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Full text of "First Dutch (Reformed) cook book"

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REMOVAL 



NEW STORES 



E. L. HEWSON, 



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GENTS' FURNISHERS, 

Near Main Street. PATERSON, N. J. 



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THE CELEBRATED 



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ARE CERTAINLY THE BEST! 

CONSIDERING THE QUALITY THE CHEAPEST!! 



Sold for Lowest Cash, or Rented. 



Illustrated Catalogue of 100 styles, with net prices, sent 
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Instrnineuts of all otlier Makers Fnrnisliefl. 

S. FRANCISCO, Agent, 



IV ADVERTISEMENTS. 



THE USE AND ABUSE OF A WATCH 



nPHE construction of a watch being very delicate, it is certainly 
very necessary that we should use great care in handling them. 
It requires only a very little thought and careful attention to enjoy the 
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The possession of a watch has become universal. It is not alone 
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That they are suitable for Birthday, Holiday and Bridal Presents, needs 
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Repairing of all kinds done on the premises, with the assistance of 
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Established since March, 1864. 



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173 Main Street, 

PATERSON, N. J. 

Louis A. PlAOBT. S. M. SCHOONMAKER. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



ESTABLISHED THIRTY YEARS. 



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It is due to our many country friends to 
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J.W.ENSIGN&SON, 
UNDERTAKERS, 



271 MAIN STRilET. 

. PATERSON,N. J. * 






A specialty with us is the preservation of bodies without ice, when 
so desired, thereby removing the prejudice which exists in the use of it. 



T i: L 13 I* H O IV E: No. 373. 



JAMES W. ENSIGN. 



FERD. S. ENSIG-N. 



VI 



ADVKETISBMENTS. 



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First Dutch 




COMPILED BY THE LADIES OF THE REFORMED CHURCH 
OF POMPTON PLAINS, N. J. 



1883. 



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COPYRIGHT, 

1883. 



POLHEMUS, PRINTER, VAN SAUN & ARNOLD, 

NASSAU, COR. ANN STREETS, ENGRAVERS, 

NEW YORK. 14 JOHN STREET, NEW YORK. 



INTRODUCTION. 



rr^HE ladies make no apology in presenting to their friends 
-*- this little collection of recipes, as it is intended principally 
for each other's benefit. It has been hastily gathered, but we 
believe there will be found in it something of the ancient hos- 
pitality — the spirit of the hearth-log and crane — for which our 
venerable homes have become proverbial. 

Not many dishes of the olden time can be reduced to print. 
We are glad to crystallize a few, such as Roliches, Souse, Waf- 
fles, Appel Koek, Buhling, but the flavor of good old Dutch 
cookery is not lost, so that what we term our modern dishes 
may be sweetened to the taste of our childhood. 

Time has forbidden the correction of individual manuscripts, 
and most of the recipes appear as originally written. The 
names and initials attached to many of them will disclose the 
fact that we have enjoyed the co-ojieration of ladies from be- 
yond our immediate community, for whose assistance, and 
that of all who in various ways have aided us, we offer our 
cordial thanks. 

PoMPTON Plains, N. J., June, 1883. 



" Of all appeals— although 
I grant the power of pathos and of gold — 
Of beauty, flattery, threats — a shilling — no 

Method's more sure at moments to take hold 
Of the best feelings of mankind, which grow 

More tender, as we every day behold 
Than that all-softening, overpowering knell — 
The tocsin of the soul — the dinner-bell !" 

— Byron. 



It is important to bear in mind the necessity and economy 
of keeping good stock for soup constantly on hand. The 
soup will be better if the stock is made the day before, as 
the grease may be easily removed — an essential item in pre- 
paring good soups. 

To Prepare the Stock. — Buy a knuckle of beef or veal. 
Have the bone well cracked in small pieces. Put in a closely 
covered iron kettle, and, for a medium-size piece, add five or 
six quarts of cold water. Let it come to a boil, then add 
seasoning to the taste, and, if agreeable, a small pinch of red 
pepper. Set the kettle on the back part of the stove after it 
once commences to boil, and keep it simmering gently all 
day. Then strain into a pot kept for the purpose. The 
next morning carefully remove the hardened grease that has 
risen to the top, and you will have a clear, rich stock ready 
for use. 

TOMATO SOUP— No. 1. 

Four good-sized ripe tomatoes, skinned and sliced, boiled 
tender in one pint of water. Then add one small half tea- 
spoonful of soda, dissolved in hot water, and used while 
foaming. Add one pint of boiling milk, set oflE and season 
to taste with butter, pepper and salt. A. V. N. 

TOMATO SOUP— No. 2. 

Take a shank piece of beef with a marrow-bone. Cover 
well with cold water and boil slowly three hours. Then re- 
move the grease, season with pepper and salt, and thicken 



6 DUTCH (reformed) 



with rice. Put the contents of one can of tomatoes into the 
soup, boil up and serve. One can of tomatoes is sufficient for 
five or six quarts of soup. Mrs. J. C. Christie. 

CHICKEN SOUP. 

Take two good-sized fowls, boil until very tender. Season 
with pepper and salt, four or five sliced onions and a little 
parsley. Have on hand plenty of boiling water to add to the 
soup as it boils away. When the chickens are done, remove 
from the pot and cut them up. Have ready, in a spider, but- 
ter nicely browned ; lay the pieces of chicken in and brown 
them. When about ready for use drop into the soup four or 
five potatoes, quartered, and a half bowlful of flour, wet with 
a little cold water. Boil up once and serve. 

Mrs. p. Hopper. 

VERMICELLI SOUP. 

Make a rich soup of veal, mutton or fowls. Season with 
salt, two onions sliced, sweet herbs, a head of celery, cut 
small. Boil until the meat falls to pieces and, if necessary, 
strain the soup. Then add ^ lb. of vermicelli and let it boil 
ten minutes. The addition of a little pearl barley will be an 
improvement. Mrs. Wm. Roome. 

GEEEN PEA SOUP. 
One peck of green peas, four tablespoonfuls of lard heated 
in the kettle ; put in the peas and stir them until perfectly 
green, add pepper and salt and pour in as much water as you 
want soup. Boil three-quarters of an hour ; then add one 
teacupful of milk thickened with one tablespoonful of flour ; 
put into the soup two or three young onions cut fine and fried 
in butter to a light brown. Just as you take it up add 
the yolks of two eggs beaten in a little cream. 

NOODLES FOR SOUP. 
Beat one egg light ; add a pinch of salt and flour enough 
to make a stiff dough ; roll it out in a very thin sheet, dredge 



COOK BOOK. 



with flour to prevent sticking, then roll up tightly. Begin at 
one end and shave down fine like cabbage for slaw. 

Mrs. T. C. Doremus. 

CLAM SOUP. 
Fifty small clams. Take two quarts of water and let it 
boil. Then add two tablespoonfuls of flour, mixed thin in 
water, and boil ten minutes. One pint of milk, let boil to a 
foam. Chop the clams fine and stir a few rolled crackers 
with them in a separate dish ; put in a lump of butter and 
pepper; pour the clams in the boiling water and let simmei- — 
the longer the better. Mrs. Geo. Roome. 

OYSTER STEW. 
Drain the liquor from the oysters and dilute with water to 
make the desired strength. Use one half pint of milk to one 
quart of oysters. Put the liquor, milk, butter, pepper and a 
little salt in the kettle together and let them come to a boil. 
When boiling drop in the oysters. Boil two or three minutes 
and it is ready for the table. Mrs. C. Doremus. 

BEAN SOUP. 
Soak one quart of beans in warm water over night. In the 
morning renew the water and put on to boil with a piece of 
salt pork. When the beans are soft take them out, press 
them through a colander, and put them back in the water in 
which they were boiled. It improves it to add three hard- 
boiled eggs, quartered, just bringing the soup to a boil after 
adding the eggs. When served, cut up half a lemon in thin 
slices, and lay in the bottom of the tureen, pouring the hot 
soup over them. Mrs. W. R. 

VEGETABLE SOUP. 
Four good-sized potatoes, boiled with a small half cup of 
rice in three quarts of water. Add three onions, two toma- 
toes, one large spoonful of butter, a little parsley. Thicken 
with one small half cup of flour smoothed in one tablespoon- 
ful of milk. Season with salt and pepper to taste. 

A. V. N. 



DUTCH (reformed) 



BEEF SOUP. 

Take about two pounds of leati beef, cut it up in small 
pieces and boil about an hour. Then skim off all the fat and 
add two onions cut in small slices, a carrot, some celery or 
celery seed and rice, with seasoning. When nearly done add 
some parsley leaves. Mrs. G. R. 



In boiling fresh fish, clean, wash thoroughly, wipe dry, and 
then sew up in a cloth kept solely for fish, and plunge at once 
into boiling water that has been first well salted. When done, 
cut the threads down the back of the fish and cut the skin of 
the fish, so that in taking off the cloth the skin will come off 
with it, leaving the fish white and whole. Eat with egg 
sauce or plain drawn butter. When you broil fish, grease the 
broiler with butter or lard to prevent sticking. Lay the 
skin side down first. Fish that is to be fried should be 
rolled in fine bread crumbs or Indian meal; that which is apt 
to break in frying may be kept whole by being dipped in a 
beaten egg before it is rolled in the bread crumbs. Pork fat 
gives a particularly nice flavor to fish. 

BAKED BLUE FISH. 

Place the fish in a well-greased dripping-pan, and after 
sprinkling with salt and pepper, both inside and out, place in 
the oven and bake about an half hour. Serve with drawn 
butter and chopped parsley. An egg well beaten and stirred 
in before adding the boiling water improves drawn butter 
for fish. R. 



COOK BOOK. 9 



CREAMED SALMON. 
Put the contents of a can of salmon in a pan on the fire 
where it will heat without burning. Then scald one pint of 
milk, thicken it with two tablcspoonfuls of flour moistened 
with cold milk and add one saltspoonful of palt. Serve the 
salmon on a hot flat dish and heap spoonfuls of the cream over 
it. This is an excellent way of using cold boiled fish. 

Mrs. J. C. C. 

BOILED BASS. 

Wrap in a towel a fish weighing about eight pounds. Boil 
forty minutes in a vessel with water enough to cover and a 
little salt. Serve with drawn butter and chopped parsley. 

R. 
SAUCE FOR FISH. 

Two ounces butter, one tablespoonful flour, three gills 
sweet milk, yolk of one egg, salt. 

Mix the butter and flour cold. Add the milk gradually. 
Put on the fire in a tin saucepan. When it thickens add the 
yolk of the egg not beaten. Stir quickly. Serve hot. 

Mrs. T. C. D. 

CODFISH BALLS. 

One teacup of well-soaked codfish ; two cups of potatoes ; 
one Q^'g ; butter, one-half the size of an egg. Flour your 
hands and make into small balls. Fry in lard. 

Mrs. W.R. 

CODFISH CUSTARD. 

One bowlful of codfish picked up fine. Soak in cold water 
until nearly fresh, put in a saucepan and add boiling water. 
Scald (do not boil) the fish, pour the water off, then take two 
tablespoonfulfi of flour, one pint of sweet milk, added little by 
little to the flour to prevent lumping, and pour over the fish. 
Boil just long enough to thicken. Add one egg not beaten ; 
stir quickly and take off the fire immediately. A nice dish 
for breakfast. Mns. D. N. Jacobfs. 



10 DUTCH (eEFORMBD) 



STEWED CODFISH. 

Put the fish in the kettle with hardly enough water to 
cover them, and let them boil about fifteen minutes. Then 
add a lump of butter, a little cream, pepper and salt, parsley, 
and a little flour as thickening. Mrs. G. R. 

FISH FRITTERS. 

Take any kind of cooked fresh fish, remove all the bones 
and chop it finely with half the quantity of bread crumbs, 
adding also half the quantity of cold mashed potatoes. Mix 
into balls, after seasoning well with pepper and salt, a little 
cream or milk, and one egg, well beaten. Fry the fritters in 
boiling-hot lard and serve on a hot platter, garnished with 
water-cresses or parsley. Mrs. R. R. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

In the first place the cook ought not to be hurried. The 
oysters should be large. Drain them from the liquor and 
lay them on a cloth to dry well. Beat the yolks of eggs, add 
to them a little melted butter, a little cayenne pepper, and 
salt to your taste. Dip the oysters in this, then in cracker- 
crumbs rolled very finely, then again in the batter. Fry in 
hot lard. Have enough fat in the pan to cover the oysters, so 
that they will not need to be turned. 

Mrs. J. A. Slingbeland. 

OYSTER PATTIES. 

Put one quart of oysters into a saucejjan with enough liquor 
to cover them, set it on the stove and let it come to a boil ; 
skim well and stir in two tablespoonfuls of butter, a little 
pepper and salt. Line some patty-pans with puff-paste ; fill 
with oysters, cover with paste, and bake twenty minutes in 
a hot oven. The upper crust may be omitted, if desired. 

M. E. D. 
SCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

Cover the bottom of an earthen dish with a layer of oys- 
ters, pepper and salt, with bits of butter. Then cover with 



COOK BOOK. 11 



finely rolled cracker or pulverized bread crumbs. Alternate 
each layer until you have as many as you wish to use, making 
the top layer of cracker or breadcrumbs, dotted well with 
small bits of butter. Add a cupful of milk or cream and 
oyster liquor. Set in the oven, and brown nicely. Do not 
cook them too long. Miss J. M. YA^r Saun. 

PICKLED OYSTERS. 

For 100 oysters take one cup of vinegar, half ounce whole 
mace, half ounce whole pepper, two lemons, pared and sliced. 
Drain the juice from the oysters, add the vinegar, spices and 
lemon, and let it scald. Pour in the oysters, allowing them 
to stand only a few moments ; then place them in a tureen. 
"Wlien cold they are ready for use. 

CLAM CHOWDER. 

Take 30 large-sized clams, wash them thoroughly and place 
them in an iron vessel or pot, with enough water to cover 
them. Boil until the shells open. Then take out the clams, 
strain the liquor and chop the clams fine. Take half-pound of 
corned pork, chop it fine and fry it brown. Take one quart 
of onions, two quarts of potatoes (cut very fine), one quart of 
tomatoes, and six soda crackers, broken up ; add all to the 
liquor, and boil two or three hours. Season to taste. 

Mrs. Nichols. 

CLAM FRITTERS. 

Fifty clams ; use only the soft parts, cut into small pieces ; 
two well-beaten eggs, one cup of milk. Add flour to make 
batter, as for griddle cakes ; half teaspoonful of baking-powder 
being mixed dry with the flour. Take equal quantities of 
butter and lard boiling hot. Drop the batter in with a table- 
spoon, and fry to a deep brown. J. M. V. S. 



12 DUTCH (reformed) 



A 



TO ROAST A LEG OP LAMB, 

Slice salt pork very thin, leaving the rind on to make the 
piece as large as possible. Make as many of these thin slices 
as will cover the whole leg, then wrap the whole in grape 
leaves, pass a string round to keep them on and roast. The 
lamb will be exceedingly juicy and of delicious flavor. Use 
rich soup-stock instead of butter to baste the meat. 

TO BOIL A LEG OP MUTTON OR LAMB. 

Cut off the shank-bone. Have water enough to cover 
the meat. If well skimmed the water will make ex- 
cellent broth for another day. Lamb is neither good nor 
healthful unless well done. Drawn butter with mutton and 
lamb, and cut parsley added, is an improvement. W. 

ALAMODE BEEP.— Plain. 

Take a thick piece of flank or, if more convenient, the 
thickest part of the round, weighing six or eight pounds. Cut 
off the strips of the coarse fat on the edges, make incisions in 
all parts and fill them with a stufiing made of bread, salt pork 
(chopped), pepper and sweet marjoram. Push whole cloves, 
here and there into the meat, roll it up, fasten it with skewers, 
and wind a strong twine or tape about it. Have ready a pot 
in which you have fried to a crisp three or four slices of salt 
pork. Take out the pork, lay in the beef, and brown every 
side. When well browned add hardly enough water to cover 
it, chop a large onion fine, add twenty cloves and boil it gently 
but steadily three or four hours, according to the size. The 



COOK BOOK. 13 

water should boil away so as to make a rich gravy, but be 
careful it does not burn. When you take up the beef, add 
browned flour to the gravy if it needs to be thickened. 

CURRIED BEEF. 

Put two tablespoonfuls of butter in a saucepan, with two 
small onions cut in thin slices, and fry a light brown. Add 
one and a half tablespoonfuls of curry powder, and mix it 
well. Take three pounds of the best of a round of beef, cut 
into inch squares and pour in one-third pint of milk. Let it 
simmer for thirty minutes, stirring constantly to prevent burn- 
ing. Serve hot, in a dish with sliced lemon and a wall of 
mashed potatoes or boiled rice around it. 

Mrs. J. J. Ball. 

The milk of a cocoanut and a quarter of the meat of the nut 
grated fine and squeezed through muslin, soften the taste of 
the curry, and no curry is ever made in India without it. 

BEEFSTEAK SMOTHERED WITH ONIONS. 

Cut up six medium-sized onions. Put them in a spider and 
fry them brown in butter, pepper and salt. Have ready the 
beefsteak broiled, put the onions over it, cover with a dish 
and put in the oven for a few minutes. Miss C. Van Nkss. 

BEEFSTEAK AND OYSTER PIE. 

Take one pound of beefsteak and one pint, or fifty oysters. 
Beat the steak gently with a rolling pin and season it by rub- 
bing pepper and salt into it. 

Take a deep pie dish and line the upper edges with pastry. 
Put the beefsteak on the bottom of the dish and lay the oys- 
ters over it. Put bits of butter all over the oysters and pepper 
and salt to taste. Boil the liquor from the oysters and strain 
over them. Cover with a rich crust. Bake a half hour. 

Mrs. R. R. 

CRUST FOR MEAT PIE. 
Seven cups of flour, one and a half teaspoonfuls of salt, 
five teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking powder, one cup of lard. 



14 DUTCH (reformed) 



enough sweet milk to make as soft a dough as can be conve- 
niently handled. This is only intended for a top crust, and 
is sufficient for two ordinary basins. 

Mrs. Martin R. Roome. 

PIE, OF COLD MEAT. 
Mince any kind of cold meat together. Put it about an 
inch and a half deep in a platter and cover it with gravy. Add 
salt and pepper. Lay over it mashed potatoes smoothed at the 
top. Cut it across in diamonds with a knife. Bake till it is 
crisp and brown at the top. Miss A. E. Slingeeland. 

FRICANDEAU— VEAL LOAF. 
Five pounds veal, two eggs, four ounces salt pork, a little 
salt and pepper. Choj) veal and pork together fine. Mix with 
the eggs one dozen small crackers rolled. Make into a form 
and rub the outside with the beaten eggs, and sprinkle with 
cracker crumbs. Bake two hours, basting frequently with 
butter and water. Miss Anna L. Berry. 

IRISH STEW. 

Cut two pounds of the flank or neck of beef into small pieces, 
rubbing them well with pepper and salt. Peel and slice one 
quart of onions. Place beef and onions in a saucepan with 
just enough cold water to cover them and stew them gently 
for one and a half hours. Then add one quart of peeled po- 
tatoes (cut, if large), and boil the stew until the potatoes are 
soft. Serve hot. Mrs. W. R. 

HASH WITH TOAST. 

Toast half dozen slices of stale bread and soak about half 
a minute in water with a pinch of salt added. Arrange on a 
long meat platter. Put the cold meat, which has been pre- 
viously chopped fine, over the fire ; cover with water and allow 
it to boil off. If you have any gravy left from the meat, re- 
move the fat from the top and add to the hash. Allow it to 
boil a few minutes. A few cold potatoes chopped fine and 
added before removing from the fire are an improvement. 

Mrs. M. R. Roome. 



COOK BOOK. 15 



SUGAR-CURED HAMS. 
One quart salt, one ounce saltpetre, quarter pound sugar, 
for twenty -two pounds of pork. Lay the pork on a slanting 
board or table, and rub the mixture on once a week until all 
is used. Mrs. J. .H Slingerland. 

TO SALT HAM. 
Four gallons water, one and a half pounds sugar, two 
ounces saltpetre, six pounds rock salt. Boil all together and 
skim while boiling. Let it become cold before putting on the 
meat. Pack the meat skin down. Miss A. Jones. 

TO SEASON SAUSAGE. 
Quarter pound salt, one ounce pepper, ten pounds meat. 

A.J. 
ROLICHES.— No. 1. 

After cleaning and preparing the tripe for use, cut it in 
strips ; cut beef in small pieces, seasoning with pepper and 
salt to taste ; then put the meat in the strips of tripe and sew 
them up. Boil until a straw can be run through. Put away 
and press. Mrs. Thos. Mandeville. 

ROLICHES.— No. 3. 
Cut beef in thin strips and season with salt and pepper ; 
take prepared tri^je and lay the beef upon it ; gather over the 
top and sew together firmly ; boil until you can stick a straw 
through. Put this in a large wooden bowl and press with 
weights ; then set away in a pot. Slice and fry, or warm up 
in vinegar. Mrs. J. J. M. 

SOUSE. 
Clean carefully a pig's feet and hocks ; boil till soft ; take 
the meat from the bone and chop, moderately fine, season and 
set it away. Fry in vinegar. Mrs. S. P. Roome. 

TO SHAVE SMOKED BEEF. 
Use a very thin-bladed sharp knife, and shave as thin as the 
thinnest paper. Do not attempt to cut across the piece. No 
matter how small the shavings are, if they are but thin. 



16 nuTcu (reformed) 



SCALLOPED BEEF. 

Take cold corned or roast beef ; cut off all the sinew and 
fat, and cut into small pieces not more than half an inch 
square. Line the bottom of a pudding dish with a crust made 
of sea-foam crackers crumbed fine and moistened with milk, 
then cover with a layer of meat, season with pepper and salt 
and sprinkle with bits of butter. Alternate the layers, and 
cover with a crust of crackers, moistened with milk. 

Before putting on the upper crust, add a cupful of nice 
gravy, or of milk and hot water with a small lump of butter. 
Cover with a plate or pie tin, and bake forty-five minutes. 
Remove the covers and brown nicely. 

Mrs. J. C. Christie. 



EilS* 



Poultry will be much sweeter and finer in flavor if allowed 
to remain in cold water with a little soda from 20 to 30 min- 
utes, to extract the blood. Then hang in a cool place for 
twenty-four hours, in winter even longer, inserting a piece 
of charcoal to keep the flesh sweet. 

ROAST TURKEY. 
Make a dressing with six pounded crackers, one teaspoonful 
of pepper, one tablespoonful of salt, one teaspoonful of sage, one 
of summer savory, one of parsley, two eggs, butter the size of 
an egg and cold water to moisten. Stuff the turkey with this. 
Stuff the breast first, and put the remainder in the body. Now 
cross and tie the legs down tight. Run a skewer through the 
Avings, fastening them to the body. Fasten the neck under 
the body with a skewer and bind all with twine. Rub the 
turkey with salt, and while in the oven baste often with the 



COOK BOOK. 11 



drippings and flowr and, occasionally, with butter. About 
fifteen minutes before dishing baste with butter and dredge 
on a little flour. Allow in roasting, for eight pounds, one and 
a half hours, and fifteen minutes for every additional pound. 
Serve with giblet gravy and cranberry sauce. 

A GOOD WAY TO COOK CHICKENS. 
Take two or more chickens and, after cleaning and washing 
them well in cold water, split them down the back, break the 
breast bone and unjoint the wings to make them lie down 
better in the pan, sprinkling pepper, salt and flour over them. 
Put a lump of butter on each chicken, pour boiling water in 
the pan and set in the oven. Let them cook till very tender 
and brown. Put on more butter and add as much hot water 
as needed for the quantity of gravy desired. Thicken with 
flour. Miss A. E. S. 

AUNT GITTY'S OLD FASHIONED DUTCH CHICKEN POTPIE. 

Vkuy Nice. 

One small bowl of sweet milk. 

One " " thick " 

Half bowl of fat soup of the chicken. 

Four potatoes, boiled and mashed fine. 

Two eggs well beaten. 

Butter the size of an egg. 

One teaspoonful of saleratus. Salt and pepper to taste. 

Mix all together. Then put in the flour and knead 
very soft. Do not roll the crust. Take a lump of the dough 
and thin it with your hand. Have your chicken boiled tender 
with plenty of juice. Take it out and place it in layers be- 
tween the crust as you thin it out. Boil quick and eat hot. 
It is better if not allowed to stand too long when done. 

Mrs. D. N. J. 

TO ROAST WILD DUCKS. 

Wash clean, and fill with a dressing of bread and an onion 
cut into small pieces. Boil until about half done ; then lay 
them on their backs, and spread some slices of salt pork over 
their breasts, and roast. Mrs. G. R. 



18 - DUTCH (reformed) 



ROAST QUAILS. 
Quails are very nice to steam until nearly done. Then roast 
in the oven to a nice brown, basting very often with butter 
melted in water. Mrs. J. R. Evans. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 
To one chicken and one pound of cold veal, chopped very 
fine, almost to a paste, add one-half a chopped onion, one 
tablespoonful of parsley (chopped), one salt spoonful of mace 
and one egg. Take the same quantity of stale bread crumbs 
as of chopped meat. If you have any gravy or stock, heat 
and gradually stir in the bread crumbs until the bread absorbs 
all the gravy and add that to the meat. The mixture must be 
quite smooth and thin. If not thin enough add a little cream 
or milk ; it will whiten the croquettes. Roll the croquettes — 
egg-shaped or cone-shaped — in an egg beaten with a table- 
spoonful of milk, then in the bread crumbs dried in the oven. 
Fry in boiling grease in a deep pan. When done, put them 
on brown paper to absorb the grease. 

DUMPLINGS. 
Seven cups of flour ; one and a half teaspoons of salt ; five 
teaspoons of Cleveland's baking powder ; one tablespoon 
of lard ; three eggs, and enough sweet milk to make a very 
stiff dough. Have a pot half filled with hot water, with a 
large teaspoon of salt added. Drop the dumplings in, cutting 
them with a tablespoon. Boil about fifteen minutes. When 
done, split them with a sharp knife as you take each one from 
the pot, to avoid heaviness. Mrs. M. R. R. 

TO LAY MEAT AND POULTRY ON THE DISH FOR THE 
TABLE. 

Lay a sirloin of beef with the tenderloin down, and the 
thick end toward the left of the person who carves. A loin 
of veal or a quarter of lamb, with the thick edge toward the 
the carver, and the inside uppermost. A leg of veal, with the 
inside up, and the thick end toward the right hand. A leg of 



COOK BOOK. 19 



mutton or lamb in the same way. A fore-qnarter of lamb or 
a breast of veal, with the outside up and the thick edge toward 
the carver. A ham, with tlie outside up, and the thick end 
toward the right hand. A turkey or goose upon the back, with 
the neck toward the left hand. JBowls on the back, and if 
there are more than one, with the legs toward the carver. 

The sharpness of the breast bone, which is a defect in the 
appearance of a fowl on the table, may be remedied in the fol- 
lowing way : When preparing it to be cooked, take a small 
sharp knife, and passing it up the body, cut off the little slen- 
der bones which join the " hug-me-close " to the side. (This 
is the bone on each side of the neck of a fowl.) Then push 
down the breast bone by pressing heavily upon it. A little 
practice will make this easy. The appearance of a fowl when 
on the table depends much upon its having been handsomely 
skewered. ( .) 



SAWCEP^ <eilATlMie^ m%m^ 



DRAWN BUTTER. 
Beat one cup of butter and two tablespoonfuls of flour to a 
cream, and pour over this one pint of boiling water. Set on 
the fire and let it come to a boil, but do not boil. Serve im- 
mediately._ Mrs. J. H. W. 

EGG SAUCE. 
Chop up two hard boiled eggs, and stir into drawn but- 
ter. W. 
OYSTER SAUCE. 
Set a basin on the fire with half a pint of oysters and one 
pint of boiling water. Let them boil three minutes, and then 



20 DUTCH (reformed) 



stir in half a cup of butter beaten to a cream, with two table- 
spoonfuls of flour. Let this come to a boil and serve. L. 

CELERY SAUCE. 

Chop fine two heads of celery, and boil one hour. At the 
end of that time have about one and a half pints of water 
with it, and stir in two tablespoonfuls of flour, wet with 
cold water. Boil this ten minutes, and then stir in two table- 
spoonfuls of butter. Season with pepper and salt, and 
serve. H. 

MINT SAUCE.— (For Roast Lamb.) 

Chop fine half a cup of mint and add a cup of vinegar and 
a tablespoon of sugar. L. 

TOMATO SAUCE. 
Two gallons of green tomatoes sliced ; two quarts of vinegar; 
one quart of sugar ; two tablespoons of salt ; two of white 
mustard ; two of black pepper and one of ground allspice. 
Boil slowly two hours. Then put in stone jars, and it is ready 
for use at any time. It will keep very well. 

Miss Emma Green. 

PARSLEY SAUCE. 
Make drawn butter. Dip a bunch of parsley into boiling 
water, cut it fine and stir into the drawn butter. \ 

TO KEEP PARSLEY GREEN. 
Plunge the parsley into saleratus water and dry for winter 
use. Mrs. J. M. Berey. 

CHILI SAUCE.— For Cold Meats. 
Twenty-seven ripe tomatoes ; 5 green peppers ; 3 onions ; 
3f cups of vinegar ; \^ of sugar ; 3 tablespoons of salt ; l^of 
cloves, cinnamon and allspice. Cook all together 20 minutes. 

Miss M. F. RooMi:. 

CRANBERRY SAUCE. 
Pick and wash the cranberries and put in the preserving 
kettle with half a pint of water on each quart of berries. Put 



COOK BOOK. 21 



sugar over the berries, allowing a pint of sugar to a quart of 
berries. Set on the fire and stew about half an hour. Stir 
often to prevent burning. They will not need straining and 
will preserve their rich color, cooked in this way. Less sugar 
may be used if you do not wish them very rich. ( .) 

ROAST MEAT GRAVY. 

Skim all the fat from the gravy. Add half a cup of boil- 
ing water, if there is about that amount in the pan. Mix one 
teaspoonful of browned flour with cold water, enough to 
make a thin paste. Stir this into the boiling gravy. Season 
with salt and pepper. Strain and serve. ( .) 

ROAST POULTRY GRAVY. 
Boil the heart, gizzard, liver and neck in two quarts of 
water two hours. Then take them up, chop finely and put 
them back in the water again. Thicken with one tablespoon- 
ful of flour wet with cold water. Season with salt and pep- 
per. Let this simmer one hour longer, and when you dish the 
poultry, turn the drippings into this gravy. Boil up once 
and send to the table. * 

BAKED DRESSING. 
Half loaf of stale bread; 3 pints of milk; 3 eggs. Break the 
bread into the milk and allow it to stand on the back of the 
stove until thoroughly soaked. Then beat with a fork until 
fine, add the eggs, with salt and pepper to taste, and butter 
half the size of an egg. Bake about half an hour. To be 
eaten with poultry or roasts. Mrs. Martin R. Roome. 

TO BROWN FLOUR. 
It is well to brown a quart of flour at once. Spread upon 
a tin plate and set in the stove or on the top. Stir it often, 
lest it should bum. When it is a light brown all through 
put it into a jar or wide-mouthed bottle. Shake up every few 
days to keep it light and prevent lumping. W. 



22 DUTCH (rEFOEMEd) 



®A»ew^p Mmm wEmmmmm® 



TOMATO CATSUP.— No. 1. 
Take 1 bushel ripe tomatoes and boil them in a porcelain 
or tin kettle until they are soft. Squeeze them first through 
a colander, then through a wire sieve. Put the juice into the 
kettle, boil down one quarter and add 2 qts. cider-vinegar, -^ 
pt. salt, 2 oz. cloves, | lb. allspice, ^ oz. cayenne pepper, 3 
tablespoons black pepper, 1 dozen onions cut fine. Mix and 
boil till reduced to the thickness you wish. Bottle without 
straining. Mrs. W. Roome. 

TOMATO CATSUP.— No. 2. 
One peck of tomatoes. Boil a few minutes until the skin 
separates from the pulp. Then strain and add 1 qt. of vinegar 
with salt to taste ; a scant teaspoon of cayenne pepper and 
1 oz. of whole cloves. Boil slowly from seven to ten hours, 
or until quite thick. Tie the cloves in a cloth. 

Mrs. Munson Van Ness. 

TOMATO CHOW-CHOW.— No. 1. 

One peck of green tomatoes ; one dozen onions. Chop fine 
together, sprinkle over it one pint of salt and let it stand over 
night. Then drain oif the brine, put in a kettle, cover with 
vinegar, add two pounds of brown sugar, half cup of mustard, 
two tablespoons of cinnamon, one of cloves, one of allspice 
and one of pepper. Cook slowly two hours. Pack in glass cans. 

Mrs. S. S. Slingerland. 

TOMATO CHOW-CHOW.— No. 2. 
Half bushel of green tomatoes ; one dozen onions ; half 
dozen green peppers. Chop all very tine and sprinkle one pint 



COOK BOOK. 23 



of salt over them and let them stand over night. In the morn- 
ing drain off the brine and cover with equal parts of vinegar 
and water. Boil slowly one houi-, then drain again. Take two 
tablespoons of cinnamon, and one each of allspice, pepper and 
cloves ; half cup of white mustard, two pounds of brown sugar 
and one gallon of vinegnr. Pour the mixture boiling hot over 
the tomatoes, stirring well. Put in jars and cover tight. 

Mrs. Lucas M. Rteeson. 

TOMATO BUTTER. 
Twelve pounds ripe tomatoes, peeled and boiled till thick. 
Then add four pounds brown sugar, one tablespoon of salt, 
one of ground cloves, two of cinnamon and one pint of good 
vinegar. Then boil them till quite thick. 

Miss M. F. Van Houten. 

To prevent scum from rising on pickles, put a small piece of 
horseradish in the jar. M. F. V. 

PICKLED TOMATOES.— Very Nice. 

One peck of green tomatoes cut in thin slices ; one cup of 
salt sprinkled through them. Let them stand over night. In 
the morning squeeze off the juice. Take three green peppers 
chopped fine, ten large onions sliced, half cup of white mus- 
tard seed, one pound of sugar and one ciip of molasses. 
Sprinkle all of these through the tomatoes in a kettle and 
cover with vinegar. Simmer or boil slowly one hour or more, 
covered closely with a dish. Put in a stone jar for use. 

Mrs. D. N. Jacobus. 

CHOW-CHOW. 

Two quarts of green tomatoes, one head of cabbage, two 
dozen cucumber pickles, two small or one large cauliflower, 
four large green peppers, without seeds, one quart of white 
onions, one quart of string beans, one-quarter pound of ground 
mustard, two ounces of white mustard seed. Salt to taste and 
vinegar. Simmer until sufficiently cooked. J. V. R. R. 



24 DUTCH (reformed) 

PICKLED ONIONS. 

Take over a quart of small white or yellow onions. Peel 
off the outer skins. Make a brine of boiling water and salt 
to float an egg ; pour it over the onions and let them stand 
over night. In the morning drain, and having scalded a pint 
of vinegar with a broken nutmeg and a few blades of mace, 
pour it over the onions hot. Put in a quart can or bottle and 
seal. They will be ready for use in a week. 

Miss H. A. Morehouse. 

BLACKBERRY PICKLES. 

Three and a half pounds sugar, one quart vinegar, one 
ounce unground cinnamon, one ounce unground cloves, ten 
pounds blackberries. Heat the sugar, vinegar and spice; 
cook the berries until done, then skim them out. Boil the syrup 
down qtiite rich. Mrs. Ida R. DeMott. 

SPICED GRAPES. 

Seven pounds grapes, three and a half pounds sugar, one pint 
vinegar, one teaspoon cloves, two teaspoons cinnamon. Pulp 
the grapes, heat and strain through the colander to remove the 
seeds. Boil until quite tender, and skim. Then add the other 
ingredients and boil until quite thick. It will keep well in 
glass cans that will not do for other fruit. Very good with 
cold meats. Mrs. D. N. J. 

PLAIN CUCUMBER PICKLES.— Canned. 

Put the small cucumbers to soak for twenty-four hours in 
salt and water that will bear an egg. Then take them out and 
wash them off. Put them in a porcelain kettle and cover with 
vinegar and water in equal quantities. Stand on the back of 
the stove for half a day, at no time allowing the liquor to get 
so warm you cannot bear the finger in. Then pack tightly in 
fruit jars, adding one teaspoon of mustard seed, and half of a 
long red pepper to a quart jar. Stand the jars near the stove 
to keep warm while you boil the kettle half full of vinegar 



COOK BOOK. 26 



diluted with water. Pour this into the jar, filling them very 
full, and seal immediately. Care must be taken not to have 
them too sour. Mrs. M. R. R. 

PEPPER HASH. 

Take one large head of cabbage, six green peppers and 
twenty medium sized cucumbers. Chop the cabbage very 
fine ; sprinkle six ounces of salt over it and let it stand over 
night. Chop it all very fine, adding one teaspoonful of celery 
seed and one ounce of English mustard seed. Cover the whole 
with vinegar. Mrs. Alice Van Saun. 

PICKLED FRUIT. 
Five pounds fruit, two pounds sugar, one pint vinegar, one 
ounce cloves, quarter ounce mace, one ounce cinnamon bark. 
Boil the sugar and spice in the vinegar. Pour it boiling hot 
on the fruit, then pour it off. Boil it for six successive days; 
the last time put the fruit in and let it come to a boil. Pears 
and quinces must be boiled soft before pickling. 

Mrs. N. J. DoREMUs. 

FRENCH PICKLES. 
One peck of green tomatoes, six large onions sliced. Lay 
them in a jar or pan. Sprinkle a cup of salt over them. Let 
them stand over night and drain off in the morning. Boil 
them in two quarts of water and one quart of vinegar fifteen 
or twenty minutes ; then drain in a colander. Take four 
quarts of vinegar, two pounds of brown sugar, half a pound 
of white mustard seed, two tablespoons of black mustard seed 
and two tablespoons of cinnamon. Miss J. M. Van Saun. 

PICKLED NASTURTIUMS. 
Gather the seeds while green and let them lie a few days ; 
then throw them into vinegar. They need no spice except a 
little salt, being themselves sufficiently spicy. Boil the vine- 
gar and pour on them. Tiiey are considered by many better 
than capers, and are much like them. They should be kept 
8ix mouths, covered close, before they are used. W. 



26 DUTCH (reformed) 



PICKLED WALNUTS. 

Gather them between the twenty-fifth and thirtieth of June. 
Make a brine of boiled salt and water strong enough to bear 
an egg after it is cold. Skim while it boils. Pour it on the 
nuts and let them lie in it for twelve days. Then drain them, 
lay them in a jar and pour over them the best cider vinegar 
boiled with pepper-corns, cloves, allspice, mustard, ginger, 
mace and horse-radish. This should be cooled before it is 
poured on. Cover close, and keep them a year before using. 
The vinegar becomes an excellent catsup, by many persons 
preferred to any other. H. 



CHICKEN SALAD— No. 1. 
Two chickens. Boil till very tender, and skin and cut up in 
small squares with a pair of scissors. Two heads of lettuce; 
after washing, dry with a napkin. A layer of chicken, then 
a few pieces of lettuce ; then sprinkle a little vinegar from 
the bottle of capers, also a few capers and olives, and so on till 
the dish is filled ; each layer, pouring on the dressing. 

Dressing. — Yolks of two eggs ; a very little cayenne pep- 
per and salt ; ^ of a large bottle of olive oil ; \ cruet of vine- 
gar. Beat the yolks and add first the oil and then the vinegar 
a little at a time until stiff. This dressing must be stirred 
all one way. R. 

CHICKEN SALAD.— No. 3. 

Mince finely the white meat of a chicken previously well 
boiled. Take blanched crisp celery and chop fine. With one 
measure of chicken put two of celery, or if celery is not plenty, 
one measure each of celery and finely chopped cabbage. 



COOK BOOK. 27 



Dressing. — Rub the yolks of two or three hard boiled 
eggs smooth ; to each yolk put half a teaspoon of oil and half 
a teacup of vinegar. Mix the chicken and celery just before 
it is to be served ; pour on the dressing ; cut the boiled whites 
of the eggs in rings and lay on the top, garnishing also with 
the smaller leaves of celery and parsley. Mrs. W. R. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 
One can of lobster ; one bunch of celery ; one teaspoonful 
each of black pepper, red pepper, mustard, and two of vinegar, 
with the yolks of two eggs boiled hard. J. M. V. S. 

CHICKEN OR LOBSTER SALAD. 
Half a bottle of Geirster's olive oil ; four eggs, yolks and 
whites beaten separately ; half a cup of vinegar ; salt, pep- 
per and mustard to taste. Beat the yolks of the eggs thor- 
oughly ; add the oil, a teaspoonful at a time, stirring it in 
gradually. Continue until it becomes thick ; then add salt, 
dry mustard, and pepper. Add the vinegar ; and lastly the 
whites beaten to a stiff froth. Beat well after adding the 
whites. Mrs. C. W. Mandevillb. 

DUTCH SAUCE FOR LETTUCE. 
Cut some fat salt ham in small pieces and fry brown. 
Beat up an egg with two tablespoonfuls of flour in a quart 
bowl ; fill the bowl nearly full with vinegar and water ; pour 
it into the pan and stir until it boils. To be eaten warm, not 
hot. Mrs. G. R. 

CABBAGE SALAD. 
One head of fine white cabbage, minced fine ; three hard 
boiled eggs ; two tablespoons of salad oil ; two tablespoons of 
white sugar ; one teaspoon of salt; one teaspoon of pepper; 
one teaspoon of made mustard ; one teacup of vinegar. Mix 
as for lettuce and pour upon the chopped cabbage. Cut the 
eggs in slices and lay over the top. 

Mrs. Austin Doremus. 



28 DUTCH (bEFORMED) 



POTATO SALAD.— Nice for Supper. 

Chop fine one onion ; add twelve cold boiled potatoes. 
When quite fine, place in a dish; melt one tablespoonfnl of 
butter and pour over it. Salt, pepper, vinegar, etc., at table 
to suit taste. Mrs. S. S. Slingerland. 

A good dressing or sauce for almost every kind of salad or 
fish is made by taking the yolks of two boiled eggs, mash 
them with a little mustard and oil (or melted butter), and 
a little sugar and salt, adding about three tablespoonfuls of 
vinegar. Mrs. W. R. 



All green vegetables must be washed thoroughly in cold 
water and then dropped into water which has been salted and 
is just beginning to boil. The time of boiling green vegeta- 
bles depends very much upon their age and how long they 
have been gathered, the younger and fresher the more quick- 
ly they are cooked. 

^TIME-TABLE FOR COOKING VEGETABLES. 

Potatoes, boiled 30 minutes. 

« baked 45 " 

Squash, boiled 25 " 

" baked 45 " 

Green peas, boiled 20 to 40 " 

Shelled beans, « 60 " 

String " '* 1 to 2 hours. 

Green corn 25 to 60 minutes. 

Asparagus 15 to 30 " 



COOK BOOK. 29 



Spinach - Ito 2 hours. 

Tomatoes (fresh) --- 1 " 

« (canned) i " 

Onions Ito 2 " 

Beet Greens -- 1 " 

Cabbage. I to 2 « 

Cauliflower - 1 to 2 " 

Parsnips " 

Carrots.. " 

POTATO PUFF. 

Boil and mash four good-sized potatoes ; then add one 
quart of milk, two eggs, flour enough for a stiff batter, three 
teaspoons of baking powder, or one half teaspoon of soda, 
and a little salt. To be dropped with a spoon in boiling lard. 
Serve hot. Miss Ida Dokemus. 

SARATOGA POTATOES. 

Pare and slice some raw potatoes very thin. Lay them in 
cold water for half an hour ; wipe dry between two cloths, 
spreading them on one and pressing the other upon them. 
Have ready in a frying-pan some boiling lard ; fry a light 
brown ; take from the pan as soon as brown, with a per- 
forated skimmer ; put in the colander and shake for an in- 
stant ; sprinkle with salt, and serve. 

Potatoes are very much improved by standing in cold water 
an hour before boiling. Mrs. G. R. 

TO COOK GREEN BEANS IN AN HOUR. 

Cut, and put in the pot with three-fourths of a cup of but- 
ter ; let steam half an hour, then cover with water and cook 
half an hour. Mrs. T. Ryeeson. 

STEWED ASPARAGUS. 

Cut the asparagus in lengths of not quite two inches ; put 
them in boiling water, with salt, pepper and vinegar. Cook 
until soft. Miss C. Van Ness. 



30 DUTCH (reformed) 



SCALLOPED ONIONS. 

Six large onions, sliced and cooked half an hour. Butter a 
baking dish well and throw fine bread crumbs about it until 
they adhere on all sides. Have a bowl of bread crumbs ready, 
seasoned with butter, pepper and salt ; cover the bottom of the 
dish with onions ; sprinkle crumbs over them and small pieces 
of butter ; then another layer of onions, covered in the same 
way, until the dish is full. Cover the last layer rather more 
thickly with crumbs, add one cup of milk, and bake until 
nicely browned. Mrs. M. E. Doremus. 

TO BOIL MACARONI. 
Boil about 20 minutes in plenty of water, stirring con- 
stantly ; take from the fire and strain through a colander ; 
then add three small onions and tomato, previously cooked ; 
boil all together about ten minutes ; add a lump of butter, 
and season to taste. J. V. R. R. 

CORN FRITTERS. 
Four ears of corn, two eggs, two tablespoons of corn-starch 
or flour, one teaspoon of salt and sugar. ( .) 

AUNTY'S CORN CAKES. 

One dozen ears sweet corn that is not too young. Cut the 

kernels by drawing a knife through each row on the cob ; then 

scrape it out ; add one egg, well beaten, with flour enough to 

thicken. Salt to taste. Fry in cakes, with butter and lard. 

Miss Emily Slingerland. 

PARSNIP OYSTERS. 
Boil the parsnips until tender and mash well. To a pint of 
parsnips add a tablespoonful of butter, two well-beaten eggs, 
salt and pepper to taste ; add flour enough to hold the mix- 
ture together. Make into small flat balls. Fry in butter till 
brown. Mrs. H. Julius Smith. 

MACARONI WITH CHEESE. 
Boil half pound of macaroni in salted water sufficient to 
cover : when tender drain off. Put half of the macaroni 



COOK BOOK. 31 



in a small pudding-dish, cover with a layer of grated cheese, 
a little salt, pepper and bits of butter. Put in the remainder 
of the macaroni and proceed in the same manner. Beat two 
eggs light and add one and one-half cups of milk ; pour over 
and bake till brown, or about 30 minutes. Mks. M. R. R. 

ARTIFICIAL OYSTERS. 

Ten ears of green corn, gi-ated. To a pint of corn, add one 
egg, one half cup of butter, one small cup of flour, a little salt 
and pepper. Fry in small cakes. When eaten, butter well. 

Miss M. F. Roome. 

GREEN CORN PATTIES. 
Grate as much corn as will make one pint ; add one teacup- 
ful of flour, one of butter, one egg, pepper and salt to 
taste. If too thick, add a little milk. Fry in butter. 

Mrs, Geo. Demarest. 

MACARONI PUDDING.— With Meats. 

Simmer one-quarter pound of macaroni in water until it is 
tender. Strain off the water and add a pint of milk or cream, 
one ounce of grated cheese and salt. Mix well together, and 
strew over the top two ounces of grated cheese and crumbs of 
bread. In baking, brown it well on the top. It will bake in 
a quick oven in half an hour. Mrs. W. R. 

BROWNED OR FRIED TOMATOES. 

Select nice large tomatoes which will cut nicely in two 
pieces ; flour them and place them, skin side down in a fry- 
ing-pan in which a small quantity of lard has been melted. 
Sprinkle them with salt and pepper. "When they have 
browned on one side turn them carefully and let them brown 
again. Serve hot. W. J. 

VEGETABLES AND SAUCES FOR DIFFERENT MEATS. 
Potatoes are good with all meats. With fowls they are 
nicest mashed. Sweet potatoes are most appropriate with 



32 DUTCH (rEPOBMED) 



roast meats, as also are onions, winter squash, cucumbers and 
asparagus. 

Carrots, parsnips, turnips, greens and cabbage are eaten 
with boiled meats, and corn, beats, peas and beans are appro- 
priate with either boiled or roasted meat. Mashed turnips 
are good with roasted pork and with boiled meats. 

Tomatoes are good with every kind of meat, but especially 
with roasts. Apple sauce with roast pork ; cranberry sauce 
with beef, fowls, veal, and ham ; currant jelly is most appro- 
priate with roast mutton. Pickles are good with all roast 
meats, and capers or nasturtiums with boiled lamb or mutton. 
Horse radish and lemons are excellent with veal. 

Among the little things which are worthy the attention of 
the housekeeper is that of having the dinner served hot. It 
is often the case that a well-cooked dinner loses much of its 
excellence by want of care in this particular. All the meat 
and vegetable dishes should be heated, and in winter the 
plates should also be warmed. ( .) 



COOK BOOK. 33 



m^^m® 



EGG ON TOAST. 
Brown a slice of bread nicely over the coals ; while doing 
this, break an egg into boiling water slightly salted, and let it 
stand over the fire till the white hardens ; butter the toast ; 
take lip the egg with a skimmer. Lay on toast, dust with 
pepper, salt and bits of butter, and serve while hot. 

Miss Emeline Doeemus. 

POACHED EGGS. 
The eggs should be fi-esh. Have the boiling water in a 
shallow pan, break the eggs separately in a saucer and slip 
gently into the boiling water ; when all are in the water place 
the pan over the fire until the white of each is perfectly set ; 
remove with a slicer, and lay on buttered toast or broiled 
ham. Mrs. J. C. Christie. 

FRICASSEED EGGS. 
Boil eggs hard ; cut them in two, lengthwise ; dispose 
neatly on a hot dish with the yolks uppermost ; pour over 
them simple drawn butter. Ornament with parsley or any 
other green you may happen to have. 

Mrs. M. E. Doremus. 

SALAD EGGS. 
Take twelve eggs and boil half an hour. Then plunge them 
into cold water, as the shells will then peel off more readily. 
Put again into cold water to prevent discoloration. Cut them 
in halves. Mash the yolk into a fine powder, season accord- 
ing to taste with vinegar, pepper, salt, mustai'd and oil or 
melted butter. A pinch of cayenne pepper is an improve- 



34 DUTCH (reformed) 



raent for some palates. Mix all to the consistency of a smooth 
stilf paste. When ready for use, fill the halves with the dress- 
ing, and garnish with parsley or imbed in a dish of lettuce. 

Miss J. M. Van Saun. 

OMELETTE.— No. 1. 

Six eggs. Beat the yolks separately, adding to them one 
teacup of milk, pepper and salt. Beat the whites very 
light, stir quickly through the yolks, ind turn into a well 
greased and hot frying-pan. Mrs. S. Stiles. 

OMELETTE.— No. 2. 

Five eggs; one teaspoon of flour; half cup of milk; a little 
salt; one tablespoon of butter. Miss M. F. Roome. 

OMELETTE.— No. 3. 

Six eggs; one cup of milk; one tablespoon of flour; a pinch 
of salt. Beat the whites and yolks separately. Mix the flour, 
milk and salt. Add the yolks and then the whites. Have a 
buttered spider very hot. Pour in and bake in a quick oven 
five minutes. A perfect omelette. Mrs. Nichols. 

Ham, mushroom, lobster, chicken and all kinds of omelettes 
are made by chopping up the meat and laying it between the 
folds before dishing. 



COOK BOOK. 35 



IH^AB^g, ®lP®Wl^^)f M,i®* 



Give us this day our daily bread ! " 



There is no article of food of so great importance to the 
health, comfort and happiness of the family as bread. Make 
it perfect. 

GOOD YEAST FOR BREAD.— No. 1. 

Six potatoes, boiled in a gallon of water with a handful of 
hops tied in a bag. Put in a jar half a cup of flour; when 
the potatoes are done, pour the water over it and add the 
potatoes when mashed. When luke-warm, add a cup of yeast; 
when cold, half cup of sugar, quarter cup of salt and a table- 
spoonful of ginger. Mks. H. J. Smith. 

YEAST.— No. 2. 

One handful of hops; two quarts of water; boil together; 
strain and add two tablespoons of salt, one teacup of sugar 
and six medium-sized potatoes, well grated. Boil all together 
until cooked ; let cool sufficiently to mix in one teacup of 
yeast; then let stand in a warm place to rise. M. J. D. 

POTATO YEAST. 

Boil twelve potatoes ; to the water in which they were 
boiled add enough to make two quarts. When lukewarm, 
add two yeast cakes or two cups of yeast, two tablespoonf uls of 
the salt and two of sugar. Stir well and set in a warm place 
to rise. When light, bottle and cork, and put in a cool place. 

Miss A. E. Geaham. 



36 DUTCH (reformed) 



HOP YEAST. 

Take two handfuls hops and pour over it two quarts hot 
water. Let it steep half an hour. Have ready in a stone jar, 
two spoonfuls wheat flour, two of brown sugar and one of 
salt. On this pour the hot tea, stirring briskly to keep from 
getting lumpy. Then stand it in a warm place to rise, pre- 
viously adding half a teacup of yeast. Stir often, and when 
light put it in a stone jug and keep in the cellar. 

Miss C. V. 

» 

PURE BAKING POWDER. 

Half pound of cream tartar ; quarter pound of soda ; over 
quarter pound of corn starch. Mix and sift thoroughly. Put 
in tin boxes and keep in a dry place. 

Miss H. A. Morehouse. 

BREAD. 

Boil eight potatoes in one quart of water. One large spoon 
of flour rubbed fine through the potatoes. When cool, add 
half a yeast cake and one teaspoon of sugar. Let this stand 
until it is light. Then rub a small piece of lard through the 
flour and mix. 

BREAD. 

One quart milk ; one quart water. Put in a pan as much 
flour as would be required for these ; rub in the flour a large 
tablespoon of lard, a handful of salt and a handful of sugar. 
Then add the milk and water and two yeast cakes (dissolved). 
Stir with a spoon until stiff enough to knead with the hand ; 
knead thoroughly until smooth ; then let stand over night. 
If risen enough in the morning, knead and let rise again. 
When risen knead again and set down to rise a second time. 
Tlien put in pans and let rise again. Finally put in the oven 
and bake. If, when the bread is baked, the crust is hard, 
spread butter over the top and cover over. A good hot oven 
is required. Belle and Flora Van Cleef. 



COOK BOOK. 37 



RYE BREAD. 
Make a sponge of soft yeast and wheat flour — the same as 
for wheat bread. When light, liaving boiled some potatoes, 
mash and strain through a colander. Add milk sufficient to 
make as many loaves as you wish, and a little salt. Mould 
and put in pans to rise. When very light, bake in a hot oven 
about forty-five minutes, Mks. G. R. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

One yeast cake ; six potatoes, medium size, boiled in one 
quart of water. Mash the potatoes and take three cups of 
the water in which they Avere boiled ; five cups of Graham 
flour stirred in the water. Mix yeast cake, water and flour 
and let it stand until light ; then knead stiff with wheat flour 
adding a little salt. This quantity will make two loaves. 
Bake one hour with a gentle heat. Mrs. Jacob DeBow. 

BROWN BREAD. 

One cup of Indian meal ; one cup of I'ye flour ; a half cup 
of molasses ; one teaspoonful of salcratus and a little salt. 
Steam three hours. Mrs. H. J. Smith. 

UNION BREAD. 

Half cup sugar, two eggs, one pint milk, four cups flour, 
two teaspoons soda, four teaspoons cream tartar. 

Mks. J. T. V. N. 
BISCUIT. 
One quart of sifted flour ; one tablespoonful of lard ; half 
teaspoonful of salt ; two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 
Mix well together. Add suflicient milk to form a very soft 
dough. Knead as little as possible and bake immediately in 
a quick oven. Miss. C. Van Ness. 

RAISED BISCUIT.— No. 1. 
One quart of sifted flour; a lump of butter the size of a 
black walnut. Stir into the flour the same as in making 
pastry. When well stirred, add one cup of milk and one of 



38 DUTCH (reformed) 



sweet cream. Add a little salt, and, if desired, a half cup of 
sugar. Mix in the evening as for bread and let rise. In the 
morning shape them with the hands and let rise. Then hake. 

Mrs. p. H. Mandeville. 

RAISED BISCUIT.— No. 2. 

One quart of milk boiled at night ; let it stand and cool ; 
then stir the sponge and add the yeast. In the morning add 
one cup of butter, one tablespoon of sugar, a little salt, half 
teaspoon of soda. Knead and let stand to rise. Mould and 
put in the tins. Set down again for the second rising. Bake 
in a moderate oven. Mrs. J. A. Slingerland. 

TEA BISCUITS.— No. 1. 

One quart of sifted flour ; a pinch of salt, three teaspoonf uls 
of baking powder, one small handful of sugar. Mix lightly 
through the flour, rub a large teaspoonf ul of lard through the 
dry mixture, mix with sweet milk or water, the colder the 
better. Roll out soft to thickness of about one-third of an 
inch ; cut in squares. Bake in a really liot oven. 

Belle and Flora Van Cleef. 

TEA BISCUITS.— No. 2. 
Four cups flour : four teaspoonfuls Royal baking powder ; 
half cup lard ; one teaspoonful sugar and one of salt. Sift the 
salt, sugar and powder together. Rub the lard through the 
flour until smooth. Add milk enough to form a smooth con- 
sistent dough. Roll it out to the thickness of half an inch. 
Cut with a small round cutter. Bake in a very hot oven. 

Miss Annie E. Cooper. 

GRAHAM BISCUITS. 
Take one quart milk, butter the size of an egg, three table- 
spoons of sugar, two of baker's yeast, and a pinch of salt ; 
white flour to make it the consistency of batter cakes. Add 
as much Graham flour as you can stir in with a spoon. Set 
away till morning. Then take a lump of dough the size of 



COOK BOOK. 39 



an egg ; roll lightly between the palms of your hands. Put 
in a pan and let rise until very light, and bake in a moderate 
oven. Mrs. R. R. 

DUTCH DRIED BISCUITS. 

One quart of milk, three-quarters of a pound of butter, 
four eggs, flour to knead soft enough to roll out. Mix well 
together. Allow to rise and become very light. Then make 
into biscuits and let them rise the second time, placing one 
on the other, two deep, with a little butter spread between. 
When baked, separate them. Place them in pans, set them 
in a moderate oven and let them dry hard. 

Mrs. Nathan DeMott. 

OLD-FASHIONED DRIED BISCUIT. 
One quart of milk, three-quarters of a pound of butter, 
four eggs, one bowd of sponge. Knead soft enough to roll out, 
and let them stand to rise. Have ready a well buttered pan, 
placing a layer of the biscuit in, rub over them a little but- 
ter, then another layer, and bake immediately. When done, 
separate the layers and put them in a partly cooled oven to dry. 
After thorough drying they may be eaten for dinner Avith 
milk, or simply dipped in cold water and spread with butter, 
for supper. Mrs. C. Doremus. 

ROLLS. 

One pint milk, one cup jeast. Set over night. In the 
morning take one egg and half a cup of butter and mix in a 
stiff dough. Set to rise. Let it get very light, then mould 
and set to rise again. When light bake twenty minutes. 

Mrs. J. R. Evans. 

BREAKFAST ROLLS. 

One pint sweet milk ; half cup of sugar ; one tablespoon 
of butter ; one teaspoon of salt ; two eggs ; one compressed 
yeast cake. Miss J. M. Van Saun. 



40 DUTCH (rEFOEMBd) 



DELICIOUS ROLLS. 
One half teacup of butter ; one pound of flour ; one half 
teacup of yeast ; a little salt and enough milk to make a good 
dough. Let it set in a warm place two hours. Bake in a hot 
oven. Miss K. T>. K. 

BUTTER ROLLS. 

One pint of sweet milk ; one tablespoonful of lard ; a little 
sugar. Scald the milk with the lard. Three pints of flour ; 
half cup of yeast. Set to rise in a warm place. When ready 
knead and let it rise again. Then put it on the board and 
shape into rolls. Mks. H. J. S. 

RUSK.— No. 1. 

Nine ounces of butter ; one and a quarter pounds of sugar; 
five eggs ; one quart of sweet milk ; half teaspoon of soda ; 
one cup of yeast. Mix it all together and let it rise over night. 
Stir with a spoon as stiff as you can. In the morning add 
more flour and knead. Mbs. W. Baxter. 

RUSK— No. 3. 

One pint of milk ; one teacup of yeast. Mix it thin. When 
light, add twelve ounces of sugar, ten oimces of butter, four 
eggs, flour sufiicient to make it as stiff as bread. When risen 
the second time, cut as biscuit, then bake. 

Mks. R. Alyea. 

SWEET RUSKS. 
Two cups of sugar ; one cup of butter ; one pint of sweet 
milk ; two eggs ; one bowl of sponge. 

Mrs. C. a. Rverson. 

BREAKFAST RUSKS. 
Four cups of flour ; half cup of white sugar ; one cup of 
milk ; two eggs ; two teaspoons of baking powder. Beat the 
eggs and sugar together, add the milk, sift the baking powder 
into the flour and stir all togetlier. Bake in a shallow pan 
in a quick oven. Mrs. R. R. 



COOK BOOK. 41 



CORN BREAD.— No.l. 
Two mixing spoons of flour; three of Indian meal; one egg; 
three teaspoons of baking powder; salt and molasses to taste. 

Mrs. S. DeMott. 
CORN BREAD.— No. 2. 
Two teacups each of flour, meal and sour milk ; one egg ; 
one tablespoon each of melted lard, molasses and salt ; one 
teaspoonful of saleratus. Mrs. C. W. Mandbville. 

CORN BREAD.— No. 3. 
Three cups of corn meal, one and a half cups of flour, the 
same of sweet milk, five eggs, four teaspoons of baking pow- 
der, a little sugar. Mrs. B. H. Brown. 

CORN BREAD— No. 4. 
Two cups corn meal ; one cup wheat flour ; one pint sour 
milk ; two teaspoons saleratus, mixed in half the wheat flour ; 
one teaspoon salt ; one gill molasses ; a small lump of butter. 
Bake from thirty -five to forty minutes. 

Mrs. N. Doeemus. 
CORN BREAD.— No. 5. 
Two cups wheat flour, two cups corn meal, two cups sweet 
milk, two eggs, half cup sugar, one large tablespoon butter, 
two teaspoons Royal Baking powder, a little salt. 

Mary S. Ryerson. 
MISSISSIPPI CORN BREAD. 
One pint Indian meal ; one pint buttermilk ; two eggs ; one 
teaspoon soda ; two tablespoons butter and a little salt. 

A. E. Graham. 
JOHNNY CAKE.— Very Nice. 
Three cups of sour milk ; three cups of corn meal ; three 
tablespoons of molasses ; one egg ; one teaspoon of saleratus ; 
a little flour ; salt. Mrs. H. J. S. 

JOHNNY CAKE.— No. 2. 
One quart each of wheat flour, Indian meal and buttermilk ; 
one cup of molasses ; one dessert spoon of baking soda, and a 
little salt. Mrs. L. L. R. 



42 DUTCH (reformed) 



WMMwmmm^ mmmwEmm^ mtm^^ 



WAFFLES.— No. 1. 
One quart of milk, quai'ter pound of butter, three eggs, 
three teaspoons of baking powder. Mrs. N. DeMott. 

WAFFLES.— No. 2. 
One quart of sweet milk, four eggs, half pound of short- 
ening (butter and lard) ; one pint of yeast. Mix all well to- 
gether and let rise. If mixed in the morning, will be light 
for tea. Grease a waffle iron, put the batter in and bake on 
top of the stove. 

WAFFLES.— No. 3. 
One quart of milk, four eggs, half pound of butter, half a 
compressed yeast cake. Mix as stiff as pancakes. 

J. M. V. S. 

SOFT WAFFLES. 
Three eggs; two quarts sweet milk ; half pound butter ; two 
tablespoons soda, a little salt. Mix in a thin batter and bake 
in a waffle-iron. Then heat together half a pound of butter 
and one quart of milk. Pour over and sprinkle with sugar. 

Mrs. L. M. Ryerson. 

MUFFINS— No. 1. 
One quart of sweet milk ; one quarter pound of butter ; four 
eggs ; flour enough to make a stiff batter ; one teacup of 
yeast. M. J. D. 

MUFFINS.— No. 2. 
One pint of sweet milk, two eggs, three cups of flour and 
three teaspoonf uls of baking powder. Mrs. J. R. E. 



COOK BOOK. 43 



CORN MEAL MUFFINS.— No. 1. 
Two cups of corn flour ; two of wheat flour ; four eggs. 
Set to rise over night if intended for breakfast ; if for sup- 
per, set sponge at one o'clock. Salt ; two tablespoons of N. 
O. molasses ; one yeast cake, sweet milk, lastly the eggs. Bake 
in well greased rings on a griddle. Brown on both sides. 

Mrs. Jacob DbBow. 

CORN MEAL MUFFINS.— No. 2. 

Mix together in a sieve and rub through it a teacupf ul of corn 
meal, twice as much flour, one-third of a cupful of sugar, a 
teaspoonful of salt, and three teaspoonfuls of baking powder; 
two tablespoonfuls of butter in a cup. Set the cup in 
a basin of hot water and while the butter is melting, beat three 
eggs very light and add a large cupful of milk. This mixture 
is poured upon the dry ingredients, beating well all the while, 
the melted butter is added and the mixture poured into mufiin 
pans. Mrs. J. J. Ball. 

CORN MEAL MUFFINS.— No. 3. 
Two cups of Indian meal, one cup of wheat flour, two and a 
half cups of loppered milk, half cup of sugar, half cup of lard, 
three eggs, two teaspoonfuls of salt, one teaspoonful of soda. 
Bake immediately in mufiin rings. To be eaten hot. 

Miss C. V. 

GRAHAM MUFFINS.— No. I. 

One quart of Graham flour ; two tablespoons of sugar ; 
two eggs ; half tablespoon of butter ; one tablespoon of 
baking powder ; a little salt. Moisten and mix thoroughly 
with a little milk. Bake in patty-pans, at once, in a quick 
oven. Mrs. G. D. 

GRAHAM MUFFINS. -No. 2. 

One pint of sweet milk ; two eggs ; one tablespoon of 
lard ; one large mixing-spoon of sugar ; one teaspoon of soda ; 
two teaspoons of cream tartar ; flour enough for a thin batter. 

Mrs. S. DeMoit. 



44 DUTCH (reformed) 



RICE MUFFINS. 

One cup of cold boiled rice ; one ))int of flour ; two eggs; 
one quart of milk ; one tablespoon of butter ; a little salt. 
Beat hard. Bake quick. Mrs. J. G. Ryersgn. 

GRAHAM GEMS.— No. 1. 
One cup of warm water ; one egg ; two tablespoons of 
molasses ; one half teaspoon of soda ; salt ; half a compressed 
yeast-cake ; flour for rather thick batter. 

Miss J. M. Van Saun. 

GRAHAM GEMS.- No. 2. 
Take one quart of Graham flour — of fine flour of the en- 
tire wheat. Stir in it cold water, or milk and water, half 
and half, till you have a batter that will drop from the spoon 
and not run. Stir very thoroughly. The gems are best 
baked in cast-iron gem-pans. Heat the pans in the oven, 
grease slightly and drop the batter in the hot pans. Bake 
in a quick oven. Miss H. A. Morehouse. 

DROP SHORT-CAKE. 

One pint of thick milk ; three eggs ; one teaspoon of soda ; 

a small piece of butter, the size of an egg ; a little salt ; 

flour enough to make good batter. 

Mrs. C. a. Ryerson. 

STRAWBERRY SHORT-CAKE. 
One cup of powdered sugar ; one tablespoon of butter 
rubbed into the sugar ; three eggs ; one heaping cup of 
prepared flour ; two tablespoons of sweet cream. Bake in 
jelly-cake tins ; when quite cold lay between the cakes nearly 
a quart of berries. Sprinkle each layer lightly with pow- 
dered sugar and strew the same thickly over the upper cake. 
Eat while fresh. Miss Mary Simkins. 

SOFT SHORT-CAKE. 
Three eggs ; one pint of sour cream ; one teaspoon of 
baking-soda ; salt ; stir very stiff ; bake on griddle. 

Mrs. T. R, 



COOK BOOK. 46 



STRAWBERRY OR PEACH SHORT-CAKE. 
Three eggs ; one cup of sugar ; two cups of sifted flour ; 
six tablespoonfuls of cream ; one teaspoonf ul of soda and 
two of cream-tartar or three (heaping) of baking-powder. 

Bake in two jelly-tins, and when you are ready to put them 
on the table split them and spread each half with strawberries 
or peaches, sprinkle sugar over them and a little cream. Then 
put the top on and cover -with the same. 

Miss A. Jones. 

STRAWBERRY SHORT-CAKE. 

Two cups of thick milk; half cup of lard; one teaspoonf ul of 
saleratus, and a little salt sifted through the flour. Knead 
soft ; roll and bake in jelly-tins. Put a layer of strawberries 
between and sprinkle with white sugar. Serve hot with 
sweet cream. Miss E. Doremus. 

STRAWBERRY SHORT-CAKE. 

First, prepare the berries in an earthen bowl, then bruise 
them with a potato masher ; cover with a thick layer of 
white sugar and set aside until the cake is made. 

Take one quart of sifted flour ; half cup of butter ; one 
egg, well beaten ; three teaspoonfuls of baking-powder and 
milk enough to make a stiff dough. Knead well and roll 
out till about one inch thick. Bake till a nice brown. 
When done turn it out of the pan, run a sharp knife through 
it and allow it to lie open a few minutes to let the steam es- 
cape. Then put the under crust upon a plate ; cover thickly 
with the berries, dust with powdered sugar, lay on the top 
crust and pour the juice of the berries around the cake, and 
you will have a delicious short-cake. Miss A. F. D. 

CORN GRIDDLE-CAKES.— Very Fine. 

One dozen ears of corn (grated), two eggs, a little salt, one 
cup of milk, a half cup of butter, one cup of flour. 

Mks. H. J. S. 



46 DUTCH (reformed) 



NICE GRIDDLE CAKES. 
Two quarts of flour, a handful of Indian meal, two eggs, 
a teaspoouful each of salt and soda, one quart of milk. 

Mrs. J. R. E. 

GERMAN EGG CAKES. 
One quart of sweet milk, one-third quart of water, two 
large potatoes (grated fine), six eggs (beaten very light). 
Thicken with flour about like griddle cakes or thin batter. 
Bake in a spider and turn over. Butter and sprinkle with 
white sugar as fast as you bake. Serve hot. They are deli- 
cious for tea or lunch. Miss Emeline Doremus. 

WHIGS. 
One pint of milk, warmed slightly ; one-quarter pound of 
butter dissolved in the milk ; two pounds of flour ; four or six 
eggs, beaten very light ; one-half pound of sugar ; one teacup 
of yeast ; a little salt. Stir milk, butter and flour together ; 
sugar and eggs last. When light, put in pans and set down 
to rise. Put in oblong tins, half filled with tlie batter. Bake 
fifteen minutes. Mrs. Jacob DeBow. 

TEA CAKE. 

Three cups of sugar, one of butter, one of milk, two of 
flour, three eggs, two teaspoons of baking powder, a little 
salt. Miss M. F. Rooms. 

PUFFET.— No. 1. 

One cup each of light sponge, sugar and sweet milk, half 
a pound of butter, four eggs, a little allspice. Mix and raise 
and bake the same as you do bread. 

Mrs. E. W. Martin. 

PUFFET.— No. 3. 

One quart of sweet milk, one pound of sugar, one half 
pound of butter, three eggs, one teacup of yeast. 

M. J. D. 



COOK BOOK. 47 



PUFFET.— No. 3. 

Two cui)S of milk, two of spouge, one of butter, lialf a 
flip of sugar, two egg.^. M. F. V. H. 

PUFFET.— No. 4. 

A bowl of light sponge, mix with four eggs, one half pound 
of butter, one quart of milk, one coffee cup of currants and 
two cups of sugar. Mix quite stiff with a spoon, and when 
light it is ready to bake. Mrs. A. V. N. 

AUNT JANE'S PUFFET. 

One quart of milk, four eggs, one half pound of butter, 
three quarters of a pound of sugar. Set the sponge in half 
of the milk. Mrs. N. DeMott. 

SALLY LUNN. 

Pour into a stone pot one pint of sweet milk, a quarter 
pound of butter, a half cup of yeast, three eggs and salt. 
Mix in three pints of wheat flour. Let stand until light, then 
put in long tins and let rise again ; after rising the second 
time it is ready to bake. Mrs. J. DeBow. 



48 DUTCH (kEFORMEd) 



P'lSP® 



PIE CRUST. 

Proportions . One cup of lard or butter to three of flour. 
Water to mix. Use a fork in mixing. Add a little extra 
flour to roll. Mrs. J. H. Slingerlakd. 

GOOD COMMON PIE CRUST. 

Allow one heaping handful of flour for a pie, with a table- 
spoonful of lard or butter. ( .) 

PUFF PASTE. 

Half a pound of butter, half a pound of lard, one and a 
quarter pounds of flour. Wet half the flour to a paste ; mix 
the other half with the shortening, chopping it fine ; do not 
use your hand ; stir together with a silver or wooden spoon. 
Roll out the paste on the board about a quarter of an inch 
thick, and add one-third of the mixed flour and shortening ; 
fold the four corners over it and beat out with a rolling-pin 
till again a quarter of an inch thick. Spread over it one-third 
more of the shortening, fold over tlie corners, beat out again, 
add the remainder of the shortning, beat, roll out and use. 

W. 
LEMON PIE.— No. 1. 

Two soda crackers, two lemons, two eggs, one and a half 
cups of sugar, one and a half cups of boiling water. Roll 
the crackers fine, pour on the boiling water, cover with a 
plate when cold, add the eggs, sugar, grated rind and juice of 
the lemons. Place between thin crusts and bake about thirty 
minutes. Mrs. G. M. Bruen. 



COOK BOOK. 49 



LEMON PIE.— No. 2. 
Two Clips of sugar; three of water; three eggs; two table- 
spoonfuls of corn starch; two lemons. 

Miss Silah Van Ness. 

LEMON PIE.— No. 3. 

Two lemons; yolks of two eggs; one cup of sugar; one 
coflfee cup of cold water; one large slice of bread; two table- 
spoons of melted butter. When baked, beat the whites of two 
eggs to a stiff froth ; add four tablespoons of sugar; spread over 
the pie and return to the oven to brown. Miss J. B. 

LEMON PIE.— No. 4. 
One large lemon ; two cups of hot water ; two cups of 
sugar ; one and a half tablespoons of corn starch. Boil, and 
let stand till cold ; then grate the lemon in and bake. 

Mbs. Hester Van Ness. 

LEMON PIE.— Excellent. 

Two cups of sugar; three eggs; three lemons; two table" 
spoons of corn starch mixed with a little cold water; three 
cups of boiling water stirred in the corn starch. Put the corn 
starch in a vessel on the stove, stirring it until it begins to 
thicken; allow this to cool, and add the other ingredients. 
Bake without upper crust. When done have ready the whites 
of four eggs, beaten with four tablespoons of powdered 
sugar to a stiff froth. Flavor the meringue with vanilla. 

Miss C. Van Ness. 

LEMON MERINGUE PIE. 
Grate one and a half lemons, mixing the juice with the 
grated rind, and one cup of water; one cup of sugiir; yolks of 
two eggs; a piece of butter the size of an egg, and one slice 
of bread broken fine without the crust. Bake with only an 
undercrust. When done, beat the whites of the eggs with 
four tablespoons of sugar and a few drops of lemon juice, and 
spread over the top. Then return to the oven and brown 
4ghtly. This makes one pie. Mrs. P. H. Mandevillk. 



60 DUTCH (reformed) 



FROSTED LEMON PIE. 

The juice of three lemons, grated rind of one ; eight table- 
spoons of sugar; two tablespoons of melted butter; one cup 
of sweet cream; the yolks of three eggs; the whites of one. 
The whites of two eggs and four tablespoons of sugar for 
frosting. Mrs. T. Rtbrson. 

COCOANUT PIE.— No. 1. 

One cocoanut, grated; three pints of milk; five eggs; one 
and a half cups of sugar. Line three medium-sized dishes 
with good crust, and fill. Bake in a hot oven, 

Mrs. G. G. Van Ness. 

COCOANUT PIE.— No. 2. - 
One grated cocoanut; one quart of milk, using the milk of 
the cocoanut ; simmer the cocoanut and milk fifteen minutes 
over a moderate fire; then take it off and mix with four 
tablespoons of sugar, two of melted butter, one small cracker 
pounded fine, and half a nutmeg. Add, when cool, five eggs 
beaten to a froth and a wineglass of wine. Turn into deep 
plates that are lined with nice pastry, and bake immediately 
in a quick oven. Miss A. Jones. 

ORANGE PIE. 

One orange; one cup of sugar; butter the size of an egg; 
two eggs; one and a half cups of milk. Ornament with strips 
of pastry. Mrs. Jacob DeBow. 

CURRANT PIE.— Excellent. 

One teacup of mashed currants; one of sugar; one of cream, 
and one tablespoonf ul of flour for one pie. Under crust and 
strips of pastry for the top. Mrs. Atno Van Ness. 

CREAM PIE, 

One pint of sweet cream; whites of two eggs well beaten; 
sweeten to taste with pulverized sugar. 

Mrs. Munson Van Ness. 



COOK BOOK. 51 



PUMPKIN PIE. 

Take one quart of pumpkin, stewed and pressed through a 
sieve; two quarts of milk; two cups of sugar; seven eggs, 
beaten very light; a teaspoonful of butter; ginger and cinna- 
mon to suit the taste. Stir well together and bake with plain 
crust. Mks. Geo. Demarbst. 

PREPARED MINCE FOR PIES. 

Eight pounds meat; three pounds suet; three pounds seeded 
raisins; three pounds currants; one pound citron; one pint 
brandy; one pint molasses; three and one-half pounds sugar; 
four teaspoons of allspice; four teaspoons of cinnamon; two 
teaspoons of cloves; one and one-lialf teaspoons of mace; one 
nutmeg. Boil the meat until done, and the suet half an hour. 
When cold chop fine separately. Mix all together. Take one 
bowl of the mixture, two of the apples, and cider when you 
make your pies. Mks. T. Wolfe. 

MOCK-MINCE PIE. 

Four soda crackers, rolled fine; two cups of cold water; 
one cup of molasses; one cup of brown sugar; one cup of 
sour cider or vinegar; one half cup of melted butter; one cup 
of chopped raisins; two eggs; one tablespoonful of all kinds 
of spices; nutmeg, salt and a little pepper. 

Mrs, J. M. Berry. 

APPLE MERINGUE PIE. 

Stew apples soft; sweeten and flavor with lemon. Bake in 
an undercrust. Use the whites of three eggs to each pie, and 
brown lightly. Peaches may be used in the same way. 

Mrs. M. Van Ness. 

SWEET APPLE PIE. 

Two quarts of mellow sweet apples; one and a half quarts 
of sweet milk; two tablespoons of flour; two eggs, well beaten; 
a little salt. Pare the apples, boil and mash very fine. Mix 
with the milk and eggs. Having rubbed the flour smooth 



52 DUTCH (reformed) 



with a little of the milk, add all together and sweeten to 
taste. Flavor with nutmeg. Bake with one crust, the same 
as custard pie. Meal Dutch pie and very good. 

Mrs. D. N. Jacobus. 

PRUNE PIE. 

French prunes make delicious j^ies. Soak them in a very 
little cold water over night. In the morning pinch the stones 
out of them, and stew slowly. When tender, take them out 
of the water with a long-handled strainer. Then strain the 
Avatei- through a piece of flannel ; add sugar and make a 
syrup to pour over the prunes. Bake with two crusts. 



COOK BOOK. 63 



wii^iif^^s Air® PAW®^p® 



AUNT ELLIE'S PLUM PUDDING. 

One teacup of suet; one teacup of raisins; one teacup of 
currants; one teacup of molasses; three teacups of flour. 
Boil three hours. Mrs. C W. Mandevillb. 

YANKEE PLUM PUDDING. 

One pound of Boston crackers, rolled fine; two quarts of 
milk; six eggs; butter, the size of an egg; one pound of 
raisins, stoned; a little salt; sweeten to taste. 

Mrs. C. a. Ryeeson. 

ORANGE PUDDING. 

Six oranges, peeled and sliced; one coffee-cup of sugar 
poured over them; one pint of milk; yolks of three eggs; 
one tablespoonful of corn-starch. Let the eggs, milk and 
corn-starch thicken on the fire, and pour over the oranges. 
Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth with two tea- 
spoonfuls of sugar. Pour on the top, and let brown in the 
oven. Sweeten the eggs, milk and corn-starch to taste before 
pouring over the oranges. 

LEMON MERINGUE PUDDING. 

One quart milk; two cups bread crumbs; one half cup but- 
ter; one cup white sugar; four eggs; one large lemon, the 
juice and half the rind, grated. Soak the bread in the milk; 
add the beaten yolks, with the butter and sugar (rubbed to a 
cream), and the lemon. Bake in a buttered dish until firm 
and slightly brown. Draw to the door of the oven, and 
cover with a meringue of the whites beaten to a froth, with 



54 DUTCH (reformed) 



three tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar and a little lemon juice 
Brown slightly, and eat cold. 

Oranges may be used the same way. 

Miss A. E. G. 

FULLER PUDDING. 

One cup of water; one cup of molasses; half a cup of 
butter; half a pound of currants or raisins; one teaspoon of 
soda; a little salt; flour enough to make stiff. Boil two and 
a half or three hours. Mrs. W. B. 

BROWN BETTY. 

One cup of bread crumbs; two cups of chopped apples; 
one half cup of sugar; one teaspoon of cinnamon; two table- 
spoons of butter, cut in small pieces and put on top. Place 
the apples first; then sprinkle a few crumbs, then apples, then 
crumbs. To be eaten with sauce. Mrs. H. J. Smith. 

DUTCH PUFFS. 

Three eggs; three cups of flour; three cups of milk; a 
little salt. Bake in cups, two thirds full, twenty minutes. 
To be eaten hot, with sauce made of butter and sugar beaten 
to a cream. Flavor to suit the taste. C. V. 

LOWELL PUDDING. 

One coffee-cup of milk; one cup of raisins; half a cup of 
molasses; half a teacup of brown sugar; one teacup of 
suet; one teaspoonful of saleratus ; half a teaspoonful of 
salt; flour to make a stiff batter. Boil three hours. Serve 
with sauce. Mrs. Geo. Dbmarest. 

FRUIT BREAD PUDDING. 

One cup of bread crumbs, grated; yolks of two eggs; one 
tablespoon of sugar ; one quart of milk; half a cup of seeded 
raisins; half a cup of currants. To be eaten with sauce. 

Mrs. J. T. V. N. 



COOK BOOK. 55 



FLOUR PUDDIxHG. 
Four eggs; four cups of sweet milk; two cups of flour ; 
one tablespoon of butter. Bake half an hour in hot oven. 
To be eaten hot with sauce. M. J. D. 

INDIAN PUDDING. 
Three pints of sweet milk, boiled; seven tablespoons of 
Indian meal; four eggs; nutmeg; salt; sweetened to taste. 
Stir the meal into the milk when it begins to boil. 

Miss Silah Van Ness. 

QUICK PUFF PUDDING. 
Into one pint of flour stir two teaspoonfuls of baking pow- 
der and a little salt; then sift and stir the mixture into mi'k 
until very soft. Put about half of the batter into a pan, 
then a layer of berries, or canned fruit, then the remainder 
of the batter. Bake half an hour. To be eaten with sweet 
sauce. Mks. G. A. Ryerson. 

COTTAGE PUDDING.— No. 1. 
Half a cup of sugar ; one tablespoon of butter ; one egg; 
one cup of sweet milk; one pint of flour; one teaspoon of 
baking powder ; a little salt. Mrs. J. J. Mandbvillb. 

COTTAGE PUDDING.— No. 2. 
One quart of flour ; two eggs; two tablespoons of butter; 
two cups of sweet milk; one cup of sugar ; two teaspoons of 
Sea Foam; sweet sauce to your taste. A. V. N. 

SUET PUDDING. 
One cup of raisins, chopped; one of suet; one of milk; one 
of molasses; two (heaping) of flour; one teaspoon of soda; 
spice to taste. Make it as stiff as cake. Boil three hours. 

J. M. Van Saun. 

DANDY PUDDING. 

One quart of milk, boiled in water ; two spoonfuls of corn- 
starch, mixed with the yolks of four eggs and half a cup of 



56 DUTCH (reformed) 



sugar. Pour into the milk and stir very quickly, and take off 
at once. Beat the whites of the eggs well; add half a cup 
of sugar and spread over the pudding when cool. Flavor, 
put in the oven and brown. To be eaten cold. 

Miss A. Jones. 

APPLE BATTER PUDDING. 
One pint sweet milk ; two cups flour ; four eggs ; one tea- 
spoonful salt ; quarter teaspoonful baking-powder. Peel and 
core eight sour apples ; put them close together in a deep 
dish ; beat the batter and pour over them. Bake one hour. 
Eat with sauce. Miss Stella Cammeybr. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

Boil one quart of milk with one pint of bread crumbs ; 
while hot, add a piece of butter the size of a hickory-nut ; 
when nearly cold, add the yolks of five eggs, six tablespoons 
of Baker's chocolate (grated), vanilla and sugar to taste; bake ; 
when the whites are beaten to a stiff froth, add a cup of pow- 
dered sugar. Pour this on the top of the pudding -when it is 
baked, and brown slightly. Mrs. J. G. R. 

PEACH PUDDING. 

Pare your pudding-dish about half full of peaches and 
sprinkle two tablespoons of sugar over them. Then make a 
batter of one cup of sugar, two eggs, one tablespoon of but- 
ter, one cup of milk, one pint of flour, one teaspoon of baking 
powder (in the flour). Throw this batter over the fruit. 
Bake about forty-five minutes. 

Mrs. C. W. Mandeville. 

PUFFS. 

One cup flour; one cup milk; one egg; a little piece of but- 
ter; a little salt; two spoonfuls baking-powder. Bake in tins, 
half-filled. Mrs. Alice Van Saun. 

SHANGHI PUDDING. 
One quart of flour; one pint of milk; two eggs; three spoon- 



COOK BOOK. 57 



fills of baking-poAvder ; one dessertspoonful of butter ; one 
of sugar ; half a teaspoonful of salt. Boil in a pudding mould 
for one hour. To be eaten with sauce. ( .) 

QUEEN OF PUDDINGS. 

One pint of fine bread-crumbs ; one quart of SAveet milk ; 
one cup of sugar; yolks of four eggs; the grated rind of one 
lemon; small piece of butter ; nutmeg and salt to taste. Bake 
until done, but not watery. 

Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth ; add one cup 
of powdered sugar, in which has been stirred the juice of the 
lemon. Pour the whites over the pudding and replace in the 
oven ; let it brown lightly. To be eaten cold. 

This is very line with a layer of jelly or fresh fruit put over 
the pudding and covered with the meringue. C. V. 

BERRY PUDDING. 

One pint of milk ; two eggs ; half a teaspoon of salt ; quar- 
ter of a teaspoon of soda, dissolved in hot water ; half a tea- 
spoon of cream tartar, sifted through a cup of flour, and added 
to enough flour to make a thick batter ; one pint of any kind 
of berries, well dredged with flour, stirred in at the last. Boil. 

Mes. J. R. E. 

SNOW PUDDING. 

Half a box of gelatine, soaked fifteen minutes in four table- 
spoonfuls of cold water ; then add a pint of boiling water, 
the juice of two lemons, one cup of sugar. Then cool, till 
nearly stiff, and add the well-beaten whites of three eggs. 

Mrs. H. J. Smith. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Four tablespooufuls of tapioca ; one quart of milk ; four 
eggs, reserving the whites of two for frosting; one tablespoon- 
ful of sugar. Soak the tapioca over night in a little water; then 
boil tlie milk and pour over it. When it is nearly cold, add 
the sugar and eggs (well beaten) ; flavor to taste and bake one 
hour. After it comes from the oven and has cooled a little. 



58 DUTCH (rBFOEMED) 



pour on it a frosting made of the reserved whites and half 
pound of powdered sugar, well beaten together. This serves 
as a sauce and will be found extremely fine. Mrs. W. R. 

CREAM TAPIOCA PUDDING. 
Soak three tablespoonf uls of tapioca in water over night. 
Put the tapioca into a quart of boiling milk and boil forty- 
five minutes. Beat the yolks of four eggs into a cup of 
sugar, add three tablespoonfuls of prepared cocoanut, stir it in 
and boil ten minutes longer ; pour into a pudding dish. Beat 
the whites of the four eggs to a stiff froth, stir in three table- 
spoonfuls of sugar, and put this over the top. Sprinkle with 
cocoanut and brown for five minutes. Miss A. F. D. 

BIRDS' NEST PUDDING. 

One quart of milk, fourteen tablespoons of flour, six eggs, 
six or eight tender sour apples, pared, cored and halved ; a lit- 
tle salt. Mix the flour with the milk, taking care to add the 
milk slowly, to avoid unevenness, then add the eggs, well 
beaten, and the apples. Stir for fifteen or twenty minutes 
after putting in a brisk oven, to avoid the flour from settling 
to the bottom of the dish. Bake about three-quarters of an 
hour. Sauce of butter and sugar rubbed to a cream ; flavor 
with sherry wine. Mrs. M. R. R. 

DUTCH RAISED DUMPLINGS. 
To one bowl of light sponge, take two cups of sweet milk, 
one egg, salt. Mix, and when light drop with a spoon in a 
pot two-thirds full of boiling water. Serve with sauce. 

Mrs. J. H. Slingerland. 

POP-OVERS. 

Three eggs, one pint of milk, seven tablespoons of flour. 
Beat the eggs till very light, mix the flour and milk together, 
adding a small quantity of the latter at a time, stir in the 
eggs, pour in greased cups, place in a dripping-pan and bake 
in a quick oven about thirty minutes. Mrs. M. R. R. 



COOK BOOK. 59 



COTTAGE PUDDING SAUCE. 
One quart of boiling water; four teaspoons of corn starch, 
mixed in cold water; two tablespoons of butter; twelve table- 
spoons of sugar ; flavor with lemon. ( .) 

BROWN BETTY SAUCE. 
One large cup of sugar, one half cup (scant) of butter, one 
egg, one lemon (all the juice and half the grated peel), a lit- 
tle nutmeg, one half cup of boiling water. 

Mrs. H. J. S. 
SNOW PUDDING SAUCE. 
Use the yolks of the eggs, left from the pudding, for a 
boiled custard, and pour over it. ( .) 

PUFF PUDDING SAUCE. 
Four tablespoons of sugar, two of butter, yolk of one egg, 
stir all to a cream. Beat the white of the egg to a froth and 
stir in one tablespoon of flour, and one half cup of boiling 
water. Mrs. A. V. S. 

LEMON OR ORANGE PUDDING SAUCE. 
One large cup of sugar, a scant half cup of butter, one 
egg, one lemon (all the juice and half the grated peel), one 
teaspoon of nutmeg, three tablespoons of boiling water. 

Mrs. G. D. 

SUET PUDDING SAUCE. 
Two small cups sugar, butter size of a large egg, two eggs 
(beaten separately). Mix yolks with butter and sugar ; have 
the whites in a stiff froth and stir in last, with wliatever fla- 
voring is desired. Mrs. J. H. W. 

COLD OR HARD SAUCE. 
Four tablespoons of sugar, half a teaspoon of butter, one 
teaspoon of hot water, half a teaspoonful of vanilla extract. 
Beat the butter to a cream, add the sugar gradually, then the 
water and flavoring. When smooth and creamy ])ut in a 
small dish and grate nutmeg on top. Served with any kind 
of hot pudding. M. 



60 DUTCH (reformed) 



SOUR CREAM SAUCE. 
Put together a cup of sugar and a cup and a half of thick, 
sour cream, beat the mixture five or six minutes, then put it 
into a sauce-tureen and grate nutmeg over it. This sauce is 
especially appropriate for Indian puddings (baked or boiled), 
and for boiled suet puddings. 

APPLE PUDDING SAUCE. 
One cup of sugar and half a cup of butter, rubbed to a 
cream ; white of one egg, well beaten ; a little nutmeg or 
orange-juice. Wheu ready to serve, stir in two great spoons of 
boiling water. 



COOK BOOK. 



PSl^^WB®^® 



FRITTERS.— No. 1. 

Two eggs ; one cup of milk ; one teaspoon of sugar ; one 
teaspoon of baking-powdei- ; pinch of salt. Make in a stiff 
batter and drop in boiling lard with a spoon, the same as 
dumplings. To be eaten with sauce, or butter and sugar. 

Mrs. M. a. Beebe. 

FRITTERS.— No. 2. 
Three eggs, well beaten ; one cup of milk. Mix as stiff as 
pan-cakes ; cook as crullers. Eat with sauce of butter and 
sugar, well beaten. Miss M. F. R. 

FRUIT FRITTERS. 
Make a batter of one pint of milk, three eggs, one pint of 
flour, a little salt. Add a teaspoon of baking-powder, and 
stir in sliced apples, canned peaches or any fruit you choose. 
Banana fritters are very nice. W. 

APPLE FRITTERS.— No. 1. 
Make a batter, not very stiff, with one quart of milk, three 
eggs and flour. Pare and core a dozen large apples and chop 
them to about the size of small peas. Mix them well in the 
batter and fiy in lard, as you would doughnuts. To be eaten 
with powdered sugar and cream. Mrs. N. 

APPLE FRITTERS.— No. 3. 

Make a batter of two eggs, milk, flour and a little salt ; 

beat the batter smooth and light. Peel the apples and cut in 

thin slices ; dip them in the batter and fry them in fresh lard ; 

then put them on a sieve to drain, and sift sugar over them. 

R. 



62 DUTCH (reformed) 



PEACH FRITTERS. 

To one pint of milk add a small teacup of sifted flour, a 
pinch of salt, and four well-beaten eggs, reserving the whites 
of two. Beat to a stiff batter ; stir in half a can of peaches 
and fry in large spoonfuls, in very hot lard. To the juice 
of the peaches add the whites of two eggs, beaten to a stiff' 
froth, and sugar to taste. This will serve as sauce for the 
fritters. Mrs. R. R. 

STRAWBERRY FRITTERS. 

Make a batter with a coffee-cupful of flour, two well-beaten 
eggs, a tablespoon of melted butter and enough milk to make 
it as stiff as pan-cake batter. Add a pinch of salt and beat 
it well. Mix in one and a half pints of large strawberries, 
and drop a small spoonful of it into hot lard and brown lightly. 
Drain on a sieve, cover with powdered sugar and serve hot. 

W. 
TRIFLES. 

One well-beaten egg and one tablespoon of sugar, a little 
salt and flour enough for a stiff dough. Cut in thin, round 
cakes and fry in lard. When they rise to the surface and 
are turned over they are done. Drain on a sieve and put 
jam or jelly on the center of each, or sprinkle with powdered 
sugar. Mrs. W. R. 



COOK BOOK. 63 



Directions for Making Cake. — Place everything you will 
need on the table. Butter the pans, grate the nutmegs and 
squeeze the lemons. Break the eggs, each in a cup by itself. 
Weigh or measure the flour and sugar, and sift them. Make 
your cake in an earthen dish, not in tin. In warm weather 
put your eggs into cold water some time before you are ready 
to break them — they cut into a much finer froth when cold. 
The whites should be beaten separately, then the yolks beaten 
and strained, and then put to the butter and sugar. After 
these have been stirred till they look like cream, mix in the 
flour gradually. In summer do not stir the cake with the 
hand — the warmth of it makes it less light. In winter soften, 
but do not melt the butter before using it. Attention and 
practice will teach when the cake is well baked — when it is 
done enough it settles a little away from the pan. Even 
well-made cake becomes heavy by being taken out of the 
oven before it is perfectly baked. Moving it carelessly while 
it is baking will also make a light cake fall. 

BUHLING.— No. 1. 

To one quart of boiling water, add corn-meal to make a 
thin mush ; add one cup of molasses and one of lard, a little 
salt and spice to taste ; buckwheat-flour to make a stiff batter. 
Bake in low pans about a half hour. 

Mes. Thos. Mandeville. 

BUHLING.— No. 3. 

Four quarts of water; one cup of Indian meal ; one cup of 
lard ; one pint of molasses ; one tablespoon of allspice. Boil 



64 DUTCH (reformed) 



the meal in the water fifteen minutes ; then add the other in- 
gredients and enough buckwheat flour to make stiff, and boil 
one hour. When it is cold, cut in slices and fry. 

Mrs. Samuel DbMott. 

BUHLING.— No. 3. 

Boil one quart of water ; then add a half cup of Indian 
meal, a lump of lard the size of an egg, one cup of molasses, 
and two teaspoons of allspice. Stir, thickening to a stiff paste 
with the buckwheat meal and set away in a greased dish. 
Slice and fry, or eat cold. Mrs. Jno. J. M. 

DELEVAN LEMON JELLY CAKE. 

Four eggs ; two cups of sugar ; one cup of butter ; one cup 
of sour milk ; two cups of flour ; half teaspoon of soda. 

Mrs. Hester Van Ness. 

APPEL KOEK.— No. 1. 

Half peck of mellow sweet apples ; one cup of sugar ; half 
cup of New Orleans molasses ; half cup of sweet milk ; a 
little salt and spice to taste. Pare and chop the apples the 
same as for mince pies. Use very little flour, and thicken 
with apples. Bake in a pie-dish or tins, in a rather quick oven 
(not too hot) three-quarters of an hour. Cut in slices and eat 
cold for tea; spread with butter. Mrs. D. N. Jacobus. 

APPEL KOEK.— No. 3. 

Half peck of sweet Dereclausha apples ; half cup of N. O. 
molasses ; half cup of brown sugar ; one cup of sweet milk ; 
two eggs, not beaten ; one teaspoonful of grated nutmeg ; a 
little salt. Peel and chop the apples, which must be mellow. 
Do not stir too stiff, and use just flour enough to make a thin 
batter. Bake in square tins or pie-dishes, well buttered, in a 
moderate oven, for three-quarters of an hour. Eat cold, cut 
in slices and buttered, for tea. Miss E. Doremus. 

FRUIT CAKE.— No. 1. 

Three cups of sugar ; one cup of molasses ; five eggs ; two 
cups of butter ; five cups of flour ; one teaspoon of soda ; 



COOK BOOK. 65 



two teaspoons of cream-tartar ; tliree lbs. of raisins ; tlii-ee 
lbs. of currants ; two lbs. of citron ; half pint of brandy ; 
two tablespoons of cloves ; two tablespoons of cinnamon ; 
two nutmegs ; one cup of sour milk. Beat the sugar and 
butter together, add the yolks of the eggs, then the milk, in 
which the soda and cream-tartar have been dissolved. Mix 
the flour with the fruit and then add the brandy, spices, and 
lastly the whites of the eggs, beaten to a stiff froth. Bake 
three hours in a moderate oven. This recipe will make three 
large loaves. H. C, E. 

FRUIT CAKE.— No. 2. 

Eight eggs ; two lbs. of brown sugar ; two lbs. of flour ; 
one lb. of butter ; one lb. of citron ; three lbs. of raisins ; 
two lbs. of currants ; one cup of molasses ; two cups of sweet 
milk ; two wine-glasses of brandy ; four teaspoons of cream- 
tartar ; two teaspoons of soda ; nutmegs, cloves and cinna- 
mon to taste. Mrs. R. Alyea. 

FRUIT CAKE.— No. 3. 

One lb. of flour ; one lb. of sugar; eight eggs; three-quarters 
lb. of butter ; one pint of molasses ; three lbs. of currants ; 
one lb. of citron ; four lbs. of raisins ; one gill of brandy ; 
half oz. each of spices of all kinds. Bake three hours. 

Mrs. Ida R. DeMott. 

FRUIT CAKE.— No. 4.— Very Good. 

Two cups of sugar ; one cup of milk ; one cup of molasses ; 
one cup of butter ; four eggs ; four cups of flour ; one tea- 
spoon of soda ; one lb. of currants ; one lb. of raisins ; half 
lb. of citron ; one nutmeg ; cloves, cinnamon and allspice to 
taste ; one wine-glass of brandy, Mrs. S. P. Roome. 

FRUIT CAKE.— No. 5. 

One lb. of flour ; one lb. of sugar; three-quarter lb. of 
butter; two lbs. of seeded raisins ; two lbs. of currants ; one 
lb. of citron ; quarter lb. of almonds ; half oz. of mace ; one 
teaspoon of rose-water ; one wine-glass of brandy ; one wine- 



66 DUTCH (reformed) 



glass of wine ; ten eggs ; one teaspoon of soda ; two tea- 
spoons of cream-tartar. Stir the sugar and butter to a cream ; 
add the yolks and whites of the eggs, beaten separately ; stir 
in the flour, in which the soda and cream-tartar have been 
sifted ; then the wine, brandy and spices. Add the fruit just 
before it is put in pans. It should be made three or four 
weeks before it is used. Miss A. Jones. 

PLAIN FRUIT CAKE. 

One cup of butter ; two cups of dark brown sugar ; four 
eggs (separated) ; one large cup of milk ; one cup of mo- 
lasses ; five cups of flour ; one lb. of raisins ; one lb, of cur- 
rants ; one teaspoon of cinnamon ; half teaspoon of cloves, a 
little nutmeg and a little baking-powder added in the flour. 

Mrs. C. Elliott. 

POUND CAKE.— No. 1. 

One lb. of sugar; three-fourths of a pound of butter ; one 
pound of flour ; three eggs ; half a teaspoon of soda. 

J. V. R. R. 

POUND CAKE.— No. 2. 

One lb. of sugar ; one lb. of flour ; half lb. of butter ; six 
eggs ; two teaspoons of baking-powder ; half a pint of milk; 
essence of lemon. Miss S. Cammeyer. 

HALF-WAY POUND CAKE. 

Half pound butter, one pound sugar, one pound flour, five 
eggs, one cup thick milk, one teaspoonful saleratus, lemon to 
flavor. Mrs. C. A. Rterson. 

COTTAGE POUND CAKE. 

Mix well together one pound of sugar and half a pound of 
butter, add six well beaten eggs, stir in one teacupful of 
sweet milk, add one pound of flour in which has been sifted 
three teaspoonfuls of Royal Baking Powder. 

Miss Emily Slingerland. 



COOK BOOK. 67 



SPONGE CAKE. 
One cup of sugar, three tablespoons of water, four eggs, 
one cup of flour, one and a half teaspoonfuls of baking pow- 
der, a pinch of salt ; flavor to taste. 

Belle and Flora. Van Cleef. 

BERWICK SPONGE CAKE, 
Six eggs, three cups of powdered sugar, four even cups of 
sifted flour, two teaspoons of cream-tartar, one cup of cold 
water, one teaspoon of soda, one lemon. First beat the eggs 
two minutes, put in the sugar and beat five minutes more ; 
then stir in the cream-tartar and two cups of flour, and beat 
one minute. Now dissolve the soda in the water and stir in ; 
having grated the rind of the lemon, squeeze in half the juice 
only, and finally add the other two cups of flour. Beat all 
one minute and put into deep pans in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. J. DeBow. 
CITRON CAKE. 
Two cups of sugar, half a cup of butter, one cup of milk, 
three eggs, three cups of flour, sifted with three teaspoonfuls 
of Sea Foam powder, one and one-quarter pounds of citron. 

Mrs. p. H. Mandeville. 

FEATHER CAKE. 
Two cups of sugar, half cup of butter, two eggs, three- 
quarters of a cup of milk, three cups of flour. Flavor to taste. 

Mrs. J. J. Mandeville. 

MARBLED CAKE. 
One cup of butter, two cups of powdered sugar, three cups 
of flour, four eggs, one cup of sweet milk, half teaspoon of 
soda, one teaspoon of cream-tartar. When the cake is mixed, 
take out a teacupful of batter and stir into this two spoonfuls 
of grated chocolate wet with a tablespoonful of milk. Fill 
your pan an inch deep with the yellow batter ; drop upon this, 
in two or three places, a spoonful of the dark mixture, j^ro- 
ceeding in this order until all is used up. 

Mrs. Mary Andruss. 



68 DUTCH (eEFORMEd) 



DELICATE CAKE. 

One and one-half cups of sugar, half cup of milk, half cup 
of butter, half teaspoonful of soda, dissolved in the milk, two 
cups of flour, one teaspoon of cream-tartar, rubbed in the flour ; 
flavor with lemon or vanilla ; beat the whites of four eggs to 
a stiff froth and add last. J. M. Van Saun. 

ONE-TWO-THREE-FOUR CAKE. 

One cup of butter, two cups of sweet milk, two cups of 
sugar, three cups of flour, four eggs, two teaspoons of cream 
tartar, one of soda ; flavor to taste. 

Miss Jennie Slingerland. 

ANGEL CAKE. 

Whites of eleven eggs, one and one-half cups of powdered 
sugar, one cup of floiir, one small teaspoon of cream-tartar, 
and one teaspoon of vanilla. The sugar must be sifted once 
before using, and the flour four times, adding the cream-tartar 
before sifting the last time. Beat the whites to a stiff froth, 
then add the sugar, flour and flavoring. Bake in a very slow 
oven without buttering the pan. This cake is best baked in a 
smooth cylinder pan. "When it is done invert the pan so that 
the air can reach it while cooling. 

Miss H. A. Moeehouse. 

WATERMELON CAKE. 
One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, whites of six eggs, 
one cup of sweet milk, two cups of flour, half paper of corn- 
starch, three teaspoons of baking powder, one teasjioon of pul- 
verized cochineal, half teaspoon of pulverized alum. Mix the 
cochineal and alum together and dissolve in four teaspoons of 
boiling water, strain through a thin cloth ; take one-third of 
the cake batter and stir this in. Put the batter in the pan the 
same as for marble cake. E. G. D. 

PORK CAKE. 

One pound of salt pork, chopped fine ; pour half a pint of 
boiling water upon it ; stir together one pound of seeded rais- 



COOK BOOK. 69 



ins, quarter pound of citron, two cups of sugar, one cup of 
molasscB, one teaspoouful of saleratus (dissolved in the mo- 
lasses), flour enough for the consistency of common cake-bat- 
ter, one ounce of nutmeg, one ounce of cloves, two ounces of 
cinnamon, Mrs. E. Stevens. 

SPICE CAKE. 

One and one-half cups of butter ; three cups of sugar ; one 
cup of sour milk ; five cups of flour ; five eggs ; one teaspoon 
of soda ; one pound of raisins ; one teaspoon each of cin- 
namon, cloves, nutmeg and allspice. , Miss K. D. K. 

METHODIST CAKE. 

Four eggs ; one pound of sugar ; one-half pound of butter ; 
one cup of sweet milk ; four cups of flour ; two teaspoonfuls 
of cream-tartar ; one of soda ; flavor to taste. Dissolve the 
soda in the milk ; mix the cream-tartar with the flour. 

Mrs. J. M. B. 

NOTHING CAKE. 

One egg ; butter, the size of an egg ; one cup of sugar ; one 
cup of milk ; one pint of flour ; two teaspoonfuls of cream 
tartar ; one of soda. Divide the milk, disolving the cream 
tartar in one portion, the soda in the other ; pour one into the 
other, to effervesce ; then add the other ingredients. 

Mrs. J. G. Rterson. 

SISTER MAGGIE'S CAKE. 

Two and one-half cups of sugar ; three-fourths of a cup of 
butter ; one cup of sweet milk ; three cups of flour ; one lemon 
(juice and rind); one small teaspoon of soda. 

Mrs. C. W. M. 
GOLD CAKE. 

The yolks of eight eggs ; one cup of sugar ; three-fourths of a 
cup of butter ; one-half cup of sweet milk ; one and one-half 
cups of flour; one teaspoon of baking powder; flavor to taste. 

Mrs. J. V. R. 



70 DUTCH (reformed) 



SILVER CAKE. 

Two cups of sugar ; one cup of butter ; three cups of flour ; 
one cup of sweet milk ; two teaspoons of baking powder ; 
whites of seven eggs, beaten to a stiff froth and added the 
last thing. Mrs. J. M. B. 

LUNCHEON CAKE. 

Take one pint of milk, warm it, stir in flour till you have 
a thick batter ; then add one teacup of yeast and set to rise. 
When light stir in flour till quite thick ; then stir in one tea- 
cupful of melted butter, two of white sugar, cinnamon and 
nutmeg to taste. Stir, until as thick as you can stir with a 
spoon. Have dripping-pans buttered ; take a spoon and spread 
the batter on them quite thin, say an inch or so, and put away 
to rise. In order to spread the mixture you will need a pan 
of melted butter to dip your spoon in and spread on the cake. 
Put on enough melted butter to have it smooth on the top. 
After it has risen very light^ sprinkle sugar and cinnamon over 
it and bake. Mrs. W. R. 

COFFEE CAKE. 
One coffee-cup of sugar ; one of butter ; one of molasses ; 
one of strong coffee ; four of flour ; two eggs ; one teaspoon 
of cloves; one of cinnamon; one of allspice ; one of mace ; two 
of soda, dissolved in one tablespoon of vinegar ; one wineglass 
of brandy ; two pounds of raisins ; two of currants ; one-half 
pound of citron. Mrs. J. M. Berry. 

WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE. 
One pound of flour ; one pound of sugar ; one-half pound 
of butter ; five eggs ; one cup of milk ; two teaspoons of 
baking powder ; a little salt. C. V. 

AUSTIN CAKE. 
Three cups of sugar ; five cups of flour ; one cup of butter ; 
one and one-half cups of milk ; one pound of raisins ; two 
eggs ; one teaspoon of soda ; two of cream-tartar. 

Mrs. S. p. Roomb. 



COOK BOOK. 71 



HICKORY-NUT CAKE. 

One and one-half cups of sugar ; half a cup of butter ; two 
cups of flour ; whites of four eggs ; three-fourths of a cup of 
milk ; one teaspoon of baking powder ; one cup of hickoiy- 
nut meats. 

Mrs. L. L. R. 

SNOW-FLAKE CAKE. 

Two cups of sugar ; one of butter ; whites of seven eggs ; 
one cup of corn starch; two of flour; (mix the flour and corn 
starch together and flavor with vanilla) ; two teaspoons of 
baking powder. The yolks of the eggs may be used for 
gold cake. Mrs. A. Van Saun. 



LAYER OAKE 



LEMON JELLY CAKE. 

Cake. — Three eggs ; one and a half cups of sugar ; a scant 
half cup of butter ; a half cup of milk ; two and a half cups 
of flour ; two teaspoons of baking powder sifted with the 
flour. 

Jelly. — Grated rind and juice of one lemon ; one small tea- 
cup of water ; one tablespoon of corn starch ; one egg ; a little 
butter and salt ; sweetening to taste. Boil until it is thick. 

Mrs. a. V. S. 

LEMON CREAM CAKE. 

Cake. — One and one half cups of sugar ; four eggs ; one 
half cup of butter ; two cups of flour ; one half cup of 
water. 

Cream, Filling. — One egg ; one cup of water ; one cup of 
sugar ; one teaspoon of coru starch ; lemon to taste. 

Mrs. J. R E. 



Y2 DUTCH (kEFORMKd) 



COCOANUT JELLY CAKE.— No. 1. 

Four eggs, beaten liglit; one and a half cups of white sugar; 
two cups of flour ; one small teaspoon of soda, in the flour ; 
two teaspoons of cream-tartar; six tablespoons of sweet cream; 
flavor and bake in three layers. 

Filling. — One cocoanut, grated; three tablespoons of pow- 
dered sugar; white of one egg, beaten stiff ; three tablespoons 
of cream. 

Set the cake in the oven and brown slightly. 

Mrs. Jacob De Bow. 

COCOANUT JELLY CAKE.— No. 3. 
Two cups of sugar ; half a cup of butter ; three eggs ; one 
cuj) of milk ; three cups of flour ; two teaspoons of cream 
tartar ; one of soda. 

Filling. — One grated cocoanut ; add to one-half of it the 
whites of three eggs, beaten to a froth, and one cup of pow- 
dered sugar ; mix with the other half four tablespoons of 
sugar and strew thickly over the top of the cake. 

Mrs. M. a. 
ICE CREAM CAKE. 

Whites of eight eggs; one cup of butter ; two cups of sugar; 
two cups of flour ; one cuj) of corn starch ; one cup of 
milk; two teaspoons of baking powder. 

Mrs. S. DeMott. 

RIBBON CAKE. 

Two teacups of sugar ; three quarters (scant) of a cup of 
butter ; four eggs; one teacup of sweet milk; two and a half 
cups of flour, sifted; one teaspoon of soda; two of cream-tar- 
tar. Beat butter and sugar well together ; then add eggs, 
milk, spice and flour. Bake in jelly-cake tins. This will make 
four layers of plain cake, and the i-emaining batter will pro- 
vide the dark layers by adding one large tablespoon of mo- 
lasses; one half pound each of raisins, currants and citron, all 
chopped fine ; a little more flour to stiffen suflSciently. This 



COOK BOOK. 73 



will make two layers of dark cake to alternate with the plain. 
Spread with icing or jelly, when putting together. 

Mrs. J. G. R. 
OKANGE CAKE. 

Two cups of sugar; yolks of five eggs, whites of two; half 
a cup of cold water ; two and a half cups of flour ; two tea 
spoons of baking powder ; juice and riud of one orange. 

Joining. — Beat the whites of two eggs to a stiff froth, add 
seven large tablespoons of powdered sugar, and the grated 
rind and juice of one orange. Spread tliis between the layers. 

Mes. Pauline Rykrson. 

CARAMEL CAKE. 

Two cups of powdered sugar ; three eggs; one scant cup of 
sweet milk ; one tablespoon of butter ; one-half teaspoon of 
bitter almond flavoring ; three cups of flour ; two teaspoons 
of baking powder. Cream the butter and sugar together, 
adding the milk gradually ; then the eggs (well beaten) — re- 
serving the white of one for frosting the top of the cake ; a 
little salt and flavoring. Bake in jelly tins. The two flavor- 
ings, as of vanilla and bitter almond, will blend pleasantly 
together. 

Filling. — A half pint of sweet milk ; one and a half table- 
spoons of corn starch ; three quarters of a cup of sugar ; one 
egg, ; one tablespoon of vanilla. Have the milk boiling hot ; 
stir in the corn starch, wet with a little cold milk ; beat the 
egg and sugar together ; add a little of the hot milk to it ; 
then stir in the custard until quite thick. Flavor when cold, 
and spread between the cakes. Miss E. D. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE.— Very Nice. 
Two eggs ; one cup of white sugar ; half a cup of sweet 
milk; quarter cup of butter ; one and a half cups of flour ; a 
little salt; one and a half teaspoons of baking powder. Bake 
in jelly tins. 

Chocolate Filling. — One and a half bars of chocolate, 



74 DUTCH (reformed) 



grated ; the white of one egg ; three heaping tablespoons of 
pulverized sugar. Mix and spread between the layers. 

Mrs. H. J. S. 
CHOCOLATE CAKE.— No. 2. 

Two cups of sugar ; one cup of butter ; yolks of five eggs ; 
whites of two eggs ; one cup of milk ; three and a half cups 
of flour ; one teaspoonful of cream-tartar ; half a teaspoon of 
soda. Bake the same as jelly cake. 

Filling. — Half a cup of sugar ; three tablespoons of grated 
chocolate; one teaspoon of extract of vanilla. Beat well and 
spread between the layers and on the top. 

Mrs. H. Van Ness. 
CREAM CAKE. 

One pound of flour; one of sugar; one half pound of butter; 
one half pint of cream ; four eggs ; one pound of currants; 
one teaspoon of soda, and two of cream-tartar. 

Cream filling. — One half pint of milk ; two small teaspoons 
of corn starch; one half cup of sugar ; one Gg^\ one teaspoon 
of lemon. Let the mixture cool before you flavor, and 
spread on the cake. Mrs. L. M. R. 

APPLE JELLY CAKE. 

Two cups of sugar ; one scant cup of butter ; four eggs ; 
one cup of sweet milk ; four cups of flour. Use Sea Foam 
powder in the flour and flavor to taste. This will make four 
layers. 

Jelly filling. — One cup of sugar ; four large apples, grated ; 
juice and grated rind of one lemon ; one egg. Boil the mix- 
ture and when nearly boiled put in the egg. 

Mrs. J. G. R. 

ROCHESTER JELLY CAKE. 
Two cups of sugar; one of sweet milk; three of flour; two- 
thirds of a cup of butter ; three eggs ; one teaspoon of baking- 
powder. To one-third of the mixture, add one teaspoon of 
molasses, one cup of raisins, a quarter of a pound of sliced 



COOK BOOK. 75 



citron, one teaspoon of cinnamon, half a teaspoon of cloves 
and allspice, half a nutmeg and one tablespoon of flour. Bake 
in jelly tins, putting the spice cake between the other two 
layers. Spread jelly over each layer. Mrs. L. L. R. 

PINE-APPLE CAKE. 

One cup of butter ; two of sugar ; one of milk ; three of 
flour ; the whites of six eggs, yolks of four ; three teaspoons 
of baking powder, well mixed with the flour. Bake in jelly- 
cake pans. 

Filling. — Grate one pine-apple, sprinkle with sugar and put 
between the layers. Mrs. G. G. Van Ness. 

NEAPOLITAN CAKE. 

Black. — One cup of butter ; two scant cups of brown sugar ; 
one cup of molasses ; one cup of strong coffee ; four and a half 
cups of sifted flour ; four eggs ; two teaspoons of soda ; four 
of cream-tartar ; two of cinnamon ; two of cloves ; one of 
mace ; one pound of raisins ; one of currants ; one quarter 
pound of citron. 

White. — One cup of butter ; four of sugar ; two of sweet 
milk ; four and a half of sifted flour ; two of corn starch, 
mixed with the flour ; whites of eight eggs ; one teaspoon of 
soda ; two of cream-tartar. 

The cakes should be baked in pans with straight sides. After 
the cakes are cold, the black loaf should be spread with a 
thick coating of the following mixture : the white of one egg 
well beaten ; the grated rind of t^vo and juice of tliree lem- 
ons ; powdered sugar to make a thick frosting. Then alter- 
nate the loaves and frost as any other cake. 

Miss A. Jones. 

JELLY CAKE. 

Tw^o cups of sugar ; three eggs ; half cup of butter ; three 
cups of flour ; one cup of milk. Use prepared flour. Bake in 
jelly tins. Spread with any fruit jelly. 



76 DUTCH (reformed) 



ICING-S. 



ICING FOR ICE-CREAM CAKE. 
Whites of five eggs ; four cups of sugar ; half a pint of boil- 
ing water. Boil sugar and water together until clear and 
candied; beat the eggs light, pour the syrup on the eggs and 
beat until cold ; then flavor with vanilla; dissolve citric acid 
the size of a pea and put in the icing. Have the cake cold 
when the icing is put on. Mrs. S. DeMott. 

SOFT ICING OR FROSTING. 
White of one egg, and sugar enough to make it stiff. Put 
the sugar with the egg before beating, and then beat until very- 
light. Mrs. a. V. S. 

SOFT CHOCOLATE ICING. 
One scant cup of sugar ; a half cup of grated chocolate; 
whites of two eggs. One half of this is sufficient for a me- 
dium-sized cake. Miss A. L. Berry. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMEL ICING. 
One cup of grated chocolate ; two cups of brown sugar; 
one wine glass of water. Boil the mixture until it will 
harden when dropped into water ; then lose no time in pour- 
ing it over the cake while it is hot, or it will harden before 
you get it on. Mrs. J. H. W. 

SMALL CAKES. 



CHEAP POUND CAKE. 

Two cujjs of sugar ; one cup of butter ; two-thirds cup of 
milk ; five eggs ; three cups of flour ; two teaspoons of baking 
powder ; a little salt. Bake in patty tins. C. V. 

SUGAR KISSES. 
Whisk the whites of four eggs to a stiff froth and stir in 
half a pound of sifted white sugar and flavor to taste. When 
stiff, put in heaps on white paper, each being the shape and 



COOK BOOK. 77 



half the size of an egg, and an incli apart. Place them on a 
board which is half an inch thick, and put them into a hot 
oven. When they turn a little yellowish, slip off the paper 
on a table and let them cool five minutes. Then slip off two 
of the kisses from the table with a knife and join the bottom 
parts together which, if pressed gently, will adhere. Then 
lay them on a plate and continue until all are thus prepared. 
These look handsomely, and are very delicate and good. 

Mrs. W. R. 

BACHELOR BUTTONS. 

Rub two ounces of butter into five ounces of flour ; add five 
ounces of sugar. Beat one egg with half the sugar, then put 
it to the other ingredients ; add flavoring to the taste. Roll 
in the hand to the size of a nut ; spi'inkle with white sugar 
and bake in tins on buttered paper. Brown slightly. 

Miss A. Jones. 

CREAM PUFFS. 

Melt one-half cup of butter in one cup of hot water and, 
while boiling, beat in one cup of flour ; take from the stove 
and cool ; when cool, stir in three eggs, one at a time, without 
beating ; drop on tins quickly, and bake half an hour in a 
moderate oven. 

Cream filling. — One-haK pint of milk ; one egg ; three 
tablespoons of sugar ; two tablespoons of flour. Boil the 
same as any mock-cream, and flavor with lemon. When 
baked, open the side of each puff and fill with the cream. 

Mrs. a. V. N. 

COCOANUT DROPS. 

One cocoamit, grated ; whites of four eggs, well beaten ; 
one-half lb. of sifted white sugar ; flavor with rose water or 
lemon. Mix all as thick as can be stirred, lay in heaps, an 
inch apart, on paper and place on a baking tin ; put them in a 
quick oven and take them out when they have browned very 
slightly. Mrs. W. R. 



78 DUTCH (kEFORMED) 

COCOANUT PUFFS. 

Mix two cups of cocoanut with one cup of powdered sugar, 
the beaten whites of two eggs and two tablespoons of flour 
or corn starch ; drop on buttered tins and bake quick. 

Miss C. V. 

HARD WAFFLES. 

One lb. of butter ; three-quarters lb. of sugar ; three 
eggs ; two lbs. of flour. Bake in a waffle iron and eat cold. 

Miss M. F. V. H. 

GRANDMA'S CRULLERS. 

A small teacup, half full of lard or drippings ; one egg ; 
nutmeg to taste ; one bowlful of sugar ; one bowlful of 
buttermilk ; a large teaspoonful of saleratus, dissolved in a 
half cupful of warm sour milk ; one teaspoonful of salt. To 
be made stiff with flour ; cut in any shapes desired, and fry 
in boiling lard. Miss A. E. S. 

CRULLERS.— No. 1. 

Four even tablespoons of butter ; ten tablespoons of sugar ; 
three eggs ; one coffee-cup of milk ; one teaspoon of salera- 
tus ; one nutmeg. To be made stiff enough to roll out. 

Mrs. Mart Rterson. 

CRULLERS.— No 2. 

Five eggs, yolks and whites, beaten separately ; one and a 
half cups of sugar ; one tablespoon of butter or lard ; two 
heaping teaspoons of baking powder ; one nutmeg (grated) ; 
a pinch of salt. Knead just stiff enough to roll, and cut any 
shape you wish. Mrs. M. A. Beebe. 

EXTRA CRULLERS. 

Six eggs ; three cups of sugar ; two eupa of sour cream ; 
two teaspoons of baking soda ; one teaspoon of salt ; flavor 
to taste. Mrs. T. Ryerson. 

GILMOR'S CRULLERS. 

One cup of sugar ; one egg ; one-half pint of milk ; butter, 



COOK BOOK. 79 



the size of an egg ; two heaping teaspoons of baking powder. 
Put all together in the flour and knead stiff enough to roll. 

Mrs. J. M. B. 

FRENCH JUMBLES. 

Two cups of sugar ; a half cup of butter ; four cups of flour ; 
three eggs ; one teaspoonful of soda ; two teaspoonfuls of 
cream tartar ; with or without spice. Roll out, and bake 
and sprinkle with sugar. Mrs. J. G. Rybrson. 

JUMBLES. 

One lb. of sugar ; one lb. of butter ; two lbs. of flour ; 
three eggs ; two teaspoons of baking powder. Keep a little 
of the sugar to roll them in. Mrs. M. J. D. 

COOKIES.— No. 1. 

Two cups of flour ; one cup of sugar ; a half cup of butter 
or lard ; two eggs ; one teaspoonful of soda, dissolved in a 
quarter of a cupful of milk ; two teaspoonfuls of cream-tar- 
tar ; flour to roll out thin ; cut to suit the taste. 

Mrs. Wm. Baxter. 

COOKIES.— No. 2. 
Two cups of sugar ; one cup of butter ; one-half cup of sweet 
milk ; two eggs ; three teaspoons of baking powder ; flavor to 
taste. Mix stiff and bake in a quick oven. The above re- 
cipe is very much improved by adding grated cocoanut. 

Mrs. J. V. R. R. 

DOUGHNUTS.— No. 1. 

Three eggs ; two cups of sugar ; one cup of sweet milk ; 

butter the size of an egg ; one teaspoon of saleratus dissolved 

in a little hot water ; one scant teaspoon of cream-tartar ; 

flour enough to roll without sticking to the moulding-board. 

Mrs. H. J. S. 

DOUGHNUTS— No. 2. 

One-half lb. of butter ; one half lb. of sugar ; three eggs ; 
one pint of milk ; one teacup of yeast. Mrs. M. J. D. 



80 DUTCH (reformed) 



NEW YEAR'S CAKES. 

Six lbs. of flour ; two and a half lbs. of sugar; one-half lb. 
of butter ; one oz. of hartshorn; two ozs. of caraway seed ; 
one pint of boiling water. 

Pour the boiling water on the sugar, hartshorn and seeds ; 
rub the butter and flour together ; then stir in the liquid ; 
roll out and cut with cake-cutters. Miss E. G. D. 

MOLASSES CAKE. 



GINGER SNAPS.— No. 1. 
One cup of butter and lard, mixed ; one cup of sugar ; one 
of molasses ; a half cup of water ; one tablespoon of ginger ; 
one tablespoon of cinnamon, one teaspoon of cloves ; one tea- 
spoon of soda, dissolved in hot water ; flour to make the dough 
quite stiff. Roll out thinner than sugar cakes. Bake quickly. 

Mrs. C. a. R. 

GINGER SNAPS— No. 2. 

One-half cup of butter ; one-half cup of lard ; one table- 
spoon of ginger ; one cup of sugar ; one cup of molasses ; one 
teaspoon of soda ; a little salt. IVliss C. V. 

GINGER SNAPS.— No. 3. 
One cup of lard ; two cups of molasses ; one tablespoon of 
ginger ; one tablespoon of saleratus or soda, dissolved in one- 
fourth cup of hot water. Put all together in flour with a 
little salt ; knead stiff and roll out thin. Bake in a quick 
oven. Mrs. J. M. Berry. 

GINGER COOKIES. 
One cup of molasses, one half cup of butter ; one cup of 
Bweet milk ; one teaspoon of soda ; flour to mix stiff enough 
to bake on the griddle. A. V. N. 

GINGER CRACKERS. 
One pint of molasses, one cuj) of butter ; one cup of sugar; 
three tablespoons of ginger ; three teaspoons of saleratus, 
dissolved in a half cuj^ of boiling water. Mary Uyerson. 



COOK BOOK. 81 



MAGGIE'S MOLASSES CAKE. 
One teacup each of molasses, sugar and sour milk ; a scant 
cup of lard and butter, mixed ; one teaspoon of soda ; two 
eggs ; flour to make as stiff as cup-cake batter ; spice to taste. 

Mrs. C. W. M. 

MOLASSES CAKE. 
One cup of molasses; two-thirds cup of melted butter; 
three-fourths cup of milk ; two and one-half cups of flour ; 
one egg ; one teaspoon of saleratus ; a little salt. 

Miss M. F. R. 

SOFT GINGERBREAD.— No. 1. 
One-half cup of butter ; one cup of molasses ; one cup of 
sugar ; one cup of sour or buttermilk ; one teaspoon of soda; 
one teaspoon of cinnamon ; one tablespoon of ginger ; two 
eggs; five cups of flour. Mrs. P. R. 

SOFT GINGERBREAD.— No. 3. 
One cup of butter and one cup of brown sugar, beaten to- 
gether ; then add one cup of molasses, one cup of flour, one 
cup of sour cream, yolks of four eggs, another cup of flour, 
one tablespoon of ground ginger, one tablespoon of cinna- 
mon ; one teaspoon of cloves, three cups of fruit, one tea- 
spoon of soda dissolved in a little warm water, whites of four 
eggs, and finally a third cup of flour. Mrs. L. M. R. 

MOLASSES FRUIT CAKE— No. 1. 

Two eggs ; two cups of molasses ; one cup of sugar ; one 
and a half cups of butter ; one cup of milk ; one teaspoon of 
soda; one teaspoon of lemon; one pound each of raisins, cur- 
rants and citron; spice to taste; a little brandy; flour to make 
batter. Miss Susie Stiles. 

MOLASSES FRUIT CAKE.— No. 2. 
One cup of butter, one cup of molasses, one cup of brown 
sugar, one cup of milk, three cups of flour, four eggs, two 
pounds of raisins, one nutmeg, two teaspoons of yeast pow- 
der. Mrs. Nichols. 



82 DUTCH (reformed) 



MOLASSES CHOCOLATE CAKE. 
One cup of molasses, one ounce of butter, a half cup of 
sugar, a half cup of sour milk, two eggs, two cups of flour, 
one teaspoon of ginger, one teaspoon of cinnamon, one tea- 
spoon of soda, dissolved in the milk, rind and juice of half a 
lemon. Bake in jelly tins. 

Chocolate Filling. — One cake of sweet chocolate, four table- 
spoons of water ; butter the size of a hickory nut; sweeten to 
taste. Boil until thick, stirring all the time. 

Mrs. J. D. B. 

SOFT MOLASSES CAKE. 
One cup of sugar, one cup of butter, one cup of molasses, 
one cup of sour milk, four cups of sifted flour, one tablespoon 
of ginger, one tablespoon of cinnamon, rind of one lemon, 
two teaspoons of saleratus, dissolved in a large spoonful of 
water. Stir the butter and sugar to a cream ; four well 
beaten eggs ; lastly, flour and milk added. 

Miss J. M. V. S. 



COOK BOOK, 83 



^W®^Am©P* ^JSEIAMIJ® mtm^ 



TAPIOCA CUSTARD. 

One quart of milk, two eggs, two tablespoons of granulated 
tapioca ; sweeten to taste ; salt ; flavor with extract of lemon. 
Cook in a farina kettle, or in a tin pail boiled in a pot of 
water. Mrs. J. H. S. 

LEMON CUSTARD. 
Two cups of sugar, two lemons, four eggs, two tablespoons 
of corn starch. Grate the peel of the lemons and put four 
cups of boiling water on it. Let it boil while you mix the 
corn starch. Strain the lemon peel ; put that water and the 
juice of the lemons back and let it boil ; stir in the corn 
starch ; while that is boiling stir in the beaten yolks of the 
eggs and the sugar. Beat the whites to a froth, stir them 
in, then turn out in a pudding dish to cool. Mrs. M. S. R. 

CHOCOLATE CUSTARD. 
One quart of sweet milk, four tablespoons of com starch, 
six tablespoons of sugar, two of grated chocolate, a little 
salt. Wet the corn starch wath milk, and also the chocolate, 
to make it even. Have the milk neai'ly boiling ; stir in the 
corn starch ; boil it two minutes. After taking it from the 
stove stir in the chocolate. To be eaten cold with milk sauce. 

Satcce. — One half pint of milk, two tablespoons of sugar, 
one half teaspoon of vanilla, a little nutmeg. 

]\Irs. L. L. Ryerson. 

CHOCOLATE BLANC ]\LVNGE. 
Three pints of rich milk ; set over the fire to boil ; dissolve 
one box of Cox's gelatine in one pint of cold water ; grate one 



84 DUTCH (reformed) 



large cup of chocolate and add to it a little cold millc, one 
pound of sugar and a tablespoon of vanilla. When the milk 
is nearly boiling pour in the mixture, then add the gelatine 
and boil five minutes. Pour into moulds. 

Mrs. J. M. Berry. 

CORN STARCH BLANC MANGE. 

Make a corn starch pudding with one quart of milk, four 
tablespoons of corn starch and three tablespoons of sugar; 
when done remove about lialf and flavor to taste. To the 
remainder add a beaten egg and two ounces of vanilla choco- 
late. Put in a mould, alternately, the dark and light por- 
tions. Serve with whipped cream and sugar. 

Miss A. F. D. 
FLOATING ISLAND. 

Heat one quart of milk ; add sugar to taste, and when 
nearly boiling, pour in the yolks of six eggs, thoroughly 
beaten, stirring briskly until the custard is cooked ; flavor as 
you like. Turn this in a suitable deej) dish and set in a cool 
place. 

Beat the whites to a very stiff froth, turn them in a colan- 
der and pour boiling water through the foam ; shake it to- 
gether and turn it carefully on the custard. Keep in a cool 
place till used. Mrs. M. J. D. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 
Dissolve one half packet of Cox's gelatine in a cup of 
warm milk ; strain through a fine sieve into a pint of well- 
sweetened cream ; add two teasj^oons of essence of vanilla and 
a wine-glass of wine ; set on ice to stiffen a little. Then 
beat the whites of four eggs thoroughly ; add to the rest ; 
return to the ice until stiff. Put into cups, lined with sponge 
cake. Keep cool until used. If too thick add milk or cream. 

Mrs. C. Elliott. 

PREPARED RICE FOR DINNER OR SUPPER, 
Boil the rice fifteen minutes in salted water ; pour off the 
water, pour in milk and let it simmer slowly till the rice is 



COOK BOOK. 85 



soft. There should be sufficient inilk to make tlie rice thick 
so that it can be put in cups and turned out, keeping its form. 
Fill small teacups with this rice and invert them in a shallow 
dish. On the summit of each one make an opening with a 
teaspoon and lay a piece of jelly. Then pour into the dish a 
custard made of two eggs and a pint of milk. 

Mrs. W. R. 

APPLE SNOW. 

Six fine pippins ; two cups of powdered sugar ; one lemon, 
juice and half the grated peel ; one pint of milk ; four eggs. 
Make a custard of the milk, one cup of the sugar and the 
yolks of the eggs. Bake the apples, without peeling or coring, 
in a covered dish with a little water to prevent burning. The 
apples should be so tender that a straw will pierce them. 
Take off the skins and scrape out the pulp ; mix in the sugar 
and lemon; whip the whites of the eggs light and beat in the 
pulp by degrees, until very white and firm. Put the custard, 
when cold, into a glass bowl and pile the snow upon it. 

Mrs. M. R. Roome. 

SPANISH CREAM. 

Half an ounce of Cox's gelatine, dissolved in half a pint of 
milk; one quart of milk to boil. Beat the whites of six eggs 
to a stiff froth; beat the yolks with one cup of sugar. When 
the milk is nearly boiling, stir in the gelatine, yolks, sugar and 
one tablespoon of vanilla. Pour this, boiling hot, on the beaten 
whites, stirring constantly. Mrs. J. M. B, 

COFFEE CUSTARD. 
Half a pint of rich cream ; half a cup of cold coffee ; four 
eggs ; sugar to taste. Miss A. F. D. 

VELVET CREAM. 
One and a half pints of cream, whipped; half a box of Cox's 
gelatine; one heaping cup of powdered sugar; two wine- 
glasses of sherry wine. Soak the gelatine in one and a half 
cups of warm water, until all is dissolved ; then strain into the 



86 DUTCH (reformed) 



whipped cream, add the sugar and wine and pour into a mould. 
Set on the ice to stiffen. After twenty minutes, beat 
thoroughly, as the cream will rise to the top ; repeat this 
again in about twenty minutes. Serve with quince or currant 
jelly. Mrs. M. R. K 

ICE CREAM. 
Two quarts of milk ; three quarters of a pound of sugar ; 
six eggs ; one teaspoon of lemon or other essence. 

Mrs. Quinlan. 

CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM. 
Four quarts of milk ; one and a half pounds of sugar ; one 
quart of cream ; two ounces of gelatine ; three squares of 
chocolate. Soak the gelatine in a pint of milk, over night. 
Grate the chocolate finely, dissolve in milk and mix all together, 
adding a tablespoon of vanilla. Then freeze. 

LEMON ICE. 

To a quart of lemonade add the whites of six eggs, cut to a 
froth and freeze. Mrs. W. R. 

WINE JELLY. 

One paper of Cox's gelatine ; one pint of cold water. 
Soak the gelatine in the cold water and let it stand two 
hours : then add one and a half pints of boiling water, three 
quarters of a pound of sugar, the juice and rhid of one lomon 
and one pint of wine. Stir until dissolved and strain through 
a flannel bag into moulds. Miss J. M. V. S. 

LEMON JELLY. 
Two ozs. of Cooper's gelatine ; the juice of five lemons ; 
one and a half lbs. of sugar. Soak these together in one pint 
of cold water for fifteen minutes ; then add three pints of 
boiling water and stir until the sugar and gelatine are dis- 
solved. Then strain through a jelly bag and pour into 
moulds. Put in a cool place to stiffen. Dip the moulds 
in cold water, to prevent the jelly from sticking. 

Miss A. E. Graham. 



COOK BOOK. 87 



MIIFS ^m€ ^»PE1WE® PaWl^S® 



Fresh fruits are very necessary to perfect health. Figs, 
dates and bananas, either fresh or preserved, are very health- 
ful, nutritious fruits. The sensible as well as pleasing cus- 
tom of serving fruit as a first course at breakfast should be 
practiced in every house, as far as possible. One nice way to 
serve strawberries is to send the large fine ones to the table 
with the hulls on, and put at each plate a little dish con- 
taining sugar, so that the berries may be dipped in it and 
eaten. 

AMBROSIA. 

Eight fine oranges, peeled and sliced ; half a grated 
cocoanut ; half a cup of powdered sugar. Slice the oranges 
in a glass dish ; scatter the grated cocoanut thickly over 
them ; sprinkle this lightly with sugar and cover with 
another layer of orange. Fill the dish in this order, having 
a double quantity of cocoanut and sugar at the top. Serve 
soon after it is prepared. Miss A. E. Cooper. 

FROSTED PEACHES. 

Twelve large rich peaches ; whites of three eggs, whipped 
to a standing froth ; two tablespoons of water ; one cup of 
powdered sugar. Put the water and beaten whites together, 
dip in each peach when you have rubbed off the fur and roll 
in the powdered sugar. Set carefully on the stem-end upon 
white paper, laid on a waiter in a sunny window. When half 
dry, roll again in sugar ; expose to sun and breeze until dry ; 
then put them in a cool, dry place until ready to arrange in a 
glass dish for the table. Miss Maey S. 



88 DUTCH (reformed) 



EXCELLENT BAKED APPLES. 

Take ten or twelve good-sized, juicy apples, pare and core 
them. Butter the dish, put the apples in and fill the cavities 
with sugar. Take a half teacup of butter and a tablespoon 
of flour, rubbed together until smooth ; to this add enough 
boiling water to make it thin enough to cover the apples. 
Grate nutmeg over them. Miss Elmira Dullegae. 

RHUBARB SAUCE. 

Strip the thin skin from the rhubarb ; cut the stalk into 
pieces about an inch long ; wash and put in a stew-pan, cover- 
ing with boiling water ; in an hour, pour off the water. To 
each quart of rhubarb add one-foui-th of a cupful of water and 
one large cupful of sugar ; stew up quickly and cool in an 
earthen dish. This gives a light green sauce. L. A. W. 



COOK BOOK. 89 




FOR CANNING PINE- APPLES. 
Take one dozen pine-apples, peel and slice. Put tliem in a 
chopping bowl, add five pounds of granulated sugar and then 
chop quite fine. Put in cans ; set the cans in a kettle of 
cold water and let it boil thirty minutes. Then take them 
off and seal. Mrs. R. A. 

QUINCE MARMALADE. 
Cut in quarters ; boil until tender in a small quantity of 
water ; put through a fine sieve. To every pint of pulp, add 
one pound of sugar, and boil about half an hour, stirring 
frequently. It should be thick and firm when cold. 
PINEAPPLE MARIVIALADE. 
Peel and grate the pine-apples, adding an equal weight of 
sugar. Let it boil gently about twenty minutes. 
FRUIT JELLIES. 
To every pint of juice, add one pound of sugar. Fruit not 
too ripe is better for jellies. When the juice is ready and 
has boiled fifteen minutes, add sugar that has also been 
heated. Then take off and pour in glasses. Mrs. J. R. E. 
PIPPIN APPLE JELLY. 
Wash and quarter some pippin apples ; stew them until 
soft ; then strain. Take one pound of sugar to a pint of juice. 
Flavor with lemon. Boil fifteen or twenty minutes. 

Mrs. J. D. B. 
BRANDY PEACHES. 
Seven lbs. sugar to nine lbs. peaches ; one quart of brandy. 
Boil them in water till you can stick a fork in them easily. 
Take them out and pour the brandy over them. Let them 
stand until you have dissolved the sugar, and allowed it to 
boil one minute ; then pour it over the peaches. 

Mrs. N. J. DoRBMus. 



90 DUTCH (reformed) 



©AMP)1M1P® 



COCOANUT CANDY. 
Two cups of white sugar ; one-quarter cup of water. Boil 
five minutes ; stir until cool. When it begins to get stiff, stir 
in the grated cocoanut. Mes. Susie Stiles. 

BUTTER SCOTCH. 
One cup of light-brown sugar ; half a cup of vinegar, not 
too strong ; half a cup of butter ; flavor with vanilla and 
boil twenty minutes. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS.— No. 1. 
Two cups of brown sugar ; one cup of molasses ; one table- 
spoon of butter ; three tablespoons of flour. Boil twenty-five 
minutes ; stir in half a lb. of chocolate and flavor with vanilla. 

Mrs. M. E. Doremus. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS.— No. 2. 
One cup each of grated chocolate, milk, molasses and brown 
sugar ; butter, the size of an egg. Boil till it drops hard, pour 
in a buttered tin, and before it gets cool mark off in squares. 

M. F. V. H. 

BILL OF PARE FOR EVERY DAY IN THE WEEK. 



SUNDAY. 

Breakfast. — Beef steak, omelette, baked potatoes, oatmeal 
chocolate or coffee. 

I>mner. — Cold boiled ham, apple sauce, mustard, mashed 
potatoes, stewed tomatoes. Apple pie or canned fruit and 
cake. 

2^ea. — Corn starch blanc mange, with preserves, cake, bread 
and cheese. 

MONDAY. 

Breakfast. — Fried mashed potatoes, fried eggs, hominy. 
Dinner. — Cold ham, potatoes, corn, canned or fresh ; beets 
or tomatoes, sliced in vinegar. Rice-pudding, coffee. 
Tea. — Waffles, bread, ripe or canned fruit, cake. 



COOK BOOK. 91 



TUESDAY. 

Breakfast. — Corn bread, ham and eggs. 

Dinner. — Roast or corned beef, potatoes, succotash or cab- 
bage and parsnips. Apple dumplings with sauce, or lemon 
pie. 

lea. — Bread, crushed wheat, clam or oyster fritters, fruit, 
cake. 

WEDNESDAY. 

Breakfast. — Cold beef or hash, boiled or scrambled eggs, 
muffins. 

Dinner. — Vegetable soup, chicken, apple or cranberry 
sauce, baked tomatoes or &^^^ plant, potatoes. Suet pudding, 
with sauce, or fruit, pie and cheese. 

Tea. — Luncheon cake, bread, cake, fruit, cottage cheese. 

THUESDAY. 

Breakfast. — Broiled mackerel or breaded veal, Graham 
gems. 

Dinner. — Roast turkey, cranberries, tomatoes, onions or 
Irish stew, sliced tomatoes or pickled beets. Tapioca pudding 
or apple meringue. 

Tea. — French rolls or rice muffin ; ice-cream, cake, etc. 

FKIDAY. 

Breakfast. — Codfish balls or fried oysters, potatoes, corn- 
meal muffins. 

Dinner. — Soup, baked or boiled fresh fish, lettuce salad, 
mashed potatoes, asparagus or gieen peas. Baked corn-meal 
or cottage pudding, coffee. 

Tea. — Cold boiled tongue or salmon, biscuits, floating is- 
land, cake. 

SATURDAY. 

Breakfast. — Griddle cakes or hominy balls, frizzled eggs 
with ham or dried beef, mutton chops. 

Dinner. — Bean or vermicelli soup, roast mutton or veal, 
asparagus or spinach, potatoes, onions. Queen of puddings or 
rhubarb pie. 

Tea. — Croquettes, fried tomatoes, raised biscuits, fruit, 
cake. Mrs. W. R. 



92 DUTCH (reformed) 




Some of the first necessities of the sick are quiet, fresh air 
and cleanliness ; the next is proper food, properly cooked and 
given at the right time. Keep plenty of fresh air in the sick- 
room ; keep it clean and quiet. Wash the patient every day; 
if there is fever use a little soda in the water, only washing a 
small part of the body at a time and keeping the rest covered. 
Use a sponge and a soft towel, keeping both sponge and tow- 
els perfectly clean and fresh. Do not lohisper nor walk on 
tip-toe in a sick-room. If you have anything to say that you 
do not wish the patient to hear, leave the room. Do not cook 
much of anything. A well person tires of one dish soon, and 
a sick person is much more liable to do so. Do not keep a 
patient waiting for his food. 

BEEF TEA. 
Cut half a pound of lean beef into very small pieces — do 
not have a grain of fat on it — and put into a wide-necked bot- 
tle or fruit jar; put in half a cup of cold water and cork tight. 
Set this in a basin of cold water and place on the fire, where 
it will come to a boiling point, but not boil ; keep it at this 
temperature for two hours ; then strain and season with salt. 
This mode of making beef tea concentrates the nourishment 
more than any other. 

ANOTHER WAY. 
[Furnished by a Physician.'\ 
Take a piece of beef cut from the round ; take off every 
particle of fat, then cut it into pieces about an inch square and 



COOK BOOK. 93 



put into cold water in the proportion of a pint to tlie pound. 
After standing a half or three-quarters of an hour, set it on 
the fire and boil it slowly several hours. If the water boils 
away add more cold water, so there will be a pint of tea for 
every pound of beef. Strain it, add salt, and black pepper 
also, if the case permits. 

BEEF JUICE. 
Take a choice steak, remove the fat, put on the broiler and 
heat through ; then press out the juice and add a little salt. 
This can be fed with a spoon to one that is too weak to raise 
the head or care to eat, and it is very nourishing. 

Miss E. S. 

CHICKEN PANADA. 
Boil a young chicken half an hour in a quart of water ; then 
remove the skin , cut off the white meat and when cold, put it 
into a mortar with a spoonful or two of the water in which it 
was boiled, and pound it to a paste. Season it with salt and 
a very little nutmeg ; add a little more of the water and boil 
it up three or four minutes. It should be of such a consist- 
ency that it can be drank, though rather thick. The bones 
which remain may be returned to the water in which the 
chicken was boiled, and, with the addition of rice, a good 
broth be made of it. 

BAKED SQUASH.— Fob Dyspeptics. 

Take a Boston squash, clean, cut in two and remove the 
seeds ; then, putting the halves together and making a small 
opening in the stem-end, place upright in a tin dish and bake 
in a moderate oven. When done, scrape from the rind and 
serve. 

Baked potatoes and parsnips are good. Miss E. S. 

CORN TEA. 
Brown and pound in a mortar one cup of sweet dry corn ; 
pour on this two cups of boiling water and steep fifteen min- 
utes. This is very light and nutritious and can be taken when 
the patient is very weak. 



94 DUTCH (refoemed) 



CREAM TOAST. 

Let half a cup of cream come to a boil and season with salt. 
Have two slices of bread toasted a nice brown ; dip them in the 
cream and dish, pouring the remaining cream over them. 
Serve immediately. 

RICE COFFEE. 

Brown rice as you would the coffee bean and then grind in 
a mill or mortar ; take half a cup of the powder, pour a quart 
of boiling water on it and let it stand for ten or fifteen min- 
utes ; strain; sweeten with loaf sugar and season with boiled 
milk. Drink of this freely. This is particularly nice for 
children. 

APPLE TEA. 

Roast sour apples and pour boiling water upon them. Let 
them stand till the water is cold. It is a refreshing drink. 

CRUST COFFEE. 
Take a large crust of bread, brown or Graham; dry it in 
the toaster and at last almost burn both sides ; lay it in a 
saucepan and pour boiling water on it ; boil it up a minute or 
two and then strain off the coffee ; return it to the saucepan 
with a little milk or cream and boil it up again. It should 
be made strong enough to look like real coffee, of which it is 
a very good imitation when well made. 

A GOOD DRINK FOR THE LUNGS. 

Wash clean a few pieces of Irish moss ; put it in a pitcher 
and pour over it two cups of boiling water. Set where it will 
keep at the boiling-point, but not boil, for two hours. Strain, 
and squeeze into it the juice of one lemon. Sweeten to taste. 
If the patient cannot take lemon, flavor with vanilla, wine, or 
nutmeg. 

CURE FOR HOARSENESS. 

Bake a lemon or sour orange for twenty minutes in a mod- 
erate oven, then open it at one end and dig out the pulp ; 
sweeten this with sugar and eat. This will cure hoarseness 
and remove pressure from the lungs. Mrs. W. R. 



COOK BOOK. 95 



ARROWROOT. 

The best kinds of arrowroot are the Jamaica and Bermuda. 
Wet a large teaspoonful in a little cold water, with half a 
teaspoonful of salt ; pour on it half a pint of boiling water, 
stirring it very fast ; then set it where it will just boil up for 
one minute ; sweeten it, and add milk, if it is allowed. For 
a drink, make it very thin and put in lemon juice and sugar. 

SIMPLE WINE WHEY. 
Take equal quantities of wine, water and milk ; warm the 
water and milk, then add the wine and sweeten. 

WINE WHEY. 
One pint of boiling water ; two wineglasses of wine. Boil 
them one minute, stirring constantly ; take out the curd, 
sweeten and flavor to taste. Mrs. Quinlak. 

BARLEY WATER. 
Two ounces of pearl barley ; two quarts of boiling water ; 
boil to one-half the qunntity and strain, A little lemon juice 
and sugar may be added. To be freely taken in febrile dis- 
orders. Mrs. Wm. Roome. 

EGG TEA AND COFFEE. 
Beat the yolk of an egg with a spoonful of sugar and put it 
to a teacup of cold tea or coffee ; add half a teacup of water, 
cold in summer and boiling in winter, and as much cream ; 
then whip the white of an egg to a stiff froth and stir it in. 

SLIPPERY ELM TEA. 
Take an ounce of the sliced bark, or a large tablespoon ful 
of the flour of the bark, wet with cold water ; pour on a pint 
of boiling water, let it stand awhile and then strain. This may 
be used freely in fevers, influenza, coughs, inflammation of the 
lungs, etc. To make it more nutritious, increase the quantity 
of bark ; add sugar and flavor as desired. 

TAPIOCA JELLY. 
One cupful of tapioca ; wash it thoroughly and soak in 
water from six. to ten hours ; then simmer it in the same 



96 DtJTCH (reformed) 



water in which it has been soaked, with a pinch of salt, until 
it becomes transparent ; then add lemon juice, loaf sugar and 
wine to flavor it. Let this all simmer together, and pour into 
glasses to cool. Mrs. W. Roome, 

CURE FOR A COLD. 
Take one pint of Jamaica rum, and a quarter ounce of oil 
of tar ; put in a bottle together and mix well ; put ten cents 
worth of hoarhound to one pint of water, and boil down to 
half a pint. Mix all together, and sweeten with half a pound 
of strained honey. Take one tablespoonful thi-ee or four 
times a day. Mrs. Austin Dorbmus. 

COUGH SYRUP. 

Two tablespoonfuls of tar, ten cents worth of stick liquo- 
rice, two quarts of water ; boil an hour and a half, sti'ain, add 
one pound of dark brown sugar. Boil slowly for three hours. 
Dose, half a teaspoonful night and morning. 

Miss M. F. V. 
EXCELLENT SYRUP. 

Ten cents worth each of senna and manna, of liquorice 
root and of anise seed ; put on three quarts of water, boil 
down to two quarts, strain and add one quart of N. O. 
molasses. Boil until a nice syrup. Miss E. D. 

BLACKBERRY BRANDY. 
Eight quarts of water and four quarts of blackberry juice, 
boiled togetlier ; then add two pounds of sugar and half a 
pint of brandy. 

ELDERBERRY OR CURRANT WINE. 
Two quarts of water, one quart of juice, three pounds of 
sugar ; put in a keg or jug, let it stand two weeks to ferment, 
strain and bottle for use. 

LEMON BRANDY. 
Put the yellow rind of two fine fresh lemons into a bottle 
of brandy, and after two days strain it ; boil two ounces of 
loaf sugar in a teacup of water to a nice syrup, let it become 
cold, then mix it with the brandy. Mrs. J. M. B. 



COOK BOOK. 07 



Kl®^E»!&Alfl2#WP® 



TO TAKE OUT MILDEW. 
[This and the folloviing recipe are furnished by a chemist] 
Obtain the dryest chloride of lime that can be bought, and, 
for strong fabrics dissolve four tablespoonfuls in half a pint 
of water. Let the mildewed article lie fifteen minutes in this 
solution ; then take it out, wring it gently and put it imme- 
diately into weak muriatic acid, one part of the acid and four 
parts of soft water. For delicate fabrics, laces, muslins, etc., 
the solution of lime should be diluted by the addition of three 
or four times the measure of water. Let the article lie in it 
five minutes, then put it into the muriatic acid. 

TO TAKE OUT IRON-MOULD. 

Dissolve a teaspoonful of salts of tin in two tablespoons of 
water. Dip the iron-mould into the solution and let it remain 
five minutes. Then dip it into a mixture of equal parts of 
muriatic acid and water. Dip the mould spots alternately 
into these mixtures or make the first one stronger with the 
salts of tin, and apply it with a soft rag on the end of a stick. 
Last of all, rinse the article very thoroughly in cold water. 

A simpler method of removing iron-mould succeeds well, 
provided it is recent and not very dark : Tie up a teaspoonful 
of cream-tartar in the moulded place, put it into cold water 
without soap and boil it half an hour. Fruit stains may be re- 
moved in a similar way. 

TO TAKE OUT INK. 

Spread the cloth immediately over a pitcher or basin and 
let another person turn boiling water on the spots. Do not 
put the article into the water, as the whole would then be 



98 DUTCH (reformed) 



tinged with the ink. If the spots are still visible, tie up a 
teaspoonfnl of cream tartar in the places, and proceed as for 
iron-monld. If not convenient to use boiling water at once, 
put the stains in cold water — do not let them become dry. 
Soap will tend to make ink or fruit stains permanent. 

TO CLEANSE OIL CLOTHS. 

Wash with soft flannel and luke-warm water ; wipe per- 
fectly dry. Then wring a clean cloth out of skimmed milk 
and wipe the oil cloth over, moving the cloth straight across, 
not in circles or waves, and finish with a clean dry cloth. In 
this way you can keep the oil cloth fresh and bright, and it 
will last much longer than if scrubbed with soap and brush. 

W. 

TO CLEANSE BLACK SILK. 

The silk must be thoroughly brushed and wiped with a 
cloth, then laid smoothly on a board or table and well sponged 
with hot coffee that has been strained through muslin. The 
silk must be sponged on the side intended to be shown, 
allowed to become partially dry and then ironed on the wrong 
side. Miss A. E. Slingerland. 

BORAX SOAP. 

Put together one pound of bar soap cut into small pieces, 
one ounce of powdered borax, and one quart of hot water. 
Mix this over the fire but do not let it boil. When it is cold, 
cut into cakes and use like common hard soap. This soap is 
very eifectual in cleaning soiled clothes. W. 

TO RAISE THE PILE OF VELVET. 
Cover a hot smoothing iron with a wet cloth and hold the 
velvet firmly over it. The vapor arising will restore the pile 
of velvet, with the aid of a little shaking. Miss A. E. S. 

TO CRYSTALLIZE FLOWERS. 
A quarter pound of alum to one pint of boiling water. 
Put in an earthen vessel, dip the flowers singly into the hot 
liquid, and hang up to dry. Miss E. Dullegab. 



COOK BOOK. 99 



RHEUMATIC LINIMENT. 
Two ounces of alcohol; two of spirits turpentine; one of 
oil of hemlock; one of chloroform; half an ounce of gum cam- 
phor. Apply two or three times a day, rubbing in well. To 
be used only externally. Miss E. Dokemus. 



n®w®Min©ii© BiifiiP* 



Needleavork should be ironed upon clean flannel, and be 
long enough under the iron to dry it, as it will look badly if 
laid away damp. Iron it on the wrong side. L. A. W. 

There is a great difference in the quality of starch. It is 
labor lost to use a poor grade. There is so much difference 
in the quantity of gluten in this article that no precise meas- 
ure for use can be given. A little experience will decide. 

Flour and meal of all kinds should be kept in a cool dry 
place. 

The best rice is large, and has a clean fresh look. Old rice 
often has little black insects inside the kernels. 

The small white sago called pearl-sago is the best. The 
large brown variety has an earthy taste. 

Keep coffee by itself, as its odor affects other articles. Keep 
tea in a close chest or canister. Bread and cake should be 
kept in a stone jar or tin box. 

Bar soap should be cut into pieces of convenient size, and 
laid away in a dry, airy place. 

Cranberries will keep all winter in a fii'kin of water in 
the cellar, if the water be renewed occasionally. Lemons may 
be kept in the same way. 



100 DUTCH (reformed) COOK BOOK. 

For bee or wasp stings wet some cut tobacco and lay it on 
the sting. In five minutes it will be cured. Always keep cut 
tobacco in the house for such emergencies. It is invaluable 
and sure. 

Most people dry their umbrellas handle upwards. This 
concentrates the moisture at the tip, rusts the wire and rots 
the cloth. After the umbrella is drained, it is better to in- 
vert it and dry in that position. 

In testing flour, place a little in the palm of the hand and 
rub gently with the finger; if the flour smooths down, feeling 
slippery, it is inferior, and will never make good bread; if it 
rubs rough in the palm, feeling like fine sand, and has an 
orange hue, you may be confident it will not disappoint you. 

To prevent discoloration from bruises, apply a cloth wrung 
out of very hot water, renewing it frequently until the pain 
ceases. Miss M. F. V. 

A FREQUENT application of lime-water is an excellent 
remedy for burns and also for ivy poison. 

Sugar burned while cabbage is cooking will kill the odor 
and keep your dwelling sweet. Miss A. E. G. 



HOUSEHOLD WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

One quart of wheat flour one pound. 

One quart of Indian meal one pound two ounces. 

One quart of butter (soft) one pound one ounce. 

One quart of loaf sugar (broken) one pound. 

One quart of powdered sugar one pound one ounce. 

One quart of brown sugar one pound two ounces. 

Ten eggs, average size one pound. 

Sixteen tablespoonfuls one half pint. 



INDEX. 



SOUPS. 

PAGE 

Tomato Soup, No. 1 - 5 

" No. 2 5 

Chicken Soup 6 

Vermicelli Soup 6 

Green Pea Soup 6 

Noodles for Soup 6 

Clam Soup 7 

Oyster Stew 7 

Bean Soup.. 7 

Vegetable Soup 7 

Beef Soup 8 

FISH. 

Baked Blue Fish 8 

Creamed Salmon 9 

Boiled Bass 9 

Sauce for Fish 9 

Codfish Balls 9 

" Custard 9 

Stewed. 10 

Fish Fritters 10 

Fried Oysters 10 

Oyster Patties 10 

Scalloped Oysters. 10 

Pickled Oysters 11 

Clam Chowder. 11 

" Fritters 11 

MEATS. 

Roast Lamb 12 

Boiled " 12 

Alamode Beef 13 



PAGE 

Curried Beef 13 

Beefsteak and Onions 13 

Beefsteak and Oyster Pie 13 

Crust for Meat Pie 13 

Cold Meat Pie 14 

Fricandean 14 

Irish Stew 14 

Hash with Toast 14 

Sugar-cured Hams 15 

To Salt Ham 15 

To Season Sausage 15 

RolichesNo. 1 15 

" No. 2 15 

Souce 15 

To Shave Beef 15 

Scalloped " 16 

POULTRY AND GAME. 

Roast Turkey 16 

Chicken 17 

Aunt Gitty's Pot-pie 17 

Roast Wild Duck 17 

" Quail 18 

Chicken Croquettes 18 

Dumplings 18 

To Dish Meat and Poultry 18 

SAUCES, GBAVIES, ETC, 

Drawn Butter 19 

Egg Sauce 19 

Oyster Sauce 19 

Celery " 20 

Mint " 20 



11 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Tomato Sauce 20 

Parsley " 20 

Chili " 20 

Cranberry Sauce 20 

Roast Meat Gravy 21 

" Poultry Gravy 21 

Baked Dressing 21 

To Brown Flour 21 



CATSUP AND PICKLES. 

Tomato Catsup, No. 1 

No. 3 

Chow-chow, No. 1. 
" No. 2- 



22 
22 
22 
22 

" 23 

Butter.- 23 

Tomatoes Pickled 23 

Pickled Onions 23 

Blackberries Pickled 24 

Spiced Grapes. 24 

Cucumber Pickles 24 

Pepper Hash 25 

Pickled Fruit 25 

French Pickles 25 

Pickled Nasturtiums 25 

Walnuts 26 

SALADS. 

Chicken Salad, No. 1 26 

" No. 2 26 

Lobster " 27 

Chicken or Lobster Salad 27 

Dutch Sauce for Lettuce 27 

Cabbage Salad 27 

Potato " 28 

VEGETABLES. 

Time-table for Cooking 28 

Potato Puff 39 

Saratoga Potatoes 29 

Green Beans, Steamed 29 

Asparagus, Stewed 29 



PAGE 

Onions, Scalloped 30 

Macaroni, Boiled 30 

Corn Fritters. 30 

Aunty's Corn Cakes 30 

Parsnip Oysters 30 

Macaroni with Cheese 30 

Artificial Oysters 31 

Green Corn Patties 31 

Macaroni Pudding 31 

Browned Tomatoes. 31 

Vegetables and Sauces for dif- 

erent Meats 31 

EGGS. 

Egg on Toast 33 

Poached Eggs 33 

Fricasseed " 33 

Salad " 33 

Omelette, No. 1 34 

No. 2 34 

No. 3... 34 

BREAD, BISCUITS, ETC. 

Yeast, No. 1 35 

" No. 2 35 

Potato Yeast 35 

Pop " 36 

Pure Baking Powder 36 

Bread, No. 1 36 

No. 2. 36 

Rye Bread... 37 

Graham " 37 

Brown " 37 

Union " 37 

Biscuit 37 

Raised Biscuit, No. 1 37 

No. 2 38 

Tea Biscuits, No. 1 , 38 

No. 3 38 

Graham Biscuits 38 

Dutch Dried Biscuits. 39 

Old-Fashioned Dried Biscuits. 39 



INDEX. 



in 



PAGE 

Rolls 39 

Breakfast Rolls 39 

Delicious " 40 

Butter " 40 

Rusk, No. 1 40 

" No. 2 40 

Sweet Rusks 40 

Breakfast" 40 

Corn Bread, No. 1 41 

" No. 3 41 

" No. 3 41 

" No. 4 41 

" No. 5. 41 

Mississippi Corn Bread 41 

Johnny Cake 41 

" No. 2 41 

WAFFLES, MUFFINS, ETC. 

Waffles, No. 1 42 

No. 2 42 

No. 3 42 

Soft Waffles 42 

Muffins, No. 1 42 

" No.2 42 

Corn Muffins, No. 1 43 

No. 2... 43 

No. 3 43 

Graham " No. 1 43 

' " " No. 2 43 

Rice Muffins 44 

Graham Gems, No. 1. 44 

" No. 2 44 

Drop Short-cake 44 

Strawberry Short-cake 44 

Soft " 44 

Strawberry or Peach Short-cake 45 

Strawberry Short-cake 45 

Corn Griddle Cakes 45 

Nice " " 4G 

GermanEgg " 46 

Whigs 46 

Tea Cake 46 



PAGE 

Puffet, No. 1 46 

Aunt Jane's Puffet 46 

Pufifet,No. 2 47 

" No. 3 47 

" No. 4 47 

Sally Lunn 47 

PIES. 

Pie Crust 48 

Puff Paste 48 

Lemon Pie, No. 1 48 

" No, 2 49 

" No. 3 49 

" No. 4 49 

" Meringue Pie 49 

Frosted Lemon Pie 50 

Cocoanut Pie, No. 1 50 

" No. 2 50 

Orange " 50 

Cun-ant " 50 

Cream " 50 

Pumpkin " 51 

Mince for Pies 51 

Mock Mince Pies 51 

Apple Meringue Pie 51 

Sweet Apple " 51 

PrunePie 53 

PUDDINGS AND SAUCES. 

AuntEllie's Plum Pudding... 53 

Yankee " " 53 

Orange Pudding 53 

Lemon Meringue Pudding 53 

Fuller Pudding 54 

Brown Betty 54 

DutchPuffs 54 

Lowell Pudding 54 

Fruit-Bread Pudding 54 

Flour Pudding 55 

Indian " 55 

Quick Puff Pudding 55 

Cottage " No. 1 55 



IV 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Cottage Pudding No. 2 55 

Suet " 55 

Dandy " 55 

Apple Butter 56 

Chocolate " 56 

Peach " 56 

Shanghi Pudding 56 

Puffs 56 

Queen of Pudding 57 

Berry Pudding 57 

Snow " 57 

Tapioca " 57 

Cream Tapioca Pudding 58 

Bird's Nest " 58 

Dutch Raised Dumplings 58 

pop-Overs 58 

Cottage Pudding Sauce 59 



Brown Betty 
Snow Pudding 
Puff 

Lemon " 
Suet 

Cold or Hard 
Sour Cream 
Apple Pudding 



59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
60 
60 



FBITTER8, 

Fritters, No. 1 61 

No. 2 61 

Fi-uit Fritters 61 

Apple " No. 1 61 

" No. 2 61 

Peach " 62 

Strawbeiry 62 

Trifles 62 

CAKE. 

Directions. 

Buhling, No. 1 63 

No. 2 63 

" No. 3 64 

Deleyan Lemon Jelly Cake. ... 64 



PAGE 

Apepl Koek, No. 1 64 

" No. 2 64 

Fruit Cake, No. 1 65 

" No. 2 65 

" No. 3 65 

" No. 4 65 

" No. 5 66 

Plain Fruit Cake 66 

Pound Cake, No. 1 66 

" No. 2 06 

Half-way Pound Cake 66 

Cottage Pound Cake 67 

Sponge Cake 67 

Berwick Sponge Cake 67 

Citron Cake 67 

Feather Cake 67 

Marbled Cake 67 

Delicate Cake 68 

One-two-three-four Cake 68 

Angel Cake 68 

Watermelon Cake 68 

Pork Cake 69 

Spice Cake 69 

Methodist Cake 09 

Nothing Cake 69 

Sister Maggie's Cake 69 

Gold Cake 70 

Silver Cake 70 

Luncheon Cake — 70. 

Coffee Cake 70 

White Mountain Cake 70 

Austin Cake 71 

Hickory-nut Cake 71 

Snow-flake Cake 71 

LAYER-CAKE. 

Lemon Jelly Cake 71 

Cream Cake 71 

Cocoanut Jelly Cake No. 1 — 72 
" No. 2... 72 

Ice Cream Cake 72 

Ribbon Cake 72 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Orange Cake..- 73 

CararaelCake - 73 

Chocolate Cake, No. 1 73 

" No. 2 74 

Cream Cake 74 

Apple Jelly Cake 74 

Rochester Jelly Cake 74 

Pine-apple Cake 75 

Neapolitan Cake 75 

Jelly Cake 75 

ICINGS. 

For Ice Cream Cake 76 

Soft Icing or Frosting 76 

" Chocolate Icing 76 

Chocolate Caramel Icing 76 

SMALL CAKES. 

Cheap Pound Cake 76 

Sugar Kisses .-. 76 

Bachelor Buttons 77 

Cream Puffs 77 

Cocoanut Drops 77 

Puffs 78 

HardWaffles 78 

Grandma's Crullers 78 

Cmller's, No. 1 78 

No. 2 78 

Extra Crullers 78 

Gilmor's Crullers 78 

French Jumbles 79 

Jumbles 79 

Cookies, No. 1 79 

No.2..-. 79 

Doughnuts, No. 1 79 

No. 2 79 

New Year's Cakes 80 

MOLASSES CAKE. 

Ginger Snaps, No. 1 80 

" No. 2 80 

" " No. 3 80 



P.A.GK 

Ginger Cookies 80 

Crackers 80 

Maggie's Molasses Cake 81 

Molasses Cake - 81 

Soft Gingerbread, No. 1 81 

No. 2 81 

Molasses Fruit Cake, No. 1 . - . 81 
No.2... 81 

" Chocolate Cake 82 

Soft Molasses Cake 82 

CUSTARDS, CREAMS, ETC. 

Tapioca Custard 83 

Lemon " ^^ 

Chocolate " 83 

" Blanc Mange 83 

Cornstarch " 84 

Floating Island - 84 

Charlotte Russe 84 

Prepared Rice -- — 84 

Apple Snow - 85 

Spanish Cream 85 

Coffee Custard 85 

Velvet Cream 85 

Ice " 86 

Chocolate Ice Cream 86 

Lemon Ice 86 

Wine Jelly 86 

Lemon " 86 

RIPE AND STEWED FRUITS. 

Ambrosia 87 

Frosted Peaches 87 

Baked Apples.. 88 

Rhubarb Sauce 88 

CANNED PRUITS, JELLIES, ETC. 

Canning Pine-apples 89 

Quince Marmalade 89 

Pine-apple " 89 

Fruit Jellies •- 80 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Pippin Apple Jelly 89 

Brandy Peaches 89 

CANDIES. 

Cocoanut Candy 90 

Butter Scotch 90 

Chocolate Caramels, No. 1 90 

No. 3.... 90 
Bill of Fare for the Week 90 

FOOD AND DRINK FOR THE SICK. 

Beef Tea 93 

" Juice 93 

Chicken Panada 93 

Baked Squash 93 

Corn Tea 93 

Cream Toast 94 

Rice Coffee 94 

Apple Tea 94 

Crust Coffee 94 

Drink for the Lungs 94 

€ure for Hoarseness.. 94 

Arrowroot 95 

Wine "Whey, No. 1 95 



PAGE 

Wine Whey, No. 2 95 

Barley Water 95 

Egg, Tea and Coffee 95 

Slippery Elm Tea 95 

Tapioca Jelly 95 

Cure for a Cold 96 

Cough Syrup, No. 1 96 

No. 3 96 

Blackberry Brandy 96 

Currant Wine 96 

Lemon Brandy 96 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

To take out Mildew 97 

" Iron Mould 97 

Ink 97 

" Cleanse Oil Cloths 98 

Black Silk 98 

Borax Soap 98 

To Renew Velvet 98 

" Crystallize Flowers 98 

Rheumatic Liniment 99 

Household Hints 99-100 



ADVERTISEMENTS. Vll 



'NO SENTIMENT IN BUSINESS! 



Q\0? "Well, now, we think differently, and we are quite 
^^ sure that we express the views of all honorable people,, 
that Business without Sentiment is desperate, heathenish, 
and in the long run can only issue in Ruin and Shame. 

There is the Sentiment of Honor, for instance. Even 
thieves have this Sentiment, as the phrase goes : " Honor 
among thieves." And yet there are furniture and carpet 
houses, right here in Paterson, that will have nothing to do 
with Sentiment. 

There is the Sentiment of Commercial Courtesy, the 
Sentiment of Local Pride, the Sentiment of Confidence, 
all of which most business men count upon for success. 

We offer our stock of Furniture, Carpets, Oil Cloths, 
Bedding, Etc., at fair prices for good goods, and invite all 
to come and see us before buying. 
We deliver all goods free of charge, 

W. LOCKWOOD & SONS, 

292 & 294 Main Street, 

PATERSON. 



Vlll ADVERTISEMENTS. 



E:S'Z'.A.^XjX8ZZX1X> X84X. 



THE CHEAP FANCY GOODS STORE. 

WILLIAM H. H. STRYKER, 

No. 166 MAIN STREET, PATERSON, N. J., 



OPPOSITE ODD fellows' HALL. 



UNDERWEAR, RIBBONS, LACES, CORSETS, 

Hosiery, Gloves, Hoopskirts, Jewelry, &.c- 

A FULIi ASSORTMENT OF NOTIONS. 

]MRS. MlOHRISOISr, 

MILLINERY AND FANCY GOODS, 

No. 98 MAIN STREET, 

A few doors below Broadway, PATERSON, N. J. 



MILLINERY IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. 

An Extensive Stock of MOURNING GOODS always on hand. 
Straw, Leghorn and Panama Hals Cleaned, Pressed and Altered. 

A SUPERIOR QUALITY OP KID GLOVES. 

CHARLES KEELER, 

DEALER IN 

Hats and Caps, 

GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS, 

UMBRELLAS, GLOVES, &c., 
124 MAIN STREET, PATERSON, N. J. 

DAVID B. BEAM, 

Boots and. Shoes, 

TRUNKS, TRAVELING BAGS, &c., 
144 MAIN STREET, PATERSON, N. J. 

REPAIRING IN ALL ITS BRANCHES, 



ADVERTISEMBNTS. IX 



ESTABIjISHED in 1858. 



JAMES INGLIS, Jr., 



DEALER IN 



Musical Instruments, 

STATIONER, 

Blank Book Manufacturer, 

Publisher and Dealer in School Books, 

FANCY GOODS, &c., 

172 MAIN STKEET, PATEESON, N. J. 

SAML. McILROY, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

PREPARED FLOUR, 

AND DEALER IN 

FINE GRADES 

OF 

FAMILY FLOUR. 

69 MAIN STREET, PATEESON. 



ADVKETISEMENTiJ. 



DEMAREST & WORTENDYKE, 
FAIKEIIiir GROCERS, 

177 & 179 Main Street, 

PATERSON, It. J. 

CHINA TEA HOUSE, 

68 BRO^D^W"A.Y, 

PATEBSON, xV. J. 



MARSHALL <& BALL, 

ONE PRICE 

CLOTHIERS, 

209 and 211 MAIN STREET, 

Patorsoii, ]V. J. 



Practical AVatchmaliers. 



'J 



: K 



REPAIRING IN ALL ITSBRANGHE8, 

35 Main Street, PATERSON, N. J. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. XI 



BENJAMIN STINSON'S SONS, 

128 MAIN STREET, PATERSON, N. J. 

Wholesale and Retail dealers ia 

Crockery, Glassware anil Hoise FirBlslinE Mi 

The Oldest House, 

Ttie X^arsest Stoclc, 

Tl\e TLiOAvest Prices. 

Mm UleDsils of SfaDlte, Tin M Iron Ware, 

GUNS, PISTOLS, POWDER, SHOT, ETC., 

AND THE 

ILiarg^est asf^ortineut of I''isliing- Xackle in the City. 



J. JOHNSON & SONS, 

141 MAIN STREET, PATERSON, N. J. 

C. D. VOO R H I S, 

No. 9 FAIR STREET, PATERSON, N. J., 

Manufacturer of and dealer in 

STOVES, RANGES AND HEATERS, 

Tin and Slate Roofing, Gutters, Leaders, Lead Pipe, Pumps, &c. 
TIN, BRASS, COPPER, ENAMELED AND SHEET IRON WARE. 

rialyanlzed Cornices, PlnmMng, Steal and Sas Fitting in all its Brandies. 

STOVES REPAIRED AND TAKEN ON STORAGE. 
LEADING HOKSE FURNISHING HOUSE, Established 1863, 

CHARLES R. HOPSON, 

Mannracmrer of FINE HARNESS ! 

And dealer in Saddle-^, Bridles, Collars, 
Wnrps, Blankets, Lai- Robes, Sheets, Dusters, 
Flt Nets, Eartips. Village Cart, Track, 
Carriage and BcG(iT Harness made to order 
and warranted. A Good Assortment of Har- 
KEss always in stock. 
Nickle plated Buggy Harness from ^8 00 up 
Track " " 18 00 " 

" Business " " 15 OO " 

Truck and Farm " " 25 00 " 

Carriage trimming and repairing Harness will ^/, 
receive prompt attention. 

21 MAIX ST.. (or. Godwin, Paterson, N. J. 




xil ADVERTISEMEN^TS. 



NOTARIES PUBLIC. 

ALFRED A. VAN HOVENBERG 

AND 

ROBERT E. VAN HOVENBERG, 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law, 

SOLICITORS AND MASTERS IN CHANCERY, 

209 MAIN STREET, PATERSON, N. J. 

Room 2, Town Clock Building. 

ODD FELLOWS' HALL DRUG STORE, 
DR. MOSS, Proprietor. 

I*reseription!S Carefully Prepared. 

Trusses, Supporters and Elasti c Stock ings a Specialty. 

Orders solicited by mail. Satisfaction guaranteed. Postage Stamps received for goods. 
Ext. Vanilla and Lemon for Cooking, Perfumer}', Triple Extracts Colognes and 
Sachet Powders of the best make. Cash paid for Beeswax and Hops. 

STORE— 167 MAIN ST., Paterson, X. J. 

P. H. & W. G. SHIELDS, 

175 MAIN STREET, 

Pour doors above Odd Fellows' Hall, PATERSON, N. J., 

DEALERS IN 

FINE GROCERIES, FRUIT, &c., 

ALSO 

OOLTON'S SELECT FLAVORS 

OF THE CHOICEST FRUITS AND SPICES. 

Their Delicious Purity, unequaled Strength and Economy, commend them to all 
lovers of Choice Flavors. 

130 J. & H. HABBEN, 130 

IMPORTER? AND DEALERS IN 

China, Olass and Earthenware, 

HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS, 

CUTLERY AND SILVER PLATED WARE, 

ALSO, BEST QUALITY KEROSENE AND MACHINE OIL, 

130 MAIN STREET, PATERSON, N. J. 



m -0 '^'^^