(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Flower city cook book .."

•o 




Do you wonder at this picture of a TRAIN OF CARS ? Let 
me tell you that a great many young people complete the COURSE 
in SHORTHAND annually, living at home and riding to and from 
UNDERHILL'S COLLEGE OF PHONOGRAPHY, at 16 

State street, Rochester, N. Y. 

We have in use 15 of the LEADING 
Typewriters, upon which pupils are drilled 
in the most thorough manner. 




64 page circular sent to any person de- 
siring to take up the study. 



REMINGTON. 




CALIGR \ I ■ J I . 




SMI III PREMIER. 



Study " Greek" and "Latin," and then starve ! ! ! 



The Freshest and Best. 

This is the kind of Groceries we sell. Our stock of really nice and 
seasonable goods is always full, and housekeepers can rely on get- 
ting "the best" at our store. 

The Best Coffees roasted daily. — Fresh Creamery Batter every morning. — 
Cooked Meats and Soups in cans. — Fruits of all kinds in season. — Imported 
and Domestic Delicacies. — Everything fresh, clean and palatable. 

MOOt^E <§ ©OLE, 

GROCERS. 26 West Main Street. 



J. K. HUNT, 

PAPER BOX MANUFACTURER, 

MILL AND CENTRE STS., 

Rochester, N. Y. 

0OUGH MIXTOHE. 

For Coughs, Colds, Croup, Influenza, Hoarseness, and all affections of the 
Lungs leading to Consumption. 



DOSE. — For an Adult, a teaspoonful 3 or 4 times a day ; Children, 3 drops for every 

year of age. 



PREPARED BY 

J". O- I/CTHSTG-, ID:c-\xgg±s-b 3 
252 Lake Avenue, Rochester, N. Y. 

1 



"W. HI. ZHZ^STIILTGJ-S 

«GROGER>» 

Fine Teas and Coffees a Specialty. 

402 STATE STREET. 



IF YOU WOULD LIKE 



Fresh # Pure Candies 



zimmEHfliflri's 



86 EAST MAIN ST. 



1®. ©HITMAN. 

DEALEK IN 

FRESH, SALTED AND SMOKED MEATS, FISH, VEG- 
ETABLES, OYSTERS, ETC. 

You can get the best home-made kettle rendered lard at this market, at all 
times, put up expressly for family use. 

183 LYELL AVENUE, 



OH ! SUCH COOKIN G. 

It's all right, but you've neglected to post yourself in the fact that the 
greatest piece of cooking is being done every day by Plain Ed. Beck, who has 
so thoroughly cooked high prices on his whole stock of Fine Shoes and Slip- 
pers, that to see his styles and get his low prices will convince you that he is a 
good cooker, and that you'll buy your Boots, Shoes and Slippers of him at 
176 East Main St. Be sure and go to 

PLAIN ED. BECK. 



EBWIN B. FISKE, 

Attorney and Counselor. 
31 and 32 Smith's Arcade, Rochester, N. Y. 

All business promptly attended to. 



Seamless Soft Sole. Ask your Shoe Dealer 

FOB 



Infants' - Bootettes 



5 

^^t^ 5 **^ Manufactured by 

Wmiir^P G , f , HERR, Rochester, N. Y. 

Patent applied for. ' 



H. Hedditch, 

DEALER IN 

Fresl}, Salt aijd Snjoked Meats, Saiisage, 

POULTRY, ETC. 
471 anzLci 4=7 3 S^ba/be S-bx-eei:. 

3 



T. H. MAGUIRE. J. W. MAGUIRE. 

Maguire Brothers, 

SHIPPERS OF 

ANTHRACITE AND BITUMINOUS COAL, 

LEHIGH COAL. 

Brewster Building, 187 East Main St. Yards, 281 Lyell Ave. Rochester, N.Y. 

-^1 KJaine^ IBro?/ f^lanoj [^ 

Endorsed by all the leading artists. 

Foster & Co., 

57 STATE STREET, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

6E0. WELD6N & G9., 

WALL PAPER AND WINDOW SHADES, 
1 1 9 and 1 2 1 East Main Street, 

Rochester, N. Y. 

G. H. DAGGS, 

DEALER IN 

©HOi©£ Ff?£§H AN® SALT M^ATa, 

Fish, Oysters and Poultry in season. 
535 STATE STREET, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



TO THE PATRONS OF THIS BOOK. 



Good Materials are Absolutely Essential to 
Good Cooking." 

WE THEREFORE RECOMMEND AS THE BEST, 



Smith's Common Sense Baking Powder, 

AND 

TRUE-FRUIT FLAVORING EXTRACTS. 

USE IDTO OTHEE. 



SPECIALTIES. 



SMITH'S COMMON SENSE BAKING POWDER. 

20 per cent, stronger than any other. 

SMITH'S TRUE-FRUIT FLAVORING EXTRACTS. 

These extracts are made entirely from the fruit, by a new process of 
our own and are guaranteed from two to eight times the strength of 
any on the market. 

LEMON, ORANGE, 

VANILLA, ALMOND, (Redistilled.) 

RED ROSE, (made from English flowers.) 
FRUIT COLORING, (Red.) For Cakes Creams, etc. 



KOU SALE BY ALL DEALERS. 

J. HUNGERFORD SMITH CO., 

mRfiOFRCTORifiG cHEfnisTS, 
Laboratory, 19 Elm Street, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

5 



THe WHitg is Kins ! 

The experts of Europe and America pronounce it the Best in the World. 
We also sell the celebrated Butterick Paper Patterns. No family- 
complete without a White Sewing Machine. Call and see them. Try 
one and you will buy no other. 

WHITE SEWING MACHINE COMPANY, 

182 E. MAIN STREET. 
J. S. YORK, Manager. 



FRGD. S. JONGS, 

DEALER IN 

lS)ry ©ooel^ anel INJotion^ 

G-ezzts' P-cunxisTxirtg s cl Specialty. 

456 State Street, ROCHESTER, N, Y. 



HYGIENIC MILLS, 

286 LAKE AVENUE. 

Choice High Grade Family Flour. 

SPECIALTIES : 

Kelly's Dansville Graham, a pure Wheat Meal. Cracked Wheat. Entire 
Wheat Flour. Choice Granulated Corn Meal Mill Feed of all kinds. 

JAMES GORSLINE. 

6 



CARROLL, BEADLE & CO., 

DRV GOODS, 

ZMT±:i_l±:o_e:t?;y- am_cL TJ^lxols'be^^r, 

Nos. 144 to 158 East Main Street, 



ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



C. A. ROCKWELL & CO. 

Successors in Retail to I. H. Dewey Furniture Co. 

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN 

f\\\ ^ir)d$ of puncture, 

1 08 State Street and 75 Mill Street, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



COFFEES. 

The fact of our being large distributors of genuine Old Government Java 
and Mocha Coffees, is positive evidence that, quality and price combined, we 
offer inducements second to none. 

The continued high value of Coffees has led to the introduction of many 
methods of reducing the cost at the expense of quality. 

Housekeepers desirous of procuring COFFEE possessing all the richness 
and delicacy of flavor inherent only in the highest grades, will do well to 
make their purchases at 

J. f\. <§)HEL'<§), 

14-20 Lake Avenue, and Corner Plymouth Aye. and Spring Street. 



No. 32 NORTH FITZHUGH STREET. 

FRGB. QW/ILTR0WeH 

BELLS 

COOKING SHOES FOR LADIES AT $1.90 A PAIR. 

"w^a_:r:r.a.:isj" ted . 

SMITH & HOWELL, 

DENTISTS. 

522 Powers' Building. ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

HOURS 9 TO 5. 

Our KjoU^e "pUrni^tyncS "©ep&rtment 

Is filled with nearly everything to meet the requirements of Cooks and 
Housekeepers. Look at our Splendid Line of REFRIGERATORS, 
ICE CREAM FREEZERS, CARPET SWEEPERS, 
CLOTHES WRINGERS, Etc. 

HAMILTON & MATHEWS, 26 Exchange St. 

In order to insure Good Cooking it is necessary to have Good Coal, 
therefore use the 

STJ±l<rjDJ±ttJD COALS, 

BOLD I5Y 

DOYLE & GALLERY CO., 

Telephone 158. 37 WAREHOUSE ST. 

8 



NEW OR REFURNISHED HOMES. 

, It is timely to remind the public thai HOWE .v EtOOERS are prepared 
with a most complete aggregation of the newest products to suppl) homes 
(new or refurnished) with 

Carpetings and Draperies. 

Much depends on the harmony of these two Features, anil Howe & Rogers 
confidently claim an advantage in this, thai their lines are superior iii variety 
freshness, and style, at lowest prices. Patrons also get the benefit of advanced 
taste in such matters at no added cost. 

Howe & Rogers, 

80-82-84 STATE ST., 55 and 57 MILL ST., Rochester. 



Wm. Miller. 



S. L. Ettenheimer. 



.1. Miller. 



E. S. ETTENHEIMER & 



°l r 

j 



Ulatcljcs, Sewelry, 



DIAMONDS, 



^ 



CLOCKS AND BRONZES. 



No. 2 State Street, 



Rochester, N. Y. 



SCHAFFNER & HOYT, 

Dealers In 

FINE, MEDIUM AND FANCY 
____________ 

ITJattrcsscs, Spring Beds, Etc. 

98 State and 65 Mill Street, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

MOSE GOODMAN, 

DEALER IN 

f~ine V/atcl^e^, "©iamonel^, 

AND JEWELRY. 

No. 7 State St., - - ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Wutcli Department in charge of H. C. Williams. 

JOHN A. VAN INGDN, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer In 



« ® COAL . @ © 

DELIVERED TO ALL PARTS OF THE CITY. 
Ti.Lhi-iioNK 245 D. 91 and 98 SMITH STREET. 

10 



CHARLES E. MORRIS. 

Books, Stationery and Art Etchings, Engrav- 
ings, Imported Photographs in Artistic 
Frames. 

MOST ELEGANT STOKES IN NEW YOKK STATE. 

17 STATE ST. 16 WEST MAIN ST. 

MARBLE AND GRANITE WORKS 



HEM, BUDS, & 
JVIantels, Grates and Tiles. 

IMPORTERS OF SCOTCH GRANITE. 

238 and 240 State St. ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

I. H. THOMPSON, 

DEALER IN 

Groceries and f revisions. 

FINE TEAS AND COFFEES A SPECIALTY. 

463 State Street. ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



FOR (3( 



And House-furnishing Goods, visit 



Glenny's Basement Dep't. 

Greatest place in town for high class goods at low prices. 

190-194 East Main Street, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




FACTS TO BE REMEMBERED. 

Our three stores of five floors each give us facilities 
for carrying one of the largest and finest stocks of fur- 
niture to be found in the state. 

Our inexpensive location enables us to transact 
business at an unusually small percentage for ex- 
pense; our customers have the advantage of this. 

You will find it a pleasure to make selections from 
our large and varied stock. 

Prices marked in plain figures. 

We extend a cordial invitation for all to examine 
our goods and prices before buying anything in furn- 
iture or other house furnishing goods. 




I O I H0ME-FURNI5HING HOUSE j <j 1 



FL0WER 6ITY 



COOK BOOK. 



" Let good digestion wait on appetite 

And health on both." 



PUBLISHED BY 2 2 2/ 2j (z W 




THE LADIES OF THE LAKE AYENUE MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH. 






FRIGE, 50 CENTS. 



ROCHESTER. N. V.: 

Post-Express 1'uintino Company. 

1891. 






v. • 

COPYRIGHTED 1891. 



FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK 



SOUPS. 



For making soup stock, a porcelain lined, or granite ware 
kettle with close cover is best. Into this stock kettle all pieces 
of meat, bones and trimmings, both cooked and uncooked may 
be put, and a supply of stock kept on hand at all times, for 
use in the making of soups and sauces. 

After cooking, stock should always be cooled rapidly, as it 
sours if left in a warm place. If perfectly clear soup is desired, 
ordinary stock may be clarified by adding the whites of eggs, 
boiling, and then straining. 

SPLIT PEA SOUP. 
One pint of split peas ; one quart of boiling water; one quart 
of soup stock; one teaspoonful onion juice; salt and pepper. 

Soak the peas over night in cold water, drain, add the boiling 
water, and boil until soft — about two hours, — add stock, press 
through the colander, return to the soup kettle, add onion juice, 
salt, pepper, boil up once and serve with croutons. 

Miss Lki.ia Barrett. 

TOMATO SOUP. 
One pint canned tomatoes; one quart milk; two tablespoon 

fuls of Hour; half teaspoonful of soda; one small onion sliced; 
one tablespoonful of butter; salt, red pepper. 

Stew the tomatoes with tin- onion, rub through a coarse sieve, 
return to kettle and bring to a boil. Scald the milk, add butter 
and Hour. When ready to serve add soda to the tomatoes, pour 

Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page J. 



1 6 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

into the heated milk, and serve immediately. If fresh tomatoes 
are used take one quart and boil down to a pint. This will 
serve six. 

Mrs. W. A. Montgomery. 

CELERY SOUP. 

Boil the root and outer pieces of celery until tender, then 
press through a colander. Boil one quart of milk with one slice 
of onion in farina kettle, add celery, a bit of butter, salt, and 
two tablespoonfuls of flour; serve with croutons. Cold corn, 
asparagus and green peas may be used in the same way. 

Mrs. Bigelow. 

CLAM SOUP. 

Drain the liquor from twenty-five clams and boil, skim off all 
scum, add the clams chopped fine, and one cup of water; simmer 
for five minutes, then add butter, salt, pepper, and one pint of 
milk. Remove from the fire as soon as heated. 

Mrs. Bigelow. 

CHICKEN SOUP. 

Boil the bones and skin of a cold roast chicken slowly until 
the bones are dry; strain and set away to cool. When cold skin 
off all fat and use the stock as the basis for one of the following 
soups. The addition of milk, butter and one cup of cold mashed 
potatoes makes a good white soup. A cup of canned tomatoes 
makes a clear soup. Any vegetable may be used. 

CROUTONS. 

Croutons for serving with soup are made by buttering slices 
of bread, cutting into half-inch squares, and browning them 
delicately in a moderate oven. These are sprinkled on the soup 
just before serving. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

Simmer together twenty minutes one quart of canned toma- 
toes, one pint of stock or water, one half tablespoonful of sugar, 
one teaspoonful of salt and a dash of cayenne pepper. Fry 
one tablespoonful each of chopped onion and parsley in 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page j. 



FLOWER CITY COOK HOOK. l 7 



one 



.. tablespoonful of butter until yellow, add one tablespoonful 
of corn starch, or two of flour; stir until smooth. Strain the 
tomatoes, return to the kettle, add the onions, parsley, etc.; let 
boil once and serve with croutons. 

Boston Cooking School. 



FISH. 



CLAM CHOWDER. 
One dozen clams chopped fine, and the liquor saved; eight 
medium sized potatoes and three small onions sliced thin; one- 
half pound butter crackers; one-half pound solid salt pork; cut 
the pork in small slices, sprinkle over the bottom of the 
kettle, and fry a light brown. Add a layer of potatoes and 
onions; season; a layer of clams and crackers and so on. Cover 
with boiling water and cook slowly two hours. When ready to 
serve, add one half-pint of milk; bring to a boil; serve hot. 

Mrs. Nodvnf. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

For twenty-five large oysters take one cup of fine bread or 
cracker crumbs, a teaspoonful of salt and one of baking powder 
Mix the crumbs, salt, and baking powder thoroughly; dip the 
oysters in egg, then into the crumbs. Have ready a kettle of 
very hot lard; fry the oysters a delicate brown; drain and serve. 

Mrs. A. J. Barrett. 

ESCALOPED OYSTERS. 

Use a shallow, broad dish for escaloped oysters; a bright tin 
pie plate is excellent, as the oysters cook quickly and evenly. 

Put a layer of coarsely crumbed crackers and bits of butter on 
the bottom of the tin; cover thickly with oysters, then another 
layer of crumbs, and if the depth of tin allows it, another layer 
each of oysters and crumbs. Moisten thoroughly with cream or 
milk: dot with pieces of butter, and bake in a quick oven. 

Elise Kurpust. 



SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page 5. 



l8 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

OYSTER FRICASSEE. 

Bring twenty-five oysters to a boil in their own liquor; drain. 
To one coffee cup of boiling milk, thickened with one large table- 
spoonful of flour, add the oysters, a half-cup of the liquor, a 
piece of butter, a dash of cayenne; let just come to aboil. As 
it is taken from the fire, add the beaten yolks of two eggs and a 
teaspoonful of chopped parsley. 

Mrs. Bigelow. 

PANNED OYSTERS. 

Have a spider piping hot; wash and drain your oysters; 
throw into the spider, stirring them constantly to prevent stick- 
ing. When the edges curl, add butter, pepper and salt; serve 
in a hot dish immediately. These are delicious. 

Mrs. M. E. W. Root. 

STEAMED OYSTERS. 

Place one quart of oysters in a granite basin, and set in a 
steamer. Steam until the edges curl, season with butter, salt 
and pepper, and pour over buttered toast. A Welch rarebit may 
be combined with this by pouring melted cheese on the oysters, 
or on the toast, and the oysters added last. 

Mrs. Willis Upton. 

OYSTERS ON TOAST. 

To one quart of oysters use one cup of butter and one cup of 
cream or milk. Put the oysters without their liquor into the 
melted butter and bring to boiling point; have the cream already 
heated separately, turn over the oysters, let boil up; pour over 
thin slices of toast arranged on a platter. Serve hot. 

Mrs. M. C. Mack. 

CREAMED OYSTERS. 

Drain off the liquor from one quart of oysters, and put it on 
the stove to heat. Skim it, and add a small piece of butter, a 
cup of cream, and pepper to taste. When it comes to a boil, put 
in the oysters, and cook them until the edges begin to curl. 
Stir in a tablespoonful of flour which has been mixed smooth 

V^TUse SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page j. 



FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 19 



with a little milk; salt. Have ready slices of toast, pour the 
creamed oysters over them, and serve immediately. 

Miss Hattie Skinner. 

FISH TURBOT. 

Take a fresh white fish, steam until tender — any cold boiled 
or baked fish may be used, — remove the bones, separate into 
flakes. For the dressing, heat one pint of milk, thicken with one 
cup of flour and one-half cup of butter beaten to a cream; when 
cool add two well-beaten eggs. Fill the baking dish with alter- 
nate layers of fish and sauce; cover with bread crumbs; bake 
one half hour. 

Mrs. A. Steven >. 

CODFISH BALLS. 

One cupful picked salt-codfish; two tablespoonfuls of milk; 
one cupful mashed potatoes; one tablespoonful of butter. 

Scald the codfish and mince very fine; heat the potatoes in 
the milk and butter and whip in one well-beaten egg. Add the 
codfish while the potato is still hot; beat thoroughly; form into 
balls; dip in egg, then in fine crumbs; fry in very hot lard until 
a light brown. 

Mrs. W. A. Montgomery. 

A root of parsley will thrive in a flower pot set in the kitchen 
window, and will furnish all the parsley needed for garnishing 
and flavoring at an outlay of five cents. 

TARTARE SAUCE FOR FISH. 

One cup of butter; juice of one lemon; yolks of four eggs; 
pinch of cayenne pepper; one half cup of boiling water; one 
teaspoonful of salt. Beat the butter to a cream; add the yolks 
little by little, lemon juice, pepper and salt. Cook over boiling 
water and beat with an egg beater while cooking, until it begins 
to thicken, then add the boiling water, beating all the time. 
Very nice for baked or boiled fish. 

Mrs. Frank LTpton. 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page 5. 



FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 



EGOS. 



POACHED EGGS. 

Drop perfectly fresh eggs into boiling water, and set back 
immediately where the water will not boil. Let stand until the 
white is jellied. Eggs are much more delicious if poached 
without boiling, the white then cooks without becoming 
leathery. Serve on slices of buttered toast. M. 

EGGS POACHED IN MILK. 

Cover the bottom of a saucepan to the depth of one inch with 
milk. When scalding hot, break into it one-half dozen eggs and 
poach. When the eggs are set, remove them carefully, season 
the milk and pour over them. Serve either on buttered toast or 
plain. 

Mrs. H. C. Williams. 

BAKED EGGS. 

Grease a pie tin thoroughly, spread thickly with bread or 
cracker crumbs, break the eggs over them in a circle, add pepper 
and salt. Set in the oven to bake, until the whites are set; then 
slip the whole from the tin to a hot platter and serve. 

Mrs. C. E. Crouch. 

STUFFED EGGS. 

Boil a half dozen eggs half an hour. Remove the shells, and 
cut in halfs lengthwise. Take the yolks and with a silver fork, 
rub them to a smooth paste with one tablespoonful of French 
mustard, one of vinegar, one of butter or olive oil, and a pinch 
of salt. Fill the whites with this mixture and serve each half on 
a crisp lettuce leaf. Some add to the yolks a tablespoonful of 
minced ham. If the eggs are to be prepared for a picnic, press 
the two halves of the egg together and twist each in a square of 
oiled paper, such as is used for caramels. 

Mrs. Miller. 

VWCTse SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts, They are the best. Seepage j. 



FLOWER CI l V COOK BOOK. 



STEAMED EGGS. 

Break a half dozen eggs into egg cups, set them in a steamer, 
cover, and steam eight to ten minutes. 

OYSTER OMELET. 

Drain and chop fine one dozen oysters, leaving out the hard 
part. Beat the yolks of four eggs, add two tablespoonfuls of 
cream, then the chopped oysters and a pinch of salt, last the 
whites beaten stiff. Turn into a hot buttered saucepan; when 
set, put in the oven a few minutes to brown on top, slide out into 
a hot platter, and serve at once. 

EGG OMELET, HOT. 
Boil one dozen eggs four minutes, remove the shells and 
lightly hash; place in a bowl and turn over the following dress- 
ing: Two hard boiled eggs; one-half teaspoonful each of 
mustard, salt and sugar, dash of pepper, a half teacupful of 
boiling vinegar, and four teaspoonfuls of olive oil. 

Mrs. Desmond. 

OMELET. 
Beat the yolks of three eggs; add a half cup of milk, and a 
scant half cup of bread crumbs, with a dash of pepper and a 
pinch of salt; let it stand ten minutes. Beat the whites of the 
eggs very, very stiff, and stir in lightly. Pour the mixture into a 
hot saucepan, well buttered, and stand on the stove until it 
begins to set; then place in a hot oven for a few moments to 
brown, and slip gently from the saucepan to a hot platter. Un- 
less one has a saucepan with sloping sides, it is easier to cook 
the omelet entirely on the top of stove, fold together and turn 
out of the dish, than to try to slip it out. 

Miss S. E. 1! irrett. 

BAKED OMELET. 

Thicken three cups of milk with one scant tablespoonful of 

corn starch, one tablespoonful of butter and a teaspoonful of 

salt. When cool add the whites of four eggs beaten very stiff, 

separately. Pour into a buttered dish, and bake twenty minutes. 

G. 

JGFUse SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. Seepage j. 



2 2 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

CREAMED EGGS. 

Boil six eggs for half an hour; remove the yolks and cut the 
whites into slices. Heat three cupfuls of milk, and thicken with 
two heaping tablespoonfuls of flour and one of butter. Rub the 
yolks to a smooth paste, and mix them with the white sauce 
gradually. When the yolks are smoothly mixed with the sauce, 
add the whites, salt and pepper to taste, and pour over slices of 
buttered toast. «$. M. 

BREAKFAST DISH. 

Put one-half cup of bread crumbs in a spider with one-half 
cup of milk, one tablespoonful of butter, some pepper and salt. 
When the crumbs have absorbed the milk, break in two eggs and 
stir slightly with the mixture, and then cook like an omelet. 

Mrs. W. S. Kachler. 



M EATS. 



For roast meats the oven should be very hot the first ten 
minutes, and more moderate during the rest of the time. 

In broiling steak or chops, if the dripping causes the fire to 
blaze, a clear bed of coals may be obtained by throwing on a 
little salt. 

In boiling, fresh meat should be boiled rapidly the first fifteen 
minutes, to harden the albumen on the surface and preserve the 
juices ; after that the kettle should be set where it will just 
simmer. 

Boiled mutton will be more juicy if wrapped tightly in a 
thickly floured piece of coarse cotton. 

Every scrap of meat left from roasts and steaks can be used 
in made dishes, and should never be thrown away. 

The tough ends of sirloin and porterhouse steaks should be 
cut off before broiling and utilized in Hamburg steaks for 
breakfast the next morning. 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are (lie best. See page j. 



FLOWER CI I Y COOK BOOK. 23 

Some of the most appetizing and nutritious dishes are made 
with the despised cheap cuts of meat. 

The flavor of roast meat is very much improved by using a 
meat rack in the bottom of the dripping pan, thus preventing 
the meat from becoming water soaked. The rack may be pro- 
cured at any hardware store. 

RIB ROAST WITH YORKSHIRE PUDDING. 

Buy a rib roast and have the butcher remove the bones and 
roll the meat. Roast fifteen minutes for every pound. Three- 
quarters of an hour before the meat is done, remove from pan 
and pour out nearly all the drippings (reserving them for gravy). 
Turn in the pudding, replace the roast upon the rack, across, not 
in the pan, and complete the roasting. For the pudding, beat 
three eggs light, add one pint of milk and a pinch of salt. Pour 
half this mixture on six large tablespoonfuls of flour and beat 
until smooth, then add the remainder of the mixture, and pour 
all into the dripping pan. Cut in squares when done and serve 
as a garnish with the roast. This will serve six. 

Mrs. W. A. Montgomery. 

TO COOK ROUND STEAK. 

Cut one slice of round steak into pieces, place in porcelain 
kettle with one cupful of barley, salt, pepper, and water enough 
to cover. Bake in the kettle closely covered three or four hours 
in slow oven. 

Mrs. A. ELWOOD. 

TOAD IN THE HOLE. 

One pound round steak, one pint of milk, one cupful of flour, 
one egg, salt and pepper; cut the steak into dice, beat the egg 
very light, add milk to it and half a teaspoon of salt. Pour 
upon the flour gradually, beating very light and smooth. Butter 

a two-quart dish and put the meat in it, season well and pour 
the batter over it. Bake an hour in a moderate oven Serve hot. 
(Can use mutton or lamb instead of steak.) 

Mrs. C. Crouch. 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They arc tin- best. Sec page j. 



24 FLOWER CITY COOK HOOK. 

_ 

VEAL LOAF. 

One pound raw veal, piece of butter size of egg, three 
slices of bread, two eggs, one teaspoonful mustard, salt and 
pepper. Chop meat and bread fine, add eggs beaten, butter, 
pepper, salt and mustard. Bake two hours. 

Mrs. C. E. Crouch. 

HAMBURG STEAKS. 

Have the butcher mince, very fine, round steak or the tougher 
portion of the sirloin. To one pound of this minced meat add 
one tablespoonful of onion juice, half a teaspoonful of salt and 
a dash of pepper. Mix and form with the hands into round, flat 
cakes. Heat two tablespoonfuls of butter in a frying pan, put 
in the steaks and cook rapidly until brown on both sides. Place 
the steaks on hot platter, add a tablespoonful of flour to the 
butter in the pan, mix thoroughly, add a cup of boiling water, 
stir until smooth, add salt and pepper and, if desired, a spoon- 
ful of mushroom catsup or Worcestershire sauce, pour over the 
steaks and serve. One pound will make eight Hamburgs. They 
may be broiled if preferred. M. 

BEEF STEW WITH DUMPLINGS. 

One pound of lean meat from the shoulder, cut into small 
bits, dredge with flour, brown in frying pan in drippings or 
butter. Skim out the meat when browned over, add one pint of 
water and one tablespoonful of flour to the butter or drippings 
remaining in the frying pan. Put back the meat with a slice of 
onion and sprig of parsley, cover the frying pan and simmer for 
two hours. 

To make the dumplings, take one cupful of flour, one large 
teaspoonful of baking powder, and enough milk to make a soft 
dough. If necessary, add a little water to the stew to make a 
good gravy; season, dip up the dumplings by spoonfuls and place 
on top the stew; cover, simmer for ten minutes and serve imme- 
diately. Do not uncover until the dumplings are done or they 
will be heavy. H. B. M. 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Ext '/arts. They are the best. See page j. 



FLOW! k CI IV COOK BOOK. 25 

BOSTON HASH. 

Place in a baking disli a layer of cold mashed potatoes, then 
one of finely-chopped meat; have the last layer potato ; pour 
over one cupful of milk (scant), dot with butter, salt and pepper; 
bake in quick oven until brown. 

Mrs. Ai.vak \i><> Si r.\ 1 xs. 

RISSOLES. 

To two cupfuls of finely chopped cold meat, add two table- 
spoonfuls of water, one of butter, a dash of salt and pepper ; 
when boiling, stir in one well-beaten egg, and remove from the 
fire. Roll out pieces of tender pie crust, until about five inches 
in diameter ; place a spoonful of the mixture on the crust at one 
side of the center, fold over like a turnover, pinch the edges 
together ; bake in a quick oven twenty minutes. 

W. A. M. 

CROQUETTES. 

Croquettes may be made of any kind of cold meat chopped 
very, very fine. 

Any quantity of meat may be used, by remembering the 
general rule, to use just half as much milk or cream as you have 
meat, and to make the mixture as soft as it can be handled. 

In measuring the quantity of meat, always press solidly into 
the cup. 

To shape croquettes, place the hot mixture by spoonfuls on 
some shallow dish or platter, using a large cooking spoon and 
giving each spoonful as nearly cylindrical shape as possible. Do 
not be troubled if the mixture spreads ; it will be Stiff enough 
when cold. When perfectly cold, take these spoonfuls from the 
platter with a pancake turner, and shape with the hands lightly ; 
dip the croquette into beaten egg, remove on the pancake turner, 
roll in very fine bread crumbs until a perfect cylinder, and lay at 
one sid«' of your board. In frying, place several in a wire frying 
basket, and brown in boiling fat; drain on brown pap 

After making a few times, croquettes are very quickly and 
easily shaped; they may be set away for a day before trying 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. Seepage 5. 



26 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 



if desired. If properly made they should be creamy within and 
not at all greasy. 

If one has no frying basket croquettes may be slipped from 
the pancake turner into the boiling fat, and taken out on the 
same useful little article. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

Boil one cupful of cream or milk, add one heaping table 
spoonful of butter, two cupfuls of finely chopped chicken, two 
tablespoonfuls of flour, salt, pepper, and, if desired, a teaspoon- 
ful each of onion and lemon juice, and a finely minced sprig of 
parsley. Let the mixture boil two minutes, add two beaten 
eggs and remove from the fire. Many use half sweetbread and 
half chicken in making chicken croquettes. To obtain onion 
juice, grate on a coarse grater. 

Mrs. W. A. Montgomery. 

SWEETBREADS. 

In buying sweetbreads, be sure to get veal sweetbread, as that 
from beef is tough. After removing the fibrous skin, parboil in 
granite or porcelain kettle fifteen minutes in water that just 
simmers, and then throw them into cold water. They should be 
parboiled as soon as received, as they spoil quickly. Sweet- 
breads, at most seasons of the year, are an economical as well as 
delicious article of diet. 

BROILED SWEETBREADS. 

Parboil, split, butter thickly, and broil over clear fire until a 
delicate brown. Serve on hot platter with border of fried 
apples, or fry in hot saucepan with butter. 

SWEETBREAD PATTIES. 

Parboil one pair of sweetbreads thoroughly; chop fine with a 
silver knife. Make a cream sauce with one coffee cup of cream, 
one tablespoonful of butter and one tablespoonful of flour. Into 
this stir the sweetbreads, the white of one hard-boiled egg 
chopped fine, and the yolks of two creamed, gradually into the 
sauce. Care must be taken to boil the eggs until the yolks are 

}^ m Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder an J 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page j. 



11 OWER CITY COOK BOOK. 27 

perfectly dry and creamy or they will not blend with the sauce. 
Add salt and a dash of white pepper. Let all cook gently five 
minutes, then place a spoonful of the mixture into little shells of 
puff pastry, and serve at once. These are very nice for luncheon 
served with French pease. 

Mrs. W. A. Montgomery. 

BAKED SWEETBREADS. 

Parboil, dredge with flour, salt and pepper, lay on a meat rack 
in a baking pan, cover the bottom with water, and bake in a 
moderate oven forty minutes. Make a sauce with one cupful of 
milk or cream ; into it pour one cupful of French pease, drained 
of their liquor, heat, serve the sweetbread on a hot platter and 
pour over it the dressing. W. A. M. 

BRAISING. 

Braising is a combination of roasting and boiling, in which 
meat is partially covered with boiling water, and then roasted in 
a tightly-covered pan. This method possesses many advan- 
tages, for pieces of meat otherwise tough and tasteless, when 
braised are appetizing and nutritious. The essentials in brais- 
ing are to have the pan tightly covered, the pores of the meat 
closed by browning in hot drippings before putting in the 
water, and enough vegetables used to impart flavor and prevent 
dryness. Pieces from the shoulder, flank and rump of beef, 
mutton or veal, also tongue and calves liver, are especially good 
braised. 

BRAISED LAMB. 

In the bottom of the braising pan, heat a little fat or drip- 
pings ; in this fry one small onion ; put in the piece of lamb to 
be braised, and brown on all sides. Remove the lamb, and slice 
into the pan one raw potato, one stalk of celery, and one small 
carrot ; add a spoonful of mushroom catsup or Worcestershire 
sauce, if desired-, with salt and pepper. Replace the lamb on a 
meat rack, half cover with boiling water, cover tightly, and roast 
in moderate oven until very tender. Let the liquid cook down. 
and pour over the lamb before serving. 

X^~C7ss SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. Tiny are the best. See page 5. 



FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 



BRAISED TONGUE. 

Put one fresh beef's tongue in kettle, cover with boiling water, 
simmer for two hours. After skinning the tongue, roll it and 
tie, place it on a meat rack in a deep baking pan, and pour 
around it a sauce made as follows : Put two tablespoonfuls of 
butter in a frying pan, let it brown, stir into it two tablespoon- 
fuls of flour, mix, add one quart of water in which the tongue 
was boiled, one raw potato sliced, one onion, one stalk of celery, 
one carrot, and, if desired, a tablespoonful of mushroom catsup, 
and a sprig of parsley. When the sauce boils, pour into the bak- 
ing pan, cover tightly, and bake two hours, basting every half 
hour. Dish the tongue on a platter, and pour around it the 
sauce. Mrs. Stevens. 

MOCK DUCK OR BRAISED BEEF. 

Cover one thick slice of round steak evenly with a bread 
crumb dressing, roll tightly and tie. Brown the entire surface 
of the roll in a hot frying pan in a little butter or drippings ; 
then place the roll in the baking pan with enough boiling water 
to nearly cover it ; bake slowly until the liquor is cooked down to 
a thick gravy. Pour over the roll, and serve either hot or cold. 

Mrs. Servoss. 

PRESSED CHICKEN. 

Cook a chicken until the meat drops from the bones. Cut the 
meat into small pieces, return the skin and bones to the kettle, 
and boil until the liquor is reduced to about a pint ; strain, 
season to taste, adding chopped mushrooms, if desired; mix with 
the chicken and put all in a mould. Place a flat cover on it and 
press with a light weight over night. Turn out from the mould, 
garnish with lemon and parsley, and serve. 

CHICKEN IN JELLY. 

Prepare two chickens as for fricassee ; skim thoroughly just 
before they boil ; when tender remove the white meat from the 
bones. Make a jelly of one-third box of gelatine soaked in one 
cupful of water one hour, one pint of chicken broth free from 
grease and sediment, juice of two lemons and grated rind of one, 



;-*, Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-jFruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. Seepage j. 



I LOWER CI 1 V COOK HOOK. -JO 

one-fourth cupful of white sugar. Boil five minutes before add- 
ing the lemon, strain, and when cold, but not set, arrange in it 
the chicken cut in various shaped pieces. When hardened, re- 
move from mould, garnish with nasturtium blossoms. 

Mrs. Dl 5MOND. 

FILLET OF VEAL WITH FORCE MEAT. 

Remove the bone from a fillet of veal, and stuff with the fol- 
lowing force meat : One bowlful of grated bread crumbs, a 
little sweet marjoram, lemon peel, thyme and parsley, one-half 
cupful of scraped bacon, or the same quantity of butter. Chop 
and mix with one raw egg and one cupful of sweet cream. Sea- 
son to taste with salt and cayenne. Make another force meat of 
one quart of oysters, one pint of rolled cracker, one-half cupful 
of butter and one cupful of chopped celery; salt, add cayenne to 
taste. Make cuts in the outside of the fdlet, and stuff each cut 
with this force meat. Tie the fillet and cover with a thin paste 
that can be removed, and bake. 

Mrs. Desmond. 

MUTTON A LA VENISON. 

Tak a leg of mutton and lard it well with strips of salt pork 
inserted in deep slits in the meat, which has been previously 
rolled in pepper and cloves; bake two hours, or according to the 
size of the roast, basting frequently while in the oven. About 
an hour before serving, spread over it currant jelly, return to the 
oven and let it brown. 

Mrs. Sinclair. 

BOILED HAM. 

Put the ham into a kettle nearly full of cold water, and let it 
come to a boil on the back of the stove ; this should take two 
hours. Skim, and let it stand where it will simmer gently fifteen 
minutes to every pound. Let it cool in the water in which it 
boiled. In boiling a half ham, plaster the side from which slices 
have been cut thickly with moistened corn meal, sew in a cloth 
and boil. This will prevent the meat from drying. 

Mrs. A. S. Mon mi ry. 

%MT(/se SMITH'S COMMON SENSE /taking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. Tiny are the best. See page j. 



3° FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

MADE DISH WITH HAM. 
Spread bread dice with butter, then lightly with made mus- 
tard, cover with a deep layer of cheese and ham. Fry in butter, 
without turning, lift out and set in a hot oven for four minutes. 

Mrs. Desmond. 

TO COOK VERY SALT HAM. 
Soak sliced ham that is too salt, in sweet milk overnight. Fry 
the ham and remove from the spider, turn off most of the drip- 
pings, stir into the remainder one tablespoonful of flour, and add 
the milk in which the ham was soaked. Thicken, pour around 
the ham, after placing scrambled eggs on each slice. 

Mrs. Desmond. 

TONGUE IN JELLY. 
Boil and skin a tongue. Cover the bottom of a two quart 
mould with a jelly made as follows : One quart of beef stock, 
half a box of gelatine dissolved in a cup of cold water, a table- 
spoonful of onion juice, a stick of celery chopped fine, salt, a dash 
of red pepper. Boil the stock, onion and celery for ten minutes, 
add the gelatine, and as soon as dissolved take from the fire. 
Strain and pour enough into a mould to cover the bottom. 
When this has hardened, place the tongue and half a cupful of 
jelly that has cooled but not thickened ; when hard add the rest 
of the jelly and set away to harden. When ready to serve, dip 
the mould in warm water and then turn on a platter. Garnish 
and serve. 

FRIED PORK. 

Cut side pork into slices one-eight of an inch thick ; soak in 
thick sour milk over night. Wash and dry, dust and fry brown. 
Beat two eggs very light, stir in two tablespoonfuls of flour ; 
dip the slices of pork in this batter, return immediately to the 
hot drippings and fry light brown. Serve at once garnished 
with mashed-potato cones. 

Mrs. Desmond. 

BROILED KIDNEYS. 
Take mutton or veal kidneys and split them in half. Care- 
fully trim all skin and fat from the inside. Season, clip in 
melted butter and flour, and broil over a clear fire. 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page j. 



FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 3 1 

BEEF A LA MODI' 

Mix three pounds of finely chopped round steak, raw, with 
one egg, one slice of bread, one cup sweet milk, one tablespoon- 
ful salt, one teaspoonful pepper. Form into a loaf and bake one 
hour in a slow oven. 

Mrs. A. J. Barrett. 

TONGUE ON TOAST. 
Chop cold boiled tongue very fine, add to one cupful of tongue 
two eggs beaten, salt, pepper, two tablespoonfuls of boiling 
water, bring all to a boil, and serve immediately on squares of 
buttered toast. 

ESCALOPED MUTTON. 
Put a layer of finely chopped cold mutton in the bottom of a 
baking dish, then a layer of bread crumbs, then one of stewed 
tomatoes, bits of butter, salt, pepper; repeat until dish is full, 
covering the top with crumbs. Bake one hour. M. 

MINT SAUCE. 

Chop one bunch of fresh mint very fine and mix with it a tea- 
spoonful of sugar and a pinch of salt. Add one-fourth cup of 
vinegar, and serve with roast lamb or mutton. 

BREAD SAUCE. 

Put one pint of milk and one-half pint of bread crumbs into a 
double kettle, add a tablespoonful of onion juice (extracted by 
rubbing the onion on a grater), a blade of mace and a bay leaf ; 
boil five minutes, press through a sieve and return t<> the kettle, 
add two tablespoonfuls of butter, with salt and pepper to taste, 
heat thoroughly, and serve with fish or poultry. 

Mrs. M\ kin \m. 

CELERY SAUCE. 

Clean and stew slowly in a pint of water five roots of celery 
until very tender, then press through a colander and stir it into 
one pint of milk thickened with one even tablespoonful of flour. 
Add salt, butter and pepper and serve with boiled fowl. 

M M aki ham. 



Use SMITJTS COMMON SENSE Baking Powder am/ 
True- Emit Flavoring Extracts, They are the best. See page 5. 



32 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

CREAM SAUCE WITH MUSHROOMS. 

Stir together until smooth one tablespoonful each of butter 
and flour in a hot saucepan, add very carefully and gradually, 
6tirring all the time, a cupful of sweet cream, with salt and 
pepper to taste. When thickened, add a cupful of either fresh or 
canned mushrooms chopped fine. If canned, simply heat 
through, as boiling makes them tough ; if fresh, boil ten 
minutes. Good with sweet breads or fried chicken. 

Mrs. Makeham. 



VEGETABLES. 



To render old potatoes mealy, let them lie in cold water an 
hour or two before cooking. 

A scant teaspoonful of soda added to the water in which string 
beans are to be cooked, will make them tender, and shorten the 
time of cooking. 

Onions will be firmer and of better flavor, if cooked in hard 
water. 

Soft water may be hardened by adding a teaspoonful of salt. 

Water should always be boiling before vegetables are placed 
in it, and should continue to boil until they are done. 

Young green vegetables should be cooked in boiling hard 
water to retain their color and flavor. 

FRENCH FRIED POTATOES. 

Pare raw potatoes and cut them in thick slices ; if old or 
wilted, let them lie in cold water for an hour. Wipe them dry, 
and fry in a deep kettle of boiling fat for about ten minutes. 
Drain, salt, and serve. If properly fried, they will be dry and 
mealy like a baked potato. 

MRS. fV\RRETT. 

y&TUse SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page j. 



FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 33 

POTATO CROOUETTS. 
Mix one quart mashed potatoes, one cupful of cream, two 
eggs, one tablespoonful of butter, and four slices of stale bread; 
thoroughly season, and make into small rolls. Dip them in cream, 
and then in flour and corn-meal equal parts. Fry in hot lard. 

Mrs. A. Elwood. 

FRENCH BAKED POTATOES. 
Pare the potatoes and split lengthwise. Spread each piece on 
the flat side thickly with butter, add a dash of pepper and salt, 
place the potatoes in a baking pan with boiling water to cover 
the bottom, and bake in a good oven until golden brown. 

Miss. Vic. Crowther. 

DELICIOUS SWEET POTATOES. 
Pare the potatoes and divide if very large; place in granite or 
porcelain kettle with just enough boiling water to cover; add 
one tablesDoonful of sugar, and two of butter for each half dozen 
large potatoes. Boil for half an hour, remove the potatoes and 
lay in a baking dish. Pour the liquor remaining over them, and 
bake to a rich brown, basting occasionally. 

Miss Crowther. 

ESCALOPED POTATOES. 
Boil twelve good sized potatoes, cut into dice. Put into a 
deep dish a layer of potatoes, sprinkle liberally with butter, salt 
and pepper, then another layer of potatoes, until the dish is 
nearly full. Cover the top with rolled cracker and bits of butter, 
fill the dish with milk and cream, and bake two hours slowly 
while covered, then remove cover, and brown. 

Mrs. H. C. Williams. 

ESCALOPED POTATOES. 

Make a sauce with one pint milk, two tablespoonfuls of flour 
and two of butter, mix smoothly, salt and pepper to taste. Put 
a layer of this into the bottom of a baking dish, then a layer of 
boiled potatoes sliced thin, and so on, having the last layer sauce. 
Sprinkle with fine bread crumbs, and brown in a hot oven. This 
quantity of sauce is enough for four huge potatoes. 

VW*C/se SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts, They are the best. See page 5. 



34 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

STUFFED POTATOES. 
Cut the tops off from six large baked potatoes as soon as they 
are done. Take out the inside carefully, so as not to break the 
skin, into a hot basin. Mash until light with cream, butter and 
salt, beating them until snow white; add the stiffly beaten white 
of an egg, return the mixture to the skins, heaping it on top. 
Brush over with the yolk of an egg and brown in a hot oven. 
This is an excellent way to save baked potatoes from becoming 
watery, if for any reason dinner is delayed. 

Dr. Sherman. 

POTATO PUFFS. 
Stir into two cupfuls of mashed potatoes, two tablespoonfuls 
of butter, beating to a white cream. Add two beaten eggs, a 
teacup of cream or milk, and salt to taste. Bake until golden 
brown. 

Mrs. Servoss. 
CREAMED POTATOES. 
Thicken milk, and season as for milk toast. Slice cold boiled 
potatoes, heat them thoroughly in the milk and serve. 

Mrs. W. S. Kachler. 

TO COOK CELERY. 

Cut up the outer stalks of celery into small pieces, boil in 
granite kettle one hour, drain, season with salt, pepper and butter, 
add one cup of milk and thicken slightly with flour. 

Mrs. A. Elwood. 

FRENCH BAKED APPLE. 

Pare, quarter and core large fine apples. On each quarter lay 
a piece of butter and a teaspoonful of sugar. Place in a baking 
dish with a very little water; bake until transparent and deli- 
cately browned. Serve as a garnish with meats. 

Miss Victoria Crowther. 

BAKED PEARS. 

Take a small stone jar, such as is used for baking beans, fill 
it with alternate layers of pears, halved but not pared, and sugar. 
Fill the jar with water, cover, and bake three hours in a moder- 
ate oven. 

B^~*7« SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page j. 



FLOWER < I 1 Y COOK I'.OOK. 35 

BOSTON BAKED BEANS. 
Pick and wash one quart of beans, put in cold water and cook 
until the skin cracks open when you blow on them. Drain out 
of this water into a deep earthen jar or crock, with hall a pound 
of salt pork scored across the top. Bake slowly eight hours, 
keeping covered with boiling water until nearly (lime when the 
water should be allowed to cook down. Many add a tablespoon- 
ful of molasses. 

Miss S. R. TAYLOR. 

CORN OYSTERS. 
Chop enough uncooked green corn fine to make two cupfuls; 
add two beaten eggs and one teaspoonful of baking powder, one 
cupful of milk, and flour enough to make a good batter. Fry 
in a well greased hot spider in spoonfuls to make about the size 
of a fried oyster. 

Miss Nellik Kishlar. 

CORN PIE. 

Cut from the cob four ears of cold boiled corn, add to it two- 
thirds cupful of milk, a small piece of butter, salt, pepper, and 
two eggs beaten separately, and a teaspoonful of corn starch. 
Bake in two pie tins in a quick oven. 

BAKED OR STUFFED ONIONS. 
For this use the Spanish or some large onion. Boil for one 
hour or longer, if very large, then set in baking pan with a little 
water, put a piece of butter on each one, and sprinkle with 
crumbs, bake until tender, at least one hour. Serve with a cream 
sauce. If the onions are to be stuffed, remove the heart after 
boiling, and fill the center with minced meat, highly seasoned, 
then bake as above. 

Mrs. M. 
WINTER SQUASH. 

Cut in three inch squares, scrape off the soft part, place the 
squares in a baking dish, put a small piece of butter on each, 
salt and pepper, bake until tender. Serve it on the shell, a 
square to each person. The squash may be cut in halt, and a 
spoonful helped to each person. 

$WUst SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page J. 



36 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

BAKED TOMATOES. 
Cut a slice from the stem end of large, firm tomatoes; with the 
fingers carefully remove the center of the tomato. Make a 
force meat of finely minced ham or veal, bread crumbs, salt, 
pepper, butter, and fill the tomato, rounding the top and sprink- 
ling with bread crumbs. Put the tomatoes in a granite baking 
pan in which is a very little water, bake forty minutes in hot 
oven, take up carefully on a cake turner, and serve. 

M. 
FRIED TOMATOES. 

Cut in thick slices without peeling, dip the slices either in 
batter or egg and bread crumbs, and fry until brown in buttered 
sauce-pan. 

TOMATOES AND MACARONI. 
Break six sticks of macaroni into short lengths, boil until tender 
in salted water, drain, and pour over it one quart of canned tom- 
atoes, season, let come to a boil and serve. This is very good 
escaloped, using one layer of macaroni to one of stewed tomato, 
covering with bread crumbs and browning in a hot oven. 

Mrs. A. S. Montgomery. 

FRIED PARSNIPS. 

Boil the parsnips until tender and mash, adding to a pint of 
mashed parsnip, a large tablespoonful of butter, two tablespoon- 
fuls of milk or cream, pepper, salt. When the mixture is very 
hot, add a well beaten egg, and remove from the fire. When 
cool, make into small balls, dip in egg, and then in bread crumbs, 
fry in kettle of hot lard. 

COLD SLAW. 
One quart of cut cabbage, two eggs, one-half cup of cream; 
(sour is best), one teaspoonful of salt, two tablespoonfuls of 
vinegar, a little pepper, butter the size of a walnut. Cut the 
cabbage very fine, and put in bowl. Put the vinegar on to boil. 
Beat the eggs until light, add to them the cream and butter. 
Now add to these the boiling vinegar, stir over the fire until 
boiling hot, add the salt and pepper, and pour over the cabbage 
and it is ready to serve when cold. 

Mrs. Makeham. 

Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. Seepage j. 



Fl.OWKK CI IV Cook HOOK. 37 



SALADS. 



Use silver or wooden spoon in preparing salad dressing. 

Have all the ingredients very cold. 

Never mix any salad with its dressing until just ready to serve. 

With a little ingenuity many salads not in the books, but yet 
wholesome and delicious, may be concocted from the bits left 
over. 

FRENCH DRESSING. 

Place one-half teaspoonful of salt, and one-fourth teaspoonful 
of black pepper in a bowl, and then stir in gradually three table- 
spoonfuls of pure olive oil, and little by little one tablespoonful 
of strong vinegar; mix thoroughly. This is used with a plain 
lettuce salad, with water-cress, endive or nasturtium blossoms; 
sprinkled over the salad just before serving. 

W. A. M. 
MAYONNAISE DRESSING. 

One tablespoonful of mustard, one tablespoonful of sugar, one 
dash of cayenne, one teaspoonful of salt, yolks of two uncooked 
eggs, juice of one-half lemon, one-fourth cupful of vinegar, three- 
fourth pint of salad oil. Beat the yolks and dry ingredients 
until thick, add the oil slowly until very thick, then the vinegar 
and oil alternately, and last the lemon juice. A cupful of 
whipped cream is an improvement, but the beaten whites of the 
eggs may be used instead; add the cream or whites beaten just 
before using. This will keep in a cool place several weeks. 
Everything used in making this dressing must be ice cold. If 
the oil and eggs should curdle, beirin with more fresh yolks in 
another dish as directed, and add the curdled dressing gradually. 

Mrs. W. A. Montgomery. 

SALAD DRESSING WITHOUT OIL. 

Four eggs, one tablespoonful of salt, one cup of butter, one 
cup of mustard, one-half cup of sugar, one cup of cream, .1 

VWUse SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder ami 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. Sec page j. 



$8 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

little cayenne pepper. Cook over boiling water. Remove from 
the fire and stir in one pint of vinegar. 

Mrs. Frank Upton. 

SALAD DRESSING WITH OIL. 

Six eggs, two teaspoonfuls of sugar, four and one-half tea- 
spoonfuls of salt, four and one-half teaspoonfuls of mustard, 
three tablespoonfuls of cream, one teacupful of vinegar. Cook 
over boiling water until thick. When cold add a drop at a time 
— six tablespoonfuls of olive oil. 

Mrs. Frank Upton. 
SALAD DRESSING. 

One tablespoonful each of mustard, sugar, salt, butter, one and 
one-half tablespoonfuls of flour. Beat all together ; add three 
well-beaten eggs, one-half cup of vinegar, one-half cup of water, 
and last, one cup of cream or milk. Cook fifteen minutes; stirring 
constantly. 

Mrs. Geo. W. Herr. 

SALAD DRESSING, TO KEEP. 

Two boiled potatoes, put through a sieve, one teaspoonful of 
mustard flour, two of salt, a dash of cayenne, one raw egg; mix, 
then add yolks of three hard-boiled egg?, six tablespoonfuls of 
olive oil or melted butter, eight of vinegar, three of white sugar, 
four of sweet cream, and the white of an egg beaten stiff. Bottle 
and set in a cool place, and it will keep for months. For meat 
salad, to one cupful of this dressing, add the beaten whites of 
two eggs, and one cupful of whipped cream. 

Mrs. Desmond. 

SALAD DRESSING, FOR IMMEDIATE USE. 

Place a deep dish in snow or cracked ice, break into it one 
egg and the whites of two, beat with an egg beater until they 
begin to rope, then add gradually one pint of olive oil. Beat to 
a paste the hard-boiled yolks of four eggs; mix with them one 
tablespoonful of mustard which has been cooked one-half hour 
in five tablespoonfuls of water, four tablespoonfuls of vinegar, 
one-half tablespoonful of salt and a dash of cayenne. Have 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page 5. 



FLOW] R CI IN I < ">K BOOK. 39 

ready this last mixture before beginning, and add it gradually to 
to the contents of the bowl. Last add one-half cup of sweet 
cream and the beaten whites of two eggs. 

Mrs. Desmond. 

DRESSING FOR CHICKEN SALAD. 

Mix together two tablespoonfuls of Hour, one of butter and 

one cupful of moderately strong vinegar; place in bowl and set 

in boiling water. Then add one well beaten egg, one teaspoon- 

ful of mustard, a little salt; boil until smooth and thin with 

cream when cold. 

Miss Hattie Skinner. 

SOUR CREAM SALAD DRESSING. 

Mix thoroughly one cupful of rich, sour cream with one tea- 
spoonful each of salt and sugar, a dash cayenne, three table- 
spoonfuls of vinegar. Good with cabbage and cauliflower. 

M. 

CAULIFLOWER SALAD. 

Boil one small cauliflower until tender, lay in cold water until 
wanted. Pick it apart into small pieces, dry carefully on a 
towel, put in a salad dish and pour on it one cupful of may- 
onnaise dressing. Let it stand about a quarter of an hour and 

serve. 

Mrs. Makeham. 

CABBAGE SALAD. 

Two teaspoonfuls of salt, two and one-half of mustard, one of 
flour, one-half cup of sugar, one egg, butter the size of a wal- 
nut. Mix together and add three tablespoonfuls of milk and 
one-half cup of vinegar. Cook well, Stirring all the time;, when 
cool pour over finely chopped cabbage. 

Mrs. W. S. K VCHLER. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

Cut cold roast or boiled chicken into dice, and if a very ele- 
gant salad is desired, use only the white meat. Season with salt 
and pepper and set away in a cold place until needed. Cut into 
pieces half an inch thick, tender, white celery, two-thirds the 

j&Tl/ss SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They arc the best. See page j. 



4° FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

quantity of the chicken, put in a bowl, cover with towel wet 
in ice water, and set in the refrigerator. When ready to serve, 
mix the chicken and celery, being sure that the celery is care- 
fully dried if it has been put in water at all. Pour over the 
mayonnaise dressing, allowing one cup and a-half to each pint of 
chicken. Garnish with celery tips, and serve immediately. 

Mrs. Bigelow. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

Mince the lobster as directed for chicken salad. Arrange two 
or three crisp white lettuce leaves together shell shape, and 
place these shells on a platter. Mix the lobster with may- 
onnaise, place a spoonful in each shell, and add a teaspoonful of 
dressing over all. If in season, a nasturtium blossom laid in each 
shell makes a pretty garnish. 

Mrs. W. A. Montgomery. 

FISH SALAD. 

Salmon, or any cold boiled fish, may be used as salad, arranged 
with lettuce as directed for lobster salad. Plainer dressing may 
be used. M. 

SWEETBREAD SALAD. 

Prepare as directed for lobster salad. Delicious. 

CELERY SALAD. 

Cut tender white celery into half-inch pieces, and to every 
pint allow a half of mayonnaise or other dressing. Serve im- 
mediately after mixing with Bismark or Newport wafers. 

H. B. 
EGG SALAD. 

On a crisp leaf of lettuce, slice one-half a hard boiled egg. Cover 
with a spoonful of mayonnaise, and serve with cheese straws or 
toasted crackers. W. A. M. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Chop five cold-boiled potatoes with one small onion and a 
little parsley until very fine; salt to taste. Mash the yolks of 
two hard-boiled eggs perfectly smooth, and add one teaspoonful 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page j. 



FLOWKR CUV I OOK HOOK. 41 

of dry mustard, a dash of cayenne pepper, two tablespoonfuls of 
salad oU and five of vinegar ; mix thoroughly. Pour over the 
potatoes an hour before using, garnish with the whites of egg 
and parsley. 

Mrs. W. A. Morrison. 
Potato salad may also be made with any of the salad dressings 
given. 

TOMATO SALAD. 

Peel small and perfectly smooth tomatoes, slicing them nearly 
through, but letting them retain their shape. Place on ice. 
When ready to serve, place each tomato in a shell of lettuce 
leaves and pour over it a large spoonful of mayonnaise dressing. 

M. 



BREAD, BREAKFAST HAKES, 

ETC. 



HOP YEAST. 



Two even teacupfuls of sifted flour, two medium sized 
potatoes, boiled and mashed through a colander, one heaping 
teaspoonful each of sugar and salt; put all into a crock. Boil 
one teacupful of hops in three pints of water, for twenty 
minutes, strain while still boiling into the contents of the crock, 
and mix until smooth. When cool, add one cake of yeast, let it 
rise and stir it down. Cover and put in a cool place. It will 
keep several weeks. One cupful should be saved each time to 
make new yeast with. 

Mrs. J. Handy. 

SALT RISING BREAD. 

Pour a pint of boiling water in a two-quart pail or pitcher, on 
a half tablespoonful of salt; when the finger can be held in it, 
add flour enough to make a thick hatter, and beat vigorously 
until full of air bubbles. Cover, stand in a pan of warm water, 

V^~C/se SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They arc the best. Seepage j. 



4 2 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 



and keep in a warm place over night. In the morning this 
sponge should be very light, and of a peculiar odor. Mix this 
salt rising with a stiff batter made of one pint of scalded milk, 
and enough flour so that it will just drop from a spoon. Beat 
until smooth, cover, and set in a pan of warm water until light; 
add flour to make a dough, mould thoroughly, make into loaves, 
and when very light, bake. 

Mrs. A. S. Montgomery. 

ENGLISH BISCUITS. 
One and a half pints of flour, one coffeecupful corn starch, 
three tablespoonfuls sugar, large pinch salt, two teaspoonfuls 
baking powder, three tablespoonfuls lard, one egg, one-half pint 
milk, one-half cup currants, one tablespoonful coriander seed (if 
desired). Sift together flour, corn starch, sugar, salt, and pow- 
der, rub in the lard (cold); add eggs beaten, milk, currants well 
washed, picked and dried, and coriander seeds. Mix into 
smooth dough, soft enough to handle. Flour the board, roll out 
the dough one-fourth inch thick, and cut with a large round 
cutter; lay them on greased baking tin, and bake in rather hot 
oven twenty minutes. Rub over with little butter on clean 
piece of linen, when taken from oven. 

Miss M. Pearce. 

RAISED BISCUITS OR ROLLS. 
One pint sweet milk scalding hot, one-fourth teacup of sugar, 
one-half teacup of butter, one small teaspoonful of salt. Put 
these into the milk while hot; when cool, stir in the white of one 
egg, well beaten, and one compressed yeast cake dissolved in a 
little water. Then add enough sifted flour to make a stiff 
batter, and let rise till very light ; work in flour to make soft 
dough, and let rise again. When very light, form into small 
rolls or buscuits, let rise very light, and rub over the tops with a 
little warm milk and butter, and bake in a quick oven. This 
receipt makes about thirty medium sized buscuits. 

Mrs. Miller. 

RAISED BISCUITS OR ROLLS. 
Boil two good sized potatoes, scald two tablespoonfuls each 
of flour and sugar with the water in which the potatoes 

$^~Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Fx tracts. They are the best. Seepage^. 



I i OWER CITV COOK BOOK. 43 

were boiled. Add to this the mashed potatoes and enough 
water to make with that used in scalding the flour, two cupfuls. 
When this mixture is cool, add one-third of a yeast cake dissolved 
in a little water. Stand this sponge in a moderately warm 
place over night. In the morning add one cup of warm water, a 
little salt, and Hour to make a thick sponge. Let this rise, add 
flour to make a soft dough, knead fifteen minutes. Let rise 
again, then add one-third cupful of mixed butter and lard, mix 
thoroughly, let rise until very light ; mould into biscuits, and 
when very light, bake in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. S. A. Ellis. 

BROWN BREAD 

Mix together two cupfuls of corn meal, one of flour, two of 
sour milk, one-half cupful of molasses, two even spoonfuls of 
soda, and one of salt. Pour into a thoroughly greased two-quart 
basin and steam three hours. 

Miss Taylor. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

Make a batter of three teacupfuls of corn meal, two of graham 
flour, one of molasses, and three and one-half of warm water, 
with one full teaspoonful of soda. Steam for three hours. 

Mrs. A. S. Montgomery. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

Scald one pint of milk, add three teaspoonfuls of sugar, one 
of salt, one half teacupful of lard or butter. When slightly cool, 
add a compressed yeast cake and flour to make a stiff sponge, 
and when light, mix as for bread. Let it rise again until very 
Light, then mould until free from air bubbles, roll until two- 
thirds of an inch thick, cut OUt with tin cutter, brush with 
melted butter and fold. When very Light, bake in quick oven. 
Where compressed yeast is used, these may be set in the morn- 
ing to be ready for tea, or with slower yeast may be set the 
night before. In hot weather, one half a compressed yeast cake 
is enough. 

M A i MS i '! \i>. 

; • Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts, They are the best. See pa^ 



44 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

DELICATE MUFFINS. 

One cupful of sweet milk; sift into it two scant cupfuls of 
flour, mixed with one teaspoonful of salt and three teaspoonfuls 
of baking powder. Bake in well greased muffin rings in a hot 
oven. If not mixed too stiff, and properly baked, these are ex- 
ceedingly tender and delicious, and hygienic as well. 

Miss S. E. Barrett. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

Stir one cupful of graham flour into one pint of boiling 
water, add one pint of cold water, and enough graham to make 
a thick batter. Now add two cupfuls of white bread sponge ; 
stand until light; add one cUp of molasses, salt, graham to make 
very stiff batter, pour into pans and let it rise. Bake in slow 
oven. 

RYE BREAD. 

One coffeecupful of rye flour, one of wheat, one of corn meal ; 
mix with one and one-half pints of sour milk, two-thirds cupful 
of molasses, two teaspoonfuls of soda, and two of salt. Steam 
three hours. 

Mrs. Jas. A. Aldridge 

STEAMED GRAHAM BREAD. 

Mix one and one-half cupfuls each of wheat and graham flour, 
with two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Stir into this two 
cupfuls of sweet milk, and a half cupful of molasses mixed with 
one-half teaspoonful of soda. Steam three hours, and bake 
fifteen minutes. 

Mrs. Hiram Doty. 

MUFFINS. 

One quart of flour mixed with two teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder, one of salt, and one of sugar if desired. Add one pint 
of milk, and two well beaten eggs. Bake in muffin rings on a 
griddle or in the oven. 

Mrs. Dr. E. S. Jom s. 



Use SMITITS COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page j. 



FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 45 

MUFFINS. 

One teacup of milk, one egg, one tablespoon of sugar, one 
tablespoon of butter, two teaspoons of baking powder, and a 
little salt. Rub butter and sugar together (as for cake), add 
the egg, well beaten, mix the baking powder through part of 
the flour, add the milk, then stir the flour in carefully; make 
a little stiffer than for cake — about a cup and one-half of flour. 
Bake in a quick oven in small tins or gem irons. 

M. L. Judson. 

GRAHAM GEMS. 

One cupful of sweet milk, one cupful of sifted graham flour, 

one egg, and one-fourth teaspoonful of salt. Beat very light 

and bake in gem irons which are hissing hot when the 

batter is dropped in. 

Mrs. A. Fould. 

GRAHAM GEMS. 

One cupful of graham, one of wheat flour, one teaspoonful of 

sugar, two-thirds cup of butter, one egg, one even teaspoon of 

soda, one of salt. 

Mrs. Almstead. 

BAKED CORN BREAD. 

Two cupfuls of corn meal, two cupfuls of flour, one-half cup- 
ful each of sugar and butter, three teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder. Add cold water enough to make a stiff batter, and 

bake in a very hot oven. 

Mrs. A. Foulds. 

RAISED DOUGHNUTS. 
One and one-half cupfuls of lard, one pint of milk, one pint 
of water, four eggs, one quart of sugar, one-half teaspoonful of 
salt, two-thirds cupful of yeast. Melt the lard into the milk, 
add water, scald ; add salt, yeast, one-half of the sugar, and 
flour to make a stiff batter. Let it stand from noon until bed- 
time ; then add the rest of the sugar, the eggs, and a pinch ol 
soda, and flour enough to make a dough. Mould into ;i loaf. 
In the morning roll and cut, let rise on the board. When halt 
risen, turn the cakes over, and when light, try. 

Mrs. Servo 

K3T 5 Use SMITH* S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder ami 

True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. Thty are the best. See page 5. 



4<5 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

TEA CAKES OR WIGS. 

Two pounds of flour, one-half pound butter well rubbed in, 
mix with or without one egg. Add four spoonfuls of yeast, a 
gill of milk — new milk — warm. Let it stand an hour before the 
fire to rise, after which beat with wooden spoon. Add one-half 
pound of sugar, a few currants or carraway seeds ; with the 
spoon lift into tins or rings ; let stand one-half hour to rise, and 
bake. Do not kneed with hands as for bread. 

Mrs. T. H. Pattison. 

POP OVERS. 
One teacup of milk, one teacup of sifted flour, one egg, and a 
little salt. Mix the flour carefully with the milk, add your well 
beaten egg, and stir thoroughly before dropping into the tins. 
Have the small tins hot, drop in a small piece of butter, and a 
tablespoon of the batter. Bake in a moderately quick oven. If 
too hot, they will not rise nor pop over. They require neither 
baking powder nor soda. 

Mrs. Lee Judson. 

QUICK WAFFLES. 
Beat light the yolks of three eggs, add one pint of milk, then 
three cupfuls of flour, and a pinch of salt ; beat until smooth. 
Add one tablespoon of melted butter, two heaping teapoon- 
fuls of baking powder, and the stiff beaten whites of three 
eggs. Bake in waffle iron well greased, over clear, hot fire. 

Mrs. J. W. Brooks. 

SALLY LUM. 
Make a batter of one pint of flour, half pint of sweet milk, 
butter size of an egg, three even teaspoons of sugar, three tea- 
spoons of baking powder, and two eggs. Whip the yolks, add 
milk, flour, baking powder, sugar, then the butter melted, and 
last, the whites beaten stiff. Bake twenty minutes in quick 
oven. 

Mrs. Miller. 

SPIDER CORN CAKE. 
Mix three-fourths cup corn meal, one-fourth cup white flour, 
one tablespoon of sugar, one-half teaspoon of salt. Beat in one 

VWVst SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True -Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. Seepage 5. 



FLOWER < I l Y COOK BOOK. 47 

egg, one-half cup of sour milk, one-fourth cup of sweet milk, 
one teaspoon of soda. Butter a hot spider, pour in the mixture, 
then turnover it, but do not stir in, one-fourth cup of SV 
milk. Bake in a hot oven. 

Mrs, Mu u r. 

FRIED CAKES, 

One coffeecupful sour milk, one teacupful of sugar, two eggs, 
one full teaspoonful of soda, three tablespoonfuls of melted 
butter, nutmeg, flour to make a soft dough. 

Mrs. A. S. Montgomery. 

FRIED CAKES. 

Beat two eggs light, add one even cupful of sugar, beat until 
very light ; add three even tablespoonfuls of melted lard, beat, 
add one cupful of sweet milk. Let this stand a few minutes, 
and stir until the sugar is thoroughly melted before adding the 
flour, as this prevents the cakes from soaking fat in trying. 
Sift into this mixture three even teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder, mixed with enough flour to make a soft dough. Roll 
out and fry in hot lard. 

Mrs. A. J. Barrett. 

FRENCH CRULLERS. 

Into a cupful of boiling water, put two tablespoonfuls of butter. 
When it boils, add eight rounded tablespoonfuls of flour, stir 
over the fire until the dough cleaves from the side of the sauce- 
pan. Remove from the fire and beat thoroughly, then stand 
aside for a half-hour. Add one unbeaten egg, and beat the 
mixture until smooth ; add three other eggs one at a time, belt- 
ing the whole until very light. Have ready a kettle of clear hot 
fat, and a plate of pulverized sugar mixed with a little cinnamon. 
Flour the baking-board and drop on it one tablespoonful of 
the dough ; roll until a quarter of an inch thick, and cut out 
with a fried cake cutter; lift carefully with a cake turner, slide 
into the hot fat and brown, drain, and roll in sugar and cinna- 
mon. Troublesome, but delicious. 

VWUse SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They arc the best. Sec page 5. 



48 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 



RICE PANCAKES. 

To one cupful of boiled rice, add one pint of sweet milk, one 
egg, salt, one tablespoonful of melted butter, two heaping tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder, mixed with flour enough to make a 

thin batter. 

C. L. M. 

CORN MEAL GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Make a batter of one pint of buttermilk, one-half cupful of 
flour, and one of corn meal, one egg, a pinch of salt, and a small 
teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a little boiling water. 

Mrs. A. Elwood. 

GRAHAM GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Scald one pint of milk, and let it cool, then add two cups of 
graham flour, one-half cupful of wheat flour, one tablespoonful 
of compressed yeast dissolved in a little water ; beat until 
smooth. Stand in a warm place over night ; in the morning 
beat two eggs separately, add first the yolks and then the 
whites. Bake on hot griddle. 

M. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES. 

Make a smooth thick batter of buckwheat and cold water, add 
salt and half a compressed yeast cake ; stand over night. In 
the morning thin with milk to required consistency, add one- 
half teaspoonful of soda in a tablespoonful of boiling water ; 
bake on hot griddle. If water only is used, a tablespoonful of 
molasses will be required to make the cakes brown evenly. 

GRAHAM CRACKERS. 

One cupful of milk, and one-half cup of cream, mix with 
graham to make a soft dough. Knead fifteen minutes, and roll 
very thin, cut square or round, and bake twenty minutes. 

OATMEAL SNAPS. 

Mix fine oatmeal with one cupful of sweet cream till stiff ; 
knead slightly, roll very thin, cut out, bake until crisp in a slow 
oven. 

VW Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page J. 



II OWI R CITY COOK BO( >K. 49 



FRUIT CRACKERS. 

Make a dough very stiff with one cup of cream and equal 
parts whit-' and graham flour, with one-half teaspoonful of 
baking powder sifted in. Roll very thin, cover thickly with 
dried currants, lay on another sheet of dough, press lightly 
together, and cut in square crackers. Prick deeply with fork, 
and bake thoroughly. 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

4 liquid teaspoonfuls equal i liquid tablespoonful 

i •' tablespoonful " x 2 ounce 

i " pint '" i pound 

2 " gills " i cupful 

i kitchen cup " '_• pint 

4 cups of flour " i pound 

2 cups granul'td sugar " l pound 

3 cups corn-meal " i pound 
2 cups butter " i pound 
Butter size of an egg " 2 ounces 
1 tablespoonful butter " 1 ounce 
10 eggs " 1 pound 



CAKE. 



GENERAL REMARKS. 

Remember that different brands of flour vary in the amount of 
moisture required, so you may need to change the quantity of 
flour given in the receipts. If your cake cracks in the centre, 
you have made it too Stiff. 

You can always substitute for one teaspoonful of baking pow- 
der, one of cream of tartar and a half teaspoonful of soda. 
Most cakes require a mi (derate 1 »ven, especially true i >f the richer 
cakes. 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Eruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page j. 



50 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

GINGER DROP CAKES. 

One cupful of molasses, one of sour cream, one of brown 
sugar, two-thirds of a cupful of shortening, four cupfuls of flour, 
two eggs, one small dessert spoon of soda, one of ginger. Just 
before baking, grate in a little fresh orange peel, it gives a 
delicious flavor. Drop in small tins, bake in moderate oven. 

Mrs. Servoss. 

MOLASSES CAKES. 

One coffee cup of molasses, one of brown sugar, one teacup 
of butter, three eggs, two tablespoons of water and three tea- 
spoons of soda, spices, flour to make soft dough. Roll thick, 
cut in cakes, bake in moderate oven. 

Mrs. A. S. Montgomery. 

GINGER DROPS. 

One cup each of molasses and brown sugar, boiled with three- 
eighths cup of lard. When cool, add one teaspoon of soda, dis- 
solved in one tablespoon of hot water, two well beaten eggs, 
two teaspoons of ginger, one of cinnamon; roll thin. 

Mrs. H. C. Williams. 

GINGER COOKIES. 

One cupful of butter, one of brown sugar, cream together, and 
add three beaten eggs, three even teaspoonfuls of soda, dissolved 
in hot water, two teaspoonfuls of ginger, a pinch of salt, and 
flour to make a soft dough. 

Mrs. Sinclair. 

MOLASSES COOKIES. 

Put in a coffee cup one teaspoon of ginger and one of soda; 
add a tablespoonful of boiling water, four tablespoonfuls of 
melted lard, and fill the cup with molasses. Stir until it foams, 
add flour enough to roll as soft as it can be handled. 

Catherine Coapman. 

CREAM COOKIES. 

Two cups of sugar, one of rich sour cream, one-half cup of 
butter or shortening (with city cream, use three-fourths cupful), 

®T« SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page J. 



FLOWl R i I I V COOK HOOK. 5 1 

two eggs, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, one of soda added 
to the cream. Do not make too stiff a dough. 

Oka B. Fry. 

SUGAR COOKIES. 

One cupful of sugar, one-half cupful each of butter and sweet 
milk, one even teaspoonful of soda, three well beaten eggs, two 
heaping teaspoonfuls of 'baking powder, three cupfuls of flour. 

Mrs. A. Elwood. 

SCOTCH CAKES. 

Two cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of butter, three eggs, one- 
fourth cup of milk, one-fourth teaspoonful of soda, flour enough 
to rool. After cutting the cakes, dip their tops in a dish con- 
taining one teaspoonful of cinnamon and one cup of brown sugar 
mixed. Bake in good oven. 

Mrs. W. P. Bigelow. 

SOFT GINGERBREAD. 

Beat together the yolks of three eggs and one-half cupful of 

lard, add one-half cupful of milk, one and one-half cupfuls of 

New Orleans molasses, one teaspoonful of soda, one tablespoon- 

"ful of ginger, and three cupfuls of flour. Beat the whites of the 

eggs stiff and add last. Bake in moderate oven three-quarters 

of an hour. 

Mrs. Makeham. 

WATER CAKE. 

One egg, one cupful of molasses, one tablespoonful of butter, 
one teaspoonful of ginger, three tablespoonfuls of water, one 
teaspoonful of soda, two cupfuls of flour. 

Mrs. Almstead. 

JUMBLES. 

Two cups of sugar, one of butter creamed together, three eggs 
well beaten, one-half teaspoonful of soda, dissolved in one-fourth 
cup of sweet milk, four cups of flour. 

Mrs. Sin. i air. 

i^TC/se SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 

True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page j. 



52 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

FRUIT JUMBLES. 
One cupful of sugar, one-fourth cupful of butter, two eggs, 
one-half cupful of milk, three even spoonfuls of baking powder, 
one-half cupful of currants, and two scant cupfuls of flour. 

C. E. 

CREAM PUFFS. 

To one teacup of boiling water, add one-half cup of butter; 
when it boils, add a bit of soda the size of a pea, and one cup of 
flour, and stir until smooth, boiling constantly. When cool, 
but not cold, add the eggs, well beaten, and stir all together, 
until very light and smooth. Take a teaspoonful of the dough 
for a puff and drop on a buttered tin, spreading it a little. Place 
puffs far enough apart so that they will not run together. Bake 
twenty-five minutes in an oven hot enough for biscuit. When 
cold, fill through a small opening in the side. 

Cream for filling. — One cup of milk, one-half cup of sugar, 
three tablespoons of flour, one egg; boil like any custard; flavor 
to taste. 

Mrs. C. H. Wheeler. 

PORK CAKE. 
One cupful of molasses and one-half teaspoonful of soda, dis- 
solved in boiling water; add one cup of milk, one of finely, 
chopped fat pork, and four of flour; add last one cup of finely 
chopped raisins. Bake in slow oven one hour. 

Mrs. Makeham. 

COFFEE CAKE. 
One cup of sugar, one-half cup each of butter and strong 
coffee, one cup each of currants and seeded raisins, one-half cup 
of citron, two eggs, one large teaspoonful of baking powder, 
spice to taste. Bake in slow oven. 

Mrs. Babbage. 

COFFEE CAKE. 
One cupful, each of butter, brown sugar, molasses, and strong, 
cold coffee; two eggs, two teaspoons of soda, spice, three and 
one-half cups of flour. 

Mrs. James Ai drich. 

J Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extratts. They are the /'est. Seepage J. 



FLOWER C n y COOK BOOK. 53 

DELICATE CAKE. 

Cream two cups of sugar and one-half cup of butter; add 
three-quarters of a cupful of sweet milk and the whites of six 
eggs, then three cupfuls of flour and three spoonfuls of baking 
powder. 

Mrs. S. C. VanHoesi n. 

GOLD CAKE. 

Cream two cups of sugar and one-half of butter, add the 

beaten yolks of four eggs, one cup of water, three of flour and 

two teaspoons of baking powder. 

Mrs. II. J. Beers. 

PLAIN CAKE. 

One cup of sugar, one good tablespoonful of butter, one egg, 
two-thirds cup of milk, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, one 
and one-half cups of flour. Flavor to suit. Sprinkle with a 
little granulated sugar before putting in the oven. 

Mrs. S. C. Van Hoesen. 

GRAHAM CAKE. 

One-half cup each of sugar and molasses, one cup of sour milk 
and one even tablespoonful of soda dissolved in it. To this, add 
four tablespoonfuls of melted butter, two cups of Graham flour 
and one cup of currants. 

Mrs. H. G. Beers. 

BREAD CAKE. 

Four cupfuls of raised dough, one of butter, two of sugar, one 
of raisins, two eggs, one teaspoonful of soda, cinnamon and nut- 
meg to. taste. 

Ora B. Fry. 

SPICE CAKE. 

One cupful of brown sugar, one of molasses, one of sour milk. 

in which is dissolved one heaping teaspoon of soda, three-fourths 

cupful of butter, spices to taste, three and one-halt" cups of flour 

(scant), one cupful each ^\ raisins and currants, dredged with 

flour, and three eggs. 

Or\ B. Fry. 



Use SMITH'S COM VOX SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They arc the best. See page J. 



54 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 



SPONGE CAKE. 

Beat the yolks of three eggs, add one and one-half cups of 

sugar, beat very -light, then one-half cup of boiling water and 

two cups of sifted flour mixed with two teaspoonfuls of baking 

powder; lastly the whites beaten stiff. 

Mrs. A. Foulds. 

DELICATE SPONGE CAKE. 

One pound of sugar, one half pound of flour and ten eggs. 

Beat th'e sugar and yolks to a foam, the whites to a stiff froth, 

add lemon to the sugar and yolks to flavor, then flour, then 

whites. It takes two persons to make it quickly and properly. 

Mrs. Sinclair. 

SPONGE CREAM CAKE. 

Beat three eggs very light, add one teacup of very dry A 
coffee sugar and a pinch of salt, then three tablespoonfuls of 
water, and last one teacup of flour, measured before sifted, and 
two full teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Bake in two layers. 
Fill with a cream made of one cup of milk, thickened and sweet- 
ened to taste, to which the yolk of one egg is added just as it is 
taken from the fire. Frost the top with the whites. 

Mrs. Miller. 

ICE CREAM CAKE. 

Two cups of powdered sugar, one of cornstarch, two of flour,. 

three-fourths cup of butter, whites of seven eggs beaten stiff, one 

teaspoon of baking powder, cream, butter and sugar; add beaten 

whites, then sift in flour and corn-starch. Put together with 

boiled icing. 

Mrs. Beirs. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 
Mix one-half cake of Baker's chocolate grated, one-half cup of 
sweet milk, one cup of sugar, yolk of one egg, one teaspoonful 
of vanilla; boil until smooth. Beat this mixture into a cake 
batter made as follows: One cup of sugar creamed with one- 
half cup of butter, add one-half cup of sweet milk, two eggs, 
yolks and whites beaten separately, one teaspoon of soda, two 
and one-half cups of flour. Bake, frost with white icing. 

Mrs. Geo. Herr. 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page j. 



l I OWER CI I V COOK BOOK. 55 

NUT CAKE. 

Cream two cupfuls of sugar very light with one-third cupful 
of butter, add the beaten whites and yolks of four eggs, and one 
cup of sweet milk and three cups of flour sifted, with three even 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Just before putting in the oven, 
add one cupful of finely chopped nut meats dredged with flour. 
Bake in large square tin in moderate oven. Frost with either 
boiled or confectioner's icing, and place walnut meats on the icing 
so as to cut in square pieces with a nut on each piece. 

Mrs. D. A. Woodbury. 

WALNUT CAKE. 

One coffeecupful of sugar, one-half of butter, one-half of sweet 
milk, three eggs, beaten separately, two and one-half cupfuls of 
flour, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, two cupfuls of raisins, 
stoned and cut, and one of walnut meats chopped slightly. 

Mrs. S. R. Taylor. 

WHITE CAKE— RELIABLE. 

One cup of sugar, one-half cup each of butter and milk, one 
and one-fourth cups of flour, one-fourth cup of corn starch, two 
level spoonfuls of baking powder, whites of three and one-half 
eggs. Cream sugar and butter, add milk slowly, then flour, 
corn-starch, baking powder and beaten whites. 

The yolks with one egg added, and then the same recipe 
followed, will make a delicious gold cake. These two recipes 
may be used as foundations for all kinds of layer cake. 

Mrs. Grorge Wetmore. 

MARTHA'S CAKE. 

Three eggs, one cup of sugar, butter the size of an egg, one 

cup of, flour, one teaspoonful of cream of tartar sifted in the 

flour, one-half teaspoonful of soda, dissolved in a tablespoonful 

of milk. Bake in jelly cake tins and spread when cold with fruit 

jelly. This cake seldom fails, and when well mixed and baked, 

is very nice. 

Miss M. Pearce. 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder ami 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See pa. 



56 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

FRENCH CAKE. 
Half cup of butter, three eggs, two cups of sugar, three cups 
of flour, one cup of milk, two teaspoons of cream of tartar and 
one teaspoon of soda. Beat the yolks of the eggs in the milk, 
add the butter and the sugar, then the flour and the cream ot 
tartar, then the whites of the eggs, and last of all, the soda. 
Whip the whites of the eggs before adding them to the cake, and 
dissolve the soda in a little milk or water. This receipt may be 
used either as a sponge or layer cake with equal success. 

Miss Pearce. 

CUSTARD CAKE. 

Two eggs, beaten separately, one cupful of sugar, one table- 
spoonful of butter, four tablespoonfuls of cold water, one cupful 
of flour and one heaping teaspoonful of baking powder. Bake 
in three layers and put together with a cream made as follows: 
One-half cupful of sugar, three-fourths cupful of milk and one 
tablespoonful of corn-starch; boil until as thick as jelly, and flavor 
to taste. 

Miss S. R. Taylor. 

ALMOND CREAM CAKE. 

Two cups of sugar (pulverized), one-fourth cup of butter, one 
cup of sweet milk, three cups of flour, three teaspoons of baking 
powder, whites of four eggs, beaten very light, and one-halt 
teaspoonful of vanilla. Bake in four layers. 

Cream — Whip one cupful of sweet cream to a froth, stir grad- 
ually into it one-half cupful of pulverized sugar, a few drops of 
vanilla, and one pound of almonds, blanched and chopped. 
Spread quite thickly between the layers and frost the top and 
sides. Scald the nuts after shelling and the brown skins will 
come off easily. 

Alice Loughborough. 

SUPERIOR SUNSHINE CAKE. 

Take whites of seven eggs, yolks of five, one cup of granulated 
sugar, two-thirds cup of flour, one-third teaspoon of cream of 
tartar; add a pinch of salt. Sift, measure, and set aside flour 
and sugar. Beat the yolks of eggs thoroughly, the whites about 

B^Cfo SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Pruit Flavoring Extracts. They arc the best. See page j. 



II OWER i I I V COOK BOOR. 57 

half; add cream of tartar and beat very thoroughly. Stir in sugar, 
then the beaten yolks, add flour, and flavor to taste. Put in a 
tube-pan and into the oven at once. Should bake in thirty live 
to fifty minutes. Use pastry flour. 

Mrs. J. YV. Johk 

PORTSMOUTH ORANGE CAKE. 

Grate the rind of an orange, squeeze over it the juice of half 
an orange, and add one teaspoonful of tartaric acid; stand aside 
for one-half hour. Meanwhile mix a teaspoonful of baking 
powder with one cup of sifted flour; sift three times and set 
aside. Separate the whites and yolks of four large eggs; to the 
yolks add one cup of granulated sugar, and beat very light; add 
the juice and grated rind of half a lemon; beat again; last, add 
the flour with baking powder and the whites beaten stiff. Bake 
in two layers. 

Icing — Add a cupful of confectioner's sugar to the orange 
juice, already prepared: stir thoroughly and it is clone. If too 
stiff, add more orange juice; if too thin, more sugar. Put betwem 
the cakes a filling of sweet oranges sliced thin; cover with this 
icing, and the cake will be ready to serve in an hour or two. It 
is better eaten soon after icing it. 

Mrs. S. E. Barrett. 

ORANGE ROLL. 

Four eggs, white and yolks beaten separately, one-half pint of 
powdered sugar, one-half pint of sifted flour, two tab'lespoonfuls 

of boiling water, one teaspoonful of baking powder. Bake in a 
sheet ten minutes in a quick oven; spread with orange 
marmalade and roll. 

JELLY ROLL. 

Beat separately the yolks and whites of three eggs; to them 
add one even teacupful of sugar, one-half egg shell of water, one 
even teacupful of flour, and two even teaspoons of baking 
powder. Bake in a square shallow tin in a moderate oven. 
Turn on a towel, bottom side up. spread with jelly roll, and 

'Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Pmuder ami 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See pa± 



58 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

leave it wrapped in the towel. Four eggs may be used, and the 
water omitted. Be sure that the measuring cup is a teacup and 
not a larger size. Mrs. Henry Beigler. 

FRUIT CAKE WITHOUT EGGS. 

One pound of fat pork, chopped fine; pour over it one pint of 
boiling water or coffee, two cups of molasses, one of sugar, one 
and one-half pounds of raisins, one-half pound of currants, spice, 
one teaspoonful of soda, eight cups of flour. 

Mrs. H. Doty. 

CONFECTIONERY CAKE. 
One coffeecup of sugar, three-fourths coffeecup butter, two of 
flour, one of milk, whites of five eggs, three teaspoons baking 
powder. To one tablespoonful of this cake, add one-half cup 
each of chopped raisins, citron, flour and molasses, and spice to 
taste. Bake in three layers, two white and one dark. Put 
together with soft frosting. Mrs. Hurd. 

FRUIT CAKE. 
One pound of flour, one of brown sugar, one cupful of 
molasses, three-fourths pound of butter, eight eggs, one pound 
of citron, one pound of raisins, spice to taste. Cream butter and 
sugar, beats yolks and whites separately, add molasses, flour, 
fruit. Bake two hours. Mrs. Almstead. 

FRUIT CAKE. 
Four eggs, one cupful each of butter, molasses, strong coffee,, 
two of brown sugar, four of flour, one pound each of raisins 
and currants, one-half pound of citron, one teaspoonful of soda,, 
one of cloves, two of cinnamon, one whole nutmeg. 

Miss Hattie Skinner. 

MOCHA CAKE. 
Cream together one-half cup of butter with one of sugar; add 
one-half cup of corn starch mixed with one-half cup of milk, 
then one and one-quarter cups of flour, into which is sifted one- 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page J. 



H owl R ( 1 IV COOK BOOK. 59 

half teaspoonful of soda and one of cream-tartar; last add the 

beaten whites of three eggs. Bake in two laye 

Mocha Cream for Filling. — Put four large tablespoonfuls of 

Mocha coffee, ground to a powder, in a French coffee pot. Pour 

over it slowly one-half cup boiling water; repeat this twice. 

(If without a French coffee pot, the coffee may be filtered through 

a little bag made of strong thick cotton or drilling.) Reserve 

three tablespoonfuls of this liquid coffee for the icing, and add 

to the remainder three-fourths cupful of milk, scant. Put in a 

double boiler, and when it boils, stir into it two tablespoonfuls 

of flour (or one of corn starch), beaten with the white of one 

and yolks of four eggs and one cup of sugar. Cook until 

smooth, stirring constantly. When this cream is lukewarm, 

beat into it two tablespoonfuls of butter, and spread 

upon one of the cakes, placing the other over it. Ice the top 

thickly with soft frosting mixed with the three tablespoonfuls of 

coffee reserved. 

Miss S. E. Barrett. 

NEAPOLITAN CAKE. 

Make a recipe as for Mocha cake, and into half of it stir liquid 
cochineal, drop by drop, until a light pink; bake in two layers, 
one white and one pink. Prepare the cochineal by boiling one- 
half ounce of pure cochineal, one tablespoonful each of sugar 
and cream-tartar, and a piece of alum the size of a pea, in one- 
half cup of water for fifteen minutes. Strain and bottle, and use 
for coloring cake, jellies and cream, as it is perfectly harmless. 
For the other two layers, make a cake as before, substituting the 
yolks of the eggs with one egg additional. Bake half of it, and 
to the remainder add one ounce of Baker's chocolate, three 
tablespoonfuls of sugar and one taplespoonful of water, melted 
over the fire. Put the four layers together witli a soft frosting, 

flavored with orange juice. 

Miss S. E. Barrett. 

CHOCOLATE ICINGS. 
I. One-fourth cake Baker's chocolate, one cup of sugar, three- 
fourths cup of milk, scant. Boil together until perfectly smooth 
and thickened somewhat. Flavor, and when nearly cold, spread 
on the cake. 

|^~ Use SMITH 1 S COMMON SENSE Baking Pcmuter and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See pa. 



60 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

II. One cupful of sugar, seven teaspoonfuls of water; boil 
until it will string when dropped from a spoon. Stir this hot 
syrup gradually over the beaten white of one Qgg, white still 
warm, add seven tablespoonfuls of grated chocolate, and one 
teaspoonful of vanilla. 

ANGEL FOOD. 

Add one even teaspoonful of cream-tartar to one even cupful 
of flour; sift together three times. Have ready one and one-half 
cupfuls of granulated sugar. Beat the whites of eleven eggs 
very, very stiff, whip into them lightly the sugar, then the sifted 
flour, and bake in ungreased tins kept for this cake alone. The 
usual shape is round with a tube in the centre, reaching higher 
than the sides of the pan. This recipe will fill two of the me- 
dium sized, or one large sized pan of this style. Bake forty or 
fifty minutes in a slow oven; when done, turn the pan over so 
that it rests on the tube, and after an hour the cake will easily 
loosen and slide out of the pan. Ice the bottom and sides with 
confectioner's icing. 

Mrs. W. A. Montgomery. 

CONFECTIONER'S ICING. 

Use the confectioner's sugar and moisten it witli water or 
milk; beat until thick and creamy, flavor as desired, spread on 
the cake and it will dry in an hour. Very little liquid is required 
to moisten the sugar; it should be added cautiously, little by 
little. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS. 



To make good pastry, observe the following directions : 

Have all the ingredients cold. 

Do not mix the flour and shortening to a powder, but allow 
the shortening to remain in small flakes. 

IW Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page j. 



FLOW ik i l l V COOK BOOK. 6 1 

Add only enough water to make a crumbly dough, and add it 
so gradually that no portion is made pasty. 

Have the oven hot the first ten minutes, cooler after that. 

PLAIN PIE CRUST. 
To one quart of sifted flour take one half cupful each of lard 
and butter and a pinch of salt, mix lightly, add gradually about 

three-fourths of a cupful of ice water, and mil thin, using as 
little flour as possible. This may also be made with lard or 
butter alone. M. 

SUET CRUST. 
Chop very fine one-half pound of beef suet, add to it three 
cupfuls of sifted flour and a teaspoonful of salt, mix, and add 
about one cupful of ice water. M. 

POTATO CRUST. 

Add to a cupful of hot mashed potato a half cupful of cream 
or milk, and beat very light with an egg beater; add enough 
flour to make a soft dough, and roll "lit. Many use an even 
spoonful of baking powder mixed with the flour. Good for 
meat pies. 

PUFF PASTE. 

Mix a piece of butter the size of an egg thoroughly into one 
even pint of flour, add ice water enough to make a hard dough. 
Roll out this dough on the board, and cover the top thickly with 
bits of butter, then roll up the dough tightly like a jelly roll. 
Cut this roll in three pieces and put them on top of each other, 
the cut ends at tin- sides, never on top. Press down with the rolling 
pin and roll out again, always rolling the same way, SO as to 
keep the layers undisturbed. Cover with bits of butter, roll up 
tightly and proceed exactly as before. After covering with the 
bits of butter for the third time, rolling up and cutting, the 
paste should be set on the ice until very cold before using. It 
may be wrapped in a cloth, and kepi tor a week on ice. When 
you wish to use it. press the rolls tlat, and rolljas before, keeping 
the layers right. It may be rolled very thin as it will puff up in 
the oven to many times its original thickness. All bits left 
should be laid tlat on each other, and not molded into a lump. 

Z^™C/se SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking and 

True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. Se 



62 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

as that spoils the grain. The paste must be icy cold when put 
in the oven, and the oven very hot. Many cooks wash the 
butter used in making puff pastry until elastic and waxy. B. 

LEMON PIE. 
Bake a shell of rich pie crust, pricking it carefully to avoid air 
bubbles. Have ready a filling made of one cupful each of water 
and sugar, into which, when boiling hot, is stirred the juice and 
grated rind of one large or two small lemons, two tablespoon- 
fuls of corn starch, and last, when this mixture has cooked clear, 
the beaten yolks of two eggs. Place this when cold in the 
shell, cover with a meringue made of the whites, and brown 
for a moment in the oven. The amount of corn starch may need 
to be increased a little with very juicy lemons ; flour may be 
used instead, but does not make so clear or pleasing a jelly. 
One egg may be used instead of two. 

Mrs. A. J. Barrett. 

LEMON PIE. 
The juice and grated rind of one lemon, one egg, one cup of 
sugar, three crackers rolled fine, one teaspoonful of butter, one 
cup of boiling water. This is for one pie. 

Mrs. James Aldrich. 

MOCK MINCE PIE. 

Three milk crackers rolled, one cupful of cold water, one of 
molasses, one-half of sugar, one-half of vinegar, one-half each of 
raisins and currants, one beaten egg, two tablespoonfuls of 
butter, cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg to taste, five apples 
chopped fine. Mix all together and bake as mince pie. This 
recipe makes two pies. Mrs. Babbage. 

[Other recipes omit the apple and substitute bread crumbs for 
crackers. — Ed.] 

MINCE PIE. 

Two pounds of meat, four pounds of apples, three pounds of 
sugar, one pound of raisins, one-half pint of boiled cider, one 
tablespoon of cloves, three tablespoons of cinnamon, three table- 
spoons of allspice, one tablespoon of nutmeg, one cup molasses. 
Mix together, heat scalding hot and put in jar. 

Miss Skinner. 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page 5. 



FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 63 

CHOICE STRAWBERRY PIE. 
Take three cups of strawberries, one cup of sugar. Line pie 
plate with crust, pricked over with fork to prevent blistering or 
shrinking ; cut top crust out a little larger than the bottom one, 
prick also and bake. Put the fruit and sugar in the pie plate 
and cover with the top crust. If the fruit be ripe, they will 
steam tender; if not, return to oven until heated through. 

Mrs. J. W. Johnson. 

CRANBERRY PIE. 

Fill a pie tin with uncooked cranberries, add one large cupful 
of sugar, cover with upper crust and bake. The cranberries 
should be washed so that they will be damp, and the sugar 
sprinkled with water. Stewed cranberries may be used if pre- 
ferred. 

CHERRY AND BERRY PIES. 

Dredge the fruit with flour to prevent the juice from being 
watery. Press the edges of the pies very closely together. A 
narrow strip of cotton cloth, dampened and pressed firmly over 
the two edges of a juicy pic will hold them together and prevent 
the juice running out. When the pie is baked, the strip may be 
easily pulled off without injury. 

CREAM PIE. 

Scald one pint of milk, add one-half cupful of sugar, two heap- 
ing tablespoonfuls of cornstarch, and last, the yolks of two eggs. 
Flavor with almond, orange, vanilla, or lemon. When cold, fill a 
pastry shell with this cream, make a meringue of the whites of 
the eggs and brown delicately. A cupful of fresh cocoanut will 
make this delicious. 

GERMAN APPLE PIE. 

Take a deep pudding dish holding two quarts, and in the 
center invert a tea cup. Fill this dish with sliced apples, 
sweeten with a little sugar, sprinkle with cinnamon, and pour 
over it one cupful of water. Cover the top with a biscuit crust, 
made with one pint of flour, one tablespoonful of butter, two 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder, and milk enough to make a soft 

iWVse SMITH'S COMMON SENS/-: Baking Powder and 

True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They arc the best. Seepage j. 



64 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

dough. Bake in a moderate oven. Upon opening, the inverted 
cup will be found full of delicious juice. Any fruit pie is whole- 
some baked thus, without under crust. They may be served 
with or without additional sauce. Are very good with sugar 
and cream. Mrs. S. 

CHOCOLATE PIE. 

One coffee cup of milk, two heaping tablespoonfuls of grated 
chocolate, three-fourths teacup of sugar, yolks of three eggs. 
Heat chocolate and milk together, add sugar and yolks together, 
beaten to cream. Flavor with vanilla. Bake with under crust. 
Spread meringue of whites over the top, and brown slightly. 

Mrs. C. H. Wheeler. 



HOT PUDDINGS. 



PLUM PUDDING. 

(John Bull's Own. 1 

One pound of suet, one pound of moist sugar, one pound of 
mixed candied peel, one-half pound bread crumbs, one-half 
pound flour, eight eggs, one pound of currants, one pound of 
raisins, one pound of sultana raisins, one teaspoonful of salt, 
one teaspoonful of mixed spice. Chop the suet fine, stone the 
raisins, wash and dry the currants, chop the peel, and sift the bread 
crumbs. Mix in the following order; flour, salt, spices, sugar, 
raisins, peel, bread crumbs, sultanas, and currants. Beat the 
eggs, and strain them for ten minutes ; pour over the mass ; stir 
for twenty -five minutes. Butter a mould and till it, scald a 
clean cloth and flour it, tie the pudding down and boil for 

thirteen hours. 

Mrs. T. Harwood Pattison. 

SUET PUDDING. 

One cupful of suet chopped, one cupful of raisins stoned, one 
cupful ol sweet milk, two and one-half cupfuls of flour, one-third 

J^~tfo SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. Seepage 5. 



FLOWI R CITY COOK BO< 'k. 65 

cupful of dark molasses, two even teaspoonfuls of baking pow- 
der, a little spice, i. e. cloves, nutmeg and cinnamon, raisins, 
chopped in one-half cup of flour. Steam three hours. 

Mrs. Aldrich. 

STEAMED PUDDING. 

Two-thirds of a cupful of sugar, one cupful of sweet milk, 
three of flour, two tablespoonfuls of butter, two teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder, yolks of two eggs. Steam one hour in buttered 
dish. 

SAUCE. 

To one cupful of boiling water, add one heaping tablespoon- 
ful of corn starch, and boil until clear. When cold, whip this 
starch gradually into one cupful of sugar, and one-half cupful 
of butter, which have been already creamed. When perfectly 
smooth and velvety, add the whites of two eggs beaten stiff, and 
any flavoring desired. [This is a delicious sauce. Ed.] 

Mrs. A. Foulds. 

VICTORIA PUDDING. 
One-half pound of carrots and potatoes grated raw, one-half 
pound each of suet, flour, and currants, one-fourth pound of 
raisins, one-half cupful of molasses, one tablespoonful of brown 
sugar, soda, spice. Steam four hours. 

Mrs. A. Elwood. 

GRAHAM PUDDING. 

To one cupful each of milk and molasses, add one beaten egg, 
two and one-half cupfuls of graham flour, two teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder, one cupful of raisins, salt, spice to taste. Steam 
three hours. 

Miss Kittie lit iCO< k. 

PUFF PUDDING. 

Into two and one-half tablespoonfuls of flour mixed with one- 
half teaspoonful of baking powder, stir gradually one cupful of 
milk; then add the beaten yolks of three eggs, a pinch of salt, 
and last, the whites beaten stiff. Bake one-half hour. Serve 
with hot sauce. 

Mrs. J. w. Brooks, 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. Set page j. 



66 MOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

PUDDING. 

Stir into a quart of scalding milk six tablespoonfuls of sugar, 
three of corn starch. Add the beaten yolks of five eggs ; remove 
from the Are, flavor, then bake fifteen minutes. Make a merin- 
gue for the top, of the whites of eggs, and three tablespoonfuls 
of powdered sugar ; brown in the oven. Serve hot or cold. 

Mrs. Beers. 
RAISIN PUFFS. 

Two eggs, one-half cup butter, three teaspoonfuls baking 
powder, two tablespoonfuls sugar, two cups of flour, one cup of 
milk, and one of raisins chopped fine. Steam one-half hour in 
small cups. 

Mrs. C. E. Meade. 

HANNAH WHIPPLE'S PUDDING. 

Four cupfuls fine pieces of bread or cake, measured before 
soaking, one cupful (good measure) sweet milk, one-half cupful 
molasses, one cupful stoned raisins, one-half cupful melted but- 
ter, one teaspoonful soda, a little chopped citron, spice of several 
kinds, to taste. The milk should be poured over the bread and 
left for a while to soak. Then add the other ingredients, the 
fruit slightly floured, the soda dissolved in a little cold water, 
and put the whole into a well buttered mould, allowing plenty 
of room to rise. Boil three hours without stopping. 

Mrs. C. E. Meade. 

INDIAN MEAL PUDDING. 

Put three pints of milk in a kettle; when boiling, add ten even 
tablespoonfuls of fine corn meal wet with a little cold milk, 
stirring carefully to avoid lumps. When partly cold, two-thirds 
coffeecupful of molasses, one-half pint of milk, cinnamon and 
salt to taste. Bake for three hours in a well buttered pudding 
dish. When half done, pour over it a half pint of cold milk. 

Mrs. C. H. Wheeler. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Put two tablespoonfuls of pearl tapioca in one pint of milk, 
cold, and add one tablespoonful of butter. Place over the fire 
until it thickens or boils, remove from the stove, add one pint 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page j. 



l-i 0W1 R Cm I OOK BOOK. 67 



of milk, and sugar to taste. When quite cold, add two well 
beaten eggs, and bake one-half hour in moderate oven. To be 
eaten either hot or cold. 

Mrs. S. C. Van Hoesen. 

GOLDEN PUDDING. 

Cream four even teaspoonfuls of butter with one cupful of 
powdered sugar and the yolks of three eggs. Add one teacup- 
ful of corn meal, and three whites beaten stiff. Bake in a mod- 
erate oven one-half hour. Serve with the sauce given under 
"Steamed Pudding," or, if preferred, any hot sauce. Delicious. 

Miss S. E. Barrei i . 

WONDERFUL PUDDIMi 

Put one-half cupful of uncooked rice in a pudding dish, pour 
over it five cupfuls of sweet milk slightly sweetened ; bake three 
hours in a slow oven, stirring occasionally. To be eaten hot or 
cold ; if hot, with foam sauce ; if cold, with cream and sugar. 
This pudding is delicious if well cooked; it should be a smooth 
cream. If the oven is too hot, it may be allowed to simmer on 
the back of the stove until nearly done, then the cover removed 
and the pudding browned in the oven. Serve with the following: 

FOAM SAUCE. 

Beat the yolks of two eggs light, cream with them one cupful 
of powdered sugar, stand the bowl containing them in boiling 
water, and stir occasionally until the mixture is warm through- 
out. Then add the whites beaten stiff, and one tablespoonful 
of boiling water just before serving. Flavor as desired, 

Mrs. A. I. Barrett. 

CABINET PUDDING. 

Butter a bowl or pudding mould, and till with layers of stale 
bread or cake crumbs, sprinkled with raisins. Pour over this 
enough sweetened milk and egg to just cover the bread or cake 

The quantity of milk must !><■ determined by the size of the 
mould; a quart mould will take about three cupfuls of milk. 
Allow one egg for each cupful of milk used. When the mould 
is filled, allow it to stand about fifteen minutes, then place it in 

1@g-Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking ■ and 

True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the bat. See page 5. 



68 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

a pot of boiling water, and boil steadily for one hour. Turn 
out of the mould, and serve with hot sauce or fairy butter. 

M. 

ROLY POLY. 

Roll a good baking powder crust about one inch thick, spread 
with fruit jam, roll it up, and tie up in well floured cloth, 
leaving room to swell. Steam two hours. Serve with foam 
sauce. 

APPLE DUMPLINGS. 

Make a crust with one quart of flour, one large tablespoonful 
of lard or butter, three teaspoonfuls of baking powder, and 
about one cupful of milk, using more or less as the flour 
requires to make a good biscuit dough. Roll out the dough 
half an inch in thickness, cut it out with large cutter about the 
size of a saucer. Have ready the apples pared and cored, place 
one apple on each piece of dough, fill the center of the apple 
with sugar (if desired), and work the dough up to cover the 
apple. Set the dumplings on a large greased plate, put in a 
steamer, and steam thirty to forty minutes according to the 
apples. Serve with maple sugar and butter, hard sauce, or 
sugar and cream. 

Mrs. A. S. Montgomery. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

One cup of flour, one tablespoonful of butter, one-half cup of 
sugar, one egg, one-third cup sweet milk, one heaping teaspoon 
baking powder. Bake in round tin or dish, and serve with sauce. 

Mrs. Beers. 

FIG PUDDING. 

One-half pound each of finely chopped figs, suet and bread, 
one-half pound of brown sugar, two eggs, a pinch of salt. 
Steam three hours. Serve with foam sauce. 

Mrs. Willis Upton. 

RAISIN PUFFS. 

Two eggs, one-fourth cupful of butter, two cupfuls of flour, 
one of milk, one of raisins chopped fine, three teaspoonfuls of 

B3P Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page j. 



FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 69 

baking powder. Steam one-half hour in buttered cups, turn 
out and serve with hot sweet sauce. 

Mrs. A. Elwood. 

BOSTON STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE. 

One-half cup of sugar creamed with one tablespoonful of 
butter, and one beaten egg, one-third cup of milk, one cup of 
flour, and one heaping teaspoon of baking powder. Bake in 
two thin layers. Take a quart oi sweet berries, slice them, but 
do not mash or bruise. Stir over them lightly one pint of thick 
whipped cream, well sweetened ; place a layer several inches 
thick of berries and cream between the cakes, and serve 
immediately. Be sure that you do not crush the berries in any 
way to extract the juice, or they will render the cream thin. 
Mix the berries and cream the last thing before serving. The 
upper crust may be heaped with whipped cream if desired. 

Mrs. W. A. Montgomery. 

STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE. 

Crust : one quart of flour, one-half cupful of butter, three tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder, and milk to make a soft dough. 
Steam or bake in large square tin. Filling : mash three pints 
of strawberries, sweeten partially ; then add one cupful of sugar 
beaten to a cream with one-half cupful of butter. Pour this 
filling over and around the shortcake and serve immediately. 

Mrs. Skrvoss. 

APPLE SHORTCAKI. 

Make crust as above, and toll it out in two large layers, 
butter each of them, and lav them buttered sides together in a 
square tin. Bake, remove the upper layer, and fill with well 
seasoned apple sauce. Put on the top layer, cover it with 
whipped cream, and serve. [Stewed Apricots or Prunes are 
delicious served in this same way. Ed.] 

Mrs. >i r\ oss. 

ORANGE SHOR rCAKE. 

( )ne egg, one cup of milk, two tablespoonfuls of butter, two 
cups of flour, two teaspoonfuls <>i baking powder ; baked in two 

i^Tl/se SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 

True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They arc the best. X 



70 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 



shallow tins. One-half dozen oranges sliced ; cover with sugar. 
Pour the oranges between and over the cake. 

Mrs. Wm. A. Cogswell. 

PUFF PUDDING. 

Put two teaspoons of baking powder and a little salt into a 

pint of flour, and mix very soft with milk. Grease cups. Put 

one spoonful of batter into the bottom of the cup, and then a 

spoonful of any kind of canned fruit (cherries are best), and a 

spoonful of batter on top. Steam twenty minutes, and eat 

with sauce. 

Mrs. Koehler. 

BROWN BETTY. 

A layer of bread crumbs in the bottom of a pudding dish, 
then one of apples, and so on, having the last layer crumbs. 
Pour over one-half cupful each of molasses and water mixed, 
and bake in a moderate oven. If molasses is not liked, a pleas- 
ing variety in this pudding is produced by using slices of butter- 
ed bread, slightly sprinkled with cold water in the layers, 
alternating with apple. Over the top layer of apples, sprinkle 
fine crumbs, those used for croquettes, and bake. 

H. B. 



PUDDING SAUCES. 



CREAMY SAUCE. 



Cream together one-half cup each of butter and powdered 
sugar, beating until very light. Add, little by little, three table- 
spoonfuls of thick, sweet cream. Place the bowl in boiling 
water, and stir until the sauce is heated a very few moments. 
Flavor and serve. 

FAIRY BUTTER. 

Cream together one heaping teaspoonful of butter, and one 
cupful of powdered sugar, add the white of one egg unbeaten, 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder ami 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page j. 



I i OW] R i I I \ C OOK BOOK. 7 « 



and beat until frothy, then the white of one egg beaten stilt, ami 
one teaspoonful Of vanilla. Mix lightly, and heap on a small 
dish : set on the ice to harden. 

FOAM SAUCE. 

One and one-half < upfuls of boiling water, one of sugar, one 
dessert spoonful of corn starch, butter tin- size of an egg. When 

boiled clear, add the juice of half a lemon, and, while boiling hot, 
pour, just before serving, into a sauce dish in which you have 
placed one-halt teaspoonful of soda. Stir and it will foam. 

Mrs. Bigelow. 

ALMOND PUDDING SAUCE. 

Beat one egg and one cupful of powdered sugar to a froth, 
add one-half teaspoonful of almond extract, and just before 
serving, six tablespoonfuls of boiling milk. 

G. A. 

PUDDING SAUCE. 

Beat the yolks of two eggs and the white of one with a half- 
cup of sugar ; flavor. Over this pour one teacupful of boiling 
milk, gradually stirring all the time. Beat the other white 
stiff, and stir in lightly. A pretty and delicate sauce. 
Be sure to pour the boiling milk over the egg. and not 
the egg into the milk, as the egg and sugar must not actually 

boil. 

N. E. 

FRUIT PUDDING SAUCE. 

One-half cup butter, two and one-halt' cups SUgar, one dessert 
spoonful corn starch, wet in a little cold milk, juice of one lemon, 
and half the grated peel, one CUp boiling water. C 
the butter and sugar well, pour the corn starch into the boiling 
water, and stir over a clear lire until well thickened; put all 
together in a bowl and beat five minutes bet,. re returning t.. the 
saucepan. Heat once almost to the boiling point and serve. 

\| (1 Mi \i»i . 



i^rc/ss SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking ana 

True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best Seepage 5. 



72 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 



COLD PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. 



PRUNE PUDDING. 

One pound of prunes boiled soft; drain and add one and one- 
half cups of granulated sugar, stir in the beaten whites of five 
eggs, and bake in a quick oven fifteen minutes. Serve with 
custard made of the yolks and one pint of milk. 

Mrs. Frank Upton. 

LEMON CREAM. 

Grate the rind of two lemons and squeeze the juice. Beat 
the whites and yolks of six eggs separately. Mix the whites, 
lemons and one pint of water; stand aside one hour. Beat the 
yolks with one pint of sugar and one tablespoonful of corn 
starch; add to the whites and lemons. Boil like custard. 

Mrs. James Aldrich. 

ORANGE PUDDING. 

Take four large oranges, peel, seed and cut into small pieces; 
sweeten to taste. Boil one pint of milk, sweeten, add to it one 
tablespoonful of corn starch, dissolved in a little cold milk, and 
the yolks of three eggs beaten. When thickened, cool and pour 
over the oranges. Beat the whites stiff, add one-half teacup of 
sugar; spread over the pudding and brown slightly. Eaten cold. 

Mrs. C. H. Wheeler. 

SEA FOAM PUDDING. 

Make a lemon jelly and let it harden. Beat the white of one 
egg stiff; spread it over the jelly. Take the yolk of one egg, add 
half a cup of granulated sugar, a pinch of corn starch, and beat 
thoroughly. Scald a half pint of milk and pour it over the 
beaten yolk and sugar. Put over the fire and heat until it 
thickens; flavor to t taste, cool and pour over the jelly when 
served. Mrs. J. W. Johnson. 

V^~Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page jr. 



MOWER CITY COOK ROOK. 73 

RIBBON PUDDING. 

Let one pint of new milk come to boiling point. Add one- 
half cup of sugar, and two tablespoonfuls each <>f grated 
chocolate and corn starch. Boil until thickened. Take same 
quanity of milk, sugar and corn starch as the above (leaving 
out the chocolate). Bring it to a boiling point. When both are 
done, have ready a deep dish, and put a layer of the dark 
pudding, then a layer of the light, doing this till all is used up. 
When cold, turnout, bottom side up, into a glass dish, and serve 
with sugar and cream. Flavor with vanilla. 

S. K. Taylor. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

A half box of Cox's gelatine, one quart of milk and a quarter 
cake of Baker's chocolate. Pour half the milk upon the 
gelatine, let stand until dissolved, then add the chocolate (after 
grating), and the rest of the milk; make very sweet. Cook 
carefully, as you would a boiled custard; if scorched 'tis spoiled; 
after it is thoroughly cooked, ponr into a mould to harden and 
cool. For sauce, or dressing, use sweetened milk, or cream 
flavored with vanilla. Mrs. Royal Mack. 

FLOATING ISLAND. 
Four eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately, four heaping 
tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar, two teaspoonfuls almond or 
vanilla, one-half cup of currant jelly, one pint of milk. Make a 
custard of the yolks, sugar and milk, pouring the milk gradually 
when boiling hot, on the yolks and sugar. Flavor and pour in a 
glass dish. Put the beaten whites on top and dot with jelly. 

Mrs. Beers. 

DKSSKRTS. 

One quart of cold boiled custard flavored with orange, one 
pint of whipped cream, sweetened, and flavored with vanilla. 
Mix and turn over one and one-half pints of oranges .mil 
bananas in equal parts, cut into small blocks; serve very cold. 

Make one quart of ordinary corn starch blancmange, thin 
enough to eat without sauce. Omit the yolks, and add the 
beaten whites when partly cool. Stir in one half pound of fresh 
chocolate creams until it colors in streaks. Serve cold. 

I^c7>y SMITHS COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. Seepage §. 



74 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

Peel bananas and suspend by running long slender wire 
through them. Boil to a syrup one-half pound of light brown 
sugar, one-fourth cake of chocolate, one-half cup of sweet milk, 
and butter the size of an egg. When this will hair, remove from 
the stove, and place in pan of hot water so that it will not cool 
too fast. Into it dip the bananas repeatedly until coated thickly 
with the caramel. 

Mrs. Desmond. 

CREAM CORN STARCH PUDDING. 

Heat one pint of milk with one-half cup of sugar; when 
boiling, stir in four even tablespoonfuls of corn starch and boil 
until smooth. Remove from the fire and add three beaten 
whites, whipping them thoroughly into the pudding. Flavor 
with vanilla, and pour into a quart bowl which has been dipped 
in cold water. When very cold serve with a custard made of 
the yolks. 

DANDY PUDDING. 

Make a custard with one quart of milk, two tablespoonfuls of 
corn starch, one-half cupful, of sugar, and the yolks of four eggs, 
adding the yolks last, just before removing from the fire. Flavor, 
pour into baking dish, cover with the whites beaten stiff and one 
tablespoonful of sugar. Put in the oven to brown. Serve icy 
cold. 

Mrs. Makeham. 

COFFEE SPONGE. 

Add two cupfuls of sugar to one scant quart of strong coffee, 
boil, add one-half box of gelatine, soaked for two hours in one 
cupful of water. Remove from the stove as soon as the gelatine 
melts; stand in a cold place. When it begins to thicken, but 
before it is stiff, add the beaten whites of four eggs; stand the 
jelly in a pan of ice water, and beat all together fifteen minutes. 
Turn into a mold to harden. When ready to serve, stand the 
mould an instant in boiling water, invert, and the sponge will 
slip out easily. Serve with cream and sugar, or with whipped 
cream poured around it. Mrs. Servoss. 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. Seepage j. 



FLOWER CI IV COOK BOOK. 75 

PEACH SPONGE 

Beat a pint of fresh peaches to a smooth cream with an egg 
beater (the Keystone is best). Let three cupfuls of water and 
one of sugar boil for five minutes, add the peaches and boil five 
minutes longer. Then add one-half box of gelatine, which has 
been soaked for two hours in one-half cupful of water; as soon 
as the gelatine dissolves, remove from the fire and cool in a pan 
of ice water. When the jelly begins to thicken, but before it sets 
hard, add the stiffly beaten whites of three or four eggs, !>eat 
until thoroughly blended, standing the bowl meanwhile in 
ice water. When so thick that it will just pour, put in a mould 
or bowl and stand away to harden. When ready to serve, turn 
the mould over in a glass dish, wraparound it a cloth wet with 
boiling water for an instant, and then slip out the sponge. 
Serve with whipped or plain cream and sugar. 

Sponges of many flavors are easily made, and in summer 
especially, are delicious. For all kinds, use a half box of 
gelatine for a quart of sponge, and vary the number of eggs to 
suit convenience. 

For lemon or orange sponge, use the grated rind and juice of 
two to the pint of sponge. The yolks of the eggs may also be 
used, cooking them with the syrup and lemon. 

A delicious sponge is made with (me lemon, one pint of water, 
and one-quarter of a pound of candied cherries beaten in with 
the whites. Serve with boiled custard. 

Make apricot the same as peach sponge. If canned fruit is 
used, drain and use the juice instead of water. 

Use a quart of fresh strawberries or blackberries to a pinl ol 
syrup, rubbing the berries through a sieve after mashing them. 

If the sponge gets too hard, before adding the whites, to beat 

well, soften it by standing in a pan of hot water. 

SNOW PUDDING. 

To one pint of boiling water and two cupfuls of Sugar add the 
juice of three lemons, and onedialf box of gelatine which has 
soaked for an hour in cold water. Strain this and cool. When 
cold and beginning to thicken, add the beaten whites of tli: 

t^TC/st SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They art the best. See pa 



76 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

four eggb and beat until snowy white. When thick enough so as 
to just pour, turn into the mould and set away to harden. This 
is the same as lemon sponge. To be served with a custard made 
of the yolks of the eggs. Mrs. Makeham. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

Whip one quart of sweetened and flavored rich cream to a 
froth and set on the ice. Dissolve one-third box of gelatine, 
soaked in a little water, in three-fourths of a cup of boiling milk. 
When very cold, add this to the whipped cream, and pour all into 
a glass dish lined with lady fingers or sponge cake. Set away to 
harden. Mrs. Aevarado Stevens. 

APPLE TAPIOCA. 

Soak one teacupful of tapioca in cold water for one hour, 
drain, add to it one quart of boiling water, and boil in double 
kettle until transparent. Sweeten moderately and add six 
medium sized apples pared and quartered. Bake thirty minutes. 
Serve very cold. 

For cherry, apricot or peach tapioca, soak the tapioca over 
night, simmer with one pint of water until clear, sweeten, add 
the stewed fruit as desired, and pour into the dish in which it is 
to be served. Serve very cold with sugar and cream. 

COLD BERRY PUDDING. 

Heat one pint of canned huckleberries, sweeten. Line the 
bottom of a quart bowl with buttered stale bread, add a layer of 
the boiling hot berries, then bread, and so on until the bowl is 
full. Press down with a weight. When cold, turn out of bowl, 
and serve with hot foamy sauce. Dried raspberries are good 
used this way. Mrs. W. P. Bigelow. 

WEST END DESSERT. 

Slice thin in a glass bowl four bananas, cover thickly with 
sugar, pour in the juice of two lemons, and stand two hours on 
the ice. Mrs. Aldrich. 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. Seepage j. 



FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 77 



ICE CREAMS. 



DIRECTIONS FOR FREEZING. 

Pound the ice fine in a coarse bag and use coarse salt. Allow ten 
pounds of ice and two quarts of salt to a three-quart freezer. 
Have the first layer ice, three inches, then salt one inch, and so 
on to the top. After freezing the cream, take out the dasher, 
stir down, cover, and cork the hole in the cover ; pour off the 
water, repack, and let it stand two hours before serving. 

A covered tin pail set in a larger bucket makes a very fair 
freezer. Carefully remove the cover and stir occasionally, and 
between stirs, give the pail a slow whirling motion. In winter 
snow may be used in place of ice. 

PLAIN VANILLA. 

Heat one pint of cream in a double kettle, and when scalding 
hot, add one-half pound of sugar, and boil five minutes. When 
cold, add this boiled cream to one pint of cream, or if a plainer 
ice cream is desired, to one pint of milk. Flavor with vanilla 
and freeze. Boiling half the cream gives the peculiar velvety 
smoothness of the Philadelphia ice creams — it is not necessary 
but makes the most delicious creams. 

Mrs. W. A. Montgomery. 

PEACH OR APRICOT CREAM 

Beat one quart of fruit (if canned, without the juice), to a 
pulp with an egg beater. Mix three cups of good cream and 
two of milk ; boil half of this with three-fourths of a pound of 
sugar until clear, cool ; add to the rest of the cream ; freeze. 
When partially frozen, add the fruit. 

BANANA CREAM. 

To one quart of mingled cream and milk, and one-half pound 
of sugar prepared as directed in previous receipts, add, when 
partially frozen, six bananas beaten to a pulp. Will serve nine. 

ISF'C/se SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They arc tin- best. See page J. 



78 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

COFFEE CREAM. 

Boil four tablespoonfuls of Mocha coffee in one pint of cream, 
and one-half pound of sugar ; strain, cool, add another pint of 
cream ; freeze. Will serve six. 

FROZEN STRAWBERRIES. 

Mash one quart of strawberries, then add one pound of sugar 
moistened with the juice of one lemon. Stir until the sugar is 
melted. Freeze. 

FROZEN PEACHES. 
One quart of water and three cupfuls of water boiled ; one 
quart of peaches mashed. Freeze. 

FROZEN BANANAS. 
Boil one pint of water and two cupfuls of sugar ; cool ; add 
one dozen bananas beaten to a pulp and the juice of an orange. 
When nearly frozen, add a pint of whipped cream. 

CURRANT WATER ICE. 
One pint of red currant juice added to a cold syrup made of 
one pound of sugar and one pint of water; freeze. It will take 
much longer than ice cream to freeze. Delicious. 

Miss Mary Hall. 

LEMON WATER ICE. 

The juice and grated rind of four lemons and one orange, add 
to a boiling syrup made of one quart of water and four large 
cups of sugar. Strain and freeze. 



PICKLES AND CATSUPS. 



CUCUMBER PICKLE. 
Take cucumbers, wash and cover them with boiling hot water. 
Let them stand one day and wipe them dry. Measure the water 
to see how much vinegar to use. To one gallon of vinegar take 
one tablespoon of powdered alum, one teacup of salt, two table- 
spoons of mixed spices. Heat vinegar together with alum, salt and 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page j. 



FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 79 

spices, and pour over pickles; let stand until next morning. Do 

this until vinegar has been boiled and poured over three times. 

Then slice a piece of horse radish over top, and wash grape 

leaves and cover over last thing. 

This receipt can be depended upon; it makes hard green 

pickles that keep for years without any scum getting over the 

top. 

Mrs. W. S. K \< hi kr. 

PICKLES. 

To every hundred cucumbers, one pint of barrel salt ; pour 
boiling over them and let them stand over night. In the morn- 
ing, wipe them dry with a towel ; then pour hot vinegar, spiced 

to suit the taste, over them. 

Mrs. Servo 

OIL PICKLES. 

One hundred small cucumbers and one quart of onions sliced, 

and put in layers with coarse salt; stand aside all night under a 

heavyweight. Drain and pour over them enough cold vinegar, in 

which a tablespoonful of powdered alum has been dissolved, t<> 

cover them; stand six hours; drain. Mix togetherone-half pound 

of dry mustard, one-half cup of celery seed, one teaspoonful of 

black pepper, one pint of olive oil, and last two quarts of strong 

vinegar. Pour this mixture on the cucumbers and onions 

packed in glass jars; fasten the tops and the pickles will be 

ready to use in two weeks. • M. 

RIPE CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

Pare and scrape out the inside, put in a weak brine twenty- 
four hours. To a quart of strong vinegar add three pounds "t 

sugar, and spice to taste : into this boiling syrup put a few slices 
of the cucumber at a time ; boil until they look clear. When 
all are cooked, pour tin- syrup over thejn and put away in glass 
jars. 

Watermelon rind may be pickled tin- same way. 

GREEN TOMATO PICKLE 

Take medium sized tomatoes, slice thick ; cook in a weak 
brine till a fork will pierce them easily. Drain through .1 col- 



lie Use SMITH" S COMMON SENSE Baking Pounier ami 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. Seepage j. 



8o FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

ander thoroughly, and put into vinegar for three or four days 
or a week. Drain off from this vinegar ; then take equal parts 
of sugar and fresh vinegar ; put in the fruit and heat to a boil. 
Put spices in a muslin bag and boil with the tomatoes ; turn 
bag into your pickles with the rest. One teaspoonful cloves, 
one tablespoon cinnamon, one tablespoon mace, one tablespoon 

allspice. 

Miss Susie E. Barrett. 

SWEET TOMATO PICKLE. 

One peck of tomatoes sliced, one teacup of salt, soak over 
night. Take two quarts of water and one quart of vinegar and 
put the tomatoes in and boil fifteen minutes. Throw this liquor 
away and then take two quarts of vinegar (reduced if very 
strong), and two pounds of brown sugar, one-half pound of 
white mustard seed, one tablespoonful of allspice, one of cloves, 
two of cinnamon, one of ginger. Put the tomatoes in this and 
boil until tender, about fifteen or twenty minutes. 

Mrs. W. S. Kachler. 

CHOPPED PICKLE. 

One peck of green tomatoes, two quarts of onions, four pep- 
pers chopped ; cook in salt water and then in weak vinegar 
until tender. Take five cups of fresh vinegar, two pounds of 
sugar, two tablespoons each of mustard, cinnamon, cloves, and 
one-third pound white mustard seed. Cook together two hours. 

Ora B. Fry. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

One peck ripe tomatoes, six onions, four red peppers, one-half 
teacup salt, one and one-half cups sugar, three cups of vinegar. 
Chop onions and peppers very fine ; boil the whole together 
two hours. 

Mrs. Morrison. 

PICKLED ONIONS. 

Buy the small button onions, remove loose skin, stand in weak 
brine over night. Boil them until just beginning to be tender 
in weak vinegar, drain and put in glass jars. Cover them with 
strong hot vinegar, and seal. 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page 5. 



FLOWER < 1 I V COOK BOOK. 8l 

MIXED PICKLES. 

Two dozen large cucumbers, two dozen green tomatoes, four 
large onions, two cauliflowers, two quarts small onions, two 
quarts cucumbers, two quarts beans. 

Slice the large cucumbers, etc., and put each in separate dishes 
and soak over night in weak brine; then strain and cook till ten- 
der in weak vinegar, after which drain and put into crock or jar 
intended for the pickle. 

Then make a paste as follows : two gallons vinegar, two cups 
Hour, one pound mustard, two pounds brown sugar, one-half 
ounce celery seed, one-half ounce turmeric, one ounce cinnamon, 
one ounce cloves. Stir smooth with cold vinegar. Have the 
rest of the vinegar boiling, and add paste to it, stirring till the 
thickness of cream, then pour while hot over the pickles. 

Mi<-. Pi u<< i . 

PICKLED PEACHES OR PEAKS 

Choose firm fruit not very ripe, gently rub off the down, place 
in layers in a stone jar and pour over them enough boiling 
vinegar to cover them ; let stand over night, drain. Make for 
each seven pounds of fruit, a syrup of three pounds of sugar, 
one pint of vinegar, and one tablespoonful of cinnamon. Stick 
two cloves into each peach, put them a few at a time into the 
syrup and cook slowly until clear. Skim out the peaches and 
place carefully in glass jars, cover with the syrup and seal. It is 
better to make these pickles a few at a time, as they loose their 
shape if crowded in the kettle. The vinegar in which they were 
soaked over night, may we used for several lots of pickles, one 
after the other. Pears may be pickled the same way. but do 
not need to stand over night. 

M. 

CHOW CHOW. 

One pint each oi tiny cucumbers, onions and string beans, one 
head of cauliflower ; cook together the onions, string beans and 
cauliflower until tender, but not soft: stand the cucumbers in 
strong brine over night. To two quarts and a half of vim. 
add, when boiling, a paste made of one-fourth pound of English 
mustard, one-fourth ounce of turmeric, one tablespoonful of 

}@8~Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They arc the best. See page j 



82 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

white mustard seed, one-half cup of sugar, and one cup of olive 
oil ; stir constantly until it thickens, then pour over the fruit 
which has been mixed and packed in glass jars. 

SPICED GOOSEBERRIES. 

Five quarts of fruit, three pounds of brown sugar, one pint 
of vinegar, a tablespoonful each of cloves and cinnamon ; boil 
all together until thick. Many add for this quantity two pounds 
of seeded and chopped raisins. 

Mrs. A. S. Montgomery. 

SPICED CURRANTS. 

Five pounds of currants, four of sugar, one-half pint of vine- 
gar, four tablespoonfuls of cinnamon, two of cloves. Boil three 
hours. 

Ora B. Fry. 

SPICED PLUMS. 

Six pounds of damson plums, three of sugar, one pint of 
vinegar, cloves, allspice, cinnamon, each two teaspoonfuls. Boil 
about three hours. Very good with roast turkey. 

Mrs. Sturgiss. 

SPICED BLACKBERRIES. 

Into a boiling syrup made of one pint of vinegar and two and 
one-half pounds of sugar, spiced to taste, put five quarts of ripe 
blackberries, and scald for about ten minutes. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

One peck of ripe tomatoes, two heaping tablespoonfuls of salt, 

one of black pepper, two of mustard, one half tablespoonful each 

of cloves, allspice, cinnamon, one-fourth teaspoonful cayenne, 

one pint of vinegar, two large onions. Boil together four hours. 

Mrs. Brox. 

GRAPE CATSUP. 
Five pints of grapes cooked until soft and then put through a 
colander ; add two pounds of sugar, one pint of vinegar, six 
tablespoonfuls of mixed spice, and one-half teaspoon of cayenne. 
Boil until rather thick ; bottle. 

Miss Satterlee. 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page j. 



FLOWKR CITY COOK BOOK. 83 



APPLE BUTTER. 
To one peck of apples measured after being peeled and quar- 
tered, allow four pounds of brown sugar, and two quarts of water, 
and one cup of vinegar. Cook until smooth and thick. When 
nearly done, add spices to suit the taste. Stir constantly to 

avoid burning. Put up in jars like marmalade. 

F. 



JKLLIKS. 



LEMON JELLY. 
One box of gelatine, put in one pint of cold water, let it 
stand one hour, then add one pint of boiling water, one large 
lemon, one cup of white sugar, then strain. Make the day be- 
fore using. 

Mrs. A. Elwood. 

ORANGE JELLY. 

One-half box of gelatine dissolved in one cup of cold water, 

one large cup of sugar, juice of two oranges and a little of the 

grated peel, one lemon, juice and peel, one-half pint of boiling 

water. Strain through a bag into a mould and set aside to cool. 

Mrs. C. S. Wheeler. 

COFFEE JELLY. 

One half box of gelatine softened in one-half pint of cold 

water ; then add one-half pint of strong boiling hot coffee, 

sweetened with one-half cup of sugar. Add enough boiling 

water to make one and one-half pints of liquid. Strain into a 

mould to harden. Serve very cold with cream and sugar, or 

whipped cream. 

Mrs. Whkeler. 

LEMON FRUIT JELLY 
Make a rich lemon jelly with one box gelatine, three lemons, 
juice and grated rind, and one pound of sugar. Add the sugar 
and lemons to one quart of boiling water, and when all are boil- 
ing, pour over the gelatine which has soaked several hours in "tie 



JSP* Use SMI TITS COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Eruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page j. 



84 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

pint of water. Put a layer of this jelly in the bottom of three one- 
quart moulds and let it harden. Then place on the first mould 
a layer of sliced bananas, in the second of English walnut, in the 
third of Malaga grapes. Pour over the fruit in each mould 
enough of the jelly to cover, and let this harden. Repeat this 
until the jelly is used up. Have the jelly poured over the fruit 
cold and a little thick, but not hard. Should it grow too thick, 
warm it a little by standing in hot water. In summer the moulds 
will need to be set in ice to harden each layer. Turn the three 
moulds out, side by side, into a large platter, pour whipped 
cream around them, and serve. 

M. 

CURRANT JELLY. 

Select currants when they first ripen — they will not jelly well 
if dead ripe. Wash them and remove leaves, but do not stem. 
Mash thoroughly in a stone jar and then scald in a porcelain 
kettle. Pour the scalded currants into a flannel jelly bag, and 
hang the bag where it will drip into a stone jar over night; do not 
squeeze at all. 

In the morning measure the juice, and bring it to a boil in 

porcelain kettle ; let it boil ten minutes before adding the sugar 

(which should be thoroughly heated in the oven), measure for 

measure. Boil rapidly after adding the sugar, skim carefully, 

and after five minutes, try it in a cold saucer to see if it will 

jelly; if not, boil a very little longer. Dip glasses in hot water, fill 

them and stand aside to cool. After two days, cover the tops 

of the jelly with writing paper dipped in alcohol, and then cover 

the whole with heavy paper, or the regular glass top. A second 

quality of the jelly, good to use for cakes, may be made by 

squeezing the pulp remaining in the bag after it has dripped all 

night. If a very fine color is desired, heat the juice two quarts 

at a time. 

Mrs. W. A. Montgomery. 

CRANBERRY JELLY. 
Boil one quart of cranberries in one cupful of water until soft; 
mash, let them drain through a flannel rag. Return the juice 
to the fire and boil five minutes, add one pound of sugar and 
boil until it jellies, about five minutes. 

WS^Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page j. 



FLOWER CITY COOK HOOK. 85 

GREEN GRAPE JELLY. 

Cook the grapes after stemming until soft. Pour into jelly 
bag. and drain all night. To three quarts of this juice, add a 
pint of cranberry juice strained. When boiling, add hot sugar 
measure for measure ; boil until it jellies. This jelly is much 
cheaper than the currant jelly and is almost as good. 

JELLIED CURRANTS. 

Put one pound of stemmed fruit into a granite kettle, and 
over it pour one pound of sugar. Bring to a boil carefully, so it 
does not burn ; boil twenty minutes and pour into jelly glasses. 

Mrs. Brady. 



BEVERAGES. 



VIENNA COFFEE. 

Add the stiff beaten white of an egg to one pint of cream, put 
in the cups with the sugar and pour over the hot strong coffee. 
The yolk of the egg can be used to settle the coffee. Whipped 
cream may be used instead of the white of an egg. 

CHOCOLATE. 

Scrape four squares Baker's chocolate, add six tablespoons of 
sugar and four of hot water ; stir over the fire until smooth and 
glossy ; add gradually to one quart of boiling milk. Beat it 
vigorously with an egg beater, and serve with whipped cream 
in each cupful. 

BOUILLON. 

Have four pounds of lean beef chopped fine ; pour over it two 
quarts of cold water, and simmer five hours in a closely covered 
granite kettle. Remove from the fire, strain, and when cool, 
add the beaten white of an egg. Put on again and boil until 
clear, skimming as fast as the scum rises. Season; serve in 
little cups. 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENS!: Baking Powder and 

True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page j. 



86 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 



RASPBERRY VINEGAR. 

Pour one pint of cider vinegar over three pints of red rasp- 
berries and let stand twenty-four hours. Strain and add a 
pound of white sugar to every pint of juice ; boil half an hour; 
bottle when cold. This makes a delicious drink in summer if 
diluted and sweetened. 

Mrs. Hiram Doty. 

GRAPE JUICE OR UNFERMENTED WINE. 

To three quarts of grapes add one quart of water; boil one 
hour, strain. Add one pint of sugar to three pints of juice, boil 
half an hour, skim, and can boiling hot, like canned fruits. Use 
porcelain or granite ware in cooking, and glass jars for canning. 
Diluted one-third with ice water, this makes a delicious drink. 

Deacon Hiram Doty. 

OAT MEAL WATER. 

First. — Put one cupful of uncooked oatmeal in a pitcher of 
ice water, stir several times, and let it settle. A very health- 
ful drink for warm weather. 

Second. — Boil one-half cupful of oatmeal in two quarts of water 
several hours until creamy and smooth. When cold, add a 
spoonful to a glass of ice water. 

ESSENCE OF MEAT. 
(valuable in illness.) 
Take two pounds fillet of beef, remove all fat and skin, and 
cut the meat into small pieces ; put into a wide-mouthed jar or 
bottle with salt and pepper. Tie down with a bladder, and set in a 
saucepan of water to boil for five hours, when the whole essence 
of meat will be extracted and look like oil. A teaspoonful to be 
taken at a time — equal to one mutton chop. 

Mrs. T. Harwood Pattison. 

BUTTERMILK POP. 

Boil one quart of buttermilk in a double kettle, add one small 
tablespoon of corn starch moistened with a little milk. Drink 
when cold, with or without sugar. Good for dyspepsia. 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder and 
True-Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page j. 



ll i'\vi R CITY ( OOK hook. 87 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



TO REMOVE STAINS. 

For fruit stains in linen, pour boiling water through the linen. 

For coffee stains in linen, pour boiling water through the linen. 

For cream stains, soak in cold water; hot water will set the stain. 

For ink stain, rub on lemon and salt and place in the sun. 

For mildew, rub on the article while wet a paste made of soap 
and chalk, equal parts, and place in the sun. 

For iron rust, rub the spot with sulphuret of potash, then 
bathe in lemon juice and wash in water. 

TO BRIGHTEN TINWARE. 
Rub on it a little common baking soda, well moistened. This 
will keep it beautifully bright and sweet. 

CHINA CEMENT. 

Get pure gum arabic, and make a thick solution with water. 
Stir in enough plaster of Paris to make a white paste. Apply to 
the broken edges and stick them together. In three days the 
dish may be used, with no fear of it breaking again in the same 
place. 

TO CLARIFY FAT. 

Mrs. Rorer gives the following directions : Melt the drippings 
to be clarified, and strain into a clean pan; add to every three 
pounds of this fat a pint of boiling water and a quarter-tea- 
spoonful of baking soda. Boil until the water has all evaporated. 
Skim and strain, and it is ready to use. Fat that has been used 
for croquettes or fried cakes, may be clarified again and again. 

WASHING FLUID. 

One pound-can Babbitt's potash, one-half ounce sal anionia, 
one-half ounce salts of tartar, dissolved in two gallons of water. 
Use one-fourth cup of this fluid to a tub of water. In preparing 
the fluid, dissolve the potash in hot water, and use a stone jar in 
dissolving the sal amonia and salts. Mrs. Rosa Nod\ \k 



Use SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Pmvder and 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. Seepage J, 



88 FLOWER CITY COOK BOOK. 

TO OPEN A CLOGGED WATER PIPE. 

Dissolve a pound of Babbitt's potash in boiling water, pour 
into the sink or bowl, and it will eat out the obstruction in the 
pipes. A few hours after, wash out the pipe thoroughly with 
boiling water. This simple device will often save sending for a 
plumber. 

TO KEEP WOOLEN CLOTHING AND FURS. 

Heavy woolens and furs should be put away early, before the 
moth miller is abroad. Hang out the furs where the sun shines 
hot, and thoroughly brush and comb them, and let the warmth 
of the sun penetrate every part. Put the muff in its box, and 
paste a strip of paper perfectly smooth and tight where the 
cover joins the box. See that the box is whole, and there is no 
danger of moth. Larger fur garments may be sealed tightly in 
paper bags, made of heavy manilla paper, and be perfectly safe. 

Winter overcoats should be thoroughly brushed, sunned, and 
hung on a wire holder; then all inserted in a paper bag made 
the length and width of the coat. Paste the top of the bag 
tightly, allowing the wire loop only to project; have no tiny hole 
anywhere. Hang the overcoat by a hook in the top of the closet 
and it will come out fresh and unwrinkled. If garments are 
properly sunned and sealed tightly, no camphor or pepper is 
needed. 

If winter flannels and woolen pieces are wrapped securely in 
newspaper — several wrappings, then tied securely, — leaving no 
break, they will be safe. Leave no woolen pieces exposed to 
breed mooths, but have all laid away in tight paper bags or 
wrappings, and you will have no trouble with moths. 

TO CURE HAMS. 
To every twenty pounds of ham, take one pint of salt, one 
ounce of saltpetre, one pint of molasses; dissolve all in just 
enough water to cover the ham. Repack every week, and in 
four weeks they will be salt enough to smoke. 

Deacon Doty. 
TO CLEAN PAINT. 
Save tea leaves from the table, steep them in a tin basin — do 
not boil — half an hour; strain and use on the paint. 

IWVse SMITH'S COMMON SENSE Baking Powder ana 
True- Fruit Flavoring Extracts. They are the best. See page 5. 



Orchids and White Violets. 

\VK HAVE AMONG OUR 

MANY VARIETIES OF FINE FLOWERS, 

In their Season, Orchids and White Violets 

E. R. FRY, Florist, 

95 EAST MAIN STREET. 
BOOKSELLER AND STATIONER. 

W. J. WILCOX, 

No. 12 S-TA TE ST., ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Prices always reasonable in 

Birthday and Wedding Gifts. 
Wm. J Wegman, 

DEALER IN 

♦ FINE * GROCERIES. ♦ 

I have now a complete stock of Fresh and New Goods at prices that 
will compare with the lowest. 

88 and go LAKE AVENUE, Rochester, X. )'. 

x, 



WHITNEY ROLLER FLOURING MILLS. 



FERGUSON & LEWIS, 



CHOICE 



Family % Bakers' Flour, 

MILL STREET, foot of Brown, 



Telephone 346. ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

WOODBURY'S 
GROCERY HOUSES. 



RETAIL. — 44 and 46 East Main Street, 5 Front Street, 12 Monroe 
Avenue, 177 Lake Avenue, 278 and 280 West Avenue. 

WHOLESALE.— Over 44 and 46 East Main Street. 
FLOUR DEPARTMENT.— Over 42 East Main Street. 

ROCHESTER, N.Y. 

90 



GORTON & McCABE, 

Carpets and Draperies 

43 & 45 STATE STREET, 

# Rochester, N. Y. — # 



MERRIAM'S 

Pharmacy and Drug Store 

561 STATE ST. (cor. Lyell Ave. and Smith St.) 

DRUGS, MEDICINES and CHEMICALS, HOMEO- 
PATHIC MEDICINES, SHOULDER BRACES 
and SUPPORTERS, CHAMPION, 
ERY & JONES' TRUSSES 
and CRUTCHES. 

PALMER'S BALSAM, for Colds and Coughs, a Safe and Effectual Cure. 

Superior Flavoring Extracts. Prescriptions carefully put up. 

Our stock is complete, genuine, and of the best. 

A. W. MUDGE, 

UNDERTAKER 

No. 31 NORTH FITZHUGH ST 

TELEPHONE 226 A. 

Residence, 60 SOUTH WASHINGTON STREET. 

TELEPHONE 226 D. 
9 1 



Firman, Webb & Webb, 

INSURANCE, 

109 WILDER BUILDING, 

I 

TelephoneINo. 83. ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

FIRE INSURANCE : 

Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

L. B. MARCY, 
Attorney and Counselor at Law, 

No. 60 TRUST BUILDING. 

W. D. SCOFIELD & CO., 

Dress Goods Specialty, 

No. 170 EAST MAIN STREET, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

92 



JUDICIOUS RND EXACTING BUYERS 

OK 

DRY GOODS, CARPETS 

AND MILLINERY 

always consult their own interests by inspecting the 

-hN=w MAGNIFICENT DISPLAY ^§^ 

of these goods at 

Burke, FitzSimons, Hone &Co.'s 

BEFORE PURCHASING ELSEWHERE. 



Bicycles, 

Jriey<;l<5 

AND^ 

BABY CARRIAGES, 

Toys and Fancy Goods. 





$100,000 Stock on Exhibition. 

67 and 69 Exchange Street. 

FRANCIS L. HUGHES. 

93 



LEVI HEY & CO. 

311 .A.3STID 313 STATE STEEET, 
Have the Largest Assortment of 

Stoves, * Ranges, # Furnaces 

AND KITCHEN SUPPLIES 

of any house in the city 




THE F. & W. Co. 

fringes 

With Oval Fire Box, 

Large Water Fronts, 

and Draw Out Ovens, 

Excel all others on the market. 

""■"They also carry a lare stock of Refrigerators, Oil Stoves, Gas and Gasoline Stoves. 
Call and examine their stock bofore you buy. 

D. LEARY'S 

Steam Dyeing & Cleansing 

ESTABLISHMENT, 

Mill Street, Cor. Piatt, - ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Goods Received and Returned by Express. Packages 

Called for and Delivered to any part of 

the City, Free of Charge. 



An old Business and a growing Business means pleased Patrons. 
The means of wise economy to thousands ; why not to you ? 

94 



WILLIAM EASTWOOD, 

ARTIST IC FOO TWEAR 

A i.i. Feet Properly Fitted. 
All Widths and Sizes. Prices to Please and Satisfy Everyone. 



No. 130 East Main St., Rochester, N. Y. 

mrs. s. f. baker, 
Manicure and Chiropodist, 

518 POWERS BLOCK, Art Gallery Floor, 
Rochester, N. Y. 

FINGER NAILS BEAUTIFIED. All Diseases of the Feet Treated. 

Office Hours: 9 A. M. to 1 P. M., 2 to 8 P. M. 

ATTENTION, LADIES! 

CALL ON 

H. F. SEYMOUR & CO. 

FOR ALL KINDS OF 

HOUSE-FURNISHING GOODS, 

Kitchen Utensils, Cutlery, Etc. 

Prices low and goods guaranteed. Also a full line of Builders' Hardware and 
Mechanics' Tools. 

No. 23 EAST MAIN ST., Opposite the Arcade. 

STREET BROS., 

Merchant Tailors 



-AND DEALERS I 



GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS, 

51 S cV si 7 STATE ST, ROCHESTER, N Y. 

95 



GOKMLY BROS., 

Crockery, Glassware, Silver Plate, 
Lamps, Etc., Etc. 

67 STATE STREET, Opposite Market Street, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Henry Likly & Co., 

96 State Street, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Trunks, Traveling Bags, Pocketbooks, Dressing Cases, 
Telescope Cases, and Leather Novelties 
at bottom prices. 

SIDNEY B. ROBY, 

JOBBER OF 

SADDLERY ♦ AND * COACH * HARDWARE, 

Iron and Steel Axles, Springs, Hubs, Spokes, Felloes, 
Wheels, Carriage Bolts, 6-v. 

Nos. 67, 69, & 71 Mill Street, Rochester, N. Y. 

AMBROSE COOMBES, 



-DEALKR IN- 



<# DRY • GOODS le 

Notions and Gent's Furnishing Goods, Fine 

Millinery, Carpets and Oil Cloths. 

203 LYELL AVE., ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

96 



- The - Backus - Heater - 



YOU CAN SIT IN ANY ROOM IN YOUR HOUS] 



A GAS LOG FIRE AND STEAM RADIATOR COMBINED. 

No chimney or flue needed. i cents per hour for gas. 



J. C. Barry, 



49 North Ave, 



Near Main Street, Rochester, N. V 



GIBBONS & STONE, 

M \M i s< I OSEBa OF 

Grand, Square and Upright Pianos. 

Pianos and Organs sold on monthly paYments. 
no EAST MAIN STREET. 



IK YOU DO 



£5K 



N-O-T W-A-N-T 



£ 



CONTAINING NO ARTIFICIAL OH. 
ORING, NO GLUCOSE, NO TERRA 
ALBA, NO PARAFINE, ETC., ETC., 




£S 



D-O-N-'T G-O T-O 
LOVEJOY'S, at 71 E. Main St., or Powers Hotel Store 



W1CHMANN & KALLUSCH, 
MERCHANT TAILORS, 

(YOUNG MENS' CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION BUILDING.) 

The Latest Styles always in stock. Largest Assortment in the 
eity to select from. 

136 \m> 138 S. St. Paul Street, - - Rochester, N. Y. 
(cor. court street.) 

97 



CRAIG & VANDERBELT, 

No. 199 LYELL AVENUE, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

WHERE MAY BE FOUND 

PURE DRUGS, PATENT MEDICINES, DYE STUFFS, 
COMBS, BRUSHES, PERFUMES, ETC 



Physicians' and Family Recipes compounded with care. 

In order to obtain the best results from these excellent recipes, it will be 
necessary to use one of the far famed 



ACORN RANGES 



FOR SALE BY L. E. MASON, DEALER IN 

STOVES, RANGES & HARDWARE, 
380 State Street. 

Agent for American Seal Paint, the best Mixed Paint in the market. 

TANNER & HUBER, 

DEALERS IN 

Building Stone. 



Rock Faced and Point Dressed always on hand. 
Quarry, head of Champlain Street. Office, 260 Bronson Avenue. 

B. H. SCRANTOM. L. G. WETMORK. A. C. WALKER. 

SCRANTOM, WETMORE & CO. 

BOOKSELLERS, 
S TA TIONERS and ENGRA VERS 

41 STATE STREET, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 
,8 




U/ \\. COODGER 9 QO., 
Manufacturers of 

Ladies' FINE SHOES, 

Including the famous 

"L« Belle/' 

Bold only at 

Carroll, Beadle & Co.'s, 

1 44- 1 54 E. Main St., 






i: ESTER. N. Y. 



IS YOUR HUSBAND A 
FARMER? 

Ask him if he lias ever 
heard of our Hay and Grain 
Carriers and Slings. The 
house-keepers like them be- 
cause they save boarding two 
or three extra men at wheal 
time. 




A. V. SMITH & CO., 

• I lave moved to 

No. 128 STATE STREET, 

Where a good assortment of Harness can be found. 

REPAIRING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 

99 



E. M. HIGGINS, 



DEALER IN 



Fine Groceries and Imported Cigars 

Extra Sugar Cured Ham and Bacon of my Curing. 
52 STATE STREET. (Branch Store, 235 E. Main Street). 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




r «"fj 



» t 



Eight Pages for 2 Cts. 



$5.00 a Year Delivered at Your Door. The Great 
WANT MEDIUM. 



If you want a Servant, if you want a Situation, if you want to 
Buy or Sell anything, 

"Put it in THE POST-EXPRESS." 

More WANT Advertisements daily than ALL 'the other 
papers in Rochester. 



Help Wanted, or 

Situations Wanted, 



10 cts. for Two Insertions. 



AN EXQUISITE PERFUME. 



» ::=; <®wm ^ 



*v A 



SWEET : LILAC 



Fragrant, Delicate, Lasting, New. We sell our perfumes 
to Retail I druggists onl} . 

WE MAKE ALL THE FAVORITE PERFUMES. 

T. B. DUNN CO., Perfumers, 

ROCHESTER, X. Y. 




QNPRE< EDENTE1 i Sl'i < l 



The Rotary Principle Triumphant. 
Defiance to all ( lompel ition. 

Wheeler & Wilsons 

NEW HIGH-ARM 

FAMILY SEWING MACHINE. 

The "NO. 9" is the 

Lightest Running and only Ported 
Lock Bt itch Sewing Machine 

in the W <>t lil 

An unparalleled product of Me- 
chanical and Artistic Skill. 

Sr. ii before purchasing anj other 

JAS. M. HARRISON, General Agent, to Exchange Street, 



WILDER BUILDING. 



LIBR^ J 



CONGRESS