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Full text of "First album of the city of Davenport, Iowa"




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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS. 

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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 







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FIRST ALBUM 



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CITY OF DAVENPORT, IOWA, 



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ZE^e^-u-ie-uy- o£ ttie: Oxigira, F'ast t^^"^ Fressrat IDe;T7-e;lopmiSJ:at, 

and a TDescrripti-tre; Ske^tcti of the 

lE^oott Island. jPLrs<zn.al. 



Published by Huebingers Photographic Art Gallery. 



ADAM HUEBINGER, PHOTOGRAPHER. 



MELCHIOR HUEBINGER. CIVIL ENBinetR tUD SURVtvOR. 



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Copyright, 1887, by Hueblnger Brothers. All Rights Reserved. 



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PfffSS Of CGBBRT, FIDLAR, &. CHAMBCRS, DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



Contents. 



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PAGE 

Location and climate :i 

The city government 4 

Educational institutions 7 

Charities 14 

Business affairs 15 

Transportation facilities 18 

Societies 21 

Historical Review 25 

The Rock Island Arsenal 3o 

Conclusion 35 

iLn_usTR.jPLXioisrs. 

I. ENGRAVINGS. 

Grace Cathedral 10 

Home for the Friendless 14 

Mercy Hospital 15 

Ferry-boat 18 

City of Rock Island 19 

Hennepin Canal 25 

Black Hawk 2(5 

Black Hawk's Watch-tower 27 

Colonel George Davenport 28 

General Rodman 33 

Colonel Flagler 33 

Water Power Machinery 34 

Map of Rock Island Arsenal I 

Map of Scott County and Vicinity 



2. PHOTOGRAPHS. 

City of Davenport (bird's-eye view) . . . 

Davenport, looking north 

Davenport, looking east 

Davenport, looking south 

Davenport, looking southwest 

Brady street, looking north 

Brady street, looking north from Fifth street 

Brady street, looking south 

Perry street, looking north 

Second street, looking west 

Second street, looking east 

Third street, looking west 

Third street, looking east 

Soldiers' Monument 

High School 

Schuetzen Park 

Washington Square 

Davenport, from the Arsenal Tower , . . 

Second street, looking west 

Government Bridge (draw pier) 

Government Bridge 

Water-works Station No. i 

Water-works St.ntion No. 2 

Churches 

Schools 

Library Hall 

Turner Hall 

Mercy Hospital 

Orphans' Home 

Sisters' Academy 

St. Ambrose Seminary 

Griswold College and Schools 

Court-House 

Masonic Temple 

Davenport Residences 

Rock Island Arsenal Views 



^ n 



IV 



V 



VI 



VII 



VIII 



IX 



XI 

1 



.St. James Hotel 

Kimball House 

T. Kircher 

Aug. Stefien 

Robert Krause 

Sickels, Preston, & Co 

John Berwald 

N. Kuhnen 

Jens Lorenzen 

J. H. C. Petersen & Sons 

Beiderbecke & Miller 

A. Moritz & Bros 

Phceni.x Mill Co 

Reupke-.Schmidt Cracker Co 

Globe Plow Works 

Lindsay & Phelps 

U. N. Roberts & Co 

Der Demokrat 

Davenport Woolen Mills Co 

H. F. Brammer & Co 

Davenport Glucose Manufacturing Co. 

Cable Lumber Co 

Crescent Mills ' ' 

M. Frahm & Son 

Christ. Mueller 

Davenport Gas Light Co 

A. Warnebold (P'arniers Mills) . . . . 

Davenport Steam Heating Co 

Newcomb House 

Isaac Rothschild ' 

Lage & Co 

German Clinic 

Ryan Block 

Young & Harford 

M. Arnold 

A. J. Brownson 

Retail Business Houses, etc. . . . • . 



10 
10 



The City of Davenport t^ Vicinity. 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT. 

(Illustrations, Pages I. and V'l.) 

LOCATION AND CLIMATE. 

rN the midst of the amenities and natural beauties of 
the upper valley of the Mississippi rises the City 

of Davenport upon the northern shore of the 
father of rivers, which here, at a width of about 2,500 
feet, at a fall of not quite five inches to the mile, and 
at an elevation of 533' i,. feet above the level of the sea, 
makes its greatest bend from east to west, of over 30 
miles, and hastens toward the Gulf of Mexico with a 
velocity of one to three miles per hour. 

Three and one-half miles in length the city ex- 
tends along the mighty stream, and ascends gradually 
upon and over the bluffs, iSo to 200 feet high, and 
trimmed with a fresh wreath of green oaks, from which 
stately school houses, church-spires to a height of 120 
feet, electric-light towers of 125 feet in height, and 
numerous magnificent and cozy villas like blossoms 
eradiate. 

Situate upon 40° 30' northern latitude, and 13° 30' 
west from the City of Washington, D. C, it is, by 
river, 332 miles from St. Louis and 397 miles from St. 



Paul; by rail, 181 miles west of Chicago, 197 miles 
from Milwaukee, 1,072 miles from New York, 2,187 
miles from San Francisco, and aboiit 1,600 miles from 
New Orleans; and enjoys a decidedly temperate climate, 
though often subject to sudden changes — generally ex- 
perienced in the Mississippi valley, but milder than in 
Minnesota and cooler than in Missouri. The daily 
changes in the temperature are often strikingly per- 
ceptible, but a happy combination of heat and cold, of 
sunshine and rain, promotes the growth of corn and 
all kinds of cereals, and favors the development of a 
strong, hardy, and healthy race. 

According to official observations taken from 1872 
to 18S6, the mean actual annual barometer is 29.369, 
and the average annual temperature 49.6 degrees fah- 
renheit; the average rain-fall is three inches per month. 

During the last seventeen years, the first frost oc- 
curred September 9th, 1883 ; the last. May 29th, 1874 
and 1884. The highest stage of the water in the river 
was 18.4, on June 26th, 1880; the lowest stage, .95, on 
December 12th, 1S62 — the difference being not quite 19 
feet. The gauge is placed upon the government bridge, 
and zero is at 533.761 feet elevation above the sea level. 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



THE CITY GOVERNMENT 

is in the hands of a Mayor, whose term of office is one 
year, and twelve Aldermen, who are elected every two 
years, and constitute the City Council, which holds its 
regular meetings twice a month, except in the winter 
months from November to March, when it convenes 
only once a month. The Council elects the Street 
Commissioner, the Chief of the Fire Department, the 
City Engineer, the City Attorney, the City Collector, 
and the City Sexton ; has full legislative power under 
the special charter of the city, and has the supervision 
and control of the city officers and all the cit}' affairs 
and institutions. 

The remaining city officers forming a part of the 
city government are the City Clerk, the City Treas- 
urer, and the City Assessor, who are elected annually 
at the city election, the first Saturday in April, and the 
Police Magistrate, elected bi-annually. 

The Police Dcpartmenf, consisting of the Chief of 
Police, the Night Captain, and thirteen regular patrol- 
men, who are annually appointed by the incoming 
Mayor and confirmed by the Council. Their yearly 
salaries amount to $10,200. The present force is 
known for its effectiveness; and in the watchfulness, ca- 
pability, and reliability of the members and its Chief, 
stands probably unsurpassed in the state, judging from 
the decrease of crime and offences and the quick and 
effective manner in which criminals are brought to 
justice. The last annual report of the Chief of Police 



shows 516 arrests made during the last year — about 
two per cent of the population — and property stolen 
to the value of $1,031, of which property $1,017 ^"^^^ 
restored to the owners. The Chief of Police has also 
to attend to the duties of Marshal and Sidewalk Com- 
missioner. 

The Fire DeparUnent, organized in the spring of 
1882, contains one hook and ladder and three hose 
wagons, with a force of sixteen experienced firemen, 
under the command of a Chief, at an annual expense 
of about $14,000. The men are on duty day and night. 
Each wagon is drawn by two horses, which are selected 
and trained with the greatest care. The effectiveness 
of the service is considerably increased and hastened 
by the employment of the fire-alarm telegraph, for 
which the city paid $5,000. At the instant the alarm 
is given, the gongs and bells sound, four double stable 
doors open themselves, the horses place themselves 
before the wagons, the harness drops down upon them, 
the firemen mount their seats, and forward they go 
to the place of fire. All of this is done in fifteen to 
seventeen seconds. At extraordinary conflagrations, 
the paid fire department is assisted by the volunteer 
companies, who are also under the command of the 
Chief of the Department. The department has been 
established at an expense of about $35,800, exclusive of 
the buildings and the fire-alarm. During the last year 
there were sixty-three fire alarms. The total loss was 
$9,777.50, of which $8,000 was lost at one fire. The 
expenses for the year were $13,556.21. 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



THE DAVENPORT WATER COMPANY. 

(See Illustration, Page VII., Nos, 19 and 20.) 

Before entering into a description of the works of the Daven- 
port Water Company, it is no idle boast to say that, without excep- 
tion, Davenport has the most complete system of water-works, both 
for fire protection and sanitary purposes, of any city in the west. 

The Davenport Water Company is a private corporation, 
which was organized through the efforts of the late ex-Mayor 
Michael Donahue. What a monument to the public spirit and 
enterprise of the Hon. Michael Donahue are the Davenport Water- 
Works ! He was the originator and founder of them. His capital, 
and that of his brother, Col. Peter Donahue, whom he enlisted in 
the cause, built them. Both the brothers are dead, but the good 
they did in this community will be a memory here to the last gen- 
eration. Their sons, James P. Donahue, of Davenport, and James 
M. Donahue, of San Francisco, have inherited their energy and 
enterprise. The constant improvement of the water-works is evi- 
dence of it. 

It was on December 4th, 1872, that the City Council chartered 
the Davenport Water Company, and on February 2d, 1874, the 
works were tested as to their efficiency with fire streams, and all 
was done, and more too, than the Company guaranteed. 

The plant of this Company comprises a reservoir, low and 
high-service pumping-stations, known as Pumping-Station No. i 
and Pumping-Station No. 2. 

The reservoir is located at the highest elevation in the city, 
and has a capacity of 5,000,000 gallons. No money was spared in 
its construction ; the best of material and labor that could be had 
was used. ' It was built in 1883, and cost $100,000. 

Pumping- Stalion No. i. — Pumping capacity, 11,000,000 gal- 
lons every twenty-four hours. This pumping-station comprises the 
original works, and is situated on the Mississippi river, about a 
mile above the Government bridge. The pumping-house is a 
large, two-story building, 68x93 ^^t, including the boiler-room. 
There are two sets of pumps and engines in this station. Pump- 
ing-engine No. i is a condensing set of duplex engines of 5,000,000 



gallons capacity per twenty-four hours, built by the Clapp & Jones 
Manufacturing Company. Pumping-engine No. 2, which has been 
recently placed upon foundations, is a high-duty Worthington 
duplex compound condensing engine, and capable of delivering 
6,000,000 gallons per twenty-four hours against a head of 345 feet. 

Pumping-Station No. 2. — Pumping capacity, 5,000,000 gallons 
per twenty-four hours. The bluff, or high service, or all that por- 
tion lying above Sixth street, is supplied by reservoir water de- 
livered by the pumps at this station, which are situated at the res- 
ervoir. These engines are vertical, of the duplex compound con- 
densing type. In precisely thirty seconds, the pumps of station 
No. 2, which are continually running for the high service, can be 
changed so as to pump into the gravity service, and pump down 
hill in case the reservoir pressure is not sufficient for fire purposes. 
Then, too, there is another resource in case of fire, and that is 
pumping-station No. i can be set in motion and give all the addi- 
tional pressure necessary. This means that the piping system is 
so designed that the pumps at station No. i and station No. 2 can 
pump at the same time at their respective ends of the distribution 
mains, thereby insuring increased pressure — an almost unlimited 
supply of water and pressure in time of fire. 

For the fire and sanitary suppl)' of the city, there are 253 
public and 9 private, or a total of 262, fire hydrants. There are 27 
miles of main pipe, from four to sixteen inches in diameter, and 
about 1,200 water consumers. 

The Water Company, aside from its enormous expenditure in 
establishing the works, is at a heavy constant outlay to sustain 
them. The operating expenses of the two pumping-stations being 
no small expenditure. Still, the rates charged for water furnished 
consumers, in many instances, are lower than those charged in 
other western cities, and is in but few cases more, and the citizens 
in other places are by no means so perfectly served. 

The Davenport Water Company is entitled to the thanks, not 
only of the citizens generally, but particularly of every owner of a 
home or business block. It guarantees them against loss by fire, 
as has been shown by the records of the fire losses. It is doubted 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



if any single individual has done more to make Davenport known 
abroad, or contributed more to its enduring prosperity, than the 
enterprising late lamented Hon Michael Donahue. 

The present officers of the Company are: Nicholas Kuhn'^n. 
President; James P. Donahue, Vice-President and Secretary; Thos. 
N. Hooper, Inspector and Chief Engineer. 

The above named officers, with: Col. James M. Donahue, 
San Francisco, California, and J. H. Murphy and F. H. Griggs, 
Davenport, constitute the Board of Directors. 

THE D.WENPORT GAS COMPANY. 

(See llluslralion, Page 8. No. 58.) 

Furnishes gas at a price of $2.50 per 1,000 cubic feet to private 
consumers, through their main pipe of 26 miles in extent. 

The lighting of the city by electricity was accomplished on 
February ist, 1886, by the Ft. Wayne Jenney Electric Light Com- 
pany, and contains 94 lights of 2,000 candle-power each, of which 
40 are placed on 8 towers 125 feet high, 52 upon mast-arms 30 
feet high, 5 over the intersection of streets, and 2 upon poles 40 and 
50 feet high. The wires have a length of over 26 miles, and the 
light is perfect. Each light is kept up to the agreed strength of 
2,000 candle-power. 

The city pays therefor about $16,000 per annum, in monthly 
payments, and the contract runs five years from November 6th, 
1885. 

THE PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS. 

The City Hall (page III., No. 6), built in 1859, at 
an expense of $12,000, contains the offices of the City- 
Clerk, City Assessor, City Collector, City Engineer, 
and Street Commissioner, and in the upper story the 
council chamber. 

The Police Station^ established at a cost of about 
$18,000, contains the offices of the police officers and 



the Police Magistrate, the city prison, and the armory 
of Company " B," of the state militia. 

The Fire Department. — Of the four buildings oc- 
cupied by the fire department, three are on ground 
owned by the city and one on leased premises, and cost 
the city about $20,000. 

Central Park., bought by the city, for about $13,000, 
in 1885. 

JVashington Square (page V., No. 16), with a foun- 
tain erected at a cost of about $1,500 

Lafayette Square^ laid out by Antoine LeClaire in 
the original plat of the city. 

The City Cemetery., also the public levee or landing, 
established in 1859, at an expense of $12,000, and at 
that time estimated at a value of $150,000. 

THE Pl'BLIC STREETS. 

The whole city is divided into blocks — most of 
them 320 feet square — by 126 streets, 60 to 80 feet 
wide and of over 80 miles in length. Their annual 
repairs and improvements amount to about $50,000. 
Since the year 185S, about 20 miles thereof have been 
macadamized, at an expense of nearly $1,000,000. 
These streets are in a good deal better condition than 
is generally found in the state, or in the west. 

THE SEWERS 

have been constructed since 1858, but the greater part 
of them were built since 1877. They drain the prin- 
cipal part of the city, run from the bluff down into the 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



river, and cost from 4^ cents to $1.25 per rnnning foot. 

THE CITY REVENUE 

amounts annually to about $140,000, of which about 
$20,000 is paid for licenses, and the balance of $120,000 
levied upon an assessment at about $7,100,000. 

THE CITY DEBTS, 

originating from the loans made in 1856 and 1857, 
which in 1869 were converted into twenty years bonds, 
amount to about $280,000, with six and seven per cent 
interest, payable semi-annually, and are due in 18S9. 

THE BOARD OF HEALTH, 

consisting of the Mayor, acting Chairman, and four 
members, a majority of whom are members of the 
Council, appointed by the Mayor and confirmed by the 
City Council, is clothed by state law and city ordi- 
nances with full power to keep the city in a good and 
sanitary condition. The city has been free from epi- 
demic diseases, and the death rate is low in comparison 
with other cities similarly situated. 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 

(See Illustrations, Page V., No. 14, and Page VIII., No. 22.) 

The Public Schools. — The Independent School Dis- 
trict of the City of Davenport embraces the whole city 
and some territory outside the city limits, of which the 
western part has been provided with school house No. 
7. The tuition is free. The management is in the 
hands of a Board of Education, of six members, who 



are elected every two years. The Board elects every 
year the Treasurer and Secretary. There are eleven 
common school buildings and one high school building, 
which was erected in 1874, at a cost, including the 
ground and furniture, of about $50,000. All the build- 
ings, with the grounds and school furniture, represent 
a total value of about $400,000. The yearly expenses 
amount to $80,000 or $90,000. The staff of teachers 
is composed of one Superintendent, eleven principals 
(one in each school building), seven male teachers, of 
whom one instructs in music and one in gymnastics, 
and about one hundred female teachers, of whom ten 
teach the German language. The attendance is in- 
creasing every year so that at present an additional 
building, estimated at $3,500, is required. The last 
census gave a school population of 9,295, of which 4,468 
were boys and 4,827 were girls. The average number 
enrolled was 4,466, and the average daily attendance 
was 3,236" 10. The school term is ten months. During 
the winter months there is also a free evening school 
maintained. 



PRIVATE SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES. 

IMMACULATE CONCEPTION ACADEMY. 

(See Illustration. Page IX., No. 27.) 

This institution, situated on the corner of Eighth and Main 
streets, is devoted to educational interest, and is conducted by the 
Sisters of Charity of the B. V. M. The photograph represents the 
present Academy, which was first ready for occupancy in Septem- 
ber, 1885. Previous to the erection of this imposing structure, the 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



Sisters and pupils occupied the edifice adjoining, better known 
as the Hill Estate. 

The Sisters Academy is one of longstanding. On July i6th, 
1857, the Sisters took possession of the old Immaculate Conception 
Academy, which is now known as the Mercy Hospital. Their 
saintly founder, the Very Reverend T. J. Donaghoe, premeditated 
the erection of a noble structure, but financial difficulties prevented 
his accomplishing his design, and but one wing of the main build- 
ing was completed. The ground, ten acres in extent, was the gift 
of Judge Mitchell and Mr. L. Davenport. The site, though excel- 
lently well adapted for the purpose, was deemed too far removed 
from the city proper at that period, and after a stay of some time, 
during which many improvements were made, the Sisters disposed 
of the property to Reverend Pelam, from whom it passed to Right 
Reverend John Hennessy, Bishop of Dubuque. The latter con- 
veyed it to the Sisters of Mercy for hospital purposes, and they 
not only carried out the intention of Very Reverend T. J. Dona- 
ghoe, but have added largely to the grounds, and have erected 
several additional buildings. It is a pleasure to those who experi- 
enced the discouraging trials attendant upon pioneer life in that 
spot to note that the seed they planted under so many difliculties 
has ripened to so abundant a harvest, even though it be gathered 
by other hands. 

Removing to the city, the Sisters rented the Sargent property 
on Brady street. Here the school flourished, and so rapidly did 
the number of pupils increase that it was soon necessary to procure 
a more commodious dwelling. After some deliberations, the ele- 
gant mansion of Mr. Hill was chosen as best suited to the purpose 
in question, and the Eve of All Saints, November ist, 1864, found 
the Sisters domiciled in their new home. 

The Academy has a past of which it may well be proud, a 
present which the community delights to honor, and a future which 
the most sanguine cannot over-estimate. Year after year young 
ladies are leaving its sacred recesses to enter into the busy world, 
their intellects having been stimulated, their powers fully cultured, 
their morals founded on the "rock of ages," thus preparing them to 
adorn the world they enter, andto give happiness to all around them. 



For many, many years this noble institution of learning, under 
the care and guidance of the good and accomplished Sisters of 
Charity of the B. V. M., has been surrounded with the earnest 
sympathies of a host of friends — Protestant as well as Catholic — 
who have testified their confidence in its management by bestowing 
upon it their approval, as well as by giving it a liberal support. 

ST. AMBROSE SEMINARY. 

(See Illustration, Page IX., No. 28.) 

The present Bishop of Davenport, Right Reverend Henry 
Cosgrove, D. D., knowing the advantages of a higher school for 
young men, sought for years an opportunity to establish one. 
When Vicar-General of the Diocese, he made known his project 
to his Right Reverend Ordinary, John McMullen, D. D,, and he 
being favorably impressed, steps were immediately taken to open 
the institution. A few rooms in St. Margaret's parochial school 
building were accordingly fitted up, and the school was formally 
opened September 4th, 1882. The school received the name " St. 
Ambrose Seminary." The Reverend A. J. Schulte and Professor 
Joseph E. Halligan were appointed its first teachers and faculty. 

The first scholastic year had scarcely closed when death robbed 
the school of its benefactor and patron, the Right Reverend John 
McMullen, D. D. His death, on July 4th, 1883, was a severe blow 
to the institution, as his plans could not be carried out. Its perma- 
nent establishment was left to the future, and fell to the lot of his 
successor. 

During the following year, Mr. T. J. Mullen was appointed 
assistant teacher, which position he held until near the close of the 
year. Having been promoted to the Priesthood, he assumed his 
duties as Professor the ensuing year. 

With the appointment of the Right Reverend Henry Cos- 
grove, D. D., the institution's first projector and friend, came new 
life and hope. The temporary location being inadequate to its 
wants, steps were taken to secure new grounds. A suitable loca- 
tion was found, within the city limits, yet well removed from the 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



noise of traffic — a magnificent oak grove embracing ten acres, 
formerly known as Noel's grove. 

On May 24th, 1885, work began at the new Seminary on 
Locust street, and on November 3d of the same year enough had 
been completed to permit the transferring from the old to the new 
quarters. The new building is large and commodious, and fitted up 
in the best manner known for the purpose intended. Its rooms 
are large and airy, and finished in oak and yellow pine. The 
grounds surrounding the building are of diversified surface, adapted 
to walks and other outdoor exercise. Its location is in a healthy 
vicinity, and whatever can be done to promote the health and pro- 
gress of the student is attended to. 

As the number of students increased, more aid was necessary, 
and Reverend John T. A. Flannagan was appointed Assistant Pro- 
fessor, November 3d, 1885. On October 6th, 1885, the institution 
was incorporated under the laws of the State of Iowa, empowering 
it to confer the usual academic honors. 

There are three departments — preparatory, commercial, and 
classical. The preparatory is designed for those whose acquire- 
ments are not sufficient to enable them to enter the two higher 
grades. The commercial affords its students the benefit of a busi- 
ness education. The classical not only gives a complete course of 
reading in the best ancient authors, but also furnishes a thorough 
training in modern science and literature. 

A well selected library, of 2,960 volumes, affords the students 
the means of perusing the best literary works. Among the vari- 
ous works, we may mention those of reference, biography, science, 
art, history, etc. Some of these works are of great value. 

Cabinets of geological and entomological specimens, and cases 
of rare coins and other articles of vertii are provided for the enter- 
tainment and instruction of the students. 

Various societies have been organized. Among these may be 
mentioned the debating and the dramatic associations, which are 
maintained for intellectual exercise and development. These so- 
cieties afford the students an opportunity of practically applying 
their acquired knowledge in argumentative discourses and elocu- 



tionary efforts. Other societies of a religious character exist and 
have a full membership. 

Though existing but a few years, the Seminary has done good 
work, and will, without doubt, prosper in the future. The first 
faculty is still at the head of the institution. Every year has 
marked its progress, and ere long may it rank among the first 
educational institutions of the land. 

THE GRISWOLD EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 

(See Illustrations, Pages VIII., No. 21, and X., Nos. 29 and 30.) 

Stepping from the incoming train from the east, at the Chicago, 
Rock Island & Pacific Railway station, the eye is attracted by the 
beautiful " old Trinity," covered with woodbine, and with its grace- 
ful outlines making good its claims to be one of Upjohn's designs. 
Its seating capacity was between three and four hundred — was we 
say; for this picturesque building — the mother church of the city, 
and one of the oldest in the state — is dismantled and disused, 
and is rapidly falling into ruin. Would that God might put it into 
the heart of some one or more of His servants to redeem this 
deserted temple of the Most High, by placing it in the Bishop's 
hands as a mission church for the dense population of railroad men 
and other artisans who will ever abound in this locality. Surely a 
spot where the apostolic Kemper ministered again and again, and 
which, though unconsecrated, was for years the shrine of those who 
laid the foundations of the church in eastern Iowa, should not be 
lost, when a few thousand dollars would purchase and refit it for 
use, and make its stones a memorial of the past. 

Passing westward from " old Trinity," for a couple of blocks, 
Brady street, the most fashionable avenue in the city, is reached, 
and, as you ascend the hill, the eye is at once attracted by the 
massive buildings of new Trinity, a memorial of the late Hon. 
Ebenezer Cook, erected by his widow, Clarissa C. Cook, at a cost 
of over $50,000. Here is a fine stone chyrch, with upwards of four 
hundred sittings, and, connected with it, a chapel and guild-rooms, 
used for Sunday-school and week-day services, and for various 
parochial activities. This church lacks something of the graceful 



4 



lO 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



outlines of " old Trinity," but it is a noble structure, with a chime 
of bells, and stands out ajjainst the sky with a prominence that will 
not be overlooked. An intellig^ent and cultivated congregation 
frequent this beautiful sanctuary, and enjoy their possession of 
a completely equipped and attractive 
church, which is the center of abun- 
dant charities and helpful work. 

On the broad table-land at the 
sumit of the bluff, occupying nearly 
ten acres, in the heart of the city, and 
surrounded by beautiful residences, are 
the Cathedral - close and the college 
grounds, separated by Main street, with 
the fine soldier's monument in a circu- 
lar enclosure opposite the west front of 
the Cathedral. 

Fronting on Brady street, but re- 
moved from the thoroughfare, stands 
the Bishop's house, one of the finest 
Episcopal residences in the country. 
This noble structure, in which is en- 
shrined Bishop Perry's valuable library 
of "Americana," liturgies, and_ cannon 
laws, with belles-lettres and general lit- 
erature, numbering over thirteen thou- 
sand volumes, occupies the southeast 
corner of the Cathedral-close, and was 
built out of the avails of the invest- 
ments in land made by the first Bishop 
of Iowa on his entrance on his see. 

Lee Hall, the former residence of 
Bishop Lee, and now occupied by the 
theological department of Griswold col- 
lege, is a substantial brick structure, oc- 
cupying the entire southwest corner of 
the close. Here the divinity students, 




GRACE CATHEDRAL — COMPI.liTED, 



to the number of eight or ten, are accommodated with pleasant 
rooms, well furnished, and with a pleasant outlook from the 
windows, and here the " head of the house," a theological pro- 
fessor who has charge of the students, gathers them as a Christian 

family to prayers, and gives to them 
the comforts and culture of a home. 
In the spacious rooms of Lee hall is a 
well selected theological library ; and in 
a suit of apartments specially fitted for 
the purpose, the Dean of Davenport, 
the Reverend Charles R. Hale, S. T. Z?., 
who has charge of the department of 
liturgies in the school, has his home. 
The Bishop's house and Lee Hall 
occupy the southern portion of the 
close, in the center of which is the 
Cathedral, which, although its tower 
and spire are unfinished, is confessedly 
the most beautiful church building in 
the west. Built by the first Bishop of 
Iowa, to whose wise master-building 
the Episcopate fund, the Bishop's res- 
idence, the college building, and the 
larger portion of its endowments, as 
well as the Cathedral, are due; its erec- 
tion was chiefly accomplished by the 
gifts of the late David J. Ely, Esq., 
of Chicago and New York, who gave 
$15,000 to make a memorial to a be- 
loved daughter, Mrs. Sarah Ely Par- 
sons, and the late John David Wolfe, 
Esq., who, with his daughter. Miss 
Catharine Lorillard Wolfe, of New 
\'ork City, contributed upwards of 
$25,000 to make more complete and 
beauUful the Cathedral of the Diocese 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



II 



of Iowa. The building is one of the happiest of the many admir- 
able designs of Mr. Edward T. Potter, and in its erection neither 
pains nor expense were spared. The churchmen of Davenport 
and the Diocese gave but little — in all not a tenth of the $75,000 
expended in its erection. It was a gift to the Bishop and Diocese 
of Iowa, and it will ever attest the taste, the far-seeing wisdom, 
the churchliness, and zeal of Henry Washington Lee, to whom 
the conception and execution of the plan of this Cathedral-church 
are wholly due. The beauty of the exterior is surpassed by the 
tasteful effects of the interior. The adornments are lavish, and the 
chancel is well filled with beautiful memorials of the departed or 
gifts to God from the living. The noble organ, made by Johnson, 
of Westfield, Massachusetts, is tastefully built around the great 
wheel-window of the west front, itself a memorial of the apostolic 
Kemper. An exquisite faldstool, placed " between the porch and 
the altar," is the gift of the Reverend C. T. Olmstead, of Utica, 
New York, the memorial of a beloved brother, who entered into 
the rest of paradise while preparing ibr holy orders. The baptis- 
tery and the chancel have their memorials of departed connections 
of the present Bishop and Dean. Part of the beautiful brass fur- 
niture of the altar was a gift of the late Reverend Doctor John 
Cotton Smith, of New York. The windows, of the best American 
stained glass, bear each a name for a memorial, and the whole in- 
terior, as revealed by the "dim, re'igious light" streaming in 
through the painted windows, or as made glorious by the flood of 
gas-light for the night services, is most attractive. The deep recess 
of the chancel will accommodate more than a score of clergy. The 
Cathedral is one hundred and forty-two feet in length, and has sit- 
tings for upwards of seven hundred worshippers. 

On the north side of the west front of the Cathedral stands Ely 
House, built by Mrs. Caroline D. Ely, of New York, as a residence 
for the incumbent of the theological chair founded and endowed by 
her late husband. It is a convenient and attractive building of 
brick, and was erected at a cost of between $6,000 and $7,000. 

Directly opposite the west front of the Cathedral, and sepa- 
rated from the Cathedral-close by Main street, stands Wolfe Hall, 



a stone building, three stories high, with a basement, named in 
memory of the late John David Wolfe, Esq., of New York City, 
who advised the purchase of the Iowa College property by Bishop 
Lee, and whose liberal gifts made this step possible. Wolfe Hall is 
a lasting memorial of a good and generous man. Even on his 
death-bed, this excellent churchman was not forgetful of this 
charity, and with his last words he made provision for a gift to 
Bishop Lee for the maintenance of the college, which largely owed 
its inception and continued existence to his charity. In this sub- 
stantial structure of stone are contained the college chapel, the 
library, with upwards of seven thousand volumes, the cabinets, the 
study-hall and recitation-rooms, with apartments for professors 
and a limited number of students — all under the broad overhang- 
ing roof, from the cupola of which is a view of wonderful beauty, 
embracing the cit}', the river, the islands, the bluffs, and the neigh- 
boring cities of Rock Island, Moline, and Milan, the homes and 
haunts of a population of fifty thousand and more. 

On the southeast corner of the college grounds stands Kemper 
Hall, the preparatory and grammar school of Griswold College, with 
accommodations for a head-master, three assistants, and forty boys. 
This noble structure, just completed, perfect in its plan, and fitted 
preeminently for its purpose, is one of the most attractive and best 
equipped school buildings in the country. It was erected at a cost 
of $25,000, by the trustees of the college, and has, since its opening 
in September, 1SS5, offered to its patrons all the advantages prof- 
fered by the great schools of Concord, Southboro', Faribault, and 
Racine, adding to the attraction of a new and spacious hall, nobly 
planned and completely furnished, a sound, churchly training, 
coupled with the careful oversight and home restraints that can 
only be had in a school of limited numbers. For good learning, 
for culturing and improving surroundings, accompanied with the 
advantages of a military drill, for the personal labor of an enthus- 
iast in education and a devoted minister of Christ, for the loving 
care and constant supervision of the Bishop of the Diocese, 
Kemper Hall well deserves the fullest support. The curriculum of 
study is that of our best eastern schools. The teachers are all tried 



12 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



men. The location combines healthfulness and ihe advantages of 
easy access from north and south, east and west. Heated by 
steam, Hghted by gas, with every provision for the comfort and 
care of the boys, the school could not be !m{)roved. The home 
attractions and the highest and holiest influences are maintained 
by the constant intercourse of the boys with cuhivated men and 
earnest christian instructors. The churchly character of the school 
gives to its religious training a distinctiveness and point. The 
Cathedral services on Sundays and the daily prayers at other times, 
the presence of the Bishop and city clergy at the hall from day to 
day, the receptions and other means of imparting a refinement of 
manner and a familiarity with the requirements of a social life, will 
all unite to give to Kemper Hall the foremost place among our 
Iowa schools, and make it rank with those eastern institutions 
which cannot be surpassed. 

It is proposed, should the means be secured, to add to Kemper 
Hall a gymnasium and college hall, to front on Eleventh street, and 
to form part of the quadrangle contemplated as the final develop- 
ment of the schools. $5,000 will put up and equip this mdispensa- 
ble addition to our work, and give us a structure seventy-one feet 
in front by thirty-one feet in width, in which all the apparatus for 
the physical development of the students will be provided, and 
there will be also a commodious hall for exhibitions, lectures, and 
other purposes of the school. 

On the northeast corner of the college grounds is Sheldon 
Hall, formerly the residence of Professor David S. Sheldon, LL. D., 
whose connection with the college dated back to its very birth, and 
whose fame as a scientist and educator was not surpassed by that of 
any savant in the west. Sheldon Hall is one of the most beautiful 
of the creations of the architect of Kemper Hall and (new) St. 
Katharine's Hall, Mr. E. S. Hammatt, and is a great addition to the 
grounds. 

Griswold College, which comprises the various institutions 
known as " Bishop Perry's Schools," has a noble landed domain in 
the heart of the city of Davenport, valued, with the buildings, at not 
less than $150,000. Its endowments are nearly or quite $80,000. 



This is exclusive of the property of St Katharine's Hall, to which 
Miss Sarah Burr, of New York, bequeathed $30,000 (not yet re- 
ceived), and of which the ground, buildings, and furnishing repre- 
sent an outlay of nearly another $100,000. The endowed chairs 
and special trusts of the college are as follows; 

CAPITAL. 

Ely Professorship 1121,325 

Crocker Professorship 21,250 

Anthon Professorship 11,300 

Catherine Lorillard Wolfe Professorship 20,000 

Mary Buttles Scholarship Fund 5,000 

George B. Boal Scholarship Fund 500 

179,375 
Sarah Burr bequest to the college, with accrued interest (not yet 

received) |i 1,200 

Sarah Burr bequest to the girls' school 33i6oo 

|44,8oo 

Descending the hill as fir as Third street, a walk of nearly two 
miles brings one to Christ church, a very pretty timber church with 
one hundred and fifty sittings, filled Sunday after Sunday with 
a congregation drawn from the neighborhood, while the largest 
church Sunday-school in the city attends the zeal and success of 
the rector and his fellow-laborers. Beside the church is a pretty 
brick rectory, erected at a cost of nearly $3,000. Christ church has 
an endowment fund of $2,000, bequeathed to the parish by the late 
Mrs. C. C. Cook. 

Near by is the Clarissa C. Cook Home for the Friendless, 
a noble charity founded by the devoted and liberal churchwo- 
man whose name it bears, and endowed with a capital of nearly 
$100,000. The home was erected at a cost of $20,000. 

On one of the loftiest bluffs in the eastern part of the city, with 
its outlook across the river upon the cities of Rock Island, Moline, 
and Milan, stands preeminent St. Katharine's Hall, the Diocesan 
school for girls, founded by Bishop Perry and opened in Septem- 
ber, 1S84. 

St. Katharine's grounds comprise six acres, and on the highest 
point stands the Hall, which, as originally erected, was designed to 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



13 



be the most palatial private residence in Iowa. Seventy-five thous- 
and dollars were spent on the house and grounds; and when the 
bequest of the late Miss Sarah Burr, of New York City, of $30,000 
for the establishment of a girls' school, to be under the control of 
the Bishop of Iowa, was announced, the first thought of Bishop 
Perry was to secure this most desirable property. Negotiations 
were at once entered upon, and in the summer of 1884 the 
purchase was made, possession being given but a month before 
the building, refitted and completely furnished for its new use, was 
formally opened with an office of benediction, and devoted to its 
Christian and churchly purpose. The school, placed by the Bishop 
in the charge of Miss Emma A. Rice, for some years the accom- 
plished and successful head of St. Mary's, Faribault, was filled 
within a few weeks of its opening, and ere the close of the first 
term the necessity for enlargement was evident. 

Plans for an " annex," more than doubling the size and capac- 
ity of the original structure, were adopted, and at the beginning of 
the second year the entire building, with every convenience, and 
even lu.xury, was opened to applicants, and was again filled to its 
utmost capacity ere the first half of the school year had passed. 
Such success, gained without resort to advertising or to any at- 
tempt to underbid schools of a similar grade, is sufficient evidence 
that Bishop Perry undertook this work not a moment too soon. 

The further enlargement required was made in the summer of 
1886, and although it was intended never to exceed the limit of 
fifty-eight house-pupils, it was evident that provision for even this 
number would not supply the demand for accommodations in this 
popular school. The secret of this success is the combination here 
offered of thorough culture united with personal oversight and 
care, and accompanied by every possible attention to the comfort 
and happiness of the pupils. The school is a Christian family. 
The surroundings, the influences, the general tone and temper of 
the school, are refining, culturing, home-like. Through the spa- 
cious halls, corridors, library, reception and school rooms the 
pupils move freely, and, while decorum and good order are main- 
tained and constant personal oversight exercised, there is the fullest 



liberty consistent with study and the necessary restraint of a loving. 
Christian home. The furnishings of the school and recitation 
rooms, the parlors, the dormitories, are all in exquisite taste, and 
neither care nor pains nor lavish outlay have been spared to make 
St. Katharine'.s, in everything save expense, the " Ogontz " of 
the west. 

There are fourteen teachers on the staff, and a limited number 
of day-pupils are received, making the whole number under in- 
struction at the hall in its second year between seventy and eighty, 
and in its third year reaching one hundred. Every care has been 
taken to ensure safety from fire and to obtain perfect ventilation and 
the most complete sewerage. The immense boiler for the steam- 
heating apparatus, with the various appliances for laundrying, are 
all out of the hall in a building by themselves. Every device that 
ingenuity can offer for the saving of labor and the quick and effi- 
cient accomplishment of work is at hand. The numerous bath- 
rooms afford capacity for a hundred or more baths each day. The 
arrangements for cooking are sufficient for many more than the 
school family can ever number. Ample provision is made for 
acquiring the best table manners, and the monthly receptions, to 
which special invitations are sent out from the ladies of the Hall, 
and which have proved most enjoyable as well as most popular, 
afford the opportunity to the girls to familiarize themselves with 
the requirements of society; while full care is taken of each in- 
dividual pupil in all matters of health and habits. 

The children of the Hall attend morning prayer on Sundays at 
the Cathedral. Evening prayer is said in the school-room until the 
school chapel is built. During Advent and Lent the Bishop con- 
ducts special services each week. 

Such are the foundations for church work in Davenport: 
Realty (land and buildings) valued at $350,000; furnishing (libra- 
ries, cabinets, apparatus, bells, organs, etc.), $25,000; endowments 
in hand or in prospect (the $40,000, with interest, of the Burr be- 
quest not being paid over), $125,000; in brief, upwards of half a 
million of dollars worth of property, of which a little more than 
one-third of the whole sum was contributed outside of the Dio- 



14 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



cese. The excess represents the appreciation of our property, the 
gifts made from our own people, and the results of a wise and care- 
ful husbandry. 

There also exist two colleges for the edtication of 
business men — the Davenport Business College^ since 
1865, and the Iowa Commercial College^ of a more 
recent date. 

Private Schools are only nine in nttmber, of which 
two are kiudergardens, one a free German school, and 
the other six are parochial schools. 



CHARITIES. 



"i-C/li'tr 




W%^ ilWiif -^i \ 







cook's home for the friendless. 

HOME FOR THE FRIENDLESS. 

Clarissa C. Cook's home for destitute and indigent females was 
opened in the year 1882. After the building (the home of the 
friendless) had been completed upon the fifteen-acre tract donated 
by Mrs. Cook, in the western part of the city, at a cost of $20,000. 



Women who are residents of Scott county, and over sixty years of 
age, are here admitted as permanent inmates, upon paying an ad- 
mission fee of 5^100. The building has a capacity for twenty-five 
inmates. The Toundress has provided the institution with an en- 
dowment of over $90,000, the interest of which is to be used annu- 
ally by the trustees for the support of the home and its inmates. 

THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
(See Illustration, Page VIII., No. 23) 

Through the benevolence of Mrs. Clarissa C. Cook, a suitable 
building for a library, centrally located, on Brady and Si.xth streets, 
has been erected at a cost of $13000, upon a lot purcliased with 
the proceeds from individual donations It contains over lOjOoo 
volumes of standard works. Upon the reading -tables are found 
twelve leading magazines and eight newspapers. The number of 
volumes annually drawn is about 13,400, and the number of visi- 
tors 34,000. 

IOWA soldiers' orphans' home. 

(See Illuslration, Page IX., No. 26.) 

The State ot Iowa can point with pride to what her loyal 
citizens have done, and are doing, tor the orphans of her heroic 
dead, and to what is being done for equally unfortunate indigent 
children. 

The soldiers' orphans' home was organized in 1863, and 
opened for children in 1864, at Parinington; was removed to Dav- 
enport in 1865, and occupied the barracks in what had been a 
soldiers' camp during the war, the general government having 
given them to the State of Iowa for this purpose. These tempo- 
rary and unsuitable buildings gradually gave way to substantial and 
permanent ones, which consist of one central building, 50x90 feet, 
three stories high, to which is attached a dining-hall and kitchen, 
66x92 feet, two stories high ; a school building, 35x68 feet ; sixteen 
cottages, 31x51; laundry, with boiler-room, and a spacious barn; 
all built of brick, except the barn, which is of wood, with stone 
foundation. Since its organization upwards of fifteen hundred 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



15 



soldiers' orphans have been cared for, of whom but forty-five now 
remain. In 1876 the home was opened to indigent children, since 
which time about five hundred have been received, of which num- 
ber two hundred and sixty-four remain, making three hundred and 
nine in all now at the home. 

The support and maintenance of the indigent children is paid 
for by the several counties from 
which they are sent at the rate 
of $100 per year for each child. 
The state provides $10 per 
month for the support of 
soldiers' orphans. All salaries 
and running expenses are paid 
out of these amounts. 

That the home is accom- 
plishing the object for which 
it was established is attested 
by the fact that of the large 
number who have already left 
the home, very many are known 
to be prosperous and happy, 
and proud to say they were 
brought up at the home. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Pierce, 
as Superintendent and Matron, 
with a body of efficient help- 
ers, very successfully conducted 
the affairs of the home for nine- 
teen years. The present Superintendent and Matron are Gen. and 
Mrs. A. C. Litchfield. 

MERCY HOSPITAL. 

(See Illustration, Page IX., No. 25.) 

Mercy Hospital, in all of its departments, is one of the best 
institutions of the kind in the country — one with which there is 
not another in Iowa for comparison. The grounds cover about 




thirty acres, located just outside of the city limits on the north. 
The main building is a massive brick structure, four stories high, 
and 60x150 feet in size. The institution was opened in December, 
1868, and has grown to magnificent proportions. The entire 
control and discipline is in the hands of the Sisters of Mercy. The 
hospital is subject to constant visitations by county officials, who 

point to it with a feeling of pride. 
"Z i ~~^ The institution has the entire 

confidence of the official board 
and of the city physicians and 
surgeons, who regularly visit 
the place. The upper build- 
ing, as shown in the cut, rep- 
resents the St. John's Asylum, 
which was built for the comfort 
of the male insane patients. 
The asylum has just been built 
at a cost of $23,000. It has a 
frontage of 45 feet, with a 
depth of 91 feet, and the east 
and west wings are 12x20 feet 
each. 




MERCY HOSPITAL. 



BUSINESS AFFAIRS. 

Of the extensiveness of the variotis btisiness 
dealings of the citizens of Davenport, we give the 
following instittitions, industries, man ti factories, and 
other business branches as an approximate represen- 
tation : 



i6 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



BANKING HOUSES. 

The First National Bank^ organized June 27th, 
1863 — the first in the United States under the national 
banking law — with a capital of $100,000, a surplus of 
$50,000, a deposit of $549,133, and undivided profits 
of $60,000. 

The Davenport National Bank^ organized in 1S65, 
with a capital of $200,000, a surplus of $40,000, a de- 
posit of $350,505, and undivided profits of $18,000. 

The Citizens National Bank^ organized in 1868, 
with a capital of $100,000, a surplus of $100,000, a de- 
posit of $873,116, and undivided profits of $34,000. 

The German Savings Bank^ organized in March, 

1869, with a capital of $300,000, a surplus of $60,000, a 
deposit of $2,584,938, and undivided profits of $92,375. 

The Davenport Savings Bank, organized in March, 

1870, with a capital of $120,000, a deposit of $1,084,182, 
and undivided profits of $53,812. 

The Scott County Savings Bank, organized in 
December, 1883, with a cash capital of $50,000. There 
has since been added by stock dividends $20,000; ac- 
cordingly, the capital is now $70,000, deposits $660,000, 
and undivided profits $90,000. 

These savings banks pay depositors five per cent 
per annum interest, and loan their money upon good 
security. The savings in these three banks amount 
to $4,329,120. 

THE WHOLESALE TRADE, 

the volume of which was estimated in 1881 at $8,000,- 
000, in 1883 at $10,000,000, and may now amount to 



over $12,000,000, is represented by thirty-six wholesale 
houses, of which seven deal in wines and liquors ; four 
in groceries and provisions; three in dry goods; two in 
tobacco and cigars; two in cloths and clothing; two in 
crockery and glassware; two in fruits; two in hardware; 
one in boots and shoes; two in paper stock; one in coal 
oil; one in hides, pelts, and tallow; one in iron and 
wagon stock; one in paints, varnishes, and oils; one in 
leather and saddlery; two in cand}', nuts, etc.; one in 
carriages and buggies, and one in sash, doors, and 
blinds. 

THE RETAIL TRADE 

is carried on by about seven hundred business firms, 
including sixteen druggists. 

MANUFACTORIES. 

As taken from the statistical tables of the year 
1882, the capital invested in manufacturing industries 
amounted to -^4,610,280, the value of products to $g,- 
874,006, and the number of hands employed to 2,290. 
During the last four years these establishments have 
considerably increased, and to-day all of them are in a 
flourishing condition. 

There are now in operation, two awning factories; 
twenty bakeries ; twenty four blacksmithing establish- 
ments; one blank-book manufactorj^ ; one boat-yard; 
one boiler factory ; three book binderies ; fort3--four 
boot and shoe factories ; three box factories ; three brass 
foundries; five breweries; six brick-yards; one brush 
factory; one bustle factory, emplo3'ing thirt}-- eight 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



17 



hands ; four cand}^ factories ; one canning factory ; 
thirty-nine carpenter shops; seven carriage factories; 
seven carpet weavers; one cheese factory; two churn 
factories; thirty-nine cigar factories, with a product of 
13,743,425 cigars during the year ending December 
31st, 1886; two cigar-box factories; two coffee and spice 
mills; twentj^ confectioneries; four cooperies, employ- 
ing eighty-five coopers ; two cracker factories ; one 
creamery; forty dress makers; two dying works; three 
flour mills; eight foundries and machine shops; three 
furniture factories; one glucose factory, the first in 
Iowa, employing ninety-five hands, and produced last 
year 32,200,000 pounds of grape-sugar; three grist and 
corn mills ; two gunsmiths ; six hair works ; nine har- 
ness makers; eight hatters; one hay press; one horse- 
collar factory; seven job-printing houses; one ladder 
manufactory; nine laiindries; four malt houses; four 
marble works; twenty-seven meat markets; twenty- 
three merchant tailors; two mineral water manufac- 
tories; four mustard factories; one oat meal mill ; four 
packing - houses ; twenty -six paint shops; one paint 
factory; one pants, shirt, and overall factory; one 
piano factory; two plow factories; one pottery; two 
pump factories; three sash, door, and blind factories; 
four shirt factories; one show-case factory; two soap 
factories; two soda water factories; seventy-nine stone 
masons; one stove-polish factory; two tanneries; one 
tent factory; one threshing machine factory; one trunk 
factory; three vinegar works; sixteen wagon shops; 
three washing-machine factories; one wheel factory; 



sixteen watchmakers ; one wood engraver, and one 
woolen mill. 

OTHER BUSINESS BRANCHES AND OCCUPATIONS. 

Six agricultural stores; six architects; fifty attor- 
neys; one auctioneer; twenty-two barbers; one bill- 
poster; ten book stores; twenty- nine brakemen; six 
carpet stores; two cane chair repairers; eleven conduc- 
tors; nine civil engineers; fourteen cigar stores; twelve 
clothing stores; ten coal dealers; seven commission 
houses ; three cutters and grinders ; four crockery 
stores; nine dentists; sixteen druggists; fourteen dry 
goods merchants ; two employment agencies ; seven fish 
dealers; nine florists; fifteen flour and feed stores; three 
fruit stores; ten furniture dealers; three furriers; thirty 
grain dealers ; one hundred and five groceries ; eight 
hardware dealers ; two harness dealers ; six hay and 
straw dealers; two hospitals; one house-mover; five ice 
dealers; twenty -five insurance agents; sixteen jewelers; 
twelve hundred and forty-eight laborers ; four lime and 
cement dealers ; fourteen livery stables ; two mercantile 
agencies ; five midwives ; eleven milliners ; three music 
stores; sixteen music teachers; nine newspapers; five 
news stands; eight notion dealers; three ocean steam- 
ship agencies ; two oil dealers ; three thousand opera- 
tives ; six paint, oil, and glass dealers ; four dealers 
in paper bags and boxes ; three paper hangers ; two 
pattern-makers ; six photographic galleries ; forty-nine 
physicians; seven dealers in pictures and picture - 
frames ; seven plumbers and gas-fitters ; fifteen public 



i8 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



weighers ; one dealer in rags and iron ; eighteen real 
estate agents ; four repair shops and stencil cutters ; 
twenty-four restaurants ; one rubber-stamp factory; one 
hundred and sixty-two saloon keepers; one sand dealer; 
six second-hand stores ; ten seed stores ; eight sewing- 
machine agents ; twelve stock dealers ; one stock-yard ; 
six hundred students ; one hundred and forty-three 
teachers ; one hundred and eightj'-four teamsters ; two 
telegraph offices ; two tele- 
phone companies; six toy 
stores ; ninety-seven travel- 
ing agents ; two trunk 
dealers ; five undertakers ; 
four veterinary surgeons, 
and twelve wood dealers. 



TRANSPORTATION 
FACILITIES. 

THE RAILROADS. 

Forty-four railroad trains 
sound their bells daily 
through the city. 

The Chicago^ Rock Island & Pacific Railway, with 
its main line in Iowa, and the southwestern branch, 
and the Albert Lea and its Illinois divisions, extends 
over 1,700 miles of track. Just now a subscription of 
liberal citizens to the amount of $10,600 has secured 
the city the erection of new work-shops, with a capacity 
of three hundred operatives. 




DAVENPORT AND ROCK ISLAND ^ERR^■ 



The Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, with 
a total length of over 4,450 miles, more than any other 
single corporation in the world, is loading freight cars 
in either of the three cities — Davenport, Rock Island, 
and Moline — for au}^ point upon its line or connections. 
Besides these, the city has, through the roads enter- 
ing the City of Rock Island, railroad connections with 
Indianapolis and Cincinnati, with the inexhaustible coal 

fields of Coal Valley, and 
Rock Island and Mercer 
Counties, in the state of Illi- 
nois, and with all points on 
the line of the Chicago, 
Burlington & Quincy i^rt'zZ- 
rc«fl^, extending 3,714 miles. 
The City Council has 
granted several side-tracks 
in the most liberal manner. 
In the year 1882 the 
Chicago, Rock Island & Pa- 
cific Railway received for 
this place 10,922 car loads, 
and forwarded from here 
10,486 car loads. In the same year 13,443 engines, 
with trains attached containing 21,023 passenger 
coaches and 209,438 freight cars, passed the govern- 
ment bridge. 

RIVER NAVIGATION. 

Two steamboat lines and several independent boats, 
besides the ferry boat, are engaged in carrying pass- 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



19 



engers and freight on the Mississippi to and from this 
port. Probably one thousand passengers are carried 



and 988 rafts passed through the government draw ; in 
1S86, 2,393 boats, 139 barges, and 784 rafts. The 



from this point during the year. Hardly an hour | traffic and communication with the City of Rock 
passes without a steamboat in sight ; and the electric Island is carried on by way of the government bridge 




THE CITV OF ROCK ISLAND. 



lamps attached to many boats during the last year 
illuminate at night the picturesque shores in the most 
gorgeous manner. In 1882, 2,614 boats, 394 barges, 



and by the ferry-boat. What number of passengers or 
what quantity of freight is carried by the ferry has 
probably never been reported. In 1882, 332,481 teams, 



20 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



and 534,058 foot passengers passed the bridge. The 
Davenport and Rock Island Street-Railway Company 
are in possession of the charter for a street-railway 
over the bridge and the Island, granted by congress, 
and also have a charter granted by the City of Daven- 
port October 7th, 1885,. but have not yet succeeded in 
making the connection of the tri-cities. 

The Davenport street -cars run both waj-s every 
fifteen minutes. 



THE BUSY POST-OFFICE. 

The solid progress of Davenport is pretty well illustrated in 
the annual report of Postmaster De Armond. The statements will 
interest the people all the more because they show a substantial 
increase of business in Davenport. The financial statement for the 
year 1886 shows the following receipts and disbursements, exclusive 
of money-order business : 

RECEIPTS. 

Stamps, envelopes, wrappers, and postal-cards 137,164.90 

Newspaper and periodical stamps 838.24 

Postage-due stamps 139.58 

Waste paper and twine 11. 32 

Box rents 550.75 

Total f38>704.79 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Railway mail service $iit3S7-5i 

Carriers 6,460.12 

Clerks 8,001.64 

Rent and expense bills 2,576.14 

Mail messenger 444.00 

Deposited with Assistant Treasurer of U. S 97835.38 

Total 138,704.79 



MONEY-ORDER BUSINESS. 

ISSUED. AMOUNT. 

Number ilomeslic money-orders 6,013 | 61,615.40 

Fees on domestic money-orders 562. 98 

Number postal-notes 4,612 9,018.75 

Fees on postal-notes 137.28 

Number foreign money-orders 446 5,640.58 

Fees on foreign money-orders 74.10 

Surplus deposits from other offices 665,905.00 

PAID. 

Number domestic money-orders 12,942 189,288.74 

Number postal-notes 7,4*<7 16,780.50 

Number foreign money-orders 1,203 6,643.09 

UNPAID. 

Number money-orders 54 562.47 

Number postal-notes 41 79.27 

Surplus funds remitted to postmaster at Chicago . . 529,600.00 

Grand total of money-order transactions. 11,485,908.18 

LETTER CARRIER BUSINESS. 

l8Ss. 1SS6. 

Registered letters delivered 5,939 

Mail letters delivered 1,398,312 1,716,946 

Mail postal-cards delivered 234,753 273,052 

Local letters delivered 76,952 136,727 

Local postal-cards delivered 78,567 125,761 

Newspapers delivered 604,838 788,868 

Letters collected 630,830 838,753 

Postal-cards collected 169,948 250,120 

Newspapers collected 54i320 104,559 

Postage on local matter 14.377-59 

Carrier expenses 6,581.78 

SPECIAL DELIVERY BUSINESS. 

Number mail special letters delivered 922 

Number local special letters delivered 499 

Whole number special letters delivered 1,421 

Number special letters failed of delivery 21 

Number special letters for Sunday delivery 33 

Number special letters arriving on II p. M. train 98 

Number special letters mailed to other places 1,013 



I 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



21 



Number special stamps sold I>I50 

Amount paid messengers $113.60 

Average time of delivering special letters 23 minutes. 

It will be seen from the ioreg;oing that the money-order trans- 
actions amount to nearly $1,500,000. The important position of 
the Davenport post-office is apparent. It is the depository for the 
surplus money-order funds for about one hundred and fifty post- 
offices in Iowa and Illinois, 

The sum of nearly $10,000 deposited with the assistant treas- 
urer of the United States at Chicago is the cash postal surplus 
after paying employes' salaries, rent, and all other office expenses. 
In other words. Uncle Sam has that amount of profit in the Daven- 
port post-office. 

The ligures show the greatly increased work of the letter- 
carriers, who handled 998,857 more pieces of mail in 1886 than in 
1885. The amount of work performed by these faithful servants 
may be imagined from the statement that during the past year each 
of the nine carriers handle an average of 1,561 pieces per day. 

With a laudable pride in our city, it may be confidently 
asserted that the Davenport post-office is earnestly striving to give 
the people the very best and most efficient postal-service. 



SOCIETIES. 



The societies the citizens have formed and sustain 
for benevolent, gymnastical, literary, musical, religious, 
scientific, or other social purposes, are particularly the 
following : 

THE DAVENPORT ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES. 

Sketch by W. H. Pratt, Curator. 

The Davenport Academy of Natural Sciences was organized 
December 14th, 1867, by a few individuals who had long desired by 



r 



co-operation to increase their facilities for the pursuit of studies in 
natural science, and especially to endeavor thus to encourage an 
interest in this direction throughout the community. They accord- 
ingly began by the ado|jtion of a constitution setting forth as the 
object of the association " the increase and diftusion of a knowl- 
edge of the natural sciences by the establishment of a museum, the 
reading and publication of original papers, and other suitable 
means," and the late Professor D. S. Sheldon was elected president. 
Several of the organizers transferred their own private collections 
to the Academy as a nucleus of the " museum " which it was hoped 
to establish. 

The society commenced its existence without any funds what- 
ever, and the first initiation fees were applied to the purchase of 
one plain case to contain the specimens contributed. This was 
located and the meetings held in the real estate agency office of 
one of the original members, in the present post-office block, corner 
of Third and Perry streets. 

A considerable number of persons were immediately elected as 
corresponding members, thus soliciting their interest, influence, and 
co-operation ; and several of them responded very promptly and 
kindly, and additions to the collections soon began to come in from 
associations and individuals. 

Monthly meetings were held, to which the public were invited ; 
and as the new organization began to attract the attention of 
citizens, new members were received and their fees were appro- 
priated to procuring additional cabinet-cases as they were required, 
and ere long more space was needed than the small quarters where 
the Academy was born could afford. 

In 1868 a proposition received from the Library Association 
offering the privilege of a joint occupancy of their rooms on the 
third floor, northeast corner of Brady and Second streets, was 
accepted, and the cabinets and books were placed there and meet- 
ings held there for over four years. 

Next the Academy rented a small back room on the second 
floor, first door east of the Davenport National Bank, which was 
its home for one year, during which time several of the natural 



22 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



history specimens and books were destroyed by a fire- which 
occurred in the building ; fortunately, however, the loss sustained 
by the Academy was very small. From this place the institution 
was moved, in 1874, into rooms on the second floor of the Odd 
Fellows' building, on Brady street above Fifth, where it remained 
until January, 1878. 

In 1873 the Academy turned its attention to the exploration of 
the ancient mounds which were found to be very numerous, though 
hitherto quite neglected, and it was discovered that the Davenport 
Academy was situated in the midst of one of the richest fields for 
such researches in the whole country. The first explorations were 
made in the mounds at Albany, Illinois, thirty-five miles up the 
river on the Illinois side, with results which gave encouragement to 
pursue the work, and from this time forward the Academy con- 
tinued the investigations chiefly under the direction and by the 
active efforts of Reverend J. Gass. Thus the search has been ex- 
tended, and hundreds of mounds explored throughout Scott, Mus- 
catine, and Louisa counties, Iowa, and Rock Island and Mercer 
counties, Illinois, and with what may certainly be considered quite 
remarkable success, having resulted in bringing together by far the 
largest collection ever made of the stemless "curved-base" mound 
pipes, a type totally unknown to any existing tribe on the continent; 
a large number of primitive implements of hammered copper, many 
of them still showing their ancient cloth wrappings, impregnated 
with and preserved by the carbonate of copper ; and very numer- 
ous beads, charms, and other ornaments, made of shell, bone, horn, 
and teeth. Aside from this, and in addition to the numerous scat- 
tering contributions from other parties. Captain W. P. Hall, by his 
persistent labors, chiefly in the lower Mississippi valley, has added 
to the collections several thousand ancient stone and flint imple- 
ments from almost every part of the country, and many hundreds 
of specimens — some very remarkable ones, too — of the ancient 
pottery of the southern mound-builders. A valuable collection has 
also been secured of human crania from the mounds both north 
and south ; all together constituting one of the finest museums of 
archaeological relics in the United States. An especial value 



attaches to these collections from the fact that almost all of the 
specimens have been obtained by the direct researches of members 
of the Academy, and thus all the circumstances of their discovery 
are perfectly known, instead of having been received at second or 
third hands, and of uncertain history. 

Although the especial work above referred to has commanded 
particular attention, the general objects of the institution have not 
been lost sight of, and original observation and investigation have 
been carried on in other branches of natural science, as the means 
and opportunity of the several members would permit. 

In the fall of 1875 it was decided to undertake the publication 
of the proceedings and work of the Academy ; and in the next year, 
mainly through the active exertions of a number of enthusiastic and 
public-spirited ladies. Volume I. of the " Proceedings" was brought 
out. This was quite extensively distributed, and exchanges solic- 
ited, and the verdict of the scientific world upon the work thus far 
of this little western institution was awaited with considerable 
anxiety. On the whole, this verdict proved decidedly favorable, 
more so than those engaged in the work had dared to expect. 
Since that time the publication has been continued more or less 
irregularly, as circumstances would permit, and four well-illustrated 
volumes of over 300 pages each have been published, and the fifth 
is now (1887) in progress. From the entire want of a publication 
fund, the successful prosecution of this work has been one of great 
difficulty, but the means have been procured and the work con- 
stantly pushed on, chiefly by the unremitting efforts and able 
management of Mrs. M. L. D. Putnam, Chairman of the Publica- 
tion Committee. These volumes contain full descriptions of the 
archaeological investigations made, and of the remarkable collec- 
tion thus secured, with numerous papers on original researches in 
geology and paleontology, botany, conchology, and various other 
subjects, by members and other contributors, and an especially im- 
portant and thorough monograph on the Solpugidae, with other 
entomological studies, by the late J. Duncan Putnam, and have 
been widely distributed, not only throughout the United States, but 
also in foreign lands, and have made the institution, though a 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



23 



young, small, and pecuniarily feeble one, well and favorably known 
in every civilized country. 

In 1877, by the munificence of a wealthy lady ol our city, 
Mrs. Patience V. Newcomb, the Academy became the owner of a 
iavorably situated building-lot. This was presented uncondition- 
ally, but the Academy immediately proceeded, largely through the 
influence and direct efforts of the ladies above mentioned, to pro- 
cure means by contributions, entertainments, and life-memberships, 
to erect a building for the museum, library, meetings, and all the 
purposes of such an institution. A plan was adopted providing 
such a building as seemed desirable, and the rear portion, which 
was as much as the means at hand would allow, was built at a cost 
of #14,500, and the institution was moved into it in January, 1878. 
Since that time the work of the several departments has gone 
steadily on, though often slowly, and though the workers are few 
and some of the best already gone forever, additional ones are 
gained from time to time, and among those who cannot take an 
active part the friends and well-wishers are many, and large and 
important collections have often been added in each department. 
The museum now contains something interesting and instructive in 
almost every department of natural science, including many very 
beautiful specimens, ami one of the most important and valuable 
collections in archaeology in the country, in some respects quite 
unequaled. 

As the direct result of the publication and distribution of the 
Proceeding.^, a valuable scientific library has been built up, contain- 
ing over 6,000 volumes of scientific books, including government 
and state surveys, proceedings of great numbers of scientific socie- 
ties, scientific, historical, and archaeological works, and many agri- 
cultural, mechanical, and technical journals, etc. 

For several years past a curator has been employed, whose 
whole time is given to the care of the building and the work 
required in connection with the library and museum. The rooms 
are open for a number of hours every day, without charge for 
admission, and the visitors number several thousand in the course 
of each year. 



It is worthy of note that while this institution has become 
widely and favorably known, many similar attempts in diflferent 
parts of the country during the same period — indeed a large pro- 
portion of them — have failed from want of interest and support. 
Some of the circumstances which have made this survival and meas- 
urable degree of success possible are : First. The fact that in its 
inception the Davenport Academy was based upon work, and did 
not wait for " endowments," " state aid," or other outside support. 
Second. It was situated in a rich field for researches, such as could 
be successfully conducted without much money. Third. It had 
enlisted in its support a few determined, unselfish workers who were 
willing and eager to devote their available time and means to the 
interests of science and this institution, to make it instrumental in 
the great object of promoting " the increase and diffusion of knowl- 
edge." Fourtli. It wisely adopted and persistently held to the plan 
of publishing its Proceedings ; and finally, though by no means of 
least importance, women have from the start joined earnestly in 
the work, ant! been welcomed to the councils and offices of the 
institution. 

THE CHURCHES. 

(See Illustration, Page VIII., No. 21.) 

Thirty-two churches and one synagogue represent the religious 
societies of tiie city. Of the nine Christian denominations, there 
are four Baptist, four Catholic, one Christian, three Congregational, 
five Episcopal, four Lutheran, six Methodist, four Presbyterian, and 
one Unitarian. 

Davenport is also the see city of the Bishop of the Roman 
Catholic Diocese of Davenport, containing the southern half of the 
state, and the sec city of the Protestant Episcopal Church for the 
Diocese of Iowa. 

LODGES, ETC. 

(See Illuslratioti, Page X., No. 33.) 

About fifty-five lodges and eighteen other secret societies are 
organized and divided as follows : 



24 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



Five lodges of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons — now en- 
gaged in building their Masonic Temple, at the northeast corner of 
Third and Main streets, at a cost of over #60,000 ; seven lodges 
of the Ancient Order of United Workmen; one Ancient Order of 
Hibernians ; one of the Catholic Knights of America ; one Danish 
Brotherhood of America ; one Danish Ladies' Society of America ; 
five lodges of Druids ; one Free Brotherhood ; two lodges of Haru- 
gari ; five Indepedent Order of Odd Fellows ; one Iowa Legion of 
Honor; one Irish National League; one of the Knights and Ladies 
of Honor; four of Knights of Pythias; two orders of the Knights of 
Labor, and five other labor organizations ; one Modern Woodmen 
of America; one National Union; one Royal Arcanium ; one V. A. 
S. Fraternity; seven lodges of the United Brotherhood of Iowa 
one Independent Order of B'nai Brith. Besides these there are: 
One Grand Army of the Republic ; one of the Sons of Veterans ; 
one of the Army of the White Cross, and fifteen relief and sick 
societies. 

FORTY- SIX OTHER ASSOCIATIONS. 

About twenty societies are formed and maintained for social, 
literary, and musical purposes. Three societies belong to Grace 
Cathedral ; three to St. Marguerite's Cathedral ; three to Trinity 
Church ; three Temperance Societies ; one Young Men's Christian 
Association, and one Military Association — Company " B," Second 
Regiment, First Brigade, I. N. G.; two Boat Clubs ; two Shooting 
Associations ; one Cremation Society ; two Charitable Societies. 
Particular to mention are the Davenport Loan and Building Asso- 
ciation ; the Old Settlers' Association ; the Scott County Medical 
Society, and the Davenport Board of Trade, organized in 1S55 by 
a few enterprising and public-spirited business men for the pur- 
pose: "To collect and record such local and general statistical 
information relating to commerce and manufactures as may pro- 
mote the interests of Davenport, and to protect and advance the 
welfare of the commercial and manufacturing, and all other classes 
of citizens; to promote just and equitable principles in trade; to 
establish uniibrmity in the commercial usages of the city." It has 
done valuable services in promoting business interests, railroad 



connections, in making efforts for the building of the Hennepin 
Canal and the Davenport, Iowa & Dakota Railroad. It is the 
parent association of the Produce Exchange, which was organized 
in the spring of 1882 by a number of dealers in grain and produce, 
including millers and pork-packers It now has about thirty- five 
members. It receives daily market reports from all commercial 
centers in the United States, and opens its rooms to strangers. 

The two Davenport Turner Societies, of wiiich the Davenport 
Turn-Gemeinde, the first society of the kind in Iowa, embraces 
about four hundred members. It is now engaged in building a 
new hall at the southwest corner of Scott and Third streets, at a 
cost of $70,000. (See Illustration, Page VIII., No. 24). 

THE ADVANCE CLUB. 

An extract from the annual report to the Advance Club by its 
President, Robert Krause : 

Allow me to congratulate you upon the encouraging outlook 
and new manufacturing and building enterprises already secured 
since our organization fifteen months ago, and the confident feeling 
existing among all of our citizens as to the future prosperity of our 
lovely city ; and allow me to briefly mention what projects were 
either in part or in whole brought to a point of realization by the 
joint efforts of your Board of Directors and members of the Club. 
The first and most important was the petition for a railroad ta.x, 
the victory for progress at the polls, and again in the district court. 
At present we are patiently waiting the decision of the supreme 
court, which I trust will not fail to approve the efforts of those of 
our citizens who have no other desire than to build up our city, 
extend our commerce, and erect factories and work-shops for the 
people. Should the supreme court unfortunately decide against us, 
it will nevertheless be admitted by all of our fair-minded citizens 
that this Davenport, Iowa & Dakota Railroad project has been 
principally instrumental in waking up our people, and if the tax 
now fails in consequence of technical errors committed, and could 
be again submitted to the people, it would be carried by an over- 
whelming majority. 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



25 



NEW ENTERPRISES FOUNDED. 

The second enterprise, already fully established, and promising 
to double its capacity very soon, is the Bettendorf Metal Wheel 
Company, in the old Donahue 
machine - shops, which began 
operations late last fall, is now 
giving steady employment to 
sixty mechanics. 

The third is the incorpora- 
tion of the Canning Works, for 
which enterprise the buildings 
and machinery will be erected 
immediately, and which, during 
the coming season, will give 
employment to about two hun- 
dred hands, and next year 
probably three hundred. 

The fourth is the enlarge- 
ment of the Chicago, Rock 
Island & Pacific Railway shops 
to more than double their 
present capacity, which now 
we can no longer doubt : and 
before another winter, will 
give employment to probably 
two hundred and fifty mechan- 
ics, while in the meantime the 
Railroad Company employ 
more builders and laborers 
than our present population 
can furnish. 

Besides those projects above mentioned, several new minor 
enterprises have been established during the past six months in our 
city, and others have been increased in capacity, all of which 
employ fully one hundred hands in addition to the regular force 




THE PROPOSED HENNEPIN CANAL. 



heretofore employed, which includes the Moeller & Aschermann 
Manufacturing Company, the Globe Plow Works, the Artificial 
Stone Company, and the Robert Krause Overall Factory. Besides 
all of these, I know of important projects now under consideration, 
which, however, I cannot men- 
tion here. 

To add to all of the above, 
there is, in consequence of our 
citizens' confidence in the 
future growth and prosperity 
of our city, already a building 
boom inaugurated that prom- 
ises to exceed a half-million 
dollars within the next twelve 
months. As a part of the new 
buildings may be mentioned 
the Masonic Temple, the 
Turner Hall and Opera House, 
the Court House, the new Bap- 
tist Church, the new addition 
to the St. James Hotel, and 
four new brick business blocks, 
also many new elegant res- 
idences, which aggregate fully 
$ioc,ooo. It is safe to add that 
the enterprises and buildings 
mentioned will necessitate the 
drawing to this city of a large 
force of mechanics and labor- 
ers, who will find ready employ- 
ment at remunerative wages. 
Davenport, Iowa, March 15, '87. 

HISTORICAL REVIEW. 

A history of Davenport, tracing back the events to 
Adam, or to the discovery of America, or even to the 



26 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 




14LAi_k HAWK 



time of the declaration of independence, would be an 
impossibility. History, however, informs us that the 
Mississippi river was discovered in the year 1519; 
that the French built the City of New 
Orleans in 171 7, and ceded the large 
territory of Louisiana in 1763 to Spain, 
who returned it in iSoo to the French 
Republic, which controlled it until 
1803, when it was sold by Napoleon to 
the United States for $11,250,000 ; but 
the aborigines of Davenport never 
owed any allegiance to either France 
or Spain, nor had they any official connection with 
these governments ; only in the year 1804 we learn 
that tliey came in contact with civilization, when the 
Sacs, Saukees, and Musquakees or Foxes ceded to 
the United States, through General Harrison, all the 
lands lying on Rock river and elsewhere, but this 
treaty was not signed by the celebrated Black Hawk 
until the year 1S16, being the same year that Fort 
Armstrong (page I., Views of Rock Island Arsenal) 
was built by the United States upon the western point 
of the Island of Rock Island, nearly opposite the City 
of Davenport, and right above the cave wherein the 
great and good Indian spirit lived. Black Hawk is 
reported to have spoken at that time the following 
words: "We did not, however, object to their building 
a fort on the island, but we were very sorry, as this 
was the best island on the Mississippi, and had long 
been the resort of our young people during the sum- 



mer. It was our garden which supplied us with straw- 
berries, blackberries, plums, apples, and nuts of various 
kinds; and its waters supplied us with pure fish, being 
situated in the rapids of the river. In my early life I 
spent many happy days on this island. A good spirit 
had care of it, who lived in a cave in the rocks immedi- 
ately under the place where the fort now stands, and 
has often been seen by our people. He was white, with 
large wings like a swan's, but ten times larger. We 
were particular not to make much noise in that part of 
the island which he inhabited for fear of disturbing 
him ; but the noise of the fort has since driven him 
away, and no doubt a bad spirit has taken his place." 

In 1823 the larger portion of the Foxes and Sacs 
removed across the Mississippi, headed by the Chief 
Keokuk, but Black Hawk refused to vacate the Sac 
Village on Rock river. 

In 1827 difficulties commenced between the white 
settlers and the Indians, and while the Indians were 
absent on their periodical hunt some reckless frontier- 
men applied the torch to some forty lodges, which 
were consumed. 

In 1829 the lands upon the Rock river were thrown 
into the market, against the terms of the treaty of 
1804; and in 1830 and 1831 Black Hawk and his fol- 
lowers were notified by the government agent at the 
island to move, or troops would be sent to drive them 
off. During this time, in the spring of 1831, the 
squaws had commenced planting corn, which the 
whites had plowed up, whereupon Black Hawk became 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



27 



so enraged that he tlireatened to dri\e the whites away 
by force, but the Governor of Illinois ordered out the 
militia, and General Gaines, with 1,600 men, took pos- 
session of the Sac Village, and Black Hawk retreated 
across the river. In 
the spring of 1S32 
Black Hawk again 
tried to recover his 
lands; but after failing 
to receive assistance 
from other tribes, he 
sent his women, chil- 
dren, and baggage up 
Rock river in canoes, 
and ventured an at- 
tempt to capture Fort 
Armstrong; but not 
succeeding therein, he 
followed his people up 
the river. The troops 
under General Atkin- 
.son, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Zachary Ta3'lor with 
Lieutenant Jefferson 
Davis under him, and 2,000 Illinois volunteers under 
command of General Whiteside — Abraham Lincoln 
was Captain under him — followed the Indians up 
Rock river, and after miich fighting, from the battle 
at Stillman's Run, May 15th, where 50 braves routed 
300 troops, until the battle at Bad Axe, on the Missis- 




BLACK HAWK S U'ATCH-TOWRR. 



sippi, August 2d, where Black Hawk's whole band was 
nearly destroyed, the Black Hawk War came to an end. 
General Scott, with troops from the east, arrived at 
Prairie Du Chien a few days after the battle, and went 

from there down the 
Mississippi to conclude 
a new treaty with the 
Indians, on September 
2ist, 1832, at the old 
depot grounds of the 
Chicago, Rock Island 
& Pacific Railway, 
within the present 
City of Davenport, by 
which six million acres 
were ceded to the 
United States for an 
annual payment of 
$20,000 for thirty 
years, the payment of 
the debts of the tribe, 
and the support of a 
blacksmith and gun- 
smith among them. In 
the treaty the Chief Keokuk had a section of land 
reserved to the wife of Antoine LeClaire, under con- 
dition that she should build a house on the spot which 
General Scott's marquee had occupied during the 
treaty. This section was surveyed as the " LeClaire 
Reserve," and in its southwest corner the original 



28 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



town of Davenport was laid out by Major Gordon 
into fort}' -two blocks, three of which were public 
squares. " The necessity of a town between the upper 

and lower rapids, the 
unexampled fertility of 
the adjacent country, 
the magnificent beauty 
of the location, its free- 
dom from malarial 
marshes and facilities 
for drainage, and the 
propinquit}^ of immense 
opportunity for water- 
power," were reasons 
* advanced for the choice 
of the location. The 
town was named after 
Colonel George Davenport, a native of England, who, 
after ten years' service in the United States Army, was 
employed in the commissary department at the time 
Fort Armstrong was built on Rock Island, where he 
settled with his family (page i. Views of Rock Island 
Arsenal), and where he was murdered by robbers, July 
4th, 1845. He was generally known and much beloved 
for his great humanity. 

So the town had been surveyed and received its 
name, but it was not legally organized until it received 
its charter by the legislature of the Territory of Iowa, 
on January 25th, 1839. February nth, 1842, it re- 
ceived a new charter, which the citizens adopted by 




COLONIiL GEORGE DAVENPORT. 



a vote of seventy-two against ten. This act was 
repealed b}- an act to incorporate the City of Daven- 
port, passed and approved February 5th, 1851, by the 
legislature of the State of Iowa — organized since 1846 
— and adopted by a vote of ninety-seven against 
seventy -one, which, with the amendments thereto, 
passed January 24th, 1853 (extending limits), Janu- 
uar}' 22d, 1855, ^^1^ January 23d, 1S57, constitutes the 
present organic law of the city, and guarantees to its 
citizens self-government under the laws of the land. 

The original seal of the town was an American 
eagle of the twenty-five cent piece — adopted May 4th, 
1839 — but November 30th, the same 3'ear, changed to 
an American eagle of a ten cent piece, for which the 
present seal — the half-dollar American coin, having 
on it the Goddess of Liberty — was substituted June 
29th, 1844. 

In May, 1836, the first lots were sold at public 
auction, mostly to speculators who had arrived from St. 
Louis on a boat ; but only fifty or sixty lots were dis- 
posed of, at from $300 to $600 apiece. In 1838 single 
lots brought onl}' from $50 to $200; and in 1850-51 
some of the poorest situated lots were sold at only $15, 
while in the years 1855-56 the prices went up to $4,000 
and $5,000; depreciated again in the beginning of the 
rebellion to $1,000, but since that time gradually ad- 
vanced to $16,000 apiece. 

In the same year, 1836, the first hotel — the "Daven- 
port Hotel" — was erected, which still stands in a dilapi- 
dated condition on the northwest corner of Front and 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



29 



Ripley streets. Two blocks below the hotel, in the 
same year, James Macintosh opened the first grocer}?, 
at the corner of Third and Ripley streets, and D. 
C. Eldridge opened another shortly afterward ; A. 
McGregor opened the first law office ; A. LeClaire 
became the first United States Postmaster. Postage 
amounted to twenty-five cents. The mail arrived once 
a week from the east via Chicago, and once in two 
weeks from Dubuqne via Davenport to Fort Des 
Moines (now Montrose).' In the same year, A. 
LeClaire established the ferrj? — a mud boat, which 
was substituted by a horse-ferry, and this was super- 
ceded by a steam-ferry in 1852. 

In 1837 D. C. Eldridge erected the first patent 
flour mill, operated by horse-power; Doctor A. G. 
Donalson became the first physician ; Harvey Leonard 
operated the first brick-yard, at Sixth and Harrison 
streets ; A. Logan started the first printing-ofiBce, and 
published the first newspaper, " The Iowa Sun," and 
" Davenport and Rock Island News." 

May 25th, 1839, St. Anthony's church was dedi- 
cated — the first house of worship in the town. The same 
year the first fire company was organized ; the Misses 
O'Hara opened the first seminary for young ladies, and 
a Mr. Blood taught the first school ; Riddle & IMorton 
opened the first paint-shop ; S. P. Whitney the first 
wagon factory ; C. Lesslie the first drug-store ; L. B. 
Collamer the first shoe-store ; Jacob Lailor the first 
harness-shop ; a Mr. Armitage the first butcher-shop, 
and R. L. Linbaugh the first watch and jewelry store. 



In 1840 Antoine LeClaire had completed the erec- 
tion of the " LeClaire House," at a cost of $35,000 ; it 
was for a long period favorably known as the best hotel 
on the upper Mississippi. It contained a reading-room, 
with fort}? newspapers, a barber-shop, and the post- 
office. The Davenport Lyceum was organized, where 
once a week social, political, moral, and other questions 
were discussed. The same year, on August 24th, the 
contest about the county seat, which had raged between 
Rockingham and Davenport, was decided in favor of 
the latter place. Davenport received three hundred 
and eighteen votes against two hundred and twenty-one 
for a ninety-acre tract of land at the mouth of Duck 
Creek. 

In 1 84 1 the first brick buildings were erected, 
among them the court-house and the county jail, with- 
out cost to the county. The court-house was taken 
down in 1886 to make room for a new one (see page X., 
No. 32) now in course of erection at a cost of $150,000. 
The old court-house was sold at auction and removed. 
In August of the same year Alfred Sanders established 
the " Davenport Gazette." 

In 1846 John Bechtel erected the first plow factor}-, 
and A. C. Fulton the first steam flour mill. 

In 1847 appeared the newspaper, " Democratic 
Banner." Cook & Sargent organized the first banking 
house, which failed in 1859. The first large German 
emigration, consisting of twenty persons, arrived di- 
rectly from Schleswig Holstein, Germany. In 184S M. 
Frahm erected the first beer brewery, at the same place 



3° 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



uow occupied by the large brewery of Frahni & Son ; 
his products were from two and one-half to five barrels 
per week. 

In spite of the hard times following the financial 
crisis of the year 1857, when most all money had dis- 
appeared, and the "Sun" complained that in Davenport 
" even counterfeit paper and bogus money have almost 
totally disappeared," the town had grown gradually, 
and even so progressed in business that in 1849 there 
was reported as imports: Merchandise, $148,500; pine 
and oak lumber, 790,000 feet; shingles, 1,120,000; 
square timber, 6,000 feet; lath, 310,000, and reaping 
machines, 42. There was reported as exports : Flour, 
30,200 barrels; pork, 1,425 barrels; lard, 720 barrels ; 
wheat, 16,700 bushels ; barley, 5,020 bushels ; beans, 
200 bushels; potatoes, 800 bushels; onions, 11,160 
bushels; flax-seed, 120 bushels; bran and shorts, 3,200 
barrels; hides, 20,400, and bacon, 212 hogsheads. 

In the year 1850 the citizens commenced talking 
about the necessity of railroad connection with the east. 
The project of a road from the eastern shore of the 
Mississippi to LaSalle, there to connect with the canal 
from Chicago, was so much favored that the Davenport 
people had already siibscribed their share of $75,000 
before the Rock Islanders had discovered the import- 
ance of the undertaking. About the same time there 
was much talk about the bridging of the river and 
the building of a road from Davenport west, through 
the state to the Missouri river. In November the 



Rock Island & LaSalle Railroad Company was organ- 
ized, and $85,000 in stock taken by Scott county. 

In April, 185 1, the subscription books of the 
Chicago & Rock Island Railroad were closed, after 
$300,000 had been subscribed. Judge Grant, of Dav- 
enport, was elected president of both of said companies. 

On May 2 2d, 1852, the city loaned $40,000 for the 
construction of the Chicago «Si Rock Island Railroad. 
February 2 2d, 1854, the road was completed to Rock 
Island, and the connection made between the Atlantic 
and the Mississippi. On September ist, the same year, 
the corner-stone of the bridge was laid, and under a 
charter from the State of Illinois, dated January 17th, 
1853, the erection commenced in spite of an order from 
Jefferson Davis, then Secretary of War, issued to the 
United States Marshal for the District of Illinois, to 
clear the island of all intruders. This order was not 
made applicable to the bridge contractors and their 
operatives. The cost of the structure was estimated at 
$250,000. Over the main channel of the river, on the 
Davenport side, the length was 1,582 feet; on the Illi- 
nois side, 474 feet. The elevation was 21 feet above 
high water mark, and it was to be completed by 
December ist, 1855. 

On April 21st, 1856, the first locomotive — " Des 
Moines" — passed over the bridge. The first bridge 
(page I., Views of Rock Island Arsenal) over the 
Mississippi was now a fait accompli^ in spite of the 
vehement opposition of all steamboat companies and 
all steamboat men ; but the opposition was not yet at 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



31 



an end, because, when on May 6th, 1856, the steam- 
boat Effie Afton, while passing through the draw, had 
driven against a pier, taken fire, communicated the same 
to the bridge so that a portion thereof was destroyed, and 
the boat had become a total wreck, the owners of the 
boat brought suit against the bridge company, and the 
enemies of the same made their last effort to induce 
the United States Supreme Court to declare it an 
obstruction to navigation and a nuisance erected con- 
trary to the Constitution of the United States, but 
without result. 

The first bridge was removed after the National 
Government had completed the present bridge, which 
was turned over to the war department in February, 
1873. This monumental structure (page VII., Nos. 
17 and 18, and page IX., No. 34) is 13^ feet above 
natural high water, 1,550^ feet long, containing five 
spans and one draw. The wagon-road and foot-walks 
are on the lower deck, which is 12^ feet high; the 
railroad track is on the upper deck, which is 17 feet 
high; total width, 16^3 feet. The cost, as estimated 
June 27th, 1886, is about $1,296,292.11. 

In January, 1853, the Mississippi & Missouri Rail- 
road Company was organized by Ebenezer Cook, James 
Grant, John P. Cook, Hiram Price, and others, with a 
capital stock of $6,000,000, in shares of $100 each, to 
extend the expected Chicago & Rock Island Railroad 
to Council Bluffs, on the Missouri river. July 9th, 
1853, the city took $75,000, for which bonds were 
issued; the county took $50,000, and $125,000 were 



taken b}^ individual subscription. September ist, the 
first ground was broken under great festivities, and 
December ist, 1854, 57 miles of the road was completed 
— to Iowa City, then the State Capitol. This road was 
thereafter extended to Council Bluffs and Oskaloosa, 
Iowa. On September 25th, 1866, the entire road, 
including the land grant allowed by congress and the 
state legislature in 1856, was sold by order of the 
United States Court for the District of Iowa at public 
auction to the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway 
Company for $2,100,000. This land grant contained, 
according to the last report of the Iowa Railroad Com- 
missioner, 550,193 acres, for which, in the course of 
time, over $4,000,000 was realized. This road has now 
920 miles in operation in the state. 

The Davenport & St. Paul Railroad, now in pos- 
session of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway 
Company, a corporation operating over 3,400 miles of 
road in the state, received its right-of-way and depot- 
grounds on Front street, between Harrison and Ripley, 
May nth, 1870. The road was completed in 1872, 
and the citizens took about $125,000 in its stock. 

The Davenport, Iowa & Dakota Railroad Company 
received its right-of-way from the city September 12th, 
1S82, and September 25th, 1886, the citizens voted a 
railroad tax of about $125,000 — one-half payable in 
1887 and one-half in 1888 — which tax has just been 
decided legal by the supreme court. 

The city has two street-railways in operation: The 
City Railway, running from east to west along Front 



32 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



and Third streets, received its charter in 1867, and the 
Central Railway, running from Second street north on 
Brady to Central Park, and branching off on Fifteenth 
street, running toward East Davenport, received its 
grant November 2d, 1870. 

To show what effect the construction of railroads 
and an increased immigration had upon business and 
trade, the reports of 1854 enumerate: One hundred 
and twenty -five stores; three banking-houses; six 
steam mills ; one foundry ; seven blacksmith shops ; 
nine churches ; seven hotels ; two public school-houses, 
one built at a cost of $6,000 ; four saddle, harness, and 
other leather manufacturing establishments ; the Iowa 
College ; one Masonic Lodge ; two Odd Fellow Lodges ; 
one Maine Law Club ; one Division Sons of Tem- 
perance ; ten land agents ; fourteen doctors ; twenty- 
two lawyers; four weekly newspapers; one bi-weekly 
newspaper, and a good county poor-house, with farm 
attached. 

The value of all taxable property in Davenport 
Township in 1855 amounted to $4,408,433, and in May, 
1856, the manufacturing interests of the city were 
compiled as follows: Hands employed, 526; capital 
invested, $586,000 ; value of manufactures for the year 
past, $1,522,516; the sale of lumber, etc., amounted to 
17,420,187 feet, 6,496,000 shingles, and 8,000,000 laths, 
and of this amount 10,000,000 feet was manufactured 
here, 3,500,000 came from Chicago, and the remainder 
was rafted down the river; 20,800 hogs were packed, 
and 454,000 bushels of wheat brought in. The same 



year the citizens voted a loan of $59,000, by a vote of 
628 against 216, which was approved by the council 
August II, 1856, and ordered to be applied as follows: 
$20,000 for water-works, $10,000 for the fire depart- 
ment, $4,000 for shares in the Gas Company, and 
$25,000 for the improvement of the streets. The next 
year the citizens, by a vote of 674 against 153, author- 
ized a loan of $200,000, to-wit : $15,000 for a hospital, 
$35,000 for a cit}' hall, $50,000 for water-works, and 
$100,000 for street improvement. This loan was ap- 
proved by the council May i6th, 1S57. These loans 
were consolidated in 1869 by virtue of a state law, and 
new bonds issued, payable in twenty years. 

The failure of the crops in 1857 and 1858, and the 
collapse of a number of private banks, which had over- 
flowed the country with wild-cat notes, caused a number 
of bank suspensions and a general stagnation of busi- 
ness, the effects of which increased with the beginning 
of the rebellion, and were still felt at the close of it. 
After the war better times set in, and the United States 
census of 18S0 reports the city of Davenport with 
189 industrial establishments, with a capital stock of 
$2,861,222, employing 1,498 males, 82 females, and 150 
children, expending $689,571 in wages per year; value 
of material amounting to $2,979,698, and the value of 
products, $4,494,790. 

The Population of ilic City amounted, at the close of 
1836, to 100 inhabitants and 7 dwellings; 1837, ^S^ 
with 15 dwellings; 1838, 50, and 1840, 100 dwellings; 
1840, 700 inhabitants; 1842,817; 1845,1,000 (?); 1847, 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



33 



918; 1850, 1,848; 1854,5,203; 1857, 18,000 (?); i860, 
11,267; 1863, 12,113; 1865, 14,068; 1867,17,550; 1869, 
20,065; 1870,20,038; 1873,21,250; 1875, 21,234; 1880, 
21,831 ; and 1885, 23,830 inhabitants, with 4,732 houses. 
Among this last number the state census specifies 6,139 
inhabitants as native Germans, or more than one-fourth 
part of the whole number. 



THE ISLAND OF ROCK ISLAND. 

(See Illustration, Page i. Views of Rock Island Arsenal.) 

The Island of Rock Island is about two and three- 
quarter miles long from east to west, atid from one- 
quarter to three-quarters of a mile wide; has an eleva- 
tion of from seventeen to 
twenty-three feet above the 
highest high water, and con- 
tains an area of nine hundred 
and seventy acres. The ground 
rests upon a foundation of gray 
magnesian lime-stone, which 
in a few places crops out to 
the surface, but is generally 
covered with from one to eight 
feet of earth, upon which the most luxuriant forest 
of ash, elm, linden, hickory, and walnut grew seventy 
years ago. It was the most beautiful island in the 
upper Mississippi, and the Sac and Fox Indians elected 
it their garden place of resort and principal fishing 
ground. The forest was filled with game and birds, of 




THE I. ATE GENERAL RODMAN. 



which fifty species had survived some three years ago; 
it furnished them with berries, plums, apples, and nuts 
in abundance; the by-rushing stream supplied them 
with pure fish, and the great spirit living in the cave of 
rocks took care of it. 

In September, 1815, the Eighth regiment of United 
States infantry was ordered from St. Louis here to build 
Fort Armstrong, which was completed in 1817. It was 
occupied by a garrison until 1836, when it was evacu- 
ated, but remained in charge of government Indian 
agents until 1840, when an ordnance depot was estab- 
lished, and continued until 1845, when the stores were 
removed to St. Louis Arsenal. Thereafter a civil agent 
employed by the war department had it in charge until 
the National Arsenal was 
established. 

The subject of a western 
armory was much talked of 
in 1840 by the inhabitants 
of Davenport. The island 
was prominent as affording 
the best position for its es- 
tablishment; fuel in abund- 
ance, immense water-power. 




COLONEL D. W. FLAGLER. 



facilities for shipment of material, the healthfulness of 
the location, its connection by the Mississippi with 
important places and the seaboard, were reasons justly 
urged for the selection of this point. Meetings were 
held and the usvial resolutions passed all over the west, 
and petitions sent to congress. In September, 1841, a 



34 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



committee appointed by congress gave the island a thor- 
ough examination, but reported in 1842 in favor of Fort 
Massac, on the Ohio river, in Illinois. In the year 1849 
strong efforts were made to improve the navigation of 
the upper rapids. Two conventions were held ; the lat- 
ter one in October, representing four states and one 
territory by one hundred and fifty delegates, declared 
the improvement to be a work concerning the whole 
universe, and endorsed the 
plan of Major Lee and rec- 
ommended him to prosecute 
the work. 

One report of 1864 says 
that the survey of the chan- 
nel had been made, the con- 
tracts let, the contractors 
ready to proceed when the 
water would permit, and 
$250,000 would be spent 
within the next two years; 
but the real damming and 
blasting of the rapids com- 
menced in 1867, and up to 
1887 the National Government had expended the sum 
of $1,169,829 for that purpose. 

On September 4th, 1861, the City Council of Daven- 
port appointed a committee to proceed, with the proper 
committees appointed by the cities of Rock Island and 
Moline, to Washington to urge the establishment of an 
arsenal on the island, and appropriated for that purpose 




ARSHNAL WATER-POWKR MACHIN1-;RY. 



$100; November 6th, $500; February 5th, 1862, $250, 
and on July nth, 1862, congress located the National 
Arsenal on Rock Island and appropriated $100,000 
for the purpo.se. 

Ground was broken September ist, 1863, and the 
corner-stone of the first building laid April 20th, 1864. 
This building stands upon the western point of the 
island, and contains in its projecting tower one of the 

best clocks in the United 
States. Its four dials are 
twelve feet in diameter, and 
its striking bell weighs 
tliree thousand eight hun- 
dred pounds. 

General Thomas J. Rod- 
man assumed the command 
on August 3d, 1865, and held 
it until his death, June 7th, 
1S71. According to his 
plans the great improve- 
ments are made and the 
great buildings erected, for 
which the National Govern- 
ment has expended $5,403,520.47 from 1863 to 1876. 
Colonel D. W. Flagler assumed the command after 
General Rodman, until he was superceded by Colonel 
Baylor in the summer of 1886. 

The principal buildings are the ten great shops, in 
two rows of five shops each, named after the letters 
designating the companies of a regiment in the army, 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



35 



viz: Shops A, C, E, G, and I on the south side of the 
main avenue, designed for the arsenal, and B, D, F, H, 
and K on the north side of the main avenue, for the 
armory. Each building consists of two parallel wings 
60x300 feet, 90 feet apart, leaving an interior court of 
90x238 feet, and covering an area of a little more than 
one acre. 

A IVatcr-pozacr of nearly 4,000 horse-power has 
also been constructed by the government. Here it is 
intended to manufacture small arms and equipments 
for the infantry, cavalry, and artillery ; all amunition of 
every kind for cannon, rifle, carbine, and pistol, and 
also rockets ; all cannon and gun carriages for field, 
siege, garrison, mountain, and prairie service, and all 
equipments for the coast, consisting of harness, tools, 
implements, battery-wagons, and forges. More than 
one-half of the equipments for the western army are 
now manufactured here, such as the scores of articles 
that enter into horse equipments, infantry equipments, 
and cavalry equipments. This work gives employment 
to about ninety hands the year around. During the last 
year $130,000 was expended here for the above purpose. 
This arsenal, when completed as planned, will be suf- 
ficient in time of war to arm, equip, and supply an 
army of 750,000 men. 



CONCLUSION. 



The historical review of the city demonstrates a 
gradual, steady, and healthy development ; its location, 
its climate, its healthiness, and its municipal govern- 
ment are not excelled by any other ; the wealth of the 
citizens is on a solid foundation ; their enterprising and 
liberal spirit stands forth unsurpassed; its business and 
social life, in connection with the transportation facil- 
ities by rail and by boat, have made the city a meet- 
ing-center for political conventions, soldiers' reunions, 
and all kinds of festivals celebrated by lodges, singing 
societies, shooting societies, turner societies, and various 
other organizations, have induced thousands of visitors 
to come and enjoy the hospitality of its citizens ; to 
come and see the rich collections of the Academy of 
Sciences, the monumental national buildings on the 
island, and see and enjoy the best operas and dramas at 
the Burtis Opera House and German Theatre ; and 
thousands of people, again, to deal and transact busi- 
ness with our manufacturing and mercantile establish- 
ments, and to consult our prominent attorneys, physi- 
cians, bankers, and church dignitaries. 



jPlFFENDIX. 





T 




IDixectox-y of Lea. ding IBtxsira(ZSS Hlou-Ses 
and. In.d uLstxia.1 HI,stablisJn.nne;n.ts. 



|- 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



E. S. BALLORD, President. 

S. F. SMITH, Vice-President. 



GEO. E. MAXWELL, Cashier. 

S. D. BAWDEN, Asst. Cashier. 



CAPITAL. $200.000. 



• • • • Davenport National Bank, • • • • 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



DIRECTORS. 



E. S. BALLORD. 

GEORGE H. FRENCH. 
JOHN L. MILES. 



[See Illustration, page 11, No. 20.] 



JOHN B. PHELPS. 

WM. RENWICK. 

D. T. ROBINSON. 



S. F. SMITH. 

I. H. SEARS. 

ROBT. SICKELS. 



A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED. 



I. H. SEARS, President. 

H. F. PETERSEN, Vice-President. 



J. H. HASS, Cashier. 

C. A. FICKE, Attorney. 



• • • • 



CAPITAL. $70,000.00. 

Scott County Savings Bank, 

OF DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

[Office IN Davenport National Bank Building, Corner Third and Brady Streets.] 



• • • • 



FIVE PER CENT INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. MONEY LOANED ON REAL ESTATE AND PERSONAL SECURITY. 

DIRECTORS. 

I. H. Sears. C. A. Ficke. A. P. Doe. G. M. Schmidt. 

J. H. Haas. H. F. Petersen. J. L. Miles. Otto Klug. J. B. Phelps. 

Office open from 9 A. M. to ? P. M., and on Saturdays to 8 P. M. 

[See Illustralion, page 11, No. 20.] 



-o 



jPlffenidix. 



M. ARNOLD. 

(See Illustration, Page lo, No. 67 



West Second street, and 125 and 127 Main 
1S72, the resort which has been so long and 
tlie purchasing public as Arnold's Bazaar, 
a by-word with the ladies of the three cities 
years, and now owns a deserved reputation 



M. Arnold, 129 
street, established in 
favorably known to 
This place has been 
for the last fifteen 
for reliability. 

In 1872 Mr. Arnold occupied but a small store and employed 
but two clerks. His business, however, constantly increased, and 
after one and one-half years he removed to Brady, between Second 
and Third streets, which at that time were quite commodious 
quarters. But the ever-growing patronage with which he was 
favored soon compelled him to seek still larger rooms, and he 
removed (about ten years ago) to his present store, where he 
employs from fifteen to twenty hands the year around. This 
house does a constantly increasing business every year, and now its 
annual sales aggregate as much as any other house of its kind in 
the state. The principal specialty is ladies' and children's cloaks, 
in which Mr. Arnold controls the market for a hundred miles 
around. He certainly deserves credit for the way in which he has 
built up, by his own unaided exertions, such a good and paying 
business. 

Arnold's Bazaar has a frontage of 24 feet on Second street and 
40 feet on Main street, and has a depth of 80 feet. An " L" 
40 feet square extends to the Main street entrance. It has the 
same space on the second floor devoted to the cloak trade. 

BEIDERBECKE & MILLER. 

(See Illustration, Page 4, No. 43.) 

The firm of Beiderbecke & Miller comprises as members Chas. 
Beiderbecke and F. H. Miller. They started in the retail business 



in 1856, gradually added jobbing, and after they had built their 
present commodious and large building, went into the exclusive 
jobbing business. Two years ago they added an addition 36x75, of 
five floors, which, with the main building 33x150, of five floors, 
gives them ample room. The buildings are as fire-proof as pos- 
sible, and contain three elevators and a gas engine to facilitate 
work. The help consists of twenty-one persons, including five 
traveling agents. The volume of business of the firm is constantly 
increasing. 

JOHN BERWALD. 

(See Illustration, Page 3, No. 39.) 

The above firm occupies 214 West Second street (three stories 
and basement) with the largest assortment of stationery, toys, and 
fancy goods in the tri-cities, and does an importing, jobbing, and 
retail trade. The business was established in i860. The European 
steam-ship business is a specialty with this firm, being the agency 
for the best transportation lines. Newspapers and magazines are 
also furnished regularly. 

H. F. BRAMMER & COMPANY. 

(See Illustration, Page 6, No. 52. 

The above establishment was started on an exceedingly small 
scale by the senior partner, Mr. Brammer, in 1876, who, by close 
attention to business and excellence of workmanship, soon pushed 
to the front. In 1882 the business had become too extensive to be 
handled to advantage by any one man. In the above year Mr. E. 
H. Schmidt was admitted to partnership. Since then the business 
has nearly doubled each succeeding year. In 1884 the box depart- 
ment was added. To-day the establishment employes forty-two 
persons the entire year. Their lumber-yards occupy a lot 150x150, 
containing all grades of seasoned lumber. The manufactures con- 
stitute by far the greater part of the business. The reputation of 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



. . J. C McHART, . . 

Real Estate and Loan Agent. 



City and Farm Property Bought, Sold, and Exchanged on favorable Terms. Special atten- 
tion given to all kinds of Investments on Commission. Loans Negotiated and 
General Collections attended to. Houses, Stores, and Rooms for Rent. 
We take full charge of properly for sale or rent when so placed in our hands. All business 

entrusted to us will he promptly attended to at reasonable charges. 
Correspondence Solicited. OFFICE, m WEST SECOND ST., Vieie's Block, 

Between Brady and Main Streets, Davenport, Iowa, 



lO^^AT^^ 



COMFLHTB 

IN ALL ITS DEPARTMENTS. 

THE MAIN BRANCHES ARE 

Book-Keeping, Actual Business Prac- 
tice, Banking, Commercial Arithmetic, 
Commercial Law, Civil Government, Spelling, Penmanship. Corresi>ondence, Telegraphy, 
Short Hand and Type-writing. Send two-cent stamp for a trial lesson in Rapid Calculation, 
sample of Penmanship, and many other valuable points. Three hundred and seventy-eight 
students in attendance during i8S6. Circulars free. Address, 

IVOOD <2f VAN PATTEN, S. IV. Cor. Second and Brady Sts., 
[See Illustration, page lo, No. 65.] DA VENPORT, IOWA. 




V 



lENNA BAKERY AND TOAST FACTORY, 

(ZWIEBUCK FABRIK.) 
H. KORN, Proprietor, 

jjj and Jig Harrison Street, Davenport, lozva. 



LT NISSEN 

UNDERTAKER 
And Dealer in all kinds of 

FURNITURE, 
420 IV. Second St., Davenport, Iowa. 



^ H. MARTIN, . . . 
Attorney at Law, 

N. E. Cor. Second and Brady Sts., 

Davenport, loiua. 



P^ HOMBRECHT, . . 

Boots and Shoes, 
utica shoe store, 

214 Brady St., Davenport. Iowa. 



pARL BRAUN, . . . 
Dentist, 

Deutscher Zahnarzt, 
A' F. Cor. Second and Riplfy .Sts , 

Davenport, Iowa. 



^ 
^ 



M. CARROLL, * 

I)?}' (roods, ?foUom and Fancy Goods, 



Ryan's Block, 105 West Second Street, 

DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



[See Illustration, page lo, No. 65 



J. S. WATSON & CO., 

Manvfadurers of Fire Proof 'Roof Painl 

Roofs Painted and general Roofing; done. Iron, Gravel, Asbestus, and Warren's three or 
four ply Kelt Roofing. Roof Paint for sale by the Barrel. 

We also carry a large stock of Copper Liglitniiig Rods, Weathervanes, Balls, Arrows, 
and other Rod Ornaments. Old Rods Repaired. 



Office with C. G. Hipwell, 



430 Brady St., Davenport, Iowa. 



q^ J. O 'MEAR A & CO. 

Dealers in Boots and Shoes, 



126 W. Second Street, 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



p H. KOCH, .... 

Attorney at Law, 

Justice of the Peace. 
Third and Alain Sts., Davenport, Iowa. 



L 



EOPOLD MILLER, . 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 

FINE CIGARS. 



Miller's Best, 10 cents. 

Leading 5-cent Brands. 



IS" E. Third St., 



Davenport, Iowa. 



T B. FRAHM, .... 

i • Commission Merchant 

And dealer in all kinds of Produce. 
Specialties : Barley, Wheat, Potatoes, and 
Onions. Refers to Citizens National 
Bank, and Davenport National iiauk, 

Davenport, Iowa. 



pETER EVER, . . . 
PLUMBER, 

Gas and Steam Pipe Fitter 

No. 416 West Second Street, 

Davrnport, louia. 



% 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



the washer extends all over the northern part of the United States, 
sales being- made to regular established agents in every state north 
of Mason and Dixon's line. They have also shipped several orders 
to Australia and Europe — hope to establish a regular trade there 
soon. New buildings have been erected as needed. Their shops 
now consist of one 2/^-story building 40x80, one 2)4-stOTy build- 
ing 40x60, and one i -story building 40x80, arranged in the form 
of a double " L," with engine, boiler-room, blacking-room, and 
machine-shop in the court. If the rate of increase is maintained, 
it will be but a short time beibre more commodious quarters will 
have to be secured. 

BROWNSON, THE HATTER AND GENTS' FURNISHER. 

(See Illustration. Page to. No. 67.) 

The old reliable hat-store on the corner of Second and Main 
streets, Davenport, Iowa, established over twenty -seven years, 
always had, and has at present, the reputation of carrying in stock 
the finest and most reliable goods ; buying strictly for cash and of 
manufacturers, thereby saving the jobbers' profit, which enables us 
to sell a better quality of goods for less money than many are 
asking for inferior goods. He handles strictly first-class goods 

— goods that speak for themselves. Sole agent for the celebrated 
Dtinlap Hat, which has no equal either in quality, style, or finish 

— one price to all. All other leading makes in stock, from the 
cheapest to the best. The furnishing goods are complete in every 
department, handling in that, as well, the finest and most reliable 
goods. Agents for the celebrated Wilson Bros ' shirt, of which he 
carries a large stock, and made to order, if desired. Also novel- 
ties in neckwear, suspenders, hosiery, gloves, and underwear. In 
fact, everything that comprises a first-class furnishing-stock. 

Mr. Brownson succeeded Mr. E. H. Ryan, September ist, 1885, 
since which time trade has constantly increased, even beyond his 
expectations, for which he extends thanks to his many friends 
and patrons. 



CABLE LUMBER COMPANY. 

(See Illustration, Page 7, No. 54.) 

The Cable Lumber Company, a company incorporated under 
the laws of the State of Iowa, with an authorized capital of 
$200,000, manufactures and deals in lumber, etc. The mill of this 
company is located in East Davenport, and gives employment to 
about one hundred and ten men and boys. The mill is a gang and 
rotary mill, and has a capacity of 18,000,000 to 20,000,000 feet of 
lumber per annum, besides laths and shingles. During the last 
season their cut was 19,100,000 feet of lumber, 4,000,000 laths, and 
3,500,000 shingles. 

DOW, OILMAN, HANCOCK COMPANY. 

(See Illustration, Page 7, No. 55.) 

The original Crescent Mills were built by Dow, Gilman & 
Hancock in 1868, and contained ten run of buhr-stone, with a daily 
capacity of about 300 barrels. At the time it was built it was the 
most complete and best equipped mill of its size west of Albany, N. 
Y., and turned out flour far superior to any of the local mills at that 
date. But time brings changes, and the art of milling, in which 
there had been no radical change in the last hundred years, has 
been so thoroughly and completely changed that Oliver Evans 
himself, could he be brought to view a modern mill, would not be 
able to tell what it was. The advent of the roller system has 
entirely revolutionized the old way of milling, and to keep up with 
the times, in 1882 the corporation of Dow, Gilman, Hancock 
Company was formed, and a new 500-barrel roller mill was built, 
complete in every detail. Golden Crescent and Snow White, two 
of their favorite brands of flour, are known in every family within a 
radius of two hundred miles. The motive power is furnished by 
a three hundred horse-power Corliss engine, built by the Lane & 
Bodley Company, of Cincinnati, Ohio, and while being very useful 
is quite ornamental — a credit to the builders. Steam is furnished 
from a battery of four boilers. Employment is given to about 
forty people. 



? 



O- 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



J 



OHN HOYT, 



moie,a/e and Retail Mustccil Merchandise, 

STEINWAY AND OTHER PIANOS. 

No. joj Brady Street, Davenport, loiva. 



[ See Illustration, page l. No. 35.] 



HOMPSON & BAHLS, 



T 

. . • MERCHANT TAILORS, ... 

And Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Cloths, Cassimeres, and Vestings. 

118 East Third Street, Davenport, Iowa. 

■pvAN B. HORNE, [ successor to John Hill.l 

Livery, Sale, and Boarding Stable, 

Horses and Carriages of all kinds, at all Hours, at Reasonable Rates. 



Telephone 37 g. 215 West Third Street, 



Davenport, Iowa. 



•T^ W. McClelland & CO., T. W. McClelland-C. p. McClelland. 

Sash, Doors, Blinds, Etc. 



Factory. J04 to 312 Main Street, 

Lumber Yard, Corner Fourth and Harrison Sts. 



Davenport, Iowa. 



E. 



S. HAMMATT, 



^^ Architect. ^^ 



REFERENCE TO WORK: St. Katharine's, Kemper, and Sheldon Halls. [See page 
X, Nos. 29 and 31.] Roddewig Block. [See page 10, No. 68.) 



Office, S. IV. Cor. Third and Brady Sts., Davenport, Iowa. 



J^EYNOLDS & GIFFORD, . 



Ira L. GiFFORD. 
S. M. Reynolds. 



Deaie,jjn JfardiTure, Painls, and Oils, 



22^ Brady Street.^ Davenporl., Iowa. 

[ See Illustration, page 11, No. 20.] 



T 



ECHENTIN & HOYER. 



HENRY TECHENTIN. 



HENRY HOYER. 



Established zSsj. 

A/am^/ac infers of Ha7ness, Saddles and Collars. 



Also, Agents for the Household and Domestic Sewing Machines. 



jo5 West Second Street^ Davenport, Iowa. 



o 



TTO ALBRECHT & CO., 



Established 1854. 

Ma7iufactnrcrs of the Celebrated Rob Roy a7id Modoc Cigars, 

And Dealers in Tobaccos, Pipes, and Smokers' Utensils, 

^06 West Second Street^ Davenport, loiva. 



Q TARK & RUSER . 



Watches^ fewetry, Frefich and Airierican Clocks^ 



Solid Silver and Silver-Plated Ware, Etc. Repairing. Adjusting, ami Rating of Watches a 
Specialty. Strangers are cordially invited to examine our goods and prices, and compare 
with other dealers. 

No. 128 West Second Street, Davenport, Iowa. 



M. 



E. NABSTEDT, 



• • AMERICAN WATCHES, • • 

Waltham. Elgin. Hampde7i. Howards. 



'^ DIAMONDS ^' 



And a full line of Jeivelry, Clocks, Silver and Silver-Plated Ware. 

Only Agent for the noted Columbus Watch. 
A Si-F.ciAi.TY.— Repairing and Engraving Promptly Done. 

406 West Second Street, Davenport, lo-iva. 

[See Illustration, page ii. No. 4.] 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



The present officers are : Josiah Dow, President ; S. F. Gil- 
man, Vice-President; John L. Dow, Secretary; F. H. Hancock, 
Treasurer and General Manager ; H. F. Johnston, Head Miller. 

DAVENPORT STEAM HEATING COMPANY. 
(See Illustration, Page 8, No. 60.) 

The Davenport Steam Heating Company, which was organ- 
ized but some five or six years ago, is a fair illustration of what 
energy and perseverence can do in Davenport, the most beautiful 
of Mississippi river cities. Its managers, although confronted by 
long-established competition at the commencement of business, 
have, by their thorough knowledge of the same, fair dealing, and 
doing only the best quality of work, at moderate prices, placed 
their company in the lead of all competitors, and gained for them- 
selves a high reputation throughout the state, extending as well 
into Illinois, Kansas, and Nebraska. Two years ago they erected 
their present building, occupying a space with a frontage of 40 feet 
and a depth of i6o feet, being the most complete and best equipped 
shop in their line of trade in the west. Besides furnishing and 
constructing steam heating and ventilating apparatus, they do a 
general plumbing and gas-fitting business, and carry at all times 
the largest stock of any like concern in the state of brass and iron 
goods for water, steam, and gas, gas-fixtures, hose-packing, well 
and cistern pumps, iron, lead, and sewer-pipe, etc. 

The officers of the company are: D. H. Hartwell, President; 
J. C. Emeis, Vice-President and Superintendent ; G. T. Ahrens, 
Secretary ; A. F. Cutter, Treasurer. 

DAVENPORT GLUCOSE MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 
(See Illustration, Page 7, No. 53.) 

The Davenport Glucose Manufacturing Company was incor- 
porated in 1873, and has grown up from a small factory to its 
present gigantic proportions, with a capacity of working 3,500 
bushels of corn per day. The buildings and yards cover about 
six acres of ground. There are employed in the factory one 
hundred to one hundred and twenty hands. Three side-tracks run 



to the difterent buildings to facilitate the receiving of corn, coal, 
and sundry supplies, and in shipping their products. The capital 
is now $300,000. The company owns elevators and corn-cribs at 
Casey, Adair, and Marne, Iowa, with a capacity to store about 
300,000 bushels of corn. The products of this company are favor- 
ably known all over the country, from Portland, Oregon, and San 
Francisco, California, to New York and Boston During the year 
1886 about $70,000 worth of cooperage was used to ship their pro- 
ducts, the most of which was manufactured in Davenport. 

The officers are : H. H. Andresen, President; Robt. Krause, 
Secretary ; Louis P. Best, Superintendent. 

DAVENPORT WOOLEN MILLS COMPANY. 

(See Illustration, Page 6, No. 51,) 

The Davenport Woolen Mills Company was organized Feb- 
ruary 17th, 1 88 1. The original woolen mills were built and 
operated by Joseph Shields, in 1863, and gained a reputation for 
making the very best flannels for the trade of any offered in the 
western market. The present management have enlarged and 
increased the capacity of the mills to about double the original 
capacity and employ about one hundred hands. The new looms, 
being the best made, are fully up to the times, and can turn out 
1,000 yards per day of those superior western flannels, besides 
blankets from the finest to heavy Mackinac, and for the past five 
years they have made a specialty of those extra heavy govern- 
ment cavalry blankets, and hope to continue, as in the past, making 
the most desirable goods offered in their line. 

The present officers are: Wm. Renwick, President; W. D. 
Petersen, Vice-President; S. A. Jennings, General Manager; H. 
V. Drebing, Superintendent; J. B. Phelps, Secretary and Treasurer. 

DER DEMOKRAT. 

(See Illustration, Page 6, No. 50.) 

" Der Demokrat" is the oldest German newspaper in Iowa, 
and with the exception of the "Anzeiger des Westens," in 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



STANDARD WORKS FOR ElERY LIBRARY. 

% % T. F. COLLIER, Publisher. % % 

Complete editions of the BEST STANDARD WORKS \\\ elegant bound volumes. 
Encyclopaedias, Family Bibles, and Fine Albums, all sold oti Easy Payments. 

Just issued — the latest edition of 

CHAMBERS' ENCYCLOPEDIA, 

Revised up t<i 1SS7. Couijilete in eight massive \'olumes, 40 colored majis, 6,300 pages, 

including a very elatiorale American Supplement. Compiled by an able corps of 

American editors. This magnificent work delivered (complete) on 

payments of J2.00 per month. 

p. F. COLLIER, Publisher, 

100 to no Attorney St., New York. 

Branches in all the principal cities in America. 

Davev/>ort House, 125 and I2j iMuin Street. 

G. F. PEPPER, Manager. 

[See Illustration, page 10, No, 65.] 



J. C. SCHRICKER. F. G. RODLER. 

SCHRICKER & RODLER, 

PROPRIETORS OF 

City Marble Works, 

DEALl-.FS IN 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC MARBLE, 

Monume7its, Headstones, 

Tablets, Posts, Table-tops, Shelves, Etc., Etc. 




Scotch and American Granite Monuments Furnished to Order. 
Cemetery Work of all kinds Neatly Executed. 

Orders promptly Filled, and Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

222 Harrison Street, DA VENPOR T, 10 WA. 



Mason's • Carriage • Works 




CARRIAGES, HARNESS, AND 

Mason's • Patent • Runner • Attachments 



FOR WHEELED VEHICLES. 



Factory, jjg and 121 East Foiirtli Street, \ 
Repository, under Kimball House, J 



Davenport,^ lotva. 

[See Illustration, page 2, No. 34.] 



• • REIS, • • 

DEALER IN 

Watches, a Jewelry, 
cLocKs, 

Silver, arid Silver- Plated Ware. 

Repairing, Adjusting, Etc., Promptly Done. 

Alo. 208 West Second Street, 
DAVENPORT, IOWA. 




THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



St. Louis, and the " Illinois Staats Zeitung," in Chicago, it is 
also the oldest German paper in the great west. The paper was 
founded in 1851 by Theodore Guelich, now of Burlington, and on 
November 17th of that year the first issue appeared in the modest 
form of four pages of five columns each. Right bravely it took up 
its lance for freedom and social reforms, and, indeed, has maintained 
constantly during the almost thirty-six years of its existence a firm 
position for the liberty of the people. In 1852 Mr. Guelich associ- 
ated Mr. R. Reichmann, now of Tama county, with himself, and 
soon thereafter the paper was enlarged. At first it was liberal 
democratic, but at the commencement of the Kansas-Nebraska 
troubles left the democratic party and joined the " Free Soil " 
party, and then its successor, the republican party, and whose first 
candidate, John C. Fremont, the " Demokrat " most energetically 
supported. 

Upon Reichmann's withdrawal Guelich alone conducted the 
paper and made it a daily, commencing on January 3d, 1856. 
with Heinrich Ramming, an Austrian refugee, as assistant editor, 
Soon thereafter, in April, 1856, Guelich sold the "Demokrat" to 
Henry Lischer and Theodore Olshausen, who had come from St. 
Louis, and were possessed of valuable and practical newspaper 
experience. Mr. Olshausen, who since then died in Germany, was 
the editor. These two gentlemen, in i860, purchased the " West- 
liche Post," in St Louis, and removed there, after selling the 
"Demokrat "to John A. Daldorf and H. Ramming. Times were 
bad in those days ; owing to the ominous political forebodings 
which preceeded the civil war, all business was depressed, and 
the publishers felt compelled, from May 7th, 1861, to again make 
the paper a weekly ; and succeeding but poorly in this, Mr. Lischer 
on June 28th, 1861, again took the paper, and this time as sole 
proprietor, remaining, however, two months yet in St. Louis to 
complete a term in the militia, in which he had pnlisted upon 
Lincoln's first call. In August he returned to Davenport and 
revived the " Demokrat " by publishing it from August 28th, 1861, 
again as a daily and weekly. On September 17th of the same year 
the experienced writer, Mr. Jens Peter Stibolt, became the editor. 



and has conducted the paper in the furtherance of the people's 
rights with incessant energy, wisdom, and firmness to the present 
time. Through this course, and the excellent business care and 
integrity of its proprietor, " Der Demokrat " has become one of the 
best known and most influential papers in the entire west ; and its 
daily, weekly, and (since 1879) semi-weekly issues have an exten- 
sive circulation, not alone in the United States, but even has its 
readers on the steppes of Russia, and in Africa and Australia. 

The paper has, of course, been steadily increased in size 
during these years; in 1861 the Daily had only sixteen small 
columns, but now thirty-two and often thirty-six columns, and the 
Weekly has fifty-four columns of a goodly size. 

At first the paper was often compelled to move its location, 
but the removals were easily accomplished. In April, 1862, the 
office was established in the building on the northwest corner of 
Second and Main streets, and remained there for sixteen years, 
until finally it was moved, on August 19th, 1878, into a new home 
of its own at Nos. 207 .ind 209 West Third street, where every 
arrangement exists which could be desired for the publication of a 
paper, as also for conducting a book and job-printing establish- 
ment. The elegant front of " Der Demokrat" building, in gothic 
style, is an object of admiration, and can be seen photographed in 
our Album. 

M. FRAHM & son's CITY BREWERY. 

(See Illustration, Page 7, No. 56.) 

Our German-American citizens appear to take the most promi- 
nent position in establishing and successfully conducting the lead- 
ing breweries in this country. This applies to but few with greater 
force than to the above-named gentlemen, proprietors of the City 
Brewery of Davenport. 

Mr. Mathias Frahm came to the United States from Germany 
in 1848, and located at the southwest corner of Sixth and Harrison 
streets, where at present his brewery stands. When he first arrived 
in this country he was a practical brewer, having devoted his whole 
life to the manufacture of beer. From the original establishment 
of this brewery, he has constantly added to its size and equipments 



lO 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



until now the City Brewery is one of the best in the state, and 
produces lager-beer, the excellence of which is acknowledged by a 
large number of dealers and consumers in this and other vicinities. 
Henry Frahm, the son -partner, made the most profound 
studies in the manufacture of this noble beverage at the City of 
Worms, and other German cities celebrated in this particular busi- 
ness, during a sojourn in that country of over three years. 

GERMAN CLINIC. 

(See Illustration, Page 9, No. 64.) 

The German Clinic, established in Davenport, Iowa, in 1882, is 
a private institute, conducted by three physicians who are regular 
graduates from reputable medical colleges of Germany. These 
gentlemen are not only engaged in the Clinic, but also practice as 
family and visiting physicians in Davenport and vicinity. The 
institute has its general, gynecological, surgical, and orthopedical 
departments. The arrangement and equipment is such that all the 
requirements of the most advanced science and knowledge in 
medicine are complied with, and, together with this, a home-like 
comfort of the patient is provided. 

The German Clinic is located near the street-car line, upon the 
hill in a most salubrious and fashionable neighborhood, and away 
from all factories or other disturbing influences. Its spacious park 
comprises nearly one-half a block, bounded on the west by Harri- 
son street and on the north by Sixteenth street, and with its trees 
and shrubbery, gravel-walks and flower-beds, is attractive in ap- 
pearance and cheerful in its surroundings. In fair weather this 
affords the patients out-door exercise and recreation. In the winter 
a roomy conservatory filled with tropical and other plants, warmed 
by steam and provided with fountains, singing birds, and other 
pretty sights, supplies the place of the park. 

It should be especially understood that the three physicians 
who conduct the Clinic, and also tlieir families, live in the institute 
itself, and consequently are within call, and, indeed, upon duty con- 
stantly at any time of the day or night; so that by this means, 
together with the assistance of skilled and trusty nurses, each 



patient receives uninterrupted supervision and attention. All the 
wants of the patients are provided for in the Clinic. 

Physicians and others are cordially invited to visit them 
and examine for themselves their location, equipments, and sur- 
roundings. 

The more particular object of the establishment is to treat 
those who cannot well receive adequate attention from the single 
physician whose large practice, long drives, and distant visits may 
leave him but little time for each ; and whilst offering to such a 
constant attendance, they seek to supply them also with the most 
approved apparatus and greatest possible domestic comfort. Of 
course, in the most instances, the family physician will be the one 
upon whose judgment a patient should be advised to go to them, 
but for the information of those who have no such advice, they will 
state their more particular plans : 

The leading principle of the Clinic is to keep the patient from 
his home only so long as is absolutely indispensable for effecting a 
successful cure. In all cases in which the patient can be relegated to 
the family physician for a prolonged treatment or a dietetic regime 
it is so done, and thus the patient has the pleasure of returning to 
his family, and they have the satisfaction of receiving reports from 
a competent source of the condition of their former patient. 

The following are the principal departments of the German 
Clinic: General, Gynecological, Surgical, and Orthopedical, in 
which are treated with the best attention all kinds of diseases. 

Those desiring admission or any information are requested to 
write to the German Clinic. Dr. Gustaf Hoepfner, 

Dr. Adolph Jaenicke, 
Dr. Carl Matthey, 

Directors and Resident Physicians. 

GLOBE PLOW WORKS. 

(See Illustration, Page 5, No. 47.) 

The Globe Plow Works, successors to the Davenport Plow 
Company, established 1850, reorganized and incorporated Decem- 
ber 15th, 1886, manufacturers of plows, cultivators, harrows, and 



i 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



II 



other agricultural implements and farm machinery. The names of 
the officers are well-known as those of pushing, experienced, and 
successful business men, Aug. Warnebold being President; E. G. 
Henderson, Vice President ; H. G. Scharfenberg, Secretary and 
Treasurer; John C Lafrenz, formerly with Buford's Plow Works, 
Superintendent. The first and the third of these four gentlemen 
have long been connected with the old establishment, and in the 
two others the very best business qualifications unite with the best 
of the old to inspire the enterprise with new life and vigor. The 
shops and the office are at 
the same place as before, on 
West Third street, between 
Harrison and Ripley streets. 
The present capacity of the 
works is one hundred men, 
which number will soon be 
reached, if the encouraging 
prospects for business are 
only partially fulfilled, and it 
is pretty sure they will. The 
authorized capital stock is 
$250,000. The principal 
business territory of the new 
company will be Iowa, Illi- 
nois, Kansas, Missouri, Ne- 
braska, Dakota, Minnesota, 




THE GI.OBK ADIUSIAM.H STIKRIN.. I'LOU 



whatever there remained of ready-ware. Now the two principal 
patents of the Globe Plow Works are : 

First. Hen. Y. Butler's Hercules Tricycle Sulky Plow, of whose 
strength, durability, and work all farmers who have seen it handled 
or handled it themselves speak highly ; indeed, it possesses all the 
points of superiority required to make it the best sulky out; is drawn 
from the axle, and is easily adjusted and managed by the driver. 

Second. The Globe Adjustable Stirring Plow, which has a 
malleableTjiron beam, and is lighter in draft than any other plow 
made The beam can be given different positions, there being an 
ingenious mechanicism to move it sideways as well as up and down, 
as desired. Another important feature of this plow is a protruding 
heel^under the rear landside, which protects the landside from wear. 
In general, it can be said that this/plow is so constructed as to 

make it almost unnecessary 
for the driver to take hold 
of the handles when the 
plow has once been set for 
a furrow. It was awarded 
premiums at the New 
Orleans Exposition, at the 
American Institute in New 
York, at the Mechanical In- 
stitute in Baltimore, and at 
the St. Louis Exposition. 
It will not be amiss to 



and Texas, from most of which parts of the United States orders 
are continually arriving and being filled. It is unnecessary to 
dwell upon the single implements manufactured at the works, as 
far as they are not patented, but made in common with other similar 
concerns, for it goes without saying that no piece that is not fully 
up to all reasonable requirements shall leave the shops. Special 
attention, however, should be called to two of the company's 
patents, by which it cannot fail to secure numerous new customers 
in addition to the old ones who frequented the works during their 
unvoluntary suspension, buying there in preference to other firms 



add that the connection of the company with the best steel and iron 
firms, as well as their capital, enables them to manufacture those 
splendid first-class implements at prices worth considering by the 
purchaser before he goes to another factory. Farmers and dealers 
should call and convince themselves of what the Globe Plow Works 
is doing for them. 

T. KIRCHER. 

(See Illustration, Page 2, No. 35.) 

T. Kircher, Jeweler, 301 Brady street. This business was 
established in the year 1852 by Wm. Rutenbeck. After his death, 






12 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



■c 






* 



First National Bank, 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

The First National Bank in operation in the United States. 



Capital, $100,000.00. 



Surplus, $50,000 00. 



4^ 






Undivided Profits, $50,000.00. 



OFFICERS. 

JAMES THOMPSON, President. J. E. STEVENSON, Vice-President. JOHN B. FIDLAR, Cashier. GEORGE HOEHN, Asst. Cashier. 

DIRECTORS. 

WALKER ADAMS. JAMES THOMP.SON. NATHANIEL FRENCH. HENRY W. KERKER. 

A. BURDICK. AUGUST STEKFEN. CHRIST. MUELLER. J. E. STEVENSON. 

S. F. GILMAN. 



AUGUST STEFFEN. 
G. W. CABLE. 



CHRIST. MUELLER. 

HENRY KOHRS. 



A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED. 



LSee Illustration, Page VI., No. 2.] 



WALKER ADAMS, President. 

LOUIS HALLER, Vice-President. 



JOHN B. MEYER, Cashier. 

OTTO L. LADENBERGER, Teller. 



. CASE CAPITAL, $120,000.00 DEPOSITS, OVER $1,000,000.00. 



Davenport Savings Bank, 

Office in First National Bank Building, DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

FIVE PER CENT INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. MONEY LOANED ON REAL ESTATE AND PERSONAL SECURITY. 



DIRECTORS. 



WHIT M. GRANT. 

H. KOHRS. 

A. STEFFEN. 

[See Illustration, Page VI., No. 2.] 



WALKER ADAMS. 

LOUIS HALLER. 

A. BURDICK. 



JAMES THOMPSON. 

WM. O. SCHMIDT. 

F. H. HANCOCK. 



$ 



. 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



13 



in 1868, the business was purchased by Fred. Goos and Otto 
Kircher, under the firm name of Goos & Kircher. Under their 
management the business prospered to such an extent that their old 
store-room on Second street became too small, and larger and 
more commodious quarters had to be provided. They selected 
the present site — the northeast corner of Third and Brady streets 
— where they erected a large building for their use. 

Alter the loss of Mr. Kircher on the steam-ship Schiller, in 
1875, his interests were assumed by his widow, Mrs. T. Kircher, the 
firm-name remaining unchanged. 

After the demise of Mr. Fred. Goos, in 1877, Mrs. Kircher 
assumed control of the entire business under the present firm-n;ime. 
The business is conducted in the large and nicely-furnished store 
at 301 Brady street. The stock carried is a very fine and well- 
selected one. It is valued at about $40,000, and consists of watches 
of all kinds, diamonds and other precious stones, fine gold jewelry, 
and the largest stock of solid silverware in the state. It also com- 
prises a very large stock of plated ware, clocks, and optical goods. 
There are at present six employes engaged in the business — two 
watchmakers, one jeweler, one engraver, and two clerks. Mrs. 
Kircher continues to give her prosperous business her undivided 
attention. 

ROBT. KRAUSE. 
(See Illustration, Page 3, No. 37.) 

Robt. Krause's wholesale and retail cloth and clothing busi- 
ness, at 115 and 117 West Second street, has grown from a small 
retail business establishment, in 1854, to the largest in the State of 
Iowa in that line, and since 1S83 a factory of forty sewing-machines, 
operated by steam-power, employing fifty hands, has been added, 
in which pants, vests, jeans suits, shirts, and the celebrated " Crow 
Overall " is manufactured. The working force is eight traveling 
men and fourteen employes. The building occupied is the base- 
ment and three stories, each 40x150 feet. The annual business 
is $350,000. The house is favorably known among trade all 
through Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, northern Missouri, Dakota, and 
the western part of Illinois. 



NICHOLAS KUHNEN; 

iSee Illustration, Page 3, No. 40.) 

The cigar manufacturing industry of Davenport is fully repre- 
sented by the large factory of Nicholas Kuhnen — one of the 
largest cigar factories west of New York City. This business was 
established in 1854, and has constantly increased since that time. 
Six floors, each 25x140, besides two basements of the same size, 
constitute the factory, while two buildings of three stories each, 
situated in the rear of factory and fronting on Perry street, are 
occupied for the storage of leaf tobacco. The product of this 
factory finds a market in every state from New York to California, 
and from Minnesota to Texas ; in fact, Mr. Kuhnen's leading brand 
of cigars, the " Pappoose," might be said to enjoy a national rep- 
utation, and has done good missionary work as a Davenport 
industry. 

J. LAGE & COMPANY. 

(See Illustration, Page 9, No. 63.) 

J. Lage & Company's Eagle Brewery, 1235 West Fifth street, 
has kept up its reputation as one of the most reliable and best 
establishments of its kind in the state for over thirty years. The 
members of the firm, Messrs. J. Lage, Geo. Mengel, and H. Klindt, 
pay their personal attention to the business, and have succeeded in 
manufacturing a beverage appreciated by all consumers for its 
purity and healthiness, combining the strength of the North- 
Albingian with the Rhineland's suavity. 

LINDSAY & PHELPS. 

(See Illustration, Page 5, No. 48.) 

The Lindsay & Phelps saw-mill was erected in 1S66 — com- 
pleted by the addition of a gang mill the next season, built by 
P. W. Gates & Company, of Chicago. This was the first gang 
mill in operation in this vicinity. Some improvements have been 
made from time to lime, and the capacity has been increased so 
that the annual product amounts to about 18,000,000 feet of lumber, 
4.500,000 shingles, and about 3,500,00c laths. The present owners 



14" 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 




H 



H 



CO 
H 
10 



1 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



15 



were from the lumbering regions of Essex County, New York, 
where their ancestors were lumbermen from fifty to sixty years ago, 
and lived to see the Adirondac pine, spruce, and hemlock nearly all 
cut oft and marketed. The first logs cut for this mill were from 
Clark County, Wisconsin, and cut from lands entered by the senior 
member of the present firm, Mr. J. E. Lindsay, at the United States 
land office, in 1856-57. 

JENS LORENZEN. 

(See Illustration, Page 4, No. 41.) 

Jens Lorenzen, dealer in china and crockery, 221 and 223 West 
Third street. The commencement of this firm dates back as far as 
the year 1857, when a room i6xig was amply sufficient for the size 
of the business ; but only for a short time, for with increase of busi- 
ness it became necessary to seek larger quarters ; but no permanent 
location was secured until the erection of the magnificent block on 
Third street, comprising four floors 150 feet deep, of which every 
inch is occupied. The firm's wholesale trade extends over the 
States of Ipwa, Illinois, and Missouri, and requires three traveling 
salesmen's constant attention. The firm's claim of being the leader 
in fine goods is nowhere disputed in the west. 

MOELLER & ASCHERMANN MFG. COMPANY. 

(See Illustration, Page 14.) 

The Moeller & Aschermann Manufacturing Company, manu- 
facturers of cigar-makers' supplies, all kinds of boxes, and apiarian 
supplies. This company was incorporated a year ago with a capital 
stock of $200,000, and is one of the most prominent establishments 
in the city. Their principal line of manufacturing is the newly- 
invented cylindrical cigar-shaper (Elges' patent). Bunches made 
in this shaper cannot be distinguished from hand-work, and this 
machine will without doubt, in a short time, be adopted by every 
cigar manufacturer in the world, and make Davenport known all 
over the globe. 

The following gentlemen, well and favorably known in the 
business world, comprise the company, and their names and capital 



can be justly figured upon regarding the great success this institu- 
tion will have: President, Hon. R. Guenther ; Vice-President, Ed. 
Aschermann ; Secretary and Treasurer, Aug. Kleinguenther, who 
is also General Manager : H. F. Moeller, G. D. Elges, Emil Berger, 
and John Hill; Book-keeper and Cashier, Julius Grunewald. 

A. MORITZ & BROTHERS. 

(See Illustration, Page 4, No. 44.) 

A. Moritz & Brothers, clothiers and gentlemen's furnishers, 
121 and 123 West Second street, have been established for twenty 
years. This is one of the largest and most notable business houses 
in Davenport. It is an old and honorable firm, and one that not 
only successfully conducts an immense establishment, but also con- 
ducts it in such a liberal and enterprising spirit as to equally benefit 
the city as themselves. They occupy one of the finest buildings 
(24 feet frontage, with a depth of 150 feet), and have more space 
devoted to their trade than any other clothing house in the Stale 
of Iowa. Their four floors, besides the basement, which is also 
utilized, comprise 14,400 square feet. The interior is arranged 
splendidly, with everything that modern taste and wisdom can 
suggest for the accommodation of the patrons of a great clothing 
store. The high, airy, and dry basement is the storage and ship- 
ping-room. The first floor is the retail department; the second, 
third, and fourth floors are devoted to the exclusive wholesale 
trade. Their tremendous stock consists of everything that comes 
under the comprehensive head of clothing, from the coarse overall 
to the finest broad-cloth suit, together with an immense line of 
furnishing goods of every description. Strangers in the city are 
cordially invited to visit this grand establishment. 

MUELLER SAW-MILL. 

(See Illustration, Page S, No. 57.) 

In the year 1849 Mr. Strong Burnell commenced the founda- 
tion of a saw-mill on the present site of the new Chris. Mueller 
mill. The capacity of the mill, when operations were commenced. 



-< 



i6 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



H 



ARD, SOFT, AND BLOSSBURG 



COAD 



LIME. CEMENT. MARBLE r^^ GRANITE 

MONUMENTS 

McCOSH & DONAHUE. 



308 TO 312 East Third Street. 



Jj ECKER'S HALL , (Formerly Lahrmanns.) 

GUST. BECKER, Proprietor. 



BILLIARDS / RESTAURANT. 

WARM MEALS AT ALL HOURS. 

HALL FOR PARTIES AND DANCES. 

329 West Second Street, DAVENPORT. IOWA. 

[See Illustration, Page 11, No. 14.] 



S ECURI TY FIRE INSURANCE CO, 



[See Illustration 
Page 6, No. 2.] 



DAVENPORT. IOWA. 

g.a.:f>it.a.l, $100,000.00. 



FIRE. 




LIGHTNING. 
TORNADOES. 



OFFICERS: 

S. F. OILMAN, President. GEO. P. McCLELLAND, Vice-President. 

ERASTUS a. BENSON, Treasurer. E. J. BABCOCK, Secretary. 

DIRECTORS: 

S. F. OILMAN. E. J. BABCOCK. JENS LORENZEN. GEO. P. McCLELLAND. 
F. H. GRIGGS. J. B. PHELPS. ROBERT SICKELS. ERASTUS A. BENSON. 

M. L. MARKS. J. S. WYLIE. A. F. WILLIAMS. 



J OHN J. DAHMS. 



REAL ESTATE 



■AND- 



LOAN AGENCY. 



128 EAST THIRD ST.. D.WENPORT, IOWA. 



'i 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



17 



was five thousand feet per day, but in a few years was increased to 
ten thousand feet. The mill changed owners several times, and in 
1867 Schricker & Mueller took hold of it and operated it until the 
death of Mr. Schricker, in 1883, when Mr. Mueller .issumed the 
entire ownership. On December 15th, 1885, the mill was totally 
destroyed by fire. The capacity of the mill at that time was ninety- 
five thousand feet per day. 

In the spring and summer of 1886 Mr. Mueller erected a new 
mill. He spared neither pains nor means to make this mill one of 
the most complete and practicable saw-mills in the northwest. The 
mill contains three band-mills with all the requisite machinery, 
edgers, trimmers, lath and shingle mills, etc., and it is said that 
lumber can be manufactured and handled cheaper here than in any 
other mill in this vicinity. The capacity of the mill now is 140,000 
feet of lumber, 30,000 shingles, and 35,000 lath per day. The num- 
ber of hands employed is one hundred and ten, and the pay-roll 
amounts to over $1,000 weekly. 

NEWCOMB HOUSE AND VIELE BUILDINGS. 

{See Illustralion, Page 9, Nos. 61 and 62.) 

This block of buildings is situated on the north side of Second 
street, between Main and Brady streets, and occupies the entire 
south half of block 43 in the city of Davenport, Iowa. It was 
originally constructed by the late Aiitoine LeClaire, Esq. The old 
and well-known " LeClaire House," built in 1839, formerly occupied 
the southwest corner of this block, and for many years was one of 
the most noted resorts in the Mississippi valley. It was a favorite 
summer resort for the citizens of St. Louis, and during the heated 
term was generally filled to overflowing. The building on the 
corner of Second and Brady streets was constructed by Mr. LeClaire 
in 1852, and the intermediate building in 1853. In the former of 
these structures was located the old " LeClaire Hall," which for 
many years was the place for all public meetings, lectures, and 
theatrical performances. This valuable property was purchased by 
the Hon. Charles Viele in 1863, through the instrumentality of his 
brother-in-law, the late Daniel T. Newcomb, Esq. Soon after the 



purchase of this property by Mr. Viele, the old " LeClaire House" 
was thoroughly remodelled and improved, and its name changed to 
the " Newcomb House." This, for a long time thereafter, was the 
principal hotel in the city ; and it was in this house that the late Dr. 
John J. Burtis commenced his career here as a landlord. With the 
erection of other hotels in the city, this house became unremuner- 
ative, and a few years since its occupancy for such purposes was 
discontinued. At the present time it is principally occupied by the 
famous notion store of Emerson & Company. This block of build- 
ings is one of the most central and eligible in the city for business 
purposes, and its store-rooms are always in demand. Being situated 
back from the line of the street about eight feet it thus affords a 
twenty-foot sidewalk, which is consequently a favorite promenade. 
It embraces sixteen stores and a large number of offices. The 
east part of the block is occupied by the Business College of 
Duncan & Hawks, one of the largest and most popular institutions 
of the kind in the western country. Among the present occupants 
of this block are Isaac Rothschild, E. S. Ballord, and the Messrs. 
Webb, who have been tenants of Mr. Viele during almost his entire 
ownership of the property. Charles E. Putnam, Esq., of Daven- 
port, Iowa, acts as the agent of Mr. Viele in the management of 
these buildings. 

J. H. C. PETERSEN & SONS. 

(See Illustration, Paj^e 4, No. 42.) 

The wholesale dry goods and notions firm of J. H. C. Petersen 
& Sons commenced business in 1872 in a small store (21x50) with a 
very small capital. On account of their departure from the old way 
of doing business, viz : long time and large profits, instead of which 
they inaugurated a cash system on the basis of small profits and 
large sales, their business increased so rapidly from year to year 
that they were compelled to occupy more room annually. They 
now occupy one large four-story building, 33x150 feet, of which all 
the floors are connected by two fine hydraulic passenger and freight 
elevators, and two two-story stores adjoining the above building, 
each 21x150 feet; also basements of same dimension under each 
building. They employ seventy-five clerks in their retail, and fifteen 



i8 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



t 



yOHNJIILL 



Restaurant, 



And all kinds of Refreshments, 



122 and 124 Main Street^ Davenport^ Iowa. 



P J. RAIBLH. 



Man,.facturerof FINE CIGARS, 

And dealer in Tobacco^ Pipes, and Smokers^ Articles, 

210 West Second Street, Davenport, Iowa. 



P H. WORLEY, 

First-Class Livery, Feed, and 
Sale Stable, 

Telephone No. 208. 42s and 427 Brady St. 
Davenport, Iowa. 



H 



ADSELL & CO., 



Paper Box Manufacturers. 
Boxes made to Dimension. Special atten- 
tion given to Shelf and Shoe Boxes. 
104 East Front St., Davenport, Iowa. 



n R. E. H. HAZEN , 

Specialties : Eye, Ear, Nose, 

and Throat. 

Office Hours, t) to 11 a. m., and s to 5 p. m. 

Cor. Second and Brady Sts., 
Kyan Block, Davenport, Iowa. 



J^ H. FLUKE , 

Books, Stationery, IVall Paper, 
Art Material, Fancy Goods, 

Davenport, Iowa. 



A 



LBERT HARTUNG. 



PROPRIETOR 



.^r.yl^'^Sw.?,— - 



iiiiiii'iiitiiiiiMiiimiiiiiii 



iiiuiiiiiiiiiiiii.tiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiitiiiiitiiiiiiii'iliiiii ii 



-^ El dorado Billiard Far lor, w- 

{ELECTRIC LIGHT.) 

.IIIIIIIIIIMKIMIItMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItllllll'lini lll1ini11)lllirillllM<lt,l>ll|-|II1llllllllllllll[lllllllltllllllrillllllMlllltlllllllllrlllllllMJIIII>IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIillllllillllllllll 



e-^ 



-eJv-5 



WET GOODS, 



116 East Third Street, DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



H J. WITT. 



Manufacturer of Mineral Waters, 

Bottler of Beer, Porter, Ale, and Cider, and Wholesale dealer in Bottling Supplies. 

S02, jcf, $06 W. Front Street, Davenport, Iowa. 



W. WIRTEL 



Wholesale Manufacturer of 

Trunks and Travelhig Bags, 

Nos. 220 c3^ 222 Brady St., 

Davenport, Iowa. 



C 



HAS. KARST, 



Manufacturer and Dealer in 
Fine Imported and Domestic Cigars and 
Smokers' Articles. 
228 Brady St. , Davenport, Iowa, 



H 



ARRISON'S PHARMACY, 



J. H. Harrison, Proprietor, 
DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



C. BILLS & CO., 



Proprietors of 

Davenport Showcase Manufactory, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Showcases. 

The Improved Metal- Comer Cases 

a Specialty. 

434 Brady Street, t'oi, 103. 105 Fifth Street, 

Davenport, Iowa. 



t 



Ht 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



19 



clerks in their wholesale department. They also have two branch 
houses, one being at Geneseo, Illinois, which occupies three store- 
rooms, employing twenty clerks; and one at Muscatine, Iowa, occu- 
pying two store-rooms and employing fifteen clerks. Their sales 
are without doubt the largest of any house of the kind in the state. 

PHOENIX MILLS COMPANY. 

(See Illustration, Pag;e 5, No. 45 ) 

The Phoenix Mill was first built in 1862 by M. Donahue & Com- 
pany. In 1866 James Johnston bought it and run it unlil 1871, when 
H. Pohl & Brother leased it for one year After their lease expired 
H. P. Beattie bought and operated it until it burned down in 1879 
He rebuilt it and put in some stone rollers These rollers not ])rov- 
ing a success, the property, in October, 18S0, passed into the hands 
of the Phoenix Mills Company, which is a stock company, with F. 
H. Griggs as President, and F. T. Blunck as Secretary and Treas- 
urer, and H. Pohl as Superintendent; they remodelled the mill and 
put in the Stevens steel rollers. These rollers worked very satis- 
factory. On the morning of September 26th, 1881, the mill was 
struck by lightning, and the main building, with all the milling 
machinery was destroyed. Immediately rebuilt and enlarged, it 
was furnished with Allis & Company's porcelain rolls, which give 
entire satisfaction. The buildings cover one hundred and five feet 
on Front street and one hundred and forty feet on Western avenue. 
The mill has a daily capacity of four hundred barrels of flour, and 
employs thirty-one persons. It has an enviable reputation for 
making extraordinary fine flour. 

REUPKE-SCHMIDT CRACKER COMPANY. 

(See Illustration, Page 5, No. 46.) 

Among the many manufacturing interests of the growing north- 
west none deserve more favorable mention than the Reupke- 
Schmidt Cracker Company, wholesale cracker and biscuit manu- 
facturers, Davenport, Iowa. 



t 



This firm has gained an excellent reputation throughout the 
coimtry wherever their goods have been introduced Established 
in business ever since July, 1874, their increasing trade has made it 
necessary to require the full capacity of the present buildings, being 
about four times the original size, with an extensive branch house 
at Des Moines, Iowa, as a distributing depot for their western terri- 
tory. They give employment to thirty-five hands, manufacturing 
ninety varieties of crackers and biscuit, and using ninety barrels of 
flour per day. Their success may be attributed to the superior 
quality of goods manufactured and careful attention to the wants of 
the trade. Orders will be promptly filled either from headquarters 
in Davenport or from their branch house in Des Moines, Iowa. 

ISAAC ROTHSCHILD. 

(See Illustration, Page 9, No. 62.) 

Isaac Rothschild, proprietor of the largest exclusive retail 
clothing, merchant-tailoring, and gent's furnishing-goods store in 
the state. Nos. 203 and 205 Brady street, and 102 and IC4 Second 
street. Established 1865. 

What honesty, industry, and square dealing will do : This 
establishment has grown from a small business, in 1865, to its 
present proportions, and now occupies a double store, three stories 
high, together with the second and third stories on the opposite 
side of the street (45 feet front with a depthof 150 feet). 

The first floor is occupied with the choicest stock of ready- 
made clothing, imported and domestic woolens, and a full line of 
gents' furnishing-goods. The second floor, overcoats of all descrip- 
tions, and a complete line of hats, caps, and rubber clothing. The 
third floor, trunks and valises. The two stories on the opposite 
side of the street are occupied by skilled tailors, under the man- 
agement of Mr. Henry Kamp, formerly of New York City, employ- 
ing in this department thirty-five men all the year around. Total 
number employed in the establishment, forty-five. 



.$ 



20 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



UENRY BERG, 

Dealer in Sportsmen's Goods, Fishing Tackle, 



N. E. Corner Third and Harrison Streets. 



Base Ball Goods, and Bicycles, 



QHAS. NAECKEL & SON, 

Picture Frames, Wall Paper, Window Glass , 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Brushes, Etc. 
405 W. Second St., Davenport, Iowa. 

JOHN H. SCHUETT, 

Dealer in Groceries, Crockery, and Glasszvare, 
402 West Third Street. DAVENPORT. IOWA. 

J^OUIS HANSSEN, 

Dealer in General Hardware, Farming Tools, 

And all kinds of Seeds. Agent for IVasliing Machines, Churns, Etc. 
213 and 215 West Second Street, bet. Main and Harrison Sts., Davenport, Iowa. 

P^ J. LERCH & BRO., 

Stoves and House-Fnrnishing Goods, 



120 West Third Street, Davenport, Iowa. 



Tin, Copper ami Sheet-Iron Ware. 



yHOMAS THOMPSON, 

T/ie Central Book Store — Wholesale and Retail. 

Books, Stationery, IVall Paper, Pictures, Frames, Etc. 
Corner Third and Brady Streets. 

gCHAUDER'S HOTEL AND ORCHESTRION HALL, 
L. ScHAUDER, Proprietor, 

126 West Front Street. Near Ferry Landing, DA\'ENPORT, IOWA. 

n O. D. STEAM LAUNDRY AND SHIRT FACTORY, 
C. Cruys, Proprietor, 



112 and 114 West Third Street, 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



(^HRIST. KUEHL, 

Dealer i?i Staple and Fancy Groceries, Crockery, 

Glassware, Hardivare, Paints, Flour a?id Feed. 

Telephone No. 5. Cor. Eddy and Mound Streets, Davenport, Iowa. 

n F. KNOSTMAN & SON, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in all kinds of Furniture, 

Carpets, Oil Cloths, and Afattiiigs. 
Telephone No. 120. 207 and 209 East Second Street, Davenport, Iowa. 



pARMER'S HOTEL, ( koester's.) 

J. L. SIEGFRIEDT, Proprietor. 
Good Accommodations at Reasonable Rales, 

Good Stablings Connected ivitk the House. 
212 and 214 Scott Street, Davenport, Iowa. 

p H. GRUENAU, 

Dealer in Boots and Shoes, 
No. 408 West Second Street, Davenport, Iowa. 

Q M. SCHMIDT, 

Dealer in Ladies' and Gents' Fine Shoes, 



Cor. Second and Harrison Sts., 



Davenport, Iowa. 



p & E. KOENIG, 

Millinery and Fancy Goods, Zephyr Worsteds, Embroideries, ■ 

Materials for Embroidery, Notions, Trimmings, and Stamped Goods. 
318 West Second Street, Davenport, Iowa. 

yHE IOWA REFORM, 

Semi- Weekly and Weekly German Neivspapcr. 
ADOLPH PETERSON df BRO.. Proprietors. GUSTAV DO.WALD, Editor. 
N. W. Cor. Second and Scott Streets, Davenport, Iowa. 

J^EIMERS & BRAUCH, 

Dealers in Stoves and House-Furnishing Goods, 

No. 414 West Second Street, Davenport, Iowa. 

J^AHRMANN'S HALLE, 

B. H. Lahrmann, Proprietor. 



.S. W. Cor. Second and Ripley Sts., 



Davenport, Iowa. 



A TLANTIC HOTEL, 

George Pahl, Propr. $150 per Day 

Cor. Fifth and Perry Sis., 0pp. C. R. I. & P. Depot, Davenport, Iowa. 



P)AVIS & CAMP, 



Manufacturers 0/ and Dealers in Granite and Marble Monuments 

and Headstones, Marble^ Slate, Iron, and IVood Mantels and Grates. 
Don't forget the place, and come and see us before purchasing, and you will save money. 

224 East Third Street, Davenport, Iowa. 

WM. O. SCHMIDT, 
^^ Attorney at Law, 

5. W. Cor. Second and Harrison Sts., Dave7iport, loiva. 



t 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



21 



U. N. ROBERTS & COMPANY. 

(See Illustration, Page 6, No. 49.} 

1 I /HE business of this firm was established in 1865 by Mr. U. N. Roberts, 
®1® and thus for twenty years has had a continuoiis and growing pros- 
perity. Since the death of Mr. Roberts, in 1S77, the business has 
been under the exclusive management of Mr. Uriah Roraback, who has been 
a member of the firm since 1S71. The firm are manufacturers of and whole- 
sale dealers in glazed sash, doors, blinds, mouldings, stair-work, etc. The 
house stands high in the trade, and their goods have a first-class reputation. 
Their trade extends east to Indiana, west to Utah, north to Dakota and Min- 
nesota, and south to the Gulf of Mexico. The measure of success attained 
by this well-known and old-established concern is largely due to the personal 
attention given to details by the manager and his employes. Their commo- 
dious and well-arranged store-rooms, built by them exclusively for their use, 
afford the best facilities for handling the large amounts of material which 
daily pass through their hands. 







22 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 






FERD. RODDEWIG'S SONS. 

(See Illustration, Page lo, No. 6S.) 

Ferd. Roddewig's Sons, importers of and wholesale dealers in 
foreign and domestic wines, liquors, cordials, etc., Nos. 4og and 411 
Harrison street. The wholesale trade in fine wines and Hquors has 
a worthy representative in Davenport in the old-estabUshed and 
prominent house of Ferd. Roddewig's Sons, whose fine premises, 
so centrally located, have no superior in the west. The immense 
business conducted here has reached the thirty-second year of its 
e.xistence, having been founded by the late Mr. Ferd. Roddewig in 
1855, and ably, honorably, and successfully managed by him up to 
his sudden demise in December, 1885. The firm was continued by 
his three sons, Paulo, Peter, and Ferd. Jr., and the business has had a 
steady growth, indicative of the purity and high quality of all goods 
handled. 

The building has been planned throughout to secure the great 
essentials of light, air, and convenience. Its thick walls and 
sturdy foundations, heavy girders and solid partitions, all indicate 
the honest character of the work, while every modern improvement 
has been introduced by the enterprising owners. The main floor, 
devoted to the firm's splendid and unrivalled stock, is 32x152 feet in 
dimension, with a ceiling fifteen feet high The cellarage accom- 
modations beneath are unexcelled, which, with the warehouse in the 
rear, completely filled, enables them to fill the largest wholesale 
orders. 

The gentlemen are popular and respected citizens, noted for 
their honorable methods and sterling integrity, and worthily main- 
tain the lead as importers of wines and liquors, controlling, as they 
do, the best class of trade in this city and all through the state. 

RYAN BLOCK. 

(See Illustration, Page lo. No. 65.) 

This block of buildings, situated on the southwest corner of 
Second and Brady streets ( the two principal business streets of the 
city), is four stories high, with large, airy basement, and is the model 
office building in the city. The basement is occupied almost entire 



by H. A Pearne as a candy factory, working about fifteen hands. 
The first floor has three store-rooms, the corner, No. loi, being 
occupied by the Boston store, Harned, Pursel, & Van Maur, pro- 
prietors ; the middle store, No. 103, by H. A. Pearne, wholesale and 
retail candies, and the west store, No. 105, by M. Carroll, dry goods. 
On the second floor Dr. J. B. Morgan has the handsomest dental 
parlors in the state ; Miss Hazen, art studio ; Dr. Hazen, an elegant 
suite ; the Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company, Messrs. Lyman 
& Miller, agents, and W. T. Dittoe and W. M. Chamberlain, attor- 
neys, have each handsome rooms. On the third floor the North- 
western Mutual Life Insurance Company, of Milwaukee, have three 
elegant rooms finely fitted, and are as handsome office rooms as 
can be found in any city, George E. Copeland, general agent. In a 
large, airy front suite the Equitable Life, of New York, holds forth, 
Charles G. Bliss, general agent. The entire west half of this floor 
is made into a very handsome little hall (24x75) for dancing parties, 
with reception-rooms adjoining. 

The entire fourth floor is occupied by the Iowa Commercial 
College, Wood & Van Patten, proprietors, and is the largest and 
best-equipped school of the kind in the state. Here actual busi- 
ness principles are taught — telegraphy, short-hand, and steno- 
graphy — besides the ordinary penmanship, book-keeping, etc., of 
ordinary commercial schools. 

The entire building — store-rooms, each office, and the college 
— is heated by steam, and has every convenience of a modern 
building. The offices are rented to tenants, including steam-heating 
and janitor service, Mr Ryan having a janitor employed by the 
year to take care of the offices, keep the halls and stairways always 
neat and clean, and there is no such kept building in the city, 
which fact makes the building, together with its unexceptional 
location, a most popular office and business building. 

SICKELS, PRESTON & COMPANY. 

(See Illustration, Page 3, No. 3S.) 

Sickels, Preston & Company, wholesale hardware, metals, tin- 
ners' stock, rope, paints, and oils. This house was established in 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



23 



MANUFACTURER OF AND DEALER IN 



C HARLES HILL 

MANUFACTURER OF A] 

-=FURNITURE=- 

CARPETS, AND DRAPERIES. 
317 AND 319 W. Second Street, DAVENPORT. IOWA. 



W. 



P. HALLIGAN & CO., 



Dealers in Anthracite, Blossburg, and Soft Coals, 

S. E. Cor. Fifth and Harrison Streets, Davenport, Iowa. 



T 



HEO. KLAHN, 



WESTERN LANDS A SPECIALTY. 



LAND AND STEAM-SHIP AGENT, 



225 West Second Street, 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



■pAMOUS" : : 127 W- Second St., DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

BOOT AND SHOE HOUSE. 
A. F. JUDIESCH, THE LEADER IN LOW PRICES. 



C L LINDHQLM. 

No. j/6 Perry Street, Davenport, loiva, 

MERCHANT TAILOR. 

Work at Lowest Prices Warranted. 

Dealer in Imported and Domestic Piece-Goods . 



F.. D. ROBESON & SONS. 

STOCK DEALERS, 

And Wlwlesate and Retail dealers in 

Fresh and Smoked Meats, 

Telephone 204. No. 426 Brady St., Davenport, Iowa. 



H 



ANS F. GRILK, 



Agent for Burks' Stoves and Rajiges. 



Dealer in Stoves, Tin and Copper Ware, 

And House-Furiiishi-iig Goods, 
304 Harrison Street, DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



JV^ NIEGGE & HARTUNG 

Manufacturers of Fine Cigars, and dealers in Smolrrs' Articles, 
For a good Ten- Cent Cigar, smoke Signal Service and Commerce. 

Five- Cent Brands: Red Cloud and Special. 
327 Brady Street, DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



c 



HAS. SCHAKE, 



MERCHANT TAILOR AND CLOTHIER, 

jjo West Second Street, detzveen Harbison and Ripley Streets, 

DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

P. B. HARDING , ^^-- ^- 

The Osborne Steel-Frame Self-Binders and Mowers, 

the Advance Threshers atid Etigines, 

And Dealer in GENERAL FARM MACHINERY. 

Also agent for the American, Standard, and Helpmate 
SEWING MACHINES. 

N. W. Cor. Second and Harrison Sts., Davenport, Iowa. 



I 



24 THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 

The Fair * EMERSON ^ The Fair 



MAIN ENTRANCES 



5 and lo Cent Store, China Hall, gg Cent Store, Pictures, Paintint^s, and Picture Frame Departuient, 

1 20 West Second Street. 122 West Second Street. 124 West Second Street. 124] West Second Street. 



^Wholesale Department, Third Floor.^ 

BARGAINS IN ALL KINDS OF MERCHANDISE. 

CKClCKERY, CHINA, SILVER-PLATED WARE, TRUNKS AND SATCHELS, TOYS, 

C;LASS\VARE, clocks and watches, hooks AND STATIONERY, NOTIONS, 

TINW.^RK. JEWLERY, FISHING TACKLE, FANCY GOODS, 

WOODENWARE, GUNS AND REVOLVERS, SPORTING GOODS, BIRD CAGES, 

HARDWARE, HARNESS, JAPANESE GOODS, MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, 

LAMPS AND SADDLERY, [lABY CARRIAGES, HASKKT GOODS, 

LAMP CJOODS, WHIPS, ETC. WILLOWWARE. 

EVERYBODY INVITED TO VISIT OUR MAMMOTH STORE. ' EMERSON & COMPANY, Proprietors. 

[See Illuslration, Page 9, No. 61.] 



Ill West Second Street, W DEUTSCH DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

Dealer in Staple and Fancy Dry Goods. 

Always the Latest Novelties at the Lowest Prices. 

MANUFACTURER AND IMPORTER OE LADIES^ MLSSES' AND CHILDREN'S CLOAKS. 

Cloaks and Wraps made to order. 



H. DEUTSCH, 111 West Second Street. 



[See Illustration, Page 4, No. 43 ' 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



25 



1853, and has steadily increased in magnitude of business. It now 
ranks among the largest houses in its line in the west. The main 
business of the firm is conducted in their wholesale store, Nos. 121 
and 123 West Third street, a large and capacious store fully stocked. 
They have also a large retail establishment, No. 226 West Second 
street, where, in addition to a full line of hardware, they carry the 
largest stock of belting and mill-furnishing goods in this section. 
They also have two large warehouses on Front street for the 
storage of nails, wire, pumps, wheelbarrows, building-paper, and 
other bulky goods 

AUGUST STEFFEN. 

tSee Illustration, Page 2, No. 36.) 

August Steffen, wholesale and retail dry goods and notions, 
Nos. 226, 228, and 230 West Second street, corner of Harrison, 
commenced the above business in 1878, being exclusive retail until 
1882, when the jobbing department was opened. The business in- 
creased to such an e.xtent that they were compelled twice to enlarge 
their establishment, and now occupy three floors and basement. 
The first or main floor is used for retail, and measures 44x150 feet, 
and the wholesale department occupies the second and third floors, 
each of which have the enormous dimensions of 66x150 teet. 

Four traveling salesmen and forty-four employes constitute the 
working force of this establishment. The annual sales amount to 
$500,000. 

ST. JAMES HOTEL. 

(See Illustration, Page 2, No. 33.) 

The St. James Hotel is located opposite the ferry-landing, 
corner of Front and Main streets. It was built by Judge James 
Grant in 1876, and was first opened by Mr. Charles Ryan, and 
afterwards run by Mr. James Bellows, until it fell into the hands of 
its present manager, Mr. Gough B. Grant, who became proprietor 
September ist, 1879. The above hotel has a capacity of forty-five 
sleeping-rooms, nearly half of which are double. The St. James is 
largely patronized by commercial travelers, and ranks second to 
none as a $2.00 per day house. Its popularity has continued to 
grow to such an extent that Mr. Grant is putting up an addition, by 



which he will be able to accommodate twenty-five to thirty more 
guests. The new building is situated on Main street, with a front- 
age of forty-one feet; will be three stories high and forty-five feet 
deep. It will be a hanHsnme structure, and add much to the 
appearance of Main street 

A. W.-VRNEBOLD (FARMERS MILLS). 

(See IHustratioti, Page 8, No. sy.) 

The Farmers Mills, situated on Harrison and Eighth streets, 
were built by Winn & Blagrooz in 1873. This firm done a flour- 
ishing business until July, 1S77, when they sold their interest to 
Warnebold & Wittenberg. These gentlemen being so well and 
favorably known for their sterling business qualifications, under 
their superior management the mills soon began to show signs of 
rapid improvement. The demand for their flour increased so that 
in a short time they found that in order to keep their trade fully 
supplied they would have to enlarge the capacity of their mill. 
Finally, in 18S1, the mill was changed to the new roller system with 
double capacity. The flour since jiroduced by the new system is 
universally acknowledged to be equal if not superior to any in the 
market. They give employment to twenty-one men. 

On June i6th, 1887, Mr. Wittenberg sold his interest to A. 
Warnebold, who is now controlling the whole mill. 

M. WEIDEMANN. 

(See Illustration, Page 3, No. 37.) 

M. Weidemann, wholesale dealer in notions, white goods, em- 
broideries, laces, and trimmings, hosiery and millinery goods, a 
resident of Davenport since 1852, was engage in the wholesale 
and retail dry goods business until 1873, but for the last two years 
has been conducting the present business at No. 113 West Second 
street. 

YOUNG & HARFORD. 

(See Illustration, Page lo. No. 66.) 

This firm was founded in i860, by D. T. Young, and was con- 
tinued by him until 1880, when George H. Young was admitted as 
a partner, the firm name being D. T. Young & Son, until 1881 It 



i 



26 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



GIIS HAASE. WM. HAASE. 

HAASE BROS. 

Hliolem'lc 'Dealers in ]\ ines and Liquors, 

No. 216 West Third Street, 

DAVENPORT, IOWA 

r^ ANN ON & McGUIRK. 

Collectwtn promptly attended to. A I I R N EY b Al LAW. 

Telephone No. .f2$. S. II'. Cor. Third and Brady S/s., Davenport, loiva. 

CTEAM MUSTARD MILLS , 1 IT SONNTAG 

The Theo. Tiedemaim Co.. Plumber and Gas Fitter, 

Manufacturers ol and Wholesalers in all ■•^'"' ^"'"^ agent for Hydraulic Beer Pumps, 

kinds of Mustard, j2t West Third Street, 

624 W. Third Street, Davenport, Iowa. Davenport, Iowa. 

TJINCHER'S SUMMER GARDEN, 

Popular Summci Resort. 

Concerts every Wednesday evening, and Sunday afternoon and evenijtg, 
by Strasser's Uyiion Band. 

Teleplioiic 343. Twelfth and Brown Sts., Davenport, Iowa. 

n^HE FEDERAL LIFE ASSOCIATION 

-*• is recognized by the Insurance Department ol Iowa as one 
ol the leading- companies in the State. 

It has an accumulated Keserve Fund of over 520,000, which is being added to constantly. 

It has paid in death losses over S40.000. It pa\s all valid claims i)romptly and in fidl. 

Cost of insurance stated definitely, and nia\ he paid Iti yearly, semi-annual, or quarterly 
payments. All securities for investments made are deposited and held by the Auditor of 
State. It will pay you to investigate the plans and workings of the 

FEDERAL LIFE ASSOCIATION, 
F O. Block, Cor. Third and Perry Sts , Davenport, Iowa. 



H. HUEBINGER. 

CONFECTIONERY, 

FANCY BAKERY AND RESTAURANT, 

ICE CREAM AND CAKES. 

Dinners and Suppers to order. Warm Meals at all hours. 

Difiner from 12 to z F. 3/. 

Telephone No. 60. 322 Brady Street, DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



'OHN M. KILLIAN, 



r 

J Decorative Paper- Hanger, House and Sign Painter, 

AND GRAINER. 
Whitening done on short notice. 

Shop, ^12 West Second St., bet. Scott and Western Aves., Davenport, Iowa. 



H. WHITAKER, 



H 



SCHNECKLOTH, 



Contractor and Bnitder, 
Manufacturer 0/ Sash, Doois, and Blinds^ 
loio to 1016 East Front Street. 

Davenport^ Iowa. 



BOTTLER,- 



516 Harrison Street, Davenport^ Iowa. 



\ LBERT F. MIEKLEY, . 

Cotitractor, House Builder, and Carpenter , 

No. 314 West Fifth Street, DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



URMEIER & RASCHER. 



Henry Kurmeier, Frank Rascher. 

Cooking and Heating Stoves, Tin and Sheet-Iron Ware. Jobbing and Roofing Done. 
224 Second Street, Davenport, Iowa. 



K 



T)1CHARDS' DRUG STORE AND PHARMACY, 

212 Brady Street, Davenport, Iowa. 



7 L. REID 

I • Dealer in Stoves and Tinware, also New and Second-Hand 

Furniture and House-Furnishing Goods. 

218 Brady Street, Davenport, Iowa. 



I 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



was then reorganized under the firm name of George H Young & 
Company, the company being Mr. E. S. Ballord, a gentleman of 
liberal means, and one being identified with Davenport interests. 
The business was materially enlarged and was continued until the 
spring of 1884, when T. W. Harford purchased of E. S. Ballord his 
interest in the concern, and the name was changed to Young & 
Harford, under which it now exists. George H. Young has been 
fully schooled in every detail of carriage building, and is fully com- 
petent to superintend the work with which he has been so long con- 
nected. T. W. Harford has long been upon the road, and has the 
care of disposing of the out-put of the firm. The specialties of this 



firm are spring wagons and top buggies, of which they will manu- 
facture none but the best — such as can be fully recommended and 
warranted. But not every buyer of a buggy cares for these 
qualities, but rather looks for cheapness. For such customers 
Young & Harford carry a full line of the machinery-made buggies, 
which are having a large sale. They are agents for the Standard 
Wagon Company, of Cincinnati, who build the best cheap work on 
the market. Their trade extends throughout Iowa, Minnesota, 
Missouri, Nebraska, and Kansas, and by the united efforts of the 
partners, their business is mcreasing rapidly, and it bids fair to be 
one of the prominent manufacturing firms of the city and state. 



5 



A. HuEBINGER. 



M. HUEBINGER. 




CoDicr Tliiid and Bradv Strccls^ I^ai'fupoii, foiva. 



Large Portraits a Specialty. 



? 



i 



28 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



/CO NSOL IDATED TANK LINE CO 

Carbon and Lubricating Oils, 
M. MAXON, Manager. 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



H. 



B. POHLMANN. 



U AT FACTORY. 



Propri/'tor of the Brick Yard. 
1233 Marquette St., Davenport, Iowa. 
Orders from the city solicited. 

Also, goods delivered. 



F. A. BUSSE, Proprietor, 



JZ4 Brady Street^ 



Davenport, Iowa. 



W. 



STERNBERG. 



[ENS HANSEN, 



Proprietor 
West Davenport Machine Shops 

AND BRASS FOUNDRY. 

1642-44 West Locust St., Davenport, Iowa. 



Manufacturer and dealer in 

Fuvnititre of all Kinds, 
1522 West Locust St., Davenport, Iowa. 



D RAMMER & OTT, 

JUI.IUS BRAMMER. LOUIS OTT. 

Dealers in Groceries, Crockery, Hardware, 

Paints, Oils, Etc., 
1647 and 1649 West Third St., 

Davenport, Iowa. 



C BI & NEUMAN, 



Founders and Machinists, 
Manufacturers and dealers in 

FARM MACHINERY, 
Telephone i6s. Cor. Front and Gaines Sts. 
DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



A 



LINDBLOM, 



A 



DAMS MFG. CO. 



Merchant Tailor, Cleaner, 
and Repairer, 

125 East Third St., Davenport, Iowa. 



Installment dealer in Wringers, Silver- 
Plaled Ware, Clocks, Smyrna Rugs, 
Sad Irons. Carpet-Sweepers, Rub- 
ber Coats, Circulars, and other 
Household Necessities. 
Agents Wanted. C. F. Dhwend. Mgr. 

i/g Main St., Davenport, Iowa. 



T)0^nrr)M STOR.P ^"'^^ mustration. page 10, No. 65.] 

HARNED, PURSEL & VON MAUR, 

Dcnlcrs in Foreign and Domestic 

'Dry and Fa /in' doods, % '^ % 

Cor. Second and Bradv Sts., DAVENPORT, IOWA 



rOHN D. BROCKMANN, 



J Dealer in Ge^ieral Merchmidise , 

Sole agent for Budweiser Bottled Beer. Goods delivered free of charge. 

329 Marquette Street, Davenport, Iowa. 



J OSEPH OTTEN, 

Proprietor of the Brick Yard, 

1422 Marquette Street, Davenport, Iowa. 

C>rders from the city solicited. 

Also, goods delivered. 



:MITH & HUGHES, 



Bag Manufacturers, 
iig Brady Street, 

Davenport, Iowa. 



D 



AVENPORT NURSERY, 



Nichols & Lorton, Proprs. 

DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



Q EO. H. ECKMANN , .... 

Dealer in Groceries, Crockery, 

and Hardware , 

901 and 903 West Third Street, 

DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



U ABEL. JR. & CO. 

Dealer in Best Grades of 
Hard and Soft Coal, 

Coke and Blossburg, 
Offices, 307 West Second St.. Cor. Second 
and Davie Sts. Telephoue 121. 

Davenport, Iowa. 



"W ASHINGTON PARK, 



John Wiese, Proprietor, 

Leonard and Marquette Streets, 

Davenport, Iowa. 



B. LINDSAY, 



Plumbing, Gas and 

Steam Fitting, 

No. 128 East Third Street, 

Davenport, Iowa. 



■^ M. CHAMBERLIN, .... 
Attorney at Law, 

S. W. Cor. Second and Brady Sts., 

DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



gUELAU & LANTAU. 



-^ BOOTS ^^ ±^D '^ SHOES,w 



No. 312 W. Second Street, Davenport, Iowa. 



^ 



Abstracts. 
Brown, L. J., 203 W. 3d . , . 



PAGE 

. 34 



Agricultural Implements. 

Ebi & Neumann, 112 and 114 Gaines 28 

Globe Plow Co., 310 to 324 w 3d, tel 259 ... 10 

Hanssen, Louis, 213 and 215 w 2d 20 

Harding, P. B., nw cor. 2d and Harrison . . .23 

Architects. 

Claussen, F. G., 205 w 3d 32 

Hammatt, E. S., sw cor 3d and Brady 6 

McClelland, T. W. & Co., 312 Main 6 

Ross, J. W., 131 e 3d 36 

Attorneys-at-Law. 

Chamberlain, W. M., Ryan Block 28 

Claussen, Ernst, 320 w 2d, tel 3S4 

Gannon & McGuirk, sw cor. 3d and Brady, tel 

425 26 

Heinz & Hirschl, nw cor. 3d and Main, office 

tel 307 32 

Hoersch, William, 225 w 2d 

Koch, G. H., cor. 3d and Main 4 

Martin, W. H., ne cor. 2d and Brady 4 

Peters, Bleik, 325 w 2d 

Schmidt, William O., 301 w 2d, tel 81 20 

Bakers. 

Davenport Steam Cracker Bakery, Reupke, 
Schmidt, & Co., props., nw cor. 4tli and Iowa, 
tel 31 19 

Korn, Henry, Vienna Bakery, 319 Harrison . . 4 

Banks. 
Citizens National Bank, nw cor. 2d and Main, 

tel 265 37 

Davenport National Bank, se cor. 3d and Brady, 

tel 249 2 



IlSTHDEZX: TO -A.ID\7"EI=S.TISER.S. 



♦-^sA*^-* 

Banks — Continued. 

PAGE 

Davenport Savings Bank, sw cor. 2d Main . . 12 
First National Bank, sw cor. 2 and Main, tel 

260 12 

German Savings Bank, 204 w 2d 37 

Scott County Savings Bank, se cor. 3d and 

Brady 2 

Billiard Halls. 

Becker, Gust, 329 w 2d 16 

Hartung, Albert, " Eldorado," 1 16 e 3d, tel 245 18 
Hill, John, 122 and 124 Main 18 

Books and Stationery. 

Berwald, John, 214 w 2d, tel 270 3 

Fluke, W. H., 317 Brady, tel 22S 18 

Frisius, Adolph, 316 w 2d, tel 138 36 

Pepper, G. F., manager Collier's agency, se cor. 

2d and Main, up stairs 8 

Thompson, Thomas, sw cor 3d and Brady, tel 

283 20 

Boots and Shoes. 

Baumgarten & Co., 226 and 228 w 3d 34 

Gruenau, P., 408 w 2d 20 

Hombrecht, A., Utica Shoe Store, 214 Brady . 4 

O'Meara, T. J., 126 w 2d 4 

Schmidt, G. M., 301 w 2d 20 

Suelau & Lantau, 312 w 2d 28 

Bottling Works. 

Collins & Baker, 432 w 5th 34 

Schneckloth, H., 514 and 516 Harrison. . . . 26 
Witt, H. J.. 302 to 306 w Front, tel 386 IS 

Box Factories. 
Brammer, H. F. & Co., 317 to 323 Warren . . 3 

Hadsell & Co., 104 e Front 18 

Moeller & Aschermann Mfg. Co., 519 w 5th, tel 
218 15 



l^rahm & Son, 516 and 518 Harrison, tel 186 . . 9 
Koehler & Lange, Front and Mound, tel 37 . . 34 
Lage & Co., 1235 w 5th, tel 198 13 

Brick Yards. 

Otten, Joseph, 1422 Marquette 28 

Pohlmann, H. B., 1233 Marquette 28 

Builders, Carpenters, and Contractors. 

McClelland & Co.. 312 Main, tel 267 a 

Mickley, Albert, 721 Harrison 26 

Whitaker, J. H., 1014 e Front 26 

Business College. 
Iowa Commercial College, sw cor. 2d and 
Brady, third floor 4 

Candy Factories. 
Pearne Bros., 103 w 2d, tel 310 30 

Carpets and Oil Cloths. 

Hill, Charles, 317 and 319 w 2d, tel 117 23 

Knostman, G. F. & Son, 209 e 2d, tel 120 . . 20 

Carriages and Buggies. 
Mason, J. L., 119 and 121 e 4th, tel 219. ... 8 
Young & Harford, 202 to 206 e Front 27 

China and Glassware. 
Lorenzen, Jens, 221 and 223 w 3d, tel 275 . . . 15 
Schueit, Joachim H., 402 Ripley 20 

Churn Manufacturers. 
Brammer, H. F. & Co., 317 Warren, tel 388 . . 3 
Moeller & Aschermann Mfg Co., 519 w 5th, tel 

218 l.r, 

Cigar Manufacturers. 
Albrecht, Otto & Co., 306 w 2d, tel 347 . ... 6 
Haak, Ferd, iioS to 11:2 w 7th 34 



t 



30 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



C 



~^HAS. H. MEIER'S fire, life, and accident 



INSURANCE AGENCY, 



Representing a large line of OLD and TRIED Firr Insurance Companies, both honir and 

foreign, whose record for prompt payment of losses — large or small — cannot 

be excelled. Policies carefully 7uritfen. 

■ LIGHTNING TORNADOES ■ C) CLONES 

Office: 228 W. Second St. (Steffeti's Block), DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



CHAS. L. ri'ngr:. p. FEPDKBSHN. |R. 



n UNGE & FEDDERSEN, . 

Dealers in GENERAL HARDWARE, 

425 West Second Street, DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



T_T A. PEARNE, successor to PEARNE BROS 

Manufacturing Confectioners^ 

RYAN'S BLOCK Dealers in Fruits, Nuts, and Cigars. 

loi and 103 West Second Street, DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

TIERED. MEHT-, mantfacturer and dealer in 

306 Harrison Street, 



FURNITURE- 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



C^^^ 



-"^i^ 




DIAMOND 



* * 



WORK A — 



t a ft ft 



SPECIALTY. 

OVER S09 BRADY STREET, 



DAVIS BLOCK, 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



P E. PF/JT). 

LEATHER AND FINDINGS, 



Maiiufaclnrcr of 



BOOT ANT) SHOH L'l'PERS. 

^09 West Second Street, DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



JOHN OCHS' SONS 

Reai, Estate and Investment Brokers, 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



T) UDOLPH ROHLFS & CO., fire, life, and accident 



K 



INSURANCE AGENCY 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



HERMANN VOSS, established 187 i. 
Wholesale Dealer and Importer of 

WINES, LIQUORS, ETC. 

411 West Second Street, DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



F 



F. T. Schmidt. J. B. ScHMinr. G. C. Schmidt. 

RITZ T SCHMIDT & SONS, proprietors of . . . 



Ri ACK Hawk Vineyards, 

And Wholesale liquor Dealers and Importers, 
315 West Second Street, DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



31 



Cigar Manufacturers — Continued. 

PAGE 

Karst, Charles, 22S Brady 18 

Kniegge & Hartung, 327 Brady 23 

Kuhnen, Nicholas, cor. 2d and Perry, tel 142 1:5 

Miller, Leopold, 130 e 3d 4 

Raible, F. j., 210 w 2d 18 

Cigar-Box Manufacturers. 
Moeller & Aschermann Mfg Co., 519 w 5th, tel 
218 15 

Cloal<s and Ladies' Furnishings. 
Arnold, M., 129 w 2d, tel 252 3 

Clothing. 

Heeschen & Freese, 103 w 3d 36 

Krause, Robert, 115 and 117 w 2d, tel 126 . . .13 

Moritz & Bros., 121 w 2d, tel 130 15 

Rothschild, Isaac, 102 and 104 w 2d, tel 296 . . 19 
" Why" Store, J. Froehlich, propr., ne cor. 2d and 
Main 36 

Coal Dealers. 
Abel, Henry Jr. & Co., 307 w 2d. tel 121, and 2d 

and Davie, tel 26 28 

Frahm, J. B., 320 Harrison, tel 389 4 

McCosh & Donahue, 310 and 312 e 3d, tel 118 . 16 

W. P. Halligan, 429 Harrison, tel 171 23 

Wylie, J. S.. 217 Brady, tel i ; 420 Harrison, and 

cor. 4th and Front 34 

Coffee and Spice Mills, 
Boldt, William, 109 Brady 34 

Confectionery and Fruits 
Huebinger, Henry, 322 Brady, tel 60 26 

_ Dentists, 

Braun, Carl, 332 w 2d 4 

Kulp, W. O., 114.} w 3d, te! 232 

Druggists. 

J. E. Driscoll, 308 Brady, tel 204 34 

Harrison's Pharmacy, 305 Brady, tel 229 .18 
Richards, C. L., 212 Brady, tel 281 26 



Dry Goods, 

pa(;e 
Petersen. J. H. C. lS: Sons, 217 lo 221 w 2d, tel 

399 l"? 

Stefifen, Aug., 226 to 230 w 2d, tel 381 25 

Arnold, M., 129 w 2d, tel 252 3 

Carroll, M., Ryan Block, 105 w 2d 4 

Harned, Pursel & Von Maur, cor. 2d and Brady, 28 
Deutsch, H.. iii w 2d 24 



Dyers. 
Sebelien, A., 223 Perry 

Flour and Feed. 
Carstens, H. L. W., 413 w 2d . . 



36 



Foundries and Machine Shops, 

Ebi & Neumann, cor. Front and Gaines, tel 165.28 

Sternberg, William, 1642 w Locust 28 

Warhus & Quirk, Front and Brady 32 



Furniture Dealers. 

Hansen, Jens, 1522 w Locust 

Hill, Charles, 317 and 319 w 2d, tel 117 . . 
Knostman & Son, 207 and 209 e 2d, tel 120 

Mehl, Fritz; 306 Harrison 

Nissen, H., 420 w 2d 

Gents' Furnishing Goods. 

Brownson, 131 w 2d, tel 135 

Cameron, W. S. & Son, 127 e 3d, tel 250 . 
Krause, Robert, 115 and 1 17 w 2d, tel 126 . 

Moritz & Bros., 105 w 2d, tel 130 

Rothschild, Isaac, 102 and 104 w 2d, tel 296 



28 
23 
20 
30 
4 



Glucose Manufacturers. 
Davenport Glucose Mfg Co., Rockingham road 
west of City Cemetery, tel 155 7 

Grinders. 
Waldniann, George, 30S Harrison 36 

Grocers. 
Beiderbcckc & iMiller (wholesale), 107 and 109 
w 2d, tel 261 3 



Grocers — Continued. 

PAGB 

Brammer S: Ott, 1647 w 3d, tel 390 28 

Brockmann, J. D., 326 Marquette, tel 164 . . .28 

Eckmann, George, 901 and 903 w 3d 28 

Eckmann & Westphal, 801 and 803 w 4th and 

710 Harrison 34 

Kuehl, C. D., 129 Mound 20 

Guns and Ammunition. 
Berg. Henry, 230 w 3d 20 

Hardware. 
Lamp, Peter, & Co., 211 and 213 w 3d, tel 383 . 36 
Sickels, Preston, & Co., 121 and 123 w 3d, tel 

241 22 

Eckmann & Westphal, (retail) 901 and 903 w 3d 34 

Hanssen, Louis, 213 and 215 w 2d 20 

Reynolds & Gififord, 223 Brady, tel 240 .... 6 
Range & Feddersen, 425 w 2d, tel 124 30 

Harness-makers. 
Hageboeck, John, Jr., 113 and 115 e 3d . . . . 34 
Techentin & Hoyer, 50S w 2d 6 

Hat Manufacturer. 
Busse, F. A., 324 Brady (up-stairs) 28 

Hatters, 

Brownson, 131 w 2d tel 135 5 

Cameron, W. S. & Son, 127 e 3d, tel 250 .... 
Krause, Robert, 115 and 117 w 2d, tel 126 . . 13 
Richter, T., 323 w 2d, tel 251 

Hospitals. 

German Clinic, 217 w i6th, tel 337 10 

Mercy Hospital (Sisters of Mercy) sw cor. Mar- 
quette and Gaston, tel 294 15 

Hotels. 

Atlantic Hotel, 422 and 424 Perry 20 

Farmers Hotel, 212 and 214 Scott 20 

Kimball House, ne cor. 4th and Perry, tel 217 . . 

Laclede House, 208 and 210 e 3d 32 

Pennsylvania House, 402 e 3d 36 

Schauder, Louis, 126 w Front, tel 358 20 



i 



32 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



f] C. THHH & SON. 



DEALERS IN 



FRESH AND SALT MEATS. 



No. 324 Bradv Street, 

DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



P G. CLAUSSEN, 

ARCHITECT, 

Office : Der Demokrat Building. 



TT HANSEN, manufacturer of 

Farm and Spying Wagons. 
All kinds of repairing promptly attended to. 
S. IV. Cor. Third and Harrison Sts.. 

DA VENPORT, lOlVA. 



w 



ALTER HENDER & SONS, dealers .n 

Stoves, Till and Copper Ware, and House- Furnishing Goods. 



Walter Bender. W. H Hender. W. E. Hender. 

No. 21 g Brady Street, 



DA VENl'OR T, lO WA. 



TTEINZ & HIRSCHL, Fred. Heinz. A.J.Hirschl. 



LAWYERS 



202 West Third Street, 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



T^HE BEST $1.00 AND ^1.50 HOUSE IN THE CITY. 



• • LACLEDE HOUSE. 



H. L DeBATTIE, Pruprietor. 



208 and 210 East Third Street, 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



gCHUETZEN PARK. 

iSee Illustration, page V., No. 15.] 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



J. WICHELMANN, Lessee. 



The Most Popular Resort for Family and Public Pic-Nics. 



"ll^ARHUS & QUIRK, .... 

Boilers, Engines, Blake's 
Steam Pumps, and General 

Machinery Supplies. 
Foot 0/ Brady Street, Davenport, Iowa, 



■pOBERT CLAYTON, ... 

Plumber, Gas and Sieam Pipe Fitter, 

Lead and Iron Pipe, Cistern Puvips^ Well 

Pumps, Steam and Water Supplies. 

4o8BradySt., DAVENPORT, lOlVA. 



J 



OHN ZIMMERMAN, manufacturer of 

•'^'" WEBER P.ANos. FIRST-CLASS PIANO FORTES. 

Ware-room and Factory : 120 Main St. < Three doors below First National Bank. 1 
DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



G 



EO. F. KRAMER . 

Justice f^ Peace, Notary Public, § Police Magistrate, 
DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

OTXESEN, 

MILLINERY, EMBROIDERIES, 

MATERIAL POR FANCY WORK, 
WORSTEDS. ETC. 

412 West Second Street, DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



33 



— Continued. 

PAGE 

St. James Hotel, nw cc-. Front and Main, tel 
268 25 

Household Fi lishing Goods. 
Adams, C. F., 119 Main 28 

Infirmaries. 
German Clinic, i6th bet. Main and Harrison, tel 

337 10 

Insurance Agents. 

Babcock, E. J., cor. 2d and Main 16 

Meier, Charles H., 228 w 2d 30 

Montague, A. J., 304 Brady, tel 11 1 :!4 

Rohlfs & Co., 209 w 3d .30 

Insurance Companies. 
Federal Life Association, over post-office ... 26 
Security Fire Ins. Co., First Natl. Bank bldg, tel 
376 16 

Jewelers and Watch-makers. 

Kircher, Mrs. T. , 301 Brady, tel 40 11 

Nabstedt, Martin, 406 w 2d ■ ' . 6 

Reis, Henry, 208 w 2d 8 

Stark & Ruser, 12S w 2d 6 

Tilton, J. C, Davis block, Brady 30 

Job Printing. 
Der Demokrat, 207 w 3d, tel 256 7 

Justices of the Peace. 

Koch, G. H., cor. 3d and Main 4 

Kramer, George F., rooms 3 and 4 Davis block, 

tel 355 32 

Laundries. 
Cruys, C, 112 and 114 w 3d, tel 372 20 

Leather and Findings. 
Peto, F. E., 309 w 2d 30 

Lime and Cement. 
Claussen, William, Front and Ripley, tel 147 . 34 
McCosh & Donahue, 310 and 312 e 3d, tel iiS . 16 



Liquor Dealers. 

PAGE 

Haase Bros., 216 w 3d, tel 106 26 

Roddewig's Sons, 413 and 415 Harrison, tel 184 22 

Schmidt & Sons, 315 w 2d 30 

Voss Herman, 411 w 2d 30 

Livery, Feed, and Sale Stables. 

Burrall, Charles E., Commercial Alley, tel 278 . 34 

Home, Daniel, 215 w 3d, tel 379 6 

Wiese, Fritz, & Sons, 114 Harrison, tel 145 . . 34 
Worley, Charles H., 427 Brady, tel 208 .... 18 

Loan Agents. 

Dahms, J. J., 128 e 3d 16 

McHart, J. C, 112 w 2d, tel 415 4 

Lumber Yards. 

Cable Lumber Co., cor. Front and .Spring, tel 9. 5 
Lindsay & Phelps, Eddy e of Mound, office sw 

cor. 3d and LeClaire, tel 29 13 

McClelland, T. W. & Co., cor 4th and Harrison, 

tel 267 6 

Mueller, Christ, 2d and Scott, tel 167 ir> 

Marble Works. 

Davis & Camp, 224 e 3d 20 

McCosh & Donahue, 211 Perry, tel 118 .... 16 
Schricker & Rodler, 222 Harrison 8 

Meat Markets. 

Robeson & Sons, 426 Brady, tel 204 23 

Thee, H. C, 416 Brady, tel 201 32 

Merchant Tailors. 

Heeschen & Freese, 106 w 3d 36 

Lindblom, A,, 125 e 3d 22 

Lindholm, C. L., 316 Perry 23 

Rothschild, Isaac, cor. 2d and Brady, tel 296 . . 19 

Rieck, Louis, 223 w 2d 34 

Schake, Charles, 330 w 2d 23 

Thompson & Bahls, 118 e 3d 6 



Milliners. 

PAGE 

Emerson & Co., 124 w 2d, tel 334 24 

Forward & Co., 314 w 2d 36 

Koenig, P. & E., 318 w 2d 20 

Ottesen, Julia, 412 w 2d 32 

Petersen, J. H. C, & Sons, 217 to 221 w 2d, tel 

399 • 1~ 

Steffen, August, 226 to 230 w 2d, tel 381 .... 25 
Withrow, Mrs. A. C, 108 w 2d 36 

Flour Mills 

Crescent Mills, 510 to 524 e 4th, tel 28 5 

Farmers Mills, Sth and Harrison, tel 195 . . . 2.') 
Phoenix Mills, cor. Front and Western av., tel 
160 19 

Music Stores. 

Hoyt, John, 303 Brady, tel 230 6 

Wallace, J. C, 116 w 2d, tel 297 36 

Zimmerman, John, 120 Main 32 

Newspaper. 
Der Demokrat, 207 w 3d, tel 256 7 

Notions. 
Eckmann & Westphal, 801 and 803 w 4th ... 34 
Emerson & Co., 120 to 124 w 2d, tel 334 . . .24 
Petersen, J. H. C, & Sons, 217 to 221 w 2d, tel 

399 I'' 

Steffen, August, cor. 2d and Harrison .... 2.5 
Weidemann, M., 113 w 2d 25 

Ocean Steamship Agencies. 

Berwald, John, 214 w 2d, tel 270 3 

Klahn, Theodore, 225 w 2d 23 

Oil Dealers. 
Consolidated Tank Line Co., Federal and Swits, 
tel 416 -^2 

Packing Houses. 
Zoeckler, John L., 1337 w 2d, tel 158 34 

Painter. 
Killian, J. M., 930 w 2d ■!!■ 



i 



34 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



J 



OHN L. ZOECKLER 

POJ^/sT PACKER- 



Office: No. 1337 W. Second St 



DAVENPORT, IOWA 



w. 



F. BAUMGARTEN & CO., dealers ,n . 
BOOTS AND SHOES 



VV. Third St., N, E. Cor. Harrison (Berg's Block), DAVENPORT, IOWA. 

I J. BROWN'S . . LOANS NEGOTIATED. TITLES EXAMINED. 
-'• NOTARY PUBLIC. 

Abstract^ Conveyancing, and Real Estate Office, 

No. 203 W. Third .Street, S W. Cor. Main, DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



T H, RIECK, 

Mercliant lailor, 

223 W. Second St., Bet. Main (5' Harrison, 
DAVENPORT, JOM'-.-l. 



c 



OLLINS & BAKER 

MANLFACTURERS OF 

Soda and Mineral Waters. 

432 West Fifth Street. 

DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



w 



'lESE & SONS, ESTABLISHED 1875. TELEPHONE I45. 

LIVERY AND BOARDING. 

Carriages Furnished at All Hours at Reasonable Charges. 
II / and 1 1 4\ Harrison JSi., Bet. Front and Second^ Davenport, Iowa, 



J 



E. DRISCOLL, 



Druggist and Chemist. 
Perfumery^ Toilet and Fancy Articles, etc. 

Prescriptions a Specialty. 
308 Brady St., DA VENPOR T, lOIVA. 



A J. MONTAGUE, 

Real Estate, Loans, and Insurance. 

Have Always Ready Bargains in Real 

Estate. Eirst- Class Loan 

Securities. 

304 Brady St., DA VENPOR T, 10 IV A. 



r^QAT .... J. S. WYLIE. DEALER ,N . 

HARD AND SOFT COAL, 

Lehigh a Specialty. 



F' 



|ERDINAND HAAK, . . Great Western Cigar Manufactory. 

MANUFACTURER Op 

RosadeOro. La Doncella. FT f AT 17 r" TT' J f? C Pure Quill. 

Tea Rose. Little Dot. HaaksCuba. ri l\ H, ^l^r^tly^) MyBeaut\. 

1110 & 1112 W. Seventh St., DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



T^OEHLER & LANGE, ' 

ARSENAL BREWERY- 



H. KOEHLKR. 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



^\\ / M. CLAUSSEN, wholesale and retail dealer in 

Cordova aiid Sugar Creek Lime, 

Plaster Paris, Sand, Plaster, Plastering Hair, St. Louis Fire-Brick 

and Fire- Clay. DA VENPOR T, lO WA. 



THE ARC-SCALES 
The Little Wonder Postal Scale, 
the Posta.iie-Rate Scale, the Home Friend, 
the Everlasting, the Plantation, and 
the Double-Index Counter Scale. 

ARC-SCALE MFG. CO MP A N } ; 
Works : Rock Island St., DA VENPOR T. 



VV A/,„ 



.LIAM BOLDT, 

Manufacturer of and Wholesale 
Dealer in Roasted Coffees., Spices., Bluings, 

Elavoring Extracts, etc. 
no East Front Street, 

DAVENPORT. 10 IV A. 



r^ E. BURRALL, telephone 278. 

LIVERY, FEED, f^^ SALE STABLE, 



Commercial Alley. 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



E 



CKMANN & WESTPHAL, dealers m . . . Terms Cash. 
Groceries, Crockery, and Provisions, 

DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



801 and Soj W. Fourth Street, 

and yj6 Harrison Street, 



Telephone No. i. 



DAVENPORT IOWA. 



TOHN HAGEBOECK, manufacturer and dealer in 

Harness, Saddles, Collars, Bla^ikets, etc. 
Ill and 113 East Third Street, DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



35 



Paints, Oils, and Glass. 

PAGE 

Naeckel & Son, 405 w 2cl '20 

Reynolds & Gifford, 223 Brady, lei 240 .... 6 

Photographers. 
Huebinger Bros., 3d and Brady 27 

.• Physicians, 
Hazen, E. H., Ryan's Block, cor. 2d and Brady 18 
Hoepfner, Gustav, i6th bet Harrison and Main 10 
Jaenicke, A., i6th and Harrison 10 

Pictures. 

Berwald, John, 214 w 2d, tel 270 3 

Fluke, W. H., 317 Brady, tel 228 18 

Thompson, Thomas, sw cor. 3d and Brady, tel 

283 20 

Piano factory. 
Zimmerman, John, 120 Main 32 

Picture Frames, 

Berwald, John, 214 w 2d, tel 270 3 

Frisius, Adolph, 316 w 2d, tel 138 36 

Naeckel & Son, 405 w 2d 20 

Thompson, Thomas, sw cor. 3d and Brady, tel 
283 20 

Plow Manufacturers. 
Globe Plow Co., 322 w 3d, tel 259 10 

Plumbers, Gas and Steam Fitters. 

Clayton, R. C, 408 Brady 32 

Davenport Steam Heating Co., iiS w 3d, tel 11. 7 

Eyer, Peter, 416 w 2d 1 

Lindsay, J. B., 128 e 3d 22 

Sonntag, H., 227 Harrison 26 

Real Estate Agents. 

Brown, L. J., 203 w 3d 34 

Dahms, John J., 128 e 3d 16 

Klahn, Theodore, 225 w 2d 23 

McHart, J. C, 205 Brady, tel 415 4 

Montague, A. J., 304 Brady, tel III 34 

Ochs', John, Sons, 126 Main 30 



Restaurants 

PAGE 

Becker, Gust., 329 w 2d, tel 170 16 

Hill, John, 122 and 124 Main 18 

Huebinger, H., 322 Brady, tel 60 2(i 

Roofers. 
J. C. Watson cS: Co-, 430 Brady, tel 375 4 

Sash, Doors, and Blinds. 
McClelland, T. VV. & Co., 304 to 312 Main, (el 

267 6 

Roberts, U. N. & Co., 4tli and Harrison, tel 190.2I 

Scale Manufacturers. 
Arc-Scale Mfg Co., 411 and 413 Rock Island . . 34 

Seeds. 
Hanssen, Louis, 213 and 215 w 2d 20 

Sewing Machines. 

Harding, P. B. , 2d and Harrison 23 

Techentin & Hoyer, 308 w 2d 6 

Shirt Manufacturer. 
Cruys, C, 112 and 1 14 w 3d, tel 372 20 

Show-case Manufacturers. 
Bills, John C. & Co., 434 Brady 18 

Sleigtis. 
Mason, J. I^., 119 and 121 e 4th, tel 219 .... 8 
Young & Harford, P>ont and Perry 27 

Soda-water Factories. 

Collins & Baker, 432 w 5th 34 

Witt, Henning, 302 to 306 w Front, tel 386 . . 18 

Steamship Agents 

Berwald, John, 214 w 2d, tel 270 3 

Frisius, A., 316 w 2d 36 

Klahn, Theo., 225 w 2d 23 

Stoves and Tinware. 

Gnik, H. F., 304 Harrison 23 

Hender, Walter, 219 Brady 32 



Stoves and Tinware — Continued. 

PACK 

Kurmeier & R;ischer. 608 \v 2d "26 

Lerch, A. J. & Bro., 122 w 3d, lel 231 20 

Reid,J. L.,2iS Brady 20 

Reiniers & Branch, 414 w 2d 20 

Tobacco. 

Albrecht & Co., 306 w 2d, tel 357 6 

Kuhnen, Nicholas, sw cor. 2d and Perry ... 13 

■ Toys. 

Berwald, John, 214 w 2d, tel 270 3 

Emerson & Co., 124 w 2d, tel 334 24 

Frisius, A., 316 w 2d '. . 36 

Trunk Factory. 
Wirtel.J. W'., 220 Brady 18 

Undertaker. 
Nissen, H., 420 w 4tli, tel 449 4 

Wagon Shop. 
Hansen, Hans. 305 w 3d 28 

Wagon Stock. 
Lamp, Peter & Co., iii and 113 w 3d, tel 383 . 36 

Wall Paper. 
Fluke, W. H., 317 Brady, tel 228 ...... 18 

Naeckel, Charles F., 405 w 2d 20 

Thompson, Thomas, 3d and Brady, tel 283 . . 20 

Washing-machines, Churns, and Boxes. 
Branimer & Co., 317 to 323 Warren, tel 388 . . 3 
Moeller & Aschermann Mfg Co., Scotland 5th, 
218 14 

Wood Dealers. 
Abel & Co., 307 w 2d, and 2d and Davie, tel 126. 2S 

Woolen Mills. 
Davenport Woolen Mills Co., Front e of Bridge 
av "^ 



i 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



rOE FROEHLICH, 



ne " IV/iy " One-Price 

Clothing House, 

Corner Second and Main Streets, 

Davenport, Iowa. 



H 



EN RY SCHNITGER , . . . 
Lessee City Street- Railivay. 



Res. Spring St., North of Front St., 

Davenport, Iowa. 



/\ DOLPH FRISIUS, r./......... 

Importer and Jobber in 

Toys, Stationery, and Fancy Goods, 

Druggists' Sundries, Cliina, ]?oliemian Glassware, Musical Instruments, 
X'iolin Strings, Etc. 

316 West Second St., bet. Harrison and Ripley Sts., Davenport, Iowa. 



A 



UG. SEBELIEN'S 



Iowa State Steam Dye and Cleansing Works, 

And Repairing Establishment. 
22s Perry Street, bet. Second and T/iird Sts., Davenport, loiva. 



G 



EO. WALDMAN, 



Cutler and Grinder, 



Dealer in all kinds of Cutlery and Barber Supplies. 

Razors, Shears, Clippers, Lawn Mowers, and all kinds of 
edged tools Ground and Repaired. 

30S Harrison St , Davenport, Iowa. 



H EESCHEN & FREESE, 



^ MERCHANT * TAILORS, ^ 



106 West Third St.. Davenport. Iowa. 



J. 



W. ROSS, 



C. WALLACE, 



Architect and Superintendent 

of Buildings, 

Eldridge Block, Cor. Third & Perry Sis. 

DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



Gold String, and other Pianos. 

iig H^est Second St. Telephone 297. 

DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



P ETER LAM P & CO. 



Steel, Iron, Heavy Hardware, 

Carriage and Wagon Woodware, Etc. 

Third St., between Main and Harrison Sts. 

DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



M"^ 



RS. A. C. WITHROW, 



108 West Second Street, Davenport, Iowa. 
A fine line of Millinery, including Special 

and Exclusive Shapes not to be found elsewhere. 



P 



ENNSYLVANIA HOUSE, 



Jos. Traeger, Proprietor. 

Best One-Dollar-a-Day House in the City. 
Good Stabling in Connection. 

N. E. Cor. Third and Iowa Sts., Davenport, Iowa. 



FORWARD & CO. 



Wholesale and Retail 

'Millinery and Fancy Goods, 

.41 Loivesl Prices, at the Forward Store. 
We make a Specialty of all kinds of Embroidery Materials. 

314 West Second St., Davenport, Iowa. 



t 



THE CITY OF DAVENPORT AND VICINITY. 



37 






Capital, 
Surplus, 






H. LISCHER, 

President. 



German Savings Bank, 

DAVENPORT, IOWA. 






^f 



$800,000. 
60,000. 



Five per cent interest Paid on Deposits. 

Money Loaned on Real Estate and Personal Security. 



Doors Open from 9 a. m. to 3 p. m., and on Saturdays to 8 p. m. 



OFFICERS. 



H. H. ANDRESEN, 

Cashier. 



L. WAHLE, 

Vice-President. 

JOHN F. BREDOW, 

Asst. Cashier. 



DIRECTORS. 

OTTO ALBRECHT. JENS LORENZEN. 

H. H. ANDRESEN. F. H. GRIGGS. 

DANIEL GOULD. NICHOLAS KUHNEN. 

L. WAHLE. HENRY LISCHER. H. TECHENTIN. 



Citizens National Bank, 



OF DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



CAPITAL, $100,000.00. 



SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS, $130,000.00. 



OFFICERS. 



F. H. GRIGGS, 

President. 

E. S. CARL, 

Cashier. 



ROBT. KRAUSE, 

Vice-President. 

ADOLPH PRIESTER, 

AssT. Cashier. 



DIRECTORS. 

T. VV. McClelland. Nicholas Kuhnen. F. H. Griggs. 

Robert Krause. P. T. Koch. Daniel Gould. 

Otto Albrecht. D. N. Richardson, H. H. Andresen. 

W. C. Wadsworth. Jens Lorenzkn. 



A GENERAL BANKLNG BUSINESS TRANSACTED. 
Foreign Exchange Sold at the Lowest Rates. We issue our own Drafts on all the Principal Cities of Europe. 



t 







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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS * 



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