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Full text of "Forty-fifth Annual Report of The National Farm School 1942-1943"

National 
Farnv/ 

School 




Forty-Fifth Annual Report 

Farm School, Bucks Co., Pa. 

1942-43 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/fortyfifthannual1943farm 



Forty 'Fifth Annual Report 

OF 

The National Farm School 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

A School of Scientific and Practical 

x\griculture Supported Largely by 

Voluntary Contributions 



Founded 1896 by Rabbi Joseph Krauskopf 



Specializes in Training City Boys for 
Careers in Agriculture 



Open to Boys 16 Years of Age and 

Over of All Creeds from All Sections 

of the L^nlted States 



FARM SCHOOL, BUCKS COUNTY 
PENNSYLVANIA 

1942 - 1943 




Joseph Krauskopf 
Founder and First President 




The Joseph Krauskopf Library contains nearly 10,000 volumes in the 

main section. Adjoining the Library is a room which reproduces in 

exact detail the founder's library in his former Philadelphia home and 

contains his jjersonal collection of 7,500 volumes. 




Louis Nusbaum 
Fourth President of The National Farm School 



LOUIS NUSBAUM 



Farm School's New President 



The Board of Trustees of The National Farm School 
announces the election of Doctor Louis Nusbaum, as the fourth 
president of the institution, effective May 1, 1943. Doctor 
Nusbaum does not come as a stranger to this new position. 
He has been intimately and actively associated with the School 
for the past thirty years as a member of its Board of Trustees, 
and during most of that period as the chairman of its Educa- 
tional Committee. For the past five years he has been first 
vice-president of the School and chairman of an advisory com- 
mittee composed of nationally-known educators. 

Dr. Nusbaum succeeds as president Dr. Harold B. Allen, 
who resigned after four years of service to engage in educa- 
tional reconstruction for the Iranian government under the 
sponsorship of the Near East Foundation. 

Dr. Nusbaum brings a fund of knowledge and many years 
of experience in the field of education to the work of The 
National Farm School. At the time of his election as Farm 
School president, he was associate superintendent of schools 
of Philadelphia. 

He is a member of numerous professional organizations ; a 
member of the Board of Trustees of the Hebrew Education 
Association, Gratz College, Mt. Sinai Hospital and the Phil- 
adelphia Health Council, and of the consulting staff of the 
New Jersey Training School. 

Temple University, of which he is a graduate, conferred 
upon him in 1930 the degree of Doctor of Pedagogy. 

Under his leadership. The National Farm School should 
become one of the country's most important agencies in help- 
ing to solve our wartime problems and in aiding in post-war 
reconstruction. 



OFFICERS AND BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Louis Nusbaum, President 
Louis A. Hirsch, Vice-President 
Maurice Jacobs, Second Vice-President 
Leon Rosenbaum, Treasurer 
Miss E. M. Belfield, Secretary 



Joseph H. Hagedorn, Honorary Chairman Board of Trustees 
Leon Merz, Chairman Board of Trustees 



Isidore Baylson 
David Burpee 
Harry Burstein 
Horace T. Fleisher 
Jos. H. Hagedorn 
Roy a. Heymann 
Julian A. Hillman 
Jos. H. Hinlein 



HONORARY MEMBERS 
Stanley H. Hinlein 
Louis A. Hirsch 
Harry B. Hirsh 
Maurice Jacobs 
Chas. Kline 
Mrs. Jos. Krauskopf 
M. R. Krauskopf 
Leon Merz 



Elias Nusbaum 
Louis Nusbaum 
Leon Rosenbaum 
Edwin H. Silverman 
Leon Solis-Cohen 
Philip Sterling 
Isaac Stern 
James Work 



Term Expires 19^3 
Sydney K. Allman, Jr. 
Samuel Cooke 
Al. Paul Lefton 
Dole L. Levy 
Walter Rosskam 
Harry H. Rubenstein 
Emanuel Wirkman 



ELECTED MEMBERS 

Term Expires 19 UU 
J. Griffith Boardman 
Sylvan D. Einstein 
Lester Hano 
Mrs. M. J. Karpeles 
David H. Pleet 
Israel Stiefel 
Max Trumper 



Term Expires 19^.5 
Edwin B. Elson 
Benjamin Goldberg 
S. S. Greenbaum 
A. Spencer Kaufman 
Theo. G. Rich 
Nathan J. Snellenburg 
Edwin H. Weil 



Alumni Representatives 
Morris R. Blackman David Platt 



WOMEN'S AUXILIARY COMMITTEE 

Mrs. Jos. Krauskopf, Chairman 
Mrs. Theodore Netter, Treasurer Mrs. David Frankel, Secretary 



Mrs. a. J. Bamberger 
Mrs. Henry S. Belber 
Mrs. D. T. Berlizheimer 
Mrs. Leon Cohen 
Mrs. Sol Flock 
Miss Belle Floersheim 



Mrs. Sig. Guggenheim 
Mrs. Hiram Hirsch 
Mrs. M. J. Karpeles 
Mrs. Carrie Kaufman 
Mrs. a. M. Klein 
Mrs. M. R. Krauskopf 



Mrs. a. Marks 
Mrs. J. P. Morrison 
Mrs. Abraham Orlow 
Mrs. Samuel Paley 
Mrs. Wm. Pleet 
Mrs. Maurice E. Stern 



Mrs. Albert M.Greenfield Mrs. Sidney Lowenstein 



Miss Helen L. Strauss, Director of Public Relations 
6 



NATIONAL BOARD OF STATE DIRECTORS 



ISAAC STERN, New York City. ActinK Chairman 



Edmund H. Abrahams, Savannah, Ga. 

B. Abrohams, Green Bay, Wis. 

Sam Albrecht, Vicksburg, Miss. 

Henry A. Alexander, Atlanta, Ga. 

Arthur A. Aronson. Raleigh, N. C. 

Marcus Bachenheimer, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Melvin Behrends, Washington, D. C. 

Dr. Henry J. Berkowitz, Portland, Ore. 

I. W. Bernheim, Denver, Col. 

W. P. Bloom, Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

R. D. Blum, Nashville, Tenn. 

S. B. Brunwasser, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Edgar M. Cahn, New Orleans, La. 

Gabriel M. Cohen. Indianapolis, Ind. 

Juluis L. Cohen. Superior, Wis. 

Louis Cohen, Ft. Smith, Ark. 

Miss Felice Cohn, Reno, Nev. 

Herman Cone, Greensboro, N. C. 

Allen V. deFord, Washington, D. C. 

Max de Jong, Evansville, Ind. 

Carroll Downes, Jr., Kansas City, Mo. 

Nathan Eckstein, Seattle, Wash. 

Samuel Edelberg, Saranac Lake, N. Y. 

Herbert U. Feibelman, Miami, Fla. 

Rabbi J. B. Feibelman, New Orleans, La. 

Rabbi A. J. Feldman, Hartford, Conn. 

Stanley Frank, San Antonio, Tex. 

A. Frankel, Sr.. Des Moines, la. 

Ike L. Freed, Houston, Tex. 

Max Friedwald, Billings, Mont. 

Louis M. Fushan, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Judge Edward I. Gleszer, Bangor, Me. 

Milton D. Greenbaum, Baltimore, Md. 

N. Greengard, Mandan, N. D. 

S. Gugenheim, Corpus Christi, Tex. 

Mrs. H. A. Guinzburg, New York, N. Y. 

Judge Samuel J. Harris, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Sieg. Harzfeld, Kansas City, Mo. 

Hugo Heiman, Little Rock, Ark. 

Harry Hirsch, Toledo, O. 

Wm. L. Holzman, Beverly Hills, Cal. 

Robt. W. Isaacs, Clayton, N. M. 

Simon Jankowsky, Tulsa, Okla. 

Carl H. Kahn, Chicago, 111. 

Thos. Kapner, Bellaire, O. 

Edmund I. Kaufmann, Washington, D. C. 

Howard Kayser, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Samuel E. Kohn, Denver, Col. 

Daniel E. Koshland, San Francisco, Cal. 

Rabbi Isaac Landman, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

G. Irving Latz, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

Isidore Lehman, Jackson, Miss. 

Jos. G. Lehman, Dayton, O. 

Bernard Levitt, Wichita, Kan. 

Dan A. Levy, Fort Worth, Tex. 

Dr. I. H. Levy, Syracuse. N. Y. 

M. Lipinsky, Asheville, N. C. 



Alex. Lischkoff, Pensacola, Fla. 

J. H. Loveman, Birmingham, Ala. 

A. L. Luria, Reading, Pa. 

H. A. Mackoff, Dickinson, N. D. 

Herbert Marcus, Dallas, Tex. 

Ben. H. May. Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Isaac May, Rome, Ga. 

Jewell Mayes, Richmond, Mo. 

Sam Meyer, Meridian, Miss. 

William Meyer, Butte, Mont. 

M. G. Michael, Athens, Ga. 

L. Migel, Waco, Tex. 

Abe Miller, Chicago, 111. 

Louis Mosenfelder, Rock Island, 111. 

Herbert A. Moses, Sumter, S. C. 

N. Murov, Shreveport, La. 

Chas. Nussbaum, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Michael Panovitz, Grand Forks, N. D. 

Dr. I. E. Philo, Youngstown, O. 

Judge Max L. Pinansky, Portland, Me. 

Myron Porges, Pocatello, Idaho 

James A. Pratt, Loch Raven, Md. 

Chas. S. Rauh, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Hiram S. Rivitz, Cleveland, O. 

Alex Rosen, Bismarck, N. D. 

Bernath Rosenfeld, Tucson, Ariz. 

Arthur Rosenstein, Boston, Mass. 

Emil Rosentock, Sioux City, la. 

Dr. Henry Ross, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Dr. Leo S. Rowe, Washington, D. C. 

Samuel Rudley, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Oliver R. Sabin. New York, N. Y. 

Henry Sachs, Colorado Springs, Col. 

Judge S. B. Schein, Madison, Wis. 

Charles Schoen, Cedar Rapids, la. 

Dr. Laurence Selling, Portland, Ore. 

Max Semel, New York, N. Y. 

David Snellenburg, Wilmington, Del. 

Morris Stern, San Antonio, Tex. 

Samuel Stern, Fargo, N. D. 

Edward Stiles, Montpelier, Vt. 

Bertram A. Stroock, Newburgh, N. Y. 

Milton Sulzberger, Providence, R. I. 

Louis Tober, Portsmouth, N. H. 

Louis Veta, Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Eugene Warner, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Jerome A. Waterman, Tampa, Fla. 

Adolph Weil, Paducah, Ky. 

Isadore Weil, Montgomery, Ala. 

Herschel Weil, Lexington, Ky. 

Lionel Weil, Goldsboro, N. C. 

Morris Weil, Lincoln, Neb. 

Leo Weinberg, Frederick, Md. 

Henry Weinberger, San Diego, Cal. 

M. J. Weiss, Alexandria, La. 

S. D. Wise, Cleveland. O. 



NEW YORK COMMITTEE 



Lester J. Alexander 

Hon. William D. Baer 

Samuel Berliner 

Walter Hart Blumenthal 

H. H. Butlef 

Hon. Abram I. Elkus 

Joseph Engel 

Manfred Goldman 

Rev. Dr. Israel Goldstein 

Frederick William Greenfield 

Dr. Louis I. Harris 

Dr. Herbert M. Kaufmann 

Rev. Dr. Nathan Krass 

Hon. Herbert H. Lehman 

Hon. Samuel D. Levy 

Leopold J. Lippmann 

Dr. Louis C. Lowenstein 

Jesse J. Ludwig 



Benjamin Mordecai 

Rev. Dr. Louis I. Newman 

Hon. Algernon I. Nova 

Hugo H. Piesen 

David L. Podell 

Louis P. Rocker 

Sidney R. Rosenau 

Aaron Sapiro 

Otto B. Shulhof 

Sigmund Stein 

Isaac Stern 

Rev. Dr. Nathan Stern 

Hon. Aaron Steuer 

Bertram A. Stroock 

Benjamin Veit 

Jerome Waller 

Rev. Dr. Stephen S. Wise 

Isidore Witmark 



FACULTY 

Louis Nusbaum, B.S., Ped.D. (Temple University), President 

William O. Strong, B.Sc. (Cornell University), Dean of Agriculture; 
Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds; Farm Management 

Samuel B. Samuels, B.Sc. (Massachusetts State College), Director of 
Domestic Department, Director of Athletics, Purchasing Agent; 
Rural Sociology 

Samuel J. Gurbarg, B.A. (University of Pennsylvania), LL.B. (Temple 
Univeisity Law School, Director of Student Relations 

J. Claud F. Strong, A.B. (University of Delaware), Secretary to the 
President; English 

Maud Briel Maines (Drexel Institute), Librarian 

Walter J. Groman (The National Farm School), In Charge of General 
Agriculture Department; General Agriculture and Farm Machinery 

Joshua FELDSTEiN(The National Farm School) , Assistant, Farm Machinery 

David M. Purmell, B.Sc. (Michigan State College), In Charge of Fruit and 
Vegetable Department; Horticulture 

Solomon Leon Soskin (The National Farm School), Assistant, Fruit and 
Vegetable Department 

Herman G. Fiesser (Gartenbauschule, Geisenheim, Germany), In Charge 
of Landscape and Floriculture Department; Landscaping 

Herman Wilensky (The National Farm School), Assistant, Landscape and 
Floriculture Department; Floriculture 

Leroy W. Ingham, B.Sc. (University of Nebraska), M.Sc. (University of 
California), In Charge of Animal Husbandry Department; Animal 
Husbandry 

Philip Ellman, B.Sc. (Rutgers University, College of Agriculture), Assis- 
tant, Animal Husbandry Department; Creamery Management and 
Dairy Products 

Wesley Massinger, D. V. S. (New York University), Veterinarian; Veter- 
inary Science 

Floyd Cook, Herdsman 

Samuel H. Meisler, B.Sc, M.Sc. (Rutgers University, College of Agricul- 
ture), In Charge of Poultry Department; Poultry Husbandry 

Leo Perkes (The National Farm School), Assistant, Poultry Husbandry. 

Henry Schmieder, B.Sc, M.Sc (University of Pennsylvania), In Charge of 
Apiary; Natural Science 

OTHER STAFF MEMBERS AND AGRICULTURAL SERVICE STAFF 

Herman Silverman (The National Farm School), Manager, Roadside 
Market 

Eva R. Hobbs, R.N., Resident Nurse 

John J. Sweeney, M.D. (Hahnemann Medical College), Physician 

Lieutenant Joseph Frankel (Director of the Philadelphia Municipal 

Band), Band Master and Musical Instructor 
Leonard Rose (The National Farm School), Assistant, General Agriculture 
Leonard Martin Dansky (The National Farm School), Assistant, General 

Agriculture 
William J. Wilkinson (The National Farm School), Assistant, General 

Agricultui-e 
Norman G. Myers, Mechanic; Farm Carpentry 

8 



Keeping faith • • • • • 
• •••*• with america 



"*■ Fighting men must 
have plenty of food. 
People behind the 
lines must eat to 
turn out the needed 
equipment. Our Al- 
lies must have food 
to keep fighting and 
working. Food is 
needed to feed the 
hungry peoples in 
the countries which 
will be freed from 
Axis domination, 

"Food ivill ivin the 
war and tvrite the 
Peace!" 

The National Farm 
School realizes the 
importance attached 
to an agricultural 
institution in times 
of war, and is utiliz- 
ing all of its re- 
sources to speed up 
production and to 
increase the supply 
of food as well as 
of agricultural man- 
power. 

The National Farm 
School is keeping 
faith with America 
in this hour of need. 
It is playing an important part in upholding the basic food pro- 
duction line! 





(At Top) 

Adolph Segal 

Hall 

Containing 

Laboratories, 

Classrooms and 

Dormitories 



(At Left) 

Morris Lasker 

Domestic 

Hall 



Annual Report of the President 
H. B. ALLEN* 

to the 

FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL MEETING 

of 

The National Farm School 

October 18, 1942 

In the midst of a mad universe seemingly bent on total destruc- 
ton, we welcome you to this little world of creative effort. We meet 
today to celebrate the 1942 Victory Harvest Festival and the 45th 
Annual Meeting of The National Farm School. 

In our annual message of last year, nearly two months before 
Pearl Harbor, we recognized an active state of war as already exist- 
ing. On that occasion, as you will recall, we adopted as our slogan the 
battle cry of our Founder in World War I: "To Farm is to Arm." 

The Farm School at War 

Today, we of The National Farm School have reached yet 
another stage in our rapid evolution. We, ourselves, have become a 
definite part of the war. The struggle now affects our every thought 
and action; it moulds all of our policies; it has called to its ranks by 
enlistment and selection considerably over one hundred of our vigor- 
ous young men. It has sent them out to the far corners of the earth; 
it has already taken its toll of Farm School lives. As a result of this 
tragic trend, our resident student body has been decreased, our 
faculty reduced, and our workers in the office brought under an 
almost unbearable load. 

In a word, we have come to the startling realization that we are 
fighting a war, and the battle that we here are waging — the battle 
for food — is a crucial job: as vital in its own sphere as is the drive 
for tanks and planes and ships. Moreover, we here are engaged also 
in helping to train the technical army for this strategic farm front. In 
these strenuous efforts we need to draw upon all our resources, to 
utilize these resources in the most effective manner and to keep our 
eye on the ultimate goal, which is complete and total victory. To 
attain this objective we must be willing to sacrifice, for the present, 
many of our educational ideals. 

Facing Realities 

I can report to you with patriotic pride and satisfaction that the 
members of this little community of American citizens appreciate 
these facts and are attempting to adjust their lives accordingly. In 
normal times our faculty is expected to combine sound instruction 
with creditable production, and they do this with notable results. 
Today, however, the serious lack of manpower and the urgent 
demand for raw materials require that they be primarily laborers. 

* Resigned as of March 31, 19^3, to engage in educational reconstruction 
work for the Iranian goveimment. 

11 



Our training program presupposes that students are instructed as 
they work in fields and barns and, for the sake of balanced experi- 
ence, are rotated among the many farm jobs that are available here; 
but today these young men must work where the call of the harvest 
is most urgent, with little supervision and frequently long assign- 
ments to one routine job. Most of our students have the maturity, 
and the patriotism to welcome such sacrifice — to be glad, in fact, that 
they are in a school that is so vitally related to the war efi'ort. 

Where the farmer is tragically short of helpers, even among the 
members of his own family. The National Farm School is suffering 
from a 30 to 40 percent reduction in its resident student enrollment. 
In an institution that is organized to be operated largely by students 
as a definite part of its educational policy, the effects of such a reduc- 
tion can be easily imagined. One result, although quite understand- 
able, is not so readily perceived by the general public. Whereas, in 
a time like this, most schools can, if necessary, combine classes, 
reduce the staff and cut down the overhead to a point somewhat in 
line with the smaller enrollment, just the opposite is true at an insti- 
tution like ours. In order merely to maintain the plant on a produc- 
tive basis, the staif should be increased while the educational aspects 
of the program are, of necessity, considerably modified. 

Consumers Made Into Producers 

In spite of all these difficulties, we are daily achieving results in 
which we take considerable satisfaction. We are contributing in a 
large way to the wartime food and commodity needs of the country. 
In these days when the need of manpower is so critical, we are help- 
ing to meet the urgent demand for workers trained in agricultural 
production. In truth, we are making an unusual contribution to this 
important problem. This is due to the fact that our program is 
designed primarily for the boy from the city, and we are, therefore, 
transforming these youth from consumers of goods to producers of 
vital commodities. Finally, we are not merely preparing these young 
people for future usefulness in an essential industry, but, as a result 
of the system of instruction here employed, we are enabling them to 
produce on an extensive scale as an integral part of their training. 

A Record Production 

Last year good weather and hard work combined to give us the 
best harvest in years. It is still too far from the end of the present 
season to summarize accurately the results of this year's efforts. 
Weather conditions were not quite so favorable as last year. In the 
spring it was excessively dry; in the late summer and fall it was 
much too wet. This naturally had its unfavorable effect on early 
vegetables and certain of the fruit crops. But, good management 
and boundless energy have gone far to overcome this condition. The 
apple crop, the grape harvest and silage yields have been the best in 
many seasons. By the time our fiscal year comes to a close, the 
dairy and poultry departments will have contributed to our own and 
the nation's needs a record production. The achievements of our 

12 




(Above) 
The Isaac H. Silverman Gates 



(Below) 
A View of the Campus and 

Athletic Practice Field 




landscape department in training students and in producing plant 
materials are abundantly shown through the beautiful and appro- 
priate decorations of this room. 

Possibly some of you could understand better what this school 
means to the economy of the country if in place of generalized 
statements I were to give you a few figures. The Farm School pro- 
duced this last year: 

More than 800,000 pounds of milk. 4,000 bushels of apples. 

Some 10,000 bushels of potatoes. Over 600,000 eggs. 

750 tons of soybeans and sorghum. 2,800 baskets of peaches. 

Nearly 8,000 pounds of poultry meat. 

Most of these figures are for 1941, as the 1942 summaries are not 
yet available. We could go on with such figures, but these few will 
serve to indicate the kind of contribution we are making to the 
nation's food needs. 

Property Maintained 

The maintenance of our property always deserves special consid- 
eration in a report of this kind. For some years now we have been 
attempting to undo the damage resulting from a prolonged de- 
pression. It appeared finally that lean years were not to end for 
institutions of this kind. But buildings, property, and equipment 
must be kept up regardless. And so in our reports of recent years 
we have emphasized our achievements in this direction — machinery 
that has been repaired or replaced, barns that have been painted, 
buildings that have been renovated. 

About eighteen months ago, our Trustees vigorously implemented 
this trend by establishing improved maintenance as a definite policy 
of the Board and appropriating the funds necessary to achieve this 
objective. As a result, the barn at Schoenfield Farm No. 3, long In 
disrepair, was completely rebuilt. This farm has now become a place 
of beauty instead of presenting the disreputable appearance that it 
did for many years. In addition to this major project, scores of other 
repairs, not so easy to see, but no less important, were made possible 
by the decisive action of the Board. The same policy was applied not 
only to the replacement but to the repair of farm machinery. 

While these extensive repairs have required sizable appropria- 
tions, they represent in reality, improved assets rather than any 
further depletion of our already limited funds. If It becomes neces- 
sary, as It frequently does, to dispose of certain of our outside hold- 
ings in order to maintain properly this educational center, we can at 
least take satisfaction In the fact that Important buildings are pro- 
tected from deterioration, appearance enhanced, the program made 
more effective, the whole place greatly Improved, and our capital 
assets properly safeguarded. 

On the Educational Side 

Educationally speaking the Farm School has contributed much 
during the past twelve months to the war effort, to the development 
of youth and to rural progress in general. In March, a class of 54, one 

14 




"To Farm is to Arm" 



of the largest in the history of the School was sent out into the world 
to add to the ranks of trained agricultural workers. While many of 
these young men immediately enlisted in the armed forces there were 
some who were available to the agricultural industry at a time when 
there is much need for farm manpower. Furthermore, we succeeded 
in enrolling a freshman group of over fifty which, incidentally, was 
twice the size of the entering class of a year ago when high wages and 
the selective service law almost without warning, first swept from 
their feet the youth of this country. Only by the addition of a field 
worker and the effective efforts of that member of our staff were we 
able to achieve such results. For the sake of all that is involved in the 
successful operation of this important institution, we sincerely trust 
that we may do as well with the next incoming class. 

Evening Defense Course 

Merely because we had long specialized in boarding pupils and 
the shortage of such pupils seriously affects our traditional program, 
we sometimes overlook the fact that these young men are by no 
means the only students of The National Farm School. From last 
October to April, for five nights every week and three hours each 
night we operated a defense course in metal work and the repair of 
farm machinery. Fifty-eight out-of-school young men, and a few 
fathers, received training in this practical field while conserving old 
farm implements for further use in food production. This instruction 
was, undoubtedly, just as effective and certainly as valuable in many 
respects as our traditional daytime program. The day and evening 
courses combined gave us a total enrollment this past year of over 
180 which is the largest number of students receiving systematic 
training at The National Farm School in a number of years. 

War-time Adjustments 

We have made many adjustments during the past several months 
to conform to changing conditions. One-year training units to sup- 
plement the traditional three-year course were added; a summer 
work program was inaugurated to enable selected city boys not en- 
rolled as regular students to aid in food production while gaining 
valuable farm experience. As one means of supporting the effort of 
the public _ schools of New York City and of other metropolitan 
centers to induce high school boys to work on farms in summer, we 
offered to accept summer work on a farm as a substitute for our 
summer practice of the freshman year. Each of these measures added 
a few young men to our training program. However, the most popu- 
lar adjustment that was made to the demand of the times was the 
evening defense course we have already mentioned. 

Student Life 

It must be remembered that producing food, maintaining prop- 
erty and instructing students are by no means the only responsi- 
bilities of a practical farm school, even in time of war. There are 
niany other activities that make up the life of a community of this 
kind. There is for instance, the field of sports, and in this our 

16 



students have given a good account of themselves. Another is the 
band which has recently shown signs of rapid improvement as a 
result of student support, combined with good instruction. There 
are the weekly forums that contribute so much to clear thinking and 
accurate expression. Periodic dances are important items of our 
program. In addition to the regular swimming parties at Forrest 
Park, weekly movies were conducted throughout the summer eve- 
nings in our out-of-doors amphitheatre. As if all of these regular and 
extra curricular activities did not consume enough energy, the stud- 
ents, faculty, and a few friends of our immediate neighborhood con- 
tributed 119 pints of blood to the Red Cross blood bank. 

Departed Leaders 

In thinking back over the events of the year, we cannot forget 
two great leaders who have passed from our midst. In January, Her- 
bert D. Allman, long a trustee of The National Farm School, for 
many years its able president, and in latter years holding the title of 
honorary president, passed on to his well-earned reward. In Sep- 
tember, just a few days after returning from a 12,000 mile tour of 
the United States and Canada, Mr. Louis Schlesinger, a member of 
the Board of Trustees, chairman of the National Board of State 
Directors, and the School's leading ambassador of good-will, passed 
away. Mr. Schlesinger died quite suddenly and practically in 
harness, just as he would wish to have gone. No more fitting tribute 
could be paid to these two great men than to dedicate to them this 
beautiful affair of today. 

Role in War and in Victory 

In the long, hard days of reconstruction that must surely follow 
the present world conflict. The National Farm School will continue 
to play an important part in the economy of the country. When 
victory finally comes, as it surely will, and men return to normal life 
from belching factories and bloody battle fronts, it is to the soil that 
many will hurriedly go for a secure livelihood and a peacful mode of 
life. When the vast, devastated, scorched areas of Europe are again 
free to bloom, it will be the seeds of America that will supply the new 
life. When the poor starved slaves of Hitlerized Europe are again 
unshackled and made free to be nourished back to vitality, it will be 
the products of American soil that will be urgently needed. The farms 
of post-war days will be called upon to provide many of the products 
that now come from industrial sources. 

And so in this harvest season that lies between the ancient 
Succoth of Israel and the Thanksgiving Day of our Pilgrim fathers, 
we give thanks that we are permitted to play so vital a part in the 
needs of our fellowmen — in war and in peace. 



17 



/^•- 




FORTY-SECOND ANNUAL COMMENCEMENT 
EXERCISES 

March 22, 1942 

The Forty-second Annual Commencement of The National 
Farm School was held in the Louchheim Auditorium on Sun- 
day afternoon, March 22, 1942, in the presence of a large 
audience. Among the fifty-four graduates who received di- 
plomas were five young refugees from Nazi-dominated Euro- 
pean countries. One of the refugees, Peter Salm, who entered 
the School from New York City, was valedictorian of the class 
and Herman Wilensky, of Philadelphia, was salutatorian. 

The graduation address was delivered by Dr. Ernest 
L. Nixon, agricultural leader, author and lecturer. Henry 
Schmieder, professor of chemistry and botany, represented 
the faculty on the program. Rabbi Malcolm Stern, of Phil- 
adelphia, delivered the invocation and Reverend Enoch S. 
Moore, of Doylestown, Pa., gave the benediction. 

Diplomas and prizes were awarded as follows : 
Graduates in Dairying 

SEYMOUR M. ADLER New York City, N. Y. 

JACK ALSON New York City, N. Y. 

ABRAHAM DeLEON Philadelphia, Pa. 

CYRIL FARE Philadelphia, Pa. 

SHELDEN FELDMAN Chicago, 111. 

RICHARD KENNETH GUDYKUNST Reading, Pa. 

J. KENNETH KINCAID Philadelphia, Pa. 

LAWRENCE KLEINMAN Bronx, N. Y. 

♦ROBERT WILLIAM LEBER Philadelphia, Pa. 

RUDOLPH J. LOEWENSTEIN New York City, N. Y. 

WILLIAM GEORGE LUTTERER Perkasie, Pa. 

ROBERT LEE NEESON Roslyn, Pa. 

MILTON ROZEMAN Birmingham, Ala. 

GRADUATES IN FLORICULTURE 

ERVIN BILSKY Philadelphia, Pa. 

ALBERT DAVID COHEN Philadelphia, Pa. 

*W. JOSEPH FRANK New York City, N. Y. 

GLENN DEWEY ROTHROCK Quakertown, Pa. 

MERRITT J. SCHULTHEIS Bethlehem, Pa. 

Graduates in General Agriculture 

*NORMAN WILLIAM GOURLEY Bloomfield, N. J. 

HYMAN LEO HANDLER Bronx, N. Y. 

♦JOSEPH SIDNEY NATHANSON New York City, N. Y. 

EUGENE RICH Montclair, N. J. 

*ROMUALD V. SCHUTSKY Philadelphia, Pa. 



*HONOR Students — These students according to averages of grades in 
class and practical work are in the top fifth of the class. 

19 



Graduates in Horticulture 

CHARLES BERNSTEIN Brooklyn. N. Y. 

HARRY H. COOGAN New York City, N. Y. 

♦LEONARD MARTIN DANSKY Bayonne, N. J. 

JOSHUA FELDSTEIN Chicago, III. 

ISIDORE FLAUM Bronx, N. Y. 

IRVING KAUFMAN Brooklyn, N. Y. 

MAX LEVINOWSKY Bronx, N. Y. 

WILLIAM OREL Boston, Mass. 

*PETER SALM New York City, N. Y. 

MILTON SAMOVITZ Detroit, Mich. 

♦WALTER YANIAK Merchantville, N. J. 

Graduates in Landscape Gardening 

CHARLES BROOKS Glenloch, Pa. 

♦LOUIS DOMSKY Philadelphia, Pa. 

PHILIP PRIEMAZON Brooklyn, N. Y. 

♦HERMAN WILENSKY Philadelphia, Pa. 

JAY DONALD WOLFE Reading. Pa. 

Graduates in Poultry Husbandry 

HAROLD L. BEDICK North Bergen, N. J. 

NORMAN SUMNER BERKOVITZ Brookline, Mass. 

HAROLD BRAUER North Bergen, N. J. 

JOSEPH CH WICK Brooklyn. N. Y. 

IRWIN DAVID COHEN Riverside, N. J. 

JOSEPH FOWLER Aldan, Pa. 

RUDOLPH BERNARD FOX St. Louis, Mo. 

DAVID GARBER Atlanta, Ga. 

GEORGE KAISER Elmsford, N. Y. 

LEWIS POLAKOFF Atlantic City, N. J. 

DAVID ROSENFIELD Brooklyn, N. Y. 

MORTON SHAPIRO Philadelphia, Pa. 

ROBERT WEINTRAUB Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Post Graduate in Horticulture 

KURT NATHAN Binghamton, N. Y. 

*Honor Students — These students according to averages of grades in 
class and practical work are in the top fifth of the class. 

PRIZE AWARDS 

Highest Scholastic Attainment Peter Salm 

Highest Marks in Supervised Practice W. Joseph Frank 

Most conscientious and consistent effort and progress among refugee 

students W. Joseph Frank 

Dairy Prize — Most capable and efficient Senior in Dairying. . Cyril Farb 
Farm Machinery Prize — Most capable and efficient Senior in Farm 

Machinery work Robert Wm. Leber 

Floriculture Prize — Most capable and efficient Senior in Floriculture 

work W. Joseph Frank 

General Agriculture Prize — Most capable and efficient Senior in General 

Agriculture Norman Wm. Gourley 

Horticulture Prize — Most capable and efficient Senior in Hoi'ticulture, 

Walter Yaniak 
Landscape Prize — Most capable and efficient Senior in Landscape work, 

Louis Domsky 
Poultry Prize — Most capable and efficient Senior in Poultry work, 

Moi'ton Shapiro 

A number of other prizes are distributed each year, but these are 
given out more informally in student assembly. 

20 




A Section of the Carpentry Shop, 

Where, by Actually Building and Repairing Various Items Used 

ON THE School Farms, Students Acquire Some of the Many 

Skills They Will Need to Know 



FORTY-THIRD 
ANNUAL COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 

March 21, 1943 

A class of twenty-two students was graduated at the 
Forty-third Annual Commencement Exercises of The National 
Farm School, held on Sunday, March 21, 1943, in the Louch- 
heim Auditorium on the School campus. This class had felt 
the full impact of war conditions and, as a result, its numbers 
had been considerably reduced during its three-year stay at 
the School. 

Dr. John A. Lester, of Doylestown, Pa., executive secre- 
tary of the Friends Council of Education, delivered the Grad- 
uation Address. Dr. Lester laid stress upon the importance 
of each of the graduates informing himself about what is 
necessary to plan for a permanent peace. He declared "The 
very nature of the existence of our schools in America today 
depends upon planning for an enduring peace to come." He 
urged the graduates to remain in agriculture to help win the 
war and the peace afterward. 

In his address to the graduates, prior to presenting the 
diplomas. Dr. H. B. Allen, president of the School, said to 
them : "We now come to the real point of this program. Our 
purpose from the moment we assembled here was to do honor 
to you, to send you out from this place with all of the inspira- 
tion we might be able to give to each one of you as our final 
contribution to your training at Farm School in mind and 
character. This year we can well consider our farewell 
thoughts together. For I, too, am taking leave of Farm School 
at the end of the same period of time as some of you — three 
years of undergraduate study, let us say, and one year of 
postgraduate training. In that period of time we have caught, 
I hope, the spirit of idealism of the founder of the School. 
We have tried to carry a few steps upward and onward the 
message of love, hope, creative effort and human tolerance 
which was bequeathed to this School by Doctor Krauskopf." 

LeRoy W. Ingham, professor in charge of the animal hus- 
bandry department, represented the faculty on the program. 
C. Milton Eder, of Green Lane, Pa., was salutatorian and 
Abraham Cohen, of Philadelphia, was valedictorian. 

22 



Prizes were awarded to Abraham Cohen for highest scho- 
lastic attainment and for work in horticulture ; to C. Milton 
Eder for highest marks in supervised practice and for work 
in general agriculture; to Otmar Silberstein, as the outstand- 
ing refugee student of the class ; to Uriel H. Schoenbach for 
work in dairying ; to Benjamin Goldpaint for greenhouse 
work; to Otto L. Stein, in farm machinery; to John R. Mollick 
for work in horticulture ; to James R. Charlesworth for land- 
scape gardening; and to Paul Schwartz for work in poultry 
husbandry. 

Diplomas for completion of the three-year course and cer- 
tificates for post-graduate work were awarded as follows : 

GRADUATES IN THE THREE-YEAR COURSE 

Animal Husbandry and Dairying 

KURT WOLFGANG LOSER New York City, N. Y. 

WILLIAM NICKEL, JR Dunellen, N. J. 

URIEL H. SCHOENBACH . .New York City, N. Y. 

GEORGE WINDHOLZ Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Horticulture 

♦ABRAHAM COHEN Philadelphia, Pa. 

GERALD D. GROFF Sellersville, Pa. 

JOHN HELLER Vineland, N. J. 

JOHN R. MOLLICK Philadelphia, Pa. 

HARRY PAUL Atlantic City, N. J. 

*OTMAR SILBERSTEIN Bayside, N. Y. 

Poultry Husbandry 

JOHN ALLEN EVANS Gwynedd Valley, Pa. 

LEON GOLDFARB Liberty, N. Y. 

THOMAS HENDRICKS Philadelphia, Pa. 

ALBERT G. ORNER Brooklyn, N. Y. 

MURRAY RESNIK Bronx, N. Y. 

PAUL SCHWARTZ Columbia, S. C. 

General Agriculture 

*C. MILTON EDER Green Lane, Pa. 

♦MORRIS LIPELES Caledonia, Wis. 

♦OTTO LUD WIG STEIN Yonkers, N. Y. 

Floriculture 

BENJAMIN GOLDPAINT Philadelphia, Pa. 

LANDSCAPE Gardening 

JAMES R. CHARLESWORTH Hanoverton, Ohio 

HERBERT CLAYTON W EISER Brooklyn, N. Y. 

POST GRADUATES 

Farm Machinery 

JOSHUA FELDSTEIN Chicago, 111. 

Floriculture 

W. JOSEPH FRANK New York City, N. Y. 

HERMAN WILENSKY Philadelphia, Pa. 

Animal Husbandry and Dairying 

J. KENNETH KINCAID Philadelphia, Pa. 

One- Year Student in Poultry 

EDWARD STAHURSKI Plains, Pa. 

*Honor Students — These students according to averages of grades in 
class and practical loork are in the top fifth of the class. 

23 



FOUNDERS DAY 
AND TREE DEDICATION EXERCISES 

SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 1942 

Founders Day, marking the forty-sixth anniversary of the 
establishment of The National Farm School by the late Rabbi 
Joseph Krauskopf, was celebrated on Sunday, June 7, 1942. 
The ceremonies were held on the picturesque campus in an 
improvised outdoor amphitheater. The traditionally fine 
"Krauskopf weather" prevailed, though the drastic restric- 
tions which the war situation had placed upon the use of 
automobiles considerably reduced the customary large num- 
bers which usually attend these exercises. 

James Marshall, president of the New York City Board of 
Education, delivered the Founders Day address, in which he 
made this significant observation: "One of the most notable 
truths to emerge from our present war program is that every 
economical segment of our nation can and must play its part. 
The role of the farmer is of transcendent importance. The 
fall of Bataan and Corregidor proved once again that without 
food men cannot fight. It cannot be too often repeated that 
food will win the war and write the peace. I regard the work 
of The National Farm School, which each year produces a 
squadron of young men fully equipped to man the food pro- 
duction line, as an important contribution to victory." 

Dr. Isaac Landman, of the Garfield Place Temple, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., editor of the Jewish Encyclopaedia, was on the 
program for the traditional tribute to the work of the founder 
of the School, as well as to pay a eulogy to the late Herbert 
D. Allman, benefactor and former president, who had passed 
away recently. Dr. Landman spoke intimately and from per- 
sonal knowledge and friendship of the fine qualities of these 
two leaders; "the one the founder and first president; the 
other the builder and second president, whose vision and de- 
voted service had been responsible for much of the Farm 

25 



School's transition from simple beginnings to its present fine 
physical and educational standing." 

Dr. Cornelius Weygandt, professor of English at the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, lecturer and author, was in charge 
of the dedication of the Festive and Memorial Trees. More 
than seventy such trees had been planted during the year in 
honor of joyous occasions and in memory of departed persons. 
Prominent among those for whom trees were named, in addi- 
tion to the tree for former President Allman, were two for 
former students who lost their lives in the armed forces. 
These were Corporal Theodore Lewis, who was killed in action 
at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, and Corporal Alfred 
Savino who was killed while in training shortly after his 
enlistment.'"' 

The student body was represented on the program by 
Otmar Silberstein '43, of New York City. Rabbi Joseph Klein, 
of Philadelphia, offered the invocation and the closing bene- 
diction was pronounced by Reverend John F. Fogarty, of 
Doylestown, Pa. Stanley H. Hinlein, of Philadelphia, member 
of the Board of Trustees and Chairman of the Founders Day 
Committee, presided. 

Starting from the Krauskopf Library on the campus, hay- 
ride educational tours, under the guidance of members of the 
faculty, were conducted over the entire farms, visiting the 
poultry department, the dairy barns, greenhouses, orchards 
and other places of interest on the over one thousand acres 
under cultivation by the School. Guides stationed at the 
speakers' stand directed visitors to the various buildings and 
departments, which were open for inspection throughout the 
day, and to the Memorial and Festive Trees.* 

Music for the occasion was furnished by the student band, 
under the direction of Lieutenant Joseph Frankel, of Phil- 
adelphia, bandmaster and musical instructor. 



* Complete list of those for whom trees were dedicated is published 
on page 33. 



26 





(Upper Left) 
Preparing for a Day's Work 

(Upper Right) 
A Section of the Apiary 



(At Bottom) 

The Abraham Erlanger Barns and 

Nathan Straus Dairies 



-^ ,JS- 




HARVEST FESTIVAL AND 
FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL MEETING 

OCTOBER 17-18, 1942 

Farm training for war production was the keynote sounded 
at the 1942 Harvest Festival and Forty-fifth Annual Meeting 
of The National Farm School held at Farm School, Pennsyl- 
vania, Saturday and Sunday, October 17 and 18, 1942. 

Educational and competitive exhibits were opened on Sat- 
urday morning and the two-day harvest festival was brought 
to a close with appropriate exercises, held at 2:30 on Sunday 
afternoon, in the Louchheim Auditorium. The Honorable 
Howard I. James, Bucks County Senator, was patron of the 
two-day celebration. Dr. Louis Nusbaum, Vice-President of 
the School, Associate Superintendent of Philadelphia Public 
Schools, presided. 

The principal address was given by Dr. Wheeler McMillen, 
editor-in-chief of the Farm Journal and outstanding American 
leader in chemurgy. Dr. McMillen pointed out that the world's 
post-war prosperity depends on whether the people's earned 
buying power can be raised to the level of their consuming 
capacity. He asserted that the consuming power of this coun- 
try has never been approached. 

Dr. H. B. Allen submitted the annual report of the Presi- 
dent which included a digest of the reports of each individual 
department. He directed the attention of the audience to the 
fact that these reports are bound together and filed in the 
Library for the benefit of those who are sufficiently interested 
to read them. 

Jerry Groff '43, of Sellersville, Pa., a member of the stu- 
dent council, represented the student body on the program. 
Rabbi Malcolm Stern, of Philadelphia, delivered the prayer at 
the opening of the session. 

Manfred R. Krauskopf, of Philadelphia, presented the re- 
port of the Nominating Committee in connection with the f orty- 

28 



fifth annual meeting of the School which formed a part of the 
Harvest Festival Exercises. The following trustees were re- 
elected for a term of three years : Edwin B. Elson, New York 
City; William F. Fretz, Doylestown, Pa.; Dr. S. S. Greenbaum, 
Benjamin Goldberg, Dr. A. Spencer Kaufman, Theodore G. 
Rich, Nathan J. Snellenburg and Edwin H. Weil, of Philadel- 
phia. Dr. Leon Solis-Cohen, of Philadelphia, was elected an 
honorary trustee in consideration of the completion of ten 
years of service on the Board. Morris R. Blackman, of Phil- 
adelphia, was elected to the Board as a representative of the 
Alumni Association. 

A special feature of the Harvest Festival was the active 
co-operation of Bucks County agencies interested in rural 
progress. Organizations such as the Grange, 4-H Clubs, Rural 
Scouts, Future Farmers of America, Defense Council and 
others participated. The exhibits of these various groups were 
not competitive but were arranged purely to promote the 
interests of agriculture and rural life and to represent the 
activities of each individual agency. 

The Farm School educational exhibits were arranged by 
the department heads with the assistance of the students and 
served to emphasize certain principles that are taught in the 
various classes. As a further incentive to students and as a 
means of promoting their agricultural training, competitive 
exhibits were put on by the students themselves. Selections 
of fruits, vegetables, farm crops and animals were made by 
the students and the exhibits that resulted from these selec- 
tions were judged by competent experts. 

The animal exhibits were staged in a tent on the campus. 
Farm machinery exhibits were housed in the farm machinery 
building, where poultry exhibits were also on display. All 
other exhibits were shown in the Louchheim Auditorium. 
After announcement of exhibit awards, the exercises came to 
a close with the singing of the national anthem by the entire 
audience, accompanied by the student band. 

The two-day program was dedicated to the late Herbert 
D. Allman, of Philadelphia, and the late Louis Schlesinger, 
of Newark, N. J., leaders in the work of the School for many 
years, both of whom had passed away since the last annual 
meeting. 

29 




(Above) 

Allman Administration and 

Farm Mechanics Building 



(Below) 

ROSETTA ULMAN DORMITORIES 




MEMORIAL RESOLUTIONS 
On the Death of Louis Schlesinger 

Adopted by the Board of Trustees of The National Farm School 
September 2U, 19U2 

It is with deep regret that the Board of Trustees of The 
National Farm School notes the death of 

LOUIS SCHLESINGER 

on September 15, 1942. For twenty-five years Mr. Schlesinger 
has been a member of the Board and Chairman of the National 
Board of State Directors of the School. His membership in the 
Board was not honorary nor perfunctory. His interest in the 
School was intense, active, and constructive. He never missed a 
meeting of the Board when he could attend, and he often tra- 
velled many miles to be present and to contribute to the Board's 
deliberations. 

Of his many activities in behalf of the School his most 
important contribution was in his capacity of Chairman of the 
National Board. Quietly, unostentatiously but effectively, Mr. 
Schlesinger made The National Farm School known favorably 
in the most remote sections of the land. He sacrificed time, 
money, and personal convenience to hold conferences and to keep 
appointments for the benefit of the School. 

Mr. Schlesinger's services to The National Farm School were 
only a small part of a busy life. He was a constructive leader 
in the real estate and insurance business in his native city of 
Newark and of the whole State of New Jersey. His communal 
activities included trusteeship in the Union of American Hebrew 
Congregations, treasurership of the Hebrew Benevolent Orphan 
Asylum Society, and a lifelong interest in the Jewish Children's 
Home of Newark. 

More than anything else, however, the members of the 
Board of Trustees of The National Farm School will miss Louis 
Schlesinger's kind and genial personality and his genuine friend- 
ships. There was a sincerity and a heartiness in his greeting, a 
warmth in his handshake, and a fine sense of humor in his most 
casual conversation. Our loss is that of a real friend. 

Resolved that the formal gardens on the School campus, 
where trees for Mr. Schlesinger and members of his family have 
previously been planted, be designated as the "Louis Schlesinger 
Gardens." 

Resolved, That the Board of Trustees of the National Farm 
School adopt this minute expressing its sense of loss in the 
passing of Louis Schlesinger, and that a copy be forwarded to 
his family. 

COMMITTEE: 

LEON MERZ 

HARRY B. HIRSH 

JOSEPH H. HAGEDORN 

MRS. JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF 

H. B. ALLEN 

LOUIS NUSBAUM, Chairman 



31 



IN MEMORIAM 
AMELIA M. ABRAHAMSON 

On February 11, 1943, Amelia M. Abrahamson 
passed from amongst us very suddenly. She had given 
loyal and devoted service to The National Farm School 
as field representative throughout the entire history of 
the School. 

Miss Abrahamson was instrumental in securing 
some of the School's first household furnishings and 
through the many years was responsible for a con- 
siderable portion of the School's support. 

Wherever she went, she served the School not only 
in the friends she made for the institution and the 
funds she secured for its maintenance, but in the dig- 
nity and standing she gave to the School by her own 
connection with it. 

Thes3 few brief words are introduced into the 
records of The National Farm School in recognition of 
her long and useful service and as an expression of 
our sorrow in the passing of this genial and lovable 
personality. 




Shrine 

IN THE 

Krauskopf 

Memorial 

Library 




TREE PLANTING 

AT THE 

NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

The National Farm School plants each year on its spacious 
acreage Memorial Trees for the departed and Festive Trees 
for joyous occasions, such as births, confirmations, gradua- 
tions, betrothals, weddings, anniversaries. This practice of 
tree-planting is in keeping with the custom established by the 
Founder many years ago. 

It serves two useful purposes : it offers a beautiful and 
fitting means of keeping green the memory of those persons 
or occasions we wish to perpetuate ; and at the same time of 
assisting in the financial support of the School as a tangible 
expression of affection for loved ones. 

At the Founders Day Exercises on Sunday, June 7, 1942, 
trees for which provision had been made during the year, 
were dedicated for the following: 

FESTIVE TREES 

Lois Goldstein, Philadelphia, Confirmation 

Albert M. Greenfield, Jr., Philadelphia, Confirmation 

Joseph L. Krauskopf, Philadelphia, Confirmation 



CALIFORNIA 
Beverly Hills 

Lew Fields 

Joseph M. (Joe) Weber 
GEORGIA 
Atlanta 

Louis H. Moss 
Augusta 

Julia Warner Simon 
INDIANA 
Tipton 

John Nash 

MARYLAND 
Baltimore 

Edward J. Bond, Jr. 

Rabbi Edward L. Israel 
MISSOURI 
St. Louis 

Hannah Auer 
NEW JERSEY 
Asbury Park 

Oscar L. Weingarten 
Atlantic City 

Michael A. Devine 
Belmar 

Marjorie King Rachlin 
Boonton 

George W. Morse 
East Orange 

Francis Lafferty 

Flora Kuhn Marx 

Fanny Negbauer 
Elberon 

Francis M. Rosenfeld 
Hoboken 

Herman Geismar 
Irvington 

Wm. H. Templeton 
Maplewood 

Theo. S. Fettinger 

Sidney Stein 



MEMORIAL TREES 

Newark 

Rachel Bierman 

Thos. F. Halpin 

Babetta Hammerschlag 

Nathan V. Hammerschlag 

Simon Heyman 

Edward W. Jackson 

Miriam Kohn 

Meyer Kraemer 

Nathan Lindeman 

Paul Lindeman 

Joseph May 

Helene S. Meyer 

Delia Walter 
Orange 

Jas. A. McGlynn 

John Martin Schreiber 
Paterson 

Etta Estelle Straus 
West Orange 

B. Leroy Sale 
South Orange 

Edward M. Waldron 

Jane Young 

NEW YORK 
New York City 

Carrie Altscheeler 
Benjamin Altscheeler 
Barney Altscheeler 
Fannie Altscheeler 
Paul Block 
Morris Gest 
Henry Lippmann 
Mrs. Milton B. Loeb 
Harry F. Louchheim 
Dr. Solomon Lowenstein 
Linda Lowenstein 
L. Simon Plaut 
Max L. Schallek 
Sol. M. Stroock 



Westbury 

Edna Garfield Duncan Miner 
Woodmere 

Benj. Lowenstein 
OHIO 
Cincinnati 

Flora M. Haas 

Jesse Levy 

Nanette E. Van Inwegen 
PENNSYLVANIA 
AUentown 

Jay M. Samuels 

Margaret S. Samuels 
Philadelphia 

Hazel S. Allman 

Herbert D. Allman 

Elizabeth Baylinson 

Gustave L. Blieden 

Katharine Epstein 

Cornelia Gans 

Jeannette Gans 

Julia Gans 

Moses Gans 

Clarence Hexter Goldsmith 

Paul Green 

Meyer Herman 

Cecile W. Jeitles 

Dr. Louis Jurist 

Morris Lang 

Corporal Theodore Lewis 

Abraham Rose 

Private Alfred Savino 

Helen J. Salus 
TENNESSEE 
Knoxville 

David Moskovitz 



33 



STUDENTS AND FACULTY RECEIVE AWARD FOR 
FOOD PRODUCTION 

On December 18, 1942, the students and faculty of The 
National Farm School, were awarded a "Certificate of Merit" 
by the National Farm and Home Hour and the Blue Network 
Company for outstanding food production. The award was 
made in a nation-wide broadcast with the following announce- 
ment: 

"The National Farm and Home Hour and the Blue Net- 
work Company pay tribute to a group of young people who 
are truly 'soldiers of the soil.' We salute today the students of 
The National Farm School, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. 

"When Secretary Wickard's call to increase production in 
the food for freedom campaign came to the students at The 
National Farm School, these boys responded wholeheartedly 
and with the student body reduced by enlistments and war 
industries from a normal enrollment of 160 to about 100 ; and 
an ordinarily small faculty still further limited for the same 
reasons, these patrotic workers produced this past year, with 
their own hands, on their 1,000-acre farm: 
Over 800,000 pounds of milk 
Over 600,000 eggs 

Nearly 8,000 pounds of poultry meat 
Just under 10,000 bushels of potatoes 
4,000 bushels of apples and other farm products 
on an extensive scale. 

"The National Farm School founded in 1896 was designed 
to give city boys a chance to obtain an agricultural education 
and these boys devote their time to practical agricultural train- 
ing. Not only have they done a splendid job of producing food 
but they have also made an effort to aid farmers in the com- 
munity wherever possible. 

"So, we pay tribute to The National Farm School, its 
faculty and students and we present to them this Certificate 
of Merit. With the future production of food in such able 
hands as those of the young men being trained in The National 
Farm School, the nation knows there will be food for America 
and our Allies. The Certificate of Merit is on its way to you 
and with it go the thanks of the entire nation and our fighting 
Allies. The Farm and Home Hour and the Blue Network salute 
you farmers of The National Farm School." 

35 




-^ 



'^ji^tmf 




(At Top) Breaking Ground for Demonstration Victory Garden on the Parkivay, in 

Philadelphia. Mayor Samuels of Philadelphia at the Plow. 
(At Bottom) A Section of the School's Poultry Plant Which Contributes Hundreds of 

Thousands of Eggs and Thousands of Pounds of Meat to the Nation's Food Needs. 



SPECIAL WAR-TIME ACTIVITIES OF THE 
NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

i^ In co-operation with the Farm Security Administration and 
the Pennsylvania State Department of Public Instruction, 
The National Farm School is helping to alleviate the serious 
farm labor shortage in the East by training contingents of 
farmers from unproductive areas from other sections of the 
country, to the conditions and practices of this region. The 
National Farm School is one of several institutions in the 
northeast selected as a training center for some of these 
workers. 

•^ Evening extension classes in farm machinery for out-of- 
school rural youth and for adults are conducted throughout 
the fall, winter and early spring. It is planned to extend this 
service to include all of the other fields of agriculture in which 
the School specializes. 

-^ In co-operation with the Pennsylvania Department of 
Labor and Industry, the School has, for several years, trained 
for rehabilitation a limited number of industrial casualties. 
Plans are now^ under way to extend this service to include 
training for rehabilitation of war casualties. 
•^ During the Easter vacation period, twenty-five high school 
boys received special training to equip them for leadership as 
farm helpers for summer work on farms. 
•^ A special summer course of two months' duration permits 
selected high school students, not enrolled as regular students, 
to aid in farm production while gaining valuable farm ex- 
perience. 

-^ The National Farm School is operating three demonstra- 
tion VICTORY GARDENS in Philadelphia and its environs. 
Competent student-gardeners are on hand to answer inquiries 
and assist the uninitiated. 

^ Faculty members are acting as consultants to Victory 
garden growers, giving lectures and displaying model exhibits 
at major department stores in Philadelphia and vicinity. 
^ A leaflet of "Practical Hints for Victory Gardeners," pre- 
pared by Professor David M. Purmell, Horticulturist of The 
National Farm School, was reproduced in lots of tens of 
thousands and made available to the public. 
^ Finally, The National Farm School is prepared at all times 
to adjust its program and extend its facilities to meet the 
shifting needs of the War for Victory. 

37 




WHERE 

CITY 

BOYS 

BECOME 

SUCCESSFUL 

FARMERS 



An opportunity for 
American Youth 



Few city boys ever think of farming for a life career. 
They may consider hundreds of different occupations, but 
rarely give any thought to agriculture, the most fundamental, 
especially in war time, of all vocations. 

The National Farm School has specialized for the past 
forty-seven years in this particular type of training and urges 
city boys to consider farming as a career. The School knows 
from experience that city boys make successful farmers ; that 
many who were never on a farm before they came to Farm 
School become practical and scientific farmers and follow that 
vocation successfully. 

There is an urgent call today for the kind of men that 
The National Farm School is able to turn out : men of vigor 
and character, trained to co-ordinate their hands with their 
heads. 

For the period of the war emergency and until further 
notice, the minimum age for admission has been reduced to 
sixteen years and the educational requirement to two or more 
years of high school training. Candidates for admission must 
be in sound health, of good character and indicate a sincere 
interest in rural life. 

The regular course of training requires three years. Special 
one-year courses are also offered. The school year operates 
from April to April. Students are admitted from April 1 to 
July 1. There is no tuition charge. Liberal maintenance 
scholarships are available. Incidental fees are nominal. 

Those interested are urged to visit the School for further 
information or to write for a catalog. 



38 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

FARM SCHOOL, BUCKS COUNTY, 
PENNSYLVANIA 

Membership of The National Farm School 
Date 



I, the undersigned, being in sympathy with the object of The National 
Farm School — the training of young men in the science and practice of 
agriculture — do hereby agree to subscribe as one of the maintainers of 

the institution the sum of dollars annually. 

Name 



Benefactor . . 


. $100 


Friend 


50 


Patron 


25 


Member . . . . 


10 


Supporter . . . 


5 



Address 

Make checks payable to The National Farm School 



Form of Legacy to The National Farm School 

"I give and bequeath unto The National Farm School, Bucks County, Pa., 

near DoylestoivTi, the sum of dollars 

free from all taxes to be paid to the Treasurer, for the time being, for the 
tise of the institution." 



Form of Devise 

ON REAL ESTATE OR GROUND RENT 

"/ give and devise unto The National Farm School, Bucks County, Pa., 
near Doylestown (here describe the property or ground rent), together with 
the appurtenances, in fee simple, and all policies of insurance covering said 
premises, whether fire, title or otherwise, free from all taxes." 



A donation or bequest of $10,000.00 will found a perpetual scholar- 
ship, the income from which will go far toward maintaining one student 
each year; such scholarship may bear the name of the donor or such names 
as the donor may designate. A donation of $900.00 will provide instruction, 
board and room of a student for one year (a twelve-month term) ; $2,700.00, 
for three years (thirty-six months) to graduation. 



Gifts to The National Farm School in Cash, War Bonds and 
War Savings Stamps Are Allowable Income Tax Deductions 



39 




THIS MAP SHOWS LOCATION OF SCHOOL AND HOW IT MAY BE 
REACHED BY AUTOMOBILE AND TRAIN 

(Reading Railroad trains, operating between Philadelphia and Doylestown, stop 
at Farm School station, directly on the grounds of the School.) 

40 



The publication of this Annual Report 
without cost to the School is made pos- 
sible by the contributions of generous 
friends, hereby acknowledged with the 
thanks of the President and Board of 
Trustees of the School. 



Now in our 

new daylight store 



where furs 

may be seen 

in their true beauty 



FURRIERS now 

unto the 

third generation 



T^fieo. 5. S'i4t^ 



FURS OF THE BETTER GRADE 



1710 WALNUT ST. 
PHILADELPHIA 



Accept this as a personal 




invitation to visit and 




shop in our air-co7idition- 


LANE BRYANT 


ed store . . . which serves 




as a setting for Lane 


Chestnut Corner 12th 


Bryant's old fashioned 


PHILADELPHIA 


friendliness. 




W. S. Chevallier 


The Women's Store for 


Manager 


Slenderizing Apparel 



Your Children Stand a Better Chance for Health in Shoes 
That Bear This Mark 




Made Just Like Costly Adult Shoes To Insure Finer Fit, 
Better Wear, More Attractive Appearance 

J. EDWARDS & COMPANY, Inc. 

314 NORTH TWELFTH STREET PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

STREET, LINDER & PROPERT 

. . . OPTICIANS . . . 

N. E. Cor. 20th and Chestnut Streets PHILADELPHIA 



Compliments of 



A FRIEND 



M. PHILLIPS L. PHILLIPS 

National Hair Cloth Co. 

Manufacturers of 

HAIR CLOTH AND SOFT-ROLL 
INTERLININGS 

1424 North Howard Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



New York Office: 215 Fourth Avenue, New York City 

THOS. HALTON^S SONS 

Jacquard Machines 

C and Clearfield Streets PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

HOFFNER RAYON COMPANY 

NATURAL — DYED — CONVERTED 
Skeins, Cones, Tubes, Cops, Spools, Reeling, Twisting 

Special Resists for Hosiery and Weaving Trades 

Belgrade and Ontario Streets PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

WM. MacINTOSH COMPANY 

Manufacturing Lithographers 

113-115 ERIE STREET CAMDEN, N. J. 



NICETOWN DYE WORKS 

Dyers of 

Yarns, Slubbing and Wool Raw Stock 

FRANKFORD - - - - PHILADELPHIA 

ESTABLISHED 1877 

BERGMAN KNITTING MILLS 

"BEACH MATE" "CLUB MATE" 

Bathing Suits Sweaters 

Pastorius and Osceola Streets Germantown, Philadelphia 

D. F. WATERS & SONS, Inc. 

Germantown Dye Works 

Dyers of 
WOOLEN AND WORSTED SKEIN YARNS 

53 and 55 Wister Street 
GERMANTOWN PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



NATHAN SCHWARTZ & SONS 



INCORPORATED 



54th and Poplar Streets 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



PHILADELPHIA WOOL SCOURING AND 
CARBONIZING COMPANY 

Glenwood and Castor Avenues 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

INDEPENDENT'S Standard FERTILIZERS 

Make a Good Farmer a Better One 
ANIMAL ORGANIC BASE 



Independent Manufacturing Co. 

Wheatsheaf Lane and Aramingo Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. 



SOAPS — OILS — FINISHES 

For All Textile Purposes 

Laurel Sanitary Cleaner 

For General Cleaning- 

Insecticides — Disinfectants — Sprays 
LAUREL SOAP MANUFACTURING CO., Inc. 

Wm. H. Bertolet's Sons 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



FRANKFORD TRUST COMPANY 

4400 Frankford Avenue 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



INTEREST PAID on Savings Accounts 

Insures Title to Real Estate 

" OVER 55 YEARS OF SUCCESSFUL BANKING " 

Member of the Philadelphia Clearing House Association 
Member of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



Penn Fruit Company 



Foods Sold with Sincerity " 



Philadelphia and Vicinity 



BURPEE'S 
SEEDS 
GROW 




Write for a Free Copy of Burpee's Annual 

The Leading Americafi Seed Catalog 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO. 

BURPEE BUILDING 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Compliments of 



UNITED STEEL 



BARREL CO. 



CEDAR, CYPRESS Established 1868 OREGON FIR, PINE, etc. 

AMOS H. HALL & SONS 

Manufacturers of 

Wood Tanks 



Office and Works: 
5500 N. Water Street Philadelphia, Pa. Phone: MICH. 9022 



Compliments 
. . . of . . . 



A FRIEND 



CHOICE 

SUBURBAN REALTY 

RENT or SALE 

W. T. B. Roberts & Son 

Open Every Day GLENSIDE (at Station), PA. 

J. HOWARD BROWN & CO. 



INSURANCE 

No. 328 Walnut Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



DOUGHERTY SEED GROWERS 

GROWERS and WHOLESALERS 



Northern Michigan Certified Petoskey Rural Russet Seed Potatoes 

Aroostook County, Maine, Certified Irish Cobbler Seed Potatoes 



WILLIAMSPORT, PENNA. 



Adelphia Automatic 
Sprinkler Company 

ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS 

Cor. Blabon and Ruffner Streets 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Telephone: RADclf 100 000 

7700 Capacity Per Day 

PAPER and 
CIGAR BOXES 

Drug, Cigar, Candy, Dental, Hosiery, Hardware, Stationery 

Miscellaneous 



YOUR NEEDS ANALYZED WITHOUT OBLIGATION 



GEORGE H. SNYDER, Inc. 

3631-47 North Smedley Street Philadelphia, Pa. 



BRANCH FACTORY: RED LION, PENNA. 



E. HUBSCHMAN & SONS 

MANUFACTURERS 

FINE CALF LEATHERS 

415 North Fourth Street Philadelphia, Pa. 

WM. F. DOUGHERTY & SONS, Inc. 

. . . Kitchen Equipment . . . 

1009 ARCH STREET PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



SAMUEL J. CRESSWELL 
Iron Works 

23rd and Cherry Streets PHILADELPHIA 

WALNUT 2277 , MAIN 5195 

JAMES CARNWATH CO. 

MANUFACTURERS 

WOOD PACKING BOXES — CRATES — BOX SHOOKS 
CABINET MAKING — WOOD SPECIALTIES 

613-615 Cherry Street Philadelphia 

REGENT 1828-1829 PARK 5566-5567 

Edward Matusow 

KEYSTONE WIPER & SUPPLY CO. 

1308-10-12 North Third Street PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



REGent 1796 PARK 2128 

JACOB I. MALSCHICK 
Scrap Battery Lead 

Storage Batteries for Scrap Only 
186 WEST BERKS STREET PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

JOHN P. KELLY 
BRASS FOUNDER 

Brass, Bronze and Aluminum Castings 

23rd and Westmoreland Streets PHILADELPHIA 

Mink Smelting and Refining Works 
Globe Rubber Products Corp. 



Bell: DELaware 1800-1801 Keystone: EAST 9802 

A. BERS & COMPANY 
Smelters — Refiners 

Lewis and Ashland Streets Frankford, Philadelphia 

WATSON & McDANIEL CO. 

Manufacturers of 
McDaniel Steam Traps and Watson Pressure Regulators 

N.W. Cor. Marshall and Noble Sts. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Gray's Ferry — Iron and Metals 



HARRY WILSON, 723 Chelten Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Allegheny Iron and Metal Co. 

Second and Clearfield Streets PHILADELPHIA 



SARATOGA 0889 WEST 1903 

Abrams Metal Company 

Scrap Iron METALS and Steel 

58th Street Below Woodland Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 



METALLURGICAL PRODUCT CO. 



DEWEY 5815 Established 1904 RACE 5169 

A. Perez & Son 

Dealers and — METALS — Smelters 

31st and Reed Streets PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Pennsylvania Smelting & Refining Co. 

Cottonwood Bottle Boxes Packing Boxes Milk Crates 

Treen Box Co., Inc. 
GOOD WOOD BOXES 

Tioga and Memphis Streets Philadelphia, Pa. 

S. D. Richman Sons 

IRON AND STEEL SCRAP 

926-28-30 North Fortieth Street PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

SAGamore 0830 PARK 3389 

Stave Brothers 

Dealers in Scrap Iron, Steel and Metals 

Office and Yard: 2210-30 W. Westmoreland St. Philadelphia, Pa. 

David Weber & Co. 

3500 Richmond Street, Philadelphia 

OFFICE PHONES RESIDENT PHONE 

NEBraska 2041 SARatoga 0456 

EAST 8978 

Raymond Kaplan 

MOTORS and MACHINERY 

East York and Cabot Streets Philadelphia, Pa. 



METRO SMELTING CO. 

ONTARIO and BATH STREETS 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Philadelphia Hide Corporation 
HIDE AND CALFSKIN DEALERS 

Ontario, East of Richmond Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

REGent 8887 PARK 2428 

Bauer Metal Company 

. . . METALS and RESIDUES . . . 

1116 Frankford Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. 

Established 1875 

Joseph Rosenthal's Sons, Inc. 
SMELTERS AND REFINERS 

190-192 West Berks Street Philadelphia, Pa. 

Joseph Berliner Company 

METALS 

Lewis below Ashland Street PHILADELPHIA 



Ladenson Metal Corporation 



Franklin Smelting & Refining Co. 

METALS — RESIDUES 

Castor Ave. (Formerly Erie Ave.), East of Richmond St., Philadelphia 

Telephones: 

NEBraska 2231-2232 
EAST 9809 

Richard C. Remmey Son Co. 

Hedley Street and Delaware River 
PHILADELPHIA 



FRANKLINSHIRE WORSTED MILLS 

BENJ. F. MILLER & SONS 



W. MESSINGER 



EDWARD JACOBS 



FRANK STRICK 

LIFE MEMBER 



S. RUDOFKER'S SONS 

N. E. Corner 22nd and Market Streets 

PHILADELPHIA 



S. MAKRANSKY & SONS 



H. DAROFF & SONS 

INCORPORATED 



LEE L ROBINSON 



HYMAN BRODSKY & SON CO. 



MR. and MRS. HERMAN D. STEEL 



JACOB SIEGEL COMPANY 



JOSEPH SPECTER 



A. H. HOFFMAN, Inc. 



JACOB H. BRODSKY 



BENJAMIN SWARTZ 



NANETTE MFG. CO. 



Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Liebman 



PHILIP L. SHEERR 
and Sons 



NATHAN BLOOM 



LEO C. COLEMAN 



ARTHUR BRODY 



J. R. GRUNDY 



The OLIVER H. BAIR CO. 



DAVID M. WEINER 



JONATHAN RING & CO. 



CHARLES TAXIN 



JACOB C. GUTMAN 



H. G. BLACK 



THE CAR-MOR METAL 
CO., Inc. 



FRANK WILL 



KAY SPORTSWEAR CO. 



JOSEPH W. LEBERMAN 



W. H. LEVY 



PERLOFF BROS. 



William D. Weimar 

Successor to WEIMAR BROTHERS 
Manufacturers of Tapes, Bindings and Narrow Fabrics 

2046-48 Amber Street PHILADELPHIA 

BERT — SCHNURER — CABANA 

West Point, Inc. 

1602 Hunting Park Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. 

Samson -Polay and Goodman, Inc. 

Superior Knitting Mills 

3747 Ridge Avenue PHILADELPHIA 

Markovitz Brothers 

321-323 Market Street Philadelphia, Pa. 

Jobbers in 

Hosiery and Underwear, Overalls, Work Shirts, Notions 

Sole Distributor of "Philmont" Union Suits for Men 

DAVenport 5700 Established 1859 

Charles Peberdy & Son 

Manufacturers of 

KNITTED OUTERWEAR 

East Penn Street Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Biberman Brothers 

Manufacturers of WASH DRESSES 

Fifteenth and Mt. Vernon Sts. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pincus Brothers, Inc. 
NORTHBROOKE CLOTHES 

232-248 N. Eleventh Street Philadelphia 

Quaker Pile Fabric Co. 

Second and Lippincott Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 

D. Seidmann's Sons, Inc. 

N.W. Cor. Tenth and Washington Avenue 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Howard 2100 — 2101 Main 5101 

Modern Cloth Sponging Co. 

Tenth Street and Washington Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Fertik & Company 

WASTE MATERIALS — SCRAP METALS 



Front and Venango Streets 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



Martyn Perez 

INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT 



313-15 North Third Street 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



"EVERY FOOT A SQUARE FOOT' 



Jacobs Bros. Lumber & Millwork Co. 



921-23-25 N. Fortieth St. BARing 4026 



PHILADELPHIA 



FULTON 4268 



MAIN 5150 



Max Bailis & Sons 

Ferrous SCRAP Non-Ferrous 

S. E. Cor. Water and McKean Streets Philadelphia, Pa. 



REG. 1600 



A-1 Industrial Equipment 



EAST 7339 



Manufacturers Representative 
EQUIPMENT FOR EVERY INDUSTRY — NEW and REBUILT 

M. LEESE 1202-22 Frankford Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Philip Solomon 

Successor to Jos. Albert & Son 

2100-02-04-06 Bolton Street (Off 21st and Ridge Ave.) 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



BENJ. SPECTOR 

FRUIT 

S.W. Corner 2nd and Dock Streets 
PHILADELPHIA 

H. LANDAU & CO. 

32 N. Third St., Phila., Pa. 

JOHN ELLIS 



Rynes & Freedman 

Wholesale Fruit and Produce 

117 Dock Street Philadelphia 



SAMUEL ZEITLIN'S SONS 



SAMUEL SHUMAN 



MENG'S SONS 



A FRIEND 



S. WOLF & SONS 

Wholesale Distributors of 

Floor Coverings and Window Shades 

1017 ARCH STREET PHILADELPHIA, PENNA. 

Keystone Phone: Main 4024, 4025, 4026 Bell Phone: Lombard 4423 

H. PERILSTEIN 

JOBBER IN 

Polished Plate and Window GLASS 

515 South Sixth St. PHILADELPHIA 524-32 Lombard St. 

Warehouse: 510-518 South Randolph Street 

VICTOR V. CLAD CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Food Service Equipment 

Full Line of Kitchen Utensils, China, Glass and Silverware 

117-119-121 SOUTH 11th STREET PHILADELPHIA 

Bell: Dewey 8600 Keystone: Main 2301 

Established 1893 

M. Krakovitz & Sons Co. 

GLASS 

1322 Washington Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 



ALLegheny 3333 WEST 2996 

The Magen Hardware Co. 

5219 Market Street, Philadelphia 

Wholesale Retail 

THE MOST COMPLETE HARDWARE STORE 

Phone Us Your Order Delivery Service 

GRAnite 3014-15 WEST 1757-58 

West. Phila. Electric Supply Co. 
SUPPLIES — LIGHTING FIXTURES — APPLIANCES 

6018-20 Market Street PHILADELPHIA 



Frank Kelly 

8115 Forest Avenue 

Telephone: Majestic 0369 ELKINS PARK 

The Hartman Company 
BOOK BINDERS and PRINTER'S FINISHERS 

FOLDERS PAMPHLETS 

521-527 Vine Street Philadelphia, Pa. 

Baugh & Sons Company 

Manufacturers and Importers 

ANIMAL FEEDS AND FERTILIZERS 

PHILADELPHIA 

George Nass & Son, Inc. 

Lumber and Millwork — Masonite Products 

Glen'wood Avenue and Dauphin Street Philadelphia, Pa. 

International Harvester Company 

of America, Inc. 

McCormick-Deering Tractors & Power Farming Equipment 

2905 North Sixteenth Street Philadelphia, Pa. 

MAURICE G. COHN, President SAMUEL L. COHN, Secretary-Treasurer 

Specialty Furniture Company 

Wholesale Furniture 

Bell Phone: Lombard 2036 242 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia 

Philadelphia Manufacturers 
Mutual Fire Insurance Co. 

800 Commercial Trust Building 
Fifteenth and Market Streets PHILADELPHIA 



Robert L. Latimer & Co. 

MILL, MINE, ELEVATOR, CONVEYOR and POWER 

TRANSMISSION MACHINERY and SUPPLIES 
24-26 North Front Street PHILADELPHIA 

FOR A GOOD SWEEPING COMPOUND 
Paxson Mfg. Co. 

1026 North Third Street PHILADELPHIA 

ESTABLISHED 1885 

Louis Blumberg^s Son 
SCRAP IRON — METALS 

240-56 West Allegheny Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. 



LEWIS D. GOLDSTEIN CO., Inc. 

WHOLESALE FRUIT and PRODUCE 

PRODUCE BUILDING 

S. W. Cor. Second and Dock Streets 

Telephone Connections PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

R. SIPPLE Bell Telephone: MARket 4117 

R. SIPPLE & COMPANY 

WHOLESALE COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

DRESSED POULTRY AND EGGS 



141 Callowhill Street 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



Lombard 8687 



Main 8871-8872 



L. RESNICK & SONS 

PAPER — BAGS 
BASKETS 

131 Dock St. 232 S. Front St. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



REGent 8600 



PARK 2313 



Cross Bros. 

BEEF — VEAL — LAMB 

Boneless Beef Cuts 

Abattoirs: 3600 N. FRONT STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 



SMITH BROS. 

Wholesale 

Commission Dealers 

SEAFOODS 

POULTRY GAME 

N. E. Corner Water and Dock Sts. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Bell Phone: Lombard 2503 — 2504 
Keystone: Main 2077 — 2078 



Bell, LOMbard 3395 Keystone, MAIN 3371 

SALER'S DAIRY STORES 

INC. 

Butter, Eggs and Cheese 

OFFICES 
39 S. Front St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Warehouse: 32-34-36-38 S. Water Street 



Bell: Jackson 2825 Keystone: Main 4856 

SOUTH PHILA. 
DRESSED BEEF CO., Inc. 

WHOLESALE SLAUGHTERERS 
Beef, Lamb, Veal and By-Products 

U. S. Government Inspection 
232-50 Moore Street Philadelphia, Pa. 

In Every Good Delicatessen Store Are 

Tongues That Speak for Us 

Bernard Pincus 

454 to 462 North American Street 
PHILADELPHIA 

Bell: Howard 1675 Keystone: Main 50S1 

DAVID AVERBACH 

Manufacturer of and Wholesale Dealer in 

BOLOGNA — SAUSAGES 
Pickled Tongues, Beef, etc. 

S.E. Cor. Moyamensing Ave. & Moore St. 
PHILADELPHIA 

Bell Phones : Lombard 3167 ; Lombard 5291 
Keystone Phone: Main 3488 

HILL'S SEA FOOD 

WHOLESALE 

OYSTERS — CLAMS — CRABS 
CRAB MEAT and SNAPPERS 

255-57 South Front Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Both Phones 

FRIEDMAN & BELACK 

Manufacturers and Wholesalers of 

Fine Provisions 

634-36 Washington Avenue 
PHILADELPHIA 

U. S. Government Inspected 



National Casket Company, Inc. 

The World's Largest Manufacturers of 

FUNERAL FURNISHINGS 
BRANCHES IN 30 PRINCIPAL AMERICAN CITIES 

Philadelphia Branch and Display Rooms 

1519-1521 Fairmount Avenue 

Send for a copy of "Funeral Facts Everyone Should Know" 



Established 1882 

Morris Rosenberg's Son 
MEMORIAL CHAPELS 

2009-2011 North Broad Street Phone — Bell: Stevenson 1644-1645 

(Licensed to Conduct Funerals in New Jersey) 

PHILADELPHIA 



Boyertown Burial Casket Company 

"COAST TO COAST" 
1211 to 1217 Arch Street Philadelphia, Pa. 

Asher & Son, Inc. 

UNDERTAKERS 

1309 North Broad Street, Philadelphia 

ALFRED R. GREENSTEIN, Sec'y-Treas. STEVENSON 3700-3701 



Benjamin Berschler 

FUNERAL DIRECTOR 



Bell: Lombard 6397 — 8647 730 Pine Street 

PHILADELPHIA 



Finney & Son 

Paramount Memorials, Monuments and Mausoleums 
Twelfth and Spring Garden Streets PHILADELPHIA 



MONEY for Mortgages 

Straight, Reducing or B. & L. with Insured Shares 

. . . QUICK SERVICE . . . 

HOWARD B. WILSON & CO. 

REALTORS 
3624 North Broad Street Philadelphia 



FORREST 



Quality for Over Half a Century 

Launderers 
Cleaners 
Oriental Rugs — Lace Curtains — Blankets — Pillow Sterilizing 

COLD STORAGE 
Atlantic City — Phila. — Ocean City — Camden and Suburban 

Phones: STE. 2100— PARK 4154 



When You Wish Any Electrical Work Installed or Repaired 

Call Up 

ALBERT GENTEL, Inc. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

1503 COLUMBIA AVENUE PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Bell Phone: STEvenson 3680 Keystone Phone: PARK 1194 

JAMES E. TAGUE & CO., Inc. 

Industrial LUMBER YARD Jobbing 

Ninth below Columbia Avenue PHILADELPHIA 

Bell: Stevenson 1780 — Keystone: Park 3376 Specializing in Rent Collection 

N. M. Diamond 
REAL ESTATE 

MORTGAGES — INSURANCE — NOTARY PUBLIC 

N. W. Cor. Twelfth and Girard Avenue PHILADELPHIA 



DEWey 5706 RACE 4261 

2318-20 Washington Avenue 

CENTRAL STOVE REPAIR 
and FOUNDRY CO. 

Stoves, Ranges & Furnace Repairs 

HOT AIR FURNACES AND BOILERS 

S. E. Corner 12th and Girard Ave. 

STEvenson 1724-1725 PARK 1076 



DIAMOND COAL & 
FUEL CO. 

1340 Belmont Avenue 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
Phone: Greenwood 4600 



Chas. A. Belz Co. 

Engrossers of 

Memorial Resolutions 

and Testimonials 

1711 Walnut Street 
PHILADELPHIA 



Zabel Bros. Co., Inc. 

Color Lithographers 

S.W. Cor. 5th St. & Columbia Ave. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



LOCust 1118 



West 2393 



Artcraft Venetian 
Blind Company 

Manufacturers 

Factory and Offices 

1540 Wood Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



BILT-RITE 

UPHOLSTERING COMPANY 

N. E. Cor. 68th and Woodland Avenue 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

LOMbard 3944-3945 MAIN 8133 

STAPLER'S 

SILKS — WOOLENS 

754 South Fourth Street 
408-10-14 Fitzwater Street 

PHILADELPHIA 



SPRuce 7157-58 RACE 0031 

Danzig & Bowers 

OFFICE SUPPLIES 

ENGRAVING 

PRINTING 

1625 Ranstead St. Philadelphia, Pa. 



CARPETS — RUGS 

WINDOW SHADES 

WILF BROS. 

Armstrong's Linoleum 

16 North 52nd Street 
PHILADELPHIA 

Other Stores: 619 MARKET STREET 
5435 GERMANTOWN AVENUE 

Meet Your Friends at 

ABRAM'S 
Hardwear Shoes 

Cancellations and Sample Shoes 

S. W. Cor. 55th Street and 

Haverford Avenue 
53 West Chelten Avenue 

GERMANTOWN 

S. MARGOLIS 

COAL 

Authorized Dealers 

KOPPERS Philadelphia COKE 

YARDS: 

815 Washington Avenue WALnut 2240 

3100 Germantown Avenue RADcliff 2422 

4800 Parkside Avenue TRInity 4500 

S. W. Cor. Eighth and Washington Ave. 

HOWard 2030 

D. SCHULTZ 

Incorporated 
Washable Wall Papers 

917-19 West Lehigh Avenue 
3163 Frankford Avenue 
5901-03 Market Street 

Main Store and Office 

521-525 South Fourth Street 
PHILADELPHIA 



RENT A NEW CAR OR TRUCK— DRIVE IT YOURSELF! 



NEWEST MODELS 
Plymouths Chevi-olets Open and Closed Trucks 



All Sizes 



MILESTONE SYSTEM 



Drive It Yourself 



1526 MARKET STREET 
SPRuce 3600 



1738 N. BROAD STREET 
FREmont 1738 



POP. 6950 RACE 3401 

HARRY KROUSE 

STUDEBAKER 
Sales and Service 

667 North Broad Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Bell: Keystone: 

SAGamore 6624 PARK 1493 

AUTO WRECKERS 

Here's Where Service Counts 

SHORTY'S AUTO PARTS 

HYMAN ASKIN — SAM GALINSKY 
PARTS for ALL MAKES of CARS 
Wrecks Our Specialty Service at All Times 

17th and Cambria Streets, Phila. 



PARK 3335-5880-1763 RADcliff 9516 

FOX AUTO PARTS 

PARTS FOR ALL CARS 

Wrecks Bought — Glass Installed 

N. E. Cor. Fox Street and 
Hunting Park Avenue 

J. TINKLE PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Bell: Regent 2032 Keystone: Park 3286 

PINOL MANUFACTURING 
CO., Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes and 
Specialties 

S. W. Cor. Hancock and Berks Sts. 

PHILADELPHIA 
Largest Buyers of Wrecked Automobiles 

RIDGE AUTO 

REPLACEMENT 

PARTS CO. 

Used and New Parts for All Cars 

PHILADELPHIA 
S.W. Cor. 29th and Clearfield Sts. 

Bell, RADcliff 4255 Keystone, PARK 2957 
Indiana and Hunting Park Aves. 

Bell, BALdwin .351.3 Keystone, PARK 1812 



Bell 
Market 8800-8801 



Keystone 
Main 9737 



Established 1874 

SHOYER'S 

FAMOUS RESTAURANT 

Catering- of All Kinds 

M. GALFUND, Prop. 
412 Arch Street Philadelphia 



Bennett Hall Apartments 



S.W. Cor. Camac Street and Lindley Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 



MAYER I. BLUM 



BELL PHONE 



BOOTH BOTTLING COMPANY, Inc. 
Booth's Pale Dry Ginger Ale 

Clearfield and Ruth Streets Philadelphia 



TILLES 

A Cosmopolitan Restaurant in 
The Heart of Philadelphia 

50c -60c DINNERS 

1110-12 Sansom Street 

Sea Food Steaks Sandwiches 



Those Who Know 
Always Sow 

yvVlCHELLS 

Seeds 

Jl8 Market St Phila- 

^ Write for Ca^talog- ^' 



MERCHANT'S PARCEL DELIVERY 

Established 1883 

Packages delivered to all parts of the City and over 150 Suburban Points in 

Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Area exceeding 300 square miles. 

1713-27 NORTH ST., PHILA., PA. Race 5359 

ROYAL PIONEER PAPER BOX MANUFACTURING CO. 

INC. 

1147 North Fourth Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

EST. 1900 

MORT COMPANY 

PLUMBING, HEATING and BUILDERS' SUPPLIES 

HARDWARE 

Fourth Street and Girard Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. 



A. J. NICK LAUNDRY CO. 



FRAIMAN 

HATBORO, PA. 



S. OSTERNECK & CO., Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

NEW BURLAP BAGS 
Importers of Burlap Dealers in Second-Hand Bags 

171-79 West Jefferson Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



DR. GEORGE T. HAYMAN 

HERNIA 

RECTAL DISEASES 

VARICOSE VEINS and ULCERS 

Office and Private Hospital: 

153 E. STATE ST., DOYLESTOWN, PA. 
Phone: Doylestown 4272 

Office: 

PHILA. SAVINGS FUND BUILDING 

12 S. Twelfth St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Phone: WALnut 48.50 



TERHUNE, YEREANCE & WOLFF, Inc. 

Selling Agents 
New York Life Bldg., New York 

Clear-Spring Worsted Mills 

Incorporated 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Textile Fabrics 
DOYLESTOWN, PENNA. 



George R. Beidler 

PERKASIE, PA. 



Compliments of 

Doylestown 
Inn . . . 

and 

Bucks County Inn 

GROFF & CARWITHEN 

Coal, Fuel Oil, Lumber, Building 

Materials — Millwork and Roofing 

Papec Machinery Caterpillar Tractor 

Electric Furnace-Man 

Bell Phone 4420 Doylestown, Pa. 



Sol Duchovnay 

CHALFONT, PA. 



DOYLESTOWN STEEL THRESHERS 




McCORMICK-DEERING FARM MACHINES 
BARN EQUIPMENT BEAN SPRAYERS 

SILOS INTERNATIONAL TRUCKS 

Doylestown Agricultural Company 

Established 1851 Doylestown, Pennsylvania 



SPECIAL BONELESS SHAD DINNERS 

THE FOUNTAIN HOUSE 

Ye OLDE INN (1748) GEORGE SLOTTER. Proprietor 



"First Quality Food" 



Bell Phone 393 



Main and State Streets, DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



Delco — BATTERIES — National 

PAUL B. MOVER 

AUTO ELECTRIC 
PARTS and SERVICE 

23 and 25 East Oakland Avenue 

Phone 4621 DOYLESTOWN, PA. 


SPORTING GOODS Bell Phone 4053 

Estimates Furnished 

CHARLES H. SHIVE 

HARDWARE 
Garden and Flower Seeds 

PAINTS — OILS — GLASS 

Main and State Streets Doylestown, Pa. 


SMITH'S SANITARY 
DAIRY COMPANY 


HISTAND BROTHERS 
Slate and Tin Roofing 


SMITH'S ICE CREAM 
Pasteurized Milk and Cream 

SWEET CREAM BUTTER 

Bell Phone 246 DOYLESTOWN, PA. 


Red, Green and Gray Asbestos 

Shingles 

Gutters and Spouting 

Phone 4121 Shop: 67-73 S. Hamilton St. 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 


Phone 261 

Leatherman &. Godshall 


Doylestown Laundry 


Choice Meats 


Phone 4245 


16 West State Street 
DOYLESTOWN, PA. 


DOYLESTOWN - - - PENNA. 


HERMAN F. VOSS 


I. ROD 



DR. WESLEY MASSINGER — Veterinarian 
CHALFONT, PENNSYLVANIA 



For Fun . . . FOREST PARK 

CHALFONT, PA. 

SWIMMING POOL — AMUSEMENTS — BOATING 

PICNIC GROUNDS 



Clymer's Department Store 

OUR SPECIALTIES: 

General Electric Refrigerators — Maytag Washing Machines 

Cabinet Heaters — Perfection Oil Stoves — Radios 

Hoover Electric Cleaners — Hoosier Kitchen Cabinets 

Bed Room, Dining Room and Living Room Furniture 

Bought in Carload Lots Doylestown, Pa. 

F. D. HartzeFs Sons 
Company 

Flour, Feed, Coal, Seeds, Fertilizer, 
Lumber and Builders' Supplies 

Chalfont, Pa., and Lansdale, Pa. 

Compliments of 

JAMES G. WEST 

MILK TRANSPORTATION 

Telephone: Buckingham 3117 FOREST GROVE, PA. 

Bell Phone 

JAMES B. FRETZ 

COAL, LUMBER and BUILDING MATERIALS 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. NEW BRITAIN, PA. 

Phone 276 

NYCE PLANING MILL COMPANY 

"Everything to Build Anything" 
Lumber, Millwork and Building Materials 

CONCRETE PRODUCTS AND PAINTS 
North Franklin Street DoylestoMrn, Pa. 



Complete Banking Service 

THE DOYLESTOWN NATIONAL BANK 
& TRUST COMPANY 

Doylestown, Pennsylvania 

1833 - - - - 1943 

W. C. Fleck & Bro., Inc. 

ESTABLISHED 1865 

HARDWARE 

Ogontz 72 — Maj. 2625 JENKINTOWN 

FRITZLYN FARMS 

Guernseys 
W. F. FRETZ 

PIPERSVILLE PENNA. 

THRIFT FEED MILL 

CUSTOM GRINDING AND MIXING 

DAIRY and POULTRY FEEDS 
Grain — Molasses — Fertilizer 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



AT YOUR SERVICE 



The FIRST NATIONAL BANK of Lansdale 



COMPLETE BANKING and TRUST SERVICE 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 



Bell Telephone 297 

LANSDALE ICE & STORAGE COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 

Distributors COOLERATOR "TOP-ICER" 

Requires Ice Once Only Every 4 to 7 Days 
Lansdale, Pa. Plants Perkasie, Pa. 



POOL & SON 



PANTALOON MANUFACTURERS 



LANSDALE, PA. 



Arcadia Hosiery Company 

LANSDALE, PA. 



H. L. DETWILER — Clothing Manufacturer 

Telford, Pennsylvania 

GLENSIDE WHOLESALE CO. 

CANDY — TOBACCO Glenside, Pa. 



Lansdale Consumer Discount Co. 



Loans up to $1,000.00 



11 N. Broad Street LANSDALE, PA. Phone 3318 

Interstate Hosiery Mills, Inc. 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y. 
CHICAGO, ILL. CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Plants at Bloomfield, N. J. — Lansdale, Pa. 

Compliments of 
The Keller Whilldin Pottery Company 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Standard Flower Pots, Azalea Pots, Bulb Pans, etc. 

Long Distance Phone 815 

NORTH WALES, PENNSYLVANIA 
Quakertown Clothing Mfg. Co. 

Tenth and Juniper Streets Quakertown, Penna. 

Willauer Machine Co. 

Manufacturers of QUAKERMADE Poultry Equipment 
QUAKERTOWN, PA. 



MORRIS T. WALTERS 

Wholesale Butcher 

MONTGOMERYVILLE, PA. 

Bell Phone: 3029, Lansdale 



. . Compliments of . . . 



J. A. Gardy Printing Co. 



• PRINTING 

• STATIONERY 

• ADVERTISING 



28 W. State Street Phone: 4369 
DOYLESTOWN, PA.