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Full text of "The Flesherton advance"

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N 

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VOL. 60; -NO. 44 

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FLESHERTON. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 1941 

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W. H. Thurston & Son, Props. 

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DR. J. A. McARTHUR CENSUS 

ENUMERATOR GREY-BRUCE 

Dr. J. A. McArthur of Markdale 
baa been appointed census enumerat- 
or for the riding of Grey-Bruce foi 
ten-year census which commences on 
June 2nd. Names of 246 census ad- 
ministrators for the Dominion were 
announced last week by the Depart- 
ment of Trade and Commerce, 
Others are Archie McKay, Under- 
wood, for Bruce; North Grey, H. H. 
Boyes, Meaford; Simcoe North, John 
R. Lawrence, Creemore. 

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TRAMPLED BY BULL PROTON 
FARMER INJURED 

Robert Goodfellow, farmer ol the 
14th Concession, Proton, sustained a 

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fractured right arm and other injur- 
ies Monday morning, when trampled 
by & bull. A cow kicked him and 
knocked him into the boll's stall. 
Goodfellow's arm was broken neai 
the shoulder and the shoulder cap dis- 
located before he could get out of 
the animal's way. After preliminary 
examination by Dr. T. P. Carter, 
he was taken to Lord Dufferin Hos- 
pital, Orangeville. 
Marriages 

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RUTH McLEAN BROKE LEG 

Ruth McLea.., 14, daughter of Mir. 
and Mrs. Archie McLean of Tryon 
district, Osprey, suffered a broken 
leg while sleigh riding on Friday, 
when another sleigh ran into her. 
She is in the Markdale hospital. 

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Shop at Duncan's for 
your Hardware needs 

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GALVANIZED WARE 

Cream Cans, Strainers. 

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Pails, Tubs, Boilers, 

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\ 
I 

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CROSS CUT SAWS, AXKS^'rEDE SAWS, 

FILES, SNOW & S*5ip SHOVELS, 

MAN T ^<KE 'FORKS. 

jODER STOVES and 
.CK SUPPLIES 

> v 

<MiiG PAINT SHIPMENT IS JUST IN 

^-re ready to filll your P' 'at, Enamel and 
-si/ requirements' >ti<J 'BJ^brvin- Williams 
Quality Paints and Popular Priced Lines." 

4 * j 

ROYAL PURPLE and DR. BELL'S STOCK 
and POULTRY REMEDIES 

F. W. DUNCAN 

HARDWARE "Blue Coal" Phone 54 

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CASH 

FOR YOUR TIMBER 

Farmers ! Why not cut that crop of large, 
matured trees and turn them to cash? 

We will pay highest cash prices for Logs and 
Standing Timber of all species. 

It will pay you to cut your choice, straight logs 14 
and 16 feet long, beech preferably cut 16 feet long, 
as we pay extra for these lengths. 

Harvest your Matured Timber now and give your 
small trees a chance to grow into money for 
you. 

WRITE OR PHONE 

DUNDALK SAW MILLS 

BAXTER WRIGHT PHONE 3 

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\ 

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Equipped to handle the finest service at moderate prices 

Our Beautiful 

Air 

Conditioned 
Funeral Chapel 

124 AVKNUB ROAD 

TORONTO, Ont. 

RICHARD HADDOCKS, FRBD MADDOCK& 

Manager. Associate. J 

Mwnber of th FlMhwton Old B jvs" * Girls' Association 

FES & MADDOCKS 

Frmrljr of F5hrt<m. Ont 

1 12 ie Road, Toronto, Out KI. 4344 t 

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SERGT. FRED GORRELL 

Sergt. Gorrell enlisted with the 
Grey and Simcoe Foresters, overseas 
force, in June of last year. For a 
time hew as an Acting Sergeant, but 
was later given command of a section 
with the rank of Corporal. His pro- 
motion to Sergeant came through a 
ago. Sergt. Gorrell was 

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a member of the former Grey Regi- 
ment for ten years and his promotion 
was not a surprise to his friends. 

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ST. PATRICK'S SOCIAL AT 

ST. CDuL uMA CHURCH 

The postponed St. Patrick's social 
was held in the church basement on 
Tuesday, when an evening of pro- 
gressive crokinole was enjoyei by all 
present. Homemade candy was sold, 
and a fine lunch concluded the enter- 
tamraent. Jack McConkey and Miss 
Anna Sh.ortr.eed, with counts of 1195 
the ftwt prizes, while 
consolations went to' Carmen. 4i'o 
and Mrs. E. G. Bitchie, 395. 

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Large Rat Caught 

Some kind of marauding animal 
has been operating Mr. P. Hemp- 
hill's, store at Ceylon for some tim 
and all efforts to catch the miscreant 
has been in vain. Traps and poison 
were placed, but all to no avail. Mr. 
Hemphill decided as a last resort t, 
use a sn:.re and that idea was a 
bright one, and the animal was 
caught. !t proved to be the great- 
grandfather of all rats and" WS5 I s ^a 
inches in length, minus the tail. It 
will be a relief to have caught thai 
fellow and no doubt store keeping 
will now be more profitable. 

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Campaign For War 
Services Fund Starts 

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Maple Syrup flaking 
Just Starting Here 

Maple syrup making has received 
a set-back this year with the spring 
coming so late and this Tuesday none 
of the larger producers "have yet 
commenced Jj^fSfG the trees. Mr. 
Walter Akitt, Grajp- .County's largest 
producer of maple' products, expects 
to commence operations this Wed- 
nesday when about 2800 trees in his 
bush will be in production within a 
few days. Mr. W. J. Chard also ex- 
pecta to get into production at once 
with around 500 trees. The season, 
this year is expected to be very good, 
as there is plenty of snow in the 
bash and the cold nights and warm 
days will be perfect for maple syrup 
production. 

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Returned From North 

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After a month visiting with theii 
daughter. Mrs. Royden McDonald, at 
Gold Pines, Ont., Mr. and Mrs. John 
V"ickcns of the Valley returned home 
on Friday after a most interesting 
and appreciative trip. The weather 
was perfect while there as there was 
only about two inches of snow fell 
one day. Mr. and Mrs. McDonald 
reside five miles from Gold Pines and 
the only way to reach their place i< 
by dog team in the winter or boat in 
the summer. When they left for home 
last week the ice in the river had 
broken up. The home her daughter 
and husband occupy is of frame con- 
struction and contains all modern" 
conveniences and are owned by the 
Hydro, for whom Mr. McDonald is an 
open tor. There are about 20 houses 
in the little- village, but are without 
store service, but the people are most 
sociable and went out of their way to 
make their visit a memorable one* 

One thing of Interest noticed by 
Mr. Wickens was that the trees in 
the swamps are tall and thin, not 
more than three or four inches ir 
diameter. Going out m the airplane 
there was a high wind of 45 miles 
and the trip was rough, but on the' 
way home tne air w a? quiet and iflj^. 
plane sailed along with"olrira--auiver. 

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1,223 CARS OF GRAIN HAVE 
BEEN BROUGHT TO ONTARIO 

Under the Dominion- Provincial 
freight subsidy arrangements, 1,225 
cars of freight-free grain- from 
Western Canada have been distribut- 
ed through Ontario, Hon. P. M. 
Dewan, Minister of Agriculture, said 
last week. ^ 

"It has worked out, certainly bet- 
ter than I anticipated," said Mr. De- 
wan, "and I t.ni'ik the loan has been 
very well received by the farmers, 
particularly those whose fields .were 
badly affeoted by the wet season." 

The movement up to Thursday 
night last has brought J.201,000 bu. 
into the province and thare are still 
999,000 busKels yet to come. 

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Cream Service 

, x^ 

In order to assist you during the 
bad roads conditions, when you can 
get to the highway with a sleigh but 
cannot continue to town we will give 
| the following service: 
j Our tru:ks starting Fri. Apr. 4th, will 
leave PriceviUe at 10 a.m. and wil' 
pick up cream frpm there on its way 
in to Flesherton. On the sam<> day 
tt 2 p.m. will leave Maxwell and 
will pick tip cream from there into 
Flesherton. We witf give you thi? 
service at the same hours on Tues- 
days. 

Our trucks will leave Proton Cor- 
nrs on Saturday and Wednesdays at 
10 a.m. From the time the truck 
leaves you may allow five miTvute' 
for each 1% miles. 

We hope you will take advantage 

of this service which is of no cost to 

you just a matter of co-operation. 

FLKSHERTON CREAMERY CO. 

Phone 66 

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_ 

John McFadyen Dies 

Death removed one of Ceylon's 
most highly respected and well 
blown citizens on Teusday morning, 
when Mr. John MvFadyen passud 
away at the home of his brother. 
Mr. Alex. McFadyen. Mr. McFadyen 
had been enjoying very good health 
until late last fall, when he suffered a 
heart attack. Since that time he has 
been confined to his bed and passed 
quietly away Tuesday morning at 
the age of 81 years. 

The late Mi 1 . McFadyen was a son 
of the late Janet McLi-an and Dun- 
can McFadyen and was born near 
PriceviUe, where he received his ed- 
ucation and grew into manhood. In 
1888 he married Janet Muir, coming 
to reside at Ceylon at that time. His 
wife predeceased him in 1932. There 
was no family. Deceased also are 
two brothers. Neil and Hugh. Sur- 
viving are orte brother, Alexander, 
of Ceylon and one sister, Mary Ann 
(Mrs. Wm. McLeod), of Portland. 
Oregon. 

The late Mr. McFadyeji was a man 
of sterling worth and was a carpent- 
er f,rom his youth. Many of the 
homes in this locality were erected 
by him and his brother. He wag a 
favorite with everyone and his 
passing occasions deep regret by a 
wide circle of friends. 

The funeral will take place on 
Thursday, April 3rd. at 2 p.m., whoti 
Rev. Dr. Campbell of PriceviUe 
Presbyterian ctyurch will conduct 
the service. Interment will be made 
in McNeill Cemetery, Pviceville. 

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The campaign in Flesherton for 
funds for the Canadian War Services 
Campaign, now in progress, commenc- 
ed on Monday when the organization 
meeting was held in the town hall, 
when the following officers were 
appointed: 

Chairman Ken G. Betts. 

Secretary C. P. Wilson. 

Treasurer C. J. Kennedy. 

Publicity ttanager J. Nuha. 

The committee is to meet at once 
and organize for the canvass am! 
appoint canvassers. No objective for 
Flesherton has as yet been set. The 
village of PriceviUe has an organiza- 
tion of its own and will conduct its 
own canvass. 

Announcement that Canadian aux- 
iliary war services organizations have 
agreed to hold one united flnancia' 
drive this year, instead of six separ- 
ate drives, has met with the warmest 
public approval. 

It was on the insistence of the 
public, in fact, and with the suppor* 
of the newspapers jvp^rally, that the 
principle of six atfjr'^, in one wa- 
accepted not only to\i away with 
a large percentage of campaign ex- 
penses, but also to relieve as of the 
vexatious necessity of responding to 
what seemed endless calls for help. 
As far as the public is concerned 
there is every reason to feel grati- 
fied with this arrangement, which 
actually was made at our own request 
and for our convenience. It is a great 
relief, indeed, to know that by donat- 
ing once we shall have carried our 
our obligations in 'hat respect for the 
next 12 months. 

Havirar inspired the creation of this 
new "six in OTO'' policy, it is the 
moral responsibility of every one 
us to play our part by supporting 
the drive to the fullest possible ex 
tent. We must not, moreover, in al 1 
fair'ie'':-. give lss to this one drive 
than we wotf d srive in total to all six 

This money is for the entertain- 
ment and for giving comforts to the 
bo s in camps in Canada and" also for 
those in the centre of the war i: 
England. The "boys ov k er. there" de- 
pend on the *^nllt back home," si 
give generously -when the canvasser 
comes to call. ? l^Jiyour son, your 
father, yotrr brJth'er. your husband, 
or your* sweetheart is on active ser 
.vice, then you will want him to b' 
happy and comforiabie'w'tm'e *-***'- 
Our contributions *fti be our gift t' 
those who are figntfng our battles. 
Let us dip deep into our pockets and 
put the campaign across, so that the 
boys will know that all those they 
left behind are with them in spirit 
and thinking of their welfare. 

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Late Mrs. Susan Scott 

Mrs. James Scott died at her hom 
in Delia on Monday, March. 3, aftec 
a short illness. The deceased 
had been in poor health fo 
time, being at the adva 
83 years, having been born 
Flesherton, Ont., in 1867. 

In the year 1880 she married ili^jP 
James Scott and lived for some tim 
at Saulte Ste. Marie, Michigan. In 
1903 her husband came West, and 
in 19O5 Mrs. Scott with the family 
joined him on the homestead at Car- 
lew (now Wimborne), 28 miles east 
of Olds, residing there until 1910, 
when Mr. Scott having- purchased 
land in the Handbills, the family 
moved into the Delia district, where 
she remained until her death. She 
is survived by her husband; one son, 
Walter, of Delia; one sister, Mrs. 
Catherine McLeod, of Flesherton, Ont. 
and one brother, Adam Holley, of 
Berkley, Ont. She was pre-deceased 
by one daagrhfcr and three sons. 

Funeral services were held in the 
Interdenominational Sunday School 
on Wednesday, March 5. Mr. N. J. 
McEwen officiated, and M - T ^' " 
Macdonald presided at th 
Hymns sung were: "Nearer 
to Thee"; "Rock of Ages",; and 
"Abide with Me.? ' 

Interment followed .in the family 
plot in the Delia cemerety. 

Pallbearers Chas. Horsky, Geo. 
Golds, P. Nielsen, Geo Lowe, Peter 
Thompson, and Martin Julson. 

Winter's Funeral Home, Drum* 
heller, had charge of arrangements. 

Floral tributes ..: etaoin etaoin 
Delia Time*. 

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Maxwell United Church 
1EV. GEO. L. MERCER, BJX, DJ>.' 
Minister 

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PALM SUNDAY, APRIL 6 
Palm Sunday commemorates a joy 
ous procession from Betheny to 
Jesusalem. The morning sermon will 
deal with "The Great Offensive oi 
Jesus," and the evening theme will 
be "A King Who Attacks the World/' 
SERVICES OF WORSHIP 
11 a.m. -Mt. Zion. 
3 p.m. Wareham. 
7.30 p.m. G Eugenia. 
Note: The services at Maxwell wiD 
be withdrawn. 

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Flesherton United Church 

REV. G. K. MCMILLAN. 

Mi, 

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PRESENTATION TO PTBS. 
MEADS and DON WHITE 

(By Ceylon Correspondent) 

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BOB 

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A large crowd of friends from Dur- 
ham Rd.. Pricoville and Ceylon om- 
munities attended the social evening 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. 
Meads. Friday, when they honoured 
Pte. Bob Meads of the Grey and Sim- 
coe Foresters, Camp Borden a"d Pte. 
j Don White of the Lincoln and Wet- 
land Regiment. Niagara. 

During the evening Mrs. Thos. Cur- 
rie read an address, while Farquhav 
McKinnon and Joe Williamson pre- 
sented the boys with wrist watches 
and military brushes in leather ease*. 
Each of the boys expressed his p- 
preciation and thanks in a very happy 
speech. Those present enjoyed danc- 
ing and cards following a delightful 
lunch served at midnight. 

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The Advance "Small Advts." bring 
good results; that's why so many 
people use them whn they have any- 

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thing for sale or 

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to buy. You 

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too, can have satisfaction by using 
the "Small Advtj." 

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Phone in the names of your visit- 
ors to The Advance. 

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11.00 a.m. Worship Flesherton. 
2.00 p.m. Worship Ceylon. 
7.30 p.m. Worship Fleshertoa. 
Morning Subject: 

"It is Finished." 
Evening Subject: 

"This Man or Barabbas." 

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Gospel Workers Church 

Fevcrsham, Ont. 
Rev. C. McNichol. Pastor 

Sunday School at 10.00 a.m. 
Morning Service at 11.00 a.m. 
Evening Service at 7.30 ->jn. 

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Future Events 

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Credit auction sale of Farm Stock. 
Implements. Furniture, Sat.. April 12, 
at Lot 21, Con. 6, Osprey, Colling- 
wood Gravel, 2*^ miles east of Max- 
well, Mrs. Eliza-beth Mclnnes, Prop. 
Geo. Duncan, Auctioneer. 

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Big dance in Ceylon hall on Wed., 
April 9th, at 9 p.m. Fine quilt made 
by school children, will be raffled. 
Proceeds in aid of British War Vic- 
tims' Fund. Admission 35c. Come 
and help out this worthy cause. 

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Flesherton Baptist Church 

Minister; Rev. Frcrf Ash' OB 

Services Fle*herton. 

11 a.m. Worship. 

12 noon, Rjble Schoil. 
7 p.m., Gospel Service. 

Monday at S p.m. Y. P. Service. 
Rock Mills 

2 p.m., Bible School. 

3 p.m.. Worship. 

Owing to sickness of Rev. C. H. 
Schutt. D.D.. of Toronto could not 
keep his engagement with the Flesh- 
erton and Rock Mills Baptist churches 
last Sunday. However, a very suit- 
able supply was sent in the porson 
of Rev. L F. Xipp, B.A., editor of 
The Canadian Baptist, who gave 
three stirring messages to the good 
congregations that assembled. Mr. 
Roy Langford sang very effectively 
at each service and his solos were 
greatly appreciated. 

The services will be held at the 
usual hour next Sunday, when Mr. 
Ashton will speak on the fourth 
word from the Cross, also remember- 
ing the day as Pal-n Sunday. A 
cordial welcome to all. 

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We -wonder if the Boy Scouts took 
their "Be prepared" motto from th> 
girls, since girl.? can go -owhere 
without their powdr puff and a bit 
of 
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SUNDAY 
SCHOOL 
LESSON 

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LESSON I 
CHRIST PROMISES POWER 

Luke 24: 48, 40; Actn I. 
PRINTED TEXT, Act* li 1-12 
GOLDEN TEXT. But ye .ball 
rciv power, when the Holy 
Spirit u com* upon you; and ye 
hall b my witneise* both m 
Jerusalem, and in all Judaea and 
Samaria, and unto tha uttermoit 
frt of the earth. Acts 1:8. 

THE LESSON IN ITS SETTING 

Time The Ascension of Christ 
ccurred on Thursday, May 18th, 
A.D. 30, as far as we are able to 
ascertain. Pentecost occurred 
ton days later May 28. 

Place. The City of Jerusalem, 
and, for the most part, the upper 
room, wherever that may have 
be:i located. 

In this lesson we are forcefully 
reminded of the significance of 
our Lord's last days on earth, of 
the definite work which He gave 
Bis Church to do, and of the 
power which He promised to Hi* 
Church for the doing of this 
(Teat work, together with the an- 
nouncement of the angels con- 
cerning our Lord's return. 

Our Lord'* Final Word* 

The final appearance of our 
Lord and His Ascension are re- 
4orded only by Mark and by 
Luke, though Luke's account is 
by far the fuller of the two, both 
in the Gospel of Luke and his 
Bl historical work, known now 

Ithe Acts of the Apostles. 

Acts. 1:1 "The former treatise 
I made, Theophilus, concerning 
all that Jesus began both to do 
and to teach. 2. Until the day in 
which h* was received up, after 
tltipt he nad given commandment 
through the Holy Spirit unto th 
apostles win 'in he had chosen: 8. 
T whom he also showed himself 
alive, after his passion by many 
proofs, appearing unto them by 
the space of forty days, and 
apeaking the things concerning 
the kingdom of God." In th 
opening paragraph Luke gives, as 
it were, the three keynotes of the 
in...'', to follow: the subject of 
the book of Acts is the same as 
that of the Gospel (former treat- 
ise) the words and deeds of 
Jsus; the Acts is the history of 
the fulfilment of the commission 
of Christ to the disciples to be 
witnesses to Him; and again, 
this commandment was given 
through the Holy Ghost. 
The Holy Spirit 

4. "And, being assembled to- 
gether with them, he charged 
them not to depart from Jerusa- 
lem, but to wait for the promise 
of the Father, which, said he, ye 
heard from me: 5. For John in- 
deed baptized with water; but ye 
hall be baptized in the Holy 
Spirit not many days hence." 
These words refer to the descent 
of the Holy Spirit upon the as- 
believers on the Day of 
""Tjn days after our 
Lord's Ascension, -*uii--"A'- van I 
truthfully say that the Holy j 
Spirit has continued to abide 
upon the Church from that day 
until this. In great quietness, 
we should all set our souls (till, 
silent "to God, and give the 
it time to quicken and 
us the assurance that 
grant Him to work 

' therefore, when they 
together, askod him, 
:d, dost thou at this 
, the kingdom of Is- 
rael? 7, And he said unto them 
H is not for you to know times 
or season, which the Father hath 
*et within his own authority." 
This amazing i|Uestion indicntes 
11 established faith in Him as the 
Messiah, but betrays, at the same j 
time, an expectation that His 
kingdom would be to some extent 
a temporal one that it would 
trve the nation from their de- 
pendence on the Romans and re- 
t.ii- to them their ancient pros- 
perity and power. H. "But ye 
hall receive power, when the 
Holy Spirit is come upon you." 
The Apostles were not only 
promised the power of the Holy 
Spirit, they were given his power 
divine power, power to convict, 
power to illuminate, power for 
mil-Hi-."" , power when at work in 
the hearts of men would actually 
transform them. Today the Gos- 
pel still lives! Men are saved. 
Bins are put away. Hope is horn 
ha the human heart. The Holy 
Spirit i* ttill with us, but of 
eoursr, He will only work through 
those who yield to His sovereign 
way in th throne-room of their 
Hvts. 

To tl'r I Mlri'iniitl Part 

"And ye shall be witnesses buth 
in Jerusalem, and in all Judaea 
ml unto the uttrrmoit part of 
the earth." This verse is really 
an outliMe in brief of the book of 
Act*. 'I'd-- disciplex did exactly 
what the Lord told them to do 
*)>',- job waa to be witnesses and 
toll the truth, the whole truth in 
their message of Jesus and Hi* 
life on tarth. . "And when he 
had Mid the** thin** M lbr 

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Camera Close-Ups of the Battle of Atlantic 

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BACK-TALK Lewis gunners prepare to pepper Nazi bomber. 

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CLOSE Bombs miss the British ship, explode harmlessly. 

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were looking, he was taken up; 
ajid a cloud received him out of 
Aei'r sight." 

The Angel'i Me**ag* 
10. "And while they were look- 
ing stedfastly Into heaven ss he 
went, behold two men stood by 
them in white apparel; 11. Who 
also -aid, yg. ritOirol "Galilee, why 

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stand ye looking Into heaven T this 
Jesus who was received up from 
you into heaven, shall so come hi 
like manner as ye beheld him go- 
ing into heaven. 12. Then re- 
turned they unto Jerusalem from 
the mount called Olivet, which to 
nigh unto Jerusalem, jt. xnbbath 
day's journey /.&?" 

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RADIO REPORTER 

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By DAVE ROBB1NS 

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"BIRTHRIGHT" 

Karly in January, the CBC 
Features Department produced 
ure of its most stirring broad- 
casts "Birthright." The script 
m by Harry Ernest Foster, and 
tells Canadians of their precious 
heritage today when tyrants have 
killed freedom in Europe, and are 
threatening* it throughout the 
world. The writer tells Canadians 
how their land was built by the 
"mad-Bouk'd dreamer*," the trap- 
pers and the voyageurs who "dar- 
ed the wilderness with song," and 
-H* pioneers who hewed out their 
homesteads from the depth of the 
forests, and how it was defended 
by "the gay, unheeding lads who 
made in war the ultimate offer- 
ing." 

It has been decided to present 
"Birthright" again fo listeners of 
CBC' National Network. The 
broadcast will be heard on Frl- 
<in, April 4 at 9.30 p.m. EDST. 

ft is a program you should hear. 

* 

HITS OF THE DAY 

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And here's a tip. You should 
take a ride along harmony high- 
way on the B-A Band Wagon, 
with Joe Chrysdale at the wheel. 
The Band Wagon rides the air 
lanes from CKOC every Friday 
niglit at 8.30 bringing top 
names and hit tunes to Ontario 
radio listeners in a fast moving 
variety show with a theme that 
stesses community undeavotir In 
helping to push forward Canada's 
war effort. 

You can enjoy tho hits of the 
day and hear how you can htlp 
win the war by dialing in 1160 
on Friday nights at 8.80. 

AROUND THE DIAL 

Knsy on the ears is the Mon- 
day afternoon quarter-hour t 
1.16 o'clock on WHEN, which is 
given over to the bright chatter 
and pleasing song? of Vera Holly 
nnd Jim Frieling. 

Jim 8iul Vera don't, go through 
A formal rolu-arsal. In fact, they 
try not to have too sot nn idea 
k-foi-chaml of what they'll do on 

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BATTLE STATIONS" From 
bridge convoy commodore mega- 
phones orders to defenders. 

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The Buttle of the Atlantic 
rages with daily renewed inten- 
sity as Germany unleashes her 
air force and gambles her finest 
remaining battleships in desper- 
ate effort to cut the vital ferry - 
ing of supplies from America to 
England. T h * s e remarkable 
photos were taken during a dra- 
matic but unsuccessful attack 
by a deadly German Messer- 
chmitt 110 bomber on a British 
convoy. 

These exclusive XEA pictures 
were taken by cameraman H. P. 
Andrews aboax-d a freighter which 
a Nazi bomber attacked. 

The convoy -was 011 the last leg 
of its perilous journey steaming 
up England's east coast when 
the attack came. 

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the air. They just pick out their 
tongs, make a few notes of what 
they might lay and await the en- 
gineer's lignal to "go ahead." 
Their conversation, 

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sounds ao spontaneous, Is spon- 
taneous. The station call letters 
ending the program are given by 
the person reaching the mike first 
the announcer, Jim or Vera. 


"Tunes .?! *> Day" ie the 
name of a new programme to be 
heard on the CBC Friday*, be- 
ginning April 4 at 9.00 p.m. 
EDST. It features the latest hits 
from, the pens of leading tune- 
smi'.hs of Britain and America. 


Colonel Lemuel Q. Stoopnagle, 
who has earned the tide of "Host 
to Hosts" through his policy of 
entertaining leading; "personalities 
of the American scene on his 
Columbia network "Quixie- 
Doodle'' program, adde three more 
top-flight names to his long list 
when he presents Fred Waring, 
Jean Muir and Mary Margaret 
HcBride. This is a CBS Sun- 
day treat, at 6.30. 


Are you catching Walter Win- 
ehell these Sunday nights? Walt 
ii waging a one-man war against 
Hitler and Dr. Goebbele, and we 
get quite a kick out of his re- 
marks. Winchell carries a gun 
at all times and has said so more 
than once on his broadcasts. A 
special bodyguard protects ,htm 
against any idea* of reprisals that 
might occur to Mr. Hitler's Ges- 
tapo. 

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Canada's Coal 
Output Rises 

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January Production Total 
Exceeds Dominion Figures 
For Five Yr 

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Canadian coal production during 
January was well above the vv- 
age of the past five years and 
ehowed an Increase over produc- 
tion In the s.itu* mouth in 1940, 
th Dominion Bureau of Statistics 

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January production was 1,745,- 
468 tone, compared with l,731,tiSl 
tona in January, 1940, and 1,460, 114 
tons, the average for the mouth 
during the past five years, the re- 
port said. 

Output of bituminous coal lu 
January totalled 1,150,908 tons, su'i 
bituminous coal 72,629 tons an ft 
lignite coal 521,945 tons. 

SAME TONNAGE KXPOFTRD 

Imports of coal during Jamiwy 
werd 16.9 per cent about ImportM 
a year ao and 7.4 per cent Sibove 
the January, 1936-4'.> average. Total 
receipts of 529, 5Tu loi.s included 

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177,447 tons cf ankbracit*, 351,962 
tons of bituminous and 161 tons of 
lignite. 

Exports of Canadian coal am- 
ounted U>f0L3,676 tons during Jan- 
uary, compared with 43,520 tons 
In January, 1940, and 42,043 tons. 

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the (ire-year average for ttti 
month. 

Coal mettle available for eon- 
sumption during January Ut*ll4 
2,221,476 tons compared .with ,- 
146..23C in the sam monUi a y4 
ago. 

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B William 

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THIS CURIOUS WORLD fcJJS 

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J. J. AUCXJBOfx) 

OF 
PK3BONS 

NEAR UOUISVILLE, K>C, 
IN 1813, ESTIMATED 
MORE. THAN 

&/LJJOM 

BIRJDS. 

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COHt. 1W *V HfA SHWICC. UK 

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S4JCH 
A FLOCK 

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.ADDUBON FTOJRED, 

WOULD GGNtSU/ME 

e.712.,000 

BO6WELS OF? FOOD 
CVMLV. 

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H-30 

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CALVIN) GOOLJCX3E. 
MAYOR OP 

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HE 

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OF AAASSACHUSETTS?; 

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ANSWER: Cslvin ,*o!!sle ficvv 
his flrst term as goveir.rr M Massich. ; 
hotict In the press for .hi? h.-.ndhng c' 
smd for hii statement, where is no, ri t 
afety by anybody, anftvhere, anytime. 

NEXT: Where does tfc word "cajole" 

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EARLY COONIAL 

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major of Boston. During, 
he wo n 'oHr> 

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HORIZONTAL 
J , 4 Man who 

invented the 
cotton gin in 
1793. 
Measure. 

11 Born. 

12 Haughty. 

13 Biblical 
priest. 

14 Money paid 
for use of 
property 

15 Boasts. 

17 Suet. 

18 Ugly oM 
\vonr-n. 

20 Piece of 

furniture. 
24 Provided 
26 Part of foot. 

31 Abhorrence. 

32 Succor. 

34 Giraffe-like 
animal. 

35 Organ in 
.mouth. 

37 Note in scale. 
88 Imitator. 

19 Animal pest. 
41 To court. 

43 Pillar. 
47 Plants 

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.man f r to~PrevIons Puzzle 

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subterranean 

parts. 

49 In this place. 
52 To eat away- 

54 Epoch. 

55 Pertaining to 
poles. 

88 Mineral filled 
rock fissure. 

57 Coin. 

58 Direction 

59 His machine 

seeds 

from cotton. 

60 His gin ranks 
among the 

inventions. 

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VERTICAL 

2 Learning. 

3 Metal. 

4 Soft mass. 

5 Sluggishness. 

6 Tissue. 

7 Call of a 
horse 

8 Sweet potato. 
10 Walnut. 

12 His machine 

is the . 

or pattern 
for most 
modern gins. 

15 The soul. 

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16 Capudpii 
monkey. i 

17 Thighbone. ' 
19 Maxim. 

21 Stir. 

22 Coal box. 

23 Pitcherl ear. 
25 To suit*" 

27 Kind Of mow 
shoe. 

28 Beret. 

29 Roof finial. 

30 Device for 
picking 
cotton, 

33 To inflate. 
36 Lug. 
40 Browned 

bread. 
42 You and mt. 

44 Helmet 
wreath. 

45 Fold of 
string. 

48 Norse 
mythology. 

48 S-moldyig. 

49 \ r enerable. 

50 Otherwise. 

51 Pob'neian 
chestnut 

53 Ever. 

35 Wooden jpin. 

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POP Pop's Prepared to Furnish the Sharp Cuts 

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By J. MILLAR WATT 

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I'M LOOK! MS FOR A 
CHAP WITH S WARP- 
CUT FEATURES 
I 

*ta- 
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Wednesday, April 2, 1941 

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THK FLESHIRTON ADVANCE 

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Announcement 

The Grey Coulny Seed Fair is being held in the 

Market -Buildings, Owen Sound, on , 

TUESDAY, APRIL 8th, 1941 

Prize Lists are to be found in Seed Cleaning and Chopping 
Plants, Seed and Hardware Stores, etc. 

Sp<.-fi.:l lectures and sale of seed during the afternoon. 

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H. S. WEAVER, Pres. 

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T. STEWART COOPER. Sect. 

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* 1 1 1 M i m ++++*+++ ;***t 

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Fresh and 
Cured Meats 

HOME MADE 
SAUSAGE 

BAILEYS 

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We DELIVER 

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V 

o 

Y 

T 

i> 

Y 

** 
O 

O 

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* 

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Canada First Lest We Forget! 
>M 1 1 1 1 M*<M >****+***+*+***** 

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FLESHERTON. Ont 

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50th Ainimsary 

Tuesday, Mr. and Mrs. Alex Holley 
celebrated their 50th wedding anniv- 
ersary, at their home in Sault Ste. 
Marie, Ont. 

At 12.30 the immediate family sat 
down to a delicious dinner served in 
the Oak Room. The table was beau- 
tifully decorated with daffodils and 
other spring flowers. 

.Following the dinner a poem was 
read, which had been written by a 
friend of the family, in Chicaga. 

During the afternoon and evening 
Mr. and Mrs. Holley were at home 
to their friends, at the home of the 
daughter, Mrs. W. L. Whalen, 44 Ca- 
thcart Street. A /host of friends 
called to congratulate them. 

The rooms were beautifully decor- 
ated with gold and white wedding 
bells ami - tier wedding cake 
centered the tea table. 

Later in the evening, music and 
dancing was enjoyed by the honoured 
couple, their children and grand- 
children. 

Many telegrams and congratula- 
tions were received, one of them 
from their son-in-law and daughter, 
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Springfield, Pit- 
tsburg, California. 

Three daughters were home for the 
occasion: Mrs. J. Lerch, Chicago, Mrs. 
L. Hesgard, Hammond, Indiana, Mrs. 
F. Markham, Detroit. 

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Local and Personal 

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Mr. George Armstrong spent the 
past few days in Toronto. 

Mrs. Bob Phillips is visiting hei 
sister, Mrs. D. Neff, at Singhampton. 

Miss Helen Heard of Varn'jy spent 
the week end at her home. 

Aircraftsman E. I. Holley of To- 
onto was home over Sunday. 

Sergt. Angus Turney of "B" Coy. 
taff is away on two weeks' furlough. 

Pte. Ben Leavpll of the Foresters, 
}amp Borden, spent several days 
week in town while on leave. 

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I 

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Send in your Renewal Now 

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Easter Parade 

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JOIN THE EASTER PARADE, COME TO HILL'S READY-TO-WEAR 
DEPARTMENT. SEE THE NEWEST OF SPRING STYLES IN COATS, 
DRESSES AND MILLINERY. BELLOW ARE A FEW VALUES 

OF SPECIAL INTEREST. 

You needn't be slim and tall to get a smart coat. We have many 
[styles and makes to fit most figures, tall or short. Coats in Harris 

Tweeds, Canadir n-made cloth of excellent wearing quality. These 
coats will fit most any pocket book. Moderately priced at $9.85, $10.95, $14.95 
and $15.95. See this range. 

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NEW EASTER DRESSES 

A wonderful showing of new Ray- 
on Dresses in all the new printed de- 
signs from flowers to polka dots. 
Extra Special at $2.95 

NEWEST OF 
EASTER MILLINERY 

Straws, flower trimmed, straws and 
felts combined and all felts. Excep- 
tional values at $1.95 and $2.45 

SPRING CURTAIN MATERIALS 

Newest of Spring Curtain Materials 
by the yard. A wonderful showing in 
this line. See our window display. 
We are proud of the values we can 
offer Marquisettes, Voiles, Shower 
Spots, Tuscan Nets all at various 
prices per yard l2 l / 2 , 19, 25, 35, 39, 59 

NEW WALLPAPERS 

Add smartness to your home by de- 
corating 1 different rooms with Sun- 
worthv Wallpapers, sold exclusively 
by the Hill Co. in Markdale. Papers 
for kitchen, bedrooms, dining rooms, 

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parlors and halls. Prices range from 
lOc per single roll to 50c single roll. 

LADIES' CREPE DRESSES 

A real array to choose from. A 
Super Value at $4.95 

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Men's Wear 

Men's Fine Shirts for Easter. A 
wonderful selection to choose from 
and outstanding values. 

Lot 1 15 doz. Fine Shrts with 
fused collar attached in plain colors 
and narrow and broad stripes, sizes 
from 14 to 17. Extra value at 89c 

Lot 2 15 doz. Men's fine Broad- 
cloth Shirts in almost any color desir- 
ed. An extra firm cloth of good wear- 
ing quality. Extra Value, each $1.25 

MEN'S FINE HOSE 

An exceptional buy, made of wool 
and rayon, all sizes 10, 10J/2, 11, 11^. 
Trice 35c, or 3 pair for $1.00 

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True Economy in Food Values at Hil's 

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Sockeye Salmon, Horseshoe Brand 

1's 37c; J4's20c 
Cohoe Fancy Red Salmon 

I's27c; y 2 's 15c 
Clover Leaf Fancy Pink Salmon 

1's only 16c 
Quaker Oats, family size pkg 19c 

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Pork & Beans, Ubby's 20 oz. size 

2 for 15c 
Condensed Milk, assorted brands 

Ts 2 for ISc 
Sandwichc Spread, made by Anne 

Page, 8 oz. jar 19c 
See.dless Raisins 2 Ib. for 21c 

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Specials for Friday and Saturday 

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Purity Flour 98 Ib $2.95 bag 

Peas, No. 2 size, No. 4 sieve 3 for 25o 
Tomatoes, large tin 28 oz. .... 3 for 27c 
Toilet Soap, various kinds cake 4c 

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Crown Brand Syrup: 

No. 2 tins 17c 

No. 5 tins 39c 

No. 10 tins 79c 

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F. T. Hill & Co., Ltd. 

MARKDALE, Ont, 

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Wilson and 
visitors 

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were 

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Mr. and Mrs. Mark 
daughter of Durham 
h town on Sunday. *. Wi 

Aircraftsman Dick Stewart of To- 
ronto was a visitor in town Saturday 
while on week end leave. 

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The robins made their appearance 
on Friday last and their cheery song 
n the early morning has a brighten- 
ng aspect on the world. 

EASTER FLOWERS Order your 
Easter Lilies and all kinds of flower- 
ng plants and cut flowers for 
Easter from W, A. Hawken, phone 17. 

Mr. Jas. R. Wilson received the 
appointment of caretaker of the high 
school at a meeting of (he Board 
leld last week, succeeding Mr. Russell 
Park, whos has held the position for 
several years. 

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FARMERS SHOULD PLAN 

TO HELP EACH OTHER 

- j, 

There is an old saying that "the 
Lord helps those who help them- 
selves," and it would be equally true 
to say that "the Lord helps those who 
help each other." Many Ontatrio 
farmers will literally have to help 
each other this year if they cannot 
get sufficient help for their own in- 
dividual farms. 

There will be, from all accounts, a 
number of "one-man" farms this 
year with a consequent reduction in 
crap acres as a result of the farm 
help situation, unless farmers co- 
operate in the old-fashioned neigh- 
borly manner of changing "works" 
with each other. It will be recalled 
that during severe farm labor short- 
ages in the last war, neighbors 
worked back and forth helping each 
other with seeding . and harvest 
operations, 

A return to this method of opera- 
tion will mean that fanners will In 
able to plant and harvest more crop 
acres and feed more hogs and cattlt 
than they would by attempting tc 
run the farm alone. 

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Renew your subscription NOW. 

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TO LOSE LICENSES ON 

RECKLESS DRIVING CHARGE 

Leopold Macaulay's bill to provide 
for automatic suspension of drivers' 
licenses upon conviction for reckless 
or dangerous driving, was approved 
with one change by the municipal law 
committee of the Ontario Legislat- 
ure. Mr. Mccaulay, Conserva- 
Mentber for York South and a for- 
mer Minister of Highways, agreed 
to delete the term "careless driving" 
from the bill after several member* 
objected that police used this charge 
under the criminal code for many 
minor offences. 

The Highways Traffic Act pro- 
vides for suspension of drivers' licen- 
se where there is culpability in an 
accident causing damage of $25 or 
more. The amendment approved by 
the committee provides for suspen- 
sion where reckless or dangerous 
driving convictions are made under 
the criminal code, even though there 
had been no accident. Restoration o* 
license is dependent on filling of 
proof of finincial responsibility. 

J. P. Bickwell, registrar of motor 
vehicles, said that in 10 years there 
had been 43,200 licenses suspended 
in Ontario following convictions. 

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McCLELLAN CAIRNS 

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Small Ad. Column 

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A quiet wedding took place at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Cairns 
of 'Winnipeg, Man., on March 8tr, at 
8 p.m., when their eldeet daughter, 
Ethel Eleanor, was united in mar- 
riage to Mr. Jack McLellan, eldest 
son of Mr. and Mrs. H. J. McLellan. 
Rev. W. E. Donnelly was the effic- 
ient. Ferns and daffodils formed the 
setting. 

The bride was attended by her 
sister, Miss Bessie Cairns. Mr. Jas. 
Potteir was best man. The bride 
chose turquoise blue triple sheer 
with rounded neckline and full bod- 
ice banded at the waistline. The 
short bolero was banded with tubu- 
lar applique. She wore a matching 
chapel veil, held by a halo of tur- 
quoise flowers. Her Colonial bouquet 
was of Sweetheart roses and white 
narcissi. 

Miss Cairns chose pink sheer with 
crossed neckline and full bodice and 
tubular appliue at the waistline and 
o n the short puffed sleeves of the 
match ing jacket. Her chapel veil 
as secured by a sweetheart halo. Her 
Colonial bouquet was of American 
Beauty roses. 

The bride's going away costume 
was of grey suedella, showing red 
trimming. Her hat was of gros- 
jrrain ribbon and curled straw braid. 

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FOR SALE Quantity of Erban 
oats. Everett Blackburn, R. R. 
3, Flesherton. 43p2 

FOR SALE Seed grain. Ed. 
Pedlar, phone Feversham 1 r 22, 
Singhampton R. R. 1. 44c2 

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GIRL WANTED Apply at Park 
House, Flesherton. 44p2 

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FOR SALE Vanguard and Erban 
oats for seed; also horse 6 years 
old. Allie McLean, Priceville, 
phone 49 r 3. 44c2 

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AKINS LARKIN 

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In Niagara Falls, Ont., on Mon- 
day, Aug. 5th, 1940, Panssie (Pat) 
Larkin, only daughter of Mrs. 
Frances S. Larkin of Toronto and 
the late Geo. Thomas Stephen Lark- 
in, to Herbert L. Akins, Toronto, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Claude C. Akins 
of Flesherton, Ont. 

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Auction Sale 

WM. G. HUTCHINSON 

will sell by public auction on 

N. % of Lot 21, Con. 13 Artemesia 

About Ms mile north of Vandeleur 

THURSDAY, APRIL 10th 

when the following will be offered: 

Horses 1 horse, 15 years old; 
Aged Mare. 

Cattle Durham Cow, 10 years 
old; Durham Cow, 3 years old; Dur- 
ham Cow, 5 years old; Holstien C^ 
8 years old; Black Cow, 6 ye^rs old; 
Spotteed Cow, 5 years old; Steer 
rising i; 2 Steers rising 2; 3 Heifers, 
rising 1; Baby Beef, 6 months old; 
Aged Cow, due date of sale. 

Swine Yorkshire Brood Sow, 
due May 13; 5 Chunks, around 100 Ib. 

Implements, Etc. M. H. Mower; 

10 ft. steel hay rake; No. 21 Fleury 
plough; 12 plate disc harrows; set 
iron harrows; wagon; bugger; light 
sleigrh; stone boat; ladder; M.-H. root 
pulper; hay rack; double harness; 2 
almost new collars; Perfection coal 

011 heater; 12 grain bags; number 
sacks; small Vega cream separator; 
metal churn; butter bowl and ladel; 
graduated zream can and mimorous 
other small articles. 

TERMS OP SALE 
All sums of 10.00 and under, cash; 
over that amount 6 months credit 
will be given on furnishing approved 

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FOR SALE Hatch of Barred Rcxk 
chicks on April 2, also hatching 
eggs. Mrs. Ward Harrison, R. R. 
3, Proton, phone 41 r 4. 43p2 

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FOR SALE Heavy draft mare, 12 
yrs., due to foal May 1st, priced 
for quick sale. Herb Grummett, 
R. R. 2, Proton Station. 

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WANTED Man for general farm 
work, boy around 16, would be ac- 
ceptable. Norman R. Brown 
phone 166 r 13, Clarksburg. 

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NOTICE Paper hangind and paint- 
ing at reasonable prices. Estimates 
free. Ross Mitchell, Dundalk, 
telephone 77. 

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FOR SALE 7-octave Bell Piano; 
illimitable repeating action; Bell- 
tone sustaining frame; in good con- 
dition. Rev. F. Ashton, Flesherton. 

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FOR SALE Good hay $7.00 at the 
barn. Joe. Radley, Flesherton. e 

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FOR SALE 2 Durham cows, due 
in spring. Albert Wilkinson, R. 
R. 1, Flesherton. 43p& 

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FOR SALE Heavy brown mare colt 
rising 3 years. W. Weber, R. R. 
No. 4, Markdale. 44p2 

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FARM FOR SALE $475.00 Lot 
20, Concession 7, Osprey, ormerly 
McQueen property. Apply to I. B." 

Lucas & Co., Markdale, Ont. 43cS- 

FARM FOR SALE Owner ->re- 
pared to sell at sacrifice. 200 acres 
near Duncan, known as Howard 
farm. Apply to I. B. Lucas & Co., 
Markdale, Ont. 43c3 

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FOR SALE House in Flesherton, 
with seven rooms, hard and soft 
water, double lot and barn. For 
full particulars apply to J. W. Mc- 
Mullen, Ceylon, Executor. 30c 

FOR SALE 7-room brick house in 
Flesherton, large lot, garage, good 
well, must be sold to settle estate 
of the late Andrew Gilchrist Ap- 
ply to John Stewart, Executor, Pro- 
ton Station, phone 32 r 4. 

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POTATOES FOR SALE Grade 
Canada No. 1, early varieties 
Warbas and Cobblers; later var- 
ieties, Katahdins and Dooleys. 
Alex. S. Muir, R. R. No. 1 Ceylon, 
phone Flesherton 47 r 14. 44c4 

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interest at 6 per 

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joint notes, with 

cent per annum. 
GEO. E. DUNCAN, Auctioned 
Sale to commence at 1.00 p.m. 

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Farm For Sale 29 Acres, Range 2, 
Proton. Good buildings. Half 
mile west of highway no. 10 at Vic- 
toria Corners. Ideal premises for 

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poultry farm, 
on, R. R. 1. 

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J. F. Acheson, Prot- 

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FARM FOR SALE 

Lots 14-15, Con. 1, S.D.R., Arte- 
meaia, containing 100 acres, on which 
is situated a bank barn 45x55, also * 
large driving shed. This property 
must be sold to wind up estate. Thos 
interested communicate with John 
Oliver or W. R. Meads, Priceville, Ex- 
ecutors for the esti.te. 47 

AUCTIONEER 

WALTER SEE LET < 

See me about your auction sale. All 
sales conducted on business prin- 
ciples. Phone me at Feversham 4rl2 
or make arrangements at Tha 
Flesherton Advance office. 

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TENDERS WANTED 

Tenders plainly marked (Tractor 
Power) will be received by the under- 
signed, until 12 o'clock noon, Satur- 
day, April 12th, 1941, for tractor 
power to operate Township grader. 
The lowest or any tender not neces- 
sarily accepted. 

C. N. LONG. Clerk 

Fever-sham 

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BUSINESS CAR OS 

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BRAY DELIVERS the chicks Bray 
Chicks 'deliver the goods.' Contact 
our agent, ask for Daily Specials. 
Get your brooder busy before the 
spring rush; your Bray chicks 
growing fast to catch good mar- 
kets. John McWilliam, Flesherton. 

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FOR SALE In Ceylon, comfortable 
7-room house, electric ligfcts, hard 
and soft water, good stable, hen 
house and garage with cement 
floor, lot containing 1 acre more 
or less. For particulars apply to 
Mrs. Nellie Gilchrist, Badjeros, R. 
R. 1, or Fred Irwln, Flesherton. 

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FARM FOR SALE 

100 acre farm, 5 acres wheat, 
spring creek, tiled well and windmill, 
comfortable dwelling, barn and hen- 
house, situated 1 mile south of Flesh- 
erton on No. 1 Highway, reasonably 
priced for quick sale. Apply to 
Fred Irwin, Flesherton. Ont. 

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DR. S. R. THIBAUDEAU 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

Graduate of Ontario Veterinary Coll- 
ege. Phone: 91 day o r night 
MARKDALE, ONT. 

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DR. J. E. MILNE 

Office _ Durham St. 
Office Hours _ Afternoons, 1.30 to 4. 
Evenings, 7 to 8.S. 

Sundays and Thursday afternoons by 
appointment only. 

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Princ* Arthur Lodge No. 833, 
& A.M., meets in the Fraternal Ha'1, 
Flesherton, the second Friday in ntk 
month. W.M., Herb. Corbett; Sec- 
retary, C. J. Bellamy. 

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ROY LANiGFORD 

District A*nt for 
MUTUAL LIFE OP CANADA 

ACCIDENT and SICKNESS, FIR* 

AUTOMOBILE, BURGLARY 

>lunieipl Liability Guarantee SowU 

Any laranuMe Problem 

FLKSHERTON, Ont 

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: 

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, 

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CORVO 

Rosirio 

fySi.ita Cruz 
FLOHES 

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Hortm, beit known city, has clipper 
hue. powerful radio station: It 
junction of trans-Atlantic cable}, 

reflating port for ocean shipping. 

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NINE LITTLE ISLANDS 

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Atlantic Ocean 

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Angra. Po--.a Oetgada are 

bigg? it ::: farmers on 

the islands rail* fruit, 

grapes, wheat, pineapples, 
potatoes, cor*-.; "isharman 

catch tuna. wraJes, bonita 

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\ 

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ST. MICHAELS 

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Ponta 

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THE AZORES ISLANDS 

(Portuguese PssjessMin) 
Population: 254.000. Total aria: 922 
sq. mi., smaller than Rhode Island. 
Axis plane base here would be within 
bomber rang* of Air.erica. U-boat base 
could command crossianes of shipping. 

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F-anct 

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SANTA 

MARIA 

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Tiny, but looming larjb in strategic importance, are the nine little Azores, undefended group of. Portu- , 
guese islands in mid-Atlantic. Britain is reported contemplating their seizure to keep them out of axis 
hands, for a base there would give Germany a strangle hold on British shipping lanes. t 

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How COD I? 

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BY ANNE ASHLEY 

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Q. How can I* make white- 
wash? 

A. Fill a bucket half-full of 
lime and cover it about two 
inohea frith water. Let stand for 
24 hours to slake, or until it is 
the consistency of paste. Dip out 
portion of this slaked lime into 
another bucket and thin with 
water to the desired consistency. 
Add I teaspoonfui of bluing to 
V6-fcuckt of whitewash to whit- 
ea it, and tt-pint of salt to make 
tt mk-k. 

Q. How can 1 avoid a lard 
caate in pastry? 

A. By adding a tablespoonfol 
t Tine*r for each half cup of 
water us 

Q. How can 1 prevent chap- 
ped hands? 

A. Apply glycerine and rose- 
water or letron juice, several 
times daily acid at night before 
retiring. 

Q. How can I make a mahog- 
aay stain? 

A. Mix 1 quart boiled luueeti 
oil,' I quart turpentine, 1 pint 
whiting, 1 tablespoon burnt 
aienna, H tablespoon yellow 
ocher, ar.ti ! . tablespoon Bis- 
marck brown. 

Q. How can I renew black 
ailk (lore.} which have acquired 
a shabby appearance? 

A. Mix a little white of an 
iff with *ome black ink; put on 
the gloves and apply the mixture 
with a soft cloth. 

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Out At Elbows? 

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Do you find the elbows of 
your aweaters get pushed out of 
ebape qtikkly? If ao, try sew- 
ing a four-inch wide strip of silk 
ioeide aa a lining. Cut the silk 
on the (traight 30 that there is 
no "give" and tack it to the in- 
ide of the sleeve just at the el- 
bow, uaing long stitch e< on the 
wreng aide and very thin ones 
a the right. This band takes th& 
train and prevents that ug!r. 
puabed-out look at the elbow. Th 
a*me idea can be used for dr<?s- 
of thin wool liable to stretch. 

---- column ----

modern 
Etiquette 

BY ROBERTA LEE 

---- column ----

1. Isn't it permissible for a 
woman to take a man's arm when 
walking along: the street? 

2. When a bachelor has been 
entertained by married friends, 
what is a frood way for him to 
return the hospitality? 

S. Should a chiid be permitted 
to leave the table before the rest 
of the family have finished eat- 
ing? 

4. When a briiie is to be mar- 
t'U'd in a traveling; suit, what 
should the brideK''>oi" wear? 

5. What is the best way for a 
mau to ask a girl .for a dance? 

6. May one u.o. a lead VH-.I: 
for \vrititig a social' or bus . --= 
letter? 

Answers 

1. Ye?, under certain condi- 
tions it is all right. If the street 
It poorly lijjhto.i. or otherwise 
dangerous and uucvftaiii, it is 
well to do so; and also when 
walking under an umbrellu. -. 
Take them to a restaurnnt for 
dinner, or to the thesiuv. 3. Xo, 
It* should sit ijii.eily until the 
others have finished. Of course. 
he may s be excuse*! if the grown- 
up* llnrt-r over after-dinner cof- 
fee and conversation. 4. A busi- 
nes u!t. 5. "May 1 have the 
next da'H-e?" (?. Not unless one 
I* ill and writing the letttr in 

---- column ----

13V2 Million U. S. 
Visitors In 1940 

---- column ----

Prospects For A Greater 
Touriet Trade For Thit Year 
Are Reported 

---- column ----

t traffic from the United 
Sta-.es to Canada continues te 
flow freely acrow the interna- 
tional boundary, according to the 
Immigration Branch of the De- 
partment of Mines and R&sourcea, 
which reports that 13,398,77T 
visitors entered Canada from the 
United States during 1940. Al- 
though Canada is at war, and her 
industries have been re-organized 
on a war basis, no restrictions 
have been placed on :'r.e entry of 
bona fide tourists from friendly 
or neutral countriea. 
MORE ENQUIRIES RECEIVED 

Prospects for a much greater 
tourist trade in 141 were envis- 
aged by D. Leo Dolan. chief of 
the Dominion Travel Bureau, la 
an address last moath before the 
llth annual dinner of the Traf- 
fic Club of Montreal. 

The speaker noted that since 
the beginning of the present 
ye&r, mor? than 22,000 inquiries 
for travel information had beea 
received by the bureau a: Ot- 
tawa. ThU waa an increase of 
31 per cent over the higheat 
number ever received for * eer- 
responding period. 

---- column ----

Population in 
Quebec Up 

---- column ----

3.151,871 Pereone Reticle In 
Province; 277.416 Gain In 10 
Years 

---- column ----

Quebec's population has grown 
steadily since the last Federal 
census in 1931 and now amounta 
to well over 3,000,000, accord- 
ing to figures tabled in the Que- 
bec Legislature by Hon. Oscar 
Drouia, Minister of Municipal 
Affairs, Trade and Industry. 
26 CITIES, 108 TOWNS 

Th* figures resulting from a 
close estimate on the part of the 
Provincial Statistical Department 
show that there were 3.151,871 
persons in Quebec in 1939. Tnla 
figure shows an increase of 277,- 
416 over the Federal census 
count made in thia prvvince ia 
1931. when 2,874.255 persona 
were registered as being in Que- 
bec. 

The report stated that there 
were l.U'3 municipalities within 
the province. Within this num- 
ber are 20 cities and 109 towai, 
the remainder being rural muni- 
cipalities and parishes. 

---- column ----

Ask Curb Be Put 
On Speed of Boat* 

Attorney-General Gordon D. 
Onant declared last week th* 
-federal government had been 
askt-d to pass legislation to con- 
trol the speed of motor boaU aa 
a result of an accident on die 
Winnipeg River in which a girl 
was badly injured. The mishap 
occurred when the girl waa run 
down while bathing near Minakl 
in Northwestern Ontario last 
August. 

T. T. Bower, operator of the 
beat, charged with negligence, 
was acquitted when the court rul- 
ed there w-as no provision in the 
Criminal Code covering the oper- 
ating speed of motor bout*. 

---- column ----

Machine tool production in 
C'auada during 1940 was valued 
at $10,821.943. compared with 
J1.-MS.J1S* in I !>:?!>. an increase 
of 800 ru-r cent. 

---- column ----

SHIPPING 
STORING 

---- column ----

MOVING 
PACKING 

---- column ----

. 

' \'. - I \\ < ; 

M. RAWLINSON, LIMITED 

l-Nt:il>l--h>-! 1SX'. 

610 YONGE ST. - TORONTO 

---- column ----

What Science 
Is Doing 

FOR SEVERE BURNS 

thacovery of a n*w treatmeat for 
severe bui'os iua been anaoonced 
by authorities at Jota Hojkln* 
Hospital la Baltimore. The treat- 
ment utee a combination of ml- 
fadtaalae ia saray form. Report* 
trom th* hospital show that It ha* 
produced retuarfeaWe reaults in lt 
early tet cues. 

HAIR GROWTH AFTtR DEATH 

A. California physician ha lt 
4tat*Bint that J*air grw to a coa- 
aiderabie lanjth. aft r ^^^ * 
interred In two cawo. The Journal 
I the Aaericaa Medical Assocla- 
tioa dxprs doubt aa to ttw ao- 
onracT ot tie r*porw, t stat it 
Is poasibi* to* a smaJt jrowtli tw 
take tac* aftr eoaartc death du 
t continuatioa ot Uie molecular 
life processes until available 017- 

---- column ----

a|>p*raii<e ot jrowth ot 
aalr on a >! Pron due to th 
hrlnkiag o UM kia, wtoioh - 
poeee por:i'>u* ot tn.* hair iatt 
prevtousty oonc^ld. 
^-o 

APPLES PUT TO SLEEP 

Aypl** from last year'a crop. 
s.*pc aci^w by a aw prooess o 
th.it thy remain as fra*! aa win 
picked, arts coming on th market 
in May and June. 

They aav* bn stored siucu liet 
euauciM 1 by four storage* in Nw 
\ork State, and at Coru'.l Vn'- 
rsriity where this new j:x--*>s tiaa 
been ua<lr dtjve4opatut for (our 
years by Dr. R. V. Sqpook. twsitt- 
ant professor ot pomolosy. 

The trait wa placeU last fall is 
oool roonu. ' ddre* instead of 
tha ordiua: 7 tt dcgroee >'. : (tor- 
age temperatui^. Th-.< rooms wr 
tightly ai!ed aud tti* oxye at 
thir air reduced to two pr cent. 
ioateaU ot th<> uomaj. ft) p*r cat. 
At the same uoie the oarboa diox- 
ide was raised to Ore per CMC 
thie gas coming from the fru::. 

This ittncn^her* Boa bwa maio- 
tained veailliy ever ln. Tae two 
per cent oxygen I* juat enough t 
kep th apples alUe. Th carbon 
dioxide and low oxygen puts t'.iam 
into deep s'.e^p. like an auae$thttc. 

The effect Is to literally stow 
down their rate of living, or of 
ijsmg :\n-l dviiig. sj that they latt 
for many months without de:*ct- 
able cMcice. vn lu 

---- column ----

If you oje an electric vaouum- 
cleanev, empty the dust-'oag fre- 
quently and repularly. Failure t 
do this is i>ad for the mechanism. 

Funds for the rebuilding of 
London aftov the disastrous fire 
of 1666 were obtained from a 
tax on coal aud whoa:, land-.'d at 
the Port of London. 

---- column ----

MIDDLE-AGE 
WOMEN 

---- column ----

HEED IHIS APVICCII 

---- column ----

itiousaiick- odt women 
xo -jaiUnjt thru"trying 
t!n-es' with Lydla E. 
Pmlham's Ve*etabtf 
Compound famous 
for over 60 yrs IQ re- 
lieving female func- 
tional troubles Try It' 

---- column ----

HAVE 
YOU HEABD? 

---- column ----

Tte olJ sailor had retired from 
the sea. Each morning a grubby 
youngster knocked at bis door, 
went in and came out again. Af- 
ter this had gone on for some 
weeks the curiosity of the villa- 
gers vraa aroused. 

"Tell me," said one to the 
youngster, ''why do 700 visit that 
old sailor every morning?" 

'Well, sir, he gives n-.e a dime 
if I say to him, 'The captain 
wants yoa immediatefy.' " 

"And what does he say to 
that?" 

"He says, 'Tell the captain to 
go to blazes.' " 

---- column ----

H: "Lwt night I dreamed 
1 was married to die most 
beautiful fir! in iht world." 

She; "Oh. Georje, Were 
w. happy?" 

---- column ----

Nation's Diet 
Is Inadequate 

---- column ----

Round up Ogden's 
for a Real Smoke 

---- column ----

On* Japanese bragged DO an- 
other thai; he made a fan iait 20 
7an by opening or.'.;.- a fourth 
ection, and tuing thii for five, 
years, tier. th next section, and 
so on. 

The o;her Japanese registered 
acorn. 

"Wasteful r f he ejaculated. "I 
waa better taught. I make) a fan 
laat a lifetime. I open it wide, and 
liold it under my rose quite 
motionless. Then I wave rrrjr 
head." 

---- column ----

Teacher: 1 iid. Draw 
dorse end cart. You've only 
drawn a hone. 

Freddy: Ye*,  Isorte 
will draw th cart. 

---- column ----

"If you get up earlier in the 
morning than your neighbor," 
eaid the town philosopher, "and 
work harder and scheme E>or 
and stick to your job more closely 
and stay up Later planning how to 
make mor* money than yoar 
neighbour and burn the midnight 
oil planning' bow to gt ahead of 
him while he ia snoozing, not only 
will you leave raore money when 
you ciie than h will, but you'll 
it a darn s!ght sooner." 

---- column ----

Tororta Doctor Advisee That 
Mo-e Attention to Nutrition 
le Esaential te War Effort 

There is too much buying of 
vitamin concentrate* and not 
enough attention paid to build- 
ing up an adequate diet of na- 
tural foods. Dr. D. L. Thomson, 
professor of biochemistry at Me- 
Gill University, last week told 
the Canadian Association of Me- 
dical StuJents and Internes. 

Dr. Thom.'oa'; commenta on. 
the national diet followed an ad- 
dress by Dr. E. W. McHenry, as- 
sociate professor of nhyaiokgt- 
cal hygiene of the University of 
Toronto. Dr. McHenry spoke of 
the value of dietary surveys and 
referred particularly to stndie* 
which had been made of 100 low- 
income families in Toronto. 

In these families, the men, he 
stated. were the best fed, the 
children next and the mothers 
wor. Only three of the 100 
families received adequate am- 
ounts of food. The tack of "pro- 
B vitamins, was most evident 

MALNUTRITION WIDESPREAD 
Both speaiars emphasized that 
in time of war it waa imperative. 
if Canada ia to pot forth her best 
war effort, to pay more atten- 
tion to nutrition. They emphas- 
ised that this attention most b* 
based on knowledge, r.ot popular 
fancies. While there may b 
little actual hanger in Canada, 
tlier waa malnutrition. Dr. 
Thomson pointed out, particular- 
ly aa lack of the essential mlaer- 
a!i and vitamins did not create 
hanger in the sense that lack of 
calorie* did. 

---- column ----

Thre roamf girl im 

th choir 
Whoe voice went up hoir 

mad hair 

Till one Sunday - <h- 
It went out of >i(ht 
And they found it next 

dT in toe spoir. 

---- column ----

Walking Gallerw* 

Tattoo expert* say that more 
customer* art throngiag their 
saloons than -er before, acd that 
their clients do not coma mamty 
from the arr-.ed forces. To-day 
Serrice mea do not want iniie* 
and ladders, and hearts with 
"Mabel" in th middle, inscribed 
on their cheats, bat British cmli- 
ar.a ire being tattooed with Iden- 
tification marks. Many cattooista 
do nothing but remove former de- 
sign? from the kini of their cus- 
tomers, for tasta change* with 
the pasa;r. of the years. Some 
time ago ia the U.S. tattooiata 
>ud a tremendoos rush of buai- 
nes, for the United States Navy 
barred entry into the service to 
any man with the nude figure 
of a wo.iian inscribed on hia ate. 
Thousands rushe-d to hare clothes 
added ;o these designs. 

---- column ----

" 

---- column ----

Take a tip from 
old timers who 
have been rolling their own for 
twenty years or more. Their brand 
is Ogden's and they wouldn't think 
of smoking anything else. They lik 
it because it has a taste you cant 
matcn a taste wrtich cornea fror 
its distinctive biend of choice, rip* 
tobaccos. Try it. You'll find ifs not 
just another tobacco ifs Ogden's. 

Only the best cigarette papers 
"Votn-e" or "Chintsder" 
are good enouoti far 

---- column ----

OGDEN'S 

FINE CUT 
CIGARETTE TOBACCO 

fHp* Smoicers .' 
Atk for Opfaa's Cut Hug 

---- column ----

Do You Live 
In The Past? 

---- column ----

V 

---- column ----

-' 

---- column ----

Claime It'e a Sure 
9' Middle Age 

---- column ----

j 

---- column ----

When you star: living la U* 

instead of adjusting yourself B 
to changes in environment, you'v 
reached middle-age, according 
Dr. William A. O'Brien. UoiTe*- 
aity of Minnesota professor. 

"When men start living in ta 
pas:, senility ia near at hand,* 
he eaid. In some people this may 
come early ia life, while wife 
others it may be np to 60 or be- 
yond. * 

UNDERSTAND THAT LIFE 
CHANGES 

''For many years the indiviil*. 
al ia confronted with the parados 
of an aging body, an alert mini 
social and business techniques ac 
a high order of development. 9> 
trie to prolong his physical actfc 
vities by a strenuous program ost 
keeping fit. The result is oftaft 
dangerous. 

"It ia impossible to fight th* 
changes. We should understand 
them and make the necessary a4> 
justments." 

---- column ----

.CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS. 

---- column ----

A.K.\T WlM'tiU 

---- column ----

*TT>.ES . '3 MONTHS H'AKAXTES. 
; ..-i.c . actory to YOU with oae 
Ball profit. If needing TIRES. 
It will pay you u r:t* (or prices. 
Agrit* wanted . . . lave mooey 
for yourself, and mak few- 
dollars .:'. ruur frtad6. All 
tlrjj shipped prepaid, lubjact to 
your Inspvctiou and approval. 
Mayalls Tire S-rV. I Bin St.. 
Toronto 

~ B.1MV CHICKS 

'OXFORn- CHJCK3 FROM OX~- 
tario Bredlnff Station Flocks, six- 
teenth year culled and blood- 
teted by th Poultry Deport- 
ment. Ontario Agricultural Col- 
lege. Guelph. Barred Rock Cock- 
erel* 5c each. Whit* Leghorn 
Cooker*!* 2c ^each. Writ* tor Cir- 
cular. The Oxford Farmers' Co- 
Operative Produce Cv-mpar. v. Lim- 
ited. Woodstock. Ontario. 

RAISE GOOD CHICKS WITH JOHX- 
,.n' brad to lav barred plymoutb 
rocks and S.C.W. le^hornj Barroo 

---- column ----

Strain. 16 years L<r-.-d!nii. 
hatching and blood t-.'?:ius- Price 
for March and Ai>ril Rocks and 
Leghorns as hatched 10 CODU. 
Rock Pullets 17 cer.t!, Leghorn 
Pullnts . "0 cents. Clrcu".- with 
othar prices on re<ius:. J. D. 
'i. f- . 

---- column ----

oi'i'ou ri MT\ 

---- column ----

HtTIOV TOWN (JUOCK'.'.V >T'>Kfc: 
tt:i.-h*>d dn-cllinjr. Ren: $25. Oa-i 
stock, fixture*, about fifteen hun- 
q--.-d. XV TV iv. t rve. Kx : 

---- column ----

MOVNT 1'l.KA^ANT MOTOr.S LTD., 
Toronto's oldt-ft Olirysler. Plym- 
outh dealers: three locations. 8SS 
Mt. P!*ant Road. 2>>li) Vi>r- St.. 
InSO L'anforth Avev.uo Our l"eJ 
>.'nrs :u<Uf u^ HIT, ti ... J<. _ 

CHICK*. rtJLt.Kl'H 

BOOKIJET ri;ODiciN: IXKJ^ LN- 

der Te. r : Cents per J.ezi-r for Feed 
<"ost mailed free on request. Order 
chicks snd pullets uor. Manor 

---- column ----

3T. KKFK t HICKS 

WITH rvKKV 100 Pl'IJ.KTS or 1(>O 
mixed (.-hicks ordt-ml. we gi.r So 

rreer&icle*. ruiuu ju.oo to lu.oo 

per 100: MUftJ Thick* 18.00 ro 
$10.00 per 100: I'ukoreU per 100 
light breeds. SI.;.' heavy ^re(^. 
JI.OO. Immedi.te Ui'ivo ; iJoiWard 
Chick H a tV her*. t*.y : ;nu!a 

---- column ----

i:\KI l!> 

i;.VKKRs>' OVKNS .V.NT MACHtX- 
ery. also rebuilt e4'.i:poient al- 
ways /on hand. Term? arranged. 
IVrrespondence invited Robbard 
Portable Oven Co.. lOJ Uathurst 
Sf,. Tororlci. 

1 Ml \l VI I \> 

---- column ----

' IVNS \::\\ I;V: 

wholesale. 

' ' ' '' 

---- column ----

ISSUE 14 '41 

---- column ----

! "H S ILK 

---- column ----

tJOATS. N.VNNY AND BILiLT |H.0. 
<Je5e J5.0J. Runner Ducks I LI* 

i-tMivoa : ! < wtinted. Harold 
S'urr-.*. Alma. OM'.A: o. 

---- column ----

YOl" GOITRE. 1 "ABSORBO* 
reduces. For particular* writ* 
J. A. Jonnatoa Co.. 1T1 K!n K., 

---- column ----

ii' KH 

---- column ----

fit Wt: r.\}\ HVNDREPS 

enc Herbs. Roots. Bavrka. Writ* 
ioii Herb Pistributor*. UK 

---- column ----

HUKSC VOK VLB 

PEKOilKK'.'N "siTAUJON. 4 V KARJ?. 
.. real hors* cheap. 1 ".formation. 
picture write J. Aj-lward. Queeos- 
v!Ue. (v;t. _ 

LKUAL 

J. X. LINTSAV. LAW OFFICE. CAP- 
ttol Theatre Building. St. Thunns, 
Ontario. Special Department for 
farmer? c-MJectlcrs. _ 

---- column ----

rOl'LTRY 

A-' B-VBY CHICKS. BARKUD 
l;ock*. White Rocks. White Lag- 
horns. Brown Leghorn*. Jersey 
Black Gianta. Nw Hampshire 
F.ds. \Vr!te for new low prices. 
A. H. Switzer Hatchery. Oranton. 
(int. 

BA15Y CHICKS. (.JOVERXMENT Af- 
p- ,'ve 1 White Leghorns and Barred 
Kucks. also s*xed Pullets or 
Cockerels. Breeding since UOJ. 
t>end for v'ric* !:s:: Wrigh: Farm. 
Brockville. Ontario. 

---- column ----

TRAY UKiaVLT.S THE CHICKS. 
Order with confidence of quick 
delivery nu>j: treed*, cross bruds, 
pullets, cockerels, capona. Started 
chicks. Write for list Dally Spec- 
ials showing breeds, with dates. 
available. Some specials now Im- 
mediate delivery are U-ijhorus. 
Harred Rocks, .N H x 1, S. Bray 
H.itchry, lid John N Harallion. 
Out tllm'.teJ number Turkeys). 

OKKRH TO 1XVKVTVR9 

AN oyi'-SK TO EVERY INVKNTOR 
Lust of Inventions and full Infor- 
mation sent free. The Ramsay 
Co., Pegistered. Patent Attorneys. 
3~,i Bai'k_ Street. Ottawa. CttiadK 

PKKSU>' Al 

DUPREE PILLS $1.50 

DOl'tl.!'.' STKKNOTH S^.'.'U. lAdieJ 
quick, reliable relief tor delayed, 
overdue, or painful period*. w,t 
11am Crcsb}-. Pepi. WI N 394 Oo- 
tario liu'.ldiiii;. Tvronto. 

V\ I't'U 

---- column ----

LIJAH COMlXvi BEFORE C 

wonderful book sent fre*. Me<id4s) 
Mission. H.. Rochester. New Torja, 

---- column ----

REFAiRS 

---- column ----

SINGfcR SEK REVKKSS 

befjre buying. ^^-..J for eataloi 
price* and term-. Repair*. 3' 
fewing Uach'.n Company, 
Tonge St.. Torvn:?. Oct. 

SEED FOR <*\LK 

---- column ----

XORTUERX GROWN NO. J ALSIKjl 
II cents pound. No. ^ Miuture 90% 
Alslk* balance timothy dutcsi 
clover. IS cents pound. Xo>. } VI ia- 
*ture Aluk* 10 * balance dutcat 
clover 1) cents pour.d. No. S silo* 
ture Aisike (0%. timothy 51)11, 
IS cents pound. No. 1 Timothy^ 
No. 1 Purity > cerf* pound, oe 
primary noxious weeds, 35c. pajf 
ment with order. \Vm. A. P.tl4, 
Ksrlt.in. Ontario. 

SNAPSHOTS TO-DAY 
TREASURES TO-MORROW , 

Your films are carefully and iclea* 
tlflcally processed by imperial, te 
make *u; they lust. 

e r K\i>o<il K: FILMS 20 
with beautiful enlargement free, 
t reprints with enlargement 2S& 
Thousands of Inter* from satljf'ej 
customers testify to our superio* 
quality ;md service. 

IMI'KKIll. VHOTO SKRVICB 
S'ir.on J. Toronto. 

---- column ----

TU.H1CU 

---- column ----

PR. McIJ50r'-S STOMACHIC 
bring: you happiness th yof. 
ii. Towr.sr.d. (.Jorrie. Ontarl 
state*. "Suffered for yare wit 
terrible <niw:n* rains few houre j 
after eating: Also had voraitln , 
attacks and hemorrhn^e. Xothlosf 
seemed to help much but soda, 
and It only for short time, the* 
I le irnsd of IT. McLeod'e Stoat* 
achlc. After taking three bottle* 
t was free from pain. Kpt oe) 
Improving and have now b<>*) 
well for nln year*, enjoying 
meats without medicine." Storn* 
.tchic Is good for all formn of 1st* 
digestion. l>rug Store or write Oev 
Method's Stomachic Co.. ?iS Ba'.fc* 
urst. Torvr-t.i. Sl.So per bo'.tM 

---- column ----

SA1.KSM VN \\ANTKI' WITH CAK 
td sell to stores, l^di"< Home 
Presses .u;d ilen's \Vykinic cloth- 
es. on comroisslon ba-*is. \':th bond 
required to -o\cr co^t of samples. 
K.ielusixe tvrrityry uiveii. S'.nte 
<KI\ \; nc ref-ieiices. Write 
I'.O. Uoi 1U. Muti 

---- column ----

rou v* t w 

---- column ----

ion: 

---- column ----

n'M-t; iH"i:u:v AND 
laf for pil>e tl.SS. 
yrnnrant Virginia 
i':ret;* Tobacco :'.50 poetyat 
N.ttuti' l>af Tol'ai'i'o Co.. LeT 

---- column ----

fiT* 

LoeJ 

tyatfc 

---- column ----

Guaranteed 

CAR AND TRUCK PARTS 

Used New 

---- column ----

l\ lll.lllll.r MS> 

lrBl 

---- column ----

, 

---- column ----

M'lilVPI IN 

Ml|f>. I'tlW I I' I M'I'S. U..l 

H I I . \\i~i ( C.eBerti>re> 

SI triers. l .iui-i ,-. i xr'-urrto. , 

Itadlmor* 

---- column ----

. - 

l.ery aulu I'arit. lien J.. Tereaie. 
---- page ----

---- column ----

JWednesday, April 2, 1941 

---- column ----

THE FLESHERTON ADVANCE 

---- column ----

THE 

FLESHERTON ADVANCE 

Published on Collingwood Strati, 
Fleshcrton, Wednesday of emch 
week. Circulation over 1,000. 
Price in Canada fZ.OO pr year, 
when paid in advance $1.60; in 
V. S. A. $2.60 per year, when 

paid in advance $2.00. 
F. J. THURSTON. Editor. 

---- column ----

1>UT EFFORT INTO PRODUCTION 

In just a few weeks, a large num- 
E l>er of Ontario boys in their late 
"teens will be on their way from 
: *heir city homes to the farm. En- 
ouragrcd to do so by the Ontario 
CJovernment, these lads will approach 
their experience with a feeling that 
they are doing something of a ser- 
vice to their country. 

Practically all of them will be 
jfrcen and awkward at their new jobs. 
JMany of them will miss at first the 
xciteTnent of city life. But if they 
aapproach their work with the idea 
that they are taking the places of 
young men from the rural areas who 
liave enlisted in the armed forces and 
others who have joined the ranks of 
"industrial war workers, they may 
apply a seriousness to their tasks 
that will make them useful to har 
ssed farmers. 

Without doubt, a large number of 
these boys will take back to the city 
next fall a new appreciation of the 
meaning of hard work. Several of 
them should get a new slant on an 
old truth, that in order to produce 
Anything worth while, a man must 
5>ut real effort into the process of 
production. 

EARNING ITS WAY 

"Wonders will never cease. Due to 
increase in earnings it is now con- 
fidently expected by the Board, that 
the Canadian Nat.iona' Railway will 
conclude operations in 1991, without 
a deficit. The man who predicted 
this even ten years ago would have 
t>en thought slightly mad, but it all 
jtoes to show that there is no need to 
fce despondent in regard to our rail- 
way outlook. As business gets better 
*hi country may easily support two 
major systems, the C.N.R. and the 
C.P.R. 

---- column ----

AN HISTOKICAL VICTORY 

---- column ----

News filtering through from the 
Eastern Mcitcrranean over the week 
end jrave information of a great 
naval battle with the Italian fleet off 
*he south shore of Italy that was a 
credit to the Uritish navy. A close 
iwatch has been kept on the move- 
ments of the Italian fleet for some 
time and when intelligence brought 
lows of the movement of <> number 
*f enemy ship.?, the British n.\vy im- 
mediately took steps to cut it off 
f i- in iU base and was so successful 

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that two cruisers, three destroyers 
and probably other craft were aunk 
in a surprise attack. It is reported 
there were no British casulties. The 
watch dogs or the Empire are con 
stantly and quietly on the job, no 
fan-fare of trumpets mark their ap- 
proach until there tare results to 
announce. The battle in the Medi- 
terranean over the week end will no 
doubt go down in history as one of 
the great battles of this war. 

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EDITORIAL NOTES 

How much longer can Mussolini 
keep th,e truth from his people, that 
every battle he has fought in this 
war as been a losing one? When 
the break comes there will be plenty 
of fight at home for him to look 
after. Who knows what the end 
will be? 

* 

The warm sun is taking down the 
snow banks, but the gravel roads 
are rough and slow for travel. The 
cement highways are bare of snow 
and where plows have been use<i 
deigning has disappeared. Work at 
opening the county highway from 
the Feversham corner to Singhamp 
ton was halted Sunday evening after 
the plow had reached the Mclntyre 
sideroad, due to the snow freezing 
making it impossible for the plow to 
continue. 


After signing an agreement with 
the Axis Powers Yugoslavia gov- 
ernment leaders resigned their posi- 
tions and a government favorable to 
Britain has tx.en placed in charge. 
The Germart^vYvernment has askec 
for a statement as to the position ol 
the new government in regard to the 
pact signed, but so far there has 
been nothing but silence in that re- 
gard coming fron Yugo-Slavia 
From that silence Hitler and his gang 
of thieves should realize that the 
little country means business in the 
defence of their country and will not 
allow the Axis to send troops over 
their land without a fight. Britain 
has mechanized forces in Greece al 
the Yugoslavia border ready to lenc 
assistance in their fight for freedom 

---- column ----

Orange Valley School 

Grade 8 Margaret Smith*, Mur- 
iel Gilchrist, Oscar Irving, Marjorie 
Fraser. 

Grade 6 Nina Teeter, Jack Gil- 
christ, Fred Gilchrist. 

Grade 4 Ruth Smith*, Doreen 
Teeter*, Philip Irving, Melville Irv- 
ing, Dorothy Brown. 

Grade 3 Rae Smith*, Betty Hill, 
Emerson Brown, Harold Gilchrist. 

Grade 2 Gordon Rrown*, Billy 
Gilchrist*, Jimmic Irving. 

Grade 1 Alice Irving, Gordon 
Gifchrist, (Phyllis Brown*, Herman 
Brown. 

* Perfect attendance. 

G. B. Littlejohns, Teacher. 

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HOUSECLEANING SPECIALS 

Wallpaper 

OVER 200 COMBINATIONS TO CHOOSE 
FROM, AS LOW AS 5c PER ROLL 

Floor Coverings 

Large* Display of 

LINOLEUM, CONGOLEUM, FELTOL, 

REXOLEUM & REXFELT 

at Mail Order Prices. 

CURTAIN RODS BLINDS 

Bedding Specials 

45 Ib. COTTON FILLED MATTRESS $6.95 

"HIGH RISER" SPRING $6.95 

SPRING-KILLED MATTRESS, A.C. Ticking, 

Rolled Edges, 190 Inner Springs, Ventilators. 

For the price of $13.25 

COUCH PADS, good quality $7.25 

See our Display of 

STUDIO COUCHES, BREAKFAST SUITES, 
CHESTERFIELD SUITES, etc. 

'If it is for the Home, We have it' 

Bennett & Richards 

HOME FURNISHERS 
Phone 78 We Deliver Flesherton, Ont. 

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EUGENIA 

(Intended for Last Week) 
We are glad the storm is over. It 
was one of the heaviest we have had 
for some time. We did not receive 
any mail for over a week, then the 
Kimberley-Flesherton mail man had 
to be met at the valley road and the 
mail brought up the hill. 

Pte. Douglas Cairns of the Grey & 
Suticoe Foresters, Camp Borden, was 
on a six-day leave at his home. 

Pte. Allan Love of the Foresters. 
Camp Borden, spent a few days at 
*he Phillips home. 

Tanker Norman Williams of Camp 
Borden spent the week end at his 
home here. 

Mr. H. Tudor and daughters visit- 
ed recent with Mr. and Mrs. Stanley 
Magee, Maxwell. 

We extend our symathy to the 
members of the Munshaw family and 
their relatives in their sad bereave- 
ment by the death of their father, 
the late Mr. Peter Munshaw, whose 
funeral took place on Saturday to 
Flesherton cemetery. Mr. Munshaw 
was a resident in Eugenia for a good 
many years, being proprietor of the 
Eugenia House, but spent the past 
three winters with hi* daughter, Mre. 
J. E. Large, at Niagara Falls. 

We are sorry to hear of the serious 
accident which befel Mr. Jas. Harri- 
son, Flesherton, and we wish him a 
complete recovery. 

Messrs. Fykes and McArthur ol 
Toronto, also Miss Mary McEee, 
spent the week end with the latter's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. McRee. 

Miss Doris Fawcett is spending a 
few weeks with friends in Toronto. 

Misses Lillian and Doris Magee of 
Flesherton spent the week end with 
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Magee and Mr. 
and Mrs. Cecil Magee. 

Messrs. Everett Graham and Reg 
Fawcett have returned from near 
Barrie, where they have been 
working. 

Aircraftsman Argyle Martin, who 
returned to Manning Depot from the 
Chorley Park hospital n week ago, 
spent the week end at his home. 

Mrs. J. V. Tomilson has gone to 
Toronto for a visit. 

On Saturday evening, March 15, 
the residents of this community held 
a social evening in the L.O.L. hall in 
honor of Aircraftsman Argyle Mar- 
tin, who was home on a 48-houi 
leave from Manning Depot, Toronto. 
Although the night was stormy and 
the roads bad, there was a nice gath- 
ering and a very enjoyable time was 
spent. Mr. Ben Shortt actd as 
chairman for the proigram, vrtiich 
consisted of community singinp, a 
duet "The Church in the WiK'wood" 
by the Phillips sisters; a selection, 
"He is Calling," by the church choir; 
two solos by Norval Belts; a violin 
selection by Bert Mclntosh. Mr. 
Shortt then called Argyle to the plat- 
form while, on behalf of the com- 
munity, a splendid address in poetry 
form was read to him by Miss I. 
Dinsmore and the presentation of a 
wrist watch made by Mr. Ed. Baker, 
and a sum of money by Mr. Ben 
Shortt. All joined in singing "He's 
a Jolly Good Fellow," after which 
Argylp heartilv than'tod nil thosr 
who contributed toward the gifts, as 
well as the collectors and also Miss 
Dinsmore for the address. He appre- 
:iated the wrist watch very much 
and passed it around for all to view. 
With the gift of money he intends to 
y a pen and pencil set. A pleasant 
time was ended near midnight with 
all singing the National Anthem. 

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-,.~'-! 

? i ": 

M* II 

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* 

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41 FEATURES FOR '41 

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Now is the tune to see your dealer 
about a new Chevrolet. Now while 
you can get so much motor car value 
for your money! Now while low 
price boys "all the necessities and 
most of the luxuries of modern 
motoring" I Never has a car carried 
more advancements and advan- 
tages than this year's value-leading 
Chevrolet . . . Concealed Safety 
Steps . . . comfort-increasing Knee- 
Action . . . quality Body by Fisher 
. . . Vacuum-Power Shift, at no extra 
cost ... 41 great features for '41 ! 
The new Chevrolet has been sized 
ahead, styled ahead, designed ahead 
for your protection. Eye it, try it, 
buy it today. Enjoy immediate 
delivery and make sure of depend- 
able motoring in the years ahead. 

CANADiAN-ftUUT BY 00ORAL MOTOtf 

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U.W Behind lUdUter 

Weight 3250 Ibs. 

34. Glass Area 228, sq. ins 

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YEARS AHEAD for YEARS TO COME 

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D. McTAVISH & SONS, FLESHERTON, Out 
H. Grummett, DundaJk (Associate Dealei) 

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BO UN 

FISHER At Mrs. Nuhn's Nurs- 

ng Home, Flesherton, on Friday, 

March 28, 1941, to Mr. and Mrs. E. J. 

Fisher, the gift of a daughter, Sandra 

Jean. 

GORRBLL At Mrs. Nuhn's Nurs- 
ing Home, Flesherton, on Sunday, 
March 30th, 1941, to Sergt. and Mrs. 
Fred Gorrell, the gift of a daughter, 
Patricia Yvonne. 

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"GO PLACES" 

FOR EASTER 

SPECIAL LOW FARES 

Between all points in Canada and 

to certain destinations in the 

United SUtM 

FARE & ONE-QUARTER 

FOR THE ROUND TRIP 

Tickets good going any time Thurs- 
day, April 10, until 2.00 p.m. Mom- 
day April 14. 

Return Limit to leave destination not 
later than midnight Tuesday, April 

15th, 1941 

Take advantage of this long week 
end for a visit home or away 

with friends. 

For fares and information ask any 
Railway Ticket Apent. 

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/trtemesia louucu 

Artemesia Council met at the 
Council Chambers, Flesherton, on the 
12th day of March. The members 
were all present with the Reeve in 
the chair. The minutes of the last 
meeting were read and on motion 
adopted. 

Communications presented and 
read were from: Department of Mun- 
icipal Affairs, re municipal subsidy ; 
Department of Public Welfare, re 
unemployment relief; Department of 
Highways, re with forms of applica- 
tion for subsidy, 1940. 

Accounts presented and ordered 
paid were from; Municipal World, 
subscriptions $6; Advance Printing 
Co., notices and financial statement 
$51.95; Department of Health, insul- 
in for indigent patient; Geo. Johnson 

Featuring a green cover with a 
message on the back urging the pur- 
chase of war savings stamps and cer- 
tificates, Flesherton's new telephone 
directory has now been distributed. 
In aid of the national war effort, The 
Bell Telephone Company is donating 
the back cover of all its 1941 direct- 
ories to promote the war saving.* 
campaign. * 

Since there are more than 2,500 
new and changed listings in the al- 
phabetical section alone, the need foi 
destroying the old book and carfully 
consulting the new one before plac- 
ing calls is obvious, if the "wrong 
number" nuisance is to be avoided. 
The green cover will make it easy to 
distinguish the new book from the old. 

Altogether, more than 8,000 vol- 
umes of the directory are printed. 
Of this total, about 250 are distrib- 
uted in Fk-iherton. The remainder 
i,'o to subscribers in Owen Sound 
and surrounding communities, 
and Bob Lee were each refunded $2 

---- column ----

.'or dig tax assessed in error in 1940; 
the premium on Municipal Indemnity 
Insurance, $92.20, was ordered to be 
paid. 

The Collector was instructed to 
(rase from his Roll |9.04, being 
Hydro tax charged to Wallace Fisher, 
he having paid the same to the 
Commission. 

The Clerk was instructed to adver- 
tise for tenders for tractor to draw 
trader. 

Tender was received and accepted 
from Lome Turvey for crushing 
erravel for roads in 1941 at 48 cents 
per cubic yard, placed on roads, to 
the amount of approximately 5,500 
yards, and the Clerk was instructed 
to prepare a contract giving effect to 
the Under. 

Pay Sheet No. 1 of 1941, amount- 
ing to $70.8S, was passed for pay- 
ment. 

The Council adjourned to meet on 
the 15th day of April, 1941, at one 
o'clock t).m. 

---- column ----

"Take measles seriously"-- Heading 
of medical article. But we would 
rather not take them at all, please. 

---- column ----

MYLES McKAV 

A quiet but pretty edding was 
solemnized in St. Mark's Anglican 
Church, Orangeville, on Saturday, 
March 22, with Rev. J. McMaster of- 
ficiating, when Stella Naomi, daught- 
er of the late Mr. and Mrs. James Mc- 
Kay of Swinton Park, became the 
bride of William James, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Myles of Melancthon. 
The young couple were attended by 
Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Ladd, Orange- 
ville. * 

The bride looked lovely in a dress 
of soldier blue crepe with a corsage 
of- carnations and accessories to 
match. 

Imjf ediately after the ceremony 
refreshment were served to about 18 
guests at the home of the groom's 
sister in Orangeville. The young 
couple left for a short honeymoon. 
They will reside in Toronto. 

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Just how bombing restaurants and 
dance spots is going to win the war 
for Germany is not at the moment 
clear. 

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INSURANCE 

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Authorized agent for 

GERMANIA FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

also All Lines of 

CAR INSURANCE, BONDS, etc. 

See HERB CORBETT 

Proton Station, Ont. 

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Phone Dundalk 44 r 21 
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7 

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THE FLESHERTON ADVANCE 

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Wednesday, April 2, 1941 

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KIMBERLEY 

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Ezra Fawcett of the Veterans' 
Guard of Canada is spending a leavt 
with Kimberley friends. 

Mr. Dalton Ferguson, who has 
been lumbering in the north, is home, 
arriving Wednesday morning. 

Mr. and Mrs. Otto Baker and fam- 
ily visited Sunday with Mrs. M. 
Ferguson. 

At last the storm and roads permit 
the mail man making his trips, going 
once via the valley road and missing 
even trips. 

Mrs. Chas. Graham visited a week 
with her daughter, Mrs. Neff, a 
Binghampton. 

Mr. Jack Graham has received hi - 
notice for four months' military 
training. 

Miss Tena Hutchinson spent the 
week end with her mother and 
brother here. 

Mr. Earl Heitman and Mr. and 
Mrs. A. Richardson and children ci 
Toronto spent the week end with Mr, 
and Mr . Ira Harris. 

We extend our sympathy to Miss 
Weller, our junior teacher, in the 
death of her aunt at, Brampton. 

The W. I. met at the home of Mrs 
E. Morwood when over 20 were pre- 
sent. Mrs. D. L. Weber donated a 
quilt top which was completed at her 
home. Miss Annie Burritt donatec 
a quilt for the Red Cross. More are 
in the making. More yarn an< 
goods are expected soon for more 
Red Cross work. A very interesting 
paper was given by the president 
Mrs. E. Morwood, on Grey County 
A committee was appointed to ae 
core a play. Roll call was a town 
hip in Grey County. 

These two weeks Mr. Garnet Bake: 
has been busy "buzzing'" for the 
busy farmers. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Wickena re- 
turned on Friday from their trip t< 
visit their daughter, Gladys (Mrs 
Hoyden McDonald), at Gold Pines 
Ont. They enjoyed their visit very 
much. 

We extend our sympathy to Mrs. 
Geo. Cornfield, in the death of her 
brother, Mr. Jos. Cherry, at Woode- 
bouse, last week. 

A pleasant time was spent at the 
W. I., when the members and W. A. 
members presented Mrs. Ross Ellis 
with a line table cloth and serviettes, 
prior to her departure for her new 
home near Rocklyn.. Mrs. Ellis 
thanked the ladies in a few well 
chosen words. Mr. nnd Mrs. Ellis 
and family will be greatly missed. 

---- column ----

adies were present, Work commenc- 
ed on two quilts, one a heavy flannel- 
ette lined was yarn-tied, while the 
other was put in frames and partly 
completed and has since been finish- 
ed. It was decided, on account of 
road conditions to cancel further 
meetings until after the snow was 
gone and cars running. In last week's 

ssue one of our items should have 
read Mrs. Thos. Watson who donated 
a quilt top, in place of Mrs. Lome 
Watson. Sorry for the mistake. 

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VANDELEUR 

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(Intended for Last Week) 
A very successful "pot luck" sup- 
per was held in the church on Friday, 
March 14th, under the auspices of 
the W. A. The ladies served 
splendid supper in the basement and 
a fine program folio-wed in the audi- 
torium. A feature of the program 
was a "Treasure Trail" contest, con- 
ducted by Messrs. Howard McGee 
and Melville Buchanan. 

In site of the violent March 
weather a very successful quilting 
and tea was held at the home oi 
Mrs. Will Johnston on Wednesady 
afternoon of last week. 

Miss Marion Boland of Mimico 
spent a few days at her parenta 
home here. 

Mr. Jim Cargoe is busy buzzing 
wood for farmers in the district. 

Margaret Ruth Graham celebrated 
the third anniversary of her birth on 
Monday, March 17th. Ruth was a 
very sick little girl that day, and 
the weather was bad, but her sham- 
rock plant had three blossoms on i 
in honor of the occasion. 

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SPRINGHILL 

Mrs. B. Talbot of Proton visited 
her sister, Mrs. Claude Akin.-;, one 
day last week. 

We are sorry to report Mrs. Geo, 
Best on the sick list. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy McMillan and 
Billy of Eugenia visited on Sunday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Frank Eagles. 

Miss Elsie White was hostess last 
Thursday to the Red Cross. 
Owing to the lovely day most of the 

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BUCKINGHAM 

(Intended for Lut Woek) 

Miss Ann Robinson, R.X., of Fev- 
ersham spent last week with Mr. and 
Mrs. J. T. Davidson. 

The Club meeting- at the home of 
Mrs. W. J. Conn on Wednesday of 
last week was attended by nine 
members and several visitors. Aftei 
the devotional exercises, the secre- 
tary's report of the last meeting wa? 
adopted. A woollen quilt made by 
the members, was handed in, to be 
included in a refugee bale, as were 
several articles of clothing. Mrs. H. 
McKee very generously donated a 
quilt top, which will be completed 
later. Material to be made into 
blocks for a quilt was distributed 
among the ladies present, one mem- 
ber taking remnants to be converted 
into a comforter top. The invitation 
of Mrs. J. T. Davidson to have the 
April meeting at her home was 
accepted. 

Mrs. Garfield McLeod of Maxwell 
visited with her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. J. Conn, last week. 

Miss Doreen Davidson is staying 
with her sister, Mrs. J. Hughaon, in 
Creemore. 

---- column ----

CEYLON 

Word was received this Tuesday 
morning of the death at Berkeley of 
Mrs. Wm. Kirk, mother of Mrs. A. 
Muir. Mrs. Muir*s many friends 
sympathize with her in her loss. 

Mrs. Earnie Mitchell was among 
the guests at the home of Mrs. F. 
Stanton, Owen Sound, on Friday at 
trousseau tea in honour of hei 
daughter Muriel, whose marriage 
takes place this week. 

Pte. Lloyd Archibald of the G. & S. 
Foresters , Camp Borden is on a six 
day leave at his home here. 

Miss Isobel Cameron has returned 
from Guelph where she has spent the 
week end at here home here. 

Mr. Harvey Huston, Oshawa, was 
a week end visitor with Mr. and Mrs. 
Peter Muir and was accompanied on 
return by Mrs. Earl McLeod. . 

Mr. and Mrs. Archie Sinclair, Dun- 
dalk were visitors Sunday at J. R. 
Sinclairs. Master Douglas Sinclair 
returned with them for a visit. 

Miss Agues Mcphail returned Mon 
day from Ottawa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Knox, Swinton 
Park are visiting their daughter, Mrs 
Wm. Meads and Mr. Meads and fam- 
ily. 

Mrs. A. C. Muir was in Berkeley 
or the week end. 

Mr. Jack Foster formerly of Swin- 
on Park is assiting Frank Collinson, 
The Ladies' Aid met at Mrs. John 
Jeatiy's, Thursday afternoon with 
be President, Mrs. T. Stewart in the 
hair. Mrs. A. C. Muir gave a St. 
'atrick's reading 1 . The meeting took 
he form of a St. Patrick's social. 
Mrs. Hunt and Mrs. McWUliam 
ach supplied contests, the winners 
being: Mrs. -Snowden McLeod and 
Irs. Jas. McMullen. 

During the business session it was 
lecided that each member raise one 
lollar before the next meeting to 
raise more money for the Aid. A 
mppy social hour was spent at the 
close of the meeting. 

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When in town renew your subscrip- 
tion to The Advance. 

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OF PARTICULAR INTEREST TO LADIES 

SPECIAL SPRING 

Display and Sale 

Wed., April 9th 

LADIES' SPRING COATS 

TAILORED SUITS 
NEW SPRIN DRESSES 

SPRING MILLINERY 

Display and Sale by Wray's Ladies' Wear 
of Owen Sound 

ONE DAY ONLY 

New House Furnishings 

SUNWORTHY WALL PAPERS 

WINDOW SHADES 

LACE CURTTAINS 

CRETONNES and DRAPES 

CURTAIN NETS 

CONGOLEUM RUGS 

LINOLEUMS 

ALL REASONABLY PRICED 

F. H. W. Hickling 

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General Merchant 

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FLESHERTON 

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ROCK MILLS 

Beautiful spring weather at time 
of writing. April came in nice anc 
f the fine weather continues the snow 
will not be long disappearing. 

Mr. Alex. Laughlin, who has spenl 
the winter working at Kearney, ar 
rived last week to work at the mil 
again. 

Mr. W. Hamilton had Mr. Dave 
Weber of Kimberlcy deliver the large 
boiler to the mill here from Ceylon, 
with one of his large trucks. 

Messrs. P. Gagnon and J. DuffielJ 
of Durham made a business trip here 
the first of the week, 

Chas. Newell and Jim Pedlar each 
lad buzzing bees last week, with Mr. 
Lome Sharp's outfit. 

Miss Ettie Radley has recovered 
from her illness and has returned 
iome. - 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Stafford and 
Jimmie visited recently with friends 
near Feversham. 

Mrs. D. Hopkins and children 
returned to their home in Toronto, 
after spending a week with her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Dick Clark. 

---- column ----

THE ONLY 
NATIONAL APPEAL 

THIS YEAR 

FOR OUR MEN 

IN UNIFORM 

---- column ----

> For die things that are not given to a fighting man with his uniform 
. . . thing* that are not part of his military equipment . . . things of the 
spiiii . . . Canada's fighting sons, wherever they may be, rely on you. 

The Government provides them with uniforms, rifles, ammunition 
but for comforts recreations and wholesome opportunity to make 
their precious moments of leisure a genuine boon . . . they rely on you. 

Of cours* you help to buy airplanes, guns, ships, tanks BUT for 
the things that express to the soldier the affection and thoughtfulness 
of the foiki back home ... he relies on you. 

Six great national organizations labour unceasingly to provide him 
with ihoKe things. 

They can do it only with your money. 

Your money started diis work your money is needed to carry it 

The nxi is urgent. Be generous. 

Let the volunteer helper who calls on yon carry back your pledge of 
fullest support for our fighting men. 

THE BOYS RELY ON THE FOLKS BACK HOME 

If you have not been canvassed if you are not canvassed send your 
contribution to your local committee or to: 

ortor. 200 Bay St., Toronto, Canada to 

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SlX APPEALS IN 

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K1-:.\I) TFE "SMALL ADVTS". 

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Advertisement of Sale 

Under and by virtue of the powers 
contained in certain mortgage 
which will be produced at the tinv 
of sale, there will be offered fo 
sale by public auction on Friday, th 
18th day of April, 1941, at the hou 
of 1:00 o'clock, in the afternoon 
at Robinson's Store, in the Villag< 
of Feversham by George E. Duncan 
Auctioneer, the following property 
namely: 

Lot 18, Concession 8, north of th< 
Durham Road, in the Township of 
Osprey, in the County of Grey, 
containing one hundred acres, in- 
cluding buildings erected thereon. 

Terms: Ten percent of the pur- 
chase money to be paid down at 
the time of sale, balance to be paid 
within ten days. Subject to reserve 
bid. 

For further particulars and con- 
ditions of sale apply to Robert 
S. Johnston, Barrister, 21 1 Imperial 
Building, Hamilton, Ontario. 

Dated at Hamilton, the 29th day 
of March, 1941. p 

! . . 

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SWINTON PARK 

Mrs. Jim Kennedy of .Shelbume 
spent the week end with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. John Aldcorn. 

A large crowd gathered last Wed- 
nesday evening in the Orange Hall 
in honor of Lance Corporal Wm. 
Stainsby, and presented him with a. 
lovely watch. Bill thanked all for 
their kindness to him. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Knox and Mr. 
Walter Knox attended -the presenta- 
tion on Friday evening in honor of 
their nephew, Pte. Robert Meads, of 
the O.D.R., at the home of his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Will Meads. 

Miss Irma Dingwall entertained 
the Euchre Club at its closing even- 
ing at the home of Mr and Mrs. Fred 
Knox on Tuesday evening. Mr. Del- 
bert Haw won the men's high prize 
and Mrs. Fred Knox the ladies' high. 
Low prizes were won by Mr. R. 
Hardy and Mrs. Jas. Hardy. 

Mr. Eby. Ostrander had the mis- 
fortune to cut his foot while work- 
ing in the bush, and has been laid 
off work. 

The Ladies' Aid and W.M.S. m*et 
on Wednesday at the home of Mrs. 
Arthur Richardson, when 14 ladies 
were present. 

A shower is being held on Friday 
evening in honor of Mr. and Mrs. 
Myles (nee Stella McKay), of West- 
on, who were recently married. 

Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Haw and 
babe and Mr. and Mrs. Robt. McDon- 
ald of Saupreen Jet. spent Sunday at 
the home of Ed. Haw. 

---- column ----

who is recovering from a sligh 
stroke. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herb Eby ami 
Stephen visited a few days his week 
with her sister, Mrs. Armstrong, at 
Barrie. 

Born On Tuesday, March 28th 
to Mr. and Mrs. Harold Osborne, a. 
daughter. 

Mr. Geo. Cooper, who was in Mark- 
dale hospital, returned home on Sat- 

---- column ----

urday much improved in health. 

Mr. John Thomson of Agincourt 
visited last week with his brother, 
Mr, Chris. Thomson. 

---- column ----

There are about five vacancies in 
Ontario Legislature, but the Liberal; 
have a majority of about three to 
one, so the by-elections will probably 
keep on waiting. , * -^ 

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SPECIAL TRAIN SERVICE 

EASTER SUNDAY, APRIL 13 
Owen Sound FLESHERTON Toronto 

For the convenience of patrons desiring to spend longest 
possible Easter Week-End visit with out-of-town friends and 
be back home at a reasonable hour Sunday night. Special 
Train will operate Sun., April 13. as follows, making all stops: 

Lv. Owen Sound 6.15 p.m. Lv. FLESHERTON 7.00 p.m. 
Ar. Toronto Union 10.45 p.m. AH times are Standard. 

Consult Agents or current Time Tables for detailed schedule 
Enquire regarding Low Holiday Fares. 

CANADIAN PACIFIC 

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SAFE LOCK 
WIRE FENCE 

is best because stays are flexible, 
not rigid. If accidentally depress- 
ed it apringts erect the moment 
pressure is removed with no 
straightening of bent, wires. Many 
farmers call it 

Hinge Lock Fence 

Ask your local denier for H. 
Made only by the 

KEENAN FENCE CO. 

OWEX SOUND. Ont 

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FEVERSHAM 

---- column ----

Mr. Leighton Mclirnis spent the 
week end with friends in Toronto. 

Large crowds attended the auction 
sales of Mr. Jas. Davidson on Wed- 
nesday and Mr. Wm. Heitman on 
Saturday. 

We re orry to report that Mr 
Bert Davidson is in Collingwood hos- 
pital suffering from an appendicitis 
attack. 

An epidemic of measles among the 
children is prevailing in our village, 
causing a small attendance at school. 

Mrs. Emerson Wright, Stanley and 
Shirley visited on Saturday nt her 
parental home in Ceylon. 

Mrs. G. Eby spent a few days in 
Toronto la.it week. 

Mr. Norman Davidson of Colling- 
wood spent Sunday at his home. 

Mr. Walter Saigeon is visiting in 
j Toronto with his sister, Mrs. Walker. 

---- column ----

cat Storage 

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WE FEEL THAT WE WOULD NOT BE FAIR TO 

YOU IF WE DID NOT AGAIN REMIND YOU OF 

THE COLD STORAGE FACILITIES. 

A $5.00 box for a year will hold approximately 
220 to 250 Ibg. meat and you may refill th box 
often as you wish. You may also place meat in 
storage at the rate of 1%* per Ib. 

NOW IS THE TIME THAT THE STORING 

OF MEAT SHOULD BE IN FULL 

PROGRESS. 

. 

Call in to see us about tke storage. , 

Flesherton Creamery & Produce Co. 

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Phone G6 

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Angus Avis, Manager ' 
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\ 

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Saving Ontario's 

Natural 
Resources 

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G. C. Toner 

Ontario Federation of AngUr* 
and Hunter* 

(No. 36) 

FISH, GAME LAWS 

* 

Last week I mentioned that 
there had been other government 
bodies concerned with our fish 
tmd game before our present 
Game and Fisheries Department 
t^as instituted in 1905 but even 
before there were any regulatory 
< c administrative bodies there 
were game laws enacted by the 
Legislature. I mentioned the 
earliest of the?e last week, the 
Act of 18:il. 

In 1839 another Act was pas- 
sed which was even more com- 
prehensive for it provided that no 
person "shall hunt or shoot, or go 
out with a gun in quest of any 
deer or other wild animal or wild 
fowl on the Lord's Day (common- 
ly called Sunday; within this 
Province." The season for deer 
was changed to open August 1st 
and close February 1st. "Wild 
turkey, prairi* hen or grouse; 
commonly called pheasant or 
partridge; or any quail or wood- 
cock," could legally be taken 
from September 1st to March 1st. 

Open and Clo.ed Son* 

When the Statutes of Upper 
Canada were consolidated in 
1859 there were few changes. 
The duck season extended from 
August 1st to April 15th, eight 
and one half months of shooting 
which should have satisfied most 
paopl*. Even at that time they 
bad. trouble with wolves and the 
Act mentions a bounty of six 
dollars. 

In 1868, the Province of On- 
tario revised the gam* laws, cut- 
ting down th open season to 
more reasonable length but even 
this did not prevent depletion. By 
1890, the anxiety among thinking 
people culminated in the appoint- 
ment of a Commission to investi- 
gate condltioni and submit rs- 
*V mmendations. 

One can find in libraries the 
Id leather bound volume that 
contains the report of the Com- 
mission of 1890. It is well worth 
reading, particularly for ths pic- 
ture It gives of conditions fifty 
years ago. It was a sweeping 
fend outspoken indictment of ths 
Tenons abuses that hampered ths 
conservation of our gams and 
til*. It had considerable effect 
for shortly afterwards the Legis- 
lature set up a Board of Fish 
Vid Gam* Commissioners under 
the nominal jurisdiction of th* 
(Commissioner of Crown Lands. 
This Commission administered tht 
mid lift for nearly fourteen 

Cm when It was dissolved and 
prestnt Department of Gam* 
ud Fisheries was set up In its 
place. 

---- column ----

Willows Have 

Turkish Origin 

Britain and America have a 
pary strong bond with Turkey, 
tor every weeping willow gracing 
ur river banks owes iU origin to 
a single cutting brought from 
tfcat country. This is how it hap- 
pened. At the beginning of th* 
18th century a large basket of 
2igs was sent from Smyrna to 
Lady Suffolk in Kngland. Th* 
..L'L rojjo was there when th* 
tfift arrived, so drawing one of 
the withes from which the basket 
was made, he remarked: "Per- 
itaps this will produce something 
w* have not in Kngland." H* 
took it with him to his villa at 
Twickenham and planted it by the 
Thames, vvhcrs it grew into a 
magnificent weeping willow. It 
v.'aii generally admired and cut- 
tings were taken 'IS all parts of 
England. Years lator, a British 
officer leaving for this continent 
cut a twig from Pope's willow, 
tnrapped it in oiieu silk and rr- 
H*4 it in his baggage throughout 
Hie Revolution. After the war 
he presented it to John Curtis, 
son of Manlia Washington, who 
planted it in Virginia where it 
became the ancestor of all weep- 
ing willows in the States. 

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Visible Smells 

N*ither gold nor platinum has 
in, odour wich can b* recog- 
nised by the human nose, but 
most of the commoner motals 
ran easily bo recognised by the 
Hense of smell. Tin, for instance, 
when freshly cut, has u strong 
a*4 unmistakable odour. Of th* 
Mur*r metals, uranium and its 
eompoundB giv* out th* strong- 
eat small. I. raniuni Is on* of lh* 
radio-active metals and constant- 
ly throws off extremely small 
particles. 

Long u]f" -I. J. Thomson show- 
ed that these particles produce 
jtu'lu'As on a photographic film 
and can be deflected by a magr- 
uet. Though infinitesimal in size, 
they ran affect our olfactory or- 

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Some Do, Some Don't Science Seeks Answer 

---- column ----

Working hand in hand with the f tghtinur forces of Canada and of the rest of the Empire are the scien- 
tists of the -National Research Council of Ottawa. Already they have made numerous highly important con- 
tributions to the war effort, both in the industrial field and in the armed forces. In this photo one of the 
research workers is shown as he subjects steel helmets to special tests. One has been penetrated T)y a 
bullet and the other has resisted it. The scientist is trying to find out why. 

---- column ----

THE WAR-WEE K Commentary on Current Events 

U. S. S. R. PROMISES AID 
IF TURKEY IS ATTACKED 

---- column ----

Last week M spring opened th 
door on what might well be th 
decislv* phase of the conflict be- 
tween Britalm and Germany, tu 
Battle at Britain out of which has 
frown the Battle of the Atlantic 
was etUl the main engagement of 
the war. But events In the Medi- 
terranean basin were receiving 
much more of the world's attention. 
There, the British conquest of It- 
aly's African Km;. ire, all but com- 
plete, was beginning to be chal- 
lenged by large forces of German 
mechanized troop* In western Lib- 
ya; and the Battle of the Balkans 
was fast approaching the "shoot- 
ing" stage. 

Yugoslav Crisis 

The capitulation to tha Axis of 
Yugoslavia's head men precipitat- 
ed a number of new crises: in 
Yugoslavia Itself, where open re- 
volt and 'civil war threatened; In 
Greece, where the Allle<l-Grek 
military command, had swiftly to 
revise their plan of defence to em- 
embrace a much wider front; In 
Turkey, where the country's lead- 
ens saw her Independence menaced 
from ret another angle; and in 
Russia, where German penetration 
of the Balkans had long been view- 
ed with growing auilety. 

Russia Assures Neutrality 

The Soviet Union reacted to thU 
situation by reaffirming friendship 
wttlh Turkey and assuring Russian 

---- column ----

neutrality should Turkey resist a 
Gtorman attack on herself. Ths 
agreement did not promise neutral- 
ity If Turkey should strike at Ger- 
man/ In the event of a Nazi move 
against Greece. On ths contrary It 
stated that "in the event that Tur- 
key should be tha object of aggree- 
a Ion and she found herself obliged 
to enter war for the defence of net 
territory, Turkey could then. In 
conformity with the non-aggression 
pact existing between herself and 
the r. S. S. ft , rely on the full 
comprehension and neutrality of 
the U. S. S. R." 

Tuls was sensational news. The 
entering Into of tills pact with Tur- 
key constituted the first concrete 
step the Soviet Union had taken to 
Influence the course of ths war 
sine* the German-Russian agree- 
ment of August, 1939. This latest 
act barred further Nazi penetra- 
tion southeast, along the TJ. S. 3. 
R's western bordera. (It also was 
reliably confirmed that Russia had 
halted shipment of all supplies of 
oil to Germany since March 1). 
Bad For Germany 

'Writing on the significance of 
the new Soviet assurance to Turkey 
Canadian military analyst W. R. 
Plewman said: 'The dlopatcb.es 
suggest that Russia will glr ma- 
terial help to Turkey much as the 
U. S. Is giving material help to 
Britain. Some war supplies prol>- 

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GuecU in Wartime Britain Come and Bring Their Own 

---- column ----

Hostesses in wartime Britain need no longer worry about their 
friends' food fads. When week-end guest* arrive, they frequently bring 
their rations along with them. 

---- column ----

ably are moving from Russia to 
Turkey, and It would be logical for 
the movement to develop gradually 
to a large scale . . . Russia Is mov- 
ing her troops and warships west- 
ward as quietly as possible, but 
perhaps with little idea of offens- 
ive action . . . It remains to be seen 
whether Stalin will neglect his op- 
portunities until Hitler 1s ready to 
strike. His military advisers should 
tell him the truth that until Ger- 
any has fought it out with Britain, 
Hitler won't have sufficient gaso- 
line and grease to permit large 
mechanized forces to drive far into 
Russia and that Hitler really to 
staging a gigantic bluff to keep 
Russia quiet. The Russian armies 
possess a vast nu-- n rical superior- 
ity over the German armies and it 
Is Impossible for the German forces 
to guard every vital point that the 
Russians could menace. The Sov- 
iet air force could work havoc to 
German cities; Russian cities are 
so remote they would be compar- 
atively fre from attack. Were Rus- 
sia to make common cause with 
the Greek, British and Turkish 
armies, the defeat of Germany 
within a year would be a near 
certainty." 

Whatever purposes were behind 
th* Soviet pledge of aid to Tur- 
key, they portended ill for Nazi 
Germany. Even the U. 8. State De- 
partment heartily applauded Rus- 
sia's attitude. 

"Bridge of Ships" 

President Roosevelt's biggest 
headache, once the first financial 
appropriations under the Lease- 
Lend bill had been approved by 
the Senate, appeared last week to 
be: how the U. S. was to assure 
delivery of American aid to Bri- 
tain. Everything obviously depend- 
ed upou maintenance of the 
"bridge of ships" across the At- 
lantic. (Hearteniogly enough last's 
week's British shipping losses were 
away down). A move to lend more 
destroyers to Britain was expected 
hourly; and large-scale plans were 
being laid for the repair of Bri- 
tain's naval and merchant shipping 
in United States yards. Use of 
American warships in British con- 
voys was contemplated, but not 
plnnned until a more critical stage 
of U. S.-Gorman relations should 
i>.< reached. 

Very encouraging news for Bri- 
tain came out of the U. S. last 
weeik with the report, reliably eon- 
firmed, that 15,000 bomber and 
fighter planes would be ready to go 
across the ocean to join the war 
by. July. By the end of 1941, It 
was said, American production 
would bring Britain's air fighting 
strength up level with Germany's. 
Japan Reconnoitre* 

Japanese Foreign Minister Mat- 
suoka's sojourns in Moscow, Rome, 
Berlin, were last week not yet com- 
plete. His parleye with tha Axis 
rlilofd were the subject of much 
speculation since no Information 
about them was forthcoming 
but it was generally thought that 
Mr. Matsuoka had rome to Europe 
to sen for himself whether the 
Axis partners were in position to 

---- column ----

make good their claim that they 
can ' nullify American aid for Bri- 
tain and knock the latter out. His 
findings would without doubt 
strongly ' r luenc the decision of 
his government as to whether Ja- 
pan is to weave a tortuous course 
of non-belligerency or throw cau- 
tion to the -winds and join In the 
attack on the Anglo-Allies. One of 
Japan's greatest fears of course li 
that Soviet Russia might attack 
her In the north (by air, sea and 
Land) when she's busy In the south, 
and what the Japanese government 
desires perhaps above all else at 
the moment Is a Russo-Japanese 
non^aggression pact. 
* * 

$2,600,000,000 This Year 

Canada will spend $2,600,000,0 
over the next twelve months on 
her own war effort and financial 
aid to Britain $850,000,000 more 
than was estimated late In Feb- 
ruary Premier King told Parlia- 
ment last week. The Prime Min- 
ister declared that this sum, to be 
spent In a mighty drive of men, 
money and materials, represented 
44 per cent of the whole national 
income of Canada. 

On a comparative basis, the 
premier estimated, this financial 
assistance to Britain for Canadian 
puchases would equal an expendi- 
ture of |15 billions by the United 
States more than twice the Wash- 
ington appropriation for land-lease 
purposes. 

Following Premier King, Fin- 
ance Minister Ilsley announced 
federal taxes of $1,000,000,000 for 
the fiscal year beginning April 1 
which represented an additional 
$100,000,000 in revenue to b* 
.io:ight from Canadians by the Do- 
minion government next year. A 
billion dollars, he said, would bar* 
to b* borrowed next year to cover 
direct war outlay and non-war ex- 
penditures including financing of 
the new federal wheat policy. 
Unpopular Wheat Policy 

Western members of the House 
of Commons last week were urg- 
ing that they be given an opportun- 
ity to debate the government's new 
wheat policy which provides: a 
limit of 230,000,000 bushels to 
Wheat Board purchases of the 1941 
crop; a continuation of th* pre- 
sent 70c a bushel minimum price; 
basing of delivery quotas on 05 
per cent of the 1940 wheat acreage 
(which means acreage reduction); 
and payment of bonuses for sum- 
merfallowing and seeding to coarse 
grains and grasses. Agriculture 
Minister MacMlllan of Alberta had 
Issued a statement saying that this 
policy was "highly unsatisfactory 
and Inadequate" and that It would 
be Impossible of acceptance by the 
Western wheat farmers unless 
drastic modifications were made. 
Fanners of the prairie provinces, 
ha contended, should be placed la 
a position of equality with other 
classes of Canadian citizens In tha 
war effort and not forced to live 
on an "Income on the verge of 
poverty." 

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The Book Shell 

"H. M. PULHAM, ESQUIRE" 
By J. P. Marquand 

"H. M. Pulham, Esquire" la th* 
story of * man whose lite Is shap- 
ed by bin surroundings In a mould 
formed by home, school, society, 
o/eu hiisinrss influences of his day, 
smooth-fitting, comfortable, un- 
breakable. (Many men and womea 
live In such moulds more often 
than not without realizing It tor 
It U the unique quality of snoli 
a mould that one to not conscious 
of its existence until It chafes). 
Mr. Pulham, on the occasion of th* 
twenty^flfth reunion of his college 
class, becomes aware of what ha 
has been missing throughout his 
narrow, circumscribed life. He real- 
izes his Ideas have not moved with 
the times *e is trying to measure 
today's problems with yesterday's 
yardstick but alas it Is too late 
and too comfortable to change. 

Men who read this book will find 
themselves stopping to compare 
Harry Pulham's life with their owa 
and women will find themselves 
wondering how well they know 
their own men. 

"H. M. Pulham, Esquire" ... by 
J. P. Marquand . . . Toronto: 
McClelland and Stewart, Publish- 
ers . . . $3.00. 

---- column ----

VOICE 

Of T H C 

PRESS 

---- column ----

Pigs are the only farm animals 
which can be fed on a diet of all 
food waste. 

---- column ----

LIBYAN NURSERY RHYMK 

Mussolinl-miny-mo 
Oaught a lion by th* toe. 
Warm you'd love to let him go, 
Teny weeny Benttol 

Toronto Saturday Night 

THE GREATEST FEAR 
The biggest drawback to farm 
organisation Is th* fear of political 
entanglements and the suspicion 
that the leaders are working their 
way up to a soft, cushy Job. 

Farmer's Advocate. 

WAR STYLES 

Dr. Stapletord, the director of 
voluntary services, says that tfce 
time will come when it will be 
"patriotic" to wear an old salt or 
drive* an old car. That's comforting 
for all the people who are already 
obliged to do so. 
Brockvllle Recorder and Times. 

BEST ADVICE 

The Ontario Departments of Ag- 
riculture, Education and Labor 
have collaborated In the produc- 
tion of a booklet of "Farm Maxims 
and Slogans" for the use of st- 
dnts registering for farm serrto*, 
and probably the best advlc* given 
in It Is this: "Never trust a bull" 
Brockvllle Recorder and Times. 

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Europe's tallest structure Is 
the Eiffel Tower, in Paris. 

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LIFE'S LIKE THAT 

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By Fred Neher 

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"What part of my bill make* you sick . . . the part you paid 
the balance?" 

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REG'LAR FELLERS That'. Different 

---- column ----

By GENE BYRNES 

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fc-W- 

---- column ----

\ 

---- column ----

/PUD AN 1 rVWER 
IN A STREET 
> CAR AM* VW 
' FOUND A OME f 
ON THE FLOOR.', 

---- column ----

V/EU.,1 POUND 

OUT X HAD A 

MOLE IN MY 

POCKET A*' 
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: 

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' 

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Pledge for War Savings 

SALADA 

---- column ----

T 

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SERIAL STORY 

---- column ----

1111111 ROMANCE AHEAD 

BY TOM HORNER 

---- column ----

CAST OF CHARACTERS 
MONNIE MILES her mania for 

fast driving almost wrecked her 

romance. 

LARRY.. COLLINS newspaper 

reporter, hunting the murderers of 

his brother. 

MIKE BENTLEY wealthy 

rancher, knew too much about 

uto accidents. 

* 

LAST WEEK: Monnie sees 
Larry, denounces him as thief. 
Then she tells Bentley that 
Larry's brother was killed on the 
curve, that he has been investi- 
gating the accident, spying on her. 
Larry tries to tell her that Bent- 
ley is smuggling narcotics. She 
refuses to believe him. Later she 
promises to marry Bentley if he 
will turn Larry over to the sheriff. 
Bentley agrees, but makes his own 
plans. 

---- column ----

CHAPTER XIV 

Worrying about what Bentley 
was planning to do with him didn't 
keep Larry from enjoying the din- 
ner his guards brought. He was 
Jnst finishing the pie when the 
rancher walked itt. 

"Good cook you hire here. Beut- 
l*y," Larry eommcntwl. "You al- 
ways eat this well?" 

Bentley laughed. ''No, this is 
peclal for you. The condemned 
man ate a hearty dinner and all 
that. Glad you liked it, though. It's 
your last meal." 

Larry rolled a cigaret, eyeing 
Bentley speculatively. "You're a 
nice guy, Mike. I'll bet you used 
to drown kittens, stick pins in 
tugs, and that sort of thing when 
you were a kid. You enjoy seeing 
people squirm so much. Do your 
worst, Bentley. I'm not squirming 
for you." 

"I KUIed Him!" 

"You will before we get throush 
with you." The man's innate cruel- 
ty reflected itself in his face. "You 
came here asking for trouble, just 
Mke your brother. We caught him 
snooping. We caught you. It's not 
healthy to know too much a-bout 
Hike Bentley. You're finding that 
out. Your brother discovered the 
same thing." 

"You admit you killed him?" 

"Sure, I did. And I did a swell 
Job of It. Unidentified drunk killed 
en curve. Everybody forgot about 
him as soon as the inq/uest was 
ver. No one will bother much 
About a dead cattle thief either." 

"There are a fe>w who might be 
interested," Larry suggested. 
"They might even start Investi- 
gating when I don't come back. 
Ever think about that?" 

"Let 'em Investigate all they 
want to, they won't find a thing." 
Bentley was aggravatlugly confi- 
dent. "Might slow things up for a 
Mt cancel a few deliveries, but 
nothing more than that. You're 
not so important as all that, Col- 
Hns." 

Well Worked Out 

"You must have It pretty well 
worked out." 

"I always have things 'pretty 
w*H worked out.' That's why I 
never fail. Here's what's going to 
happen to you at least, this Is 
w*at everyone will think happen- 
ed to you. 

"In a couple of hours, you're go- 
tag to knock me out, while I sit 
ere talking to you" 

"I'll enjoy that part of it," Lar- 
y Interrupted. 

"That's only in the story, you 
don't actually have the pleasure 
of slugging me. One of the boys 
will take care of it. ... You take 
y gun, throw down on the boys 
and get away. .Tust outside you 
find my oar . . . you jump In it, 
ra*e to town. You'll meet the sher- 
Mf at Dead Man's Curve. ... If ha 
drives too fast you may take him 
tat.o the canyon with you. . . I won't 
mind. . . . The car catches fire. . . 
You shoot yourself with my gun, 
ol course (rather than burn to 
death or be taken to prison. You'll 

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Slow Burning 
CIGARETTE PAPERS 

HONE FIHCR MADE 

---- column ----

ISSUE 14-'41 

---- column ----

make a few headlines, but we prob- 
ably won't bother to hold much of 
an inquest." 

"Just like Hugh," Lawy com- 
mented. "Aren't you afraid some- 
one will start thinking these ac- 
cidents on the curve are occurring 
too frequently?" 

"What if someone does? What 
can he prove? The sheriff will be 
the only witness. This setup is per- 
fect. It worked for your brother. 
It'll do for yon." 

* * * 

Bill and two more of Beutle-y's 
men came for Larry about 9.30. 
They tied his hands behind him, 
then hustled him upstairs and out 
into Bentley's car. He was pushed 
into the front seat beside the ranch- 
er. He noticed a man riding a 
horse down the highway, leading 
a second saddled horse. 

"He goes down into the canyon 
to fire the shot when you kill your- 
self." Bentley explained. "He'll 
stay close to the curve, but well 
out of your way. From the high- 
way it sounds like. Hie shot comes 
from the burning car.' 1 

Larry was silent. He watched 
another man put a gasoline can in 
Bentley's car. Bill climbed in the 
back, fondling a machine gun. 
Bentley drove out to the highway. 
A second car followed. 

"Nice car you'vo got here," 
Larry said. "Don't you mind los- 
ing it?" 

She's Set the Day 

Bentley was amused. "It's in- 
sured. I'll need a now one any- 
way, when Monnie and I get mar- 
ried. You knew we were going to 
be married, didn't you? Monuie 
set the day, September in, thig aft- 
ernoon. She went on In to town 
to talk io her bridesmaids. 'TOO 
bad. Collins. You should have stay- 
ed in New York." 

1,/arry did not answer After this 
afternoon, nothing surprised him. 
He didn't mind Monnie believing 
he was a thief, she might have 
been angry, but to tell Bentley 
about Hugh. That was more than 
he could stand. He had trusted 
her loved her. 

The car stopped, but Bentley 
left the motor running. Larry saw 
the curve a hundred yards beyond. 
Bentley got out, called to the men 
In the other car. 

"Turn around and keep the mo- 
tor running. This will go off just, 
like the other one. Joe you get 
up on the hill. Flash your light 
whe-n you see a car coming up, 
then duck back through the pas- 
ture. I'll have someone pick you 
up. 

"You, Bill, steer the car. Be sure 
that fuse Is fastened tight and 
watch out you don't blow up when 
you light it. Jump off when the 
car gets rolling good and go down 
into the myon. Tony'll have your 
horse down there. 

"I'll go back to the house with 
Shultz and let him put a bump on 
my head. But I'll take fare of Col- 
lins first." 

Caught Off Guard 

He came back to harry, cut the 
ropes that bound his wrists. "Move 
over under the wheel, Collins, 
You're driving from here on."- 

Larry rubbed his wrists to re- 
store the circulation. When he fail- 
ed to obey Bentley's command, Bill 
prodded him In the back with the 
machine gun. "You heard him, 
buddy. Move over." 

Bentley ha.nded his automatic 
to Bill. "I'll take that tommy-gun 
up to the other car. Shoot him In 
the head if he tries anything." 

He was back, in a minute, "All 
right, Bill. Spill some gasoline back 
there; wind the fuse up over the 
door." He took his gun from Bill, 
got into the seat beside Larry. 
"Any last words, Collins?" 

"You certainly have this down 
to a system." 

"We practiced on your brother. 
When Joe flashes his light, I'll 
shoot you. let off the brake and 
put the car in gear. '1 jerk the hand 
throttle open as I jum.p out. Bill 
lights the fuse, steers you almost 
to the curve. Then" 

"What about Monnie? She knows 
why I'm here, knows I've been try- 
lug to prove you're smuggling nar- 
cotics. She suspects there was 
something wrong about the firs!; 
accident, here. She'll talk." Larry 
was stalling. 

"No she won't. We'll take care 
of Monnie. 1-f she starts any trou- 
ble we'll tip (lift federal men to 
search hrr ear. There's $500 worth 

---- column ----

On Choosing 
Child's Shoes 

---- column ----

Baby's First Pair I* Very 
Important, Health Specialist 
Says Plenty of Space For 
.Growth Necessary 

---- column ----

"Baby's first pair of shoes is 
one of the most- important pairs 
in a lifetime," said an official 
of the Health League of Canada 
in a recent address. "The one 
thing that doesn't matter about 
them is style." 

Square-toed shoes with straight 
inner edges are what the child 
needs, with plenty of space to al- 
low for quick growing, said the 
speaker. He pointed out that 
the infant bones and muscles ( 
cannot stand the strain of long 
standing, and are likely to "flat- 
ten out" if the child is encour- 
aged to stand or walk too much. 

In adult life, he declared, care 
of the feet was of the. first im- 
portance to general comfort and 
health. In this connection he 
deplored the tendencey of wom- 
en's footwear to sacrifice com- 
fort for style. Usually, he de- 
clared, women's shoes are too 
narrow, their soles are too thin, 
the toes too pointed and the 
heels outrageously high. 

All shoes, 'whether for men or. 
women, should be well-fitting 
but not too tight, he asserted. 
The wearer's toes should not 
touch the end of the shoe, but 
should have freedom of move- 
ment. He recommended rubber 
heels to -absorb the shock in 
walking. 

---- column ----

Fashion Flashes 

Prints in large sine and well 
tpace-d are attractive for afternoon 
dresses especially in black and 
white, and combination colors 
worked in stripes, are effective. 

* * * 

Front fullness is a highlight of 
coats as well as dresses, and there 
are numerous examples of pl**ts 
for fullness, sometimes all-around, 
sometimes in clusters. 

* 

For afternoon weddings, and for 
the mother of the bride, dre-sees in 
pastels, with yokes and sleeves in 
lace and tuckexl chiffon. Lingerie 
accents are important, noted on 
many dresses with convertible 
nevklines. 

> * 

Jacket ensembles are ac-cente*! 
for spiring, with bolero and over 
the hip le-ngtliH in the majority, 
although the longer, wristle-nnth 
jacket is also represented. FOJ- 
evening, the brief jac-ket is also 
approved, sometimes tieing on ;if 
the waistline. 

* 

A long cout ensemble ua<< a wool- 
len coat, easily fitted, worn over 
a printed dress, the cent suggesting 
a drop-shoulde"!' line in straps Uut 
cross the upper sleeves. The coat 
Is a medium shade of blue and 
the print in the same background 
color is interesting with yellow pat- 
tern. 

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For Every Cat 

Its Own Purr 

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For every cat its own purr, 

That is very plain. 
My "Thomas" makes a roaring 

Like a far freight train; 

I know a yellow kitten 
(A cat of just renown) 

That winds up like a small watch 
And keeps on running down. 

"Tabby" has a deep tune; 

Old gray "Bob" 
Hums the way a kettle 

Hums on a hob; 

For every cat its own purr, 
And every purr, 'twould seem, 

Is chock-full of comfort 
As milk is full of cream! 

Nancy Byrd Turner in Our 
Dumb Animals. 

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Interim Color 

---- column ----

In London, a girl filing her 
A. T. S. (Auxiliary Territorial 
Service) registration blank stated 
that the color of her hair was 
"temporary." 

---- column ----

of dope hidden in it You Couldn't 
find it. But tlie government men 
will." 

'That's why you stole her carl" 

Bentley nodded. The smpll of 

gasoline came from th> rear sent. 

Bill carried the eniptj can up to 

, the other car. Larry knew he 

wouldn't have long to waif, now. 

"Monnie would have trotiblu ex- 

plaJning how that stuff got in her 

car. We plante-d It there Just to 

make wire she wouldn't talk, if 

she did find out anything. We're 

irot. worried about Monnie." 

"YOU'D BETTER BE!" 

The words split the stillntss. 

Monnie! Here! 

Bentley was caught oft guard. In 
that instant, Larry swung )'o.- 
Mike's chin, grabbed for the anto- 
ma!lc. 

(To Be Concluded) 

---- column ----

Household Hints 

Try standing on a (.ushion lor 
a long stretch of Ironing, and your 
feet won't get either cold or tired. 

* * * 

To flatten au upturned bniio o; 
a knife Ueat the poim, and when 
tool trim it with scissors. Fiaieli 
it off by filing. 

* * * 

Make a cream, with powdered 
starch and cold water and apply a 
coat all over a plaster statuette. 
Let it dry and when brushed off, 
the statuette will be clean. 

* * * 

Botli black and navy blue wash- 
ing materials look twice as good 
if thpy are "blued" after being 
riubed, and they do like to be hung 
out to dry without wringing 
weat'ier permitting. 

* * * 

Save gas by filling your sauce- 
pan lid with potatoes, tie a cloth 
tightly over them and then return 
the lid to the saucepan in which 
your greens or stew is cookiug; 
the potatoes will be perfectly 
steamed wit'- out any trouble. 

* * * 

It your white things handker- 
chiefs, towels, etc. have become 
a little yellow with time, try this 
time, let them soak overnight In 
clean, cold water with a teaspoou- 
ful of cream of tartar^ allowed to 
every quart o-f water. When the 
clothes are ironed after this treat- 
ment you will find them really as 
white as snow. 

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Boards Superior 

To Perambulator 

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A New York Archaeologist 
who studied tribal customs of the 
Shoshone-Bannock Indians near 
Pocatello in 1037 has decided 
they know best when it conies to 
rearing a child. 

Dr. Charlton G. Laird, a pro- 
fessor at the University of Idaho, 
South, received a letter from 
Godfrey 3. Olsen, the archaeolo- 
gist, who lives at Danskammer 
Point, N.Y. 

Olsen said he v ronvinced 
the Indian system of carrying 
their papooses on "boards" was 
sound, both from health stand- 
point anil for practical purposes. 

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SCALLOPED 
BUTTON-FRONT STYLE 

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By Anne Adami 

Attention, Mrs. Housewife! 
Here's that "just-right" frock to 
wear the livelong day. It's Pat- 
tern 4705 . . . and its quick-as- 
a-flash making. There are just 
three main pattern parts, not 
counting the long or short sleev- 
es. Darts give smooth fit at the 
seamless waistline. A real sew- 
ing, laundering and wearing con- 
venience u that buttoning down 
the .front. The prettily scalloped 
collar, and the neat little cuffs, 
may be in self-fabric or fresh 
contrast. !>et the Sewing In- 
structor help you speedily finish 
tills useful frock. 

Pattern 4705 is available in 
nusses' and women's sizes 16, 18, 
20, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44 and 4ti. 
Size 36 takes 4% yards 35 inch 
fabric, 

Send twenty cents (20c) HI 
coins (stamps cannot be accept- 
ed) for this Anne Adams pat- 
tern. Write plainly size, name, 
address and style number. 

Send your order to Anne Ad- 
ams, Room 425, 73 West Adelaide 
St., Toronto. 

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UWCKMKIN6 COSTS 

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YOU USELESS 

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Ask your grocer for Calumet. Try it an<3 
gee how double-action permits you to use 
less and still get better results. 

Notice, too, how the Calumet tin opeus 
at a slight twist of the wrist yet iiever 
spills, even when full. Under the lid is a 
handy device to level each spoonful as 
you use it. 
CALUMET IS PRICED SURPRISINGLY LOW 

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o o tt 

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'*, 

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/ If 

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Color Is Rampant 
In Spring Picture 

Darker Tones Predominate 
in Formalized Town Fashions, 
With Light, Neutral and 
Bright Shades for Country 
and Casual Wear 

---- column ----

Color will run rampant for 
spring! Light, neutral shades, dark 
and bright shades, are all in the 
picture and you will find many to 
match or contrast with your spring 
costume. The darktM- shades pre- 
dominate in formalized town fash- 
ions, while the light, neutral and 
bright shades will find their way 
in town and country traveling 
wardrobes. 

NAVY VERY POPULAR 

Navy is lor greater popularity 
than ever before. Always a fav- 
orite, ii will lead the spring fash- 
ion parade. It is shown in 
suits and coats and sheer dresses, 
dressed -,ip with crisp, lingerie 
touches. While red is a natural 
complement with navy in trims, 
edging, lining and in bright red 
blouses. Navy sportswear Is a new 
"dark horse" and with white braid 
and brass buttons on a slacks out- 
fit or suit, navy has a real nautical 
flavor. Another bine that is in the 
spring fashion picture is Al force 
blue, seen particularly iu I'oats and 
suits, and reflects the military In- 
fluence and a keen interest in av- 
iation. 

GRKEM LEADS 

Newest color group to le;ip into 
prominence this spring is green, 
definitely a color with a future! 
Highlighted in a wide variety of 
ilindtis, greens were predominant 
In the Fashion Futures show held 
in New York. Greens from iime 
green, yellowed greens and dark 
forest greens ... all have a na- 
tural spring flavor. Clear, lettuce 
"Vitamin" green is used for day 
and evening dresses, while bright 
Emerald green is the latest news 
for casual coats and sportswear. 

Whenever you mention greens, 
you always think of that other 
bright color range reds this spring 
still a favorite tu coats, suits, print 
dresses and accessories. 

Women Can Help 
Nation To Health 

It Should Be A National Ob- 
jective, Says Director of 
Health League of Canada 
Women Needed in Parlia- 
ment 

---- column ----

If health were to be a national 
objective in Canada the doctors 
needed the help of women, Dr. 
Gordon Bates, director of the 
Health League of Canada, said in 
an address before the Local 
Council of Women in Toronto. 

"In all our municipal affairs 
it takes men and women together 
to build a world that makes 
sense," lie said. "Men cannot do 
it alone. We need more women 
to give thought to the things that 
are worthwhile." 
UKSOLUTIONS NOT ENOUGH 

Groups of women passing reso- 
lutions was "not enough." Wo- 
men by themselves were no more 
capable of settling the affairs of 
the world than were men, and 
women in such groups in the long 
run had little political influence. 

"We need women in our poli- 
tical assemblies and in all of our 
serious national deliberations," 
he said, "We need women in 
parliament; we need women to 
work with men to decide the fu- 
ture of mankind." 

---- column ----

Coldest Place 

Russia claims that the coldest 
phvce in the world is Oi-Mekon, 
in Siberia, where water thrown 
from a bucket "'.it of a first- 
t:loor window is said to freeze 
before it reaches the ground. 

---- column ----

T 
A 
B 
L 
E 

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T 
A 
L 
K 

S 

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By SADIE E. CHAMBERS 

"Maple Syrup Days' 9 

One of the sure signs of Spring 
to a Canadian :s the news that 
"the sap is running" or !;iUfr th 
long anticipated information, that 
"Maple syrup is on the market". 
What could be more patriotic thnn 
to encourage the use of Map!* 
Sv >!>'.' T:ien we immediately think 
or miu'-tkHs, waffle" or muffins 
so :i"re goes: 

---- column ----

PANCAKES 

2 cups sifted pastry flour 

3 teaspoons baking powder 
5 -i t''a"|'"ou salt 

2 eggs 

l^i cups milk 
V, cup melted butter 

Measure flour and silt with bait- 
ing powder and s-aic. Add tmteii 
egg, milk and melted butter. Add 
the liuuidb slowly to the dry in- 
gredients. 

Sonio eggs vary as does tile 
flour; if batter seeme too thin add 
a little more flour. Pour or drop 
rounds of batter on hot frying pan. 
When bubbles appear turn and, 
brown on the other side. Serve 
piping hot with Maple Syrup. 

---- column ----

WAFFLES 

1'i cu;>s silted flour, 'i cup whoie 

wheat flour 

:j teaspoons baking powder 
J 2 teaspoon salt 
'I <*8K yolks 

:i tea=poona baking powder 
\-2 teaspoon suit 

3 egg whites beaten stiffly 
*y cup crem 

'.2 '-'i'l> milk 

4 tablespoons melted butter 

Sift flour, baking powder and 
salt. If using whole wheat too, toss 
ill after sifting flour. Theu add 
well-beaten egg yolks, milk and 
cream, and lastly the melted but- 
ter. Drop and cook ou electric 
waffle- Iron in the usual way. Serve 
with plain maple syrup or a thinly 
whipped cream with shaved maple 
sugar added. Waffles are not syn- 
onymous with breakfast any more. 
Tln.-y can be dressed up wit a it var- 
ied wardrobe, making them a well- 
behaved addition for 'uncheou or 
evening as well as breakfast. 

WHOLE WHEAT MUFFINS 
2 cups whole wheat flour 
1 egg 

Vt cup butter 
1 cup brown sugar 
1 cup buttermilk 
'i teaspoon soda 
('ream butter and sugar, add the 
egg well-beaten. Beat together un- 
til very creamy. Then add butter- 
milk with soda dissolved and last- 
ly the whole whe-at flour. A dash 
oE untnieg is a pleasing addition. 

---- column ----

Minn h.tiiiix-i-i welcomes personal 
letter* ir.nii Inlcrentc-tl render*, she 
In iilCHneil to receive UKgeatlun* 
ionic* for Uer column, and l 
-ii reuil.v ni listen la ynur "pet 
Itcuve*." ItequeBt* (or recipe* or 
pcvlul menu* arc In order. Aihlremi 
.vour luftera to "Mln Sadie U. Cbnni- 
bcr, Ty Wc.t Adulnldv Street, To- 
ronto." Send iliintiiert, kclf-a<l<lrme<i 
envelope If 7011 irlub a reply. 

---- column ----

Something He Ate 

John Biggs, 18, circus glass 
eater and bric-a-brac ewallower, 
was discharged from a New York 
hospital last week after physici- 
ans removed from his stomach 
"enough tacks, broken glass and 
razor blades to f51! a large 
bottle." 

Next day, Biggs was in an- 
other hospital, getting treatment 
for stomach pains. 

He said the pains were caused 
by ... something he ate in a 
restaurant. 
---- page ----

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Wednesday, April 2, 1941 

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THB FLBSHIBtTeN ADVANCE 

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- 

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Announcement 

The Grey Coutny Seed Fair is being held in the 

Market -Buildings, Owen Sound, on , 

TUESDAY, APRIL 8th, 1941 

Prize Lists are to be found in Seed Cleaning and Chopping 
riant-, Seed and Hardware Stores, etc. 

Specie! lectures and sale of seed during the afternoon. 

---- column ----

H. S. WEAVER, Pres. 

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T. STEWART COOPER, Sect. 

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1 1 1 in 1 1 1 n i in 

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Fresh and 
Cured Meats 

HOME MADE 
SAUSAGE 

---- column ----

BAILEY'S 

---- column ----

We DELIVER FLESHERTON, Ont. PHONE 47W 

Canada First Lest We Forget! 

---- column ----

50th Anniversary 

Tuesday, Mr. and Mrs. Alex Holley 
celebrated their 50th wedding anniv- 
ersary, at their home in Sault Ste. 
Marie, Out. 

At 12.30 the immediate family sat 
down to a delicious dinner served in 
the Oak Room. The table was beau- 
tifully decorated with daffodils and 
other spring flowers. 

.Following the dinner a poem was 
read, which had been written by a 
friend of the family, in Chicaga. 

During the afternoon and evening 
Mr. and Mrs. Holley were at home 
to their friends, at the home of the 
daughter, Mrs. W. L. Whalen, 44 Ca- 
thcart Street. A (host of friend? 
called to congratulate them. 

The rooms were beautifully decor- 
ated with gold and white wedding 
bells ami <* re: fler wedding cake 
centered the tea table. 

Later in the evening, music and 
dancing was enjoyed by the honoured 
couple, their children and grand- 
children. 

Many telegrams and congratula- 
tions were received, one of them 
from their son-in-law and daughter, 
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Springfield, Pit- 
tsburg, California. 

Three daughters were home for the 
occasion: Mrs. J. Lerch, Chicago, Mrs. 
L. Hesgard, Hammond, Indiana, Mrs. 
F. Markham, Detroit. 

---- column ----

Local and Personal 

---- column ----

Send in your Renewal Now 

---- column ----

Easter Parade 

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JOIN THE EASTER PARADE, COME TO HILL'S READY-TO-WEAR 
DEPARTMENT. SEE THE NEWEST OF SPRING STYLES IN COATS, 
DRESSES AND MILLINERY. BELLOW ARE A FEW VALUES 

OF SPECIAL INTEREST. 

You needn't be slim and tall to get a smart coat. We have many 
Styles and makes to fit most figures, tall or short. Coats in Harris 
Tweeds, Canadir n-made cloth of excellent wearing quality. These 

coats will fit most any pocket book. Moderately priced at $9.85, $10.95, $14.95 

and $15.95. See this range. 

---- column ----

NEW EASTER DRESSES 

A wonderful showing of new Ray- 
on Dresses in all the new printed de- 
signs from flowers to polka dots. 
Extra Special at $2.95 

NEWEST OF 
EASTER MILLINERY 

Straws, flower trimmed, straws and 
felts combined and all felts. Excep- 
tional values at $1.95 and $2.45 

SPRING CURTAIN MATERIALS 

Newest of Spring Curtain Materials 
by the yard. A wonderful showing in 
this line. See our window display. 
We are proud of the values we can 
offer Marquisettes, Voiles, Shower 
Spots, Tuscan Nets all at various 
prices per yard l2 l / 2 , 19, 25, 35, 39, 59 

NEW WALLPAPERS 

Add smartness to your home by de- 
corating different rooms with Sim- 
worthv Wallpapers, sold exclusively 
by the Hill Co. in Markdale. Papers 
for kitchen, bedrooms, dining rooms, 

---- column ----

parlors and halls. Prices range from 
lOc per single roll to 50c single roll. 

LADIES' CREPE DRESSES 

A real array to choose from. A 
Super Value at $4.95 

---- column ----

Men's Wear 

Men's Fine Shirts for Easter. A 
wonderful selection to choose from 
and outstanding values. 

Lot 1 15 doz. Fine Shrts with 
fused collar attached in plain colors 
and narrow and broad stripes, sizes 
from 14 to 17. Extra value at 89o 

Lot 2 15 doz. Men's fine Broad- 
cloth Shirts in almost any color desir- 
ed. An extra firm cloth of good wear- 
ing quality. Extra Value, each $1.25 

MEN'S FINE HOSE 

An exceptional buy, made of wool 
and rayon, all sizes 10, \O l / 2 , 11, 11*. 
J'rice 35c, or 3 pair for $1.00 

---- column ----

True Economy in Food Values at Hil's 

---- column ----

Sockeye Salmon, Horseshoe Brand 

1's 37c; ^'s20c 
Cohoe Fancy Red Salmon 

1's 27c; y 2 's 15c 
Clover Leaf Fancy Pink Salmon 

1's only 16c 
Quaker Oats, family size pkg 19c 

---- column ----

Pork & Beans, Ljbby's 20 oz. size 

2 for 15c 
Condensed Milk, assorted brands 

1's 2 for 15c 
Sandwichc Spread, made by Anne 

Page, 8 oz. jar 19c 
See.dless Raisins 2 Ib. for 21c 

---- column ----

Specials for Friday and Saturday 

---- column ----

Purity Flour 98 Ib $2.95 bag 

Peas, No. 2 size, No. 4 sieve 3 for 2 So 

Tomatoes, large tin 28 oz 3 for 27c 

Toilet Soap, various kinds cake 4c 

---- column ----

Crown Brand Syrup: 
No. 2 tins 
No. 5 tins 
No. 10 tins 

---- column ----

17c 
39c 

79c 

---- column ----

F. T. Hill & Co., Ltd. 

MARKDALE, Ont. 

---- column ----

Mr. George Armstrong spent the 
past few days in Toronto. 

Mrs. Bob Phillips is visiting hei 
sister, Mrs. D, Neff, at Singhampton. 

Miss Helen Heard of Varnjy spent 
the week end at her home. 

Aircraftsman E. I. Holley of To- 
wito was home over Sunday. 

Sergt. Angus Turney of "B" Coy. 
taff is away on two weeks' furlough. 

Pte. Ben Leavell of the Foresters, 
'amp Borden, spent several days 
week in town while on leave. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Wilson and 
laughter of Durham were visitors 
h town on Sunday. **. 

Aircraftsman Dick Stewart of To- 
ronto was a visitor in town Saturday 
while on week end leave. 

The robins made their appearance 
on Friday last and their cheery song 
in the early morning has a brighten- 
ing aspect on the world. 

EASTER FLOWERS Order your 
Easter Lilies and all kinds of flower- 
ng plants and cut flowers for 
Easter from 'W. A. Hawken, phone 17. 

Mr. Jas. R. Wilson received the 
appointment of caretaker of the high 
school at a meeting of the Board 
leld last week, succeeding Mr. Russell 
Park, whos has held the position for 
several years. 

---- column ----

McCLELLAN CAIRNS 

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f 
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A quiet wedding took place at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Cairns 
of 'Winnipeg, Man., on March 8tr, at 
8 p.m., when their eldest daughter 
Ethel Eleanor, was united in mar 
riage to Mr. Jack McLellan, eldesi 
son of Mr. and Mrs. H. J. McLellan 
Rev. W. E. Donnelly was the offic 
ient. Ferns and daffodils formed thi 
setting. 

The bride was attended by hei 
sister, Miss Bessie Cairns. Mr. Jas 
Potter was best man. The bride 
chose turquoise blue triple shee 
with rounded neckline and full bod 
ice banded at the waistline. Th 
short bolero was banded with tubu 
lar applique. She wore a matching 
chapel veil, held by a halo of tur 
quoise flowers. Her Colonial bouque 
was of Sweetheart roses and whit 
narcissi. 

Miss Cairns chose pink sheer with 
crossed neckline and full bodice and 
tubular appliue at the waistline and 
o n the short puffed sleeves of the 
matching jacket. Her chapel veil 
as secured by a sweetheart halo. Her 
Colonial bouquet was of American 
Beauty roses. 

The bride's going away costuim 
was of grey suedella, showing red 
trimming. Her hat was of gros- 
prain ribbon and curled straw braid. 

---- column ----

ARMERS SHOULD PLAN 

TO HELP EACH OTHER 

-V |j 

There is an old saying that "the 
<>rd helps those who help them- 
elves," and it would be equally true 
o say that "the Lord helps those who 
elp each other." Many Ontatrio 
armers will literally have to help 
ach o f her this year if they cannot 
et sufficient help for their own in- 
ividual farms. 

There will be, from all accounts, a 
umber of "one-man" farms this 
ear with a consequent reduction in 
rop acres as a result of the farm 
elp situation, unless farmers co- 
perate in the old-fashioned neigh- 
>orly manner of changing "works" 

ith each other. It will be recalled 
bat during severe farm labor short- 
's in the last war, neighbors 
worked back and forth helping each 
ther with seeding and harvest 
perations. 

A return to this method of opera- 
ion will mean that farmers will b< 
ble to plant and harvest more crop 
cres and feed more hogs and cattlt 
han they would by attempting tc 
un the farm alone. 

---- column ----

Renew your subscription NOW. 

---- column ----

TO LOSE LICENSES ON 

RECKLESS DRIVING CHARGE 

Leopold Macaulay's 'bill to provide 
for automatic suspension of drivers' 
licenses upon conviction for reckless 
or dangerous driving, was approved 
with one change by the municipal law 
committee of the Ontario Legislat- 
ure. Mr. Mccaulay, Conserva- 
Member for York South and a for- 
mer Minister of Highways, agreed 
to delete the term "careless driving" 
from the bill after several members 
objected that police used this charge 
under the criminal code for many 
minor offences. 

The Highways Traffic Act pro- 
vides for suspension of drivers' licen- 
se where there is culpability in an 
accident causing damage of $25 or 
more. The amendment approved by 
the committee provides for suspen- 
sion where reckless or dangerous 
driving convictions are made under 
the criminal code, even though there 
had been no accident. Restoration o* 
license is dependent on filling of 
proof of finincial responsibility. 

J. P. Bickwell, registrar of motor 
vehicles, said that in 10 years there 
had been 43,200 licenses suspended 
in Ontario following convictions. 

---- column ----

Small Ad. Column 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Quantity of Erban 
oats. Everett Blackburn, R. R. 
3, Flesherton. 43p2 

FOR SALE Seed grain. Ed. 
Pedlar, phone Feversham 1 r 22, 
Singhampton R. R. 1. 44c2 

---- column ----

GIRL WANTED Apply at Park 
House, Flesherton. 44p2 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Vanguard and Erban 
oats for seed; also horse 6 years 
old. Allie McLean, Priceville, 
phone 49 r 3. 44c2 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Good hay |7.00 at the 
barn. Joe. Radley, Flesherton. e 

---- column ----

FOR SALE 2 Durham cows, due 
in spring. Albert Wilkinson, R. 

R. 1, Flush or ton. 43p2. 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Hatch of Barred Rock 
chicks on April 2, also hatching 
eggs. Mrs. Ward Harrison, R. R. 
3, Proton, phone 41 r 4. 43p2 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Heavy draft mare, 12 
yrs., due to foal May 1st, pricet 
for quick sale. Herb Grummett 
R. R. 2, Proton Station. 

---- column ----

AKINS LARKIN 

In Niagara Falls, Ont., on Mon- 
day, Aug. 5th, 1940, Panesie (Pat) 
Larkin, only daughter of Mrs. 
Frances S. Larkin of Toronto and 
the late Gco. Thomas Stephen Lark- 
in, to Herbert L. Akins, Toronto, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Claude C. Akins 
of Flesherton, Ont. 

---- column ----

1 

f 

I 

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Auction Sale 

WM. G. HUTCHINSON 

will sell by public auction on 

N. V4 of Lot 21, Con. 13 Artemeaia 

About H mile north of Vandeleur 

THURSDAY, APRIL 10th 

when the following will be offered: 

Horses 1 horse, 15 years old; 
Aged Mare. 

Cattle Durham Cow, 10 years 
old; Durham Cow, 3 years old; Dur- 
ham Cow, 5 years old; Holstien Cow, 
8 years old; Black Cow, 6 years old; 
Spotteed Cow, 5 years old; Steer 
rising 1; 2 Steers rising 2; 3 Heifers, 
rising 1; Baby Beef, 6 months old; 
Aged Cow, due date of sale. 

Swine Yorkshire Brood Sow, 
due May 13; 5 Chunks, around lOOlb. 

Implements, Etc. M. H. Mower; 

10 ft. steel hay rake; No. 21 Pleury 
plough; 12 plate disc harrows; set 
iron harrows; wagon; buggy; light 
sleigh; atone boat; ladder; M.-H. root 
pulper; hay rack; double harness; 2 
almost new collars; Perfection coal 

011 heater; 12 grain bags; number 
sacks; small Vega cream separator; 
metal churn; hutter bowl and ladel; 
graduated jream can and numerous 
other small articles. 

TERMS OP SALE 
All sums of 10.00 and under, cash; 
over that amount 6 months credit 
will be given on furnishing approved 
joint notes, with interest at 6 per 
cent per annum. 

OBO. E. DUNCAN, Auctioneer 
Sale to commence at 1.00 p.m. 

---- column ----

WANTED Man for general farm 
work, boy around 16, would be ac- 
ceptable. Norman R. Brown 
phone 166 r 13, Clarksburg. 

NOTICE Paper hangind and paint- 
ing at reasonable prices. Estimates 
free. Ross Mitchell, Dundalk 
telephone 77. 

---- column ----

FOR SALE 7-octave Bell Piano; 
illimitable repeating action; Bell- 
tone sustaining frame; in good con- 
dition. Rev. F. Aahton, Flesherton 

---- column ----

FOR SALE House in Flesherton 
with seven rooms, hard and soft 
water, double lot and barn. For 
full particulars apply to J. W. Mc- 
Mullen, Ceylon, Executor. 30c 

---- column ----

FOR SALE 7-room brick house in 
Flesherton, large lot, garage, gooc 
well, must be sold to settle estate 
of the late Andrew Gilchrist Ap- 
ply to John Stewart, Executor, Pro- 
ton Station, phone 32 r 4. 

---- column ----

POTATOES FOR SALE Grade 
Canada No. 1, early varietiet 
Warbas and Cobblers; later var- 
ieties, Katahdins and Dooleys. 
Alex. S. Muir, R. R. No. 1 Ceylon 
phone Flesherton 47 r 14. 44c4 

---- column ----

Farm For Sale 29 Acres, Range 2. 
Proton. Good buildings. Half 
mile west of highway no. 10 at Vic- 
toria Corners. Ideal premises for 
poultry farm. J. F. Acheson, Prot- 
on, R. R. 1. 

---- column ----

BRAY DELIVERS the chicks Bray 
Chicks 'deliver the goods.' Contact 
our agent, ask for Daily Specials. 
Get your brooder busy before the 
spring rush; your Bray chicks 
growing fast to catch good mar 
kets. John McWilliam, Flesherton 

---- column ----

FOR SALE In Ceylon, comfortable 
7-room house, electric lights, hard 
and soft water, good stable, hen 
house and garage with cement 
floor, lot containing 1 acre more 
or less. For particulars apply to 
Mrs. Nellie Gilchrist, Badjeros, R. 
R. 1, or Fred Irwin, Flesherton. 

---- column ----

FARM FOR SALE 

100 acre farm, 5 acres wheat, 
spring creek, tiled well and windmill, 
comfortable dwelling, barn and hen- 
house, situated 1 mile south of Flesh- 
erton on No. 1 Highway, reasonably 
priced for quick gale. Apply tn 
Fred Irwin, Flesherton. Ont. 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Heavy brown mare colt 
rising 3 years. W. 'Weber, R. R. 
No. 4, Markdale. 44p2 

---- column ----

FARM FOR SALE $475.00 Lot 
20, Concession 7, Osprey, ormerly 
McQueen property. Apply to I. B. 

Lucas & Co., Marhdale, Ont. 43c3 

FARM FOR SALE Owner ire- 
pared to sell at sacrifice. 200 acres 
near Duncan, known as Howard 
farm. Apply to I. B. Lucas & Co., 
Markdale, Ont. 43c3 

---- column ----

FARM FOR SALE 

Lots 14-15, Con. 1, SD.R., 
meaia, containing 100 acres, on which 
is situated a bank barn 45x55, also * 
large driving shed. This property 
must be sold to wind up estate. Thos* 
interested communicate with John 
Oliver or W. R. Meads, Priceville, Ex- 
ecutors for the estate. 47e 

AUCTIONEER 

WALTER SEELET < 
See me about your auction sale. All 
sales conducted on business prin- 
ciples. Phone me at Feversham 4rl2 
or make arrangements at Th 
Flesherton Advance office. 

---- column ----

TENDERS WANTED 

Tenders plainly marked (Tractor 
Power) will be received by the under- 
signed, until 12 o'clock noon, Satur- 
day, April 12th, 1941, for tractor 
power to operate Township grader. 
The lowest or any tender not neces- 
sarily accepted. 

C. N. LONG, Clerk 

Feversham 

---- column ----

BUSINESS CARDS 

---- column ----

DR. S. R. THIBAUDEAU 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

Graduate of Ontario Veterinary Coll- 
ege. Phone: 91 day or night 
MARKDALE, ONT. 

---- column ----

DR. J. E. MILNE 

Office _ Durham St. 
Office Hours Afternoons, 1.30 to I 
Evenings, 7 to 8.8*. 
Sundays and Thursday afternoons by 
appointment only. 

---- column ----

Prince Arthur Lodge No. 833, . 
& A.M., meets in the Fraternal Ha'!, 
Flesherton, the second Friday in eae* 
month. W.M., Herb. Corbett; Sec- 
rotary, C. J. Bellamy. 

---- column ----

ROY LANJGFORD 

District Agent for 
MUTUAL !JFE OP CANADA 

ACCIDENT and SICKNESS, FIR* 

AUTOMOBILE, BURGLARY 

lunicipml Liability Guarantee Bowie 

Any Insurance Problem 

FLKSHERTON, Ont 
---- page ----

---- column ----

VOL. 60; NO. 45 

---- column ----

FLESHERTON. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 1941 

---- column ----

W. H. Thurston & Son, Props* 

---- column ----

Ski Guests Valuable 

To apeak of gold in the Lauren tine 
Mountains is, of course, poetic 
license, nevertheless there is a sub- 
stantial stake in the hills which has 
been paying dividends for years and 
promises to continue. It comes in 
the cash expenditures of the Canad- 
ian and United States visitors who 
spend winter vacations in the mount- 
ain country. The season now ending 
has been an excellent one for visitors 
to such places as St. Sauveur, most 
popular of all Lauren tine ski centres; 
Morin Heights and other communities 
served by the Canadian National 
Railways. Years ago residents of 
these mountain communities had a 
busy summer season then went into 
retirement for the winter season. 
Now the activity of ski enthusiasts 
and the enterprise of the railways in 
operating ski specials has establish- 
ed two seasons and it would be dif- 
ficult to tell which is the most popu- 
lar. 

---- column ----

St. Columba Church News 

A joint meeting of the managers 
and the session was held in the vestry 
on Wednesday evening. Plans were 
made for presenting the fuel situation 
to the congregation and for naking 
a financial appeal at an early date. 
The treasurer was authorized to pay 
the Presbytery assessment. 

There was no ser"'ce in St. Colum- 
ba on Sunday evening. 

The Salem service was withdrawn 
Sundy afternoon on account of the 
bad condition of the roads. 

Rev. A. R. Muir conducted the 
funeral service on Monday afternoon 
for the late William John Burnett 
who passed away on Friday at his 
home on the South Line. Mr. Burnett 
who had been in poor health for the 
past nine years, was 67. 

---- column ----

s Mrs. Bidding Passes 

It is our sad duty to announce the 
passing Tuesday morning of Adelaide 
Elizabeth Armstrong, beloved wife ol 
Mr, F. H. W. Hickling, at her home 
in Flesherton. Mrs. Hickling has 
been in poor health for the past 
three years, and whiie her death did 
not come unexpected, there is no 
less a degree of sorrow through her 
departure. The funeral will take 
place this Thursday afternoon, when 
service will be held in St. John's 
United Church at 2:30 o'clock p.m., 
interment to be made in Flesherton 
Cemetery. 

---- column ----

SHEAR FIVE SHEEP TO EQUIP 
SOLDIER IN CANADA'S ARMY 

---- column ----

Wool clipped from five sheep is re- 
quired to equip one Canadian soldier 
with a uniform and three blankets, 
the Ontario Branch of the Canadian 
Association of Textile Colorists and 
Chemists informs us. Millions of 
blankets, socks, underwear, gloves, 
scarfs and other material have been 
delivered for the Can-dian -rmy. 
Orders since the war started would 
require wool from 4,500,000 sheep 
Silk mills have also delivered huge 
quantities of cloth for parachutes. 

---- column ----

Card of Thanks 

We wish to express our sincere 
thanks and appreciation for acts of 
kindness and beautiful floral tributes 
from our friends and neighbors dur- 
ing our recent bereavement in the 
death of our brother, John. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alex. McFadyen 
and sister, Mary. 

---- column ----

Cadet Ulan T. Todd, an apprenti- 
ce, swam for two hours in the icy 
Atlantic before bing picked up. "I 
am anxious," he said, 'to get back 
on the job." 

---- column ----

*->*> 

---- column ----

Shop at Duncan's for 
your Hardware needs 

GALVANIZED WARE - Pails, Tub., Boiler., 
Cream Cans, Strainers. 

CROSS CUT SAWS, AXES, SWEDE SAWS, 

FILES, SNOW & STABLE SHOVELS, 

MANURE FORKS. 

BUCKEYE BROODER STOVES and 
CHICK SUPPLIES 

OUR SPRING PAINT SHIPMENT IS JUST IN 

We are ready to filll your Paint, Enamel and 

Varnish requirements with Sherwin - Williams 

Quality Paints and Popular Priced Lines. 

ROYAL PURPLE and DR. BELL'S STOCK 
and POULTRY REMEDIES 

F. W. DUNCAN 

HARDWARE "Blue Coal" Phone 54 

---- column ----

Equipped to handle the finest service at moderate prices 

Our Beautiful 

Air 

Conditioned 
Funeral Chapel 

at '-. 
124 AVENUE KOAU 

TORONTO, Qnt. 

RICHARD MADDOCKS, 

. . Manager. 

Member of Uie Flwhorton Old B oys' & Girls' Association 

BATES & MADDOCKS 

---- column ----

FRED MADDOCKS. 

Associate. 

---- column ----

Formerly of Fleherton. Out. 

124 Avenue Road. Toronto, Ont 

---- column ----

KI. 4344 

---- column ----

DOUGLAS MORGAN 

A. C. 1 Douglas Morgan is with the 
Royal Canadian Air Force and is at 
present stationed at Calgary, Alta. 
He is a son of Mrs. W. E. Morgan oi 
Flesherton and enlisted with the Ah 
Force a year ago, following a course 
at the Gait Aircraft School. 

---- column ----

iling On Agriculture 

Miss Agnes Macphail, Canada's 
first lady member of Parliament, has 
undertaken to write a column for the 
Toronto Globe & Mail, appearing in 
the issues of that paper each Tues- 
day, Thursday and Saturday, in the 
interests to agriculture. Miss Mac- 
phail has been a life-long champion 
of the farmer and the farm industry 
and is well qualified to conduct such 
a column. Her articles will bi 
awaited with great interest by the 
people of the farming communities 
Her first article appeard Tuesday ol 
this week and dealt with the stand- 
ard of living on the farms in the 
Dominion and the unhealthy state ol 
agriculture as a whole. 

---- column ----

Priceville Old Boys 
Held Toronto Dance 

---- column ----

Carrying out their program of dir- 
ecting as much of their efforts as pos- 
sible to aid The Evening Telegram 
British War Victims' Fund, Price- 
ville Old Boys' and Girls' Associat- 
ion decided to forego their annual 
fowl supper this year and substitute 
a euchre and dance for the cause. 
The event, held in Parkdale Assemb- 
ley Hall, added $25 to the fund. 

It was this organization's second 
function for the fund, and 300 per- 
sons attended. Fifty motored down 
from Priceville to lend support. 
Prizes for the euchre and special 
dance lumbers were war savings 
stamps. 

Hon. Farquhar Oliver, a native *t 
Priceville, welcomed 50 airmen and 
soldiers, who were guests of honour, 
and Controller W. J. Wadsworth, a 
native of Ceylon, near Priceville, also 
spoke. 

The committee in charge, which 
plans to contribute as much to the 
fund as possible from all future 
events, includes: Mrs. Jessie M. Koer- 
itz, president; Miss M. McKinnon, 
first vice president; Alex McEachren, 
second vice president; Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry Pedlar, J. A. Knox, and Mrs. 
Knox, who is secretary; Mrs. A. 
Salter and Mrs. Elmer Watson. 

---- column ----

Aid Tourist Traffic 

---- column ----

We notice in the County of Simcoe 
a movement is on foot for a county 
Old Home Week to ring back resi 
dents of the United States and others 
for a visit to the old home community 
some time around July 1st, in an ef- 
fort to boost the number of tourists 
in Ontario, the number of which fell 
greatly last year from one cause 01 
another. The movement is a worthy 
one and we were wondering if the 
Flesherton Old Boys' and Girls' Assoc- 
iation, local branch, would take this 
matter up a nd sponsor it. There does 
not need to be any great celebration 
as we had twelve years ago, but a 
quiet home-coming without fuss. Let 
us add our bit in an effort to bring 
back the tourist trade to Ontario and 
have greater prosperity for all of us. 

---- column ----

CREAMERY SERVICE 

On account of Friday being a pub- 
lic holiday, our truck will go to 
Maxwell Thursday afternoon in place 
of Friday at 2 o'clock and to Price 
ville Thursday afternoon at 4 o'clock, 
instead of Friday morning. 

---- column ----

The highways are drying up nicely 
at present, but the back roads have 
still plenty of snow on them. Mr. 
Alex McEachnie, mail carrier on 
Rural Route 2 from Flesherton, takes 
a buggy the first mile or so, a cutter 
for most of the distance and a cart 
on the last lap of the journey. The 
following day he reverses his route 
to pick his conveyances where he had 
left them the day before. Apparently 
ev<3ry person has his own troubles 
during the spring break-up. 

---- column ----

New Priceville Society 

What is believed to be almost a re- 
cord for the community of its size is 
the fact that Priceville ladies during 
he past two months have made 20 
quilts for war purposes. At the 
Women's Institute meeting held on 
Thursday afternoon in St. Andrew's 
Church 3 quilts were completed, 2 
made by the Junior girls assisted by 
Miss Anna Shortreed, ome donated by 
Margaret Simpson and Mrs. Wright. 

It was decided to form a new socie- 
ty for war work to be called "The 
Women's Patriotic Society 1 ' and the 
following officers were elected: 
President, Mrs. W. G. McBride; Vice 
President, Mrs. Wm. Aldcorn; Sec.. 
Sadie Oliver; Treasurer, Miss Mary 
MacKinnon; The first meeting will 
be held Wednesday night. 

---- column ----

KING'S BIRTHDAY IS SET 

FOR MONDAY, JUNE 9 

---- column ----

A proclamaton fixing Monday, 
June 9 the same date as last year 
for celebration -f the King's birthday 
is published in the current issue of 
The Qanada Gazette. The King's 
birthday actually falls on December 

, but the official celebration is held 
in June. His Majesty was 45 last 
December 14. 

---- column ----

A February Colt 

It is a rare thing for a colt to be 
born in "the month of March and 
more so apparently for the month 
of February. A report in a daily 
paper of a colt being born in March 
brings the information that Mr 
Morton Sayers, Reeve of the Town 
ship of Osprey, had a Clydesdali 
mare give birth to a horse colt on 
February 15th. This is a rare oc 
currence for this district and show: 
that we do not need to take a back 
seat from anyone in regard to rare 
events. 

---- column ----

PRIZES AT SEED FAIR 

---- column ----

Mr. Alex. S. Muir of Ceylon did 
real well at the Grey County Seed 
Fair held in Owen Sound Tuesday, 
when he took first prize on barley, 
fourth place on Oats and two first 
prizes on potatoes. The value of first 
class seed in farming is becoming re 
cognized more and more today and 
Mr. Muir is setting a good example 
for others to follow. 

---- column ----

BLACK FOX SEEN 

(By Centre Line Correspondent) 
As Mr. John O.iborne was walking 
to the highway along Luther Love's 
sideroad on Wednesday of last \veek, 
he saw a fine black fox in a field. 
The same evening Mrs. G. Little and 
Mrs. F. Lyons had a splendid view of 
the fox as they were coming from 
the highway. After they passed the 
fox came from the field and walke 
along the road for some distance. 
We wonder if it was a wild fox oi 
one escaped from some ranch ? 

---- column ----

ENGAGEM E N T 

Mr. and M**. P. J. Somers, 8th 
Line, Osprey, announce the engage- 
ment of their eldest son, William, to 
Miss Margart Krumenack of McTag- 
gart, Sask., the wedding to take place 
in Simcoe on April 14th. 

---- column ----

W. J. Burnett Dies 

The sudden death of William John 
Burnett occured at his home on the 
South Line, Artemesia, on Friday, 
April 4th, due to a stroke, at the age 
of 57 years. 

He was a son of the late Mr. and 
Mrs. John Burnett and was born on 
March llth, 1884. He was married 
23 years ago to Miss Christina Mc- 
Millan, whom he leaves to mourn, 
together with his three sons and 
one daughter, Wilbur of Seagram, 
John, Emerson and Kathleen at 
home. He also leaves five sisters and 
one brother, Mrs. D. McMillan of 
Portage la Prairie, Man., Mrs. E. 
Lane of Eymore, Alta., Mrs. Cameron 
Smillie of Ceylon, Mrs. M. Barker oi 
Toronto, Mrs. N. Collins of Toronto 
and Archie of Mt Forest. 

The late Mr. Burnett 'was well 
known throughout his native town- 
ship and held in the highest regard 
by all who knew him. While in good 
health he took an active interest in 
municipal affairs and for several 
terms was a member of Artemesia 
Council. Nine years ago he suffered 
a stroke and while able to be around 
was unable to do any work. 

The funeral took place on Monday 
afternoon when service was held at 
his late residence by Rev. A. R 
Muir of St. Columba United Church. 
Priceville, who also conducted the 
service at McNeill's Cemetery, where 
interment was made. 

The pallbearers were his three 
sons, Wilbur, John and Emerson 
Wm. Brown, Angus McMillan, Chas. 
McNaulty, Allan McLean and Alfred 
O'Dell. 

The flower bearers were: Albert 
O'Dell, C. D. McMillan, Bill Mc- 
Naulty and John McMillan. 

Friends and relatives from a dis- 
tance who attended the funeral were: 
Mr. an Mrs. N. E. Collins, Mrs. M 
Barker, Mr. W. Brown, Mr. Neil Mc- 
Lean, Miss K. McLean and Mrs. 
Engleauf, all of Toronto, Mr. am' 
Mrs. Robt. Anderson, Mr. White 
Anderson and Mr. Wm. McKechnie 
of Brampton, Mr. Robt. Burnett ol 
Durham, Mrs. Mary Irwin and Mr. 
and Mrs. Cecil McKechnie of Flesh- 
crton and Mr. Herb Corbett of Pro- 
ton Station. 

---- column ----

$3.500 SALARY FOR BRUCE 

PENINSULA DOCTOH 

---- column ----

A new chapter is written in the 
history of North Bruce Peninsula 
townships in the payment of $3,500 
to Dr. Carr-HarriS J Toronto, for- 
merly of Maxwell, as a resident phys- 
ician. St. Edmunds, Lindsay and 
Eastuor municipal boards are con- 
tributing $600 each and Lions Head 
$1,700. He will be house surgeon of 
the Red Cross Outpost Hospital at 
Lions Head. 

---- column ----

Future Events 

---- column ----

Credit auction sale of Farm Stock, 
Implements, Furniture, Sat., April 12, 
at Lot 21, Con. 6, Osprey, Colling- 
wood Gravel, 2Mi miles east of Max- 
well, Mrs. Elizabeth Mclnnes, Prop. 
Geo. Duncan, Auctioneer. 

Big dance in Ceylon hall on Wed., 
April 9th, at p.m. Fine quilt made 
by school children, will be raffled. 
Proceeds in aid of British War Vic- 
tims' Fund. Admission 35c. Come 
and help out this worthy cause. 

---- column ----

Gunner on a small British boat, 
attacked by a German dive bomber, 
waited until the 'bomber was within 
JO feet before opening fire with 
Lewis gun, and the bomber was de- 
stroyed. That sort of waiting takes 
nerve. 

---- column ----

The annual Easter Dance will be 
held in the Fraternal Hall, Flesher- 
ton on Monday, April 14th, "when 
Rubin Kirk and His Red Hot Trump- 
eters will provide real music. Ad 
mission 50c. Lunch free. 

Credit auction sale of Farm Stock 
Implements, etc., at Lots 26-26, Con. 
3, N.D.R., Osprey (3 miles south of 
Maxwell), on Monday, April 14th 
Farm for sale or rent. Neil 'Winters, 
Prop., Geo. E. Dunean, auctioneer. 

Send in the names of your Easter 
visitors to The Advance. Phone 18w 

---- column ----

The Functions of The Pres* 

Commencing this week it is our itt- 
tention to feature an editorial eacb 
week for nine weeks, outlining the 
functions of the press in a democratic 
community and its relationship to the 
various phases of community life. 
There is considerable ignorance as to 
the position and prerogatives of the 
press in the area it serves. This lack 
of knowledge is almost entirely the 
fault of the press itself, because it 
has neglected the important duty of 
making iti roaders conversant with 
the fundamental principles involved 
in the publication of a community 
newspaper. The series seeks to make 
amends for the omissions of the past, 
and to present in simple language .n 
explanation of the main relationships 
between the newspaper, its readers, 
its community, and its associates with 
organizations, business groups and 
institutions within the realm it seeks 
to serve. 

The nine phases to be discussed arer 
The Freedom of the Press, The Press 
and the Advertiser, The Press and 
Gevernments, The Press and Propa- 
ganda, The Functions of an Editor. 
The Functions of a Reporter, The 
Press and Local History, and The 
Guarantee of Freedom. We sincere- 
ly hope that our readers will care- 
fully study and digest the series, be- 
cause we believe that it will give 
them a new understanding of iheie 
local newspaper, an3 the historical 
purpose of its mission in the commun- 
ity. 

---- column ----

Maxwell United Church 

IEV. GEO. L. MERCER, B.D., D.I>. j 
Minister 

GOOD FRIDAY, APRIL 11 

Morning Service, ll a.m., Eugenia: 

Subject; "The World a t The Cross" 
The choir will lead the service of 
praise and appropriate musical num- 
bers will be sung. 

The Sacrament of the Lord's Sup- 
per will be administered on Good 
Friday morning. Attendance at Holy 
Communion is a sacred privilege and! 
a means of grace. Jesus said: "This 
do in remembrance of me." He is the 
Host, we are the guests. Let us 
honor Him with our presence. 
Evening Service, 7.30 p.m., MaxwelL 
Subject: "The Challenge of the 
Cross." A hearty welcome is assur- 
ed visitors and friends. 

EASTER SUNDAY, April U 

11 a.m. Eugenia. 

3 p.m. Wareham. 

7.30 p.m. Maxwell. 
Sermon Themes; "The Victory of 
the Risen Lord," "Why Celebrate 
Easter?" 

Gifts of flowers "in remembrance" 
for the Easter services will be grate- 
fully appreciated. 

A special Easter offering, for which 
envelopes are being distributed, is to 
meet pressing demands on tn* 
Board of Stewards, and members of 
the congregations are respectfully 
requested to make an offering worthy 
of the great Easter event which we 
shall celebrate. 

---- column ----

INCREASE IN POWER 
NEW WAVE LENGTH 
Radio Broadcasting Station C.F.0. 
S., the voice of Grey and Bruce, Owen 
Sound, has increased in power to 260 
watts, giving it a much wider range 
throughout the district. Dial 1400 
the new wave length. 

---- column ----

Flesherton United Church 

KEV. G. K. MCMILLAN, B.A., BJX 

Minister 

11.00 a.m. -- Worship Fleshei ton. 

2.00 p.m. Worship Ceylon. 

7.30 p.m. Worship Fleshertoa. 

Next Sunday is Easter Day. "We 
will celebrate it with special services 
both morning and evening in St 
John's church. At the morning ser- 
vice the Sacrament of the Lord's 
Supper will be celebrated and there 
will be a service of reception foi 
new members. 

In the evening, a Religious Drama, 
entitled "Release"' will be presented 
by a number of young people. Come 
to church and share in these services 
and be filled with the Joy and Vic- 
tory which are so much a part of the 
message of this religious occasion. 

---- column ----

Flesherton Baptist Church 

Minister- Sev. Fr><l \sh'n 

Services Fleaherton. 

11 a.m. Worship. 

12 noon, Bible School. 
7 p.m., Gospel Service. 

Monday at 8 p.m. Y. P. Service. 
Rock Mills 

2 p.m., Bible School. 

3 p.m., Worship. 

---- column ----

It seemed a little strange to read 
of a discussion in the House of Com- 
mons about the shortage of natural 
gas. 

---- column ----

\ 
---- page ----

---- column ----

i 

---- column ----

B/G MEWS ... for farmers! 

AGNES 
MACPHAIL 

---- column ----

former Member of Parliament for Srey- 
Eruce and one of Canada's best 
informed authorities on agricultural 
problems is now writing exclusive 
articles based on her wide experience 
of the past and her observations of 
today for 

---- column ----

Traditional friend, and spokesman for the farmer in its newi columns and on its editorial 
page, The Globe and Mail now takei this further step in extending "all-out" editorial 
assistance to the farming industry. 

Agnes Macphail gladly consented t lend her wholehearted co-operation, since 
the widely-read and influential columns of The Globe and Mail afford her an unusual 
opportunity to carry on the campaign she has been waging in the farmers' interests for 
many years. 

You'll read her nports and sincerely lympaiheiic artidei with 
interett. Don t mist a tingle one published ibr fimet 
weekly. Order your Globe and Hail from your dal*r 
Potfmaifer or Rural Mail Courier To-dayl 

---- column ----

VOICE 

OF THE 

PRESS 

---- column ----

UNDECLARED SPRING 
It looks aa U It will ba an uj- 
ttwUreil spi'iug. 

BiamloQ Sun. 

o 

TOO MUCH TO EXPECT 
Great as may be the St. Lawr- 
ence Doev Watwway project, it is 
really too much to anticipate that 
th.j K 3. Queen Elizabeth will aomo 
rt/ dock at the St. Catharines 
port on the Ship Canal. 

St. Cat liar him SUiudard. 

---- column ----

WRONG PEOPLE TO GROUSE 
Heople who are dissatisfied with 
tlioir li'jmo town and spend much 
of their tin!) complaining usually 
are the PIT-MIS who H.P: respons- 
ible for the town being wliat th>y 
think It shouldn't be. 

Kitchener Record 

---- column ----

CANADIAN INCOMES 
There are fewer than 12,000 In- 
tvuiea ot more than $10,000 per 
rr in Canada. The House ot Com- 
mons has i ":i Informed that re- 
turns were filed in 1940 by 9,901 
Individuals roceiviui? $10,000- 
$23,000; 1,433 receiving $25,000 to 
HO/MHt, aud 483 receiving over 50,- 
W*. The corresponding figures for 
the fiscal year 1939 were 7,278, 
1,395 ami 457. 

Toronto Star 

---- column ----

Grounds Given 

---- column ----

In Brooklyn, a woman ot 
Italian descent sought separation 
from her British-born husband. 
Grounds : gloating. 

---- column ----

Yugoslavia's New Premier 

---- column ----

General liirlianl Duxan Miino- 
rich, above, friend of Great 
Britain and chief of the Yugo- 
tlav air force, became premier of 
Yugoslavia in a coup which over- 
Arew the government which hart 
agreement with the Axis. 

---- column ----

Easter Customs 
And Traditions 

Origin of Hot Cross Bunt 
Lost In Obscurity; Gaily- 
Colored Eggs War* Enjoy- 
ed In Scotland for Gener- 
ations; Some Beautiful Cus- 
toms Come From Southern 
Europe 

---- column ----

"Hot Cross Buns! Hot Croat 

Buns! 
One-a-penny, two^a-penny, Hot 

Cross Buns! 
If ye have no daughters, give 

thorn to your sons." 
So sang the bilker's boy as he 
pushed his flat two-wheeled cart 
laden with Buster confections 
through the narrow streets of old 
Ldndon; and to most people even 
yet Good Friday would not be com- 
plete without the Hot-Crosi Huns 
to adorn the breakfast table. 

MARKED WITH A CROSS 
Many are the stories that have 
li'XiU passed down through the 
;iKa in connection with this bun. 
It at said that the inhabitants of 
auclent Egypt and Greece offered 
sacred cakes to the Moon Goddeaa, 
marking t'n-m with a cross to In- 
dicate the four quarters ot the 
moon. Then at a later date, the 
Saxons ate a similar bread, which 
they called "bouus," or buni. Theae 
too, were marked with a cross, in 
honor of their goddess of light. 

In a number of European coun- 
tries the Hot Cross Bun Is regard- 
fMl as a good-luck symbol, and it in 
believed that one should be kpt 
until the following Good Friday to 
insure the best of fortune through- 
out Uie year. In one part of Eng- 
land it U still believed that Hot 
Cross Buns hung In the chimney 
corner on Good Friday will guar- 
antee good bread to the housewife 
for the following 12 months. An- 
other tradition in connection with 
the Good Friday buns and bread 
in that if ki>pt through the year a 
few rnimbs soaked In water would 
work a cure for any ailment. 

Ad plentiful as the Hot Cross 
Runs at this season of the year 
are the gaily-colored eggs which 
ailorn almost every shop window. 
These are a survival of the distri- 
bution of "pace" or "pnsche ege," 
....-:> observed for generations 
liy children in Scotland as well as 
in the Knglittli counties of Lanes, 
Stafford and Warwick, where the 
dyort, hiird-tioiled f-ggs were rolled, 
loaned and finally eaten; for "hall- 
plaj'lug" oil Ktister Monday was 
universal. KVPII bishops and douns 
Joined in the dancing and throw- 
ing of a ball in the, church, the 
elorgy and laity alike compel ing 
.for prize* of "tansy cake." 

On** oC the most beautiful of 
Raster customs coniew to us from 
Central Europe, where the Tyrol- 
eie observe Holy Saturday In a 
unique manner. On the evening of 
that (lay they traverse every flow- 
ervilrewn ralley sins ing hymns ac- 
companying themselves on guitars, 
nii calling people from their 
homes to join In the procession. 
u -M .,. liidud-brimnied hats ad- 
orned with spring blossoms, and 
with dancing oulldrwi about them 
and lighted plnn torches adding to 
the. effect those musicians present 
a most plcliirr.'qiie ati 

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Afterwards refreshing drinka are 
served and hard-boiled eggs that 
havs been brightly colored are giv- 
en to the children. 

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Easter 

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We wait for Easter and the glad rebirth 
Of all things fair 

And clean and good and wholesome on the earth, 
When sunshine warm to scatter Winter's dearth 
l everywhere. 

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We wait for Easter and the glau 
From lethargy 
Of Nature's children to breathe forth their peace 
And give our weary bodies quick increase 
Of energy. 

We wait for Easter and a world made free. 
The stinging sword 

Of strain and suffering then shall broken be, 
And blinded spirits shall more clearly see 
The risen Lord. 

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Eileen MeQuiggan. 

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April's Costume 

Never a girl more quaintly 

dressed 

Than lovely April is 
Poke bonnet lined, crab apple 

pink; 

Catkin-furred pelisse. 
The silken fabric of her gown 
Draped over crinoline, 
Misty violet shot through 
With birch leaves' tender green. 
Her feet are shod in primly 

laced, 

Softest, loam-tan kid, 
And ah, the ruffles now disclosed, 
Now demurely hid, 
Of .cherry-petaled pantalettes; 
The white starched petticoats 
Make music where she walks, as 

crisp 

As wind in fields of oats. 
And all the air is spiced with 

scent, 

When lovely April passes. 
Of satcheta of orris root 
Budding In marsh grasses. 

Ethel Romig Fuller 

Marriage Attracts 
Plane Stewardesses 

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Stewardesses are employed for 
an average of about a year, ac- 
cording to Miss Patricia Eccle- 
ston, supervisory stewardess of 
the Trans-Canada Air Lines. The 

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company tries to keep them longer 
but competition with Cupid Is too 
keen. They don't marry pilots or 
passengers but the boy friends 
they left at home. Miss Eccleston 
has 17 girls on her division. One 
of the things that keeps her busy: 
hiring new stewardesses. 

---- column ----

Raccoon Reveals 

Homing Instinct 

Jack Miner, Kingsville (Ont.) 
naturalist, is- beginning to think 
pigeons aren't the only creatures 
with homing instinct. He banded 
a raccoon caught at his bird 
sanctuary a short time ago and 
took it 20 miles away. Three 
days later the animal was back 
in the same trap. 

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More Sheep in 
Canada 

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The number of sheep on Cana- 
dian farms at December 1, 1940, 
was 2,688,800, a gain of 1.8 per 
cent over the 2,653,000 at De- 
cember 1, 1939. Declines in num- 
bers occurred in the Maritime 
Provinces and Ontario, while Sas- 
katchewan showed an increase of 
12.5 per cent. It is expected that 
a further increase in numbers *i!l 
be shown in the count at June 1, 
1941. 

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Bee Hive 
& O\A* Syrup 

---- column ----

s\\\r 

ENERGY 

'//It' For >\\\\\ 

WORK! 

---- column ----

Your most 
Valuable Energy 
KK Food. 

---- column ----

Bicycle Loads 
Now Regulated 

Amendment to Municipal Act 
Goes Through Ontario Legis- 
lature 

---- column ----

Under the terms of an amend- 
ment to the Municipal Act, approv- 
ed by an Ontario Legislature com- 
mittee, mnuidpa! councils will 
have the power to regulate sla* 
and weight of loads carried on bi- 
cycle*. 

Toronto police spokesmen laid 
tlie bill was intended as much for 
the protection of the boya as for 
the protection of motorists. 

"Suoh regulation Is needed," said 
Dr. A. 0. Trottier, Essex East mem- 
ber. "The law will b more a pro- 
tection to boys and motorists ttuui 
a regulation for storekeepers." 

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Ham como* to the table glaied 
aide up. These illustration* ahow 
right ham with the bone struc- 
ture marked in dotted linea. The 
method fur carving a left ham 
will be the name, except that 
ahank will DO to thecarver'i left. 

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Fia.i 

A Aitch ! ... n u 
B Hum bona 
C Shank bone 

I' i '..,!.i., i. id 
K Thin (Flank) aid* 

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FIO. 

Cut rounded portion front 
tha Thin (Flank) Sida to 
provide a flat surface 
parallel to the Ham ban* 
on which to Bland Ham for 
carving. 

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no. a 

Lay piece thu* remov*4 to 
one aide of platter, later 
to be acrved cold. Male** 

tasly hmchoon piec*. 

---- column ----

Without Ham for Easter Sunday, it would hardly seem 
like Easter. For iu Canada, Ham in the traditional meat 
for the Easter Season. So, here's what we suggest: 

But first, be sure to choose a 
'Maple Leaf TENDERSWEET Ham. 
You will find it considerably more 
than just a Ham. You will find it 
plump and tender. You will find 
its delicate flavour distinctive. Its 
sweetness will make your mouth 
water. The new and scientific 
process by which TENDEKSWKRT 
Hams are cured and smoked 
assures all this and more no 
soaking and no parboiling for a 
'Maple Leaf' TENDBRSWKBT Ham. 
Perfect cooking ia easy and 
simple. Directions are wrapped 
with every Ham. 

Your dealer will be pleased to 
ihow you the Maple Leaf Brand 
on every TendersweeT Ham. 

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(1) You .-ill wish to choose a 
Ham that is sure to be tender, of 
sweet flavour, and easy to cook 
(no parboiling). 

A NS WER Just ask your 
Butcher or Grocer fur a 'Maple 
Leaf TendersweeT Ham. 

(2) You may wish to learn how 
to carve iteasily and economically. 

ANS WER A proven new 
method of carving is illustrated 
with directions in the panel below. 
Show it to the person in your home 
who does the carving. It may 
be the answer to the carver's 
problem. " 

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Riauuut 

STYLE 
...hon*> In 

---- column ----

* MAPU LEAF TENDERSWEET HAMI ARE MARE IY CANADA PACKERS LIMITED 

---- column ----

\ 

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FIO. 4 

Turn Ham ovtr ao that it 
stand* Irmly on the flat 
cat nurface mad* in Fig. 2. 
preferably with garnished 
aurface) towards gout*. 
Cut a amaU wedgft-ahaped 
piece from the dunk end 
aa illustrated above. , 

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no. 

Now begin to alic* almott 
vertically through the 
cuabion meat to the Ham 
bone. Thnno elloaa will all 
be cut niruii the grain of 
the meat. 

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rM.) 

Remove and serve the 
elioea one or mure at a 
time, by cutting along Hum 
bone ae above. 

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FIO. 7 

Kopeat slicing u in Fig*. 
6 and 6 until you coma to 
tha aitch bone, which ia 
about 1 inches from the 

round end of Hiun. 

---- column ----

FIO.S 

Now turn the Ham back to 
original petition 1. Carve 
allot* above, starting; at 
th* *hank end. finiehmg 
at tha butt end. Looaer. 

---- column ----

. 

ahcM bv running the knife 
along tha bona aa before. 

---- column ----

SOLD BY ALL LEADING RETAILERS 
---- page ----

---- column ----

Pledge for War Sayings 

---- column ----

TEA 

---- column ----

SERIAL STORY 

---- column ----

iPANGERl! ROMANCE AHEAD 

BY TOM HORNER 

---- column ----

HT. J 

---- column ----

CHAPTER XV 

Bentley pulled the trigger as 
Larry's fist crashed against bis 
Jaw. The bullet grazed Larry's 
hirr. buried itself in the door. 
Lorry jerked the gun away as 
Bentley slumped in the seat, out 
old. 

Then he was out of the car, 
earhing the darkness, shouting 
"Monnie! Monoie!" 

"Larry!" She ran across the 
road to him. 

"Don't shoot, Collins. Everything 
wider control," came another voice. 
Colonel Harris! 

Honnie's arms were aroniid him. 
'Larry, darling! Are you all right? 
TSiat shot?" Tears were streaming 
down her face. 

He kissed her. "I'm not hurt. He 
Kissed." 

Colonel Harris was beside him. 
"Good work. Collins. Got all of 
UIMU. Bentley?" 

"In the car. Hud to sock him. 
That shot was for me-." Harris left 
ttum to pull Bentley, from the seat. 
A car rounded the curve slowly, 
its headlights illuminating the 
eene. Bill and .Shultz were stand- 
tun beeide the highway, hands In 
the tr. Two highway patrolmen 
guarded them. A third officer ca- .e 
down the hill, pushing a protest- 

"We'll get the one in the can- 
ine Joe In front of him. 
yon later. He cun't get far," Col- 
onel Harris shouted. 

Bentley routed AS handcuffs 
napped on bis wriss. "What . . . 
What ..." he mumbled. Harris 
larked him to his feet. 

"You lost this time. Bentley. You 
Tell into a trap. You're through!" 

Tli sheriff aws setting out of 
his car. 

'Twas Monnie'i Idea 

It wag not until Bentley and his 
te Mike's own car that Colonel 
men were headed toward town 
Harris explained. 

"This was all Miss Mile*' Idea, 
Collins. You have her to thank 
for saving your life." Larry .squeez- 
ed her tighter to hiiu. He had never 
released her. 

"She figured Be-iiUey perfectly," 
Harris went on. "Bentley got away 
with Hugh's murder. He thought 
he could do the same thing with 
you. 

"Miss Miles, here, had to make 

---- column ----

him decide to get rid of you him- 
self, and she wanted him to keep 
remembering Hugh" 

"That's why I had to tell him 
you were Hugh'-, brother," Monnie 
bzroke in. 'That's why I pretended 
to hate you." 

"Miss Miles called us as -mm as 
she sot away from Bentley's" the 
highway patrol chief continued. 
"We knew we'd never get you alive 
If we rushed the house. So after 
Miss Miles explained more about 
the other accident, \ve decided 
Be-utlpy would try the same thing 
over again. When he called the 
sheriff, were were sure of it. We 
came up here, hid down in the 
canyon. 

"Luckily, I sent wnt of the boys 
up on the hill to watch for Benl- 
ley. He took care of Joe. We heard 
everything Bentley said. 

"It was getting you out safely 
that worried us. We knew you 
weren't tied, but we were afraid 
that Bentley would shoot you the 
minute he suspected anything. 
When he started talking about 
Miss Miles, I told her to shout, and 
let you take your own chances. 
She was game enough to do It. It 
worked out swell." 

"Monnie's voice did It," Larry 
said. "It was unexpected and It 
threw Bentley off guard. That gave 
me time to clip him, and to push 
that giui away." 

"And the others had their hands 
in the air as soon ae fche boys 
pointed a gun at .them. We kept 
them covered all (he (imp we were 
here, Just In ease But we didn't 
want to start a battle." 

"I was scared, Larry." scared to 
dt'ath." Monnie said. "But I had 
to keep Mike from killing you." 

Harris walked with them to thp 
sheriff's car. "You go back to the 
rajicl). The sheriff and I will go 
on up to Bentley's. There may 
have been a scmp there. I sent, 
half H dozen men up the canyon 
road to take Bentle-y's place. T 
think we'll have enough on Bint- 
ley and all his men to hang him 
after I go over his records." 

"There'll be a shipment of nar- 
cotics arrive by plane next week," 
Larry remembered. "Bentley wa* 
to gAt a tip." 

"We'll camp there until the plane 
comes In. That will clinch llie case 

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HERE'S HOW TO CORRECT 

CONSTIPATION 
WITHOUT DOSING! 

---- column ----

If you have suffered from constipa- 
tion, you probably know from ex- 
perience that harsh purgatives give, 
at best, only temporary relief. 

That's why doctors will tell you 
to get at the cause. If your consti- 
pation Is the common type due to 
lack of the right kind of "bulk, 1 ' 
try KELLOGG 'S ALL BRAN . . . 

---- column ----

a truly delicious cereal that can 
help to keep you regular by sup- 
plying the "bulk" you need. 

Eat ALL-BRAN every morning 
. . . drink plenty of water . . . and 
see if you don't notice a big differ- 
ence in the way you look and feel I 
Available at all grocers' in two con- 
venient sizes. Made by Kellogg's 
in London, Canada. 

---- column ----

v L e~4 c n/ M a 

---- column ----

PRICED 

SURPRISINGLY 

LOU) 

---- column ----

YOU PAY LESS 

---- column ----

Calumet, one of the world's 
laigeM-selling brands of baking 
ii-ilrr, probably costt less than 
Ac baJtiug powder you uc using. 

YOU USE LESS 

Cahunet'a double -action permits 
you lo use less because it gives 
double leavening both dunng 
mag tad in the oven. 

IETTER RESULTS 

Calumet's comiaitoiit Itnicning 
mm finer, better textured results 
fat all your baking, 
aty-opcnlng, won't-spill con- 
tainer, with handy mcaiuring 
device ,'n the lid. 

LICI 

---- column ----

NEW CURING PROCESS MAKES 
EASTER HAM MORE TENDER 

(Cuts Cooking Time, Too) 

"by 

MARY CLAIRE THOMPSON 

---- column ----

Thousands of cords of oak and hard maple have sent iheir pungent 
smoke seeping into the Easter ha ins that now wait to join with Easter 
eggs on your feast day table. 

Ham, baked, broiled or boiled has always been a Canadian favorite 
Decause of its flavor and juiciness. Today, however, a now process of 
curing and smoking makes hams extra tender, juicy and sweet. What's 
more, the flavor is the same right through the ham from the outside 
layer of fat to tha bone. This new curing and smoking; process, called 
tenderizing, not only gives them a richer flavor, but makes the meat 
more tender as well. 

Whole Ham, Baked 

Do not be afraid to buy a whole ham for Easter, but be sure to 
select one that has had the new tenderizing process. Ask for a Tender- 
sweet ham. You will appreciate the difference from the old style hams 
just as soon as you start to cook it. No soaking, no parboiling is neces- 
sary before putting this ham in the oven. Just give it a long, slow bak- 
ing, then about 15 minutes before serving, remove the rind and spread 
the fat with a brown sugar glaze. Serve the whole ham baked, for the 
special Easter Sunday dinner. Then during the week following, slice 
some of the left-over piece for quk-k broiling. For another meal, use 
chopped cooked ham in croquettes, a meat loaf or as a sandwich filling 
and finally draw out every last bit of goodness from the ham by sim- 
mering the bone for soup. What's pea soup without a ham bone? You 
will find one of these Tendersweel hams a thrifty meat buy because 
every scrap can be used. 

Fruit* Are Affinities 

It is not surprising that juicy hams and fruits are the latest in 
food affinities. They are lovely to look at and delicious to eat. Broiled 
pears, sauteed pineapple, spiced peaches, pickled cherries and raisin 
sauce are ham accompaniments of epicurean acclaim. 

Here is a suggested menu for an Easter dinner made festive because 
it features Tendersweet ham. The simple directions for cooking tha 
ham are given as well as the recipe for Raisin Sauce, an ideal accom- 
paniment. 

---- column ----

EASTER DINNER MENU 

Baked Ham Raisin Sauce 

Glazed Sweet Potatoes Harvard Beets 

Spinach with Hard Cooked Egg Garnish 

Salad of: Endive, Cress, Cabbage and Tomato Salad Dressing 

Ice Cream Daffodil Cake 

Beverage 

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BAKED HAM 

1 whole Maple Leaf Tendersweet 

Ham 
1 cup warm water 

1 cup brown sugar, packed down 

2 teaspoons dry mustard 

3 tablespoons cider vinegar 
Whole Cloves 

Maraschino cherries (if desired) 

Ham should be at room temper- 
ature before baking, 

Wrap ham in parchment or 
heavy brown wrapping paper or 
leave in original glassine wrap- 
ping. Place in open roasting pan 
with 1 cup water. Bake in a mo- 
derately slow oven of 325 degrees 
F. for 8 to 3',i hours (allow 15 
minutes to the pound for 12 to 
14 pound ham and for ham of 6 
pounds '/i ham, allow 22 min- 
utes to the pound). 

When baked for the required 
time, remove wrapping and rind. 
Mix brown sugar, mustard and 
vinegar into a smooth paste; 
spread on top side of ham stud 
decorate with whole cloves and 
slices of cherry. Keturn to hot- 

---- column ----

ter oven (375 to 400 degrees F.) 
to brown and glaze. This requires 
about 15 minutes. 

Note: If placed in oven just 
after removing from the refriger- 
ator, allow at least 30 minutes 
longer for baking. 

* f * 

RAISIN SAUCE 

"i cup raisins 

1 cup water 

4 or 5 cloves 
?4 cup brown sugar 

1 teaspoon cornstaroh 
'i teaspoon salt 
Few grains pepper 

1 tablespoon butter 

1 tablespoon lemon juice 
'4 teaspoon concentrated mat 

sauce. 

Cover raisins with water and 
add cloves and simmer for 10 
minutes. Remove cloves. 

Add sugar and cornstarch, salt 
and pepper mixed together. Stir 
until slightly thickened and add 
remaining ingredients. 

Serve as an accompaniment to 
baked ham. 

---- column ----

asuinst the wliol gang." Hun is 
smiled at the prospect. "Yon two 
KO iilong now." 

He watched them back the sher- 
iffs car around, then head down 
the hill. After they had gone, he 
crossed the road, stared down into 
the canyon. 

"Your Job is finished now, Hiifcb." 
he said. 

MOMMIC Is Waiting 
Colonel Miles a-nd Pete Barnes 
had to hear all the details us soon 
as Monnie and I^airy returned. 
Thf-y had learned of Monnie's plan 
as soon as they came back from 
Lost Canyon, and it had boen dif- 
ficult to keep the Colonel from 
riding off to "'blow Bentley off thr ; 
ma])." 

''Sorry I wa.nted to hang you for 
stealing calves. Collins," tih CoT- 
onel apologized gruffly. 

"1 kept telling you Larry would- 
n't steal," Barnes added. 

"Korget it,'' Larry said. "Monnia 
rfgniKKlyphp oKtDahuhfrnrau'ai 'r 
and t intend to." He tumid to 
her. "WaJit to take a ride, Mon- 
nle? I've got some unfinished bus- 
iness to attend to, out on * hill. 
Bui I've got to get a call through 
to Steve Clark first." 

He gave Steve the story wlnlo 
she changed clothe*. 

"Swell yarn, boy," came Steve's 
voice. '"We'll bent everyone here 
by two editions . . . Take a vaca- 
tion for two weeks now. mid then 
get back. They're (Hiking ;ibo\it 
opening up on the nickels ngain. 
City Hall story is hot hiid elec- 
tions " 

Larry hung up the receiver. He 
rememl>ei-e(l lie had promised to 
cover Harris' newspaper Sriemls 
and lie phoned the office. Monnie 
was waiting when he finished. 

"Pels saddlod the horses," she 
said, taking Larry's hand. 

They slood on the hill, close to- 
gether, looking out over the iliirk- 
oned Hnyhook. 

"l>nd will prolvably buy Bent- 
ley's ranch now, and move Pete 
Barnes up there," Monnie said. 
"He tulked about buying the Circle 
Cross for Pte before Beutlny 
came." 

"And If he does?" Larry aakei). 
"The Hayhook will need a new 
foreman." 

"But I've got a Job. with Stern 
Clark." 

"You belong here, Larry." 
"I'm not going to work for mj 
fnllw-in-law." 
"You'll hnve to." 
"I wont' You can romp to New 
York with nip." 

---- column ----

"1 won't!" 

Larry laughed. "Monnie, dar- 
ling. we're quarreling. Let's settle 
that to-morrow. Maybe we'll start 
a i>aptr on the Hayhook . . ." She 
smiled at him. 

"Say it," he commanded, gruff- 
ly. 

"1 love you,'' she answered, add- 
ing: "And 1 won't drive fast again 
ever!" 

(The Ertd> 

---- column ----

Snowy White 
Spring Touch 

---- column ----

On Suits, 
Choice of 
able 

---- column ----

Coats. Dresses; 

Materials Avail- 

---- column ----

When spring comes \ve all revolt 
against the dark severities of win- 
ter's fashions. Suddenly, we waul 
to be feminine. We want to froth, 
frou-frou, and fancy flnisdiings. Our 
spring suits, coats anil dresses 
must spill a bit of snowy white or 
Miowa flash of dainty pink or blue. 
It is as inevitable a sign of spring 
us the chirping of robins arid the 
blooming of daffodils. 

Dainty Lingerie Touches 

This spring there will be no 
difficulty in finding dainty lingerie 
touches for i-ost nines. Never has 
there been a better or more var- 
ied array of- neckwear. You can 
take your choice of hand-drawn 
linens, organdies, nets, permit soles, 
and any number of materials. You 
can have ruffles, pltats, lace in- 
serts or edgings, and solid, eyelet, 
or appenznll flower embroidery. 

If you have a jabot you ilou't 
need to worry about sewing prob- 
lems. Practically all the jabots clip 
or tie over your coat or suit. bub- 
Ming and fluttering delightfully to 
almost any desired point between 
your neckline and your waist. 

---- column ----

51 Seventh Sons 

---- column ----

At Moneda Chapel, Santiago, 
51 baby boys, nil seventh eons of 
51 families, have been simultane- 
ously baptised. 

---- column ----

* S/ow Burning 

CIGARETTE PAPERS 

HONE FfMeft MADE 

---- column ----

Many people can safely drink. 
coffee and . t.i. Miny oihcii 
and j. childien ihould 
never drink them. II you xt> 
one of these, drink delicioiu, 
economical Postum. bet; how 
much better you fed! 

---- column ----

"Jim Burton would drink cot- 
fee any time you'd make it. So 
I soon welcomed him to my 
nighttime stay-awakes! Gitteine 
nerves wouldn't let him sleep a 
wink . . . that is, until he heard 
about Postum. Curses! He kick- 
ed me out in no time when he 
switched to Postum instead of j 
cofifee and tea." | 

v_ J 

---- column ----

Summer Hats Are 
Revolutionized 

---- column ----

For men, Very Light, Mesh- 
Woven Tropical Headwear 
Are Shown In Many Patterns 

No department in men's dress 
has seen such a revolution as his 
summer headwear. When con- 
fined to the stiff sailor straw or 
the Panama both in the bleached 
while color there was little en- 
joyment and not too much com- 
fort in the change to straw hats. 
This past year brought the discov- 
ery of a vast new field in sum- 
mer hats. There are now innum- 
erable new featherweight, mesh- 
woven tropical hats, in a great 
variety of native weaves and pat- 
terns which are thoroughly in- 
bucd with the color and comfort 
of modern porous, hot- weather 
clothes. In all, a menu of some- 
thing like 300 new summer hats, 
each with its special quality of 
appearance and comfort, hai been 
kdded for men's choice. 

With Colored Btnds 

These new hats are trimmed 
with bands to express every man's 
fancy and harmonize with all types 
of costumes plain colors, bright 
print pugress in Javan Batik, 
polka dot and other gay patterns, 
two-tone bands, bands of soft-col- 
ored Oxford shirting. Particular- 
ly striking is the Mayan Indian 
band, woven in Guatemala in au- 
thentic native patterns and color?. 

---- column ----

Shoes Step Out 
In Lively Hues 

Red Leads Parade; Like 
Hats, the Sillier the Better 

---- column ----

have been so many pre- 
views of th Easter parade that the 
occasion itself will have an ele- 
in en i of surprise in seeing exactly 
wliat this or that woman may 
choose to make of herself. One 
may he a trim girl In suit and 
sailor, or another a lady in soft 
frills or a portrait in finery. 
A COLORFUL EASTER 
Jt certainly is going to be a lively 
spring as gay and colorful as styl- 
ists can contrive, which is pretty 
gay and colorful. Even shoes will 
step lively in colors headed by 
red, which seems a bit revolution- 
ary but such is the case. No one 
expects, or seems to want, sen- 
Bible shoes. Like lints, the sillier 
they are the harder we fall for 
them, but they art* not all open- 
toed and many have closed heels, 
which is somt'tliing. The pyramid- 
ed heel is smart and hints of dan- 
ger, although it really isn't as 
tricky as it appears. 

If you don't happen to care for 
novelty shoes, it's too bad, since 
all sorts of unusual trimmings arc 
used, ranging from nail heads, dec- 
ok-iitive brass ones, to match box 
affairs that sprout where bows and 
Imokles once grew. Plniiento and 
ht-nrt-beat red are two of the fav- 
ored shoe colors. 

---- column ----

Laundering Your 
Candlev/ick Spread 

One of tin? most popular mod- 
ern fabrics is candlewick. It's 
reasonable, it's attractive to look 
at "find it conies in lovely colours. 
This is ITOW to launder spreads.- 

Make some wood, soapy water 
and plunge the fabric in, use a 
squeezing- action to expel the dirt, 
but don't rub or wring the mater- 
ial. Rinse until the final rinsing 
water is clear (two or three in- 
stalments of water as a rule) and 
then hang outside until nearly, 
dry.. When the candlewick is al- 
most dry, shake it as hard as you 
can to brinff up the wicky part 
and when it is absolutely dry heat 
the whole surface with a li^ht 
brush, a sort of dabbing, whisk- 
ing action. 

You can iron a quilt so long as 
you avoid the raised tufts, but a 
l>th-rrmt. requires no pressing at 
all. 

---- column ----

MUSIC 

---- column ----

Although the spirit );e not 
master of that which it creates 
through music, yet it is blessed 
in this creation, which, like every 
creation of art, is mightier than 
the artist. Beethoven. 

Music is the harmonious yoice 
of creation; an echo of the invis- 
ible world; one note of the divine 
concord which the entire universe 
is destined one day to sound. 

Mazzini 

Human hope and faith should 
join in nature's grand harmony, 
and, if on minor key, make music 
)n the heart. Mary Bakej: Eddy. 

The highest graces of music 
flow from the feelings of the 
heart. Nathaniel Emraons. 

Music, in '.he best sense, does 
not require novelty; nay, the older 
it is, and the more we are accus- 
tomed to it, the greater its effect. 
Goethe 

Among the instrumentalities of 
love and peace, surely there can 
be no sweeter, softer, more effec- 
tive voi'.'e than that of gentle 
peace-breathing music. 

Elihu Bnrriit 

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Domestic Strife 

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In Duluth, the News-Tribune 
printed consecutive classified ads: 
"I will not be responsible for any 
bills contracted by my wife Elaine 
Swick. Earl Swick." "Earl Swick 
Since when has your credit rat- 
ing been O.K. for me to charge 
under your name? Elaine Swick." 

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BtauUful Coloured and Mounted Pictures ot 
Warships ot the British Navy 

N.M.S. HOOD . RODNEY - WARSPITC 
REPULSE . ARK ROYAL > SUBMARINE 
MOTOR TORPEDO BOAT - DESTROYER 

also similar picttirt* of 
BRITAIN'S FIGHTING PLANES, 

KM \fl\V! ! Take thf label Irrm 
a tin of deIlci"i(M 'Crmvn iyrui>' 
write your luinu und address on th 
buok with the uume of iho picture 
desired. Send one uumpli'ii: lube) for 
each picture you 
w.-uit address 
The <" a n a d n 
Starch Company 
Ltd., Dept. J.ii. 
;il XVi.lllnK'ion St. 
!'.. Toronto, Out. , 

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< 

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i 

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] 

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ISSUE 15 '41 
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Wednesday, April 9, 1941 

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THE FLESHERTON ADVANCE 

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THE 

FLESHERTQH ADVANCE 

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OB Culling wood 

Wednesday of 
i ek. Circulation ovr 1,000. 
Price in Canada $8.00 par y*r, 
when paid in advance |1.60; in 
(J. S. A. $2.50 per year, when 
^ paid in advance $2.00. 

/ F. J. THUR8TON. Editor. 

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. ZThe Freedom of The Press 

1 Great men of history who have left 
s the legacy of democratic ffOTW 
(ttent all seem to have been of one 
mind, that the preservati n of the 
freedom of the press, because this 
freedom has essentially, through the 
centuries shown iUelf to be the one 
great force which hag seen to it that 
the freedom of the individual has 
been preserved. When freedom of 
the press is abolished, other freed- 
oms go with it. There is little need 
at this time to stress that point. 
There are so many poignant and trag- 
ic examples in the world today of a 
subservient press, that it must be ob- 

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"GO PLACES" 

FOR EASTER 

SPECIAL LOW FARES 

JLictween n11 points in ('.-. -.ada and 
to certain destinations in the 
Unitd Stt C-K 

FARE & ONE-QUARTER 

FOR THE ROUND TRIP 

Tickets good going any time Thurs- 
day, April 10, until 2.00 p.m. Mon- 
day April 14. 

Return Limit to leave destination not 
later than midnight Tuesday, April 

15th, 1941 

fake advantage of this long week 
end for a visit home or away 

with friends. 

WOT fares and information ask any 
Railway Ticket Agent. 

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vious to any intelligent person is syn 
onoumous with the freedom which is 
democracy. 

There have always been those, who 
often for reasons of personal aggran 
disement or lust for power, woulc 
rob the press of this precious jewe 
in the crown of liberty. There have 
been others who cry out for persona 
freedom of expression, but wh 
would deny this right to the press 
It has been claimed that this freed 
om can become license, but this i 
one of those half-truths which un 
thinking people are likely to accep 
at its face value. 

Actually the press enjoys a- free 
do which gives it no privilege abovi 
the individual. It must conform to 
the laws of the state. Its freedom 
is bound by the lows of libel and slan 
der. It certainly offers no greater 
opportunity for defaming any per 
son of institution, than does the in 
herent right of free speech with 
which every person is endowed as a 
birthright. Abraham Lincoln in u de 
bate on the constitution once said 
"The liberty of the press is the ty 
rant's scourage; it is the true frienc 
and the supermost suporter of civi 
liberty." The principal of freedom 
of the press, as it exists today, is th 
result of a long and bitter struggl 
ictween those who believe in civi 
rights and constituted authority, and 
those who feared the exercise of these 
rights. 

It is significant that the first 
amendment to the Bill of Rights oi 
the Amercan Constitution, adopted in 
1791, is one that relates to the free- 
dom of the press. It reads: "Con- 
gress shall make no law respecting 
the establishment of religion, or the 
prohibition of the free exercise 
thereof; or abridging the freedom oi 
speech, or of the press; or the right 
of the people peaceably to assemble 
and to petition the government for a 
redress of grievances." The very 
wording of this amendment places 
frecdnm of the press on the same lev- 
el, and of equal import with freedon 
of religion, of speech and of assembly. 

A Rhode Island State provisio n 
sums up the question of a free press 
in a few words when it says:"The 

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SUPERIOR STORES 

Specials are. Cash Only 

Real Fresh Crispy SODAS 2 IBs. 25c 

Excellent brand FLOUR, highly guaranteed 
Only $2.98 

Kellogg's ALL BRAN and measuring cup, all 23c 

Sugar Crisp CORN FLAKES per box 7c 

OXYDOL, large package 23c 

Fresh Ground COFFEE whUe U wait lb. 35c 

FRESH and CURED MEATS OUR SPECIALTY 
All Electrically Refrigerated. 

IF IT'S FRUITS or VEGETABLES 
our assortment is larger and fresher 

SPECIAL PRICES ON MEN'S RUBBER 
BOOTS FOR SPRING 

C. J. KENNEDY 

Phone 37 WE DELIVER 

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liberty of the press being essential to 
the security and freedom of the state, 
any person may publish his sentimen^ 1 " 
on any subject, being responsible for 
the abuse of that liberty, and in all 
trials for libel, both civil and crimin- 
al, the truth unless published from 
malicious motives, shall be sufficient 
defence to the person charged." 
Many other democratic countries have 
passed similar legislation, because 
from a wide study of the dangers of 
a subservient press, they have learn 
ed that free press is the best assur- 
ance of a free country. 

To be fully comprehended, the free- 
dom of the press must be accepted 
by democratic peoples as a typical 
example of the privileges they en- 
joy as individuals in a democratic 
state. To' abolish th freedom of 
the press, is to invite the abolition 
of all freedom for the individual. 

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NOT SO MUCH DICTATION 

Since its formation in 1930. the On- 
tario Securities Commission has done 
a good deal for mining and industrial 
affairs through the control of specu- 
lation. But in the past, its restric- 
tions have had dictatorial force, in 
that no order of the Commission was 
subject to review in any way in the 
courts. This session an amendment to 
the Securities Act granting right o' 
appeal from decisions of the Commis- 
sion was introduced in the Legislature 
by Attorney General Conant. It is 
proposed that a Board of Review, con- 
sisting of the Master of the Supreme 
Court, the judge of the Mining Courf 
and the Deputy Minister of Mines, be 
set up, to which any "direction, de- 
cision, order or ruling regarding a 
license or affecting the right of any 
person to trade in securities'* may be 
appealed and that final resort may 
be made by the appellant to the (tourt 
of Appeal for Ontario. On the prin- 
ciple that citizen should be permitted 
to have his rights determined by the 
courts, whenever it is at all possible 
and whenever it does not too drast- 
ically delay or impair administration 
curtailment of the aBsolute power o 
the Board should meet general ap 
proval. 

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HIGH HYDRO REVENUE 

Increased deliveries of power for 
war industries is credited for the re 
cord high reached by the revenue am 
power sales of the Hudro Electric 
Commission during the fiscal year 
nding October 31, 1940. Revenues 
'rcm all gystms totalled $37,399,- 
536.M). 

In this connection it is interesting 
to note the possibility of an entire 
reversal of the basic "power at cost" 
principle o f the Hydro-Electric Sys- 
tem, as a result of a request for the 
appointment of a select committee of 
the Ontario Legislature to study the 
question of establishing a flat rate 
for Hydro power across the province. 
Under the present system, rates are 
governed by the distance of a muni- 
cipality from the source of generation 
and the density of the area served. 
The establishment of a universal 
rate would undoiitodlv entail nn ii- 
'"". ureas. 

l-rti.uiariy in the major citiees. On 
the other hand the reduction of rural 
rates thus affected would in all prob- 
ability increase the number of power 
users on farms and go far towards 
encouraging industries to locate in 
the smaller centres, causing n decen- 
trnilizn.tion of Industry which in the 
long run might prove beneficial to 
the Province. The fact that the St. 
I.invn nrc project gives promise of 
1 i-cs.-rvi's of powor makes a pol- 
'"' '-liiinge more feasible. 

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Jfreebom . . . 

Ring every Sunday, in Canada 

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"In many lands this year bells art 
silent alum are dimmed ..." 

RT. How. W. L. MACKENZIE KINO, 

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It is your privilege to attend the church 
of your choice ... to worship as your 
conscience wills. 

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A Nazi world means the end of the church 
you love. It means compulsion to accept 
form of worship prescribed by political 
dictators. 

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In the words of the Prime Minister, 
"When we speak of the preservation of 
democracy, of Christianity and of civili- 
zation, we use no idle words . . . the 
existence of all three it at stake." 

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Freedom of worship Is one of the price- 
lets privileges that all Canadians enjoy. 

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That dearly-bought right It in jeopardy. 

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Therefore we must all unite in supporting 
Canada's war effort in order to preserve 
this Freedom. 

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Keep up YOUR PLEDGE I . ; . 

Increase Your Regular /nvesfmenf $ in 

WAR SAVINGS CERTIFICATES 

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Remember in addition to your pledged amount 
vou can buy extra War Savings Certificate 
From your local Post Office or Bank, or dived 
from the War Savings Committee, Ottawa. 

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War Savings Cammitttt, Ottawa 

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1 

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: 

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"Frery duty, wilt *mi brxintly June, ii a contrlbulloM to victory." 
THE PRIMI MINISTBK OP CANADA. 

STANDARDIZED FOR EFFICIENCY 

A car witli Nova Scotia license plates limps into a service ' -^-^ 
station in Winnipeg. Steam is spouting from under the hood. 

"It's your water pump," says the mechanic. "We can 
have new one on in 'a jiffy won't hold you up long." 

Only a water pump perhaps assembled in Oehawa or 
Windsor from parts made in half a doien different 
towns, yet it fits to a T when this Manitoba mechanic 
puts it on a car from Nova Scotia. 

Uniformity standardization are big factors IB tele- 
phone service, too. You can talk practically anywhere, 
any time, for oner reason, because telephone equipment 
made with meticulous care fits to a T in all parts of the 
system. Operating methods are co-ordinated, too, to 
that your call is put through 
quickly and accurately your 
voice spans the miles direct 
to your listener's ear. To a 
nation at war, such standard- 
isation is great astet. 

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CEYLON 

FUNERAL OF MR. J. McFADYEN 

Rev. Dr. Campbell of Priceville. 
Presbyterian Church htd charge oi 
the funeral service of the late Mr. 
John McFadyen Thursday afternoon. 
Fie gave a very comforting message 
to the 'bereaved. The pallbearers 
were Messrs. G. Arrowsmith, Jos. 
Staubles, A. n ml P. Muir, M. Hogarth 
and J. F. Collinson. Interment \\n~- 
made in the McNeill Cemetery, Price- 
ville. Mrs. Jones, Mr. Chas. Kyle 
and Mr. and Mrs. John Kyle of 
Haple were in attendance at the 
imeral. 

Miss Agnes McPhail has accepted 
^ position as columnist with the 

lobe and Maili Her articles on 
'arming will appear three times a 
week in that paper. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cameron Smillie 
lave the sympathy of a host of 
riends in the loss of the latter's 
>rother, Mr. A. Burnett, Priceville. 

Mrs. ercy Hunt was in Berkeley 
n Thursday. 

Miss Agnes Macphail, Mrs. Ho- 
;arth, Mrs. Hunt, Miss Lottie Whit- 
nker and Mr. John McWilliam were 
in Toronto on Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. T. Coleman and 
Mary Caroline. . London, spent the 
week end with the former's mother, 
Mrs. H. Coleman and Mr. and Mrs. 
J. F. Collinson and family. 

Miss Catherine Stewart, who has 
completed her training at the G. and 
M. Hospital, Owen Sound was a vis- 
itor at her home here last week. 

Mr.. Jas. Turner, Laurel, is visit- 
ing Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Oliver. 

The monthly meeting of the 
Women's Institute took the form of 
a quilting at the home of Mrs. J. R 
Sinclair, when 16 members and vis- 
itors were present. The meeting 
opened with the singing of O Canada 
followed by a reading by Mrs. Smillie. 
The roll call was answered by giving 
suggestions for making money. $10 
was voted to the Flesherton-Arteme- 
sia Red Cross Society; 70c was added 
to the fuda for the tea, donated by 
Mrs. McMillan. Mrs. Sinclair held 
the lucky ticket on the tea. Miss 
Swanton's contest was worn by Mrs. 
Collinson. The quilt was finished 
that evening and will go to the 
Evacuated Children's Fund 

Mr. John Niched was in To; onto 
last woo.k. 

Mrs. Patsy Ovorton, Toronto, was 
a visitor last week nt the horn 

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KILLED ANYONE 
THIS YEAR? 

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if Of course not but some 
motorist s do and somebody 
pay*. We offer sound insurance 
advice; <puek helpful service. 

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H. W. KERNAHAN 

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Tlesherton, Ont. 

RJCPRKSENTING 

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elected rik* in Automobile, Fire, Plate Glut, Burglar?, 
Public Liability, and other general iiuurance. Head Office, Toronto. 

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Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Oliver. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Doupe of 
Owen Sound spent the first of the 
week with the latter's parents, Mr. 

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and Mrs. Luther Duckett. Little 
Miss Joan returned with them aftei 
spending three weeks with hei 
grandparents. * 

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SPECIAL TRAIN SERVICE 

EASTER SUNDAY, APRIL 13 
Owen Sound FLESHERTON Toronto 

For the convenience of patrons desiring to spend longest 
possible Easter Week-End visit with out-of-town friends and 
be back home at a reasonable hour Sunday night. Special 
Tram will operate Sun., April 13, as follows, making all stops: 

L?. Owen Sound 6.15 p.m. Lv. FLESHERTON 7.00 p.m. 
Ar. Toronto Union 10.45 p.m. All times are Standard. 

Consult Agents or current Time Tables for detailed schedule 
Enquire regarding Low Holiday Fares. 

CANADIAN PACIFIC 

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INSURANCE 

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Authorized agent for 

GERMANIA FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

also All Lines of 

CAR INSURANCE, BONDS, etc!. 

See HERB CORBETT 

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Phone Dundalk 44 r 21 

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Prolongation, Ont. 
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THE FLESHERTON ADVANCE 

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Wednesday, April 9, 1941 

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A 

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MAXWELL 

On Friday evening of this week 
there will be a Good Friday service 
in the United Church here, to bt 
conducted by Rev. Dr. Mercer. 

Kr. and Mrs. Edgar Kerton and Mr. 
Downing: of Kerwood visited with 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Kerton last week. 

The W. A. was held at the home of 
Mrs. Geo. Ross on Thursday of last 
week. Mrs. Geo. Morrison read the 
cripture lesson and in the absence of 
the secu-etary, Mrs. Mercer acted as 
secretary for the meeting. The date 
was set for the strawberry festival 
for June 27th. Arrangements will 
be made for the program later. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Priestely oi 
Owen Sound are visiting relatives 
here. 

We are very sorry to report Mr. 
Norman Mclllmurray under the Dr 
Care, but hope he will soon be im- 
proving in health. 

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Some fight the rest buy certifi- 
cates. 

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SAFE LOCK 
WIRE FENCE 

is best because si ays are flexible, 
not rigid. If accidentally depress- 
ed it springs erect the moment 
pressure is removed with no 
straightening of bent wires. Many 
farmers call it 

Hinge Lock Fence 

Ask your local dealer for it. 
Made only by the 

KEENAN FENCE CO, 

OWEN $OtrND, Om. 

Advertisement of Sale 

Under and by virtue of the powers 
contained in certain mortgage, 
which will be produced at the time 
of sale, there will be offered for 
ale by public auction on Friday, the 
18th day of April, 1941, at the hour 
of 1:00 o'clock, in the aft- moon, 
at Robinson's Store, in the Village 
of Feversham by George E. Duncan, 
Auctioneer, the following property, 
namely: 

Lot 18, Concession 8, north of th 
Durham Road, in the Township of 
Osprey, in the County of Grey, 
containing one hundred acres, in- 
cluding buildings erected thereon. 

Terms: Ten percent of the par- 
chase money to be paid down at 
the time of sale, balanc to be paid 
within te.i days. Subject to reserve 
bid. 

For further particulars and con- 
ditions of sale arply to Robert 
S- Johnston, Barrister, 211 Imperial 
Building:, Hamilton, Ontario. 

Dated at Hamilton, the 29th day 
of March, 1941. 

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CENTRE LINE 

Not much news this Monday morn- 
ing as we are sort of blocked in here 
soft snow banks. a nd bare flats. Ev- 
en walking is bad except early in the 
morning. But we have had some nice 
spring days and the snow is melting 
fast. Some of the boys ai-p getting 
anxious to see the road open for cars. 
Our Mail Carriers started coming in 
the morning, even then he can't get 
here every day. 

Mr. Wm. Collins spent a couple ol 
days last week with W. H. Little and 
family. 

Mrs. G. Little and Mrs. T. Lyons 
spent a day last week with Mr. and 
Mrs. Russel White, Saugeen Jet. 

Mr. Alex Kendrich lost a good cow 
one day last week. 

The (West) Centre Line Red Cross 
group are quilting another quilt to- 
day at the home of Mrs. Gilbert 
Little. 

Our Minister, Dr. Mercer, had the 
misfortune to sprain his ankle 
severely on Sunday while walking 
from Mt. Zion to Wareham. 

(Intended for Last Week) 

Nice spring days but the snow is 
not going very fast. 

Miss Marjorie Jamieson of Tor- 
onto visited with Mrs. Florence 
Lyons and family over the week end. 

Mrs. Jack Badgerow and Inez and 
Mrs. Mac Cudmore and baby Ken- 
neth spent a few days with their 
parents Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Osborne 
and brothers John and Victor over 
the week end. 

Ptes. Victor Oaborne and Joseph 
Little left Sunday evening for Camp 
Borden after a pleasant 6 day leave 
spent with friends here. On Friday 
evening a large number of well wish- 
ers gathered at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Gilbert Little to spend another 
evening with our soldier boys, Joe 
and Victor, before their return to 
camp. 

Mrs. Jack Hargrave and Gordon 
spent Friday afternoon last (with 
Pte. Victor Osborne at his home here. 

The Wareham Red Cross Society 
met in the church basement last 
Thursday and quilted two quilts. 
They decided to hold their meeting 
monthly now for some time. The 
Centre Line (West) group quilted 
a quilt at the home of Mrs. Eva Arn- 
ott on Monday afternoon of last week 
and have a couple more ready to 
quilt. 

Mr. Robt. Nichols has gone to Tor- 
onto for a couple of weeks to visit 
with friends there. 

The Mount Zion W. A. which was 
to be held at Mrs. Robt. Osborne's 
home this month will be held at 
the home of Mrs. Jas. Hopps Portlaw. 

The May meeting will be held at 
Mrs. Osborne's. 

Pte. Victor Osborne, John and 
Garfield Lyons, visited on Saturday 
with friends at Clarksburg. 

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Owing to unforeseen circumstances we regret 
to announce that the Display and Sale of 
Ladies' Coats, Dresses and Millinery by 
Wray's Ladies' Wear of Owtn Sound, adver- 
tised to take place on Wednesday, 9th inst., 
has been postponed for a few days. 
Furthe announcement later. 

F. H. W. Hickling 

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General Merchant 

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FLESHERTON 

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4. 

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Meat Storage 

WE FEEL THAT WE WOULD NOT BE FAIR TO 

YOU IF WE DID NOT AGAIN REMIND YOU OF 

THE COLD STORAGE FACILITIES. 

A $5.00 box for a year will hold approximately 
220 to 250 lb. meat and you may refill the bojc 
often as you wish. You may also place meat in 
storage at th rate of I 1 2 c per Ib. 

NOW IS THE TIME THAT THE STORING 
, OF MEAT SHOULD BE IN FULL 
: PROGRESS. 

Call in to see us about the storage. 

Flesherton Creamery & Produce Co. 

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Phone C6 Angus*Avis, Manager | 

X'*^><*><^^ 

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EUGENIA 

Service will be held in the United 
Church here at 11 o'clock a.m. Good 
Friday. 

On Wednesday evening, March 26, 
at the Y. P. U. meeting, Mrs. C. 
Martin had charge of the discussion 
peridd. She took for her topic a talk 
on "African People".. On April 2, 
Miss Edith Betts took as her discus- 
sion topic "Spring". The meeting 
this Wednesday evening is in charge 
of the citizenship convenors Doro- 
thy Falconer and Jean Proctor. 

Pte. Jack Traynor of Camp Bord- 
en was a week end visitor with the 
McMillan family and Mrs. Wilson. 

Pte. Allen Love of Camp Borden 
was a week end visitor with friends 
in the village. 

The Misses Mary and Isofoel Mc- 
Kee and Mr. McArthur of Toronto 
spent the week end at the former 1 !! 
home here. 

Mr. Roy McMillan of Oakvilk 
spent the past week with his family. 

Pte. Clarence Williams of the 2nd 
Batt. Queen's Own Rifles, Toronto 
and brother Joe, also Pte. Norman 
Williams of the Tank Corps, Camp 
Borden, visited over the week end 
with friends in the village. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Wood and Mr. 
W. Love of Markdale were callers at 
the Martin home one day recently. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Lawler have 
moved back to their farm again from 
Flesherton. 

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PRICEVILLE 

The play "Crazy to Reduce" was 
presented by the ladies of St. An- 
drew's Church, Friday night, in the 
basement. A good sized audience en- 
joyed the play. Each character play 
his part well 

Mrs. Elizabeth Haw of Brampton 
spent a few days visiting her sister, 
Mrs. Jim Sturrock. Gordon Stur- 
rock, who spent some weeks in the 
Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, 
returned home feeling much better. 

Sympathy is extended to Mrs. Wm. 
Burnett and family in the death ot 
Mr. Burnett, whose funeral took place 
at his late residence on Monday 
afternoon. 

We are glad to report Mrs. Archie 
McKechnie and son Laurie improving 
after being sick with pneumonia. 
Miss Marjorie McLeod, Durham, was 
nursing them. 

All were very sorry to hear of Dr. 
Milne's illness and wish for hjm a 
speedy recovery. 

Miss Kathleen M'eArthur has gone 
to Hamilton, where she has secured 
work. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Me Art In 
Collingwood, spent the week end at 
the home of Mr. D. L. McArthur. 

Mr. David Hincks returned home 
after spending a week with his 
daughter at Atwood. 

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Auction Sale 

FARM STOCK, IMPLEMENTS, Etc. 

MRS. ALEX. CARRUTHERS 

will sell by public auction on 
LOT 26, CON. 14, ARTEMESIA 
(2% miles south of Kimberley) 

TUESDAY, APRIL 15, 1941 

when the following will be offered: 
HORSES, SHEEP, Etc. Team of 
Horses, Mares, 10 and 12 years; Year 
old Oxford Down Ram, eligible for 
registration; 7 Pigs, 3 months old; 
Brood Sow, due June 18; 16 Ewes, 
Number of Hens. 

CATTLE RedCow, calf at foot; 
Grey Sow, 6 years old, due April 1 : 
Black Cow, 5 years, due March 24; 
Blue Cow, 3 years, supposed due Jan. 
9; Heifer, 2 years, due April 15th; 
Yearling Heifer; Yearling n teer. 

IMPLEMENTS, Etc. F. & W. 
Binder, with trucks; P. H. Mower, 6 
foot cut; Buggy; Hny Rake; Culti- 
vator; Mnd Roller; Road Cart; Seed 
Drill; Cutter; Set of Discs' 3 Single 
burrow Plows; Hay Rack; 2-Furrow 
Plow; 2 Wagons; Set Heavy Sleighs; 
Fanning Mill; Set Light Sleighs; Set 
2,000 Scales; Stoneboat; Wagon Bo>: 
and Stock Rack; Cycle Grinder; Root 
Pulper; Drag Harrows; 2 Canthooks; 
Logging Chains; Jacks; Crowbars; 
Wire Stretchers; Binder Tongues; 
Hay Fork; Anvil;. Pick; Scales 60-lb.; 
Incubator, 130 egg; Shovels; Melotte 
Cream Separator, new last Sept.; 
Root Scuffler; Hoes; Quantity of Hay 
and Grain; Numerous other articles. 
FURNITURE Piano; Kitchen 
Table; 2 Iron Beds and Springs; 1900 
Gravity Washer* Studio Couch; Coal 
Oil Stove with Oven; Rocking Chair; 
Fruit Jars; Numerous other house- 
hold articles. 

SAfcE AT 1.00 P.M. SHARP 
Positively no -reserve; as the owner 

is giving up farming. 
TERMS Hay, Grain and all 
of $10 and under, cash; over tha 
amount 6 months' credit will he givi-i 
on notes approved by t the Csmadiai 
Bank of Commerce, Flesherton, bear 
\ng interest at G' ; I . 

GEO. E. DUNCAN. Auctions. 

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Have y&u Been Overlooked? 

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LET'S MAKE IT A 

WHIRLWIND FINISH! 

("The Boys Rely on the Folks Back Home") 

---- column ----

Thousands of firms and individuals, 
in all parts of Canada, have respond- 
ed magnificently to this Six-in-One 
Appeal. But there are other 
thousands equally ready to help. 
You may be one who has still to be 
heard from. 

This is an appeal to every Cana- 
dian who has been overlooked. W 
wish for every Canadian, at home, 
an opportunity to support our men 
in uniform. The Fund is now well 
on the way to its objective. That 
objective definitely can be reached, 
probably exceeded. 

For the sake of "The Boys", let's 
finish it with a bang that will raise 
resounding cheers from Coast to 
Coast! 

How You Can Help 

If you have not yet been called on 
by a War Services worker, and if 
yon have not yet sent in your sub- 
scription, make up your mind NOW 
what you are going to do, and do 
it TO-DAY! Fill in the coupon 
below and mail it to your' Provin- 
cial Headquarters at the address 

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shown. If you know of some friends 
who have also been overlooked, get 

them to do the same. 

. 

The form is self-explanatory; 
Simply check on the left in the 
appropriate place, and if you enclose 
a remittance, make it payable to 
Canadian War Services Fund. An 
official receipt will be sent you by 
return mail. 

Every Dollar Does its Job 

Remember all monies contributed 
to the Canadian War Services Fund 
will be divided in accordance with 
government-approved budgets, 
amongst the six organizations em- 
braced in this campaign. 

A non-profit corporation with let- 
ters patent from the Dominion 
Government is your guarantee that 
every dollar that you subscribe will 
be properly applied to provide com- 
fort, cheer, recreation and needed 
personal services to our fighting 
forces services not provided in any 
other way. 

Your contribution ft urgently 
needvdl 

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MAIL THIS COUPON TODAYI 

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Provincial Headquarters, - 

Canadian War Services Fund, 

Room 101, 200 Bay St. Toronto, Ont. 

{Cheque 1 
Money OrderV for... as my contribution to your Fuodl 
Postal note ' 

Q Please send me in duplicate official pledge card providing for instalment payments, which I 
undertake to complete and return, subscribing all told the sum of.. .......................... 

Name (Mr., Mrs., or Miss) 

Street Address ............................................... 

City, Town, Village or R.R 

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Telephone (if you have one) 

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THE ONLY NATIONAL APPEAL 
FOR OUR MEN IN UNIFORM 

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VANDELEUR 

The March meeting of the Woman's 
nstitute wa.-i held at the home of Mrs 
:has. Boland on March 27th. The 
.'resident, Mr*. Geo. Shuw presided 
jnd there was a good attendance of 
ncmbers. Mrs. F.R. Boland gave a 
juper on "History of Vandeleur 
Church^ past and present". Miss 
Dora Boland conducted a contest and 
was won by Dorothy Kelsot and Mrs. 
Geo. Shaw. Five young ladies wert 
ippointed to get donations for war 
purposes. Lunch was served by the 
hostess, assisted by Mrs. Geo. Shaw. 

Mrs. Will Johnston was hostess 'o 
the Woman's Association on Wednes- 
day, April 2nd. The president, Mrs 
Geo. Buchanan, presided over a well 
attended meeting and a fine progran 
was provided. 

Mr. Will Bowles of the West Back 
Line is moving his property to the 
Warling farm which he recently pur 
chased. 

Misses Hazel Morrison and Dor 
Bnlnnd spent a day in Owen Sound. 

Week end visitors with Mr. an 
Mrs. Jim Cargoc were Misses Jea 
and Verda Careroe of Toronto an 
Pte. Will BurreU of Camp Borden, 

Mr. W. G. Hutehinpon is having 

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sale on Thursday afternoon of this 
.veek. 

Mr. John Boland of Weston was a 
ecent visitor at his home here. 

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THEY'LL NEVER QUIT 

In Philadelphia 30 members of a 

orpedoud British ciirgo ship are 

'ready to go to sea again." One of 

hem, named McKillop, has been 

li rough three sinkings. Said he to 

he reporters: "It's a rotten feeling. 

But it won't stop me from going to 

sen again. I'm ready now." 

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The export of eggs from Canada 
to Britain is reported high. It is 
to be hoped the eggs are not HI that 
condition. 

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Auction Sale 

FARM STOCK, IMPLEMENTS, Etc 

WM. G. HUTCHINSON 

will sell by public auction on 

M. 'o of Lot 21, Con. 13 Artemesh 

About '4 mile north of Vandeleur 

THURSDAY, APRIL 10th 

whpn the following will bn offered: 
Horses 1 horse, 15 years eld: 

! Mare. 
Cuttle Durham Cow, 10 venrs 

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Id; Durham Cow, 3 years old; Dur- 
um Cow. 5 years old; Holstien Cow, 
! years old; Black Cow, 6 years old; 
Spottced Cow, 5 years old; Steer 
rising 1; 2 Steers rising 2; 3 Heifers, 
isinj? 1; Baby Beef, 6 months old; 
Vged Cow, due date of sale. 

Swine - Yorkshire Brood Sow, 
luc May 13; 5 Chunks, around lOOlb. 
Implements, Etc. M. H. Mower; 

10 ft. steel hay rake; No. 21 Fleury 
plough; 12 plate disc harrows; set 
iron harrows; wagon; buggy; light 
sleigh; stone boat; ladder; M.-H. root 
pulper; hay rack; double harness; 2 
almost new collars; Perfection coal 

011 heater; 12 grain bags; number 
sacks: small Vega cream separator; 
metal churn; butter bowl and ladel; 
graduated cream can and numerous 
other small articles. 

TERMS OF SALE 
All sums of 10.00 and under, cash; 
over that amount 6 months credit 
will be given on furnishing approved 
jomt notes, with interest at 8 per 
cent per annum. 

GEO. E. DUNCAN, Auctioneer 
Sale to commence at 1.00 p.m. 
NOTE: Roads open for cars from 
Fi,'-hcrt.on via Eujrcr'a to Power; 
of sale M hill 3 little west f 
.,,.., i| .,o. 
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i 
t\ 

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SUNDAY 

SCHOOL 

LESSON 

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THE TRIUMPHAL ENTRY 
Luke 19: 28-40 

GOLDEN TEXT Ble*ed . he 
tlut comth in the name of the 
Lord. Mark 11:9. 
THE LESSON IN ITS SETTING 

Time Sunday, April 2, A.D. 
30. 

Place The Western slope of 
the Mount of Olivet;, opposite the 
erty of Jerusalem. 

Lt Journey to Jerusalem 

Luke 19:28. "And when he had 
thus spoken, he went before, go- 
ing up to Jerusalem. 29. And it 
came to pass, when he drew- nigh 
unto Bethphage and Bethany, at 
the mount that ia called Olivet, 
he sent two of the disciples." The 
order of events was probably ai 
follows: Jesus left Jericho on the 
morning and reached Bethany on 
the evening of Friday. There He 
remained with the Twelve, our 
Lord doubtless being with Lazar- 
us and his sisters. The next day, 
Sabbath (our Saturday), He spent 
in quiet at Bethany. In the eve- 
ning He was at supper in the 
house of Simon the leper, liii 
disciples, with Lazarus and his 
istn>. being present. At this 
feast he was anointed by Mary. 
During the afternoon, Jews of 
JIM limit m, who had heard from 
pilgrim?- of His arrival, went out 
to see Him and Lazarus. This 
coming to the ears of the chief 
priests, a meeting of the council 
was held at night to consider the 
propriety of putting both Jesus 
and Lazarus to death. On the 
morrow (Sunday) the narrative of 
Luke resumes. 

To Fetch a Colt 

30. "Saying, Go your way into 
the village over against you; in 
which as ye enter ye shall find a 
colt tied, whereon no man ever 
yet sat: loose him, and bring him. 
31. And if any one aik you, Why 
d.. ye loose him? thus shall ye 
say, The Lord hath need of him." 
The sending of the two disciples 
proves the deliberate intention of 
Jesus to give a certain solemnity 
to this scene. He wished to show 
Himself at least once as King 
Messiah to His people. He knew 
that in any case death awaited 
Him in the capital. 32. "And 
they that were sent went away, 
and found even as he had aid 
unto them. 33. And as they were 
loosing the colt, the owners there- 
of isid unto them, Why loose ye 
the colt? 34. And they said, The 
Lord hath need of him." The 
disciples' faith was splendid in the 
hour of miracle, when in the name 
f Jesus they were might; but it 
waw not less splendid in this un- 
noticed hour, when they were sent 
to fetch the ass from Bethphage. 
Acclamation of the Multitude 

36. "And they brought him to 
Jesus: and they threw their gar- 
ments upon the colt, and set 
Jesus thereon. 36. And as they 
went they spread their garments 
fa the way." The companies of 
pilgrims from the_vnrious towns 
nd districts of Palestine, or from 
Jewish settlements abroad, were 
wont to make public entries into 
the city before the great feasts. 
fiin h sn entry Jesus would make, 
Himself its central .figure. It 
would* be a day of joy and glad- 
new to Him and to others, as when 
a king enters on his kingdom. He 
would no longer check the popular 
feeling in His favour. His last 
entry to the Holy City, at the 
Feast of Tabernacles, had been 
designedly secret; but this should 
be in exact contrast, for He knew 
that His kingly work was now 
ver, so far as it could, for the 
time, be completed, and the en- 
thusiasm of willing consecration 
to death, as His path to eternal 
triumph, filled Him with a serene 
and victorious joy. Misconception 
f His claim would be impossible, 
In honest minds, in the face of 
facts. Israel should now see Him 
<ome openly, as 'He, who alone, if 
they frankly accepted Him, could 
eewc them, by leading them as a 
ation, to true repentance and a 
higher spiritual life. He knew be- 
forehand, that they would not; 
fcnt His work could not be said to 
i completely ended till He had 
sjiven them and their leaders this 
Jaet public opportunity. 

Hitherto He had entered the 
Holy City on foot; this day, like 
David ami the Judges of Israel, 
he would ride nn an ass, the an- 
cient symbol of Jewish royalty. 
HI. ..<.! ! the Kins;'' 

37. "And as he was now draw- 
ing nigh, even at the descent of 
the mount of Olives, the whole 
multitude of the disciples began 
to rejoice and praise God with a 
loud voice for all the mighty 
works which they had socn; 38. 
Saying, Blessed is the King that 
eometh in the name of the Lord: 
peace in heaven, and glory in the 
highest." These cries clearly re- 
cognized Jesus as the Messiah. The 
Psalms from which they come 
were nung at the Passover and at 
the Feast of Tabernacles, and 
hence were familiar to the people. 

The Phariiee* Rebuked 
39. "And some of the Pharisees 
from the multitude said unto him, 
Teacher, rebuke thy disciples. 40. 

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Pup's Protection 

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This big kenuel doesn't appear 
to be much of an air-raid shelter 
for tiny pooch somewhere in 
England. Maybe he'll crawl un- 
der the helmet 

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And he answered and said, I tell 
you that, if these shall hold their 
peace, the stones will cry out." 
Jesus and His disciples were un- 
der the ban of the hierarchy. The 
Sanhedrin had issued a decree 
that, if anyone knew where He 
was, he should give information, 
that they might arrest Him. And 
yet, here are His disciples bring- 
ing Him in triumph into Jerusa- 
lem and the populace enthusiasti- 
cally joining with them. The 
Pharisees were horrified. Never 
before had they witnessed such a 
demonstration. They saw no way 
to stop what to their ears was 
blasphemous) praise of Jesus, ex- 
cept an appeal to Jgus himself 
that he rebuke this enthusiasm. 
His answer stunned them. 

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Gardening . . . 

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ARTICLE No. 6 

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Shrubs, trees and perennial 
flowers have a fearful habit of 
taking up more room when grown 
up than the average gardener an- 
ticipated. Generally speaking, 
when setting out such thing!, al- 
low half as much space between, 
und away from fences or walls, 
as the natural heights for these 
plant* in the catalogue. Thni the 
most common type of 8nirea, the 
Van Houttei, which reaches a full 
height of from six to eight feet 
in most parts of Canada, should 
fas planted from three to four feet 
apart or the same distance from 
walk, wall or fence, for decora- 
tive effect. For a hedge, however, 
it may be planted closer. 

Again the common peony, which 
grows to a height of two and a 
ha!f feet when full grown, should 
have about 18 inches between 
plants. 

Have Vegetables Hand? 

In the kitchen garden, at the 
d'.or, it is advisable of course to 
keep a plentiful supply of salad 
material like leaf and head let- 
tuce, onions and, possibly, celery. 
The latter is set out in the gar- 
den as well started plants usually 
after all danger of frost is over. 

For vegetable rows, there are 
small cultivators pushed by hand 
which will cultivate a plot 100 by 
ISO in well under an hour and 
these can be procured in larger 
size for horse or tractor. 
For Cut Flowert 

If a supply of cut flowers is 
wanted for the table, blooms with 
long stems that will keep well In 
water, horticultural authorities 
urge the planting of sweet pca., 
snapdragons, cosmos, zinnias, lu- 
pine, African Marigolds, scabiosis, 
asters, tingle and double, verbena 
and salpiglosis. If preferred these 
can be grown in rows in the vege- 
table garden. 

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Coffin Rider 

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Near Barcelona, Spain, a pea- 
sant hitched a ride on a truck 
carrying an empty coffin. As it 
was raining, he crawled inside the 
toffin. Soon, the truck took two 
more passengers aboard. As they 
drove on, the peasant raised the 
.Id, ejaculated: "It's stopped 
raining." Over the sido went the 
other riders in terror. One was 
killed, the second badly hurt. 

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Easter Island 

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There lies lone isle in the tropic seas, 

A mountain isle, with beaches shining white, 
Where soft stars smile upon its sleep by night, 

And every noonday fans it with a breeze. 

Here on a cliff, carved upward from the knees, 
Three uncouth statues of gigantic height, 
Upon whose brows t!ie circling sea-birds light, 

Stare out to ocean ovtr the tall trees. 

For ever gaze they at the sea and sky, 

For ever hear the thunder, of the main. 

For ever watch the ages die awny; 
And ever round them rings the phantom cry 

Of iome loat race that died in human pain, 

Looking towards heaven, yet seeing no more than they. 

Frederick George Scott. 

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Saving Ontario's 

Naturai 
Resources 

---- column ----

G. C. Toner 

Ontario Federation of Angler* 

nd Hunter* 

(No. 37) 

---- column ----

MAINTAIN FISH STOCKS 
One of the functions of the 
Department of Game and Fisher- 
ies is the maintenance of a stock 
of fish in our lakes and rivers. 
I am going to quote Mr. H. H. 
MacKay, Biologist of the Depart- 
ment, on this subject, for he 
knos more about fish culture and 
fish stocking than any other man 
in Ontario. Mr. MacKay has full 
charge of all the hatcheries in 
Ontario and with his assistant, Mr. 
A. H. Warner, looks after the 
scientific side of the Department's 
program. 

Quoting from an article written 
by Mr. MacKay: "A restocking 
policy must be followed by regu- 
lation, conservation and main- 
tainence of the fish supply, con- 
sistent with the demands made 
upon H. The ways and means by 
which the Department are endea- 
vouring to realize these objec- 
tives are by means of fish culture, 
legislation, research and the edu- 
cation of i tit- public." 

Preirve Natural Conditions 

"The raising of young fish in 
our Government hatcheries will 
not improve fishing unles* the 
water in the streams and lakes 
into which thete little fish are 
planted, i suitable for them. 
Many streams which formerly 
supported trout will no longer do 
so and to plant young fieh in such 
waters is pure waste. Angler* 

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must therefore work for the pre- 
servation of natural conditions in 
the lakes and streams of our 
Province if the splendid efforts 
which the Government is making 
to restock depleted waters is to 
be of any avail." 

"Prevention of pollution is one 
of the first essentials in the main- 
tenance of natural conditions in 
our streams. Anglers should bring 
to the attention of the Govern- 
ment every case of suspected pol- 
lution. The next essential is the 
maintenance of a uniform stream 
flow. In cleared and deforested 
areas the melting snows in sp'-ing 
cause floods and summer droughts 
both destructive to fish life." 

"Of course, we cannot reforest 
our agricultural areas for the sake 
of having a steady flow of waters 
in our streams, but anglers should 
take an active interest in the re- 
forestation of waste lands. They 
also should take an interest in 
preventing the drainage of swamps 
and the deforeststioa of areas 
about the head waten of our 
river systems." 

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The Book Shelf 

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"RANDOM HARVEST" 

By James Hilton 
The author of tbe celebrated 
"Good-bye, Mr. Ohlpt!" has jut 
written hi* first full-length novel 
in seven years. And it is topping 
the best-sllr itais all over the 
continent. 

"Random Harvest'' te Uie'story of 
a man who was. The setting te 
England; the ti:n- the yea-re be- 
fore the present war. That's a/H 
we're going to tell you about th 
contents of the* book, so that you, 
M reader, may enjoy the full pleas- 
ure of discovering Mr. Hilton's 
touching tore tale and magic story- 
telling for yourself. Suffice it heve 
to say that the i ' ,,,. KK greater 

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RADIO REPORTER 

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By DAVE ROBBINS 

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GOOD FRIDAY MUSIC 

"The walls, windows and col- 
umns of the church were hung 
with black cloth and only one 
large lamp, hanging in the centre, 
lighted the solemn and religious 
gloom . . ." This is the setting 
in which Haydn's great oratorio 
"The Seven Words of the Saviour 
from the Cross" was first per- 
formed in the Cathedral at Cadiz, 
in 1786. 

Thl* work, which will be heard 
on the CBO National Network 
from 9.00 to 10.00 p.m. daylight 
tune on Friday, April 11, will be 
the climax of the religious broad- 
casts scheduled for Holy Week. 
A Fifty-piece orchestra directed 
by Jean-Marie Beaudet, with 
soloist* and a choir led by Victor 
Riault, will take part in the pre- 
sentation. 

* * 

"FORTUNE TIME" 

Then from CKOC comes * new 
radio game and it gives good 
prizes too. It's Fortune Time, a 
program that Is heard every Tues- 
day and Friday at one o'clock 
from 1160 on the dial. 

Fortune Time Is entirely new 
as an air game for everyone can 
win prizes, and them are no ques- 
tion.", rhymes or what-not to get 
in the winning column. 

Dial In either Tuesday or Fri- 
day at noon, and watch the wheels 
of fortune spin out the winners 1 


AROUND THE DIAL 

Joan Edwards, Girl About 
Town, is a fine new feature on 
CPRB each Monday and Wednes- 
day nights at' 11. 30. 'Tune in this 
exciting lass and do the town with 
her. 

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Diversion of an NBC sound- 
effects man is playing recordings 
of. African cannibal drummers 
simultaneously with hot Tommy 
Dorsey or Benny Goodman num- 
ber. They blend perfectly he 
says. 

---- column ----

Radio Slants: Crane Wilbur, 
producer of the Edward G. Rob- 
inson "Big Town" program over 
CBS, was in England shortly be- 
fore the start of World War II 
and paid a visit to old friends hi 
Cornwall. There, in a local "pub," 
he came face to face with a re- 
minder of earlier days when he 
was an actor in London a dusty 
portrait of himself which bore the 
legend: "The King of the Theatre 
World" . . . Time is turning back- 
ward for radio actor Marvin 
Mueller. He played his first radio 
character a man 60 years old 
when he was 19, and since then 
his parts have been getting young- 
er. Now he plays the youthful but 
hard-boiled Sergeant Monihan in 
"Dear Mom" . . . Popular tune 
"Cathedral in the Pines" sounds 
an awful lot like "The Old Rugged 
Cross"; play 'em together your- 
self sometime . . , Comedian Bob 
Hope threw a big "Wild West" 
party for a bunch of British re- 
fugee children living in or near 
Hollywood . . . Benny Goodman 
broke down and named Artie 
Shaw's recording of "Dr. Living- 
stone I Presume" the waxing of 
the month; Shaw is Goodman's 
chief rival . . . Radio and movie 
actor John Barrymore is 89; 
Konald Colman is ?>0. 

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Interest and suspense than did that 
ot "Lost Horizon." Its leading char- 
acter* are as appealing as Mr. 
OLIps himself. 

"Random Harvest" ... by James 
Hilton . . . Toronto: McClelland 
& Stewart . . . $2.76. * 

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"America is still in a medieval 
state of mind about the place of 
women." Pearl Buck. 

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Cravats of Fiahskin 

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Xeckties made from^the skin of 
sea salmon are the latest style in- 
novation in Germany. The mater- 
ial is available in twenty-four col- 
ors. The advantage claimed, in 
addition to saving on Cotton, silk 
and wool, is that the ties do not 
become soiled easily. 

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THIS CURIOUS WORLD 

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By William 
Ferguson 

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vesuvius, 

PRECEDING 

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ERUPTION 
1*531, 
DURJNK3 WHICH 

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WERE KILLED, 
HAD 

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CkOVO 

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O= 

THE ATTECINAME, 

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IS THE STUDV OF 

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ANSWER: Hie study of trees and shrubs. 

Vesuvius is estimated to be at least 10,000 years old, .-.IK! there to 
nothing In iU history that suggests that it is on the wne, since 
ne of its greatest eruptions was in 1906. 

How many oeMS arc there? __ 

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BREAKFAST FRUIT 

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HORIZONTAL 

1 Pictured 
fruit used 
for food 
and Juice. 

7 Frolic. 

11 Conscious. 

12 Its tree has 
hard yellow 

13 Nights 
before. 

14 Secular. 

16 Waistcoats. 

18 African 
tribe. 

19 Ye. 

21 Either. 

22 Gypsy. 

25 To bare the 

head. 

28 Be stilll 
30 Chalices 
32 Rabbit. 

34 Shower 

35 Era 

38 Slovak 

39 Measure of 
length. 

40 Peasant. 
41. Skirt edge. 

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Answer to Previous Puzzle 

---- column ----

43 Exclamation. 

44 Steering 
apparatus. 

45 Coins. 
47 Baseball 

teams. 

60 To do wrong. 
52 Staff 

officers. 
C3 Cloak. 

56 Field. 

57 Toward sea. 

58 In botany it 
is classed as 

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59 Its rind 

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yields 

60 Its blossom 
is . 

VERTICAL 

2 To be furious. 

3 Inspires 
reverence. 

4 Disgusting. 

5 Grain. 

6 Ever. 

7 Southwest. 

8 Pertaining 
to poles. 

9 Chestnut 
horse. 

---- column ----

10 To redact v 
13 Its tree is 

in type, 

15 It is a widely 

d fruit. 

17 Spirit. 

18 NortfTeast 
wind. 

20 To open a 
letter, 

23 Verbal. 

24 Correspond* 
ence. 

26 Indian. 

27 Anesthetic. 

28 Tissufr 3 
29 U.S. State. 
31 Within. 

33 Postscript. 

36 Grapefruit 

37 Sung in 
chorus 

40 Fretful . 
42 Parrot 
44 To listen 
46 Girdle, 

48 Frozejh water 

49 Neither 

51 Portuguese 
coin 

53 The gftds 

54 Rodent. 

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POP Geographically Speaking 

---- column ----

By J. MILLAR WATT 

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WMAT COUNTRY IS THERE 
TO TOUCH 
ENGLAND 

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I.:.. '..1 hi Tllf P,!i ::.*< IM.I^ 

---- column ----

-THERE'S 

SCOTLAND 

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'' 

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They Know Mountain Fighting, Too 

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Hitler's boys did some historic mountain fighting in Norway, but if 
they try it against Yugoslavia they'll run into the "komitadjis," famed 
for centuries for their mountain warfare. Expert sharpshooters, the 
fearless komitadjis have never been dislodged from their mountains. 
Here are some of them in festive dress. 

---- column ----

How Con I? 

BY ANNE ASHLEY 

Q. How can I remove white 
spots on furniture caused by hot 
dishes or water? 

A. Rub the spots with a mix- 
ture of machine oil and soda. 

Q. -How can I make a satis- 
factory emergency glue? 

A. Soak some tapioca in warm 
water. This will prove a very sat- 
isfactory glue or paste. 

Q. How can I remedy the loud 
ticking of a bedroom clock? 

A. Place a glass container of 
aome kind over the clock. It can 
th^n be seen without being heard. 

Q. How can I make steak more 
tender? 

A. A tough steak can be made 
more tender by rubbing with a 
piece of lemon and then with 
olive oil. 

Q. Is it advisable to beat rugs 
nd carpets when cleaning them? 

A. Rug manufacturers advise 
against this, as beating causes 
the threads to weaken and break. 
Instead, use a carpet sweeper 
daily and a vacuum cleaner once 
a week, and beating will not be 
necessary. 

Q. How can I clean a velvet 
piano cover? 

A. Brunh well ; then sponge 
with a weak solution of benzine or 
borax. Dry thoroughly and then 
brush the pile the right way. 

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Nazis Fear Flank Attack 

---- column ----

Modern 
Etiquette 

BY ROBERTA LEE 

---- column ----

A real threat to German drive 
south is sure to result from Yugo- 
slav position . . , Nation has best 
rmy in Balkans, could throw 
million men, fairly well trained 
but poorly equipped, in flank at- 
tack against extended German 
supply line. 

---- column ----

1. When a young man meet* 
a girl on the street and stops to 
talk, shouldn't ha remove his hat 
and hold it in his hand as long as 
he talks? 

2. When giving a formal din- 
ner, should the carving be done 
at the table? 

3. Shouldn't a call of condol- 
ence be returned? 

1. Is it necessary to repeat tha 
person's name when being intro- 
duced? 

5. Is ic necessary to have a 
train on a white satin wedding 
dress? 

(i. Is it all right to use ruled 
paper for social correspondence? 

' Answer* 

1. It isn't necessary for him to 
hold his hat longer than a minute, 
and not at all if the weather is 
disagreeable. He should of course 
lift it when meeting the girl, and 
again when leaving. It wouHd be 
presumptuous for a grl to expect 
a man to stand bareheaded in a 
snow storm or rain. 2. No; it 
should be done in the kitchen. At 
an informal dinner tha carving 
may be done at the table. 3. No; 
it is not required and certainly 
should not be expected. !'. No. 
"How do you do" is sufficient. 5. 
The dress may be made with or 
without a train, depending upon 
the formality of the wedding. 6. 
No; if there is trouble in writing 
a straight line; buy the black- 
ruled paper which fits under the 
notcpaper and envelopes. These 
are called "guides" and can be 
purchased in any stationery store. 

---- column ----

Flies High for Science 

Ordinarily most conservative in 
the altitudes at which its aircraft 
fly, Trans-Canada Lines went 
"stratosphere" at Montreal re- 
cently and sent one of its ships 
up to 22,600 feet. The ascent 
to more than the four milo level 
was in the causa of science, to 
test a stratosphere-type military 
flying suit. 

---- column ----

CREAM 

Since March 13, we have paid 
4lc for Xo. 1 cream delivered 
to Toronto. 

DAILY PAYMENTS 
Write for Cans 

Toronto Creamery 

hraiu'h of 
4 nl U-tl i ni NUT** <'o-|K*rtlve 

< .... Ltd. 

i'or. Duke .V < .. ..i x.-" Sift., 
Toronto 

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GROWN IN SUNNY, SOOTHER 

---- column ----

RIO 

---- column ----

HAVE 
YOU HEARD? 

---- column ----

A bachelor, whose landlady was 
supposed to mend his clothes, 
grew tired of finding his pyjamas 
always without buttons. 

In despair he pierced the lid of 
a cocoa tin and sewed it to his 
pyjama jacket as a hint. 

When the jacket was returned, 
ha found the lid still there, and 
opposite it a buttonhole of equal 
size! 

---- column ----

Movie Star: "I've decided 
to demand a new trial." 

Interviewer: "But why? 
You won the cae." 

Movie Star: "1 know, but 
I'm not satisfied with the 
publicity." 

---- column ----

The business man locked blue. 
He walked round the office with 
an extremely worried face. 

"What's wrong with you?" 
asked his associate. "Family 
trouble?" 

The other paced tin luxurious 
room nervously. 

"No," he replied, "it isn't that. 
It's something: else and I just 
can't explain it." 

His associate lighted a big ci- 
gar. 

"Stop talking nonsense, man," 
he advised. "Why, you're sitting 
on top of the world. For the 
past fifteen years, without fail, 
you've been drawing five thousand 
year, and " 

"Now you've hit it," interrupt- 
ed the other. "That's just what'* 
worrying me. A twenty-five thou- 
sand a year income for the past 
fifteen years." Ha rubbed hii 
weary forehead. "Don't you see 
how terrible it is?" he went on 
excitedly. "I'm in a rut!" 

Betty: "Your new overcoat 
ii pretty loud, isn't it?" 

Billy: "Yeah, but I'm gonna 
buy a muffler to go with it." 

---- column ----

First Little Girl: "I have two 
brothers and one sister." 

Second Littla Girl: "I hava two 
sisters and one brother." 

Third Little Girl: "I liava no 
brothers and no sisters, but I have 
two papas by my first mama and 
three manias by my second papa." 

Bean Drying 
Is Successful 

Testa Undertaken By On- 
tario Dept. of Agriculture 
Will Help Dispose of Bean 
Surplus In Province 

W. R. Reok, deputy minister of 
agriculture, has announced that the 
experimeut In ban drying which 
was conducted by the Ontario Gov- 
ernment had proved a success. 
Last week the problem confroutlng 
the growers \v;<3 to get their bean* 
to some centra! poiiit where the 
drying could be done without da- 
lay. 

Thousands of btlshels of b&aiis In 
storage in Western Ontario were 
threatened, \vliou excessive mois- 
ture was (Ii.*co>"ered. The crop has 
to be dried within the next month 
if it to to be prevented from rot- 
ting. 

Government oi't'iciai* uava met 
with re[n-?6eutaUv9 of the grow- 
ers to i!is-.is the problem of trans- 
porting tlw beans to some central 
point capable of doing tha drying 
quickly and at the san.e time It 
is expected steps will be taken 
to facilitate t!i marketing oE the 
crop. 

---- column ----

HARNESS & COLLARS 

Farmers Attention Consult 
your nearest Harness Shop 
about Staco Harness Supplies. 
We sell our goods only through 
your local Staco Leather 
Goods dealer. The goods are 
right, and so are our prices. 
We manufacture in our fac- 
tories Harness, Horse Col- 
lars, Sweat Pads, Horse Blan- 
kets, and Leather Travelling 
Goods. Insist on Staco Brand 
Trade Marked Goods, and you 
get aatisfactii.n. Made only by: 

SAMUEL TREES CO., LTD. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 

42 Wellington St. E., Toronto 

---- column ----

MOVING 
PACKING 

---- column ----

SHIPPING 
STORING 

---- column ----

Kediiuccl li'jif., Kiirniluru i'uol 

Cars U'iiinlpOK and West 

lo Co;m. 

M. RAWL1NSON, LIMITED 

I'^tnhlishfd IHH"' 
610 YONGE ST. - TORONTO 

---- column ----

38 to 52 yonrs olU. Women who are 
restless, moody. NERVOUS who 
fear hot flashes, dizny spells to tuke 
Lydiu E. Plnl;' .1 i '. ' , Vegetable Com- 
pound. Plnliham's IB famous for 
helping woiueu during these "trying 
times" due to functional Irregulari- 
ties. Get a bottle todny from your 
druggist! WORTH TRYING! 

---- column ----

Sub- Arctic Holiday 
Open to Travellers 

North of 54! The words con- 
jure visions of intrepid explorers, 
sturdy French sailors and goldiera 
trying to hold an empire for their 
king, of Scottish people braving 
terrors in their search for a home, 
of missionaries, of prospectors. 
In August next tho Canadian Na- 
tional Railways will offer an op- 
portunity to visit this spacious 
empire. From Winnipeg to 
Churchill and return the special 
train will be home for the travel- 
lers who leave that city on Aug- 
ust 15 and return on August 21, 
having in the meanwhile visited 
Dauphin, Flin Flon, Sherridon, 
the Pas and Churchill. 

---- column ----

Adventure in Canada 
Yet Awaits Explorer 

Positively adventure yet awaits 
tha bold in Canada as witness 
this extract from a booklet en- 
titled "Hunting, Fishing and Ca- 
noe Trips in Canada," issued by 
the Canadian National Raiways, 
th particular reference being to 
the Northwest Territories : "De- 
cidedly not a tenderfoot's joy ride, 
but real explorers, not worried 
too much by maps that prove 
partly erroneous and not afraid 
of hearing the timber wolf at 
night, and preferably provided 
with the best equipment and guid- 
es, can find their heart's desire in 
this great solitude right up to 
the edge of the barrens in the 
far-famed land of little sticks." 
The land refeered to lies north of 
60 degrees North and comprises 
an area of 1,309,682 square miles, 
while the hunting includes Polar 
Bear. 

---- column ----

Hospital on Skates 

Moscow Eye Hospital, built 
nwre than 150 years ago, is being 
moved bodily, on rollers, to a new 
site with 180 patients still in- 
side. 

---- column ----

Over-Protected Child 
Grows Antagonistic 

Antagonistic attitudes develop 
frequently in children who are 
given too much affection and 
over-protection, according to Dr. 
Mandel Sherman, psychologist 
and psychiatrist at the University 
of Chicago's orthogenic school. 

"When the child grows up and 
leaves the family, he becomes dis- 
appointed and frustrated because 
tho3 in the outside world obvi- 
ously cannot give him the atten- 
tion and affection to which he 
had become accustomed. This 
causes him to believe that people 
are unfair to him, and he later 
expresses this attitude by joining 
groups which are antagonistic to 
existing authority." 

---- column ----

"A successful marriage is an 
edifice that must be rebuilt every 
day." Andre Maurolo. 

---- column ----

BOOKLETS explaining OIL ROYALTIES 

Available on Request From Canada's Largest 
Oil Royalty Distributing 'House 

CLIFTON^. CI\OSS 

'r 

---- column ----

20 !-.. Hi 

OK - K v n r 

TO INVESTORS 

---- column ----

307 VICTORY BLDG. 

---- column ----

TORONTO, ONT. 

---- column ----

Newsprint production in Canada 
during January, 11)41, amounted 
to 261,298 tons, an increase of 
10,266 tons over January, 1940. 

---- column ----

SOLDIERS 

RUB OUT TIRED ACHES 

---- column ----

For no more than 
you d pay for a com 
mon mineral mix- 
ture. Corn King 
live* you 20 im- 
proved balanced 
ingredients all in 
one bat That's 
why farmers find 
that Corn King 
gives more feeding 
value for ALL types 
01 live stock Trjt 
one bag and see the 
big difference. Ask 
your Com King rep. 
reieniative. or wnt : 
S*by Oittritnitoti, Ltd. 
Stilby, Ontario. 

---- column ----

mazing 

MINERAL 
OFFER 

---- column ----

MINERAL FEED 

---- column ----

.CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS. 

---- column ----

A(iK.\T \V\.\TEU 

---- column ----

TiP.ES . . 12 SIONT1IS GUARANTEE 
Direct Factory to YOt_' with on* 
mull profit. If needing TIRES, 
It will pay you to write for prices. 
Agents wanted . . . save money 
for yourself, and muke a few 
dollars selling your friends. AH 
tiros shipped, prepaid, subject to 
your Inspection und approval. 
MayalU Tiro Servka, S Elm St., 
Toronto. 

UAIIY CURKS 

RAISE GOOD CHICKS WITH JOHN- 
BOD'S bred to lay burred Plymouth 
rocks and 3.C.W. leghorns Bnrron 
Strain. 16 years breeding, culling 
hatching and blood testing. Price 
for March and April Rocks and 
Leghorns a hatched 10 cents. 
Rock Pullets IT cents, Leghorn 
Pullets 20 cents. Circular with 
other prices on request. J. D. 
Johnson, Fergus, Ont. 

---- column ----

CARS, >K\V 

---- column ----

U S< >: 

---- column ----

MOUNT PLEASANT MOTORS LTD., 
Toronto's oldest Chrysler, Plym- 
outh dealers; three locations, 632 
Mt. Pleasant Road, 2040 Yongo St., 
li>5U Danforth Avenue. Our Used 
Cars make us many friends. 

CHICKS, i-l i.i.'vrs 

BOOKLET PRODUCING liGGS CN- 
der Ten Cents per dozen for Feed 
Cost mailed free on request. Order 
chicles and pullets now. Manor 
Farm, Clarkson, Ontario. 

25 I HI'lK CHICKS 

WITH KVERY 100 PULLETS or 100 
mixed chicks ordered, wa give 23 
free chicks. Pullets Jlfi.OO to $19.00 
per 100; Mixed Chicks $8.00 to 
$10. no per 100: Cockerels per 100 
light breeds, $1.00; heavy breeds. 
$4.00. Immediate delivery. Goddard 
Chiolc H a t|c h e r y, Britannia 
Heights. Unt. 

llMvlKV I ((I ITMI V! 

MAKERS' OVENS AND MACHIN- 
ery, also rebuilt equipment al- 
ways on htittdt Terms arranged. 
Correspondence Invited. Hubbnrd 
PortnWe Oven Co., 108 Bnthurst 
St.. Toronto. 

EXHAUST 

---- column ----

IKK.* FOH SALE 

---- column ----

REGlSTETiED YORKSHIRE BOAHS 
and sows all iigen, reasonable. 
R. U. Thomson, Woodhrldge. Ont. 

IKIISE W.l.VCKU 

ABOL'T SIX 1IOOMH, A.LL CONVEN- 
lanCMi ':'.<! garden; prefer main 
street. 1'rico about $1500 cub. 
State full particulars. Personal. 

Box :!!i. _ 

SK FOB !AI.K 

---- column ----

FOR 8ALK. GREY PER' 'HERON 
Stallion, fiva years old, granted A 
premium for 1941-2-3. Lambert P. 
VVlgle, K'nu'HvUlo, Ontario. _ 

I.KiHT HOUSE* 

FOR 3AL.ii:. STANDARD BRED 
Stallion, Premium A class, sur* 
foal, in good ahnpe, cheap or ex- 
change on cattle. ICIam Shantz 
Ron.'a 1. Waterloo, Ont. 

---- column ----

S VI,l.IAJf WAM'KO 

---- column ----

SALESMAN WANTED WITH CAR 

to sell to storen, Ladies' House 
Dresses and Men's V\ orklng cloth- 
. on commission basis. Cash bond 
required to cover coat of samples. 
Exclusive territory given. State 
age, experience references. Writ* 
P.O. Box US. Montreal. 

UKI.K.IOUS 

HLJJAH COMING BEFORE C11KIST, 
wonderful book sent free. Menrlddo 

Mission. H.. Uuclinator, N-sw Yorst. 

WAMTKD " 

---- column ----

EXHAUST FANS, NEW OENKRAJ. 
Klectrtrs. way under wholesale. 
Toronto Merrnntilo. 2!) Mollnda, 

Toronto. 

i 1:1 ,ii ion S.U.K 

STOCK I'KEO: BUStlKI, AM' ONE 
hnlf bn, 12c per butt InrHidlng 
the hngr eooltod icreenlnfrs from 
puffed whi-at. nnd rice, Kav.iimgh 
FoOdfl l.iinltoil, 3tiO Si'i:uiren Av- 
I'liiii-, Tnrcntri. 

currnR 

HAVE VOL' GOITRK? "ABSORBO" 
reduces. I'^or particulnrH write 
J. A. Johnston Co.. 171 Kins: E.. 
TniMiihi. I'vli't- $.'I.IMI IT liulllo. 

HKRIIS WANTED 

$J$ \\V. lit'V HUNDREDS DIFFER- 
cut Horbs. Hoots. Bnrks. Write 
dominion Herh Distributors, 142& 
. Main, Montreal. 

---- column ----

J. N. LINDSAY, LAW OFFICE, CAP- 
Itol Theatre Building, St Thomas, 
Ontario. Special Department for 
farmers collections. 

POULTRY 

A-l liAU i CHUCK 3, BARU1CL' 
Hocks, White Rocks, White Leg- 
horns, Brown Leghorns, Jersey 
Black Giants, New Hampshire 
Reds. Write for now low prices. 
A. H. Switzer Hatchery, Granton, 
Out 

BABY CHICKS, GOVERNMENT AP- 
proved White Leghorn* and Barred 
Rocks, also sexed Pullets or 
Cockerels. Breeding since 1901. 
Senfl for price list: Wright Farm, 
Brockvllle, Ontario. 

GET THE FACTS AND YOU'LL 
buy Twaddle chicks. Send for Big 
N Av 1941 Twiddle Catalogue. All 
chicks from carefully culled Gov- 
ernment Approved blood-tasted 
breeders. Sixteen pure breeds and 
8 Hybrid trusses and four breads 
of turkeys to choose from. Also 
started chicks and older pullets. 
Tn-eddlo Think Hatcheries Limit- 
ed. Fergus, Ontario. 

$1.00 FOR LEGI'ORNS, $.1.00 FOR 
Heavies Cockerels per 100; Rocks, 
Learhorns, Hybrids as hatched or 
pullets (!B% guaranteed). Low 
prlcea. Ouly egs* from my own 
breeding, farm hatched, Green Roc 
Poultry Farm, Wales. Ontario. 

NOT "ANY CHICKS" NOW -BUT 
"Bray Chirks." Get your brooder 
busy before the spring rush. No 
"shopping round" because Bray 
has what you want. Moat breeds; 
crosses; pullets; capons; day old, 
started chicks. Turkeys. Bray de- 
livers tho chtoks Bray chicks 
"deliver ih gooils." Bray Hntcli- 
ffi-.v. ll! John, ll.'imilton. Ont. 

VIUIIM:ITV I.-OR SAI.K 

NJCF, i-io.MK si'irr FOI: ci.il'ri.K. 
l!i acres, well fruited, well blver- 
greoned, nw brick cabin, ete. 
Stamp reply. Wheeler. North wood, 
Ontario. 

OFFER TO i t\i-.\ rui(s 

AN OFFER TO EVERY INVENTOR 
List of Inventions and full Infor- 
mation sent free. The Ramsay 
Co., Registered, Patent Attorneys, 
273 Bank Street, Ottawa, Canada. 

---- column ----

UNHATIS1'"1BD ROUTK MEN. MBD- 
Iclno mon. build lifetime rout* 
selling- reliable Remedies, Quality 
Cosmetics. Farm Products, a com- 
plete lln of 200 guaranteed spec- 
ialties for household nnd farm. 
Repent Orders certain. Interesting 
profits. Get Details nnd free cat- 
alogue: FAMILEX. 57U St. Clm- 
ont, Mon'roa!. 

9EWI3TO MACHIXKS AND 
RBI 1 AIR!* 

SINGER SEE REVERSE STlTCft 
before buying. Send for catalogue, 
prices and terms. Repairs. Slnmr 
Sewing Machine Company, 264 
Yong St., Toronto, Ont. 

---- column ----

SEED FOR SALE 

NORTHERN GROWN NO. 2 ALSIKB 
18 cents pound. No. 2 MInture 90% 
Alsllie balance timothy dutch 
clover. 16 cents pound. No. S MIn- 
ture Ai.ike 90% balance dutch 
clover 13 cents pound. No. X MIn- 
ture Alslke 60%, timothy 60%, 
IS cents pound. No. 2 Timothy. 
No. 1 Purity 9 cents pound, n 
primary noxious weeds, S5c, pay- 
in em with order. Wm. A. Reid, 
Earlton. Ontario. 

SNAPSHOTS TO-DAY 
TREASURES TO-MORROW 

Your films are carefully nnd scien- 
tifically processed by Imperial, t 
mnke sure they Inst. 

6 or 8 KXVOSliRR FILMS Mm 
with beautiful enlargement fro*. 
I reprints with enlarKement 16o. 
Thousands of letters from satUflcet 
customers testify to our superior 
quality and service. 

IMPERIAL PHOTO SERVIOB 
Stntifn .T. Toronto. 

TOBACCO 

FOUR POUNDS nUULEY AND VIR- 
:;i7iin L*;af for pii> $1.SS. FIT* 
pounds Fragrant Virginia Lai 
Cigarette Tobacco $2. SO postpaid. 
Vntnrnl l^eaf Tobncco Co., Leam- 
Inpton. Ontario. 

---- column ----

Guaranteed 

CAR AND TRUCK PARTS 

Used New 

SI'I'H lll.rS.IM. IN HI 111 II I NU- 
TOH*. ri>\\ i H i M'l - llydrimlla 
n .. I . i Wlnrke* Ijpoemlnr*. 

M.-irlcr*. MflKnelO*. i sirlul rt-lur*. 

llmliiilur* Kxfhanije Serrlce, 
i.li. Hilriic ili.n or 

---- column ----

Levy Aulo l'sr(. 

---- column ----

. 

refasii. 
J. Toreo. 

---- column ----

ISSUE 1S-*41 

---- column ----

\ 
---- page ----

---- column ----

Wednesday, April 9, 1941 

---- column ----

THE 

---- column ----

ADVANCE 

---- column ----

, ^^./ -*. . > ^JH 

JS^Jm 

---- column ----

Polish Squadron in Britain's Air Force 

One of the Hurrican Fighters used in the famous Polish Fighter 
Squadron of Britain's Doyal Air Force is seen being re-armed with thou- 
sands of rounds of ammunition by Polish ground staff. 

The Squadron has shot down 126 German aircraft in six weeks and 
many of its pilots have been decorated. 

---- column ----

Remember those funny little bon- 
nets grandma used to wear? You 
don't have to remember them, be- 
cause granddaughter is wearing them 
now. 

---- column ----

So with the others. They had look- 
ed death in the face, had gone thr- 
ough indescribable horrors. But 

---- column ----

they weren't dismayed; not eve 
downhearted. 

---- column ----

ORANGE VALLEY 

Miss Norine Morrison of Toronto fo 
isiting with her sister Mrs. Gordon 
Hill. 

Mrs. Chaa. Smith and two daughters 
f Quebec are visiting with the Alcox 
amily. 

Pte. Wm. Sprung of Camp Borden; 
AT. R. Trousdale of Markdale; Mr. 
and Mrs. Moody uf Durham spent 
unday at the McFadden home. 
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Hargrave and 
Wrs. Hargrave Sr. are getting com- 
'ortably settled on the Hundt farm 
We welcome them to our community. 
Mr. Wesley Littlejohns of Flesher- 
ton and lady friend, Miss I. Russel of 
Rock Mills were Sunday visitors with 
the former's parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Geo. Littlejohns. 

Mrs, Allen is spending a few days 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Aaron 
Teeter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Phillips of Maxwell 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Geo. 
Hargrave and Mrs. Hargrave Sr. 

Mr. David Mitchell of Schomburg 
called on hig cousin lira. Geo. Little 
Johns one day last week. 

---- column ----

Local and Personal 

---- column ----

Spirit such as this just can't be 
beaten. 

---- column ----

Spring is just starting here, while 
in South America they are having 
their early days of fall. 

---- column ----

Card of Thanks 

The family of the late Peter M. 
Munshaw wish to express to their 
many friends and neighbors, to the 
High Falls Hunt Club, the members 
of the I.O.O.F., Markdale, their ap- 
preciation of the many 'messages oi 
sympathy, floral tributes and th 
kindness extended in the loss of a 
dear father. 

---- column ----

Easter Parade 

---- column ----

JOIN THE EASTER PARADE, COME TO HILL'S READY-TO-WEAR 
DEPARTMENT. SEE THE NEWEST OF SPRING STYLES IN COATS, 
DRESSES AND MILLINERY. BELLOW ARE A FEW VALUES 

OF SPECIAL INTEREST. 

I*" 1 , You needn't be slim and tall to get a smart coat. We have many 

V/Q3T3" stylts and ma ^ es to flt most n s ures ' tall or short. Coats in Harris 
Tweeds, Canadian. made cloth of excellent wearing quality. These 
coats will fit most any pocket book. Moderately priced at $9.85, $10.95, $14.95 
and $15.95. See this range. 

---- column ----

NEW EASTER DRESSES 

A wonderful showing 1 of new Ray- 
on Dresses in all the new printed de- 
signs from flowers to polka dots. 
Extra Special at $2.95 

NEWEST OF 
EASTER MILLINERY 

Straws, flower trimmed, straws and 
felts combined and all felts. Excep- 
tional values at $1.95 and $2.45 

SPRING CURTAIN MATERIALS 

Newest of Spring- Curtain Materials 
by the yard. A wonderful showing in 
this line. See our window display. 
We are proud of the values we can 
offer Marquisettes, Voiles, Shower 
Spots, Tuscan Nets all at various 
prices per yard \2 l / 2 , 19, 25, 35, 39, 59 

NEW WALLPAPERS 

Add smartness to your home by de- 
corating different rooms with Sun- 
worthy Wallpapers, sold exclusively 
by the Hill Co. in Markdale. Papers 
for kitchen, bedrooms, dining rooms, 

---- column ----

parlors and halls. Prices range from 
lOc per single roll to 50c single roll. 

LADIES' CREPE DRESSES 

A real array to choose from. A 
Super Value at $4.95 

---- column ----

Men's Wear 

Men's Fine Shirts for Easter. A 
wonderful selection to choose from 
and outstanding values. 

Lot 1 15 doz. Fine Shrts with 
fused collar attached in plain colors 
and narrow and broad stripes, sizes 
from 14 to 17. Extra value at 89o 

Lot 2 15 doz. Men's fine Broad- 
cloth Shirts in almost any color desir- 
ed. An extra firm cloth of good wear- 
ing quality. Extra Value, each $1.25 

MEN'S FINE HOSE 

An exceptional buy, made of wool 
and rayon, all sizes 10, 10^, 11, 11^. 
Price 35c, or 3 pair for $1.00 

---- column ----

True Economy in Food Values at Mil's 

---- column ----

Sockeye Salmon, Horseshoe Brand 

1's 37c; ^'s20c 
Cohoe Fancy Red Salmon 

I's27c; H's |Sc 
Clover Leaf Fancy Pink Salmon 

1's only 16c 
Quaker Oats, family size pkg 19c 

---- column ----

Pork & Beans, Lobby's 20 oz. size 

2 for 15c 
Condensed Milk, assorted brands 

1's 2 for ISc 
Sandwichc Spread, made by Anne 

Page, 8 oz. jar 19c 
Sec-.dless Raisins 2 Ib. for 21c 

---- column ----

Specials for Friday and Saturday 

---- column ----

Purity Flour 98 Ib $2.95 bag 

Peas, No. 2 size, No. 4 sieve 3 for 25c 

Tomatoes, large tin 28 oz 3 for 27c 

Toilet Soap, various kinds cake 4c 

---- column ----

Crown Brand Syrup: 

No. 2 tins 

No. 5 tins 

No. 10 tins 

---- column ----

17c 
39c 
79c 

---- column ----

F. T. Hill & Co., Ltd. 

. MARKDALE, Ont. 

---- column ----

Phone 18w and give us the names 
uf your Easter visitors. 

Mr. Ted Dixon of Toronto was a 
visitor in town over the week end. 

Mr. Jack Adams spent a few days 
in Toronto last week. 

Mias Gwen Gorrell of Barrie is 
visiting this week with Mrs. Fred 
Jorrel! and little daughter. 

A meeting of the road supervisors 
employed by the County of Grey was 
held in Flesherton Tuesday afternoon. 

Dr. and Mrs. Ern. Armstrong ar- 
rived on Friday to visit at the home 
of Mr. F. H. W. Hickling. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alex. Henderson ant 
Junior visited at the former's par 
ental home at Mt. Forest on Sunday 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Thompson visite< 
at the former's home at Durham on 
Sunday. 

Mr. W. J. Caswell left on Friday 
to spend a few weeks with his daugh 
ters at Waterloo, St. Thomas i 
Dresden. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Fawcett and 
two children left last week to reside 
at Bronte. Mr. Fawcett is employed 
with the Hydro at Burlington. 

Dr. Cyril A. Dyer of Detroit and 
Mr. Russell Dyer of New York spent 
the week end with her mother at 
the home of Mrs. Jos. Blackburn. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Kemahan and 
Miss Doreen Hagan have returned to 
town after spending the winter in 
Toronto. 

Mrs. C. R. Wood, Laverne and Lois 
and Mr. Oscar McKee spent a couple 
of days this week with Mr. and Mrs 
Emerson McKee at Bronte. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alex. Aberdein and 
family and Mr. and Mrs. John Styles 
and Mrs. E. I. Holley visited Sunday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Chas. McClean at 
Brampton. 

EASTER FLOWERS Order your 
Easter Lilies and all kinds of flower- 
ing plants and cut flowers for 
Easter from W. A. Hawken, phone 17. 

---- column ----

EASTER MEATS 

If you desire any special land of Meat for Easter 
jul give us your order and we will gladly procure 
it for you. We appreciate your business and al- 
ways try to give the best of service. 

BAILEY'S 

We DELIVER " FLESHEBTON, Ont. PHONE 47y 

Canada First Lest We Forget! 

'M'IMI Mill I"* I M 1 1 1 1 I >**< 

---- column ----

+'t**t**+4 *+*** 

---- column ----

Small Ad. Column 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Quantity of Erban 
oats. Everett Blackburn, R. R. 
3, Flesherton. 43p2 

FOR SALE Seed grain. Ed. 
Pedlar, phone Feversham 1 r 22, 
Singhampton R. R. 1. 44c2 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Vanguard and Erban 
oats for seed; also horse 6 years 
old. Allie McLean, Priceville, 
phone 49 r 3. 44c2 

---- column ----

f 

t 
f 

f 

T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
f 
T 

t 
<& 

---- column ----

LATE MARK MURPHY 

---- column ----

Another one of Osprey's pionetrs, 
Mr. Mark Murphy, passed away at 
his home on the eighth line, ^sprey, 
on Saturday, March 8, in his eighty- 
third year. Although the deceased 
had not been in the best of health 
for over a year, his sudden death 
came as a shock to the community. 

The late Mr. Murphy was born in 
Pickering and when quite young 
camo with his parents to the Eighth 
Line, Osprey, where he has lived ever 
since. He was the only son of James 
Murphy and Catherine Holmes of 
Ireland and were among the early 
pioneers to wrest a living from the 
wilderness. 

The late Mark Murphy was a ve y 
highly respected citizen, honest and 
industrious and well known through- 
out the community of which he ha? 
been a life-long resident. 

He was of a kindly jovial dispo- 
sition and enjoyed the companionship 
of his many friends and neighbours 

He was married to Bridget Agnes 
Farden of Glenelg. To them were 
born five children, Mamie (Mrs 
Frank Brown) of Collinpwood, James 
Elizabeth and John at home and Ad- 
eline of Toronto. He is survived by 
his widow and family, who mourn 
the loss of a faithful husband and 
loving father. His only sister, Mrs. 
James Burns, predeceased him by 25 
years. 

The funeral took place on Saturday 
morning to St. John's R.C. Church, 
Glenelg where requiem mass ( was 
said by Father Egam. Many were 
the spiratual offerings for the repose 
of his soul. 

The pallbearers were: Messrs. 
Wm. O'Brien, Donald Stephens, Fred 
Hale, Walter Saigeon, Peter Somers 
and Thos. Bemrose. May his soul 
rest in peace. 

---- column ----

CORRECTION 

In the notice of presentation to two 
Old Durham Road soldiers last week 
we make a change as to those who 
made the presentation, as follows: 
Lloyd Vause and Don Meads made the 
presentation to Pte. Bob Meads and 
Farquhar McKinnon and Joe William 
son to Pte. Don Whyte. 

---- column ----

Three airmen from Finga! were in 
a taxi when it jumped the ditch, 
broke off a power line pole, when' 
through a wire fence and stopped In 
a farm field. After which the three 
got out unhurt, having made what 
they called a perfect three-point land- 
ing. 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Hatch of Barred Rock 
chicks on April 2, also hatching 
egys. Mrs. Ward Harrison, R. R. 
3, Proton, phone 41 r 4. 43p2 

---- column ----

GIRL WANTED Apply at Park 
House, Flesherton. 44p2 

---- column ----

FOR SALE 6 Pigs rady to wean. 
J. P. Stewart, phone 32rll. 

---- column ----

FOR SALE 2 Durham cows, due 
in spring. Albert Wilkinson, R. 
R. 1, Flesherton. 43p2 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Heavy brown mare colt 
rising 3 years. W. Weber, R. R. 
No. 4, Markdale. 44p2 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Vanguard and Erban 
seed oats, also a mare 10 years old, 
to foal in July. Ross Stevens, 
Phone 32 r 31. 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Heavy draft mare, 12 
yrs., due to foal May 1st, priced 
for quick sale. Herb Grummett, 
R. R. 2, Proton Station. 

---- column ----

FOR SALE 2 Purebred Hereford 
Bulls, ready for service, H and 12 
months old. Wm. Fadden, Fev- 
ersham, phone 22 r 41. 45c2 

---- column ----

NOTICE Paper hangind and paint- 
ing at reasonable prices. Estimates 
free. Ross Mitchell, Dundalk 
telephone 77. 

---- column ----

FOR SALE 7-octave Bell Piano; 
illimitable repeating action; Bell- 
tone sustaining frame; in good con 
dition. Rev. F. Ashton, Flesherton 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Threshing machine 32 

in. cylinder in good condition; also 

sow with litter of 8, 2 weeks old, 

and 2 spring calves. Richard 

Irving, Flesherton, R. R. 2. 45c2 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Shur-Gain Chick Start- 
er, Shur-Gain Pig Starter and 41 
Hog Concentrate; also red clover 
seed and small peas. George 
Morrison, Maxwell. 45p2 

---- column ----

FOR SALE House in Flesherton, 
with seven rooms, hard and soft 
water, double lot and barn. For 
full particulars apply to J. W. Mc- 
Mullen, Ceylon, Executor. 30c 

---- column ----

FOR SALE 7-room brick house in 
Flesherton, large lot, garage, good 
well, must be sold to settle estate 
of the late Andrew Gilchrist Ap- 
ply to John Stewart, Executor, Pro- 
ton Station, phone 32 r 4. 

---- column ----

POTATOES FOR SALE Grade 
Canada No. 1, early varieties 
Warbas and Cobblers; later var 
ieties, Katahdins and Dooleys. 
Alex. S. Muir, R. R. No. 1 Ceylon 
phone Flesherton 47 r 14. 44c4 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Driving horse, 5 years 
old, good worker, or will exchange 
for heavy horse 1 also 10 chunks of 
pigs. Geo. Thompson, phone 
Feversham IrSl, Singhampton P.O 

46 p. 2 

---- column ----

ORDER your Bray Chicks from oui 
agent and save time. He'll see 
you get what you want. Pullets, 
capons, cockerels, day-olds, started. 
Fill your brooder with Bray Chicks 
to catch good markets. John 
McWilliam, Flesherton. 

---- column ----

FOR SALE In Ceylon, comfortable 
7-room house, electric lights, hard 
and soft water, good stable, ken 
house and garage with cement 
floor, lot containing 1 acre more 
or less. For particulars apply to 
Mrs. NelHe Gilchrist, Badjeros, R. 
R. 1, or Fred Irwln, Flesherton. 

---- column ----

FARM FOR SALE 

100 acre farm, 6 acres wheat, 
spring creek, tiled well and windmill, 
comfortable dwelling, barn and hen- 
house, situated 1 mile south of Flesh- 
erton on No. 1 Highway, reasonably 
priced for quick gale. Apply to 
Fred Irwin, Flesherton, Ont. 

---- column ----

FARM FOR SALE $475.00 Lot 
20, Concession 7, Osprey, ormerly 
McQueen property. Apply to I. B. 

Lucas & Co., Markdale, Ont. 43c3. 

---- column ----

FARM FOR SALE Owner ire- 
pared to sell at sacrifice. 200 acres 
near Duncan, known as Howard 
farm. Apply to I. B. Lucaa & Co., 
Markdale, Ont. 43c3 

---- column ----

WANTED Girl for general house- 
work, must be good with children, 
good wages, must be ready to start 
May 1. Apply to Miss B. Cairns, 
11 Haddington Ave., Toronto, tie- 
phone MO 5368, Toronto. 

---- column ----

FARM FOR SALE 
Lots 14-15, Con. 1, SD.R., Art*. 
niesia, containing 100 acres, on which 
is situated a bank barn 45x55, also 
large driving shed. This property 
must be sold to wind up estate. ThoM 
interested communicate with John 
Oliver or W. R. Meads, Priceville, Ex- 
ecutors for the estate. 47 

---- column ----

PROPERTY FOR SALE IN 
FLESHERTON 

---- column ----

Lot 10 on Collingwood St, on 
which is situated a 7-room house, 
well and stable. Those interested 
communicate with I. B. Lucas, Mark- 
dale, Solicitor for the Ella Gibson 
Estate. 

---- column ----

AUCTIONEER 

WALTER SEELEY 
See me about your auction sale. AH 
sales conducted on business prin- 
ciples. Phone me at Feversham 4rlg 
or make arrangements at Th* 
Flesherton Advance office. 

---- column ----

TENDERS WANTED 

Tenders plainly marked (Tractor 
Power) will be received by the under- 
signed, until 12 o'clock noon, Satur- 
day, April 12th, 1941, for tractor 
power to operate Township grader.. 
The lowest or any tender not nec3 
sarily accepted. 

C. N. LONG, Chris. 
Feversha 

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BUSINESS CARDS 

---- column ----

DR. S. R. THIBAUDEAU 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

Graduate of Ontario Veterinary Coll- 
ege. Phone: 91 day or night 
MARKDALE, ONT. 

---- column ----

DR. J. E. MILNE 

Office Durham St. 
Office Hours _ Afternoons, 1.30 to 4 
Evenings, 7 to S.M. 
Sundays and Thursday afternoons bf 
appointment only. 

---- column ----

Prince Arthur Lodge No. 888, A1V. 
& A.M., meets in the Fraternal Hid!, 
Flesherton, the second Friday, in: 4fc 
month. W.M., Herb. Corbeti; Sfee- 
retary, C. J. Bellamy. 

---- column ----

ROY LANGFORD 

District Agent for 

MUTUAL LIFE OF CANADA 

ACCIDENT and SICKNESS. TIRM, 

AUTOMOBILE, BUROLAftY 
vlnnielp.l LiaMllty Gurate 
Any laranuM* Probltm 

FLBSHERTON, Ont 

---- column ----

/* 

..' 4 
'.* 

4 
---- page ----

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- VOL. 60; NO. 46 

---- column ----

FLESHERTON. WEDNESDAY. APRIL 16, 1941 

---- column ----

W. H, Thurston & Son, Props. 

---- column ----

t 

---- column ----

Flesherton Public School 

EASTER TERM REPORT 
Grade 8 Evelyn McTavish (H), 
Edna Thompson (H), Kenneth Lang- 
ford, Bobby Avis, Gordon Miller, 
Velma Sewell, Burton Russell, Keith 
. Goessel, Ted Banks, Helen Brown, 
Eva Doupe, Victor Langford, Gordon 

Dungey. 

Grade 6 Eleanor Williams (H), 

Verna Loucks (H), Lois Sparks (H), 
Mary Dolan (H), Colleen McCutcheon 
Donald Langford, Edmund Thomp- 
son, Ernie Russell, Elma Talbot, Jim 
Hamilton, Bob Turney. 

Grade 5 Evelyn Stewart (H), 
Ted Newell, Shirley McCracken, Mar- 

ion Stautfer, David Aberdein, Bruce 
Thurston, Frank Taylor, Jim Arm- 
strong, Stanley Teeter, Howard 

Teeter, Bob Long. 

Grade 4 Eleanore Sparks, Barry 

Thurston, Joan Turney, Jack Milne, 
Dannie McTavish, Joyce McNabb, 
Don Banks, Ivan Russell, Billie Rich- 
ardson, Keith Dungey, Burt Talbot. 

Grade 3 John Milligan, Shirley 
Langford* Mark Wilson, Bob Stod- 
dart, Earl McKechnie. 

Grade 2 Erma Aberdein, Audrey 

Wauchope, Margot Anne Goessel, 
Rosa Loucks, Pat Stauffer, Clifford 

. Richardson, Jim Stoddart, Bob Mc- 
Cracken, Garnet Hamilton, Bruce 
Langford, Isobel Duneey. 

Grade 1 Muriel Sparks, Mary 
Jane McTavish, Elaine Cook, Joan 

, Avis, Joanne Wood, Milford Loucks, 
Prank Beatty, Bob Teeter, Lois 

.' Russell, Gary Stiles, Stanley Mc- 
Kechnie. 

---- column ----

HOME GUARD OPERATIONS 

It is suggested by the leader of the 
Home Guard that drills be resumed 
Thursday evening of this week at the 
town hall at 8 p.m. All members are 
urged to be present. 

---- column ----

AIRPLANE FORCED 

DOWN IN OSPREY 

---- column ----

(By Buckingham Correspondent) 

Considerable excitement, as well 
as anxiety, was caused here Monday 
night when a plane from the Port 
Albert air port made a forced land- 
ing in Mr. Herb Hawton's field. The 
machine, a twin motored Blenheim 
bomber, developed engine trouble 
half an hour after taking- off and was 
brought down with slight damage to 
the Diane and a small cut on the 
face of one of the crew. 

An inspector and mechanics from 
the air port arrived later to test the 
engines and remove small part pre- 
paratory to having it taken out by 
truck when the roads are fit. Mean- 
while two men from the air port are 
guarding the plane and staying at 
the home of Mr. Herb Taylor. 

A large number of people took 
advantage of the opportunity to see 
one of these machines on the ground 
and the pleasant, courteous manner 
of those men from England in show- 
ing all who came and in answering 
innumerable questions, but strength- 
ens our wish for their success and 
safety in training- to do battle with 
Hitler's birds of prey. 

---- column ----

CEYLON PUPILS AID TELEGRAM 
BRITISH WAR VICTIMS' FUND 

About $45.00 was realized by the 
teacher and pupils of Ceylon Public 
School for the Toronto Telegram 
British War Victims Fund. The 
pupils cut put blocks for a quilt, the 
mothers did the quilting; and the 
pupils sold tickets on the quilt for a 
draw, which was made at a dance 
held in the Ceylon hall Wednesday 
night of last week. Mr. Bert Magee 
of Eugenia was the lucky winner. 
The money has been sent to the To- 
ronto Telegram for the fund. 

---- column ----

---- column ----

** 

---- column ----

How About a New Suit 
This Spring? 

Probably you're thinking of a new Suit for Spring 

don't leave it too laid! The fine new samples 

of Spring Suitings and Overcoatings are here 

there is a splendid selection of smart patterns. 

SUITS & OVERCOATS FROM $24.95 
Each garment made and tailored to your individ- 
ual measure fit and satisfaction guaranteed. 

i i Ready-to- Wear Suits 

New serges and Fancy Suitings specially priced 

contracted for before the recent advances 

in woollens. All sizes. 

PRICED FROM $14.95 

i NEW HOUSE DRESSES i! 

Smart styles new patterns in extra quality sun 
and tub-fast prints. All sizes up to 52. 

PRICED 98c, $1.19, $1.39, $1.59 

All wonderful value. 

F. H. W. Hickling 

---- column ----

General Merchant 

---- column ----

FLESHERTON 
*>***********< 

---- column ----

> Equipped to handle the finest service at moderate prices 

Our Beautiful 

Air 

:: Conditioned 
;: Funeral Chapel 

---- column ----

at 

---- column ----

124 AVENUE ROAD 

TORONTO, Ont. 

---- column ----

; ; RICHARD MADDOCKS, 

Manager. 

---- column ----

FRED MADDOCKS. 

Associate. 

Member of the Fleeherton Old B ays' A Girls' Association 

BATES & MADDOCKS 

Formerly of Flesherton. Ont. 

124 Avenue Road. Toronto, Ont KI. 4344 

---- column ----

Large Attendance At 
Funeral Mrs. Hickling 

---- column ----

Death called one of Flesherton's 
most highly respected citizens on 
Tuesday mopiing of last week, in the 
person of Adelaide Elizabeth Arm- 
strong, beloved wife of Mr. F. H. W. 
Hickling, in her 77th year. Death 
occurred at 6.30 a.m. at her home 
here following a lengthy illness of 
some three years. 

The late Mrs. Hickling waa a 
daughter of the late John W. Arm- 
strong and was born at Inistioge on 
the old homestead and moved with 
her parents to Flesherton a t an early 
age. Her father was a J.P. and Div- 
ision Court Clerk for the Flesherton 
district She spent almost her entire 
life in Flesherton, except when she 
attended Ontario Ladies' College at 
Whitby. 

She was united marriage in 1901 to 
Frederick H. W. Hickling of Flesh- 
erton and had resided here most of 
the time except for several years 
when they lived at Sault Ste. Marie, 
Ont. Surviving;, besides her sorrow- 
ing husband, are three brothers and 
one sister, John W. Armstrong of 
Toronto, Rev. Albert E. Armstrong 
of Meaford, Dr. E. F. Armstrong of 
Cobalt a nd Mrs. F. D. Goff of 
Clarksburg. Two other brothers, Dr. 
G. S. Armstrong and Wm. A. Arm- 
strong, and two sisters, Mrs. John D. 
Clarke and Mrs. T. E. Aikenhead, 
predeceased her. 

The late Mrs. Hickling was a lady 
of sterling quality and was highly 
regarded by all who knew her. She 
was a member of St. John's United 
Church, and while health prevailed 
was a constant attendant at the ser- 
vices. She also took an active part 
in the work of the Ladies' Aid, Wo- 
man's Missionary Society and the 
Women's Institute and a willing 
worker in the W.C.T.U. Her loss to 
her native town is greatly deplored 
and she will be missed in all the 
village activities. 

The funeral was held on Thursday 
afternoon, April 10th, when service 
was held in St. John's United church 
at 2:30 o'clock p.m., with her pastor, 
Rev. G. K. McMillan, officiating, 
assisted by Rev. Fred Ashton of the 
Flesherton Baptist church. Interment 
was made in the family plot in 
Flesherton Cemetery. 
- The pallbearers were six nephews: 
Berry Armstrong, Samuel A. Goff, 
John Armstrong, Ernest Armstrong, 
Jas. Aikenhead and W. Aikenhead. 

Among the large number of beau- 
tiful floral tributes carried by four- 
teen of the Flesherton business men 
were tokens of sympathy from the 
following: Village Ratepayers, Bus- 
iness Men, Wray's Ladies' Wear of 
Owen Sound, friends and neighbors, 
Flesherton Old Boys' and Girls' As- 
sociation of Flesherton, Flesherton 
Old Boys and Girls of Toronto, Gord- 
on McKay Limited (Geo. Meads). 

Among the relatives and friends 
from outside town who attended the 
funeral were: Miss Ruby Aikenhead, 
Mary Keith, Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred 
Aikenhead, Mr. and Mrs. Jim Aiken- 
head, Mr. and Mrs. J. Wesley Arm- 
strong, Mrs. Frances Dreslard, Mrs. 
Jack Armstrong Jr., Mr. Ern Arm- 
strong, R.C.A.F., Manning Depot, 
Mrs. W. A. Armstrong, Mrs. Herman 
Hyland, Mr. and Mrs G. T. Prentice, 
Mr. S. A. Goff, Mr.' and Mrs. Jos. 
Armstrong, Miss Lottie Armstrong, 
Miss Elizabeth Armstrong, Rev. Jas. 
Armstrong, Mrs. A. E. Webster, Mr. 
and Mrs. Howard Armstrong, all of 
Toronto, Dr. and Mrs. E. F. Arm- 
strong, and Master Peter Armstrong. 
Cobalt; Sergt. David Armstrong of 
the Algonquin Regt., Port Arthur; 
Mrs. A. Muskopp, Pembroke; Rev. A. 
E. Armstrong and Master David 
Armstrong, Meaford; Mr. Albert T. 
Armstrong, Haliburton; Miss Dorothy 
Armstrong. Moaford; Mr. and Mrs. J 
C. Mitchell, Thornlmry; Mr. J. W. 
Armstrong, Owen Sound; Rev. Berry 
Armstrong, Smiths Falb: Rev. F. D. 
Goff, Clarksburg; Mrs. Howard Hall, 
Thornbury; Mr. Chas. Armstrong and 
Miss Ruth Armstrong, Markdale; 
Miss Alice Armstrong. Kingston; 
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Miller and Mr. and 
Mrs. Rowe, Durulalk; and Mrs. L. W. 
Thorn, Barrie. 

---- column ----

The Canadian War Services Fund 
campaign in Flesherton has been al- 
most completed and to date the 
amount collected has been disap- 
pointingly small, as the total amount 
collected is under two hundred 
dollars. It was hoped that the 
committee would be able to turn 
over to the County committee two 
hundred and fifty dollars. If there 
has been any person n-ot contacted 
for a donation, the committee would 
be pleased to have their contribution. 

---- column ----

SAFE LOCK 
WIRE FENCE 

is best because stays are flexible, 
not rigid. If accidentally depress- 
ed it springs erect the moment 
pressure is removed with no 
straighteninR of bent wires. Many 
farmers call it 

Hinge Lock Fence 

Ask your local dealer for it. 

Made only bv the 

KEENAN FENCE CO. 

OWEN SOUND. Ont. 

---- column ----

Aid Ontario Tourist 
Campaign In States 

---- column ----

Citizens of Ontario and those in 
sister provinces are at last rflally 
wide awake to the real neH for the 
millions of dollars of United States 
f umlii wbkh pour across tie boHi-r 
wit',; the arri al of tourists. Never 
before have all our various public 
agencies put so much effort into the 
job of coaxing United States citizens 
to spend their holidays in Canada. 

Advertisements in periodicals pub- 
lished on the other side of the line 
have been increasing in volume and 
in quality. Through one of these 
advertisements, Prime Minister Mac- 
kenzie King has personally addressed 
United States people, extending a very 
hearty invitation to them to come on 
up. In this province, Douglas R. 
Oliver, in charge of the tourist 
bureau, is redoubling his efforts to 
increase the flow of U. S. cars into 
Ontario this summer. Convention 
bureaus are exerting unusual effort 
to get more people in, and as one 
result of this, thousands of members 
of the American Legion will comj to 
Toronto this summer for their annual 
meeting. 

The general result of all this act- 
ivity should be good, but only if we 
continue to fight against the propa- 
ganda which Nazi agents in the 
United States continue to spread. 
Friends of Germany, without doubt, 
will keep up their whispering cam- 
paign that tourists may be held for 
military duty in Canada, that food 
is rationed, and that gasoline is ex- 
pensive and scarce. It would seem 
to be in order now for Canadians to 
set up the machinery to make sure 
that citizens throughout the United 
States read the truth. You cannot 
always fight progaiganda with silence. 

To the end of making the invita- 
tion a more personal one to friends 
in the United States The Advance 
suggested that the Flesherton Old 
Boys' and Girls' Association sponsor 
a local movement for a Grey County 
Old' Home Week the latter part of 
June and the first week in July to 
take in the American national holiday 
and through the columns of the local 
press give a personal invitation to 
their friends to come to Ontario and 
Grey County for their holidays this 
summer. We would like to have an 
organizer come to Flesherton at an 
early date and explain the scheme to 
the lively local Old Boys' and Girls' 
Association, the logical organization 
tio sponsor such an event. 

---- column ----

St. Columba Church News 

---- column ----

EXAMINATIONS COMPLETE 

BIBLE INSTRUCTION 
AT DURHAM ROAD SCHOOL 

---- column ----

Rev^ A. R. Muir completed the first 
term of Bible instruction at the Old 
Durham Road school with examina- 
tions Tuesday of last week. As has 
been the case elsewhere, this course 
has proved its worth and justified the 
time spent on it, Appreciation is ex- 
pressed to Miss Susie McKinnon, 
teacher, and to the parents for help- 
ful co-operatioin. Marks obtained, 
based on weekly memory work, con- 
dition of note books, and written 
test: 

Grade 8 Elmeda Underbill 88, 
Leroy Meads 88, Marie Meads 87. 
Ivy Ostrander 82, Lcona Hiltz 72, 
Kenneth. Meads, 39, Ward Hutchin- 
som 79. 

Grade 6 Eleanor Hiltz 72, Emmn 
Meads 86, Douglas Oliver 91. 

Grade 5 Billie Hutchinson 83. 
Joyce Connolly 91. Winnifred Wright 
66. 

Grade 4 Clara Hiltz 80. 

The managers and helpers held a 
bee in Walter Williamson's bush on 
Saturday afternoon when 12 were 
present and cut and split the re- 
mainder of the church's wood. 

Easter messages were given in St. 
Columba Sunday when the minister 
spoke in thj mnrning on "A Name 
Above Every Name,* and in the 
evening from the text 'Because I MVP, 
y.? .ihall liv* also." In the afternoon 
at Salem the subject of the sermon 
was "Easter Surprises." and Lily and 
Annie Flynn sang a duet "Low in 
The Grave." 

---- column ----

TURNEY FOSTER 

---- column ----

J 

---- column ----

The chapel of Christie Street hos- 
pital, Toronto, was the setting for an 
intorestincr event when Miss Patricia 
Foster, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Foster. Toronto, became the 
bride 01 Q. M. Scrjrt. Angus Turney. 
eWev son of Major and Mrs. Turney 
of Flesherton. Lieut-Col, the Rev. 
Sidnov Lambert officiated. 

---- column ----

ARTEMESIA FEBRUARY COLT 

---- column ----

Artemesia township is bound not 
to allow Osprey to tret very far ahead 
in the matter of February colts. Mr. 
Roy White of Portlnw informs us 
that he litd one born in February, 
ovon houirh it was near the line of 
March. The colt was born during 
the evrriing of February 2Sth. 

---- column ----

Very warm weather has prevailed 
during the past week nnd the snow 
has practically dismnneared'. This 
Wedne^dnv morning thp weather is 
considora.bly cooler and those who 
discarded their woollens would feel 
like donning them again. 

---- column ----

J. D. Clark Passes 

---- column ----

Mr. p. H. W. Hickling received the 
sad news Tuesday morning of the 
death of his brother-in-law, Mr. John 
D. Clarke, which had occurred at the 
home of his son, Jack, at Boston. 
Mass., on Monday evening. The late 
Mr. Clarke was born in Scotland and 
was 88 years of age. He was well 
known in Flesherton and his many 
friends here are sorry to hear of his 
passing. Three years atro he suffered 
a stroke at the home of his son and 
lately was able to be out for rides in 
the car. 

The funeral is being held on Thurs- 
day of this week, when service will be 
held at the home of Mr. Hickling at 
2.30 o'clock p.m., interment to take 
place in Flesherton cemetery, under 
the aupices of Prince Arthur Lodge 
No. 333, A.F.&A.M., of which Order 
the deceased was a Past District 
Deputy Grand Master. 

---- column ----

Leg Broken And Burned 

(By Priceville Correspondent) 
Mrs. McMeekin hd the misfor- 
tune to fall one day last week at the 
home of Mr. Bert Irwin as she was 
carrying a kettle of hot water and 
suffered extensive burns and a 
broken bone in her lee. She was tak- 
en to the Durham hospital and later 
removed to the home of her 
daughter. 

---- column ----

PRICEVILLE 

Sacrament of the Lord's Supper 
will be dispensed on Sunday next 
in St. Andrew's church. 

Easter visitors at the home of Mr. 
Alex. Carson were: Mr. and Mrs. A. 
Knox and Garnet, Messrs. Donald. 
Dick, Stewart and Jack Carson, all 
of Toronto and Miss Mabel Adams. 

Miss Marie McLachlan, Fergus, 
spent the week end at her home. 

Rev. Dr. Campbell nreached a 
splendid sermon Sunday. Mr. Innis 
McLean gave a lovely violin solo and 
a Quartette was given by Dr. Camp- 
bell, Mrs. Sutherland, Monica Lam- 
bert and Innis McLean. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alex. McLean and 
Mr. and Mrs. J. McFarlane and son 
O f Toronto were Easter visitors with 
their parents. Mrs. C. A. McLean 
returned home with them, after 
spending the past month in Toronto. 

Mr. Vic Scheurman and familv, 
accompanied by Mr. Bill McDonald, 
visited Mrs. Scheurman in Hamilton 
last week. 

Mr. David Hincks and Clifford vis- 
ited the first of the week in Egre- 
mont township. 

Mr. C. E. Hincks, Wyoming. Mr. 
and Mrs. Alf. Hincks and Marilyn 
and Miss Jean Hincks of Toronto 
spent Easter vacation with relatives 
here. 

---- column ----

Auction Sale 

F \K.\1 STOCK, IMPLEMENTS, ETC 

J. E. CARGOE 

LOT. 21, CON. U, ARTEMESIA 
Half Mile South of Vandeleur 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23 

CATTLE Gray Cow 3 yrs. old, 
due June 18; White Cow 5 yrs. old, 
calf at foot; White Cow 8 yrs. old, 
calf at foot; Red Cow 3 yrs. old, calf 
at foot; Black Cow 6 yrs. old, calf at 
foot; Red Cow 8 yrs. old, milking; 
Gray Cow 7 yrs. old, calf at foot; 
Black Cow 5 yrs. old, calf at foot: 
5 Heifers rising t year old; Bull Calf, 
4 months old. 

Horses Sorrel Mare 10 years old; 
Brown Mare 12 years old. 

Swine Brood Sow; 5 Chunks. 

Harness Set Heavy Team Har- 
ness; Set Light Harness. 

IMPLEMENTS, ETC. -- Massey- 
Harris Tractor, 20-30; Massey-Harris 
Tractor plow; Massey-Harris Tract- 
or Disc; Massey-Harris Binder, 7 ft. 
cut; McCormick Mower, 5 ft. cut; 
Cnvkshutt Fertilizer Drill, new; 
Massey-Harris 13-tooth Cultivator; 
Set Drag Harrows; Walking Plow; 
International Manure Spreader; O. K. 
Potato Digger; Set Sleighs; Hay 
Rack, 8-inch Brantford Grain Chop- 
per; Buzz Sawing Outfit; DeLaval 
No. 12 Separator; Other articles too 
numerous to mention. 

Everything must be sold 
TERMS: CASH 

GEO E. DUNCAN, Awiloi.eer 

---- column ----

VICTORIA CORNERS 

(Intended for Last Week) 

Mr. Jas. Batchelor and Bill have 
been laying cement for the former's 
brother-in-law, Mr. Paul Tarzwell, at 
Hillsburg. Word waa received by 
the Batchelor family that the mill 
owned by Mr. Tarzwell was burned 
on Saturday. 

Mr. Wm. Talbot is recovering from 
being laid up with a sprained ankle. 

Mrs. Geo. McGregor and babe, 
Wayne, is visiting her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Jas. Batchelor. 

Mrs. Chas. Moore spent a week at 
Smithville and Toronto. Charlie, 
who has been working at Niagara 
for the winter, returned with her. 

Muriel Talbot and Mrs. 'Wm. Lud- 
low are at Jack Batchelor's, Bethel, 
taking care of the new boy (Stanley 
Edwin). 

Clifford Talbot, who has been 
working at Pickering, is visiting his 
parents, prior to going north. 

Mr. a nd Mrs. Mel Hawes and Mary 
of Bright visited Mrs. Hawe's par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Stinson, 
for the Easter holidays. 

Mr. John Henry Richardson is 
building a colony house and has ord- 
ered 500 baby chicks. Will the price 
of eggs drop next year? 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernie Stinson and 
sons visited the latter's parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Bert Henderson. 

Out student minister will preach 
his farewell messacre next Sunday. 

What a terrible noise was heard on 
Saturday evening! At first 'twas 
thought the Axis army must have 
arrived, but it was later found to 
have been Russel Aeheson and his 
father, Mr. Robt. Acheson, of Pro- 
ton who were enjoying (?) a merry 
ride behind a colt hitched to a rub- 
ber tire buggy and pulling a steel 
tire bugjry. The colt scared at a 
truck and bolted up the road. It 
started at Ed. Stlnson's. Russell 
held it to the road and when the colt 
reached Mr. Best's it began to think 
that the fun and excitement was 
hardly worth the bother, so it stopp- 
ed with no harm done. 

A week ago snow banks were quite 
in evidence, but the warm weather 
this week makes everything spring- 
like. Here is hoping the weather 
continues warm, 

ENGAGEMENT 

Mr. T. Bemrose wishes to announce 
the engagement of his daughter, 
Mary, to Mr. Laurie Russell, only 
son "of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Russell 
of Rock Mills, the marriage to take 
place quietly in Toronto the end of 
April. 

---- column ----

Maxwell United Church 

REV. GEO. L. MERCER, B.D., D.D. 

Minister 

SUNDAY, APRIL 20th, 1941 
11 a.m. Mt. Zion. 
3 p.m. Wareham. 
7.30 p.m. Maxwell. 
Note: The minister will bring an 
Easter message to the Mt. Zion con- 
gregation on Sundav morning. Good 
attendance at & \l services is desired. 

ILUSTRATFD LECTURE 
The Rev. S. E. Annis. M.A., B.D., 
chairman Grey Presbytery, will give 
an illustrated lecture on West China 
at Eugenia church this evening. Mrs. 
Annis will also be present and will 
display a number of interesting sou- 
venirs which she obtained while in 
China. This lecture is sponsored by 
the Young People's Union and the 
public is invited. Lunch served. 

---- column ----

Future Events 

---- column ----

A dance will be held in the hall at 
Eugenia on Friday night of this week, 
April 18th, under auspices of L.O.L. 
1118. Good music. Lunch. Admis- 
sion 26c. 

---- column ----

Flesherton United Church 

REV. G. K. MCMILLAN, B.A., B.D. 

Minister 

11.00 a.m. -- Worship Flesherton. 
2.00 p.m. Worship Ceylon. 
7.30 p.m. Worship Fleshertoa. 

---- column ----

A dance will be held in the hall at 
Oratige Valley on Friday, April 18th. 
Admission 25c. Ladies with lunch 
free. Good mu?ic. 

---- column ----

Mr. McArthur, the hair dresser 
from Toronto, will be at M. Arthur 
MncDonald's residence (bake shop) 
Flesherton, on Thursday April 24th, 
to give permanents. Make appoint- 
ments with Mrs. Scarrow at the 
bake shop. 

---- column ----

Flesherton Baptist Church 

Minister- Sev. Fred Asb'on 

Services Fleherton. 

11 a.m. Worship. 

12 noon, Bible Schoil. 
7 p.m., Gospel Service. 

Monday at 8 p.m. Y. P. Service. 
Rock Mills 

2 p.m., Bible School. 

3 p.m., Worship. 

Easter services at the Baptist 
church were observed last Sunday 
with the Rev. C. H. Stmutt, D.D., of 
Toronto as special speaker. The pul- 
pit was tastefullv decorated with 
flowers and Mr. Roy Langford was 
the soloist. The young people met 
Monday night with Mr. Langford in 
charge and a very entertaining and 
profitable time was spent by all. 
Next Monday night Young People's 
meeting will commence at 7 45. 

Don't fail to hear Prof. Parker of 
McMaster University at the Baptist 
church on Sunday, April 2? after- 
noon at Rock Mills and evening at 
Flesherton. Pastor Ashton will give 
his farewell message in the morning. 

Gospel Workers' Church 

Feversham, Ont. 
Rev. C. McNichol. Pastor 
Sunday School at 10.00 a.m. 
Morning Service at 11.00 a.m. 
Evening Service at 7.30 r.m. 

---- column ----

\ 
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---- column ----

Saving Ontario's 
Natural 

^ 

Resources 

---- column ----

By G. C. Tonstr 

Ontario Federation of Angler 

and Hunter* 

(No. 38) 

BASS CULTURE 

The raising of young ba*w i 
one cf the most difficult prob- 
lemg in fish culture, for unlike 
the trout or the whitefish, th 
Ita&'os canr.ot be stripped of their 
eggs as '.his process kills the par- 
ent fish. Fishes which spawn in 
schools an- of such a nature that 
their cgrtrs and sperm flow freely 
from the body when rip, but th 
l>a<;s must build a nest, come to- 
gether in pairs, and spread th 
'KK laying period over several 
clays. Apparently, one reason for 
this is that the egs of the feinala 
do not ripen al! at the same time. 

Since this is so we must bring 
the adult bass together in ponds, 
leave them to pair naturally, and 
leave the male bass with the nest 
for several weeks. This can best 
be understood if I explain th 
way in which the- basses repro- 
duce. In natural waters, when 
they warm in the spring, the mala 
Itass selects a site protected 
against wave action and to som 
extent, from natural enemies. H 
dears the ooze from this site by 
fanning with his tail and lower 
fins, leaving a cleared circular 
area of gravel. This is the nest. 
Hatching of Young Bass 

When the nest is completed, if 
:he water temperature has reach- 
ed 65 the male drives a female 
over the nest and a few of her 
eggs are extruded and fertilized 
'y the male. This is repeated a 
number of times until there r 
everal thousand eggs In th 
(travel of the nest. Then tht 
male mounts guard, driving away 
all other fishes including the fe- 
laales. He watches the eggs for 
several weeks and when they 
hatch guards the young for some 
time. 

The young at first are very tiny 
and live on the egg sack which is 
atill attached to their bodies. In 
a week or so they have grown 
considerably and have absorbed 
the remainder of the yolk. They 
are now r<?ady to feed and rise to 
the surface. The male bass seems 
to know that his job it finished 
and he drives into the school 
scattering them in all directions, 
riiis is why we find young bass 
in July scattered all through the 
shallow waters if the hatch has 
!>een successful -for that year. 

---- column ----

Canada's Railways 
Increase Revenue 

Groti Intake During 1940 
Wai The Beat In A Deoad* 
Freight Train* Earned Muoh 
More 

Gross revenues of Canadian 
railways during 1940 soared to 
their highest point since 1930, 
leaching $424,820,629, compared 
with $3f.3,32G,824 in 1939, the 
Dominion Bureau of Statistics has 
reported. 

At the same time, operating 
expenses were heavier than dur- 
ing the previous year by $29,605,- 
507, transportation expenses were 
\H> $13,550,56!! and maintenance 
expenses higher by $16,343,0-19 
the report said. 

Expenses Heavier 

The operating income was in- 
'reased by $27,506,404, from 
*46,649,20o to $74,155,656. 

Freight traffic measured in 
ton-inili-K was heavier than in 
lysrt by 20.5 per cent., and pas. 
oenger miles increased by 24.5 
per cent. Total payroll increased 
by *13,0fl,277, from $191,101,- 
727 to S204,1U3,004, for an av- 
erage of 121,00!) employees in 
193!) and 127,028 in 1040. 

Freight trains earned 15 cents 
more per train-mile than in l!3f* 
and carried 34. y more tons of 
revenue freight. Passenger trains 
showed higher earnings per train- 
mile of 30 rents and carried 10.5 
more passengers per train-mile. 
C.N.R. Revenue up 22.7% 

Of tin- gro.ss revenue totaU, 
$212,300,711 was made up of 
Canadian National Hallways cani- 
ingH, which showed a 22.7 per 
cent, increase from tin- )!>3!i fig- 
ure of S173,05!,ll!i. 

Canadian Pacific Uailway Gorn- 
|n.v gross revenues towards the 
total wirr- SI 71, 5.15, 47 1 a 12.7 
percent, increase fYorn $ir,'_,l IX,- 
:>?'.'! in 1M!. 

Pine Cone Found 

In Spruce Wood 

While- sawing a piece of sprue* 
wood, John Walker, of Windsor, 
i ami- arums an ummul formation. 
inxi'l of the wood was found 
* piece of pino cone which had 
apparently been lodged ihcra 
nuite a number of years am>. Th 
uotie had turned t,<> a ruddy i-olyr 
hut was still in an excellent .state 

---- column ----

More Bomber* For Britain Are Being Dismantled for Shipment Oversea* 

---- column ----

More than thirty Lockheed Hudson bombers arc assembled at Floyd Bennett Airport in New YoA, 
where they'll be dismantled and shipped to England via beats. They're part of the steady flow of American 
planes which have greatly bolstered the R.A.F. 

---- column ----

THE WAR- WEE K Commentary on Current Events 

BALKAN FRONT IS STAGE 
OF MAJOR WAR DRAMA 

---- column ----

"PeopU of tke Empira 
bbuld be profoundly grate- 
ful that in the Naci path 
Greece and Yugoslavia have 
become active obstacles. But 
tli chief obetacle to Nazi am- 
bition* i> still Britain . . . 
The threat of invasion of her 
own island has not passed; 
that danger will (row at the 
spring- advances . . . The 
Battle of the Atlantic, yet te> 
be won, is the most vital 
truffle of all." Prime Min- 
ister Mackenzie King, 
see 

At the start of the tremendous 
war drama in the Balkans, ail in- 
itial seriei of triumphs for the 
German military machint in both 
Yugoslavia and Greece appeared 
all but inevitable. 

Hitler Must Act Faet 

Far from inevitable, however, 
(wrote Edward Bomar of the 
Associated Press) was it that such 
victories at the early capture of 
Belgrade and the overrunning of 
the Yugoslavs' richest areas would 
b followed by the smashing of 
all obstacles to the Nazi drive to 
th east. "Only the verdict of 
fateful battles to the sout/h 
could decide whether Hitler's gen- 
erals would be able to match in 
th Balkans the quick victories 
won in the Low Countries and in 
France last year," Mr. Bomar 
continued, in one of the clearest 
analyses of the situation made 
last week. "They are forced by 
necessity to try to execute in a 
hurry Hitler's injunction to smash 
the dangerous new British-Greek- 
Serb alliance and drive the Brit- 
ish forces from southeastern Eur- 
ope. With United States aid in- 
creasing steadily though slowly, 
time is no ally of the Nazis . . . 
Germany is faced with the neces- 
sity of a quick decision to avoid 
the alternative of a long struggle 
with its perils that Turkoy and 
even Russia might join the foes." 

Most military observers saw in 
the Balkan campaign the major 
part of an attempt to wrest con- 
trol of the entire Mediterranean 
from Britain and to win the war 
thi* year. Another part of the 
same drive was the new Na/,i 
campaign in Libya which might 
develop into a drive to close 
fche Mediterranean at Gibraltar 
from the south (instead of from 
Spain)- -with or without the aid 

---- column ----

of the rue French Army in Mor- 
occo. 

At Tvrkejr'a Back Door 

But Germany could never con- 
quer the Mediterranean miles-. 
Turkey were first put out of the 
picture, either by military con- 
quest or by diplomacy. Thei pro- 
Axis coup in Iraq last week plac- 
ed Turkey in a doubly dangerous 
position German air bases could 
now be located at her back door. 
It was believed that Hitler would 
shortly demand that Turkey be- 
tray her alliances or be herself 
attacked. In the latter event, 
there was no question that Turkey 
would defend herself with all th 
force she could muster. Last 
week thoujfh still non-belligerent, 
Turkey was helping the anti-Axis 
allies in rnore ways than one, 
chief of which consisted in keep- 
ing the Bulgarian army immobil- 
ized. (British quarters hinted last 
week in Istanbul that Turkey 
might declare war soon. They 
suggested she would remain on the 
defensive, but could permit Brit- 
ain to use Turkish air bases and 
to move warships through the 
Dardanelles into the Black Set.) 

U-S. Approaches Zro Hoar 

In Washington last week, the 
opinion of most observers wan 
that April was likely to be the 
month for events which would 
send the United States into the 
war. It was thought that the 
U.S., if any ruptures in foreign 
relations were made, would break 
with Italy first, then Germany. 
Before another month was up, ob- 
servers said, the American na- 
tion would be very close to the 
state of actual belligerency a 
state of war can and may be es- 
tablished without formal declara- 
tion. The future war role of the 
United States was just about at 
the zero hour. 

Mateuoka to Moscow 

Japan'* Foreign Minister Mat- 
suuka left Berlin "suddenly" laat 
week for home, having been en- 
tertained in two Axis capitals to 
several exhibitions of fireworks 
that went "pfft!" (Italy's Ionian 
Sea disaster in an engagement 
with the British Navy and Yugo- 
slavia's .stand against Germany). 
Kn route l>nck to Japan, Matsuoka 
stopped off in Moscow again for 
an important appointment rela- 
tive to nt- initiation of a llusso- 
Japanosc non-Eggnulon pact. His 
meeting there with Soviet officials 

---- column ----

was watched very closely by th 
British, who, according to foreign 
military observers recently re- 
turned from the Far East, be- 
lieved that if Japan were success- 
ful in concluding such a pact she 
would start a land, sea and air 
attack on Hong Kong. 

"Waiting- Period" at End? 
In the Dutch East Indies, too, 
authoritative circles were of a 
similar mind. There the view was 
that the "waiting period" in the 
Far East would shortly come to 
an end and that concrete action 
toward Japan's aim of a "new 
order" in Asia would be exped- 
ited. Reports that Thailand would 
very soon join the Axis and shar- 
pon the crisis in the Paific, cen- 
tering on Singapore, appeared to 
be well substantiated. 

---- column ----

The Book Shelf.. 

---- column ----

"NEW IMPROVED CULBERT- 
SON SYSTEM" (1941) 

Here are the latest rules in con- 
tract bridge summarized for you 
by Ely Culbertson himself. Thi 
first basic changes that have been 
made in the Culbertson System in 
six years are completely describ- 
ed in this little book. With it* 
help, you can play with any part- 
ner, whether average player, ad- 
vanced, or expert. ($1.35). 

"CONTRACT BRIDGE SELF- 
TEACHER" 
By Ely Culbertson 

The world's greatest authority 
on contract bridge, in an entirely 
new book on the game, has im- 
plified bidding and play so that 
anyone can now learn expert 
methods easily and quickly. 89 
clear lessons teach you how and 
86 practice drills. All you need 
I* a book and pencil. ($1.35). 

Toronto: John C. Winston Co. 
1. in.it-. I, Publisher*. 

---- column ----

Dogs Going Into 
Action On Birds 

Spring Field Trial* of On- 
tario Bird Dog Association 
Are Being Held at Niagara- 
on-the-Laka Next Week-end 

The cream of tu biixl dog* in 
Ontario will display their wares at 
Niagara -on-t-he-Lake on April 19th 
and 20th, wlien HI > Ontario Bird 
Dog Association will hold IU sixth 
Aunuail Spring Field Trials. 

S|/.mi.'k Setters and Pointers 
will in- seen in action on birds. 

The. first stake to be run ou Sat- 
ninlay, th* liHh, Is an opm ovp)i<. 
f<-r Pointer and Setter pujtpios and 
Btaie likely contenders are expect- 
ed to take the field. ThU trial 1 
aclioduUd for 1 o'clock. 

---- column ----

For BETTER desserts 

DURHAM 

---- column ----

Two Spaniel trials will also be 
run on Saturday afternoon, a trial 
tor Novice Spaniels and the Open 
Spaniel Stake. 

Dr. John Barnes, Williams villa, 
X. Y. and G. S. Steckles, Welland, 
will judge the Spaniel trials. 
SPANIELS, SETTERS. POINTERS 

Two trials for Setters and Point- 
em are on the card for the second 
day. In the morning Novice Setters 
and Pointers, owned la Ontario. 
wlU auow their stuff and in the 
afternoon in the Opn All Age 
Slake for Setters and Pointers will 
b run. Geo. W. Boag, Woodstock, 
Ont., Secretary of the Association 
ipredlcto big fields in all trials. Aa 
asual, it is exipected that New York 
State kennels will be well repre- 
sented in the events, particularly 
In tb* open stake for Setters and. 
Pointers on the second day's pro- 
gramme. Tommy Thomas, Rochest- 
or, N.Y., and Don Crawford, Kings- 
vlll, Ont. will judge the trials tor 
SMtera and Pointers. 

The Prince of Wal*s HoteJ, Nla- 
gwa-oii-the-Lake will be head- 
quarters for the meet anil road 
ilgna will be posted to mark the 
courses (or the benefit of the big 
gaJlery of spectators which Is ex- 
pected to witness the trials. 

---- column ----

Ugly, Poorly Built 
Homes Lack Value 

---- column ----

Failure to design buildings of 
attractive architectural style is an 
evil which must be combatted to 
improve conditions of home own- 
ership, according to authorities. 

Other conditions which mak 
for poor mortgage security ar 
bad construction, poor workman- 
ship, improper use of materials, 
or use of inferior materials, and 
inefficient or objectionable room 
proportion and arrangement. 

---- column ----

SCOUTING . . . 

---- column ----

The proceeda of a "single dog 
derby" for 'boys and girls of 
Rouyn and Noranda of 16 yean 
and under, sponsored by the Nor- 
anda Firemen, went to the camp- 
ing funds of the Rouyn-Koranda 
Scouts. Rules for the race barred 

the use of whips. 

e e 

An indoor campfire program, 
conducted in the main hall of St. 
John's Church, Peterborough, 
was the entertainment feature of 

---- column ----

the annual banquet get-together 
of some 200 Cubs, Scouts, Rovers 

and parents. 

* 

At a meeting of the Sarnia Boy 
Scouts Association, which was in 
part run as a demonstration Boy 
Scout Troop, adult members be- 
came boys in the various patrols. 
During the evening several of the 
members were invested as Scouts. 
e * * 

800 magazines for soldiers' 
reading rooms were collected in 
one week by the Boy Scouts of 
Dartmouth, N.S., and 2,729 were 
gathered in a month by a Winni- 
peg Boy Scout Group. 

e * 

Three Boy Scouts of Bristol, 
England, own and operate their 
own mobile tea canteen. They 
carried on during the heaviest 
Nazi bombing of the port, serving 
a hot drink and sandwiches to 
firemen and A.R.P. workers. 

---- column ----

VOICE 

Of THE 

PRESS 

---- column ----

NOT ALL SO LUCKY 

Niagara is to keep its beauty, 
but the upper stretches of the St. 
Lawrence are due for some sad 
treatment if, as and when tha 
deep waterways scheme material- 
izes. 

Stratford Beacon-Hehald 

EXTREMELY DANGEROUS 

It is unlawful for a pedestrian 
to stand on the travelled portion 
of a roadway to beg rides or sell 
articles. It is also extremely 
dangerous to stand or idle in any 
roadway where motor traffic 
passes. 

Hamilton Spectator 
THINK NATIONALLY 

A Member of Parliament from 
Saskatchewan claims that, but for 
the development of the Western 
Provinces, Ontario would still be 
a backwoods district. This is a 
highly theoretical statement, but 
in any case it would-be better 
for this and all M.P.'e to think in 
terms not of the West or of On- 
tario, but in terms of the Domin- 
ion of Canada. 

Brantford Expositor 

---- column ----

"You can no more regiment fun 
than Hitler can regiment IOT." 
Cornelia Otis Skinner 

---- column ----

LIFE'S LIKE THAT 

---- column ----

By Fred Neher 

---- column ----

"Doin" yer plowin' early, in'lcHa, pardner?" 

---- column ----

REG'LAR FELLERS The Opportunist 

---- column ----

By GENE BYRNES 

---- column ----

/ THE HUDSON* ARC 
MOVIN 

\ AN' I'M cerriN' 

CENTS TO 
HELP/ 

---- column ----

VERY 
PINHEAD.' NO 
QO BACK AND 
AMOTHCK 

I.OADX 

---- column ----

I 1 1J 

It At 
---- page ----

---- column ----

for War Savings 

---- column ----

: 

---- column ----

SALADA 

---- column ----

TEA 

---- column ----

Keeping 
Company . . 

Adapted from the 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 
Picture 

by 
Lebbeus Mitchell 

Copyrifhr 1940 by Loew'i Inc. 

---- column ----

CHAPTER ONE 

Beside the mailbox, bearing the 
name of Harry (.'. Thomas, stoo.l 
a young girl of some nine or ten 
years. She whistled shrilly and two 
other girls o\' about her age came 
out ot the shrubbery. 

"Did'ya Ma give you a dime for 
ice cream, Harriet?" asked one. 

"I was lucky even to get out," 
replied Harriet Thomas. "Here 
comes the ice cream man. I'll 
handle the negotiations." 

An elderly, weary mail, driving a 
decrepit car, stopped at her hail. 
He glared at them resent fully. 

"It's no use. My boss says there 
Ain't no such thing as an ice cream 
wagon with charge accounts." 

"I got another proposition. Mr. 
Green," said Harriet. "My two 
friends here have got dimes. 
They're willing to buy two tee 
creams for cash, if I get one free." 

"Oh, no!" said the driver. 

"Let's go to Hosey's tee cream 
parlor," said Harriet to her com- 
panions. They had gone but a few 
feet when Mr. Green called: 

"Wait a minute! They each got 
dimes?" 

"Right! They buy for ca*h n<l 
I get one free for brinimg the bus- 
iness." 

"Three ice creams for twenty 
cents," Mr. Green figured mentally 
for a moment. "All right. " He dish- 
ed up three ice creams and the 
three little girls began eating 
them. "Come, where are the 
dimes?" 

"Mine's home." said Harriet's 
etoo^e, Emily, gulping the rest ot 
the ice cream. 

"And mine's in the " 

"In the bank. I suppose," Har- 
riet, in a chagrined voice, inter- 
rupted AI. Belle, her second 
stooge. She nodded and Harriet 
hastened to forestall Mr. Green's 
wrath. "They double-crossed me. 
loo, Joe. I'm only the middle man." 
Sister Mary's Upstairs 

"Sure, I kuow. The middle man 
of all the trouble I've ever had on 
this street!" said the inseused 
sweet vendor. 

"Harriet!" called Mrs. Thomas. 
"Harriet!" the Intonation caused 
the smell girl to hide her ice cream 
under her dress. 

"Well, this time you kfpt your 
promise!" smiled Mrs. Tlioma-s. 
"Your dress is just as clean as 
wht-n you put It on. Rim upstairs 
and wash your hands . . . Why, 
what's the matter, dear?" The little 
ffrl was twitching as though hit 
by a spurt of ice cold water. 

"Nothing, mother. It's Uirued a 
httle chilly, I think." 

"Chilly? Aren't you feeling well? 
Why, your teeth are chattering!" 

"I'm all right. I'll wa*b up, like 
you said." 

"But d-arlinjj, are you sure?" She 
pressed Harriet dote. "1 must take 
your temperature. Why, it is ehilly 
all of a sudden!" Stepping back 
to look at her daughter, Mrs. Thom- 
as saw the chocolate ice cream 
oozing thruugh the child's d^ees. 

"We gotta face it, Mom. Things 
just have to Inppen when I'm 
around!" 

"Yes, 1 know," sighed Mrs. 
Thomas, "t'pstairs with jon! 
Change everything down to your 
skin. And tell Mary father'll be 
honiH any niiuute, so we'll have 
dinner as soon as she can coax 
herself away fi-oui the mirror!" 

Kearing thf> liathroom. Harriet 
heard her nist.-r Mary's voice. Sii> 
stopped and lisuned. Mary was <t 
grown young lady with iwo steady 
beaux. The tone In her voice pro- 
mised something inte:-etiiip to lla:- 
rlet. 

"You've ih'iif me- a gre.it honor 
>H uikiiiK me to bcomo your wife," 

---- column ----

Slow Burning 
CIGARETTE PAPERS 

MONK FIHlltMADC 

---- column ----

ISS U E Ifr '41 

---- column ----

came Mary's voice, "but you've got 
to give me time to think." After a 
pause, she continued: "I ... I 
really hadn't regarded you in last 
light." Another pause. "I really 
never thought of you in that way." 
Then again: "It's a very serious 
tiueston you've asked me . . . It's 
not that I don't regard it as an hon- 
or ... Marriage is an Important 
matter. A woman can't a girl 
can't just say yes or no as simply 
as all that." 

"Let me in, Mary," said Harriet. 
Aifter some hesitation the door was 
opened. "You all alone?" 

"1 thought I heard you talking 
to Home one ... 1 guess I was 
wrong. You better hurry. Mom says 
it's nearly time for dinner." 

Mrs. Thomas and her second 
daughter. Evelyn, aged seventeen, 
wt -e busy about the dinner when 
Harriet, in a clean dress, appear- 
ed. "I know something I won't 
tell aud it ain't two midgets In a 
peanut shell!" 

"Harriet, how many times do 1 
have to tell you not to spy on your 
sisters?" 

Talking to Herself 

"The last time you said you 
weren't going to tell me ;u.i:n' 
Mary's gonna get married!" 

'Mary!" cried Mrs. Thomas am- 
azed. "How how do you know?" 
"I heard her talking in the bath- 
room, eo I listened." 
" "You shouldn't listen to people 
talking." 

"If I don't listen wlven they are 
talking when jun 1 suppcsed to 
listen?" 

"Well, never mind that. Who did 
Mary say she was goiug to marry?" 

"She didn't say. Here's Pop!" 
Harriet ran to the door and sprang 
into Mr. Thomas's arms. "Gee, 
Pop. I'm glad you're home." 

"Are you, ha,ly?" he said, smil- 
ing fondly. 

(To be continued) 

Fashion Flashes 

---- column ----

Relaxed Knees 
Help Carriage 

Stiff, Awkward Leg Muscles 
Mean An Ungainly Walk 

---- column ----

Slips and petticoat.* for spring 
re colorful in prints, dots, strip- 
es, floral prints and dots, more 
hold in outline and in color mix- 
tures, while the range of pastels 
is used in dots against dark 
grounds, navy, black. Jeep red . . 
The shops show candy striped 
taffeta petticoats . . . dotted taf- 
feta slips ... as well as bright 
colors in taffeta slips and petti- 
coats, with the following given 
preference in the monotones: 
Dusty rose, deep pinks, opaline, 
lea rose, light and dark blues, 

bright greens and black. 


Slimness with movement is ex- 
pressed in pleats in skirts, with ; 
wide box versions noted, also in 
concentrated front fullness, with 
soft gathers and fine tucks re- 
gistering. Frequently fullness de- 
velops from below the waistline, 
from a section suggesting yoke, 
with this same curved or pointed 
outline repeated in the bodice, in 

a shoulder yoke. 

* * 

Xew jackets are sometimes 
boxy, sometimes easily fitted, and 
skirts show definite approval <if 
pleats, but always with accent on 

smooth htplines. 

* 

Separate dresses have an im- 
portant look, sometimes all-over 
tucked, with novelty tuckings, 
and especially attractive in sheets, 
extending from neckline to horn, 
and the finest sort of tucks make 
decorative scroll designs on orepe 
afternoon dresses. The twin- 
print idea is carried out in cos- 
tumes with the sheer print veil- 
ing the crepe. 

* * 

The necklace silhouette; huts of 
shimmering plastics; sombreros; 
wide, off-the-face brims on wool 
lace crowns; planted taffeta hats 
are seen. 

---- column ----

Greasy Pans Should 
Be Least of Worries 

Washing greasy pans need not 
be a painful job for the house- 
wife. Pour out the fat while the 
pan is still hot, then fill the pan 
with hot. soapy water and allow 
to soak until dishwashing time. 
If the water has then become 
cool and bits of grease cling to 
the pan, refill with hot water, let 
it boil up on the stove for a min- 
ute or two. then wash in strong 
soap suds in the regular manner. 
Rinse in clear hot water and dry. 

---- column ----

Certain types of wool are | 
known as "botany" because the 
first shipment of Australian 
morin > wool was nuvle from Bot- 
ny Bay. 

---- column ----

"Stiff, awkward legs pan.-': 
larly in the region ef the knees 
make for graceless carriage," sa> 
Nadino Gae, attractive little dan<?- 
Ing star. "No woman can stand, 
sit, walk or dance, gracefully if her 
leg muscles are tens*." 

Miss Gae> thinks that relaxai on 
exercises are the answer to thi-i 
problem. Here are directions for 
a routine, that she advocates auJ 
which she does regularly: 

Lie flat on your back on the 
floor with ankles ahoitt a foot 
apart. Try to relax the entire body 
as much as possible. Now, without 
bending knee, hut without stiffen- 
ing it unnecessarily, lift right les 
about a foot off the floor, then let 
it fall. Repeat, lifting left leg and 
then letting it fall to the fl-i-jr. 
To ke-ep heels from getting bunr ?! 
during this exercise, place a thiu 
pillow on the floor under them. 
FOR SLIM WAISTLINE 

Always remember to think of 
your legs as springs for your 
body, 1 ' the dancer concludes. "Don't 
let your torso sag against hip 
Joints. KI-. p the in.pi r part of your 
body up and away from the lowsr 
half. This will make your waistline 
slimmer and your oarriaire naoiv 
attractive." 

---- column ----

Women Like Warmer 
Air, Science Finds 

---- column ----

By Anne Adam* 

Simple, w-e.Il-fittint;- lines en- 
riched by lovely details that's 
the fashion success recipe for 
graciously mature lady. Pattern 
4634 by Anno Adam? Drives you 
just that! See how beautifully 
the skirt is planned, with douhle 
panels to tlu- front and to the 
back. The bodice is nicely cut 
too. very soft and becoming, with 
darts at botii the waist and shoul- 
ders 10 injure perfect fit. Tile 
flower motifs are in an easy 
transfer pattern, with directions 
for their simple making: rifrht in 
the Sewing Instructor. A tltroe- 
HUartor-ieiiKth <li-eve version is 
included in this most flattering 
of styles. 

Pattern 4634 is available in 
women's sizes 34, 36, 38, 40, 42. 
44, -10 ami 48. Size 36 takes 3\ 
yards 35 inch fabric and '4 yard 
contrast. 

Send twenty cents (20c) in 
coins (stamps cannot be accept- 
ed) for this Antic Adams pattern. 
Write plainly site, name, aiMress 
and style number. 

Soiu) your order to Anne Ad- 
ams. Room , 73 West Adelaide 
St, Toronto. 

---- column ----

Table Talk: 

---- column ----

By SADIE B. CHAMBERS 

---- column ----

Her Profession : Advertising 

---- column ----


---- column ----

Science has proved a fact which 
men have suspected for a long 
time that women like the room 
temperature considerably higher 
than is comfortable for the men. 

F. C. Houghton, director of rhe 
American Society of Heating and 
Ventilating Engineers' research ' 
laboratory, spent a year recording- , 
the reactions of persons under '. 
different temperature and heating 
conditions to prove the conten- 
tion. 

The reason, he said, is obvious, i 
Women just don't wear as mnny 
clothes. 

---- column ----

EMBROIDERY MAY 
ENRICH DRESS 

---- column ----

A. Company Dinner 

As lovely Spring days approach there will be much visiting and 
modest entertaining. Two things the hostess keeps in mind is to 
have something a little different, yet economical and also a menu that 
will be for her as simple as possible, that her energies may be con- 
served for enjoying her guests to the utmost. 

With all this in mind I offer you this menu: 

---- column ----

Apple Juice 
Creamed Pork Chops Baked Potatoes 

Glazed Onions 

Whole Wheat Muffins and Butter 

Pea and Carrot Salad 

Maple Cream Dessert 

Date Loaf 

Coffee 
After Dinner Mint* 

---- column ----

CREAMED PORK. CHOPS 
Pan brown the chops and then 
place them in a shallow dish 
sprinkle with salt, pepper and a 
dust of sage. Sprinkle thickly 
with finely-ground bread crumbs. 
Dot with butter bake in hot oven 
until crumbs are lightly browned 
then dd enough water to keep 
from rtickin? C ok 30 minutes 
then add 1 can of condensed 
mushroom soup. Cook 10 min- 
utes longer. 

GLAZED ONIONS 
'i dozen small white onions 
2 tablespoons butter 
C tablespoons sugar 
2 teaspoons water 
Peel onions; cook in boiling 
waited water until tender. Drain; 
Melt butter, add sugar and water. 
Add onions, simmer to brown 
and glaze. 

PEA AND CARROT SALAD 
2 cups small canned peas 

1 cup grated carrot 

4 cup finely chopped ooiery 

2 tablespoons chopped onion 

---- column ----

A Spring Riddle 

What conies in spring, 
A welcome thing, 
But doesn't ever -lay? 

Upon its back 

A small black cap. 

Its fuzzy coat iS gray. 

It grows a-pai'e. 
And in a trace. 
Some yellow iiu>t ;* there. 

In spi-mgtimt-'s sun, 

It has begun 

To cur: its yellow hair! 

Then off it drops 
And never stops 
To bid .1 fond ai'ieu. 

1 hope next spring 
The same soft thing 
Will viir us, don't you? 

Ruth Tewksbury Bjorkman 
fAnswer: Pussywillow) 

---- column ----

It'j 

---- column ----

The Fastest 
Of All Things 

---- column ----

The, fastest thing on this earth 
is the gyroscope, some types of 
which whirl round at 47,000 revo- 
lutions a niinute. This means that 
any point on the circumference 
is moving at 55. 8 miles a minute! 
The principle of the gyroscope 
has been known for centuries, and 
many boys own toy gyroscopes. 
It was from one of these that 
Elmer A. Sperry, inventor ot' the 
Sperry Gyroscope, got his idea. 
Gyroscopes are used mainly in 
mono-rail trains, air liners, and 
huge sea-going steamships, and 
they range in weight from 60 Ib. 
to more than 1 00 tons. Those in 
huge liners are installed in a 
special room and are looked after 
by an expert, because they ; n- 
crease the speed of the ship, pr- 1 - 
vent rolling, and prevent sea sick- 
ness. 

---- column ----

"Knows His Onions" 

Mr. H. J. Hutchinson. of Sclby. 
England, has gathered I cwt. of 
onions after sowing 12 oz. of 
seed a 3.000-fold increase. 

---- column ----

This Coupon Worth $4.1 1 

---- column ----

lnlri*.[iH'ini nor l:ttri*ff 
AuKitttullr Tcli'l i*.ia 1'fpr 

ru K.- TO i'u.-.!i the imtti<!>. 

watch it Ml. 

riii ojiipon 'ind only .Sl'i,- 
entit;s til-: D nU. i- to 

"f .-u- u-_ <i Televisi 
Knir T-JI !',-i. s. with 
written tiro <tu:i.-:ni- 

to.-. li-r !:'y 

Push the Button 

Any :! Initials on>!r;n .1 
on this pen in -lolii ' i< 
, i tw Mtra N in."- 

p.. r liTiitip J '.- 

---- column ----

This pen f'co tr jvu cuti 
purchase ono like it *! 
n here (or lss thun ... 
Coupon is good only while 
advertising- tale is on. 
Limit: 3 pens to one coupon 

V.-n'i M.I.- h.i. KlB( Clip 

See It Fill! - * 

---- column ----

IVnn mme brown, i 
ltry vr blark. 

Sond 5c extra .'.: |>,> 

*. *!, i YII, M- to 

ii.-i.. 'i !. Extra .. 

---- column ----

Same initials fi-ce on pen- 
cil with pu:vh.i-e i/f set, 

Starr Pen Co., Regina 

---- column ----

Household Hints 

---- column ----

Start The Day With 
Bran Griddle Cakes 

---- column ----

Hern's a trio of breakfast de- 
lijihts to ktip y.ni singing all day 
ionsr bacon, bran griddle cakes, 
and a cup of steaming hot coffee! 
Spre:!il with melting butter and 
inapK- -\-!-ii|i, these modern flap- 
jacks a ix 1 rnusi,- to the appetite at 
any time so be prepared for 
plenty of encores! 

BRAN GRIDDLE CAKES 

2 eiru* 

'* cup sugar 
2*4 cups milk 

3 cups flour 

2 tablespoons baking powder 
I 1 * teaspoons salt 
*& cup shortening; 
H cup All-Bran 
Beat efrirs and sugar until light 
and flufiy; add milk and mix 
well. Sift flour with baking pow- 
der and salt; add 10 first mixture, 
stirring until flour disappears. 
Add mehud and cooled shorten- 
ing:. Fold in All-Bran. Bake on 
hot griiuilo, turning only once. 

Yield: 15 griddle cakes . 
iuches in d'ameter). 

---- column ----

2 labiespoon? chopped olives 
2 chopped hard boiled eggs 

Drain peas grate carrot and | 
cHon other ingredients. Just be- 
fore serving tosa all together 
A-ith your favorite mayonnaise. 
Sprinkle chopped egg on top 
Also attractive :s some chopped 
parsley or water cress added. 

MAPLE CREAM DESSERT 

2 tablespoons granulated gela- 
tine 
'* cup cold water 

1 cup milk 

2 egg yolks 

' teaspoon salt 

'2 cup maple syrup 

'i cup chopped nut meats 

1 cup whipped cream 
'B cup marshmsllows diced. 

Soften the gelatine in the cold 
water. Scald the milk over hot 
water; add a small amount of it 
slowly to the egg yolk Return to I 
the milk remaining in the double ' 
boiler and cook until the mixture 
coau the spoon. In the meantime 
it r n the salt and maple syrup. 

---- column ----

S-w rape to the four corners of 
your ironint? blanket and tie them 
firmly to the table legs; it saves 
any annoying wrinkles on the 

blanker. 

* 

Make .-.tire the feathers won't 
work through your new pillow 
ticking- by waxing the inside of 
the cover, ironing it with a hot 
iron rubbed over beeswax and 
ironing the beeswax every time 

before pressing the material. 


Straighten bent knitting need- 
les that have done overtime for 
the troops by plunging them into 
boiling water or holding them in 
hot steam, straightening with the 
"njrers anil then leaving in cold 

\vati-r to harden. 

* 

The tjuli-kest way to blanch al- 
monds is to put them in cold 
water, brinj; it to a boil and then 
put them into cold water again 
at once; the skins will rub off in 

a twinkling. 

* * 

If you slop hot fat on to the 
kitchen table or floor, dash cold 
water on it at once : this sets it 
before it has time to penetrate 
the w.^od and makes it easy to 

scrape off later. 

n 

A lump of sugar put into the 
Teapot with the tea prevents it 
from staining the tea cloth; any 
<pilt tea will come out in the 

wash quite easily if you do this. 


Avoid any risk of burning acci- 
dents by making thin cotton or 
flannelette materials used for 
kiddies' fancy dresses or decora- 
tion purposes n, in-inflammable in 
this way. Wash and rinse the 
material and squeeze it dry, then 
soak for a few minutes in 2 ozs. 
a!ur-i dissolved in 1 quart of 
boiiing water and used when 
cool; hang out to dry without 
wringing or mangling. 

* * 

If your coal cellar has a win- 
dow or an outside door, leave it 
open; the more fresh air coal 
pets, the less of its gas it loses 
and. consequently, burns longer 
and brighter. 

---- column ----

Miss Hazel Kel.y h<H '-t 
pointed manager of the Torfnt* 
office of Stevenson & Sen:; Ltd., 
Montreal. Misa Kelly joiuej the 
Toronto branch when it op;:tt fn 
1938 and before that was roaee 
buyer with Ftfiancial Advertising 
Co. of Canada Ltd. 

---- column ----

It's Fairly Easy 
To Keep Slim 

Establishing Right Face. Hab- 
its la Most ImporUht 

---- column ----

Once you are slim after .^.ten- 
sive dieting, writes Alice :ade 
Robinson, you will have to tu.ng 
on to a few of -he princir/*- of 
right eating in order to stay illn;. 
If pou go back to your old v ays-, 
you will pick up the 10 or -o fosi 
pounds faster than you lost '.hem! 

Slimming down should aave 
given you a good start -.ward 
changing your food habit-, how- 
ever, and when slim food habits 
arc well established you yi-n't 
hav to worry about your '.\--'-ht. 
SKIP THE DESSERT 

In the meantime, here v a 
weight stabilizing trick tht; will 
help you to control the i -:f>9 
without ooiuting the oaloi \ i too 
closely. You are not apt to "vei-- 
eat of the protective food.-, nuch 
as eggs, lean meat, and you .'-n't 
have to keep an eye on tho?* Put 
you may be inclined to over-eat 
on bread, potatoes anil def<rrts; 
o make it a strict nilc t.i Umit 
yourself to ne oat of the '.(tree. 
When you have bread, leav: off 
the potatoes and the desc.frt 
other than fresh fruit for {has 
meal. Or, it you would il 
have the dessert, skip the 
two. 

---- column ----

Musical Milk 

Swing music on the -adio 
made c..ws at Trinidad c olr- 
ado) produce milk giving a , ex- 
tra pint of cream a day. 

---- column ----

SWAY 
SAVING 

ON BAKING 

---- column ----

YOU USE LESS 

---- column ----

; 

BETTER 

---- column ----

U's ihe ii <iMe -jcuou >t 
Olurnet Baking Powder that 
permits you to -v Ins, and 
still get better results. 

Calumet gives continuou-t 
leavening during mixing ur. ' 
in the oven. Eisy-openinj: 
won't-spill container, with 
handy measuring device under 
the lid. AND THE PRICK 
IS SUnPRISUVGLY LOW. 

---- column ----

i 

---- column ----

---- column ----

DOUBLE-ACTING 
---- page ----

---- column ----

Wednesday, April 16, 1941 

---- column ----

THE FLBSHERTON ADVANCE 

---- column ----

---- column ----

THE 

fLESHERTON ADVANCE 

Published on Collingwood Strwt, 
. Klt-Bhertun, Wednesday of Mcb 

wuvk. Circulation ovr 1,000. 

, Price in Canada |2.00 P*r jrr, 

| When paid in advance $1.50; in 

j C. 8. A. fZ.MJ per year, when 

paid in advance $2.00. 

F. J. THURSTON, Editor. 

---- column ----

THE PRESS AND THE 
GOVERNMENT 

Misconceptions relating to the right 
of the press to criticize, commend or 
suggest to government bodies, civic, 
provincial or federal, is often assailed. 
For that reason it is essential that 
the position of the press in its rela- 
tionship to governmental bodies 
should be examined. 

Many well-meaning people con- 
ecientuously believe that the press 
should express no conviction upon 
civic, provincial or federal affairs. 
They assume that to offer criticism 
is to become partisan. They confuse 
the meaning of the words "indepen- 
dent" and "neutral." There is a very 
real and vital difference between the 
two. To be independent is to reserve 
the inalienable right of every citizen 
to approve or disapprove of any pub- 
lic matter without thoughtof servi- 
tude to any particular party or group. 
To be neutral is to avoid reference to 
any contentious matter. To sum up the 
two it would be fair to say that ind 
pendence was that same privilege of 
the individual to decide for himself, 
for which party he shall vote, or 
which church he shall attend without 
pressure from party executives or 
religious dignitaries. To be neutral 
la to admit that one is not prepared 
to come to a decision or make a stand 
on anv matter, and .therefore to leave 
it alone. 

Members of civic bodies sometimes 

---- column ----

point out that newspapers have such 
a tremendous influence in the com- 
mvnity, and that their circulation is 
so wide-spread that they have an 
advantage over those with whom they 
disagree. This is true only in-so-far 
as the individual refuses to take ad- 
vantage of the privileged granted by 
almost every newspaper of using the 
columns of the press, to express his 
or her views. There is however, a 
much more important angle to this 
question. Newspapermen are equip- 
ped to give more adequate study to 
municipal affairs than most individu- 
als. At their fingertips they have in- 
formation which is not so readily 
available to every citizen. Their 
representatives attend meetings of 
civic bodies, and therefore have the 
opportunity of i-ettinc a better 
understanding of municipal affairs 
than the average voter. Of even 
greater importance is the almost uni- 
versal attitude of the public to expect 
advice and leadership from the press. 
The newspaper is often the only 
medium through which citizens may 
keep in touch and abreast of the 
community. They expect, and have 
the right to expect, tha'. their news- 
paper will keep them advised of what 
is going on, and will also, through the 
information at its disposal, endeavour 
to interpret the news. The news- 
paper which fails to do this, is 
failing in what often amounts to its 
supreme task in the community. 

Another assumption of some men 
and women in public office is that 
any criticism offered in a newspaper 
is personal, rather than objective. 
That is not true. Newspapers have 
been know n to conduct violently per- 
sonal campaigns, but it is the excep- 
tion rather than the rule, and if anv 
criticism violates the laws of defama- 
tor" libel, the individual always has 
recourse to the courts. 

The newspaper which comments on 
public affairs, far from being presum- 
ptious, is but fulfilling one of the 
most important and vital functions of 
the press. It is genuine in its desire 
to be of service to the community, it 
will open its columns to signed letters 
from those who disagree with 

---- column ----

its editorial opinions, but all too often 
those who have this privilege fail to 
avail themselves of the opportunity, 
preferring to carry on a street corner 
or platform feutl against the news- 
paper. By intelligent comment on 
public affairs the newspaper prevents 
the rise of unscrupulous men who 
seek office for private gain, and it 
often brings to light factors in a situ- 
ation that have been entirely oyer- 
ooked by the civic administrations 
and the public. In this service alone 
newspapers have saved their com- 
munities from colossal financial loss 
and from racketeers who would use 
public office to enrich themselves. 

---- column ----

en COOWCAR 

---- column ----

MARATKOHS! 
THty eivt you 

9IQ Mil CACC AND 

Tfffy Sll AT A 

R(Al tOW PR IC 

---- column ----

For big mileage and a down- 
right cash saving in first low 
cost, get the popular Goodyear 
Marathon. In it you get a 
centre-traction diamond tread 
at the lowest price. Drive In! 
See it today! 

---- column ----

GOOD /YEAR 
MARATHON 

---- column ----

FOR YOUR BEST BUY IN TIRES ...SEE 

D. McTAVISH & SONS 

---- column ----

FLESHERTON, 

---- column ----

ONTARIO 

---- column ----

SUPERIOR STORES 

Speciils are Cash Only 

Real Fresh Crispy SODAS 2 IBs. 25c 

Excellent brand FLOUR, highly guaranteed 
Only $2.98 

Kellogg's ALL BRAN and measuring cup, all 23c 

Sugar Crisp CORN FLAKES per box 7c 

OXYDOL, large package 23c 

Fresh Ground COFFEE while U wait H>. 35c 

FRESH and CURED MEATS QUR SPECIALTY 
All Electrically Refrigerated. 

IF ITS FRUITS or VEGETABLES 
our assortment is larger and fresher 

SPECIAL 1'KICES ON MEN'S RU1U5KR 
BOOTS FOR SPRING 

C. J.KENNEDY 

Phone 37 WE DELIVER 

---- column ----

IMPROVEMENT IN HIGHWAYS 

The improvement in Ontario's 
iighways system is undoubtedly of 
benefit to motorists in the Province 
and an attraction to United States 
tourists, but there is one other factor 
which must be remembered. Modern 
four-lane highways are in themselves 
an incentive to excessive speed, and 
daily evidence goes to show that the 
campaifrn for safer driving must not 
be relaxed. With the improvement 
in highways there is even greater 
need for supervision, and Attorney- 
General Conant forecasts an enlarge- 
ment of the Ontario Provincial Po- 
lice Highway Traffic Patrol in the 
very near future. As it is, the high- 
ways have been expanded consider- 
ably faster than has been the num- 
ber of patrol men. Recent amend- 
ments to the Highway Traffic Act 
make it illegal to drive at night with 
parking lights, and authorize cities, 
towns and villages to pass by-laws 
restricting sections of their highways 
to speed limits between fifteen and 
thirty miles, should also accomplish 
something in the direction of safety. 

Big Night In Toronto 

Monday evening of next week the 
Toronto branch of the Flesherton 
Old Boys' and Girls' Association are 
holding a euchre and dance in the 
Ramona Gardens, 2271 Bloor St. W. 
Toronto. This annual event is always 
well attended and a goot time is also 
assured this year. Dont' miss this 
big 1 event. A representative delega- 
tion from Flesherton is expected to 
attend. 

---- column ----

FEVERSHAM 

Our beautiful summer-like weather 
has certainly played havoo with the 
snow. 

Mr. Ross Davidson of Toronto 
spent the week end at his home. 

Miss Irene Hudson visited at her 
home and with friends. Miss Phyllis 
Hudson accompanied her back to 
Toronto. 

Mr, and Mrs. Howard McKee visit- 
ed -with Mr. and Mrs. Win. Colquette 
at Owen Sound. 

Miss Evelyn Hale of Toronto is 
home for Easter holidays. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Forsythe of 
Owen Sound visited with Mr. and 
Mrs. G. Eby on Sunday 

Our teachers, Mr. McGinnis, Miss 
Bonis and Mr. Monaghnn left Thurs- 
jay evening for their respective 
lomes at Elmvale, St. Marys and 
Rock Mills. 

The warm weather has shortened 
the maple syrup season, causing it 
to be almost a complete failure. 

The funeral service of the late Mr. 
Allen Campbell was conducted at the 
residence of Mr. Jas. Long on Satur- 
day, April 5th. The body was placed 
in the mortuary chapel in Flesher- 
ton Cemetery for interment in Mc- 
lntyre Cemetery in the spring. 

BUCKINGHAM 

Miss Marguerite Mullin of Toronto 
spent Easter with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. W. J. Mullin. 

Mr. Alex. Mitchell spent a few 
days last week in Toronto. 

Mrs. Herb Eby and son, Stephen, 
spent Easter with the former's par- 
ents, Mr. imd Mrs. J. T. Davidson, 
before leaving for Barrio, where Mr. 
Eby has a position. 

Miss Gertie Mitchell and Mr. Gor- 
don Cameron, who are attending the 
Collegiate in Collingwood, are at 
their respective homes for the Easter 
vacation. 

Mr. Gilford Mullin of Barrio spent 
Kiistor at his home here. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mel Robinson O f Col- 
linjrwood visited on Sunday at Mrs. 
Robinson's home here. 

(Intended for Last W<*k) 
The Club meeting at the home of 
Mrs. J. T. Davidson on April 2nd, 
was well attended, with 12 members 
and 12 visitors present. The meeting 
opened with singing of the hymn 
"Stand Up, Stand Up for Jesus," 
followed by the Lord's Prayer in uni- 
son. Tire secretary gave the report 
of the previous meeting and also read 
correspondence in regard to boxes of 
fruit received and a note which ac- 
companied a very generous donation 
of print remnants which, due to their 
size and quality, were sold to the 
members, rather than used in piec- 
ing quilt tops. Following n lengthy 
discussion as to the most beneficial 
disposition of funds, n vote was taken 
fnvorinir n further donation of $25.00 
to the Evening Telegram 'War Vic- 
tim's Fund. 11" n unanimous vote the 
members signified their willingness 
to sponsor a community effort tt. 
rnise money for the above fund, this 
at the invitation of those who are 
making tentative arrangement for 
sueh a drive. The balance of the 
afternoon was spent completing n 
quilt, the woollen top of which wan 
iniule and given to the Club by Mrs. 
Herb Taylor and Mrs. A. Mitchell. 
Rome nicely made sleeping garments 
won* handed in, i\\ well ns some 
lionvy clothing to be Included In n 
bale. Rloolcs for nrint. quilts to b 
comnlrted Inter wore also received 
Ttio place ami t|nt<> of the May mcet- 
ir< will lv> dprifled Inter. 
Mr. A. Mitchell spent a couple of 

in Collimrwond last week 
Mrs. J. Kncrlish of N"tt;\wa snent 
HIP i>nnt week with Mr. and Mrs. A. 
Mullin nml family. 

---- column ----

'Bill's Boy was at Gibraltar- 

---- column ----

... at least, that's what 
his folks think ... he went 
over with that hard-rock 
mining outfit in the engi- 
neers . . . seems like only 
yesterday he was a kid 
spending holidays here. . . 
now he's in the middle of 
the big fight. 
We'll do our part too . . . 

---- column ----

W /KMT fee? on 

WAR SAVINGS CERTIFICATES 

---- column ----

Remember when Victory is 
won you r dollars come back to 
you with compound interest. 
The more you save and lend, 
the better for Canada NOW 
the better for you THEN. 

PullitttJ by tbt ^" Sovmgs Cfmnutttt, OMMW 

---- column ----

KIMBLRLEY 

We feel that spring is here once 
again, as the fields and lawns are 
green and farmers are working on 
the land. 

Syrup-making has been the order 
of the day. The first runs were good 
but is over now. 

We are sorry to report Mr. Frank 
Chard suffering from a heart attack. 
His daughter, Mrs. Wilkinson, is aid- 
ing in caring for him. Mr. Joe 
Cornfield is also not in good health. 

Mr. Jenkins and Miss Weller are 
holidaying at their respective homes. 

The Community Hall sponsored a 
successful dance Thursday night. 

More Red Cross material has been 
received to make up children's gar- 
ments. 

Mrs. Buchanan is conducting a 
very successful Mission Band class 
in the church every two weeks. 

Interest is being taken in the War 
Savings project in the Sunday school. 
Five stamps wero bought the first 
Sunday by three classes. 

Eastor visitors wore: Mr. Allen 
Ferguson of H.E.P.C., Sholburne. 
with Mrs. Ferguson and Dalton; Miss 
Vera Hrush and Janet Betts with Mr. 
and Mrs. D. L. Weber; Mrs. Me Mul- 
len and other members of the family 
with her daughter, Mrs. Leslie 
Mi-Mullen. 

Born On Tuesday, April 8, 11U1. 
to Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Ward (nee 
Ora Wickens) a daughter. 

Mr. nml Mrs. ('. Sutherland and 
Mr. and Mrs. H. Millward are spend- 
ing Raster holidays with Mr. H. R. 

Stafford. 

The chuivh services on Sunday in 
both churches wore very much en- 
joyed: in the United led by Rev. W. 
BtK'hnnan and all wero glad to have 
Rev. Young back again in the Baptist 
churi-h, after an absence of two 
weeks at Midland, where he was 
assisting in special services. 

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NEW AND USED 

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Farm Machines 

FOR SALE AT COCKSHUTT AGENCY 

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13-Disc McCormick Seed Drill 
2-Furrow Tractor plow 
13-Dise Cockshutt Seed Drill 
12-Plate Disc Harrow 
1 Reposessed Renfrew Cream 
Hart-Parr Tractors 

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Separator, used 3 months 

like new 

New Renfrew Cream Separators 
Toronto Asphalt Roofing 
Lundy Woven Fence 
Barb Wire 
C.I.L. Fertilizers in stock. 

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Fertilators 

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Eastern Steel Products 

Barn Tracks 

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Steel Roofing 

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W. EDGAR BETTS 

Cockshutt Implements - Flesherton, Ont. 

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- 


- 

. 

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* 
> 

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S. S. No. 14, Os.prey 

Grade 8 Donald Thompson 78 
(H), Hector MeClean 72, Elda Mor- 
rison 71, Doris Mclntyre 69, Christ- 
ina Radcly 3<>. 

Grade 7 Lillian Winters 78 (H), 
Ross McCloan 70. 

Grade 6 Dm(-.vnn Winters 78 
(II). Kenneth Winters 77 (H), John 
MiClean 74, Niel Smith 70, Donald 
Molntyre 60, Fred Radloy 66. 

Grade 5 Gordon Smith. 78 (H), 
Rillio Thompson 65, George Mclntyrt 
64, Fxlnn Mclntyre 62, Russel Mars- 
don 61. 

Grade 4 Evelyn Winters 70. 

Promoted to Grade 3 Marion 
Smith (H), Eleanor Mclntyre (H), 
Ki*>.v Modem) (H). Lsobel Mclntyre 
(II). TsobH Winters. Evn Radley.' 

Grade 1 - Annn Thompson '(H). 
Unrton Cnmcron (11), Olivr Mrs>)en. 
Dorothv Mnmlen, Mnnruerite Mc- 
Ponnld. 

No. on roll, 30. Ayertw attend- 
ance 27. 

Ehvood A. Smith, Teacher. 

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*+**>* .*** 

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Economy 

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Our Government is asking our citizens to econo- 
mize wherever possible in our daily routine of 
living and functions. We can suggest two ways 
of economy, namely: by delivering your cream to 
the creamery and receiving 1 cent per pound fat 
over truck price, and also making use of our cold 
storage meat lockers, by freezing your own meat, 
which is a big saving on your cost of living. 

MEAT STORAGE 

A $5.00 box for a year will hold approximately 
220 to 250 Ibft. meat and you may refill the box 
often as you wish. You may also place meat ife 
storage at the rate of I 1 2 c per Ik 

NOW IS THE TIME THAT THE STORING ; 
OF MEAT SHOULD BE IN FULL 

PROGRESS. 
Call in to s'ee us about the storage. 

THE CREAMERY WILL BE OPEN EACH SATURDAY NIGHT ', 

Flesherton Creamery & Produce Co. 

Phone 06 Angus Avi, Manager 

>**+*+.+.>.., MI>I'OH- **>* 

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THE FLESHERTON 

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Wednesday, April 16, 1941 

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EUGENIA 

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The Easter ser ice was veil it- 
tended Sunday. The choir sang two 
beautiful anthems and Mrs. Cairns' 
Sunday School class rendered a sel- 
ection "Easter Lilies." Rev. Dr. 
Mercer delivered a very interesting 

and imprsaive sermon. He also held 
a service here Good Friday morning 
and Sacrament was administered. 

At the Y.P.U. on Wednesday even- 
ing if last week Mrs. Cairns presid- 
ed for the first part of the meeting. 
The discussion period was taken by 
Miss Dorothy Falconer, after which 

recreation was followed. This week 
. Rev. Annis of Markdale will show 

lantern slides on 'West China. Lunch 
will be served and a small admission 

fee charged. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pinkerton and their 

daughter Mrs. Haas and Janette, 

have returned to 'heir cottage on the 

8th line, afer spending the winter 
in Brantford. 

Mr. Rutledge Stafford of Kimber- 
ley, Mr. and Mrs. Millward of To- 
ronto and Mr. and Mrs. Otto Baker 
and family of Heathcote were Sun- 
day visitors with Mr. and Mrs. Ed. 
Baker. 

Mr. Roy McMillan of Oakville was 
home for the week end, 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Park and 

Cteen of Ingersoll scent the week 

, end at the Park and Carruthers 

. homes. N 

Rev. Browett of Duncan ave an 
hour's religious instruction to the 
Public School pupils here one day 

recently. 

Miss Irene Dinsmore is spending 

her Easter vacation at her home 
near Thorabury. 

A.C. Argyle Martin of Montreal 
was home from Friday to Sunday. 
He was one of the boys chosen to 
take part in the demonstration par- 
adt: on Monday, April 7th, in Mont- 
real and as a result all in the parade 
were granted a leave. 

Little Miss Shirley Cairns is 
spending a few of 1. ?r Easter "holi- 
days with Mr. and Mrs. Joe. Por- 
teous, 8th line. 

Mrs. Martin, Argyle and Carmel 

spent Saturday afternoon with Mr. 

and Mrs. Levi Duckett and family 

' at Maxwell. 

Mrs. M. McMullen has returned 
home, after spend ;" the winter in 
"Toronto. Mrs. Graham and Huth and 
Miss Millie McMullen of Toronto are 
sending: the Easter vacation with 
her l.ere. 

Miss Irene Martin of Islington is 
holidaying with her uncle and aunt, 
Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Gorley. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Ma^ee of 
Maxwell visited in the village on 
Sunday. 

Pte. Wm. Scorer and Corp. Carl 
Walthers of the Foresters, Cami 
Borden, spent the week end at the 
Carruthers home. 

Mr. C. Martin visited with Mr. Jim 
Harrison, south of Fleshertov on 
Sunday. Jim is recoverir-- nicelv 
fcm the injur- which he received in 
a -car accident in March 

Mr. Ray Genoe and Mr. Glen Ped- 
lar have returned home from Fer- 
land for a visit. They have been 
employed with the fl.E-P.C. there all 
winter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ross Lehman of To- 
ronto visited over the week end with 
the latter's father. Mr. Jake 
Williams. 

^^ Mr. and Mrs. Joe Porteous have 
moved from the Lawlor farm to the 
fcpofford farm. 

Mr. Everett " rah am spent a few 
days at Kearney. 

Miss Margie Park has not been 
enjoving very good health the past 
few weeks. We hope she may soon 
K well again. 

In Memoriam 

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TORONTO LINE NORTH 

Beautiful spring-like weather; the 
snow is almost all gone. 

Miss Evelyn Brown of Toronto 
spent the week end with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Brown. Mrs. 
Brown returned to the city with her 
on Sunday. 

Mrs. Minnie Lever has returned 
from visiting with friends in Toronto. 

Messrs. Harold "Richardson, Gordon 
Long, Bert Sparks, Harold Lever and 
Fred Mathewson attended the Owen 
Sound-Kingston hockey game at 
Owen Sound Friday evening. 

Miss Gertrude Lever of Richmond 
Hill spent Easter and a few days at 
her home here and was accompanied 
back on Monday by Mr. G. Clayton 
and Miss Helen Donnally, who spent 
Easter in Durham. 

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ROCK MILLS 

The rain on Sunday and Monday 
will do much good, and if the 
weather continues warm it will pro- 
duce rapid growth. The grass is 
already beginning to look nice and 
green. 

Easter visitors with Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter Russell were: Mr. and Mrs. 
Ken Teeter of Vandeleur, Mr. Laurie 
Russell and Miss Mary Bemrose of 
Toronto. IV 

Mr. Murray Fisher and friend, 
Miss Amanda Fisher and friend -of 

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Guelph spent a few days renewing 
acquainances here, returning to their 
home at Guelph Sunday evening. 

Mr. B. Field made a business trip 
to Owen Sound last week. 

Visitors over Easter with Mr. J. 
A. Foster and Sadie were: Mr. and 
Mrs. Thos. Aldcorn and Yvonne of 
Toronto, Mrs. B. Toman of Corbetton 
and Mr. Stewart Foster of Durham. 

Visitors with Mr. and Mrs. Dick 
Clark over Easter were: Mr. Bob 
Clark of Gait, Mrs. Bob Lee and 
Douglas of Owen Sound and Mrs. 
Coburn and babe of Barrhead. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ken Betts of Flesh- 
erton were Easter visitors with his 
father, Mr. Levi Betts. 

Mr. John McDonald of Flesherton 
was employed on Saturday by the 
Durham Furniture Company moving 
one of the large smoke stacks to fit 
the new boiler, which has been 
placed in position. 

Aircraftsman Leslie Seeley son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Seeley, was 
one of 150 men chosen from 1,500 to 
form a g-uard of honor for the Polish 
general at Montreal, who has come 
to Canada to recruit a Polish legion. 

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SPRINGHILL 

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The sympathy of all is extended to 
Mr. F. H. W. Hickling of Flesherton 
in his recent bereavement. 

Miss Dorothy Little of Corbetton 
spent a week end recently with Mr. 
and Mrs. C. Akins. 

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Miss Leona Johnson entertained 
the C.GJ.T. of St. John's church last 
Wednesday evening. A .pleasant 
time was spen with 16 irls present. 
The evening was spent in playing 
crokinole and Chinese checkers. 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Johnson and 
Mr. Harold Johnson of Toronto spent 
Easter with their parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Wm. Johnson. 

Mr. Jas. Harrison returned from 
Owen Sound on ~aturday, somewhat 
improved after his recent accident, 
but we are sorry he has to retun to 
the city for continued treatment 

Mr. and Mrs. Herb Akins of To- 
ronto spent Blaster with the former's 
parents. Miss Annie Akins. who i- 
teaching near Markdale, is home for 
her vacation. 

Mrs. John ^atterson has returned 
home from Flesherton, after spend- 
ing the winter months there 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Oldfield of Cor- 
betton spent Sunday at the latter's 
parental home. Mr. Allister Patter- 
son returned with them, where he 
will work during the spring and 
summer. 

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Miss Hilda Duckett of Toronto 
was an Easter visitor with her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Luther Duckett, 
west backline. Miss Helen Duckett 
is visiting in Owen Sound this week. 

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Mussolini again makes the state- 
ment that he stands square behind his 
army. But unless he is fleet of foot 
it must be a great way behind. 

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TIME TABLE 

CHANGES 

Effective 
SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 1941 

Full information from Agents 

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WOOt GROWERS OROAMZUION 

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IT PAYS TO MARKET 

O\ A GRADED BASIS 

obtain Sacks and Twine from 

LOCAL LIVE STOCK TRUCKERS 

or direct from 

CANADIAN CO-OPERATIVE 

WOOL GROWERS LIMITED 

217 Bay Street - Toronto 

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INSURANCE 

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Authorized agent for 

GERMANIA FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

also All Line* of 

CAR INSURANCE, BONDS, etc. 

Ste HERB CORBETT 

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Phone Dundalk 44 r 21 

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Proton Station. Ont. 

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Paul In loving memory of a 
dear father. Elijah Paul, who passed 
away April 14th, 1938. 
Ever remembered by the Family. 

i ; 

; In Memoriam 

" WILKINSON In loving memory 
of our dear wife and mother. Mrs. 
John Wilkinson, who departed this 
life April 18th. 1939. 
Sweet is your memorv, dear to our 

hearts, 
.The place you hold there shall never 

depart. 
And all through the years, be they 

many or few, 
Shall be filled with remembrance, 

dear mother, of you. 
Ever remembered, Husband and 
Family. 

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Advertisement of Sale 

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Under ad by virtue of the powers 
Contained in certain mortgage, 
which will be produced at the ti 
of sale, there will be offered for 
ale by public auction on Friday, the 
18th day of April, 1941, at the hour 
of 1:00 o'clock, in the a/t-rnoon, 
at Robinson's Store, in the Villa-'* 
of Feversham by George E, Dmncan. 
Auctioneer, the following property, 
namely: 

Lot 18, Concession S, north of tht 
Durham Road, in the Township of 
Osprey. In the County of Grey, 
containing one hundred acres, in- 
cluding buildings erected thereon. 

Terms: Ten percent of the pur- 
chase money to be paid down at 
the time of sale, balarc* to be paid 
within ten days. Subjet to reserve 
bid. 

For further particulars and con- 
ditions of sale apply to Robert 
S. Johnston, Barrister. 211 Imperial 
Builditur. Hamilton. Ontario. 

Dated at Hamilton, the 29th day 
of March, 1941. ft I 

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. 

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' 

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FOR 
THE FARM 

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! 

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*Wv 

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A, 

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Ontario's Students 

Offer to Help Relieve 

Emergency Need for Farm Help! 

Already more than 6,000 of Ontario's sturdy High School 
students have volunteered their services to the Farm Service 
Force of Ontario! They are devoting their summer months 
to help farmers meet the greatest production demands in 
their experience. Students will be relieved of school 
responsibilities as farmers require them. Especially pre- 
pared courses of study have been offered to fit these 
willing young people for the summer's work on the farm. 

Britain is depending upon Ontario's farmers to supply a 
great -proportion of their neds for cheese, bacon, con- 
centrated milk, and other farm products. 

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"S 

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.ONTARIO./^. 

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A/fr on* wftk on Hit farm, Htw* 
rturdy, young vo/vnton rciy fVi 
cfotiiKtiV* crrf upon opp/icaffon to 
n form S*rvk* Force, 
of labour, Toronto. 

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Farmers who have not registered their requirements for 
student assistance are urged strongly to do so without delay. 
Simply notify your Agricultural Representative or local High 
School Principal, or write: Farm Service Force, Department 

ii MMNM^MV 

of Labour, Parliament Bldgs., Toronto. 

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ONTARIO INTER-DEPARTMENTAL COMMITTEE - LABOUR - AGRICULTURE - EDUCATION - AND DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR, OTTAWA 

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i 

I 
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SUNDAY 

SCHOOL 

LESSON 

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LESSON III 
USING WITNESSING POWER 

Act. 2:1 4t31 

PRINTED TEXT 
AcU 2:1-4; 4.-8-2O 
GOLDEN TEXT In-, w.r 
.11 f ilN-,1 with the Holy Spirit, nd 
tKy ipake ih word of God with 
Loldnrt.. AdU 4:81. 

THE LESSON IN ITS SETTING 

Time. The day f Pentecost 
occurred as far as we re able to 
judge, on Sunday, May 28, A.D. 
80. The eventi recorded in the 
third and fourth chapters of AcU 
took place In the summer of A.D. 
30. 

PUc*. The City of Jerusalem. 

We should oome away from the 
ttudy of thi luton with a new 
conviction concerning the divine 
origin and th greatnvsa of the 
Church of ChrUt. We should be 
reminded that loyalty to tde 
Chnroh and to the Christ of the 
Church ik the great privilege and 
obligation of every true believer 
and of every contecrated disciple. 
Birth of the Church 

Acta 2:1. "And when the day 
of Pentecost was come, they were 
all together in one place." The 
Feast of Pentecost was the second 
of the three chief Mosaic festi- 
val*. It fell on the fiftieth day 
after the second day of the paae- 
over. It celebrated the comple- 
tion of the grain harvent. Special 
offerings were made, and two 
leavened loaves of wheat bread, 
significant of the finished har- 
vest, together with two lambs as 
peaceofferings, were waved be- 
fore the Lord. If passover re- 
minded the Jewi of their redemp- 
tion from the land of bondage, 
Pentecost celebrated their pos- 
session of the land of promise. 

2. "And suddenly there came 
from heaven a sound as of the 
rushing of a mighty wind, and it 
filled all the house where they 
were sitting. 3. And there ap- 
peared unto them tongues part- 
Ing asunder, like as of fire; and 

sat upo.fi each one of them." 

obably the great noise was to 
be taken as a symbol of mighty 
power, whereas the tongues of 
fire would be symbolic of purg- 
ing and of dedication to a proph- 
etic ministry, somewhat compar- 
able to the experience of Isaiah 
eight centuries before. 4. "And 
they were all filled with the Holy 
Spirit, and began to speak with 
other tongues, as the Spirit gave 
them utterance." This ability to 
speak in foreign languages not 
previously learned was merely a 
temporary endowment granted 
for a special purpose. It was one 
ef those miraculous spiritual gifts 
which marked the age of the 
p.'M ' . The gift of tongues was 
exactly the preparation needed by 
the disciples for the task of wit- 
nessing to the throngs who had 
gathered from all parts of the 
world to observe the fenst. 
Book of tli* Holjr Spirit 

The Book of Acts has often 
been called the AcU of the Holy 
Spirit, and truly io. 'Hie Spirit 
ef God it referred to eventy 
limes in this one book. It is He 
who is the energiiing power, the 
lure guide and teacher of the 
Church of Christ, not only for 
the days of the Church whose his- 
tory is recorded in thi.- book, hut 
Jw ell the subsequent years of 
ih Church's history in every 
land. The dominance of the Holy 
Spirit in the life of a ever is 
not ordinarily to be te.-ted by the 
presence of any ipecial /ift, such 
as the ;'.i!': of tongue.*. One who 
ie obedient to his Matter i.s grant- 
ed the ability to do the will of 
tJie Master, for the "fruit of the 
Spirit is love, joy, putce, long- 
ruffrring. kindness, goodness, 
faithfulness, nifckiir- . -elf-con- 
trol." 

Salvation Only In Him 
Acts 4:X. "Then IVlcr, filled 
with the Holy Spirit, Mi<l unto 
them, Ye rulers of the people, 
ml elders, 

V. If we this duy arc examined 
concerning a good de< d <ionu to 
JM impotent man, by what nirnns 
this man in made whole; 

10. Be it known unto you all, 
n<! lo all the people of Israel, 

that in the name of Jesus Christ 
f Nazurelli, whom ye crucified, 
whom (ind raised from im dead, 
n iii him doth thi IIIHII -Innd 
*<i< before you whole. 

11. He if* the stone which was 
Mt at nought of you the builder*, 
which was made the head <>f the 
center. 

12. And in none other in there 
alvation: for neither is there any 
ttier name under heaven, that is 
given among men, whcroin we 
must be saved. 

13. Now when they hchfld the 
beldness nf 1'cter and John, and 
liml perceived that they were un- 
learned and ignorant men, they 
marvelled; and they took knowl- 
edge of them, that thpy had been 
with Jeus. 

14. And seeing the man that 
was healed standing with them, 
they could lay nothing against 
it 

15. Dut. when they had com- 
manded them to go anid* of the 

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Noted British Flier Shuttles Between Canada, Britain 

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Complete with "Mae West'' inflatable life-saving jacket and 
fur-lined trousers, stands James Mollison, former trail blazer of the 
air across the globe, but now turned ferry pilot for bombers to Britain. 
Tfl* picture was taken as Mollison arrived recently in Montreal. 

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council, they conferred among 
themselves, 

16. Saying, What shall we do 
to theee men? for that indeed a 
notable miracle hath been wrought 
through them, is manifest to all 
hi' dwell in Jerusalem; and we 
cannot deny it. 

17. But that it spread no 
further among the people, let us 
threaten them, that they speak 
henceforth to no man in this 
name. 

18. And they called them, and 
charged them not to tpeak at all 
nor teach in the name of Jesus." 

II.. Disciple* Stand Firm 
The Sanhedrin were compelled 
to acknowledge that the miracle 
had ben genuine; but also veal- 
ired that if these men kept on 
preaching, soon everyone would 
believe in what they had denounc- 
ed. The Sanhedrin's conclusion 
was that the disciples should be 
threatened and commanded to 

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speak no more in the name of 
Jesus. No doubt, they would be 
allowed to go out and preach if 
they would leave out the name of 
Christ and what Christ meant. 
19. "But Peter and John answer- 
ed and said unto them, Whether 
it is right in the sight of God to 
hearken unto you rather than 
unto (Jod, jndgre ye: 20. for we 
cannot but ipeak the things which 
we saw and heard." 

What boldn> .- these apostles 
manifested! Standing before this 
awesome body of men, they 
frankly declared that even though 
they knew it might involve their 
immediate death, they positively 
could not be kept from speaking 
the things which they bad seen 
and heard, namely, the teachings 
of Christ, the Resurrection. Thou- 
sands and thousands of men have 
said thefe words since, many of 
thorn suffering death at a conse- 
quence. 

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RADIO REPORTER 

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By DAVE ROBBINS 

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"HOME FRONT CHATS" 
A program lluil every Ontario 
woman will like makes ite bow thlx 
we*h fron.1 CKOC, when Avis Cm-- 
roll Introduce* ChaU on the Home 
Front, a ft-.n . that will be heard 
from 1 160 on the radio dial earh 
w*ok -day .if ! minii at 1.30. 

Avis Carroll I" a new radio per- 
eoiiHlll.y \vltli * style you will like, 
and he-r program iH designed es- 
pecially to Interest the womon. 
Ways to make life Interesting while 
Uie menfolk are away In the w>v 
rke~ wartime economies, end Ji^l 
,.i'n' ni , Hi* I'miii' i il In tills new 
bright |)l. 

So tun* in tomorrow afternoon 
and pyentl fifteen mlinit*H with 

Avis Carroll. 


AROUND THE DIAL 
TukiiiK Dlock tliln week alter her 
first *ix months of ... r.iMirt 
WOK's woman's coiiuneiiiat/or Be*x 
i lien ii\ , who utexl lo be on of 
()i luitmn'n forwnoKt woman Jour- 
nalliut unit editors. wa ank'-il 
wbMi ill* lik bolter: radio or 

wr|lloc 

J M .,-!-: was Huilio: "You 
?," BHS.-H- i -:m admitted. "I'm 
Irish, and tbre'i nodiliiE I like 
better than to talk.." 


The fin oil Hlbli<-Hl drama on 

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Hio air, we believe, In the program 
ontiiled "And It Came To Paas," 
originating in Montreal. This Sab- 
bath Interlude In heard over the 
UBC network at 1.30 on Sundays, 
"mi In mil ;* tii n<i ing for Us realltv 
In the dramatized Bfblknl imp 
PMiliiK that It features. 


The ubiquitous 8cuUera>oil 
Ha Ires heard over the Columbia 
olmln at 6.46 In the afternoon, la 
one of the funniest of the Unuiustlc- 
patliTJied programs on tho air. This 
troupo have beou on the air a long 
Urn* uow, and are still pa-nvldinK 
many lanjflis s nny of them. 


Speaking of daucf bauds lint 
Nice's 10.15 tpot on OVRB. on 
Tuesday r.iviiiv 1ms many, many 
listeners. And well it nilKlit, for 
Hcrl's crew we one of the top 
Canadian bunds. 


Radio ilantr. Dluuli Shore, on 
th advko of ft New York throat 
Hjieciallst, recently was forcod to 
cancel an apiiearbnco on tur Kddto 
Cantor show, and pool pout*, wiii'iil- 
lancoiisly, UK- m.. .u i. of a two or 
liirci* w>k eiiKBRi'incnt ul New 
York's Pii^iHiloiint Then' IT. Slie 
WHS stricken with 11 "("TWO cn of 
laryngitis, l>nuii;)i! on from u cold. 

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Celebrate June 9 
King's Birthday 

A proclamation fixing Mon- 
day, June 9 the tume date as 
last year for celebration of 
ihc King's birthday has been 
published in th Canada Gaz- 
ette. 

The King's birthday actually 
falls on December 14, but the 
official celebration is held in 
June. His Majesty wus 45 last 
December 14. 

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Tiie specialist ordered lonj-r-fs'if 
hours of absolute re*t for tue .til- 
ing larynx "no talking or f-vcn 
whispering" after which s1i- war 
to be re-exa/niiced . . . Glen Miller, 
ace Bluebird batoncr, IIHS >.<na;:ig- 
ed the services of lo - . t-'y P.r.ila 
Kelly for his vocal deparUn-rut. . . 
"Just Plain Love," ntw f.iup. by 
Hecry Bnll, Jr., forme-r XB*' pi;:e, 
will have Its <Jbut on the new 
ea.rly morning variety show, "Who's 
Blue?" . . . The -premiere p.-./i.-m- 
ance wa given on April 3rd by 
Irving Milter's band. 

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Gardening . . . % 

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ARTICLE No. 7 

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A few special implements will 
make gardening more interesting 
and less arduous. These are not 
expensive. For ordinary digging 
both a spade and a digging fork 
have a place. The first is ideal 
for turning over soil in the 
Spring or for breaking up sod. 
The fork, lighter and quicker to 
operate, is excellent for cultiva- 
ting anytime through the season 
and especially for breaking up 
soil that has been plowed or .spad- 
ed sometime earlier. For killing 
weeds, thinning, cultivating large 
vegetables and shrubbery, a small, 
not-too-wide hoe, well sharpened 
is the ideal tool. 

To Prevent Jungles 
One can do wonders with 
flowers alone, but still more 
amazing results will follow where 
we combine flowers skilfully with 
grass, winding walks, shrubbery 
and bits of stone-work. In this 
combining, however, we must 
take, care not to reproduce a 
jungle. A little preliminary plan- 
ning and a rough sketch drawn 
approximately to scale will help 
wonderfully. Flowers and shrub- 
bery niust not be so crowded that 
they become spindly and weak. 

Little flowers must not be hid- 
den by tall things like full size 
marigolds, cosmos or zinnias. 
Beds must be so arranged that 
we can keep down weeds and re- 
move fading foliage. Above all 
we must remember that unless 
we are very skilful, it is best to 
use a fair amount of lawn as a 
foreground for our flowers. 
Lawns are almost vital in cre- 
ating garden pictures. 

Feed !> Lawn 

Thin lawns badly mixed with 
weeds almost invariably have 
poor soil. Sometimes only a lib- 
eral application of commercial 
fertilizer or well-rotted manure is 
necessary to restore rich green- 
nes*. Well fed, well wate ed 
grass will usually crowd out 
most weeds, though it will ap- 
preciate some help from the gar- 
dener who does not mind spanning 
a few hours with a sha r p w.-eder. 

---- column ----

Food Takes Third 
Of Average Wages 

Canadian Families Living In 
Cities Spend 31.9 Per Cent. 
Of Income on Edibiet 

---- column ----

The average Canadian family 
living in the city just plain >fr. 
and Mrs. So-aml-so with from 
' i'.r to five children spends 31.9 
per cent, of it* annual income for 
food. 

For clothing it spends lli per 
rent.; shelter, 1'.2; personal cave, 
9.1; education and vocation, 1.6: 
transportation, 5.3, and welfare 
and gift?, 2.4. 

These facts and a vast <iuan- 
tity of relative information are 
shown 'in the first family-living 
expenditure survey ever compiled 
in Canada and rtcently issuod hy 
the Dominion Bureau of statistics. 
KRSULT OF Sl'KVi:Y 

The survey, wWcl '"-^.ui in 

---- column ----

January* 1938, on the initiative 
of the late Norman Refer.--, then 
minister of labor, was conducted 
in 12 cities, compiling 45,000 re- 
cords on 6,252 families coming 
within certain limitations which 
made them "typical average fami- 
lies." 

---- column ----

An analysis of the debt and 
savings of the families under sur- , 
vey brought out that 36.3 per 
cent, of the total number showed * 
increased debt; 'only 37 families 
broke even and 62 per cent, of 
these average earners savfr n>oney 
regularly. 

---- column ----

THIS CURIOUS WORLD 

---- column ----

By William 
Ferguson 

---- column ----

1 

---- column ----

THE 

HUMAN HAND. 
I 

---- column ----

O;;'y tluxe oceans are now generally recognized . . 
the Atlantic, the i'acific. and the Indian. The Arctic Ocean, of only , 
4.000,000 square miles, has been incorporated with the Atlantic,;} 
as the Arctic Sea. and the Antarctic has been reupportioned iver' 
the three 'named above. 

NEXT: What insect sometimes lays eggs and sometimes brings 
forth Its VOUHK alive? 

---- column ----

ARMY CHIEF 

---- column ----

HORIZONTAL 

1. Newly 

appointed 
U. S. army 
head 

12 Stir. 

13 To cure 

15 To talk 
wildly. 

16 Skeleton 
structure. 

18 Coin slit. 
20 Dress 

trimming. 
22 Loiters 
24 Soon. 

36 Drone bee. 
27 Preposition. 

29 Weaving 
frame. 

31 Sand. 

33 Negative 

34 Toward. 

35 Subsists 

37 Astir. 

30 Common verb 
40 To haul 

42 Good name 
H Frozen 

desserts 
48 Papei 

mulberry 

bark 

---- column ----

Answer to Previous Puzzle 

---- column ----

Njl|N[E!S 

CJOAJT 

SiElR'R Y 

---- column ----

note 

---- column ----

47 Pound. 
49 Melts. 

51 Brink. 

52 Musical 

53 To con. 

55 Like 

56 Year. 

58 Boundarv 
61 Fold. 
3 Needy 
65 Sell* 
68 H? will be 

to 

Gencr.il 

Craig. 
09 Cock's comb 

---- column ----

VERTICAL 

U Organ of 

hearing. 
3 Land right 
( Braided 

thong. 

5 Sound of 
inquiry 

6 Evils 

7 By the length. 

8 Senior. 

9 Ugly old 
woman 

10 Greedy. 

11 Citric fruit. 

---- column ----

14 Electrical 
term. 

16 He was an 
honor student 
and star. 

17 Self. 
19 Law. 

21 He will direct 
a rearmament 
(Pi.) 

23 Therefore. 

25 Near. 

28 Enemy. 

30 Fights. 

32 To honk. 

36 Certain. 

38 To snarl. 

41 Appliances. . 
43 Narcotics. 
45 Brushed \vtlh 

a brooi)! 
48 Lake inM. 
50 Code of laws. 
54 Expensive-. 
57 Bird 

39 Being. 
60 Since. 

62 Devoured 

63 Postscript 

64 Red Crov. 
66 -Either 

S7 Street 

---- column ----

POP A Long A It's Not a Major Disaster 

---- column ----

By J. MILLAR WATT 

---- column ----

I WAVE- A SARGENT 
PAINTING IN MY 

---- column ----

1 THAT'S , 
I NOTHING! 

AT MAVt 

W A 

GENERAL 

HOUSt - 

C LEANING 

IN MINE- 

I 
---- page ----

---- column ----

Big British Battleship, King Georga V, Carrie* Amphibian Planet Along 

---- column ----

iere is one of the planes carried by the British battleship, King George V, being hoisted aboard 
light. It is a Walrus amphibian. Exploits of British fliers operating from naval units in the Md-i- 

---- column ----

gnt. it 13 a Walrus amphibian. Exploits of British fliers operat.r.g irom navai units in tn ma 
i-on^-Ti-u and off the European _,,ast are becoming more frequent and more daring daily, and they t*ks 
proud place in the line-up against the Axis powers. 

---- column ----

Here 
after a 1' 

---- column ----

How Con I? 

BV ANNE ASHLEY 

Q. How can I clean painted 
walk without using soap? 

A. Use two ounces of borax in 
two quarts of water and one tea- 
spoon of ammonia. Use about 
half this quantity to each bucket 
of water, and no soap will be re- 
quired. 

Q. How can I make use of dis- 
carded umbrella ribs? 

A. These ribs wake good and 
lasting supports for trailing 
flowers. If they are painted a 
soft green, they will hardly be 
noticed in the garden. 

Q. How can I make an econ- 
omical deodorizer for a sick 
room? 

A. An economical deodorizer 
can be made out of a pint of 
viaegar boiled with one quart of 
myrrh. 

Q. How can I bleach silk, wool, 
Hnen, or cotton? 

A. The best bleaching process 
for these materials is to use one 
teaspoon of peroxide of hydrogen 
to H-tub of cold water. Let the 
clothes soak in this ovenight; then 
rinse and wash as usual. This 
does not injure the fabric and 
imparts a pure white. 

Q. How can I prepare a good 
waH paper cleaner? 

A. Mix two cups of flour and 
one tablespoonfuls of kerosene 
with enough water to mak a stiff 
dough; then knead thoroughly. 
Use like ordinary cleaner. 

---- column ----

Cameras Not Guns 
Shoot Air Target 

---- column ----

Ordinarily Trans-Canada Air 
Lines uses models of its aircraft 
for window display purposes. At 
least one of them has a nw pur- 
pose in life as a target for anti- 
aircraft practise by th military. 
An Essex County regiment has 
borrowed one to shoot at. For- 
tunately for the model, camera 
guns will be used and not the real 
thing. 

---- column ----

Many "Pigs In Poke." Sold at Auction 

---- column ----

The salt- of nneUbaacd bajjgaRC nd articles fouud on Canadian 
Pacific property provided an interesting interlude at Fraser Brothers* 
auction rooms. Montreal, recently. Articles of this nature from aa far 
as Calgary to the west and Halifax to the east. When a certain period 
has passed and it is ?til! um-laimfd, the law requires that it all be sold 
*t auction, tht- worthless and the valuable. Buyers bid for it blind and 

---- column ----

quite high price? on the chance 

---- column ----

<f finding something really valuable. 
Canadian Pacific Photo. 

---- column ----

Canadian National 
Railways Revenues 

The gross revenues of the all- 
inclusive Cunadinn National Rail- 
ways System for the period end- 
ing March 3lst, 1J141. were .S7.- 
938.0GJ as compared with $5,- 
H72.3S6 for the correspon'dir.p 
period of 1910, an increasa of 
IMfO,?I8 or 85. 1-;. 

Super Special 

Delivery Asked 

Suner-special delivery of air- 
mi{ was retiuestod of Trans- 
Canaiin Ait- Lines a few days 
a|T<. A passenger making hei 1 
fU-st fl\g\\t asked the stewardess 
if *h would request the captain 

---- column ----

of Iier trip to fly over her grand- 
son's home eji route as alie wanted 
to ilrop him a birthday card 
airmail The stewardess advised 
less spectacular methods and pro- 
duced an airmail stamp. 

---- column ----

New. Long Look 

Seen in Sweaters 

---- column ----

The longer fitted sweater is a 
rival now for the very short on. 
The new type has been slowly 
making headway in influencing 
the sweater trend until now th 
movement is dv- finitely to longer 
fitted types. 

Many of the brief sweaters that 
last year would have been waist- 
length are now inching down to 
cover the hips. You will find them 
in daytime and evening sweaters, 
either smoothly molded or with 
waistline nipped in by ribbing or 
finer stitches and reinforced here 
by elastic threads to hold them 
in. Pullovers with such nipped-irt 
waistlines or with draping at the 
hips aiid high necfclines zipped ae 
back as well as the long semi- 
folded skirt pullover are especi- 
ally new-looking. 

---- column ----

What Science 
Is Doing 

---- column ----

SUPER-GIANT STARS 

Dr. Ralph E. Wilson has work- 
ed out a new astronomical yard- 
stick by using rare super-giant 
"C" type stars. 

It will serve to determine di- 
tances to these stars, among tbe 
largest in the sky, and to nearby 
star systems. 

Only about 400 of the star* 
have been found, the Mount Wil- 
son observatory astronomer said 
last week. He used 246 of them 
in his studies. 

"They rang* in color from red, 
orange, yellow, whitish-yellow and 
white to blue." said Dr. Wilson. 

"They are distinguished from 
other stars by the abnormal in- 
tensities of the hydrogen line* 
and by the sharpness of the oxy- 
gen, nitrogen, iron and silicon 
lines in their spectra." 

---- column ----

NEW PRODUCTS HASTENED 

Tile speed with which scientific 
research is translated into com- 
mercial products is demonstrated 
in a report made by Arnold E. 
Pitcher, general manager of the 
planting department of the da- 
Pont Company, in which he dis- 
closes that three-quarters of all 
the plastics that the company ex- 
pects to pro '.ace during the pres- 
ent year have originated in the 
laboratory in the last forty-aight 
months. 

---- column ----

POOR DIET AND CANCER 

Evidence showing how poor 
diet can become one of the causes 
Of cancer was reported last week 
in science by five Memorial Hos- 
pital i N.Y.I physicians. 

The cancers were iu animals, 
but were important because iatery 
physicians have reported in hu- 
mans occasional cancers that 
seemed to be helped by diet 
changes, such as high vitamins or 
high proteins. 

---- column ----

Great Hunters 

Going Farming 

---- column ----

The Blackfoot Indian, a notable 
success in hunting buffalo and 
raiding: neighboring tribes in by- 
gone days in the Canadian West 
has become outstanding among 
his race in farming and coal min- 
ing, the Indian Affairs Branch 
reports. Blackfoot Indians are 
the most prosperous of Canadian 
redskins. They have about $2,- 
500,000 in the bank in trust, the 
result of land sales and accrued 
interest in past years. A certain 
portion of the revenue from thia 
capita; is used year by year in 
assisting the itenecal welfare oC 
the 830 members of the band. 

---- column ----

MOVING 
PACKING 

---- column ----

SHIPPING 
STORING 

---- column ----

r.'Mured !:> !' ivn-uire Pool 
u's-.s Winnipcs and West 

M. RAWLINSON, LIMITED 

HacaMiclieU 1S8J 
610 YONGE ST. - TORONTO 

---- column ----

Nervous Restless 

A* |_ I franky? Rstles 
IllMV Cn't$Uep?TLr 
Mil IV I ' 1: '-'" i ' Annoved "v fe- 
male functional dis- 
orders ;vn<l monthly distress? Then tak 
Lrdla K. Plnkhum's Vegetable Com- 
pound, famous for over 60 years la 
ivlplng such rundown, weak, nervous 
conditions. Madr rspccialiy /or uiomtn. 
WELL WORTH TRYIKQI 

---- column ----

HAVE 

YOD HEABD? 

---- column ----

"Look here," stormed Brown 
to the real estate spent, ''about 
that riverside bungalow yon sold 
me." 

"Anything wrong?" asked the 
agent. 

"Wrong! Wrong!" exclaimed 
Brown. "The other morning we 
woke up and found that the place 
had floated two miles down the 
river." 

"H'm," said the agent blandly 
enough, 'that's a good stroke of 
lack. The taxes are much lower 
dwn there." 

---- column ----

"Now perhaps you'll wanta 
have?" queried the barber 
who Kid juit givon five-year- 
old Bobbie his first profes- 
sional haircut. 

Bobbie (after feeling of 
his face) : "I f ues there 
wouldn't b enough shavings, 
would there?" 

---- column ----

A robbery had been committed 
in the English village, and * de- 
tective hd been sent to investi- 
gate. 

"Have you jeea any mysterious 
trang^rs about here lately?" 
asked the detectiv of the old vil- 
lager. 

''Yes, sir," replied the old man. 
"There was a man "ere with the 
circus last week, an' ' took a pair 
o' rabbits out o' my whiskers!" 

---- column ----

First Iriihman: "Which 

would jrez rather be in Pat 

aa explosion or a collinoa ?" 

Second ditto: "la at collu- 
ion. Because in a calli!on 
there ver are, but in an ex- 
plosion where are vr : ' 

---- column ----

"I wouid like to meet you 

again." he murmured, as they 
glided through the waltz. "Whit 

about letting me have your tele- 
phone number?" 

"It's in the book," she told 
him. 

---- column ----

"Good! What's your name?" 
"You'll find that in the book 
also," she said. 

---- column ----

Modern 

Etiquette 

BY ROBERTA LEE 

---- column ----

1. What w the correct expres- 
sion to use when thanking some- 
one for a courtesy? 

2. Ho\v can a person disting- 
uish be. ween genuine hospitality 
and that which is affected? 

3. la it correct for the bride 
and her attendants to arrive at 
:he church about a half-hour be- 
fore the ceremony is to begin? 

4. When a young man wishes 
to ask a girl for a dace, Is it aH 
right for him to say: "Are you 
going to be busy Wednesday eve- 
ning?" 

5. Isn't it improper for a card 
player to begin arranging his 
cards before the entire hand has 
bean dealt? 

4. When a dish is passed to one 
at the table by a servant, hou4d 
one say ''Thank you?" 

---- column ----

Answers 

i. "Tlur.k you." Av..iu the 
expressions "Thanks" and "Muck 
obliged." 2. A person with th* 
least intuition can quickly div 
tinguish this. As Washingtom 
Irving said, "There is an emana- 
tion from the heart in genuine 
hospitality which cannot be de 
cribec. but is immediately felt, 
and puts the stranger at once at 
his ease." 3. No, they should 
arrive promptly on the moment 
sot f. r the ceremony. 4. It would 
be much better to ask her for tnt 
date. It is her privilege t.> accept 
or say that she has an enga^e- 
nien:. 5. Yes: this is crude. Ai 
player should wait until every* 
body has been deal: his entire 
hand. 6. It is not necessarv. 

---- column ----

CREAM 

Since March 13, we have paid 
41c for Xo. 1 cream delivered 
to Toronto. 

DAILY PAYMENTS 
Write for Cam 

Toronto Creamery 

branch o. 
l ttiri Ffrmtrm ( IJ-UP<TI| >< 

' .'.. I'd. 

Cer. Dnki- * r.rnrgr ->.. 
Toroate 

---- column ----

.CLASSIFIED ADVEBTISEMENTS. 

---- column ----

AGENTS 1* 

---- column ----

TIRES . . IS MONTHS Of ARAVTEE. 
Direct Factorr to YOV w >th one 
ima.II profit If needing TIRES, 
It will pay you to write for prices. 
Agenti wanted . . . save money 
for yourself, and make a few 
dollar* sailing y^ur friends. All 
tires shipped, prepaid, subject to 
your inspection and approval. 
Mayall* Tire Servko. S Elm St., 
Toronto. 

BS VOl'R i>\VX BOSS, ib' YOU' CAN 
create dour to door market for 
cu.iruntsed necessities (over 200 
of them) SrOCEEU WITH K-VMI- 
LKX. Liberal Oommis-.oii. Repeat 
buiiu' assured. Co-operation. 
Complete detail* mid fre cat- 
llnsrue first letter: KAMI LEX. 570 
ijt. <"leii'Mr. MJH' : i.i' 

n IBY i HI. K - 

RlliliT N\V IT \M1.I. VAV YOV 
to b "fussy" with your chick 
buying. Be auru y<iu get rut 
fro-wers. Bray "delireri the 
ehK-k*" Bray Chick* "deliver the 
foods." Started, day olds, cocker- 
el*. capona. pullets. Sum* Turkeys. 
Order now before you're "on the 
land." Bray Hatchery. 150 John 
Xvntli. Hamilton. Ont. 

---- column ----

A-I BABY CH;ICKS, TARRED 

Rocks, White Rocks. White Leg- 
horns. Brown Leghorn?. Jersey 
Black Giants. New Hampshire 
Roils. Write for new low prices. 
A. H. Swirzar Hatchnrv. Granton, 
Ont. 

B.VTiY I'HICKS. GOVERNMENT Ap- 
proved White Leghorns and Barred 
Rocks, also se.xeil Pullets or 
Cockerels. Breeding since I:'".'. 
Sond fnr ;>r r <'9 list: Wrisli; Farm, 
BtOCkriUe, Ontario. 

---- column ----

3.1 rny.i: rim KS 

WITH KVKJJT 100 FfLL-KTS pr 10H 
m:ici1 .-hicks ordered, we give :'j 
free cliioks. Pullet* 115.00 to J 19.00 
por UMI; Mix*d Chicks JJ.OO to 
110.00 per 100: Cockerels per 100 
lijtht breeds, $1.50: hoa.v breeds, 
14.00. Immediate delivery. Goddard 
Thick Hatchery. Britannia 
HeiKhti, Ont. 

---- column ----

IIAKRRY 

BAKEF.S' OVENS AXD MACHIN- 
ery, also rebuilt equipment al- 
ways on hand. Terms arranged. 
Correspondence invited. Hub bard 
Portable Oi en Co.. 10 3 Bathurjt 
St.. Toronto. 

---- column ----

1 IVl-ISH Hi-roll I'l MTV 

tlKXEKM.STOliK IN KVTKA >-,Oi)l> 
turning district No opposition. 
i-lean st.H-ic. must be sold duo ill 
health. Oti>> Johsnn. l>\> on iiour.d, 

---- column ----

CAHS. 

---- column ----

1 SKJU 

---- column ----

MOi:.VT n.KAS.VXT MOTORS L.TD., 
Turonto'8 oldest Chrysler. Plym- 
outh dealers; three locations. 6SJ 
ill. l^lessunt Road. 2010 Yonge St., 
1*50 Dan forth Avcnuo. Our L'sed 
Crs mak us many friends, 

---- column ----

T FANS. M-:w tlKXKRAI, 
SttQtrtcti way under wholesale. 
ToroMM Mercantile. I 1 3 Molinda, 

---- column ----

IT.KO I-'K \I.K 

Tiii-K KKL-:I> nrtftiKi. ANI> OM: 

h:ilf h:m, 1.'. | l>:is iucludins 
the i\m i oi'K '"I ., >., i -inss from 
pir.-il M'I':I' 'M-it rico, K.i' ma.fh 
rooeto Lllttlted, .;'. $or:iuren Av- 
enue. Ti<rnl. 

---- column ----

\ 

---- column ----

FOR <iALK 

---- column ----

A PROFITABLE AND INTERKST- 
ing kOStetSSt Maka and sell Lawn 
Ornaments from our full-size pat- 
terns. Color scheme aud instruc- 
tion! with each order, noxens of 
ornamtwii from each pattern 
Cutch Ulri. Dutch Boy. Wlndmiil. 
Sprinkiing Girl. Gardeu Girl. Com- 
ic Pis, Elephant, Comic Raccoon. 
Sailor Boy with keep off g-rajs 
Ig-n. *t>.'. I5c each, t for !5c. It 
for 11.00 postpaid. War Snviun 
Si unj'8 aceepted. Darling. 51 War- 
dea St. M'.mu'o. Ont. 

---- column ----

GOITRE 

HAVE YOU UOITRJE? "ABSOR8O" 
reduces. For particulars write 
J. A. Johnston Co.. 1T1 KJng E.. 
Toronto. Price $5.00 per bottle. 

---- column ----

i! UK- W ACTED 

J$ VVIi KUY HV.VDRED3 DIFFER- 
ent Herbs. Roots. Barks. Write 
Dominion Herb Distributee. lli 
M.ilr. Montreal. 

---- column ----

J. N. UXDSAT. LAW OFFICE, CAT- 
Itol Theatre Building, St. Thomas, 
Ontario. Special Department for 
farmer-* colloctions. _ 

Ol'FER TO I.VVEATUKS 

-VN OFFER TO EVERX IXVENTOE 
LJst of Inventions and full infor- 
mation sent free. The Kamsa: 
Co.. Ups^stered. S:\iter.t Attorneys. 
27^ F.:ii;U Street. Ott^iwu. Canmla 

MK.DIt 11. 

---- column ----

Oi; MclJ-X'D'S STOMACHli.' 
obsthiite Stomach Trouble: I'ser 
states: "For years 1 suffered ter- 
rble Kiiawiiijt pains bolow breast- 
hono, few hours after eattotc, 
cnusiiiR i'is and bloutintc. My oul> 
relif f is soda and that only for 
slmr! me. Then I took Dr. Mr- 
Ucod's ^tonuiohio. After three bot- 
; les i \\--.\f free from pain. I kept 
on Improving and have now been 
well for several years, enjoying 
meals without medicine. Uoort for 
ajl form? of indigestion. Drue 
store or write l>r. snLsosfl Stom- 
achlc Co. 558 B.ithurst Toronto. 
Jt.13 per bottle postpaid. 

---- column ----

EVKRV Sl'F- 
ferer from Rheuniatir 1 \iiiis or 
.Veurlf's should try Dixou'a Rem- 
edy. Munro's TruR Store. 38i 
flgi". Ottawa, fostpaid tl.OO. 

STOCK 

---- column ----

HVROY NIT THKES. THK IDEAL 
wartime tree to plant, due to pre- 
sent ban on nut import!), and the 
uncertain fruit market. Write for 
free copy: "Nuts for Home and 
Market." David i;'ll.-ul>. .Nut Tree 
Specialist. Weatbnnk. 1UV 

H'O ROOTS ASPAKAiJVS "MVRV 
W:islii!iitt,'U" nr loii Strwl>erry 
Plants "Senator l>unlop" fl.0(i 
'Vstpaid. two for J1.7J. Forward 
t-i.ird us. Irunuois. Qntarui. _ 

! 1II.M rOH HVI.K 

---- column ----

1'I.RAN 'PU'O TO ;\i .. 
Pils, suluble for Ssp. S. Barber 
<ft Son*. 4lXiO Dud;3 St. W r 

---- column ----

I'l. V> I I'OK *I.K 

i-i'fi SAI.I-: \r sACUii-'irfc:. rr-TO- 

date 5-tim capacity ice plant, with 
complvtc equipment. Plant h;\" 
h,-(>M t.p.-ratinif onl> seven >pvs 
I'olil >toruite onuipnient included 
M\tsi ho removed at once. K. T 
\Vlii-i. IV I >'i'll>orne. l.'tiln ... 

I'UOIM'lir^ I'HH SILK 

Mi'K li.OMK SI'OT Kin; I'ntCl.K 
1 ' !n'i--!i. will fiui!.,|. well KVIM- 
grcencd. new brick cabin, etc. 
Stamp reply. \VhoeUn-. Northwooil 

---- column ----

1*1 TS KOR S il.K 

ST. HKKNAHI' I't IT'IKS. KKMVI.KS 
$8.00. Mules $t.;.."". \\ . A. 
Bancroft. Ontario. 

---- column ----

SALE.-MA3T WAITED 

---- column ----

SALZSMAX WANTED WaTH CAB 
to sell to stores, Ladies' Ho us* 
Presses and Men's Working cloth 
?. on commiasion bastn. Cuh bcosi 
required to cover coat of sample** 
Exclusive territory given. 
age. axperience references. 
P.O. Boi 143. Montreal. 

---- column ----

SEWI3TQ MACHIKBS AXD 
REKA1RS 

SINGEF. SES REVERSE 
before buj'ing. Send for 
prices and terms. Kepalrs. Sin 
Sewing Machine Company. 
Tonge St.. Toronto. Ont. 

---- column ----

osv 
n* 
ZM 

---- column ----

SEED FOR SALE 

N'OKTHKKN GROWN NO. : AI.SII 
IS rents pound. No. t Mmture 
Altilcs balance timothy d'.ito 
clover. IS c-.nti pound. No. t Mia* 
ture A -.k J0% balance dutofc 
clover IS cents pound. No. I Mia* 
tu.-e A'.slka 50%, timothy SOU! 
13 centj pound. No. i TlmotkM 
No. 1 Purity 9 cents pound, as) 
primary noxious weed*, tic. v*f 
ment with order. Wm. A. RelsV 
Karl ton, Ontario, 

---- column ----

A KirLU 

---- column ----

VANGUARD OATS FROM 

tered fourth generation grade 1> 
due to color, otherwise gr*tde oae> 
Germmntion 94"c. TO cents bu.shsi 
sacks free Erban .tame price, f. 
O. \Vh::e. (,;i:inwnrth. (int.irlo. 

---- column ----

SNAPSHOTS TO-DAY 
TREASURES TO-MORROW 

Your films are carefully and sciea* 
tiflcally processed by imperial. tS) 
make sure they last. 

9 r S F.-XPOSVKE riLMS X9e 
with beautiful enlargement free. 
8 reprints with enlargement &. 
Thousands of letters from <i.iti*fls4 
customers testify to our suparlot 
nualitv and service. 

1MPF.R1AL PHOTO i ii\ It IS 
Station J. Toronto. 

-. \\1-SV. KOK A1.K 

Fur. svt.E KEiilSTERKP TAkV 
wurtli, S weeks old. Both. sn>i# 
1 ' without papers. S" '0 wltk 
papers. \Vm. R. Wood. Lombard)* 
Ontario. 

---- column ----

TOBACCO 

FOLK FOl'NDS BCRLET AND VTR- 
ginia Leaf for pipe fl.IJ. Ftr* 
pounds Fragrant Virginia !! 
Cigarette Tobacco $2.30 poetpal4> 
Natural Leaf Tobucio Co., Least* 
inKtcn. Ontario. 

i \..u\in i> H.I. 

---- column ----

\\ K srrt'i.Y i \VSES AND IVVT 

hiKhe^t Market Pvlce.i. Further 
partti-ulxrs apply Caiiadiftn l'^J 
vision i- Supply Company. 199 

IMP:.' ST-i'pi Ka.it. Toronto. 

\VVVKI> TO I'l 11(11 t^K 

FEATHERS WANTED 

NK\\ AND rSKP tU>OSi: AN 
lull U. i;.-.' "r.lthei hed.1. HiKhufll 
! i ' - !Mi,l. Send psrtirlllarfr %> 
Quoi 1'iv I'--. 1 ;*: h.>r. -'.* HaldwISb 

T,-i -,.ti: -i. 

Guaranteed 

CAR AND TRUCK PARTS 

Used New 

sl-Kl 1 Vl.r/.IM. IN III 1:1 HI Mil. 
rolls. .- u ; i: i \ : t - ; I > ii-. * . H 
llalolo. \\lnchr. i..->i.Tiil.ir. Mart* 

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^ :*i >si .' 

I'nrt*. 

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r .n. nl. l.e\y 

J.. I ..'.'Tt> > 

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1S 

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ISSUE 16 '41 
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"-.*, 

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Wednesday, April 16, 1941 

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THE FLESHERTON ADVANCE 

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FITXF.SS FIRST IN BRITAIN'S NAVY 

Officers and officer cadets of the B ritish Royal Naval Volunteer Re- 
serve arc seen at physical training. The British Navy claims to have 
the highest physical standard of an y fighting service in the. world. 

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CEYLON 

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Easter week end and holiday visit- 
ors in the community were: A.C. 2 
Dick Stewart, Jackson Stewart and 
Mis? Grace Dierlem, Toronto, at John 
Sti-wart's; Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Jaynes, 
Toronto, with Mrs. Plcster; Miss 
Catherine Cairns, Toronto, and Mrs. 
Chas. Ottewell, Montreal,, at Mr. Geo. 
Cairns'; Mr. and Mrs. H. Huston and 
family and Stewart Muir, Oshawa, 

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with P. Muir; Mr. and Mrs. M. 
Reaney and family, Palmerston, with 
Miss A. C. Maophail; Miss Jeanette 
McLeod, Toronto, with J. D. McLeod; 
Miss Isabel Irish, Toronto, with S. 
Hemphill; Miss Margaret Collinson, 
Toronto, with J. F. Collinson. 

Mrs. Knox has returned home, 
after spending the winter in Toronto. 

Miss McDnald, teacher at Stone's 
Line, is spending the Easter vaca- 
tion 3t her home at Aurora. 

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Mrs. Fred Marshall is spending a 
week in Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Arnott and 
Miss Owen Pattinson of Owen Sound 
spent Sunday at the home of W. T. 
Genoe. 

Miss Minnie Swanton is spending 
the vacation at her home. 

Miss Frances Collinson left Tues- 
day to attend the O.E.A. and visit 
friends in Toronto. 

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Local and Personal 

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Easter Parade 

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JOIN THE EASTER PARADE, COME TO HILL'S READY-TO-WEAR 
DEPARTMENT. SEE THE NEWEST OF SPRING STYLES IN COATS, 
DRESSES AND MILLINERY. BELLOW ARE A FEW VALUES 

OF SPECIAL INTEREST. 

/** i You needn't be slim and tall to get a smart coat. We have many 

\.,Qcl LS sty ' cs an< ^ nia ^ eh * ^' mo *t figures, tall or short. Coats in Harris 
Tweeds, Canadian-made cloth of excellent wearing quality. These 
coats will fit most any pocket book. Moderately priced at $9.85, $10.95, $14.95 
and $15.95. See this range. 

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NEW EASTER DRESSES 

A wonderful showing of new Ray- 
on Dresses in all the new printed de- 
signs from flowers to polka dots. 
Extra Special at $2.95 

NEWEST OF 
EASTER MILLINERY 

Straws, flower trimmed, straws and 
felts combined and all felts. Excep- 
tional values at $1.95 and $2.45 

SPRING CURTAIN MATERIALS 

Newest of Spring Curtain Materials 
by the yard. A wonderful .showing in 
this line. See our window display. 
We are proud of the values we can 
offer Marquisettes, Voiles, Shower 
Spots, Tuscan Nets all at various 
prices per yard \2 l / 2 , 19, 25, 35, 39, 59 

NEW WALLPAPERS 

* 

Add smartness to your home by de- 
corating different rooms with Sun- 
worthv Wallpapers, sold exclusively 
by the Hill Co. in Markdale. Papers 
for kitchen, bedroorhs, dining rooms, 

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parlors and halls. Prices ranpe from 
lOc per single roll to 50c single roll. 

LADIES' CREPE DRESSES 

A real array to choose from. A 
Super Value at $4.95 

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Men's Wear 

Men's Fine Shirts for Easter. A 
wonderful selection to choose from 
and outstanding values. 

Lot 1 15 doz. Fine Shrts with 
fused collar attached in plain colors 
and narrow and broad stripes, sizes 
from 14 to 17. Extra value at 89c 

Lot 2 15 doz. Men's fine Broad- 
cloth Shirts in almost any color desir- 
rd. An extra firm cloth of good wear- 
ing quality. Extra Value, each $1.25 

MEN'S FINE HOSE 

An exceptional buy, made of wool 
and rayon, all sizes 10, \O l / 2 , 11, 11*. 
Trice 35c, or 3 pair for $1.00 

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True Economy in Food Values at Hills 

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Sockeye Salmon, Horseshoe Brand 

l's- : 37c; #'s20c 
Cohoe Fancy Red Salmon 

1's 27c; y 2 's 15c 
Clover Leaf Fancy Pink Salmon 

1's only 16c 
Quaker Oats, family size pkg- 19c 

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Pork & Reans, Libby's 20 oz. size 

2 for 15c 
Condensed Milk, assorted brands 

1's 2 for 15c 
Sandwichc Spread, made by Anne 

Page, 8 oz. jar 19c 
Seedless Raisins .. .2 Ib. for 21c 

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Specials for Friday and Saturday 

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Purity Flour 98 Ib. $2.95 bag 

Peas, No. 2 size, No. 4 sieve 3 for 25o 

Tomatoes, large tin 28 oz 3 for 27c 

Toilet Soap, various kinds cake 4c 

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Crown Brand Syrup: 
No. 2 tins 
No. 5 tins 
No. 10 tins 

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17c 
39c 
79c 

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F. T. Hill & Co., Ltd. 

MARKDALE, Out. 

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f 

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Mr. Alex. Cherry of Toronto visit- 
ed on Friday with Mr. W. E. Myers. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. P. 'Wilson are hol- 
idaying at Stamford. 

Mr. Fred Finder of Toronto was in 
town on Tuesday. 

Mr. and Mr.-. Harold Beat spent a 
couple of days in Toronto last week. 

Mr. Harold Fawcett of Bronte was 
a visitor in town Friday. 

Mr. Wm. McMillan of Picton spent 
the week end with his famil" 'here. 

Mrs. L. W. Thorn of Barrie spent a 
few days with friends in town last 
week. 

Messrs. Chas. and Stewart McTav- 
ish of Oshawa spent Good Friday 
with their father, Mr. D. McTavish. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Ben and son 
of Toronto visited Friday with Mr. 
and Mrs. Bob Phillips. 

Misses Dorothy Patton and Ollie 
McDonald of Toronto spent the holi- 
day at their homes here. 

Guard Norman Stoddart, R.C.A.F., 
Toronto, spent the week end with his 
family in town. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dan Helson of Toron- 
to spent the week end with her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. L. McCracken. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Coe of Hamil- 
ton are visiting with Mr. and Mrs. 
Fred Irwin. 

Aircraftsman E. I. Holley of To- 
ronto spent the week end with his 
family in town. 

Bmbd. Sid Rainbird cf Petawawa 
was the week end sruest of Mrs. C. 
R. Wood and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Bellamy of To- 
ronto spent the week end with Mr. 
W. J. Bellamy. 

Mrs. F. Eibach of Detroit is visit- 
ing with her sister, Mrs. R. Alex- 
ander and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clive Dolan and 
daughter, Mary, spent the first of 
the week in Toronto. 

Miss Elma Hamil^n of Guelph 
spent the week end with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Hamilton. 

Miss Mary R. Stewart is spending 
the Easter vacation at her home at 
Clinton. 

Mr. Harvey Croft and Miss Mar- 
garet Gaston of Toronto soent the 
week end with Mr. and Mrs. S. Croft. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Perigoe and 
daughter, Mary K of Malton spent 
the holiday with Mr. and Mrs. Albert 
Stewart. 

Eleanor Williams is spending a few 
days with her cousin Wilma Williams, 
Feversham. Wilma will return with 
her for the remainder of the holidays. 

Miss Velma Fryer of Toronto and 
Miss Ruth Blackburn of Flesherton 
spent the week end holiday with their 
cousin, Mabel Blackburn, 4th line. 

Signalman Bruce Ashton of Kings- 
ton was an Easter visitor at the home 
of his parents, Rev. and Mrs. F. 
Ashton. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Leavell and 
daughter, Ruth, of Collingwood spent 
the week end with Mrs. Leavell's par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Clark. 

Mr. and Mrs. Len Hill and two 
children of Toronto <i->ent the holiday 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. 
Bentliam. 

Misses Evelyn Brown and Ethel 
Burnett of Toronto and Gertrude 
Lever of Richmond Hill holidayed at 
their homes on Toronto Line North. 

Mr. Delhert Smith of Napanee 
spent Easter week end with his par- 
ents. He was accompanied by Miss 
Ivers of Toronto, who visited Mr. and 
Mrs. Smith on Good Friday. 

Mrs. Chns. Ottewell of Montreal 
was a visitor during the past week 
with her mother, Mrs. Wilcock, and 
left on Monday for Vancouver to visit 
with her son, Jack. 

Pte. Ben McLeod of Calgary, now 
with the 1st Rrigmio Tank Company 
of Cnmp Borden snent the week end 
with his cousin, Mr. S. Stnuffer, and 
family. 

Mr. Bob Bellamy returned to his 
nonir here on Saturday, after spend- 
ing four weeks in a Hamilton hospit- 
al following an operation for appen- 
dicitis. 

The following teachers are holi- 
daying at their respective homes: 
Kate McMillan, Helen Heard. Annie 
Akins, Tnez Brown, Audrey Brown, 
Laura Royd, Lucy McDonald. 

The first ground hog delivered to 
John Leffler, mink breeder of town, 
was taken to him the first of the week 
by two eight year old boys Jnck 
Milne and Brtrry Thurston, who had 
their traps set as soon as the snow 
disappeared. 

Week end visitors at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. R. McNnbb were: Miss 
Vickie MtfNabb nml Mrs. Garland F. 
Young of Toronto, Mr. R. J. McNabb, 
Wilson McNabb and Mr. and Mrs. 
Russcl Farrow nnd sons, John and 
Garland, of Chntsworth. 

Spi-cinl Enster services were held 
in St. John's United Church Sunday, 
when Rev. McMillan dispensed the 
Sncrni'iient of the Lord's Supper at 
the morning service, besides receiv- 
ing six young people into member- 
ship in the church. At the evening 
service a drama "Release" wns pre- 
sented by the young neople, depicting 
a scene in the life of Bnrabbns. Good 
congregations attended both services. 

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M **'*** 

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Fresh and . 
Cured Meats ! 
Home Made 
Head Cheese ':. 

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--* ! 1 

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BAILEY'S 

We DELIVER FLESHERTON, Ont. 

^Bto- ''^ff~~~' w * fV** 

* Canada First Lest We Forget! 

>+****+****+****** *M it******** 

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PHONE 

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Small Ad. Column 

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FOR SALE Alfalfa clover seed, 
$8 bu. Gordon McMullen, phone 
170 r 5, Thornbury. 46p2 

FOR SALE Seed grain. Ed. 
Pedlar, phone Feversham 1 r 22, 
Singhampton R, R. 1. tc ' 

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FOR SALE Vanguard and Erban 
oats for seed; also horse 6 years 
old. Allie McLean, Priceville, 
phone 49 r 8. 44c2 

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FOR SALE Hatch of Barred Rock 
chicks on April 2, also hatching 
eggs. Mrs. Ward Harrison, R. R. 
3, Proton, phone 41 r 4. 43p2 

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FOR SALE Vanguard and Erban 
seed oats, also a mare 10 years old 
to foal in July. Ross Stevens 
Phone 32 r 31. 

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FOR SALE General Purpose team 
of horses, 3 and 4 years old, also 
duck eggs. C. McDermid, phone 
46 r 31, Flesherton. 46c2 

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FOR SALE Heavy draft mare, 12 
yr-.. due to foal May 1st, priced 
for quick sale. Herb Grummett 
R. R. 2, Proton Station. 

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FOR SALE 2 Purebred Hereford 
Bulls, ready for service, 11 and 12 
months old. Wm. Fadden, Fev- 
ersham, phone 22 r 41. 45c2 

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NOTICE Paper hangind and paint- 
ing at reasonable prices. Estimates 
free. Ross Mitchell, Dundalk, 
telephone 77. 

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FOR SALE Threshing machine 32 

in. cylinder in-good condition; also 

sow with litter of 8, 2 weeks old, 

and 2 spring calves. Richard 

Irving, Flesherton, R. R. 2. 45c2 

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FOR SALE ShutvGain Chick Start- 
er, Shur-Gain Pig Starter and 41% 
Hog Concentrate; also red clover 
seed 'and small peas. George 
Morrison, Maxwell. 45p 

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FOR SALE House in Flesherton, 
with .seven rooms, hard and soft 
water, double lot and barn. For 
full particulars apply to J. W. Mc- 
Mullen, Ceylon, Executor. 30c 

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FOR SALE 7-rootn brick house in 
Flesherton, large lot, garage, good 
well, must be sold to settle estate 
of the late Andrew Gilchrist Ap- 
ply to John Stewart, Executor, Pro- 
-ton Station, phone 32 r 4. 

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POTATOES FOR SALE Grade 
Canada No. 1, early varieties 
Warbas and Cobblers; later var- 
ieties, Katahdins and Dooleys. 
Alex. S. Muir, R. R. No. 1 Ceylon, 
phone Flesherton 47 r 14. 44c4 

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FOR SALE Driving horse, 5 years 
old, good worker, or will exchange 
for heavy horse 1 also 10 chunks of 
pigs. Geo. Thompson, phone 
Feversham Ir31, Singhampton P.O. 

46 p. 2. 

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FOR SALE In Ceylon, comfortable 
7-room house, electric lights, hard 
and soft water, good stable, hen 
house and garage with cement 
floor, lot containing 1 acre more 
or lens. For particulars apply to 
Mrs. Nellie Gilchrist, Badjeros, R. 
R. 1, or Fred Irwln, Flesherton. 

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FARM FOR SALE 

100 acre farm, 5 acres wheat, 
spring creek, tiled well and windmill, 
comfortable dwelling, barn and lien- 
house, situated 1 mile south of Flesh- 
erton on No. 1 Highway, reasonably 
priced for quick sale. Apply to 
Fred Irwin, Flesherton, Ont. 

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GIRL WANTED Apply at Park 

House, Flesherton. 44p2 

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FOR SALE 6 Pigs rady to wean. 
J. f. Stewart, phone 32rll. 

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FOR SALE Cows, horses, oat 
(with a little mixture of barley. 
W. J. McFaddcn, R. R. 6, Mark- 
dale, phone 33 r 3. 46c2 

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FOR SALE C.C.M. bicycle in per- 
fect condition. Wm. McBride,' 
Priceville. 46p2 

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FOR SALE Heavy brown mare colt 
rising 3 years. W. 'Weber, R. R, 
No. 4, Markdale. 44p2 

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FARM FOR SALE $475.00 Lot 
20, Concession 7, Osprey, ormerly 
McQueen property. Apply to I. B. 

Lucas & Co., Markdale, Ont. 43c3 

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FARM FOR SALE Owner 
pared to sell at sacrifice. 200 acres 
near Duncan, known as Howard 
farm. Apply to I. B. Lucas & Co., 
Markdale, Ont. 43c3 

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WANTED Girl for general house- 
work, must be good with children, 
good wages, must be ready to star* 
May 1. Apply to Miss B. Cairns, 
11 Haddington Ave., Toronto, tie- 
phone MO 5368, Toronto. 

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FARM FOR SALE 

Lots 14-15, Con. 1, S.U.R., Alt*. 
mesia, containing 100 acres, on which 
is situated a bank barn 45x65, also 
large driving shed. This property 
must be sold to wind up estate. ThoM 
interested communicate with John 
Oliver or W. R. Meads, Priceville, Jfc. 
ecutors for the estate. 47o 

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PROPERTY FOR SALE IN 
.FLESHERTON 

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Lot 10 on Collingwood St., on 
which is situated a 7-room house, 
well and stable. Those interested 
communicate with I. B. Lncas, Mark* 
dale, Solicitor for the Ella Gibson 
Estate. 

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AUCTIONEER 

WALTER SEELET 

Se me about your auction sale. All 
sales conducted on business prin- 
ciples. Phone me at Feversham 4rl2 
or make arrangements at The 
Flesherton . Advance office. 

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BUSINESS CARDS 

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DR. S. R. THIBAUDEAU 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

Graduate of Ontario Veterinary CoU- 

ege. Phone: 91 day or night 

MARKDALE, ONT. 

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DR. J. E. MILNE 

Office Durham St 
Office Hours _ Afternoons. UO te i. 
KveninRs. 7 U 8.M. 
Sundays and Thursday afternoons bf 
appointment only. 

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Prince Arthur Lodge No. MS, AJ. 
& A.M., meets in the Fraternal Hall, 
Flesherton, the second Friday in ea*B 
month. W.M., Herb. Corbett; 
retary. C. J. Bellamy. 

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ROY LANGFORD 

Diitrict Agent for 

MUTUAL MFR OP CANADA 

ACCIDENT and SICKNESS, FIR*, 

AUTOMOBILE, BURGLARY 
Municipal Liability GnarantM 
Any Inraranee Problem 

FLESHERTON, Ont. 
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/lesfyetton 

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VOL. 60; NO. 47 

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FLESHERTON. WEDNESDAY. APRIL 23, 1941 

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W. H. Thurston & Son, Props. 

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Dance For "A" Coy. 
Foresters Thursday 

"A" Company of the Grey and Sim- 
coe Foresters is coming to Flesherton 
.and Markdale late Thursday after- 
'noon. They will have their supper in 
Markdale from their own mobile field 
kitchen at teh armories. They ex- 
' t pect to pass through Flesherton some 
% time late in the afternoon so it is not 
known whether or not they will march 
through town on their way to Mark- 
dale. Half the Company will spend 
the night in Markdale and the other 
half in Flesherton, with the town hall 

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as headquarters and for sleeping ac- 
commodation. On Friday they will 
continue to Owen Sound, where they 
will receive their week end lav from 
that point. Capt. Harris of Markdale 
will be in charge of the Company. 

Thursday evening a dance will be 
held in the Fraternal Hall, Flesher- 
ton, in honor of the fc'oops and their 
visit to town, when good music will 
be povided for modern and old time 
dancing. The ladies are requested to 
bring lunch. The only charge will be 
a silver collection. Be on hand and 
show the boys from the Grey County 
Company in the Foresters that theii 
sacrifices in joining the army are not 
forgotte. Give them a good time 
while in town. 

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OF PARTICULAR INTEREST TO LADIES 

SPECIAL SPRING 

Display and Sale 

Wed. April 30 

LADIES' SPRING COATS 

TAILORED SUITS 
NEW SPRING DRESSES 

SPRING MILLINERY 

Display and Sale by \V ray's Ladies' Wear 
of Owen Sound 

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ONE DAY ONLY 

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How About a New Suit 
This Spring? 

Probably y ->u're thinking of a new Suit for Spring 

don't leave it too late! The fine new samples 

of Sprii.*; Suitings and Overcoatings are here 

there i a. splendid selection of smart patterns. 

SUITS & OVERCOATS FROM $24.95 

EJ !; gari .. : made and tailored to your individ- 
ual measure fit and satisfaction guaranteed. 

Ready-to-Wear Suits 

New sefges and Fancy Suitings specially priced 

contracted for before the recent advances 

in woollens. All sizes. 

PRICED FROM $14.95 

NEW HOUSE DRESSES 

Smart styles new patterns in extra quality sun 
And tub-fast prints. All sizes up to 52. 

PRICED 98c, $1.19, $1.39, $1.59 

All wonderful value. 

F. H. W. Hickling 

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General Merchant 

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** 

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FLESHERTON 

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**< ti >*** *+ 

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Equipped to handle the finest service at moderate prices 

tp- 

Our Beautiful 

Air 
Conditioned 

Funeral Chapel 
ft 

124 AVENUE ROAD 

TORONTO, Ont 

RICHARD MADDOCKS. 

Manager. 

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FRED MADDOCKS. 

Associate. 

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Mamber of th Fl*h*rton OM B ays' A Girls' Association 

BATES & MADDOCKS 

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Formerly of Ftahcrton, Out. 

124 Avenue Road, Toronto, Ont 

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KI. 4344 

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The late J. D. Clarke 

The funeral of the late John D. 
Clarke, who passed away last week 
at the home of his son at Winchester, 
Mass., was held on Thursday after- 
noon from the home of his brother- 
in-law, Mr. P. H. W. Hickling. The 
service was conducted by Rev. G. K. 
McMillan, pastor St. John's United 
church, and also at the intsrment at 
Flesherton Cemetery. 

The members of Prince Arthui 
Lodge No. 333, A.F.&A.M, conducted 
the masonic service at the cemetery, 
with Wor. Bro. W. G. McBride act- 
ing as Master. The pallbearers were 
Past Masters of Prince Arthur 
Lodge, Wor. Bros. W. G. Watson, P. 
Muir, R. Piper, A. Blackburn, C. N. 
Richardson and F. J. Thurston. 

The late John Duncan Clarke was 
born in Belhelvie, Aberdeen, Scotland, 
in 1853, and came to Canada in his 
early twenties. He was married to 
Jennie Armstrong, daughter of the 
late J. W. Armstrong of Flesherton, 
in 1883. He served on the Hamilton 
Spectator, the London Free Press and 
was editor of the London Advertiser 
before going to Ottawa as secretary 
to the Hon. David Mills, Minister of 
Justice, and subsequently to his suc- 
cessors, Hon. A. B. Aylesworth, Si: 
Chas. Fitzpatrick and the Hon. Chas. 
Doherty. Among his most interest- 
ing assignments as a newspaper re- 
porter, he covered the Philadelphia 
Centennial Exhibition in 1876 and the 
Republican convention of 1880, at 
which the Hon. Jas. Garfield defeated 
Gen. V. S. Grant, who was seeking a 
second term. Before retiring in 1922, 
Mr. Clarke was chief of the Clemency 
Branch of the Department of Justice. 

An enthusiastic Mason, Mr. Clarke 
was one of the Canadian delegates to 
the Masonic World Convention held 
in The Hague. Holland, in 1912, when 
at the same time, he spent four 
months with the Canadian Commis- 
sion, representing Canada in the 
famous Canada-U. S. fisheries dis- 
pute. He was a former president of 
the St. Andrew's Societies of London 
and Ottawa. On retiring from the 
government service he lived in Wes- 
ton until three years ago when, on a 
visit to his son in Winchester, Mass.. 
he suffered a stroke from which he 
never fully recovered, and has made 
his home there since. 

He is survived by his son, John 
Hamilton Clarke, and five grand- 
children. Dorothy and Peter Clarke 
of Winchester, Mass., and Paul, Jack 
and Barbara Clarke of Vancouver, 
children of his late son. George. 

With the passing of Mr. Clarke The 
Advance has lost a true friend, as he 
had frequently contributed articles 
to this paper while in good health. It 
was always a pleasure to have him 
come into the office when in town and 
relate some of the many experiences 
he had while in newspaper work and 
at Ottawa. He had many warm 
friends in Flesherton. who sympa- 
thize with Jack in the loss of a 
father. 

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Foresters Now In 
Toronto Barracks 

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The Grey & Simcoe Foresters 
moved last week to Toronto, where 
they have taken up quarters in the 
horse palace in the Exhibition 
grounds. The Irish Regiment of 
Canada, brigaded with the Forest- 
ers, also moved to Exhibition Park 
at the same time. Lieut. -Col. T. J 
Rutherford in command of the For- 
esters since mobilization last June 
has been appointed Brigadier of the 
1st Tank Brigade, Camp Borden. 
Col. Rutherford has qualities ol 
leadership that will prove a valuable 
asset to Canada. Major N. E. Mc- 
Donald, M. M., has been appointed 
to command the 2nd Battalion of the 
G. & S. Foresters and took over his 
new duties last week. 

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Killed In EngLnd 

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Word was received by Mr. Jos 
Blakeley on Friday of the death in 
England of L.-Cpl. William Stafford 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Stafford 
of Toronto. Mrs. Stafford was for- 
merly Miss Pearl Blakley, daughter 
of the late Mr. and Mrs. Thos. A 
Blakeley, former resident of Flesh- 
erton. L.-Cpl. Stafford was an in- 
structor with the Royai Canadian 
Corps of Signals. He was wounded j 
last fall but remained in England to j 
have another crack at Hitler. Par- 
ticulars as to his death have not yet 
been received, but it Is presumed' to 
have occured during the intense aii 
raid on England Wednesday night ol 
last week. 

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RED CROSS NOTES 

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Will knitters please hand in finish- 
ed garments this week for the mon- 
thly shipment. 

All knitting is now done on a 
monthly basis and we have been askoil 
specially for, two way mitts, sleev- 
less sweaters, long stockings, turtle- 
neck sweaters and a few seamen's 
scarves. The seamen's garments are 
still urgently reeded. 

We have moved our sewing room 
back to the Town Hall for the sum 
mer and would appreciate assistance 
from, anyone willing to help. 

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SOMERS KRUMENACHER 

St. Mary's R. C. Church, Simcoe 
Ontario, was the scene of a pretty- 
wedding at nine o'clock Monday morn- 
ing, April 14th, when Margaret 
Krumenacher of McTaggart, Sask.. 
and Mr. William Somers of Fern Glen. 
Ont., were united in the holy bonds of 
matrimony. 

Rev. Father Finn of Simcoe pre- 
formed the wedding ceremony in the 
presence of a large number of friends 
of the young couple. 

The bride, wearing a dress of white 
brocaded satin with long train and 
carrying a boquet of sweetheart roses 
and maidenhair fern, was given away 
by Mr. Frank Krubinski of Simcoe. 
She was attended by Miss Mary 
Krubinski of Simcoe. wearing a floor- 
length dress of pink chiffon crepe 
and Miss Emily Haas of Toronto 
wearing pale blue chiffon crepe, ot 
floor length. The groom was support- 
ed by his brother Mr. P. J. Somers. 
of Banks and Mr. Andrew Krubinski 
of Simcoe. 

The wedding breakfast was served 
at the home of Mr. Frank Krubinski. 
when about thirty friends sat down 
to a suplenteour repast. Rev. Father 
Schwartz of St. Mary's Church was 
present to wish the young couple 
success and happiness. In the after- 
noon Mr. and Mrs. Somers left for a 
motor trip to Niagara Falls. They 
| will reside at Fern Glen, Ont.. where 
the groom is engaged in teaching. 

---- column ----

BORN 

MeKINNON B.irn at Strathcona 
Private Hospital, Toronto on Sunday, 
March 30. 1941, to Mr. and Mrs. Alex- 
ander MeKinnon (Laura White), 260 
j Windcrmere Ave., Toronto, a daught- 
er Sarah Diane. 

---- column ----

Subscribe for The Advance $1.50 
per year in advance. 

---- column ----

Future Events 

---- column ----

The annual meeting of East Grey 
County L.O.L. will be held in Pun- 
dalk, Tuesday. April 29, at 8 p.m. 

---- column ----

Priceville Women 
Doing War Work 

A small group of Priceville ladies 
have been quite active the past couple 
of moiiths. making refugee quilts for t 
the local Red Cross Branch. 

In February nine quilts and one 
crib cover were made. Two tops do- 
nated by Mrs. Dan Campbell and Mrs. 
Kate MacArthur and one quilt com- 
plete. All three were quilted at Mrs. ] 
Dan Campbell's. One q'uilt complete i 
donated by Mrs. Harold Karstedt and I 
Mrs. Tom Harrison, quilted at Mrs. | 
Harrison's. Material for two tops 
donated by Mrs. McB-ide and pieced 
by Mrs. F. McKinnon. quilted at Mrs. 
McBride's. Material for three quilt.' 
was donated by Mrs. Fred Karstedt 
and pieced by Miss Nellie ?IcLean 
and Miss Mary MacKinnon. These 
quilts were quilted in the basement ol 
St Columba Church. The samples 
for the crib cover were donated by 
Mrs. Fred Karstedt and put togethei 
by Miss Mary McKinnon. In ^ebru 
ary six pairs of mens flannelettt 
pyjamas were also donated to the 
local Red Cross by Priceville W. I. 

In March four quilts were made. 
Two tops donated by Mrs. Win. Aid- i 
corn, quilted at Mrs. McBride's. One I 
top donated by Mis? Nellie McLean ! 
and quilted at Mrs. F. MacKinnon's. I 
One quilt, complete, donated by Mrs. : 
Robert Parslow and Mrs. Harold 
Karstedt. Quilted at Mrs. Parslow's. 
In March Mrs. Fred Karnedt donat- ! 
ed nine ready made dresses for small 
girls. 

For the month of April we have 
five quilts, one (complete) donated j 
by Miss Margaret Simpson and Mr. 
Elizabeth Wright. Toronto. Two j 
quilt tops pieced under the direction ! 
of Miss Anna Shortreed by the young j 
girls of the village. These three | 
quilts were quilted in the basement 
of St. Andrew's Church. One top 
pieced by Mrs. F. MacKinnon and 
Mr?. McBride was qui'ted at Mrs. 
Tom Harrison's. One quilt, (com- 
plete 1 ) donated by Mrs. McBride and 
was quilted at her home. 

In early February a quilt was do- 
nated (complete) by Miss Nellie Me 
Lean and Mrs. McBride. and beauti 
fully quilted at Miss McLean's home 
by Miss McLean and Miss Mary Mac- 
Kinnon. Tickets were sold on this 
quilt to help defray expenses for 
baats, linings and thread used for 
quilts not donated eomplet The 
draw was made last Monday evening 
in PriceviTle Hall a nd Mr George Mc- 
Tavish held the lucky number, 164. 
Mr. McTavish returned the quilt to the 
ladies to be raffle., off again. Thi* 
kind, generous act was much appreci- 
ated by the ladies. Mrs. Dan Camp- 
bell donated material for another 
quilt. This one was also quilted at 
Miss Nellie McLean's home and sold 
to Mrs. Oswald Purkis, Toronto. 
There were also two money donations. 
One dollar each from Mrs. Kate Mac- 
Arthur and Mrs. A. B. McDonald. 

After expenses were paid there was 
a balance of ten dollars. This mm 
was handed over to the local Red 
Cross. The ladies are proud of their 
achievement and very grateful to all 
who helped. They have organized u 
club and would be glaj to welcome 
either materials or money would be 
greatly appreciated. Donations could 
be sent to the secretary. Miss Sadie 
Oliver. 0. P. R.. or to Mrs. W. G. Mc- 
Brido. Prieville. 

---- column ----

St Columba Church New* 

The April meeting of St. Columb* 
W. A. was held in the church base- 
ment Wednesday afternoon, with the 
president, Mrs. Wm. Meads in the 
chair. A sum was voted to the church 
treasurer. Following considerable 
discussion as to ways of raising 
funds, the executive was asked to 
work out group plans for consider- 
ation at the next meeting. 

The W. M. S- meeting followed with 
Mrs. E. G. Ritchie in charge. Mrs, 
Gary White read the scripture, ilri. 
Wm. Mather and Mrs. Ritthie led in 
prayer and the latter read an Easter 
story, "The Mother." Plans were 
made for some of the members to 
attend the Presbyterial in Owen 
Sound on May 6. Misses Edith and 
Bertha James took the study period 
dealing with early missionary work 
in British Columbia and featuring 
the work of Rev. Horace Wrinch, 
surgeon of the Skeena. 

It was decided to hold the Majf 
meeting at the home of Miss Eliza- 
beth Mather. 

---- column ----

ATTENDED AT HOME 

---- column ----

The annual At Home of the Toron- 
to branch of the Flesherton Old Boys' 
& Girls' Association was held in To- 
ronto Monday evening 1 , when the fol- 
lowing from Flesherton attended: G. 
B. Welton. Mr. and Mrs. Cecil McTav- 
i-h. Albert Sparks. Mr. and Mrs. Ab. 
Stewart, Mr. and Mrs. A. Aberdein, 
Geo. Boyd. Ruby Akitt, Geo. Akitt, 
Bernice Campbell. Aled a Mitchell. Mr. 
and Mrs. H. Best. Major and Mrs. W. 
Turney. and Jos. Field. 

---- column ----

HIGHWAY DEATHS APPALING 

Mr. Justice Hope told the Grandl 
Jury that the publication each weefe 
end of the casulty list of persons kil- 
led in motor accidents might brinjp 
home to Canadians how appalling is 
the death toll on our highways. 

His Lordship went further ar.J 
pointed out that if the motor 
or fatalities was contrasted with th 
list of those killed in the war, th 
citizens would be appalled. 

The words of the learned justice 
are timely and truly represent cond- 
itions on the highways of Canada to- 
lay "Many people fail to appreciate 
the menace they are to the lives anJ 
property of others." His Lordship 
added, noting that no manslaughter 
ca'sos were on docket before him for 
trial. 

Most highway accidents are due 
to carelessness and disregard for the 
rights of others. In some cases liqu- 
or plays an important part. What- 
ever the causes of accidents arc, how- 
ever, it is appj.rent that even more 
drastic regulations than now exist 
will have to be enacted. 

One of the most interesting bullet- 
ins is one in the maternity wards of 
a Montreal hospital which says "No 
Children Allowed." 

---- column ----

GUY M.VCH.VN 

---- column ----

SAFE LOCK 
WIRE FENCE 

is best because stays are flexible, 
not rigid. If accidentally depress- 
ed it spring's erect the moment 
pressure is removed with no 
straightening of bent wires. Mny 
fanners call it 

Hinge Lock Fence 

Ask your local dealer for it. 
Made only by the 

KEEN AN FENCE CO. 

OWEtf SOUND. Ont. 

---- column ----

Mr. MeArthur, the hair dresser 
from Toronto, will be at M. Arthur 
MacDonald's residence (bake shop) 
Flesherton, on Thursds". April 24th. 
to give permanent?. Make appoint- 
ments with Mrs. Scarrow at the 
bake shop. 

Red Cross Dance and Euchre in the 
Fraternal Hall. Flesherton, on Thurs- 
day, May 1st. Old time and modern 
dancing. First Class music. Admis- 
sion: 35c, lunch included. Come out 
and have a good time and assist the 
Red Cross. 

OPTICAL. A large number of 
accidents are the result of defective 
vision. If in doubt about yours con- 
sult P. Campbell at the Munshaw 
House next .uesday. the 29th. from 
1.30 to 8.30 p.m. See the new Tona- 
Ray (slip-over) goggle. 

---- column ----

A quiet but very pretty wedding 
took place at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. J. N. Guy. Seventh Street. Mid- 
land. Saturday afternoon, April 12, 
when Marjorie Jean Machan of Mel- 
ville. Sask.. became the bride of Wil- 
lard Thomas Guy. Rev. W. R.'Auld 
officiated at the marriage. 

The bride, who was unattended, en- 
tered the room on the arm of her 
father to the strains of Lehengren's 
Wedding March. 

After a buffet luncheon the yourtg 
couple left for a motor trip to 
Niagara Falls and St. Catharines. 

Out-of-town guests attending the 
wedding were: Mr. and Mrs. Machan 
of Melville. Sask.. father and mother 
of the bride: Constable R. E. Guy, of 
the R. C. M. P. at Rockcliffe. Ont.; 
Harry Atkey and Bob McMurray of 
St. Catharines, formerly of Melville, 
Sask. Midland Press Herald. 

---- column ----

Mr. Clive Dolan left last week to 
take a position in Toronto, after being 
with the O. & A . Co-operative for the 
past couple of years. 

---- column ----

Flesherton United Church 

REV. G. K. MCMILLAN, B.A.. B.D. 

Minister 

11.00 a.m. Worship Flesherton. 

2.00 p.m. Worship Ceylon. 

7 .30 p.m. Worship Fleshertoa. 
Morning Subject; 

"Lovest Thou Me?" 
Evening Subject; 

"A Saving Sence of Humour." 

---- column ----

Flesherton Baptist Church 

Minister- Her. Fred Asb\w 

Services Fleaherton. 

11 a.m. Worship. 

12 noon, Bible School. 
7 p.m., Gospel Service. 

Monday at 8 p.m. Y. P. Service. 
Rock Mills ' 

2 p.m., Bible School. 

3 p.m.. Worship. 
Professor N. H. Parker of Mc- 

Master University will be the special 
speaker in the Flesherton and Rock 
Mills Churches next Sunday. After- 
at 3'o,clock at Rock Mills, and at 
Flesherton at 7 p.m. Pastor Ashton 
will be in charge of these services and 
will preach on Sunday morning in the 
Flesherton Church. Mr. Roy Lang- 
ford will be the Soloist in the even- 
ing service. A cordial welcome for 
all who can attend these services. 

---- column ----

Gospel Workers' Church' 

Feversham, Ont. 
Rev. C. McNichol. Paetor 

Sunday School at 10.00 a.m. 
Morning Service at 11.00 a.m. 
Evening Service at 7.30 n.m. 
---- page ----

---- column ----

Saving Ontario's 

Natural 

Resources 

---- column ----

Raising Young Bass 

(No. 39) 

In my article last week I told 
of the way in which Uis basos 
B^awn in nature. The Game and 
fisheries Itepartment ralso many 
thousands of young buss earn year 
! -but they have to imitate the nat- 
ural en\ iromue-ut closely tor full 
access. To do this is very expens- 
ive and fi:: sterling bass cost much 
More than fiugerllnss of, trout or 
pickerel. It is this high cost that 
wakes it so difficult to raise young 
ban* iu quantities, 

lu various places Itirougiioul the 
Province, tin Department has 
toullt a number of bass liatcue-rles. 
Theeo cousist of a series of pouda. 
rectangular in shape and less than 
an acre in extent. They are sep- 
arately fed and drained. Tho source 
of the water supply U usually a 
spring creek, the waters of which 
have been heated tn some extent 
bjr holding them above a dam be- 
fore being distributed to the var- 
ious ponds. These ponds vary in 
depth from a knife edge to six feet 
at the outlet, where tu> ftah may 
be corralled in a email basin when 
the waters of the pond are low- 
ered. 

In Hatcheries 

If small mouth bass are being 
l>i -opugaled nests are constructed 
of gravel. The diameter of this 
uest Is approximately two teet and 
is HO placed that when the pond to 
flooded, the depth of water over It 
will range from eighteen lnche to 
two feet. Large mouth bass do not 
need nests for they will clean off 
suitable areas themselves. 

Before the breeding SMSOU, the 
adult bass are introducd Into th 
pond iind if the temperature Li 
right eventually a large number 
of young bass are produced. Th 
greatc-st vigilance is noeded to re- 
tain the heat In the pond. A cold 
upell, of cloudy Jays will cause ser- 
ious losses among the gg, BO the 
attendants, by various method* 
which tlioy bave learned, try to 
maintain a uniform temperature 
if the witter. When the young has* 
rise to the surface they are col- 
lected iu cheesecloth nets and plac- 
ed In retaining ponda where they 
are hel^ and fed until they are 
ready for distribution In natural 
waters throughout Ontario. 

---- column ----

THIS IS WHAT MASS PRODUCTION OF BOMBERS MEANS 

---- column ----

SCOUTING . . . 

The IUSH of 700 leaders through 
enlistment iu H. M. Force* was dlv 
closecl In the rerently lnuad An- 
nual Report of the Hoy Scoutd As- 
sociation for 1940. The effect of 
tlil lr>sn upon boy membership 
was nhown in a drop of 5.37 per 
cent, to 97,3*1. This figure, how- 
rer, waa still la excess of th* 
membership total of the pre-war 
yc*r of 1933. 


Membership analysis: Th 1040 
total consisted of 40,353 Wolf Oubi, 
46,489 Boy Scouts, 503 I/on Scouts. 
883 Sea Scouts, 2,361 Rover Scouts, 
217 Rover Sea Scouts and 7,6 
leaders (not counting 444 Scoiiters 
registered as Rovers). 


Membership by province* show- 
ed: Prince Edward Island, 74C; 
Nova Scotia, 5,378; New Bruns- 
wick, 6,782; Quebec, 8,319; On- 
tario, 41,095; Manitoba, 7,181; 
Saskatchewan, 6,808; Alberta, H.- 
599; Hrit tali Columbia, 8,168; La 
Kndcratiiui d*a Scouts Oathollgues, 
Quebec, 4,279; Mfe Saving Scouts 
of the Salvation Army, 1,460. 


Tbo various units Included: 2,- 
306 Scout Groups, which Included 
1,646 Wolf Oub Packs, 2,051 Boy 
Scout Troops, 221 Rover Hcout 
Crown, 21 Sea Stout Troops, 8 Soa 
8cout Patrol* and II Hover Soa 
Scout Crews. 


Affiliation*: Sponsors of Scout 
Groups are given as follows: An- 
Hllcan, 430; Baptint, 6-'; Canadian 
Legion. .'15; Community, 747; Han- 
dicapped (Hospitals), U; JlHiiew. 
28; Latter Day Saints, 30; Luth- 
eran, 4; I'resliyterinn, 108; ItuniHii 
Calliollc, 3*4; Salvation Army. 50; 
Service Clubs, 80; United Church, 
276. Oth.M-n, in. 

---- column ----

This City Forgets 
To Hold Election 

Tin; tbiant-injndad profua.ifir 
didn't have a thing < n North Kan- 
sas City. 

The iiiunici|>a!il> furuiit to hold 
its i-lee linn. 

Mayor Kdward A. lieckcr, 
reading election returns, wonder- 
d why balloting in tho city wa* 
set for ths following Tuesday in- 
itfl<! of April 1 an in oilier Mis- 
souri towns. 

"I liavfi the law right here," re- 
plied City Clerk Marl .Sims li> the 
mayor's <|iiery. It says . . . the 
firat Tuesday after the first Mon- 
day .... Wait a minute that's 
for general elect! ms." 

The mayor, preparing for tha 
belitted elevtign contends h* 

won't a 

---- column ----

Bodies of Martin B-26 medium bombers stretch out in long row on assembly line awaiting wings and 
engines in Balttmore plant of Glenn L. Martin, which is producing them in droves for U.S. Army. 

---- column ----

THE WARWEE K Commentary on Current Events 

New R\isso - Japanese Pact 
May Change War's Course 

---- column ----

Sir Robert C'live, the eminent 
Britisher who has been Ambass- 
ador at Tokyo and Brussels and 
minister to the Vatican and Per- 
sia, and is now travelling on this 
continent, very recently expressed 
the vie-w that to a diplomat Russia 
and Japan appeared to hold the 
key to the future of the world. He 
predicted the early signing of an 
accord between the two countries. 
May Change War'* Course 

Subsequent events dramatically 
bore out his prediction. Last week 
a Sovlet-Ja,panese neutrality pact 
was signed, ending 24 years of 
trained Far Eastern relations aud 
giving the western nations a new 
yogar to puzzle over. Most observ- 
ers agreed that the pact rivalled 
IB world Importance the non-ag- 
gression accord In 1939 between 
Germany and Russia aud that it 
would powerfully affect the course 
of the war, on every front. 
Interpretations 

Editorial writers all over the 
globe spread themselves on this 
latest international development. 
From amongst a score of Inter- 
pretations we have selected sev- 
eral representative opinion. 1 ) which 
throw light on various angles of 
the situation: 

Toronto Globe and Mall: "The 
ut result of the pact on the Euro- 
pean situation Is that Russia can 
now poke a gnu In Germany's ribs 
without fear of Japan. In the Kant 
tha situation does not neeni to be 
altered. Japan's most dogged en- 
my Is China, which received aid 
from the United States, from Bri- 
tain and from Russia. There is 
nothing In the new pact which pro- 
hibits Russia from continuing her 
aid to China. There was never any 
suggestion that Russia might Inter- 

---- column ----

"Good Exposure" Not 
Recommended 

---- column ----

Statistically, there shuulil be 

Plenty of house-room in London, 
Ingland, today, so many millions 
have oeen evacuated. Kut tlie set 
of ruli-s that now must bo employ- 
ad to judge an apartment knocks 
statistics into a cocked lint. No 
longer is a top floor with a fine 
view desirable for an apartment. 
Instead, the apartment-hunter 
asks: 1 it steel anil concrete? Is 
, it near a military objective? Is 
It close to tho ground? 

---- column ----

fere with Japanese operations In 
tha Southern Pacific', which is a 
matter which concerns only the 
Netherlands, the United States, 
Britain and France, who would 
seftn well able to take care of their 
Interests so long as China hangs 
on to Japan's coattalls." 

Pravda, the Communist Party 
organ Jn Moscow: "The neutrality 
pact and declaration are documents 
of vast political significance, since 
they constitute an important step 
for the Improvement of relations 
between the U. S. S. R. and Japan, 
whose governments are guided in 
this case by a 'desire to strengthen 
peaceful and friendly relations be- 
tween the two countries.' The dec- 
laration puU an end to all petty 
frontier conflicts between the 
two." 

U. S. S. R. Talks With Turkey 

Dorothy Thompson, columnist: 
"The pact Is a definite gain for 
Russia, for It means that Japan 
bows out of the Axis as far an Rus- 
sia Is concerned. It Is, therefore, 
It would seem, a loss for Germany, 
which has every interest In keep- 
Ing Russia weak and occupied else- 
where than iu the Middle East . . . 
Tha best-informed people all seem 
certain that the Soviet Union will 
not enter the war against Germany 
unless she is attacked, but official 
pronouncements from Moscow do 
Indicate that she Is preparing to 
give what aid she can to Turkey, 
the laat non-violated nation in the 
Balkans. Naturally, Russia wants 
to be sure that, If she becomes en- 
gaged In war In the west, Ja>pau 
will not attack her In the east. The 
pact assures her of Just this." 

Nichl Nlchl, Tokyo: "The con- 
clusion of the new neutrality pact 
allows Japan to avoid two-front op- 
erations, that U, fighting both tha 
United States and the Soviet Un- 
ion, In case of a positive advance 
of her southward policy and a crto- 
1* in the Pacific." 

U. S. Unruffled? 

U. 3. Secretary of State Cordell 
Hull made a formal statement with 
regard to the pact declaring: "Tlio 
significance of the pact between 
the Sovlat Union nnd Japan relat- 
ing to neutrality eould be over- 
estimated . . . Tha policy of this 
government, of course remains un- 
changed." 

More Help For Britain 

Nevertheless a number of steps 
were taken last week by the 
IH>.V,-I < i imi <t.,< In the United States 
which served to bring the nation 
to the south of us closer into iti > 
war: ten coast guard cutters were 
transferred to Britain for anti- 
submarine BOA patrol; President 
Roosevelt reopened the R<vt Sea 
and OuW of Aden to American vev 
sel (U. S. Rhlps now are permit- 
te<l to go all the way to tho Suez 
Canal with supplies for the Allies); 
the United States pledged protec- 
tion to UrriHii 111,1 and obtained Hi > 
right to build nlr bases and forti- 
fications thfliH - the southern tip 
of Greenland was made the umv 
limit of western hemisphere de- 
fense; President Roosevelt made a 
declaration that the United States 
will protect her ships everywhere , 
except in conilmt xunes; the U. S. 
navy began |Mi'pHvntloiil for till 1 

---- column ----

swift arming of gome 1600 govern- 
ment aud privately owned mer- 
chant vessels. 

With regard to the ticklish con- 
voy question which must be settled 
very soon if American-produced 
war material is to continue to reach 
Britain, the New York Times said: 
"The President has not yet reach- 
ed a decision. He will exhaust 
every other alternative before 
reaching any conclusion on the 
question of convoying merchant- 
men across the Atlantic by United 
States warships." The newspaper 
suggested tliat Mr. Roosevelt was 
considering a plan to allow Ameri- 
can merchant ships to carry war 
materials to Halifax, to bo trans- 
shipped overseas. 

Three Warnings 

Warnings that the United States 
was on the point of going to formal 
war with Germany came from the 
lips of at least three members of 
the President's Cabinet last week. 
Vice-President Wallace declared 
that the United States was ready 
for war if American rights were 
transgressed. (Presumably he bad 
In mind the probability that U. S. 
ships, now going to Red Sea ports 
with war material for the British, 
would be attacked by the Axis at 
whatever time the Axis was will- 
ing to accept a formal state of war 
with the United States). Secretary 
of the U. S. Navy, Frank Knox, 
toM the House naval affairs com- 
mittee that: "I don't like to be a 
soare-moiiRer. but from the Inform- 
ation I have, I say we are now 
in the midst of the decisive per- 
iod of this war." Secretary of War 
Hury -Stimson, testifying at a Con- 
gressional hearing on United 
SUtcs defense problems, warned 
that the United States "Is facing a 
dangerous emergency which may 
b very prolonged." He said also 
that it might become necessary for 
the United States to wage war, In 
iu own defense, outside the Ameri- 
cas. 

---- column ----

The Book Shell .. 

"FANNY BY GASLIGHT" 
By Michael Sadleir 

In "Fanny by Gaslight" Mr. Sad- 
leir re-creates a London of s-eventy 
years ago when the dark streets of 
the Empire capital wore lit after 
dark by a yellow flicker of street 
lamps. He draws an exciting pic- 
ture of the taverns, nlghthouses 
and .,'ii>ii--i [..i.in.s of the period, 
full of motley Londou crowds. But 
through them moves a smali, 
hi'owu-haired, bright-eyed girl, who 
meets life with cheerful gallantry 
aud whose love-story is both tender 
and passionate. 

The girl Fanny was a child with 
no background save one of viol- 
ence and catastrophe, a child win 
grows up into a life of courage, 
gaiety aud self-forgetful devotion. 
As an old woman, living iu a small 
town In France, she tolls her story 
to a sympathetic Englishman. 

"Fanny by Gaslight" ... by Mich- 
ael Sadleir . . . Toronto: Macmll- 
la i Company of Canada . . . $2.75. 

---- column ----

Swift Action 

---- column ----

A New York man, given a job 
aa postal clerk, was arrested an 
hour and a half later on a charge 
of robbing the mails. 

---- column ----

The motto of our Sovereign. 
"Hicu et Mon Droit" (God and 
My itight), was first used by 
Uuiluird the Lion Heart in the 
twelfth centurv. 

---- column ----

Says City Folk 
Are More Virile 

Doctor Claim* Rural Resi- 
dents, Contrary to Long Be- 
lief, Are Not As Healthy 

---- column ----

Contrary to a long popular be- 
lief, the city man is more virile 
than the man in the country, ac- 
cording to Dr. Oswald Swinney 
Lowsley. 

Dr. Lowsley, head of the de- 
partment of urology at the New 
York Hospital of New York city, 
said the city man is more virile 
because he is beginning to appre- 
ciate the benefits of exercise and 
right living. 

"MANKIND IS IMPROVING" 

"Mankind is improving," he 
said. 

Men and women should system- 
atically work to attain the best 
physical condition in the face of 
world crisis and nerves, Dr. 
Lowsley said. They will need this 
bolstering to be able to "take it," 
he emphasized. 

"The lot of the man on the 
street is highly important today," 
he declared. 

---- column ----

, 

ENERGY 

TO'LAUGH 

---- column ----

*& 

---- column ----

Add to Milk Serve' 
on Puddings Spread 
on Bread and Butter 

---- column ----

Bee Hive 
^A" Syrup 

---- column ----

Scientist Sister Proud 
Of Willkie's Attitude 

---- column ----

Brilliant woman chemist 
devotes time to research 
on Ontario Wines 

---- column ----

Points to Benefits 

---- column ----

When Wendell Willkie visited 
Toronto, one of those waiting on 
the city hah steps was his sister 
Julia whose quiet life devoted to 
scientific pursuits is in sharp con- 
trast to the tumultuous public life 
of the great American champion 
of democracy. 

CrWds swept the police aside, 
perhaps for the first time in the 
city's history, as the triumphal 
procession swept up Yonge street 
to the cheers of the Canadians 
assembled to honour the man who 
had travelled to Great Britain to 
report on the Empire's war effort. 

Miss Willkie had come from St. 
Catharine.H, somewhat nervously, 
wondering why Toronto should be 
interested in her all of a sudden. 
Canadians wanted to express their 
gratitude to Wendell Willkie by 
giving his sister a day she'll never 
forget. But now that the shout- 
ing is over, she has resumed her 
quiet life in St. Catharines, de- 
voting her time to her book-filled 
room and her laboratory. She is 
a wine chemist. But her status 
has altered. She is no longer just 
a serious, middle-aged woman, but 
a celebrity, the sister of tha man 
who many believe may be the next 

---- column ----

president of the United States. 

She told reporters she believa* 
that the occasion of dinner .-should 
be made into a more convivial 
affair with wines. "In time," she 
said, "the custom would have 
beneficial effect on the national 
digestion and would probably 
make Canadians into a nation of 
brilliantly witty conversationists." 

One suggestion Miss Willkis 
made was that Canadian wines 
should be given names that 
breathe the spirit of Canada in- 
stead of recalling old France. 
French wine, she thinks, can 
never ba made in Canada and 
comparisons between Canadian 
and French wines are a waste of 
time. 

"Our climate is so different 
from that of France. W could 
give our wine the same sort of 
bouquet but we are chiefly con- 
cerned with making a palatable 
product from Canadian grapes. 
The result must be judged on the 
merit of the product. Because 
they taste differently, Ontario 
wines are in no wise inferior," 
she said, adding that the cutting 
off of French wine supplies wouU 
make very littla difference t 
Canadian wine consumption be- 
cause importations were never on 
a large scale. 

---- column ----

Orchids grown from seed re- 
quire a period of anything from 
seven to twelve years to reach th 
blossoming stage. 

---- column ----

LIFE'S LIKE THAT 

---- column ----

By Fred Neher 

---- column ----

"Spring training >Urti today!" 

---- column ----

REG'LAR FELLERS Retiring from Business 

---- column ----

By GENE BYRNES 

---- column ----

YOUUU NEVFR , 
BE RICH, PINHEAD/ 

YOU LOAF TOO 
v MUCH/ 

---- column ----

-*,: '.: -i _., 
ft-ll 

---- column ----

WHEN I DO 
THI3 LAWN I'LL 
HAVE A QUARTER 
AN' YOU'LL BE 
BROKE BUT IT WILL 
06 YOUR ' 
FAULT/ 
AMBI 

---- column ----

. 
---- page ----

---- column ----

I 

---- column ----

World War Map In Colour 
MODERN easy to follow NEW 

World events are shaping and changing 

daily. A modern up-to-date map of all War 

Zones is a necessity. 

Dated Events Clearly Marked 

---- column ----

ENGLAND 
NORWAY 
BALKANS 

---- column ----

EGYPT 

LIBYA 

TURKEY 

---- column ----

Send Coin or Money Order to 

COLONIAL DISTRIBUTORS LTD. 

253 Queen St. West Toronto 

---- column ----

Keeping 
Company . . 

Adapted from the 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

Picture 

by 
Lebbeus Mitchell 

Copyright 1940 by Loew'i Inc. 

---- column ----

"You bet! It's nice to nave a 
man In the house. 1 get sick and 
tired all day listening to the wo- 
men around here." 

"Harriet, your father's tired," re- 
monstrated Mrs. Thomas. "Let him 
cit down. Had a hard day, Harry?" 

"I am tired, Chief,' 1 he said, put- 
ting Harriet down and kissing his 
wife's cheek. He flopped into a 
worn, comfortable old Morris chair. 
"This grind is getting me down" 
He. stopped, grinned and pulled 
Mrs. Thoma-s down on his knees. 
"Chief, I had a pretty easy day 
and a pretty good day. I guess hus- 
bands Just get in the habit of com- 
ing home tired.' 1 

"Harriet," said her mother, "rim 
up aud brush your hair.'' 

"I know. Tfou're going to talk 
about Mary getting taa-r-r " 

"Go up and brush your hair!" 

"Why do people try to fool peo- 
ple that can't be foo!e<I? Oh all 
right. I'm going." 

"Remember, if you get yourself 
dirty I'll put you under the shower 
- dress aud all!" Harriet left re- 
luctantly, and Mrs. Thomas said: 
There's another privilege of be- 
ing a husband and a father hav- 
ing your pipe and newspaper up In 
the bedroom this evening." 

"Suffering cats! You know this 
chair is the only comfortable " 

"Tonight ie a very special night. 
Mary is thinking of getting mar- 
riedand tonight this room be- 
longs to her." 

Marry The Lone Ranger? 

"Mary? Getting married? Who's 
tfhe going to marry?" 

"Well, with Ted Foster aud Jim 
Reynolds doing ererythlng but 
sleeping here for six months, I 

---- column ----

Too much coffee and tea gave 
Mrs. Broim the bfst case oj caf- 
feine-nerves I evtr sou:. Poor 
iltep for treekt htr temper 
flarrd Hist a skyrocket. I nvs 
fraud of the nay the made life 
miserable for everybody till 
some meddler got htr to siciu-h 
to I' i- ft 11 in. Naturally that teas 
the end of Caffrine-fterref." 

T. !V. 1,'ti/Tre \err 

If you are troubled ixilli sleep- 
]<":--. hare headaches, and up- 
et nerves you may be one of 
thf many people who cfcould 
never drink coffee or tea. Dout 
be a victim of caffeine-ncrveel 
1 Vui in contains no cefetnt it 
delirivus and rods less per cup. 
Made instantly in (be (up with 
no wnMe. Order PoHum today. 

---- column ----

don't think Mary is planning to 
marry the Lone Ranger!" 

"Chief, there's something maybe 
I should hare told you before this. 
\\"asn,'t Ted Foster pretty serious- 
ly involved with that little Ather- 
ton. flibbe-rty-gibbet?" 

"But Anastasia Athertou m in 
New York." 

"I got a letter f. om ' her last 
week. She safd not to rent her 
house. She's coming back to live 
In it." 

"Back here to stay?" Mrs. Thom- 
as's voice expressed concern. "I 
thought she was working as a mod- 
el." 

"Personally I'd pay somebody 
ten dollars cash to go to Miss Ath- 
erton and tell her what's hap.pned 
to Mary and Ted since she left 
I mean, In case it is Ted. Do you 
think he would be- weak enough 
I mean fool enough " 

Some sound, slight yet suspici- 
ous, had caught his ear. At a nod 
from his wife he reached out his 
foot and closed the grill of the hot 
air furnace. A sudden sneeze from 
upstairs confirmed bis suspicion of 
having been overheard, and he con- 
tinued: "A boy Ted's age mar- 
riage the first couple of months ie 
no picnic a streamlined redhead 
handy I wonder." 

"Our first couple of years was 
no picnic and we got through it." 
"But I didn't have a redhead 
hamly: he kidded her. Evelyn au- 
nouuced that dinner was just about 
rwdy. 

Harriet, her ear glued to the- hot 
air register, had listened to bet- 
parents' conversation, but when 
.Mr. Thomas closd the vent down- 
stairs a vague cloud of coal dust 
flew out of the grating into her 
face, over her dress, and she could 
not suppress the sneeze- that gave 
her away. 

He Owei Her Ice Cream 
Without waiting to clean up, 
Harriet betook herself to tbe up- 
stairs tele-phone, spoke low into the 
mouthpiece: "Hellman Auto Ag- 
ency? I'd like to speak to Ted Fos- 
ts-r, please." After an interval Ted 
answered. 

"Oh. It's you. Hello, Harriet." 
"I celled up to make a business 
proposition." said Harriet in a cau- 
tious voice. "If I told you that my 
sister Mary spent an hour in trout 
of her mirror just in case a cer- 
tain young man happened to drop 
in that certain young man would 
owe me some ice cream, and he 
might just as wel! bring it with 
htm. and might just as well be 
pistachio! " 

"Thanks, Harriet! At eight o'- 
clock tonight you'll have a gallon 
of pistachio ice cream!" Ted. grin- 
ning broadly asked permission to 
take out a Cornet demonstrator 
car that evening. Mr. Hellman 
granted It, but Ted had no more 
than left the office until the 'phone 
rang again and the some youthful 
voice asked to speak to Jim Rey- 
nolds. Ted's rival In selling Cor- 
net autos a* well as for Mary's 
hand. 

To him Harriet made the euuiie 
"business proposition" that sue had 
just made to Ted. aud it was as 
eager snapped up. And then Jim 
Reynolds request-si 'Mv. HtMlman's 
permissiou to take out a demon- 
strator car that evening. 

When Harriet didn't answer the 
call to dinner, Mary was sent up 
after her. She fomul Harriet stand- 
ing, fully clothed, under the show- 
er. 

"Harriet! Are you crazy?" cried 
Wary, jumping to the shower. 

"Mother said If 1 got dirty she'd 
put me under the shower bath, 
dres ami all. so I'm just saving 
her th trouble," responded Har- 
riet with a virtuous air. 
(To Be Continued) 

---- column ----

She Hated Men 
But Married One 

Mrs. Marian Phillips Ahmlale, 
whose "83 reasons why I hate 
men'' touched off widespread pub- 
licity two years ago when she 
was a co-ed at the University of 
Michigan, has just become' the ! 
mother of a seven-pound jriil 
She wrote the reasons for a ,-am- 
pus literary publication. She 
eloped with Einar Almdale in 
I'.MO after a courtship which she 
says proved ho v.aa not like other 
men. 

---- column ----

Various Types 
Are Analyzed 

Character Analysis Is Subject 
of Talk Based on Physical 
Trait* 

Certain character types se--m to 
have physical traits in comuaon, 
Mrs. A. Cameron Grant pointed out 
In an address on "Character An- 
alysis" at a recent meeting <;f the 
Mount Royal Women's Comm nity 
Club. In the beginning of her talk 
Mrs. Grant stressed the need for 
guidance for young people caoosiug 
a vocation. "It is such a wafp "f 
time and energy to force d:ili!:vn 
into fields where laey have no tal- 
ents, making them feel inferior, in- 
stead r-r guiding them in thi- dir- 
ection iu~ which they can nuke a 
definite contribution to society," 
she remarked. 

SKIN i.'OLORS IXKLVENr-E 
ACTIONS 

Color has been foun'I to be mo:'e 
than skin deep, the speaker noteii. 
Environment influences life, habits 
and finally general characteristics. 
Hence, those at the equator where 
extremes in seasons need not b 
contended with, live an easy life, 
with food and shelter and cloth- 
Ing easily acquired. There i* no 
need to be markedly creative. With 
many free hours these people turn 
to things artistic, colors, music, 
characteristics associated with ;he 
dark colored races. On the other 
hand, groups moving farther north, 
with no need to resist the heavy 
rays of tue sun, have lighter skins, 
tnd must struggle for daily needs, 
until, in the north, the blonde races 
are found practically and resource- 
ful. 

READING PHYSICAL 
CHARACTERISTICS 

Mrs. Grant described various 
types of personalities ou the basis 
of physical characteristics. She 
mentioned the mental type who 
prefers to fight with ideas and 
words rather than with fiets: the 
driving type, who is the football 
hero in school and the engineer or 
business man in adult life; the ty,.e 
who becomes an executive because 
he has learned to direct others; 
the conservative type; and the 
nian-of-action type who Joins the 
air force or seeks other forms of 
adventure. 

---- column ----

Teach Child To 
Finish His Job 

Youngsters Should Learn to 
Stick With A Task Once Be- 
gun 

---- column ----

There, is one point about child- 
ren's wort that needs attention. 
It concerns the good begiuuer and 
the- bored finisher. 

This tendency to "dabble" is re- 
ceding as special courses in train- 
ing come to the fore. Witt atten- 
tion, directed to a special vocjtion 
or trade or profession, there ie 
less tendency to fool away t!tue 
and quit. 

DISCOURAGE "DABBLING" 

It is in childhood that this ment- 
al habit needs to be jelled, if the. 
future career is to be a success. 
It is the "personal" quality that 
counts in all good work. 

This is no day for dilettantes or 
fiddlers. The roadside is full of the 
weak sisters who quit. Only the 
firm In heart get there. Only the 
child taught to carry a job through 
will be infected sufficiently with 
the virus of determination to am- 
ount to anything later in life. 

Duck Shocked 

It was so cold recently at Port- 
land. Oregon, that when a liuck 
sat down it froze to thf vr -'mmi. 

---- column ----

Sn 

---- column ----

rsrvlce r><-- 
pnrtmni. a 
helpful ser- 
vice, offers 
a wide r:>i!i;f 
of vntu;ililc 
nnd othi- Booklets Vl;KK. 
now for the booklet T-2 
8" a cake recipe for v<y 
in the year. Send Crorvn 
1 label to: r.'iiiada Siaivh Hon'e 
' '. l>opt. J.4, 49 Wciliiiston 
r Knsl. Turor'.o. 

---- column ----

URCM COMPANY LIMITED 

---- column ----

Fashion Flashes 

They'll be wearing during the 
pring and summer seasons ahead: 

Capes for every hour of the 
day. 

Young, bold colors like iliaik 
green, pinwheel purple, pop wage) u 
yellow, balloon blue, tricycle red 
and an e*ven more vivid purple, 
called ultra violet. 

Beige ar.d brown instead of that 
perennial spring favorite, navy 
blue. 

"Lady" suits, inspire*! by 18th 
Century riding habits. 

Stoles in wool with sparkling 
embroidery as we'.l as fur. 

Sloping shoulders. (They drop, 
but they do not droop.) 

Hars that decorate rather than 
distort the face. 

Angle straps on shoes for both 
day and e-vening. 

One-piece sports anil play outfits. 
Dipping hemlines. 

---- column ----

Health of Quebec 

Worst in Canada 

On their own testimony, Brit- 
ish Columbians are healthier than 
residents of any other part of 
Canada. 

At national registration last 
Aug-ust, about 65 per cent of 
British Columbians who filled in 
cards said they were in "good"' 
health. In Ontario 62 per cent 
placed themselves in that cate- 
gory, in the Maritime Provinces 
69 per cent, on the Prairies 57 
per cent and in Quebec 50 per 
rent. 

Totals for the Dominion indi- 
cated 56 per cent of all Cana- 
dians were in good health, accord- 
ing to the detailed statistics tabled 
in the House of Commons. 

---- column ----

Grown Woman at 5 

Doctors are baffled by a pretty 
5-year-oid girl of Houston, Texas. 
She is 4 ft. 5'i inches tall, has 
the body of a matured woman and 
the mind of a child. She is com- 
pletely healthy. 

---- column ----

TOTS' DRESS-UP OR 
PLAY MODE 

---- column ----

By Anne Adams 

This. Anne Adams pantie-frock 
is gay and novel as can be. yet 
it's so simple to cut ami sow! 
First, notice the slathering through 
the front skirt, just below that 
unexpected point of the waist- 
scam so smart! Then, see the 
nicely curved side bodice sections. 
The sleeves may be wing-like 
flares in crisp puffs. For a dress- 
up style of sheep flowered fabric, 
sew on a pert bow and lace edg- 
ing. To make a more everyday 
version of cotton or rayon, use 
buttons and a matching or con- 
trasting collar. 

Pattern 4720 is available in 
children's sizes 2, 4, fi. 8 and 10. 
Size 6 takes 2 yards 33 inch fabric 
and Vi yard contrast. 

Send twenty cents (2(V) in 
coin (stamps cannot be accepted) 
for this Anno Adams pattern. 
Write plainly size, name, address 
nd style number. 

Send your order to Anne Ad- 
ams, Room 421, 73 West Adelaide 
St^ Toronto. 

---- column ----

Yes, thousands of people suffering 
from constipation due to lack of 
the right kind of "bulk" in their 
diet have been able to say the same 
thing. For now there is a sensible 
way to correct this condition . . . 
far better than cathartics, which 
only give temporary relief. 

If you suffer from this common 
trouble, try eating delicious 
KEI-LOGG'S ALL-BRAN every 
morning. It contains the neces- 

---- column ----

sary "bulk" to help you become 
"regular' 1 . . . naturally! 

Why not do this : Gt your 
KELLOGG'S ALL-BRAN daily 
. . . drink plenty of water . . . and 
discover for yourself how easily 
your old "trouble" disappear. 
Get KELLOGG'S ALL-BRAN* 
Available in two convenient 5121-3 
at all grocers' ! Made by Ke!lc?t s 
in London, Canada. 

---- column ----

TABLE TALKS 

By SADIE B. CHAMBERS 

---- column ----

SPRING ENTERTAINING 
After Easter always comes a 
little extra entertaining. The 
hostess is then ever looking for 
something new and sprightly 
Nothing satisfies this requirement 
better than the cereal recipes. So 
why not try the following 

---- column ----

Cocoanut Crispy Cake 
^ cup shortening 
I 3 !* cups sugar 
3 eggs, separated 
3 cups flour 

- tggt 

1 cup brown su^ar 
1 teaspoon vanilla extract 
2 1 ? teaspoons Calumet baking 

powder 

IT teaspoon salt 
1 cup milk 

1 teaspoon vanilla extract 
* teaspoon salt 
1 cup shredded Baker's cocoa- 
nut 

1 cup Keliogg's corn flakes 
1 cup chopped nut meats 
Cream shortening and sugar 
thoroughly. Add unbeaten egp 
yolks, one at a time, beating well 
after each addition. Sift flour 
with baking powder and salt and 
add alternately with combined 
milk and flavoring to creamed 
mixture. Beat well. Fold in egg 
whites, beaten stiff but n-it dry. 
Pour batter into greased cake 
pan, with waxed paper in the bot- 
tom. 

---- column ----

Corn Flake Cruncbie* 
'2 pound Baker's sweet chocolate 
2 cups Keliogg's Corn Flakes 
Vi cup chopped dates 
Mi cup chopped nut meats 

Melt chocolate over hot water. 
Measure other ingredients into a 
greased bowl and add melted 
chocolate. .Mix well. Drop on 
waxed paper or buttered cookie 
cheer, using a measuring tea- 
spoon. Set in a wol place until 
chocolate harden*. Yield: 45 
small candies. 

---- column ----

Corn Flake Macaroon* 

2 egg whites 

1 cup brown or granulated 

sugar 
'- teaspoon vanilla extract 

2 cups Kellogg's Corn Flakes 
'i cup chopped nut meats 

1 cup shredded Baker's cocoa- 
nut 

Btat egg whites until stiff but 
not dry. Fold in sugar; add fla- 
voring, Corn Flakes, nut meats 
and cccoanut. Mix carefully. 
Drop by spoonfuls on well-greased 
baking sheet. Bake in moderate 
oven (35 degrees F. ) 15 to 20 
minutes. Remove immediately 
from pan. If macaroons stick, 
place pan on damp towel and re- 
move macaroons using spatula or 
sharp knife. If macaroons bee me 
hardened to pan they may be re- 
turned to oven for a few minutes 
to soften. 

Yield: l 1 ^ dozen macaroons (2 
inches in diameter). 

---- column ----

Honey Krisp Cookies 
'a cup shortening 
4t cup honey 

---- column ----

" J a vup sour cream 
I 3 * cups flour 
1 teaspoon Calumet baking 

powder 

' teaspoon sa;i 
'a teaspoon soda 
H cup c'nopped nut meats 
'a cup chopped dates 
'i tt?a<poon nutmeg OR 
1 teaspoon vanilla extract 
1 cup Mice Krispies 
Blend shortening and honey. 
Aiiil weil-beaten eggs and cream. 
Sift t'iour with baking powder, 
salt and soda; add t) first mix- 
ture. Stir in nut meats, dates, 
flavoring and Rice Krispies. 
Drop from a dessert spoon 
onto lightly greased baking sheet 
and bake in moderate oven (375 
degrees F.) about 20 minutes. 

Yield: 2 dozen cookies (4 inch- 
es in diameter). 

---- column ----

MlM Chtimlier* welcome* peroBnl 
letter* from Interested rentier*. She 
I* plenird to receive ucgentlona 
topic* for her eoluniB, a ail I* 
CTCB rr.ni? ( lUtea to >.>ur "pet 
peeve." RcqueMi for recipe* or 
(ecliil iii.-nii* *re In order. Addre** 
Tour Idler* to "*! Surtle II. Chum- 
ker*. 7:i Went Ailelnldc Mrrel. Tn- 

r.MH.i ' -. ,..! l(nill|>ed, .-! ..I. Ir. ..! 

eavelop* It sou nl*b a reply. 

---- column ----

Never Too La'e 

---- column ----

Too late, I thought, to mend> my 

life 

Or build my soul anew, 
Too many are the years behind, 
The years ahead too few. 

Around me and my .wintry 

thoughts 

There lay a wintry scene, 
A bare and sodden garden pricked 
With little points of green. 

O peeping bulbs, Earth's NeW 

Year thoughts, 
Though Earth is old, so old, 
Yet she can change the withered 

past 
To fla.ne of cracus gold. 

And If the ancient Earth can 

change 

Then I can change as well. 
The world shall see a new life rise 
Where all my dead dreams fell. 

Country Girl 

---- column ----

CUTS 

---- column ----

8AKIN6 

---- column ----

COSTS 

---- column ----

3WAYS 

---- column ----

Calumet is one ( die world's 
largest- selling baking powders 
befouif it gives such fate result}, 
due to its double action. 

It leavens during mixing con- 
tinues to leaven in the oven. Easy- 
opening, won't-spill container, with 
handy measuring device under die 
lid. AND THE PRICE IS SUR- 
PRISINGLY LOW. 

---- column ----

G 

---- column ----

ISSUE 17 '41 

---- column ----
---- page ----

---- column ----

fWednesday, April 23, 1941 

---- column ----

THE FLESHERTON ADVANCE 

---- column ----

THE 

fLESHERTON ADVANCE 

Published on Colling wood 3U-t, 

Flecherton, Wednesday of Mk 

week. Circulation over 1,000. 

' t Price in Canada |2.00 pr yx, 

| when paid in advance fl.50; ID 

' C. S. A. 12.50 per year, when 

paid in advance $2.00. 

F. J. THURSTON, Editor. 

---- column ----

The Press And The Churches 

One of the most easily miscon- 
structed relationships in the publish- 
tnjr field is that between the news- 
paper and the churches in the com- 
munity it serves. The newspaper 
man asks himself the question: "What 
should be my attitude toward the 
churches?" He endeavours to answer 
that question so that he will be for 
both to the churches and to himself. 
Churches sometimes assume the 
attitude that as they are supported 
solely by voluntary donations, and a.- 
they are a spiratual and moral force 
in the community, any publicity de- 
sired should be given without charge 
by the newspaper. Strangely enough 
the churches do not expect the same 
privilege from any other business or 
profession. It should be remembered 
at the outset that most publishers are 
church members, and that as individ- 
uals they are decidec^y interested in 
the welfare of the church with which 
they are affiliated. They give regu- 
larfly and as generously as their 
circumstances permit. They attend 
the various functions designed to 
nlse funds for continuance of the 
Church's work. As such they must 
t>e considered as any other church 
member who is conscientiously striv- 
ing to support the church and what 
3t stands for. 

While newspapers are more gener- 
ous with space to churches than to 
other institutions, this is simply a 
recogniion by the press of the 
premier place held by the church in 
the spiratual and moral sphere in the 
community. However the church has 
no legal right to expect the press to 
give more generously than any indi- 
vidual church member. It is not ex- 
pected of the man who sells the 
church fuel, or the public utilities 
which serve the church. In larger 
Centres it is not expected that the 
organist should work without re- 
Onuneration. 

The press, we believe, will always 

---- column ----

recognize the position and value of 
the church in the community. It will 
realize that the community without 
the church would be like a rudderless 
ship, not knowing whence the tide of 
events and fortune might lead it. 
The press will continue to give ser- 
vice to the church as one important 
institution to another, but the church 
must also realize that to continue its 
service, nt only to the church but to 
the community, the newspaper must 
have an income, and that income can 
only come from the space it sells in 
its columns. This same reasoning 
must apply to charaitable organiza- 
tions in the community. To them the 
publisher and the men and women 
who work for the publisher give gen- 
erously of their private means and 
of their time and talent. They too 
must prosper if they are to continue 
the support to the church, and all 
kindred organizations seeking to 
carry out an uplifting work in the 
community. 

---- column ----

EUGENIA 

---- column ----

OUR BRITISH FLEET 

---- column ----

(By Poet's Friend) 
Hold on; you ships of State, 
Who guard our freedom's shores; 
Hold on; till some sweet day, 
When victory will be ours. 

Sail on; you sea born warrior's 
pride of the British fleet; 
Sail on; till your duty's done, 
Then rest at victory's feet. 

Bear high; your royal banner, 
Tis the ensign of British might; 
The flag of a mighty nation; 
With Honour, Truth and Right. 

And when in the midst of battle, 
God's own hand may save; 
To take His own from the wicked., 
And from a sinful grave. 

And when the day of victory comes, 
Let us seal our faith in Thee; 
And no more through ocean waves, 
Search our brothers of the sea. 

---- column ----

HALF HOLIDAYS 

The annual half holidays for the 
business places in Flesherton will 
commence on Thursday of next week, 
May 1st, when the stores will close 
at 12 o'clock noon. The stores will 
be open each Wednesday night dur- 
inp the summer. 

---- column ----

Miss Edna Doupe spent Easter ' oli- 
days with her grandparents, Mr. anc 
Mrs. Robt. Haney at Eugenia. 

---- column ----

FAST SERVICE IN 
CASE OF ACCIDENT 

---- column ----

k When > on let us write your auto- 
mobile and fire innurance, you not 
<uil> protect yourself against lost, but 
you get the quick nervice provided by 
us,and by Pilot office* in other Ontario 
places, and by Pilot automobile claim* 
' tervice In the United State*. 

---- column ----

H. W. KERNAHAN 

Flesherton, Ont. 

REPRESENTING 

---- column ----

Writing telerted rinks in Automobile, Fire, Plutr GliiH.i, lim ::l,n-> 
f ublic Liability, und otlirr general insurance. Head Oilier, Toront. 

---- column ----

\OpAVsQ, 

^Pf^^t!^$\* 

---- column ----

At the Y.P.U. Wednesday evening, 
April 16, Mrs. Cairns presided for a 
short devotional and business period, 
after which the missionary convenor, 
Mrs. Martin, introduced Rev. and 
Mrs. Annis of Markdale, who showed 
lantern slides of West China, describ- 
ing each picture. Mrs. Annis dis- 
played many articles which she 
brought from China and told some- 
thing- about each. All present en- 
joyed a very pleasant evening, which 
was made so by Rev. and Mrs, Annis. 
We hope they will be able to visit 
the Y.P.U. again at some near future 
date. A hearty vote of thanks was 
extended to them for their kindness. 
The meeting closed with prayer by 
Rev. Annis, after which lunch was 
served and a social hour spent. 

Miss Dorothy Jamieson returned 
to her teaching duties at Lake 
Rosseau after spending the Eastei 
vacation with her brother and wife, 
Mr. and Mrs. John K. Jamieson, at 
Alexandria, and with her parents and 
brother, Wes, here. Mr. and Mrs. 
Jamieson accompanied her as far as 
Toronto on Sunday and visited with 
friends. 

Mr. Chas. Hopper visited his wife 
and family in Toronto on Sunday. 

We are sorry to report Miss Lillian 
Magee on the sick list. 

Pte. Norman Williams of the Tank 
Corps and Pte. Jack Traynor, Camp 
Borden, and Pte. Douglas Cairns of 
the Foresters, Toronto, were week; 
end visitors in the village. 
H^Mrs. Alex. Carruthers held a suc- 
cessful auction sale of farm stock and 
implements on April 15th. She and 
her daughter, Miss Muriel, and her 
brother~-in-law, Mr. Ben Carruthers, 
have moved to the village. We wel- 
come them and wish them the best 
of luck. 

Miss Reta Duckett of Maxwell 
snent a few days at the Martin home. 
"xMr. and Mrs. Stanley Magee have 
rented the Carruthers farm and have 
moved thereto from Maxwell. We 
welcome them to the community and 
wish them success in their new home. 

Mr. Roy McMillan of Oakville was 
home over the week end. 

Miss Irene Martin has returned to 
her school at Islington and Miss 
Irene Dinsmore of Thornbury has re- 
sumed her teaching duties here. 

We are sorry to report Mrs. Fred 
Duckett on the sick list again. 

Sunday School in the United church 
here is held at 10 o'clock each Sun- 
day morning. Now that spring has 
arrived we hope that the girls and 
boys from the country will be able to 
attend. 

The Women's Association met on 
Wednesday afternoon, April 16th, in 
the church basement. After the 
usual devotional exercises, conducted 
l>y the Vice-Pres., Mrs. F. Genoo, the 
President, Mrs. F. Jamieaon, presid- 
ed over the business period. It was 
decided to have a "copper" contest to 
end May 2lA. The captains chosen 
were Mrs. F. Genoe and Mrs. Court 
Smith. The roll call for the May 
meeting will be answered by a verse 
suitable for Mother's Day or pertain- 
inpr to mother. Visitors welcome at 
meetings. 

We extend our sincere sympathy to 
Mr. F. H. W. Hickling in his recent 
sad bereavements, caused by the 
death of his wife and his brother-in- 
law, Mr. J. D. Clarke. 

Congratulations to Mr. Will Som- 
ers, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. P. 
Somers, 8th Lino, who wsi? recently 
mnrricd. We wish him and his wife 
many happy years of wedded life. 

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CEYLON 

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OKICMAL -ANNUAL 

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SALE 

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COLORS 

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For only 10 days every year is NARVO 
sold at these reduced prices! Don't delay. 
get your Spring requirements at once. 
Save $1.50 a gallon. 30 beautiiul colors 
io choose from. Remember, NARVO is 
neither paint, enamel nor lacquer but 
combines the good qualities of all three. 
Tough as rubber. Hard as ebony. Covers 
in one coat. Flows freoly fvorn the brush, 
<lries quickly and ia odorless. 

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by lh>~ 

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/ Mtir\>\\v 

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For Sale by 

CKSPREY & ARTEMESiA CO-OPERATIVE Co. Ltd. 
FLESHERTON, ONTARIO 

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In 
CANADIAN 

SCHOOLS 

adz 

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Boys and girls are encouraged to ask 
questions in Canadian schools. 
They are not forced to accept 
false principles and theories with- 
out challenge. 

This is the freedom of democracy 
... the freedom we are fighting to 
maintain. What a difference this 
from the fetters that a Nazi vic- 
tory would impose on Canada . . . 
and on the world! 
So ... you who want your children 
to be educated in schools where 
freedom of thought and action is 
allowed and encouraged ... do 
your part to help to win the war. 

Keep up YOUR PLEDGE! . . . 
Increase Your Regular Investments in 

WAR SAVINGS CERTIFICATES 

Ronrmber whtn Victory it won your doUari 
come back to you with compound interest. The 
more you lave and lend, the better for Canada 
NOW -the better for you THEN. 

Pui> W by Ike War Sa*in Conuniiu*. Ounce 

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iJk 

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McDermid; Sandwiches, Mrs. A. C 
Muir. 

A number of the younger set en- 
joyed a surprise party Monday even- 
ing in honour of Bill Cairns at the 
home of his parents. Court whist 
was played, the winners being Fran- 
ces Collinson and .Austin McKee. 
Dancing followed. 

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ENGAGEM E{JT 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Benson with to 
announce the engagement of their 
daughter, Ida Mildred, to Mr. Russel 
Melville Halliday of Singthampton, 
the marriage to take place the end ol 
April. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. J. Chard of 
Flesherton announce the engagement 
of their younger daughter, Gertrude 
Mari, to Mr. Gerald Ross Davidson, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest David- 
son of Feversham, the marriage to 
take place quietly early in May. 

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Mr. I >' 11 -I'll Purdy of Toronto was 
home for the weok end. 

Miss Isol)ol Cnnu-ron has returned 
Guelph and Miss Janet Cameron 
las taken u position in Durham. 

Mr. Will Stewart has returned to 
Toronto, after visiting his brother, 
Mr. John Stewart and Mrs. Stewart. 

Mrs. Thos. Hazard accompanied 
Vi-rnon to Toronto for medical 
rait merit. 

Miss McDonald of Aurora and Miss 
Swantori of Vandeleur have returned 
to their schools at Stone's Line and 
Ceylon. Miss Catherine Cairns of the 
Toronto Normal will spend this week 
with Miss Swanton. 

Mr. Earl McLeod was home from 
Oshawa for the week end. 

Mrs. Staunton of Durham spent 
the Easter week end with Mrs. Neil 
Cameron and family. 

Mrs. E. Mitchell was in Toronto 
on Wednesday. 

Mrs. Fred Wright and Winifred 
visitod last week with the former's 
brother, Kurlie Speers, and other re- 
latives at Markdnle. 

Miss Janet Campbell has re-turned 
nfter spending the E*.ster vacation at 

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The W. I. will meet at the home of 
Mrs. Sam McDormid, Thursday ovm 
in". M:>y 1. :it S p.m. Mrs. Thos 
St.fwnrt will n ;ul tho ic'inluri 1 aiifi 
hove will lie the annual election of 
ITS. Lunch Com.: Cake, Mrs 

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NEW AND USED 

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Farm Machines 

FOR SALE AT COCKSHUTT AGENCY 

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13-Disc McCormick Seed Drill 

2-Furrow Tractor plow 

1.5 -Disc Cooks hull Si-d Drill 

12-Plate Disc Harrow 

1 Repoeessed Renfrew Cream 

Hart-Parr Tractors 

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Separator, used 3 months 

like new 

New Renfrew Cream Separators 
Toronto Asphalt Roofing 
Lundy Woven pence 
Barb Wire 
C.I.L. Fertilizers in stock. 

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Fertilatorn 

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Eastern Steel Products 

Barn Tracks 

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Steel Roofing 

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W. EDGAR BETTS 

Cockshutt Implements '- Flesherton, Ont. 

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MAXWELL 

Miss Shirley BucKinjjharr. returned 
tu hor school a* Millbrook, after 
spending the holiday season at her 
home here. 

Mr. J. H. Lougheed of Toronto 
spent the week end with relatives in 
;his district. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Fenwick and 
family spent Sumlnf with her father, 
Mr. John Wilkinson, at Portlaw. 

Miss Isobel Pallister has returned 
homo, after spending a few vreeks in 
Toronto. 

Mr. Fred Ross is in Cheltenham 
this week. 

Miss Reta Duckett visited friends 
in Eugenia last week. 

The Women's Institute met at the 
home of Mrs. F. J. Seeley Thursday, 
April 17th, with a fair attendance. 
The president, Mrs, lieggate, pre- 
sided. It waa decided to sell tickets 
on a quilt, the procewls to go to the 
war victims' fund. The afternoon 
was spent in sowing and knitting for 
the Red Cross. 

Miss Ruth Mercer spent the Easter 
holiday with her parents at the 
parsonage. 

Miss Knthlppn Morrison spent lost 
week with friends in Shclhurne and 
Toronto. 

We are sorry to IOSP Mr. nnd Mrs. 
Stanley Mneoo, who hnvo moved to a 
fnrm north of Kiiponln. 

Mr. flirt Mrs <"Jn. Rosi visited In 
TVii-'Tilo 1". -.( weoV. 

Mrs. M. Oonld nnd Tnbel visited 
with friends in Pchomr.orR last week. 

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+*> 

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Economy 

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Our Government is asking our citizens to econo- 
mize wherever possible in our daily routine of 
living and functions. We can suggest two ways 
of economy, namely: by delivering your cream to 
the creamery and receiving 1 cent per pound fat 
over truck price, and also making use of our old 
storage meat lockers, by freezing your own meat, 
whk-h is a big saving on your cost of living. 

MEAT STORAGE 

A $5.00 box for a year will hold approximately 
220 to 250 Ibs. meat and you may refill the box 
often as you wish. You may also place meat in 
storage at the rat* of I 1 ^c per Ib. . 

NOW IS THE TIME THAT THE STORING 
OF MEAT SHOULD BE IN FULL 

PROGRESS. 

Call in to see us about the storage. 
THE CREAMERY WILL BK OPEN EACH SATURDAY NIGHT 

f-- 

*"' 

Flesh erton Creamery & Produce Co. 

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Phone 06 

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Angus Avis. Manager 

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4 

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, 
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THE FLESHERTON ADVANCE 

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VANDELEUR 

Mr. Albert Buchanan of Toronto 
spent his Easter vacation visiting 
his father, Mr. Jos. Buchanan. 

Mr. and Mrs. Will Bowles and fam- 
ily are now settled in their new home 
recently purchased from Mr. E. War- 
ling. 

Mr. W. Hutchinson had a successful 
sale of live stock and implements on 
'Thursday of last week. 

Miss A. Bowman ia spending the 
holidays with his parents at Tara. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Fawcett and 
family and Mr. Ted Fawcett, former- 
ly of Fleslierton, who have moved to 
Bronte were recent visitors with Mr. 
and Mrs. Gordon Wyville. 

The Woman's Institute will meet at 
the home of Mrs. W. Katcliffe on 
April 24th. 

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Send in the names of your visitors. 

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FOR SALE 150 acres, Lots 181, 
182, 2nd Con. N.E.T.&S.R., Artame- 
sia, Very cheap; also 13 year old mare 
3 year old horse, cow, cattle, dog, 
heavy harness, light harness, cut- 
ter, plow, mower, gravel box, hay 
rack. Very reasonable. Apply tc 
Geo. Allen (Mt. Zion), R. R. No. 3, 
Flesherton. 47c2 

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LET US 

GIVE 

YOUR CAR 

BUDGET A 

BREAK! 


RIDE ON THE 
BIG MILEAGE 

GOOD/YEAR 

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CENTRE LINE 

The weather man is not giving us 
such nice weather now. The past 
week was showery, Sunday was cool- 
er with high winds and showers and 
it ia quite cool and windy this Mon- 
day morning. We do not hear the 
frogs this morning. 

Mr. and Mrs. Emerson Gallagher 
and baby Keith, also Mr. and Mrs 
G. Little, spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Russel White, Saugeen Jot 

Mrs. Amanda Lyons spent a few 
days with Mrs. Florence Lyons and 
family. 

Master Garfield Lyons spent part 
of Easter holidays with his cousin, 
Delbert Magee, Eugenia. Garfield 
has a new bicycle and this was 
his first long trip with it. 

The west group of Centre Line Red 
Cross met at Mrs. Lyons and pieced 
a heavy quilt on Wednesday after- 
noon last. 

Our soldier boys Joseph Little and 
Victor Osborne are now stationed at 
the Horse Palace, Exhibition Camp, 
Toronto. The Foresters moved from 
Camp Borden to Toronto' on Thursday 
morning. 

Mr. John Osborne, accompanied by 
Mr. Jim Zilliott and Jean, Alice, Alex 
and Bob spent Sunday evening at his 
home here. 

Mt. Zion S. S. will reopen on the 
first Sunday in May. Please come 
out and help the officers and teachers 
make a success of the Sunday School 
this summer. Dr. Mercer has kindly 
consented to teach the Bible class. 

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SWINION PARK 

Mrs. Bert artin spent a couple of 
days in Markdale last week and atte- 
ded a course there, given by the 
W omens Institute. 

Mrs. Niel Campbell .spent the past 
week with Toronto friends. 

Mr. Gordon Campbell of Dundalk 
H. S. spent the Easter vacation with 
his parents. 

We are sorry to report the serious 
illnesg of Mr. John Aldcorn. We wish 
him a speedy recovery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Doug Chant and babe 
and Mr. and Mrs. Don McMillan ol 
Toronto spent the week end at Mr. 
Hugh McMillan's. 

Miss Irma Dingwall spent the 
Easter holidays at her home at Hope- 
ville. 

Mr. and Mrs. Will McMillan of 
Flesherton are spending a few days 
at Mr. Aldcorn's, also Mrs. Ken- 
nedy of Shelburne and Mr. James 
Aldcorn of Corbetton. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hank Hamilton and 
daughters, Futsy and Ruby, also Mrs. 
Jack McMeekin of Mt. Forest, spent 
Sunday at Mr. Geo. Haw's. 

Mr. 'Walter Knox has been engaged 
for the coming year with Mr. Neil 
Campbell. 

Buzzinz wood and house cleaning 
seem to be the order of the day. 

The Ladies Aid and W. M. S. met 
on Wednesday at the home of Mrs. R. 
Hardy. Eighteen ladies were pres- 
ent and a splendid meeting was en- 
byed. 

Mrs. J. L. Ferguson returned home 
Saturday, after spending the winter 
n Toronto and Kettleby. 

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SPRINGHILL 

Miss Ruth Blackburn accompanied 
her sister, Mrs. Ken Stewart, to To- 
ronto last week end and spent a 
couple of days there. 

Mr. Ward Harrison spent a few 
days in Toronto recently. 

A number of young people from 
Markdale spent last Tuesday evening 
with Mr. Jim Harrison. 

Master Joey Allison of Markdale 
spent Easter week with his sister, 
Mrs. Frank Eagles, and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ken Stewart of Flesh- 
erton spent an evening recently with 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Eagles. 

Miss Annie Akins spent the past 
week in Toronto. 

Mr. Mervin Johnston of Pickering 
spent the week end with his father, 
Mr. George Johnston. 

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Send in vour Renewal Now 

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I 

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saves you money 

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Let us show you this big 
value, mile-eating tire today. 
It's priced right . . . and 
Goodyear guaranteed! 

D. McTAVISH & SON? 
Flesherton, Ont. 

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Clydesdale Stallion 
For Sale 

"CRAIGIE LORD ROBERTS" 

(20895, Imp.) 

Apply to H. Lougheed, 682 
Broadview Ave., Toronto, or 
John Lougheed, Dundalk. 

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PITY THE POOR GROW 

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From Ottawa to Toronto is only 223 
miles "as the crow flies." 

But the crow, according to experts 
in Natural History, flies only 30 miles 
au hour. Even the swift carrier 
pigeon makes only 40 miles an hour. 

The telephone covers the distance 
well, you might say, instatituiteoug- 
ly. The sound of your voice, changed 
t electric waves, travels with the 
speed of light. 

And it's the same between any two 
cities of the continent. Whether your 
message is to Halifax, to Vancouver, 
New York or San Francisco, the tele- 
phone makes possible an immense 
speeding up distance is hardly a 
factor any more. 

Whether for the great emergencies 
that war brings, or 
for every-clay busi- . $**<* 

ness, the telephone 0* * 
meets the need for 
quick completion 
of every detail. 

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^Y^.^f^r'^-fe . ' . , 

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KIMBLRLEY 

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The mission prayer meeting was 
held in the Baptist church Wednes- 
day evening, Rev. Young in charge, 
this Wednesday evening the mem- 
jers of both churches will accept an 
invitation to be with him in Thorn- 
bury, where he is conducting special 
meetings. 

Mr. Buchanan and a number of in- 
terested young people are cleaning 
and improving the "Thurston Park." 
We feel very sympathetic toward this 
project, as through the kindness of 
the JThurston family, it has been 
loaned to the young people of the 
church, in memory of their parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Thurston, whose 
home it was. We appreciate very 
much their interest in. Mr. and Mrs. 
Thurston and all members of their 
family were whole-hearted in doing 
all they could for the church and the 
cause of temperance. So turn out, 
boys and girls, and aid in making the 
old home site beautiful. 

Jean and Harold McAfee are holi- 
daying with Mr. and Mrs. Laverne 
Morwood. 

Rev. Young, accompanied by Rev. 
Schutt, brought a wonderful message 
on his visit to the Holy Land. He is 
assisting Rev. Young with the special 
meetings at Thornbury. 

Mr. and Mrs. Haddon Hutchinson 
and Calvin of Ceylon and Mr. Frank 
Hutchinson of Smiths Falls, visited 
with Mrs. G. Hutchinson and Milton 
on Sunday. 

We are sorry to report Mrs. D. 
Wallace not 5n very good health. 

Mrs. Parks visited her mother, Mrs. 
Wallace, on Sunday. 

Mr. H. Thompson of Barrie and 
Mrs. Chas. Thompson of Orangeville 
spent a couple of days with Mr. and 
Mrs. N. E. Burritt. Mr. and Mrs. 
Burritt attended the interment of Mr. 
Chas. Thompson at Flesherton on 
Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mansel Cook of Walt- 
er's Falls visited Sunday with Mrs. 
Ferguson. 

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Artemesia Council 

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The Council of the Township oi 
Artemesia met in the Council 
Chambers in Flesherton, on the 
15th day of April, 1941. The mem- 
bers of the Council were all present 
and the Reeve in the chair. The min- 
utes of the last meeting were read 
and upon motion adopted. 

Communications, etc., presented 
were; letter from Chief Engineer oi 
Roads, with certified copy of by-law 
regarding road expenditure for 1941. 
Tenders for tractor to draw grader 
were received from L. C. Alcox at 
$1.25 per hour, W. Websr'at |2 per 
hour, Gordon Hundt at $1.25 per 
hour and M. F. Sayers at $1.50 per 
hour. Claims for sheep killed by 
dogs were received from John Flynn, 
four killed and two injured valued by 
G. W. Buchanan at $6O; Thos. Betts, 
one killed, valued by John Campbell 
at $9; Geo. Buchanan, one injured, 
valued at $1. Jos. Watson, Earl and 
Roy Best and John Dow waited on 
the Council in regard to snow plow 
and the condition of certain ditehes 
and culverts in their neighborhood. 

McLoughry Whittak;r That 
L. C. Alcox be refunded $2 for dog 
tax of 1940, he having killed the dog. 
Carried. 

McLoughry Betta That the 
tender of L. C. Akoz for tractor to 
draw grader be accepted. Carried. 

Whittaker Betts That the 
snow plow at Earl Best's be donated 
to that section of the Township and 
that they repair same at their own 
expense and it be superintended by 
Messrs. Jos. Watson and Earl Best. 
Carried. 

McLoughry Whittaker That 
the following claims and cost foi 
sheep killed by dogs be paid: J. Flynn 
$60, G. Buchanan $1, Thos. Betts $9. 
and G. W. Buchanan and John Camp- 

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bell for valuing sheep fl each. Cd. 

Whittaker Purvis That the 
Medkal Officer of Health, Dr. Mime, 
is instructed to inspect schools in the 
Township and Council pay his assist- 
ant in regard to goitre. Carried. 

Betts McLoughry That the 
Road Superintendent's pay sheet no. 
3, for 1940, be passed and the amount 
of $272.74 paid. Carried. 

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S. S. No. 6, Osprey 

Grade 8 Jean Cox 71, Winslow 
Hutchinson 63, Ruby Dobson 59. 

Grade 7 Eunice Dobson 72, Don- 
ald Wilson 53. 

Grade 6 Loreem Milne 75, Doug- 
las Davidson 73, Mildred Poole 53. 

Grade 5 Royden Maxwell 80. 
Kenneth Long 66, Beverley McKenzie 
61, lone McKenzie 45. 

Grade 4 Jessie Milne 67, Jimmie 
Cox 62, Betty Spears 53. 

Grade 3 Yvonne Davidson 70, 
Herbie Rockley (a). 

Grade 2 Vera Poole 84, Lawrence 
Dobson 79, Lvoqne Short (a). 

Grade 1 George Spears, Wiyne 
Maxwell. 

Alda Hawton, Teacher. 

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Wednesday, April 23; 1941 

CABDS MUST BE TNRNED IN 

Did you know that your rejfistra- 
tion card had to be turned in to the 
government after you pass on from 
this world? That is one of the duties 
of the undertaker. We believe this 
ia not generally known and friends 
might destroy the registration card, 
thinking it was of no further us*. 
However, one is not officially dead 
until the registration card ia turned 
in, and this prevents it being used 
by someone else not registered. 

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WOOL GROWERS ORCANIZATWN 

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IT PAYS TO MARKET 

ON A GRADED BASIS 

Obtain Sacks and Twine from 

LOCAL LIVE STOCK TRUCKERS 

or direct from 

CANADIAN CO-OPERATIVE 

WOOL GROWERS LIMITED 

217 Bay Street - Toronto 

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INSURANCE 

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Authorized agent for 

GERMANIA FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

also All Lines of 

CAR INSURANCE, BONDS, etc. 

See HERB CORBETT 

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Phone Duodalk 44 r 21 

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Proton Station, Ont. 

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BE MT1I-MSE! 

Only Chevrolet among low-priced cars gives you all these features 

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^ O C K M ILLS 

School re-opened Monday after the 
Easter vacation. 

Mrs. Bob Lee and Douglas returned 
to their home in Owen Sound, after 
spending a week with Mr. and Mrs 
Dick Clark. 

Mr. Jack Beard of Owen Sound 
arrived here on Thursday and will be 
the sawyer again when the mill starts. 
fThe Ritchie Bros, of Durham are 
employed this week at the mill build- 
ing the brick work around the boilers 
end everything will be in readiness to 
start around May 1st. 

Mrs. W. Coburn and babe of 
Barrhead spent the past week with 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Dick Clark. 

Mr. Ned Croft left Friday of last 
week to work in the mill at Durham 
for awhile until the Company can get 
an experienced man to take the 
carriage to set for the sawyer. 

Miss Edna Croft of Owen Sound 
visited* the past week with her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. H. Patton. 

Seeding operations are being de- 
layed owing to the cold spoil. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Russel and Elva 
of Wareham, and Mervin Little oi 
Berkeley were visitors at the home of 
\Vallace Fisher over Sunday. 

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When will you have the chance again to get 
so much motor car value for your money? 

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Be Chevrolet-wise this year! Cheek over 
the styling aud engineering advance- 
ments illustrated above extra advan- 
tages at no extra cost. Check up "what 
you get for what you pay" 41 great 

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t'ealure* for "4 1 the most modern, uiost 
complete low-priced ear your money can 

lm\ ! For today and for the years nhvad 
it pays to pick Chevrolet! See your 
iloali'i for a trial drive, today! 

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CANADIAN-BUILT 
BY GENERAL MOTORS 

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CHEVROLET/^! 

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C-IMIB 

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D. McTAVISH & SONS, FLESHERTON, Ont 
H. Grummett, Dundalk (Associate DealeO 
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SUNDA Y 
SCHOOL 
LESSON 

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LESSON IV 

THE EARLY CHURCH MEETING 

HUMAN NEEDS. 

Acts 4 : 327 : 60. 

PRINTED TEXT, Acts 4 : 3235; 

e : 1-7. 

GOLDEN TEXT. And the multi- 
tude of them that believed were 
of one heart and soul. Acts 4 : 32. 
THE LESSON IN ITS SETTING 

Time. Practically all of tho ev- 
ents In our lesson occurred In A.D. 
S6. 

Place. The city of Jerusalem. 

This lesson is filled wil-h com- 
fort. \Ve are living in days wbeu 
the Christian Church ie beins; at- 
tacked on every hand, and when 
many people are suffering In the 
most terrible way because of their 
loyalty to Christ. They began to 
surfer for Christ in this chapter. 
There have been some who have 
likewise s-uffered down through, 
every, age. ()>. faith Is a faith that 
the world hates, and that some 
men somewhere in every age try to 
stamp out. The consequences ot 
persecution which are found In the 
long lesson which Is before us 
are also being discovered to bo 
the consequences of persecution 
today, in many places. The final 
result of these persecutions wax the 
extending of the Church, the con- 
firming of the disciples, and tha 
final destruction of the powers at- 
tempting to stamp out the Church. 
The Jerusalem Church 

At the opening of our lesson, the 
first persecution, not a severe one, 
had just passed. While the apost- 
les wece thrown into prison, though 
confined there only for a single 
night, and while It Is true they had 
been examined by tho Sanhedrln, 
the following day, their form of 
punishment was only a prohibition. 
They wwe commanded never to 
preaoh again In the name of Jesus 
and were then released. Many per- 
secutions followed, and finally, be- 
fore forty years had passed, the 
whole city of Jerusalem would be 
on the ground in absolute ruin. 
In the meantime, a very be-autlful 
and Berene condition prevailed In 
the mother Church. 

All Things In Common 

22. "And the multitude of them 
that believed of one heart and soul: 
and not one of them said that 
aught of the things which he pos- 
sessed was hie own; but tliey had 
all things common." The Lord had 
summed up one of tho two tables 
of the Mottalc law in the command: 
Thou shall love thy neighbor as 
thyself. The Apostolic Church In 
this time of holy enthusiasm and 
devotion to the memory and com- 
mands of Jesus, fulfilled His pre- 
cepts in the most literal fashion. A 
Christian who had money or the 
means of securing it, could not see 
i L-> poorer brother believer In want, 
but loving him and treating him 
as another part of himself, freely 
shared what he had with his l.>ss 
fortunate neighbor. What would 
happen to the Church today If Its 
members followed Christ's pre- 
cepts as closely as did the men of 
the early Church? 

33. "And witb grt^at power gave 
the apostles their witness of the 
resurrection of the Lord Jesus: 
and great grace was upon them 
aJI." The power with which they 
preached would seem to Imply 
that tho consequence of their wit- 
nessing to the Resurrection was 
aeen in many being convinced ot 
Ui truths of which these awi{|eg 
were speakinp. bi-lng led to be- 
lieve on t!ie I<ord JCKUH ClirlHt. 

34. "For neither was there arnojig 
"1 any Ut lavk4: .- - numy 
H \\c:e - -Manors of lands or 
houses sold them, and brought the 
prlccK of the tilings that were soid, 

35. anil luld ilitm nt tin- apOHtlfV 
feet: nnd distribution was nude 
onto each. according ns any <,\m 
had ii'l." The condition here 
spoken of. nairn-ly what we miulit 
call a "community of goods." By 
others it lias liuen called "cotn- 

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The Firit Deacons 
*: "Now in these days, when llie 
umber of the disciples was multi- 
jtying, there arose a murmuring of 
the Crrrlan Jews against tho He- 
brews, because their widows were 
neglected in the dally ministration. 
1. And iJi twelve called the multl- 
iiilr. of the disciples unto thi-m, an5 
said. It Is not fit that wn should 
forsake tin- word of (Jurl, and MTVC- 
'.M.I. - 3. Look ye out thwi-fori?, 
brethren, from among you ne\pn 
on 11 of good 1-oport, full of the Spir- 
it ind of wisdom, whom we niny 
appoint <,:' thin business. 4. Mut 
we will continue utedfaatly in 
prayer, wild In the ministry of \hn 
wort\. 5. And the saying pleased 
the whole multitude: and tlu-y 
cJ'os* Stephen, a man full of faith 
and of tho Holy Spirit, nnd Philip, 
and Prorhorus, and Mean or, and 
Tlmon, an<! 1'arniPiMH. nnd N'lrol- 
aus of proselyte of Anllo.'h; i;. 
whom they pet before thn apostles: 
nnd when lliry had pruycd. they 
laid their ItamlH upon them. 7. And 
tlio word of God Increased; nnd the 
number of the disciples imililplli") 
In JeniHdltm exc-eedliisly; and a 
great company of tlm priests \vivc 
ohndlont. to Ihn faith." 

Not Infrequi ntly (i'lllr.-m in lilo 
Christian Church li;is brought about 

---- column ----

A Hobby Horse Isn't His Hobby 

---- column ----

The youngsters aboard seem contented enough, but lad holding 
the reins doesn't seem to like idea of the horse, at evacuee nursery in 
London's West End. 

---- column ----

a genuine reform, or perhaps a 
definite advancement in the affairs 
of the Church in which the crit- 
icism arises. Such was the situa- 
tion we are now confronted with 
In the mother Church at Jerusalem. 
ll. Greek-speaking Jewish 
Christians complained that the wi- 
dows of Palestinian Hebrew Chris- 
tians were receiving more consid- 
eration by tho Church than were 
the widows of their own group, a 
criticism that may have been well 
founded, though there was no de- 
liberate Intention on the pert ot 
any to alight the windows here re- 
ferred to In the matter of charity. 
The apostles wisely called a multi- 
tude of the disciples together, and 
laid down a great principle which 
It would have been well had the 
Church, observed throughout the 
subsequent centuries. "It is not fit 
that we should forsake the Word 
of God and serve tables." The early 
Church remedied the situation, by 
appointing seven men as deacons, 
to take caxe of these material as- 
pects of Chiirch life, with the re- 

---- column ----

sult that the Word of God increas- 
edT'aud the Church greatly multi- 
plied. 

---- column ----

The Tiniest Rose 
Is In Switzerland 

---- column ----

In the tiny hamlet of Marbor- 
get In the Jura Mountain range, 
in Switzerland, flower lovers for 
many years have been growing 
perhaps the tiniest rose in the 
world. A colonel in the Swiss 
army, Roulet, procured one of 
these jewel-like plants and pre- 
sented it to Henri Correvon, the 
eminent Swiss rock-garden spe- 
cialist, who christened it "Rosa 
rouleti" and propagated it. 

The pigmy plants are little 
more than hand high. The exquis- 
ite semi-double flowers, produced 
from April to November, are 
bright rose-pink. The blossom is 
so tiny that a bee stopping to call 
almost covers the rose. 

---- column ----

RADIO REPORTER 

---- column ----

By DAVE ROBBINS 

---- column ----

SUMMER SEASON 
Broadc<itlng on this continent 
salutes the summer season next 
Sunday. On April 27th, the United 
States networks Join the Canadian 
sfarlons In Issuing program sched- 
ules set out In daylight saving 
time, and this, of course, will be 
the signal for an increasing num- 
ber of lighter miiHlcal features and 
other Bummer programs. 

Among the new CBC listings for 
the spring v/enther are Leon Zuc- 
kert's orchestra who will be heard 
in Along Gypsy Trails Wednesdays 
at 10.00 p.m. ... Sweet and Love- 
ly, another new one, will be pre- 
sented Monday nights at 8.00, with 
Myrtle Campbell and Eddie Allen 
doing the vocals . . . while Quen- 
tin McLean's organ program on 
Tuesdays nnd Thursdays at 7.00 
has taken on a distinctly summer 
air ... then, CROC is offering 
|be bl|j liolweather tld-bit in tbcjr 
baseball f"~:Sf!t-S. tfiat a?e pre- 
sented ench day at C.30 p.m. 

Ilemember, after April 27tli, all 
programs are listed on daylight 
time. 


NOTES AND NEWS 
A neat little program heard from 
CROC at 11.30 these mornings, is 
Salute to (do Dride, a feature that 
will interest women in general. 
The program carries news of the 
cngaKmi-nls, weddings, and all the 
fol-de-rol as the young folks' 
.thoughtx turn lightly to love. And 
here's a tip, If you're a 1941 bride, 
you had better send In a note tell- 
ing them about It, for there are 
ftom lovely gifts to be won by 
some lucky bride, 

* 

Brace Di'cmtT who originated 
tho role of the Ixmo Ranger, is 
i-.i-k on tho air In that western 

---- column ----

Hobinhood tale, after his pal Karle 
Urasspr rode off to the last round- 
up the other night. Brace wrote 
tho original script, and for a time, 
played the role until he decided to 
bring In Grasser ta do the hard 
Mini; and two gun shooting. How- 
ever, the voices of the two men 
are so much alike, that few of the 
younicstrrs will notice there Is a 
change. 


Another unique treasure hunt 
Gold If You Find It offers re- 
wards for unusual objects with 
colorful story aesocintlous. This 
program ic heard over the Col- 
umbia chain on Aaturdaytt at 10.30 
a.m. Requests received to date 
rangn from authentic small beauty 
murks, to Information regarding an 
eighty year old el> phant. Here Is a 
feature that Is really different, 
and wo fhiuk you will enjoy It. 


Radio Beams Funnymen Ab- 
bott and Costello are set for a 
stunt with Oharllo McCarthy . . . 
f'onnlo Boswell Is slated to carry 
the load of the Music Hall program 
when I'roaby and Piivns vacate this 
summer . . . John narryniore Is 
:iM to be a personal friend of the 
Ihiko of Windsor . . . "On Parade" 
In through for the RIWKOII . . . Jack 
1'each, CBC producer at Vancouver, 
pnsmlo through Toronto last week 
on hi* way to new duties na n 
commentator with the CBC Over- 
Hcas Unit, iu England. He reported 
to K. L. n.i .h i.-; : General Program 
Sup or via or of the CBO, to receive 
final instructions before leaving 
for the Old Country. 

* * 

Talking about the forthcoming 
aiitoniotivo seiiHnn, worldly-wise 
Knlgmatlo K v e 1 y n remarked: 
"Reckless drivers aren't wreckless 
long." 

---- column ----

Soviet Flier 
Visits "Pole" 

Veteran Lands Plane and 
Party on Arctic Floe For 
Scientific Study of Ice, Water 
nd Weather Conditiona 

A Soviet aerial polar expedi- 
tion reported early In April that 
it had landed on an Ice floe in the 
zone of the "inaccessible Pole," 
the point in the Arctic Ocean 
farthest from any land. 

The expedition, which began its 
hazardous flight by stages from 
Moscow March 8, spent several 
days studying ice, water and wea- 
ther conditions. 

The plane was piloted by I. I. 
Cherevichny, veteran Polar flier. 
He flew over the Northern sea 
route to Wrangcll Island, then 
proceeded some 850 miles farther 
North. 

The position of the ice floe 
base was given ke 81 decree* 
North Latitude, 180 degrees 
Longitude, two degrees latitude 
and five degrees longitude from 
the "inaccessible Pole" and Ihe 
point farthest North ever reached 
by a Soviet plane in the Eastern 
Arctic. 

Cherericliny was accompanied 
by lix crew men and three scien- 
tists who were preparing for the 
spring opening of navigation over 
the Northern sea route. 

This latest achievement cred- 
ited to Soviet fliers is a sequel 
to their previous exploit in flying 
over the North Pole itself on May 
21, 1987. After crossing the Pole 
a Russian pilot set his plane down 
13 miles from the Pole and left 
a four-man expedition which was 
rescued nine month* later after 
drifting to a point off Greenland. 

---- column ----

Gardening . . . 

---- column ----

Article No. 8 

Tender vegetables are quickly 
grown. A check by dry weather or 
anything else Ir variably causes 
woodlue-s. To eliminate such dan- 
ger experienced market gardeners 
push their plants along with fre- 
quent applications of commercial 
fertlli2er. This must be applied 
carefully so a* to be close to, but 
not actually tout-hlng, stems or 
roots. 

Watering, of course, will also 
keep vegetable gardens growing in 
dry weather, but where the luxury 
<.; a hoe is not available one oan 
kep things moving with cultiva- 
tion alone. This conserves mois- 
ture In two ways. It kille weeds 
that use up water and it checks 
evaporation by the sun. For this 
cultivation a small hoe Is almost 
ftHsertbil but there are other good 
tools, wonders around and under 
growing flowers and vegetables. A 
Dutch hoe which Is ehoved along 
about an Inch under the soil will 
cultivate a hundred feet or so of 
pereuulal bed In thirty mtuutes. 
For Special Locations 

Because one's garden Is too shad- 
ed, too sunny or too wet, In no 
longer sufficient excuse for doing 
without a flower garden. There ure, 
as a matter of fact, flowers to suit 
almost any location, fiome actually 
like damp soil, some dry, some full 
hot sun, others shady corners. Cer- 
tain types do best in deep, rttJi 
soil, while some actually ask the 
poorer sorts. Special like* and dis- 
Hkea will be found mentioned In 
the better Canadian seed cata- 
usual in location it is advisable 
logties, and If your garden is un- 
to make special selections. li:deed 
there are flowers to suit even flit- 
most indlffeo-eut of gardeners. 
soiho that re-ally grow tbemsrlvee 
regardless of neglect. 

---- column ----

Standardization 
Of Gasoline Here 

---- column ----

ON Controller Announces 
Two Grades Only To Be Sold 
to Public Acres* Canada 

---- column ----

Standardization of gasoline is 
being placed in effect from coast 
to coast in Canada, G. R. Cott- 
relle, Dominion oil controller, said 
in a recent interview at Calvary. 

"I want if possible, to work 
through the provincial govern- 
me nts and I am glad to say that 
almost every provincial lioily has 
agreed to gasoline standardiza- 
tion," Mr. Cottrclle said. 

---- column ----

Vi'ler the standardisation plan 
only two grades of g;iso)ine will 
be sold to the general public- 
premium gasoline, ontaining ethyl 
fluid, and a standard grade gaso- 
line. Standards are also being 
adopted for fuels used by farmtrs 
in tractors. 

Mr. Oottrelle said standardiza- 
tion permits ontrol of anti- 
Vnock fluid (ethyl) Imported 

---- column ----

from United States. It was im- 
portant that such control be **- 
ercised in the interest of Can! 
dian money exchange. Standard 
ization also protects the public, 
averred, from inferior grades 
gasoline. 

"Also it will lay the foundation 
for the fixing of gasoline price* 
if such hould become necesaay, 
he stated. 

---- column ----

. 

---- column ----

THIS CURIOUS WORLD 

---- column ----

By William* 
Ferguson 

---- column ----

PLANT LICE. 

SOAAEVTIAA 

---- column ----

'ARK 

C4AINSOW 

Tfcocrr 

THAT HAVE 
A *n- Off 
LIVES INI THR 

^or 

---- column ----

H-* 

---- column ----

I IS THE 

\ MOU/VTA//V 

SWISS 

---- column ----

Wr$. There are higher peaks in the Swiss Alps 
than the H,76-tot MuMerhcm. but none which tower higher in 
me romantic imagination of both native and tourist. 

u *ork nest factory! 

---- column ----

ANGEL OF MERCY 

---- column ----

HORIZONTAL 

1 Most famous 
nurse, 

Florence 
10 She WT.B the 

first 

nurse. 

13 Mistake 

14 Snaky fish. 
15SheepIike 

antelope. 

17 Intention. 

18 Sharp pinch. 

20 Mineral 
spring. 

21 Asylum 
inhabitants. 

23 Those that 
sort. 

26 Cotton 
machine 

27 Sloth. 

28 Consequence. 
81 Eminent. 

3^ To ventilate. 
35 Lixivium. 
86 Rental 

contract. 
3D Petitioned 
41 Possesses. 
43 Compass 

point. 

---- column ----

3 HCSHH QKJHGfl HKE 
2H KHHC HSDID GQg 

---- column ----

---- column ----

Answer to Previous Puzzle 19 Measure. * 

21 She is 
considered 

the , 

nurse. 

22 Twitching. 

24 Tatter. 

25 Glutted. 

29 Sound of 
disgust. 

30 Brother. 

32 Deer. 

33 Forever. 

37 Flinched. 

38 To sup. 

39 Onager. 

40 Horse fennel 
42 Resembling 

slate, 

44 Let it stand. 

45 Balsam. 

46 Pertaining 
to wings. 

47 To sin. 

48 Flightless 
bird. 

49 Native metaJa, 

50 To border on. 

51 Zoology teraft. 

52 Ratification. 
65 Burmese 

knife. 

---- column ----

44 To alarm. 
48 Altar cloths. 

53 Weight. 

54 Enthusiasm. 

56 Tree. 

57 Ardor. 

58 To exchange. 

59 Brain orifice. 
CO She served as 

nurse in 

61 She 

established 

sanitary 

conditions. 

VERTICAL 

1 Northeast. 

---- column ----

2 Persia. 

3 Fierce. 

4 Respect. 

5 Transposed. 

6 Fresh tidings 

7 Driving 
command. 

8 Sound of 
sorrow. 

9 Electrical 
term. 

10 To polish. 

11 Seaweed. 

12 Sun god. 
16 Stirring 
18 Wigwams. 

---- column ----

POP-The Easier Way 

---- column ----

By J. MILLAR WATT 

---- column ----

i I .-lOW DO 

I 
KTTOW 

---- column ----

WEU,6ET UP At 

SEE! 

---- column ----

,", -rTFJVI I * CV'V .?:::) V, 

! k;tSf^ 

---- column ----

NO: WHISTLE FOR 

TME- DOG TO COME- IN 

AMD 5EEr IP HE'S 
WE-T 
---- page ----

---- column ----


---- column ----

POPULATION: 17.000, 
including 400 Danes; 
AREA: 736,518 st,i:aro 

---- column ----

Limit of U. S. 
Hemispheric 
Defense Zone 

---- column ----

Baffin 

Bay X. 

Upernivik* 

---- column ----

Limit of Extended 
German Blockade 

---- column ----

Umono 

I 

Godh'oyn 

---- column ----

Interior covered 

---- column ----

c 

CANADA 

Davis 
Strait 

---- column ----

with great sheer 

---- column ----

Godthaab 
(capital) 

Frederiksdal 

---- column ----

World s only source 

of cryolite, ore 
vital to manufacture 
of metallic aluminum 

---- column ----

Frederikshaab 

/ Ivigtut 

---- column ----

To Britain 
1600 ml. 

---- column ----

Denmark's vast hulking island of Greenland is mostly ice-covered, ; 

I tout occupies a strategic position in the north Atlantic. Here U. S. | 

air bases and fortifications will be built soon, presumably around 

towns at southern end of island, under new protection agreement 

---- column ----

t 

---- column ----

HAVE , 
YOU HEARD?; 

---- column ----

The small boy looked rathei- anx- 
loua as three aei splanes flew dir- 
ectly overhead. 

"Don't worry, Jimmy." said Mrs. 
Jones next door, "they're ours." 

Some time !ater little Jim was 
In his garden, and the three aero- 
planes came back, flyiag rather 
low. His father, who was digging 
looked up questionably at the ma- 
chines. 

"It's all right, daddy," said the 
boy. "don't worry. They're Mrs. 
Jones'." 

I wlirr that I could make 

rule 
That every Moth mutt go to 

school, 
And learn from some experiec- 

ed Mole 

To make a less conspicuous 
hole. 

o 

Down South, a Negro woman 
was buying eggs In a store run by 
another Negro. 

"Is deee aigs fresh?" she asked. 
The salesman replied, 'Tse not 
sayin' dat de-y ain't." 

To which she encountered, "I 
ain't ajiki-Q' ye ain't de-y ain't, I'se 
akin' IB dey Is?" 

"You have a nice collection 
of books, but you should have 
more shelves." 

"I know, but nobody seems 
to lend me shelves." 

o 

Tba bewildered guest was star- 
Ing at Junior who was driving sev- 
eral nails into au expensive ti*ble. 
He turned to his host. 

"It'a none of my business," he 
said pointing to the boy with the 
ti*nmi,T. "but don't you find it 
rather expensive to let your chil- 
dren play that way?" 
The host smiled proudly. 
"Not at all." he replied, 'I gat 
the nafls wholesale!" 

o 

"Mary, my husband came 
home very late last night. Can 
you tell me what time it was?" 
"Well, ma'am, I don't know 
exactly, but when I got Up this 
morning the master's hat was 
swinging backwards and for- 
wards on the hatstand." 

---- column ----

Port Churchill 
Use Uncertain 

House of Commons Hear 
That Shipping Companies 
Don't Appear to Favor Using 
It For Handling of Cargoes 

Whether or not tho port of 
Churchill will be used fur cargo 
handling next shipping season de- 
uends upon the shipping compan- 
ies, Hon. I*. J. A. Cardin, Trans- 
port Minister, told the House of 
Commons before the Fasten re- 
cess. 

He said the elevators at Chur- 
chill were full of grain. 
RAILWAY HAS BIG 'DEFICIT 
It was not possible for the Gov- 
linnient to force "shipping- coni- 
to send their vessels to 
aurchlll, the Minister told ques- 
1 Conors duiin^- consideration of * 
pplementary estimate for $b'8.- 
ftO to oover the additional am- 
nt required to meet the deficit 
the Hudson Bay Railway. 
"Never have so many paid so 
puch for so little," commented P. 
Black (Con. Cumberland), in 
apparent parody on Premier 
iurchill's famous reference to 
airmen 

---- column ----

Hybrid Corn's 
Possibilities 

Experiments Show It Yield* 
Much More Shelled Corn 
Than the Standard Varietiee 
Fine For Ensilage Produc- 
tion 

It is expected that at least half 
the acre-age, or around 80,000 to 
90.000 acres, will be occupied bj 
hybrid corn this year in the coun- 
ties of Essex and Kent alone, saya 
P. Dimmock, Division of Forag 
Plants, Central Experimental Farm, 
Ottawa. According to experimental 
trials conducted by the Dominion 
Experimental Farms, the better 
corn hybrids have yielded from 15 
to 25 per cent more shelled corn 
than the standard varieties. Similar 
results have been reported by 
mauy growers. Such increases 
mak* possible tha production of 
the same amount of corn on lesa 
acreage than was formerly planted 
ta open-pollinated varieties or 
more corn- on tha same acreage-. 
While no definite claims are made 
that hybrids are resistant to tb 
European Corn Borer, observa- 
tions have shown that there s g<M- 
era'.Iy much less stalk breakage in 
hybrids from borer attacks tUan 
In the varieties. ThU suggests the 
advantage of luiug hybrid corn in 
areas where borer attacks are liable 
to occur. The same M true with re- 
spect to disease, sucu as ear rot*. 
ThU was apparent lo the 1940 
crop of corn when ear rot damag* 
was so prevalent. The hybrids gen- 
erally suffered lew demasje tliau 
the varieties. 

---- column ----

Surface Of Mars 
Said Like Earth's 

---- column ----

Slow Burninq 
CIGARETTE PAPERS 

NONE F/Hf MAOe 

---- column ----

But Much Nontensa Written 
About Planet, Subject of 
Scientific Interact Phys- 
ical Conditions Resemble Our 
Globe'* 

---- column ----

The planet Mars, of ail th* 
heavenly bodies w can observe, 
has a surface whose physical con- 
ditions most nearly duplicate 
those on the earth. Because of 
this fact, and because It is our 
next door neiffhbor in the so!r 
system and is thus favorably 
placed 'for observation. Mars haa 
always been a subject of great 
scientific and popular interest. 
Unfortunately, so much nonsense 
has been written about the planet 
in various branches of literary 
endeavor, that it is easy to forget 
that Mars is still an object of 
serious scientific investigation, 
though in a less spectacular and 
sensational role than many people 
believo 

WHITK POLAR CAPS 

Percival Lowell, founder of the 
jjroat Lowell Observatory in Ari- 
zona, made an extensive study of 
the Martian surface features, | 
writes Dr. Peter M. Millnian in 
"Sky." The planet is of a cen- 
cral orange-red color and, apart ! 
from this shade which is possibly 
duo to oxidation of the surface 
rocks, the two chief features of 
the surface are the white polar 
caps, believed to consist of snow 
or frost, and some lanre areas of 
a dark green'sh hue. 

---- column ----

Public Service 
Payrolls Rise 

---- column ----

Parliament Learns 20,600 
Civil Service Employees Have 
Been Added During War 

---- column ----

A return tabled in the Com- 
mons for John Diefenbaker, Con- 
servative, Lake Centre, said 
about 20,660 employees have been 
added to Canada's public service 
since the war began. 

Figures listed in the return 
show that all but approximately 94 
of the total arc temporary em- 
ployees and that more than 19,- 
000 wore appointed through the 
Civil Service Commission. 

MOST IX AIR SERVICES 
Departments with greatest in- 
creases in their personnel are na- 
tional defence for air, 7,334; na- 
val, 1,504; national defence ( mil- 
itia i, 2,727; national war serv- 
ices, 1,061; tiansport, i,092; mu- 
nitions and supply, 1,329, and the 
office of the comptroller of the 
treasury, 1,616. 

---- column ----

Who! Science 
Is Doing 

---- column ----

MOVING - SHIPPING 
PACKING - STORING 

I >-lii'?i-d Kate furniture l-Vu! 

Cars Winnipeg ntiJ \Vest 

to Coast. 

M. RAWLINSON, LIMITED 

l\st:iblisll<*(l llv'i 

610 YONGE ST. - TORONTO 

---- column ----

FEMALE PAIN 

Women who suffer paialul irregu- 
lar periods with nervoiu. mood/ 
spells due to functional ouse 
should Mod Lydl E. Plnkham's 
Vegetable Compound srapjy mar- 
velous to relieve such distress. 
1'inshum's Compound Is rnAde 
MptcioUy to help weak, tired wom- 
en to to smlllns thru difficult dv. 
Over 1.000.000 women have reported 
:>ma.-l:ig bcuctUs. WELL WORTH 
TRYING! 

---- column ----

VITAMINS AND SHELL-SHOCK 

Use of vitamins to prevent 
shell shock among soldiers under 
fire may result from experiments 
on albino rats conducted by two 
University of Pittsburg scientists. 

They found that: 
Rats fed on a diet rich in vita- 
min B-l "barely blink an ey" 
when a loud buzzer is sounded. 

Rats fed on foods slightly de- 
ficient in vitamins can be "knock- 
ed cold" by the same noise. 

o 
FOOD FOR LONGER LIFE 

Middle age is not too late to 
start in order to increase your life 
span. Some new diet facts, just 
published by Cornell University 
nutritionists show that even after 
40 it may be possible to alter a 
destiny which seemingly has been 
fixed by early life habits. 

There is one outstanding "vari- 
able," a food factor which can 
be changed with certainty of giv- 
ing important results. 

This variable is fatness. Hold- 
ing down fatness definitely leng- 
thens the lives of the middle-aged 
an'mals. Letting them get fat 
by eating as much as they want 
shortens their lives. 
o 
HEAT PRESERVES MILK 

It has been the general practice 
to chill milk immediately after it 
has been taken from the cow and 
to- keep it refrigerated up to and 
after the process of pasteuriza- 
tion to prevent it from becoming 
rancid. Investigations at the Uni- 
versity of California by Drs. N. P. 
Tarassuk and G. A. Richardson 
have demonstrated that the best 
way to prevent rancidity is to 
keep the milk warm, between 30 
and 90 degrees Fahrenheit, for 
one to three hours. 
o 
DEBUNKING SPINACH 

Some doubts of the value ot 
spinach in the diet are raised by 
recent experiments with rats and 
tadpole*. Dr. Robert W. Briggs, 
of McGill University, fed large 
numbers of tadpoles th same diet 
except that in one the vegetable 
lenient was supplied by spinach 
and in the other by lettuce. The 
growth rate generally was nor- 
mal, but autopsies on 252 or those 
receiving spinach revealed that 
127 had numerous large kidney 
stones. Autopsies on seventy- 
four receiving lettuce showed only 
two such cases, and these stones 
were very small. 

o 
CHEMICALS VS. DISEASE 

Two new synthetic chemicals, 
formerly found only in shark oils, 
have been created and added to 
th'e treatment of one of man's 
most serious diseases. 

The chemicals known techni- 
cally as batyl and chimyl alcohols 
arc terrific stimulators in the 
production of white btocd cells, 
those which eat disease germs, in 
the marrow of bores. Without 
these cells disease irerms run wild 
in the boclv. 

---- column ----

{ How Con I? 

BY ANNE ASHLEY 
I ..__ 

Q. How can I correct soup that 
te too salty? 

A. Siic ci i n -V potato uiU) !t and 
bring it to a boil for a few min- 
utes. Then, before serving, take 
the potato out and you will find 
that the salty taste has disappear- 
ed. 

Q. How can I make up for tha 
lack of a cedar closet in tiie house? 

A. When the house la not equip* 
peii with a cedar closet, wipe the 
woodwork and the shelve* ot the 
clothes closet with c&dar oil when 
cleaning, repeating this process 
from time to time. 

Q. How can I remedy a straw liat 
which droops at the brim? 

A. Sponge well with the white 
of an egg that has been thorough- 
ly beaten. Then place on a hat 
stand to dry. 

Q. How can I clean stained piano 
keys? 

A. Try rubbing tliani with a 
chamois dipped in a mixture of 
whitening and methylated spirit. 

Q. What is a good spring salad? 

A. Chopped mint leavea added to 
French dressing, and served over 
tomatoes, lettuce, and cucumbers, 
makes an excellent spring salad. 

Q. How can I polish my silver- 
ware if I have run out of silver 
polish? 

A. Try using a little of your 
toothpaste on a goft cloth. It will 
clean the silver beautifully. Rub 
to a polish with a clean cloth. 

---- column ----

"It DOES taste good in a pipe I" 

---- column ----

HANDY SEAL-TIGHT POUCH-1M 
VrVLB. "LOK.TOP" T!N-65< 

*lfo ptclttJ in Pocket Tint 

---- column ----

Etiquette 

---- column ----

BY ROBERTA LEE 

---- column ----

Millions of Chicks 

---- column ----

Of the 13,700,000 chicks pro- 
duced in Canada in li)40 under 
the Dominion Poultry Breeding 
Program, more than 3,400,000 
were R.O.P. (Record of Perform- 
ance) sired. Preliminary reports 
in 1941 show an even stronger 
trend towards the use of R.O.P. 
males to head commercial hatch- 
ery flocks. 

---- column ----

C.N.R. Revenues 

Up 44 Per Cent 

The grcas revenues of the all- 
inclusive Canadian National Rail- 
ways System for the seven days 
ending April 7, 1941, wera $5,- 
594,051 as compared with $3,- 
877,506 for the corresponding 
period of 1940, an increase of 
$1,716,545 or 44%. 

---- column ----

1. Should a new employee In an 
office address the other employees 
as MT and Mi? 

2. Should a man always rise 
wuen a woman enters the room? 

3. to it proper to Invite a divorc- 
ed couple to the same party? 

1. IB It improper for the bride- 
groom to see the bride on the wed- 
ding day, before tha ceremony? 

5. Who receives the gtieeta at a 
dance? 

tt. Does ic show good ta^ita to use 
perfumed correspondent's paper? 

Answers 

1. Yes. until this ejupl^yee be- 
comes well enough acquainted to 
call them by their first names. If 
that is customary in this office. 
i. Yea, always, and remain siand- 
inj until she in seated. 3. Jt you 
know positively that they are still 
friendly. Otherwise, it should nevar 
be done. 4. There is nothing im- 
proper about U. This is merely au 
old supersitition that it la bad 
luck. 5. The hostess receive* alone, 
with other members of her fam- 
ily, or with the guest of honor. Tht 
host may receive with her, but us- 
ually stands near by, to greet Qi 
guests after they have been receiv- 
ed by the hostess. 6. No. 

---- column ----

Masks For Ailing 
Like 'Bad Dream' 

---- column ----

The prettiest of girls will look; 
like something 1 out of a bad 
dream when she dons Britain's 
newest typo gas-mask, with s> 
great peaked hook nose, round, 
staring goggle-eyas and a beU 
lows dangling from the mouth- 
piece. The Ministry of Home Se- 
curity provided the mask for suf- 
ferers from respiratory ailment* 
who cannot breathe comfortably 
in regular civilian masks. 

---- column ----

Civil aircraft in Canada car* 
ried 58,604 passengers during; 
the third quarter of 1940 sat 
against 37,856 in the second 
quarter. 

---- column ----

SAFES 

I'rotrrt your BOOKS nml < 1*H 
from I'lltl ia. I mil xiv W 
linn- ii !/,. aid type of Safe, or 
l.ublnrt, ic.r :inT purpose. Vluli 
on. or write for prl^rn, etc. 
Urpt. U . 

J 6f J. TAYLOR LIMITED 
TORONTO SAFE WORKS 

11.1 front St. E.. Torunlo 

I < :iMnli.-.l 

---- column ----

CREAM 

Why not support > JUT own 
Company? Highest prices. 
DAILY PAYMENTS 
Write for Can* 

Toronto Creamery 

bi .inch of 
1'Blted Farmer* <'-oprrtlve 

Co., Ltd. 

Cor. Duke Jt Grorffe St., 
Toronto 

---- column ----

...CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS. 

---- column ----

AGE-VPS W V.Vl'tD 

---- column ----

TIRES . . 12 MONTHS OC.VP.ANTEE. 
Direct Factory to IOC with one 
small profit. If needing TIRES, 
It will pay you to writa for prices. 
Asent3 wanted . . . save money 
for yourself, and maka a few 
dollars selling your friends. All 
tires shipped, prepaid, subject to 
your Inspection and approval. 
Mayalls Tire Service, t Elm St., 
Toronto. _ 

HUM < Hl< K* 

QIVUJTV KMl!KYf> KKD CHh'KS 
from rurinii Fed flock*. Barred 
Rucks and White Leghorns, bred 
fur muat and fHH". blood tested. 
our flocks are rigidly culled 
110.00 per hundred. SlS.OU for two 
weeks old. Kelly Chick Hatciu-.-y. 
Barrle. Ontario. 

PIU.IUUCK.KS UK CHICKS FOR 16 
years, barred rocks br4 to lay 
and S. C. \". Leghorns Barroii 
train. None hut large eggs set. 
Rocks and leijhuriis us hatched 
t cents. Rock pullt-ts 13 cents. 
Leghorn pulletn IS runts. Kvery 
chick is from blood tested breed- 
ers. Satisfaction Kti:i:antead. $1.0!) 
books your order. J, V. Johnson, 
Fergus, Ont. 

IF YOU'P.K KltOM MlSSOl'lll 
Tweddle can Hhow ymi. The man 
i>r woman who U hard to con- 
vince. the man or woman who 
won't believe that real goad 
chicks can be bought for less t 
Twiddles' is tho man or woman 
we \\;mt as a Twiddle customer. 
Send for free 1341 catalogue and 
special prices on starte<t chicks. 
also turkeys. Tweddle Chirk 
Hntrhc:u's Limited. Fergus. Out. 

M> ST\K r.i'.\i:nK!;s i.v BRAY 
flocks. They start producing early 
fun! U ep at tt. Hray started pull- 
ets will help you catch up. There 
are r.iviy Chicks and started 
chicks for every need. Lose no 
time orderiiifc. Fur fast arrow-til 
hiuh liv.'ibility early find con- 
sistent production -- buy Bray. 
BTH.V ll-itchery. 130 John North, 
Hamilton, Ont. 

: i 1:1 i CHICKS 

WITH KVKRY 100 PULLETS or KM) 
mixed chicks ordered, we sive 25 
free chicks. Pullet? SL'i.OO to $19.00 
per 100: Mixed Chicks 58.00 to 
$10.00 per 100: Cockerels per 100 
liaht breeds. $1.50: heavy breeds, 
$1.00. Immediate delivery, floddard 
' hick Tlntlchcry. Hi'tannla 
11,-iffhts. Ont. 

I'l.t MIIKIt* 1 M I'IM.IK* 

---- column ----

: Uf.AIN 1'KICKS. 
toiiots. sinks. furnace-.*, alr- 
c.inditiiininir. pipe, valves, fittings. 
Shallow Well electric puini) com- 
plete with SO itall.m tnnk. $74.50. 
Inquiries wlcoind. IViiklii Supply 
rompnny. 21S I'.aiton Street E.. 
H.iiniKoii, Omari". 

---- column ----

OVENS AND MACHIN- 
ery, also rehuiif equipment al- 
ways on hand. Terms arranged. 
Correspondence Invited. Huhbnrrl 
Portable Oven Co.. INS I'athurst 
'.i.. To'-nnlo. 

---- column ----

111 

---- column ----

orroiiri MT\ 

---- column ----

;MVV:IIAL STOCK IN KXTRA cooo 

fiiinim; district. No opposition, 
clc.nn stock, niu.-t lie sold due ill 
health. Otto Johann, Owen Sound, 
Ontario. 

---- column ----

C HIS, JfKW A3TD I ^ l.l> 

MOUNT PLEASANT MOTORS LTD.. 
Toronto's oldest Chrysler, Plym- 
outh dealers; three locations, (IX 
Mt. Pleasant Road. 2040 Tonga 3t, 
1650 Oanforth Avenue. Our Used 
Carj make us many friends. _ 

in \i.i:it- \\ > i i i! 

---- column ----

K.V.R.N' A SL'RK INCOME 
direct 200 necessity produaU. 
iJood commisiilon. monthly bar- 
gains. As many customers a* there 
are families. Xo risk. Start at 
onue to build a solid clientele (or 
SprlnHT. Conditions and Free Ca- 
talogue. FAMILKX. 57'.i St. Clem- 
ent. Montreal. 

---- column ----

EVHAVST FANS 

EXHAUST FANS. NEW GENKRAi 
Electrics, way under wholesale. 
Toronto Mercantile. 29 Meltnda. 
Toronto. 

---- column ----

111:11 FOR SA.I.V 

STOCK FKKD: BUSHEL AND ONK 
half bait, 12c per bap includlnn 
tha bag cooked screenings from 
puffed wheat and rice, Kavanagh 
Foods Limited, S6!l Sorauren AT- 
enue, Toronto. 

---- column ----

GOATS FOR SALE 

MILK GOATS FOR SALE. BEST 
food for Infants or persons af- 
flicted with stomach trouble. C. 
P. Uphe-ty. Kinmniint. Ont. 

GOITRE 

UAVK VUU GOITRE? "AESORBO- 
reduces. For particulars write 
J. A. Johnston Co.. 171 King B., 
Toronto. Price $3.00 per bottle. 

---- column ----

w \.\TKI> 

JJJ WK UUV HUNURKDS 1MFFKR- 
ent Herbs, Hoots, Barks. Writ* 
Dominion Herb Distributors, Dept. 
W, t42S Main, Montreal. 

LKGAI. 

J. N. LINDSAT. U.VVV OFFICE. CA1'- 
itol Theatre Bulldinic. St. Thomas. 
Ontario. Special Department for 
farmers collections. 

i i\ I STOCK 

;Vi AVKSHIP.E FEMALES, 12 COWS. 
18 Heifers for sale or exchange 
fur Holsti-in irrade or pure bred. 
Rest of breeding accredited. Cronrt 
rensnn for .idling. Priced tr> sell 
Willard HtiKh-N. R.K. N.I. L 1 . S..r 

---- column ----

MOI IHTIS M I-'!'' I-'.HKKS 

---- column ----

I:KAI> THIS KVKIM si 

of Rheumatic I'alns or Neuritis 
should try hixnn's lieniedy. Mun- 
ro's Druic Store. S:i."i Elgin, Ot- 
t-iwa. I 'UN ipa itl $1.0ti. 

M USI-:il> STOl K 

r.n;<:L;sT $1.00 I;AI:I>K\: 24 PKR- 

ennlals Pelphlniuni. liianlhui 
Loveliness, Coneflower. Regal 
Lily, Oriental Poppy. Chrysanthe- 
mum, others: Sugar M^; le: t'edar; 
4 Shrubs: ^MI Seeds f'i t-.i.iifl. Twn 
orders $1.8'i. HOLLA'S NL'RSKR- 
1ES, Fonthill, Ontario, 

---- column ----

OFFER TO INVESTORS 

AN OFFER TO EVER7 INVENTO8 
List of Inventions and full Infor- 
mation sent free. The Ramsax 
Co., Registered, Patent Attorney*. 
273 Bank Street. Ottawa. Cnnndy 

---- column ----

IMII.S FOR SILK 

CLEAN TWO TO 2* GALU> 
pails, suitable for Sap. S. Barbi 
ft SOPS. 40<TO Dundas St. W.. T 
ronto. 

---- column ----

UHEIMVT1C .! . I I U Us 

DIXON'S REMEDY FOR NKL'R 
Itis and Rheumatic Pains. Thous- 
ands satisfied. Munro'a DrttK 
Store. 33K Elgin St.. Ottawa, PoaR 
paid $1.00. 

---- column ----

SALESMAN WASTED 

---- column ----

SALESMAN WANTED WITH CA 
to sell to stores, Ladies' Hius* 
Dresses and Men's Working cloth, 
as, on commission basU. Cash bond 
required to cover cost of sample*. 
Exclusive territory given. Statf 
. experience references. Writ* 
r.O. Box 143, Montreal. 

---- column ----

SNAPSHOTS TO-DAY 
TREASURES TO-MORROW 

Vour f:lms are carefully and srieu- 
tifically processed By Imperial, t> 
innlie sure they last. 

e er 8 rXPOSVKU FILMS 2R 
with beautiful enlargement free. 
8 rcpriuts with enlargement l!6a 
Thousands of letters from satiaflet 
customers testify to our superior 
quality and service. 

IMl'KRIAL PHOTO SERVICB 
Oi'pt. t>, Station J. Toronto. 

---- column ----

I \-.i'. Mui> !:<;<;* w \ N i i i> 
K srrrLV ' -ASKS \ND PAT 

highest Market 1'ru-es. Furthe* 
particulars apply Canadian Pro- 
vision & Supply I'ompany, 109 
Front Street K.ist. Toronto. 

---- column ----

VSKU i I .' 1 HIM. 

---- column ----

CI.KAN' t'SKD OXJTH- 
', Men's, and Children'* 
vvvar. Lowest prices, 3J7 Queen 
Ka-ii. Toronto. Agen'n wanted. 

WA.M'KD TO 1*1 H 1 H\I-: 

FEATHERS WANTED 

---- column ----

NKW ANI> L'SKD < ;uOtf J : ASt> 
1 MI, k nl.<.> feathfr beds. Holiest 
prices priul. Si'inl i . " s to 
yiifi n 'iiv K out Inv. J.! Baldwin, 
Ti.ri'iiin. 

Guaranteed 

CAR AND TRUCK PARTS 

Used New 

SI'KI I Vl.l/.IM. IN Klllll II, T >!>- 

i He*. I-IIH i i! i M r^. llyilrnnllv 
HtiiwiH. \\inrheN. i .< ii.- 1 1 1 ,. Htarl* 
i*. >l ii^n*liiN* < nrliiiri' lorn, Knillltt- 
or* i * l< in... or\lor, '.l.-r.^ - 
MKlNfHftion or rrtiind. l.rr Ant* 
t'nrt*. iii-iu. .1.. r, ir,, ,,,,.. 

---- column ----

ISSUE 17 '41 
---- page ----

---- column ----

Wednesday, April 23, 1941 

---- column ----

THE FLESHERTON ADVANCE 

---- column ----

NO CAUSE FOR CHEERS 

Perhaps you may brand it is an old 
fogey Idea, but we find it is out of the 
question to become enthusiastic be- 
cause the province did a business in 
spirits, wine and beer during 1940 
mounting to 122,820,689, and out 
of that made a profit of something 

---- column ----

like $10,000,000. 

How much the Federal Govern- 
ment would make out of it we do not 
know at the moment, but it might 
well be as much as the provincial 
body extracted. The year 1940 was 
one of war throughout and yet the 
drink bill was greater than in 1939. 

We have approximately 3,800,000 

---- column ----

WE HAVE A FULL LINE OF 

Spring Seeds 

---- column ----

FOR 

---- column ----

Garden and Field 

ORDERS RECEIVED FOR 

"Fertilizer" 

'Delivered from Dundalk." Inquire for prices. 

& A. Co-operative Company, Ltd. 

FLESHERTON, Ontario 

---- column ----

people in Ontario, and that takes in 
children of all ages, includes men 
and women who do not drink, and 
the total of such would be a fair 
enough figure. There must have 
been a section of our citizenry which 
drank a great deal and spent much 
more than could be afforded. Pet- 
erborough Examiner. 

---- column ----

REPORT OF FEVERSHAM 

CONTINUATION SCHOOL 

Grade IX Kathleen Somers, 72; 
Shirley Maxwell, 70; Margaret Po- 
cock, 65; Leona Short, 62, Bruce Poole, 
58; Edward Pedlar, 68; Margaret 
Douglas, 65; Florence Pocock, 49. 

Grade X Frances Haley, 67; 
James Pedlar, 67; Norman Ball, 62; 
Grace Poole^ 60; Velma 'Smith, a 
pupil enrolled in Grade XI, made an 
average of 69% in four Grade X 
subjects. 

Middle School Edna Smith, 74; 
Mina Douglas, 68; Annie Radley, 67; 
Norman Heitman, 67;. Eleanor Mc- 
Kenzie, 66; Norman Maxwell, 60; 
Hazel Magee, 59; Rita Radley, 56; 
Dorothy Fee, 66; Phyllis Hudson, 56; 
Velma Smith, 47; Patricia Bemrose, 
38; La Verna Smith, 36. 

---- column ----

The safest decision for an Italian 
admiral would be to run his boat into 
the garage and safer. 

---- column ----

Out of a total of $39,000 of 1940 
current taxes in Carrick, Collector 
Otto Baetz has been able to turn in 
all except $400. 

---- column ----

:K^ 

Y 

Spring Parade f 

JOIN THE EASTER PARADE, COME TO HILL'S READY-TO-WEAR f 

DEPARTMENT. SEE THE NEWEST OF SPRING STYLES IN COATS, * * 
DRESSES AND MILLINERY. BELLOW ARE A FEW VALUES 

OF SPECIAL INTEREST. 

You needn't be slim and tall to get a smart coat. We have many 
..styles and makes to fit most figures, tall or short. Coats in Harris 
Tweeds, Canadian -made cloth of excellent wearing quality. These 
coats will fit most any pocket book. Moderately priced at $9.85, $10.95, $14.95 
and $15.95. See this range. 

---- column ----

NEW EASTER DRESSES 

A wonderful showing of new Ray- 
on Dresses in all the new printed de- 
signs from flowers to polka dots. 
Extra Special at $2.95 

NEWEST OF 
EASTER MILLINERY 

Straws, flower trimmed, straws and 
felts combined and all felts. Excep- 
tional values at $1.95 and $2.45 

SPRING CURTAIN MATERIALS 

Newest of Spring Curtain Materials 
by the yard. A wonderful showing in 
this line. See our window display. 
We are proud of the values we can 
offer Marquisettes, Voiles, Shower 
Spots, Tuscan Nets all at various 
prices per yard U l / t , 19, 25, 35, 39, 59 

NEW WALLPAPERS 

Add smartness to your home by de- 
corating different rooms vyith Sun- 
worthy Wallpapers, sold exclusively 
by the Hill Co. in Markdale. Papers 
for kitchen, bedrooms, dining rooms, 

---- column ----

parlors and halls. Prices range from 
lOc per single roll to 50c single roll. 

LADIES' CREPE DRESSES 

A real -array to choose from. A 
Super Value at $4.95 

---- column ----

Men's Wear 

Men's Fine Shirts for Easter. A 
wonderful selection to choose from 
and outstanding values. 

Lot 1 15 doz. Fine Shrts with 
fused collar attached in plain colors 
and narrow and broad stripes, sizes 
from 14 to 17. Extra value at 89o 

Lot 2 15 doz. Men's fine Broad- 
cloth Shirts in almost any color desir- 
ed. An extra firm cloth of good wear- 
ing quality. Extra Value, each $1.25 

MEN'S FINE HOSE 

An exceptional buy, made of wool 
and rayon, all sizes 10, 10^, 11, 11*. 
Price 35c, or 3 pair for $1.00 

---- column ----

True Economy in Food Values at Hills 

---- column ----

Sockeye Salmon, Horseshoe Brand 

1's 37c; H's20c 
Cohoe Fancy Red Salmon 

I's27c; y 2 's 15c 
Clover Leaf Fancy Pink Salmon 

1's only 16c 
Quaker Oats, family size pkg 19c 

---- column ----

Pork & Beans, Libby's 20 oz. size 

2 for I5c 
Condensed Milk, assorted brands 

1's 2 for 15c 
Sandwichc Spread, made by Anne 

Page, 8 oz. jar 19c 
Seedless Raisins 2 Ib. for 21c 

---- column ----

Specials for Friday and Saturday 

---- column ----

Purity Flour 98 Ib $2.95 bag 

Peas, No. 2 size, No. 4 sieve 3 for 25o 
Tomatoes, large tin 28 oz. .... 3 for 27c 
Toilet Soap, various kinds cake 4c 

---- column ----

Crown Brand Syrup: 
No. 2 tins ... 
No. S tins ... 
No. 10 tins 

---- column ----

... 17c 
39c 
79c 

---- column ----

F. T. Hill & Co., Ltd, 

MARKDALE, Ont 

---- column ----

Local and Personal 

---- column ----

Mr. Ted McTavish of Toronto was 
home over the week end. 

Mrs. Alex. Aberdein spent the 
past week at Durham. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alex. Henderson were 
in Toronto on Sunday. 

Mr. Jim Wilson has secured a po- 
sition on the staff of the Owen Sound 
hospital. 

Pte. R. Whitehead of the Foresters 
spent the week end with his wife and 
family in town. 

Pte. Harry Fellow oft he Veterans- 
Guard, Miraico, spent a few days in 
town last week. 

Mr. A. E. Bellamy of the Air Force 
School at St. Thomas spent the past 
few days with nis wife in town. 

Mrs. John Jones of Toronto is vis- 
iting with her mother, Mrs. W. S. 
Inkater. 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Scarrow and 
little son were in Toronto over the 
week end. 

Mr. Everett Parker of Markdale, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Parker oi 
Springhill has passed the Air Force 
examination and is awaiting his call. 

Dr. J. E. Milne visited his father 
on Sunday, who is a patient in the 
Durham hospital following a stroke. 
We are sorry to know that Mr. 

:ie's condition is very serious, 
ev. Fred Asbton is preaching his 
well sermon in the Flesherton 
Baptist church on Sunday. We will 
be sorry to lose Mr. Ashton a nd Mrs. 
Ashton, and they will leave many 
warm friends when they leave. 

The following attended a gathering 
of the C.G.I.T. in Toronto the latter 
part O f last week; Ruth Turney, Jean 
McTavish, Margaret Turney, Jean 
Duncan, Ethel Taylor and Virginia 
Wilson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Otto Clipperton, Mr. 
and Mrs. Geo. Mitchell and little son, 
Billie, of Toronto and Capt. John 
Thompson of the Haldimand Rifles 
spent the week end wUh Mr. and Mrs. 
Geo. Mitchell. Mr. Mitchell has not 
been enjoying good health lately. 

Mr. Robt. Clark of town suffered 
a slight stroke at his home in town 
on Thursday morning of last week 
and we are pleased to know he is 
improving. His daughter, Mrs. F. 
Leavell, of Collingwood is assisting 
to nurse him. 

The annual meeting of the Toronto 
branch of the Fleshertori Old Boys' 
and Girls' Association will be held at 
53 Yonge St., Toronto, on Monday 
evening, April 28th, at 8.30 p.m. The 
election of officers and other import- 
ant business wift be dealt with and it 
is hoped that there will be a large 
turn-out of members. 

---- column ----

See Power Is Hub 
Of Allied Cause 

Sea Power is the hub upon which 
the whole of the Allied cause revolves. 
The Germans realize this just at> 
much aa we do. 

It is the main task of the Royal 
Navy to protect the seaborne trade 
without which we in Britain could 
neither exist nor continue the war. 
Much of our food comes from over- 
sea; but our most important life-line 
is undoubtedly represented by the con- 
voys of merchantmen travelling 
across the Atlantic with munitions, 
aircraft and raw materials from 
America. 

The Army in the Middle East was 
largely transported there over 13,000 
mile route round the Cape of Good 
Hope, and under the protection of 
the Royal Navy. The triumphal ad- 
vance of the army into Libya, the 
disastrous defeats inflicted upon the 
Italians, and the removal of the 
threatened- invasion of Egypt, were 
largely attributed to British Sea 
Power. Sea Power also assisted the 
Greek successes in Albania, for other- 
wise Mussolini would have been able 
to send troops to the Aogean. Sea 
Power has also helped the Army's 
more recent successes in Eritrea, 
Italian Somaliand and Abyssinia. 

It is wise to remember that no 
troops can safely be sent abroad ex- 
cept under the protection of the Navy, 
and that the Royal Air Force, wher- 
ever it may be, operates on petrol 
carried by sea to its bases all over the 
world. 

The task O f the Navy is not merely 
protective. Out warships are also 
used offensively wherever there is a 
chance for attack. Consider the re- 
cent raid on the Lofoten Islands the 
long series of naval engagements, 
bombardments and operations In both 

---- column ----

MHM *< 

---- column ----

imiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiii 

---- column ----

Fresh and 
Cured Meats 
Home Made 
Head Cheese 

---- column ----

BAILEYS 

---- column ----

I We DELIVER FLESHERTON. Ont. PHONE 47W 

Canada First Lest We Forget! 

t*M<M4>MI*IM Ml !** 1 1 II 

---- column ----

basins of the Mediterranean, as well 
as in the Red Sea and off the coast 
of Somaliland. 

There is no denying, however, that 
the safeguarding of our convoys 
across the Atlantic is our most im- 
portant responsibility at the present 
time. Gemany realizes this, and the 
2,000 miles of European coast in her 
occupation, from the North Cape to 

---- column ----

the Pyrenees, has provided her with 
many bases for the use of surface 
raiders, U-boats and aircraft. All the 
venom of her atack by these means, 
coupled with the extensive use of 
motor torpedo-boats and mines laid 
from aircraft, is now being concen- 
trated upon our essential seaborne 
trade in the western approaches and 
round the coasts of Britain. 

---- column ----

Small Ad. Column 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Vanguard and Erban 
oats for seed; also horse 6 years 
old. Allie McLean, Priceville, 
phone 49 r 3. 44c2 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Vanguard and Erban 
seed oats, also a mare 10 years old, 
to foal in July. Ross Stevens. 
Phone 32 r 31. 

---- column ----

FOR SALE General Purpose team 
of horses, 3 and 4 years old, also 
duck eggs. C. McDermid, phone 
46 r 31, Flesherton. 46c2 

---- column ----

K(.K SALE Heavy draft mare, 12 
yrs., dur to foal May 1st, priced 
for qji.'k sale. Herb Grummett, 
R. R. 2. Proton Station. 

---- column ----

FOR SALE 2 Purebred HereArd 
Bulls, ready for service, 11 and 12 
months old. Wm. Fadden, Fev- 
ersham, phone 22 r 41. 46c2 

---- column ----

NOTICE Paper hangind and paint- 
ing at reasonable prices. Estimates 
free. Ross Mitchell, Dundalk, 
telephone 77. 

---- column ----

WANTED Reliable girj for gener- 
al house work, over 20 preferred, 
permanent position if satisfactory. 
Mrs. Lyness Myles, Thornbury, 
Ont., phone 16. 47c2 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Alfalfa seed, $8 pet 
bu. Duncan Williams, Eugenia. 

---- column ----

FOR SALE 6 Pigs rady to wean. 
J. P. Stewart, phone 32rll. 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Cows, horses, oats 
(with a little mixture of barley. 
W. J. McFadden. R. R. 6, Mark- 
dale, phone 33 r 3. 46c2 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Alfalfa clover seed* 
|8 bu. Gordon McMullen, phone 
170 r 5, Thornbury. 

---- column ----

FOR SALE C.CJW. bicycle in per- 
fect condition. Wm. McBride, 
Priceville. 

---- column ----

FARM FOR RENT Lot 20, Con. 9, 
Osprey, formerly McQueen proper- 
ty. Apply to I. B. T ucas & Co., 
Markdale, Ontario. 470$ 

FARM FOR SALE Owner ire- 
pared to sell at sacrifice. 200 acre* 
near Duncan, known as Howard 
farm. Apply to I. B. Lucas & Co.. 
Markdale, Ont. 434.3 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Heavy black team o: 
Percheron horses; 3 purebred Jer 
sey cows, fresh; Cockshutt dist 
drill; cultivators, etc. Otto Meyer 
114 miles east of Flesherton, R.R.3 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Shur-Gain Chick Start 
er, Shur-Gain Pig Starter and 41% 
Hog Concentrate; also red clove 
seed and small peas. George 
Morrison, Maxwell. . 45p2 

---- column ----

FOR SALE House in Flesherton 
with seven rooms, hard and lof 
vater, double lot and barn. For 
full particulars apply to J. W. Me 
Mullen, Ceylon, Execi tor. 30c 

---- column ----

FOR SALE 7-room brick house in 
Flesherton, large lot, garage, good 
well, must be sold to settle estate 
of the late Andrew Gilchrist Ap 
ply to John Stewart, Executor, Pro 
ton Station, phone 32 r 4. 

---- column ----

POTATOES FOR SALE Grade 
Canada No. 1, early varieties 
Warbas and Cobblers; later var- 
ieties, Katahdins and Dooleys. 
Alex. S. Muir, R. R. No. 1 Ceylon 
phone Flesherton 47 r 14. " 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Driving horse, 6 years 
old, good worker, or will exchange 
for heavy horse- also 10 chunks of 
pigs. Geo. Thompson, phone 
Feversham Ir31, Singhampton P.O 

46 p. 2 

---- column ----

You can start right now with Bray 
Chicks, pullets. Others are, and 
making money. A wide choice of 
breeds, crosses. "Bray" spells suc- 
cess with poultry. (Order June 
delivery turkeys now), John Me 
William, Flesherton. Phone 70. 

---- column ----

FARM FOR SALE 

100 acre farm, 5 acres wheat, 
spring creok, tiled well and windmill, 
comfortable dwelling, barn anil hen- 
house, situated 1 mile south f Flesh- 
erton on No. 1 Highway, reasonably 
prieed for quick sale. Apply to 
Fred Iwin. Flesherton. Ont. 

---- column ----

WANTED Girl for general house- 
work, must be good with children, 
good wages, must be ready to start 
May 1. Apply to Miss B. Cairns. 
11 Haddington Ave., Toronto, tie- 
phone MO 6368, Toronto. 

---- column ----

FARM FOR SALE 
Lots 14-16, Con. 1, S.D.R., Arte- 
mesia, containing 100 acres, on which 
is situated a bank barn 46x66, also a 
large driving shed. This property 
must be sold to wind up estate. Thoet 
interested communicate with John 
Oliver or W. R. Meads, Priceville, to- 
ecutors for the estate. 47^ 

PROPERTY FOR SALE IN 
FLESHERTON 

Lot 10 on Collingwood St, on 
which is situated a 7-room house, 
well and stable. Those interested 
communicate with I. B. Lucas, Mark- 
dale, Solicitor for the Ella Gibson 
Estate. 

---- column ----

AUCTIONEER 

WALTER SEELEY 
See me about your auctien sale. All 
sales eonducted en business prin- 
ciples. Phone me at Feversham 4rlJ 
or make arrangements at The 
Flesherton Advance office. 

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BUSINESS CAROS 

---- column ----

DR. S. R. THIBAUDEAU 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

Graduate of Ontario Veterinary Coll- 
ege. Phone: 1 day O r night 
MARKDALE, ONT. 

---- column ----

DR. J. E. MILNE 

Office _ Durham 8t 
Office Hours _ Afternoons, 1.30 to 4 
Evening*, 7 to S.M. 
Sundays and Thursday afternoon* by 

ippointment only. 

---- column ----

Prinee Arthur Lodg, No. US, JLF. 
t A.M., meets in the Fraternal Hall, 
Flesherton, the second Friday in 
month. w.M., Herb. Cortott; 

-0 
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VOL. 60; NO, 48 

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FLESHERTON. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 1941 

---- column ----

W. H. Thurston & Son, Props. 

---- column ----

Thomas Quigg Passes 

. Word was received by relatives here 
.of the death of Thomas Quiyg of 
Hig-hvale, Alta., which occured in 
Edmonton hospital on April 8th. The 
late Mr. Quigg was born on the West 
backline, Artemesia on March 18th, 
1864, the third child of the late Pat- 
rick and Mary Quigrg. He was mar- 
ried in 1894 to Jennie Sherson and 
with his family moved to the West 
in 1908. Besides his wife he is sur- 
vived by two daughters and five sons- 
Catherine (Mrs. Petie), Beth (Mrs' 
Olsen) ar.d Walter, Samuel, George, 
Frank and Wilfred, all of the High- 
vale district. He is also survived by 
five sisters and one brother: Mrs. E. 
Wurts of Duff, Sask., Mrs. J. E. Swift 
of Toronto, Mrs. Mark Stewart and 
Mrs. Archie Stewart of Flesherton, 
Ms. A. Brooks and Mr. Harry 
Qpigg of Harristcn. "Tie late 
Mr. Milne was in good healfi until 
he was seized with hevere heart at- 
tack two days before .is death 

---- column ----

. The new American monster Doug- 
las bomber is said bo be able to fly 
non-stop across the Atlantic and back. 
The sooner it can be enlisted in con- 
voy duty the sooner the Battle of the 
Atlantic will be won. 

---- column ----

Mrs. John Neilson Dies 

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Death came suddenly on Tuesday 
morning, April 29th, in the Markdale 
hospital, to Eva Wauchope, beloved 
wife of John Neilson of Proton Sta- 
tion, at the age of 33 years. The 
late Mrs. Neilson gave birth to a 
child a week ago and was apparently 
making splendid progress, when she 
suddenly passed away without any 
warning as to her condition. Besides 
her sorrowing husband she leaves a 
family of five young children, Betty, 
Leona, Eleanor, Keith and the baby. 
Deceased was a daughter of Mrs. 
Wauchope and the late Thos. Wauch- 
ope of Proton Station, and a sister 
of Mr. Gordon Wauchope of Flesh- 
erton. The funeral will take place 
on Thursday afternoon of this week, 
when service will be held at her late 
residence at 2 o'clock p.m., interment 
to be made in Flesherton cemetery. 

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ENGAGEMENT 

---- column ----

Mr. and Mrs. G. Helmkay of Rock 
Mills announce the engagement of 
their eldest daughter, Eleanor Ber- 
nice, to Mr. William George Hanley, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Hanley of 
Eugenia, the marriace to take place 
early in May. 

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Minimum 

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nm it n** 

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House Furnishings 

New Spring Offerings 

TUSCAN LACE CURTAINS $1.00 to $3.50 pair 

i RAYON LACE CURTAINS $1.50 to $2.50 pair 

; RUFLED CURTAINS 50c to $1.50 pair 

TUSCAN CURTAIN NETS 35c to 75c yard 

NEW CURTAIN NETS 15c to (rSc yard 

CREONNES, New Pattern* 25c to 59c yard 

i HOMESPUNS and SHADOW CLOTHS 

SOc, 59c and 75c yard 

Congoleum Rugs Feltol Rugs 

Linoleums, 4 yards and 2 yards wide 

Congoleums, Rexoleums & Floor Oilcloths by the yard 

Curtain Rods and Window Shades 
: Brandram- Henderson Paints, Enamels, Floor Finishes 
and Famishes. Paint and Varnish Brushes 

SUNWORTHY WALLPAPERS 
for every room in the house 

; DUST MOPS, O'CEDAR MOPS- LLOOR MOPS, 
SCRUB BRUSHES, FLOOR WAX 

: : A 6x9 FT. CONGOLEUM GOLD SEAL RUG FREE j 

Absolutely Free 

Enter the Congoleum Word Guessing Contest. Open 

from April 25th to May 3rd. 
Get your Free Entry Blank today 

F. H. W. Hickling 

---- column ----

; General Merchant 

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FLESHERTON 

---- column ----

VV^^ 

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Equipped to handle the finest service at moderate prices 

Our Beautiful 

Air 

Conditioned 
Funeral Chapel 

at 
124 AVENUE ROAD 

TORONTO, Ont. 

RICHARD MADDOCKS, 

Manager. 

Member of the Fleshrton Old B ys' & tiirls' Association 

BATES & MADDOCKS 

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The LateU. Milne 

---- column ----

Andrew A. Milne, well known ami 
highly esteemed Bentinck Township 
pioneer, and father of Dr. J. E. Milne 
of Flesherton, passed away on Wed. 
afternoon of last week in the Dur- 
ham Hospital, of which his daughter, 
Miss Catherine Milne, R. N., is. the 
superintendent. The late Mr. Milne, 
who was in his 82nd "ear, had been in 
poor health for several months and 
had been a patient at the hospital 
there since Jan. 12. 

Deceased was born at Guelph but 
when he was eight years of age his 
parents, the late Mr. and Mrs. Andrew 
Milne, moved to Bentinck Township, 
settling on the l2th concession, where 
they pioneered. Deceased himself 
helped to clear the land in the pioneer 
days of the township. In 1914 he 
moved to the Elmwood district, settl- 
ing on the 8th concession of Brant, 
and in 1939 upon his retirement from 
farm life, he moved to Flmwood 
where he resided until, his illness 
made it necessary for him to be mov- 
ed to Durham Hospital. 

About 47 years ago the late Mr. 
Milne was united in marriage tt 
Catherine MeKinnon, who predeceas- 
ed him in 1927. Surviving to mourn 
his loss the late Mr. Milne leaves 
five sons, Andrew C. Milne, post- 
master at Elmwood; Neil D. Milne 
of Toronto; Dr. John E. Milne of 
town; James A. Milne, city treasurer 
at Owen Sound, and Donald H. Mil- 
ne of Cargill, and one daughter, Miss 
Catherine Milne of Durham. Deceas- 
ed is also survived by three sisters, 
Mrs. S. A. Morrison of Meaford, Mrs. 
Elizabeth Kidd of Chesley and Mrs. 
E. J. Ewing of Buffalo, N. Y. 

In religion the late Mr. Milne was 
a member of the Elmwood United 
formerly Presbyterian, Church, of 
which he had been ah elder for manv 
years. In his earlier days he had 
conducter the singing at Crawford 
Presbyterian Church first as precen- 
tor and later, after the installation 
of an organ, as leader of the choir. 

The late Mr. Milne was well known 
in Flesherton and highly respected, 
havinc- resided for a time with his son, 
here. 

The funeral was held at his late res- 
idence at Elmwood, interment being 
made in Chesley cemetery. Quite a 
number of Flesherton citizens were 
in attendance. 

---- column ----

Won Queen's Scholarship^ 

Miss Alice Armstrong of Flesher- 
ton, daughter of Rev. A. E. and Mrs. 
Armstrong of Meaford, has won the 
Sarah McClelland Waddell scholar- 
ship at Queen's University, King- 
ston. Miss Armstrong who is the 
first regular lady student in the the- 
ological college, has just completed 
her first year in theology at Queens, 
a three year course. Her many many 
friends here are pleased to know that 
Alice is doing so well in her studies. 

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In Memor iam 

---- column ----

ALEXANDER In lovin<* memory 
e<f a dear Husband and Father who 
passed away on April 27- 1936. 
Treasured thoughts of one so dear 
Often brin.srs a silent tear, 
Thoughts return to scenec -icnn- past, 
Years roll on - but memories last. 
Thy will be done: Seems hard to say 
When one we Icved has passed away. 
Some day, perhaps, will understand 
When we meet again in that better 
land Ever remembered by 
wife and Family. 

---- column ----

In Memoriam 

WILLIAMS --In lovinp- memory 
of our read mother, Elizabeth Wil- 
liams, who passed away on May 10th, 

---- column ----

You're not forgotten mother dear, 
\ ,- ever s hall you be 
As IOIIR as life and momary last 
We shall remember thee. 

Lovingly remembered by her hus- 
band and daughters; Mice, Hiliia 
and Neat. 

---- column ----

MADDOCKS. 

Associate. 

---- column ----

formerly of Flesherton. Ont. 

124 Avenue Ro;ul. Toronto, Ont. 

---- column ----

Kl. 4344 j 

---- column ----

Recently the Oddffellow*' Lodges 
extended an invitation to Americue 
Lodge of Syracuse, Now York, to 
pnv a visit to Owen Sound and ex- 
emplify one of the Decrees of the 
Ordi rt T!r- invitation has been ac- 
cepted by the Syv.ousp brethern and 
Anii"-iYn<! T.udire will rny a fraternal ! 
visit to the OddfeHows in Owen j 
Sound and stironndinv t"v itorv on 
Saturday. Juno 7th. 19-11. This will 
n i iliinbt bo n bijr d;y for fHd fellows i 
in this part, of tho ei'ivilry and the 
t\v < Owen Sound Lodge? mv lokin<r i 
vd with creftt expectancy to this 
: 

---- column ----

Gave Foresters Real 
Welcome Thursday 

---- column ----

Flesherton people were hosts to 
"A" Company, G. & S. Foresters, on 
Thursday evening of last week, while 
the Company was on a training trek 
through the Niagara peninsula and 
back to- Owen Sound. Two platoons 
spent the night in the Markdale arm- 
ories and one platoon in the Flesher- 
ton town hall. A dance was held in 
the Fraternal Hall for the guests on 
Thursday night and a large crowd 
was present to make the boys feel at 
home and enjoy themselves. Friday 
morning the Company held a tactical 
scheme at Markdale, made an attack 
on the town and captured it from 
enemy hands. 

The following letter was received 
on Tuesday from Pte. J. P. Tilt of 
the Foresters' Intelligence office: 
"The officers, non-commissioned offic- 
ers and men of "A" Company, Grev 
& Simcoe Foresters, wish to express 
their appreciation to everyone who 
helped arrange and put across the 
very enjoyable evening we spent 
there as we passed through on our 
trek around the countryside. From 
the comments of the men it is plain 
to see that this was probably the best 
time they had while they were out. 
Therefore, we would like you to con- 
vey to the people our appreciation of 
the splendid time thov gave the 
troops." 

---- column ----

Rebuilding In Markdale 

Messrs. D. L. Weber & Sons 
Kimberley have been awarded the 
contract for the erection of a new 
furniture store and funeral chapel 
for the Oliver business and have a 
gang at work this week cleaning: up 
the lots which are to be used. The 
building: will be 40x85 feet and will 
include all necessary departments for 
the most up-to-date funeral service 
of the larger cities. It is expected 
the new premises will be ready for 
occupation about July 1st. Mark- 
dale Standard. 

---- column ----

Proton Women's 

---- column ----

'The monthly meeting of the Proton 
W. I. was held at the home of Mrs. 
Wes Dever on April 24th, when seven 
members and four visitors were pre- 
sent. Owing to the absence of the 
president, Mrs. Chas. Moore, the vice- 
president occupied the chair. The 
meeting 1 was opened by singing the 
Institute Ode, after which Mrs. Robt. 
Acheson led in prayer. Roll call was 
answered by mentioning some benefit 
we had received by being members 
of the W. I. Communications were 
read and appreciations were read 
from sick friends who had received 
treats. Three quilt tops were donated 
by Mrs. Chas. Best with two and one 
by Mrs. Wes Dover. Two pairs of 
socks and two children's knitted suits 
were handed in. Mrs. Bannon gave a 
summing of the: work that had been 
done and money raised during the 
year and everyone stated that it was 
quite a creditable showing, so here's 
hoping we may still have power to do 
more in the year ahead. 

Mrs. Fell was present and gave one 
of her capable talks on Institute work 
from angles of which we are still un- 
familiar. We are always pleased to 
have Mrs. Fell. Mrs. Bannon gave a 
pnper on "The Definition c>f a Lady." 
The election of officers for the com- 
ing year resulted as follows: 

President Mrs. Chas. Moore. 

1st Vice-Pros. Mrs. Wes Dever. 

2nd V'ice-Pres. Mrs. Sackett. 

See.-Treas. Mrs. Bannon. 

Sunshine Com. Mrs. Dever, Mrs. 
P:irk. Mrs. Best. 

Kraiu-h Dir. - Mr-!. H. Corbett. 

Di.t. Director Mrs. Bannon. 

Program Com. Mrs. Reddick, Mr*. 
Lyons, Mrs. White. Mrs. Sackett. 

Auditors Mrs. A. Stinson and 
Mrs. Ferris. 

The program committee meets at 
the h<'me of Mrs. Dave Reddick Tues- 
day evening. Mny 6th, to arrange the 
program for meetings during the com- 
MIT year. 

The meeting was closed with sing- 
ing the National Anthem, followed by 
'zpah benediction. 

---- column ----

25th Anniversary 

---- column ----

In Orange Valley hall on April 25 a 
surprise party and mock wedding was 
sponsored by the neifrhbours and 
friends of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Little- 
Johns in honour of their silver wed- 
ding anniversary. At the hour of 
eleven o'clock, Mr. Mervin McFadden 
and Miss Marion Wickens be^ran to 
play that fateful weddin<* march, Mr. 
Littlejohns escorted by a gfroomsman, 
Mr. Hooper, brother of the bride en- 
cered by the side door and took their 
places. Then to those beautiful 
strains entered the bridal party. 
First the dainty little flower <*irl. 
Miss Marie Ho^*>er, niece of the 
bride, dressed in heavenly bule sat- 
in and carrying a nose-gay of sweet 
peas. Then the bridesmaid, Mrs. 
Chas. Smith of Quebec City, sister 
of the groom, dressed in naw blue 
sheer with white accessories and cor- 
sage o* 1 spring flowers. Then the 
bride of 25 years ago, (nee Annie 
Hogg) in bridal attire earryin-.* a 
bouquet of sweet neas and daffodils, 
on the arm of her uncle, Mr. Will 
McFadden. 

The officiating minister, G. Mc- 
Fadden of Orange Valley, retied the 
knot amid the laughter -* those "res 
ent. 

A presentation was made bv Mrs. 
Clarence Alcox and Mrs. Madeline 
Stewart of a china dinner set. A 
silver table centre with a bouquet 
of daffodils and a covered pyrex 
casserole. Mr. and Mrs. Littlejohns 
thanked all for the lovely gifts and 
the kindness in being remembered 
on this occasion. Lunch was then 
served. Mr. and Mrs. Littlejohns 
passed around the wedding cake 
which was a three storv design. 

---- column ----

MR. AND MRS. ROBT. CLARK 

ARE FIFTY YEARS MARRIED 

Congratulations are extended to 
Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Clark of Flesher- 
ton, who observed their 50th wedding 
anniversary quietly at their home 
in town. Both are natives of Arte- 
mesia township and have resided in 
this district all their life, except for 
a few years spent in Idaho, U.S.A. 
Mrs. Clark was formerly Miss Marv 
Ann White. They were married at 
Eugenia on April 29th, 1891. Mr. 
Clark suffered a stroke a couple of 
weeks ago, but was able to be up on 
Tuesday for a short time. Best wish- 
es are extended to this highly estim- 
able couple. 

---- column ----

Baptist Minister Gave 
tiis Farewell Sermon 

---- column ----

The Rev. Fred Ashton preached hi* 
farewell sermon in the Baptist. 
church last Sunday from the text in 
2nd Cor. 13; 11. A very large con- 
gregation had assembled to hear his 
last message, in which Mr. Ashton. 
feelingly expressed his pratitude for 
all the loyalty manifested toward 
him and his wife durinjj the four 
years of his ministry, not only from 
his own people, but also from the 
congregation of St. John's with their 
ministers and the community at 
large. It was with real sense of 
thankfulness that the work of the 
church had not only been splendidly- 
maintained through the past four 
years, but that everything in con- 
nection with the church was in splen- 
did condition and promised well for 
successor's future, stated Mr. Ashton, 
and he hoped that the church would 
rally round the new minister and co- 
operate with him in all work of the 
church. Professor Parker 01 Mc- 
Master University was the special 
speaker at Rock Mills in the after- 
noon, also at Flesherton at night. 
This was the first visit of the Profes- 
sor to Flesherton and he gave two 
excellent messages, and also express- 
ed his delight in visiting Flesherton- 
Mr. Roy Langford sang at each ser- 
vice throughout the da" in a ver- 
effective manner and his solos were? 
greatly appreciated. Mrs. HowartI 
Milligan officiated at the piano. 

---- column ----

Flesherton United Church 

RFV. G. K. MCMILLAN, B.A., B.D. 

Min later 

---- column ----

11.00 a.m. Worship Flesherton, 

2.00 p.m. Worship Ceylon. 

7.30 p.m. Worship Fleshertoa. ) 

---- column ----

Flesherton Baptist Church 

Minister- Xev. *Ved Ash'uc 

---- column ----

Maxwell United Church 

XEV. GEO. L. MERCER, 8.D.. D.D 

Minister 

SUNDAY, MAY 4th 
11 a.m. Eufeenia 
2 p.m. Mt Zion. 
3.30 p.m. Wareham 
7.30 p.m. Maxwell 
Note; Services of worship will be 
held at all appointments next Sunday, 
May 4h. 

---- column ----

Services Fleaherton. 

11 a.m. Worship. 

12 noon, Bible School. 
7 p.m., Gospel Service. 

Monday at 8 p.m. Y. P. Service. 
Sock Mills 

2 p.m., Bible School. 

3 p.m.. Worship: 

---- column ----

Sabotage is reported from Bulgar- 
ia, and we know of no country that 
needs more of it. 

---- column ----

Gospel Workers' Church 

Feversham, Ont. 
Rev. C. McNIchol. Pastor 
S'-nday School at 10.00 a.m. 
Morning Service at 11.00 a.m. 
Fvening Service at 7.30 p.m. 

---- column ----

The government os Saskatchewan 
intends to get along on a bout $28,000, 
000 for the fiscal year 1941-42. Pos- 
sibly that, province has not yet gone 
:nto the super-highway business. 

---- column ----

The good salesman must know how 
to talk and when to stop talking. 

---- column ----

Events 

---- column ----

SAFE LOCK 
WIRE FENCE 

is best because slays'nrc flexible. 
not riqrid. If accidentally depress- 
ed it sprinus ercrt the moment 
pressure Js removed with no 
straijrhteninjr of beii* v ; r.\-i. Muny 
farmers call it 

Hinqe Lock Fence 

Ask yur local dealer- for it. 

---- column ----

Msule only hy the 

---- column ----

CO. 

---- column ----

OWEN* SOUND, Ont. 

---- column ----

Thi' "t play "Tenipes!' ar 

Sunshine. " will bo presented in th< 

hall. Flosherlo:i. on Thui 
M v g . ' .;. . , . ., A.Y.P.A., 
ui'der ' 'f tho O.F..S. 

jion 25c an! 15c. 

Mr. McArthur. the hair dresser 
will be R- M. Avhur 
Macnonn'd's r.'aidem 1 " (bake shop) 
T^lesh'.'rloii, on Thursd;"' A-u-il ;Mt.h, 
to jrive nernn'irm -. Make apt', 
mi'nts with Mrs. Scat-row at the 
bake shop. 

Red Cr -ss Dance run! Euchre in the 
Fraternal Hall, Fli>sr-"vton. on Thurs- 
day, May lt. Old time and modern 
fti!iein<r. First Class music. Admis- 
sion :35c, lunch included. Come out 
and have a good time and assist the 
Rod Cross. 

---- column ----

A IV?rrvel ? ous Marshall 

SPRING MATTRESS 

---- column ----

MARSHALL 

SWING MAI7HSS 

---- column ----

FPEF 

JL T A- m-o* 

TO THE WINNER OF THIS CONTEST 

i 

There is nothing to b\r~ to qunlifv Tor this con- 

Simply come down to our store. See the 

.Marshall M:imv>s u;>|)layed in our wind' >w. There is 

a seal, and under the seal is a mimhcr. Simply guess 

the nur.-ibtr invlo 1 ' the -MV an<\ver on 

a i; M which yq ^x't from our 

store. o htiy. Ju> to our store and 

ask for e'Hrv blank. ' ine entry accepted 

from each person. 

Conies opens '. ho in 

by Mr 10th and winner wJM be anno edinottr 

ok. 

All Bedding at Special Prices during the week 
of this contest. 

B ^tt & Richards 

We Deliver HOME FURNISHERS Phono 78 
---- page ----

---- column ----

British Blast Back at Axis in North Africa 

---- column ----

SICILYT 

---- column ----

Ionian Sea 

---- column ----

'GREECE 

V 

---- column ----

British. Meet, air arm 
strike at axis supply 
line to Africa, sinking: 
ships, bombing Tripoli 

---- column ----

Aegean Sea \ 

W 

---- column ----

klCRETE 

---- column ----

TURKEY 

---- column ----

r^/^." 

CYPRUS 

---- column ----

A f e Jitcrranean Sea 

---- column ----

_W 

---- column ----

British warships, R. A. F. 
blast axis alone coast; 
allies at Tobruk with- 
stand German -Italian sicee 

---- column ----

Alexandria 

Sidi Barrani 
EGYPT 

---- column ----

SUEZ 
CANAL 

---- column ----

LIBYA 

---- column ----

Reinforcements for 

Nile army arriving 

front cast Africa 

-' " 

---- column ----

Ships out of range of 
small oxit coastal gum 

---- column ----

Britijh fleet's 15-inch 

---- column ----

guns, with 10-15 mi. range, 

blast axis airfields, troop 

positions on and near coast 

---- column ----

arship? shell coastal 
roads to prevent fur- 
ther German advance 

---- column ----

Striking back with sea power, Britain Is beginning to stem the German-Italian s\ve?p across Libya 

into Egypt, and Is cutting the axis supply route from Sicily, as shown on map. Closeup below shows 

how Brituh warships are shelling German-Italian- positions <m the north African coast. 

---- column ----

Red Cross Marks 

Scene of Crime 

---- column ----

Visitors in western uptown 
Montreal often ask questions re- 
.; ii -I'liu a big wood cross painted 
red visible over the fence of the 
Mot'v.-r Hous* of tha Order of th- 
Grey Nuns. Traffic officials of 
the Canadian National Railways 
carried a query to Dr. W. H. Ath- 
erton, authority on historic Mon- 
treal, and he recounted a story 
in explanation. In the time of 
the French regime when Montreal 
was beginning to extend beyond 
the fortified walls, "la Chomin 
<lu Roi" (The King's Road) strag- 
gled along the edge of the mid- 
town terrace about the present 
line of Dorchester Street. At the 
point where Guy street now in- 
tersects, stood a farm house and 
the farmer was credited with pos- 
sessing a store of gold. A bandit 
attempted to rob the farmer and 
when the latter resisted, killed 
the farmer, his wife and a daugh- 
ter. Captured, French justice de- 
creed that he should be hanged 
and quartered, the body to swing 
on the gibbet erected at the scene 
of the crime. Afterwards a cross 
was placed it the spot. Years 
later when the first roads were 
straightened, the cross was in the 
centre of the thoroughfare, and 
on request of the municipal auth- 
orities the Grey Nuns agreed to 
maintain in p.-rpetuity a cross to- 
mark this page in the record of 
the former French colony. 

---- column ----

New Ontario Supervisor 
For Roval Bank 

---- column ----

Changes in the Toronto Execu- 
tive Department of The Royal 
flank of O'lada to cope with ex- 
panding business throughout On- 
tario were announced by the 
Ttank lust week. 

S. A. I Hike, for some years 
Assistant Supervisor of Ontario 
tranches, has been appointed 
Supervisor. B. L. Mitchell, who 
has occupied the combined office 
of Assistant General Manager and 
Supervisor of Ontario Brunches, 
will continue as heretofore as 
Assistant General Manager and 
A3 the Bank's chief representative 
in Ontario, witli heaaquarten in 
Toronto. 

Mr. Duke began his banking 
tareer in 1!'04 with the Traders 
Bank at Grand Valley, Ontario. 
He was attached to the Staff of 
a number of Ontario branches, 
and following the amalgamation 
of the Traders Bank and The 
lio.val Bank of Cunuda in liM'2 In- 
was ;.|ip"i!itril Manager at Har- 
riston; since Ifilfi he has served 
v Managc-r of Iho Bank's branches 
in Brandon, Shorhrooke, Windsor 
uul Toronto, and in 10ti(> was ap- 
pointed Assi taut Supervisor at 
Toronto. 

Mr. Duke ha" already assumed 
i'i< new duties, with headquarter! 
in Toronto. 

---- column ----

C.N.R. Operating 
Revenues Rise 

Increase by 33 Per Cent In 
March 1941 Over Same Month 
Last Year 

---- column ----

An ini-rcase in OpeHkUng levril- 
ues of $5, 178,r!8'J and an iin-ic:is,; 
in ni-l revenue of ?2,!2!),078 for 
the month of Mutch, as compared 
with March, 10-10, nre shown in 
the monthly statement of opera- 
tiiiK i-vt'iiiK's, oporatiiiH i-xpi-nscs 
and net revenue of the Cuiunlian 
National Railways all-incliiKive 
.ij-atcm issm-d at headquarters last 
week. Net revi-tun- for the first 
three months of the present year 
increased i-.Vjrin.fiO.-. over ihi- 
fOn'i--pf> ruling period lie*l year. 

O|icr;itinir revoiK.t-s wen- S'j;!, 
BiJK.Onn. compaicil wilh $18,- 
04!,(i'JI in Mai ill, Idlll. Opera- 
ting i-.xp-i!-es tti-re S1S,5!5,!)B1, 
aifuiiM A1ii,(M<i,ii.|7 during Mnn-h 
last your. There, was a net reve- 
nue of Sl,!'32,055 as compared 
with $U,00'J,!i77 in I!" 10. 

For the three months of the 
present year, operating revenues 
were ;-i,li()K. IC.7, compare.! with 
$5a,.'(7 1,1 l,"i in the i nrrespondiiiK 
period of last year, showint: an 
increase of *! l.H'J -l,. r >2. Net 
revenue up to March 31 of this 
year was $ I0.fi!!) ,- r i(i<'>. coni|iared 
with $r.,|:!7/'<;i for !lu> similar 
]iri<Ml of lit 10. 

---- column ----

Modern 
Etiquette 

BY ROBERTA LEE 

---- column ----

1. V/ill a well-bred person 
ever attempt to entertain a group 
of people by relating the experi- 
ences of his recent illness or op- 
eration? 

2. What should a bridesmaid 
wear at the wedding if she is in 
mourning? 

3. What are the correct hours 
for a Sunday afternoon call?' 

4. When a hostess has arrang- 
ed for some kind of game ( r en- 
id tainment, is it permissible for 
a guest to a I. to be excused? 

5. Is it proper to introduce 
children to one another by for- 
mal phrases? 

C. When you have moved into 

a new neighborhood, isn't it all 

right to call on all the neighbors 

that you wish to associate with? 

Answers 

J. Never. Kven if questioned, 
be will reply in as few words as 
possible and then change the sub- 
ject, il. She would probably 
prefer not to serve as bridesmaid, 
but if she docs accept the invita- 
tion she muHt dress exactly the 
s;ime PS the other bridesmaids. 
' Between 4 and 5 p.m. 4. 
Never; it is very discourteous to 
do so. 6. No. A mother may 
say, "Martha, this is Mary Jones 
who has come to play with you." 
6. No. The neighbors should 
call first ; then you should return 
those calls. 

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HAVE 
YOU HEARD? 

---- column ----

He could neither road nor write, 
but when a distant relative left 
him a small fortune, he .started to 
make a splash. He bought a 
rliL-fiue-book, but instead of aijt'i- 
inft his name on cheques he put 
two crosses, and the bank paid. 

Then one day he handed the 
ca.shicr a chrriiie signed with three 
crosses. 

"What's this?" demanded the 
cashier. "You've put three cros- 
ses here." 

"I know," was the reply, "but 
my wife's ut social ambilion.s. 
She says I must have a middle 
minip." 

"Whtt'i that buildini?" 
>ked the ttranger. 

"That'i the a>ylum for the 
blind," laid the native. 

"Go on, you can't fool 
me," laid th* itranger, 
"What't all them windows 
for?" 

---- column ----

CREAM 

Why not support your own 
ComimnyT Highest prices. 
DAILY PAYMENTS 
Write for Cam 

Toronto Creamery 

hnin.ii of 

I III I., I I .1111,. , I .,.,,,., HI. 

'., I. til. 
I'nr. Kin.. .V ;rnrm- >(<., 

---- column ----

An English tourist travelling in 
the North of Scotland, far away 
from anywhere, exclaimed to one 
of the natives: 

"Why, what do you do when 
any of you arc ill? You can 
never get a doctor." 

"Nae, sir," replied Sandy, 
"We've just to dee a natural 
death." 

---- column ----

What Science 
Is Doing 

---- column ----

Customer: "Can I exchange 
this unbreakable doll." 

Shop Asitant: "1 ther 
something wrong with it?" 

Customer: "No, only the 
baby's broken every break- 
able thing in trie house with 
it." 

---- column ----

Auntie: "Do you ever play with 
bad little boys, Willie?" 

Willie: "Yes Auntie." 

Auntie: "Why don't you play 
with good little boys?" 

Willie: "Their mothers won't 
let me." 

---- column ----

How Can I? 

---- column ----

BY ANNE ASHLEY 

---- column ----

I 

Q. How can I make fabrics 

fire, resistant ? 

A. Soak the material in a 
solution of five parts of boric 
acid, six parts of borax, and 100 
parts of water. After soaking, the 
fabric should be squeezed out and 
hung up to dry. 

Q. How can 1 thin cake bat- 
ter when it is found to be too- 
tiff? 

A. Beat an egg and add a bit 
at a time until the right consist- 
ency is reached. Never pour in 
milk for the purpose- of thinning 
a batter, as it will result in a 
poor cake. 

y. How can I clean nickel? 

A. Wash the nickel with soap- 
suds and polish with a paste of 
alcohol and. whiting applied with 
a flannel cloth. 

Q. How can I restore flannels 
that have been builly washed, and 
are hard and shrunken? 

A. These flannels can be .ra- 
.stored to their former softiH-.su by 
soakinj? them in gasoline for a 
few hours, then washing in soft 
soaji suds as usual, following with 
a rinse in clear water of the same 
temperature. 

y. How can I clean wall paper 
easily? 

A. Wall paper can be cleaned 
by gently rubbing it with a flan- 
nel bag filled with wheat hrnn. 

Canadian National 
Railways Revenues 

The gross revenues of the all- 
inclusive Canadian National Rail- 
way System for the week ending 
April II, Kill, were ?5,y-M,f>f.;: 
as compared with $l,0i)7,320 for 
tlio rorrcapnndinir period of HMO, 
nn incmu-'- ni SI.'.M7,233 or 

---- column ----

Discovery of a new hormone 
which appears to be nature's own 
way of preventing stomach ulcers, 
one of the most widespread and 
baffling of human diseases, is an- 
nounced by A. P. Hands, G. B. 
Fauley, Harry Greenyard and A. 
C. Ivy, all of Northwestern Uni- 
versity's Medical school, Chicago. 

o 
CANCER AND SUNSHINE 

Sunshine instead of smoking 
was declared to be the cause of 
so-called smoker's cancer of the 
lower lip among workmen. 

Dr. George C. Andrews, New 
York City, made this statement 
at a forum on sunlight and cancer 
held by the American Society for 
tlu- Control of Cancer. Excessive 
over-exposure to sunlight's ultra- 
violet rays has long been known 
a.- a cause of skin cancer. 
o 

X-RAYS AND GAS POISON 

A peculiar effect on the blood 
produced by X-rays counteracts 
the effects of carbon-monoxide 
poisoning and, in experiments on 

---- column ----

rats, saved the lives of some that 
had been submitted to severe 
toxic effects from the gas, it was 
reported at the annual meeting 
of the American Association of 
Anatomists in Chicago. 

o 

NEW OIL PRODUCTS 
A wicfe new array of chemical 
products from 'petroleum is likely 
to result from studies of the ef- 
fect of various kinds of electrical 
discharges on oils, made in the 
laboratories of the Universal Oil 
Products Company. The electric 
arc, they discovered, produces 
from almost any kind > of oil 
acetylene, the starting material 
from which the great majority of 
organic chemicals are made arti- 
ficially. 

NEW "KNOCKOUT" DRUG 

Discovery of a new "knockout" 
drug from which a person 4-ecov- 
ers quickly with no ill after-ef- 
fects was announced at tjje an- 
nual meeting of the American 
Chemical Society. 

It has the tongue-twisting tech- 
nical name of "TNT-Dialkyl- 
WNR-Oxazolediones." 

The drug was suggested as use- 
ful in medicine to produce a short 
anesthesia for minor operations. 

---- column ----

North To Alaska 
Is Holiday Call 

Color and Drama of Early 
Days Are Still To Be Seen 
There By the Traveller 

---- column ----

Planning a holiday to Alaska 
is a pleasant occupation which in 
itself will provide delightful pro- 
logue to the actual scenes of this 
Northerly land. From the first, 
the intending traveller is impres- 
sed with the color and the drama 
of the early days. The romance 
of the geld rush period led to the 
present development which has 
proven the real value of what had 
been considered a profitless folly 
but which turned out to be one 
of Nature's rich treasure houses. 
It is not necessary to undertake 
a lengthy course in the historic 
before going to Alaska; once the 
traveller has entered the awe in- 
spiring fjcrds leading to the ports 
of Alaska, the very majesty of 
the country appeals to him and 
soon he will be eager to learn all 
that is possible of the territory 
and neighboring Yukon across the 
Canadian border. 

It'* An Accessible Place 

Alaska has a distant sound, but 
it is a most accessible place. Rail- 
way connections to Vancouver 
are numerous and comfortable. 
At Vancouver, principal city and 
chief port of British Columbia, 
handsome craft of the Canadian 
National Railways, operate cruis- 
es to Skagway and return. From 

---- column ----

Roll 'em with 
Ogden's! 

---- column ----

Ask any real roll-your-owner 
about Ogden's. He'll tell you ho 
has been smoking it for twenty 
years or more. Why? Because if s 
not just another tobacco it's 
Ogden's. And Ogden's has a taste 
all its own. a taste which comes 
from its distinctive blend of choice 
ripe tobaccos. Take a tip from old 
timers and roll 'em with Ogden's. 

Only the best cigarette papen 
''Vogue" or "Chantocler" 
are good enough for Ogden'i 

OGDEN'S 

FINE CUT 
CIGARETTE TOBACCO 

Pipe Smokers I 

Ask for Ogden's Cuf Plug 

---- column ----

Vancouver and bade again re- 
ijuires nine days during which th 
traveller is at home in a comfort- 
able ship with all the pleasures of 
an ocean voyage yet sheltered by 
islands which form barrier to th 
winds of the Pacific. This is 
known as the "Inside Passage," 
a deep water way presenting con- 
tinuously impressive views. 

Midnight Sun 

For 1941, eleven such cruises 
have been arranged, the first by 
the SS "Prince Rupert," leaving 
Vancouver on June 16. Tha 
early season voyages give pas- 
sengers an opportunity of seeing 
the "Midnight Sun" because at 
this period Northern days are at 
their longest. 

---- column ----

Family Roll-Call 
Like Buzzing Bees 

The Z'j have it in this Jackson- 
ville, Fla., family. The 11 son* 
and daughters of Biggs Cox and 
Jutry Jemima Elizabeth Gertrud* 
Hart Cox are: Zadie, Zylphia, 
7ula, Zadoc, 7.eber, Zenobia. 
Zeronial, Zesllie, Zeola, Zero and 
Zelbert. 

---- column ----

Women workers in German 
factories must not be employed 
for handling goods weighing more 
than 33 Ibs. each. 

---- column ----

.CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS. . 

---- column ----

II\IIY CHICK* 

---- column ----

QUALITY KMUJlVti FKH CHICKS 
from I'urliiii Keel flocks, I'.arred 
ROCISH mill \Vliltt- I.rivhorns, brc I 
for meat and ess, blood tested. 
our flocks are rlnidly culled 
J1U.OO i>er hundred. S1K.OU for two 
weeks old. Kelly (.'hick Hatchery. 

Btrrie,' Ontario. 

rnoiiirci-:i:s CM-- THICKS ron is 

yenr. liwrod rocks bred to lay 
umi S. T 1 . \v. LeKhorns liarron 
strain. None but large esss set. 
Rocks and leghorn* us hutched 
H cents, ICock pullets 15 rents. 
l.Klii-rii pullets 18 cents. Kvory 
ehick Is from blood tested breed- 
ers. Satisfaction guaranteed, $1.00 

books your order. .1. 1'. Juhnson, 
tint. 

---- column ----

s MAY, 7c- JCNK. i;>.ic Jfl.V. MIX- 
ed chicks l.PKhorns, Hocks. Hy- 
brids, also ';. 1'ullc'ts, I.t'Khorn 
''."Uriels $l.0 liundrt-d. Kvery 
egg set from n blood-tested breed- 
er on my own farm, (ireen Roc 
Poultry r.-iiin. Wales. Ontario. 

Mil' C.\\ STAKT ItlOUT NOW 
with limy chicks, started chicks. 
pullets. Others arc doing it to 
make- money later. There's n wide 
choice of breeds, crosses, started 
imll.'ts. Prompt delivery. (Turkey* 
avnlliihle for June delivery, order 
now.) llra.v Hati-hi-vy, 130 John 
.V.. Hamilton, Out. 

-.-, i ui:i: CHICKS 

WITH KVKRY 100 PCU.KTS or 100 
mixed chicks ordered, we give 25 
tree chicks. Vullets $1,1.00 to $10.00 
per 100: Mixed Chicks 18.00 to 
$10.00 per 100: Cockerels per 100 
lljjht breeds. $1.50: heavy breeds. 
51.00. Immediate delivery. Ooddard 
Chick II a t;c h e r y. Britannia 

HelKhts. Out. 

i-i.l iim:us- M ITI.IKS 

ISAItfi.VIN l-KICKS. ISATHTIT.S. 
li'ilcts, M i n k s. rui'imee.*. ulr- 
eomtlt ionium, pipe, valves. filUngv. 
Shallow Well elei-ti-lc pump com- 
plete with 30 K.-illon tank. S7l..'i(i. 
InqulrlM wi-lcmned. 1'nikln Supply 
Company. 21S llnrton Sheet 10.. 
Hamilton. Ontario. 

---- column ----

i:\ll.\UST FANS 

---- column ----

KXHAUSvT FANS. NEW CEXEItAL 
lOIectrics, way under wholesale, 
Toronto Mercantile. 29 Mellnda, 

Toronto. 

VKI-:I) ron svi.i-: 

.STOCK fKKl): UUStlEI. AND ONE 
half IKII.', 12c per bay Including 
the bug cooked screeninKS from 
puffi-d wheat and rice, KuvanaKh 
l-'oods< Limited. 3(-9 Sorauren Av- 
enue. Toronto. 

---- column ----

<:iMH.I.M>: 1 SKIIS 

SAVE UASOUNK TO 30',;. OAK OK 
tractor. 'J.'ic brings aimi/.iiiK, sim- 
ple. Inexpensive and Kuurantn-il 
IMthOd, Si hub, Uox L'7I, Calder. 
Sask. _ 

WAM'KO 

---- column ----

SOLDIERS, 

RUB OUT TIRED ACHES 

---- column ----

UAKKI'.S' OVKNS AND MACH1X- 
ery, also rebuilt eiiulpment al- 
ways on hand. Terms arranged 
Correspondence Invited. Hubhard 
Portable Oven Co., 10S Ualhurst 
St.. Tonmto. 

1:1 SIMONS orroirri MT\ 

(;I-:M-:I:AI. STOKK IN KXTUA (KIOD 

farming district. Nc opposition. 
< lean slock, must be sold clue 111 
I, i- i 'i I, (HI .lol'.ann, Owen Sound, 
Onlarin. 

i\\n*. M:W A\D i ! 'SKII 

Miil.'NT I'l.KASANT MOTOKS LTD., 
Toronto's oldest Chrysler, I'lym- 
onlh denlr-rs: three locations. 632 
Mt. I'loasnnt Road. 2010 Yongc- St., 
ii.r.n ivinfoith Avenue. Our Us'id 
Car.- mats i- Hi many friends. 

---- column ----

ISSUE 18 '41 

---- column ----

JSJ Wi; lU'V Hl'NDKKDS 1'IFKHU- 
ent Herbs, Hoots, narks. Write 
Dominion Herb Distributors. L'ept. 
W, ill'.'. Main, Montreal. _ 

l.KtiAI, 

J. N. LINDSAY. LAW OFl'HCK C.Vf- 
itol Theatre Building, St. Thomas, 
Ontario. Special Department for 

farmers collections. _ 

M'ltHKHY STOCK 

l:i(!(!KST $1.00 tiAKDKN! 21 I'KK- 
ennials t. Delphinium.,- Dianthm 
Loveliness, Coneflower, R e ;-: a 1 
Lily. Oriental Poppy. Chrysanthe- 
mum, others: Sugar Maple; Cedar; 
I Shrubs; HBO Seeds. Prepaid. Two 
orders $1.80. DOLLAR Nl'RSKU- 
1IJS, l-'onthlll, Ontario. 

CUAMKIJ NTRSK1MKS. U I l> C. K- 

dale. Sask.. Llliiow, [lonevsucklrs, 

. flowering ugre a, SI.Mi: flowering 

perennial collodion 30. $1.00; Car- 

HKann or A.sparaKU.s three years 

i HO. si,:;.-.. _ __ 
>n:i>i< .vi, 

NATVUK'S I1KIJ- HIXO.VS UtlM- 
t-dy for Uheiimatic rains. Neurit- 
is. Thousands prnisiitK it. Munro's 
I'riiK stun-. :;:;,', Klsjin si.. Ottawa, 
Postpaid $l.ini. 

HAVK VIM <;oiTKK? "AKSOKIIO" 
reduces and remove.". I'riec $5.uO 
per bottle. J. A. Johnston Co.. 171 
Kitm' K.. Toronl x 

MI-: v \v v \ i i M 

r.lOCIN MAKINl! MONKY 1MMKD- 
iately M-IIini; KAMILKX LINK 
from door to door. Our name, is H 
nuarantei! of SKJtVlCK A.\l> SAT- 
ISFACTION. l-:\|>ern-n<-f llnlKM-CH- 
smv. (looil iarnin^;s to haul 
workers. Try 2 months or more 
and ttet your money back for un- 
sold umiils. UK particulars ami 
Fill-no CATAUXII'I-; wilhout ..bli- 
Kiilloir KAMIl.KN. fi7H Si. Clement, 
Mont real. 

---- column ----

orn-% TO 

---- column ----

\\.V\Tl;i> A MOW Kit KOI! (>\|.; 
Ill, isc, Mr. Meoro, :"IK Adel-iidi- 
St. \V., Toronto. 

---- column ----

AN OFFEH TO CYEUV INVENTOR 
List of inventions and full infor- 
mation sent free. The Ramsay; 
Co.. ReBistered, Patent Attorneys, 
^7S Bank Street. Ottawa, Canada. 

VHOl'KHTY KOU SALli 

2,-, i) ACKKS. WITH FINK BRICK 
residence and large outbuilding". 
located in I>undus County, Kastern 
Ontario. Near location of proposed 
new power development: will rent 
or inuht exehanKe for cit> t>roper- 
ty. A. N. Smith. 153 Siiadnn Road, 
Toronto. 

---- column ----

it HI I M VI'ISM M l-'I'i:iti:HS 

;ooi> i:i-:s..ii.\'TiON KVKKV 
sufferer of Rheumatic Pains or 
Neuritis should try Dlxon's Rem- 
edy, Munro's DruK Store. 331 
KlKln, Ottawa. $1.0n Postpnid. 

---- column ----

SNAPSHOTS TO-DAY 
TREASURES TO-MORROW 

Your films are carefully iind scien- 
tifically processed by Imperial, t 
make jure they last. 

6 or 8 i \r..-i 1:1 FILMS '::., 
with beautiful enlargement fre*. 
8 reprints with enlargement 25c- 
Thc.usnnds of U- tiers from satisfied 
customers testify to our superior 
Duality and service. 

IMI'KltlAt l'IHI-1'O SKHVICH 

Dept. 1>. Station J, Toronto. 

i M.K MM;I< !:.<* \V\T\TI-:> 

wio sri'-ci.v I-ASKS AN - P PAY 

hlKhest Market Trices. Further 
particulars apply CutiHdlnn Tro- 
vislon 4: Supply (,'ompany. ll'J 
l-'ront Street Kast. Toronto. 

1 SKI) I 101 HIM. 

MOOKHN. CLl-IA.N I'SED Cl.fiTH- 
IIIR. Uiilie.i'. Men's, rmj Children 
iv car. Lowes' in-ico.-*. .127 Quieu 
K.-ni. Toronto. AKOIU>I wantc d . _ 

WAVI'KII 'I'd I'l l 

---- column ----

FEATHERS WANTED 

MOW AM' I'SKli C.OOt-K AM - 
Ouck, ulno feather beds. Hisne.st 
prices paid. Send particulars tu 
<Juoeii City Feather, 23 Baldwin, 
Toronto. 

---- column ----

Guaranteed 

CAR AND TRUCK PARTS 

Used New 

---- column ----

l\ 1:1:111 n.r MO. 
T(IU>, ro I'.u-l M TS, Hydraulic 
lli.iMs. \\lnchfM. (i< H-rulom, Slurl- 

rm. l i .:..,.,, ( iirbllrrtOrN. Iliullnt. 
r Kvehiinnr Serilee. .lx 
NiKivi'iictiiiii or r. -.mi. i Levy \nt 
I'nrlx, ii. {.i .1.. i.. i. .ni,,. 

---- column ----

* 
I 

---- column ----
---- page ----

---- column ----

*^ 

---- column ----

Presentation of Portrait 

---- column ----

A Portrait of J. S. McLean, Esquire, President of Canada Packers, 
painted by Wyndham Lewis was recently presented to Mr. McLean by 
the employees of the firm to mark the Fortieth Anniversary of his 
entrance into the packing industry. 

Mr. McLean was recently appointed Principal Trade Advisor oi the 
United Kingdom Food Mission to the United. States. The Food Mission 
is part of the British Purchasing Commission now at Washington. Mr. 
McLean has already assumed his duties. 

---- column ----

THE WAR WEE K Commentary on Current Events 

---- column ----

CANADA, UNITED STATES 
COMBINE WAR PROGRAMS 

---- column ----

"It was agreed as a general 
principle that In mobilizing the 
resources of this continent 
each country should provide 
the other with the defence ar- 
ticles It Is best able to produce, 
and, above all, produce quickly, 
and that production programs 
should be co-ordinated to this 
end." Joint statement issued 
at Hyde Park, N.Y., by Presi- 
dent Roosevelt and Prime Min- 
ister King. 

An agreement of momentous im- 
portance in the history of thig con- 
tinent and of vital concern to all 
Canadians was last week reached 
t Hyde Park, N.Y., by the chief 
executive* of the United States and 
Canada, under the terms of which 
tiii> two largest countries ot the 
New World merged their econo- 
mies, to most practical purposes, 
tor to production of war materials 
tor British aid and defense of the 
hemisphere. 

Economies Merged 
In brief, the agreement amount- 
ed to: 1. An undertaking by the 
United State to buy between $200,- 
000,000 and $300.000,000 worth of 
4efene and wax material from 
Canad during the coming year, this 
to help out Canada's unf.avora.ble 
balance; 2. A further undertaking 
oy the United States practically to 
Include In the Leasts-lend arrange- 
ment with Britain all unfinished 
war material which Canada im- 
ports from the United States and 
re-exports or transfers to Britain, 
this making current payments by 
Canada unnecessary. 

Total Union Inevitable? 
Many and far-reaching would be 
the results of such a pact. Numer- 
ous thinking Canadians, taking tha 
long-raaige view, saw in In the 
agreement a big step toward the 
ultimate union of the Dominion 
with the United States Toronto's 
late Goldwiu Smith's dream 
brought to fruition. Total co-oper- 
ation was sure to follow economic 
and productive collaboration, they 
averred. 

But of more immediate conse- 
quence would certainly be a vast 
shipbuilding and armaments manu- 
facturing boom in Canada. Indus- 
trial leaders last week, estimated 
that, with the United States now 
needing many things of which Can- 
ada has a surplus, an employment 
*te.p-up of forty per cent might be 
necessary, drawing rnoro women 
Into industry anil more western 
farmers off the land. 

Over the Border 
The foreign exchange situation 
which for Canada had been grow- 
ing increasingly critical was taken 
care of by the agreement; oue of 
the minor offshoots would be the 
lifting of restrictions on travel to 
the United States by r.itin/llan $Jtl- 
tens. 

Joint Defence 

Two days previous to the Hyde 
Park declaration had ome> the an- 
nouncement from the Permanent 
Joint. Defence Board of Canada and 
the United States, that sfratcev 
plans for the military and navnl 
defence of the eastern and western 
coasts of Canada ami the United 
States had been completed down 
to the minutost 0"! <;]. 

---- column ----

June, Peak Month 
The question most commonly 
d'scussel last week by Washington 
officials was reported to be not 
whether the United States would 
so to wax but WHEN'. Preponder- 
ance of authoritative opinion seem- 
ed '.) bt two-Ui-one that the Unit- 
ed States would get. Into belligerent 
war. The time and incidents pre- 
cipitating It were still uncertain. 
.*onie guessed 30 days, some 60 
duyg, and very few placed the date 
any later. The mouth of June was 
coming to be thought the peak 
month of the war. If Britain could 
hold on till then, United States' 
weight would surely be able at 
that time to help torn the tide. 

No Slackening 

There was a certain amount of 
feeling In the T'nlted States last 
week following the Allied defeat 

---- column ----

In the Balkans that shipment of 
American war materials to Bri- 
tain' might drop off if the admin- 
istration believed itself backing a 
losing cause. But to scotch this 
wave of rumor, President Roose- 
velt at his press conference declar- 
ed that the Axis victory in the Bai- 
kans neither would win the war for 
Hitler and xiussolial nor resuit in 
any slackening on Lease-Lend de- 
liveries. 

* * # 

Semi-Final Round 
That the defeat In Greece wa 
not decisive was the opiulon held 
by most military experts on thig 
continent. Major Georg3 Fielding 
Eliot pointed out that the setbacks 
in the eastern Mediterranean by 
no means meant that Britain was 
losing the war; for the Germans to 
win, he said, the British Isles must 
be conquered. Associated Press' 
Dwltt Mackenzie pointed out once 
again that the Battle of the Bal- 
kans was only a phase important 
but still far from decisive of the 
general conflict. Should Hitler be- 
come master of the entire Mediter- 
ranean, he postulated, he would 
only have copped off the semi-final 
round of the contest with the Batt'.e 
of Britain still to be won. 

Decision In Atlantic 
Writing from Washington, Kirke 
L. Simpson, military expert also 
with the Associated Press, declared 
that it was in the Atlantic that the 
war would still be lost or won. And 
"provided British morale can en- 
dure the strain," he said, "there i 
nothing definite to imply that tht* 
crisis in the Atlantic will come this 
year." Of the same mind apparent- 
ly was Prime Minister Churchill 
when lie said last week that Bri- 
tain was in for an "undoubtedly 
long and formidable war." 
. But no one really could prophesy 
with truth what would happen be- 
fore the end of 1941. Russia and 
Germany might ?o to war and the 
entire world picture would be 
changed. 

* * * 

Six-Nation Pact? 

Things appeared to be shaving 
up according to a new pattern in 
the Far East last week, if the sen- 
sational reports of the> Osaka i Ja- 
pan) MainichI were to be credited 
with any degree of correctness. 
This newspaper stated that a mil- 
itary and naval pact had been con- 
cluded between six nations Unit- 
ed States, Britain. China, British 
India, Australia and the Nether- 
lands East Indies which pooled 
their entire military and material 
resources in the Far East for the 
purpose of strengthening their de- 
fenses a.id opposiug Japan's south- 
ward advance, while protecting the> 
communication lines linking South 
Africa, British India. Singapore, 
Hong Konir, M.inila. Australia and 
the United States. 

Under this pact, which this col- 
umn believes to be largely authen- 
tic, Sir Robert Brooke-Popham, 
Commander-in-chief of the British 
Forces In the Far East, is su-piwsed 
to assume the supreme command 
of the combined land and ah- forces, 
while Admiral Thomas Hart, Com- 
manrter-ln-Chlef of the American 

---- column ----

LIFE'S LIKE THAT 

---- column ----

By Fred Neher 

---- column ----

"5t all started v.hen they tossed the coin for goals!' 

---- column ----

REG'LAR FELLERS New Style 

---- column ----

Asiatic Fleet, la supposed to re- 
sume supreme command of the 
combined naval forces, the head- 
quarters of both being in Singa- 
pore. 

Russia and Germany 
The same paper reported anoth- 
er sensational, if true, development. 
According to it, Russia was de- 
manding the right to ocupy the 
northern Provinces of [ran (Per- 
sia) in order :o protect the Baku 
oil fields, as well as to obtain a 
possible outlet on the Persian Gulf 
iu the event of a German drive to 
the Dardanelle-s, and that to back 
up these demands Russia was con- 
centrating troops around Tiflls. 

---- column ----

VOICE 

OF THE 

PRESS 

---- column ----

CAN PLANT TREES 

Every farmer could plant at 
least 500 trees. That can be done 
some day after a rain when the 
land H not in a fit condition to 
work. 

Farmer's Advocate 

RUNNING OUT 

It is said that German generals 
are taking over the Italian army. 
Apparently either Italy is running 
out of generals or the generals 
art running out of Italy. 

Gait Reporter 
o 

A DIFFERENT LAW 
Down in Gananoque the police 
-.-lumped down on slot machines 
and as a result 18 men charged 
with keeping slot machines, pin 
ball games and punch boards paid 
a total of $1,298.48 in fines and 
costs. It seems there's a differ- 
ent law for slot machines in each 
section of Ontario. 

Amherstburg Echo 

o 

THE WHEAT POLICY 
The disappointment and con- 
cern that die announcement of 
the Federal Government's 1941 
wheat policy has caused through- 
out the Prairie West were inevi- 
table. But they are much more 
acute because of the easy opti- 
mism in regard to the situation 
that has been expressed in recent 
mouths by many who ought to 
have been fully conscious of its 
::.. -les and have been impres- 
sing the painful necessity of ad- 
opting public measures in accord- 
ance with these. 

Edmonton Journal 

---- column ----

The Book Shell. 

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"UP AT THE VILLA" 
Bjr W. Somerset Maugham 

---- column ----

This short novel of a beautiful 
woman's indiscretion and its ef- 
fect on the lives of three men who 
love her presents as enthralling; a 
situation as Somerset Maugham 
has ever created. It is the dra- 
matic story of Mary Panton, a 
widow at thirty, who finds herself 
in a situation which threatens to 
jeopardize her future life and 
happiness. 

The author of "The Letter" 
and "Of Human Bondage," Som- 
erset Maugham is the dean of liv- 
ing novelists; the clarity of his 
style, the perfection of his form, 
the sublety of his thought, havt 
made him an international figure 
in the world of literature. "Up 
at the Villa," so full of his shrewd 
observation of the human animal 
under stress, is a fine example of 
this brilliant writer's mastery of 
his craft. 

The title is borrowed from a 
poem by Robert Browning. 

"Up at the Villa" ... by W. 
Somer*et Maugham . . . Toronto: 
McClelland and Stewart, Publish- 
er. ... $2.00. 

---- column ----

Turkeys on Farms 

Turkeys on Canadian farms to 
the number of 2,715,600, states 
the second bulletin on the De- 
cember 1, 1940 live stock survey, 
showed an increase of 2.8 per 
cent on the 2,641,800 on farms 
at December 1, 11)39. The large 
increase in Saskatchewan from 
880.300 in 193!) to 1,013,300 in 
;:'ii). together with the increases 
of 1.700 in Prince Edward Island 
and SOO in Nova Scotia, offset the 
declines in numbers in the other 
provinces. 

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UNP <* 

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GAINS SEEN FOR AGRICULTURE 
FROM WINE IMPORT LOSSES 

---- column ----

Replacement ci 

foreign wares 

follows trade 

ban 

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Result Was Foreseen 

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fit. Catharines, April 24 Col- 
lapse of French and Italian trade 
with British countries as a result 
of the war promises to bring some 
beneficial results to one branch of 
Canadian agriculture, with na- 
tive-grown grapes finding a 
greater use in the production of 
vermouth. Supplies of Italian and 
French vermouth have been ex- 
hausted and already Ontario ver- 
mouth has taken their place in 
government stores throughout at 
least one province. 

Long-sighted wine producers in 
Canada, it is stated, began the 
purchase of heavier quantities of 
the compound of herbs from which 
Italian and French producers 
made their vermouth. For years 
a small quantity of vermouth had 
been produced in Canada, with 
the result that considerable ex- 
perience had been gained long 
before the need for increased 
quantities was felt. As a result, 
large stocks of the herbs had been 
gathered in Canada, and before 
the ilemand arose Ontario produc- 
ers had begun production of extra 
supplies. 

Vermouth is produced from 
SWOI-T ir dry wines, each native to 
Italy and France respectively. 
Because Canadian grape-growers, 
most!;.- In Ontario, produce grapes 
from which both types of wines 
are made. Ontario growers stand 
ii nefit from the increased pro- 
duction of vermouth. Excellence 

---- column ----

of the Ontario product, it II 
claimed, Is reflected in the readi- 
ness with which Canadian win^ 
connoisseurs have adopted th 
domestic vermouth. Grape-grow- 
ers also claim that this indicatsf 
the extent to which the Ontario 
wiue industry lias gone in iai*> 
ing the standards and improving 
the quality of their wares in re- 
cent years, inasmuch as purcha** 
ers of vermouth were mostly ia 
the class of buyers who ''bought 
imported wines. 

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ENERGY 

for PL AY! 

---- column ----

Serve Their *** 
Favourite Energy 
Food Re&ularlyl 

---- column ----

Bee Hive 
e^ Syrup 

---- column ----

Sarah Churchill Learns Gas Mask Technique 

---- column ----

Wing Commander Hodsoll, Inspector General of Civil Dtienc* 
Services in Great Britain, shows Miss Sarali Churchill, daughter of Th 
Prime Minister., how to don a gas mask in a demonstration of anti-gas 
measures. Top. the first stop is to put the thumbs under the tapes of 
the mask. Centre, t'.ie chin is jutted fnruu.d anu the mask iii'iorl to tht 
face with the thumbs in the tapes. Lower, the mask over the fare. It 
is held in position liy drawing the tapes i>:u'k ir.er the head. 

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By GENE BYRNES 
---- page ----

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frVednesday, April 30, 1941 

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THE FLESHERTON ADVANCE 

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THE 

FLESHERTON ADVANCE 

Published on Collingwood Strtwt. 
Fteshertou, Wednesday of n*ch 
wk. Circulation ovr 1,000. 
i'ru-f in Canada $2.00 per y*r, 
when paid in advance fl.50; in 
V. S. A. |:i 5o per year, when 
paid in advance $2.00. 

F. J. THURSTON, Editor. 

---- column ----

} The Press And The 
i Advertiser 
I 

I The relationship between the newg- 
P..IH-I- and its advertisers is as ini- 

R riant to the newspaper reader as 
is to the publisher. Newspapers 

i' sometimes unfairly accused of 
feeing subservient to the advertisers 
Who provide the revenue upon which 
the newspaper exists. This erroneous 
Impression has been feathered because 
the average person knows that the 
newspaper must hare advertising; to 
exist, and therefore if he happens to 
be of a suspicious turn of mind, he 
concludes that the advertiser must Bet 
the policy of the newspaper. 

Not only is such a suggestion un- 
true, but it is unfair both bo the news- 
paper and to the advertiser. Prac- 
tically every publisher will tell you 
that few merchants ever attempt to 
dictate the policy of the newspaper. 
They must express opposition to 
some stand the newsppier has taken, 
but few would go so far as to threat- 
CD the newspaper with the withdraw- 
al at business, if that policy was not 
changed to conform with the wishes 
of Hie advertiser. The successful 
Merdiant is usually ucesful be- 
O.TIM he is an honourable man, and 
fcw would stoop to the level of 
threatening a newspaper because its 
publisher had different ideas on a 
ftnm question than the advertiser. 

The relationship between the ad- 
vertiser and the newspaper is simil- 
ar to that which exists between a 
merchant and his customer, only ir 
tWs case the publisher is the mer- 
eant and the advertiser the customer. 
The advertiser purchases space in the 
newspaper because he has a story to 
tell the readers of the rmner. He 
tises advertising as a legitimate 
Weans of drawing custom to his 
tore. If the newspaper continues 
to nrovlde the service required and 
adequate returns for the investment, 
the merchant continues to advertise. 
'When he feels he is not petting that 
Talue he oeases to advertise. That, too 
IF the relationship which exists be- 
tween any other merchant and hi? 
customer. So long as the customer 
ferls he is getting good value and 
tervicp from the store, he continues 
to be a customer. When value and 
Service cease he takes his trade else; 
jrher*. 

That, very simple, is the relation- 
Hi ip between the publisher and the 
advertiser. Any suggestion that the 
policy of the newspaper is dictated 
py tne advertiser Is a slander on 

---- column ----

both newspaper and merchant. Best 
proof that the advertisers do not 
dictate policy is the fact that it would 
be almost impossible to find a group 
of merchants in any community 
whose ideas could be so identical that 
they could formulate the policy of 
any newspaper. 

---- column ----

CRUCIAL TESTING TIME 

The crucial testing time for Can- 
adians is drawing closer and closer. 
It won't be long now before most citi- 
zens physical sacrifices far beyond 
and physical sacrifices far beyond 
that asked for up to this moment. 
Previously Canadians have been asked 
to tighten their belts, to roll un their 
sleeves. Soon, the formality of a re- 
quest willbe dispensed with. The 
struggle for self-preservation will 
loom so big that the course of the 
average person will be obvious. 

None who knows the basic charac- 
ter of a Canadian doubts that he will 
fail in the time of crisis. When the 
father and the mother and the grown 
up children wholly realize that they 
must do certain things to save the 
home from destruction, no job, no 
sacrifice will seem too big. 

---- column ----

AN IMPORTANT RULING 

The Ontario Court of Appeal has 
ruled_ that a motor car owner who 
permits another to drive his automo- 
bile while intoxicated is equally partv 
to an offence. This judgment which 
was handed down last week fa believ- 
ed to have established a precedent In 
Canadian jurisprudence. In this par- 
ticular case three of the persons in the 
car were killed and only the owner a 
Windsor jeweller, who was riding in 
th* back seat escaped. The judjre 
ruled that he was equalh' guilty with 
the drunk man at the wheel and sen- 
tenced him to one year determinate 
and six (months indeterminate to- 
gether with a fine of $500.00 or an 
additional five months in event of the 
fine not being paid. 

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BUCKINGHAM 

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Word v.-as received by relatives 
here of the death of Mr. John Cam- 
eron at Tyvan, Sask., on Wed., April 
23rd. Mr. Cameron had been in poor 
health for several years and had un- 
dergone an operation a few dnys be- 
fore his death. Mrs. Cameron (form- 
erly Minnie Hawton) and a grown up 
family are left to mourn. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Armstrong of 
Barrie visited on Sunday at J. T. 
Davidson's. 

We are glad to know Mrs. John 
Brown is able to be up around again, 
after having : been confined to bed 
with a heart attack. 

The grounded airplane has proved 
an attraction for visitors and on Sun- 
day last approximately 300 people 
viewed it during the day. 

Mrs. J. T. Davidson spent a few 
days in Barrie a week ago. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ross Robinson of 
Nottawa and Miss Dorothy Hawkins 
of Toronto were recent visitors with 
Mr. and Mrs. Alf. Hawtcn. 

---- column ----

SPRINGHILL 

A Red Cross meeting was held last 
Wednesday afternoon at the home of 
Mrs. Will Johnson's, when about 12 
ladies were present and completed 
one quilt and some other sewing. 
Owing to the busy summer season 
ahead, it was decided to hold the 
meetings once a month. Mrs. J. Allen 
has offered her home for the May 
meeting, which will be on the fourth 
Thursdav in the month. All ladies are 
asked to try and attend. 

Miss Frances Collinson, our local 
teacher, is now driving the car back 
and forth to school after the winter 
months. 

Miss Ruby Allison and Mr. Russell 
Trousdale of Markdale spent Sunday 
pvening with Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Eagles. 

Trooper Dave Graham of Camp 
Borden spent his week end leave with 
Mr. Jas. Harrison. 

---- column ----

Send in the names of your visitors. 

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Brightenfthe Corner 
Where You Are" 

---- column ----

PAINT UP Paints, Enamels, Varnishes, Turpen- 
tine, Oils, Paint, Brushes. Colors to suit your 
taste; prices to suit your purse. 

CLEAN UP Floor Wax, Polishes, Cleaners, Dust 
Mops, Prooms, Brushes- Paint and Paper 
Cleaners, Scrub Pails. 

FIX UP Roofing, Roof Coating, Plastic Cement, 
Step Ladders, Carpenter's Tools, Lime, Plas- 
ter, Cement. 

Tools for the Lawn and Garden Hoes, Rakes, Lawn 
Mowers, Garden Seeds. 

Watch for our Spring and Summer Catalog. 

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F. W. DUNCAN 

---- column ----

HARDWARE 

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"Blue Coal" 

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Phone 54 

---- column ----

ORANGE VALLEY 

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Morrison of 
Walters Falls spent a day with their 
daughter, Mrs. Gordon Hill. 

Mr. J. Fetch of Barrie visited on 
Saturday with Mr. and Mrs. Fred 
Bown. 

Mrs. Wm. Irving .nd Alice fne&t 
Sunday with Mr. ai.d Mrs. Jack Hill. 

Mrs. Gordon Hill returned home on 
Thursday from Markdale hospital 
with her baby daughter. 

Mr. Robt. Humble, who has spent 
the past winter in this locality left 
Monday morning for Port Dover. 

Mr. Robt. Smith of T ronto is 
spending a few days with his wife 
and family here. 

Miss Thelma Miller is visiting her 
cousin, Miss Dorthy Bo"d. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Littlejohns 
were honoured on their silver wedding 
anniversary. 

---- column ----

Want ads cover and discover a 
multitude of needs. 

---- column ----

The suggestion is now made that 
cities in Britain should turn on every 
possible light at night, instead oi 
trusting to the blackout , the claim 
being that the blackout has been 
somewhat of a failure, while plenty 
of light might prove confusing to the 
raiders. 

---- column ----

To All Stations In 

Western Canada 

SPECIAL BARGAIN 

EXCURSIONS 

Going Dated 
DAILY MAY 17 TO 28, 1941 

Return Limit; 45 days 
TICKETS GOOD TO TRAVEL 

IN COACHES 

Excursion tickets good in Tourist, 
Parlor and Standard sleeping cars, 
also available en payment of slightly 
higher passage fares, plus price of 
parlor or Bleeping car accommodation 
ROUTES Tickets food going via 
Port Arthur, _Ont., Chicago, Iu., or 
Sault Ste. Marie, returning via 
same route and line only. Gener- 
ous optional routings. 
STOPOVERS will be allowed at 
any point in Canac!a on the going 
or return trip, or both, within final 
limit of ticket, on applicatioln to 
Conductor; also at Chicago, 111., 
Sault Ste. Marie. Mich., and west, 
in accordance with tariffs of United 
States lines. 
Full particulars from any agent. 

---- column ----

ROUND TRIP 

Special Rail Bargains 

MAY 2-3 

iffom FLESHERTON to 

TORONTO f 2.15 

HAMILTON $ 2-45 

LONDON $5.00 

BELLEVILLE $5.00 

CHATHAM $ 6.B8 

PETERBORO $4.10 

SMITH'S FALLS $ 7.35 

WINDSOR $7.65 

and other intermediate points, 
fining; Afternoon and evening trains 

May 2; All trains May 8. 

Return Limit: Up to May 5 

('(Hi-nil Ajfontu - Procure DnAger 

CANADIAN PACIFIC 

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.*""! 

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Tfote aae MD Tfaei fa whet ~ 

MARTIN SENOUR 

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': v 

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'"V 

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-USE 

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28 

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100% PURE 
PAINT 

For all outside home paint- 
ing. Gives greater protec- 
[tion and lasting beauty. 

---- column ----

WfcGtoT^" 

l"-ojj /<&! 

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F. G. KARSTEDT 
General Merchant Fletherton- Ont. 

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IjHMHUMIIfflllllllllSI: 

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Suggested Modern 
Color Combinations: 

Body Trim 

358 Old Ivory 188 SbtUHr Grim 
278 Crm 808 Seal Browa 

268 Ivory 74BMaroo 

448 GoUtn Glow 568 Apple Grttn 
KM Apple Gretn 268/vory 

Study your house carefully. Does 
it Mem too high for its length? 
Has it too many gables? Styling 
with Paint will correct such 
defects and bring out id best 
features. 

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"If AVIS NO MUSH MARKS* 

---- column ----

Paints and Enamels 

---- column ----

Color is a dominant factor in today's living, and paint 

" 

---- column ----

, 

color beauty as well as surface protection. To "color-style 
your home" means paint styling it in such a way as to bring 
out its best features and give it a character all its own. 

The Council for Paint Styling, composed of leading decora- 
tors and color experts, have studied thousands of homes 
inside and out. They have developed a new way of using 
and combining paint colors to give homes individual beauty 
and charm. 

Color-styling for bonus is as new M tomorrow! Come in 
and let us tell you about it. Don't just paint your house. 
Color-style it with Flo-glaze Paints and Enamels in the 
latest modem colors! 

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Flo-glue levels out smoothly and evenly, leaving no knub 
mjrki. Dirt his no chance to lodge on this smooth r*'nr 
film. The natural rains wash it clean. 

---- column ----

McKILLOFS HARDWARE 

Flesherton, Ont. 

---- column ----

* 


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ROCK MILLS 

---- column ----

Beautiful weather the past week 
and seeding operations are progres- 
sing favourably. 

Mr. Stanley Campbell *f Wareham 
has been in this neighborhood the past 
tew days ploughing for the farmers 
with his tractor, Mr. John Oaborne 
of Wareham is assisting him. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thus. Aldcorn and 
daughter of Toronto spent the week 
end with Mr. J. A. Foster and Sadie. 

The mill is now in readiness to 
commence sawing on May 1st. All 
the old haruta but two will be back on 
the job, with two men added to fill 
the vacancies. 

Mr. and Mrs. Laurie Russel, bride 
and groom of Toronto were week end 
guests with his parents, Mr. a"d Mrs. 
Walter Russel. Many friends here 
join .in wishing the young couple 
many years of happiness. They will 
reside in Toronto. 

---- column ----

A CANADIAN DAWN 

Following is a poem entitled "A 
Canadian Dawn" composed by Argyle 
Martin, now stationed at Montreal. 
He submitted the poem to The 
World's Fair Anthology of Verse a 
year or so ago and it was accepted 
and published last year. Ho tilso 
submitted one last year which will 
bo published in the noxt volume of 
the 1 W. F. Anthology. He was fortun- 
ate in having both poems accepted 
for publication. 

I 
All is \viant in n deadly calm, 

Not a stir in peaceful land or sea: 
Silence sits on hor mighty throne 

And patiently waits her hour to 
floe. 

The deep blue skies grew bright 

again. 

Illumed by an unseen, piercine; ray; 
Nature's pevrless choir awak'ning 
Sine 1 their matins to a new horn 
day. 

The twinkling sturs put our their 

lights, 
And the moon, her golden dress 

she sheds. 

The morning mist which hung so still 
With its balmy scent from flower- 

isg beds. 

The morning mist which him so 

still 
Slowly lifts, ;uul niigbtv shadows 

die; 

Like a sphere of eternal fire, 
TKt- rrimarin sun creeps into the 
sky. 

The lake is calm from sho> to shore, 
A Silv'ry mirror in forest shade 

The crystal, sparkling dcwdropg cling, 
Like diamonds to every leaf and 
blade. 

Fair Nature lifts her murky robe 
And bathes the world with a rosy 

hue, 

Night fades out like (> cloud of smoke, 

Day has come with its glory nm>\v. 

Argylo'Mar in. 

---- column ----

NEW AND USED 

---- column ----

Farm Machines 

FOR SALE AT COCKSHUTF AGENCY 

---- column ----

IS-Dise MeCorntick Seed Drill 
13-Dis Cockahutt 3ed Drill 
la-Plato Disc Harrow 
Fleury Ridia* Plow 
Hart-Parr Tractors 

---- column ----

M.-H. Side Delivery Rake 

New Renfrew Cream Separators 

Toronto Asphalt Roofing 

Lundy Woven Fence 

Barb Wire 

CJ.L. Fertilizers in stock. 

---- column ----

Eastern Steel Products 

Fertilaton Bwn Tracks 

---- column ----

Steel Roofing 

W. EDGAR BETTS 

Cockshutt Implements - Ffesherton, Ont. 

---- column ----

The usual protest nt the number of 
Quebec divorces going through the 
Senate- niul Commons has boon rcftis- 
terc.l. The province of Quebec is not 
the offender as most of them come 
from the city of Montreal. 

---- column ----

MIMIMMI* 

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MHIIIMIIM 

---- column ----

Economy 


Our Government is asking our citizens to econo- 
mize wherever possible in our daily routine of 
living and functions. We can suggest two ways 
of economy, namely: by delivering your cream to 
the creamery and receiving 1 cent per pound fat 
over truck price, and also making use of our cold 
storage meat lockers, by freezing your own meat, 
which is a big saving on your cost of living. 

MEAT STORAGE 

A $5.00 box for a year w hold approximately 
220 to 25ft lb. meat and you may refill the Box 
often as you wish. You may also place meat in 
storage at the rate of P/ 2 c per Ib. 

; On account of the new government egg regulations 
] we must take more time in grading eggs. We are 
; asking you to co-operate with us by bringing your 
eggs earlier during the day to avoid congestion dur- 
ing open wight. The creamery will remain open each 
Wednesday and Saturday night during the summer 

NOW IS THE TIME THAT THE STORING 
OF MEAT SHOULD BE IN FULL 

PROGRESS. 
Call in to ee us about the storage. 

TliE CREAMERY WILL BE OPEN EACH SATURDAY NIGHT 

Flesherton Creamery & Produce Co. 

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Phone 06 

M Ml M !*' 

---- column ----

Angus Avis, Manager 
---- page ----

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THE FLESHERTON ADVANCE 

---- column ----

Wednesday, April 30, 1941 

---- column ----

HAVE 

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VICTORIA CORNERS 

---- column ----

PLEDGED ALL YOU CAN TO BUT 

---- column ----

WAR SAVINGS 

CERTIFICATES 

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YOU KNOW that Canada's War Effort requires a steady flow 
of money week by week, month by month loaned from th 
savings of her people. 
If YOU HA VENT pledged yourself If YOU HAVE pledged yoorseH 

keep up your pledge. See yoar invest- 
ment grow as the months go by. 
INCREASE the amount you have pro- 
mised to save and invest. And remem- 
ber that, in addition to your regular 
pledged amount, you can at any rime 
buy extra War Savings Certificates from 
your local Bank Post Office or you 
can send your money direct to the 
War Savings Committee in Ottawa. 

---- column ----

ACT NOW ! Canada needs ALL you 
can save and lend. There are three 
ways to pledge: 

1. Ask your employer to deduct a speci- 
fied sum from your salary or wages 
each pay day. 

2. Authorize your bank to deduct it 
each month from your savings account. 

3. Sign an "Honour Pledge" to buy 
Stamps or Certificates for a specified 
amount at regular intervals. 

---- column ----


---- column ----

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Linton and 
Douglas, accompanied bv Mrs. Edith 
Hall of East Linton, spent the week 
end in Toronto. 

We welcomed our new student min- 
ister of Emmanuel College, Mr. Thos. 
Jackson, who preached on this circuit 
on Sunday. Mrs. Jackson and babe 
will be joining Mr. Jackson later. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo Blakey of Toron- 
to visited the former's parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Dave Blakey. 

The ladies of the W. A. held their 
April meeting' in the church Thursday 
last, with the president in the chair; 
14 members were oresent. The roll 
call was answered by relating an 
event which took place after the re- 
surrection o<f oar Savior. Papers 
were read by Gertrude Montgomery 
on "Summer Schools'* and by Mrs. 
Chas. Moore on "Preparing oar part 
after the war," by Nellie McGung. 
Birthday gifts were distributed. Mrs. 
Gallagher had two beautiful o^iiVt 
tops on display and for sale, which 
had been pieced by herself and Mrs. 
Albert Stinson. 

The Y-P.S. met at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Lawrence Irying, between 
Corbetton and Sbelburne. They will 
resume their meetings in the church 
this week and continue each week 
during the summer months. 

(Too Late for Last Week) 

The beautiful weather has cert- 
ainly taken a chin and is blowing 
terrible today, Monday and Tuesday. 

Mr. Wm. Stinson of Port Rowan 
visited his brother, Mr. Albert Stin- 
go n last week. 

The buzzing bees are very busy, 
but are nearly done in our neighbor- 
hood. 

Last Thursday evening as some 
of the younK lads were placing fte 
sawing 1 outfit at Mr. Angus McCaul- 
eys they saw the silver fox persnm- 
ably belonging to Mr. Louis Sheardon 
of Wareham, sitting on the Mr. Mc- 
Cauleys gangway, They tried to 
catch it but Mr. POT enjoyed his free- 
dom too much and ran away up to 
Ern Stinsons where he doped in to a 
building: but found a small hole 
through which he escaped and said 
eoodbye to his pursuers. 

We were very sorry to bid fare- 
well on Sunday to Mr. and Mrs. Pat- 
terson our minister and his wife. 
Mr. Patterson preached a very im- 
pressive sermon in farewell. 

---- column ----

ORIGINAL A/V/Vl/Al 

---- column ----

ON 

---- column ----

Save 
NARVO! 

---- column ----

'GALLON 

---- column ----

Publish*! by tbt rr Saving, <* 

---- column ----

Ottawa 

---- column ----

up youfc ffledy 

---- column ----

/ 

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. . . 

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INCREASE YOUR REGULAR INVESTMENTS IN 

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: 

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. 

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WAR SAVINGS CERTIFICATES 

---- column ----

We read where a robber in West 
ern Ontario, "was surprised when at 
his work and made a hurried exit.' 
Reading our book "What To Do In 
An Emergency** we concluded tliat 
the robber did the right thing. 

---- column ----

A great man is probably one whs 
lives in the pleasant memory of his 
friends after he is dead. 

---- column ----

When your dealer's store closes Monday, 
May 5th, NARVO goes back to its reg- 
ular price for ar Qt ^ |<>r year. Don't miss 
<ht annual opportunity to serve. 30 beau- 
tiful Colors to choose from. NABVO flows 
freely, dries quickly, covers in one coat 
and is odorless. 

--.. StaJan of Murphr Pond 

---- column ----

For Sale by 

OSPREY & ARTEMESIA CO-OPERATIVE Co. Lid. 
FLESHERTON. ONTARIO 

---- column ----

INSURANCE 

---- column ----

Authorised ageat for 

GERMANIA FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

also All LJBS of 

CAR INSURANCE, BONDS, etc 

Se HERB CORBETT 

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Phone Dundalk 44 r 21 

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Proton Station, OnL 

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. 

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CEYLON 

Miss Elsie Fiaher of Toronto spent 
the week end with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Geo. Fisher. 

Miss Agnes Macphail was a speaker 
at the Community Life Conference, 
Bracebridge, Saturday, and also 
poke in Toronto Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. K. Goleman of Lon- 
don were visitors the latter part of 
the week at J. F. Collinson's. 

Mr. Percy Hemphill had had the 
hydro installed in his store and 
dwelling. 

Mrs. A. S. Muir returned home 
on Saturday after spending the winter 
in Toronto. 

Messrs. Bill and Keith Cairns 
accompanied Miss Catherine Cairns 
to Toronto on Sunday. 

Messrs Melville Hunt and Paul Gil- 

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lespie of Gait and Mias Maltby of 
Kitchener spent the week end with 
the former's parents. 

Mr. Stewart Muir of Oahawa was 
home for the week end. 

Miss Basel Oliver returned to To- 
ronto on Monday after spending the 
week end with her grandparents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Joseph Oliver. 

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Spring turns the thoughts of some 
to love and others to poetry. To 
illustrate here is a couplet we heard 
last week: "Spring is here, the grass 
ri, I wonders where the flowers is." 

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The only thing that can be said in 
favour of overly tight shoes is that 
they take your mind off the rest of 
your troubles. 

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NO WA/T/NG/ NO DELAY! 

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GET THE TIRES YOU 

NEED Today! 

WE HAVE YOUR SIZE 

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M 

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COME IN AND 

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THE 

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'*> 

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You don't have to buy the tiros 
you need sight unwwnt You can 
ee and get thea* big-mileage, low- 
priced Goodyeara at our place 
today. We're ready to put them on 
your car without dlay, without 
fuaa or muss on your part. And 
we'll mount them correctly. 

Goodvoor Pathfinder ha* all theie 
quality feature* for long service 

CENTRE-TRACTION TREAD 

TWIN PROTECTOR CORD PLIES 

NEW SUPERTWIST CORD 

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D. McTAVISH & SONS, Flesherton 

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PRICEVILLE 

A splendid service in celebration 
of the Paying of the Mortgage will be 
held in St. Andrew's Church, this 
Sabbath, May 4th, at 11 aja.. The 
mortgage will be burned at the ser- 
vice and addresses delivered by Hec- 
tor McLean, Donald Ttewart and 
others. Everybody is welcome to 
attend this service. 

Cream of the West, Purity of 
Robin Hood Flour in 98 ft. bags for 
12.96 at Karstedt's. Priceville. 

Mrs. Jos. McJKee, who has spent the 
past three months in Markdale hos- 
pital, returned and is at the home of 
her sister, Mrs. Aldcorn. Her many 
friends here are glad to know that 
she is improving. 

Mr. and Mrs. Caleb Marshall, To- 
ronto, spent the *vtrk end at Mr. 
Hector McLean's. 

The Y.P.S. is holding the weekly 
meeting: Monday evening at the horn* 
of Mr. Allie McLean. 

Messrs. Donald and Stewart Carson 
and Bert Watson of Toronto visited 
Tuesday at the formers' home. 

Mrs. Mary Macdonald returned on 
AVednesday to the home of her par- 
ents at Swinton Park, after spending 
the past month with her sister. Mrs. 
A. L. Hincks. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. McLellan of 
Niagara Falls spent a couple of days 
at the home of Mr. D. Campbell. 

Mr. J>)hn L. McDonald of Ottawa 
visited recently with friend? here. 

Miss Mabel Adajju. F'.esherton, 
spent the week end with Miss Ber- 
nice Carson, 

Reeont visitors at the home of A. 
L. Hincks were: Mr. and Mrs. Wm. 
Hay and Marie of Swinton Park. Mr. 
and Mrs. Chas. Tucker. Thelnxa and 
Gorald, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Calder and 
Larry of Fairbairn. Mr. and Mrs. A If 
Hincks and Marilyn and Miss Almtda 
Hineks of Toronto. 

Mr. Dick Oarson of Guelph spent 
the week end at hi? parental ho>me. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold McKeehnie 
of Durham visited the first of the 
week at the home of A. L. Hincks. 

Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. 
Ear! Seigner (nee Willa MacCuaig) 
of Walkerton on th arrival of a 
baby boy. 

Mr. Murray McMillan of Hamilton 
visited recently at his home. 

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How to 

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WOOL ONOWERS ORGANIZATION 

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IT PAYS TO MARKET 

ON A GRADED BASIS 

Obtain Sacks and Twine from 

LOCAL LIVE STOCK TRUCKERS 

or direct from 

CANADIAN CO-OPERATIVE 
WOOL GROWERS LIMITED 
217 Bay Street - Toronto 

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in Service Costs 

en Your Truck 

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D. McTAVISH & SONS, FLESHERTON, Ont 
H. Grummett, Dundalk, Assoc. Dealer 
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Pledge for War Savings 

"SALADA 

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TEA 

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Keeping 
Company . . 

Adapted from the 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

Picture 

by 
Lebbeus Mitchell 

Copyright 1940 Ly Loew't Inc. 

SYNOPSIS 

The Harry C. Thoma* family, 
father, mother and three daugh- 
ter*, is the typical American fam- 
ily In a town of about 15,000 popu- 
lation. Harriet, aged nine, the 
youngest, is independent and ven- 
turesome with an enormous appe- 
tite for ice cream. She overhears 
her sister Mary rehearsing, in front 
of the bathroom mirrorr her reply 
to a prospective proposal of mar- 
riage, and of course spills the beans 
to her mother. Listening at the 
.hot air register upstairs, Harriet 
everhears her parents' conversa- 
tion on the subject of Mary and 
her two rival beaux Ted Foster 
nd Jim Reynolds, both of whom 
are salesmen at the Hellman Auto 
Agency. Harriet calls up each beau 
In turn and makes him a business 
proposition; in exchange for ice 
cream to be brought to her that 
evening, she tells that Mary has 
spent an hour before her mirror, 
primping in case a certain young 
man should happen to call that 
evening. 

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CHAPTER TWO 
Whui Coronf-t sedan parked 
iii front of the Thomas home that 
evening, a basket lowered from an 
upstairs window hit the caller on 
the In-, iii as lie climbed tho nte.ps. 
"PssC" whi-pi-i-id Harriet. ''Put 
ray ice cn-iim in the basket." 

It wa the ilismayi-d voice of 
Jim Reynolds that answered. "I'm 
sorry. I'll send you two gallons to- 
morrow." 

The door opened and Mr. Thorn- 
H addrefised the caller Jovially: 
"Well, well! Jim Reynolds. This 
to a surprise. Mary, here's Jim." 

"Dad. don't you ever welcome 
wiyliody without saying this a 
surprise?" 

"Not Jim Reynolds I don't. Nor 
Ted Foster. \Vh**n it's Jim I'm isur- 
prle<l that It's not Ted -- and 
when it's Ted I'm surprised that 
it's not Jlru. Does that answer your 
question?" 

"I'm sorry I asked," responded 
Mary. "Como in, Jim." 

Another Coronet sedan |>iikl 
by the sidewalk. Again the banket 
was lowi-red and dangled In front 
of the e<-i>iid caller. 

"Ted! Put the Ire cream In the 
baket." - 

"Sorry, they were all out of pla- 
Urhln, llarriM." . . 

"Then put Hit- vanilla or what 

VM - V.MI'VK (lot Illi'l-c III till- IMS 

tot" 

"Supply Your Own!" 
"This IK sumo candy for M:iry. 
I didn't think yon wanted liny fla- 
vor but i>l-l:it hio. I'm sorry." 

"You c-imld have li<ii just HH 

forry irni brought some chocolate." 

"Ilai.ii t. I'll- plume from insi.lt- 

lllld llMVe Hutu Ki-IHl Up .sollle i 'me 

date." 

"You'll di no Mich tiling! Sonie- 

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Stops Home Fires Burning 

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.',- li, : , ./lail Ilrli h fire fight- 
er pictured here; and hundreds 
like him hold Na/i dent ruction 
down by .snuffing. incendiary 
bombs as soon a* they're 

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times my father it> very peculiar 
..limn my business transactions." 
Mr Thomas, who had been at- 
traced by voices outside the door, 
stepped Into view. 

"To bed, young lady! When I 
raised your allowance you were to 
supply your own ice cream." 

"If you asked me,-" said Harriet 
plaintively, "I think this is a dirty 
trU-k to play on a child!" She slam- 
med the window shut. 

"Well, well, Te<l. This is a sur- 
prise. Come on In." 

Ted and Jim were not very much 
surprised at encountering each 
other in the Thomas living room, 
but there was no cordiality in tho 
civilities they exchanged. Mr. 
Thomas was trying to help enter- 
tain the two guests, when his wife 
called him upstairs. He entered the 
bed room hitching/up his trousers. 
"It looks like Mary has made- 
up her mind," said Mrs. Thomas. 
"You're wrong. Chief. No girl 
has two boys around when her 
mind's made up unless she's 
thinking of bigamy." 

Is it necessary to keep hauling 
at your pants, Harry?" 

"It is if I want to keep my under 
wear up. There's no buttons on 
them. Mary's not going to get any 
proposal with both Ted and Jim 
down there." 

"So you're going down to make 
It three!" 

"Nil, I'm going down to maK>- it 
on-." t 

Mary and Her Beaux 
Mary and her beaux were ex- 
changing trivialities when her fath- 
er re-entered. He introduced the 
subject of drawers with missing 
buttons and at Mary's protest, came 
fo the point. 

"All right, Mary. I can talk about 
other things. Jim, what does a 
sedan like the two outside sell 
for?" 

"Why. for JSi'-'.'iS f.o.b. Detroit." 
Mr. Thomas allowed sudden In- 
terest to appear In his voice. "Run 
me around the block in one . . Oh, 
i-onie on, Jim. this is biwiiipse." 
Jim arose nicely to the halt. 
"Business Is nine to six for any- 
body but your father, Mary. Be 
vight back." 

A moment of i-niburrassr-d sil- 
now followed the departure of Mr. 
Thomas and Jim. 
"Mary," said Ted. 
"Yen?" 

"Do ... do yon like steak?" 
"Do I like what?" Mary all but 
Rasped. 

"Steak. S-t-e-a-k. Do you like 
blink?" 

"No. Not particularly. Why?" 
"I ... I was just wondering," 
nald Ted In a squelched voice. After 
a silence he began again: "Mary." 
"Yes?" 

"Thin is a very nice swing." 
"It's ajl right," she answered In- 
differently. 

"No. This IK a special swing. A 
fellow rould do a lot worsw than 
sipord Ills whole life on swing 
like this." 

"Hill win-re would you eal?" 
"I ... I meant It would bo awful- 
ly nire to be on t.hls swinR wh( n- 
,-vi i- yon are In It." 

"I wish . . . You know what I 
wish Mary?" 

"What, Ted?" Her voice was mi- 
eoiiraglng. but liis spirit quailed. 
"Well, iih . . Ymi think li's gel- 
lillK' lute?" 

"No. Ted. Wii.il were you u<>inu 
to -ay?" 

Ted Proposes 

"I tfiie-s 11 lot of marriages don't 
MI, r, >i-d nowadays." 

"I grefs H |.it of iiiiii-i-iaRts didn't 
QCMed In the "'d days either." 

"Take me, for Instance, Mary. 
As a husband I can't sre myself 
for dust. Anvbodj who'd marry mo 
would be making a terriiblo mis- 
lake. If I ever asked n girl mid 
she wouldn't marry me, she'd hr 
right." 

"If n nirl married you and 
watm'l happy, she'd havo mostly 
herself to bbime." 

Thai bolstered Ted's coiir.i;-,e. 
".Mnry. I love yon and wiml In 
marry you." 

"1 do!" said Mary instantly. 
"Whal?" said Ted. tiikeii aback. 
"Vi K 'I' 1 'I- hon-sily and truly." 
"I Iti > you more Ihnn ... I 
lovn yon ... I love yi>ii, Mnry." 
"I love you Ted." 
Tlielr lips in el . . . well, there 
wan mi one to In ep count o' how 
many Mini t, When Mr. Tlumi'is re- 
tinned to the pi.rch alonp, they 
uprnng up from the swing. 

"Jim (1io\e me around (lie block 
nnd then he drove me around (lio 
next block," suid Mr. Thomas. "I'm 
.iffnild imiybe I WHS kind of obvious. 
I K<>t n nut inn he e-ninht on around 
th tbirtieili block." 

"Ted wauls to nee yon about 

ROmeUitiiK," ...ud Alary .nnl retrrnt- 

cd into tin- house, closing the door. 

Mr. Thinnus looked nt t.hfl eni- 

hnrrttsscd young man for pome 

---- column ----

time. Then he Mnlled: "What's on 
your iiiiud?" 

"I . . I just thought we'd have a 
little chat." 

Mr. Thomas made further efforts 
to put Ted at his ease, and at 
loi:gth Ted blurted out: "I ... 1 
guess it's kind of a. tturprieti to 
you Mr. Thomas, iny wanting to 
talk to you like this. Well, the 
reason I came here , . . Mr. Thom- 
as, I'd like ; i.j*rry your daugh- 
ter." 

Mr. Thomas was extreme ly sur- 
prised. "Let me get this straight. 
Did you say you wanted to marry 
my daughter?" 

"I sup-pose It may sound a little 
funny to you, my wanting to mar- 
ry Mary I mean, I guess anybody 
that didn't want to marry Mary 
would be crazy. Only . . ." 

"Are you by any chance in love 
with her, young man?" 

"Yes, sir." 

"Eavesdropping, Mary?" 

"And is she In love with you?" 

"I ... I think so." 

"Ma.ybe we'd better find out for 
sure. Mary!" Instantly the door 
was opened. "Mary, have you been 
eavesdropping?" 

"Yes. father." 

"Well, here's a big situation I 
need your advice about. This young 
man says . . . but what am I telling 
you for? You heard wjiat he said." 

"Isn't hp Vondfrful, Dad?" said 
Mary, going to Ted and taking 
his hand. 

"Well, what do you want me to 
do. Mary? Dismiss the young man 
with a reprimand. Notify his near- 
est relatives and 

"No, I think I'll marry him, be- 
cause I'm in love with him." 

"Okay. Bless you, my children," 
said Mr. Thomas sincerely and left 
them together. 

After an interval: "Ted, what 
will your mother say?" 

"Anybody that didn't want me 
to love you would be crazy." 

"Xo mother ever thinks a girl 
Is good enough for her only san." 

"Not my mother! I'm going to 
tell her atbout us tonight." 

There w;.s one subject th.it Mary 
iil'i'roached gingerly. "Some people 
nnybe won't think our Retting mar- 
ried Is tnch a wonderful idea. Ted, 
wi-:v you . . . were you ever en- 
gaRi-d to An-.isiasia Atherton?" 

"Xo. I never asked Anastasia to 
marry me. Why. Mary?" 

"I wanted to be sure you weren't 
still a little bit in love with her." 

"I'm not. Not even a little bit . ." 

Mary said quickly: "I don't want 
to know any more! \Yr'vt brought 
that subject out in the open and 
can dismiss It once and for all. 
Cood nlnht, Ted." 

"flood night. Mary." 

"I'm Engaaed!" 

As Mary entered the house, Ev- 
elyn, a bathrobe over her night- 
gown, exclaimed; "Mary! I've been 
waiting sinco 10.30! You're en- 
gaged!" 

Still a bit dazed. Mary replied. 
"I guess ... 1 guess I am. I'm . . . 
I'm engaged!" 

I,i^hls were flashed on and Har- 
riet lu her high-necked, long sleev- 
ed nightgown, flashed down the 
stairs greatly excl'.ed. She grabbed 
Mary. 

"I listened at the window! I Hilnk 
I caught pneumonia, but it's worth 
it!" Tears camn into the young 
girl's eyes. "H was the most beau- 
tiful thing 1-ever heard!" 
(To Be Continued) 

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Your Wallpaper 
Need Cleaning? 

Bulges, Blisters and Tears 
May Be Simply Remedied 

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Rrnaxo spots can be taken nit 
wallpaper by HpmidInK over the 
iii'l'i ird area n gnft paste ni:>do 
f t'iillor'8 earth and either carbon 
l>-tei.ii-h)oride or benzine. It' tho 
former is used, the fumes should 
not be inhaled. 

The panle must be left on the- 
vv;ill until It is entirely white and 
dry and then it must be brushed 
off. imlng it .'ii brush. 

If tho wullpaptM' IB loose lu spots, 
ordinary library paste, well w.iUi 
ed. will fix It up. Or ri\mihir wall- 
p. !'ir paste may ho obtained at 
nust hardware and paint, stores. 
PATCHING MATK1UAI, 

Hiilnes and blisters In wallpaper 
CUM ho fixed by insi-riiiiR thinned- 
out wallpaper pastr behind the 
lnil^i> \villi a small syringe. Then 
nil .1 small sill at one end of the 
In. Ire and flatten It with a roller, 
lii- sure to remove Immediately any 
paste Hint oti/es out. 

If thf> p.iper needs imlohli.j;. ilie 
paieli r'uinld lie i irn rather I ban 
rill Illis lo ln-.iive that the p.lk'll 
Will he properi> i> '1 1-1 : nine. Paste 
should tllell \>f n|iplit-d to I lie liiICK 
of the p;,h-liiiiK piei-o. If the patch- 
iiiK iiiiitt'i'l.il i-- i ii'i-i'iilly lorn out 
anil if tin- di-sl^n is properly mateh- 
i-d. i :ie patch vvi'l In* barely visilile. 

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Finds U.S. People 
Need Bigger Hats 

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Three Ways To 
Lose Your Wife 

---- column ----

Dr. A. L. Porterfield, who 
conducts a class on marriage 
and family life at Texas Chris- 
tian University, listed the fol- 
lowing "sure" wayg to got rid 
of a wife: 

1 Learn to flick cigarette 
ashes on the floor with maxi- 
mum damage to the rug. 

2 Never have fewer than 
four rusty razor blades scat- 
tered on the bathroom floor. 

3 Come home late for din- 
ner at least three times a week. 

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A Few Flowers 
Liven Up Room 

Here Are Some Simple Ways 
v of Doing Flower Arrange- 
ments That Will Brighten 
Your Home 

A few flowers in a simple vase 
do wonders for a room. They can 
add the spot of color, the light 
touch, the centre of attractiou 
which the room, no niatter how 
well arranged, may lack. 

LEAVES OX TULIPS 

For brightening ui> living rooms, 
this is a grand spring arrangement 
for a piano or table. It Is done 
with one dozen tulips. 

You will want another holder for 
this and a vase abou 10 inches high. 
Do not 'take tho leaves off the tu- 
lips. They are wed as foliage and 
give a color contrast. 

Be sure to do your arraug!:ig 
before you put your flowers in the 
vase. Xlne of the tulips should be 
cut to vary gracefully in height 
above the vase, and the remaining 
three at differeut heights inside. 
Open the petals of the lower flow- 
ers. That is a professional touch 
to cover the' holder, add color and 
give an artistic effect. 

An additional hint about tulips 
to keep them frosh overnight, wrap 
the-m in wet ncw-vaptr. put them 
back in water, and then place them 
iu a cool room. 

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GAY KIDDIE FROCK 
AND CAPE 

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Table Talks 

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By SADIE B. CHAMBERS- 

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I'niletl Slates eit i/eiis are de- 
vt'lopinpf mnre xray mat tor ht-- 
leen tin- ears. I Ir. Ales Hrd- 
lickn, Sniith.Mdiiiin Institution nu- 
bhrOpQlOfUt, repoitril last \\eek 

that lunisiireiiieiits show skulls of 

moilerii Anierieans nro broader 

I than thos of earlier "enenUions. 

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By ANNE ADAMS 

An Anne Adams Sprint; special, 
this oasy-to-mnke frock anil cane 
iirt- just what your younifsfor 
needs to sec her through tho sea- 
son. The diTsa is in simple pan- 
elled style nice in a checked fa- 
bric to show off the hins side 
panels. The neckline U tu-'r'.iilin';-- 
ly .t|Uaved and there are front 
and back yokes tti.it \ HI may h:-.ve 
in spirited eoiuruM \\iiii tlio pcvky 
puflVd slee\es ti> inati-h. Or lisp 
one of those colorful new military 
or naval prints. You'll find the 
javnuy cape so simple to cut i\nd 
stitch, for it's in just four pat- 
tern parts with no side scams. 
Order your pattern now and 
fini.-h this ensemble in time to 
uroi-t robin redbreast! 

Pattern 4715 is available in 
children's sizes, 2, 4, (i, 8 and 10. 
Size 0, dress, takes 2Vj yards 35 
Inch fabric and 1 a i yards lace 
edging; cape, l'i yards 6-1 inch 
fabric. 

Send twenty cents (UOc) in 
.coins (.stamps cannot he accept- 
ed) for this Anne Adams ./atler'i. 
Write plainly size, name, luldivs-. 
and tlyle number, 

Send your orde' 1 to Anne Ad- 
ams, Room rJT., 715 We-t AdehiHe. 
St., Toronto. 

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Request Recipes 

Firstly, I have had requests for 
two recipes not; given with last 
week's menu One the whole 
"Wheat Muffins" and the other 
the "Date Loaf." These requests 
reminded me that a few others 
have accumulated so it gives me 
great pleasure to repeat the fol- 
lowing: 

Whole Wheat Muffin* 

& cup butter 
1 cup brown sugar 

1 egff 

1 cup sour milk 

1 scant teaspoon soda 

2 cups v:ho!e wheat flour 
Cream butter and sugar thor- 
oughly, add well beaten egg. Beat 
together until creamy then add 
sour milk into which has^ been 
stirred the soda. Lastly adcl gra- 
dually the whole wheat flour. 

For variations Add a dash of 
nutmeg or Vi cup chopped dates 
added last. Others prefer no 
seasoning or fruit but U cup chop- 
ped nuts (also added last) Oc- 
casionally just for a little extra by 
adding all three. 

Date Loaf 

1 cup chopped "dates 
$i cup boiling water 
'.i teaspoon baking soda 

1 egg 

2 tablespoons melted butter 
'-'., cup granulated sugar 

1 cup white flour with Vz cup 

whole wheat flour or 
Ite cups white flour 
1 teaspoon baking powder 
'u teaspoon salt 
*i cup walnuts, broken 
Place chopped dates in a bowl 
and add boiling water and baking 
soda; cool to lukewarm. Add 
sugar, beaten egg and melted but- 
ter beat vigorously. Sift flour, 
measure, add salt and baking 

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Infant Deaths 
Show Decrease 

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Rate Per Thousand Births In 
Dominion Down to 46 Com- 
pared With 53 

---- column ----

Infant mortality in Canada show- 
ed a marked decline during the 
third quarter of 1940, compared 
with the rate during the corres- 
ponding period in 1939, the Do- 
HIM". >ii Bureau of Statistics report- 
ed iu a preliminary quarterly re- 
view of vita! statistips. 

The rate was 46 per 1,000 live 
births, compared with a rat* of 
53 in the third quarter of the prev- 
ious year. Deaths of infants under 
one year numbered 2,883 compar- 
ed with 3.12S. 

HOJIK MATERNAL DEATHS 

Stillbirths amounted to 1,613, 
2.5 per cent of all births, as against 
1.528 aud a rate of 2.5 p.n- cent. 

Tho live birth rate advanced to 
22.0 pe-r 1.000 population during 
tile period from the 20. S level of 
tli.- third quarter of 1939. Live 
births numbered 63,242, compared 
with 69,252 and deaths totalled 
25,155 with a rate of 3.7 per 1.000 
population compared with 24,101 
and a rate of 8.5. 

Tliore wore 218 maternal deaths 
as compared with 213 and the rate 
was 3.4 as against 3.H nor 1,000 
livn births. 

l>u ting tho period it ere were 44,- 
606 marriages, giving a rate of 

15.5 us ag:iins: SIM'S? and a rate of 

11.6 In the third quaru-r of 1939. 

---- column ----

Many Are The 

Services of Salt 

Throw s:-.!t on the soot that has 
just fallen on' the cairtet, and it 
will prevent, ii from making stains 
as you swoop it up. Tour salt on 
to ink if you spill it, and it will 
make the stain ea.-ii i 1 ::> remove, 
as it laps up i|i'.iU- a lot very 
quickly. Salt and \inegar is an 
excellent tannin remover; try it 
on your I'lidly-suiined toaoup*. 
Sprinkle salt on the carpet before 
;, >ui sweep it; it brightens tho col- 
ors and heips to keep moths away. 
Stilt added to your flower water 
will keej) it fivh and help.s ;'u- 
cut flowers to attain n ripe- old 
iigo. Salt on a damp cloth re- 
moves i-ijji; stains from eji.v .s-vuns. 
Soak your new broom in salt 
\vntor for a few hours >>i-t\>i 
inir. and tfcey will not only "sweep 
clonn,'' luit sweep longer without 
soft. 

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Buying a Chicken? 

---- column ----

When inspecting a 
pi . to purchase, press tlio end 
of tho broast bones to sec if a 
fowl is young. If the breast uono 
is flabby and soft, the bird '.viM 
bo lovely for frying, grilling, or 
rousting;. If the breast lione is 
broken, have nothing to do with 
the bird and be careful of the 
poulterer who tried to sell it to 
you, too. If the bono is hard, the 
btVil is suitable for boiling-, but in 
this case always chooso n whi'.o 
fowl with white K".' they lire 
far the best for boiling. 

---- column ----

powder and then sift three times. 
If using part whole wheat floia- 
Sift baking powdev and salt .-. i;n 
white flour and add whole wheat 
'flour last. Lastly, add waJnuts 
and heat well. 

Pour into well greased luaf pan 
or 2 baking powder tin* (1 Ib. 
size). Bake in moderate 0vrn 350 
degrees for 45 minutes m- steam 
for 1 hour and 15 minute" Turn 
out on wire rack and coil before 
cutting. 

Pineapple Layer Cat* 

% cup butter 

1 cup sugar 

2 well beaten eggs 

2 cups flour 

U teaspoon salt 
4 teaspoons baking (Mnvlur 
1 1 cup pineapple syrup 

3 stiffly beaten egg yui'ie- 
Creara butter and sjjjrar to- 
gether until light. Then add egg 
yolks. Mix and sift flour salt 
and baking powder. Ad*j altern- 
ately with pineapple syrup 
(flour). Fold in egg white*. 
Bake in layer cake pana m mod- 
erate oven 20 to 25 minu.tos. Pur 
pineapple icing between "uud on 
top of cake. 

Pineapple Icing 

2 egg whites 

2 cups sifted powdered Migar 
a i cup well-drained crwshed 

pineapple 

Beat egg whites to stiff froth. 
Add the powdered sapr.r and 
crushed pineapple. Beat w II and 
add the additional powdered sugar 
until mixture holds its stipe. 

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letter* (ruin inlcrvxlrd rrnifrrx. She 
l.i |)len*fd lu receive n ,->i.iui* 
on luiiltvi for her column, unit In 
even ready to lixtcn to j-uur "pel 
peeve*. " ItetjueKt* for reHi>e* ar 
lieclul iiienu<4 nr- ID order. Aitilren* 
yuiir Inter* to -Mini mile U. ' ! -m- 
bern, 73 Weal Adelulilr M... To- 
ronto. 1 ' Send Mumped, M-ir-.-yii ,rl 
envelop* if you wish n r< ;* 

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Begin Attack Now 
On Clothes Motih 

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Combine Houseclea- '-.-.: With 
Extermination Jobs 

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Clothes moths and carpet 
beetles may cause damage io furs, 
woollens, and other fabrics of 
animjl origin during any <e:i30ii 
of the year, but the greaU-t loss- 
es from their activities occur dur- 
ing the summer. Accordingly, 
suitable precautions ebbutd be 
taken as soon as possible in the 
rpring, especially when winter 
clothing is being put .-> v ;ind 
will not be used again Jrr 5i>me 
time. 

HOW TO STORK CLOTHES 

According to information issued 
by the Division of Entomology, 
Science Service, Dominion De- 
partment of Agriculture, '.lathing-, 
blankets, and other articta sub- 
ject to damage should W "thor- 
oughly brushed or be well leaned 
before being stored awny during 
the warm weather. following 
this, they may be placed m "boxes 
or trucks made us mot'n-tipUt and 
gns-tight ns possible t>y sealing 
all cracks with adhesive f.iue. To 
remove any danger of iuftmtatjon 
scatter about one pound dl either 
fresh naphthalene flak.-i IT para* 
dichlorobcnzene ciystals in each 
large trunkful of clothes ;uJ be 
sure that the lid is cl--v.l tightly. 
These products can 'ie beOi-fct at 
any drug store. 

SKARCH OUT I.K'/KinfMtf 
FLACKS 

The larvae of clot'ics mf'tli^ and 
carpet beetles may dovolrp in 
many out of the way i>!aov <| uch 
as inverted lamp globct, Mruace 
air shafts, floor era-? Hi. Luhind 
baseboards, and even i:> tii,- mend- 
ing basket. DijcaAi- .1 -lutbes 
and furnishing:, left \\- IK base- 
ment or attic are ai? > \ fi--.|>ient 
s urce of infestation. A p-Mwilical 
housc-de.nnirig, which tah'.^ into 
account all these and similar likely 
b'.vo iinj; places, is one of the 
most effective control iniiiMires. 
Rugs should be cleaned on both 
sides. Where availablo. & y: uum 
cleaner i< a v.iliu'.bV r.'d in doing 
a thorough job. 

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Cats With 

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In luvlu'.-^.'r, N'.Y., \.-hi:> three 
of William (.'a'.'.ahan's kids came 
down with nit'ii-MJ. i!:e:r t" o cats 
'it them t-M'. 

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BETTER PAY IN 
RADIO AND WIRLJ.ESS 

Knrol now in Full fc'iod 
I'oarse, suitab'i- for l>oh \\'ar 
and IViU'eu in . ' m..!. , ,-er 18 

- years Hi>;:- School. You 
c:in study at home. Few months 
iiass quickly. You owe it to 
yourself to writ? for I-oofelet. 

DOMINION RADIO 
& TECHNICAL INST. 

Suite D 15 

50 YORKV1LLE AYE. 
TORONTO 

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ISSUE 18 '41 

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- 
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' 

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SUNDAY 
SCHOOL 
LESSON 

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LESSON V 

THE CHURCH ENLARGING 
ITS FELLOWSHIP Act. 8 

PRINTED TEXT 
Act. 8:1-8, 14-17, 25 
GOLDEN TEXT. They there- 
fore tlil were tcattered abroad 
went about preaching the word. 

Acts 8:4. 

THE LESSON IN ITS SETTING 

Time. A.D. 36. 

Place. Samaria a the region 
in Palestine lying between Judaea 
and Galilee; Gaza was an old 
city of the Philistines fifty milei 
southwest of Jerusalem; Aiotui 
was thirty miles north of Gaza, 
and Qaesarea, a coastal city, was 
located midway between Joppa 
and Tyre. 

This lessor, is helpful to as in 
the study of the consequences of 
persecution in the Christian 
church, namely, an even greater 
dissemination of the Gospel than 
was taking place before the per- 
secution arose. 

Saul the Periecutor 
Acts 8:1. "And Saul was con- 
senting unto his death. And 
L-.ere arose on that day a great 
persecution against the church 
which waj ir. Jerusalem; and they 
were all scattered abroad through- 
out the region; of Judaea and Sa- 
maria, except the apostles. 2. 
And devout ir.en buried Stephen, 
and made great lamentation over 
him. 3. But Saul laid waste the 
church, entering into every house, 
and dragging men and women 
committed them to prison. 4. 
They therefore that were scat- 
tered abroad wer.t about preach- 
ing the word." 

After the death and burial of 
Stephen, the persecution still rag- 
ed in Jerusalem. That temporary 
protection which had been ex- 
tended to the rising sect by such 
men as Gamaliel was now at an 
end. Pharisees and Sadducees 
priests and people alike, indulged 
in the most violent and ungovern- 
able fury. The eminent and ac- 
tive agent in this persecution was 
Saul (who here conies for the 
first time upon the stage of New 
Testament history ) : There ar 
strong grounds for believing that, 
if he was not a member of the 
Sanhedrin at the time of St. 
Stephen's death, he was elected 
into that powerful senate soon 
after; possibly as a reward for 
the zeal he had Shown against the 
heretic doing. Before we. have 
ruad much further in the book of 
Acte, we will find that he, who is 
now the greatest persecutor of 
:iie early Church, Saul, will be- 
come the greatest preacher of the 
Gospel of the grace of God which 
the ancient world ever knew. Thus 
is God able to work miracles with- 
in the hearts of men, and to 
mightily deliver His church in a 
time of great distress. 

The Gotpel in Samaria 
5. "And Philip went down to 
ihe city of Sanmia, and proclaim- 
ed unto. them the Christ." Sa- 
maria was populated by a nation 
of people utterly despised by the 
Jews, and equally despising their 
Jewish neighbors semi-Jews we 
might call them, who held rigidly 
to the traditions and laws of the 
Pentateuch, who wore looking for 
the Messiah. A Jew considered 
himself contaminated even to go 
through the country of Samaria. 
But the love of God through 
Christ in Philip'* heart had given 
him a love for all men every- 
where. Prejudices disappeared. 
I \\> need this today as much as it 
was needed then). Philip, the. 
evangelist, must not be confused 
with Philip, one of the Twelve 
Apostles. G. "And the multi- 
tudes gave heed with one accord 
unto the things that were spoken 
by Philip, when they heard, and 
saw the signs which he did. 7. 
For from many of those that had 
unclean spirits, they came out, 
crying with a loud voice: and 
many that wore palsied, and that 
were lame, were healed. 8. And 
there was much joy in that city." 
Philip proclaimed as a herald 
the Messiahship of Christ. He 
preached also as an evangelist the 
good news of the Kingdom of 
(Jod, and of the name of Jesus. 
Undoubtedly Philip preached from 
the Old Testament, for surely no 
New Testament book had yet been 
wriiten, but in his preaching he 
continually pointed to the Mes- 
siah, not the Messiah who 113 
still to come, but the Messiah who 
had already come, fulfilling th 
prophecies that spoke of Him. In 
preaching- Christ, he preached 
Jesus as the Messiah fur whom 
all Jews and Samaritans were 
looking. 

Receiving the Holy Spirit 
14. ''Now when the apostles that 
wre at Jerusalem hoard that Sa- 
maria had received the word of 
Gd, they sent unto them Voter 
aid John." We find this sum* 
Mtton again taken by the mother 
OKurch in Jerusalem when they 
heard of the great work which 
was being don in ih city of 
Antioch (Acts 11:1!>-2S. semli-vr 
Barnabas to examine and report 
to them concerning the condition* 
of ;h revival about whick they 

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New Brazilian Minister to Canada and Wife 

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Photographed shortly after their arrival in Montreal. His Excel- 
lency, Joao Alberto Lins de Barros with his wife, is shown above. H* 
is the Minister to Canada of Brazil and the first Latiri American diplo- 
mat of such high ranking to come to Canada. His first task here will b* 
to establish a Brazilian-Canadian direct steamship service. 

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had been hearing. Peter the 
practical; John the poet. Peter 
the man of deeds; John the 
dreamer. When the work in Sa- 
maria had to be inspected, for 
I think thaU was the first aposto- 
lic intention, the Spirit, acting 
through the apostles, sent these 
two; the man of deeds, and the 
man of dreams. 

15. "Who, when they were 
come down, prayed for them, that 
they might receive the Holy 
Spirit: 16. for as yet it was fallen 
upon none of them : only they had 
been baptized into the name of 

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the Lord Jesus. IT. Then laid 
they their haiuLs on them, and 
they received ffce Holy Spirit." 
The gift of the Holy Spirit evi- 
dence of the aew life which re- 
sulted from faith in Christ to 
the Samaritan converts was her* 
granted through the agency of 
the apostles. Peter and John, who 
were sent from Jerusalem to in- 
vestigate the work of Philip. The 
mission of Peter and John, their 
prayer, and the miraculous gifts, 
also demonstrated the unity of the 
Church. 25. "They therefore, 
when thev had testified and suok- 

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RADIO REPORTER 

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By DAVE BOBBINS 

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THE "BANDWAGON" 
The new raJlo show wiih a de- 
cldetlly new twist is ertitertaiuinit 
t'-iousanils of listeners from ttu o! 
Ontario's radio gtatioii-* these 
nights under the title The K-A 
Bandwagon. The Baiu'.waiou is s 
fast-moving musical show that has 
plenty of pe.p and enU'-uiumen: 
value, but in our niiinj. Us out- 
standing feature is its community 
service theme which varies acooi-il- 
lnjt to the location. Red Cro. 
\Vork. War Savings, Community 
\Velfare. traffic safety, eucourag- 
iujs tourists, and many other prob- 
lems of the individual community 
are sparked by this new program. 
Jts growing popularity a'.l over 
Outario proves Its worth in th-j 
very worthwhile effort it is miiki'u 
la behalf of community life, la 
Northern Ontario. th B-ind 1 * a-Mii 
Is heard in North Bay Thursday 
nights at 7.00. Sudbury. Thursday 
nights at 8.30. and Friday nights 
In Port William. In Eastern On- 
tario t Ottawa Friday uights at 
7.30. Kingston Friday nights it 
8.00. and at Prescott Ki iday | 
at 6.00 oYK><.-k. In Western Ou- 
tario. at Windsor Thursday uights 
at 8.00, aud London Friday night 
at 7.00. while in Central Ontario. It 
is heard from CKOC at Hani i Hon. 
Friday nights at S.30, and from 
PFRB in Toronto Saturday uiglits 
kt 7.30. 

in for the B.i'i>! -A .no;-, this 

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AROUND THE DIAL 
Nel Spaiks. ioiii--fav->'d comic* of 
ui.iny film hits, stars in a new 
series of half hour fun programs 
tht are heard over the Columbia 
chln each Sunday at 5.30 (Stand- 
ard). The Ned Sparks show is a 
Canadian program designed to at- 
tract American tourists to the Do- 
minion, and Includes all Canadian 
talent such as Satr l.ep. wsll- 
known Toronto singer buisi Ro- 
manelli's King Edward Ba:ul 
and others. It should be an enjoy- 
show. 

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Another new program which has 
C.A S K. written all over the script 
Aud "with Love to My Sweetheart" 
ia *very song is the feature which 
takes its uume from the sons 'Over 
H-re For Over There." written by 
vocalist Jess Jeffrey. Y\nm* Boi> 
Favnoii of Haupy Gang fnn:< will 
direct the orchestra an,i t'::- pop- 
ular Guardsmen are retu \ 

eigli strong, for this new variety 
show. Several other uanv- 
starve.! fo th-< feature t\i T i Wed- 
nesday night at nine 

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XBC's Symphony Orcaest ra. 
which closed -ks seasou under Ar- 
turo Toscanlir.'s baton last Satur- 
day evening, wf'.l be replaced this 
Saturday by a Summer Syoiphouy 
S-V : ^M heard over WKBR 

The Summer *erles will conce-n- 
t",tt on lighter works aud selec- 
tions of lessei'-kiioivn composers. 
Reginald Stewart, noted Toronto 
conductor, his ben signed to con- 
duct the opening four pron a - 

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Radio SUnts: Dinah Slioi e wants 
to go to the Charlie McCarthy 
show at au increase in ixiy but 
ii'--5-! K !'!' r,.utor thumbs down 
the proposition . . . You'll b hear- 
!.< World Series Baseball announc- 
er Red Barber ou the sport end 
of the r.ews-Av: in your theatre. . . 
The mirno of the new "Loiu- K.ia?;- 
ev" is Braes Riwrner . _. . \Va '. 
nisny will work with a Major 
film company to produce "Th. Life 
atul Sl<v ies of Hans Christian An- 
tlei-svw" . . . It's not likely we'll 
ever see Disney's "Fantasia": the 
cost of special sound equipment 
is too high . . . K.u* Smith has 
tloue a neat recording of "Little 
Church hi KiuUtiul" for Columbia 
. . . Bins Crosby's work on "Cmp- 
towti Races" for Uecc.i i* really 
sonmhinK . . . NBC comedian Boo 
Bums and his Mrs. havu takou to 
Moycling . . .1 15 or 20 mile dally 
spin. 

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n tht word of the Lord, returned 
to Jerusalem, and preached the 
joip! to many villages o: the 
Samaritans." 

The apostles had DC power t 
confer miraculous gift--; but the 
fact thmt they prayed for their 
bestowal ihowa that they recog- 
nized the fact that Samaritans 
had actually become Christians, 
and that they (the apostles* gave 
their sanction to th new step 
which Philip had taken in preach- 
ing tha gospel to those who were 
wot Jaw*. 

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Cat Lost All 

Its Nine Lives 

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Gardening . . . 

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ARTICLE No. 9 
Probably the best garden soil 
for vegetables, flowers, grass, 
and most shrubs too, is a good 
loam. This is a soil that is not 
all clay or all sand. It is really 
a mixture of both, plus a lot of 
humus, or rotted vegetable mater- 
ial like leaf mould. Now, of 
course, one does no: find this 
ideal soil everywhere but it u 
possible to create it out o? almos: 
anything in Canada. 

Hey Soil 

Heavy soil, for instance, can be 
loosened permanently by the 
spading or plowing in of some 
well-rotted strawy manure or 
lacking this vegetable growth such 
as clover, quickly grown oats or 
even weeds. In very small gar- 
dens it is possible to secure s 
load or two of sand, or loose 
black leaf mould. This will also 
help to loosen the heavy clay and 
make it easily worked. Just 
plain cultivation alone will help. 
The beginner with a brand new 
piece of raw clay should no: get 
discouraged. Such soil is always 
hardest to work a: first, fclach 
year will find the job simpler, 
the soil improved. 

Sandy Soil 

Light, sandy soils are a. * ayi 
greatly benefitted by the addition 
o: strawy manure or black loam. 
The incorporation of vegetable 
matter such as straw and weeds 
or clover will add humus to the 
sand and make it hold moiscure 
better and give it a more desir- 
able body. 

Take Your Time 
Because we have :ong hours of 
sunlight in Spring and Summer, 
it really does not matter then if 
our garden goes in late, as once 
growth starts it is rapid. Garden 
beginners are advised to have pa- 
tience. There is no need for rush- 
ing, in fact there are very good 
reasons againn such a course. 

Real growth with most vege- 
tables does not et underway until 
the weather and soil begin ta 
warm. There are. some except- 
ions, of ccurse. Lettuce, sp 
peas, nursery stock, should be 
planted as soon as possible as a'.l 
like cool weather. 

But for the medium hardy type 
of vegetable things like beans, 
beets, corn and tomatoes there 
is no advantage in sowing too 
soon. They will make little ;; 
in any case until the soil really 
turns warm. 

Even Balkan 
Experts Differ 

Pronunciation of Names In 
News Proves Difficult 

B.tlkitu autho. iti.-s i:i New York 
differ cousi:l>rably uj>ou th* pro- 
uuuci.Uion of place names rece.it !y 
prominent 111 tiie news. Take your 
choice. 

Skoplje, tha laniorta: ir Yug > a 
ceatre, can be pronounced Scope- 
lee-yeh, according to the Slavonic 
languages branch of th< New Yo;k 
Public Library, of more b ' 
Scope-lya, according to the Yugo- 
slav Legation. 

Ljubljana is Lyu-b!yii-na to both 
authorities, aud they also airee ou 
Sarajevo as Sara-yevo. 

Bitolj Southern Yugoslav city, is 
variously Bee-toll-e and bee-tol". 

A similar difficulty exists iu ol>- 
Uiuiug the e-xact English spoken 
equivalent of Greek uaiue-s. al- 
though the differences are not so 
rear. 

Fny Instance, the Strunia val- 
ley where th* Greeks made their 
' \ oc staud is pronounced St. MU< 
a ami Stream-on, with the 'n" 
sound very slight. 

Similarly the N'vrokopi ;>l.neati 
is pronounced Nevro-wpe-e> and 
Nevro-cope-cn. 

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Tw Riverton, Wyo., families 
witnessed a blackout last week 
all because of a pole-climbing 
cat. 

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The cat scurried to the top of 
an electric pole, causing a short- 
circuit which blew a fuse. 
resulted in no lights for tin 
homes. 

Total fatalities: the cat. 

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THIS CURIOUS WORLD 

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By William 
Ferguson 

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IN 

DENMARK, 

THERE \S A K 
THAT BL);(_DS 

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CCPH.1JMJ1 H6 5-K. ; NO. 

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ANSWER: No, It is a common ^unt these days for parachute' 
Jumpers to gjv the crowds a thrill oy dropping several 
ftet before opening their ch'-ita*. 

NEXT: DM M*Pl k*JW vh afth was rowi txi'ott 

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WORLD FLYER 

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I 

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HORIZONTAL 

1.7 Pictured 
round-the- 
world flyer. 

12 Pertaining to 
grandparents. 

13 Dwelling. 

16 To drive. 

17 Hail! 

18 Can talc upe. 

19 Unit of 
energy. 

20 Fast. 

22 Opposed to 
high. 

23 Saccharine. 
25 Rodent pest. 

27 Meshed fabric 

28 Connected 
with a 
religious cult. 

33 Measure of 

length. 
'35 Canadian 

heavy sleigh. 

36 Sun deity. 

37 Large ox. 

38 Ornamented 
with raised 
work. 

40 Silkworm. 

41 To feast. 

42 Pendent 
ornament. 

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Answer to Previous Puzzle 

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, 
TUB K E >TT-*os PI i '^ A_ 

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46 Thing. 
48 One who 

wears clothes. 
50 Dwarfish. 

53 Bill. 

54 Tobacco roll. 
56 Proffered. 

58 Four technical 

s flew 

with him. 

59 He acted as 

or. the 

trip. 

VERTICAL 

1 Laughter ' 
sound. 

2 Egg-shaped. 

3 Billow. 

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4 Opposite >.>: 
aweather. 

5 To stop up. 

6 Single edged 
knife. 

7 Female fowl. 

8 Thrived. 

9 To employ. 

10 To sharpen. 

1 1 Compass 
point. 

14 Leather girdL 

15 Below. 

20 He made the 

world 

flight. 

21 To convoy a 
right. 

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23 Street. 

24 He is also a 
maker of 
or motion 
pictures. 

26 Dye. 

29 Bran.::-. 

30 Taxi. 

31 Stream. 

32 Military 
student. 

33 Orb. 

34 Gibbon. 

36 To soak Sax. 
39 To choose. 

43 Inspires 
reverential 
fear. 

44 Oceans. 

45 Bearded 
monkey. 

46 Gold coin. 

47 Edible root 

49 Ir.let. 

50 Indian 
dancer. 

51 Measure of 
area. 

52 Kimono 

53 The soul. 
55 Guinea 

(abbr >. 
57 And. 

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POP And Brown'll Follow Later 

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By J. MILLAR WATT 

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'STILL UP ALO^T IS 

OROVVN - 

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- MIS UND&R CAPRI A65 

WON'T COME 

DOWN" 

i 

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" STILL UP A -O^T IS 
WEINSCL 3POWN 
HIS UNOERCAR 

MAS 
COME- 
DOWN" I 
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Wednesday, April30, 1941 

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THE FLESHERTON ADVANCE 

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Clydesdale Stallion 
For Sale 

"CRAIGIE LORD ROBERTS" 
(20895, Imp.) 

Apply to H. Lougheed, 682 
Broadview Ave., Toronto, or 
John Lougheed, Dundulk. 

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VANDELEUR 

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Mr. and Mrs. W. .1. Dennis and 
Beryl and Miss Marion Boland of 
Mimico and Mr. and Mrs. Russel 
Byere and Ruth of Tara were recent 
visitors with Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Bo- 
land and family. 

Mr. Geo. Kelso, wVo has spent a 
few months at Gait has returned 
home. 

Mr. Will Radcliffe is home from 
Malton where he spent the winter. 

Mr. Jim Cargoe had a successful 
sale of stock and implements on Wed. 
afternoon O f last week, 

The April meeting of the V. W. I. 

---- column ----

WE HAVE A FULL LINE OF 

Spring Seeds 

FOR 

Garden and Field 

ORDERS RECEIVED FOR 

"Fertilizer" 

"Delivered from Dundalk." Inquire for prices. 

& A. Co-operative Company, Ltd. 

FLESHERTON, Ontario 

---- column ----

was held at the home of Mrs. Will 
Radcliffe on Thursday last week with 
a (rood attendance. It was the annual 
election of officers. The president, 
Mrs. Geo. Shaw and other officers of 
1940 were returned to office. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Hutchinson and 
Beverley were presented with an oc- 
casional chair by the community, 
prior to their moving to their new 
home at Kimberley. 

The Sunday School was re-organ- 
ized for the summer months at a 
meeting following the service in the 
church on Sunday afternoon. Mr. 
Lunday Johnston is the new superin- 
tendent. 

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EUGENIA 

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On Sunday, Rev. Mercer preached 
a very impressive sermon to a fair 
congregation. 

On Wednesday evening, April 23, 
the discussion period in the Y.P.U. 
was in charge of the Cultural Con- 
venor, Miss Evelyn Campbell. Her 
topic was "An artist without hands." 

Mrs. Andrew Armstrong of Long 
Branch visited a week at the home of 
Mr. Wilfred Magee. 

Sergt. Arthur Lawlor of Camp Bor- 
den and M*. Lawlor orient Saturday 
with the former's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Geo. Lawlor, 8th line. 

We are sorry to report Mrs. Court 
Smith on the sick list with pleurisy. 
We wish her a speedy recovery. 

Mr. Jack Park of Toronto is visit- 
ing at his home here. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Graham of 
Clarksburg and Dr. and Mrs. Russell 
Cameron and little son, John, spent 
Sunday with Mr. < nd Mrs. Alex. 
Cameron, 8th line. 

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Local and Personal 

---- column ----

When the Ontario Brotherhood of 
THreshermen met in Peterborough 
one speaker said, in referring to fires 
at threshings, that friction originat- 
ing from mortgages was believed to 
have caused some of the fires. No 
one need fel embarrassed because he 
mentioned no names. 

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|Mg^MgM>*-*+<H>*-4>**+<Mg^ 

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T 

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f 

T 
f 

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T 
? 
T 

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f 
y 
f 
f 

T 

t 

T 
T 

t 

y 
y 

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* 

* 

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y 
y 
y 
f 
I 
t 
y 
y 
y 
y 
y 
y 
? 
y 
y 
y 
y 

---- column ----

y 
y 
y 
y 
f 
y 
y 

t 

*** 

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Hill's Specials 

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OUR READY-TO-WEAR DEPARTMENT IS FULL OF THE SMARTEST 

AND NEWEST STYLES IN LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S COATS, 
DRESSES AND BLOUSES. Prices to suit everyone. 

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LADIES' TAILORED SUITS 

In some of the newest materials and 
styles, sizes 14 to 20. Special .. $14.95 

MILLINERY 

We are showing' a wonderful range 
of the newest and smartest styles and 
colors in Ladies' Hats at very moder- 
ate prices. 

MEN'S PANTS 

Made of durable blue drill, sturdy 
and strong for general knockabout 
wear; waist band is wide with two 
dome-type buttons and belt hook; 
front pockets have turn-back button 
flaps with zipper closrd pocket on 
right side, sizes 36 to 38. Special per 
pair $1.95 

MEN'S WORK PANTS 

Made of durable S <>/.. blue- or black 
denim, front pockets have turn-back 
button flap with zipper-closed pm-kd 
on ri;Tht side, belt strap and cuff bot- 
om, sizes 32 to 42. Special, pair $1.85 

MEN'S SPORT JACKETS 

Made of sturdy, strong mate-rial in 
popular two-tone effect^ <n plain ad- 
justing for neat tit at waist, zipper 
closing, two front pockets with button 

flap, sizes 34 to 44. Special $1.69 

Bovs' sizes 26 to 34 $1.48 

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FLOOR COVERINGS 

Felt base borderless Rugs in several 
new patterns- sizes 6 ft. by 9 ft. At a 
Special price of $1.48 

MEN'S WORK BOOTS 

Men's heavy work boots, good 
strong wearers with panco or leather 
soles. A big assortment from which to 
choose, sizes 6 to 13 $1.69 to $5.50 

MEN'S FINE OXFORDS 

This smartly-styled shoe, correct to 
any dress-up occasion with good black 
leather uppers. Made on a good fitting 
last with sewn soles and rubber heels, 
si/.es 6 to 11. Specal, pair $2.50 

BOYS' OXFpRDS 

Mothers! Here is splendid value in 
neatly-styled long-wearing blucher ox- 
i .' is in black side leather with sewn 
;.. ..tiler soles, rubber heels, sizes 1 to 5. 
Special $1.95, $2.45 

WOMEN'S SHOES 

A popular choice for growing girls 
and women ; made of good durable 
'leather with good weight soles, built 
on a full-lit ting last with low rubber 
heels in black or tan, sizes 3 to 8. 
Special, per pair $1.95 

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True Economy in Food Values at Hils 

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Sweet Mixed I'ickles 27 ox. jar .... 27c 

oaj 2 Ibs. for 25c 

1'aiu '! I'iscuits 2 Ibs. 3Sc 

While Means <> Ibs. 25c 

Medium size I 'nines 3 Ibs. 23c 

Mess Raisins 2 Ibs. 21c 

Mia 1-2's ISc 

1's 25c 

Pastn l ; l f >r. 24's 63c 

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Soap !''lak''s- faniilv si/e '... pl<. 23c 

hard 2 Ibs. 19c 

J'urr Raspherrv or Strawberry Jain 
>-/.. jar 25c 

e 22clb. 

()1<1 (Mu-'-M- 25c Ib. 

IV:i'<. ('urn, Tomatoes, regular sixe 

3 for 27 c 
I'astrv Monr, O8' s $3.10, 

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F. T. Hill & Co., Ltd. 

MARKDALE, Ont. 

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t 
T 
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f 

V 

t 

y 
y 

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y 
y 
y 

i 

y 
f 
y 
y 
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y 

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Mr. Eviaon Wilson of London was 
in town on Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Thompson spent 
the week end in Toronto. 

' Mrs. W. G. Trelford of Toronto 
visited for a few days this week with 
Mr. and Mrs. C. N. Richardson. 

Mr. Laverne Wood left Tuesday to 
take a position with Mr. Emerson 
McKee in a garage near Bronte. 

Mr. R. Bentham has rented part of 
his farm to Mr. Gordon Irwin, a 
neighbor. 

Mr. H. A. MtCauley is erecting a 
summer cottage at R"d Bay, north of 
Wiarton. 

Rev. G. R. and Mrs. Service of 
Hamilton spent a couple days with 
friends in town last week. 

C.Q.M.S. Angus Turney is taking a 
course at the small arms school at 
Long Branch. 

Mrs. G. E. Henry and son, Ken, and 
Mr. and Mrs. H. A. McCauley spent 
the week end with the former's par- 
ents at Granton. 

St. George's Day was observed in 
Flesherton high school on Thursday 
of last week, when the pupils pre- 
sented a special program. 

Mrs. Irish and daughter of Proton 
Station moved to town on Friday and 
are occupying the apartments in Mrs. 
McGeoch's residence. 

Mr. Findlay Hoy, Mr. and Mrs. 
Dick Hoy and Albert Phillips of To- 
ronto spent the week end with the 
former's mother, Mrs. R. Hoy. 

Mr. M. E. Gardner and Mr. and 
Mrs. Bert Gardner of Meaford called 
on Mr. and Mrs. Herb Smith on 
Sunday. 

Miss Irene McDonald and Mr. Alex 
Doyle spent last week end with the 
formers parents, Mr. and Mrs. John 
McDonald. 

Mr. Edward Fisher of New York 
Mr. Fred Fisher of Hamilton and Mrs. 
Sparks of Hamilton visited a day last 
week with Mrs. L A. Fisher. 

Miss Alice Armstrong spent the 
past week with her uncle, Mr. F. H. 
W. Hickling, after recently finishing 
her year at Queen's University. 

Mr. Oscar Jacobs and son, Bruce, 
of Buffalo, N.Y., visited a couple of 
days last week with Mr. and Mrs. D. 
W. Adams. 

The W. I. will meet at the home of 
Mrs. W. S. Inkster on Wed., May 7, 
at 3 p.m. Roll call, najrment of fees; 
election of officers. Everybody is 
welcome. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Patton, Mrs. 
Douglas McArthur and little daugh- 
ter, Elaine, spent the -first of last 
week with Mr. and Mrs. John Mc- 
Donald. 

Mr. Ken Kellar, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Gordon Kellar of Markdale and 
well known in Flesherton, last week 
graduated as a Leading Air Crafts- 
man from the Calvary wireless 
bombing school. 

Mrs. M. Jamieson returned horn* 
last week after spending the winter 
with her daughter and son at South 
Porcupine. She was accompanied by 
hrr son, George, who remained for 
a few days. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Phillips of To- 
ronto, Mr. ad Mrs. Lloyd Oastel and 
Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred Phillips of 
Owt-n Sound. Mr. Frank Leavt-ll and 
Ruth of Collinprwoc'd and Pte. Ben 
Leavell of Toronto wore Sunday call- 
ers at the home of Mr. Robt. Clark. 

Mrs. Currio and Mr. and Mrs. F. 
Hiincox of Toledo, Ohio, spent the 
past week with the former's brother, 
Mr. Jos. Bbtkeley, wh.-se condition is 
not greatly improved. Mr. and Mrs. 
('has. Wilson, laobel and Inez, Sing- 
hamnton visited with them Sunday 

Mr. n'l-lmar Mi-noun, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Chas. E. McClean of 
r.rinip'lon. formerly of Flesherton, 
lias enlisted in the Ore" & Simcoc 
Forostprs. His brother, Rhesa, is 
with *hp Foresters, linvinp- enlisted 
on mobilization Inst June, 

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T 

y 
y 

y 

T 

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.AIWMITISINO IS BKST 

IN SMALI,KR NEWSPAPERS 

The srmrp decrease in 'ho number 
of !>;!!'(< in newspapers in England, 
caused by the war, is proving to kd- 
vertisi'rs the greater value of an ad- 
vovtisnu'iit in a small daily. 

The atlvrrtisimr ni;in:i"er of nn ad- 
vertising ajjcm in !"i!"hiul is quoted 
as savintr thnt ho \v.i> "astounded at 
the .'ffir'eney ,,f advertising in the C- 
mier compared \vith I ho 24- 
fn the smaller sized papers 
he found that small spaces wore far 
more pr minent than Wgtjor ,;p:ves in 
1'inr-v paper*, lie said: "Today's 
;i'!viT'isintr in the smaller-shod imp- 
<TS is actually lieinur read which is 
the fivil h-.il (! niorj' people 

.thin tiimr''! 1 adverti -monts wort- in 
the imst. 

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! MM MM MM I 

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Drop in and See our 
Special on Pot Roasts 

for the week end 

Home-Rendered LARD 

and 
Homemade Sausage 

on hand. 

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BAILEY'S 

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We DELIVER FLESHERTON, Ont. PHONE 

Canada First Lest We Forget! 

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Small Ad. Column 

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FOR SALE Young cow due May 6. 
Oliver Thurner, Eugenia. 48p2 

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FOR SALE Small Sword seed peas. 
J. W. R. Lever, R. R. No. 2, 
Flesherton. 48c2 

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PASTURE Cattle wanted for pas- 
ture. Chas. McDermid, phone 45 r 
13 Flesherton. 48c3 

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PASTURE For rent by month for 
cattle, sheep or horses. Donald 
Stewart, Ceylon. 48c3 

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FOR SALE Misses Coat, size 16, 
good as new, cheap, may be seen 
at The Advance Office. 

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FOR SALE 5 pigs U weeks old. 
Robt. Oliver, Priceville, phone 21r2 
Flesherton. 48c2 

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FEATHERS Will buy new or used 
feathers or exchange for spring 
mattresses. Phone The Advance, 
leave name and address. 

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FOR SALE General Purpose team 
of horses, 3 and 4 years old, also 
duck eggs. C. McDermid, phone 
45 r 31, Flesherton. 46c2 

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PASTURE Pasture for number of 
year-old cattle, abundance of feed, 
shade and water. J. F. Collinson, 
Ceylon, phone 21 r 3. 48 

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FOR SALE 2 Purebred Hereford 
Bulls, ready for service, 11 and 12 
months old. Wm. Fadden, Fev- 
ersham, phone 22 r 41. 45c2 

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NOTICE Paper hangind and paint- 
ing at reasonable prices. Estimates 
free. Ross Mitchell, Dundalk, 
telephone 77. 

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FOR SALE 4 steers rising 2, 4 
heifers, 2 years old, in calf, work 
horse, 2 brood sows, single furrow 
riding plow. Richard Allen & Son, 
Flesherton, phone 45 r 21. 48c2 

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WANTED Reliable girl for gener- 

* al house work, over 20 preferred^ 

permanent position if satisfactory. 

Mrs. Lyness Myles, Thornbury, 

Ont., phone 16. 47c2 

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FOR SALE Heavy black team ol 
Percheron horses; 3 purebred Jer- 
sey cows, fresh; Cockshutt disc 
drill; cultivators, etc. Otto Meyer 
1V miles east of Flesherton, R.R.3. 

---- column ----

FOR SALE House in Flesherton, 
with seven rooms, hard and soft 
vnter, double lot and barn. Foi 
full particulars apply to J. W. Mo- 
Mullen, Ceylon, Execi tor. 30c 

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FOR SALE 7-room brick house in 
Flesherton, large lot, garage, good 
well, must be sold to settle estate 
of the late Andrew Gilchrist Ap- 
ply to'John Stewart, Executor, Pro- 
ton Station, phone 32 r 4. 

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POTATOES FOR SALE - - Grade 
j . Canada No. 1, early varieties 
Warbas and Cobblers; later var- 
ieties, Katahilins and Dooleya. 
Alex. S. Muir, R. R. No. 1 Ceylon, 
phone Flcshertoh 47 r 14. 44c4 

RliAY titarted pullets are good bets 
for the early market money. Cua- 
tomors report laying at 4 Ms months. 
They forge ahead, catching up with 
many others. Rocks, Reds, N H x 
L S wise choices nw. See John 
McAVilliam, Flesherton. 

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Success can bo boiled down to mak- 

iii ordinary uimmnt of brains do 
nn extraordinary amount of work. 

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There !R something w->rth while 
in havim* n husband. A woman in 
n-ilhis, Texa-i, parted from her man 
in--'t a week nijo niul i now charged 
with ni'.inlrr. 

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Montreal man sowing overseas 
issued a p:iir T "ftvka am! found they 
had been knit by hid wife. Possibly 
In wan surprised as ho may nevei 
have beon aware sho could do such a 
thing. 

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FOR SALE -- 150 acres, Lots 181. 

182, 2nd Con. N.E.T.&S.R., Arteme- 

sia, VIT.V cheap; abo 13 year old mare 
3 year old horse, cow, cattle, dog, 

. hoavy harness, light harness, cut- 
ter, plow, mower, jrravel box, hay 
rack. Very reasonable. Apply to 
Geo. Allen (Mt. Zion), R. R. N i, ,1, 
Flpsherton. 47c2 

FARM FOR SALE 
100 acre farm, 5 acres wheat, 
.sin-inn creek, tiled well and windmill 
comfortiililti dwelling, barn and hen- 
house, situated 1 mile south of Flesh- 
ertn on No. 1 Highway, reasonably 
priced for quick sale. Apply to 
Fred Irwin, Flesherton, Ont. 

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FOR SALE Red Clover seed, $8. 
per bushel. Austin McKee, R. R, 
3, Proton Station. 

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FOR SALE or RENT for pastuer 
Lots 167 on East Back Line. Har- 
ry Patton, R. R. 3, Flesherton. 

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FOR SALE Corona kitchen range, 
in good condition, bargain. Mrs. 
S. E. I. Holley Flesherton. 48p2 

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WANTED Any number of fresh 
ground hogs lOc each. Jas. B. 
Sinclair, Ceylon. 48c tf 

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FOR SALE Alfalfa clover seed. 
$8 bu. Gordon McMullen, phone 
170 r 5, Thornbury. 46p2 

FOR SALE C.CJM. bicycle in per- 
fect condition. Wm. McBride, 
Priceville. 46p2 

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FOR SALE Cows, horses, oats 

(with a little mixture of barley 

W. J. McFadden, R. R. 5, Mark- 
dale, phone 33 r 3. 46c2 

FOR SALE Good used car, lately 
overhauled, new rings and brakes; 
good truck car, cheap. Mrs. J, W. 
Cook, Flesherton. 48c2 

---- column ----

FARM FOR RENT Lot 20, Con. 9, 
Osprey, formerly McQueen proper- 
ty. Apply to I. B. T ucas & Co., 
Markdale, Ontario. 47c8 

WANTED Girl for general house- 
work, must be good with children, 
good wages, must be ready to star* 
May 1. Apply to Miss B. Cairns, 
11 Haddington Ave., Toronto, tie- 
phone MO 5368, Toronto. 

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NURSERY STOCK - Surplus stock 
for a limited time: 12 ro<3c plants 
Jl; 10 perennials $1; Regal and 
Madonna Lilies 15c each; shrubs 
15c and up; Hood Acres delphinium 
or long-spurred columbine 25c per 
root; choice fladioli 25c doz. _ 
McLeod's Nurseries, Ceylon. 48 

---- column ----

FARM FOR SALE 
Lots 14-15, Con. 1, S.D.R., Arte- 
mesia, containing 100 acres, on which 
is situated a bank barn 45x55, also 
large driving shed. This property 
must be sold to wind up estate. Those 
interested communicate with John 
Oliver or W. R. Meads, Priceville, Ex- 
t cutors for the estate. 47c 

PROPERTY FOR SALE IN 
FLESHERTON 

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Lot 10 on Collingwood St, OB 
which is situated a 7-room house, 
well and stable. Those interested 
communicate with I. B. Lucas, Mark- 
dale, Solicitor for the Ella Gibson 
Estate. 

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AUCTIONEER , 

WALTER SEELEY 

See me about your auction sale. All 
sales conducted on business prin- 
ciples. Phone me at Feversham 4rl2 
or make arrangements at The 
Flcshertou Advance office. 

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BUSINESS CAK'JS 

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' DR. S. R. THIBAUDEAU 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

Graduate of Ontario Veterinary Coll- 
ege. Phone: 91 day or night 
MAUKDALE, ONT. 

DR. J. E. MILNE 

Office _ Durham St, 
Office Hours _ \fternoonn, 1.30 to 4. 
Kvnings, 7 to 8.M. 
and Thursday afternoon* by 
appointment only. 

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Prince Arthur Lodge No. 833, A.F. 
& A.M., meets in the Fraternal Hall 
Flesherton, the second Friday in each 
mouth. W.M., Herb. Corbett; Sc- 
-f -3 

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VOL. 60; NO. 49 

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FLESHERTON. WEDNESDAY, May 7, 1941 

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W. H. Thurston & Son, Props* 

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Funeral of Mrs. John 

Neilson Largely Attended 

Death came very suddenly on Tues- 

day morning, April 29th, in Markdale 

Hospital, to Eva Margaret, beloved 

wife of John Neilson, in her 33rd 

' year. Mrs. Neilson had been progres- 

. sing favouraibly after having given 

pirth to a baby boy on April 20th, and 

was expected home in a few days. A 
'Wood clot is believed to have the 

cause of her sudden passing. 

Deceased was well and favourably 
. known in the community, having lived 
.practically all her life in these parts. 
.She was the second youngest daugh- 
ter of Mrs. Wauchope and the late 
Thos. Wauchope. 

Besides her sorrowing husband, she 
la survived by five children; Betty, 
Leona, Eleanor, Keith and the infant 
son. Her mother, Mrs. Thos. Wau- 
chope, also survives, as do two sis- 
ters, and two brothers, namely: Mrs. 
Harold Thompson, (Maib.l), Dobbin- 
ton; Mrs. Ellwood Moore, (Dorcas), 
Hamilton; Lloyd at Priceville and 

Gordon a t Flesherton. 

' The funeral was held on Thursday, 
.May 1st, from her late home Vzmile 
.north of Proton Station, to Flesher- 
ton Cemetery. The service was in 
charge of Rev. G. K. McMillan, Flesh- 
' erton, and was largely attended. 

The pall-bearers were: Messrs. 
Stanley Lyons, Gordon Acheson, Ed 
, Stinson, Wes Dever, Art Badgerow 
and Eldon Blackburn. 

The floral tributes were beautiful, 
.' and were borne by Margaret Mills, 

Marvelle White, Margaret Blake, 

Ruth and Marion Lyons. 

Friend from a distance included: 
Mrs. F. G. Fisher, Mrs. Fred Fish- 

er, Mr. Nelson Fisher and Miss Annie 
Neilson, Aglncourt; Mrs. Thos. Love, 

. Ken Love, Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Neil- 
son, Weston; Miss Beth Neilson, Mr. 
and Mrs. Clark Wyville, Toronto; Mr. 
Harold Thompson, Mr. Kerr, Mr. and 
Mrs. Francis, Kingston; Mr. and Mrs 
Jack Callahan, Dobbinton; Mr. and 
Mrs. Lome Hodgins, Mr. Art Porter, 
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Farmer, Mr. Rob- 
ert Neilson and Mr. Oscar Neilson; 
Owen Sound ;Mrs. Chas. Davie, Dun- 
dalk; as well as friends from Port- 
law, Flesherton and Swinton Park. 

MAXWELL 

Mrs. Angus Morrison was hostess 
to the Woman's Association on Thurs- 
day, May 1. There was a good at- 
tendance. The -resident, Mrs. J. 
Wright presided and considerable 
business was discussed and settled. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Pallister and 
Mr. Vern Pallister and Miss N. Har- 
mill, all of Toronto, visited at the 
home of Mr. A. Pallister on Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Cameron of 
Owen Sound visited relatives here 
on Sunday. 

Miss Ethel Fenwick nurse in train- 
ing at Collingwood G. and M. Hospit- 
al spent the week end at her home 
here. 

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Osprey Brothers on Active Service 

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THOS. R. McKENZIE 

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NEIL E. McKENZIE 

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The above two young men-are sons of Mr. and Mrs. James T. McKenzie 
of Osprey Township, who are on active service with the Canadian forces. 
Thomas R. McKenzie is with the Queen's Own and is at present in a New 
Brunswick camp. He had been with his- Regiment in Newfoundland last 
fall for three months. Neil E. McKenzie is a Sapper with the Royal 
Canadian Engineers and is in England with his unit. Neil was married 
prior to his departure for overseas and his wife and small child are re- 
siding in Collingwood. 

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HIGH SCHOOL REPORTS 

\ 

In accordance with departmental 
War Service regulations, students 
with the required standing at Easter 
are being released from school. They 
must submit written requests from 
prospective employers guaranteeing 
a minimum of eight weeks' employ- 
ment in essential war production. 

Conditional release of same pupils 
with incomplete scholastic standing 
requires the pupil to continue his 
work privately and to write final ex- 
aminations in June. 

GRADE XIII L Sutherland,67.7; 
A. Chappie, 63.7; E. Russel, 56.8; L. 
Phillips, 56.3; B. Wright, 54.9; M. 
Fenwick, 54.7; I. Brown, 49.1. 

GRADE XII L. Pedlar, 74; R. 
Sutherland, 66; F. Warling, 60; R. 
Turney, 58; R. McConkey, 56; J. 
Proctor, 53; B. Bellamy, 52; V. Wil- 
son, 51; M. Buchanan, 50; W. Mc- 
Bride, 48; E. Plester, '7; D. Meads, 
45. 

GRADE XI F. O'Neill, 78.3; J. 
Duncan, 73.7; J. Loucks, 72; R. Whyte, 

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71; R. O'Dell, 

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M. Collinson, 67; 

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J. Campbell, 63; A. McMillan 60; M. 
McMullen, 58; E. Meads, 56.1; G. 
Nichol, 56; J. McTavish, 55.3; E. 
Doupe, 55; H. Clark, 54.1; M. Thistle- 
thwaite, 54; E. Beaton, 51.3. 
GRADE J E. Adams, 78.5; L. 

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A meeting will be held in the Sal- Wood, 77.1; I. Karstedt, 69.7; B. Mac- 

---- column ----

vation Army hall), Feversham, on 
Thursday, May 8th, at 8 p.m., to 
organize a committee to sponsor a 
community auction sale in aid of the 

---- column ----

Dermid, 66.2; G. Parker, 65.4; J. Mc- 
Millan, 64.4; D. Falconer, 63.1< J. Mc- 
Conkey, 61.1; F. Bannon, 60.7; A. 
Taylor, 60.7; E. Thurston, 59.4; A. 

---- column ----

Telegram War Victims' Fund. J Proctor, 58; A. Mac Vicar, 56.4; j/Mc- 

Mr. Cecil Chard of Dundas spent ' 

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the week end at his parental home 
and attended his sister's wedding on 
Saturday. 

There is always the likelihood, of 
course, that is if you don't like vour 
home town, you'll -robably not like 
any other town to which you may 
move. 

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SAFE LOCK 
WIRE FENCE 

is best because stays are flexible, 
not rigid. If accidentally depress- 
ed it springs erect the moment 
pressure is removed with no 
straightening of bent wires. Many 
fanners call it 

Hinge Lock Fence 

Ask your local dealer for it. 

Made only by the 

KEENAN FENCE CO. 

OWEN SOUND, Ont. 

---- column ----

William, 53.4; Carman Loucks, 52; 
E. Marshall, 51.4; E Taylor, 47.1; M. 
McMillan, 46.8; M. Smillie, 46.8; J. 
McMullen, 46.3. 

GRADE IX G. Milne, 80.6; J. 
Karstedt, 73.3; E. Allen, 70.1; M. Tur- 
ney, 69.1; R. Blackburn, 68; M. Smith, 
67.3: M. Brackenburv, 66.1; J. Mc- 
Cracken, 64.1; J. McMullen, 62.6; J. 
Phillips, 61.5; V. Atkinson, 62.1; D. 
McMillan, 57.5; K. Henry, 50.9; M. 
Banks, 50.6; W. Shaw, 45.6; J. Mc- 
Donald, 35.8; F. Buchanan, Aeg. 

---- column ----

New Books at Public Library 

The Library Board is pleased to 
announce that it has secured a copy 
of "BLOOD, SWEAT AND TEARS" 
by Winston Churchill. This a call to 
arms by Britain's greatest Prime 
Minister, addressed to free men every- 
where. 

Other new additions include Juven- 
ile for the youngest readers and a 
wide selection of westerns, modern 
romances, war and detective fiction 
for (he adult, 

---- column ----

Equipped to handle the finest service at moderate prices 

Our Beautifulf 

Air 

Conditioned 
Funeral Chapel 

at 
124 AVENUK ROAD 

TORONTO, Ont. 

RICHARD HADDOCKS, 

Manager. 

Member of the Ftohwton Old B aya' ft Cirls' Assoetatioi 

BATES & MADDOCKS 

Formerly of Flesherton. Ont 

124 Avenue Road. Toronto, Ont. * KI. 4344 

---- column ----

FRED MADDOCKS. 

Associate. 

---- column ----

Grey County To Share 

Cost of Snow Plowing 

At the recent session of Grey 
Bounty Council the question of snow 
plowing county roads was under dis- 
cussion several time'. At the closing 
sitting on Saturda- morning the 
County Council put their seal of ap- 
proval on a motion that snow plow- 
ing be undertaken in 1941-42 to the 
extent of paying 25% of the cost 
of plowing in those communities de- 
sirous of having the work done and 
willing to raise 25% of te cost 
themselves. The 50% balance is sub- 
sidized by the provincial government. 

Snow ploughing, long a bone of 
contention within the county, has 
been the subject of repeated argu- 
ments in County Council. During 
the past two "y ears > snow clubs have 
been organized throughout the 
country, in districts desiring of a 
winter outlet. The<e have raised one 
half of the cost of the work by sub- 
scription, the other half paid by 
government subsidy. On Saturday, 
the motion that the count" assume a 
quarter of this cost was set forward 
bv Reeve Morton Sayers of Osprey 
Township, and after some discussion, 
was approved. The ma.ioritv of com- 
munities were in favour of the idea 
although some, representing com- 
munities where winter-bound roads 
present no particular hardship, were 
against the county making arv com- 
mitment. 

Snow clubs or municipalities de- 
sirous of havine this work done and 
willing to abide by the agreement of 
raising 25% of the cost of the work, 
will be required to have estimates of 
the amount of road to be kept onen 
in the Bounty enginoei 's office before 
th" June session of Council. It will 
be understood in each case, that once 
the work is started, the road must be 
kent open throughout the winter and 
the cost of the work will be comput- 
ed bv the Road Committee of the 
council who will be in full charge. 

Special allowance for this winter 
work will be made when council 
strikes the mill rate t.t the June ses- 
sion. 

---- column ----

ACHIEVEMENT OF 

OSPREY RED CROSS 

The Osprey Township Branch of 
the Red Cross, which includes Pad- 
jeros, Rob Roy, The Community 
Club, Maxwell Institute, Sinn-Hamp- 
ton and Feversham, have made and 
sent to headquarters at Toronto 
during the first four months of the 
year, -the following articles: 

Badjeros 10 Scarves, 4 helmets, 

9 sweaters, 2 pairs of wristlets, 9 
pairs of mitts, 8 pairs seamen's 
stockings, 22 pairs of socks, % doz. 
handkerchiefs, 25 pairs pyjamas, 1 
piece of underwe-.r. 1 refugee coat, 

10 refugee quilts. 

Rob Roy 15 Pairs of socks. 

Community CTuB 3 Refugee quilts 
and 2 night gowns. 

Maxwell Institute 2 Scarves, 3 
sweaters, 6 helmets, 4 pairs seamen's 
stockings, 6 pairs of socks, 2 pairs 
of wristlets, % doz. handkerchiefs, 
2 refugee quilts. 

Singhampton 2 Sweaters 4 pairs 
of gloves, 2 pairs mitts, 4 scarves, 
17 doz. handkerchiefs, 9 pairs of py- 
jamas, 28 pairs of socks, 3 refugee 
quilts. 

Feversham 9 Scarves, 6 Pairs 
seamen's socks, 14 pairs mitts. 10 
helmets, 4 sweaters, 28 nairs socks, 
2 pairs of gloves, 5 nairs wristlet*. 
28 pairs of pyjamas 4^ doz. hand- 
kerchiefs. 9 refugee quilts. 

Feversham can boast of one man 
who is an active knitter, Mr. Georpr-e 
Ottewell. 

The consideratio' of the needs of 
the armed forces and the British civ- 
ilians to which our supplies are sent, 
necessitates the making 1 of articles 
rpally needed and avoids wasting both 
effort and branch funds. Consequent- 
ly, headouarters has decided to 
assign quotas from time to time. At 
present our branch is working on 
the following quotas: 

Seamen's Comforts 5 Ribbed 
helmets, 5 pairs seamen's lonjr stock- 
ings, 5 turtle-ne^k sweaters, 5 pairs 
of mitts, 5 scarves, are to be sent 
each month during May and June. 

Army 10 Pairs of khaki two- 
way mitts, 6 sleeveless sweaters, 16 
pairs of grey or khaki socks, are to 
be sent each month during May and 
June. 

Hospital Supplies 10 Pairs of 
pyjamas. 

In addition, refugee quilts are urg- 
ently needed. 

---- column ----

In Memo-lam 

---- column ----

GRAHAM In loving memory of 
Franklin Grab HIM, who passed away 
May 7th. 1939. 

Ever remembered by his Mother 
and Sister, Ruth. 

---- column ----

THEY GOT RESULTS 

A Small Advertisement inserted in 
The Advance has brought first clas 
results to a number of advertisers 
who used these column* to disp&se 01 
Surplus articleSi AmOng them were: 
Wilfred Lever, with --eas; Duncan 
Williams, alfalfa seed; Austin Mc- 
Kee, red clover seed, Robt. Oliver, 
youn-- pigs and MrLeod Nurseries, 
with considerable stock to dispose of. 
Each of these advertisers could have 
disposed of a considerable amount 
more than what they had. Yes, re- 
sults were secured for them by using 
a "Small Advt." Everybody reads 
them. 

---- column ----

Davidson Chard 

A quiet but nrett- marriage was 
solemnized on Saturday, Mav 3rd, at 
2 p.m., at the Riverdale Presbyter- 
ian Parsonage, Toronto, with Rev. 
K. C. McClennen officiating, when 
Gertrude Marie, younger daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. J. Chard of 
Flesherton. was united in marriage 
to Mr. Gerald Ross Davidson, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Davidson of 
Feversham. The youne couple were 
attended by the -oom's sister and 
brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Mc- 
Cleilend of Toronto. 

The bride was smurtlv attired in 
tailored grey suit, with accessories 
in brown, and corsaue of Talisman 
roses, maiden hair fern and bouvar- 
dia. The bridesmaid's corsaee com- 
posed Johana Hill roses, bouyardia 
and maiden hair fern. 

Following the C'remonv thev mo- 
tored to the home of the bride's par- 
ents, where a wedding- repast - 
served to the immediate friends of 
the bride and groom. The table was 
centred with the bride's three-story 
wedding cake, and hun<" overhead, 
was a white wedding bell, with pink 
and white streamers. The young 
couple will reside in Toronto. 

---- column ----

Card of Thanks 

---- column ----

I wish to express my heavifelt 
appreciation of the many acts of 
kindness following my recent ber- 
eavement and for the beautiful floral 
offerings and othr tokens of 
sympathy. 

John Neilson. 

---- column ----

BORN 

ADAM'S At the Red Cross hos- 
pital, Drydon Ontario, to Mr. and 
Mrs. John Adams (nee Florence Mc- 
Faddcn) of Oxdrift, a son. 

---- column ----

A letter was received by the editor 
posted a* Dundalk on Tuesday, but 
the sender did not sign her name. We 
would be pleased to have the name. 

---- column ----

Halliday Benson 

A quiet, but nretty, weddin"' was 
solemnized on Saturday, April 26th, 
at three o'clock, at the United 
Church parsonage, Heathcote, when 
Ida Mildred, second eldest daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. William Benson, 
Maxwell, became the bride of Mr 
Russell Melville Halliday. only SOH 
of Mrs. and the late Mr. Halliday of 
Toronto. 'The ceremony was per- 
formed by Rev. Stanley Elliott, for- 
mer pastor of Maxwell United 
church. 

The bride wore a street-leniarth 
eown of rose crepe with matching 
accessories. The only attendants 
were Marjory and Harold Benson, 
sister and brother of the bride. They 
returned to the bride's home, where 
a daintv lunch was served, after 
which they left for a short honey- 
moon to Toronto and other points. 

---- column ----

Future Events 

---- column ----

The tnree act play "Tempest and 
Sunshine," will be presented in the 
town hall, Flesherton, on Thursday, 
May 8th, by the Markdale A.Y.P.A., 
under the auspices of the O.E.S. 
Admission 25c and 15c. 

The Women's Institute will hold a 
Euchre and Dance in Pricerille Hall, 
on Friday, May 23, 8.30 p.m. A draw 
for the Red Cross quilt wiH be held. 
Admission 26c, lunch free. 

Mr. McArthur, the hair dresser 
from Toronto, will be at M. Arthur 
MncDonald's residence (bake shop) 
Flesherton, on Thursday Ma- 8th 
to give permanent*. Make appoint- 
ments with Mrs. Scarrow at the 
bake shop. 

r 

---- column ----

COUNCIL SPONSORS 

BIG TOURIST SCHEME 

y 

Flesherton Village Council decided 
at a meeting of the Council Tuesday 
evening to assist in the great work 
of attracting tourists from tht 
United States to Ontario thi; year, 
so that the United States dollars 
will assist Canada in paving part of 
her war debt to that country. There 
are no bars to travel in Ontario or 
Canada and the American tourist 
can be assured of splendid time when! 
he comes with no trouble in either 
coming into the country or returning 
to their home land. The Council is 
appointing a committee to work with 
the business men in advancing the 
cause. American tourist business, 
means a great thing for Can- 
ada, and while the Federal and 
Provincial Governments are spending 
large sums of money advertising 
Canad in the United States, their 
appeal can only be a general one. It 
remains for smaller centres to 
make a personal appeal and have 
the old boy or girl, resident in the 
United States, come back to their 
native homes at a certain date and 
visit their old homes and familar 
surroundings. 

Mr. A. H. Wilford of Toronto, the 
Provincial organizer, interviewed the 
Council Tuesday evening and la!3 
the proposition before them, and 
they were enthusiastic over .the 
possibilities of the scheme. 

---- column ----

Entires For Farm And \ 
Home Improvement 

Contest Number 26 

---- column ----

The third Farm and Home Im- 
provement Contest to be sponsored 
by Wareham Junior Institute and 
Junior Farmers, in co-operation with 
"Farmers' Magazine," is now well 
under way. The committee in charts 
comprises Mrs. W. E. Inkster 
Cliitford Allen and Bruce Mc- 
Cutcheon, the last named also being 
secretary. 

With 26 contestants this year, the 
judging is definitely an arduous 
task. Nevertheless, Mrs. H. M. 
Bailey of Dundalk, Rev. Keith Mc- 
Millan of Flesherton ard Mr. Geo. 
W. Ross of Maxwell, Taciously con- 
sented to act in the capacity of 
judges. It had been intended that 
the preliminary judging should have 
been done the last of November, 
but adverse weather conditions rend- 
ered this impossible, and the judges 
made their tour of inspection of the 
homes entered on April 24th and 
April 29th, However, improvements 
made since entries were tiled in No- 
vember are bein-- credited !n the 
contest. 

The entrants are: Clifford Allen, 
David Armour, Henry Arnott, Fred 
Barber, Geoge Barnet, Lome Champ, 
Thomas Blakey, Oliver Cornell, 
Frank Eagles, Howard Gordon, Daw- 
son Gordon, Howard Grummett, 
John Hargrave, Robert Hill, Wilfred 
Inkster, William Jtohnson, John 
Lougheed, Wm. McCutcheon, Wm. 
McMillan, Wilfred McNally, Cecil 
Meldrum, Wm. Russell, Ross Stev- 
ens, Fred Weatherall, Arthur Wil- 
son, and Geo. Young. 

It is interesting to note that 16 of 
the entries are within two and a 
half miles of Wareham corner, an 
area in which there .-ere but six 
entries least year. This would seem 
fair indication of the popularity of 
these Home Improvement Contests. 
Indeed, there are eight contestants 
within one and three-quarter miles 
on the Third Line, Osprey, only two 
of whom ever entered the contest 
before. 

It is realized that the shortage of 
help on the farm may prevent the 
carryin,' out of many much-desired 
improvements, yet it is hoped that 
this may not prove too serious a 
handicap, but that very definite im- 
provements may be accomplished. 
These need not be costly, in terms 
of money, as the planting of trees, 
shrubs and flowers, the cleaning up 
of rubbish or weed-infested corners, 
improving of lanes, gateways or 
buildings, the whitewashing of 
stables, or the application of naint 
<. /en around windows and doors, can 
result in a very marked change of 
appearance. True, all cannot win the 
first prize, nor even tenth, yet if the 
contest results in each of these rural 
homes becoming a greater source of 
pride and satisfaction, not only to 
the members of the family, but te 
the community at large, it will sure 
'y be an effort well wortk while. 

---- column ----

ROCK MILLS SAW MILL 
RUNS TO CAPACITY 

(By Rock Mills Correspondent) 
The saw mill here owned by the 
Durham Furniture Company, com- 
menced work on Monday, May 5th. 
arjd is in full operation. There is a 
large stock of logs in the yard* 
around *-* million feet, and atfll 
more is to De .. - > tn the- mill 
when the roads are in conm. m^ 
mtfl will operate continuously lor in. 
least the next six months. 

Driven by steam supplied by two 
large boilers, the plant ia operated 
by a crew of 15 men, including the 
manager, Mr. J. A. Foster. Custom 
work is also done at the mill and 
many farmers brin in logs to have 
made into lumber for their o-*n use, 
Most of the output of the plant is 
trucked to Durham and manufactured 
into furniture in their large factory 
there. Much of the saw dust and 
wood is also used for firing the boil- 
ers and a ready, sale is found for the 
remainder of '"the wood, which is 
usually cut in different lengths. 

New Domnion Victory 

Loan Coming in July 

Canada's forthcoming war loan, 
the third of the present war, will be 
offered to the public in a campaign 
starting June 2nd, Finance Minister 
Ilsley announced Friday. He said 
the amount of the loan and the terms 
have yet to be determined. 

The loan will be called "Victory 
Loan 1941." 

Mr. Ilsley, in announcing the name 
and date of the loan, said: "Every 
dollar we spend in waging war is 
spent to bring victory. It will be' 
Canada's Victory Loan". The forth- 
coming loan, therefore, name express- 
es at once the determination, faith 
and purpose of the people of Canada.'' 

Mr. Ilsley said a national com- 
mittee has been set up with strong 
representation in every province.. 
The honourary chairman of the 
national committee are two former 
Ministers of finance, Rt. Hon. Sir- 
Thomas White of Toronto, and Hon.. 
C. A. Dunning of Ottawa. 

---- column ----

Flesherton United Church 

iiEV. G. K. MCMILLAN, B.A., BJ>_ 

Minister 

10.00 a.m. Ce- Ion. 
11.00 a.m. Flesherton. 

i 7.30 p.m. Flesherton. 

At the morninf service Mother's 
Day will be observed. Young people 
from the Sunday School will take 
part in the service and the Sacra- 
ment of Baptism will be observed. 

At the evening service Mr. McMill- 
an will speak on Daphne Du Marier's 
book "Come Wind, Come Weather," 
which is a series of stories depicting 
the courageous manner in which the 
people of Britain are facinc the 
challenge of the hour. 

---- column ----

Flesherton Baptist Church. 

Minister: 3ev. Frp^ Ast-'o' 1 

---- column ----

Services Fleherton. 

11 a.m. Worship. 

12 noon, Bible School. 
7 p.m., Gospel Service. 

Monday at 8 p.m. Y. P. Service, 
^ock Mills 

2 p.m., Bible School. 

3 p.m., Worship. 

---- column ----

Gospel Workers' Church 

Feversham. Ont. 
Rev. C. McNichol. Pastor 

Si nday School at 10.00 a.m. 
Morning Service at 11.00 a.m. 
Evening Service at 7.30 p.m. 

---- column ----

Former Minister Preached 

Rev. J. B. McLaren of Oakville 
preached in the Flesherton Baptist 
church on Sunday. Rev. McLaren 
was a former pastor in the Baptist 
church here, having been resident 
minister in 1911 and 1912. He is now 
superannuated and residing at Oak- 
ville. Rev. McLaren will again be 
present in Flesherton this coming 
Sunday and will preach in th local 
church at 11 a.m. and 7.30 p.m., and 
at Rock Mills at 3 p.m. 

---- column ----

Card of Thanks 

---- column ----

Maxwell United Church 

JEV. GEO. L. MERCER. B.D.. D.D. 

Minister 
MOTHER'S DAY 

Sunday. May llth, 1941 

11 a.m. Eugenia. 

2 p.m. Mt. Zion. 

3.30 p.m. Wareham. 

7.30 p.m. Maxwell. 
Notes: This age is one of celebra- 
I tions. Scarcely a week passes with- 
out its "observance" an anniversary 
of something or other. In the great 
list, however, none has a more uni- 
versal appeal than "MOTHER'S 
DAY.'* which falls on Sunday next. 
It is not too much that for one day 
in the whole year the thoughts of 
mankind should turn towards that 
loving personality who taught the 
lisping tongue to speak and build so 
many castles in the air for those who 
are carrying to-day the burdens of 
life for themselves. 

A special program betfitting the 
occasion, will be followed in all our 
churches on Surday. Special remem- 
brance will be given to all mothers, 
and the choirs will render many of 
the old songs that are partiaularly 
suitable to the day. We invite you 
to attend the services of this day, 
either in honour of or in memory of 
your mother. 

---- column ----

Mrs. Thos. Wauchope, Lioyd, Gor- 
don and Doris, wish to express their 
appreciation for the many kind words 
of sympathy expressed in the pass- 
ing of their daughter and sister, Mrs. 
John Neilson. 

---- column ----

Mrs. Fred Gorrell spent the first of 
the week in Toronto. 

It does look as though TurV< had 
followed thp noor nlan of delavinr 
action until Germany was ready to 1 
deal with her seperateTv. 
---- page ----

---- column ----

Main 

to Sun Canal 

Railroad* 

Oil Pipelines 

---- column ----

ar British Base* 

---- column ----

Kayser 

W $ 

---- column ----

Supply port for 
Turks U Istanbul, 
west Turkey fall 

---- column ----

French army here 

might resist Nazis, 

submit, or even aid 

in attacking Suet 

---- column ----

\pMtt. 

---- column ----

Beirn 
Mediterranean Sea 

---- column ----

MM* paths 
Oennar. air 
.cks on Sues 

---- column ----

^- UB oucmi - 

x?7A Xs 

---- column ----

British warship 
power would be 

---- column ----

SAUDI ARABIA 

---- column ----


---- column ----

Any Uerman drive on the Suez C'anal will have to be a land and air campaign, for British wars 
control the eastern Mediterranean. Map show* highways and railroads Xazi troops would probably 
tn a pincers us-ault on Suez from positions now held in Greece and Libya. 

---- column ----

hips 
use 

---- column ----

HAVE 
YOD HEARD? 

---- column ----

The highspeed salesman had 
joined the Army, gone into action, 
xisn wounded. For several days 
4t* lay delirious, but eventually 
* turned the corner. 

On the first day of his recov- 
ery he was surprised to see all 
.th nurses standing around his 
ft*i, offering him money. 

"What's this for?" he aiked. 

"Why for the radio and refrig- 
erators, you sold us whil you 
w*re unconscious," they chorused. 

---- column ----

Teacher: "Robert, what ar* 
you going to do when you 
grow up?" 

Robert: "I'm going to be a 
grandfather and juit tit 
round telling everybody how 
cold the winter* were wken 
I wai a boy." 

---- column ----

One of John's best friends had 
4ied so he called on the widow 
express his sympathy. 

"John and I were friends," he 
aid. "Isn't there something I 
could have as a memento of him?" 

She raised her velvety brown 
eyes, which a few seconds before 
had been wet with tears. 

"How would I do?" she asked. 

Brown: If you had $20 in 
your pocket right now, how 
would you feel? 

Hawltin: I'd think 1 h.d 
lomeone eUe't trouien on. 

The prisoner was a very tough- 
looking customer. He was asked 
whether he could read or write. 

''I can write but I cannot read," 
was the reply. 

He was then asked to write his 
tame and after he had scrawled 
huge letters over the page was 
asked what it meant. 

"I dunno," said the man, "I 
told you I can't read." 

---- column ----

The Nazi leaden wer 
playing contract bridge in 
Hnl< I'N mountain retreat. 

"Three diamond*/' laid 
Coering. 

"No bid," (aid GoebbeU. 

''Five diamondi," laid von 
Ribbentrop. 

"One club," a!d Hitler. 

"P.M." 

"Paw." 

"Pa..." 

---- column ----

Dog Often Has 
Cause to Bite 

Toronto Human* Society De- 
fends Canine Offender*, Un 
le*i They're Plain Vicious 

---- column ----

A'.tUough the Toronto Humnue 
<4lety kennels frequently have 
4w undor ohscrx ulion fur the city 
heaJtb depurlmeut, they have never 
*n.,.. a .nine ctute of rablen. 
"TbU Indicates how litlle tlie To- 
ronto piililin tins Io (ear 'dog duys,' " 
V i. B. i; i.Mnii n eiitliimiaHlic 
b'Unaitu sorirly worker, states. 

'or J'J >'-.ir~, Mrs. hamh has 
haard (iim>|)liilius lodged with th* 
eoclfety. 'Most .i.,.^ bite oulv for 
etauiHlila icusona, not betaus* th*y 
** vlnUiim." sh* contend*. 

THASUD BY CHILDRIBN 

Mr*. l,nu, i, enplaU!*d t*At doy* 

4*Ji >. i for uli.M' vuiinii lik-. h**n 

MJI(> of lilting- some IM. rsofl. 

*The animal may b* atari led; 
%(Mru i.,M8 and annoy hUu, or 
OUIIKJJII imknowlntly troad* on tiU 
fuet r Ull. i'n r*ai)on* U auto- 
m**l* and usually th* do* I* M 
torn m* his rlotlm for hli momen- 
BIT ! '" of self control," she said. 

---- column ----

Begin Building 
Seven Airports 

To Connect Edmonton nd 
Whltehorse In Yukon: Will 
Aid U. 8. 

---- column ----

Coincident with the report from 
Washington that United States has 
embarked on air base ami other 
defence projects in Alaska to cost 
more than $55,000,000, transport 
department official! In Ottawa late 
la April were advteed work on each 
of the> aeveu airport* conuecting 
EMiuonton with Whltehorse In the 
Yukon has been itarted. 

"Men are on the ground at ev- 
ery sits chosen for an airport 
across northern Canada from Ed- 
monton to near the Alaska border," 
a department spokesman said. "W 
are confident all the bases will h 
completed during the summer." 

He said that with the completion 
of these seven bases. United States 
plaues could cross the border at 
any point, connect with tlie trans- 
Canada air route and us* In beams 
and other facilities to Kdmonton 
where they could swing onto th* 
Bdmouton-Whitehors route also 
provided with ail modem facilities 
to take them Into Alaska. 

The Edmonton-Whlteborse rout* 
was decided upon following recom- 
mendations from the Canada-Unit- 
ed States defence commission and 
the bases are being built by the 
transport department. 

---- column ----

What Science 
Is Doing 

BRAIN FLUID SLOWS HEART 

The brain Contain* chemical 
which can slow th heart beat, 
and lemon peel another that re- 
duces blood pressure. These Ii 
coveries were reported last week 
to the Federation of American 
Societies for Experimental Biol- 
ogy. 

The brain chemical seams to b* 
produced continuously in th* 
head, and presumably in the brain 
itself. It passes along the blood 
stream and acts directly on th* 
heart, 

o 
NEW SLEEP DRUG 

A new sleep-producinif drug, 
oxazoledione, which is safe be- 
cause an overdose is virtually im- 
possible, was announced last week 
to the Federation of American 
Societies for Kxperimental Uiolo- 
by. More than half a pound can 
b* riven a 160-pound person 
without bud effects. 

CANCER AGENT EVERY- 
WHERE 

Kvitknce that the mechanism of 
cancer is dormant in all healthy 
tissue relis in the form of ntiuute 
particles about one three-hundrod- 
auit fifty thousandth of an inch 
in diameter was presented last 
week. 

The suspected particles are 
known an mitochondria. 

PLASMA FROM CATTLE 
BLOOD 

Blood pla.'unu, the life fluid ;ir- 
Kently needed l>y bonili-.-trickcn 
Hritain. soon may he obtained 
from the blood of slaughtered 
rattle, Dr. Morris Fishbein, editor 
of the journal of tht American 
Medical Association, declure*. Re- 
Marchers working toward that *n4 
have produced promising remit*) 
Dr. Tlshhein 

---- column ----

Etiquette 

---- column ----

BY KUBER1A LEE 

---- column ----

1. What reply should ons 
mak* when being introduced to a 
stranger and he says he remem- 
bers a previous meeting? 

2. Isn't it rude for wedding 
guests to throw rice at the bride 
and bridegroom? 

3. When a hostess has waited 
15 or 20 minutes for a tardy din- 
ner guest, should she telephone 
to see why he is delayed? 

4. When entertaining a group 
of persons, whose duty is it to 
see that conversation doei not 
lag? 

5. Should a husband or a wif* 
ver criticize tho other about per- 
sonal things, when in the com- 
pany of others? 

6. Should one use a knife or 
fork to place butter on a potato? 

Antwer 

1. Be tactful enough to say, 
"How kind of you to remember 
me," and try to recall the meet- 
ing. 2. No. This is an old cus- 
tom that is still observed, and ne 
one should resent it. 3. No. Sh* 
is privileged to go ahead and have 
dinner served. 4. This is thi 
duty of th* hostess; but a con- 
genial group " . never at a loss 
for conversational subjects. 5. 
Never; not even jokingly, b'. Th* 
fork should he used. 

---- column ----

Trained Coyote 

Claims of extraordinary hunt- 
ing ability are made bf Arthur 
Nelson, of Springfield, Idaho, for 
his favorite hunting companion 
a full-blooded coyote. Th* ani- 
mal was taken from a litter of 
five coyotes. It has been raised 
liUe a dog. Nelson says the coy- 
ote has no peer at pointing pheas- 
ants. His speed also makes th* 
coyot* a good rabbit hunter, h* 
said. 

---- column ----

SAFES 

l-...i,.i .MI, HOOK* mill < ASH 
from i . ,< i Hnd i in i v !:*>. We 
have .< HII, I type of - ..i, or 
' .'.MiM-t. fur aur iiurpone. Vlll 
UN, t.r v.ii.,- for i-.i. ,-v etc. to 
II.-IH W. 

J.6CJ. TAYLOR LIMIT co 

TORONTO SAFE WORKS 

tin i mm >. i:,, i ...i. in,. 

I'JultiblUhril is.-..-, . 

---- column ----

Ask your Corn 
entalive. or write: 
SELBY DISTRIBUTORS, Ltd. 
Stlby, Onlirla 

---- column ----

MIDDLE-AGE 
WOMEN 

HE to I Hit ADVICE 1 1 

Thousand! of women 
KoamUlngtbru'trjnai 
nmM" with I.yiit T 
r nkimiu 1 . Vegetable 
imp on ad famou* 
lor over W y*an In re- 
Unvlnt female func- 
tlotml troublei. Tiy It! 

---- column ----

Con I? 

---- column ----

BV ANNE ASHLEY 

---- column ----

Q. How can I make my teth 
whiter? 

A. Apply a solution of perox- 
ide of hydrogen diluted with on*- 
half water to tho teeth. 

Q. How can I cause paint to 
adhere to new tin? 

A. Rub the surface of th tin 
first with pumice powder, or 
sandpaper, and apply shellac. Be 
sure the tin is free of grease be- 
fore beginning the work. 

Q. How can I clean whit* 
woodwork most effectively? 

A. Heat a pint of milk in a 
pint of water, and then add ona 
tablespoon of kerosene. Apply 
and polish immediately with a soft 
cloth. 

Q. How can I remove shin* 
from serge? 

A. Sponge the serge with hot 
vinegar before pressing it. 

Q. How can I remove perfum* 
spot* from furniture? 

A. Perfume spots on furniture 
should be smeared with linseed 
oil, olive oil, or camphorated oil 
immediately. Mop up, and apply 
more oil on a woolen cloth. 

Q. How can I keep a kitchen 
sink free of grease and disagree- 
able odors? 

A. Try pouring a strong solu- 
tion of hot water and salt through 
the sink and drain at least once 
a week. 

---- column ----

Four Main Factors 
In Dairy Success 

Good Farmers Must Combln* 
Them to Develop Worthwhile 
Business Efficiency Is Es- 
sential 

---- column ----

K building up a successful dairy 
business, states the War Time> Pro- 
duction Series bulletin "Success In 
Dairy Farming," issued by the Agri- 
cultural Supplies Board, good farm- 
ers pay particular attention to four 
main factors rates of production 
of live stock and crops; efficient 
nan of labour; efficient use of cap- 
ital including farm Implements; 
and a sufficiently large output with- 
out which low operating costs can- 
not in, established. 

Tbr four fartors are related 
and must be combined to develop 
successful farm business. Full iu- 
formrtlou un the various angles of 
management are given in the bul- 
letin. It also contains tabulated fig- 
ures showing a financial summary 
of the average farm business from 
which milk was sold for fluid con- 
sumption In Onario, 1937-38, and 

---- column ----

GROWN IN SUNNY, SOUTHERN ONTARIO 

---- column ----

second table of figure* giving a 
comparison of lh revenue from 
different saurcei (crops, dairy, 
hogs, and poultry on all farm* 
with th revenue from the two 
most successful farms on each 
milk marketing zon-e of Ontario 
from which milk wa sold for fluid 
consumption. The bulletin may be 
obtained free on request from the 
Publicity and Extension Division, 
Dominion Department of Agricul- 
ture. Ottawa. 

---- column ----

World War Map 

A World War Map in colour 
ihowing all Important event* up to 
date clearly marked if be>ing sold 
by direct mull. The dates of events. 
population of different countries. 
also agricultural and mineral areas 
are bhown. This map U very use- 
ful la following the war day by day 
and you would be well advised to 
order a copy. Simply send 26c to 
tu< Colonial Distributors, Limited, 
253 Qtiee-n St.. West, Toronto and 
your WORLD WAR MAP will 
be st-nt to you immediately. 

---- column ----

Ancient City 
Of Salonika 

---- column ----

Wars, Quakes and Trad* 
Highlight of Greek Port 

---- column ----

Salonika Is described by an an- 
oient writer as, "The covered city 
crouching on the side of a hill and 
touching tlie sea with her feet," 
nays Ernest D. McCurry in the Kan- 
sas City Star. 

"THESSALONICA" 

This second city of Greece was 
of little importance until Klug Cas- 
sandra of the Macedonian line took 
possession of it, and re-trained It 
"Thessalouica" in honour of his 
wif t >, the daughter of Philip, of 
Mafn!on and sister of Alexander 
the (.ireat. It was called "Salonique" 
by th French, but the Gre-eks, in 
the Interest of brevity called it 
"Salonica" which In moilorn times 
has been changed to "Salonika." 

---- column ----

CITY OF THE AGES 
This city on the shore of th* 
Aegean Sea is a veritable city of 
the ages, aud so ancient that Uu 
time of ito beginning la loot in 
obscurity. 

It was the second stopping plac* 
of the Apostle Paul, who in re- 
sponse to a call which had come to 
him in a night vision, crossed the 
Aegean Set and landed In this city. 
Late? from Corinth in 54 A.D., he 
wrote the first of his many 'ettera 
to the church which he had found- 
ed at Thessalonlca. 

MODERN SALONIKA 
The city of Salonika is a modern 
Babel, not only of languages, but 
also of races and religions, cus- 
toms and now German by occupa- 
tion, its population Is predominant- 
ly Turkish, with the Jews ranking 
second, and the Greeks themselves 
a poor third. 

---- column ----

CREAM 

Why not support your own 
Company? Highest prices. 
DAILY PAYMENTS 
Write for Can* 

Toronto Creamery 

branch of 
raited Farmers Co-operative 

< .... Ltd. 

< ->r. Duke * George M. 
Toronto 

---- column ----

...CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS... 

---- column ----

li. I \ is WAVI'EO 

---- column ----

XHnra ROP AGENT WANTED 
to aell I'hlllips Lightning Protec- 
tive System. B. Phillip* Company 
Limited, 32 Osborrm Avenue. To- 
ronto. 

II UIY CHICK!! 

Ql'AUTV KMBHVO I'KD CHICKS 
from Purina Fed (locks, Barred 
Rocki and White Leghorns, bred 
for meat and eggs, blood tested, 
our flock* are rigidly culled 
110.00 per hundred. $15.00 for two 
weeks old. Kelly Chick Hatchery, 
Uarrie, Ontario. 

PRODUCERS OF CHICKS FOR It 
years, barred rocks bred to lay 
and S. I,'. W. Leghorns Barroa 
train. None but large eggs set. 
Bock* and leghorns as hatched 
8 cents, Hock pullets 15 cents. 
IjOffhorn pullets 18 cents. Every 
chick Is from blood tested breed- 
era. Satisfaction guaranteed. $1.00 
Looks your order. J. D. Johnson, 
Fergus, Out. 

LAST YEAU A BRAY CUSTOMER 

l...:ttfht -.".0 April chicks; by Oc- 
tober 1 !><> averaged 70 Vo produc- 
tion, liray chicks aro for poultry- 
keopera who want results. Bruy 
jturted pullets are good bets for 
th early market money. Rocks, 
Reds, N.M. x L.s. wise choices for 
present buyliiK. Bray Hatchery, 
ISO John N.. Hamilton, Ont. 

IMiKr. YALt/AHLE GIFTS FOR 
uvevyone In th* family providing 
you pines your order for Tweddle 
Muy and June chicks at least ten 
dnya In advance of delivery date. 
Send for illustrated folder show- 
Ing premium, also IDll catalogue 
ii Md new low price list for May and 
.hiiio. 16 pure breeds, g Hybrids. 
4 breeds of turkeya to choote 
from. Tweddle Chick Hatcheries 
Limited. 

3S fin I CHICKS 

wiT.li BVKnr 100 PULLETS or ion 

mixed chicks ordered, we give 25 
free chick*. Pullets $15.00 to $19.00 
per 100: Mixed Chlcka $8.00 to 
S10.no per 100; Cockerels per 100 
Iit?ht breeds, $1.50; heavy breeds. 
Sjl.flO. Immediate delivery. Goddard 
chick Hal'chery, Britannia 
HoieMs, Ont. 

IM.VIIIIKHS 1 SIH'I'MKS 

BAIS<;.\1N riUCKS, VJATHTUBH. 
toilets, sinks, furnaces, alr- 
oondltlonlng, pipe, valves, fitting*. 
Shallow Well electric pump com- 
plete with 30 gallon tank, $74.50. 
Inquiries welcomed. Patkin Supply 
Company, 216 Bnrton Street K.. 
Hamilton, Ontario. 

ii llvf.lt 1 EQUIPMENT 

tAKKTtS' OVENS AND MACH1N- 
ry, also rebuilt equipment al- 
ways on hanrt. Termi arranged. 
Correspondence Invited. Hubbanl 
Portable Oven Co., 10S Bathurit 
St.. Toronto. 

CARS, NEW AND USED 

MOl'NT PLEASANT MOTORS LTD., 
Toronto's oldest Chrysler, Plym- 
outh dealers; three location*, II! 
Mt. Pleasant Road, 2040 Yongre St., 
1650 linn forth Avenue. Our Used 
Cara mnko II.H many friends. 

---- column ----

FOR HvrcHixa 

---- column ----

BUFF OKl'l.VGTON" lll'CKS, 300 
Kg? strain, Ideal meat and white 
egg variety. Buy th best. Kpg 
$1.00 per d0S*ML I.arger lots eight 
Cfnts each. Buff Valley Farm, 
Em 261. IHindna. Ontario. _ 

T.XHAl'ST 

---- column ----

EXHAUST FANS, NEW GENERAL 
Electrics, way under wholesale. 
Toronto Mercantile. tJ Mcllnda, 

Toront 1. 

---- column ----

$$$ \\K BUY HUNDREDS DIFFER- 
ent Herbs, Koots, Barks. Write 
Dominion Herb Distributors, Dept. 
u, 1I2S Main, Montreal. _ 

HKI.1 WAXTKD 

DOMESTIC HKLP IN TORONTO 
doctor's home: two children. State 
salary expected. Mrs. Malowuey, 

3'j F.'.ir'uik Avi'.. Toronto. _ 

---- column ----

J. N. LINDSAY. LAW OFFICE, CAP- 
llol Theatre Building, St. Thomas, 
Ontario. Special Department for 

f.'rmc-r-i collections. _ 

I. II. II I MM. RODS 

I.UiHT.N'INU lions. BUY FROM 
manufacturer. Save thirty to forty 
per cent. Phillips Company, 82 
Oaborne Avcnuo. Toronto. 

MKIIICAf* 

IT'S I. Ml 'OUT A NT EVERY SUF- 
ferar of Ithcumntlc pains or Neur- 
itis should try L'xon'H Remedy. 
Munro's Druar Store. 335 Elgin St.. 
Ottawa. Jl.OO postpaid. 

KU. Mcl.IWIvs STOMAC'HK' MK.VI.S 
obstinate Stomach Trouble: L'ser 
Htates: For years I suffered Ter- 
rlblo snawin.ir pains below Breant- 
bone, few hour." after er.tinfr, 
causing: KS and bloaliiif*. My only 
relief win soda and that only for 
hort time. Then I took Dr. Mc- 
L,eo<l's Stomachic. Aftc-r three 
bottles 1 iv, * free from pain. I 
Itept on Impi'ovinK and hnve now 
been "well for Hpv,.-r:i! years, en- 
,<oyln;r moalw without medicine. 
Clood for all forms of iB&jLKMtlOB. 
r>ru(f Stor or write Dr. Mcl,eod' 
Stomachic Co.. 53S Mathiirnt, To- 
rolitu. tl.i.'i ptT hottle t>tisl|)nid. 

M ll-l in STOCK 

IIIGDKST $1,00 (J.UIOEN! 21 PKH- 
eiinlals jUelphlnlum, Dianthua 
f jovellnoss, Concflower. K?al 
Lily, Oriental Poppy, Chrysanthe- 
mum, others: Sugar Maple; Cedar; 
4 Shrubs; 260 Seeds. Prepaid. Two 
orders $1.80. DOLUAR NURSER- 
IES, Fonthlll. Ontario. 

CUAMKR NURSERIES, R I D a BJ- 
i lie. Kask., I .iln.vi. Honoysucklea, 
flowerinff 6, $1.6"; Flowering 
perennial collection 30, $1.00; Car- 
iiKana or Asparagus three years 
100, $1.25. 

DAHUA SI'ECIAL 15 BULBS, 18 
varlotld exhibition Champagne, 
other beauties $1.00 postpaid. 
Gladiolus speol.il from named var- 

ieties, I'ic.'irdy. C;i rinni, Sylvln, 
other K.-UHIU-S. 10ft for 11.7". post- 
paid. K. Walker, Scotland, Onlariu. 

---- column ----

MK.V A\D WOMK.V WAM'ED 

MAKE EXCEI.I.K.NT I'KOKTS 
full or spare time. su-lllng from 
d<x>r to door 200 products of the 
highest Duality, gulolc Sales. Low- 
Price?. Blsr repeat Orders. Medium 
territory will yield bnt returns. 
Only expeii.se to start: i'ASI-[ POR- 
CUAS1NO ttERCHANOISB. Work 
on foot In a local territory. FltKhJ 
l>ETATLf and CATALOniiK: S70 
St. flpim-nt. Muntrr.'il (I.'AMII.KX.) 

PATRIOTIC' STICKKHS 

HL'XI>RBr T'ATRIOTli' MAILING 
stickers. Thoro'll Always He An 
England Sue postpaid. Znlek 
YiM-tliM), AV.'uvbew.-nv:., On . io. 

OFFER TO IXVK.VTORS 

AN OFFER TO EVIH'.V INVK.NTOR 
List of inventions and full Infor- 
mation sent frpe. The Rnmsay 
Co., Registered. Patent Attorneya, 
27S Bank Street. Ottawa. Canada. 

---- column ----

coou ADVICK: EVEIIY st'r 

of Rheumatic Pains or Neuritis 
should try Pixon's Rcinody. Mun- 
ro'si Drugr Store. 33.') Elgin. Ot- 
t;iwa, $1.00 postpaid. 

SNAPSHOTS TO-DAY 
TREASURES TO-MORROW 

Your films are carefully and scien- 
tifically processed by Imperial, to 
make sure they last. 

or 8 i \INIM id i ii M . SBe 
with beautiful enlargement free. 
8 reprints with enlargement 2Bc. 
Thousands of letters from satiafled 
customers testify to our superior 
quality and service. 

IMPERIAL PHOTO SERV1CB 
Uept D, Station J, Toronto. 

---- column ----

CXCiRAUED 

---- column ----

vx \\ n;n 

---- column ----

WW SUPPLY CASES AND PAT 
highest Market Prices. Further 
particulars apply Canadian Pro- 
vision & Supply Company. 10> 

Front Street Bast, Toronto. 

ITSEU CLOTHING 

MODERN, CLEAN 1'SEU CLOTH - 
lug. Ludic.s', Men's, and Children's 
wear. Lowest prices, 327 Queen 
East. Toronto. Agonta wanted. 

WAXTKD TO PVRCU1SF! 

FEATHERS WANTED 

NEW AND USED GOOSE AND 
Duck, also feather beds, Hlglicat 
prices paid. Send particular* to 
Queen City feather, 23 Baldwin, 
Toronto, 

Guaranteed 

CAR AND TRUCK PARTS 

Used New 

---- column ----

K< I Vl.l/.l \l. |K 

roits. l'0>\ KIl-lMT.S, n, dr. Klli 

llul.lH. WlllVhM, l.rni'i-m,.,!, ttUrl- 

er, Maoeto*, Curbnretor*, H4I(- 
or* Kxchance Nervier. <<lna 

MllUr,,.-!!,,. ,.r r. I ,l,,il. I " ~ 

I'urU, it.-iu J., -i ..,.,,!. 
---- page ----

---- column ----

SUNDAY 
SCHOOL 
LESSON 

---- column ----

LESSON VI 

THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE 
HOME REGARDING BEVER- 
AGE ALCOHOL 
Deut. 6:4-7; Jar. 35:5-10 

GOLDEN TEXT Train up . 
child la th wy h should go, 
And even when h I* old ha will 
not depart from it. Prov. 22:6. 
THE LESSON IN ITS SETTING 

Tim* The book of Deuteron- 
omy waa written somewhere be- 
tween 1450 and 1500 B.C. The 
particular chapter here quoted 
from the book of Jeremiah waa 
probably composed about 604 B.C. 

Place The entire book of Deu- 
teronomy is devoted to truth re- 
vealed to Israel while she was 
wandering for forty years in the 
wilderness. 

Tha On. Tru God 

Dout. 6:4. "Rear, O Israel : 
Jehovah our God la one Jehovah." 
This declaration asserts that the 
Lord God of I.-iratl alone is 
Jehovah tiie absolute, uncaused 
God; He who had by Hi* 
election of them made Him- 
self known to Israel. 5. "And 
thou shalt love Jehovah thy God 
with all thy heart, and with all 
thy soul, and with all thy might." 
Now, If there be any single attri- 
bute hi which the moral character 
of the Supreme attains to unity, 
that attribute is His love. The 
characteristic attitude assumed by 
Jehovah in Old and New Testa- 
ment revelation, and particularly 
in the Gospel, is this of a Saviour 
from every evil. Well, let that be 
the rekHonship under which we 
have learned to welcome, em- 
brace, and confide in God through 
Jesus Christ; and we shall find 
that we have welcome, pure 
and boundless love. Those words 
of Deuteronomy which our Lord 
recited to the scribe and which, 
they say, every Jew was expected 
to recite to himself morning and 
evening at his devotions, form a 
most penetrating commentary on 
the First Law in the Decalogue; 
and you see how they tax lang- 
uage to express totality of dedi- 
cation on our part to this love of 
God. Every part of every man, 
and the whole of every part, it 
to be filled with love. 

Teach Unto Your Children 

6. "And these words, which I 
command thee this day, shall be 
upon thy heart. 7. And thou 
shalt teach them diligently unto 
thy children, and shalt talk of 
them when thou sittest in thy 
house, and when thou walkest by 
the way, and when thou liest 
down, and when thou risest up." 
Here Is a religion which coven 
the whole day, which belongs to 
very attitude of man. The en- 
trance of Divine truth into the 
mind and heart, the formation of 
habit and the training of charac- 
ter, these are not attained by sud- 
den and isolated efforts, but by 
regular and unceasing repetition. 
This ia the law of all growth in 
nature, and of this law God seeks 
to make use in the kingdom of 
grace, in dependence upon and 
iubsrvient to the power of the 
Holy Spirit. 

Tha Loyal Rechabitet 

The founder of the fraternity 
of Rechabites ("Son of Kechab" 
may mean "son of the chariot" 
or "disciple of the great proph- 
et") was Jonadab who appears 
as the ally of Jehu in the over- 
throw of the house of Ahab. From 
I Chron. 2:55 it appears that the 
house of Rcrhab belonged to the 
Kenites who had joined the Israel- 
ites on their exodus from Egypt, 
and had settled In their lands, re- 
taining many of the old habits of 
patriarchal life. 

Jeremiah 35:5. "And I set be- 
fore the sons of the house of the 
Rechabites bowls full of wine, 
and cups; and I said unto them, 
Drink ye wine." 

It la not said that Jeremiah de- 
liberately attempted to seduce 
these Rechabites to lead them in- 
to some sin. That is not the 
point. Either Jeremiah urged 
these people to break their former 
vows only that, knowing they 
would stedfastly refuse to do so, 
he might have a powerful illus- 
tration by which to rebuke the 
more easily tempted Israelites 
who were of weaker stuff; or, he 
may have wanted to persuade 
these Rechabites to more closely 
identify themselves with the Is- 
raelites living in Jerusalem, and 
to give up their severe customs 
which kept them separate from all 
their nearby neighbors. They are 
not rebuked for their Stand but 
are really commended. 

"We Will Drink No Wine" 

6. "But they snid, We will 
drink no wine; for Jonadab the 
ion of Kechab, our father, com- 
manded us, snying, Ye shall drink 
no wine, neither ye, nor your sons, 
for ever: 7. neither shall ye 
build house, nor sow seed, nor 
plant vineyard, nor have any; but 
all your days yc shall dwell in 
tents; that yc may live irany days 
in the land wherein ye sojourn. 
8. And we have obeyed the \oice 
of Jonadab the son of Rechab, 
our father, in all that he charged 
ft, to drink BO wine all our days, 

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R.A.F. "Invasion" of U.S. Begins 

---- column ----

To every state in the Union will go a little silver Piper Cub sport 
plane like this one, shown over the lower tip of Manhattan. Marked 
with the insignia of the Royal Air Force, the 48 planes are "invading" 
the U.S. on behalf of the R.A.F. Benevolent Fund of the U.S.A. 

---- column ----

we, our wives, our sons, or our 
daughters; 9. nor to build houses 
for us to dwell in; neither have 
we vineyard, nor field, nor seed: 
10. but we have dwelt In tents, 
and have obeyed, and done ac- 
cording to all that Jonadab our 
father commanded us." 

The Force of Example 

This lesson has primarily to do 
with the teaching and practice of 
temperance in the home. It is 
strongly suggested that if par- 
ents will live wholesome, happy, 
sincere Christian lives before their 
children, being exceedingly care- 
ful in thought and in act to main- 
tain the practice of constant ab- 
stinence from intoxicating bever- 
ages, the children themselves will 
adopt some of these convictions. 
This we believe is the best way 
to approach the problem. 

---- column ----

Amateur Knitter? 

It is often difficult to gather 
the top of a knitted skirt to fit 
th waist elastic properly. First 
measure the elastic firmly round 
the waist and join end?, then 
stretch this over a chair back 
which is the same width as the 
top of the knitted skirt and seam 
the knitting to the elastic with 
matching wool or silk. When re- 
moved from the chair the skirt 
will have even fullness and will 
stretch to the right hip measure- 
ments when it is being pulled on. 

---- column ----

First Airman 

---- column ----

England's first airman is taid 
to have been James Sadler, of Ox- 
ford. He made the first success- 
ful ascent in that country in 1874. 

---- column ----

RADIO REPORTER 

---- column ----

B DAVE ROBBINS 

---- column ----

WHAT CANADA'S DOING 

Allister Grosart, who has travel- 
led across Canada as the Depart- 
ment of Information's official 
broadcast observer, will give the 
first of his impressions of Can- 
ada at work on the home front 
when he speaks from Toronto to 
listeners of the CBC National 
Network on Friday. May 9th, at 
7.30 p.m. E.D.S.T. Mr. Grosart, 
a former Toronto newspaperman, 
has seen everything from patrol 
operations up the Pacific coast to 
the voluntary war efforts of Can- 
ada's foreign-born citizens. He 
has just concluded the second leg 
of his observation trip across Can- 
ada with a tour of the Maritime 
Provinces. 

o 
ACCURATE ANALYST 

Canada's best news analyst, 
Dr. E. T. Salmon from the Mc- 
Master University staff, rang the 
bell again on the Balkan cam- 
paign. Dr. Salmon worked in 
the Balkans for a number of years 
as a King's Messenger for the 
British Foreign Office, and the 
war moved into ar. area which he 
knew as well as he knows the 
roads of Ontario. A month be- 
fore the campaign was under way, 
he predicted its development 
along the channels we have watch- 
ed these last few days. Then one 
could turn back and remember 
that Professor Salmon's predic- 
tions were working out to be one 
hundred per cent correct. 

You can follow the war with a 
greater understanding and a 
greater knowledge of what each 
move means, by dialing in the 
authoritative summing up by 
Canada's best informed observer. 
He is heard over CROC each week 
night but Saturday at 7.15 Sun- 
days at G.OO p.m. 

---- column ----

AROUND THE DIAL 

A program with a sentimental 
touch is presented over the WOR 
Mutual chain Thursday nights at 
8.15, when Walter Scanlon, out- 
standing concert tenor is heard in 
Songs of Ireland. 

---- column ----

To give you some idea of your 
Government's urgent need of 
money to meet the costs of war, 
the Department of Finance is pre- 
senting a series of radio programs 
entitled "All Star Theatre" Fri- 
day evenings at 10.00, that are 
at once enlightening and enter- 
taining. By dialing in these Fri- 
day evening treats, you can enjoy 
a- top notch program, and at the 
same time, learn where your 
money goes in the cost of war for 
freedom. 

The All Star show brings to 
the microphone each week a par- 
ade of radio, screen, and stage 
stars from Hollywood, Britain 
and Canada. This show will thrill 
you. 

o 

Enigmatic Evelyn is cattj 1 at 
times. The other day she re- 
marked: "Some fat girls are wait- 
ing for shapes that never come 
in." 

Trivia: Believe it or not, but 
such tough fellows as Jack Dcmp- 
sey, Mas Baer and Lou Nova all 
are victims of "Mike Fright" 
when they so in a radio s.udio 
. . . American news commentator 
Elmer Davis has gone to England 
for first-hand look at proceedings 
. . . Band leader Artie Shaw hns 
another mad on and will retire for 
a while . . . Songstress Doily Dawn 
will take over George Hall's 
orchy. 

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POP Depleted Account 

---- column ----

Gardening . . . 

---- column ----

ARTICLE No. 10 

Gardeners are advised to divide 
their vegetable seeds into at least 
three parts, sowing a third as 
soon as the weal her permits, a 
third a little later, and the balance 
at the very tail-end of the plant- 
ing season. In this way if frost 
does cut down the first butch 
there will be more plants coming 
on and the season will be length- 
ened by the last part of the gar- 
den sown. Of course there are 
ome exceptions to this general 
rule. One should not plant out- 
aide tender things like tomatoes, 
peppei'B, melons, etc., until danger 
of frost is over. 

Sow Grass Early 

Grass makes its most rapid 
growth in the cool weather of 
Spring and Fall. On this account, 
lawn work of a new or repair na- 
ture should be carried out just as 
soon as the soil is fit to work. 

After digging, the ground 
should be allowed to settle for a 
few days at least, and then level- 
led again. It is advisable to re- 
peat this process several times. 
The top soil should then be raked 
fine and on a windless day the 
grass sown at a liberal rate, once 
across and once lengthwise. This 
double sowing insures an even 
distribution. It is always best to 
get a good mixture of high qual- 
ity grass seed blended by expert 
Canadian seedsmen. 

Good Tool* Help 

Experts advise one thorough 
digging or spading in the late 
Fall or Spring, or if the lot la a 
large one it will be better to get 
it plowed. Just before either op- 
eration, if the ground is poor it 
!a n splendid idea to have some 
good rotted manure turned under. 
After this spading or plowing it 
will only be necessary to cultivate 
fine with a rake. One thorough 
cultivation like this once a year 
should keep the soil In shape and 
permit one to carry on easily 
with 8 small hand cultivator, or 
Dutch hoe. Either of these inex- 
pensive tools can be operated 
without bending the back and 
both will be sufficient to keep 
the soil stirred and the weeds 
down during the remainder of the 
season. 

---- column ----

Should Control 
Rheumatic Fever 

Rheumatic Infections Could 
Be Curbed If Caught Soon 
Enough Prevention In Chil- 
dren Is the Slogan 

The true prevalence of rheumatic 
infections Is unknown because Uie 
malady is not, like scarlet fever, 
diphtheria, typhoid fever and oth- 
ers, reportable. 

Rheumatic infection Introduces 
us to heart disease which with the 
co-Incident Wood vessel disease 
leads all others In the list of pub- 
lic killers. Rheumatic fever ranks 
"nun among the most severe dis- 
eases; It Is not so amenable to 
prevention as syphilis and tuber- 
culosis. So far we Ing In our ef- 
forts to control this crippling dis- 
ease. 

BEGIN IN SCHOOLS 

Our efforts in the control of 
rheumatism must begin lu the 
schools. Examinations of children 
In schools has uncovered some ap- 
palling facts; SO per cent of the 
total orgnulc heart disease of 
school children has a rheumatic 
origin. This becomes an Important 
problem when we consider that 3 
out of every KM) children are suf- 
ferers. 

POOR SURROUNDINGS PAVOIl 
DISEASE 

Rheumatic conditions seem to be 
more frequent among persons liv- 
ing in poor hygionlc surroundlimr. 
The facts Indicate that poverty, 
malnutrition and unhygienic BUI- 
roumllngs are the most favour:'. h!> 
for the development of rheumatic 
infections. 

Prevention is the slogan in rheu- 
matic fever. The child with jrrow- 
It.g )>;iins, grippe, tonsillitis anil 
sinus attacks should p;'omni!y b- 
put to bed; he should remain in be;! 
until well. Infected tonsils and 
other foci of inftx.'vm sl'ouid 1)^ 
remind]. Children s'l.nild be well 
fed, cliii.;.-il JUKI - 1 fir. It wi!J 
pay handsomely to check the onset 
ami coiiiKO of riii- 'n>'. lie. f> . 

---- column ----

Dairying in Greece 

---- column ----

Hufl'ulocs, milch cows, twes, 
and goats provide ilia milk sup- 
ply of Greece. The milk of buf- 
faloes and cows ia used mainly 
for the liquid market," and the 
milk of wes and goats for mak- 

---- column ----

ing cheese. There are appro* 
mately 220,000 milch cows, 7(1 
000 buffaloes, nearly nine miilic 
sheep and over five and a 
million goats in Greece. The yie 
from cows, goats, and ewes clo 
ly approaches each other, the SU 
ply from buffaloes being i 
times lets. 

---- column ----

THIS CURIOUS WORLD 

---- column ----

By William 
Ferguson 

---- column ----

KNEW THE 
EARTH 

---- column ----

4-pOO VGi^RS 

---- column ----

COUJMSUS 
WAS BC&/V. 

---- column ----

owe POO 

Of* THE 

---- column ----

/V\AY CONTAIN 

350,000 

---- column ----

(SACAPAGO6 ISLANDS 

ARE DUE SOUTH 

SAN FRANCISCO, n 

---- column ----

DENVER, OR. 577 LOUIS 

---- column ----

ANSWER: The. Galapagos Itlands are on the equator, about 
2500 miles due south of St. Louis. They are noted for the huge 

and ancient to: '>.,-;- found .:.u- 

NEXT: What is the only state in the United States i vrJ.ich 
Irrmitrs have not br*n found? 

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CIRCULATION ORGAN 

---- column ----

---- column ----

HORIZONTAL 

1 Organ 

circulating 

blood. 
6 It draws 

together or 

rhytlunicaily. 
13 To mulct. 

15 Rubber 
pencil end. 

16 To fuse 
partially. 

17 Winged. 
19 Slovak. 

21 Ancient. 

22 Workman. 

24 Lixivium. 

25 Railway. 

26 Form of "a." 

27 Distress signal 

29 Musical note, 

30 Desert fruit 

31 Employs. 
33 After song. 
35 Happens 

again. 

37 Either. 

38 Common verb 

39 Form of "I." 

40 Mister. 

41 Pound. 

---- column ----

Answer to Previous Puzzle 

---- column ----

43 Supped. 
45 Stratagem. 

50 Ocean. 

51 Organ 
secreting bile. 

53 Room recess. 

54 Throng of fish 
56 Cake f roster. 
07 Genus of 

chimpanzees. 

59 Gaelic. 

60 It is in 

shape. 

61 It has four 
divisions Or 

---- column ----

VERTICAL 

2 Betimes. 

3 In the middle 
of. 

4 To soak flax. 

5 Transposed. 

6 Ax -shaped 
stone. 

7 Gains. 

8 Buildings 
where money 
is stored. 

9 Sun god. 

10 Onager. 

11 Monk's 
chamber. 

---- column ----

12 Trunk 

drawers. 
14 Auto. 
16 Its action Is 

like a 

pump. 

18 Sloth. 

20 Blood vessels. 

22 Celestial 
being. 

23 3nouts t 
26 To help. 
28 Dry. 

30 Because. 
32 Total. 
34 Colonnade. 
36 To liberate. 
40 Apple acid. 
42 One that bale* 

44 Level. 

45 French. 

46 Spike. 

47 Tree. 

48 Ketch. 

49 Electric term. 

50 Rowan tree. 
52 Silkworm. 
55 Skirt edge. 

57 South 
America. 

58 Exclamo tlon. 

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> 

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' 

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By J. MILLAR WATT 

---- column ----

WMAT ARE- 

YOU 

WORRYING 

---- column ----

;V. *ife'^5- '* m 
AB ? UT 

---- column ----

.- 

' " ",- m 

---- column ----

U'ai I CANT SE9 
* V X THAT ! 

---- column ----

^r? 

---- column ----

MO! 

irs IN THE BANK! 

---- column ----
---- page ----

---- column ----

RVednesday, May 7, 1941 

---- column ----

THE PLESHERTON ADVANCE 

---- column ----

THE 

FLESHERTON ADVANCE 

Published on Collingwood Strwt, 
t'lenherton. Wednesday of adi 
week. Circulation OTW 1,000. 
Price in Canada 92.00 fv year, 
when paid in advance $1.60; in 
(I. 8. A. 12.60 per year, when 
paid in advance $2.00. 

P. J. THURSTON. Editor. 

THE PRESS AND PROPAGANDA 

One of the ever present dangers in 
the publishing field is the possibilit" 
of becoming a propaganda agency 
for some group or cause. Editors 
puard carefully against this possibil- 
ity and their efforts to be fair some- 
times incur the displeasure of those 
whose propaganda thev refuse to 
propagate. Of course there are two 
kinds of propaganda good and bad. 
The word propaganda has been much 
abused in the past few years and to 
the man on the street oropaganda 
now seems to mean exclusively 
that type of news sent out bv the 
enemy to confuse and confound those 
who read it 

Propaganda is aetuallv the method 
adopted for the propagation of doc- 
trines and principles, either religious 
or secular. If there is such a thing 
as gooo propaganda the question 
naturally arises, why does the 
Bewtpaper not become a propa- 
Itanda agency for all propaganda that 
fa rood? As a mater of fact the 
newspaper does become 8u-> an ag- 
ney in a broad senee, but not in 
Just the way that some propagandists 
would have it. For instance, any re- 
Hgious sect might consider its pro^a- 
iranda good, and therefore entitled 
to space in the newspaper. An im- 
portant factor is overlooked how- 
ever In this reasoning. Propaganda 
espoused and supported by a news- 
paper must be of a type generally 
beneficial to the community as a 
whoK It would not be fair or ethical 
to use the propaganda of one church, 
where there are perhaps half a dozen 
churches in the same community. 

Then, to there is often confgusion 
In the minds of many pecple as to 
vhat is news and what ; - ropaganda. 
Tor instance, an item relating to an 
actual event which tjok place in a 
church, or a lodge, or a service <-lub 
would be news. On the other hand 
an item which sought to impress the 
Teader with the principles or the doc- 
trine of the organization would be 
propaganda. In ehort propaganda 

---- column ----

is that type of newsmatter which 
seeks to proselytize or convert the 
reader to one particular code of eth- 
ics, principles or doctrine. 

The position of the newspaper is 
clear on this point The newspaper 
is representative of the whole com- 
munity, and while its editor or pub- 
lisher might be an Anglican, Baptist, 
Presbyterian, United Churchman, or 
Roman Catholic, it would not be fair 
to give undue prominence to the doc- 
trines of the sect to which he person- 
ally belongs. News is another matter. 
If more news comes from the United 
Church because it has more organ- 
izations, or because its press secre- 
taries are more wide awake, then 
naturally that church would receive 
more space in the paper than the 
Anglican or Baptist if those churches 
were not so well organized or did not 
possess good press secretaries. 

Weekly newspapers depend to a 
very large extent upon correspon- 
dents and press secretaries for news 
items, and this being: the caae it is 
timely to remind correspondents and 
secretaries that the newspaper is in- 
terested primarily in the news, -and in 
acting as an agency for the disemin- 
ation of their principles. This reas- 
oning however does not prelude the 
newspaper drawing attention to any 
special effort made by any organi- 
zation or institution within the com- 
munity. 

To sum up the attitude of the press 
toward propaganda it should be 
clearly understood that the press is 
interested in he events concerning 
organizations, rather than the ethics 
or principles which attract one to 
membership in these groups. 

NO TIME FOR STRIKES 

With the allies locked in a life and 
death struggle with Germany this is 
no time for a let-down in any of the 
essential industries engaged in war 
effort. From now on strikes should 
be banned, no matter what the merits 
of the case. The Government aceed 
promptly in the appointment of a 
controller to the Hamilton plant of 
the National Steel Car Corporation, 
Ltd. What strikes the casual ob- 
server is the seemingly trivial pre- 
texts on which many of the disturb- 
ances in war plants are based. With 
the boys in the ranks cheerfully 
giving up positions in civil life and 
carrying on for $1.30 a day, this is 
no time for lockouts or strikes. 

Workmen are in the enjoyment of 
freedom and good wages, and what- 
ever disputes arise they should b 

---- column ----

adjusted in the spirit of compromise 
without any cessation of work. Tho 
trouble in some plants seems to be 
that both sides, employers on the 
one hand and employees on the other, 
have been going around with chips on 
their shoulders ready for trouble. In 
the Hamilton plant the strike was 
called over the dismissal of one man 
whom the company regarded as an 
undesirable character. It is claimed 
that no question of wages, hours or 
working conditions was involved. 
Over this matter, on which would 
seem easy of adjustment, a plant 
busily engaged in the production of 
shells for the British Government 
was put out of business for several 
days. One cannot imagine the boys 
in the ranks going out on strike over 
some fancied grievance, and in the 
future the Government should stand 
prepared to see that workmen in war 
plants are not permitted to do so. 

---- column ----

"Brightenjthe Corner 
Where You Are" 

---- column ----

PAINT UP Paints, Enamels, Varnishes, Turpen- 
tine, Oils, Paint, Brushes. Colors to suit your 
taste! prices to suit your purse. 

CLEAN UP Floor Wax, Polishes, Cleaners, Dust 
Mops, Prooms, Brushes- Paint and Paper 
Cleaners, Scrub Pails. 

FIX UP Roofing, Roof Coating, Plastic Cement, 
Step Ladders, Carpenter's Tools, Lime, Plas- 
ter, Cement. 

Tools for the Lawn and Garden Hoes, Rakes, Lawn 
Mowers, Garden Seeds. 

Watch for our Spring and Summer Catalog. 

---- column ----

F. W. DUNCAN 

---- column ----

HARDWARE 

---- column ----

"Blue Coal" 

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Phone 54 

---- column ----

THERE IS A WAR ON 

The budget has helped to bring 
home to many complacent people the 
fact that there is a war on. For 
some time past not a few people have 
been conducting themselves on a high 
tide, as if there were no breakers 
ahead. The tax on gasoline, enter- 
tainment of a sort, travel and even 
on hone racing will serve to give 
balance. Apart from the present 
Provincial tax of about 8 cento a 
gallon, it is estimated that the new 
Federal impost of 3 cents a gallon 
will cost Ontario motorists about 
$10,000,000 annually. It is generally 
felt that the new gasoline tax will 
hinder the flow of American tourists 
to Canada, which is rather unfortun- 
ate. At first the Government was 
inclined to impose a much higher tax 
on gasoline with refunds to tourists, 
farmers and fishermen, but at the 
last moment this was decided against. 
While a great many people seem 
depressed regarding the new tax it 
is pointed out that it will not bring 
the price of gasoline to the 1927-28 
level. Dealers express the opinion 
that the increase of twenty to twenty- 
five per cent in the tax on automo- 
biles valued up to $900 will have no 
noticeable effects on the sale of new 
cars. 

---- column ----

Lord Ironsides Inspects A, A. Gunners 

---- column ----

Fuld Marshall Lord Ironside, the famous British soldier and former 
Governor of Gibraltar, is seen l&pecting troops of an anti-aircraft regi- 
ment during a tour of Ri tain's defences. 

---- column ----

EUGENIA 

---- column ----

NEED OF CIVIL GUARD 

The Provincial Government is con- 
sidering the advisability of augment- 
ing the strength of the Volunteer 
Civil Guard. The Cards organiza- 
tion was launched in June, 1940, and 
now must be 42,000 in 24 cities, 96 
towns, 17 townships, 10 counties and 
81 villages. Primarily the guards 
were organized to meet the possible 
danger of alien sabotage. Attorney- 
General Conant is of the opinion 
that the guards are more justified or 
even necessary now and for the fu- 
ture than in the past. "The develop- 
ment in the war and particularly 
during recent weeks,'' he said, "makes 
it advisable to reconsider the whole 
situation wfth a view to the possibil- 
ity of future emergencies and the 
need for Volunteer Civil Guard." 

---- column ----

BACK UP WAR LOAN CAMPAIGN 

Premier Hepburn is ranging him- 
self wholeheartedly behind the Dom- 
inion War Loan Campaign which fa 
expected to commence on June 2nd. 
He declared thai the seriousness of 
the war to Canada cannot be over- 
emphasized and it is the duty of 
everyone to lend his full support to 
the raising of money necessary to 
provide planes, tanks, ships, ammuni- 
tion and most important of all, to 
hack up to the limit the efforts of 
those who are fighting our battle. Mr. 
Hepburn asks the Mayors of Ontario 
to iflsue proclamations urging the 
public to decorate their homes and 
offices with flngs during the Domin- 
ion War Loan Campaign. 

---- column ----

Remember the good old days when 
the horses in western movies carried 
cowboys instead of tenors? 

---- column ----

MULTI USE ENAMEL 

---- column ----

FURNITURE, 
WOODWORK, 

noons, TOYS, 

MPUMENTS 

BOATS, .tc. 

---- column ----

Givot o clcor hiflh- 
glotl protocHv* 
to all surface*, 
iniid* or ouKide. 

---- column ----

Rev. Silas McAuslan of Heathcote 
preached an interesting sermon here 
in Sunday, while our minister was in 
Toronto. Next Sunday will be 
Mother's Day, when there will be an 
appropriate service. 

A very delightful social evening 
was held by the Y.P.U Wednesday 
evening of last week. After the 
usual devotional and business periods, 
a program followed, consisting of a 
duet by the Betits sisters, two accord- 
inn selections by Miss I. Dinsmore, a 
solo by Mrs. Cairns, readings by Mrs. 
Martin and Mrs. Cairns, an instru- 
mental by Dennis Campbell and a 
couple of contests. A dainty lunch of 
hot dogs, cake and tea, was served 
which brought a haopy time to a 
close. 

Mr. Lome Paul and Mr. MacKin- 
non of Lucknow visited on Sunday at 
the home of Mr. Bert Magee. 

Congratulations to Mr. Billie Han- 
ley, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. 
Hanley, 8th Line, who was married 
on Saturday to Miss Eleanor Helm- 
kay of Rock Mills. The young couple 
will reside in Toronto where the 
groom has employment. 

The Misses Mary and Isobel McKee 
and Mr. MacArthur of Toronto spent 
the week end at the former's parental 
home. 

Miss Irene Martin of Islington 
spent the week end with her uncle 
and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Kobt. Gorley. 
At the graduation of some of the 
boys at the Wireless School at Mont- 
real a couple of weeks ago, A.C. Ar- 
gyle Martin was chosen as one of the 
50 who formed the Honour Guard for 
the occasion. During the graduating 
services rainy weather prevailed and 
a number of the bovg contracted cold 
which developed into bronchitis, 
pneumonia etc. Argyle is now in the 
St. Anne's Military Hospital at St. 
Anne de Bellevue, Quebec suffering 
with an attack of bronchitis. 

Mr. and Mrs. Blackburn and Mabel 
of Rock Mills were Sunday visitors 
with the Carruthers family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Proctor ac- 
companied by Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Duncan of Flesherton attended the 
funeral of a Mrs. Durant on Friday, 
in northern Ontario. 

Inspector Pentland of Hanover 
made his official visit t* the school 
here this week and also visited with 
Mr. and Mn. Ed Baker 

Pte. Norman Williams of the Tank 
Corps, Camp Borden and Pte. Jack 
Traynor also of Camp Borden were 
week end visitors with friends here. 

Miss Irene Dinsmore spent Sunday 
with Feversham friend*. 

Pte. Doug Cairns of the G. & S 
Foresters now stationed inT*ronto is 
on a 14 day leave at his home here. 

Miss Evelyn Campbell and Miss 
Carmelle Martin spent a few days 
with Miss Violet Duckett of Maxwell. 
Mr. Ben Hanley of Heathcote 
spent the week end at hi narental 
home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Purvis and 
family of Toronto were recent visit- 
ors with Edwin's father, Mr. Robt. 
Purvis. 

Mrs. Jack Cairns and little daught- 
er Shirley spent a few days with 
friends in Mcaford. 

'We are sorry to report Mrs. Robt. 
Smi^h on the sick list. Nurse Robin- 
son of Feversham is in attendance. 
We hone that Mrs. Smith will soon 1 u 
well again. 

We are glad to report that Miss 
Lilian Magee is recovering from her 
illness. 

.A Miss Dorothy Falconer is assisting 
in'household duties at the home her 
mint, Mrs. Percy Magee. Miss Jean 
Phillips is doing likewise at home. 
Both girls attended Flesherton High- 
Sckool and having passed all their 
bests on their years work, must be 
employed on forms until the end of 
June in order to receive their certif- 
icates. 

Miss Winneta Martin has been ( n 
the sick list the past week. 

Miw Margie Park m spending 
awhile with friends in Flesherton. 

Mrs. Morgan of Flesherton is 
spending awhle wifc friends in the 
village. 

Mrs. Ward who has spent the past 
two months in Windsor has returned 
to the Eugenia House and is now 
ready to accomodate tourists, travel- 
lers, fishermen, etc. We wish her 
success in her business. 

---- column ----

F. G. KARSTEDT 
General Merchant Flesherton Ont. 

---- column ----

"THE LAST DITCH' 

Again came war. The tyrant's iron 

men 

Stamped out all trace of democrat- 
ic law. 
They crossed the Danube, Elbe, 

Rhine and Seine, 

They crossed the Oder and the Vist- 
ula. 

Canals of Holland stopped them not 

at all: 
New riven flowed bright red 

where they came by; 
They made all Eurooe tremble at 

their call, 

But could not cross the Strait of 
Dover. Why? 

Because beyond it lies a different 

clay: 
On that fair Isle the folk are grimly 

gay, 
Men with wet feet who will not let 

their land 

Fall, while ships floa* or one pro- 
peller spins, 
For Europe ends at Calais. On the 

strand 

Of Dover, North America begins! 
R. H. WHITTAKBR, 

Ceylon, Ont. 

The Nazis are after oil. It is as 
plain as day that they don't intend 
to use it to pour on troubled waters. 

---- column ----

A bit of news says that the re- 
cruiting offices are filled. But it 
comes from Australia. 

---- column ----

To All Stations In 

Western Canada 

SPECIAL BARGAIN . 

EXCURSIONS 

Going Dates 
DAILY MAT 17 TO 28. 1941 ' 

Return Limit: 48 days 
TICKETS GOOD TO TRAVEL 

IN COACHES f 

Excursion tickets good in Tourist, 
Parlor and Standard sleeping ears, 
also available on payment of slightly 
higher passage fare*, pins price of 
parlor or sleeping ear eeommodatio* 

ROUTES Tickets *ood going via 
Port Arthur, Ont., Chicago, 111., or 
Sault Ste. Marie, returning via 
same route and line only. Gener- 
ous optional routings. 

STOPOVERS will be allowed t- 
any point in Canada on the going 
or return trip, or both, within final ' 
limit of ticket, on applicatioin to* 
Conductor; also at Chicago, IU., 
Sault Ste. Marie. Mich., and west,, 
in accordance with tariffs of United . 
States lines. 

Full particulars from any agent. 

---- column ----

NEW AND USED 

---- column ----

Farm Machines 

FOR SALE AT COCKSHUTT AGENCY 

---- column ----

SPECIAL THIS WEEK 

Lawn Mowers, Single and 2- 

Fnrrow Walking plows and 

Walking Plows 

Hart-Parr Tractor* 

---- column ----

M.-H. Side Delivery Rak* 

New Renfrew Cnn Separator* 

Toronto Aspfaait R*ofin 

Londy Woven Ttmet 

Barb Win 

C.I.L. Fertilisers in **. 

---- column ----

Eastern Steel Product* 
Trad* 

---- column ----

rorttlator. 

W. EDGAR BETTS 

Cockshutt Implements - Fletherton, Ont 

---- column ----

A nice-looking uniform is said to 
be helpful to the soldier's morale. It 
doesn't do him any harm among 
the girls, either. 

---- column ----

A meeting will be held in the Sal- 
vation Army halli FeveTsham, on 
Thursday, IVfay 8th, at 8 p.m., to 
organize a committee to sponsor a 
community auction sale in aid of the 
Telegram War Victims' Fund. 

---- column ----

Economy 

Our Government is asking our citizens to econo- 
mize wherever possible in ur daily routine of 
living and functions. \Ve can suggest two ways 
of economy, namely: by delivering your cream to 
the creamery and receiving 1 cent per pound fat 
over truck price, and also making use of our cold 
storage meat lockers, by freezing your own meat, 
which is a big saving on your cost of living. 

MEAT STORAGE 

A $5.00 box for a year will held approximately 
220 to 250 lb. meat and you may refill the box 
often as you wish. You may also place meat in 
storage at the rate of l l / 2 c per Ib. 

; On account of the new government egg regftlations ; 
; we must take more time in grading eggs. We are ; 

asking you to co-operate with us by bringing your ; 

eggs earlier during the day to avoid congestion dur- ; 

ing open nigfft. The creamery will remain open each ; 
; Wednesday and Saturday night during the summer ; 

; NOW r THE TIME THAT THE STORING i 
OF M^EAT SHOULD BE IN FULL 

PROGRESS. 
Call in to see us about the storage. 

; THE CREAMERY WILL BK OPEN EACH SATURDAY NIGHT 

Flesherton Creamery & Produce Co. 

---- column ----

Phone G6 

---- column ----

Angus Avis, Manager 

---- column ----

' ii mi " 
---- page ----

---- column ----

THE FLESHBR9ON ABVANCS 

---- column ----

Wednesday lfoy 

---- column ----

f C 

* 

---- column ----

The poor people of Brussels can 
now look at the shop windows ia 
their district which, like their 
stomachs, are also emptv 

---- column ----

PS? 

---- column ----

ROCK MILLS 

Mr. Stewart Foster was home from 
Durham over the week end. 

Some of the farmers in the vicin- 
ity have finished seeding. The weath- 
er has been very favorable and seed- 
ing operations have progressed 
rapidly. 

Mr. Fred Betts has gone to Toron- 
to, where he has secjir ed a position. 

Miss Ruth Russellof Toronto vis- 
ted with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Jim. Russell. 

We are pleased to report Mrs. Jim 
Russell feeling much better at time 
of writing, and trust that she will 
soon be restored to her usual good 
lealth again. 

---- column ----

Rock Mills Ladies' Aid 

The April meeting of the Ladies' 
Aid was held at the home of Mrs. 
Alex. English on Wed., April 16th. 
In the absence of the president, Mrs. 
Akitt presided. The meeting; opened 
by singing- "Rock of Ages." Mrs. 
Akitt read Matthew 24, and the 
missionary money was then taken 
and talent money of $6 given, with 
collection of $1.30. The meeting 
losed with singing "Jesus Keep Me 
NJear the Cross," and all repeated the 
Lord's Prayer. The next meeting 
will be held at the home of Mm. 
Harry Patton on Wed., May 21st. 
Lunch Committee: sandwich, Mrs. W. 
Akitt and Mrs. Alex. English; cake, 
A. Blackburn and Mrs. B. Field 

---- column ----

ALL-WEATHER 

D. McTAVISH & SONS* 

Flesherton, OnL 

---- column ----

VICTORIA CORNERS 

Milton Bannon, accompanied by 
Wes Dever of Proton Station, motor- 
ed to Kingston on Saturday. Miss 
Doris Bannon returned home with 
them after completing her year at 
Queen's University 

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Arnold and 
Bobby of Buffalo and Ted Moore of 
Toronto visited for a few days at 
the home of Ohas. Moore. 

The farmers are very busy with 
their seeding operations. A real nice 
warm rain would be a great help. 

---- column ----

PR1CEV1LLE 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray McLean and 
family of Hamilton are holidaying 
with friends here. 

Mrs. Wright and Miss Margaret 
Simpson returned home after spend- 
ing the winter in Toronto. 

Mrs. Angus McVicar returned home 
after spending two months in To- 
ronto. . .- | 

Mrs. Dan Campbell spent Thursday 
in Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Runciman re- 
turned home, after spending the win- 
ter in Toronto. 

SL.Mr. Alfred Hincks of Toronto 
planted 4,200 trees on Saturday at 
his cottage. He had a number of 
boys from Flesherton and this district 
assisting him. 

Miss Dorothy Watson of Toronto 
spent a few days last week with Miss 
Bernice Carson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hector McLean spent 
a counle of days visiting in Fergus 
last week, 

Miss Doris pratt spent a week tak- 
ing observation lessons and practise 
in teaching. 

Miss Ruth McLean, who has spent 
the winter here, returned to Toronto. 

Friday was Arbor Day at the 
school, after which Mr. Matthews 
treated all the children to ice cream. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Campbell and 
family have moved into tows and are 
occupying the Gardiner house. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Bell and 
family of Arthur visited friends here 
over the week end. 

Mr. Joe Campbell of Gait spent the 
week end with relatives here. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Wauchope and 
family attended the funeral of his 
sister, Mrs. Jack Neilson, of Proton 
Station held on Thursday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sayers and family 
have moved to the farm of Mr. 
Leonard McArthur. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank McArthur of 
spent the week end at 

---- column ----

A milk bar in Philadelphia adver- 
tised "all the milk you can drink for 
a dime," but it was found that some 
of its customers could sret outside of 
five quarts at once. The price has 
been raised to fifteen cents. 

---- column ----

' 

---- column ----

House Furnishings 

New Spring Offerings 

\ \ TUSCAN LACE CURTAINS $1.00 to $3.50 pair 

RAYON LACE CURTAINS $1.50 to $2.50 pair ; 

RUFLED CURTAINS 50c to $1.50 pair \ 

TUSCAN CURTAIN NETS 35c to 75c yard 

; NEW CURTAIN NETS 15c to &5c yard 

1 CREONNE*, New Patterns 25c to 59c yard 

! HOMESPUNS and SHADOW CLOTHS ...... 

SOo, 59c and 75c yard 

---- column ----

Congoleum Rugs Feltol Rugs 

1 Linoleums, 4 yards and 2 yards wide 

Congoleums, Rexoleums & Floor Oilcloths by the yard ! 

Curtain Rods and Window Shades 

Brandram- Henderson Paints, Enamels, Floor Finishes 

and Famishes. Paint and Varnish Brushes 

SUNWORTTHY WALLPAPERS 


for every room in the house 

DUST MOPS, O'CEDAR MOPS- LLOOR MOPS, 
SCRUB BRUSHES, FLOOR WAX 

V 

F. H. W. Bidding 

---- column ----

the home of his brother, Mr. D. L. 
McArthur, and attended church ser- 
vice in the morning. 

Messrs. Donald, Stewart and Jack 
Carson of Toronto were week end 
visitors at their parental home. 

Mr. Donald Aldcorn of Toronto is 
holidaying with his mother 
brothers. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Knox and Gar- 
net and Mrs. Holly Miller of Toronto, 
Mrs. Art Richardson, Janice and 
Dorothy of Swinton Park were vis- 
itors Sunday at the home of Mr. J. 
A. Carson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thorold of Muskoka 
visitec' recently with her parents, Mr. 
nnd Mr* H. McEachern. 

Miss Monica Lambert has gone to 
Toronto. 

Miss Mary Runciman, Toronto, was 
a weeV end visitor at her home. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. McFarlane and 
son of Toronto snent the week end 
here. Mrs. McFarlane and son re- 
mained for a longer visit. 

Miss Marjorie Meuser of Owen 
Sound spent the week end with her 
sister, Mrs. Archie MacCnaig. 

Mrs. Annie McLeod of Swinton 
Park and daughter, Marjorie, of Dur- 
ham visited on Sunday at Mr. Archie 
MacCuaig's. 

A large crowd was present Sunda" 
at St Andrew's Presbyterian church 
and watched the mortgage being 
burned. Dr. Campbell delivered an 
excellent sermon and the choir eon 
tributed a lovely anthem, with Mrs. 
Mel Watson at the piano. Short ad- 
dresses wer given by Messrs. Hector 
McLean, Donald Stewart, Allan Mc- 
Lean <and JOB. McKed. Beautiful 
flowen surrounded the pulpit. A 
number were present from Markdale, 
Swinton Park and Ceylon. 

FEVERSHAM 

Rev. and Mrs. Thompson have mov- 
ed back to the manse in the village 
which they vacated last fall on ac- 
count of his studies. 

A laqge crowd attended the Com- 
mencement on Friday night given by 
the Continuation School pupils. The 
lengthy program of plays, singing 
and bar work, which the boys did ex- 
ceedingly well, was much enjoyed by 

---- column ----

KIMBLRLEY 

Mr. and Mrs. Ross Ellis and fam- 
ily moved during Easter week to 
their new home near Rocklyn, recent- 
ly vacated by Mr. Pledger. 

The W. I. met at the home of Mrs. 
Russell Ellis for business and elec- 
tion of officers. It was arranged to 
complete a quilt at the home of Mrs. 
Ellis on Tuesday for the Red Cross, 
and also to continue making quilts 
and knitting- for the Red Grose. The 
election of officers was conducted by 
Mrs. D. A. Graham, and resulted as 
follows: 

President Mrs. E. Morwood. 

Vice-President Mrs. C. Graham. 

Sec.-Treas. Mrs. Russell Ellis. 

Red Cross Key Women Mrs. E. 
Morwood, and Mrs. Ellis Weber as 
secretary -treasurer. 

Arrangements were made to hold 
the celebration on June 9th. A com- 
mittee was appointed to secure a 
play for that date. 

Mr. Norman Buchanan returned to 
Toronto, after spending a few days 
with his parents, following Jiis grad- 
uation from the Toronto Bible 
College. 

We welcome Mr. and Mrs. W. G. 
Hutchinson and Beverley of Vande- 
leur to the village. They have taken 
up residence in part of Mr. R. Hutch 
inson's house, the former Hammond 
store. We are sorry that Mr. Hutch- 
inson is not in good health. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elgar McConnell and 
children visited Mr. and Mrs. Ran 
Hutchinson. 

Mrs. Smith and family and of To- 
ronto and Mrs. E. Foster and child- 
ren of of Smiths Falls visited a few 
days with their mother, Mrs. Geo. 
Hutchinson, this week end. 

(intended for last week) 

We are glad to report that Mr. F. 
Chard is able to be out of bed again. 

Mrs. Jas. Lawrence returned from 
Oshawa, where she had spent the 
winter with Mr. and Mrs. Jack Tay- 
lor. 

Mrs. Proctor spent a day at her 
home during the week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Wallace mov- 
ed back to the farm. Mrs D. Wal- 
lace is improved again. 

---- column ----

all. 
The 

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father, mother, sister am 

---- column ----

Mr. " . L Wkw a4 number of 
a i a |HB|iiliig to rebuild the 
'umiture store in Markdale and clear 
iway the debris caused by the recent 
'ire. 

Rev. Russel of Ossington Baptist 
Church accompanied Rev. Young to 
Cimberley and preached a very im- 
>ressive sermon on Sunday after- 
loon. Rev. Russel has been assisting 
lev. Young with special meetings in 
Thornbury. A number of people here 
lave )>(' H attending and enjoying 
:he splendid meetings. 

Rev. and Mrs. Buchanan and the 
>oys went to Toronto on Thursday 
'or the graduation of their son Nor- 
man and also Miss Tena Hutchinson 
kfiss Thomas and Miss Tena returnee 
with them We appreciate Miss 
Lena's putting her graduation flowers 
n both churches. We congratulate 
both students. 

Miss Frances Soul is the guest o! 
Mrs. B. A. Carruthers. 

Mrs. Bausides sang a beautiful solo 
in the Baptist Church on Sunday 
.fternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Graham visited 
Mr. and Mrs. G. Neff on Sunday. Mr. 
Mr. W. and M. Gilbert of Barrie 
spent the week end here. 

---- column ----

Two cans of Flo-glaze Interior Gloss paint. 
Two cans' of Flo-glaze enamel for clipboards 
and trim. One large and one small brush. A 
little turpentine. A few hours of application. 

Result: A bright, attractive kitchen, 
sanitary and washable. 

Serves: Entire family. 

Costs: Surprisingly little, for 
average-sized kitchen. 

It's easy to have a kitchen you'll be proud to show your friends 
and happy to work in. Ask to see the beautiful pastel shades avail- 
able in Flo-glaze Interior Gloss Paint made especially for 
decorating kitchens and bathrooms. 

Interior Glo** Paint 

---- column ----

McKILLOP'S HARDWARE 

Flesherton, Ont. 

---- column ----

WAR SAVINGS CERTIFICATES 

---- column ----

St Columba Church News 

The minister has resumed his clas- 
es at the O. D. R. school following the 
Easter vacation. 

The South-East Grey Ministerial 
Association of the United Church 
met at the manse on Monday after- 
noon of last week. All the members 
were in attendance, and a splendid 
paper on Christain Unity was pre- 
sented by Dr. Mercer, followed by 
discussion. Lunch was served by the 
hostess, and it was decided to meet 
in May at Maxwell. The folloowing 
were present: Revs. W. H. and Mrs. 
Smith, Durham; S. E. Annie, Mark- 
dale; G. K. and Mrs. McMillan and 
Bruce, Flesherton; M. G. and Mrs. 
Butler, Dundalk; Dr. and Mrs. Geo. 
Mercer, Maxwell; C. C. and Mrs. Wel- 
lerman, Mclntyre; Mr. and Mrs. Wm. 
Buchanan, Kimberley. 

---- column ----

brother of Leierhton McGinnis, Elm- 
vale, attended the Commencement on 
Friday night. 

Misses Trent and Verna midson 
and Mr. Joe Tate of Toronto visited 
at their homes here on Sunday. 

Miss Jane Gould spent Sunday a 
her home at Revanna. 

Mr. J. W. Robinson started his saw 
mill agftin for the season on Moda> 
morning. 

Miss Annie Heathcote, who ha 
been attending Miss Tollie Spoffanl 
n Collingrwood, has returned home. 

A meeting will he held in the Sal- 
vation Army hall, Feversham, on 
Thursday, May 8th, at 8 p.m., to 
organize a committee to sponsor a 
community auction sale in aid of the 
Telejrram' War Victims' Fmnd. 

Mr Manloy Richardson, who tins- 
been with the Bank of Toronto here 
'or the past cisrht monts. left Monday 
'or a few holiday.-, prior to ioirthe 
the Roval Canadian Air Force. Best 
wishes are extended to Manlev in his 
'ountrv's service. 

---- column ----

THINGS MONEY CANT BUY 

Money can't buy a clear conscience 
square dealing is the price tag. 

Money can't buy happiness hap- 
piness is a mental attitude and one 
be as happy in a cottage as in a man- 
sion 

Money can't buy sunsets, songs of 
wild birds and the music of the wind 
in the trees these are as free as the 
air we breathe. 

Money can't buy inward peace- 
peace is the result of a constructive 
philosophy of life. 

Money can't buy character char- 
acter is what we are when we are 
alone with ourselves in ti*e dark. 

---- column ----

Hitler needs a kick in the panzer. 

---- column ----

The greatest use made of national 
registration so far has been to corner 
escaped German war prisoner*. 

---- column ----

General Merchant 

---- column ----

*** 

---- column ----

*4* 

---- column ----

FLESHERTON 
.*>*>** 

---- column ----

Mussolini musin : I couldn't whip 
little Greece myself, but I eot that 
hip bruiser O f a Hitler to do it for me. 
The world will see n<vw what a great 
nwn I am. 

---- column ----

WOOL GROWERS 

---- column ----

IT PAYS TO MARKET 

ON A GRADED BASIS 

Obtain Sacks and Twine from 

LOCAL LIVE STOCK TRUCKERS 

or direct from 

CANADIAN CO-OPERATIVE 

WOOL GROWERS LIMITED 

217 Bar Street - Toronto 

---- column ----

CENTRE LINE 

This has been a great spring -o 
for and th farmers are rashing with 
the seeding. A nice warm shower 
would do a great deal of good now, 
as the ground id very dry and grasi 
is not growing to any extent. 
\ Mr. Stanley Little a nd helper, John 
Osborne, Mr. Etoierson Gallasftor and 
hiH men. are doing a rushing busin- 
ess with their tractors and discs, 
running day and night. 

Mr. Gerald Magee and sisterb, Mrs. 
Glen Pedlar and Tliss Hazel Magee, 
visited with Mrs. Ilorence Lyons and 
family a week ago. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Hockley of 
Chesley visited at the home of W. H. 
Little recently. 

Mr. Hartley Arnott, who spent the 
winter in St. Catharines, visited a 
few days at the week end with friends 
here and on the Third Line, return- 
ing Monday to St. Catharines. 

The West group of Wareham Red 
Cross completed a quilt at the homo 
of Mrs. Gallagher last week and a 
meeting of the same group will be 
held at the home of Mrs. 'W. A. Mc- 
Cutcheon on Thursday of this week 
to patch quilts. 

The Mt. Zion W. A. meets next 
Tuesday, May 13th, at the home. of 
Urs. Eobt. Osborne. 

In the absence of Dr. Mercer. Rev. 
McMillan of Flesherton occupied the 
nilpit at Mt. Zion and delivered a 
ine address. 

Mr. and Mrs. Angus Tuohy and 
Miss Florence of Mcaford and Mr. 
iloyd Young of Collingwood were 
Sunday visitors with Mrs. Florence 
.yens. 

Another Kttle girl has arrived at 
,he home of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Shie-rs. 

Quite a number from this district 
attended the social afternoon given 
the teacher and children of Port- 
law school on Friday last. A num- 
ber of articles were sold and the 
ticket drawn on the quilt which the 
children pieced. Mr. Leslie Chard 
held the lucky number and received 
the quilt. This was all in aid of the 
Red Cross. 

Mt. Zion Sunday School opened on 
Sunday with ? far./ i<iod attendance, 
but there wag 6: t.'ty of teachers. 
Next Sunday WiH .* Mother's Day, 
when the service will be appropriate 
far the day. Mt. Zion church service 
will be at two o'clock each Sunday, 
with Sunday School at one p.m. 

---- column ----

_ t- . 

Without Insurance 

---- column ----

You take everything you own for a ride 

Do pou realize the risk you are taking when you 

drive your car without proper insurance protec- 

tion ? In case of a severe or fatal accident, every- 

thing you own can be taken away to satisfy a 

judgment. You never know what the cost 

of your ride will be 

---- column ----

IN9URH 
t, 

---- column ----

H. JAY WITH 
TLANGFORD 

---- column ----

i ph&iie 72 Flesheron, Ont. 

>t+****+**************++************** 

---- column ----

A large pig escaped from the oack- 
ing plant in Hamilton and there was 
trouble enough catching it. To what 
extent p!(?s think we dn not know 
but in getting away from the "ack 
ing plant that pig had the rifrht idea 

---- column ----

SUPERIOR STORES 

Specials are Cash Only 

Canned TOMATOES, choice .................. 2 for 25c 

"Golden Bantam CORN .......................... per tin lOc 

SUPER SUDS, large pkg. and relish dish, all 25c 
TEA IS UP; we still have quantity at old price 
FRESH SODAS at ............................ 2 Ibs. for 25c 

Superior BAKING POWDER highly recom- 
mended ........ 1 Ib. size 23c 

---- column ----

See our assortment of 
GARDEN and VEGETABLE SEEDS 

MEATS Fresh Cured and Cook I 
all reasonably priced. 

MEN'S WORK 

---- column ----

G. J. KENNEDY 

---- column ----

Phone 37 

---- column ----

WE DELIVER 
---- page ----

---- column ----

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^" i r _ __ _ r __ n : _ ^ '. ^77 

Keeping 
Company . . 

Adapted from the 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

Picture 

by 
Lebbeus Mitchell 

Copyright 1940 by Locw't Inc. 

SYNOPSIS 

Mr. and Mrc. Harry C. Thomas 
and their three daughters const, 
tute a typical American family 
In a town of some 15,000. Mary, the 
eldest daughter, is courted by two 
automobile salesmen. Ted Foster 
and Jim Reynolds, The youngest 
girl, Harriet, nine, is independent 
with sn eye slngfe to the business 
of eating Ice cream. Discovering 
Mary rehearsing a proposal, of mar- 
riage, she telephones to both suit- 
er that Mary was primping for an 
dour just In case a certain young 
nan should call that evening her 
price for the information being 
Ice cream. Mr. Foster, favoring 
Ted gets Jim to demonstrate a Cor- 
onet tedan, giving Ted time to 
ropoie to Mary and be accepted. 

---- column ----

CHAPTER THREE 

At the Hcllman Auto Agency the 
BU dav, Ted approached Mr. Hell- 
loan anil told him be was pning to 
tarry Mary Thomas. 

"And, Mr. Hellman. what do I 
fcave to do around he-re to get 
mr money?" 

"Ted. maybe I can Co better 
than tlnii. Everybody knows that 
for run:, time I've been talking 
bout Inking a rei from this bus- 
ters. Tli IK place could Riipnort me 
h" you if Jlin could take over." 

"Wh.n?" asked Ted. 

"Not this morning! Not until one 
cf you two boys shows me he ran 
ell enough cars to let me play 
jolf all 

"I fan <lo that. Mr. Hwllinan! I 
can stMl aft many cars as you've 

---- column ----

"I'm f.-'"nc I,, -,,y the same thing 
to Jlni. It'll take more than ring- 
Ing <loi>rl-ll and boosting trade-ill 
Jtowam - It'll tak- imagination 
nd fun si.l.t. If rii!i. : of you two 
huv. ~ rr.r> s >ni' Mug b> fo;-e 

---- column ----

"Too much coffee and tea. gafe 
tin. Rrou-n the but case oj cuj- 
fauu-nrn-ti I erer taw. Poor 
ilttp for iK'iA j hrr temper 
flartd like a ikyrockft. I too* 
proud of thr uay the madn life 
mitrrable for tvrrybody till 
tvmf mtddlrr got her to twitch 
lo l'o*tum. Kuturally that IMM 
the tnd oj the end of me." 

T !. Uffee firnrt 

If you are troubled vtith tlecp- 
I' in . li.i\ c headaches, and np- 
ct nervet, >ou may be one of 
tbe many people who tliould 
never drink coffee or lea. Don't 
l* I victim of rnffeine- nerve*! 
Potlum contain! no caffeine is 
delicious jnd cokt> let* per cup. 
Made iu i.uiih in tl.- rup with 
no wale. Order Postum today. 

---- column ----

* 

---- column ----

WiN^WAR 

I 

---- column ----

the annual plcnlf, I might mall* 
my announcement then." He took 
the telephone which had been ring- 
ing, and looked at Ted with a 
mixture of turprlsfc nd amuse- 
ment. "Who did you na> you were 
going to marry?" 

"Mary Thomas," Ted replied 
blankly. 

"Well, this Is a Miss Anastasla 
Athcrton." 

Twl gulped. "I'll . . . I'll take It 
outside." He hardly heard Mr. Hell- 
mail's congratulations rnd pood 
wtehrs as he hurried to the shop 
'phono. His voice was thin as he 
said: "Hello ... Oh, hello, Anas- 
tasia." 

An ardent, gay voice answered: 
"Teddy, darling! Aren't you thrill- 
ed that I'm back to stay? Corao 
nround to the house right aw.iy." 
sh refuged to listen to hi- cau- 
tious excuse that lie had to go to 
the newspaper office right away 
on business. "You'll be sorry it you 
don't . . . No, you'll find cut the 
reason when you come over." 

She was waiting for him on the 
porch of Athcrtou Hall, looking 
very delectable-. She went quickly 
to him and kissed him. "Teddy! 
Teddy, darling!" 

Embarrassed, he Uivw away from 
the embrace. "You musn't do 
that!" 

She took his arm and drew him 
Into the house. "Let me look at 
you, Ted. I drove like mad from 
New York and you're nor oven sur- 
prised." 

"Listen Anaslasia. I've got to 
say this right now: I'm engaged 
to Mary Thomas." 

"I know about thai. Harriet was 
here and told me. But everything's 
different now. I'm back for good." 

"Wlien you went away to New- 
York you couldn't tff me for fie 
dust" 

"A year ago. I didn't know ray 
own mind. So you went to Mary 
Thomas on the rebound ?" 

"No, Rtacia, T fell in love with 
Mary the only tlnip I've ever 
y.t-t-n really ill love. I can't lielievo 
that, this makes much difference 
to you. You've done all right. 
You've got a car anil " 

"FJut it does make a difference 
now, Teddy." she said sincerely. 
"I could ha\ st <%><! In Now York 
and probably done prcity will. 
Hut New York's full >f sirls who 
wish they'd married the boy hack 
home." 

"It's always going to ho Mary 
for me, Stacia," he said, realizing 
that she meant what she said. "I'll 
say Fooilliy. . nnw. I've got to go 
o the. Chronicle office ri^lit aw:r. ." 

'Come on, I'll <lrivi> you. There's 
something else 1 want to talk to 
l>>>;it." Si'" n !';HM! fn tell him 
what It was Just then. drov him 
to the Chronicle and insisted that 
ln-'<l wait outside for him 

Kditor McCHnchey von<;r:ilult"il 
Ted on his engagement; weddings 
brought him new subscribers ;uid 
fhoved a subscription blank lit 
front of him. 

"I got to sell more automobiles 
first, Mr. McCllncbey. You hear of 
everything. What's happening these- ' 
lays that will help me to sell 
more cars?" 

"ljot of cars, bun? That nuai - 
re got to find lots of fresh money. 
Here, I saw somtthlng " He 
searched among some clippings. 
"How's tills? Washington observers 
declare 'In addition, the eleven bil- 
lion dollar defence program will 
bring financial stimulation Into 
every nook and cranny of this 
country'." 

"That* It, Mr. McClinche> ! 
What IK there here In Thornrldge 
that will get a part of that eleven 
billion?" 

"Nothing, Ted. All we got here 
I* a flotlu'K-pin factory." 

"What I've got to find out Is 
how this town Is going to benefit," 
nald Ted, his hopog dashfd, lie re- 
turned to Anastosia who was now 
ready to discuss the "srunetliing 
Important," she had hinted at. 

"Ted, you're In tho automobile 
business. What cnn I get for this 
car? Living on what my folks li ft. 
me. and not earning money now, I 
can't afford to keep a car. How 
njucu could you get for it?" 

"Just about what the buyer want- 
ed to pay, Stacia." 

"Why don't you buy It yourself, 
Ted? I've got to get rid of It. You 
could write your own ticket pay 
me any way you like . . ." 
(To Be Continued) 

---- column ----

Mother 

---- column ----

All that I love is linked to you, 
All that I am or have or do, 
Tho background of my life was 

spread 
Ry your wise hand?. My baby 

head 

1 see, as pictured mem'ry now 
Against your breast. I sec your 

brow 
Above its task^, our hands your 

eyes. 
All through the year, 'ncath 

alien skies 
You went with me and kept me 

strong, 
You gave me ftrpngtb when 

things went wrong. 
You spoke, from me.morled years, 

and kept 
Your child yours still. Your 

blessed text 
Of life you gave me - wordless i 

creed 

Love, niinhrr-mve. for nil my 
need. 

Rcna Chandler; 

---- column ----

Fashion Flashes 

Bags, belts and glove,s In liand- 
palnted, transparent plastic bung 
hown In smart New York shops. 


Larger pearl necklaces are fash- 
ionable with pink, blue and mauve 

tints featured. 


The soft, natural glmnldor, the 
tiny waistline, the middy fashion, 
bright colors, the elaborate use of 
lace, of buttons nnd bows* -those 
are among the season'^ style 
IM nds. 


Strarwberrles are among the fruit 
motifs In prints. Oherriea too are 
seen and in the floral patterns are 

quintitiee of rosefl. 


White and Hght-eolored furs 
dominate the spring tyle picture. 

1'rinted suits with fragile white 
blouses were a feature of a New 
York 

---- column ----

For summer eveniugs sheer 
black looks very cool and new. 

A smart black afternoon dress, 
uneven of hem, Is caught up on 
one side In draped effect. 
* * 

A novelty drawstring turban con- 
sists of a. square piece of fab- 
ric with a drawstring balk of a 
stiffened front "hem" and another 
at the very edge of the back. 

---- column ----

Ontario Drops 

Summer Courses 

---- column ----

Announcement was recently 
made by Major J. P. Cowles, of 
the Department of Education, that 
Ontario would have no summer 
courses for teachers this year un- 
der departmental control. 

"The main reason for not hold- 
ing them is that so many teachers 
will be employed in war work," 
said Major 'Cowlcs. Some men 
teachers plan to help on the farm, 
and women teachers will sew for 
the fighting services through the 
summer. 

---- column ----

Birthday Stroll 

James H. Hocking, of Hacken- 
nack, New Jersey, celebrated hi* 
84th bhtlul.iy by going for a 
stroll. He walked 54 miles, In 
11 hours, 50 minutes. 

---- column ----

SCALLOPED YOKES 
TR'M FROCK 

---- column ----

By Anne Adam* 

Did you know that this season 
it's SMART to be pretty? Anne 
Adams emphasizes thi.s fact nicely 
in her Pattern 4733 becoming, 
i-asy-to-sew frock. Wouldn't it be 
lovely in a flower or leaf-sprig- 
ged print? See tho front bodice 
is in-one with the skirt panel, nnd 
the back is in plain panelled style. 
High-curved side skirt sections 
give a tiny-waisti'd, .slii-i-hipped 
look and hold ii|i the gathered 
fullness of the .--oft bodice. Let 
the belt po all around, or have it 
just tie in front. And you might 
add refreshing- ruffles or colorful 
braid for trim. 

Pattern 4738 is available in 
misses' and women's ,-izps 12, 14, 
16, 18, 20, 110, 32, 34, 30, 38 and 
40, Size ,l(i lakes 3% yards 39 
ini'h, 

Send twenty cents (20c) in 
coins (-.Uniit'S cannot In- accept- 
i-d) for lliU A Mm- Adams pattern. 
Write plainly cue, name, addre.-s 
and stylo number. 

Si'iid your order to Anno Ad- 
ams, Room .lli,'), 73 \\V4 Adelaide 
St., Toronto. 

---- column ----

keen wetl-noukidhect 

tfu* tertt WHOLE WHEAT 

/ **5DL J f *- 

---- column ----

/ / >^ k 'v y 

uWituUK 

V" '{ :^x-.^---- r ?"- 

---- column ----

if Two Nabisco Shredded 
Wheat with a cupful of Milk 

and Fresh Fruit. 

Start the day right with this 

delicious, nourishing whole 

wheat breakfast. 

At all food stores, ask for it 

by the full name "Nabisco 

Shredded Wheat." 

---- column ----

THE CANADIAN SHREDDED WHEAT 
COMPANY, LTD., Niagara Fulls, Con. 

---- column ----

Pigeons Are Popular 
Food in England 

Pigeon pie luxury dish of past 
centuries is coming back into 
fashion. 

London pet dealers arc selling 
hundreds of pigeons to house- 
wives to help out their rations. 

The cockney street pigeon and 
woo.l pigeons make good dishes 
boiled or baked. The pigeons are 
old at Del. to Is. each. 

"I could sell hundreds of pig- 
eons in a week," said Mr. G. E. 
Palmer, of Parkway, London. 

"They are very tender if cook- 
ed like rabbit." 

---- column ----

Women To Work 
At 1941 CN.E. 
For War Victims 

Six Large Workrooms Being 
Set Up In Women's Building 
Will Prepare Bales of Sup- 
plies For Sufferers in Four- 
teen Bombed Cities of Britain 

---- column ----

This year, the women of Can- 
ada arc playing an increasingly 
important part in national life. 
Not only in their essential work 
in the home but also in the war 
effort, in industry ami in social 
services, the Canadian women arc 

---- column ----

Table Talks 

---- column ----

By SADIE B. CHAMBERS 

---- column ----

SPRING QUICK DISHES 

Now is the season when house- 
wives are giving a good deal of 
thought to time-saving dishes and 
always too having economy in 
mind. Houseeleaning is the order 
or disorder of the day; then ev- 
eryone likes to spend as much 
time as possible in the garden. 
Try this menu, one of the attrac- 
tive features of it is that one 
oven will take care of all: 
Noodle-Ham Catcerole 

All Bran Muffin* 
, Apple Strudel 

The Xoodle-Ham Casserole and 
Apple Strudol may be prepared 
for haking and the muffin batter 
mixed and placed in the muffin- 
pan.''. The dishes should be cov- 
ered closely with paper or lids 
and the muffin pans wrapped in 
waxed paper to exclude the air, 
then stored in the refrigerator 
and kept at room temperature un- 
til ready to bake. All will hake 
in a moderately hot oven in less 
than thirty minutes. Set the 
table, toss together a simple salad 
and presto dinner is served. 

Noodle-Ham Canerole 
% Ib. fine noodles or macaroni 

2 quarts water 

1 teaspoon . :il; 

2 tablespoons butter 

1 tablespoon flour 

2 cups stock 

% teaspoon salt 
% teaspoon pepper 
V4 Ib. cooked ham 
% cup Rice Krispies 

1 tablespoon melted buttei 
Dash paprika 

Cook noodles in boiling water 
to which salt has been added. 
Drain. - Melt butter in saucepan. 
Add flour and stock which may be 
made by dissolving 1: bouillon 
cubes in 2 cups Toiling water. 
Stir until thickenoi). Add salt 
and pepper. Dice ham and mix 
with noodles. Add thickened 
stock. Pour into casserole. Crush 
Rico Krispies over top. Sprinkle. 
with melted butter. Add paprika. 
Bake in moderately hot oven 20 
minutes. 

Yields 6 servings. 

All-Bran Muffin* 

2 tablespoons shortening 
' cup sugar 

1 egg 

1 cup All-Bran 
% cup milk 
1 cup flour 
Vi teaspoon salt 
2% teaspoons Calumet Baking 

Powder 

Method: Blend shortening and 

i sugar Add egg and beat well. 

j Add All-Bran and jnilk; let soak 

until most of moislurc is taken 

I up. Sift flour with salt and bak- 

---- column ----

ing powder; add to first mixture 
and stir only until flour disap- 
pears. Fill greased muffin pans 
two-thirds full and bake in moder- 
ate oven about 30 minutes. 

N.B.: If sour or buttermilk 
is used instead of sweet milk use 
% teaspoon soda nnd 1 teaspoon 
baking powder. 

Yield 12 small muffins. 

Apple Strudel 

Line , a buttered baking dish 
with Kellopg's Corn Flakes. Cover 
with layer of very thinly sliced 
cooking apples. Sprinkle with 
light brown sugar, a little cinna- 
mon and dot with pieces of butter. 
Fill to top with alternative lay- 
ers, finishing with Corn Flakes. 
Cover dish closely; bake in a 
moderate oven unt'l apples are 
soft. Serve with cream. 

---- column ----

Minx Chnmbem tfrlcnnir* iirrnonnl 
((tor* from Interested rcmltT*. She 
I* pViiHi'il In riTi-H<- MI:(::>.*I.<III> 
on lupin* for her column, untl In 
even renily lo IIMen lo your "pel 
peeve*." Hequt'iit* for riM'liM'n or 
pcvlnl menu* nr In ro>r. \ililrenn 
your teller* to "Mini -. -Hi II. i hum - 
lien, T.t \Vcl 4iletl<lc SI reel. To 
ronlo." Henil (.'impr'il. ^rir.ailvlrcnncil 
envelope if yon ih n rriily. 

---- column ----

-. HURRICANE, DCH ANf, 

AUNDERLAND FLYING Re.M , 

WELLINGTON BOMBCK. f.NO 

BLENHEIM BO . ILL.. 

Dou't mi^s tliisopporluiiityl 
.livi nl<e .a Inli. i ii-ni ., in ot 
U'iV\ .\ SVHI, I 1 --write on the 
line I; >oiir 11:11110 and inldie.-s :ii..l 
ilie titlu of tho piuttn-e yuu w.'int . 
(1 Inlii-i for each pirtuit'l. 'ill tht> 
Inbcl to Dcpt. j.li, Tho i.'nn.'ula 
Stuifli Comp-iny Limited, 4:) \\vii- 

ill, "i St. I'):-!. 

Tonnito. Your 
chosen picture or 
pictures will bo 
mailed to you Im- 
mediately. 

---- column ----

taking more and more responsi- 
bility. The heads of the C-N.E. 
feel that there is no better place 
to show tangible evidence .of this 
work than at the J941 Exhibition. 
Six large workrooms are being 1 
set up in the Women's Building 
will hum for fourteen days with 
work for the men of the Army, 
Navy and Air Force. And on 
each one of the fourteen days 
boxes will be prepared and packed 
to &e sent to succour air-raid vic- 
tims in the fourteen worst-bomb- 
ed cities of Britain. Demonstra- 
tion work from the War Emer- 
gency Classes will be staged daily. 
A special competition in quilts 
for air-raid shelter use will be one 
feature of war work. 

---- column ----

So much water is discharged by 
the Amazon River, of South 
Amti-icn, that the sultiiKsi of the 
Pacific Ocean is weakened up to 
a distance of 150 miles from the 
coast of Brazil. 

---- column ----

i trouble-free baCing 
' in store for you when you 
use Culumct Baking Powder. Vim 
use less and its double leavening 
udaa du ri^jj mixing and in thc\>v<'n 
-assures better results. Eay-opconifi, 
won't-spill container, with bandy 
measuring device under '* lid. 
PRICED SURPRISINGLY LOW1 
I n 

---- column ----

ISSUE 19 '41 
---- page ----

---- column ----

Saving Ontario's 

Natural 
Resources 

---- column ----

G. C. Toner 

Ontario Federation of Anglers 
and Hunters 

(No. 41) 
TWO KINGDOMS 

Carolus Linnaeus, J-.e ex-the- 
ologicUn, who was the author of 
the modern scheme of classifica- 
tion of all plants and animals, 
lived and did most of his work in 
the early part of the eighteenth 
century. The book in which he 
outlined his plan and named the 
animals and plants according to 
this plan he called "Systema N'a- 
turae" and was revised by him 
many times. We have agreed that 
our system shall be founded on 
the tenth edition of this book and 
any names proposed before that 
time shall be null and void. 

All biologists and naturalists 
must be familiar with the Systema 
Naturae for it is the backbone of 
their scientific work. It is writ- 
ten in Latin but fortunately for 
many of us it has been translated 
into English. However, often 
times the naturalist must consult 
the original when publishing sci- 
antific studies. My Latin is weak 
and I have torn my hair many 
times trying to get the exact 
meaning of the great naturalist's 
words. So the moral for my young 
readers is to study Lalin as ar- 
dently as they study the plants 
and animals. 

Plant* and Animal* 

It is a pity that the same term 
u used by the scientist for all 
living creatures except plants as 
SM used in common language for 
the four-footed hairy animals that 
suckle their young. The scientist 
divides all animate creatures into 
either the plant or animal king- 
doms. The plant kingdom in- 
cludes the bacteria, the blue scum 
on the water, the fungi and the 
biggest of trees. The animal 
kingdom includes the microscopic 
creatures of the water, the spong- 
es, ths lobsters and crabs, the in- 
sects, the fishes, the frogs and 
snakes, the birds and the mam- 
mals. It is the mammals that the 
ordinary folk call animals but my 
readers can readily see the dis- 
tinction I have outlined. Ani- 
mals, to the scientific mind, in- 
clude all living creatures that are 
not plants; mammals is the term 
used for the animals we know in 
everyday life. 

---- column ----

Poison Ivy Preventive 
Revealed by Doctor 

In New Ofleans last week for 
a dermatologists' convention, I>r. 
Bedford Shelmire had this tip to 
offer poison ivy sufferers: "lioil 
ivy leaves in ether, evaporate the 
ether and dilute the residue with 
corn oil. Make up capsules from 
this and swallow them ovt-r a 
period of months, gradually in- 
creasing the doses until you are 
taking 10 drops a day. It takes 
with most people, immunizing 
them." 

---- column ----

Health of Animals 

---- column ----

are 212 railway points in 
a* Dominion at whi'ch, accord* 
injc to regulations, all empty 
stock cars arriving or passing 
borough are cleansed and disin- 
ed under the supervision of 
Health oj Animals Division, 
ominion Department of ART!- 
ltur, unless the cars have al- 
ready been cleansed since last 
wed for stock. During the year 
nded March, .1940, 68, -168 can 
nd Mil truok* wer so treat <t. 

---- column ----

The Book Shell.. 

---- column ----

"THE HERITAGE OF 

HATCHER IDE" 
By Booth Tarkington 

This new novel from the pen of 
Booth Tarkington stands with 
the greatest of his work. In it 
Che famous author of "Penrod," 
"Seventeen," "Alice Adams," 
deals sympathetically, humorous- 
ly with the problems of present- 
day youth. 

Hatcher Ide, the story's hero, 
is a flesh-and-blood youny; man 
whose task it is to make a living 
in this day and age, to orient 
himself in the problems of love 
and the general complexities of 
existence. He lives in a once- 
prosperous mid-western town 
which might be any American 
town after the l!2i depression 
wave broke. His father's busi- 
ness is on the rocks; his father's 
friends keep up a bold front on / 
scanty incomes; the world Hatcher | 
knew as a child ii a different ; 
world now, none too cordial to j 
young men fresh from college. 

The book provides an amazing i 
picture of the times as well as | 
telling us the story of how Hatch- | 
er goes out to meet life and love. 

"The Heritage of Hatcher Ide" 
. . . by Booth Tarktngton . . . 
Toronto: McClelland & Stewart, 
Publishers . . . $2.50. 

---- column ----

U.S. FLEET STEAMS NEARER TO BATTLE OF ATLANTIC 

---- column ----

As American warships assume their peril-fraught roles of "interested -bystanders" in the Battle of the 
Atlantic, the projected two-ocean U.S. Navy U estimated at Washington to be four years away from com- 
pletion. 

Nevertheless naval authorities are pleased by the way in which th shipyards are cutting consiruction 
time. Workmen in the U.S. Navy yards as well as in yards owned by private concerns are driving steadily 
ahead as fast as the material is delivered. 

A good sample is the 1650-ton destroyer Edison, now in commission. This vessel wa constructed in 10 
months. Some years ago the regular period of construction was 31 months. This now has been slashed 
until the average is 15 months. 

The two most welcome additions to the navy of co urse are the battleships North Carolina and Washington, 
the first completed since 1921. They both are 35,000-ton vessels. Their main armament is 16-inch guns, 
mounted in three turrets, three per turret. They also carry a heavy battery of anti-aircraft and secondary 
broadside guns. They are propelled by turbines developing 115,000 horsepower from oil-fired boilers and 
giving a speed of 27 knots. Each is equipped to carry three planes. 

---- column ----

THE WAR-WEE K Commentary on Current Events 

HIGHEST TAXES LEVIED 
IN CANADIAN HISTORY 

---- column ----

"We must be prepared for an 
extension of fighting over wida 
area* . . . Canada is determin- 
ed to spare neither her resourc- 
es nor her manpower ..." 
Prime Minister Mackenzie 
King. 

Never before ill their History 
have Canadians been called upon 
to make such a tremwidous contri- 
bution to the national coffers as 
that demanded by Finance Minister 
Ilsley in liis Budget address last 
week before the House of Com- 
mons. Out of every dollar earned 
this year by Canadian men and 
women. 45 ceutg will go out of ttieir 
pockets by way of taxw or loan to 
finance the war. If provincial and 
municipal evie-s are also takeu In- 
to accoun', 55 cents out of every 
dollar will be needed. 

Hardest On Income 
New and increased taxes design- 
ed to increase Canada's tax rev- 
enue in 1941-42 to the all-time huh 
of $1,400,000,000 Included: A new 
national gasoline tax, tipping the 
price 3c a gallon; increase In tax 
on automobiles valued tip to $900, 
from 20 to "5 per cent; motiorv 
picture shows, beer, wine, playing 
cards, carbonic .icid gas used in 
"pop," clgaret paper tubes, cigaret 
lighters, Hll pay uew or increased 
levies; a 10 per cent tax on all 
railway, bus or airplane tickets 
costing over 50 cents; tux on cos- 
metics, toilet goods, rose from 10 
to 25 per cent. But nothing In the 
Budget hit the average Canadian 
as hard as did the increases in the 
defence lax anil lite income taxes 
personal income tax rates were 
upped to 15 per cent on thd tirot 
$1,000 ot taxable income, froui the 
present rates of 6 and 8 p<?r cent. 

In Britain's Dark Hour 
Tliia Hisses t Budget, brought 
down at the end ot a month when 
the fortunes of Great Britain had 
fallen to one* of the lowest points 
in her proud record, made history 
by including provision, for the first 
lim*. of direct aid to Britain. From 
$800,11(10.000 to JSlOO.llflO.OOO was 
ii.ski-d. to jissist in I'iniiticiiiK Bri- 

---- column ----

tish purchase* in Canada this year. 

Mr. Ilsley'i record-breaker fol- 
lowed by one day Prime Minister 
King's statement to ths reconven- 
ed House in which he declared tuat 
Canada would spare neither her 
resource* nor her manpower la tUs 
forthcoming battle. During' tha 
week, too, more than 5,000 of ths 
four-month 21-year-old trainee* 
were conscripted into tha Canadian 
army and preparations wore made 
to draft many more young men thlR 
summer. 

Belt Across Atlantic 

But it was larg'ely to the United 
State* that Great Britain looked 
In her hour of dlre-st nee*. And 
last week the President, to lid 
Britain by cutting lowes of Lows- 
Lend materials shipped overseas 
(rumors suid 10 per cant of them 
were bciug nunk), took actloa 
which brought th American na- 
tion "oaily one step from w*r." Hs 
establisbt.il the equivalent ot a con- 
voy system In the North Atlaatlo. 
As far as the coastal waters of lea- 
land i a belligerent zone) th U. 8. 
ii;ivy began sending warships, pa- 
rol bombers and in all probability 
carrier-bused aircraft, to play A 
vital role iu th "Battle of His 
Ati.itufc." The- potential effective- 
ness of tbis whole far-flung sur- 
face and air patrol In dealing with 
is';u! submarine-si and raiders was 
seen as tremendous. "Red Fleet," 
organ of the Soviet navy declared 
that the extruded U. S. naval patrol 
in the Atlantic would enable the 
United States and Britain to "es- 
tablish a solid belt from Canada 
to Britain, tliortnisbly protected 
from the air." 

Words of Cheer 

Speaking more hopefully of ' e 
outcome of the Battle of the Balk- 
ans than many of liia contempor- 
aries, Major Guorge Fielding Eliot, 
I'.S. military expert said: "The 
facts are that, the Balkan war ha* 
lieeu a net gain for .Britain a long 
as Suez and Alexandria be not 
lost; that i>reclou time has been 
gained, that Germany has ben 
compelled to usi 1 up resources of 

---- column ----

which sue has none too great a 
reserve; and that the Island of 
Great Britain remains unconquer- 
ed. Nor has anything which ham 
happened In the Balkans brought 
Germany nearer to that conquest; 
indeed the reverse is the case. The 
war will be won or lost In Great 
Britain and its waters of approach; 
It Is there- that Hitler must, soon- 
er or later, face the final show- 
down. It Is precisely there that the 
power of the American people can 
make Itself felt with full force." 

Battle of Egypt 

Aside from the Battle ot the At- 
lantic the question of where 
the war would move next In Eur- 
ope engrofised moat minds here 
ajid abroad. Prim* Minister 
Churchill'* Sunday speech Indicat- 
ed that London expected the next 
Axis stab to come somewhere along 
the Mediterranean, through Tur- 
key or Spain. Some exparts belief- 
*d Hitler'* armies would play leaip- 
frog from one Aegean island to 

---- column ----

another and go at Suei without 
touching Turkey. One London 
source spoke of the coming engage 
iinMii. as the "Battle ot Egypt" and 
told the United Press Its outcome 
might decide whether Japan and 
Spain would enter the w*r as ac- 
tive Axis allies. Britten prepar- 
ations for the teat Included ap- 
pointment of Viscount Gort u com- 
munder-in-chlef at Gibraltar and 
Implied announcement that a sec- 
ond Mediterranean mine field, 800,- 
000 miles square, had been laid to 
protect the Dardanelles and Suez. 
Reports from Vichy hinted of an 
approaching showdown, with Hit- 
ler forcing the Turks to grant him 
military right of way to the Per- 
sian Gulf of Suez. 

Behind the Turks 
Recent developments In the Near 
East have led to the assumption 
that the Turks, when the Hitler- 
squeeze finally comes, will be guid- 
ed by the wishes of the Soviet Un- 
ion. Associated Press correspondent 
Dewltt Mackenzie last week wrote 
that Turkey was believed ready to 
defy the German demands If she got 
tha high-sign from tbe Kremlin. 
That this encouragement from Rus- 
sia might very well be forthcoming 
was seen iu reports of increasing 
tension between Germany and the 
Soviet Union 12,000 German 
troope, equipped with tanks and 
artillery arrived In Finland, Rus- 
sia's nearest northern neighbor; 
and the Soviet Union took stops 
to regulate strictly all shipment 
of goods to Germany, clamping a 
ban on passage of any war mater- 
ial through the Soviet Union from 
east to west, or vice versa. 

---- column ----

VOICE 

OF T H E 

PRESS 

---- column ----

WHAT DOESN'T APPEAR 

Most of Che people who claim 
th horn* town paper doesn't 
print all *e news should be glad 
it doesn't. 

Hanover Post 
o 

RUSH JOBS NOT WANTED 
W do not believe it ii wise 
to rush medical students through 
university, through 'their courses, 
whether for the army or not, for 
there is nothing more potentially 
dangerous than a poorly-trained 
medical man. 

Niagara Falls Review 

---- column ----

Sweeten Cereal, 
Puddings and 
m Fresh Fruit, 

---- column ----

WOMEN ON JURIES 

It seems strange that so simple 
a matter as women serving 011 
juries should have proven so diffi- 
cult for tha legislature to reach 
a decision upon. While the men 
hesitate, large numbers of women 
continue in forthright manner to 
shoulder home and public respon- 
sibilities, admirably performing 
tasks which require the exercia*) 
of knowledge, judgment, skill, 
precision and tact. Many havs 
replaced men in industry, com- 
merce, professions, etc., who havs 
thus been released for military 
service. Many women are doing 
work which it was thought only 
men could do. Thousands of wo- 
men are earning a livelihood for 
themselves and supporting do- 
pendents and while doing this 
are also running their homes, 
bringing up children, and in addi- 
tion some are active in public 
affairs. Toronto Star 

---- column ----

Forty rabbits will eat as much 
fodder as a dairy cow; only four 
rabbits are required to out-eat 
sheep. 

---- column ----

Mother's Day 

TO MOST of us, our first inspirations to face life squarely, to 
find and give the best, have come through the teaching and 
example of a good Mother. 

It is our Mother who by her unwearying devotion to her 
children has instilled into our mindg the virtues of a fu!l and 
unselfish life. 

All too often as we get older and have to face the responsi- 
bilities of life alone, we overlook the debt we owe Mother. W 
do not altogether forget. But somehow, there are so many de- 
mands on us, we just take Mother for granted. W know Mother'* 
love never grows cold. It is there for us to command. 

Sunday ii Mother'i Day! Let tu do something this Sunday 
to show Mother w think a lot of her. You will never be able to 
pay back all you owe her. But soras littls tangible token of your 
affection will- feed the soul . . . your own ai weft as your Mother'sl 

---- column ----

QUEUES OF HOUSEWIVES FORM BEFORE LONDON FOOD STORES 

---- column ----

faces of these London housewives refloct the increasing shortage of foodstuffs in the British , 
due to th ever- lightening German count.r-block.de. Eg<rs from Canada, along with other provisions are dol 
out on u i 3iti on on 3 us. 

---- column ----

REG'LAR FELLERS The Mechanical Lady 

---- column ----

By GENE BYRNES 

---- column ----

CAN Y'&cAT TWI3?\| 
A UE M 

DETECTOR .' 

WHEN Y'Tei-L. A / 
LIE IT JIGCiUES f 
UP AN' DOWN 
J.1KE THIS/ J 

---- column ----

/ HtV, WNHEAD/\ 

oiojft EVER see 

Oe OF THO3E 
MACHINES THAT 
CAN TEU WHEN 
---- page ----

---- column ----

Wednesdap, May 7, 1941 

---- column ----

THE PLEStifekTON ADVANCE 

---- column ----

Clydesdale Stallion 
For Sale 

"CRAIGIE LORD ROBERTS" 
(20895, Imp.) 

Apply to H. Lougheed, 682 
Broadview Ave., Toronto, or 
John Lougheed, Dundulk. 

---- column ----

Consider the postage stamp it 
gets there simply by sticking. 

---- column ----

A man who really believes in the 
good neighbour policy will have the 
lawn mower sharpened before he 
lends it. Toronto Star. 

---- column ----

Iron ore enters a modern auto fac- 
tory one morning and by noon the 
next day is going out of the delivery 
doar as part of a finished car. And 
after that it has a fairly good chance 
of coming back again as scrap metal. 

---- column ----

WE HAVE A FULL LINE OF 

Spring Seeds 

---- column ----

FOR 

---- column ----

Garden and Field 

ORDERS RECEIVED FOR 

"Fertilizer" 

'Delivered from Dundalk." Inquire for prices. 

9 & A. Co-operative Company, Lid. 

FLESHERTON. Ontario 

---- column ----

Presentation to Norman 

Williams at Eugenia 

(By Eugenia Correspondent) 

A party was held in the hall on 
Friday evening in honour of Pte. 
Norman 'Williams of the Tank Corps, 
Camp Borden. During the course of 
the evening an address was read to 
Norman by Elward Campbell and a 
presentation of a -n and pencil set 
and a sum of money bv Wilfred Ma- 
gee and Ben Shortt, on behali of the 
community. Following is the ad- 
dress; 

Dear Norman; 
We, your friends, are here to nio'ht, 

To wish you luck ere you enter the 

fight, 
To spend a pleasant hour with you, 

And clasp your hand in friendship 
true. 

We're glad to have had vou with us 

here, 
In happy friendship from ytar to 

year, 

We can't forget you as Santa Claus 
Bringing from all a hearty ap- 
plause. 

I To our Empire's urgent call you re- 
plied, 
From its duties and dangers you 

did not hide, 

But hastened awn-- to do ->ur bit 
To help to make the Germans git. 

And so before "ou go from us, 
O'er you we'll make a little fuss, 

Present to you this little gift, 

And give your yearning heart a 
lift. 

May God above lead your steps aright 
And make you victorious in the 

fight. 

May His protections be over you, 
Bringing you back when the battles 
through. 

Signed on behalf of vour friends 
and neighbours, Elward Campbell. 
Ben Shortt and WilfrcH Magee. 

Norman made a neat replv thank- 
ing all for the lovely gifts presented 
to him. 

Send in the names of your visitors. 

---- column ----

Local and Personal 

---- column ----

<<M$N$M$M3MjM$N>*^^ 

*? 

t 

Hill's Specials 

OUR READY-TO-WEAR DEPARTMENT IS FULL OF THE SMARTEST 

AND NEWEST STYLES IN LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S COATS, 
DRESSES AND BLOUSES. Prices to suit everyone. 

---- column ----

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS 

In some of the newest materials and 
styles, sizes 14 to 20. Special .. $14.95 

MILLINERY 

We nre showing a wonderful range 
of the icwest and smartest styles and 
colors in Ladies' Hats at very moder- 
ate prices. 

MEN'S PANTS 

M'ade of durable blue drill, sturdy 
and strong for general knockabout 
wear; waist band is wide with two 
dome-type buttons and belt hook; 
front pockets have turn-back button 
flaps with zipper closed pocket on 
right side, sizes 36 to 38. Special per 
pair $1.95 

MEN'S WORK PANTS 

Made of durable 8 ox. blue or black 
denim, front pockets have turn-back 
button flap with zipper-closed pocket 
on right side, belt strap and cuff liot- 
om, sizes 32 to 42. Special, pair $1.85 

MEN'S SPORT JACKETS 

Made of sturdy, strong material in 
popular two-tone effects or plain ad- 
justing for neat fit at waist, zipper 
closing, two front pockets with button 

flap, sizes 34 to 44. Special $1.69 

Boys' sizes 26 to 34 $1.48 

---- column ----

FLOOR COVERINGS 

Felt base borderless Rugs in several 
new patterns- sizes 6 ft. by 9 ft. At a 
Special price of $1.48 

MEN'S WORK BOOTS 

Men's heavy work boots, good 
strong wearers with panco or leather 
soles. A big assortment from which to 
choose, sizes 6 to 13 $1.69 to $5.50 

MEN'S FINE OXFORDS 

This smartly-styled shoe, correct to 
any dress-up occasion with good black 
leather uppers. Made on a good fitting 
last with sewn soles and rubber heels, 
sizes 6 to 11. Specal, pair $2.50 

BOYS' OXFORDS 

Mothers! Here is splendid value in 
neatly-styled long-wearing blucher ox- 
iords in black side leather with sewn 
leather soles, rubber heels, sizes 1 to 5. 
Special $1-95, $2.45 

WOMEN'S SHOES 

A popular choice for growing girls 
and women ; made of good durable 
leather with good weight soles, built 
(in a full-fitting last with low rubber 
heels in black or tan, sizes 3 to 8. 
Special, per pair $1.95 

---- column ----

Guard Norman Stoddart, R.C.A.F., 
Toronto was home over the week end. 

Jim McFadden of Hepworth was 
home over the week end. 

Miss Kate McMillan was home 
from Toronto over the week end. 

Mr. Robt. Ferris has rented the L. 
A. Fisher farm in town. 

Mrs. C. Stewart of Markdale was 
a visitor in town on Saturday. 

Mother's Day, Sunday May 11. 
Order your flowers for Mother's Day 
from 'W. A. Hawken, phons 17. 

Mr and Mrs. Hartley Blackburn of 
Port Credit and Georgina of Toronto 
were home over the week end. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harr" Meldrum of 
Toronto spent the week end with Mr. 
and Mrs. C. D. Meldrum, Portlaw. 

Miss Ruth Blackiburn spent the 
week end with her friend, Teressa 
Harvey, Cherry Grove. 

Mr. Wilfred Best, Mr. and Mrs. 
Russel Johnson visited at their re- 
spective homes over the week end. 

Mrs. Thos. Brady of Toronto spent 
a few days the first of the week in 
town. 

Mr. John McKinnon and Lome Paul 
of Holyrood visited at Richard Benth- 
am's on Sunday. 

Pte. R. Whitehead of the Forest- 
ers, Toronto, was home on week end 
leave. 

Mr. Jim Wilson of Owen Sound 
spent the week end with his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Mark "Wilson. 

Mr. Emerson Thompson left last 
week for Northern Ontario, where he 
is employed as a prospector. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stewart McTavish 
and two children of Oshawa spent 
the week end in town. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Crossley, Janet 
and John, of Toronto were in town 
over the week end. 

Mrs. M. Thistlethwaite and daugh- 
ter, Beatrice, returned to town on 
Saturday, after spending the winter 
in Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon McKinnon of 
Toronto are spending a fw weeks at 
their summer home in town, and will 
enjoy some fishing in the district. 

Mrs. "W. P. Crossley returned to 
her home in town on Saturday, after 
spending the winter with her child- 
ren at Detroit, St. Thomas, Harris- 
ton and Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Betts, Mrs. J. 
Thompson and Mr. and Mr . Howard 
Millican and son, John, visited with 
friends in Alliston last Thursdav. 
Mr. Betts attended a Cockshutt deal- 
ers' meeting held there. 

\JMrs. R. Whitehead has moved to 
tne Wilcock residence on Sydenham 
street, vacated by Harold Fawcett 
and Mr. Wallace Hamilton moved to 
the residence near the high school 
vacated by Mrs. Whitehead. 

A special song service was held in 
St. John's Church on Sunday even- 
ing, when a choir of men led the 
singing. A male quartette, compos- 
ed of Messrs. F. Duncan, Rev. Mc- 
Millan, F. J. Thurston and Geo. 
Cairns, rendered two numbers. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. L. Stauffer of town 
attended the funeral on Saturday last 
of the former's father, Eli A. Stau- 
ffer, who died at Stouffville, on 
Thursday, May 1st, in his 86th year. 
Interment took place in the family 
plot in Stouffville Cemetery. Ser- 
vices were conducted by the Rev. G. 
K. McGregor. 

Grey Chapter No. 170, O.E.S., en- 
tertained Mrs. Zelma Smith of Palm- 
erston, D.D.G.M., upon her official 
visit to Flesherton on Tuesday even- 
ing. The Worthy Matron, Sister 
Bradey, of Markdale presided. The 
banquet was held following the 
Chapter meeting. 

---- column ----

Drop in and See our 
Special on Pot Roasts 

for the week end 

Home-Rendered LARD 

and 
Homemade Sausage 

on hand. 

---- column ----

BAILEY'S 

---- column ----

We DELIVER FLESHERTON, Ont. PHONE 47W 

Canada First Lest We Forget! 

---- column ----

******* ***+* 

---- column ----

>*+'! '!"* 1 1 1 i I 1 1 * 

---- column ----

QUITE UNPRINTABLE 

The new reporter had been sent to 
interview the famous pugilist. About 
an hour later he staggered into the 
editor's office. 

"Well," barked the chief, "did you 
get anything?" 

"Yes, sir," complained the other, 
pointing to two black eyes, "these!" 

"We can't print those!" shouted 
the editor. "What did he say to 
you?" 

"You can't print that either," wan 
the calm reply. 

---- column ----

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

In the ESTATE OF WILLIAM 
JOHN BURNETT, deceased. 

All persons having claims against 
the Estate of William John Burnett, 
late of the Township of Artemesia, in 
the County of Grey, Farmer, who died 
on or about the Fourth day of April, 
AJD. 1941, are required to file proof 
of the same with the undersigned, on 
or before the Seventh day of June, 
1941, after which date the Estate will 
be distributed, hayinc regard only to- 
tl"} claims of which the undersigned 
! she.ll th i have ha- the notice. 

---- column ----

A place may be some distance 
away, but when the tax rate starts 
going down people become interest- 
ed in it. 

---- column ----

D VTED at Durham this Seventh 
day of April, A.D. 1941. 

3. H. McQUARRIE, 

Durham, Ontario. 
Solicitor for the Administricei- 

---- column ----

Small Ad. Column 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Young cow due May 5. 
Oliver Thurner, Eugenia. 48p2 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Clover seed, |9 per bu. 
Leslie Chard, 42 r 2, Flesherton, 
R. R. 3. 

---- column ----

PASTURE Cattle wanted for pas- 
ture. Chas. McDermid, phone 45 r 
13 Flesherton. 48c3 

---- column ----

PASTURE For rent by month for 
cattle, sheep or horses. Donald 
Stewart, Ceylon. 48c3 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Misses Coat, size 16, 
good as new, cheap, may be seen 
at The Advance Office. 

---- column ----

True Economy in Food Values at Mil's 

---- column ----

First Training Group 

Called For Active Service 

---- column ----

FEATHERS Will buy new or used 
feathers or exchange for spring 
mattresses. Phone The Advance, 
leave name and address. 

---- column ----

PASTURE Pasture for number of 
year-old cattle, abundance of feed, 
shade and water. J. F. Collinson, 
Ceylon, phone 21 r 3. 48 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Doherty Banner 
Range in good condition, will sell 
cheap. Pasture and working land 
for sale or rent. Mrs. L. A. 
Fisher, Flesherton. 49c3 

---- column ----

FOR SALE 4 steers rising 2, 4 
heifers, 2 years old, in calf, work 
horse, 2 brood sows, single furrow 
riding plow. Richard Allen & Son, 
Flesherton, phone 45 r 21. 48c2 

---- column ----

WANTED Reliable girl for gener- 
al house work, over 20 preferred, 
permanent position if satisfactory. 
Mrs. Lyness Myles, Thornbury, 
Ont., phone 16. 47c2 

---- column ----

FOR SALE House in Flesherton, 
with seven rooms, hard and soft 
v itiT, double lot amd barn. Foi 
full particulars apply to J. W. Mc- 
Mullen, Ceylon, Execi tor. 30c 

---- column ----

Sweet Mixed Pickles 27 oz. jar .... 27c 

Tasty Sodas 2 Ibs. for 25c 

Fancy Sweet Biscuits 2 Ibs. 35c 

White Beans 6 Ibs. 25c 

Medium size Prunes 3 Ibs. 23c 

Seedless Raisins 2 Ibs. 21c 

Cowan's Cocoa 1-2's 15c 

1's 25c 

Pastry Flour, 24's - 63c 

---- column ----

Soap Flakes- family size pkg. 23c 

Urd 2 Ibs. 19c 

Pure Raspberry or Strawberry Jam 
22 oz. jar 25c 

Mild Cheese 22c Ib. 

Old Cheese 2c Ib. 

Peas, Corn, Tomatoes, reeular size 

---- column ----

Pastry ".*< 

---- column ----

I ( f 

*.4ll Ml 4 J I ' ' * 

---- column ----

F. T. Hill & Co., Ltd. 

MARKDALE, Ont. 

---- column ----

Graduates of the first group of 4, 
840 twenty-one-year-olds called un- 
der the National Resources Mobili- 
zation Act for a four-months train- 
ing period will be kept in the Army 
indefinitely for defence work in Can- 
ada, Honourable J. L. Ralston, Min- 
ister of National Defence, announced 
at the week end. 

When they have completed their 
training in July they will go on dty 
for coast defence at the Pacific nd 
in the Maritimes, and on mternal 
se-curity and guard duty in the in- 
terior to relieve men now preforming 
this work who have signed up for 
overseas. 

Where posisble thc.ie young soldiers 
will serve in the localities from which 
they came. Whether those called for 
the second camp will be likewise as- 
signed to home ''pfpnce on comple- 
tion of their tr; inin<* in August will 
depend on developments, the Minister 
stated. 

Many of those now in training un- 
5 tli plan have simed up for 
C*h"8 service in the various arms of 
li< Mence forces, the Minister re- 
portod, stating that wl e there is a 
surplus of mannower for certain of 
thwte units, these men will be trans- 
ferrod to arms of the service where 
thpv are mist needed. 

A total of 0,830 voiine men called 
for four months' training period are 
now in training. Of these f.,840 will 
finish thoir course in Julv. and 4,990 
in August. In thp second draft 468 j 
of the 5,458 reporting, failed 4 o pass ' 
the medical examination at the 
trnininrr centres. 

---- column ----

FOR SALE 7-room brick house in 
Flesherton, large lot, garage, good 
well, must be sold to settle estate 
| of the late Andrew Gilchrist Ap 
ply to John Stewart, Executor, Pro- 
ton Station, phone 32 r 4. 

---- column ----

POTATOES FOR SALE Grade 
Canada No. 1, early varieties 
Warbas and Cobblers; later var- 
ieties, Katahdins and Dooleys. 
Alex. S. Muir, R. R. No. 1 Ceylon, 
phone Flesherton 47 r 14. 44c4 

---- column ----

LAST YEAR a Bray customer 
bought 250 April chicks; by Octo- 
ber they averaged 70% production. 
Bray chicka are for poultrymen 
who want results. Started chrcks, 
pullets, many breeds, cro-ses. See 
John McWilliam, Flesherton. 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Stable to tear down 
for lumber. Mrs. W. E. Morgan, 
Flesherton. 49cl 

---- column ----

FOR SALE or RENT for pastuer 
Lots 167 on East Back Line. Har- 
ry Patton, R. R. 3, Flesherton. 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Corona kitchen range, 
in good condition, bargain. Mrs. 
S. E. I. Holley Flesherton. 48p2 

---- column ----

WANTED Any number of fresh 
ground hogs lOc each. Jas. R. 
Sinclair, Ceylon. 4So if 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Two Colony Houses 
for chickens. K Robt. Purvis, R. R. 
4, Flesherton, phone 43 r 2. 49c2 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Cows, horses, oat* 
(with a little mixture of barley. 
W. J. McFadden. R. R, 5, Marie- 
dale, phone 33 r 3. 40c2 

FOR SALE Good used car, lately 
overhauled, new rings and brakes; 
good truck car, cheap. Mrs. J. W. 
Cook, Flesherton. 48c2 

---- column ----

FARM FOR RENT Lot 20, Con. 9, 
Osprey, formerly McQueen proper- 
ty. Apply to I. B. T ucas & Co, 
Markdale, Ontario. 47c3 

---- column ----

NOTICE Paper hangind and paint- 
ing at reasonable prices. Estimates 
free. Ross Mitchell, Dimdalk. 
telephone 77. 

---- column ----

CAME ASTRAY Came to my 
premises, Lot 24, Con. 10 Artemes- 
ia, 4 yearlings and 1 two year old 
cattle. Owen prove property and 
pay expenses. Oliver Turner, R. 
R. 1, Fugenia. 49c& 

---- column ----

FARM FOR SALE 

Lots 14-15, Con. 1, S.D.R., Arte- 
mesia, containing 100 acres, on which 
is situated a bank barn -15x55, also 
large driving shed. This property 
must be sold to wind up estate. Those 
interested communicate with John 
Oliver or W. R. Meads, Priceville. Ex- 
ecutors for the estate. 47e 

PROPERTY FOR SALE IN 
FLESHERTON 

---- column ----

Lot 10 on Collingwood St., on 
which is situated a 7-room house, 
well and stable. Those interested 
communicate with I. B. Lucas, Mark- 
dale, Solicitor for the Ella Gibion 
Estate. 

---- column ----

BUSINESS CARDS f. 1 

---- column ----

FOR SALE 180 acre*, Lots \8l 
182, 2nd Con. N.E.T.&S.R., Arteme- 
sia, Very cheap ; also 13 year old mare 
3 year old korse, cow, cattle, dog 
heavy harness, light harness, cut- 
ter, plow, mower, gravel box, hay 
rack. Very reasonable. Apply tr 
Geo. Allen (Mt Zlon), R. R. No. 3, 
Flesherton. 

---- column ----

FARM FOR SALE 

100 a*re farm, 5 acres wheat, 
spring creek, tiled well and windmill, 
comfortable dwelling, barn and hen- 
house, situated 1 mile south of Flesh- 
erton on No. 1 Highway, reasonably 
prked for quick sale. Apply te 
Fred Irwin, Flesherton, 0t. 

---- column ----

DR. S. R. THIBAUDEAU 

TETERINARY SURGEON 
Graduate of Ontario Veterinary Cell- 
ege. Phone: 91 day or nijkt 
MARKDALE, ONT. j 

---- column ----

DR J. E. MILNE 

Office _ DorHsM 81 
Hours _ Afternoon*. l.SO to fc 
Ermines, 7 to 841. 

Sundays and Thursday aftwBoaw fey 

appointment only. 

Prince Arthur Lode* No. US, AJ. 
A A.M., meets in the Fraternal HaQ. 
""lesherton, the second Friday in e*e 
month. W.M., Her*. Corkett; Sec- 
retary, C. J. Bellamy. 
---- page ----

---- column ----

VOL. 60, NO. 50 

---- column ----

FLESHERTON. WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 1941 

---- column ----

VV. H. Thurston & Son, Prop*. 

---- column ----

NEW AND USED 

---- column ----

Farm Machines 

FOR SALE AT COCKSHUTT AGENCY 

---- column ----

SPECIAL THIS WEEK 

Lawn Mowers, Single and 2- 

Furrow Walking plows and 

Walking Plows 

Hart-Parr Tractors 

---- column ----

M.-H. Side Delivery Rake 

New Renfrew Cream Separators 

Toronto Asphalt Roofing 

Lundy Woven Fence 

Harb Wire 

C.I.L. Fertilizers in stock. 

---- column ----

Eastern Steel Products 

Fertilators Barn Tracks Steel Roofing 

W. EDGAR BETTS 

Cockshutt Implements Flesherton, Ont. 

---- column ----

"Brighten the Corner 
Where You Are" 

---- column ----

PAINT UP Paints, Enamels, Varnishes, Turpen- 
tine, Oils, Paint, Brushes. Colors to suit your 
taste; prices to suit your purse. 

CLEAN UP Floor Wax, Polishes, Cleaners, Dust 
Mops, Prooms, Brushes- Paint and Paper 
Cleaners, Scrub Pails. 

FIX UP Roofing, Roof Coating, Plastic Cement, 
Step Ladders, Carpenter's Tools, Lime, Plas- 
ter, Cement. 

Tools for the Lawn and Garden Hoes, Rakes, Lawn 
Mowers, Garden Seeds. 

Watch for our Spring and Summer Catalog. 

---- column ----

F. W. DUNCAN 

---- column ----

HARDWARE 

---- column ----

"Blue Coal" 

---- column ----

Phone 54 

---- column ----

We Specialize In 

* 

Maple Leaf Flour 
Cream of the West 

$3.10 

Monarch Pastry 

80c 
* & A. Co-operative Company, Ltd. 

FLESHERTON. Ontario 

---- column ----

"% 

---- column ----

; Equipped to handle the finest service at moderate prices 

I Our Beautiful 

Air 

; Conditioned 
Funeral Chapel 

at 

124 AVENUE ROAD 

TORONTO, Ont. 

RICHARD MADDOCKS, 

Manager. 

---- column ----

FRED MADDOCKS. 

Associate. 

---- column ----

Member of the Fleahrton Old Bays' ft Girls' Association 

BATES & MADDOCKS 

---- column ----

Frmerly of Flesherton. Ont. 

; 124 Avenue Road. Toronto, Ont. 

---- column ----

Feversham People Holding 
Auction Sale June 5th 
For War Victims' Fund 

---- column ----

A meeting was held in Feversham 
on May 8, by interested citizens to 
organize a project to raise money 
for sufferers in Geat Britain. 

A committee was elected, of which 
Rev. D. L. Dinnick is to be chair- 
man. It was decided to hold an 
auction sale in Feversham on Thurs- 
da. , June 5, 1941 a t 1 p.m. The 
committee set the substantial sum of 
$500. as their objective, but the feel- 
ing of the meeting was that this 
amount could be reached, for the' 
hearts of the people of the commun- 
go out in deep sympathy to that hero" 
ic "Front Line" of defenders who are 
saving us from those same dangers 
and sufferings, > -hich they are so 
nobly enduring. We want to help 
them. 

Mr. Dinnick is in charge of the pro- 
gram and we hope to have Jim Hun- 
ter here for the occasion as well as 
other prominent men. We are en- 
deavoring to secure a band from 
Cairn Borden and a small military 
parade. Refreshments will be serv- 
ed by the Ladies' Community Club, 
under the direction of Mrs. Alex. 
Mullen. 

Mr. Geo. Duncan offered to give 
freely of his time as auctioneer. 

It is to be hoped that the people 
who live in this section of Osprey 
will "ive sacrifically to this fund and 
all of us unite to make it a success. 
In the way of donations almost any- 
thing of value, large or small will be 
acceptable a load of hay or wood, 
a calf, pig. horse, fruit, potatoes, 
speckled trout, stoves, furniture, a 
farm or a hound. Cont. 

---- column ----

KI. 4344 

---- column ----

Flesherton W. I. Meeting 

The 'Women's Institute met at the 
home of Mrs. Inkster on Wed., May 
7th. Following the singing of the 
opening hymn "O Canada," Mrs. 
Cargoe read St. John 13 and the roll 
oall was answered by 12 ladies pay- 
ins their fees. Mrs. C. P. Wilson 
gave "Current Events." The same 
officers carrv on for another year, 
except Mrs. Inkster, who requested to 
be relieved of her position. Mrs. 
Edgar Betts was elected 1st Vice- 
President and District Representa- 
tive. Mrs. Karstedt had charge of 
the program and after giving a read- 
ing "The Queen's Canadian Fund 
for British Air Raid Victims, 1 ' she 
called on Miss Evelyn McTavish for 
two instrumental. Mrs. Hamilton 
read a poem "To day, 1 ' and Mrs. 
Turney "How the Question Came 
Home." Following this a Scripture 
-ontest was carried out by Mrs. 
Karstedt. The meeting closed with 
National Anthem. 

The officers for the coming year 
are: 

President Mrs. Ed Fisher. 

1st Vice-Pres. Mrs. Edgar Betts. 

2nd Vice-Pres. Mrs. Turney. 

Sec. -Teas. .Mrs. Dargavel. 

Dist. Director Mrs. Cargoe. 

District Rep. Mrs. Edgar Betts. 

Organist Mrs. Karstedt. 

Auditors Mrs. W. A. Hawken and 
Mrs. T. J. Fisher. 

---- column ----

Hanley Helmkay 

The home of Rev. A. F. MacKen- 
zie, Toronto, was the scene of a quiet 
but pretty weddinjg. on Sa< rday. 
Mav 3. when Miss Eleanor Bemice 
Helmkay. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
G. Helmkay of Rock Mills became 
the bride of William George Hanley. 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Hanley 
"f Eugenia. 

The bride was becomingly attired 
in a biege ensemble with brown ac- 
cessories and carried a bouquet 
French Tea Roses and Babies breath 
with li'ng white ribbon streamers. 

Miss Winnifred MacKenzie the 
bride's attendant was attired in biege 
flowered crepe and black accessories. 
She carried pink roses and babies 
breath. 

Mr. Benjamen Hanley was his 
brother's groomsman. 

The groom's giffc to the bride was 
a gold wrist watch, to the brdesmaid. 
a gold enamel compact. The groom- 
sman's gift was a gold signet ring. 

Large bunches of daffodils, white 
wedding bells and nink and white 
ctreamers made a charming setting 
for the reception, which was held at 
the bride's home. A three tier wed- 
ding cake topped by a silver arch 
and bells graced tbo centre of the 
table. There were ei'teen at thf 
dinner. 

After spending the week end i' 
this vicinity, the couple motored t>- 
New Toronto, where they will reside. 

---- column ----

Feversham Continuation 

School Commencement 

A large crowd attended the Fever- 
sham Continuation School Commence- 
ment held in the school on Friday 
May 2. Rev. F. Thompson proved 
an able chairman, giving a short and 
interesting address on the value ot 
education. 

Musical nunVbers throughout the 
programme were of a high order. 
The programme opened with a chorus 
by the school, "Land of Hope and 
Glory". At intervals througnout the 
evening a six piece school orchestra 
played. Loud applause greeted the 
descant," Moonlight and Roses" sung 
by twelve girls of the school. 

Two plays proved interesting feat- 
ures. A three act play, "A ready 
Made family" provoked much laught- 
er from the audience. A shorter one, 
"Buddy Buys An Orchid" was an 
amusing satire of the life of teen 
age boys and girls. 

The presentation of diplomas by 
the Secretary of the school, Mr. Har- 
vey Pedlar, was an imoortant item 
on the program. Moreen Grummett, 
Murray Lepard, Bernice Wright, 
and Mabel Fenwick. Intermediate 
diplomas were presented to >Iina 
Douglas, Hazel Magee, Eleanor Me 
Kenzie and Annie Radley. 

The physical training display, as 
usual, proved popular. An Athletic 
Dawce was well done by six girls in 
yellow and mauve costi'^ies. When 
the curtain was drawn for the boys' 
work the audience saw a striking 
group of boys in white trousers and 
sweat shirts with the school crest. 
The pyramids and bar-work were 
especially good, judging 'from the 
applause from the audienc Mr. 
McGinnis and Bert Hale, the oldest 
and youngest member of the group, 
showed that in this school, bar-work 
has no limits. 

After the chorus, "We'll stick to- 
gether," the lengthly program was 
brought to a close by singing the 
National Anthem. 

G. & S. Foresters Leave 

Toronto Next Week 

---- column ----

The Grey Hi Simcoe Pollsters, 
1st Battalion (A.F.) has received 
orders to leave early next week 
for a distant point to carry out 
further training. Enroute they 
will march throu^li several of 
the towns O f Central Ontario in 
the interests of recruiting. 

Fourth Line Red Cross 

A branch of the Artemesia Red 
Cross was formed on the fourth line, 
on March 7th, though their member* 
were comparitively few, in two 
months time they had completed the 
following aticles; six quilts, eighteen 
women's and children's dresses, 1 pr. 
boys pants and shirt, three .scarves, 
2 helmets, 1 pr. two way mits. Part 
of the above go in" through the local 
Red Cross and part through the Sal- 
vation Army. 

They are especially proud .of one 
of their senior members, Mrs. W. 
Simmons, who has already completed ' 
thirty-seven pairs of soldiers' socks, 
one pair of seamen's socks and one 
scarf. Workers like this member 
urge others to do their part. 

---- column ----

Prince Arthur Lodge 

Receives District Deputy 

Prince Arthur Lodge No. 333, A. 
F.&A.M., received the annual visit 
of the District Deputy Grand Mast- 
er, R.W. Bro. Fitzgerald of Orange- 
ville, on Friday evening last. The 
election of officers of the Lodge was 
conducted and the following were 
elected: 

W.M. J. S. McDermid. 

S.W. W. E. Walker. 

J.Vv. M. S. McLeod. 

Chaplain Rev. McMillan. 

Treasurer F. H. W. Hickling. 

Secretary C. J. Bellamy. 

Tyler E. Blackburn. 

Following the Lodge meeting a 
banquet was held, presided over by 
the Master., Wor. Bro. H. Corbett. 
R.W. Bro. McCauley proposed the 
toast to Grand Lodge of Canada in 
the Province of Ontario, which was 
responded to by R. W. Bro. Fitzger- 
ald in a masterly address. The toast 
to the visitors, proposed by V.W. 
McBride, was responded to by V.W. 
Bro. C. V. Jeffers, District Secretary. 
Bro. Harvey Griffen and Bro. A. 
McGilvray. Visitors present were 
C. V. Jeffers and A. McGilvray of 
Orangeville, H. A. Hutcheson and 
R. C. Walker of Shelbume, Alex. 

---- column ----

Campbell of Dundalk and H. 
of Toronto. 

---- column ----

St. Columba Church News 

---- column ----

A carload of St. Columba young 
people went to the Presbytery Y. P. 
rally in Queen St. Church, Durham, 
a week ago Monday evening. 

Rev. A. R. Muir on Tuesday atten- 
ded the sessions o* Grev Presbytery 
in Division Church, Owen Sound. He 
was accompanied by M- E. G. Rit- 
chie and Mrs. Gary Whyte who were 
delegates to the W. M. S. Presbyterial 
which met in Knox church the same 
day. 

Salem Ladies Aid me f Wednesday 
at the home of Mrs. Roy McNalty 
with a good attendance. Plans were 
made for the garden party in June. 

The minister conducted the first 
class in Bible lessons at the Swamp 
College school on Wednesday after- 
noon. 

A special order of service for 
Mother's Day was observed in St. Co- 
lumba on Sunday. A children's choir 
assisted at the mornin-* service sing- 
ing, "Count on Me^. Mr. Roy Lang- 
ford was in charge fo- the day, sing- 
ine ut the evening service as well as 
rendering a trumpet solo, "Sandon." 

---- column ----

PRESENTATION TO MR. AND 
MRS. W. H. O'BRIEN ON MAY 7 

A number of the friends and 
neighbors of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. 
O'Brien, 8th Line, Osprey, gathered 
at their home Tuesday evening, May 
7th, prior to their departure to their 
new home at Formosa. During the 
course of the evening the following 
iddress was read by Mrs. J. J. Otte- 
well and a presentation made by Mr. 
Lloyd Stephens: 

To Mr. and Mrs. O'Brien:- We, a 
few of your friends and neighbors, 
have gathered here this evening to 
spend a few social hours with you 
before your departure from our 
midst. We are sorry that you have 
decided to lave our community, but 
hope that in your new home at For- 
mosa you will enjoy health and hap- 
piness and that you will not forget. 
your friends in Osprey. 

---- column ----

Future Events 

---- column ----

The Women's Institute will hold a 
Euchre and Dance in Priceville Hall 
on Friday. May 23, 8.30 p.m. A draw 
for the Red Cross quilt will be held. 
Admission 25c, lunch free. 

---- column ----

Mr. McArthur. the hair dresser 
from Toronto, will 'bo at M. Arthur 
MacDonald's residence (bake shop) 
Flesherton on Thursday, May 22nd, 
to (five permanent*. Make appoint- 
ments with Mrs. Scarrow at the 
bake shp. 

---- column ----

OPTICAL D. Campbell, the op- 
tometrist, will be at Maxwell, Tues.. 
May 20th. from 2 to 5.30 p.m., and 
Flesherton 8.30 to 9 p.m. 

---- column ----

Jas. Cullen Injured When 

His Team Ran Away 

Thrown from a wagon while his 
t''am was running away, Mr. James 
Cullen of the East Rackline was se- 
verely injured on Monday afternoon 
in town. He was driving his team 
t-> the shed at the rear of F. G. Kar- 
stedtfs store, when they suddenly 
became frightened from undisclosed 
source and bolted. They grazed a 
wagon in the shed to such an extent 
that Mr. Cullen was thrown from the 
wag in while attempting to ston their 
headlong flight. His head struck the 
ground with such force that he was 
rendered unconscious for several 
minutes and received deep cuts and 
scratches on his head. He also suf- 
fered a broken wrist. He was taken 
to Dv. Milne's office and had his 
wounds dressed. The horses brought 
un with dizzy suddenness when they 
came in contact with a tree at the 
tennis court, each horse taking a 
different route around the tree. The y 
went through the wire fence, smashed 
an eight inch posl, when they fell on 
the cement court and received cuts 
>n the head. The tongue of the wa- 
<ron was broken. Mr. Cullen was 
fortunate that, his injuries were not . 
of a more serious nature. Messrs. 
F. G. Karstedt and A. R. Ferris were 
the only eye witnesses to the run- 
away and promptly rendered assist- 
ance to the injured man. 

---- column ----

If 9011 WAHT 91$ 

AHD sic 
in A mf 

CCT GOODytAR 

MfiRATHOH 

---- column ----

T'S rue r/*e\ 

FOR MB...OHC 

THAT RfAiiy 
[SA'/fS M 

---- column ----

In the Marathon you get 
every desirable Goodyear quality 
for long trouble-free service 
plus the popular centre- traction 
diamond tread at the lowest 
price. Drive in today! 

---- column ----

MARATHON 

---- column ----

FOR YOUR BEST BUY IN TIRES ... SEE 

D. McTAVISH A SONS 
FLESHERTON. ONTARIO 

---- column ----

Economy 

---- column ----

Our Government is asking our citizens to econo- 
mize wherever possible in our daily routine of 
living and functions. We can suggest two ways 
of economy, namely: by delivering your cream to 
the creamery and receiving 1 cent per pound fat 
over truck price, and also making use of our cold 
storage meat lockers, by freezing your own meat, 
which is a big saving on your cost of living. 

MEAT STORAGE 

A $5.00 box for a year will hold approximately 
220 to 250 Ibs. meat and you may refill the box 
often as you wish. You may also place meat in 
storage at the rate of iVzc per Ib. m 

On account of the new government egg regulations 
we must take more time in grading eggs. We are 
asking you to co-operate with us by bringing your 
eggs earlier durincr the day to avoid congestion dur- 
ing open night. The creamery will remain open each 
Wednesday and Saturday night during the summer 

NOW IS THE TIME THAT THE STORING 
OF MEAT SHOULD BE IN FULL 

PROGRESS. 

Call in to see us about the storage. 
THE CREAMERY WILL BE OPEN EACH SATURDAY NIGHT 

Flesherton Creamery & Produce Co. 

---- column ----

Phone 06 

---- column ----

Angus Avis, Manager 

---- column ----

I 
---- page ----

---- column ----

SUNDAY 
SCHOOL 
LESSON 

---- column ----

LESSON VII 

BROADENING CHRISTIAN 

HORIZONS SAUL'S 

CONVERSION 

AcU 9: 1-31 

PRINTED TEXT, Acts 9i 1-16 

GOLDEN TEXT I ,., not di.- 
obedient unto the heavenly vision. 
Acts26:l!i. 

THE LESSON IN ITS SETTING 
Time The conversion of Saul 
took placu probably in A.D. 30, 
and later events in this chapter 
are believed to have occurred In 
AiD. 37 and 38. 

Place The city of Damascus 
was approximately 1DO milei 
northeast of Jerusalem, in Syria { 
the city of Tarsus was located in 
the southeastern part of Asia 
Minor, on the Cydnus River, ten 
miles from the scacoast. 

Christ's soldiers are His cap- 
tured enemies. Kvpry soul won 
from resistance to the cross is 
sent out into the field to win 
others. Of this the most noble 
instance in Christian history is 
the conversion of Saul. Jesus 
Christ never encountered a bit- 
terer nor an abler foe; Jesui 
Christ never won a mightier cap- 
tain for His army of light. 

The Zealous Persecutor 
Acts 9:1. "But Saul, yet breath- 
ing threatening and slaughter 
against the disciples of the Lord, 
went unto the high priest, 2. And 
asked of him letters to Damascus 
unto the synagogues, that If ha 
found any that were of the Way, 
whether men or women, he might 
bring them bound to Jerusalem." 
The reason he would bring them 
to Jerusalem was to make sure 
that they would be put to death, 
for, though they might be pun- 
ished by scourging or in some 
other way in other cities, it would 
be only in Jerusalem that a Jew- 
ish convert would be condemned 
to death. 

(Saul, like the Saul of the Old 
Testament, was of the tribe of 
Benjamin, and had come from hi* 
home at Tarsus, in Asia Minor, 
to sit at the feet of the great 
Jewish teacher, Gamaliel. Saul 
was a Hebrew of the Hebrews, 
equipped with an excellent Greek 
education, and a freed man in 
the Roman Empire). 

The Voice From Heaven 
3. "And as he journeyed, it 
came to pass that he drew nigh 
unto Damascus: and suddenly 
there shone round about him a 
light out of heaven." Later we 
are told that the time of the day 
was "about noon" when the vision 
was seen and Paul says that at 
midday the light was "above the 
brightness of the sun." 4. "And 
he fell upon the earth, and heard 
a voice saying unto him, Saul, 
Saul, why persecutes! thou me? 
5. And he said, Who art thou, 
Lord? And he said, I am Jesus 
whom thou persecutes! :" Our 
Lord doc.1 not call himself Mes- 
siah, Son of Man, or Son of God, 
but Jesus of Nazareth, the man 
who was crucified. He recalls to 
Saul's mind His humiliation, suf- 
fering, and death all stumbling 
blocks to the Pharisee; for what 
Paul had to be taught was that 
Jesus of Nazareth was the Christ. 
C. "But rise, and enter into 
the city, and it shall be told thee 
what thou must do." Saul had 
received all that he could bear 
just now. Human agents, like 
Ananias, could finish what Jesus, 
by supernatural manifestation, 
had horn begun In Saul. 

Saul's New Life 

"And the mm Hint journeyed 
with him stood speechless, hearing 
the voice, but beholding no man. 
8. And Saul arose from the 
earth; and when his eyej were 
'j-n.ncii, he saw nothing; and they 
JoJ him by the hand, and brought 
him to Damascus. !'. And he 
was three days without sight, and 
in neither. eat nor drink." How 
quickly things can change in one's 
life. A man tan be in the glow 
of health one clay, and )> pros- 
trate on a bed of illness the next. 
Saui, this morning, was the furi- 
ous loadm 1 of a terrible persecu- 
tion. Niw, like a child, blind, ha 
U led into the city. No wonder 
Saul neither ate nor drank dur- 
ing those three day*, which must 
have meant days of storm, and 
suffering, turmoil, and readjuRt- 
9>nt within his .strong and tem- 
pea'ihri- naluu- 

"A Ckol.n Vessel" 
10. "Now there was a certain 
disciple a-t Damascus, named An- 
anias; and the Lord said unto 
bim in a vision, Ananias. And 
be said, Hthoid. I HIM lien , l.oril." 
Aiutn lat- wax a Christian Jew or 
Damascus. He must have held a 
leading position in the local 
Christian assembly; our ).! 
elected him as His agent of com- 
OHimcation when dunlin'.' with this 
iew convert. 11. "And the Lord 
laid unto him, Arise, and go to 
Uiu street which in called Straight, 
And inquire in the house of Judas 
for one nnnied Saul, a man of 
Tarsus: for behold, he prayethj 
12. And he hath seen a man 
named Ananias coming in, and 
laying his hand on him, tli.it he 
niijiht receive his sight. 18. Put 

---- column ----

British Soldiers Guarding Near East Pipeline 

---- column ----

Oil pipeline* were strung across desert to Mediterranean outlet* 

Sboth French Syria and British Palestine after World War 1. Most 
Iraq'* 30,000,000-barrel annual output flowg through Britain's pipe*, 
for she hat controlled and protected th well*. This oil production ia 
nearly equal that of German-occupied Rumania; but only one-fifth 
of Oklahoma 1 * (U.S.A.) 

---- column ----

Ananias antwerad. Lord, I have 
heard from many of thi man, 
how much evil h did to thy saint* 
at Jerusalem: 14. And here he 
hath authority from tint chief 
priests to bind all that call upon 
thy name. 15. But the Lord 
said unto him, Go thy way: for 
he U a chosen vessel uruo me, to 
bear my name before the Gentile* 
and kings, and the children of 
Israel: 16. For I will show him 
how many things he must suffer 
for my name's sake." Thes last 
two verses seem to be almost a 
ummary for the whole future 
history of the great Apostle, now 
waiting in blindness for the com- 
ing of Ananias. Saul was a 
"chosen vessel" unto him. The 
Lord has chosen you also, in ac- 
cordance with your preparation. 
For what are you preparing your- 
f el vest 

---- column ----

Dive-bombing 

---- column ----

Sparrow 

---- column ----

Mrs. K P. Hindrichs, of Mem- 
phis, Tenn., can't figure It all 
out, but her wire-haired terriar 
is fighting a losing battle with a 
sparrow. 

When the dog goes out of the 
house, the bird swoops down onto 
hit back, given the terrier a sharp 
peck on the tail, and then f!ie* 
away again. 

Several times a day for several 
weeks this has been going on, and 
each time the terrier has snapped 
at the bird and missed. 

---- column ----

Excessive Mental 
Effort Harmful 

It's More Likely Than Hard 
Phyiical Labor to Cauie 
Hardening of the Arteries 

That excessive mental work U 
more likely than hard physical la- 
bor to cause arteriosclerosis 
hardening of the arteries and that 
more men than women suffer from 
that malady, were among the recent 
statements made by a physician 
connected with the Health League; 
of Canada. 

A well-established condition of 
arteriosclerosis Is made apparent 
by the rigid and tortuous condition 
of the arteries which, to the> touch, 
feel like a string of beads, said 
the speaker. The earlier symptoms 
are less definite and often are so 
slight as to pass unnoticed. 

These symptoms, he pointed out, 
arise from a diminished blood sup- 
ply, resulting from tbe thickened 
condition of the artf rie which re- 
duces their inner capacity. Natur- 
ally, symptoms vary according U 
the parts of tu body which are 
being deprived of a normal blood 
supply. 

Thus, If tbe arteries supplying 
the brain are affected, there will 
be Increasing loss of mentor/, In- 
ability to sleep properly, defective- 
ness of Judgment, Irritability and 
despondency. In the aged, sufferer* 
are restless, even delirious, during 
the night. During the day they are 
drowsy. 

---- column ----

RADIO REPORTER 

---- column ----

By DAVE ROBBINS 

---- column ----

SPECIAL OBSERVERS 

Those who have watched Bri- 
tain stand off her enemies, an<l 
those who have observed democ- 
racy go down In Ktirnpe. have a 
story of imperishable couraga a 
well as a message ot urgent warn- 
ing for the people of the Western 
Hemisphere. 

And because these war observer* 
Include men of unassailable public 
reputation who have shown a de- 
termination to help Britain and 
all other pooulo striving agaiaat 
oppression, a number of them have 
been Inrlted to participate la * 
series of broadcasts now being pr- 
Rented by the CBC over Its Nation- 
al Network on Sundays at 9.00 
B8T. 

Wallace Deuel, former Berlin 
correspondent of tli9 Chicago Dally 
News, Colonel William Donovan, 
President Roosevelt's Rpoclal ob- 
server who has returned from a 
tour of the Near Kast, Virgil Pink- 
lay, who travelled from Russia to 
Spain to observe the offsets of 
Hitler's hand, Vincent Sheoan, 
Wendell Willlde, who came to Can- 
ada to help tbe Dnmliilon'ei War 
Services anil who hfis saul that ha 
will come aKain and speak in tills 
serie*, are among; the distinguish- 
ed Americans who will he hoard. 

John Bird. Kditor of the Winni- 
peg Tribune, who Is at present 
overseas, Davidson Duiiton, Kditor 
ot the Montreal Standard, Just 
back, R. T. Bowman, tho CBC rep- 
resentative who lias tbe distinction 
of having bpn the first Canadian 
In Britain to report the war. are 
among the CaniullaiiH who will da- 
scribe for thftir countrymen what 
they have seen In rfrMit months. 

---- column ----

AROUND THE DIAL 

What's New the CKOC feature 
011 fashions aud foibles for tbe 

ladies is now on a n&w time, 

heard at ten each Monday, Wed- 
nesday and Friday rooming. 

Beriilce Burns has many up-to- 
the-mlnuts Ideas and tip* In thle 
program that are worth hearing, 
tips on clothes, makeup, table set- 
tings, materials, and odds and endi 
for housekeeping. 

Dial In and hear Bornlce Burn* 
tell the world What's New! 
e e e 

At last the "Three Little Pigs," 
of story-book fame have name*. 
Thanks fo W BEN'S "Story Hour 
Lady." 

Distressed that the tiny porkere 
were Individually nanioleag. the 
story lady hold a contest on her 
Tuesday morning program at ft. 30. 
From a mountain of assorted tags 
and title* sent In by young fans, 
she picked three that wore ad- 
Judged the best Blackie. Whitle 
Hiid Pinkie which are the names 
by which WHKN's Btory Hour Fans 
now know the trio of story-book 

pic*. 


The running of the King's Plate 
at Woodbine Ilaca Course, Toron- 
to, will be de-scribed In a CBC com- 
mentary on Saturday, May 17, at 
:t.30 MOST over the National Net- 
work. Foster Dryilen will doscribe 
tho hlii" bloods of the equine world, 
as they face the barrier and pound 
down the homo stretch to win Can- 
iida's famed turf classic trophy. It 
is planned to send tlie program by 
special beam to the Canadian 
troops In Britiiln. 

---- column ----

Gardening . . . 

---- column ----

ARTICLE NO. 11 

---- column ----

There is nothing to equal the 
taste of vegetables that have just 
reached the proper maturity and 
art fresh from the garden. But 
f&r too few people with plenty 
of vegetable garden right at their 
door get the full benefit of this 
freshness. In most cases there 
are a few meals of green peas, 
baby carrots and beets, new po- 
tatoes and corn, and that is all. 
Either the rows are finished or 
else there is nothing left but ma- 
tured vegetables, which should 
have been eaten days or weeks 
be-fore, when they were full of 
flavor." With a little foresight 
and planning, however, these un- 
fortunates could jii.-t as easily 
have had really fresh vegetables 
coming on all through the Sum- 
mer. They could extend even the 
green pea season to over a month, 
could have fresh corn from early 
Summer until almost Christmas. 

Spreading Out Season 
There are two ways to achieve 
th! objective. First, the planting 
season can be spread over several 
. weeks. Experts advise making at 
least three sowings of practically 
all vegetables, the first a week or 
so before the regular time, the 
second at -the regular time and 
the third a week or ten days later. 
Second, by buying early, med- 
ium and later maturing varie- 
ties still more length can be add- 
ed. With almost all standard 
vegetables there are varieties that 
are really days or weeks before 
the average, and also others much 
later. By sowing both kinds and 
also a medium one, the season ia 
greatly lengthened. 

Garden Picture* 
Ona can do wonders with 
flowers alone, but still more amaz- 
ing results will follow where wa 
combine flowers skilfully with 
grass, winding walks, shrubbery 
and bits of stonework. In this 
combining, however, we must take 
care not to reproduce a jungle. 
Flowers and shrubbery must not 
be so crowded that they become 
spindly and weak. 

Little flowers must not be hid- 
den by tall things like full size 
marigolds, cosmos or zinnias. 
Beds must be so arranged that w 
can keep down weeds and remove 
fading foliage. Above all we 
must remember that unless we are 
skilful it is beat to use a fair 
amount of lawn as a foreground 
for our flowers. Lawns are almost 
vital in creating garden pictures. 

---- column ----

Human Body 
Busy Factory 

---- column ----

Five Quarts of Blood Per Per- 
son: Two-fifths Red Cede 

---- column ----

You have, if you are a person 
of about average size and weight, 
about half a bucket of blood ia 
your body a little over five 
quarts. About two-fifth* of thii 
re the red blood cells, writes Dr. 
Logan Clendening. They float, 
pretty widely separated, in the 
serum, but if packed down they 
would constitute about two-fifths 
of the entire volume. The rest 
of the blood it the plasma, or 
aerum, which ;s a clear, yellow- 
ish fluid. 

A chemist estimates that in thii 
half-bucket of blood there it dis- 
solved a tcaspoonful of sugar and 
a tablespoon of ordinary table 
salt, and about a tablespoonful of 
sodium bicarbonate or ordinary 
baking soda. There are about six 
5-grain capsules of .nitrogenous 
products in the blood, and about 
1/100 of a grain of iodine. There 
ie from a te-aspoonful to a table- 
spoonful of fat. 

These substances are all in a 
state of flux and it is, indeed, a 
very busy chemical factory. These 
substances are, of course all der- 
ived from the food. After diges- 
tion they are carried to the liver 
most of them and there chang- 
ed into forms which the cells can 
utiiijf. Some part ' of them ii 
stored in the liver and the rest 
released in the blood stream. 

---- column ----

Courtesy Counts 

An amusing story was told by 
Mi Afrikander farmer living near 
Cape Town. Many years ago h 

---- column ----

was in the veld looking for cattle 
that had strayed when, on round- 
ing some rocks, he suddenly came 
face to face with a big lion. The 
two stared at each other in amaze- 
ment. After a few tense moments 
the farmer took off his hat and 
said quietly, "Good morning." 
Whereupon the lion turned tall 
and slowly walked away. 

---- column ----

Brazil, with a surplus of sev. 
eral million cases of oranges, 
wants to exchange them for Am- 
erican apples. Orange export* * 
from Brazil are on the downward 
path. The largest purchaser), 
Great Britain and the Scandina- 
vian countries, are unable t 
transport them and the orang* 
market has been badly hit. 

---- column ----

THIS CURIOUS WORLD 

---- column ----

By William 
Ferguson 

---- column ----

MUCH OF THE 

---- column ----

CRUST 

---- column ----

IS ,, 

OF AAATEJ5JALS 
WHICH ONICE 

---- column ----

UPON THE 
SURFACE, 
IN THE FORM 

---- column ----

PCANTTS 

AND 

ANfMAC-S. 

---- column ----

TERMITES 

HAVE BEEN FOUND 
IN EVERy STATE 
EXCEPT 

---- column ----

MEN) HAVE 

A42" / 

THAN 

---- column ----

ANSWER: Wrong. Both men and women have 12 pair*. Tot 
belief that women had on* more came from th* Biblical story 
that woman was created with a rib taken from man, 

NEXT: What elephant earned his owners uw Uun 
! in three yean? 

---- column ----

MORMON LEADER 

---- column ----

HORIZONTAL 

1,7 Most 
famous 
Mormon 
leader in 
Utah. 

11 Touched with 
the toes. 

12 To elude. 

14 Actor's part. 
1 Accented 

syllables. 
17100 square 

meters. 

1 8 Pertaining to 
the Pope. 

19 Gatherers of 
honey. 

20 Preferences. 
22 Cooking fat. 
23'Sea eagle. 
24 Disputant. 

26 Sheltered 
place. 

27 High. 
20 Loiters. 

30 Negativ*. 

31 Light. 

33 Promise. 

34 Third-rat* 
actor. 

35FarcvvcllI 

---- column ----

Answer to Previous Puzzle 

---- column ----

37 To weep. 
39 Roofs of 

mouths. 
42 To endure. 
4,4 Genius of a 

language. 
45 Came 

afterward. 
47 Myself. 
49 Recipient*. 
51 Roar. 
54 Intolerance or 

caused 

the Mormons 

to settle in 

Utah, 

---- column ----

VERTICAL 

1 Shipworm. 

2 To express 
displeasure. 

3 Part of 
Roman month 

4 Masculine 
pronoun. 

5 To profit. 

6 Provision 
mart. 

7 You. 

8 Russian 
mountains. 

9 Prickly pears. 
10 Fierce look. 

---- column ----

11 Huge Morn\oa 
church in 
Salt Lake. 
City. 

13 To think. 
15 Minor church 
official. 

20 To dangle. 

21 Fodder vat. 

24 Chubby. 

25 Heavy spars. 
28 Camel's hair 

cloth. 

32 Having no 
head hair. 

33 To prohibit 

34 European 
mint. 

36 Conceited. 
38 Inner sole. 

40 Military 
assistants. 

41 Ant. 

43 Melody. 
46 Ever. 
48 Biblical 
priest. 

50 Southeast. 

51 Bushel. 

52 Behold. 

53 Onward. 

---- column ----

POP No Credit to Either Gentleman 

---- column ----

---- column ----

By J. MILLAR WATT 

---- column ----

MV VYIF-E- IS 
NtVEP HAPPY- 
WHPN I'M OUT 
OF MER 

---- column ----

MINE- DOE-SN T 

TRUST ME- 

CITHER 

I 
---- page ----

---- column ----

Axis Threats, Strife in Iraq Presage Near East War 

---- column ----

German fifth 

column repotted 

preparing Syria 

for invasion 

---- column ----

Avoiding (lash with Turkey, 

Germans likely to strike at 

Suez through Syria, using air 

transport!, sfnoil vessels to 

carry troops, supplies across 

---- column ----

Russian move 
en Iran oil, 
Persian Gulf 
might follow 
German attack 
in near cast 

---- column ----

Mediterranean 

---- column ----

British fleet blasts axis posi- 
tions on Libyan coait, might 
prevent large-sccle ferrying 

---- column ----

or Nazi troops to Syria by lea 

---- column ----

I German grab or 

rich (it ids her* 

would cancel ef- 

fact of British 

oil block-* 

---- column ----

TRANS 
JORDAN 

(Br.) 

---- column ----

Brrto in at odds with 

---- column ----

SAUDI 

ARABIA 

---- column ----

government (considered pro- 
German) over reinforc*mtr.r 

---- column ----

of Iritish force et Basra 

---- column ----

Axis may try parachute 
behind British lines, and tank 
thrust* across desert, up Nile 
to escape warship fire on coasr 

---- column ----

1200-Mile Front 
British Mil** Dctcod 

Possible Axis Thruatl 

---- column ----

-Caravan 
Koxfet 

---- column ----

New war hovered over the ancient Near East as Axis pincers drives on Suez, from Libya and Syria, 
were believed a matter of days by the British, who were beset with additional troubles over landing 
ot troops in Iraq. Map shows how Germans may strike to try for double victory in Egypt and Iraq. 

---- column ----

What Science 
Is Doing 

---- column ----

GERM KILLER IN SOIL 

Discovery of a tremendously 
powerful gevmkiiler in common 
soil has been announced by Dr. 
C. Hoogerheide, ir.icrobio'. jgist at 
the Biochemical Research Foun- 
dation of the Franklin Institute, 
Philadelphia. 

According to the Foundation, 
a minute quantity of the sab- 
stance will kill the germs of pneu- 
monia, gangrene and other infec- 
tious diseases. It has been term- 
ed scientifically HI. 

PROTEINS IN NEW DRINK 

Science has a new drink, by 
which one glassful will give the 
steak, bread, eggs and other pro- 
teins of a good meal. 

The drink is chocolate flavored, 
If you wish, and tasty. 

The new drink offers two tools 
to doctors. One is to make cer- 
tain that no essential protein is 
missing from a person's diet. The 
other is to give proteins to those 
persons whose bodies, because of 
Illness, fail to absorb the pro- 
teins from meals. 

o 

AIR-RAID DEATH CAUSES 

Peculiar and unexplained ef- 
fects of air-raid explosions were 
discussed at a recent meeting of 
the Royal Academy of Medicine 
in London. Professor Geoffrey 
Hadfield reported that in thirty 
autopsies he had made of air-raid 
fatalities eight cases showed no 
external causes of death. In some 
eases air passages in the lungs 
were filled with blood, but there 
was no sign of rupture of the 
lungs. There was, however, a 
high degree of- carbon-monoxide 
saturation in the blood. Profes- 
sor S. Zuckcrman, of Oxford, re- 
ported that it has been known 
since the Spanish civil war that 
blasts of high explosives could kill 
or Injure people without causing 
external injuries. 

---- column ----

How Gon I? 

BY ANNE ASHLEY 

\ 

Q. How can I keep a house 
plant supplied with water, when 
foing away for a few days? 

A. Soak a large sponge well 
with water and place it on the 
dirt in the pot. The plant will 
absorb enough water to keep it 
fresh until you return. 

Q. How can I clean smeary ma- 
aogany furniture? 

A. First sponge with a cloth 
dipped in a solution of hot water 
and vinegar, and then with a 
loth dipped in a pint of warm 
water to which one teaspoon each 
f linseed oil and turpentine has 
bn added. Follow this by pol- 
ahing with a soft, dry cloth. 

Q. How can I prevent cauli- 
flower from darkening when be- 
ing boiled? 

A. Add a slice of lemon to the 
water. 

Q. How should I dye a sweater? 

A. Remove the buttons before 
dyeing a tweater. Then weigh 
the garment while it is dry. 
Enough dye should be bought to 
eolcr the number of pounds the 
article weighs. A sweater will 
not take a good color with insuffi- 
cient dye. 

<). How can 1 remove unsight- 
ly itains on the hands, caused by 
paring vegetables? 

A. Use a little raw tomato 
juke to remove thee staint. 
Lemon juice can be used for the 

---- column ----

Toronto-New York 
Air Mail Service 

Letter* Now Take Only Two 
Hours to Make the Trip 

---- column ----

An. Air Mail Service has now 
been established between Toronto 
and New York both ways. 

This service operates on the fol- 
lowing schedule until further ad- 
vised: 

DAILY INCLUDINC SUNDAY 

STANDARD TIME 
Lv. Malton Airport 10.00 a.m. 

Ar. New York 12.00 noon 

Lv. Malton Airport 11.30 p.m. 
Ar. New York 1.30 a.m. 

Lv. New York 7.30 a.m. 

Ar. Malton Airport 9.45 a.m. 

Lv. N>w York 8.15 p.m. 

Ar. Malton Airport 10.30 p.m. 

Air mail posted in Toronto up to 
11 p.m. Daylight Saving Time will 
make connection with the plane 
leaving Malton at 11.30 Eastern 
Standard Time, and be available 
for delivery In New York by first 
letter carrier delivery the follow- 
in)? morning. , 

This will also afford a material 
gain in time for delivery of air 
mail to points in the Southern At- 
lantlc States as far south as MiamJ, 
F.4. 

---- column ----

Modem 
Etiquette 

BY ROBERTA LEE 

---- column ----

1. When a house guest has 
permission from her hostess to in- 
vite a friend to dinner, or some 
other affair, by whom should the 
invitation be extended? 

2. What should one do when 
he finds that another person,'! 
opinion is directly opposed to hia 
own? 

3. What is considered the beat 
decoration for any room of the 
house? 

4. What is the correct way for 
a man to lift a soft, hat when 
speaking to a girl? 

5. Isn't it very unwise for a 
girl to write some words of en- 
dearment on a photograph of her- 
self that she is giving to a young 
man? 

6. Shouldn't one be grateful 
when a friend has pointed out to 
him a very glaring fault that 
should be corrected? 

Answer* 

1. All H Citations should come 
from the hostess. 2. Change the 
subject of conversation. Above 
all, do not argue. 3. Freshly-cut 
flowers, attractively arranged 
will outrank any other decoration. 
4. The hat should be lifted by the 
crown, not the brim. And above 
all, the hat should be^ lifted slight- 
ly, not merely a touch of the 
brim. 5. Yes; it is very unwise. 
She may regret it many times in 
the future. 6. Yes. But. sad as 
it seems, resentment instead of 
gratitude is usually the effect, 
and very often a lost friendship. 

---- column ----

Beavers Sabotage 

Railway Lines 

Beavers in Algonquin Paj-k are 
sabotaging the Canadian National 
Railways. So ay A. Hoffman, 
Section Foreman at Brawuy, Ont., 
w reported In The Canadian Na- 
tional Magazine. For months he 
IMS had to break up dams to pre- 
ve-nt damage to railway property 
froth floods. He has tried all sorts 
of ruses but the beavers are clever 
rini persistent. Too clo*e to the 
lallway track is their ponfl. 75 feet 
square, the work of th co years. 
The fight COM on. 

---- column ----

HAVE - 
YOU HEARD? 

---- column ----

An American was defeated ig- 
nominiously when he ran for the 
office of sheriff. He got 58 votes 
out of a total of 3,500, and the 
next day he walked down Main 
Street with two guns hanging 
from '. s belt. 

"You were not elected and you 
have no right to carry guus, ' ft!- 
low citizens told him. 

"Listen folks," he replied, "a 
man with no more fricnda than 
I've jot in this country needs to 
carry guns." 

---- column ----

"Why *OHictimet I'm tnken 
for my o*vn daughter.'* 

"Nonsense! You don't look 
old enough to have a daugh- 
ter ao old." 

---- column ----

The circus and fun fair was 
visiting; a small town, and on* 
old Negro had taken a fancy to 
the merry-go-round. 

Round and round he went, 
never seeming to tire, until ail hii 
money was gone. Then only did 
hu dismount to rejoin his wife, 
who had been watching him with 
impatient eyes. 

"Well, Ebenezer," she said, 
"you sure have spent your mo nay 
auid had s good ride. But where 
you been, Ebenezer, where you 
been?" 

---- column ----

Wife: "I went in to a bar- 
gain itle today." 

Huiband: "Did you see 
anything that looked real 
cheap?" 

Wife: "Yea, teveral men 
waiting for their wive*." 

---- column ----

"What's the matter, my little, 
man'.'" asked a sympathetic stran- 
ger of a small boy whom he saw 
crying in the street. 

"Please, sir, my dog's dead,' 1 
sobbed the boy. 

"Well," said the man, "you 
mustn't make such a trouble of 
it. My grandmother died last 
week, and I'm not crying." 

"No," said the boy, "but you 
didn't bring her up from a pup." 

---- column ----

Motor Sali-.--Ti.in- "Can 1 
ihow you lomething, ir'.'" 

Pedeitrian: "No, I'm not 
here to buy anything. But 
it's such wonderful change 
to be in the midst of all these 
cars without havinf to dodge 
them." 

---- column ----

The Guildhall, London's fam- 
ous building which suffered to 
severely in a recent raid, received 
its name because it was common 
to all the London Guilds, the 
associations formed by the mer- 
chants in different trades to 
safeguard their interests. 

---- column ----

Improved Select Italian 
Package Bees 

Cut Prices For May 

HI ( .MID I'KOI'r* - I'll.H'l .. 

<;K\TI,K - PROM IT sKii'MK 

K\I'HK!S < !.!. K'T 

2 Ib. A queen $1.50 

3 Ib. & queen $2.00 

In I . . rundn 

R. B. HER1ER 
Valdosta, Ga., U.S.A. 

---- column ----

VDNEiWW 

---- column ----

I : 

---- column ----

38 to 52 years old. Women -who are 
I reitleas, mood;. NERVOUS wi- o 
I fear hot dashes, dizzy spells to take 
I Lyii l a E. Pin ilium's Vegetable Com- 
I pound. Piakbam'a It famous for 
I helping women during these "trying 
I limes" due to functlonti Irregularl- 
I tie*. Get a bottle toda; froiu your 

1 drugglstl WORTH TRYING! 

m. ^ 

---- column ----

Now's Best Time 
To Sow Potatoes 

Plant Them Before May 18th 
Later Planting* Result hi 
Lower Yields. Ontario Dept, 
of Agriculture Tests Show 

---- column ----

Whe-n is the proper time to plant 
potatoes? 

Results of experiments conducted 
in Middlesex and South Slmcoe In- 
dicate that from the 18th to the 
25th of May is the most desirable 
time to plant, says the Ont. Dept. 
of Agriculture. These results are 
supported by similar finds at the 
Ontario Agricultural College, 
Guelph. and the Central Experi- 
mental Farm, Ottawa. 

The tests showed that potatoes 
planted May 18th, yielded 274 bush- 
ete of marketable potatoes per acre. 
The yield dropped to 248 bushe'.s 
per acre when planted May 25th. 
and 224 bushels when planted June 
i. Potatoes planted June 10th show- 
ed an average of only 198 bushels 
per acre. 

SPRAYING AND DUSTING 
The value of proper and consis'- 
en! spraying has also become an 
established fact. Spray and dust 
experiments with potatoes at Ridge- 
town Experimental Farm for eight 
successive years have shown that 
plots thoroughly sprayed and dust- 
ed five times during the growing 
eabou. gave an average increased 
jleld of approximately 28 per cent 
more marketable potatoes than un- 
sprayed or undusted plots. 

There is no staple article of food 
brought into the average home 
that has greater appeal to the 
housewife than Rood, bright, clean 
potatoes of a uniform size and free 
from bruises and disease. 

---- column ----

- 

---- column ----

Warmest April 
Speeds Crops 

In Ontario Domestic Aspar- 
agus. Among Other Vege- 
. tables. Waa on Dinner Table* 
Far Ahead of the Usual Time 

---- column ----

Otitavio's warmest Ajjnl in 39 
jears advanced the province's 
crops to such a point that some 
domestic products ot the earth 
are on saie at public markets, 
anywhere from two to four weeks 
ahead of last year. 

Besides relieving a feed shortage, 
the early season resulted in the ap- 
pearance ot doiu^sti'* asparagus, 
among other vegetables on provin- 
cial dinue>r tables far ahead of the 
nsual time-. Vegetables, as a whole, 
are about a month ahead of recent. 
years and Out:irio Department of 
Agriculture officials are of the op- 
inion that this is the earliest in 
bietory such products have been 
available for sale and consump- 
tion. 

EARLIEST IN HISTORY? 

Along with asparagus, rhubarb 
alBo maiie a record early appear- 
ance anil today domestic rhubarb 
la competing with the Imported 
Tariety in Ontario's produce mar- 
kets. Imported rhubarb usually 
Iteld the market until after the 
middle of May when It retired in 
favor of rhe home-grown product. 

---- column ----

BIG BEN 

the famous 

chew for 

many years 

---- column ----

Lettuc. carrots and radlshee are 
expected soon, ahead of the usual 
time. 

" Grain crops in general are three 
weeks In advance of last year, but, 
according to the agriculture de- 
partment, farmers expect a curtail- 
ment of acreage in grain and cul- 
tivated crops because of a labor 
shortage. A department official 
said that the difference in acreage 
will go into hay and pasturage. 

FEAR OF FROST 
In the Niagara peninsula fruit 
blossoms were two weeks In ad- 
ranee of !ast year but. crop offi- 
cials pointed out, there is always 
a danger of frost so early In the 
Reason and fruit growers actually 
prefer to see their blooms appear 
later 

---- column ----

Canadian National 
Railways Revenues 

The ifross revenues of the all- 
inclusive Cana'dian National Rail- 
ways System for the nine day 
period ending April 30, 1941, 
were $7,912,856 as compared with 
$6,620,850 for the corresponding 
period of 1940, an increase of 
$2.292.00* r 40.S r : . 

---- column ----

Canadian Posters 

Brighten Shelters 

Posters of scenes in Canada 
including those which depict the 
beauties of Jasper National Park 
have been freely distributed to 
brigrhten the walls of First Aid 
Post* and rest centres in Britain. 
Even hospitals have received sup- 
plies. Nurses and Wardens found 
their way to the offices of the 
Canadian National Railways in 
Cockspur Street and their requests 
for posters hafe been promptly 
granted. 

---- column ----

Cow's Can't Take It 
Bombs Curdle Milk 

---- column ----

Bombings in Britain have the 
cows on edge and the nervous 
reaction is affecting the milk 
supply. Bossy's milk fairly curd- 
les when the bombs begin scream- 
ing, Major Gage of Kansas City 
was informed in a letter from 
Capt. T. Allen Stevens, breeder 
of dairy Shorthorns near Faring- 
ton, Berkshire, England. 

---- column ----

South Africa is turning out 60 
m.p.h. armoured cars, with gun- 
turrets and builet-proof tractor- 
grip tires, in sufficient numbers 
to supply her own armies, and 
also to contribute to the equip- 
ment <jf the British forces ki 
North Africa. 

---- column ----

CREAM 

Why not support your own 
Company? Highest prices. 
DAILY PAYMENTS 
Write for Cans 

Toronto Creamery 

branch of 
railed farmer* < u-u|irratl\e 

Co.. Ltd. 

.ir. Duke * fieorgc -. 
Toronto 

---- column ----

.CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS. 

---- column ----

Ailv\TS \\A\TED 

---- column ----

LIUHTSINO UOU AGENT WANTKD 
to sell Phillips LlKhtning Protec- 
tive Sj'M'i-m. H. 1'hillips Company 
Limited, 31! Osfoorne Avenue. To- 

---- column ----

BAIIY U1ICKS 

PRODl'CEKS OF CHICKS FOR 16 
yinri>. barred rocks bred to lay 
and S. C. W. Leghorns Barron 
atraln. None but large eggs set. 
Hocks and leghorns as hatched 
8 cents. Rock pullets 15 cents. 
Leghorn pullets 18 cents. Every 
chick Is from blood tested breed- 
ers. Satisfaction guaranteed. Jl.Ofl 
books your order. J. D. Johnson, 
l-'i-i-iois, Out. 

ANY WAY YOC IXlOK AT IT MH 
can't loi- with Uray Chicks. KM.-* 
Kriiwerf. i -specially now out mi 
ran*v. T.-l! us what you'd like. 
chicks. started pullets. Most 
breeds. 1-1. ISM s. rrom.pt and s.ifv 
dellvi-ry. Hr.*iy Hatcher)*. 130 John 
North, Hamilton, Ontario. 

BAHV -Hl'-KS AND ST ARTEL) 
I'-iii-ft. H:m't-i> Roi-ks. White I..-1-- 
hi>rn.. l.'v-lit Sussex <5overmn. lit - 
Appri'M-il -tn,-k. Write to Cov- 
eti.-y's Il.Uehei-y, Mitchell. Out. 

as vnf.K CHICKS 

WITH KVKRY 100 PULU5TS or 100 
mi\e<) ..-hicks ordered, wo ijlve 25 
freo i-lii.!ks. Pullet* $1500 to $111.00 
per 100: Mixed Chicks $8.00 to 
J10.no per 10": Cockerels per 100 
light breeds, $1.50: hnnvy broods. 
$*.ft'l. Immediate delivery. Ooddnrd 
chick Hotchery. Brlt.innla 

H* i Jill*. '>llt. 

Pl.t Ml! KHS 1 SI I'l'MES 

BAHRAIN PRICES. nATHTVUS, 
toilets. s ' n k s, furnaces, air- 
conditlonlDK. pipe, valves, fittinss. 
Shallow Well electric pump com- 
plete with no Kallon tank. $74.50. 
Inquiries wolcomcil. Palkln Supply 
Company, 'Jl*) Barton Street E.. 
Hamilton, Ontario. 

IKI KY Kill 11-MlvN I 

BAKEH3' OVENS AND MACHIN- 
ery, also rebuilt equipment al- 
ways on hand. Tarma arranged. 
Correspondence lnritd. Hubbard 
Portable Oven Co., 10J Bulliurst 
St.. Toronto. 

CARS, KI2W M> USED 

MOUNT PLEASANT MOTORS LTD., 
Toronto's oldest Chrysler. Plym- 
outh dcnlcrs; three location)*, 632 
Mr. Pleasant Road, 2040 Vonge St., 
'i'.'" Danforth Avenue. Our UscJ 
Cart make ui many friend*. 

---- column ----

F\HAI.ST 

---- column ----

EXHAUST FANS, NEW GENERAL 
Electrics, way under wholesale. 
Toronto Mercantile. 29 Mellnda. 
Toronto. 

FOR -AI.K 

]>Kri>liATE WITH "NT-WALL" - 
The economical paint for walls 
and reilinits. Your hardware oy 
paint More will gladly show you 
the attractive shades and tell you 
all about it. NU-WAI.L Limited, 
IjeaMile. (Toronto"* Canada. 

Kl R KAItMKKS 

NUTRIA VKUKTAKIAN FVK 
Hearer. Easily raised. 1'nlr $36.U'J. 
Correspondence invited. Robert W. 
Col. ''lint. in. Out. 

---- column ----

HERBS WANTED 

$J5 WK IH'Y HUNDREDS DIFFER- 
ent Herbs. Roots, Barks. Writo 
Dominion Herb Distributors, Dept. 
W. 14'i. r . Main. Mon'n il. _ 

LKGAI, 

J. N. LINDSAY. LAW O Kir ICE, CAT- 
Itol Theatre BulldinR. St. Thomas. 
Ontario. Special Department" for 
fanner" collections. 

---- column ----

I 

---- column ----

HODS 

---- column ----

Ll'.iHTNIMt HODS. HUY FROM 
maniifa. 'er. Save thirty to forty 
per ren:. rhillips Company, 32 

Osh i i > Avenue. Tor.nto. 

---- column ----

KM: i ui MIS r.L'UuiiY ANVJ VIH- 

gln'.u. l.i f f.-r pip- ?1.35. Fivo 
in"/ '.: . Krnurant Virginia Leaf 
'lK':rttt* Tohiioeo $2.3(1 postpaid. 
Vnurnl i.< >f Tobdico Co., Lenm- 

tllKtoT*. Ontnri'i. 

---- column ----

MKUII Al> 

A TRIAI, EVERY SUFFBREK 
of Rheumatic Pains or Neuritis 
hcuild try i '!..! Remedy. Mun- 
ro' E.UK Store. 335 Blgln, Ot- 
tawa. Poiitpald* $1.00. 

---- column ----

HAVE YOU GOITRE? "AB8OKUO" 
reducv- :m<l removta, Prlco $J.OO 
per h^t i.e. J. A. Johnston Co., 171 
King L.'., Toronto. 

---- column ----

HAVE YOU HEARD ABOUT D1X- 
on'*- Vi iritis and Rheumatic 1'iin 
Bii).dy? It gives good results. 
uBro'i Drug Store. 935 Kl ::. 
Ottawa, Postpaid $1.00. 

ISSUE -'41 

---- column ----

MRSKHV STOCK 

---- column ----

BIGGEST ji.oo GARDEN: 24 PER. 

ennlnls Delphinium. Dlanthus 
Loveliness, ConefKiwer, Ret; 0,1 
Lily. Oriental Poppy. Chrysanthe- 
mum, others: Sugar Maple: Cedar; 
+ Shrubs: liii'i Seeds. Pnpald. Two 
orders $1.80. DOLLAR NURSER- 
IES. Fonthil). Ontario. 

CRAMER NURSERIES. RIDGE- 
dale. Saek., Lilacx. Honeysuckles, 
f lowering ape 6, $1.50; Flowering 
perennial collection 30, $1.00; Qar- 
ogana or Asparagus three yearn 
100. $1 25. 

---- column ----

OFFER TO INVKXTOHS 

AN OFFER TO EVERY INVKNTOR 
List of inventions and full infor- 
mation sent free. The Ramsay 
Co., Registered. Pat.-mt Attorneys, 
273 Bank Street. Oll-iwa. ^ 

---- column ----

S.VI.IOSMK.N >\ 

UNSATISFIED RPi'TU MKN. MKDI. 
tine men. build llfetlma routs 
selliiiR r>h;ibli) Remedies. Quality, 
Cotunt-ticH, Farm Products a. 
cmplete line of 2uO guaranteed 
mciaJtiefl for household and 
farm. REfK.VT ORDERS CER- 
TAIN. Jnter-siimr Profits. Get d4* 
nils and free catalogue: FAMI 
i.K.V. 570 St. ('lment. Montreajt 

SEED FOR - . l " 

Al.l'AI.FA SF.KI1 "HAHJiY WEST* 
vrn" all grndes cud blends, writ* 
direet for delivered prices. Hood 
Seed Growers, Hudson Bay June* 

li. in. .-.i .<!;; -hew:i'\ _ 

Til ACTOR I'OH SALE 

Mei'URMlCK.0- I> E K 1? 1 N O 10-29 
Trsi.-tor. Reconditioned by the \n<r 
ternntional Harvester Co., ami In 
wood ruiininB order. J. H. 
R.-u-rle, Ontario. 

---- column ----

SNAPSHOTS TO-DAY 
TREASURES TO-MORROW 

Your films are carefully and aclea* 
tlfically processed by Imperial. t 
mako euro they lt. 

or S VXIMIM !(! KILMS 3So 

wltli beautiful enlargement free 
S reprints with enlargement "!>u, 
Thousands of letters from s.itistlel 
customers testify to our superloc 
quality and service. 

IMPBRIA1, PHOTO SERVICE , 
Dept D, Station J, Toronto. 

CSED CLOTHING 

---- column ----

MODERN. CLEAN USED CLOT: 
Ing. Ladles'. Men'e, and Children? 
wear. Lowest prlcex, 337 (Juc 
East, Toronto. Dealer* wanted. 

---- column ----

---- column ----


---- column ----

5 
---- page ----

---- column ----

(JJVedncsday, May 14, 1941 

---- column ----

THE FLESHERTON ADVANCE 

---- column ----

THE 

FLESHERTON ADVANCE 

---- column ----

Published on Colliiigwood 
FleBherton, Wednesday of 
week. Circulation ovr 1,000. 
I' ici in Canada fii.'JO per year, 
A .en paid in advance (1.60; in 
i>. S. A. |2.60 per year, when 
paid in advance $2.00. 

F. J. THURSTON. Editor. 

---- column ----

The Function of An 

Editor 

---- column ----

The title "editor" is sometimes mis- 
ndorstood by newspaper readers, 
Hot because they want to misunder- 
(;. i but because they have never 
fcec-n told just what the functions are 
of '''.e person who holds this title. An 
(!.. . o, to explain it briefly, is one who 
an ; Tintends, revises or prepares lit- 
erary matter for publication. The ti- 
tle does not necessarily mean that the 
policy of the newspaper is set or con- 
trolled by the editor. The duties of 
the other editors, city, sport, subur- 
ban, women's page and others, is sim- 
ply to carry out the duties prescribed 
in their particular spheres. 

For our purpose, however, we must 
deal with the editor in a little differ- 
ent light, because in fully 9<K'r of 
Canada's weekly newspapers, the ed- 
itor is also the publisher. In other 
v^ds he fills the dual role of pre 
r '-g literary matter for publica- 
tion, and of deciding upon policy as 
well. We want to deal with the func- 
tions of an editor from this stand- 
point. 

Essentially the editor is a human 
being, writing and dealing with men, 
women and children. He may be 
young or old. lazy or cnergetoic, bold 
or timid, superficial or deep, queru- 
lous or constructive, slovenly or bus- 
iness-like, grasping or generous. He 
Is certain to he human. He reacts to 
praise and criticism, to good and evi' 
in much the same way as th->se who 
share community life with him. The 
editor, and this is true of 99 P 4 of al 
$"Vly editors, recognizes the inher- 
e Vcency of the cotmtrvside. He 
1* till sufficiently old-fashioned to 
believe with his readers thnt the Ten 
Commandments nnd the Golden Rule 
have either been repealed, improver 
upn or modified bv modern advances 

The editor is a student of cornmnn 
ity affairs. He has at his disposa. 
records of public "reanizations in the 
community, and it is from hi? study 
of _ these records that he makes hi 
editorial comment. He is not easiK 
swayed hy the Jivsterias which sway 
nn'l excite and mislead peonlp 
LiVe the people he serves he use; 
p* n <l connonsense in his rensonintr. 

It Is the Editor who decides wha 
is and not fit to print. It is 
h i differentiates between news 

' "opncanda. It is he who can. r 
IIP will, give the leadership tha 
jvo-y energetic community mus 
ravo. He is not hnrd to get along 
with, hut he has a code of ethics 
wh'rh often cause him to refuse bus- 
fcjfH rather than accept it against 
Well grounded principles. He is not 
suner-humnn. H<> is a hard-work- 
lri) individual doing nn important job 
In 0U community to the best of his 
hil'fy. and If at times he fails in his 
Mt. it must be remembered that he 
I* like every other human beine in 
Inn Community, heir to the frailties 
With which all mankind is endowed. 

---- column ----

CANADA NEEDS 

MORE SHEEP 

At a time when Canada is looking 
n vain for export markets and etag- 
gcring under the burden of farm- 
rnnving surpluses it is startling to 
earn that out of the 80 million 
mils of wool used annually in Can- 
ida only about lit million pounds 
came from the backs of saeep grown 
n this country. Here in this climate 
*oollen goods are a vital necessity, 
jarments made of this material are 
<>st hcathful and most comfortable, 
n spite of that we have been import- 
ng, largely in the manufactured form 
upproximately 7 pounds of wool out of 
pvery 8 pounds. 

More than that Canadian eonsump- 

on would probably take care of 
another 6 million pounds of lamb an- 
mally. We could not increase lamb 
narketings freely and carelessly with- 
out disturbing other branches of the 
ive stock industry; but statistics in- 
licate tha sheep husbandry in Can- 
ada could be enlarged substantially 
without interfering seriously with 
attle, swine or poultry. 

Canada has had approximately the 
aim' sheep population for half a 
century, bpt never before was there 
he same necessity for adapting pro- 
luction to the inescapable needs of 
the Canadian people. 

---- column ----

EDI OR MclNTYRE REC'RIVKS 
FINE NKWHIWI'BR TROPHY 

---- column ----

T' Advance tenders congratula- 
tion t<> Editor Frank Mclntyre of 
the 'iimlalk HrniM on his winning 
the T '. Clark Memorial Tropliy for 
the 1 iund weekly newspaper 

In tov,,< ( i ill.-trc 1BOO population 
BII , r;vL Kditor Mclntyre was also 
lec< ' President of the Ontnrio- 
*/eekJy Newspaper Associa- 
'oe anual meeting of which was 
n Hamilton on Friday and 
lay. 

---- column ----

Qu< ' 
tion 
he)'' 
Sat 

---- column ----

war 

---- column ----

tior 
diet 

---- column ----

'0 who hnve been claiming the 
lould drift toward the East 
-,t least had whatever sutisfnc- 

iiy come from seeing the prc- 
.1 come true. 

---- column ----

Itl?!! off 30,40,50 

, VIGOR, Bibnormal? 

ipep, vim, vigor, vitality? 
Tonic Tablets. Oontnlni 
tlmulr.ntn, oyHtcr clcnii MM 
t i noi-mit! pm> nftcr 80. 40 or 60. 

4 rporlal introductory dze for only 

/ thlt aid to normal pep nnd vim 
to- For Mia at til good drug itorw. 

---- column ----

Citizens Aid Needed 

Tn Canada during* the next six 
wooks, news of overv description rill 
be overshadowed hv that of the 
prfr)arn f 'o" ' -> notnal progress 

of Cat mil's Tionri 1941. From 

fnforr '' I.- nt Ottawa, tt 

fc(><~rne!! PV' * t'-->f ttin T ,nan etm- 
paien win be '!' ' iVa Mggt 
eo'-irnnnitv nnHerta'- i 1 1ffnch- 

(? in the Dnminion of CnnJii'^. 

The sellinsr of bond* to Inrcrc 
fO^ninlps and to thr bifrjrpr invest- 
or ; a professional jr>h. These pro- 
fe 1 -'' ' hond salesmen will HP nnid 
for -I i ' -,'ork likelv on a salar" 
bav> Rince this new Innn ean- 

riat ^bly bo fully subscribed un- 
I"? U-ns of thousands of citizens in 
rno:-s moderate circumstances buy, 
th'- - e remains to bo done a trememl- 
ou c selling job by patriotic people 
wb will work for no enumeration. 
Th- r payment will be untisfnction in 
cur "ing out a patriotic work which 
is j 4Ht an important nfl anything else 
th<~-- could Ho for their country . 

IT indreds of thousands of men 
Wo i 'en and children will take part in 
whi't may prove to be the dramatic 
Wp' ' of Canada's war effort. 

Th-.y <f -nrl solemnly arnund the 

Tot ) ... h is to be sent to Wins- 
ton Otiurchill, nml dedicate liem- 
elv' i anew to the task of providinfr 
the tools with which the British 
Emi- fe may finish the job. 

---- column ----

A man of 78 years .n Gait has been 
drawing the Old Age pension for 
seven years bu* now has a job aH 
wishes to get off the pension list. He 
can be sure of one thing there will 
be others ready to take his place. 

---- column ----

Priceville Holds Sale 

For British War Victims , 

The people of Priceville and sur- 
rounding countryside are planning 
-in a "Help the Telegram British War 
Victims' Fund" camtmign on the 24th 
of May. In the. morning trucks will 
be aunt all along the concession and 
sideroada in . the townships adjacent 
to the village, to gather old tires, 
rubber, bones, rags, scrap iron and 
bundles of newspapers and maga- 
zines that persons will place at their 
Kates to be picked up. These will 
be sold as junk to dealers. 

In the afternoon a huge auction 
sale will be staged of articles and 
animals contributed by the commun- 
ity toward this (worthy cause. 
Everything offered will be of some 
use to someone else, and no one will 
miss a little pig, calf, a few hens or 
chickens, or an- other article that is 
given to the committee. They want 
you to come out and purchase these 
articles. It will be about the only 
way you can show your sympathy to 
those brave, but stricken, people of 
Britain. There will be pipers in at- 
tendance as well as amusements in 
the afternoon. 

In the evenlnsr, commencjn- sharp 
at 8 p.m., a mammonth dance will be 
stage until 11.55 p.m. Good music 
will be supplied. If you don't dance, 
come out anyway. There will be 
plenty of fun and a good time is 
assured for everybody. 

---- column ----

If the smoking of a cigarette is a 
nail in one's coffin then some people 
ars going to be buried in a lot of 
hardware. 

---- column ----

mum 
-usi 

---- column ----

100 PURE 
PAINT 

---- column ----

For all outside home paint- 
ing. Gives greater protec- 
tion and lasting beauty. 

---- column ----

F. G. KARSTEDT 

General Merchant Fkshertoa- Ont. 

---- column ----

SWINTON PARK 

Mr. Ken Ferguson of Toronto spent 
the past week with his mother here. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack McMeekin and 
three sons of Mt. Forest spent Sun- 
day at the home of Mr. Geo. Haw. 

Mrs. Delbert Haw and baby spent 
a few days with relatives at Bay- 
field. 

---- column ----

Visitors on Sunda- at the home of 
Mr. Hugh McMillen were; Mr. and 
Mrs. Don McMillen and Misses Jes- 
sie and Isabelle McMilken of To- 
ronto, also Mr. and Mrs. Marvin 
Little and babe. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Fressidder and 
two soldiers from Little Norway vis- 
ited with friends here over the week 
end 

Mrs. Wm. Sackett of Proton Sta- 

---- column ----

tion spent a' few days with her moth- 
er, Mrs. Robt. Knox. 

We are sorry to report Mr. John 
Aldcorn still very seriously ill. Mrs. 
Will McMillen of Flesherton is help- 
ing to nurs her father. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Ferris spent 
Sunday with Mrs. J. L. Mclntyre In 
Qundalk. 

---- column ----

A 

---- column ----

A D 

---- column ----

CALLS 

Canada has reason to count her blessings in these days of trial. 

---- column ----

---- column ----

. 

---- column ----

Canada is three thousand miles away from the sound of guns 
which are devastating Europe. 

The broad Atlantic Ocean rolls between us and the ruthless 
savagery of the German Armies. 

The strongest fleets in the world British, American and 
Canadian patrol the sea between us and the enemy. 

We have a great friendly nation, probably the richest and most 
powerful in the world, at our side. 

---- column ----

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CANADA CAN AFFORD HER SACRIFICES 

---- column ----

This war is a mechanized war. 

We have the nickel . . . copper . . . lead . . . zinc and other metals 
the war industries need. We have access to the iron. We can 
make the steel. 

We have the organized industries to fabricate these metals and 
make the trucks, and tanks, and guns, and planes, and the ships. 

We have skilled workers and the plants for mass production. 
Canada has the wheat and the food supplies. 

Let us count our blessings, and tighten our belts. 

Canada is rich one of the richest countries per head of popula- 
tion in the world. Let us lend our strength to the utmost of our 
power. Our national future depends upon Victory. 

We must win to live. 

---- column ----

---- column ----

THERE WILL BE FURTHER CALLS 

---- column ----

---- column ----

There have been many calls upon the people of this country 
for money since Canada entered the war at the side of 
Great Britain. 
There will be further calls. 

Let us face the future unafraid. 

Canada can carry the load. 

But every Canadian must shoulder his and her share. 

This is the most critical hour in our history. Let the future 
historians say of Canada, as they will say of our Mother Country: 

---- column ----

was their finest hour." 

---- column ----

- 

---- column ----

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Get under your load. ..and LIFT 

---- column ----

DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, CANADA 
---- page ----

---- column ----

THE FLESHERTON ADVANCE 

---- column ----

Wednesday, May 14, 1941 

---- column ----

YOI/APEALJOB! 

---- column ----

HERE'S WHY: 

---- column ----

Plo-glaze Palm is made with a specially treated linseed oil which 
makes it flow evenly and smoothly and leave no brush marks. 

Brush marks are really hundreds of tiny grooves in a paint film 
These grooves collect and hold dirt, which spoils the appearance of 
your paint job, and may cause early peeling and cracking. 

When you paint with Flo-glaze there is no place for din to lodge 
on the perfectly smooth paint filtn and any surface dust is washed 
dean by the rains. 

Flo-glaze has good covering and hiding powers. Keeps fresh-looking 
fix long years of wear. Thai's why we say it "has what it takes to give 
700 a real job!" 

Come m worn and ue our range of colon for Spring. 

---- column ----

'S H A R D W A 

Flesherton, Ont. 

---- column ----

RE 

---- column ----

WAR SAVINGS CERTIFICATES 

---- column ----

WOOL GROWERS ORGANIZATION 

---- column ----

IT PAYS TO MARKET 
ON A GRADED BASIS 

Obtain Sacks and Twine from 
LOCAL LIVE STOCK TRUCKERS 

or direct from 

CANADIAN CO-OPERATIVE 

WOOL GROWERS LIMITED 

217 Bay Street - Toronto 

---- column ----

DIED 

McILMURRAY At the Toronto 
General Hospital on Friday morning, 
May 9, 1941, Norman E. MoUmurray, 
beloved husband of Nellie Robert- 
son, late of Maxwell, and dear father 
of Lois, in his 69th year. 

The remains rested at the William 
Sherrin Funeral Home, 873 Kingston 
Road, Toronto. Service was held J 
the chapel on Monday, May 12th, at 
2 p.m. Interment was made in the 
Scarboro" Memorial Park Cemetery. 

---- column ----

READ THE "SMALL ADVTS* 

---- column ----

**M**MMIM***M*>**M*Mt**>MIMM 

---- column ----

Men's 

Spring Suits 

Now is the time to select your new Spring Suit 

whether you want one made to your individual 

measure or ready-to-wear. We can assure 

you satisfaction. 

Made-toMeasure Suits from $25.95 

Ready-to- Wear Suits from $15.50 

Come in and see our offerings there is no 
obligation to purchase. 

---- column ----

MEN'S CAPS 
MEN'S TROUSERS 
. MEN'S OVERALLS 
MEN'S HATS 

---- column ----

MEN'S HOSIERY 

MEN'S UNDERWEAR < 

MEN'S SHIRTS 

MEN'S SWEATERS ' 

---- column ----

Reliable Footwear 

MEN'S WORK BOOTS 

MEN'S and BOYS' OXFORDS 
LADIES' FINE SHOES 

CHILDREN'S FOOTWEAR 

Our assortment is larger than ever particular 

attention has been paid to good \qparing qualities, 

Styles and prices right in every line. 

F. H. W. Hickling 

General Merchant FLESHERTON 

III IMIMI I Ml SIM III IM I MM HIM II Mil I 

---- column ----

DIED 

CORNFIELD At his residence 
at Kimberley on Tuesday, May 13, 
1941, Joseph Cornfield, aged 80 years. 
The funeral will take place Thurs- 
day afternoon of this week, when 
service will be held at 2.30 p.m., in- 
terment to take place in Flesherton 
Cemetery. 

If you want to feel that you are 
actually doing something, keep right 
on week after week buving War Sav- 
ings Certificates. There may appear 
to be nothing heroic about it, but 
fighting dollars go a long way in 
winning wars. 

---- column ----

KIMBLRLEY 

On Thursday night the people of 
the Community had a most inspiring 
and helpful lantern lecture from Mr. 
Parish of Toronto. Mr. Parish, with 
his wife and family are on furlough 
from Colombia and Costa Rica, South 
America, Mission field. His talk was 
very fine a s also were their slides. 
He was on his way to Owen Sound, 
where he gave his talk Friday night. 
Anyone interested in missions would 
enjoy Mr. Parish, "Call on him". 

The W. A. met at the home of Mrs. 
R. Chard on Tuesday afternoon when 
lo ladies were present. A quilt is 
ready to sell and literature was re- 
cieved for missionary programs, as 
the W. A. is joining a s one associate 
societv with the W.M.S Mrs Bur- 
ritt was appointed to be responsible 
for the next meeting on Japan. The 
key word for the next meeting is 
"niG-hf It was decided to do some 
repa.rmjr to the parsonage furniture 
Mrs. R. Chard and Mr< Buchanan 
were appointed as buying* committee. 
The nert meeting will be at the home 
of Mrs. Ross ElHs at Rocklin. 

Sunday School was changed to Sun- 
day morning for the summer and 
most of the beautiful mother's day 
service was used. There was a good 
attendance. In the afternoon, Rev. 
Young n-f Thornbury grave a very 
beautiful and helpful Mother's 
Day sermon. Mrs. Bansides of Coll- 
ingwood gave a message in sone. . 
The evening service in the United i 
Church was very well attended. Rev. i 
W. Buchanan .preached a splendid 
sermon on "Mary the Mother of Je- 
sus." Six girls san<? "Mother's 
prayers". 

Miss Marjorie Proctor of Toronto 
and cousins of Eugenia called in 
Kimberley O n Sunday. 

We are sorry to report that Mrs. 
Wm Clark had the misfortune to fall 
Thursday, breaking her leg above 
the knee. Nurse Clark is taking 
care of her. Mrs. Clark was 82 on 
Tuesday and w^ sympathize with her. 

Mr. Jos. Cornfield is not so well 
and there are grave fears for his re- 
covery. Mrs. Stafford is with her 
parents. 

Don Graham and Merv. Gilbert re- 
turned Friday from Barrie. 

Mrs. Earl Foster and baby Cathar- 
ine of Smith's Falls are guests of the 
former's mother, Mrs. G. A. Hutch-' 
inson. 

---- column ----

MAXWELL 

---- column ----

VICTORIA DAY 

LONG WEEK-END 
FARES 

Between all points in Canada and 

to certain destinations in the 

United States 

FARE & ONE-QUARTER 

FOR THE ROUND TRIP 

Tickets god goin Friday, May 28 
until 2 P-m., Sunday, May 25 

Return Limit: to leave destination 

not later then midnight. Monday. 

May 26, 1941 

---- column ----

MINIMUM SPECIAL FARE 
Adults or Children - - 25c 

Full particulars from any agent. 

CANADIAN PACIFIC 

---- column ----

The Women's Institute met at the 
home of Mrs. J. L. Morrison at 
Collinjrwood on Thursday. May 8th. 
with Mrs. Jas. Lesflgatt presiding 
After the business for the day was 
concluded, the election of officers for 
the coming year was held, resulting 
as follows: President. Mrs. Jas. 
Lpgfratt: Vice-Pres., Mrs. Geo. Ross; 
Secretary. Mrs. E. Hawton; Treas- 
urer. Mrs. M. Gould; Distict Dir- 
Misfpr of Collinywood invited the 
W. I. to her home for the June 
meeting. 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Morrison 
and family of Toronto and Mr. and 
Mrs. R. .1. Morrison of Walkerton 
visited with Mr. and Mrs. Angus 
Morrison over the week end. 

Mr. Ttios. Black and family of 
Oranjreville and Mr. and Mr*. Jas. 
Russell and familv of Rock Mill? 
spent Sunday with 'Mr. and Mrs. 
Wallac- Fisher. 4th Line. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Gny of Midland 
visited with "Ac former"? mother, 
Mrs. Sarah Guy. 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Boyce and 
fan*-''- of Cherrv Grove spent 
Mother's Day with the former's par- 
ents. Mr. and Ms. J. J. Boyce. 

Mr. and Mrs J. L. Morrison and 
familv of Collinewood scent the 
week end with friends here. 

We welcome Mrs. Mervin Wright 
and family to Maxwell. The'- are 
occupying Dr. Guv's residence. 

During the next two weeks two 
solicitors will call on von to receive 
' ^ur donations for the auction aale 
to be held in Feversham on Thurs- 
o"nv. Tune Rth. in aid of the Evening 
Telegram War Victims' Fund. 

---- column ----

Maxwell United Church 
R1TV. GT8O. L. MEKCER. B.D.. D.D. 

Minister 

SUNDAY. MAY 18th 
11 a.m. Eugenia 
2 p.m. Mt. Zion 
3.30 p.m. ""areham 
7.30 p.m. Maxwell 
Note: Visitors in the community 
over the week end are invited to at- 
tend the services of worship. 

---- column ----

~Every duty, u;eM and hnnesdy done, it a M 
contribution to victory." 

THE PHIME MI.NISTEH OF 

---- column ----

MANY A "JOHN DOE" 
IN TELEPHONE WORK 

---- column ----

A subscriber writ 

"The other day I read that John 
Doe had completed 30 years with 
your company. 

"John got u-here he is by intel- 
ligence and industry. But your 
company got John where he is be- 
cause it also teas intelligent enough 
first to choose, then to promote him, 

To me John Doe is the tele- 
phone company." 

We ire quite content that itii- company 
should be judged by the people who 
work for it Their skill, courtesy and 
devotion to ser- 
vice account, in ^ ^feft* 
large measure, 
for the progress 
of the telephone. 

---- column ----

8TH LINE OSPREY 

We are sorry to rtport Mrs. Win. 
Moffatt not much improved in health. ! 
Her daughter, Mrs. S. Crawford is 
in constant attendance. 

Mr. Jim Wright. Collingwood, ac- 
companied by Mr. P. 3. Seiners of 
Banks were callers on our line ^n 
Wednesday. 

Mr. Geo. Saigeon lost a valuable 
h-^rse last week . The animal drop- 
ped dead while at wcnk. 

Mr. ? nd Mrs. W. H. O'Br c n moved 
to their new home at Formosa on 
Thursdav last. Mr. Stan Smith mo~- 
ed their household effects. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred drackenbury of 
Flesherton accompanied by Mr. arid 
Mrs. Jack Brackenbury and Marj- 
orie were callers on this line on 
Sunday. 

---- column ----

It's a sin to play horses the way 
some people do. 

---- column ----

Orange Valley School 

GRADE VTII Margaret Smith* 
Muriel Gilchrist, Oscar Irving*, 
Marjorie Fraser*. 

GRADE VI Nina Teeter*, Jack 
Gilchrist*. Fred Gilchrist 
GRADE IV Ruth S-mith*, Doreen 
Teeter*, Philip Irving, Melville Irv- 
ing'. Dorothy Brcmn. 
GRADE III Rae Smith*, tetty 
Hill*. Emerson Brown*. Harold Gil- 
christ*. 

GRADE II Billie Gilchrist, 
Gordon Brown*. Jimmie Irving. 
GRADE I Alice Irvine. Gordon 
Gilchrist*, Phyllis Brown*, Herman 
Brown*. 

denotes perfect attendance. 

G. B. Littlejohns, Teacher. 

---- column ----

Even if Hitler conquers all Eur- 
ope he still has staring him in the 
face the fate of Napoleon who did 
the same thing. 

---- column ----

!: Stop! Without Insurance \ 

You take everything you own for a ride ; 

Do pou realize the risk you are taking when you 
drive your car without proper insurance protec- 
tion ? In case of a severe or fatal accident, every- 
thing you own can be taken away to satisfy a 
judgment. You never know what the cost 
of your ride will be 

INSURE TODAY WITH 

ROY L. LANGFORD 
Phone 72 Flesherton, Ont 

**************** >**** M >** * > t >** > I > 1 1 M *** 

---- column ----

To All Stations Ir 

Western Canada 

SPECIAL BARGAIN 

EXCURSIONS 

Coin? Date* 
DAILY MAY 17 TO 28, 1941 

Return Limit: 45 days 
TICKETS GOOD TO TRAVEL 

IN COACHES 

Excursion tickets good in Toarbt, 
Parlor and Standard sleeping ears, 
also available on payment of slightly 
hither passage fares, pins price of 
parlor or sleeping car accommodation 

ROUTES Tickets ood going via 
Port Arthur, Ont., Chicago. Ill, or 
Sault Ste. Marie, returning via 
same route and line only. Gener- 
ous optional routings. 

STOPOVERS will be allowed at 
any point in Canada on the going 
or return trip, or both, within fiaal 
limit of ticket, on applicatioin to 
Conductor; also at Chicago, ID., 
Sault Ste. Marie. Mich., and west, 
in accordance with tariffs of United 
States lines. 

Full particulars from any agent. 

---- column ----

Flesherton United Church i 

REV. G. K. MCMILLAN, B.A., B.D. 

Minister 

tO.Oo a.m. Ce Ion. 

11.00 a.m. Flesherton. 
i 7.30 p.m. Flesherton. 
Morning: "Strength and Beauty'*. 
Evening; Christian Prayer in War- 
time". 

---- column ----

FLESHERTON AND ROCK MILLS 
BAPTIST CHURCHES 

---- column ----

Services Fle*herton. 

11 a.m. Worship. 

18 noon, Bible 9cho >1. 

7 p.m., Gospel Service. 
Monday at 8 p.m. Y. P. Service. 
;.-k Mills 

2 p.m.. Bible School. 

3 p.m.. Worship. 

Rev. L. F. Kipp of Toronto will 
have charg-e of the service on Sun- 
day next. 

---- column ----

. 

---- column ----

Gospel Workers' Church 

Feversham, Ont-. 
Rev. C. McNichol. Pastor 

Si nday School at 10.00 a.m. 
Maroinff Service at 11.0" a.m. 
rveniug Service at 7.30 i.m. 

---- column ----

Possibly a full-grown man would 
not want to go out in the road and 
kick a tin can, but just the same he 
would like to feel that he would. 

---- column ----

SUPERIOR STORES 

Speci .Is are Cash Only 

_Canned TOMATOES, choice 2 tor 2Sc 

Golden Bantam CORN per tin lOc 

SUPER SUDS, large pkg. and relish dish, all 25c 
TEA IS UP; we still have quantity at old price 

FRESH SODAS at 2 IDS. for 2Sc 

Superior BAKING POWDER highly recom- 
mended 1 Ib. size 23c 

See our assortment of 
GARDEN and VEGETABLE SEEDS 

MEATS Fresh Cured and Cook * 
all reasonably priced. 

MENS WORK BOOU Specially P 

* 

C. J. KENNEDY 

Phone 37 WE DELIVER 
---- page ----

---- column ----

VOICE 

OF THE 

PRESS 

---- column ----

JUST TOO TOUGH 

It will be Toronto'* bad hiok 
if ft becomes a ral seaport only 
to find that it can't get credit 
for the fact and moat be referred 
to merely at "A southern Ontario 
port" 

Toronto Star 

TIMBERLESS FARMS 

There are plenty of farina In 
Old Ontario where the owner can- 
not cut a ttick, or a atake or * 
prop. It IB not well for a farmer 
to ba entirely at the mercy of 
the fuel barons and the lumber 
merchants. 

Plant at least 500 trees! 

Farmer'* Advocate 

REDUCE NIGHT SPEED 

Ontario had 642 traffic fatal i- 
tlea In 1940 an increase of 70 
over 1989 and more than out- 
half of them occurred at night. 
This fact givea point to the sug- 
gestion that the legal ipeed limit 
automticaily should be reduced 
when darknesa falla, perhaps to 
36 in.p.h. on the highways and 20 
on city streets. 

Ottawa Journal 

---- column ----

In Every Hundred 
One Is Stutterer 

Defect Usually Develops In 
Fifth Grade of Public Schools 
Boys Suffer Oftener 

Prof. Harry J. Heltman o< 
Syracuse University believe* there 
Is little if any truth in the saying 
that left-handed children, who 
later were taught to use their 
rijrht hands-, are stutterers. 

Heltman, chairman of the 
School of Speech and Dramatics 
at Syracuse, told a local Science 
forum that of 1,600 tested stud- 
ents entering Syracuse, only one 
of 77 who had their handedness 
Hanged, was afflicted. 

Heltman said there are about 
1,800,000 persons in the United 
States who stutter. The ratio ia 
ene stutterer among every 100 
persons. 

MORE BOYS STUTTER 

"It Is interesting to note," he 
added, "that stuttering is likely 
to develop in children during !he 
fifth grade in school when they 
are about 11 years old. It is also 
difficult to explain," he added, 
"why boys have a greater ten- 
dency to stutter than girls." 

Prof. Heltman said-there arc at 
least three times as many boys 
afflicted as are girls. 

---- column ----

Light Pillows 

Indicate Quality 

A pillow can be checked for 
resilience by depressing its centre 
with the palm of the hand. If it 
quickly regains its shape after 
the pressure is removed, there to 
atill life and buoyancy in the 
feathers. If not, it ic indication 
tat the feathers are probably 
worn out and a new pillow need- 
ed. Good quality feather pillows 
are light in weight an all-down 
pillow 21 by 27 inches weighs 
aJM>ut one and a half pounds, 
fooe and chicken feather pillows 
of the tame size weigh one and 
two pounds more respectively. 

---- column ----

The Book Shelf. 

---- column ----

"BETWEEN TWO WORLDS") 
By Upton Sinclair 

This new novel by the eminent 
American writer is three tilings 
in one a fascinating story rich 
with incident ami intrigue; an in- 
timi.tc review of significant ev- 
ents in that turbulent, wealthy 
era which Ix-^an with the Treaty 
f Versailles and ended with the 
1929 crash; and an analysis of 
tlM ills that l>f-M I. our times. 

The book includes six full- 
length love stories; four wedding* 
Mid two separations; two murders 
and one near-hanging. The scenes 
re set in a Riviera villa, a Gcr- 
iran castle, three French chateaux 
and an imitation one on Long 
Jelaml ; three yacht cruises and 
any visits to I'nriv, London, 
Berlin, Munich, Geneva, Genoa, 
Bom* and Leningrad. Historic 
characters met on the pages in- 
dud* Hitler, Mussolini, John 
aVifent, Lincoln Steffens, Isadora 
Duncan and Sir Basil /arahoff. 
Sinclair's central theme ia 
world of the twentieth con- 
tary, and It U enough to have 
hv<1 In that time to understand 
and enjoy the story. 

The title ia taken from lines by 
Arnold . . . "Between two worlds, 
$e ene dead, the other power- 
tsNN to b born." 

"Between Two Worlds" . . . by 
Upton Sinclair . . . Toronto: Mc 
mUUn Company of Canada . . . 

$9.11. 

Fire hydrants of different col- 
ours according to the nixo of the 
water main* serving them are in 
UM In Aniinii.v.'. in Mnrylnnd, 
U.S.A. 

---- column ----

MONSTER OF THE AIR FLIES TO BRITAIN FROM U.S. 

---- column ----

On the way to England for vice there, or on one of the Empire air lines, a huge Boeinjr dinner 
tope temporarily at Laguardia Field after flying from Seattle. 

---- column ----

THE W AR W E E K Commentary on Current Events 

U. S. PREPARES TO FIGHT 
FOR DEMOCRACY AGAIN 

---- column ----

"Freedom of democracy In 
the world ... la the kind of 
faith for which we have fought 
before, for the existence of 
which we are ever ready to 
fight again." U. S. President 
Roosevelt. 

The story of last we*k's> develop- 
ments In the war abroad was punc- 
tuated on this side of the Atlantic 
by a series of sharp, ''more action" 
utterances which cunie from the 
lips of tb key men In Ui Roose- 
velt Cabinet and from the Presi- 
dent himself. 

In a speech dedicating UK a 
ahrlne the birthplace of Great War 
Pereldent Woodiow Wilson, Mr. 
Iloosevelt clearly annunciated the 
.American decision "we are ever 
ready to fight again, for the free- 
dom of democracy in the world." 
Calling For "More Action" 

Jjiet weak as the T"nHf>d .States 
stood on the brink beforu derlar- 
log formal war on tho Axl, the 
United Press published a review 
of some of the significant state- 
ment made within the previous 
month by responsible U. S. Govern- 
ment officials aud Influential lead- 
ers. It showed how "stop-by step" 
the United States had been ab- 
andoning Its non-belligerent policy 
and preparing for Intervention on 
the side of Britain: 

April 9 (Maritime Commission 
Chairman Emory S. Land) "In ' 
the field of flipping aid to Britain, 
there Is a huge bonfire burning 
the submarine menace . . . We 
might well auk onrselvoe In our 
all-out aid to Britain If we. could 
not give greater help by aiding the 
British to put ou', the fire rather 
than by concentrating mot of our 
efforts on feeding It with fuel." 

April 24 (Secretary of State Cor- 
dell Hull) "It IB high tlui- that 
the remaining free countries 
should arm to the fullest extent and 
Jn the brlofost time humanly poa- 
siblo and act for their se.lf-i . -i -r- 
vatlon . . . Aid (to Britain) must 
reach Its destination In the short- 
est time In maximum quantity. So 
wnye miiBt be found to do thlt." 
"Make Promite Good" 

April 24 (Secretary of the Navy 
Frank Knox) "We have (livlared 
that the fight that Kngland is mak- 
ing Is our fight . . . Having gone 
thus far wo ranuot back down . . . 
Hitler cannot allow our waf sup- 
plies anil food to reach England 
n will bft defeated If they do. Wo 
cannot allow our Koods to be sunk 
In the Atlantic we shall be bent- 
en If they are-. We ran.st make our 
i- i.n i> i, gone) to >.' i. aid to Hrl- 
tain. We must, see the job through." 

April 25 ( President Hoonevelt} 
"United States neutrality patrols 
will b sent an tar Into tli waters 
of the st>vpn seim us inaj be ne- 

---- column ----

e&sary for the protection of rhe 
American hemisphere." 

April 39 (President Roosevelt) 
"Legal authority exist* to send 
American warships into combat 
tones . . . this does not necessar- 
lly mean such action will be- tak- 
en." 

Course Chosen 

April 29 (Secretary of Commerce 
Jwsse Jones) "We have chosen 
our course ... to give all possible 
aid to those countries which are 
fighting to preserve their Inde- 
pendence ami our way of life . . . 
more sacrifice* are In store for u.'' 

April HO (President Roosevelt) 
"\V must fight this threat (of a* 
iTcssion) wherever it appears . . ." 
A Critical Situation 

May 2 (President Roosevelt) 
"Arms production must be stepped 
up to meet the wer-increasiiig de- 
mands for munitions, planes and 
"hips, caused by the critical situa- 
tion which confronts our nation." 

May S (Wendell Wlllkle) "The 
8ia:p of sinking* Is so serious ih.it 
we should protect our cargoes of 
arms and foods to England." 

May 4 President Roosevelt's 
statement quoted at the head of 
this column. 

May 5 (President Roosevelt) 
"Command of (lie air by the democ- 
iii. I s must and can be achieved." 
(Increased production of henyy 
bombers had been ordered.) 

May E (House Naval Affairs Com- 
mittee Chairman Carl Vluson 
"I am for convoys now." 

May 6 i lle.p. E. E. Cox. Dem., 
Georgia) "Of course we are 
going to convoy and we are going 
to convoy right away." 

"Shall We Now Flinch?" 
May 8 (Secretary of War Henry 
S'imson) "Shall we now flinch 
niul permit our billions of dollars 
wiTth of munitions to be sunk In 
tlii' Atlantic? Jf today the t'liited 
St'ites Nnvy should make secure 
tli sea for tho delivery of muni- 
Ions to Britain, It will render as 
sn-eat a service to our own coun- 
try and to the preservation of Am- 
erican freedom an It has ever ren- 
dered In all its glorious history. 
Supplementing the efforts of the 
British Navy, it can render secure, 
all the ovt-ana, north aud south, 
i.-<t find cant, which surround our 
continent. In that way, it cun he/lp 
to hold in check the onward rush 
of the. tide of nnzlsm until the other 
defence force* of all the democ- 
racies are completed." 

Mediterranean Crlsla 
f- .ill' - the crisis In the Hal tie 
of the Atlantic, new threats wore 
developing for Britain In the Mixll- 
trrraneun basin in North Africa, 
where tho Herman army was re- 
ported Htroitgly reinforced prepar- 

---- column ----

atory to concurrent drives toward 
Suez and the Atlantic; and in oil- 
rich Iraq, Britain's air bos for 
the whole Middle East, where Nazi- 
inspired revolt flared, appeared to 
be in danger of spreading to en- 
velop neighboring Arab countries. 
In the latter case the possibilities 
would have to be taken into con- 
sideration, that a vast Arabian 
force would be thrown against the 
British In the Near Kast; thai tne 
Axis powers would gain the bases 
they needed to develop ihelr drive 
from the east against the Suei 
Canal and Egypt; that Britain 
would lose ess-iit In! oil pipeline* 
which feed her Mediterranean 
fleet. 

Smoking Out Turkey 

Til, in y was In a worse spot than 
Yer la^t week. Following the occu- 
pation by Germany of more Greek 
Islands in the Aegean, Associated 
Press" Kh HI- Simpson wrote: "Tur- 
key U menaced by the possibility 
of air bombardment or invasion 
from her Black Sea front to her 
southern ccaotline In the eastern 
Mediterranean it ehe resists 
mounting Nazi pressure to abandon 
her British alignment. Her eastern 
frontiers aud contacts with her 
British allies are menaced by the 
Anglo-Iraq conflict, and she Is re- 
ported also hastily reinforcing her 
defence on the Turkish-Iran border 
In fear that the war in Iraq may 
spread in that direction." (Study 
of the map recommended). 

The Waking Bear 

On May Day, while signs multi- 
plied of increasing tension in 
Hn: -., lt , ; man relations, the De- 
fence Commissar of the Soviet Un- 
ion S. K. Tlmoshenko issued a 
warning that Russia had reorganiz- 
ed her nrmed forces "In the' light 
of experience and modern war- 
fare" and was ready for any "sur- 
prised." He declared that the U. 8. 
S. R. was ready to "offer an anni- 
hilating re-buff to any encroach- 
ments by Imperialists." That same 
week Josef Stalin became Premier 
of the Soviet Union, a sign that 
Russia was consolidating h>-r \ . i 
strength for the days that lay 
ahead. 

Reports emanating from Vichy 
told of a huge "about face" of Rus- 
sia's military strength and a shift- 
ing of large land, sea and air !' 
southward toward the Balkan and 
Nflor Eastern frontiers. Although 
the reports contained no bint of 
any kind of Impending Soviet mil- 
itary action they were descrlhed 
In Vichy aa revealing a general 
"jockeying for position" through- 
out the Near Kast from the s lllack 
Sea to the Persian Gulf. The Sov- 
iet High Command also was said 
to have decided on an extensive 
reinforcement of its fleets In tho 
Black Sea and Caspian due, accord- 
ing to some versions, to the pres- 
ence of Italian and Germim naval 
forces in that urea. Theso Russian 
naval forces, mostly 'transf. -rn-il 
fnim the Baltic, were beli.'ved to, 
include submarine!! and torpedo 
boats. 

---- column ----

Free Aeroplane Pictures 

---- column ----

JJEHE IS ALL YOU HA VETO DO: 

Jp B?t photos of the following aeroplpnci 
Bpitfirr . . . Defiant . . . Hurricane . 
Airacobra . . . Fairey Battle Ptane . . 
UskSMSd HucUcn . . . Briitol Blenheim 
i.1.' f^ cVtn Wellington . . . Blackburn 
Bkna-Diye BomUr . . . Fa-rey Swordfieh 
. . . Boonf Flying PortreM . . . Sundcrlsnd 

---- column ----

Flying Boat and 1 S other modem pUna fall 
are the latest official photographs in full 
detailj. For rich acrotlant photo yoy wish 
send two Durham Corn Starch label.. 
Spec.fy plane or plane} v/anted, your name 
and address, enclose necessary !abcls and 
mail requests to the St. Lawrence Starch 
Co. Limited, Port Credit, Ontario. 

---- column ----

Should Encourage 
Child's Orderliness 

---- column ----

Providing sufficient space for 
a child to keep his toys ia one 
way to encourage orderliness. If 
you prefer a chest, one placed un- 
der a window will do double duty 
as window seat. Flank the chest 

---- column ----

with shelves for his books. Have 
the corners rounded and smooth 
to avoid bumped heads. Decal- 
comonia transfers make appropri- 
ate decorations. 

---- column ----

Fur obtain -d from the skins of 
the common rabbit can be treated 
and dyed until it resembles that 
of almost any other animal 

---- column ----

BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS 

---- column ----

---- column ----

Personal income tax rates increased to 15 per cent on 
firt $1,000 taxable income from present r*te of six and 
ight per cent. 

Excess profits tax flat rate increased from 12 per cent 
to 22 per cent making minimum Corporation Tax now 40 per 

cent. 


National Defence Tax rates increased from two to five 
per cent and from three to seven per cent effective July 1, 

nd exemptions slightly increased. 


Budget proposes new Succession Duty Tax Act to be- 
come effective when legislation given Royal Assent, patterned 

after Provincial Acts. 

* 

New tax of three cents per imperial gallon imposed on 
gasoline ffective April 30, 1941. (No previous Federal 
gasoline tax.) 

New 20 per cent -tax imposed on moving picture enter- 
tainment and five per cent tax placed on race-track wagers, 

effective immediately. 

* 

Tax on automobiles valued at $900 or less increased f-om 
20 per cent to 25 per cent; other group classes tax unchanged. 


General sales tax level remains unchanged; bui'di ig 

materials removed from exempt list. 

^ 

Sugar tax increased from one cent to two cents a pound, 

and on glucose by half a cent to one cent. 


New tax of 10 per cent on rail and air travel tickets cost- 
ing more than SO cents. 


Tax on malt increased from 1O cents to 12 cents and on 
domestic malt syrup from 15 cents to 18 cents, eauivalent to 

about five cents a gallon on beer. 

* 

Ordinary wines tax increased from IS cents to 40 cents 

per gallon, and on sparkling wines from $1.50 to $2 a gallon. 


Carbonic acid gas tax increased from five cents to 25 
cents per pound increasing "soft drink" costs by less than one 

cent a bottle. 


Cosmetic and toilet preparations rate increased from 10 

per cent to 25 per cent. 


Long distance telephone call tax increased from six per 
cent to 10 per cent with maximum of 50 cents from a pay 

station. 


Tax on playing cards increased from 10 cents to 15 cents 

a pack. 


Tax on pocket lighters increased from 20 per cent to 25 
per cent and on combination lighters and cases from 10 per 

cent to 25 per cent. 


Paper cigarette tubes increased from five cects to ten 

cents per 100. 


New tariff concessions granted United Kingdom on vari- 
ety of commodities including woollens and footwear. 

* * 

Provincial governments asked to vacate personal and 
corporation income tax field for duration of %.,-.-. with equi- 
valent compensation granted by Federal Treasury. 


New taxation expected to yield $300,000,000 in full 

fiscal year. 

* 

Total revenue for current fiscal year estimated at $1,* 

150,000,000. 


Total war and ordinary expenditures for current fiscal 

year to be at least $1,768,000,000. 


Deficit for current fiscal yeir estimated at $618,000,000. 


Canada taking responsibility for deficit in British foreign 
exchange account on purchases in Canada amounting possibly 

to $900,000,000 in fiscal year 1941-42. 


British exchange drficit added to Canadian budget de- 
ficit means Canada may have total budgetary deficit for year 

1941-42 of approximately $1,500,000,000. 

* 

Apart f IT in money new taxation produces and payments 
into supercnnuation, annuity and other funds held by Govern- 
in. :. and war savings, Government expects necessity bor> 
rowing from people and institutions approximately $1,000,> 
000,000 this fisc.tl year. 

v* * ' * 

New -construction and equipping of industrial plant to be 
licensed as from today to control investments. 

---- column ----

REG'LAR FELLERS-A Wise Guy 

---- column ----

By GENE BYRNES 

---- column ----

I LENT BAQQY 
SCANLON A NICKFL 
AN' HE WONT 
QlVE IT BACK 
TO ME' ' 

---- column ----

DID YOU 

LCNO 
IT TO 'IM OR 

QIVC 

ro 'IM f* 

---- column ----

DON'T YOU KNOW 
THAT ITS BETTER 

TO QIVK 
THAN TO UCMD, 
AN' IT C03T3 EXACTLY 
THE SAME PRICE' 
---- page ----

---- column ----

"I WANT TO TELL EVERYBODY 

HOW GOOD ALl-BR AN IS 

TO RELIEVE CONSTIPATION" 

---- column ----

"For 13 years I had suffered from 
constipation, trying all kinds of 
remedies without any hope of cure. 
Then I started eating KELLOGG 'S 
ALL-BRAN regularly . . . with 
marvelous results. I wish I could tell 
all people who are suffering from 
constipation how good ALL-BRAN 
it to relieve it!" So writes Mrs. Paul 
Oariepy, Joliette, Quebec. 

---- column ----

If you have been dosing yourself 
with harsh cathartics, try ALL- 
BRAN's "Better Way". Eat it every 
day and drink plenty of water. But 
remember this crisp, delicious cereal 
doesn't work like purgatives ... it 
takes time. Get ALL-BRAN at your 
grocer's, in two convenient sizes, or 
in individual serving packages at 
restaurants. Made by Kellogg's in 
London, Canada. 

---- column ----

Keeping 
Company . . 

Adapted from the 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

Picture 

by 
Lebbeus Mitchell 

Copyright 1940 by Loew' Inc. 

SYNOPSIS 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry C. Thomas 
and their three daughters consti- 
tute a typical American family 
in a town of some 15,000. Mary, the 
eldest daughter, Is courted by two 
automobile salesmen. Ted Foster 
and Jim Reynolds. The youngest 
girl, Harriet, nine, is independent 
with an eye single to the business 
of eating ice cream. Discovering 
Mary rehearsing a proposal of mar- 
riage, she telephones to both suit- 
or that Mary was primping for an 
hour just in case a certain young 
man should call that evening her 
price for the information being 
ice cream. Mr. Foster, favoring 
Ted gets Jim to demonstrate a Cor- 
onet sedan, giving Ted time to 
propose to Mary and be accepted. 

---- column ----

Harriet rau and threw herself 
In Mr. Thomas' arms as he re- 
turned from business, exclaiming: 
"Hello, Daddy. Do you love me?" 
"More than anything in the 
world!" he said warmly. 

A horn tooted mid Mary 
dashing past her iaK;*;. "That 
must be Ted!" 

Ted smiled at her from a Coro- 
nel coupe with 'be top down. He 
leaned down to kiss her. 

"How was business today, dar- 
ling?" 

He blinked. "What do you ku v 
about business?" 

"Nothing. I was just rehearsing 
to be a good wife. Twldy " 

"Don't call me Teddy." he winc- 
ed. "I never liked that name." 

She looked at him questioning!?. 
"Six people warned ms you were 
with Anastasia today." she< said, 
and at his startled, worried look, 
continued: "But I told them all it 
didn't mean a thing." 

"It didn't. 1 saw her for only a 
couple of minutes." 

"Yes." said Mary happily, "we've 
dismissed that subject once and 
for all. I don't want to see- her. 
hear about her. or have, anything 
to do with her past, present or 
futurel" 

"It's Ours!" 

Ted removed his hum! from the 
door of the car as though It were 
red-hot and murmured: "I ... I 
hope you won't have to." 

"Stay for dinner. Ted. and then. 
If you can keep that demonstrator, 
we could drive over to the park 
and feed the pigeons." 

"Mary, guess what." said Ted in 
a carefully prepared spetx-h. "this 
car isn't a demonstrator. It's ours. 
I bought H today." 

"Oh Ted! It's a beauty. I K>ve it 
Was it a bargain?" 

"A steal. An old geezer with too 
much money found he didn't need 
It." 

"I hope, yon gave htm a hie kiss 
for me!" 

"No. I just gave liiui the check. 
Mary, we've covered pivtty near 

---- column ----

BETTER PAY IN 
RADIO AND WIRELESS 

Knrol now in Full Period 
Course, suitable for both War 
and Poacotimo. if mule > ver IS 
2 years High School. You 
can study at home. Few months 
pass quickly. You owe it to 
yourself to write for Booklet. 

DOMINION RADIO 
& TECHNICAL INST. 

Suite D 15 

50 YORKVILLF AVE. 
TORONTO 

---- column ----

ISSUE 20 '41 

---- column ----

every angle of this married thing 

except when. I've got a good 

job and something came up that's 
going to make ererythius perfect 
So let's get married as soon u 
possible." 

"Well," she said demurely, -'moth- 
er and I were figuring or. nit 
month." 

"Next month's fin*! Let's make 
It Che first!" . . . 

As Harriet caught the bride's bou- 
quet shouting: "Hooray. I'm gonna 
be married next," Ana-stadia An- 
therton approached Ted who was 
looking upstairs as Mary ascended 
to change into trareling costume. 
She offered her hand. 

"Congratulations. Ted. Better 
luck next time." la spite of her 
smile, Ted felt that she was not 
kidding and made an excuse to 
mingle with the guests. 
A Bride Now 

His mother was savins :o Mrs. 
Thomas: "I suppose I ought to 
call you Susaii aow. Well. Susau, 
you dont' know how I feel. Yon 
still have two daughters." 

And then Jim Reynolds was wish- 
lug him good luck. 

"Thanks. Jim. No hard feeliugs?" 

"Plenty. When I tak< over M.- 
He-llman's job I'll cut your salary." 

"Better look out for him. Ted!" 
laughed Mr. Heilmau. "Jim's work- 
Ing up a deal to sell eight station 
wagons." 

"That means nothing. Mr. Hell- 
man. Any day now I'll show you 
a scheme to sell automobiles la 
clusters. like- grapes." 

Meanwhile upstairs. Harriet, al- 
most in tears, offered Mary her 
cowboy handkerchief and her rab- 
bit's foot. Her mother sent her 
downstairs. 

"Well, child." said Mm. Thomas. 

e a bride now and I could 

give you advice for hours. But I 

t!on't suppose- it would avid up to 

more than one thing." 

"Mother." said Mary tremulously, 
"I know I'll make mi-" 

"Of course- you will! But see 
tb:it you survive the fi'-st i -' 

"Tne first quarrel?" 

"No. the first separation." 

"No matter what happens. Ted 
and I would ne-ver seiwrate." 

"Oh. yes. you will! Maybe you'll 
only leave each other spiritually 
for half a second! Or one of you 
might walk out on the other for a 
day. a wee-k or a month." 

"We'd always come back togeth- 
er again. Mother." 

"Probably, but It's how you come 
back that may determine your 
happiness. Marriage u like an Ill- 
ness If you come through the 
crisis the patient's got a ch nice to 
live," 

( Continued Next Week) 

---- column ----

Household Hints 

Kqual parts of cold water and 
vinegar applied to the shiuy seat 
of your frock with a nailbrush will 
take '.he gleam away, aftt-rwanli 
pressed on the wrong site with an 
iron over a cloth. 


l'st a damp dust suwt to b*stt 
your suite indoors in the winter; 
throw the sheet over the chair and 
then beat through it with a slick: 
the dust sticks to th* sheet ins tend 
of dei-oraiing ttu room. 

* 

l"ce:ui your skin ru.us witii H mix- 
ture- of dry silver sand and French 
chalk (provided they ar white or 
pule In colour), rub it well in and 
then beat the fur side with a cane. 
Kor bail suins. make- a niixtui-' 
of magnesia am! starch powder, ap- 
ply ami then roll the vug up for 
two days lu-t'niv shaking am! comb- 

---- column ----

Blackout Curtains 
In T.C.A. Equipment 

---- column ----

Blackout curtains have 
stock equipment with Trans-Can- 
ada Air l.ini'*. \Vhoti 20 miles 
out of Halifax opaque grey cur- 
tains are drawn across the win- 
dows of T.C.A. planes on both 
sides of the passenger co'mpart- 
nient. The curtains rt^main drawn 
until the aircraft land-; and taxis 
to the passenger terminal. Thi* 
tremendously busy Canadian At- 
lantic port lies in a restricted 
xone. There can be no peeking. 
The curtain is full length from 
one end of the cabin to ('> other 
an<l ample in height. 

---- column ----

Fashion Flashes 

Red is enlivening in play foot 

wear. 


Black dresses a<iopt lingerie 
ruffles. 
The stole jacket or stole ca:>e is 

a bright sprinz idea. 


Multicolor floral silk cliiffous are 
shown for summer. 


Checks iu brown aud white ar 
featured in summer frocks. 

Alencon au<l filmy chantllly laca 
are being much used oa summer 
frocks. 

---- column ----

Home Accidents 
Greatest Threat 

---- column ----

Spectator sport (i.tssr-s aii 
K chalky pastel rough-textuv* ma- 

ier'als 

* * 

Shantung, 3iH -i-sey and spun 
linens rival sh . md heavy cot- 
tons in summer T.vies. 

Use up those old handbags and 
leather gloves by making them into 

patchwork leather cushions. 
. 

Dance dresses are immensely 
wide mousse-line de soie, using col- 
or ovr color to get iridescent cool 
watery color schemes or using all- 
over embroidery to get a very 
"worked" fragile effect. These 
full-skirt romantic dauc* gowns 
have low decolletages with trans- 
parent films of chiffon filling them 
In. back and front. 

---- column ----

Absent-minded Lady 
Gets Enormous Order 

When a busy West Branch, 
N.Y. housewife sent her neigh- 
bor's 10-year-cld son to the gro- 
cer's, she received more of a'l 
order than she bargained for. 

She handed the boy a list of 
the articles she wanted as fol- 
lows: 1 bottle vanilla. 1 can bak- 
ing powder, 5 pounds sugar, 2 
bars soap. 

Absently, the housewife check- 
ed off the lis: with her pencil. 
"One, two, three, four items,'' she 
said, writing the figure* down at 
the side ff the list. Completely 
to her surprise, she received the 
following: 11 bottles of vanilla, 
21 cans of baking powder, 35 
pounds of sugar, and 42 cakes of 
soap. 

---- column ----

STREAMLINED 
PRINCESS DRESS 

---- column ----

To Our Babie* Children'* 
Tendency to Experiment 
Leads to Dangerous Situa- 
tions Which Must Be Avoided 

---- column ----

Accidents, not mumps, meaale* 
or pneumonia, take the heavy toll 
of our children today. Accident* 
are the leading cause of death 
among children between 4 and 10 
and rank second for children be- 
tween 2 anu 4. 

Most frequent causes of acci- 
dents at home are suffocation, 
burns, poisoning, cuts, drownings 
and falls. Many of these could 
be prevented by simple precau- 
tion and ever-watchful care. 

The young child is a great ex- 
perimenter. If he sees mother 
take something from the medicine 
chest, he may drink it, or even try 
to use daddy's razor. The best 
way to prevfent such accidents U, 
of course, to keep such things out 
of baby's reach. 

OUT OF CHILD'S REACH 
Mothers shojild keep handy an- 
tidotes for all poisons. If the 
child swallows poison or some 
harmful substances, administer the 
antidote at once and then call 
yt-ur doctor immediately. 

Bed covers should be arranged 
in such a way that they cannot 
be pulled over the baby's head. 
Too many deaths are caused from 
suffocation and can be avoided by 
careful attention and the use of 
simple devices to prevent such 
accidents. These can be obtained 
in your local stores. 

Leave no unprotected places 
such as the head of staircase, an 
open window, porch or fire place 
into which toddlers might tumble. 
Safety doors or playpens may be 
bought or built cheaply. They 
may save your child from break- 
ing a bone or even from death. 

---- column ----

CDC DITTI DCCI ol Britains f '9 htin 9 
r K C C r I L I U K tD . pi an es and Warship 

---- column ----

By Anne Adam* 

Kor that buoyant "jeune fille" 
look t'nit's <u in keeping with the 
sm-iiivr -season make this en- 
cliantiujr frock from Pattern 
17i:<! Amu- Adams has denned 
this style for ensy cutting, -i-w- 
ins and t'ittii'tf. A spirited effect 
U i:ivon at the yokes by the scal- 
loped tops of the panels; the neck- 
line is cut in a becoiiiinir square, 
l.nco rdsir.x; and a bow are nice 
trimming iv.tos. I'se contrast for 
the yoke, how and sleevebands if 
you like striking color. Do start 
this '"wear-everywhere" style as 
soon as possible! 

Pattern 47-H is available in 
misses' sizes 12. II, 1'i. IS and 
20. Jjize U> takes 3Vs yard* 39 
inch fabric and 3 S yards lace 
edging. 

Send twenty cents ('20c> in 

coins (*:an<p< cannot be accept- 

oii i for tiiis \nr.e Adams p;uu>rn. 
\\riie plainly size. name, address 
;\.-ci style nurtii'er. 

>. -d your order to Anne Ad- 
itoom . 7.'? Wv-it Adelaide 
St., i' >ronto. 

---- column ----

Hellenic Hair 
Fashions Good 

---- column ----

Sculptured Curls and Ringlets 
of Classic Beauty Are Coming 
In 

---- column ----

Ou no:ed New York authority 
fus launched a series of HeHenic 
hair fashions. This trend was in- 
spired by Cluck's famous Greek 
opera "Alceste." and many ideas 
wre Uken dlreotly from Greek 
musterpiaces. Th^s* Cre< :.tn styles 
employ the use of curls in great 
abundance, sculptured curis ;in.i 
rmglets of classic beauty, many of 
them three inches In length. Some- 
times these curls are piled high 
an -I lieid with a cord to emphasize 
the. contour of the head. One witli 
this ba.-io an augernent has a side 
bang of curls, givin a s-v piiii? 
effect of mass en:'.- f:vrn :->w on 
the temple upward to I MI of 

the head. 

For very young things or fo. wo- 
men who lead an active life ye< 
want the Grecian touch, there Is 
the short, cropped hair-do .t solid 
m.'?s of fly-away cucls. This type 
of hair-do is very attractive w:;!i 
hats that sit on tils back of thd 

---- column ----

Braid* or twists of hair will be 
rery much in use tuU season, pa.- 
Ucularly iu the evening when< dig- 
nity and grace are. of first import- 
ance. They will be used to circle 
the head wreath fashion, span the 
distance between two upswept 
rolls, or build a Psyche's knur. 

I'pswept waves are good, the 
theory being that they match the 
popular upturn of hat brims. 

Something different, again. - U 
coiffure that is parted and comb- 
eil buck into tiig loose wave*, or 
the coiffure that is rolled at the 
sides to reveal a p.". f-ct widow's 
peak 

Holiday Fares 

Canadian railways will o:';Vr 
reduced fares for coming holiday 
periods including 1 Victoria Pay. 
May --1. falling on a Saturday; 
the King's Birthday, June !, 
falling on a Mond-iy: and Domin- 
ion Day. July 1. which this year 
coiv.es on a Tuesday. 

---- column ----

sheep "popuiaium'' 
is estimated at ll'J.000.000 head. 
ei|iia! to about eighteen t,> every 
one of the human population. 

---- column ----

LENHEIM TOMMX" MIIPBM 

"WELLINGTON BOMBOT* 

"HURJNCAKC" DEFIAJCr* 

"tUMDCRLAMD FLVtNQ MAT" 

NJU. HOOD. BOMtCY- AUK BOY AL 

HJM. DCSTBOYOt (TIMdM) 

SUBMARINE (Start am) 
MOTOR TORKDO BOAT mttt 

---- column ----

Rood two box top fr>m pkr of Ctiud* 
Corn Starch lor eab piotur* 

---- column ----

Wnta your oani tar- VMT*S oa ooa of 
ilw box tcpi. with tb* urn* of th <iMim4 

un hw miul Uvto to D*Dt. J10 
CuxU 8tcb CoapMir, 49 tfc 

---- column ----

St. K.. Toronto. Onu 

---- column ----

woodVfful PU-tun* ir* tlto obtaiaobU 
fat 1 bji :opa from p*ckag of 
, BENSON'S 
CORN STARCH 

or 

ILVE* GLOSS LAUNDMY STAJtCH 
or 1 oomp^t* liu^i fium a tin of 

enowN RAHD SYRUP. 

LI L Y WHITE SYMUr 
KAJtO 

<fo 

---- column ----

Table Talks 

---- column ----

By SADIE B. CHAMBERS 

---- column ----

More Requests 

- * 

It does seem as if I can never 
gat ahead of requests. Although 
last week's column was devoted 
w them I hart quit* a number 
of "left-overs" so here w are: 

Apple Upiide-Down Cak 
3 tablespoons butter 
: . cup brown sugar 
5 or 6 thick slices peeled apple 
5 or 6 Maraschino cherries 
Place batter in round cake pan 
and melt. Sprinkle in the sugar. 
No*- place in slices of apple with 
a cherry in the middle of each 
one. Cook slowly for one minute 
coverec 1 . 

2 1 * tablespoons butter 
's cup fine sugar 

---- column ----

"4, teaspion fla-vorirng 

1 cup Swansdown flour 
l*i teaspoons Calumet baking 

powder 
l cup milk 

Method: Cream butter very 
*-el.. Add sugar gradually and 
cream in well. Add the well- 
beaten egg and beat very thor- 
oughly. Add flavoring. Mix and 
sift the dry ingredients and add 
alternated with the milk. Pour 
over the fruit arranged in pan. 
Bake at 350 degrees F. for about 
35 minaies. Loosen cake from 
sides of pan. Invert on large 
serving plate and serve either 
with or without whipped cream. 

Pressed Veal 

4 Ibs. veal shank 

1 Ib. pork hock 

2 quarts water 
~i teaspoons salt 

to teaspoon pepper 

1 iiay leaf 

2 cloves 

1 small onion 

1 1 cup chopped cc!e"y 

1 teaspoon lemon juice 
Wipe off meat. Cover with 
water and add seasoning. Bring 
to boil and boil for 5 minutes. 
Reduce heat and allow to sim- 
mer for I 1 * hours or until meat 
falls away from the bone. Now, 
pick off the meat and put through 
food chopper. Place slices of 
hard-cooked egg in mould and 
then put in minced meat. Cook 
stock down 3'ightly. add lemon 
juice. Pour into the meat until 
it feels very moist and soft. Chill 
until set and slice when cold. 
Serve with salad Water cress 
garnishing add a zest. Serves 
3 or 10. 

Apple Rice Delight 

1 cup cooked rice 
1 cup sweetened, shredded al- 
monds 

12 marshmallows cut in pieces 
* pi:it cream, whipped 

Combine rice and apple sauce. 
Add other ingredients folding in 
whipped cream at the last. Chill 
and serve with cherry garnish 
i Maraschino.* 

Jellied Applet and Raisin* 

4 red app e- 
*t cup granulated sugar 

1 cup boiling water 
Thin shavings of lemon rind 

1 tablespoon Knox gelatine 
* cup cold water 

I 1 -* cups apple syrup 

2 tabiu-Hoi'jis lemon juice 
l cup seedless raisins 

Combine sugar, water and 
!e:uoti lind. Boil 2 minutes; re- 
move rind, drop in sections of 
appla pared and cored. Cook 
s!ow!y 1:1 syrup until clear (cov- 
ered part of the time). Lift sec- 

---- column ----

tions out carefully so as not to 
break. Measure syr^p. Add 
water to apple juice to make up 
I'-s cups. Soak gelatine in cold 
vater. Add to boiling syrup and 
lemon juice. When partially sefc 
add apple sections and raisin*, 
carefully folding them into the 
jelly. Pile in sherbet glasses and 
serve with custard sauce. 

---- column ----

Mlu t Iliiniliers urlrunir* per4tUl 
letter* from iatereatrd reudrra. sfce 
Is pleased to rrreire (iiggetti*** 
lopU-x f.ir ln-r i-uluitin amtl to 
firn read; to llMea iu ;<>UT -*pel 
eeve." Iteqoesr* for it-vine* r 
PCI in I nirnui nrr ia onK-r \.ldrr* 
yvur letter* iu -HiM Saiiie tt. Cham- 
ben, 7.: ttrxi Adelaide Street, T- 
renm." rml namped, ri 
eavelupe if >u niah n r-plj 

---- column ----

Early Habits 
Ruin Features 

---- column ----

Misshapen Jaws, Irregular 
Teeth Are Often Caused by 
Seemingly Unimportant Ha- 
bits of Small Children 

---- column ----

How little habits warp the 
smi.es, dispiiice the teeth and eve* 
twist the lower part of the face 
out of shape was shown M> th 
California Dental Association re- 
i-i-ncly by Dr. Yernon L. Hunt and 
Dr. Bernard Matzen of Arcata, 
Calif. 

TWISTED XOSES 
pictures of dozens of 
ctiiiJre;-. with misshapen jaws, 
twisted noses ugly, irreguiar 
teeth, over-developed tongues and 
. i.-.ties were exhibit- 
ed. Dr. Hunt attributed them in 
part at Ifast tj habits. 

Here are soir.e of his findings: 
sjiris and boys who habi- 
. bite their '.o'-ver lips majr 
deveiop protruding upper jaws or 
"buck teeth." Sometimes the 
upper becomes abnormally large 
from be'r.c '"-' treated and tue 
.oer teeth become sianted in- 
ward. 

BRKATHIXG THROUGH 
MOUTH 

Breathing through the mouth 
can contribute toward the uptilt- 
ing of the nose and a fhcTtening 
of the upper lip. until ihe young- 
ster cannot ciose his lips. 

The youngster who sleeps with 
hands, palms together, on the pil- 
low, and cheek resting on the back 
of one hand, may cause a flatten- 
ing on one side of the jaw. Dr. 
Hunt measured the amount of 
pressure exerted on one side of 
ti-.e :"aoe i:i that position and re- 
ported it was 14 pounds. That 
much weight repeatedly applied 
Co the same side of the face a fer 
minutes every night is sufficient 
to deform the ja'.v. 

---- column ----

Bet You Quebec 

Can Beat This 

---- column ----

W::o is the champion grand- 
father in Norm America? 

T. R. Fowler, of Colorado 
Springs, Colo., asked the ques- 
tion and he's trying to find 
the answer. He's challenged 
"any white man who has mar- 
ried only once" to dispute his 
own c 'aim to the title. Fowler 
now S t years old, has 82 direct 
descendants. He is the father 
of 12 children; has 52 grand- 
children and IS groat-grand- 
children. All but two are liv- 

---- column ----

^- v/> 
---- page ----

---- column ----

Wednesday, May 14, 1941 

---- column ----

THE FLESHERTON ADVANCE 

---- column ----

Send in the names of your visitors. 

---- column ----

NOTICE 

PAYMENT REGULATIONS OP 
FLESHERTON HYDRO 

No prompt payment discount shall 
be allowed unless the bill is pai I on 
or before the last discount day. This 
rule shall be impartially enforced. 

When the consumer ; fifteen days 
in arrears for two months' service, 
the service shall be discontinued, and 
service shall not be o'iven again until 
payment is mad' 1 in full, including a 
charge of $1.00 for cost of re-con- 
nection. Such discontinuance of ser- 
vice does not relieve the consumer 
of the liability for arrears or for his 
service charge or minimum bills fer 
the balance of the term of contract. 
The corporation may. if deemed ad- 
visable, make more rapid require- 
ments regardin" payment of bills. 
All arrears must be made bv May 
31st. 

By order of 

Flesherton Hydro Commission 

---- column ----

TORONTO LINE NORTH 

Mr. Arthur Tomks and Miss Ruby 
Peel of Toronto spent the week end 
with Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Swantun. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Richardson 
and family were Sunday visitors with 
Mrs. Wilson at Barrhead. 

Air. Ref? Hutton of Longstufl 
spent the week ^nd at his home on 
.the East Buck Line. 

Mr. Laurie Thompson has gone to 
the north country for n while, leav- 
ing here on Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred Lever and 
son spent the week end with the lat- 
ter's parents at Oshweken. 

Mr. R. Smith and sons Wm. and 
Geo. and the lattcr's wife and son 
spent the week end at their home 
here. 

Miss Gertrude Lever of Richmond 
Hill spent the week end with her 
mother, Mrs. T. Lever. 

We are sorry to hear that Mrs. 
Fred Brown is still in the hospital in 
Toronto, but we ho^o that she will 
soon bi- able to be home again. 

Saturday visitors with Mrs. T. Lev- 
er and Harold were; Ifr. and Mrs. 
Roy Wood and daughters, Ella and 
Muriel. Misses Whitney and Bussey 

---- column ----

y 
f 
y 
f 
y 
y 
y 
y 
y 
t 
y 
y 

5! 

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and Messrs. R. McDonald and J. Wil- 
son of bi..rkdale, Mr. Edward Boyles, 
West Back Line, Mr. and Mrs. Harpld 
Hutton and family and Mr. Reg Hut- 
ton. 

Mr. Arnold Harbottle and son of 
Vandeleur visited recently with Mr. 
H. Lever. 

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Most of the people who claim thi- 
home town paper doesn't print all 
the news should be glad it doesn't. 

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By taking autos off the highways, 
paying more attention to health and 
diet, there are less people dying in 
Bngfeind during peace days, even 
with the bombings. 

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Not that it makes any difference 
now, but perhaps a couple of years 
ago when people were saying that 
the newspapers were publishing too 
much war talk. 

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Tho St. Catherines Standard re- 
marks that "Great, indeed will be 
the military camp at Old. Niagara 
this summer. It is regarded as the 
finest in all Canada." And on his- 
torical ground as well. 

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"Brighten Up" 

BRIGHTEN UP YOUR HOME WITH NEW FLOOR COVERINGS AND 
CURTAINS. WE ARE SHOWING A BIG RANGE IN THESE LINES AT 
VERY SPECIAL PRICES. NOW IS THE TIME iXD BUY, 
AS PRICES ARE ADVANCING. 

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LINOLEUM in 2, 3 or 4 yd. widths 

in a good range of patterns Some- 
thing to suit any room. 

CONGOLEUM in big assortment of 

patterns and colorings in 2 and 3 yard 
widths, 3 yds. wide $2.10 yd. 

FELTOL, in some very smart pat- 
terns, will give good wear, 3 yards 
wide Special $1.75 yard 

RUGS in Linoleums, Congoleum- 

Feltol in every size at prices much be- 
low to-day's price. 

Felt Base Rugs, borderless in a good 

assortment of patterns; size 6 ft. x 9 
ft. Buy these now and save. Spec- 
ial $1.48 and $1.69 

CURTAINS 

Marquisette Curtains that give 

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your window that correct look, both 
inside and out when curtained in love- 
ly pastel tones. They come in green, 
white, pink and blue, with snowy, 
flaky, cluffy dots and fancy frilled 
edge and ends, 2 l /\ yds. long by 42 in. 
wide with Priscilla top. Special price 
of, per pair $2.25 

Novelty Marquisette Curtains in a 

dainty ruffled style with Priscilla top 
in white or ecra. They are about 28 
in. wide by 2j4 yds. long. Special 
price, per pair $1.19 

Floral Scrim Curetains. Who would 

not refresh their windows when such 
gay colorful curtains can be had at 
such modest prices. Made in light 
ground curtain scrim with ruffles and 
J 'rise-ilia tops in gold, green, blue and 
rose- 2; 4 yds. long. v Spccial, pair 75c 

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Ladies' Ready -Wear 

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This department is brim-full of the 
newest and latest styles in Coats, 
Suits and Dresses. 

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Some 

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Ladies' Printed Chiffon Dresses 

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in 

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some /of the daintiest patterns and 
newest styles. You will be delighted 
when you see them. Special .... $4.95 

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Ladies' 2-Piece Crepe Suits... 

of the very smartest of the new sea- 
son styles in floral and polka dots. 
Special $5.50 

Millinery. Visit our millinery dept. 

and see such a wonderful range of 
hats in every color and all the new 
styles a.id at very reasonable prices. 

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Mem' Ready To Wear 

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MOILS, Young Men's Suits. Dress 

up for the holiday with one of our 
new style suits. Made of fine Eng- 
lish worsteds and well tailored with 
pood serviceable linings. They come 
in single and double breasted si vies. 
Some are very outstanding, Values 
from $14.SS to $25.00 

Men's Fine Shirts. I'ig assortment 

of patterns in plain, stripes and checks 
with fused collars. Shirts worth up 

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to $1.25, sizes 14 - 17. Your choice 89c 
Boys' Suits. R-incy tweeds in peppy 

stvles, novelty sport hacks. These 
will please the young lad. You will 
appreciate the wear and smart appear- 
ance of these suits. Special price 
'.. $6.95 to $9.85 

Men's Caps. Light weight cotton 

cap in smart check effects, sizes 6-Hi to 
7 1-2. Special 25c 

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True Economy in Food Values at Hil s 

---- column ----

This pineapple week. Do your can- 
,ning now. Large size 4 for 95c; med- 
ium size 6 for $1.10; small size 6 
for 89c 

Supreme Shortening 2 Ihs. 27c 

Pure T.,ard 2 Ihs. 17c 

Oranges, medium si/.e 25c do/. 

Oranges, large size 39c do*. 

HARDWARE 

Woven Wire Specials: full No. 9 
9 Strand, reg. 73c 

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Stra wherry Jam, 32 oz. jar 25c. 

Raspberry Jam, 32 oz. jar 25c 

Clark's Soups: Tomato, Vegetable, 

Fancy Miscuits ISe Ih. ; 1 for 3.Sc 

Condensed Milk, 1 Ib. $i/.e .... 2 for I5c 
Rat-lev and Oat Chop .... $1.35 cwt. or 

S.'S.OO per ton. 
Clarke's Catsup, 11 ox. size, Spec. 14c 

DEPARTMENT 

gauge S strand, reg. 66c rod for .. 58c 
rod for . . 65c 

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F. T. Hill & Co., Ltd. 

MARKDALE, Ont. 

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o 

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Local and Personal 

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? 

i 

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Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Chappie spent 
the week end at Meaford. 

Miss Doris Magee spent the week 
at the home of her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Bert Magee, Eugenia. 

Sigmn. Bruce Ashton of Kings- 
ton is visiting with his parents, Rev. 
and Mrs. Ashton. 

Pte. Jack Kav of Toronto and Mrs. 
Kay of Collingwood snent the week 
end at the home of Robt. Clark. 

Mr. Walter Dungey and family 
moved last week to the H. Wilson 
residence. 

Allan Shaw of Hamilton spent a 
couple days this week with his 
grandmother, Mrs. W. H. Thurston. 

We have some broad leaf Dwarf 
Essex Rape to offer. It is scarce. 
Fred G. Karstcdt, Priceville. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harve" Griffen and 
Miss Catharine Cairns of Toronto 
spent the week end with Mr. and 
Mrs. Geo. Cairns and Mrs. Wilcock. 

Mrs. Jas. Avis, Miss Mary Avis, 
Gordon and Russell Avis of Tiverton 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 
Angus Avis. 

Miss Kate Macmillan of Toronto 
was a "Mother's Dav" visitor with 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Mac- 
millan. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Akins of To- 
ronto spent the week end with the 
former's parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. 
Akins, Springhill. 

Mr. A. E. Goessel was in Toronto 
last week taking a course with the 
B.-A. Oil Company. Mr. Johnston 
of Barrie was relieving him here. 

By. Wutuu tupplied at Paisley 
Baptist church on Sunday and for 
the next two Sundays will preach at 
Mt. Forest. 

Miss Elizabeth Nixon of Stowlea, 
Sask., arrived on Monday and visited 
her aunt, Mrs. R. Bentham. She will 
spend the summpr with her aunt, 
Mrs. Robt. Smith, Eugenia. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Thurston attend- 
ed the funeral of Robert Dawson 
Shaw, 9 months old son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Willard Shaw at Owen Sound on 
Saturday afternoon. 

Pte. Laurie. Smith of the R.C.A.S. 
C., and wife and two children of 
Toronto visited over the week end 
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. I. 
Smith. 

Dr. Leslie Ferris and family mov- 
ed ln<t week to their new home at 
New Liskeai-d, where Leslie has been 
stationed by the Canadian Govern- 
ment. 

Visitors with Mr. and Mrs. Albert 
Stewart over the week end were; Mr. 
and Mrs. Hi>rl> Perigo, of Sudbury; 
Misses E. Hickling, R. Milligan and 
E. Sproulr O f Toronto and Mrs. Bert 
Milligan of Detroit 

A light drizzle on Friday was the 
only rain received here for several 
weeks and the gnmnd is very dry. 
Most of the farmers have finished 
their seeding, due to the most favor- 
able seeding weather. 

Mr. and MM. Otto Clipperton and 
Miss Florence Bunt of Toronto, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Goldsbonugh of 
St. Catharines were week end visitors 
with Mr, and Mrs. Geo. Mitchell and 
Miss Aleda. 

Mrs. M. .lamioson welcomed the 
following guests to her home on 
Sunday: Miss B3habW Hickling, 
Miss B. Milligan and Miss Sproule 
f Toronto, Mrs. Millignn of Detroit 
and Mrs. Jackson of Georgetown. 
The latter is making a longer visit. 

Visitors with Mr. and Mrs. Bert 
Magee o n Sunday were: Mr. and Mrs. 
George Johnson and Royden, Mrs. 
Gordon Kellnr, Mr. Hnrry LeGard, 
Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Portoous, Mr. and 
Mrs. .Cecil Magee and Mrs. Robt. 
Gorley. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Arnott. accom- 
panied by Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Genoc, 
motored to Niagara on Blossom Sun- 
dnv. tnkinir in "the scenery and also 
visiting friends in Hamilton nnd 
Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Wilson, Jimmy 
Legge nnd Billy Wilson of St. Cath- 
arines, Mr. and Mrs. John Edwards, 
Dick and Allnn of Toronto, Archie 
Grnlmm of Bnrrie nnd Dick Graham 
of tlu> R.O.A.F, Toronto, wore week 
end visitors nt the home of Mr. rind 
Mrs. C. J. Bellamy. 

Special Mother's Day services were 
held in the Rnptist church and St. 
John's United churches on Sunday, 
Rev. Mi'l-arc-ii of Onkvillo preaching 
to the former congregation. At St. 
Jiohn's church n baptismal service 
was also heldi, when John Kdwin 
Gownnlock, son of Mr. nnd Mrs. John 
Gowanl 'ck. nnd Frederick Maurice 
Wauchope, son of Mr. and Mrs. Gor- 
don Wauchope, were baptised. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. I. Henry, Mr. nnd 
Mrs. H. A. Mt-Cauley of town and 
Mr. nnd Mrs. W. .G Kennedy of Dun- 
diilk attended the funeral of Miss 
Colia Pentium), which was held at 
Dungannon on Saturday Miss Pent- 
land was a sister of Mi-s. Henry and 
passed away at Nanton, Alta., on 
Sunday, May -1th. The deceased Was 
well known in Flosherton, having re- 
sided with her sifter fur s MIH- time. 

Mrs. W. H. Thurston returned to 
her home in town after spending the 
winter nt Mitchell witJi her diuighter, 
Mrs. N. H. Dui'rant. nnJ family; Miss 
Dell of Toronto nac unpnnicd hor 
home. Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Thurston, 
Ttnald and Warren of Meaford and 
Miss Hetty of Toronto Mrs K. Shaw 
of Lion's Hrnd: Mr. nml Mrs. \V R 
Shnw and Audrey of Owen Sound, 
Mr. and Mrs. Cole f Cheslev. dropped 
in to welcome her home. 

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Drop in and See our 
Special on Pot Roasts 

for the week end 

Fresh LAKE TROUT 

and 
Homemade Sausage 

on hand. 

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BAILEY'S 

We DELIVER FLESHERTON, Ont. .''HONK 47W 

Canada First Lest We Forget! 

---- column ----

In Memoriam 

BEECROFT In lovin memory 
of our dear mother, Mrs. Mary Bee- 
croft, who passed away, Mayl9, 1938. 
Your presence is ever near us, 
Your love remains with us yet, 
You were the kind of a mother 
Your loved ones will never forget. 

Ever remembered T - the family. 

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When you see furniture out on the 
lawn do not jump at the conclusion 
that the bailiff or the instalment 
man has been operating. You know 
how they go about housecleaning 
some places. 

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NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

In the ESTATE OF HANNAH E. 
McDONALD, deceased. 

All persons having claims against 
the Estate of Hannah E. McDonald, 
late of the Village of Flesherton, in 
the County of Grey, Widow, who died 
on or aDout the Thirteenth day of De- 
cember, A.D. 1940, are required to 
file proof of the same with the under- 
signed, on or before the Seventh day 

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of June, 1941, after which date the 
Estate will be distributed, having, 
regard only to the claims of which 
the undersigned shall then have had 
notice. 

Dated at Flesherton this Thir- 
teenth day of May, A.D. 1941. 

W. TURKEY, Executor. 
Flesherton, Ontario. 

---- column ----

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

In the ESTATE OF WILLIAM 
JOHN BURNETT, deceased. 

All persons having claims against 
the Estate of William John Burnett, 
late of the Township of Artemesia, ia 
the County of Grey, Farmer, who died 
on or about the Fourth day of April, 
A.D. 1941, are required to file proof 
of the same with the undersigned, on 
or before the Seventh day of June, 
1941, after which date the Estate will 
be distributed, havino- regard only to 
the claims of which the undersigned 
shall then have had the notice. 

DATED at Durham this Seventh 
day of April. A.D. 1941. 

J. H. McQUARRIE, 

Durham, Ontario. 
Solicitor for the Adrninistrices 

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Small Ad. Column 

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FOR SALE Young cow due May 5 
Oliver Thurner, Eugenia. 48p2 

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FOR SALE Mammoth clover seed $9 
per bu. Leslie Chard, phone 42 r 2, 
Flesherton R. R. 3. 

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PASTURE Cattle wanted for pas- 
ture. Chas. McDermid, phone 45 r 
13 Flesherton. 48c3 

PASTURE For rent by month for 
cattle, sheep or horses. Donald 
Stewart, Ceylon. 48c3 

---- column ----

FOR SALE Certified Kahtadan 
seed potatoes $1.25 per bag. Alex 
S. Muir, Ceylon, 49 r 14. 50c2 

FOR .SALE Young pigs ready to 
go Jas. Hopps (Portlaw) R. R. 
:?, Flesherton. 50cl 

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FOR SALE Buckwheat, $26. pel- 
ton; Wheat, $29. r er ton. Phone 
33r3. A. C. Muir, Ceylon. 50p2 

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FOR SALE Stable to tear down 
for lumber. Mrs. W. E. Morgan, 
Flesherton. 49cl 

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FOR SALE 15 bu. Cartier oats, 
also purebred Berkshire sow due 
next month. Allan A. McLean, 
Priceville phone 49 r 3. 50c2 

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FOR SALE Doherty Banner 
Range in good condition, will sell 
cheap. Pasture and working land 
for sale or rent Mrs. L. A. 
Fisher, Flesherton. 49c3 

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FOR SALE 4 steers rising 2, 4 
heifers, 2 years old, in calf, work 
horse, 2 brood sows, single furrow 
riding plow. Richard Allen & Son, 
Flesherton, phone 46 r 21. 48c2 

---- column ----

BRAY PULLETS started, dayold 
immediate shipment. A dozen pur e 
breeds, several crosses. From 
early laying, heavy laying stock. 
John McWiijiam, Flesherton. 

FOR SALE House in Flesherton 
with seven rooms, hard and soft 
v :Uer, double lot and barn. Foi 
full particulars apply to J. W. Me- 
Mullen, Ceylon, Kxeci tor. 30i- 

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FOR SALE or RENT for pastuer 
Lots 167 on East Back Line. Har- 
ry Patton, R. R. 3, Flesherton. 

FOR SALE Corona kitchen range, 
in gaod condition, bargain. Mrs. 
S. E. I. Hollo- Flesherton. 48p2 

WANTED Any number of fresh 
ground hogs lOc each. Jas. R. 
Sinclair, Ceylon. 43c tf 

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FOR SALE Two Colony Houses 
for chickens. Robt. Purvis. R. R. 
4, Flesherton, phone 43 r 2. 49c2 

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PASTURE Pasture for number of 
year-old cattle, abundance of feed, 
shade and water. J.. F. Colliiuon, 
Ceylon, p^one 21 r 3. 48 

FOR SALE Cedar shingles at old 
prices while they last. Clears at 
$3.45 per square; Seconds, $2.70 
square. Over 10 square deliv< red 
free. A. C. Muir, Ce"lon. 50p2 

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FARM FOR RENT Lot 20, Con. 9, 
Osprey, formerly McQueen proper- 
ty. Apply to I. B. T ucas & Co* 
Markdale, Ontario. 47cJ 

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NOTICE Paper hangind and paint- 
ing at reasonable prices. Estimates 
free. Ross Mitchell, Dundalk, 
telephone 77. 

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FOR SALE 7-ro>mi brick house in 
Flesherton, largo lot, garage, good 
well, must be sold to settle estate 
of the lato Andrew Gilehrist Ap- 
ply to John Stewart, Executor, Pro- 
ton Station, phone 32 r 4. 

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FOR SALE 150 acres, Lots 181, 
182, 2nd Con. N.E.T.&S.R.. Arteme- 
sia, Very rhca|t; also 13 year old mare 
8 year old horse, cow, cattle, dog, 
heavy harness, light harness, cut- 
ter, plow, mower, gravel box, hay 
ruck. Very reasonable. Apply ti 
Geo. Allen (Mt Zion), R. R. No. 3, 
Fleshrrton. 47c2 

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FARM FOR SALS 
Lota 14-15, Con. 1, S.D.R., ArU- 
mesia, containing 100 acres, on which 
is situated a bank barn 45x55, also 
large driving shed. Thi property 
must be sold to wind up estate. Those 
interested communicate with Joh 
Oliver or W. R. Meads, Priceville. Ex- 
ecutors for the estate. 47e 

PROPERTY FOR SALE IN 
FLESHERTON 

Lot 10 on Collingwood St, o 
which is situated a 7-room house, 
well and stable. Those interested 
communicate with I. B. Lucas, Mark* 
dale, Solicitor for the Ella Gibson 
Estate. 

BUSINESS CARt> 

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DR. S. R. THIBAUDEAU 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

Graduate of Ontario Veterinary Coll- 
ege. Phone: 91 day or night 
MARKDALE, ONT. 

---- column ----

pARM FOR SALE 

100 acre farm, 6 acres wheat 
spring creek, tiled well and windmill, j 
comfortable dwelling, barn and hen- 
house, situated 1 mile south of Flesh 
erton on No. 1 Highway, reasonably 
(iricrd for qnick sole. - Apply to 
Fred Irwin, Flesherton, Ont. 

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DR. J. E. MILNE 

Office Durham St. 
Office Hours Afternoona, l.SO to 4. 
Evenings, 7 to 

Sunduys and Thursday afternoon* 
only. 

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Prince Arthur Lodga No. 883, .V.F 
& A.M., meets in the Fraternal Hull, 
Flesherton, the second Friday in eacfc 
month. W.M., Herb. Corkett; See- 
rotary, C. J. Bellamy. 

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- : 
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- 

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VOL. 60; NO. 51 

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FLESHERTON. WEDNESDAY. MAY 21, 1941 

---- column ----

VV. H. Thurston & Son. Props. 

---- column ----

NEW AND USED 

Farm Machines 

FOR SALE AT COCKSHUTT AGENCY 

M.-H. Side Delivery Rake Toronto Asphalt Roofing 

New Renfrew Cream Separators Lundy Woven Fence 

HOW ABOUT REPLACING THAT OLD MOWER, HAY RAKE, 
HAY LOADER, SIDE DELIVERY RAKE, SCUFFLER 

WITH A NEW COCKSHUTT Agent for Fl*ury-Bissell implem 
ents. Used Renfrew Cream Sep-arator in good condition 

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W. EDGAR BETTS 

Cockshutt Implements - Flesherton, Ont. 

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"Brighten the Corner 
Where You Are 

---- column ----

PAINT UP Paints, Enamels, Varnishes, Turpen- 
tine, Oils, Paint, Brushes. Colors to suit your 
taste; prices to suit your purse. 

CLEAN UP Floor Wax, Polishes, Cleaners, Dust 
Mops, Prooms, Brushes- Paint and Paper 
Cleaners, Scrub Pails. 

FIX UP Roofing. Roof Coating, Plastic Cement, 
Step Ladders, Carpenter's Tools, Lime, Plas- 
ter, Cement. 

Tools for the Lawn and Garden Hoes, Rakes, Lawn 
Mowers, Garden Seeds. 

Watch for our Spring and Summer Catalog. 

F. W. DUNCAN 

HARDWARE "Blue Coal" Phone 54 

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Notic 

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Until further notice this 
store will not be purch- 
asing eggs 

9 & A. Co-operative Company, Ltd. 

FLESHERTON, Ontario 

---- column ----

Equipped to handle the finest service at moderate prices 

* Our BeautrfH 

Air. 

Conditioned 
| Funeral Chapel 

124 AVENUE ROAD 

TORONTO, Ont. 

RICHARD MADDOCKS, 

Manager. 

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KUKD MADDOCKS. 

Associate. 

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M.-mb.-r of Ui* Flehrton Old B oys' & Girls' Association 

BATES & MADDOCKS 

Formerly of Fleeherton. Ont 

---- column ----

J 124 Avenue Road. Toronto, Ont 

---- column ----

KI. 4344 

---- column ----

Many Contributing For | Mr. Jos. Blakeley Died 

Feversham Auction Sale At Age of 85 Years 

This week we began our drive for j Death came quietly to an old Art- 
donations of articles to be auctioned j emesia and Fleaherton resident on 

---- column ----

at the sale in Ftversham on June 5th 
at 1 p.m., in aid of the people in 
Britain who have suffered the terrible 
effects of this all-out aerial warfare 
carried to their shores by the Nazi. 
The response that our volunteer 
workers has met with at the hands 
of the public, has to date been sym- 
pathetic and generous. This spirit 
of sympathy and generosity among 
Canadians is being carried to the 
British victims of the war through 
the gifts of money which are stream- 
ing to them from all parts of Canada. 
The Lord Mayor of London has said 
that the people of London and other 
English cities have been heartened 
and strengthened by the knowledge 
that Canada is united in its devotion 
to the needs of the Motherland. 

We ought to" welcome this oppor- 
tunity to directly aid our defenders. 
The Evening Telegram of Toronto 
bears the cost of administration of 
this Fund, so that the dollars "you 
give go one hundred per cent to the 
suffering British people men, wo- 
men and children. 

'Will you help us make this sale on 
June 5th a success for these people 
sacrificially ? (Cont.) 

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Miss Helen Hurd In Canada 

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(Kimberley Reporter) 
The many friends of Miss Helen 

---- column ----

Hurd will be 

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to know that she is 

---- column ----

back in Canada and is at present with 
her sister. Mrs. A. Hurlburt, at 
Vernon, B.C. Miss Hurd was one of 
22 ordered by the Mission Bqard to 
return to Canada, leaving only six 
to care for the work in Japan. She 
felt very sorry to leave the work she 
loved so dearly and was not in any 
way alarmed about her safety there. 
She is now filling in at any oppor- 
tunity and is also visiting some Jap- 
anese missions in British Columbia. 
where the people are lad to hear 
news from their homeland. 

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Decorate The Town 

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The Council of the Village of 
Flesherton request that the citizens 
in <*eneral and the business men par- 
ticularly, decorate their premises in 
preparation for the opening of Can- 
ada's Victory Loan campaign, the 
week previous to the campaign which 

---- column ----

opens on June 2nd. 

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A. DOWN. Reeve. 

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Grey & Simcoe Foresters 
On Ther Way Eastward 

Leaving Exhibition Camp on Tues- 
day morning, the Grey and Simcoe 
Foresters started a long trek on 
foot to Trenton, which is to be this 
unit's trainin- ground for at least 
part of the summer. 

The battalion is marching all the 
way without the aid of mechanical 
transport, except for baggage and 
equipment, it was announced yester- 
day by Captain J. A. D. Craig, of the 
llth Infantry Brigade staff. 

First-night bivouac was at West- 

---- column ----

Thursday evening of last week in the 
person of Mr. Joseph Alexander 
Blakeley, in his 86th year. The late 
Mr. Blakeley had been confin-.l to his 
bed for the past several months and 
his passing, although not unexpected, 
was regretted by a wide circle ot 
friends. 

The late Mr. Blakeley was born at 
Streetsville and when quite young 
came to Artemesia Township, and has 
spent his life within a radius of a 
few miles of Flesherton. He was the 
eldest son of a family of 11 born to 
Thomas Blakeley and Isabella Orr 
and was born December 12. 1855. 
He was married to Grace Sharp of 
Artemesia and to them were born two 
children. Gladys and Garnet, who died 
many vears asr. Together they re- 
sided at Inistioge. then on a farm 
north of Flesherton and later south 
of town. Mr. and Mrs. Blakeley 
retired to Flesherton 23 years agrj. 
For over 60 years Mr. Blakeley wa.- 
a member of L.O.L. 244. Proton Sta- 
tion and the oast few years was ar 
honorary member ,?f that Lodge. He 
wis well known 'hrough.iut thi5 
district and was highly regarded by 
a host of friends. TT : s stories of th. 
early days of Artemesia were al- 
ways interesting, as he was a g, od 
conversationalist. For over 50 vear 
he wis 3'tivch- connected w>h St 
.Term's United Oinrch. and prior to 
Union wa a Methodist. He served ! ' ' 
is older in St. J hn's Church. arf !! 

---- column ----

97th Battery Was In 

Flesherton Thursday 

Flesherton citizens had an oppor- : 
tunity to view the 97th Battery of! 
the 7th Field Brigade of the Canad- 
ian Army on Friday morning of last 
week, which wa* on tour of Bruce i 
and Grey Counties. The. Battery was 
completely mechanized and the ve- 
hicles passed through town at a good 
clip. The convoy consisted of trucks, 
three Bren gun carrier trucks, two 
completely equipped radio trucks, 
three machine gun trucks and eight 
18-pounder guns with limbers, carry- 
ing reserve artillery shells. Accom- 
panying the trucks were three motor 
cycle patrols to direct traffic and one 
of these was placed at the main cor- 
ner in town directing the vehicles to 
change their course from No. 4 High- 
way north to Markdale. The convoy 
was scheduled to pass through town 
at 9.45 a.m.,* but they came through 
at 9.05 a.m. There were quite a num- 
ber of citizens on the street viewing 
the convoy as it passed through. The 
Battery was recruited with men 
mainly from Bruce and Grey Coun- , 
ties. Previous to the appearance of ' 

---- column ----

the main body six tracks carrying: 
cooks and quartttr-master details 
went through town eastward on uieir 
way to Collingwood where the noon 
meal was served to the 184 men com- 
prising the Battery, which is one- 
third of a regiment. 

9th Platoon Took Cup 

No. U Platoon, "A" Company- 
recruited from the County of Giey, 
was last week judged the best pla- 
toon in the Grey and Simcoe Forest- 
ers, A.F.) and the choice is a credit 
to the Grey boys for their whole- 
hearted interest in their training and 
deportment. Sergt. Wm. Welto'n is 
the Platoon Sergeant of N'o. 9, 
which received the award of a cup, 
plus $5.00 for each man and $1.00 
extra from the Compar" Commander. 
Major Ivor Wagner. N'o. 3 Section 
of the Platoon was judged the best 
section in the battalion. 

Messrs. Ivan Henderson, and Frank 
Prentice and Miss Helen Crawford of 
Toronto and Mr. Eric Henderson of 
Brantford spent - day last week with 
Mrs. R. H. Henderson. 

---- column ----

Mrs. Jas. Patterson Passes 

---- column ----

(By Victoria Corners Reporter) 
Inistiogt* lost one of its most 

hill, just "east of the city. ~To-days valued members in t>- person of 
raaivh will be from Westhill to Whit- ! Mrs 5 Patt . erson V , who c 
by, and on the third day. which will away Ust week " the 
be Thursday. May 22, the Greys will 

---- column ----

reach Bowmanville. Leaving there 
Friday mornine. the troops will foot- 
slog on to Port H.ipe for the fourth 
nig-ht's bivouac. Saturday, the niirht 
halt will be at CobouTjr. where the i 

battalion a lso will spend the week- : B 5- p Bur T' Vm re - W 1"' U ? ar 
,* and Russeli. both in Melancthon 

township, one brother. John Russell, 
and a sister, Miss Annie Russell, of 
Adjala Township. 

---- column ----

homestead. 

Mrs. Patterson, who before her 
marriage was Nancy Russell, was 
born in this community and resided 
here for her entire 76 ears. Her 
predeceased her by 11 

---- column ----

end. 

A drumhead service for the troops 
and public will be held in Cobourg on 
Sunday, it was announced. 

battalion 

---- column ----

M "' 

---- column ----

>r 

---- column ----

will hike to Colbourne and then on to ! i n n / Ve ,f K * od ?i r . sh * , 
Trenton, the final objective of the i * retttl " m !f d ,' n c urch 

week-long march, on Tuesday, the 27. j aml ** as well as her home. 

In deciding to send the Grey and ] 

Simcoes on foot to their new camp, 
instead of using the lorries customary 
in this war, or even b'- train, it was 
felt by the authorities that it would 
be irood training and ol*.> provide res- 

---- column ----

Ring Comes to Light 35 

Years After Being Lost 

---- column ----

idents of the towns to be passed a 
better view of the soldiers. The cur- 
rent recruiting campaign also had 
some bearing on the decision. The 
commanding officer of the Grey and 
Simcoes is Major V. R. Fell. 

---- column ----

n o v. N 

STAFFORD At Mrs. Nuhn's 
I Nursing Home. Flesherton, to Mr. 
and Mrs. Stanley Stafford (neo Ann 
i McFadden) of Berkeley oi> Thursday, 
i Mav 15th. the gift of a daughter. 

A. Itii'* Nnnn's Ni'"" 
:ii" ttui.tv'. KIi ^.-,, . ,.,i;j, rn M" * 

*.;.*. j hr. v. : . , ,0 lib . rfc- 

Nalty) of Roothville, the gift of a 
dsuyrhter. 

---- column ----

I'By Victoria Corners Reporter* 
A peculiar coincidence occurred in 
regard to Mrs. Jas. Patterson, who 
passed away last we>ek. About :15 
years ag.> while milkin<" the cow? 
one evening in the field adjacent to 
the house. Mrs. Patte'von's wedding 
ring- hurt her finders and she took it 
off. giving it to tier son, Russell, who 
\v-is a little fell- w. to hold. He 
dimmed the ring and it could not be 
found. The field has been worked 
regularly but the ring- was newr 
f 'i-'"d. About a .-eek before Mrs. 
Patterson's death, her two s.^ns 

---- column ----

Future Events 

---- column ----

Mr. McArthur, the hair dresser 
from Toronto, will he at M. Arthur 
M'u- Donald's residence (bak* shorO 
Flesherton on Thursday. May :22iul, 
to irive permanent.'. Make appoint- 
ments with Mrs. Scarrow at the 
bake shop. 

---- column ----

.)wii ami pickvii up .1 c'.od of earm 
I and in the breaking up process the 
r-iu> wns brought tx> light. Mrs. 
Patterson was able to re-cognize the 
"'.r. which looked quite new. 

---- column ----

The Women's Institute will hold a 
Euchre and Dance in Pricoville Hall 
on Friday. Mav 23. 8.W tun. A draw 
for the Kcd Cross will be made by 
Hon. F. R. Oliver. Minister of Public 
Works. Prizes for hiph and low 
euchre scores. Lucky number pripe. 
Gov! nuisic; lunch served. Proceeds 
in aid of war work. Admission: 25c. 

---- column ----

C*rd of Thanks 

I wish to thank my kind friends 
and neighbors for their acts of love 
and sympathy and for the 1 V'.-h- 
f',Mv.>r< duri;\r t.ho illrt-ss of my 
hul<;uid and in mv herenvement. 

Mrs. Jos. Blakelev. 

---- column ----

Card of Thanks 

---- column ----

Mrs. Jos. Cornfield .ind fa-nilv 
wi<h t.< express thejr irratitii ie and 
annreciation of the manv act f 
kindness dnv ; nvr tho> i!lm's of the> 
husband and father and for flown 
and sympathy extended to them in 
their bereavement. 

---- column ----

'*>MI I MM MUM I II 

---- column ----

** 

---- column ----

it the time of his death was an hon- ! ' 
orarv elder of the church. 

Besides his sorrowing wife he 
leaves to mourn two sisters, Mrs. M. 
I. Allen of Toronto and Mrs. C. 
Currie of Toledo, Ohio, and one 
brother. Andrew Blakeley, of Wall- 
halla. North Dakota. 

The pallbearers were: Messrs. W. 
Caswell, Thos. Taylor. Russell Park. 
John Stewart. Wm. Miller and Geo. 
Cairns. 

The funeral service was conducted 
in St. John's United Church by his 
pastor. Rev. G. K. McMillan, who 
based his sympathetic remarks from 
the 23rd Psalm. Mr. Roy Langford 
rendered a solo by request, singing 
"Crossing The Bar." 

Interment was made in the family 
clot in Flesherton cemetery. 

Amony those from a distance who 
attended the funeral were: Mrs. 
J. C. Ellis and family. Mr. 
and Mrs. Henslewor>d. Miss Mild- 
red Sharpe. Gordon Blakeley. Mr. and 
Mrs. R. H. Irving and Mrs M. I. 
Allen, all of Toronto: Mr. Clifford 
Blakeley. St. Thomas: Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry Logan. Owen Sound; Mr. and 
Mrs. \Vm. Miller and Mr and Mrs. 
A. W. Rowe of Dundalk, Mr Robt. 
Weir. Nottawa: Mr. and Mrs. Chas. 
Wilson and daughters. Isobel and 
Inez. Mrs. Gertrude Wilson and Del- 
mar and Elsie, all of Singhampton: 
and Mr. and Mrs. Jared Lyons of 
Meadowvale. 

---- column ----

Proclamation 

Village of Flesherton 

That Monday, May 26 be observed as Victoria 
Day and CIVIC HOLIDAY instead of Saturday, 
May 24th in the Village of Flesherton. 

A. DOWN, Reeve. 

---- column ----

IIHIMII 

---- column ----

ii ii i tin 

---- column ----

WE WONT, 
SELL YOU 

---- column ----

loo much tire insurance but 
we'll sell YOU -urf protection 
and quick service. 

---- column ----

H. W. KERNAHAN 

Flesherton. Ont. 

REPRESENTING 

---- column ----

Writing nflfcted risks in Automobile. Fire. Vl.it i- i;i.i--. Burglary. 
Public Liability, and other general insurance. Head Office. Toronto. 

---- column ----

Economy 

---- column ----

Our Government is asking our citizens to econo- 
mize wherever possible in our daily routine of 
living and functions. We can suggest two ways 
of economy, namely: by delivering your cream to 
the creamery and receiving 1 cent per pound fat 
over truck price, and also making use of our cold 
storage meat lockers, by freezing your own meat. 
which is a big saving on your cost of living. 

MEAT STORAGE 

A $5.00 box for a year will hold approximately 
220 to 250 Ibs.. meat and you may refill the box 
often as you wish. You may also place meat in 
storage at the rate of I 1 -c per Ib. 

On account of the new government egg: regulations 
,,,.- - '-'.-, ni^rp ti'rne in Grading 1 eggs. \Ve are 

---- column ----

;; aMvins; \ou to co-operate with us t 

---- column ----

-T your 

---- column ----

esrgs earlier during the dav to avoid con^eicion d*. ir- 
itis: open nisrht. The creamery will remain open each 
Wednesday and Saturday night during the summer 

XOW IS THK TIME THAT THE STORING 
OF MEAT SHOULD BE IX FULL 

PROGRESS. 

Call in to see us about the storage. 
THE CREAMERY WILL BE OPEN EACH SATURDAY NIGHT 

Flesherton Creamery & Produce Co. 

---- column ----

?hone 06 

---- column ----

Angus Avis, Manager 

---- column ----

<**!<>*** 
---- page ----

---- column ----

Saving Ontario's 

Natural 
Resources 

---- column ----

C. C. Toner 

Ontario Federation of Angler* 
and Hunter* 
(No. 42) 
THE BULLFROG 

Ontario has a number of kinds 
f frogs in its swamps and marsh- 
ta; of these, the most important 
conomically is the lar^e bullfrog. 
I am sure everyone has heard its 
deep call note but I am also sure 
that few people know anything 
/ its life history or habits. The 
ther frogs found in Ontario may 
leave the water or will often be 
found in small ponds but the big 
bullfrog is restricted to lakes, 
permanent streams and rivers. 

The breeding season of tha 
bullfrog 'a in early summer, usu- 
ally late June or early July. The 
tadpoles break from the eggs 
within several days and are quite 
mall when first hatched. Th 
very young tadpoles are black in 
colour but as they grow they be- 
come mottled with brown on th 
back and vary from yellow to 
cream underneath. From July 
till the waters chill is not a long 
period so the young bullfrogs do 
not transform the first year, they 
hibernate as tadpoles. Along in 
August of their second summer 
they become adult frogs. 

Their Food, Enemiei 

Bullfrogs feed on almost any- 
thing they can swallow. They 
have been known to take birds, 
fish and mammals. Other smal- 
ler frogs are a regular part of 
their diet, even their brotherg and 
aieterii, if they can be caught. 
Crayfish, insect; and various 
other animals of the water make 
op the bulk of their food. The 
tadpoles feed on vegetation and 
itch email life as they can catch. 

Bullfrogs have many enemies. 
When they are still in the tad- 
pole stage they arc taken by fish, 
frogs, snakes and birds. After 
transformation their enemies have 
a harder time to catch them for 
they can escape to either land or 
water. The mo.n important en- 
emy of the bullfrog is man who 
takes them in many thousands nf 
pounds each year for the market. 
These frogs have become quite 
carce in many places and at the 
present time the Game and Fish- 
ery Laws protect them during 
June and July. During these 
months they must not be taken 
anywhere in the Province. 

---- column ----

British Economist Here to Tackle War Problems 

---- column ----

103, He Has 375 
Living Descendants 

Hubert Leclerc, of St. Hubert 
de Spaulding, Quebec, who haa 
more than 375 living children, 
grandchildren and great grand- 
children, last month celebrated 
his 102n-' birthday anniversary in 
the Frontenac County town near 
the Maine border. 

Completely blind for 13 years, 
he Ls otherwise in excellent 
health. His wife whom he mar- 
ried in 1842, died years ago. 
They had 16 children, two Rons 
and 14 daughters. Leclerc is 
now living with a grandson. 

---- column ----

London Horses Must 
Hnve Ration Cards 

---- column ----

Horses, mules and donkeys 
need ration cards before they can 
put on the feed bag, according 
to a regulation of the British 
Ministry of Food. Owners of ur- 
ban horses mu.st produce the cou- 
pons when purchasing feed such 
as oats, beans or bran. 

Horses already registered with 
agricultural departments or coun- 
ty war executive committees are 
exempt from the order. Similarly, 
registration is not necessary for 
animals used in mining, for army 
horses or racing and hunting: 
tecds. 

---- column ----

The Book Shelf. . 

"IN THIS OUR LIFE" 
By Ellen Glasgow 

Here id a novel of modern 
times, ending a few days before 
the outbreak of war in Kurope. 
The scene is a southern city in 
the United States. The members 
of the Timberlake family father, 
mother, and the two strangely 
eontrasted young women who are 
their daughters are the central 
characters of an intensely drama- 
tic story. They arc true, vital 
creation.", these characters, and 
they make the action, precipitate 
the crowding events of "In Thi 
Our Life." 

The fascinated reader sees un- 
folding be-fore him here an analy- 
sis of the modern mind and tem- 
per a/ exhibited in this family 
and their community. The hook 
gather* its aprcial intensity an Mi 
chief theme ("character is des- 
tiny") grows through the story. 

"In This Our Life" ... by 
Ellen Glaifow ...'.. Toronto: 
G*orge J. Mcl.eod, Publiiliers . . . 
$3.00. 

---- column ----

U.S. economy could not function at all on the present basis if Hitler 
wins the war, warns the British economist, Prof. John Maynard Keynes, 
who is an adviser to the Bank of England. Here he is as he arrived 
at LaGuardia Field, New York, with Mrs. Keynes, after flying the 
Atlantic in the Clipper. Representative of Sir Kingsley Wood, British 
Chancellor of the Exchequer, he will study special problems raised by 
the Lease-Lend Act. 

---- column ----

THE 

W A R W E E K Commentary on Current Events 

Was Hess' Flight Plotted 
To Fool British Leaders? 

---- column ----

"Yes, the maggot it in the 

pple" British Prime Minister 

Winston Churchill. 

The most sensational single cv- 
nt yet to occur in the waj be- 
tween Britain and Germany the 
flight of No. 3 N:i/i Rudolf Hess 
to Scotland last week precipitat- 
ed a welter of rumor, a turmoil 
of conjecture, of fantastic reports, 
fax-fetched explanations, topical 
jokee, among all the people of the 
Anglo-Saxon world. This most in- 
credible development had every- 
body by the ears. And one and all, 
we sought to decipher what was 
behind It. 

The Obviout 

Expert opinion differed widely. 
Among the more optimistic on- 
lookera were the New York Times 
editors who naid, "Whatever he is, 
Hees is good news for England. 
The eseapc worries Hitler and 
must spread ami deepen the doubts 
that eat into the ;ic.. - t of Germ- 
any.'' The Herald Tribune, sim- 
ilarly accepting the most obvious 
theory that Hiss was a traitor and 
wanted to help Britain declared 
it possible that Hess, "converted 
for whatever reason, le about to 
put bis knowledge and the power 
of his voice into a crusade against 
the whole gang with which he 
roee," and Raid the incident "could 
easily inark one of the great turn- 
Ing points of the war." 

---- column ----

Held Suspect By Many 
Prime Minister Churchill's first 
reported verbal reaction to Hess' 
landing in Scotland ("Yes, the mag- 
got is in the apple") was inter- 
preted in most quarters as referr 
ing to a major rift iu the Nazi 
hierarchy which might In time split 
the whole o-f Germany In two. Mr. 
Churchill's remark could also mean 
that Hess" undertaking was strong- 
ly suspect. 

It seemed phoney to the one- 
time president of the Norwegian 
Parliament, Carl J. Hambro, who 
expressed the view that Hess had 
been sent from Germany to "fool 
England"; "Hess may be a fan- 
atic willing to bacrlfice evi>n his 
own life if it could hplp bring about 
the downfall of England." A form- 
er member of the German Reich- 
stag, now editor of a New York 
magazine was of the same opinion: 
II. s is the first missile of poison 
gas fired to England by Hitler to 
start public discussion of peace 
possibilities, counting on a split 
within tne Nazi party." 
Caution Against Sentimentality 
Th*> ami-Nazi (ierman-lauKuage 
newsffcppr Die Zeitung, published 
in I. ihlm;. rautioned against let- 
ting sentimentality lead to the feel- 
ing that Hess "is not so bud," and 
urge-d all to remember "he Is as 
bad as the worst of them." The 
newspaper falil further: "His 

---- column ----

Britain's Baby Destroyers Scout The Atlantic 

---- column ----

"^'rV;^w^ 

- ^&^' s; ^ ' -^If^^ip S** - 

v T.T' -w 't J rv*y*' > - vC "*_ jiMaiiL^^'i I> - : '-_MIT'"' "^.-^ v "*^^l 

^ s r ^aBSSSsawiB^^ 

t . , .--w^ r^^rasSfcw^*^ -r^Sl^'Si. 

---- column ----

Pocket destroyers, m-wrst British weapon to offset mounting toll 
in Battle of the Atlantic, cut swiftly through the water in search of 
German submarines. These "Handmaidens of tho Navy" nre small 
motor launches, built in Britain from American parts. They carry 
depth charges, machine guns, anti-aircraft weapons. 

---- column ----

hrndi are stained with the blood 
of thousands of Innocent people. 
Hla fanaticism an<! rtithlessness 
match that of Himxnler and Strel- 
oher . . . IS there is anything by 
which h distinguished himself 
among bis tellow-iTiminalH it is tbe 
impudence which always made him 
specially suited to deny his atroc- 
ities with an air of offended hon- 
esty." 

Still With Hitler? 

Otto Strasser, leader of the anti- 
Hitler Black Front group, and per- 
ha-ps one of the best-qualified men 
on this continent to discuss mem- 
bers of the Nazi top drawer, wrote 
II!K analysis of the 11' affair in 
a copyright story for the Montreal 
Horald. Dr. Strasser said he believ- 
ed that a tremendous trial of 
strength was at hand between the 
Army (Goering) elements in Germ- 
any on the one hand, and the Hit- 
ler elements (Hess, Goebbels, Him- 
mler) on the other. Hess, becom- 
ing aware of this and knowing full 
well that his life was not worth a 
pfennig, escaped before the axe 
fell. In a later interview, Dr. Strass- 
cr said: "I cannot believe that Hees 
is now against Hitler. I am sure 
though he has lost confidence that 
Hitler can win the war." 

No. 1 Propaganda Weapon 

However diverse the Interpreta- 
tions put upon the multitudinous 
aspect* of the affair, one thing was 
crystal clear: as a propaganda 
weapon the flight of Hess to Bri- 
tain could deal a knockout blow 
to German morale if used to the 
fullest advantage by the British. 

Furthermore, according to the 
Canadian military expert, \V. R. 
Plowman, If Hess really had turned 
traitor be might reveal bidden 
weaknesses of Germany such as, 
say, ih i. impoesibiliy of maintain- 
ing the present German output of 
planes; the destruction of ship- 
yards making submarines; the 
heavy lo&sts at sea of submarines 
and rheir crews; the possible early 
decline of the campaign agaiust 
shipping; the possible inability of 
Germany 1o cope with British 
bombing attacks on Germany or to 
crush Britain by means of night 
fighters. Diplomatic secrets he 

could reveal by the score. 

* * 

i France Joins "New Order" 
The second biggest news story 
of the week came with the an- 
nouncement that the Petaln gov- 
ernment of unoccupied France had 
approved terms of a "collaboration" 
agreement negotiated by Hitler and 
Vice-Premier Jean Darlan. France 
had now become a part of the 
"new order" in Europe. The impli- 
cations of this step, designed, so 
it was said, "to halt American entry 
into the war," would be far-reach- 
ing, varied and unpredictable. 
Their first effect undoubtedly 
would be felt in the Battle of the 
Mediterranean, east and west. 

Events were sha.ping up rapidly 
In the Middle East last week. The 
only hand which remained fully 
to be disclosed was that of Germ- 
any. Most reliable reports in Lon- 
don indicated that the Hermans 
were preparing to land a consider- 
able force In Syria for an attack 
on Iraq, by-passing Turkey in order 
to keep Russia out of the struggle. 

---- column ----

King George V 
A Mighty Ship 

Has More Secret Weapons 
Than Any Other Battleship 
Afloat 

---- column ----

Britain's latest and prroatest 
battleship, King Gcorp'i! V, has 
more secret weapons than any 
other warship, writes a Reuters 
correspondent who was the first 
newspaperman allowed aboard. 

One of the most interesting; de- 
vices might be called "Prime Min- 
ister Churchill's secret weapon." 
The correspondent understood it 
was inspired by Mr. Churchill 
when he was at the Admiralty. 

Here is the correspondent's de- 
scription of the battleship, which 
recently took Viscount Halifax, 
British ambassador, and Hon. C. 
D. Howe, Canadian Minister of 
Munitions and Supply, to the 
United States: 

"This is probably the mightiest 
instrument of war that man has 
yet created. As I write in the 
depth of the ship I am surroundod 
by more marvelous devices for 
both offence and defence than in 
any area of similar size anywhere 
on earth. 

16-INCH ARMOR PLATK 

"The first thing you notice, as 

---- column ----

^ B^ ^^ A Great Energy Food 

BEE HIVE 

\ \A \v flofcf An ^^W 

^\\ _fl ^ ^x ^^^^ *" 

SYRUP 

---- column ----

FREE Aeroplane Pictures 

HERE IS ALL YOU HAVE TO DO: 
to grt photoi of the following aeroplane* 
Spit Are . .. Defiant . . . Hurricane . . . 
Airacobra . . . Fairey Battle Plane . .. 
Lockheed Hudson . . . Briltol Blenheim 
. . . Vickert Wellington . . . Blackburn 
Skua-Dive Bomber . . . Fairey Swordfish 
. . . Boeing Flying Fortreu . . . Sunderland 

---- column ----

Flying Boat and IS other modern plane* 
(all are the latest official photographs in 
full detail) for eacb aeroplane photo you 
with *end one Bee Hive Syrup label. 
Specify plane or plane* wanted, your name 
and addre**, enclose necessary label*, and 
mail request* to the St. Lawrence Starch 
Co. Limited, Port Credit, Ontario. 

---- column ----

you ascend the gangway, is the 
astonishing; thickness of the- armor 
plate. It is not possible to see. 
all of it but enough is visible to 
suggest the unofficial estimate of 
16 inches is not far wrong. 

"On the broad deck you are 
confronted with one of the colos- 
sal quadruple 14-inch gun turrets. 
Outwardly it is as big as a bung- 
alow. Altogether there are 10 
such guns arranged in one quad- 
ruple turret forward and another 
aft with a double turret to fire 
over the forward one. 

"To enter one of the big turrets 
you squeeze through a tiny hatch 
and are confronted with a medley 
of machinery more Wellsian than 
if any H. G. Wells' fantasy. With- 
in the thick steel walls are levers, 
dials, tubes, telephones and wires 
in orderly profusion, and along 
one side the breeches of the guns. 
DOWN INSIDE THE TURRETS 

"Next you descend to the very 
bowels of the turret, where the 
shells come from. Gingeily you 
climb down many ladder rungs, 
past glistening copper tubes and 
other parts of the hydraulic ma- 
chinery which turns the turret in 
action, swiftly and smoothly. They 
have hydraulic power instead of 
electric, so the guns could con- 
tinue moving and firing even if 
the electric supply failed. 

"Inside this cylindrical cavern, 
when a battle is on, 104 men will 
work levers and press buttons. If 
all 10 14-inch guns were fired at 
once the weight of metal hurled 
from the battleship would be no 
less than 15,600 pounds. The six 
forward guns alone can fire 9,360 
pounds of shell. 

SUICIDE TO ATTACK IT 

"Back on deck, one notices the 
rows of 6.25-inch high-angle guns 
along both sides of the ship 16 
in all and on a higher level the 
multiple pom-poms. 

"Air attack against 'K.G.5,' as 
the ship is known in the navy, 
would be a job for the suicide 
squad, which would encounter a 
deadlier barrage than from any 
other vessel afloat. 

---- column ----

Cheques cashed in Canadian 
clearing centres during 1940 
totalled $34,437,000,000, an in- 
crease of $2,820,000,000 over 
1939. 

---- column ----

VOICE 

OF THE 

PRESS 

---- column ----

VOICE OF THE PRESS 

TWO LESS THAN ONE 
The young man contemplating 
matrimony can rest assured that 
whether or not two can live aj 
cheaply as one, two certainly paj| 
less Income tax than one. 

Toronto Sta*, 
o 

RADIO MENACE 
The newspaper goes into 
home once or twice a day 
radio Is with us always, from 
time -we get out of bed until 
go 'back to It. In some respect 
the radio has been a great bless? 
ing, but in others it has proved 
a curse, destroying agent whigfi 
doe* Us ruthless work on publio 
morale, on our home life. We must 
take bad news but we do not nead 
to take it a dozen times a daV, 
Ottawa Journal. 
o 

UNDERPAID TEACHERS 
Statistics of the Ontario De- 
partment of Education show th{t 
for Ihe year 1938-39 (latest coffl- ' 
pilation available) the average sal- 
ary of male teachers in rur^J 
schools was $823 and the averagf 
of female teachers $714. Sorni*. 
both male and female, made si 
little as $500 a year. Beyond ques- 
tion, as The Ottawa Journal df- 
clares, "many rural teachers fix 
this province are shockingly paid 
when one considers their training 
and qualifications, the responsi- 
bility for which rests upon them.'.' 
This is one "educational reiorm" 
which should be added at once to 
the list already inaugurated by th 
department 

Brantford Expositor. 

---- column ----

Catfish Story 

In Shrevoport, La., C. E. Whit- 
ney returned from nearby Cross 
Lake with a fish story: on one 
cast he caught five catfish. Some- 
one had lost a string of five, and 
one of the five went for Whit- 
ney's worm. 

---- column ----

LIFE'S LIKE THAT 

---- column ----

By Fred Neher 

---- column ----

"Why can't you wait till we get home?!!" 

---- column ----

REG'LAR FELLERS-Kitty Kitty 

---- column ----

By GENE BYRNES 

---- column ----

NO, SIR / 
I HAVEN'T HAD 
A BITC 

AN 1 I'VE BEEN 
HERE THREE 
HOURS/ 

---- column ----

THERE S 
NAWTHIN IN 
THIS CREEK 

BUT 

ATFIiH 
ANYHOW/ 

---- column ----

OH, NO 
WONDER/ 

---- column ----

THIS 13 THE- 
VWONG KINDA 
AIT/ 
---- page ----

---- column ----

I MADE A SCtHP j 
OUT OF HSK \ 

* 

---- column ----

"She was a loving wife and mother 
until caffeine-nerves caused by too 
much coffee and tea gave her a brittle 
temper! How she could carry on ac 
the children or her husband. But her 
mother told her about Postum and 
^ ' that was the end of me." 

---- column ----

Perhjpi you, also, fhouIJ Hop drinking coffe* 
sod tea and twiuh to Postum. If you hive hrjj. 
cbc, indigestion, rettleu nerve* try Poctum for 
30 days. You'll enjoy Uu' dflicioufl mealtinw 
beverage and it it very economic*!. Order from 
your grocer. 

---- column ----

POSTUM 

---- column ----

P22I 

---- column ----

Keeping 
Company . . 

Adapted from the 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

Picture 

by 
Lebbeus Mitchell 

Copyright 1940 by Loew'i Inc. 

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SYNOPSIS 

Mary Thomas, eldest of the three 
daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
p. Thomas, typical small city Am- 
fcricans, is wooed by Ted Foster 
and Jim Reynolds, both salesmen 
in Hellman's Auto Agency. Mr. 
Thomas favors Ted and manages 
to get Jim away when both suitors 
6all when the parents know Mary 
is expecting a proposal. Ted pro- 
poses and is accepted. But when 
the stream-lined redhead. Anastas- 
|a Atherton, a former heart-throb, 
returns from New York, trouble 
threatens for she sells her auto to 
Ted on time payments and Ted 
tells Mary he bought It at bar- 
gain from some old geezer. Mary 
had just told him she never want- 
ed to hear anything about Anas- 
tasia for the present or the future. 
So Ted and Mary are married. 

CHAPTER FOUR 

Back from their honeymoon. Ted 
and Mary had been established 
(or nearly two months in their 
own cozy little house. Mary, in a 
negligee, was in the kitchen pour- 
ing coffee, when Ted entered In 
Dressing gown, bearing a pair of 
drawers. 

"There's no buttons 011 these 
drawers, Mary." 

'I thought the laundry took ear 
of that." 

"The-y take the buttons off. You 
have to sew 'em on." 

"Right away. dear. Coffee and 
toast's all ready." 

While Ted ate and glanced at 
(ho newspaper. Mary began sewing 
on the missing buttons. The tele- 
phone rang and Ted jumped up. 

The call came from Editor Me- 
flinchey; he had just learued that 
he city of Thoruride might get a 
part of that eleven million dollars 
for defense and asked Te<1 to ca'.l 
right sway. 

"I'll lie there in five minutes. 
Thanks. Mr. McCliuch-n-. Quick. 
Mary, gimme the drawers?" 
Call From Mr. McClinchey 

He grabbed the- drawers and hur- 
ried into the bedroom. As he start- 
ted to get into the shorts, he found 
Mary had sewn the front to 
back. He ripped them apart, 
looked on the dresser for some- 
thing with which to fasten them, 
<lnd grabbed a brooch with a clus- 
ter of grapes on it. He had gof into 
his trousers as Mary entered. 

"Button sewed on all right. Ted?" 

''Great! Say, honey, there's a 
basketball game tonight. I know 
you don't like it as well as I do. 
but we can hold hands." 

"We could hold bauds at the 
baud concert and Evelyn says 
they're going to play the Bolero." 

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S STAMPS 
0** 

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ISSUE 21 '41 

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"Who am I to argue with Eve- 
lyn? Bolero, he/re wa come." 

"I'm married to you, not Evelyn," 
said Mary happily, "ao we'll go to 
the basketball gams." 

"Bolero!" said Ted affectionate 
If. 

"Basketball game:" retorted 
Mary with a happy grin. 

Ted kissed her. "I'll show you 
who's boss In this family! Ge. I 
told McClinchey I'd be there in 
five minute*! Got to run! Good- 
bye, honey." 

"Dinner at 6.30 sharp so we can 
get good seats," she called as she 
went to the door to see him off. 
The postman was just coming up 
the walk. There was a le-tter for 
Ted marked "Personal." Mary turn- 
ed it over, saw it was from Anas- 
tasia Atherton. Her face was very 
thoughtful as she re-entered th 
house . . . 

Ted was quite cocky as he hur- 
ried into the Hellman agency after 
his talk with the editor of the 
Chronicle. 

"Now. Mr. Hellman, who arouiid 
here is going to get any part of 
that eleven billion dollars?" 

"Nobody! There isn't a nvy 
machine shop in town." 

"But Belleville's in the county 
and in our territory." Ted was 
saying eagerly when Mr. Hellman's 
secretary. Miss Miller, interrupted 
with the news that his wife was 
on the 'phone. 

"She says one of the wedding 
presents is missing a brooch 
with a cluster of jrapes dangling; 
from it. She wants to know if you 
put it anywhere." 

Possibilities For Belleville 
Involuntarily. Ted felt of his 
waistline. "Tell her not to worry, 
I've got it here and will bring It 
home tonight. Now. Mr. Hellman, 
Belleville's our spot! The Com- 
monwealth Metal Corporation is 
buying the old electric toaster fac- 
tory there. They're going to reopen 
it immediately and make bomb 
fuses for the Government. Mr. Mc- 
Clinchey just got word of it this 
morning." 

Instantly alert, Mr. Hellman was 
caught with Ted's enthusiasm. 
"You bet that's going to mean husl- 
uess for us!" 

"Three or four hundred skilled 
laborers coming into our territory. 
First, they'll want homes and sec- 
ond " 

"Our Standard Coronet." said 
Mr. Hellman. 

"Now do you see the possibilities 
in Belleville?" 

"We'll run up some sort of an 
emergency showroom, Ted. right 
across trom the factory, and I'll 
put you iu charge. We can fill 
their orders within teu days." 

"So can every other agency in 
town." The outfit that can s:\y, 
'You want a red one. Mister? Here's 
the key. Drive it away' is going to 
get the business. A big stock of 
cars on baud is the only answer. 
Wire the factory now to rush forty 
cars, different models, diffeioiit 
coolrs. to Thorn ride right away." 

Mr. Hellman's eyebrows went up. 
"Forty cars? Well, maybe it Isn't 
a crazy idea. Ted, hut I don't think; 
I'll wire the factory until the Hel- 
leville deal has been signed. s?nle'l 
and delivered." 

Ted quickly recovered from that 
little blow to his hopes. "Then I'll 
start to check tip on that right 
now!" 

As he came out of the private 
office. Evelyn Thomas was waiting 
by the Secretary. "Ask him!" said 
Miss Miller as Ted appeared. 

"Brooch?" What brooch?" said 
Ted. "Oh. the grape brooch! I 
haven't seen that tor a week! See 
you later!" 

He took a long stride. t"e!t some- 
thing give way. then a cold object 
sliding down Insitle his trouser leg. 
cl;iit -rini; on ttie floor. 

\Vhere on earth did that come 
f i oin?" cried the secretary. 

"Through . . . through a hole in 
my pocket." said Ted guiltily. 

"You were probably using It to 
hold up your drawers." said Evelyn 
wickedly. "Sometimes. Miss Mill- 
er, my father has to use adhesive 
tape!" 

A Trip Out of Town 
Ted flushed and wilted, but but- 
toilless shorts couldn't interfere 
with the business on hand. He 
strode to tlit 'phone and dialed his 
borne, giving a hitch to his trous- 
WH. , 

"Helto, honey. I've g'H to take a 

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littla trip out f town. ! e*a't > 
plain here. It's business. If I'm not 
home by 6.30 you have your din- 
ner and meet me at the box-office 
at 8.15 so we can get good seats. 
Goodbye, dear. I've got to run!" 

Mary waited at the high school 
gymnasium door for Ted until 
shortly after nine o'clock, the 
shouts of the basketball enthusi- 
asts adding fuel to her mounting 
anger. Afte'r having waited an 
hour, she returned grimly home. 
She had chosen the basketball 
game to please Ted and he had 
appointed 8.15 as their meeting 
time, and then had "stood her up." 

Her furious steps halted by the 
table on which lay the letter to 
Ted from Anastaaia. She picked it 
up, smelled it with distate. put it 
down and walked away. But she 
was drawn "back to the letter like 
a drunkard to a bottle, picked It 
up again, slipped her finger-nail 
under the flap. 

Dear Teddy." she read: "I think 
I left my compact in the car. May- 
be it slipped down behind the seat. 
Will you look for it, darling? 
Thanks, loads! Anastasia," 

In a fury of anger mingled with 
bitter jealousy. Mary struggled 
against tears. But her emotions 
conquered and she groped, choking 
with sobs, for a chair. . . 

At The Band Concert 

Ted. waiting at the City Hall 
entrance, gave a last look at the 
Jewelry store clock. It was 9.50. 
The box office had shut dowu. and 
the band concert had long been in 
progress. He decided to go home. 

"Mary!" he called, a clutch at 
hU heart, as he entered the house. 
There was no anawef. He went into 
th* bed room. At his sigh of relief 
at seeing Mary in bed, apparently 
asleep, she pretended to awake. 
"Thank goodness you are all right, 
Mary! I was worried! What hap- 
pened? Where were you?" 

"Where wag I? That's funny! 
Where were you?" 

Ted was taken aback. "I was at 
the band concert at 8 15 " 

"Why band concert? I agreed to 
go to the basketball game to please 
you." 

"Xo. dear. You persuaded me to 
go to the band concert." 

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"I prsud4 you?" Mary's voice 
was growing nhriil. "Teu fester 
you practically threatened me!" 

"But I distinctly remember say- 
ing " and at the recollection 
a grin replaced Ted's wide-eyed 
confusion "that I'd show you 
who was boss around here." 

Mary cut in sharply: 'So. after a 
crack like that, I had to go to 
the bask&tball game! Besides, how 
do I know you went to the band 
concert?" 

"Maybe t didn't!" said Ted, his 
head wagging. "Maybe I went to 
the basketball game! You've got 
me so confused I don't know where 
I went!" 

"That's right! Call me a liar!" 

"I didn't call you a liar! C didn't 
call you anything! I . . ." 

"You implied I wasn't at the bas- 
ketball game because you were 
there and didn't see me!" 

"I guess we're both crazy!" said 
Ted in despair. 

With Anastasia 

"Now I'm crazy, am I?" 

"Mary," he appealed, his an a er 
vanishing. "Mary . . ." 

"Ted. please . . . "At his melting, 
she groped humbly for him. "I 
didn't mean anything I said! What 
are we saying to each other? We 
w&re getting close to a crisis." 

"No. we weren't, honey." ha 
soothed her. 

"We were, for a minute, apart, 
separated and all over a basket- 
ball game." 

The 'phone rang. Mary answered. 
It was Harriet. She said: "I sneak- 
ed downstairs to do Evelyn a 
favor. I heard her telling Mom and 
Pop about seeing Ted and Anas- 
tasia at the band concert. She said 
of course she couldn't tell you, but 
she'd fe! better if you knew about 
it." 

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(To Be Continued) 

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Green Mouse 

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Bred by the rector of Hurst- 
monceux, Sussex, England, * 
green mouse is the descendant, 
after 60 generations, of the white 
mice he kept is a boy. 

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SEWING FOR WAR RELIEF 

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Bjr Anna Adami 

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Tiio recent day I spent visiting 
the headquarters of the various 
organizations interested in war- 
relief sewing was hoart-warminjr. 
From groups of women, from in- 
dividuals, a constant stream of 
warn, colorful clothes is pouring 
in. Everywhere women are turn- 
ing left-over lengths of material 
and the most uoles-!ooking; 
scraps into gay and useful articles 
for shipment overseas. 

Some Practical Hintt 

Children's garments, 1 was told, 
should be of the self-service kind 
so that they can be put on with- 
out adult assistance. Dresses for 
girls are urgently needed, and so 
are night clothes and underwear, 
especially slips and bloomers of 
outing flannel. (These latter, due 
to the colder climate, are worn all 
summer long.) 

Little boys of ail ayes need 
wool shorts, and mannish little 
jackets and sleeveless vests that 
are snug and warm. Housedvossos 
with long sleeves are in demand 
for women, as are undergarments 
and nightwear. Long sleeves are 
requested on children's garments 
also, as are deep hems to make 
adjustments easy. Buttons should 
b sewed on firmly, and scraps of 
material fur mending purposes 
are thoughtful things to include. 
Finished garments, whether one 
or a whole bundle, will be warmly 
welcomed at the ! ca.1 branches 
of the various organizations in- 
terested in war ix-iu't' work, such 
as the Red Cross, the Salvation 
Ai'in. and similar organizations. 
You n';iy deliver them in person. 

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or mail them in, knowing that 
everything will be thankfully re- 
ceived and sent off on the first 
possible boat. 

Clothes for civilian relief may 
be made in any size or color or 
material, although the sturdier 
the fabric, and the brighter the 
color, the better. Fo 1 ' readers who 
wish to do their bit, the Anne 
Adams patterns sketched are of- 
fered as suggestions of practical 
styles in needed garments. 

Pattern 4010. a simple-to-iake 
outfit for boy cr girl, comes in 
children's sizes. '1, 3, 4. 5 and tf. 
Size 6, girl's jacket and hat. takes 
I 'fa yards 35 inch fabric and sk-n. 
l?s yards: boy's jacket, 1 yard 

35 inch fabric and trouser.-.. \ 
yard. 

Pattern 45fi2, to be made in 
outing flannel, comes in children's 
sizes. 2. 4. 6, ,8, 10 and 12. Size 
6, nightgown, takes '." yards 39 
inch fabric; size 8. slip and 
bloomers, 2*fe yards 36 inch fab- 
ric. 

Pattern 4770 suggests a gay ; 
cotton print. It conies in misses' 
and women's sizes 16, IS, 20. 34, 
3f>, 38, 40. 42. 44 and 4t>. Siz 
Hi takes 4 Vi yards 35 inch fabric. 

Pattern 4771, so easy to put on, 
comes in children's sizts. 2, 4, 6, 
and 10. Size 6 takes 2 T * yards 

36 inch fabric and -\ yard con- 
trast. 

You may obtain these Anne 
Adams Patterns by sending twen- 
ty cents in coins (stamps cannot 
be accepted) to Aine Adams, 
Room 42.1, 73 West Adelaide St., 
Toronto. 

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TABLE TALKS 

By SADIE B. CHAMBERS 

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Rhubarb : Spring's 
Incomparable Fruit 

With the coming of Spring 
meal-planning is so much easier. 
As soon as Spring has actual!/ 
arrived with those delightful 
sunny days the keen homemaker 
begins to watch the market for 
the early fruit as a variation 
from the winter fruit. Rhubarb 
is usually the early honored guest 
and is always so refreshing and 
gives zest to almost any menu. 

Rhubarb Crisp 
Vi cup butter 
% cup suiar 

2 eggs 

^3 teaspoon nutmeg 
V* teaspoon vanilla 
IVi cups small toasted bread 

cubes 

2 cups Kellogg's corn flakes 
4 cups diced fresh rhubarb 

Blend butter and x i cup sugar 
thoroughly. Add eggs and beat 
well. Stir in nutmeg, flavoring, 
bread cubes and corn flakes. Placa 
half of mixture in buttered baking 
dish. Arrange rhubarb evenly 
over top and sprinkle with *rt cup 
sugar; cover with remaining 
creamed mixtura. Bake in mod- 
erate oven <375*F.) about 35 
minutes until rhubarb is done. 
Yields 8 servings. 

Orange Refrigerator Puddinf 

1 tabJespoon gelatin 

V4 cup cold water 
 cups fresh or canned orang* 
juice 

H cup sugar 

" teaspoon salt 
2 tablespoons lemon juice 
2 egg whites 

** cup Mgar 

1 s cup whipping cream 
4 cups Kellogg's corn flake* 

'i cup melted butter 

*s cup sugar 

Soak gelatin in cold water. 
Heat orange juice, sugar and salt 
to boiling point; add softened 
gelatine and stir until dissolved. 
Add lemon juice and cool. When 
mixture begins to thicken, fold in 
stiffly beaten egg whites to which 
the sugar has been added. Whip 
cream and fold in last, reserving 
enough to garnish pudding. Crush 
Corn Flakes in fine crumbs. Mix 
with melted butter and sugar. 
Distribute evenly in bottom of 8 
by 8 inch square pan. Press down 
firmly. Pour in orange mixture 
and garnish with whipped cream. 
Chill in refrigerator until firm 
enough to cut into square*. 

Yields S servings. 

Rhubarb Coiuerre 

4 !bs. rhubarb 

5 Ibs. sugar 
1 lemon 

1 Ib. seeded raisins 

2 oranges 

v cup chopped walnuts 

Wash and peel stalks of rhu- 
barb and cut in 1 inch pieces. 
Place in kettle. Sprinkla with 
sugar, add raisins, juice of orange 
and lemon and the grated rinds. 
Mix; cover and let cook one-half 
hour. Then bring to boiling point 
and let simmer 45 minutes, stir- 
ring constantly. Then add chop- 
ped nuts. Boil 5 minutes longer. 
Fill jelly glasses; cool and seal. 

Crumb Pie (Request) 

This recipe makes filling for 
two large pies: One and one-half 
cups seeded raisins heated in 
water to cover with one and one- 
half cups of sugar. Let cool after 
a few minutes' boiling. Then 
mix one and one-half cups sugar; 
2 cups flour; l * cup shortening. 
When thoroughly blended with 
pastry, blend remaining 1 cup of 
mixture and set aside. To the 
rest add 1 cup milk, 2 eggs, well 
beaten and 2 teaspoons baking j 
powder. Have ready two pastry- I 
lined pans (pie) and pour the 
cooked raisins into them draining 
off any excess juice. Then cover 
with batter and sprinkle thickly 
with the cup of crumbs taken out 
of the first mixture. Bake in hot 
oven till pastry is well browned 
and top delicately browned. 

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Mis* Clinmlirra welcome* personal 
letter* from Interested reader*. Ske 
I* pleased to receive nggrxluM 
nn topic* for her column, astd I* 
evea rend? to ll*te to runt u pel 
peere*." Requests (or recipes or 
licvlnl menus are In order. Aildre* 
your letters tu "Miss Sadie R. rhnn- 
bers, 7:t West Adelnlde Street. I .- 
ronlo." Send slninned. seir-addres*e<l 
envelope If you wish n reply. 

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Daughters Said 

More Expensive 

Canadian income taxpayers 
should be allowed to claim ex- 
emption for daughters over 21 
who are attending schools and 
colleges. G. K. Fraser, (Con. 
Peterborough West) contended 
in the House of Commons. 

His reason: During this period 
parents frequently had to spend 
more on their daughte:.- than at 
any other time. 

"I say girls .uul not boys," he 
said, "because a boy can get out 
during: the summer and earn an 
estra dollar." 

"I had to do it and many other 
nr.embers and we are the better 
ioi it" 

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^^- _"*- - - - ^ -~~*1 

EDWARDS BURG | 

(RQWN BUM) 

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'X Published 
by the Can- 

. i i j ; i r c h 
Home Servi -B 
Dept- {> a val- 
uable Booklet 
entitled "51 
Eak.i.5 Secrets". Wr'.ta for yom 
FREE copy now enclosing a Crown 
Syrup label, to Canada Starch Home 
Service, Dept 11 4:' \Ve"'r.3to 
Street East, Toronto. 

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THf C3NA09 STARC 

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Laundering 
Suggestions 

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Follow These Direc* . ;is Ana 
You'll Be Delighted With th 

Results 

I;'. A-ashing, remember that all 
whius garments shouid be hung 
in the sun while colored clothe* 
*h ..!J be hung m the shade. 


When boiiicj clothes place aa 
unpeeied lemon cut in slices m 
the boiler with the clothes to boiL 
This will remove :he itains an4 
make tha clothes beautifully 
white. 


Lingerie ribbons should not b 
ironed while wet, or they will be- 
come stiff. They should be pull- 
ed into a smooth condition and 
when dry pressed over with a 
cool iron. 


When washing handkerchiefs, 
rub each one with food yellow 
bar soap and soak for an hour or 
so in warm water to which a gen- 
erous amount of salt has been 
added. Wash in warm water, re- 
soap and place in an enamel ves- 
sel. Cover with warm water, boil 
for half an hour, then remove and 
rinse in tepid water. Dip in blue 
water, wring, and press when 
nearly drv. 

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T 

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Calumet's double-action gives 
you double leavening both dur- 
ing mixing and in the oven. 

This exclusive feature permits 
you to use less and still get better 
results. Easy-opening, won't-spill 
container, with handy measuring 
device under the lid. AND THE 

PRICE 15 Sl'RPRISlXCLY LOW. 

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: 
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> 

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.Wednesday, May 21, 1941 

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THE FLESHERTON ADVANCE 

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THE 

FLESHERTON ADVANCE 

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uu ColliflgWOOd 
Meshertun, Wednesday of 
week. Circulation ovar 1,000. 
Piicc in Canada |2.00 per year, 
hen paid in advance $1.60; in 
V. 8. A. Jid.MJ per year, when 
paid in advance $2.00. 

K. J. 1UURSTON, Editor. 

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The Functions of The 
Reporter 

A reporter is of necessit- an imper- 
sonal observer of the happenings of 
the community. Officially, it matters 
little to him what action a town coun- 
cil may take in any given matter. Aa 
an impartial observer a news item 
stating one side of a controversy is 
just as important as an item convey- 
ii.ir the other side. In other words he 
is not biased witness of any event. 
"He is interested only from the stand- 
point of news. 

Perhaps the actions of a reporter 
at a meeting sometimes seems un- 
usual, but they have to be unusual 
because he is, as we have said, only 
an observer and not a participant in 
an event. It wi)l be noticed that he 
doesn't applaud when a speaker makes 
some remarks that please the aud- 
ience. He doesn't join in the pro- 
gram, unless it is to stand when the 
national anthem is sunjj. He is 
merely an onlooker and is reportinj; 
the course of events, not for the ben- 
efit of those at the meeting but for 
the whole community. 

To paraphrase a famous poem "his 
is not to reason why." That phrase 
adequately describes the reporter's 
attitude toward an" assignment he is 
called upon to cover. He should not 
be expected to take part in the pro- 
ceedings unless he is personally 
interested s a member of the group. 
A reporter re>?ntly covered a tem- 
perance meeting 1 and was asked to 
express his opinion on the liquor 
question. This he declined to do, and 
rightly so, because he was attending 
the meeting a< a representative of 
his newspaper and not as a member 
of the Temperan-e Federation!. 

Newspaper re-porters are often 
asked to keep thin"* nut of the paper 
or to s:ift pedal on some news item 
The conscientious reporter wil) nevi 
make any promises to do this. Thi. 
is the prerogative of the editor only 
and the only thing a reporter can >' 
is take the matter up with his editor 
Sometimes a bribe is offered, and <f 
one really wants to earn the ill-will 
of a reporter this is the surest way 
to do it The newaspaperman who 
accepts a bribe is breaking faith with 
his profession, and he never remains 
a newspaperman very lon<*. 

Reporters hnve a very difficult job 
They are surrounded by people who 
want special favors that he has not 
the power to grant. In practically 
every instance the reporter is worthy 
of the fullest confidsnce. He is a 
hard working person who is trying 
to serve his community, and his rind- 
ing satisfaction in life, not from the 
ordinary pleasures of life, but from 
following the most fascinating cabling 
known to mankind. 

'When one is tempted to invite a 
reporter to forget his code of ethics, 
it is well to remember thmat he has 
no power to assure you of immunity 
from publicity or of Fiecial consider- 
ation. That responsibility rests sole- 
ly with the editor. Never blame a 
reporter for what appears in your 
newspaper. He is just doing the job 
he is paid for. The editor is the man 
who decided the issues. 

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The Late Jos. Cornfield 

Kimberley district lost one of its 
oldest residents on Tuesday, May 13, 
n the person of Mr. Joseph Cornfield, 
who passed away in his 80th year. 
He had not been in very good health 
'or some time and was confined to 
lis bed with a weak heart. 

The late Mr. Cornfield was born 
at Epping on April 10th, 18(51, on Lot 
13, Con. 5, Euphrasia, now occupied 
>y a nephew, George. He was a son 
of the late John Cornfield and Mar- 
.aret Woods. On January 4th, 1892, 
ie was united in marriage to Kmn- 
Wilson, who survives to mourn the 
oss of a kind and loving husband, 
also a daughter, Ethel (Mrs. A. Staf- 
ord) of Parry Sound, four grand- 
children. La Verne, Phyllis, Kenneth 
and Donald, one sister, Mrs. Wm. 
Pawcett, Kimberley, and one brother, 
Wesley, also of Kimberley. 

The funeral was held on Thursday, 
May 15th, from his home near Kim- 
berley. Rev. Mr. Buchanan had 
charge of the service and brought to 
the sorrowing ones a comforting 
message, taken from the third chap- 
ter of St. John. "Softly and Tenderly 
Jesus is Calling," and "A Few More 
Years Shall Roll," favorite hymns of 
the deceased, were tung. Beautiful 
floral tributes bore silent testimony 
of affection from a number of rela- 
tives and friends. 

The pallbearers were; Messrs Wm. 
Haines, Robert Lawrence, John Wil- 
son, R. Stafford, Norman Burritt and 
Frod Wickers. 

The flower bearers were: Arthur 
Wickens. Fred Ellis, Welly. Fawcett, 

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The Curfew Law 

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Flesherton Village Council has in- 
!i"<rurated the Cnrfew Law and all 
chiliir- " iro to be off the streets and 
not loitu-iiiK In any public place after 
nine o'clock p.m. There have been 
too many young people of tender 
years travelling around our streets 
late at night and the action 
of the Council in preventing this is 
to be commended. If the parents will 
not see that the children are home 
early some other person has appar- 
ently had to take hold and bring the 
law into effort. The street? are no 
place for young children to he par- 
at night. 

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ORANGE VALLEY 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Montgomery of 
Toronto and Mr. Maxwell of Chast- 
worth were visitors with Mr. and 
Mrs. George Hargrave and Mrs. Jim 
Hargrave Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Hill and children 
spent Sunday at Walters Falls. 

Pte. W. Sprung 1 , Toronto, spent the 
week end with the McFndden family. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Uussel of Rock 
Mills visited with Mr. and Mrs. Geo. 
Little* johna. 

A party was sponsored in the hall 
on Friday evening by the Orangemen 
and was well attended and all roport 
a (rood time. 

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Goehells' propaganda department 
has issued short hjstory of the war. 
Any similarity to actual uersons or 
events is purely coincidental. 

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NOTICE 

TO THK KKStDKM'-S OK THIS 

VILLAliK OK KI.K.SHKKTON 

TAKK NOTICE that at a meeting 
of the Village C.iunuil it was di-.-ided 
to enforce the curfew law, contained 
in the Ontario StutuUs, Chapter 312, 
Section 16: 

(1) No. ohild Hluill loiter in itny 
public place after ninu o'clock in the 
afternoon, or be in any place of pub- 
ilc resort, <( r entertainment after that 
hour, unless accompanied by his par- 
ent or guardian, or nn mlult appoint- 
ed by the parent or gunrdian to ac 
compunv the child. 

By order 

KLKSHK'.tTON COUNCIL 

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Elmer Ellis, Ralph Stafford and 
Andrew Fawcett. 

Interment was made in Flesherton 
Cemetery. 

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In Memoriarn 

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HANLEY In loving memory of 
Wm. C. Hanley, who departed this 
life, May 23rd, 123. 

Ever remembered by his Wife. 

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Court of Revision 

VILLAGE OF FLESHERTON 

The Council of the Village of 
Flesherton w;ll meet on the 2nd day 
of June, 1941, as a Court of Revi- 
sion of the Assessment Roll of 1941, 
to revise the Assessment Roll of 
1941. 

Dated this 21st day of Mav, 1941. 
W. J. BELLAMY, Clerk. 

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Court of Revision 

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TOWNSHIP OF ARTEMESIA 

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The Council of the Township of 
Artemesia will meet as a Court of 
Revision of the Assessment Roll of 
1941, at Council Chambers on Mon- 
day, the 9th day of June, 1941, at 
eleven o'clock a.m. to revise the rol) 
and try any appeals which may be 
entered properly. 

Dated this 21st day of May, 1941. 
W. J. BELLAMY, Clerk 

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Ertrf duty, u'lll and botatlly dun*, ii contribution to victory 
THB PUMB MINI* or CANADA. 

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TRIBUTE TO MARY 

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Mary is the "voice with a unite". Mary ia the efficient 
person generally known ai a telephone operator. As in 
operator she knows much about telephone equipment 
how it should be used and handled. 

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But Mary is best known for her personality for her cool- 
ness in emergencies for the grand things she has done 
time and again, ignoring; her own danger, intent on one 
thing only to keep the standard of telephone service high. 

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We pay respectful tribute to Mary and 
the girls who work with her. Her 

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devotion to her job sets standard of 
public service. Tactful, patient and 
courteous, Mary is the medium through 
which this Company and its public 
are always In touch. She plays vital 
part in Canada's war effort. 

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D...TOIL... 
TEARS and SWEAT 

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This is a war for existence. It is war to the death. It is a war to win or to lose. 
There can be no half way no compromise. It ia a war to WIN. 
Money is the fourth arm of the service. 

Whatever you are called on to pay or to lend, it is little compared to the livea 
that our sons offer. 

There have been many and heavy calls upon Canada already. 

There will be more. 

Let us face the truth and the truth will make us free. 

It is freedom we are fighting for, British freedom, the freedom of body and 
spirit that makes life worth tiring. 

If we fail, we fall. 

Be prepared for sacrifice. 

Great Britain has set us an example on a scale of heroic magnificence history 
doesn't record. 

Let us FIGHT! 

Canada has the resources. Let us spare nothing. When our soldiers offer their 

lives, let us be willing to share our livelihood. 


Presently the Government of Canada will call for money. 

* 

, 
The money is here. 

We are spending biltions. We are already heavily taxed. But most of these 
billions and those taxes are being spent in Canada. That money comes back to 
you. Keep it rolling. Keep putting it back into the war effort, so that it may be 
spent again and again and again until Right prevails and the world is free. 

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FIGHT... WORK... PAY 

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Canada mu&t ie 

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DEPARTMENT 

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O P 

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FINANCE, 

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CANADA 

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43 
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THE FLESHERTON ADVANCE 

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.Wednesday, May 21, 1941 

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THE EIGHTH DECENNIAL 

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Census of Canada 

June 2 1941 

** 

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1 HE Census is the stock-taking of the nation of its 
men, women, and children; its agriculture, trade, and 
industry; its housing, and general social condition. By 
it, all Governments, Dominion, Provincial and Muni- 
cipal are enabled to work more effectively and econ- 
omically in the interest of every resident of the Dominion. 

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ALL INFORMATION SUPPLIED 
HELD STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL 

You can place absolute trust in the official 
Enumerator, who is sworn to secrecy. AH 
the information which you provide will bt 
held m strictest confidence both 6y Aim and 
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, 'and eon 
Mr be used against you by any tax-coi- 
Itcting, military, or other agency, or in 
court of law. 

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It ia compulsory by lano to answer 
questions, but you will be assisting you! 
Government in these difficult times by giv- 
ing the information readily and accurately 
im the spirit of good citizenship. 

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these days of 
increasing Govern- 
ment responsibili- 
ties, no Government 
can give the best 
ll service unless it has 
detailed and accu- 
rate knowledge of 
the people and their 
varying circum- 
stances. That is 
why we request the 
co-operation of all 
Canadian citizens in the taking of the 
Census. When the Government's 
Enumerator calls at your door, re- 
ceive him courteously and give him all 
the information for which he asks. 
Remember that he is in your ser- 
vice. Accuracy and despatch in your 
replies will promote good administra- 
tion in your country, now under stress 
of war and facing' crucial post-war 
reconstruction. 

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Issued by oMthority of The Honourable JAMES A. MacKINNON, M.P., Iftitutar. 
DOMINION BUREAU OF STATISTICS - DEPT. OF TRADE AND COMMERCE 

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MAXWELL 

On Tuesday evening of this week 
the friends of Mr. and Mrs. Russel 
Halliday (nee Ila Benson) held a 
shower for them in the Orange Hall 
and presented them with a purse of 
money and many other nice presents. 
The evening was spent in dancing. 

On Monday evening, May 19th, two 
ar loads of young: r-eople attended 
the Y. P. S. Rally at Dundalk and re- 

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ported a lovely evening. 

Miss Shirley Buckingham and girl 
friend of Millbrook spent the week 
end at her home here. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jim Guy and Mrs. 
Ernie Guy of Midland, Mr. and Mrs. 
J. Yearle" of Toronto were week ena 
visitors with Mrs. Thos. Guy. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Leggett visit- 
ed in Meaford on Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Ross visited in 
Cheltenham over the week end. 

Mr. and Mrs. Emerson "Wright vis- 

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**<*++*+*+'**>**+*+*** ! > >*+****t*+ >'> *** 

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Men's 

Spring Suits 

Now is the time to select your new Spring Suit 

whether you want one made to your individual 

measure or ready-to-wear. We can assure 

you satisfaction. 

Made-toMeasure Suits from $25.95 

Ready-to- Wear Suits from $15.50 

Come in and see our offerings there is no 
obligation to purchase. 

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son. 

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MEN'S CAPS 
MEN'S TROUSERS 
MEN'S OVERALLS 
MEN'S HATS 

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MEN'S HOSIERY 
MEN'S UNDERWEAR 
MEN'S SHIRTS 
MEN'S SWEATERS 

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Reliable Footwear I 

MEN'S WORK BOOTS 

MEN'S and BOYS' OXFORDS 
LADIES' FINE SHOES 

CHILDREN'S FOOTWEAR 

Our assortment is larger than ever particular 

attention has been paid to good wearing qualities, 

Styles and prices right in every line. 

F. H. W. Hickling 

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General Merchant 

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FLESHERTON ;; 

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PR1CEV1LLE 

Recent visitors with Mrs. Eva 

picer were: Mrs. R. J. Spicer, Mrs. 

ceil Mathewsoo, Mr. R. J. Spicer 

and Miss Joyce Kilmer, all of 

lamilton. 

Mrs. Neil Norman and Ruth of 
)rillia spent the week end at the 
lome of her father, Mr. Colin 
icLean. 

Dr. Campbell spent a couple of 
lays at Kitchener last week. 

The Women's Institute is holding 
a dance Friday night in the hall at 
'riceville. The proceeds will go for 
war work. 

Saturday night a Red Cross 
dance on May 24th will be held in 
;he hall. Everybody is asked to come 
and help along this worthy cause. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Tucker and 
'amily. accompanied by Mr. David 
Hincks, spent the week end at 
Atwood. 

Mr. Donald Carson and friend of 
Toronto spent the ?veek end at the 
'ormer's parental home here. 

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Mr. and Mrs. Doug. Chant and 
and _Miss Isabella McMillan of 
Toronto spent Sunday at the home 
of Mr. Hugh McMillan. 

Mrs. Hugh Copeland and son, Bob, 
and Miss Erma Pegg of Meadowvale 
spent the week end at the homes of 
1' red KiK'-x and Jas. Hardy. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Mclntyre and 
little daughter, Margaret, spent Sun- 
day evening with Mr.' and Mrs. 
Robert Ferris. 

Mr. Neil Campbell spent a couple 
of days with a construction company 
at Gananoque last week. 

Miss Agnes Harrison returned home 
from Toronto Saturday, after spend- 
ing the winter there." 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Hooper of 
Toronto spent the week end at the 
home of Mr. Dougald McCannell. 

Mrs. Fred Knox had the misfor- 
tune, while gathering eggs, to fall 
through a hole in the floor, severely 
injuring her shoulder and side. She 
was taken to the Markdale hospital, 
where an X-ray showed that there 
were no bones broken, but the liga- 
ments were badly torn, which will 
take some time to heal. 

Mr. H. D. Tresidder and daughter. 
Jessie, of Toronto spent the week 
end at the home of R. Hardy. Mrs. 
Tresidder returne' home with them, 
after spending the past week here. 

We are glad to report Mr. John 
Aldcorn slightly improved at time of 
writing. 

Mrs. Hugh McMillan Is spending 
this week with friends in Toronto. 

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<&4^>U MINTED IHWS- 

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SPRINGHILL 

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ited with Shelburne friends on Sun 
lay. 

Mr. and Mrs. 'W. J. Chard spent 
the week end in Toronto. 

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B UCKINGHAM 

The club met on May 15th at the 
home of Mrs. Bert Hockley with an 
attendance of twenty, including visi- 
tors. The meeting opened with the 
usual devotional exercises, after 
which the secretary's report of the 
last meeting was read and adopted. 
The treasurer, Mrs. Herb Eby, having 
to relinquish her duties because of 
her removal to Barrie, Mrs. A. Mit- 
chell consented to assume the respon- 
ibilities. It was decided to meet later 
in the month t clean the church and, 
beside the general discussion of sev- 
eral items of business definite ar- 
rangements were made for a refresh- 
ment booth in connection with tHe 
sale in aid of the War Victims' Fund 
on June 5th in Feversham. The re- 
mainder of the afternoon was spent 
in social chat accompanied by the 
rhythm of busy knitting needles The 
date and place of the June meeting 
will be announced later. 

Mr. and Mrs. Randall Taylor of 
Banks visited with the latter's par- 
ents. Mr. aad Mrs. A. Hawton on 
Sunday. 

Quite a number from here attend- 
ed the musical festival in Collingwood 
on Friday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wagg of Ra- 
venna spent Sunday with Ms. and 
Mrs. J. Brown. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herb Eby and Steph- 
en of Barrie visited over the week 
end with Mr. and Mrs. J. T. David- 

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Miss Ann Akins spent the week 
end at her parental home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Acheron spent 
a day recently with Mr. and Mrs. 
Claude Akins. 

Mr. and Mrs. Russel Johnston and 
Harold Johnson of Toronto and Miss 
Lorraine Johnson spent Sunday at 
the parental home. 

A number from this vicinity at- 
tended the funeral of Mr. Joseph 
Blakelev in Flesherton on Saturday. 

Mr. Ed. Littlejohns a