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Full text of "Flora and Thalia; or, Gems of flowers and poetry: being an alphabetical arrangement of flowers, with appropriate poetical illustrations, embellished with coloured plates"

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'*?^? 



W PUBLICO TIOJVS. 



CAREY, LEA, & BLANCHARD 

Have lately published, 

The Third Edition, (with six nexv coloured Plates, 
elegantly bound in embossed Morocco,) of 
THE LANGUAGE OF FLOWERS, with il- 
lustrative Poetry ; to which is now added. The Ca- 
lendar of Flowers. Revised by the editor of " For- 
get me Not." 

With a Coloured Plate, 
THE CHRISTL\N FLORIST; containing the 
English and botanical names of different plants, 
with their properties briefly delineated and explain- 
ed ; illustrated by lexts of Scripture, and accompa- 
nied with poetical extracts from various authors. 
Elegantly bound with gilt edges. 



With numerous Wood Cuts, 
THE YOUTH'S BOOK OF THE SEA- 
SONS ; or, Nature familiarly developed. 

" We propose to converse with our young readers ia a fami- 
liar and confidential style ; to take our way with them through 
many pleasant paths and shady nooks by the still waters of 
the valley, and over the steep mountain top, to point out the 
fair works of the Creator to their grateful admiration, and to 
draw many delightful and useful lessons from his wonderful 
and beneficent arrangement of the varying seasons."— ^x- 
tractfrom Preface. 



Phrenology for Ladies. 

' A beautiful volume for the centre table. 

PHRENOLOGY, and the Moral Influence of 
Phrenology. Arranged for general study, and the 
purposes of education, from the first published 
works of Gall and Spurzheim, to the latest disco- 
veries of the present period. By Mrs. L. Miles. 

" Man s greatest knowledge is himself to know."— P<^e. 



One small volume, elegantly bound in embossed 
cloth, with steel Engravings, 

THE YOUNG WIFE'S BOOK; a Manual of 
Moral, Religious, and Domestic Duties. 

" The Editor begs permission to present the bride with this 
small Volnm6,to supply the place of a living adviser — a vo- 
lume filled with precept, advice, warning, and encouragement 
— gathered from many sources, the weirk of many learned and 
experienced minds. I hope that she will permit it to lie upon 
her toilet or centre table, and occasionally read it, until the 
whole is familiar to her as household words." — Extract from 
the Preface. 



With numerous Cuts, 
THE BOOK OF SCIENCE; a familiar Intro- 
duction to the Principles of Natural Philosophy, 
adapted to the comprehension of Young People; 
comprising Treatises on Mechanics, Hydrostatics, 
Pneumatics, Chemistry, &c. In three Parts. Il- 
lustrated by many curious and interesting Experi- 
ments and Observations, and including Notices of 
the most recent Discoveries. 



5^'V 
\^'' 



THE 

BOOK OF FLOWERS; 

OR, 

GEMS OF FLOWERS AND POETRY. 



TE ABE THE STARS OF EARTH, AND DEAR TO ME 

IS EACH SMALL TW1>'KLI>'G GEM THAT WAXDEKS 

FREE 
'mid GLADE OR WOODLAND, OR BY MURm'rING 

STREAM, 
FOR ¥E TO ME ARE MORE THAN SWEET OR FAIR, 
I LOVE XE FOR THE MEm'rIES THAT YE BEAR 
OF BY-GONE HOURS, WHOSE BLISS WAS BUT A 

DREAM. 

LOUISA ANNE TWAMLEY. 



,FS7 



PRINTED BY 

HASWELL AND BARRINGTON, 

ST. JAMES STREET. 



mew yoka 

PREFACE. '^^^f'-^' 



The Compiler of this little Volume offers it to 
^ an indulgent Public, not as a scientific work, but 
^ one of moral amusement, which may possibly 
"^ lead the reader to the study of botany; feeling 
^ convinced there is no study that possesses' so 
j^' many charms, nor any that can exceed it, in 
<, raising our curiosity, gratifying our taste, or 
-o expanding our powers of discrimination. It 
c^ excites the student to elevated feelings ; for the 
more we study the works of the Creator, the 
-f«rj more His wisdom becomes manifest. With 
^ these sentiments, the Editor offers her little 
"* Work, hoping it may be a means of calling 
^ forth those ideas which all should possess when 
■^"^ they contemplate nature, " always pleasing, 
"* everywhere lovely." 



8 PREFACE. 

The care and attention bestowed on the moral 
and poetical department, will, she hopes, insure, 
at least, a small share of approbation. 

The coloured plates which illustrate the poe--^ 
try, were taken from nature ; and are as botani- 
pally correct as so small a work will admit. 
The descriptive part is from Woodville, Sir 
James Smith, Rousseau, the Hortus Cantabri- 
giensis, and other scientific works of later date. 

King's Road, Chelsea. 



v^ 



CONTENTS. 



INTRODUCTORY POEMS. 

SEASOIfS, FLOWERS, ETC. 



SpRIAG, JJUODE TO 


Grat 


13 


April .... 


Clare 


15 


The Greenhouse . 


COWPER . 


17 


Gardening 


Cooper 


19 


The Garden 


TH0MS0]?r . 


21 


The Chaplet 


RlCUARDSON" 


24 


The Close of Spring 


Smith 


25 


May . . . . 


Darwin . 


26 


The Summer's Call 


Mrs. Hemaks 


26 


Summer — the Tropics 


Thomsoi"? 


28 


Summer Morning 


MiLTOX . 


29 


Invitation to Solitude . 


Thomson 


29 


The Parting of Summer 


Mrs. Hemans 


30 


AuTUMJf 


Thomson . 


31 


L'Automne . 


De Lamartine 


32 


WlXTER 


Thomson 


33 


December 


Scott 


34 


The Seasons 


Hervey 


34 


Choice of Seasons 


MONTGOMEKT 


35 



10 



CONTENTS. 



FLOKA ALPHABETICA 



WITH POETICAL ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Plate 
ANEMOfTE PrATBNSIS A 

Blue or Harebell B 

Christmas Rose C 

Dahlia . . D 

Evening Primrose E 

Foxglove . F 
Heliotrope, or 

Turnsole . G 

Iris, the Purple H 

Jasmine . . I 
King-cup, or Meadow 



Crowfoot 
Lavender 
Mezereon 
Narcissus 
Orchis 
Pink, the Clove 

Quince 

Rose, the Provence 

Solomon's Seal 

Tobacco 



UvA Ursi, (Bear 

Berry) . . T 
Violet-Pansey, or 

Throe-coloured 

Violet . . V 



Pa?e 
Meadow Anemone 39-41 
Non Scriptus . 42-5 
Helleborus niger 46-9 
Dahlia Georgina 50-2 
Ornothera . 53-7 
Digitalis purpurea 58-61 



Heliotropium 
Iris Subbiflora 
Jasminum 



63-4 

65-6 

67-72 



Ranunculus acris 73-4 
Lavandula Spica 75-8 
Daphne Mezereum 79-81 
Narcissus Tazetta 82-5 
Orchis . . 87-90 
Dianthus Caryophyl- 

lus . . 91-3 
Pyrus Cydonia 94-5 
Rosa centifolia 96-114 
Convallaria polygo- 

natum . 115-18 

Nicotiana Taba- 

cum . 119-120 



Uva Ursi 



121-2 



Viola tricolor 123-36 





UUJMll 

Plate 


Page 


Wall-Flower . 


w 


C. Cheiri 137-47 


Ykllow Water- 






Flag 


Y 


Iris pseud-acorus 148-52 


Zedoart . 


Z 


Zedoary 153-4 



MISCELLANEOUS POEMS 



To A Mountain Daisy 

Banks of Devon . 

Vers a Madame de Ch* * 

Fading Flowers . 

Mother's Dirge over her 
Child 

To 

The Nosegay 

Aux Fleurs 

To an Early Primrose . 

The Bud of the Rose . 

Moite di Dardinello 

The Sun Flower . 

The Snow Drop . 

A Christmas Wreath 

A Daisy's Offering 

Field Flowers 

The Purpose of Flowers 

Cowslip and Rose 

La Farfalla sulla Rosa . 

The Dial of Flowers . 

The Daisy in India 

Flowers of the Field 
prove God's Existence 

A Happy Country Dwel- 
ling .... 



Burns . „ . 


1.57 


The same 


160 


De St. Lambert 


161 


Wesley . 


163 


MoiR 


164 


Byron 


167 


Old Song 


168 


Delille . 


169 


Kirke White 


171 


Old Song 


172 


Ariosto . 


172 


Thomson 


173 


Barbauld 


173 


TWAMLEY 


174 


. 


174 


Campbell 


175 


Martin . 


177 


Prior 


177 


Bertola 


178 


Hemans . 


179 


Montgomery . 


180 


Dr. Good 


183 


Coleridge 


184 



12 



CONTENTS. 



Child and Flowers 

Love's Wreath 

To make a Hortus Siccus 

The Marygold 

To the Crocus 

Le Lode degli Pomi 

Lines to a Young Lady 

Spring and Summer 

Flowers . 
Poetical Portrait . 
La Branche D'Amandier 
The Primrose 
Bring Flowers 
The Celandine 
Sur des QGillets arroses 

par le Grande Conde 
Le Matin 

Night-scented Flowers . 
On planting a Tulip-Root 
The Wreath 
On the Lily . 
The Blue Harebell 
On a Time-Piece . 
Lily of the Valley 
The Snow Drop . 
To a Primrose 
April Flowers 
The Death of the Flowers 
The Dial of Flowers . 
A Botanical Description 

of a Flower 



Page 

HEMAJfS . 185 

MooRE . . 187 
Sir James E. Smith 188 
Withers . 191 

Pattersoit . 192 
Almanni Del. Col. 193 
R. Patterson 194 

Flowers of all Hue 196 

Jewsbury . 197 

De Lamartine 198 

Herick . . 200 

Hemans . . 200 

Wordsworth 202 

De Scxtdert . 203 

Victor Hugo . 204 

Hemaxs . . 205 

Montgomery . 206 

S. J. . . 207 

Several . . 209 

TWAMLEY . 210 

Sacred Offering 211 
Bishop Mant . 213 
Wordsworth 216 

CARRIJfGTOX . 217 

Bishop Mant . 218 

Caroline Bowles 220 
223 
of the various Parts 

231 



FLORA AND THALIA; 

OH, 

GEMS OF FLOWERS AND POETFvY. 



AN ODE TO SPRING. 

Now the golden morn aloft 

Waves her dew-bespangled wing, 
With vermeil cheek, and whisper soft, 

She wooes the tardy spring ; 
Till April starts, and calls around 
The sleeping fragrance from the ground ; 
And Ughtly, o'er the living scene. 
Scatters his freshest tend' rest green. 

New-born flocks, in rustic dance. 
Frisking ply their feeble feet ; 
Forgetful of their wintry trance, 
The birds his presence greet. 
But chief the skylark warbles high 
His trembling thrilling ecstasy. 
And lessening from the dazzled sight, 
Melts into air and liquid light. 



14 FLORA. AND THALIA. 

Rise, my soul ! on wings of fire, 

Rise the rapt'rous choir among : 
Hark ! 'tis Nature strikes the lyre, 

And leads the general song. 
Warm let the lyric transport flow, 
Warm as the ray that bids it glow, 
And animates the vernal grove 
With health, with harmony, and love. 

Yesterday, the sullen year 

Saw the snowy whirlwind fly ; 
Mute was the music of the air, 
The herd stood drooping by ; 
Their raptures now that wildly flow, 
No yesterday, nor morrow, know; 
'Tis man alone that joy descries, 
With forward and reverted eyes. 

See the wretch, that long has tossed 

On the thorny bed of pain, 
At length repair his vigour lost. 
And breathe, and walk again. 
The meanest floweret of the vale, 
The simplest note that swells the gale, 
The common sun, the air, the skies, 
To him are opening paradise. 

CHAT. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 15 

APRIL. 

Now infant April joins the Spring, 

And views the wat'ry sky ; 
As youngling linnet tries its wing, 

And fears at first to fly. 
With timid step she ventures on, 

And hardly dares to smile : 
Till blossoms open one by one, 

And sunny hours beguile. 

In wanton gambols, like a child. 

She tends her early toils ; 
And seeks the buds along the wild. 

That blossom while she smiles : 
Or, laughing on, with nought to chide, 

She races with the hours ; 
Or sports by Nature's lovely side, 

And fills her lap with flow'rs. 

The shepherd, on his pasture-walks. 

The first fair cowslip finds. 
Whose tufted flowers, on slender stalks. 

Keep nodding to the winds. 
And though the thorns withhold the May, 

Their shades the violets bring, 
Which children stoop for in their play. 

As tokens of the Spring. 



16 FLORA AND THALIA. 

Sweet month ! thy pleasures bid thee be 

The fairest child of Spring ; 
And every hour that comes with thee, 

Comes some new joy to bring; 
The trees still deeper in their bloom, 

Grass greens the meadow lands ; 
And flowers with every morning come, 

As dropt by fairy hands. 

The field and garden's lovely hours 

Begin and end with thee; 
For what's so sweet as peeping flowers, 

And bursting buds to see 1 
What time the dew's unsullied drops. 

In burnish'd gold distil, 
On crocus flowers' unclosing tops. 

And drooping daffodil 1 

To see thee come, all hearts rejoice. 

And warm with feeUng strong ; 
With thee all Nature finds a voice. 

And hums a waking song. 
The lover views thy welcome hours. 

And thinks of summer come ; 
And takes the maid thy early flowers. 

To tempt her steps from home. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 17 

Though, at her birth, the northern gale 

Come with its withering sigh ; 
And hopeful blossoms, turning pale, 

Upon her bosom die ; 
Ere April seeks another place, 

And ends her reign in this. 
She leaves us with as fair a face, 

As e'er gave birth to bliss. 

CLAHE. 



THE GREENHOUSE. 

Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too ; 
Unconscious of a less propitious clime, 
There blooms exotic beauty, warm and snug, 
While the winds whistle, and the snows descend ; 
The spiry myrtle, with unwithering leaf, 
Shines there, and flourishes. The golden boast 
Of Portugal, and western India, there 
The ruddier orange, and the paler lime. 
Peep through their polished foliage at the storm. 
And seem to smile at what they need not fear. 
The amomum there, with intermingling flow'rs 
And cherries, hangs her twigs. Geranium boasts 
Her crimson honours ; and the spangled beau 
Ficoides glitters bright the winter long. 
All plants, of every leaf, that can endure 
3 



18 FLORA AND THALIA. 

The winter's frown, if screen'd from his shrewd bite, 

Live there and posper ; — those Ausonia claims, 

Levantine regions these ; th' Azores send 

Their jessamine, her jessarnine, remote 

Caffraria; foreigners from many lands, 

They form one social shade, as if conven'd 

By magic summons of th' Orpheian lyre ; 

Yet just arrangement, rarely brought to pass 

But by a master's hand, disposing well 

The gay diversities of leaf and flow'r. 

Must lend its aid t' illustrate all their charms. 

And dress the regular, yet various scene. 

Plant behind plant aspiring, in the van 

The dwarfish ; in the rear retir'd, but still 

Sublime above the rest, the statelier stand. 

So once were ranged the sons of ancient Rome, 

A noble show ! while Roscius trod the stage ; 

And so, while Garrick, as renowned as he, 

The sons of Albion ; fearing each to lose 

Some note of Nature's music from his lips, 

And covetous of Shakspeare's beauty, seen 

In every flash of his far-beaming eye. 

Nor taste alone, and well-contriv'd display 

Suffice to give the marshall'd ranks the grace 

Of their complete effect. Much yet remains 

Unsung, and many cares are yet behind, 

And more laborious ; cares on which depends 

Their vigour, injur'd soon, not soon restor'd. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 1 

The soil must be renew'd, which, often wash'd, 
Loses its treasure of salubrious salts, 
And disappoints the roots ; the slender roots 
Close interwoven, where they meet the vase 
Must smooth be shorn away ; the sapless branch 
Must fly before the knife ; the wither'd leaf 
Must be detach'd, and where it strews the floor, 
Swept with a woman's neatness, breeding else 
Contagion, and disseminating death. 
Discharge but these kind offices, (and who 
Would spare, that loves them, oflices like these?) 
Well they reward the toil. The sight is pleased ; 
The scent regal'd ; each odorifrous leaf. 
Each op'ning blossom, freely breathes abroad 
Its gratitude, and thanks him with its sweets. 

COWPER. 



GARDENING. 



To deck the shapely knoll. 



That softly swell'd, and gaily dress'd, appears 
A flow'ry island from the dark green lawn 
Emerging, must be deem'd a labour due 
To no mean hand, and asks the touch of taste. 
Here also grateful mixture of well-match'd 
And sorted hues, (each giving each relief, 
And by contrasted beauty shining more,) 



So FLORA AND THALIA. 

Is needful. Strength may wield the pond'rous spade, 

May turn the clod, and wheel the compost home; 

But elegance, chief grace the garden shows, 

And most attractive, is the fair result 

Of thought, the creature of a polish'd mind. 

Without it, all is gothic as the scene 

To which th' insipid citizen resorts 

Near yonder heath ; where industry misspent, 

But proud of his uncouth ill-chosen task. 

Has made a heaven on earth; with suns and moons 

Of close-ramm'd stones has charg'd th' encumber'd 

soil. 
And fairly laid the zodiac in the dust. 
He, therefore, who would see his flow'rs dispos'd 
Sightly and in just order, ere he gives 
The beds the trusted treasure of their seeds, 
Forecasts the future whole; that when the scene 
Shall break into its preconceiv'd display. 
Each for itself, and all as with one voice 
Conspiring, may attest his bright design. 
Nor even then, dismissing as perform'd 
His pleasant work, may he suppose it done. 
Few self-supported flow'rs endure the wind 
Uninjur'd, but expect th' upholding aid 
Of the smooth-shaven prop ; and, neatly tied, 
Are wedded thus, like beauty to old age, 
For interest sake, the living to the dead. 
Some clothe the soil that feeds them, far diffused 



FLORA AND THALIA. 21 

And lowly creeping, modest and yet fair, 

Like virtue, thriving most where little seen ; 

Some, more aspiring, catch the neighbour shrub 

With clasping tendrils, and invest his branch, 

Else unadorn'd, wuth many a gay festoon 

And fragrant chaplet, recompensing well 

The strength they borrow with the grace they lend. 

All hate the rank society of weeds. 

Noisome, and ever greedy to exhaust 

Th' impoverish'd earth ; an overbearing race 

That, like the multitude made faction-mad, 

Disturb good order, and degrade true worth. 



THE GARDEN. 

See, how the lily drinks 

The latent rill, scarce oozing through the grass. 

Of growth luxuriant ; or the humid bank 

In fair profusion decks. Long let us walk, 

Where thS breeze blows from yon extended fiel<l 

Of blossora'd beans. Arabia cannot boast 

A fuller gale of joy, than, liberal, thence 

Breathes through the sense, and takes the ravish'd 

soul. 
Nor is the mead unworthy of thy foot, 
Full of fresh verdure, and unnumber'd flow'rs, 



22 FLORA AND THALIA. 

The negligence of nature, wide and wild ; 
There, undisguised by mimic art, she spreads 
Unbounded beauty to the roving eye ; 
Here, their delicious task, the fervent bees. 
In swarming millions, tend ; around, athwart, 
Through the soft air the busy nations fly, • 
Cling to the bud, and, with inserted tube, 
Suck its pure essence, its ethereal soul ; 
And oft, with bolder wing, they soaring dare 
The purple heath, or where the wild thyme growls, 
And yellow load them with the luscious spoil. 
At length the finish'd garden to the view 
Its vistas opens, and its alleys green. 
Snatch'd through the verdant maze, the hurried eye 
Distracted wanders ; now the bow'ry walk 
Of covert close, where scarce a speck of day 
Falls on the lengthen'd gloom, protracted sweeps — 
Now meets the bending sky ; the river now 
DimpUng along, the breezy ruffled lake. 
The forest dark'ning round, the glitt'ring spire, 
Th' ethereal mountain, and the distant main. 
But why so far extensive ] v^hen, at hand, 
Along these blushing borders, bright with dew, 
And, in yon mingled wilderness of flow'rs. 
Fair-handed Spring unbosoms ev'ry grace ; 
Throws out the snow-drop and the crocus first ; 
The daisy, primrose, violet darkly blue, 
And polyanthus of unnumber'd dyes ; 



FLORA AND THALIA. 23 

The yeilow wall-flovvev, stained with iron-brown 

And lavish stock, that scents the garden round : 

From the soft wing of vernal breezes shed, 

Anemones ; auriculas, enrich'd 

With shining meal o'er all their velvet leaves ; 

And full ranunculus, of glowing red. 

Then comes the tulip-race, where beauty plays 

Her idle freaks : from family diffused 

To family, as flies the father-dust. 

The varied colours run ; and while they break 

On the charm'd eye, th' exulting florist marks, 

With secret pride, the wonders of his hand. 

No gradual bloom is wanting ; from the bud, 

First boon of Spring, to Suminer's musky tribes : 

Nor hyacinths, of purest virgin white. 

Low-bent, and blushing inward; nor jonquils 

Of potent fragrance ; nor narcissus fair, 

As o'er the fabled fountain hanging still; 

Nor broad carnations, nor gay-spotted pinks ; 

Nor, shower'd from ev'ry bush, the damask rose. 

Infinite numbers, delicacies, smells. 

With hues on hues expression cannot paint. 

The breath of Nature and her endless bloom. 

THOISO^r. 



24 FLORA AND THALIA. 



THE CHAPLET. 

To thee, sweet Maid, I bring 
The beauteous progeny of Spring : 
In every breathing bloom I find 
Some pleasing emblem of thy mind. 
The blushes of that op'ning rose. 
Thy tender modesty disclose : 
These snow-white lilies of the vale, 
Diffusing fragrance to the gale, 
No ostentatious tints assume. 
Vain of their exquisite perfume ; 
Careless, and sweet, and mild, we see 
In these a lovely type of thee. 
On yonder gay enamell'd green. 
That azure blossom smil'd serene ; 
Not changing with the changeful sky, 
Its faithless tints inconstant fly ; 
For, unimpair'd by winds and rain, 
I saw th' unalter'd hue remain ; 
So were thy mild affections prov'd, 
Thy heart, by fortune's frown unmov'd, 
Pleas'd to administer relief, 
Would solace and alleviate grief. 
These flowers with genuine beauty glow 
The tints from Nature's pencil flow. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 25 

What artist could improve their bloom, 
Or 'meliorate their sweet perfume ? 
Fruitless the vain attempt ! Like these, 
Thy native truth, — thine artless ease, 
Fair, unaffected maid, can never fail to please. 

IlICHARDSOX. 



THE CLOSE OF SPRING. 

The gju-lands fade that Spring so lately wove. 

Each simple flower which she has nursed in dew,— 
Anemones, that spangled every grove ; 

The Primrose wan, and Harebell mildly blue : 
No more shall Violets linger in the dell, 

Or purple Orchis variegate the plain : 
Till Spring again shall call forth every -bell, 

And dress with humid hands her wreaths again. 
Oh poor humanity ! so frail, so fair. 

Are the fond visions of thy early day ; 
Till tyrant passion, and corrosive care, 

Bid all thy fairy colours fade away ; 
Another May new buds and flowers shall bring : 

Ah ! why has happiness no second Spring 1 

CHARLES SMITH. 



26 FLORA AND THALIA. 



MAY. 

BoRx in yon blaze of orient sky, 

Sweet May ! thy radiant form unfold ; 

Unclose thy blue and tender eye, 

And wave thy shadowy locks of gold. 

For thee the fragrant zephyrs blow, 
For thee descends the sunny shower; 

The rills in softer murmur flow, 

And brighter blossoms gem the bower. 

DARWIN. 



Come away ! the sunny hours 
Woo thee far to founts and bowers ! 
O'er the very waters now. 

In their play, 
Flowers are shedding beauty's glow, 

Come away ! 
Where the lily's tender gleam 
Quivers on the glowing stream, 

Come away ! 



FLORA AND THALIA. 27 

All the air is filled with sound, 
Soft, and sultry, and profound ; 
Murmurs through the shadowy grass 

Lightly stray; 
Faint winds whisper, as they pass, 

Come away ! 
Where the bee's deep music swells, 
From the trembling fox-glove bells — 

Come away ! 

In the deep heart of the rose. 
Now the crimson love-hue glows ; 
Now the glow-worm's lamp, by night. 

Sheds a ray, 
Dreary, starry, greenly bright, — 

Come away ! 
Where the fairy cup-moss lies. 
With the wild wood-strawberries. 

Come away ! 

MRS. HEMAXS, 



FLORA AND THALIA. 



SUM3IER THE TROPICS. 

Bear me, Pomona, to thy citron groves ; 
To where the lemon, and the piercing lime, 
With the deep orange, glowing through the green, 
Their lighter glories blend. Lay me reclined 
Beneath the spreading tamarind that shakes, 
Fanned by the breeze, its ever cooling fruit. 
Deep in the night the massy locust sheds. 
Quench my hot limbs ; or lead me through the maze. 
Embowering endless, of the Indian fig : 
Or thrown at gayer ease, on some fair brow, 
Let me behold, by breezy murmurs cooled, 
Broad o'er my head the verdant cedars wave, 
And high palmettos lift their graceful shade. 
Or stretched amid these orchards of the sun, 
Give me to drain the cocoa's milky bowl, 
And from the palm to draw its freshening wine. 
More bounteous far than all the frantic juice 
Which Bacchus pours. Nor, on its slender twigs, 
Low bending, be the full pomegranate scorned ; 
Nor creeping through the wood, the gelid race 
Of berries. Oft in humble station dwells 
Unboastful worth, above fastidious pomp. 
Witness, thou best Anana ! thou, the pride 
Of vegetable life, beyond whate'er 



FLORA AND THALIA. 29 

The poets fabled in the golden age : 
Quick let me strip thee of thy tufty coat, 
Spread thy ambrosial store, and feast with Jove. 

THOMSON. 



SUMMER MORNING. 

Awake ! the morning shines, and the fresh fields 
Call you : ye lose the prime to mark how spring 
The tender plants ; how blows the citron grove ; 
What drops the myrrh, and what the balmy reed ; 
How Nature paints her colours ; how the bee 
Sits on the bloom extracting liquid sweets. 

MILTON. 



INVITATION TO SOLITUDE. 



But when the sun 



Shakes from his noon-day throne the scatt'ring 

clouds, 
E'en shooting listless languor through the deeps; 
Then seek the bank where flow'ring elders crowd ; 
Where, scatter'd wild, the lily of the vale 
Its balmy essence breathes ; where cowslips hang 
The dewy head ; where purple violets lurk 
With all the lowly children of the shade ; 



30 FLORA AND THALIA. 

Or lie reclin'd beneath yon spreading ash 
Hung o'er the steep, whence, borne on liquid wing, 
The sounding culver shoots ; or where the hawk 
High in the beetling cliff his aerie builds. 
There let the classic page thy fancy lead 
Through rural scenes, such as the Mantuan swain 
Paints in the matchless harrriony of song ; 
Or catch thyself the landscape, gliding swift 
Athwart imagination's vivid eye : 
Or by the vocal woods and waters lull'd, 
And lost in lonely musing, in the dream 
Confus'd, of careless solitude, where mix 
Ten thousand wand'ring images of things. 
Soothe ev'ry gust of passion into peace; 
All but the swellings of the soften'd heart, 
That waken, not disturb, the tranquil mind. 

THOMSON. 



THE PARTING OF SUMMER. 

Thou'rt bearing hence the roses, 

Glad Summer, fare thee well ! 
Thou'rt singing thy last melodies 

In every wood and dell. 



Brightly, sweet Summer ! brightly 
Thine hours have floated by. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 31 

To the joyous birds of the woodland boughs, 
The rangers of the sky. 

And brightly in the forest, 

To the wild deer wandering free ; * , 

And brightly, 'midst the garden flowers, 

To the happy murmuring bee. 

But oh ! thou gentle Summer, 

If I greet thy flowers once more, 
Bring me again the buoyancy 

Wherewith my soul should soar ! 

MRS. HEMANS. 



AUTUMN. 

When the bright Virgin gives the beauteous days. 

And Libra weighs in equal scales the year ; 

From heaven's high cope, with fierce effulgence 

shook. 
Of parting Summer, a serener blue, 
With golden light enlivened, wide invests 
The happy world. Attempered suns arise, 
Sweet-beamed, and shedding oft through lucid clouds 
A pleasing calm ; while broad and brown below, 
Extensive harvests hang the heavy head. 
Rich, silent, deep, they stand ; for not a gale 



33 FLORA AND THALIA. 

Rolls its light billows o'er the bending plain : 

A calm of plenty ! till the ruffled air 

Falls from its poise, and gives the breeze to blow. 

Rent is the fleecy mantle of the sky ; 

The clouds fly different ; and the sudden sun 

By fits effulgent gilds the illumined fields, 

And black by fits the shadows sweep along. 

A gaily-chequered, heart-expanding view, 

Far as the circling eye can shoot around, 

Unbounded tossing in a flood of corn. 

THOMSON. 



Salut, bois couronnes d'un reste de verdure ! 

Feuillages jaunissans sur les gazons epars ! 
Salut, derniers beaux jours I le deuil de la nature 

Convient a ma douleur, et plait a mes regards. 

Oui, dans ces jours d'Automne ou la nature expire, 
A ses regards voiles je trouve plus d'attraits. 

C'est I'adieu d'un ami, c'est le dernier sourire 
Des levres que la mort va fermer pour jamais. 

Ainsi, pret a quitter I'horizon de la vie, 

Pleurant de mes longs jours I'espoir evanoui, 



FLORA AND THALIA. 33 

Je me retourne encore, et d'un regard d'envie 
Je contemple ses biens dont je u'ai pas joui. 

Terre, soleil, vallons, belle et douce nature ! 

Je vous dois une larme au bord de mon tombeau; 
L'air est si parfume ! la lumiere est si pure ! 

Aux regards d'un mourant le soleil est si beau. 

Je voudrais maintenant vuider jusqu' a la lie, 

Ce calice mele de nectar et de fiel : 
Au fond de cette coupe oii je buvais la vie, 

Peutetre restait-il une goutte de miel ! 

La fleur tombe en livrant ses parfums au zephire, 

A la vie, au soleil, ce sont la ses adieux ; 
Moi, je meurs : et mon ame, au moment qu'elle 

expire, 
S'exhale comme un son triste et melodieux, 

DE LAMAKTIIfE. 



WINTER. 
'Tis done ! dread Winter spreads its latest glooms. 
And reigns tremendous o'er the conquered year. 
How dead the vegetable kingdom lies ! 
How dumb the tuneful ! Horror wide extends 
His desolate diomain. Behold, fond man ! 



34 FLORA AND THALIA., 

See here thy pictured life ; pass some few years, 
Thy flowering Spring, thy Summer's ardent strength, 
Thy sober Autumn fading into age ; 
And pale concluding Winter comes at last, 
And shuts the scene. 



DECEMBER. 

No mark of vegetable life is seen ; 

No bird to bird repeats his tuneful call, 
Save the dark leaves of some rude evergreen : 

Save the lone redbreast on the moss-grown wall. 

SCOTT. 



THE SEASONS. 

Wheiv snows descend, and robe the fields 

In winter's bright array : 
Touched by the sun tlip lustre fades, 

And weeps itself away. 

When Spring appears ; when violets blow, 

And shed a rich perfume ; 
How soon the fragrance breathes its last, 

How short-liv'd is its bloom. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 35 

Fresh in the morn, the summer rose 

Hangs withering ere 'tis noon ; 
We scarce enjoy the balmy gift, 

But mourn the pleasure gone. 

With gliding fire, an evening star 

Streaks the autumnal skies ; . 
Shook from the sphere, it darts away, 

And in an instant dies. 

Such are the charms that flush the cheek, 

And sparkle in the eye ; 
So from the lovely finish'd form. 

The transient graces fly. 

To this the seasons as they roll, 

Their attestation bring ; 
They warn the fair ; their every round 

Confirm the truth I sing. 

HERVEY. 



CHOICE OF SEASONS. 

Who loves not Spring's voluptuous hours, 
The carnival of birds and flowers 1 
Yet who \vould choose, however dear. 
That Spring should revel all the year 1 



36 FLORA AND THALIA. 

Who loves not Summer's splendid reign, 
The bridal of the earth and main 1 
Yet who would choose, however bright, 
A dog-day noon without a night 1 
Who loves not Autumn's joyous round. 
When corn, and wine, and oil abound "? 
Yet who would choose, however gay, 
A year of unrenewed decay 1 
Who loves not Winter's awful form 1 
The sphere-bom music of the storm "? 
Yet who would choose, how grand soever. 
The shortest day to last for ever ? 

MONTGOMERY. 



FLORA ALPHABETICA. 



38 FLORA AND THALIA. 



WHO CAN PAINT 



XIKE NATURE .' CAN IMAGINATION BOAST, 

AMID ITS GAT CREATION, HUES LIKE HERS ? 

OR CAN IT MIX THEM WITH THAT MATCHLESS SKILL, 

AND LOSE THEM IN EACH OTHER, AS APPEARS 

IN Ev'rT bud that blows ] IF FANCT THEN, 

UNEaUAL, FAILS BENEATH THE PLEASING TASK, 

AH ! WHAT SHALL LANGUAGE DO 1 AH, WHERE FIND 

WORDS 
TINg'd with SO MANY COLOURS ] 

THOMSON. 



"Wl 




FLORA AND THALIA. 39 



ANEMONE PRATENSIS. 

{jyieadoxv Anemone.) 

This Anemone is perennial, and a native of Ger- 
many, where it grows in open fields, flowering in 
May. It was first cultivated by Mr. Millar, in the 
year 1 7-31 ;. and as we now find it in our gardens, it 
very much resembles the Anemone Pulsatilla. The 
principal distinctions between these species, as they 
grow naturally, are taken from the flower, which in 
the Anemone Pratensis is more pendulous, smaller, 
of a darker colour, and has the apices of the petals 
reflexed ; the stem, also, is less hairy and shorter 
than that of the Pulsatilla. The Anemone, or Pasque 
flower, so called from its flowering about Easter, 
adorns some of our dry chalky hills with its beautiful 
purple flowers. The garden Anemones, which are 
so ornamental to the flower borders in the spring, 
are only of two species, notwithstanding the variety 
of their colours. Art, to increase their beauty, has 
rendered them very large and double. 

Baron Stoerck has recommended this plant as an 
effectual remedy for most diseases affecting the eye ; 
and many German physicians have since tried its 



40 ■ FLORA AND THALIA. 

effects, and with success. Every part of this plant 
was recommended by Baron Stoerck for medicinal 
purposes. The flowers have scarcely any smell. 

Class, PoLTAKDHiA. Order, Poltgtxia. 



THE ANEMONE. 

See yon Anemones their leaves unfold, 
With rubies flaming, and with living gold ; 
In silken robes each hillock stands arrayed. 
Be gay ! too soon the flowers of Spring will fade : 
Ah ! crop the flowers of pleasure while they blow, 
Ere Winter hides them in a veil of snow. 
Youth, like a thin Anemone, displays 
His silken leaf, and in a mom decays. 

SIR WM. jom.s, from the Persian. 



FLORA AND THALIA. - 41 



TiA ANEMONE. 

Short time ensued, till where the blood* was shed, 
A flower began to raise its purple head ; 
Still here the fate of lovely forms we see, 
So sudden fades the sweet Anemone : 
The feeble stems to stormy blasts a prey, 
Their sickly beauties droop and pine away ; 
Their winds forbid the flowers to flourish long, 
Which owe to winds their name in Grecian song, j- 
EUSDEJf, yrom Ovid. 



From the soft wing of vernal breezes shed, 
Anemones ; auriculas enriched 
With shining meal o'er all their velvet leaves ; 
And full ranunculas, of glowing red. 

THOMSON, 

* The aJicienl' writers inform us, that Venus, in her grief for 
the loss of Adonis, mingled her tears with his blood ; from 
whence sprang an Anemone, the first ever seen. 

t Anemone is derived from the Greek «^«//.5j, the wind; 
and hence is called tlic wind-flower, 
6 



42 FLORA AND THALIA. 



BLUE, OR HAREBELL. 

{JSTon script!^.') 

This beautiful little flower is a native of Persia ; 
but is found in most parts of Europe. Our woods 
in the Spring present a lively appearance, from the 
mixture of their azure blue bells among the pale 
yellow primroses, and the many different tinted 
heaths, so tastefully intermingled by the hand of 
Nature. It is called Harebell from its generally 
growing in those places frequented by hares: the 
flower varies in colour and beauty ; some being 
completely white, and others much resembling the 
poorer kinds of hyacinths; but they have longer and 
narrower flowers, not swelling at the bottom ; the 
bunch of flowers is likewise longer and bends down- 
wards. The fresh roots of this plant are said to be 
poisonous; the juice is mucilaginous, and in the 
time of Queen Elizabeth was used as starch. 

Class, Hexandbia. Order, Monogtnia. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 43 



THE BLUE, OR HAREBELL. 

In Spring's green lap there blooms a flower, 

Whose cup imbibes each vernal shower, 

That sips fresh Nature's balmy dew, 

Clad in her sweetest, purest blue ; 

Yet shuns the ruddy eye of morning, 

The shaggy wood's brown shade adorning. 

Simplest floweret ! Child of May ! 

Though hid from the broad eye of day, 

Doom'd in the shade thy sweets to shed, 

Unnoticed droop thy languid head ; 

Still Nature's darling thou'lt remain; 

She feeds thee with her softest rain ; 

Fills each sweet bud with honied tears. 

With genial gales thy bosom cheers. 

Oh ! then, unfold thy simple charms 

In yon deep thicket's sheltering arms. 

Far from the fierce and sultry glare. 

No heedless hand shall harm thee there ; 

Still, then, avoid the gaudy scene, 

The flaunting sun, th' embroidered green. 

And bloom and fade with chaste reserve, unseen. 

CAROLINE SXMONDS. 



44 FLORA AND THALIA. 



THE BLUE, OR HAREBELL, 

With drooping bells of clearest blue, 
Thou didst attract my childish view, 

Almost resembling 
The azure butterflies that flew 
Where on the heath thy blossoms grew. 

So lightly trembling. 

Where feathery fern, and golden broom. 
Increase the sand-rock cavern's gloom, 

I've seen thee tangled, 
'Mid tufts of purple heather bloom, 
By vain Arachne's treach'rous loom 

With dew-drops spangled. 

'Mid ruins tumbling to decay, 

Thy flowers their heavenly hues display, 

Still freshly springing, 
Where pride and pomp have passed away, 
On a mossy tomb and turret grey. 

Like friendship clinging. 

When glow-worm lamps illume the scene, 
And silvery daisies dot the green. 

Thy flowers revealing ; 
Perchance to soothe the fairy-queen, 
With faint sweet tones, on night serene, 

Thy soft bejls pealing. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 45 

But most I love thine azure braid, 
When softer flowers are all decay'd, 

And thou appearest, 
Stealing beneath the hedgerow shade. 
Like joys that linger as they fade, 

Whose last are dearest. 

Thou art the flower of memory ; 
The pensive soul recals in thee 

The year's past pleasures ; 
And led by kindred thought will flee, 
Till back to careless infancy 

The path she measures. 

Beneath autumnal breezes bleak, t 

So faintly fair so sadly meek, >.. 

I've seen thee bending ; 
Pale as the pale blue veins that streak 
Consumption's thin transparent cheek, 

With death hues blending. 

Tho shalt he sorrow's love and mine, 
The violet and the eglantine. 

With spring are banished ; 
In summer's beam the roses shine, 
But T of thee my wreath will twine. 

When these are vanished. 

ASTON, 



46 FLORA AND THALIA. 

BLACK HELLEBORE, OR CHRISTMAS ROSE. 

(^Helleborus niger.') 

The Christmas Rose, so called from its flowering 
about Januar}', is perennial, and a native of Austria 
and Italy. It was unknown in our garden, till cul- 
tivated by Mr. John Gerard, in 1596. It has a 
pleasing appearance in our parterres, at a time of 
the year when all around it looks dull and gloomy. 
The Ancients used to esteem this plant a powerful 
remedy in maniacal diseases ; but as the same effects 
may be produced with more certainty and safety by 
other medicines, the use of it is now almost entirely 
abandoned, as it is well known to be poisonous. 
However, as agreat acquisition to the flower border, 
we recommend its cultivation. 

Class, PoLrANDRiA. Order, Poltgynia. 



FLORA AND THaLIA. 47 



THE CHRISTMAS RO.SE. 

The garden boasts no beauty now, 

Its summer graces all are fled ; 
Fi'ost glitters on the leafless bough, 

And branch and spray alike seem dead. 

Yet here, regardless of the chill. 
The sternness of the wintry hour. 

One pleasing blossom greets us still, 
A fair, though unassuming flower. 

In changeful life 'tis even so. 

False friends fall off when storms arise ; 
They shared our joy, but shun our woe, 

Like plants that fear inclement skies. 

And thus the true of heart remain, 
Without one altered look or tone ; 

So kind we almost bless the pain. 

That makes us know such friends our own. 

M. 



48 FLORA AND THALIA. 



THE WINTER ROSE. 

Hail, and farewell, thou lovely guest ! 

I may not woo thy stay ; 
The hues that paint thy glowing vest 

Are fading fast away, 
Like the returning tints that die 
At evening on the w^estern sky. 
And melt in misty grey. 

It was but now thy radiant smile 
Broke through the season's gloom, 

As bending I inhaled awhile 
Thy breathing of perfume ; 

And traced on every silken leaf, 

A tale of summer, sweet and brief. 

And sudden as thy doom. 

The morning sun thy petals hail'd. 

New from their mossy cell ; 
At eve his beam, in sorrow veil'd, 

Bade thee a last farewell. 
To-morrow's ray shall mark the spot, 
Where, loosen'd from their fairy knot, 
Thy withering beauties fell. 

AJfOIf. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 41> 



ON THE SAME. 

Alas ! on thy forsaken stem 

My heart shall long recline, 
And mourn the transitory gem, 

And make the story mine ! 
So on my joyless winter hour 
Has oped some fair and fragrant flower, 

With smile as soft as thine. 

Like thee the vision came and went, 
Like thee it bloomed and fell ; 

In momentary pity sent. 
Of fairy climes to tell ; 

So frail its form, so short its stay. 

That nought the lingering heart could say, 
But hail, and fare thee well ! 



50 FLORA AND THALIA. 



DAHLIA. 

{Dahlia Georgina.') 

This splendid plant was originally found by 
Baron Humboldt, in a sandy soil in Mexico, North 
America. Its height varies from three to six feet. 
The petals of the single flower are commonly eight, 
but the number is variable, and in the double flowers 
they are exceedingly numerous. This plant was 
first introduced into this country in 1804, and excited 
so much admiration from the splendour and variety 
of its colours, that, we are told, florists could scarcely 
satisfy the demand for them. For stateliness of 
appearance, and richness of colouring, this flower 
stands unrivalled ; but for fragrance it must bend 
even to the modest Hly of the valley, or the retiring 
violet; although Mr. Knight says, that at one par- 
ticular period of the flower's opening it has a sUght, 
but not a fragrant smell. The varieties are very 
numerous, and botanists are divided as to their 
species. This plant received its name of Dahlia, 
from Cavanilles, who dedicated it to Andrew Dahl, 
a Sweedish Botanist ; and that of Georgina from 
Wildenow, who named it after Dr. Georgi of Peters- 
burg. Florists difler much in the culture and 
propagation of this plant, some recommending a dry 



FLORA AND THALIA. 51 

situation, and moistened with liquid manure, others 
a moist one, with a great deal of water. 

Mr. Knight, of Hammersmith, has favoured us 
with his method of propagating it : during the sum- 
mer, he ascertains the different varieties, which he 
keeps packed dry in sand, generally on the sides ; 
ahout the middle of January he removes them to 
a gentle heat, to forward their shoots, and when 
advanced to five •or six inches in height, takes his 
cuttings, which he places in warm situations; by 
which plan he informs us he does not lose one in 
fifty, whereas were the cuttings taken in the summer 
or autumn, not one in fifty would take root : he ob- 
serves that great care must be taken to keep the 
plant perfectly dry when taken out of the ground, 
as the least moisture will at that time cause the 
roots to rot. 

The Dahlia blossoms in July, and continues in 
bloom and beauty till late in the autumn ; and 
when the weather has been mild, we have seen them 
boasting their autumnal splendour in December. It 
is said that the roots are good to eat, and in some 
degree resemble the Jerusalem artichoke; but we 
doubt its ever having been cultivated in our gardens 
except for its beauty. 

Class, SzjfGEjrEsiA. Order, Polxgtnia. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 



THE DAHLIA. 



Though scver'd from its native clime, 
Where skies are ever bright and clear, 

And nature's face is all sublime, - 
And beauty clothes the fragrant air, 
The Dahlia will each glory weal-, 

With tints as bright, and leaves as green ; 

And winter in his savage mien, 

May breathe forth storm, — yet she will bear 

With all : — and in the summer ray, 

With blossoms deck the brow of day. 

And thus the soul — if Fortune cast 
Its lot to live in scenes less bright, — 

Should bloom amid the adverse blast ; — 
Nor suffer sorrow's clouds to blight 
Its outward beauty — inward light. 

Thus should she live and flourish still. 

Though misery's frosts might strive to kill 
The germ of hope within her quite : — 

Thus should she hold each beauty fast, 

And bud and blossom to the last. 

WM. MARTIN. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 53 



i 



/ 



% EVENING PRIMROSE. 

(Ornothera.') 

The Evening or Tree Primrose' is a native of 
Virginia, and nov^r common in most of our English 
gardens. 

This deUcately-coIourcd flower is usually shut 
during the day, as if to protect itself from the heat 
of the sun, but expands towards the approach of 
evening, whence it is called the Evening Primrose. 
It flowers in June, and continues for a considerable 
time in blossom. 

There are three different sorts of this plant ; but 
the most common in our gardens is the broad-leaved 
kind, with flat lance-shaped leaves, a hairy stalk and 
a corolla of pale yellow. 



Class, OcTAifDRiA. Order, Monogtnia. 



54 FLORA AND THALIA. 



TO THE EVENING OR TREE PRIMROSE. 

Fair flower, that shunn'st the glare of day, 
Yet lov'st to open, meekly bold, 

To evening hues of sober grey, 
Thy cup of paly gold ; 

Be thine the offering, owing long 
To thee, and to this pensive hour. 

Of one brief tributary song, 

Though transient as thy flower. 

I love to watch, at silent eve, 

Thy scatter'd blossoms' lonely light ; 

And have my inmost heart receive 
The influence of that sight. 

I love, at such an hour, to mark 

Their beauty greet the night-breeze chill, 

And shine, 'mid shadows gathering dark, 
The garden's glory still. 

For such, 'tis sweet to think the while, 
When cares and griefs the breast invade, 

Is friendships animating smile. 
In sorrow's dark'ning shade. 



1-* 



FLORA AND THALIA. 



Thus it bursts forth, like thy pale cup, 
Glist'ning amid its dewy tears, 

And bears the sinking spirit up, 
Amid its chilling fears. 

But still more animating far, 

If meek Religion's eye may trace, 

Even in thy ghmm'ring earth-born star, 
The holier hope of grace ! 

The hope that, as thy beauteous bloom 
Expands to glad the close of day, 

So through the shadows of thy tomb 
May break forth Mercy's ray. 

BAttTOX. 



THE EVENING PRIMROSE. 

There are that love the shades of life, 
And shun the splendid walks of fame ; 

There are that hold it rueful strife 
To risk Ambition's losing game. 

That, far from Envy's lurid eye, 
The fairest fruits of Genius rear ; 

Content to see them bloom and die 

In Friendship's small, but genial, sphere. 

Than vainer flowers though sweeter far, 
The Evening Primrose shuns the day ; 



56 FLORA AND THALIA. 

Blooms only to the western star, 
And loves its solitary ray. 

In Eden's vale an aged hind, 

At the dim twilight's closing hour, 

On his time-smoothed staff reclin'd, 

With wonder view'd the opening flov/er. 

" Ill-fated flower, at eve to blow !" 
In pity's simple thought, he cries 

" Thy bosom must not feel the glow 
Of splendid suns, or smiling skies. 

" Nor thee, the vagrants of the field, 
The hamlet's little train behold ; 

Their eyes to sweet oppression yield, 
When thme the falling shades unfold. 

" Nor thee the hasty shepherd heeds. 

When love has filled his heart with cares ; 

For flowers he rifles all the meads. 

For waking flowers — but thine forbears. 

" Ah ! waste no more that beauteous bloom. 
On night's chill shade that fragrant breath : 

Let smilmg suns those gems illume ! 
Fair flower, to live unseen is death!" 

FABLES or ri-ORA. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 57 



TO THE EVENING PRIMROSE. 

Fhom childhood I have lov'd thee more, pale flower, 
Than all the garden's gayest boast and pride ; 

For thine has ever been my fav'rite hour, 
The quiet, pensive, twilight eventide. 

And I have watch'd thy beauteous leaves unfold, 
Soon as the sun has brightly sunk to rest, 

Opening thy buds to meet the moonlight cold, 
And therefore 'twas, sweet flower, I lov'd thee 
best 

Memory, the moon, and thou, my friends have been. 
When other friends were scattered wide and far ; 

And now I value not night's brightest scene, 
If wanting thee, my chosen Evening Star, 

F. R. ELLIOTT. 



58 FLORA AND THALIA, 



FOXGLOVE. 

{Digitalis Purpjirea.) 

The Foxglove is perennial, commonly growing 
about road-sides and hedges, especially in dry gravel- 
ly soils ; flowering in June and July. It is one of 
the most showy of our wild plants ; and takes its 
name from the resemblance of the flower to the fin- 
gers of a glove. In a wild state it is purple, or red ; 
when cultivated in gardens, white or yellow. 
Among the most deadly vegetable productions of 
this country, is the Foxglove, which, 

With modest blush in bosky dells, 
Hangs her dewy purple bells; 
So softly nodding in the breeze. 
The blossoms seldom fail to please ; 
But woe to him who rashly sips, — > 
There's poison on her glowing lips ! 

Class, DruTXAMTA. Ortler, AxaiospERMiA. 



FLORA AND THALIA, 59 



THE FOXGLOVE 
AND THE HAREBELL. 

In a valley obscure, on a bank of green shade, 
A sweet little Harebell her dwelling had made ; 
Her roof was a woodbine, that tastefully spread 
Its close woven tendrils o'erarching her head ; 
Her bed was of moss, that each morning made new ; 
She dined on a sunbeam, and supp'd on the dew ; 
Her neighbour, the nightingale, sung her to rest ; 
And care had ne'er planted a thorn in her breast. 

One morning she saw, on the opposite side, 

A Foxglove displaying his colours of pride ; 

She gazed on his form that in stateliness grew, 

And envied his height, and his brilliant hue ; 

She mark'dhow the flow'rets all gave way before him. 

While they pressed round her dwelling with far less 

decorum. 
Dissatisfied, jealous, and peevish, she grows, 
And the sight of the Foxglove destroys her repose ; 

She tires of her vesture, and swelUng with spleen, 
Cries, " Ne'er such a dowdy blue mantle was seen !" 



60 FLORA AND THALIA. 

Nor keeps to herself any longer her pain, 

But thus to a Primrose begins to complain : 

" I envy your mood, that can patient abide 

The respect paid that Foxglove, his airs and his pride ; 

There you sit still the same, with your colourless 

cheek, 
But you have no spirit, — would I were as meek." 

The Primrose, good-humour'd, replied, " If you knew 
More about him (remember I'm older than you, 
And, better instructed, can tell you his tale) : 
You'd envy him least of all flowers in the vale ; 
With all his fine airs and his dazzling show. 
No blossom more baneful and odious can blow ; 
The reason that flow'rets before him give way 
Is because they all hate him, and shrink from his 
ray. 

" To stay near him long would be fading or death, 
For he scatters a pest with his venomous breath ; 
While the flowers that you fancy are crowding you 

there, 
Spring round you delighted your converse to share. 
His flame-colour'd robe is imposing, 'tis true. 
Yet who likes it so well as your mantle of blue ; 
For we know that of innocence one is the vest, 
The other the cloak of a treacherous breast. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 61 

" I see your surprise, but I know him full well, 
And have number'd his victims, as fading they fell ; 
He blighted twin violets that under him lay, 
And poisoned a sister of mine the same day." 
The Primrose was silent — the Harebell, 'tis said, 
Inclined for a moment her beautiful head ; 
But quickly recovered her spirits, and then 
Declared that she ne'er should feel envy again. 

AjroN. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 63 



HELIOTROPE, OR TURNSOLE. 

(^Heliotropium.) 

This beautiful little plant, a native of Peru, flowers 
in May ; but in the greenhouse continues in bloom 
nearly all the year. It is said to turn to the sun, 
and thereby has acquired its name; but should a 
cloud obscure the sky, it droops its head. Its flowers 
are much esteemed for their beautiful simplicity and 
fragrance. 

Class, Pentandria. Order, Monogynia. 



64 FLORA AND THALIA. 



THE HELIOTROPE. 

TuEBE is a flower whose modest eye 
Is turned with looks of light and love, 

Who breathes her softest, sweetest sigh, 
Whene'er the sun is bright above. 

Let clouds obscure, or darkness veil, 

Her fond idolatry is fled ; 
Her sighs no more their sweets exhale, 

The loving eye is cold and dead. 

Canst thou not trace a moral here, 

False flatterer of the prosperous hour "? 

Let but an adverse cloud appear, 
And thou art faithless as the flow'r. 



FLORA ANP THALIA. 65 



PURPLE IRIS. 

(Iris subbijiora.) 

This beautiful and showy plant is a native of 
Portugal, flowering in !May ; and from its height, the 
size of its blossoms, and the richness of its colours, 
it adds much to the splendour of the flower-garden, 
particularly in shady situations. 

There are fifty-one species of Iris ; from one of 
which is taken the beautiful perfume called orris 
root The plant from wliich this is taken is a native 
of Italy, and was cultivated in England by Gerrard, 
in 1596 ; but the roots of the orris produced in this 
country, have neither the odour nor the other quali- 
ties of those from warmer chmates. 

Class, Thiaxdkia. Order, Mo>-octma. 



6G FLORA AND THALIA. 



THE IRIS* (or rainbow). 

How oft have I view'd thee, all glorious and bright. 
In the pride of thy birth-place, thou vision of light ; 
Like an angel of gladness, in mercy design'd 
As a token and herald of love to mankind ! 

There, too, where the floods of the desert resound. 
Thou reignest unmoved by the tumult around ; 
And the eye may repose on thy soft smiling beams ; 
And the fancy may hail thee the Nymph of the 
streams. 

Oh! thus, when the moments of sorrow are nigh, 
When the stern voice of Nature shall call us to die ; 
At that thrilling hour, when, in anguish and pain. 
Our spirits return to life's pleasure in vain ; 

May Peace with her soft silv'ry pinions be there, 
To chase from our bosoms the phantom Despair. 
May Hope, gentle Hope, with her sweetness illume 
The darkness that shadows the depths of the tomb. 

* The brilliancy of its colours, and the graceful curve of its 
petals, emulate the arch of Iris or the rainbow. 



FLORA AND THALIA. G7 



JASMINE. 

(^Jasminum.) 

The white Jasmine is a native of China ; and was 
first cultivated in England in the year 1549. From 
its beautiful blossom, fragrance of smell, and rapid 
growth, spreading its long pliable branches several 
feet in one summer, we find it a favourite plant for 
adorning verandas and summer-houses ; and also for 
spreading along garden walls. Its numerous white 
flowers, intermingled with the dark green leaves, 
form a beautiful contrast. 

There are several varieties : some being very large 
and double, and others yellow. At Malabar, the 
women string the larger double blossoms, and wear 
them round their necks for ornament, as well as for 
their odoriferous perfume : in our own country, the 
essence, extracted from the flowers, is much esteemed. 

Class, DiANDRiA, Order, MoNOGXifiA. 



68 FLORA AND THALIA. 



JASMINE. 



TO A FRir.ND. 



Sweet Jessamine, long may thy elegant flower, 

Breathe fragrance and solace to me ; 
And long thy green sprigs overshadow the bower, 

Devoted to friendship and thee. 

The eye that was dazzled, where lilies and roses 

Their brilliant assemblage display 'd, 
With grateful delight on thy verdure I'cposes, 

A tranquil and delicate shade. 

But, ah ! what dejection thy foliage expresses, 
Which pensively droops on her breast ; 

The dew of the evening has laden her tresses, 
And stands like a tear on her crest. 

I'll watch by thy side through the gloom of the night, 

Impatient, till morning appears : 
No charm can awaken this heart to delight. 

My Jasmine, while thou art in tears. 

But soon will the shadows of night be withdrawn, 

Which ever in mercy are given ; 
And thou shalt be cheered by the light of the morn, 

And fanned by the breezes of heaven. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 69 

And still 7nay thy tranquil and delicate shade, 

Yield fragrance and solace to me ; 
For though all the flowers in my garden should fade, 

My heart will repose upon thee. 

JANE TAYLOR. 



ON THE INDIAN JASMINE FLOWER. 
{Jasmimim Bigvonia.^ 

How lovelily the Jasmine flower 

Blooms far from man's observing eyes; 
And having lived its little hour, 

There withers, — there sequestered dies. 
Though faded, yet 'tis not forgot ; 

A I'ich perfume time cannot sever, 
Lingers in that unfriended spot, 

And decks the Jasmine's grave for ever. 

Thus, thus should man, who seeks to soar. 

On Learning's wings, to Fame's bright sky, 
Far from his fellows, seek that lore. 

Unheeded live, sequestered die. 
Thus, like the Jasmine, when he's fled. 

Fame's rich perfume will ever keep, 
Ling'ring around the faded dead, 

As saints that watch some infant's sleep. 

n. RTAX. 



FLORA AXD THALIA. 



TO THE JASMINE. 



Ojr gentle gales the grateful twilight came ; 
Dimpling the shining lakes, the fragrant breeze 
Sighs o'er the lawns, and wliispers thro' the trees. 
Refreshed, the lily rears its silver head, 
And opening Jasmines o'er the arbour spread. 

CAMOEXS. 



*TwAS midnight — through the lattice wreathed 

With woodbine, many a perfume breathed 

From plants that wake when others sleep ; 

From timid Jasmine-buds that keep 

Their odour to themselves all day : 

But when the sunlight dies away. 

L^ ^be delicious secret out 

To everv breeze that roams about. 



FLORA AM) THALIA. Tl 



JASMINE rLO'vVZR?. 

AxD brides, as deHcate and &ir 

As the white Jasmine flowers they wear. 

Hath Yemen in her blissfal clime ; 
^Mio lulled in cool kiosk or bower. 

Before their mirrors count the time. 
And grow still lorelier every hour. 

XOOHT. 



TO A J A S AI I y E TREE. 
i:\ THi corRT or hawoeth cattle. 

yir slight and slender Jasimne-tree, 

That bloomest on my border tower. 
Thou art more dearly loved by me. 

Than all the wealth of fairy bower. 
I ask not, while I near thee dwell, 

Arabia's spice or Syria's rose ; 
Thy light festoons more freshly smell, 

Thv virgin white more freshly slows. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 

My mild and winsome Jasmine-tree, 

That climbest up the dark grey wall. 
Thy tiny flowerets seem in glee, 

Like silver spray-drogs, dov/n to fall : 
Say, did they from their leaves thus peep, 

When mailed moss-troopers rode the hill ; 
When helmed warders paced the keep, 

And bugles blew for Belted Will 1* 

My free and feathery Jasmine-tree, 

Within the fragrance of thy breath, 
Yon dungeon grated to its key, 

And the chained captive pined for death. 
On border fray, on feudal crime, 

I dream not while I gaze on thee ; 
The chieftains of that stern old time 

Could ne'er have loved a Jasmine-tree. 

LOUD MOKPETH. 



* LorJ William Hjwiird.— See " Lay of ihe Lust Miiis- 
irel,"&c. 



. FLORA AND THALIA, 73 



KING-CUP, OR MEADOW CROWFOOT. 
{Ranunculus acris.) 

This is a perennial plant, and a native of mear 
dows and moist pastures, flowering in June and 
July ; on being applied to the skin it excites itching, 
redness, and inflammation, and even produces blis- 
ters ; on being chewed it corrodes the tongue, and if 
taken into the stomach brings on all the deleterious 
efl[ects of an acrid poison. Mr. Curtis observes that 
even pulling up this plant and carrying it some little 
distance, excited considerable inflammation in the 
palm of the hand in which it was carried ; but the 
acrimonious quality of this plant is completely dis- 
sipated by heat, and on its being thoroughly dried, 
becomes perfectly bland. 

The flowers, have, however, a pleasing appearance 
in our meadows, which they enamel with their bright 
yellow cups. 

Class, PoLTAXURiA. Order, Poltgynia. 



10 



74 FLORA AND THALIA. 

TO THE KING-CUP. 
Simple pledge of June's returning, 

Pleasing 'tis to see thy bloom, 
Winter's rudest terrors spurning, 

Rising forth from Nature's tomb. 

Thy bright form betokens pleasure. 

When no piercing winds assail ; 

* June's creations, brightest treasure. 

Soon will breathe a sweeter gale. 

Yet, bright flow'r, thy fate too often 

Emblem is of others' woe ; 
When warm airs stern winter soften. 

Thy rich petals burst and blow. 

But with sithe the mower hieing 
To the mead with anxious breath ; 

Then around thee danger's flying. 

Then, bright flower, you sink in death. 

So it is with human sorrow. 

Some dear friend smiles on our joy, 
Anticipation cheers the morrow, 

Bliss feels then no dread alloy. 
But alas ! stern sickness seizing. 

Sinks the sufferer to his doom ; 
When the soul, with prospects pleasing. 

Mounts to joys beyond the tomb. 

ALTERED FROM LACy's PRIMROSE. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 75 



LAVENDER. 

(^Lavandula spica.) 

This plant is perennial, and grows spontaneously 
in many of the southern parts of Europe, of which 
it is a native. It flowers from July to September, 
and from the fragrance of its blossom, is now so ge- 
nerally cultivated, that we can scarcely enter a gar- 
den where it is not to be found. To most people 
the perfume is agreeable, and the weU-known Laven- 
der water, so refreshing in a warm or crowded room, 
is made from its flowers. According to Dr. Cullen, 
Lavender is, when taken internally or applied exter- 
nally, a powerful stimulant to the nervous system. 
The corollas of this plant are as it were turned 
topsy turvy, that which is the upperpart in most 
others being the lower in this, and vice versa : the 
calyces are supported by a bracte, and the stamens 
lie within the tube. 

• Class, DxDYJfAMiA. Order, Gymnospermia. 



76 FLORA AND THALIA. 



TO THE LAVENDER. 

Sweet lavender, sweet lavender, 
Fresh gathered from the tree, 
No lad or lass could finer bunches 
Ever wish to see. 

Its perfume keeps the moths away, 
That Sunday clothes devour ; 
Come buy, come buy my lavender, 
Sweet lavender in flower. 

Sweet lavender, sweet lavender, 
In vain, alas ! I cry, 
Altho' I offer bargains rare 
To every passer by. 
I've fasted long, and laboured hard 
Through many a sultry hour ; 
In pity buy my lavender, 
Sweet lavender in flower. 

MBS. T. WELSH. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 



THE LAVENDER AND THE POPPY. 

(A Fable in imitation of Lang-home.) 

A PoppT, clothed in scarlet pride, 

Once blossomed 'midst a garden's bowers : 

Filled with conceit, he pertly cried, 

One morn to all the neighb'ring flowers, — 

" Ye vile-clad plants — ye rabble, how 
Dare you approach thus near to me, 

And do not all most humbly bow. 

When garments such as mine you see 1" 

The Lavender grew close beside, 

Of modest and retiring hue, 
(For such is merit,) and replied. 

To him whose worthlessness she knew, — 

" Base Fop ! 'tis thus I always find 
The proud, the foolish, and the vain ; 

All that they want in heart or mind, 
They try by outward pomp to gain. 

" The blossoms, of which now you boast, 
Soon shall decay upon the ground ; 

Another day, or two, at most, 

Where will their gaudy tints be found ] 



i FLORA AND THALIA. 

" But know, that I a fragrance give — 

A fragrance that can never die ; 
E'en when my colours cease to live, 

My leaves that perfume shall supply." 

Truly she spoke : the next day sees 
The fopling Poppy stripped and bare ; 

Its gaudy blooms are on the breeze. 
And tossed by every breath of air. 

The Lavender still sweetly grew, 

Till Anne, one Summer morning, found, 

By its rich fragrance where it grew ; 

Its heads she plucked and gently bound. 

But still it gives its inatchless scent. 
Sweet as that maiden's spotless mind. 

Which, when old age her charms has reft. 
Will charm by what is left behind. 

R. PATTEESOIf. 

Belfast. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 



MEZEREON. 

(^Daphne mezereum.) 

This beautiful and hardy shrub is a native of 
England, and is found growing wild in the woods 
near Andover, in Hampshire, and about Laxfield, in 
Suffolk. The colour of their blossoms varies in hue 
from deep red to peach-coloured and white. 

This shrub, which is valued for visiting us when 
few others are in bloom, flowers in February and 
March; the blossoms surround the stem, and the 
leaves, which are lance-shaped, appear at the ter- 
minations of the branches after the flowers are 
expanded. 

There is a different sort found wild in woods and 
shady hedges, called spurge laurel, (Daphne lau- 
reola,) which is evergreen ; but it will not bear a 
comparison with the Daphne mezereu'm, the corol- 
las being of a dingy green, and not having the agree- 
able odour of that more beautiful shrub. The 
germen, which is oval, becomes a beautiful red berry, 
and is said to be poisonous both to man and beast, 
but birds eat freely of it. 

Class, OcTANDRiA. Order, Monogtxia. 



80 FLORA AND THALIA. 



ON RECEIVING A BRANCH OF 
MEZEREON, 

WHICH flowehed at WOODSTOCK, dece:mber, 1803, 

ODoms of spring, my sense ye charm 

With fragrance premature, 
And, 'mid these days of dark alarm, 

Almost to hope'allure. 
Methinks with purpose soft ye came, 

To tell of brighter hours, 
Of May's blue skies, abundant bloom. 

Her sunny gales and- showers. 

Alas ! for me shall May in vain 

The powers of life restore; 
These eyes, that weep and watch in pain. 

Shall see her charms no more. 
No, no, this anguish cannot last ! 

Beloved friends, adieu ! 
The bitterness of death were past, 

Could I resign but you. 



"H' 






li 



l> 




^■■' 



\-y 



FLORA AND THALIA. 81 

Oh ye ! who soothe the pangs of death 

With love's own patient care, 
Still, still retain this fleeting breath, 

Still pour the fervent prayer. 
And ye, whose smile must greet my eye 

No more, nor voice my ear. 
Who breathe for me the tender sigh, 

And shed the pitying tear; 

Whose kindness (though far, far removed) 

My grateful thoughts perceive ; 
Pride of my life — esteemed, beloved. 

My last sad claim receive ! 
Oh do not quite your friend forget — 

Forget alone her faults ; 
And speak of her with fond regret. 

Who asks your lingering thoughts. 

MRS. TIGHE. 



u 



82 FLORA AND THALIA. 



NARCISSUS. 

(J^/^arcissiis Tazetta.) 

This beautiful and fragrant flower is a native of 
Northern India, of China, and Japan. Sir James 
Smith informs us that it decorated in profusion the 
banks of the Alpheus: even the barbarians had taste 
enough to collect nosegays of those lovely flowers. 
The appearance of this elegantly formed flower, so 
early in the season, we hail with more pleasure, 
because it is almost among the first to welcome the 
approach of spring. The colour of the corolla varies ; 
some being white, with a deep yellow cup edged 
with red ; others pale primrose ; and some entirely 
of a bright yellow. By the art of cultivation, the 
florists have produced a very fine variety with double 
petals in the corolla. 

Class, Hexandria. Order, Monogtxia. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 83 



TO THE NARCISSUS. 

Arise, and speak thy sorrows, Echo, rise; 
Here, by this fountain, where thy love did pine, 
Whose memory lives fresh to vulgar fame, 
Shrined in this yellow flower, that bears his name. 

Echo. — His name revives, and lifts me up from earth ; 
See, see, the mourning fount, whose springs weep yet 
Th' untimely fate of that too beauteous boy, 
That trophy of self-love, and spoil of nature. 
Who (now transformed into this drooping flower) 
Hangs the repentant head back from the stream ; 
As if it wished, — would I had never looked 
In such a flattering mirror ! O Narcissus ! 
Thou that wast once (and yet art) my Narcissus, 
Had Echo but been private with thy thoughts, 
She would have dropt away herself in tears, 
Till she had all turned water, that in her 
(As in a truer glass) thou might'st have gaz'd. 
And seen thy beauties by more kind reflection. 
But self-love never yet could look on truth. 
But with bleared beams; slick Flattery and she 
Are twin-born sisters, and do mix their eyes, 
As, if you sever one, the other dies. 



84 FLORA AND THALIA. 

Why did the gods give thee a heavenly form, 
And earthly thoughts to make thee proud of iti 
Why do I ask 1 'Tis now the known disease 
That Beauty hath, to bear too deep a sense 
Of her ovm self-conceived excellence. 
O hadst thou known the worth of heaven's rich gift, 
Thou wouldst have turned it to a truer use, 
And not (with starved and covetous ignorance) 
Pined in continual eyeing that bright gem 
The glance whereof to others had been more, 
Than to thy famished mind, the wide world's store. 

BEX joxsox. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 85 



THE NARCISSUS. 

Heue young Narcissus o'er the fountain stood, 
And viewed his image in the crystal flood ; 
The crystal flood reflects his lovely charms, 
And the pleased image strives to meet his arms. 
No nymph his unexperienced breast subdued, 
Echo in vain the flying boy pursued. 
Himself alone, the foolish youth admires, 
And with fond look the smiling shade desires ; 
O'er the smooth lake with fruitless tears he grieves ; 
His spreading fingers shoot in verdant leaves; 
Through his pale veins green sap now gently flows. 
And in a short lived flow'r his beauty blows. 
Let vain Narcissus warn each female breast, 
That beauty's but a transient good at best ; 
Like flow'rs it withers with th' advancing year, 
And age like winter robs the blooming fair. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 87 



ORCHIS. 

( Orchis.) 

This plant, which is common in meadows, is a 
perennial, flowering in April and May. 

There are no less than fifty different species of the 
Orchis; which, seeming to spurn culture and art, 
are not capable of essential changes, except in the 
colour of the flowers; and they require to be ex- 
amined to see all their beauty. For this purpose we 
should seek for them abroad in the meadows; and 
one of the great advantages of botany is, that- we 
must add exercise to study, as we cannot learn it 
from books, sitting in our easy chair by the fire-side. 
The root is gelatinous, and possesses the same quali- 
ties as gum arable. The saloop, which is imported 
here from the east, and was formerly held in great 
estimation, is now well known to be a preparation of 
the Orchis roots. 

Mr, Mault has recommended a method of pre- 
paring them ; and his specimens of salep were equal, 
if not superior, to that brought from the Levant: it 
is as follows : — 



88 FLORA AND THALIA. 

" The root is to be washed hi water, and the fine 
brown skin which covers it to be separated by means 
of a small brush, dipping the roots in hot water, and 
rubbing them with a coarse linen cloth ; when 
cleansed, they are to be spread upon tin, and placed 
in an oven heated as for bread ; there they are to 
remain six or ten minutes, by which time they will 
have lost their milky whiteness, and have acquired 
a trasparency like horn, without any diminution of 
bulk ; they are then to be removed, to dry and 
harden in the air, which will require several days, 
Saloop, considered as an article of diet, is extremely 
nutritious, containing a great quantity of farinaceous 
matter in a small bulk ; and hence it was thought 
fit to constitute it a part of ships' provisions, to pre- 
vent famine at sea; for it is asserted by Dr. Per- 
cival that one ounce of this saloop, and the same 
quantity of portable soup, dissolved in two quarts of 
boiling water, will be sufficient sustenance for one 
man a day. The Romans believed it to be the food 
of the satyrs ; hence the name Orchis Satyrium. 

Class, Gy:vandria. Order, Diastdaia. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 89 



THE ORCHIS. 



See, Delia, see this image bright; 

Why starts my fair one at the sight? 

It mounts not on obtrusive wing, 

Nor threats thy breast with angry sting ; 

Admire, as close the insect lies. 

Its thin-wrought plume and honey 'd thighs ; 

Whilst on this flow'ret's velvet breast 

It seems as though 'twere luU'd to rest, 

Nor might its fairy wings unfold, 

Enchain'd in aromatic gold. 

Think not to set the captive free — 

'Tis but the picture of a bee. 

Yet wonder not that Nature's power 
Should paint an insect in a flower. 
And stoop to means that bear in part 
Itesemblance to imperfect art. 
Nature, who could that form inspire 
With strength and sv/iftness, life and fire. 
And bid it search each spicy vale. 
Where flowers their fragrant souls exhale ; 
And labouring for the parent hive. 
With murmurs make the wild alive. 
12 



90 FLORA AND THALIA. 

For when in Parian stone we trace 
Some best-remember'd form or face ; 
Or see on radiant canvass rise 
An imitative paradise; 
And feel the warm affections' glow. 
Pleased at the pencil's mimic show ; 
'Tis but obedience to the plan 
From Nature's birth proposed to man ; 
Who, lest her choicest sweets in vain 
Should blossom for our thankless train ; 
Lest beauty pass unheeded by, 
Like cloud upon the summer sky ; 
Lest mem'ry of the brave and just. 
Should sleep with them consigned to dust ; 
With leading hand th' expedient proves, 
And paints for us the form she loves. 

R. SNOW, Esa. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 91 



CLOVE PINK. 

(Diaiithns Caryophilius.) 

This fragrant plant is perennial, and grows wild in 
several parts of England, in old walls and in crevices 
of rocks (at Rochester, Deal, Sandown, and other 
castles, plentifully) : but the choicest kinds are cul- 
tivated in our gardens, where they become extremely 
luxuriant ; and by the aid of culture, that beautiful 
variety is raised, so highly esteemed under the name 
of Carnation ; and which is universally acknowledged 
a worthy leader of one of the finest natural orders. 
When we consider the size of the flower, the beauty 
of its colour, the arrangement of its parts, and, above 
all, the sin^larly rich and spicy odour that it ex- 
hales, we cannot withhold that tribute of admiration 
which will ever be given it. For ornament and 
beauty, we should gather these flowers from the 
parterre ; but as botanists, we should take them from 
a wall, or a dry untilled soil, where their simplicity, 
and the clearness of their natural character, will make 
amends for their want of splendour. 

Class, Decandria. Order, Digynia. 



92 FLORA AND THALIA, 



PINKS AND CARNATIONS. 

Stat while ye will,- or goe, 

And leave no scent behind ye ; 
Yet, trust me, I shall know 

The place where I may find ye. 
Within my Lucia's cheek, 

(Whose livery ye wear) 
Play ye at hide or seeke, 

I'm sure to find ye there. 



So smell those odours that do rise 

From out the wealthy spiceries ; 

So smells the flower of blooming clove. 

Or roses smothered in the stove ; 

So smells the air of spiced wine, 

Or essences of jessamine ; 

So smells the breath about the hives, 

When well the work of honey thrives, 

And the busie factours come 

Laden with wax and honey home; 



FLORA AND THALIA. 93 

So smell those neat and woven bowers, 
All over arched with orange-flowers, 
And almond-blossoms that do mix, 
To make rich these aromatics ; 
Thus sweet the smells ; oh ! what can be 
More liked by her, or loved by me 1 

HEBRICK. 



The warden of these haughty towers 

Has reared me into day ; 
And well the proud carnation's flowers, 

The cares of man repay. 
In Flora's thousand glories drest, 

My varied petals bloom, 
And well the loaded gales attest, 

Their burdens of perfume. 

FROM THE GERMAN OF GOETHE, 



'0* 

94 FLORA AND THALIA. 



QUINCE. 

(Pyrus Cydonia.) 

This tree, which seldom rises very high, being 
usually crooked and distorted, appears originally to 
have been brought from Cydon, in Crete ; hence the 
name Cydonia. At present the Quince grows wild 
upon the banks of the Danube, though in a much 
less luxuriant state than in our British gardens. 
The deUcate pink blossoms of this tree, add much to 
the beautiful appearance of our orchards ; and the 
flavour of its fruit is too well known to need any 
comment. 

Class, IcosANDBiA. Order, Pextagynia. 



«fts| 




FLORA AND THALIA. 95 




THE QUINCE TREE. 

I HAD a little comely cot, 

As neat as cottage well could be ; 
And near it rose a garden-plot, 

Where flourished one delightful tree ; 

Ah ! 'twas a tree of trees to me ! 

Its crooked branches o'er my head, 
Waved wide, an arched canopy ; 

And its bright leaves benignly spread 
A fan of green embroidery, 
That shaded all my family. 

It was a screen from wind or sun, 

A veil from curiosity ; 
And when its summer bloom was gone, 

We still could feast with social glee, 

On its autumnal fruitery. 

E'en Winter oft has seen it gay. 

With fretted frost-work spangled o'er ; 

While pendants drooped from every spray. 
And crimson budlets told once more, 
That Spring would all its charms restore ! 



96 FLORA AND THALIA^ 

But I have left that comely cot, 

Where blossoms now my favourite tree ; 

And I possess an ampler spot, 
Which boasts of more variety. 
And more enraptures all but me. 

ALTERED FROM PARk's FILBERT TREE. 



PROVENCE, OR HUNDRED-LEAVED ROSE. 

{Rosa centifolia.) 

This elegant species of rose-bush, a native of 
Europe, vpas first cultivated in Englahd in the year 
1596. According to the Hortus Cantab rigiensis, 
there are fifty-eight species of the Rose, of which the 
moss rose is perhaps the most beautiful. This spe- 
cies rises in our English gardens from four to five 
feet ; but in Persia it grows to much greater perfec- 
tion. Many of the roses, though so much cultivated 
in our gardens, are far from being distinctly charac- 
terised; those denominated varieties are extremely 
numerous, and often permanently uniform ; and the 
specific differences are, in many respects, so inade- 
quate to the purpose of satisfactory disciimination, 
that it becomes difficult to say which are varieties 
only. 



m 




LORA AND THALIA. 97 

the world is the rose so much es- 
Persia, where they hold a festival in 
this flower. 

Rose ! thou art the sweetest flower 

That ever drank the amber shower ; 

Rose ! thou art the fondest child 

Of dimpled Spring, and wood-nymph wild ; 

Even the gods, who walk the sky, 

Are amorous of thy scented sigh. 



The rosa canina, or dog rose, which adorns our 
hedges in the summer, bears the fruit known by the 
name of heps, of which the well-known conserve is 
made. 

Class, IcosANDRiA. Order, PoLTGXifiA. 



13 



98 FLORA AND THALI 




LOVE IN A ROSE-BUD. 

A FRAGMEXT. 

As late each flower that sweetest blows 
I plucked, the garden pride ; 

Within the petals of a Rose 
A sleeping Love I spied. 

Around his brows a beamy wreath 

Of many a lucent hue ; 
All purple glowed his cheek beneath, 
• Inebriate with dew. 



COIERIDGE. 



A THOUGHT OF THE ROSE. 

Rosa, Rosa ! ijerche sulla tua belta, 
^empre e scritta questa parola— Morte ? 

How much of memory dwells amidst thy bloora, 
Rose ! ever wearing beauty for thy dower ! 

The bridal day — the festival — the tomb — 
Thou hast thy part in each, thou stateUest flower ! 



FLORA AND THALIA. 99 

Therefore, Vj^Pthy soft breath, come floating by 
A thoussaSid images of love and grief; 

DireiBftSf'Elled with tokens of mortaUty ; 

Deep thoughts of all things beautiful and brief. 

Not such thy spell o'er those who hailed thee first. 
In the clear light of Eden's golden day ; 

There thy rich leaves to crimson glory burst, 
Linked with no dim remembrance of decay. 

Rose ! for the banquet gathered, and the bier ! 

Rose ! coloured now by human hope or pain ; 
Surely, where death is not, nor change, nor fear. 

Yet we may meet thee, joy's own flower, again. 

MRS. HEMANS. 



THE LAST ROSE OF SUMMER. 

'Tis the last Rose of summer 

Left blooming alone, 
All her lovely companions 

Are faded and gone ; 
No flower of her kindred. 

No rose-bud is nigh. 
To reflect back her blushes. 

And give sigh for sigh. 




100 FLORA AND THALIA, 

I'll not leave thee, thou Ion 

To pine on the stem ; 
Since the lovely are sleeping, 

Go, sleep thou with them. 
Thus kindly I scatter 

Thy leaves on the bed, 
Where thy mates of the garden 

Lie scentless and dead. 

So soon may I follow. 
When friendships decay, 

And from love's shining circle 
The gems drop away ; 

When true hearts lie withered, 

And fond ones are flown, 
Oh ! who would inhabit 

This cold world alone ? 

T. MOORE. 




LORA AND THALIA. 101 



SURE THE ROSE IS LIKE A SIGH. 

CO:>IPOSED BT A BLIKD CHILD. 

If this delicious grateful flower, 
Which blooms but for a little hour, 
Should to the sight as lovely be 
As from its fragrance seems to me, 
A sigh must then its colour show, 
For that's the softest joy I know. 
And sure the Rose is like a sigh. 
Born just to soothe, and then to die. 

My father, when our fortune smiled, 
With jewels decked his sightless child; 
Their glittering worth the world might see, 
But ah ! they shed no sweets for me ! 
Still as the present failed to charm, 
The trickling drops bedew'd my arm ; 
And sure the gem to me most dear, 
Was a kind father's pitying tear. 



102 FLORA AND THALIA. 

9> 



THE ROSE. 

As through a garden late I roved, 
And musing walked along, 

While list'ning to the blackbird's note, 
Or linnet's cheerful song; 

Around were flowers of various hues ; 

The pink and daisy pied ; 
When, in the centre of a grove, 

A blushing rose I spied. 

Eager to pluck the beauteous flower, 

I quickly hastened there ; 
Securely in my bosom placed. 

And watched with tender care. 

Its fragrant odours grateful were, 
And pleasant to the sense ; 

Its leaves with brighest colours glowed 
Like virgin innocence. 

But, lo, ere evening dews descend. 
Those beauteous tints were fled ; 

Withered and blasted in their prime. 
And drooped its tow'ring head. 




FLORA AND THALIA. 103 

Sweet blossom ! then T sighing said, 

Hov.' soon thy beauties die ; 
The I'airest flower the garden knows, 

With thee in vain would vie. 

Be thou my silent monitor, 

And warn my heedless youth. 
The graces of the mind to seek, 

In piety and truth. 

For outward charms of shape or face 

Soon wither, like the rose ; 
But virtue, lovely e'en in death, 

Fresh beauties will disclose, 

OBIGIITAI. 



104 FLORA AND THALIA. 



THE YOUNG ROSE. 

The young Rose which I gave thee, so dewy and 

bright, 
Was the flow'ret most dear to the sweet bird of 

night ; 
Who oft by the moon o'er her blushes hath hung, 
And thrilled every leaf with the wild lay he sung. 

Oh ! take, then, this young Rose, and let her life be. 
Prolonged by her breath she will borrow from thee ! 
For while o'er her bosom thy soft notes shall thrill, 
She'll think the sweet night-bird is courting her still. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 105 



BUD BY MY EARLY WALK, 

A ROSE-BUD, by my early walk, 
A down a corn-inclosed bawk, 
Sae gently bent its thorny stalk, 

All on a dewy morning. 
Ere twice the shades d' dawn are fled. 
In a' its crimson glory spread. 
And drooping rich the dewy head, 

It scents the early morning. 
Within the bush, her covert nest 
A little linnet fondly prest. 
The dew sat chilly on her breast 

Sae early in the morning. 
She soon shall see her tender brood 
The pride, the pleasure o' the wood, 
Among the fresh green leaves bedew'd. 

Awake the early morning. 
So thou, dear bird, young Jenny fair. 
On trembling string, or vocal air, 
Shall sweetly pay the tender care 

That tents thy early morning. 
So thou, sweet Rose-bud, young and gay, 
Shalt beauteous blaze upon the day. 
And bless the parent's evening ray, 

That watch'd thy early morning. 

BURKS. 
14 



106 FLORA AND THALIA. 



THE ROSE OF SUMMER 

Child of the Summer, charming Rose, 

No longer in confinement lie ; 
Arise to light, thy form disclose, 

Rival the spangles of the sk3^ 

The rains are gone, the storms are o'er, 
Winter retires to make thee way : 

Come, then, thou sweetly-blushing flow'r. 
Come, lovely stranger, come away. 

The sun is dress'd in beaming smiles, 
To give thy beauties to the day ; 

Young zephyrs wait with gentle gales. 
To fan thy bosom as they play. 

CASSIMin. 



THE DOG ROSE. 
The rose is fairest when 'tis budding new. 
And hope is brightest when it dawns from fears ; 
The rose is sweetest washed with morning dew, 
And love is loveliest when embalmed in tears. 
O, wilding Rose, whom fancy thus endears^ 
I bid your blossoms in my bonnet wave, 
Emblem of hope and love through future years. 

LADY OF THE LAKE. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 107 

THE MOSS-ROSE. 

{Rosa imiscosa.) 

The Rose-bud swelled in Sharon's vale, 
And bloom'd in Eden beauteously, 

It drank the breath of southern gale, 
It prov'd the warmth of summer sky ; 

But o'er thy growth no summer rose, 

But drifted lay the untrodden snows. 

The Rose of England beamed of yore, 

In lily and in crimson hue; 
Its bloom was dipped in human gore. 

And sullied were its leaves to view; 
But thou hast spread amidst the storm. 
In stainless purity thy form. 

Sweet innocence ! by mercy fed, 

With light, and warmth, and shelter meet ; 
Whilst winter all his horrors sped, 

In drifted snow and driving sleet ; 
Thus have I seen, in maiden form, 
A beauteous nursling of the storm ! 

Sweet purity ! no grosser breath 

Of fervid winds and scorching skies, 

Taught thee to spring from mother earth. 
And, midst impurities arise ; 



108 FLORA AND THALIA. 

But thou hast sprung a lovely thing, 4|^|||^ 
Nor proved the genial breath of SprinUPPiP 

Sweet messenger of triumph due, 
O'er death in all its wintry pride, 

He cannot quench one living hue. 

Which Heaven has destined to abide, 

Undimm'd 'midst Nature's dire decay. 

To blossom in eternal day. 

I'll fix thee here beside my heart, 

To calm its pulse, and check its play. 

To heal its wounds, and soothe its smart. 
And chase the rankUng thought away ; 

For surely nought of earthly care, 

May mar its peace when thou art there. 

GILLESPIE. 



Oh, sooner shall the Rose of May 
Mistake her own sweet nightingale. 

And to some newer minstrel's lay. 
Open her bosom's glowing veil,* 

Than love shall ever doubt a tone, 

A breath of the beloved one. 

MOORE. 

* A frequent image among Oriental pcets. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 109 



THE MOSS-ROSE. 

The Angel of the Flowers, one day, 

Beneath a rose-tree sleeping lay ; 

That spirit to whom charge is given, 

To bathe young buds in dews of heaven ; 

Awaking from his light repose, 

The Angel whispered to the Rose : — 

" O, fondest object of my care, 

Still fairest found, where all is fair; 

For the sweet shade thou giv'st to me, 

Ask what thou wilt, 'tis granted thee !" 

" Then," said the Eose, with deepened glow, 

" On me another grace bestow." 

The spirit paused in silent thought ; — 

What grace was there the flower had not 1 — 

'Twas but a moment — o'er the Rose 

A veil of moss, the Angel throws ; 
\ ' ^ ' 

And robed in tiature's simplest weed. 

Could there a flower that Rose exceed 1 

FROM THE GEKMAX. 



110 FLORA AND THALIA. 



THE MOSS-ROSE. 

In the garden of Venus a Moss-rose grew, 

As sweet as a morning in May ; 
But the sunbeams had drank all her exquisite dew, 

And left her, alas ! to decay. 
A Zephyr, who long in his covert had lain, 

As the twilight advancing stole out, 
He danced with the Gossamers over plain? »-ja 

And fanned them in ether about. 
He saw the Rose drooping, as nearer he flew. 

And skipped round her withering stem ; 
The soft air of evening over her blew. 

And decked her with many a gem. 
As lovely again did appear the Moss-rose, 

As when in her earlier bloom ; 
And to Zephyr she gave, as she sank to repose, 

All the sweets of her luscious perfume. 

T. B. 



FLORA AND THALIA. Ill 

THE ROSE. 
AN IDYLL.* 

Said Ino, " I prefer the Rose 

To every radiant flower that blows ; ' 

For when the smiUng seasons fly, 

And winds and rain deform the sky, 

And roses lose their vivid bloom, 

Their leaves retain a sweet perfume. 

Emblem of virtue ! virtue stays 

When beauty's transient hue decays; 

Nor age, nor fortune's frowoi efface, 

Or injure her inherent grace." 

" True," answered Daphnis ; " but observe, 

Unless some careful hand preserve 

The leaves, before their tints decay, 

They fall neglected ; blown away 

By wintry winds or beating rains. 

No breath of fragrancy remains. 

Some kindly hand must interpose ; 

For sore the wintry tempest blows. 

And weak and deUcate's the Rose." 

mCHARDSOX. 

* The Idyll, or Idyllion, seems to signify, according to th« 
practice of the ancients, a representation in verse, most com. 
monly of some pastoral or rural incident. 



113 FLORA AND THALIA. 

TO MY BELOVED DAUGHTER. 

The Rose that hails the morning, 

Arrayed in all its sweets, 
Its mossy couch adorning, 

The sun enamoured meets; 
Yet when the warm beam rushes, 

Where hid, in gloom, it lies, 
O'erwhelmed with glowing blushes, 

The hapless victim dies. 

Sweet maid, this Rose discovers 

How frail is beauty's doom, 
When flattery round it hovers, 

To spoil its proudest bloom : 
Then shun each gaudy pleasure, 

That lures thee on to fade, 
And guard thy beauty's treasure 

To decorate a shade. ' 

MARY ROBIXSON. 



ON THE ROSE. 

Ye violets, that fii'st appear. 

By. your pure purple mantles known, 

Like the proud virgins of the year, 
As if the spring were all your own — 
What are ye when the Rose is blown T 

SIR H. WOTTON. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 113 



ON THE OPENED ROSE. 

Oh mark those smiling tears, that swell 
The opened Rose ; from heaven they fell. 

And with the sunbeams blend ; 
Blest visitations from above, 
Such are the tender woes of love, 

Fostering the heart they bend.. 

S. T., COLERIDGE. 



ON THE SAME. 

Yon viewless wanderer of the vale, 
The spirit of the western gale, 
At morning's break, at evening's close, 
Inhales the sweetness of the Rose ; 
And hovers o'er the uninjured bloom, 
Sighing back the soft perfume ; 
Vigour to the zephyr's wing, 
Her nectar-breathing kisses fting ; 
And he the glitter of the dew, 
Scatters on the Rose's hue. 
Bashful, lo ! she bends her head, 
And darts a blush of deeper red ! 

». T. eOUEItlOGX. 

15 



14 FLORA AND THALIA. 



THE ROSE-BUD. 

Beauteous Kose-bud, young and gay, 

Blooming in the early May ; 

Never mayst thou, lovely flow'r. 

Chilly shrink in sleety show'r ! 

Never Boreas' hoary path, 

Never Eurus' pois'nous breath, 

Never baleful stellar lights, 

Taint thee with untimely blights ! 

Never, never, reptile thief. 

Riot on thy virgin leaf! 

Not even Sol too fiercely view 

Thy bosom blushing still with dew! 

Mayst thou long, sweet crimson gem, 

Richly deck thy native stem ; 

Till some ev'ning, sober, calm. 

Dropping dews, and breathing balm, 

"While all around the woodland rings, 

And ev'ry bird thy requiem sings; 

Thou, amid the dirgeful sound, 

Shed thy dying honours round, 

And resign to parent earth. 

The loveliest form she e'er gave birth. 

B17RKS. 



FLOJ^A AND THALIA. 115 



( Cojivallaria poli/g-o?iatiim.) 

This plant is perennial, and a native of Britain, 
growing in rocky and woody parts, and flowering 
in May and June. The root is beset with knobs, 
and marked with circular depressions, resembling 
the impression of a seal ; hence it has acquired the 
name " Solomon's Seal." 

In Galen's time this plant was much used by 
ladies to remove freckles, and for beautifying the 
skin. The berries, flowers, and leaves, are said to be 
poisonous. 

Class, Hexandria. Order, Moivogtnia. 



116 FLORA AND THALIA. 



White bud ! that in meek beauty so dost lean, 

Thy cloistered cheek as pale as moonlight snow, 
Thou seem'st beneath thy large high leaf of green, 

An eremite beneath his mountain's brow. 
White bud ! thou'rt emblem of a lovetide thing, 

The broken spirit that its anguish bears 
To silent shades ; and there sits offering 

To heaven the holy fragrance of its tears. 

ANOy. 

Sweet flower, you fondly strive to hide 

Your lovely form public view, 
While the gay blossom's eastern pride 

Appears in every varied hue. 

So will a cultur'd feeling mind, 

Oft trembling shrink from worldly gaze ; 

Whilst flippant wit, at ease reclined. 
Spreads all around its transient rays. 

Yet do I love that modest flower, 

Which blossoms in the humble shade, 

And asks not for the sun's bright power, 
By which this splendid plant's arrayed. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 117 



SPARE MY FLOWER. 

Oh spare my flower, ray gentle flower, 

The slender creature of a day ! 
Let it bloom out its little hour, . 
And pass away. 
Too soon its fleeting charms must lie 

Decayed, unnoticed, overthrown ; 
O, hasten not its destiny. 

Too like thy own. 

The breeze will roam this way to-morrow, 

And sigh to find its playmate gone : 
The bee will come its sweets to borrow, 
And meet with none. 
O spare ! and let it still outspread 
Its beauties to the passing eye, 
And look up from its lowly bed. 
Upon the sky. 

O spare my flower ! thou know'st not what 

Thy undiscerning hand would tear ; 
A thousand charms thou notest not, 
Lie treasured there. 



Il8 



FLORA AND THALIA. 

Not Solomon, in all his state, 

Was clad like Nature's simplest child ; 
Nor could the world combined create 
One flow 'ret wild. 

Spare, then, this humble monument 

Of an Almighty's power and skill ; 
And let it at his shrine present 

Its homage still- 
He made it, who made nought in vain ; 

He watches it, who watches thee ; 
And He can best its date ordain, 
Who bade it be. 

O spare my flower ! for it is frail, 

A timid, weak, imploring thing — 
And let it still upon the gale, 

Its moral fling. 
That moral thy reward shall be : 

Catch the suggestion, and apply — 
" Go live like me," it cries ; " like me 
" Soon, soon, to die." 

RET. F. H. LITE. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 119 



TOBACCO. 

{JYicotiana Tabacum.) 

Tobacco is a native of America, and was first im- 
ported into Europe about the middle of the sixteenth 
century, by Herniandez de Toledo, who sent it to 
Spain and Portugal. At that time the ambassador 
of Francis II. resided at the court of Lisbon ; and 
in the year 1560 he carried the tobacco into France 
when it was presented to Catharine de Medicis, as a 
plant from the New World, possessing extraordinary 
virtues ; the ambassadors name was Nicot, from 
whence it has taken the name Nicotiana. 

The tobacco is an annual plant, flowering in July 
and August, and is now common in various parts of 
the globe ; it is frequently used medicinally, although 
proved to be a deleterious poison. The fume of it is 
often applied to destroy the insects on plants in 
greenhouses and conservatories, and also to keep 
moths from woollen cloths and furs. 

Class, Pentanbria. Order, Monogtnia. 



* 



120 FLORA AND THALIA. 



THE TOBACCO PLANT. 

How short-lived the struggle for honour or power, 
Of the brightest rose-bud, or more fragrant flower, 
Who claim for their form, or their beauty alone, 
Their right to be placed on the garden throne ; 
A form without blemish may strike the sight. 
Or fragrance alone the senses delight ; 
But I have been prized for my virtues I ween. 
And was once quite beloved by an English queen ;* 
No disdain, then^ I fear, nor from beauty a frown, 
Since the worth of Tobacco was owned by a crown. 
How can the gay tulip, then, e'er think to claim, 
From the labour of poets such honour or fame ; 
Or the poor lowly violet, the offspring of chance, 
While I am esteemed both in Holland and France ; 
To visit the nobles I've crossed the Great Line ; 
I'm prized in all climates, such virtues are mine. 
Those honours I gain for my perfume alone ; 
True worth will be valued when beauty has flown. 

* Queen Charlotte, consort of George III. was very partial to 
snuff. 



..•^' 



FLORA AND THALIA. 131 



THE UVA-URSI, OR BEAR BERRY. 

The Uva-Ursi is perennial, a native of the 
northern parts of Britain, and flowers in June ; it 
grows in different parts of Europe and America in 
great abundance, particularly in sandy soils. This 
beautiful plant, though formerly employed by the 
ancients as a remedy for many diseases, has almost 
entirely fallen into disuse, except as an ornament in 
our green-houses : the delicacy of its blossoms, 
grouped together at the top of each branch, is not 
excelled by any flower that graces the conservatory, 
or green-house. 

Class, Decandria. Order, MoNOGyisriA. 



16 



122 FLORA AND THALIA. 



TO THE UVA-URSI. 

How modest, sweet, and bright, 
Your clust'ring flow'rs appear ; 

Above the leaves to hail the light, 
And meet the sunshine there. 

But when the summer's sun is sped, 
Where will your bloom be found ; 

Your blossoms gone, your leaves all dead, 
And scattered on the ground. 

Yet when next June's bright sun is high, 
Your modest flow'rs will spring 

In all their beauty to the sky, 
And leaves around you bring. 

Just such is youth of virtuous breast. 

He'll fade but yet to bloom ; 
And in his Saviour's bosom rest, 

When risen from the tomb. 



AlfON. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 133 



VIOLET PANSY, OR THREE-COLOUR- 
ED VIOLET. 

( Viola tricolor.). 

This plant grows wild in corn fields, waste, and 
cultivated grounds ; flowering all the summer, it 
varies much by culture, and, from the variety of its 
colours, often becomes extremely beautiful in our 
gardens. 

There are now twenty different coloured violets, 
or heartsease, cultivated by our florists. 

This flower, the universal favourite of the more 
simple unrefined ages, is one of those in which, when 
we compare the diminutive and almost colourless 
pansy, which we find wild among the corn, with the 
ample rich-coloured corolla and its tissue of velvet, 
as is now common in many gardens, we cannot but 
allow that human art has made a considerable im- 
provement; and we survey it with more pleasure, 
because it is not at the expense of the natural cha- 
racters of the flower. § 

This violet has numerous provincial names, all 
bearing some allusion to love ; perhaps the most uni- 
versal is that of heartsease. 

Class, Pentaxdria. Order, Monogtnia. 



124 FLORA AND THALIA. 



THE VIOLET. 

Wht better than the lady rose, 

Love I this little flower 1 
Because its fragrant leaves are those 

I loved in childhood's hour. 

Though many a flower may win my praise, 

The violet has my love ; 
I did not pass my childish days 

In garden or in grove. 

My garden was the window-seat, 

Upon whose edge was sdt 
A little vase, — the fair, the sweet, 

It was the violet. 

It was my pleasure and my pride ; 

How I did watch its growth ! 
For health and bloom what plans I tried. 

And often %ijured both. 

I placed it in the summer shower, 

I placed it in the sun ; 
And ever at the evening hour 

My work seemed half undone. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 125 

The broad leaves spread, the small buds grew, 

How slow they seemed to be, 
At last there came a tinge of blue, 

'Twas worth the world to me. 

At length the perfume fill'd the room, 

Shed from the purple wreath ; 
No flower has now has so rich a bloom^ 

Has now so sweet a breath. 

I gathered two or three — they seemed 

Such rich gifts to bestow : 
So precious in my sight, I deemed 

That all must think them so. 

Ah ! who is there but would be fain 

To be a child once more ; 
If future years could bring again 

All that they brought before ! 

My heart's world has been long o'erthrown. 

It is no more of flowers ; 
Their bloom is past, their breath is flown. 

Yet I recall those hours. 

Let nature spread her loveliest. 

By spring or summer nurst; 
Yet still I love the violet best, 

Because I loved it first. 

MISS LAXDOK. 



136 FLORA AND THALIA. 



LE VIOLE. 

NoN di verdi giardin, ornati e colti, 
Del soave e dolce acre Pestano, 
Veniam Madonna nella tua bianco mano; 

Ma in aspre selve, e valli ombrose colti 

Ove Venere afflitta, e in pensier mold 
Pel periglio d'Adon, correndo in vano, 
Un spino acuto al nudo pie villano 

Sparse del divin sangue i boschi folti ; 

Noi somraettimmo allore il bianco fiore, 
Tanto die 'Idivin sangue non aggiunge 

A terra, ond' il color purpureo nacque. 
Non.aure estive o vivi tolti a lunge 

Noi nutrit' anno, ma sospir d'amore 

L'aure son sute, e pianti d'Amare I'acque. 

LOREJfZO DE MEDICI. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 12" 



HEARTSEASE. 

(^Viola tricolor.') 

I USED to love thee, simple flower, 
To love thee dearly when a boy ; 

For thou didst seem, in childhood's hour. 
The smiling type of childhood's joy. 

But now thou only mock'st my grief, 
By waking thoughts of pleasures fled, 

Give me — give me the withered leaf, 
That falls on Autumn's bosom dead. 

For that ne'er tells of what has been, 
But warns me what I soon shall be ; 

It looks not back on pleasure's scene, 
But points unto futurity. 

I love thee not, thou simple flower. 
For thou art gay, and I am lone ; 

Thy beauty died with childhood's hour — 
The Heart's-ease from my path is gone. 

LONDOIf MAGAZINE. 



m 



128 FLORA AND THALIA, 



LOVE-IN-IDLENESS. 

Ix gardens oft a beauteous flower there grows, 
By vulgar eyes unnoticed and unseen ; 

In sweet security it humbly blows, 

And rears its purple head to deck the green. 

This flower, as Nature's poet sweetly sings. 

Was once milk-white, and Heart's-ease was its 
name. 

Till wanton Cupid poised its roseate wings, 
A vestal's sacred bosom to inflame. 

With treacherous aim the god his arrow drew, 
Which she with icy coldness did repel ; 

Rebounding thence with feathery speed it flew, 
Till on this lonely flower, at last, it fell. 

Heart's-ease no more the wandering shepherds found; 

No more the nymphs its snowy form possess ; 
Its white now changed to pmple by Love's wound, 

Heart's-ease no more, — 'tis Love-in-idleness. 

MRS. BKIXSLEY SHERIDAW. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 129 



THE ALPINE VIOLET. 

The spring is come, the Violet's gone, 

The first-born child of the early sun ; 

With us she is but a winter flower. 

The snow on the hills cannot blast her bower ; 

And she lifts up her dewy eye of blue, 

To the youngest sky of the self-same hue ; 

But when the spring comes with her host 
Of flowers, that flower, beloved the most. 
Shrinks from the crowd, that may confuse 
Her heavenly odours and virgin hues. 

Pluck the others, but still remember 
Their herald, out of dim December; 
The morning star of all the flowers, 
The pledge of day-light's lengthened hours ; 
And, 'mid the roses, ne'er forget, 
The virgin, virgin Violet. 

BTIIOX. 



17 



130 FLORA AND THALIA. 



LE VIOLE. 



Belle, fresche, e pui-pure Viole, 
Che quella candidissima man colse, 
Quel pioggia, o qual pure aer produr volse, 

Tanto piu vaghi fior che far non suole 1 

Qual rugiada qual terra, over qual sole 
Tante vaghe bellezze in vol raccolse-? 
Onde il soave odor Natura tolse, 

O il del che ha tanto ben degnar ne vuole ? 

LOREXZO DE MEDICI. 



THE VIOLET AND THE PANSY. 

Far from his hive, one summer's day, 
A young and yet unpractised bee. 

Borne on his tender wings away, 
Went forth the flowery world to see. 

The mom, the noon, in play he passed ; 

But when the shades of evening came, 
No parent brought the due repast. 

And faintness seized his little frame. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 131 

By nature urged, by instinct led, 
The bosom of a flower he sought, 

Where streams mourned round a mossy bed, 
And Violets all the bank enwrought. 

Of kindred race, but brighter dyes, 
On that fair bank a Pansy grew, 

That borrowed from indulgent skies, 
A violet shade, a purple hue. 

The tints that streamed with glossy gold, 
The violet shade, the purple hue. 

The stranger wondered to behold ; 
And to its beauteous bosom flew. 

In vain he seeks some virtues there, 
No soul-sustaining charms abound, 

No honeyed sweetness to repair 
The languid waste of life is found. 

An aged bee, whose labours led 

To these fair springs and meads of gold, 

His feeble wing, his drooping head 
Beheld, and pitied to behold. 

" Fly, fond adventurer ! fly the art 

That courts thine eye with fond attire ; 

Who smiles to win the heedless heart, 
W ill smile to see that heart expire. 



1.32 FLORA AND THALIA. 

" This modest flower, of humble view, 
That boasts no depth of glowing dyes, 

Arrayed in unbespangled bhie. 
The simple clothing of the skies ; 

" This flower with balmy sweetness blest. 
May yet thy languid life renew :" 

He said, and to the Violet's breast 
The little wanderer faintly flew. 

LAlfGHORXE. 



TPIE VIOLET. 

The Violet in her greenwood bower. 

Where birchen boughs with hazels mingle, 

May boast herself the fairest flower, 
In glen, or copse, or forest dingle. 

Though fair her gems of azure hue, 

Beneath the dew-drop's weight reclining, 

I've seen an eye of lovelier blue. 

More sweet through watery lustre shining. 

The summer sun that dew shall dry, 
Ere yet the day be past-its morrow ; — 

Nor longer in my false love's eye 
Remained the tear of parting sorrow. 

SIR W. SCOTT. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 133 



PANSY VIOLET. 

{Heartsease, or Love-in-idleness.) 

That very time I saw (but thou couldst not), 

Flying between the cold moon and the earth, 

Cupid all armed : a certain aim he took 

At a fair vestal, throned by the west ; 

And loosed his love shaft smartly from his bow, 

As it should pierce a hundred thousand hearts. 

But I might see young Cupid's fiery shaft 

Quencht in the chaste beams of the watery moon : 

And the imperial votaress passed on, 

In maiden meditation, fancy-free :* 

Yet marked I where the bolt of Cupid fell ; 

It fell upon a little western flower. 

Before milk-white, now purple with love's wound 

And maidens call it Love-in-idleness. 

MIDSUMMER NIGHt's DREAM. 



* This was intended by Shakspeare as a compliment to our 
maiden queen, tlizabtth. 



134 FLORA AND THALIA. 

THE VIOLET. 

(Viola odor at a.) 

Sweet lowly plant ! once more I bend 
To hail thy presence here, 

Like a beloved returning friend, 
From absence doubly dear. 

Wert thou for ever in our sight, 
Might we not love thee less 1 

But no-w thou bringest new delight, 
Thou still hast power to bless. 

, Still doth thine April presence bring 

Of April joys a dream ; 
When life was in its sunny spring — 
A fair unrippled stream. 

And still thine exquisite perfume. 

Is precious as of old ; 
And still thy modest tender bloom, 

It joys me to behold. 

It joys and cheers, whene'er I see 
Pain on earth's meek ones press, 

To think the storm that rends the tree, 
Scathes not thy lowliness. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 1-35 

*And thus may human weakness find, 
E'en in thy lowly flower, 
An image cheering to the mind. 
In many a trying hour. 

M. 

Prom ^^Flowers of all Hue^ 
Belfast. 



136 FLORA AND THALIA. 



VIOLETS. 
A SOXXET. 

Beavtiful are you in your lowliness; 

Bright in your hues, delicious in your scent. 
Lovely your modest blossoms downward bent, 
As shrinking from our gaze, yet prompt to bless 
The passer-by with fragrance, and express 
How gracefully, though mutely eloquent 
Are unobtrusive worth, and meek content. 
Rejoicing in their own obscure recess. 
Delightful flow^erets ! at the voice of Spring, 
Your buds unfolded to its sunbeams bright ; 
And though your blo?soms soon shall fade from 
sight. 
Above your lowly birth-place birds shall sing, 
And from your clust'ring leaves the glow-worm fling 
The emerald-glory of its earth-born light. 

B. BAnT0>'. — Poetic Vigils. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 137 



THE WALL-FLOWER. 

This is a native of Britain, but now found wild in 
France, Spain, and Switzerland. It is a very hardy 
plant, bearing our severest winters, particularly on 
old walls and ruins, where it becomes much stronger 
and more woody than in the ground. Its fragrance 
is so well known and admired, that we find it in the 
gardens of both rich and poor. A small bunch of 
the flowers is sufficient to scent a large room. 

Were it scarce and more difficult to raise, we 
should prize it as one of our choicest flowers ; for it 
not only refreshes us with its bright green leaves all 
the winter, but from an early period in the spring, 
until late in the autumn, we are regaled with the 
fragrance of its flowers, and with its gay appearance 
in the parterre. The colours are sometimes exceed- 
ingly rich, varying from a warm yellow to a rich 
brown or deep red corolla, that vies with velvet in 
richness.' So great a favourite is this plant with 
writers of romance, both in prose and verse, that we 
generally find it embellish all romantic castles and 
ruins. 

Class, TiTRADYNAMiA. Orckv, S1LIQ.L-OSA. 
18 



138 FLORA AND THALIA. 



THE WALL-FLOWER. 

To me thy site disconsolate, 

On turret, wail, or tower, 
Makes thee appear misfortune's mate. 

And desolation's dower. 

Thou ask'st no kindly cultured soil 

Thy native bed to be; 
Thou need'st not man's officious toil 

To plant or water thee. 

Sown by the winds, thou meekly rear'st 

On ruins' crumbling crest, 
Thy fragile form ; and there appear'st 

In smiling beauty drest. 

There in the bleak and earthless bed, 
Thou braVst the tempest's strife ; 

And giv'st what else were cold and dead, 
A lingering glow of life. 

BABTOlf. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 139 



TO THE WALL-FLOWER. 

I WILL not praise the often-flattered rose, 

Or virgin-like, with blushing charms half seen, 
Or when in dazzling splendour, like a queen, 

All her magnificence of state she shows; 
No, nor that nun-like lily, which but blows 

Beneath the valley's cool and shady screen; 
Nor yet the sunflower, that with warrior mien, 

Still eyes the orb of glory where it glows ; 
But thou, neglected Wall-flower, to my breast 

And muse art dearest, wildest, sweetest flower, 
To whom alone the privilege is given 

Proudly to root thyself above the rest. 
As genius does, and from the rocky tower 

Send fragrance to the purest breath of heaven. 



140 FLORA AND THALIA. 



THE WALL-FLOWER. 

From the Fables of Flora. 

" Whx loves my flower, the sweetest flower. 
That swells the golden breast of May, 

Thrown rudely o'er yon ruined tower, 
To waste her solitary day 1 



" Why, when the mead, the spicy vale, 
The grove and genial garden call. 

Will she her fragrant soul exhale, 
Unheeded on the lonely wall ! 

"For never sure was beauty born 
To live in death's deserted shade ! 

Come, lovely flower, my banks adorn, 
My banks for life and beauty made." 

Thus pity waked the tender thought, 
And by her sweet persuasion led, 

To seize the hermit flower I sought. 
And bear her from her stony bed. 



/ 



FLORA AND THALIA. 141 

I sought — but sudden on mine ear 
A voice in hollow murmurs broke, 

And smote my heart with holy fear, 
The Genius of the Ruin spoke. 

"From thee be far th' ungentle deed. 
The honours of the dead to spoil. 

Or take the sole remaining meed, 

The flower that crowns their former toil ! 

" Nor deem that flower the garden's foe. 
Or fond to grace this barren shade ; 

'Tis nature tells her to bestow 
Her honours on the lonely dead. 

" For this, obedient zephyrs bear 

Her light seeds round yon turret's mould, 

And undispersed by tempests there, 
They rise in vegetable gold. 

" Nor shall thy wonder wake to see 
Such desert scenes distinction era vie ; 

Oft have they been, and oft shall be 

Truth's, Honour's, Valour's, Beauty's grave. 

" Where longs to fall that rifted spire, ' 

As weary of the insulting air ; 
The poet's thought, the warrior's fire, 

The lover's sighs are sleeping there. 



142 FLORA AND THALIA. 

" When that too shakes the trembUng ground, 
Borne down by some tempestuous sky, 

And many a slumbering cottage round 
Startles — how still their hearts will lie ! 

" Of them who, wrapt in earth so cold. 
No more the smiling day shall view ; 

Should many a tender tale be told, 
For many a tender thought is due. 

" Hast thou not seen some lover pale, 
When evening brought the pensive hour, 

Step slowly o'er the shadowy vale. 

And stop to pluck the frequent flower 1 

" Those flowers he surely meant to strew 

On lost affection's lowly cell. 
Though there, as fond remembrance grew, 

Forgotten from his hand they fell. 

" Has not for thee, the fragrant thorn 

Been taught her first rose to resign 1 * 

With vain but pious fondness borne 
To deck thy Nancy's honoured shrine 1 

" 'Tis nature pleading in the breast. 
Fair memory of her works to find ; 

And when to fate she yields the rest. 
She claims the monumental mind. 



FLORA, AND THALIA. 143 

" Why, else, the o'ergrown paths of time 
Would thus the lettered sage explore ; 

With pain those crumbling ruins climb. 
And on the doubtful sculpture pore ] 

" Why seeks he, with unwearied toil, 

Through death's dim walk to urge his way ; 

Reclaim his long-asserted spoil, 
And lead oblivion into day 1 

" 'Tis nature prompts, by toil or fear 

Unmoved, to range through death's domain ; 

The tender parent loves to hear 
Her children's story told again. . 

" Treat not with scorn his thoughtful hours, 
If haply near these haunts he stray ; 

Nor take the fair enliv'ning flowers 
That bloom to cheer his lonely way." 

LANGHORIS^E. 



144 FLORA AND THALIA. 



THE WALL-FLOWER. 

The wall-flower — the wall-flower! 

How beautiful it blooms ! 
It gleams above the ruin'd tower, 

Like sunlight over tombs ; 
It sheds a halo of repose 

Around the wrecks of time ; 
To beauty give the flaunting rose, 

The wall-flower is sublime. 

Flower of the solitary place ! 

Grey Ruin's golden crown ! 
That lendest melancholy grace 

To haunts of old renown ; 
Thou mantlest o'er the battlement, 

By strife or storm decayed ; 
And fillest up each envious rent 

Time's canker-tooth hath made. 

Whither hath fled the choral band 
That fiU'd the abbey's nave 1 



FLORA AND THALIA. 145 

Yon dark sepulchral yew-trees stand 

O'er many a level grave ; 
In the belfry's crevices, the dove 

Her young brood nurseth v^rell, 
Whist thou, lone flower ! dost shed above 

A sweet decaying smell. 

In the season of the tulip cup, 

When blossoms clothe the trees. 
How sweet to throw the lattice up, 

And scent thee en the breeze. 
The butterfly is then abroad, 

The bee is on the wing, 
And on the hawthorn by the road 

The linnets sit and sing. 

Sweet wall-flower — sweet wall-flower I 

Thou conjurest up to me. 
Full many a soft and sunny hour 

Of boyhood's thoughtless glee ; 
When joy from out the daisies grew. 

In woodland pastures green, 
And summer skies were far more blue 

Than since they e'er have been. 

Now autumn's pensive voice is heard 

Amid the yellow bowers. 
The robin is the regal bird. 

And thou the Queen of Flowers ! 
19 



146 FLORA AND THALIA. 

He sings on the laburnum trees, 

Amid the twilight dim, 
And Araby ne'er gave the breeze 

Such scents as thou to him. 

Rich is the pink, the lilly gay, 

The rose is summer's guest ; 
Blind are thy charms when these decay — 

Of flowers, first, last, and best ! 
There may be gaudier on the bower, 

And statelier on the tree ; 
But, wall-flower, loved wall-flower; 

Thou art the flower for me ! 

DAVID MACBETH MOIR. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 147 



THE WALL-FLOWER. 

And well the lonely infant knew 

Recesses where the Wall-flower grew, 

And honey-suckle loved to crawl 

Up the low crag and ruin'd wall ; 

I deem'd such nooks the sweetest shade, 

The sun in all his round survey'd, 

And still I thought that shattered tower, 

The mightiest work of human power. J- 

WALTER SCOTT. Wji 



148 FLORA AND THALIA. 



YELLOW WATER-FLAG. 

(/r/s pseud-^'^corus.) 

This plant is common in marshes, and on the 
borders of rivers ; and adds much to the beauty of 
their appearance, by its sho\\7- yellow flowers, which 
appear in the beginning of July.. 

This bright Lily of the wave, so pleasing to the 
eye, is devoid of perfume, unlike the Iris Florentina, 
which is one of the most delicate perfumes we have. 
The root of the Yellow Water-Flag, or Iris, is some- 
times used instead of galls in the making of ink. 

" Amid its waving swords, in flaming gold, the Iris lowers." 
Class, Tkiastdria. Order, MoNOGxifiA. 



^ /.'/ ,.'1- 




FLORA AND THALIA. 149 



WATER-LILIES. 



Come away, elves ! while the dew is sweet, 

Come to the dingles where fairies meet; 

Know that the Lilies have spread their bells, 

O'er all the pools in our forest dells ; 

Stilly and lightly their vases rest 

On the quivering sleep of the water's breast. 

Catching the sunshine thro' leaves that throw 

To their scented bosoms an emerald glow ; 

And a star from the depth of each pearly cup, 

A golden star unto heaven looks up, 

As if seeking its kindred, where bright they lie. 

Set in the blue of the summer sky. 

Come away ! under arching boughs we'll float. 

Making those urns each a fairy boat ; 

We'll row them with reeds o'er the fountains free. 

And a tall flag-leaf shall our streamer be ; 

And we'll send out wild music so sweet and low. 

It shall seem from the bright flower's heart to flow. 

As if 'twere a breeze with a flute's low sigh, 

Or water-drops trained into melody. 

Come away ! for the Midsummer sun grows strong. 

And the life the Lily may not be long. 

MRS. HEMANS'S NATIOIfAL LYRICS. 



150 FLORA AND THALIA. 



YELLOW-FLAG, OR THE WATER-LILY. 



How peaceful sails 



Yon little fleet, the wild duck and her brood. 
Fearless of harm, they row their easy way ; 
The Water-Lily, 'neath the plumy prows, 
Dips, reappearing in their dimpled track. 

GKAHAME. 



Those groups of lovely date-trees bending, 

Languidly their leaf-crowned heads, 
Like youthful maids, when sleep descending 

Warns them to their silken beds ; — 
Those virgin Lilies, all the night 

Bathing their beauties in the lake, 
That they may rise more fresh and bright, 

When their beloved sun's awake. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 151 



THE water-lilies; 

OR, 

A voyager's dream of land. 

There's a spring in the woods by my sunny home, 
Afar from the dark sea's tossing foam ; 
Oh ! the fall of that fountain is sweet to hear, 
As a song from the shore to the sailor's ear ! 
And the sparkle which up to the sun it throws, 
Through the feathery fern and the olive boughs, 
And the gleam on its path as it steals away 
Into deeper shades from the sultry day ; 
And the large Water-Lilies that o'er its bed, 
Their pearly leaves to the soft light spread ; 
These haunt me ! I dream of that bright spring's flow, 
I thirst for its rills like a wounded roe. 

MRS. HEMAXS. 



152 FLORA AND THALIA. 



He little knew how well the boy 

Can float upon a goblet's stream, 
Lighting them with his smile of joy; — 

As bards have seen him in their dreams, 
Down the blue Ganges floating glide. 

Upon a rosy Lotus wreath,* 
Catching new lustre from the tide, 

That with his image shone beneath. 



* The Indians feign that Cupid was first seen lloating dywn 
the Ganges on the Nymphsea Nctumbo. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 153 



ZEDOARY. 

(Zedoai^y.) 

This plant is a native of the East Indies, and but 
little known in this country, although it would grace 
the greenhouse from the beauty of its blossom. 
The roots are imported into England for medicinal 
purposes; but of late years have gone much out of 
use : they have an agreeable camphoraceous smell, 
and a bitter aromatic taste. 

Class, MoNAXDHiA. Order, Moijogyxia. 



* 



20 



154 FLORA AND THALIA. 



Z E D O A R 1' . 

Offspring of India, decked with beauteous flower, 
How oft I've watched thee in my orange grove. 
At morning's dawn and at the evening hour, 
With wonder viewed, and praised the Pow'r above. 
From earliest years I loved thee more, dear flower, 
Than all the florist's endless arts could raise ; 
A parent planted thee to deck her favourite bower : 
No more her love, no more her lips shall praise 
Your flowers,* nor her I ever more shall see ; 
But memory sad recals the past to me. 



* A young lady having brought a favourite plant from India : 
but which died on her reaching Endajid. 



-A 



FLORA AND THALIA. 



MISCELLANEOUS POEMS, 



A 



THERE IS BELIGIO:^ IN A FIOWER; 
ITS STILL S^IALE VOICE IS AS THE TOICE OF CON- 
SCIENCE : 
MOUNTAINS AND OCEANS, PLANETS, SUNS, AND 

SYSTEMS, 
BEAR NOT THE IMPRESS OF ALMIGHTY POWER 
IN CHARACTERS MORE LEGIBLE THAN THOSE 
WHICH HE HAS WRITTEN ON THE TINIEST FLOWER, 
WHOSE LIGHT BELL BENDS BENEATH THE DEW- 
DROP's WEIGHT. 

HENRY G. BELL. 



MISCELLANEOUS POEMS. 



TO A MOUNTAIN, DAISY. 
ON TURNING ONE DOWN WITH THE PLOUGH. 

Wee, modest, crimson-tipped flow'r, 
Thou'st met me in an evil hour ; 
For I maun crush amang the stoure 

Thy slender stem ; 
To spare thee now is past my pow'r. 

Thou bonnie gem. 

Alas ! it's no thy neebor sweet, 
The bonnie lark, companion meet ! 
Bending thee 'mang the dewy weet ! 

Wi' speckled breast, 
When upward-springing, blythe to greet 

The purpling east. 



158 FLORA AND THALIA. 

Cauld blew the bitter-biting north 
Upon thy early, humble birth ; 
Yet cheerfully thou glinted forth ' 

Amid the storm, 
Scarce rear'd above the parent earth 

Thy tender form. 

The flaunting flow'rs our gardens yield, 
High shelt'ring woods and wa's maun shield : 
But thou, beneath the random bield 

O' clod or stane, 
Adorns the higtie stibble-field. 

Unseen, alane. 

There in thy scanty mantle clad. 
Thy snawy bosom sunward spread, 
Thou lifts thy unassuming head 

In humble guise ! 
But now the share up-tears thy bed. 

And low thou Hes ! 

Such is the fate of artless maid. 
Sweet flow'ret of the rural shade ! 
By love's simplicity betray'd. 

And guileless trust; 
Till she, like thee, all soil'd is laid 

Low i' the dust. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 159 

Such is the fate of simple Bard, 

On life's rough ocean luckless starr'd ! 

Unskilful he to note the card 

Of prudent lore, 
Till billows rage, and gales blow hard, 

And whelm him o'er ! 

Such fate to suff'ring worth is giv'n, 

Who long with wants and woes has striv'n, 

By human pride or cunning driv'n 

To mis'ry's brink, 
Till wrench'd of ev'ry stay but Heav'n, 

He, ruin'd, sink ! 

Ev'n thou who mourn'st the Daisy's fate, 
That fate is thine — no distant date ; 
Stern ruin's ploughshare drives, elate, 

Full on thy bloom. 
Till crush'd beneath the furrow's weight. 

Shall be thy doom ! ^ 

BURlfS. 



160 FLORA AND THALIA. 



BANKS OF DEVON. 

How pleasant the banks of the clear-winding Devon, 
With green-spreading bushes, and flowers blooming 

fair; 
But the bonniest flower on the banks of the Devon, 
Was once a sweet bud on the braes of the Ayr. 

Mild be the sun on this sweet-blushing flower. 
In the gay rosy morn, as it bathes in the dew ! 
And gentle the fall of the soft vernal shower. 
That steals on the evening each leaf to renew. 

O, spare the dear blossom, ye orient breezes. 
With chill hoary wing as ye usher the dawn ! 
And far be thou distant, thou reptile that seizes 
The verdure and pride of the garden and lawn ! 

Let Bourbon exalt in his gay gilded lilies. 
And England, triumphant, display her proud rose; 
A fairer than either adorns the green valleys, 
Where Devon, sweet Devon, meandering flows. 

BURNS. 



FLORA AND THALIA. IGl 



VERS A MADAME DE CH* * * . 

SUK SES TABLEAUX DES FLEURS. 

J'EJf jouis de ces fleurs si belles ; 

J'admire ce pinceau divin, 
Et ces roses si naturelles, 

Que le papillon incertain 
Viendra voltiger autour d'elles, 

L'abeille y chercher son butin, 
Les fleurs ne brillent qu'un matin ; 

Les votres sont immortelles. 

Ah ! si j'avois votre talent, 
Je peindrais un objet charmant, 

Pare des graces du jeune age, 
Qui plait des le premier instant, 

Et chaque instant plait d'avantage ; 
Dans I'amitie tendre et constant, 
Sincere sans etre imprudent, 

Naif et fin, sensible et sage. 
Aisement on devineroit 

Quel auroit ete mon modelc ; 
Ch * * * seule ignoreroit, 

Que le portrait est d'aprcs elle. 

M. UE .SJ. LAiMl'.ERT. 

21 



162 FLORA AND THALIA. 



FADING FLOWERS. 

The morning flowers display their sweets, 
And gay their silken leaves unfold, 

As careless of the noontide heats, 
As fearless of the evening cold. 

Nipt by the wind's untimely blast, 
Parch'd by the sun's directer ray. 

The momentary glories waste, 

The short-lived beauties die away. 

So blooms the human face divine, 

When youth its pride of beauty shows ; 

Fairer than spring the colours shine, 
And sweeter than the virgin rose. 

But worn by slowly rolling years, 
Or broke by sickness in a day. 

The fading glory disappears. 

The short-lived beauties die away. 

Yet these new-rising from the tomb, 
With lustre brighter far shall shine. 

Revive with ever-during bloom. 
Safe from diseases and decline. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 163 

Let sickness blast, let death devour, 
If heaven but recompense our pains ; 

Perish the grass and fade the flovrer, 
If firm the word of God remains ! 

C. WESLEX. 



The twining jasmine and the blushing rose, 
With lavish grace their morning scents disclose ; 
The smelling tuberose and jonquil declare 
The stronger impulse of an ev'ning air. 

pRion. 



164 FLORA AND THALIA. 



A mother's dirge over iter child. 

Brixg me flowers all young and sweet, 
That I may strew the winding sheet, 
Where calm thou sleepest, baby fair, 
With roseless cheek and auburn hair ! 

Bring ine the rosemary, whose breath 
Perfumed the wild and desert heath ; 
The lily of the vale, which, too. 
In silence and in beauty grew. 

Bring cypress from some sunless spot, 
Bring me the blue forget-me-not ; 
That I may strew them o'er thy bier, 
With long-drawn sigh and gushing tear. 

Oh, what upon this earth doth prove 
So steadfast as a mother's love ! 
Oh, what on earth can bring relief, 
Or solace to a mother's grief. 

No more, my baby, shalt thou lie. 
With drowsy smile, and half-shut eye, 
Pillowed upon my^ fostering breast 
Serenely sinking into rest ! 



FLORA AND THALIA. 165 

The grave must be thy cradle, now ; 
The wild-flowers o'er thy breast shall grow, 
While still my heart, all full of thee, 
In widowed solitude shall be. 

No taint of earth, no thought of sin. 
E'er dwelt thy stainless breast within, 
And God hath laid thee down to sleep, 
Like a pure pearl below the deep. 

Yea ! from mine arms thy soul hath flown 
Above, and found the heavenly throne, 
To join thy blest angelic ring, 
That aye around the altar sing. 

Methought when years had rolled away, 
That thou wouldst be my age's stay ! 
And often have I dreamt to see 
The boy — the youth — the man in thee ! 

But thou hast past ! for ever gone, 
To leave me childless and alone, 
Like Rachel pouring tear on tear, 
And looking not for comfort here ! 

Farewell, my child, the dews shall fall. 
At noon and evening, o'er thy pall ; 
And daisies, when the vernal year 
Revives, upon thy turf appear. 



166 FLORA AND THALIA. 

The earliest snow-drop there shall spring, 
And lark delight to fold his wing ; 
And roses pale, and lilies fair, 
With perfume load the summer air ! 

Adieu, ray babe ! if life were long. 
This would be even a heavier song ; 
But years, like phantoms, quickly pass, 
They look to us from memory's glass. 

Soon on death's couch shall I recline ; 
Soon shall my head be laid with thine ; 
And sundered spirits meet above. 
To live for evermore in love. 

MOl] 



FLORA AND THALIA. 161 



I SEXD the Lilies given to me ; 

Though long before thy hand they touch, 
I know that they must withered be ; 

But yet reject them not as such : 
For I have cherished them as dear, 

Because they yet may meet thine eye. 
And guide thy soul to mine, even here, 

When thou behold'st them drooping nigh. 
And know'st them gathered by the Rhine, 
And offered from my heart to thine ! 

The river nobly foams and flows, 

The charm of this enchanted ground, 
And all its thousand turns disclose. 

Some fresher beauty varying round ; 
The hautiest breast its wish might bound, 

Through life to dwell delighted here ; 
Nor could on earth a spot be found, 

To Nature and to me so dear. 
Could thy dear eyes, in following mine, 
Still sweeten more these banks of Rhine ! 

BYR02 



168 FLORA AND THALiA. 



THE NOSEGAY. 

I CULLED for my love a fresh nosegay, one day ; 

She smiled as I flew to her side ; 
I checked the soft sunbeam of pleasure's bright ray, 

While thus I, half playfully cried : — 
" Those lilies and sweets, gentle maid, are like yours, 

This nosegay thy excellence tells ; 
The rose to the eye, like thy beauty, allures, 

But its thorn, like thy virtue, repels." 

The jasmine, so simple, so sweet to the sense, 

Of gentle and delicate hue, 
Recals all thy talents, so void of pretence, 

So modest, yet exquisite too; 
The woodbine, where bees love their treasures to seek 

Is a type of affection like mine ; 
And oh ! may this innocent flow'r my wish speak. 

And heartsease for ever be thine ! 



FLORA AND THALIA. 169 



AUX FLEURS. 



Fleurs charmantes ! par vous la nature est plus belle, 
Dans ses brillants travaux I'art vous prend pour 

moclele; 
Simples tributs du coeur, vos dons sont chaque jour 
Offerts par I'amitie, hazardes par I'amour. 
D'embellir la beaute vous obtenez la gloire : 
Le laurier vous permet de parer la victoire ; 
Plus d'un hameau vous donne en prix a la pudeur ; 
L'autel meme oii de Dieu repose la grandeur, 
Se parfume au printeraps de vos douces ofFrandes, 
Et la Religion sourit a vos guirlandes. 
Mais c'est dans nos jardins qu'est voire heureux 

sejour. 
Filles de la rosee et de I'astre du jour, 
Venez done ; de nos champs decorer la theatre. 



Sans obeir aux lois d'un art capricieux 
Fleurs, parure des champs et delices des yeux, 
De vos riches couleurs venez peindre la terre. 
Venez; mais n'allez pas dans les buis d'un parterre, 
Renfermer vos appas tristement relegues; 
Que vos heureux tresors soient partout prodigues, 
22 



170 FLORA AND THALIA. 4 

Tantot de ces tapis emaillez la verdure; 
Tantot de ces sentiers egayez la bordure ; 
Serpentez en guirlande ; entourez ces berceaux, 
En meandres brillants, courez au bord des eaux, 
Ou tapissez ces murs, ou dans cette corbeille 
Du choix de vos parfums embarrassez I'abeille. 

DE DELiLLE. " Les Jardius.' 



FLORA AND THALIA. 171 



TO AN EARLY PRIMROSE. 

Mild offspring of a dark and sullen sire ! 
Whose modest form, so delicately fine, 

Was nursed in whirling storms, 

And cradled in the winds. 

Thee, when young Spring first questioned Winter's 

sway, 
And dared the sturdy blusterer to the fight. 

Thee on this bank he threw. 

To mark his victory. 

In the low vale, the promise of the year. 
Serene, thou openest to the nipping gale, 

Unnoticed and alone. 

Thy tender elegance. 

So Virtue blooms, brought forth amid the storms 
Of chill adversity ; in some lone walk 

Of Ufe she rears her head, • 

Obscure and unobserved; 

While every bleaching breeze that on her blows, 
Chastens her spotless purity of breast. 

And hardens her to bear 

Serene the ills of life. 

KIBKE WHITE, 



172 FLORA AND THALIA. 



THE BUD OF THE ROSE. 

Her mouth, which a smile, 
Devoid of all guile, 
Half opened to view, 
Is the bud of the rose, 
In the morning that blows, 
Impearled with the dew. 
More fragrant her breath 
Than the flow'r-scented heath 
At the dawning of day ; 
The lily's perfume, 
The hawthorn in bloom. 
Or the blossoms of May. 

OLD SOKG. 



MORTE DI DARDINELLO. 
jCome purpureo fior languendo muore, 

Che'l vomere al passar tagliato lassa, 
tO come carco di superchio umoi-e 

II Papaver nell'orto il capo abbassa ; 

Cosi giu della faccia ognio colore, 
, Cadendo, Dardinel, di vita passa: 

Passa di vita, e fa passar con lui 

L'ardire e la virtu du tutti i sui. 

ARiosTO. Orlando. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 173 



THE SUNFLOWER. 



Who can unpitying see the flow'ry race 

Shed by the moon their new flush'd bloom resign 

Before the parching beam] So fades the face, 

When fevers revel through their azure veins, 

But one the lofty follower of the sun, 

Sad when he sets, shuts up her yellow leaves, 

Drooping all night, and when he warm returns 

Points her enamour'd bosom to his ray. 

THOMSOX. 



THE SNOWDROP. 

Already now the snowdrop dares appear, 
The first pale blossom of th' unripen'd year ; 
As Flora's breath, by some transforming power, 
Had chang'd an icicle into a flower, 
Its name and hue the scentless plant retains, 
And winter lingers in its icy veins. 

BARBAULD. 



174 FLORA AND THALIA. 



A CHRISTMAS WREATH. 

A WREATH for merry Christmas quickly twine, 
A wreath for the bright red sparkUng wine, 

Though roses are dead 

And their bloom is fled, 
Yet for Christmas a bonnie, bonnie wreath we'll twine. 
Away to the wood where the bright holly grows, 
And its red berries blush amid winter snows, 
Away to the ruin where the green ivy clings. 
And around the dark fane its verdure flings; 
Hey ! for the ivy and holly so bright, 
They are the garlands for Christmas night. 

LOUISA AKIfE TWAMLEt. 



A DAISY'S OFFERING. 

Hlk Think of the flowers culled for thee, 

In vest of silvery white, 
When other flowers perchance you see, 
Not fairer, but more bright. 

Sweet roses and carnations gay. 
Have but a summer's reign ; 

I mingle with the buds of May, 
Join drear December's train. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 175 

A simple unassuming flower, 

'Mid showers and storms I bloom ; 

I'll decorate thy lady's bower, 
And blossom on thy tomb. 



FIELD FLOWERS. 

Ye field flowers ! the gardens eclipse you, 'tis true, 
Yet, wildlings of nature, I dote upon you ; 

For ye waft me to summers of old, 
When the earth teemed around me with fairy delight, 
And when daisies and buttercups gladdened my sight. 

Like treasures of silver and gold. 

I love you for lulling me back into dreams. 

Of the blue Highland mountains and echoing streams. 

And of broken blades breathing their balm ; 
While the deer was seen glancing in sunshine remote, 
And the deep mellow crush of the wood-pigeon's note 

Made music that sweetened the calm. 

Not a pastoral song has a pleasanter tune 
Than ye speak to my heart, little wildlings of June ; 
Of old ruinous castles ye tell ; 



176 FLORA AND THALIA. 

I thought it delightful your beauties to find, 
When the magic of Nature first breathed on my mind, 
And your blossoms were part of her spell. 

E'en now what affections the violet awakes; 
What loved little islands, twice seen in their lakes, 

Can the wild water-lily restore. 
What landscapes I read in the primrose's looks; 
What pictures of pebbles and minnowy brooks 

In the vetches that tangle the shore. 

Earth's cultureless buds ! to my heart ye were dear 
Ere the fever of passion, or ague of fear, 

Had scathed my existence's bloom ; 
Once I welcome you more, in life's passionless stage. 
With the visions of youth to revisit my age, 

And I wish you to grow on my tomb. 

CAMPBELL. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 177 



THE PURPOSE OF FLOWERS. 

Beautiful flowers, whose tender forms 
Survive the deadly lightning's glare, 

And bend your bosoms to the storms 
That ride upon the midnight air! 

Say, were ye only born to fade ; 

0.r were your tints and odours given 
To give the spirit in the shade 

Of this dull world some glimpse of heaven? 

W. MARTIX. 



COWSLIP AND ROSE. 

The cowslip smiles in brighter yellow drest, 
Than that which veils the nubile virgin's breast ; 
A fairer red stands blushing in the rose. 
Than that which on the bridegroom's vestments flows. 

PBIOR. 

23 



FLORA AND THALIA. 



LA FARFALLA SULLA ROSA. 

Farfalletta dorata 
Sulla Rosa sedea, 
E^superba dicea 
Per me la Rosa e nata, 
E spiegava le alette 
E le fresche cimette 
Del fior giova scotendo ; 
E scherzando e giojendo 
Repetea baldanjosa. 
Nata e per me la Rosa. 
On mentre qual reina 
Sta su quel trono e parla, 
Giovine contadina 
S'invoglia di predarla; 
La man furtiva stende 
Entro il pugno la prende 
Le pinte all le toglie 
E poi la Rosa coglie, 
" Non ti fidar se infiora 
Tuoi di sorte pomposa ; 
Pensa che sei tu ancora 
Farfalla sulk Rosa." 



FLORA AND THALIA. 179 



THE DIAL OF FLOWERS. 

'TwAS a lovely thought to mark the hours, 

As they floated in light away, 
By the opening and the folding flowers, 

That laugh to the summer's day. 

Thus had each moment its own rich hue, 

And its graceful cup and bell, 
In whose coloured vase might sleep the dew, 

Like a pearl in an ocean shell. ^ 

To such sweet signs might the time have flowed 

In a golden current on, 
Ere from the garden, man's first abode. 

The glorious guests were gone. 

So might the days have been brightly told — 

Those days of song and dreams — 
When shepherds gathered their flocks of old. 

By the blue Arcadian streams. 

So in those isles of delight, that rest 

Far off in a breezeless main. 
Which many a bark, with a weary guest. 

Has sought, but still in vain. 

, * This dial is said to have been formed by Linnaeus. It 
marked the hours by the opening and closing, at regular inter- 
vals, of the flowers arranged in it. 



180 FLORA AND THALIA. 

Yet is not life, in its real flight, 

Marked thus — even thus — on earth, 

By the closing of one hope's delight, 
And another's gentle birth ] 

Oh ! let us live so, that flower by flower. 

Shutting in turn, may leave 
A lingerer still, for the sun-set hour, 

A charm for the shaded eve. 

MRS. HEMAXS. 



THE DAISY IN INDIA. 

Dr. Caret having deposited, in his garden at 
Serampore, the earth in which a number of English 
seeds had been conveyed to him from his native land, 
was agreeably surprised by the appearance, in due 
time, of this " wee, modest, crimson-tipped flower." 
This circumstance, being stated by the Doctor in a 
letter to a friend, suggested the following lines : — 

Thrice welcome ! little English flower ! 

My mother country's, white and red, 
In rose or lily, to this hour, 

Never to me such beauty spread — 
Transplanted from thine island-bed, 

A treasure in a grain of earth ; 
Strange as a spirit from the dead, 

Thine embryo sprang to birth. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 181 

Thrice welcome! little English flower ! 

Whose tribes, beneath our natal skies, 
Shut close their leaves while vapours lower ; 

But when the sun's gay beams arise. 
With unabashed but modest eyes. 

Follow his motions to the west. 
Nor cease to gaze till day-light dies ; 

Then fold themselves to rest. 

Thrice welcome ! little English flower ! 

To this resplendent hemisphere, 
Where Flora's giant oflTspring tower < 

In gorgeous liveries all the year, 
Thou, only thou art little here, 

Like worth unfriended and unknown. 
Yet to my British heart more dear 

Than all the torrid zone. 

Thrice welcome ! little Enghsh flower ! 

Of early scenes, beloved by me, 
While happy in my father's bower, ' 

Thou shait the bright memorial be ! 
Thy fairy sports of infancy. 

Youth's golden age, and manhood's prime. 
Home, country, kindred, friends — with thee. 

Are mine in this far clime. 

Thrice welcome ! little English flower ! 
I'll rear thee with a trembling hand : 



182 FLORA AND THALIA. 

O for the April sun and shower, 

The sweet May dews of that fair land, 

Where Daisies, thick as star-light, stand 
In every walk ! — that here might shoot 

Thy scions, and thy buds expand 
A hundred from one root. 

Thrice welcome ! little English flower, 

To me the pledge of hope unseen ! 
When sorrow would my soul o'erpower 

For joys that were, or might have been, 
» I'll call to mind how fresh and green, 

I saw thee waking from the dust; 
Then turn to Heaven, with brow serene, 

And place in God my trust ! 

J. MOJfTGOHERT. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 183 



THE FLOWERS OF THE FIELD PROVE 



Not worlds on worlds, in phalanx deep, 
Need we to prove a God is here ; 
The Daisy, fresh from Winter's sleep, 
Tells of his hand in lines as clear. 

For what but He who arched the skies 
And pours the day-spring's living flood, 
Wond'rous alike in all he tries. 
Could raise the Daisy's purple bud 1 

Mould its green cup, its wiry stem, 
Its fringed border nicely spin ; 
And cut the gold-embossed gem 
That, set in silver, gleams within ] 

And fling it unrestrained and free, 
O'r hill and dale, and desert sod, 
That man, where'er he walks, may see 
In ev'ry step the stamp of God 1 

DR. MASON GOOD. 



184 FLORA AND THALIA. 

A HAPPY COUNTRY DWELLING. 
Low was our pretty cot ; our tallest rose 
Peep'd at the chamber window. We could hear, 
At silent noon, and eve, and early morn. 
The sea's faint murmur. In the open air 
Our myrtles blossomed ; and across the porch 
Thick jasmines twined ; the little landscape round 
Was green and woody, and refresh'd the eye. 
It was a spot which you might aptly call 
The Valley of Seclusion ! Once I saw 
(Hallowing his sabbath-day by quietncps) 
A wealthy son of commerce saunter by, 
Bristowa's citizen ; methought it calm'd 
His thirst of idle gold, and made him muse 
With wiser feelings; for he paused, and look'd 
With a pleased sadness, and he gazed all round, 
Then eyed our cottage, and gazed round again, 
And sighed, and said it was a blessed place. 
And we were blessed. Oft, with patient ear, 
Long listening to the viewless sky-lark's note, 
(Viewless, or haply for a moment seen 
Gleaming on sunny wing) in whisper'd tones 
I've said to my beloved, " Such, sweet girl ! 
The inobtrusive song of happiness. 
Unearthly minstrelsy ! then only heard 
When the soul seeks to hear, when all is hush'd. 
And the heart listens !" 

COLERIDGE. 



7 



FLORA AND THALIA. 185 



THE CHILD AND FLOWERS. 

Hast thou been in the woods with the honey-bee 1 
Hast thou been with the lamb in the pastures free 1 
With the hare through the copses and dingles wild 1 
With the butterfly over the heath, fair child l 
Yes ; the light fall of thy bounding feet 
Hath not startled the wren from her mossy seat ; 
Yet hast thou rang'd the green forest dells, 
And brought back a treasure of buds and bells. 

Thou know'st not the sweetness, by antique song, 
Breath'd o'er the names of that flow'ry throng : 
The woodbine, the primrose, the violet dim. 
The lily that gleams by the ft)untain's brim : 
These are old words, that have made each grove 
A dreamy haunt for romance and love ; 
Each sunny bank, where faint odours lie, 
A place for the gushings of poesy. 

Thou know'st not the light wherewith fairy lore 
Sprinkles the turf and the daisies o'er. 
Enough for thee are the dews that sleep. 
Like hidden gems in the flower-nrns deep ; 
Enough the rich crimson spots that dwell 
'Midst the gold of the cowslip's perfumed cell ; 
And the scent by the blossoming sweetbriars shed, 
And the beauty that bows the wood-hyacinth's head. 
24 



186 FLORA AND THALIA. 

Oh ! happy child, m thy fawn-like glee, 
What is remembrance or thought to thee 1 
Fill thy bright locks with those gifts of spring; 
O'er thy green pathway their colours fling ; 
Bind them in chaplet and wild festoon— 
What if to droop and to perish soon 1 
Nature hath mines of such wealth — and thou 
Never wilt prize its delights as now. 

For a day is coming to quell the tone 

That rings in thy laughter, thou joyous one ! 

And to dim thy brow with a touch of care, 

Under the gloss of its clustering hair ; 

And to tame the flash of thy cloudless eyes 

Into the stillness of autumn skies ; 

And to teach thee that grief hath her needful part 

'Midst the hidden things of each human heart. 

Yet, shall we mourn, gentle child, for this 1 

Life hath enough of yet holier bliss. 

Such be thy portion ! the bliss to look 

With a reverent spirit through Nature's book ; 

By fount, by forest, by river's line, 

To track the paths of a love divine ; 

To read its deep meanings — to see and hear 

God in earth's garden, — and not to fear. 

MRS. HEMATfS, 



FLORA AND THALIA. 187 



love's wreath. 

When Love was a child, and went idling round 
Among flowers the whole summer's day, 

One morn in the valley a bower he found, 
So sweet it allured him to stay. 

O'er head from the trees hung a garland fair, 

A fountain ran darkly beneath ; 
'Tw£is Pleasure that hung the bright flowers up there, 

Love knew it and jumped at the wreath. 

But Love did not know, and at his weak years, 

What urchin was likely to know 
That sorrow had made of her own salt tears, 

That fountain which murmured below 1 

He caught at the wrreath but with too much haste, 

As boys when impatient will do. 
It fell in those waters of briny taste. 

And the flowers were all wet through. 

Yet this is the wreath, he wears night and day ; 

And though it all sunny appears 
With Pleasure's own lustre, each leaf, they say, 

Still tastes of the fountain of tears. 



ISS FLORA AND THALIA. 

TO MAKE A nORTUS SICCUS, OR 
HERBARIUM. 

Perhaps it may not be unacceptable to our 
readers to make a few remarks on the benefit of pro- 
curing a collection of dried plants : we will therefore 
quote Sir James Smith's observations on the subject. 

" The advantage of preserving specimens of plants, 
as far as it can be done, for examination at all times 
and seasons, is abundantly obvious. Notwithstanding 
the multitude of books filled with descriptions and 
figures of plants, and however ample such may be, 
they can teach no more than their authors observed. 
But when we have the works of nature before us, we 
can investigate them for ourselves, pursuing any train 
of inquiry to its utmost extent, nor are we liable to 
be misled by the errors or misconceptions of others. 

" A good practical botanist must be educated among 
the wild scenes of nature, while a finished theoretical 
one requires the additional assistance of gardens and 
books, to which must be superadded the frequent 
use of a good herbarium. When plants are well 
dried, the original forms and positions of even their 
minutest parts, though not their colours, may at any 
time be restored by immersion in hot water. By this 
means, the productions of the most distant and various 
countries, such as no garden could possibly supply. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 189 

are brought together at once under our eye, at any 
season of the year. If these be assisted with drawings 
and descriptions, nothing less than an actual survey 
of the whole vegetable world in a state of nature could 
excel such a store of information. 

" The greater part of plants dry with facility be- 
tween the leaves of books, or other paper ; the 
smoother the better. 

" If there be plenty of paper, they often dry best 
without shifting ; but if the specimens are crowded 
they must be taken out frequently, and the paper 
dried before they are replaced. 

" The great point to be attended to is, that the 
process should meet with no check. Several vegeta- 
bles are so tenacious of their vital principle, that they 
will grow between papers, the consequence of which 
is a destruction of their proper habit and colour. It 
is necessary to destroy the life of such, either by 
immersion in boiling water, or by the application of 
a hot iron, such as is used for linen, after which they 
are easily dried. 

"I cannot, however, approve of the practice of 
applying such an iron, as some persons do with great 
labour and perseverance, till the plants are quite dry, 
and all their parts incorporated into a smooth flat 
mass ; this renders them unfit for subsequent exami- 
nation, and destroys their natural habit, the most 
important thing to be preserved. 



190 FLORA AND THALIA. 

"Even in spreading plants between papers, we 
should refrain from that precise and artificial disposi- 
tion of their branches, leaves, and other parts, which 
takes away from their natural aspect, except for the 
purpose of displaying the internal parts of some one 
or two of their flowers for ready observation. 

" Dried specimens are best preserved by being 
fastened with weak carpenter's glue to paper, so that 
they may be turned over without damage. Thick 
and heavy stalks require the additional support of a 
few transverse slips of paper, to bind them more 
firmly down. A half sheet of a convenient size 
should be allotted to each species. 

"One great and mortifying impediment to the 
perfect preservation of an herbarium, arises from the 
attacks of insects ; to remedy this inconvenience, I 
have found a solution of corrosive sublimate of mer- 
cury in rectified spirits of wine, about two drachms to 
a pint, with a little camphor, perfectly efficacious, 
applied with a camel-hair pencil when the specimens 
are perfectly dry, not before ; and if they are not too 
tender, it is best done before they are pasted, as the 
spirit extracts a yellow dye from many plants, and 
stains the paper. A few drops of this solution should 
be mixed with the glue used for pasting. The her- 
barium is best kept in a dry room, without a constant 
fire." 

sin JAMKS edwaud smith's 

Introduction to Botany. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 191 



THE MARYGOLD. 



Whex with a serious musing, I behold 

The grateful and obsequious marygoid, 

How duly, every morning, she displays 

Her open breast when Phcebus spreads his rays ; 

How she observes him in his daily walk, 

Still bending tow'rds him her small slender stalk ; 

How, when he down declines, she droops and mourns. 

Bedewed as 'twere with tears, till he returns ; 

And how she veils her flowers when he is gone, 

As if she scorned to be looked upon 

By an inferior eye ; or did contemn 

To wait upon a meaner light than him : 

When this I meditate, methinks the flowers 

Have spirits far more generous than ours. 

And give us fair examples to despise, 

The servile fawnings and idolatries 

Wherewith we court these earthly things below, 

Which merit not the service we bestow. 

But O, my God ! though grovelling I appear 

Upon the ground, and have a rooting here 

Which hales me downward, yet in my desire 

To that which is above me I aspire, 

And all my best affections, I profess 

To him that is the Sun of Righteousness. 



192 FLORA AND THALIA. 

Oh ! keep the morning of his incarnation, 
The burning noontide of his bitter passion, 
The night of his descending, and the height 
Of his ascension, — ever in my sight. 
That imitating him in what I may, 
I never follow an inferior way. 



WITHERS. 



TO THE CROCUS. 

Lowly, sprightly Uttle flower! 

Herald of a brighter bloom. 
Bursting in a sunny hour, 

From thy winter tomb. 

Hues you bring, bright, gay, and tender, 

As if never to decay ; 
Fleeting is their varied splendour, — 

Soon, alas ! it fades away. 

Thus, the hopes I long had cherished. 
Thus, the friends. I long had known, 

One by one, like you, have perished ; 
Blighted — I must fade alone. 

H. TATTEHSON. 

Belfast. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 193 



LE LODE DEGLI POMPI. 

L'alma, verde odorata e vaga pianta 
Che fu trovata in ciel, che'l pome d'oro 
Produsse, onde poi fu I'antica lite 
Tra le celesti Dee, c'al terren d'Argo, 
Partori mille afTanni, e morte a Troia ; 
Quella ch'entr'ia giardin lieti e felici 
Tra le ninfe d'Esperia in guardia avea 
L'omicidial serpente; ond' a Perseo 
Fu tanto avaro alfin I'antico Atlante, 
Ch'ei divenne del ciel sostegno eterno 
Dico il grallo limon, gli Auraci e i cedri, 
Ch'entr'ai fini smeraldi, al caldo, al gielo 
(Che primavera e loro ovunque saglia, 
Ovunque ascenda il sol), pendenti e freschi 
Ed acerbi e maturi an sempre i pomi 
Ensieme i fior che'l gelsomino e'l giglio 
Avanzan di color ; I'odore e tale, 
Che l'alma Cyterea se n'impie il seno, 
Se n'Inghirlanda il Erin. 

ALMANNI DEL, COL. 



25 



194 FLORA AND THALIA. 



LINES TO A YOUNG LADY, 

WITH VERSES OS A VARIETY OF FLOWERS. 

Some lines on many a garden flower, . 

And native wildling too, I send ; 
Trifles like these assume a power 

To please, when offered by sl friend. 

Flowers are the brightest things which earth 
On her broad bosom loves to cherish ; 

Gay they appear as childhood's mirth. 
Like fading dreams of hope they perish. 

In every clime, in every age, 

Mankind have felt their pleasing sway ; 
And lays to them have decked the page 

Of moralist, and minstrel gay. 

By them the lover tells his tale. 

They can his hopes, his fears express ; 

The maid, when words or looks would fail, 
Can thus a kind return confess. 

They wreathe the harp at banquets tried, 
With them we crown the crested brave; 

They deck the maid — adorn the bride — 
Or form the chaplets for her grave. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 195 

If hopes and fervent wishes could 

Control futurity's dark veil, 
There's not a plant or flower but should 

Have virtues such as you'd reveal. 

You should, like roses, charm the view ; 

Like mignonette, should glad the heart ; 
Your friends should be like ivy, true, 

And everlasting where thou art. 

As the bright flower, which fables say 
Turns on its stem, the sun to greet. 

Should you, where'er your path might stray, 
Continued joy and sunshine meet. 

But should misfortune dim your road, 
May you be like that lovely flower. 

Which, pressed beneath an adverse load, 
Breathes secret sweets of balmy power. 

And as through sunshine you may go. 

Or bow beneath affliction's night, 
May He who bids the lily grow, 

Direct and guide your course aright. 

H. PATTEKSOIf. 



196 FLORA AND THALIA. 



SPRING AND SUMMER FLOWERS. 

When every leaf is brightly green, 

When every stem hath sweetest flowers, 

And brilliant hues bedeck the scene, 
Throughout the joyous summer hours ; 

When sweetest perfumes scent the air, 
When the bright sky hath deepest blue, 

When fairest scenes seem doubly fair. 
And all is cloudless to our view ; 

Say, with what feelings do we gaze 
Upon the garden's gaudy flowers. 

The Rose's tint, the Tulip's blaze, 
The sweet Carnation's spicy powers ! 

Their beauty greeteth every eye, 
Their perfume floats on every breeze, 

Yielding rich incense to the sky, — 
Our love abidejth not with these. 

But when the Snowdrop's fragile head. 

First timidly attracts our view. 
Ere winter's sternest hour hath fled. 

Like friendship to affliction true ; 



FLORA AND THALIA. 197 

And when the breath of early spring- 
Gives to the modest Primrose birth, 

And tempts the Violet to bring 

Her beauty from the sheltering earth ; 

It is with exquisite delight 

We hail these unassuming flowers, 

More dearly precious in our sight. 

Than all that deck our summer bowers. 

They are the prized, the cherished few, 

Types of our best affections here ; 
Our path they beautifully strew, 

And first perchance in gloom appear. 

M. 
From "Floicers of all Hue." 



POETICAL PORTRAIT. 

A Violet by a mossy stone, 

Half hidden from the eye, 
Fair as a star, when only one 

Is shining in the sky. 

WORDSWORTH. 

Flowers of the fairest. 

And gems of the rarest, 
I find and I gather in country or town ; 

But one is still wanting. 

Oh ! where is it haunting 1 
The bud and the jewel must make up my crown 



198 FLORA AND THALIA. 

The Rose with its bright heads, 

The diamond that light sheds, 
Rich as the sunbeam and pure as the snow ; 

One gives me its fragrance. 

The other its radiance ; 
But the pearl and the lily where dwell they below 1 

'Tis years since I knew thee. 

But yet should' I view thee 
With the eye and the heart of my earliest youth ; 

And feel thy meek beauty, 

Add impulse to duty, 
The love of the fancy to old ties of truth. 

Thou pearl of the deep sea, 

That flows in ray heart free, 
Thou rock-planted lily come hither or send ; 

'Mid flowers of the fairest. 

And gems of the rarest, 
I miss thee, I seek thee, my own parted friend ! 

M. J. JEWSBURY. 



LA BRANCHE d'aMANDIER. 

De I'amandier tige fleurie, 
Symbole, helas ! de la beaute, 

Comme toi, la fleur de la vie, 
Fleurit et tombe avant I'ete. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 199 

iju'on la neglige ou qu'on la cueille, 
De nos fronts, des mains de I'amour, 

EUe s'echappe feuille a feuille, 
Comme nos plaisirs jour a jour. 

Savourons ces courtes delices ; 

Disputons les memes au zephyr; 
Epuisons les rians calices, 

De ces parfums qui vont mourir. 

Souvent la beaute fugitive 

Ressemble a la fleur du matin, 
Qui du front glace du convive, 

Tombe avant I'heure du festin. 

Un jour tombe, un autre se leve ; 

Le printemps va s'evanouir ; 
Chaque fleur que le vent enleve 

Nous dit : Hatez-vous d'en jouir. 

Et puisqu'il faut qu'elles perissent, 

Qu'elles perissent sans retour '. 
Que les roses ne se fletrissent. 

Que sous les levres de I'x'^.mour ! 

DE LA3IABTINE. 



200 FLORA AND THALIA. 



THE PRIMROSE, 



Ask me why I send you here 

This sweet infanta of the year 1 

Ask me why I send to you 

I'his Primrose all bepearled with dew ] 

I will whisper in your ears, 

The sweets of love are washed with tears. 

Ask me why this flower does shew, 
So yellow-green, and sickly too ] 
Ask me why the stalk is weak, 
And bending, yet it doth not break 1 
I will answer, these discover. 
What fainting hopes are in a lover. 

HERBICK. 



BRING FLOWERS. 

Bri>^g flowers, young flowers, for the festal board, 

To wreath the cup ere the wine is poured ; 

Bring flowers ! they are springing in wood and vale. 

Their breath floats out on the southern gale ; 

And the touch of the sunbeam hath waked the rose. 

To deck the hall where the bright wine flows. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 201 

Bring flowers to strew in the conqueror's path, — 
He hath shaken thrones with his stormy wrath ! 
He comes with the spoils of nations back, 
The vines lie crushed in his chariot's track ; 
The turf looks red where he won the day — 
Bring flowers to strew in the conqueror's way. 

Bring flowers to the captive's lonely cell, 
They have tales of the joyous woods to tell ; 

Of the free blue streams and the glowing sky, 
And the bright world shut from his languid eye : 
They will bear him a thought of the sunny hours. 
And a dream of his youth,— bring him flowers, wild 
flowers. 

Bring flowers, fresh flowers, for the bride to wear ! 
They were born to blush in her shining hair ; 
She is leaving the home of her childhood's mirth, 
She hath bid farewell to her father's hearth ; 
Her place is now by another's side — 
Bring flowers for the locks of the fair young bride ! 

Bring flowers, pale flowers, o'er the bier to shed, 
A crown for the brow of the early dead ! 
For this, through its leaves hath the white rose burst, 
For this, in the woods was the violet nursed ! 
Though they smile in vain for what once was ours, 
They are love's last gift — bring ye flowers, pale 
flowers ! 

26 



202 FLORA AND THALIA. 

Bring flowers to the shrine where we kneel in prayer, 
They are Nature's offering, their place is there ! 
They speak of hope to the fainting heart, 
With a voice of promise they come and part; 
They sleep in dust through the wintry hours, 
They hreak forth in glory — bring flowers, bright 
flowers ! 

MRS. HEMiAIfS. 



THE CELANDINE. 

Paxsies, Lilies, King-cups, Daisies, 
Let them live upon their praises ; 

Long as there's a sun that sets. 
Primroses will have their glory ; 

Long as there are Violets, 
They will have a place in story : 

There's a flower which shall be mine, 

'Tis the little Celandine. 

Ere a leaf is on the bush, 
In the time before the thrush 

Has a thought about its nest. 
Thou wilt come with half a call, 

Spreading out thy glossy breast. 
Like a careless prodigal, 

Telling tales about the sun, 

When there's little warmth, or none. 



FLORA AND THAHa!. 303 

Soon as gentle breezes bring 
News of winter's vanishing, 

And the children build their bowers. 
Sticking 'kerchief plots of mould. 

All about with full-blown flowers, 
Thick as sheep in shepherd's fold ; 

With the proudest thou art there, 

Mantling in the tiny square. 

Comfort have thou of thy merit. 
Kindly, unassuming spirit ! 

Careless of thy neighbourhood, 
Thou dost show thy pleasant face 

On the moor and in the wood ; 
In the lane — there's not a place. 

Howsoever mean it be. 

But 'tis good enough for thee. 

"WORDSWORTH. 



SUR DES CEILLETS ARROSES PAR LE 
GRAND CONDE. 

"Ey voyant ces (Eillets, qu'un illustre guerrier 
Arrose d'une main qui gagna des batailles ; 
Soviens-toi qu'Apollon batissait des murailles, 
Et ne t'etonnc pas que Mars soit jardinier. 

MADEMOISELLE DE SCUDERT. 



204 FLORA AND THALIA. 



LE MATIN. 

Le voile du matin sur les monts se ddploie. 
Vols, un rayon naissant blanchit le vieille tour, 
Et deja dans les cieux s'unit avec amour, 

Ainsi que la gloir-e a la joie, 
Le premier chant des bois sfux premiers feux du jour. 

Oui, souris a I'eclat dont le del se decore ! 
Tu verras, si demain le cerceuil me devore, 

Luire a tes yeux en pleurs un soleil aussi beau, 
Et les memes oiseaux chanter la meme aurore, 

Sur mon noir efinuet tombeau ! 

Mais dans I'autre horison I'ame alors est ravie, 
L'avenir sans fin s'ouvre a Tetre illimite; 

Au matin de I'eternite 

On se reveille de la vie, 
Comme d'une nuit sombre ou d'un reve agite. 

VICTOR HUGO. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 205 



NIGHT-SCENTED FLOWERS. 

Cah back your odours, lovely flowers, 
From the night-winds, call them back ; 

And fold your leaves till the laughing, hours 
Come forth in the sunbeam's track. 

The lark lies couched in her grassy nest, 

And the honey-bee is gone ; 
And all bright things are away to rest, 

Why watch ye here alone 1 

" Nay, let our shadowy beauty bloom. 

When the stars give quiet light ; 
And let us offer our faint peJIme ^; 

On the silent shrine of night. 

" Call it not wasted, the scent we lend^" ^. 

To the breeze, when no step is nigh ; 
Oh, thus for ever the earth should send 

Her grateful breath on high ! 

" And love us as emblems, night's dewy flowers. 

Of hopes unto sorrows given. 
That spring through the gloom of the darkest hours 

Looking alone to heaven. 

FROM mus. hemaxs's national lyrics. 



206 FLORA AND THALIA. 



ON PLANTING A TULIP-ROOT. 

Here lies a bulb, the child of earth. 

Buried alive beneath the clod, 
Ere long to spring, by second birth, 

A new and nobler work of God. 

'Tis said that microscopic power, 

Might, through his swaddling folds, descry 
The infant image of the flower, 

Too exquisite to meet the eye. 

This, vernal suns and rains will swell, 
Till from its dark abode it peep, 

Like Venus rising from her shell, 
Amidst the spring-tide of the deep. 

Two shapely leaves will first unfold ; 

Then, on a smooth elastic stem, 
The verdant bud shall turn to gold. 

And open in a diadem. 

Not one of Flora's brilliant race, 
A form more perfect can display ; 

Art could not feign more simple grace. 
Nor Nature take a line away. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 207 

Yet, rich as morn, of many a hue. 

When flushing clouds through darkness strike, 
The Tulip's petals shine in dew, 

All beautiful, but none alike. 

Kings, on their bridal, might unrobe. 

To lay their glories at its foot ; 
And queens their sceptre, crown, and globe. 

Exchange for blossom, stalk, and root. 

Here could I stand and moralise ; 

Lady, I leave that part to thee ; 
Be thy next birth in Paradise, 

Thy life to come — eternity. 

MOXTGOMERT. 



THE WREATH. 

Weave a wreath of varied hues, 

Here are garlands twining. 

For the gay, the brightest choose, 

And drooping for the pining. 

" Lo'Dox Pride," for West-end beaux 

Or belles, as fancy ranges ; 

" Heart's-ease" too, in plenty glows, 

To meet Dame Fortune's changes. 



208 FLORA AND THALIA. 

With the Heiress, " Makx-gold," 
For men who wish to marry ; 
"Bachelok's Buttons" now unfold, 
Fo,r those who ever tarry. 
" Love lies bleedixg" for the flirt 
Its lonely bloom discloses ; 
Maidens, pray your frowns avert, 
Prudes shall wear " Primroses." 

In this wreath, for city men 

The " Stock" its blossom raises ; 

" Pinks" for would-be dandies, then 

The simple lack-a "Daisies;" 

Deep "Blue Bells" for belles who read, 

"JoxauiLs" for the scribblers; 

" Laurel" cro ,vns the victor's meed, 

And " Viol-ets" the fiddler's. 

"Passiox-flcwers" for lovers' vows, 
When they dare confess them ; 
"KosEs" sweet, for Beauty's brows. 
My pray'r is, Heaven bless them. 
Lady, may thy pathway be. 
Through life, with flowers blended, 
"Forget me xot," I ask of thee — 
With this, my " Wreath" is ended. 

s. J. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 209 



ON THE LILY. 



Bold Oxlip, and 



The crown imperial ; lilies of all kinds, 
The Flower-de-luce being one. Of these I lack 
To make you garlands of, and my sweet friend 
To strew him o'er and o'er. 

wiktek's tale. 



Shipwrecked upon a kingdom where no pity, 
No friends, no hope, no kindred, weep for me ; 
Almost, no grave allowed me : like the lily, 
That once was mistress of the field and flourished, 
I'll hang my head and perish. 

KIXG HEJTHY VIII. 



Observe the rising lily's snowy grace, 

Observe the various vegetable race ; 

They neither toil nor spin, but careless grow. 

Yet see how warm they blush ! how bright they glow . 

What regal vestments can with them compare ; 

What king so shining, or what queen so fair ! 

rRlOR. 

27 



210 FLORA AND THALIA, 



THE BLUE HARE-BELL.* 

Have ye ever heard in the twilight dim, 

A low, soft strain, 
That ye fancied a distant vesper hymn, 

Borne o'er the plain 
By the zephyrs that rise on perfumed wing, 
When the sun's last glances are glimmering ? 

Have ye heard that music, with cadence sweet, 

And merry peal, 
Ring out, like the echoes of fairy feet, 

O'er flowers that steal 1 
And did ye deem that each trembling tone 
Was the distant vesper-chime alone ] 

The source of that whispering strain I'll tell ; 

For I've listened oft 
To the music faint of the Blue Hare-bell, 

In the gloaming soft ; 
'Tis the gay fairy-folk the peal who ring, 
At even-time for their banqueting. 

* These exquisitely beautiful lines have been selected from 
a volume, recently published by Mr. Tilt, entitled " Poems, 
with Illustrations, by Louisa Anne Twamley." A young lady, 
who, at the age of ttcenti/, is a Poet, a Painter, and ha- men 
Engraver. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 211 

And gaily the trembling bells peal out, 

With gentle tongue, 
While elves and fairies career about, 

'Mid dance and song. 
Oh, roses and lilies are fair to see ; 
But the wild Blue-bell is the flower for me. 

LOUISA ANISTE TWAMLEY. 



ON A TIME -PIECE. 

WITH A FIGURE OF TIME, PLACED NEAR A VASE ^ 

OF FLOWERS. 

O PAUSE, Old Time, ere o'er my flowers. 

Thy fatal sithe is coldly laid ; 
And leave, leave, some lingering hours. 

Ere Nature's final debt is paid. 

Some lingering hours, in which may rise 

The memory of the buried past ; 
And I may pour some parting sighs, 

O'er hopes, thoughts, joys, for ever past. 

They rise no more — those flowers are shed, 
Whose early fragrance blest my morn ; 

They haunt the chambers of the dead, 
Like flowers around the funeral urn. 



212 FLORA AND THALIA. 

Yet shall arise upon my way, 

Affection's buds and blossoms fair ; 

The same that in my early day 

With heavenly fragrance filled the air. 

They live — they breathe ; and on my heart 
I wear, still wear those cherished flowers ; 

And death alone those ties can part, 

First woven in my home's sweet bowers. 

O pause, old Time ! for though to thee 
I have not brought the tribute due ; 

And hours, days, years have fled from me, 
Still to my mortal trust untrue ; 

Yet, in thy course thou hast not seen, 
Ungenerous wish, or fault unmourned, 

And all that ought not to have been 
Upon a sorrowing heart returned. 

And ere I bow beneath thy sway, 
Full many a virtue shall be mine ; 

For I will consecrate each day. 

To bend at duty's hallowed shrine. 

Then pause, old Time, ere o'er my flowers. 

Thy fatal sithe is coldly laid ; 
And leave, leave, some lingering hours, 

Ere Nature's final debt is paid. 

FROM THE SACRED OrFEEING. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 213 



THE LILY OF THE VALLEY. 

Fair flower, that, lapt in lowly glade 
Dost hide beneath the greenwood shade, 

Than whom the vernal gale 
None fairer wakes on bank or spray. 
Our England's lily of the May, 

Our Lily of the vale ! 

Art thou that " Lily of the field," 
Which, when the Saviour sought to shield 

The heart from blank despair, 
He showed to our mistrustful kind 
An emblem of the thoughtful mind 

Of God's paternal care ] 

Not thus, I trow ; for brighter shine 
To the warm skies of Palestine 

Those children of the East; 
There, when mild autumn's early rain 
Descends on parched Esdrela's plain, 

And Tabor's oak-girt crest ; 

* The Editor has taken a liberty (for which the beauty of the 
language as well as the poetry must plead her excuse) of ex- 
tracting this piece from " The British Months," a poem in 
twelve parts, by Dr. Mant, Lord Bishop of Down and Connor, 
recently published by Mr. Parker, West Strand. 



214 FLORA AND THALIA. 

More frequent than the host of night, 
Those earth-born stars, as sages write, 

Their brilliant disks unfold ; 
Fit symbol of imperial state, 
Their sceptre-seeming forms elate, 

And crowns of burnished gold. 

But not the less, sweet spring-tide's flower, 
Dost thou display the Maker's power, 

His skill and handy work ; 
Our western valleys' humbler child. 
Where, in green nook of woodland wild, 

Thy modest blossoms lurk. 

What though nor care nor art be thine, 
The loom to ply, the thread to twine, 

Yet, born to bloom and fade,^r 
Thee too a lovelier robe arrays, 
Than, e'en in Israel's brightest days. 

Her wealthiest king arrayed. 

Of thy twin leaves the embowered screen. 
Which wraps thee in thy shtoud of green; 

Thy Eden-breathing smell; 
Thy arched and purple-vested stem. 
Whence ^elidant many a pearly gem. 

Displays a milk-white bell. 

Instinct -with life thy fibrous root, 
Which sends from earth the ascending shoot. 
As rising from th^ dead, 



FLORA AND THALIA. '215 

And fills thy veins with verdant juice, 
Charged thy fair blossoms to produce, 
And berries scarlet red. 

The triple cell, the twofold seed, 
A ceaseless treasure-house decreed, 

Whence aye thy race may grow. 
As from creation they have grown, 
While Spring shall weave her flowery crown, 

Or vernal breezes blow. 

Who forms thee thus, with unseen hand 1 
Who at creation gave command. 

And willed thee thus to be ; 
And keeps thee still in being, through 
Age after age revolving] Who 

But the great God is he 1 

Omnipotent to work his will; 
Wise, who contrives each part to fill 

The post to each assigned; 
Still provident, with sleepless care. 
To keep, to make thee sweet and fair 

For man's enjoyment — kind ! 

" There is no God," the senseljjfs say : — 
"O God! why cast'st thou us awayl" 

Of feeble faith and frail. 
The mourner breathes his anxious thought : — 
By thee a better lesson taught. 

Sweet lily of the vale ! 



216 FLORA AND THALIA. 

Yes, He who made and fosters thee, 
In reason's eye perforce must be 

Of majesty divine. 
Nor deems she, that his guardian care 
Will He in man's support forbear, 

Who thus provides for thee. 



THE SNOW-DROP. 

Lone flov^er, hemmed in with snows as white as they, 

But hardier far, once more I see thee bend 

Thy forehead, as if fearful to offend. 

Like an unbidden guest. Though day by day, 

Storms, sallying from the mountain-tops, waylay 

The rising sun, and on the plains descend ; 

Yet art thou welcome, welcome as a friend 

Whose zeal outruns his promise. Blue-eyed May 

Shall soon behold this border thickly set 

With bright jonquils, their odours lavishing 

On the soft west wind and his frolic peers ; 

Nor will I then thy modest grace forget, 

Chaste snow-drop, vent'rous harbinger of spring. 

And pensive monitor of fleeting years ! 

WORDSWORTH. 



FLORA AND THALIA. 217 



TO A PRIMROSE. 

PRESENTED TO A FRIEJfD, JANUARY, 1829. 

Sweet herald of the ever-gentle Spring, 
How gently waved o'er thee the Winter's wing ! 
Around thee blew the warm Favonian gale, 
Devonia nursed thee in her loveliest vale ; 
Beneath she rolled the Plym's pellucid stream, 
And Heaven diffused around its quickening beam. 
But, ah ! the sun, the shower, the zephyr bland, 
Made thee but fair to tempt the spoiler's hand. 
I cannot bear thee to thy bank again, 
And bathe thy breast in soft refreshing rain, 
Nor bid the gentle zephyr round thee play, 
Nor 'raptured eye thee basking in the ray ; 
But snapped untimely from thy velvet stem, 
Be thou my daily care, my "bonnie gem," 
And when thus severed from thy native glade, 
The radiance of thy cinque-rayed star shall fade, 
And pale decay come creeping o'er thy bloom, 
A sigh, dear flower, shall mourn thy early doom. 

N. T. CARRINGTOlf. 



28 



218 FLORA AND THALIA. 



APRIL FLOWERS. 

NoH, April, fail with scent and hue, 
To grace thee lowlier blossoms new. 
Not only that, where weak and scant 
Peep'd forth the early primrose plant. 
Now shine profuse unnumbered eyes, 
Like stars that stud the wint'ry skies ; 
But that its sister cowslip's nigh, 
With no unfriendly rivalry 
Of form and tint, and fragrant smells. 
O'er the green fields their yellow bells 
Unfold, bedropt with tawny red. 
And meekly bend the drooping head. 
Not only thkt the fringed edge 
. Of heath, or bank, or pathway hedge, 
Glows with the furze's golden bloom ; 
But mingling now, the verdant broom, 
With flowers of rival lustre deck'd, 
Uplifts its shapelier form erect. 

And there upon the sod below, 
Ground-ivy's purple blossoms show, 
Like helmet of crusader knight, 
Its anthers' crosslike forms of white ; 
And lesser periwinkle's bloom. 
Like carpet of Damascus' loom. 
Pranks with bright blue the tissue wove, 
Of verdant foliage : and above, 



FLORA AND THALIA. 2VJ 

With milk-wliite flowers, whence soon shall swell, 

Rich fruitage, to the taste and smell 

Pleasant alike, the strawberry weaves 

Its coronets of three-fold leaves, 

In mazes through the sloping wood. 

Nor wants there, in her dreamy mood, 

What fancy's sportiveness may think 

A cup, whence midnight elves might drink 

Delicious drops of nectar'd dew, 

While they their fairy sports pursue, 

And roundelays by fount or rill ; 

The streaked and chequered daffodil. 

Nor wants there many a flower beside, 
On holt, and hill, and meadow pied ; 
With pale green bloom the upright box, 
And woodland crowfoot's golden locks ; 
And yellow cinquefoil's hairy trail ; 
And saxifrage with petals pale ; 
And purple bilberry's globelike head ; 
And cranberry's bells of rosy red ; 
And creeping growwell blue and bright ; 
And cranesbiU's streaks of red and white. 
Or purple, with soft leaves of down ; 
And golden tulip's turban'd crown. 
Sweet-scented on its bending stem ; 
And bright-eyed star of Bethlehem. 
With those, the firstlings of their kind. 
Which through the bosky {hickets wind 



220 FLORA AND THALIA. 

Their tendrils, vetch, or pea, or tare, 
At random ; and with many a pair 
Of leafits green the brake embower, 
• And many a pendent-painted flower. 

FROM BISHOP ]>IA>"t's " BRITISH MOIfTHS. 



tAe death of the flowers. 

How happily, how happily, the flowers die away; 
Oh, could we but return to earth as easily as they ! 
Just live a life of sunshine, of innocence, and bloom, 
Then drop, without decrepitude or pain, into the tomb. 

The gay and glorious creatures ! they neither " toil 

nor spin ;" 
Yet, lo ! what goodly raiment they're all apparelled 

in ; 
No tears are on their beauty, but dewy gems more 

bright. 
Than ever brow of eastern queen endiademed with 

light. 

The young rejoicing creatures! their pleasures never 

pall; 
Nor lose in sweet contentment, because so free to all ! 



FLORA AND THALIA. 221 

The dew, the showers, the sunshine, the hdlmy, 

blessed air, 
Spend nothing of their freshness, though all may 

freely share. 

The happy, careless creatures ! of time they take no 

heed; 
Nor weary of his creeping, nor tremble at his speed ; 
Nor sigh with sick impatience and wish the Ught 

away ; 
Nor when 'tis gone cry dolefully, " would God that 

it were day !" 

And when their lives are over, they drop away to rest. 
Unconscious of the penal doom, on holy Nature's 

breast ; 
No pain have they in dying, no shrinking from decay : 
Oh ! could we but return to earth as easily as they ! 

CAROLINE BOWLES. 



THE 

DIAL OF FLOWERS. 



'Twas a lovely thought to mark the hours, 

As they floated in light away, 
By the opening and the folding flowers 

That laugh to the summer's day. 

Thus had each moment its own rich hue, 

And its graceful cup and bell, 
In whose coloured vase might sleep the dew, 

Like a pearl in an ocean shell. 

To such sweet signs might the time have flowed 

In a golden current on, 
Ere from the garden, man's first abode. 

The glorious guests were gone. 

So might the days have been brightly told — 
Those days of song and dreams — 

When shepherds gathered their flocks of old 
By the blue Arcadian streams ; 




224 DIAL OF FLOWERS. 

So, in those isles of delight, that rest 
Far off in a breezeless main, 

Which many a bark, with a weary guest 
Has sought, but still in vain. 



Yet is not life, in its real flight, 
Marked thus — even thus — on earth. 

By the closing of one hope's delight, 
And another's gentle birth ? 

Oh ! let us live so, that, flower by flower, 

Shutting in turn, may leave 
A lingerer sti^l for the sunset hour, 

A charm for the shaded eve ! 

Hemans. 



When a plant is approaching its state of perfec- 
tion, when its organs of nourishment are completely 
developed, and its vegetation is most luxuriant, then 
arrives the time of flowering, which has been aptly 
termed " the joy of plants." The most superficial 
observer must have noticed how different is the sea- 
son of flowering of individual plants, and how each 
month is adorned with its particular flowers. When 
the intense cold of January confines us to our houses, 
the Black Hellebore, or Christmas Rose, unfolds its 
dazzling white blossoms ; in February, the innocent 
Snowdrop presents to us her elegant cup. In the 
same month the Hazel puts forth its catkins, and 
not rarely the early-blooming Crowfoot shows the 



DIAL OF FLOWERS. 225 

blue tips of its clusters of blossom. March boasts a 
richer Flora ; then the Violet dehghts us with its- 
fragrance; the Mezereon offers its peach-coloured 
flowers, and the Primrose leads on a long train of the 
charming children of Spring. These now continue 
to advance in increasing numbers, displaying, espe- 
cially in May and June, their highest splendour ; 
till at length the Meadow Saffron takes leave of 
inclement Autumn, and, saturated with rain, the 
Mosses acquire fresh vigour, and open to the botan- 
ist a new field for investigation. 

IS ot less different than the period of flowering is 
the time of the opening and shutting of flowers. 
Some plants habitually open and close their flowers 
by turns ; others are governed in these respects by 
the weather ; others again, by the length or short- 
ness of the day : while some open and shut at certain 
hours, and thus furnish materials for composing the 
Dial of Flowers. 

According to the observations of later botanists, 
the flowery crown of plants serves, among other 
things, to envelop the tender organs of fructification, 
and to protect them from the pernicious influence of 
external agents. Those organs of fructification are 
the chief objects of the maternal care of Nature ; 
while shut up in the flower-bud, they acquire that 
strength and perfection of parts, which enable them 
29 



226 DIAL OF FLOWERS. 

to endure the light of the sun and to perform the 
functions for which they are designed. It is not 
till they are capable of fulfiUi?!^ these functions that 
the flower unfolds itself; but it again closes at such 
times when external influences might be injurious to 
the delicate organs of fructification. Many flowers 
can bear only the refreshing morning air and the 
first rays of the sun, but remain shut all the rest of 
the day. This may be particularly observed in 
the diflerent species of Convolvulus, Ipomsea, and 
Goat's Beard. We find these in general open only 
till about eleven o'clock. In like manner the Mal- 
lows and the Mesembryanthemums unfold their 
flowers about noon, and precisely at that time, in 
serene weather, open the singularly formed Drosera, 
and the common Purslain, which shut again in an 
hour. Others unfold themselves only in the evening 
and continue open all night, probably because their 
delicate organs would be injured by the sun. The 
CEnotheras, the Gauras, and the different species of 
the Mirabilis, furnish examples of this kind. Thus 
too the Cactus opuntia opens its magnificent blos- 
soms at night only, and towards morning shuts them 
up for ever. The flowers of many plants of the 
nineteenth class are observed to hang their heads 
during night — the Camellia, for example — by which 
means the rain, or dew, which might injure the 
tender organs of fructification, can run off the more 



DIAL OF FLOWERS. 227 

easily. In other plants of this class, the flower shuts 
up against rain, and on the approach of evening, as 
is the case with the marigolds. 

The periodical change of colour in some flowers 
is also worthy of remark. Thus the flowers of the 
speckled French Honeysuckle (Jledysarum macula- 
turn) are purple in the morning and green at noon. 
The changeable Hibiscus (Hibiscns mutabilis) is 
white in the morning, flesh-coloured at noon, and 
rose-red in the evening. Thus too, the great Corn- 
flag, ( Gladiolus grandus) changes its colour several 
times in the course of the day. 

Neither is the -scent of flowers equally strong and 
agreeable at all hours of the day : many, even of our 
indigenous flowers, have the strongest scent at night. 
The Ixia cinnamomea gives out its fragrance in the 
evening only; the highly-scented Lesser Orpine, 
(Crassida odoratissima), only in the night; the 
Epidendrum fragrans, morning and evening ; an- 
other species of Epidendrum, hung up in a room 
without earth or water, yields an agreeable perfume 
for years. The flowers of the Hebenstreitia dentata 
are scentless in the morning, have a disagreeable 
smell at noon, and give out in the evening a fragrant 
odour not unlike that of the Hyacinth. 

These properties of flowers, and the opening and 
shutting of many at particular times of the day, led 
to the idea of planting them in such a manner as to 



228 DIAL OF FLOWERS. 

indicate the succession of the hours, and to make 
them supply the place of a watch or clock. Those 
who are disposed to try the experiment may easily 
compose such a dial by consulting the following 
Table, comprehending the hours between three in 
the morning and eight in the evening. 

It is, of course, impossible to ensure the accurate 
going of such a dial, because the temperature, the 
driness, and the dampness of the air, have a con- 
siderable influence on the opening and shutting of 
flowers. 



DIAL OF FLOWERS. 



229 



xa:«es of plakts. 



Hour of j Hour of 
Open- Shut- 
ins, linsr. 



Yellow Goal's Beard {tragopogon luteum) 
Common Base Hawkweed {crepis tectonmi) 
Field Sowthisile (sonchus agrestis) 
Dandelion (Jeontodon taraxacum) 
Alpine Base Hawkweed {crepis alpina) 
Naked-sialked Poppy ipapaver nudicaule 
Orange Day-lily Qiemerocallis fulva) . 
Red Hawkweed (hieracium rubruni) 
Meadow Gushmore Qiypoiharis pratensis) 
Red Base Hawkweed {crepis rubra) 
White Water Lily {nymphau alba) 
While Spiderwort {anthericuvi album) 
Tongue-leafed Mesembryanthemum (M. 

linguiforme 

Beardea Mesembryanthemum (M.barbatum) 
Dandelion (leontodon taraxacum) 
Yellow Goat's heard {tragopogon luteum) 
Field Marigold {calendula arvensis) 
Single-flowered Hawkweed {hiercLCium pi- 

losella) 

Red Pink {dianthus prolifer) . 

Red Sandwort {armaria rubra) 

Ice PI ant {mesembryanthemum crystallinum) 

Common Base Hawkweed {crepis tectorum) 

Alpine Base Hawkweed {crepis alpina) 

Field Sowthisile {sonchits agrestis) 

Red Pink {dianthiis prolifer) . 

Red Base Hawkweed ( repis rubra) 

Bearded Mesembryanlhemnm {M.barhatuni) 

Single-flowered Hawkweed {hieracium pi- 

losella) 

Red Sandwort {are^iaria rubra) 
Field Marigold {calendula arvensis) 
Tongue-leaYed Mesembryanthemum {M. 

linguifurme) 

Red Hawkweed {hieracium rubruni) 
Ice Plant {mesembryayilhemum crystallinuvi) 
While Spiderwort {anthericum album) 
Meadow G'ishmore {hypocharis pratejisis) 
While Water Lily {nymphaa alba) 

1 Naked-stalked Puppy {papaver nudicaule) 
Orange Day-lily {hemerocallis fulxu) 



5-6 
6 

61-2 

7 
7 

—8 



A 

BOTANICAL DESCRIPTION 

OF THE 

VARIOUS PARTS OF A FLOWER. 



Iif a perfect flower there are seven parts : — viz. 

1. The Calyx. 2. The Corolla. 

3. The Stame^js. 4. The Pistil. 

5. The Pericarp. 6. The Seed. 

7. The Receptacle. 

Many flowers are deficient in some of their parts, 
but the stamens and pistils are essential, and to be 
found in all, either in flowers on the same plant, or 
in different individuals of the same species on sepa- 
rate plants. The calyx, cup, or empalement, is the 
outer part of the flower, formed of one or more 



232 BOTANICAL DESCRIPTION OF 

greenish leaves, sustaining the corolla at the bottom, 
and enclosing it entirely before it expands, as you 
may remark in the Rose and Geranium. 

The Calyx is either, 

A cup, as in the Polyanthus. 

A fence, as in the Carrot. 

A catkin, as in the Willow. 

A sheath, as in the Daffodil. 

A husk, as in Oats, Wheat, or Grasses. 

A veil, as in Mosses. 

A curtain, as in Mushrooms. 

The blossom, petals, or corolla, is that beautifully 
coloured part of a flower which first attracts the 
attention, and is regarded by common observers as 
the flower itself; it serves as a protection to the im- 
portant parts of fructification, the stamens and pistils, 
and falls off when they attain maturity. 

The stamens or chives, are composed of two parts, 
one long and thin, by which they are fastened to the 
bottom of the corolla, and called the filament ; the 
other thicker placed at the top of the filament, called 
the anther. Each anther is a kind of box, which 
opens when it is ripe, and throws out a yellow dust, 
called pollen, or farinia. This dust is absorbed by 
the pistil, and passing through it reaches the germ, 
and vivifies the seed, which without this process 
would be imperfect and barren. "When the flowers 



THE PARTS OF A FLOWER. 233 

grow on separate plants, the pollen is often carried 
by insects, as it adheres to their wings while they 
are extracting honey. It is also possible that an 
attraction may subsist between the parts, which may 
draw the pollen, floating in the air, to the pistils of 
its own species. The pistil, or pointal, is composed 
of three parts, the gerraen, which stands at the bot- 
tom, and contains the embryo seeds ; the style, which 
is placed on the germen, a hollow tube of various 
figures and lengths, and sometimes wholly wanting : 
the stigma which is placed on the top of the style, 
or, if there be none, on the germen. 

The seed-vessel, or pericarp, is the germen, en- 
larged as the seeds increase in size. The seed- 
vessel is divided into nine kinds : — 

Capsule, as in the Poppy. 
Nut, as in the Filbert. 
Drupe, as in the Cherry. 
Berry, as in the Strawberry. 
Pome, as in the Apple. 
Silique, as in the Wall-flower. 
Silicle, as in Honesty. 
Legume or Shell, as in the Pea. 
Cone, as in the Fir. 

The seeds, or fruit, resemble the eggs of animals, 
and contain the rudiments of a new vegetation. The 
30 



234 BOTAJVICAL DESCRIPTION OF 

seed is composed of several parts ; — first, the heart, 
or principle of life, contained within the lobes ; this 
also consists of two parts, the plume which ascends, 
and becomes the future stem ; and the beak which 
descends, and becomes the root. Second, the lobes ^ 
which supply the heart with nourishment, till it is 
capable of deriving it from the earth. Third, the 
eye or external mark where the seed was fastened 
within the seed-vessel. Fourth, the seed-coat, or 
proper cover to the seed. The seed itself is sometimes 
crowned with the cup of the flower, and sometimes 
winged with a feather or thin membrane, which 
assists the wind to waft or disperse it to a distance. 

The base, or receptacle, is that part by which the 
whole fructification is supported ; it is very remarkable 
in the Artichoke, consisting of that part which is 
eaten. 

The nectary, or honey cup, is an appendage with 
which some flowers are furnished, containing a small 
quantity of sweet juice, from which the bees collect 
their rich treasures. It is very conspicuous in some 
flowers, as the Nasturtium, Crown Imperial, but less 
visible in others, and in some appears to be entirely 
wanting. In the Dove-footed Cranesbill, there are 
five yellowish glands, which serve as a nectary. The 
use of this organ is supposed to be that of a reservoir 
for the nourishment of the tender seed-bud. 

As the flowers mentioned in this little work are 



THE PARTS OF A FLOWER. 235 

arranged under the Linnaean mode of classification, 
it may be thought necessary here to give a brief 
account of those parts of the flower on which this 
classification depends, and also a list of the classes 
^themselves. 

Before the time of Linnaeus, the study of botany 
was involved in the greatest obscurity, from the 
utter want of regularity in the various systems which 
had been propounded by philosophers. The great 
Swedish Naturalist undertook to remove this diffi- 
culty, and devised a new mode of classification, 
which, though arbitrary, and in some respects defec- 
tive, is certainly the most generally approved of any 
which have hitherto appeared. Linnseus made his 
system to depend upon the part of a plant necessary 
to propagation; namely, the stamens and pistils. 
On this plan he divided the vegetable world into 
twenty-four classes ; the first thirteen of which de- 
pend upon the number of stamens, and derive their 
names from two Greek words, the latter of which, 
Andria, means husband, and refers to the stamen 
itself, while the former expresses the number of sta- 
mens of which the class is composed, thus : — 



Class 


. Name. 


1. 


Monandria, 


2. 


Diandria, 


3. 


Triandria, 


4. 


Tetrandria, 


5. 


Pentandria, 


6. 


Hexandria, 


7. 


Heptandria, 


8. 


Octandria, 


9. 


Enneandria, 


10. 


Decandria, 


11. 


Dodecandria, 



236 BOTANICAL DESCRIPTION OF 

Number andjiosUion of Sla7nens. 
one stamen, 
two stamens, 
three stamens, 
four stamens. •' ^ 

five stamens, 
six stamens, 
seven stamens, 
eight stamens, 
nine stamens, 
ten stamens. 
Dodecandria, from eleven to nineteen stamens, 
inclusive, provided they are disunited. 

12. Icosandria, tvrenty stamens, standing on the 

calyx and blossom. 

13. Polyandria, from tvpenty stamens, upw^ards, 

standing on the receptacle. 

14. Didynamia, or two powers, contains all plants 

which have four stamens, of which two are 
shorter than the others. Labiate, or Lip- 
shaped, and Personate or masked flowers, are 
included in this class. 

15. Tetradynamia, or power of four. Its character 

is distinguished by six stamens, four of which 
are long, and the remaining two short. The 
Cruciform, or cross-shaped species, are con- 
tained in this class. 

16. Monadelphia, — one brotherhood. In this class 



THE PARTS OF A FLOWER. 237 

the filaments are united at the bottom, but 
separate at the top ; as in the Geranium. 

17. Diadelphia, or two brotherhoods. The fila- 

ments are united at the bottom, in two bun- 
dles ; as in the Sweet Pea. 

18. Polyadelphia, or many brotherhoods. The 

filaments are united at the bottom, into three 
or more bundles. 

19. Syngenesia — contains the compound flowers; 

as the Daisy. See description. 

20. Gynandria, — many stamens growing on the 

pistil itself; as in the Orchis. 

21. Monoecia, or one house. Flowers, some bear- 

ing stamens only, and some pistils, being 
produced on the same plant. 

22. Dioecia, — two houses. Flowers, some pro- 

ducing stamens only, and others pistils, 
growing on different plants. 

23. Polygaraia — provides for the only remaining 

case that can possibly occur, and consists of 
flowers with stamens and pistils in separate, 
as well as on the same, plants. 

24. Crytogamia, — plants whose flowers are not 

perceptible to the naked eye, though there is 
good reason to believe that no plant exists 
without the essential parts which constitute a 
flower. Ferns, Mosses, and Sea Weeds belong 
to this class. 



238 BOTANICAL DESCRIPTION OF 

To these classes Ijinn^eus has added the Palm 
Trees, which he calls Princes of India. They are 
distinguished by bearing their parts of fructification 
on a spadia or receptacle, within a spathe or sheath ; 
remarkable for their prodigious height, distinguished 
by an unvaried, undivided perennial trunk, crowned 
at top by an evergeeen tuft of leaves, and rich in the 
production of large and fine fruit. Since, however, 
the time of Linnseus, the study of botany has ad- 
vanced, and many of these hitherto unclassed trees 
have been added to the class Hexandria. 



The orders which compose the classes, and which 
are also given in this little work, are arranged by 
Linnaeus as follows : — 

Monogynia,* one pistil. 

Digynia, two pistils. . 

Trigynia, three pistils. 

Tetragynia, four pistils. 

Pentagynia, five pistils. 

Hexagynia, six pistils. 

Heptagynia, seven pistils. 

* The orders of the first thirteen classes, distingiiislied by 
the number of the pistils contained in the flower, and by adding 
the word gynia (a Greek term for wife) to the number, may be 
easily remembered. 



' THE PARTS OF A FLOWER. 239 

Octagynia, eight pistils. 

Enneagynia, nine pistils. 

Decagynia, ten pistils. 

Dodecagynia, from twelve to twenty pistils. 

Polygynia, many pistils. 
In the 14th class, Didynamia, the orders, which 
are two, depend upon the seeds being contained in 
seed-vessels or not. They are called — 

Gymnospermia, when the seeds are naked; and 
Angiospermia, when they are inclosed in a seed- 



The orders of the 15th class, Tetradynamia, are 
also two, and are determined by the shape of the 
seed-vessels or pods : — 

The first has broad short pods, and is called . 
Siliculosa. 

The second has long pods, and is named, Siliquosa. 

In the 16th, 17th, and 18th classes, the orders are 
known by the number of stamens. 

The 19th class, Syngenesia, contains 5 orders: — 

1 St. Polygamia Equalis, having all the florets alike. 

2d. Polygamia Superflua, florets of the centre per- 
fect ; those of the margin having pistils only, but all 
producing perfect seeds, as in the Daisy. 

.3d. Polygamia Frustranea, florets of the centre 
perfect, those of the margin neuter; as in the Blue 
Bottle. 

4th. Polygamia Necessaria, florets of the disk with 



240 BOTANICAL DESCRIPTION, ETC. 

stamens only ; those of the margin with pistils only ; 
as in the Marygold. 

5th. Polygamia Segretata, several florets in one 
common calyx, yet each floret having a calyx for 
itself; as in the Glohe Thistle. 

The 22d and 23d classes have their orders chiefly 
distinguished by their stamens. 

The 24th class has 5 orders, comprehending — 

1st. Filices, or Fern. 

2d. Musci, or Mosses. 

3d. Hepaticae, or Liverworts. 

4th. Algfe, or Flags. 

5th. Fungi, or Mushrooms. 



THE END. 



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