer and Arthur L. Baker is directc 
of sales. 



— when coming from experts. Any man who builds a theater 
and then fails to insure it against fire is criminally careless. 
Our advice costs nothing- It may be worth thousands. 



Reuben 5?Xmuels 

I Veal jJN^ ervice 

I Insurance ' ' " 60 Maiden Lane 

m Phone John 5425 - 542.6 • 9427 - 94ZB 



Samuek 



There are many things 
concerning RITCHEY 
posters that most people 
don't know, but there is 
one thing about them that 
everybody knows — they 
are the best motion pic- 
ture posters produced any- 
where in the world! 

RITCHEY 

UTHO. CORP. 

406 W. %IA SI..N.T., Phone OmImk 83*8 




ali^^ 



1 



DAILV 



Saturday, January 17, 1920 



PatkeNews 

No. 5 

EASTON, WASH.— Get a ilttle auto- 
led of your own and take the family 
ut — a novel device enables autos to iilow 
iroueh deep snows. 

CHICAGO, ILL. — "No Smokes" is her 
log^an! Lucy Page Gaston announces 
er candidacy for I'resident on an anti- 
)bacco platform — addressing her "adher- 
its." 

ALBANY, N. Y.— Legislative judiciary 
jmmittee to try ousted N. Y. Socialists, 
ssemblyman who will investigate the 
>yalty of the Ave suspended Socialist 
lentbers. 

PABIS, FRANCE — Marshals Foch and 
etain open 6th annual airplane exhibit 
t French capital — planes of all types are 
isplayed. 

MEDRTHE VALLEY', FRANCE— War- 
avaged lands of Eastern France suffer 
ew disaster — terrific floods devastate en- 
ire towns, and render thousands home- 
>ss and detsitute. 

GUANTANAMO, CUBA- Marines keep 
1 tip-top form while guarding V. S. Nav- 
1 Base at Guantanamo Bay — constant 
latch is maintained. 

IN THE RING— Who will win world's 
eavyweight championship? Sport fans 
t ail nations look forward to the ex- 
ected bout between Dempsey and Car- 
entier. 

SATSOr. WASH.— AVill big salmon sup- 
ily help bring down H. C. L.f Large 
raps and fish hatcheries are used to 
atch spawning salmon. 

M'ASHINGTON, D. C. — Americans pre- 
erve your nation's ideals! Secretary ok 
nterior Lane heads patriotic movement 
> spread "Americanism" as check against 
Reds." „ ^ 

BOSTON, MASS. — (LOCAL) Boston 
Ions its wintry snow mantle — the city 
s transformeil into a wonderland of 
now and ice as mercury drops to 6 
ibove. 

Snowflakes form a picturesque baok- 
;round for the statue of Robert Burns, 
lerly erected in honor of the great poet. 
Youthful sculptors. 

toaay 



CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG 

Once more demonstrates her magnifi- 
cent art in 

"THE EYES OF YOUTH" 
We have made for this production i 
very artistic lobby display together 
with reproductions in fac-simile oil 
paintings from her latest poses in 
various sizes. 

KRAUS MFG. CO. 

220 West 42d Street 
17Ui Floor TeL 3607 Bryant 



Send Us Your 
hS&^ Junk Film 

INTERSTATE SMELTING 
(SL REFINING COMPANY 

23 Commercial St. NEWARK. N J. 



Review Board Issuing Catalogues 

riie National Board of Review lias 
in preparation two new catalogs'. 
One of these is "A Garden of Amer- 
ican Motion Pictures" covering the 
nine months from April 1, to Dec 
.31, 1919. 

Of interest, to those concerned 
with the church use of pictures is 
the catalog entitled "The Best Mo- 
tion Pictures for Church and Semi- 
Religions Entertainments" • — 850 
dramatic, Americanization, comic, 
travel, missionary and instructive 
pictures. 



Selznick After "Sleepless Night" 

"A Sleepless Night," the bed-room 
force which ran at the Bijou last 
year under the direction of the Shu- 
berts is being bid for by Selznick, 
according to a report. 



Dinner Tonight for Godal 

Friends of Edward Godal, manag- 
ing director of the British and Col- 
onial, an English producing com- 
pany will lender a farewell dinner 
at the Astor tonight. Mr. Godal 
leaves for England shortly. 



Saunders to Tour Exchanges 

E. M. Saunders, in charge of sales 
for Metro will start next week on 
a trip to the exchange centers of 
the company. 



Salt Lake — -G. L. Gloward has been 
appointed manager of the Metro ex- 
change here succeeding B. F. Rosen- 
berg who has gone to the Denver 
office. 



Marjorie Rambeau has finished 
"The Fortune Teller," a Capellani 
production for Pathe release. 




WARNING 






The picture called "Tiger Girl," recently advertised as a D. W. Griffith 
production, was not directed by Mr. Griffith, but by Paul Powell, and it is anj 
injustice to Mr. Powell as well as to Mr. Griffith, to call it a Griffith picture, * 

As a matter of record, the picture called "Tiger Girl" is an old print 
formerly entitled "The Lily and the Rose" and is now being resurrected pre-' 
sumably for the purpose of trading on Mr. Griffith's name. 




"TO THE MOTION PICTURE INDUSTRY: 

"All genuine Griifith productions carry the initials D. G. and the written name 
GRIFFITH on the main title and on all important subtitles, and any motion picture 
offered without these trade marks not only is unauthentic, but is being foisted on 
the exhibitors and the public in an effort to give the public the impression that it was 
personally directed. 

"In justice to all concerned I hereby ask all exhibitors, for the protection of 
themselves and their patrons, not to advertise any picture as a Griffith production 
unless it carries the above trade marks stamped in the film." 

(Signed) 




Any picture not stamped with the name GRIFFITH is not a GriffitI 
Production, and if advertised as a Griffith Production a denial signed b; 
Mr. Griffith will be published in all territories where it is shown. ^ 

For further information, address ALBERT L. GREY 
General Manager, 720 Longacre Bldg., 1480 Broadway, Ne\'< 
York City. 



^ 



Saturday, January 17, 1920 



iMA 



DAILV 



KINOGRAMS 

\ I "®e VISUAL News ^ 

» ALL THE World 

VREPAKE TO TRY SOCIALISTS— 

Members of Judiciary committee of New 
York Assembly make plans for hearing 
of men siispentleil. 
TOKIO ATHLETIC CONTEST— Orien- 

' tal athletes take part in a Jiu Jitsu de- 
bate which proves to be very informal. 

" MUST GIVE UP STOCK YARDS— Re- 

«»ent ruling deprives packers of owner- 

' ship of the gigantic Union Jack Stock 

' Yards in Chicago. 

, SHE WOULD BE PRESIDENT— Lucy 

' Page Gaston seeks nomination for presi- 
dent on platform of better morals. 

PERSHING GETS GOLD SWORD— 

i! Admirers of commander of A. E. F. pre- 

] »ent him with a beautifully wrought 

' weapon in Kansas City. 

' SIR OLIVER LODGE— Noted British 

,' scientist arrives on the Lapland to tell 

\ Americans of his ideas on immortality. 

/ COLLEGE GIRLS HAVE ICE CAR- 
NIVAL — Scenes from Alice in Wonder- 
land are presented by students at Smith 
at Northampton, Mass. 

, TROOPS BRING RUSSIAN BRIDES— 

^ Soldiers on the Logan from Vladivostok 

: arrive in San Francisco with wives from 

' Siberia. 

CUT ICE CROP IN SIERRAS— Miles 

L and miles of winter's chill are sawed up 
and put away for summer at Boga, Cal. 

• PHOTOGRAPH THE CONSTITUTION 
—Original documents of the Constitution 
•f the United States and the Declaration 
•f Indepedence are taken from the State 

''' Department vault, and inspected by Sec- 

T retary Lansing. 

r COMPLETE LINCOLN MEMORIAL — 

. Classic Greek structure on Potomac at 

Washington costing over two million is 

^ ready for dedication. 

RANGERS AND FISCALES PATROL 
BORDER — Texas gardians of Rio Grande 
aontry and Mexican patrols co-operate 

■ ;»n terms of friendship near Ysleta, Tex. 

DISTRIBUTED BY 

' REPUBLIC DISTRIBUTING! 

CORPORATION 



;l Ascher Bros, to Build Another 
' Chicao, 111. — Contract has been let 
. or erection of one-story theater and 
Mtore building-, at 63d Street and 
', Vlarshfield Avenue, for Ascher Bros., 
' ■ o cost $600,000. 



Laemmle To Fight 

{Continued from Page 1) 
without a fight, it will leave the film 
world in a very deplorable state, and 
it will be a very dangerous precedent 
to set for directors and players of 
the industry, if this disregard of 
their legal agreement s allowed to 
go unchallenged. 

"In fighting this case, I feel that 
I am fighting for all honest pro- 
ducers. It will be the means of 
safeguarding their interests in the 
future- Producers will then know 
that the success tliat any of them 
build up for their stars at a great 
expense to themselves, is not a thing 
which can be transferred to another 
man's control at the mere whim of 
the star or director." 



Hamlin's Paper Appears 

Tom Hamlin's new regional trade 
paper, the Motion Picture Journal 
has made its apearance. The publi- 
cation will appear every Thursday 
and caters to the exhibitors in New 
York State and Northern New Jer- 
sey. The initial issue is 30 pages 
and cover. 



French Actress Here 

Gaby Marcy, said to be a promi- 
nent actress in France has arrived in 
New York. She is here with her 
seven year old son who will be 
placed in American schools- 
John J. Livingston is her man- 
ager. Miss Marcy will appear in 
films here. 



Famous Lab. Almost Ready 

Famous Players' laboratory in 
Long Island City will be ready with- 
in a month. All of the' printing 
and development of films made in 
the East wU be done at the new 
plant which will be in charge of 
Emanuel H. Jacobs. 





There are 30 Reasons 



why you should book, 

"The 
Screaming 
Shadow" 

REASON NO. 15 

Diogenes took his lantern in 
Iiand to hunt for an honest 
man. Mr. Exhibitor is hunt- 
ing for a good serial. Look 
at tlie First four episodes of 
"The Screaming Shadow" and 
stop your hunt. Watch for 
Reason No. 16 tomorrow. 

BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 

UNIVERSAL CITY CAL. 

Released through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK 

Foreign Rights controlled by Apollo Trading Corp.. 220 W. 48th St. 






Research Department at Metro 

Hollywood — A research depart- 
ment to work in conjunction with 
the technical staff has been estab- 
lished at the Metro plant. David S. 
McCann has been placed in charge. 



Dowling Coming East 

Los Angeles — Pat Dowling who 
handles the publicity for Christie 
comedies will shortly leave here for 
a trip to all the ej^change centers 
of the country, finally ending up in 
New York. 



Change Title of Beck Serial 
The title of the Arthur Beck ser: 
has been changed to "Trailed 
Three." Former title, "The Isle ot 
Jewels." Pathe release. 



i 



Metro FieM Changes 
Denver — B. F. Rosenfield has been 
appointed manager of the Metro ex- 
change here. He was formerly at 
Salt Lake and succeeds C Klein. 



JOHN J. LIVINGSTON 

Motion Picture Representative 

For 

STARS— DIRECTORS 

1440 Broadway New York 



CM 




Form $1,000,000 Corporation 

St. Paul, Minn.— The Duluth The' 
ater Co., has been incorporated here 
with a capital of $1,000,000. The 
incorporators are William Hamm i 
and Moses Finkelstein of St. Paul, 
Isaac H. Reuben of MinneapoHs, and 
Moses S. Burnett, B. J. Cook and 
Julius Cook of Duluth. 



Francis McDonald — 

Who demonstrated hisi 

genius in 

"The Confession" — 

breaks his own recor< 

in 



THE. 



COLONEtr 



An All-American 
Picture! 



J. A. BERST 

PRESIDENT OF 

UNITED 

PICTURES PRODUCTION CORPORATION 

ANNOUNCES 

THAT UNITED HAS SECURED CONTROL 

OF THE 

TRIANGLE EXCHANGES 

AND 

ALL THE FAMOUS TRIANGLE PICTURES WHICH INCLUDE 

SUCH STARS AND DIRECTORS AS 



D. W. Griffith 
Thomas H. Ince 
Douglas Fairbanks 
William S. Hart 
Frank Keenan 
The Gish Sisters 



Charles Ray 
Norma Talmadge 
Constance Talmadge 
Dorothy Dalton 
Louise Glaum 
Olive Thomas 



AND 



The Famous Mack Sennett Keystone Comedies 



7^BRADSTREET 
of FILHDOM 




7/cRECOGMIZED 

Authority 



Vol. XI, No. 17 



Sunday, January 18, 1920 



Price 25 Cents 



ADOLPH ZUKOR k^esertts 



GEORGE FITZMURICE 



PRODUCTION 



ON VV^ITH 
THE DANCE^ 



^V'ITH 



MAE MURRAV 
^Ai^ DAVID POWELL 

Ruthless . ^inAxl. 
profligate .aciursed ! 

or NEW^ YORK ! — 




inspiTind , magnificent ! 

foAe wonder picture f . 
with a wonder ^oul ! 

Photoplavr Jby Ouida'fiergere 

Founded on the pl^ 
of the same najme 
by Michael Morton 



Cparamovnt 
^rtcraft\ 
Q>icture 



FAMOUS PLAYERS -lASKY CORPORATION 





still smashing reooras 




'<^4^ 



^^^^^ -^ WALAMO 
•"^y Omaha ^^ ^^ ^ ^"'' ' 



.-v>^ 



.'.*"' 



^.' 




GARDEN 
'""S^Washiti^toni 



Saiv 



t)'tc* 



>"_'■; 



,-.''-':^' 







PICTURES_ 










STRAND 
Fresno 



'v. 



RAPH - COMMERCIAL CABLES 



CLARENCE H. MACKAY. 



I 10 CAST 4k. 

NEW 'T-crf^r^ji^jrjf- ' 

Tal<(iliorKit: S655. ilSL.fr^r-f'f/" 



TELEDRAIVI 



DCLIVERT no. 



I The Postal Telegraph-Cable C(iinpany(lncorporated)transmits anil delivers this messas^e subject to the terms and conditions printed on the back ot this blank. 



autaet Dan TeUaram unlnt othtririse indicated >•' .•— -Jo/Jcr (iv number ot icorito.— * *JV.'l-» " (Niahl Lrttrrfram) or "Nlte^ (lVf«lU 7fe<e«ran). II leOW— 2«9< 

OMAHA NEB JAN 11 

JOroi S WOODY 

GENL MGR REALART PICTURES CORPN kGS 5 AVE NYC 

BIFF BANG ZOWIE AND A COUPLE BANGS. THAT'S JUST THE WAY 
SOLDIERS OF FORTUNE SMSHED OUR HOUSE RECORD INTO LITTLE 
SPLINTERS LAST WEEK AND BELIEVE ME THAT IS NO EASY FEAT 
TO ACCOMPLISH ON A WEK RUN FOR THE SUN THEATRE PLAYS ONLY 
THE VERY BIGGEST AND BEST PICTURES PRODUCED AND VERY FRE- 
QUi^NTLY PLAYS TWO BIG ONES IN THE SAME WEEK. MARY MILES 
MINTER IN ANNE OF GREEN GABLES OPENED TODAY TO TREMENDOUS 
BUSINESS STOP THE CROWD CAME IK DROVES IN MOBS IN HERDS. 
THEY BROKE DOPfN OUR CHAINS AND SWAPJffiD INTO THE HOUSE A 
SEETHING MASS OF EAGER HUMANITY AND ALL WERE MORE THAN 
DELIGHTED WITH THE PICTURE STOP HAS REALART DELIVERED THE 
GOODS? WELL I'LL SAY SHE HAS 

HARRY GOLDBER G , SUN THEATRE 



REALART PICTURES CORPORATION 
4-69 Pifth Ave.. New York City 



\''. 



39$pBeADSTREET 
of FILMDOM 




DAIbYi 



7/^recocmized 
Authority 



Vol. XI. No. 17 Sunday, January 18. 1920 Price 25c. 



Copyright 1920, Wid's Film and Film Folks, Inc. 



Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., New York, N. Y., by 
WID'S FILMS AND FILM FOLKS. INC. 
F. C. ("Wid") (lunning. President and Treasurer; Joseph Dannenberg, 
Vice-President and Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and Business 
Manager. 
Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, at the post office at 

New York, N. Y., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms (Postage free) United States, Otitside of Greater New York, 

$10.00 one year; 6 months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, $15.00. 

Subscribers should remit with order. 

Address all communications to 

WID'S DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, N. Y. 

Telephone: Vanderbilt 4551-2 

Hollywood, California: Editorial and Business Offices: 6411 Hollywood 
Boulevard. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 

Chicago representatives: Willis, Eckels and Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers 
Building, Chicago, 111. 



Features Reviewed 

F. B. Warren and G. B. Baker present 

STARVATION 

State Rights Page 3 

Enid Bennett in 

THE WOMAN IN THE SUITCASE 

Thos. H. Ince Prod. — Paramount-Art. . . Page 5 
Lucy Cotton in BLIND LOVE 

Gerald Bacon — Ay won — State Rights. . Page 7 
Elaine Hammerstein in. .GREATER THAN FAME 

Selznick-Select Page 10 

Alice Joyce in SLAVES OF PRIDE 

Vitagraph Page 11 

William Russell in 

THE VALLEY OF TOMORROW 

American — Pathe Page 13 

Tom Mix in .THE CYCLONE 

Fox Page 15 

Nazimova in STRONGER THAN DEATH 

Nazimova Prod. — Metro Page 17 

H. B. Warner in HAUNTING SHADOWS 

Hampton — Robertson-Cole Page 20 

Robert Warwick in THE TREE OF KNOWLEDGE 

Paramount-Artcraft Page 21 

Lois Weber Prod. FORBIDDEN 

Jewel — Universal Page 23 

OTHER MEN'S SHOES 

Edgar Lewis Prod., Inc. — Pathe Page 25 

Earle Williams in WHEN A MAN LOVES 

Vitagraph Page 27 

SHORT STUFF Page 31 



News of the Week 
in Headlines 

Monday 

Americanization drive via the films opens Feb. 12. 

United Picture Theaters take over Triangle exchanges. 

Arthur S. Kane, former Realart president, returns 
from tour. 

First Annual meeting of First National opens at At- 
lantic City. 

Tuesday 

Over 300 theaters join Ohio First National. 

C. B. Price applies for injunction to restrain distribu- 
tion of alleged duped print of U-35 picture. 

Ackerman and Harris to build in Los Angeles. Loew 
will operate. 

Wednesday 

Declare dividend on Famous Player preferred stock. 

Directors elected for next four years. 
Equity Pictures' directors hold meeting in Chicago. 
.S. L. Rothapfel in New York. Gives up management 

of Goldwyn's California theater. 
Al Kaufman announces resignation from Famous 

players. 
Associated First National Theaters, Inc., ready to 

spend 20 million instead of 6 million as originally 

planned. 

Thursday 

Reported Loew-Metro after Big Five distribution. 

Zukor denies Famous Players building theaters; says 
Wall St. does not control company. 

First iSIational members have 75 theaters under con- 
struction in various sections of the country. 

Friday 

Goldwyn reported to have bought in to Ascher Bro^. 

Circuit. 
Loew, Rowland and Engel to leave for California. 

May build new studio. 
First National Convention closing. 

Saturday 

Carl Laemmle to contest alleged violation of contract 
by Allen Holubar and Dorothy Phillips. 

Control of Exhibitor's Trade Review passes from L. 
F. Blumenthal to A. B. Swetland. 

Charles C. Burr producing series of comedies with 
Johnny Hines. 



'Pardoning the bad is injuring the good'* — Benjamin Franklin, 



SAWING WOOD 

Remember the story of the three neighbors who started sawing wood? One bright morn- 
ing they started on the job — and shortly two of 'em commenced GABBING over 
the back fence— then the ARGUMENT started. 

—WHILE THE THIRD SAWED WOOD. 

At the end of a week the two were right where they started, STILL TALKING, while 
the third had his wood packed away for the winter. His job was not to argue. 

HE SA WED WOOD. 

During the past month WID'S DAILY has gained over 
One hundred PAID IN ADVANCE new subcribers. 

AT TEN DOLLARS A SUBSCRIBE. 

Over a thousand dollars in new subscriptions. 

That kind of a subscription list stands for one thing — 

INDEPENDENCE. 

Independence of thought and EDITORIAL POLICY. 

Subscribers don't pay ten bucks a year these days for any publication unless they READ 
that publication. 

Last week Wid's carried nearly TWO HUNDRED PER CENT, more advertising 
than the same week a year ago. That stands for 

PROGRESS. 

It means SERVICE for the advertiser and SERVICE for the exhibitor. 

It is EASY to make extravagant claims — 
■ — another thing to PROVE those claims. 

In the controversy now running between certain trade publications relative to the pre- 
sentation of "Exclusive News" and "First News" have you noticed while in referring 
to the other papers in the field the term "WEEKLY" is used? 

"THERE'S A REASON." 

"WID'S DAILY" prints the news, ALL THE NEWS and nothing but the news. 

The editorial policy of its Sunday is characteristically IT'S OWN. 

Hokem, Publicity Bunk and "Semi-News" so-called, got the GATE many moons ago. 

TWO YEARS ago WID'S believed this policy to be right. 

THE INTERVENING TIME HAS PROVED CONCLUSIVELY THE CONSIS- 
TENCY AND SOUNDNESS OF THIS POLICY. 

WID'S believed that news to be news should be published while it IS news — that is the 
big COMPELLING reason for WID'S DAILY. 

News to YOU Mr. Reader, not from a day to a week OLD, but while the big, virile 
happenings that you are interested in are really occuring. 

Look back over your WID'S files for any length of time and you will probably find it in 

WID'S DAILY 

FIRST fSW''^'" ' 

And if there is any doubt in any one's mind over this fact WE'LL PROVE IT. 




Sunday, January 18, 1920 



l^ 



DAILV 



Ghastly Panorama of Starving European Countries 



F, B. Warren and G. B. Baker present 

"STARVATION" 

State Rights 

DIRECTOR George Z. Zimmer 

AUTHOR War 

CAMERAMEN Eight official photographers 

AS A WHOLE Ghastly panorama of starving 

European countries. 

STORY The most tragic ever told ; will touch 

everyone's heart. 

DIRECTION Zimmer has obtained remarkable 

views of European ports and interior cities in 
the grip of starvation. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Acceptable 

LIGHTING Sufficient to show off all of the 

sad details. 

CAMERAWORK Photographers have obtained 

exclusive and utterly astonishing pictures. 

STAR Hunger 

SUPPORT The populace of Europe 

EXTERIORS Taken in various of the big cities 

of Europe and show points of great interest 
besides the scenes that drive home Europe's 
condition. 
DETAIL First a subtitle then a scene is the or- 
der of the picture; there are surely as many 
inserts as there are scenes. 

CHARACTER OF PICTURE Will certainly 

waken people to Europe's plight in no uncer- 
tain terms. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 6,500 feet 

The terrible conditions existing in various Euro- 
pean countries but principally Russia, Austria, Poland 
and Germany, which Herbert Hoover and the Ameri- 
can Relief Administration are in some way alleviating 
today are set forth in all their ghastliness in "Starva- 
tion," a seven-reel feature the scenes of which were 
taken under the direction of George F. Zimmer, Mr. 
Hoover's aid, and approved by him and' government 
officials. 

The picture may be set down as the greatest tragedy 
that ever reached the screen for it throws a pitiless 



light on conditions today in Europe, conditions result- 
ing from war's devastation and its sapping at a people's 
vitals, and made worse by the political and social 
upheavals that have continued since the great war 
came to a close. 

In these days of great changes it is futile to pull 
wool over the eyes and attempt to go through life 
thinking everything is just perfect because the auto- 
crat of Germany has been unseated. And so such a 
picture as "Starvation" will serve the world in open- 
ing the eyes of the many superficially inclined folk 
in this country who believed that fighting stopped with 
the signing of the armistice. 

And it drives home its argument and its message 
in a series of terrifically tragic views. Far worse than 
the ghastly scenes of the execution of men are those 
which show young children, hopelessly emaciated, 
under-nourished, their eyes sunken, their expressions 
ever breaking between an insane man's grin and a 
desire to cry. Children with their limbs twisted, un- 
able to stand, so steadily starved from birth that they 
have lost the shape of human beings. 

Bolshevists are shown facing firing squads. No 
preliminaries, the triggers are pulled and the rows 
of revolutionists topple quickly into ready prepared 
graves. There are hangings, too. The marked men 
are obliged to arrange the nooses about their own 
necks and swing off into the air as if they were going 
on a holiday. 

The whole rotten condition of Europe is blamed on 
the Bolshevists in "Starvation." In fact the blame is 
placed so often that the picture takes the semblance 
of anti-Bolshevist propaganda as well as a lesson in 
modern European history. 

There are many scenes showing endless bread-lines, 
American ships unloading at strange and interesting 
ports and hungry hordes awaiting the distribution of 
the contents of their holds. Of subtitles there are un- 
doubtedly too many. As the picture stands now there 
is one to each scene. Some amount of elision is sug- 
gested. 



This Won't Entertain But It Will Wake Up a Lot of People 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



"Starvation" is remotely removed from anything ap- 
proaching pleasant entertainment. It is a series of 
scenes, each one a tragedy. That it will do a tremen- 
dous good in showing people the true condition of 
affairs in Europe is a foregone conclusion. And be- 
cause of this the exhibitor will be doing a duty to his 
community in showing it — or parts of it. 



However, the exhibitor wants to give his people 
entertainment. It would be a good idea to insert the 
more dominant scenes of this on a regular bill and fea- 
ture them in the advertising along with the entertain- 
ment part of the bill. The message would be spread 
just as forcefully then. The picture as it stands now 
is too long except for special showings. 




Made bt] Selznick 



Distributed bij Select 



Sunday, January 18, 1920 



Vit4!i 



DAIUY 



Average Program Offering Aided by Star's Personality 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 

Enid Bennett in the better efforts hardly hold it up. 

"THE WOMAN IN THE SUITCASE" Just for the sake of argument, if nothing more, 

Thos. H. Ince Prod. — Paramount Artcraft what young girl would think up such an ex- 

DIRECTOR Fred Niblo traordinary way of "saving" her father and wondering 

AUTHOR C. Gardner Sullivan further, how would such a scheme meet with such 

SCENARIO BY C. Gardner Sullivan splendid and "just as planned" success. There are 

CAMERAMAN George Barnes numerous incidents that just happen without the 

AS A WHOLE Old time situation lacks convic- slightest foundation and even some explaining by way 

tion and seldom reaches the entertainment of titles doesn't seem to convince. 

point. Roland Lee does a lot of unusual things and hum- 

DIRECTION .. Registered a few laughs and handled bles himself greatly for the sake of adventure while 

players very well in most instances but Dorcas Matthews is a "wery wicked wamp" who must 

couldn't make up for the impossible story. have cost the producer quite a bit for her supply of 

STORY Been done hundreds of times and isn't cigarettes. 

different enough to get by on that score. Enid Bennett is the young girl just graduated from 

PHOTOGRAPHY Fairly good college who comes across Dolly's (Miss Matthews') 

LIGHTINGS A bit hazy at times photo in her daddy's grip while looking for a present 

CAMERA WORK. .. .Interior shots frequently too which he has bought for her. Realizing that "The 

deep. Woman in the Suitcase" must be the cause of her 

STAR Satisfactory for the most part but regis- father's recent "business at the office" evenings, Enid 

tered some strange emotions in close-ups. plans to save him from disgrace without letting her 

SUPPORT Roland Lee very pleasing as the mother know anything about the adventure. 

proxy sweetheart; William Conklin fails to Shero advertises for a gentleman to act as escort 

impress. and it happens that Roland Lee, a wealthy young man, 

EXTERIORS Seldom necessary answers the ad in the spirit of adventure. Enid gives 

INTERIORS Lavish and looked like the real him strictly to understand that he is being employed 

thing. by her and insists that he allow her to pay the bills at 

DETAIL Some titles that got snickers instead the various cafes they visit in shero's search for "The 

of laughs. Woman in the Suitcase." 

CHARACTER OF STORY Daughter sets out to When finally they come upon the "wamp," Enid is 

save father who is straying from the straight agreeably surprised to see that her escort knows the 

and narrow. famous woman and immediately asks for an introduc- 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 5,410 feet tion which he reluctantly assents to give her. Accord- 

With the exception of a very few moments at long ing to her plan, shero becomes very friendly with 

intervals which contain slight entertainment value, Dolly. The climax comes when the father comes to 

"The Woman in the Suitcase" falls slightly below the Dolly's apartment and finds his daughter evidently 

border line of the average program offering. The story much intoxicated but this is only a part of her scheme 

has been given adequate production and the players and in the end hero Lee gives Dolly some hush money, 

for the most part are well adapted to their parts, but father goes back to his wife and shero falls in love 

the idea is so ancient and actually so implausible that with Lee. 

Will Satisfy But Won't Stand Any Extraordinary Boosting 

There is no great reason why you shouldn't play Bennett is supported by a capable company. 
"The Woman in the Suitcase" and get away with it. The title is a good one and suggests numerous ex- 
Even though the story is implausible and at times a ploitation and advertising ideas. Catchlines might 
trifle ridiculous, direcjor Niblo has worked in a few read: "Who is 'The Woman in the Suitcase'? Come 
good bits. Miss Bennett plays her part with sincerity to the blank theater and see how Enid Bennett solves 
and except for once or twice when she was poorly the mystery." Or, "What would you do if you found 
lighted, photographed very well. Dorcas Matthews a woman's photograph in your father's suitcase? See 
is very well cast as the home-wrecker and Roland Lee what Enid Bennett does in her latest production at the 
is a patient and pleasing hero. Taken all in all Miss blank theater." 





OLIVE THOMAS 

^ in bradleq VirK^^'s ^^ 

KXmiGHTSandSHADOWS 

Scenario h\] R. Cecil SmifK 

Direction — John V Noble 




EUGENE OBRIEN 



tr 



in 



ir 



THE BROKEN MELODY 

bq Quida Berdere 

Direction — William P S.Earle 



eide bt| Selznick 




ELAINE HAMMERSTEIN 

in S.Jay Kau-pnan'S ,, 

"GREATER THAN FAME 

Scenario by Kafherine Deed 

Direction - Alan Crosland 





OWEN MOORE 

in Lewis Allen Brovne's 

"SOONER OR LATER" 

Scenario bu t^. Cecil Smith 
Direction— Ves:leij Ru^cjles ( 

Distributed bij Select 



Sunday, January 18, 1920 



Tsit4^ 



DAII.Y 



Author's Dramatic Idea Is Quite Spoiled by Scenario and Direction 



Lucy Cotton in 
"BLIND LOVE" 

Gerald Bacon — Aywon — State Rights 

DIRECTOR Oliver D. Bailey 

AUTHOR Max Marcin 

SCENARIO BY Basil Dickey 

CAMERAMAN Edward Earl 

AS A WHOLE Very fine dramatic idea marred 

by ill-treatment in scenario ; climax shows big 

league situation but is not sympathetically 

developed. 
STORY Essential twists, expertly contrived and 

climax reveals a big dramatic idea but poor 

handling has deprived it of full entertaining 

power. 
DIRECTION Shows real effort but for most part 

is stagey and forces players to play to camera 

in obvious fashion. 

PHOTOGRAPHY ; Good 

LIGHTINGS Some good but others just as bad 

in regard to lights and shadows. 

CAMERA WORK Poor 

STAR Registers fairly well through youth, 

beauty and ability although her work in later 

features has shown to better advantage. 

SUPPORT Well selected but not well directed 

EXTERIORS Beautiful garden shots 

INTERIORS Fail to create the proper high class 

atmosphere. 
DETAIL Le Guere's makeup varies in different 

scenes and gives him appearance of chame- 
leon. 
CHARACTER OF STORY Mercenary villain 

attempts to ruin young man's marriage to 

rich girl. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 5,300 feet 

On reading- all those big names of the men concerned 
in the production of "Blind Love" one might arrive 
at the conclusion that the picture was something out 
of the ordinary in the way of entertainment. Such, 
however, is not the case unless out of the ordinary 



be interpreted to mean below the average feature 
standard. 

Mr. Marciu's idea for "Blind Love" was curiously 
different and doubtless emanated a dramatic strength 
in its original synopsis form. It builded to a par- 
ticularly striking climax, a climax which one can well 
imagine holding an audience breathless on the speak- 
ing stage or, again, on the screen if it were handled 
in a sympathetic manner. 

However, the other celebrities connected with the 
production, namely Basil Dickey and Oliver Bailey 
have generally failed in realizing on the dramatic 
worth of the material handed them by the author. 
The scenario writer has botched the work almost com- 
pletely so what might have been an intensely inter- 
esting story culminating in a denouement of real force, 
turns out to be an artificially motivated, uneven story 
concluding in a climax that only reveals its full pos- 
sibilties to one trained to take even the bad pictures 
seriously — and which will hardly reveal anything sat- 
isfactory to the person in search of entertainment. 

The story relates of Beard's love for Josephine Bur- 
den, an heiress, who is overjoyed particularly as she 
realize he is unaware of her wealth. They marry. 
Previously George Collins had received Beard's sig- 
nature, when the latter was intoxicated, to a paper 
purporting to be an ordinary I. O. U. but which was 
a statement to the effect that he (Beard) would pay 
Collins a sum of money in reward for his introduction 
to Josephine if he ever succeeded in marrying her. 

When Josephine learns of this she is utterly dis- 
consolate. The story then concentrates on another 

love affair of an aged pair and through the tragedy 
which concludes this Josephine and Beard are brought 
to a real understanding of each other — the false note 
is explained. 

Lucy Cotton creates a^ favorable impression as Jo- 
sephine while George Le Guere, Thurlow Bergen, 
Morgan Coman, Charles Butler, Lillian Bacon and 
Edouarde Durand play other important roles. 



People Have Been Educated to Better Pictures Than This 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Practically every picture audience in the country 
has been educated to expect better things than "Blind 
Love." And it seems a pity to condemn it when all 
the sincere effort expended on it is considered. How- 
ever, "Blind Love" is way below the standards set by 
the average offering of the day. Exhibitors who 
have built up any sort of a patronage through select- 



ing their pictures from the best the market has to 
offer, will find that it fails to rank in the 1, 2, 3 class. 
If it has to be played, feature the name of Max 
Marcin and mention the fact that he was one of the 
authors of "Cheating Cheaters" and also give Lucy 
Cotton a play for all things indicate to the rapid rise 
in popularity of this young actress. 



Real Showmen - and \t^ 



There is valuable information for every exhibitor in 
the country on "How to Be Successful Though an Ex- 
hibitor" in a review of the methods that have enabled 
N. H. Gordon, of Boston, to achieve his present status. 

Twelve years ago Gordon owned and managed one 
small house. It required approximately four years 
for him to obtain a substantial start toward success. 
During that time he carefully formed the policies and 
methods upon which he bases all of his achievements. 

Today he is the executive head of a circuit of more 
thaVi 60 first-class theaters. He is a financial power; 
a bank director; owner of the First National Exhibit- 
ors' Circuit franchise, and the exhibitor who took a 
special feature attraction, while it was being played foi; 
maximums of one and two weeks in other big cities, 
and put it on in Boston for twenty consecutive weeks 
at prices which topped $1.50 a seat. 

The business acumen which actuated Mr. Gordon in 
this accomplishment which has shattered all precedents 
for duration of runs and admission prices, is th.e one 
that is the underlying motive in everything he does as 
an exhibitor. 

. It amounts to an unshakable confidence in motion 
pictures. 

Gordon began his career as an exhibitor on the pro- 
verbial "shoe string" for finances. In that respect he 
was not unlike a dozen or -five thousand other motion 
picture exhibitors of twelve years ago. But it is the 
things Gordon has done since then that comprise a 
guide to growth, prosperity and community import- 
ance for other exhibitors who have the ambition and 
possibly lack the secret of the way to realize it. 

"How did you do it?" he was asked. And Gordon 

replied : 

"First, by realizing early in my experiences as a 
theater owner, with one small house, that I would need 
assistance to enable me to realize my ambition for a 
big circuit in New England. To build up my interests 
with nothing but the profits from one theater would 
have been a long, tedious process. I felt that some 
other exhibitor might not feel the hesitancy I had 
about a partnership with capital, which would mean a 
division of profits. So I overcame one word— my 

hesitancy. 

"It seemed to me that the folks who had surplus 
money, made in other industries, and who might be- 
come interested in motion picture theaters, would be 
more agreeably disposed if they were personally ac- 
quainted with the man who submitted a proposition 
to them It lias seemed perfectly natural to me al- 



ways to associate with influential men. I cultivated 
their acquaintance. I always replied truthfully to ques- 
tions about my business. I never hesitated in my con- 
fidence in the business. I was building for the future 
during the early years, and my chief asset was a fast 
growing personal friendship with worth-while business 
people. 

"Four years after I opened my small house I found 
my big opportunity to enter Boston as an exhibitor. 
From that time on it has been chiefly a problem in 
restraining ambition so that it did not get out of step 
with resources available for development and exten- 
sion work. 

"I think that every exhibitor, no matter where he is 
located, or how big or small his theater holdings may 
be, should consider himself an integral part of his 
community, just as important as the clothiers, bankers 
or merchants in any line. He should have a genuine 
pride in his business. Membership in local civic bodies, 
commercial clubs and even representative private clubs 
and associations, is a valuable point of contact with 
municipal affairs, and it gives an exhibitor position, 
socially and commercially. Then, when he wants as- 
sistance, in any form, to build a new and larger house, 
or to extend his holdings into other communities in 
the territory, he has a great asset in his local acquaint- 
ance." 

One important feature of Gordon's policy for the 
operation of his theaters is his refusal to recognize 
precedents or what the other fellow does. ' He is a 
convert to pioneering. Here enters the most recent 
example. Gordon has given the industry of his refusal 
to consider the facts of what has been done as having 
any bearing on what can be done. By his willingness 
to cut away from things conventional, he has made 
money on productions long after exhibitors in other 
territories have ceased to run them. 

When First National released Mary Pickford's 
"Daddy Long Legs," Gordon decided that the indus- 
try had gone beyond the point of one and two weeks' 
stands as the maximum. By the use of showmanship 
he proved his theory to be a fact. More important 
still, he demonstrated that exhibitors can charge prices 
that are almost the equivalent of those for legitimate 
road shows. 

For twenty consecutive weeks he presented "Daddy 
Long Legs" in Boston at $1.50 top admission. And 
during the five months' of its run he did not have a 
week when the net profits were more than twenty per 
cent, below those of the opening week. 





c?^= 



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X 



Tk© 

Best known man 
in the world in the 

MILLION DOllAR 

pathe' serial 

DAREDEVIL 
DURANT 

(?)Pafhe' 

V±^ Distributors 



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"'%*.. 



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A positivelij unparalleled anc. 



i-^if- 'jf.i 



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RELEASED 



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Pafhe 

Distributors 



amazing box ojjice attraction- 

vhose name jiqures daily in the newspapers 
of thevorld.is presented in a Pathe Serial 
certain to eclipse all records ojpast and present 
and to enrich the exhibitors oj the earth'- 



»;33 










Distributors 




JsckDempsey 

in 

latlie presents to exhibitors the opportunity 
of their lives to fill their houses until the walls 
bulge. If publicity means dollars, and it vb 
certain that it does, then this Dempsex serial 
means milliong). 

624 unsolicited bookings, price unaskd.caiiie 
in by wire and letter within three days oi the 
bare announcement of the fact that Jack 
Dempsey champion of champions, was work- 
ing in a Pathe serial! 

Scores oi^ exhibitors who never ran a 
serial are ashing fox terms. 

The stampede for this certain success is' 
starting-; GET IN TOUCH WITH THE NEAR- ' 
EST PATHfi EXCHANGE AT ONCE IF YOU 
WANT TO CHAIN 'EK OUT FOR FIFTEEN 
HOUSE'CHOKING WEEKS ! 




Sunday, January 18, 1920 



Vis4>i 



His combination of a supreme confidence in the 
business, which enables him to impress his business 
associates and acquaintances with its stability and 
soundness, with his determination not to consider any 
achievement the limit of possibilities for the screen, 
has enabled him to forge ahead by leaps and bounds. 

"No one can correctly state the ultimate in motion 
pictures," he declares. "I feel today almost as I did 



DAILV 



H'l' 



twelve years ago, that the future for exhibitors is just 
as great and equally as promising as ever. The great 
essential is for an exhibitor to consider his theater or 
theaters as a business enterprise, worthy of the best 
that is in him, and sorely needing a thorough mastery 
of the details of showmanship to make them profitable 
and enduring." 




10 



s!i^^ 



DAIUY 



Sunday, January 18, 1920 



They Dressed This Up Lavishly Enough But Forgot a Story 



Elaine Hammerstein in 

"GREATER THAN FAME" 

Selznick — Select 

DIRECTOR Alan Crosland 

AUTHOR S. Jay Kaufman 

SCENARIO BY Katharine Reed 

CAMERAMAN Jules Cronjager 

AS A WHOLE Very adequate production given 

to totally inadequate story idea. 
STORY Always preaching that love is greater 

than fame and preaches so much the plot 

never makes any headway. 

DIRECTION Very lavish and high class 

PHOTOGRAPHY Very good 

LIGHTINGS Realistic 

CAMERA WORK Highly commendable 

STAR Appeals and seems thoroughly able to 

handle what little work is given her. 

SUPPORT Excellent 

EXTERIORS Include a number of different 

views of New York City and pretty suburban 

shots. 

INTERIORS All rich and lavish 

DETAIL Some anacronisms in inserts and time ; 

director shows big comfortable setting for 

which girl pays $10.00 a week and meagre 

setting for which villain pays $300.00 a month 
CHARACTER OF STORY Girl learns that love 

is greater than fame. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 5,000 feet 

Barring a few directorial slips which fail to make 
very big dents in a careful and lavish production, 
"Greater Than Fame" may be set down as a richly 
embellished picture, with a capable star and a highly 
competent supporting cast but without anywhere near 
enough substance to entertainingly fill out its foot- 
age. 



The story is terribly weak and the main points that 
stand out in it are its subtitles which are forever 
preaching about love and fame and ambition. In fact 
they serve very forcefully to give the impression that 
the author of "Greater Than Fame" had a "message" 
to get over to the public, to wit that love is greater 
than all fame, and that, furthermore, he didn't have a 
plot to write into his message. 

Elaine Hammerstein assumes the role of Margaret 
Brooks, a New England girl who comes to New York 
to cultivate her singing voice. She doesn't get along 
very well on account of lack of funds. Her teacher 
introduces her to Mrs. Waring, a wealthy patron of 
struggling artists who promises assistance. In truth 
she takes Margaret into her home and supplies her , 
with plenty of gowns and a life of leisure. ' 

Then Margaret wakes up to the fact that she isn't 
getting anywhere and decides to try it alone again. 
This time she falls foul of Mr. Waring who attempts 
to get her in his power. Margaret's true friend, John 
Martin, sees them together and misconstrues the en- 
tire situation. He returns to his home and suffers a 
nervous breakdown. Margaret visits an opera impres- 
sario who also makes a nasty proposition to her and 
then reforms when she reproaches him. Then she 
returns to Martin, explains matters and they marry 
and the last scene shows her making her operatic 
debut in an opus by her husband which is presented 
by the self-same impressario. 

All of which is nowhere near substantial enough 
for a feature story and this despite the very good work 
of the star and her notable supporting cast which in- 
cludes such skilled players as Walter McGrail, Albert 
Roccardi, Wiliam H. Tooker, Julia Swayne Gordon, 
Arthur Donaldson and Cora Williams. 



This Doesn't Give Sufficient Satisfaction 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



This certainly doesn't measure up to the type of en- 
tertainment that one is led to hope for from the Selz- 
nick studios. And its shortcomings, first and last, 
may be chalked up to the lack of dramatic story mater- 
ial. You can endow a picture with the most lavish 
production in the world, contribute to it the best 
photography and lighting effects and secure the ser- 
vices of a competent star and supporting cast but when 
all is said and done these amount to nothing if the 
story fails to deliver the goods. 

That's just the trouble here. Of course Selznick has 



advertised his product largely and there may be an 
already created public waiting to see "Greater Than 
Fame" as soon as you show the title and the name of 
the star over your theater but most people are going 
to come out pretty much disappointed after sitting 
through the feature. Its lack of meaty material and 
the obvious padding that it contains tire the spec- 
tator and while it has some human interest moments 
and some interesting and pretty shots it can not be 
ranked as a first class feature because of the lack of 
real honest-to-goodness story material. 



Sunday, January 18. 1920 



ali^^ 



DAILV 



11 



Holds Well Throughout and Gets Over Its Point With Decision 



Alice Joyce in 

"SLAVES OF PRIDE" 

Vitagraph 

DIRECTOR George Terwilliger 

AUTHOR Not credited 

SCENARIO BY William B. Courtney 

CAMERAMAN Joe Shelderfer and Charles Davis 

AS A WHOLE Especially fine acting is a big 

feature of Miss Joyce's latest ; generally 

splendid production. 
STORY Goes to quite a degree of exaggeration 

to show the depth of pride but gets over the 

lesson effectively. 
DIRECTION Allowed a few incongruities but 

registered the author's intention in a practi- 
cal way. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Very good 

LIGHTINGS Always clear 

CAMERA WORK Creditable 

STAR Dignified and sincere; her usual pleasing 

self. 
SUPPORT Percy Marmont and G. V. Seyffer- 

titz have equally forceful parts and make 

striking impressions. 

EXTERIORS Beautiful country estate 

INTERIORS Quite suitable 

DETAIL One or two bad bits but nothing 

extremely noticeable. 
CHARACTER OF STORY Fully implied by 

the title. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 5,362 feet 

About the biggest features of Miss Joyce's latest 
Vitagraph production, "Slaves of Pride," are the un- 
usually well selected cast and peculiar suitability of 
the story to the star's personality. Miss Joyce sup- 
plies a very fine and a truly finished performance, re- 
taining her accustomed poise and dignity throughout 
the picture. 

A share of the credit for the success of the produc- 
tion goes to Mr. Marmont and Mr. Seylfertitz, both 



of whom render strikingly forceful portrayals, Mr. 
Marmont playing the part of the austere 'slave of 
pride' and Mr. Seyffertitz as his secretary. 

The director has handled the story material very 
well and worked up to the various high spot in an 
efficacious manner. Some audiences may take excep- 
tion to a rather unnecessary bit where the best friend 
of the bankrupt millionaire hands him a revolver as 
a means of deliverance from his trouble. The entire 
idea is mainly for the purpose of having the wife save 
her husband at the fatal moment but it seems there 
should be some other way of having the idea present 
itself to the husband. 

Miss Joyce has been reared in luxury but at the time 
the picture opens her mother is anxious to secure a 
wealthy husband for her daughter now that they are 
reduced in circumstances. Her ambitions are realized 
when Alice marries Brewster Howard (Percy Mar- 
mont), a wealthy and powerful figure in financial 
circles but a 'slave of pride.' 

Shero Alice, contrary to gossip, is truly in love with 
her husband but it isn't long before his pride, which 
assumes a domineering attitude toward everyone in- 
cluding his wife, begins to freeze the loyalty and de- 
votion of the wife who determines to humiliate How- 
ard by pretending to elope with his secretary. 

Howard follows the pair but when he arrives at the 
hotel where they are registered, the secretary has 
escaped after an unsuccessful attempt to force his at- 
tentions on Alice. Howard gives chase, finally cor- 
nering his victim at a railroad station. The secretary 
backs out a door and onto a track where he is killed 
by an approaching train. 

The action jumps to the offices of Howard where 
a meeting is in progress which discloses that the for- 
mer secretary had been systematically ruining his 
employer for years and he is now a bankrupt. Alice 
returns to her home in time to save her husband from 
killing himself. 



Use the Name of the Star Extensively and Promise Them Something Good 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Admirers of Miss Joyce who follow up her work 
on the screen, will be particularly pleased with her 
performance in "Slaves of Pride." The star is admir- 
ably adapted to the part and throughout the entire 
picture is her usual charming self. Her's is a real 
personality, one that makes no small impression. Be 
sure to tell your women patrons that she wears some 



very gorgeous gowns and wraps as the wife of the 
millionaire. 

Make a point of the story. Play up the title of the 
picture and say something about the results of too 
great a pride. You can safely promise them some very 
good acting on the part of Miss Joyce's supporting 
company, mentioning the names of Mr. Marmont and 
Mr. Seyffertitz. 



ANOTHER GREAT SPECIAL PRODUCTION 






MOTION PICTURE NEWS: "Wonderful" is the 
word that accurately describes this screenization 
of Emerson Hough's great story "The Sage- 
brusher. " A photoplay masterpiece demands 
many essentials and Benjamin B. Hampton's 

Eicture qualifies in every respect. First it 
as an appealing story and a notable cast ... * 
Box-office angle: Metropolitan, big puller and 
tremendously pleasing; Elite, strong puller and 
exceptionally pleasing; Family, big puller and 
wonderfully pleasing; Workers, strong puller, 
and tremendously pleasing. 

MOVING PICTURE WORLD: Benjamin B. 
Hampton's newest Great Authors' special, Emer- 
son Hough's " The Sagebrusher " is the story of 
a rough diamond with a big heart. It will please 
the great majority of screen patrons. Replete 
with dramatic intensity with much of the spectac- 
ular and melodramatic elements. 

EXHIBITORS TRADE REVIEW: Benjamin 
B Hampton's big new production " The Sage- 
brusher " brings another powerful author to the 
screen in the person of Emerson Hough. This 
picture has a following booked in advance on 
the author's popularity. 

WID'S DAILY: In his story of love and faith 
Emerson Hough has the truly human touch 
containing all of the emotions expected in such 
a fine theme. There are enough thrills to flavor 
and they will keep the interest sustained. Be 
sure and tell your audience this is the first 
Emerson Hough novel ever screened. 

NEW YORK TELEGRAPH: "The Sage- 
brusher" is highly commendable and worth 
seeing from every angle. It combines story, 
director and players in a strong attraction; a 
worthy successor to "The Westerners" and, 
"Desert Gold." 



\ /> 




Benjamin B. yami 
Jbr^sents 



ron 



••^¥wiv,^.:''■<^■'^.^ 



The pKotoplay op the novel by 



With an all-star cast: 

ROY STEWART 

MARGUERITE De La MOTTE 

NOAH BEERY 

BETTY BRICE 

ARTHUR MORRISON 

GORDON RUSSELL 



EMERSON HOUGH 

': ^Dlreeted by EDWARD SLOMAN 

ij Bmjamin B. Hampton-- Great Jut hors Production 
7 WW: HODKINSON CORPORfflON 

527 Fifth Avenue . New York City 

DistnbuUngthroughXSTRiExc'ruinge.Tncarporated 
Foreign Distributor. J Frank Brockliss;lnc.729-7ii Are. 



Sunday, January 18, 1920 



jM i 



DAILV 



13 



Russell Stars in Effective Melodrama 



William Russell in 

"THE VALLEY OF TO-MORROW" 

American — Pathe 

DIRECTOR Emmett J. Flynn 

AUTHOR Stephen Fox 

SCENARIO BY Stephen Fox 

CAMERAMAN George Rizard 

AS A WHOLE Strong mountain drama which 

is thrilling and will hold audience in suspense ; 

possesses healthy outdoor atmosphere. 
STORY Melodrama which affords star splendid 

opportunity to please film fans. 
DIRECTION Brought out the big moments in 

fine fashion; has slight anti-climax. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Generally good 

LIGHTINGS Up to the standard with some 

splendid effects near camp-fire, 

CAMERA WORK Commendable 

STAR Exceptionally goo|d; displays powerful 

personality. 
SUPPORT. Acceptable; Frank Brownlee fine as 

villain and Mary Thurman reasonably good 

in feminine lead. 

EXTERIORS Pleasing to the eye at all times 

INTERIORS Few but satisfactory 

DETAIL Most of it good, there being several 

fine touches; spectacle of dying man writing 

accusation of villain in blood on newspaper 

rather ghastly; a superfluity of closeups. 
CHARACTER OF STORY Hero is called upon 

to avenge sister whose death was indirectly 

caused by the man who saved his life. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 6,000 feet 

Pleasing in atmosphere and possessing the element 
of suspense, caused by placing the star in a rather 
unusual position, this will probably prove a worth- 
while offering. William Russell in the stellar role 
gives an excellent performance and the production 
generally measures up to high standard. It has ro- 



mance, cleverly interwoven with thrills and incidents 
in such a manner, that it will prove pleasing to the 
fan audience. 

After the big punch in the offering, there is what 
is more or less an anti-climax, but that can be over- 
looked. There are many touches that will prove effec- 
tive, the bits with the kitten and some others being 
especially pleasing. Some manner should have been 
devised, in which the portion where the dying man 
writing the name of his murderer in blood on an 
old newspaper hanging by his side, might have been 
made less gruesome, however, for that is one part 
that is certainly not pleasing. 

George Rizard who did the camera work, and is 
credited with arranging the lighting effects, did good 
work, securing some splendid outdoor shots and sev- 
eral pleasing effects. 

While Dabney Morgan reposes in jail for violating 
the liquor distilling law, he receives word of the fact 
that his sister has been deceived by a cosmopolitan 
chap, who has brought her into such a frame of mind 
that she jumped off a cliff. He manages to get out 
but on his journey, is caught in a quicksand and saved 
by the man he is trailing. Subsequently, he is con- 
fronted with the problem of living up to the tradi- 
tions of his clan, and killing the man who has saved 
him from an unhappy finish, or letting the scoundrel 
live. He solves it by giving the fellow what is. con- 
sidered a fair chance, that is, permits him to dash 
off a certain distance and then takes a shot at him. 
Russell wounds him severely, but does not kill him. 
Subsequently, he is forced at the point of a revolver 
by the wounded man's sister, to bring him indoors. 
Fang Morgan, the villain has a hand in the proceeding, 
and almost queers Russell with the girl, whom he 
is rapidly learning to love, but it's all fixed in the 
end, when Fang is shot, and Russell goes as. far as 
to promise not to make any more moonshine whiskey. 



You Should Be Able to Find Room for This 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



If you have found that your crowd takes a liking 
to William Russell's productions, you will be perfectly 
safe in booking this for Russell will make a hit in 
it. Your crowd may like outdoor dramas, and if it 
does, then again, you have a reason for signing to 
play this. Most probably, it will please your audience, 
no matter what sort of a crowd it is. 

Play up William Russell's name if you decide to 
present this. He gives a splendid exhibition in the 



production and they won't go away disappointed. 
Promise them a virile drama with plenty of action and 
love interest, a wicked villain and a good hero. 

You won't go wrong if you decide to go in for some 
exploitation on this, and it certainly will afford you 
an opportunity to pull some stunts. Play up the. 
problem in which Russell is placed when he has to 
kill the man who saved his life. That idea should 
provide you with some catchy catch-lines. 



WARNING 



The entire Motion Picture Industry is hereby warned of an attempt by the dis- 
tributing agencies to offer a series of productions as being the works of David Wark 
Griffith. 

For the protection of all — AND ESPECIALLY EXHIBITORS — and 
that they may not be misled by these offerings, Mr. Griffith has issued the following 
statement: • i 



"TO THE MOTION PICTURE INDUSTRY: 

"All genuine Griffith productions carry the initials D. G. and the 
written name GRIFFITH on the main title and on all important subtitles, 
and any motion picture offered without these trade marks not only is un- 
authentic, but is being foisted on the exhibitors and the public in an effort 
to give the impression that it was personally directed. 

"In justice to all concerned I hereby ask all exhibitors, for the protec- 
tion of themselves and their patrons, not to advertise any picture as a 
Griffith production unless it carries the above trade marks stamped in 
the film." (Signed) 



^ 




For the information of all exhibitors the following list of GENUINE GRIFFITH 

PRODUCTIONS is submitted: 

RELEASED THROUGH D. W. GRIFFITH SERVICE: 

"Hearts of the World" 
"The Fall of Babylon" 
"The Mother and the Law" 

RELEASED THROUGH FAMOUS PLAYERS-LASKY: 

"The Great Love" "A Romance of Happy Valley" 

"The Greatest Thing in Life" "True Heart Susie" 

"The Girl Who Stayed at Home" "Scarlet Days" 

RELEASED THROUGH UNITED ARTISTS: 

"Broken Blossoms" (Others to be announced later) 

RELEASED THROUGH FIRST NATIONAL EXHIBITORS' CIRCUIT: 

"The Greatest Question" (Others to be announced later) 

SPECIAL PRODUCTIONS: "The Birth of a Nation" "Intolerance" 

Any and all productions not listed above ARE NOT GRIFFITH PRODUC- 
TIONS, and if advertised as Griffith productions a denial signed by Mr. Griffith will 
be published in all territories where they are shown. 

For Further Information Address 

D. W. GRIFFITH SERVICE 

ALBERT L. GREY, General Manager 

720 Longacre Bldg., 1480 Broadway, New York City 

'NJ^^'T'P' The picture called "Tiger Girl," recently advertised as a Griffith production, was not directed by Mr. 
*^Vy I Ht Griffith, but by Paul Powell, and it is an injustice to Mr. Powell as well as to Mr. Griffith to call it 
a Griffith picture. As a matter of record, the picture is an old print formerly called "The Lily and the Rose" and is 
now being resurrected presumably for the purpose of trading on Mr. Griffith's name. 



Sunday, January 18, 1920 



ittfejf^fer 



15 



They Meant to Make a Thriller But They Turned Out a Pretty Good Comedy 



Tom Mix in 

"THE CYCLONE" 

Fox 

DIRECTOR Cliff Smith 

AUTHOR Col. Todhunter Marigold 

SCENARIO BY J. Anthony Roach 

CAMERAMAN Frank Goode 

AS A WHOLE Rapid-action western stuff with 

thrills that will get the same sort of laughs as 
those in the Sunshine comedies. 

STORY The old famiUar plot of the Northwest 

Mounted Policeman hero persuing his man 
and eventually getting him. 

DIRECTION Has speeded up the action to a 

fine pace but has failed to make the thrills at 
all real — maybe Smith wasn't trying to. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Average 

LIGHTINGS Commonplace 

CAMERAWORK. .... .One particularly interesting 

shot of house with its "side" removed. 

EXTERIORS Good western stuff 

INTERIORS Acceptable 

DETAIL. . . .No kicks on it considering general char- 
acter of the production. 

CHARACTER OF STORY Hero runs Chinese 

border smugglers to the ground. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 5,000 feet 

They evidently set out to make another thriller in 
"The Cyclone," a picture that would be in line with 
Tom Mix's previous productions. But they went 
astray, particularly on the thrills, these scenes of 
physical sensationalism taking on the ridiculously im- 
possible aspect of those seen in Mr. Fox's own Sun- 
shine comedies. For instance, take the scene where 
the gallant hero is going across a street from one roof 
to another by means of a rope. Villains cut it and 



he swings down through a window, landing on a bed 
where reposes a woman. Hampton Del Ruth please 
write. 

Another one that for sheer improbability rivals even 
the wildest slapstick trick is the climax scene where 
hero rides his horse up to the roof of a gambling' and 
opium joint and then crashes through its three stones 
to the basement below, still remaining in the :^addle. 
The funny part about this is that the horse is just as 
good as new when it's all over. No beast but a stallion 
made of iron could stand that drop and still count 
no broken legs when the trick was over. 

However, what with the rapid-action combined with 
these stunts they have succeeded after all in turning 
out a pretty good comedy-melodrama. Folks are go- 
ing to laugh at the thrills good-naturedly and the story 
itself succeeds in stimulating a mild degree of interest. 

Hero is Sergeant Tim of that familiar picture band, 
the Northwest Mounted Police. He is assigned to 
trail down a band that is engaged in smuggling China- 
men across into the United States. At the ranch 
owned by the father of the girl he loves he discovers 
the villain in the person of the foreman. He suc- 
ceeds in capturing most of the smugglers but the vil- 
lain escapes and goes after the girl. Tim pursues but 
gets the worst of it from the villain who almost kicks 
the life out of him, then making off with the girl to 
Vancouver's Chinatown. Tim again pursues him there 
and then follows the rescue effected by the marvelous 
drop from room to basement. An interesting cross 
section of the gambling house is disclosed by remov- 
ing the front of the building. 

Mix goes through all the thrills calmly and manages 
to get away with what little acting awarded him pret- 
ty successfully. Coleen Moore is his leading lady 
while Henry Herbert and William EUingford are oth- 
ers in the cast. 



Star's Admirers Will Probably Count This as Good Entertainment 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



While the thrills in "The Cyclone" are far more im- 
probable than those in the average western picture, 
Tom Mix's admirers will probably accept them in 
good fun and count the picture as good entertainment. 
There are times when the more improbable the thrill, 
the more applause it brings from a sympathetic audi- 
ence. Exhibitors who have seen some of the Fair- 
banks' improbabilities are in a position to realize this. 

As a consequence the followers of this star are 



quite likely to accept this picture in the same way, 
good-naturedly. At the same time the action through- 
out is keyed at a good, fast clip and the plot, slight as 
it is, is never allowed to lag in the least bit. 

All things considered, "The Cyclone" should pro- 
vide most satisfactory entertainment to yoiu" Mix fans 
and will get over fairly well before not too particular 
audiences that are not as famiUar with the star. 




<._y 



I33 




IhoYoars Bc^st 
Serial Bet 

Universalis 

nnni. 




pULL house! Exactly what it says — your theatre filled week after week! 
Look at these five leaders of the serial field — stars, all of them, of proven 
pulling-power, in five of the greatest new top-notch serials the "know-how- 
experience" of Universal has ever produced. Go carefully over this list — cap- 
tivating Kathleen O'Connor in "The Lion Man," inimitable Art Acord in 
"The Moonriders," mighty Elmo Lincoln in "Elmo the Fearless," popular 
Eddie Polo in "The Vanishing Dagger," and dashing Marie Walcamp in 
"The Dragon's Net." Five competitor-proof offerings that will assure you 
fifty-two straight weeks of full houses. Book the Full House Five. It's good 
business insurance — and it's business that pays. 




POLO 
WA.LCA.MP 
LINCOLN 
O CONNOR 
ACORD 



MM am 



Sunday, January 18, 1920 itt/^ ^\ DAkll^^ 



B!i^?l 



A Production Beautiful to Look at But Lacks Sympathy in Its Dramatic Action 

Nazimova in the actress. Ilcr latest \eliie!e, "Stnuij^er than Deat'.i" 

"STRONGER THAN DEATH" does not give her tli'/ (.i)i.(.rtunity to (hsi)hiy licr dis- 

Metro tinct dramatic al)ilit\ , I rue llie story lias its drani- 

DIRECTOR Herbert Blache and Charles Bryant atic moments hut they ari' short-li\ed and hick the 

.SUPERVISED BY Maxwell Karger symi)at!iy that the star's personality re(|uires. 

.AUTHOR I. A. E. Wylie "Stron.ger Than Death" i- not without its imijhius- 

•SCENARIO BY Charles Bryant ihilities. It would seem that the .author has a rather 

'CAMERAMAN R. J. Bergquist strange conception of a ])lace to send his heroine in 

AS A WHOLE Lavish production with sump- search of a rich luishand hut he that as it may he 

tuous scenes and settings; spectacle atmos- estahlishes lur in a colon\ in India where her fame as 

phere dominant feature. a dancer gains for her tiie admiratiou and ])atronage 

■STORY Doesn't give the star her happiest en- of tlie whites in the settlement. 

vironment but she handles the part in her lu this colony there is one known as James Barclay 
usual capable manner. hut openly axoided hy society hecause he is a half- 
DIRECTION Highly commendable for the most ])reed. He is immensely wealthy, however, and know- 
part; gave the star every opportunity. ing the reason for the dancer's ])resence, he gallantly 
PHOTOGRAPHY Splendid; some beautiful offers her his wealtli along w'th himself hut is re- 



effects. 



pulsed 



LIGHTINGS Artistic Commander of the local I'.ritish garrison is Col. 

■CAMERAWORK Very good Boucicault .and his son. played hy .Mr. Bry- 

STAR Maintains her distinct individuality; ant, known as the llermit Doctor of (ia\a. tor 

doesn't reach the dramatic heights oT some his sacrificing attend.ance among the choler.a ]>atients. 

earlier vehicles. The dancer falls in lo\e with him .and while in his 

SUPPORT. .Charles Bryant pleasing in the male lead hut discovers her own photo which hrings forth the 

Herbert Prior gives a splendid character por- confession that he has been secretly in lo\e with her 

trayal. since he had seen her dance in I'jigland sometime 

EXTERIORS Appropriate backgrounds; very i)re\ious. 

real. It h;ii)])ens that Barclay sees the doctor strike his 

INTERIORS Entirely suited father and in order to have the half-caste keep silent 

DETAIL Wasted too much footage getting and s;i\e her lover from court m.arti.il. the dancer 

started. m.arries Barchn-, hut "in n.ame onl}." 

■CHARACTER OF STORY ...... Famous dancer i^ack of space forbids going into the remainder of 

broken down in health in search of a rich , . , ., , -,,,01^ .1.^.^1 

the storv m detad hut it should snfhce to sav that tiie 
husband. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 7.000 feet ^^^'^''^ ^''^ ""^^"^ ^" ^^''' '■'^'^ •^^^'''' '"i"^'^'''' ^^ory regard- 
Madam Nazimova's producers are seemingly finding ing the sacred dancer of the 'rem])le of N'ishnu is 
it difficult to g-et material especially well suited to unfolded and Barclay's identit} is established. 

Star and Splendor of Settings Will Get It Over 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 

The more recent productions which Metro has re- It is in connection with these latter secjuences that 

leased starring Xa/imova have been more or less ^ c ^\ \ ■ \ i ,,.■ «• .,* .,,„.i 

•- . , . most of the lavishness and artistic etiects are used. 

^along spectacular lines and "Strong^cr than Death" is 

another such picture. The main story deals with the "Stronger Than Death" will probably please admirers 

"dancer's search for a rich husljand wdien her health of the star but there will he a vast majority of them 

fails her and she is no longer able to continue her work, ^^,^^ ^^.^^^,^, ^.^i^^^^,^ something less fanciful, .some- 
but of practicallv equal im])ortance is the story of the 

bride of Vishnu' the sacred dancer of the temple who thing that will give Nazimova a better chance to dis- 

had been seduced many years previous by a British play her dramatic ability, along the lines of "Out of 

Army officer. the Fog." 



MAGNIFICENT, BIG, SHOULD ^E^i YOU MONEY, 
THESE ARE SOME OF THEhC QJl^ili^ ^N A PICTURE 

thAt you want- 



-%,_ 



-» 






mm^ I 



m\ • I' 



v 



,^ 



fi 



:^^ 



V* 



JESSE D. HAMPTON Preseixks 



adapted from James Willard's celebrated 
London success 

Directed by Wallace Worsley 

WID'S says: "Nicely handled; should register 
most anywhere. . . Very satisfactory enter- 
tainment .... Excellent title and popular; 
should get you money." 



.-^.^ 



MOTION PICTURE NEWS says: "Can be con- 
sistently exploited as a big production." 

MOVING PICTURE WORLD says: "A magnlfi 
cent seven reel production. Too much can- 
not be said for the brilliant Zululand camp 
and battle scenes. It will give the spectator 
a fresh set of thrills. 

A SEVEN PART SPECIAL 



H^feru^ 




DAILV 



Sunday, January 18, 1920 



Starts Off With a Bang But Peters Out Toward End 



H. B. Warner in 
"•HAUNTING SHADOWS" 
Hampton — Robertson — Cole 

DIRECTOR Henry King 

AUTHOR Meredith Nicholson 

SCENARIO BY Eugene B. Lewis from "House 

of a Thousand Candles." 

■CAMERAMAN Victor Milner 

-AS A WHOLE Doesn't satisfy as it should ow- 
ing to enormous amount of footage awarded 
to star alone. 
"STORY. .Deep mystery story with numerous touches 
that starts off well but grows tiresome toward 
end as no new complications appear. 
DIRECTION Should have compressed the ac- 
tion further and forgotten Warner once in a 
while. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Excellent 

LIGHTINGS All very good; some fine effects 

CAMERA WORK Very effective 

;STAR Creates fine impression at first but film 

gives entirely too much of him. 

:SUPPORT Capable 

EXTERIORS Highly appropriate 

INTERIORS Very good settings which seem 

to further suggest mystery. 

DETAIL No slips 

CHARACTER OF STORY Villain tries to trick 

and scare hero out of inheritance ; surprise 
finish in return of man supposedly dead. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 4,900 feet 

This certainly started off like a regular whirlwind 
and showed a fine lot of mystery punctuated frequently 
"by some flashes of fine comedy. But evidently the 
pace was too hard to maintain throughout and before 
the picture has passed the half-way mark the interest 
begins to slacken and the action becomes draggy 
owing- to a lack of fresh complications and a tiresome 
stretching out of those already introduced. 



And it surely looks as if H. U. Warner had written 
in Itis contract that he should have so many scenes- 
and so many closeups to liimself. For there is scene 
after scene in "Haunting Shadows" that shows him 
investigating the mysterious old house that are held 
altogether too long and that are, in many cases, un- 
necessary besides. 

This entering of all the action, or footage rather, 
(in the star and the absence of fresh twists to capture 
the interest as the film rolls on is responsible for a 
big turn in the picture's character after the first two 
reels. The action loses its pep and sparkle, the mys- 
ter_y instead of maintaining suspense, merely becomes 
aggravatingly mystifying and the spectator sits and 
awaits the ending restlessly. 

Warner appears as John Glenarm who inherits a 
mysterious old liousc in a little Indiana town from 
his grandfather. By the conditions of the will he 
must live in the house a year else forfeit his entire 
fortune to a certain Marian Devereaux who resides 
at a l:ioarding school a short distance away. 

Glenarm meets Marian and falls in love with her 
Init she represents herself as someone else and tells 
him that Marian is something of a prude and an old 
maid. Pickering, attorney for the Glenarm estate is 
desirous of making the hero forfeit the fortune and 
aims to marry Marian himself thus gaining control 
of the money. To gain his ends he makes life a 
series of dangers for Glenarm by hiring men to haunt 
the house, while Glenarm's butler also acts strangely. 
In the end when Pickering and his thugs are attack- 
ing Glenarm, his grandfather, who is still quite alive, 
returns and the attorney is taken off to jail while 
the young people receive the old man's blessing. 

Supporting the star are Marguerite Livingston. 
Charles H. Mailes, Edward Piel, Frank Lannnig, Flor- 
ence Oberle and Harry Kendall. 



Mention Source of Story and Denote Its Type 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 

By mentioning the source of this picture, Meredith this time and no one questions his acting ability. Fea- 
Nicholson's "House of a Thousand Candles" and ture him prominently along with the source of the 
dwelling on its mystery type, you should be able to story and the results should show very well at the 
draw the people in. The picture gets away to such a box office. The novel on which this is based has been 
•good start that there is a probabiUty that it will hold ^^^^^^ j,^ pictures before but in these modern days of 

picture exploitation the exhibitor should be able to 
cash in on this picture because of the readers of the 



up pretty well with many until the end even though 



some of its scenes may be tiring. 

The kicks you get on it won't be strenuous, how- 



ever, and it is possible that you may get by without 



novel to a jjreater extent than he could have when the 



any. H. B. W^arner is a well known picture star by first picture was made. 



Sunday, January 18, 1920 



aJi^ 



DAILV 



21 



Old Stuff Dressed Up with Prologue and Fancy Title Void of Entertainment 

Robert Warwick in 
"THE TREE OF KNOWLEDGE" 



Paramount — Artcraft 

DIRECTOR William C. DeMille 

AUTHOR R. C. Carton 

SCENARIO BY Margaret Turnbull 

CAMERAMAN Guy Wilky 

AS A WHOLE An idea that has been done 

thousands of times but is again presented 

under a fancy title and a prologue. 
STORY Uses ancient legend of Lilith and 

Adam as an excuse for present-day drama. 
DIRECTION Allowed too wide a gap between 

sequences and left entirely too much to the 

audience's imagination — at the wrong time. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Very good 

LIGHTINGS Always clear 

CAMERA WORK First rate 

STAR Did some good work but lidicrous story 

will prevent folks from appreciating it. 
SUPPORT Well known cast with equally 

inappreciable parts. 

EXTERIORS Represent wealth and luxury 

INTERIORS Ditto 

DETAIL Not so bad 

CHARACTER OF STORY Deals with the 

workings of a "vamp" who picks 'em rich 

and often. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 4,940 feet 

It is possible to blame one of several people for the 
choppy way in which "The Tree of Knowledge" is 
presented. The cutter may lay it to the director and 
the director to the continuity writer, but certainly 
somebody made a bad job of it. The manner in which 
the action shifts from one continent to another will 
make folks go some to keep up with it and they are 
bound to be confused. 

The story, supposedly based on the action in the 
prologue, wouldn't amount to anything at all if this 
were true, for it merely consists of the appearance 
of a man and woman "dressed" as Adam and Eve. 



One instance of the choppiness of the production is 
where Warwick's best friend, played by Tom Forman, 
leaves England to find Warwick and urge him to 
return to his home. After flashing a title which gives 
this information the next scene opens up with the 
friend proposing to the vamp who has just forsaken 
Warwick after ruining him financially. This just 
happens and you don't know whether he has accom- 
plished the object of his errand or not, until later on. 
The plot seems to be unfolded backwards. This might 
gO' all right in China, but not here. 

The direction is not the best in the world, allowing 
the players to appear noticeably "acty" at times and 
failing to register sincerity of purpose at any point, 
and surely no one will sympathize with such a faint- 
hearted hero. 

After Warwick is deserted by Kathlyn Williams, a 
mercenary adventuress, he returns to his home and is 
beginning to forget his past mistake when his friend 
returns bringing with him a wife who is none other 
than Kathlyn. The couple take up their abode at 
Warwick's home presumably for the time being until 
Bryan can reconcile his father to the marriage, but 
from all appearances this was merely another con- 
venience on the part of the author. 

When Kathlyn discovers that Bryan will probably 
lose his fortune she plans to elope with Loftus Roup- 
elle, a wealthy sport, but Warwick discovers the plot 
and, in an attempt to prevent the lady from keeping 
her date, the contemplated outrage upon his friend, 
enhanced by his own dealings with Kathlyn, get the 
better of him, and he is succeeding very well in chok- 
ing her when Bryan returns. 

Kathlyn explains the situation by saying that the 
man in her life whom she had once mentioned to her 
husband was Warwick, whereupon Byran turns on his 
friend who accepts the circumstance rather than tell 
the truth. However, the wicked woman manages to 
get away with her next victim, leaving her husband 
to learn the truth and Warwick to propose to his 
ward, played by Wanda Hawley. 



Secure a Good Supporting Program If You Show This 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



There is no reason why you should make a special 
effort to secure "The Tree of Knowledge" for it sure 
is a lemon tree and there's no knowledge to be plucked 
from it. You'll find no helpful advice in a practical 
way and from a standpoint of picture production, there 
is nothing new or worth while bothering about in this. 



If you do present this to your audience go easy on 
promises and secure a good comedy or some other 
worth while short stuff to make up for a poor feature. 
You may use the name of the star if you think it ad- 
visable, but his acting in this one, which is really not 
bad, won't make an impression or be taken seriously 
because of the utterly foolish story. 



.^ijM^ 



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§ 



^* 



:"*> 




\ 













JESSE L,LASKY 

BIWANT 

^mSHBURN 



// 



in 



TCX) MUCH 
JOHNSON 

j2^ C/>ammounJj^rtem/i 
picture 

Make a Holler! 

You can't disappoint your audiences, 
no matter how much you promise for 
"Too Much Johnson." 

It's criticism-proof! 

Tell them it's the furmiest screen com- 
edy that you've had in a blue moon. 
Promise them the plot will tickle their 
laugh-plexus as it hasn't been tickled in 
years. Assure them that for full five reels 
the comedy doesn't let down once. And 
add that it's perfectly acted without a 
thing overdrawn or impossible in the 
whole story. 

And you'll be telling the truth! For 
"Too Much Johnson" is the biggest laugh 
in pictures! 

From the play 0/ the same name 

'by William Gillette 

Directed by Donald Crisp 

Scenario by Tom J. Oeraghty 



W 



5 FAMOUS PlAYERS-LASlUf CORPORATION M 



ADOLPH ZUKORPrv. JRSSgJ>LASKYl''.vPna< 








lUKl-'JilVWOBEEi:: 



Sunday, January 18, 1920 




DAILV 



23 



Glean Country Versus Wicked City with Advantages all to the Former 



Lois Weber Production of 
"FORBIDDEN" 
Jewel — Universal 

DIRECTOR Lois Weber 

AUTHOR E. V. Darling 

SCENARIO BY Lois Weber 

CAMERAMAN Roy Klaffki 

AS A WHOLE Excellently staged production 

contrasting wicked city life with clean coun- 
try ; will appeal anywhere. 
STORY Novel treatment of sympathetic, human 

theme; touch of mystery well handled. 
DIRECTION Effective and with an eye to the 

appeal touches will bring. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Excellent 

LIGHTINGS ReaHstic and effective 

CAMERA WORK Very good 

STAR Registers an appealing role 

SUPPORT Headed by Henry Woodward and 

including Priscilla Dean in a bit. 

EXTERIORS Some beautiful; all realistic 

INTERIORS Wonderful; all of them the real 

thing; no settings. 

DETAIL Director seems to have missed nothing 

CHARACTER OF STORY Deals with wife's 

love for city's glamor and husband's trick to 

disillusion her. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 5,972 feet 

"Forbidden" is a picture that comes out flat-footed 
with the suggestion that city folks all lean to the im- 
moral while the clean country tends to the good and 
pure and sweet. Just remember that everyone who 
lives in a city either has lived in the country or wants 
to, so that this is sure-fire as to appeal. Of course, the 



small-town folks will like it. It reminds me of the 
question Charlie Winningcr asks up at the Winter 
Garden : "Why will a fellow from the country come 
to the city and work his head off in order to make 
money enough to be able to live in the country?" 
Think it over ! 

Maddie Irwin, the girl played by Mildred Harris 
Chaplin in the present instance, longs for the city. 

On the other hand there is Fred Worthington also 
from Maddie's village, who has tasted five years of 
what money and the city can bring him and has 
become disgusted with it all. They marry and Maddie 
insists on the city so at length they journey there. 
But Fred refuses to take Maddie out and they quar- 
rel and separate, he supposedly going back to the 
country. 

Maddie decides on a Chinatown sight-seeing tour. 
She gets as far as an opium den when a bearded 
stranger attacks her. He is shot by Maddie's old 
country sweetheart who has seen and followed her. 
After that Maddie's one thought is to go back to 
Fred and the country. Fred appears with a band- 
aged arm and later he sneaks off and burns the beard 
he wore when he played villain to take the fun out 
of the city for Maddie ! 

Director Lois Weber has dressed her picture ele- 
gantly and has secured a lot of real lavish interiors 
in which to stage miich of the action. 

The plot never reaches any great dramatic heights 
but the little trick played on Maddie by friend hus- 
band is clever enough and well enough handled (as 
the disguise he wears is excellent) to furnish a real 
surprise at the finish that will quite likely take the 
little curse off the unreality of the plot. 



LAST WEEK IN WID'S-- 

— six reviews criticised, subtitles particularly: 

"The titles are hopelessly hackneyed, and the attempts at comedy are pathetic." 

"The titles were childish." 

"Titles too 'wordy'." 

"Unnecessary repetition in titles," etc. 

Titling is an art in itself. Let us review your productions and submk*^ suggestions for 
their improvement in editing and titling. 



HARRY CHANDLEE 



WILLIAM B. LAUB 



Room 2004 



CANDLER BUILDING 



Bryant 7392 



REFERENCES: 
J. W. McKay, Mayflower; Thomas Dixon, Mastercraft; Murray Garsson, Foundation Film Corp; George 
Randolph Chester, Vitagraph. 



24 



iM ^ 



DAILV 



Sunday, January 18, 1920 



Nothing Small About the Advertising Value of This 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Lois Weber Production of 

"FORBIDDEN" 

Jewel — Universal 

There are certainly enough advertising angles to 

this to make it a winner. The star, the director, the 

title and the fact that Priscilla Dean is in the cast. 

She hasn't a big enough part to call for a co-starring 

billing but the line "with Priscilla Dean" could be 

included to advantage. 



Center plenty of attention on Lois Weber, the pro- 
ducer, and mention some of the dozens of great suc- 
cesses she has made. You will find that all your fans 
are taking an exceptional interest these days in the 
item of "Who made the production?" 

Give the title a good play. It's catching and can 
be elaborated on in advertising readers so that it will 
attract no end of attention. 



SU^afga^.^S'^s: 



PHOTOGmPHED BV 




MEMBERS OF 

Atttprtrait g^nrt^tg nf (Kin^matngraplirrfi 

(INCORPORATED) 

325-331 MARKHAM BUILDING 

HOLLYWOOD, 4404 

I 6372 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD 




HOLLYWOOD. CAL. 



J. D. JENNINGS 
Now Associated With 

FRANK LLOYD 

Photographing 

PAULINE FREDERICKS 

Goldw3m West Coast Studios 



ROY H. KLAFFKI 

Now Photographing 
MONROE SALISBURY 

Current Release 
"His Divorced Wife" 

DAL CLAWSON 

Now Photographing 

LOIS WEBER 

PRODUCTIONS 

JOHN ARNOLD 

Now Photographing 

"The WUlow Tree" 

With 

VIOLA DANA 



William C. "Billy" Foster 

Now Photographing 
DUSTIN FARNUM 

Current Release 
"THE SILVER HORDE" 

L. GUY WILKY 

With 
WILLIAM C. DeMILLE 

Current Release 
"The Tree of Life" 

WILLIAM E. FILDEW 

Now Photographing 

"The Virgin of Stamboul" 

Current Release 
"Bonnie Bonnie Lassie" 

PAUL P. PERRY 

Now Photographing 
GEORGE H. MELFORD 

Current Release 
"Everywoman" 



HENRY CRONJAGER 

Photographing for 

MARSHALL NEILAN 

"The Rivers End" 

CHARLES ROSHER 

Now Photographing 

MARY PICKFORD 

"PoUyana" 

E. G. PALMER 

Now Photographing 

George Loane Tucker 
Specials 

All 

CINEMATOGRAPHERS 

Read 

WID'S DAILY 



Sunday, January 18, 1920 



jM ^ 



DAILV 



25 



Wholesome Sentiment and 

"OTHER MEN'S SHOES" 
Edgar Lewis Prod., Inc. — Pathe 

DIRECTOR Edgar Lewis 

AUTHOR Andrew Soutar 

SCENARIO BY George D. Proctor 

CAMERAMAN Everett Horn 

AS A WHOLE Good wholesome production 

filled with sure-fire sentiment, comedy and 
drama ; will "get" any audience. 

STORY Has some loop-holes but action is swift 

and constantly increasing in interest so story 
always convinces and holds. 
DIRECTION Brings out all the highlights suc- 
cessfully ; has created a real "audience" pic- 
ture. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Very good 

LIGHTINGS Realistic 

CAMERA WORK Commendable 

FEATURED PLAYER Craufurd Kent gives 

two effective and well defined characteriza- 
tions. 

SUPPORT Excellent 

EXTERIORS Always appropriate 

INTERIORS Realistic and thoroughly approp- 
riate. 

DETAIL All details well handled 

CHARACTER OF STORY Strong man as- 
sumes place of weak brother and wins his 
battles. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 6,425 feet 

Edgar Lewis has surely filled this with wonderful 
audience-getting material and .although at various 
points it would be a simple matter to point out holes 



Sure-Fire Drama in This 

ill the construction of the story, the fact remains that 
the merits of the picture are so many and so well 
calculated to reach the sympathies of the average 
picture audience that the flaws are altogether over- 
whelmed. 

Stephen Browning, a minister in a small city, is 
unable to cope with the situation created by the strong 
opposition in his parish, fostered and headed by 
Creeke, his rival in love. A weakling, he gives up the 
fight and is afraid to face the issue. James, his 
brother who has spent a term in prison, returns to his 
home and takes Stephen's place, conquering over his 
enemies and winning all the church elders to his 
side. 

Even then Stephen will not step back into his char- 
acter and James is obliged to go on playing the im- 
poster and, all the while, falling deeper in love with 
Irene Manton, the girl that Stephen loves. Creeke, 
conspiring with Dreener, a man who knew James in 
jail, conspires to make public the career of the min- 
ister's Avayward brother at a meeting called to raise 
funds for an orphanage and educational institution. 
They hope by so doing to turn the parish against its 
pastor. Quite the contrary, however, James wins 
them all over to his side by confessing the whole im- 
position. Dreener, assaulting Stephen mistaking him 
for James, kills him and this leaves James free to v/in 
the love of Irene. The picture ends happily and with 
a good laugh with the children of the orphanage look- 
ing on while hero and heroine go into the final "clinch." 

There are many happily sentimental scenes between 
James and the children of the town, who are headed 
by little Bobby Connolly. 



MR. PRODUCER: 

On the opposite page are represented the foremost cameramen in the 
United States. Ask any of these boys regarding the quahty and service 
of the 

S^loom Jf ilm i^atioratoriesi 



7520 Sunset Blvd., 
Hollywood, California 



Telephone — Hollywood 4015 



26 



jsjiM 



DAILV 



Sunday, January 18, 1920 



Offers the Real Goods in the Entertainment Line 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



"OTHER MEN'S SHOES" 
Edgar Lewis' Prod., Inc. — Pathe 

This certainly offers the real goods in the entertain- 
ment line. Those of you who have played the Keenan 
picture "Brothers Divided" already have a good line 
on it for it contains the same type of down-to-the- 
ground wholesome sentiment atid comedy and drama 
that was shown in the previous picture. It's a cer- 
tainty that practically every picture audience is going 
to like it. 



The picture also gives you the opportunity to play 
up a director's name. Edgar Lewis is pretty well 
known owing to his previous productions such as "The 
Barrier, "The Bar Sinister," ."The Sign Invisible," 
"The Nigger," etc. 

Craufurd Kent has also appeared in a number of 
important pictures as leading man and the public has 
had many opportunities to become acquainted with 
him. 







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There are 30 Reasons 

WHY YOU SHOULD BOOK 

"THE SCRE4MIN6 SHADOW" 

Reason No. 16 

MR. EXHIBITOR: 

There is nolhing sure on earth except death, taxes and a 
Ben Wilson Serial. Book "The Screaming Shadow." 
Watch for Reason No. 17 Tomorrow 

BEN WILSON PRODUCTIONS 

UNIVERSAL CITY CALIF. 

Released Through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46tli Street New York 

Foreign Rights controlled by Apollo Trading Corp., 220 W. 48lh St. 





Wm. Horsley Film Laboratories 

Ideal Facilities for Samples and Release Prints 
Developing and Printing In All Its Branches 

Why not have your release prints made at the HORSLEY LABORATORIES, where the finished 
product can be approved by the STUDIO EXECUTIVES, DIRECTORS AND PHOTOGRAPH- 
ERS who are responsible for the picture. We are at present doing work for the FOREMOST PRO- 
DUCING COMPANIES on the COAST. 

PROJECTION AND CUTTING ROOMS FOR USE DAY AND EVENING 

Address: 6060 Sunset Blvd. Hollywood, California 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED 
IN THE HEART OF THE STUDIO SECTION OF HOLLYWOOD 

Phone No. Hollywood 3693. 



Sunday, January 18, 1920 




DAI1.Y 



n 



The Old English-Japanese Romance Unassisted by Imagination on Author's 

Part 



Earle Williams in 

"WHEN A MAN LOVES" 

Vitagraph 

DIRECTOR Chester Bennett 

AUTHORS H. H. Van Loan and Florence 

Williams. 

SCENARIO BY . . . E. Richard Schayer 

CAMERAMAN Nov credited 

AS A WHOLE Old stuff which onh^ mildl.v in- 
terests owing to its obviousness. 

STORY Fails to work up any great degree of 

interest and contains a number of fallacies. 

DIRECTION Rather unimaginative but handled 

the material averagely well. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Average 

LIGHTINGS Good 

CAMERAWORK Commendabie 

STAR His usual gentlemanly self 

SUPPORT Good generally but some Japanese 

types don't convince. 
EXTERIORS. . . .Some pretty Japanese garden shots 

INTERIORS Acceptable 

DETAIL Good Japanese atmosphere 

CHARACTER OF STORY Englishman falls in 

love with ward of Jap's afterwards discover- 
ing her to be of English birth. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 4,442 feet 

The authors of "When a Man Loves" didn't over- 
work their imaginations to any great extent in writing 
this vehicle for Earle Williams. They unearthed the 
time-honored plot about the white man, in this case 
an Englishman, who falls in love with a girl he meets 
in Japan who is the ward of a Japanese shop keeper. 
Their romance progresses happily, menaced ever so 
Httle by the girl's native suitor, until a female villain 
in love with the Englishman sticks her finger in the 
pie. 

She writes home to the hero's father saying that 



his son is "making a fool of himself" and requesting 
him "to act quickly." Father seems to sense the en- 
tire situation from these few lines and summons his 
son home by a cable which says he's near death's 
door. 

Of course hero hasn't got time to bid his sweetheart 
good-bye and female villain gets in her dirty work by 
intercepting his note to her and- then telling the girl 
that hero only wanted to use her as one of the char- 
acters in the book he was writing. 

Hero discovers the ruse when he gets home and 
jumps back to Japan in two scenes or so. He explains 
things to the girl and then jumps back to England 
with her as his wife. The haughty old father will 
have none of his muchly traveling son until his old 
friend arrives on the scene and explains that his daugh- 
ter-in-law is none other than his daughter in fact and 
tells a story of a lost wife and baby to prove it Thus 
with the sugar spread thickly the picture draws to a 
saccharine conclusion. 

This is more or less old stuff from tirst to last and 
doesn't hold any great interest inasmuch as it is all 
so obvious. It looks as if the authors sat themselves 
down and said, "Well, Earle needs a story, let's see, 
why not give him one of the variations on 'Madame 
Butterfly' " and then acted accordingly without giv- 
ing either serious thought or imagination to the matter. 

There is to be sure nothing flagrantly bad about the 
picture but at the same time there is cert-ainly noth- 
ing conspicuously meritorious. But its obviousness 
and lack of imagination will probably disniiss a rather 
dissatisfied audience. 

Earle Williams is his usual gentlemanly self as the 
hero. Margaret Loomis has the role of the girl, Yuri 
San, even the character name shows nothing new, 
while Barbara Tennant, Thomas Guise and George 
Hall are others. 



Let It Go By If You Can; If You Play It Do So Quietly 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



This picture certainly has none of those qualities 
which will stamp your theater as a place where the 
best pictures are to be seen. It's conventional in story 
idea, in development and general treatment, and there 
is no well maintained suspense or good climax to the 
plot. The best thing to do under the circumstances 
is to let it go by. It is such pictures as these that are 



way below the average in story value that bring down* 
a theater's standard. 

If it's got to be played put the soft pedal on in talk- 
ing about it in the advertising and concentrate on Earle 
Williams. He certainly knows how to deport himself 
as a gentleman even though his part here refuses to 
give him any great acting opportunities. 



CURRENT RELEASES 



EQUITY PICTURES CORP. 

Release Lfeng:th 

Date Reels Reviewed 

Byes of Youth (Clara Kimball Young) 7 11/16/19 



Release 
Date 



Length 
Reels Reviewed 



Bennison Star Series 

High Pockets 5. 

A Misfit Earl 5. 



FAMOUS PLAYERS-LASKY CORP. 

Dee. 7 An Adventure in Hearts (Robert Warwick). .5 

Dee. 7 Victory (Tourneur) 5 12/7/19 

Dee. 7 More Deadly Than the Male (Ethel Clayton). 5 12/14/19 

Dee. 14 The Cinema Murder (Cosmopolitan) 5.... 

Dee. 14 Behind the Door (Ince Special) 5 1/4/20 

Dee. 21 His Wife's Friend (Dorothy Dalton) 5 

Dec. 21 Hawthorne of the U. S. A. (Wallace Reid)...5 11/30/19 

Dee. 21 A Girl Named Mary (Marguerite Clark) . ...5.... 

Dec. 28 Wanted— A Husband (Billie Burke) 5 12/21/19 

Dec. 28 Red Hot Dollars (Charles Ray) 5 1/4/20 

Dec. 28 Everywoman (Super-Special) 5 12/21/19 

Jan. 4 The Woman in the Suitcase (Enid Bennett) 

Jan. 4 Too Much Johnson (Bryant Washburn) . .... 

Jan. 4 The Thirteenth Commandment (Ethel Clayton) 5. . .. 

Jan. 11 Sand (William S. Hart) 5 

Jan. 11 On With the Dance (Special) 5.... 

Jan. 18 Mary Ellen Comes to Town (Dorothy Gish). .5 • — 

Jan. 18 Huckleberry Finn (Special) 5.... 

Jan. 18 The Tree of Knowledge (Robert Warwick) .5. .. . 

Jan. 25 What's Your Husband Doing? (Douglas MacT.ean- 

Doris May) T) 

Jan. 25 Dangerous Hours (Ince Super) 5.... 



FIRST NATIONAL 

The Thunderbolt (Katherine MacDonald) .5 11/23/19 

Virtuous Vamp (Constance Talmadge) 5 11/30/19 

Mind the Paint Girl (Anita Stewart) 6 11/30/19 

Heart O' the Hills (Mary Pickford) 6 12/7/19 

The Beauty Market (Katherine MacDonald; 6 

In Wrong (Jack Pickford) 5 12/28/19 

In Old Kentucky (Anita Stewart) 5 12/21/19 

A Dmv'.s Pleasure (Charlie Chaplin) 2 12/14/19 

The (;i-e:itesl giipstion (l>, W (iiiffilli's Pro ...5 1/4/20 

A Daughter of Two Worlds (Norma Talmadge)5 1/11/20 

The Inferior Sex (Mildred Harris Chaplin) 5 

The Turning Point (Katherine MacDonald) . .5. ... 

The River's End (Marshall Neilan Prod.) 5.... 



FOX FILM CORP. 

WllUam Farnum Series 

Wings of the Morning 6 12/7/19 

Heart Strings 1/4/20 

The Adventurer 

Tom Mix Scries 

The Feud 5 

The Cyclone 

The Daredevil 5.... 

Theda Bara Series 

La Belle Russe 6 9/21/19 

Lure of Ambition 6 11/16/19 

Fox Fntertainments 

The Winning Stroke (George Walsh ........5.... » 

Eastward Ho (William Russell) 5 11/23/19 

Thieves (Gladys Brockwell) 5 11/2/19 

The Devil's Riddle (Gladys Brockwell) 5 • 

The Lincoln Highwayman (Wm. Russell) .'5 

The Shark (George Walsh) 5 1/11/20 

Sliod With Fire (William Russell) 5 

Flames of the Flesh (Gladys Brockwell) 5 12/28/19 

Tlie Square Shooter (Buck Jones) ii.... • 

Tin Pan Alley (Ray & Fair) 5 

Her Klephant Man (Shirlev Mason) 5.... 

The Hell Ship (Madlaine Traverse) 5 

GOLDWYN DISTRIBUTING CORP. 

star Series Productions 

Upstairs (Mabel Normand) 5 8/31/19 

Heartsease (Tom Moore) 5 9/14/19 

The Girl From Outside (Rex Beach) 7 8/24/19 

The World and Its Woman (Geraldine Farrar) 7 9/21/19 

Lord and Lady Algy (Tom Moore) 6 9/7/19 

Strictly Confidential (Madge Kennedy) 5 10/12/19 

Bonds of Love (Pauline Frederick) ,...5 

Almost a Husband (Will Rogers) 5 10/19/19 

Jinx (Mabel Normand) 5 9/28/19 

The Gay Lord Quex (Tom Moore) 5 12/21/19 

Jubilo (Will Rogers) 5 12/14/19 

The Loves of Letty (Pauline Frederick) ...... .5.... . 

Flames of the Desert (Geraldine Farrar) 7 11/9/19 

Toby's Bow 5 

The Cup of Fury (Rupert Hughes) 5.... 



HALLMARK PICTURES CORP. 

A Dangerous Affair (Herbert Rawlinson) 5.... 

Wit Wins ( Florence Billings) 5 

Love, Honor and ? (Stuart Holmes- Ellen Cassidy) 

5.... 

The Phantom Honeymoon (Margaret Marsh) . . .6. . . . 

The Heart of a Gypsy (Florence Billings) 5 '12/7/19 

A Woman's Experience (Mary Boland) 

W. W. HODKINSON CORP. 

Distributing Through Fathe 
Bcnj. B. Hampton — (Jreat Authors Pictures, Inc. 

The Westerners 7 8/10/19 

The Sagebrusher 7 1/4/20 

Zane Grey Pictures, Inc. — Benj. B. Hampton and Eltinge F. Warner 

Desert Gold 7.... 11/16/19 

The Desert of Wheat 6 

J. Parker Read, Jr., Productions 

Sahara (Louise Glaum) 7 3/23/19 

The Lone Wolf's Daughter (Louise Glaum) 7 12/14/19 

Deitrich-Beclc, Inc. 

The Bandbox (Doris Kenyon) 6 11/30A9 

The Harvest Moon (Doris Kenyon) 6.... 

Artco Productions 

As a Man Thinks (Leah Baird) 5 4/20/19 

The Volcano (Leah Baird) 6 8/17/19 

The Capitol (Leah Baird) 6 12/21/19 

Cynnthia-on-fhe-Minnute (Leah Baird) 

Robert Brunton Productions 

A White Man's Chance (J. Warren Kerrigan).. 5 4/20/19 

The Joyous Liar (J. Warren Kerrigan) 5 12/14/19 

The Lord Loves the Irish (J. Warren Kerrigan)5 

National — Billie Rliodcs Productions 

The Blue Bonnet (Billie Rhodes) 6 8/31/19 



METRO PICTURES CORP. 

Nazlmova Productions 

The Red Lantern 7 5/4/19 

The Brat 7 9/14/19 

Stronger Than Death 6 

Screen Classics, Inc. (Specials) 

Lombard!, Ltd. (Bert Lytell) 6 9/28/19 

Please Get Married (Viola Dana) 6 11/9/19 

Fair and Warmer (May Allison) 6 10/19/19 

Should a Woman Tell (Alice Lake) 6 12/28/19 

The Walk-Offs (May Allison) 6 

The Willow Tree (Viola Dana) 6.... 1/11/20 

The Right of Way iBert Lytell) 6 

The Best of Luck (Drury Lane Melodrama) .. .6 



PATHE EXCHANGE, INC. 

Dec. 7 Brothers Divided' (Frank Keenan) 5 1/4/20 

Dec. 14 The A-B-C of Love (Mae Murray) 6 12A4/19 

Dec. 21 The Prince and Betty (Wm. Desmond) 5 12/14/19 

Jan. 4 Mv Husbands's Other Wife (Sylvia Breamer)..6 

Jan. 11 Fighting Cressy (Blanche Sweet) 6 12/14/19 

American Film Co., Inc. 

Yvonne From Paris (Mary Miles Minter) 5.... 7/6/19 

The Tiger Lily (Margarita Fisher) 5 7/20/19 

This Hero Stuff (William Russell) 5 7/27/19 

Eve in Exile (Charlotte Walker) 7 12/14/19 

REALART PICTURES CORP. 

Soldiers of Fortune (Anna Q. Nilsson), 
Pauline Starke, Norman Kerry, Wallace 

Beery 7. . . . 11/16/19 

Anne of Green Gables (Mary Miles Minterj. ...6 11/23/19 

Erstwhile Susan (Constance Binney) 5 12/7/19 

Mystery of the Yellow Room Lorin Baker, 

Ethel Grey Terry, Geo. Cowl, Edmund 

Elton) 6. . . . 10/26/19 



ROBERTSON-COLE 



Specials 



The Open Door 6 10/19/19 

The Broken Butterfly 6 10/26/19 

The Beloved Cheater 5 11/16/19 





w^Jmnd 





O you believe in 
Reincarnation ? ^ 
Can the Dead come 
hack to life? ^ ^ 
Is there a Transmi- 
gration of Souls? 



%te 



ISTOCRATo/SERMl^ 



qAu these 
Millions 
will flock to 
your theatre 



MILLIONS BELIEVE IN 
THE SHADOW WORLD 

MILLIONS BELIEVE IN 
THE PSYCHIC 

MILLIONS *BELIEVE IN 
PHANTOMS 

MILLIONS *BELIEVE IN 
APPARITIONS 

MILLIONS *BEL1EVE IN 
SPIRITS 

MILLIONS *BELIEVE IN 
HYPNOTISM 




dF"» Robert Muline 



JOHN W. GREV, President 

"WEST -^S^^L5» BTR.E1ET 




Keless* Length 

D,it« BeeU Kevlewed 

SUPERIOR PICTURES 

December ReleaseH 

Seeing It Tlirdugh (Brentwood Prod.) 5.... 

lii'tkoning Koads (Bessie Barriscale) 5 12/28/li» 

The Tong Man (Sessue Hayakawa) 5 12/14/19 

•January Releases 

'Ihe Third Generation (Brentwood) 5 

The Beggar Prince (Sessue Hayakawa) 5 

The Luck of Geraldine Laird (Bessie Barriscale)5 

LEWIS J. SELZNICK ENTERPRISES 
SELZNICK PICTURES 

Distributed by Select Exchange!.. 

A Regular Girl (Elsie Janis) 5 11/30/19 

The Country Cousin (Blaine Hamraersteln) . .5 12/14/19 

Sealed Hearts (Eugene O'Brien) 5 

The Glorious Lady (Olive Thomas) 5 11/9/19 

Ficcadily Jim (Owen Moore) 5.... 

Out Yonder (Olive Thomas) 5 

The Broken Melody (Eugene O'Brien) 5 12/28/19 

SELECT PICTURES 

Distributed by Select Exchanges. 

The Undercurrent (Guy Empey) 6 12/7/19 

Faith of the Strong (Mitcliell Lewis) 5 9/21/19 

A Scream in the Night (Special) 5 10/20/19 

Isle ot Conquest (Norma Talmadge) 5 11/9/19 

UNITED ARTISTS' CORP. 
Dec. 2 When the Clouds Roll By (Fairbanks) 1/4/20 

UNITED PICTURE THEATERS 

Her Game (Florence Reed) 5 

The Eternal Mother (Florence Reed) — 

The Corsican Brothers (Dustin Farnum) 12/28/19 

UNIVERSAL FILM MFG. CO. 

Jewel Features 

Paid in Advance (Dorothy Phillips) 6.... 11/16/19 

The Right to Happiness (Dorothy Phillips).. 8 8/24/19 

Blind Husbands (Eric Stroheim) 7 10/19/19 

Universal Features 

The 'Woman Under Cover (Fritzi Brunette). 5 9/14A9 

The Sundown Trail (Monroe Salisbury) 6 9/21/19 

Common Property (Robt. Anderson-Nell Craig) 6 

Loot (Ora Carew) 6 

Bonnie, Bonnie Lassie (Mary MacLaren) 6 "rTTl';: 

The Brute Breaker (Frank Mayo) 6 11/23A9 

The Rider of the Law (Harry Carey) 6 10/12/19 

The Trembling Hour (Helen Eddy) 6 10/19/19 

His Divorced Wife (Monroe Salisbury).. 5 11/9/19 

Under Suspicion (Forrest Staniey-Ora Carew) 5.... 11/23A9 

Lasca (Edith Roberts-Frank Mayo) 5 11/23/19 

A Gun Fighting Gentleman (Harry Carey) 6 11/30/19 

The Pointing Finger (Mary MacLaren) 5 12/7/19 

VITAGRAPH 

In Honor's Web (Harry Morey) 5.... 11/9/19 

A Fighting Colleen (Bessie Love) 5 11A8/19 

The Black Gate (Earle Williams) 5 

The Combat (Anita Stewart) 5 

The Golden Shower (Gladys Leslie) ...5.... 

The Tower of Jewels (Corinne Griffith) 5 1/11/20 

The Darkest Hour (Harry Morey) 5.... 

Pegeen (Bessie Love) 5 

When a Man Loves (Earle Williams) 5 

The Sins of the Mothers (Anita Stewart) 5 

The Midnight Bride (Gladys Leslie) 5 

Human Collateral (Corinne Griffith) ».... 

The Birth of a Soul (Harry Morey) 5. . . , 

Special Productions 

The Winchester Woman (Alice Joyce) 6.... 11/16/19 

The Climbers (Corinne Griffith) 6.... 11/9/19 

The Vengeance of Durant (Alice Joyce) 6.... 

Slaves of Pride (Alice Joyce) 6 

SHORT REEL RELEASES 

Frohman Amusement Co. 

Gemini Ambrose (Mack Swain) 1 

All Wrong Ambrose (Mack Swain) 1 

The Heart of Texas (Texas Guinam) 2 

Spirit of Cabin Mine (Texas Guinan) 2 

C. L.. Chester 

No Coma in Acoma 1 • 

The People in White 1 

The Simple Life 1 

Mr. Outing Gets a Pipe Dream 1 

Famous Players-L,asky Corp. 

A Lady's Tailor (Sennett) 2 

After the Circus (Briggs) I ■ 

Push Car Trails in Formosa (Burton Holmes) 1 



UNIVERSAL 

SEBIAI..S 

Great Radium Myntery l.S to 16 each 

JAon Man, 2 to 6 each 

COMEDIES 

Sweet Patootle (Lyons-Moran) 

Adam and Eve a la Mode 

Some Shimmiers (I^yons-Moran) 

A Baby DjII Uandlt 

■NauKhty I^ions and Wild Men 

The Sweet Dry and Dry (I^yons-Moran) 

All for the DouRh Bag 

WESTERNS 

The ,Jay Bird (Hoot Gibson) 

West Is Best (Hoot Gibson) 

CAPITAL 



A Man's Creed (Neal Hart) 

The Wilderness Man (Neal Hart) 

My Girl Suxzanne 

Bandit's (iold (AI Jennlnes) 

An Outlaw's Alibi (AI Jennings) . 



PATHE 

Reviews 32 to 35 

COMEDIES 

From Hand to Mouth (Harold Lloyd) (released late 

In Dec.) 

Why Go Home (Snub Pollard) 

Slippery Slickers (Snub Pollard) 

The Dippy Dentist (Snub Pollard) 

aVDT A T G 

Black Secret, 9 to 12 (Pearl White) each 

The Adventures of Ruth (Ruth Roland) each 

Topics of the Day, .S6 to 39 each 

HALL ROOM BOY COMEDIES 



Wrone Again 
Neck and Neck 



C. L. CHESTER 



Pilgriming Through the Clouds 
Broadway Will Be Broadway . . . 
Moosing the Kipawa 



FROHMAN AMUSEMENT CO. 



Ambrose's Visit (Mack Swain) 

Ambrose's Winning Ways (Mack Swain) 

Ambrose in Bad (Mack Swain) 

Ambrose and the Bathing Girls (Mack Swain) 

Boss of the Rancho (Texas Guinan) 

Just Bill (Texas Guinan) 



VITAGRAPH 

O. HENRY STORIES 

The Church With an Overshot Wheel 

While the Auto Waits 

BIO V COMEDIES 

Throbs and Thrills 

Dames and Dentists 

SERIALS 

The Invisible Hand (Antonio Moreno), 3 to 6 each 

GOLDWYN 

Bray Pictographs, 419, 420, 421, 422 each 

FORD EDUCATIONAL WEEKLY 



Eventide 

Bubbles 

Just Kids 

Taken With a Grain of Salt 



CAPITOL COMEDIES 

The Sure Cure (Mr. and Mrs. Carter DeHaven) 
Two Dollars Please 



FAMOUS PLAYERS-LASKY CORP. 

BURTON HOLMES SERIES 

Gaping Gullett of Gifu 

Mirrors of Nature 

Royal Ballet of Bangkok 

From Blarney to Bloodstairs 

Paramount Magazines, 3868 to 3871 each 

COMEDIES 

House Cleaning (Briggs) 1 

The Garage (Arbuckle) 2 

The Star Boarder (Mack Sennett) 2 

His Sister's Wedding (Briggs) 2 



FOX 

MUTT AND JEFF ANIMATED CARTOONS 

He Ain't Done Right by Our Nell . . 

On Strike : 

Shaking the Shimmy 

The Rum Runners 

SUNSHINE COMEDIES 

Chicken a la Cabaret 

Hungry Lions and Tender Hearts . 



MONEY TALKS! 



mmm 



wmmmmmmm 



Universal Film Manufacturing Company 
1600 broadway 



. 4; 12374 






UMIVCRSAL mLM MAWaFACTtURlWa COMPANY 




.« HP. .»e< tY ; »• 




TO THE MOTION PICTURE EXHIBITORS:— 

Tlie money represented by the above check is the first ever paid to exhibitors for the showing of educa- 
tional and industrial pictures which they have received without charge. This amount was paid to be dis- 
tributed among exhibitors for the showing of HEADS WIN in Chicago and vicinity. 

The arrangement between the UNIVERSAL FILM MANUFACTURING COMPANY and the 
MOTION PICTURE EXHIBITORS OF AMERICA, INC., under which this money was paid is NOT 
AN EXCLUSIVE ONE AND NEVER HAS BEEN. ANY OTHER PRODUCER OF MOTION 
PICTURES IS AT LIBERTY TO ENJOY THE SAME PRIVILEGES THAT THE UNIVER- 
SAL HAS AND DOES ENJOY IN REGARD TO EDUCATIONAL AND INDUSTRIAL FILMS. 



IN REPLY TO SLURRING CHARGES MADE IN RECENT TRADE PAPER ADVERTISEMENTS 

1. — -First, the so-called Motion Picture Theatre Owners' Association has failed to answer any of the per- 
tinent questions, evidently for reasons best known to themselves. 

2. — Mr. H..A. Mintz ranks as one of the high-grade attorneys of New England. The contract as pro- 
posed was arranged so that the Association in the event of any slip-up would not be involved with heavy 
legal fees. 

3. — As a matter of fact no contract was ever executed. It was submitted to the Cleveland gentleman in 
a tentative form and he promptly turned it over to the men who were trying to tear down one big 
exhibitors' movement for personal reasons. It was decided best not to further consult Mr. Lustig, and 
as president I am only too pleased that this gentleman has tendered his resignation. It would have shown 
better business ethics to have resigned first than to have used a committee membership against the best 
interests of the Association. 

4. — The League would have made a large sum of money had the New York Tribune seen fit to con- 
tinue negotiations. Under the proposed contract the League would have received the first $10,000 earned 
and continuous profits thereafter. 

5. — If this so-called Motion Picture Theatre Owners' Association's idea of commercial independence means 
the censorship of the screen by a self constituted committee, then I am very glad that I stand for open 
competition whereby each and every exhibitor will receive direct remuneration for the use of his screen 
for advertising purposes. 
6. — As to comparison of records, we are glad to have the Exhibitors of the country decide as to the calibre 

of the men concerned in this controversy, and to their honest intent for 

the best interests of the industry. 

Vice-Presidents ALFRED S. BLACK, President, 

Marcus Loew, of New York- Motion Picture Exhibitors of America, Inc. 
P. J. Schaefer, of Illinois 

Harry Nolan, of Colorado 64 Broadway, Boston, Mass. 

Jake Wells, of Virginia 

Frank Rembusch of Indiana, Secretary 

Ernest Horstman of Massachusetts, Treas. 




\J^0 ijl^fJH? 



31 



Some Short Reels 



"India," Mentor 

Two widoly difforoiit sections inako up this colored Mentor 
offering, wliicli opens witli a scenic study, sliot in India, and 
wliicli lias another portion devotetl to a pair of lion cubs. 
The former is rich in the elaborate architecture of the Orient, 
and includes numerous beautiful scones taken along the 
banks of a river, showing the temples and other structures. 
In addition to the lion cubs, some monkeys, a duck and a 
l)retty little girl appear, and it will certainly appeal. As 
good a colored one-reeler as has been seen hereabouts in a 
long while. 



"His Fatal Bite," Gaiety Comedies 

You have probably at some time or other experienced the 
sensation of having a dentist poke his different tools into 
your mouth, jab his thumb into your eye, torture you slowly 
with a variety of drills and pincers and otherwise annoy you. 
This Gaiety comedy which features George Ovey, in the role 
of a dentist, shows several amusing scenes in a dental par- 
lor. Some years ago, there were several pictures in which 
dentists were satirized, but recently, there have not been 
very many films of that type. This has a fairly clever 
theme, although not a strictly novel one, and although it 
ends rather suddenly, the good work of the cast and com- 
mendable direction, will get it across in good fashion. 



"Holland's Rustic Life and Waterways," Educational 

Scenic pictures of Holland must have their wind- mills, 
and although almost sixty per cent, of this deals with the 
different Dutch types of people, a wind-mill shot opens 
producing a fine effect, and a satisfactory cloud bits closes. 
Much that is beautiful and colored is included in the reel 
which is up to the mark. The usual fault with colored pro- 
ductions- — ^the manner in which faces are tinted, or allowed 
to remain blank, is to be observed here, but pictures of this 
sort are enjoying great popularity just at present and you 
will probably please your crowd if you sign to play it. 



One great thing- in its favor is that it is out of the ordi- 
nary, and that will probably get them to come and see it, 
although they probably won't know what idea the authors 
are trying to convey to them for a long while. Ben Wilson 
and Neva Gerber are starred, and Joe Girard plays the lead- 
ing heavy role. Burke Thorne directed and King Grey 
cranked the camera. 



"The Screaming Shadow," Hallmark 

People always have an awe for the supernatural or that 
which mystifies them. In serials, especially, has it been 
found profitable to deal with unknown quantities, and thus 
impress those who are fond of the drawn-out drama. "The 
Screaming Shadow" is said to be .based on the monkey- 
gland theory of the prolongation of human life, but is ac- 
tually a weird concoction of the combined imaginations of 
J. Grubb Alexander and Harvey Gates. It has little to do 
with the recently discovered idea if the first three episodes 
may be taken as a criterion. Four mythical maids, each of 
them having retained youth and beauty through over a 
thousand years, are supposed to bear on their personages the 
secret to permanent life and a crystal, in possession of the 
villain is the key which can unravel the mystery. Beyond 
that little is clear. There is some sort of a squabble over 
the possession of the European kingdom of Burgonia, and a 
resemblance between one of the quartet of virgins and a 
girl newspaper reporter furnishes one of the big twists in 
the theme. 

Some semi-invisible sort of an arch-criminal is the cause 
of several murders, and the spectator sees little but his 
shadow most of the time. He is in the habit of uttering 
a cry like the roar of a lion and those whose earthly exist- 
ence has terminated, bear a strange mark — the imprint of 
a set of teeth. In each episode someone is killed, everyone 
appears to be fighting everyone else, and much to think 
about is in evidence. 

There is no great danger of anyone's outguessing this, nor 
any great likelihood that they'll be able to keep up with 
the story, but it will draw. 



"The Black Secret." Pathe 

George B. Seitz, who was co-starred with Marguerite 
Curtot in "Bound and Gagged," and who is directing this 
serial, makes his entry into this production in the eleventh 
episode, called "The Death Studio." Ho plays a German 
spy this time, and certainly helps to thrill 'em. 



Bray Pictograph, 419, Goldwyn 

Eft"ects of the moon and sun on tides are dealt with in 
a series of diagrams that make up the opening portion of 
this Bray Pictograph, which has a part devoted to the 
hunting of wild ducks following, and an animated cartoon, 
called "A Chip Oft" the Old Block" closing. On the whole, 
this is a creditable screen magazine, although by no means 
the best of the series. 



"Why Go Home?" Pathe 

Several corking situations, in which a colored youngster. 
Snub Pollard and other members of the cast figured, made 
the start of this a riot, but towards the finish, it developed 
into a series of chases and shooting. Although the latter 
part of this is not up to the standard of what goes before, 
this one-reeler will probably prove acceptable almost any- 
where. It includes much that is commendable. 



"The Rink," Clark — Cornelius 

Men and women who have laughed at Charles Chaplin 
the vagabond, policeman, floorwalker, waiter and so on. 
will surely laugh at Charlie, the skater. The Chaplin feet 
on level ground provoke mirth, and on rollers, they are just 
as funny. At the start, a great deal of this is hackneyed 
stuff, but after a while, when the star starts traveling about 
the rink, his antics provoke an unlimited amount of mirth. 
Chaplin can skate and he shows to fine advantage here. 
The superfine quality of the greatest part of the offering 
make the re-issue valuable. 



"The Story of the Jaguar," Universal 

Jaguars, according to the information dealt out by Major 
Jack Allen who wrote and produced this, are fierce animals 
and exceptionally difficult to capture. Regardless of that 
fact, however, the Major skips out to the jungle and using 
a few feet of rope captures one of the animals, and accord- 
ing to the story wins a wager. Undoubtedly, this will prove 
of interest, for it has one big thrill in the scene showing 
the animal falling upon one of the hunters and the manner 
In which it is shot, and much more that will hold the eye. 
A short subject worth a bit of exploitation. 



"Chicken a la Cabaret," Fox 

Chester Conklin is the shining light in this knockabout 
affair from Hampton Del Ruth's fun factory. He plays the 
role of the chief of police and, with Harry Booker, ' as the 
mayor, gets taken in by a pair of slick crooks, one of whom 
is Billy Armstrong. The crooks offer their services to assist 
the policemen's benefit and by an old and still very funny 
trick they make off with all the watches in the party. A 
wild chase then ensues with the crooks operating their car 
with its garage as a covering. There's some great comedy 
business in the chase concerning the efforts of the police to 
overtake the garage and gain admittance to it. Eventually 
chasers and chasees are blown skyward by dynamite. They 
descend into the police station where the crooks are promptly 
jailed. There are enough laughs in this to put it in the best 
slapstick class. 



t) 



> 



W^ WO-o 



V 



Short Reels 



"The Bull Thrower," Century — Universal 

A moonshiner, cast into some land where bandits flourish 
and liquor has been banned, puts over most of the comedy 
in this. Presumably, the scene of the action is Mexico, and 
the hero has to give an acceptable exhibition of the torea- 
dor's skill to win the hand of the fair maid. And this is 
where the direction slipped up, for the manner in which it 
has been screened is not effective. The scenes where the 
characters jump out of the enclosure wherein is supposed 
to stamp about the wild bull gives no one cause to imagine 
that what is supposed to happen, really occurs. Some of 
the stuff included in the piece is really clever, but it has 
several faults that are a handicap. 



"Harmony Ranch" — Universal 

A fair story, the basic theme of which is not very un- 
common, and which has a few points that will cause the 
critical to question the plausibility of the entire affair, will 
probably get this over in the smaller houses. Hoot Gibson 
heads the cast and does his share of the work in acceptable 
style. You can probably use this if your crowd likes his 
stuff. It is not very thrilling, but hits an even pace, and if 
they're not very particular, they'll overlook its weaknesses. 



"Naughty Lions and Wild Men," Century — Universal 

Plot has been made subordinate to action in which animal 
novelty is much in evidence, in this two-reel comedy which 
is much better than some similar subjects turned out by this 
company recently. Several varieties of animals, lions, leop- 
ards, monkeys, and their young are seen in it. Shots of a 
mother ape, with her babe dining to her will appeal, and 
there are other bits that will draw exclamations, from your 
audience. For the greater part, the material in the offering 
will prove laugh-provoking. Fishback directed, and Charles 
Gay, animal tamer, is credited with assisting. 



Bray Pictograph, No. 416 — Qoldwyn 

This is one of the finest screen magazines turned out by 
any one in a long time. Four subjects, one more than usual, 
are dealt with, and each of them is treated in splendid fash- 
ion. "A Glimpse of New Zealand," the opening part, which 
consists of scenes taken along the Wanganui River, is one 
of the most beautiful scenic bits screened. The tinting, a 
delicate shade of pink, and rich blue being the colors used, 
is superb and serves to bring out its splendor. Colonel 
William Barclay Parsons, noted engineer and designer of 
various transportation systems occupies the position of promi- 
nence in the next section, and then comes a cute bit called 
"Baby Bruin." A commendable animated cartoon, entitled 
"Sauce for the Goose," directed by Yernon Stallings, winds 
up the reel. 



"Where Did You Get That Hat?" — Famous 

Hats — all details about the manner in which they are 
manufactured- — are taken up in the second issue of the 
Paramount Industrial Magazine. Unlike the first issue, in- 
stead of demonstrating the way in which the finished pro- 
duct is used, this shows the scenes at one of the Stetson 
hat factories. Very good handling of the subject and a 
worth-while addition to your bill if you happen to need an 
offering of this nature. - 



"Eventide" — Ford=-Goldwyn 

Carefully tinted and finely photographed, the scenic por- 
tion which opens registers a pleasing impression. Cloudy sky 
effects feature that part and are of merit. A second portion 
is devoted to the beaver, ad a third deals with the Canadian 
Porcupine. All of it is filmed excellently, and it marks a 
deviation from the string of industrial pictures turned out 
by Ford. 



Another Mentor Scenic 

Three parts make up another colored Mentor one-reeler 
which should prove acceptable. It opens with a portion 
called "Wedding Bells in Malaysia." After that, there is 
an exquisitely tinted section which deals with the culti- 
vation of the dahlia. Everyone of the numerous varieties of 
this flower is shown and this part will certainly appeal to the 
eye. Closing is some stuff shot along the seacoast of Spain 
and it includes some effective bits. Although the different 
parts of this have very little in common, the reel will prob- 
ably go well in the smaller and neighborhood houses, where 
crowds are inclined to prefer variety. 



"The Millionaire Paupers" — National 

Several humorous bits of comedy business and a fairly 
clever plot will get this hall room boy two-reeler over. Some 
of the stuff — the closing shot in which the boys ride home 
in garbage cans, the restaurant scene and one or two other 
portions are exceedingly funny, but there are some knock- 
about bits that are not very effective. This has been 
stretched just a bit, but it is nevertheless, a creditable of- 
fering. 



"Good Little Brownie" — Century=Universal 

Bathing damsels in tight-fitting one-piece apparel, that 
permits a considerable limb display occupy the center of the 
screen for a considerable portion of the time in this two- 
reeler, which features Brownie, (Century's educated dog. If 
the censors do not order much of the beach stuff out, for 
there is a considerable amount of footage devoted to the 
capers' of the girls who sprawl all over each other in the 
most unconvetnional fashion, it may get by, for there is a 
considerable amount of humorous material included. The 
plot has been used before, the best part of the production 
being some of the business toward the beginning, and that 
really is not essential to the story. 



"The Floor Below" — Pathe 

Neither the theme of this one-reeler which stars Snub 
Pollard, nor the incidents connected with it are very much 
to enthuse over. It deals with two henpecked husbands, 
who on the advice of their aged grand-father, determine to 
rule their households and succeed in intimidating their wives 
by shooting off revolvers. The father of one of the wives 
appears and some clever chase stuff — the only really laugh- 
able portion of the production — follows. The finish of the 
picture shows both old men acting humbly before their 
strong-minded wives. 



"Bubbles," Ford — Goldwyn 

Following the production of a reel consisting of some 
scenic stuff and portions devoted to animals. Ford has 
turned out another industrial concerning soap, telling of 
the production of that article in reasonably interesting fash- 
ion. On the whole, a creditable offering of its type. 



"The Sure Cure," National — Goldwyn 

Hypocondria, defined early in this two-reeler, with a gram- 
matical error in the explanation, is dealt with lightly in the 
story by Robert McGowan. The Carter De Havens play 
the leads in the piece and perform in their usual manner. 
Several of the situations are very funny, but the stuff aboard 
the boat is not as good as most of that in the early portion. 
Incidentally, there was too much footage devoted to the 
part of the picture which depicts the condition of the youth- 
ful husband, and too little to explain the manner in which 
he is cured. Certainly, that could have been taken up more 
fully. The story deals with a young man who is firmly 
convinced that he has a varied assortment of illnesses. 
Old and apparently wise physicians continually feed medi- 
cine to him and it takes a more modern doctor to prescribe 
a trip to sea for him. Aboard the liner, he eventually realizes 
that his troubles were imaginary. 



Short 



Reels 



"33 



"Children of the Netherlands," Mentor 

Dutch youngstors have been pictured by artists more thau 
onco, together with their scenic surroundings in Holland, and 
this one-reeler lias several close-ups and other interesting 
shots of the kiddies. The manner in which the stuff lias 
been tinted is not as good as it might he in phices and mars 
the offering somewhat. A .second portion, devoted to the 
wild birds of Scotland is better as far as the tinting is con- 
cerned. The close views are especially commendable, re- 
garded from the angles of photography and coloring. 



"Islands of Japan," Mentor 

Here is a colored reel that from beginning to end is re- 
plete with bits of beauty — an offering that has been tinted 
and photographed in artistic style. The second and prin- 
cipal portion shows the territory of the Japanese islands of 
Matsushima and Kyushu, the lakes, hills, rapids and water- 
falls of the country, and includes a sunset that is really 
remarkable. Parrots of Australia, green and yellow are 
dealt with in the first part and hold the eye. They look 
especially pretty against the background of leaves and 
oranges, being perched on the branches of orange trees. 

"Making Elsie Good," Universal 

, Young.sters — several of them — appear in a -fairy-tale 
('■'offering that will go well with the children and many of the 
; older folks. The little girl who plays the lead — a blond — 

is pleasing and the others do as well as may be expected. 

This deals with the dream of a girl who has several uu- 

de-sirable traits, among them being snobbishness. While sleep- 
r.ing, she is placed in a position where she realizes that she 
r has ..acted improperly and when she wakes up reforms. 



)\ 



' V "Jits and Wits," Rival Film 

Not very long ago. a great many comedians imitated 
Charles Chaplin, but the Chaplin craze has died down some- 
what, and only a few do it now-a-days. The Rival Film Co., 
ill its initial production, starring Al Joy, has a comedy built 
pn an acceptable theme and one that has a few incidents that 
are funny, although much of it is not as bright as it might 
be. Whatever his merits may be otherwise, however, Joy's 
imperaonation of Chaplin leaves much to be desired, as do 
the imitations of most of the others who try to duplicate 
the wabble and Chaplin's other characteristics. The director 
did not do as well as he might have done with situations and 
the offering lags somewhat. A few good situations will go 
a great way towards helping this along, but thev can not 
make it a hit. 



"Informing a Nation," Encyclopedia Americana 

Publishing periodicals and books is a subject that has 
not been touched very recently by producers of Educational 
pictures, and the organization which is turning out the En- 
cyclopedia Americana, has shown in good fashion the man- 
ner ill which that publication is made ready for the pur- 
chaser. Some of the steps shown are quite familiar, but the 
gilding and marbling of edges as well as some other processes 
are not as well known to the average spectator. This sheds 
light on the matter and also gives publicity to the new ency- 
clopedia, but in a careful and wise manner. 



"The Jay Bird," Universal 

Unlike the type of pictures Hoot Gibson has been making 
for some time, this two-reeler is more like the modern 
cinema drama as far as the manner in which the story has 
been worked out and the way in which it has been produced, 
are concerned. It has some very good comedy relief and is 
thoroughly wholesome. The story is built on a much hack- 
neyed theme, but has been screened in a satisfactory manner 
and will probably prove acceptable. If your crowd has been 
taking to the recent Hoot Gibson pictures, you will be wise 
to book this. 



"Lao Kai," Mentor 

Scenes photographed in Lao Kai, French Indo China, make 
up the earlier portion of this Mentor scenic, colored as 
usual. A great deal of the tinting is of a high standard. 
"Hunting a liabbit" is the title of the second and closing 
part. In certain localities, rabbits are pests and have to be 
eliminated, and this shows the various ways in which the 
task is accomplished. A fair reel. 



Screen Smiles, Z and No. 31, Screen Smiles, Inc. 

With a new finish, a neat piece of animation, instead of 
the old one. Screen Smiles is an improved offering. At pres- 
ent the stuff at the finish is drawn out in black on white 
but having it correspond to the rest of the reel, that is, hav- 
ing the figures at the finish marked in white on dark blue,* 
will add more improvement. The remarks included refer 
lightly, and cleverly to profiteering, landlords, prohiltition, 
marriage, divorce, the Bolsheviki, 1. W. W.'s, the Monkey 
(ihind theory, prohibition, etc. 



"Meat Again," Ford — Ooldwyn 

Recently there was a Ford release that pictured the cut- 
ting of meat, and this reel deals with some of the by-products 
of the meat. It shows the canning processes, sausage-mak- 
ing, what is done with hog bristles and the manufacturing 
of butterine. This is a fair educational subject, but not a 
particularly effective production to offer as entertainment. 



"The Nooze Weekly," Fox 

Humorists have overlooked, hitherto to all appearances, 
the usual screen news weekly, and in this Mutt and Jeff 
one-reeler Fox has a novel subject. It has been handled in 
good fashion, and the only regret is that it is so short — 
that there was not enough space devoted to the ridicule of 
other events depicted in news reels. In producing this, they 
strayed somewhat from the original idea and included sev- 
eral bits of business that might have been used elsewhere 
to better advantage, but the stuff is funny. 



"The Line Runners," Universal 

Whether or not this entire production, a two-reeler, was 
meant to be satirical, is a matter that is open to question, 
for either much of it was meant as a sort of subtle comedy, 
or there was much amiss with the work of the cast and 
direction. The photography and lightings in many places 
are excellent, in fact, the manner in which this has been 
screened is generally satisfactory. The story, however, 
smacks of the type of western popular some time ago, an'd 
will draw laughs from the critical members of your audi- 
ence. There is one big kid towards the finish, when it is 
explained that a man of large proportions, wearing the 
broad-brimmed black slouch hat usually associated with 
heavies, in pictures of this type, and smoking a cigar with 
great vivacity, has nothing to do with the story, and is 
about to leave town. It's a bit that will get a laugh. 



"The Heart Beneath" — Capital 

Camera work, which is of high order throughout, features 
what is otherwise a more or less mediocre offering. Xeal 
Hart pla.vs the stellar role in the piece which is built around 
an eternal triangle story of the type that has been used 
frequcntl.v, and in similar form very recently by another 
company. From the ver.y start, the conclusion is obvious 
and the average fan will probably outguess it without deep 
thought. It deals with a "city feller" who comes out to a 
ranch on business, but stays and leads the cow puncher's 
wife astray. The husband, however, arrives in time to avoid 
the disruption of his family and order the villain to board 
the first train for home. Included in the cast are Marie 
James, who plays the feminine lead : Joe Rickson, the villain 
and Inez Gommez. 



"All for the Doughbag," Century — Universal 

J. A. Howe wrote and directed this farce which starts in 
fine fashion and continues well until almost the very end, 
when there is just a bit too much of the riotous stuff. A 
dog does some exceptionally fine work at the beginning and 
there are two male comedians who handle their work in as 
fine a manner as could be desired. The youthful comedienne 
handles her character acceptably and but for the fact that 
there is too much slapstick comedy towards the culmination, 
this is almost certain to score. There is some excellent busi- 
ness in the early portion, and that will more than help get 
this over. 



'XPe g^u^ed to 6eU 



ilFfirilCn 



Shousond Dottais 



niiii: 



THE day after "Empty Arms" was turned over to us by Director Frank Reicher, a well-known 
distributor tendered us a point-blank offer of $100,000 guarantee on the sale. This offer did 
not appeal to us, because we had spent over sixty thousand dollars in producing the picture and 
were cognizant of the fact that, in it, we have one of those master productions that strikes the industry 
about every three or four years. But the distributor insisted that his offer was wcrely a guarantee; 
that the amount Empty Arms" could command, might run close to seven figures. 



Then, in the course of the discussion, the head 
of our advertising department apologized for inter- 
rupting us, and said: "It is peculiar that you 
should offer $100,000 for 'Empty Arms,' for I 
have here in my hand my Hundred Thousand 
Dollar Packet, which 1 was just about to hand to 
Mr. Park." 

What is the Hundred Thousand Dollar 
Packet.''" asked the well-krfown distributor. 

It's nothing more than a book of printed sug- 
gestions that show the exhibitor who books 



'Empty Arms' how easily he can put it over, and 
I consider it worth $100,000," replied our adver- 
tising manager. 

At first, we must confess, we thought the A. M. 
had lost his reason. We knew that he had been 
working day and night inventing valuable promo- 
tion "stunts," but, after ten minutes of discussion, 
he convinced us that he was right. 

At parting, the well-known distributor raised his 
offer to a sum that the average independent pro- 
ducer would sell thrte pictures for; but in justice to 



ENPTY ARMS 

THE SENSATION OF THE CENTURY 

we were forced to reject. 

On the following pages, we publish a brief digest of the extraordinary history 
and superlative qualities of "Empty Arms," being thoroughly convinced that, 
among the intelligent film buyers of America, there is going to be the most 
spirited bidding in years. All exhibitors, States Right men and chain operators 
are invited to communicate at once with 



PHOTOPLAY LIBRARIES, 

(Exclusive Selling Agents) 

500 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK CITY 



I NC 



6cUtfard Whiteside 



PROOUCERS 



ifif^^tjirt 



DoUcir?qckct 



WHEN the advertising manager en- 
tered the conference immediately 
after the well-known distributor 
made his original offer, he said: 

"The idea in 'Empty Arms' is one never before 
touched. Its originality is worth a great deal. But the 
idea is of such importance at this time, that I find our 
picture can command over a hundred thousand dollars 
worth of advertising in every important city. 

"How do I know.' Well, I have wrirten to news- 
paper editors, civic authorities, educators and men and 
women in public life, club officials, doctors, lawyers 
and other professionals. Jn every city, interest in the 
subject contained in 'Empty Arms' is so great, that, if 
we were to try to arouse this interest with paid adver- 
tising, it would cost over a hundred thousand dollars 
to do it." 

T/ie Hundred Thousand Dollar Packet 
Tells the Whole Story; It Covers the 
Box-Office Possibilities of ''Empty 
Arms" from Every Angle. A Copy of 
It Will Gladly be Sent Only to Those 
Exhibitors and States Right Buyers 
Who Personally Sign On Their Busi- 
tiess Stationery a Request for It. 



PHOTOPLAY LIBRARIES, 

(Exclusive Sellinz Agents ) 

500 FIFTH AVENUE 

NEW YORK CITY 



Inc. 



^Slf^'cr 



m 






.©«-. 



.^^. 



:^^ 



toith THURSTOtM HALL, 
J.HERBERT FRANK & IRENE BLACKWELL. 

\A/F%ITTEN BY V*ILUAP.O >\»NCr BRADLEY 



Tibw Xestcr ^ork axid 
Sckvard xyhitesidc produced 
HPTY i 

uiiiniiiiiiiiMiiininiiMiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiiniiiiiimiiiiiiiiii^ 



"jir^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^n 112 



AFTER a hundred or more stories suitable for screen production were submitted to 
us by the foremost authors of America, we selected the script of a young writer, 
Willard King Bradley, as the most original in the batch, and the most original 
we had seen in years. The story, dealing with the Gargantuan question of Mother- 
hood, demanded the finest artistic talent procurable. Frank Reicher, responsible for 
manv Paramount and Metro successes, was chosen to direct "Empty Arms," because 
we figured that he alone could handle a great number of its exceedingly difficult 
scenes, the majority of which were at once intensely dramatic and unusually delicate. 
Mr. Reicher immediately surrounded himself with the foremost technicians. Gail 
Kane, famous star of screen and stage, who had just closed in the Broadway success, 
"The Woman in Room 13," was signed to star; then a powerful cast, including 
Thurston Hall, J. Herbert Frank and other well-known screen celebrities, was 
engaged to support her. The picture was made; and, as we watched its progress, we 
believed that we had a master production. But we were not content to rest on our 
own judgment. We called in that famous editorial writer. Dr. Frank Crane, who 
contributed his unique services to the thought side of the picture. 

It is the easiest thing in the world for a producer to deal in twelve-cylinder adjectives, and to megaphone 
it from the housetops that his picture is supreme. We are so confident of the success of "Empty Arms" 
that we are more than willing to simply place it in the hands of the buyers and exchange men, and let the 
screen do the talking. We are so certain that they will say that we have wWi-restimated it, that we will stake 
our future success on itJ Which is saying volumes. 



Staninq GAIL KANE 



THE production alone will stand on its merits. But there is something else 
we have to offer which makes *' Empty Arms" a picture //?<rj-. This ' 'some- 
thing else" is the Hundred Thousand Dollar Packet, prepared by our advertis- 
ing department. 

If you are desirous of seeing the picture, wire or write for details. If 



writteM by 



IN THE EYES 
OFTHE¥ORLD 
SHE¥AS GUILTY 




breath -taking mysterij. 
a haunting tale of revenie. 
an inspiring romance •• 

And io top it all, tne tre- 
mendous emotional acting 
oi raulinerreaerick, sweep- 
ind from climax to climax 
tuitn apouier unrivallea 
in the annals oi ^reat 
screen periormances. 



SAMUEL GOLDWYN 



PRESENTS 



PAULINE FREDERICK 



1 N 



THE PALISER CASE 



B "V EDGAR. SA.L.T11S 

dRSCTlBD BY "WILljllAM PARKE 




GOLDWYN PICTVRES CORPORATION 



SAMVtt OOkDWVN AiuKaii 




7/?BI^DSTKET 
0/ FILHDOM 





^ 



J^RECOCHIZEEl 
UTHORITy 



Vol. XI. No. 18 



Monday,. January 19, 1920 



Price 5 Cents 



=on: 



United-Hallmark Deal 

Berst Signs Contract Whereby Un- 
ited Becomes Distributor of 
Hall's Product 

J. A. Bcrst, closed contracts last 
week whereby United Picture Thea- 
tres of which he is president, as- 
sumes tlie physical distribution of 
tlio Hallmark productions. The deal 
went into effect yesterday. 

This announcement is evidently 
the one which Mr. Berst promised at 
the time he closed the contract tak- 
ing over the Triangle exchanges and 
the Triangle productions. It is re- 
garded as a move that inaterially 
strengthens the Ignited Picture 
Theaters. 

It is also announced that Berst 
has still further deals under way 
including the acquiring of important 
works for production at United's 
Dwn studios- Both distribution and 
production activities of United will 
still be under Mr. Berst's direct con- 
trol. 



It was stated at the Robertson- 
Cole offices that the report last week- 
regarding the taking over by that 
company of the physical distribu- 
tion of Hallmark productions was 
merely a temporary arrangement un- 
til Mr. Berst and Mr. Hall perfected 
the new deal. 



Magnet Exchange Has Fire 

Everyone got all bet up, the maid- 
enly stenographers dashed down- 
stairs, all of the available Pyrene 
was used up, and some damage, the 
extent of which is unknown, was 
:aiised when someone started a fire 
in the film room of the Magnet 
Exchange on the eighth floor of 729 
Seventh Ave. The fire was extin- 
guished before it could spread to 
the other rooms in the building. 



After Blank Houses 

Goldwyn Reported Interested in 
Nebraska Chain 

I It was reported Saturday that 
Goldwyn Pictures were trying to 
'ecure an interest in the A. H- Blank 
Enterprises in Nebraska. Blank 
pperatcs one. of the largest chains 
in the West. 

I It was impossible to communicate 
^.ith cither A. H. Blank or Samuel 
joldwyn on Saturday with reference 
;o this report. 

The Blank chain includes houses 
1, Des Moines, Marshalltown, Mas- 
>? City, Davenport, la. and Omaha 
-alt-fiYs-t class" theaters. " "^ 



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"How dare you come here?" she cried, recoiling in fear. For she 
knew that she was alone and th at this man would stop at nothing. 
From "The Turning Point," the F irst National picture with Katherine 
MacDonald, the American Beauty, s tarring. — Advt. 



Meeting Opens Today I 

Famous Players Forces Gather for : 

Convention — Zukor Expected 1 

{Special to fVID'S DAILY) j 

Chicago — Arrangements have been ' 
made for the Famous Players Lasky 
convention which opens at the Ls 
Salle Hotel to-day. It will last until 
the 23rd. 

One of the big topics at the meet- 
ing which will be attended by offi- 
cials of the home office as well as 
branch inanagers will be the devel- 
opment of the top-notch exploitation 
force. 

Among those who are expected 
from the home office are Adolph 
Zukor, Jesse .L. Lasky, Eugene Zuk- 
, (Continued on Page 3) 



Tucker Case Again Postponed 

The- hearing on the George Loanc 
Tucker 'case for alleged violation of 
contract h'as" been postponed until 
Friday, Jan. 23 at the request of the 
de,fe'n"dants, • Mayflower Photoplay 
Corp. and Famous Players-Lasky. 



Ince Stays Home 

Significance Attached By Virtue of 
Loew — Rowland Visit to the Coast 

Thomas H. Ince, head of the As- 
sociated Producers, (The Big Six) 
disappointed a number of film folk 
in the East by not arriving in New 
York last week. Although his of- 
fice reported that they had no idea 
of his arrival it was confidently be- 
lieved by a number of important 
executives that Ince would be here. 

It developed Saturday that the 
probable reason for Mr. Ince delay- 
ing his departure for the East was 
because of the trip West by Marcus 
Loew and Richard A. Rowland of 
Metro- Messrs Loew and Rowland 
left yesterday for the coast. 



First National Meeting 

Executive Committee of First Na- 
tional will hold an important meet- 
ing today in New York. Many of. the 
important members who were in 
Atlantic City last week are in town. 



Deal On 

F. W. Reynolds Seeking to Acquire 

Swanson-Nolan Properties — Ad- 
mitted By W. H. Swanson 

A definite offer for the entire 
Swanson-Nolan properties has been 
made to that firm by F. W- Reynolds/ 
an important business man of Lake 
City. 

William H. Swanson who was in 
New York on Saturday admitted 
that an offer had been made for the 
property. 

His partner, H. T. Nolan, who is 
also here, said that he preferred any 
statement to come from Mr. Swan- 
son. 

Swanson and Nolan have head- 
quarters in Denver and operate thea- 
ters at a number of points including 
Denver, Salt Lake City, Grand Junc- 
tion, Greeley, Pueblo, and other 
points. 



Buys Selznick Output 

Glucksmann Secures Rights for 
South American Countries 

Max Glucksmann, through his 
brother, Jacobo Glucksmann has 
purchased the entire output of Selz- 
nick Pictures, Select and National 
Picture Theaters for Argentine, 
Uruguay, Paraguay and Chile. The 
contract which covers the 1920 out- 
put of the Selznick producing or- 
ganizations provides for about 70 
pictures. 

Glucksmann has also secured 
"Twin Pawns" and "The A. B. C. of 
Love" Leonce Perret productions 
for the same territory. 

The Glucksmann quarters are now 
in the Candler Bldg. 



1st Natl's Sold 

David P. Howells has sold the .1 
First National attractions for Ar- 'j 
gentinc, Chile Paraguay, Uruguay, ' 
Bolivia, Peru, Brazil and Ecuador ' 
to Natalini and Co. of Buenos Aires. 

This is reported as being the 
largest deal closed for that territory. 



Black Gets Another 

Alfred S. Black arrived in town j 
Saturda}' from New England and ■ 
announced the acquisition of the 
Carcj' property on the Square at 
Taunton, Mass. When completed 
the property will seat 1,800. 

Mr. Black admited that this made • 
over 50 theaters in his chain. 1 



Cohn Leaves for Coast 

Harry Cohn left for California o 
Saturdaj'. 



\\ 



Monday, January 19, 1920 



jsM ^ 



DAILY 



■I 



^g^^b^ 



VaLIIIb.l8 Monday. J«nnary 19. 1920 Trig 5 Cttt 

Copyright 1920, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

F. C ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 
urer; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 
and Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 
Business Manager. 

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post oflfice at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms (Postage free) United States, Outside 
of Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00 

Subscribers should remit with order 
Address all communications to WID'S 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 
York. N. Y. 
Telephone: Vanderbilt, 4551-4552-5558 
Hollywood, California 
Editorial and Business Offices: 6411 Holly- 
wood Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 

Chicago representatives— Willis, Eckels 
and Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 
Oiicago, 111. 

«l — " I . I i' ■ I ii u ■ - I.. ... .I ... 

Quotations 

Bid Asked Last Sale 

Famous Players .. 85;4 87 87 

Goldwyn 32 34 33 

Loew's, Inc. .— 31 }4 

Triangle Film H ^A M 

Unit. Pict. Prod. 16 17 16^4 

World Film — — H 



Expect New Firm to Build House 

Portland, Me — The Capitol Real 
Estate Co., recently incorporated 
with a capital of $200,000, and which 
will take over the buildings now con- 
trolled by the Congress Realty Co., 
is reported to be planning a new 
film house. Abraham Goodside is 
president of the firm and Irene Mc- 
Cullum is treasurer. Charles J. 
Nichols with the other two com- 
prises the board of directors. 



COMING 

A 

REVIVAL 

OF 

Punctured 
Romance" 

TOWER FILM CORP. 

71 W. 23rdSt.,N. Y. 



Coast Brevities 

{Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Hollywood — Betty Blythe has 
been engaged by Universal to play 
the leading feminine role opposite 
Frank Mayo in a picture called 
"The Primrose Path," being directed 
by Christie Cabanne. 



Work on a new Eric Stroheim 
production for Universal has been 
held up pending the company's suc- 
cess in Staining the screen rights 
of the f '^. They are negotiating 
for F 'I^orris's novel, "Mc- 

Teaguc tiv plot of which is laid 
in San Francisco and the Mojave 
Desert. It is understood that Gib-, 
son Gowland of "Blind Husbands" i 
fame is to play the title role- Stro- 
heim is now completing the cutting 
of his second picture, "The Devil's 
Pass Key," which is regarded as a 
sequel to "Blind Husbands." 



Putting It Over 



Here is 


hovi a b 


Tother 


exhih- 


itor put 


his shoiu 


over. 


Send 


along your ideas. 


Let th 


e other 


fello-w k 


new hoiv 


you 


cleaned 


up. 









Alice Lake has returned from 
San Francisco where she and 20 
members of her company have been 
taking scenes for "Shore Acres." 



The cast has been selected for 
"The Girl in the Mirror," from the 
novel of the same name by Eliza- 
beth Jordan, which will go into pro- 
duction at Universal within the next 
few days. It includes Frank Mayo, 
Ray Ripley, Elinor Fair, Harry Hil- 
liard, Claire Anderson, Arthur Hoyt, 
Ruth Royce and Bull Montana. The 
director will be Jack Ford- 



Morris R. Schlank, producer of the 
Hank Mann comedies, has engaged 
Frederick Bennett, author of "The 
Radium Mystery," "The Lost Ex- 
press," and several coiriedies fea- 
turing Arbuckle and Lyons-Moran, 
to write two-reel stories for the new 
series of comedies featuring Hank 
Mann. 



The King W. Vidor company fin- 
ished exteriors on the old Southern 
mansion at Sunland this week and 
now is at work on interiors. 



They are connecting "In Old Ken- 
tucky," starring Anita Stewart, with 
horse racing and the scheme is prov- 
ing successful. At the Kinema, Los 
.■\ngeles, the fact that there had been 
an Anita Stewart day at the Ascot 
Races, when she presented the win- 
ning jocky with a floral horseshoe, 
served to get an overflow crowd. At 
the Madison, Detroit, they are mak- 
ing the entrance look like a pad- 
dock entrance, with a sort of betting 
club within the lobby- There is a 
girl in jocky costume distributing 
heralds and night riders parade 
through the streets, in addition. 



Dallas, Tex. — L. B. Remy, manager 
of the local Goldwyn exchange en- 
gineered an exploitation stunt with 
Ben Austin and Jake Newman, own- 
ers of the Gentry Dog and Pony 
Show. He made arrangements to 
have large white signs, advertising 
Goldwyn, attached to two elephants 
with the show. The company trav- 
els from town to town, and the 
elephants being a big attraction, the 
words "This is a Goldwyn Year" — 
Goldwyn Pictures, etc are getting 
much attention. 



The 4)roduction of "Polly of the 
Storm Country," a Grace Miller 
White story, is in its last stages of 
completion. Mildred Harris Chap- 
lin is starred. 

GAUSMAN 



Minneapolis, Minn. — Anita Stewart 
in "In Old Kentucky" packed them 
in at the New Lyric due to a large 
exploitation campaign put over by 
Arthur Abelson, manager. A tre- 
mendously large billboard — 22 sheet 
long and ten sheets high was used, 
making it possible to put the words 
in eight foot letters. A negro jazz 
band paraded about town giving 
concerts before each performance 
and the stage setting of the original 
play served as the setting for the 
prologue. There was a lobby dis- 
play with a horseshoe, 18 feet high 
and special boosting was given the 
song "In Old Kentucky." Confec- 
tionery establishments started serv- 
ing the "Kentucky Mint Julep," and 
there were other advertising acces- 
sories including 10,000 one-sheet 
cards, 2,000 snipes, 10,000 circus her- 



Added Protection 
MUST Follow 
Increased Values 

A thousand dollar policy of two years ago could well be in- 




creased to twice that amount 
worth considerably more. Don't 
protection. . See 



to-day. Your property is 
let it be without ardequate 



KEUBEN CXMUELS 



Jnrurance 
9 Phone John 



SO MAifien Lane 



Samuels 



aids, 1,000 one sheet lithos ancil 
twenty-four sheet stands. The o 
duction ran for a full week wit 
great success. 



Hannibal, Mo. — -An old sch.ii 
was used to crowd the Park wn 
Geraldine Farrar in "Flame of k 
Desert" was presented. Souvii 
Photograph Day was announ . 
and a photograph of the grand 0)r; 
motion picture star was oflferecto 
each of the first 300 women en i 
ing. It worked. 



M'arianna, Ark — -T. E. Hoj; 
manager of the Majestic, put "h 
Jinx," starring Mabel Norm 
over by using the circus parade st 
Three prizes were offered to h 
children exhibiting the best wajn 
coaster or cart rigged up to reser 
a circus float. All of the disp 
were assembled in the parade, he; 
by a banner advertising the 
Interest was aroused and capa t 
business resulted. 



Allen Films Ready 

Universal will release three M 
Jack Allen animal pictures be 
ning March 1. Weekly release. 



Metro Buys "Kiss Burglar' 

Metro has purchased "The 
Burglar," the stage play in w, 
Fay Bainter appeared. ' | 



Controversy Over French Actfi 

Ray Raymond, agent, declfi 
that he is the representative 
Gaby Marcy, the French actpi 
who recently arrived here- 

John J. Livingston who is hi 
ling her publicity here, states iii 
Mr. Raymond may be her theat :; 
agent but that he is handling 
picture oflers. 



"Empty Arms" Finished 

Lester Park and Edward W 
side have finished "Empty A 
the production with Gail Kl 
Thurston Hall and Herbert Frh 
Frank Reicher directed, while D 
Frank Crane, the editorial writerjo 
laborated. 

The story is by Willard In 
Bradley. 



0^ 



The only time a movie 
fan is undecided which of 
two theatres he will enter, 
is when they both have 
RITCHEY posters on dis- 
play. 

RITCHEY 

UTHO. CORP. 
4«6W.31i( St.J(.T., Phooe OmIm* 83U 




JM i 



DAIL.Y 



Monday, January 19, 1920 



leeting Opens Today 

(Continued from Page 1) 

1 Arthur S. Friend, H. D. H. Con- 

ik chairman of the finance com- 

»i):tee; Al Lichtnian, general man- 

*il;r, department of distribution; S- 

Kent, F. V. Chamberlin, John C. 

nn, Jerome Beatty, J. W- Toone, 

lude Saunders, A. C. Glenn, Gor- 

% H. Place, A. O. Dillenbeck, re- 

■'ifsenting HanfT- Metzger, Inc., ad- 

ftising agents for the company. 

pistrict managers who will attend 

Harry Asher, Boston; W. E. 

ith, Philadelphia; C. E. Holcomb, 

anta; Louis Marcus, Salt Lake 

.^y; Herman Wobber, San Fran- 

Jipecial representatives: J. W. Al- 
J, Chicago; M. H. Lewis, Kansas 
Jy, Mo.; W. J. Pratt, Atlanta, New 
cleans and Charlotte, N- C; L. L. 

nt, Dallas, Texas. 
)j|5ranch managers: J. A. McCon- 
e, Boston; William O'Brien, Port- 
d, Me.; Henry T. Scully, New 
•ven; H- H. Buxbaum, New York; 
•hard C. Fox, Buffalo; J. D. Clark, 
iladelphia; Paul J. Swift, Wash- 
ton;Herbert E. Elder, Pittsburgh; 
P. Wolfberg, Cincinnati; G. W. 
iman, Cleveland; Fred Creswell, 
icago,: J. W. Hicks, Jr., Minne- 
)lis: H. A. Ross, Detroit; C- L. 
Vey, Kansas City, Mo.; R. C. Li 
au, Des Moines; C L. Peavy, 
laha; R. E. Bradford, Atlanta; H. 
Wilkes, New Orleans; G E. Akers, 
Louis; T O. Tuttle, Dallas; Jo- 
h H. Gilday, Oklahoma City; Da- 
Prince, Charlotte; F. B. Mc- 
cken. Salt Lake City; Milton H. 
in, Denver; H. G- Rosebaum, San 
ncisco; H. G. Ballance, Los An- 
;s; G. W. Endert, Seattle; C M. 
1, Portland, Oregon, 
'xploitation representatives: Os- 
A. Doob, Cincinnati; John P. 
ing, Kansas City, Mo-; John D. 



WANTED 
IMMEDIATELY 



Capable cameraman for 
Scenic Material; with his 
own outfit, for two months' 
2 trip in the West Indies. 

Apply 

EDUCATIONAL FILM 
CORP., 

729 Seventh Ave. 





The Acme 
Portable 
Projector 
For the 
Studio 

Cutting Room 
The Editor 
Home School or 
Church 

monstrated to You Anywhere 
lowells Cine Equipment Co. 
7th Ave. New York 

Phone Bryant 1166 



Howard, Seattle; Fred W. McClel- 
lan, Philadelphia; Paul L. Morgan, 
New Haven; Herman Phillips, 
Cleveland; H. Wayne Pierson, At- 
lanta; T. J. Planck, Detroit; Alf 
Price, Los Angeles; Daniel Roche, 
Chicago; Wayland H. Taylor, New 
York; Lester Thompson, Boston; 
Leslie F. Whalen, Dallas, Texas; and 
Charles L. Winston, Denver. 



Adolph Zukor will leave for Chi- 
cago the early part of this week. 

Gordon Place, editor of Progress- 
Advance will issue a daily copy of 
"Pep" the company's confidential 
house organ during the convention. 



Denny Sails for South Africa 

Orrin Denny, cameramen for Uni- 
versal has sailed for London and 
from there will go to Belgian Con- 
go, South Africa where he will re- 
place Pliny Home as cameraman 
with the expedition now in that 
country. 



Curwood Denies Combination 

James Oliver Curwood denies that 
he is interested in any merger of 
authors. The report emanated from 
the coast a short time ago that Ralph 
Connor, Peter Clark MacFarlane, 
Johnson McCullough and Peter B- 
Kyne would picturize their own 
stories. 



Sunday Films for Endicott 
KUpccial to WID'8 DAILY) 

Endicott, N. Y. — Rescinding its 
vote of Dec. 23, the village board of 
trustees has legalized Sunday motion 
picture shows. 



Caribou House Bums 
{Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Caribou, Me — Thomas Willett's 
motion picture house was burned 
last week in a fire which caused a 
total damage of $20,00. 



Keeler Directed Hines 'T-omedy 
H. P. Keeler, formeriy.with Thom- 
as H. Ince directed the first "Tor- 
chy" comedy with Johnny Hines for 
Master Films, Inc., the company of 
which Charles C Burr is president. 



Blames it on Pictures 
(Special to WID'S DAILY) f 

Hood River, Ore. — Time spent at 
motion picture houses was classed 

with that wasted in the pool rooms 
by Circuit Judge Fred Wilson in an 
address before the Hood River Wo- 
man's Club. He spoke on causes for 
delinquencies of boys and the parole 
system. 



Universal Releases 
Universal will release week of Jan. 
26 "The Phantom Melody," with 
Monroe Salisbury; "Bungled Bunga- 
lows," Lyons-Moran comedy; a Cen- 
tury comedy and a western. Also 
episodes of serials. 



Louisville for Sunday Shows 
Louisville, Ky.— Declaring that 
elimination of Sunday motion pic- 
ture shows, urged by the local Bap- 
tist Ministers Association would 
lead to the old-fashioned "Blue Sun- 
day," with no golf, soda fountain, 
etc., following, Mayor Smith has 
gone on record as favoring Sunday 
performances. 



IT REQUIRES ORCANIZATION TO 
MANUFACTURE COODENCRAVINCS 

MHAYEBEEN0R(;ANIZED''^''I898 

EpUIPPEDTODELIVtRrH'BEirPOJIIBlE 
WORK INTHE LEAST POSSIBLE TINE 



THE STANDARD EIICRAYINdCO. 

PUOTO ENGRAVERS 

225 WEST 39™ STREET. NEW YODK 

AMEDICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION BLDO 



MAKE YOU HEAR WHAT YOU SEE 



FILMUSIC CUE SHEETS ARE GOOD FOR ALL THEA- 
TERS EVEN THOSE THAT USE ROLLS— AND LOTS OF 
THEM DO. 



HlR8!1USIC-CO. 

. . LOS ANCELES . 



1129 Highland Ave. 



The difference between 
moving pictures and 
Goldwyn Pictures is the 
difference between 
speculation and invest- 
ment. 




LEUMAS CARTOON SERVICE 

f^roducers of Animated 

Films- for eVery purpose. 

17^. 45tli St. TelBiyant - 6806 



THE HAL BENEDICT STUDIOS 



College Point, Long Island 



Telephone, Flushing 3000 



Monday, January 19, 1920 



Koppin to Build Detroit Theater 
(Special to If ID'S U/IILY ) 

-' Detroit — Henry S. Koppin will 
build a $250,000 theater at Cathrine 
and St. Antoine Sts. C Howard 
Crane is the architect. 




D. W. GRIFFITH 



KNOWS 

The value of strictly high 
class people for the ensemble 
scenes of his productions. 

WE ARE supplying him 
with only the most select 
good-looking and properly 
dressed people for his pro- 
ductions. 

UUK financial strength en- 
ables us to supply any num- 
ber of people. 

Select Motion Picture 
Bureau 

William W. Cohill, Manager 

1493 Broadway 

New York 

Telephones 

I 2389 
Bryant i 2390 

I 2391 




Eddie Lyons and Lee Moran 
to do Edgar Franklin's "Everyth^ 
But the Truth," for Universal. 



AilTvTlTLES 

HAND LETTERING 

Vjr-r (Oxe auficLmd Mies -^ Day) t--,- - 

f :-A LY N L U' if 

X PHONE 2323 -BRYANT Xj 



Realart Pictures have a special 
liibLiy display for all their produc- 
tions now ready in their exchanges 
throughout the country for all 
tlieir bookings. Look them over 
and see how this enterprising con- 
cern will assist you in getting 
"them" up to the box office. 
KRAUS MFG. Co. 
220 W. 42nd St. 
17th Floor Tel. 3607 Bryant 



CHRISTIE COMEDY 
Bobby Vernon in a new Christie Comedy "Fair But False." Vernon 
who has made a hit in Christie Comedies, will soon be seen in a spe- 
cial Christie Special two-reeler- — Advt. 



National Film's Fifth Year. 
The National Film Corp. of Amer- 
ica began its fifth year on Dec. 30 
last, the company having been 
formed in 1915 by the late William 
Parsons. 



J. A. BERST 

PRESIDENT OF 

UNITED 

PICTURES PRODUCTION CORPORATION 

ANNOUNCES 

THAT UNITED HAS SECURED CONTROL 

OF THE 

TRIANGLE EXCHANGES 

AND 

ALL THE FAMOUS TRIANGLE PICTURES WHICH INCLUDE 

SUCH STARS AND DIRECTORS AS 



D. W. GriflBth 
Thomas H. Ince 
Douglas Fairbanks 
William S. Hart 
Frank Keenan 
The Gish Sisters 



Charles Ray 
Norma Talmadge 
Constance Talmadge 
Dorothy Dalton 
Louise Glaum 
Olive Thomas 



AND 



The Famous Ma.c]c gknnett Keystone Comedies 



"WHERE PROMISES ARE SACRED" 

LOUIS MEYER 

FORMERLY BRODA & MEYER INC 

TITLES 

LETTtRED - ILLUSTRATED - PHOrOGRAPHED 
ASK TO SEE OUR NEW 
PROCESS TITLES AND 
ILLUSTRATIONS 

A PHONE CALL WILLI BRING SAMPLES 

BRYANT 7392 
220 WEST 42nd ST. - ROOM 20O4 





There are 30 Reasons 



why you should book, 



"The 
Screaming 
Shadow" 

REASON No. 17 

Hen Wilson's ^mashing: $er- 
ial $uoeess Spells Dollars at 
your Box office. 

Mr. Exhibitor 

Wateli for Reason No. 18 to- 
morrow. 

BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 







dfl 


^N** 


j^^ff 


%«* 


I^^H^B 


►v 


W 


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UNIVERSAL CITY 

Released through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK 

Foreign Rights controlled by Apollo Trading Corp. , 220 W. 48th St. 



CAL. 




^ 




^BRADSTREET 
FILHDOM 




7i^RECOCHIZEi 
UTHORIYy 



^^^yJSt-h^'' 



\I. No. 19 



Tuesday, January 20, 1920 



Price 5 Cents 



./nch Offices to United 

hi Gives Latter Number of In- 
depentdent Productions for 
Southern Territory 

A. Berst of United has closed a 

I with tlie S. A. Lynch Enter- 
es of Atlanta, wliereby United 

take over the Lynch exchanges 
New Orleans, Dallas, Kansas 
r, Omaha and St. Louis where 
ch has been operating under the 

e of Enterprise Distributing 
p. These exchanges have been 
ributing Triangle productions. 

II films which have been handled 
these branches will be controlled 

booked by United on and after 
25. For the present, United 
iuctions will be handled in New 
ans by Pierce Films, 
xclusive of the Triangle pictures, 
e exchanges have been handling 
lumber of independent produc- 
s including "The Unpardonable 
" and "The Hushed Hour." This 
efore gives the exchanges feed- 
that territory a considerable 
iber of films besides the United 
Triangle output. 



athe Installs Offices on Coast 

athe has opened permanent coast 
Pes, located in the Wright-Cal- 
jiar Bldg., Los Angeles. Gilson 

lets formerly head of the scen- 

I department is in charge of the 
e while Mrs. Phyllis Daniels will 
die the publicity- The opening 
the office was a result of the 
: of Paul Brunet to the coast. 
rgef Returning With Rowland 
axwell Kargcr of Metro will 
e east with Marcus Loew and 
■lard Rowland when they return 
few York in about a month. Kar- 
will make "The Four Horsemen" 



Roberts of Texas Here 

B. Roberts, secretary-treasurer 
he Buckhorn Pictures Corp. of 

Antonio, Tex. is in New York. 
!s here to dispose of a five reeler 
two two reelers directed by Har- 
jordon 



)lubar With Famous 

! (Special to WW'S DAILY) 
)s Angeles — Allen Holubar will 
^ with Famous Players, accord- 
to what appear to be well au- 
ticated reports. From one who 
osely connected with the Para- 
nt organization it is learned that 
itiations are nearing a "success- 
;ermination." 



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"I will not give you an answer until you have proved yourself in the 
world of men," she said. But her heart was breaking, for she loved 
him with her whole heart. Katherine MacDonald, the American Beauty, 
in the First National picture, "The Turning Point" — Advt. 



6 Million for Theaters 

Paramount Understood to Have Set 

Aside That Amount for Canadian 

Construction 

{Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Toronto — It is understood here 
tliat Paramount has set aside a sum 
of $6,000,000 for the erection of 
theaters throughout Canada. 

The plan will provide for a first 
class house in every important city 
in the Dominion. 



.^dolph Zukor was in Washing- 
ton yesterday and during his ab- 
sence, no information regarding the 
Canadian move could be secured- 



{By Wire to WW'S DAILY) 

Washington — Adolph Zukor was 
here yesterday conferring with the 
local representatives of the National 
Association and Secretary of the In- 
terior Lane regarding the forthcom- 
ing Americanization drive. 



"Big 6" Plan Studio 

Associated Producers to Build Plant 

in Glendale, Calif.— To Be Started 

in a Month 

(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles — The Big 6 — Associ- 
ated Producers — plan a monster stu- 
dio to be built in Glendale. 

Each director of the combination 
will have his own stage, cutting 
room. etc. 

Work on the plant will be started 
within a month. 



New Theater Company 

(By Wire to WW'S DAILY) 
Dover, Del. — The representatives 
of the Corporation Trust Co. have 
formed a $1,000,000 corporation 
known as the General Theaters 
Corp. The interests in back of the 
company have not been divulged. 



Exchange Lists Loew 

Stock Passed by Board of Gover- 
nors — Closed Yesterday at 31 With 
2,800 Shares Changing Hands 

It was somewhat of a surprise to 
a number of film folk yesterday when 
it was learned that the Board of 
Governors of the New York Stock 
Exchange had admitted the stock of 
Loew's, Inc. to trading on the floor. 

The stock closed at 31 yesterday 
while the turnover was 2,800 shares. 

A financial statement issued by 
Loew's, Inc., shows that during the 
three months ending Nov. 30, 1919, 
the gross earnings of the Loew thea- 
ters were $941,000, and the net earn- 
(Continued on Page 3) 



First National Meets 

.'\n important meeting of First 
National was held in the Astor j^es- 
tcrday. 



Warner With Pathe 

H. B. Warner is the latest of the 
Pathe stars. 

His productions heretofore have 
been handled through Robertson- 
Cole but the releasing arrangement 
has been changed by Jesse D. Hamp- 
ton, the producer. 

A short time ago, as noted exclu- 
sixely in WID'S DAILY, the Wil- 
liam Desmond productions were 
switched from Robertson-Cole to 
Pathe. The Warner deal removes 
the last of the Hampton product 
from the Roberson-Cole lists. 

At the latter offices, it was stated 
yesterday that "nothing was known 
of the matter" but Pathe readily ad^ 
mitted that the report was true^ 



Hodkinson Buys Gaumont Film 

Hodkinson has purchased "His 
Temporary Wife" a feature pro- 
duced by Gaumont with Ruby de 
Remer. Edmund Breese and Mary 
Boland. It will be released in Feb- 
ruary. 



Goldwyn Buys Stories 

Goldwyn yesterday announced the 
pnrcha.se of "The Christian," by Hall 
Caine for picturization. 

"The Slim Princess" in which El- 
sie Janis appeared has also been se- 
cured as has an unpublished story by 
Ben Ames Williams called "The Man 
Who Had Everything." 



It was the recollection of some 
people in the film business yester- 
day that "The Christian" had been 
done in films some years ago by 
Vitagraph. 



Tuesday, January 20, 1920 



V«LUN*.1S Tueid*;, January 20. 1920 Mo S Oltl 

Copyright 1920, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

F. C. ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 
urer; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 
«nd Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 
^Business Manager. 

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
St the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
Hie act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms (Postage free) United States, Outside 
of Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00 

Subscribers should remit with order 

Address all communications to WID'S 

DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 

York, N. Y. 

Telephone-. Vanderbilt, 4551-4552-5558 
Hollywood, California 
Editorial and Business Offices: 6411 Holly- 
wood Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 

Chicago representatives— Willis, Eckels 
and Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 
Chica go. III . ,..,-11 

Quotations 

Bid Asked Last Sale 

Famous Players -- 80 86>^ 82 

-Loew's Inc. 30^ 31 3^ 31 

Goldwyn 33 33 33 

Triangle Film ^ 

United Pict. Prod. 16 17 16 

World Film 1 1^ 1 

San Pedro to Have New House 

San Pedro, Cat. — A new house 
costing $225,000 will be built here by 
F. O. Adler. It will be three stories 
high and will seat 1,700. Adler will 
manage it. 

Ziegfield to Play Famous Films 

Chicago,, 111. — The Ziegfield will 
play all of the Famous productions 
after Jan. 24. Charles Ray's "Red 
Hot Dollars" is the first picture to 
be presented under the new policy. 



COMING 

A 

REVIVAL 

OF 

"TiUie's 
Punctured 
Romance" 

TOWER FILM CORP. 

71 W. 23rd St., N. Y. 



On Broadway 

Moss' Broadway — Taylor Holmes, 
"Nothing But the Truth." 

Review "Delights." 

Martin Johnson travel picture. 

Topical Review. 

Capitol — Louise Glaum, "Tlie 
Lone Wolf's Daughter." 

Capitol News. 

Prizma Colorland Review. 

Sennett comedy, "The Star Board- 
er." 

Ned Wayburn's Song Scenes. 

Rivoli— Mary Pickford, "Polly- 
anna." 

Rivoli Pictorial. 

Sennett Comedy, "The Star Board- 
er." 

Bruce scenic, "The Cloud." 

Strand — Katherine MacDonald, 
"The Beauty Market." 

Strand Topical Review. 

O. Henry story, "Tclemachi's 
Friend." 

Rialto — Marion Daviis, "The Cin- 
ema Murder." 

Rialto Magazine. 

Chaplin Classic, "The Rink." 

Brooklyn Strand — Zane Grey's 
"Desert Gold." 

Loew's New York — Today: Mar- 
guerite Clark, "A Girl Named 
Mary." 

Wednesday— "What Would You 
Do? 

Thursday — Sessuc Hayawaka, "The 
Beggar Prince." 

Fridav — Leah Baird, "The Capi- 
tol." 

Edward Earl, "High Speed." 

Saturday — Enid Bennett, "The 
Woman in the Suitcase." 

Sunday — Douglas Fairbanks, 
"When Clouds Roll By." 



Next Week 

Rialto — Mary Pickford, "Pollyan- 
na." 

Rivoli— Alice Brady, "The Fear 
Market." 

Strand — Constance Talmadge, 
"Two Weeks." 

Brooklyn Strand — Constance Tal- 
madge, "Two Weeks." 

Capitol — Mabel Normand, "Pin- 
to." 



Talmadge Film Day and Date 

Constance Talmadge's latest pro- 
(hiction, "Two Weeks," will play the 
New York and Brookyn Strand day 
and date next week. 



Mandlebaum Leaves for Home 

E. Mandkljaum, Ohio francliise 
holder of First National left for 
Cleveland yesterday. He was in 
town for the First National con- 
vention. 



Reddy 111 

Joe Reddy of Lathe is at home ill 
with an attack of la grippe- He is 
expected bark at his desk some time 
this week. 



Special Showing for Catholic Film 
A special showing for "American 
Catholics in War and Reconstruc- 
tion" produced by Famous Players 
was given at the Cohan and Harris 
theater Sunday night- 



Two "U" Comedies on Broadway 

Two Universal comedies are play- 
ing at Broadway theaters this week. 
One is "Over the Transom" a Joe 
Martin comedy and the other "Some 
Shimmiers" with Lyons and Moran. 



Andersen Due Jan. 29 

Robert Andersen of L^niversal will 
return to this country from Europe 
aboard the Mauretania, due in New 
York Jan. 29. 



Gets "Confession" for Michigan 

Detroit. Mich. — Equity Pictures 
has taken over tlie Michigan rights 
to "Confession." 



Seymour Hodkinson Manager Here 

Walter Seymour, district manager 
for Hodkinson, in charge of the 
Detroit, Cleveland and Cincinnati of- 
fices is in New York. 



Eight More Hall Room Comedies 

Jack and Harry Cohn still have 
eight Hall Room Boj^ Comedies to 
release under their contract with Na- 
tional Film. Whether there will be 
a renewal or not is questionable. 

Harry Cohn who is now on his 
way west will supervise production. 



Canadians Organize 
{Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Toronto, Can. — The exchange 
managers and various franchise hold- 
ers of Canada have formed an or- 
ganization known as the Canadian 
M. P. Dist. Assn to be afifiliated 
with the Canadian Board of Trade. 

The organization will assist in 
various legislative matters that may 
crop up. Officers are: Claire Hague, 
Universal; W. F. Barrett, vice-pres- 
ident, Vitagraph; J. P. O'Loughlin, 
secretary and treasurer, Regal 
Films- 



Call "Pollyanna" Best Pickford 

The Nat'l Board of Review in a 
special report on "Pollyanna" the 
new Mary Pickford subject states 
that the film is best she has ever 
done- 



New Rialto Sunday Record 

All previous Rialto records for 
a Sunday were smashed with "The 
Cinema Murder" with Marion Dav- 
ics when 9,741 patrons paid to see 
the film. 

The picture has been very widely 
advertised in the New York dailies. 



Cameramen Dance 
(Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Local motion pic- 
ture cameraman gathered on Satur- 
day evening at the first annual ball 
of the American Society of Cinema- 
tographers, at the Alexandria. The 
ballroom was transformed into a 
.gi.gantic studio "set" with all the 
"props" and light effects" essential 
to the happiness of the cameraman, 
as well as floral decorations and 
novelties. The committee in charge: 
.\rthur Edison, chairman, and Wal- 
ter Griffin, Chester Lyons. Guy Wil- 
ky, Charles Rosher, Frank Good, T. 
S. Gaudio, Roy KlaflFki and Lyman 
Browning. 



Chicago, 111.— B. I. Dasent, former- 
ly dramatic editor of the New York 
Herald and then the Times, is now 
doing the publicity work for Capital. 



To Film Connor Bocs 

Dominion Films, Inc. Formed— r- 
nest Shipman, Advisory Directi 

Dominion Films, Inc. have Ln 
formed for the purpose of filmii a 
series of Ralph Connor stories- if 
corporation has been chartercdin 
New York State. 

Ernest Shipman, now producirij 
series of Curwood stories with !:ll 
Shipman is advisory director of iie 
new company which plans to picr- 
ize the stories in the original lija- 
tions described by Connor. 

The first production will be "le 
Man from Glengarry," which wilof 
made on the upper Ottawa River id 
in the old quarter of Quebec. 



Ruth Dwyer in Leonard Seria 

Ruth Dwyer has been sig'd 
through George H- Callaghan to ?- 
pear in "The Evil Eye," the Bey 
Leonard Serial for Hallmark. 



"Flu" Warning in Chicago 
(Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Chicago — Because of the rap 
increasing number of cases of " 
reported each day during the \ 
week in Chicago, John D. Rob 
son. Commissioner of Health, 
sent out the following bulletin to 
theater owners: 

We are tlireatened iit the present t 
with a reeiiritMico of the influenza 
(leniic. althongli iirciliahly In a mi 
fdi-iii Hum last .vcar. However, it w( 
\>t' unwise even thoiiKh this be tru( 
nejjleet an.v action that would tenc: 
niininiize the present epidemic si\ci 

I expect the fullest ro-operatioii in 
Iiart of all theaters in Chicago, as it i 
your interest to ]irevent a reciirrenci 
this (lisea.se whicli even in a mild f 
will reduce your patronage. A severe 
ciirrence would re(iulre their tempoi 
closing. Please observe the follovi 
instructions: 1 

1st — 1'horoughly clean and disin 
floors, seats, lobbies and otlier sp; 
fre(|nented by the public. 

2nd — Display a notice on the sei 
advising all patrons that uncov( 
covigliing and sneezing will be folio 
l>y temporary e.jecti()n from the thea 
staling, if you wish, this is a strict oi 
from the Commissioner of Health. 

;!rd — ICxainine carefully your venti 
ing e(niipment, see that it is in good < 
dition and continuous operating dui 
performances. 

Respectfully, 
.John Dill Robertson, 
Commissioner of Ilea 



When RITCHEY posters 
are supplied with a photo 
play it means that the dis- 
tributor is giving the ex- 
hibitor the best posters 
that it is possible to ob- 
tain. 

RITCHEY 

LITHO. CORP. 

406 W. 3 lit St.,N.Y., PImdc CiMiuM 838S 



I 




TsJiM 



DAILV 



Tuesday, January 20, 1920 



I Coast Brevities 

{Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Hollywood — Mary Miles Minter, 
ealart star, will hereafter produce 
the Lasky studio. 



'Kathleen Kerrigan, sister of J. 
'arren Kerrigan, has an important 
It in her brother's latest Brunton 
..(hiction, "One Week End," a 
( ly comedy of New York society 
< l)y Wyndham Martyn. 



Harold Lloyd's new leading lady, 
ildred Davis, will be seen in the 
ltd of his special two-reel features, 
itited "From Hand to Month." 
hich is now ready for release. Miss 
;ivis is the successor of Bebe Dan- 
Is and is conceded by all to be 
M of the most beautiful girls in 
nidom. 



Rol)ert Warwick has finished 
Thou Art the Man !" under the 
;rection of Thomas Heffron, for 
aramount Artcraft, and it is an- 
hunced that he will shortly be 

aired in "The City of Masks." 



I'rom Santa Barbara comes the re- 
>i t that Arthur Edmund Carew has 

'11 offered a contract with an in- 
■])cndent producing organization, 

;ided by Eva Sturtevant, formerly 
cnario editor and manager of sev- 
• il local studios. 



Exchange Lists Loew 

(Continued from Page 1) 

ings $531,421, or at the rate of more 
than $2,000,000 a year. The attend- 
ance at the theaters in 1919 totaled 
53,4.SO,000, as against 43,088,000 in 
1918. 

The balance sheet shows the status 
of the company as follows: — 

.\s.sets- Ciisli, 5»l,^)'i'8,l.'{i»; loan.s on call, 
.f.'I.OOO.WX) ; snl).s(iii)tioiis to capital stock 
by outside interests, I'JOti.OOO ; notes re- 
ceivable, !t;n,OO0; Liberty bonds, $15,500; 
accounts receivable, $.'J13,0!»3; lan<l, build- 
ing, eiinipment. etc., .$10,260,648; construc- 
tion work, ^7!t,.''M.'! ; leases at cost, $1,353,- 
044; investments in other conipanies not 
consolidated, $2X3, (iOO; deposits on con- 
tr.icts, .$L'00,000; undivided protit.s, $ia5,- 
260; aiivance p.iynients on contracts, 
$143,.333; deposits on leases and tilni con- 
tracts, .$201,3a3; other investments $57,910; 
tluatrical c<tntracts, advertising and good 
will, .$9,035,028; deferred charges, $199,- 
tiOl; total, $27,103,190. 

Lial)ilities -Accounts payable, $90,429; 
cash deposits on leases, .$31,637; loans and 
notes payable, $273,231 ; income and ex- 
cess profits taxes, $367,209; taxes on thea- 
ter admissions, $136,9(>3; deferred ac- 
counts and instalments, $.337,443; bonds 
anil mortgages. .$3,475,000; deferred cred- 
its $2.S,421 : reserve for Federal income 
and excess profits taxes. 1920, $222,970; 
advances bv co-operative interests, $94,- 
10.3; capital stock Loew's, Inc., 700,000 
shares without i)ar value, $17,500,000; 
Loew's Inc., surplus, $46,733; affiliated 
companies, capital stock par value co- 
operative interests, $2,290,;?91 ; surplus of 
affiliated companies applicable to stock 
owned tiy Loew's Inc., $1 ,(>29,:i9:! ; surplus 
of affiliated companies appli«able to 
stock owned by co-operative interests, 
.$.597.'_>67; total. 27.103,190. 



Will Propose Sunday Shows 
Providence, R I. — A bill legalizing 
Sunday motion picture performances 
is expected when the Rhode Island 
legislature opens. CJergyman are 
opposing such a measure. 



Sherwood and Ballinger with Chaplin 
Baltimore, Md. — Edwin A. Sher- 
wood and William F. Ballinger are 
now associated with Milton Chaplin 
ill the ownership of the Variety Pic- 
tures Corp. Sherwood was fortnerly 
connected with Pathe and Famous, 
while Ballinger was with Select. 



Kooskia, Idaho. — Q. T. Taylor 
has taken over theater here and at 
Stite-;. 



Lew Stone has been engaged to 
i\ the role of Gordon Hayne in 
I eld by the Enemy," a Paramount 
itcraft special to be directed by 
i>nald Crisp. Jack Holt will be 
■1. Charles Prescott; Clyde Fill- 
ire, recently recruited from the 
L^itimate stage, plays Brigadier 
ingeon Fielding; Wanda Hawley 
ill appear as Emmy McCreery, Ag- 
' -- Ayres as Rachel Hayne and 
. alter Hiers as Tommv Beene. 



Tsuru Aoki, Universal's Japanese 
It", has almost finished work on 
r second feature, "Locked Lips," 

om the story by Clifford Howard. 

/illiam J. Dowling is supervising 

le production. 



%! 



.\gnes Ayres, who has won con- 
derable prominence in eastern pro- 
.ictions, but who is new to the 
oast, has arrived at the Famous 
layers-Lasky studio to work on 
jleld by the Enemy." 

GAUSMAN. 



epublic Exchanges to Open Feb. 1 

New Orleans, La.— The Republic 
cchange will be opened with J. F- 
'Flaherty in charge on Feb. 1. The 
maha exchange of that firm will 
so open at about that time with 
H. Hill, at the head- 



Kashin Managing Montreal House 

Montreal, Can. — M. Kashin, for- 
merly manager of the Broadway, N. 
Y., is now manager of the Holman. 
He succeeds John T. Fiddes. 



Mayors' Committee to Meet Feb. 2 
{Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Albany, N. Y — The Special Com- 
mittee appointed to look into the 
question of film censorship by the 
Mayors' Council of the State of New 
York will convene here on Feb. 2 
to draft a report to be made to the 
Council. 

Mayor Canfield of Kingston, is 
chairman of the committee. 



JOHN J. LIVINGSTON 

Motion Picture Representative 

For 

STARS— DIRECTORS 

1440 Broadway New York 



Collins Goes to Los Angeles 

Portland, Ore — Due to illness in 
s family. Dean Collins has been 
ansferred by Universal from this 
ty and Seattle to Los Angeles. In 
Idition to doing publicity work, 
bllins has been editing "Reel 
.uff,'' a four page publication for 
^]'ashington and Oregon exhibitors. 



CLARA KIMBALL YOUN^ 

Once more demonstrates her magnifi- 
cent art in 

"THE EYES OF YOUTH" 
We have made for this production a 
very artistic lobby display together 
with reproductions in fac-simile oil 
paintings from her latest poses in 
various sizes. 

KRAUS MFG. CO. 

220 West 42d Street 

17th Floor Tel. 3607 Bryant 



Send Us Your 
hS'&S Junk Film 

INTERSTATE SMELTING 
(SL REFINING COMPANY 

23 Commercial St. NEWARK. N. J. 




IDEAL STUDIOS 
FOR RENT 

Apply to 
JAMES J. REARDIN, 

General Manager 
Telephone Union 5067-68 




THE DIAL FILM CO 

announces 

the completion of Super-feature. 

MITCHELL LEWIS 



KING SPRUCE" 



adapted from best seller by 
Holman Da.v 



r 



^c (Refused to 5ett 
or One Iftuidred. 
ShousoncL Dotfcus 



iiniiiiitTitMUifirrrfMfjc 



Have you thought that, in your own 
neighborhood, several prominent women 
have started a movement which will be 
responsible for your house being packed 
when you show 

EMPTY ARNS 

THE SENSATION OF THE CENTURY 



Have You Seen the Hundred 
Thousand Dollar Packet? 

PHOTOPLAY LIBRARIES, INC. 

(Exclusive Selling Agents) 
500 Fifth Avenue, New York City 



rTTiiiiimiiiiiiiTi^j: 



iJc-5tcr <Park & 
6du>awilPhite5idc 



Tuesday, January 20, 1920 



tM A 



DAILV 



Putting It Over 



Here is hoiu a brother exhib- 
itor put his shoiu over. Send 
along your ideas. Let the other 
felloiv knoiv hoiv you cleaned 
up. 



I W. H. Productions have secured 
the backing of the American Legion 
for "Everybody's Business," which 
is on the state right market. Every 
post of the Legion will give the six 
reeler its support, and arrangements 
have been made to have the picture 
play a prominent part in the Amer- 
icanization Drive now under way. 



Cincinnati, O. — R. H. Haines, local 
First National branch manager had 
a special showing held here for those 
who claimed that they had never be- 
fore seen a motion picture show. 
"Heart O" the , Hills," which stars 
Mary Pickford was shown to the 
audience which consisted mainly of 
invalids. Included among them was 
a blind man to whom the titles were 
read, the situations being described 
by a friend. 



Los Angeles, Cal. — Lew Cody 
tried a new stunt in conjunction with 
the run of "The Beloved Cheater" 
at the Symphony, conducting a love- 
note contest. The girl who wrote 
the best love letter to him was of- 
fered an opportunity to try-out for 
his next picture antl tlie one who 
wrote the second best one, a prize of 
$25. Creat interest was aroused in 
the product on. 



Denver, Col. — A fair exchange is 
no robbery, says the well known 
proverb, and E. J. Drucker, local 
branch manager for Hallmark, and 
the proprietor of one of the dry 
?oods stores here adheres to the 
idage. "High Speed," is scheduled 
to open at one of the houses here 
shortly, and Drucker has made an 
arrangement with the store to place 
1 display in one of the windows 
boosting that production. In return 
For the privilege, he has made ar- 
rangements with the exhibitors here 
to run slides regularly, explaining 
that copies of the book by Clinton 
H. Stagg, from which the picture 
IS adapted, can be procured at the 
store. 



Cleveland, O. — In order to get the 
editors of local newspapers to de- 
i^ote an increased amount of space 
to motion picture news, and to con- 
k'ince them of the fact that the pub- 
lic is interested in "The Inside Dope" 
and not only in what each picture 
is about, the Strand after booking 
i feature for a week's run, adver- 
tised only the name of the distribut- 
ing company, the star and cast. 
1 That scheme of advertising result- 
ed in big business for "Her Kingdom 
of Dreams," First National, starring 
Anita Stewart. The editors are ex- 
pected to give additional space to 
film news in the future. 



Brandt to Tour South 
Joe Brandt left last night for an 
jxtendcd southern trip with "Con- 
cession. " 



Pasadena House to Cost $250,000 
I'asadena, Cal. — A house to be 
built here by R. O. Kendall, W. M- 
Easton .and W- C. Crowell will cost 
$250,000. 



Rosenfield-Hopp to Build 

Rock Island, 111. — The Rosenfield- 
Hopp Co. will erect a house that 
will seat 1,700 and cost $225,000. 



Taylor House for Passaic 

Passaic, N. J.— .'K- M. Taylor The- 
ater Co., newly incorporated, will 
build a $100,000 house on Main St. 



New Akron House to Cost $100,000 

Akron, O. — .A. Abromovitz will 
build here at- a cost of $100,000. 



Cleveland to Have $700,000 House 
Cleveland, O— W. F. Caldwell has 
made plans for F. W. Staffield for 
a house costing $700,000. 



Form New Company 

ivildeer, N. D.— R. L. Wilcox, A. 
B. Curry and H. H. Ellsworth of 
this city have formed the Kildeer 
.■\musenient Corp., with a capital of 
$10,000. 



Mexican House Nearly Ready 

Mexico City, Me.x. — At a cost of 
aliout 2,000,000 pesos, the National 
will l)e completed this year. This 
house has been under construction 
since 1902 and will be ready in Sep- 
tember. 



Patriot, Dekalb, Burns 

Dekalb, Tex. — A disastrous firci 
tliat has caused a total damage of 
,$300,000 has wrecked most of this 
town and the Patriot, of which W. 
C. Read is manager. 



Craver in Norfolk 

Norfolk, Va.- — Allan G. Burrow 
will erect the Broadway, seating 2,- 
400, to cost $300,000. Lessees: R. 
D. Craver, Charlotte, N. C, and 
John F. Pryor, Danville, Va. 



Chicago, 111. — A Anderson is now 
manager of the Liberty, having re- 
siijned from the Beehive sales force. 



ELINOR FIELD— 

Who is daintiness per- 
sonified and a STAR in 
her Own Right — 

Plays the Feminine 
Lead in 

THE. 



KENTUCim 
COLONELT 



She Can Ride, Boy, 
Like a Flash! 



In the Courts 

Herbert Rawlinson has filed suit 
in the Supreme Court against the 
Oliver Prod, to recover $4,500 which 
he alleges is due him under his 
contract to play the lead in the Wil- 
liam J. Flynn films. He alleges he 
was engaged July 17 last by Samuel 
Grand and the contract was assigned 
to the Oliver Films. The defendant 
discontinued his services on Nov. 
21 without cause, he says, and re- 
fused to pay him his compensation 
and profits. He says he was to 
have worked 25 weeks to Jan. 3 at 
$500, on which $3,000 is due him, 
and is entitled to $250 a week as 
his share of the profits. 



Rodner Rejoins United 

Harold Rodner has rejoined 
United and is now doing special sa 
work in the New York territc r. 
Rodner was formerly manager of 
Detroit office. 



Toronto, Can. — Geo. F. Perkins, 
dealer in theater supplies and an ex- 
hibitor here, brought suit against 
J. H. Coleman, former manager of 
the Toronto office of the Perkins 
Electric Co., dealer in theater sup- 
plies, alleging theft of over $500.00 

Perkins alleges monies received 
by Coleman while projecting elec- 
tion returns, with a machine fur- 
nished by plaintiff were not returned 
to him as he says was agreed. A 
jury in the county of York was un- 
able to come to an agreement in the 
case. 

Perkins and Coleman are also riv- 
als in the theater business here. 



New House for Matlack 

Ames, la. — W. A. Matlack, owi 
of the Princess, will build a lar 
modern house near the Iowa sti; i 
agricultural college at Ames for tife 
patronage of the thousands of stiU 
ents. He says he expects to cavt 
to the student patronage and wl 
be in the market for films partic^i- 
larly desired by that class of trade?, 
Sisk & James, highly successful e ■ 
hibitors at Cherokee, la., next sui - 
mer will build a new, modern tfc ■ 
ater, seating 650. They expect th< • 
house will cost $100,000. 



Johnson Addresses Trade Boards 

Charles C. Johnson, secretary of 
the United Picture Theaters has at- 
tended meetings of the Chicago and 
Pittsburg Boards of Trade. He de- 
livered addresses relative to the 
plans of the United- 



Buys "Confession" for Canada 

Springfield, Mass. — H. Porter 
Baldwin has purchased the Cana- 
dian and Newfoundland rights to 
"Confession." 




EVE UNSELL 

Scenario Writer 
Famous Players-Lasky Corp. 

"Eyes of the Soul" 

starring Elsie Ferguson 

"Sinners" 

starring Alice Brady 

"Cup of Fury" 

written by Rupert Hughes 

"The Great Shadow" 

starring Tyrone Power 




There are 30 Reasons 



why you should book, 

"The 
Screaming 
Shadow** 

REASON No. 18 

Mr. Exhibitor: ,vou can play 
t« an entire family with 
"The ScreaniinK Shadow." It 
is clean — NotliinK t» offend. 
Matoli for Iteason No. 19 To- 
morrow. 

BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 




(l- ■ . - 


-^r-^rr^ -i^r-r- 


m 


i^|P 


Wk 


1^ 


\* 


1 i 




UNIVERSAL CITY 

Released through' 2^ 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK 

Foreitn RIghU controlled hy Apollo TradiiK Corp., 220 W. 48tb St. 



CAL. 





7^BRADSTREET 
o/ FILMDOM 





Authority 




Vol. XL No. 20 



Wednesday, January 21, 1920 



Price 5 Cents 



After Ford 

Rembusch Wants Exhibitors Paid 

for Showing Weekly — Goldwyn's 

Ideas 

Frank Rembusch, secretary of the 
M. P. E. of A. has sent the follow- 
ing wire to Henry Ford: "Protests 
are filed with the National Organi- 
zation of Motion Picture Exhibitors 
against your charge for the use of 
'Ford's Weekly' 

"The importance, value and power 
of the motion picture screen is being 
recognized more each day- 

"We are offered, not only free 
rentals for showing industrial, 
propaganda and advertising films 
but every exhibitor may now receive 
a nominal fee for showing these pic- 
tures. 

"The Universal Film Co. have 
agreed to our request and they are 
now giving splendid industrial and 
propaganda pictures free to exhibi- 
tors and pay each theater a nominal 
fee for showing the picture. 

"We ask that you refrain from 
further charge for the Ford Weekly 
to any exhibitor and also that you 
pay a nominal amount to every ex- 
hibitor who. shows Ford Weekly. 

"We feel that this is very fair and 
from the agitation now awakened 
on this question it will be very help- 
ful to the Weekly for you to meet 
with our request and recommenda- 
tion." 



Gabriel L- Hess, of Goldwyn Pic- 
tures, who are distributing the Ford 
Weekly when informed of the Rem- 
busch telegram said that the atti- 
tude taken by Rembusch was "all 
wrong." 

"It is a fact," he said, "that we 
are paid a trifling cost for the Ford 
Weekly, but this hardly covers cost 
of distribution. Mr. Ford is pre- 
paring probably the very best edu- 
cational ever offered in this country. 
In no way can it be construed as an 
advertisement. It costs him a large 
sum every year for its preparation, 
and the return is negligible." 



\ 



Keenan Here 

Frank Keenan, Pathe star arrived 
in New York from California Mon- 
day morning. He is stopping with 
his son-in-law, Ed Wynn, out on 
Long Island. 

Coast reports have it that. Mr. 
Keenan will go to France to pro- 
duce but when reached at the Pathe 
offices, he stated that his future 
plans are not as yet settled. 




She flew straight to his arms, this slip of a girl he had never seen, 
and Keith felt that fate was playin g him some grim joke — From "The 
River's End," by James Oliver Cur wocrd, a First National' attraction 
produced by Marshall Neilan. —Ad vt. 



To Produce Abroad 

E. W. Haramons of Educational 
completed the organization of the 
Educational Films Co-, Ltd., while 
in England. The company was 
formed last summer. 

The English unit has taken over 
the exchange system operated by 

one of the best known renters in 
Britain. Rights to a series of books 
by an English author have been se- 
cured and productions will be made 
abroad. Educational, Ltd., has al- 
so secured Great Brittain rights to 
(Continued on Page 4) 



New Revue for Broadway 

Hugo Janssen will present a gin 
review at the Broadway,, probabl} 
beginning the first week in Febru- 
ary. It will replace Cleveland Bron- 
ner's present review- 

The feature for next week will b>' 
Marion Davies in "The Cinema Mur- 
der." 



Regarding F. P. Stock 

Regarding Famous Players stock, 
the Evening Mail's financial editor 
said yesterday: 

"A further break of five points in 
Famous Players, following a like 
drop yesterday, was attributed to 
rumors that the syndicjata which 
late last fall underwrote $10,000,000 
preferred had been unable to mar- 
ket anything like all of the offering, 
and that with the dissolution of the 
syndicate, expected next Thursday, 
the unsold balance would tie up ■- 
much capital as to possibly weaken 
the support to the common. W'.ile 
such comment seems rather far- 
fetched, it was made a good deal of 
by the bears. Those who ought to 
kiiow say that the company is mak- 
ing good progress, and they attrib- 
ute the decline to technical condi- 
tions, expecting a 'comeback' when 
the market outlook is more favor- 
able." 



"Going to Hell" 

Says Gest Regarding Wall Street 

Control of Theaters — Film Men's 

Version of the Idea 

Chicago — Morris Gest, co-producer 
of "Chu-Chin Chow," "The Wan- 
derer," and "Aphrodite," is quoted 
as saying without reservations that 
'the American theater is going to 
hell." 

Gest is not blaming the descent 
toward the Dante district on the re 
cent war. Those culpable, the pro 
ducer states, are Wall Street "dough 
boys," who have placed more than 
$100,000,000 in the movie pastime 
They, he declares are slowly killing 
the spoken drama by buying up the 
country's leading theaters, the star 
actors and actresses and the "big 
league" producers with the purpose 
of furthering their individual inter- 
ests in the motion picture industry. 

Gest said he had been offered $!,• 
000,000 for hissoul and body" hui 
declined. He intimated that others 
in the same work as himself who did 
not have the real interests of the 
theater at heart are "falling one by 
one." 

"The American theater is in its 
greatest dangej-," he said. "The 
grasping hand of Wall Street is on 
it and when Wall Street gets a the- 
ater in hand it must die a natural 
death. 

"No greater works of authors and 
composers have been done on empty 
stomachs. The fact is to-day that 
an author almost must write a play 
both for the stage and the screen. 
In the productions of Mr. Comstock 
and myself we never knew where 
we would get the money to pay for 
them. We didn't care. To-day I 
have a suit of clothes I can call my 
own. Artistry and filthy money are 
{Continued on Page 2) 



3 Million in Strauss Go« 

{By Wire to WW'S DAILY) 

Dover, Del. — Malcolm Strauss 
Pictures Corp. has been formed witi 
$3,000,000 capital. Briton N. Busch 
Malcolm Strauss and Charles Pres 
b "y are the incorporators. 



Briton Busch, president of Repub 
lie Distributing stated yesterda> 
that his company would release the 
Strauss pictures. 

It is understood that Frank anc 
Charles Presbrey, of Frank Pres 
brey Co., advertising agents are in 
terested in the company. Nothing 
could be learned yesterday of th( 
new unit's production plans. 



/ 



Wednesday, January 21, 



^^Kis^E^^ 




VAXIIU.20 Wedne8(Uy. January 21 . 1920 Prin 5 C«itl 

Copyright 1920, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

F. C. ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 
urer; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 
«nd Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 
Business Manager. 

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms (Postage free) United States, Outside 
of Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00 

Subscribers should remit with order 
Address all communications to WID'S 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 
York, N. Y. 
Telephone: Vanderbilt, 4551-4552-5558 
Hollywood, California 
Editorial and Business Offices: 6411 Holly- 
wood Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 

Chicago representatives— Willis, Eckels 
and Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 

CSiicago. 111. 

■ I I I' ll ' II ' i M gign^^^^^M^ 

Quotations 

Bid Asked Last Sale 

Famous Players .- nV2 82i^ 79 

Loew's, Inc 293^ 30]^ 30^ 

Goldwyn — -— 33 

Triangle Film 11/16 Vx V\ 

United Fict. Prod. \^Vz MV?, 17^ 

World Film 1 IK 1 



Day Back from South America 
John L. Day, South American rep- 
resentative of Famous Players has 
; returned to New York from a five 
I months' trip and states that exhibi- 
tors below the equator say Euro- 
pean films will never replace Ameri- 
I can made pictures. 



I Tom Wilson is playing a detec- 
I tive part in Marshall Neilan's "Never 
I Get Married." 



COMING 

A 

REVIVAL 

OF 

"TiUie's 
Punctured 
Romance" 

TOWER FILM CORP. 

71 W. 23rd St., N. Y. 



"Going to Hell" 

{Continued from Page 1) 
not and never will be good bed 
fellows. 

"With the exception of those of a 
half dozen producers most of the 
theaters in America are now owned 
and controlled by motion pictures. 
Unless something is done within the 
next three years Wall Street will 
be in complete control of the the- 
ater. I do not want to live to see 
that day." 

Answering Gest 

It was impossible to obtain a state- 
ment from Adolph Zukor yesterday 
in response to the Gest statement, 
and H. D. H. Connick, who is re- 
ported to represent the financial in- 
terests in Famous said he had no 
statement to make, that any state- 
ment should come from Mr. Zukor 
who was the "sole owner and prop- 
rietor." 

All of the prominent officials of 
Metro are out of town, and in the 
absence of Marcus Loew, David 
Bernstein of the Loew offices said: 
"I guess all of us know that Wall 
Street isn't throwing i ts money 
away- It never does. Wall Street 
invested in the picture business and 
theatrical business because it found 
a paying business. Wall Street will 
leave the showmen run the houses. 
It means that the more beautiful 
theaters and picture palaces will be 
available with Wall Street capital 
and that's all." 

When the attention of Gabriel L. 
Hess of Goldwyn was directed to 
the Gest statements and when he 
was informed of the expression used 
by Gest who said "within the next 



three years Wall Street will be in 
complete control of the theater. I 
do not want to live to see the day," 
Mr. Hess said: 

"Well, Gest had better call up 
Columbus 8200." 

Investigation later developed that 
Columbus 8200 is the telephone 
number of Campbell's Funeral 
Church. 

L. J. Selznick did not care to com- 
ment on the Gest statement "at this 
time." 

Carl Laemmle, of Universal said: 
"Mr. Gest pays the moving picture 
industry the finest possibi, "ompH- 
ment when he says that Wan Street 
is investing in theaters throughout 
the country and turning them into 
moving picture houses. Whatever 
else may be said about Wall Street, 
it must be said that the men who 
constitute the financial power of 
America are men recognized for 
astuteness and business sagacity, 
therefore, if as Mr. Gest states, these 
men are investing in theaters for 
moving picture purposes, it is a self- 
evident fact that they recognize the 
great bulk of the American public 
wants moving picture entertainment. 

"The trouble with a few theatri- 
cal producers is that they fail to 
realize the tremendous influence for 
good which is wielded by moving 
pictures, and cling to the old alibi — 
as Mr. Gest does in his interview — 
that there is no art in moving pic- 
tures. Mr. Gest asserts that 'artist- 
try and filthy money are not, and 
never will be good bed-fellows.' 

"Artistry, bosh! Under the guise 

of art, Mr. Gest recently presented 

in New York, a production which 

' shocked even blase New York the- 




We Will Not 



sell you insurance unless you need it. Funny, but nevertheless 
a fact. BUT if you DO need it we will do our best to sell you 
for our mutal benefit. Fair enough, isn't it? Phone us to-day. 



I Veal iON^ ERVicE 



MFurance '"■*"' SO M&iden Lane 

I- Phone John 5425 - 5'*2« - 9*Zr - y-*2e 



Samuek 

nsiiian^' 



Leaves for Europe on Mauretania 

TRANS-REGIONAL to open branch offices in principal 
commercial centers 



JESSE S. BERNSTEIN, 
President of Trans-Regional 
Trading Corp., foreign distribu- 
tors of Automaticket Systems 
and other cinema efficiency de- 
vices, sails for London this 
month where he will establish 
a distributing center for his 
company. 



MR. BERNSTEIN, formerly 
an executive in the foreign de- 
partment of Goldwyn Distrib- 
uting Corp. offers to act as rep- 
resentative for any reliable film 
or accessory company seeking 
foreign connections. 
Phone to Vanderbilt 1409, or 
call at 47 West 42nd St. 



ater-goers, an dunder the instru 
tions of city officials was subject* 
to the pruning knife, before tht 
would suffer it further presentatio 
Mr. Gest will have difficulty in me) 
tioning any moving picture of r^ 
cent production that ran so close 1 
the edge as his production referrc 
to." 

Arthur James at Fox suggeste 
that Mr. Gest might be seeking son 
publicity and referred to the teli 
phone of the City Morgue, sayin 
that it may prove an interesting sp« 
for Mr. Gest. 



Buys "Shulamite" for Rambeau 
Harry Cahane has bought "Tl 
Shulamite," a South African stoi 
by Askew and Story for Marjor 
Rambeau. Albert Capellani will d 
rect her in it- 



Et 



When the prevailing un- 
rest gets upon your nerves, 
turn your eyes upon a 
RITCHEY poster. It will 
put you in a good humor 
again. 

RITCHEY 

LJTHO. CORP. 

4«6 W. 31<t St.,N.Y.. Pl»ne OwiiM 8JS« 



It 




nMfe 



DAILV 



Wednesday, January 21, 1920 



itkeN 



ews 



No. 6 

•ABIS, FRANCE— Deschancl elected 
esident of Francel French Senate and 
puties choose Paul Deschanel to suc- 
d President Poincare, by 743 votes out 
889. 

President Poincare, after seven years 

faithful service^ is further honored by 

country by being: elected to tlie Sen- 

'remier CIcmenceau, who was defeated 
the Presidential election, resigns as 
eniier. 

■TEW YORK CITY— World's ice cham- 
m ready to defend title — Robert Me- 
an gives final exhibition before leav- 
: for contest in Norway. 
CHICAGO, ILL— Windy City makes 
an sweep of crooks. Chief Garrity di- 
ts precinct captains to make city-wide 
ind-up to check appalling crime wave. 
lERE AND THERE— Airplane that 
es vertically — inventor demonstrates 
del of plane that will go straight up 
air without a take-off. 
lRRAS, FRANCE— France's President 
farewell tour — during last days of his 
ninistratioUj President Poincare visits 
area to "decorate" its martyred 
I'ns. 

N POLAND— Help to the suffering in 
land I It's a far but loud cry from the 
rving and homeless of that war- 
aged land. Americans distribute food 
I clothes. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. — Sensational 
irges against Navy I Rear Admiral 
IS attacks conduct of Navy Depart- 
nt during the war — leaving Senate 
Uding after inquiry, 
ecretary Daniels of the Navy, who is 
acked for unjust awards of decora- 
ns. 

>nother Congressional investigation be- 
s — Senate Committee hears L. C. A. 
Martens, Soviet representative in this 
mtry. 

TEW YORK CITY— $3,000,000 Uquor 
sed as constitutional prohibition goes 
a effect — federal revenue agents make 
il as first enforcement of 18th 
endment. 

IINCINNATL OHIO— Epidemic of fires 
wake of zero weather — four firemen 
killed and 13 injured as result of big 
ze in this city. 
=4*'AB ENDS — In Europe. — Animated 
toon by Bert Green, 



O 



day 



Going to Cuba 
Louis Blumentiial, the Jersey ex- 
litor, formerly interested in the 
JKhibitor's Trade Review," will go 
J Cuba next week for a rest. And 
Ine of the First National crowd 
Il pay the expenses. Ask 'em. 



Lebensburger Here 

|/[. A. Lebensburger of the Stand- 
Film Service Co., Cleveland, is 
|town, at the Astor. Will be here 

a week or more- 
lie reports selling the Orpheum 
Warner serial, "The Lost City," 
a week's run, being the first se- 
to break into that house. 



iO| THE DIAL FILM CO. 

announces 
the completion of Super-feature, 

MITCHELL LEWIS 



(( 



KING SPRUCE" 

adapted from best seller by 
Holnian Day 



Wid's Abroad 

Joe Plunkett writing from 
London: 

"Up to date I have not re- 
ceived a single issue of your 
celebrated little paper. I do 
not understand how you think 
I can have my breakfast with- 
out your sheet. I have 
managed to get hold of a copy 
of it in London while I was 
there as all the film men have 
it on their desks, and this is 
no yarn either. You yourself 
would be surprised to see how 
these fellows over here keep 
it right before them." 



Ecoles and Barnhard Here 

E. C. Ecoles and S. L Barnhard 
of the Capitol Film Co., Chicago, are 
in New York buying state rights 
pictures. 



Smith Going to London 

On February 1, A. George Smith 
for many years with the South Af- 
rican Film Trust and International 
Photoplays Corp. will join Goldwyn 
as British representative, with head- 
quarters in London. 



Seattle— B. R. Keller has been 
appointed representative for Na- 
tional Picture Theaters in this ter- 
ritory. 



IDEAL STUDIOS 
FOR RENT 
Apply to 
JAMES J. REARDIN, 

General Manager 
Telephone Union 5067-68 



LEUMAS CARTOON SERVICE 

-Producers o£ AnimcLted 

Films fore^'ery purpose. 

17^. 45th St. TelBiyajat - 6806 



CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG 

Once more demonstrates her magnifi- 
cent art in 

"THE EYES OF YOUTH" 
We have made for this production a 
very artistic lobby display together 
with reproductions in fac-simile oil 
paintings from her latest poses in 
various sizes. 

KRAUS MFG. CO. 

220 West 42d Street 

17th Floor TeL 3607 Bryant 



Phone Morningside 6945 

Autos to Hire 
To the Moving Picture Trade 




IDEAL AUTO RENTING CO. 



Reicher and "Empty Arms" 

In view of certain statements cir- 
culated by a director in regards to 
"Empty Arms," the initial Park- 
Whiteside production, starring Gail 
Kane, Lester Park, has issued the 
following statement: 

"A director formerly in my em- 
ploy, for reasons which I cannot 
fathom, has repeatedly boasted that 
he was responsible for the direction 
of 'Empty Arms.' 

"The truth of the matter is, this 
director was working in Los Angeles 
while Frank Reicher was staging 
'Empty Arms,' in New Rochelle. 

"This statement is issued in fair- 
ness to Mr. Reicher, who has been 
in complete charge of 'Empty Arms' 
from the main title to the final fade- 
out. 

"We are more than pleased with 
Mr. Reicher's work and have en- 
gaged him to do a series of big pro- 
ductions." 



AflT TITLES 

HAND LETTtR.I.KG 
V ^T (0/ie liuncLKd Mies .^ Ouy) ^-ffv 

•ALYNLU'' 

.^ PHONE i329 BRYANT . 



Engel, Manager of the Dyckman 

Irving Engel, former treasurer of 
Moss' Flatbush, is now manager of 
the Dyckman, which Moss took over 
recently. 



Sullivan Going Abroad in March 
{Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles. — C. Gardner Sulli- 
van, head of the Ince scenario de- 
partment, will sail for the Orient in 
March. He will tour the world- 



N 



The difference between 
moving pictures and 
Goldwyn Pictures is the 
difference between 
speculation and invest- 
ment. 






/XPc fbtu^ed to 5eU 

for Qiie Tfimdrect 

Shousdncl Dotteus 



Let us show you the names of the local 
authorities who commend the activities 
started by 

ENPTT ARHS 

THE SENSATION OF THE CENTURY 

The Hundred Thousand Dollar Packet 
tells the whole story. Send for it. 

PHOTOPLAY LIBRARIES, INC. 

(Exclusive Selling Agents) 
500 Fifth Avenue, New York City 



6dwanl Whiteside 



Wednesday, Jannaiy 21, 1920 



KINOGRAMS 

■©e Visual News «/• 
ALL THE World 

SOI.DIERS GUARD HIGHEST 
BRIDGE — Great structure at Viaduct, 
Tex., over Pecos River, strategic point in 
border communications is constantly 
Hatched. 

BIG CROP ON DRY DOCK RANGE— 
Beating proiiibition in tlie dry movement 
owners of biggest duclc farm at Colma, 
Cal. raise record "crop." 

WOULD DRAFT GEN. PERSHING — 
George J. Woods of Lincoln, Neb., comes 
to New York in effort to make presiden- 
tial lightning strike A. E. F. commander 
— Brother Jim Pershing. 

EIGHTH CAVALRY HAS LADIES' 
DAY — Wives of officers take lessons in 
riding and calesthenics a horse-back at 
Ft. Bliss in Texas. 

OLE BILL'S DAD VISITS U. S.— Capt. 
Bruce Bairnsfather, cartoonist, whose 
funny pictures helped keep up war mo- 
rale comes to New York. 

ADMIRAL SIMS' CHARGES START 
PROBE — Allegations made in hearing 
over award of medals before Senate com- 
mittee paves way for full investigation of 
war methods. 

DE VALERA GIVEN CITY FREEDOM 
— "President" of "Irish Republic" is 
warmly greeted by Mayor Hylan and 
other officials in New York. 

SELL IRISH BONDS IN DUBLIN— 
Widows of "Revolution of 1916" buy 
bonds in the Republic — the block where 
Robert Emmett was executed. 

SKATERS TRY FOR JERSEY TITLES 
— (JNOT IN N. E.) — Long Branch is 
scene of big winter carnival where speed- 
sters race over Pleasure Bay course. 

TRACK MEN TRAIN IN COLD— Har- 
vard squad takes outdoor workout over 
board track that leads among the snow 
drifts at Cambridge. 

MOST EXPENSIVE BASEBALL 
PLAYER — Babe Rutli just sold by the 
Boston Red Sox to the New York Yan- 
kees poses at his Los Angeles home. 

STANDFOBD AND BRITISH COLUM- 
BIA MEET — California men journey to 
western Canada and defeat local teams in 
Rugby games at Vancouver. 
PAN AMERICANS TALK FINANCE- 
Delegates from South and Central Ameri- 
ca meet in AVashington to discuss recon- 
struction money problems. 

READY TO CHOOSE CANDIDATE— 
San Francisco starts work of prepara- 
tion for the first national convention of 
a political party ever held on the Pacific 
coast. 

CHANGE OLD SALOONS TO STORES 
— Transform well known thirst parlors 
to places for sale of excess nav.y sup- 
plies. AV. H. Anderson head of Anti-Sal- 
oon league poses. 

DISTRIBUTED BY 

REPUBLIC DISTRIBUTING 

CORPORATION 



ali^^ 



DAILV 



To Produce Abroad 

(Continued from Page 1) 

a number of American productions- 
These will be exhibited there 
through the new exchanges. 

Educational's activities here and 
abroad will be conducted along dif- 
ferent lines. Thus feature produc- 
tions will probably be made in Eng- 
land for exhibition in Europe but no 
such plan will be carried out in this 
country. 

A number of matters affecting the 
American offices of the company are 
understood to be still hanging fire. 
Plans are under way for the exten- 
sion of the sales agencies for the 
"Rotary" Portable Proector in In- 
dia, the Far East and Europe. 



"Willow Tree" at Capitol 

"The Willow Tree," a Metro pro- 
duction with Viola Dana, will be the 
feature at the Capitol the week of 
Feb. 1. 



Weil Returns 

Joe Weil of Universal returned 
from Chicago yesterday where he 
exploited "The Great Air Robbery." 

The picture was shown to the 
officers at the aviation field in Min- 
eola last night. 

Owen Moore, Selznick star will 
shortly start work at the Brunton 
studio on "Love Among the Chick- 
ens." 



Serial to Feature 

Warner's Will Change "The Lost 
City" From 15 Episodes to a 
Seven-Reeler 

Abe Warner said yesterday that 
plans had been perfected for chang- 
ing "The Lost City" from a 15-epi- 
sode serial to a seven-reel feature. 
Work will be started at once. 

Up to the present territory has 
been disposed of as far West as 
Chicago. No more territory will be 
sold for the serial, and the seven- 
reeler will be offered first to the 
large Western houses. After the 
complete serial has been shown in 
the East the feature production will 
be offered. Several iniportau -<cenes 
have been added to perteci ^'c con- 
tinuity for the feature, and sorne of 
the "chase stuff" of the serial will be 
omitted in the feature, which will be 
sold on a state right basis. 



United Meeting 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Syracuse, N. Y. — At the Yates 
Hotel a meeting of the United Pic- 
ture Theatres of America, Buffalo 
franchise holders will be held to- 
morrow. After a luncheon general 
business will be considered, espe- 
cially the matter of classifications. 
The classification committee consists 
of E. O. Weinberg of the Strand, 
Buffalo, and J. J- Walker of the Lin- 
coln, Schenectady. Three more 
members to this committee will be 
elected at the meeting. 



Young man studying concert music 
desires few hours' work daily play- 
ing piano or violin in New York 
Moving Picture Theatre. Will con- 
sider any proposition. 

Address Box B-39, care of WID'S 



"WHERE PROMISES ARE SACRED' 

LOUIS MEYER 

FORMERLY BRODA 6c MEYER INC 

TITLES 

LETTERED - ILLUSTRATED - PHOrOORAPHBD 

ASK TO SEE OUR NEW 
PROCESS TITLES AND 
ILLUSTRATIONS 

A PHONE CALL WILLI BRING SAMPLES 

BRYANT 7392 

220 WEST 42nd ST. - ROOM 2004 



Robert Whittier has been eng 
to appear in "The Mystery M d, 
which features J. Robert Paulii . 



IT REQUIRES ORCANIZATIONT 
NANUFACTURECOODENCRAYING 

MHAYEBEEN0ll(iANI7ED''HC^I89 

EQUIPPEDIODEllVERTK'BEirPOIJIBl 
WORKINTHE LEAST POSSIBLE TIN! 



TUESTANDARDENCRAYIIKCC 

PUOTO ENGRAVERS 

225 WEST 39™ STREET. NEW YODH 

AMERICAN PPESS ASSOCIATION BLDC 




The Acme 
Portable 
Projector 
For the 
Studio 

Cutting Roo» 
The Editor 
Home Schooli>r 
Church 

Demonstrated to You Anywhfe 
Howells Cine Equipment C(' 
729 7th Ave. New llrl 

Phone Bryant 1166 ; 




There are 30 Reasons 



why you should book, 

"The 
Screaming 
Shadow' 

REASON No. 19 
The proof of the pudding is in 
the eating, and the proof of a 
good serial is in its Box office 
drawing power. Book "The 
Screaming Shadow" and see 
how it works. Watch for Rea- 
son No. 20 Tomorrow. 

BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 

UNIVERSAL CITY CAL. 

Released through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK 

Foreign Rights controlled by Apollo Trading Corp., 220 W. 48tli St. 






We never disappoint^' 



TELEPHONE BRYANT 5576 



J,.^ INCORPORATED 

/EST 42 ^ STR E ET ^l-^^^ A.L0mE5 

/M ENAA YORK GEN. MGR. 



")' Mi 




7/^BRADSTREET 
of FILMDCf'" 





7i^cRE<OCHIZEII 

Author itV 







IVol. XI. No. 21 



Thursday, January 22, 1920 



Price 5 Centa 



S/JJ 



Dwan to Finish Soon 

Has Three Films Now in Various 

Stages of Production for 

Mayflower 

Arthur Butler Graham, attorney 
for Allan Dwan, stated yesterday 
that Dwan will make a total of five 
productions for Mayflower instead 
of eight as originally contracted for. 

Mr. Graham stated that Dwan felt 
he could not devote the proper at- 
tention to the productions and make 
eight in the time left under his con- 
tract, and so he had entered an agree- 
ment with Isaac Wolper of May- 
flower whereby he will turn over to 
that company "The Luck of the 
Irish" and three more. 

Isaac Wolper stated yesterday 
that Dwan's contract expires in 
August and that Dwan would make 
a total of six productions for May- 
flower. These, according to Wol- 
per are "Soldiers of Fortune" al- 
ready released, "The Luck of the 
Irish," "The Heart of a Fool," "The 
Scoffer," "The Splendid Hazard" 
and one more which Wolper said 
has not been started yet. The last 
three mentioned above are in var- 
ious stages of production. 

Larkin With Mayflower 
(Special to fVID'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles — Mark Larkin, who 
recently resigned as publicity direc- 
tor for Mary Pickford will handle 
the coast publicity for Mayflower. 



Lehrman Due Monday 

Henry "Pathe" Lehrman, now pro- 
ducing for First National is due in 
New York on Monday from the 
Coast. 



Chester Plans Studio 

C. L. Chester Prod., Inc. will build 
a studio in Hollywood. A site has 
been secured at Western and Fern- 
dale Aves. where a two-story office 
building, laboratory and studio will 
be erected. 

It is reported that Chester whose 
activities have been largely confined 
to producing scenics will enter the 
feature production field. The head- 
quarters will be removed from New 
York to Hollywood about May 1 al- 
though an office will be maintained 
here. 



"Cy" Williams Here 

"Cy" Williams, well known on the 
Coast is here, awaiting the arrival of 
the print of a new production in 
which Patricia Palmer and Eddie 
Hearn are featured, directed by Rob- 
ert Bradbury. 




"You must not go! They will kill you," she cried in terror — From "The 
River's End," by James Oliver Curwood, Marshall Neilan's first person- 
ally directed picture for First National. — Advt. 



Executive Committee and Voting Trustees 
Named by Asso. First National Pictures, Inc. 



Protection for Independent Exhibitor Said to Be Absolute — Directors 
Complete Three-Day Session — Williams Refers to Gest State- 
ment Realtive to Theaters 



Completing late yesterday the de- 
tails of a voting trust arrangement 
which is said to be an absolute pro- 
tection for independent exhibitors 
against the inroads of any financial 
interests seeking theater monopoly 
or control, the 11 directors of Asso- 
First National Pictures, Inc., ad- 
journed a three days' meeting in New 
York with an announcement of the 
names of the exhibitor members of 
the Board of Voting Trustees, the 
officers and the members of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee of the new organ- 
ization, together with a statement 
of the purposes which actuated the 
members in creating the Boarrl of 
Voting Trustees. 

The Board of Voting Trustees, 



elected by the directors, consists of 
Robert Lieber, of Indianapolis, N. 
H. Gordon, of Boston, R. M. Finkel- 
stein of Rubin and Finkelstein, Min- 
neapolis, Fred Dahnken, of Turner 
and Dahnken, San Francisco, and J. 
G. Von Herberg of Jensen and Von 
Herberg, Seattle. 

As forcasted in WID'S DAILY 
last week Robert Lieber was elected 
President of Associated First Nation- 
al Pictures, Inc., J. B. Clark, of Pitts- 
burgh was named First Vice Presi- 
dent, Jacob Fabien, of New Jersey, 
Second Vice President, Harry O. 
Schwalbe, Secretary-Treasurer, and 
J. D. Williams, manager of the new 
enterprise. 

{Continued on Page 2) 



United- Vitagraph Deal 

Reported Berst Assumes Control of 

Smith's Company — Latter Denies 

Rumor 

It was persistently reported yes 
terday that J. A. Berst of Unitec 
Picture Theaters had closed a dea 
which gives him control of Vita 
graph. 

Inquiries at the United office yes 
terday brought forth neither a denia 
nor a confirmation. 

Albert E- Smith of Vitagraph, af| 
ter repeated efforts made last nigh' 
was finally reached on the telephon 
at his town home and asked abou 
the report. He said: 

"There is absolutely nothing to i' 
It's merely gossip." 



Ince Starts Specials 

First One to Be With Lloyd Hughe 

— Others Under Way 

(By Wire to WID'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles---Thomas H. Ince ha 
plans under way for the productio 
of a number of special production 
The first of these went into produi 
tion this week with Lloyd Hughe 
who was recently placed under co 
tract by Ince to star. 

John W. Ray, legitimate stage ( 
rector will direct the producti( 
which is called "Wheelbarrow We 
ster" by Julian Josephson. It is 
country type story such Charles R; 
has been doing for Ince. Gla 
George, another Ince discovery 
play the leading feminine role. 
is known that Ince has big plai 
under way for Hughes. , 

Other specials such as "Behi; 
the Door" and a new one not j 
shown, "Below the Surface" will j 
gotten underway. I 



R; 

1 



There was some talk in local cj 
cles that Hughes would be devl 
oped by Ince to replace Charles I. 
who has burst into fame because' 
his sympathetic "boob" types. Ii 
shortly starts work for First ] 
tional. '■ 



Osso Signs Meredit] 

Adolphe Osso has signed a C; 
tract with Lois Meredith, whc 
now in Paris, to star in a serie< 
pictures- The first will be "Coeu 
Lilac" by Tristan Bernard 
Charles Hirsh. 

Osso sails on the Mauretania 
the 28th for Paris. 



Joe La Rose of the Rialto is 
at work after being laid up wi| 
heavy cold for several days. 



Thursday, January 22, 1920 




DAIUY 




Vat. II N«.21 Ttiursday, January 22, 1920 Price 5 Cent! 

Copyright 1920, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

F. C. ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 
nner; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 
*nd Editor; J. W. Altcoate, Secretary and 
Business Manager. 

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
mt the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States, Outside 
of Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
<15.00 

Subscribers should remit with order 

Address all communications to WID'S 

DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 

York, N. Y. 

Telephone: Vanderbilt, 4551-4552-5558 
Hollywood, California 
Editorial and Business Offices: 6411 Holly- 
wood Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 

Chicago representatives — Willis, Eckels 
and Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 
Chicago, 111. 



Quotations 



Famous Players ... 

Loew's, Inc 

joldwyn 

Triangle Film .... 
Jnited Pict. Prod 
kVorld Film 



Bid. Asked. 
303/g 31 



V4. 

16H 



Vs 



17 



Last 
Sale. 

81^2 

31 
33 

Va 
16H 
1 



Buy Three More Houses 
(Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Fall River, Mass. — Louis M. Boas 
;5 vice-president and general mana- 
i:er of the syndicate which has pur- 
hased the Strand, Premier, of New- 
uryport and the Owl at Lowell, 
("he deal by which the first two 
.amed were taken over involved 
|25O,00O. The syndicate controls 
,)ur houses here. 



COMING 

"TiUie's 
Punctured 
Romance'' 

' with 

Charlie Chaplin 

TOWER FILM CORP. 

71 W. 23rd St., N. Y. 



Trustees Named 

(Continued from Page 1) 
The Executive Committee, which 
will be the official administrative 
body for the directors and officers, 
also was elected by the directors 
with Harry O. Schwalbe as Chair- 
man, N. H. Gordon and Moe Mark 
of the Mark Strand Co., New York. 

The Board of Voting Trustees is 
clothed with powers of regulation 
more than sufficient to successfully 
prevent any monopoly of theater in- 
terests being affected within Asso- 
ciated First National Pictures, Inc., 
or in any separate territory in the 
country. 

"No matter how much money Wall 
Street or any other financial source 
might pour into theaters," declared 
J. D. Williams, "the theater equities 
pledged to the new company cannot 
pass into other hands for voting pur- 
poses for a long time to come. If 
monied interests sought to buy every 
theater represented by franchise in 
Associated First National Pictures, 
the executive disposition of any ef- 
fort which threatened screen inde- 
pendence in any instance would re- 
main exclusively and absolutely with 
the five members of the Board of 
Voting Trustees- And this body is 
so constituted that it is obliged, to 
retain its powers, to work only in 
the inteersts of exhibitor independ- 
ence and for te preservation of per- 
sonal right and privilege for theater 
owners. 

"This, then bpcomes tantamount to an 
absolute barrier to theater monopoly by 
any organization, whether its functioii 
is production, distribution, a combina- 
tion of the tvv'o, or simply an investment 
group seeking domination of screens for 
reasons quite obvious but less tangible. 
They might buy every dollar's worth of 
equity In each of the five thousand and 
more theaters that will be affiliated with 
Associated First National pictures, but 
the Board of Voting Trustees would be 
absolutely free from the dictation of new 
ownership for a term of years, thereiiy 
l)reserving an independent market for 
independent stars and i)ro(lucers. And 
this absolute riglit to legislate the broad 
interests of the franchise members is so 
construed that it remains in force for the 
full limit accorded by the members 
themselves in convention at Atlantic City 
last week so long as its conduct shall he 
in harmony with every precept of ex- 
hibitor independence and freedom from 
monopolistic dictation as to what an ex- 
hibitor may or may not book for the 
theaters he owns or controls. 

"An attack by trust-seeking capital in 
any one territory, or in any number of 
territories, will avail nothing toward the 
goal of monoi)oly and domination. 

"The condition wliicli was named in a 
recent statement that the 'American the- 
ater is going to heir will find its great- 
est and most effectual stumbling block 
in the method of organization conceived, 
sanctioned and adopted by the exhib- 
itors themselves and put into effect in 
.Associated First National Pictures. Any 
man is absolutely right wlien r;e says 
that the interests blanketed under Tiie 
general term, 'Wall Street,' liave been 
striving, strenuously, for months and 
months to devise some means to the end 
that they could control production, dis- 
tribution and exhibition. Their agents 
in the field brought the fact home to 
members of First National. The danger, 
ami the real menace, with every certainty 
of realizing all of the dire possibilities 
predicted, became jiatent to anv mem- 
bers and their exhibitor affiliations, with 
the result that it grew to be a unani- 
mous sentiment that they, as independ- 
ent theater owners, should take prompt 
and radical steps to protect their inde- 
pendence. 

"It is freely prophesied in several quar- 
ters that unless something is done Wall 
Street will be in complete control of 
theaters within three years. It may 



Coast Brevities 

{Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Hollywood — Preparations are un- 
der way at the Louis B. Mayer 
studios for the filming of Anita Stew- 
art's new picture, "The Yellow Ty- 
phoon." It is a dramatization of 
Harold McGrath's story of the same 
name which ran serially in the Sat- 
urday Evening Post. Edward Jose, 
who recently finished making Miss 
Stewart's picture, "The Fighting 
Shepherdess," will also direct "The 
Yellow Typhoon.' 



Edwin Carewe is shooting the 
twelfth and last week on his latest 
production "Rio Grande" at the 
Brunton lot. Three weeks were 
spent on location in Mexico and 300 
Mexicans, including 30 children and 
20 special dancers are being used in 
the picturization of Augustus Thom- 
as' great drama. 



Leatrice Joy has been re-engaged 
for one of the leading roles and the 
rest of an all star cast will be an- 
nounced in a few days. A great deal 
of preparation is being made to 
make this production one of the early 
sensations of 1920. 



Alec B. Francis has signed with 
Goldwyn to appear in that com- 
pany's productions for another year. 
His first appearance under the new 
contract will be in "Earthbound" by 
Basil King. 



Stephen Norton will act as camera- 
man for Alice Lake in "Shore Acres," 
a Metro picture. 



Fritzi Brunette, the heroine of 
many late J. Warren Kerrigan pro- 
ductions, will play opposite the star 
in his forthcoming Brunton picture, 
"One Week-End," a story of New 
York society life. This marks Miss 
Brunette's sixth engagement with 
Kerrigan. 



Ruth Langston, former leading 
lady for Lewis Bennison and Henry 
Miller, has been engaged by Robert 
Brunton for a leading part in the 
Dempsey serial. 

GAUSMAN 



seem a vanity or a brag, but it is gen- 
uinely true that the ma.iority of the 
most important motion picture theater 
owners and operators in the country, 
have, within the week, so allied them- 
selves and their properties, that there is 
jio longer a probability that this can 
come to pass. If Wall Street, or its 
agents, wants theaters, now, and I mean 
theaters that will have an important part 
in making for production success, it will 
have to buy property and build them, 
or pay handsome prices to present ex- 
hibitors, and then be content for a con- 
siderable number of years, at least, to 
abide by the dictates and decisions of 
the independent theater owners whom 
the.v seek to oust or control." 

Ratification by the exhibitor mem- 
bers of several important recom- 
mendations by the directors, will, it 
is said,' make possible within the 
next three weeks, a detailed an- 
nouncement of the actual organiza- 
tion work of the new company, and 
its method of functioning in relation 
to its present and future members, 
and with regard to stars, directors 
and producers. 



Guts and Flashes n.A 

Jaclv and Harry Cohn have sol 
the Hall Room Boys Comedies fc 
Norway, Sweden and Denmark t 
the Liberty Trading Co., Inc. 



A. L. Pratchett, general manage 
of the Caribbean Film Corp. is il 
New York from Havana. Report] 
business good on the island. 



William Fait, Jr. David P. Howell^ 
representative in Brazil is back i^| 
town from South America- 



"Man and Woman" the seven par 
feature starring Betty Mason ha; 
l)een bought by Tyrad Pictures, Inci 



Wallace Play last seen in "Thi 
Sport of Kings" with Matt Moort 
and Margot Kelly will be seen it 
"Restitution" a forthcoming Hall 
mark release. 



"Human Passions" for Illinois and 
Indiana have been sold by Tyrad to| 
the Silee Film Exchange of Chicagoj 



Herb Kerman, recently with Aj 
won is now in charge of the Brookj 
lyn territory for Tyrad Pictures, Inc 




[k 



There is a good bit of dif- 
ference between "gilt" and 
"gold" but there is an even 
greater difference between 
"posters" and "RITCHEY 
posters." 

RITCHEY 

LJTHO. CORP. 

406 W. 31<t St.,N.Y., Plwne OkIsm 83U 




ali^?l 






DAIUY 



Thursday, January 22, 1920 



[n Arms Over Censors 

Jntario Exchanges to Fight Clause 
Submitting Ads and Posters 

for Approval 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Toronto. — -Exchanges in Ontario 
re up in arms over a new ruling 
irhich if not amended will become 
ffective March 7. The ruling sub- 
titutes the following clause in the 
Theater and Cinematographs Act: 

"(1) All posters, heralds, hand- 
•ills, cuts, newspaper and periodical 
dvertising, banners, slides, photo- 
:raphs, lobby displays, and all other 
dvertising matter in connection 
vith film displays, shall be submit- 
ed to the Inspector who shall there- 
ipon examine and approve or dis- 
pprove of same. 

"(2) Any person using or display- 
ng any advertising matter without 
laving had the same approved by 
he Inspector as provided in Clause 
1) hereof, shall be guilty of an of- 
ense under the Act." 

By some the above measures are 
leclared unconstitutional and can- 
lot be enforced as it is claimed it 
ncroaches on the liberties of the 
>eople- Others declare that they 
vill never submit to it, and would 
top importing advertising accesso- 
ies altogether rather than take a 
hance on censorship. 

Expert counsel will be engaged to 
ight the measure and it is quite ap- 
parent that the Ontario Govern- 
nent will have a battle on its hands 
The clauses place the sole power of 
pproving every form of advertising 
aatter used in exploiting films in the 
lands of an inspector. 



CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG 
Once more d-emonstrates her magnifi- 
cent art in 

"THE EYES OF YOUTH" 
We have made for this production a 
very artistic lobby display together 
with reproductions in fac-simile oil 
paintings from her latest poses in 
various sizes. 

KRAUS MFG. CO. 

220 West 42d Street 

17th Floor TeL 3607 Bryant 



Send Us Your 
feSTpS Junk FUm 

INTERSTATE SMELTING 
<a REFINING COMPANY 

23 Commercial St. NEWARK. N. J. 



A ' 'Humdinger ' ' 

Charlotte, N. C. 
Gentlemen: 

It gives me pleasure to hand 
you herewith my check for 
$10.00, to cover one year's sub- 
scription to your valuable pub- 
lication. 

Your Year Book is duly re- 
ceived and it is certainly a 
"humdinger." 

With very kindest regards, 
I am. 

Yours very truly 
BROADWAY THEATER 
R. D. Craver. 



and Mrs. Tom Tcrriss and daugh- 
ter, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Apfel, John 
Emerson and Anita Loos, Sidney 
Garrett, Arthur Butler Graham, 
Frederick Newman and a number 
of others. 

(iodal was called upon by Ricord 
(iradwell for a few words and was 
described by Gradwell as one of 
the best "American-Englishman" 
that he had ever met- In response 
Mr. Goda! said that he appreciated 
the many compliments that had been 
paid him but that he considered the 
"American-Englishman" was per- 
haps the finest tribute of all. 



Farwell Dinner to Edward Godal 

Edward Godal, the producer of 
"12.10" and head of the British and 
Colonial Film Corp. of London, 
sailed yesterday for England. 

Mr. Godal tendered a farewell din- 
ner and dance to a number of his 
friends at the Astor several even- 
ings ago- In the party were Mar- 
jorie Rambeau, Evelyn Greeley, Mr. 



JOHN J. LIVINGSTON 

Motion Picture Representative 

For 

STARS— DIRECTORS 

1440 Broadway New York 



LOUIS SHERWIN 

Continuity 

Screen Gutting and Titling 

Now Assistant 

to 

J. G. Hawks 

of 

Goldwyn 

Author of 

"BONDS OF LOVE" 

for 

Pauline Frederick 






Eight Years dramatic critic New 
York Globe, contributor Ameri- 
can, Metropolitan, Smart Set, 
Vanity Fair and other magazines. 



Before sailing Godal said that hi 
plans were so indefinite he preferred 
to make no statement at this time. 
It is known, however, that he has 
s.evcra! important deals under con 
sideration. 



Mrs. Sophia Schlesinger Dies 

Mrs. Sophia Schlesinger, mother 
of Gus Schlesinger, general sale 
manager of Interocean died Jan. 20. 
in her 80th year. The funeral will 
be this morning at 10 o'clock from 
her home 530 Riverside Drive. In 
ternment will be in Philadelphia- 



^Xl>e ytef u^ed to Sett 

fbr One TfundrccL 

Shousand Dotfcus 



Lawyers, doctors, District Attorneys, 
clergymen of every creed and famous 
men and women have heartily endorsed 

ENPTT ARMS 

THE SENSATION OF THE CENTURY 

Send for the Hundred Thousand Dollar 

Packet 

A two-cent stamp will do the trick 

PHOTOPLAY LIBRARIES, INC. 

(Exclusive Selling Agents) 
500 Fifth Avenue, New York City 



6da>cirdlPliitC5idc 



"THE RETURN Q 



igns Latest t 


FT 


^A 



Plans for distribution now 
being formulated 



a. , Address inquiries to 

lima Pictures Corporation 

LONGACRE BLDG., Suite 523^ 

Phone: Bryant 4416 



Thursday, January 22, 1920 



tM^ 



DAIUV 



Buys Pathes for 1920 

Max Glucksmann Gets Product for 

South American Countries 
I Max Glucksmann, through his 
brother Jacobo Gkicksmann, has pur- 
chased the Pathe output for 1920 
for Argentine, Uruguaj', Paraguay, 
Chile. Bolivia, and Peru- The deal 
marks a renewal of an existing con- 
tract but gives Glucksmann rights 
in three new countries, Chile, Bo- 
livia and Peru. 

The contract calls for delivery to 
Glucksmann of 50 features, six se- 
rials, 104 issues of Pathe News, 52 
issues of Pathe Review, 12 Harold 
Lloyd Comedies, and 52 "Snub" Pol- 
lard comedies. A. E. Rousseau, ex- 
port manager for Pathe, acted for 
his company. 

In addition to the above Glucks- 
mann has purchased eight Warren 
Kerrigan pictures through P. Brinck 
,of Hodkinson. He has now a total 
)of ten of that series. 
I "It Happened in Paris," with Mad- 
ame Yorska, has been secured 
through Export and Import for 
Latin America. Several territories 
have already been resold. 



Confirms Palmer House Report 
(Special to fVID'S DAILY) 

Chicago, III— Peter J. Schaefer of 
ijones, Linick and Schaefer is quoted 
as saying that his firm and Famous 
Players are negotiating for the pur- 
chase of the Palmer House site, on 
which it is intended to erect a thea- 
iiter seating 5,000 and a large hotel. 
[■About $15,000,00 is involveu. 



WID'S DAILY of Oct. 28, 1919 
published the report that Famous 
had practically closed such a deal. 
At that time, it was stated that noth- 
ing was known about the matter. 



' Louis Joseph Vance has become a 
staff author for Thomas H. Ince. 



D. W. GRIFFITH 



KNOWS 

The value of strictly high 
class people for the ensemble 
scenes of his productions. 

Mr L AKL supplying him 
with only the most select 
good-looking and properly 
dressed people for his pro- 
ductions. 

OUR financial strength en- 
ables us to supply any num- 
ber of people. 

Select Motion Picture 
Bureau 

William W. Cohlll, Manager 

1493 Broadway 

New York 

Telephones 

\ 2389 
Bryant ^ 2390 

I 2391 



New Film for Select 

Contracts were closed last night 
whereby Select will distribute "The 
Great Shadow," a picture produced 
in Canada by a company in which 
Col. B. F. Pidgeon is the moving 
factor. Tyrone Power is starred in 
the production. 

It will go out on the Select pro- 
gram. 



Ford Goes to California 

Hu.gh Ford is now en route west 
where he will make a special pro- 
duction for Famous. Title and na- 
ture of the story have not been di- 
vulged. 



Mendelson With First National 

James L- Mendelson has been en- 
gaged to specialize in the sale of 
short subjects for the First Na- 
tional local exchange. 



Forward Film Distributors to Move 

Forward Film Distributors have 
decided to move to more spacious 
quarters in the same building in 
which they have been located hith- 
erto, 110 W. 40th St. The change 
will take place on Feb. 1. 



Start Chicago Capitol 
{Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Cliicago, 111. — Work has been be- 
gun on the Capitol which when fin- 
islietl will represent an outlay of 
$4,000,000. The Balaban and Katz 
house is at State and Lake Streets. 



Wanted Financial backing 
of $5,000 

Will stand investigation 

Judge Wizaker Comedy 

Weekly c/o WID'S 



Vacates Attachment Against Young 

Justice Platzek yesterday vacated 
the attachment against the furniture 
and household goods of Clara Kim- 
ball Young on the ground the Select 
did not file the necessary papers. 
The Judge at the same time refused 
an application by Select to file the 
necessary papers in order to keep 
the attachment in force. 



Deny Price Injunction on Sub Film 

Justice Finch yesterday denied the 
application for an injunction made 
by C. B. Price against Aywon Film 
Corp. to restrain exhibition of "The 
Log of the U 35." 



Goldberg Back With Frohman 

Jesse J. Goldberg has reconsid- 
ered his resignation as secretary and 
general manager of Frohman Amuse- 
ment and is now back on the job. 



THE DIAL FILM CO. 

announces 
the completion of Super-feature, 

MITCHELL LEWIS 

in 

"KING SPRUCE" 

adapted from best seller by 
Holman Day 



Space Wanted 

750 to 1,000 ft. 

with privileges of 
projection room. 
Liberal Bonus and 
good rental offer 

Box D-S Wid's 




Charles Gerard has signed to ap- 
pear in International's all star pro- 
duction "The World and His Wife" 
with Alma Rubens. 



H. H. VAN LOAN 

Recent Releases 

Tom Mix in 

"The Speed Maniac" 

Earle Williams in 

"When a Man Loves" 

121 West Eulalia Street 

Glendale, California 

"If it is a Van Loan story it 

must be good" 

GEORGE ELWOOD JENKS 

Continuity and Specials 

"A Woman of Pleasure" 

Blanche Sweet Special 

"The Pagan God" 

starring H. B. Warner 

"Dangerous Waters" 

Original for Wm. Desmond 

JESSE D. HAMPTON 
Productions 




William A. Seiter — 

Who directed 

"Hearts and Masks"— 

Will be the talk of film- 
dom when we Market 

THE. 



KENTUCwm 
COLONELT 



The Feature Supreme 



There are 30 Reasons 

why you should book, 

"The I 
Screaming 
Shadow* 

REASON No. 20 

J. p. Morgan talies a blank 
piece of paper^ sigrns his name 
to it and It is worth millions. 
Ben Wilson takes a blank 
piece of celluloid and makes it 
worth thousands to the exhi- 
bitors' Rook, "The Scream- 
ine Sliadow." Watch for 
Keasi^n No. '*! to-morrow. 





BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 




UNIVERSAL CITY 

Released through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK 

Foreign Ricbti controlled by Apollo Tradint Corp. , 220 W. 48tli St. 



CAL. 



ibc 



ten, 



iiss 

lOllg 

Itrs, 




!7^BRADSTRHT 
o/ FILHDOM 




AyTHORITY 



Vol. XI. No. 22 



Friday, January 23, 1920 



Price 5 Cents 



Theaters to Seat 45,000 

Being Planned By Famous Players 

in Canada — Project Involves 

$10,000,000 

(Special to WW'S T>AlhY) 

Montreal, Can. — The Royal Se- 
curities Corp. has announced the 
theater building plans of the Fa- 
mous-Lasky Film Service, Ltd., 
Famous Players' Canadian corpor- 
ation. 

The project involves the spending 
of a sum reaching $10,000,000 and the 
operation of theaters by Famous- 
Lasky with a seating capacity of 
45,000. The statement adds that the 
company now operates 20 theaters 
and that six are planned for Tor- 
onto, two for Vancouver and new 
ones for Montreal, Quebec, Van- 
couver, Winnipeg, Regina, Saska- 
toon, Edmonton, Halifax and St. 
John. 

By the autumn of 1920 it is ex- 
pected that the company's theaters 
will seat 30,000 people and by the 
spring of 1921, 45,000 people. 






WID'S DAILY a few days pub- 

Ilished a dispatch from Toronto re- 
rlative to Famous' building activities 
in Canada which placed the sum to 
= be invested at $6,000,000. 

The local offices of the company 
had no comment to make on the 
above dispatch. 



Report on Walsh Bill 
The Censoship Committee of the 
Nat'l Ass'n announced yesterday 
that the bill of Congressman Walsh 
of Massachusetts providing for an 
amendment to the Penal Code which 
would prohibit the sending of ob- 
scene and indecent pictures through 
the mail had been reported to the 
House Committee in Washington. 



( 



[Denies Injunction, Then Rescinds It 

! Judge Knox in the Federal Court 
yesterday denied an injunction re- 
straining Foundation Film Corp. 
from further exhibiting "The Blind- 
ness of Youth." The action was 
sought by National Picture Thea- 
ters- 
Later in the day it developed that 
the judge acted on the papers al- 
ready filed with him and that Na- 
tional had until the close of court 
yesterday in which to file additional 
papers. 

The judge then rescinded his de- 
cision pending the examination of 
the new evidence. 




And Keith gave the dying man water to moisten his dry lips — this man 
who had determined that he should hang — From "The River's End" by 
James Oliver Curwood, a First National Attraction produced by Mar- 
shall Neilan. — Advt. 



Howells a Producer 

Will Make Scenics, and Industrials 
— Forms New Company 

David P. Howells, foreign repre- 
sentative for First National whose 
activities have heretofore been con- 
fined to the exporting field has en- 
tered the producing field. 

A company known as PhotoHfe, 
Inc. has been formed in Albany with 
a capitalization of $25,000. Mr. 
Howells, explained yesterday that 
the company will produce scenics 
and industrials in all parts of the 
world. A man has been shooting 
material in Europe for the past nine 
months. 

Howells will of course handle the 
foreign rights to the films which will 
be short reel stuff but plans have 
not progressed far enough where 
method of domestic distribution can 
•be announced- 

Howells has just sold the Japan- 
ese rights to "Back to God's Coun- 
try" and has renewed his contrac'' 
for the Metro product in the Far 
East. 



Start Bankruptcy Suit 

Waldorf Photoplays, Ltd., in Court 
Action — Fischer a Creditor 

(Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Boston, Mass. — Bankruptcy pro- 
ceedings were started in the Fed- 
eral district court on Tuesday 
against the Waldorf Photoplays, 
Ltd- of 44 Bromfield St., by three 
New York creditors who present 
claims aggregrating $60,103 for sal- 
aries and damages in an alleged 
breach of contract. The petitioners 
and their claims are David G. Fis- 
{Continued on Page 3) 



Exhibitors Meet 

An important session of the 27 
exhibitor franchise holders of the 
Associated Exhibitors, Inc. — Pathe's 
exhibitor co-operative movement — 
has been going on in the last few 
days. 

Important developments are 
looked for in a few days. 



Kane's Company 

Formed — Has Offices on Fifth 

Avenue — No Mention Made of 

Plans 

Arthur S. Kane has gone and don 
it. Formed his own company an 
has offices like all the big fellow 
have on Fifth Avenue. He is lo^ 
cated on the second floor of th 
Knox Bldg. at 40th St. and the name 
of the Arthur S. Kane Pictures 
Corp. is on the door- 
Kane recently returned from a 
trip to the Coast, and it is under- 
stood that within a week or so he 
will make an important announce- 
ment bearing on his future activi- 
ties. 

He was formerly president of 
Realart, which he organized, and pre- 
vious to this was with Select and 
previously with Paramount for which 
he organized the Western territory. 
The Kane corporation was filed 
seeral days ago at Albany, and he 
has an active capital of $5,000. 



Claims First Blood for Price 
B. P. DeWitt, counsel for C Bj 
Price Co., Inc., denies that an in 
junction against the Celebrated' 
Players Film Corp., the Mitchell 
Mark Realty Co., and the Aywor 
Film Corp., restraining them frorr 
exhibiting "The Log of the U-35,' 
has been denied by Justice Finch. 

DeWitt states that Justice Finch'; 
decision in this matter is that h«i 
will grant an injunction against the 
further exhibition by the above men 
tioned concerns to-day unless th( 
said concerns deposit a bond suffi 
cient to protect C. B. Price Co., Inc 
from determined losses when th( 
case comes to final trial. There 
fore, he says, C. B. Price Co., Inc 
have won the first claim in thi: 
case. 



I 



Out After Stars 

First National Understood to Bi 

Seekjing Nazimova, Washburn 

and Tom Moore 

(Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles — It is reported her' 
that First National is out afte 
a new batch of stars and that offer 
had been made to Nazimova, Bryan 
Washburn and Tom Moore. 

Nazimova is now with Metre 
Washburn is with Famous Playei 
and his contract expires in Augui 
while Tom Moore is with Goldwyi 



The local First National offices r( 
fused to make any comment regarc 
ing the above matter. 




DAIL.Y 




y«t M lU. 22 Frid»y. January 23. 1920 frfw 5 faltt 

Copyright 1920, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Inc. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

F. C. ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 
nrer; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 
»nd Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 
Business Manager. 

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
at the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms (Postage free) United States, Outside 
of Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
IIS.OO 

Subscribers should remit with order 

Address all communications to WID'S 

DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 

York. N. Y. 

Telephone: Vanderbilt, 4551-4552-5558 
Hollywood, California 
Editorial and Business Offices: 6411 Holly- 
wood Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 

Chicago representatives — Willis, Eckels 
and Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 
CSiicago, HI. 

\ Quotations 

Last 

Bid. Asked. Sale. 

Famous Players .... 81 82 81 J^ 

Loew's, Inc 30^ 31 30^ 

Goldwyn 33 

Triangle Film 54 

United Pict. Prod- 16 17 17 

World Film 1 

« Will Operate Community Houses 

i Minneapolis, Minn. — John Lind, 
Herbert Janssen, Max Wittles and 
Herbert Nimmo are the incorpora- 
I tors of the Northwestern Amuse- 
I ment Enter. The firm will intro- 
I duce community theaters here, 
I charging a ten cent admission rate- 
I Efforts to sell stock in the neigh- 
j borhood of each projected house 
I will be made. 



COMING 

Charlie Chaplin 

and 

Mabel Normand 



in 



"Tillie's 
Punctured 
Romance^^ 

TOWER FILM CORP. 

71 W. 23rdSt.,N. Y. 



Coast Brevities 

{Special to WID'S DAILY) 
Hollywood — Will M. Ritchey, who 
for the past two years has been 
a scenario writer for the Famous 
Players-Lasky studio has been pro- 
moted to the post of supervising 
director at the Morosco studio. 



Roscoe Arbuckle has left with his 
company, playing "The Round-Up," 
for the Sierras. He expects also to 
do some ground and lofty hunting. 

Wycliffe A. Hill, author of "Ten 
Million Photoplay Plots," has joined 
the staff of the B. B. Hampton com- 
pany at the Brunton studio- 



Phil White, secretary for the Pro- 
ducers Security Corp., is leaving for 
New York, where he expects to 
spend about two weeks perfecting 
the organization plans of his com- 
pany. 



Two new members were added to 
the cast of King W- Vidor's pro- 
duction "The Family Honor" this 
week. They are J. P. Lockney and 
Willis Marks. 



Accompanied by the all-star cast 
in National's production of "The 
Kentucky Colonel," Director Wil- 
liam A. Seiter has left for Louisville, 
where final scenes will be taken. 



Jane Novak has been retained 
to support Pauline Frederick in 
"Roads of Destiny." Others in the 
cast are John Bowers, Richard 
Tucker, Hardee Kirkland, Maude 
George and Maurice B. Flynn. 

David Butler has secured the 
screen rights to the Saturday Even- 
ing Post story, "Sitting on the 
World," for his film debut at the 
head of his own , company. Fred 
J. Butler, manager of the Morosco, 
aided in obtaining the rights from 
the Post. 



Clara Kimball Young is spending 
several days at Mission Inn, River- 
side, in consultation with Mrs. Sar- 
ah Ellis Ryan, concerning the film- 
ing of Mrs. Ryan's book, "The Soul 
of Rafael." It is the intention of 
Miss Young and her director to use 
the inn as a background. 
GAUSMAN 



Guts and Flashes 

"The Marriage of William Ashe" 
will be May Allison's next vehicle 
for Metro. 



Theodore A. Liebler, Jr., United 
scenario editor, announces he is in 
the market for stories fitted to Flor- 
ence Reed. 



Title of Bessie Barriscale's latest 
production has been changed from 
"Woman and Wife" to "The Luck 
of Geraldine Laird." 



Earle Williams will return to Vita- 
graph's studio on the coast on Feb. 
1, to film the prologue for "Cap- 
tain Swift," C. Haddon Chambers' 
drama. 



"The Courage of Marge O'Doone," 
by James Oliver Curwood has been 
purchased by Vitagraph. David 
Smith will direct the picture which 
will be made at the coast studio. 



Harry Cane will be featured in 
two reel comedies for which Film 
Specials have secured the world 
rights. They will be sold on the 
state right market. 



"Yes or No" has been bought by 
Joseph Schenck and will be used 
by Norma Talmadge as her third ve- 
hicle for First National. Charles 
Goodrich' wrote the play which had 
a long run in New York some sea- 
sons ago. 



Start Exchange Building 

Montreal, Can. — A ten-story build- 
ing to house exchanges has been be- 
gun in back of the Imperial. Pro- 
jection rooms and all other accessor- 
ies will be provided. 



Freight Rates Increased 

The United States Shipping Board 
has announced new freight rates on 
celluloid scrap and moving picture 
films between North Atlantic ports 
and Lisbon and Oporto, Portugal. 

The rates on celluloid scrap have 
been set at 90 cents per cubic foot to 
Lisbon and $1.05 per cubic foot to 
Oporto; moving picture films will be 
carried to Lisbon at the rate of 
$1.40 per cubic foot or two per cent, 
ad valorem, and to Oporto at $1.60 
per cubic foot or two per cent, ad 
valorem. 



Insurance Is Not 
Only Your Protection 
It's Your Duty 

Your home, silverware, jewelry and furniture have increased 
tremendously in value. Don't court misfortune by being 
without adaquale protection. See us NOW. 




R5ii?EN^AAdUELS 



54^5 -*^^^^.'y«^^/,%1S 



Samuek 



Friday, January 23, 1920 

Ray Company Formed 

Capitalized at $100,000— Work Starts 

in March 

{Special to \v lu ti DAILY) 

Los Angeles — The Charles Ray 
Prod., inc. nave been formed with a 
capitalization of $1UU,U00. 

Charles T. Ray, the star's father,; 
is president, Richard Willis, first 
vice-president; Gus inglis, second 
vice-president, and A. A. Kidder, is 
secretary and treasurer. They, to- 
gether with Ray himself form the 
Board of Directors. 

Ray will be ready to start work 
in March but before that will come 
East with Willis to look over the 
big town. The company will take 
over the Jesse D. Hampton studic 
in Hollywood. The plant will be 
enlarged to accommodate the com'^ 
pany. 



A 



U 



k 



Elephant Man Limch 
Engineered by Wells Hawkes 
who knows enough about a circuj 
to run one. Fox will give an "Ele- 
phant luncheon" at the Commodore 
to-day when Shirley Mason's firs! 
Fox production, "Her Elephan- 
Man" will be given a private show- 
ing. Pearl Doles Bell, the authoi 
will be the guest of honor. Spangle! 
and sawdust are promised. Guesti 
have been asked to park their ele- 
phants on Park Ave. 



Will Eliminate Iris 
Culver City, Cal — Charles Ray' 
next starring vehicle, "An Old Fa 
shioned Young Man," now in thi 
course of production at the Thoma 
H. Ince studios will have an unusua 
feature in that the iris, or "facfe' 
will be dispensed with. Contrasting 
scenes will be used to same effect 



Brooklyn House to Cost $600,000 

A syndicate headed by Walte 
Small plans the erection of a hous^ 
costing $600,000 in the vicinity o 
the Williamsburg Bridge Plaza. 



Enid Bennett is starred in "Tb 
Man in the Moon," directed by Fret 
Niblo, an Ince production which ha 
been completed. 



When you see umbrellas 
on the street it's pretty 
sure to indicate bad weath- 
er. When you see RIT- 
CHEY posters in a lobby 
it's absolutely sure to in- 
dicate a crowded auditor- 
ium. 

RITCHEY 

LITHO. CORP. 
4«6W.31«t St.J(.Y.. Ptrane CUu* a3» 







1 



Friday, January 23, 1920 



jM^v 



DAILY 



Art Directors' Ass'n Installs Officers 

Los Angeles, Cal. — Alfred W. Al- 
ley, of Metro's technical department, 
R. E. Sibley of the Lois Weber stu- 
dio, Erdras C. Hartley and Sidney 
Ullman of Metro have been installed 
as president, vice president, secretary 
and treasurer respectively of the Mo- 
tion Picture Art Directors' Asso. 
A special meeting was held for the 
purpose at the Beaux Art studio 
last week. 



Form New Organization 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Calgary, Can. — Canadian Thea- 
ters, Ltd. has been organized with 
headquarters here. The firm repre- 
sents a merger of numerous west- 
ern and some eastern houses and 
will exploit feature pictures as well 
as stock and road shows. Simon 
BerkolT heads it, and Frank Morton, 
manager of the Princess is secre- 
tary-treasurer and managing direc- 
tor. 



Phone Momingside 6945 

Autos to Hire 
To the Moving Picture Trade 




IDEAL AUTO RENTING CO. 




Blank in Combine 

Reported He Will Amalgamate With 

Abe Frankle in Des Moines 

{Special to WW'S I'AILV) 

Des Moines, la. — It is reported 
here that the A. H. Blank Enter- 
prises will amalgamate with Abe 
Frankle in a deal said to involve 
more than $1,000,000. 

Blank's Des Moines, Garden and 
Palace are included in the deal as 
are Frankle's Rialto, Majestic and 
Casino. 

It is said here the move is a re- 
sult of the invasion by Marcus Loew 
and the reports that Goldwyn and 
Fox are seeking theaters here. 



A. H. Blank had left town for 
Des Moines, and could not be 
reached for a statement regarding 
the above dispatch. j; 



Stories for Selznick Stars 

Selznick announces 16 stories for 
Selznick stars: 

"Keeping Him Guessing," bv Mrs 
Idyll Shepard Way; "The Shadow 
of Rosalie Bvrne," bv Grace Sart- 
well Mason; "The Palace of Dark- 
ened Shadows," by Mary Hastings 
Bradlev: "Proof of the Pudding," by 
Meredith Nicholson: "The Law 
Bringers," bv G. B. Lancaster: 
"False Pride," adapted from "The 
Pride of Patricia," by Elizabeth 
Redfield; "The Magdalen of Mud- 
ville," by John Lynch, and Edmund 
Goulding;" "Mysterious Moments," 
by Izola Forrester and Mann Page; 
Pretty Thing," by Louise Winter: 
"Jenny," by Roy Horinaman; "Red 
Peper. by Merle Johnson; "Prophet's 
Paradise," by O. S- Montayne: 
"Straight Down the Crooked Road," 
from "The High Stepping Young 
Iretons," by Bertha Runkel; "The 
Man Tamer," by John Barton Ox- 
ford: "The Point of View," from 
"Old Things for New," by Edith 
Ellis, and '"The Honor of His 
House," by Alfred Latour. 




License Fees Jump 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Minneapolis — The Rudsill ordi- 
nance imposing increased license 
fees will not come up before the 
Citv Council until the second week 
of February. 

It is not believed possible for the 
theater men here to forestall an in- 
crease in fees but they are making 
every, effort to have the ordinance 
changed to zone off the various dis- 
tricts and compel the larger theaters 
in the loop districts to bear the 
brunt of the increase. 

Exhibitors do not hope to retain 
the older ordinance and increased 
licenses fees are deemed inevitable- 



Toledo Men Like Community Idea 
(Special to WW'S DAWY) 
Toledo — The Community theater 
building plan of the Horwitz Broth- 
ers, controlling the Colonial here, has 
made other local exhibitors sit up- 
One of the big first-runs is already 
talking to brokers and lawyers about 
a similar stock company, to raise 
$400,000 for a new theater downtown. 
The Horwitz company is out for 
$200,000. 



Start Bankruptcy Suit 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Cher, $49,897; Dixie Lee, $7,020, and 
George M. Carleton, $3,186. 

The petition alleges the company 
assigned its cameras, lights and stu- 
dio equipment to Harry S. Kelsey 
without consideration and assigned 
the contract for the play, "Kismet," 
to a new corporation, the Waldorf 
Photoplays, Inc., without consider- 
ation. It is also alleged that it as- 
signed the contract for the Republic 
Distributing Corp. and the produc- 
tions, "Where Bonds Are Loosed" 
and "Dad's Girl." 



Waldorf Photoplays, Inc., the 
company referred to in the above 
dispatch was formed in Delaware 
a few weeks ago with a capital- 
ization of $1,500,000. 

David G. Fischer directed "Where 
Bonds Are Loosed." 



Realart Exchange Claims Record 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Cleveland — It , is understood that 
the heaviest week's business ever 
turned into the home office by a 
Realart exchange came from the lo- 
cal office last week. $16,000 is the 
estimated figure inclusive of the 
firm's share from the first week of 
"Soldiers of Fortune" at the Euclid. 

James B. Reilly, Realart rnanager 
is the man responsible. This week 
Reilly appointed Grant A. Reed as- 
sistant manager of the exchange. 



Heron Lake, Minn. — Leonard and 
E. V. Freedle are now the owners 
and managers of the new house here. 



Browning, Mont. — The Alcazar is 
now the property of James Stewart 
and Greeley Billedeaux. 



New Independent for Dallas 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 
Dallas, Tex. — The Producers and 
"Exhibitors Pictures Co. has secured 
Southern distribution of the product 
of Tyrad Pictures, Inc., of New 
York and the Bolles Equity Film 
Prod, of Los Angeles. 



Poll to Enlarge Worcester Houses 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 
Worcester, Mass. — Sylvester Z. 
Poll intends to spend $500,000 in en- 
larging the Grand, Plaza and Poli. 



Gem, St. John, Burns 

(Special to WW'S DAILY) 
St. John, Can. — It is estimated 
that a loss of $25,000 was sustained 
when the Gem burned here. This 
is one of the chain of houses oper 
ated by F. G. Spencer. 



Mabel, Minn. — Andrew Moran ha; 
sold the Opera House to Albert El- 
Hngson and Howard Pearson fof 
$2,000. 






There are 30 Reasons 



why you should book, 

"The 
Screaming 
Shadow" 

REASON No. 21 

A stitch in time, saves nine 
but a Ben WUson serial at- 
traction saves many an exhi- 
bitor. Book "The Screaming: 
Shadow." Watch lor Reason 
No. 22 tomorrow. 

BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 

UNIVERSAL CITY 

Released through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK 

Foreign Rights controlled by Apollo Trading Corp., 220 W. 48th St. 






n i 



jM^ 



DAILV 



Friday, January 23, 1920 



Putting It Over 



Here it hoiu a brother exhib- 
itor put his shoiv over. Send 
along your ideas. Let the other 
fellow know how you cleaned 
up. 



Minneapolis, Minn. — Preceded by 
a newspaper teaser campaign, and 
tie-ups with three large department 
stores which offered attractive win- 
dow displays advertising the book 
from which "The Westerners" has 
been adapted, and incidentally show- 
ing one of the stills, the film played 
to big business at the Unique- E. 
Rosen manages the house. 



Livenia, N. Y. — The population of 
this town is 836 and when 800 paid 
to see Mary Pickford in "The Hood- 
lum" at the Pictureland, manager 
I. N. Trescott, established a per- 
centage record. Circulars advertis- 
ing the production judiciously were 
distributed and reached every house- 
hold in town. The film ran for two 
days. 



Buffalo, N. Y. — Cut-outs always 
figure in the exploitation of pictures 
that are presented at the Strand, 
Manager Edwin O. Weinberg em- 
ploying several artists to prepare 
these lobby displays- "Heart O' the 
Hills," the Mary Pickford produc- 
tion was put over with the aid of 
a lobby display consisting of a large 
figure of the star sliding down a 
coal-chute and then astride a don- 
key. 



Pittsburg, Pa. — No exploitation 
except additional newspaper space 
was used by the management of the 
Columbia to put c-ver "A Day's 
Pleasure," Charlie Chaplin's latest. 
Only five reels in all were presented, 



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the shortness of the program (there 
was no longer feature) making it 
possible to get in another perform- 
ance each day. The usual scale of 
prices was maintained and due to 
the added performances, a new at- 
tendance record was established- 



Muncie, Ind. — A stunt similar to 
that tried elsewhere with success 
was employed by the management of 
the Wysor Grand, to put over Elsie 
Janis in "A Regular Girl." A con- 
test, open to readers of the Muncie 
Press was held, offering a gold 
watch to the man who wrote the best 
essay on how to spend $10,000 so 
as to bring the greatest amount of 
happiness and betterment in Mun- 
cie, and a gold bracelet to the wo- 
man submitting the best answer. It 
was called "The Regular Girl Con- 
test" 



Binghamton, N. Y.— W- A. Gillen, 
who is to manage the New Strand, 
which will open 'late in February, 
tried a new scheme to determine 
which productions were most suit- 
able for his house. Accompanied by 
stage director, orchestra leader and 
four other people, called impression- 
ists, he visited first run houses up 
state and viewed different features. 
Each of the men considered each 
picture from his particular end, two 
of the "impressionists" watching the 
audience and the other two just ex- 
pressing their personal opinions- By 
this system, Gillen has been able 
to determine to his satisfaction the 
advisability of booking different at- 
tractions. 



Toledo — Something new in "pro- 
logues" is being hatched for the run 
of "Mystery of the Yellow Room" 
in this town. Or is it a prologue? 
At any rate it comes at the end of 
the next-to-last reel of the picture, 
which appears to "break," whereupon 
a purple light is thrown on the stage 
and a man in a yellow mask appears 
telling the audience that the film did 
not break, but the management wish- 
es to give the audience a minute or 
two to concentrate on their decision 
as to who is the guilty person. 

The man explains that the next 
reel will show who was but he be- 
lieves many spectators will like to 
settle in their own minds, before the 
last reel's revelations, just who is 
who. 

And he teases the "guessers" that 
they will each and all be fooled. 
Closes with the request that after 
they do witness the final reel they 
will not discuss the ending of the pic- 
ture with their friends, in order that 
latter may enjoy the same suspense 
present audience does- 

Bert Adler, exploitation manager 
of Realart specials, framed the stunt 
with the management of the Colon- 
ial. The "don't discuss" warning is 
also given on a slide at the finish of 
the final reel, and the desired result 
of course is that the spectators will 
talk. 



"Vanishing Mask" Serial Title 

Vitagraph has selected "The Van- 
ishing Mask" as the title for the 
forthcoming serial in which Joe Ry- 
an and Jean Paige will co-star. 



In the Courts 

The Trocadero Amusement Co., 
Inc. was sued in the Supreme Court 
for $5,110 by Hyman Sonn and 
others, owners of the property at 
the northwest corner of 115th St. 
and 8th Ave., for alleged neglect- 



An attachment for $17,257 has been 
granted in the Supreme Court 
against the property for the Societe 
Francaise Des Films et Cinamata- 
graphes Eclair of Paris in a suit by 
Emi Offerman. The plaintiff alleges 
that he was engaged in 1909 as 
American representative for the 
defendant corporation at $100 a 
month salary and 20 per cent of the 
annual profits. He was employed 
until Jan. 17, 1914, during which time 
he established the studio of the de- 
fendant at Fort Lee and then be- 
came connected with a corporation 
organized to take over the defend- 
ant's interests. He alleges that his 
share of the profit for 1913 was $19,- 
897, of which $17,257 is unpaid. 



Carlyle Blackwell has been sued in 
the Supreme Court by William Har- 
ris, Jr., Samuel Shipman and John 
B. Hymer, as owners of the play, 
"East Is West," for an injunction 
restraining him from exhibiting his 
play with the title, "East or West," 
on the ground that such a title will 
deceive the public and induce the be- 
lief that the film play is the plain- 
tiff's play. The plaintiffs say they 
are negotiating for the production 
rights of their play in London and 
the Orient, and that they have not 
disposed of the film rights. 

Lee Shubert made an affidavit in 
behalf of the plaintififs in which he 
says the use by Blackwell of the 
title he had chosen "would deceive 
the public into the belief that it is 
he plaintiff's play and the production 
and motion picture rights of their 
play would become practically worth- 
less if the photoplay is continued to 
be presented." 



Albany, N. Y.— Justice Rudd of 
the Supreme Court has granted a 
writ of mandamus compelling Fred 
P. Elliott_ as majority stockholder 
of the Clinton Square Amusement 
Co. to present the books and papers 
of the corporation for inspection. It 
is contended that the minority stock- 
holders have the right to see the 
books and papers, and declare that 
their interests in the company will 
be placed in jeopardy if they are 
not given that right. 



Arrow to Open Salt Lake Office 

Denver, Col. — B. M. Shooker, rep- 
resenting J. J. Goodstein, president 
and general manager of the Arrow 
will open a Salt Lake office. 



Incorporations 

{Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Albany, N- Y.— The Poets Photo- 
play Co., Manhattan, capital, $1,000,- 
000. To produce and exhibit films. 
Board of directors: Maurice Adda, 
New Brighton, S. I., N. Y-; Louis 
L. Quasha, Carl Dernburg and Dan- 
iel W. Robinson of New York City, 
and Samuel Gordon and Isadore 
Weinberg of Boston, Mass- 



Albany, N. Y.— The Shannon Pro- 
ducing Co., of Manhattan. To main- 
tain theaters and produce and ex- 
ploit pictures. Capital, $52,000- 
Principal shareholders: William 
Grossman, Nathan April and Sam- 
uel Klinger, Times Building, New 
York. 



Effective Teaser in Circvilation 

An effective teaser, on the re- 
versed side of a post card is being 
circulated in the trade It is printed 
in four different colors and carries 
the folowing lines: 

"If the sky is blue go to the Ri- 
alto." 

"If the sky is red go to the 
Strand-" 

"If the sky is yellow go to the 
Rivoli," and 

"If the sky is green go to the 
Capitol." 

Down towards the bottom the 
card reads "Watch the Sky Feb. 
21st." 



Sterling Expanding 
Toronto, Can. — Sterling Films, 
Ltd. have purchased Canadian rights 
to four Olive Thomas Triangle pro- 
ductions, "Toton," "The Follies 
Girl," "Love's Prisoner," and "Prud- 
ence on Broadway." 

The company was recently reor- 
ganized bringing into the organiza- 
tion H. Miller and D. Dunkelman, 
two well known business men here. 
The former, who is president of the 
Miller Manufacturing Co., becomes 
president of Sterling while Dunkel- 
man is president of Tip Top Tailors, 
said to be the largest retail clothing; 
dealers in Canada. 



Knoxville to Have $250,000 House] 

Knoxville, Tenn- — The Signal 
Amusement Co. will erect a house al 
a cost of $250,000. 



New Bedford Company Chartered 

Boston, Mass. — Empire Theate^ 

Co., of New Bedford has been char-j 

tered. Capital, $200,000. 



Charles Y. Harrison, former! 
with Transatlantic has gone to Mon 
treat where he will assume manage- 
ment of one of the theaters there 



MAKE YOU HEAH WHAT YOU SEE 



FILMUSIC CUE SHEETS ARE GOOD FOR ALL THEA- 
TERS EVEN THOSE THAT USE ROLLS— AND LOTS OF 
THEM DO. 



riLi!8nus.^c-co. 

. . LOS ANC; ELES .n. 



lT2i Highland At«. 




'riday, January 23, 1920 18/^ ^\ DA 11^^ 



A First National Franchise for Your Theatre 



Guarantees 



A steady supply of good pictures at an equitable cost. 

Complete protection. 
The backing of a national organization. 



We can convince you that our new plan is the sanest and 
most beneficial exhibitor movement ever conceived. 



// will pay you to write to-day 
for our booklet 

"A Franchise to Independence '' 



Address 

Exhibitors' Defense Committee 

Care, First National Exhibitors Circuit, Inc. 
6 West 48th St. , New York, N. Y. 




DAILV 



Friday, January 23, 1920 



Old Times 

Milton H. Fahrney wa« 
working in those good old daye 
for Dave Horsley. He was 
hero, director, cameramen and 
also scenic artist. At odd 
times he also prepared the con- 
tinuity — that is, whatever rep- 
resented continuity in those 
days. Occasionally he doubled 
in brass, so to speak, and 
played hero and willyun, too— 
at the same time. All for $60 
a week. 

And in those days director* 
were getting $60 a week — th« 
bosses drew $30. 



Ince Publishing House Organ 

Culver City, Calif- — A new maga- 
zine to be called "The Silversheet," 
will shortly be published in the 
Thomas H. Ince Studios, for circula- 
tion among the theater-owners and 
their public as an innovation . in 
fresh-from-the-studios journalism. 

Hunt Stromberg, formerly direc- 
to rof advertising and publicity with 
Select, will be editor-in-chief of "The 
Silversheet" with an assisting staff 
to include feature writers. 

One of the features of the new 
magazine will be a section devoted 
to showmanship and exploitation. 



THE DIAL FILM CO. 

announces 
the completion of Super-feature, 

MITCHELL LEWIS 
"KING SPRUCE" 

adapted from best seller by 
Ilolman Day 



IT REQUIRES ORCANIZATION TO 
MANUFACTURE COODENGRAVIIKS 

W(IIAYEBEENOII(ANI7EDs'H^^M 

E^UIPPEPIODEUVERt^'BEITPOIIINE 
WORK INTHE LEAST POSSIBLE TINE 



THE STANDARD ENGRAYIftG CO. 

PUOTO ENGRAVERS 

225 WEST 39™ STREET. NEW YORK 

aM£DIC&N PPESS ASSOCIATION BLDO 



\ 




The Acme 
Portable 


f 

1 

1 






Projector 
For the 
Studio 

Cutting Room 
The Editor 
Home School or 
Church 



Demonstrated to You Anywhere 

Howells Cine Equipment Co. 

729 7th Ave. New York 

Phone Bryant 1166 



Plan Factory in Jersey 

Celluloid Co. to Build Plant in Ver- 
ona for Raw Stock Manufacture 

The Celluloid Co. manufacturers 
of raw stock, have plans under way 
for the erection of a two-story fac- 
tory and power house at Verona, 
N. J. 

The factory which will be used 
for the manufacturer of raw stock 
will be 40 by 360 ft- and will be 
erected by the Eagle Rock Manu- 
facturing Co. which is affiliated with 
the Celluloid Co. 



Milligan With Typhoon Fan 

J. A. Milligan, formerly with the 
M. p. World is now sales and ad- 
vertising manager of the Typhoon 
Fan Co. 



Incorporate Pittsfield Colonial 

Pittsfield, Mass.— The deed has 
been recorded in the registry office 
changing Colonial from Goldstein 
Bros. Amusement Co., to Samuel and 
Nathan E. Goldstein, Inc. About 
$38,000 is involved in the deal. 



Buffalo Exchange Building Ready 

Buffalo, N. Y. — Metro, Vitagraph, 
World and Universal exchanges will 
be housed in a new exchange build- 
ing erected here at 245-49 Franklin 
St. It is expected to be ready for 
occupation on or about March 1. 



Plans Big House 
Baltimore, Md. — Pleasant Pen- 
nington, of New York, is preparing 
plans for brick, stone and terra cot- 
ta theater, to cost about $500,000 for 
Harry A. Webb. 



Minneapolis House to Cost $400,000 

Minneapolis, Minn. — Industrial In- 
vestment Co. has plans by J. O. Prid- 
more, Chicago, for a one-story brick 
and terra cotta theater, at Eighth 
and Hennepin Avenue, to cost $400,- 
000. 



Large House for Belleville, 111. 

Belleville, 111.— Henry Schroeder, 
St. Louis, Mo., has a contract for a 
four-story building for Dickens Ho- 
tel & Theater Building Corp., to 
cost $125,000. 



Construction Forging Ahead 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 
Portland, Ore. — Improvements 
costing $40,000 have just been in- 
stalled in the Peoples' Theater, by 
Jensen & Von Herberg. Further 
work on the house will make it one 
of the most up-to-date theaters in 
that city. Work on the firm's $250,- 
000 house in Yakima, Washington, 
is now well under way. Seattle will 
be the next city where the firm will 
build. 



Merrill Sold 

Milwaukee— Bill Hirschberg of the 
Metro sales force, John Handels- 
man, city manager of the W. W 
Kimball Co. and L. Gumbiner of 
Gumbiner Brothers, all of Chicago, 
owners of a chain of theaters, have 
together bought the Merrill. This 
is a 1,000 scat house, located in the 
heart of the business and amusement 
district. 



New Theaters 

Princeton, N. J. — Princeton Thea- 
ter Co. will build a 1,000 seat house 
here shortly. 



New Bedford, Mass. — A house 
seating 2,450 will be built here 
shortly by the Empire Theater Co. 



Springfield, 111. — Harry Loper will 
build a house seating 1,800, in the 
near future. 



Northampton, Mass — Charles F. 
Atkinson, of Botson, will erect a 
film house here and is now in town. 



Bridgton, Me. — James A. O'Brien 
of Lewiston is dickering for a site 
for a film theater. 



Cleveland, O. — A house seating 1,- 
500 will be erected by Joseph and 
Sam Deutsch and will open early in 
September. 



Water, Iowa — Foundation work 
has been started here on the new 
Strand which is being built by M. 
Ford and A. J. Diehold. 



Wilkesbarre, Pa. — The Capitol 
here will be ready by spring. It 
was expected that it wotild be pos- 
sible to open early in the year. 



Pittsburg, Pa. — A new house, to 
seat 500 is to be erected in Fair- 
chance at a cost of $25,000. Charles 
H. Richelieu has had ground broken 
for the building. 



Harrisburg, 111. — Several plots of 
land are being considered for • 
theater here by the Allied Film la^ 
terests of Chicago and St. Louifl. 



Northampton, Mass — Frank H. 
Roberts has purchased the Boynton 
Homestead and will erect a film 
house seating 2,000 on the site. Con- 
struction work will be begun in the 
spring. 



Minneapolis, Minn. — The new Rex 
opened here on Jan. 19 by H. I. 
Krohling. House seats 350. Initial 
presentation, "Daddy Long Legs," 
starring Mary Pickford. 



Toledo, O. — Work has been begun 
on the World, on Dorr and True 
Sts. The house will cost between 
$75;000 and $100,000 and will be 
ready early in June. 



Perth Amboy, N. J.— Adolph M. 
Metzendorf will erect a house on a 
newly acquired site for Mr. Kuhn, 
formerly manager-director for Mar- 
cus Loew's New York theaters. 



Hallowell, Me. — A new motion 
picture theater, seating 1,200 may 
be built here by the Maine-New 
Hampshire Theater Corporation. 
The house will probably be erected 
on Walter Street, the principal thor- 
oughfare of this town. 



Smith Recovering 

Chicago. — Cress Smith, branch 
manager of United Artists has been 
in the hospital for a few days but 
is doing nicely and expects to be 

hark at Vlic H*»cL- in a f^n-^r m- fiir^ 



House Changes 

Falmouth, Mass. — Alterations wilj 
be made in the Empire. 

Lima, O. — The Lyric has been re- 
opened after undergoing alterations 
on a large scale. 



Cass Lake, Minn. — Kenneth Luf- 
kin has bought a half interest in 
the Rex- 



Granville, N. D.— J. J. Hostetler, 
who owns the Gem, is now manag- 
ing his house 



St. Paul, Minn. — Clayton E. Smith 
formerly Goldwyn booker is man- 
ager of the New Rialto. 



Buffalo, N .Y.— Alfred R. Sherry is 
now managing the Star. He is the 
third manager since it reopened in 
September and succeeds William 
West. 



Rockford, 111. — Charles Lamb has 
leased the Royal, which seats 500. 
He will close it for a week, during 
which he will alter it. Lamb owns 
the Palm. 



Minneapolis, Minn. — Reported here 
that Dan Iselin has bought the lone 
and Grandview operated for several 
years by Mitchel and Schroeder, for 
$12,000. 



Centralia, Wash. — The Hub City 
1 heaters Co. has taken over the 
Grand and Liberty from Joe Lucas. 
W. C. Ripley of Aberdeen is presi 
dent of the firm. 



Toledo, O.— L. E. Smith, A. J. 
Smith and James Beidler are plann 
ing to enlarge the East Auditorium, 
Garden and Japanese Garden. They 
are organizing a stock company. 



New Exchange Opens 

Buffalo, N. Y.— The Independent 
Film Exchange located at 212 Frank 
lin Street has been opened- Lew 
Herschel, manager. 

— ifc 

Jarmouth at Portland Theater 
Portland, Ore. — Douglas Jarmouth 
has taken over the management oi 
the Peoples and the exploitation di' 
rection of the Star. These are Jen^ 
sen-Von Herberg houses. ^ 






Starr Heads Triangle in Detroit 
Detroit, Mich.— Edward F. Call* 
han who has returned to New Yorli 
has been replaced by M. Harlan 
Starr as local Triangle Exchang< 
manager. Starr was formerly fiel( 
manager for Clark-Cornelius. 



Hurley With Robertson-Cole 
Chicago, 111. — E. F. Hurley is now 
associated with Robertson-Cole ani! 
will assist in the exploitation anc 
sales promotion of the Martin Joha 
son South Sea Island pictures B 
Illinois. 



Elinor Fair in One "U" Film 
Los Angeles. — Elinor Fair wh 
recently completed her contract vM 
Fox is appearing in one picture ti 



wi—wjiiwii.imM- . V 



iM i 



DAI1.V 



SHORT STUFF 



Never in the history of the industry has' short stuff 
played such a prominent part on every programme. 
In fact, you will find it featured many times over a 
mediocre multiple reel subject. Alive to the oppor- 
tunity, WID'S DAILY has a corps of reviewers 
covering the entire short reel field with from thirty 
to fifty short subjects covered weekly. 

For the producer of short subjects WID'S DAILY 
offers the ideal advertising medium — An oppor- 
tunity to cover the field efficiently and at small cost. 

The day is past when it is necessary to use several 
pages at prohibitive cost to tell your story to the 
exhibitor. 

Efficiency has taken the place of spread eagle copy. 

What the exhibitor wants to know is your story in 
plain facts, straight from the shoulder. Tell him, 
through the columns of 

JVid's 'Daily 



■fl 



Bli^?l 



DAIUV 



Friday, January 23, 19 



Best Ten Spent 

Kildeer, No. Dakota 

While we are new in the 
business and haven't been do- 
ing any large amount of book- 
ing, still I find that WID'S is 
the biggest asset we have in 
picking features, program stuff 
or short subjects. It is cer- 
tainly the best $10 we spend 
during the year. 

Enthusiastically yours, 

H. H. Ellsworth. 
Kildeer Amusement Co., Inc. 
Auditorium Theater, 



Glaum Tops Fairbanks 

Newark, N. J- — At the Goodwin, 
during the run of Louise Glaum in 
"The Lone Wolf's Daughter," and 
Douglas Fairbanks in "When the 
Clouds Roll By," both features be- 
ing presented as part of the pro- 
gram, the former topped Fairbanks 
in the advertising. The double fea- 
ture program ran for two weeks. 



New Theater for Rochester 

Rochester, N. Y. — George E. Simp- 
son, president of the Regorson Corp. 
operating the Regent, Piccadilly and 
Gordon here, has purchased a site 
on Clinton Ave- south on which a 
combination vaudeville and picture 
theater will be built. 

Two buildings on the site will be 
demolished and the theater planned 
will cost close to $1,000,000. 



Bealart Pictures have a special 
lobby display for all their produc- 
tions now ready in their exchanges 
throughout the country for all 
their bookings. Look them over 
and see how this enterprising con- 
cern will assist you in getting 
"them" up to the box office. 
KKACS MFG. Co. 
320 W. 42nd St. 
17th Floor Tel. 3807 Bryant 



BESS MEREDYTH 

and 

WILFRED LUCAS 

Writing and Directing 

Australian Features 



Address 

Care Snowy Baker 

84 Oxford Street 

Sydney, N. S. W. Australia 

Cable Address 
"Snowing Sydney" 



Neilan Kicks 

At Practice of Injecting Advertising 

in Features — Wants Directors 

to Stop It 

Marshall Neilan has issued a "call" 
to all motion picture producers and 
directors to attack the practice of 
injecting advertising in fi,lms and 
collecting at both ends, namely from 
the exhibitor and the national ad- 
vertiser. "The time has come," says 
Neilan, "when producers must re- 
alize that the practice of injecting 
advertising in entertainment film is 
a dangerous proceeding, not only for 
the industry in general, but for them 
individually. 

"I know of specific cases where 
pictures have been practically paid 
for in advance by national adver- 
tisers after which rentals were de- 
manded and obtained from exhibi- 
tors for the priv/ilege of making 
good the producer's arrangement 
with the advertiser. It behooves 
the individual director to stand firm 
on this matter, for its continuance 
means the prostitution of his own 
best efforts. 

"Exhibitors have become 'wise' and the 
producers who do not realize this are 
only inviting trouble for themselves. For 
many months I have been watching this 
practice of 'cutting down the overhead' 
on a production on the part of various 
prominent producers. It was quite evi- 
dent tliat this could not continue. Those 
producers became bolder with each suc- 
ceeding picture and in one particular 
case, it is generally understood that the 
cost of production on a well known film 
was covered by advertisers before the 
print reached the exhibitor. 

"In a number of instances, advertising 
has unavoidably crept into a picture. 
Producers must watch this with greater 
care than ever for if they let such ad- 
vertising pass unnoticed it will place 
them in the same class with the grasp- 
ing ones woh cannot make money fast 
enough through legitimate means. 

"It is gratifying to note that the ex- 
hibitors everywhere are denouncing this 
practice. They must do this in order to 
protect themselves. Advertising on the 
screen, to a limited extent, is very often 
good business for the exhibitor. How- 
ever, it should work out this way and 
not merely present good business for the 
producer at the expense of the exhibitor. 
The exhibitor should be the sole judge as 
to how much and how little advertis- 
ing is to appear on his screen.'' 



Americus Houses Boost Prices 

Americus, Ga. — The current ad- 
mission rate to motion picture 
houses has been raised from 10 to 
25 cents. Attendance has not suf- 
fered greatly because of the increase. 



Would Permit Sunday Shows 

Providence, R. I. — Sunday motion 
picture shows are permitted in the 
proposed law introduced by Repre- 
sentative Adama A. Aiello, in the 
house. 



Chicago Group Issues Paper 

Chicago — The Allied Amusements 
Association, composed of the mo- 
tion picture, dramatic, vaudeville and 
burlesque theater owners of Chica- 
go, have their own official publica- 
tion now. The first number of the 
Allied Amusements Bulletin, was is- 
sued on Jan. 19. 

\Vith the Allied Amusements As- 
sociation Bulletin !is incorporated 
the Interstate Film Review, and the 
two papers wjlll now be merged. 
The Allied Amusements Bulletin 
will be issued every other week here- 



Tracey Stories in Films 

Will Go Out as Gibraltar Pictures 
Through Hodkinson 

Gibraltar Pictures, recently formed 
by Arthur F. Beck will produce a 
series of productions based on the 
stories by Louis Tracey. 

The Louis Tracey Prod., Inc. was 
formed a few weeks ago in Albany 
with a capitalization of $100,000. E. 
J. Clode, who is the publisher of 
the Tracey novels is interested in 
the Master Films, Inc., starring 
Johnny Hines in a series of come- 
dies and of which Charles C Burr, 
Beck's general manager is president. 
The new Tracey pictures will be re- 
leased through Hodkinson. 

William Worthington who has di- 
rected a long string of Sessue Hay- 
akawa productions for Haworth 
will arrive in New York to-morrow 
to direct the first of a series which 
will be made at the Leah Baird stu- 
dios. Worthington will probably 
act as director general of the new 
unit. 



Arrow Has Hank Mann Releases 

Hank Mann's first four releases 
of his new series have been received 
by Arrow. They are "The Broken 
Bubble," "A Roaming Romeo," "A 
Knock Out," and "The Paper Hang- 
er." 



Combine in Reading 

Competitive Interests Join Hands 
Pennsylvania Town 
(Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Reading, Pa. — The competitive 
terests operating here have join 
hands- i 

Carr and Schad, operating* tl 
Colonia, Arcadia and Princess h; e 
affiliated with Wilmer and Vinctt 
and the Stanley interests. Wilnr 
and Vincent have always been clo |- 
ly connected with the Stanley int - 
ests and Sablotsky and MacQui . 

The competition in acquiring ril 
estate in Penn St. will proba y 
cease as a result of the tie-up. 

Schwab Prod. Formed 

Dore N. Schwab, formerly pi- 
duction manager of the Carl 
Blackwell Productions, Inc., has j 
completed the organization of 
own company to be known as 
D. N. Schwab Prod., Inc. The 
ecutive offices of the new comp; 
are at 511 5th Ave. 

D. N. Schwab has left for 
coast where upon his arrival he 
immediately start preparations 
producing a series of pictures, i 
gotiations have been closed for t 
ing over a unit of the Hollyw ' 
studios- 






There are in the United States over 
87,000 clubs, with an aggregate member- 
ship of MILLIONS, whose weekly dis- 
cussion directly concerns the subject 
contained in 

EHPTY ARHS 

THE SENSATION OF THE CENTURY 



Have you received YOUR copy of the 
Hundred Thousand Dollar Packet? 

PHOTOPLAY LIBRARIES, INC. 

(Exclusive Selling Agents) 
500 Fifth Avenue, New York City 



Xc5tcr 9ark 6" 



PC: 
hot 

fffait 



II 




o/FILMDOH 





Ji^RECOCHIZEIi 

Authority 



Vol. XI. No. 23 



Saturday* January 24, 1920 



Price 5 Cent! 



i(i 



Sales Convention 

of Famous Players on — Zukor and 

Lasky Make Addresses 

(Special to WW 8 DAILY) 

Chicago — The representatives of 
the Famous Players-Lasky Corp., 
in conveition now in session at the 
La Salle Hotel, are busily working 
on plans for a new system of dis- 
tribution and exploitation of their 
pictures. 

The convention, which is presided 
over by Al Lichtman. general man- 
aged was called by the executives 
of the corporation for the purpose of 
bringing together for the first time 
the executives and all tne district 
and branch managers, as well as the 
exploitation men of the organiza- 
tion. All of the 28 exchanges of 
Famous Players are represented, 
with a large delegation from the 
executive offices in New York- 

As a result of the work of the 
convention, it is announced that the 
same degree of specialization in 
force in the manufacture of pictures 
will be carried througR every Ijranch 
of the distribution and exploitation 
departments. 

Every production made by Famous 
Players-Lasky will hereafter be ex- 
ploited as an individual production. 

"We will first sell the pictures to 
the exhibitor," said Mr. Lichtman. 
Then we must sell the picture to 
the public for the benefit of the ex- 
hibitor. This calls for the organi- 
zation of a corps of film specialists. 
Every production will receive its 
lown special exploitation just as 
Ithough it were a road show-" 

There is to be one exploitation 
[man at each of the 28 exchanges, 
laccording to the plans perfected at 
Ithe convention. These men will 
[work under the direction of the 
lome office and in co-operation with 
the district and branch managers. 

The home office staff will create 
For each production the best plan 
)f exploitation for selling that pic- 
ture to the public. The various ex- 

loitation men will carry out these 
ilans- 

Thc convention will continue 
through to-day. Adolph Zukor and 

'ice-President Jesse L. Lasky ad- 
Iressed the convention vesterdav. 



|i Sunday Bill for Schenectady 

Schenectady, N- Y. — Alderman 
iagadorn has introduced in the 
ommon Council a measure permit- 
ing motion pictures on Sundays A 
lotion to pass it unanimously was 
efeated. 




The Chinese were creeping upon li m, when Keith wheeled and fa^ed 
them revolver in hand. From "1 e River's End," a First National t- 
traction produced by Marshall Neil an and written by James Oliv ^r 
Curwood. — Advt- 



Associated Exhibitors Elect Officers; 

Announce Tie-Up With 8,000 Theate^ s 

Messmore Kendall of Capitol Is President — His Theater to H3v>» »w 
York Showing of Pictures — Company Will Build H 

If Necessary 



The development as a result of the 
meeting of the important exhibitor- 
franchise holders of Associated Ex- 
hibitors — the Pathe co-operative 
inovement was announced yesterday 
when it was declared that Messmore 
Kendall, president of the Capitol 
Theater Realty Co., owners of the 
Capitol was elected president of the 
.\ssociated Exhibitors and the fol- 
lowing put into office: Edward 
Bowes, N. Y., first vice-president; 
James Q. Clemmer, Seattle, second- 
vice-president; Saul Harris, Little 
Rock, third vice-president; H. H. 
Wellenbrick, Newark, secretary; 
Harry Crandall, Washington, treas- 
ured, and Fred C. Quimby, New- 
York, general manager. 



The dfrectr' 






.3 



j.aore 
•Bowes, 
■ C^.Wash- 
if7;p; Den- 
~ ..Li -on, Cin- 
lardin,' ■ Kansas 
^ubliner, Chicago; 



nis iiQ. 

cinnati: p''^' 

City jsej 

Jame Q. Clemmer, Seattle; Hugo 

Lanib.ch, Spokane, and Paul Bru- 

net. New York 

The statement issued yesterday 
says that Associated Exhiliitors have 
franchise holders representing 250 
of the largest theaters in the coun- 
try and alliances with circuits which 
will bring the total to 8,000 exhibi- 
tors interested in the movement. 

The calibre of the exhibitors who 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Gunard With National 

Will Appear in r Series of 26 Twc 

Reelers — New Comedy Unit 

(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Hollywood — Grace Cunard, for-i 
merly with Universal has signed 
with National Film to appear in a 
series of 26 two reel comedy-dramas. 
Miss Cunard will direct her own 
productions- Cole Hebert will play 
the lead. 

National will also make a series 
of one reel comedies with "Smiling 
Bill" Jones. Work starts about Feb. 
15. 



To Film Bout 

Pioneer Will Have Battery of Cam- 
eras at Caddock-Stechar Match 

Next Friday Night 
Pioneer Film will have a battery 
of six cameras* ^nd 24 Wohl lights 
arranged in series to shoot the wrest- 
ling bout between Earl Caddock and 
Joe Stechar for the world's wrestling 
championship at the Madison Square 
Garden next Friday night. 

Jack Curley, fight promoter, wha 
is arranging the present bout ten- 
dered a lunch to Caddock at the 
Claridge yesterday at which Pio- 
neer's plans were announced. Mor- 
ris Rose, president of Pioneer is 
paying $30,000 for the film rights- 
Jack Cohn will supervise the pro- 
duction. 

It has not been decided as yet 
how long the film will be when re- 
leased, that depending on the dura- 
tion of the bout. It may be found 
ncecssary to shoot 100,000 feet of 
film. The lights will be so arranged 
that should one series burn out, 
another can become operative im- 
mediately without impairing any 
chance of missing the details of the 
match- 



Fawcett Directing Gish 

George Fawcett, has been loaned 
by D. W- Griffith to the Dorothy 
Gish company to direct Miss Gish 
in her forthcoming Paramount-Art- 
craft production, "Her Majesty-" 
.\mong those already engaged for 
principal parts are Ralph Graves, 
William Riley Hatch, George A- 
-Siegmann and Marie Burke. 

Fawcett directed a picture for 
\'itagraph. 



Chet Franklin With Lesser 

Chet Franklin will direct Annette 
Kellerman's first picture for Sol Les- 
ser. Bernard McConville wrote the 
story. 



Saturday, January 24, 1920 



ak^^ 



DAIUY 



^g|i<^aaa!» 



rA II lU. 23 Saturdmj, January 24. 1920 Prin S C«|U 

iipyright 1920, Wid's Film and Film Folk», 
Inc. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
Sew York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

'. C ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 
urer; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 
md Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 
Business Manager. 

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
It the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms (Postage free) United States, Outside 
of Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 
monthf, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00 

Subscribers should remit with order 

Address all communications to WID'S 

DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 

York, N. Y. 

Telephone: Vanderbilt, 4S51-4S52-S558 
Hollywood, California 
Editorial and Business Offices: 6411 Holly- 
wood Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 

Chicago representatives— Willis, Eckels 
tnd Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 
Cliicago, 111. 

Quotations 

Last 

Bid. Asked- Sale. 

Famous Players .... 80 81^ 80^ 

Loew's, Inc 30^^ 31 31 

Goldwyn SUA 33 3V/2 

Triangle Film H 13/16 V4 

United Pict. Prod. 16 W/2 16% 

World Film 1 



May Turn to Pictures 

At a meeting of the Central Man- 
agers Association held at the Knick- 
erbocker, the outlook for houses 
playing one night stand shows was 
discussed and was found to be so 
gloomy that it is likely many of 
the theaters throughout the country 
will turn to vaudeville and picture 
houses. 



COMING 

Charlie Chaplin 
Mabel Normand 

and 

Marie Dressier 



in 



"TiUie^s 
Punctured 
Romance'^ 

TOWER FILM CORP. 

71 W. 23rdSt.,N. Y. 



Guts and Flashes 

United Picture Theaters will re- 
lease "The Corsican Brothers" on 
Feb. 22. 



Julian M. ("King") Solomon has 
been doing free lance work since he 
left Famous Players. 



"Jenny" is the title of the next 
picture on which Olive Thomas will 
start work. 



Mollie King is starred in "Women 
Men Forget," the six reel produc- 
tion acquired by United Pictures 
now being prepared for release. 



United Pictures has purchased 
Adele Luehrman's novel "The Cur- 
ious Case of Marie Dupont" for 
Florence Reed. 



"Face to Face" Harry Grossman 
production with Margiierite Marsh 
has been tomplete'l at Ithaca. 



Tom Wilson has been engaged 
for an important role in Marshall 
Neilan's production, "Never Get 
Married," now filming at the Doug- | 
las Fairbanks studio. 



Charlie Burr received a gold-cased 
telescoping fountain pen and pencil' 
set when he resigned as Assistant 
General Manager of distribution with 
Famous to become General Man- 
ager of the Arthur Beck Film Ent- 
er. A- L. Lichtman, S. R.. Kent 
and Frank Chamberlain selected the 
gift. 



Walter McGrail under contract to 
Selznick, is in Los Angeles to play 
the leading role in "Blind Youth." 
This production was originally to 
have been directed by Al Green, who 
was taken seriously ill on Dec. 27 
and the 28th. Rapf was forced to 
secure another director. Rapf se- 
cured Edward Sloman who has been 
directing Bessie Barriscale. "Blind 
Youth" has a cast which includes 
Leatrice Joy, Ora Carewe, Clara 
Horton, Leo White, Colin Kenny 
and Joseph Swickard. 



R. F. Gardner, well known news- 
paper man and formerly on the ed- 
itorial str "le Trade Review, is 
now sp -entative of the 
Metro Phi 'ti^snge and in 
charge of t. 
ritory. 



Gerald F. Bacon, picture producer, 
and erstwhile stage impressario is 
rehearsing a new musical comedy, 
the joint work of Gitz Rice and I 
B. C. Hilliam. Joe Kelley of Hall- 
mark is to handle the publicity. \ 



Officers Elected 

(Continued from Page 1) 

have associated themselves in the 
new enterprise is indicated in the 
following list of franchise holders: 
Lubliner & Trinz, Chicago; Ruben 
& Finkelstein, Minneapolis; The 
Capitol, Boston (to be built); Har- 
ris & Ackerman, Los Angeles; H. 
Cornwell, St. Louis; Harris & Ack- 
erman, San Francisco; Harris & Lib- 
son, Pittsburg and Cincinnati; Paul 
Gustanovich, Cleveland; J. H. Coop- 
er, Oklahoma City; Harrj; Crandall, 
Washington; Samuel Harding, Kan- 
sas City; Bishop Cass Investment 
Co., Denver; Harding & Cohen, 
Omaha; J. Q- Clemmer, Seattle; Ol- 
sen & Sourbier, Indianapolis; Har- 
ris & Libson, Detroit; H. H, Wellen- 
Iirick, Newark; Michael Shea, Buf- 
falo; Merrill Theater Amusement 
Co-, Milwaukee; Clemmer & Lam- 
bach, Spokane; Samuel Harris, 
Little Rock, and Clemmer & Lam- 
bach, Portland. 

The organization plans to deal in 
every phase of the picture industry, 
produce, distribute, buy and build 
theaters if found necessary. 

The new organization is backed by 
an unlimited amount of capital. The 
financial interests back of the the- 
ater circuits represent many mil- 
lions of dollars and before the step 
was taken it is stated they had the 
practical assurance of the co-opera- 
tion of more than 8,000 other theater 
owners who will join with them in 
the purchase and distribution of 
motion pictures. It is frankly op- 
posed to the interests endeavoring to 
secure a monopoly on theaters as 
well as on the making of motion 
pictures- 

In New York City the franchise 
goes to the Capitol. This means 
that the f>roductions taken over by 
the organization will have their pre- 
miere in New York at the Capitol. 

The Associated Exhibitors is com- 
pletely an exhibitor's organization, 
according to the iirst announcement. 
In each territory the franchise hold- 
er will sell subsidiary franchises for 
the territory. Each exhibitor will 
be protected from competition in 
the showing of the organization's 
productions for he will have the 
exclusive rights in his territory. 

Every exhibitor will be assured of 
productions of the highest class. A 
purchasing committee made up of 
exhibitors will pass on all produc- 
tions before they are bought for 
distribution. 

The purpose of the Association 
is to bring the producer, star, direc- 
tor and independent seller of big 
state's rights features into direct 
contact with the exhibitor. 

The Associated Exhibitors has se- 
lected the Pathe Exchange to 
handle their product. 



FOR RENT— STUDIO SPACE 

in new studio located in Culver City, Calif, with latest modern 
equipment of stages, lighting, dressing rooms, offices, etc. 
Address Box 10, WID'S DAILY, 

Phone Hollywood 1603. 

Hollywood, Calif. 



Sunday Closing 

and Censorship 

Louisville Mayor Favors Svmday 
Films 

Louisville, Ky. — Following a dis- 
cussion between Mayor Smith and 
Rev. E. H. Powell, the Mayor re- 
fused to invoke the law prohibiting 
Sunday films. Rev. Powell and other 
clergymen vigorously opposed Suur 
day pictures. 



Discuss Sunday Films in Churches 

Louisville, Ky. — Sunday pTcTure 
shows are being discussed from all 
pulpits here. In some cases, inter- 
vention of the church is opposed, 
but in most addresses, opposition 
to the "Blue Laws" is assailed. 



Sunday Bill Affects License Fees 

Binghamton, N. Y — -It is reported 
that a law prohibiting Sunday shows 
will be passed. If the law is not 
passed, license fees will be five times 
as great as they would be other- 
wise, the Stone, for example pay- 
ing $750 instead of $150. 



|8<I 

111: 



lit 
im 



Sladdin Joins Goldwyn 

Chicago — S. G- Sladdin is doin 
local publicity of Goldwyn. Sladdin; i 
will have his office at the Chicago 
headquarters with I- Van Ronkel. 
He has been in Boston the past four „ 
months, organizing the Advertising, 
Publicity and Exploitation Depart 
nients for Goldwyn for all of the 
New England States. He expects tc|»» 
remain in Chicago sometime. 



Ill, 

leivi 



Id 



CI 
ir I 

Had 

lun- a, 



"Elephant Man" Lvmcheon 

William Fox gave a circus 
cheon yesterday to present his firsina 
Shirley Mason picture "Her Ele- *'^ 
phant Man," a story of the circus ^^ 
to personal friends and members o »" 
the trade press- "" 

The luncheon was held in th< at 
Grand Ball room of the Hotel Com 
modore and Wells Hawkes, who ha( 
charge of the arrangements furnishe 
plenty o{ real circus atmosphere 
Peanuts and oink lemonade and saw 
dust were much in evidence. 



f 



An individual is attractive 
because he has charm — 
whereas a RITCHEY 
poster is attractive be- 
cause it has a genuine ad- 
vertising value. 

RITCHEY 

LITHO. COHB. 
406 W. 31it St..N.Y.. PImm CUm* 83S8 




jM ^t 



DAIUV 



Saturday, January 24, 1920 



PatkeNews 

No. 7 
■NEW YORK CITY — New machine gun 
squad — not lor the army this time^ but 
for city's "finest;" police adopt real war 
devices to fight croolts. 
ALBANY^ N. Y.— Wiiat you need to 
'drive" around the globe — a collection of 
auto licenses from different lands shows 
some novel signs. 

HOBOKJKN, N. J. — Even though the 
country is dry why leave the "stuff" go 
down to a "wet" grave — hundreds of bar- 
rels of seized whiskey are rescued from a 
Kinking barge. 

PBESIDENTIAI> POSSIBILITIES — 
Who will be the candidates for the Pres- 
idency? We present a few of the men 
prominently mentioned for the Kepubli- 
la nand Democratic nominations. 
Major General Leonard Wood. 
Herbert Hoover. 
Wiliam G. McAdoo. 

Senator Hiram Johnson of California. 
Wiliam Jennings Bryan. 
Governor Calvin Coolidge of Massachu- 
setts. 
Governor W. L. Harding of Iowa. 
Champ Clarke former Speaker of the 
House. 

Senator Miles Poindexter of AVashing- 
;on. 
A. Mitchell Palmer, Attorney-General. 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. — Lightning speed 
tn two wheels! Over 25,000 witness the 
astest 100-mile motor-cycle race ever 
'taged on a one-mile track. 

CHIHUAHU.A CITY, MEXICO— Exclu- 
ive pictures of the city which has been 
he center of revolutionary strife in 
lorthern Mexico for several years. 
The consuls of various nations repre- 
ented in Chihuahua together with the 
'tate officials. 

The Governor's Band — made up of 
ewsboys and bootblacks. 
Villa's band and others have made some 
»wns here resemble the devastated area 
1 France. 

GUANTANAMO BAY, CUBA— Beady 
)r its big "war play" — the Atlantic 
guadron arrives at U. S. Naval Base in 
ul>a to hold its annual maneuvers. 
NEW YORK CITY'— Football growing 
s national sport — Cit.v College students 
jlebrate return of this sport after an 
bsence of 12 years. 

ALBANY, N. Y— The State Capitol be- 
>mes a center of national interest as the 
ivestigation begins of the right of the 
ispended Socialist assemblymen to their 

th( ats. 



^today 



Blumenthal Tenders Luncheon 

Louis F. Blumenthal, one of the 

tiring owners of the Exhibitors' 

•ade Review tendered a luncheon 

the Astor yesterday to A. B. 

I'ctland and L. W. Boynton new 

ners of the publication 

The purpose of the affair was to 

roduce Messrs Swetland and 

ynton to the publicity and adver- 

ing men of the industry. There 

re about 55 present including al- 

st the entire membership of the 

M. p. A. and members of the 

ff of the Trade Review. 

vlr- Swetland could not attend the 

cheon because of a hurried trip 

Chicago where he will attend the 

eral of one of the editors of a 

icago publication published by the 

ss Journal Co. with which Mr. 

etland is identified. 



Coast Brevities 

{Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Hollywood — Wallace Beery has 
been selected fo'r the role of "Buck" 
McKee in the production of "The 
Roundup," being made under the 
direction of George Melford. 



Vernon Dent, formerly with a mus- 
ical comedy company in New York 
and later in a comedy skit of his 
own on the Orpheum circuit, has 
signed a contract to play the heavy 
in a series of two-reel comedies 
featuring Hank Mann. He weighs 
190 pounds and is nearly six feet tall. 



An amusing mistake occurred in 
filming Booth Tarkington's Edgar 
stories when "Iris," colored cook, 
took the wrong cue. "Iris In," 
called Director Hopper to the Cam- 
eramman- Lucretia Harris, the 
colored woman playing the part of 
"Iris," the cook, hopped hurriedly 
into the picture. "Cut," said the di- 
rector hastily to the cameraman. He 
then explained to Lucretia that it 
was a perfectly excusable mistake 
but that her turn was not until later. 



Douglas Gerrard, the Universal 
director, has just finished "The 
Forged Bride," the photodrama in 
which Mary MacLaren appears as a 
soda-fountain siren. The production 
is being edited by Mr. Gerrard and 
Frank Lawrence, film editor at Uni- 
versal City, and will be ready for 
release in the spring- 



Jack Warner of Warner Brothers, 
has taken over the Burston Studios, 
6050 Sunset Blvd., and says, that 
hereafter all Al St. John Paramount 
comedies would be made at this 
plant. 

GAUSMAN 



SURE— 
It's the first of the 

NATIONAL FILM CORPORA- 
TION OF AMERICA 

Series of 1920 



KENTUCim 
COLONELT 



"National"— ize 
Your Booking 



THE DIAL FILM CO. 

announces 
the completion of Super-feature, 

MITCHELL LEWIS 
"KING SPRUCE" 

adapted from best seller by 
Holman Day 



Wouldn't Be Without It 

EMPIRE THEATRE 

Portland, Me. 
Wild's Daily, 
Gentlemen: — 

By all means renew my sub- 
scription for another year and 
kindly do not allow one single 
copy not to be mailed me dur- 
ing the time my present sub- 
scription expires and the new 
one commences. 

I am a great booster for 
Wid's and look forward to 
it as regularly as I do my 
breakfast. I wouldn't think of 
being without it as I have 
been a subscriber since it was 
first published. 

Very truly yours, 

H. J. Boucher, 

Manager. 



As soon as William h. Seiter fin- 
ishes his current production for the 
National, "The Kentucky Colonel," 
he will be appointed to the newly- 
created position of director-general 
for that concern. Seiter, who but 
four years ago was an "extra." is 
best known for his direction of the 
DeHavcn comedies and "Hearts and 
Masks." 



Raymond, Mme Marcy's Managei 
Gaby Marcy, the French actress, 
who recently arrived in New York 
as noted, states that Ray Raymond 
i -; her manager. 



Topeka Will Have New House 
Topcka, Kansas — G. L. Hopper 
wlio owns the Orpheum will erect 
a $.300,000 house on Kansas Ave. It 
will be four stories in height. 




'IPC (Re/uaed to 5eU 

or One Tftmdreci 

ahousand DoUcus 



.MMKitniuiiiiiiirniiiu/HdlMflL: ' 



Motherhood and Birth Control — either 
one of which is good for a packed house 
— are the twin themes of 

EMPTY ARMS 

THE SENSATION OF THE CENTURY 

The Hundred Thousand Dollar Packet 
SHOWS you how to put it over. 

PHOTOPLAY LIBRARIES, INC. 

(Exclusive Selling Agents) 
500 Fifth Avenue, New York City 



6dward Whiteside 



Saturday, January 24, 1920 



» 



jM^ 



DAii:r 



KINOGRAMS 

I "©e Visual News gf 

ALL THE WORLD 
ATLANTIC FLEET ARRIVES AT 
(GTJANTANAMO BAY— Klnogranis cam- 
eraman aboard the U. S. S. Utah records 
•Vents of the trip. A bit of rough 
weather. 

BASEBALL HEADS GO HUNTING— 

I President Johnson of American League 
and Heydler of Nationals shoot big^ game 
in Louisiana. 

, WETS INAUGURATE A GOVERNOR — 
Edward I. Edwards talies oath at Tren- 
ton, N. ,1. and declares he will start fight 

I en prohibition. 

I FIGHT FIRE ON COLDEST DAY— 

' FIreboats and engines respond to call 

I when Boston Railroad Y. M. C. A. burns 
— malie Ice drapery. 

! SKII .JUMPS FURNISH THRILLS— 
Great crowds make way to slides at Gary, 
III. to see international contest — Make 

. Hew record. 

I WE KEEP TAB ON RISING PRICES 
— Commissioner of Labor statistics at 
Washington has staff busy keeping rec- 
ords on the cost of living. 

BOY SCOUTS IN WINTER CAMP— 
Headquarters troop doesn't mind a little 
cold and takes a da.v's outing on the 
Palisades at .41p!ne, N. .J. 

HORSEBACK RIDING IN SNOW— 
Gen. Leonaril Wood and Mayor Peters 
of Boston go out for a jaunt in the 
zero weather at Roxburv, Mass. 

CANADA'S WINTER CARNIV.AL BE- 
GINS — Famous outdoor frolic at Quebec 
brings hundreds of spectators to skiing 
and snow shoe contests. 

DISTRIBUTED BY 
REPUBLIC DISTRIBUTING 
CORPORATION - 



Charges Waste to Kline 

Universal Answers Suit Filed for 
Alleged Overdue Salary 

Universal, in an answer filed in 
the District Court charges Harry 
D. Kline, formerly manager of pro- 
duction at Universal City with hav- 
ing wasted $150,000 of the com- 
pany's money and l)rings a countel- 
claim against Kline to recover that 
amount- 
Kline originally sued Universal for 
$32,200 which he claims is due him 
as salary for the unexpired term 
of his contract.. Kline says he was 
engaged for two years and that he 
was discharged in December. 

Universal alleges that, despite the 
advice of the company's executives 
Kline failed to manage the studios 
in an economical and competent 
matter and that he wasted sums of 
nionej' in making productions- 



Bacon Is Thurston Hall's Manager 

Gerald F. Bacon has entered into 
a contract with Thurston Hall, ac- 
tor, whereby he becomes his man- 
ager. Mr. Hall's new plans are not 
as yet decided upon. It is reported 
that he may go on the road in Mor- 
osco's "Civilian Clothes" or appear 
in a special picture production soon 
to be made by Mr. Bacon. 



Oakman Boulevard Opens 
Detroit, Mich. — The Oakman 
Boulevard seating 1,600 and erected 
at a cost of $350,000, opened recent- 
ly. H- U. Bcauchamp, manager. 



Change Hands 

Mystery As to Who Is Buying Thea- 
ters in Seattle 
{Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Seattle — Several mysterious pur- 
chases o/ theaters have been made 
in Seattle recently. It is known that 
John Hamrick has sold his Rex, 
which is the smallest first run thea- 
ter in Seattle, but at the same time 
one of the most successful. Ham- 
rick has not announced the pur- 
chaser. 

The two other houses involved 
are the Majestic of Ballard, belong- 
ing to H. W. Bruen and the prop- 
erty and plans of another house he 
was intending to build immediately 
in the University district. Harry 
Sigmond, acted for the purchasers. 
He will not disclose the name of the 
purchaser. 

It is thought that the buyer in 
both these instances is the same as 
the buyer of the Strand property, 
the Jensen and Von Herberg house 
on 2d Ave. Mike Rosenberg and his 
associates are known to be the buy- 
ers in this instance, but it is not 
known just who Rosenberg's asso- 
ciates are- 



Chicago Theaters Close 

Chicago — Three "loop" moving 
picture theaters, the .Mcazar, the 
Rose, and the Boston, were dark 
Tuesday night when the operators 
were called out on a sympathy 
strike by Thomas E. Maloy, business 
agent of their union, following a dis- 
pute with William Hewins, secre- 
tary to Harry C- Moir, the owner. 

Maloy closed the theaters at 6 
o'clock after Hewins had refused to 
pay an increase in wages to Smith 
King, operator in the Terrace gar- 
den of the Morrison hotel, also oper- 
ated by Moir and to arrange for an- 
other operator. 



Dover, N. H. — Dover Amusement 
Co. has purchased the Strand. 



United Buys "Mayfair Mystery" 

United has purchased "The May- 
fair Mystery" an English melo- 
drama for early production. 



JOHN J. LIVINGSTON 

Motion Picture Representative 

For 

STARS— DIRECTORS 

1440 Broadway New York 




PICTURE RIGHTS FOR 

SALE 

"The Crown Jewels" 

A Raffles Story by 

E. W , Hornung 

CELEBRATKI) AITHORS SOC. 

Kooni H03 Columbia Theatre Bldg. 

Tel. Br.yant 1511 



New Comedy Unit 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles — A new comedy unit 
has made its entrance into the field. 
The company is the Smiles Comedy 
Co- while the pictures will be called 
the Klean-Kut Komedies. 

Allen Williams. will be featured. 



Lane With Character Pictures 

Tamar Lane has left Selznick to 
join newly formed Character Pic- 
tures Corp. as manager of produc- 
tions. The company will make its 
first two productions in New York 
and then produce in California. 



Hettesheimer a United Director 

Cincinnati — A . G- Hettesheimer 
of the Orpheum theater has been 
elected to the Board of Directors 
of United Pictures succeeding J. W. 
Weinig who has resigned. 



Vaudevillians in Pictures 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles — John Hyams and 
Leila Mclntyre will probably head 
their own company and make two 
reel comedies here. 

The team is booked until April 
and after that it is planned to start 
production. 



Big Plans for Glaum 

Sardou's Novels Secured — First to 
Be "Theodora" 

Los Angeles — J. Parker Read, Jr., 
producer of the Louise Glaum pro- 
ductions has purchased film rights 
to Sardou's "Theodora-" 

Read plans to make the produc- 
tion an elaborate one and expects 
to spend six months in making it. 
Raymond Bartlett, is now in Lon- 
don and it is possible that the com- 
pany will go to Italy to make scenes- 
calling for that atmosphere. 

In addition to "Theodora" Read 
has secured "Cleopatra" and "Fedo- 
ra" for Miss Glaum. 



CLARA KIMBALL YOUITG 

Once more demonstrates her magnifi- 
cent art in 

"THE EYES OF YOUTH" 
We have made for this production ■ 
very artistic lobby display together 
with reproductions in fac-simile oil 
paintings from her latest poses in 
various sizes. 

KRAUS MFG. CO. 

220 West 42d Street 

17th Floor TeL 3«07 Bryant 



Picker's "Rio" Ready Next Month 
David V. Picker's new "Rio" thea- 
ter at Broadway, lS9th to 160th Sts. 
will be ready in February. The 
theater will seat nearly 3,000. 

Edward Mocsary, fornierly treas- 
urer of the Rialto will be house 
manager and Alfred de Manby, for- 
merly a singer at the Strand and 
Rialto will be styled director-in- 
chief. 



Wheeling, W. Va.— The New the- 
ater on Sixth Street has been 
opened. John Cobley, owner. 



Send Us Your 
fe2.pS Junk Film 

INTERSTATE SMELTING 
(& REFINING COMPANY 

23 Commercial St. NEWARK, N. J. 



It 



lii 






There are 30 Reasons 



why you should book, 

"The 

Screaming 
Shadow" 

REASON No. 22 

The best is none too good for 
the wise exhibitor so book "The 
Screaming Shadow." Watch 
lor Reason No. 23 to-morrow. 

BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 

UNIVERSAL CITY CAL. 

Released through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK 

Foreign Rithti controlled by Apollo Trading Corp. , 220 W. 4gth St. f'B 




cliA, 

llieac 

inc., 

ali( 

'foi 

snffi 

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P tcrr 

ft of 

clai 

Ps for 

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ir^BRADSTREET 
9/ FILMDOM 





Ji^RECOCHIZEIi 
AUTHORITY 



ol. XI. No. 25 



Momday, January 26, 1920 



Price 5 C«nU 



Haworth to Expand 

lay Make Series of Specials — 
Worthington Here 

A new company called the Ha- 
orth Studios, Inc., capitalized at 
500,000 has been formed under the 
ws of the State of Cahfornia to 
ke over the existing Haworth Pic- 
res Corp. 

The plans of the new company 
ere explained on Saturday by Wil- 
im Worthington, president of Ha- 
orth Pictures who arrived in New 
ork from California. 
Haworth Pictures were formed 
'iginally to star Sessue Hayawaka 
jt the company now plans to sign 
Iditional stars and perhaps go in 
•r a series of specials. For that 
ason the Haworth Studios were 
irmed to take over the pictures 
)mpany. 

Worthington has resigned merely 
a picture director to come east 
here he will make a special from a 
Duis Tracey story. This will be a 
braltar picture. Worthington has 
s cameraman, Virgil Miller and his 
sistant W. J. Rau with him. After 
e completion of the Tracey story 
will go to California and there 
ke a picture with Leah Baird. 
He continues as president of Ha- 
worth Pictures until April when A. 
C. Dohrmann of San Francisco 
eps in as head of the Haworth 
udios. Worthington will hold his 
ares in the new company. It is 
pected that the Hayawaka con- 
ct will be transferred from Ha- 
Drth Pictures to Haworth Studios, 
c. 



Price Wins 

Judge Finch in the Supreme Court 

gned an order on Saturday by 

hich Aywon and other defendants 

the action brought by C. B. Price 

D., Inc., will be compelled to fur- 

sh a bond within 24 hours as se- 

rity for any damages which Price 

ay suffer because of the alleged 

.authorized exhibition in the New 

Drk territory of an alleged duped 

int of "The Log of the U-35." 

ice claims exclusive distributing 

[hts for the film. 

According to the decree, if the 

nd is not filed, an irijunction will 

issued immediately restraining 

t defendant from further distrib- 

ng the picture. 

Price states that he intends seek- 
l decisions in other territories 
lere the alleged duped print is be- 
; shown. 




"So that's what you have been doing — hitting the pipe in the Chink's 
joint." From James Oliver Curwood's story "The River's End," a First 
National attraction produced by Marshall Neilan. — Advt. 



Goldwyn Buys Bray 

Company Will Expand — Plans En- 
trance Into Industrial Field 

Goldwyn has purchased a control- 
ing interest in the Bray Pictures 
Corp. 

The company will expand its ac- 
tivities and enter the industrial field 
in a generous way. The first move 
in increased output will be a new 
weekly release to be called the Gold- 
wyn-Bray Comics. It will be one 
reel, with a Bra)- cartoon and a 
{Continued on "at/e 2) 



Quimby to Leave Pathe 

Will Act as General Manager of 
Associated Exhibitors, Inc. 

Fred C. Quimby, director of ex- 
changes for Pathe will resign with- 
in the next two weeks to assume 
the duties of general manager of 
Associated Exhibitors, Inc. His 

! headquarters will be in the Capitol 

I Theater Bldg. 

I Mr. Quimby's successor to the im- 
portant post at Pathe has not as yet 
Iieen determined. 



Gardiner Pictures 

$3,000,000 Company Formed in Del- 
aware 
(By Wire to WW'S DAILY) 

Dover, Del. — Gardiner Pictures, 
Inc. have been formed here with a 
capitalization of $3,000,000. 

The following were named as in- 
corporators: T. R. Gard(iner, F. 
M. Zimmerman and C. A. Rose, all 
of Buffalo, New York. 



I Comedy Territory Sold 

j Film Specials have sold the "Jolly 
I Comedies" to Producers Feature 
; Service, Inc., for Greater N. Y. and 
northern N. J. 



"House Without Children" 

Hi-Art Prod., L. Cohen and J. 
Perl operators, has taken over the 
rights for Robert McLaughlin's 
"House Without Children," for up- 
per N. Y. State. E. E. Rose is in 
charge of the sales for Hi-Art. 



Lesser Buys Out Tally 

Latter Definitely Out of First Na- 
tional— $3,000,000 Theater Planned 1 
(By Wire to fflD'S DAILY) ' 

Lo.s Angeles — Sol Lesser, in con- 
junction with Gore Bros, of Los 
Angeles has purchased outright the 
First National Exhibitors' Circuit 
frainchise for Southern California 
and Arizona from T. L. Tally. I 

The deal means that Tally who I 
was vice-ptresident of the Circuit is j 
now definitely out of the Circuit's , 
affairs. By the terms of the deal 
which is said to involve about $1,- 
000,000 the Kinema theater in Los 
Angeles goes to Lesser and the Gore 
Bros. 

One of the first moves of the Les- 
ser-Gore tie-up will be the erection 
of a $3,000,000 theater in Los An- 
geles. The theater will probably be 
erected on Broadway and selection 
of a site will probably be completed 
in a few days. 

Gore Bros, control 15 theaters on 
the coast. They own the Playhouse, 
Alhambra. Burbank, Optic, Regent, 
Lyceum, Grand and Liberty here. I 
The Sunshine theater in San Diego ' 
is also theirs while other holdings 
include theaters in Portland, Seattle 
and San Francisco. 

Lesser is reported as having 
cleared over $250,000 on his suc- 
cessfull exploitation of "Yankee 
Doodle in Berlin," with the Sen- 
nett Bathing Girls. He has been 
mainly identified with the state 
righting of such big specials as "The I 
Spoilers" and "Hearts of the World." I 
He is president -of the All Star Fea- 
ture Film Corp. and recently en- 
tered the producing field as a financ- 
ing agent for independents. He 

{Continued on Page 2) 



Memphis Shut Down 

The National Association has re- 
ceived reports from Memphis, Tenn. 
to the effect that all amusement 
places had been shut down there be- 
cause of the "flu" situation. 

Theaters seating more than 750 
here in New York from 14th to 59th 
St. will start their evening perform- 
ances at 7 o'clock and close at 11 
o'clock, according to orders issued 
by Dr. Royal S. Copeland of the 
city Dept. of Health. 

Frederick Elliott of the Nat'l 
Ass'n stated this morning that he 
knew that film men in New York 
were solidly in back of Copeland and 
would carry out whatever orders he 
deemed necessary to check the epi- 
demic. 



Monday, January 26, 1920 



»asgsm tiRj| ^ gggsff? 



TAUIb.ZS MoQdar.J*niurT28,1920 Prict S CeiU 



jM ^c 



DAILY 



Copyright 1920, Wid's Film and Film Folks. 
Inc. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

P. C ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 
arer; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 
and Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 
Business Manager. 

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
&t the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
Cbe act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms (Postage free) United States, Outside 
of Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00 

Subscribers should remit with order 

Address all communications to WID'S 

DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 

York. N. Y. 

Telephone: Vanderbilt. 4551-4552-5558 
Hollywood, California 
Editcinal and Business Offices: 6411 Holly- 
wood Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 

Chicago representatives— Willis, Eckels 
*nd Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 
Chicago, 111. 



Quotations 

Last 

Bid. Asked. Sale. 

Famous Players .. SUA 81 V^ 81'/^ 

Loew's, Inc 303/^ 31 31 

Goldwyn — - — 31^ 

Triangle Film — — ^ 

Unit. Pict. Prod. — — 16% 
World Film — — 1 



Fire Damages Franklin 

Hartford, Conn. — The Franklin, 
Harries and Repass, managers, was 
damaged by fire last week. The 
blaze started in • the booth and 
spread to the upper part of the 
house. $5,000 damage was done. 



New Haven, Conn. — The Rialto is 
billed to open soon as 'Wll new but 
the name." 



COiMING 

Charlie Chaplin 
Mabel Normand 
Marie Dressier 
Chester Conklin 
Mack Swain 



m 



"Tillie's 
Punctured 
Romance" 

Directed by MACK SENNETT 

TOWER FILM CORP. 

71 W. 23rd St.. N. Y. 



Lesser Buys Out Tally! Goldwyn Buys Bray 



( ('nnliniifd Imm Page I 
handles the George Beban pictures 
as well as a forthcoming Annette 
Kellerman series of productions. 



No one connected with the lo- 
cal Sol Lesser offices cared to com- 
ment on the above dispatch. 

WID'S DAILY indicated, at the 
time of the Atlantic City conven- 
tion of First National that there 
was considerable importance at- 
tached to the fact that T. L. Tally 
was not named as one of the direc- 
tors of the Associated First Na- 
tional Pictures, Inc. 

An interesting angle was devel- 
oped on the deal when at First Na- 
tional it was stated that when a 
franchise holder decides to sell out, 
the purchaser must be approved by 
the total membership of the circuit 
before the new arrangement can be 
considered binding upon the Cir- 
cuit as a body. First National is 
so constituted, it was declared that 
should a purchaser not be approved, 
the Circuit will itself take over the 
franchise for that particular terri- 
tory and conduct its own distribut- 
ing in that territory. 



Mrs. Smith and Dr. Brady Dead 

The Vitagraph offices will be 
closed until noon today as a mark 
of respect because of the death of 
Mrs. Hazel A. B. Smith wife of Al- 
bert E. Smith, president of Vita- 
graph, who died on Saturday after 
a three day illness of pneumonia. 
She was but 35 and was active dur- 
ing the war in Red Cross circles. 



{Continued from Page I 
scries of witty sayings edited by 
Leslie's. In this release the com- 
pany will be backed by the Leslie- 
Judge Co. publishers of Leslie's and 
Judge's. 

The ofificers of the Bray company 
as elected yesterday are as follows: 

J. R. Bray, president; Francis A. 
Gudger, vice-presideni ; J. F. Leven- 
thal, vice-president; Moritz Hilder, 
treasurer; Gabriel L. Hess, secre- 
tary; Erich Shay, assistant secre- 
tary; Watson B. Robinson, assistant 
treasurer. Executive committee — 
Francis A. Gudger, chairman; J. R. 
Bray, Samuel Goldwyn, Board of Di- 
rectors — J. R. Bray, Francis A. Gud- 
ger. E. Dean Parmlee, Duncan A. 
Holmes, J. F. Leventhal, F. J. God- 
sol, Max Fleischer, Moritz Hilder, 
Watson D. Robinson. Gabriel L. 
Hess. 



Coast Brevities 

(Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Hollywood — Allan Dwan has tak 
en his entire company to the SantJ 
Cruz mountains to make scenes foi 
"The Scofifer," a Mayflower produc 
tion. Included in the party an 
James P. Hogan, J. K. Kirkwood 
Mary Thurman, Jean Smith anc 
Bernie Durning, together with Ly 
man Broening and Glen McWil-j 
liams, comeraman. 



Griffith's Second First National 

"Rainbow Isle" is the tentative 
title of the second D. W. Grififith 
First National subject, scenes for 
which were taken in the south on 
the recent expedition which nearly 
ended in disaster for the producer 
and his players. Those appearing 
are Clarine Seymour, Richard Bar- 
thelmess, Creighton Hale, .A.nders 
Randolph. Kate Bruce, Porter 
-Strong and Herbert Sutch. 



Cyrus Townsend Brady, noted 
author and clergyman, who was a 
member of the Vitagraph scenario 
staff died on Friday in Yonkers, also 
of pneumonia. He leaves a widow, 
three daughters and three sons. 



New Haven, Conn.— Fire last 
week damaged the Pequot theater 
here to the extent of $1,000. Harry 
Levitas is the owner. 



Hartford, Conn. — The Majestic 
theater here has extended the run of 
Arbuckle's "The Garage" another 

week. 



New Exchange Building 

{Sijicrial to WW'S D-^ILY) 
New Haven. Conn. — Plans for 'i 
new building on Meadow Street to 
house the new Fox and Vitagraph 
branches have been approved by the 
building inspectors here. John Kil- 
feather is the owner. The build- 
ing will be three stories h\L\\\ with 
a projection room on the upper 
floor. It adjoins the present Fam- 
ous Players-Lasky exchange. 

Nathan Furst will be manager of 
the Fox exchange while no man- 
ager has yet been named for the 
Vitagraph branch. 



Francis MacDonald, who steppet 
into stardom through his work witl, 
Henry Walthall in "The Confes 
sion," with the National Film Cor 
poration, will be the central figure ii 
the first of the National's "Americ 
First" series of photoplay features 
adapted from magazine stories am 
novelettes. MacDonald is now en 
gaged with William A. Seiter in pro 
ducing "The Kentucky Colonel" fo 
the National. He will begin on th 
new series as soon as that produc 
tion is concluded, which will b 
about February 20. 



Gale Henry completed her year' 
contract witli the Bullseye Film Cor 
poration last week when she tool 
the final scenes of her twenty-fourtl 
two-reeler. At present the inde 
structible comedienne is enjoying i 
much-needed rest at her home i; 
Hollywood, before starting her nei 
series of pictures. 



Forty Rialto and Rivoli seats 
have been donated by Hugo Riesen- 
feld to the benefit auction of the 
Beth Moses Hospital, Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 




Following the completion of "Mrs 
Temple's Telegram," on which he i| 
now working, Bryant Washbur 
will, begin "The Sins of St. Ar 
thony," a Saturday Evening Pos 
story for which Elmer Harris i 
writing the scenario. James Cruz 
will direct. 



For three weeks the "Old Lad 
31" company has been at Sualani 
Cal., taking scenes for the faniou 
Rachel Crothers stage play in whic 
Emma Dunn is to be featured b| 
Screen Classics, Inc. John Ince 
directing and W. J. Beckway is dc 
ing the photographing. 

GAUSMAN 



n: 
con 

to: 

the 

COB: 



^ 



Typhoon Company 

281 Lexington Ave., New^ York, N. Y. 



1044 Camp Street 
New Orleans, La 



64 West Randolph Street 
Chicago, 111. 



When any body sasrs that 
some other poster is just 
as good as the RITCHEY 
poster they imconsciously 
admit that the RITCHEY 
poster is the criterion for 
motion picture posters. 

RITCHEY 

LITHO. COHW. 
4M W. 31<l St.,N.T.. Phone CUua USS 




r 



TshM 



DAIUV 



Mooday, January 26, 1920 



Red Gross to Release 

Organization Now Listing Non- 
Theatrical Exhibitors — Seeking 
Industrials to Handle 

The American Red Cross is now 
engaged in compiling a list of the 
non-theatrical exhibitors in the 
United States. This is being ^done 
through the organization'^ 1.1 di- 
visional offices which ar-j in turn re- 
ceiving reports from 3,607 chaplers, 
embracing over 16,000 anxiliaries. 

These reports will cover churches, 
clubs, schools and inst'tiitions oi 
such character which are not con- 
cerned with the exhibition of mo- 
tion pictures as a commercial prop- 
osition. 

Apparently the Red Cross is seek- 
ing to develop a regular tie-up with 
producers of industrials to cater to 
the non-theatrical ftAd exclusively 
for a statement issued by the organ- 
ization says that besides the show- 
ings of the Red Cross' cwn films, 
correspondence with makers of in- 
dustrials is being sought. 

The Red Cross is now exhibiting 
pictures to over 3,000,000 people 
monthly through its chaplers and 
offices. 



In the Courts 

Tlieda Bara has filed an answer in 
the Supreme Court in the suit of 
Thomas F McMahon to recover for 
legal services in arranging the last 
contract made by Miss Bara with the 
Fox Film Corp. She admits that 
she paid the attorney $5,000, and that 
she has not paid $10,000 additional 
claimed by Mr. McMahon. She al- 
leges that she paid the $5,000 in full 
satisfaction of all the attorney's 
claims against her. 



Fitzgerald a Metro Director 

Dallas M. Fitzgerald, director of 
"The Open Door," a Robertson-Cole 
special has been added to the Met- 
ro stafif. He will produce in the 
West but has not as yet been as- 
signed any production. 

Duncan Studying Conditions 

Minneapolis, Minn. — D. J-_ Duncan 
of the New York Fox office is in 
town studying selling and shipping 
conditions. Duncan on his return 
to New York will be connected with 
the department engaged in exploit- 
ing pictures in South America and 
conditions here are somewhat sim- 
ilar to those there. 






P. W. GRIFFITH 

KNOWS 



The value of strictly high 
class people for the ensemble 
scenes of his productions. 

Wk AKb supplying him 
with only the most select 
good-looking and properly 
dressed people for his pro- 
ductions. 

OUR financial strength en- 
ables us to supply any num- 
ber of people. 

Select Motion Picture 
Bureau 

William W. Cohill, Manager 

1493 Broadway 

New York 

Telephones 

\ 2389 
Bryant < 2390 

I 2391 



Gustave A. Lanzko has filed suit 
in the Supreme Court agatnst the 
Pathe Exchange, the National As- 
sociation of the Motion Picture In- 
dustry and Irving I. Brown, for 
$250,000 damages, alleges that on 
June 26 last the defendants will- 
fully caused his arrest on a charge 
of violating Section 1308 of the Penal 
Laws and in consequence he was 
locked up. He was arraigned before 
Magistrate McQuaide on June 27 
and the charge dismissed, he said. 
Lanzko says he has been in the film 
business for many years and has 
gained a wide reputation but that 
the publicity attendant on his ar- 
rest ruined his reputation and hu- 
miliated him among his friends. 



LEUMAS CARTOON SERVICE 

Producers of AnimeLted . 

Films for e\'eiy purpose . 

17^: 45iii St. TelBryant - 6806 



Realart Pictures have a special 
lobby display for all their produc- 
tions now ready in their exchanges 
throughout the country for all 
fheir bookings. Look them over 
and see how this enterprising con- 
cern will assist you in getting 
"them" up to the box office. 
KRAT7S MFG. Co. 
220 W. 42nd St. 
17th Floor Tel. 3607 Bryant 




Utica to Have $400,000 House 

Utica, N. Y. — Wilmer and Vin- 
cent of New York plan to erect a 
house costing $400,000 on Colum- 
bia and Washington Sts. 



Bizer to Build 

Paterson, N. J. — Max Bizer will 
build a house seating 1,200 to be 
known as the Clay- 



Omaha Men Fail to Combine 

{Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Omaha — Motion picture men of 
Omaha state that an attempt to 
form an Allied Amusements Asso- 
ciation, including motion picture 
and legitimate theater proprietors, 
musicians, stage hands, operators, 
ushers, and in fact, all persons in- 
terested in the amusements business, 
was a failure here. 

The intention was to band to- 
gether to fight further closing by 
the fuel committee, to check cen- 
sorship, and to undertake other 
work of mutual benefit- The rela- 
tions of such business and unions, 
with so many diversified aims, could 
not be harmonized, they said. 



Arrow has changed the title of the 
production originally called "Wolves 
of Wall Street," to "Wolves of the 
Street." 



Menchen Btiys Rose Story 

Joseph Menchen has purchaseo 

rights to "The Little Girl God For^ 

got," by Edward E- Rose, author oi 

"Cappy Ricks," and "Penrod." 1 



Buys "Fatal Sign" for New England 

Boston — Sam Grand of the Arrow 
Film Co. has purchased for the NcmU 
England territory "The Fatal Sign/I 
the serial starring Claire Anderson 
and Harry Carter. 



The difference between 
moving pictiires and 
Goldwyn Pictures is the 
difference between 
speculation and invest- 
ment. 



for One Tfundred 
Shousond DoUcus 



Telegrams and letters are pouring in 
from buyers in every city in the United 
States and Canada begging for informa- 
tion on 

EMPTY ARMS 

THE SENSATION OF THE CENTURY 

Directed by Frank Reicher 

The Hundred Thousand Dollar Packet 
is packed with suggestions as to how to 
put it over. 

PHOTOPLAY LIBRARIES, INC. 

(Exclusive SelHng Agents) 
500 Fifth Avenue, New York City 



6dwcwxllUhite5idc 



Monday, January 26, 1920 



ili^^ 



BKnfStpy^srvT^r-^imv 



Offer Ad Men Screens 

Can Fxploit Product in Films, Says 

Los Angeles Firm — Abrams 

Issues Denial 

The Cinema-Ad., Inc., a Los An- 
geles Company is sending the fol- 
lowing letter broadcast to adver- 
kisini; r'^nagers of companies that 
cor.^'icl .1 "r.^ional advertising cam- 
paign: 

"We can offer you twenty million 
circulation (more than all the mag- 
azines combined) — at the Saturday 
Evening Post rates: — as we have 
contracted with a few of the great- 
est producers and stars (like Grif- 
fith, Fairbanks, and others of like 
magnitude) to insert your ad in 
their coming productions. 

"Our agreement being confiden- 
tial with the producers, we cannot 
give you their names until you are 
positively interested. 

"Therefore, we will ask you to 
kindly advise us by return mail if 
you wish to make any arrangement 
for the coming year, as it was a hard 
task for us to induce the producers 
ind stars to accept and insert ad- 
vertisements into their legitimate 
plays and we control but a limited 
number of productions. 

"Respectfully yours, 

"CiNeMa — Ad — Inc.. 

"D. E. Calnay, 

"Secy." 



Regarding the above, Hiram Ab- 
ams of United Artists who distrib- 



JJOMINO- 



alXWHKKER^ 



ffiSS 



H A SPANUTH PRES 



,10NJOOMef% 



COMMONWEALTH fr, 

PICTURES COMPANY > 

. aZO S STATE ST. CHICAGO. '*V 



Phone Uornlngside 6945 

Autos to Hire 
To the Moving Picture Trade 



i^f ^-ll' 




IDEAL AUTO RENTING CO. 




"SAVE ME SADIE!" 
An appropriate title for the Christie Special comedy with Eddie Barry, 
Helen Darling, Earl Rodney, Gene Cory, and Fay Lamport.— Advt. 



utes the Fairbanks and Griffith pro- 
ductions stated on Saturday: 

"We are not in the advertising 
business. Our business is to make 




The Acme 
Portable 
Projector 
For the 
Studio 

Cutting Room 
The Eiditor 
Home School or 
Church 

Demonstrated to You Anywhere 

Howells Cine Equipment Co. 

729 7th Ave. Nev^ York 

Phone Bryant 1166 



IT REQUIRES ORCANIZATION TO 
NANUFAaURECOODENCRAYINCS 

E9UIPPEDTIIDEIIVERt«<BEJTP0JIII»E 
WORK INTHE LEAST POSSIBLE TiNE 



THE STANDARD ENCi^VllliiCO. 

PUOTO ENGRAVERS 

225 WEST 39™ STREET. NEW YORK 

AMEDICAN PPESS ASSOCIATION BLDO 
" t 



MAKE YOU HEAR WHAT YOU SEE 



FILMUSIC CUE SHEETS ARE GOOD FOR ALL THEA- 
TERS^EVEN THOSE THAT USE ROLLS-AND LOTS OF 




17M HifUaad Ave. 



and distribute pictures. Any time 
that we want to make money out of 
advertising, we'll quit making pic- 
tures." 

No statement could be secured 
from the Griffith offices regarding 
the above. 



Wanted Financial backing 
of $5,000 

Will stand investigation 

Judge Wizaker Comedy 

Weekly c/o WID'S 



Sunday Closing 

and Censorship 

Say Opposition Is Dodging Issue 

Louisville, Ky. — Another shot in 
the Sunday pictures battle has been 
fired by the Baptist Pastors Con- 
ference which has issued through a 
committee of seven of its members, 
the statement that those who are 
favoring Sunday shows have been 
doging the issue in the controversy. 



Report Movement Against "Blue 
Law" 

Topeka, Kans. — Reported here 
that a movement to remove the law, 
prohibiting Sunday film shows is on 
foot in Kansas. In many cities the 
law was disregarded- 



Sell Lyric for $150,000 

Allentown, Pa.^Abe Sofransky 
has purchased the Lyric at a cost 
of $150,000. 









A ill 


ill LI: 


i 


MAN I; 


!J-]T1£R!NG 




• -yr-r •One /iii'ia 


cJ Jules ..-1 Dai,'i ■, 


i '■ 1 


f'ALYNLU' 




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"WHERE PROMISES ARE SACRED" 

LOUIS MEYER 

FORMERLY BRODA & MEYER INC 

TITLES 

LETTERED - ILLUSTRATED - PHOrOORAPHBI> 
ASK TO SEE OUR NEW 
PROCESS TITLES AND 
ILLUSTRATIONS 

A PHONE CALL WILLS BRING SAMPLES 

BRYANT 7392 
220 WEST 42nd ST. - ROOM 2004 





There are 30 Reasons 



why you should book, 

"The 

Screaming 
Shadow" 

REASON No. 24 

With the four necessary es- 
sentials, first class actors, an 
excellent story, good direc- 
tion and perfect photography 
the success of "The Scream- 
ing Shadow," is assured. 
Watch for Reason No. 25 to- 
morrow. 

BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 

UNIVERSAL CITY CAL. 

Released through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK 

Foreign Rights controlled by Apollo Trading Corp., 220 W. 4gth St. 









J, 

'aci 
leav( 
Tfr 



fial 

ieati 
ilreet 
laiiy 







pTi^BRADSTRlET 
of FILMDOM 





7/pRECC)CHIZEtil 
^AUTHORITy 



Vol. XI. No. 26 



Tuesday, January 27, 1920 



Price 5 Cent 



Olds With Goldwyn 

Executive Will Be Identified With 
Advertising and Publicity Dep'ts 

Nat C. Olds, an executive of im- 
portance so far as sales, advertis- 
ing and distribution are concerned, 
now with Julius Kayser & Co., man- 
ufacturers of silks, gloves and such 
merchandise, will join Goldwyn on 
Feb. 1 in an executive capacity. 

Because of his extensive experi- 
ence in advertising and publicity it 
is expected that he will be identified 
with those departments at Goldwyn. 

Ralph Block, now head of the ad- 
vertising and publicity departments 
at Goldwyn will sail in about two 
weeks or on Jan. 28 if his passports 
arrive for an indefinite trip abroad. 
This fact leads to the belief that 
Olds will assume charge of the dut- 
ies now in the custody of Mr. Block. 



May Hold Over Davies Film 

Business is reported as being so 
heavy at the Broadway, that it is 
contemplated holding over "The 
Cinema Murder" for a run. 

It is understood that $2,900 was 
done in Sunday. 



New Theaters Held Up in England 
I {Special to IVID'S DAILY) 

London, Eng. — All chances of 
building big picture theaters here 
have been greatly retarded owing to 
the fact that the government wants 
the contractors to busy themselves 
I' with homes. 



Rickards Leaves for Arizona 
J. E. Rickards of the Rickards and 
Nace Enterprises, Phoenix, Arizona 
leaves town today. He was in con- 
ference with First National officials 
while here regarding the taking over 
the Southern California and Arizona 
franchise from T. L. Tally by Sol 
Lesser and the Gore Bros. 



Groggs Control Bakersfield 
{Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Bakersfield, Calif.— The Grogg 
Amusement Co. is building a 1,400 
seat house on Chester St., the main 
street of Bakersfield. They have al- 
ready three other houses. The Bak- 
ersfield Opera House, in which vaud- 
eville and road-shows are played. 
The Hippodrome, straight feature 
pictures and The Pastime, also pic- 
tures. They will practically have 
the first run situation closed in the 
town. 




"Don't cry. Daddy will come back to us." "Polly of the Storm Coun- 
try." by Grace Miller White, a First National attraction. — Advt. 



"Don't Fear Combine" 

Connick, Head of Finance Commit- 
tee Talks at Convention — Am- 
bitious Productions Planned 

Famous Players officials who went 
to Chicago to attend the company's 
convention returned to own yester- 
day. 

H. D. H. Connick while in Chi- 
cago addressed the company's rep- 
resentatives. Connick is head of the 
finance committee and resigned 
from a downtown financial institu- 
tion to associate himself with Fam- 
ous Players. He said in part: 

"No business has the opportunity 
to-day, that I know of, that the 
motion picture industry has. 
{Continued on Page 2) 



Richards Here 

E. V. Richards of the Saenger 
Amusement Co., New Orleans, is 
back in town. With him came W. 
H. Gueringer, Saenger's New York 
representative. "Rich" expects to 
be here a week or two. Says he 
came North to see some snow. 



Garsson Wins Suit 

Judge Knox Dismisses Application 

for an Injunction Brought by 

National Picture Theaters 

Judge Knox in the Federal Dis- 
trict Court yesterday dismissed the 
application for an injunction brought 
by National Picture Theaters against 
the Foundation Film Corp. The 
litigation hinged around the exhibi- 
tion of a production called "The 
Blindness of Youth." 

National, which is the Selznick co- 
operative movement applied for the 
injunction on the ground that it 
had in production a picture called 
"Blind Youth," in which Lou Tele- 
gen appeared on the stage. 

Judge Knox's action does not fin- 
ally dispose of the case as it has 
still to come to trial. However, by 
the decision National cannot inter- 
fere with the exhibition of "The 
Blindness of Youth," pending the 
trial of the action which will prob- 
ably be brought up within a few 
months. 



Smith's Plays in Filmi 

Fairbanks to Be Financially Inter 
ested — Production in California 

{By Wire to WW'S DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Dennis F. O'Brier 
Douglas Fairbank's attorney is her 
completing a deal between Winchel 
Smith and Fairbanks under th 
terms of which the Smith plays wil 
be picturized at the Fairbanks stu 
dios. "Doug" is to be financiall 
interested in the new company. 

Two of the most successful of th 
Smith plays are "The Boomerang 
produced by David Belasco an 
"Turn to the Right" produced on th 
stage by Smith and Golden. 



Opera at Capitol 

Program To Be Changed Weekly- 
Starts Feb. 1 

The Capital theater has announce 
that the program will be change 
weekly, beginning Feb. 1. It i 
planned to maintain films as a basi 
of the program but develope tha 
idea by cloaking the films with a 
elaborate stage setting and operati 
novelties. 

The statement issued by the Cap 
itol management says that the the 
ater has that plan in mind for som 
time and that the purchase of addi 
tional property adjoining the thea 
ter was to carry out that plan. 

Complete works that may be pre 
sented in 45 minutes will be show 
as well as innovations in the fiel 
of the ballet. A singing 'ensembl 
of 76 has been organized and is noi 
in rehearsal for the first productioi 
The first will be "Hiawatha's Wee 
ding Feast. Following that will b 
"The Enchanted Crystal" and a one 
act opera by Tschaikowsky never be 
fore presented on the stage. 

The Capitol by this move expect 
to draw a "repeater" audience to th 
theater every week. This has nc 
been possible to some extent becaus 
of the fact that revues shown here 
tofore have been held over for 
number of weeks. 



Branham Leaves Lynch 
(/Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Dallas — Charles G. Branham, put 
licity manager for Hulsey-Lyncl 
has resigned and will go to Califoi 
nia, where he will be interested i 
the picture game on his own hool 
Sam Maurice succeeds Branham 3 
publicity manager. 



^«tt 



jM^ 



DAIUY 



Tuesday, January 27, 1920 




I lb. 26 Tuesd»y,JanDary27.1920 Price S CeiU 



right 1920, Wid's Film and Film Folks, 
Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
Idl FOLKS, INC. 

("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 
; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 
Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 
ness Manager. 

red as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
le post office at New York, N. Y., under 
ict of March 3, 1879. ^ ._, 

IS (Postage free) United States, Outside 
Jreater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 
ths, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 

ubscribers should remit with o™er 
ress all communications to WID S 
DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 

York, N. Y. 
relephone: Vanderbilt, 4551-4552-5558 

Hollywood, California 
orial and Business Offices: 6411 HoUy- 
i Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 
icago representatives— Willis, Eckels 
Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 
ago. 111. 



Quotations 

I Last 

Bid. Asked. Sale, 

aous Players .. 82 83^ 82 

;w's, Inc 303^ 31 2054 

dwyn 31 32 31^ 

ingle Film H -^A H 

ted Pict. Prod. 15^ 16 16 

rid Film — — 1 



Isuue Rotogravure One Sheets 

eginning with the release of 
her Men's Shoes," the Edgar 
ivis' production, Pathe will is- 
rotogravure one sheets for each 
cial. This will contain a punch 
les with sales talk appended. 



COMING 

Charlie Chaplin 
Mabel Normand 
Marie Dressier 
Chester Conklin 
Mack Swain 



"Don't Fear Combine" I 

{Continued from Page 1) 

"All you have got to do is to 
watch j'our step and push your pic- 
tures. You are in a good, solid, sub- 
stantial industry. It is just as firm 
a business as any other industry. 
The business has no more of the 
diseases of childhood than any other 
industry has had. 

"You have not begun to scratch 
the surface of your possibilities. New 
fields will develop as the industry 
grows, that will give you even 
greater opportunities for expansion 
than you have known. 

"No need to worry about ^the 
combination of other interests. The 
same thing occurred when United 
States Steel was organized. There 
were plenty of imitators but none of 
them got very far. United States 
Steel is all right because its foun- 
dation was secure and sensible; so 
Famous Players-Lasky is all right 
because its foundation is safe, sane 
and secure." 

Lasky outlined an ambitious pro- 
gram of production. He said that 
arrangements have been completed 
with a number of writers, and 
through theater organizations, by 
which the producing department of 
Famous Players will receive the 
benefit of their entire output. From 
the Frohman interests, the output of 
J. M. Barrie is assured, George 
Broadhurst's output will also be 
filmed as well as the works of John 
D. Williams, Oliver Morosco Pro- 
ductions, Max Marcin, Salisbury 
Field and others. 

Speaking of directors, Lasky said 
that the services of Cecil B. DeMille, 
George Fitzmaurice, William De- 
Mille, George Melford and William 
D. Taylor are assured for a number 
of years. Hugh Ford is also in- 
cluded. They will make 20 special 
productions in the year. 

Lasky said that the production de- 
partment has also developed the idea 
of a stock company which will en- 
able the producers to put on films 
with an all-star cast. 

Inauguration of a completely new 
plan of exploitation and distribu- 
tion of Paramount Artcraft pictures 
was brought about by this conven- 
tion. The plan is, in a nutshell, to 



50 Millions in Pictures 



Eh, What? 



Says Samuel E. Morris, Vice- 
President and General Man- 
ager of Select Pictures: 

"Within the space of ten 
years from an insecure and in- 
conspicuous position amongst 
the industries of the world, mo- 
tion pictures have leaped with 
Brobidiganian's strides, until 
to-day it is securely established 
as the fifth largest industry in 
the world." 



Large House for Duluth 

Duluth, Minn. — A house costing 
$500,000 will be erected here by Cook 
Brothers and the Twin City Amuse- 
ment Co., which have combined in 
a $1,000,000 corporation. 



Riviera Opens Soon 
Milwaukee, Wis. -^ Joseph J. 
Schwartz and Earl Rice own the Ri- 
viera, which opens shortly. The 
house will cost $125,000. 



in 



^Tillie^s 

Punctured 
I Romance'^ 

Directed by MACK SENNETT 

TOWER FILM CORP. 

71 W. 23rdSt.,N. Y. 

I 



give the exhibitor the maximum of 
financial returns on every picture of 
that brand that he shows. Each pic- 
ture will stand absolutely and solely 
on its own merits, without relation- 
ship to any other picture. 

The adoption of this plan will 
bring about the complete reorgani- 
zation of the exploitation and sales 
departments, to meet the new con- 
ditions. 

The first step will be to double 
the number of the existing, force 
and train the new men to carry out 
the work in the field. Each ex- 
change headquarters will have as- 
signed to its territory one or more 
of these trained exploitation men 
whose services will be given direct 
to the exhibitor. 

It was announced during the con- 
vention that the finance committee 
and the executives are completing a 
profit sharing program, the details 
of which will be announced within 
a short time. The committee has 
been at work on this plan for sev- 
eral months. 

The convention closed with a 
banquet and smoker, with vaudevill^ 
entertainment at the La Salle Hofel 
Friday night. 



Values Placed on Productions Made 

in Los Angeles Yearly 

{Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles — The Evening Her- 
ald says editorially: 

"The Los Angeles Chamber of 
Commerce has just issued some 
startling figures regarding the mag- 
nitude of the motion picture indus- 
try of this city. 

"According to it, 80 per cent of all 
the screen plays photographed in 
this country are made here. 

"Fifty millions of dollars is the 
estimate placed on the value of the 
films produced in this city in a 
year. 

"That is approximately equal to 
the entire value of the orange crop 
of Southern California. 

"The 40 plants in which the pic- 
tures are made are valued at $12,- 
265,000, and the payrolls show an 
employment of more than 10,000 per- 
sons who earn more than $20,000,- 
000 annually. 

"This is an industry that any city 
may envy. Who knows of another 
business centered in any American 
city that represents a combination of 
so much capital invested in so val- 
uable an output? 

"Los Angeles has too many at- 
tractions to have her reputation de- 
pend upon one, but no other of its 
features is more valuable as a 
source of publicity than the output 
of her motion picture studios-" 




And He 
Was 



Right 



One of the big men of Wall Street recently said "It is not hard 
to make money. It is holding on to it that counts." Your business 
and your home NEEDS protection and insurance supplies that 
protection. If every branch of your business activity is not gov 
ered by insurance do not wait another minute. Our representative 
will gladly call at your convenience. 



PEUBEN,5JilMUELS 
^rAL iJNCj ERVICE 

/nrurance "^ -"^ SO Maiden Lane 
Phone John 5425 - 5'*2tf - 5*2»' - 942B 



Samuek 



Squabble Continues 

{Special to WID'S DAILY) 
London, Eng. — The controversy 
between Stoll Film Co., Ltd. and 
Goklwyn over the cancellation of the 
latter's contract with Stoll continues 
here. 

Goldwyn is printing advertise- 
ments in the trade press asking the 
British exhibitor not to judge the 
company by the statements issued 
by Stoll. The latter in turn is man- 
aging to have published advertise- 
ments on the opposite page signed 
by Jef¥ert Bernard in which Stoll's 
position is maintained despite Gold- 
wyn's assertions. 



When the RITCHEY 
trade-mark appears upon 
a poster the exhibitor 
knows that poster to be 
the finest poster that it is 
possible to execute. 

RITCHEY 

LITHO. CORP. 

406W.31itSt..N.Y., Phone ChdsM 838S 







Tuesday, January 27, 1920 IB/ * ^^ DAILY 



TSJIJA 






INJUNCTION DENIED 

The Hon. Judge Knox of the United States Circuit Court 

so decided in the case of 

National Pictures Theatres Corporation 

vs. 
Foundation Film Corporation 



"The Blindness of Youth" 

Was a Title Worth Fighting For and a Production 

That Will Win Any Audience 

Territory Sold 

Ohio, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, District Columbia, Virginia, Eastern 
Pennsylvania, New York, Canada and All Foreign Rights 

For Territorial Rights Address 

MURRAY H. GARSSON 

1600 Broadway, New York City Phone Bryant 4620 



. 



i^i ^ 



jM i 



DAILV 



Tuesday, January 27, 1920 



1^ 



; House Changes 

I Hillsboro, N. D.— The Gem has 
keen purchased by Julius Overmore 
rom Halverson and Vinje. Will 
ake it over Feb. 1. 

i 

' Galveston, Texas — B. F. Roberts is 
managing the Queen. He was man- 
iger of the Liberty at Houston. 



. Harrisburg, Pa. — ^The lobby of the 
Colonial is to be remodeled. C. 
;loyd Hopkins is the manager. 



f Ottowa, 111. — Clarence Hartford 
ias reopened the Star here, follow- 
(ig his purchase of both that house 
tnd the Ruby Palace from E. P. 
iilburn. The latter closed the Star 
ipon opening the other theater. 



Mobile, Ala. — The Dauphine has 
een opened by Robert Sterling. 



Wilkesbarre, Pa. — Alterations are 
o be made in the Nesbitt. 



Columbus, Ohio. — F. W. Postle 
md R. J. Trowbridge have pur- 
chased the Victor, Livingston Ave. 
nd 66th St., a 1,500 seat house for- 
aerly owned by E. F, Schatzman. 



St. Louis, Mo. — ^William Appel 
las leased the Yale, 3700 Minnesota 
We., to the Yale Amusement Co., 
or a term of five years with the 
irivilege of five years more or an 
'ption to purchase the property at 

given figure within one year dat- 
ng from the original lease. 



I San Haba, Texas— W. C. Dofflc- 
tteyer will improve the Majestic, in- 
Ireasing seating capacity to 650. 

Three Forks, Montana — Homer 
fhompson has purchased the Ruby 
lere from Mr. and Mrs. Waddcll. 
Thompson was formerly superin- 
endent of nine schools here. 



I New Orleans, La. — The Mecca is 
o be enlarged and work on the re- 
nodelling of the structure will be 
jegun early in February. Frank R. 
'ieiderich, manager. 



[ Alvin, Texas — Phyllys Altman and 
ames Millings of Houston have 
puchased the Star, the oldest mo- 
'ion picture house here from Woods, 
jlaymond and Spurgeon. 

. Rochester, N. Y. — Mrs. Gertrude 
lichley is to head the Lyons Amuse- 
nent Co. which will be formed here 
hortly. The firm will have a cap- 
tal of $30,000 divided into shares 
if $50 each. 



Neilsville, Wis.— P. E. Smith has 
bought the Badger from W. D. Mar- 
tin. 



Kankakee, 111. — Luna Amusement 
Co., has purchased the lease of the 
Gaiety and will reopen it on Jan. 
20. 



Oconto, 111. — A. L. Robarge, who 
owns the Lyric and Majestic a|t 
Wausau and the Grand at Merrill, 
has taken over the Gem. 



Trenton, N. J. — The Trent re- 
opened here very recently, after 
having been completely remodeled 
and redecorated. , 



Hartford, Conn. — The Bristol here 
has been transferred to Julius Nus- 
enfell, Herman W. Walder and 
George Walder, of Bridgeport, by 
the Fuer-Saperstein Enterprises. 



Amsterdam, N. Y. — E. S. Hoag 
has sold the Orpheum to Thomas 
B. Shelley and Edward J. Windbiel. 



Oakland, Cal. — Lee Wilson has 
sold the Clement to H. Y. Herond, 
who formerly managed the Park 
here. 



San Jose, Cal. — R. N. Jones has 
purchased from A. G. Clapp, the 
Lyric, a second run house of promi- 
nence. 

Los Angeles, Cal. — F. Dorner has 
sold to George Diehl, the Sunbeam, 
situated on Pasadena Avenue. 



Holtville, Cal. — Manahan Broth- 
ers have bought the Arcade, for- 
merly under the management of 
Houseman Bros. 



Los Angeles, Cal. — The Russell 
Amusement Co. has taken over the 
Normandie which will be completely 
remodeled and will open under a 
new name. 



Austin, Tex. — Lewis Hancock has 
ssumed charge of the Hancock The- 
ter, relieving C. W. A. MacCor- 
lack. 



Abilene, Tex. — Jean Finley is man- 
ging the Mission. He was for- 
lerly a publicity man for the Hul- 
ey-Lynch forces. 

Fort Wayne, Ind. — Oscar E. Wo- 
rock has leased the Temple for a 
jng period of years. He is redecor- 
ting the house. 



Milhauser Directing Hansen 

Bertram Milhauser is directing 
Juanita Hansen in "The Mad Talon" 
a serial for Pathe. 



Book "Pollyanna" for Three Weeks 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 
Cleveland, Ohio — Mary Pickford's 
in "Pollyanna" has been booked for 
three weeks at the Euclid, Loew's 
largest house in this city. 



Baron C. de Daue Coming Here 

Baron C. de Daue will arrive in 
New York on the Lafayette this 
week. He is the director of the 
Royal Film Co., Paris and will sell 
here, Louis Mercanton's production, 
"The Call of the Blood." 



Logue Cutting New Fischer Film 
Charles Logue is now cutting a 
new feature produced by A. Hv 
Fischer in the studios in New Ro- 
chelle. The film is based on the 
play "Clothes Make the Man." 



Busch Sees Big Times Ahead 

Briton N. Busch of Republic pre- 
dicts that the next five years will be 
the biggest yet in the motion picture 
industry. 



WID'S DAILY 



THE NEWS— 



THE WHOLE NEWS— 



and 



at 



;io 

lin 



I 'Jtc 



NOTHING BUT THE NEWS 



SUBSCRIPTION $10.00 YEARLY 



"THE BIGGEST LITTLE BUY IN 



THE INDUSTRY" 



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Tuesday, January 27, 1920 




New Theaters 

Hutchinson, Kan. — Columbia Real- 
& Amusement Co. has plans for 
iro-story brick and terra cotta 
)use, to cost $100,000. A $25,000 
pe organ will be installed. 



Detroit, Mich. — Riviera Theater 
0. will erect a house seating 2,519 
1 Grand River Ave., between Maple- 
ood and Linsdale Aves. 



Baltimore, Md.— The Roland Park 
Dmmunity Service plans a motion 
cture house here. 



Rupert, Idaho — Ward Wilson will 
lild a new house seating 770 at a 
ist of $50,000. A similar sum will 
spent on another theater by 
eorge Dunn. 



Gloucester, Mass. — The Strand, 
ating 1,800, will open soon Joseph 
Bloomberg is the owner of the 
mse 



Lake Charles, La. — A new house is 
be built here by Julius Detzcr. It 
11 cost about $30,000. 



Salem, Mass. — John E. and Wil- 
m H. Keen of this city have pur- 
ased two plots with buildings here 
r the erection of another theater, 
ley are members of the Keen 
■others organization which owns 
s Federal, Salem and Empire hero 
well as the Colonial, Haverhill. 



Alton, Pa. — The Rivoli here has 
en opened by Harry Paco ind 
ke Bouma of Orange City. Bouma 
11 manage the house. 



Ontario, Can. — The Zakor Broth- 
J, owners of the Princess, Chat- 
m, are planning to erect a new 
usee, seating 1,200. Construction 
trk will be begun early in 1920. 



W^heeling, W. Va. — A new thca- 
seating 1,500 is to be erected at 
oundsvfille. The Strand Theater 
rp. wil finance the construction. 



A.theng, iGa. — James F. Shehan« 
II build a new theater here cost- 
r $200,000. Ground has already 
en broken for the house, to be 
lied the Palace, which will be 
idy in June. 



Cincinnati, O. — The Palace here 
11 open shortly, with a seating 
pacity of 2,700. A. W. Wallo is 
tnager. 



Toccau, Ga. — Ground has been 
oken and work is progressing rap- 
y upon the theater being built 
the Burton S. Teasley Theater 
ndicate, owning and operating ft 
ain of houses in the state. The 
w structure will seat 600. The 
ening is set for next March. 



Memphis, Tenn. — W. Roberts, 
nager of the Princess, has plans 
a new house to be completed 
the Spring, to have a seating 
)acity of 1,000 and to cost 
1,000. 



il 



Prosser, Wash. — B. J. Pascius, 
owner of Princess, will build new 
house to take name of old one. 



Wenatchee, Wash. — The Liberty 
has been opened here. The house 
cost in the neighborhood of $150,000. 



Port Arthur, Texas — A Lake 
Charles, La. architect has completed 
the blueprints for the Julius Deutzer 
motion picture theater and opera 
house for this city. The theater 
will cost about $30,000. 



Billings, Montana.— E. O'Keefe 
will manage the new $150,000 house 
which is to be built here to seat 
1.400. 



Philadelphia, Pa.— William A. Hill 
will erect a $30,000, one story brick 
film house here. 



Salt Lake City, Utah — Ground for 
a new $20,000 house has been broken 
here. 



Norfolk, Neb— H. J. Howard will 
erect a house seating 1,200 and cost- 
ing $75,000. 



Wheeling, Wa. Va. — Reported here 
that Albert M- Schenck is to head 
a concern which will erect a new 
motion picture house at Market St. 
between 11th and 12th Sts. 



Kokomo, Ind. — A new house has 
been opened here by Frank Heller 
who operates a chain of houses in 
this state. 



Corsicana, Tex. — Plans completed 
for the erection of a theater to be 
built by a stock company of local 
citizens. Its capacity will be 1,060 
with a roof garden capacity of 1,- 
100. The cost will be $75,000. 



Sipe Springs, Tex. — ^W. L. Smith 
and J. L. Scroggins have let con- 
tract for a $10,000 theater with seat- 
ing capacity of 600. Work will be- 
gin soon. 



Arctic, R. I. — A new house with a 
capacity of 1,500 will be erected 
here by Henry McMahon and A. A. 
Spitz. 



Albany, N. Y. — A. E. Merriman 
will operate a new house to be built 
shortly It will seat 800 and will be 
known as the Avon. 



Toledo, O. — Abe Horwitz, presi- 
dent of the Community Amusement 
Co., is planning to erect houses in 
various sections of Toledo. 



Chicago May Tax All Businesses 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 
Chicago — A tax of approximately 
$100 on every concern doing bus- 
iness in Chicago in order to lift the 
city out of financial difficulties, is 
threatened. 



Mintz in Charge of Serials 

N. J. Mintz has been placed in 
charge of the Hallmark serials. For- 
merly on sales end of the Clark 
Cornelius Chaplins. 



DAILV 



EXTRAORDINARY ANNOUNCEMENT: 

The Pioneer Film Corporation Has Purchased Exclusive 
Motion Picture Rights of 

The World's Championship Wrestling Match Between 

Joe Stecher and Earl Caddock 

To Be Held at Madison Square Garden, January 30, 1920 
The Greatest Sporting Event of the Decade 



For State Rights and Direct Bookings Apply Immediately to 

PIONEER FILM CORPORATION 

130 West 46th Street New York City 

Special Paper and Full Line of Advertising Accessories 



STUDIO FOR RENT 

Plenty of Space. Complete Equipment. Per- 
fect Service, Readily Accessible. Immediate 
Occupancy. 

A. H. Fischer Studios 
and Laboratory 

(Former Thanhouser Studio) 

322 Main Street New Rochelle 

Phone, New Rochelle 2277 



:% 



iM^ 



DAILV 



Tuesday, January 27, 



Biggest Buy 

ARTCOLOR PICTURES 

COMPANY, INC. 

135 West 46th St., 

New York City. 

Wid's Daily, 
New York, 

Don't you dare cut down my 
little cherry tree — Keep it 
standing— WID'S DAILY is 
like a film exchange in New 
Orleans — It's a necessary evil. 
In these days of wild profiteer- 
ing, I'll say it's the Biggest 
Buy for the money to the 
filmite. 

Sincerely yours, 

C. Lang Cobb. 



On Broadway 

Rialto— Mary Pickford, "Polly- 
anna." 

Rialto Magazine. 

Paramount, Post scenic, "The 
Cloud." 

Sunshine comedy, "Roaring Lions 
and Tender Hearts." 

RivoiHi— Alice Brady, "The Fear 
Market." 

Rivoli Pictorial. 

Bruce scenic, "The Wanderlust." 

Christie comedy, "Save Me, Sadie." 

Strcmd — Constance Talmadge, 
"Two Weeks." 

Strand Topical Review. 

Truex comedy, "The Night of the 
Dub." 

Capitol— Mabel Normand, "Pinto." 

Capitol News. 

Stage Women's War Relief Pic- 
ture. 

Universal comedy, "Naughty Lions 
and Wild Men."- 

Moss' Broadway — Marion Davies, 
"The Cinema Murder." 

Cleveland Bronner's Revue. 

Brooklsm Strand — Constance Tal- 
madge, "Two Weeks." 

New York — Today: Maurice Tour- 
neur's, "Victory." 

Wednesday: George Walsh, "The 
Shark." 



Coast Brevities 

(Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Hollywood — The Will Rogers 
company has gone to Santa Cruz, 
among the big redwoods to make 
some of the exteriors for "Seven 
Oaks." Mr. Rogers is supported by 
the following players: his four year 
old son Jimmie; Irene Rich, Lionel 
Belmore, Raymond Hatton, Bert 
Sprotte, Nick Cogley and Sydney 
DeGrey. 



Herman C- Raymaker will hence- 
forth handle the entire direction pf 
comedies featuring Hank Mann, ac- 
cording to Morris R. Schlank, pro- 
ducer. Fred C. Windemier, who un- 
til recently alternated with Ray- 
maker as the comedian's director. 



Thursday: J. Warren Kerrigan, 
"Live Sparks." 

Friday: Bessie Barriscale, "The 
Luck of Geraldine Laird." 

Friday: Harry Carey, "Marked 
Men." 

Saturday: Alice Brady, "The Fear 
Market." 

Sunday: Nazimova, "Stronger 
Than Death." 

Next Week 

Strand— Will Rogers, "Water, 
Water, Everywhere." 

Rivoli— Wallace Reid, "Double 
Speed." 

Riilto — Douglas Mac Lean and 
Doris May, "What's Your Husband 
Doing?" 

Brooklyn Strand — Nell Shipman, 
"Back to God's Country." 

Capitol— Viola Dana, "The Willow 
Tree." 



Lester S. Tobias has left Robert- 
son-Cole to accept a position as 
Realart Sales Representative for 
Connecticut. He opened Mutual's 
first exchange in Connecticut five 
years ago. 



"Nothing a Year" has been select- 
ed by B. A. Rolfe as Olive Tell's 
next production for Jans Pictures. 
The title of the story is from the pen 
of Charles Belmont Davis. 



has left the company for another 
field. 



The fourth two-reel comedy for 
Paramount, "A Tough Tenderfoot," 
under Al St. John's eight-a-year 
contract has been completed and 
subtitled. 



Mitchell Lewis is making prepar- 
ations for his first Metro starring 
production, Jack ondon's "Burning 
Daylight." 



Malcolm S. Boylan has resi{ 
from the Universal publicity sta 
become general exploitation dire 
for G. B. Samuelson, Ltd. 



Charmion London, widow of ' 
late novelist, has joined the r; 
of writers for the screen. He ',' 
Bosworth will star in one of 
stories. 

GAUSM 



( 



AT LIBERTY 



DIRECTOR 



OF ESTABLISHED REPUTA= 
TION— HAS DIRECTED FOR 
FOREMOST ORGANIZATIONS 
—NOW OPEN FOR OFFERS- 
WOULD CONSIDER SERIALS 
OR SHORT SUBJECTS 



(« 
Il- 



ea- 



PRINCIPALS 
ONLY 



Address 

BOX D=5 

Care Wid's Daily 




sday, January 27, 1920 



Ifeji^^ 



DAI1.Y 



Some Difference 

burgh Exhibitor Pays $2,500 for 
ature but Only $2 for Comedy 

xliibitors will have to realize 
n the next year that they will 
be unable to secure comedies 
other short subjects for little 
o money as they have in the 
" says Pat Dowling, represen- 
e of the Christie Film Co., who 
impleting in the East a tour of 
important exchange centers of 
;ountry. 

ccording to program and inde- 
ent dealers in all of the ex- 
ge centers, a few of the large 
ibutors have heretofore prac- 
y given away their short stuff 
rder to help them make con- 
3 on feature productions. Now 
known that at least one large 
buting company is unloading 
y all of its prices. A glaring 
pie of the practise was recently | 
n in Pittsburgh where a lead- 
louse booked a big feature for 
} for the week, and in searching 
t for a subject to balance the 
ram, selected a one reel Chris- 
)medy. The house manager felt 
when the independent dealer 
ed to book the one-reeler at 
ate of $2 per day! 
"^ith the demand for short sub- 
of all kinds, and with the ter- 
tion of certain well known 
Is, it is expected that within 
ear, high class short attractions 
lot be available except at prices 
will be self-supporting to the 
dies. In other words, film 
rs are putting the short stuff 
s own merits and selling it as 



In the Courts 

Tlie Fortuol Film Corp. has been 
sued in the Supreme Court by M. 
de Miguel & Co., of Barcelona, 
Spain, for $20,000 damages. The 
complaint alleges that in August 
last the defendants delivered an in- 
voice purporting to cover a ship- 
ment of films, reciting that the de- 
fendant had shipped three' Blue 
Ribbon pictures, "Don Caesar de 
Bazan," "The Bait," and "The Fly- 
ing Twins." When the shipment 
was opened in Spain it was found 
to contain "old and damaged films 
of no value and not the Blue Rib- 
bon films which are of great value." 
The plaintiff in reliance of defend- 
ant's alleged false representation 
paid $9,948 for the films and claims 
to have been damaged in the sum 
sued for. 



Republic Names Releases 

_ring January Republic is re- 
g "The Amazing Woman," with 
Clifford and "The Blue Pearl," 
Edith Hallor. 

February, the Edward Jose 

iction, "Mothers of Men" will 

ven its initial showing. Others 

'The Girl of the Sea," with 

Hilburn and Chester Barnett, 

dith Sterling in "The One Way 

" the first of the two-reelers 

Villiam J. Flynn and Jackie 

iers in "Dad's Girl." 



iited exchanges released "A 
lie in Souls," a Triangle pro- 
)n on Jan. 25. "Tiger Girl," 
Lillian Gish will go out Feb. 15. 



Supreme Court Justice Giegerich 
has granted a rehearing in the suit 
of Darcy & Wolford, Inc., as owner 
of the play, "The Tidal Wave," for 
an injunction restraining William 
Stoermer from taking that name for 
a film play. Justice Giegerich had 
dismissed the complaint on the 
ground that if the Stoermer play 
showed a tidal wave the defendant 
was justified in using a title which 
would be descriptive of the play. 
In granting the rehearing Justice 
Giegerich said it had been urged 
that under his decision there would 
be no protection for such titles as 
"The Girl of the Golden West," 
"The Gold Diggers," 'Son-Daugh- 
ter," or "One Night in Rome." The 
court said that all he meant to say 
was "the use of words properly de- 
scriptive of things or the actual 
names of things should not be barred 
to persons who desire to make and 
exhibit pictures of such things." 



EVE UNSELL 

Scenario Writer 
Famous Players-Lasky Corp. 

"Eyes of the Soul" 
starring Elsie Ferguson 

"Sinners" 

starring Alice Brady 

"Cup of Fury" 
written by Rupert Hughes 

"The Great Shadow" 
starring Tyrone Power 



Julian Solomon, Sr. Dead 

Philadelphia — Julian M. Solomon, 
Sr. father of Julian M. "King" Solo- 
mon of Master Films, Inc., New 
York is dead. 



ORCHESTRA CONDUCTOR 
AT LIBERTY 
Orchestra Conductor of exper- 
ience and reputation for pre- 
paring and conducting musical 
scores at Liberty January 25th. 
Present employer changing pol- 
icy to vaudeville and pictures. 
Will go anywhere but must be 
guaranteed a large enough or- 
chestra to make it a feature on 
a program. Only first class of- 
fers considered. References and 
recommendations from present 
employer who is one of most 
widely known owners and ex- 
hibitors in the country. 

Box, A-16, WID'S DAILY 




Send Us Your 
^^aS'pS Junk Film 

INTERSTATE SMELTING 
<a REFINING COMPANY 

23 Commercial St. NEWARK. N. J. 




CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG 

Once more demonstrates her magnifi- 
cent art in 

"THE EYES OF YOUTH" 
We have made for this production a 
very artistic lobby display together 
with reproductions in fac-simile oil 
paintings from her latest poses in 
various sizes. 

KRAUS MFG. CO. 

220 West 42d Street 

17th Floor TeL 3607 Bryant 



JOHN J. LIVINGSTON 

Motion Picture Representative 

For 

STARS— DIRECTORS 

1440 Broadway New York 




TYPHOON COMPANY 

281 LEXINGTON AVE., NEW YORK, N. Y. 

1044 Camp Street 64 West Randolph Street 

New Orleans, La. Chicago, 111. 



Gigantic Picturization of Edgar Rice Burroughs* Latest and Biggest Book 

"THE RETURN OF TARZAN" 



ins for distribution now 
being formulated 



Address inquiries to 

Numa Pictures Corporation 

LONGACRE BLDG., Suite 523^ 

Phone: Bryant 4416 



fl 



^ 



a!i^^ 



DAILV 



Tuesday, January 27, 19 



Sunday Closing 

and Censorship 

Censorship for New York? 
{Special to IVID'S DAILY) 

Albany, N. Y. — A motion picture 
censorship bill backed by some of 
the reform interests of the State will 
be introduced in the Legislature 
shortly. The provisions calling prin- 
cipally for censorship under the di- 
rection of the state board of regents, 
will be similar to those in a bill of 
last year, which failed to pass in the 
Senate. Last year's bill was spon- 
sored by Assemblyman John W. 
Slacer of Buffalo. 

Whether there will be other bills 
introduced providing for state cen- 
sorship of the movies, will depend 
largely on the decision of the com- 
mittee of the state mayors' confer- 
ence which is now investigating the 
necessity of such legislation. There 
will be a hearing on the subject in 
Albany in February before reporting 
to the State Conference of Mayors 
which will be also held in Albany 
late in February. 



Would Ban Immoral Films 
{Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Washington — Immoral motion pic- 
tures films would be barred from in- 
terstate commerce under a bill just 
reported by the House Judiciary 
Committee. 



Republic Changes in the Field 

George R. Meeker, sales director 
of Republic has appointed Paul 
Bush, manager of the Chicago office. 

Fred Salinger, former manager of 
the Pittsburgh branch has been made 
manager of the New York Ex- 
change. E. J. McCurty, formerly a 
salesman at the Pittsburgh office has 
been appointed as manager of that 
office succeeding Salinger. 



Olcott With Goldwyn 
Sydney Olcott, one of the direct- 
ors of the old school who went to 
Ireland for Kalem some years ago 
has been signed by Goldwyn to di- 
rect. He will produce on the coast. 



T. Roy Barnes in Hughes' Film 

T. Roy Barnes, will appear in 
"Scratch Your Back," which Gold- 
wyn will shortly place in produc- 
tion. 



Tampa, Fla. — W. L. Jones is the 
supervisor of the Grand which is 
now open. Dan Drew is managing 
the house. 



PICTURE RIGHTS FOR 

SALE 

"The Crystal Stopper" 

by Maurice Le Blanc 
An Arsene Lupin Story 

CELEBRATED AUTHORS SOC. 

Room 803 Columbia Theatre BIdg. 

Tel. Bryant 1511 



FOR RENT-STUDIO SPACE 

in new studio located in Culver City, Calif, with latest modern 
equipment of stages, lighting, dressing rooms, offices, etc. 
Address Box 10, WID'S DAILY, 

Phone Hollywood 1603. 

Hollywood, Calif. 




There are 30 Reasons 



why you should book, 

*The 
Screaming 
Shadow* 

REASON No. 25 

Booking "Tlie Screaming Sha- 
dow" is the same as insuring 
yourself for capacity business. 
Watch for Reason No. 26 to- 
morrow. 

BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 

UNIVERSAL CITY 





CAL. 




Released through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK 

Foreign Right* controlled by Apollo Trading Corp., 220 W. 48th St. 




New Exhibitor Bodies 

{By Wire to WID'S DAILY) 

Albany — Two new exhibitor or- 
ganizations have sprung into being. 
One is the Interstate Exhibitors 
Corp. capitalized at $10,000. Incor- 
porators are: J. A. Osborne, C. D. 
Bailey, B. Dinzer of New York. 

The other organization is the Un- 
ited Exhibitors Ass'n of New York. 
This company is capitalized at $25,- 
000 and has as its incorporators: 
A. V. Lowenhaupt, P. E. Robb and 
W. J. Lawrence all of New York. 



John Halliday who played oppos 
Norma Talmadge in her fori 
coming First National productic 
"The Woman Gives," will appear 
"The Love Expert," opposite Cc 
stance Talmadge. 



Sloman to Direct for Metro 

Edward Sloman will direct "Burn- 
ing Daylight" first of the Jack Lon- 
don stories to be made by C. E. 
Shurtleff, Inc. for Metro. Mitch 
Lewis will be starred. 



Carbondale, 111. — The new Bartb 

here will be opened on Feb. 1. 




Herbert Steiner has been ma 
manager of the Selznick Bro 
studio. He was formerly assists 
to the manager of the Fort LI 
studio. 



GOBS OF 
EXCITEMENT 

and hundreds of tern 

moments mean 
crowded houses witt 



COLONELT 



Ask the National, 
Hollywood 



^e g^u^ed to 5ett 

for One TfiuidrecL 

Shousond Dotfcus 



Not merely a motion picture — it is a 
SLICE OF LIFE, pictured from an angle 
that will keep the hands of your cashier 
busy on the days you run it! 

ENPTT AMIS 

THE SENSATION OF THE CENTURY 

Directed by Frank Reicher 

The Hundred Thousand Dollar Packet 
SHOWS you HOW. 

PHOTOPLAY LIBRARIES, INC. 

(Exclusive Selling Agents) 
500 Fifth Avenue, New York City 



the 



01 

Pict 
Ch 

be 
cliai 
tie 
enti 
Star 



6d«>ard lyhitesidc 



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Site 

Stri, 
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pr^BRADSTREET 
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7i^RECOCHIZEIi 

AuthoritV 



Vol. XI. No. 27 



Wednesday, January 28, 1920 



Price 5 Cents 






Ray With A. S. Kane 

Noted Star Will Soon Produce for 
Arthur S. Kane Pictures Corp. 

Charles Ray is the first big asset 
of the newly formed Arthur S. Kane 
Pictures Corp. By the arrangement 
all the pictures of this star will be 
presented by the Arthur S. Kane 
Pictures Corp. for First National re- 
lease. Through a deal made a year 
ago, the distribution of the Charles 
Ray pictures following the comple- 
tion of his contract with Thos. H. 
Ince was placed for a long time to 
come with the First National or- 
ganization. 

Kane's corporation will handle 
Ray's business with the releasing 
concern and will supervise every 
New York activity of the star. 
Books, plays and other screen ma- 
terial to be purchased for Ray's 
use will be contracted for through 
the Kane offices. 

Negotiations to bring the former 
president of Realart and the First 
National star together were started 
weeks ago. This was the principal 
reason for Kane's trip to the Coast. 



White Explains Board's Duties 

{By Wire to WW'S DAILY) 

Philadelphia — What is considered 
the largest single gathering of mo- 
tion picture men in this territory 
took place Monday afternoon when 
approximately 130 exchange man- 
agers and their assistants, members 
of the recently organized Motion 
Picture Bureau of the Philadelphia 
Chamber of Commerce attended a 
luncheon at which Harry M. White, 
chairman outlined the functions of 
the Board, in detail. Virtually the 
entire Board of Directors of the 
Stanley Company of America were 
on hand. 



Doro With Pioneer 

Marie Doro will be seen on the 
Pioneer program. 

Godfrey Tearle will be seen oppo- 
site Miss Doro in the first of the 
series while James McKay is di- 
rector. Pioneer will release the pro- 
ductions through its series of co- 
operative exchanges. 



Goldwyn After "Big Six" 
{Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles — It is reported here 
that F. J. Godsol is very active with 
regard to securing the "Big Six" pro- 
duct for Goldwyn release. 




Keith battled valiantly, but the Chinese swarmed in upon him from 
every side. From "The River's End," by James Oliver Curwood, a First 
National picture directed by Marshall Neilan. — Advt. 



Rothacker in E^st 

Will Build Big Laboratory i Long 
Island Starting in Spr 
{Special to WW'S DAIj. 
Chicago — Watterson R. R 
er left yesterday for the Coast . .»^ j 
he will remain until about Feb. 10 
when he will leave for New York to 
see that the preparatory work rela- 
tive to his new laboratory on Long 
Island is carried out. The "lab" will 
be located near the new Famous 
Players studio and the studio which 
Nathan Burkan and his associates 
are building. Work on the plant 
will be started in March or April, 
and it is expected that the plant will 
be completed by the summer. 



Going West 

J. ||. Kempner and Associates Ex- 
f pected in Los Angeles 
{Special to WW'S DAILY) 

Los Angeles — J. L. Kempner, who 
produced "Lest We Forget" and 
was interested in "The Better Ole," 
Louis Jacobson and an attorney 
named Millard Ellison, all of New 
\ork, are expected here in the early 
future. It is understood that they 
represent considerable Eastern cap- 
ital and are trying to arrange for the 
services of several well known stars 
and directors. 



Ince Coming East 

{Special to WW'S DAILY) 
Los Angeles — It is reported that 
Thomas H. Ince, president and gen- 
eral manager of the "Big Six" and 
J. Parker Read will leave for the 
East in about 10 days or two weeks. 



More Stock Listings 

Application has been made to the 
Board of Governors of the New York 
Stock Exchange to list the issue of 
$20,000,000 8 per cent, cumulative 
convertible preferred stock of Fa- 
■ mous Players and 250,000 shares of 
common stock, no par value. 



Tucker Case Argued 

Judge Platzek Reserves Decision — 
Some of the Points Presented 
Judge Platzek in the Supreme 
Court, Part I, yesterday heard the 
argument in the George Loane Tuck- 
er suit against Mayflower Photoplay 
Corp. and Famous Players-,Lasky' 
Corp. for the granting of a tempore 
ary injunction to restrain Famous' 
Players-Lasky from distributing 
"The Miracle Man" further except in 
exact compliance with the terms of 
the contract for the distribution of, 
that production and for a temporary 
injunction against the Mayflower 
Photoplay Corp. to keep them from 
interfering with him in the comple-! 
tion of his second production, "Lad-; 
ies Must Live," and for a temporary' 
injunction against both of the de- 
fendants to keep them from interfer- 
ing with him in securing other em- 
ployment. 

Isaac Malevinsky, of O'Brien, Male- 
vinsky and Drisooll, for Mr. Tucker 
(Stated that he found in the affidavii- 
submitted by Mr. Flinn of Famous Play- 
ers that Mr. Flinn admitted the obliga- 
tion due Mr. Tucker whereas Mr. Wolper 
of tlie Mayflower Photoplay Corp. de- 
nied the obligation to Mr. Tucker claim- 
ing that although the contract provided 
that George Loane Tuclcer should be ad- 
vertised that it was only for the benefit 
of Mayflower and not for the benefit ol 
George Loane Tucker. 

Alfred Beekman, representing Mayflow- 
er, cited an abrogation contract signed 
by Mr. Tucker upon the occasion of th( 
drafting of a new contract between May 
flower and Tucker which was effectlvi 
June 9, this abrogation contract being 
for the purpose of abrogating the pre- 
vious Mayflower-Tucker agreements. Ii, 
answering this claim Mr. Malevinsky foi 
Mr. Tucker, presented the argument tha 
this abrogation contract had no relatioi 
whatever to the distribution contrac 
since all of Mr. Tucker's contracts witl 
Mayflower were made in compliance witl 
the distribution contract of Famoui 
Players-Lasky thereby protecting Mr 
Tucker as to "his exploitation rights pro 
vjded for in the distribution contract. 

E. N. Zoline, representing Famous 
Players-Lasky, presented the technics 
point that because the Mayflower-Famou 
Players-Lasky contract was made unde 
the seal of the respective corporations 
Mr. Tucker could not be a third part 
thereto, also arguing that there was u 
consideration for Famous Players-Lask 

{Continued on Page 2) 



Morris 111 With "Flu" 

Sam E. Morris, general manage 
of Select is at home ill with th 
"flu." 



Realart Films at Resorts 
Charles C. Ritz has closed a co^ 
tract with Realart whereby the la' 
ter's film will be shown at reso: 
hotels. 



Wednesday, January 28, 1920 




jsjiM 



DAILY 



VAXIIU. 27 Wednesday, Janoary 28, 1920 Prfm S CciU 



f^opyright 1920, Wid's Film and Film Folks. 

Inc. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 

New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 

FILM FOLKS, INC. 

P. C ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 

tcrer; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 

end Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 

Business Manager. 

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 

■t the post office at New York, N. Y., under 

the act of March 3, 1879. 

Terras (Postage free) United States, Outside 

of Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 

months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 

J15.00 

Subscribers should remit with order 

Address all communications to WID'S 

DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 

York, N. Y. 

Telephone: Vanderbilt, 4551-4552-5558 
Hollywood, California 
Editorial and Business Offices: 6411 Holly- 
wood Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 

Chicago representatives — Willis, Eckels 
and Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 
Qiicago, 111. 



Quotations 

Last 
Bid. Asked. Sale. 
Famous Players - 82 83^ 82 

Goldwyn 31 32 31^ 

Loew's, Inc. 301^ 31 31 

Triangle Film M M M 

United Pict. Prod. 15^ 16 16 
World Film — — 1 



Fresno Operators Want Increase 

(Special to WID'S DAILY) 
Fresno, Cal. — Members of the lo- 
cal Motion Picture Operators Union 
have presented a demand for $70 a 
week beginning Feb. 15. At present 
the scale is $42.50, a week. The new 
scale is for an eight hour day with 
$2.50 a hour for overtime work. 



COMING 

Charlie Chaplin 
Mabel Normand 
Marie Dressier 
Chester Conklin 
Mack Swain 



in 



"TiUie's 
Punctured 
Romance'' 

Directed by MACK SENNETT 

TOWER FILM CORP. 

71 W. 23rdSt.,N. Y. 



Tucker Case Argued 

{Continued from Page 1) 

granting any right.s to Mr. Tucker. Mr. 
Malevinsky in rebuttal set forth various 
cases justifying his contention regard- 
ing the legal status of the case and pre- 
sented a very large mass of evidence to- 
gether VFith lengthy replying affidavits 
for the consideration of the court where- 
upon Judge Platzek took the case under 
advisement reserving decision as to the 
temporary inji:nction until he might 
have time to examine the voluminous 
papers. 

The defendants did not present any 
exhibits relative to advertising. 

In explaining the manner in which the 
woluminous exhibits of the plaintiff had 
been arranged, Mr. Malevinsky pointed 
out that because Famous Players-Lasky 
had distributed newspaper cuts, stories 
and other exliibition matter, omitting Mr. 
Tucker's name, these pieces of publicity 
had been printed ijiany millions of times 
in the past few montlis. Several thous- 
and clippings of individual instances of 
publication, one from each paper, were 
presented to the court together with 
samples of lithographs that did not con- 
tain Mr. Tucker's name, with a letter 
stating that 295,000 of these had been 
purchased by Famous Players from the 
National Printing and Engraving Co. It 
was also stated in the papers that a tre- 
mendous quantity of lithographs not 
bearing Mr. Tucker's name were pur- 
chased from the Morgan Lithograph Co. 
by the Famous Players-Laslcy Corp. 



It is just as easy to paste 
up one kind of a poster as 
another^ The only dis- 
advantage that comes 
■with the use of RITCHEY 
postea:^ lies in the fact 
that it takes longer to 
count the resultant box- 
office receipts. 

RITCHEY 

UTHO. COKV. 

4«$W.31ilSt.J4.T.. PW>De( 





Against Percentages 

Maryland Exhibitors Not in Favor 

of That Kind of Bookings 

(Special to WID'S DAILY) 

Baltimore, Md. — The Exhibitors 
League of Maryland, at an annual 
meeting just held passed a resolu- 
tion requesting exhibitors not to 
book on a percentage basis on the 
ground that producers will know 
what business the exhibitor does and 
thus go to an opposition theater 
with their productions if necessary. 

Sam Berman of the New York 
Exhibitors League addressed the 
meeting on screen advertising. The 
Maryland body is now sending a 
form letter to all its members ad- 
vising them not to sign for industrial 



reels unless paid for it or the Ford 
Weekly, distributed by Goldwyn. 

A list of exhibitors was forwarded 
to the Governor from which one will 
be selected to act on the Censor 
Board. The Governor before his 
election promised to appoint an ex- 
hibitor if elected. 

The following officers were re- 
elected: E. B. McCurdy, president; 
Thos. D. Goldberg, vice-president; 
William E. Stumpf, secretary; Louis 
Rome, treasurer and Morris A. 
Rome, attorney. Board of Directors: 
F. H. Durkee, F. A. Hornig, L. J. 
Schlichter, Walter Pacy, Charles 
Hicks, Ben Cluster, W. E. Stumpf 
and the president and vice-president. 
Legislative committee: Messrs. Red- 
dish, Hornig and Durkee. 



EXTRAORDINARY ANNOUNCEMENT: 

The Pioneer Film Corporation Has Purchased Exclusive 
Motion Picture Rights of 

The World's Championship Wrestling Match Between 

JOE STECHER 

and 

EARL CADDOCK 

To Be Held at Madison Square Garden, January 30, 1920 
The Greatest Sporting Event of the Decade 

For State Rights and Direct Bookings Apply Immediately to 

PIONEER FILM CORPORATION 

130 West 46th Street New York City 

Special Paper and Full Line of Advertising Accessories 




'J, I 



iiO. 



Clii 
Mai 

Wf 

Ite; 



TYPHOON COMPANY 

281 LEXINGTON AVE., NEW YORK. N. Y. . fc,, 

1044 Camp Street 64 West Randolph SfreetP"" 

New Orleans, La. Chicago, 111. 

— «esp 



jM ^ 



! 



PatkeNews 

No. 8 

HOIJOKKN, N. J.— 271 saved from death 

at seal S. S. Northern I'aciflc arrives 

with passengers rescued from sinking: 

transport I'owliatan in tlie worst gales 

;in many years. 

' SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS— Investigate 
affairs in Mexico. U. S. Senate Commit- 
tee headed by Senator Fall, visits bor- 
der to get first-hand information on 
trouble along Kio Grande. 

TULALIP, WASH.— "Pole" record of 
Indian tribe. William Shelton, instruc- 
tor at U. S. Indian scliool, carves his- 
tory of natives on Totem pole. 

REBUILDING IN FRAN CE— Devas- 
tated France lives again. After five 
years of sorrow and desolation, life be- 
gins anew amidst the ruins left by the 
war. Exclusive pictures. 

NEWPORT, N. H. — Learn how to ski I 
It sure is great sport — after you learn 
how not to fall. Scenes at New Eng- 
land's big winter carnival. 

BURSTING HIS OWN BUBBLE— Giv- 
ing him Ills medicine. 

PANAMA, C. Z. — British warship pass- 
es through Panama — H. M. S. New Zea- 
land, famous as tlie agship of Lord Jel- 
licoe, visits canal zone. 

The President of Panama pays a visit 
to the warship. 

CHICAGO, ILL. — Fight the influenza 
epidemic! Mindful of the disastrous re- 
land, famous as the flagship of Lord Jel- 
are quick to take steps to check spread 

I of "flu." 
Dr. Robertson, Commissioner of Health 
in Chicago. 
Tliere is a great need for nurses to help 
the campaign. 

The nature of the disease ts Investi- 
gated at the Bacteriologlear a,aDoratory 
by injecting samples of sputa in mice. 

Local authorities have pr^p«tre<t » vac- 
cine which they hope will relieve condi- 
tions greatly. 

In New York City, t4i» Kea Cross 
quickly sets to work to make up gauze 
masks for emergency. 

You can help check the "flu" if you 
suits two years ago, officials everyvvnere 



tod 



ay 



Lease Alhambra Site 
(Special to WW'S DAILY) 
Indianapolis, Ind. — Charles H. Ol- 
son, Edward G. Sourbier, Eugene 
Marks and others who make up the 
Alhambra Realty Co. and Central 
jAmusement Co. who own the Alham- 
"^^rz., have taken over a 99 year lease 
iifon the site of the house from Fred 
. C. Dickens. Several years ago, a 
IS year lease was taken. Some ad- 
iditional frontage has been purchased, 
also. 



Andrews to Sail With Osso 

Charlton Andrews, who has sold 
lis latest play, "Ladies Night" to 
A.1 Woods, who will produce it short- 
y, will accompany Adolphe Osso 
this week when he sails for France. 
Andrews will take charge of the 
scenario and continuity departments 
n the new Osso offices in Paris. 



Cunningham Joins First National 

(Special to WW'S DAILY) 
Omaha, Neb. — Lloyd Cunningham 
, las been added to the First National 
SB* jxchange, as director of advertising 
fnd exploitation. 



New Jekyll and Hyde 

Pioneer will make a screen version 
of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde with 
Sheldon Lewis in the leading role. 

This is interesting in view of the 
fact that Famous Players have under 
way an elaborate screen version of 
the same story with John Barry- 
more in the leading role. 



Lapworth With Goldwyn 

Charles Lapworth, recently asso- 
ciated with Charles Chaplin will have 
charge of Goldwyn's advertising and 
publicity abroad. He is expected to 
sail, on the 28th for England to- 
gether with A. George Smith, gen- 
eral representative for Europe. 



Silz Returns 
Rene Silz, American representa- 
tive of the Les Film Albert Dulac 
of Paris, France, has just returned 
from France after a four months' 
trip. Mr. Silz will in a few days 
give a report on film conditions in 
France. 



New Story for Character Pictures 

Character Pictures have purchased 
the story "Forty Below" a tale of 
the northwest by Craig Johnson. 
This makes three stories announced 
for production by Character. 



New State Right Firm 

Detroit, Mich. — Commonwealth 
Pictures Corp. with offices in the 
Joseph Mack Building, is a new 
state right firm established. 



I HERBERT 
I BLACHE 

^=. Now directing 

I "THE HOPE" 

m "THE DRURY LANE 
I MELODRAMA" 

B ALL STAR CAST 



iillllll 



ORCHESTRA CONDUCTOR 
AT LIBERTY 

Orchestra Conductor of exper- 
ience and reputation for pre- 
paring and conducting musical 
scores at Liberty January 25th. 
Present employer changing pol- 
icy to vaudeville and pictures. 
Will go anywhere but must be 
guaranteed a large enough or- 
chestra to make it a feature on 
a program. Only first class of- 
fers considered. References and 
recommendations from present 
employer who is one of most 
widely known owners and ex- 
hibitors in the country. 
Box, A-16, WID'S DAILY 



DAILV 



Wednesday, January 28, 1920 



MacManus Down With "Flu" 

Edward MacManus, producer of 
"The Lost Battalion" is suffering 
from an attack of the "flu." 



Baum of Cincinnati in Town 
Louis Baum, manager of the Cin- 
cinnati Exchange of Universal is in 
town. He will return home shortly. 



More Theaters for Saenger 
(Special to WID'S DAILY) 

New Orleans, La. — Saenger 
Amusement Co. has taken over the 
Sugar theater at Monroe, La. It 
will be remodeled. 

The company will build a house 
to cost $500,000 in Shreveport and 
will remodel the Isis in Houston, 
Tex. which has been taken over. 




Woman Gets $4,100 Damages 
(Special to WID'S DAILY) 
Los Angeles — Mrs. Erma Johnson 
McAllister was awarded $4,100 dam- 
ages in the suit brought against J. 
W. Early and the Oakley Super- 
Quality Prod. Inc. 

Mrs. McAllister stated that Early 
promise to make a star of her. 



Dallas to Have $100,000 House 

(Special to WID'S T>A[LY) 
Dallas, Tex. — P. J. Cameron and 
T. P. Finigan will erect a house at 
a cost of $100,000. 



The Acme 
Portable 
Projector 
For the 
Studio 

Cutting Room 
The Editor 
Home School or 
Church 



Demonstrated to You Anywhere 

Howells Cine Equipment Co. 

729 7th Ave. New York 

Phone Bryant 1166 




■*4 - ■*«' 



pff 



tJME SENSATION OF THE CENTURY 

Directed by Frank Reicher 

AND STILL THEY COME! 

Telegrams, letters, local and long distance tele- 
phone calls — a constant stream of them — all ask- 
ing for information about "EMPTY ARMS," that 
box-office thunderbolt of the new year! 
Have you received YOUR copy of the Hundred 
Thousand Dollar Packet? 

PHOTOPLAY LIBRARIES, INC. 

(Exclusive Selling Agents) 
500 Fifth Avenue, New York City 



6d«»arcL IPfutcsvdc 



Wednesday. January 28. 1920 



jM i 



DAILV 



KINOG 



P 



'«;, 



"©e Visual News gf 
ALL THE World 

BRING PASSENGERS OFF S. S. 
POWHATAN — Transport Northern Pa- 
I ciftc conies into port ot New York with 
271 persons taken from sister transport 
I held helpless for days in a North Atlan- 
tic Gale — A. E. F. conting;ent home. 

TEST A NE\V NAVY TRIPLANE— 
New three wingred Sperry seaplane is 
I sent out to make a try out at Rockaway 
' Station. 

DANCE ON FRENCH BATTLESHIP 
— Officers of the Joan D'Arc entertain 
people of New Orleans — sailors have a 
little dance of their own. 

THRILLS ON TOBOGGAN SLIDE— 
Holiday throngs take hilarious rides over 
snowy Duff'erin Terrace course at carni- 
val in Quebec. 

RHODE ISLAND BATTLES DRYS— 
Littlest state brings case against valid- 
ity of 18th amendment claiming it in- 
fringes state sovereignity. 

THE END OF THE GASOLINE TRAIL 
— AVhere the junkman waits for limou- 
sines and runabouts; that have their day 
of usefulness — the hammer hang at a 
Chicago yard. 

CAMP FIRE LIGHTS NIGHT FROLIC 
— Skaters do thrilling stunts by the 
light of the blazing logs at Cleveland, O. 

FAMOUS CATCHER IS GOOD SHOT 
— Ivy Wingo who was stair I in four 
games of the World Series goes out with 
dogs and gun at Norcross, Ga. . 

MILLION E<?GS IN SHIP'S CARGO— 
Empress of Russia drops anchor at 
Vancouver, B. C. and longshormen very 
gently unload 100,000 craves. 

KEEPING PEACE ON THE RIO 
GRANDE — Texas Rangers and Fiscales 
mounted police of Mexico ride interna- 
tional patrol at Ysleta, Tex. How the 
baby cuts its teeth. 

HEADS SECOND LARGEST UNIVER- 
SITY— Dr. Davis P. Barrows of the Uni- 
versity of California at Berkeley^ poses 
for Kinograms. 

SAYS PROHIBITION HL4KES US 
SMOKE— Sir Cunliflfe Owen, London's to- 
bacco king, arrives in New Y'ork. 

BIG MACHINE EATS FROM STREETS 
— With labor shortage so serious traf- 
fic tie up is threatened. Street cleaning 
department tries novel method to clean 
New York thoroughfares. 

DISTRIBUTED BY 

REPUBLIC DISTRIBUTING 

CORPORATION 



Mills on Trip 

B. H. Mills of Alpha Pictures, 
Inc., has left on a business trip 
through the Middle West. He will 
visit the independent exchanges in 
Detroit, Chicago, Pittsburgh, St. 
Louis, Cleveland and Washington. 



Adler Back 

Bert Adler, exploitation manager 
of Realart specials returned to town 
yesterday from the West, and will 
leave today for Toledo to aid in 
putting over "Soldiers of Fortune" 
and "The Mystery of the Yellow 
Room." 



"High Speed," Hallmark has been 
booked over the Loew's circuit in 
New York. 



Sunday Closing 

and Censorship 

Opposes Blue Law Repeal 
(iSpecial to WID'S DAILY) 
Louisville, Ky.— Rev. Dunbar H. 
Ogden, pastor of the Second Pres- 
byterian Church, authorized by 
Mayor Smith to call a meeting of 
representative citizens to consider 
the matter of Sunday entertainment 
said he would issue the call after 
another conference with the Mayor. 
In a speech, Rev. Odgen urged a 
campaign against the repeal of the 
"Blue Laws." 



Record Crowds Attend Shows 

(Special to WW'S DAILY) 
Louisville, Ky. — While the cam- 



PICTURE RIGHTS FOR 

SALE 

Arsene Lupin vs. 

Sherlock Holmes 

by Maurice Le Blanc 

CELEBR.ATED AUTHORS SOC. 

Room 803 Columbia Theatre Bldg. 

Tel. Bryant 1511 



IT REQUIRES ORGANIZATION TO 
NANUFAaURECOODENGRAVIN(iS 

Vlf[yAWBEEN0R(iANIZED^"''M898 

EQUIPPEDtDDELIVERT-<BEITPOIIIBlE 
WORKIN THE LEAST POSSIBLE TINE 



TUESTANDARDENCKAVmCCO. 

PUOTO ENGRAVERS 

225 WEST 39™ STREET. NEW YODK 

AM90ICA N PPESS AS50CIA TION BLDO 



LEUMAS CARTOON SERVICE 

Producers of Animated i 
-.Films for eVe'ry purpose. ^ 
17^.45 tk St. TelBryant - 6806 



CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG 

Once more demonstrates her magnifi- 
cent art in 

"THE EYES OF YOUTH" 
We have made for this production a 
very artistic lobby display together 
with reproductions in fac-simile oil 
paintings from her latest poses in 
various sizes. 

KRAUS MFG. CO. 

220 West 42d Street 

17th Floor TeL 3607 Bryant 



paign against Sunday film shows 
was waged in the pulpits last Sun- 
day, record crowds attended the 
performances. Managers regard it 
as a demonstation in favor of such 
shows, although they admit that 
pleasant weather and good bills had 
a great deal to do with the large 
audiences. 



Greensboro, N. C. — Roland Hill 
and J. C. Hedgpeth have secured 
a long term lease on the Bevill Build- 
ing where they will erect another 
house. They control two local film 
theaters. 



Troy, Idaho.— E. P. H. Otterbine 
has just taken over the Grand. 



Phone Morningslde 6945 

Autos to Hire 
To the Moving Picture Trade 




IDEAL AUTO RENTING CO. 



AdT TITLES 

HAND LETTERING 

f'ALYNLU'f 

X PHONE 2.529 BRYANT X 



"WHERE PROMISES ARE SACRED" 

LOUIS MEYER 

FORMERLY BRODA & MEYER INC 

TITLES 

LETTERED - ILLUSTRATED - PHOrOORAPHE» 
ASK TO SEE OUR NEW 
PROCESS TITLES AND 
1 LLU STR ATIO N S 

A PHONE CALL WILL' BRING SAMPLB8 

BRYANT 7392 
220 WEST 42nd ST. - ROOMI2004 




There are 30 Reasons 



J* 


Ifih 


^A 


^^m 


W 


Bfti 


v 


^^^Sl* ' ^'^' 





why you should book, 

"The 
Screaming 
Shadow" 

REASON No. 26 

Molasses draws flies and a Mus- 
tard Plaster draws pain, but it 
takes a Ben Wilson Serial to 
draw Crowds. Watch for Rea- 
son No. 27 To-morrow. 

BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 

UNIVERSAL CITY CAL. 

Released through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK 

Foreign Rights conlrotted by Apollo Trading Corp. , 220 W. 48th St. 





7^BRADSTREET 
of FILMDOM 





J^RECOCHIZE[l 

xAuthoritV 



Vol. XI. No. 28 



Thursday, January 29, 1920 



Price 5 Cent* 



Pools Serial Makers 

Burston Lines Up Four Other Pro- 
ducers — Plans Minimum of Waste 
in Manufacturing 
Louis Burston, producer of "The 
Hawk's Trail," a serial with King 
Baggott, says he has perfected a 
pooling of interests with four inde- 
pendent serial producers with a po- 
ential combined output to state 
ight buyers 52 weeks a year. 

The names of his associates are 
)eing kept secret at this time. The 
dea in back of the move, however, 
vill result in a minimum of produc- 
ion waste and an interchange of 
deas so as to avoid repetition in 
tory materials. 

Burston planned coming east, but 
e is confined to his home in Cali- 
ornia. He will be in New York in 
bout three weeks. 



Want $1 Weekly for Ford Reel 

.Sydney S. Cohen, acting for M. P. 
!xhil)itors of N. Y. and affiliated 
odies, is protesting 'against th^ 
ew contract for Ford Weekly, 
'ohen has written Ford advising 
lat exhibitors will not consent to 
ic terms of the contract, whicli 
ill cost $52 annually, or $1 an issue. 

Cohen classes the Ford Weekly 
ith other advertising reels. 



Kunsky After Franchise 
(Sperifl to WW'S DAILY) 

Toronto — It is reported here that 
e First National franchise for 
astern Canada held by Henry 
rouse will be taken over by John 
unsky, of Detroit. The latter is a 
rst National man. 



Local First National officers claim 
know nothing about the above re- 
irt. 



Lehrmann Here 



enry Lehrmann, of the Lehr- 
'•^"■nn Comedies, is in town, stopping 
the Claridge. 



Sales Drive on Jewrel Pictures 

Universal beginning Sunday will 
lugurate a sales drive on Jewel 
■tures. The drive will be national 
scope and will last two weeks. 



Vscher Admits Deal 

(Sperinl to TF/D'.Sf DAILY) 
Chicago — Nathan Ascher, of the 
cher Brothers Circuit, has verified 
■ report that Goldwyn Pictures 
re bought a half interest in the 
cher Brothers houses. 




Fox Moving 

Practically in New Quarters Next 

Week — Exchange to Remain 

on 46th Street. 

The William Fox organization by 
next Monday will, for all practical 
purposes, be located in the studio 
building on 55th street and 10th ave- 
nue. The exchange will continue 
in the 46th street building, however. 
Many of the departments have al- 
ready moved and others are being 
moved daily. 

The grand housewarming will take 
place next May, when the laboratory 
will be completed. At that time all 
important Fox officials will be on 
hand. 

"Winnie" Sheehan leaves next 
month for Europe, but will return in 
time for the celebration. 

Arthur James will make several 
short trips and may go to England in 
March, but this is unlikely, because 
he would be on the other side only 
a month and his plans call for a 
longer stay abroad. 



He gazed into her eyes and saw re vealed a secret that made his heart 

pound. — From "Polly of the Storm Country," by Grace Miller White 

a First National Attraction. — Advt. 



Industry Not in Census 

No figures relative to the motion picture industry 
w^ill appear in the Census now being taken by the 
Government. 

This developed yesterday in news from Washington. 

The fact that the Government will not include any 
figures relative to either production or picture theaters, 
amount expended or numbers involved, will prove a 
tremendous disappointment to a number of executives 
who had reason to believe that figures relative to the 
industry would appear in the Census of 1920. The 
reason given is that the industry "is not a manufactur- 
ing industry in the sense of the word as included in 
the law." 



Andersen Back 

Robert Andersen, of Universal, re- 
turned to America aboard the Mau- 
retania on Tuesday. 



Seadler With Kane 

Silas Frank Seadler, formerly of 
the Realart publicity department, is 
now with the Arthur S. Kane Pict- 
ures Corp. 



Maxwell Milder Back 

Maxwell Milder, of the Selznick 
foreign department, returned yester- 
day from England. Edith Koch, for- 
merly L. J.'s private secretary, who 
went abroad relative to opening the 
Selznick offices, returned last week. 
This leaves Joe Plunkett as the sole 
executive abroad. He will look 
after the various Selznick enter- 
prises. 



"Romance" Started 

Chet Withey started work yester- 
day on "Romance" with Doris 
Keane. The production is being" 
made under the supervision of D. W. 
Griffith at the Mamaroneck studios^ 



Big 

A number 
associated w 
ization, the ' 
and J. Parke 
New York i 
two weeks, 
directors at 
according to 
the coast. 



Directors Here 

of important directors 
ith the new Ince organ- 
'Big Si-x" will meet Ince 
r Read when they reach 
n the next ten days or 
Two of the important 
least will be in town, 
a special despatch from 



Thursday, January 29, 1920 



^^^ |i<^i ^«58gS9 



VA II R*. 28 Thursday, Janoar; 29. 1920 Price 5 Ceati 



Copyright 1920, Wid's Film and Film Folks. 
Inc. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., 
New York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
FILM FOLKS, INC. 

P. C ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 
nirr; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 
and Editor; J. W. Alicoate, Secretary and 
Business Manager. 

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
mt the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
the act of March 3, 1879. 
Terms (Postage free) United States, Outside 
of Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 
months, $5.00; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, 
$15.00 

Subscribers should remit with order 

Address all communications to WID'S 

DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New 

York, N. Y. 

Telephone: Vanderbilt, 4551-4552-5558 
Hollywood, California 
Editorial and Business Offices: 6411 Holly- 
wood Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 

Chicago representatives — Willis, Eckels 
tnd Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 
Chicago. 111. 



Quotations 



Bid. Asked. 

Famous Players .... 80 82 

Goldwyn 31 31J4 

Loew's, Inc 30% 31 

Triangle Film % % 

United Pict. Prod. 15^ 16 

World Film — — 



Last 
Sale. 
81 

31K 

16 
1 



United Meets in Rochester. 
{Special to If ID'S DAILY) 

Rochester, N. Y. — A meeting of 
United Picture Theatre exhibitors 
was held at the Hayward Hotel here 
yesterday. J. A. Berst, president, 
and Harry Hall, vice president, at- 
tended the meeting. A large num- 
ber of exhibitors were present. 



COMING 

5 GREAT STARS 

in a Revival of 

"Tillie's 
Punctured 
Romance" 

Charlie Chaplin 
Mabel Normand 
Marie Dressier 
Chester Conklin 
Mack Swain 

TOWER FILM CORP. 

71 W. 23rdSt.,N. Y. 



jMi 



DAII.V 



In the Courts 

The Frohman Amusement Corp. 
has filed suit in the Supreme Court 
against World Film for $25,000. The 
complaint alleges that on October 30, 
1915, an agreement was made for 
the plaintiff to deliver to the de- 
fendant negatives of "Body and 
Soul," "The Woman in 47," "Then 
I'll Come Back to You" and "What 
Happened at 22." The defendant 
was to pay the plaintiff one-half of 
the gross amount collected from the 
films and it is alleged that the World 
received more than $50,000 



Mrs. Alice M. Long and Frank J. 
Marion have each filed a suit in the 
Supreme Court against W. W. Hod- 
kinson, Frederick L. Collins, Hol- 
land S. Duell and Raymond Pawley. 
The nature of the suits is not shown 
by the papers on file. 



All Set for Wrestling Match 
Jack Cohn has changed his plans 
for shooting the Stecher-Caddock 
wrestling bout at Madison Square 
Garden to-morrow night. 

He will use six Sunlight Arc 
lamps instead of Wohl lights and 
have the arcs changed every hour 
so as to eliminate all possibilities of 
missing out. The bout is expected 
to run several hours, but the cam- 
eras will grind every minute of the 
period. 



Roy Sheldon With Capital 
Chicago — Roy Sheldon, who was 
identified with the original Reliance 
Company and others, will direct a 
series of features for Capital, which 
has been producing short reel stuf? 
to date. 




RITCHEY Posters are 
same size and shape as 
other posters, which is 
about all they have in 
common. 

RITCHEY 

LITHO. CORP. 

406 W. 31>t St.,N.Y., PiMDe Cbebu 8388 




Vocal Chorus for Rivoli-Rialto 

Hugo Riesenfeld has engaged a 
chorus of mixed voices for the Ri- 
voli and Rialto. The first perform- 
ance will be given on Sunday. There 
will be a minimum of 20 voices. . 

The Capitol announced earlier in 
the week that an ensemble of 76 
voices had been engaged for that 
theatre, while operettas running 
about 55 minutes will be produced 
weekly, beginning Sunday. 



Blackburn at Claridge 
Edward O. Blackburn, productior 
manager for Rothacker Film Manu- 
facturing Company, Chicago, is ir 
town, stopping at the Claridge. 



The Sick List 

Arthur F. Beck is confined to hi; 
home with a cold. 

E. J. Hudson, of First National 
has been hit by the "flu." 



Four Pathe Specials in February 

Pathe will release during Febru- 
ary the following: Crauford Kent, 
"Other Men's Shoes;" June Caprice, 
"In Walked Mary;" Sylvia Breamer 
and Robert Gordon, "Respectable by 
Proxy," and Frank Keenan, "Smoul- 
dering Embers." 



Katherine Hilliker With Burr 

Katherine Hilliker, whose humor- 
ous titles in Chester scenics have at- 
tracted a good deal of attention, i; 
now with Master Films, Inc., pro- 
ducers of the "Torchy" comedies 
with Johnny Hines. Charles C. Bun 
is president of the company. 



THE YEAR'S GREATEST "CLEAN 
UP" WIRE TODAY! 

The Pioneer Film Corporation Has Purchased Exclusive 
Motion Picture Rights of 

The World's Championship Wrestling Match Between 

JOE STECHER 

and 

EARL CADDOCK 

To Be Held at Madison Square Garden, January 30, 1920 

The Greatest Sporting Event of the Decade 

For State Rights and Direct Bookings Apply Immediately to 

PIONEER FILM CORPORATION 

130 West 46th Street New York City 

Special Paper and Full Line of Advertising Accessories 




'There is no mystery 
about Insurance" 



Insurance has long been recognized as the fundamental principle 
of sound business management. It is the protection that can be gained 
in no other earthly way. Make up your mind to act right now. Our 
advice without obligation is yours for the asking. 



Peuben CXmuels 

IX^XAL 4lN^ ERVICE 

R /nrurance ' " ' SO Mstdan Laae 



» Phone John 5485 - 5-*2« - 54 



^.''i'^ 



Samuek 



-jMA 



DAILV 



Thursday, January 29, 192( 



Comedy Unit Expands 

Facts and Follies, releasing a ser- 
ies of one reel comedies through 
Pioneer have reorganized and as a 
result will have two companies pro- 
ducing. 

One will be in charge of Dale 
Henshaw and the other, Ralph 
Whiteing. Both are now en route 
to Jacksonville where they will start 
work. 

Bernarr McFadden, who heads 
the company has appointed John S. 
Reilly as personal representative. 



Ft. Dodge Rialto Opens 

{/Special to WID'S I'AlLY) 
Ft. Dodge, Iowa. — W. A. Johnson 
owns the New Rialto which has 
opened. It was erected at a cost 
of $125,000 and seats 1,000. 



Wants Site for $250,000 House 
Oklahoma City, Okla.— H. C. 
Brice has offered $9,996 per year for 
a 99 year lease on a site for a house 
to cost $250,000. He owns the 
Strand recently closed. 



Marion Firm Chartered 

Indianapolis, Ind. — The Marion 
Theater Co. of Marion, owners of 
the Lun-Lite and Marion has been 
chartered here with a capital of $500, 
000. The officers are C. L. Branigan, 
president; Alfred Hogston, vice-pres- 
ident; Fred Bahr, treasurer, and Wil- 
liam Connors, secretary and general 
manager. Reported that the firm 
will erect a new house in Marion. 



:ity 



New Firm Organized 
Buffalo, N. Y. — Harry Marsey, Al- 
bert Becker, Herman Lorence, Hen- 
ry C. Price and Harry G. Ess are 
respectively president, vice president, 
secretary and treasurer of the Gen- 
eral Theaters Corp., which v/ill i'.ay 
and erect houses in Buffalo. It has 
headquarters at the Brisljane Build- 
ing. Plans for the erection of the 
Coliseum on the cast siile are re- 
ported. 



Kremer Moves to Bigger Quarters 

Victor Kremer Film l<"calures. Inc. 
will move from the Longacre to the 
Lcavitt Building, where they will 
have half the floor. 

Kremer returned to New York this 
week, after a trip through the ex- 
change centers of the United States 
and Canada. 



Omaha, Neb.— W. L. Baker of 
Des Moines has purchased the Bou- 
levard. 



Iretown, Iowa. — M. L. Mitchel 
has sold the Opera House to A. G. 
Muir. 



I WANT TO BUY 

EDUCATIONAL FILMS 

Showing source of produc- 
tion, Native tnethods of 
cultivating and harvesting 
Stages of preparation of 
raw materials — 
Packing for export ship- 
ment — 

200 TO 500 FEET 

EACH OF THE 

FOLLOWING 

Cinnamon — Ginger Root 

— Cocoanuts — Cocoa — 
Allspice — Oils of Lemon 
and Orange — Pine Apples 

— Currants ■ — Vanilla — 
French Walnuts — Nut- 
megs — ■ Mace — Cloves — 
Sugar — Etc. — Etc. — 

Also Want Aviator and 
Aerial Cameraman for 
Work in New York. 

Edward O. Blackburn 
Representing 

FILM 

MFG. CO. 

Hotel Claridge New York 
Broadway & 44th St. 




FOR^RENT-STUDIO SPACE 

in new studio located in Culver City, Calif, with latest modern 
equipment of stages, lighting, dressing rooms, offices, etc. 
Address Box 10, WID'S DAILY, 

Phone Hollywood 1603- 

Hollywood, Calif. 



Hoquiam House to Cost $100,000 
(Special to IVID'S DAILY) 
Hoquiam, Wash. — Henry New- 
man, owner of the Arcade and Lib- 
erty here will erect a new house 
costing $100,000. 

JOE BRANDT— 



1600 Broadway, N. Y. 
Will give you all the 
dope on 



KENTUCim 
COLONELT 



National Film Corp. 
of America 



CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG 
Once more demonstrates her magnifi- 
cent art in 

"THE EYES OF YOUTH" 

We have made for this production a 
very artistic lobby display together 
with reproductions in fac-simile oil 
paintings from her latest poses in 
various sizes. 

ERAUS MFG. CO. 

220 West 42d Street 

17th Floor TeL 3607 Bryant 




Send Us Your 



Hifhesi Prices 

INTERSTATE 
(SL REFINING 

23 Commercial St. 



SMELTING 
COMPANY 

NEWARK. N. J. 



PICTURE RIGHTS FOR 

SALE 

"The Last Laugh," 

By E. W. Hornung 

A Raffles Story. 

CELEBRATED AtJTHOKS SOC. 

Boom 803 Columbia Theatre Bldg. 

Tel. Bryant 1511 




TVPHOON COMPANY 



281 LEXINGTON AVE. 

1044 Camp Street 
New Orleans, La. 



NEW YORK, N. Y. 

64 West Randolph Street 
Chicago, lU^ 



A Gigantic Picturization of Edgar Rice Burroughs* Latest and Biggest Book 

"THE RETURN OF TARZAN" 



jIj] Plans for distribution now 
pi; being formulated 



Address inquiries to 

Numa Pictures Corporation 

LONGACRE BLDG., Suite 523.5 

Phone: Bryant 4416 



Thursday, January 29, 1920 



isM^ 



DAIUY 



Hawkins Back 

F. J. Hawkins of the Producers 
icurity Corp. is back in town from 
ilifornia. 



Reissuing "Skinner's Dress Suit" 

Victor Krcnier has revived "Skin- 
r's Dress Suit," which Bryant 
"ashburn made for Essanay. Will 
sold on state right market. 



(l New Comedy Star for Pathe 
{Upecial to WW'S DAILY) 

l.os Angeles — Beatrice La Plante 
; ill become a star in a series of ec- 
ntric comedies for Pathe, accord- 
g to report here. Miss La Plante 
as last seen in support of Haya- 
twa in "The Beggar Prince." 



The local Pathe offices knew noth- 
g about the report. 



Kelley Going to Washington 

W. D. V. Kelley, technical ad- 
viser of Priznia leaves for Washino- 
ton to-day preparatory to the hear- 
ing to be held before the exa.Tiiners 
of interference of the United States 
Patent Office to-morrow. 

The litigation involves iho inven- 
tion of colored motion picvures and 
is between Prizma and Arthur Her- 
nandez of the Colorgraph Labora- 
tory, Inc., New Rochelle. Kelley 
has retained • J. S. Wooster. New 
York and Church and Church, 
Washington, as his attorneys in the 
matter. 

Frederic Thomson and Madge 
Evans are now in California pro- 
ducing a series of short reel dra- 
matic subjects for Prizma. The first 
of these is "The Little Match Girl." 



Don't Use These Signs 

Ivutgers Neilson of Timely Films, 

c, producers of "Topics of the 

ay" has compiled the following 

t of signs actually used by thea- 

rs to which patrons go for amuse- | 

snt: 

Watch Your Wife every night this 

:ek. 

Mother and I Need You for three 

ys beginning Nov. 30th. 

Gcradine Farrar supported for the 

St time by her husband. 

Her Wedding Night every night 

is week. 



Hampton in New Studio 
(Special to PVID'S DAILY) 
Hollywood, Cal. — Jesse D. Hamp- 
ton Prod, have moved from 1425 
Fleming street to the new studio at 
7100 Santa Monica Boulevard. 




WFR 



JHE SENSATION OF THE CENTURY 

Directed by Frank Reicher 

The "paper" — a striking 24-sheet, two 
sixes, two threes and three kinds of ones 
— banners, business-compelling, talk-cre- 
ating "snipes," slides and newspaper lay- 
outs are MORE reasons why everybody 
in your town will soon be talking about 
"EMPTY ARMS." Midnight oil has 
been burned to make the campaign a 
KNOCK-OUT. 

IT IS! 

PHOTOPLAY LIBRARIES, INC. 

(Exclusive Selling Agents) 
500 Fifth Avenue, New York City 



Jjc^tcr 'Park 6" 
6cUtfcmiXDKite5vdc 



Keenan in Baltimore 

Frank Keenan is in Baltimore with 
Ed Wynn, his son-in-law. Mr. Kee- 
nan couldn't wait until son-in-law's 
new play reached New York, so he 
went down there to see it. 



Baremore in New Quarters 

R. W. Baremore, publicity head 
for United Pictures, is now on the 
eleventh floor of the Brokaw Build- 
ing. Permanent headquarters there. 



JOHN J. LIVINGSTON 

Motion Picture Representative 

For 

STARS— DIRECTORS 

1440 Broaidway New York 



LOUIS SHERWIN 

Continuity 

Screen Gutting and Titling 

Now Assistant 

to 

J. G. Hawks 

of 

Goldwyn 

Author of 

"BONDS OF LOVE" 

for 

Pauline Frederick 



Eight Years dramatic critic New 
York Globe, contributor Ameri- 
can, Metropolitan, Smart Set, 

Vanity Fair and other magazines. 



Latest Chaplin Sales 

Five Chaplin reissues sold by Vic- 
tor Kremer to Herman Rifkin of 
Boston, Independent Masterfilms, 
Inc. for Michigan; Essenel Prod, for 
Ohio; all except "Burlesque;" Eas- 
tern Canada, David Amus. Enter- 
prises. 



Install Equipment in Church 

Ashtabula, O. — Motion .iintiire 
equipment has been installed in the 
First Presbyterian Church basement 
where films will be exhibited here- 
after. 



H. H. VAN LOAN 

Recent Releases 

Tom Mix in 

"The Speed Maniac" 

Earle Williams in 

"When a Man Loves" 

121 West Eulalia Street 

Glendale, California 

"If it is a Van Loan story it 

must be good" 

GEORGE ELWOOD JENKS 

Continuity and Specials 

"A Woman of Pleasure" 

Blanche Sweet Special 

"The Pagan God" 

starring H. B. Warner 

"Dangerous Waters" 

Original for Wm. Desmond 

JESSE D. HAMPTON 
Productions 





There are 30 Reasons 



why you should book, 

"The 
Screaming 
Shadow" 

REASON No. 27 

Booking a Ben Wilson Serial 
Is the same to Mr. Exhibitor 
as a receipt of deposit from the 
bank. Watch for Reason No. 28 
to-morrow. 

BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 

UNIVERSAL CITY CAL. 

Released through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK ^i 

Foreign Rights cootrolled by Apollo Trading Corp.. 220 W. 48th St. 






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7^BRADSTREET 
o/ FILMDOM 





7/cRECOCHIZED^ 

AuthoritV 



Vol. XI, No. 30 



Saturday, January 31, 1920 



Price 5 Cent* 



Abrams Explains 

Tells of Securing Minneapolis Audi- 
torium for "Big Four" Product — 
Row With Ruben & Finkelstein 

Hiram .Shrams, i^cncral manager 
of United Artists, explained yester- 
day the split between his organiza- 
tion and Ruhen and Finkelstein, of 
Minneapolis. 

Aljrams stated that "I'ollyanna" 
had been booked for Minneapolis by 
R. and F. The latter encreavored to 
secure the film for Duluth, where 
L'nited Artists had previously closed 
a contract. R. and F., stated .Abrams, 
wanted to secure the film for Dnluth 
because they "wanted to run a com- 
petitor out of business." 

United Artists refused to accede 
to R. and F.'s demand, with the re- 
sult that the latter threatened to 
break the Minneapolis contract. 
Abrams advised them to go ahead. 

.'Kn arrangement was then perfect- 
ed between E. L. Carpenter and H. 
C. Clark, owners of the Minneapolis 
.'\uditoriinu whereby the "Big Four" 
jjroduct will be shown in that the- 
atre, formerly occiipled by the Sym- 
phony Orchestra. The opening date 
has been set for March 29 with "Pol- 
lyanna" or "When the Clouds Roll 
By" as the opening attraction. The 
opening film will run four weeks. 

"We are not out after theatres." 
said Mr. Abrams yesterday, "but we 
are determined that our pictures 
shall be shown in every town in 
the United States, whether we show 
them in a school or a tent." 



Bershon With First National 
{Ihl Wire to WIDS DAILY) 

Los Angeles. — Dave Bershon, for 
the past 11 years manager or Uni- 
versal Exchange, and one of the 
best known and j^est liked managers 
on the coast, has taken the position 
as manager for First National Ex- 
hibitors' Exchange here under the 
regime of Gore & Lesser. 

Pathe is building a new exchange 
here between Ninth and Tenth, on 
Olive St., and First National will 
move into Pathc's old offices Mar. 1. 

C. L. Theuerkauf, former assistant 
manager of Universal Exctiange, has 
been promoted to the position of 
manager. 



Brandt Returns 

Joe Brandt, of National Film, re- 
turned to New York from Cleveland 
yesterday. He went ttierc from At- 
lanta. 



Wells Here 

Jake Wells uf Ivichmond, \'a. 
in town. 




"And then you're not my brother after all. I'm so glad, for I — I 
love you". — From Marshall Neilan's first production from his own stu- 
dios, "The River's End," by James Oliver Curwood, a First National at- 
traction. — Advt. 



Rosson Directing for Winchell Smith 

(/ii/ U'ire hi ]Vfl>-S DAILY) 

Los .'Kngeles. — .A.rthur Rosson, 
who has just completed "Polly of 
the Storm Country" with Mildred 
Harris Chaplin, and recently finished 
"Splendid Hazard" for Mayflower, 
has been engaged to direct the first 
feature to be produced by Winchell 
Smith. Production will be started 
wihin a few days at Douglas Fair- 
Itanks' studio. 



Building for Pathe 

Pathe Exchange, Inc., has leased 
from the architect's b ue-prints the 
12 story building which will be erect- 
ed at 35-39 W. 45th St.. a short dis- 
tance west of the building in which 
Pathe now makes its headquarters. 
Pathe will pay $65,000 yearly as a 
rental figure. The lease will run 
until Jan. 1. 1942. 



Goldwyn Buys "Bunty" 

'oldwyn has purchased screen 
ri,L Its Id "Bunty Pulls the Strings" 
pr duced by Cleveland Moffat on 
the stage several seasons ago. 

Other plays acquired by Goiawyn 
are "A Tailor Made Man," a Co- 
han and Harris play and "The 
i'rulh," by Clyde Fitch. 



Bartlett Back With Selznick 

Randolph E5artlett who resigned a 
few months ago as head of the Selz- 
nick and Select publicity and ad- 
vertising to go with F'hotoplay is 
now en route east to rejoin the Selz- 
nick staff. His future activities have 
not as yet been defined but he will 
have an executive position. 



Holubar Issues Statement 
Neil P. McCarthy, attorney for 
Allen Holubar, has issued a lengthy 
statement explaining Holubar's rea- 
sons for breaking away from Uni- 
versal. 



Hart Sues Ince 

For $100,000— Property of Grea 
Western Prod. Attached — An- 
other Suit Threatened. 
{Bi/ Wire to WIDS DAILY) 

Los Angeles.— William S. Har 
has filed suit here through his attor 
ney, Henry Wetherhorn, agains: 
Thomas H. Ince for $100,832.44 
Great Western Productions, Inc. 
formerly William 5. Hart Produc 
tions, also named as defendant ir 
the action. Suit was filed as an at 
tachment suit and the property o: 
the Great Western concern was at 
tached. Because of this details o: 
the suit were to be kept secret untij 
the attachment was levied. 

The action grew out of a compli- 
cated motion picture deal by whicl 
William S. Hart Productions becam* 
tlie Great Western Productions, wit! 
one-half its capital stock issued tc 
Hart and one-half to Ince. The dea 
was to be consummated, it was al- 
leged on condition that Ince wouh 
assign to the corporation his inter- 
est in the contract with Artcraf 
Pictures Corp.. by which the pro- 
ductions were to be released and dis- 
tributed. A contract was involvec 
by which Hart was to receive $1,00( 
a week in salary, and a large addi- 
tional sum weekly on account a 
guaranteed profits or dividends. Th( 
complaint then recited that Hart ac- 
cepted employment on these term! 
with the Great Western Compan] 
and 16 pictures were completed be- 
tween July, 1917, and July, 1919 
Hart alleged the profits or dividend) 
of the Great Western exceeded one; 
third the total gross receipts b1 
$201,664.88. Under the terms of thi 
contract Hart alleged he was en] 
titled to one-half this sum. Grea' 
Western Productions, according t< 
the complaint, is acting now only ii 
capacity of collecting receipts fron 
the 16 productions from the Art 
craft Company, its function as a pro 
ducing concern having ended witi 
the completion of the 16 pictures. 

Wetherhorn states after this sui 
is settled another suit for $100„00( 
will be filed for moneys due Hart ii 
connection with the percentage ar 
rangements of other productions. 



Ince Special at B.oadway 

"Dangerous Hours " a personalh 
supervised Thomas H. Ince produc- 
tion directed by Fred Niblo, will b« 
the feature at Moss' Broadway be 
ginning to-morrow. i 

A new musical comedy revue en| 
t'tled "Pardon Me."" with A. Sev 
]uonr Brown, will also be on th< 
programme. 



■Saturday, January 31, 1920 



bM^ 



DAILV 




]ri.IIIb30 SatDr<U;.J*naai7 31. 1920 PriMSCnU 

1 ll'i : !■ J 'i 'iill l .. ' ' ' 

opynght 1920, Wid's Film and Film Folks. 
nc. Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St, 
lew York, N. Y., by WID'S FILMS and 
.'ILM FOLKS, INC. 

'. C. ("Wid") Gunning, President and Treas- 
rer; Joseph Dannenberg, Vice-President 
1 ad Editor; J. W. Alicoate, SecreUry and 
lusiness Manager. 

entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, 
.1 the post office at New York, N. Y., under 
'he act of March 3, 1879. 
'erms (Postage free) United States, Outside 
i Greater New York, $10.00 one year; 6 
■aonths, $5.00; 3 months, $3.0a Foreign, 
15.00 

t Subscribers should remit with order 
Address all communications to WID'S 
DAILY, 71-73 West -Hth St., New 
York, N. Y. 
Telephone: Vandorijilt, 4551-4552-5558 
Hollywood, California 
iditorial and Business Offices: 6411 Holly- 
rood Blvd. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 
• Chicago representatives— Willis, Eckels 
",nd Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers Bldg., 
'."hicago, 111. 



Quotations 

Last 
Bid. Asked. Sale. 



-"amous Players 

; Do pfd 

joldwyn 



81 

88; 

30 



iV4 



82 
90 

31K 



'_oew s Inc 

': Triangle Film 54 

I Jnited Pict. Prod. ISV'o 

World Film — 



16 



H 



8934 
31 

30/8 
H 

16 
1 



Gray Switched to St. Louis. 

Paul Gray, formerly assistant to 
VTark Gates at the Dayton Theatre, 
nd later exploitation man attached 
:o the New York Select Exchange, 
las been switched to the St. Louis 
;xchange. Gray's work here has 
)een taken up by members of the 
;xisting stafif. 



COMING 

5 GREAT STARS 

in a Revival of 

^Tillie^s 
Punctured 
Romance'' 

Charlie Chaplin 
Mabel Normand 
Marie Dressier 
Chester Conklin 
Mack Swain 

TOWER FILM CORP. 

71 W. 23rdSt.,N. Y. 



SUNDAY SHOWS 
AND CENSORSHIP 

Will Prosecute for Violation 
(Special to tVID'S DAILY) 

Fort Worth, Tex. — According to 
statements issued by Jesse M. 
Brown, district attorney, and W. H. 
Tolbert, assistant district attorney, 
exhibitors who attempt to sliow pic- 
tures on Sundays will be prosecut- 
ed, according to the law which for- 
bids performances on the Sabbath 
in this state, if the sherJfF files com- 
plaints. 



E. M. Asher Expectca 

E. M. Asher, Mack Sennett's per- 
sonal representative, is expected in 
New York from the Coast, daily. 



Record Week for Famous Players 

H. H. Buxbaum, local exchange 
manager for Famous Players re- 
ports that the week ending last Sat- 
urday was a record one for Famous 
Players in New York State so far 
as cash rentals are concerned. 

He has just returned to the office 
after a sliort siege of the "flu." 



Loew Books F. P. Films 

The Loew Circuit in Greater i>few 
York has booked "Everywoman,," 
Feb. 16; "The Copperhead," March 
8; "On With the Dance," March 22, 
and "What's Your Husband Doing?" 
IVlarch 22. All Paramount-Artcrafts. 



Wilmont, Minn. — G. E. Kiser wiil 
spend $10,000 on a new house. 






Studios on 48th St. 

Available for Four Weeks 
75 by 110 ft. 

Apply 

ED. SMALL 

1493 Broadway 

Bryant 2389 






The high cost of things 
generally forces the exhib- 
itor to either cut his stan- 
dard of living, or use an 
increased number o f 
RITCHEY posters. 

R ITC HEY 

i.iriio. ct>KP. 

406 W. 31>t St..N.Y.. Pbone Ckdu* g38« 




J. W. Allen Dead 

Word was received in the local 
Famous Players office of the death 
yesterday from double pneumonia of j 
John W. Allen, special representa- 
tive for the company in Chicago. 
Mr. Allen was sick a weetv. 
■ He entered the film business as an 
operator then went to Warner's and 
subsequently with Universal, and 
Famous Players. Allen worked in 
very close contact with "Al" Licht- 
man, general manager of distribu- 
tion. 



Keeler Delivers Talk 

H. P. Keeler delivered a talk last 
niglit before the photoplay club of 
the School of Journalism, Columbia 
University. Mr. Keeler spoke on 
the development of photoplay plots. 



Unique Stunt for Ending Film 

Metro has just arranged a unique 
stunt for "The Right of Way," Bert 
Lytell's latest vehicle. Two endings 
have been prepared; one a happy 
one and the other an unhappy one. 
The exhibitor has his choice. 



Rothapfel in Chicago 
(By Wire to WW'S DAILY) 
Chicago. — S. L. Rothapfel, of Gold- 
wyn, is here. He is keeping his mis- 
sion very dark, but it appears to have 
something to do with the securing 
of a director general for the Gold- 
wyn theatres. 



Rosebud, Mont. — W. L. Kennedy, 
O. G. Valentine, and E. M. Reid 
have purchased the T. and T. from 
Guy Thomas. 



Incorporates 

Albany, N. Y.— D. E. Goldfarb, S. 
H. Zimmerman and Selma Lessing, 
of 35 Nassau St., New York City, 
are named as the principal stock- 
holders of the Celebrated Authors' 
Society, Ltd., which was incorporat- 
ed with the Secretary of State. Cap- 
ital. $10,000. Will engage in a gen- 
eral motion picture business. 



Morristown, Minn.. — G. Sower 
will have the Uno redecorated. 



DIRECTOR 

Of long experience and 
established reputation 

• 

SEEKS NEW CONNECTION 

For Interview 

Address 

Director in care of Wid*s Daily 




DONT BE 
TOO LATE 



An ounce of prevention is worth a poimd of cure — Old Man 
Misfortune never warns of his coming — Perhaps you're next 
on his calling list — But — You'll keep him away with insur- 
ance — Phone us — to-day. 




ITAL 

Jm-uratiKQ 

Pi i one Jolin 



4WCJ 1 



EUBEN CXMUELS 



ERVICE 
SO Maiden Lane 



Saoitsel^ 




zaHd 



DAIUY 



Saturday, January Jl, 1^(20 



T^atkeNe^vs 



TATHE NKWS NO. 9 

PARIS, FRANCE.— A view of the 
French capital Hooded by the rising 
■waters of tlie Seine. 

OAKLAND, CAI>.— Plane lands in heart i E„,press, Ballard, Ye College Play 



Seattle Firm After More Houses 
iSf^nat to tyiD'S DAILY) 

Seattle, Wash.— The G. & G. The- 
ater Co. has been incorporated by 
Donald and Myrtle Geddes for $500,- 
000. Geddes is president, Harry 
Sigmond is general manager. Prop- 
erty owned outright by the company 
ncludes the Majestic, Ballard, the 



Griffin Enterprises Prospering 



Toroiitd. Canada -Griffin Enter., 
Ltd. now owns six houses here, in- 
stead of the three owned when it 
succeeded Griffin Amusement Co. 



of city. Daring aviator brings his air 
plane to rest on the main thoroughfare 
of business district. 

IN THK LIMBI.KJIIT. — American girl a 
captain in d'Annunzio's army. Miss Vera 
Bloom, who was an officer in Flume 
forces, returns to II. S. 

(ierman Minister attached. Mathias 
Erzberger, Minister of Finance, who was 
shot by assassin. 

' Marshall Petain 



house, Seattle, Fremont, Fremont. 
They also own the site and plans 
for a new theater to be erected this 
summer in the University district 
and have plans for three others. 

The plan is to specialize in neigh- 
borhood houses. The Geddes' have 
been operating Ye College Play 



New French war chief. Marshall I'etain [ , / the nast four vears In 

is appointed commander-in-chief of the "OUSe tor the past rour years. in 
French army. 'June, 1917, Sigmond organized the 

An odd accident. S. S. Hortense ar- Morthwest Film Board of J rade. 
rives in New York with dummy smoke 

Edwards Leaves Hallmark 
{Special to WID'S DAILY ^ 
Kansas City, Mo. — C. S. Edwards, 
Jr., formerly manager of the local 
Hallmark office has resigned to as- 
sume with his father, C. S. Edwards, 
Sr., the active management of the 
E.xhibitors Film Co., a local distrib- 
uting organization. 



Universal Sells Foreign Rights. 

Universal has sold United King- 
dom rights to "Blind Husbands" to 
E. Wertheim, of London, and "The 
Right to Happiness" for Argentine, 
Uruguay and Paraguay to American 
Products Exchange. 



stack. The real one was carried away 
in a storm. 

PHOENIX PARK, IREL.AND.— First 
pictures arriving here showing scenes o£ 
recent attack on Lord French, Lord 
Lieutenant of Ireland. The vice-regal 
lodge where attack was made. 
The gates are closely guarded. 
Lieutenant Boas, killed during the at- 
tack, is buried by his comrades. 

A strong military force is being kept 
all over Ireland now. Guarding Kings- 
ton Harbor gate. 

Armored cars are a familiar sight, as, 
well as squads of troops. 

FRESNO, CAL. — Huge Kerckhoff Dam 
finished for hydro-electric plant — it is 
12.5 feet high, 400 feet long and took 7 
months to construct. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. — Ask extension 
of rail control. Delegates of Labor, 
Farmers and R. R. Brotherhoods call at 
White House to present plea to extend 
government operation. 

SARANAC LAKE, N. Y.— Tie for skat- 
ing title — Roy McWhirter and Everett 
McGowan share equal honor in national 
championship race. Scenes of race from 
"finish to start." 

MEXICO CITY, BIEX. — Japanese sail- 
ors entertained by Mexicans — Senoritas 
give festival for cadets from visiting 
Nipponese cruiser Yakumo. 

PARIS, FRANCE — Great War officially 
ended in Europe — First pictures showing 
the historic scenes of the ratification of 
the Peace Treaty and Protocol ending the 
war. 

The leaders of the different nations ar- 
rive at the Qiiai d'Orsay to sign the 
documents. 

Premier Nitti of Italy is the only fig- 
ure at the ceremony. 

Crowds gather outside the building to 
witness the final scenes of the momentous 
event. 

The signing of the Protocol. 



Latest Chaplin Sales 

Five Chaplin reissues sold by Vic- 
tor Kremer to Herman Rifkin of 
Boston, Independent Masterfilnis, 
Inc. for Michigan; Essenel Prod, for 
Ohio; all except "Burlesque;" Eas- 
tern Canada, David Amus. Enter- 
prises. 



tod 



ay 



Bugie Leaves Pathe. 
Atlanta, Ga.— Harry A. Bugie, who 
has been manager of the local Pathe 
Exchange for the past two years, 
has resigned to accept a position as 
sales manager for Dwyer Brothers, 
of Cincinnati, Ohio, to take effect 
Feb. 1. 



Livingstone Still With Talmadges. 
Beulah Livingstone complains that 
three people have been after her jol) 
of looking after the Talmadge sis- 
ter's publicity. Miss Livingstone 
says that she will remain there de- 
spite her affiliation with Wentworth- 
Livingstone, Inc., players' represen- 
tatives. 



In loving memory 

JOSEPH KAUFMAN 

Died, February 1, 1918 

Ethel Clayton Kaufman 





INDEPENDENT? ^ 

Of course, we are. 
As long as we can produce pic- 
tures like 



KENTUCim 
COLONEir 



We will always be independent. 

THE NATIONAL FILM 
CORP. OF AMERICA 



There are 30 Reasons 



why you should book, 

*The 
Screaming 
Shadow" 

REASON No. 29 

There is nothing so success- 
ful as success. Ben Wilson's 
serial productions have all 
l>een successes. Watch for 
Reason No. 30 to-morrow. 

BEN WILSON 
PRODUCTIONS 





UNIVERSAL CITY 

[Released through 

HALLMARK PICTURES 

130 W. 46th Street NEW YORK 

Foreign Rights controlled by Apollo Trading Corp. , 220 W. 4Sth St. 



CAL 




THE GREATEST EVER 

EXCLUSIVE PICTURES OF THE WORLD'S CHAMPIONSHIP WRESTLING MATCH 

STECHER vs. CADDOCK 



First Showing GEORGE M. COHAN THEATRE, Sunday Night, Feb. 1, 1920 

For State Rights and Direct Bookings Act Immediately 
PIONEER FILIVI CORPORATION, 130 West 46th Street, New York City 



iv'r ].:*T^^iiB>CTiTtfp«r!'M 



\i 



Saturday, January 31, 1920 



■jM^ 



DAIUY 



JONOGRAMS 

If We Visual News gf 

ALL THE World 

I'LAXK ANI> TU(J IN A GALE SAVE 

ICE BOVND SHIP. — Aviator sailed out 

; !in blizzard to drop food bomb on ship 

I ^eld six miles off Chicago harbor — tug 

With supplies battles way through floes 

in effort to liberate hungry crew. 

' } DO(J TEAMS KACE AT CARNIVAE.— 

Woman handles team that wins event in 

'.winter sports at Quebec — snow shoe club 

lj;oes for a hike. 



LANDS .AEROPI..\NE IN STREET.— 



^Daring bird man drops into Oakland. Cal- 
ifornia, but skids on wet pavement and 
ihits a lamp post. 

• HOLD HORSE RACES IN SNOW.— 
jTrotters hitched to light cutters turn 
jOut for winter meeting at Brighton, 
TMass. make fast time. 
I LONDON HAS COAL SHORTAGE. — 
' jCit.v officials establish suppl.v stations for 
the need.v and long lines of push carts 
form in streets. 

BRIN(i TREATY PETITION FROM 
CALIFORNIA— Mrs. Aurelia H Rein- 
ibardt, president of Mills College, hands 
ito Senator Phelan in Washington, re- 
quest of 20.000 women for ratification. 
. J. FROST IN PHIL.4DELPHIA.— He 
finds the parks delightful but onl.v the 
.Polar bear gives him unqualified en- 
dorsement while water fowl complain at 
added work. 

' SON OF BRITISH PREMIER VISITS 
AMERIC.4— Major Richard Lloyd George 
with his wife arrives in New York — 
-other notables here. 

A PEEP INTO GRAND CANYON — 
Cameraman makes winter stop at famous 
gorge and finds clouds 'i,00 feet below 
him are sprinkling floor of canyon with 
'snow. 

I DO<i SEEKS M.ASTER TRAVELS 900 
MILES. — .lack, famous airdale who tra- 
veled from Edmonton to Vancouver all 
alone. 

FISHER.MEN DON'T AIIND THE 
COLI>. — A lot of them go to ake Sun- 
apee, N. H. cut holes in the 18-inch ice 
and do some fanc.v angling. 

lil'ILD SCHOOL TO HONOR KOOSE 
[VELT. — Former President's son. I.t. Col. 
J Roosevelt takes i)art in cornerstone lay- 
, Ing in New Rochelle. N. Y. 

DISTRIBU'»'RD BY 
: REPUBLIC DISTRIBUTING 

[ CORPORATION 

i:f — 

)' Universal Changes in the Field. 
Universal announces the following 
field changes: 

J. H. Ca vert, appointed manati;cr 
Kansas City Exchange, succeeding 
W. R. Wilkerson. 
I H. v. f.efholz, manager of the 
Omaha office, succeeding J. H. Cal- 
vert. 

Edgar Haines, manager of Des 
Moines office, succeeding F. H. 
Frisch. 




JOHN J. LIVINGSTON 

Motion Picture Representative 

For 

STARS— DIRECTORS 

1440 Broaxlway New York 



For Open Market 

The series of Al St. John come- 
dies being produced by Warner 
Bros, will be state righted. 

Originally, Famous Players had 
handled them Init since that organi- 
zation has discontinued its short 
reel department, the three comedies 
which it has had to date have been 
returned to the Warners who are 
now getting ready for release. 

Celebrated Players of Chicago 
have bought "The Lost City," for 
Indiana and Illinois. 



Carewe Returns With Feature 

Edwin Carewe returned from Cal- 
ifornia yesterday with the negative 
of "Rio Grande." Mr. Carewe 
turned the print over to Pathe who 
will act as distributor. 



Giles' $300,000 House 
The George A. Giles Co. has 
signed contracts for their new $300,- 
000 playhouse to be erected at South 
Framingham, Mass., to seat 1,800. 
The Giles Co. already operate the 
I Gorman in that town. 

The same company has set Febru- 
ary 23d as the opening date for the 
new Gardner Theatre at Gardner, 
Mass. This theatre, seating 1,200, is 
remodelled from the old store and 
up-stairs theatre into a modern 
down-stairs playhouse, being entire- 
ly new throughout with the excep- 
tion of the four walls. The Giles 
Company have for some time oper- 
ated the Orpheum there. 



Smith of Cleveland Wins 

E. J. Smith, manager of (Jniver- 
sal's exchange in Cleveland won the 
first prize in Universal's $6,000 con- 
test for his office. 

He wires he was aided in winning 
the contest by the untiring loyalty 
and a whole-souled belief in the ex- 
cellence of Universal tilms by every 
man under him. 



Lesser Moves 

(Special to WW'S DAILY) 
Los Angeles. — Sol Lesser has 
moved his executive offices to 306 
Brack Shops, 521 West 7th St. 

Lesser pTans to make his distrib- 
uting headquarters in Los Angeles, 
and thus eliminate the delay in- 
curred in travelling to New York to 
close deals. 



Spanuth Completes Three Billy 
Whiskers. 
(Special to WIDS DAILY) 
Chicago. — The first three of the 
Billy Whiskers comedies, in which 
a billy goat takes the lead, have 
been completed by Commonwealth. 
H. A. Spanuth has not decided dis- 
tributing arrangements. 



CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG 

Orjrc more demonstrates her magnifi 
tent ari in 

"THE EYES OF YOUTH" 
Wp have made for this production a 
very artistic lobbv display together 
with reproductions in fac-simile oil 
paintings from her latest poses in 
various sizes 

KRAUS MFG. CO. 

220 West 42d Street 

17th Floor Tel. 3607 Bryant 



Send Us Your 

nShes'lPrlces JUHk FIIRI 

INTERSTATE SMELTING 
(Si REFINING COMPANY 

23 Commercial St. NEWARK. N J. 




Kellerman Feature to Start. 
(Bi/ Wire U) WIDS DAILY) 

Los Angeles. — Selection of sup- 
porting cast for Annette Kellerman 
feature, which is being produced by 
Harry P. Caufield,, directed by C. 
M. Franklin and to be distributed by 
Sol Lesser, has been completed. 
Principals, Wheeler Oakman, Ralph 
Lewis, Walter Long, and Carl Ull- 
man. .'\ctual production will start 
Monday at the Brunton Studios. 

E. M. Asher, personal representa- 
tive of Mack Sennett, has left for 
New York with a print of "Down 
on the Farm." 



Montreal.— The Regal is the name 
chosen for the house hitherto called 
the Connaught. Regal Films, Ltd., 
control it and will change Its policy. 



Silverman Leaves Public Projection 
"Hy" Silverman is no longer con- 
nected with the Public Projection 
Rooms in the Godfrey Building. 



Goldsmith on Journey. 

Milton M. Goldsmith, treasurer of 
United, left for a business trip last 
week. 



Westling Bout Filmed 

Jack Cohii with a staff of camera- 
men was on hnad last night to film 
the Caddock-Stecher wrestling bout 
at the Garden for Pioneer Film. 

Cohn used a battery of Sun-Light 
Arc lamps. 



Earle Williams Going West. 

Earle Williams, who came East 
recently from Vitagraph's Holly- 
wood studio to make two special 
productions, Winchell Smith's "The 
Fortune Hunter" and C. Haddon 
Chambers' "Captain Swift" left on 
Sunday for his return trip. 



Seymour, Tex. — H. C. ArbuclU i: 
now the manager of the Nolon. Hi 
replaces Mr. Alderson. 



PICTURE RIGHTS FOR 
SALE 

by Maurice Le Blanc. 
ci:t.ebratei> authors soc. 

lioom 80.S Columbia Theatre BIdg. 
Tel. Bryant 1511 



iMnf 

ARMS 

JME SENSATION OF THE CENTURA 

lb Personally Supervised 

and 
Directed by Frank Reicher 

DR. FRANK CRANE 

whose followers are numbered by the 
MILLIONS, is only ONE of the many 
famous box-office names "EMPTY 
ARMS" has to offer. Your patrons will 
be interested in the stirring message 
which this great philosopher has written 
ESPECIALLY for "EMPTY ARMS." 

PHOTOPLAY LIBRARIES, TNC. 

(Exclusive Selling Agents) 
500 Fifth Avenue, New York City 



Xc-5tcr 9ark & 
6dwani WliUc5idc 



7^BRADSTREET 
of FILHDOM 




VOL. XI, NO. 31 



7/fRECOCHIZED 

Authority 



Sunday, February 1, 1920 



Price 25 Cents 



Jesse L , Laslcy 

presents 

William D. Taylor's 

production 

Huckleberry 
=^Finn= 





HAS BROKEN EVERY 
BOX-OFFICE RECORD 



I 



il 



Yellow 



,hree symtola 
ck (njmbtr of 
!ssaa9. Cthsr- 

tiT tha chzck. 



WESTEM*. UNION 

AM 



r^. 



NEWCOMB CARLTON. PREsrocNT 



OEORGE W. E.ATKINS. fmST viCCPREsiDENV 



om 



AT GRAND CENTRAL TERMINAL MAIN CONCOURSE. N. Y. *^'J?:» ' 

1920 JAN 19 AM 4 25 

a6x 7S m, 

TOLEDO 18 
REAL ART PICTURES CORP 

^9 5 AVE NEW YORK NY 
WE ARE PLEASED TO SAY THAT COLONIAL THEATRE TO- 
DAY BROKE EVERY BOX OFFICE RECORD OPENING 
MYSTERY YELLOW ROOM HAVE PUT ON NEW STUNT OF 
STOPPING PICTURE JUST BEFORE END AND DEFYING 
AUDIENCE TO GUESS WHO IS GUILTY ONE RESULTS ARE 
SO GRATIFYING THAT I AM SENDING THIS THE FIRST 
WIRE OF ITS KIND I HAVE EVER SENT A DISTRIBUT- 
ING FIRM IN FACT THE FIRST STATEMENT OF BUSI- 
NESS DONE AT THIS HOUSE I HAVE EVER PERMITTED 
TO GO OUT HORWITS^ -COLONIAL THEATRE 



an 

Emile 

Chautard 
Production 

Presented!]^ 

Mayflower 

Pictures 
Corporation 



REALART PICTURES CORPORATION^ 

d^^ 469 Fifth Ave. New York 



PICTURES 



PICTURt5_ 



jfrBftADSTREET 
«^PILMDOH 




AUTHORITY 



Vol. XI. No. 31 Sunday, February 1, 1920 Price 25c. 

Copyright 1920, Wid's Film and Film Folks, Inc. 

Published Daily at 71-73 West 44th St., New York, N. Y., by 

WID'S FILMS AND FILM FOLKS, INC. 

F. C. ("Wid") Gunning, Presidttat and Treasurer; Joseph Dannenberg, 

Vice-President and Editor; J. W, Alicoate, Secretary and Business 

Manager. 

Entered as second-class matter May 21, 1918, at the post office at 
New York, N. Y„ under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms (Postage free) United States, Outside of Greater New York, 

$10.00 one year; 6 months, $S.OO; 3 months, $3.00. Foreign, $15.00. 

Subscribers should remit with order. 

Address all communications to 

WID'S DAILY, 71-73 West 44th St., New York, N. Y. 

Telephone: Vanderbilt 4551-2 

Hollywood, California: Editorial and Business Offices: 6411 Hollywood 
Boulevard. Phone, Hollywood 1603. 

Chicago representatives: Willis, Eckels and Mack, 6th Floor, Consumers 
Building, Chicago, 111. 



Features Reviewed 



New9 of the Week 
in Headlines 

Monday 

llavvorth to expand. 

Goldwyn purchases controlling interest in Bray Pic- 
tures Corp. 

.Sol Lesser and Gore Bros, buy First National fran- 
chise from Tally. 

Fred C. Quimby resigns from Pathe to become gen- 
eral manager of Associated Exhibitors. 

Tuesday 

Nat C. Olds to join Goldwyn. Likely to have charge 
of advertising. 

Fairbanks interested in production of Winchell Smith 
stories. 

Capitol to change program weekly. 

Wednesday 



Mabel Normand in PINTO 

Goldwyn Page 2 ^''thur Kane to be Charles Ray's manager. 

Shirley Mason in HER ELEPHANT MAN ^arie Doro to appear on Pioneer program. 



Fox ; Page 5 

Bert Lytell in THE RIGHT OF WAY 

Metro Page 7 

Sessue Hayakawa in THE BEGGAR PRINCE 

Haworth — Robertson-Cole Page 9 

Sylvia Breamer and Robert Gordon in 

RESPECTABLE BY PROXY 

J. Stuart Blackton Prod.— Pathe Page 12 

Mary MacLaren in THE FORGED BRIDE 

Universal Page 13 



Decision reserved in Tucker suit against Mayflower 
and Famous Players. 

Thursday 

Louis Burston arranges pooling of interests of serial 
makers. 

Fox moving to new building on 55th St.. 

Washington reports that industry will not be included 
in 1920 census data. ' 

Friday 

Harry T. Morey in THE BIRTH OF A SOUL Educational to open 26 exchanges in key pities. "Joe" 

Vitagraph '■i'- :;.". ^ .■: . Page 16 Lee in charge. . . . 

Buck Jones in THE LAST STRAW Famous Players' income for 1919 approximately four 

Pqx Page 17 million. 

Constance Talmadge in TWO WEEKS Fatty Arbuckle to make five-reel features. 

First National Page 19 

Gladys Leslie in THE MIDNIGHT BRIDE Saturday 

Vitagraph ' Page 21 William S. Hart suing Thomas H. Ince for $100,000 

Bessie Barriscale in Al St. John comedies to be state righted by Warner 

THE LUCK OF GERALDINE LAIRD Bros. 

B. B. Prod.— Robertson-Cole Page 23 United Artists secure theater for showings in Minne- 

SHORT REELS Page 26 apolis. In row with Ruben and Finkelsteln. 



"Pardoning the bad is injuring the good**— Benjamin Franklin. 



jsJtM 



DAIUNT 



Sunday, February 1, 1920 



A Wonderful Comedy and All To Victor Schertzinger's Credit 



Mabel Normand in 

"PINTO" 

Goldwyn 

DIRECTOR Victor L, Schertzinger 

AUTHOR Victar L. Schertzinger 

SCENARIO BY Gerald C. Duffy 

CAMERAMAN George Webber 

AS A WHOLE Comedy-drama with the accent 

all on the comedy ; a sure-fire entertainment, 
best the star has done for this company. 
STORY Approaches burlesque at times but al- 
ways registers and retains the interest. 

DIRECTION Schertzinger certainly knows how 

to handle this star; has done a fine piece of 
work. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Very good 

LIGHTINGS Excellent 

CAMERA WORK Good 

STAR Registers wonderfully well in role built 

specially for her ; gets over some great comedy 
business. 
SUPPORT All good; Cullen Landis most ac- 
ceptable leading man. 

EXTERIORS Western and fashionable eastern 

stuff. 

INTERIORS Appropriate 

DETAIL Subject is particularly well titled, 

many of the lines being good for comedy. 
CHARACTER OF STORY Cowgirl's experi- 
ences in the usual effete east. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 5,000 feet 

The only things the matter with many of Mabel 
Normand's Goldwyn pictures were story and direc- 
tion. But in "Pinto" she has had them both supplied 
in one fell swoop by none other than Victor Schert- 
zinger, one time director for Charles Ray. "Pinto" 
is a great comedy, just the right sort of story for the 
star and one which has been screened with due regard 
\ for her talents in the comedy line. And it is to Schert- 



zinger's credit. He seems to be one of the few old 
Ince directors who, on another lot, manages to retain 
the sure-fire Ince method of development of plot and 
general smoothness of action. 

Then, too, that sense of comedy which Schertzinger 
evinced in handling the Ray subjects is again apparent 
here both in the writing and the directing of "Pinto." 
He has not allowed himself to be hampered by any con- 
! ventional comedy bounds and "Pinto" further reveals 
itself as a picture possessing considerable original 
and enriching comedy business, even though its ac- 
ytual frame-work is more or less of a scenario tin-type. 

PTfrto is a western girl who had been reared by five 
godfathers. She wears sombrero, chaps, uses the 
lariat and rides, just as if she were a regular cowboy. 
Then there comes the time when her godfather in New 
York, Pop Audrey sends for her. Pop has great wealth 
and a wife who is a snob and, worse than that, de- 
ceitful. Pinto is of a mind that New York is a big 
ranch and receives an awful shock when she gets 
there in company with Looey, her ancient tutor and 
companion. 

There follows her initiation into society, her ro- 
mance with Bob De Witt and her final unmasking of 
Mrs. Audrey's deceit before Pop. And the end finds 
her on her way back west with Bob and Pop as com- 
panions. Scenes that are sure-fire laugh-getters are 
Pinto's meeting with Pop in the course of which she 
reaks up Mrs. Audrey's tea, Pinto and Looey wander- 
ing around lower New York asking where Pop Aud- 
rey lives, Bob's instructions to Pinto on how to act 
with men during which sequence he makes love to 
her, and society's frantic efforts to escape when 
Looey, filled with red-eye shoots up a lawn party. 

Miss Normand is well supported by Cullen Landis 
as leading man and by George Nichols as Pop Audrey. 
Others are Edythe Chapman, Hallam Cooley and Ed- 
ward Jobson. 



Give it the Limit in Advertising and Exploitation 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



There isn't a single doubt but that "Pinto" is going 
to register and register strongly with every sort of 
audience. Its appeal isn't limited to any class or 
classes. You know how even and well running the 
Ray pictures, were that Schertzinger made for Ince. 
Well, he's got the same wonderful smoothness into 
this feature, and what with the good stuff he has put 
into the story in the way of comedy, he's succeeded 
in making a wonderfully fine picture. 



Give it the limit in advertising and exploitation. 
The business you do on it should only be confined 
to the capacity of your house. Advertise it to the 
kids, advertise it to the old folks that like a good 
comedy. Play it up in every conceivable fashion for 
it's going to "get" any and all audiences and you 
won't have th^ smallest kick after it's all over. 



^ 



nfio Initial 

AmGncanization 

Pioduction 




THE lAND OF 

OPPORTUNITY 

Atwo reel supGr-:^amie that embodies 
the spurt of Unooln-the spirit of America 

ARALPH INCE 
PRODUCTION 

with Ml'. Ince as Lincohi 

Produced |oi theAmeiicaitizatiqn Gamniftee 

Hou.Fiaiibliii K.lane Giaimian 

Lewis J. Selznick Distribution 

Rdolph Zukor. Production 

HaiTij Oandall Exhibition 

Maj. Dai)moiid¥Pullniati...Muiiicipal Coopeiafion 
William ABradt^ ex-officio 



Distributed btj Select 
Distributed bi^ Republic 





NATIONAL 




PICTURES 



Adapted ffom fhe plat^ bi^ 
Eu<!>etio lUaltGr 



Diiectioti-1-lou)aid Hicfeman 

Scenario tn) "Katlicriiie l^oed 

NATIONAL 
PICTURE 

THEATRES 

Lewis J. Selznlck 

Presidoni 



INC. 







I 



TTladG bt^ TlQfiotial 
Disfiibufed bi^ Select 



Sunday, February 1, 1920 




II.Y 



Big Sympathetic Appeal and Thrilling Climax in Story of Circus Life 



Shirley Mason in 

"HER ELEPHANT MAN" 

Fox 

DIRECTOR Scott Dunlap 

AUTHOR Pearl Doles Bell 

SCENARIO BY Isabelle Johnson 

CAMERAMAN Not credited 

AS A WHOLE Picture dealing with circus life 

containing big sympathetic appeal in central 
character and building to thrilling climax. 
STORY. . . .Simple and obvious but well handled plot 
that always retains the interest through situa- 
tions and characterizations. 

DIRECTION Has developed an excellent circus 

atmosphere; climax when tents are destroyed 
in rain and wind excellently handled. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Good 

LIGHTINGS Plain and suitable 

CAMERA WORK Effective shots particularly 

in climax sequence. 
STAR Better than ever before; registers de- 
lightfully in sympathetic role. 

SUPPORT Two principal assisting roles well 

acted by Albert Roscoe and Harry Todd. 

EXTERIORS Scenes about the big-top full of 

real circus atmosphere. 

INTERIORS Ditto 

DETAIL Some minor details of direction rather 

obvious but generally an air of realism per- 
vades entire picture. 

CHARACTER OF STORY Romance of circus 

girl and her "Elephant Man," an unhappily 
married Englishman. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 5,000 feet 

With "Her Elephant Man," William Fox has intro- 
duced an element rather original in his series of pro- 
ductions, for it departs altogether from any suggestion 
of sex or sensationalism and reveals itself as a won- 
derfully S3'mpathctic story of the circus containing an 
atniospliere as realistic as an habitue of the big top 



itself could require. It is by all odds the best picture 
that Fox has turned out within average memory and 
contains an appeal that refuses to confine itself to any 
particular type of audience. 

The plot itself is extremely simple and almost as 
obvious once it comes to its essentials, but throughout 
the interest is exceptionally well maintained because 
of the fine acting of the star, Shirley Mason, in a role 
that is sympathetic at least, and the admirable circus 
atmosphere with which Director Scott Dunlap has 
endowed the production. 

The story opens in Africa where Joan, a young gfrr, 
is left with only the blacks as friends and companions 
when her father, a missionary, dies. She is found 
among the natives by Jerimy, a circus man on an ani- 
mal hunt and Philip Dorset, an Englishman who dis- 
covered that his wife only cared for his money and 
had left her immediately after marriage. Jerimy takes 
Joan back to the circus and Dorset goes along as ele- 
phant man for the show. 

As time goes on and Joan outgrows short dresses 
her love for Dorset deepens into something beyond 
mere childish afifection. And Philip thinking of the 
barrier between them finally leaves the show. Blake, 
the heavy, tries by various means to blacken Dorset's 
reputation in Joan's eyes and ultimately succeeds when 
he tells her of the marriage. But that very night Dor- 
set returns with the news that his wife has divorced 
him. A terrific hurricane and rainstorm fairly sweeps 
the big tents from the ground and, of course, it proves 
the reunion of the lovers. 

The storm with the attendant commotion caused 
among the audience, the circus folk and the animals 
form a thrilling sequence. The scenes are excellently 
arranged with judiciously placed big shots and close- 
ups so that the utmost in suspense has been derived. 

Albert Roscoe as Dorset and Harry Todd as Jerimy 
handle the principal supporting roles very well while 
others arc Henry Herbert, Ardito Mcllonino and 
Dorothy Lee. 



Bill It Like a Circus and Business Ought to Be Big 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



You know what circus day means! It means the 
turning out of young and old alike to see that "greatest 
show on earth" or whatever it's called. And "Her 
Elephant Man" contains most of that appeal of the 
real old circus with a real human story to back up the 
wealth of atmosphere with which it is endowed. It 
stands to reason then that you ought to clean up on 
it if you bill it and exploit it in the right manner. 

Of course, there is no end to the exploitation stunts 



that can be applied to the advertising of a circus story. 
Where to stop is only a question of money. But it 
may be remarked here that "Her Elephant Man" 
surely is going to satisfy most everyone that comes 
to your theater. Figure out what your maximum busi- 
ness comes to and then make your advertising appro- 
priation accordingly. Certainly you can't go wrong 
in playing "Her Elephant Man" and making a big 
noise about it. 






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Sunday, February 1, 1920 



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AILV 



Dramatic and Impressive Picturization of Famous Novel 



Bert Lytell in 
"THE RIGHT OF WAY" 
Screen Classics — Metro 

DIRECTOR Jack Dillon 

AUTHOR Sir Gilbert Parker 

SCENARIO BY June Mathis 

CAMERAMAN Robert B. Kurrle 

AS A WHOLE Highly appropriate picturization 

of famous novel; should score heavily partic- 
ularly with better class audiences. 
STORY Holds the interest all the way and con- 
tains a number of intense dramatic crises. 

DIRECTION Has handled various sequences 

realistically. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Generally very good 

LIGHTINGS Very good 

CAMERA WORK. . . . ; Good shots 

STAR Gives carefully studied and impressive 

characterization of difficult part. 

SUPPORT Very good; Gibson Gowland stands 

out in very important role. 

EXTERIORS ..Good French-Canadian village 

stuff for the most part. 

INTERIORS All appropriate 

DETAIL Everything carefully attended to 

CHARACTER OF STORY Awakening of ag- 
nostic through contact with lives of simple 
and trusting people. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 6,800 feet 

Here is a picture that is going to make a big im- 
pression on most everyone that sees it, probably 
scoring more heavily with the better class audiences 
because of the more or less improved nature of its 
theme. But while it contains not a little penetration 
into the psychology of important character's mind, 
there is enough thrilling physical action throughout 
its lengthy footage to warrant the picture receiving 
universal endorsement. 

Tt opens with a particularly fine sequence in a Mon- 



treal court where Charley Steele, the brilliant, cyn- 
ical, supercillious lawyer acquits one Joe Portugais 
of murder when all the evidence is against him. Steele 
is at once the pride of Montreal's society as well as the 
thorn in its flesh. He is one who scoffs at God, 
willing to be convinced but permitting no one to 
convince him. In addition he is a heavy drinker. 

Two years after his marriage he is drawn into a 
brawl in a tavern on the river's edge, knocked out 
and thrown in the water. Joe Portugais finds him 
and takes him to the village of Chaudiere where he 
lives. After many months an operation restores 
Steele's mind but a paper then informs him that he 
is believed dead, with the stain of embezzlement on 
his name, and that his wife has married again. 

He secures work in a tailor shop operated by a re- 
ligious fanatic who is near crazed when Steele pro- 
fesses his doubt of God to him. That night he sears 
his chest with a burning cross. But it is the love of 
Rosalie, the rose of Chaudiere, that brings Steele to 
a better understanding of something infinite. His 
old superciliousness drops from him and he lives for 
a time untroubled save by the thought of his wife in 
Montreal. Then one night while protecting the funds 
of the church from thieyes he is mortally wounded 
and died in the arms of the Cure. Before the simple 
villagers he has redeemed himself for his words of 
doubt. I ""'-i' 

The story maintains an admirable thread of inter- 
est throughout and is sustaineid often enough by 
dramatic crises of real power, namely Steele's argu- 
ment in the court room, his fight in the tavern, the 
act of the fanatic in burning his chest with the cross 
and the final redemption of Steele in his fight to save 
the funds,,of the church. 

Bert Lytell gives a carefully studied and impres- 
sive characterization of the difficult role of Steele. 
He brings out the arrogance and superciliousness of 
the man wonderfully well. 



A Wonderful Buy for Exploitation as Well as Entertainment 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



"The Right of Way" is a well known title for the 
reason that the novel by Sir Gilbert Parker had a 
wonderful sale. You ought to be able to get an un- 
usual amount of publicity from it because editors and 
other influential folk can be interested in the pro- 
duction. Then there is Bert Lytell, a rapidly rising 
star. Title, author and star should create a real box 
office card for all better class houses. 



The producers are sending the picture out with 
two endings. One as related above, the other con- 
cluding happily with the understanding that Steele 
and Rosalie finally marry. The exhibitor may chose 
which to use. Here again is a chance for additional 
publicity. Both endings might be utilized and a 
contest inaugurated as to which is the most fitting. 
All in all from the exploitation angle you have a 
wonderful buy here. 





presents 



100% HIGH! 

"One hundred per cent High, 
and gripping throughout," says 
the Cleveland Plain Dealer. 
"Interwoven in a subtle plot of 
strong dramatic force, it car- 
ries the acutest thrills of intre- 
pid, death-defying dare-devil- 
ism." 

"Here is a drama you must see 
in order to realize," declares 
the Los Angeles Record. See it 
today — it will astound you, and 
you'll realize here's your great 
opportunity to cash in. 



STAGED 
ABOVE 




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mm Mmm 

UNIVERSAL - JEWEL 
PRODUCTION DE LUXE <»^ 



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fJRK DENPSET 



The Best known Man 
in the World. /'^^'cVcK 
In the Colossal Box 
Office Attr ac ti on /o 



DAREDEVIL 
JACK 

(Not aprize-fi^ht serial) 



A Pafhe Serial 





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BEST KNOWN MAN I N 
THE WORLD. 



Million Bollai* 
Pathe^ Serial 

]I4IIEDI:VIL 



JACK 



II 




Positively imprecedenl- 
ed in its business-draw- 
ing pover 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



RELEASED FEB. 15 





dizzying in its magnitude--. 





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E)r months one man has been receiv- 
ing more newspaper space than presidents 
and kings. 

The reading public of the world has ^- 
followed his doings, speculated upon 
his plans. 

Pathe offers to you this man in a -- 
superlative serial, at a time when pub- 
lic interest is at a fever heat. 

What can such vast publicity do- 
for you? You know , you don't have 
to ask! 

Get it quick! The bookings are alTea4x 
crowding the mails! 

Released Feb. 15th 



Produced by 
Robert Brunton 



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Sunday, February 1, 1920 



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DAILV 



Hayakawa in a Comedy-Drama that Gets Over Very Well 



Sessue Hayakawa in 
"THE BEGGAR PRINCE" 
Haworth — Robertson-Cole 

DIRECTOR William Worthington 

AUTHOR E. Richard Schayer 

SCENARIO BY E. Richard Schayer 

CAMERAMAN Frank D. WilHams 

AS A WHOLE. .Unusual comedy-drama that should 
register satisfactorily and appeal to more peo- 
ple than most Hayakawa subjects. 

STORY Takes place on a mythical island and 

this time star doesn't have to sacrifice himself 
for white man or woman. 

DIRECTION Has registered the comedy and 

the serious scenes with equal satisfaction. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Excellent 

LIGHTINGS Very effective 

CAMERA WORK Most satisfactory 

STAR Appears in dual role and gives highly 

effective performances. 

SUPPORT Types are all mixed up but ability 

is commendable. 

EXTERIORS Good island stuff 

INTERIORS Some realistic scenes represent- 
ing palace of prince. 
DETAIL Varying types of players rather con- 
fusing but then the locale is mythical. 

CHARACTER OF STORY Fisherman changes 

places with vain prince and sets both the gov- 
ernment and the prince aright. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 5,100 feet 

An unusual comedy-drama, very artistically mounted 
is presented in "The Beggar Prince," Sessue Haya- 
kawa's latest production. It is quite different from 



the majority of this star's pictures for the reason that 
the locale of the story and the "race" that is dealt with 
are mythical and that the star is not called upon to pull 
any sacrifice stunt to bring lovers together. 

Hayakawa appears as a prince of a mythical island, 
who is being buncoed by his courtiers into believing 
that he commands the tides of the sea and the eclipses 
of the sun and moon, while they collect enormous 
taxes from the people. Niki, a fisherman, is also played 
by Hayakawa. The prince sets eyes on Niki's girl 
and insists on having her for a slave. Niki, good and 
mad, follows her and her captors to the palace, crowns 
the prince with a hefty wallop when no one is looking 
and changes places with him. 

Then, of course, Niki proceeds to inaugurate a just 
administration on the island while in the meantime 
the real prince, taking Niki's place, is learning what 
contentment and happiness really is. In the end Niki 
gives back the throne to the now reformed prince and 
the culmination of two romances brings the picture ':o 
a happy conclusion. 

There is some very good comedy registered by Niki 
when he first assumes the role of the prince and there 
are situations scattered throughout that are good for 
laughs. The picture has been given an exceedingly ar- 
tistic production and is delightfully photographed. 
The subtitles use "dost" and "thou" and "goest" and 
are generally flowery and if they get a few titters it 
won't matter. And the island sure is a mythical one. 
There are whites and blacks and then there is Haya- 
kawa. 

The story is well supported by Thelma Percy, Bea- 
trice La Plante, Josef Swickard, Bert Hadley and Rob- 
ert Bolder. 



A Departure for Hayakawa That Should Meet With General Approval 



Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



"The Beggar Prince" should gain a larger circulation 
and meet with more general approval than most of 
the Hayakawa pictures inasmuch as it is a radical de- 
parture from previous subjects and has nothing in it 
that could possibly be interpreted as propaganda for 
any race. The parts played by the star could just as 
well have been taken by any actor but stand out con- 
spicuously owing to the fine performances rendered 
by Hayakawa. 

In advertising it would be well to bring out this 
fact by informing your public that the story takes 
place on a mythical island and that the star appears 



as both the hero and the heavy. If you can also work 
in the nice moral the story drives home, by all means 
do so but be careful not to give the impression that 
the picture sets out to "teach a lesson." 

The picture oft'ers a good opportunity for some sort 
of tropical lobby decoration if this type of exploita- 
tion is gone in for. Also bring out the fact that the 
subject contains many moments of comedy. Haya- 
kawa is just as good in these sequences as he is in 
the serious ones and his versatility shows itself to 
fine advantage. 



Arthur RBeck. 

bresents 

LEAH 




BAIRD 

Ohe Picture Girl Beautiful 
In 

aPITOL 

From the notable stage success by 

AUGUSTUS THOMAS 

Directed t^ George Irving 



IKcy fihe'OKc Capitol- Qud 3 hey Know Why! 



BECAUSE - "we never recollect seeing 
Leah Baird do anything better than her 
strong role in 'The Capitol'," says The 
Motion Picture News. 

BECAUSE — "the story is an engrossing 
one; logically told in action and will 

prove a money attraction," says Exhibitors 
Herald. 



BECAUSE — "Leah Baird plays two widely 
different roles with brilliancy and fans will 
like the picture's thrills," says Exhibitors 
Trade Review. 

BECAUSE— "The Capitol" had a splen- 
didly profitable full week's engagement to 
heavy patronage at my Strand," says Tom 
Moore, the big Washington exhibitor. 



BECAUSE — "the popular appeal of this BECAUSE — "the climax of this picture 
subject will draw crowds if advertised prop- will thrill all classes of screen fans," says 
erly," says Wid's. Moving Picture W.orld. 

im. HODKINSON CORPORATON 



527 Fifch Avenue. New YorkGtr 

Distributing through MJTIE txchnngejncorpcraled 

Foreign Distributor J Frank Brockliss.Inc. 729-7* Ape. 




12 



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DAILV 



Sunday, Februar y 1. 1920 



Splendid Production Qualities Obviate Shortcomings of Story 



Sylvia Breamer and Robert Gordon in 
"RESPECTABLE BY PROXY" 
J. Stuart Blackton Prod. — Pathe 

DIRECTOR J. Stuart Blackton 

AUTHOR Florence Myott 

SCENARIO BY Stanley Olmsted 

CAMERAMAN William S. Adams 

AS A WHOLE Technically accurate and gen- 
erally well produced ; needs punch to get over 
its action. 
STORY Demands little sympathy for the char- 
acters and at times entirely too obvious. 

DIRECTION Registers some clever touches 

and pays considerable attention to the ar- 
tistic. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Splendid 

LIGHTINGS Very fine 

CAMERA WORK Many ideal shots 

STARS. . . .Perhaps the best thing they have done in 

some time. 
SUPPORT. . . .Eulalie Jensen convincing in her part; 
old negro couple afford about the most re- 
alistic bit in this film. 

EXTERIORS Beautiful southern atmosphere 

INTERIORS Impress by their correctness 

DETAIL Titles might be shortened but there 

are no serious errors. 

CHARACTER OF STORY Fairly original twist 

given to a case of switched identity. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION 5,540 feet 

As in all his productions, J. Stuart Blackton lives up 
to his reputation for mastery over the ideals of tech- 
nique and artistry. Throughout the production his 
special knack of registering the smallest bit in the 
most appealing and satisfactory way, is evidenced by 
not only his handling of the players but in the camera 
work, detail and particularly locations. 



Miss Breamer and Mr. Gordon are more fortunate in 
having parts more adapted to their individual personali- 
ties than have been accorded them in some of their 
more recent productions. The supporting cast with but 
one exception has been well selected, Eulalie Jensen 
appearing to advantage as the "good bad" actress. 
Two negro characters afford a good deal of amusement 
and most of the human touches. 

There are several beautiful shots representing a 
typical southern home which will impress for their 
accuracy not alone in exterior scenes but interior as 
well. Detail has been well taken care of and the night 
scenes are very good with the exception of one scene 
in which a painted drop is used. 

Eulalie Jensen is on her way to accept an engage- 
ment with some insignificant stock company. On the 
train, Robert Gordon, a wealthy young southerner 
leaving home to escape an undesirable marriage, comes 
to Eulalie's assistance when she pretends to have lost 
her purse. The unsuspecting Robert falls for the 
scheming actress and inside of a week they are mar- 
ried. 

A title says that a year has passed and Robert is 
reported among those drowned on a vessel bound for 
Siberia whither he was going after but three days of 
married life. Eulalie persuades Sylvia Breamer, the 
ingenue in the company, who is without funds and 
in poor health, to present herself to Gordon's mother 
as her son's widow and thereby acquire a home and a 
share of the southerner's fortune. 

Of course hero returns and things look rather bad 
for a time but after two scheming relatives have their 
plans badly foiled, matters clear up very nicely and 
Robert and Sylvia are legally married. Hero's return 
is effectively presented by having him appear in the 
midst of the negro mammy's voodoo incantations dur- 
ing a heavy storm. 



Use Blackton's Name and Trust That They Will Be Satisfied 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



You will probably be willing to accept this for its 
technical and artistic value in spite of the fact that the 
story isn't very strong. It does contain some origi- 
nality in its treatment but there are moments too de- 
cidedly obvious that detract from its distinction. 

At one time particularly it seemed essentially un- 
necessary and improper at the height of a dramatic 
moment to turn it to comedy by having the three 
leading women characters pitch in to a hair pulling 
match. It may be that it should be taken seriously 



but everyone will be inclined to laugh right out at it. 
You have every advantage in "Respectable by 
Proxy" from a production angle. Director Blackton 
has exercised his usual care with details and generally 
speaking has provided a production pleasing to look 
at, good photography, splendid effects and has handled 
the players effectively. He has incorporated some de- 
lightful bits of darkey mannerisms and human touches 
through the characters of the old negro couple which 
will be sure to please. 



Sunday. February 1, 1920 



tM ^ 



DAILV 



13 



Weak and Mechanical Production that Never Approaches the Dramatic 



Mary MacLaren in 

"THE FORGED BRIDE" 

Universal 

DIRECTOR Douglas Gerrard 

AUTHOR J. G. Hawks 

SCENARIO BY Hal Hoadley 

CAMERAMAN Not mentioned 

AS A WHOLE Rather weak and mechanical 

production that never generates any real in- 
terest. 

STORY Is built about a single idea that shows 

only with little force in the climax; a lot of 
old situations supplied to lead up to it. 

DIRECTION Looks as if the director had had 

to hurry to get through with this ; no good 
touches or imagination displayed in handling 
material. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Average 

LIGHTINGS Same 

CAMERA WORK All straight shots 

STAR Doesn't show much acting; just walks 

through her part. 

SUPPORT Harold Miller, leading man, very 

poor actor; rest only average. 

EXTERIORS A beach resort that looks like 

Coney or Venice labelled as the playground of 
the fashionable rich. 
INTERIORS. . . .Very plain and sometimes give ap- 
pearance of cheapness. 

DETAIL Some real ten, twenty, thirt' subtitles 

CHARACTER OF STORY Forger disclaims 

being father of girl to save her from disgrace 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 4,990 feet 

There may have been possilMlities for a good picture 
lying in the central idea of "The Forged Bride" but 
certainl_v those concerned in its production here have 
failed to realize them. The climax resembles one of 
those human interest vaudeville acts, in which the 
crook, fin this case he is a forger), arranges things so 



that it will appear his daughter is realTy another man's 
child, thus saving her from disgrace and permitting her 
to go hap])ily on her married way without any shadow 
hanging over her. The orchestra usually plays 
"Hearts and l'"lower^' for this. 

But in the working out of it the scenarist has em- 
ployed a lot of hackneyed situations to form the 
l)ody of the picture while the director has showed 
neither taste in the production of the individual 
scenes nor any imaginative attempt to bring out what 
few high lights there were in the "script. Even in 
the handling of the climax when the old forger pulls 
his sacrifice stunt, the action is stimulated by no dra- 
matic feeling or suspensive interest. 

After old J^ill Reynolds lias been sent to jail for 
forgery, his daughter gets a job at a "fashionable re- 
sort" selling pop and souvenirs. The resort looks 
like A^enice or Coney Island. Here she meets Dick 
A^an Courtland, scion of wealth. They marry and 
Dick takes her home to his mother who for some 
reason is living in the same house with Judge Farrell, 
who in turn for some other reason harbors one Clara 
Ramerez, villainess extraordinary, in his home. Clara 
had her cap set for Dick and does considerable chest 
heaving when she learns that Peggy has won him. 

It is left to her to find out that Peggy's father is 
a jailbird. Then she accuses her of it before Dick 
l)ut old Reynolds, divining what was going to hap- 
pen, breaks jail and walks in at that moment with a 
forged letter proving that Peggy is really the judge's 
long lost daughter. The judge knows it's all a frame- 
up but for the sake of everyone's happiness says 
nothing. 

Mary MacLaren walks through her role in a listless 
fashion. TIarold L. Miller appearing as Dick is no 
actor. Barney Sherry makes the role of the judg-e 
quite human while others are Dorothv Hagan and 
Pagmar Godowskv. villainess. 



Not Much to Attract or Satisfy in This One 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 

There certainly isn't much to commend aljout thi> that little money was spent on it and as a result it 

one, AVhile the idea seems to contain possibilities fails to compare with the majority of the feaures pro- 

those connected with its production here never grasped chiced to-day, 

them and showed anv real ability in developing the '"^^ ''^ production to advertise, the cHmax idea aa<i 

,,,,,, , , . . r •, the title are the onlv essentials that can be nlaved u') 

material m hand. As a result the picture can not fail ^ , ^ rr " t i • , , i j - '-^^ 

to advantage. If you book it then use these and don't 
to give the impression of weakness and flatness. More ^^^claim the story proper with adjectives. However, 
than that the director's choice of exterior settings and audiences educated to the average picture of the day 
the rather cheap aspect of the interiors make it seem will find this considerably below standard. 




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The remarkable interest shown in "Empty Arms," 
the production plus made by Lester Park and Edward 

Whiteside, and The Hundred Thousand Dollar Packet, 
which is issued in connection with this extraordinary 
film, is proven by the fact that, one day last week, one 
hundred and eighty-one letters, seventeen telegrams 
and fifteen telephone calls were received by the pro- 
ducers. Represented were over a hundred and fifty 
cities of twenty-seven different states; over a hundred 
and forty theatres, including six of the largest in the 
country ; over forty state rights buyers and five of the 
big distributors who are anxious to "take over" this 
big money-maker. 

EMPTY ARMS 

The Sensation of the Century 

Send for a copy of The Hundred Thousand Dollar 
Packet. Read it and you'll readily understand why 
filmdom is literally going wild over this unusual 
picture. 

PHOTOPLAY LIBRARIES, INC. 

(Exclusive Selling Agents) 

500 Fifth Avenue New York City 







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16 




DAIUY 



Sunday, February 1, 1920 



Business of Going All Wrong on a Good Idea 



Harry Morey in 

"THE BIRTH OF A SOUL" 

Vitagraph 

DIRECTOR Edwin L. Hollywood 

AUTHOR Arthur Edwin Krows 

SCENARIO BY Arthur Edwin Krows 

CAMERAMAN Robert A. Stuart 

AS A WHOLE A Cumberland mountain feud- 
ist picture that spends all its time leading up 
to a climax that fails to get over. 

STORY Author has taken the climax situation 

from Dickens' "A Tale of Two Cities," but 
it loses its effect through poor treatment. 

"DIRECTION Failed to realize on the dramatic 

worth of the climax, nor are any forceful high- 
light evinced. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Average 

LIGHTINGS Same 

CAMERA WORK Not much skill shown in 

double exposure stuff. 

STAR Registers well as possible in dual role 

SUPPORT Average 

EXTERIORS Good Kentucky mountain stuff 

INTERIORS Plain and appropriate 

DETAIL Picture shows signs of being revised 

in cutting room; and the job wasn't clever. 
CHARACTER OF STORY. . . .Worthless man takes 
hero's place and goes to death for love of girl. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 4,650 feet 

You all know the dramatic climax of Charles Dick- 
ens' "A Tale of Two Cities," when the more or less 
worthless fellow takes the hero's place and is killed on 
the guillotine, all for the love of a girl. That's a situa- 
tion offering" at least I)ig dramatic possibilities. It is 
this situation around which they have built "The Birth 
of a Soul." But the parallel between Dickens' classic 
and the present work can go no further than that. In 



the process of modernization and in the author's at- 
tempt to alter the details of the climax, the dramatic 
bolt of the novel becomes almost unmoving and en- 
tirely unconvincing. 

It looks as if the 'script furnished by the author 
might have contained good material for an unusual 
feature. But either the director or the person who cut 
and titled the picture have taken what measure of dra- 
matic force and conviction out of it altogether. The 
body of the picture is taken up with mere building to- 
ward the climax. This is a clever but dangerous de- 
vice m picture construction. If the climax is powerful 
and justifies all the footage leading up to it all well 
and good but if not the final emotion of the spectator 
is utter disgust at being fooled. 

The locale is the familiar old Kentucky Cumberlands 
and an ancient feud is revived by foolish mountaineers. 
It so liappens that two of the parties of the opposing 
sides, Charles Drayton and Dorothy Barlow, have 
married but Drayton is taken captive by the Barlows 
and threatened with hanging unless his uncle, the man 
who fired the shot that renewed the feud, is brought 
back dead or alive before nightfall. 

Nightfall comes and the murderer is still absent 
and so they prepare to hang Drayton. But Philip 
Grey, a drink-sodden and worthless admirer of Doro- 
thy's who bears a resemblance to Drayton takes his 
place that husband and wife may go away together. 
The climax is handled with no more sense of the dra- 
matic than it is told here. It is not led up to expertly 
nor is it handled with an eye for dramatic or suspen- 
sive effect. It's all over when you're still looking for 
the drama. 

PTarrv Morey gives two sincere performances but is 
unaljle to lift the picture. Jean Paige, George Cooper. 
Walter T.ewis, Charles Eldridge and Charles Kent 
made up an average supporting cast. 



Better Be Looking the Other Way When This One Gomes Along 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



Certainly Vitagraph had a good chance to show an 
unusual picture in "The Birth of a Soul" considering 
the fact that the most dramatic situation from all of 
Charles Dickens' works was borrowed for the occa- 
sion. But certainly again the producers have fallen 
down on the job and the picture stands as a mighty 
poor effort to derive drama out of a proven dramatic 
situation. 

The best thing to do under the circumstances is to 
be looking the other way when "The Birth of a Soul" 



comes along. It's certainly liable to get an audience 
sore on you when it's all over, for the main action of 
the picture, slack of interest though it is, keeps prom- 
ising and promising something pretty big as a climax 
and then when at last this seciuence puts in its appear- 
ance it falls completely flat. As a consequence of all 
this the advertising worth of the picture which is unu- 
sual because of the origin of the climax, would prob- 
ably act as a boomerang to the exhibitor. 



Sunday, February 1, 1920 



bM^ 



DAILV 



17 



Latest Fox Star Gets Off to Good Start in First Production 



Buck Jones in 

"THE LAST STRAW" 

Fox 

DIRECTOR Denison Clift 

AUTHOR Harold Titus 

SCENARIO BY Denison Clift 

CAMERAMAN Vernon Walker 

AS A WHOLE Will make a good impression as 

introduction for Fox's latest cowboy star. 

STORY Holds interest nicely throughout but 

gets a bit confused in one sequence ; particu- 
larly well suited to star. 

DIRECTION Registered distinct originality and 

handled players and material in a capable 
manner. 

PHOTOGRAPHY Very good 

LIGHTINGS First rate 

CAMERA WORK One of the features 

STAR Gets off to a fine start in initial produc- 
tion ; unassuming and has a personality that 
will win him many admirers. 

SUPPORT Vivian Rich pleasing; western types 

all fine. 

EXTERIORS Beautiful shots of western country 

INTERIORS Up-to-date ranch home 

DETAIL Used same interior scenes too often 

CHARACTER OF STORY City girl gives up 

city ways through goodly influence of cow- 
boy hero. 

LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About 5,000 feet 

William Fox has become his own competitor and 
introduced a second cowboy star in the person of 
Buck Jones who makes his initial bow to stardom in 
"The Last Straw." Taking all in all it must be con- 
ceded that the latest cowboy hero will probably meet 
with the approval of the picture-loving public, more 
especially those admirers of western photoplays. 

The star's work in his first picture is confined to a 
straight role and although he does do some fast riding 



there are no hair-raising plunges from clififs or daring 
riding feats. It may be that the producer is hoard- 
ing up some surprises for forthcoming productions, 
but at any rate Jones has personality just a little dif- 
ferent than most of the western heroes we have had so 
far. There is a certain sincerity of purpose about his 
portrayal that will be sure to please. 

A story well adapted to the star has been secured 
and Denison Clift has handled it satisfactorily for the 
most part. There are numerous beautiful shots of 
western country which add to a generally pleasing pro- 
duction. 

Vivian Rich arrives in the west to live on the ranch 
which she has inherited. She decides to select a fore- 
man for the place by having the men draw straws. 
Jones doesn't participate in the lottery because he 
refuses to take a chance. It happens that the last 
straw, and the one which he would have drawn, is the 
lucky one. A fellow named Hepburn is made fore- 
man and it isn't long before hero intuitively learns 
tliat Hepburn is in league with the cattle rustlers on 
a neighboring ranch. 

A former wealthy suitor whom Vivian turned down 
when she fell heir to the ranch, follows her west and 
is going through some cave-man manouevers when 
hero Buck intervenes and orders him from the house. 
All this time hero is gradually falling in love with 
Vivian and when he goes in pursuit of the rustlers 
she gives him a locket containing the last straw but 
telling him not to open it, that it would bring him 
good luck. 

After being captured by the rustlers and left to 
die on the plain, Buck succeeds in getting back to 
Vivian and there is the usual reunion. There art- 
several weak spots in the thread of the story and an 
audience may have difficulty in understanding the 
progress of the action. However, matters clear up as 
they go along and in the end it doesn't make a great 
deal of difference. 



Get Them Acquainted With the New Cowboy Hero. They'll Like Him 

Box Office Analysis for the Exhibitor 



You will probably have little trouble in launching the 
new Fox star inasmuch as his first production gets off 
to a good start a4id his is a personality that is dis- 
tinct. His work is done in a congenial manner with 
no display of "acting." His naturalness and adapta- 
bility in the role portrayed in "The Last Straw" should 
win him many friends at the start. 

In introducing the latest Fox star you can safely 
promise a story with a real western atmosphere, minus 



the usual dance hall scenes and having some real 
pleasing romance and just enough shootin' to let you 
know you're out west. With the exception of one or 
two evidences of bad continuity you can assure them 
they will like the story and even the few slip-ups 
may get by unnoticed. 

If you intend showing the future productions of 
this new star you will do well to give him a good send- 
ofi^ for his initial presentation and make enough fuss 
to get folks interested at the start. 



I 




REID 



C/>aramount^rtcra/ll 
Q'icture 

Zo wie! 

¥ lERE'S a roaring road race 
* ■* picture made up of speed 
thrills, love glow, laugh lilts 
and money — for every exhibi- 
tor that shows it. 

It's a picture built for all 
human souls who have never 
been married in an automobile 
going at fifty miles an hour. 
And for all persons who be- 
lieve Wallace Reid and the 
kind of happy stories in which 
he appears make the sort of 
entertainment this world 
needs right now. 

And that's why it means 
money — for you ! 

By J. Stewart Woodhouse 

Directed by Sam Wood 

Scenario by Clara G. Kennedy 



FAMOUS I^LAYERS LASKY CORPORATION 

AUOlPM iUKOH -v.. JESSE L LAbKV ,. CECIL B Df MILLE C-f. v- C—^- 



Sunday, February 1, 1920 




DAI1.V 



19 



Fast, Sparkling Comedy That Will Appeal to All 



Constance Talmadge in 

"TWO WEEKS" 

First National 

DIRECTOR Sidney A. Franklin 

AUTHOR From Anthony Wharton's play "At 

the Barn." 

SCENARIO Not credited 

CAMERAMAN Oliver Marsh 

AS A WHOLE Just the sort of a picture to ex- 
pect from Constance Talmadge ; fast sparkling 
comedy that will appeal to all. 

STORY Starts off on a dramatic tangent, works 

up good suspense and then plunges into great 
comedy. 
DIRECTION Has realized all possibilities re- 
markably well and maintained strong interest 

PHOTOGRAPHY Very good 

LIGHTINGS Commendable throughout 

CAMERA WORK Very good 

STAR Is usual irresistable self; plays role de- 
lightfully and with thorough appreciation. 

SUPPORT Exceptional; Conway Tearle and 

George Fawcett outstanding. 

EXTERIORS Pretty country estate stuff 

INTERIORS Highly appropriate 

DETAIL Some fine comedy subtitles 

CHARACTER OF STORY Chorus girl wins 

love of woman-hater through peculiar series 
of circumstances. 
LENGTH OF PRODUCTION About