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Full text of "The first parishes of the province of Maryland; wherein are given historical sketches of the ten counties & of the thirty parishes in the province at the time of the establishment of the Church of England in Maryland in 1692; also a short treatise on the religious situation before the establishment, together with 56 illustrations & a colored map"

UNIVERSITY 
OF PITTSBURGH 

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LIBRARY 



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The First Parishes of the 
Province of Maryland 




ISLE OF KENT 

In lb31 Claiborne brought to the " Isle of Kent" from Hampton, Virginia, the Rev. 
Richard James, a minister of the Church of England, who conducted there in the virgin 
forest along the shores of Eastern Bay the first Christian Services held in the territory 
now within the bounds of Maryland. 



THE 

FIRST PARISHES 

OF the PROVINCE of 

MARyLAND 

Wherein are ^ven HISTORICAL 
SKETCHESofthetenCOUNTlES 
& of the thirtr PARISHES in the 
PROVINCE at the time of the 
m m ESTABLISHMENT ^ S • 
OF the CHURCH oP ENGLAND 
In MARYLAND in l692 m m 

.ALSO 

,,/£X£o// ETreafise 
On /fie^^gious Sifuafion 

cfn Me G^rovince 
3efore/Ae '^s/ajSIisAmenf 

Ubge/Aer HVif/i 
&A C0£09l'ESd UiA<P 

By PERCY G SKIRVEN 
BALTIMOFIE 

THE NORMAN, REMINGTON COMPANY 
5K 547 NORTH CHARLES STREET M-C 



JDouT 



Copyright, 1923, By 

THE NORMAN, REMINGTON CO. 

Baltimore, Md. 



Printed in the United States of America at the Press of G. ALFRED PETERS CO. 



To the memory of my beloved son 

THOMAS WILLIAM SKIRVEN. 

whose sweet and sterling character 

has ever been an inspiration, 

this book is affectionately 

dedicated. 



CONTENTS 



PARTI Historical Notes, 1634-1692 1-19 

PART II Papers relating to Religious Conditions Prior to 
the Establishment 

Queries about Maryland, 1676 23- 25 

Religious Conditions in the Province, 1676 26- 27 

Meeting of the Lords of Trade and Plantation, 

1677 28 

Lord Baltimore's Statement of Religious Condi- 
tions, 1677 29- 30 

Lord Baltimore's Answers to the Queries about 

Maryland, 1678 32-34 

Address to King William, 1689 35-36 

Instructions to Gov. Lionel Copley, 1691 37- 38 

Names of the Associators, 1 690 39 

Names of Council and Assemblymen, 1692 40- 43 

Repeal of Former Laws 44 

PART III First Law Establishing the Church of England, 

1692 47- 58 

Taxables 59 

Sheriffs' Jurisdiction 60 

PART IV Instructions to Vestr^Tnen 63- 68 

PART V Law under which the Church Functioned for sev- 
enty Years 71- 94 

Papers relating to the Validity of the above Law. 95- 97 

Disposition of the "Forty per Poll" Tax 98-102 

PART VI Counties, Parishes, Hundreds, Churches, Vestry- 
men, Ministers, etc 105-164 

PART VII Papers relating to the Establishment 165-167 

Acts of Assembly, 1698-1765 

Census of Maryland, 1696 

Parishes of Maryland and the District of Colum- 
bia, 1922 

INDEX: Names, Counties, Court Houses, Hundreds, Par- 
ishes, Churches, Geographical names and Mis- 
cellaneous Subjects 

MAP of the Province of Maryland, 1692 (also shows location 
of Churches in 1922) 



ILLUSTRATIONS 

Church Colinty Page 

Isle of Kent Kent Island Queen Anne's. Frontispiece 

St. Mary's River St. Mary's City St. Mary's 6 

Old Oak Tree St. Paul's Cemetery . Kent 15 

Old Council House. . . .AnnafX)lis Anne Arundel 62 

County Seal Kent 1 07 

Trinity Church St. Mary's City St. Mary's 110 

St. Andrew's Church. . .Leonardtown St. Mary's Ill 

St. George's Church. . .Valley Lee St. Mary's 112 

Christ Church Chaptico St. Mary's 113 

Emmanuel Church .... Chestertown Kent 114 

Vestry House St. Paul's Church . . . Kent 115 

Christ Church Stevensville Queen Anne's 116 

St. Paul's Church Fairlee Kent 117 

State House Annapolis Anne Arundel 118 

St. James' Church Herring Creek Anne Arundel 120 

All Hallows Church South River Anne Arundel 121 

St. Ann's Church Annapolis Anne Arundel 122 

St. Margaret's Church. Westminster Anne Arundel 123 

Middleham Chapel .... Lusby Calvert 1 24 

St. Paul's Church Prince Frederick. . . .Calvert 125 

Christ Church Port Republic Calvert 126 

All Saints Church Sunderland Calvert 127 

St. Paul's Church Baden Prince George's 128 

All Faiths Church Mechanicsville St. Mary's 129 

St. Paul's Church Rock Creek District of Columbia. 130 

Christ Church Wayside Charles 132 

Christ Church La Plata Charles 133 

Christ Church Grayton Charles 134 

St. John's Church Broad Creek Prince George's 135 

All Saints' Church Frederick Frederick 136 

Rectory St. Paul's Parish. . . .Baltimore City 137 

Vestry House St. George's Parish. .Harford 138 

St. Thomas' Church . . . Garrison Forest Baltimore County 139 

St. Paul's Church Baltimore City 140 

St. John's Church Kingsville Baltimore County 141 

St. George's Church. . .Perryman Harford 142 

Christ Church Easton Talbot 143 

Old Wye Church Wye Mills Talbot 144 

St. Paul's Church Centerville Queen Anne's 145 



ILLUSTRATIONS— Concluded 

Church County Page 

Ruins of Whitemarsh . .Hambleton Talbot 146 

Christ Church St. Michael's Talbot 147 

St. Andrew's Church. . Princess Anne Somerset 148 

St. Martin's Church. . .near Berlin Worcester 149 

All Saints' Church Monii Somerset 150 

Ruins of Coventry Ch..Rehoboth Somerset 151 

Stepney Church Green Hill Wicomico 152 

All Hallows Church. . .Snow Hill Worcester 153 

Site of St. Paul's Vienna Dorchester 154 

Christ Church Cambridge Dorchester 156 

Trinity Church Church Creek Dorchester 157 

Trinity Church Elkton Cecil 158 

St. Mary's Church. . . .Northeast Cecil 159 

Shrewsbury Church . . . Locust Grove Kent 160 

St. Stephen's Church . . Earleville Cecil 161 

St. Barnabas' Church. .Leeland Prince George's 163 

St. Luke's Church Church Hill Queen Anne's 164 



PREFACE 

This book is the embodiment of a desire to make 
available for reference the data concerning the Establish- 
ment of the Church of England in the Province of Mary- 
land, which was authorized by an Act of the Provincial 
Assembly in 1692. Where possible, information has been 
added concerning the formation of the parishes with their 
original metes and bounds, the first Churches built, the first 
ministers who preached in Maryland and the first vestry- 
men who served the Church of England in the thirty 
parishes which were then laid out. 

The encouragement given the author by the present 
Bishop of the Diocese of Maryland, the Rt. Rev. John 
Gardner Murray, D. D., is gratefully acknowledged. The 
valuable advice of Mr. Lawrence C. Wroth, Historiographer 
of the Diocese of Maryland, now Librarian of the John 
Carter Brown Library, Providence, R. I., the Rev. James 
M. Magruder and the Rev. Dr. Frank M. Gibson made the 
work of compiling this book easier and is deeply appreci- 
ated. 

It was only through the enterprise of The Norman, 
Remington Company that the publication of this book was 
made possible. It is the author's hope that this fresh evi- 
dence of their interest in Maryland historical writings will 
meet with the appreciation it deserves from the book buy- 
ing public. The author deeply appreciates the generosity 
with which they have treated him at every stage of the 
book's progress. 

To Mr. Albert B. Hoen for the valuable advice and 
assistance given the author in making the map of Mary- 
land (which accompanies this book) his sincere thanks are 
extended. 

Percy G. Skirven 
Baltimore, Maryland 
May 24th, 1923 



PART I. 

HISTORICAL NOTES 



HISTORICAL NOTES 

The Protestant Reformation in England resulted in the 
entrenchment of the Church of England as part of the 
government of the Kingdom and the consequent displace- 
ment of the Roman Catholic Church and the political and 
social disability of its members. At a later period the 
Puritan Churches also found themselves under distasteful 
restrictions and numbers of their adherents began to seek 
asylum from what they deemed unjust persecution. Coin- 
cident with the conception of America as the land of 
material opportunity had grown the idea of it as a place 
of refuge, and we find almost from the beginning of the 
American settlement the two motives animating the suc- 
cessive colonies. The first of these, however, was without 
religious motive. Virginia had been settled as a commer- 
cial venture. New England had meant opportunity and 
refuge to the Puritans, while the Province of Maryland 
meant opportunity and refuge to the Roman Catholic 
colonists whom Lord Baltimore led to the shores of the 
Chesapeake. 

Virginia, settled in 1607, was a stronghold of the 
Church of England, and Maryland, being a provincial grant 
to a Roman Catholic, was received by the Roman Catholic 
Church as an opportunity for initial establishment of its 
power in this part of the New World. No such event took 
place, however, for it was not possible to establish an ex- 
clusively Roman Catholic colony under the English rule at 
that time. To this fact may be assigned the primary cause 
for the "Religious Liberty" enjoyed for nearly half a cen- 
tury by the settlers in the Pro\'ince of Maryland. 



2 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

Prior to the landing of Lord Baltimore's colonists at 
St. Mary's there were no settlements within the limits of 
the Province as specified in the Charter with the exception 
of those on the "Isle of Kent" and on Palmer's Island. 
The latter was within the mouth of the Susquehanna river. 
Eight years prior to the landing of the colonists, whom the 
fancy of one of Maryland's brilliant historians^ has led him 
to call "Pilgrims," William Cleyborne traded, under license, 
with the Indians in the upper Chesapeake bay, establishing 
in 1631 a Trading Post on the "Isle of Kent." In that 
year there were about one hundred souls in that settlement 
and in 1632 the settlers sent a representative to the Virginia 
Assembly at Jamestown." 

In that year, 1631, Cleyborne brought to the "Isle of 
Kent" from Hampton, Virginia, the Rev. Richard James 
who conducted there the first service of the Church of Eng- 
land said to have been held in the territory now lying 
within the borders of Maryland. As this minister went to 
Virginia from England, "certified" by the Bishop of London, 
and thence to the "Isle of Kent," it will be observed that 
this was the first regular planting of the Church of England 
on what is now Maryland soil. It is quite probable that 
Mr. James conducted these services in the small fort which 
had been built on the extreme southern end of the island 
as a protection against the Indians. 

The poet tells us that the "Pilgrims" of New England 
went to that land seeking "Freedom to worship God, " but 
it was to the Province of Maryland, first of all the American 
colonies, that all creeds went assured of their freedom to 
worship as their conscience dictated. McMahon says "Re- 
ligious liberty was subject only to the restraints of Con- 
science."^ Very naturally the question arises how such a 

1 McMahon, History of Maryland, p. 198. 

* Chalmer's Political Annals of United Colonics, p. 206, also Henning's 
Statutes at Large, Vol. 1, p. 154. 

5 McMahon, History of Maryland, p. 198. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 3 

condition was brought about since George Calvert, the first 
Lord Baltimore, was an avowed Roman Catholic and Ce- 
cilius Calvert, his son, who succeeded to his father's titles 
and estates, becoming the second Lord Baltimore, was also 
a Roman Catholic. 

Born of Church of England parents at Kipling, York- 
shire, England, in 1582, George Calvert early developed 
into a man of large capabilities. James I, recognizing in 
him the qualities of an excellent business man as well as an 
astute politician, made Calvert one of his Secretaries of 
State in 1619.^ In frankly announcing his conversion to the 
Roman Catholic Church he so impressed the King with his 
honesty that he was continued in the Privy Council and 
later, in 1625, made Baron Baltimore of Baltimore, in the 
County of Longford, Ireland. 

Having failed in a former endeavor toward colonizing 
in bleak Newfoundland- George Calvert made a voyage, in 
1629, to the Southern mainland of North America. Being 
impressed with what he saw, during this visit, in the Virginia 
Colony he asked for the territory now known as Maryland. 
There he had expected to offset the loss of the money 
sunk in his ill-fated project at Avalon and to build 
a fortune for himself and his family. There was also 
another object that he had in mind. As a secondary con- 
sideration he wanted to establish a refuge for his Roman 
Catholic friends — a place where they could practice their 
religious ceremonies without interference. Destined never 
to realize his cherished ambitions George Calvert died in 
April, 1632, before his promised charter to Maryland 
received the Great Seal. 

The death of George Calvert did not prevent King 
Charles from signing the Charter on June 20, 1632, grant- 

1 Ency. Brie, 9th Edit., Vol. IV, p. 713. 

' The Charter to Avalon, Newfoundland, was a gift from King James in 
further recognition of George Calvert's faithful services. 



4 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

ing to Cecilius Calvert, the second Lord Baltimore, all 
that his father had asked. In giving him the Province 
of Maryland Charles I placed Cecilius Calvert in absolute 
ownership of all the land^ lying within the bounds of the 
Province. McMahon says "this Charter was the most 
ample and sovereign that ever emanated from the English 
Crown."' In the Charter appears the following: "And 
We do by these Presents . . . make, create and 
constitute Him, the now Baron of Baltimore, and his 
heirs, the true and absolute Lords and Proprietaries of the 
Region [Maryland] aforesaid . . ."^ There would seem 
to be nothing to prevent Cecilius Calvert from using his 
authority, thus conferred, to adopt any religious policy for 
his Province that his ambitions dictated. True there was a 
provision in the Charter which held in check any very radi- 
cal change from the laws of the mother country. The pro- 
vision read in part: "So nevertheless, that all Laws afore- 
said be Consonant to Reason and be not repugnant or 
contrary, but (so far as convenient may be) agreeable to the 
Laws, Statutes, Customs and Rights of this Our Kingdom of 
England . . . "■* 

In recognition of the magnificent gift, the Province of 
Maryland, and in acknowledgment of the overlordship of 
the King, Cecilius Calvert was required to yield "there- 
fore unto US, our Heirs and Successors, two Indian Ar- 
rows of those parts, to be delivered at the said Castle of 
Windsor, every year on Tuesday in Easter- week: and also 
the fifth part of all Gold and Silver Ore, which shall hap- 
pen from time to time, to be found within the aforesaid 
Limits."^ 

' McMahon, History of Maryland, p. \b7. 
2 McMahon, History of Maryland, p. 1 55. 
^Charter, Section V. 
* Charter, Section VII. 
' Charter, Section V. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 5 

The second Lord Baltimore, Cecilius Calvert, was a 
great-hearted far-sighted nobleman endowed with good 
common sense. He realized that he possessed an exceed- 
ingly valuable gift in this fine domain, interlaced as it was 
with beautiful rivers and divided by the great Chesapeake 
Bay. He appreciated fully the meaning of the various 
provisions of his Charter. He also realized that he held this 
Charter under a Protestant government and owing to the 
existing religious feeling in England it was impossible, 
"Absolute Lord" though he was, to establish an exclu- 
sively Roman Catholic colony. He shrewdly adopted as 
his policy "Religious liberty," for by doing so he avoided 
all conditions that tended to mar the success of his under- 
taking' of colonizing Maryland. He made no misstep, nor 
did he miscalculate his plans, for he was in possession of all 
the knowledge we now have bearing on those times, and 
also had the advantage of breathing the atmosphere of 
English politics of the day. Second only to the territory 
itself Calvert's policy of "Religious liberty" was his most 
valuable asset. Like all good business men he looked after 
his business assets with great care. 

The encouragement given Cecilius Calvert by the gift 
of so generous a "grant" was sufficient to induce him to 
make a great outlay of money to fit out two vessels, the 
"Ark" and the "Dove," and also to provide nearly 300 
colonists for the voyage to the Province in North America. 
The expedition left England on Saint Cecilia's Day, No- 
vember 22nd, 1633, and Leonard Calvert, a brother of the 
Proprietary, was sent out as governor of the Province. 
After a long and stormy voyage by way of the West Indies 
they came into the Chesapeake on the 27th of February, 

' "The system of toleration was co-eval with the colony itself; and sprang 
from the liberal and sagacious views of the first proprietary." McMahon's Hist, 
of Maryland, p. 226. 



6 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

1634. After sailing about the bay looking for the best 
place to found the city which they intended to build in the 
Province, they decided to land on an island in the Potomac 
River which they named. "St. Clements." Having made 
the selection of that place, they waited a day or two, prob- 
ably in order that they might land on Lady's Day, the 
Feast of the Annunciation, March 25th, 1634. Upon going 
ashore they erected a cross and took possession "In the 
name of the Savior of the World and of the King of Eng- 
land." This was nearly three years after the Rev. Richard 
James, Priest of the Church of England, first ministered on 
the Isle of Kent. 

The numerical majority of those who came to the 
Province in the "Ark" and the "Dove" wereof the Anglican 
Faith. ^ The principal adventurers were Roman Catholics 
and as a consequence the religious tone of the early province 
was Roman Catholic. 

There does not appear to be any record of an Anglican 
Clergyman among them nor of services held according to 
the rites of the Church of England very soon after the 
landing of the colonists. It is generally believed that 
Anglicans and Roman Catholics for some years used the 
same chapel at St. Mary's for worship. Doubtless the 
Anglican Church services were read by lay readers or by 
visiting clergymen from the neighboring colony of Virginia.^ 

Under the date of the 13th of November, 1633, Cecilius 
Calvert had given instructions to Governor Leonard Cal- 
vert and his two Commissioners, before they sailed from 
England for the Province, as follows : — 

' Johnson's Founders of Maryland, p. 22. 

' The Rev, William Wilkinson, Rector of St. George's Church, Poplar Hill, 
1650-1663, had loaned money in this vicinity previous to his moving from Vir- 
ginia to Maryland as a permanent resident and apparently was drawn thither in 
person by the opportunity of ministering to the adherents of the Established 
Church of England. 







J-) — 

[1. ~ 



> ^ 



^I't.}' I\IM, 'lU 



THE FIRST PARI5MES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 7 

"No. 1 Impri. His lordship requires his said 
Governor and Commissioners that in their voyage to 
Maryland they be very careful to preserve unity 
and peace amongst all passengers on Shipboard, and 
that they suffer no scandal nor offence to be given 
to any of the Protestants whereby any just com- 
plaint may hereafter be made by them in Virginia or 
in England. And that for that end they cause all 
Acts of Roman Catholique Religion to be done as 
privately as may be, and that they instruct all the 
Roman Catholiques to be silent upon all occasions 
of discourse concerning matters of Religion, and 
that the said Governor and Commissioners treate 
the Protestants with as much mildness and favor as 
Justice will permit. And this to be observed at 
Land as well as at Sea."' 
It is apparent that Cecilius Calvert realized that it was 
essential that no offence be given to the Protestants. And 
also that only the fairest treatment of the colonists upon 
their arrival in the newly discovered country would keep 
the Province in his hands. 

Indeed Calvert intended from the moment he conceived 
the idea of founding the Province of Maryland to insure 
religious toleration in the province by writing into his in- 
structions orders to that effect. It is evident that he car- 
ried out his intention. As a case in point to show how 
diligently Leonard Calvert, governor of the province, car- 
ried out the wishes of his brother, that of William Lewis, 
the steward of Thomas Cornwallis, a Roman Catholic, 
can profitably be told here. Losing control of himself 
when two of his fellow servants read aloud from a volume 
of Smith's Sermons certain passages reflecting upon the 

' Narratives of Early Maryland (C. C. Hall), p. 16. 



8 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

Pope and the Roman Catholic faith, Lewis made the 
assertion, it was alleged, that all Protestant ministers 
were "ministers of the devil." Governor Calvert with a 
Roman Catholic Court immediately fined him 500 pounds 
of tobacco and exacted a bond from him for good behavior 
lest he should "again offend the peace of the colony . . . 
by injudicious and unnecessary argument or disputation in 
matters of religion; ... or use any ignominious 
words or speeches touching the books or ministers author- 
ized by the State of England."^ 

Following up these instructions to his brother Leonard, 
Cecilius Calvert issued in 1636 instructions for his future 
governors and also an oath of ofifice which included the 
following : 

"I will not by myself, or any other, directly 
or indirectly trouble, molest or discountenance any 
person professing to believe in Jesus Christ for or in 
respect of religion. I will make no difference of per- 
sons in conferring offices, favors or rewards for or in 
respect of religion, but merely as they shall be 
found faithful and well deserving and endued with 
moral virtue and abilities. My aim shall be public 
unity and that if any person or official shall molest 
any person professing to believe in Jesus Christ on 
account of his religion I will protect the person 
molested and punish the offender."^ 
This oath was the forerunner of the so-called "Tolera- 
tion Act" passed by the Assembly twelve years later. 
Shortly after promulgation of the Governor's oath, the first 
building was erected, in 1642 for the Church of England 

1 Arch. Md. Prov. Council, 1637-1650, p. 35. 

' McMahon's History of Maryland, p. 226. (Chalmers says "this oath 
was taken by the Governors and Council from 1637 to 1657," see Political Annals.) 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 9 

worshippers in St. Mary's County — Trinity Church.^ 
Without the formal induction of a minister, the congre- 
gation worshipped there without interference. Further 
up the Potomac River and some three or four miles across 
the St. Mary's, Poplar Hill (St. George's) Church was 
built about the same time. It was in this Church in 1650 
that the first permanently settled Church of England 
clergyman, the Rev. William Wilkinson, began his thirteen 
years of ministry. Another church was built for the 
Protestants at St. Clement's Manor, about the same time 
as Trinity and Poplar Hill were. This church was built by 
Thomas Gerrard "for the convenience" of his Protestant 
wife, her friends and servants. In the building of these 
churches may be perceived the immediate results of Lord 
Baltimore's assurances of protection to the colonists in 
religious worship. Up to this time no other parts of the 
colony had attempted the building of a church. While it 
is true that no churches were built, it is known that there 
had been places of worship, however primitive they may 
have been, on Kent Island and in Kent County on the 
north side of Chester River about the year 1652. As proof 
of there being no Protestant minister in the colony at that 
time, a fine of five hundred pounds of tobacco upon a 
colonist was to be paid to the first Protestant minister "to 
arrive" in the colony.^ 

When Charles P was deposed, and opposition to the 
King which culminated later in the establishment of the 
Commonwealth under Cromwell developed, Lord Baltimore 
set about to solve the difficult problem of retaining pos- 

' Trinity Church, at St. Marys City, now stands on the site. 
There were no churches built for Roman Catholic worship in the Province 
because of that part of the Charter, Section IV, which expressly says: "The 
Patronages and advowsons of all churches which within the said Region 
shall happen to be built . . . the same to be dedicated and consecrated 
according to the Ecclesiastical Laws of our Kingdom of England.'" 

» Arch. Md. Prov. Council, 1637-1650, p. 35. 

'Charles I was beheaded 30th January, 1649, Ervcy. Brit., 9th Edition. 



10 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

session of his colony. With characteristic shrewdness 
he concluded that the best way to do this was to change 
the "complexion" of the Council so that it would give 
to the Protestants a majority. Prior to this change (1648) 
the Assembly, it is said, had been composed almost en- 
tirely of Roman Catholic members. With this exhibition 
of willingness to satisfy the Protestants, he went further 
and appointed a Protestant Governor of the colony, William 
Stone. Feeling that his province was still in danger of 
confiscation, he urged in 1649 the passage by the Assembly 
of the "Act Concerning Religion"^ which became known 
as the "Maryland Toleration Act." The preamble to the 
act is as follows : 

"For as much as in a well governed Xtian 
Common Wealth matters concerning Religion and 
the honor of God ought in the first place to be taken 
into serious consideration and endeavored to be 
settled. Be it therefore ordered and enacted by the 
R' Hon'''^ Cecilius Lord Baron of Baltimore Abso- 
lute Lord and Proprietary of this Province, with the 
advice and consent of this General Assembly. . . ." 
The first clause in the "Act" was as follows: 

"That whatsoever person or persons within the 
Province and the Islands thereunto belonging shall 
from henceforth blaspheme God, that is Curse him 
or deny our Saviour Jesus Christ to bee the sonne 
of God, or shall deny the Holy Trinity the Father, 
Sonne and holy Ghost, or the Godhead of any of the 
s'' Three Persons or the Trinity or the Unity of the 
Godhead or shall use or utter any reproachful 
Speeches, words or languages concerning the said 
Holy Trinity or any of the said Three persons 

■Arch. Md, Vc! 1, p. 244. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 11 

thereof, shall be punished with death and confisca- 
tion or forfeiture of all his or her lands and goods 
to the Lord Proprietary and his heires." 
The law further provided against the calling of names. 
The enumeration of these is interesting because the list 
apparently includes the names of some of the sects then 
within the Province — they are "Heretick, Scismatick, 
Idolater, Puritan, Independent, Prespiterian, Popish Priest, 
Jesuit, Jesuited Papist, Lutheran, Calvinist, Anabaptist, 
Brownist, Antinomian, Barrowist, Roundhead and Sepa- 
ratist." The Sabbath was not to be profaned. The last 
clause and most important of all was as follows : 

"That no person or persons whatsoever within 
this Province, . . . , professing to believe in 
Jesus Christ, shall from henceforth bee any waies 
troubled. Molested or discountenanced for or in 
respect of his or her religion nor in the free exer- 
cise thereof within this Province or Islands there- 
unto belonging nor any way compelled to the be- 
liefe or exercise of any other Religion against his 
or her consent, soe as they be not unfaithful to 
the Lord Proprietary, or molest or conspire against 
the civil Government established, or to be estab- 
lished, in this Province under him or his heires."-' 
The passage of the "Toleration Act" was published in 
England and had its effect on the migration to the Province. 
Men of character and wealth were attracted to this de- 
lightful country of the New World. The numerous religious 
sects, finding full protection there in their religious worship, 
lived in harmony with their neighbors. Maryland, first of all 
the American colonies, had completed all the conditions that 
afforded to the World what it had for centuries longed for — 

'Arch. Md., Vol. I, p. 246. 



12 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

Religious Liberty. By persistently adhering to his original 
plan Cecilius Calvert had the satisfaction of realizing 
that his foresight was good in avoiding any condition that 
would compromise his ownership of the Province. How well 
he and his successors governed the Province nearly a half 
century is told by McMahon.^ "Conspicuous above every 
other colony of that period, for its uniform regard of 
religious liberty, it had its reward. Harmony, peace and 
prosperity, were the general results; and this period in 
the history of Maryland, may be truly styled 'the golden 
age of its colonial existence.' " 

From the beginning of the Province up to the Protes- 
tant Revolution in 1689 the missionary work of the Church 
of England was productive of very little result. The Church 
was interested in the missionary work in Virginia- but the 
work in Maryland was hampered by the provisions of Cal- 
vert's Charter. Cooperation between the Proprietary and 
the Church was practically impossible. Baltimore neglected 
to appoint ministers of the Church to "livings " in the 
Province. An effort was made in 1661 in the Lower House 
of the Provincial Assembly to provide a "maynetenance 
for ministers," but two days later, May 1st, 1661, upon the 
reading of the bill in the Upper House, "It was voted to be 
altogether insufficient and short of the thing aimed at."^ 
However this did not prevent the gradual growth of the 
Church and throughout the Province the faithful Church- 
men held the regular services . 

On Kent Island a church was built on Broad Creek 
about the year 1652. This was near where the Rev. Richard 

' McVIahon History of Maryland, p. 228. 

' "In 1629 the Bishop of London announced the jurisdiction of the Church 
of England over the religious affairs of the Virginia colony on the James River. 
That was the beginning of the official missionary movement in America," see 
Hawks, Vol. I, p. 38. 

'Arch. Md., Vol, I. p 406. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 13 

James had preached eighteen years earlier. Upon the death 
of the Rev. William Wilkinson in 1663, the Rev. Francis 
Sourton became rector of old Poplar Hill Church in St. 
Mary's County. At a church in Baltimore County on 
Bush River the Rev. John Yeo preached in 1683. In Cal- 
vert County the Rev. William Mullett held services in 
1684. In 1682 in Anne Arundel County the Rev. Duell 
Pead baptized children. The Assembly at St. Mary's asked 
this same minister, in October, 1683 to preach to both the 
Upper and Lower Houses on October 14th, 1683, which he 
did and this interesting record of the proceedings of the 
Assembly of the 20th of October, 1683, gives an insight into 
the religious conditions that obtained at that time in the 
province. It is as follows: 

"Upper House 20"^ October, 1683. 
This house having taken into their serious con- 
sideration the great Care and Kindness of Our Sov- 
ereign Lord the King in giving in charge to the Right 
Reverend Father in God the Bishop of London to 
Supply this Place with able and Devout Ministers 
whereby the people may know their Duty to God and 
their Obedience to their Rulers do request the Lower 
House of this Assembly to Join with this House in 
giving thanks to M' Duell Pead for his Learned 
Sermon preached before these two Houses the 14'*' 
Instant and that some Acceptable Present be given 
him for the same and this House is willing to concur 
with them therein. 

Signed pr. Order Thos. Gounwin, 

Clerk of Assembly." 

The Lower House concurred on the 24th of October, 

1683, and gave him a vote of thanks, only. The ministers 

whom we have just mentioned were among the earliest of the 

clergy to come to the province to engage in missionary work. 



14 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF iVIARYLAND 

Before William of Orange ascended the throne, Lord 
Baltimore is said to have opposed the revolution in England^ 
which conferred the crown on William. The enemies, in 
England, of Lord Baltimore induced the King to uphold the 
" rebellious" body of men in Maryland who had overthrown 
in 1689 the Proprietary's officials there. The work of the 
.'"associators" popularly described as the "Protestant Revo- 
lution" (1689) has been overfeatured as a factor in influ- 
encing the King to terminate the rule of the Calverts. It 
was a factor, but viewed from Whitehall, it was regarded 
more as an excuse than as a cause. The die had been cast. 
On the 21st of August, 1690, proceedings were insti- 
tuted at Whitehall, London, against the Charter of the Cal- 
verts in order to "vacate"- it and an address to the Colo- 
nists under date of the 12th of March, 1691, was sent to 
Maryland in which appears the following : 

". . . Wee have thought fitt to take our Province 
of Maryland under our immediate care and Protec- 
tion and by letters Patents under the Great Seal of 
England to appoint our Trusty and well beloved 
Lionel Copley, Esq., of whose prudence and loyalty 
we are assured, to be our Governor thereof."^ 

This ended the rule of the Calverts as Roman Catholics, 
and not until 1715, after the accession of King George I, were 
the powers of government restored to them. The then Pro- 
prietary, Charles Calvert, infant son of Benedict Calvert, 
Lord Baltimore, had been educated in "the established 
religion of England and had thus become capable of holding 
governmental authorities subordinate to the Crown."* He 

' F. L. Hawks, Vol. 2, p. 57, "Ecclesiastical History of the United States. " 

2 Arch. Md., Vol. 8, p. 200. 

'Arch. Md., Vol. 8, p. 235. 

* Kilty's "Landowner's Assistant," p. 163. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 15 

governed the province under the guidance of his guardian, 
Lord Guilford. 

This also was the end of "Religious Liberty" which 
had been the principal "asset" of the Calverts and to which 
particular attention has been called.^ "Religious Liberty," 
the child of expediency, was supplanted by no weakling 
when the king extended the jurisdiction of the Church of 
England to the Province of Maryland. Governor Copley's 
commission, dated February 14th, 1691, outlined the policy 
he was to pursue. The establishing of the Church of Eng- 
land by law was one of the first movements he was to set 
on foot. The right of induction of ministers was vested in 
him and upon close examination of his instructions it will 
be seen that he came to Maryland as the personal repre- 
sentative of both the Crown and the Church of England. 
Notice what this part of his instructions says: 

. and you are to enquire whether there be any 
minister within your Government who Preaches and 
Administers the Sacrament in any orthodox Church 
or Chappell without being in due Orders whereof 
you are to give an account to the said Bishop of 
London."' 
At the meeting of the first Assembly, May, 1692, at 
the City of St. Mary's, after Governor Copley came, the first 
act passed was for the repealing of all previous laws. This 
done, the Assembly was presented with the draft of the Act 
entitled "An Act for the Service of Almighty God and the 
Establishment of the Protestant Religion within this Prov- 
ince." The provisions of this Act had been thoroughly 
discussed during the session, the first mention of the Act 
being found in the proceedings of May 16th, 1692. On 
June 2nd the House and Council both assented to the bill 

' Sec aiso Act of 1702, p. 71, this book. 
2 Arch. Md., Vol. 8, p. 276. 



16 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

and on June 9th, Governor Copley invited all the members 
of both houses to witness his signature to this Act. The 
first provision of the Act read as follows : 

"Be it therefore enacted by the King and Queens 
most Excellent Majestys by and with the advice and 
consent of this present General Assembly and the 
authority of the same That the Church of England 
within this Province shall have and enjoy all her 
Rights Liberties and Franchises wholly inviolable as 
is now or shall be hereafter Established by Law and 
also that the Great Charter of England be kept and 
observed in all points."^ 
Under the authority of this Act, the justices of each of 
the ten counties of Maryland were instructed to meet at 
their respective Court Houses, having previously given 
notice to the freeholders also to attend the meeting. With 
the advice of the freeholders the counties were to be divided 
into parishes. The vestrymen elected for each parish were 
to be of the freeholders, six in number, and the orthodox 
minister to be one of the vestry in his respective parish. 
Churches were to be built in each parish and a tax of forty 
pounds of tobacco was to be laid on the people of the 
province irrespective of creed for the maintenance of the 
minister. The provisions of this Act were carried out and 
the work of dividing the counties into parishes was com- 
pleted in the following year, full reports of the work in each 
county being made to the Governor and Council by the 
County Clerks. 

The "instructions" to Governor Copley, given him 
upon leaving England, included a command to 

". . . take especial care that God Almighty be 
devoutly and duly served within your Govern- 

'Arch. Md.. Vol. 13, p, 425. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAX'D 17 

ment ; the book of Common Prayer as it is now estab- 
lished read each Sunday and Holiday and the Blessed 
Sacrament administered according to theRitesofthe 
Church of England. You shall take care that the 
churches already built there shall be well and orderly 
kept and more built as the Colony by God's Blessing 
be improved and that besides a competent mainte- 
nance be assigned to the minister of each church, 
a convenient house built at the common charge for 
each minister. You are not to prefer any minister 
to any Ecclesiastical Benefice in that Our Province 
without a certificate from the Right Reverend the 
Bishop of London of his being conformable to the 
doctrine and discipline of the Church of England and 
of a good life and conversation."^ 
The reports to the Assembly in 1694 made by the 
Justices of the ten different counties of the Province showed 
that there were then thirty parishes, twenty-two churches 
and nine ministers. 

Upon the death of Governor Copley,- Sir Francis Nich- 
olson was sent out as Governor of the Province,^ and to 
him the work of building up the Church was a pleasure. 
He wrote to the Board of Trade and Plantation in N4arch, 
1697, as follows; — 

"There was a law passed in the late Governor 
Copley's time for establishing the Church of 
England which his Majesty in Councill was pleased 
to disapprove and disallow of &c; But there is 
another law now sent to your Lordships, and you 
may please to see by the Journals of the Assembly, 
what difficulties I met with about it. When I came 

1 Arch. Md., Vol. 8, p. 276. 

= September 9th, lb93. 

'Gov. .\UchoIson arrived in the province in July, 1694. 



18 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

hither I found very few of the Churches built, but 
I hope in God that they will be all finished this 
year, and then we shall want Clergymen, and a Com- 
missary to inspect the Church affairs, for whose 
maintenance an Act is passed, and now sent to your 
Lordships. My Lord Bishop of London hath prom- 
ised to send an able Commissary and some good 
Clergymen."^ 
Governor Nicholson took the greatest interest in per- 
fecting the Establishment and offered by way of an in- 
centive "that if a way can be found out to build a house 
in every parish for the ministers, his Excellency (Nichol- 
son) does propose to give five pounds sterling towards 
building every such house begun in his Excellency's time." 
His influence was the strongest help the Church of England 
had in Maryland at that time. The expenses of transpor- 
tation of the ministers into the province was allowed them 
and in the year 1697, nine more clergymen came into the 
colony, making in all eighteen.- 

The time had now arrived for a personal representa- 
tive of the Bishop of London to take charge of the affairs 
of the Church. Dr. Thomas Bray was one of the greatest 
of the missionaries ever sent out from England and was 
noted for his godliness and great intelligence. Born 1656 
at Marton, Shropshire, he was educated at Oxford. After 
serving as rector of Sheldon for a number of years (during 
these years he was devoting much of his time to collecting 
libraries for the use of the missionaries), he was sent 
to Maryland by Bishop Compton, then Lord Bishop of 
London, to settle the affairs of the infant Church.^ Doctor 
Bray left England on December 20th, 1699, and arrived 

1 Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 82. 

' Sec Section VII for list of Churches and Clergy in 16%. 

2 Encyclo. Brit., "Dr. Bray." 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 19 

in Maryland in March following. Going at once to An- 
napolis, he summoned the clergy to a "visitation," which 
was held in that city on May 23rd, 1700. There were 
present seventeen clergymen representing fifteen of the 
parishes. To these he delivered a charge and gave them 
instructions in their clerical work. This good man was able 
so to impress the importance of the ELstablishment upon 
both the clergy and the Assembly that the work received 
a great impetus. 

After a short period (less than six months) of hard 
work in the Province in the interest of the Church, Doctor 
Bray returned to England to help in getting a law passed 
that would firmly establish the Church in Maryland. 
Those laws for the Establishment which the Assembly 
passed in 1692, 16% and 1700 had defects which caused 
their "disallowance" by the King when they were pre- 
sented in council at Whitehall. Doctor Bray, having had the 
intimate knowledge of the conditions in the Province as well 
as of the requirements necessary to have the law passed at the 
King's Council, advised the Assembly at Annapolis first to 
have the law framed by the Commissioners of Trade and 
Plantation in England and then to pass it as it came from 
them. Doctor Bray gave his personal attention to the 
law, and when the Assembly convened at Annapolis in 
March, 1702, Governor Nathaniel Blackistone instructed the 
members of the Assembly to "fill in the blanks and pass the 
bill without amendment." This was done! The Assembly 
adjourned on the 25th of March, 1702, having passed the 
"Act for the Establishment of Religious worship in this 
Province According to the Church of England and for the 
Maintainance of Ministers." By that act the Church in 
Maryland was governed, for over seventy years — until the 
outbreak of the Revolutionary War in 1775. 



PART II 



PAPERS RELATING TO THE RELIGIOUS CONDI- 
TIONS THAT OBTAINED IN THE PROVINCE 
PRIOR TO THE ESTABLISHMENT. 



Queries from Whitehall and Answers by Lord Baltimore, 
Address to King William, Instructions to Governor 
Copley, Names of Associators, 1690, Members of 
Council and Assembly, 1692, Changes in Per- 
sonnel, Laws Repealed, 1692, etc., etc. 



QUERIES ABOUT MARYLAND PROPOUND- 
ED BY THE COMMISSIONERS OF 
TRADE AND PLANTATION. 

"At the Committee of Trade and Plantations, Monday 
the 10"^ of Aprill 1676 at the Robes Chamber in Whitehall. 

Present 
Lord Privy Seale Earle of Craven 

Duke of Ormond M' Sec'''' Williamson 

Earle of Carlisle 

There was also prepared the draft of a letter to the 
Lords Proprietors of Carolina, the Lord Baltimore Pro- 
prietor of Maryland, Sir George Carteret Proprietor of 
New Jersey, and to the Bermudas Company, setting forth 
how that the plantation business (managed lately by a 
particular Councill) was now referred by his Majesty to a 
Committee of his Privy Councill, and that their Lordships 
might be enabled to inform his Majesty touching the con- 
dition of those Colonies. Their Lordships do send them 
some heads of Enquiry, upon which they are to return an 
accompt."^ 

"Their Lordships on the 10"^ of April sign a Circular 
letter w'^ severall Heads of Inquiry to the Lord Baltimore 
Lord Proprietary of Maryland.^ 
The letter followeth. 

After our very hearty commendacons 
to your Lordship. His Majesty having in his wis- 
dom thought fit to supersede the Commission by 
which his Council of Trade &l Forreign Plantations 
lately acted & thereby restoring all the business of 

•Arch. Md., Vol. 5, p. 125. 
•Arch. Md., Vol. 5, p. 128. 



24 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

that nature to its accustomed Chanel of a Com- 
mittee of his Privy Council. And his maj'^ having 
more especially committed to a select number of the 
Board, whereof we are, the care and management of 
things relating to his Plantations, we have therefore 
thought it convenient to give your Lord'^ advir- 
tism*^ thereof. And because we do not as yet find 
ourselves enabled to give his Ma''^ such account of 
the State & Condition of that Colony as his Royall 
service & the dependence thereof upon the Crown 
does require. We have therefore thought fit to send 
your Ld^ (as we have done to others) some Heads of 
Inquiry here anext, the better to guide your Lord- 
ship in the method of that state and representation 
of things which we expect from your Lordship, and 
do desire it may be done with all convenient speed. 

And soe not doubting of your Lordships care to 
advise us farther in all matters that may from time 
to time conduce to his ma"^'" service, & our better 
discharge of the trust reposed in us. 

We bid your Lordship very hearty farewell." 

The questions most important to the subject are: 

"From the Council Chamber at Whitehall' 
This Tenth of April 1676" 

No. 11. Trade Building. What are the principal Towns 
and Places of trade. And what manner of Build- 
ings are most used in your Colony as to the 
strength and largeness of them. 

No. 12. Parishes. How many Parishes, Precincts or 
Divisions are within your Lordship's Province? 

•Arch, Md., Vol. 5, p. 128. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 25 

No. 18. Christenings. What number of Whites, Blacks 
or Mulattos have been born and Christened for 
these seven years last past, or any other space 
of time for as many years as you are able to state 
an account of? 

No. 19. Marriages. What number of Mariages for 
seaven years last past or any other time, for as 
many years as you are able to state an account 
of? 

No. 20. Burials. What number of people have yearly 
dyed within your Province for seaven years past 
or any other time, for as many years as you are 
able to state an account of? 

No. 26. Religion. What persuasion in Religious mat- 
ters is most prevalent; and among the varieties 
which you are to express which proportion in mem- 
bers and quality of people the one holds to the 
other. 

No. 27. Church: What course is taken for the instruct- 
ing of the people in the Christian Religion? How 
many Churches and Ministers are there within 
your Province and how many are yet wanting for 
the accommodation of your Colony? What pro- 
vision is there made for their maintenance as also 
for relieving the poor decayed and impotent per- 
sons ? And whether you have any Beggars or idle 
Vagabonds?" 



26 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 



RELIGIOUS CONDITIONS IN THE PROVINCE OF 
MARYLAND 1676 

Writing from the Patuxent river section of the Province 
under date of 25th May 1676, the Rev. John Yeo, a Church 
of England clergyman, labouring as a missionary in Mary- 
land at that time, calls thea ttention of the Archbishop of 
Canterbury to the religious situation which confronted 
him. His letter is in part as follows: 

"Most Reverend Father; 

Please to Pardon this Presumption of Mine in 
presenting to your serious view these Rude & indi- 
gested lines w^*" (with humble submission) are to ac- 
quaint yo' Grace with the Deplorable estate & con- 
dition of the Province of Maryland for want of an 
established Ministry, here are in this Province tenn 
or twelve County's & in them at least twenty 
thousand soules & but three Protestant ministers of 
us th'^ are Conformable to the Doctrine & Discipline 
of the Church of England." 
He writes of those who pretend they are ministers 
and states that they are not qualified and 

"for the most part such as never understood any- 
thing of learning & yet take upon themselves to be 
Dispensers of the Word & to administer Sacrament of 
Baptisme & sow seeds of Divission amongst the 
People & noe law Provided for the Suppression of 
such in this Province soe th' here is a great neces- 
sitie of able 6z learned men to confute the gaine 
sayer especially having so many Profest enemies as 
the Popish Priests & Jesuits are, who are encour- 
aged & Provided for & the Quaker takes care & 
provides for those that are Speakers in their Con- 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 27 

venticles, but noe care is taken or Provision made 
for the building up Christians in the Protestant Re- 
ligion by means whereof not only many Dayly fall 
away either to Popery, Quakerism or Phanaticisme 
but also the Lord's Day is prophaned, Religion dis- 
* pised, & all notorious vices committed soe th' it is 
become a Sodom of uncleaness and a Pest house of 
iniquity. 

I doubt not but yo' Grace will take it into 
Consideration & do yo' utmost for our Eternall wel- 
faire, 6z now is the time th' yo' Grace may be an 
instrument of a universal reformation amongst us 
with greatest facillity. Cacillius Lord Barron Balti- 
more & Absolute Proprietor of Maryland being dead 
and Charles Lord Barron of Baltimore &ourgovernor 
being bound for England this year (as I am In- 
formed) to Receive a farther confirmation of that 
Province from his Majestie at wh"^ time 1 doubt 
but yo' Grace may soe prevaile with him as th' a 
maintenance for a Protestant ministry may be es- 
tablished as well in this Province as in Virginia, 
Barbadoes and all other his Majesties Plantations 
etc., etc. 

Yo' Most Obedient Son & Serv' 



To 

The Most Reverend Father in God 

Gilbert by Divine Providence 

Lord Archbishop of Canterbury 

and 

Metropolitan of England 

at his Palace at Lambith."' 

1 Arch. Md., Vol. 5, p. 130. 



John Yeo. 



28 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

The letter was received in due course by the Arch- 
Bishop and being convinced of the earnestness of the 
appeal wrote to the Bishop of London as follows : 

"Croydon/ 
August 2""^ 1676. 
My Lord : 

The enclosed came lately unto me, and from a 
person altogether unknown. The design there in 
proposed, seem's very honest and is in itself so 
laudable that I conceive it concerns us by all means 
to promote it : 

If your Lordship shall please to remember it, 
when the Lord Baltimores affaires comes to be con- 
sidered of at the Councel Table, I make no question 
but there may be a convenient opportunity to ob- 
tain some settled revenue for the ministry of that 
place as well as the other plantations; when that is 
once done, it will be no difficult matter for us to 
supply them with such as are of competent abilities 
to undertake the employment and with all such as 
we know to be both regular and conformable. 

I bid your Lordship heartily farewel and am 
My Lord your Lordships 

Most affect ; Friend and Brother 
Gilb: Cant:" 
No action was taken upon the matter until the meet- 
ing of the Lords of Trade and Plantation on July 19, 1677^ 
at which meeting Lord Baltimore appeared before the 
Board in person. The minutes of that meeting state — 
''On reading a letter from the Archbishop of Canterbury 
to the Bishop of London, Lord Baltimore presented a 
paper^ setting forth the present religion in Maryland." 

•Arch. Md., Vol. 5, p. 132. 

' Calendar of State Papers, America and West Indies, Vol. 1 677- 1 678, p. 1 2 1 . 

' See Lord Baltimore's Paper on next page. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 29 

-WHEREUPON THE LORD BALTIMORE PRESENTS 

A PAPER SETTING FORTH THE PRESENT 

STATE OF RELIGION IN 

MARYLAND, VIZ" 

That for the encouragement of all such persons as 
were desirous and willing to adventure and transport them- 
selves 6z families into the Province of Maryland a law 
there made by the advice and consent of the Delegates of 
the Freemen concerning Religion, wherein a toleration is 
given to all persons believing in Jesus Christ freely to 
exercise their Religion & that no person of what judge- 
ment soever, believing as aforesaid should at any time be 
molested or discountenanced for or in respect of his Re- 
ligion or in the free exercise thereof and that noe one should 
be compelled to the beliefe or exercise of any other [Re- 
ligion] against his consent. Upon this Act the greatest 
part of the people and Inhabitants now in Maryland have 
setled themselves & families there & for these many years 
this toleration &l liberty has been known & continued in the 
Government of that Province. 

That those persons of the Church of England there 
who at any time have encouraged any ministers to come 
over into that Province have had several sent unto them 
as at this time there are residing there foure that the L'^ 
Baltimore knows of who have Plantations & settled beings 
of their owne and those that ha\'e not any such beings are 
maintained by a voluntary contribution of those of their 
own persuasion, as others of the Presbiterians, Indepen- 
dents, Anabaptists, Quakers & Romish Church are. 

That in every Country [county?] in the Province of 
Maryland there are a sufficient number of Churches and 

1 Arch. Xld., Vol. V. p. 133, July I^\ Io77. 



30 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

Houses called Meeting Houses for the people there and 
these have been built and are still kept in good repaire by a 
free and voluntary contribution of all such as frequent the 
said Churches and Meeting Houses. That the Laws of 
that Province have been ever made by the advice and con- 
sent of the Freemen by their Delegates assembled as well 
as by the Proprietor and his Council and without the con- 
sent of all these no law there has been made. 

That the Laws of that Province have been ever made 
by the advice and consent of the Freemen by their Dele- 
gates assembled as well as by the Proprietor and his 
Councill and without the consent of all these no Law there 
has been made. 

The greatest part of the Inhabitants of that Province 
(three of four at least) doe consist of Presbiterians, Inde- 
pendents, Anabaptists and Quakers, those of the Church 
of England as well as those of the Romish being the fewest, 
so that it will be a most difficult task to draw such persons 
to consent unto a Law, which shall compel them to main- 
tain ministers of a contrary persuasion to themselves, 
they having already an assurance by that Act for Religion 
that they have all freedom in point of Religion and Divine 
Worship and noe penalties or payments imposed upon 
them in that particular. That in Carolina, New Jersey and 
Roade Island, the Inhabitants for the peopling of those 
places have had and still have the same toleration that 
those in Maryland have." 

After the submission of the foregoing paper by Lord 
Baltimore the minutes of the Lords of Trade and Plan- 
tation have the following entry : 

"Whereupon their Lordships sign a letter to Lord 
Baltimore as follows: 

Have received very credible information that 
many inhabitants of Maryland live very dissolute 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 31 

lives, committing notorious vices and prophaning 
the Lord's Day. Hope there are sufficient Laws to 
restrain and punish such evil lives and oblige men 
to live at least like Christians, though not of the 
same profession. If the laws be full enough desire 
his Lord'P to have them put in execution, or, if 
defective to pass such laws as the occassion requires. 
Have reason to believe this wicked kind of 
living proceed from there being no certain estab- 
lished allowance for ministers of the gospel, espe- 
cially of the Protestant religion according to the 
Church of England, the cause of a great want of 
able ministers. Know how necessary it is to have 
this want supplied without imposing any burthen 
upon the inhabitants that they are willing freely to 
settle, therefore desire his Lord'^ to write to the 
Governor and Council of Maryland to send over an 
account of the number of Protestant ministers of 
the Church of England and their allowances, also of 
the number of Protestant families and the value of 
their Plantations and how many congregations they 
make up; also to inquire what each congregation will 
freely settle for the maintenance of an able minister 
which, when agreed upon, to be enacted into a law 
as in His Majesty's other Plantations. 

Would likewise be glad to have account of the 
number of ministers or teachers of dissenters and 
their allowances, and of the number of the planters, 
their persuasions, and the number of each per- 
suasion."' 
Lord Baltimore's answers to the "Quiries" which 

appear on page 24, and to the above letter are set forth in 

part as follows: 

• Calendar of State Papers, America and West Indies, Vol. 2. 1677-1678, p. 121 



32 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF K1ARYLAND 



ANSWER OF LORD BALTIMORE TO THE QUERIES 

ABOUT MARYLAND PROPOUNDED BY 

COMMISSIONERS OF TRADE AND 

PLANTATION 

26th March 1678 

"Answer to No. II — Trade Building and No. 12 — 
Parishes. ' 

The people there [Maryland] not affecting to 
build nere each other but soe as to have their 
houses nere the water for convenience of trade 
and their lands on each side of and behind their 
houses by which it happens that in most places 
there are not fifty houses in the space of thirty 
miles. And for this reason it is that they have 
been hitherto only able to divide the Province 
into Counties without being able to make any 
subdivisions into Parishes or precincts which is a 
work not to be effected until it shall please God 
to increase the number of the people and so to 
alter their trade as to make it necessary to build 
more close and to live in towns."- 

"Answer to No. 18. — Christenings; to No. 19. — Mar- 
riages; to No. 20, — Burials; to No. 26. — Religion and to 
No. 27 Churches/^ 

Secondly — That having as yet no further 
divisions of the said Province than into Counties, 
nor in truth any possibility of making as yet any 
further subdivisions into Parishes for the reasons 
before given, there is no way to be found to make 
calculations to satisfy these inquiries without tak- 
ing a very great time and making such scrutinies 

lArch. Md., Vol. 5, p. 129. 
2 Arch. Md., Vol. 5, p. 266. 
1 Arch. Md., Vol. 5, p. 129. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 33 

as would certainly either endanger insurrections or 
a general dispeopling of the Province which is at 
present in great peace and quiet, all persons there 
being secured to their content for quiet enjoyment 
of everything that they can reasonably desire. 

The reasons why such scrutinies would be 
thus dangerous is that viz"^ That at the first 
planting of the Province by my father albeit he 
had an absolute liberty given to him and his heirs 
to carry thither any persons of any of the Do- 
minions that belonged to the Crown of England 
who should be found willing to go thither; yet 
when he came to make use of this liberty he found 
very few who were included to go and seat them- 
selves in those parts but such as for some reason 
or other could not live with ease in other places. 
And of these a great part were such as could not 
conform in all particulars to the several laws of 
England relating to Religion. 

Many there were of this sort of people who 
declared their willingness to go and plant them- 
selves in this Province so as they might have a 
General Toleration settled there by a law by which 
all of all sorts who professed Christianity in general 
might be at liberty to worship God in such man- 
ner as was most agreeable with their respective 
judgments and consciences without being subject 
to any penalties whatsoever for their so doing 
provided the civil peace were preserved. And that 
for the securing the civil peace and preventing all 
heats feuds which were generally observed to 
happen amongst such as differ in opinions upon 
occasion of reproachful nicknames and reflecting 
upon each others opinions it might by the same 



34 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

law be made penal to give any offence in that kind, 
these were the conditions proposed by such as 
were willing to go and be the first planters of the 
Province. And without the complying with these 
conditions in all probability this Province had 
never been planted. 

To these conditions my father agreed and 
accordingly soon after the first planting of this 
Province these conditions by the unanimous con- 
sent of all who were concerned were passed into a law 
and the inhabitants of this Province have found 
such effects from this law and from the strict ob- 
servance of it, as well in relation to their quiet 
as in relation to the farther peopling of the Prov- 
ince that they look on it as that whereon alone 
depends the preservation of their peace, their prop- 
erties and their liberties. 

This being the true state of the case of this 
Province it is easy to judge what consequences 
might ensue upon any scrutinies which should be 
made in order to the satisfying these particular 
inquiries."^ 



Arch. Md., Vol. 5, pp. 267-9. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 35 



ADDRESS TO KING WILLIAM III. 

"The address of the Representatives of their Majestie's^ 
Protestant Subjects in the Province of Maryland as- 
sembled. 

To the Kings most excellent Majestie — - 

Whereas we are with all humility fully assured 
that the benefitt of your Majestie's glorious un- 
dertakings, and blessed success for the Protestant 
Religion, and civil rights and liberties of your Sub- 
jects, was graciously intended to be extensive as well 
to this remote part, as to all others of your Majes- 
tie's Territorys and Countreys, being thereby influ- 
enced to express our utmost zeal and endeavors for 
your Majestie's service and the Protestant Re- 
ligion, here of late notoriously opposed, and your 
Majestie's sovereign dominion and Right to this 
your Majestie's Province of Maryland invaded and 
undermined by our late Popish Governors their 
Agents and Complices. 

Wee your Majestie's most dutifull and loyall 
Subjects of the said Province being assembled as the 
Representative Body of the same ; doe humbly pray 
your Majestie's graceous consideration of the great 
grievances and expressions wee have long layne under, 
lately represented to your Majestie and directed 
to your Majestie's principall Secretary of State, 
in a certain Declaration from the Commanders, 
Officers and Gentlemen in Armes for your Majestie's 
service and defence of the Protestant Religion. 

And that your Majesty would be graciously 
pleased in such waies and methods as to your 

'Arch. Md., Vol. 13. p. 239. 

• Why was Queen Mary left out? 



36 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

Princely wisdom shall seem meete, to appoynt such 
a deliverance to your suffering People, whereby for 
the future, our religion, rights and libertyes may be 
secured under a Protestant Government by your 
gracious direction specially to be appointed. 

Wee will waite with all becoming duty and loyalty 
your Majestie's pleasure herein, and will in the mean 
time (to the hazard of our lives and fortunes) perse- 
vere and continue to vindicate and defend your 
Majestie's rights and soveraigne Dominion over 
this Province, the Protestant Religion and the 
Civil Rights and libertys of your Majestie's Sub- 
jects here against all manner of attempts and oppo- 
sitions whatsoever, Hereby unanimously declaring 
that as we have a full sense of the blessings of 
heaven upon your Majestie's generous undertake- 
ings, soe we will endeavor to express our due 
gratitude for the same as becomes Professors of 
the best of Religions, and Subjects to the best of 
Princes.' 

Maryland — dated in the Assembly 
sitting at the State House in the City of 
S' Maryes the 4'*" day of Sept' 1689 
in the first year of their Majestie's reign." 

Endorsed 

"Maryland 
4^*^ Sept' 1689 

Address of the Assembly to the King 
Rec'" 31 Dec' 1689."^ 

' Bernard C. Steiner says "they ask to be made a royal province." See 
"The Protestant Revolution in Maryland." Reports Am. Hist. Assoc, 1897. 

' There are those who doubt the sincerity of this appeal to establish the 
Church of England in the Province of Maryland but the personnel of the 
Assembly of 1689 leads me to believe that the appeal was an honest expression 
of a desire for relief from a difficult situation. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 37 

INSTRUCTIONS TO GOV. LIONEL COPLEV- 

August 26th, 1691. 
"Where being arrived you are forthwith to call 
together the Members of our Councill for that our Province 
and Territory By name, 

Sir Thomas Lawrence K'. and Bar'., 

Henry Jowles 

Nehemiah Blackiston 

Nicholas Greenbury 

Charles Hutchins 

Charles Robotham 

David Browne 

Thomas Tench 

John Addison 

John Coates 

James Frisby 
and 

Thomas Brooks, Esq. 
And that God Almighty may be more inclined to 
bestow his blessing upon us and you in the welfare and im- 
provement of that our Province you shall take especiall care 
that He be devoutly and duly served within your Govern- 
ment, the Book of Common Prayer as it is now estab- 
lished Read each Sunday and holiday and the blessed 
Sacrament administered according to the Rites of the 
Church of England. 

You shall take care that the Churches already built 
there shall be well and orderly kept and more built as 
the Colony shall by God's blessing be improved and that 
besides a competent maintenance to be assigned to the 
Minister of each Church a convenient house be built at 
the common charge for each Minister. 

'Arch. Md., Vol. 8, p. 271. 

' Arch. Md., Vol. 8, p. 276. See also Commission of Gov. Lionel Copley. 



38 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

You are not to preferr any Minister to any Ecclesi- 
astical! Benefice in that Our Province without a Certificate 
from the Right Reverend the Bishop of London of his 
being conformable to the doctrine and discipline of the 
Church of England of a good life and conversation, And 
if any Person already preferred shall appear to you to 
give scandall either by his doctrine or manners you are to 
use the best means for the removall of him and to supply 
the vacancy in such manner as we have directed. 

And you are to give Order forthwith if the same be 
not already done, that every Orthodox Minister within 
your Government be one of the Vestry in his respective 
Parish and that no vestry be held without him except in 
case of sickness or that after notice of a vestry summoned 
he absent himself. 

And you are to enquire whether there be any Minister 
within your Government who Preaches and Administers the 
Sacrament in any Orthodox Church or Chapel without 
being in due Orders, whereof you are to give an account 
to the said Bishop of London. 

And to the end the Eccliasticall Jurisdiction of the 
said Bishop of London may take place in that our Province 
as far as conveniently may be We do think fit that you give 
all countenance and Encouragement in the exercise of the 
same excepting only the Colating to Benefices, Granting 
Licenses for Marriage and Probate of Wills, which we have 
reserved to you our Governor or the Commander-in-Chief 
for the time being." 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 39 



ASSOC I ATORS— 1690 



St. Mary's County 
Kent County 
Anne Arundel 
Calvert 
Charles 



Baltimore 



Talbot 



Somerset 



IDorchester 



Cecil 



Capt. John Coode 
Commander 

Kenelm Cheseldyne 
Nehemiah Blackiston 

Michael Miller 
William Harris 

Nicholas Gassaway 
Nicholas Greenbury 

Henry Jowles 
Ninian Beale 

John Addison 
John Court (Coates) 

John Thomas 
Thos. Staley 

Geo. Robotham 
John Edmondson 
David Browne 
Robert King 

John Brooke 
Henry Trippe 

Edward Jones 
Charles James. 



Of the Associators, Blackiston, Robotham, Jowles, 
Addison, Browne, Court and Greenbury were made mem- 
bers of the Council by Gov. Lionel Copley, and Cheseldyne, 
Harris, Staley, Edmondson, Trippe, Brooke and Jones 
were elected members of the Provincial Assembly in 1692. 



Arch. Md. Vol. 8, p. 199. 



40 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 



THE COUNCIL AND ASSEMBLY 
May 10th-June9th, 1692. 

During this period the "Act for the Service, etc." was 
passed. 

Lionel Copley, Esq., Governor. 
Council 



Col. Nehemiah Blackiston 

Speaker 
Col. George Robotham 
Col. Charles Hutchins 
Col. Henry Jowles 
Capt. John Addison 
Sir Thomas Lawrence, Bart. 

John Llewellin 

Clerk to Council. 



Col. David Browne 

Capt. John Court (Coates) 

Mr. Thos. Brooke 

Col. Nicholas Greenbury 

Mr. Thos. Tench 

Mr. James Frisby 



Assembly 
Speaker — Mr. Kenelm Cheseldyne ' 



St. Mary's City 
Edw. Wynne, Esq. 
Mr. Robert Mason 

St. Mary's County 

Mr. Kenelm Cheseldyne 
Maj. John Carvell 
Mr. Philip Clarke 
Mr. John Watson 

Kent County 
Mr. Wm. Harris 
Mr. Hans Hanson 
Mr. Elias King 
Mr. Saml. Wheeler 



Baltimore County 

Mr. Geo. Ashman 

Mr. Edw. Boothby 

Mr. Era. Watkins 

Mr. Thos. Staley 
Talbot County 

Mr. Robert Smith 

Mr. Wm. Phiney (Finney) 

Mr. Hugh Sherwood 

Mr. John Edmondson 
Somerset County 

Capt. Wm. Whittington 

Rev. John Hewett 



■Arch. Md., Vol. 13, p. 252. 
2 Arch. Md., Vol. 13, p. 350. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 41 



Anne Arundel County 
Mr. John Hammond 
Mr. Henry Ridgeley 
Mr. James Sanders 
Mr. John Dorsey 

Calvert County 
Mr. Thomas Greenfield 
Mr. Thomas Tasker 
Mr. Henry Mitchell 
Mr. John Bigger 

Charles County 
Mr. Wm. Dent 
Mr. Henry Hawkins 
Maj. Ja. Smallwood 
Capt. Philip Hoskins 



Mr. Thomas Evemden 
Mr. John Godden 

Dorchester County 
Maj. Henry Trippe 
Dr. John Brooke 
Mr. Thos. Ennalls 
Mr. Edw. Pinder 

Cecil County 

Mr. William Dare 
Col. St. Leger Codd 
Mr. Edward Jones 
Mr. George Warner 



Henry Denton 

Clerk to the House. 



Changes in Personnel. 

"Came the speaker of the House and prayed his Ex- 
cellencys Order for the Issueing out of Writts of Election 
of Burgesses to serve in the room [place] of M' John 
Edmondson of Talbot County, M' Everdine [Evernden], 
M' Godwin and M' Huett of Somerset County M' Warner, 
M' Dare and Col. Codd of Cecil County disabled and Ex- 
pelled the House, which was granted.""^ 

Mr. Thomas Everdine and Mr. John Edmondson being 
Quakers refused to take the Oaths.- Mr. John Godwin 
was a Quaker.^ 

Mr. Huett (Hewett) was "dismissed the House by rea- 
son of his Ministerial function, the Law in that Case as was 

1 Arch. Md., Vol. 13, p. 2fo8. 

2 Arch. Md., Vol. 13. p. 253. 
5 Arch. .Md., Vol. 13, p. 354. 



42 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

afore desired being read in the house, rendering him, in 
the Opinion of the whole house, unqualified."^ 

On May 14th, 1692, Mr. Huett and the Re v. James Clay- 
land, later rector of St. Michael's Parish, Talbot County, 
were asked to serve as Chaplains to the Assembly and 
answered that they "will be ready at the State house every 
Morning, to say Divine Service upon the Beate of the 
second Drume, dureing this Sessions of Assembly."^ Their 
salaries were fixed at 3000 lbs. of Tobacco. 

Mr. Huett was rector of Stepney Church and of Old 
Monie in Somerset. 

The cause for dismissal of Col. St. Leger Codd and 
Mr. George Warner of Cecil was found by the Committee in 
the fact that they "called Cecil County Court [in April, 
1690] and held the same in the name of the Lord Baltimore, 
denying the Authority of the Late Convention, etc."' 

Mr. Wm. Dare was permitted to take his seat providing 
he give security for his good behavior. Upon his refusal to 
give the required security he was ordered to appear for 
contempt. He finally, upon giving some excuse, was per- 
mitted to pay a fine of 200 pounds of Tobacco and be dis- 
charged from custody of the "Serjeant att Armes."'* 

Mr. James Wroth, Mr. Robert Crooke and Mr. Thomas 
Theakston were elected to serve in the Assembly for Cecil 
County, "in the Roome of Col. Codd, M' Warner and M' 
Dare. "... "accordingly the oaths appointed by Act of 
Parliament instead of the Oaths of Allegiance and Su- 
premacy were administered to the aforesaid members" on 
May the 27th, 1692.^ 



■ Arch. 


Md.. 


Vol. 




p. 366. 


2 Arch. 


Md. 


, Vol. 




p. 367. 


' Arch. 


Md., 


Vol. 




p. 365. 


'Arch. 


Md., 


Vol. 




p. 368. 


'Arch. 


Md., 


, Vol. 




pp. 366-397. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 43 

"Came from the House M' Whittington and M' 
Ennals and desired to have the Sheriff's Return of the new 
Election for Somerset County. . . . Said Whittington 
and Ennals came again for the House together with M' 
Roger Woolford, M' John Bozman and M' Lawrence 
Mattox members returned for Somerset County 
they were accordingly sworn and dismist" June the 2nd, 
1692.' 

■'The Sheriff of Talbot County makes return of M' 
Thomas Robins a delegate chosen for the said County in 
this Assembly in the Room of M' John Edmondson dis- 
abled and dismissed the House."'' 



'Arch. Md., Vol. 13, p. 327. 
2 Arch. Md., Vol. 13, p. 326. 



44 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

ALL LAWS REPEALED 

—1692— 

"An Act of Repeale of all Laws heretofore made 
in this Province and confirming all Laws made 
this General! Assembly. 

Be it Enacted by the King and Queens Most Excellent 
Majesties by and with the advice and consent of this 
present Generall Assembly. 

That all Laws heretofore made in this Province be and 
forever hereby stand Repealed annulled and void, and that 
all Laws now made and assented to this present Generall 
Assembly (and no other) be and remain in full force and 
power according to the true intent and meaning thereof 
and that the same be accounted and esteemed as the body 
of the Laws of this Province and no other heretofore made. 

Provided always that this Law shall not extend or be 
Construed to make void any persons Right by Acts of 
nature Affections on any private Acts heretofore made 
relating to any private persons, but that the same be 
hereby kept and preserved to them according to the true 
intent and meaning thereof anything herein to the Contrary 
notwithstanding.^ 

June 7'^' 1692. June the 7^ 1692 

Assented to by the Councill The house of Assembly 

Board have Assented 

Signed p Ord' Signed p Ord' 

W. Taylard Clk. Hen : Denton Clk :" 
Assistant 



'Arch. Md., Vol. 13, p. 560. 



PART III. 

THE FIRST LAW ESTABLISHING THE CHURCH 



FIRST LAW ESTABLISHING THE CHURCH 

"an act for the service of almighty god 

AND THE establishment OF THE PROTEST- 
ANT RELIGION within THIS PROVINCE." 

Act of Assembly at a session held at St. Mary's 1692 

Lionel Copley, Esq. 

Royal Governor. 

It was under this law that the parishes of the Prov- 
inces were laid out. 

The first record of any action taken by the Assembly 
to establish the Church of England in the Province of Mary- 
land is found in the proceedings of that body under date of 
May 16th, 1692. It follows: 

"Ordered that the following Articles be drawne up 
into Lawes viz' — - 

Article No. 1. That the number of Ordinaries be 
ascertained in each County. 

Article No. 2. To Lay the Province into Parishes 
and that care be taken for provision 
for the Clergy."^ 

Two days later, May 18th, the bill had been drawn up, 
"read and passed the lower house the first reading with some 
amendments to be referred." 

On the 25th of May the following note is found in 
Assembly Proceedings : 

1 Arch. Md., Vol. 13, p. 368 and 369. 
47 



48 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

"The Act Concerning Religion they think most 
proper to Consider of and make provision for Glebes 
when the Parishes are settled and laid out." 

The Council read the bill for the first time on the next 
day (May 26th) and, after making the customary notations 
as to reading, the following "Remark" was added: 

"The Ministers to be one of the Vestry according to 
his Excellency's Instructions and a Clause tobeincerted 
Empowering the Vestrymen with the Advice and As- 
sistance of the Commissioners to purchase and procure 
one or more Glebes in a County and in such places as 
there shall be occasion, or they shall be Convenient 
viz'' One Glebe in a Parish each Glebe to Consist of 
fifty Acres of Land at the least and not under."' 
The bill received its second reading in the Council on 
the 27th of May and was sent to the Assembly. The 
Lower House adding the following: 

"Signify the opinion of the House thereupon that it 
may not commence nor take force till March next."- 
The same day it also received a reading in the Lower 
House brought from the Council. The following is an 
extract upon the records : 

"An Act for the Service, etc., ordered to be read, 
upon which was reassumed a former Vote concerning 
the Settlement of an Annuall Income in each parish 
upon the Ministry within the Province and Voted 
whether it should be done by the Assessmen' of Forty 
or 20 "" of tob° p. poll, and Carryed by the Majority 
of Voices to be assessed by a Taxe of Forty pounds 
of Tobacco p. poll upon the Taxeables of each parish."^ 
Under date of June the 2nd the following record shows 
the work completed and ready for the Governor's signature. 

•Arch. Md., Vol. 13. p. 306. 
= Arch. Md., Vol. 13, f. 316. 
'Arch. Md.. Vol. 13, p. 3%. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 49 

"An Act for the Service of Almighty God, &z'= 
thus subscribed, viz' 

June the 2"^' 1692 
The House of Assembly have assented 
Signed p Order 

Henry Denton Clk 

Read here and Subscribed June the l""^- 1692 

Assented to by the Council 

Signed p order 

J. Llewellin Clk"i 

Governor Copley on June the 9th "desired the House 
would walke up and see the Lawes signed." "M' Speaker 
with the Rest of the Members of the House goe up to the 
Councill Chamber accordingly where were signed by the 
Governor and passed under the Great Scale of the Province 
the following Lawes, viz'' 

An Act for the Service, etc"'^ 

"Maryland S. S.^ 

Att an Assembly held at the Citty of S' Mary's on 
the Tenth Day of May Anno Dom. 1692. And in the 4* 
Year of the Reign of Our Soveraign Lord &Z Lady William 
and Mary by the Grace of God of England Scotland France 
and Ireland King and Queen &c= These Acts following 
were made. 

[Title.] 

An Act for the Service of Almighty God and the 
Establishment of the Protestant Religion within this Prov- 



1 Arch. Md., Vol. 13, p. 328. 
'Arch. Md., Vol. 13, p. 421. 
5 Arch. Md., Vol. 13, p. 425. 



50 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

[Preamble.] 

Foreasmuch as in a well Governed Commonwealth 
Matters of Religion and the Honour of God ought in the 
first place to be taken in serious consideration, and nothing 
being more acceptable to Almighty God than the true and 
Sincere worship and Service of him according to his Holy 
Word. 

I. Bee it therefore Enacted by the King and Queens 
most Excellent Majestys by and with the advice and con- 
sent of this present General Assembly and the Authority 
of the same 

[Rights of the Church of England.] 

That the Church of England within this Province shall 
have and Enjoy all her Rights Liberties and Franchises 
wholly inviolable as is now or shall be hereafter Established 
by Law, and also that the Great Charter of England be 
kept and observed in all points — 

[Sunday Observances.] 

— and forasmuch as the sanctifying and keeping holy 
of the Lords Day commonly called Sunday is and hath 
been Esteemed by the present and all primitive Churches 
and People a Principall and Chief part of the said Worship, 
which Day in most places of this Province hath been and 
still is by many wicked Lewd and disorderly people Pro- 
phaned and neglected, by working Drunkeness Swearing 
Gaming & other unlawful pastimes and debaucheries, for 
remedy whereof, for the future — 

[Penalty for Sabbath breaking.] 

IL Bee it Enacted by the King and Queens most Excel- 
lent Majestys and by and with the advice and consent 
aforesaid, That from and after the publication of this Law 
no Person or Persons within this province shall work or do 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 51 

any bodily Labour or Occupation upon any Lord's Day 
commonly called Sunday, etc./ . . . 

[Establishing the Church of England.] 

And for the raising of a Supply of the Ministry and 
the Maintenance of the ministers of Gods word and Sacra- 
ments — 

[Meeting of Commissioners and Justices of each County.] 

in. Bee it Enacted by the Authority aforesaid that the 
severall Commissioners and Justices of each respective 
county within this Province shall at some convenient time 
between this and the first day of September next ensuing, 
meet together — 

[Place of Meeting.] 

At the respective places of holding Courts for the same 
Countys, 

[Freeholders notified to attend the meetings.] 

— and shall give notice to the most principal Free- 
holders- of the severall Counties to attend them at the said 
time and place of meeting to be by the said Commissioners 
and Justices appointed, ten days before the same — 

[Dividing the Counties into Parishes.] 

— and thereby and with the advice of the Principal 
freeholders aforesaid so many of them as the said Commis- 
sioners and Justices shall call to their Assistance divide and 
lay out their severall and respective Counties into severall 
districts and Parishes — 

' Considerable space taken up here with penalties for drunkeness, etc., on 
Sunday. 

' "Freeholder (Principal Freeholder) entitled to vote or to represent county 
in General Assembly must have a freehold of fifty acres of land or a visible estate 
of Forty pounds Sterling at the least." (\ld. Arch., Vol. 27, pp. 352-1708.) 



52 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

[Number of Parishes to each County.] 

— so many as the conveniency of each respective 
county and the scituation of the same will afford and allow 
of, as in the discretion of the said Justices with the advice 
aforesaid shall be thought convenient. 

[Parish boundaries to be well defined.] 

And the same districts and Parishes the said Justices 
shall cause to be laid out by meets and Bounds and fair 
certificats of each Parish with the most evident and demon- 
strable Bounds of the same, return to the next County 
Court to be held for the said County, — 

[Parish boundaries recorded in County Records.] 

— which the Justices at their County Courts as afore- 
said shall cause the Clerk of the said Court to enter the 
said certificate uppon Record, — 

[Copy of Parish Certificate sent to the Governor.] 

— and draw a fair Copy thereof, affixing his name and 
the Scale of said County thereunto and Transmitt the 
same with all convenient speed to the Gov"" and Councill of 
this Province to be kept on Record in the Councill Books, — 

[Clerks fee for recording.] 

— for which the said Clerk shall be allowed as for other 
matters recorded to be paid by the severall counties, — 

[Penalties.] 

— and for the more sure and certaine Effecting of the 
same, the severall Justices of the severall Counties within 
this Province, which Clerks aforesaid are hereby enjoyned 
and required to do and perform the severall Injunctions 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 53 

requisite and parts of this Law under the penalty of five 
hundred pounds of Tobacco to every Justice failing in the 
premisses, and to the Clerk one thousand pounds of To- 
bacco — 

[Fines in their Majestie's names.] 

— to be recovered in their Majestie's names in any 
Court of Record in this Province — 

[Fines applied to Parish use.] 

— and Employed to the use of the Parrish where the 
said offender shall reside — 

[Meeting held to choose Vestries.] 

•^and.the Severall Parishes being laid out limited and 
bounded in the severall Counties within this Province as 
aforesaid the Freeholders of each Parish do within some 
convenient time within two months — 

[Justices to appoint time and place of meeting.] 

— as by the Justices of County Courts aforesaid 
shall be appointed, meet together at the most convenient 
place in the said Parish to be appointed by the Justices 
aforesaid, — 

[Six vestrymen to be chosen.] 

— and there make choice of six of the most able men 
of the said respective Parishes to be a Vestry for each 
respective Parish as aforesaid, — 

[Vestrymen given authority of office.] 

— who are hereby Authorized Impowered and required 
to take care of preserve and Imploy all such Tobaccos, 



54 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

Wares, goods and Merchandizes as by this Act or any 
other Act hereafter to be made, or by any other waies or 
means whatsoever shall be given or granted raised or allowed 
to the use of the Church or Ministry of the said Parish to 
which they belong. 

[Vestry meeting to take account of parish income.] 

To which end and purpose the said Vestrymen or the 
Major part of them when and as often as need shall require 
shall meet together and have a Clerk^ to attend them to take 
the accompt of all such Tobaccos, Goods, Wares and Mer- 
chandizes as by any means as aforesaid shall accrue to the 
use of the Ministry in the Parish aforesaid, — 

[To build churches and chapel.] 

— and with the first Tobaccos, goods Wares and Mer- 
chandizes as aforesaid, shall erect and build in the most 
convenient place of the said Parish, one Church or Chap- 
pell— 

[Vestrymen to decide on dimensions, etc.] 

— in such Dimentions and Proportions and in such 
Methods and ways as by the said Vestry men in their 
discretion and Judgement shall think fitt and convenient — 

[Exceptions where churches are already built.] 

— (such Parishes as already at the time of the laying 
out of the same shall appear to have churches and Chap- 
pells already built in them Excepted) — 

[Vestrymen to keep record.] 

— the said Vestry men alwayes keeping a Record how 
and in what manner they shall execute and performe the 
severall Trusts in this Act reposed in them — 

■ Clerk to Vestry. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 5? 



[Vestry to obtain a yearly list of taxables in their parish.] 

—and also shall procure yearly and every year from 
the Constables within each hundred within their Parishes 
aforesaid or by such other waies or means as to them shall 
seem expedient a true & just accompt and list of all Taxable 
Persons within their Parish aforesaid — 

[List of taxables kept with vestry records.] 

—and the same yearly and every year cause to be 
recorded amongst their other Proceedings, the better to 
Enable them to know what sum or sums of Tobac° to 
demand and require of the Sherriff of the County for the 
use of their Parish aforesaid, as by this Act hereafter shall 
be raised for the uses aforesaid, — 

[Tax of forty pounds of tobacco.] 

That is to say, That a Tax or assessment of forty 
pounds of tobacco per poll be yearly and in every year 
raised and levyed upon every Taxable Person within each 
Parrish aforesaid, — 

[Sheriff to collect "Forty per poll."] 

— and to be collected and gathered by the Sherriff of 
the County in manner and form as the publick or County 
Levies hitherto have and still are collected and gathered — 

[Sheriff to pay the tax to the vestrymen.] 

— which said Sherriff is to make punctuall payment of 
the said Tax or Assessment to the Vestrymen of each 
Parrish as aforesaid, of so much Tobacco as by the Tax 
aforesaid shall be raised within each Parrish, — 

[Sheriff's commission for collecting tax.] 

— the said Sherriff deducting his Salary for collecting 
the same, five pounds of Tobacco per cent, — 



56 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

[How tax shall be applied.] 

— which said Tobacco so Assessed and raised as afore- 
said shall always and after the building of the Church or 
Chappell within the each Parrish as aforesaid be appropri- 
ated and applyed by the Vestrymen aforesaid to the use 
and benefit of the Minister of that Parrish if any Minister 
[be] Inducted into the same, — 

[Tax to be spent for repairs when there is no minister.] 

— But if no Minister be Inducted into the Parish, 
then the same Tobacco or such part thereof as by the said 
Vestry men shall be thought convenient to be kept and 
made use on for the necessary reparations of the Church 
or Chappell aforesaid or other pious uses at the discretion 
of the Vestry men aforesaid. 

[Vestrymen authorized to accept donations to the church.] 

And to the end that any gift bequest Grant ordination 
or appointment by any person or persons which shall be 
so piously inclined either by their last Wills and Testaments 
or by Deed Executed in their life time to give grant or any- 
ways appoint or bestow any sum or sums of Money Tobaccos 
Goods or Chattells Lands Tenements or hereditaments of 
what nature or kind soever for the use and benefit of any 
Minister or Ministers or to the Ministry or Poor of any 
Parrish or Parrishes within this Province, the Vestrymen 
for the same Parrish by this Act are Impowered and Au- 
thorized to take the same into their Custody and Possession 
and apply to the use and intent of the Donor or Donors — 

[Vestry authorized to sue.] 

And the better to enable them to recover and receive 
the same, they are hereby fully and absolutely Empoweerd 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 57 

Authorized and Qualified to prosecute and maintein any 
Action or Actions whatsoever, whether reall personal! or 
mixt for the Recovery of all or any the premisses aforesaid 
from any Person or persons that shall hold or deteine any 
of the goods or chatties Tenements or hereditaments as 
aforesaid, given and granted &l otherwise appointed to the 
uses aforesaid, or for any damages accruing by any Trespass 
upon and in the premisses or any of them, — 

[Vestrymen to act as "body corporate. "] 

— and in the Prosecution of any Action or accons as 
aforesaid to prosecute Act and do in the nature and amply 
as a body Politick or corporate might or could do for the 
recovering of the same and preserving of the premisses 
aforesaid — 

[Suits to be entered in name of the principal vestryman 
with the other vestrymen,] 

— in any Action or Actions to be comenced as aforesaid 
in the Writt and Declaration and other proceedings of the 
same the principall Vestryman shall be named together 
with the other his Vestrymen as aforesaid for the Parrish 
especially appointed by Act of Assembly any Law Statute 
or useage to the contrary hereof in any wise notwith- 
standing. 

[Vestrymen to fill vacancies in vestry.] 

And when any Vestryman or Vestrymen shall at any 
time hereafter happen to dy or depart this life or out of 
the Parish to which he or they belonged. It shall and may 
be lawfull to the other Vestrymen who are hereby enjoyned 
at their next meeting to make choice of such other able 
person or persons residing and being Freeholders in the 



58 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

Parrish aforesaid to make up the number of such deceased 
absent Vestryman or Vestrymen as aforesaid. 

[Date that Act shall become effective.] 

This Act as to the raising and Assessing a Support by 
the Poll not to commence or be in force untill after the 
Tenth Day of March [1693] next, but as to all other parts 
thereof, from and after the Publication of the same. 

June2"'' 1692 June 2"'^ 1692 

Assented to by the Council The house of Assembly 
Board. have Assented 

Signed p Ord' Signed p Ord' 

John Llewellin Clk. Hen: Denton Clk." 

' 'The aforesaid Law was signed and Subscribed by the 
Governor thus viz' 
June 9* 1692 

On behalfe of their Maj''" King W"" and Queen 
Mary I will these to be laws. 

L. Copley."^ 



' Arch, Md., Vol. 13, p. 424. This Act was repealed by the Act of 1696, 
same title. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 59 

TAXABLES 
"An Act for the Constables Taking a List of Taxables. 

— And to the end that no person for the future may be 
Ignorant what Persons are Taxables and what not 

Be it Enacted by and with the Advice and Consent 
aforesaid and the Authority of the same, That all Male 
Children born within this Province and Resident in it shall 
be taken and Accompted Taxables at the Age of sixteen 
years and upwards, and all male Children Servants Im- 
ported into this Province at the age of sixteen years and 
upwards shall be accompted Taxables, And all Slaves 
whatsoever, whether Male or Female Imported or born in 
this Province at or above the Age of sixteen years shall 
be accompted Taxables and so Rated, And that all freemen 
within this Province (Except Clergymen and such poor 8z 
Impotent persons that receive Alms from the County) 
shall be Taxables above the Age of Sixteen years. 

June 2"^ 1692 June the 2"'^ 1692 

Signed p. Ord' The House of Assembly have 

John Llewellin Clk Assented 

Signed p. Ord' 
Hen: Denton Clk."^ 



' Arch. Md., Vol. 13, p. 538. Assembly proceedings. 



60 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 



SHERIFF'S JURISDICTION. 

"At a Council held at Port of Annapolis. 
March y 1695. 

The Question : 

Ordered that it be referred to M' Attorney & Solicitor 
Generall whether the Sherriffs now at present Officiating & 
Acting in the late divided Counties can legally continue to 
Act in their several places, in the Counties as (by the late 
Law) they stand now divided, and whether the Commissions 
of the peace S^c" ought not to issue, and that they make 
Report of their opinion therein unto this Board with all 
speed ; who make the following Return viz' 

The Opinion : 

We humbly conceive that after the day in the Act of 
Assembly mentioned for dividing the Counties, the Sheriff 
of each County is not to Act beyond the limits of the 
County in the Act mentioned, and for prevention of incon- 
veniency and for the better administering Justice, it would 
be requisite that the Commission to All Officers Judiciall 
8z Ministeriall should be made to take Effect at that time, 
in the new Erected County. 

(Signed) Geo: Plater [Attorney General] 
(Signed) Wm. Dent"^ [Solicitor General] 

' Arch. Md., Vol. 20. p. 380. This opinion is quoted here to impress upon 
the reader the fact that the boundaries of parishes and counties were official and 
that the map (in back of book) of the province showing those boundaries is 
based upon that opinion. In otiner words the parish boundaries were made co- 
extensive with the country boundaries. 



PART IV. 

INSTRUCTIONS TO VESTRYMEN 



INSTRUCTIONS TO VESTRYMEN 

By 

"His Ex"'^ Francis Nicholson, Esq., Cap' Gen" &""" 

And his Councellors 

Shortly after the passage of the "Act for the Service 
of Almighty God and the Establishment of the Protestant 
Religion within this Province" the Governor and Council 
issued instructions to the Vestrymen throughout the Prov- 
ince. 

There were many things to learn in the management 
of the affairs of the Church under the Act of i6g2 and no 
doubt the vestrymen were glad to be instructed on such 
important questions. 



"At a Council held at the Port of Annapolis 
March 4'^ 1695 

Order touching the Vestry's, what inside Worke they are 

obliged to perform in their Churches 

Upon Representation, Ordered that the Vestrymen 
of the severall and respective Parishes within this 
Province be obliged to perform & see finished, within 
their respective parish Churches, no other inside worke 
than Viz' plastering the Walls, making the pulpit, the 
Reading pew &l Clerks Desk, to provide a Communion 
table & Raile in the same; And as for all other pews 
& seats, that the severall Parishioners be at charge of 
making the same according to their own liking. And 

63 



64 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

it is hereby further ordered that the Sheriffs of the 
Province give Copy of this Order to the severall Ves- 
trys within their respective Precincts."^ 



"At a Council held at the Port of Annapolis 

August 17^ 1695. 
Vestrymen Ordered to build Churches, &c^ ^ 

[Vestrymen to build churches where needed.] 

Ordered that the Vestrymen of the Severall and Re- 
spective parishes within this Province take all due and 
Speedy care for the building of Churches (where wanting) — 

[Oathes and test for vestrymen.] 

— and for the taking the Oathes & Subscribing to the 
Test— 

[Choosing church wardens.] 

— as also chooseing Church Wardens pursuant to the 
directions of the Act of Assembly of this Province in that 
Case made &i provided ; 

[County court houses to be used as churches.] 

And that where the Court houses within any of the 
Counties of the Province are placed convenient where 
Churches may stand or be Erected, that in such case said the 
Court houses may be made use of for Churches to perform 
Divine Duty & Service in; 

'Arch. Md., Vol. 20, p. 388. 
* Arch. Md., Vol. 20, p. 283. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 65 

[Dorchester County Court House.] 

— especially Dorchester County Court house in the 
parish of Great Choptanck, so that instead of Building a 
church at Cambridge, the Vestrey may build a Chappell of 
Ease in some other Convenient place, 

[This rule to be observed in other parishes.] 

And in like manner other parishes are hereby directed 
and Required to Observe and follow the same Rule. 

[Appointment of Lay Readers in vacant parishes.] 

And it is hereby further Ordered, that where ministers 
are wanting in any the said parishes the Vestreymen for 
the same appointed take care to provide some sober, dis- 
creet person to Read prayers on Sundays, 

[Lay Readers appointed to assist ministers of two parishes.] 
And where it so falls out that one Minister happens to 
Enjoy the benefits & profits of two parishes that then such 
Minister provide some sober and discreet person to Read 
prayers as aforesaid in that Church those days the minister 
shall therein be absent, Provided the whole Forty per poll 
be paid such Minister, Requireing such persons diligently 
to observe the Reading the first & second Service 6z the 
people to stand and kneele as the Rubrick directs; 

[Care of Churches.] 

And that the churches be decently kept & the Com- 
munion Tables Raild in, 

[Baptism of children after reading of Second Lesson.] 

And Further Ordered that all Children brought to 
Church to be baptized be Christened immediately after the 
Reading of the Second Lesson 



66 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

[Administering the Lord's Supper.] 

— & that the Holy Sacrament of the Lords Supper be 
administered at least three times every year, Viz*^ Christ- 
mas, Easter & Whitsontide ; 

[Collecting the "Forty per poll."] 

And that where the Forty per poll was not Collected 
last year that the same be Collected this year (according 
to the Directions of the Order of the last Assembly) for 
the Use of the Ministry, Ministers being sent for in and 
Expected this Fall ; 

[Sheriff to report to the Governor & Council on property 
given to the church.] 

And lastly Ordered that the Severall Sherriffes of the 
province make Strict inquiry of the Justices or other per- 
sons living within their respective Counties, if there be 
any Glebe Lands or personall Estate bestowed or given 
to the Church or towards building of Schooles or other 
pious Uses, whereof the Sherriffes are to Return an Ac- 
count unto this Board — 

[Sheriff to notify vestry of this order.] 

— & give Copy of this Order to the Vestry of each 
parish within their respective County's and that they sig- 
nify to this Board under their hand by the V day of 
October next of their having so done, under the pain & 
perill which may Ensue for neglect of the same; — 
Sheriffs to report number of taxables. 

The list of Taxables are then likewise by you to be 
Return'd." 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 67 

"At a Council held at the Port of Annapolis 
August 20'^ 1695 
[Churches to be used as Court Houses.] 
Ordered that it be Recommended to the house of 
Burgesses for a Law to be made that the Church at Mount 
Calvert be fitted to serve as well for a Court house as 
Church, and so in all other places where the same can 
conveniently be done. "' 



"At a Council held at the Port of Annapolis- 
October 10'^ 1696" 
[Order to the Vestrys to dispose of the "Forty per poll.] 

Ordered that the Vestrys of the Severall parishes 
within this Province take care to dispose of the 40 p poll 
(where Ministers are not placed or inducted and where 
Churches are actually built) for ready Goods, Money or 
bills of Exchange pursuant to Former Ord' Tobacco 
being a good comodity this Year; and that the Church 
Yards be pail'd pursuant to the late Ordinance of Assembly 
the Sherriffs being hereby directed to give a Copy of this 
Order to the Severall Vestrys within their respective 
Bayliwicks." 

"At a Council held at the Port of Annapolis ^ 
October 10^^ 1696. 
[Returns of County Levys and Vestry Proceedings.] 
Ordered that the Clerks of the Severall County Courts 
and Vestrys make Return of their County Leavys and 
Vestry proceedings next December Court, and so from that 
time Annually pursuant to the late Act of Assembly, and 
that the Sherriffs give them notice thereof." 

' Arch. Md., Vol. 20, p. 284. 

2 Arch. Md., Vol. 20. p. 523. 

3 Arch. Md., Vol. 20, p. 524. 



68 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

"At a Council held at the Port of Annapolis^ 

December 16^ 1696. 

[Order to Vestrys to make return about the Churches.] 

Ordered that the Vestrys of the respective parishes 
within this Province make Return what forwardness the 
Churches are in and whether Finished according to Contract 
and paid for, and whether the ground the same stand on is 
purchased & made secure to the parishion" to the End iif it 
should not, and Act of Assembly may be procured for the 
Same, and that the Severall Vestrys have the s"* Accounts 
ready for his Ex""^^ perusall against he comes and 
visitts the s'^ Churches, which (God willing) he intends 
very shortly and that the Sherriffs Serve them Severally 
with a Copy hereof." 



'Arch. Md., Vol. 20, p. 584. 



PART V. 

IHE LAW UNDER WHICH THE CHURCH OF 

ENGLAND FUNCTIONED UNTIL 

THE REVOLUTION IN 1775 

Papers Relating to the Validity of the Law and the 
Act Providing for the Disposition of the Taxes 



"AN ACT FOR THE ESTABLISHM^ OF RE- 
LIGIOUS WORSH"" IN THIS PROVINCE 
ACCORDING TO THE CHURCH OF 
ENGLAND: AND FOR THE 
MAINTAINANCE OF 
MINISTERS."^ 

Act of Assembly— March 25'^ 1702. 

The defects of the previous similar bills framed by the 
Assembly had caused their rejectment and upon the advice 
of Dr. Thomas Bray, who had fathered the Act of April 
26th, 1700, and who had appeared personally in London 
before the Board of Trade and failed to get it passed ; the 
Assembly asked the Commissioners of Trade and Planta- 
tion to prepare a bill that would be allowed by the Crown 
indicating their willingness to pass such as an Act of the 
Assembly of Maryland. 

The defect in the Act of 1700 was the clause, "Bee it 
Enacted by the Authority aforesaid that the booke of 
Common Prayer and Admistration of the Sacraments 
with other Rites and Ceremonys of the Church According 
to the use of the Church of England the Psalter or Psalms 
of David and Morning and Evening Prayer therein con- 
tained be Solemnly read by all and Every Minister or 
Reader in Every Church or other Place of Public Worship 
within this Province."'^ 

' Arch. Md., Vol. 24, p. 2b5. This is the Law under which the Church 
functioned for over seventy years. 

= .Arch. Md.. Vol. 24, p. 91. For statement of Council in regard to restric- 
tions see Letter to Commissioners of Trade and Plantation, page 166. 

71 



71 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

This deprived the Quakers and other dissenters of the 
benefits of toleration they had enjoyed. Upon receiving a 
letter from the "Right Hon*"'" the Lords of Plantation and 
Trade" notifying him of the failure to pass the Act of 1700, 
Governor Nathaniel Blackiston addressed the Council and 
Lower House in joint session on the 16th of March, 1702. 
He said in part: 

"The Law for Establishing religious worship 
in this Province according to the Church of Eng- 
land which you made last & sent home is now re- 
turned by his Majesty for your Assent. You'll find 
the Alterations, that are made but very little, and 
that such Visible Amendments to our Advantage be- 
ing corrected by so wise an Hand. We ought to be 
proud of the pattern in confirming it. If I mistake 
not your Journalls of Assembly will make it appear 
that this Way was humbly requested by yourselves 
in an Address to his Majesty that he would be pleased 
to order it to be drawn as he should judge fit and 
it be remitted to you for your Concurrence and there- 
fore since this Law was so unanimously made by 
you I have not the least doubt that any crafty 
Inclinations will abate your good Intentions in 
confirming so glorious and good an Act; But that 
you will cheerfully Join in putting it on foot His 
Majesty has been graciously pleased to give us an 
handle so to do. That for the future it may not be 
within the reach of our opponents to shock it again, 
tho their Efforts have proved feeble hitherto yet 
you ought not to trust any longer, but Endeavour to 
plant it firm to your Posterity which will be a most 
lasting Testimonie of your virtues."^ 

1 Arch. Md., Vol. 24, p. 207. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 73 

On Tuesday, March 17th, 1702, the Governor sent the 
bill to the Lower House "for your Consideration, and your 
Concurrence and Resolutions thereon are desired with as 
much speed as conveniently may be."' Owing to the ab- 
sence of several of the members of the Lower House, no 
action was taken until the 20th of March, at which time a 
full attendance of the members allowed the Assembly to 
proceed with its consideration. The Council records show 
that on the 20th "Came Major Dent and M' [Edward] 
Lloyd from the House to desire a Conference of Some 
Members of their House with some Members of the Council 
upon the Bill proposed for Establishment of religious Wor- 
ship within this Province, which Conference was readily 
granted when the House shall think fitt. Col. Addison, 
Col. Courts, M"" Brooke and Col. Hammond appointed to 
conferr with the members assigned by the House." 

After the conference at the morning session, the bill 
was read the first time. A vote was then taken as to 
whether it should pass as it came from England. "Carryed 
in the affirmative and ordered that the blanks be filled 
up and it be th^ endorsed. Resolved that it pass ivithout any 
amendment and ordered to be read ag"" this afternoone."^ 
It was read the second time in the Lower House and passed; 
it also received two readings and was "agreed to" by the 
Council at the same session and then sent up to the Com- 
mittee to be engrossed. 

At the Council meeting on Monday morning, March 
23rd, 1702, the Governor read a part of a letter written to 
him by Dr.Thos.Bray, under date of July 1 5th, 1 70 1 . Doctor 
Bray called attention to the work he had done in England 
for the "Law of Religion" and says "My own Time and 
Pains in this affaire I willingly make an offering of together 

'.Arch. Md., VoK 24. p. 209. 
2 Arch. Md., Vol. 24, p. 247. 



74 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

with what other Services have been done the Country." 
He then states that he expected to be reimbursed for the 
outlay of cash (upwards of £50) paid out in soliciting the 
passage of the bill before the Board of Trade in England. 
A vote of thanks was tendered Doctor Bray by the Upper 
and Lower Houses and an order drawn to reimburse him 
for that which he had "disbursed in negotiating the said 
affair about the Act for Religious Worship."^ 

At the Afternoon session on March 23 rd, the bill re- 
ceived its third reading in the Council and sent to the 
Lower House by Col. Addison and Mr. Brooke, where it 
received its final reading and approval. 

"An Act for the Establishment of Religious 
Worship in this Province according to the Church 
of England and for the Maintainence of Ministers^ 

[March 25"^ 1702] 
[Preamble.] 

For as much as in well grounded Xpiom comon 
Wealths Matter concerning Religion and the honour of 
God ought in the First place, to be taken into considera- 
tion. And honest Endeavour to Attaine to such good end 
Countenanced and Encouraged as being not only most 
Acceptable to God ; but the best way and Means to Obtaine 
his mercy and blessing upon a People or Country. 

[Use of Book of Common Prayer authorized.] 

L Be it therefore Enacted by the Kings most Excellent 
Maj'' by and with the Advise and consent of this pres- 

'Arch. Md., Vol., 24, p. 254. 
2 Arch. Md., Vol. 24, p. 265. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 75 

ent General! Assembly; And by the Authority of the same 
that the book of Common Prayer and Administracon of 
the Sacraments with other Rites and Ceremonys of the 
Church According to the use of the Church of England; 
The Psalter or Psalmes of David. And Morning and Eve- 
ning Prayer therein Conteyned be Sollemnly read by all 
and Every Minister or Reader in Every Church which now 
is or hereafter shall be settled and Established within this 
Province. 

[Defines "Established Churches."] 

And that all Congregations and Places for Publick 
Worship, according to the usage of the Church of England 
within this Province for the Maintenance of whose Minis- 
ters, and the persons OfYiciateing therein any certaine in- 
come or Revenue is or shall by the Laws of this Province 
be Established and Enjoyned to be raised or paid shall be 
deemed Settled and Established Churches; 



[Tax for the "Maintenance" of Ministers.] 

And for the Encouragement of Faithfull and able 
Ministers Labouring in the Worke of the Gospell to come 
and reside in this Province. 

II. Bee it Enacted by the Authority aforesaid that a 
Tax or Assessm' of Forty pound of Tob° per Poll be Yearly 
and every Year Successively Levy'^ upon every Tax- 
able Person within each respective Parish within this Prov- 
ince. As they have been ; now are or here After shall be 
laid out Limitted or Appointed; by Laws of this Province; 
And entered upon Record As the said Former Laws therein 
did Direct. 



76 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

[Disposition of "Forty per poll" tax.] 

Which said Assessment of Forty pounds of Tob° p 
Poll shall alwayes be Paid and Allowed to the Minister of 
each respective Parish haveing noe other Benefice to Offici- 
ate in ; Presented ; inducted or Appoynted by his Excell"^ The 
Governour or Comander in Cheife for the tyme being — 



[Clerk of parish church.] 

And every such Minister is hereby Required and En- 
joyned to Appoynt And Constantly to Keep a Clerk of 
Such Parish Church; and to pay and Satisfye such Clerk 
the Sume of One Thousand Pounds of Tob° yearly and 
Every year out of the Said Fourty p. poll ; — 



[Prevention of illegal marriages.] 

And to prevent all illegall and Unlawful Marriages; 
not allowable by the Church of England ; but forbidden by 
the Table of Marriages, 

III. Bee it Enacted by the Authority aforesaid; That 
noe Minister, Preist or Magistrate shall Presume to joyne 
Together in Marriage any Person whatsoever contrary to 
the Table of Marriage; by this Act Appoynted to be sett 
up in Every Parish Church within this Province ; Under the 
penalty of Five Thousand pounds of Tob° Nor shall any 
Person Forbidden to Intermarry by such Table of Marriage 
p'"sume to be joyned in marriage Under the Like Penalty of 
Five Thousand pounds of Tob° such Penalty and For- 
feiture ; on either side ; to be made to our Soveraigne Lord 
the King ; his heires and Successors, for the uses in this Act 
hereafter menconed ; 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 77 

[Who shall perform marriage ceremonies.] 

And to prevent Any Lay Person From Joyning any 
Persons in Marriage ; Where any Minister or Prest cann be 
had; And to Assertaine what shall be paid for Marriages. 

IV. Hee it likewise Enacted by the Authority Aforesaid 
that in every Parish where any Minister or Incumbent 
shall reside & have Charge of Souls therein; noe Justice or 
Majestrate being a Lay man shall Joyne any Person in Mar- 
riage; Under the Penalty of Five Thousand Pounds of Tob° 
For such Offence; To our Soveraigne Lord the King; as 
aforesaid; — 

[Marriage fees.] 

And it Shall be Lawfull to every Minister; To take and 
receive of Every Person or Persons by him Married the 
Sume of Five shillings Sterling and noe more. 

[Place of marriage ceremony.] 

Provided such Persons come to such Parish Church or 
Chappell at time of Divine Service for Solemnizeing such 
Marriage. 

[Sheriff to collect "Forty p. poll" tax.] 

And for the better and more effectually collecting the 
said Duty of Fourty Pound of Tob° p. Poll ; and paying 
this same to the uses by the Law intended and Appoynted. 

V. Bee it Enacted that the Sherriffe of each Severall 
County shall and is hereby obliged to Collect and gather 
the said Assessment of Forty p. poll of the Severall persons 
within each respective Parish in his County; in the same 
maner. And by the same authority as the Publick and 
County Levys are Collected; — 



78 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

[To whom paid.] 

and shall pay the same Forty Pounds p. Poll to the 
Minister or incumbent in each respective Parish ; — 

[Authority for vestrys.] 

And the better to Promote the Execution of the good 
Laws of this Province ; soe farr as Concerns the Respective 
Parishes. And for the more Easey Dispatch of Parish 
Business ; 

VI. Bee it Further Enacted by the Authority aforesaid, 
by and with the Advice and Consent aforesaid; that there 
be Select Vestrys, in each Parish of this Province; and 
that the severall Vestrymen of the Severall Parishes within 
this Province, That now are or hereafter shall be Chosen, 
be such select Vestry ; — 

[Number of vestrymen.] 

■ — Of which Vestry the Number shall always be Six at 
least. Except upon Death or Resignation or other Dis- 
charge of any of them; according to the Provision herein 
made, — 

[Filling vacancies in vestry.] 

To that purpose and in such case of Death or Resig- 
nacon or other Legall Discharge from serveing the re- 
maining part of such Vestrys shall with all convenient 
Speed Sumon & Appoynt a Generall meeting of all the 
Inhabitants of the said Parish; — 

[Voters must be freeholders.] 

— Who are Free holders within the same Parish; and 
Contribute to the Public Taxes & Charges of the said 
Parish ; — 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 79 

[Vestrymen must be freeholders.] 

— who shall by Majority of Voyces Collect and 
Choose one or more Sober and Discreet Person or persons 
Freeholders of each Respective Parish To supply such 
vacansye — 

[Oath required of a vestryman.] 

And such Person or Persons soe Ellected and Chosen 
shall take the Usuall oath appoynted by Act of Parliament 
instead of the Oath of Allegiance and Supremacy ; and the 
Following Oaths viz. I doe Solemnly Swear and Declare that 
I will Justly and truly Execute the trust or Office of a 
Vestryman of this Parish. According to my best skill and 
Knowledge; without P'judice Favor or Affeccon; — 

[Oath administered by justice of peace] 

— which said Oath at the Elleccon of a New Vestry 
are to be Administered by any Justice of the Peace of the 
County ; City or Place ; where such Vestry is who is hereby 
required and Impowered to Administer the same. 

[Additional Oaths administered by either justice of peace 
or the "First Vestryman."'] 

And upon Elleccon Afterwards either by A Justice of 
Peace as aforesaid or the First Vestryman who is hereby 
likewise required & Impowered to Administer the same; 

[Additional oaths for vestrymen.] 

And each person soe Elected and Chosen; shall like- 
wise subscribe the Test; And alsoe the Association and 
haveing soe Done, and not before shall be Deemed and 
taken as one of the Vestry. To all intents and purposes. 

' Repealed May 1st, 1704, Arch. Md., Vol. 24, p. 418. 



80 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

[Two new vestrymen chosen annually.] 

VII. And it is hereby further ordained and Enacted by 
the Consent and Authority afores"' that Two new Vestry- 
men shall be Annually Chosen in the Places of Two Others 
who shall be Left out ; 

[Annual elections to be on Easter Monday.] 

To w'^'^ purpose all the Inhabitants of every Parish 
being Freeholders within the same Parish ; and Contributing 
to the Publick Taxes and Charges thereof, or such of them 
as shall think fitt to Attend; shall repaire to theire re- 
spective Parish Churches, every Year Successively upon 
Easter Monday. 

[Freeholders to name retiring vestrymen.] 

And there by their Free Choyce, declare what Two 
Persons shall be Discharged from their being Vestrymen; 
And Chuse Two others Qualify'd according to this Present 
Act; in their stead & Room who takeing the Oaths and 
performing all other things required by this present Act or 
other the Laws of this Province for Vestrymen; Shall be 
Deemed and taken to be members of the said Vestry; To 
all intents and purposes. 

[Minister to be one of the vestry.] 

Provided alwayes that in every Parish where any Min- 
ister or Incumbent is or shall be Lawfully according to the 
Laws and usages of this Province Appointed; and in pos- 
session of any Liveing invested with the 40 p. Poll ; and 
resideing therein he shall Dureing the continuance afors'' 
and noe longer, be one of the Vestry of such Parish ; and 
Principall of such Vestry; Although there be the Number 
of Six persons or more beside ; 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 81 

[Register of parish appointed.] 

And for keeping a faire Register of all such Vestrys 
proceedings and for Registring of all births Marriages and 
Burialls; in each Respective Parish. 

VIII. Bee it Enacted by the Authority advice and 
consent aforesaid. That each Vestry shall and is hereby 
Obliged to provide a fitt Person for a Register ; who shall at 
all times keep a true and faire Registry of the Sevall pro- 
ceeds of Such Vestry from time to time in Executeing their 
trust and Authority; and making just and true entrys 
thereof, — 

[Register's oath.] 

which Person soe to be Appointed for keeping such 
Registry, shall take the Oath substituted in the place of the 
Oaths of Allegiance and Supremacy and Subscribe the Test 
and Association; and alsoe an oath to be given him by the 
said Vestry; which oath the said Vestry are hereby im- 
powered To Administer accordingly for the due and Faith- 
full Executeing his said Office ; before he shall be Admitted 
into the said Office; 

[Register to record vestry proceedings, etc.] 

And shall make due entry of all Vestry proceedings 
and of all Births, Marriages and Burrials (Negroes and 
Mullattoes excepted) That is to say the Christian and Sir 
name; with the day moneth and year of every such Births, 
Marriages or Burryalls; 

[Inhabitants of parish to furnish information.] 

To which purpose all and every the Inhabitants of 
each Parish that are either Parent, Guardians, Overseers, 



82 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

Masters or Mistresses of any person, borne Married or 
buried, are hereby Injoyned and required. To give Notice, 
to the Register of such Parish within two Moneths after 
such Birth, Marriage or Buriall; 

[Register's fee.] 

and pay him six pence for entrying it at the time of 
giveing Notice aforesaid 

[Penalty of inhabitants for not giving information.] 

— under the Penalty of one hundred pounds of Tob° 
To be forefeited by such Inhabitants Aforesaid; Refuseing 
or neglecting as aforesaid — 

[Penalty of Register for refusing or neglecting to make 
entries.] 

— under the penalty of one hundred pounds of Tob° 
To be forefeited by such Register refuseing or neglecting to 
enter it; haveing received his fee for the same. 

[Register to show records of parish.] 

And such Register is hereby Obliged To shew any 
Person or Persons Reasonably desireing it any such Register, 
give a Cert, of any Births, Marriages or Burialls That 
shall be reasonably required of him; — 

[Register's fees.] 

— and Shall have for Fees from such person; Six pence, 
for any Search, and Six pence for any Copy or Cert given 
as aforesaid and noe more; 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 83 

[Ratifying previous parish records.] 

— hereby Ratefying & confirming as Vallid all Regis- 
ters, or Entrys of any Births, Marriages, or Burialls here- 
tofore made with any Clarke of any County Court accord- 
ing to the direccons of such Laws, as were then in force, 
before any of those Laws were in being. 

[Providing record books.] 

And that the Register of each Parish may be enabled 
to performe the Charge hereby required of him. 

IX. Bee it Enacted by the Authority Advice and con- 
sent Aforesaid, That if there be any Vestry of any Parises 
that has not already Provided good and Substantiall 
Writeing books; well bound sufficient for registring such 
proceedings, in according to the direccons of the former 
Laws : 

[Penalty for not providing record books.] 

— that in every such case of such neglect or omission 
the Vestry of such parish shall at the Parish charge. Pro- 
vide such book or books within Six moneths from the end 
of this Session of Assembly under the Penalty of Five hun- 
dred pounds of Tob" each Vestryman (the minister only 
excepted) neglecting as aforesaid. To our Soveraigne Lord 
the King, for the uses within menconed : 

[Vestry meetings once a month.] 

And that there may be noe neglect in the Vestry of 
those Employ'd under them in the Lawfull and con- 
scionable Performance of theire Severall charges. The 
said Severall Vestrys are hereby obliged to meet once in 
every moneth, or as often as need shall require — 



84 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

[Public notice of vestry meetings.] 

— upon publick notice given by the Principall Vestry- 
man of each Parish To Consult of the methods and ways 
of performing the severall Authorityes reposed in them. 

[Penalty for absence of vestrymen.] 

And from which Vestry soe Appointed, noe Vestryman 
being Personally summoned shall without a Lawfull or 
reasonable Excuse Absent himselfe under the Penalty of 
such Fine or Mulct as the residue of the said Vestry meet- 
ing shall Lay upon them, soe as the same never Exceeds 
One hundred pounds of Tob° — 

[Authority to vestrymen for calling a meeting.] 

— and upon default or neglect in such Principall 
Vestryman as is before menconed to Suirion a Vestry 
when there is need for one, and he is thereunto requested 
any other Three of the Vestry or if there shall happen by 
any Accident To be but Two of the said Vestry, beside 
the Principall Vestryman resideing in the said Parish, such 
Three or Two shall have power and Authority To Sumon 
and Appoint a Vestry to be holden: — 

[Record of vestry proceedings to be kept in register.] 

And all such omission and neglects to be noted in the 
Vestrys Reg"' of proceedings And any forfeiture thereby 
incur'd to be recovered in his Majesty's name — 

[Table of marriages to be provided.] 

— and the said severall and respective Vestrys are 
hereby further Enjoyned That where there is not Tables 
of Marriages already put up in theire respective Parish 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 85 

Churches, with all convenient Speed, and within Six 
moneths at the most To procure a faire Table of Mar- 
riages Transcribed and sett up In theire respective 
Churches and the same keep continually in theire said 
Churches and persons being thereby informed what Mar- 
riages are forbidden may avoyd the Contracting of any 
such unlawfull marriages. 

[Church wardens appointed each year.] 

And that the said Vestrymen & the rest of the In- 
habitants of every Parish being free holders within the 
same Parish and contributing to the Publick Taxes and 
charges there doe once every year upon Easter Munday 
yearly make Choyce and Appoint Two sober and Discreet 
Persons freeholders of their respective Parishes: To be 
Church Wardens for that year. 

[All freeholders of parish vote on church wardens.] 

All the Inhabitants of every Parish, being freeholders 
within the same Parish and contributing to the Publick 
Taxes and charges thereof. Have in Liberty alsoe To 
vote in the Choyce of Church wardens. — 

[Penalty of vestrymen for nonperformance of duty.] 

— each Vestryman Expecting as before Excepted 
being under the Penalty of Two hundred pounds of Tob° 
for neglecting either to procure a Table of Marriages or 
to Appoynt Church Wardens; To our Soveraigne Lord 
the King as aforesaid, — 

[Oath of church wardens.] 

— which Church Wardens soe Chosen shall Take the 
usuall Oaths. And likewise declare on his Oath to be 



86 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

Administered unto him by the Vestry to whome power 
is hereby given. To Administer the same Accordingly; 
well and Faithfully to Execute that Office for the En- 
sueing year: According to the Lawes and Usages of the 
said Province to the best of his Skill and power and 
untill he shall be thereof duly Discharged. 

[Fines for church wardens.] 

And any such person or persons soe Chosen Church 
Warden or Wardens; that shall wilfully refuse To Serve 
in the said Office and take the Oaths aforesaid : shall be 
find one thousand pounds of Tob° To our Soveraigne Lord 
the King: — 

[Church wardens and vestry to see that parochial charges 
are paid.] 

And the Church Wardens and Vestry are Authorized 
and required To take constant care To satisfye and pay 
the Parochiall charges and all necessary repaires and 
Amendm'^ of theire respective Churches, Chappels or 
Church yards, and cause the same at all time to be re- 
paired and Amended as need shall require : — 

[To be paid out of gifts to the parish.] 

— out of such gifts, goods or Chattels, as shall come to 
their hands for the Church or Parish use: and the pay- 
ment of with Parochiall charges. 

[Fines to be levied by church wardens.] 

All the Fines forefeitures and Mulcts, by this Law 
incurr'd shall be Levyed by the Church Wardens in each 
respective Parish. And by them accordingly Applyed; 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 87 

and in Case they shall not have sufficient Effects to pay 
Parochial! charges as aforesaid or to make such necessary 
repaires as is required : — 

[Justices of county courts to assess ten pounds of tobacco.] 

Then and not otherwise it shall be Lawfull for the 
Justices of the County Courts upon Applycacon of such 
parish Vestry and Church Wardens, To Assess the re- 
spective parishes by a certaine sume of Tob° not exceed- 
ing Tenn pounds of Tob° by the Poll in any one year: — 

[Sheriff authorized to collect tax.] 

— which Assessm"^ made by such County Court : 
And a Certificate thereof under the County Seale shall he 
sufficient to the Sherriff of such County to Levy such 
Tax by the Poll on the Taxables of such Parishes in the 
same maner as other Public dues are Levyed — 

[Sheriffs fees.] 

— and shall not deduct above Five p. hundred for his 
Sallery, — 

[Church maintenance tax paid to vestry.] 

— and pay the same to such Vestry for the use afore- 
said. 

[Defines the purposes of this Act.] 

And to the intent that this Act may Answer the end 
of the makers, which is that his Ma'^" Good Subjects 
of this Province may be instructed in Religion and therein 
of their Duty to God, his Ma*^^^ and themselves, And 
those pious and Exemplary persons that shall Labour 
therein Suitably provided for — 



88 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

[Ministers limited to two parishes.] 

X. Bee it Enacted by the Authority Advice and con- 
sent aforesaid, that no Minister or Incumbent shall at one 
time hold more than two parishes — 

[Minister's hold two charges subject to vestrys of the two 
parishes.] 

— nor Two [parishes] unless by the desire or Agree- 
ment of the Vestry of the said Adjacent parish and con- 
sent of the Vestryes where he resides. And appoyntment 
of the Ordinary, 

[Lay Readers appointed by vestry and licensed by the 
Ordinary.] 

— and where there are not or shall not be Ministers 
in any Parish it shall and may be Lawfull to the Vestry 
To provide some Sober and Discreet person as a Reader, 
And present him to the Ordinary, — 

[Lay reader's Salary.] 

— who may Sequester part of the Forty pounds p. 
poll; To pay him for such Service; 

[Remainder of "Forty p. poll".] 

And the rest to be Apply'd as the Law' in cases of 
such Vacancies directs. 

[Lay Readers' oaths and license.] 

And upon such Readers takeing the Aforesaid Oathes 
Appoynted by Act of Parliament; Subscribing the Test 
and Association, and procureing Lycence from the Ordi- 
nary — 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 89 

[Lay Reader's duty.] 

— shall and may read Divine Service, Homilies and 
such other good Authors of Practicall Divinity as shall be 
Appointed; at the usuall Times in such Churches or 
Chapp"^ and therein shall Demean himself according to the 
Lyturgy of the Church of England as aforesaid: — 

[Vestry meetings dates fixed.] 

And for the Preventing of Delayes and other incon- 
veniences which might happen if there were a necessity 
for the Expecting the Attendance and presence of all the 
said Vestrymen; And at the same time to prevent the 
doeing of any thing of Consequence by Surprize by a 
small number of them. — 

XI. Bee it hereby Enacted, That the First Tuesday in 
Every Moneth shall be and is hereby fixt and Ascer- 
tained for holding a Vestry at a Eleaven of the Clock in 
the Forenoon in the usuall place for that purpose, without 
any notice or warning to be given thereof, — 

[Number constituting a vestry meeting.] 

— at which time and Place, the major part of the 
Vestrymen then present (soe as such Majority be not 
under the number of Three persons) shall be esteemed a 
Vestry. 

[Authority for vestry to act.] 

And shall have full power to ord' Direct and Act in 
all things, by this Act Appoynted. To be done According 
to this Act as a Vestry; — 



90 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PRO\'IN'CE OF MARYLAND 

[Vestryman to be removed for non attendance.] 

And that in case any Vestryman shall remove or 
with draw himselfe from the Parish or Voluntarily or 
Freequently neglect to give his Attendance, and Absent 
himselfe from the Vestry or otherwayes become unfitt or 
Incapable to continue To execute the said Office or Trust, 
that in any such case the residue of the said Vestry or the 
majority of them (soe as such majority be riot under the 
number of Three persons) shall and may have power After 
personall Notice given to such party if it conveniently 
may be, or the affixing of a publick notice upon the great 
Door of the Church for three Several! Sundays Succes- 
sively. If personall notice can not be given without great 
Difficulty charge or Delay, of their Intentions to proceed 
in such manner To remove such person from being a 
Vestryman and to declare his Office voyd — 

[Electing new vestrymen in usual way.] 

— to Sufnon a meeting of the Parishioners Qualified 
as is above Directed for the Electing another in the place 
of such person (who shall after Allowing a reasonable 
time to such person to make his complaint if he Appre- 
hend himselfe injuryed not exceeding a Fortnight) Pro- 
ceed to a new Election accordingly — 

[Register must show vestry books and parish accounts.] 

And that there may not be any appression' or mis- 
applycacon of the publick Revenue by such Vestrys or 
just cause of Complaint Against them in any of theire 
proceedings without redress. 

XII. Bee it Enacted by the Authority advice and con- 
sent aforesaid, that all and every Parishioner and Pa- 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 91 

rishioners whatsoever who contribute to the Publick Taxes 
and charges of the said Parish shall and may require the 
Register herein before menconed. At any reasonable or 
Convenient time or Times to give them an Inspection of 
the Vestry books and Accompts of all every theire orders 
and proceedings. 

[Register to make copy of records.] 

And shall and may take Copy thereof paying a 
reasonable Fee for the same according to the length 
thereof, and the trouble of Attendance. 

[Appeals from parish records to be made to the Governour 
or Deputy Governour and Councill.] 

And that all and every Person and persons whatsoever 
who shall find or Apprehend him her or themselves 
grieved or Injuried, or that the body of the Parish is in- 
juried or Appressed by any Acts, Orders, Rules, Ac- 
counts or other proceedings of any such Vestry. The 
partyes soe injuryed or any other in their behalfe or in 
right of the whole body may from time to time Appeale 
for Redress against all and every such orders Accounts 
and other proceedings. To the Governour or Deputy 
Governour for the time being, and Councill of the said 
Province, — 

[Decision of Governour and Council to be final.] 

— who are hereby required and impowered to Ex- 
amine, hear and Determine, all and every such Appeale 
and Complaints for Redress. And to give Redress as 
they in theire Judgm' shall think agreeable to Justice and 
Equity; and such their order Judgm' and Decree; shall 



92 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

be finall & bind all parties; the right of Appeal being 
alwayes Reserved to his Ma'^' in Councill according to 
the Lawes of this Province — 

[Exemption of dissenters and Quakers.] 

Provided alwayes that every of his Ma'^"' Prot- 
estant Subjects within this Province; Decenting from the 
Church of England. As to matters relateing to the Wor- 
shipp and Service of Almighty God And the Decenters 
Comonly called Quakers in all matters relateing To the 
takeing of Oathes and all protestant Decenters whatsoever 
as to all discharges and Exemplicacon from penaltyes or 
forfeitures upon Ace' of theire Desenting Separate meet- 
ings or other matters wherein Tolleracon and ease is 
granted. To Protestant Decenters by one Act made in 
the First Year of the reigne of his present Ma'^'' and 
his late Consort Queen Mary of Blessed Memory En- 
tituled An Act for Exempting theire Ma'^*"^ Protestant 
Subjects Decenting from the Church of England from the 
Penaltyes of Cert Lawes; And by another Act made in 
the 7'^ and 8"^*" years of the Reigne of his present Ma""^ 
Intituled An Act that the Solemn Affirmacon or Declar 
of the people called Quakers shall be Accepted instead of 
an oath in the Usual forme, Shall have the full benefitt of 
all Exemptions ease and Indulgence by the said Acts 
granted and allowed according to the True intent and 
meaning of the s'' Acts they respectively confirming 
themselves in theire meeting and Assembling. 

[Jurisdiction of local Justices of Peace.] 

And all other things to the ord' and rules Enjoined 
by the said Acts with this Alteracon only that the severall 
things required or appointed by the s'^ Acts to be done 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 93 

by or at the Gen^^ or Quarter Session of the Peace or any 
other Court whatsoever or by Two or to any one single 
Justice of the Peace shall be done by to and at the re- 
spective County Courts of this Province within whose 
Jurisdiction the matter shall fall out ; and before to or by 
the Justices of the same. 

[Dissenters' places of worship to be registered.] 

And that the severall places used for Religious wor- 
sh"'' by any such Decenting Congregacon or Assembly 
shall be Certified unto and Register'd at the s'' County 
Court, in the same maner, as is by the said first men- 
coned Act appointed to be done, To the Bishop of the 
Diocesse, The Arch Deacon of the Arch Deaconary, and the 
Justices of the Peace At theire generall or Quarter Sessions. 

[Repeal of Act of 1700.] 

Provided alsoe and 

XIII. Be it further Enacted, that one Act made at a 
Gen" Assembly, begun and held at the Port of Annapolis 
the 26"*^ day of Aprill 1700 Intituled an Act for the Ser- 
vice of Almighty God, and Establishm"^ of Religion in 
this Province According to the Church of England, &c 
Bee and is hereby repealed and made voyd." 

"The Governor endorsed the bill in these words viz" 
"On behalfe of his most Sacred Maj'''^ King William the 
Third &c I will these to be Laws' 

N. Blakiston"! 

March 25th, 1702.= 

> Arch. \Id., Vol. 24. p. 264. 

' It is apparent that the news of the death of King William which occurred 
on the 8th of March had not reached the Province of Maryland at the time this 
bill was passed. 



94 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

"Which being done his Ex^^ was pleased to Seale 

them with the Broad Seale of this Province , 

Thereupon M'. Speaker and the rest of the Members were 
prorogued (until 25th of April) accordingly. 

Soe ended the Second Sessions of the Assembly on 
Wednesday the 25^ day of March Anno Dni. 1702 and in 
the 1 4"^ yeare of the Reigne of our Sovereigne Lord Wil- 
liam the third by the Grace of God of Engl'^ Scotl'* 
France and Ireland King defender of the faith, 6/" 

W. Taylard, 

Clk: house Dell. "1 



'Arch. Md., Vol. 24, p. 264. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND P5 

VALIDITY OF THE ACT OF 1702 

"At the Court of S' James' 

IS'^ January 1702/3 

Present the Queen's Maj'"^ in Councell 

Whereas — By Powers granted under the Great Seal of 
England, the Governor, Council and Assembly of 
her Maj"^' Province of Maryland have been 
authorized and impowered to constitute and 
ordaine Laws, Statutes and Ordinaries which 
are to be in force until her Maj"*^ pleasure shall 
be signified to the Contrary, and 

Whereas — Pursuant to the said powers an Act has been 
lately passed by the Governor, Council and As- 
sembly of the said Province entitled 'An Act for 
the Establishment of Religious Worship in this 
Province according to the Church of England 
and for the Maintenance of Ministers' which said 
Act having, upon the perusal of the Lords 
Com" of Trade and Plantation been p'scribed 
by her Maj'"^ for her approbation of this Board. 

Her Maj''^ with the advice of her Governor and Council is 
pleased to declare her approbation of the same. 

Pursuant to her Maj''" pleasure herein signified, the said 
Law is hereby confirmed and finally enacted and 
ratified accordingly. 

John Povey" 
[Deputy Secretary of the Plantation Office] 

• Vestry Proceedings, All Saints Parish, Calvert County. 



96 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

"Maryland s s 

By the Honorable Presid"' & Councell 

22"'' June 1703 

Ordered that her Maj"" most Sacred Maj"" 
Royall Assent to the Act of Religion (as above) 
be published by the severall Minist' at the 
parish Churches the First Tuesday in August. 
Signed p order 
W" Bladen 
Clk Council. 

At A Vestry Meeting 

3^^ August 1703 

This day according to the Order of the President 
and Council was published her Maj''" Royall 
Assent to the Act of Religion. The vestry 
being present. M"' Thos. Cockshutt, M' W*" 
Dalrumple, M' James Heigh, M' Ed*- Baleter 
and M' Joseph Hall."^ 



' Vestry Proceedings, All Saints Parish, Calvert County. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLANH ^7 

BASIS OF CLAIM THAT THIS ACT WAS VOID 
"The following facts may be premised as the case — 
King William deceased on the 8'*^ of March 1701/2; the 
assembly, which was therefore called in the usual manner 
met on the 16'*" of the same month, and during its sitting 
passed the Act in question, without the possibility of 
knowing, that such an event had taken place. Governor 
Seymour the successor of Governor Blackistone, who 
summoned the assembly upon his arrival, on the 11'^ of 
April, 1704, found the same assembly existing, that had 
been called, by his predecessor, in the name of King Wil- 
liam; so that there were three several seccessions of 
assembly held, after the demise of King William, to wit, 
in June 1702, in October 1703, and in April 1704."' 

"The Act of 1701/2 under which the claim was pre- 
ferred was passed by a House of Delegates chosen under 
writs of election issued the name of King William, the 
Government [of Maryland] being then in the hands of 
the Crown. A few days after the decease of this King 
and without any fresh writs of election or summons, the 
Assembly was convened and the Act in question was passed. 
It was now [1772] contended that by the death of the king 
that Assembly was dissolved ; and that this Act being passed 
thereafter, was absolutely void, and not susceptible of con- 
firmationby subsequent acts merely presuming its existence. 
The opinions of Mr. Hollyday and Mr. Dulany, 
sustaining the validity of the Act; and those of Mr. Paca 
and Mr. Chase in opposition to it, have been preserved 
and are remarkable for their ingenious views and pro- 
found investigations."^ 

The American Revolution settled the controversy over the 
validity of the Act of 1702 before it reached the courts. 

' Chalmers, Opinions of Eminent Lawyers, p. 303. 
2 McMahon, History of Maryland, p. 399. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 



DISPOSITION OF "FORTY PER POLL." 

"At a Council held at the Port of Annapolis 
Friday, March 20^ 1702. 

Present 

His Excellency the Governour, (Nathaniel Blackiston) 

Col. John Addison Col. Edw"^ Lloyd 

Thomas Brooke, Esq' Lt. Col. W" Holland 

Col. John Courts James Saunders E^q' 

And this Board being of opinion that all Tob° raised 
by the 40 "^ p. Poll whilst no incumbent in the Parish and 
lodged in the Vestry's Hands is not the right of any minister 
who are only by law entituled to that part of the 40 "'■ p. 
Poll proportionable to such Time they shall officiate in 
their respective Parishes, and that such Tob° ought to be 
applyed by the Vestry for the use of the Parish."^ 



1 Arch. Md.. Vol. 24, p. 217. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 99 

DISPOSITION OF TOBACCO TAX^ 

Repair Churches, Buy Land, Stock for Glebes, etc. 

Act of 1704 

Title. 

"An Act to Declare how the forty pounds of Tobacco 
p. poll in such Parishes where there is no Incumbent shall 
be disposed of. 

[Preamble.] 

Whereas by an Act of Assembly made at a Generall 
Assembly begun and held at the Port, of Annapolis the 
twenty sixth day of April One thousand Seven hundred and 
two Entituled an Act for the Service of AllmightyGod and 
Establishment of Religion in this Province according to the 
Church of England, ^ic" There is no provision made where 
there is a Vacancy or no Incumbent in a Parish how or to 
what use the forty pounds of tobacco p. Poll shall be 
Applyed. 

Therefore the Burgesses and Delegates of this present 
Generall Assembly pray that it may be Enacted and — 

[Vestrymen to have control.] 

I. Be it Enacted by the Queens most excellent Ma- 
jesty by and with the advice and Consent of her Majesty's 
Governour Councill and Assembly of this Province and the 
authority of the same. That what tobacco of the s'^ forty 
p. poll hath, is or shall become due in any Parish where 
there is hath or shall be no incumbent the said tobacco 
shall be Employed and applyed to and for the uses follow- 
ing (that is to say) by the Vestrymen of each respective 
Parish — 

' Arch. Md.. Vol. 24, p. 420. 



100 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

[Vestrymen to use it for repairing Churches, etc.] 

• — who are hereby Empowered to dispose thereof for 
and toward the repairing such Churches as are all ready 
built finishing and Compleating the insides thereof as the 
said Vestrymen shall think fitt or for the purchasing a 
Pulpit Cloth Cushion bible or Common Prayer book or 
Church Plate for the use of the said Church 

[Confirming Vestry's Action.] 

And of any Vestry hath already applyed or laid out 
the said Tobacco or any part thereof to the uses aforesaid 
such application or disposals is hereby Confirmed. 

[To build new Churches.] 

II. And be it further Enacted by the Authority afore- 
said by and with the Advice and Consent af"^ that in 
Any Parish where the Church is old or so out of repaire 
as not fitt to be made use of and shall be so adjudged by 
the Vestrymen of such Parish It shall and may be Law- 
full to and for such Vestrymen to apply the said forty 
pounds of tobacco p. poll for the building of a new one — 

[Empower the Vestrymen to buy land.] 

And it hath or shall so happen by reason of a Long 
Vacancy in such Parish that there shall be no occassion to 
apply the said Tobacco to the uses afd or of any such to- 
bacco after such application hath or shall remaine in the 
hands of the Vestry The Vestry s'' are hereby directed and 
Empowered to purchase therewith either a plantation with 
a Tract of Land or a Certaine Tract of Land as near and 
contiguous to the Churche belonging to such Parishes as 
may be (and if there be no Church in such Parishes then to 
purchase a tract of Land as may be most Convenient for 
the Inhabitants thereof and build a Church thereon) 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 101 

[Property to be known as Glebe.] 

Which Plantation or Land shall be and forever remaine 
as a Glebe to the use of the ministers of such Parish for the 
time being who shall be Lawfully inducted and appointed 
according to the usage of the Church of England and this 
Province. 

[Surplus Tobacco to be used for "Stocking" the Glebe.] 

And if there shall happen in any Parish to be Tobacco 
over and above answering the uses aforesaid it shall be 
Employed to the Improvement and Stocking such Glebe as 
the Vestry Shall Judge most Proper. 

[Sheriffs fees for collecting the "forty p. poll."] 

And forasmuch as by the said recited act there is 
nothing Allowed to the Sheriffe for Collecting the said 
forty pounds of Tobacco p. poll and paying the same to the 
incumbent or Vestry — ■ 

III. Bee it Enacted by the Authority af'^ that the 
Sheriffs of each respective County shall have allowed him 
or them, out of the said forty pounds of tobacco per poll 
which they shall pay to such Vestry or incumbent, five 
pounds of Tobacco p. cent for Collecting and Paying the 
same and no more, any Law Statute or usage to the Con- 
trary notwithstanding. 

May the 2^ 1704 May the 2^ 1704 

Read and Assented to by Read and Assented to by 

the house of Delegates her Maj'*'^ hon'''^ Councill 
W. Taylard W. Bladen 

Clk House Del. CI. Council. 



102 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

May the third Seventeen hundred and four 

On behalf of her most sacred Majesty Anne by the 
Grace of God of England Scotland France and Ireland and 
the Dominions thereunto belonging Queen Defender of the 
faith, &c^ 

I will this to be a law. 

Jo. Seymour f 'with the ^ 

J Great Seal of [ 

1 Maryland 

Sealed.' " 



PART VI. 

COUNTIES, PARISHES, HUNDREDS, CHURCHES 
VESTRYMEN AND MINISTERS, ETC. 



PARISHES 

"In England the parish may be regarded as essen- 
tially an Ecclesiastical institution being defined as the 
township or cluster of towns which was assigned to the 
ministration of a single priest, etc. 

The beginnings of the parochial system are attributed 
to Theodore of Tarsus who was Archbishop of Canterbury 
toward the close of the seventh century .... The 
two systems, the parish and the township, have existed for 
more than a thousand years side by side, identical in area 
and administered by the same persons and yet separate in 
character and machinery. 

The boundaries of the old ecclesiastical parishes are 
usually identical with those of the township or townships 
comprised within its precinct .... many parishes 
contain more than one township."^ 

HUNDREDS 

The work of dividing the counties into parishes by the 
Justices and Freeholders showed that they followed the 
lines of the hundreds or districts of the counties. Accord- 
ing to Webster's Dictionary a "hundred" is a division of a 
county supposed to contain a hundred families. 

"The origin of these divisions (lathe, soke, tithing, 
hundreds, etc.) is generally ascribed to the creative genius 
of Alfred [The Great, 849-901] who, according to the popu- 
lar theory, divided the country into counties, the county 
into hundreds, and the hundreds into tithings, or towns. "^ 

' Encycl. Brit.. Vol. 18, p. 295 (Qth Ed.). 
2 Encycl. Brit., Vol. 12, p. 360 (9th Ed.). 

105 



106 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

CHURCHES STANDING BEFORE THE 
ESTABLISHMENT 

"Before 1691 there were the following Churches^ 

County Church Minister 

St. Mary's Trinity Rev. Mr. Davis 

do St. George's do 

do St. Paul's do 

Charles Christ Rev. Mr. Moore 

do Portobacco do 

Calvert Christ Rev. Mr. Turling 

do All Faith's do 

do St. Paul's do 

Baltimore St. George's 

do St. John's 

Cecil North Sassafras Rev. Mr. Vander- 

bush 
do South Sassafras do 

Kent Kent Island 

do St. Paul's 

Talbot St. Luke's Rev. Mr. Lillings- 

ton 
do St. Paul's do 

do Wye Revs. Clayland and 

Leach 

Dorchester Dorchester [Trinity] Rev. Mr. Huett 

Somerset All Saints Monii Rev. Mr. Huett 

Anne Arundel Herring Creek .^ 

do All Hallows " 

' From the manuscript of the late Dr. Ethan Allen, Protestant Episcopal 
clergyman, for many years Historiographer of the Diocese of Maryland, Photo- 
stat Copy, p. 15. 




PROPOSED SEAL FOR THE COL^NTIES OF H^E PRO\ INCE OF MARYLAND 

Authorized 1692. Arch. Md.. Vol. 13, f. 290 and Vol. 8, f. 383. It is not now known 
that anv of these seals were made. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 107 

COUNTIES OF MARYLAND— 1692' 

The Provincial Assembly resolved after debate that the 
members from the Counties take "precedency"- as follows: 

"City of S' Maryes 

1. S' Maryes County 6. Baltemore County 

2. Kent " 7. Talbott 

3. Ann Arundall " 8. Sumersett 

4. Calvart " 9. Dorchester 

5. Charles " 10. Cecill 

There were protests made against this order by the 
residents of Kent County. They wanted to be recognized 
as the oldest county of the Province. Among other protests 
one was presented to the Assembly on Oct. 15th, 1695, and 
Mr. Matthew Erexon (Eareckson), an inhabitant of the 
"Isle of Kent" was allowed to speak on its merits.^ The 
official recognition of this petition and the ruling of the 
Council appears as follows: 

"Council Chamber May 2'' 1696^ 

Kent Island petition produced and Ordered sent down [to 
the Lower House] with the following endorsement, viz' — 

By His Excell'ncy the Gov"' and Council &c. Upon 
reading the within Petition it was Ordered that the same be 
sent down but with this note that His ExcelP^ will in no 
wise Assent to any Alteration contrary to the late Act 
and that whereas it is insisted upon that they [the In- 
habitants of the Isle of Kent] are the most antient County, 
it is Observed that the first People that Inhabited the same 
did not acknowledge themselves Belonging to this Province 
and therefore are not the most antient County." 

' The arrangement of the counties is in accordance with the date of their 
erection. Under this plan the parishes are given numbers in accordance with 
those of the county in which they were erected. 

2 Arch. .VId., Vol. 13, p. 350. 

3 Arch. Md., Vol. 19, p. 251. 
* Arch. Md., Vol. 19, p. 300. 



108 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 





THE PARISHES ERECTED IN 1692-1693 




County 


Parish 


I. 


St. Mary's 


1. William and Mary 

2. King and Queen 


2. 


Kent 


3. Kent Island or Christ Church 

4. St. Paul's 


3. 


Anne Arundel 


5. Herring Creek or St. James 

6. South River or All Hallows 

7. Middle Neck or St. Ann's 

8. Broad Neck or Westminster 


4. 


Calvert 


9. Christ Church 

10. All Saints 

11. St. Paul's 

12. All Faiths 


5. 


Charles 


13. William and Mary or Pickawaxon 

14. Port Tobacco 

15. Nanjemy or Durham 

16. Piscataway or St. John's 


6. 


Baltimore 


17. Patapsco or St. Paul's 

18. St. John's or Copley 

19. St. George's 


7. 


Talbot 


20. St. Paul's 

21. St. Peter's 

22. St. Michael's 


8. 


Somerset 


23. Somerset 

24. Coventry 

25. Stepney 

26. Snow Hill or All Hallows 


9. 


Dorchester 


27. Great Choptank 

28. Dorchester 


10. 


Cecil 


29. So. Sassafrax or Shrewsbury 

30. No. Sassafrax or St. Stephen's 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 109 

I have not been able to find a record of St. Andrew's 
Parish having been laid out in 1692 though the Fulham 
papers are said to mention it as one of the original 
parishes of the Province of Maryland. In 1744 a St. An- 
drew's Parish was erected in St. Mary's County. It would 
seem probable that it would have been erected in Cecil 
County had all of the territory of that County been taken 
into consideration. North Sassafras Parish, in Cecil 
County, apparently did not cover all of the part of the 
county which lay north of the Sassafras River at that 
time, 1692. 



no THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

ST. MARY'S COUNTY 

Named in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary, 
the landing in St. Mary's of the Colonists 
having been made on the Feast of the An- 
nunciation, March 25th, 1634. 

ST. MARY'S COUNTY (erected 1637) bounds began at 
Point Lookout thence with the Potomac river 
No. 1 to the southern boundary of Charles County, 
then in an easterly direction to a line parallel- 
ing the 'Three Notched Road," then the line ran to Pyne 
Hill creek or river, then down this creek to the Chesapeake 
bay and thence to the place of beginning. It will be ob- 
served that St. Mary's county did not extend to the Patux- 
ent river; the "Three Notched Road" practically divided 
it from Calvert county on the north. 

Shortly after the "Establishment" the lines were 
changed (1695), and are described in the Assembly records' 
as follows: "St. Mary's county Bounds begin on the lower 
side of Birds [now Budd's] creek on the Potomock river and 
so runne to the lower side of Indian creek on Potuxent 
river — , and that the divisions be straight lines from the 
heads of the said creekes." 

"S' MARIES COUNTY is divided into Ten Hundreds 
besides the City, viz' — 

Resurrection 
S"^ Maries 
New Town 
Choptico 
S^ Michaells 
St. Georges 

» Arch. Md.. Vol. 23. p. 23 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 111 

S' Inego's 
S'^ Clements 
Harvy 

and 
Poplar Hill ( 

S' Maries City."^ j 

"S' MARIES COUNTY COURT to be kept in S' Maries 
City and that the State House there be for a Court 
house and Church the Act to take place on the 23*^ of 
April next [1695] being S' Georges day."^ 

■"S' MARIES COUNTY is divided into two Parishes, and 
that the same be divided between New Town hun- 
dred and Clements hundred by M' Langworths 
Branch [now St. Clements river] which leads to the 
Petuxant main road and the s'^ branch divides the 
said hundreds & parishes the Lower whereof being 
called by the Name of William and Mary Parish 
and the Upper by the Name of King and Queen 
Parish."^ 

" It was by the Justices and Freeholders of the 
said county — met at New Town the day and year 
above said — 5^^ day of September 1692." 

IN THE REPORT to the Assembly in 1694, July 30th, we 
find the following: — 

"SAINT MARIES COUNTY is divided into two parishes 
which both contain about One thousand Tythables. 

1 Church built at S' Georges. 

1 Church to be built near Cap"^ Good's. 
No minister inducted. 

A Glebe at St. Georges of 300 Acres Rented 
at 2000 '^' of tobacco per Annum. "^ 

'Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 17. 

2 Arch. Md., Vol. 19, p. 159. 

3 Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 17. 

* Arch. Md., Vol. 20, p. 106. 



112 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

WILLIAM AND MARY PARISH embraced all that 
part of St. Mary's County lying between St. 
No, 1 Clement's bay and Point Lookout on the 
Chesapeake bay. Its boundaries were "the 
Potomac river, St. Clement's bay and river, the Calvert 
County boundary line, [then near the Three Notched road] 
to Pine Hill creek and with Pine Hill creek to the Ches- 
apeake, thence down the Chesapeake bay to Point Lookout."^ 

"VESTRYMEN for William and Mary Parish chosen, 
&"" viz' 
M'' Kenelm Cheseldyne 
Maj. John Campbell 
M' Robert Mason 
M' John Watson 
M"" John Llewellin 
M' Thomas Beale"^ 

THE FIRST CHURCH in this parish was St. George's 
Church built, about 1642, at Poplar Hill.^ It was the 
second Protestant church built in the Province. 

MR. THOMAS DAVIES was lay reader in 1691." 

Mr. Crawford officiated in 1694,^ no 

minister having been inducted. The Rev. Benjamin 
Nobbes was rector from 1696 to 1700.*^ 



' Chronicles of Colonial Maryland, p. 204. 

2 Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 17 

' Chronicles of Colonial Maryland, p. 205. 

'Allen Ms., p. 15. 

'Arch. Md., Vol. 20, p. 106. 

• B. C. Steiner, Md. Hist. Mag., Vol. 12, p. 




'i< 







CHRIST, BUILT 1737 

Chaptico, St. Mary's County 

This church succeeds the one built in 1642 by Thomas Gerrard. He presented the 
congregation that same year with a glebe. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 113 

KING AND QUEEN PARISH extended from St. Clements 

bay and river to the extreme end of St. 

No. 2 Mary's county as then defined and which 

embraced within its limits the territory known 

as Newport Hundred, now part of Charles County. 

Its boundaries were St. Clements bay and "run" 
[then known as "Mr. Langworth's Branch"], the Calvert 
County line [near the "Three Notched Road"] to the upper 
extremity of Newport Hundred, thence to the headwaters 
of Wicomico river [now Zachia's swamp] and with the Wi- 
comico river and the Potomac river to the beginning. 

'•VESTRYMEN for King & Queen Parish Chosen & ^^ 
Viz^— 
Col. Nehemiah Blackiston 
Cap' John Cood 
M' Richard Clouds 
Cap' John Dent 
M' Philip Brisco 
M' Jn° Barecraft.i 

THE FIRST CHURCH was probably "Newport 
Church" then located west of the center of the 
parish near Newport. The Episcopal Church of St. 
Clements manor on St. Pauls" creek, erected in 1642, 
was the third Protestant church built by the Col- 
onists. A Chapel built prior to 1692 on Church 
"run," stood at Wicomico between Plowden's Wharf 
and Bluff Point.- "The church for King & Queen 
parish in St. Mary's County is built at Wicomico 
on land belonging 1696 to Capt. Gerrard Slye."^ 

"REV. MR. THOS. DAVIS minister prior to 1691."^ 
The Rev. Christopher Platts was rector of this 
parish in 1696-1700.^ 

» Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 18. 

- Chronicles of Colonial Maryland, Thomas. 

' Arch. Md., Vol. 20, p. 585, and Md. Cal. of Wills, Vol. I, p. 48. 

* Allen Ms. p. 1 5 

« B. C. Steiner, Md. Hist. Magazine, Vol. 12. p. 118. 



114 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

KENT COUNTY 

Named for the English county of Kent. 
KENT COUNTY'S (erected 1642) boundaries went through 
many changes prior to the "Establishment" 

No. 2 and it may prove of interest to state here the 
most important ones. 

The Isle of Kent had once comprised the whole of the 
Eastern Shore of the Province north of the Choptank river 
and in his "History of Maryland" McMahon says "The 
subdivision called the Isle of Kent being in its origin, as 
was St. Mary's, the name of an undefined settlement, the 
County of Kent received its definite limits from the erec- 
tion of other counties around it."' 

The County of Kent comprised at successive times 
parts of Baltimore and Cecil counties and received its 
present limits or bounds in 1706. The boundaries in 1692 
of Kent county comprised the whole of Kent Island and 
that portion of the present county that lies south of a line 
that ran from "Buck Neck," at the head of Worton creek, 
to some point on Morgan's creek. 

The land records of Baltimore county prior to the erec- 
tion (in 1674) of Cecil county indicate that the southern 
bounds of Baltimore county were as stated in the above 
paragraph. 

Kent's boundaries became confused by the proclama- 
tion erecting Cecil county, and protests from the inhabi- 
tants of the lower part of Kent county brought forth another 
proclamation as follows: "Forasmuch as by a late Procla- 
mation bearing date the sixth day of this instant June some 
Additions were made to several counties upon the division 
of that of Baltimore County and by the proclamation it 
was then declared that Swan Point downe to Hell point on 

' McMahon, Hist, of Md,, p. 82. 



t^ o <^ ^ ?: o jn 

CprUJ &^LJJ 

r; cT;'-:r _ ^ .. 
c CO a-5 P clC 

*" Ia ra tj - ra rj 
^ oj::_ uJC a 




THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 115 

Chester River should be and remaine for the future belong- 
ing to that Eastern side of the Bay lately erected and called 
by the name of Cecill County upon further consideration 
hereof it is thought most necessary that so much of the 
Eastern side as was formerly added to Kent County doe 
still remaine and belong to the said County as afore not- 
withstanding that part of the said proclamation, in witness 
whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the lesser 
scale of this Province to be hereunto affixed the IQ'^ day 
of June in the 42"'^ Yeare of the Dominion of Cecilius, &c. 
Annoq Dmi 1674 

"To all whom these may Concern"' 

"KENT COUNTY is divided into Seven Hundreds viz'— 
Town Hundred Island Hundred 

Chester River Lower " Eastern Neck 

Langfords Bay " " Chester Upper 

Swann Creek " "* 

"KENT COUNTY has 2 parishes 

1 Church built (Kent Island) 
another laid out to be built; but noe min- 
ister"^ 
Report to Assembly July 30th, 1694. 

"KENT COUNTY is divided into two parishes viz' — 

Kent Island &i S" Paul's Parish. Kent Island Parish 
is bounded Natureally within its Self. S' Paul's 
Parish consists of the Rest of the County."^ 

THE COURT FOR KENT was held in the house of the 
prominent freeholders until 1680 at which time a 
Court House was built in the town of New 
Yarmouth on Gray's Inn Creek. In 1696 it was 
abandoned and a Court House built on the present 
site at Chestertown.^ 

' Arch. Md., Vol. 15, p. 41. (Signed by Charles Calvert.) 

2 Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 25. 

3 Arch. .Md., Vol. 20, p. 107. 
< Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 21. 
'Arch. Md., Vol. 19, p. 376. 



116 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

"KENT ISLAND PARISH is bounded Natureally within 

it Self."^ The Chesapeake bay and the Ches- 

No. 3 ter river washed its northern and western 

shores. Eastern bay and the "Narrows" 

divided it from the main land on the east and south. This 

parish was also known as Christ Church Parish in 1698.^ 

"VESTRYMEN for the s'' Parish Chosen S^^ viz' 
M' John Coppage 
Coll. W"" Laurence 
M' Philip Conner 
M' Alexander Walkers 
M' Edward James 
M' Valentine Southern"^ 

BROAD CREEK CHURCH was erected on Kent Island in 
1652 according to the various authorities who have 
written of this island parish. The old site is at the 
head of Broad creek and it is said that the water in 
the creek was deep enough at the time the church 
was built to allow boats to land at its doors. It is 
near the place supposed to have been selected by 
Cleyborn for the holding of divine services when "he 
brought the Rev. Mr. Richard James to the Island 
in 1631."^ 

Anthony Workman^ left £50 on Sept. 6th, 1708, 
' ' for erecting a Church in Christ Church Parish, Kent. 



'Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 21. 

2 Maryland Calendar Wills, Vol. 3, p. 21. 

3 Arch. Md.. Vol. 23, p. 21. 

■• Claiborne and Kent Island in Maryland History by DeCoursey W. Thorn. 
> Md. Calendar of Wills, Vol. I, p. 1 15. 




CHRIST 

Stevensnille, Kent Island 
This is the successor of the church that was built on Broad Creek about 1652. the 
ruins of which are about one mile south of Stevensville. Twenty-one years prior to the 
building of the old church the Re\erend Richard James had preached to the settlers 
on the " Isle of Kent." 




1^. 



— - j: c 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 117 

ST. PAUL'S PARISH "consists of the rest of the County."^ 

The Chesapeake bay from Worton creek south 

No. 4 to the Chester river bounded the parish on the 

west, the Chester river also bounded it on the 

south and east. The northern line ran from Morgan's creek, a 

branch of the Chester river, to the head waters of Churn 

creek. - 

•'VESTRYMEN chosen for the s'' Parish & C" viz^— 

M' William Frisby 

M"' Michael Miller 

M' Hans Hanson 

M' Charles Tilden 

M' Thomas Smyth 

M' Simon Wilmore" 
ST. PAUL'S CHURCH is the parish church and stands 

at the head of Dunn's creek, the Northwest branch of 

Langford's bay, amid a grove of giant oaks. The 

church was completed in 1713. 
THE REV. STEPHEN BORDLEY was sent in 1697 to the 

parish to take up the work that had been begun by the 

Rev.Mr. Lawrence Vanderbush, the first minister. Mr. 

Vanderbush went to St. Paul's in September, 1693 and 

not only preached in this parish but also held services in 

South Sassafras or Shrewsbury parish. This latter 

parish was then within the bounds of Cecil county. 

The Rev. Stephen Bordley incumbent 1696.^ 

By an Act of the Assembly, passed April 4th, 1 697, the division line between 
this and Shrewsbury parish was determined and a commission appointed to run 
the line and make a report to the Assembly. The bounds of St. Paul's parish were 
changed but little when the line was finally run in 1698; the commission finished 
its work that year. The following is a partial copy of the Act: "That from and 
after the tenth of June 1698 all that land and inhabitants in Chester river abo\e 
the riding over of a branch of Morgan's Creek on the east side of William Bate- 
man's house and on the north side of a line drawn from the riding over of the 
sd branch to the head of a branch of a Creek issueing out of the Bay called Churn 
Creek, be Always taken and reputed and be in Shrewsbury parish and All the land 
on the South side of the sd Churn Creek and Branch and Division line down the 
Bay to the extent of CECIL COUNTY be added to St. Paul's parish in KENT 
COUNTY on the North side of Chester River and Always to be Reputed in St. 
Paul's Parish anv Law, Custom or Usage to the contrary Notwithstanding." 

' Arch. Md'., Vol. 23, p. 21. 

2 Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 21. 

' B. C. Steiner in Md. Hist. Magazine, Vol. 12, p. 119. 



118 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 



ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY 

Named for Lady Anne Arundel, the wife of 
Cecilius Calvert, second Lord Baltimore. 

ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY'S (erected 1650) southern 
boundary was a "line from Herring Creek to 

No. 3 the head of Patuxant River. "^ 

The Chesapeake bay was the eastern 
boundary and according to the Act of Assembly of 1722, 
Chap. No. 3, the division between Westminster parish in 
Anne Arundel and the parish of St. Paul's in Baltimore 
county apparently .ran from the Chesapeake bay at a 
point about equidistant from the Magothy river and the 
mouth of Bodkin creek to about where the present village 
of Elkridge is situated. This line followed the ridge be- 
tween the Patapsco and Magothy rivers. How long this 
line had served to divide the two parishes is not known. 

The following official record shows that part of Anne 
Arundel belonged to Baltimore county in 1694: 

"Petition of the Inhabitants Situated upon the South 
Side of the Patapsco River praying that they may be Re- 
joyned to the County of Ann Arrundell as formerly they 
were. Which being Read, Ordered that the said peticon be 
sent to the house of Assembly for their considercon."' 

"By the Assembly, Oct., y^ 1694. 

The within Petition Read & Considered, Voted whether 
the South Side of Patapsco River be added to the County 
of Ann Arrundell or Remaine still as it is. Carried by 
Majority of votes to Remaine as it is."^ 

'Arch. Md., Vol. 19, p. 318. 
2 Arch. K'ld , Vol. 19, p. 31. 
' Arch. Md., Vol. 19, p 69. 




M \ I I-. I It H 
Annapolis, Anne Arundel Colntv 
Here many of the laws affecting the early Church in the Province were enacted. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 119 

"ANN ARRUNDEL COUNTY is divided into Six Hun- 
dreds viz"^ 

1. Town Neck Hundred 

2. Middle Neck " 

3. Broad " 

4. South River 

5. West •' ;; 

6. Herring Creek " "' 

"ANN ARRUNDEL COUNTY is Divided into Four 
Parishes viz' — 
Herring Creek Parish 
South River 
Middle Neck 
Broad Neck " "^ 

IN THE REPORT to the Assembly on July 30th, 1694, 
Anne Arundel was said to contain : 
"4 Parishes laid out 
but noe churches built, 
nor noe Minister."^ 

THE PARISHES in Anne Arundel county were divided by 
the rivers that emptied into the Chesapeake with the 
exception of Broad Neck, or Westminster, parish on 
its northern side. This parish was divided from St. 
Pauls parish in Baltimore county as described on 
page 138 of this book. Their western boundaries 
being the line run north from the branch of Matta- 
woman creek to the northern limits of the Province, 
as called for in naming the bounds of Piscataway 
parish in Charles county.^ 

THE COURT HOUSE for Anne Arundel county was 
built at Annapolis. 

'Arch. i\!d., Vol. 23, p. 25. 

'Arch. \ld.. Vol. 23, p. 19. 

5 Arch. Md., Vol. 20. p. 107. 

* See description Piscataway Parish. Page 135 



120 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

"HERRING CREEK PARISH consists of Herring Creek 
Hundred and the major part of West River 
No. 5 Hundred."^ 

""Beginning at ye Southmost bounds of 
South River Parish and bounding on ye East with ye bay 
of Chesapeake lieing down southerly to ye creeke called 
Fishing Creek then west with ye Said creeke to ye bounds 
of Ann Arundel and Calvert Countys to Lyons Creek then 
with the said creeke to Potuxent then up the said river to 
ye land called White Plaines to the Southernmost bounds 
of South River Parish"'- and to the beginning. 

"VESTRYMEN chosen for Herring Creek Parish, viz' — 
Thomas Tench Esq' 
M' Seth Biggs 
Cap' William Holland 
Cap' Robert Lockwood 
M' James Rigbey 
M' Nicholas Perret."^ (Turrett?) 

HERRING CREEK (now known as St. James") CHURCH 
was built in 1765. The records of the parish go back 
to 1695.^ When the vestry assumed charge of the 
parish they found an old church already standing. 
It was the church of the original Herring Creek 
Parish. "'The vestry set about building a new edifice, 
the contract for which was given out in 1695."'^ 

THE FIRST RECTOR of the parish was the Rev. Henry 
Hall. He served from 1695 until his death in 1721. 
He was regularly inducted May 7th 1698. Joseph 
Tilley was lay reader in 1696 and 1697.'' 

' Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. IQ. 

2 Church Life in Colonial Maryland, p. 63. 

3 Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 19. 

* Old Brick Churches, Ridgely. 

' Church Life in Colonial Maryland, Gambrall, p. 68 &257 

« Allen Ms., p. 18. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 121 

"SOUTH RIVER PARISH consists of South River 
Hundred and a Small part of West River 
No. 6 Hundred."' 

"VESTRYMEN Chosen for South River Parish: 
Cap' Hen. Hanslope 
M' John Gresham 
M' William Roper 
M' Edw. Burgess 
M' Walter Phelps 
M' John Watkins."^ 

' "ALL HALLOWS CHURCH was built about 1 727, succeed- 
ing an earlier one which antedated the Establishment. 
The Rev. Duell Pead performed the rites of baptism 
in this neighborhood from 1682 to 1690."^ He 
preached by request a sermon, 1683, before the 
Provincial Assembly^ at St. Mary's City. 

THE REV. JOSEPH COLEBATCH served as first rector, 
beginning his work in 1695. He died in 1735.^ 



' Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 19. 
2 Arch. Md.. Vol. 23, p. 19. 
= Old Brick Churches. Ridgely 
* See page 7 of this book. 
' Allen Ms. 



122 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

"MIDDLE NECK PARISH is Scituated betwixt South 
No. 7 River and Severn River. "^ 

"VESTRYMEN for the s'' Parish chosen &" Viz' 
M' Thos. Bland 
M^ Rich" Wharfield 
M' Laurence Draper 
M' Jacob Harness 
M' W'" Brown 
M' Corne. Howard."^ 

ST. ANN'S CHURCH was begun in 16% and finished in 
1699. Committee appointed by Governor Nicholson 
reported, October 2, 1696, that "We find by com- 
putation that the Building of the Church [St. 
Ann's] at Annapolis, according to the modell pre- 
scribed by his Excellency will not cost less than 
1200 pounds Sterling."^ Rebuilt in 1792 and again 
in 1858. 

THE REV. PEREGRINE CONY was rector of this 
parish from 1696 to 1698. The Rev. James Wootton 
was rector from 1706 to Apr. 19, 1710.* 



1 Arch. Md., Vol. 23. p. 19. 
«Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 20. 
«Arch. Md.. Vol. 19, p. 450. 
* Allen Ms. 




ST. AXN', BL'ILT lo-w. REBUILT 17^12 AND 1858. 
Middle Neck Parish. .Ann.apolis. .-Vnne .Arundel County 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 123 

"BROAD NECK PARISH is situated on the North Side 
of Severn River including Town Neck & 
No. 8 Broad Neck Hundreds."^ This is now known 
as Westminster Parish. 

"VESTRYMEN for the s^ Parish Chosen, &" viz' 
M' John Bennet 
M' William Hopkins 
M' Rob't Eagle 
M' George Eager 
M' Hugh Merrican 
M^ Edw. Fuller."^ 

THERE WAS A CHURCH prior to 1692 which stood on 
Severn Heights. It was destroyed by fire many 
years ago, the parish records perishing with the old 
church. A few tombstones and the stone founda- 
tion of the old church remain to mark the site. 

THE REV. EDWARD TOPP, JR., was the first rector. 
The Rev. Edward Topp, Jr. was incumbent in 1696.^ 
Dr. Ethan Allen'* states that he (Topp) was there in 
1698. He also states that the Rev. James Wootton 
was rector in 1705. 



1 Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 20. 

= Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 20. 

' B. C. Sceiner in Md. Hist. Magazine, Vol. 12, p. 119. 

* Allen Ms. p. 18. 



124 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 



CALVERT COUNTY 

Named for the Calvert Family. 

CALVERT COUNTY (erected 1650) in 1692 was divided 
from Anne Arundel County "by a line from 

No. 4 Herring Creek to the head of the Patuxent."^ 
On the east the county was bounded by 
the Cheapeake bay. On the south and west by Pyne Hill 
creek, then paralleling the Three Notched Road and then 
on through the woods to the "head of the Patuxent." 
Calvert County in 1692 comprised parts of the present 
counties of St. Marys, Charles, Prince Georges and Anne 
Arundel. 

"At that time the Governor decided to — 'Erect make 
and appoint both sides of the Putuxent river into one 
County by the name of calvert county bounded on the 
Southside with Pynehill River or Creek to the head thereof 
and from thence through the woods to the head of Putexent 
River being the Northerly bound of St. Maries County 
and bounded on the North Side with the Creek upon the 
Westerne Side of Chesapeake Bay called the Herring Creeke 
and from thence through the woods to the head of Putuxent 
River being the Southerly bound of Anne Arundel 
County '."2 

The two parishes of St. Paul's and All Faiths which 
were within the bounds of the old county were laid out on 
the west side of the Patuxent river. 

"CALVERT COUNTY is divided into Six Hundreds, 
viz' — 
Lyons Creeke Hundred Hunting Creek Hundred 
Lower End of Cliffs " Leonards Creek 

Upper End of Cliffs " Elton Head " "^ 

'Arch. Md., Vol. 23, 

^ The Counties of Maryland. Edward B. Mathews. 

'Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 23. 




ST. PALL 
Prince Frederick. Calvert County 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 125 

■•CALVERT COUNTY is divided into Four Parishes, 
viz' 
Christ Church 
All Saints 
St. Pauls 
All Faiths."' 

REPORT to the Assembly 

July 30, 1694. 

••CALVERT COUNTY has 

5 parishes laid out, 

3 whereof have Churches built, 

but noe Ministers."^ 

THE FIRST COURT HOUSE for Calvert was the 
church at Mt. Calvert. "Ordered that it be moved 
to the Burgesses for a law that the church at Mount 
CaK^ert be a Court house as well as a Church."^ 
Court House at Calvert Town 1694.'' 



'Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 18. 
2 Arch. Md., Vol. 20, p. 108. 
'Arch. Md., Vol. 20, p. 284. 
* Arch. Md., Vol. 20, p. 7b. 



126 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

"CHRIST CHURCH PARISH consists of these following 
Hundreds, viz' 
No. 9 Hunting Creek Hundred 
Leonards Creek do 

Eltonhead do 

Clifts Lower do "' 

"VESTRYMEN chosen at the time and place [Waring- 
town], viz': — 

M^ Rich'' Smith 

Cap' Thomas Clegate 

M' Henry Firnley 

M' Francis Maulden 

M' John Manning 

M' Samuel Holdsworth"^ 
"THE CHURCH being already built [1692], called by the 

name of Christ Church standing on one acre of land 

gave by Mr. Francis Mauldin for the same Intent 

and purpose out his tract of land called by the name 

of 'Prevent Danger'."^ Christ Church was rebuilt 

in 1735. 

THE FIRST MINISTER was the Rev. Dr. William Mul- 
lett who preached in this vicinity in 1684.* The 
Rev. Mr. Turling was preaching there in 1691.* 
The Rev. Richard Hill was the minister of Christ 
Church Parish serving there in 1694.*^ The Rev. 
Henry Hall was rector 1695-1697.' 

ONE SET OF THE LIBRARY books sent over to the 
Province by the Rev. Thomas Bray was sent to Mr. 
Richard Smith, a vestryman of Christ Church 
Parish.** 

'Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 18 
2 Arch. Md., Vol. 8, p. 472^ 
' Arch. Md., Vol. 8, p. 472. 
«Arch. Md., Vol. 17, 
'Allen Ms., p. 15. 
e Allen Ms., p. 68. 
'Allen Ms., p. 18. 
"Arch. Md., Vol. 20. p. 212. 




CI IRIS 1, BLILT ABOUT 1735 
Port Republic, Calvert County 




z ~- ^ 



■^ ^'^^ 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 127 

"ALL SAINTS PARISH consists of these two following 
Hundreds, viz' — 
No. 10 Lyons Creek Hundred and the 
Upper hundred of the Clifts.""' 

"VESTRYMEN for the s'' Parish chosen &'" viz' 
M' Walter Smith 
M' William Nichols 
M' William Turner 
M' John Scott 
M' John Leech Jun' 
M' John Hance."^ 

"AND A CHURCH to be built on one acre of land be- 
longing to Thomas Kemp on the cross Road of 
Severn Ridge Path and the road leading to Cox 
town to be called by the name of All Saints Church."^ 
"Petition of the vestrymen of the parish of 
All Saints in Calvert County sitting forth that they 
had taken care to build a church within their said 
parish and had sometimes on Sunday in an after- 
noon the benefit of M' Hull's preaching amongst 
them, etc."'* The present church was built in 1815. 

REV. HENRY HALL officiated in 1694.* "M' Andrew 
Geddes, layreader at All Saints October 8'^ 16%."^ 
Mr. Thomas Cockshutt was appointed minister 
in 1697. 

"AN ACC^ OF THE SIX SETS OF BOOKS the Bishop 
of London sent and where they are and to whom 
delivered to. To Walter Smith, vestryman of the 
church newly built in the freshes of the Patuxent 
where M' Hull intends to preach.."' 

1 Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 18. 

2 Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 18. • 

3 Arch. Md., Vol. 8, p. 473. 

* Arch. Md., Vol. 20, p. 277. 
' Allen Ms. p. 18. 
« Arch. Md., Vol. 20, p. 515. 
' Arch. Md., Vol. 20, p. 212. 



128 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

"ST. PAUL'S PARISH consists of the following bounds, 

viz' 
No. 1 1 From the Upper Part of M' Calvert 

hundred to the main branch of Swantsons 
Creek."' This was decided at a "Court held at Benedict 
Leonard Town the W*" of February, 1693." 

"VESTRYMEN for the s^ Parish chosen &^" viz' 
M' Thomas Brooke 
M' Thomas Greenfield 
M"' Thomas Hollyday 
M^ Rich'^ Charlet 
M' William Barton 
M' Sam' Magruther."^ [Magruder] 

"THE CHURCH for the same [parish] being already 
built [1692] at Charles Town called by the name of 
St. Paul's Church."^ 

REV. MR. TURLING was rector prior to 1691.* The 

encumbent in 1696 was Monsieur Morien.*^ Rev. 

Thos. Davis was rector in 1695 ,^ and the Rev. Robert 

Owen, from 1700 to 1710. 
QUEEN ANNE PARISH in 1704 was erected from this 

parish by Act of the Assembly, Chapter 96.' 

"ONE SET OF BOOKS to Thomas Hollyday vestry- 
man of the church at Mount Calvert for that 
church."* 



1 Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 18. 

'Arch. Md., Vol. 23. p. 18. 

3 Arch. Md., Vol. 8, p. 473. 

* Allen Ms. p. 15 

<■&. C. Steiner, Md. Hist. Mag., Vol. 12, p. 118. 

•Allen Ms., p. 18. 

' Bacon's Laws of Maryland. 

'Arch. Md., Vol. 20, p. 212. 




— ~ ^ 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE F^ROVINCE OF MARYLAND 129 

"ALL FAITHS PARISH consists of the following bounds, 
viz' 
No. 12 From the main branch of Swanson's 

Creek to the Lower part of Harvy Hundred."^ 

"VESTRYMEN for the s'' Parish chosen, &" viz' 
M' James Keech 
M' John Smith 

M' Rich'd Southern [Sotheron] 
M' John Gillam 
M' Charles Askue [Ashcom?] 
Cap' Rich'' Gardner."^ 

"THE CHURCH for the said Parish being already built 
standing by the fork of Trent Creek called by the 
name of All Faiths Church."^ The present church 
erected 1765. 

"REV. MR. TLTRLING minister prior to 1691. "^ The 
Rev. Thomas Davis went there as rector in 1695.^ 

TRINITY PARISH was erected out of part of this parish 
by Act of the Assembly, 1744, Chapter 14.*' 



'Arch. Md., Vol. 23. p. 18. 

2 Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 18. 

' Arch. Md., Vol. 8, p. 474. 

* Allen Ms. p. 15. 

'Allen Ms., p. 18. 

' Bacon's Laws of Maryland. 



130 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

CHARLES COUNTY 

Named for Charles Calvert, Third Lord Baltimore 

CHARLES COUNTY (erected 1658) in 1692 was bounded 
on the south and west by St. Mary's county 
No. 5 and the Potomac river, on the east by Calvert 
county and the north by the Maryland- 
Pennsylvania line. This may be more fully described by 
quoting from Thomas' Chronicles of Colonial Maryland: 
"Charles County bounds, the river Wicomico to its head and 
from the mouth of that River up the Potomac as high as the 
settlements extend and thence to the head of Wicomico." 
In describing the bounds of Piscataway Parish, the north- 
ernmost of the Charles county parishes. Dr. Allen gives 
practically all of the rest of the Province (not already cov- 
ered by the other nine counties) to this county thereby 
making it nearly equal in area to all the other counties 
combined. 

"CHARLES COUNTY is divided into Seven hundreds, 
viz*^ 

Lower part of William & Mary Parish Hundred. 

Upper 

East Side of Portobacco 

West " " 

Lower part of Nanjemy Parish 

Upper 

Upper " " King & Queen Parish^ 

Benedict Town being joyned to part of King Sz 
Queen Parish."^ 



' This Hundred counted as part of St. Mary's until 1716. Was also known 
as Newport Hundred. 

2 Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 24. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 13! 

■■CH7\RLES COUNTY is divided into four Parishes viz' 
William & Mary 
Port Tobacco 
Nanjemy 

Piscatoway, the Bounds whereof being artificial and 
Somewhat Long have Omitted to insert them here."' 

REPORT to the Assembly; 
July 30, 1694. 
"Charles County has 4 parishes laid out, viz' 

William and Mary, which has church built 
Portobacco, which has church built 
Nanjemie, which has church building 
Pescattaway, which has a church agreed for 
All want ministers, Vestry men in ex'ery 
Parish. "- 

THE COURT HOUSE for Charles County stood (1688) on 
the plantation of Thomas Hussey . " "Ordered that the 
Deputy Surveyor of Charles County survey and lay 
out the Lott or Acre of Land on which the Court 
House in the said County standeth including in the 
said Acre said Court House, Prison, Pillory and 
Stocks . . . . in no wise prejudiceing the 
dwelling or the other houses of the said Thomas 
Hussey near the said Court House adjacent . . 
April 5, 1688.^ 



' Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 18. 

' Arch. Md., Vol. 20, p. 109. and Md. Cal. of Wills, Vol. 1, p. 48. 

' Arch. Md., Vol. 8, p. 26. 



132 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

WILLIAM AND MARY PARISH bounds are given in the 
court records of Charles County. Dr. Allen's 
No. 13 Ms described them as follows: "Bounds of 
Pickawaxon Parish. Beginning at the plan- 
tation of John Courtes, Senior, and running with a straight 
line to the plantation formerly Samuel Cresseyes" Landing — 
the said courtes on the north of the said line and the said 
CRESSEYES on the southside of the said line and bounding 
with the Potomac River to the mouth of Wiccomomico 
River and so up the Wiccomomico to the head of said 
river and with the branch thereof to the said Courtes' 
Point. "^ 

"VESTRYMEN for William & Mary Parish chosen,&^^ viz' 
Co" John Courts 
M' Robert Yates 
M' William Hawton 
M' Henry Hardy 
M' John Wielder 
M^ William Harbert."^ 

CHRIST CHURCH. The first church was built prior to 
1691.=' 

DR. ETHAN ALLEN states that the Rev. Mr. Moore 
was rector of the parish in 1692 and 1693 and the 
Rev. George Tubman preached from 1695 to 1700.^ 



' Charles County Land Records, Lib. R., p. 459. 
'Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 19. 
5 Alien Ms., p. 15. 
'Allen Ms., p. 18. 




2- -^ 



'^T^ 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 133 

PORT TOBACCO PARISH is described in Dr. Allen's Ms 
as follows: "Beginning at the plantation of 
No. 14 Samuel Cresseyes and running up the Poto- 
mac River to the mouth of Nanjemy Creek 
or Avon River and so up the Nanjemy Creek to the Mill 
at the head thereof and so up the said branch to Capt. 
Hoskin's Quarter and then with a straight line to the head 
of Joseph Bullett's Mill Branch and down the said Branch 
to Mattawoman Creek, thence up the Mattawoman Creek 
to the utmost limits of the County [Charles] to the head of 
Zachyah Branch and with the said Branch to John Courtes, 
Senior, and with the line of Pickyawaxan Parish [William 
and Mary] to Cresseyes plantation."' 

"VESTRYMEN for Port Tobacco Parish chosen S^^viz' 
M' Henry Hawkins 
M'' William Barton 
M' Phil Hoskins 
M' C. Lomax 
M' John Hawkins 
M' John Hanson. "- 

"AND IN CHARLES COUNTY att the head of Porto- 
bacco Creeke [April 26, 1684] neare the Church 
there. "^ Notice that this church was built prior to 
the Establishment, and according to Dr. Allen was 
called "Christ Church." 

THE REV. MR. MOORE preached there in 1691, 1692 
and 1693.^ The Rev. George Tubman was rector 
in 1695, he also was rector of William and Mary & 
Nanjemy Parishes at the same time. He died in 1 70 1 .^ 

'■ Charles Countv Land Records, Lib. R, p. 460. 

2 Arch. \fd.. Vol. 23, p. 19. 

3 Arch. Md., Vol. 13, p. 112. 
< Allen Ms., p. 18. 

s Allen Ms., p. 65. 



134 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

NANJEMY PARISH which is now known as "Durham 

Parish" is bounded as follows: — "Beginning 

No. 15 at Phillip Hoskin's Quarter, soe with a 

straight line to the head of Joseph Bullett's 

Mill Branch and down the said Branch to Mattawoman 

Creeke and so down Mattawoman Creek to the mouth 

thereof, and down the Potomak River to the mouth of 

Nanjemy Creek or Avon River and so up the said creek or 

river to the Mill at the head thereof and thence to Capt. 

Hoskin's Quarter."^ 

"VESTRYMEN for Nanjemy Parish chosen &r viz' 
M' John Stone 
M' Joseph Manning 
M' William Dent 
M' William Stone 
M' Richard Harrison 
M' Gerrard Fowke."^ 

THE CHURCH for this Parish was being built at the time 
the report was made to the Assembly.^ Upon com- 
pletion it was called Durham Church. The second 
church (now standing) was authorized to be built 
in 1732. 

REV. JOHN TURLING, "Presbyter Anglicans", probably 
first Rector of this parish. William Dent and Eliza- 
beth Fowke were married by him in i684.* Rev. 
George Tubman rector in 1695.^ Rev. George 
Tubman incumbent in 1696.® 



' Allen Ms. 

2 Arch, Md., Vol. 23, p. 19. 

3 Arch. Md.. Vol. 20, p. 109. 

< Charles County Court Records, Liber R No. I, Vol. 2. 

6 Allen Ms., p. 18. 

' B. C. Steiner in Md. Hist. Magazine, Vol. 12, p. 118. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 135 

PISCATTAWAY PARISH (alias St. John's.) Doctor 

Allen gives the bounds of this parish as fol- 

No. 16 lows: "Beginning at the mouth of the Matta- 

woman Creek and running up the said Creek 

and Branch thereof to the utmost limits of the County 

[Charles] and running North to the line of the Province 

and then West to the Potomac River and then down the 

said River to the mouth of the Mattawoman Creek."' 

"VESTRYMEN for Piscattaway Parish chosen &^ viz'- 
John Addison Esq' 
M"" William Hutchinson 
M' William Hatton 
M' William Tanneyhill 
M' John Emmet 
M' James Stoddart"^ 

NO CHURCH had been built at the time the report was 
made. The first meeting of the vestry was held at 
the house of John Addison, Esqr. At that meeting 
it was decided to buy 7d> acres, part of "Lisle Hall", 
at Broad Creek. It was on this land in 1699 that 
the parish church was built and it received the 
name of "Broad Creek Church." 

PRINCE GEORGE'S PARISH\ by Act of the Provincial 
Assembly, 1726, Chapter 6, was erected out of 
Piscattaway Parish, and the chapel of Ease at Rock 



' Charles Countv Land Records, Liber R, p. 460. 

2 Arch, Md.. Vol. 23, p. 19. 

' Mr. John Small wood was elected a member of the vestry on January 30th, 
1693 and upon his death Mr. James Stoddart was elected July 29th, 1696 to fill 
the vacancy. 

' Bacon's Laws of Maryland 



136 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCES OF MARYLAND 

Creek, built in 1719, became the parish church of 
Prince George's parish. In 1742 the Assembly was 
again petitioned further to divide the territory 
originally covered by Piscattaway Parish, and Chap- 
ter 18 of that Session erected "All Saints Parish" 
with the parish church at Frederick.' 

THE FIRST RECTOR of Piscattaway Parish was the 
Rev. George Tubman who began his work August 
4th, 16%. He was also rector of Portobacco, Wil- 
liam and Mary and Nanjemy Parishes at the same 
time. He died in 1701.^ 



1 Bacon's Laws. 

•Dr. Ethan Allen's Ms., p. 65. 




ALL SAINTS 
Frederick City, Frederick Colntv 

The creation of All Saints Parish in 1742 was at the expense of Prince George's Par- 
ish. The latter was itself taken from the original territory of Old Piscattoway Parish, 
which thus suffered its first dismemberment The first All Saints Church was built 
in 1750; the new church was begun in 1855. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND )37 

BALTIMORE COUNTY 

Named for the Lord Baltimore's Irish Barony. 

BALTIMORE COUNTY (erected 1659) in 1692 was 

bounded on the east by the Susquehanna 

No. 6 river. The Chesapeake bay was one of its 

boundaries. For its southern boundary, we 

quote proclamation of June 6th, 1674, "the southern 

boundary of Baltimore county shall be the south side of 

Potapsco River, and from the highest plantation on that 

side of the river due south two miles into the woods. "^ 

This "two miles into the woods" means that a two 
mile strip of country on the south side of the Patapsco 
river was taken from Anne Arundel county by this "proc- 
lamation" for we find in the "Upper House Journal" 
under date of April 23, 1684 "A Petition of the Inhabi- 
tants scituate upon the southside of Patapsco River and 
others holding land there desireing to bee restored into the 
County of Ann Arundell from whence at first they were 
taken into Baltimore County by reason of their greate dis- 
tance from and incommodious waves of goeing to the 
County Court of Baltimore & Ca. Read and rejected, — 
This House Considering that Baltimore County being 
already very small and for other motives the same re- 
maine as now it is."^ 

The present southern boundary of Baltimore county 
was made by Act of Assembly 1722, Chap. 3, and the 
former lines recited in the Act prove that the division line 
between the two counties, Baltimore and Anne Arundel, 
began upon the shore of the Chesapeake bay about a mile 
and a quarter south of Bodkin Point and paralleled the 

' Scharf's Hist, of Baltimore Countv, p. 41. 
2 Arch. Md., Vol. 13, p. 41. 



138 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

course of the Patapsco at a distance of about two miles, 
running northwest along the ridge between the Magothy 
and the Patapsco rivers. 

The western boundary^ of the county was the line 
that bounded Piscattaway parish (Charles county) on the 
east — this line ran north from the head of Mattawoman 
creek to the boundary line of the Province. 

THE FIRST COURT HOUSE of Baltimore county was 
built on Bush river, now Harford county, and it 
is generally supposed it was there that the Court 
met until 1712 when by Act of Assembly the Court 
House was built in Joppa, also now in Harford 
county. In 1768 the Court Elouse was abandoned 
and the county seat removed to Baltimore city.^ 

"BALTIMORE COUNTY is divided into Five Hundreds, 
viz*" 
Speceutia Hundred 

Gun Powder River 
South Side Gun Powder 
North Side Patapsco 
South Side Patapsco " " ^ 

REPORT to the Assembly, 

June 30, 1694. "What Parishes laid out un- 
known." "The division of the Parishes and Bounds 
thereof have not as yet been Returned by the Clerk 
of the said County but do find by the Returns 
of the Severall Vestrymen that the said County is 
divided into three Parishes, viz"" 

Patapsco [St. Paul's] Parish 

S"^ John's 

S'^ Georges " " ^ 

' Note Baltimore County's western boundary. 
2 Scharf's Hist, of Baltimore County, p. 43. 
'Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 24. 
<Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 20, 




< 'x - 

o - 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 139 

In accordance with the directions of this Act of the As- 
sembly, (1692, Ch. 2) the Justices of Baltimore 
County at a Court held Nov. 1692 made the follow- 
ing order: — "That one Parish be in Speceutia Hund- 
red, and another in Gunpowder River (that is to 
say) from Gunpowder River to the head of Middle 
River And [another] from Middle River as far as 
the County goes or extends.'"' 

June 27, 1702. 

"According to his Excellency the Governours order and 
summons appeared the Vestry of St. Paul's Parish 
on Patapsco River in Baltimore County and it being 
required of them to produce their Accounts how the 
40 lb. p poll raised in that Parish has been disposed 
of M' Richard Cromwell alledges for that the Sheriff 
of the County Lieut. Col' Maxwell is now very sick 
but says that the Vestry have about 20000 pounds 
of Tob° wherewith they desire to build a Chappel 
of Ease for the Parishioners on the South side of 
Patapsco River but that being contrary to Law. 

Ordered by his Excell"'' the Governour & 
Council that the said Vestry do apply what 
Tob° they have in their Hands belonging to 
the Parish in building a pretty convenient 
House and purchasing a Glebe for the Min- 
ister & his successors."^ 



' Baltimore County Court Records, Vol. F, p. 338. 
2 Arch. Md., Vol. 24, p. 289. 



140 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

"PATAPSCO (or St. Paul's) PARISH. The bounds ot 
this parish were as follows: — On the east by- 
No. 1 7 Middle river, on the south by the Chesapeake 
bay, on the west by the county of Anne 
Arundel and the eastern boundry line of Piscattaway 
parish,^ one of the parishes of Charles County. It was 
bounded on the north by the boundry line of the province. 

"THE VESTRY, September 1693, was as follows:— 
George Ashman Richard Sampson 

John Ferry Richard Cromwell 

Nicholas Corban Francis Watkings 

John Gay, Clerk to the Vestry"^ 

THE FIRST CHURCH built, 1702, in this parish stood 
at the head of "Cloppers," now Colgate creek. 
"We the Vestrie men for Patapsco Hundred met to- 
gether at the house of Major John Thomas (re- 
solved] that at Pettites Old Field was the most 
convenient place for to erect a Church."^ 

The present parish church stands on the corner 
of Charles and Saratoga Streets in the City of Bal- 
timore. The first church built on this site was 
erected in 1730. 

THE REV. EDWARD TOPP, JR. was the incumbent of 
this parish in 1696.^ According to the Allen Manu- 
script the first rector of the parish was the Rev. 
Edward Topp, Jr. He served from 1698 to 1702. 

ST. THOMAS' PARISH was the first subdivision of 
St. Paul's Parish. It was erected by authority of an 
Act of the Provincial Assembly in 1742, Chapter 15.^* 

■ See bounds of Piscattaway Parish, Charles County. 
2 Court Records, Baltimore County, Liber G, No. 1, p. 126. 
■* Court Records, Baltimore County. Liber G, No. 1, p. 126. 
* B. C. Steiner in Maryland Hist. Mag., Vol. 12, p. 1 19. 
' Bacon's Laws of Maryland. 




~ c r 



^ f Q. 



:3 o 






THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 141 

ST. JOHN'S PARISH ("'alias Copley Parish"), Dr. Allen 
says, contained the two hundreds of Gun- 
No. 18 powder and Southern Gunpowder, bounded, 
according to the best records obtainable, by 
the Bush river on the east, the Chesapeake bay on the 
South, Middle river on the west and the northern line of 
the Province on the north. 

Dr. Allen's Ms. gives the following as vestrymen in 
June 1693. 
M' Thomas Haley 
M' Thomas Hodge 
M' Richard Adams 
M' Moses Groome 
Cap*^ Thomas Preston 
M' Lawrence Richardson. 

"VESTRYMEN chosen as by Return, viz' 
M' Thomas Staley 
Cap"^ Thomas Preston 
M' Richard Adams 
M' Samuel Siclemore 
M' Daniel Scott 
M' Abram Tayler."^ 

"THE CHURCH to be on Elk Neck on Gunpowder 
River."- St. Johns Church was built later at the 
former county seat of Baltimore county, Joppa, but 
the present parish church is at Kingsville, built in 1817. 

IT IS KNOWN THAT the famous Rev. John Yeo, 
who died in 1686, lived in the territory which was 
included in 1692 in the parish bounds. The earliest 
record of a minister after the Establishment is that 
of the Rev. John Edwards, 1710. 

ST. JAMES PARISH was erected in 1770, the chapel of ease 
of St. John's Parish becoming the parish church. 

1 Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 20. 
' Dr. Aliens Ms. 



142 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

ST. GEORGE'S PARISH was bounded on the east and 
south by the Susquehanna river and Chesa- 
No. 19 peake bay. The Bush river and its head- 
waters served as the western bounds. The 

northern line of the Province was its northern limits. 

"VESTRYMEN as by Return, viz' 
M' William Hollace [Wallace?] 
M' Laurence Tayler 
M' John Parker 
M' George Smith 
M"" Roger Mathews 
M' Thomas Cordey."'^ 

THE FIRST CHURCH in this part of the Province was 
called "Spesutia Church" built in 1671.- This 
present church is now called St. George's and is near 
the village of Perryman, Harford county. 

THE REV. JEREMIAH EATON was the first Protestant 
minister in Baltimore county (west of the Chesapeake 
bay) and he owned land (1675) near Bush river. In 
1683 the Rev. John Yeo preached in that part of 
Baltimore county afterwards laid out into St. 
George's Parish. He settled at New Castle, Dela- 
ware, June 4, 1678, and was the first Episcopal 
minister in that State. Rev. Thomas Dawes "min- 
of this parish, 1695;^ Rev. Jno. Edwards rector 
1702-1711 ;^ Rev. Evan Evans from 1718 to 1722.^ 



'Arch. Md., Vol. 23. p. 20. 
2 Allen Ms., p. 18. 
'Arch. Md., Vol. 19, p. 274. 
'Allen Ms., pp. 19-20. 
'Allen Ms., p. 71. 




- ? 

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- ^ "5 ^ 




CHRIST 

Easton, Talbot County 
The Parish Church of St. Peter's Parish, of which the corner stone was laid May 21, 1840. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 143 



TALBOT COUNTY 

Named for Grace Talbot, daughter of George 
Calvert, first Lord Baltimore. 

TALBOT COUNTY (erected 1662) in 1692 extended from 
the head of Chester river down to the Chop- 
No. 7 tank river. The western bounds were the 
Chester river, the "Narrows," Eastern bay 
and the Chesapeake. 

While the eastern boundaries were identical with 
those of the Province there were very few colonists who 
lived far from the water courses, hence the eastern limits 
were not sharply defined. 

"TALBOT COUNTY is divided into nine Hundreds, viz' 
Tredhaven Hundred 

Bullinbroake 
Mill 

Tuckohoe 
Worrell 
Bay 
Island 
Chester 
Lower of Kent Island. " " ^ 

"TALBOT COLTNTY is divided into three Parishes, viz' 
S'' Paul's Parish 
S' Peter's 
S' Michael's " " - 



» Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 24. 
2 Arch. Md.. Vol. 23, p. 21. 



144 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

REPORT to the Assembly 

June 30, 1694. "They can Give noe certain 
Returne as yet for Talbot County."^ 

At a court held at Yorke, June 20th, 1693, 
there were appointed by the court the vestrymen 
for the three parishes of the County.^ 

THE FIRST COURT HOUSE was on Skipton creek, a 
branch of the Wye river, at "Hopton."' 
" . . at the time of laying out the parishes, in 
1693, the Court House was on a branch of Wye 
river where is the dwelling plantation of Mr. Wm. 
Hemsley Jun' which by many is still called the 
old Court House."* 

"In 1680 a Court House was built upon land pur- 
chased of Jonathan Hopkin which was located on Skipton 
creek near the headwaters of the Wye river. In this build- 
ing court was held for the first time in 1682 or 1683. Later 
a 'prison' was built. Around these two buildings there 
grew up quite a village which was called, by Act of As- 
sembly of 1686, "Yorke" evidently in honor of the ancient 
town in England of the same name."^ 



lArch. Md., Vol. 20, p. 111. 

* Ms. of Dr. Samuel A. Harrison. 

'Hist, of Talbot County. Col. Oswald Tiighman, 

* Ms. Dr. Samuel A. Harrison. 

* Maryland's Colonial Eastern Shore, p. 26. 




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ST. PAUL, BUILT 1834 
Centerville, Queen Anne's County 

The first church of St. Paul's Parish was of wood construction and stood about a 
mile southwest of where Center\ille is, at a place called "Hibernia." In 1698 this 
building was replaced by a brick structure and called "Chester " church. In 1765 
Chester Church was in such bad condition that the vestry decided to rebuild it follow- 
ing the plans of St. Paul's Church in Philadelphia. 'This later building was torn 
down and some of the bricks, for sentimental reasons, were used in making the walls of 
the present parish church. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE [PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 145 

"S"^ PAUL'S PARISH begins at the head of Chester River 

& Extends to the Court House^ and from the 

No. 20 Court House along the north side of Brewers' 

Branch [now Skipton creek] to the Head of 

s'' branch and from thence to Judwin's branch being the 
North part of Tuccohoe Hundred. "- 

"VESTRYMEN for the S'^ Parish chosen & C viz' 
M' William Finney 
M' William Coursey 
M' John Whittington 
M' Nathanial Wright 
M' Robert Macklin 
M' John Chairs."^ 

THE CHURCH for this parish was old Chester Church 
built near the present town of Centerville. It was 
torn down in 1834 and rebuilt in that town. In 
1717 the vestry began the Chapel of Ease, now 
Wye Church, which is in excellent repair and stands 
almost hidden from view amongst some of the largest 
oaks to be seen anywhere on the Eastern Shore. 
This became the parish church, in 1860, of Wye 
Parish formed at that time. 

THE REV. JOHN LILLINGSTON was minister from 
1691 to 1709 when he died. He had held services 
in Talbot county as early as 1681.* 

"ONE SET OF BOOKS to Mr. Lillingston sent by the 
Bishop of London 1694."'^ 

ST. LUKE'S PARISH was taken from this parish by Act 
of Assembly 1728, Chapter 19.^ 

'On "Hopton" surveyed for Jonathan Hopkins, June, 1668. 

= Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 21. 

'Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 21. 

* Ms. of Dr. Samuel A. Harrison. 

'Arch. Md. Vol. 20, p. 212. 

' Bacon's Laws of Maryland 



146 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

"ST. PETER'S PARISH begins at John Judwins Branch 

and extends to Oxford Town."' 

No. 21 "In 1714 the county surveyor of Talbot 

County was authorized to 'lay off' the line of 

this parish and in his report to the Justices of the County 

says, 'St. Peter's Parish to contain Third Haven-Hundred, 

Bolingbroke Hundred and part of Tuckahoe Hundred 

bounding on the north by a line drawn from the head of 

Brewers' Branch, [now Skipton Creek], north Ty degrees 

east to the head of Judwin's Branch."^ 

"VESTRYMEN for the s'' Parish Chosen, ^^ viz^ 
M' Thomas Robins 
M' Thomas Bowdle 
M' George Robins 
M' Nicholas Lowe 
M' Samuel Abbet S' 
M' Thomas Martin."^ 

WHITEMARSH CHURCH, the ruins of which are to be 
seen near the little settlement of "Hambleton," is 
supposed to have been built about 1666. It became 
the parish church in 1692. These ruins are now in 
Whitemarsh Parish. The parish church of St. 
Peter's Parish is now (1923) in Easton. 

THE REV. MR. LILLINGSTON was minister before 
1691. It is supposed that the Rev. Joseph Leich 
became the rector of St. Peter's Parish in 1692. 
Court records show that he baptized children in 
that section of the county as early as 1689.* 
There was a church erected at Oxford in 1695.^ 
Rev. James Clayland preached in 1694, 1695 and 
1696.« 

1 Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 21. 

'Col. Oswald Tilghman in Easton "Gazette," January 7, 1914. 

'Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 21. 

* Ms. of Dr. Samuel A. Harrison. 

'Arch, Md., Vol. 19, p. 215. 

8 Allen Ms., pp. 18-19. 




X p. 



r. - 'i 





CHRIST 
St. Michael's, Talbot County 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 147 

"ST. MICHAEL'S PARISH consists of Mill & Bay Hun- 
dreds and part of Island Hundred that is to 
No. 22 say from the Court House' Downward."^ 

This parish was bounded on the east by 
the main road that now leads from Wye Mills to Easton 
and by the Tred Avon river. On the south by the Choptank 
river. Both the Chesapeake and the Eastern bays bounded 
it on the west. The Wye river and Skipton creek, formerly 
known as Brewer's Branch, were its northern bounds. 

"VESTRYMEN for the s"^ Parish chosen, &=^ viz' 
Cap' John Davis 

Cap' James Murphy [of Rich Neck] 
M' Thomas Smithson 
M' Michaell Turbut 
M' Hugh Sherwood 
M' John Power. "^ 

CHRIST CHURCH is the present representative of the 
original church of this old parish and stands in the 
town of St. Michael's. 

THE REV. JAMES CLAYLAND, as minister, received 
in 1672 from Mr. Andrew Skinner a gift of 50 acres 
of land part of a grant called "Forked Neck" in 
Miles River Neck to be used as a Glebe "forever 
hereafter to be holden . . . and belonging to ye 
aforesaid Church of Christ there congregated."^ He 
became rector of St. Michael's Parish, 1692. In 1696 
he was succeeded by the Rev. Rich'd Marsden who 
served until 1707. The Rev. Henry Nicols was 
rector in 1 709 ;^ Rev. John Leach incumbent 1696.^ 

1 See St. Paul's Parish (Talbot)- 

2 Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 22. 
'Arch. .VId., Vol. 23, p. 22. 

* Ms. of Dr. Samuel A. Harrison. 

'Allen Ms., p. 18. 

6 B. C. Steiner in Md. Hist. Magazine, Vol. 12, p. 1 19. 



148 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

SOMERSET COUNTY 

Named after Mary Somerset, sister of Lord Baltimore. 

SOMERSET COUNTY was erected by proclamation on 

the 22nd of August 1666. The territory lying 

No. 8 south of the Choptank River and extending 

to Watkin's Point and the line drawn from 

thence to the "Maine Ocean" was settled for the most 

part by people from the county to the south of it — the 

Eastern Shore of Virginia. 

On February 4th, 1662, John Elzey, Randall Revell 
and Stephen Horsey were commissioned Justices for the 
territory. They held their offices until the 20th of the fol- 
lowing February at which time they were reappointed, 
with the exception of Mr. Revell. He was succeeded by 
Capt. William Thorne. August 15th 1663 Capt. John 
Odber was added to the Justices whose names appear 
above. ^ They were described as "Commissioners for that 
part of the Province newly seated called the Eastern Shore." 
Commissions were issued on the 28th of August 1665 to 
Mr. Stepen Horsey and Capt. William Thorne to continue 
Justices on the "Eastern Shore "^ with the following six 
new appointees : — George Johnson, William Stephens, John 
White, John Winder, James Jones, and Henry Boston, 
Gent. Capt. William Thorne was commissioned to com- 
mand all the forces on the "Eastern Shore of the Province." 
Upon the erection of Somerset county, August 22nd, 
1666, the Justices who had been appointed the previous 
year for the "Eastern Shore," were reappointed. Mr. 
Stephen Horsey was made Sheriff of the new county. 

1 Arch. Md., Vol. 3, p. 488. 

- Notice the fact of "Eastern Shore" being the name of the section south 
of the Choptank prior to 1666, at which time it became the County of Somerset. 




M . ANlJKhU, BL II. 1 1771 

Princess Anne, Somerset County 

First built as a Chapel of Ease for Somerset Parish. Now the parish church of that 
Parish. 




— ci. 




THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 149 

"SOMERSET COUNTY was divided into Eight Hun- 
dreds, viz' 

Poquede Norton Hundred 

Mattapany 
Manny 
Pocomoke 
Annamessix 
Monakin 
Wiccocomoco 
Nantecoke 

"SOMERSET COUNTY is divided into four Parishes, viz^ 
Somerset Parish 
Coventrey 
Stepney 
Snow hill " " ^ 

REPORT to the Assembly 
July 30 1694. 

"Somerset county has 4 Parishes laid out but never 
a Church."^ 

THE FIRST COURT HOUSE of Somerset County was 
built in 1671 at Back Creek on a part of the now 
well known "Westover" farm.^ Prior to this date, 
as was the custom in the other counties of the Prov- 
ince, court was doubtless held at the home of some 
one of the Justices. In 1694 a court house was 
built near Dividing Creek. "Upon the division of 
the County and the erection of part of it into Wor- 
cester County, the Court House was built at Princess 
Anne. The present building is the third one to have 
been built on that spot. "^ 

'Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 24. 

2 Arch. Md.. Vol. 23, p. 22. 

3 Arch. .Md., Vol. 20, p. 110. 
* H. Fillmore Lankford. 

' Hon. Joshua W. Miles 



150 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

"SOMERSET PARISH consists of Manokin and Manny 
hundreds."^ The parish extended from the 
No. 23 Wicomico river to the Manokin river. 

"VESTRYMEN for the s'^ Parish as by Return, viz"^ 
M' John Huett 
M' Richard Chambers 
M' John Panter 
M' Nathaniel Horsey 
M' Miles Grey 
M' Peter Elzey."^ 

NO CHURCH had been built but provision was made for 
its erection shortly after the choosing of the Vestry- 
men ( 1 692) . Dr. Ethan Allen states in his manuscript 
history of the various parishes that "All Saints Church 
was there before 1691." He also states that the 
Rev. Mr. Huett was preaching there. This church 
is doubtless the one now known as "Old Monie" 
and stands just West of Princess Anne, the county 
seat of Somerset County. 

THE REV. GEORGE TROTTER was incumbent of this 
parish in 1 696.^ The Rev. Alexander Adams served 
as rector of the parish for 65 years — from 1 704 until 
his death in 1769.* 



» Arch. Md, Vol. 23, p. 22 

2 Arch. Md., Vol 23, p. 22. 

3B. C. Steiner, Md. Hist. Magazine, Vol. 12, p. 119. 

* Allen Ms. 




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THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 151 

'COVENTRY PARISH consists of Pocomoke and Anna- 

messix hundreds."^ This parish extended 

No. 24 from the Manokin river to the Pocomoke 



"VESTRYMEN for the s'' Parish as by Return, viz^ 
M' Francis Jenckins 
M' George Layfield 
M"" Thomas Nuball 
M"" William Planer S' 
M'' Thomas Dixon 
M' William Coleburn."^ 

IN THE OLD CHURCH at Rehoboth, Maryland, the 
vestry met in 1692, when they held their first 
meeting under the Act of Establishment. The ruins 
of the second church are to be seen today not far 
from Pocomoke City. 

THE REV. JAMES BRECHIN was rector 1696-1698. 
He was succeeded by the Rev. Robert Keith in 
1707.3 



: Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 22. 
! Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 22. 
'Allen Ms., p. 18. 



152 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

"STEPNEY PARISH consists of Wiccocomoco & Nante- 

coke Hundreds."^ The old parish was 

No. 25 bounded on the north and west by the Nan- 

ticoke river and on the south and east by the 

Wicomoco river. 

"VESTRYMEN for the s'' Parish as by Return, viz' 
M' James Weatherley 
M' John Bounds 
M' Philip Carter 
M' Robert Collyer 
M' Thomas Holebrooke 
M' Philip Askue."^ 

STEPNEY CHURCH commonly called "Green Hill 
Church," to which yearly pilgrimages are now made, 
was a place of worship for the settlers of the upper 
part of Somerset County. The present building 
erected 1733 has this date set in the brick of the 
east end. Spring Hill (Goddard's Chapel) or Quan- 
tico Church was first built (1711) as a Chapel of 
Ease for this Parish.^ The present church was 
erected prior to the Revolutionary War. 

THE REV. MR. HUETT was the officiating clergyman in 
1695. The records of Somerset county show marriages 
performed by him in October 1682. He died 1697.* 
In 1696 Rev. George Trotter was incumbent of 
Stepney Parish.^ 



'Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 23. 

2 Arch. Md., vol. 23, p. 23. 

^ Somerset County Records I, K, L, 112. 

< Allen Ms., p. 18. 

' B. C. Steiner in Md. Hist. Magazine, Vol. 12, p. 119. 




£ a. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 153 

"SNOW HILL PARISH consists of Bogettenorten & 

Mattapany Hundreds."' Also known as All 

No. 26 Hallows Parish. This old parish extended 

east from the Pocomoke river to the Atlantic 

ocean and from the Virginia line to far within the present 

lines of the State of Delaware. 

"VESTRYMEN for the s'^ Parish as by Return, viz' 
M' Matt : Scarborough 
M' William Round 
M' John Francklin 
M' Thomas Pointer 
M' Thomas Selbey 
M"' Edward Hammond."^ 

ALL HALLOWS CHURCH is the parish Church and the 
present building stands in Snow Hill. 

THE REV. JAMES BRECHIN was incumbent 1696.' 
The Rev. Robert Keith preached at All Hallows in 
1703." 

WORCESTER PARISH was erected out of the parish^ by 
Act of Assembly 1744, Chapter 24. St. Martin is 
the name of parish Church. 



'Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 23. 

'Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 23. 

' B. C. Sterner in Md. Hist. Magazine, Vol. 12, p. 1 19. 

< Allen Ms., p. 18. 

' Bacon's Laws of Maryland. 



154 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

DORCHESTER COUNTY 

Named for the Earl of Dorset. 

DORCHESTER COUNTY was erected in 1669. That 
part of the original territory called the "East- 
No. 9 em Shore, " including the county of Somerset, 
that lay between the Choptank river on the 
north and the Nanticoke river on the south and east was 
the extent of the county of Dorchester. Its north-eastern 
limits were identical with those of the Province. 

"DORCHESTER COUNTY is divided into five Hundreds, 
viz"^ 
Hermitage Hundred 

Great Choptanck 
Fishing Creek 
Nantecoke 
Little Choptanck " "^ 

"AND THAT WHERE THE COURT HOUSES within 
any of the Counties of province are placed conven- 
ient where Churches may stand or be Erected, that in 
such case the said Court Houses be made use off for 
Churches to perform Divine Duty and Service in; 
especially Dorchester County Court house in the 
parish of Great Choptanck, so that instead of Build- 
ing a Church at Cambridge, the vestrey may build 
a Chappell of Ease in some other convenient place. "^ 



'Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 24. 
2 Arch. Md., Vol. 20, p. 283. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 155 

"DORCHESTER COUNTY is divided into two Parishes, 
viz"^ Great Choptanck and Dorchester Parish." 

"The Bounds whereof being Artificiall and some 
what long I have not here inserted. But are 
Entered among the Councill proceedings had and 
taken in S"^ Edm'' Andros's time being then Re- 
turned but no Acco't of the Vestrymen was 
therein."^ 

REPORT to the Assembly 

"July 30, 1694. They can Give noe certain Re- 
turne as yet for the County of Dorchester. "- 

"Wee the said Justices and Freeholders . . . did 
agree and consent unto that the said County of Dorchester 
should be Divided into two several Districts and Parishes 
by a Divisionale Line drawne from the Mouth of Little 
Choptank River binding therewith to the head of the said 
River from thence with a straight Line drawne to the 
head of the North branch of Black Water River to a 
plantation now in the Tenure or occupation of Benjamin 
Hunt of this County thence runing downe the said river 
on its severall Courses to the Mouth of the same. The 
Eastermost of which Parishes is named and called by the 
Name of Great Choptanck Parish, the other Parish is called 
and knowne by the name of Dorchester Parish . . 
June 10'^ 1693. 

Hu. Eccleston, CI. Com. 
Dorchester."^ 



» Arch. N!d., Vol. 23, p. 22. 
» Arch. Md., Vol. 20, p. 111. 
' Arch. Md., Vol. 20, p. 67. 



156 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

GREAT CHOPTANK PARISH was on the northern side 

of the county and included most of the pres- 

No. 27 ent county of Dorchester. The parish was 

divided from Dorchester parish on the south 

by a line "Begining at the mouth of the little Choptanck 

binding therewith to the head of s"^ River, — from tl ence 

with a straight line to the north Branch of Blackwater 

River to Benj. Hunt's Plantation, thence down said river 

to the mouth of the same."^ 

"VESTRYMEN: yet do find by a Return of the Vestry 
of Great Choptanck Parish the s*^ Return be'ng 
Subscribed thus, viz' 

M^ Phil V. Pitt \ 

M Obadiah King 
M' Edward Stephens 
M' John Person 
M' John Lecompt."- 

"ALSO it being represented by the Burgesses of Dorchester 
County that the Court house at Cambridge Stands 
convenient for a Church in the Parish it is built in; 
Ordered it be Used for that End also."'^ 

"The petition of Philip Pitt and others vestrymen of the 
parish of Great Choptanck in Dorchester County 
read and thereupon the the House are of the opinion 
that the s*^ Vestry proceed to build their church as 
to them shall seem convenient."^ 

THE REV. THOMAS HOWELL was the first Minister, 
1696-1728 of Great Choptank Parish.^ 

ST. MARY'S WHITE CHAPEL PARISH was erected from 
this parish by Act of the Assembly 1725, Chapter 6.^ 

'Arch. Md., Assembly Proceedings 16'53. 

2 Arch. Md.. Vol. 23, p. 22. 

^ Arch. Md., Vol. 19, p. 234, and various authorities. 

" Arch. Md., Vol. 19, p. 359. 

5 Allen Ms. 

^ Bacon's Laws of Maryland. 




L,l IRIM 

Cambridge, Dorchester County 

The first services of the Church after the Establishment were held in this parish 
(Great Choptank) in the Court House at Cambridge. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 157 

DORCHESTER PARISH occupied all of the territory 

south of the Little Choptank and the line that 

No. 28 connected it with the Black Water river. 

Some later writers contend that the waters of 

Fishing Creek are really the headwaters of the Little 

Choptank. 

"VESTRYMEN for Dorchester parish as by Return, 
viz' 
M' Arthur Witley 
M' William Robison 
M' John Button 
M' Thomas Vickers 
M' James Moadsly 
M' William Shinton. [Shenton]"^ 

THE OLD CHURCH of Dorchester Parish which is still 
standing is said to have been built prior to the 
"Establishment." It is known as Trinity Church, 
first receiving this name April 17, 1853 when con- 
secrated by the Rt. Rev. Henry J. Whitehouse, 
then Bishop of Illinois, and acting for Bishop Wm. 
R. Whittingham, then Bishop of Maryland, who was 
sick at the time. 

THE REV. THOMAS HOWELL was rector from 1697 to 
1708;^ the Rev. Thomas Howell incumbent in 16%.^ 
The Rev. Mr. Huett was preaching in Dorchester 
Parish in 1691.^ 



1 Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 22. 

- Allen Ms. 

'B. C. Steiner in Md. Hist. Magazine, Vol. 12, p. 1 19. 

< Allen Ms., p. 15. 



158 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

CECIL COUNTY 
Named after Cecilius Calvert, second Lord Baltimore. 

CECIL COUNTY was erected by proclamation in 1674. 

Its boundaries included, for about two weeks, 
No. 10 all of the area now within the two counties 

of Cecil and Kent. 
The proclamation erecting the county bore date 
of June 6th, 1674, and its provisions were met with 
such a storm of protests from the inhabitants of the 
lower part of what is now Kent county that the 
Proprietary in less than two weeks issued an "Order," 
June 19th 1674, giving back to Kent what she had 
held as hers for many years. The "Order" read in 
part as follows: — " . . that so much of the 
Eastern side as was formerly added to Kent County 
doe still remaine and belong to the s'' County as 
aforesaid — ."* 

"CECIL COUNTY is divided into two four Hundreds, viz'' 
Worton Hundred 

South Sassafrax 
Bohemia 
Elk *• "2 



' Arch. Md., Council Proceedings 1674. 
' Arch. Md,, Vol. 23, p. 24. 



■v^P 






V » 




THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 159 

"CECIL COUNTY is divided into two Parishes, viz' 
South Sassafrax 
North Sassafrax."^ 

These two parishes comprised all of the county 
and they were divided by the "Sassafrax" river. 

REPORT TO THE ASSEMBLY 
July 30 1694 

"Cecil County hath 3 parishes 
1 vacant of both 
Church & Minister."^ 

THE COURT HOUSE was first located on Ordinary 
Point on the Sassafras River. Later on moved to 
Charlestown and still later to "Head of Elk," now 
Elkton, the present County Seat. 



'Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 20. 

2 Arch. Md.. Vol. 20, p. 111. 

The Fulham records mention 3 1 parishes in the province. It was evi- 
dently expected that the other parish (St. Andrew's) would be laid out to cover 
the territory to the north of the Elk river. Just why it never was laid out I have 
been unable to find. The records of the county show that only two parishes were 
laid out notwithstanding the "Report" to the Assembly. 



160 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

"SOUTH SASSAFRAX PARISH consists of these follow- 
ing Hundreds, viz'' 
No. 29 Worton Hundred 

South Sassafrax " "^ 

At that time the parish was bounded on the north by 
the Sassafras river, on the west by the Chesapeake Bay, 
on the south by a line running from the head of Worton 
creek to some point on Morgan's creek. Like the other 
border parishes its outer bounds were identical with those 
of the Province.* 

"VESTRYMEN for the said Parish as by Return, viz' 
Col. William Peirce 
M' William Harris 
M' Edward Blay 
M' William Elins 
M' George Sturton 
M' Edward Scidmore"^ 

SHREWSBURY CHURCH at the head of Turners 
creek in Kent County was the parish church. It 
was first built about 1693. The present church in 
1823. 

THE REV. LAWRENCE VANDERBUSH, the first rec- 
tor, was serving from 1692 until his death in 1696.^ 
The Rev. Rich'd Sewell succeeded him;^ which is 
confirmed by another authority.^ 



1 Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 20. 

2 Arch. Md., Vol. 23. p. 20. 

'See St. Paul's Parish, Kent County. 

« Allen Ms., p. 18. 

' B. C. Steiner in Md. Hist. Magazine, Vol. 12, p. U'^ 




SHREWSBLRY, BLILT 1833 

Locust Grove, Kent County 

When Shrewsbury Parish was laid out in 1692 a church, according to the records 

was then standing that had been built prior to 16*51. The first parish church was 

built in 1693, repaired in 1701, again in 1705, and rebuilt of brick in 1729. That one 

was torn down in 1829 and the present one built in 1832. 




.s I . S fEPHEN 

Earleville. Cecil County 

When the first parish church of North Sassafras Parish was built, 1705, it succeeded 
a "Meeting House" which was standing as early as 1601. The parish church has been 
rebuilt three times: 1737, 1823 and again in 1873. 



THE FIRST PARISF-IES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 161 

"NORTH SASSAFRAX PARISH consists of Bohemia 

and Elk Hundreds."' It was bounded on the 

No. 30 south by the Sassafras river on the east its 

bounds were the same as those of the 

Province. This was true of the northern boundary 

also. The Chesapeake bay was its western boundary. 

It was later called St. Stephen's Parish. 

VESTRYMEN for the s'^ Parish as by Return, viz' 
Coll. Caspa' Herman 
Maj' John Thompson 
M^ William Ward 
M' Henry Rigg 
M' Matth. Vanderhaden 
M' Henry Jones. "^ 

ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH stands at the head of Bo- 
hemia river. The first church on the spot was begun 
in 1702 and dedicated in 1706. 

THE REV. LAWRENCE VANDERBUSH was rector 
from 1692 to 1694. The Rev. Rich'd Sewell was 
incumbent in 1696.^ He was sent as rector of this 
and South Sassafras Parish^ in 1697. He also preach- 
ed at St. Ann's Church near Middletown/ Delaware, 
about 1 704. 

NORTH ELK PARISH was erected^ out of this parish 
by Act of the Assembly in 1706, Chapter 4. It is 
now called St. Mary Ann's Parish. 



1 Arch. Md., Vol. 23, p. 20. 

2 Arch. Md., yol. 23, p. 21. 

^ See St. Paul's Parish Records, Kent County. 
*Hist. of Delaware, Conrad. 

' B. C. Steiner in Md. Hist. Magazine, Vol. 12, p. 119. 
' Bacon's Laws of Maryland. 



PART VII 

Papers relating to the Establishment. 

Census of Maryland 1696. 

Parishes of Maryland and the 

District of Columbia 1922. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 16J 



INDUCTION OF AN INCUMBENT 

"The bearer hereof is M' Stephen 
Bordley who is sent by the Right 
Honorable and Right Reverend 
Father in God, Henry, Lord Bishop 
of London in order to officiate as 
a clergyman of the Church of England 
in this his Majesty's Province of 
Maryland; I do therefore, in his 
Majesty's name appoint the same 
M' Stephen Bordley to officiate as 
a clergyman of the Church of England 
in the Parish of S' Paul in Kent 
County. 

Given under my hand and seal 
at the Port of Annapolis the 23"^ 
day of June in the year of the 
reign of our Sovereign Lord William 
the Third, by the Grace of God of 
England, Scotland, France and 
Ireland, King, Defender of the 
Faith ^^ Anno Domini 1697. 

Francis Nicholson.^ 

**** + ***+ + + + 

SEAL 

************ 



To 



The Vestrymen of S^ Paul's Parish, Kent County, 
These." 



■ Governor of the Province. 



166 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 

At a Council Meeting at Annapolis 
June 1700 

There was a letter written to the Commissioners of 
Trade and Plantation refuting some charges made against 
the Law by the members of the Church of Rome and by 
the Quakers. The letter is in part as follows : 

"We^ assert to your Lord^^^ for an undoubted 
truth, that there is nothing imposed upon any dis- 
senting Protestant or even Papist but the payment 
of 40 "'• p poll equal with his Maj"^'" other Protes- 
tant Subjects & none of the other injunctions in that 
Law have been so much as pretended to be imposed 
upon any dissenting Protestant but, on the contrary 
they are permitted the quiet & peaceable enjoyment 
6z use of their Religion w''^ out the Least Molesta- 
tion whatsoever & therefore they greatly wrong that 
Law & the Gov' by their Insinuations in the first 
second & third exceptions. 

There has no sects of Religion here opposed 
that law but the Papists and the Quakers who from 
the first beginning of his Ma"" happy Gov' here 
with which that Law entered, have with their great- 
est might obstructed it, . . . in fine may it 
please your Lordships their design is not only 
against that Law but Extablishing Protestant Re- 
ligion here, and there might be no more Countenance 
given to it now under his Ma''" Gov' than was 
under Lord Baltimore's who was a Papist & as they 
say so it was Liberty of Conscience to all without 
publick Countenance to any but we are assured as 
by his Ma''" matchless valour and conduct he pre- 

1. Members of the Provincial Council 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 167 

served our lives and fortunes from destruction no 
less our Religion also and we hope to enjoy both 
and at the same time permit the Quiet Exercise of 
Dissenters in theirs while they will use it with 
peace and quietness. With which we will beg your 
Lord^"' pardon for so intruding so long upon 
your patience and beg leave to subscribe 

Your Lordships most humble Sz 
Obedient Serv'' 

Hen : Jowles 
Jno. Addison 
Tho. Brooke 
Tho. Tasker 
Jno. Hammond" 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 169 



CENSUS OF THE PROVINCE IN 1696' 



" Count YS 


Parishes T 


ITHABLES 


1 Tobacco 


Incumbents 


St. Mary's 


William and Mary 


532 


21,280 


Benj. Nobbs 


St. Mary's 


King and Queen 


473 


18.920 


Chris Platts 


Calvert 


Christ Church 


537 


21,480 


Hugh Jones 


Calvert 


All Saints' 


507 


20,280 


Tho. Cockshutt 


Prince George 


All Faiths' 


278 


11,120 




Prince George 


St. Paul's 


500 


20,000 


Monsieur Morien 


Prince George 


Piscattaway 











Charles 


William and Mary 


258 


10,320 






Charles 


Port Tobacco 












Charles 


Manjemy 


175 


19,000 


George Tubman 


Anne Arundel 


Herring Creek 


507 


20,280 


Henry Hall 


Anne .Arundel 


South River 


460 


18,400 


Tho. Clayton 


Anne Arundel 


Middle Neck 


374 


14,960 


Peregrine Coney 




(Port Annapol 


is is in Middle Neck) 


Anne Arundel 
Baltimore 


Broad Neck 
Patapsco 


223 
218 


8,9201 
8,720/ 


Edw'd Topp, Jr. 


Baltimore 


St. John's 


128 


5,120 





Baltimore 


St. George's 


137 


5,480 






Cecil 
Cecil 


South Sassafras 

North Sassafras 


350 
321 


14,000\ 
12,840/ 


Rich'd Sewell 


Kent 


Kent Island 


146 


5,840 




Kent 


St. Paul 


338(7) 


15.320 


Stephen Bordley 


Talbot 


St. Paul's 


606 


24,240 


John Lillingston 


Talbot 


St. Peter's 


453 


18,120 






Talbot 


St. Michael's 


485 


19,400 


Leach 


Dorchester 
Dorchester 


Choptank 
Dorchester 


407 
221 


16,280\ 
8,840/ 


Tho. Howell 


Somersett 


Somersett 


304 


12,160 


Geo. Trotter 


Somersett 


Coventry 


369 


14,760 




Somersett 


Stepney 


362 


14,480 


Geo. Trotter ut supra 


Somersett 


Snow Hill 


356 


14,240 


James Brechin" 



IB. C. Stciner, "Some Unpublished Manuscnpts from Fulham Palace Relating 
Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine, Vol. XII, p. 1 18-1 19. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 171 



1699. 



1700. 
1701. 



ACTS OF THE ASSEMBLY 
Subsequent to the Establishment 

Chapter 5. Division line between St. Paul's and Shrewsbury Parishes. 
Chpater 50. Providing for Church (St. Ann's) Middle Neck Parish, 

Anne Arundel County. 
Chapter 5. Land given to Christ Church Parish, Calvert County. 
Chapter 5. Land for St. James Herring Creek Parish, Anne Arundel 
County. 
1704. Chapter 96. Queen Anne Parish erected from St. Paul's Parish, Prince 

George County. 
1706. Chapter 4. North Elk Parish erected in Cecil County. 
1706. Chapter 7. Newport Hundred taken from King and Queen Parish and 
added to William and Mary Parish, Charles County. 

1718. Chapter 8. Providing for church, St. Ann's, Middle Neck Parish, Anne 

Arundel County. 

1719. Chapter 6. Rector of St. John's Parish, given "Stoakley Manor," Bal- 

timore County. 

1720. Chapter 4. Old State House and lot at St. Mary's City "settled on" 

Rector of William and Mary Parish, St. Mary's County. 

1722. Chapter 3. Part of St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore County, annexed to 
Westminster Parish, Anne Arundel County. 

172;. Chapter 9. Chapel of Ease at Vienna, Great Choptank Parish, Dor- 
chester County. 

1725. Chapter 10. St. Mary's White Chapel Parish erected out of Great Chop- 

tank Parish, Dorchester County. 

1726. Chapter 6. Prince George's Parish erected out of St. John's Parish 

(Piscattaway), Prince George's County. 

1727. Chapter 10. Providing Parish Church, St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore 

County. 

1728. Chapter 19. St. Luke's Parish erected out of St. Paul's Parish, Queen 

Anne's County. 

1728. Chapter 15. Queen Caroline Parish erected, Anne Arundel County. 
172S. Chapter 25. Chapel of Ease, Middle Neck Parish, .Anne Arundel County. 

1729. Chapter 11. Chapel of Ease, Middle Neck Parish, Anne .Arundel County. 
1729. Chapter 10. New Church, All Hallow's Parish, Anne Arundel County. 

1729. Chapter 13. Erecting church, St. Luke's Parish, Queen Anne County. 

1730. Chapter 2. Chapel of Ease at Vienna, Great Choptank Parish, Dor- 

chester County. 

1730. Chapter 9. Church, St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore County. 

1731. Chapter 4. New Church, Westminster Parish, Anne Arundel County. 

1731. Chapter 11. Church, St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore County. 

1732. Chapter 12. New Church, Christ Church Parish, Calvert County. 
1732. Chapter 28. New Church, Durham Parish, Charles County. 

1732. Chapter 29. New Church and Chapel of Ease, St. Paul's Parish, Prince 
George's County. 



172 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 



1733- 


Chapter 


10 


1735- 


Chapter 


9 


I73&- 


Chapter 


I 2 


1736. 


Chapter 


13 


1737- 


Chapter 


"> 


1742- 


Chapter 


9 


1742. 


Chapter 


15 


1742. 


Chapter 


18 


1744- 


Chapter 


3 


1744- 


Chapter 


14 


1744- 


Chapter 


14 


1744- 


Chapter 


26 


1744- 


Chapter 


2 


1744 


Chapter 


21. 


1744- 


Chapter 


24 


1745. 


Chapter 


4 


174^. 


Chapter 


8 


1747. 


Chapter 


9 


1747. 


Chapter 


18 


1747- 


Chapter 


24 


1748. 


Chapter 


2. 


1748. 


Chapter 


4- 


1748. 


Chapter 


4. 


1748. 


Chapter 


4- 


1748. 


Chapter 


6 


1748. 


Chapter 


8. 


1748. 


Chapter 


9- 


1748. 


Chapter 


9- 


1748. 


Chapter 


13- 


1748. 


Chapter 


16. 


1749- 


Chapter 


6. 


1750. 


Chapter 


7- 



1750 
1750 



Chapter 8. 

Chapter 21 . 
Chapter 21. 



ACTS OF ASSEMBLY— Continued 

New Church and Chapel of Ease, North Sassafras Parish, 

Cecil County. 

New church to be built and Newport Church repaired. 

King and Queen Parish, St. Mary's County. 

Church in Durham Parish, Charles County. 

Same as Chapter 9. 1735. 

Same as Chapter 10, 1733. 

St. Mary Ann's Parish erected, Cecil County. 

St. Thomas' Parish erected, Baltimore County. 

All Saint's Parish erected, Frederick County. 

Augustine Parish erected. Cecil County. 

Trinity Parish erected, Charles County. 

St. Mary's County divided into four parishes. 

Chapel of Ease erected on land given by Wm. Scott. 

( 7) County. 

Chapel already built to be made a Chapel of Ease, Prince 

George's Parish. 

Land for St. James Herring Creek Parish, Anne Arundel 

County. 

Worcester Parished erected, Worcester County. 

Same as Chapter 14, 1744. 

Chapel of Ease to be built, Christ Church Parish, Calvert 

County. 

Church and two chapels of ease to be built in All Saints 

Parish, Frederick County. 

Land. Westminster Parish. Anne Arundel County. 

Land. Middle Neck Parish, Anne Arundel County. 

Chapel of Ease, Shrewsbury Parish, Kent County. 

Bounds of King and Queen Parish, St. Mary's County. 

Bounds of All Faith Parish, St. Mary's County. 

Same as Chapter 14, 1744, St. Mary's County. 

New church at Snow Hill. Worcester County. 

Church enlarged, Christ Church Parish, Kent Island. 

Trinity Parish, Charles County. 

Bounds of King and Queen Parish, St. Mary's County. 

St. John's Parish erected. Queen Anne County. 

Chapel of Ease, St. John's Parish, Baltimore County. 

Parish Church, St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore County. 

New Church and Chapel of Ease, St. George's Parish, 

Baltimore, now Harford County. 

Parish Church to be enlarged, William and Mary Parish, 

St. Mary's County. 

Parish Church, All Saints Parish, Frederick County. 

Chapel of Ease to be erected. King and Queen Parish, St. 

Mary's County. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 173 



I75I- 


Chapter 


6. 


1751. 


Chapter 


9- 


I75'- 


Chapter 


I 2. 


1751. 


Chapter 


13- 


1751- 


Chapter 


6. 


1753- 


Chapter 


12. 


1753- 


Chapter 


18. 


1753- 


Chapter 


19. 


1754- 


Chapter 


6. 


1754- 


Chapter 


7. 


1755. 


Chapter 


14. 


1755- 


Chapter 


15- 


1756. 


Chapter 


7- 


I757- 


Chapter 


18. 


1758. 


Chapter 


2. 


1762. 


Chapter 


16. 


1762. 


Chapter 


15- 


1762. 


Chapter 


28. 


1763. 


Chapter 


14- 


1763. 


Chapter 


17- 


176J. 


Chapter 


31- 


1770. 


Chapter 


18. 


1770. 


Chapter 


9- 


1770. 







ACTS OF ASSEMBLY— Concluded 

Glebe, Durham Parish, Charles County. 

Parish Church and Chapel of Ease to be built in Trinity 

Parish, Charles County. 

New church to be built, Portobacco Parish, Charles County. 

Chapel of Ease to be built, Coventry Parish, Somerset 

County. 

Parish Church and Chapel of Ease. 

Same as Chapter 12, 175 1. 

Chapel of Ease repaired, St. Paul's Parish, Prince Georges 

County. 

Vestrymen, St. Andrews Parish, St. Mary's County. 

Chaptico Church to be repaired. King and Queen Parish, 

St. Mary's County. 

Chapel of Ease at Ivy Springs, Portobacco Parish, Charles 

County. 

Chapel of Ease, Worcester Parish, Worcester County. 

New Church, St. Mary's White Chapel Parish, Dorchester 

County. 

Same as Chapter 6, 1748, Worcester County. 

Same as Chapter 7, 1750, Baltimore County. 

Same as Chapter 7, 1750, Baltimore County. 

Chapel. Somerset Parish, Somerset County. 

Chapel of Ease to be built at T. L., St. Paul's Parish, 

Baltimore County. 

New Church to be built St. James Herring Creek Parish, 

Anne Arundel County. 

Relating to No. Sassafras, Parish. Cecil County. 

Enlarging Church, St. Johns Parish, Baltimore County. 

Chester Parish erected, Kent County. 

St. James Parish erected, Baltimore County. 

Eden alias Zion Parish erected, Frederick County. 

St. John's Parish, Hagerstown, erected Frederick County. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 175 



BALTIMORE CITY 
CATHEDRAL OF THE INCARNATION 

Churches In Use 1923 



Advent 

All Saints' 

Ascension 

Christ 

Christ Church Chapel 

Emanuel 

Epiphany, Govans 

Grace and St. Peter 

Grace Deaf Mute Mission 

Grace Chapel, Mt. Winans 

Guardian Angel 

Holy Cross 

Holy Comforter 

Holy Evangelist 

Holy Innocents 

Holy Nativity 

Holy Trinity 

Messiah 

Memorial 

Mt. Calvary 

Nativity, Cedarcroft 

Our Savior 

Prince of Peace 

Redeemer, Govans 



Redemption 

St. Andrew's 

St. Andrew's, Hamilton 

St. Bartholomew's 

St. David's, Roland Park 

St. James', Irvington 

St. James" (Colored) 

St. John's 

St. John's, Catonsville Ave. 

St. John's, Mt. Washington 

St. Katharine's Chapel 

St. Luke's 

St. Margaret's 

St. Mary the Virgin Chapel 

(Colored) 
St. Mary's, Hampden 
St. Michael and All Angels 
St. Mathias, Belgravia 
St. Paul's 
St. Paul's Chapel 
St. Philip's, Highlandtown 
St. Stephen the Martyr 
St. Thomas', Homestead 
Trinity, Ten Hills 



176 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 
CATHEDRAL OF ST. PETER AND ST. PAUL 

(The National Cathedral) 
Churches In Use 1923 



Advent 

All Saints' 

All Souls' 

Ascension 

Atonement 

Bethlehem Chapel 

Calvary 

Christ, Georgetown 

Christ 

Emmanuel 

Esther Memorial 

Epiphany 

Epiphany Chapel 

Good Shepherd Chapel 

Grace, Georgetown 

Grace 

Holy Comforter Chapel 

Incarnation 

Nativity Chapel 

Our Savior 

Redeemer 

Resurrection Chapel 

St. Alban 

St. Agnes' Chapel 

St. Andrew 

St. Barnabas' Chapel 



St. Columba's Chapel 

St. David Chapel 

St. Elizabeth 

St. George's Chapel 

St. James' 

St. John's 

St. John's, Georgetown 

St. John's Chapel 

St. Luke's 

St. Mark's 

St. Margaret's 

St. Mary's Chapel 

St. Matthew's Chapel 

St. Matthew's, Bennings 

St. Matthew's, Seat Pleasant 

St. Michael and All Angels 

St. Monica's Chapel 

St. Patrick's Chapel 

St. Paul's 

St. Peter and St. Paul's 

St. Philip the Evangelist 

St. Stephen's 

St. Thomas' 

Transfiguration Chapel 

Trinity 

Trinity, Takoma Park 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 177 



MARYLAND PARISHES 



E, Easton; 


M, Maryland; 


\V. Washington 


Advent 


1900 


W. 


Washington, D. C. 


Addison 


1811 


W. 


Seat Pleasant 


All Faith's 


1692 


W. 


Mechanicsville 


All Hallows 


1692 


M. 


Davidsonville 


All Hallows 


1692 


E. 


Snow Hill 


All Saint's 


187 J 


E. 


Longwoods 


All Saint's 


1692 


M. 


Sunderland 


All Saint's 


1742 


M. 


Frederick 


All Saint's 


1893 


VV. 


Oakley 


All Soul's 


1913 


w. 


Washington, D. C. 


Anacostia 


1869 


w. 


Washington, D. C. 


Ascension 


1845 


VV, 


VV ashington, D. C. 


Ascension 


1844 


M. 


Westminster 


Antietam 


1899 


M. 


Sharpsburg 


Augustine 


1744 


E. 


Chesapeake City 


Brookland 


1897 


W. 


Washington, D. C. 


Catoctin 


1855 


M. 


Thurmont 


Christ Church 


1818 


W. 


Washington, D. C. 


Christ Church 


1692 


E. 


Stevensville 


Christ Church 


1692 


M. 


Port Republic 


Christ Church 


1913 


W. 


Kensington 


Chester 


1765 


E. 


Chestertown 


Churchville 


1869 


M. 


Churchville 


Congress Heights 


1908 


VV. 


Washington, D. C. 


Coventry 


1692 


E. 


Upper Fairmount 


Deer Creek 


1859 


M. 


Darlington 


Durham 


1692 


\V. 


Nanjemoy 


Dorchester 


1692 


E. 


Church Creek 


Emanuel 


1803 


M. 


Cumberland 


Epiphany 


1871 


VV. 


Forestville 


Epiphany 


1844 


VV. 


Washington. D. C. 


Georgetown 


1809 


VV. 


Georgetown 


Great Choplank 


1692 


E. 


Cambridge 


Grace 


1866 


VV. 


Washington, D. C. 


Grace Church 


1852 


V\'. 


Washington, D. C. 


Havre de Grace 


1809 


M. 


Havre de Grace 


Holy Trinity 


1844 


M. 


Eldersburg 


Holy Trinity 


1844 


VV. 


Collington 


Holy Trinity 




E. 


Greensboro 


Holy Trinity 


1852 


E. 


Oxford 


"1. U." Christ Church 


1862^ 


E. 


VVorton. 


Immanuel 


1876 


M. 


Glencoe 


Incarnation 


1868 


VV. 


Washington, D. C. 



178 THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 



MARYLAND PARISHES— Continued 

E, Easton; M, Maryland; W, Washington 



King and Queen 


1692 


W. 


Chaptico 


Linganore 


1889 


M. 


New Market 


Miles River 




E. 


Tunis 


North Elk 


1706 


E. 


North East 


North Sassafras 


1692 


E. 


Earlville 


North Kent 


1855 


E. 


Massey's 


Norwood 


1895 


W. 


Bethesda 


Piscattaway Broad Creek 1692 


VV. 


Oxonhill 


Pocomoke 


1855 


E. 


Pocomoke City 


Port Tobacco 


1692 


W. 


La Plata 


Prince George 


1726 


W. 


Rockville 


Queen Anne's 


1704 


W. 


Leeland 


Queen Caroline 


1728 


M. 


Guilford 


Reisterstown 


1871 


M. 


Reisterstown 


Rock Creek 


1726-1811 


W. 


D. C. 


St. Alban"s 


1855 


W. 


Washington, D. C. 


St. Andrew's 


1744 


W. 


Leonardtown 


St. Andrew's 


1858 


W. 


Washington, D. C. 


St. Ann's 


1692 


M. 


Annapolis 


St. Bartholomew's 


1812 


W. 


Laytonsville 


St. Bartholomew's 




E. 


Crisfield 


St. George's 


1692 


M. 


Perrymans 


St. George's 


1875 


M. 


Mt. Savage 


St. James' 


1770 


M. 


Monkton 


St. James' 


1873 


W. 


Washington, D. C. 


St. James' 


1692 


M. 


Herring Creek 


St. John's 


1823 


W. 


Accokeek 


St. John's 


1748 


E. 


Hillsboro 


St. John's 


1692 


M. 


Upper Falls 


St. John's 


1896 


M. 


Frostburg 


St. John's 


1700 


M. 


Hagerstown 


St. John's 


1816 


W. 


Washington, D. C, 


St. Luke's 


1728 


E. 


Church Hill 


St. Mary Anne's 


1742 


E. 


North East 


St. Mary's Whitechapel 


1725 


E. 


Denton 


St. Mary's 


1851 


W. 


St. Mary's City 


St. Mark's ' 


1800 


M. 


Petersville 


St. Mark's 


1869 


W. 


Washington, D. C. 


St. Margaret's 


1897 


W. 


Washington, D. C. 


St. Matthew's 


1916 


M. 


Sparrows Point 


St. Matthew's 


1811 


W. 


Hyattsville 


St. Matthew's 


1874 


M. 


Oakland 


St. Michael's 


1692 


E. 


St. Michael's 


St. Michael's and All Angels 


1893 


W. 


Washington, D. C. 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 179 



MARYLAND PARISHES— Concluded 

E, Easton; M, Klaryiand; \V, Washington 



St Paul's 

St. Paul's 

St. Paul's 

St. Paul's 

St. Paul's 

St. Paul's 

St. Paul's 

St. Paul's 

St. Peter's 

St. Peter's 

St. Peter's 

St. Philip's 

St. Stephen's 

St. Stephen's 

St. Thomas' 

St. Thomas' 

St. Thomas' 

St. Thomas" 

Salisbury 

Severn 

Shrewsbury 

Sherwood 

Silver Spring 

Somerset 

Spring Hill 

Stef}r\ey 

Susquehanna 

Takoma 

Trinity 

Trinity 

Trinity 

Trinity 

Vienna 

Washington 

Western Run 

Westminster 

Whitemarsh 

Vi'illiam and Mary 

William and Mary 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Wye 

Zion 

Zion 



16<52 


E. 


Fairlee 


1868 


W. 


Washington, D. C 


1836 


E. 


Vienna 


1692 


W. 


Baden 


1692 


E. 


Centerville 


1692 


M. 


Baltimore City 


1842 


M. 


Prince Frederick 


1841 


M. 


Point of Rocks 


1869 


M. 


Patuxent Forge 


1792 


W. 


Poolesville 


1692 


E. 


Easton 


1848 


W. 


Laurel 


1836 


E. 


East New Market 


1892 


W. 


Washington, D. C 


1891 


W. 


Washington, D. C 


1891 


M 


Hancock 


1742 


M. 


Owings Mills 


1851 


W. 


Croome 


1848 


E. 


Salisbury 


1838 


M. 


Millersville 


1692 


E. 


Kennedyville 


1859 


M. 


Cockeysville 


1864 


W, 


Woodside 


1692 


E. 


Princess Anne 


1827 


E. 


Quantico 


1692 


E. 


Bivalve 


1913 


E. 


Port Deposit 


1896 


W. 


Takoma Park 


1827 


W. 


Washington, D. C 


1744 


W. 


Newport 


1869 


M. 


Dorsey 




E. 


Elkton 


1836 


E. 


Vienna 


1794 


W. 


Washington, D. C 


1845 


M. 


Glyndon 


1692 


M 


St. Margaret's 


1858 


E. 


Trappe 


1692 


W. 


Wayside 


1692 


W. 


Valley Lee 


1845 


E. 


Mt. Vernon 


1744 


E. 


Berlin 


1860 


E. 


Queenstown 


1811 


W. 


Beltsville 


1804 


M. 


Urbana 



THE FIRST PARISHES OF THE PROVINCE OF MARYLAND 181 



SOURCES 

McMahon's "History of Maryland." 

Chalmer's "Political Annals " 

Chalmer's "Opinions of Eminent Lawyers " 

Henning's "Statutes at Large " 

Encyclopedia Britannia, gth Edition. 

Johnson's "Founders of Maryland." 

Hall's "Narratives of Early Maryland." 

Archives of Vlaryland. 

Hawk's "Ecclesiastical History of the United States," Vol. 2. 

Kilty's "Landholders' Assistant. " 

Reports of the American Historical Society. 

Thomas' "Chronicles of Colonial Maryland." 

Allen's Manuscript "History of the Church in Maryland." 

Baldwin's "Calendar of Wills " 

Ridgely's "Old Brick Churches." 

Gambrall's "Church Life in Colonial Maryland." 

Mathews' "Counties of Maryland." 

Bacon's "Laws of Maryland." 

Scharf's "History of Baltimore County " 

Tilghman's "History of Talbot County." 

Earle & Skirven's "Marylands Colonial Eastern Shore." 

Harrison's Manuscript "History of the Church in Talbot County." 

Conrad's "History of Delaware." 

Bozman's "History of Maryland." 

Steiner. "Some Unpublished Manuscripts from Fulham Palace, etc." 

Parish Records of the Thirty Original Parishes. 

Court Records of the Ten Original Countys. 

Land Records of the Ten Original Countys. 

Calvert Papers. 

Wroth. "The First Sixty Years of the Church of England in Maryland.' 



INDEX 

Names, Counties, Court Houses, Hundreds, Parishes, 

Churches, Geographical Names and 

Miscellaneous. 



NAME 

Abbett, Samuel Senr 

Adams, Rev. Alexander 

Richard 

Addison, Col. John. 37, 39, 40, 73, 
98, 135, 

Alfred the Great 

Allen, Rev. Ethan lOti, 

Andros, Gov. Edmund 

Anne. Queen of England 95, 

Arundel, Lady Anne 

Archbishop of Canterbury 26, 28, 

Ashman. George 40, 

Askue, Charles 

Philip 

Baleter, Edward 

Baltimore, Lord, First. . . .3, 4, 7, 

Second. . . . 1-1 1, 

118, 137, 148, 

Third.. . .14, 23, 

28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 130, 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Barecraft, John 

Barton, William 128, 

Beale, Ninian 

Thomas 

Bennett, John 

Bigger, John 

Biggs, Seth 

Bishop of Illinois 

Bishop of London, W'm. Laud. . . 
Henry Comp- 
ton. . 13, 15, 
18, 28, 38, 127, 145, 

Bishop of Maryland 

Blackiston (orBlackistone), Govr. 
Nathaniel. ... 19, 72 
Col. Nchemiah 

37, 39, 40, 

Bladen. William 96, 

Bland, Thomas 

Blay, Edward 

Boothby, Edward 

Bordley, Rev. Stephen 117, 

Boston, Henry 

Bounds, John 

Bowdle, Thomas 



INDEX 

NAME 

146 Bozman, John 43 

150 Bray, Rev. Thomas. ... 18, 19, 71, 73, 

141 74, 126 

74, Brooke (or Brooks), Thomas, .37, 40, 

164 73, 74, 98, 128, 164 

105 Dr. John 39,47 

I 30 Browne, Col. David 37, 39, 40 

155 Brown, William 122 

102 Brechin, Rev. James 153, 171 

118 Brisco, Phillip 113 

105 Bullett, Joseph 133, 134 

140 Burgess, Edward 121 

129 Button, John 157 

152 

Calverts, the 14 

''t> Calvert, Benedict 14 

'•^5 Cecelius.4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 

27, 27, 104, 111, 158 

'58 Charles 14, 27, 130 

27. George 2, 3, 5, 143 

'*^^ Leonard 5,6,7,8 

'•* Campbell, John 112 

'"* Canterbury, Archbishop of 

113 26, 28, 105 

133 Carlisle, Earl of 23 

39 Carolina, Lords Proprietors of. . . 23 

112 Carter, Philip 152 

123 Carteret, Sir George 23 

41 Carvel, Major John 40 

120 Chairs, John 145 

I 57 Chambers, Richard 1 50 

2 Charles 1. of England 3, 9 

Charlet, Richard 128 

1 7, Chase, Samuel 97 

162 Cheseldyne, Kenelm 39, 40, 112 

157 Clarke, Philip 40 

Clayland, Rev. James 

, 98 42, 106, 146, 147 

Clegate, Thomas 126 

1 1 3 Cleybourne, William 2, 116 

101 Clouds. Richard 113 

122 Cockshutt, Rev. Thomas 96, 127 

160 Codd, Col. St. Leger 41, 42 

40 Colcbatch, Rev. Joseph 121 

162 Coleburn, William 151 

96 Collyer, Robert 152 

152 Commissioners of Trade & Plan- 

146 tation. 17, 23, 30, 32, 71 , 72, 74, 163 



INDEX 



NAME 

Conner, Philip 116 

Cony, Rev, Peregrine 122 

Coode, Capt. John 39, 98, 113 

Copley, Govt. Lionel. .14, 15, 16, 17, 
37, 40, 47. 49, 58 

Coppage, John 116 

Corban, Nicholas 140 

Cordey, Thomas 142 

Cornwallis, Thomas 7 

Coursey, William 145 

Courtes (or Coates), Col. John 

37, 39, 40, 73,98, 132, 133 

Craven, Earl of 23 

Crawford, Rev. Mr 112 

Cressey, Samuel 132, 133 

Cromwell, Oliver 9 

Richard 139, 140 

Crooke, Robert 42 

Dalrumple, William 96 

Dare, William 41, 42, 34 

Davies (or Dawes), Rev. Thomas 

106, 112. 113, 128, 129. 142 

Davis. Capt. John 147 

Dent. Capt. John 73. 113 

William 41, 60, 134 

Denton. Henry 41. 44, 49, 58, 59 

Di.xon, Thomas 151 

Dorset, Earl of 1 54 

Dorsey. John 41 

Draper. Lawrence 122 

Dulaney, Daniel 97 

Eager, George 123 

Eagle, Robert 123 

Eareckson, Matthew 107 

Eaton. Rev. Jeremiah 142 

Eccleston, Hugh 155 

Edmondson. John 39. 40. 41. 43 

Edwards, Rev. John 141. 142 

Elins, William 160 

Elzey. John 148 

Peter 150 

Emmet. John 135 

Ennals, Thomas 41. 43 

Evans. Rev. Evan 142 

Evernden. Thomas 41 



NAME 

Ferry, John 140 

Firnley, Henry 126 

Finney. William 40. 145 

Fowke, Elizabeth 134 

Gerrard 134 

Francklin. John 153 

Frisby. James 37. 40 

William 117 

Fuller. Edward 123 

Gardner. Capt. Richard 129 

Gassaway, Nicholas 39 

Gay, John 140 

Geddes, Andrew 127 

George I. of England 14 

Gerrard, Capt. Thomas 102 

Gillam. John 129 

Godwin (or Godden), John 41 

Gourwin. Thomas 13 

Greenbury, Col. Nicholas. .37, 39, 40 

Greenfield, Thomas 41. 128 

Gresham, John 121 

Grey. Miles 1 50 

Groome. Moses 141 

Guilford, Lord 15 

Haley, Thomas 141 

Hall, Rev. Henry 120, 126, 127 

Joseph 96 

Hammond. Edward 153 

John 41.73. 164 

Hance. John 127 

Hanslope. Capt. Henry 121 

Hanson. Hans 40. 117 

John 133 

Harbert. William 132 

Hardy. Henry 132 

Harness, Jacob 122 

Harris, James 108 

William 39. 40. 160 

Harrison, Richard 133 

Hatton. William 135 

Hawkins, Henry 41, 133 

John 133 

Hawton, William 132 

Heigh, James 96 

Hemsley. William Jr 144 



INDEX 



NAME 

Herman, Col. Casparus 161 

Hill, Rev. Richard 126 

Hodge, Thomas 141 

Holdsworth, Samuel 126 

Holebrokc, Thomas 152 

Hollacc, William 142 

Holland, Capt. William 98, 120 

Hollyday, Vlr. James 97 

Thomas 128 

Hopkins, Jonathan 144, 145 

William 123 

Horsey, Nathaniel 150 

Stephen 148 

Hoskins, Capt. Philip. . ..41, 133. 134 

Howard, Cornelius 122 

Howell, Rev. Thos 156, 157 

Huett (Hewett), Rev. John. . .40, 42, 
106, 150, 152, 157 

Hull, Rev. Richard 127 

Hunt, Benjamin 1 56 

Hussey, Thomas 131 

Hutchins, Col. Charles 37, 40 

Hutchinson, William 135 

Illinois, Bishop of 157 

James I. of England 3, 12 

James, Charles 39 

Edward 116 

Rev. Richard 2, 6. 13, 116 

Jenckins, Francis 151 

Johnson, George 148 

Jones, Edward 39, 41 

Henry 161 

James 148 

Jowles, Col. Henry. . . .37, 39, 40, 164 
Judwin, John 146 

Keech, James 129 

Keith, Rev. Robert . 153 

Kemp, Thomas 1 27 

King, Elias 40 

Obediah 156 

Robert 39 

Langworth. Mr 98, 1 13 

Laurence, Col. Wm 116 



NAME 

Lawrence, Sir Thomas 37, 40 

Layfield, George 151 

Lecompt, John 156 

Lcich (or Leach), John Jr 127 

Rev. Joseph 146, 160 

Lewis, Wm 7 

Lillingston, Rev. John. .106, 145, 146 

LIcwellen, John 40. 49, 58, 59, 112 

Lloyd, Edward 73, 98 

Lock wood, Capt. Robert 120 

Lomax, C 133 

Lowe, Nicholas 146 

Macklin, Robert 145 

Magruder, Samuel 128 

Magruther, Samuel 128 

Manning, John 126 

Joseph 134 

Marsden, Rev. Richard 147 

Martin, Thomas 146 

Maryland, Bishop of 157 

Mary, Queen of England. . .35, 49, 58 

Mary, the Blessed Virgin 110 

Mason, Robert 40, 1 12 

Mathews, Roger 142 

Mattox, Lawrence 43 

Maulden, Francis 126 

Maxwell, Lt. Col 139 

Merrican, Hugh 123 

Miller, Michael 39, 117 

Mitchell, Henry 41 

Moadsly, James 157 

Moore, Rev. Mr 106, 132, 133 

' Morien, Rev. Mr 128 

Mullett, Rev. William 13, 126 

Murphey, Capt. James 147 

Nichols, William 127 

Nicholson, Gov. Francis. . . 17, 18, 63, 
122, 162 

Nicols, Rev. Henry 147 

Nobbes, Rev. Benj 112 

Nuball, Thomas 151 

Odber, Capt. John 148 

Ormond, Duke of 23 

Owen, Rev. Robert 128 



INDEX 



NAME 

Paca, William 97 

Panter, John 1 50 

Parker, John 142 

Pead. Rev. Duell 13, 121 

Pearce (or Pierce), Capt. William 160 

Perrett, Nicholas 120 

Person, John 1 56 

Phelps, Walter 121 

Phinney (Finney?), Wm 40 

Pinder, Edward 41 

Pitt, Philip V 156 

Planer, Wm. Sr 151 

Plater, George 60 

Platts, Rev. Christopher 113 

Pointer, Thomas 153 

Pope, The 7 

Povey, John ')5 

Power, John 1 47 

Preston, Capt. Thos 141 

Revell, Randall 148 

Richardson, Lawrence 141 

Ridgeley. Henry 41 

Rigbey, James 120 

Rigg, Henry 161 

Robins, George 1 46 

Thomas 43, 146 

Robison, William 157 

Robotham, Charles 37 

Col. George 3Q, 40 

Roper, William 121 

Round, William 153 

Sampson, Richard 140 

Sanders, James 41 

Saunders, James 98 

Scarborough, Matt 153 

Scidmore, Edward IbO 

Scott, Daniel 141 

John 127 

Selbey, Thomas 153 

Sewell, Rev. Richard 160, 161 

Seymour, Go\t. Joseph 102 

Sherwood, Hugh 40, 147 

Shinton. William 157 

Siclemore, Samuel 141 

Skinner, Andrew 147 



NAME 

Slye, Capt. Gerrard 102 

Smallwood, John 135 

Major James 41 

Smith, George 142 

John 129 

Richard 126 

Robert 40 

Walter 127 

Smithson, Thomas 147 

Smyth, Thomas 117 

Somerset, Mary 148 

Southern, Richard 1 29 

Valentine 116 

Sourton, Re\'. Francis 13 

Staley, Thomas 39, 40, 141 

Stephens, Edward 1 56 

William 148 

Stoddart, James 135 

Stone, John 134 

William 134 

Govr. William 9 

Sturton, George 160 

Talbot, Grace 143 

Tanneyhill, Wm 135 

Tasker, Thomas 41, 127, 164 

Taylard, W 44,94, 101 

Tayler, Abraham 141 

Lawrence 142 

Tench, Thomas 37, 40, 120 

Theakston, Thomas 42 

Theodore of Tarsus 105 

Thomas, John 39 

Major John 140 

Thompson, Major John 161 

Thome, Capt. Wm 148 

Tilden, Charles 117 

Tilley, Joseph 120 

Topp, Rev. Edw. Jr 123, 140 

Trippe, Major Henry 39, 41 

Trotter, Rev. George 150. 152 

Tubman, Rev. George 

132, 133, 134, 135 

Turbut, Michael 147 

Turling, Rev. John 

106, 126, 128, 129, 134 
Turner, Wm 127 



INDEX 



NAME 

Vandcrbush, Rev. Lawrence 

106, 117, 160, Icil 

Vanderhaden, Matthew 161 

Vickers, Thomas 157 

Walkers, .Mcxander 116 

Ward, William 161 

Warner, George 34, 41, 42 

Walkings (or Watkins), Francis 

40, 140 

Watkins, John 100, 121 

Watson. John 40, 112 

Weatherly , James 152 

Wharfield, Richard 122 

Wheeler, Samuel 40 

White, John 148 

Whitehouse, Rt. Rev. Henry J . 157 

Whittingham, Rt. Rev. Wm. R.. 157 



N.AME 

Whittington, John 14J 

William 40, 43 

Wiclder, John 132 

Wilkinson, Rev. William 6, 9, 13 

William III. of England., 14, 35, 49, 

58, 93, 94, 97, 162 

Williamson. "Mr. Secretary". . 23 

W ilmore, Simon 117 

Winder, John 148 

Witley, .Arthur 157 

Woolford, Roger 43 

Wootton, Rev. James 122, 123 

Workman, Anthony 116 

Wright, Nathaniel 145 

Wroth, James 42 

Wynne, Edward 40 

Yates, Robert 132 

Yco, Rev. John 13,26,141,142 



INDEX 

HUNDREDS Old County 

Annemcssex Somerset 149, 151 

Bay Talbot 143. 147 

Bohemia Cecil 158, 161 

Broad Neck Anne Arundel 119, 123 

Bollingbroke Talbot 143, 146 

Chaptico St . Mary's 110 

Chester River, Lower Kent 115 

Upper Kent 115 

Chester Talbot 143 

Choptank, Great Dorchester 154 

Little Dorchester 154 

Cliffs, Lower End of Calvert 124, 126 

Upper End of Calvert 124, 127 

Eastern Neck Kent 115 

Elk Cecil 158, 161 

Elkton Head Calvert 124, 126 

Fishing Creek Dorchester 154 

Gunpowder River Baltimore 138, 141 

South Baltimore 138, 141 

Harvey St. Mary's 110, 129 

Hermitage Dorchester 154 

Herring Creek Anne Arundel 119, 120 

Hunting Creek Calvert 124, 126 

Island Kent 115 

Island Talbot 143, 147 

Kent Island, Lower Talbot 143 

King and Queen Parish, Upper Charles 130 

Langford's Bay Kent 115 

Leonard's Creek Calvert 1 24, 1 26 

Lyon's Creek Calvert 124,127 

Manii (Monii) Somerset 149, 150 

Manokin Somerset 1 49, 150 

Mattapany Somerset 1 49, 153 

Middle Neck Anne Arundel 119 

Mill Talbot 143, 147 

Mount Calvert Calvert 128 

Nanjemy (Nanjemoy), Upper Charles 130 

Nanjemay (Nanjemoy), Lower Charles 130 

Nanticoke Dorchester 1 54 

Nanticoke Somerset 149, 152 

Newport Charles 113, 130 

New Town St. Mary's 110, 111 

Patapsco, North Side Baltimore 138, 140 

South Side Baltimore 138 

Pocomoke Somerset 1 49, 1 5 1 

Poplar Hill St. Mary's 99, 110 

Poquede Norton (or Bogettenorton) Somerset 149, 153 



INDEX 

HUNDREDS Old County 

Portobacco, East Side Charles 130 

West Side Charles 130 

Resurrection St. Mary's 110 

Sassafrax, South Cecil 158. 160 

South River Anne Arundel 1 19, 121 

Specutia Baltimore 138, 139 

St. Clements St. Mary's Ill 

St. Georges St. Mary's 110 

St. Inegos St. Mary's 110 

St. Maries St. Mary's 110 

St. Michaels St. Mary's 110 

Swan Creek Kent 115 

Town Kent 115 

Town Neck Anne Arundel 119, 123 

Tredhaven (Third Haven) Talbot 143, 146 

Tuckahoe Talbot 143, 145, 146 

West River Anne Arundel 119, 120, 121 

Wiccocomoco Somerset 149, 152 

William and Mary Parish. Upper Charles 130 

Lower Charles 130 

Worrell Talbot 143 

Worton Cecil 158, 160 



I^sfDEX 

ORIGINAL PARISHES 

Parish Present Name Old County 

All Faiths All Faiths Calvert 108, 124, 125. \29 

All Saints All Saints Calvert 108. 125, 127 

Broad Neck Westminster Anne Arundel. . . . 108, 118, 119, 123. 123 

Christ Church Christ Church Calvert 108, 124. 125, 129 

Copley St. John's Baltimore 108, 138, 139, 141, 141 

Coventry Coventry Somerset 108, jj/, 1 5 1 

Dorchester Dorchester Dorchester 108, 155, 157 

Great Choptanck. .Great Choptank. . . Dorchester 

65. 108. 1^4. 154. 155. ;j6. 156 

Herring Creek St. James Anne Arundel 108, 1 19. 120, 120 

King and Queen. . .King and Queen. . . .St. Mary's 108, 111, 113, 130 

Kent Island Christ Church Kent 108, 115, 116 

Middle Neck St. Ann's Anne Arundel 108, 119, /22, 122 

Nanjemy Durham Charles 108. 131. 133. 1J4. 134. 136 

North Sassafrax.... North Sassafras. . . .Cecil 108, 109, 159. t6o, 161, 161 

Patapsco St. Pauls Baltimore 

108. 118, 119. 137. 138, 139, 140. 140 

Pickamaxon William and Mary. .Charles 108, 131, 132, 132, 133, 136 

Piscattaway St. Johns Charles 108. 119, 130, 130, 131, 

13;, 135, 136, 136, 140 

Portobacco Portobacco Charles 108, 131, 133, 133, 136 

Snow Hill All Hallows Somerset 108, 149, 153 

Somerset Somerset Somerset 108, 148, / 50, 150 

South River AH Hallows Anne Arundel 108, 119, 120, 121 

South Sassafrax Shrewsbury Cecil 108, 117. 159, 160, 161 

Stepney Stepney Somerset 108. i;2, 152 

St. Andrew's 109. 1 59 

St. George's St. George's Baltimore. . .108, 115, 138, 138, 139, 142 

St. Michael's St. Michael's Talbot 42, 108, 143, 147 

St. Paul's St. Paul's Calvert 108. 124. 125. 128 

St. Paul's St. Paul's Kent 

IS. 108. ns. 115. ,;/. 117. 13S. 162 

St. Paul's St. Paul's Talbot 108. 143. 144. 14s. 145. 164 

St. Peter's St. Peter's Talbot 108. 143, 143, 146. 146 

William and Mary. William and Mary. .St. Mary's 108. Ill, 112 



Page numbers in italics denote reference to be found on illustration opposite the 
number 



INDEX 

LATER PARISHES 

Parishes Present Location Old County 

All Saints Frederick Charles f j6, 1 36 

Chester Kent Kent 114 

North Elk (or Cecil Cecil ;jq, 161 

St. Mary Anne's) 

Prince George's. . . Prince George Prince George 130, 135, jj6, 136 

Queen Anne Prince George Prince George 128, 163 

Rock Creek Dist. of Columbia . . Charles ijo 

St. Luke's Queen Anne's Talbot 144, 145 

St. Mary's White Caroline Dorchester 1 56 

Chapel 

St. Thomas' Baltimore Baltimore 759, 140 

Trinity Charles St. Mary's and Charles 129 

Whitemarsh Talbot Talbot 146 

Worcester Worcester Somerset 153 

Wye Queen Anne's Talbot 145 



Page numbers in italics denote reference to he found on illustration opposite the 
number 



INDEX 

CHURCHES 

Old County Present County 

All Faiths Calvert St. Mary's 106, 120, i2q 

All Hallows (Snow Hill) Somerset Worcester 15 3, i;} 

All Hallows (South River) . . . .Anne Arundel Anne Arundel . . 106, 121, /2/ 

All Saints Calvert Calvert 127, / 27 

All Saints (Monii) Somerset Somerset . . .42, 106, 150, ;jo 

All Saints (Frederick) Charles Frederick 136, / j6 

Christ Church (Broad Creek). .Kent Queen Anne's 

12, 106, 116, r/6 

Christ Church (Easton) Talbot Talbot 14J, 146 

Christ Church (Nanjemy) Charles Charles 1^2, 134 

Christ Church, Cambridge. . . .Dorchester Dorchester 65, i;6, 156 

Christ Church (I. U.) Kent Kent 114 

Christ Church (Portobacco Charles Charles 106, ijj, 133 

and La Plata) 

Christ Church (Wayside) Charles Charles 106, 132, 132 

Christ Church Calvert Calvert 106, 126, 126 

Christ Church (St. Michaels) . .Talbot Talbot 143, 147 

Christ Church (Chaptico) St. Mary's St. Mary's /;j, 1 13 

Chester Church Talbot Queen Anne's 145 

Coventry (Rehoboth) Somerset Somerset t^i , 151 

Emmanuel (Chestertown) Kent Kent 1:4 

Middleham Chapel Calvert Calvert 124 

Shrewsbury (Locust Grove) . . .Cecil Kent 106, 160, 160 

Spring Hill Somerset Wicomico 152 

Stepney (Green Hill) Somerset Wicomico 42, 7j2, 152 

St. Ann's (Middletown) State of Delaware 161 

St. Ann's (Annapolis) Anne Arundel Anne Arundel 722, 122 

St. Andrew's (Princess Anne). Somerset Somerset 148 

St. Andrew's (Leonardtown). . .St. Mary's St. Marv's 1 1 1 

St. Clement's Manor St. Mary's St. Mary's 113 

St. George's (Poplar Hill) St. Mary's St. Mary's 

9, 13, 106, 112, 112 

St. James (Herring Creek) .... Anne Arundel Arundel 106, 120, 120 

St. John's (Broad Creek) Charles Prince George's ij;, 135 

St. John's (Kingsville) Baltimore Baltimore 106, 141, 141 

St. Luke's (Church Hill) Talbot Queen Anne's 106, 164 

St. Margaret's (Westminster). .Anne Arundel Anne Arundel 123, 123 

St. Martin's Somerset Worcester 14^ 

St. Mary's (Northeast) Cecil Cecil i;q 

St. Paul's (Rock Creek) Charles District of Columbia. . . . 130 

St. Paul's (Fairlee) Kent Kent 106, 117, 117 

St. Paul's Baltimore Baltimore City 140, 140 

St. Paul's (Vienna) Dorchester Dorchester 1^4 

St. Paul's (Baden) Calvert Prince George's. 106, 12S, 128 

Page numbers in italics denote reference to be found on illustration opposite the 
number 



INDEX 

CHURCHES 

Old County Present County 

St. Paul's St. Mary's 106 

St. Stephen's (Earleville) Cecil Cecil 106, i6i, 161 

St. Thomas (Garrison Forest). .Baltimore Baltimore lyg 

Trinity (Church Creek) Dorchester Dorchester 106, 757, 157 

Trinity (St. Mary's City) St. Mary's St. Mary's. . .9, 106, ijo, 110 

Trinity (Elkton) Cecil Cecil lyS 

Whitemarsh (ruins) Talbot Talbot 146, 146 

Wye Talbot Talbot 106, 14s, 145 

St. Paul's (Prince Frederick) . . Calvert Calvert 125, /25 

St. Paul's (Centerville) Talbot Queen Anne's. . 106, 14s, 14^ 



Page numbers in italics denote reference to be found on illustration opposite the 
number 



INDEX 



GEOGRAPHICAL 

Annapolis I*). 60, 63, 64, 

68, 93, 98, 99, 122, 

Atlantic Ocean 

Avalon, Newfoundland 

Avon River 

Back Creek 

Baltimore City 

Bermuda 

Blackwater River 155, 

Bodkin Point 118, 

Bohemia River 

Brewer's Branch 145, 146, 

Broad Creek 12, 116, 

Broad Neck 

Bluff Point 

Buck Neck 

Budds (Bird) Creek 

Bush River 13, 138, 141, 

Calvert Town 

Cambridge 65 , 154, 

Centerville 

Charlestown 

Chesapeake Bay 5, 110, 

116, 117, 119, 120, 124, 
140, 141, 142. 147, 160, 

Chester River 

9, 115, 116, 117, 143, 

Chestertown 

Choptank River 143, 147, 

Churn Creek 

"Cloppers" (Colgate) Creek. . . . 

Courte's Plantation 

Cox Town 

Cresseye's Landing 

Cresseye's Plantation 

Delaware 

Dividing Creek 

Dunn's Creek 

Eastern Bay 116, 143, 

Eastern Shore 145, 148, 

Eastern Shore of Virginia 

Easton 146, 

Elk Neck 

Elk Ridge 

Elkton 

England 5, 7, 14. 16, 18, 19, 

33, 49, 73, 94, 102, 

Fishing Creek 

"Forked Neck" Plantation 



,67, 
134 
153 
3 
134 
149 
140 
23 
156 
137 
161 
147 
135 
119 
113 
114 
110 
142 
125 
156 
145 
159 
112, 
137, 
161 

145 
115 
148 
117 
140 
132 
127 
132 
133 
153 
149 
117 
147 
154 
148 
147 
141 
118 
159 
27, 
144 
120 
147 



France 49, 94, 102 

Frederick (Maryland) 136 

Gray's Inn Creek 115 

Green Hill 152 

Gunpowder River 139, 141 

Hamblcton 1 46 

Hampton, Virginia 2 

Head of Elk (Elkton) 1 59 

Hell Point 114 

Hemsley's Plantation 144 

Herring Creek 118, 124 

Hopton 1 44 

Hoskin's Quarter 133, 134 

Hunt's Plantation 155, 156 

Indian Creek 110 

Ireland 3, 49, 94, 102 

Isle of Kent 2, 6, 107 

James River (Virginia) 12 

Joppa 138, 141 

Judwin's Branch 145, 146 

Kent Island 9, 12, 114, 115, 116 

Kingsville 141 

Kipling, England 3 

Lambeth. England 27 

Langford's Bay 117 

Langworth's Branch Ill, 113 

•'Lisle Hall" Plantation 135 

Little Choptank River 155, 156 

London, England 14, 71 

Longford. County of 3 

Lyon's Creek 120 

Magothy River 118, 138 

Manokin River 135, 138 

Marston, England 18 

Maryland, Province of. . 1, 3. 6. 7, 15, 

16, 18, 19. 23, 26. 27, 28, 29, 30, 

31, 32. 35. 36, 47. 49, 93. 95, 96, 

97, 102, 107, 109, 119, 130, 151 

Mattawoman Creek .... 1 1 9, 113. 134 

Middle River 139, 140. 141 

Middletown (Delaware) 161 

Miles River Neck 147 

Monii 150 

Mt. Calvert 125, 128 

Nanjemy 133, 134 

Nanticoke River 152 

"Narrows," The 116, 143 

New Castle (Delaware) 142 



INDEX 



GEOGRAPHICAL 

New England 1,2 

New Foundland 3 

New Jersey 23,30 

Newport 113 

New Town Ill 

New Yarmouth 115 

Ordinary Point 159 

Oxford College 18 

Oxford Town 146 

Palmer's Island 2 

Patapsco River.. ..118, 137, 138, 139 

Patuxent River 110, 118, 120, 124 

Patuxent River Main Road Ill 

Perryman 1 42 

Pettite's Old Field 140 

Pine Hill Creek 110, 112, 124 

Plowden's Wharf 113 

Pocomoke City 151. 153 

Pocomoke River 151 

Point Lookout 110, 112 

Poplar Hill 6, 9, 112 

Portobacco Creek 113 

Potomac River 

110, 130, 132. 133, 134, 135 
■"Prevent Danger" Plantation. . . 126 

Princess Anne 1 49, 1 50 

Quantico 152 

Rehoboth, Maryland 151 

Rock Creek 136 

Sassafras River. . . . 109. 159, 160, 161 

Severn Heights 123 

Severn Ridge Path 127 

Skipton Creek 1 44, 1 46 



Snow Hill 

Spring Hill 

State House (St. Mary's City) . . 

St. Clement's Bay 112, 

St. Clement's Island 

St. Clement's Manor 

St. Clement's River 

St. George's 

St. Mary's City 

2,' 6, 15, 47, 49, 110. 

St. Michael's 

Susquehanna River 2, 137, 

Swan Point 

The "Three Notched Road" 

110, 112, 113, 

Tred-Avon River 

Trent Creek 

Virginia 1, 3, 6 

Waringtown 

Watkin's Point 

West Indies 

Whitehall 14, 18, 19, 23, 

"White Plaines" Plantation. . . . 

Wicomico 

Wicomico River 113, 

Windsor Castle 

Worton Creek 114, 117. 

Wye Mills 

Wye River 144, 

Yorke 

Zachiah Branch 

Zachias Swamp 



153 
152 
111 
113 
6 
113 
111 
111 



147 
142 
114 

124 
147 
129 
. 12 
126 
148 

5 
. 24 
120 
113 
130 

4 
160 
147 
147 
144 
133 
113 



INDEX 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Act "Concerning Religion," 1649 

10, 30 
"For Maintainance of Mini- 
sters," 1661 12 

"For the Service of Almighty 
God, Etc.," 1692. . .10, 12, 15, 
16, 17, 18, 47-58, 166 
"For the Service of Almighty 
God, Etc.," Defining its 

purposes 87 

"For the Service of Almighty 
God, Etc.," Defects of this 

Law 19 

"For the Service of Almighty 

God, Etc.," Effective date 58 
"For the Service of Almighty 

God, Etc.," Date Repealed 93 
"For the Establishment of 
Religious Worship, etc.," 

1702 19, 71,94 

"For the Establishment of 
Religious Worship, etc.," 

Validity of 95, 96, 97 

For Constables taking List of 

Taxables 59 

Address to King William III. . . . 35 

"Anabaptists" 1 1, 29, 30 

Anglicans 6 

Anglican Church 6 

Clergymen 6 

Faith 6 

Answers to Queries about the 

Province, 1676 32 

"Antinomian" II 

Assembly, Maryland Provincial 

12, 13, 15, 16, 17, 19, 30, 
40, 47, 48. 49, 58, 71, 73, 
74, 93, 94, 101, 107 
Maryland Provincial, 
Changes in person- 
nel 41, 42, 43 

"Associators " 39 

Appeals from Vestry decisions to 
be made to Governor and 

Council 91 

Baptisms 25, 32, 65 

"Barrowist " 11 

Benefices, Collating of Ecclesias- 
tical 17, 38 

Bishop of London, Personal rep- 
resentative 

of 15 

Jurisdiction of 
the 12,38 



Board or Commissioners of Trade 
and Plantation 

17, 23, 28, 30, 32, 71 

Book of Common Prayer 

37, 71, 74, 

Bray, Dr. Thomas.. 1 8, 19, 71, 73 

"Brownists" 

Burials in the Province of Mary- 
land 25 

Calverts, As Anglican Church 



100 

, 74 



, 32 



men 

As Roman Catholics. . , 
Rule of terminated, . . . 
Rule of restored 


14 
14 
14 
14 




n 


Chaplains to the Council and As- 


47 


Charter of Avalon 

of the Province of Mary- 
land 3,4, 5,9, 12 


3 
. 14 


Church of England. . . 1 , 2, 3, 6, 8, 

15, 17, 18, 19, 26, 29, 

31, 36, 38, 47, 50, 71, 

75, 89, 93, 95, 99, 

Established 

by Law 

15, 16, 51, 58, 


12, 
30, 
74, 
101 

.93 


Growth of. . . 


12 


Doctrines 
and disci- 
pline of the 


17 


Rights, Lib- 
erties and 
Franchises 
of the. . .15, 


, 50 


Jurisdiction 
of the. .. . 


15 


Governor 

Copley rep- 
resentative 
of the 


15 


Ritesof the. 17,37 


Livings 


12 



Church, The Puritan I 

The Roman Catholic. . . 1,3 

"The Established" 75 

Churches, Care of 65 

To be built in each 

Parish 17 

Twentv-two built in 

1693..". 17 

Exceptions where 

churches are built . . 54 



INDEX 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Churches, care of 

To be used for Court 

Houses 

Church Wardens, Appointed each 

year 

Elected by 
Freeholders 
of the Par- 
ish 

Oath of 

Fines for non- 
performance 

of duty 

To see that pa- 
r o c h i a 1 
charges are 

paid 

Fines to be lev- 
ied by 

Clerks of Parishes To make re- 
turns to 
County 
Courts. . . .67, 
Fee for record- 
ing 

Clerks of Parishes 

Colonies, The American 

Colinists, The Roman Catholic. . 
Commissary, Dr. Bray appointed 
Commission of Gov. Lionel Cop- 
ley 

Commonwealth of England 

Copley, Instructions to Governor 
16, 
Commission of Governor 
Representative of Crown 

and Church 

Council, The King's, at Whitehall 
Counties of the Province of Mary- 
land 16, 

Work of Dividing into 

Parishes 16 

County, Court Houses to be used 

as churches 

Seals 

Decisions of Governor and Coun- 
cil Final 

Disposition of the Forty per poll 

Tax 76, 98, 99, 100, 101, 

Dissenters and Quakers exempted 

Dissenters 

Drum, Council and Assembly 
called by beat of drum 



64 
107 



102 
92 
167 



Ecclesiastical Benefices 17, 38 

England, The Great Seal of 14 

Revolution in 14 

Fines To be applied to Parish 

uses 53 

To be recorded in "Their 

Majesties' Names" 53 

Freedom to worship God 2 

Freeholders 16, 51 

To be notified to at- 
tend meetings of 

Justices 51 

Voters in church elec- 
tions must be ... . 78 
Vestrymen must be 79 
To name retiring ves- 
trymen 80 

To vote for church 

wardens 85 

Glebes 48 

"Heretics" II 

" Idolators" 11 

Inhabitants to furnish informa- 
tion 81 

"Independents" 11, 29, 30 

Instructions to Governor Leonard 
Calvert and the Commission- 
ers 6, 7 

Jesuit II 

"Jesuited Papist " 11 

Justices, Meeting of 51 

Jurisdiction of 87, 92 

Laws of Province of Maryland re- 
pealed, 1692 44 

Lord's Supper, Administering the 66 

Lutherans 11 

Laws, Ecclesiastial of England. . 9 

Lay Readers, Appointed in va- 
cant Parishes ... 65 

To assist ministers 
with two Par- 
ishes 65 

Appointed by Ves- 
try 88 

Licensed by the Or- 
dinary 88 

Salary of 88 

Oath and Licenses 
of 88 

Duty 



89 



INDEX 



MISCELLANEOUS 
Marriages, Prevention of IllegaL 
Who shall perform ce- 
remony 

Fees 

Place and time of. . . 
"Tables" to be pro- 
vided 

Meetings of Justices 

Ministers of the Church of Eng- 
land 12, 

Expenses of transpor- 
tation to Maryland . 

Induction of 15, 

Maintenance of 

12, 16, 48, 
To be one of the Vestry 

16. 48, 
Limited to two Parishes 

Missionary 12, 13 

Oath of Governor and Council . . 

of Registrar 

of Vestryman 64, 

Additional. . 

of Church Warden 

Appointed by Parliament. 42 

"Papist-Priest " 

Papists 

Parishes 16, 17, 24, 32.48, 

Boundaires to be well 
defined. . . 
to be r e - 
corded in 
County 
Courts. . . 
Copy of Cer- 
tificate to 
be sent 
Governor. 
Dividing Counties into. 
Number in each County 
Ratifying records of. . . . 
Parochial Charges to be paid out 

of gifts to the Parishes 

Penalties for Sabbath breaking. . 

for failing to carry out 

provisions of the Act 

of 1692 

for absence from Ves- 
try meetings 

Pilgrims of New England 

of the Province of Mary- 
land 



81 

79 

79 

85 

,80 

11 

166 

105 

15 



Places of Worship of Dissenters 
and Quakers to be registered. . 93 

"Prespeterians ' 11. 30 

Protestants 7, 8, 9, 166 

Protestant Governor 10 

Ministers 7, 9 

Revolution in the 
Province of Mary- 
land 12, 14, 36 

Religion 36 

Puritans 1 

Quakers 33, 92, 93, 166 

Queries about the Province of 

Maryland 29, 30 

Registers of Parishes, Appointed. 81 
Oath of... 81 
To rec ord 
vestry 
proceed- 
ings, etc. 81 

Fees 82 

To Furnish 
Copy of 
the Par- 
ish Rec- 
ords 90 

To Show 
Records 
of Par- 
ishes . . 82, 90 

Religious Liberty 1,5, 15 

An asset of the 

Calverts. ... 5 
The "Child of 
Expediency" 15 

Religious Toleration 8 

Report to Governor and Council 16 
Roman Catholics. 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 14 

"Romish Church" 29 

"Roundhead" 11 

St. Cecelia's Day 5 

St. George's Day Ill 

Salaries of Chaplais n 42 

"Scismatic " 11 

"Separatists" 11 

Sheriffs, Jurisdiction of 60 

To collect Forty per poll 

Tax n 

To pay Forty per Poll 

Tax to Vestry 78 

Commission for collect- 
ing Tax 55 



INDEX 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Sheriffs, Jurisdiction of 60 

To report Property Do- 
nations 66 

To report number of 

Taxables 66 

To collect additional Ten 

pounds Tax 87 

Fees 87 

Sunday Observances 50 

Tax Forty pounds of Tobacco 

■•per Poll" 16, 55 

Sheriff to Collect 55, 17. 87 

to pay to vestry 

55, n, 87 

How to be Spent 56 

Application of remainder of 88 

Disposition of 76 

Ten pounds of Tobacco ad- 
ditional 87 

Sheriff's salary for collecting 66 

Taxables 59 

List of Taxables kept 
with vestry records. . 55 

Toleration Act 8 

Trade Building in the Province 

of Maryland 24, 32 

Vestries, Authority for 78 

Annual election on Eas- 
ter Monday 80 

Authority for calling 
meetings 84 

To build churches and 
chapels 54 

To build churches where 
needed 64 

To determine dimen- 
sions of Churches and 
Chapels 54 

To obtain list of Tax- 
ables yearly 55 

Records to be kept in 
register 84 

To receive tax from 
Sheriff 55 

Instructed as to certain 
interior work on 
churches 63 

To see that churches are 
decently kept 57 

Meetings to be held once 
a month 83 



Vestries, Authority for 78 

Public notice to be 

given of meetings. ... 84 
Auhtorined to accept 

Donations 56 

To act as a "'Body Cor- 
porate" 'i7 

Authorized to sue 56 

To choose church war- 
dens 64 

Meeting dates fixed. . 89 
Minimum constituting 

vestry 89 

Appeals from their deci- 
sions to be made to 
Governor and Council 91 
Authorizing vestry to 

Act 89 

Vestrymen 16 

Number constituting 

a vestry 78 

Must be Freeholders. 79 

Oath of 64,79 

Oath administered to 
First vestryman by 
one of the justices. 79 
Oath administered to 
other vestrymen by 
First Vestryman. . . 79 
Additional Oath of. . 79 
Two new ones chosen 

annually 80 

Freeholders to name 

retiring vestryman. 80 
Penalty for absence 
from vestry meet- 
ings 90 

Election of 53,90 

Number of to be cho- 
sen 53 

Given authority of 

office 53 

To fill vacancies .... 57, 78 
Suits to be entered in 
the name of the 
principal Vestry- 
man 57 

Virginia Colony, The 1,3,6 

Visitation of Dr. Thomas Bray. . 19 

Voters must be Freeholders 78 

Whitehall, Council at 19 

Writs of Election of Burgesses. . . 41 



INDEX 



COUNTIES 

Anne Arundel. .39, 41, 106, 

118, 119, 120, 124 

Baltimore. . 39, 40, 106. 107, 

118, 119, 137, 139, 

Calvert 39,41,96, 106, 

112, 120, 124, 125 

Cecil 39, 41,42, 

108, 109, 114, 

Charles 39, 41. 106. 

113, 119, 124, 
132, 133, 135, 

Dorchester 39. 41 



107. 


108. 


, 137, 


, 140 


108, 


114, 


, 141, 


142 


107. 


108, 


, 127, 


130 


106. 


107, 


, 115, 


158 


107, 


108, 


130. 


131, 


, 138, 


140 


,65, 


106. 



107, 108, 154, 155, 156 

Harford 138 

Kent 9. 39. 40, 106, 107, 108, 

114, 115, 116, 158, 160. 165 

Prince George's 124, 142 

St. Mary's. . .9, 39, 40, 106, 107, 108. 
109, no. 111. 112. 113. 124, 130 

Somerset 39. 40, 41, 42, 43, 106, 

107, 108. 148, 149, 150, 152 

Talbot 39, 40, 41, 42, 43. 106, 

107, 108. 143, 144, 146 
Worcester 1 49 



COURT HOUSES 

Anne Arundel County 119 

Baltimore 138 

Calvert 125 

Charles 131 

Cecil 159 



Dorchester 1 54 

Kent 115 

St. Mary's Ill 

Somerset 149 

Talbot 144