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Full text of "Finial"








Csinicii 



honors 



YOU 






(See page 67) 



OUR PRESIDENT AND FOUNDER 



"DR. ROBERT C. McQUILKIN" 




THE MESSAGE of the Victorious Life is almost 
synonymous with the name of Dr. Robert C. 
McQuilkin. But his message would not be complete 
if the Great Commission and the Second Coming 
were not brought in, too. 

Dr. McQuilkin was born February 16, 1886, in 
Philadelphia. His stubborn will to fight against all 
odds comes from his Irish blood, inherited from his 
parents who were born in Ireland. His sweet dis- 
position is due to the training that only his four 
sisters could have given him, he believes. 

Dr. McQuilkin grew up in the church. He held 
all the offices in Sunday School and Christian 



Endeavor, but his life was not changed till he at- 
tended a New Wilmington Missionary Conference. 
It was here, at the age of 25, that he realized that 
Christ was meeting all his needs. He went back to 
live a new life. 

On the way to one of these conferences, Dr. 
McQuilkin met Marguerite Lambie. He was never 
the same again. 

While working in the building business. Dr. 
McQuilkin felt the call of the Lord into Christian 
service. He left the business to prepare for the 
mission field. This training was interrupted when 
he became associate editor of the Sunday School 
Times. In 1918 he started to Africa under the Africa 
Inland Mission. After being hindered in departing 
several times, he began conference work. Through 
this work he came in contact with a group in 
Columbia who were praying for a Bible School. 
So, in 1922, Dr. McQuilkin came to Columbia and 
started the Columbia Bible College. 

Dr. McQuillan's fruitful service can be clearly 
seen from the imprint which it has left upon 
Christianity today. He will long be remembered as 
the founder of two Christian Conference Grounds— 
Keswick in New Jersey and Ben Lippen near Ashe- 
ville, N. C. He was also instrumental in founding 
the Foreign Missions Fellowship which has now 
united with the Inter- Varsity Christian Fellowship 
in its nation-wide college and university works. 

The numerous graduates of C. B. C. now in 
Christian service are sufficient reward for the 
twenty-six years which Dr. McQuilkin has served 
as president of Columbia Bible College, and he 
looks joyfully forward to many more years in lead- 
ing young people "To Know Him and to Make 
Him Known." 



PICTURES OF THE YEAR • • 



In twenty-five years in answer to prayer and without personal 
solicitation for a single dollar, the Lord has provided Columbia 
Bible College with two campuses and ten buildings. In praise to 
Cod for His undertaking in bringing to reality the vision of our 
president, Dr. Robert C. McQuilkin, the 1950 Fuiinl presents the 
photographs of the year. 

This vision of Dr. McQuilkin is not merely that of establishing 
a great Bible College. But more than that, it is the vision of the 
hundreds of young persons who are being sent forth knowing 
Christ and zealous to make Him known to the ends of the earth. 

Opening in 1923 in room 209 of the Colonia Hotel with eight 
students, Columbia Bible College has been a testimony to hundreds 
of prayer helpers who have seen the Lord meet its every need. 

By its fourth anniversary, the increased enrollment neces- 
sitated the purchase of the entire hotel as the first unit of the Bible 
College campus. In 1937 C. B. C. took over the Columbia Seminary 
property, one block north of the main building, to use as the men's 
campus. As the student body approached the 400 mark, a $210,000 



dormitory and classroom building located on the south campus 
was completed three years ago. 

Now the main building, chapel, new dormitory and classroom 
building, Houston and Legters Halls, Mills Building, library, and 
government housing units point to the faithfulness of God. 

In commenting upon the expansion of Columbia Bible College, 
Dr. McQuilkin refers to the testimony of George Muller: "A 
visitor to the George Muller orphanages in Bristol, England, was 
astonished at what he saw, and exclaimed, 'What a great faith 
that man had!' The superintendent answered: 'Mr. Muller would 
tell us 'the secret was not his great faith, but his great God. It is 
the raft that carries a man across this water. Our faith may be 
weak, but if we step on the raft, we get across.' 

Many of us covet George Muller's faith. But he would remind 
us that we have George Muller's God. We have chosen for the 
1950 Bible College vear verse: 'FOR THE LORD IS A GREAT 
GOD ... HE IS OUR GOD' (Psalm 95:3, 7). 'This is just a great 
point to remember,' writes Muller, 'that this God is our God,— 
Jehovah, the Almighty God, is our God.' " 



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THE COUNCIL STRESSES INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITY 



UTT IS MY DESIRE that next year we will be able 
A to move in the direction of greater student re- 
sponsibility," President Howard Blair of the Student 
Association stated in his inaugural speech on Friday, 
May 6, 1949, when he announced a new experiment in 
student life at Columbia Bible College. 

The goal was outlined. But that was not enough, and 
Blair took the lead in transforming vision into fact. The 
first step was to formulate a plan acceptable to both 
faculty and students. His foundational thesis that stu- 
dent responsibility would lead to better self-discipline 




"the traffic lights will still b 
red and green" 



No longer a figu 



enlisted the cooperation of the student association. He 
frequently reiterated the need for discipline and 
repudiated any desire to make drastic changes in rules 
(to change the traffic lights from red and green to purple 
and pink as one put it). 

Actual work on the establishing of a greater amount 
of responsibility began in September with an exchange 
of a series of letters between the faculty and the Stu- 
dent Council. On September 20th, the faculty gave 
assent to the plan for greater student responsibility as 
it affected dormitory life. The following week the plan 
was taken to the student body where it was voted in 
with only eight opposing votes. But the question still 
remained: would it work? 

The new form of student responsibility acted at times 
like an erratic patient. In mid-November, for instance, 
it ran a very high fever. The fever subsided, however, 
when the President of the student body gave the patient 
an injection or two in the form of a statement of 



clarification of areas of responsibility. The patient, a 
little later, was considerably strengthened by an opera- 
tion toward the end of November in which the Student 
Council took on the responsibility for making a periodic 
check on student life. 

For the first time in the memory of the student as- 
sociation, the Vice President was not a figure head. 
Chosen to head the Student Council Committee on 
Student Morale, James Shook, vice president of the 
Student Association, played a major role in guiding the 
destinies of student government during these early 

(Continued on page 7) 

"I'm going 
to art school" 

When anyone sets out to 
find what is the outstanding 
characteristic of Mr. James M. 
Hatch, general practitioner in 
the art of drawing illustrations 
on the blackboard, he will 
eventually find himself in just 
as big a muddle as does the 
student who endeavors to fig- 
ure out what the professor's 
drawings mean. But Mr. Hatch 
said only recently, "Don't let 
this out, but I'm taking a 
year's leave of absence next 
year; I'm going to art school." 

Until February 13, 1950, it 
seemed that Mr. Hatch could 
find a combination of circles 
and semi-straight lines to il- 
lustrate almost any psychologi- 
cal or Biblical principle. How- 
ever, on this momentous day 
Mr. Hatch picked up his chalk 
only to admit that he couldn't 
represent the relationships ex- 
isting between the various 
members of the Thessalonian 
Church. 

Mr. Hatch's formal educa- 
tion began in Charlotte, N. C, 
where he spent the most of his 
life. He attended high school 
there and finished the last year 
in the Darlington Military 
Academy. After this brief ex- 
perience as a soldier, he en- 
rolled in a pre-med. course 
at Duke University. Between 
the third and fourth year at 
Duke, he accepted Christ. The 
Lord called him into the min- 
istry with the result that Mr. 
Hatch gave up pre-med. 
studies and finished at Duke 
with a B.A. in the Liberal 
Arts. 

The following three years 
were spent here at Columbia 
Bible College from which he 
graduated with a Th.M. in 
1939. When Mr. Hatch came 
to C. B. C, he made certain 
of the future by bringing his 
fiancee with him. But it wasn't 
until seven years after their 
engagement, while he was 
serving a five-year term as a 
home missionary among the 




rural churches of Mississippi, 
that "Mittie" and "Buck" were 
married. To many impatient 
students of the College this 
example has proved to be a 
blessing. 

The next alma mater of our 
soldier-preacher was the Uni- 
versity of Chicago where he 
received an M.A. in the Social 
Sciences in 1947. The results 
of education can be clearly 
seen in his teaching of psy- 
chology and application of its 
principles to the study of the 
Bible. Mr. Hatch's busy sched- 
ule includes teaching General, 
Educational, and Child Psy- 
chology; Principles of Teach- 
ing: Hermeneutics; Epistles; 
and Prophets. 



In 1927 the Colonia 
Hotel was converted into 
Columbia Bible College. 



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WILLIAM L. KEITER 

President, Graduate Class 

See page 50 



. 



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Presidents 



(Continued from page 5) 

months. Shook's practical outlook was a great asset to 
the Council in the solution of many problems which 
arose at the outset. 

Other members of his committee during the first 
semester were Phebe Morse, Sam Tatem, Gwen Hum- 
phreys, Alice Jacobsen, and Ed Iwan. At the beginning 
of the second semester Marlys Anderson, Elva Brownlee 
and Larry Brown, all underclassmen, replaced Hum- 



W1LLIAM T. HARDING 

President, Senior Class 

See page 14 



phreys, Jacobsen, and Iwan. On this committee fell most 
of the burden of administering student government. 
Enforcement of dormitory rules and discipline were 
part of its responsibility. But its hardest task, as its 
name implied, was the building of good student morale. 

By the beginning of the second semester the system 
seemed to be on its feet. There were specific achieve- 
ments the Council could point to. Improvement was 

(Continued on page 8) 




V LA 

m 


W. BUR WELL FRAZIER 

President, Freshman Class 

See page 38 




PHIS LITTLE SHAVER 
"Music, literature 
and fine arts" 
See page 61 



Council, Phebe Morse, was more than double that of 
any previous year. Even the Treasurer, Bruce Shelley, 
had additional duties in connection with a separate 
student aid fund. 

In addition to the Committee on Student Morale, 
three other Student Council committees kept up a 
flurry of activity. The program committee headed by 
Grace Howell was responsible for the eight student 
assemblies during the year as well as for the several 
banquets. Stanley Hartman, Margaret Orton, and Gwen 



most apparent on the North Campus. Complaints con- 
cerning rules governing social life were at an all time 
low. Yet at the same time the discipline had improved. 

During this first year, Mr. James Hatch, faculty ad- 
visor to the Council, was most helpful not only in of- 
fering suggestions on many things, but especially in 
making the Council face the realities of every situation 
it dealt with. 

But Student dormitory responsibility was not the 
only interest of the Student Council. If activity were 
the measure of vitality, the Student Council had never 
been so much alive. The work of the Secretary of the 



FORENSICS NELSON 

"Fonims, 

debates, 

talks" 

See page 62 





Humphreys and Paul Besancon also worked with Grace 
on this committee. 

Elva Brownlee directed the activities of the Music 
Committee. Helping her on everything from arranging 
the pianists for the chapel service to organizing and 
presenting the Spring Musical were Genevieve Black- 
burn, Stanley Barthold, Verta Needham, Mary Ellen 
Powers, and Roy Eichner. 

Arranging the social calendar for the year and spon- 
soring each party and picnic as it came along kept 
Alice Jacobsen's Social Committee busy all year. Those 
who were associated with Alice at various times during 
the year were Nancy Reynolds, Sam Tatem, Ernie 
Chun, Harry Smith, and James Standridge. 

During 1949-50 there were 19 seats on the Student 
Council. Besides the seats occupied by the four execu- 
tive officers and the three committee chairmen who 
have already been mentioned, there were the heads of 
the various school organizations and publications and 
2 new members of the council this year, the presidents 

(Continued on page 7) 




c 

MADEIRA'S 
"New approach to yearbook joumalisn 



of the Men's and Women's dormitories; the five class 
presidents: Bill Keiter, Grads; Bill Harding, for the 
Seniors; Frank Sanders, for the Juniors; Dave Renaker, 
Sophomore, and Burwell Frazier, Freshman President. 
They have contributed to school life by guiding their 
respective classes in their social and spiritual life. 

The Women's Literary Society President Marylin 
Shaver and Walter Nelson, President of the Men's 
Forensic Society, have led their respective organizations 
in giving students the needed cultural subjects and 
world affairs. 

The two new officers seated on the council this year, 
the presidents of the Men's and Women's dormitories, 
were Gwen Humphreys and Marlys Anderson for the 
women and Sam Tatem for the men. One reason for 
the added prestige of these officers is the vital part 
they have played in instituting student responsibility in 
the dormitories. Another added responsibility this year 
for the Men's Dorm leader is the directing of the Cam- 
pus Improvement Program. This program began last 
year under the initiative of Eugene Madeira, now the 
Editor of the Finial, the school's yearbook. As editor 
of this publication this year Madeira has been kept busy 
embodying a picture of school life in his new experi- 
ment in yearbook journalism. 

Jonathan Lucas as Editor of the CeBeCean, the 



school newspaper, led his staff in putting out a publica- 
tion that portrayed student life. It also has stimulated 
student opinion concerning various student enterprises. 

The Foreign Mission's Fellowship, the center of the 
Bible College spiritual life, was led this year by Ed 
Iwan (see photo next page). Under his leadership the 
organization not only presented missionary challanges 
and information to CBC students but also extended 
their deputations throughout South Carolina, to reach 
the people with the messages of Missions. 

It was a year of work for every one of the officers on 
the Council. There were probably as many man hours 
devoted to Student Council affairs this year as in all 
previous years put together. But it was not work with- 
out reward. 

One reward for being on the Council this particular 
year was the singular honor which came in the invitation 
of the governor of South Carolina, and recent presi- 
dential aspirant, J. Strom Thurmond, to be his guests on 
Friday evening, November 25, at the Executive Mansion 
for dinner. 

But the greater reward was the satisfaction derived 
from the sense of achievement and progress made dur- 
ing the year. There were mistakes; there were difficult 
times. But there was a record of accomplishment. The 
vision was fact. 




NEWSHOUND LUCAS hunts editorial meat 



STORY OF THE YEAR 

The Burden of Missions Rests Upon YOU 

T N SPITE OF THE FACT that the Great Commission 
of Jesus Christ was given nineteen and one-half cen- 
turies ago, the world is not yet completely evangelized. 
Missionary movements in past centuries, started by 
small groups of individuals, lacked the universal sup- 
port of the Church of Christ. Thus these movements 
were limited in their attempt to bring the Good News 
to the "uttermost parts of the world." 

Missions should be the responsibility of every mem- 
ber of the Body of Christ. It is not a program to be 
carried on solely by professionals or missionary societies. 
It is a program that demands the enrollment of every 
believer. Without this universal conscription of support 
the missionary effort cannot succeed in its goal. So, 
the Foreign Missions Fellowship sponsors a program to 
reach the college students of America with this mes- 
sage of individual responsibility in carrying out the 
Great Commission. 

FMF's Role In World Missions 
Columbia Bible College's FMF chapter conducts a 
missionary program of a two-fold nature! First, it seeks 
to enlist volunteers to go out as missionaries with the 
Gospel message. (Two-thirds of CBC's student body 
are FMF members and missionary volunteers.) Under 
the leadership of Edward Iwan, President, special 
programs with guest speakers, usually missionaries on 
furlough, are presented on subjects pertaining to the 
call of God to a life of missionary service. 

Informative talks on missionary life in general, as 
well as opportunities for service and specific needs of 
the various fields are also included. These are helpful 
in orienting students who are purposing to go or who 
are considering the possibility of going as missionary 
volunteers. 

Jimmy Cail, Vice President of our chapter, directs 
the deputations to various churches in this area of the 
south. These deputations which our chapter sponsors 



present the same challenge of missionary service to 
young people of high school and college age. In these 
functions FMF is a "student recruiting agency." 

The second phase of FMF's program at C.B.C. is that 
of prayer. Most of the activity of FMF is centered in 
this most-important of all missionary efforts. It is a 
prerequisite to any and all work in the Kingdom of God 
and a work for which there is no substitute. When the 
Great Commission was given by the Lord Jesus to 
evangelize the world, He equipped His disciples in a 
two-fold manner. Dr. O. Hallesby of the Independent 
Theological Seminary in Oslo, Norway, when speaking 
of this equipment says, "Objectively He equipped them 




WYCLIFFE'S BLACKMAN ADVISES F.M.F.'S IWAN 
"Prayer— the heart of missions" 

with the Messianic gift itself, The Holy Spirit, through 
whom the powers of the supramundane world were 
put at their disposal. . . . Subjectively He had equipped 
them with prayer, the means by which all of these 
objective, supramundane powers are imparted to the 
individual believer. . . . Since by prayer we couple the 
powers of Heaven to our helplessness, and make the 
impossible possible, the work of praying is a prerequisite 
to all other work in the Kingdom of God." It is in con- 
nection with prayer that every individual member of 
the Body of Christ is responsible for the world mis- 
sionary effort regardless of qualifications, training, or 
position in life. Since intercessory prayer is the most 
important work in missionary effort, every believer can 



10 



take part in the very heart of the missionary enterprise. 

The program of intercession for missions is carried 
on in our school by a number of prayer groups, each 
one centering their attention on the needs of a particular 
field. Anne Kotiadis, FMF secretary, distributes the 
reports from various mission boards and individual 
workers to the prayer group leaders, who in turn, tell 
of the work that is being carried on in that field and 
mention the items for which intercessory prayer is 
needed. Here is prayer at work. The powers of Heaven 



FMF is a nationwide fellowship. The program to 
foster an awakening of students to the call of evangeliz- 
ing the regions beyond is being carried out on many 
campuses all over the country. Whether students are 
recruited by the Master to go or to stay, they should all 
be recruited to pray faithfully. The future of the Chris- 
tian work which is now being carried out does not 
depend primarily upon streamlining methods or re- 
organization. It depends upon whether the Spirit of 
God can persuade believers to take up the all-important 




AN EXTENSIVE MEDICAL TRAINING, twelve years of missionary 
work in the Philippines, teaching missions in several Christian colleges, and 
directing missionary training camps qualified Dr. Paul G. Culley for his 
position of Director of the Graduate School of Missions and professor of 
missions and hygiene. 

Dr. Culley was led to the Lord at an early age by his mother. After 
attending the University of Pennsylvania, The Bible Institute of Los Angeles, 
and the Winona Summer School of Theology, Dr. Culley received his B.A. 
and later his M.A. from Cornell University. In 1925 he received his M.D. 
from Johns Hopkins University. 

Following a year's medical practice in this country, Dr. Culley went to 
Palestine for one year as a staff member of an archaeological expedition. 

In spite of all of this traveling and education. Dr. Culley still had not 
been able to find the one whom he believed to be God's choice for his life 
partner. It wasn't until 1934, after six years of missionary endeavor in the 
Philippines, that Dr. Culley married, in Manila, the lady who was later to 
become the instructor of hygiene and practical nursing at Columbia Bible 
College. 

Dr. Culley had a very fruitful ministry in the Philippines from 1928- 
1940. Doing medical mission work, teaching at the Manila Evangelistic 
Institute, editing a monthly Bible magazine, directing a radio broadcast, 
and exploring new fields in the Philippines and New Guinea comprised the 
activities of this energetic servant of the Lord. 

Since his return to this country in 1940, Dr. Culley's time has been 
filled with teaching, preaching and directing missionary training as well as 
carrying on a medical practice. 



Veteran pioneer 



are at our disposal. The moment we bow in prayer for 
these laborers in the far-flung countries of the world, in 
that same instant this power "to do the impossible" 
becomes active in these people. 

Intercession for Alumni (260 now serving in the 
foreign countries) is aided by the publication and dis- 
tribution of a booklet listing their names and the fields 
on which they are laboring. A gift of money is also sent 
to these Alumni. The money is collected from banks 
placed in dormitory rooms. Louise Mitchell, Treasurer, 
announced that a goal of $1,000 was set for this purpose 
this vear. 



work of prayer— the very heart of the missionary enter- 
prise. 

FMF prayer group leaders for this year were: China, 
Annamae Opper and Edward Harrell; Japan, Harry 
Smith and Jonathan Lucas; India, Kent Hoekzema and 
Rueben Sulc; Moslem, Elwin Palmer and Eva Sewall; 
Africa, Larry Brown and Dick Griffiths; Isles of the 
Sea, Ernie Chun and Jack Frizen; Europe, Frank Noell 
and Jimmy Russ; South America, Carroll Warlick and 
Perry Priest; Central America, Ed Walker and Caleb 
Cutherell; Jewish, Jean Hampson and Virginia Penn; 
Home, Sylvia Jones and June Jenkins. 



11 



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ADS FOR GRADS 



ALUMNI OF 1950 JOIN THE ALUMNI PROJECT 



UPON HIS ELECTION as president of the Alumni 
Association, Thomas M. Petty found that he had 
received an inheritance from Buck Hatch. The in- 
heritance was a $3,150 idea. 

The idea is to sponsor a drive to give the school a 
BALDWIN ELECTBONIC OBGAN, which is to he 
known as the PBATT MEMOBIAL OBGAN. 

The Baldwin electronic organ is endorsed by the Na- 
tional Organ Guild, not to mention Public Belations 



Director Donald E. Hoke, Mr. and Mrs. Supplee, Di- 
rectors of the Music Department of CBC and John 
Hehl, Business Manager. 

The other officers of the Alumni Association of Co- 
lumbia Bible College for 1950 are: J. D. Howell and 
Edyth Sedgley, Vice-Presidents; Dee Jenkins, Becord- 
ing Secretary; Edith T. Owings, Treasurer; William E. 
Tisdale, Member-at-large, and Marguerite McQuilkin, 
Alumni Secretary. 



MEET THE SEC 




THE REPORT: 

Including the class of 1950, there 
will be 748 graduates of Columbia 
Bible College. These new members 
automatically become members upon 
graduation. But there are approxi- 
mately 200 associate members who are 
former students and are not gradu- 
ates. Of all the Alumni membership 
280 are foreign missionaries, 44 Bible 
teachers, and over 100 men have 
pastorates or some similar ministry. 




ftjtJt^J^J^J^^Ci^ 



XOU know how Divine Service is inspired and devotion 
augmented by the majestic music of a truly fine church organ. 
In your school such an organ will give inspiration through 
the years. Such an organ is the Baldwin, traditional in tone, 
style and method of playing. 

Many have chosen Baldwin for that main reason. But other 
reasons recommend the Baldwin. It is easy to play. It is 
easy to install. It fits readily into churches, schools and homes 
of any size or architectural style. 



% BALDWIN 

ELECTRONIC ORGAN 
CASE BROS. PIANO CO. 

3713 Main St. Phone 9723 )^ 



STUDENTS BECOME TEACHERS 

SENIORS FINISH TRAINING 



SENIOR YEAR introduces a time 
when many experience a new thing 
in changing from a pupil to a teacher 
in the Directed Teaching course. After 
taking prerequisite classes in lesson plan- 
ning, educational and child psychology, 
principles of teaching and classroom 
management, the prospective teacher, 
with a head full of aims, approaches and 
ambitions, enters a class of high school 
or elementary school pupils. 

A high school class in Bible is his to 
teach for a period of seven weeks. In 
addition to the all-important Bible les- 
sons, he has the full responsibility for 
everything in that class— attendance, 
grading, learning and discipline. 

Supervisor Sarah Petty, assisted by 
Miss Edith Sedgley, observes the class 
frequently. A private consultation be- 
tween the supervisor and teacher is also 
held each week. Along with the actual 
teaching, each teacher spends thirty 
hours in the schools observing regular 
teachers in secular subjects and Bible. 

"The actual joy of teaching the Word 
and seeing His mighty power at work 
overshadows the difficulties and trials 
of a practice teacher. The Lord teaches 
many invaluable lessons through this 
method," stated one enthusiastic survivor. 

"I love teaching . . . it's my life," de- 
clares Miss Sarah Petty, Senior class ad- 
visor and director of practice teaching. 
Since she came from a family back- 
ground of educators it is not surprising 
that this one who has such great interest 
in people, should be in this profession. 
Her patience and insight, in addition to 
varied interests ranging from baking to 
basketball, make Miss Petty well qualified 
to teach and lead young people. 

One of her chief joys is "Lena," the 
car with personality. Her friends have 
learned that to deride "Lena" is to insult 
its owner who feels much affection for 
her unique '37 Chevrolet. "Lena" accom- 
panied the Seniors on their sneak, chug- 
ging all the way to Folly Beach and back 
with no casualties. 

Miss Petty received her B. A. at As- 
bury College and later completed work 
for her M. A. degree at C. B. C. After- 
wards she taught school in Trinity and 
Ware Shoals, N. C. With the inaugura- 
tion of practice teaching in 1945, Miss 
Petty came to C. B. C. to direct this 
important course. 

This year she has also advised the 
Senior Class which after four years of 



Biblical training faces the hour of degree 
dispensing. "Alarming" is the only word 
which can accurately describe the rapid- 
ity with which dormitory life, open 
houses, spring musicales, basketball 
games, picnics and parties have gone by. 
The class day was especially enjoyed by 
all in spite of the chagrin of Clarence 
Stroupe and Grace Howell who desper- 
ately tried to keep the Junior detectives 
from gaining a knowledge of their 
destination. 

Sent off by a welcoming committee 
most generously furnished by the Junior 
Class, the Seniors enjoyed a wonderful 




teaching" , says EDUCATOR PETTY 



day at Folly Beach. Relaxing in the sun 
and exploring the shore occupied the 
more retiring individuals. The energetic 
ones, armed with nets and baskets, went 
crabbing on the pier in the afternoon. 
The numerous crabs they caught not 
only provided a wonderful supper, but 
also made a nice bed-mate for a certain 
Junior later that same night. 

After devotions around a beach camp- 
fire, President Bill Harding III; Vice- 
President Clarence Stroupe; Secretary 
Betty Beauchamp; Treasurer Box Sax- 
ton, and the rest of the Senior Class re- 
turned. Their only regret was that this 
momentous day had come to such a 
swift close. 

Leadership in student government and 
Christian service is the privilege and 
responsibility of this class. As officers of 
the Student Association and other stu- 
dent body organizations, many are given 
the opportunity to express the results 
of their training. Student pastorates and 



directorship in many other phases of 
Christian testimony afford valuable ex- 
periences for these who are about to 
assume roles of spiritual leadership. 

This year was highlighted by the 
completion of the Bible College curri- 
culum with Systematic Theology, Christ 
in the Old Testament, Problems of 
Theology, Progress of Doctrine in the 
New Testament and a majority of elec- 
tive courses, including Hebrew, filling 
the schedule. 

The opinions which have been crystal- 
lized in these final months of Bible Col- 
lege experience have been built upon 
the child-like faith with which these 
students began their freshman year. Yet 
child-like faith is not enough. Faith that 
is based on a personal knowledge of God 
is the faith of the mature Christian. 

This knowledge has been gained 
through a series of circumstances which 
has forced the students to rely wholly 
upon God. Senior chapel messages served 
as an expression of the Senior's spiritual 
vitality, although it was not without its 
moments of fright and quaking as they 
prepared to face their classmates and 
professors. 

Seniors, you are in the Pursuit of 
God, but remember, "Complacency is a 
deadly foe of all spiritual growth ... I 
want deliberately to encourage this 
might longing after God. Every age has 
its own characteristics. Right now we 
are in an age of religious complexity. 
The simplicity which is in Christ is rarely 
found among us. In its stead are pro- 
grams, methods, organizations, and a 
world of nervous activities which occupy 
time and attention, but can never satisfy 
the longing of the heart. 

"When religion has said its last word, 
there is little that we need other than 
God Himself. The evil habit of seeking 
'God-and' effectively prevents us from 
finding God in full revelation. 

"We need not fear that in seeking 
God only we may narrow our lives or 
restrict the motions of our expanding 
hearts. The opposite is true. We can well 
afford to make God our All, to concen- 
trate, to sacrifice the many for the One." 
—A. W. Tozer. 



14 



_J_ , , y, ■ 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 
(left to right) 
Vice-President Stroupe, 
Treasurer Saxton, 
President Harding, and 
Secretary Beauchamp. 



: ■ 









Thoughts by the sea side 



Ham at 
i Civic Club 



15 



SAM V. ARCHER 

Recina, Saskatchewan, Canada 

1720 Broad Street 

Western Canadian Bible Institute, 
Active FMF Prayer Group Leader, 
3, 4; Camera Club, 3. 



BETTY A. BEAUCHAMP 
Cradock, Vircinia 
37 Alden Avenue 

Class Secretary, 4; Associate FMF, 
1,2,3,4; Subscription Manager Finial, 
3; Phi., 1,4; Chorus, 2. 



GENEVIEVE BLACKBURN 

Norfolk, Virginia 
122 San Antonio Boulevard 

Norfolk School of the Bible; Active 
FMF, 3,4: Phi. Vice-President, 2,3; 
Phi. member, 1-4; Chorus, 2,3; Glee 
Club Librarian, 4. 



HOWARD C. BLAIR 

Upper Darby, Pennsylvania 

1216 Myrtlewood Avenue 

Army Air Force Veteran; Student As- 
sociation President, 4; Active FMF, 
2-4; Prayer Group Leader, 2: Editor 
CeBeCean, 3; Forensic President, 2; 
Forensic member, 1-4. 



JAMES OTIS BRASWELL 

Ft. Walton, Florida 

P. O. Box 1761 

Army Veteran: Class President. 1: 
Active FMF, 1-4; Prayer Group Lead- 
er, 1; CeBeCean writer, 1. 




JO 



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r 


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. 




L 




SEHIRS 



ELAINE G. BROWNLEE 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

234 W. Walnut Lane 

Student Association Music Committee 
Chairman, 3; Associate FMF, 1: 
Active FMF. 2-4; Feature Editor Ce- 
BeCean, 2-3; Literary Editor Finial. 3; 
Phi.. 1-4; Master Sergeant. 2: Chorus, 1. 



CLIFFORD K. BURTON 

Stillwater, Oklahoma 

Route 4 



Navy 
Active 



Veteran. 
FMF. 



Phillips University, 



J. MARGARET CAMERON 

Ontario, Canada 

Ailsa Craig 

Bible Institute of Pennsvlvania: 
Active FMF. 3,4; Radio Club Vice- 
President. 3. 



WILLIAM P. CARTER 

Sumter, South Carolina 

120 White Oak Park 

Army Air Force Veteran; Student As- 
sociation Clean-Up Chairman. 2; 
('lass Treasurer, 1; Class President. 2; 
Associate FMF, 1-4; Business Man- 
ager Finial, 3; Forensic, 1; Chorus, 1. 



STANLEY O'NEAL COOK 
Clearwater, South Carolina 

Navy Veteran; Active FMF. 1-4; Ad- 
vertising Manager Finial. 3; Forensic. 
1-2: Sergeant At Arms, 2; Chorus, 3. 



16 



1950 



HERMAN H. COOK 

Kannapolis, North Carolina 

Route 1, Box 181 

Navy Veteran, Associate FMF, 4. 



L. JEANNE COOK 

Kannapolis, North Carolina 
Route 1, Box 181 

Associate FMF, 4. 



PATRICIA A. DAVIS 

Greenville, South Carolina 
115 Rose Avenue 

Phi., 1-4; Vice-President, 2. 



BETTY DOVERSPIKE 

Sumter, South Carolina 

114 S. Sale Avenue 

Associate FMF, 1-2; Active FMF, 3-4; 
Phi., 1-2; Chorus, 1-2. 



RAYMOND E. FITZSIMMONS 

Roachdale, Indiana 

Route 2 

Army Veteran, Arizona Bible Institute. 




ROGER W. FOX 
Baltimore, Maryland 
3710 Yosemite Avenue 

Army Air Force Veteran; Active 
FMF, 4; Camera Club, 3-4; Radio 
Club President, 4. 



F. PHOEBE GILCHRIST 

Atlantic City, New Jersey 

461 Maryland Ave. N. 



PAUL E. GRIMES 

Columbia, South Carolina 

2214 Holt Drive 

Army Veteran. 



THOMAS G. HAMILTON, JR. 

Pearson, Georgia 

Free Will Baptist Bible College 



WILLIAM T. HARDING III 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

908 Berekeley Avenue 

The Citadel, Class President, 4; As- 
sociate FMF, 3; Active FMF, 4; 
Forensic, 3-4; Vice-President, 3. 



17 



MARTHA A. HARRISON 
Thomson, Georcia 
909 Cleveland Street 

Georgia State College for Women, 
Missionary to Costa Rica, Central 
America; Latin American Mission. 



ESTHER N. HODGE 

Yorkville, New York 

2 Hillcrest Avenue 



Active FMF, 1-4. 



GRACE E. HOWELL 

Evergreen, Alabama 

Route 1, Box 129 

Student Association Program Chair- 
man, 4; Class Secretary, 2; Active 
FMF, 14; Prayer Group Leader, 2; 
FMF Southeastern Regional Deputa- 
tional Secretary, 4; CeBeCean Associ- 
ate Editor, 3; Phi, 1-4; Secretary, 2; 
President, 3. 




GWEN HUMPHREYS 
Aldan, Pennsylvania 
118 E. Providence Road 



Active FMF 4. 



i 


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[ 




\ 






a 



EDWARD L. IWAN 

Bronx, New York 56, New York 

815 Elton Avenue 

Veteran; Class Vice-President, 2; 
Active FMF, 1-4; Prayer Group Lead- 
er, 2; FMF President, 4; Editor Finial, 
3; Camera Cluh, 3-4. 





SENIORS 



ALICE JACOBSEN 

Largo, Florida 

Box 99 

Student Association Social Chairman, 
4; Active FMF, 2-4; Prayer Group 
Leader, 3; CeBeCean Feature Edi- 
tor, 3; Assistant Editor, 4; Finial 
Writer, 3; Phi., 24; Social Chairman, 
3 ; Chorus, 1. 



ROY H. JENSEN 

Staten Island 14, New York 

142 Goodwin Avenue 

Navy Veteran, Columhia University, 
Illinois Institute Technology, Wagner 
College, Active FMF, 34; Prayer 
Group Leader, 2; CeBeCean Business 
Manager, 2; Editor, 3; Newswriter, 4; 
Finial Art Editor, 3; Forensic, 24; 
Sergeant at Arms, 2; Program Chair- 
man, 3; Barhell Cluh, 2-3; Camera 
Club, 2-3; Basketball team, 2. 



E. LORENE KEEVER 

Hiddenite, North Carolina 

Route 2 

Active FMF, 14; Phi.. 3.4; Radio Club 
Secretary-Treasurer, 4. 



HAROLD W. KING 

San Antonio, Texas 

525 Highland Boulevard 

Veteran. Active FMF, 3,4. 



REBECCA S. KNOWLTON 

Edinboro, Pennsylvania 

Box 206 

Active FMF, 2-4; Chorus, 1. 



IS 



1950 



MARIAN J. LAIRD 

Enclewood, Colorado 
3145 South Cherokee 

Denver Bible College; Active FMF, 
24. 



O. JENNINGS HILL 

Columbia, South Carolina 
2512 Wilmot Avenue 

Coast Guard Veteran. FMF Active. 14 ; 
Barbell Club, 2 ; Camera Club, 2. 



JONATHAN LUCAS 

Folly Beach, South Carolina 

Box 198 

Army Veteran, Clemson College, Class 
Vice-President, 3; Associate FMF, 3,4; 
Prayer Group Leader, 4; CeBeCean 
Cartoonist, 2 ; Associate Editor, 3 ; 
Editor, 4; Forensic, 24; Parliamen- 
tarian, 2,4; President, 3; Camera 
Club, 4. 




BERNARD L. MAHAR 

Lansing, Michigan 
1313 E. Main Street 



jpf 




f 




W 4***V 






7 




~*.^k 











MAGDALEN H. MARTINEZ 

Brooklyn 1, New York 
22 Ft. Greene Place 

Active FMF, 1-4. 





john d. McNeill, jr. 

Greensboro, North Carolina 
1302 Brandt Street 

Navy Veteran, Associate FMF, 1-4; 
Forensic, 1. 



LOUISE M. MITCHELL 

Wilmincton, Delaware 

104 Rodman Road 

Beacom College, Active FMF, 
Treasurer, 4; Phi., 1-2. 



PHEBE G. MORSE 

Pineville, North Carolina 
c/o Dr. Ralph Reid 

Temple University, Student Associa- 
tion Secretary, 4; Class Treasurer, 2; 
Active FMF, 24; Phi., 1-4; Social 
Chairman, 2; CeBeCean, 1,2. 



DONALD K. MOSES 

Pittsburgh 18, Pennsylvania 

2107 Delaware Avenue 

Army Veteran, University of Pitts- 
burgh, Freshman Representative; 
Active FMF, 2-4; Prayer Group Lead- 
er, 2; Forensic, 3,4; Chorus, 1-3. 



WILLIAM C. NEEF 

Aldan, Pennsylvania 

27 Beech Avenue 

Navy Veteran, Active FMF, 1-4; Vice- 
President, 3; Prayer Group Leader, 2; 
Dormitory Secretary-Treasurer, 4; 
Basketball Team, 1-4; Camera Club 
Secretary, 3,4. 



19 




WALTER A. NELSON 
Spokane 12, Washington 
West 2529 Maxwell Avenue 

Prairie Bible Institute; Active FMF, 
3,4; CeBeCean Writer, 3; Forensic, 
3,4; Parliamentarian, 3; President, 4. 





*t7 


V 


i . 



MARTHA NTZAMIAN 

Central Islip, New York 

11 Elmore Street 

Active FMF, 1-4; CeBeCean Feature 
Writer, 1; Finial Associate Editor, 3; 
Phi., 1; Sergeant at Arms, 1. 



FRANK M. NOELL 

Washington, D. C. 

510 B Street, North East 

Class Vice-President, 3; Active FMF. 
1-4; Prayer Croup Leader, 2,4; Foren 
sic, 2,3; Barbell Club, 2-4. 



ASTRID OLSEN 

Baudette, Minnesota 

Atlanta Bible Institute, Staff Member. 



ANNAMAE OPPER 

Elyria, Ohio 

213 East Avenue 

Class Treasurer, 3; Active FMF, 1-4; 
Prayer Croup Leader, 4; Phi., 1-4; 
Chorus, 1. 




DONALD E. PETERSON 

Seacrove, North Carolina 

c/o W. Graves 

Air Force Veteran, Active FMF, 14; 
Prayer Group Leader, 3. 



HUGH S. POWLISON 

Plente, California 

2010 S. Turnbull Canyon Road 

Franklin & Marshall College, Summer- 
land Jr. Bible College. 



ROLAND F. REED, JR. 

Longmont, Colorado 

885 Francis Street 

Navy Veteran, Active FMF, 14. 



JAMES W. RUSS 

South Norfolk, Vircinia 

1217 Chesapeake Avenue 

Basketball Coach, 3-4. 



MAX A. SALTZMAN 

East Moi.ine, Illinois 

372 21st Street 

Veteran, Camera Club President. 3,4. 



20 



1950 



ROBERT J. SAXTON 

Orlando, Florida 
515 W. Amelia Avenue 

Navy Veteran, Class Treasurer, 4 
Active FMF, 3,4; Camera Club, 3,4 
Treasurer, 4. 



MARILYN J. SHAVER* 

Toronto, Ontario, Canada 

68 Dawlish Avenue 

University of Toronto, Active FMF, 
3,4; Phi., 3,4; President, 4. 




PHILIP SPACE 

Chuchatuch, Virginia 

Route O 

Podunk Bible Institute, Co-Chairman 
Social Committee, 4; Forensic Chair- 
man of Absentee Members, 4; Presi- 
dent 5:50 Club, 4. 



ELAINE B. SPEANBURG 

Amsterdam, New York 
Route 3 

Active FMF, 1-4; Prayer Group Lead- 
er, 2. 



I. JAMES SHOOK 

Prescott, Arizona 

Box 134 

Army Veteran, Elim Bible Institute, 
Student Association Vice-President, 4; 
Class President, 2; Barbell Club, 1. 



DORIS P. SORRELLS 
Weaverville, North Carolina 

Active FMF, 4. 



DORIS M. SOUTHARD 
Katy, Texas 
Moody Bible Institute. 



'Graduate in summer school. 




MARY STEELE 

Columbia, South Carolina 

Columbia Bible College 

Washington Bible Institute, Staff 
Member. 



ERNEST A. STILES 

ROBBINSVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Box 284 

Army Veteran, Associate FMF, 1-4; 
Prayer Group Leader, 2; Forensic, 1,2; 
Chorus, 1. 



JAMES A. STODDARD 

New York, New York 

260 West 44th Street 

Army Veteran, Active FMF, 1-4. 



21 



seniors 



WILLIAM D. STONE 

Sharon, West Vircinia 

Box 78 

MA in Summer School, '50; Navy 
Veteran; Class Treasurer, 2; Associ- 
ate FMF, 1; Active, 2-4; Prayer Group 
Leader, 2 ; Chorus, 1. 



CLARENCE G. STROUPE, JR. 

Memphis, Tennessee 

793 Spring Street 

Bob Jones University. 



WENDELL M. SULLIVAN 

Mt. Hermon, California 
Box 105 

Navy Veteran, B.S. Kings Point Acad- 
emy; Associate FMF, 1-3; Active, 4. 



SAMUEL W. TATEM 

South Norfolk, Virginia 

915 Wilson Road 

Forensic, 1,2; Dormitory President, 4. 



AGNES J. TAYLOR 

Geneva, New York 

Route 3 

Active FMF, 1-4; Phi., 1,2; Chorus, 
1,2. 




DOROTHY D. THORSBY 

Trenton 9, New Jersey 
203 South Clinton Avenue 



Navy Veteran. 



FORREST S. THORSBY 

Trenton 9, New Jersey 

203 South Clinton Avenue 

Active FMF, 1-4. 



ARTHUR F. WEAVER 

Glenolden, Pennsylvania 
10 Bartram Avenue 



Veteran. 



ERNEST L. WILLIAMS 

Spray, North Carolina 
c/o Mrs. S. P. Gilley 



MARION C. WILLITS 

Moorestown, New Jersey 

123 Chester Avenue 

Pennsylvania Hospital; Associate FMF, 
1,2; Active, 3.4; Chorus, 1-3. 



22 



1950 



FERN A. WILSON 

Ventnor, New Jersey 
6409 Monmouth Avenue 

Bible Institute of Pennsylvania, 
Active FMF, 3,4. 



THOMAS R. WILSON 

Ventnor, New Jersey 
6409 Monmouth Avenue 

Army Veteran, Bible Institute of 
Pennsylvania; Active FMF, 3,4; 
Chorus, 3. 




DOROTHY DINSTUHL* 

Clarkesville, Georgia 
Box 412 

Union University; Active FMF, 3. 



MAX L. DINSTUHL* 

Memphis, Tennessee 

1183 Minna Place 



Union University; 
Active FMF, 3. 



Navy Veteran ; 



MARY E. WINTERS 

Savannah, Georgia 
Box 276, Bonna Bella 

Erskine College; Active FMF, 1,2. 



GLENNIS I. YOUNG 

Perry, Florida 

316 Willow Street 

Active FMF. 3,4; Phi., 1,2,4; Chorus, 
1-3. 



WALLACE AVERY* 

Norfolk, Virginia 

122 San Antonio Boulevard 

Active FMF, 1 ; Photo Editor CeBe- 
Cean, 1; Barbell Club, 2. 



'Graduate in summer school. 




FRANK B. ERWIN, JR.* 

Birmingham, Alabama 
1306 35th Street 
Marine Corp Veteran; Active FMF, 
1-4. 



L. JUNE JENKINS 

Devers, Texas 

Box 593 

University of Texas, Active FMF, 2,3 
Phi., 2,3; Treasurer, 3. 



JAMES McLEOD* 

Salisbury, South Carolina 
716 East Council Street 



23 



V 







"crabbing served more than one purpos* 



M 



f 



.-j*: v jh 




"The retiring 
individuals 
explored the shore" 



24 



LLY 

BEACH 







Photo by Walker 



JUNIORS DISCLOSE SECRET 

Tliey tell how they uncovered sneak 



FRUSTRATING over a half a year's 
careful planning, the Juniors not 
only discovered the site of the Seniors' 
sneak five days prior to "S Day" Nov. 
10. 1949, but they also revealed the des- 
tination of this annual outing to many 
an ignorant Senior. 

After much guessing and speculation, 
the dejected Seniors falsely concluded 
that a phone call to the bus station the 
night before had been the means of dis- 
covering this closely guarded secret. 

In reality on "S Day," minus five, the 
actual location of the sneak was gleaned 
from the contents of two over-heard 
conversations. One uncovered the site as 
being either near Charlotte, N. C, or 
else at Folly Beach, S. C. The other re- 
peated Folly Beach but gave Poinsetti 
State Park as the alternative. Thus this 
high priority information was obtained 
a full three days prior to the searching 
of a certain Senior's desk which contained 
further information. 

This enabled Burt Harding, Harold 
Sells, Ed Walker and Tommy Watson to 
depart for Folly Beach with previously 



prepared signs a full hour before the 
Seniors posted an ultimatum containing 
their unconditional surrender. A con- 
firmation phone call the night before 
made it possible for Hubert Addleton, 
Cecil Hawkins, Archie Davis, Frank San- 
ders, Lee Kirkpatrick, John Knopf and 
Pierce Barnes to be aboard the chartered 
bus when it arrived at school at 5:15 
A.M. on "S Day." 

The secrecy employed by the Seniors 
in telling only a few of their classmates 
of the site boomeranged by enabling the 
victorious Juniors to inform many an 
unsuspecting Senior of his destination. 
This was accomplished by shining their 
flashlights on a huge "Folly Beach Spe- 
cial—Best Wishes— Juniors" sign plastered 
on the side of the bus. 

This victory was put in song by Sophie 
Graham and given its premier rendition 
at the breakfast table the same morning. 
Huge Greyhound bus signs and Folly 
Beach photographs placed on the Stu- 
dent Association bulletin board formed a 
vivid exhibit of this great success. 

"Stroupe's Folly," as the sneak came 



JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS (left to right) 

^-President Harrell, Secretary-Treasurer Stapf 

and President Sanders. 

25 







to be known, was not the only accom- 
plishment of President Frank Sanders; 
Vice-President Ed Harrell; Secretary- 
Treasurer Beulah Stapf, and their class- 
mates. Assuming the responsibilities and 
privileges of upperclassmen, they en- 
gaged in several social activities of which 
the Junior-Senior Banquet, an Earl- 
wood breakfast hike and a progressive 
party were the most successful. 

Adopting the program of the Apostles, 
the Juniors endeavored to put into prac- 
tice their year verse:. "But we will give 
ourselves continually to prayer, and to 
the ministry of the word."— Acts 6:4. 

(Continued on page 30) 




HUBERT F. ADDLETON 


MARLYS J. ANDERSON 


ELEANOR L ANDREWS 


SALLY L. ARNER 


MACON, GKOHGIA 


LMMALENA, KENTUCKY 




Rome S 


Aciive FMF. 3; Art Editor 


029 South Church Street 


940 Tenth Avenue. South 


dive FMF, 1-3; Chora., 1. 


Finiol, 3. 


As»ociate FMF, 1; Aciive, 2.3; 


Student Association Social 




Photo Editor Finial, 3; Phi., 1 ; 


Chairman. 2; Phi., 1.2: Chorus 






Chorus, 1-3. 


President, 3. 



mums 



\ 



MARVIN D, COCKRELL 

OATESHUm;. S«i 
Army Veteran. 




217Dn%ir>Dri< 
MalTilt Villapr; Navy Veil 



26 




MARTHA E. DUFF 



Route 2, Boi 72 
Associate FMF, 1-3. 



CLIFTON C. DUVALL 

ATLANTA, GEORGIA 

1353 Dupont Avenue S.E. 

University System of Georgia; 

Student Association Treasurer, 



DAVID N. EVERTSBERG 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICHICAN 
2215 Frances Avenue 



RUSSELL K. FERRY 

RICHMOND HILL. NEW YORK 
101-52 110th Street 



ft \l:!:!-\ I, I HI hi KICK 



Route 1, Box 165 
Army Veteran; John B. Stetson 
University; Associate FMF, 3. 



27 




JOSEPHINE A. READ 

BROOKLYN 5. NEW YORK 

African Inland Mission 

375 Carlton Avenue 

Missionary — Kenya Colony, 




MIZPAH S. ROBERT 

NASSAU. BAHAMAS 

Bay Street 



13lh and Liberty Sti 
Army Veteran; Associate FMF. 



92 Woodville A v. 
Class President, 3: Associate 
FMF, 1; Active, 2.3; Prayer 
Croup Leader, 2 ; Barbell Secre- 
tary, 2; President, 3; Dormitory 
Secretary-Tr( 



5038 Reach Street 
e FMF. 3. 



CHARLES M. PRESTON 

BliRDETT. 
Army Veteran; Kansas Slate 
College; Radio Club, 3. 



If 




At 



El GENE I . VUDEIRV 
EL1ZABETRT0WN, PENNSYLVANIA 

314 College Vvenue 
\i,m Veteran; Chairman Stu- 
dent Relief; Iclive IMF. 1-3; 
Prayer Group Leader. 2; Edi- 
tor-in-Chief Fininl, 3 ; Forensic 
2; Barbell, 1.2; Ci ra Club, 




J '( , 



NONA I. MtCLURE 



2575 Henry ! 



ELIZABETH M. MILLS 

DETROIT !1. lOCfllCAll 

8557 Elsworth 

Associate FMF, 1; Active, 2J; 

Prayei Group Leader. 2; Phi.. 

1-3; Secretary. 3; Chorus. 1. 



28 




EDWIN' S. WALKER III 

Route 1 
Active FMF, 1-3 ; Prayer Group 
Leader, 3; Business Manager 
Finial, 3 ; Business Manager Ce- 
BeCean. 1; Forensic. 2,3; Vice- 
President, 3; Barbell Club, 1.2. 



LAURA WILLIAMS 

SPRAY, NORTH CAROLINA 
c/o Mrs. S. P. Gilley 



Active FMF. 1-3; Phi. Cri 



29 



Continued from page 25 

Their Bible study was enriched by the 
application of the principles of Biblical 
hermeneutics to their classroom work. 

Through this training the Juniors are 
seeking to obtain a knowledge of the 
English Bible, which is too frequently 
absent in the modern Christian ministry. 
It is not an abstract knowledge of the 
principles and techniques involved in 
presenting the Scriptures that is lacking. 
Neither is acquaintance with historical 
and classical scholarship the imperative 
which is needed to fill the vacuum exist- 
ing in the Church of Christ today. In- 
stead the practical exposition of Biblical 
truth is the object of the longing which 
many have expressed in words similar to 
these, "When I go to church I want to 
hear what the Bible has to say— not what 
some preacher thinks it means." 

Yet amid the wonders of God's Word, 
we hope that our class is becoming in- 
creasingly careful not to lose the sense 
of the reality of God's presence which 
loss befalls those who do not take time 




MR. SANDERS 



basic principles of speech 



to cultivate the knowledge of Him as a 
person. It is for this reason that great 
stress is placed upon each student re- 
serving time each day for communing 
with God in devotional Bible study and 
prayer. 

Each student must remember that 
"sound Bible exposition is an imperative 
must in the church of the living God. 
Without it no church can be a New 
Testament church in any strict meaning 
of that term. But exposition may be car- 
ried on in such a way as to leave the 
hearers devoid of any true spiritual 
nourishment whatever. For it is not mere 
words that nourish the soul, but God 
Himself; and unless, and until, the hear- 
ers find God in personal experience, they 
are none the better for having the truth. 
The Bible is not an end in itself, but a 
means to bring men to an intimate and 
satisfying knowledge of God, that they 
may enter into Him, that they may de- 
light in His Presence, taste and know the 
inner sweetness of the very God Himself." 



"GOOD MORNING. We welcome you 
to listen for a moment to the Little 
Chapel of the Air. Come and meditate 
with us. . ." And from 7:55 to 8:00 A.M. 
each weekday hundreds of South Car- 
olinians hear the voice of announcer F. 
Brooks Sanders over radio station VVCOS 
in Columbia. 

Mr. Sanders began his radio training at 
Wheaton College where he majored in 
speech and brightened many a program 
with his trombone solos. After receiving 
his B.A. in 1947, he attended Eastern 
Baptist Seminary and New Brunswick 
Theology Seminary. He also served as 
music director of the Madison Street 
Bible Church in Oak Park, 111., and the 
Philadelphia Youth for Christ during that 



period. After serving as pastor of the Old 
Bridge Baptist Church in Old Bridge, N. 
J., Mr. Sanders went to Costa Rica un- 
der the Latin American Mission to be- 
come both the program and musical di- 
rector of radio station TIFC. 

The Sanders were forced to return to 
the United States on account of Mrs. 
Sanders' health. In 1949 Mr. Sanders 
came to teach public speaking at C.B.C. 
He is also assisting in the music depart- 
ment and radio production course in ad- 
dition to heading up student deputations. 
In his spare time Mr. Sanders pastors a 
church in Augusta, Ga., and encourages 
the basketball team every Friday night. 

Concerning his present position Mr. 
Sanders states, "I think speech is of ut- 



most importance to a Christian worker. 
Whatever is worth saying for the Lord 
is worth saying well. Our objective is to 
produce a sense of coordination between 
all speech mechanisms so as to permit 
greater freedom in speaking." 






^1 


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CAMERA SHY 

JOSEPH RAY ATTMAN 
Seaford, New York 
3813 Merrick Road 
New York University 

LEONA J. ATTMAN 

Seaford, New York 
3813 Merrick Road 


\\ 1 


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R ' 


i 


J 




Camera Shy 


JAMES P. CARTER 
Helton, Solth Carolina 
Route 2 

BRUCE ATKINSON 


Hff3 












Bennettsville, S. C. 

208 Parsonage Street 




M ■ 




* i i 


r ■ if<- i 


CM 


30 


JUNE GRAY 

Park Ridce, Illinois 

20 North Knight Avenue 



YOUR GUARDIANS 




MRS. WALKER, THE GIRLS' CHIEF GUARDIAN 
She's gracious, sympathetic, and understanding 



MISS CUMMING, 

THE ASSISTANT GUARDIAN 

From debutante to C.B.C.'s etiquette authority 



SANTA NEEF PLAYS GUARDIAN 

TO DEAN MUNRO 

He has a mind for historical details 



"MOTHER just makes her living talk- 
ing." Provoked with his mother for the 
amount of time that she was spending in 
talking with the girls, twelve year old 
Billy Walker made this comment to his 
friends. 

All the girls who have come to C.B.C. 
have found Mrs. William Walker to be a 
true mother with a gracious and sympa- 
thetic interest in each girl. She has never 
been too busy to listen to even the small- 
est problems and give practical advice. 

At the age of sixteen Mrs. Walker had 
a vital experience with the Lord. From 
that day on her heart has been in mis- 
sion work. 

She married a minister who was pastor 
of the First Baptist Church in Rome, Ga. 
After they were married, they applied 
for missionary work in Japan, but they 
were hindered from going. Hence mis- 
sions lay always at the heart of Mr. Wal- 
ker's work. 

Mrs. Walker has three daughters and 
one son. Bill is at Yale studying the Jap- 
anese language in preparation for serv- 
ice on that mission field. Catherine is a 
missionary in China now. Elizabeth is 
married to Kenneth Strachan, who is co- 
director of the Latin American Mission. 
Her eldest daughter is married to one of 
the staff members at Wheaton College. 

After her husband's death, Mrs. Wal- 
ker taught Bible for eight years in Char- 
lotte, N.C, before coming to C.B.C. While 
filling the position of Dean of Women 
for the past sixteen years, she has said 
that her goal is to treat the girls as she 
would like to have her own girls treated. 



"FOR THE FIRST TIME in my life I 
realized that there was some other goal in 
life besides marriage," stated Associate 
Dean of Women, Miss Katharine Cum- 
ming, concerning the time when she first 
heard the gospel as a young woman. 

Since her only knowledge of God up 
to this time was gained from a few na- 
ture studies in Sunday School as a child, 
the first twenty years of Miss Cumming's 
life were spent in total ignorance of a 
personal God. True, she had heard of 
Christianity along with the other reli- 
gions. They all were included in the in- 
tellectual training engineered by her fa- 
ther. But to believe that a simple, un- 
educated Jewish carpenter could sud- 
denly appear and claim to be the Son of 
God was too fantastic to be accepted by 
intelligent people. Thus, the theories of 
evolution and atheism were substituted 
for Christianity and became her philoso- 
phy of life. 

It was after her graduation from finish- 
ing school in Raleigh, N.C, and her de- 
but in Augusta, Ga., that Miss Cumming 
began teaching contract bridge to 
wealthy visitors in Augusta. These luxu- 
rious and social winters, interspersed with 
her trips to Europe, made up the early 
years of her life. But underneath the sur- 
face exhilaration, her heart was constantly 
seeking— seeking for the real answer to 
life and its problems. 

Her first contact with cultured people 
who also claimed to know a personal God 
was at a conference on the Hudson River. 
The testimonies of answered prayer and 
the living power of God were things she 
could not overlook. For the first time in 
her life, Miss Cumming prayed. Soon 
afterward, she was led to a personal 
knowledge of Christ through a Bible Col- 
lege alumna. 



FROM A RUN-AWAY BOY to a history 
teacher and dean of men is Mr. John 
Ker Munro's story. His keen memory for 
incidents from ancient history is illus- 
trated by his present vivid recollection of 
running away from home at the age of 
two. A bridge was being built over the 
Saskatchewan River. An inquisitive child, 
he went to investigate. He stayed on into 
the night oblivious of the fact that the 
police were searching for him. 

It was not until the age of sixteen that 
this explorer again ventured forth into 
parts unknown. This time it was a 2,000 
mile trek across western Canada. After 
having worked to meet all expenses, he 
joyously returned with $100 in his pocket. 
Four years later, he went with his mother 
on an extensive tour of Europe and Pales- 
tine. 

Mr. Munro received his B.A. from 
Wheaton College and his Th.M. from Dal- 
las Theological Seminary. His public 
schooling and Bible college training were 
received in Canada, where he was born 
and brought up. 

His own four sons and his 187 adopted 
ones, as well as teaching history and pas- 
toring a church, keep him fairly busy 
now. But it is said he also has time to 
devour the contents of twenty-five pe- 
riodicals each month. 

Those of us who are studying history 
under Mr. Munro see evidences that he 
has not lost his keen memory or love of 
travel. 

31 




SOPHOMORES ARE CREDITED WITH WINNING GRITS BOWL 

They are all outstanding; some in football, basketball, others in music. 



IN POINTING to the Senior-Sopho- 
more's 6 to conquest of the Junior- 
Freshman football team, the Sophomores 
can rightly stake their claim of leadership 
in Bible College sports. Sophomores 
Larry Brown, Tommy Watson, and Bruce 
Shelley— were the outstanding players in 
this traditional Thanksgiving Day Grits 
Bowl Game. This supremacy is further 




32 



substantiated by the appearance of three 
Sophomores— Joel Ortendahl, Bruce Shel- 
ley, and Tommy Watson— on the first 
quintet of C.B.C.'s champion basketball 
team. 

As is the case with the other classes, 
the Sophomores readily state that the ma- 
jor characteristics of their group are the 
Christian fellowship and unity of spirit 
which have been especially evidenced in 
their weekly prayer meetings and class 
socials. This is reflected in their choice of 
a year verse: I Corinthians 15:58 "There- 
fore my beloved brethren, be ye stead- 
fast, unmoveable, always abounding in 
the work of the Lord, forasmuch as ye 
know that your labor is not in vain in the 
Lord." 

Led by President David Renaker; Vice- 
President, Perry Priest; Secretary, Vir- 
ginia Penn; and Treasurer, Winford 
Headrick, this class enjoyed what is prob- 
ably the most interesting part of the four- 
year Bible College curriculum. For it is 
in the second year that courses under 
Dr. Robert C. McQuillan, Mr. James M. 
Hatch, and Dr. J. Walter Carpenter are 



first offered. 

This is the fateful hour in which the 
courageous individuals trembling, tiptoe 
into "baby" Greek. At this point Dr. Mc- 
Quilkin is transformed in the mind of 
the student from a beloved president 
who abounds with inspirational and 
challenging chapel messages to a scholar 
who possesses a deep knowledge of the 
books of John and Romans and Daniel 
and Revelation. Here the study of psy- 
chology introduces one to the remarkable 
teaching ability and keen insight into 
the problems of learning which one al- 
most immediately associates with the 
mention of Mr. Hatch's name. 

The editors of the 1950 Finial would 
remind the Sophomores that, "Our gifts 
and talents should also be turned over to 
Him. They should be recognized for 
what they are, God's loan to us and 
should never be considered in any sense 
our own. We have no more right to claim 
credit for special abilities than for blue 
eyes or strong muscles. 'For who maketh 
thee to differ from another? and what 
hast thou that thou didst not receive?' 



ABOUT OUR ADVISOR 

GOING DIRECTLY FROM SPANISH CLASS to 
French class without getting her languages mixed up, 
Miss Kathryn E. McClarty has amazed students for 
three years now since joining the faculty in 1947. 

Perhaps the most remarkable characteristic of this 
well known faculty member is her dry, and often too 
subtle to detect, sense of humor. One is just as likely 
to come across it on a final French exam as in a casual 
conversation in the lobby. 

After receiving her B.A. at Elmira College in Elmira, 
N. Y., and her M.A. at Middlebury College in Vermont, 
Miss McClarty did advanced work at McGill Uni- 
versity in Montreal, Grenoble in France, Sorbonne in 
France, and Syracuse University in New York. 

At the age of seven, Miss McClarty went to an 
evangelistic service with her mother. Following a 
message concerning Christians standing for Christ, 
she declared her faith in Christ by going forward. She 
is not certain of the date since she was brought up 
in a Christian home and never remembers having any 
doubt that Jesus is God. 

A very prominent place in Miss McClarty 's out-of- 
the-classroom conversation is occupied by her only 
sister's two daughters. Like all aunts, she gets great 
joy and satisfaction out of convincing you that they 
are the two most unusual nieces any aunt ever had. 

"Eating period is one of my favorite pastimes with 
chicken and lamb heading the list of favorite foods," 




Left to right— President Renaker, Secretary Perm, 
Treasurer Headrick, and Vice-President Priest 



states Miss McClarty. Her pet peeve is people who 
always put things off until the last minute. "This 
includes cramming for exams too." During the summer 
much of her time is spent on her favorite hobby- 
entertaining her two nieces. Other hobbies include 
knitting, playing the piano, and photography. 

(See photo on Page 37) 




As freshmen, their unity of fellowship was evidenced in social activities as well as in prayer meetings 



33 



LOWELL A. BULL* 

', jMOENTOS '" "' 

Faith Bible Icadem] 



jffffiHSS. 

,- 1 MF, - 



10HN S. BANKS 
118 Randolph Sir"' 
e FMF, 2. 



JOY BARN*™ 

;,««■ ■' 

i 62jFW \,enue.N 



, PIERCE BARNES 
235 Summit Koau 

Ulball. 1 - ^ l " 



STANLEY BARTHOLD 

910 Elm Street 

VMF Prayer Group 

\£Si. V Barbell Cl-b. 1- 




nrvMS \ BARTHOLOMEW 
U7We.tBto.dStr. 

Xetiv.FMF.1-2 :l'l.i..l- 



M j«,V BEARDSHA* 
\ is*H GEORGIA 

5 Bo« 593,' R°<* " 



, l Ml. 1 



Phi. Sergeant- 
1 .2; Chorus 



CLIFTON E. BLEVmS 

Y>. •« tl an TSJH3SJ 

'"ujW. King Street 
Vnn j \ eleran. 



IRENE BOMAN 

'.„„,,.*. FLORIDA 



ntTWA A. BRANCH 
Route 3. Bo» ^"" 
ir-e FMF- 1-- 



*"« U BRECON 

RICHMOND «>LU 



SOPH 



LAURENCE D, BROW 

, KHS AF*VOBk 

76Sislh Vvenue 

N .»vv«te. '"- Tr rT;; r 'l 

, Ml Pr.,er Croup Le.o.-. 

Siv, f^-^y:;', ;.i. - - 

!■.,! 1-2. 



ELVAH mgg^ 

, u \v,-, WalnutUne 

<> ^'^FMF.ZiChon.., 



BETTY E. CALLOWAY 

., t\NV|l, GEORGIA 



"""LESSEES* 

'23 Canaan SU" 1 

„ FMF, 1-2: W..1* 



EL01SE CRAWFORD 

]i v\l>V. t.V'Hi.lV 
Route 3 



*RUE MAY CROWJ, 

lilO Laurel A\enuc 

,. kctiv. FMF- 
ClM> SK "l. Ury Vj ! ,m Fini.1, '■ 
1-2; \-" 





f, il^/l 



, 



BOY I- DAVIS, JR- 

Marine \«-i<ran. w< 
lege 



34 



WnJJAMJ^RLY „ EICHNER^ 



DOUGLAS EREM1C 

,„, HB1A. -"Til I "<"" 



Army V« 



MARILYN I KTK 

OMDWIUi SOUTH' >'<"" 

KOI \uru«i» «"•'* 
,.,„,. IMF 2. 



BBTTY LOU FOWLER 

V„veFMF.l-2:rh..'- 



FRANasco CARCU 

""««, CUBA 

7 No. 24 
«*»«oBe„ iteJ M arianao 
Associate F1WF, 2.1- r 
Dorm Vic e .p res ,j "rensic. 2; 






° mu > Nineteenth Stn, 
e ' eran ;Ac.iveFMF ,a. 




* i 

RICHARD r r r,,„ CLIFFORD CRnco 

5-17 Ca Jl f Sbn ^m Bo, l , „ ' ' 



5-17 C, 
e FMF, 2. 



AciveFMF,.?'^ I d "' -' 







- ■ [J 7 

KENNET„ L . H4RpER 



MS Ada, 



KJ5* "AYWOOD V l N ™" D L - HEADWCK 

"00 Defense Higl'wa, R ™'e 2 

«.™, y . v ^x i m °°*> BiD ,e r „. fe?::*w^. 

lule "-'"'"Slon Bible l„s„ FMF 1 r ""P ^"'cr 1 

mie. Arrive r»fr « ,. , "' [|- ■"" Aa&rtfiat*. 1 . *' * 



N «« Edi>or, ,, F„- ren ' s i c C 2 BeCean F " re " sic - *: Brtrtdl-ST, 




DONALD/ HP,,.. 
Box «8. Ro ut( , , 






ii)A n . MAR lLA 1 \o 
'08 Ork„ ey R oad 



MILDRED E urn- 



CT0 " i ' WI JE8SEV 
■Ule 5 



Associate F1VIF, 2. 



Rout- ? D 'Molina 

"° - "ox 254 




---senile 
"ooseveh r«n 

'■- P K i-£ ct~- c "~ e FMF - 



Moody Rihi B r 

■O-. Bol.V. ,„":,'"""•• Mi «i»n 
d « Bolivia >„d^ u-"*™'- »»■ 
"laian Mission. 



ir>HN V LAWING 

1919 Truman BO * 
■ FMF 1-2; CeBeCean car- 
Active l»». "^ j 



0D«5A D. LEWIS 

«>«»»* 1 
Routt 2. Bo" 3 " 



36 Channine, Avenue 



JAMES N. EOL'WERSE 

OBANCE CITY. IOTA 
311 South Pella 



ciME 0. LUCAS 
.^" a.lTH CAHOUIU 

t FMF. 1* 



-^Tbl-Stree, 
Kinp C»«e S e. 




RAYMOND MARCOS 

2310 LaSalle Street 



JOHN L. McFARLAND 
612 Wee. 31* Street 



C « L ™UCaX.a e eL»„e 



JOHN P- ME1SS „ V . 

^1822 Wallace Aveuue 

FMF 2; Chorus, 1: •J*' 
^rC.uZ i ;Can."^lub, 1 -2. 



Route 1 
Active FMF. .-2:.Ph...l ; Chonte 



. FMF o- Camera Club. 1- 
Active rMf • -■ 



SOPHO 



HELEN B. NLCKLES 
1507 Atlantic SlK« 



I01SM. NYLEN 

••^V'TAtnue 
,21 South Crescent Ave 

,„ v ,. V MF.l-2;Phi-.L 






Veteran; Ba.We.hall —• >- 2 ' ^.nff.a 






l-2-.Phi.2- ^ 

Class Secretary. « 
1-2: Ph'- 2 - 



V ,, RY ELLEN POWERS 
"-•""•""ST 

14943 Starnsbury 

. . \.-iHia"' 
FMF DetrnitBtblel^,.,,.. \# 

Chorus. !-• - 




ITtVtt.. < M n Wi a() 

■>010Turnhull' '"""" 
Active FMF. 1.2;'' ' 2 ' 



I OIS J- POWUSON 

,010 Turnbull Canyon Road 

v ;. c FMF...2;Phi-^-a— 



PERRY & "jSf 1 

nor. msauaw 



Basketball w 
Preaidenli 2. 



JOSEPHINE RACANO 

2101', EfP* A"" ue 
Active FMF. 2. 



36 



„,...„ » RENAKER 

16 Sequoia Un 
•j _. 2- Associate FMt. 
"»!• r ""„f." .U;.. Forensic -2-- 
2;Serfe.ntal» |ic ,„ b ,2. 

Vice pres«"nt liar. 



~SSJ22 St- 

Associate FMF. 1.2. 



1 



MILDRED ROGERS 

Box 244 
Active FMF. 2. 



2rr= y 

JUS Sou,|, Vl | )a Dr .» 
Army vete ra „. ~ 
V "»™„„„, .,', ' r "»urer. S, ud 
" en '- I • A*' ""•' ** *'ce-/v, 

- B "-ke.h„|, tau J~j* n ' 



"text i^ E SHt, n: 




JANICE E. SMITH 

Bl'SHKILL. PENN.sm ,,„ 



cuveFMF,l,2;P),i., i. 



JUANITA G. SMITH ROBERT E. SMITH 

H"nt,„p „ Co|y 1324 Fore,, Road 

] - 2 - PW- 1,2; Ch„™, 1 " e ™ F - A «'ve FMF, 1 ,. F „ - 

>rus < i - '-• forensic, 1,2. 



MISS _KATHRYN E. McCLARTY 



HIRES 



5SS?«»BM 



'■-"'"IflBj, 



CAROLYN j sr . 



*«*. FAfF, , 2 I S ' r <« A «'VeFMF, 2 . Pni 

'"=• forensic, 3 2 



" "-'"''LAND 



r °- Box 5 o 







e FMF. 1,2- PK. j 



WH.LMM WILLOUCHBY 

222o Oatdale Avenue 
ffa^ir Coliege; Active^ 
1 -2-For,n«,c,I, 2:Bai . oe ,; c| FMF. 



MILDRED 
224 Ea„ ft, 

Active FMF, 2. 



E- VOUNT 

MICHIGAN 
"'Peel Street 



37 



MANY ARE ENROLLED IN THE PURSUIT OF GOD 



FRESHMEN FIT INTO CBC'S TRAINING PROGRAM 



Orientation aids adjustment 

ii^Y/nTmN THE FOLD of conservative Christianity 
▼» there are to be found increasing numbers of per- 
sons whose religious lives are marked by a growing hunger 
after God Himself. They are eager for spiritual realities and 
will not be put off with words, nor will they be content 
with correct 'interpretations' of truth. They are athirst for 
God, and they will not be satisfied till they have drunk 
deep at the Fountain of Living Water." 

Tozer well expresses why we freshmen enrolled in C.B.C. 
Here we are able to study courses that are not only planned 
to provide the basic knowledge essential to setting forth 
the doctrines of Christ, but our whole life and activity is 
armed to stimulate the devotional life by which the pres- 
ence of God is manifested. 

But the abrupt change from a secular state high school 
to a school that is distinctly a Bible College, the abrupt 
change from home life to dormitory life, causes many 
problems which are only relieved by the certainty that the 
Lord had led us here to receive training for effective 
Christian service. 

Stressing the practical result of entering into victory 
over sin and the Spirit-filled life, Philosophy III (Christian 
Ethics) provides us with a knowledge of the means to 
this end. Gaining some maturity through this course, we 
find that we have already become adjusted to student life. 
The first semester was our opportunity to become regu- 
lated to the Bible College concept of responsibility. Our 
representative was Bobert Baker. He served in a non- 
voting capacity on the Student Council. 

By the time the middle of the year came, all of us were 
well acclimated, and we were officially classified. Classi- 
fication brought with it recognition. This meant that we 
could choose our own officers and advisor. The officers we 
elected to guide our activities of our now self-governing 
class were President, Burwell Frazier; Vice-president, 
Leonard Allred; Secretary, Virginia Poley; and Treasurer, 
Eugenia Gasperson. Our class advisor, Mr. William Supplee, 
(see page 62 FINIAL congratulates) was also new, for he 
joined the faculty the same time we arrived at school. 




Left to right— President Frazier. Secretary Poley, 
Vice-President Allred, and Treasurer Gasperson. 



HEY DAY 



«Q. 



(BIENTATION WEEK is thoroughly effective from 
beginning to end. It gives us students time to 
adjust ourselves without being rushed with studies." 

"... a fine thing for us Freshmen who need to know 
what daily living of the Christian life is." 

These quotations illustrate the favorable reaction ex- 
pressed by many Freshmen concerning their opening orien- 
tation week. Preliminary tests, lectures on various phases 
and problems of Bible College life, spiritual life meet- 
ings, recreation, and opportunities for consultation with 
the deans and other faculty members comprised this pro- 
gram which helped the incoming students adjust them- 
selves to Bible College life. 

Many lasting friendships were begun during this open- 
ing week and also on the traditional "Hey Day." On this 
day each student is never to use the foreign expression "Hi" 
in greeting anyone. Instead, he is to say "Hey" in a South- 
ern manner to everyone he meets. A prize is given to the 
one who has learned the most names and important facts 
about people whom he has met. 



38 




SECOND SEMESTER FRESHMEN 







HEY DAY finds Waiter Lochstampfoi 
forking real hay to CBC's hungry horses 



L. to R. First Ro 



Second Row 



MOSES YU 

Kowloon, Hong Kong, China 

WILLIAM C. RUSS 
So. Norfolk, Virginia 
1217 Chesapeake Avenue 

GEORGE C. BIGGAR 

Wheaton, Illinois 
522 Naperville Road 

JOHN USRY 
Roanoke, Virginia 
1922 Rover Avenue 

MORRIS O. COTTLE 

Castle Hayne, North Carolina 

EDWARD G. CUNNINGHAM 
Hastings, West Virginia 

FRANK BLACKMAN 
Brentwood, Tennessee 
Route 1 

PAUL GILCHRIST 
Philadelphia 44, Pennsylvania 
145 Maplewood Avenue 

ROBERT O. BRANK 

West Columbia, South Carolina 

Rt. 2, Box 553 



GLADWIN G. KREIMANN 
Manitowoc, Wisconsin 
414 No. 8th Street 
Not shown in Picture: 

FRANKLIN D. BLACK 
Camden, South Carolina 



RUTH M. GRAY (MRS.) 
Washington, D. C. 
1715 Upshur Street 

JOYCE E. IRELAND 
Guilford, Maine 

RUTH A. MAHAR (MRS.) 
Lansing, Michigan 
1313 E. Main Street 

DOROTHY B. SHORT (MRS.) 
Columbia, South Carolina 
1143 Olympia Avenue 

BETTY R. SIMS (Staff Member) 
Jasper, Texas 
Box 522 

ANNA BANFIELD (MRS.) 
Columbia, South Carolina 
2411 Cypress Street 



ILA MAE ANDERSON 
Emmalena, Kentucky 

ANITA REISE 
Elinora, New York 
R. D. 1 

LEONA LONG 
Biscoe, North Carolina 

JOYCE McKINSTRY 
Philadelphia 38, Pennsylvania 
6015 N. 21st Street 

PAULINE MUSELMAN 
Berne, Indiana 
517 E. Main Street 

ALBERTA KINNARD 
Bremen, Georgia 
409 Lambert Street 

GRACE BRAKER 
Corbin, Kentucky 
P. O. Box 87 

ROBBIE L. SUMMER 
Rock Hill, South Carolina 
1209 Bose Avenue 

JESSIE F. IZZI 

New York 24, New York 

63 West 91 Street 



BARBARA E. MEIER 
Berwyn Heights, Maryland 
5812 Quebec Street 
Not shown in Picture: 

EUNICE E. CHAPMAN 

Augusta, Georgia (Staff Member) 

423 Telfair Street 

HELEN HENDRICKS (Staff Member) 
Aurora, Illinois 
122 Central Avenue 

JOHN L. KNOTTS 
Columbia, South Carolina 

MARY W. MARTIN (MRS.) 
Augusta, Georgia 
2003 Warren Street 

ROBERT W. SHORT 
Columbia, South Carolina 
1143 Olympia Avenue 

CORNELIA YU (MRS.) 
Kowloon, Hong Kong, China 
76 Nga Tsin Long Road 

CHARLES BANFIELD 
Columbia, South Carolina 
2411 Cypress Street 




CBC's latest happy addition's 



39 



LEONARD P. Al.LRED 



ANNABELLE ANDERSON 
JACKSONVILLE, f 
1227 Mon 

■ FMF, 1. 



ROBERT BAKER 

CLEARWATER, 

1768 East Drew Street 



JAMES L. BENTON 
Route 1. Bon 72 



CARL B. BLACK. Jr. BARBARA A. BLACKBURN 

89 Cushing Street 




ULLIAM E. BOHLER 



ELMER 0. BONNETTE JUNE M. CAM 

Route 1, Box 222 "Lyndenhurts' 

.:._™r, EndcIilTe Hdl A 



MARJORIE A. CAMP 

CORDON CITY, MINNESOTA 
Active FMF, 2; Phi., 1 ; Choru 



MARGARET CREECH 
Route 1 



CORNE1.I1 S DALKE 



CHARLOTTE V. CROTTS 

Box 436 Route 3 

N.vy Veteran; Active FMF. 1 



mi 



WILLIAM A. ENCELS KATHERINE ER1KS0N WILLIAM III HUF.l.L FRAZIER MARY LEE FRY 

1705 City Point Road 726 North 12th Street Route 1 823 Kentucky Avtniii 

Active FMF. 1,2; Foren.ic, 1,2. Associate FMF. 1.2. Cla»» President, 1. Arm c FMF, 2. 



G. RUSSELL DROLL 

PHILADELPHIA. PENNSYLVANI 
3450 North Second Street 



DORIS J. GARRETT EUGENIA GASPERSON 

PLEASANTl ILLE. NEW JERSEY SKYLAND, NORTH CAROLINA 

903 North New Road Route 1. Box 6 

Class Treasurer. 1. 




1817 Orleans Street 3816 Cauth.irn Dri 

Na»y Veteran. II.,, I., II Club. 1. Barbell Club. I. 



EDNA K. GOODWIN 
2402 Glenwood 



LOUISE GRAHAM 

; CALIFORNIA 
1214 Prinrelon Dmr 



JACK K. HAYES WILLIAM T. II \MMOND 

1719 Beverly Drive Route 1 

He FMF. 1 : Barbell Club. 1. 



40 



WILLIAM E. HANCOCK MARY E. HARRINGTON C. SIDNEY HOFFMAN VIRGINIA HOOKER CLARA HOSWELL WILLIAM INGBRETSEN JAMES W. JENSEN 

412 East Watuaga Avenue 117 Gordon Avenue Route 2. Box 315 2532 West Baltimore Street 14 Miller Street P. O. Box699 

Phi., 1; Chorus,!. Navy Veteran. Associate FMF, 1. Veteran; Active FMF, 1. 









a - i. \ 




ROBERT L. JONES 
6118 Ellis Avenue 
Active FMF. 1. 



JOEL L. KEITER 
40+8 Twenty-First Street 
live FMF. 1 ; Business Manager Asi 
BeCean, 1; Forensic, 1. 



IVA KIRKPATRICK 



320 Clark Street 
te FMF. 1; Chorus, 1. 



RACHEL A. LENNON EDGAR F. LOCHSTAMPFOR 

. NORTH CAROLINA PORTSMOUTH. VIRGINIA 

Route 2, Box 129 36 Channing Avenue 



nn 



DOROTHY M. MARSH 



WANDA A. McLEOD 

521 West Horah Street 



JEAN AUDREY McGEE ROSE MARY MONDA PATRICIA JOAN MOYER 

127 Fourth Sir. 



EDWTNA NORMAN J, MARGARET PAKKEBIER 

Box 181 Calvin College, Mona Lake Gospel 

Mission, Muskegon Heights, 
Michigan. 




1622 Ridgeway Road 

Class Secretary. 1; Active FMF. Bible Institute of Pennsyl 
1; Phi., 1. Active FMF, 1. 



B. CAMILLA RIGDON M. CAROLYN ROBINSON 

ILLE, 5 
114 Capers Street 1812 High I 



II 



HUBERT M. RUMSEY 

TH CAROLINA 

215 ES 



EVA L. SEW ALL 

II PLAlNFIELD. NEW JERSEY 
119 Grove Street 



DANIEL SULC 

HOPEWELL. VIRGINIA 
Route 1. Box 332 



REUBEN SULC 



EDWARD R. TRITT 



Route 1. Bos 332 
Army Veteran; Active FMF., 1. M.i 



JEANELLE TWETEN 
1355 84lh Street 



VELMA WALTON 
404 North 33rd Street 




RI.MR WESI 

UT Clinton Street 



NORMA JEAN WEST 

KOUnT CLEMENS. MICHIGAN 
147 Clinton Street 



ROBERT V. WILLUMS 

CHARLOTTE. NORTH CAHl.LIN 
318 Weal Ninth Street 



EMIL C W1TT1C BETTY J. ALLISON E. GENEVIEVE BAR.NETT CAROL BREMER 

CHICAGO 11 ILLINOIS BLUEF1ELD. WEST VIRCINlA MEHPHB TENNESSEE CHICAGO II. ILLINOIS 

6482 Oxford Avenue 1004 College Avenue 1235 East Parkway Street 7016 South Peorii Street 

Army Veteran: Active FMF. 1; BlueBeld College. Prairie Bible Institute; Active LuUieran Bible In 

Forensic. 1 ; Barbell Club. 1. FMF. 1. 



FRESHMEN 



FRANCES P. BUTLER LOUISE CLARK THOMAS E. DANCERFIELD WILLIAM R. CYATT J. KATHERINL HARRINGTON DON HESSE 

NEWARK. NEW JERSEY CHAPEL, VIRGINIA CHARLESTON. WEST VIRGINIA SYRACUSE. NEW YORK FOUNTAIN CITY. TENNESSEE CLARKSVILLE. IOW 

„ ,. . r .. 1823 Crescent Road 169 Milnor Avenue 117 Garden Avenue 



547 Summer A 
Wheaton College. 



JAMES I. JACKMAN 

SVRONA. WISCONSIN 

Momingside Park 



Iowa Slate College: Air Force 

Southland Bible Institute; Marine Syracuse University: Air Force Bob Jones University; Phi., 1: Veteran; Active FMF. 1 : Photog- Free Church Bible In. 
Corps Veteran. Veteran; Active FMF. 1. Chorus. 1 rapher Finial. 1 ; Camera Club. 1 c " 






f%tL a 



DORIS MAY LAWSON P. JOANNA LOWERY 



KENNETH MAYES 



1320 Poplar Avenue 1 10 Whiteford Avenue. N.E. 508 North Harmon Street 

Bible Institute of Pennsylvania. Alabama Slate Teacher. - College. Multnomah School of the Bible 



LETTIE McCEE 

RW VTTJL SOUTH CAR 
7 Townsend Street 



CORNELIA Nl'NN 

4SHLV.ND. ALABAMA 
Route 3 



M. EUSE OTTO 



>l 
FLORENCE PEARSON 



5728 First Avenue Plymouth Teachers' College. 

Bible Institute of Pennsvlvan.a: 
Active FMF. 1. 



42 







BERYL W. PRICE VIRGINIA M. PROZAN SOPHIA SCHADE 

GREEN SPRINGS, OHIO KRIE. PENNSYLVANIA ASHTON, ILLINOIS 

Route 1 1225 Arlington Road Northern Illinois Slale Teachers' 

Soulhland Bible Institute; Air Pennsylvania Stale Teachers' Col- College; Active FMF. 1 

Force Veteran; Associate FMF, 1. lege; Active FMF, 1. 



VERNE M. SCOTT 
20 Craighurst Avenue 
Toronto Normal School; Ac 
FMF. 1; Phi., 1; Chorus, 1. 




% 



KI.IZ UIF.TH SONEY 

Ml Benjamin Street Navy 

Bob Jones University; WvclirTe 
Riblc Translators. Mexico; Active 
FMF. 1; Chorus, 1. 



t FIFTH'S STYRON 



Bible 




REGISTRAR KATHRYN WARREN 
always on the lookout 

WHAT WOULD YOU DO if you were in this predicament? 

You have just twenty minutes in which you must prepare for 
a message that you have been called upon to give at the T. B. 
sanitorium. But you feel led to pray for an unsaved school-chum. 

Would you pray or would you work on your message? 

The girl of this story prayed. And her school-chum, known 
to us as Miss Kathryn Warren, was saved. Miss Warren at this 
time was in her junior year at college and on this particular 
evening was attending a vesper service at the Y. W. C. A. The 
Holy Spirit spoke to her heart through Psalm 24:3,4: "Who 
shall ascend into the hill of the Lord? Or who shall stand in 
his holy place? He that hath clean hands, and a pure heart; 
who hath not lifted up his soul unto vanitv nor sworn deceit- 
fully." 

After a childhood spent in Alba, Pa., Miss Warren's two 
brothers went into business, and she followed the profession of 
her father by becoming a schoolteacher. After graduation from 
Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pa., she taught five years in 
Pa. and seven years in N. Y. Miss Warren's favorites among her 
students were always the bad boys. Along with teaching eight 
high school subjects, she held Bible clubs and coached the girls' 
basketball team. 

One of the most unusual things about Miss Warren is her 
love of languages. In college, she majored in both French and 
Latin and also studied Spanish. At C. B. C. she not only took 
Greek but also Hebrew. As if this weren't sufficient, she en- 
rolled in a course in Anglo-Saxon at the University of South 
Carolina. 

As you see Miss Warren stepping lively through the halls, 
you would not guess that one of her special enjoyments, besides 
studying languages, is observing people. 




SCHOLARLY MR. BROOMALL 
gives a winsome smile 

"NOW TAKE MY GOATS for instance. . . ." These famous 
words have long been the signal for much humor in the classes 
of Professor Wick Broomall. 

Mr. Broomall, professor of theology and history, is known as 
the walking library. There are but few class periods when he 
fails to pull some old manuscript out of his brief case and be- 
gin to read some underscored passage to his students. 

Born in Birmingham, Ala., Mr. Broomall is a real Southerner. 
His family (three sisters and one brother) were always closely 
united, resembling as he states it "a clan." Now that neither 
of the parents is living, two of the sisters keep up the old 
homestead in Birmingham. 

Saved at the age of twelve, Wick Broomall joined the Vine 
Street Presbyterian Church and has continued in that denomina- 
tion ever since. For four years he pastored a church in his 
home town. 

Mr. Broomall spent his early college years at Maryville Col- 
lege in Tennessee. Later he graduated from Princeton Uni- 
versity and then Princeton Theological Seminary. While at 
Princeton young Wick Broomall won a prize from the Ameri- 
can Tract Society for his paper on the Holy Spirit. 

Finishing his education, Mr. Broomall taught first in the 
Evangelical Theological College at Dallas, Texas, and later at 
the Birmingham School of the Bible. He has been on the faculty 
of Columbia Bible College since 1937. 

Mr. Broomall's chief hobbies are raising goats, gardening, and 
observing people. He often stands aside to watch people and 
note their facial reactions to varying situations. 

The Broomall's have one son whom they named John Owen 
in honor of the great English preacher of the 17th century. 

43 



POSSIBLE SUICIDE PREVENTED 

Dramatic restoration highlights many Christian Service activities 

By Arlie May Crowl, Associate Ed 





Roy Jensen holds interest of 
Industrial School hoys 



a 




A TREMBLING HAND ran down the page of Columbia's 
telephone directory early one November morning, and 
paused gladly at the words, "New Life Center." In his present 
condition these words to Bill Hamlin* spelled "deliverance" 
more accurately than anything else at hand. A Bible College 
student at the mission hurried to Bill's side after receiving the 
call, and heard this story: Bill was on the verge of ending his 
own life before he called the mission. That morning, after a 
night of revelling, he had awakened with a nasty gash in his 
forehead. His '49 Plymouth, his watch, and his money had been 
taken from him while he was in a drunken stupor. 

The Bible College student spent the entire day with Bill, 
praying and poring over God's Word with him. He learned that 
Bill had been saved from a drunkard's life in a previous experi- 
ence, but had since fallen along the wayside. Gradually he had 
lost his Christian testimony and with it both the motive and 
desire to live. He had come to the end of himself that day when 
he woke up wounded and robbed, and obeyed the voice of the 
Holy Spirit to his heart by calling the mission. 

Before the day was over, the joy and assurance of Bill's 
salvation were restored through the testimony of the Bible Col- 
lege student. He left Columbia within a few days a new man 
with a new hatred for sin and a new desire to serve God. 

This is just one of the many thrilling experiences C.B.C. stu- 
dents have weekly on their city-wide Christian Service Assign- 
ments. The Bible College is located in an ideal place for witness. 
Doors are open for opportunities to teach the Word in the 
Women's Penitentiary, the Girls' Industrial School, the Colored 
Boys' Industrial School, and in the public schools. Numerous 
hospitals are open for visitation. Within a few miles of the city 
is Fort Jackson which has a constant influx of young men who 
need the Gospel. Opportunities to teach and preach in Co- 
lumbia's many churches challenge the Bible College young 
people continually. 

OPPORTUNITIES AT STATE FAIR 

The annual State Fair held in Columbia each fall finds the 
Christian Service Department busy arranging an attractive Bible 
College booth and preparing teams of personal workers to alter- 
nate morning, noon, and night covering the fair grounds. Groups 
of students systematically canvass the entire grounds, distribut- 
ing tracts and witnessing to the crowds of people who come 
from every walk of life to this big event. 

Many thrilling stories have come out of C.B.C.'s experience 
at State Fairs through the years. This year students came back 
with striking testimonies of the Lord's working through their 
individual witness. Many who had never before led a soul to the 
Lord saw the Lord take their words and use them to the sal- 
vation of someone. 

For ten years the Christian Service Department had tried to 
get an opening to hold a class for colored nurses in a local hos- 
pital, and this desire was answered unexpectedly when one of 
these nurses accepted the Lord at the State Fair and made it 
possible for the Bible College to come into that hospital. One 
girl saw 19 people decide to follow their Lord in one afternoon. 

Thousands of tracts were distributed prayerfully throughout 
the week and hundreds were spoken to about their relationship 
to God. In addition to the personal work done on the fair 
grounds, a group of students kept a program going continually 
in the Bible College booth, giving forth the good news of sal- 
vation in movies, testimonies, object lessons, and special music. 

* True name withheld. 



44 



WORK AMONG THE SERVICEMEN 

Impelled by the moral and spiritual degradation prevailing in 
America's peacetime army, several C.B.C. students working 
through the Servicemen for Christ organization have put forth 
a vigorous evangelistic appeal to the men at Fort Jackson. Each 
Sunday night scores of soldiers aimlessly walk the streets of 
Columbia seeking some form of thrill or diversion from the rou- 
tine of army life to which they are subjected at this large fort 
which is located only five miles from the city. Many fine young 
men have been lured into shame and wickedness through the 
temptations which are readily found in cities. 

Because of Servicemen for Christ, many of these soldiers are 
greeted with, "Say, Soldier, come on over to a swell Service- 
men's rally we're having tonight. A lot of us fellows who were 
in the service know what it is to be in a town where you don't 
know anybody and have nothing to do, so we put on these infor- 
mal meetings every Sunday night in the Bible College audi- 
torium. They're held especially for the students and fellows from 
Fort Jackson. Just hop in my car here and come along. There'll 
be a good song service, testimonies, and then some of the girls 
will sing before one of the ex-G.I.'s brings a message. What's 
more, we'll give you a free bus ride back to the Fort after the 
meeting is over." 

Over twenty-five servicemen come to these services every 
week. Recently in one service fourteen out of the thirty fellows 
in attendance stepped out for Christ when Assistant-Director 
Emil Wittig gave the invitation. Two fellows from Fort Jackson 
who accepted Christ at the Bible College are now conducting 
regular Bible Classes for their fellow soldiers in Japan. Bob Sax- 
ton, Sunday night director, emphasized the fact that the results 
experienced are due directly to the prayer support of the stu- 
dents. 

Servicemen for Christ was begun simultaneously by a soldier 
from Fort Jackson who held meetings at C.B.C, and by a group 
of soldiers in France during the war. One of these fellows, Bob 
Brosius, later came to the Bible College and learned of the simi- 
lar work which had begun here under the same name. Deciding 
to work together, the two groups united under the directorship 
of Bob Brosius. 

With headquarters in Chicago and branch offices throughout 
the United States, Servicemen for Christ with the cooperation of 
the Chaplains* Department has now spread to every section of the 
countr\'. The departure of one team for Japan this fall will be 
the beginning work among soldiers, sailors, and marines in both 
the Pacific and European theaters of operation. 

The Army attributes a two percent rise in chapel attendance 
to Servicemen for Christ. This and the testimonies of redeemed 
men, the praise of numerous chaplains— all indicate the effective- 
ness of the work of Servicemen for Christ. 

BUSINESSMEN'S BIBLE CLASS 

From 10:00 to 10:30 every Sunday morning Dr. McQuilkin's 
Bible studies are broadcast over radio station WKIX as a part 
of Businessmen's Bible Class. Students canvass Main Street, in- 
viting servicemen to attend the class, which is held at the Hotel 
Jefferson, and many have been converted. 

WEEKLY STREET MEETINGS 

Street meetings with as many as seventy in attendance are 
held every Saturday night at eight on the corner of Hampton 
and Main. All of the men students who want to participate meet 
for a time of earnest prayer beforehand. They go out with a bur- 
den for souls and a determination to win men to Christ. Director 
Joel Ortendahl and the many who take part in speaking, testify- 
ing, and playing musical instruments have had the joy of seeing 
scores of lives transformed through their acceptance of the sal- 
vation message presented there. 



45 




Bus Driver Standridge loads tl 
for its return to Fort Jacks. 




Dr. McQuilkin is on the air. sponsored 
by the Business Men's Bible Class 





Willing workers relax after Sunday morning service 
(shown below) at the Veterans' Hospital 





VETERANS" HOSPITAL WORK 

A fruitful ministry is carried on weekly at the Veterans' Hos- 
pital located outside the city. Sunday morning finds a busload of 
singing C.B.C.'ers headed for the hospital prepared to give tes- 
timonies, to sing special music, and to do personal work in the 
wards. The students find the thankful hearts and sincere praise 
of the many sick veterans ample reward for their service. On 
Tuesday afternoons another talented group puts on a "Victory 
Hour" "wardcast" over the public address system from the hospi- 
tal auditorium. A mid-week prayer and praise service is led by 
still another team on Wednesday evening. 

DEPUTATIONS 

Out-of-town deputations are a vital part of the Christian 
Service outreach. These deputations, planned and directed by 
Mr. Brooks Sanders, include several Gospel services and parties 
at which C.B.C. students get acquainted with the members of 
the particular church to which they are ministering. In the homes 
where the students are given overnight accommodations, there 
are additional opportunities for a Christian witness. Happy 
memories of these week-end trips are preserved by all the stu- 
dents who participate. This year groups were sent to Asheville, 
Charlotte, Wilmington, North Carolina; Augusta, Georgia; and 
numerous cities in South Carolina. 

BIBLE CLUBS 

Most of the women students have Bible Club assignments with 
children. Usually the weekly Bible classes are taught in private 
homes in Columbia and the surrounding areas. Valuable practical 
experience in teaching and dealing with small children, both 
colored and white, is gained. 

The Bible College library has equipped itself with every imag- 
inable aid for the girls in their teaching. For recreation they 
may check out suitable equipment. Numerous flannelgraph 
stories, backgrounds, and boards are available; and Sunday 
School and other Gospel literature is on file in great quantities. 

Working in the Women's Christian Service Department is Miss 
Dorothy Strauss, director, assisted by Miss Nellie Duval] and 
Miss Edythe Sedgely. The Men's Department, with a fleet of 
Christian Service cars, is under the leadership of Mr. Thomas 
Petty. His assistants are Mr. Otis Braswell and Miss Irene 
Boman. 

CHRISTIAN SERVICE LEADERS SET THE PACE 
About Men's Director Petty . . . 

"DON'T SUBSTITUTE tact for contact" is a part of Mr. 
Tom Petty's advice to C.B.C. students in relation to their 
Christian Service, of which he is the director. Mr. Petty's 
pet peeves fit him well for his job. "Much activity without 
objective, and the performance of Christian Service in the 
energy of the flesh are my chief dislikes," states this ex- 
perienced personal worker. 

For five years before coming here as Christian Service 
Director. Mr. Petty was the pastor of Palmetto Community 
Church. During the last year of his pastorate, he took on an 
additional responsibility as chaplain of the Girls' Industrial 
School. At one time he headed a Gospel mission in Lorain, 
Ohio. He was also the headmaster of the Edwards' Memorial 
Boys' school at Salemburg, N. C. 

A native of Greensboro. N. C.. Mr. Petty traces his 
conversion back to his fifth year when his mother led him 
into a personal experience of salvation. 

46 



MEN'S STAFF IN CONFERENCE 




Bowman, Petty and Braswell laugh during conference interlude 

His childhood ambition was to teach farming in South 
America. This interest in farming has stuck with him until 
now. He anticipates taking up the hobby of organic farming 
at his rural home. 

At Asbury College, Mr. Petty received his B.A. degree, 
and his M.A. was secured at Columbia Bible College. He 
also attended the University of North Carolina and Cleve- 
land Bible College in Cleveland, Ohio. 

MISS STRAUSS, WOMEN'S DIRECTOR . . . 
IN A JEWISH HOME in Chicago, where the children were 
taught to hate Christ and all Christians, C.B.C.'s Women's 
Christian Service Director, Miss Dorothy Strauss, was born. 

Throughout high school Miss Strauss was bitter against 
all those who even mentioned the name of Christ. After 
graduation she started working in an office where there were 
two Christian girls. They asked her to go to the Chicago 
Business Women's Council. Again and again she made 
excuses but finally could think of no more; so she went. 
For the first time she heard the Gospel. After this she began 
to go to a weekly Bible class and then to read the New 
Testament. Her two Christian co-workers took Miss Strauss, 
practically by force, to see the Bible class teacher, Miss 
Lucy Peet. She warned her in their second interview that 
if Miss Strauss decided to accept Christ she might be put 
out of her home. Then she asked Miss Strauss, "Is Christ 
worth it?" 

Miss Strauss made the decision and was put out of her 




home, but she found Christ worth it and ten years later her 
father, too, accepted Jesus as his Messiah and Lord. 

Since her conversion the Lord has led Miss Strauss into 
Mountain Mission, Children's Bible Mission, Bible teaching 
in the school, and camp work. In 1942 she became a member 
of the C.B.C. family, and since then has been reaching 
out into Columbia through the Christian Service Depart- 
ment. 

MR. SELLS, CHRISTIAN SERVICE ENTHUSIAST 
A GUST OF WIND— you turn around to see what just 
went by. It's just Mr. Sells, head bent low, trying to get to 
his class on time. 

This Bible teacher did not come to C.B.C. first as a 
teacher, but as a young man he left the Tennessee hills to 
come as a student to the Bible College. After graduating, 
he attended King's College and Dallas Seminary. His 
education was furthered when he went with his father to 
Palestine in 1935. 



t 




and her staff decide it 



Busy Mr. Sells p; 



Since 1936 he has been teaching at C.B.C. He doesn't 
devote his entire time to the Bible College geniuses, how- 
ever, but does much Gospel work in the public schools. 
His love for the Negroes and his work among them claims 
much of his time. He teaches Bible courses at colored 
colleges in Sumter, S. C, and Orangeburg, S. C. 

Mr. Sells is not the only famous member in his family. 
His father was a congressman to Washington from the 
First Congressional District of Tennessee in 1910-1920. One 
of his two sisters is Mrs. Walter Carpenter, Jr. 

During the first semester Mr. Sells taught a weekly 
Bible class on Tuesday evenings in the Bible College 
auditorium. His course, which included practically every 
phase of prayer— its doctrine, style, mistakes about it—, 
attracted crowds of local people every week. Mr. Sells also 
takes part in teaching each Thursday night at the Savannah 
Evening School of the Bible. 

47 




SEND for your FREE 
CATALOGUE 

for a complete listing of 
CHRISTIAN SERVICE SUPPLIES 



Write to: 



CHRISTIAN LIGHT PRESS 

20 South Market Street 
Elizabethtown, Penna. 




RODGERS BROTHERS SERVICE STATION 

Complete servicing and lubrication 

of CBC's Christian Service cars 

Gas GULF Oil 

Corner Taylor and Pickens Streets 

PHONE 6640 
Columbia, South Carolina 




Helping to bridge the gulf 



-THE GOSPEL IN THEIR LANGUAGE — 



IN OVER 200 LANGUAGES THE GOOD NEWS OF 
SALVATION GOES OUT TO THE COUNTRIES OF THE 
WORLD ON DISCS CONTAINING SCRIPTURE MES- 
SAGES, HYMNS, SOUND-EFFECT BIBLE STORIES, ETC. 



REACHING THE UNREACHED — 



RECORDS PREACH FOR THE NEW MISSIONARY 
RECORDS ARE SPARE VOICES FOR THE OVER- 
WORKED MISSIONARY 

RECORDS ARE ASSISTANT EVANGELISTS ANSWER- 
ING THE CALLS FROM UNREACHED PLACES 



Joy Ridderhof (CBC), Recording Foreign Student 



GOSPEL RECORDINGS INCORPORATED 



Joy Ridderhof- 



\V 



t^hS, 



Vt/ fl 



124 Witmer St., Los Angeles 



1J* 



■HELPING TO OVERCOME MANY OBSTACLES — 



RECORDS SPEAK AS MANY LANGUAGES AS THE 
MISSIONARY NEEDS. 

RECORDS CONTINUE THE MINISTRY TO THE ILLIT- 
ERATE AND REPEAT FOR SIN-DULLED MINDS 
RECORDS STAY WHEN THE MISSIONARY MUST GO. 



RECORDS GO BEHIND THE CLOSED DOORS OF THE 

FEARFUL 

DISSOLVE THE ANTAGONISM OF THE PREJUDICED. 

TRAVEL WITH THE NOMADIC. 

CATCH THE ATTENTION OF THE INDIFFERENT. 

RECORDS SPEAK THE LANGUAGE. 



48 



— AVAILABLE TO MISSIONARIES 




LACANDONE INDIANS LISTENING TO THE GOSPEL 



GREETINGS FROM SWITZERLAND TO THE CLASS OF 1950 
BEATENBERG BIBLE SEMINARY joins with "GROSSE FREUDE FUR EUROPA 

(Good News for Europe) 
in praying God's richest blessing on the graduates of 

COLUMBIA BIBLE COLLEGE 

GO YE INTO ALL THE WORLD AND PREACH THE GOSPEL TO EVERY CREATURE 




Beatenberg Seminary: 

* Stands for the full inspiration of the Bible 

* Trains students from 14 nations 

* Has a definite aim in world evangelism 

* Sends gospel teams throughout Europe 

* Supplies many foreign Missionaries 

* Reaches 38 countries with its literature 

* Its Correspondence Courses used by many 



Bible Seminary Building 



Grosse Freude: 

* Branch of Good News Publishers, Chicago 

* Has a fully equipped printing shop 

* Employs only consecrated Christians 

* Is dedicated to printing gospel literature 

* Prints tracts, etc. in foreign languages 

* Reaches multitudes with the true gospel 

* Wins many souls through the printed page 




Grosse Freude Building 



Information and literature gladly supplied 
Address: Grosse Freude fur Europa, Beatenberg, Switzerland 



49 




The Ostentatious Acapella Octet vocalize "Oh-h-h-h, the Grads!" 



GRAD ADVISOR, DR. CARPENTER 



GRADUATES PREPARE 

FOR FOREIGN SERVICE 

Desire to know Bible and Missionary Methods 

"BUT THE GRADS!" Ten years from now those all too 
familiar words from the Thanksgiving Day skit will still be 
ringing in the ears of the graduate class of 1950 as we trek 
through the jungles of Africa, climb the towering Andes, 
or look into the mucky waters of the Ganges. Eating fried 
ants with the Bantu tribes may give us a longing for a fudge 
party, making snail soup with the Mazatecos may make 
us wish for a hot dog, and climbing the Himalayas may 
make our muscles hurt like those volley-ball games did. 




time' Prepositions take 




But, wherever we are, we will praise the Lord for the 
joyous days of preparation at C.B.C. and for the privilege 
of serving Christ in the hard places of His harvest field. 

The Graduate School of Missions of Columbia Bible 
College offers prospective missionaries training on the 
graduate level in practical missions, Bible, and theology. 
Designed to train workers for the mission fields of the 
world, the Graduate School meets the need of graduates 
of secular colleges and universities who want thorough 
study in the Word of God along with training for a specific 
field of foreign mission service. Students from many walks 
of life hear the call of the Lord of the harvest and come 
to the Graduate School for the training offered. Among the 
fields of previous specialization represented this year are 
engineering, agriculture, chemistry, anthropology, home 
economics, education, business, psychology and English. 

For students who have graduated from a Bible college 

Continued on page 54 



50 




FRONZIE A. BECKON 

BOONE, IOWA 

108 South State Street 
Wheaton College, B.A • Active FMF. 



CHARLES T. BUTRIN 

CANTON, OHIO 
3927 23rd Street S/vT. 
Ohio State University, B.A. 



WILLIAM F. DOVERSPIKE 

SUMTER, SOUTH CAROLINA 

Columbia Bible College, B.A. 



TDOROTHY G. FERGUSON 

CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 

1418 Oakmont Road 

Morris Harvey College; Columbia 
Bible College, B.A.; Active FMF; 
Feature Editor CeBeCean, Phi. 



EDWIN L. FRIZEN. Jr. (JACK) 

EYANSTON, ILLINOIS 

114 South Boulevard 

Navy Veteran; Wheaton College. B.A.; 
Active FMF. 




1950 



LAURA A. JOHNSTON 

MANTEO, NORTH CAROLINA 

University of North Carolina, B.A. 
Phi., Chorus. 



ESTHER M. LINDEMAN 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN 
322 Marion Avenue, N.W. 

Africa Inland Mission; Oberlin Col- 
lege, B.A.; Active FMF; Phi. 



JAMES T. MIDYETT 

KENTON, TENNESSEE 
Route 3 

Veteran; Columbia Bible College, 
B.A.; Active FMF. 



ELAINE G. PALMER (Mrs.) 

STARKYILLE, MISSISSIPPI 

Box 3 71 State College 

Blue Mountain College, B.A. ; Active 
FMF. 



FRED W. PEARSON 

TREADWAY, TENNESSEE 

Air Force Veteran; Berea College, 
B.A. ; University of Tennessee, M.A. 



51 



GRADUATES 



CLAUDE E. SHARPE 

CHAPPELLS, SOUTH CAROLINA 

Navy Veteran; Furman University, 
B.S.; Active FMF. 



MARSTON R. SPEIGHT 

MARSHALL, TEXAS 

1310 North Grove Street 

Navy Veteran; Baylor University, 
B.A. ; President Graduate School; Ac- 
tive FMF; Prayer Group Leader. 



DONALD A. STODDARD 

BOMA, WEST AFRICA 

Congo Beige 

Suminerland Bible School; Columbia 
Bible College, B.A.; Active F.M.F. 



,? *9 **!• 









~ 




-I 




I!) .ill 



MILDRED M. WALKWITZ 

WHEATON, ILLINOIS 

520 East Willow 
Wheaton College, B.A.; Active FMF. 



ERNEST W. ZIMMERMAN 

BERCENFIELD, NEW JERSEY 

17 Dick Street 

Navy Veteran; Wheaton College, B.A.; 
Active FMF. 



DOUGLAS A. BUTLER 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 
547 Summer Avenue 

Navy Veteran; M.A., Columbia Bible 
College Summer School. 




LEONA B. IDELMANN 

46 Chamberlin Drive 

Ruff.lr. Sl.le Teacher.' College, 
B.S.; Vire-Pre.idenl Gr.Ju.lt.; 
A..ooi.te FMF; Phi. 



- 



V 



CARL A. BLACKBI RN 



PAUL F. BF.SCAINCON 

Rur.l Route '2 507 PJobl 

Icr.n; Wheaton Collet. B.A.; Kent St.lt I'lm 
lumhia Bible College. M.A.: Ac- li.r FMF. 
• FMF. 




\N\K HI V.h.M\N 



Rural Route '1 Colorado A * M. B.S.; A. 

1. Bible College. B.A.; FMF; Camera Club. 



1 A.bury Court 
n College. B.A. 



I Helen Street 
I William College. B.! 



52 



VERA M. BRAY 



CARROLL E. BRENTI.1NGER DOKOTlll 1. BROWN (MRS.) 



710 North \.kin ■ 
Wheaton College, B.S. 



Air Force Veteran ; Houghton Col- 1334 S, « U «) r R ° a<l 

lege, B.A.; Radio Club. Wheaton College, B.A.; Active Yenching University, B.A 



ET 


ER CHANG 


BRUNICE C. COLE, JR. 


CALEB S 


CI'THEKELL, JK. 


S. GRACE DAVIS 


Si 


E Kia Hutung 


201 Rolling Road 


Rout 


e 1, Box 300 C 


creene, new vobk 

Route 1 




THKRF.M DEHAAN 



MARGARET E. HAUPT 



WV.v H-WI.1C.K 



J. KENT HOEKZEMA 

500 East Street 



ERNEST W. IRELAND ED* \K1> JARAMILLO, JR. WILLIAM L. K.EITER 

Route 2 Po«t Office Box 342 



4048 21.1 Street 

Vheaton College, B.A. ; Secretary. Hood College. B.S. ; Active FMF. Columbia Bible College, M.A.; Air Force Veteran; Michigan State Gordon College of Theology and Array Veteran; University of Virginia Polytechnic Instil 
•reasurer Graduates. Staff Member. College, B.S.; Active FMF; Prayer Missions, B.A. North Carolina, B.S. ; Active FMF. B.S.. Active FMF. 

Group Leader; Radio Club. 



GRADUATES 



HELEN R. KORNFIELD 

ENCLEWOOD. NET JERSEY 
24 Garden Street, W. 



CAROLINE J. KREIMANN 

MANITOWOC WISCONSIN 
414 North 8th Street 



MILDRED L. LARSON 



Jl^E L. MARKIS 

SUMMIT, ILLINOIS 
7435 West 58th Place 
Wheaton College, B.A. 



Ill \ M. Mi.NEIl.l. 



JEW L. NIXON 



DOROTHY L. MURRAY 
1600 Blanding 2240 Madison 924 Marengo 

Vermont Junior College; Colum- Navy Veteran; University of Mis- Wheaton College. B.A. 
bia Bible College, B.A.; Active sissippi, B.A. 
FMF. 




ELWLN D. PALMER ROBERT L. PETERS FLORENCE I. RIEDLE JEAN L RUMBAUGH STANTON H. SIZEMORE HARRY E. SMITH, JR. CHARLOTTE B. WATSON 

PRESTON. MISSISSIPPI SAUGERTIES. NEW YORK HoPKINTON. MASSACHUSETTS LINCOLN 6. NEBRASKA JOHNSON CITY. TENNESSEE PORTSMOUTH. OHIO LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN. TENNESSEE 

Route 1 132 Market Street Hayden Rowe Street 4717 Hillside Avenue 407 Peach Tree Street 1050 25th Street 210 Scenic Highway 

Army Veteran; Mississippi Stale Air Force Veteran; New York Navy Nurse Veteran; Gordon Col. Wheaton College, B.A.; Active East Tennessee Slate Teachers' Navy Veleranj Wheaton College, University of_ Chattanooga, B.. 

College, B.S. ; Iowa State College, State College for Teachers. B.A.; lege of Theology and Missions. FMF. College. B.S. 

M.S.; Active FMF; Prayer Group Active FMF. B.A.; Framingham Union Hos- 

Leader. pital. RN ; Active FMF. 



53 




Linguistics make the contact with the Catawba Indians possible 
Continued from page 50 

or seminary the Graduate School offers studies in mission 
subjects including medical training, philosophy of mis- 
sions, linguistics, anthropology and indigenous church. 
Outstanding visiting professors present series of lectures on 
special missionary subjects, Bible books or theological 
topics each year. Christian service assignments each week 
give practical experience and supervised training while still 
in school. 

During the summer some of the Grads will be found at 
the missionary training camp near Asheville, N. C. Coming 
unexpectedly into camp we might find a couple of girls 
building a little log cabin. Others are clearing a place for a 
garden, and one of the young men is in charge at the 
kitchen stove. Beginning to grind the corn early in the 
morning, he has found bread baking an all day job. 

During the day there are classes in problems of health, 
missions, dietetics and cookery and Bible. Evangelism and 
teaching are practiced in the neglected mountain settle- 
ments near by. Sleeping on the ground, fixing on a very 
limited budget, and making the best of every circumstance 
are other parts of the preparation for the life of a pioneer 
missionary. 

The Catawba Indian Reservation, six miles from Rock 
Hill, S. G, with only a Mormon Church, has presented the 
Graduates a strong missionary challenge. They began 
working there in the fall of 1948 by making the 140 mile 
trips in order to hold a Bible class in their school. Saturday 
gatherings, home visitation, and Christmas program put on 
by Mizpah Roberts, Dorothy Kebler, Esther Lindeman, and 
Caleb Cutherell have provided additional opportunities to 
present the Gospel. Mizpah and Dorothy bore the brunt of 
the responsibility during the first semester while Mildred 
Walkwitz and June Marcus carried on the work throughout 
the second semester. 




Back for more-left to right: Esther M. Lindeman, Josephine A. Read, Martha 
A. Harrison, Ann Blackman, Dorothy Kebler, and Sunny Beth Soney 

Although no definite individual response can be pointed 
to, the Grads are trusting God to give the increase. During 
a visit with old Chief Blue, he announced, "We are Mormons 
and we expect to stay Mormons." One boy of twelve stood 
up before one of the several Mormon missionaries to defend 
his newly acquired book, the Gospel of John. "I have read 
it and I don't find anything wrong in it," he said. Another 
child was trying to pray "like Miss Dorothy did." 

President Bill Keiter; Vice-President Lee Adelman; Sec- 
retary-Treasurer Millie Larson; and their Grad class feel 
more qualified as they go forward another year towards 
the place that the Lord has willed for them to serve Him. 

ABOUT OUR VERSATILE ADVISOR, DR. CARPENTER 

IN THE OPINION of his students, the greatest qualification 
which Dr. Walter J. Carpenter Jr. possesses for imparting 
a knowledge of the Greek New Testament is his keen 
sense of humor. Many a class period spent in discussing 
such interesting subjects as the genitive absolute or accusa- 
tive of general nuisance is highly enlivened by the wise- 
cracks, funny faces, and jokes which ensue from this 
professor who is supremely human. 

Sixteen years of studying New Testament Greek culmi- 
nated in Dr. Carpenter's receiving his Ph.D. degree in New 
Testament Greek from Southern Baptist Seminary in Louis- 
ville, Ky. Special instruction under Dr. W. H. Davis enabled 
Dr. Carpenter to realize the value of obtaining the literal 
meaning of the Greek New Testament. 

This emphasis on getting the literal meaning of the text 
has enabled many C.B.C. alumni to excel in further Greek 
studies in other institutions. One alumnus stated that he 
wanted to come back to Greek class for another week and 
get another year's sermon material. 

"I was born in Uniontown. Pa., because I wasn't born in 
Hawaii," states Dr. Carpenter in referring to his birth. The 
explanation-his father had accepted a pastorate in Hono- 
lulu, but the mail delivery was so slow that the church had 
ahead)' called another minister before his acceptance ar- 
rived. 

If any student is contemplating the study of Greek, he 
may be assured that he will enjoy the professor even if he 
dislikes the subject— which isn't probable. 



54 




■■■■■■■•IB 
_■■■■■■■■■■ 






I 



//■TlY>Jft"l 




and Marion Willets 



Lit's new offic 



WOMEN EXHIBIT KNOWLEDGE OF DOMESTIC ISSUES 



Upset Men in Strategic Debate 

TO THE SURPRISE and humiliation of the Men's 
Forensic Society, two members of Women's 
Literary Society staged a brilliant upset in a debate 
on Truman's National Health Insurance program No- 
vember 17, at the first joint meeting of the two socie- 
ties. Representing the Women's Literary Society for 
the negative were Marian Willets and Martha Ni- 
zamian. Howard Blair and Jonathan Lucas spoke for 
the men on the affirmative side. 

The two prized Forensic representatives were kept 
on the defensive throughout the performance. Em- 
phatically and convincingly the women debaters put 
forth their sane objections to socialized medicine, 
offering more conservative measures as the better 
solution to the national health situation. At the close 
of the informative and revealing discussion. Judge 
Kathryn Warren rendered the decision favoring the 
women. 

The Women's Literary Society, however, is not 
primarily a debating society or a political science 
club. Its main interests, as its title implies, are liter- 
ary. It affords its members the opportunity to become 
acquainted with the world-famous works of music, 
literature, and fine arts. 

In the Society's assembly program, given shortly 
before Christmas, the audience took a trip "Around 
the World" with music and orations. Ireland's lilting 
air, "Danny Boy," a review of the best recent novel 
on South Africa, "Cry, the Beloved Country," and 
the French piano composition, "Little White Don- 
key," were featured on the program. In Canadian 
vernacular, Verne Scott quoted "Little Batiste." Joy 
Beardshaw took us on a fast trip around the world 
on her marimba, with several clever adaptations 
of "Chop Sticks," while Gennie Blackburn finished 
the program with a devotional thought based on the 
nationally-known missionary, David Brainerd. 

When Miss Anne Childs of I.V.F. visited the Bible 
College in January, she was welcomed by the Liter- 
ary Society at one of its Thursday night gatherings 
to speak on the value of literature in the Christian's 



life. The fact that the study of the world's greatest 
literary works, both pagan and Christian, results in a 
deeper concept and appreciation of God was im- 
pressed upon Lit members in her address. Her 
observations were comparable to Tozer's, as he 
spoke on the creative work of men down through 
the ages: "It is my own belief that every good and 
beautiful thing which man has produced in the 
world has been the result of his faulty and sin- 
blocked response to the creative Voice sounding over 
the earth. This universal voice has ever sounded 
. . . Could it be that this Voice . . . has been the 
undiscovered cause of the troubled conscience and 
the longing for immortality confessed by millions 
since the dawn of recorded history?" The spoken 
and written works of men evidence man's inherent 
dissatisfaction, and the all-sufficiency of Jesus Christ. 

Women's Lit was ably led through the first se- 
mester by President Marilyn Shaver, assisted by 
Annamae Opper and Marlys Anderson, vice-presi- 
dents; Elizabeth Mills, secretary; June Jenkins, 
treasurer; and Joy Beardshaw, master-sergeant. New 
officers for the Society were installed at a candlelight 
service in February. Elaine Brownlee accepted the 
president's gavel. Others serving for the new term 
were Jane Powell and Verne Scott, vice-presidents; 
Virginia Penn, secretary; Anne McQuilkin, treasurer; 
and Marian Willets, master-sergeant. 




55 




Left to Right: Parliamentarian Lucas, Ass't SGT Dalke, Veep Walke 
Treas-Sec Brown, Program Chairman Shelley and M/Sgt-at-arms Renake 



Left to Right: 1st row-Ass't SGT Willoughby, Pres. Brown, M/Sgt-at- 
arms Dalke. 2nd row— Program chairman Barthold, Parliamentarian 
Walker and Scc-Treas Basso. 



CBC'S POLITICAL SCIENCE CLUB 



ON THE MOMENTOUS day of October 
the fifteenth, nineteen-hundred and thirty- 
six, the male members of the Literary 
Society of Columbia Bible College declared 
themselves free and independent of this 
original society. Their purpose was to or- 
ganize a separate society that could deal 
with subjects of a "practical," "technical," 
or "worthwhile" nature "wholly unsuited to 
feminine taste." 

Since that momentous day, the Philologian 
Forensic Society has progressed steadily in 
the fulfillment of the original plan. Through 
forums, debates, and talks the Society has 
presented the problems of the day in an 
interesting and informative manner with the 
emphasis on Christian responsibility. 

The topics of some of the programs will 



give an idea of the scope of the Society: 
"Should We have a United Nations Organi- 
zation?" 

"Historical Review of the Past Fifty Years" 
"Should America Have National Health In- 
surance?" 

The officers of the Society 




semester were Walter Nelson, President; Ed 
Walker, Vice-President; Larry Brown, Sec- 
retary-Treasurer; Dave Renaker, Sergeant-at- 
Arms; Cornelius Dalke, Assistant Sergeant- 
at-Arms; Jonathan Lucas, Parliamentarian; 
and Bruce Shelley, Program Chairman. For 
the second semester they were: Larry Brown, 
President; Dick Basso, Secretary-Treasurer; 
Cornelius Dalke, Sergeant-at-Arms; Ed 
Walker, Parliamentarian; Stanley Barthold, 
Program Chairman; and Bill Willoughby, 
Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms. 

The training offered by the Society is in- 
valuable to the students in training them 
in parliamentary procedure and in public- 
speaking. Each member of the Society is 
expected to take an active part in the 
speaking and debating activities of the 
organization. 



56 



SILVERS 

SOUTH CAROLINA'S LARGEST VARIETY STORE 



1546 MAIN STREET 



COLUMBIA, S. C. 



Advertisements 



CAMPUS IMPROVEMENT DID BIG BUSINESS 

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Sumter Highway 

Columbia, S. C. 



57 



THE PAINT YOU USED 



was supplied by 

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2013 Green Street 
Columbia 5, S. C. 





SPORTS 




CBC PRESSES TOWARDS GOLD TROPHY 

Second Consecutive Championship Assured 



AS THE FINAL TWO GAMES of the 
Y.M.C.A. Church League season ap- 
proached, the C.B.C. basketball quintet 
seemed destined to come away with the 
championship for the second consecu- 
tive year. A 33 to 32 defeat at the hands 
of Tabernacle Baptist was the only blem- 



ish on an otherwise perfect two year 
record. 

The standings with nine out of the 
eleven regular season games completed 
showed the Bible College in first place 
with overtime victories over the "Y" 
Dormitory and St. Joseph's especially 

(Continued on page 59) 



On Friday ni] 

you'll find 

the CBC crcv 

at the "Y." 



58 




I 




impressive. 

Won Lost 

Columbia Bible College. . . 8 1 

Y.M.C.A Dormitory 7 2 

St. Joseph's 7 2 

Ebenezer 6 3 

Commercial College 6 3 

Wesley Memorial 6 3 

Incarnation 4 5 

Tabernacle 4 5 

Park Street 3 6 

Rosewood 3 6 

Good Shepherd 1 8 

First Baptist 9 

Ortendahl with 97 points and Shelley 
with S3, followed by Harding and Wat- 
son with 59 and 44 respectively, led the 
team as it racked up 292 points to its 
opponents' 228. 

Opponents C.B.C. 

Y.M.C.A Dormitory 31 32 

Park Street 42 62 

Tabernacle 33 32 

St. Joseph's 41 43 

Wesley Memorial 31 47 

Incarnation 21 39 

First Baptist* 2 

Rosewood* 2 

Commercial College. ... 29 33 

Totals 228 292 

*— Forfeit 

Six foot six inch center, Big Joel 
Ortendahl's control of the backboard 
necessitates his playing nearly all of 
every game. This indespensible man is 
especially noted for his taps and spec- 
tacular hook shots which seem to be 
made without even a glance at the 
basket. 

In contrast to Big Joel, five foot eight 
Bruce Shelley is the second highest 
scorer on the team. This is largely due 
to the fact that he has the highest 
percentage in making free throws. His 
expert ball handling and calm manner 



make Bruce a valuable asset as first string 
guard. 

Long, lanky Burt Harding specializes in 
feeding the ball from his forward spot 
into the center position by passing almost 
through his guarding opponent. Burt can 
be depended upon to come through 
with those under the basket crib shots 
which are so easy to make in practice 
but prove to be very difficult in the heat 
of the game. 

The amusing, confident smile upon 
the face of Tommy Watson before he 
slips the ball through the hoop from 
mid-court makes this starting guard a 
crowd thriller. No game could be com- 
plete without Watson's long shot or 
famed one-handed free throw. 

Forward Harry Smith, another above 
six-footer, is best on bank and set shots. 
As a jumper he excels in quick deliveries 
deep within the opponents' territory. 

One of the hardest fighters on the 
team, forward Harold Sells, uses a com- 
bination hook-set shot which is likely to 
be cold one night only to explode the 
next. 

Leading defensive player is Bill (Per- 
petual Motion) Engels. His dogged play 
has resulted in ball stealing which often 
leads to Bill's ringing up two more points 
for C. B. C. 

Bill (Midrift) Neef is the only player 
who will be lost by graduation. His high 
arch push shot and protruding bay win- 
dow make Bill an interesting player to 
watch. 

Yet, the most energetic member of the 
team never leaves the bench. For Coach 
Jimmy Russ in guiding the fortunes of 
the Bible College team does as much 
work as any member of the first team. 
Jimmy is faithfully counselled by a 
young gentleman often garbed in a pair 
of red and green corduroy trousers. He 
is Mascot Walter Carpenter, III, enjoy- 
ing some of the fun which the C. B. C. 
basketball team provides the student body 
for fifteen weeks each vear. 



Shelley followed with the highest 
percentage of free throws. 




Perpetual motion Engles is fai 
for stealing the ball. 





THE HAMPTON 

SODA & SUNDRY 

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60 



HUDSON 

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COLUMBIA, S. C. 

W. B. COX 
President 

Phone 23373 



WHAT DOES YOUR 

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and smart — if 
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Book OF a Lifetime... FOR a Lifetime 
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WESTERN 

congro/u/o/es 

THE COLUMBIA BIBLE COLLEGE 

GRADUATES OF 1950 

WESTERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

a thoroughly Conservative Baptist Graduate School 

5511 S. E. Hawthorne Blvd. 
Portland 15, Oregon 

Catalogue on request. 



COLUMBIA TIRE 
SERVICE 

1531 TAYLOR ST. Phone 2-2123 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 



61 



GRADUATING STUDENTS 

particularly will want to keep 
up reading Christian literature. 

The Sunday School Times 

contains just the diversified 
reading you need, including 
helps on the International Uni- 
form Sunday School lesson. 

Special short term offer — 
22 weeks for $1 

The Sunday School Times Co. 

325 North Thirteenth St. 

Philadelphia 5, Pa. 



Phone 2-0062 1 134 Bull Street 

WOODLAWN 
STUDIO 

Everything in 
Photography 

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Archie B. Fraley, Jr. 



Derrick's Gulf 
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Gervais and Assembly — 
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DRY CLEANING CO. 



LAUNDERING & DRY CLEANING 
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Eight Branch Offices 

Phone 2-4363 Columbia, S. C. 



Bill Simpsons 

S & K LUNCH 

1315 HAMPTON STREET 

We Never Close 



HAMBURGERS 



FRIED CHICKEN 



THE 1950 

IF I N II A L 



CONGRATULATES 



MR. & MRS. G. WILLIAM SUPPLEE 



A VALUABLE ADDITION was made 
to C. B. C.'s musical staff this year by the 
coming of Mr. and Mrs. G. William 
Supplee. Mrs. Supplee is a Wheaton 
graduate and a former vocalist over 
Moody Bible Institute's station WMBI. 
In 1948 Mr. Supplee finished his training 
at Wheaton with a double major in 
piano and voice. Since that time he has 



worked as a producer with WMBI, and 
directed the College Church choir at 
Wheaton. Since their arrival here, a 
Women's Glee Club, and also a Men's 
Chorus, have been begun. Working with 
Mr. Brooks Sanders, these newest newly- 
weds of C. B. C. have helped train many 
students this year in voice, piano, and 
brass instruments. 




Double congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. G. 
William Supplee. They inaugurated a pro- 
gressive music department and (lest we 
forget) are the faculty's newest newlyweds. 




They toured the South-cast 



62 



LITTLE CHAPEL 
OF THE AIR CHOIR 




CBC BROADCASTS 

The Supplees' experience in radio 
proved of real benefit to the Bible Col- 
lege last November, when a 5-minute 
broadcast was begun over local station 
WCOS. C. B C.'s "Little Chapel of the 
Air," featured a ten-voice ensemble di- 
rected by Mr. Supplee and accompanied 
by Joy Beardshaw. Mrs. Supplee supple- 
mented the ranks of the vocalists, who 
included Mary Ellen Powers and Sophie 
Graham, sopranos; June Markus, Jean 
Rumbaugh, and Mary Harrington, altos; 
Wendell Sullivan, Howard Blair, and 
Don Moses, tenors; and Russ Ferry, 
Bruce Shelley, and Burt Harding, basses. 
Between musical numbers, Mr. Brooks 
Sanders, also experienced in radio, reads 
the script, usually a human interest story 
with a spiritual message. Shortly after 
the Little Chapel's debut, postal cards 
and telephone calls poured into the 
WCOS studios, expressing the listeners' 
appreciation of C. B. C.'s morning broad- 
cast. 

Music has played an important part 
in all of C. B. C.'s activities this year. 
A pre-Christmas program, featuring most 
of the Bible College's fruitful talent, in- 
cluded all of the best-known seasonal 
numbers. In January, Mr. and Mrs. Sup- 
plee's vocal and instrumental students 
staged a well-attended recital. 



WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB 

The Women's Glee Club was organ- 
ized early in the fall. During the anni- 
versary celebration in October, the group 
made its first appearance. The C. B. C. 
family was favorably impressed with 
their first presentation, "The Name of 
Jesus." 

With an eye, for big things in the 

future, the Glee Club elected Sally 

Arner and Sophie Graham president and 

Continued on page 64 





Glee Club officers and Director Supple 



63 




business manager, respectively, to be- 
gin negotiations for out-of-town engage- 
ments. A few weeks before the spring 
holidays, plans were laid for a week's 
tour during vacation time. The twenty- 
eight girls left on a busy trip from Co- 
lumbia to Augusta, Lincolnton, Griffin 
and Atlanta, Georgia; to Chattanooga 
and Knoxville, Tennessee; to Charlotte, 
North Carolina; and Lancaster, South 
Carolina. In addition to several group 
arrangements, trio, duet, quartet, and 
solo numbers were featured. Verta Need- 
ham, Kay Harrington, Elva Brownlee, 
and Sophie Graham were among the 
soloists, and a C. B. C. trio combination 
—Sally Arner, Sophie and Louise Gra- 
ham—appeared often on the program. 

SEQUEL 

A men's glee club of 32 members was 
also organized this year (second semes- 
ter). The first officers of this group were 
Bill Stone, President; Russ Ferry, Busi- 
ness Manager; and Fred Tenny, Secre- 
tary-Treasurer. 

SEQUEL 2d semester 



Jean, Mary Ellen, and June-the Chapel Choir trio. 




Champion marimbist Joy Beardshaw. 





KLEINS 

at ALL times 

KLEIN CHOCOLATE CORPORATION 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA 



65 





EASTERN EXTENSION OF THE 

FAMED PENNSYLVANIA 

SOON THE MOTORIST with a big enough gas tank 
can travel non-stop across Pennsylvania. The famed 
Pennsylvania Turnpike, four lane, limited-access, cross- 
ingless highway with easy curves and grades, originally 
started near Harrisburg and extended westward over 
the rugged Alleghenies to within a few miles of Pitts- 
burgh. Now this great highway is being pushed west- 
ward to the Ohio border and eastward to suburban 
Philadelphia. 

Surveyed and planned between 1935 and 1938, the 
160-mile mountain section of this Super-Highway was 
built in two years. The extension to the East 100 miles 
long was completed this month. The 67-mile connec- 
tion to the Ohio border will be completed in 1951. 

When completed the Pennsylvania Turnpike will ex- 
tend 327 miles from Pennsylvania's Western border to 
the great National Shrine of Valley Forge on the out- 
skirts of Philadelphia. The turnpike with its twin traf- 
fic lanes, traverses the most beautiful of American land- 
scapes—prosperous, well-kept farm land, majestic hills 
and mountain ranges, the entire right-of-way free from 
billboards, rural slums or screaming neon-signed road- 
side cabarets. 

For its entire distance— not a stop sign or traffic light 
—not a cross road or street— no grade over three per- 



TURNPIKE NOW COMPLETED 

cent on this modern superhighway which, instead of 
clirhbing over the tall peaks of the Alleghenies, dives 
through them in seven well-ventilated, well-illuminated 
tunnels. Alongside the highway, about every 17 miles, 
are modern utility stations with clean rest rooms and 
where gas, oil and good food can be obtained at rea- 
sonable prices. 

Although a speed of 70 miles per hour is permitted 
over most of the Turnpike, it is the safest of all high- 
speed highways. Not only is it the safest, but the 
smoothest and most beautiful. 

HOW THE SUPER-HIGHWAY 
WAS CONSTRUCTED 

A contract is given to the lowest bidder in that lo- 
cality of highway. For the East extension over 20 con- 
tracts were given to twenty separate contracting com- 
panies. This is an example of American private enter- 
prise doing big business. 

The contract pictured above was given to the H. J. 
Williams company. It is 4 1/3 miles long, costing 1 1/2 
million dollars. In these 4 1/3 miles there were eight 
bridges crossing highways and three arches for streams. 
The sand for this section was supplied by Hempt Broth- 
ers' Sand Quarry at Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania. 



66 



Advertisement 



STheCcBeCcan 



18th Year Special Issue 



COLUMBIA BIBLE COLLEGE, COLUMBIA, S. C. 



MAY 22, 1950 



JUNIORS REVEAL WHY THE FINAL IS DEDICATED TO YOU 



FINIAL SETS NEW PRECEDENT IN YEARBOOK JOURNALISM 



Editor Explains New Format 

"I have longed to introduce 
an annual that would break the 
traditions of yearbook journal- 
ism," stated Finial Editor, Eu- 
gene Madeira, as he began his 
explanation of this year's new 
format in a recent interview. 

"With this idea in mind, 
explained Madeira, "We theEditors 
and staff set out to achieve a 
new precedent in yearbook design 
by utilizing the elements of 
mystery and surprise, by uniting 
the book with a meaningful use 
of the intrinsic relationships 
between the various parts of 
school life and by the nse of 
modern principles of Christian 
j ournalism. " 

Continuing, Madeira said 
t hat this yearbook is proof that 
a yearbook need no longer be 
stolidly frozen to the familiar 
format, but can be a vitally 
new and meaningful presentation 
of the school year. 

To produce this new book, 
Madeira said three basic elements 
or princ iples were carried through 
out the book. T bey are as follows: 

1. MAGAZINE STYLE. Traditional 
time worn divider pages, with 
trite titles are removed. Head- 
line stories of events in which 
you participated and photographs 
of those activities are present- 
ed in a magazine style. 

2. MEANINGFUL PHOTOGRAPHY 

A faculty section with antique 
portraits, making them impersonal 
mummies is eliminated. To re- 
call how human they are, we have 
given you vivid, interesting ev- 
ents or characteristics about 
them, and have emphasized a diff- 
erent aspect for each. Meaning- 
ful photographs are used instead 
of prosaic posed pictures. 

3. ADVENTURE AND SURPRISE 

To provide you with adventure as 
you read this book, there are 
mysteries of relationships betw- 
een the placing of each faculty 
member, and the order in which 
articles occur. We have given 
many hints. Some are advisors 
of classes and organizations, 
others have more to do with you 
when you register. One is avet- 
eran missionary. 

Madeira concluded that he 
believed our efforts will help 
to give a meaningful represent- 
ation of our experience at Colum- 
bia Bible College. 




CeBeCean STAFF ( left to right) 

ALICE JACOBSEN Associate Editor 

DOROTHY FERGUSON Feature Editor 

DEAN HAYWOOD News Editor 



CeBeCean Photographer Wins Finial 
Photo Contest (See page 4) 




Vote Held Last September 
Was Unanimous 

In a secret interview last 
night, Pres. Frank Sanders of 
the Junior Class disclosed the 
reasons for the unanimous decis- 
ion of the Junior Class made 
last Sept. to dedicate the year- 
book to you, the possessor of 
t his book. 

"In honoring yon in this 
manner," Sanders explained, , "the 
intention of the Junior Class 
is to emphasize anddepict graph- 
ically your individual responsi- 
bility as a representative of the 
Lord Jesus Christ." 

Though it would hardly be 
proper to dedicate snch a mater- 
ial object, that is neither evan- 
gelistic nor instructive, to 
Christ, Sanders said that it is 
fitting to remind the members of 
Christ's body, of their respon- 
sibility as His ambassadors. There- 
fore we, the Junior Class, dedi- 
cate the 1950 Finial to you as a 
reminder not only of your posit- 
ion in Christ, but also of your 
obligation to make Him known. 

"With this aim in mind we 
designed the book around you 
the individual, including your 
background, home address, and 
activities and have represented 
your school year with meaning- 
ful photographs of your of f icers, 
teachers, activities and frie nds. " 

In conclusion Sanders said 
that he hoped that the book will 
also remind the departing stud- 
ents that you are REPRESENTAT- 
IVES OF CBC- 



A. W. TOZER - AUTHOR - 

PASTOR - HONORARY 

EDITOR 

In trying to represent to 
some degree your Christian exp- 
erience and the Philosophy of 
Education behind your whole cur- 
riculum, the staff of Finial Editors 
choose A. V. Tozer' s recent book, 
THE PURSUIT OF GOD, as the best 
expression of the purpose for 
which we are all here. 

All quotations occurring in 
this bookthat represent a deeper 
meaning or interpretat ion of your 
Christian experience, are quoted 
from his book. THE PURSUIT OF 
"0D is published by: 

CHRISTIAN PUBLICATIONS, INC. 

HARRISBURG, PENNSYLVANIA 

Permission was granted for 
the use of this book by both the 
publisher and author. 



Yowee What Good Contrast! 



67 



Special Issue (cont'd) 



CHRISTIAN LIFE EDITOR 

ADVISOR TO 1950 FINIAL 

"Good morning, class, everyone 
here? Good, let's get started." 
These are words heard from Mr. 
Donald E. Hoke as he rushes into 
room 10 to begin his journalism 
class. 

This energetic young profes- 
sor, who is Assistant tothePres- 
ident, is especially known for 
his ability in debating and writ- 
ing, twosubjects which he learn- 
ed outside of the classroom. 

Recently in assembly he dis- 
played his talent for debating by 
"hashing out" with three other 
faculty members the issue, "Reso- 
lved: that Roman Catholicism Is 
a Greater Menace to Christianity 
Than Communism." 

If you want proof of his 
writing ability, read Christian 
Life, the magazine of which he is 




Mr. Hoke 



the 



an associate editor. He excels 
in biographical articles even 
though in a recent preference 
test in writing he rated a mark 
which indicated low proficiency 
in that profession. 

Mr. Hoke is another "Jack-of- 
all-trades" around the C. B. C 
Not only is he public relations 
man, bnt he also teaches Bible, 
homiletics, journalism, and phi- 
losophy. 

"My childhood and convers ion 
were undramatic but happy", says 
M r. Hoke. " 1 was reared in aCbrist- 
ian home and was saved when I was 
twelve years old. " 

While in Wheaton Academy, he 
yielded his life tothelord after 
bearing Dr. McQuilkin speak. Upon 
graduat ion f rom theWheaton Gradu- 
ate School, he started a church 
in ParkRidge, Illinois. After 

holding this pastorate for six 
years, Mr. Hoke came to the Bible 
College in 1947. 




CeBeCean Staff Cont'd (left to right) 

JOEL KEITER Business Manager 

MARION WILLITS Typist 

HAROLD SELLS Photographer 



EXTRA-CURRICULAR 

ACTIVITIES MUST BE 

CHOSEN OF GOD 

Every member of the Finial Staff 
will testify that they could not 
possibly have done the job re- 
quired of them, (and their stud- 
ies), if they did not have God's 
direct interest, guidance, help, 
and assurance that' he wanted 
them to participate in Finial 
act ivity. 

Here are two examples: 
- CBC did not have a photograph- 
er who could bear all the re- 
(continued end of next column) 



LJ 




68 



i* ij f^! 



Photo Editor Eleanor Andrews tackled the most tii 
Miming job. 



FOR THOSE 

WHO DIDN'T KNOW 

Each student who has come into 
Personal Evangelism class with 
fear and trembling need not be 
told of Business Manager John 
Hehl's peculiar entertainment. 
Mr. Hehl confessed that one of 
bis favorite hobbies is scaring 
students half to death. There 
is nothing to fear, however, as 
he is laughing on the inside all 
the time. 

Mr. Hehl's business experi- 
ence began at the age of five 
when he started carrying newspa- 
pers. His ambition of never do- 
ing anything in a half-baked 
sort of way is illustrated by an 
announcement in an old CeBeCean: 
LOST One Dodge Christian Serv- 
ice Car — it is rumored that Mo 
Hehl was driving it across a 
toll bridge this summer, and the 
toll keeper called our "Fifty 
cents!" To which Mr. Hehl Prompt- 
ly replied, "Soldi " 

While standing on a Cali- 
fornia street corner one day, he 
was challenged with the state- 




Mr. Hehl says, "You see what 
needs to be done. I see what has 
been done." 

ment, "Try the Lord Jesus for a 
week; if you aren' t sat isf ied, 
the devil will always take you 
back." He accepted the challenge 
and now, after twenty-seven 
years, "that week has not come to 
a close. " 

As a member of the first 
graduating class, Mr. Hehl is 
frequently called upon to re- 
late the experiences which he had 
while being the sole occupant of 
the Men's Dormitory of C. B. C. 

In retrospect, Mr. Hehl af- 
firms that he enjoys anything ex- 
cept seeing people trying to 
cheat themselves out of what God 
has for them. 



EXTRA-CURRICULAR 
sponsibility of a yearbook pho- 
tographer. But when September 
came around, Don Hesse, transfer 
student enrolled and found him- 
self a j ob. 

- The photo-editor had a job 
that required more time than 
any other member of the staff. 
Eleanor Andrews felt it as the 
Lord's will for her to have the 
job; so she prayed for it sever- 
al months. Last summer she re- 
ceived a letter rom the Bditor 
(who didn' t even know her) ask- 
ing if she'd take the job. 



Varitype Composition Compliments McDonald Letter Shop — — — Printers of The CeBeCean 




'The Photographer Is 

Photographed' 

DON HESSE 

1950 Finial Photographer 




"Dribbling around town 

looking for Ads really 

put me in shape for basketball' 

BURT R. HARDING 

Advertising Manager 




"Trimming Expenses" 
EDWIN S. WALKER III 

Business Manager 




"Personality sells subscriptions 

NANCY BROWN 

Subscription Manager 




Cover Girl or Cover Artist? 
MARYLS ANDERSON 



Mbbbbbb 
mmmmrr 



r\«rmm 



in 



■■■■■ 

BBBBB 




ARLIE MAY CROWL 

Associate Editor 
"A Sophomore becomes Editor" 




Darkroom Technician 



<l 



Experience here fitted him for 
CeBeCean Editorship later 



LEE KIRKPATRICK 
Literary Editor 



69 




u. 







¥ 2S» -c 








^*2>z 







^^r^4^- ^ 



->*■ g^^r* £^fa- 




v 



?<~ 



70 






MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

P. O. BOX 4020 PHONE 3-7066 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 

CENTRIFUGAL & TURBINE TYPE PUMPS 

STEAM TRAPS AND SPECIALTIES 

PRESSURE & TEMPERATURE CONTROLS 

HEAT EXCHANGERS, HOT WATER HEATERS, DEAERATORS 

COMPLETE BOILER FEED SYSTEMS 

AND 

CONDENSATE RETURN SYSTEMS 

"Uts Jteip OihsM in dint Wat**" 



RUDISILL AND COMPANY 

Printers and Litho gra phers 



1 09 West Chestnut Street LANCASTER, PA. 

Phone: 8176 

71 



"Foremost 

in the 
Carolinas' 




"one of the 

oldest studios 

in South Carolina' 



SARGEANT 
Studite, 

CREATORS OF FINE PORTRAITURE 

• * * * 

Masters in the art of Child Portraiture 



Phone 6607 



1728 MAIN STREET 



PALMETTO PICTURES, INC. 

Complete Line of Leading Photographic Supplies 
and Visual Education Service 

• • • • 

24-hour photo finishing 

* • • • 
"Everything in Photography" 



Eastman 


Kodak 




Graflex, 


Inc. 




Ansco 






DuPont Defender 




Argus, 1 


nc. 






Phone 4 


4584 



719 Sauda Ave. at Five Points 



72 




U)hsA£ the Student* Offset 



SEASES 



Taylor Street Pharmacy 



PRESCRIPTION 
DEPARTMENT 



Prescription carefully 
compounded as your 
doctor prescribes. — &. 
Nothing but the fin- 
est materials used. 



1529 TAYLOR ST. 




FOUNTAIN . . . 
LUNCHEONETTE 



Try our delicious 
sandwiches, salads, 
pies, and cakes. Take 
home a box of Whit- 
man Candies or our 
delicious Ice Cream. 



Phone 3-2277 



CLAUSSEN'S BAKERY, INC. 

A Hundred and Eight Years of Baking Excellence 

2001 GREEN ST. 




The exclusive 
Supplier of 

Your Bread" 



Phone 8143 



73 




74 



SENIOR INSERT 



NEWELL FERRIS 

SAYRE, PENNSYLVANIA 

403'i South Elmer Avenue 

Army veteran. Staff member. 



OPIE HARGRAVE 

MOUNTAIN HOME, 

ARKANSAS 

Box 1503 

F.M.F. active, 2-4; Cho 




Privately-Owned Utilities Pay 
Their Way in Taxes! 



Unlike government-owned utility projects which are sub- 
sidized by the taxpayers' money and which pay only small 
sums "in lieu" of taxes, investor-owned utilities like this Com- 
pany contribute heavily to Federal, State and Local govern- 
ments each year. For instance, our financial provisions for our 
1949 tax bill amounted to: 

For the State of South Carolina $702,882.58 

For the Towns and Counties served 275,491 .88 



TOTAL PROVISIONS IN THE STATE $ 978,374.46 



For the Federal Government 



1,183,742.02 
TOTAL $2,162,126.48 



Provisions for 1949 taxes were almost three-quarters of a 
million dollars GREATER than for 1948. 



SOUTH CAROLINA ELECTRIC & GAS COMPANY 




Dietician Dowdle marks down our favorite 
southern dishes 



ROBERT PRESCOTT 
You're just too good to me, Santa! 






MRS. GLADYS SHEPHERD 
Smile? Why that's my favorite pastil 



MOTHER McNAULL 

The fellows' adopted 



Rejoicing in His goodn 
MRS. T. E. DOWNEY 
Welcoming guests is her year-round task. 



"She grows sweeter all the time!" 
(Pattersons' Anniversary celebration) 





ss University is not just a preachers' 
because it is so well known 
TS cultural advantages and unusual and 
rcictical spiritual emphasis, it has one thousand 
students registered for the ministerial course. 
They represent 54 denominations. 
The World's Most Unusual University teaches 
them not only how to load the Gospel 
gun, but also how to shoot it. 
Music, speech, and art B ob Jones University consists 
Without additional cost above regular of , he Co || ege of Arts and Sciences 

and the Schools of Education, Commerce, Fine 



academic tuition. 



BOB JONES 
UNIVE 



Arts, Religion, and Aeronautics. 

""from Handel's MESSIAH 



75 



GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA 



SUPPLIES THE 
SOUTH WITH 
GROCERIES-MEATS- 
PRODUCE 




$ * ft 



DIXIE HOME STORES 

• DIXIE HOME SUPER MARKET 

2338 TAYLOR — PHONE 32379 



DIXIE SUPER MARKET 

1438 Assembly — Phone 23649 



New Car 
Department 

Used Car 
Department 

1625 Main St. 
Phone 2-4021 




Service 



Department 



Parts 



Department 

I I 14 Calhoun St. 

Phones 433 I I 

7081 



J&OK 



76 



Pontiac Sales and Service 




DRAKE'S TRAILER 
SALES 

diom& 0$ "fi/uiadw& (Raw 

JUST NORTH OF COLUMBIA ON US. ROUTE 1. 



// 



TUCKERS 

AUTO DRIVING 
SCHOOL 

1 734 Main Street 

Columbia, South Carolina 

Phone 44889 




Dean M. Haywood learns to drive. 



Certified by National Institute for Traffic Training — Learn to drive at 
Tucker's where learning to drive is a pleasant accomplishment. You 
want to be a safe driver, learn it correctly and be a better driver. 



77 



DRINK MILK 

For Healthy Mind, Body and Spirit 




In the dining- 
room it's fresh 
milk from Edisto 



Convenient delivery of 

pure Edisto Milk 

to married students 



Students and their families at Columbia Bible College 
drink lots of extra fresh Golden Guernsey milk from 
Edisto Farms Dairy. They know it is tastier, fresher and 
pure! The folks at Edisto Farms Dairy consider it a priv- 
ilege to supply this all important factor in daily diet. 
Always remember that truck delivery also includes ice 
cream, homogenized milk, chocolate milk, buttermilk, 
cottage cheese, whipping cream and coffee cream — all 
extra rich Edisto Farms Dairy Milk products. 

EDISTO FARMS DAIRY 



GARDENER-LIBRARIAN SHIRLEY WOOD 



5 Points Dairy Store 
605 Harden St. 



Eau Claire Dairy Store 
3316 N. Main St. 



Main Plant 650 S. Edisto Ave. 
Telephone 6916 




Staff (L to R)-Nancy Havlick, Mary Steele, Velma 
Wood, Gladys Shepherd. 




"Casting all your care upon Him" Betty Sims, Maurine McCord 
Greetings to those from Greensboro, N. C. Lawrence Pace 
"Surely the Lord is in this place" Gen. 28:1 6 Mrs. Walker 

He saves keeps satisfies H. Hendricks, L. Hardin 

"This one thing I do" Phil. 3:13, 14 Dorothy Strauss 

Greetings to the Greek scholars Velma Wood 

"We love Him, because He first loved us" Eunice Chapman 



78 



Advertisement 




Staff (L to R)-Helen Smith, Betty Sii 
Helen Hendricks. 




Colonial Stores in 

Columbia are convent 

ently located at: 

• 141 1 Gervais St. 

• 3121 Millwood Ave. 

• 1215 Blanding St. 




NOW SERVING NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA 

FROM OUR NEW, MODERN WAREHOUSE IN 

COLUMBIA 

• Bringing more jobs, new industry to South Carolina 

• Buying more South Carolina products of farm and industry 

• Giving better-than-ever service to our customers 

COLONIAL STORES 

Serving the South With Greater Food Values 



Staff (L to R)-Grace Tweten, Louise Hardii 
Marguerite McQuillan. 



KATHRYN 



CUMMING. Annuals come and go 

McCLARTY. But ihis we know 

WARREN. The Finial's best by every test! 



Arthur's Open-air Market 935 Harden 

Slate Furniture Company 2506 Two Notch Road — Ph. 25589 
Plowden Company— P. O. Box 633— Columbia, S. C— Tel. 33351 
Compliments Shandon Curb Market 



Advertisement 



79 




WHERE ARE THEY FROM? 

Some of the finest schools in America: Wheaton College, University of North Caro- 
lina, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, University of Tennessee, Ohio State, Women's 
College, North Carolina, Houghton College, Furman University, University of Chatta- 
nooga, Tennessee State, Gordon College, and other outstanding undergraduate 
schools from coast to coast. 

WHERE ARE THEY GOING? 

To the ends of the earth with the Gospel of Christ. A few brief years will find 
them in the Philippines, Africa, India, Europe, and the other major mission fields 
of the world, where they will be evangelists, teachers, and missionary leaders. 



WHY ARE THEY HERE? 

1 . For outstanding courses in English Bible, Hermeneutics, and Theology. 

2. For practical missionary courses available nowhere else. 

3. For the vital spiritual life and essential spiritual discipline offered here. 

YOU will find just the graduate training you want to prepare you for missionary service at 

COLUMBIA 

/^Ti A AT» BIBLE COLLEGE 

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MISSIONS Dr. Paul G. Culley, Director, Columbia, South Carolina 



Jjoa a 

SUMMER OF BLESSING 

in the "LAND OF THE SKY" 



Hear These Outstanding Speakers: 



June 18-25 



Jim Rayburn 
Phil Saint 
Bill Harding 



July 29-August 6 

Dr. H. A. Ironside 
Dr. Van V. Eddings 
Dr. E. J. Pudney 
Dr. and Mrs. Eugene R. 

Kellersberger 
Ponzi Pennington 



August 7-11 

Dr. George E. Ladd 

Mrs. Ruth Stull 

Dr. & Mrs. Eugene R. 

Kellersberger 
Dr. E. J. Pudney 



August 12-20 

Dr. G. Allen Fleece 
Dr. George E. Ladd 
Mrs. Ruth Stull 
Mr. & Mrs. Lauren Jones 



Spiritual treats are yours in the delightful vacation-land climate of Asheville, North Carolina. Situated on top of one 
of the most beautiful mountains in the area, Ben Lippen Conference offers unparalleled scenic beauty, refreshing climate, 
comfortable accommodations — all at moderate prices. 

Write: The Director 



BEN LIPPEN BIBLE CONFERENCE 



80 



Asheville, 
North Carolina 



Hallowe'en dunking 





picnic sports 



81 



THE MASTERY OF MYSTERY 

Insurance is likely to be surrounded with an air of mystery. Even preachers 
find themselves puzzled when they read literature aimed at selling policies. 

This need not be your experience. The Fund believes it can transform a 
mystified prospect into a satisfied customer. It encourages questing friends to seek 
answers to all kinds of questions. 

Prove this by writing to 

THE PRESBYTERIAN MINISTERS FUND 

INSURANCE FOR ALL PROTESTANT MINISTERS 
THEIR FAMILIES AND SEMINARY STUDENTS 



The First Life Insur 



Boston Office 

14 Beacon St. 
Boston 8, Mass. 



Alexander Mackie, President 



Home Office 

1805 Walnut Street 
Philadelphia 3, Pa. 

St. Louis Office 
1202 Arcade Bldg. 

St. Louis 1, Mo. 

'MORE THAN A BUSINESS — 
AN INSTITUTION!" 



nded 1717 
1759 by the Penns 



Atlanta Office 

1415 Candler Bldg. 
Atlanta 3, Ga. 



BOUKNIGHT'S 

WADE HAMPTON 

GARAGE 

LONNIE G. BOUKNIGHT 
PROP. 

GAS - GENERAL AUTO 
SERVICE 

OIL — STORAGE 
Phone 7927 

1 1 25 GERVAIS ST. 
Columbia, S. C. 



ROSE-TALBERT 
PAINT CO. 

1222 TAYLOR ST. 

HEADQUARTERS for 

ART MATERIALS 

lahqsiid Aiock in S-C- 



Jhaimnq in c&ad&AAkip 




Dr. Allan MacRae with C. B. C. group at Faith 

Standing: Messrs. Chandler, Marshall, Watson, Jones, Bates, Kirkwood, 
Mood, Williamson, Smith. Seated: Dr. MacRae, President; Miss Russel, 
Librarian. 



In these days of widespread denial of 
the Word of God and its claims, FAITH 
SEMINARY has set as its goal the 
training of leaders for the cause of 
Christ who shall (I) believe the Bible; 
(2) exalt the Lord Jesus Christ; (3) 
know thoroughly the theology, the lan- 
guages and related disciplines needed 
to meet the modern attacks of the evil 
one, and (4) rely only upon the power 
of God for this warfare — an enabling 
granted solely in response to prevailing 
prayer. 

FAITH THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
places constant emphasis upon evan- 
gelism, missionary interest, the separ- 
ated life, prayer, and dependence upon 
God. These interests pervade the class- 
room, the prayer meeting, the chapel 
services, and the practical Christian 
work which students carry on under 
Faculty direction. 

For information write 

Peter Stam, Jr., 

Dean and Registrar 

FAITH THEOLOGICAL 
SEMINARY 

WILMINGTON, DELAWARE 



For Nationally Known 

Apparel and Accessories . . . 




Berry's 



MAIN 



Miss Margaret Orten (stand- 
ing) and Miss Mary Ellen 
Powers (seated) look at 
Berry's Town & Country 
shoes. Town & Country is 
just one of the famous 
brands that make Berry's 
popular with our style and 
price wise customers. 



CONGRATULATIONS 
AND BEST WISHES 

The Personnel of 



DIXIE PRODUCE COMPANY 



902 Pulaski Street 
COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA 





Married women's projects 



njp?' Always a Step Ahead 

JL ' 




» 




I.V.C.F. Representative Anne Childs (on the right) 
with chapel speaker Jane Hollingsworth also of 
I.V.C.F. 




Art Flower Shop 

ftowsM 
foh all DXXOAWJU 

"When You say it with 
Flowers, say it with ours" 

1 227 Hampton Ave. 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 

Phone 26781 




A pioneer missionary in Brazil, Ernest Lubkeman, 
challenged CBC's missionary volunteers. 




CALDWELL'S 

Betty Jane Moore tries one of the FASHIONABLE 

FASHIONS for MILADY 




Hats — Coats — Dresses 
and Formats 

1228 Hampton 
2-1203 



graduates 



YOU 

need 



these things 

in the 

College You Choose 

TO ATTEND, TO RECOMMEND, 
TO SUPPORT 

STRAIGHT THINKING 

true to the Bible. Scholarly 
ACADEMIC STANDING 

fully accredited 
CLEAN LIVING 

faculty and students with HIGH 

Christian PRINCIPLES 
PROPER BALANCE 

Study, Sports, Culture, Spirituality 



Write for FREE 
VIEWBOOK 



YOU will find these QUALITIES 
and the courses you want 
Write today to Dept. OO 



TAYLQl\ 



UNIVERSITY 

UPLAND, INDIANA 



Congratulations 

to 

Senior Class 

of 

COLUMBIA BIBLE COLLEGE 

from 

Columbia Mills 

Columbia, 

S. C. 



Stamps 



COMMERCIAL 
PRINTING 



Seals 



OFFICE FURNITURE— EQUIPMENT — SUPPLIES 



COLUMBIA OFFICE SUPPLY CO. 

DEALER FOR 

Sound Scriber 



1112 LADY ST. 
COLUMBIA, S. C. 



83 



PHONE 5163 



ADS FOR GRADS 

2000 TRANSLATORS NEEDED— to new recruits by summer of 1950 

The Bible can't be printed until there is a written language in which to print it. 



TWTYCLIFFE has reached another milestone on 
the advance, but what are 54 tribes now with 
translators in comparison to over a thousand more 
without? When we began 15 years ago, we knew of 
only 1,000 Bible-less tribes. Today we know that there 
are many more. To complete the task in this generation, 
we shall have to advance ten times as fast during the 
next 15 years as we have in the past fifteen. It is only 
natural that we should rejoice over the 200 pioneer 
missionaries that God has already raised up for our 
Bible translation movement, but it will take 2,000 
more within the next 15 years to bring within sight our 
goal of no more Bible-less tribes by 1980. 

Yes, only a start has been made, but it has been made 
in the face of big obstacles, closed doors, barriers of 
many kinds, and problems of health, training, support, 
etc. One of the big obstacles overcome in 1949 has been 



that of transportation for the pioneers in the jungles 
of Peru. But two additional planes were added. 

70 NEEDED SUMMER OF 1950-15 for Peru, 25 
for Venezuela and 30 for the remaining tribes of 
Mexico. Write: for information 

Wycliffe Bible Translators, Inc.. 
P. O. Box 870, Glendale 5, Calif. 



THERE ARE MORE THAN ?,000 LANGUAGES 
SPOKEN IN THE WORLD 



1800 OF THEM 

DO NOT HAVE /ion 

THE WHOLE X NEW 
BIBLE / NJESTAMENll 

'200\P NLY 



500 

LESS THAN 



1600 OF THEM 
DO NOT HAVE 
THE WHOLE 
NEW 
TESTAMENT 



LOOO 

NOTHING AT ALL 



WOULD YOU HAVE BEEN SAVED IF THE BIBLE HAD 
NOT BEEN TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH P 



WHERE EVER YOU 60 YOU WILL NEED THE BIBLE 

The people whom you serve need the Bible 

They need it in their own language and at a price which they can pay. To some the Scriptures 
must go as a free gift. It is of paramount importance, however, that the Bible, above all other 
books, be circulated extensively and persuasively to the far corners of the earth. 

There is but one American agency dedicated exclusively to this task. 

THE AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 

Headquarters 
450 Park Avenue, New York 22, N. Y. 



OFFICES IN AMERICA 

New York — Chicago 

Denver — Dallas — San Francisco 

Cincinnati — Atlanta — Philadelphia — Minneapolis 

Richmond — Syracuse — Baltimore — Washington (D.C.) — Pasadena 

Pittsburgh — Cleveland — Detroit — Nashville — Kansas City, (Mo.) 



OFFICES ABROAD 

Havana, Cuba — Mexico City, Mexico 

Cristobal, Canal Zone — Lima, Peru — Santiago, Chile 

Buenos Aires, Argentine — Rio de Janeiro, Brazil — Tokyo, Japan 

Instanbul, Turkey Cairo, Egypt — Manila, 

Philippine Islands — Shanghai, China 



Note: The American Bible Society is a member of the United Bible Societies which supply 
missionaries everywhere with the Scriptures. 



84