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Full text of "For Your Information: A Newsletter for the Faculty of USCS 1977-1980"

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in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



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Vol. IV, No. 1 



A Newsleifer For The Faculty Of USCS 



August 27, 1979 



I. Official Announcements 

GROUNDBREAKING ceremonies for the addition 
to the Hodge Center will be held on the 
east side of the building on Wednesday, 
September 5, at 12 noon. This $1 million 
project will add a large multi-purpose 
room, space for a central energy plant, 
and some badly needed physical education 
facilities to our campus. All faculty, 
staff and students are urged to attend. 

LATE REGISTRATION will continue through 
September 5. Because of a delay in the 
preparation of CAR materials, this date 
was changed from August 31 for the entire 
university system. 

ALL FACULTY should note the following 
important meetings: 

Monday, Sept. 10, Faculty Advisory 
Committee. All Chairpersons of stan- 
ding committees should meet in the 
Faculty Conference Room in the Adminis- 
tration Building at 12:15 p.m. 

Friday, Sept. 14, fall general faculty 
meeting, 12:15, Tukey Auditorium. 

Friday, Sept. 21, Faculty Senate 
meeting, 12:15, L269. 

FACULTY SECRETARY Michael Dressman has 
sent out a survey requesting information 
about faculty preferences for commitee 
assignments. If you have not received 
your copy of this survey by August 31, 
please ask your school secretary for one. 
Surveys should be returned to Dr. Dress- 
man by Wednesday, Sept. 5. 

FYI resumes its weekly schedule with this 
issue. The newsletter appears each 
Monday morning. Any faculty or staff 
member may submit copy for FYT . These 
should be written to be published word 
for word and submitted to Information 
Services by 5 p.m. on the Thursday before 
publication. 



THE NEW EDITION of the Faculty Handbook 
is available from your school secretary. 
The new edition of the Faculty Manual 
will be available in about two weeks. 
Any faculty member who did not receive 
an advisement manual should contact 
Student Affairs . 

FACULTY INTERESTED IN PURSUING GRANTS 
should take special note of the form 
attached to this issue of FYI, and 
return the form to Dr. Jan Yost, 
Director of Development and Sponsored 
Projects. 

A GRANTS WORKSHOP will be held at USCS 
on Sept. 7 from 12:30 to 3 p.m. in 
Library 261. The workshop will be 
conducted by the staff of the Office of 
Research on the Columbia campus and will 
cover proposal preparation for a 
variety of sponsored projects such 
as equipment, travel, sabbaticals, 
training and research. 

FROM DOYLE BOGGS : Thanks to all faculty 
who have indicated willingness to help 
with the Speaker's Bureau this year. 
We would like more new faculty to parti- 
cipate, especially since participation 
constitutes community and university 
service for promotion and tenure pur- 
poses. A form for joining the leaker's 
Sureau was distributed at the general 
faculty meeting, but if you missed it, 
please feel free to contact information 
services by telephone at extension 210. 



OVER 



FROM RIVERS HALL, DIRECTOR OF PHYSICAL 
PLANT: Effective August 15, the 
Custodial Division was forced to dis- 
continue maid service for social 
functions on campus. Those respon- 
sible for the functions will be 
asked to furnish their own service. 
Manual work such as the placement of 
tables and chairs is still a service 
of the Physical Plant office, and 
should be requested by work order 
several days prior to the event. 

The coffee pot may be signed out 
through MaryJohnson, a housekeeping 
supervisor at extension 439. 

II. Bulletin Board 

THE CONVOCATIONS §CHEDULE for this fall 
includes Judge Ed Cowart, who will be 
here on September 24 to discuss "Media 
in the Classroom," and Dr. Robert 
Theobald, who will speak on Future 
Lifestyles. On April 24, 1980, 
George Plimpton will speak on the 
"Future of Amateur Sports." Negotiations 
are underway to bring Dr. Ernest Boyer to 
the campus for the Founders' Day address 
on Feb. 18, and CBS news correspondent 
Ed Bradley will likely be with us in 
January . 

DR. ROBERT ELMORE, a recent addition to 
the political science faculty, will 
present a paper on the Urban Crisis to 
the Army War College this year. 

use-Lancaster will begin an experiment this 
semester with a four day class week, 
reserving Fridays for special classes, 
lab sections, faculty conferences and 
research. 

The use-Columbia Cultural Affairs Series 
this year features Hal Holbrook in "Mark 
Twain Tonight," the Atlanta Contemporary 
Dance Company, Count Basie, the Ohio Ballet, 
and the Charlotte Symphony Orchestra, 
More information is available from Rich 
Singer at 7130 on the Columbia campus. 





FROM: Jan Yost 


Director for Development & Sponsored Projects 
(Administration Bldg . , rm. 202) 


SO 

h 


TO: All faculty 


SUBJECT: Grant Opportunities 




I would like to update my files so that I may better disseminate grant 
ijnformation to you. If you are interested in learning about grant oppor- 
tunities, please fill in the bottom of this form and return it to me. 




Thank you. 




NAME: 







My area/s of specialization and/ or interests are: 



uses— -THIS WEEK 

Monday, August 27 - Sunday, September 2 

Monday, August 28, 1979 

8:00 a.m. — Fall Classes Begin. 

9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. — Student Teaching Seminar . Tukey Lecture Theatre. For 
more information contact Bill Reitmeier, extension 379. 



No activities scheduled for Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday. 



Friday, August 31, 1979 

6:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. — SAT Tests. Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more information 
contact Bob Addleton, extension 412. 

Late registration continues through September 5. 



No activities scheduled for Saturday or Sunday. 







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Vol. IV, No. 2 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS 



September 4, 1979 



I. Official Announcements 

GROUNDBREAKING CEREMONIES for the addition 
to the Hodge Center will be held on the 
east side of the building on Wednesday, 
September 5, at 12 noon. This $1 million 
project will add a large multi-purpose 
room, space for a central energy plant, 
and some badly needed physical education 
facilities to our campus. All faculty, staff 
and students are urged to attend. 

LATE REGISTRATION will continue through 
September 5. Registration hours will be 
from 10-12 noon and from 4-5:00 p.m. 

ALL FACULTY MEMBERS who wish to use the 
batch and/or VSPC computer systems in 
their classes should contact Raj? Ayers in 
Columbia (6015) for account numbers. If 
questions or problems arise, please call 
Andy Crosland (404), Chairperson of the 
uses Computer Services Committee. 

FROM STUDENT AFFAIRS, to All Student 
Organizations: The outdoor message board 
in front of the Hodge Center is now 
available to be used for announcements. So 
that all campus organizations may have an 
opportunity to use the board, each organi- 
zation will be required to fill out the 
outdoor message board form in the Student 
Activities Office. You are asked to com- 
plete this form as soon as possible as 
announcements will be listed on a first 
come first serve basis. The Student 
Activities Office will be responsible 
for decisions of priorities when there 
are more announcements than room. 

THERE WILL BE AN Art Exhibit Opening on 
Sept. 9 from 2:30-3:30 in the Library Art 
Gallery. The exhibit will feature three 
dimensional art, sculpture and mobiles 
by USCS students. Faculty and staff are 
urged to attend and to announce to classes 
and friends. The art exhibit will be 
open through Sept. 29. 



A GRANTS WORKSHOP will be held at USCS on 
Sept. 7 from 12:30 to 3:00 p.m. in Library 
room 261. The workshop will be conducted by, 
the staff of the Office of Research on the 
Columbia campu,s and will cover proposal 
preparation for" a variety of sponsored pro- 
jects such as equipment, travel, sabbaticals, 
training, and research. Persons planning to 
attend the workshop are requested to contact 
Jan Yost (ext. 203) by Sept. 4 so that 
sufficient participation can be assured. 

II. Bulletin Board 

SPEAKERS WANTED: The South Carolina ConsortJum 
for International Studies (SCCIS) , is a 
recently-formed consortium of fourteen South 
Carolina colleges and universities' interested 
in, among other objectives, "developing 
global perspectives and wider croiss cultural 
understanding and stimulating wider interest 
in international studies both within the 
academic community and the comiaunity at 
large." USCS is a member, SCCIS. is attempting 
to organize a speakers' bureau for member 
institutions, utilizing those faculty of 
member institutions able to speak on inter- 
national or "area studies" topics. Meals and 
lodging will be provided as necessary and 
transportation will" be paid at 18c per mile 
if you drive. This provides an excellent 
opportunity to lengthen your vita by speaking 
at other institutions of higher learning in 
the state. SCCIS is interested in both 
scholarly lectures suitable for advanced stu- 
dents and faculty as well as presentations 
suitable for a more general academic audience,. 
For the form to be filled out or for further 
information about the speakers '' bureau or 
about SCCIS, contact Jim Brown, Ext. 396. 

THE ANNUAL FACULTY-STAFF beach camping trip 
to Hunting Island will be the weekend of Oct. 
7 (rain date: Oct. 14). If you're interested 
in more information, see Nancy Moore (L248, 
ext. 408) or Lawrence Moore (A317, ext. 255). 



SAVE 4C PER GALLON on gasoline every time 
you buy this semester at an EXXON station 
within one mile of campus. Buy a coupon 
book in the Student Affairs Office for 
$8. Other coupons include discounts at 
restaurants, clothing stores, and 
specialty shops. You could save over 
$100 this semester. Coupons available to 
students, faculty, and staff only. 

THE PIEDMONT AUDUBON SOCIETY OF SPARTANBURG 
and The National Audubon Society will pre- 
sent a series of Wildlife Films this year. 
These include "Designs for Survival" by 
William A. Anderson - September 14, 1979; 
"Song of the Northern Prairie" by Allen 
King - December 1, 1979; "Northwest 
Adventure" and "Adventures in Penn's 
woods" by Tom Diez - February 1, 1980; 
"Wilderness Trek through New Zealand" by 
Grant Foster - March 14, 1980 and "Bird 
Islands of the North Atlantic" by Stephen 
Kress - April 9, 1980. A season ticket 
is $8.75 or tickets can be obtained at 
the door for $2.00. Additional informa- 
tion and tickets can be obtained from 
Dr. Jack Turner, ext. 262, Science Division. 
All- the films will be presented at 
Carmichael Hall, Converse College. 

ALL uses CO>L^IUNITY: A limited number of 
football tickets are available in the 
student Affairs Office for USC home games. 
They will be sold only to USCS students, 
faculty, and staff on a first come basis 
with a limit of two per person with an 
ID or validated Treasurer's Fee Receipt. 
Seats are located in Section 28 of the 
end zone. Tickets may be purchased in 
books for all seven home games at $45, in 
books for the remaining games, or they 
may be purchased individually for $7.00 
each beginning the Monday after each home 
game. Regular prices are $63.00 per book 
and $9.00 per game. Contact the Student 
Affairs Office for further information on 
Game dates and Sales information. 

REPAIRS TO THE HODGE CENTER will be com- 
pleted on Wednesday, Sept. 5 and students, 
faculty and staff wishing to use the gym 
may do so beginning Sept. 6. People are 
reminded that any programs to be held in 
the gym are to be scheduled through the 
Student Affairs Office to avoid conflicts 
with the athletic and physical education 
schedule. 



FROM THE PROMOTION AND TENURE COMMITTEE comes an official notice. 

ALL MEMBERS OF THE USCS FACULTY - According to the USCS Faculty Handbook . 1-7, you are 
hereby notified that it is the time to decide if you wish to be considered during this 
academic year for promotion and/or tenure. Please detach and mark the form below 
indicating your wishes, sign you name to it, and return it to Elizabeth Davidson, 
chairperson for 1979-80. Those of you who wish to be considered for promotion or 
tenure or both have from now until October 31 to prepare your file for the committee's 
consideration. The files are located in Toni McKissick's file in the Administration 
Building. 



Notification form for the Promotion and Tenure Committee 

Faculty, please return your copy to Elizabeth Sikes Davidson, chairperson. 
For the academic year 1979-80, please mark two choices. 



I wish to be considered for promotion, 

I wish to be considered for tenure., 

I do not wish to be considered for promotion. 

I do not wish to be considered for tenure. 



Signature 



USCS-— 



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4 — SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9 



TUESDAY, September 4 

6:30-9:30 p.m. — Real Estate Fundamentals continuing education course. Tuesdays and Thursdays 
through October 4. Fee $110.00. Library Classroom Building 276. For more Information contact 
Continuing Education extension 422. 

WEDNESDAY, September 5 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. — ID cards to be made In Hodge Center . For more information contact 
Student Affairs, extension 336. 

12:00 noon — Groundbreaking Ceremonies for Hodge Center addition . East side of Hodge Center. 
For more information contact Information Services extension 210. 

12:15 p.m. — Organizational Meeting for Flag Football . Hodge Center Gym. For more information 
contact Student Affairs, extension 336. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. — ID cards to be made in Hodge Center. For more information contact Student 
Affairs, extension 336. 

THURSDAY, September 6 

10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. —■ ID cards to be made in Hodge Center . For more information contact 
Student Affairs, extension 336. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. —- ID cards to be made in Hodge Center . For more information contact Student 
Affairs, extension 336. 



FRIDAY, September 7 



10:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. — ID cards to be made in Hodge Center . For more Information contact 
Student Affairs, extension 336. 

12:00 noon — 1st FLAT-OUT FALL FLING BEGINS . "Omni" band will- begin playing at noon. 
12:30 p.m. — Frlsbee Show 

1:00 p.m. — Frlsbee Clinic 

1:30 p.m. — Frlsbee Contest - For more information about the 1st Flat-Out Fall Fling 
contact Student Affairs, extension 336. 

12:30-3:00 p.m. — Grants Workshop . Library Classroom Building 261. For more Information 
contact Jan Yost, extension 203. 



SATURDAY, September 8 

9:00 p.m.-l:00 a.m. - First Back to School Dance. Featuring •'Omni". National Guard Armory. 
For more Information contact Student Affairs, extension 336. 



SUNDAY, September 9 

2:30-3:30 p.m. - Art Exhibit Opening . Library Art Gallery. For more information contact 
Katie Hicks, extension 335. SI 




•^ 






Vol. IV, No. 3 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS 



September 10, 1979 



I. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

THE FACULTY SENATE will meet on Friday, Sept. 

12 at 12:15 in Library 269. 

A FULL FACULTY MEETING will be held on Sept. 
14 in the Tukey Lecture Theatre. A major 
purpose of the meeting will be to elect 
persons to serve on committees. The meeting 
will begin at 12:15. 

ANY ITEMS for FYI may be submitted to Janella 
Koob, A-208, Information Services, unless it 
is more convenient to give them to Lou 
Hunley, Ml 12, ext. 371. All items must be 
submitted in writing before 5:00pm on the 
Thursday before Monday publication. 

CHAIRPERSONS OF LAST YEAR'S UNIVERSITY 
COMMITTEES are reminded that their summary 
reports of their committees' activities 
iyring 1978-1979 are due at the time of the 
fall Faculty meeting, Friday, Sept. 14, 

FACULTY MANUALS will be available from 
deans' secretaries by Thursday, Sept. 13. 
These manuals are on canary yellow paper 
and replace the green pages of last year. 

FROM HERMENIA GARDNER, Coordinator for 
Tutorial Services to ALL Deans, Depart- 
ment Heads, and Faculty: The Tutoring 
Lab is now fully staffed. Please inform 
your classes that we are prepared to 
tutor students in a wide range of subjects, 
as well as study skills, on appointment 
and/or walkin basis. Faculty ideas, 
suggestions and feedback are needed and 
will be welcomed. A Tutoring Lab Schedule 
will be included with the Sept. 17, 1979 
FYI. 

ON MONDAY, Sept. 17, there will be a 
questions and answer session by students 
and faculty featuring Liz Patterson vs. 
Tony Lister. This is not a debate. The 
session will be held in Tukey Lecture 
Theatre beginning at 12:15. Everyone is 
invited to attend. 



FROM JUDY DYE to ALL FACULTY: Due to the 
reduction of the library budget this year, 
no new book or periodical orders will be 
processed at this time. However, please 
continue to send your book and periodical 
requests to the library through your division 
coordinators. They will be held in the 
library in case money becomes available. 

THE COUNSELING AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTER 
will be sponsoring LAW DAY on Sept. 19. Ken 
Gaines, Dean of Student Affairs at the 
University of South Carolina School of Law, 
will be on campus to conduct two seminars 
on the nature of law school, types of pre- 
law programs, the LSAT, and other issues 
of interest to students considering legal 
careers. Students interested in this seminar 
should sign up in the Career Development 
Center on or before Sept, 14. Please help 
Earl Gordon in getting the word to interested 
students. 

THE LAST DAY to apply for Student Teaching 
for Spring 1980 will be Sept. 28, Please 
pass this along to your students. For more 
information contact Bill Reitmeier, ext, 379. 

THE USCS UNIVERSITY CHORUS AND JAZZ BAND are 
off to a flying start on what looks to be a 
very outstanding year. All faculty and 
staff that are interested in performing 
with these groups are encouraged to come to 
rehearsals whenever possible. University 
Chorus rehearses from 12:15 to 1:30 on 
Tuesdays and Thursdays; USCS Jazz Band is in 
session Mondays and Wednesdays from 3:00 
to 4:15 pm; both groups meet in A209. The 
groups are now busily at work on a Holiday 
Pops Concert, which will take place at the 
end of the Fall semester. 

DR. JAN YOST has been appointed by Dr. James 
Holdermah to serve again this year on the 
Research & Productive Scholarship Committee, 
a Special Advisory Committee to the Presi- 
dent, This Committee evaluates grant proposals 
submitted within the system to the Research 
and Productive Scholarship Fund. (Note: Pro- 
posals are usually requested in October!) 



OFi'ICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS (continued) 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 



GRANTS AWARDED TO USCS: 

(1) Title IV Talent Search grant for $73,773 
from the Office of Education/DHEW, The pro- 
ject is entitled "The Piedmont Area Talent 
Search" (PATS) and proposes to aid approxi- 
mately 1,000 Piedmont youth of financial 
and cultural need academic potential in 

the completion of their secondary educa- 
tion or admission to post-secondary edu- 
cation or completion of post-secondary 
education. Principal Investigator: Dr. 
Jane Davisson. Project Director: Mr. 
Malcolm Sanders. 

(2) CETA Title II-B grant for $152,423 
from the Governor's Office for Manpower, 
Development & Planning. The project is 
entitled "Spartanburg 70001 LTD Project" 
and proposes to recruit 75 Spartanburg 
County high school dropouts between the 
ages of 16 and 21. Clients will be pro- 
vided Adult Basic Education and GED 
preparation as well as job placement 
and supervision. Principal Investigator: 
Dr. Tony Pappas. 

ARTHUR GEORGE announces that an excellent 
career exploration and opportunity pro- 
gram is being launched at USCS beginning 
this Monday, Sept. 10 & 11. Kelly 
Service will be the first of a number of 
campus recruiters that will have repre- 
sentatives available to provide career 
information as well as to conduct personal 
interviews. Recruiters are enthusiastic 
about this program. Faculty, staff and 
students are encouraged to take advantage 
of this program. Call ext. 414 to arrange 
for a recruiter to spend a few minutes 
in your class answering questions and 
explaining bt'Tiness and industry's ex- 
pectation of graduates. Kelly Service will 
have a representative located in the 
student area of Hodge Center, Monday and 
Tuesday, Sept. 10 & 11, at 9:00 a.m. until 
3:00 p.m. Schedule will be designed for 
personal interviews and classroom visita- 
tions. 

AUDITIONS FOR THE PLAY Glass Managerle 
will be held in Tukey Lecture Theatre 
on Sept. 13 from 1-3 pm. For more infor- 
mation contact Jimm Cox, extension 397. 



BRYAN LINDSAY finished August with a speech, 
"Mankind At The Crossroads: Education As Traffic 
Signal," before the combined administration, 
staff, and faculty of the Wauwautosa School 
District, a suburb of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
That afternoon Bryan conducted a workshpp on 
integrating the arts into the elementary 
curriculum for the K-6 teachers of the district. 
Also Bryan was one of the ten winners of the Jack 
Rabbit Mello Yello Balloon Contest; his prize- 
winning photograph is on display at the West^- 
gate Jack Rabbit shop^ 

ALL FACULTY and staff are reminded of the Spar'- 
tanburg Arts Center's Fall Festival which will 
take place Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, Sept, 
14-16. In the past USCS faculty and staff have 
been generous in their contributions of salads, 
casseroles and such for the Sunday luncheon 
and they are encouraged to continue their 
largesse this year. Dishes should be delivered 
directly to the Spartanburg Arts Center on 
South Spring Street on Sunday, September 16, 

INTERNATIONAL FILM SERIES; International classic 
films will be presented on the USCS campus this 
year. The fall schedule includes: 
Weekend (France, 19.66, Dir, Jean Luc Godard, 
Subtitled); Wednesday, Sept. 19, 
The Blue Anpel (Germany, 1930, Dir. Josef von 
Sternberg, Siihtitled) ; Monday, Oct, 8. 
La Grande Illusion (France, 1937, Dir. Jean 
Renoir, subtitled) Wednesday, Nov, 7, 
Lazarillo (Spain, 1960, Dir^ Cesar Ardavin, sub- 
titled). To be arranged. 

ALL SHOWS start at 7:00 pm in Tukey Auditorium 
and are free of charge. For more information 
contact Dr. Regis Robe, ext, 430, 

INTERNATIONAL CLUB . A new Club on campus is open 
to students and staff. The purposes of this club 
are: (1) to help the Foreign Students on campus; 
(_2) to organize a series of International events 
(3) to introduce the students to the foreign 
community; (Ji) to help the foreign community in 
settling in a new environment. Among the events 
planned for this year are; an open house for 
Foreign students at USCS, foreign speakers, a 
visit to a, winery, a ski trip, an oriental night, 
the organization of minl-olympics (for children) , 
For more information contact Dr, Regis Robe in 
Foreign Languages, Ext, 430, 



ILLETIN BOARD (continued) 

EVEN NO TRUMP! Attention female faculty 
nd wives! (I know this sounds discrimi- 
atory, but read on men.) The USCS Women's 
ridge Group meets one evening per month 
or fellowship, food and fun (or frustra- 
ion) at Bridge. Couple's Bridge also meets 
t intervals, and wives and husbands do not 
ave to be partners. Also, you do not have 
o be an expert to play in the USCS Bridge 
roup. Any interested person should contact 
:arole Willmot at ext. 307 or 241. Our 
irst fall meeting is this month, and we 
on't want to miss anyone who is the least 
lit interested in playing. 

lAHTERINE BACHA, Assistant Professor, 
lachelor of Science in Nursing Program, 
Ichool of Nursing, was married July 27, 
.979 to Scott Talley of Greenville. Cathy 
ind Scott are making their home in 
Ireenville. 

:OMPUTER SCIENCE FAIR; A Data Processing 
'air sponsored by the Palmetto Chapter of 
;he Data Processing Management Association 
fill be held in Greenville, at the Atlas 
^ending dining room, on September 19th, 
Lt 6:30 pm. The Career Fair is open to 
students from USCS, Clemson, as well as 
:rom Spartanburg and Greenville Technical 
)olleges. Careers in various areas of data 
)rocessing will be described at a dinner 
leeting. Then students will he given the 
)pportunity to meet in small groups with, 
lata processing professionals to discuss 
specific career paths. Interested USCS 
students may tike a free bus to the meet- 
ing. It will leave from the Hodge Center 
It 5-30 pm on Wednesday, Sept. 19, Tickets 
for the Fair, which cost $1,00, are 
ivailable at the Student Affairs Office, 
:he office of Counseling and Career 
)evelopment, the office of the School of 
Jusiness Administration, and the office 
)f the Division of Science and Mathematics, 
'rofessor E.L, Menees, who helped plan 
:he Fair, says an excellent meal is 
)lanned, and students will have an 
jpportunity not only to learn about 
:areers in data processing but also to 
[leet potential employers. The Fair is 
jpen to all USCS students. 



uses— -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 10 — SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1979 



Monday, September 10, 1979 

12:15 p.m. -- Faculty Advisory Committee meeting . Faculty Conference room. Administration 
Building. 



Tuesday, September 11, 1979 

3:30-6:00 p.m. — " Science Fun" - Seminar. Science enrichment program for 12-14 year olds. 
Tuesdays and Thursdays for three weeks. Fee $35.00. Library Classroom Building 276. For 
more information contact Continuing Education, extension 422. 

Wednesday, September 12, 1979 

12:15 p.m. — Faculty Senate Meeting . Library Building 269. 

12:30 p.m. — Shoestring Players meeting . Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact Jimm Cox for 
more information, extension 397. 

6:00-7:30 p.m. — " Assertiveness Training" - seminar . Wednesdays through Oct. 31. Fee $20.00. 
Library Classroom Building 279. For more information contact Continuing Education, 
extension 422. 

Thursday, September 13, 1979 

1:00-3:00 p.m. — "Auditions for Glass Menagerie ". Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more information 
contact Jimm Cox, extension 397. 

Fridgy, September 14, 1979 

12:15 p.m. — Fall General Faculty Meeting. On agenda will be election of persons to 
faculty committees. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 



No a-;tivities are scheduled for Saturday or Sunday. 



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ol. IV, No. 4 



A Newsletter For The faculty Of USCS September n, 1979 



:. OFFICIAL MNOUNCEMENTS 

[ONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, there will be a 
luestion and answer session by students 
ind faculty featuring Liz Patterson vs. 
;ony Lister. This is not a debate. The 
jession will be held in Tukey Lecture 
:heatre beginning at 12:15. Everyone is 
invited to attend. 

FACULTY AND STAFF should note that ID cards 
(lust be validated each year for pay pur- 
joses and before they may be used for events 
3n the Columbia campus. ID cards may be 
/alidated in the Personnel Office, 1st floor, 
administration Building. 

CHE LIBRARY AUDIOVISUAL Distribution Center's 
lew hours for fall are: Monday, 8:30 am-5 pm; 
Cuesday and Wednesday, 8:30 am-7 pm; Thursday 
ind Friday, 8:30 am-5 pm. Please note the 
later hours on Tuesday and Wednesday evenings. 

SWITCHBOARD HOURS: All Faculty and Staff 
should note the change in switchboard opera- 
tion hours. The switchboard will operate from 
3:00 am-6:00 pm Monday through Thursday. 
Operating hours on Friday will be from 8:00 
am-5: 00 pm. Calls on Saturday will be 
answered by the Public Safety Office. 

SHUTTLE BUS SERVICE: A shuttle bus service 
leaving from USCS at 8:15 and departing the 
Columbia campus between 3:15 and 3:30 is now 
in operation on Tuesday and Friday each week. 
Anyone wishing to utilize the shuttle bus 
services should contact the Public Safety 
Dffice. 

>IIKE JILLING will be offering a continuing 
education shortcourse beginning Oct. 4 
entitled "Your Investments." Topics include 
Dasic investment decisions, common stocks, 
securities, and setting up and investment 
portfolio. The course meets from 7 to 9 pm 
Dn Tuesdays and Thursdays in Room 321 of 
the Media Building. The course fee is $75. 



THE ACADEMIC AFFAIRS committee has set Nov. 1, 
1979, as the deadline for the submission of 
proposals for new courses and for course 
changes. November 1 is the deadline for these 
materials to arrive _to^ the Executive Academic 
Affairs Committee, which means that proposals 
must have received by that date the prior 
approval of the Divisional and/or School 
Academic Affairs Committee. For making these 
proposals there will be two forms this year, 
available from campus secretaries: (1) USCS, 
Request for New Course, (2) USCS, Request for 
Change in Course. Please submit proposals in 
typed form, in clear, jargon-free English. 
(Note: jargon may be defined as technical 
language unintelligible to or inappropriate 
for the general reader. Obfuscating cant.) 

THE LAST DAY to apply for Student Teaching for 
Spring 1980 will be Sept. 28. Please pass 
this along to your students. For more infor- 
mation contact Bill Reitmeier, ext. 379. 

THE LAST DAY to apply for Teacher Education 
Program (Professional Program) for Spring 1980 
will be Sept. 28. Please pass this along to 
your students. For more information contact 
School of Education office, ext. 373. 

MR. RICHARD MEEKS an Instructor of Radiology 
at Spartanburg General Hospital and Spartanburg 
Technical Education Center will be on campus 
Monday, September 17 to present a film 
presentation entitled "Odysseys in Radiology" 
at 11:00 am in A-325. All interested students 
and faculty members are invited for a very 
entertaining and informative view into the 
field of radiology. 

HUMANITIES SCHOLARS: The National Endo^^ient 
for the Humanities has announced an Oct. 15, 
1979 deadline for applications for Summer Stip- 
ends ($2,500) for 1980. Interested faculty 
should contact Jan Yost, ext. 203. 



II. .. BULLETIN BOARD 

GRANT REQUESTS have been submitted to the 
SC Arts Commission ($500) and the SC Com- 
mittee for the Humanities ($1,000) to pro- 
vide the additional funds needed to bring 
EDWARD ALBEE to USCS on Oct. 24 and 25, 
1979 for a series of lectures and work- 
shops. Don Knight, Nancy Moore, Jimm Cox, 
and David Reid (Director of the Spartanburg 
Little Theatre) will also participate in 
the project. Principal Investigator: Jimm 
Cox. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE FAIR: A Data Processing 
Fair sponsored by the Palmetto Chapter of 
the Data Processing Management Association 
will be held in Greenville, at the Atlas 
Vending dining room, on Sept. 19th at 
6:30 pm. The Career Fair is open to stu- 
dents from USCS, Clemson, as well as from 
Spartanburg and Greenville Technical 
Colleges. Interested USCS students may 
take a free bus to the meeting. It will 
leave from the Hodge Center at 5:30 pm 
on Wednesday, Sept. 19. Tickets for the 
Fair, which cost $1.00, are available at 
the Student Affairs Office, the office 
of Counseling and Career Development, the 
office of the School of Business Admini- 
stration, and the office of the Division 
of Science and Mathematics. 

THE INTERNATIONAL FILM SERIES will begin 
this week with the film Weekend (France, 
1966, Dir. Jean Luc Godard, Subtitled). 
The film will be shown on Wednesday, 
Sept. 19 at 7:00 pm in the Tukey Lecture 
Theatre. Admission is free and everyone 
is invited. 

FROM REGIS ROBE: OPEN HOUSE FOR FOREIGN 
STUDENTS: The International Club is spon- 
soring an "Open House" for all Foreign Stu- 
dents on the USCS Campus on Wednesday, 
Sept. 19, 1979 at 12:00 noon in the lobby 
of the Administration building. As we have 
not been able to reach all the Foreign 
Students on campus, we would appreciate 
your advertising the event through your 
classes. Thank you for your cooperation. 
For more information contact Dr. Regis 
Robe, ext. 430. 



RAFTING TRIP DOWN SECTION III OF THE CHATTOOGA 
RIVER: The Science Club has openings for 24 
persons on the Chattooga River, Oct. 7. Cost 
of trip is $17.50, paid in advance, $10.00 will 
be refunded to you on the day of the trip. If 
you are interested, sign up sheet is on Gillian 
Newberry's office door, A-329. To reserve a 
spot you must sign up and deposit $17.50 with 
Dr. Newberry. 

JIMM COX, Theatre, and Jim Brown, History, will 
be appearing in "A Funny Thing Happened on 
the Way to the Forum," a light-hearted, musica] 
romp, which will be the Spartanburg Little 
Theater's first production of the 1979-80 
season. The play will run between Sept. 27 and 
October 6. 

A REMINDER: Anyone wishing to be listed with th 
South Carolina Consortium for International 
Studies' Speakers bureau, as described in the 
September 4th, FYI, please contact Jim Brown 
soon, ext. 433. 

DR. JEANNE STUART, Biology, has been asked by 
the National Science Foundation to review grant 
applications submitted to the Local Course 
Improvement for Undergraduate Science Education 
Program (LOCI) on November 14-16, 1979. Con- 
gratulations, Dr. Stuart! 

WHOA MULE ! 

Faculty, staff, students, alumni and friends of 

the university are invited to participate in 

one or all of the following: 

—Annual USCS Tennis Classic - Oct. 13, 14, 20 

and 21. Singles $5.00 - Doubles $7.00. Proceeds 

go to Scholarships. Entry deadline is Oct. 8, 

1979. For more information and registration 

forms, contact Chuck 'Stavely, ext. 238 or Ron 

Eaglin, ext. 426. 

— Golf Tournament, Peach Valley Golf Course, 

Oct. 13. Cost $10.00, includes greens fee and 

Ig of cart fee. For more information contact 

Chuck Stavely, ext. 238. 

— Wine and Cheese party - Saturday Evening, 8 

pm, Oct. 13. - Hodge Center - Coxt $2.00 per 

person. For more information contact Chuck 

Stavely, ext. 238. 

GIDDAP MULE I !!!!!! ! 



You are invited to hear 



The Honorable Edward D. Cowart 

Chief Judge, 11th Judicial Circuit 

Dade County, Florida 



discuss 



"Tlie Impact of Television in the Courtrooin' 



Monday, September 24, 1979 
Tukey Lecture Theatre 

uses 

12:00 noon and 7:30 P.M. 



Judge Cowart was the presidnig judge at the trial of Tlieodore Bundy 
who was convicted of murder in the deaths of two Florida State University 
coeds. The trial received national attention because of the sensational nature 
of the crimes and because the entire proceedings were covered by television 
cameras in the courtroom. 

Although not the fu-st to be so reported, the Bundy trial provided a 
severe test of the influence of the presence of the camera. Judge Cowart's 
experience with the media and his firm control of the proceedings offer 
strong evidence to support the feasibility of such media coverage. 

According to TJie Miami Herald, "Tlie cameras in the courtroom were 
not a factor in the verdict. . . . But they were ... a vital factor in the public's 
access to and understanding of the evolution of an actual criminal trial. This 
trial demonstrated that spectacular cases need not degenerate into court- 
room spectacles." 

Judge Coward has a wide range of experience in the legal-law enforce- 
ment-judicial process, including the Miami Police Department; Chief Trial 
Counsel and Director of Law Enforcement in the Florida Attorney General's 
Office: private law practice; Prosecutor and City Judge; and Circuit Court 
Judge. 



uses— -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17— SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1979 



londay, September 17 

11:00 am — "Odysseys in Radiology," a film presentation by Mr. Richard Meeks, instructor of 
Radiology at Spartanburg General Hospital. Administration building 325. For more informa- 
tion contact Science office, ext. 214. 

12:00 noon — Liz Patterson vs. Toney Lister . Question and answer session. Tukey Lecture 
Theatre. Everyone welcome. For more information contact Information Services, ext. 210. 

12:00-1:00 pm — Gun Club Meeting . Administration building 115. For more information contact 
M.B. Ulmer, ext. 216. 

12:00-1:30 pm — Shoestring Players Meeting . Library building 279. For more information 
contact Jimm Cox, ext. 397. 

6:30-9:30 pm — Community Concerts annual meeting . Administration building 209. For more 
information contact Vergene Colloms, ext. 218. 

7:00-10:00 pm — Physical Fitness Program . Sponsored by the Spartanburg Board of Realtors. 
Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more information contact Emily Myers, ext. 223. 



l luesday, September 18 

5:00-7:00 pm ~ Accounting meeting . NAA Seminars. Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more information 
contact Dr. Menees, ext. 280. 



fednesday, September 19 

LAW DAY - Sponsored by the USCS Counseling and Career Development Center. For information on 
seminars contact Earl Gordon, ext. 412. 

10:30-12:00 noon — Law seminar . Information on procedures for entering law school. Media 
» building 213. For more information contact Earl Gordon, ext. 412. 

12:00 noon — Open House for all Foreign Students at USCS . Administration building lobby. 
For more information contact Regis Robe, ext. 430. 

1:30-3:00 pm — Law seminar . See 10:30 am. 

6:30 pm - Data Processing Fair . Atlas Vending dining room, Greenville, S.C. Sponsored by 
the Palmetto Chapter of the Data Processing Management Association. Txckets ^i.uu. i^or 
more information contact E.L. Menees, ext. 280. 

7:00 pm - International Film Series . Weekend (France, 1966, Dir. Jean ^-Godard Subtitled.) 
, Tukey Le cture Theatre. Open to the public, free of charge. For more information contact 
Regis Robe, ext. 430. 



Thursday, September 20 

8:30-12:00 noon - Guidance Counselors Meeting . Hodge Center 247 A&B. For more information 
contact Counseling and Career Development office, ext. 412. 



Friday, September 21 

12:00-1:30 pm — Faculty Senate Meeting . Library Building 269. For more information 
contact Mike Dressman, ext.381. 




•^ 









Vol. IV, No. 5 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS 



September 24, 1979 



I. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

JUDGE EDWARD D. COWART, presiding judge at 
the trial of Theodore Bundy, will speak in 
Tukey Lecture Theatre today at 12 noon and 
7:30 p.m. (Monday, September 24). 
His topic is "Television In The Courtroom." 
Now Chief Judge of the 11th Judicial 
Circuit for Dade County, Fla. , Judge 
Cowart has a wide range of experience in 
the legal process, including the Miami 
Police Department, Director of Law Enforce- 
ment in the Florida Attorney General's 
Office, private law practice and circuit 
court judge. 
Please urge students to attend. 

FROM MICHAEL DRESSMAN, Faculty Secretary: 
There has been a lot of furor lately 
over two rulings by the office of the 
South Carolina Attorney General concerning 
the grievance rights of unclassified 
faculty teaching in state institutions 
of higher education. A copy of these 
rulings has been placed on reserve in the 
library. All faculty members are urged to 
read these documents. 

THE LAST DAY to apply for Student Teaching 
for Spring 1980 will be Sept. 28. Please 
pass this along to your students. For more 
information contact Bill Reitmeier, ext. 
379. 

THE LAST DAY to apply for Teacher Education 
Program (Professional Program) for Spring 
1980 will be Sept. 28. Please pass this 
along to your students. For more informa- 
tion contact School of Education, ext. 373. 

DR. HOLDERMAN has extended an invitation to 
all faculty in the USC system to attend the 
annual faculty receptions scheduled for 
Tuesday, Sept. 25 and Wednesday, Sept. 26 
from 7:00 to 9:00 at his home. A van has 
tentatively been scheduled to travel to 
Columbia for this event on Wednesday, Sept. 



26th. Faculty wishing to attend the reception 
should contact Lawrence Moore, ext. 255 for 
more information. 

ALL FACULTY: Book Requests for Spring are 
due in the bookstore no later than Oct. 15th. 
All requests must be signed by faculty members 
and division heads. - 

II. BULLETIN BOARD 

THE LIBRARY ART GALLERY at USCS will hold its 
first major exhibit of the year from Oct. 14th 
through Nov. 2. The showing will feature the 
works of Mary Ellen Suitt of Spartanburg, and 
begins with a receiption from 2:30 to 4 p.m. 
on Oct. 14th. Faculty, staff, students and 
the public are invited to attend. 

THE SCHOOL OF NURSING will have two extremely 
important visitors on the campus this week. 
They are Dr. Betty Hamm, Associate Professor 
of Nursing at the Medical University of Georgia 
and Margaret McKevit, Director of the 
Baccalaureate Nursing program at LSU. The pur- 
pose of their being here is to make a 
National League for Nursing site visit to 
verify, clarify and amplify the self-evalua- 
tion report prepared by the School of Nursing 
as part of the NLN accrediation process for 
four-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing 
program. They will attend BSN classes and labs, 
will meet with appropriate faculty and 
administrators and will tour the campus. 

Some events are already scheduled in connec- 
tion with the NLN visit, and these are in- 
cluded in the attached "USCS—This Week." It 
is possible that other USCS faculty members 
and administrators may be asked to meet with 
the visitors. 

THE NEW SPARTANBURG COUNTY PHONEBOOKS are on 
caapus and should be distributed this week. 
A new campus phone directory is being prepared 
with distribution scheduled for next week. 



THE SOUTH CAROLINA STATE EMPLOYEES 
ASSOCIATION will hold a meeting here 
at uses tonight (Monday, Sept. 24) 
in A209. All state employees are invited 
to attend the meeting which begins at 
7:00 pm. Guest speakers will be Larry 
Ellis, Executive-Director of the SCSEA; 
Tony Lister, Democratic candidate for 
State Senate; Liz Patterson, Democratic 
candidate for State Senate; Boyce Ransom, 
Republican candidate for State Senate. 

SOUTHERN BELL has made available several 
simulation games designed for higher 
education classes. Students role-play 
actual society situations requiring 
decision-making affecting attitudes and 
interests. Also, a film featuring the 
winners 6f the National Student Film 
Awards is available along with other free- 
loan Bell films. These are all available 
through the Audiovisuals Production 
Center, ext. 264. 

use RESEARCH AND PRODUCTIVE SCHOLARSHIP 
GRANTS - Proposals for a maximum of 
$4,000 for one year projects are due by 
October 15, 1979 in Columbia. Several 
uses faculty have received these grants 
in the past, and interested persons are 
urged to apply! Contact Jan Yost (ext. 
203) for additional information and 
application forms. 

CONWAY HENDERSON has published "Multinational 
Corporations and Human Rights in Developing 
States," in World Affairs (Summer 1979). 

MARY S. TAYLOR, Nursing, attended the 3rd 
Summer School for Gerontology sponsored 
by the S.C. Commission on Aging. Courses 
taken were: "Interviewing Skills" and 
"Performance Evaluation". 



uses— -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24— SUM)AY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1979 



MONDAY, September 24 

12:00 pm — Judge Edward Cowart - "Television in the Courtroom. " Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
For more information contact Information Services, ext. 210. 

12:00 pm — Promotion and Tenure Committee meeting . Faculty conference room. Administration 
Building. 

7:00 pm — South Carolina State Employees Association meeting. Check FYI for details. Admini- 
stration Building 209. For more information contact Con Henderson, ext. 

7:30 pm — Judge Edward Cowart - "Television in the Courtroom ." Tukey Lecture Theatre. For 
more information contact Information Services, ext. 210. 



Tuesday, September 25 

3:00 pm — NLN site visitors meet with faculty of the School of Nursing. 

4:00 pm — NLN site visitors take campus tour. 

6:30-9:30 pm — Data Processing for the Micro Computer - shortcourse. Greenville Counseling 
Center. Fee $30.00. For more information contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 



Wednesday, September 26 

12:00 pm — NLN site visitors meet with BSN students. 

3:00-5:00 pm — Microwave Workshop . Microwave Ovens Ltd. Fee $3.00. For more information contact 
Continuing Education, ext. 422. 

6:30-9:30 pm ~ TRS-80 Level II Language - shortcourse. Greenville Counseling Center. Fee $30.00, 
For more information contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 



Thursday, September 27 

9:00 am — NLN site visitors meet with BSN faculty. 



3:30-6:30 — Our Changing Environment - shortcourse. Meets on Thursdays through Nov. 1. Fee 
$35.00. Library Building 279. For more information contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 

6:30-9:30 pm — TRS-80 Disk Basic and DOS - shortcourse. Greenville Counseling Center. Fee $30.00 
For more information contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 



1 



Friday, September 28 *j 

Last day to apply for Student Teaching for Spring 1980. Contact Bill Reitmeier ^f ; 379. | 

Last day to apply for Teacher Education Program for Spring 1980. Contact School of Education. ^ 

ext. 373. 

2:00 pm ~ Final reading of Site Visit Report by NLN visitors. 

12:15 pm - Admissions and Petitions meeting. Faculty conference room. Administration Building. 




•^ 






)1. IV, No. 6 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of L/SCS Monday, October i 



[. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

[HE PUBLICATIONS BOARD will have a brief 
nee ting Monday, Oct. 1 (today) in L272 
it 12:15 pm. This meeting will be 
important and all members are urged to 
attend. Contact Harriet McDuffie, ext. 
!,00, for more information. 

FROM DR. EAGLIN: On September 5, 1979, 
Dr. Tony Pappas resigned his position of 
Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic 
Affairs. Dr. Pappas has made a very 
positive contribution to the development 
of uses. His efforts have brought state 
and national recognition to many of our 
programs. With his resignation several 
administrative adjustments have been made. 
1. Until his departure. Dr. Pappas will 
orgranize and develop the 70,001 project 
and will also assist Dr. Eaglin. 
:2. Mr. Earl Gordon has been named acting 
Director of Counseling and Placement. 

3. Continuing Education and Audiovisual 
Services will report directly to Dr. 
Eaglin. Continuing Education will be 
:housed in two offices vacated by Dr. 
Pappas. 

4. The BIS program will be assigned to the 
Dean of Humanities and Sciences and will 
be housed in the Library Building, Room 
227, beginning November 9, 1979. 

THE FACULTY ADVISORY COMMITTEE will meet 
on Wednesday, Oct. 10, at 12:15 pm, in 
the Administrative Conference Room. Items 
on the agenda include voting units in the 
professional schools, the status of the 
Computer Services Committee, the role of 
the Cultural Affairs Committee in select- 
ing speakers, and the return of students 
to the Academic Affairs Committee. 

rO ALL FACULTY: Book requests for Spring 
are due in the Bookstore by Oct. 15. All 
request must be signed by the faculty 
nember and the division chairperson or 
lean. 



FROM THE PROMOTION AND TENURE COMMITTEE: Those 
persons who have requested consideration and 
those persons who are in their penultimate year 
have been sent a form on which to submit a 
vita or a vita update. If any faculty member who 
wishes to be considered has not received such a 
form from Dr. Elizabeth Davidson, please contact 
her immediately. There is only one month left 
in which a person may prepare a file for con- 
sideration this academic year. The files, housed 
in Toni McKissick's office in the administration 
building, are open for information through the 
end of October but will then be closed while the 
committee studies their contents during November. 

STUDENT AFFAIRS has scheduled two advisors work- 
shops for new faculty members. All new faculty 
are required to attend one of the sessions. We 
will distribute advisors manuals, discuss 
policies, procedures, and forms, and prepare new 
faculty to advise during Computer Assisted 
Registration (CAR). New faculty, please mark the 
following dates on your calendar. Tuesday, 
October 23 - 1:30-3:30 - L264; Friday, October 
26 - 1:30-3:30 - L268. 

II. BULLETIN BOARD 

THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA WOMEN'S CLUB is 
sponsoring a system-wide faculty-staff picnic 
in celebration of the International Year of the 
Child at Bell Camp in Columbia on Sunday, 
October 7 starting at 2 p.m. Janella Koob in 
Information Services has a flier giving complete 
details for those faculty and staff wishing to 
attend. 

FROM DR. MENEES: The NAA (National Association 
of Accountants) has increased their effort to 
interest students in careers in accounting. A 
result of the NAA's efforts is to sponsor an 
essay contest among local college students. The 
topic for the essays will be "Opportunities in 
Accounting Careers." A $100. pri^e to be divided 
among the top three essays ($50, $30, $20) will 
be awarded. For more information about essay 
length, content, etc. contact Dr. Menees. 



FROM STUDENT AFFAIRS: 

-The 2nd Annual Piedmont Foundation 

Scholarship Tennis Tournament/Faculty 

Division 

Sign-up by Oct. 10th - Student Affairs 

Matches are Oct. 12 and Oct. 19 

1:15 - 2:30 and 3:45 

Fee: $5.00 

Balls are provided. 

-The uses Fall Dinner Dance will be 

held Oct. 20. from 8:00-12:00 am in 

the Hodge Center. 

Admission: $10.00 per couple (Faculty 

staff and alumnij $7.50 per couple (students) 

Attire: Semi-formal 

Dinner: Full meal catered by "The Catery" 

Only 100 tickets will be sold - ticket 

sales begin Oct. 10 in the Ci-^Jent Affairs 

Office. 



DR. JOE BOWMAN, School of Education, 
attended the University Affiliated Facilities 
of S.C. Regional Replication Workshop for 
training Physical Educators and Special 
Educators in developing and implementing 
lEPs in physical education. The workshop was 
held September 21st at the S.C. School for 
Deaf and Blind. 

FROM CHARLES STAVELY: If you are a member 
of Spartanburg County, don't forget to vote 
on October 2. 



DONUT NIGHTS - The Student Affairs division 
is sponsoring three donut nights this semester 
for our evening students. Please join us and 
bring your evening classes for coffee and 
donuts and information of interest to 
evening students. 
Tuesday, Oct. 2 - 5:00-8:00 pm - Adm. Bldg. 

lobby 
Wednesday, Oct. 3 - 5:00-8:00 pm - Media 
Building lobby 

Thursday, Oct. 4 - 5:00-8:00 pm - Library 
Building, 2nd floor student lounge. 



PROflOTION AND TENURE COmiTTEE 
MINUTES 

The Promotion and Tenure Committee met in the Administrative Conference Room at 
1:00 PM on 23 August 79. All members were present. 

Cluiin^erson ,];,mies Brown announced that, because of his appcdtment to a half-time 
a Iministrative position, he was no jonger eligible to serve on the Committee and 
was submitting his resignation to be effective at the election of a succes'^or. 
lie further noted that Ron Young luid resigned from the full-time faculty and would 
also need to be replaced {Brown holds an elected slot, and Young held an appointed 
slot on the CoiiunitteeJ . 

The Conniiittee proceeded to elect Elizabetli Davidson chairperson and Lav\rrence Mooj o 
secretary. 

The Committee took no further action. However, to help the new chairperson in 
planning, members noted infomially a number of matters which they anticipated would 
come before the Committee during the course of the year. In addition to the 
preparation of recommendations on individual requests for promotion and tenure, 
these included tlie following: 

1. A review of the action of the Columbia Canpus Faculty extending the probationru'v 
period for tenure. 

2. A resolution of ttie pending question of establishing rank for librarians and 
the generation of criteria for promotion to the various ranks if they are 
established. 

3. A review of the policies instituted by the administration of promoting person^s 
beyond assistant professor without simultaneously granting tenure and of 
promoting persons without providing traditional faculty- recommended increments 
in renumcrat ion. 

■1. A consideration of promotion and tenure criteria to be proposed for the School 
of Niirsing faculty. 

.S. A study of tlie timeliness and adequacy of the feedback being given to individual 
faculty members by their administrative superiors on matters relating to job 
perfomnnce, promotion, and tenure. (This matter was suggested after it was 
mentioned that a specific message from the administration was to be inferred by 
each faculty member from the percentage increment this year in his/her salar>'..) 

It should be emphiisized that no motions are before the Committee on the above 
matters except for item 2 which is an item of unfinished business froni last year. 



uses -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, OCTOBER 1 ~ SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1979 



ONDAY, October I 

12-15 pm Science Meeting. Administration Building 304, For more information contact Jackie 

Sherbert, ext. 214. 

12:15 pm — Publications Board Meeting . Library Building 272, For more information contact 
Harriet McDuffie, ext, 400, 

6-00-8:00 pm ~ Overview of Anatomy and Physiology shortcourse . Monday and Wednesdays through 
* October 17, Library Building 257, Fee $20,00, For more information contact Continuing 
Education, ext, 422. 



'UESDAY, October 2 

3-30-5-30 pm — Electricity for Elementary School Teachers shortcourse , Tuesdays and Thursdays 
'through October 18, Library Building 276. Fee $30.00. For more information contact 
Continuing Education, ext. 422. 

3:45 pm - Regional English Teachers meeting . Library Building 257. For more information 
« contact Nancy Moore, ext. 408. 

f 7:30-9:30 pm ~ AYSO soccer meeting . Tukey Lecture Theatre. 



WEDNESDAY, October 3 

8:30-3:30 pm - Srndent Nursing Workshop . Held by Dr. Granelle from the State Department of 
5 Education. Tukey Lecture Theatre, 

f 12:15 pm - BSN Faculty Meeting . Hodge Center 247A. For more information contact C. Talley, 
ext. 307. 



THURSDAY, October 4 

M^^-io ^or.^P•r 321 Fee $75.00. For more infor- j 
7:00-9:00 pm ~ Your Investments shortcourse . Medxa Center jzi. J^ee 9/J. j 

mation contact Continuing Education, ext. 422/ 



FRIDAY, October 5 

2:00-5:00 pm - Sav^_Ener^ZZzSaveJlo^^ Media Center 328. Fee $5.00. One session. 
For more information contact Continuing Education, ext. 42Z. 



SATURDAY, October 6 

Faculty, staff beach trip to Hunting Island. .« Infor^tion contac^^^ancj^^^oore^^^^ 



SUNDAY, October 6 

Chateoga River Raft Trip. For Information contact Gillian Sewberry, extension 261. 

- system-wide faculty/staff picnic at Camp Bell. For Information contact lanella Koob 



2:00 pm 



ANNOUNCING 
19 7 9 
uses FALL HAPPENING, 




^a 



Do you enjoy playing tennis, golf, or the fellowship of a wine and 
cheese party? If so, then USCS's alumni association and the athletic 
department have combined their efforts to provide the opportunity for you to 
participate in one or all of the above. 

The events are open to USCS's alumni, friends, employees, and students. 
The basic purpose is for fun, conpetition, and fellowship; however, if there 
is a profit it will be used to provide athletic scholarships . Since no 
university funds will be used for these projects, we need your response by 
Ifaiday, October 8 so that we will have the funds to finance the activities 
and so that we will know how many participants to plan for . 

The activities have been planned to avoid as many natural conflicts 
as possible, and we hope that we have included at least one event which 
you will enjoy participating in with our extended USCS family. So, look 
at your calendar and make your plans to join us in this USCS FALL HAPPENING. 



Chairman: D. D. 



USCS FALL TENNIS TOURNAMENT 
Easier 




USCS Co-Sponsors : Ron Eaglin, Vice Chancellor for Acadanic Affairs 
Jim Newcome , Tennis Coach 

Proceeds Go To Athletic Scholarships 

SPECIAL 
DIVISION 

Alumni, USCS Employee 
and Friends Division 



Open Division 



LOCATION: 

USCS TENNIS CCMPLEX 



Saturday, October 13 
Sunday, October 14 

Saturday, October 13 
Sunday, October 14 
Saturday, October 20 
Sunday, October 21 



REGISTRATION DEADUIE - M3NDAY, OCTOBER 8 



uses FAU. GOLF TOUENAMEM' 



Alumni Co-ChairnEti: Hal Parker 

Andrew Hodges 



Date: Saturday, October 13 

Tee Times: 8:00 a.m. -to 11:00 a.m. 




Rain Date: Sijnday, October 14 

Tee Times: 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. 
Location: Peach Valley Comtry Club Soft drinks and Beer Provided 



EEGISTEAHON ffiADUNE: MONDAY, OCTOBER 8 

Prizes: Longest Drive, hole 13 % dozen balls 
Nearest Hole, hole 8 % dozen balls 
Low Gross, $25 Gift Certificate 

Callaway Handicap System 
First Place S25 Gift Certificate 
Second Place §15 Gift Certificate 
Third Place $10 Gift Certificate 




WINE AND CHEESE 
(^g)\is»-^ PARTY 

Alumni Sponsors: D. D. Easier, Hal Parker, Andrew Hodges 

Date: Saturday, October 13 

Time: 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. 

Location: G. B. Hodge Center Lobby 

RESERVATION DEADLINE - MONDAY, OCTOBER 8 



For Further Information Contact: 



Associate Chancellor for University Relations Office 

uses 



Spartanburg, South Carolina 29303 

Phone: Spartanburg 578-1800 Ext 203 
Greenville 271-9111 Ext. 203 



Charles Stavely 579-3940 
Weekdays after 6 p.m. and on weekends 



ENTRY FORM 

NAME: 

STREET OR BOX NUMBER 

CITY, STATE, ZIP 

HOME PHONE BUSINESS PHONE_ 

AMOUNT OF CHECK: 

ALUMNI uses EMPLOYEE STUDENT 



TENNIS 

Special Alumni, Faculty, Friends Division: October 13, October 14 

Open Division: October 13, October 14, October 20, October 21 

Event : 

Singles: Doubles: 

men's (advanced) men's (advanced) 

men's (intermediate) men's (intermediate) 

women ' s women ' s 

men over 35 mixed doubles 

non-player donation 

Donation (Includes Tennis balls) Singles: $5.00 Doubles: $7.00 



Handicap :_ 



Combined entry and Greens fee $10.00 Carts can be rented at Peach Valley. 



WINE and CHEESE PARTY 



Number of people: Cost $2.50 per pe 



Green and white USCS visor $5.00 Sreen and white USCS Cap $5.00 

A limited supply of caps and visors will be available for purchase at the 
Golf and Tennis Tournament. Additional items will be ordered upon request. 



MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO: 

THE CAROLINA PIEDMONT FOUNDATION 

and RETURN TO: 

USCS 
University Relations Office 
Spartanburg, S. C. 29303 




s*l 






Vol. IV, No. 6 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS 



October 8, 1979 



I. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

ROBERT THEOBALD, socioeconomist and writer 
on economics, environmental science, poli- 
tics, and science fiction, will appear on 
the USCS campus on Wednesday and Thursday, 
October 10-11. The high point of his 
visit will be a lecture on "Alternate 
Lifestyles," in Tukey Lecture Theatre at 
7:00 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 10, the second 
in a series of University Convocations. 
Speaking in relation to the topic Theobald 
says, "I am convinced that it is necessary 
to move from a society based on force and 
competition to one based upon process and 
cooperation. I have tried to build my 
activities on this belief and thus to 
facilitate the present transition from the 
industrial era to the communications era. 
The immediately coming years will determine 
whether we are successful in moving toward 
the more human and humane society we so 
urgently need." Faculty, staff, and stu- 
dents are heartily encouraged to attend; 
faculty teaching courses which relate 
directly or indirectly to Theobald's work 
should be especially interested in having 
their students attend. On Thursday morning 
Mr. Theobald will be available for presen- 
tations before individual classes or groups 
of classes. Faculty interested in scheduling 
such an appearance should contact Bryan 
Lindsay, Chairperson, Cultural Affairs 
Committee, ext. 244. 

THE DATE of the Faculty Advisory Committee 
meeting has been changed to Monday, Oct. 15. 
It will still be held in the Administrative 
Conference room at 12:15 p.m. 

ATTACHED TO FYI is a list (accuracte as of 
Oct. 1) of the faculty members serving on 
standing University Committees. 

TO ALL FACULTY: Book requests for Spring are 
due in the Bookstore by Oct. 15. All requests 
must be signed by the faculty member and the 
division chairperson or dean. 



FROM THE USCS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION: We are 
happgy to tell you that we now have sufficient 
funds on hand to make consumer loans again. We 
are not yet open for FHA Title I Home Improve- 
ment Loans or 1st and 2nd mortgage loans. When 
these loans are resumed again by the Board of 
Directors, we will notify you. 

FROM ALICE HENDERSON, Chairman of Search Com- 
mittee for SBS Division Chairperson: Ballots 
were counted today (Sept. 28) for the Chairpersoi 
of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Both candi- 
dates, Gordon Mapley and Conway Henderson, were 
considered acceptable by the majority of faculty. 
In a fairly close election, Conway Henderson 
received a majority of the first place votes. 
The vitae of the candidates and a summary of 
the comments written on the ballots are being 
forwarded to Dean John Edmunds. 

USCS FACULTY and Administrators and their spousej 
are eligible on a first come, first serve basis 
for an education program in the People's 
Republic of China, 18 December 79 through 5 
January 80. Four cities will be visited, in- 
cluding educational institutions and cultural 
historic sites. The all-inclusive cost is 
$2,760 per person from New York and includes 
first-class accommodations based on double 
occupancy, three meals per day, daily guided 
educational tours, and an in-depth orientation 
meeting in New York. For additional information 
contact Jim Browiij Ext. 433. 

WHO'S WHO AMONG STUDENTS IN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES 
AND COLLEGES? Nominations by Faculty and staff 
are now being accepted in the Student Affairs 
Office through October 19. Students should be 
considered whose academic standing, participatior 
in extracurricular activities and community 
service are decidedly above average. For further 
information on nominations call Jerry Baker, 
ext. 339. 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 



THE FALL DINNER DANCE will be held Oct. 20 
beginning at 8:00 until 12:00 am. Tickets 
go on sale in the Student Affairs Office 
beginning Oct. 10. Faculty, Staff and 
Alumni may purchase tickets for $10.00 per 
couple, while students may purchase 
tickets for $7.50 per couple. The dinner 
will be catered by The Catery and includes 
a complimentary bottle of table wine, punch 
and dinner. Music will be provided by 
the Dixie Dawn band, which was the summer 
house band at Vince Perones. Please help 
support this event by purchasing your 
ticket soon. 

THE I.D. MACHING will be on campus Oct. 17, 
18, 19, and 22. Times will be announced 
in upcoming FYI publications. 

THE SHOESTRING PLAYERS will open their 
1979-80 season with the performance of 
"Glass Menagerie" to be presented Oct. 
25,26,27 and 28. All performances begin 
at 7:30 with the exception of a Sunday 
matinee (Oct. 28) which will begin at 
3:00 pm. Tickets are $2.00 and reservations 
may be made by calling Jimm Cox at ext. 397. 
All performances will be held in the 
Tukey Lecture Theatre. 

CHUCK MANGIONE will be performing at the 
Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium on Nov. 
10. This event is sponsored by the USCS 
Student Activities Office and represents 
uses' first venture into a "big name" 
entertainment event. Faculty, staff and 
students may purchase tickets for $4.50, 
$3.50, and $2.50 from the Student Activities 
Office with an ID. Only two tickets per 
person may be purchased. These tickets 
are being sold at a reduced price compared 
to what will be sold to the general public. 
Faculty, staff and students are urged to 
support this event and purchase tickets 
early, since it is expected that Mangione 
will draw a large crowd. More information 
may be obtained by calling the Student 
Activities Office, ext. 336. 

HELP SUPPORT women's volleyball, golf, 
tennis, judo, women's basketball, men's 
basketball, cross country, and the soccer 
club by restricting all or part of your 
annual gift to the Educational Foundation 
to uses' Rifle Regiment. From Chuck 
Stavely: I hope that you have noticed a 
positive change in USCS' athletic program 
which reflects the concerns and interest 
of our faculty and student body. These 
changes, I hope, will produce a viable 
program which you will personally want 



to support. I also want to express my thanks 
to the many faculty and staff who made their 
contributions to the Rifle Regiment this past 
spring. 

BERNARD KALB of CBS news will be one of the 
principal participants in a Converse College 
cymposium The Middle East: Implications for 
American Foreign Policy on Oct. 26 & 27. This 
symposium is the biennial PROBE event, spon- 
sored by the Mortar Board at the college. Kalb 
will speak on The Middle East: An Overview on 
Friday, Oct. 26, at 8 pm in Twichell Aud. Dr. 
Shahrough Akhavi will speak on Iran and 
Response, specifically the Iranian revolution 
and its implications on American foreign 
policy, on Saturday, Oct. 27, at 9:30 am. At 
11 am on Saturday, Dale R. Tahtinen, assistant 
director of Foreign and Defense Policy studies 
at the American Enterprise Institute for Public 
Policy Research in Washington will speak on 
Saudi Arabia and Oil: Its Implications for 
American Foreign Policy. At 2 pm that Saturday 
representatives from the Israeli and Arab 
embassies will discuss Viewpoints on the Arab- 
Israeli Situation. The public is invited to 
attend all of the events. Admission is free. 

GEE I FORGOT! 

Applications for: Tennis and Golf Tournament 
and Wine and Cheese Party are due Monday, 
Oct. 8. Applications are in The Carolinian 
and The University Relations Office. For more 
information call ext. 203. 

GRANTS AWARDED! 1) USCS has received Nursing 
Capitation grants of $19, 163 for the associat* 
program and $2,534 for the baccalaureate progr; 
in the School of Nursing. DEW provides the 
funds as a general support base for these 
educational programs. 2) USCS has been granted 
$1,000 by the S.C. Committee for the Humanities 
and $500. by the S.C. Arts Commission to bring 
Edward Albee, a Pulitzer Prize winning play- 
wright, to our campus on Oct. 24 and 25. Princ' 
pal Investigator: Mr. Jimm Cox, Theatre. 

GRANTS PROPOSALS SUBMITTED: 1) A preliminary 
proposal entitled"Citizenship Preparedness Pro- 
gram" has been submitted to the SC Office of 
Title I-A (Community Service & Continuing Edu- 
cation Program) for $4321. The proposal outline 
a system-wide approach to providing continuing 
education offerings designed to prepare non- 
citizens for the naturalization process in SC 
Principal Investigator: Ms. Cindy Belmont, 
Continuing Education. (2) An application for 
$800 has been submitted to the Foreign Policy 
Association to cover the honoraria and travel 
for guest speakers in the Great Decision course 
spring semester. Principal Investigator: Dr. 
Conway Henderson, Social & Behavioral Sciences. 



ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 



Term 


Elected/ 


Ends 


Appointed 


81 


e 


82 


e 


80 


e 


82 


e 


81 


e 


80 


e 



FACULTY MEMBERS ON UNIVERSITY COMMITTEES 



CULTURAL AFFAIRS 



Name 

R. Predmore,FAL, Ch. 

D. Bennett, BA 
L. Holcombe, SBS 

E. White, E 

F. Riddle, SM 
C. Talley, N 



Term 
Ends 



80 
82 
82 



Elected/ 
Appointed 



Name 

B. Lindsay, FAL, Ch. 

S. Cherry, FAL 

T. Hawkins, E 

T. Owens, SM 



FACILITIES UTILIZATION AND PLANNING 



ACADEMIC FORWARD PLANNING 



Term 


Elected/ 






Ends 


Appointed 


Name 




80 


e 


C. Henderson, SBS, 


Ch 


80 


e 


D. Glenn, BA 




81 


e 


R. Sobczak, SM 




81 


e 


J. Cox, FAL 




82 


e 


W. Bruce, E 




82 


e 


C. Willmot, N 





ADMISSIONS AND PETITIONS 



Elected/ 
Appointed 



Term 
Ends 

80 
81 
81 
82 
80 
82 
81 
81 



ATHLETIC ADVISORY 



Name 



Cohens , E 
Eggers, N, Ch. 
Addleton, E 
Davis , N 
Jacobsohn, SM 
Colloms, FAL 
Bab in, SBS 
Knight, FAL 



Term 


Elected/ 


Ends 


Appointed 


80 


e 


81 


a 


82 


e 


82 


a 



Name 

R. Luttrell, BA, Ch, 

T. Allen, SBS 

M. Strossner, N 

J. Lewis, SM 



Term 
Ends 

80 
80 
81 
81 
81 
82 



FACULTY IffiLFARE 



Elected/ 




Appointed 


Name 


e 


C. Lee, N 


a 


W. Reitmeier, E 


a 


E. Krauter, SBS 


a 


K. Hicks, FAL 


a 


L. Moore, SM 


e 


G. Mapley, SBS 



Ch. 



Term 


Elected/ 






Ends 


Appointed 


Name 


81 


e 


J. 


Stuart, SM, Ch. 


80 


e 


R. 


Simpkins , SM 


81 


e 


C. 


Coggins, N 


81 


e 


R. 


Walker, SBS 


82 


e 


J. 


Bowman , E 


82 


e 


J. 


Yehl, SBS 


LIBRARY 








Term 


Elected/ 






Ends 


Appointed 


Name 


80 


a 


K. 


Fitzpatrick, BA 


81 


e 


D. 


Lambert, SBS, Ch 


81 


a 


M. 


Harker, N 


80 


e 


N. 


Hendra, N 


82 


e 


J. 


D. Wilson, SBS 


82 


a 


A. 


Crosland, FAL 



Page 2 



LIFE LONG LEARNING 



UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 



Term 
Ends 

80 

81 
81 
80 
82 
82 



Elected/ 
Appointed 



Name 

R. Robe, FAL, Ch. 

C. Stavely, SM 

D. Ledford, N 
M. Jilling, BA 

F. Kohlenstein, E 

J. Lehman, SBS 



Term 
Ends 

80 
80 
81 
81 
82 



Elected/ 
Appointed 



Name 

J. B. Wilson, E. 

C. Schwartz, N 

E. Thomas, FAL 

H. McDuffie, FAL, Ch 

H. Kelly, L 



PROMOTION AND TENURE 



UNIVERSITY MARSHAL 



Term 
Ends 

81 
82 
82 
80 
82 
81 
81 
80 
80 



Elected/ 
Appointed 



Name 

E. Davidson, FAL, Ch. 

J. Kizer, SBS 

L. Moore, SM 

E. Seko, FAL 

E. Ladd, E 

G. Sims, N 

G. Newberry, SM 

A. Henderson, SBS 

M. Drucker, BA 



Term Elected/ 
Ends Appointed 

80 e 



Name 



F. Wenz, SBS 



STUDENT AFFAIRS 



Term 


Elected/ 


Ends 


Appointed 


80 


e 


81 


e 


81 


e 


82 


e 



Name 

H. Quinn, N 

J. Davisson, E 

M. Ulmer, SM, Ch. 

J. Barnes, SM 



STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 



Term 
Ends 

80 
81 
81 
80 
82 
82 



Elected/ 
Appointed 



Name 

B. Edwards, E, Ch. 

K. Top ley, E 

J. Dye, L 

H. Crocker, N 

R. Elmore, SBS 

L, Campbell, SM 



USCS—THiS WEEK 

MONDAY, OCTOBER 5 — SUNDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1979 



Monday, October 8 

Last day to drop a course or withdraw without a grade of WF being recorded; Last day to apply 
for December graduation, 

12:00 noon — Gamma Beta Phi meeting . Library Classroom Building 261. For more information call 
Elizabeth Davidson, ext. 434. 

5:00-5:30 pm — Gamma Beta Phi meeting . Library Classroom Building 261. For more information call 
Elizabeth Davidson, ext. 434. 

6:00 pm — USCS women's volleyball game at College of Charleston . For more information call 
Sports Information, ext. 250. 

7:00 pm — International Film Series "The Blue Angel" . Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more informa- 
tion contact Regis Robe, ext. 430. 

Tuesday, October 9 

8:30 a.m. — Family Dissolution: Divorce or Death - Nursing Continuing Education Seminar. Fee 
$35.00. For more information contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 

1:30 pm — Golf tournament at Lan-Yair . For more information contact Sports Information, ext 
250. 

Wednesday, October 1^ 

6:00 pm — USCS women's volleyball game against Furman . Hodge Center Gjai. For more information 
contact Sports Information, ext. 250. 

7:00 pm — USCS convocations series presents Robert Theobald . Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more 
information contact Bryan Lindsay, ext. 244. 

Thursday, October 11 - No activities scheduled 



Friday, October 12 

1:15, 2:30 and 3:45 — Tennis Matches . 2nd Annual Piedmont Foundation Scholarship Tennis 
Tournament/Faculty Division. For more information contact Student Affairs, ext. 336. 



Saturday, October 1 3 

Tennis Classic - Oct. 13 & 14 - 20 & 21 - For more information contact Dr. Eaglin, ext. 426. 

8:00 pm — Wine and Cheese Party . Hodge Center. $2.00 per person. For more information contact 
University Relations, ext. 203. 



Sunday, October 14 

2:30-4:00 pm - Art Opening - Mary Ellen Suitt. Library Gallery. Reception. For more information 
contact Katie Hicks, ext. 335. 







Vol. IV, No. 7 A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS 



October 15, 1979 



THE FACULTY ADVISORY COMMITTEE will meet today 
(Monday, Oct. 15) at 12:15 in the Administra- 
tive Conference room. 

THE FACULTY SENATE will meet October 19th at 
12:15 in L267. 

ALL FACULTY and STAFF: From the Public Safety 
Office - On Thursday, Oct. 18, at 1:30, a fire 
drill has been scheduled for all buildings on 
campus. This drill is a timed pre-announced 
drill. Please cooperate in evacuating all 
buildings in a prompt and safe manner when 
the alarm sounds. This drill is required by 
state regulations. Faculty should announce 
this fire drill to all classes. Buildings 
will be checked to make sure that the evacu- 
ation of all persons has been made. During 
the week of October 22nd, the campus is 
scheduled for a fire inspection of all 
buildings by the State Fire Marshall. 

FROM EVAN KRAUTER, Chairman, Facilities, 
Utilization and Planning Cormiittee: One of 
the stated functions of FUP are to "advise 
the administration on allocation of facilities 
--buildings and grounds." If you recognize 
problems with current utilization of space 
or are unsatisfied with current utilization 
or allocation of space especially if it in- 
volves teaching and scholarship please con- 
tact me. 

ALL FACULTY: Mike Dressman has resigned his 
position of faculty secretary to become a 
chairperson. Lou Hunley is the new faculty 
secretary and chairperson of the Senate. 
Faculty may call Lou at ext. 371 or at her 
home phone 582-7920. 

FROM JIM BROWN: Those who have not returned 
the "South Carolina Inventory of International 
Experience and Skills" are urged to do so at 
their earliest convenience. If you do not 
intend to complete the survey, please return 
it with a note to that effect. Thank you. 



FACULTY & STAFF 1979-80 ANNUAL GIVING CAM- 
PAIGN FOR THE use EDUCATIONAL FUND is being 
conducted during the month of October. 
Charles Quinnelly is the Chairman for our 
campus, and he will be assisted by a repre- 
sentative from each division or department. 
Commitment cards will be distributed this 
week. Gifts to be used at USCS and/or for 
a specific purpose must be noted on the 
committment cards. Contributions may be 
made by cash, check, or payroll deduction 
and are tax deductible. Faculty and staff 
are commended for their prior contributions 
and thanked in advance for their support of 
USC/USCS this year. 

ADVISEMENT FOR SPRING SEMESTER will be held 
from Monday, Oct. 29 thru Friday, Nov. 9. 
During this period, students are to meet 
with their advisors and complete the "advise- 
ment" form and the "request for classes" 
form. 

STUDENT AFFAIRS is now in the process of 
compiling information for the Spring Activi- 
ties Calendar. Anyone that is planning an 
event or anyone that has already scheduled 
an event or activity should send the infor- 
mation to Jerry Baker so that it may be in- 
cluded in the calendar. 

WHO'S WHO AMONG STUDENTS IN AMERICAN UNI- 
VERSITIES AND COLLEGES? Nominations by 
faculty and staff are now being accepted in 
the Student Affairs Office through Oct. 19. 
Students should be considered whose aca- 
demic standing, participation in extra- 
curricular activities and community service 
are decidedly above average. For further 
information on nominations call Jerry Baker, 
ext. 339. 

TO ALL FACULTY: Book requests for Spring 
are due in the bookstore today (Monday, Oct. 
15). If you have not already completed your 
request please do so at once! 



ALL FACULTY AND STAFF: The following changes 
should be made in the USCS campus directories: 
Doris Bennett - 425; Jim Brown - 433; Don 
Browning - 289; Beth Conard - 220; Kathy 
Fitzpatrick - 285; Marilyn Lipscomb - 385; 
John McAlhany - 280; Bert Menees - 283; Pam 
White - 386. 

BULLETIN BOARD 

OKTOBERFEST IS A TRADITIONAL GERMAN HARVEST 
FESTIVAL -- a time to "eat, drink, and be 
merry." The institution of the Oktoberfest 
has been brought to Spartanburg by the Ger- 
man community and there are now several 
Oktoberfest celebrations in the area. The 
largest of these will be this weekend at the 
Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium. Tickets are 
still available for Friday night, Oct. 19, 
for those interested in a buffet of German 
food, beer, a German band and dancing. 
Tickets are $15 and are available from Mr. 
Gerhard Faulstich, 350 Heathwood Drive, 
579-2927. 

THE SGA AND THE DAVENPORT CENTER are spon- 
soring Alcohol Awareness Week Oct. 29, 31 
and Nov. 2. Programs will be held in the 
Tukey Lecture Theatre at 12:15. 

CHUCK MANGIONE will be performing at the 
Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium on Nov. 10. 
This event is sponsored by the USCS Student 
Activities Office and represents USCS' first 
venture into a "big name" entertainment 
event. Faculty, staff and students may pur- 
chase tickets for $4.50, $3.50 and $2.50 
with an ID from the Student Activities 
Office. Only two tickets per person may be 
purchased. Faculty, staff and students are 
urged to support this event and purchase 
tickets early, since it is expected that 
Mangione will draw a large crowd. More 
information may be obtained by calling the 
Student Activities Office, ext. 336. 

THE I.D. MACHINE will be on campus Oct. 17, 
18, 19 and 22. For information on times 
that I.D.'s will be made call Student 
Activities Office, ext. 336. 

THE SHOESTRING PLAYERS will open their 1979- 
80 season with the performance of "Glass 
Menagerie" to be presented Oct. 25, 26, 27 
and 28. For information and reservations 
call the Shoebox, ext. 397. All performances 
will be held in the Tukey Lecture Theatre. 



HERMENIA T. GARDNER was a presenter in a 
workshop entitled Integrating Health Service 
and Social Services at the South Carolina 
Commission On Aging's Fourth Annual State 
Network Conference, Oct. 9, at the Carolina 
Inn in Columbia. Hermenia presented the 
Cross-generational Interdisciplinary Model 
for Long Term Community Care she directed 
at Columbia University. 

BRYAN LINDSAY has a rather active September, 
conducting special classes in Future 
Studies for groups of gifted and talented 
students at Dorman High School and Wade 
Hampton High School, in Greenville. Bryan 
also appeared on a special segment of the 
WSPA week-end show, "Here and Now," where 
he discussed various aspects of education 
of gifted and talented learners. That show 
aired the week-end of Oct. 5-7. Bryan is 
scheduled to tape another similar program 
later this month; broadcast dates for that 
show have not been announced. 

ED WHITE, School of Education, conducted 
two workshops at the 4th Annual South Caro- 
lina Science Council Conference at Columbia 
College on Oct. 5 and 6. The first session 
"Batteries and Bulbs" was for Elementary 
teachers. In a session for middle school 
teachers, he demonstrated the use of the 
Human Science Program recently developed 
under grants from the National Science 
Foundation by the Biological Science 
Curriculum Study Group. 

DR. JEANNE STUART, biology, has been asked 
by the National Science Foundation to review 
grant proposals for the Local Course 
Improvement for Undergraduate Science Edu- 
cation (LOCI) Program. 



The Chancellor has directed that as of Monday, October 15, the following 
procedures are in effect for the Word Processing Center: 

1. Each department or school now has a monthly typing, printing and dupli- 
cating budget allocation for the Word Processing Center. Charges for various 
jobs and individual department procedures may be obtained from the appropriate 
budget officer. *. 

2. Twice daily pickup and delivery service will be provided at the Science 
and Math office; the School of Humanities and Science Office; the School of 
Education Office; and the School of Nursing Office. 

3. The door to the printing and duplicating center is now to be locked 
at all times, and access will be limited to staff. Provided a proper 
requisition is filled out, faculty and staff may still give any needed in- 
structions to the typists. 

4. The following priority system is in effect. 

Priority I: classroom related academic work and official faculty business 
Priority II: Official USCS materials intended for external use 
Priority III: Internal reports or other documents 
Priority IV: Personal typing such as journal articles or reports and 
public service projects. 

Full information, including a copy of the complete memo which gives an 
explanation of procedures and the reasons for the changes to the new system 
is available in each division or departmental office. The Director for 
Information Services will be happy to discuss the changes with faculty or 
staff and hopes to incorporate this feedback into a new Word Processing 
Policies and Procedures Manual, which will be published in January. 



In August 1978, the South Carolina Attorney General's Office issued an 
opinion that "a faculty member of a state college or university may grieve to 
the State Employee Grievance Committee once he has completed six months of 
satisfactory service or after an official extension of not to exceed three 
months and he is appraised satisfactorily." This opinion will obviously have 
a drastic impact on the entire tenure system as it now exists on this campus 
and other campuses in South Carolina. The state House of Representatives last 
fal-1 passed a bill specifically exempting teaching faculty at state institutions 
from the grievance procedures, but the State Senate refused to act. Because 
the provisions of the bill, the attorney general's opinion, and the existing 
law are so important to all faculty at USCS, a copy is attached to this week's 
FYI. Faculty are urged to study this information carefully. 



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uses -THIS WEEK 



Monday, October 15 -- Sunday, October 21, 1979 



Monday, October 15 

Midpoint in Semester 

Book Requests for Spring Semester are due today. 

12:15 pm -- Faculty Advi story Committee meeting . Administration Building Conference Room. 

6:00 pm — Volleyball game in Hodge Center. UNC-A, Coker, USCS. 

Tuesday, October 16 
No activities scheduled 

Wednesday, October 17 

5:00-6:00 pm -- Gamma Beta Phi meeting . Tukey Lecture Theatre. 

6:30-8:30 pm -- Hunter and Gun Safety shortcourse . Library Building 276. Fee $5.00. Contact 
Continuing Education 422. 

7:30 pm -- " Mainstreaming of Handicapped Children in the Public Schools " -presented by 
School District 6 in conjunction with the International Year of The Child. Spartanburg 
County Library. 

Thursday, October 18 

1:30 pm -- Fire Drill . Scheduled for all Buildings. For details check FYI. 



1:40-6:45 pm -- S.C. Textile Show film . Library Building 255. For more information contact 
Arthur George, ext. 412. 

7:00-9:00 pm -- Buying a Home shortcourse . Fee $10.00. Library Building 279. For more 
information contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 



tt 



Friday, October 19 

12:15 pm -- Faculty Senate Meeting . Library 268. 

2:00-5:00 pm — Do It Yourself Decorating shortcourse . Fee $10.00. Media Center 328. For 
more information contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 



Saturday, October 20 
Tennis Tournament - Saturday and Sunday 



8:00-12:00 pm -- fall Dinner Dance . Hodge Center Lobby. For more information contact 
Student Activities Office, ext. 336. 







Vol. IV. No. 8 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS 



October 22, 1979 



I. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FROM MIKE BRUCE: Transportation requests 
win be accepted Monday through Friday 
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. only. No re- 
quests will be accepted after 5 p.m. or 
on Weekends. 

THE LADIES OF THE USCS FACULTY AND STAFF, 
and faculty wives, are invited to have 
lunch with Miss Joyce Bradbury, former 
headmistress, Sunderland, England, on 
November 13 at 12:15 p.m. in Room H-248. 
Cost of the lunch will be $3.50. Reser- 
vations may be made by calling Joe Greer, 
ext. 378 by f^riday, November 9. 

THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION will be hosting 
Miss Joyce Bradbury of Sunderland, England 
on November 11, 12 and 13, Miss Bradbury 
will lecture in class on Nov. 12 at 
11:00 (Tukey:Theatre) and on Nov. 13 at 
10:50 (Media, 122). She will also present 
a lecture at the open meeting of Kappa 
Delta Pi on Monday evening Nov. 12, at 
7:30 pm (Tukey Theatre). All faculty, 
staff and students are invited to attend 
any or all of her presentations. 



ON TUESDAY, 
of the S.C. 
Health Educa 
vehicle emis 
The truck wi 
Center parki 
Tuesday. The 
measure the 
with this in 
can suggest 
adjustment, 
the availabi 
please empha 
tions or sti 
ticipant (i 
any repairs 
information 
ext. 372. 



Oct. 23, the Spartanburg Branch 
Lung Association and the USCS 
tion Program are having the 
sions testing truck on campus. 
11 be parked in the Hodge 
ng lot throughout the day 
equipment will assess and 
emissions from the vehicle an 
formation the representative 
the appropriate mechanical 
Please announce to your classes 
lity of this free service. Also, 
size there are no legal obliga- 
uplations involved for the par- 
e. they don't have to make 
to their vehicles. For more 
or questions call Bruce Wilson, 



ADVISEMENT FOR SPRING SEMESTER will be held 
from Monday, Oct. 29 thru Friday, Nov. 9. 
During this period, students are to meet 
with their advisors and complete the "advise- 
ment" form and the "request for classes" form. 

STUDENT AFFAIRS is now in the process of com- 
piling information for the Spring Activities 
Calendar. Anyone that is planning an event 
or anyone that has already scheduled an event 
or activity should send the information to 
Jerry Baker so that it may be included in 
the calendar. 

COUNSELING AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTER: 
Arthur George announces that an excellent 
Career Exploration and Opportunity Program 
was recently launched at USCS. A number of 
Company Recruiters will be available to pro- 
vide career information as well as to con- 
duct personal interviews. Recruiters are 
enthusiastic about this program. Faculty, 
Staff and Students are encouraged to take 
advantage of this program. Company represen- 
tatives will answer questions and to explain 
business and industry's expectation of college 
graduates. You may arrange classroom visita- 
tions by calling extension 414. 

S.C. HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION will conduct a 
Career Fair at USCS, Monday, Oct. 22nd. from 
3 to 5 p.m. in the Hodge Center. Between 40 
and 50 hospitals and nursing homes will be 
represented. Faculty and students are en- 
couraged to participate. Interested students 
should sign-up in the Career Developement 
Center, M-231. 

ALL STUDENTS who are interested in Part-time 
of Full-time employment this semester should 
visit and sign-up in the Placement Office, 
M-213. For further information call Arthur 
George, ext. 414. 

USCS FACULTY AND STAFF - There will be a tax 
sheltered annuity representative from the 
Valic Annuity Company on campus Thursday, 

(continued) 



October 25th. If you are interested in talking 
with him please call the Personnel Office and 
set up an appointment for that date. 

GRANT APPLICATIONS SUBMITTED: 
An application for renewal of USCS' Title IV, 
Special Services to Disadvantaged Students 
program called "Counseling Outreach Reception 
Exchange" (CORE) has been submitted to DHEW/OE 
for $85,439. A part of the Developmental 
Services Department, CORE proposes to provide 
special support services to 140 academically 
and/or economically or handicapped freshmen 
per year. Project Director: Mr. Malcolm 
Sanders. 

The following applications have been submitted 
to the use Research & Productive Scholarship 
Committee: 

1) "Mill Village Land Use and Settlement Pat- 
terns", $455. Principal Investigator: Mr. Ed 
Babin, Geography. 

2) "Effects of Co-Observer Evaluative State- 
ments on Imitative Aggression in Young Child- 
ren", $2560. Principal Investigator: Dr. Leo 
Bonner, Early Childhood Education. 

3) "Biochemical Characterization of Antitumor 
Drug Resistant CHO Cells", SHOO. Principal 
Investigator: Dr. Bob Simpkin, Biology. 

4) "The Legacy of Family Murder", $2918. 
Principal Investigator: Dr. Fred Wenz, 
Sociology. 

REMINDER TO ALL NEW FACULTY: There will be 
two advisors training workshops this week. 
Tuesday, Oct. 23, L264 - 1:30-3:30 pm 
Friday, Oct. 26, L268 - 1:30-3:30 pm. 
Each session will include the distribution 
of advisors manual and discussion of policies 
and procedures. 

II. BULLETIN BOARD 

THE SGA AND THE DAVENPORT CENTER are spon- 
soring Alcohol Awareness Week Oct. 29, 31 
and Nov. 2. Programs will be held in the 
Tukey Lecture Theatre at 12:15. 

THE SHOESTRING PLAYERS will open their 1979- 
80 season with the performance of "Glass 
Menagerie" to be presented Oct. 25, 26, 27 
and 28. For information and reservations call 
the Shoebox, ext. 397. All performances will 
be held in the Tukey Lecture Theatre. 

FROM EARL GORDON: A Thank You Note to all 
those persons who served on our USCS booth 
at the Westgate Mall on Friday and Saturday, 
Oct. 5 and 5. This community event was a 
success. Each year we carry our program to 
the public. 



CHUCK MANGIONE will be performing at the 
Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium on Nov. 10. 
This event is sponsored by the USCS Student 
Activities Office. Faculty, staff and stu- 
dents may purchase tickets for $4.50, $3.50 
and $2.50 with an ID from the Student - 
Activities Office. More information may be 
obtained by calling the Student Activities 
Office, ext. 336. 

CAROL COGGINS recently participated in a 
workshop sponsored by Spartanburg General 
Hospital titled Neonatal Nursing Care. Carol 
spoke on "Counseling Parents of High Risk 
Infants. " 

ED WHITE, School of Education, spoke to the 
members of the District 6, Student Education 
Association on Oct. 17. His comments focused 
on the employment opportunities for pro- 
spective teachers and the USCS Teacher 
Education Professional Preparation Program. 

THERE WILL BE A MEETING OF THE CHESS CLUB at 
12:00 p.m. Oct. 31, 1979, in room 247A, 
Hodge Center. All interested faculty, staff, 
and students are invited to attend, irre- 
spective of their level of competency in the 
game. Dr. Seko, Chess Club Advisor, would 
like to make a special plea to women mem- 
bers of our school to take up the game, 
because chess is not a "macho" game, as 
some people so erroneously think it is, but 
an intellectual pastime befitting anyone 
who is here in the pursuit of knowledge. 

THE STATE HIGHER EDUCATION COMMISSION has 
recommended the following budgets for South 
Carolina four-year college campuses for FY 
1981 (percent increases are in parentheses). 
USC-Columbia, $75 million (11.9%); Clemson 
$41.8 million (9.8%); Medical University, 
$69 million (6%); The Citadel, $9.6 million 
(14.5%); S.C. State $11.1 million (3.7%); 
Winthrop $11.8 million (22.6%); College of 
Charleston $11.4 million (5.9%); Francis 
Marion $6.2 million (14.1%); Lander $4.1 
million (8.7%) USC-Aiken $3.6 million (4.8%) 
Coastal Carolina $4.2 million (3%) USCS 
$4.8 million (7.7%). 



RECENTLY, TWO NEW BENEFITS have been 
announced for members of the South Caro- 
lina Army National Guard. The Federal 
Government now pays a $1500 cash bonus 
to selected individuals who have gradu- 
ated from high school or who are currently 
high school seniors. This bonus is paid 
after the individuals complete three 
months of active duty training. The State 
of South Carolina also offers National 
Guard members up to $500 per year for 
four years of educational assistance, which 
can be used at USCS. This money is available 
to all Guard members who are actively par- 
ticipating in units, and many of the older 
USCS students may fall into this category 
You may wish to keep these facts in mind 
during the advisement process. 

PIC'N PAY SHOE CO. will be interviewing in 
M-213 on October 25, 1979. Please sign up 
in the Placement Office if you are an 
interested student. 



uses- -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, OCTOBER 22 -- SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28 



Monday, October 22 

8:30-4:30 pm -- Real Estate - Course II. Continuing Education course. Library building 276. 
For more information contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 

3:00-5:00 pm -- Career Fair. Conducted by the S.C. Hospital Association. Hodge Center Lobby. 
For more information contact Career Development Center, ext. 414. 

Tuesday, October 23 

1:00-3:30 pm -- New Faculty Advisement Workshop. Library building 264. For more information 
contact Carol Smith, ext. 336. 

Wednesday, October 24 

12-1:00 pm -- Student Workstudy Workshop. Administration building 209. For more information 
contact Al Gray, ext. 226. 

7:30 pm -- A public performance by Edward Albee. Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more information 
contact Jimm Cox, ext. 397. 

Thursday, October 25 

9:25 am -- Creative Writing workshop by Edward Albee. Place-TBA. For more information 
contact Jimm Cox, ext. 397. 

1:00 pm -- Creative Writing workshop by Edward Albee. Place-TBA. For more information contact 
Jimm Cox, ext. 397. 

7:30 pm -- "Glass Menagerie" - Tukey Lecture Theatre. Tickets $2.00. For more information 
contact Shoebox, ext. 397. 



Friday, October 26 



12-1:00 pm -- Student Workstudy Workshop. Administration Building 209. For more information 
contact Al Gray, ext. 226. 

1:30-3:30 pm -- New Faculty Advisement Workshop. Library building 268. For more information 
contact Carol Smith, ext. 336. 

11:50-3:00 pm -- AMS meeting. Media 217. For more information contact Ron Young, ext. 285. 
7:30 pm -- "Glass Menagerie" - Tukey Lecture Theatre. See Thursday, 7:30 pm. 



Saturday, October 27 

7:30 pm -- "Glass Menagerie". Tukey Lecture Theatre. See Thursday, 7:30 pm. 



Sunday, October 28 

3:00 pm -- "Glass Menagerie". Tukey Lecture Theatre. See Thursday, 7:30 pm. 




FV. 



n 









Vol. IV. No. 9 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS October 29, 1979 



ALL FACULTY are to submit a list of their 
evening advisement hours for the CAR period 
(Oct. 29 - Nov. 9) to their dean's office 
on Monday, Octo. 29. The evening advisement 
hours will be posted in the dean's offices 
and compiled and distributed on campus to 
help our evening students locate advisors 
and participate in CAR. 

THE LADIES OF THE USCS faculty and staff, 
and faculty wives, are invited to have 
lunch with Miss Joyce Bradbury, former 
headmistress, Sunderland, England, on 
Nov. 13 at 12.15 pm in Romm H-248. Cost 
of the lunch will be $3.50. Reservations 
may be made by calling Jo Greer, ext. 378 
by Friday, Nov. 9. 



THE SCHOOL OF EDUCAT 
Joyce Bradbury of Su 
on Nov. 11, 12 and 1 
lecture in class on 
Tukey Theatre and on 
M122. Shee will also 
the open meeting of 
Mov. 12 at 7:30 pm i 
faculty, staff and s 
to attend any or all 



ION will be hosting Miss 
nderland, England 
3. Miss Bradbury will 
Nov. 12 at 11:00 in 
Nov. 13 at 10:50 in 
present a lecture at 
Kappa Delta Pi on 
n Tukey Theatre. All 
tudents are invited 
of her presentations. 



THE AUDIOVISUAL PRODUCTION CENTER will be 
purchasing a limited number of 16mm films 
to add to the USCS film library. The source 
for this order will be TIME-LIFE which 
lists titles from many areas including 
the ASCENT OF MAN series and the NOVA series. 
Faculty may look at the TIME-LIFE catalog 
in the ARC and make requests through Nov. 
7, 1979. 

GRANT PROPOSALS SUBMITTED: 
An application for renewal of USCS' Title IV, 
Talent Search project called "Piedmont 
Area Talent Search" (PATS) has been submitted 
to DHEW/OE for $85,399. A component of the 
Developmental Services Department, PATS pro- 
poses to assist approximately 1,000 Piedmont 
youth of financial and cultural need and 



academic potential in the completion of their 
secondary education or admission to completion 
of postsecondary education. Principal Investi- 
gator: Dr. Jane Davisson, Director of 
Developmental Services. 

The following applications have been sub- 
mitted to the American Cancer Society/USC 
Research Fund: 

1) "Victim and Family Attitudes About Cancer 
in Selected Neighborhoods", $3400. Principal 
Investigator: Drs. Ed Babin (Geography) and 
Fred Wenz (Sociology). 

2) "Locational Traits of Coastal Carolina 
Esophageal Cancer Victims," $2320. Principal 
Investigator: Dr. Ed Babin. 

GRANT AWARDED: Dr. Jim Brown, Director of 
International Education, has received a grant 
of $1648 to administer the Southeastern 
Regional Seminar in African Studies program 
again this year. Congratulations, Dr. Brown. 

BULLETIN BOARD 

GREEN/WHITE DAY AT USCS 

Monday, November 5, has been designated as 
Green/White Day. At 12:15 pm, Tom Davis as 
Ring Master will introduce to the Student Body, 
faculty, and staff, the 1979-80 spectacular 
array of athletes who represent USCS in seven 
intercollegiate sports and soccer. There will 
be music, dancing girls, women' s'power ' volley- 
ball , judo, men's basketball, and more, all 
presented with circus flair. 

Burger King and USCS will provide a Rifles 
Speical of a Whopper , and order of fires, and. 
an orange dring for just $1.00. This offer is 
limited to the first 300 fans. So come out to 
the G.B. Hodge Center, at 12:15 and have food, 
fun, and maybe win a Chuck Mangione Album. 
Monday evening, 6:00 pm, Nov. 5, the women's 
"power" volleyball team will host Presbyterian 
College in the G.B. Hodge Center. These gals 
under the direction of Coach Bowman, play 
volleyball with such finesse that you don't 
want to come out, if you have a heart condi- 
tion. So, if you can take it, come out an 
enjoy an art form which is truly beautiful 

continued. 



And then, stay for the presentation of Bill 
Hinson's 1979-80 Rifles basketball squd. The 
team will square off at about 7 pm in the 
first evening Green/White Intrasquad scrim- 
mage in USCS's History. So, come out with 
your friends and let's show just how much 
spirit uses can generate. There will be 
drawings for Chuck Mangione Album's and 
free throw shooting for coke's and money. 
Oh yest, the Cheerleaders will be trying 
to get you to wear green or white on Mon- 
day, to show your team choice. 



FROM Dr. Seko, Chess Club Advisor: There 
will be a meeting of the Chess Club at 
12:00 pm, Oct. 31, 1979, in room 247A, 
Hodge Center. All interested faculty, staff 
and students are invited to attend, 
irrespective of their level of competency 
in the game. I would like to make a special 
plea to women members of our school to take 
up the game, because chess is not a "macho" 
game, as some people so erroneously think 
it is, but an intellectual pastime be- 
fitting anyone who is here in the pursuit of 
knowledge. 



FACULTY SENATE MEETING NOTES 

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA AT SPARTANBURB 

October 19, 1979 

PRESIDING: Lou Hunley, Faculty Chairperson 

ATTENDANCE: Business - R. Luttrell ; Education: no voting members - Becky Edwards, Carol 
Smith; Fine Arts, Languages & Literature - R. Predmore, E, Seko, K. Hicks; 
Library - E. McCaughrin; Nursing - N. Babb, C. Cogdell, M. Harker, A. Kloepper; 
Science/Math - J. Barnes, L. Moore, M. Ulmer; Social Sciences - T. Allen, J. 
Brown, R. Romine, J. Yehl ; Members -at-large - V. Burnie, E. Gordon, F. Riddle. 

I. Minutes of General Faculty Meeting of September 14, 1979, and Faculty Senate Meeting of 
September 21, 1979 were approved. 

II. Announcements and Remarks 

A. The text of Michael Dressman's letter of resignation as Faculty Secretary was read 
for the record. The recent appointment of Dr. Dressman as Chairperson of the Division 
of Fine Arts, Languages and Literature was cited as the reason for his resignation. 

B. The Faculty Advisory Committee members are accepting suggestions for Faculty Senate 
Chairperson-Elect before the next FAC meeting November 9. The Advisory Committee 
will nominate two persons. 

C. President Holderman will visit the campus November 6-7. 

D. R. Luttrell will organize faculty input into the selection of awards, speakers for 
special occasions. M.B. Ulmer and B. Lindsay also serve on this sub-committee of 
the Faculty Advisory Comnittee. 

II. Committee Reports 

A. Academic Affairs 

The Senate approved SMUS 155, 156. 

B. Faculty Advisory Committee 

First reading of proposal to amend the Faculty Constitution and By-laws: 

"Two students, appointed by the Chancellor, shall serve on the 
Academic Affairs Committee." 

C. Promotion and Tenure Committee 

First reading of the document entitled "Promotion Criteria for Library Faculty. 
The major criteria categories in the document are: 

1. Competence as librarian, how demonstrated and.documented; 

2. Service to University, examples; 

3. Scholarship and research activities, description, examples; 

4. Qualifications for Librarian, Associate Librarian, Assistant Librarian; 



5. Tenure regulations. 

D. Student Affairs Committee - No Report 

E. Academic Forward Planning 

Senate passed two motions about the proposed Cooperative Education Program: 

1. The Senate of the University of South Carolina at Spartanburg expresses 
positive interest in the Cooperative Education program as written in the 
printed synopsis of Oct. 19, 1979. 

2. The Faculty Secretary is to instruct the Academic Forward Planning Committee 
to consult with the Administration on the possibilities of compensation for 
faculty members involved with the Cooperative Education Program. 

This is a summary of the discussion which precluded the above Senate action: 

1. Academic Forward Planning had already given general approval of Cooperative 
Education Program as outlined in attached synopsis. 

2. An estimated 35 students and 30 businessess and other concerns have expressed 
interest in program to date. 

3. Placement of students will require faculty participation as supervisors. 

4. Renewal of funding for program is contingent upon faculty suport and involvement. 

5. As presently conceived, the plan does not provide for faculty monetary payment 
or released time. 

6. Meaningful faculty involvement, according to one view, would require considerable 
interfacing with employers. Another position was that much of the contact work 
could be handled by the director. 

7. It is not clear what impact implementation might have on the USCS budget. 

8. Interested parties should direct comments and questions to the next Academic 
Forward Planning meeting. 

IV. Unfinished Business 

The following motions were adopted by the Senate: 

1. The Senate requests that Dr. Sansbury postpone the presentation of the Senate- 
approved preliminary grievance procedure from Spring 1979, until after the open 
faculty meeting of October 31, 1979. (see the Omsbudmen Plan.) 

2 The Forum on Grievance Procedures and State Law 154 will be held on Wednesday, 
October 31, between 12:15 and 1:30. 

Lou Hunley announced that Dr. Jeanne Stuart, Chairperson of the Welfare Committee, 
and the other members of the Welfare Committee were planning the Forum. 

The presiding officer reminded the Senate to urge the faculty members to study the 
documents printed in FYI on October 15. The attorney general's office has interpreted 
S.C. Law 154 of 1977 as designating faculty members as state employees under con- 
tinuing contract after six months employment. At present, university faculty members 



may legally appeal to the State Employee Review Board. The USC Spartanburg Faculty 
Senate asked to be under the State Employee Review Board in Fall, 1978. In April, 
1979, the Faculty Senate also adopted an Omsbudmen's Plan as Stage One in the 
process for the Faculty Greivance Procedures. The South Carolina Senate Education 
Committee is conducting an open hearing on November 15. The Columbia Faculty Senate 
proposes to lobby for an amendment to Law 154 which excludes faculty of state 
universities and colleges from classification as State Employees. The purpose 
of the Forum on the Spartanburg campus is to provide each faculty member with 
information and to hear the ideas of others. Spartanburg faculty members have 
a number of decisions to make: 1) to join the Columbia Senate action plan or 
2) to support the action of last year or 3) to add to the procedures requested 
last year or 4) to design new procedures or 5) to do nothing. 

There was no further business; the meeting was adjourned. 



uses— THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, OCTOBER 29 -- SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1979 



MONDAY, October 29 

ADVISEMENT FOR SPRING BEGINS 

12 noon-l:00 pm -- Sk1 Club Meeting . Library Building 259. 

12. noon -1:30 pm -- Alcohol Awareness Week . Sponsored by the SGA and the Davenport Center. 
Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more information call Student Affairs, ext. 336. 

12:15-1:30 pm -- Called Science Meeting . Administration Building 115. 

3:00-3:30 pm -- Nursing Faculty Meeting . Hodge Center 247 A&B. 

TUESDAY, October 30 

7:00 pm -- " Physical Assessment of the Adult Client ." Seminar - limited to RN's. Fee $45.00. 
Tuesday evenings through Dec. 11. Hodge Center 247. For more information contact Continuing 
Education, ext. 422. 

7:30 pm -- "Parenting Skills. " Sponsored by the Parent Education Project of the S.C. State 
Dept. of Education in conjunction with the International Year of the Child. Spartanburg 
County Library. Free to the public. 



WEDNESDAY, October 31 



12:00 noon -- Alcohol Awareness Week . See Monday, 12 noon for details. 

12:00 noon -- Chess Club Meeting . Hodge Center 247 A. 

12:00 noon-l:30 pm -- Student Nurses Meeting . Library Building 257. 



THURSDAY, November 1 

Deadline for submission of proposals for new courses and for course changes. 

8:00-9:30 pm -- Spartanburg Free Wheelers . Library Building 263. 



FRIDAY, November 2 

12:00 noon -- Alcohol Awareness Week . See Monday, 12 noon for details. 




^ w 



7<n 



lo] . IV. No. 10 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS 



November 5, 1979 



[. OFrlCIAL 

-ROM BRYAN LINDSAY: The faculty advisory 
;ommittee is currently soliciting nomina- 
:ions for the Founders' Day Awards. Any- 
one who has a candidate should submit his 
)r her name with a brief biography and 
-ationale for nomination to Bryan Lindsay, 
rhe committee will meet on Nov. 9th so 
lomi nations should be posted prior to 
:hat date. 

3R. HOLDERMAN will be visiting USCS Tues- 
day and Wednesday, Nov. 6 and 7. Dr. 
lolderman will be meeting with various 
'acuity and administrative members. 

\LL FACULTY - From Cecilia Hood, Assis- 
:ant Editor, Carolana: In an effort to 
improve the faculty section, the Carolana 
;taff is instigating a new program. Your 
pooperation is needed. We want you to 
ell us about any unusual, abnormal, 
lappy, sad, ironic, funny, etc., 
ncident that has occured to you or 
hat you have seen occuring to someone 
Ise here at USCS. Please send all 
)aragraphs to: Cecelia Hood, Assistant 
ditor, Carolana Yearbook. Thank you 
or your time and help. 

ROM AL GRAY: Faculty members are urged 
announce in their classes that several 
/ork-study typing positions are available 
n campus. Interested students should 
ontact the Financial Aid Office in the 
dmini strati on Building. 

ROM DAVID TAYLOR to ALL FACULTY ADVISORS: 
lease note that Biology 440 is for non- 
ajors and will count as their science 
equirement. 

R. F. JOSEPH HODGE, Asst. to the Dean 
f the School of Pharmacy at the Medical 
niversity of Charleston will be on 
ampus Nov. 6 to speak with prospective 
tudents about entering the School of 
harmacy. 9-12, Counseling Center. 



THE LADIES OF THE USCS faculty and staff, and 
faculty wives, are invited to have lunch with 
Miss Joyce Bradbury, former headmistress, 
Sunderland, England on Nov. 13 at 12:15 pm. 
in Room H-248. Cost of the lunch will be $3.50. 
Reservations may be made by calling Joe Greer, 
ext. 378 by Friday, Nov. 9. 

THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION will be hosting Miss 
Joyce Bradbury of Sunderland, England on Nov. 
11, 12 and 13. Miss Bradbury will lecture in 
class on Nov. 12 at 11:00 (Tukey) and on Nov. 
13 at 10:50 (M122). She will also present a 
lecture at the open meeting of Kappa Delta Pi 
on Monday evening Nov. 12, at 7:30 pm (Tukey). 
All faculty, staff, and students are invited 
to attend any or all of her presentations. 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 

GREEN/WHITE DAY -- Faculty, staff and students 
are reminded that today, Monday, Nov. 5 is 
Green/White day at USCS. Everyone is invited 
to join in the festivities which begin at 
12:15 in the Hodge Center. Tonight at 6:00 
everyone is invited to come out and see the 
Women's Volleyball team against Presbyterian^ 
and following the game at about 7:00 the Men's 
Basketball Intrasquad Scrimmage. 

HOLLY CROCKER,- MARTE HARKER, CATHERINE TALLEY 
and MARY STROSSNER all attended a workshop - 
"Practical Approaches to Effect Positive Change" 
in Columbia on Oct. 15. One of the topics 
discussed was tools nurses can utilize to 
effect positive change. Assertiveness in Nursing 
was determined to be an effective tool. Various 
techniques were discussed. 

ADDY KLOEPPER and MARTE HARKER attended the 
UNC sponsored workshop at USC-Union on Oct. 
25. The workshop was entitled "Stress and 
Survival . " 

MR. AND MRS. COMIC SMITH and JOHNNY SMITH ex- 
press their thanks to all members of the USCS 
cormunity who contributed items in their time 
of need. 



PROMOTION AND TENURE C 
MINUTES 



ITTEE 



The Prmotion and Tenure Committee met in the Faculty Conference 
Room at 12:15 PM on 24 September 1979. G. Sims and M. Orucker 
were absent. Now members of the Committee are A. Henderson 
(elected to fill the 1 year npeniritj left by J. Rrown) and 
M. DrLicker (appointed to fill the 1 year opening left by 
R. Young ) . 

L. Moore wos named c ha i rperson-el ec t of the Committee, All 
other members, except the present chairperson, expected to resi'jn 
from or rotate off the Committee by next fall, so no election was 
held. 

A. Henderson moved that the files of all persons who had left the 
faculty be transferred to an inactive file. This would simplify 
the physical handling of those active files to be considered by 
the Committee. The motion carried. It was also noted that the 
chairperson was responsible for retiring the files of professors. 

1 he Committee received a report from G. Newberry entitled 
"Promotion Criteria for Library Faculty." After brief discussion, 
the Committee endorsed the report and forwarded it to the Faculty 
Senatcforaction. 

Ihe Committee received reports from the chair listing faculty 
holding various ranks, faculty requesting promotion and/or tenure, 
and faculty classified by penultimate year. 

The chairperson distributed copies of the tenure regulations and 
terms of employment from the Columbia campus Faculty Manual for 
study and comparison with our manual. 

Ihe chairperson suggested that the Committee present a comprehensive 
program on tenure regulations and practices in America. The 
presentation would be for the entire faculty and would be scheduled 
at the beginning of a semester in a faculty-development time slot 
The Committee endorsed the suggestion. 



Ihe Coiiimi ttce adjourned at 1:30 PM. 






> 






.V^ 



Respectfully submitted, 
Lawrence E. Moore, Secretary 



£M/jrs 



')/?[)/ 7 9 



uses -THIS WEEK 

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5 -- SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1979 



NDAY, Nov. 5 ~ ~ 

30-4:30 pm -- " Real Estate Fundamentals - Course I ." Monday-Friday/Nov. 5-9. Fee $110.00. 
Library Building 276. For more information contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 

:15 pm -- Green/White Day Festivities . Hodge Center. For more information contact Chuck 
Stavely, ext. 238. 

00 pm -- uses women's volleyball team vs. Presbyterian. Hodge Center Gymnasium. 

00 pm -- Green/White Intrasquad Scrimmage . Hodge Center Gymnasium. For more information 
contact Chuck Stavely, ext. 238. 

ESDAY, Nov. 6 

00-12 noon -- Dr. F. Joseph Hodge . Counseling and Career Development Center. For more infor- 
mation contact Earl Gordon, ext. 412. (scheduled to speak to students about entering Pharmacy^ 

DNESDAY, Nov. 7 

:00-l:30 pm -- Promotion and Tenure committee meeting . Faculty Conference Room, Administration 
Building. 

00 pm -- " La Grande Illusion" - International Film Series. (France, 1937, Dir. Jean Renoir, 
subtitled). Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more information contact Regis Robe, ext. 430. 

30 pm -- " The Exceptional Child " -Presented by the Association for Retarded Citizens and The 
Charles Lea Center in conjunction with the International Year of the Child. Spartanburg 
County Library. 

URSDAY, Nov. 8 

00-10:00 pm -- Orientation . Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more information contact Carol Smith, 
ext. 336. 

IDAY, Nov. 9 - No Activities Scheduled 



TURDAY, Nov. 10 

bO-l:00 pm -- Orientation. Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more information contact Carol Smith, 
ext. 336. 

30 pm -- Chuck Mangione Concert . Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium. For ticket information call 
Student Activities, ext. 336. Sponsored by the USCS SGA. 







Vol. IV. No. 10 



A NewsleftBr For The faculty Of USCS November 12, 1979 



THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, invites the staff, 
faculty and public to attend a presentation 
on Criteria for Selecting Toys for Young 
Children. This presentation will be de- 
livered by Ms. Lisa Whighan, Director, 
Community Service Division - Atlanta 
office - Consumer Products Safety Com- 
mission, from 10:30-12:00, November 14, 
in the Tukey Lecture Theatre. Faculty 
are requested to announce this presen- 
tation to their classes. 

THE CHANCELLOR has received informal 
notification that state personnel has 
decided that the university cannot offer 
the faculty the reduction in tuition for 
credit courses which has been offered in 
the past. According to the memo which 
was received from Columbia, the action 
was caused by complaints made by staff 
to their representatives and to state 
personnel. Dr. Holderman is appealing, 
but there is no chance of action before 
the start of spring semester, so full 
fees must be charged at January regis- 
tration. 

FACULTY and STAFF are reminded that the 
deadline for FY I is 5:00 on Thursday 
before Monday publication. Items may 
be brought or mailed to Janella Koob, 
Information Services. All items 
should be typed if at all possible and 
no information will be taken over the 
phone. 

FACULTY AND STAFF are reminded that the 
Men's Basketball Season begins this 
week. The Rifles will play at Wofford 
Wednesday evening and host Tennessee 
Temple in the Hodge Center on Friday 
evening. The athletes, pep band, 
cheerleaders and Near Misses hope to 
see you there to cheer the Rifles on. 



ON WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, the Boy Scouts of America 
and Beaufort County Schools will be on campus 
for recruitment purposes. Interested persons 
may contact Arthur George, ext. 412 for further 
information. 

FROM ELMER THOMAS, Faculty Recording Secretary: 
I am not responsible for the geammatical errors 
found in the Faculty Senate Meeting Notes of 
the FYI, October 29. 

ERIC JOLLY announces that he has a limited.: 
number of the USCS Computer Terminal User's 
Guides available. Anyone desiring a copy should 
contact him. 

GRANT APPLICATIONS SUBMITTED: 

1) Dr. Gordon Mapley (Psychology) has submitted 
a request for $41,297 to the National Science 
Foundation to support a four year research pro- 
ject entitled "Developmental Changes in Per- 
sonality Among Mature Returning Students." The 
proposed research project is a follow-up of 
the pilot grant Dr. Mapley received last year 
from the USC Research and Productive Scholarship 
Fund. 

2) Dr. Conway Henderson (Political Science) has 
submitted a request for $682. to the S.C. 
Committee for the Humanities to provide 
honoraria for guest speakers in his Great 
Decisions course for spring semester. 

BULLETIN BOARD 

A FREE COMMUNITY WORKSHOP on "Career Decision- 
Making for the Undecided" will be held Thursday, 
Nov. 15, at 7 p.m. in the Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
The program is being conducted by Counselor 
Bob Addleton. Topics include why people experience 
difficulty making decisions, why too little or 
too much information is dangerous, how to use 
others' opinions, and strategies in decision 
making. 
To make a reservation for the program, interested 
persons should contact the Counseling and Career 
Development Center, ext. 412. 



JIM BROWN, History, has published a review 
of A. Van Dantzig The Dutch and the Guinea 
Soast, 1674-1742 , in The African Book 
Publishing Record , Volume 5, Number 3, 
July 1979. 

THE AFRO-AMERICAN ASSOCIATION at USCS is 
planning a Christmas TV-GIV-A-WAY to benefit 
the Sickle Cell Anemia Foundation and other 
club projects. The drawing for the 13-inch 
color TV will be held Dec. 5 in the G.B. 
Hodge Center. The winner need not be 
present at the drawing. Participation in 
the raffle is by $1 donation. Tickets may 
be purchased from any member of the 
association, or at the Smart Set on the 
Main St. Mall, the Delux Cab Station, 
or at Oliver's Pharmacy. 

BARBARA MILLER, BETTY PRYOR, and MARY 
ANN SAWICKI traveled to Bal Harbor, Fla., 
for the District IV conference Nurses 
Association of the American College of 
Obstetricians and Gynecologists on 
Oct. 28-30. This year's conference theme 
was Obstetric-Gynecologic nursing in a 
multicultural society. The two day con- 
ference and workshop was held in con- 
junction with the American College of 
Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Despite 
the sunny 80 weather and the white 
sand beaches, they did attend all the 
meetings and only spent a total of 2 
hours on the beach. 

PR. JANE DAVISSON, President-Elect, of 
the S.C. Wil Lou Gray Adult Reading 
Council, chaired the Fall Conference of 
the organization on Oct. 18th and 19th 
at Hickory Knob State Park. Dr. Eleanor 
Ladd presented an outstanding address 
at the opening session on Thursday, Oct. 
18th. 



THE SPARTANBURG AREA CHAPTER of the National 
Association of Accountants, in cooperation 
with the School of Business and Economics, 
will conduct a seminar in the Tukey Lecture 
Theatre, Tuesday, Nov. 13 at 5:30 pm. 
The topic will be "Free Enterprise" and 
the guest speaker will be Mr. Josh W. Green, 
formerly of Mi Hi ken and currently an 
officer and director of Educational 
Industrial Services. Mr. Green will show a 
set of slides which he has presented to 
many audiences throughout the state of 
South Carolina. All faculty, staff and 
students at USCS are invited to attend. 

EVAN KRAUTER is a coauthor of a chapter 
entitled 'Animal models of aging: sensory- 
motor and cognitive functions in the aged 
rat' which will appear in the book the 
Psychobioloqy of Aging to be published by 
Elsvier. The book is a compendium of paper 
presentations and discussion which took 
place at a symposium held this last 
suimier in Luxembourg. 

FACULTY & STAFF: We desperately need 
volunteers (especially individuals over 40 
years of age) for a psychology experiment. 
We simply test each volunteer's hearing 
and muscular responsiveness to short tone 
bursts. All the person must do is stay 
awake and relax. If you are interested in 
helping please either contact me or fill out 
the sign-up sheet posted on my door - Evan 
Krauter, L217, ext. 377. 



November 7, 1979 

TO: All ''lemherr, of the 7r-culty and Administration 
PRO/.I: Lee Molcom'be, Chair, Self-Study Steering; Coimittee 

In 1976 uses was accredited by the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools as a four-year, dej^ree-grantiig institution. In 
lycl our accreditation must be reaffirmed by the Southern Association, 
and in ^reparation for this we are now embarking uoon an institutional 
self-study similar to that undertaken for our original accreditation. 

To supervise this self-study, the administration has appointed 
a Steering Gomnittee which includes, besides myself as chair, Valerie 
Burnie, Jane Davisson, Meyer Drucker, Earl Gordon, Conway Henderson, 
-Jancy '-loore, Jeanne Stuart and Catherine Talley. This comiittee has 
invited Mr. Dan Henderson and Dr. G. S. Hodge to serve asmembers, rep- 
resenting the University's Board of Trustees and the Spartanbiorg County 
Commission on Higher T.ducation resnectively, and has also asked Ed. 
Ilurlong and Virginia Martin to serve as members representing the student 
body. 

The Steering Com-iittee has now completed plans for organizing 
the work of" the self-study process. Our chief decisions were these: 

(1) to set up Standard Committees to study and report uoon the eleven 
standards set by the Southern Association and outlined in its 
ITanual; 

(2) to use, wherever feasible, regular faculty con^ittees as the Sta,nd- 
ard Committees (members with other self-study responsibilities not 
to r.erve, ex officio members not to serve because of possible con- 
flict of interest, and additional faculty to be aiopointed by the 
Steering Committee as members because of their special interests 
and expertise and/or their -lositions); 

(3) t- create special Standard Committees only for those standards for 
which no regular faculty committee ha.s responsibility; 

(4) to apToint re-oresentatives of the administration and the student 
body to serve together with faculty members on the Standard Com- 
mittees. 

Hence, our self-study organisation can be summarised as follows: 

Standard 1 Committee on Puroose 

Chair: R. Sobczak 

Organization ; Academic Forward Planning Committee, and faculty, 

administration and student members aToointed by 

Steering Committee 
'Tembers; J. Proirn, D. Poggs, 'i. Bruce, J. Cox, D. Glenn, T-I. 



-2- 



Shelden, C. I'/'illmot (faculty and administration); 
and Patricia Burton, s!ar!c ^AcKown, Lisa Roliinson and 
Susan esKinger (students). 

Sta ndard 2 ComTiittee on Organization and Administration 

Chai r; A. Henderson 

Orfranization ; Snecial Self-study committee aiTDOinted by Steering 

Committee 
'Tcmbers ; R. Connelly, T. Hamrick, E. Hutsell, S. Ladd, "I. Omer, 

C. Quinnelly, 'I. Taylor (faculty and administration); 

and Joe Siraiaons and Rebecca Washburn (students). 

Standard 3 Comiittee on Educational Program 

Chair: R. Predmore 

Or^'^anization ; Academic Affairs Committee, Admissions and Petitions 
Committee and Cultural Affairs GomTittee, and ad- 
ministration and student members appointed by Steer- 
ing Gora.'.ittee 

Ilembers ; R. Addleton, D. Bennett, E. Cohens, V. Colloms, B. 

Davis, T. Eggers, T. Eilenberg, R. Gilman, P. Hackett, 
T. Hawkins, G. Jacobsohn, D. Knight, B. Lindsay, 
T. Owens, F. Riddle, E. l-Thite (faculty and administra- 
tion); and Doug Brannon, Lynn Gilliam, Vickie Ham- 
mond, Dan Henson, Oscar Mooney and Roseraa.ry Nichols 
( students) . 

Standard 4 Committee on Financial Resources 

Chair ; M . J i 1 1 ing 

Organization ; Special self-study committee appointed by Steering 

Committee 
Members ; S. Cherry, R. Elmore, J. Kugler, J. 'lay, E. Thomas 

(faculty and administration); and Stan Huggins and 

Rohzina Hanji (students). 

Standard ^ Committee on Faculty 

Chair ; J. Lehman 

Organization ; Faculty '.'Telfare Committee, Promotion and Tenure Com- 
mittee and University Publications Committee, and 
administration and student members appointed by 
Steering Committee 

Members ; J. Belser, J. Eo^fman, C. Coggins, E. Davidson, H. Kelly, 
M. Lipscomb, H. McDuffie, L. ■'loore, G. Hewberry, C. 
Schwartz, E. Seko, R. Simpkin, G. Sims, R. talker, 
J. B. Tfilson, J. Yehl (faculty and administration); 
and Lisa Clayton, Bverette Evans and Bobby Thacker 
( students) . 



-3- 



Standard 6 Committee on Library 

Chair ; D. Lambert 
Qrf^anization ; Library Committee 
!embers ; iC. Pitzpatrick, 'T. Rarker, !■'. Hendra, J. D. Wilson 

(faculty); and Hhonda Barnhill, Brian 0" Shields and 

Susan ]-Jessin{reT (students). 

Standard 7 Committee on Student Development Services 

Chair ; '!. B. Ulraer 

Organization ; Athletic Advisory Committee, Student Affairs Committee 
and Student Financial Aid Committee, and administra- 
tion members appointed by Steering Committee 

Hembers; T. Allen, M. Bruce, L. Campbell, H. Crocker, J. Dye, 
B. Edwards, H. Gardiner, J. Lewis, R. Luttrell, K. 
I\rorrnan, H. Q.uinn, M. Strossner, K. Topley (faculty 
and administration); and Tony Sngrlish, Eick Hazel, 
Cecilia Hood, Bill Massey, Andy Moller, Jack Robin- 
son and Paul Small (students). 

Standard 8 Committee on Physical Resources 

Chair ; E. Krauter 

Orp;anization ; 'I^'acilities Utilization and Planning Committee, and 

faculty, administration and student members apt)ointed 
by Steering Committee 

Members ; E. Barnes, K. Hicks, J. Lipscomb, L. •■loore, W. Reit- 
meier (faculty and administration); and Marcia Hop- 
kins and Prank iTichols (students). 

Standard 9 Committee on Specirl Activities 

Chair ; R. Robe 

.'rganization ; Life-Long Learning Committee, and administration and 

student members appointed by Steering Committee 
Members ; A. George, P. Kohlenstein, D. Ledford, M. Sanders, C. 

Stavely (faculty and administration); and Robert 

Broi/m and Paula Smith (students). 

Standards 10 and 11 Committee on Graduate Progreji and Research 

Chair ; J. Yost 

Organization ; Sioecial self-study committee appointed by Steering 

Committee 
Members ; E. Babin, C. Brown, A. Crosland, C. Lee, G. Mapley 

(faculty and administration); and Elizabeth '!urff 

and Catherine :Jofford (students). 

An institutional self-study is a major undertaking which reauires 
a great deal of hard thinking and hard work. It is also an exciting and 



-4- 



challenging undertaking from which we can all learn and benefit. 
Those of us charged with supervising this self-study urgently need 
and heartily welcome the interest and the help of each of you. 



,j4^^^ lOc^^c^ 



— THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, NOVEMBER 12 -- SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18 1979 



MONDAY. November 12 



8:30-4:30 pm -- Real Estate Fundamentals. Fee $110.00. USC Counseling and Information Center/ 
Koger^Executive Center/Greenville. For more information contact Continuing Education, 

^^cgnt^ct-Jo elreerrixriyg:^ " '^"^ '^^'^^" '^^^^ ^^^^"^^ '''''^'- ^^ ^^ ^'"f--^-" 
11:00-11:50 am - University Publications Board Meeting . Media 221. -Harriett McDuffie. 

11:30-1:30 pm - Facilities and Utilization Planning Commit tee meeting. Library 257 
-Evan Krauter. " ' ~ ■ 

7:30 pm -- Kappa Delta Pi meeting . Miss Joyce Bradbury, speaker. Tukey Lecture Theatre 
For more information contact Joe Greer, ext. 378. 



TUESDAY, November 13 

10-50 am - Miss Joyce Bradbury -Class Lecture. Media 122. For more information contact Joe 
Greer, ext. 378. 

12:15 pm -- Luncheon with Miss Joyce Bradbury , reservations only. Hodge Center 248 For more 
information contact Joe Greer, ext. 378. 

5=^0 P"^ - " Free Enterprise " -sponsored by Spartanburg Area Chapter of National Association of 
Accountants and the School of Business and Economics. Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more 
information contact Bert Menees, ext. 280. 



WEDNESDAY. November 14 

10-'30 am - Tips for Christmas Toy Buyers . Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more information contact 
Leo Bonner, ext. 364. 

12-1:30 pm -- Club Treasurers Meeting w/Jerry Baker. Hodge Center 247A. 

7:30 pm -- Men's Basketball vs. Wofford College at Wofford. 

7:30 pm -- " The Status of the Family " -presented by Dr. Kevin Swich from USC Columbia in 
conjunction with the International Year of the Child. Spartanburg County Library. 



THURSDAY. November 15 

9:00-1:00 pm — Back to School Seminar . Tukey Lecture Theatre. -Carol Smith. 

12:15-1:30 pm -- International Club Meeting . Library 267. -Jim Brown. 

7:00 pm -- " Career Decision Making for the Undecided ." Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more infor- 
mation contact Bob Addleton, ext. 412. 

FRI DAY, November 16 

3:30-until — Improving Your Theraputic Communication Skills. Fee $25.00. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
For more information contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 



Friday, November 16, continued 

12-1:00 pm -- Talent Show . Administration Building 209. -Vergene Colloms. 

6:00-12:00 pm -- Toga Party . Hodge Center. For more information contact Jerry Baker, 
ext. 336. 

7:30 pm -- Men's Basketball vs. Tennessee Temple. Hodge Center Gym. 

SA TURDAY, November 17 

7:30 pm -- Men's Basketball vs. Limestone College at Limestone. 




7^ 



Vol . IV. No 11 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS 



November 19, 1979 



I. OFFICIAL 

TO ALL FACULTY ADVISORS and Division 
Secretaries; Please return all left- 
over blank carpool forms to Student 
Affairs so that we won't have to print 
more for regular registration. Also, 
please be sure that all completed forms 
have been returned to us. Thanks for 
your help with this project. 

THE FOLLOWING IS THE USCS POLICY on 
cancellation of classes due to bad 
weather. Please give this policy the 
widest possible dissemination. 

The Director for Information Services is 
responsible for notifying the following 
news media on the opening and closing 
of the university: radio stations WASC, 
WORD, WKDY, and WSPA in Spartanburg; 
WFBC and WGXL in Greenville and WEAC in 
Gaffney. Also WSPA-TV and WFBC-TV will 
be called. 

The Public Safety Office will update 
the telephone answering service to re- 
flect current information. On days of 
bad weather, switchboard operators will 
be picked up by security officers and the 
switchboard will operate on a normal basis 
as soon as possible. 

The university opens or closes as a 
whole, and the decision to close or open 
the campus will be binding on all classes 
and activities including athletic events, 
convocations, graduate regional studies 
courses, continuing education, the 
Burroughs Child Development Center, and 
various service functions. If there is a 
pressing need to vary this policy, con- 
tact should be made with Doyle Boggs at 
home (582-6896), prior to 6:30 a.m. for 
day events and 3 p.m. for night events. 
Under no circumstances will any faculty 
or staff member other than the Director 
for Information Services contact the 
news media about cancellations. 

For morning classes, the university will 



generally follows the policy of the Spartanburg 
Bounty Schools on the first day of a winter storm. 
The decision to open or close the university will 
be announced by 6:30 a.m. A decision to open or 
close the university during the evening hours 
(classes meeting after 5 p.m.) will be made by 
the Chancellor and will be announced by the news 
media not later than 3 p.m. After a major storm, 
the Chancellor will evaluate the condition of 
parking lots on the campus and may direct a USCS 
reopening earlier than for the public schools. 
In that event, announcements will be made through 
the regular media channels. 

Faculty and students should be aware that they 
may be required to make up any class hours lost 
due to bad winter weather. Twelve month employees 
are not authorized snow leave. They have the 
option of (1) reporting for work; (2) making up 
time lost at the discretion of the supervisor; 
or (3) taking annual leave. 

THANKSGIVING HOLIDAYS will be observed on the 
campus from 8 a.m. Thursday, November 22, to 8 
a.m. Monday, November 26. Faculty are reminded 
that evening classes on Wednesday, November 1, 
should be held as scheduled. There will be no 
FYI published on November 26. This week's 
calendar reflects campus events through December 2. 

ALL FACULTY are urged to announce to senior 
students with Humanities and Social Science majors 
to attend a career workshop which Arthur George 
is conducting to help seniors prepare vitas and 
dossiers to improve their employment prospects. 
The workshop will be on Monday, November 26 in 
L268 at 12:15 pm. 

FROM HERMENIA GARDNER: The Tutoring Lab is 
available to provide test taking assistance 
(reading and/or writing) to handicapped students. 
It is necessary to call Hermenia Gardner, ext. 341 
for an appointment for the student. Kindly en- 
courage handicapped students to utilize the 
lab for tutoring as needed. Other services for 
handicapped students are being provided by Frank 
A Nichols, Coordinator for Handicapped Students of 

-continued 



the Counseling and Career Development Center 
on a part-time basis and Robert Addleton, 
staff person. 

I I. BULLETIN BOARD 

THE LIBRARY ART GALLERY will open its 
December exhibition on Sunday, Dec. 2, when 
it presents the works by Carol Auguthun. 
The exhibit continues through Dec. 22. The 
gallery is open until 9:30 pm Monday-Thurs- 
day, and until 5 pm on Friday afternoons. 
Weekend hours are 10 am to 2 pm on Satur- 
day and from 2-6 pm on Sunday. 

THE uses JAZZ BAND AND SINGERS will present 
a Holiday Pops concert on Monday, Dec. 3 
in the Spartanburg Arts Center Auditorium. 
According to Director Bryan Lindsay, 
admission will be free for this special 
performance which begins at 7:30 pm. The 
Holiday Pops Concert will also be pre- 
sented at uses on Friday, Nov. 30 at 
12 noon in the Hodge Center Lobby. 

THE uses SHOESTRING PLAYERS will present 
"Under Milkwood," their second performance 
of the fall semester on Dec. 6-8 in the 
Tukey Lecture Theatre on the campus. 
Performances are scheduled for 8:15 pm 
on all three nights. 

THE CHANCELLOR has been informed that 
Central Missouri State University is 
searching for a Vice President and Provost. 
Anyone desiring more information about 
this position may contact Janella Koob 
in Information Services for the job 
description. 

MARY S. TAYLOR, nursing, attended the 
S.C. Gerontological Society Annual Con- 
ference in Columbia on Nov. 8 & 9. Among 
topics discussed were issues related to 
the inclusion of older persons in solving 
problems of the aged. 

CAROL R. COGGINS, nursing, presented a 
workshop, "Bonding as a Therapeutic Dy- 
namic," at the State Department of Mental 
Health in Columbia, on Oct. 22, which was 
attended by S.C. Psychotherapists. 

CAROLE WILLMOT, Holly Crocker, Catherine 
Talley, Carol Schwartz and several Jr. & 
Sr. BSN students attended a Clemson 
Lecturship by Dr. Martha Rogers, nurse ■ 
educator. 



FROM THE CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, 13 
November 1979: --The President's Commission 
on Foreign Languages and International 
Studies last week termed Americans' incom- 
petence in foreign languages "scandalous," 
and called for reinstatement of foreign- 
language requirements in high schools, 
colleges, and universities and urged that 
foreign language be reinstated as a require- 
ment for college admission or for college 
graduation. In urging that undergraduates 
be given greater insight into foreign 
societies and international issues, the com- 
mission's recommendations included 2-3 re- 
quired courses in international studies for 
all Bachelor's candidates (apart from re- 
quired language study); strengthened under- 
graduate offerings in international studies; 
comparative perspectives in the teaching of 
most undergraduate subjects; expanded oppor- 
tunities for faculty to acquire or strengthen 
international skills; increased faculty and 
student exchanges; and an expanded institu- 
tional commitment to undergraduate inter- 
national studies. The commission also urged 
colleges and universities to centralize the 
administration of international education 
programs and place them at a high level in 
their institutional structures. Schools of 
business should make a course in international 
business a requirement for undergraduate 
foreign language. State colleges and uni- 
versities should keep tuition increases 
for foreign students in line with those 
of local American students. The coiranission 
recommended that the federal government 
spend an additional $178 million annually 
for foreign languages and international 
studies at all levels, justifying its call 
for increased support in terms of national 
security. 

--The validity of the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test (SAT), the nation's most popular 
college-entrance exam, may soon be seriously 
undermined according to some admissions 
officers, even if New York is the only 
state to enact a "truth-in-testing" law. The 
law requires that questions and answers of 
college admissions tests be publicly dis- 
closed after the release of test scores. 
--Estimated fall enrollments for all students 
at US institutions of higher education in- 
creased 2.4%, with enrollments at 4-year 
institutions other than universities being 
full-time students +1.8% and part-time 
students +2.2% 




intra -office memo 



> 



Dote November 9, 19 79 



fjQ^. Dr. Richard Predmore, Chair, AA C 



To: 



FYI 



Subject: 



FORMS 



There are now three forms issued by the Academic Affairs Committee, 
all of them are available from school secretaries: 

1) "Request for New Course" 

2) "Request for Change in Course Description" 

3) "Incomplete Grade Commitment." This new form was made necessary 

by our recent change in catalogue policy regarding Incompletes. 
From now on, a teacher who gives an Incomplete must use the form, 
"Incomplete Grade Commitment. " A COpy is shown on back. 



RP/lc 
Attachment (1) 

cc: School Secretaries 



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA AT SPARTANBURG 



INCOMPLETE GRADE COMMITMENT 



DATE: 



SEMESTER OF INCOMPLETE: 



COURSE AND SECTION NUMBER: 



COURSE TITLE: 



Having received an Incomplete grade in the above course, I hereby coinioit myself 
to complete the work listed below by the deadline indicated. The evaluation of 
this work will be used for computing my final grade in this course. I am aware 
that failure to meet this deadline will result in my being given a failure for 
this course. 



DEADLINE: 



WORK COMMITMENT: 



STUDENT'S SIGNATURE: 



TEACHER'S SIGNATURE: 



Original to teacher/Copy to student/Copy to Dean 



Promotion and Tenure Committee 
Minutes 



The Promotion and Tenure Committee met in the Administrative Conference Room 
at 3:30 P.M. on October 30, 1979. Dr. Sansbury and all members of the 
Committee were present. 

There was discussion of the criteria for promotion and tenure in non-doctorate 
fields. It was reported that a proposal for these criteria is being formulated 
by the school of nursing. The criteria for librarians is currently before the 
faculty senate. 

Dr. Sansbury responded to questions about salary increments with promotions 
and stated that budget restraints will probably continue to reduce the normal 
increment for promotion. Also as in the past promotion will generally be 
delayed until the penultimate year reserving early promotion for outstanding 
performance. 

Lawrence Moore resigned as secretary of the committee because of his election 
as chairperson-elect. Judy Kizer was elected to fill this position. 

The chairperson reported that filed will close on October 31 and reading of 
files will begin on Thursday, November 1. A motion was made and passed that 
the practice previously employed of reading the files in pairs be abolished 
for the current committee. 

The presentation to the faculty of a program on tenure regulations and 
practices was discussed. This would tentatively take one hour and would be 
part of the faculty-development time slot in January. The particular contents 
of the presentation will be discussed later and a meeting will be scheduled 
with Dr. Eaglin in December. 

Weekly meetings have been scheduled on Wednesdays' at noon throughout the 
month of November to review files for completeness. 

The committee adjourned at 5:00 P.M. 

Respectfully submitted 
Judy Kizer, Secretary 



uses-— mm week 



MONDAY, NOVEMBER 19 - SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2. 1979 

MONDAY, November 19 

10:00-2:00 pm -- Class Pictures to be made for yearbook . Hodge Center. 

12:15 pm — Standard I Self-Study Committee meeting . Library 257. Contact person-Ron Sobczak. 

5:00-7:00 pm -- Class Pictures to made for Yearbook . Hodge Center. 

TUESDAY. November 20 

10:00-2:00 pm -- Class Pictures to be made for yearbook . Library Building. 
5:00-7:00 pm -- Class Pictures to be made for yearbook . Library Building. 
8:00 pm -- Men's Basketball vs. Newberry . Hodge Center Gymnasium. 

WEDNESDAY, November 21 

10:00-2:00 pm -- Class Pictures to be made for yearbook . Media Building, 2nd Floor. 

12:15-1:30 pm -- Standard 7 Southern Association Study meeting . Administration building 115. 
Contact person - M.B. Ulmer. 

THURSDAY, November 22 

THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY - NO CLASSES 

7:00 pm -- Thanksgiving Tournament . USCS vs. Lander and Newberry vs. Limestone. Hodge 
Center Gymnasium. Game times at 7 and 9. 

FRIDAY, November 23 

THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY - NO CLASSES 

7:00 pm -- Thanksgiving Tournament . USCS, Limestone, Newberry and Lander. Hodge Center 
Gymnasium. Games times at 7 and 9. 

NO ACTIVITIES SCHEDULED FOR SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24 or SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25. 

MONDAY. November 26 
12:15 pm -- Career Workshop . Library building 268. Contact person - Arthur George. 
6:00 pm -- Women's Basketball vs. Morris College . Hodge Center Gymansium. 

TUESDAY, November 27 
7:30 pm -- Men's Basketball vs. Central Wesleyan at Central. 



WEDNESDAY, November 28 

9:00-4:00 pm -- S.C. Council on Special Programs . Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact person 
Mai combe Sanders. 

6:00 pm -- Women's Basketball vs. Mercer . Hodge Center Gymansium. 

THURSDAY, November 29 
8:00 pm -- Men's Basketball vs. Winthrop at Winthrop. 

FRIDAY, November 29 

12 noon -- Holiday Pops Concert . Hodge Center Lobby. Contact person - Bryan Lindsay 
12:15-1:30 pm -- Admissions and Petitions meeting . Library 272. 

SATURDAY, December 1 
6:00 pm -- Women's Basketball vs. Coastal Carolin a. Hodge Center Gymansium. 

SUNDAY, December 2 

2:30 pm -- Art Exhibit Opening featuring works by Carol Auguthun. Library Art Gallery, 
Contact person - Katie Hicks. 



-mi^ 



intra -office memo 



> 



Date November 19, 1979 



Janella Koob 



To: 



AH Faculty & Staff 



Subject: Thanksgiving Tournament 



This memo corrects a calendar item listed in USCS--THIS WEEK. The 
Thanksgiving Tournament listed to begin on Thursday, November 22, 
actually begins on Friday, November 23 and play continues on Saturday 
November 24. Games begin at 7 and 9 each night. 

Faculty and staff are reminded that home basketball games are free 
to them and their immediate families. 




9<^ 



vf. 



Vol. IV. No. 11 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS 



December 3, 1979 



I . OFFICIAL 

From Ted Eilenburg, Business Affairs: 
THE HOLIDAY PERIOD begins at 5:00 pm, on Dec. 
21st and ends at 8:00 am on Wednesday, Jan. 
2nd. 

In order to conserve energy, we are planning 
to lower the heat in all buildings and turn 
off all air handling equipment on Friday, 
Dec. 21st at 5:00 pm. Temperatures will prob- 
ably be between 55-60 . 
The Library and switchboard will be closed 
from 5:00 pm on Dec. 21st until 8:00 am on 
Wednesday, Jan. 2nd. The phones will be set 
to ring in Public Safety. 
Security and maintenance personnel will be 
on campus during the holiday period. If you 
must be on campus for any reason, CHECK IN 
WITH THE PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICE and use the 
Hodge Center Road. Also be sure that you 
keep the outside doors to the building 
locked at all times. The Public Safety 
Office can be reached by calling 578-7827. 
If you need to make special arrangements 
for laboratory experiments, etc., please 
contact Rivers Hall, ext. 439, giving him 
ample time to make plans for specific 
requests. Have a nice vacation. 

THE DECEMBER 10th ISSUE of FYI will be 
the last issue before the holidays. Any 
material recieved after Dec. 8th will 
not be published until the January 7th 
FYI issue. 

ALL FACULTY AND STAFF are cordially in- 
vited to attend the annual USCS Faculty 
and Staff Christmas Drop-in at the 
home of Dr. and Mrs. Ron Eaglin, 240 
Heathwood Drive on Dec. 15th, from 7:00 
pm to 11:00 pm. Spouse or guest included. 
Parking is available at the Lamb of God 
Lutheran Church, 1545 Fernwood-Glendale 
Rd. with shuttle service to and from 
the Eaglin's home ewery ten minutes. 

THE STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE will meet 
Tuesday, Dec. 4th at 3 pm in the Student 
Affairs Office. 



FROM AL GRAY TO ALL FACULTY: Please announce 
to your classes that tuition for the Spring 
1980 Semester has increased from $315.00 to 
$355.00 for a full-time student and from 
$27.00 per hour to $30.00 per hour for 
part-time students. 

FROM RON EAGLIN TO ALL FACULTY: Please re- 
turn all Student Evaluations by December 3rd 
in order that they may be processed during 
the month. Since January 10th. 1980 is the 
date on which the Promotion and Tenure files 
close for final deliberations, this will 
allow time for results of student evaluations 
to be placed in individual files, if needed. 

FROM RON EAGLIN TO ALL FACULTY: In any 
course which meets two or three times a 
week, no quiz, test, or examination shall 
be given during the last two class sessions 
prior to the regular examination period. In 
any course which meets once a week, no quiz, 
test or examination shall be given during 
the last class session prior to the regular 
examination period. In any course which 
meets more than three times a week, no quiz 
test or examination shall be given during 
the last three class sessions prior to the 
regular examination period. 
No final examination may be held outside of 
the stated time without the special per- 
mission of the Vice Chancellor for Academic 
Affairs. 

THE PROMOTION AND TENURE COMMITTEE will meet 
with Dr. Eaglin at 12:00 on Wednesday, Dec. 
5th, in the Faculty Conference Room in the 
Administration Building. Whichever committee 
member now has the tenure book, please 
bring it to the meeting. 

EMPLOYEES MAY NOTIFY the Personnel Office of 
their interest in a specific vacancy by com- 
pleting and submitting to the Personnel Office 
a "Request for Transfer". The Personnel 
Office will arrange interviews for the employ- 
ees whose overall qualifications are best 
suited for the position, 



POSITIONS AVAILABLE: 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 



1) Applications are now being taken for a 
Secretary II, Grade 17, in the School of 
Education for this campus. 

2) Applications are now being taken for 
a Director of Admissions for this campus. 
A Masters Degree with two years experience 
in college admissions is required. 

FROM DR. EAGLIN: A new position of 
Director for Computer Studies is being 
created in the 1980 Spring Semester. Job 
responsibilities are as follows: 1) en- 
couraging cooperation among all schools 
in developing computer related courses 
and programs; (2) working with all 
faculty interested in using computer in 
instruction; (3) designing and implement- 
ing continuing education courses for data 
processing professionals and public 
school teachers in the community; (4) 
writing and encouraging the writing of 
grant proposals to obtain computer 
equipment; and (5) familiarizing public 
school students with opportunities in 
computer science field. Those interested 
in applying should submit a vita and 
cover letter to Vice Chancellor Eaglin 
by Friday, December 14. All applications 
will be evaluated by a search committee. 
This is a half-time administrative and 
half-time faculty, twelve-month position 
similar to that of Director for Inter- 
national Education. The Director for 
Computer Studies will report to Dr. 
Eaglin. Salary is negotiable. 

GRANT NEWS - from Jan Yost 

GRANT APPLICATION SUBMITTED: USCS has 
submitted a Nursing Capitation applica- 
tion for support of the BSN program in 
the School of Nursing. Funding will be 
determined by the Public Health Service 
based on enrollment in the program. 

GRANT AWARDED: Dr. Conway Henderson 
(Political Science) has received a grant 
of $682. from the S.C. Committee for 
the Humanities. An additional $800. from 
the Foreign Policy Association has also 
been unofficially granted. The funds will 
be used to provide honoraria and travel 
for guest speakers in Dr. Henderson's 
Great Decision Course this winter. 
Congratulations, Dr. Henderson! 



THE USCS SHOESTRING PLAYERS will present 
"Under Milk Wood," their second performance 
of the fall semester on Dec. 6-8 in the 
Tukey Lecture Theatre. Performances are 
scheduled for 8:15 pm on all three nights. 
Information and reservations may be obtained 
by calling the Shoebox, ext. 397. 

THE INTERNATIONAL CLUB OF USCS will sponsor 
a Christmas Party on Wednesday, Dec. 5th 
at 12:00 in Room 209, Administration Bldg. 
A university choir will sing caroles in 
different languages, refreshments with an 
international flavor will be served, and a 
Christmas pinata will be broken. The event 
is open to the public, USCS students, faculty 
and staff. 

IT IS WITH PLEASURE that the Tutoring Lab 
staff, faculty and Developmental Services 
invite the students, faculty and staff of 
USCS to a UNIVERSITY WIDE HOLIDAY STUDY 
BREAK on Dec. 11 and 12, from 10:30 to 
1:00 pm and from 4:30 to 6:00 pm in room 
273 of the Library Building. Coffee, coke 
and other goodies will be served. Kindly 
inform your students of this opportunity 
to relax in a Holiday atmosphere between 
study periods or exams. 

AN OVERSEAS LEARNING EXPERIENCE in France 
and England will be offered by the Foreign 
Language and Criminal Justice departments 
in May 1980. Credit is available for USCS 
students. An organizational meeting to 
discuss costs, travel events, and other 
features of the trip will be held Monday, 
December 10th at 12:15 pm in Room 255, 
Library Building. All interested persons 
are invited to attend. Persons who cannot 
attend this meeting may contact Prof. Robe 
(ext. 430) or Prof. Quinnelly (ext. 384). 
Faculty members are asked to announce this 
event to students. 

THE CHEMISTRY STUDENTS of Chem. 105 will be 
visiting the Oconee Nucelar Plant on Dec. 
5th, leaving USCS at 12:00. Other interested 
persons may arrange to go along by contacting 
Ron Sobczak, ext. 256. 

THE PIONEER FOUNDATION, "a non-profit, tax 
exempt corporation established to promote 
the publication and distribution of books 
that present new ideas or open fresh and use- 
ful approaches to old ideas" provides assis- 
tance in the publication of manscripts by 
offering free services in editing, preparation 
of manuscripts, and locating suitable 

(continued) 



publishers. Faculty who might be interested 
in such free assistance may write to Henning 
Nelms, President, The Pioneer Foundation, 
Box 7066, Arlington, Va. 22207. 

FROM THE COUNSELING AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT 
CENTER: Students planning to attend gradu- 
ate school and/or having questions regarding 
post graduate study should make note that 
Wednesday, Dec. 5th has been designated 
"Road to Grad School Day" by the Counseling 
and Career Development Center. 
Focal point of the day will be a presentation 
of materials and information of interest 
to potential graduate students beginning 
at 12:15 pm in L257. 

The program will include: (a) distribution 
of the Counseling Center's free booklet 
"The Road to Grad School," designed to 
acquaint the reader with the various aspects 
of graduate school, (b) discussion of the 
normally required admissions tests (GRE, 
NTE, etc.), with information on how to 
apply for them, (c) tips for better test 
taking, (d) information regarding financial 
aid for graduate school, (e) presentations 
by various faculty members about graduate 
school opportunities in their academic 
areas, (f) an introduction to the Center's 
"Visit to a Professional School" program, 
(g) current graduate students on hand to 
answer questions and share their 
experiences, and (h) refreshments. 
For those unable to attend at 12:15 pm, the 
materials and information will be available 
several places on campus throughout the 
day. 



FROM E. KRAUTER: Facilities, Utilization 
and Planning Committee Minutes/ 
The committee met jointly with the self 
study committee on physical resources 
Nov, 12th. Members present were K. Hicks, 
C. Lee, G. Mapley, L. Moore and E. Krauter. 
E. Krauter reported on his meeting with 
Dr. Eaglin and Mr, Eilenburg. His report 
included the following information from 
those conversations: 

A, Portions of the media building reserved 
for the ETV installation are to be temp- 
orarily converted to classrooms, seminar 
rooms, storage and office space, since it 

is expected that construction of the ETV 
complex will not begin for another 18-24 
months. Among other changes, this area 
will be used for visual arts and music, 
freeing other space on campus for use for 
theatre productions and general classrooms. 

B. The administration has set the 
following priorities for campus construction 

1. completion of Phase I of the Hodge 
Center expansion for an additional $464,600 

2. a 26,000 sq. ft. (gross) nursing bldg. 
costing about $1.5 million 

3. a 60,000 sq. ft. (gross) humanities 
bldg, (smaller than this committee's 
initial recommendation) costing $5.1 million 

4. a fine arts building. 

The committee decided that it will review 
its recommendations regarding the Nursing 
building and Humanities and Sciences bldg. 
There was a short discussion concerning 
the role of the committee in the planning 
and utilization of facilities on campus. 
G. Mapley was elected chairman-elect- 
secretary. 



uses -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY. DECEMBER 3 — SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1979 



MONDAY, December 3 

12:15-1:30 pm -- Science Meeting . Administration Building 114. 

6:00 pm -- Women's Basketball vs Newberry . Hodge Center Gymnasium. 

7:30 pm -- Christmas Pops Concert by the USCS Jazz Band and Chorus. Spartanburg Arts Center, 
S. Spring St. Contact person - Bryan Lindsay, ext, 244. 

TUESDAY, December 4 
No activities scheduled 

WEDNESDAY, December 5 

12:00 noon -- Christmas Party , sponsored by the International Club of USCS. Administration 
Building 209. Everyone is welcome. 

12:00 noon -- Visit to Oconee Nuclear Plant by Chemistry 105 students. Other interested persons 
may attend by contacting Ron Sobczak, ext. 255, 

12 15 pm -- " Road to Grad School Program " - discussion information and presentation of 
materials to interested post graduate students. Library 257. Contact person - Earl Gordon. 

T HURSDAY, December 6 

6:00 pm -- Women's Basketball vs. Erskine . Hodge Center Gymnasium. 

8:00 pm -- Men's Basketball vs. Erskine. Hodge Center Gymnasium. 

8:15 pm -- "Under Mil kwood"- presented by Shoestring Players. Tukey Lecture Theatre. Reservations 
and Boxoffice, ext. 397. 

FRIDAY, December 7 - USCS DAY AT WESTGATE MALL, SPONSORED BY THE USCS SGA 



12-2:00 pm -- AMS meeting . Media 217. 

6:00 pm -- Christmas Pops Concert by the USCS Jazz Band and Chorus. Westgate Mall. 

8:15 pm -- " Under Mil kwood "-presented by Shoestring Players. Tukey Lecture Theatre. Reservations 
and Boxoffice, ext. 397. 

SATURDAY, December 8 

9-12:30 pm -- SAT Testing . Hodge Center 247A. 

6:00 pm -- Women's Basketball vs. Baptist College , Hodge Center Gymnasium. 

7:30 pm -- Men's Basketball vs. Oglethorpe at Oglethorpe (Atlanta). 

8:15 pm -- "Under Mil kwood" -presented by Shoestring Players. Tukey Lecture Theatre. Reservations 
and Boxoffice, ext. 397. 



I 







EXTRA, EX TRA, EXTRA A Nowsletter FoF The Faculty Of USCS 



December 4. 1979 



TO ALL FACULTY AND STAFF: This FYI 
supplement contains important information 
on activities and events taking place 
at USCS in the near future. Faculty 
are encouraged to pass the information 
printed here along to their students. 



REPUBLICAN PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE George 
Bush will be on our campus Thursday, 
December 5. Mr. Bush is a former Congress- 
man from Texas, and served in a number 
of ^ery demanding positions during the 
Nixon and Ford administrations, including 
Chief of the U.S. Liaison Office in the 
People's Republic of China, U.S. Ambassador 
to the United Nations, Chairman of the 
Republican National Committee and head 
of the CIA. 

Mr. Bush's campus schedule includes a 
lecture to the Southern Politics Class 
in Tukey Lecture Theatre at 10:50 (classes 
may attend by arrangement vnth Ron Romine), 
and an open question and answer session 
for USCS students, faculty and staff at 
1 p.m. in Tukey. Mr. Bush is very likely 
to be on the Republican ticket next year 
as either President or Vice President, 
so this is a truly great educational 
opportunity for all students. Please urge 
them to attend. 

THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION is 
sponsoring a Christmas gift to the 
community at Westgate Mall this Friday 
with their first annual "USCS Day." The 
program includes a judo demonstration 
at 3 p.m., a concert by the Jazz Band 
and Singers at 6, and several other talent 
acts. Students from the School of Nursing 
will give free blood pressure checks 
during the day, and the math department 
will give micro computer demonstrations. 
While the purpose is not to recruit students, 
a table will be set up to provide literature 
and other information about the campus. Any 
faculty who might be willing to help man this 
table would be most welcome and should contact 
Tom Davis in student affairs. 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE MEN'S AND WOMEN'S 
basketball teams for outstanding starts to 
their seasons. 

The men, after victories on the road last 
week over District 6 powers Central Wesleyan 
and Winthrop, are now rated No. 1 in the 
Dunkle standings which determine berths for 
the district playoffs. The women have won 
three of four games, with their victories 
coming by impressive scores. 

Both teams play in the Hodge Center 
Thursday night in a doubleheader against 
the Erskine Flying Fleet. Admission is free 
to all students and to all faculty and 
staff and their immediate families. 

A LIMITED NUMBER OF CHRISTMAS CARDS featuring 
a full color winter campus scene are now 
available in the Office of Information 
Services. These cards, signed "The Faculty 
and Staff of the University of South Carolina 
at Spartanburg " are available for use by 
the faculty and staff who wish to remember 
members of advisory committees or other 
professional associates. Cards may be 
requisitioned through Word Processing 
procedures at a cost of 10 cents per card 
(envelope included). 










Vol. IV No. II 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS 



December 10, 1979 



I. OFFIC IAL 

TO ALL FACULTY AND STAFF from Information 
Services: This will be the last issue 
of FYI and USCS--This Week until the 
January 7th issue. Material to be pub- 
lished in that issue must be submitted 
no later than 5:00 on January 3rd. 

FROM TED EILENBURG, Business Affairs: 
The HOLIDAY PERIOD begins at 5:00 pm, on 
Dec. 21st and ends at 8:00 am on Wednesday 
Jan. 2nd. 

In order to conserve energy, we are 
planning to lower the heat in all buildings 
and turn off all air handling equipment on 
Friday, Dec. 21st at 5:00 pm. Temperatures 
will probably be between 55-60 . 
The Library and switchboard will be closed 
from 5:00 pm on Dec. 21st until 8:00 am on 
Wednesday, Jan. 2nd. The phones will be 
set to ring in Public Safety. 
Security and maintenace personnel will be 
on campus during the holiday period. If 
you must be on campus for any reason. CHECK 
IN WITH THE PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICE and use 
the Hodge Center Road. Also be sure that 
you keep the outside doors to the building 
locked at all times. The Public Safety 
Office can be reached by calling 578-7827. 
If you need to make special arrangements 
for laboratory experiments, ect. , please 
contact Rivers Hall, ext. 439, giving him 
ample time to make plans for specific 
requests. Have a nice vacation. 



FROM PERSONNEL 
1980. General 
4, will afford 
additional day 
of 12 legal hoi 
Tuesday, Jan. 1 
Friday, July 4 
Monday, Sept. 4 
Tuesday, Nov. 4 
Thursday-Friday 
Wednesday-Tuesd 
Wednesday, cDec. 



- Twelve holidays set for 
Election Day Tuesday, Nov. 
State employees one 

off in 1980 for a total 
idays. THE SCHEDULE - 

- New Year's Day 

- Independence Day 

- Labor Day 

- General Election Day 
Nov. 27-28 - Thanksgiving 

ay, Dec. 24-30 - Christmas 
31 - New Year's Eve 



FROM FINANCIAL AID: This is to confirm that 
it will be okay for your student workers to 
work through December 21, 1979 at their 
regularly allotted number of hours per week 
without it affecting their Spring, 1980 
work awards . 

FROM ERIC JOLLY: Room A123 in the Administration 
Building will not be available beginning Jan. 3 
through Jan. 22. Administrative CRTs usually 
available to Faculty will not be available 
during this time. 

Deadline dates for Computer Assisted 
Registration: 

-Last day to mail -in fees: Dec. 14, 1979 
-Last day to pay fees (in person): Jan. 4, 1980 
-Dates for payment of students receiving 

financial assistance: Jan. 3-4, 1980 
-Last day for schedule adjustment: Jan. 4, 1980 
-Priority Drop/Add in Room A115: Jan. 8, 1980 

FROM ERIC JOLLY: The operating hours for the 

Computer Room for the month of December will 

be as follows: 

-Dec. 10-13, Mon-Thurs./9:00am-9:00pm 

-Dec. 14, Fri./9:00am-5 :00pm 

-Dec. 15, Sat. /9:00am-l :00pm 

-Dec. 17-19, Mon-Wed./9:00am-9 :00pm 

-Dec. 20-21, Thurs-Fri./9:00am-5:00pm 

II. BULLETIN BOARD 

DR. MERIKE TAMM, English, has had a scholarly 
monograph titled "Performing Heroinism in 
Austen's Sense and Sensibility and Emma " pub- 
lished in the fall 1979 issue of Papers on 
Language and Literature. Another article by 
her, "Sexist Pronouns: What is an English 
Teacher to Do? was published in Carolina 
English Teacher (Spring 1979). Dr. Tamm con- 
tinues to review books for The Charlotte 
Observer and The State ; recently she wrote 
about Barbara Ward's Progress for a Small 
Planet. 



70001 LTD. WILL HOLD ITS OFFICIAL 
OPENING on Tuesday, Dec. 18 from 2^6 pm. 
70001 Ltd., a national employment and 
training program for high school drop-outs, 
is funded through the CETA Division of the 
Governor's Office and is being administered 
by uses. The 70001 office, which is 
located at 485 S. Pine St., is a national 
non-profit corporation partially funded by 
the U.S. Department of Labor, and is a 
program of employment, education and 
motivation that helps 16-21 year old 
economically disadvantaged high-school 
dropouts to prepare for, find and keep 
unsubsidized jobs. The enrollees also 
study for the General Education Develop- 
ment (GED) Test while in the 70001 
program. 

Frank Grimes, a long-time Spartanburg 
resident, has been named project director 
and Robert Baker will be the Project 
Coordinator. 

Faculty and staff are urged to visit the 
new 70001 facilities which will be open 
to the public during the open house on 
Dec. 18. Parking will be available at 
St. Johns Lutheran Church. 



FROM DEAN ARTHUR JUSTICE; The students in the 
Early Childhood Education and Elementary 
Education Pre-Student Teaching Block will 
have a display of teaching aids prepared 
during their Block Study, on Tuesday, 
December 11, 1979 from 9:00 a.m. until 
6:00 p.m. The display will be found in 
the second floor halls of the Media Center. 
These aids are in the teaching area of 
Language Arts, Social Studies, Science 
and Mathematics. 



fi^ff^^ intra - office memo ^ 

DQfg December 5,1979 

From: Jim Newcome 



Xo; All Faculty and Staff 

Subject: Summer Programs - Continuing Education 



The Department of Continuing Education is now compiling a list of 
summer workshops, institutes, special programs, and short courses. 
If you have any ideas for a program, please fill out the form on the 
bacl<; and return to me by January 16,1980. 

. ju can be assured that all ideas and suggestions will be given 
serious consideration. We thank you for your past support and 
would greatly appreciate your help in the future. 



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA AT SPARTANBURli 
CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSE PROPOSAL 



Name of Course 



Description 



(As would appear in catalog) 



(As would appear in catalog) (Include program objectives) 



Number of Sessions 
Length of Sessions 


and 




Book Required 


(Name, Author, Publisher, Cost) 


Equipment Required 


(Furnished by USCS) 


Materials Furnished 
By Students 




Week Preferred 




Time Preferred 




Target Groups if 

other than General Public 




CEU's Requested 


(1 CEU= 10 hours of contact) 


Facilities Required 

— ___ 





Other 



Miscellaneous: Instructors must furnish the following to comply with Southern Association 
Regulations: a. Current vita or resume 

b. Social Security number 

c. A brief outline of each session 

d. Samples of all classroom materials 



Promotion and Tenure Committee 
Minutes 

The Promotion and Tenure Committee met in the Conference Room in the administration 
Building at 12:00 pm on November 7, 1979 to review files for completeness, Emmanuel Seko 
was absent. 

Files reviewed included: Eleanor McCaughrin, Carol Coggins, Catherine Talley, Carol 
Wilmot, Dave Taylor. 

Lawrence Moore moved that the chairperson consult with the faculty secretary to see 
If colleague evaluations could be completed and placed in the files in time for 
consideration. 



The Promotion and Tenure Committee met in the Conference Room in the Administration 
Building at 12:00 pm on November 14, 1979 to review files for completeness. All members 
were present. 

Files reviewed included: Dave Taylor, Guy Jacobson, Nancy Babb, Richard Predmore. 

Alice Henderson reported that the deans are in the process of getting tne faculty 
to submit names for the colleague evaluations and hopefully the results of these will 
be available so that people can add them to their files when they reopen. 

It was requested that applicants be asked to organize their files in the 
prescribed manner. Also for next year the mark sense cards from the student evaluations 
should not be turned in unless the students have written comments on them. 



The Promotion and Tenure Committee met in the Conference Room in the Administration 
Building at 12:00 pm on November 21, 1979 to review files for completeness. All members 
were present. 

Files reviewed included: Judy Dye, Eb Barnes, Norma Hendra, Fred Wenz, Lyle 
Campbell, Elbert Menees, John McAlhany, Gordon Mapley, Miriam '^helden, Conway Henderson, 
Michael Jilling, Bryan Lindsay, Arthur Justice. 

This completed the review of files. Files will reopen on December 1, 1979. Files 
should be in order by January 10, 1980. 

An pinnouncement was made that the library promotion criteria have been approved 
by the faculty senate. 

Th'.} next meeting of this committee will be on December 5, 1979 to discuss the 
presentation to the faculty when we return in January. 



Respectfully submitted 
Judy Kizer, Secretary 



uses— -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, DECEMBER 10 — WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1979 



MONDAY, December 10 - LAST DAY OF CLASSES 



TU ESDAY, December 11 

8:00-11:00 am — Exams. All 8:00 am Tuesday/Thursday classes. 
1:00-4:00 pm -- Exams. All 2:30 pm Monday/Wednesday/Friday classes, 
5:30-8:00 pm -- Kappa Delta Ph1 meeting . Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
6:00-9:00 pm -- Exams. All 5:30 pm Tuesday/Thursday classes. 



WEDNESDAY, December 12 

8:00-11:00 am -- Exams. All 8:00 am Monday/Wednesday/Friday classes. 
1:00-4:00 pm -- Exams. All 3:00 pm Monday/Wednesday classes. 
6:00-9:00 pm -- Exams. All 6:55 pm Monday/Wednesday classes. 



THURSDAY, December 13 

8:00-11:00 am -- Exams. All 10:00 am Monday/Wednesday/Friday classes. 
1:00-4:00 pm -- Exams. All 10:50 am Tuesday/Thursday classes. 
6:00-9:00 pm -- Exams. All 8:20 pm Tuesday/Thursday classes. 



FRIDAY, December 14 

8:00-11:00 am -- Exams. All 9:25 am Tuesday/Thursday classes. 

9:00-3:00 pm — Student Teaching Seminar . Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact person - Bill Reitmeier. 

1:00-4:00 pm -- Exams. All 1:30 pm Monday/Wednesday classes. 

6:00-9:00 pm -- Exams. All 6:55 pm Tuesday/Thursday classes. 



MONDAY, December 17 

8:00-11:00 am -- Exams. All 9:00 am Monday/Wednesday/Friday classes. 

]:00-4:00 pm -- Exams. All 1:40 pm Tuesday/Thursday classes. 

6:00-9:00 pm -- Exams, All 5:30 pm Monday/Wednesday classes. 

TUESDAY, December 18 

8:00-11:00 pm -- Exams. All 11:00 am Monday/Wednesday/Friday classes, 

1:00-4:00 pm -- Exams. All 12:15 pm Tuesday/Thursday classes. 

6:00-9:00 pm -- Exams, All 8:20 pm Monday/Wednesday classes. 



WEDNESDAY, December 19 ~ 

8:00-11:00 am -- Exams. All 3:05 pm Tuesday/Thursday classes. 




Vkl 



7<^ 



Vol. IV No. 13 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS Monday, January 7 



I . OFFICIAL 

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING change for the 
official academic calendar for spring 
1980. Commencement exercises, originally 
scheduled for Saturday afternoon, May 17 
have been moved to 7 p.m. Friday evening 
May 16. The ceremony will again be held 
outdoors on the quadrangle. 

POSITION AVAILABLE - Applications are 
now being taken for a Custodial Worker 

II, in the Physical Plant Department for 
this campus. 

Employees must notify the Personnel 
Office of their interest in a specific 
vacancy by completing and submitting to 
the Personnel Office a "Request for 
Transfer" (p-15). The Personnel Office 
will arrange interviews for the employee 
whose overall qualifications are best 
suited for the position. 

FROM HERMENIA GARDNER, Coordinator 
Tutorial Services: The Tutoring Lab is 
still scheduling for the spring semester. 
Faculty persons teaching courses that 
are not presently being offered in the 
Lab may contact Hermenia T. Gardner, ext. 
341 or 343 to arrange to have tutoring 
available. Your referral and recommenda- 
tions of a possible tutor will speed the 
scheduling process. 

GRANTS AWARDED: Three faculty members 
have been awarded research grants from 
the use Research and Productive Scholar- 
ship Fund. 

(1) Ed Babin (Geography) received $455 
for his research entitled "Mill Village 
Land Use and Settlement Patterns." 

(2) Leo Bonner (Early Childhood Education) 
received $2100 for his research entitled 
"Effects of Co-Observer Evaluative State- 
ments on Imitative Agression in Younger 
Children. " 

(3) Fred Wenz (Sociology) received $1733 
for his research entitled "Legacy of 
Family Murder. " 

Congratulations, Drs. Babin, Bonner and Wenz! 



GRANTS PROPOSALS SUBMITTED: 

(1) Ed White (Middle School Education) has sub- 
mitted a grant proposal entitled "Palmetto 
Middle/Junior High School Science Project" for 
$12,090 to the National Science Foundation. 
The proposed project involves working with 
Spartanburg County middle/ junior high school 
principals in the dissemination of science 
education information. 

(2) USCS has submitted its annual Title II-A, 
College Library Resources, application. Maximum 
awards are expected to be $2,000 and funds are 
to be used to purchase library materials. 
Principal Investigator: Jan Yost. 

II. BULLETIN BOARD . 

FROM RICHARD GENOBLE, Rt. 2, Inman, S.C. 29349, 
585-7436: Mr. Genoble called to say that he 
owned a house in the vicinity of the University 
and would like to rent or sell to anyone coming 
into the school. He has 18,000 sq. ft.- 3 
bedrooms on Belcher Road and is asking $360. 
per month for rent or $53,500 for sale. There 
is a 9% loan on the property and he would 
consider taking a second mortgage. 

JIMM COX, along with theatre students Peggy 
Beasley and Christopher Cline, conducted two 
days of acting and directing workshops for 
Chesnee High School on December 11 and 13. 

SEVERAL A.D..N. STUDENTS along with Marte Harker, 
Holly Crocker, Carole Willmot, Judy Kugler, 
Jan Dimsdale, Katy Murphy, and Lorrie Springer, 
participated in USCS Day at Westgate Mall by 
providing Blood Pressure Screening and infor- 
mating about USCS Nursing Programs to the public. 

THE USCS RIFLES will play basketball in Carolina 
Coliseum on January 9. The Rifles will play 
Coastal Carolina at 5:45 preceding the game be- 
tween the Gamecocks and William & Mary. A limited 
number of tickets are available at the reduced 
price of $2. Tickets may be picked up at the 
USCS Athletic Office. Tickets entitle the holders 
to stay over for the Carolina-William & Mary 
game at no additional cost. 



uses -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, JANUARY 7 — SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 1980 



MONDAY, January 7 

GRADUATE REGISTRATION IN GYM ALL DAY. 

TUESDAY, January 8 

9:00-4:00 pm -- General Faculty Business Meeting . Tukey Lecture Theatre. 



6:00-9:30 pm -- Real Estate-Course II . Tuesdays and Thursdays through Feb. 14. For more infor- 
mation contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. i 

6:00-10:00 pm -- Orientation Session . Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more information contact 
-Student_Affairs,_ext^_336^ 

WEDNESDAY, January: 9 

9:00-3:00 pm -- Student Teaching Seminar . Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more information contact 
Bin Reitmeir, ext. 379. 

9:00 am -- Continuation of General Faculty Business Meeting . Administration 209. 

11:30-1:30 pm -- Kiwanis Meeting . Media 215. For more information contact Arthur George, ext. 412. 

12:00 pm -- Computer Services Orientation . Administration 114. For more information contact 
Eric Jolly, ext. 246. 

5:45 pm -- Men's basketball vs. Coastal Carolina a t Carolina Coliseum. Carolina vs. William 

and Mary immediately following. For more information and tickets contact Student Affairs, ext. 336. 

THURSDAY, January 10 

9:00 am -Noon -- Advisement and Packet Registration 

2:00-7:00 pm -- Advisement and Packet Registration 

FRIDAY, Janua ry 11 

9:00-1:00 pm -- Orientation Session . Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more information contact Student 
Mfairs, ext. 336. i 

9:00 am -- Division/School Faculty Meetings . 

1:30 pm -- Committee Meetings 

7:00 pm -- Sertoma Basketball Tournament . USCS, Wofford, Limestone and Central Wesleyan. 
Hooge Center. For more information contact Sports Information, ext. 250. 

S ATURDAY, January 12 

7:00 pm -- Sertoma Basketball Tournament. USCS. Wofford, Limestone and Central Wesleyan. 
Hodge Center. For more information contact Sports Information, ext. 250. 







Vol. IV No. 14 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS Monday, January i4 



I. _OFnnAL 

THE INTERNATIONAL Education Advisory Com- 
mittee will be forming several sub-com- 
mittees to deal with specific issues. We 
would like to involve a number of people 
from the community on these sub-committees. 
Anyone who knows "internationals" (including 
Americans) in the community who might be in- 
terested in working (not just sitting) on 
such a committee, please contact Jim Brown, 
L-236, ext. 433. 

FROM CON HENDERSON: The first event of the 
1980 Great Decisions Program is taking place 
in Tukey Lecture Theatre at 7:00 pm, Tuesday, 
January 15. I would like to invite faculty, 
and their family or friends to attend. 
Associate Professor Ed Coulter of the Dept. 
of Political Science at Clemson University 
will speak on the first topic "The World 
in 1980," a good topic to set the stage for 
more specialized talks on consecutive 
Tuesdays. 

TA X GUIDE FOR COLLEGE TEACHERS , 1979-80 is 
on Library Use Only reserve in the Library. 

II. BULLETIN 

THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS in cooperation with 
the Spartanburg Chapter, National Associa- 
tion of Accountants, is sponsoring a seminar 
on the topic "Continuing Education for 
Accountants',' on Tuesday, January 15, at 5:30 
pm in the Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
The featured speaker will be Dr. James 
Edwards, Professor of Accounting and Director 
of the Professional Accounting Program at USC 
Columbia. Dr. Edwards was recently named a 
Foundation Fellow be the USC-Business Partner- 
ship Foundation. He is a winner of six 
national writing awards and is a popular 
speaker in the accounting field. 
All USCS faculty, staff and students are 
cordially invited to attend. Contact Bert 
Menees for further details. 



CHINA TRIP. The American Association of 
Colleges for Teacher Education has organized 
a study trip to China, to include four cities 
in China, plus stays in Tokyo and Hong Kong. 
In China visits will include educational 
institutions and a meeting with an expert in 
the participant's field. Dates are March 10-29, 
1980, with cost from the West Coast of $2,699. 
For further information contact Jim Brown, 
L-236, Ext. 433. 

LAWRENCE MOORE (chemistry) has been asked by 
the National Science Foundation to review 
applications for grants under their Instruc- 
tional Scientific Equipment Program. Con- 
gratulations, Dr. Moore! 



From Andy Crosland: 

Computer Services in Columbia has offered to send instructors to this campus 
to teach seminars in VSPC (interactive computing). Job Control Language, 
SPSS and SAS (statistical packages). Each course will be taught on a 
Friday afternoon when no other classes are in session. Each will last 
three to four hours. If you are interested in taking any of these 
seminars, please mark the appropriate block(s) below, and return this sheet 
to me: 

( ) JCL (in March) ( ) SAS (in February) 

( ) SPSS (in March) ( ) VSPC (in February) 

Video taped short courses on the topics listed below are also available 
from Computer Services - If you think any of these would be useful to you 
please circle the title - I will attempt to obtain copies of those tapes 
that seem to be of significant interest. 



Course Name 

Introduction to Teleprocessing 

DP Concepts for Managers 

The Joe Batten Series I 

Structured Programming: 
Considerations for Managers 

Structured Programming for 
Programmers and Analysts 

-Structured Analysis 

-VS-OS Utility Programs 

-VSAM 

-MVS/SVS Debugging 

-MVS-JES2 for Operators 

-Advanced MVS - JES2 for operators 

-IMS Concepts and Facilities 

-DL/1 Segment Retrieval Coding 

■DL/1 Data Base Ma pulation 

-IMS Teleprocessing Programming 

-IMS Logical Relationships 

-IMS Utilities 



-TSO Series 

-The MVS Environment 

-Virtual Storage 

-CICS/VS Facilities 

-(EICS/VS Command Level Programming 

-Computer Programming Fundamentals 

-Structured Cobol 

-MVS Dumps (JES2) 

-Managing the Application Development 
Process I 

-Managing the Application Development 
Process II 

-Job Control Language (JCL) 

-Time Management for Professionals 



uses— -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, JANUARY 14 -- SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 1980 



Monday, January 14 

Clas ses Begin . 

Late_re gistration begins and continues through Tuesday, January 22. Late registration will 
__^'Jbe_held_during_the_hqurs_10£00am-12^00_noon_and_4^^ 

Tu esday, January 15 



7:00pm -- Great Decisions Class . Speaker-Professor Ed Coulter, Political Science, Clemson 
University. Topic - "The World in 1980". Tukey Lecture Theatre. Free and open to the 
Public. Contact Con Henderson, ext. 374, for more information. 

7:30 pm -- " Getting Along and Understanding Computers ." Continues on Tuesdays, thru Feb. 19. 
Fee $35.00. Media 217. For more information contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 

Wednesday, January 16 
No activities scheduled. 



T hursday, January 17 

6:00pm -- Women's Basketball vs. Winthrop. Hodge Center Gymansium. 
8:00pm -- Men's Basketball vs. Winthrop. Hodge Center Gymansium. 

Friday, January 18 
No activities scheduled. 

Saturday, January 19 
8:00pm -- Men's Basketball vs. Coker. Hodge Center Gymansium. 



Sunday, January 20 

No activities scheduled, 







Vol. IV No. 15 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS 



Monday, January 21 



1. OFFICIAL 

FROM JERRY BAKER: The I.D. machine will 
be set up and I.D.'s will be made on 
Monday, January 21 through Thursday, 
January 24. On Monday and Wednesday, I.D.'s 
will be made between 11-2 and 5-7. On 
Tuesday and Thursday I.D' s will be made 
between 12-2 and 5-7. All I.D.'s will be 
made in the Hodge Center Lobby. 
Validation Stickers for student I.D.'s 
will also be available during these 
hours. Any student who had an ID made in 
the fall should stop by and have a spring 
1980 validation sticker attached. After 
Thursday, validation stickers will be 
available from the business office. 

FROM FRED SERGIACOMI: The Student Affairs 
Office will soon be mailing its newsletter 
"The Rifle Report" out to students. If you 
have items of interest to students or need 
to get any sort of information to them, 
type it up and send it to Student Affairs 
in the campus mail by Monday, January 22. 

FROM BRYANT RKEVES: The faculty will be 
able to order their academic regalia for 
graduation on January 29 and 30. Orders 
will be taken in the Hodge Center Lobby. 
It is important that faculty members order 
during this time since a late charge will 
be assessed after Jan. 30. 

ARTHUR GEORGE has announced that the 
Nursing Recruitment Career Fair will be 
held in the Hodge Center, Thursday, Jan. 
24, from 10:00am to 2:00pm. Ten to fifteen 
hospitals will participate. For further 
information, please call Arthur George 
at ext. 414. 

THERE WILL BE A SCIENCE SEMINAR: "How to 
Give A Scientific Talk Without Being 
Horrified, Humiliated or Humbled." By Dr. 
D.L. Rohlfing, Wed. (Jan. 23) at 4:30 in 
Administration Building 325. 



MRS. ELIZABETH GUILLORY, Ph.D. candidate, 
Florida State University will be visiting 
our campus January 21-23. She is being 
interviewed for a slot on the English faculty. 
Her fields of concentration include English 
and American drama. Black literature, and 
remedial composition. 

Mrs. Guillory will make a short presentation 
at 3:00 pm in L-255 on Tuesday, January 22. 
All faculty are invited to attend the 
presentation. 

II. BULLETIN BOARD 

FROM DOYLE BOGGS: This is a note of apology 
and explanation to all faculty who did 
not receive regular 24 hour service in the 
Word Processing Center during the first 
few days of last week. 

During the period December 15 through 
January 15, the departments on the campus 
spent a total of $2307 in the Word Processing 
Center, an increase of 60 per cent over the 
month of November 15 through December 15. 
This staggering increase becomes even more 
remarkable when one considers that there 
were only 13 working days during the entire 
period and that the faculty was on caapus 
for only the last four days of the billing 
month. 

Although it was certainly no one's intent, 
then, what amounted to a very unreasonable 
demand was put on the three center personnel, 
who lacked even their usual quota of student 
helpers. As far as I can determine, they all 
reacted with hard work and a determination 
to get the job done as well as possible. 
With a little emergency temporary help, they 
were able to get things back to normal fairly 
quickly although it is realized that several 
classes were forced to start without syllabi. 

Because for the first time we now have 
accurate records about center volume and the 
extent of peak demand, we can budget to hire 
temporary help during times of severe pressure. 
Hopefully, the problems of this spring will 
not be repeated. 



(Bulletin Board continued) 



FILMSOUTH '80, the sixth annual film 
competition and conference held at Converse 
College, is still seeking entries for this 
year's event. The deadline for entries is 
-lanaury 23. 

Competition is open to all students and 
Independent filmmakers working in the 10 
Southeastern states. Films must be either 
Super-8 or 16 millimeter. There is a $2.00 
entry fee for Super-8 films and a $4.00 fee 
for 16 millimeter. 

Competition categories are ppen to young 
filmmakers under age 15, filmmakers ages 
15-18, and filmmakers 19 and over. 

Cash awards will be presented to winning 
films. 

All events for Filmsouth '80 will be open, 
free of charge to the public. For more 
information and/or entry blanks, please 
contact Dr. A.O. Schmitz, Converse College. 



NANCY BABB, Director of the ADN Program, 
attended a workshop on "Curriculum design 
for Associate Degree Nursing Programs" in 
New York City on January 9 . 

NANCY BABB, MARTE MARKER, KATY MURPHY, and 
ADDY CKOEPPER attended the Spartanburg 
County Medical Society banquet to provide 
information on the School of Nursing on 
Jan. 8. Rep. Carroll Campbell was the speaker 



THE ARTS COUNCIL OF SPARTANBURG will 
present Mitchell Korn, a twelve string 
guitarist on January 26, at 8:00 pm in 
Twichell Auditorium at Converse College. 
Tickets are $2.00 and reservations may 
be made by calling 583-2776. More infor- 
mation is available from Janella Koob in 
Information Services. 



MEYER DRUCKER spoke to B'nai B'rith on 
January 15 on "Introduction to Estate 
Planning . " 

REGIS ROBE, as President Elect of the 
South Carolina Conference on Foreign 
Language Teaching attended meetings in 
Atlanta (Nov. 24) and in Columbia (Jan. 10) 
to plan a major Foreign Language Convention 
(SCOLT-ACTFL-SCCFLT) that will be held in 
Charleston in October 1980. Dr. Robe judged 
a French Poetry contest which was organized 
by the Dept. of Languges at Clemson University 
on Nov. 10. Competing in the contest were 
high school students from all over the state 
of South Carolina. He also served as a judge 
in different Foreign Language contests taking 
place at the Wofford Foreign Language Festival 
on Oct. 15. On Dec. 21, he attended a special 
awards meeting of the local chapter of the 
Alliance Francaise at which four French students 
at uses (Ricky Hazel, Rudi Steuer, Maryanne 
Tripp and Rebecca Washburn) received national 
recognition as four of the 15 winners in the 
national French Contest organized by the 
Alliance Francaise throughout the United States. 



uses— 'THIS 



MONDAY, JANUARY 21 ~ SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1980 



Monday, January 21 

12:15-1:15 pm — Self Study Standard I Committee meeting . Library 257. 

6:00-9:30 pm — " Basic Arrhythmias: Interpretation and Interventions" -Nursing Continuing 

Education Course. Fee $35.00. Hodge Center 247. For more information contact Addy Kloepper, 
ext. 438/241. 

6:00 pm — Women's Basketball vs. Presbyterian. Hodge Center Gymnasium. 
8:00 pm — Men's Basketball v s. Presbyterian. Hodge Center Gymnasium. 

Tuesday, January 22 

3:00 pm — Presentation by Dr. Elizabeth Guillory . Library 255. See FYI for details. 

-^ 7:00 pm — Great Decisions - " The Mideast and the Gulf " -speaker: Dr. Shahrough Akhavi, 
University of South Carolina. Tukey Lecture Theatre. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, January 23 

4:30 pm — Science Seminar : "How to Give a Scientific Talk without being Horrified, Humiliated 
or Humbled." -by Dr. D.L. Rohlfing. Administration 325. 

6:00 pm — Women's Basketball vs. Francis Marion at Francis Marion. 
8:00 pm — Men's Basketball vs. Francis Marion at Francis Marion. 

Th ursday, January 24 

10:00 am - 2:00 pm — Nursing Recruitment Career Fair . Hodge Center Lobby. For more infor- 
mation, contact Arthur George, ext. 414. 

Friday, January 25 - No activities scheduled. 

Saturday, January 26 

6:00 pm — Women's Basketball vs. USC Aiken. Hodge Center Gymnasium. 
8:00 pm — Men's Basketball vs. USC Aiken. Hodge Center G3anansium. 







i/ol. IV No. 16 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS Monday, January 28 



I. OFFICIAL 

THE PROMOTION AND TENURE COMMITTEE will meet 
to consider any appeals on Tuesday, Feb. 12 
1980 from 1:40 through the rest of the after- 
noon, as needed. Candidates have Feb. 1-11 
to add any new material for appeals. 

THE FACULTY WELFARE COMMITTEE will meet at 
12:15 pm in A-114 on Wednesday, Jan. 30. 

FROM PERSONNEL. The Board of Directors has 
announced that the Credit Union will begin 
taking applications for Personal Loans on 
Friday, Feb. 1, 1980. There will be a loan 
limit of $1,500.00. 

As in the past, applications will be pro- 
cessed on a first come, first serve basis 
depending on the availabl il ity of funds. 
Also, information concerning new Certifi- 
cate of Deposit and Money Market Certifi- 
cate program is available at the Personnel 
Office. 

THE GREAT DECISIONS SERIES will continue 
on Tuesday, Jan. 29, with a presentation 
on "The United Nations at 35". The 
address will be made by Professor Robert 
S. Jordon, former director of Research 
at the U.N. Institute for Training and 
Research. The program begins at 7:00 pm 
in Tukey Lecture Theatre, admission is 
free and the public is invited to attend. 

DR. ERNEST L. BOYER, who recently became 
president of the Carnegie Foundation for 
the Advancement of Teaching, will make the 
Founders' Day address at USCS on Feb. 18. 
Tl)? program will begin at 11:15 am in the 
Hodge Center Gymnasium and is free and 
open to the public. 

ONE OF NORTH CAROLINA'S MOST DISTINGUISHED 
black civic leaders will address the 
annual convocation sponsored by the USCS 
Afro American Association on Tuesday, Feb. 
12. Mrs. Angeline Smith of Greensboro, N.C. 



will speak in the Tukey Lecture Theatre at 
12:15 pm. Admission is free and the public 
is invited. 

FROM R. PERRIN: The Library's Mag Card II 
typewriter is available for use by 
Divisional secretaries after 3:30 pm 
Monday through Friday. For those personnel 
who do not know how to use the machine it 
is important that you call ext. 420 and 
ask for Mrs. Anne Bailey who will set up 
a time for instruction prior to the 
scheduled time and date for using the 
machine. 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE: 

1. Applications are now being taken for a 
Day Care Teacher, Grade 15, in the Child 
Development Center for this campus. 

2. Applications are now being taken for a 
Student Dev. Spec. I, Grade 23, in the 
Talen Search Program for this Campus. 
-Employees must notify the Personnel Office 
of their interest in a specific vacancy 

by completing and submitting to the 
Personnel Office a "Request for Transfer" 
(P-15). The Personnel Office will arrange 
interviews for the employee whose overall 
qualifications are best suited for the 
position. 

II. BULLETIN BOARD 

On WEDNESDAY, JAN. 30, the Foreign Film 
Series will feature "Le Jour Se Leve," 
a French film with English subtitles. The 
film will begin at 7:00 pm in Tukey 
Lecture Theatre and is free of charge and 
open to the public. 

USCS WILL AUCTION OFF a 6 piece den set on 
Feb. 2 during hal-time of the U6C Aiken 
game. The set consists of a couch, chair, 
love seat, 2 end tables, coffee table and 
2 matching lamps and will be sold to the 
highest bidder with proceeds going to 
athletic scholarships. The furniture was 



To: All Faculty 

From: Cecilia McDaniel Brown 

Sunmary of Contributed In-House Research 
Conducted by USCS Faculty and Staff 

NOTE: The research described below is available for in-house use only unless 
permission is obtained from the contact person listed. Details of each study 
are available in n|^ office. 



Contact Person(s) 



Edwin White 



Nancy Moore 
Elizabeth Davidson 



Choong Lee 
Choong Lee 

Choong Lee 
Choong Lee 
Choong Lee 

Choong Lee 
Sylvia Morgan 

Jim Brown 
Jane Davisson 

Jim Brown 



Jane Davisson, 
Katie Murphy 



Nancy Moore 



Jane Davisson, 
Hermenia Gardner 



Earl Gordon 

Earl Gordon 
Ron Eaglin 



Title and/or Description 

Potential USCS students--Current instructional materials, 
methods and program goals of S.C. middle-school science programs. 

Performance of Students in English 100 and 101 for academic 
years 1976-77 and 1977-78. With Counseling Center, similar 
study is in progress for subsequent years. 

Identification of areas related to teaching perceived to be 
unsatisfactory by the nursing faculty. Conducted every semester. 

Measurement of BSN students' attitudes toward home, academic 
performance, self and the nursing provession. Evaluation con- 
ducted at the time of entry into the program and at the end. 

Measurement of nursing instructors' ability to empathize with 
his/her students methodological experiment conducted Fall 1977 

Student course evaluations of nursing faculty effectiveness 
surveyed at end of each semester, beginning Fall 1977. 

Identification of factors relevant to students' performance 
on the S.C. State licensure examination and prediction study. 
Conducted annually, beginning 1978. 

Evaluation of course objectives by nursing instructors. At the 
end of each semester, beginning Fall 1977. 

Survey of Greenville Students Enrolled, Fall 1977. Demographic 
data including age, date of high school graduation, previous 
college/university experience, field of interest, April 1978. 

Survey of faculty requirements for classroom equipment in 
proposed Humanities and Sciences Building. February 1979. 

Differential effect of self concept on two methods of teaching 
College reading ("Content" and "Artificial" method) to 1978 
freshmen reading deficient students. 

Survey of international skills and experience of all USCS staff 
as part of state survey of all full-time faculty in higher 
education. Conducted by S.C. Consortium for international 
studies. Results may appear in a state-wide directory. Conducted 
Fall 1979. 

Reading comprehension score as predictive variable for suc- 
cessful nursing students. 1977 and 1978 nursing students 
were subjects. "Successful" students were those who con- 
tinued matriculating in Spring 1979. 

Objective and subjective evaluation of the impact of career 
information on students' perceived value of career information 
and on choice of career goals of 54 freshmen English 101 
students in Fall 1978. 

Impact of tutoring lab on G.P.R. of all students receiving 
tutorial help through USCS tutoring lab in a course 3 or 
more times during 1978. 

Alumni/ae follow-up of classes of May 1977 and May 1978. Data 
includes employment information, graduate school attendance 
and plans. 

Analysis of cities and towns of residence of degree recipients. 
May 1976 to May 1978. 

Survey of Fall 1979 evening students' scheduling preferences. 






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uses— -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, JANUARY 28— SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1980 



M onday, January 28 

3-5:00 pm -- Nursing students vs. Nursing faculty basketball game . Hodge Center Gym. 



6:00 pm -- Women's Basketball vs. Erskine at Erskine. 
8:00 pm -- M en's Basketball vs. Erskine at Erskine. 



Tuesday, January 29 

8-9:15 am - Breakfast for Dr. Holderman with Student Government Associations representatives. 
Administration 209. For more information contact Chancellor's Office, ext. 200. 

4:30-6:30 pm -- Kindergarten Activity Workshop , Continuing Education shortcourse. Jan. 29- 
Feb. 24, Tuesdays and Thursdays. Fee. $45.00. For more information contact Continuing 
Education, ext. 422. 

7:00 pm -- Great Decisions - "The United Nations at 35" -presentation by Professor Robert 
S. Jordon. Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more information contact Conway Henderson, ext. 374. 

Wednesday, January 30 

12:15 pm -- Faculty Welfare Committee meeting . Administration 114. 

7:00 pm -- Fo reign Film Series - "Le Jour Se Leve," French film with English subtitles. Tukey 
Lecture Theatre. For further information contact Regis Robe, ext. 430. 

Thursday, January 31 

7:30 pm -- Men's Basketball vs. Limestone . Hodge Center Gym. 

7:30 pm -- International Reading Association meeting . Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact Eleanor 
Ladd, ext. 367 for more information. 



Friday, Feb. 1 - No Activities Scheduled. 



S aturday, February 2 

6:00 pm -- Women's Basketball vs. USC Aiken . Hodge Center Gym. 
8:00 pm -- Men's Basketball vs. USC Aiken. Hodge Center Gym. 







ol IV lio. 17 



k Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS Monday February 4 



I ._ Of/JCIAL 

FROM LOU HUNLEY to Faculty Senators: The 
Faculty Senate will meet at 12:15 in L265 
on February 15 (the third Friday). The 
agenda will include: 1) Academic Affairs 
Report on the Political Science Curriculum 
Revision; 2) Second reading of the promotion 
and tenure recommendations' 3) The Faculty 
position statement on Annual Review and 
Grievance procedures. 

FROM JANE DAVISSON: TALENT SEARCH: Talent 
Search is a counseling service which pro- 
vides an opportunity for students with 
ability who encounter obstacles in the com- 
pletion of their educational goals. We are 
searching for talent in area high schools 
and colleges in the Piedmont area (Spartan- 
burg, Union and Cherokee counties). Since 
we are located on campus, one of our pri- 
orities is providing our services to stu- 
dents at USCS. If a student stops attending 
class, this may mean that he/she is a 
potential drop-out. We will be glad to con- 
tact and work with the student through our 
prevention program. Additionally, if you 
know of students who did not return to 
USCS, we can contact the student for future 
admission. We would appreciate your assis- 
tance in the Talent Search Program. Contact 
Mike Alston, ext. 346; Malcolm Sanders, ext. 
351; or Dr. Jane Davisson, ext. 343. 

FROM JAN YOST: Grant Proposal submitted: 
USCS has submitted a preliminary proposal, 
"Increasing Educational Opportunity for 
Piedmont Adults," to the Fund for Improve- 
ment of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) re- 
questing $144,700, over three years. The 
project involves recruitment of adults, 
particularly women and minorities, through 
coordination with area employers. Partici- 
pants will be offered continuing education 
courses in reading improvement, English com- 
position, mathematics, and/or study skills 



in preparation for admission to USCS. 
Principal Investigator: Dr. Alice Henderson 
(History). 

II. BULLETIN 

ROAD TO GRAD SCHOOL: Students interested in 
graduate school schould plan to attend the 
Counseling and Career Development Center's 
"Road to Grad School Day" program Wednesday, 
Feb. 6 at 12:15 pm in HC247A. The program 
will include materials and information of 
interest, discussion of the various admissions 
tests, test-taking tips, financial aid infor- 
mation, an introduction to the Center's 
"Visit to a Professional School" program, 
and information regarding graduate oppor- 
tunities here at USCS. 

A HOMECOMING DINNER AND DANCE will be held 
at the Hodge Center on Feb. 22 beginning at 
8:00 pm. Tickets are S5--per person which 
includes a buffet dinner, complimentary 
bottle of wine and music by Dixie Dawn. 
Tickets 1 ust be purchased by Feb. 20 and 
are available in the Student Affairs Office. 

SCIENCE SEMINAR: "Gene Expression and it's 
Relationship to Birth Defects," presented by 
Dr. Roaer H. Sawyer, USC Columbia. Wed., 
Feb. e^at 4:30 in A325. 

POSITION OPENING: Full-time Reading and Study 
Skills Instructor, Masters Degree preferred. 
Contact Dr. Jane Davisson, L225. Affirmative 
action/equal opportunity employer. 

FROM COUNTY COURTHOUSE: People must be regis- 
tered to vote by Feb. 3, 1980 if they wish 
to vote in the March 8th Primary. People may 
register at the county courthouse in person. 

BRYAN LINDSAY has been invited to serve on a 
State Department of Education Task Force for 
Gifted Education. The Task Force will address 
the questions of funding and teacher training 
and certification. 



DONUT NIGHT: This semester the Student Affairs 
Division is sponsoring three donut nights. 
These programs are designed to provide refresh- 
ments and information of interest to evening 
students. A group of specially trained peer 
counselors will staff Donut Nights. Admini- 
strators, faculty, and counselors will be 
available to talk to students. Donut Night 
will be held on Feb. 4 in the Library Bldg, 
2nd floor; Feb. 5 in the Administration 
Bldg, 2nd floor; and Feb. 6 in the Media 
Bldg, 2nd floor. Everyone is invited. 

THE HODGE CENTER Gym was the scene of a 
valiant attempt by the School of Nursing 
faculty "allstars" to at least "keep-up" 
with the nursing students in basketball 
competition. Although the S.O.N, faculty 
had the brilliant coaching of Joe Bowman, 
the "allstars," numbering "10" were over- 
"run" by the "25"(+) students with the final 
margin being 29-13. But everyone really won 
because of all the fun involved. 



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uses -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4--SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1980 



Mond ay, February 4 

5:30 pm -- Women's Basketball vs. Newberry at Newberry. 



Tu esday, February 5 

Donut Night - 2nd floor Lobby of Library Building. 

7:00 pm -- Great Decisions : "Eastern Europe. "-speaker. Dr. Ross Bayard, Wofford College. 
Tukey Lecture Theatre. Free and open to the public. For more information contact Dr. 
Conway Henderson. 

Wednesday, February 6 BLOOD DRIVE, Hodge Center - sponsored by Spartanburg Shrine Club 

12:15-1:30 pm -- Road to Grad School Program . Hodge Center 247A. For more information contact 
the Counseling and Career Development Center, ext. 412. 

4:30 pm -- Science Seminar: "Gene Expression and its Relationshop to Birth Defects." 
Administration Building 325. 

Donut N ight - 2nd floor Lobby of Administration Building. 

Thursday, February 7 BLOOD DRIVE, Hodge Center - sponsored by Spartanburg Shrine Club 
D onut Night - 2nd floor Lobby of Media Building 

Friday, February 8 

12:15-2:30 pm -- Admissions and Petitions meeting . Library building 266 

3:00-5:00 pm -- "Your Investments." -C.E. Shortcourse. Fridays through April 4(skipping March 
28). Media building 320. $75.00 per person; $100, per couple. Contact John May, ext. 422 
for more information. 

7:30 pm -- M en's Basketball vs. Morris College at Morris (Sumter.) 

Sa turday, February 9 

7:30 pm -- Men's Basketball v s. Baptist College at Charleston. 







Vol. IV No. 18 



k Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS Monday, February ii 



I. OFFI CIAL 

THE PROMOTION AND TENURE COMMITTEE will meet 
to consider any appeals on Tuesday, Feb. 12 
from 1:40 through the rest of the afternoon, 
as needed. Candidates have Feb. 1-11 to add 
any new material for appeals. 

DR. ERNEST L. BOYER, who recently became 
president of the Carnegie Foundation for the 
Advancement of Teaching, will make the 
Founders' Day address at USCS on Feb. 18. 
The program will begin at 11:15 am in the 
Hodge Center Gymnasium and is free and open 
to the public. 

THE AFRO AMERICAN ASSOCIATION invites you 
to attend any of several activities sched- 
uled for next week Black History Week. 
Highlighting the week is the convocation 
by Mrs. Angel ine Smith, a civic leader from 
Greensboro, N.C. on Tuesday, Feb. 12 at 
12:15 in Tukey Lecture Theatre. Also 
scheduled are several films and the crowning 
of Miss Afro-American Association. Consult 
USCS--This Week for dates, times and 
place. 

THE FACULTY SENATE will meet at 12:15 in 
L265 on February 15. 

THE SCHEDULE for Sunday use of the gym has 
been set. The times each coach requested 
have been honored. If these times present 
a problem, please see Jerry Baker before 
changing your practice schedule. 1:30- 
3:00 - Women's Varsity Basketball; 3:00- 
7:00 - Free Use; 7:00-9:00 - Men's Varsity 
Basketball. 

MR. STEVE ANDERSON, a candidate for a 
marketing position in Business Administration 
will give a short presentation on Tuesday, 
Feb. 12 at 11:30 in M328. All faculty are 
invited to attend. 



THE GREAT DECISIONS SERIES will continue on 
Tuesday, Feb. 12 with a presentation on 
"Humanity on the Move". The address will be 
made by Dr. Ed Babin. The program begins at 
7:00 pm in Tukey Lecture Theatre, admission 
is free and the public is invited to attend. 

POSITION AVAILABLE. Applications are now being 
taken for a Printing Service Manager, grade 20, 
in the Word Processing Center for this Campus. 
Salary range is $9,545-$13,528. Employees must 
notify the Personnel Office of their interest 
in a specific vacancy by completing and sub- 
mitting to the personnel office a "Request for 
Transfer". The personnel office will arrange 
interviews for the employee whose overall 
qualifications are best suited for the position. 

II. B ULLETIN BOARD 

THE CULTURAL AFFAIRS COMMITTEE is sponsoring 
the showing of the CBS documentary film "With 
All Deliberate Speed," which recreates the 
situation in Clarendon County, S.C, in which 
Rev. J. A. DeLaine, a black minister, and J.W. 
Waring, a white judge, suffered persecution 
for trying to upgrade black schools. Paul 
Winfield plays the role of Re v. DeLaine. 
After the film, Mrs. Mattie DeLaine, widow of 
Rev. DeLaine, will discuss the film and the 
actual events which the film documents with 
students from various USCS classes. These 
events will- take place at noon on Wednesday, 
Feb. 13, in Library 261. 

THE AKA SORORITY COLLEGE FAIR will be held 
in Tukey Lecture Theatre from 9:00-1:00 on 
Saturday, Feb. 16. The Fair is being hosted 
by the Afro-American Association and the staff 
of the Career Development Center. 

DR. JANE DAVISSON has been appointed to the 
Board of Directors for United Way of Spartan- 
burg. She will serve a three year term. 



BU LLETIN CONTINUED 

THE JANUARY REGIONAL SPOTLIGHT of the S.R.E.B. 
features an extensive article "Toward System- 
atic Faculty Evaluation." Copies are available 
from Janella Koob in Information Services. 

FROM CONTINUING EDUCATION: If you have played 
competitive tennis in high school or college 
and would like to try out for the USCS tennis 
team, please contact Jim Newcome, ext. 422. 

FROM BRYANT REEVES: Book Requests are due in 
the book store by March 14 for Summer School 
and by April 15 for Fall. Please forward 
all requests through the Dean or Division 
Chairperson of your school. 

FROM JERRY BAKER: The following special events 
are scheduled for the gym: 
Feb. 18 - Founders' Day 

Feb. 29 - 2 pm, set up for High School Gym- 
nastics. 

Mar. 1 - 7-8 pm - S.C. High School Gymnastics. 
Mar. 7 - 6:30-11:30 pm - Meds vs. Feds. Basket- 
ball game. 
Apr. 10-11-12 - Science Fair. 

THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN 
is holding its annual book sale at Westgate 
Mall on March 21 and 22. Anyone who wishes to 
donate books should contact Sara Nell Boggs, 
582-6896. 

THERE WILL BE A SCIENCE SEMINAR "Derivation 
and Biochemistry of Melanoma Cells" by 
Dr. Carolyn Brown of Clemson University on 
Wednesday, Feb. 13 at 4:30 in A325. 



AN INTERNATIONAL (GERMAN) NIGHT. "Fasching" 
is a German celebration that has been intro- 
duced to Spartanburg by the German com- 
munity here. Fasching is the last big cele- 
bration before the beginning of Lent, 
comparable to Mardi Gras, of the French 
tradition. The German-American club is 
sponsoring a "Fasching Party," a costume 
dance, Saturday, Feb. 16, 8 p.m., at the 
Knights of Columbus Lodge, on Highway 176 S. 
A German band. The Continentals, will play 
and traditional food will be served. Tickets 
are $12 per person. For reservations call 
582-1793 or 439-6073. 

FROM ANDY CROSLAND: Two short courses in 
the statistical computer package, SAS and 
the interactive computing facility, VSPC, 
will be offered on Friday, Feb. 15 in room 
257 of the Library. The SAS course will 
begin at 1:15, and the VSPC course will 
start at 3:15. Last week I sent a memo to 
faculty and staff who had expressed written 
interest in these offerings. It stated that 
the VSPC class would be held before the 
SAS. Please note that the times have been 
reversed. The reason is that a number of 
those who planned to attend the VSPC seminar 
are on the faculty senate, which meets on 
Friday at 12:15 and may not conclude its 
business by 1:15. Please feel free to join 
either class late. In response to a question 
posed by several colleagues, these short 
courses are aimed at beginners and assume 
only an interest in the subjects to be 
covered. 

CHADRON STATE COLLEGE is conducting a search 
for applications for the position of Vice 
President for Academic Affairs. Interested 
persons may apply to Search Committee; 
Chadron State College; Chadron, Nebraska 
69337. Details on qualifications and general 
information is available from Janella Koob 
in Information Services. 



uses— -WIS WEEK 



MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11 -- SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, U 



MONDAY, February 11 

12:00 noon - C rowning of Miss Afro-American Association. Media 218. Contact Earl Gordon, ext. 
412 for more information. 

12:15 pm - Movie "Mandingo " - Tukey Lecture Theatre. Sponsored by the Afro-American Association, 
Contact Earl Gordon, ext. 412 for more information. 

12:15-1:30 pm - " Dating Game " -sponsored by Universal Love. Hodge Center Lobby. 

6:00 pm - Women's Basketball vs. Furman . Hodge Center Gymnasium. 
8:00 pm - Men's Basketball vs. Mofford . Hodge Center Gymnasium. 

TUESDAY, February 12 

12:15 pm - Afro-American Meek Assembly. Speaker - Mrs. Angeline Smith, Greensboro Civic Leader. 
Tukey Lecture Theatre. Drop-in Reception immediately following speech in Media Center. Contact 
Earl Gordon, ext. 412 for further information. 

1:40 pm - Promotion and Tenure Committee meeting . Faculty Conference room, administration bldg. 

7:00 pm - Great Decisions . "Humanity on the Move"-speaker : Dr. Ed Babln. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
Contact Conway Henderson, ext. 374 for further information. 

7-8:30 pm - " Clogging ," continuing education course. Tuesday nights, Feb. 12-March 11. Fee 
$15, single; $25, couple. Administration 209. Contact Continuing Education, ext. 422 for 
further Information. 

7-9:00 pm - " Widowhood: A New Beginning " -continuing education course. Tuesdays, Feb. 12-March 
18. Fee $25.00. Library 257. Contact Continuing Education, ext. 422 for further information. 

WEDNESDA Y, February 13 

12-1:30 pm - " Road to Grad School " - rescheduled from last week. Hodge Center 247A. Contact 
Carol Smith, ext. 336 for further information. 

12:15 pm -- CBS documentary film - "With All Deliberate Speed ." Library 261. See FYI for details, 

1:30 pm - Discussion of the film "With All Deliverate Speed ." by Mrs. Mattle Belton DeLaine. 
Library 261. See FYI for details. 

4:30 pm -- Science Seminar : "Derivation and Biochemistry of Melanoma Cells. "-by Dr. Carolyn 
Brown of Clemson University. Administration 325. 

THURS DAY, February 14 

6:00 pm - Women's Basketball vs. Winthrop at Winthrop. 

8:00 pm - Men's Basketball vs. Central Wesleyan . Hodge Center Gymnasium. 

FRIDAY, February 15 

12:15 pm - Faculty Senate meeting . Library 265 

12:15 pm - Movie "Mahagony " -Media 218. Sponsored by Afro-American Association. Contact Earl 
Gordon, ext. 412 for further information. 

1:15 pm - SAS^ ( Statistical computer shortcourse ) . Library 257. Contact Andy Crosland, ext. 404 
for more Information. 

3:15 pm - VSPC (statistical computer shortcourse). Library 257. Contact Andy Crosland, ext. 404 
for more Information. 



SATURDAY, February 16 

9:00-1:00 pm - AKA Sorority College Fair , hosted by the Afro-American Association and the 
staff of the Career Development staff. Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact Earl Gordon, ext. 
412 for further information. 

6:00 pm - Women's Basketball vs. Benedict at Benedict. 




Vk. 









ol. IV No. 19 



A A/ews/e/fer For Tfje Faculty Of USCS Monday, February is 



I. OFFICIAL 

ALL FACULTY ARE REMINDED that 11:00 a.m. 
classes Monday (Feb. 18) will meet in the 
Hodge Center Gymnasium for Founders' Day 
Ceremonies. Please attend and urge your 
students to do likewise. Dr. Ernest Boyer, 
president of the Carnegie Foundation for 
the Advancement of Teaching, will make the 
Founders' Day address. Special recognition 
will be extended to Dr. J.G. McCracken, 
Lachlan Hyatt, Ernest Kluttz and Johnny 
Mack Brown for outstanding service to the 
university and the community. 

STUDENT TEACHING REMINDER: The last day to 
apply for admission to the Student Teach- 
ing Program is February 29, 1980. Applica- 
tions can be picked up from Mr. Bill 
Reitmeier in the Media Building, Room 139. 

FROM BRYANT REEVES: Book Requests are due 
in the bookstore by March 14 for Summer 
and Fall Sessions. Please forward all requests 
through the Dean or Division Chairperson of 
you school . 

MAKE-UP DAY! Orders for Academic Regalia will 
be taken on Feb. 28 from 11:00 to 7:00 p.m. 
in the Hodge Center. Students and faculty 
who need to order for graduation should do 
so on this make-up date. Please make this 
announcement to you classes. 

FROM DR. EAGLIN: Business Administration: 
Two tenure-track positions are available for 
fall 1980; marketing and economics and/or 
finance. Doctorate or ABD required. Salary 
negotiable. Send resume to Dr. Doris Bennett, 
School of Business Administration, USCS. 
USCS is an affirmative action/equal oppor- 
tunity employer. 

II. BULLETIN BOARD 

PERSONS WHO HAVE PLAYED competitive tennis in 
high school or college and would like to try 
out for the USCS tennis team, should contact 
Jim Newcome, ext. 422 or 423. 



THE FOREIGN FILM SERIES continues this week 
on Wed., Feb. 20, with the film "The Green 
Wall," a Spanish film with English subtitles. 
The film begins at 7:00 p.m. in Tukey Lecture 
Theatre and is free and open to the public. 
The film, which was acclaimed as Best Picture 
at several international film festivals, 
would make an excellent topic of conversation 
or composition for literature, political 
science, history and geography classes. 

THE GREAT DECISIONS LECTURE SERIES continues 
on Tuesday, Feb. 19 with a presentation by 
Dr. Morris Blachman of USC Columbia on 
"Brazil's Rising Power." Blachman is con- 
sidered one of the nation's leading authori- 
ties on Latin America and is the author of 
the forthcoming "Eve in Adamocracy: The 
Politics of Women in Brazil." The lecture 
begins at 7:00 p.m. in Tukey Lecture Theatre 
and is free and open to the public. 

JOHN BAYLEY CONCERT: John Bayley will be fea- 
tured in concert on Feb. 21, at 12:15 p.m. in 
Tukey Lecture Theatre. Bayley, from George- 
town, Guyana, played in local clubs and con- 
certs throughout South America as a youth. 
He came to the U.S. in 1966 and has since 
opened for such artists as the Ohio Players, 
Herbie Hancock, Robi Shankar and Ike and 
Tina Turner. His solo instrumentation in- 
cludes both 12 and 6 string guitars, mandolin, 
bazouki , all latin and African percussion 
instruments, as well as his own foot-powered 
rhythm section on tamborines. The concert is 
free and everyone is invited. 



HOMECOMING DI 
USCS Homecomi 
person) will 
Feb. 20. The 
Friday, Feb. 
dancing until 
vided by DIXI 
style includi 
wine. Tickets 
dent Affairs 
Dinner Dance 
Center. 



NNER AND DANCE 
ng Dinner and 
be available u 
Dinner and Dan 
22, beginning 

midnight. Mus 
E DAWN and din 
ng a complimen 

may be obtain 
Office in the 
will be held i 



! Tickets for the 
Dance ($5.00 per 
ntil Wednesday, 
ce will be held 
at 8:00 p.m. with 
ic will be pro- 
ner will be buffet 
tary bottle of 
ed from the Stu- 
Hodge Center. The 
n the USCS Hodge 



BULLETIN BOARD continued 



THE GREENVILLE CHAPTER of the American 
Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air- 
Conditioning Engineers will meet Feb. 18, 
at the Thunderbird Motor Inn on 291 Bypass, 
N. In Greenville. The guest speaker will 
be Dr. Meyer Drucker, Business Administration, 
and the topic will be Estate Planning in- 
cluding Tax Matters and Wills. The meeting ^ 
begins at 6:00 p.m. 

THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION of University 
Women is holding its annual book sale at 
Westgate Mall on March 21 and 22. Anyone 
who wishes to donate books should contact 
Sara Nell Boggs, 582-6896. 

SCIENCE SEMINAR will be held on Wed., Feb. 
20 at 4:30 in A325. The topic will be 
"Teratocarcinoma Cells as a Vehicle for 
Mutant Genes" and will be presented by 
Dr. Mike Dewey from USC Columbia. 

GRANT PROPOSAL SUBMITTED: USCS has sub- 
mitted a proposal entitled "Progress and 
Problems in Southern Politics" to the 
Sperry and Hutchinson Foundation Lecture- 
ship Program for $2,500. The proposal re- 
quests assistance in providing honoraria 
for expert guest lecturers for next year's 
Southern Politics program. Principle Inves- 
tigator: Ron Romine (Political Science). 

JIM BROWN spoke last week to the Business 
and Professional Women's Club on "Inter- 
national Spartanburg." 

JOHN EDMUNDS spoke to a class at Dorman High 
School on Friday, Feb. 15 on "Spartanburg." 
All faculty are encouraged to document public 
service and proffesional activities by having 
them published in FYI. 

INTERNATIONAL VISITORS: From time to time 
foreign visitors passing through Spartanburg 
need temporary accomodations. This can pro- 
vide excellent opportunities to get to know 
those from other cultures. If you, or anyone 
you know, would be willing to have your name 
put on a list of those to be contacted about 
such opportunities, please contact Jim Brown, 
L236, ext. 433. 



DISCOUNT MOVIE TICKETS - ONLY $1! 

Discount movie tickets ($1) can be purchased 
in the USCS Bookstore and the Science Division 
and are redeemable at the Royal Cinema 1,2, 
and 3; Camelot Drive-In and the Greer 
Drive-In, through April 3. Anyone can buy 
and use them. 

Now showing at the Royal Cinema: The Jerk; 
Midnight Madness ; and Jaws 2 . 



HOMES NEEDED FOR FRENCH GRADUATE STUDENTS: I 
Mrs. Jacqueline Dietrich, the French Consul, 1 
needs homes for eight French graduate stu- 
dents (in their mid-twenties) , between 
April 7 ant April 12. The students will be 
here studying textile manufacturing around 
the state. They will be busy during the day 
and will have their own transportation. The 
host family would only need to provide sleep- 
ing accomodations, breakfast, and some evening 
meals (when the student is going to be back 
in time for the meal.) This is a good oppor- 
tunity to establish "international" contacts 
and for USCS to provide a service. Host 
families do not need to be USCS faculty/staff, 
so if you know someone who would be inter- 
ested, let them know. Those interested should 
contact Jim Brown, L236, ext. 433. 

TONEY LISTER, a former legislator from Spar- 
tanburg County, has been named special 
lecturer on the legislative process at the 
University of South Carolina. Lister, who 
represented Dist. 37, will serve as senior 
advisor in the legislative internship pro- 
gram and as liaison between the university 
and the General Assembly. Until 1974, USC 
followed the same practices as other state 
universities by having a fulltime liaison 
person in the legislature. Since then no 
one had been assigned to the position until 
the university began the legislative intern 
program two years ago. 



uses -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18 -- SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1980 



Monday, February 18 

11:15 a.m. -- Founders' Day Ceremonies . Hodge Center Gymnasium. For more information, contact 
Information Services, ext. 210. 

6:00 p.m. -- Women's basketball vs. Presbyterian at Presbyterian. 
8:00 p.m. -- Men's basketball vs. Presbyterian at Presbyterian. 

7-8:30 p.m. -- "Dealing with Families and Alcohol " -Continuing Education seminar. Fee $5.00. 

Seminar will be held at the Davenport Center (1-85 and New Cut Rd.) For more information, 

contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 
************************************************* 

Tuesday, February 19 

7:00 p.m. -- Great Decisions Series -speaker: Dr. Morris Blachman, USC Columbia; Topic - 
"Brazil's Rising Power." Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more information, contact Con Henderson, 
ext. 374. 

7-8:30 p.m. -- " Dealing with Families and Alcohol " -Continuing Education seminar. Final 
session. See Monday, Feb. 18 for details. 
************************************************* 

Wednesday, February 20 

12:15 p.m. — Self-Study Program . Library 268. For more information, contact Lee Holcombe, 
ext. 332. 

4:30 p.m. -- Science Seminar : "Teratocarcinoma Cells as a Vehicle for Mutant Genes"-by Dr. 
Mike Dewey, USC Columbia. Administration 325. 

6:00 p.m. -- Women's basketball vs. Columbia College. Hodge Center Gymnasium. 

7:00 p.m. -- Foreign Film Series - "The Green Wall" -Spanish with English subtitles. Tukey 
Lecture Theatre. For more information, contact Regis Robe, ext. 430. 
************************************************** 

Thursday, February 21 

12:15 p.m. -- John Bayley concert . Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more information, contact 
Student Affairs, ext. 336. 

6:30 p.m. — Women's basketball vs. Converse at Converse. 
************************************************* 

Friday, February 22 

12 noon -- Talent Show - sponsored by Sigma Pi Mu. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 

3-5:00 p.m. — " Publicity and Public Relations " -Continuing Education seminar, one session 
only. Fee $12.00. Media Building 321. For more information, contact Continuing Education, 
ext. 422. 

8:00 p.m. -- Homecoming Dinner and Dance . Tickets in advance. Hodge Center Lobby. For more 
information, contact Student Affairs, ext. 336. 

continued 



Saturday, February 23 - USCS HOMECOMING 
8_4:00 p.m. -- Minolta Camera School . Library 266 and 267. For more information, contact 
Continuing Education, ext. 422. 

6-00 P m -- Women' s basketball vs. Francis Marion. Hodge Center Gymnasium, 
si 00 p.m. -- Men's basketba TT Ts. Francis Marion. Hodge Center Gymnasium. 




•^ 







■yOL. IV No. 20 



OFFICIAL 



k Newsleifer For The Faculty Of USCS 



Monday, February 25 



PAYROLL DISTRIBUTION will be made in the 
Faculty Conference room, 2nd floor admini- 
stration building, this Friday, Feb. 29. 
It is expected that a permanent place for 
payroll distribution will be announced in 
the near future. 

STUDENT TEACHING REMINDER: The last day to 
apply for admission to the Student Teach- 
ing Program is February 29, 1980. Applica- 
tions can be picked up from Mr. Bill 
Reitmeier in the Media Building, Room 139. 

FROM BRYANT REEVES: Book Requests are due 
in the bookstore by March 14 for Summer 
and Fall Sessions. Please forward all re- • 
quests through the Dean or Division Chair- 
person of your school . 

MAKE-UP DAY! Orders for Academic Regalia will 
be taken on Feb. 28 from 11:00 to 7:00 p.m. 
in the Hodge Center. Students and faculty 
who need to order for graduation should do 
so on this make-up date. Please make this 
announcement to your classes. 

FACULTY: On Friday, March 14, President 
Holderman will take with the faculty at 12:15 
in the Tukey Lecture Theatre. Please plan to 
be there. The faculty has submitted ques- 
tion? to Dr. Holderman in order to convey 
our interests. 

FROM MIM SHELDEN: Any faculty member having 
concerns regarding the 1980-81 USCS catalog 
should contact either Dr. Predmore, Dr. Robe, 
or Dr. Shelden as soon as possible. 

LOU HUNLEY AND EB BARNES delivered the USCS 
Faculty Senate Document on Annual Review to 
the Office of the President and Office of the 
Academic Provost. Dr. Sansbury and Dr. Eaglin 
concurred with the Faculty Senate's decisions 
Copies of the USCS Faculty Senate Document 
on Annual Review will be distributed to the 
Faculty this week through the campus mail. 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 

UPCOMING CAMPUS EVENTS 

REPRESENTATIVES FROM A RECORD 30 major business 
firms and government agencies will be at USCS 
Wednesday, Feb. 27, for the fourth annual 
Career Carousel. They will be conducting job 
placement interviews with graduating seniors 
from USCS, Columbia College, Converse College, 
Limestone College and Wofford College. Infor- 
mation may be obtained" by contacting Earl Gor- 
don, ext. 212. 

STAGE SOUTH, the state theatre, of S.C, will 
present the play by Athol Fugard, "Sizwe Banzi 
Is Dead,". March 10,. at the USCS Hodge Center. 
Gurta^'n tirne is :at:-8:00 p.m. ''a^nd" admission is 
free; More information is available from 
Janelia K'oob, ext. 210. 

THE THIRD ANNUAL KfOMEN^'S WEEK will be held at 
USCS on March 3-7. A list of activities to be 
held during that week is attached with this 
FYI. 

THE GREAT DECISIONS LECTURE SERIES continues 
this Tuesday, Feb. 26, with a presentation by 
Chancellor Sansbury on "Vietnam and Its 
Neighbors." The lecture begins at 7:00 p.m. 
in Tukey Lecture Theatre and is free and 
open to the publ ic. 

SCIENCE SEMINAR: "The Fat Cell Theory" (Fat 
Cells and Obesity), -by Mr. Alan Prtichard 
(USCS senior). The seminar will be held in 
A325 and will begin at 4:30 pm on Wednesday, 
Feb. 27. 

THE USCS SHOESTRING PLAYERS will present the 
play the "Shadowbox" on Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday of this week. Curtain time is 8:15, 
For more information and reservations contact 
the Shoebox, ext. 397. 



NOTES 

PRE-COLLEGE CONFERENCES - Developmental Ser- 
vices in conjunction with Continuing Educa- 
tion will offer the following seminars for 
prospective college students: 1. How to 
Succeed in College English on Mar. 3-12 
and 2. Study Skills Make the Difference on 
Mar. 4-13. The same seminars will be 
offered again on April 8-17 and April 7-16 
respectively. More information may be 
obtained from Joyce Miller, ext. 344 or 
Jane Davisson, ext. 343. 

THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION of University 
Women is holding its annual book sale at 
Westgate Mall on March 21 and 22. Anyone 
who wishes to donate books should contact 
Sara Nell Boggs, 582-6896. 

FROM LISA ROBINSON, Carolana staff, to 
ALL FACULTY: The yearbook staff this year is 
made up of entirely new people. These 
experienced staff members have put together 
a fantastic yearbook for the 79-80 year. 
Unfortunately, in order to get this project 
rolling, we, the entire Carolana staff must 
sell 100 more yearbooks before March 7. If 
we do not sell these 100 yearbooks, we will 
be forced to decrease the size of the 1979- 
80 yearbook. We urge each and every faculty 
member to buy a yearbook from us and to 
announce this sale in your classrooms. Any- 
one wishing to buy a Carolana should stop 
by the Carolana office at H-214 or call ext. 
387. If there is no one in the yearbook 
office, please contact student affairs, ext. 
337. As a personal plea from the entire 
Carolana staff, we urge you to please buy 
a yearbook from us before March 7. 

THE uses SHOESTRING PLAYERS is the only pro- 
ducing theatre in Spartanburg to be listed 
in the latest edition of "A Directory of 
Southern Theatres" as compiled by Moore, 
Nolan, and Wilson. CONGRATULATIONS! 

TITLE IV (CORE) PROGRESS: The Title IV, Special 
Services Grant (CORE) is in the process of 
exiting the first group of students at the end 
of the Spring 1980 semester. Of the initial 
group 120 students who entered the program, 
57.5% have remained or returned to USCS. These 
students with information about progress will 
be referred to major advisors. Until CORE stu- 
dents exit the program at the end of four 
semesters they must see advisors in the Dept. 
of Developmental Studies even though it is 
often nece5sary to see an advisor in a specific 
major for information. 



DISCOUNT MOVIE TICKETS - ONLY $11 

Discount movie tickets ($1) can be purchased 
in the USCS Bookstore and the Science Divisior 
and are redeemable at the Royal Cinema 1,2, 
and 3; Camelot Drive-In and the Greer Drive- 
in, through April 3. Anyone can buy and 
use them. Now showing at the Royal Cinema: 
Midnight Madness, The Godsend and Jaws 2 



TITLE IV, TALENT SEARCH PROGRAM - The Talent 
Search staff is presently working with 226 
clients from Union, Cherokee and Spartanburg 
counties between ages of 14 and 27 years of 
age. The program emphasizes: (1) a drop-out 
prevention program in area junior and senior 
high schools, (2) a program for students who 
began a post-secondary education but dropped 
out, and (3) a late-entrance program for 
students who haven't pursued a post-secondary 
education. One of the most successful com- 
ponents of the program is the drop-out pre- 
vention program. The Talent Search staff 
counsels with the students who the schools 
have identified as possible drop-outs. This 
prevention component seems to be highly suc- 
cessful and accepted by the public schools 
and social agencies. 

OPERATION CROSSROADS AFRICA, INC., a non- 
profit organization is seeking faculty, pro- 
fessionals, and students to participate in 
eight-week summer team projects in Africa. 
The projects are sponsored jointly by Cross- 
roads and various ministries of African 
countries, often in conjunction with the UN. 
Each team will consist of about 10 American 
joined by an equal number of African special 
ists and students. Groups will be located in 
rural communities where participants gain an 
immediate personal sense of Africa that can- 
not be duplicated by academic courses. Both 
volunteer and leader positions are open. 
Apply to Crossroads' Summer Work/Travel/Stud 
Program immediately. Contact: Crossroads 
Africa, 150 5th Avenue, New York, NY 10011; 
(212)242-8550, or contact Jim Brown, L-236, 
ext. 433. 



NOTES 



DR. GENE HUTSELL spoke to the Spartanburg 
Life Underwriters Association on Febraury 
14, 1980. 

MARTE MARKER (nursing) attended a seminar 
for Occupational Health Nurses. The topic 
at the seminar was "Toxicology in the 
Work Place." The seminar was held in 
Greenville on Feb. 19, 1980. 



BETTY GRAVES (secretray, nursing) appeared 
on the Nance Welch show on Feb. 20 Betty 
appeared on the show and gave a demonstration 
on baking bread. Bettys' recipie is available 
upon request. 



BARBARA MILLER (nursing) presented a seminar 
to 30 female employees at Mi Hi ken as part 
of Mi Hi ken's personnel departments con- 
tinuing education for employees. The topics 
presented were' "Breast Self Exam, and Cancer 
Prevention." 




Monday . March 3 



THIRD ANNUAL USCS WOMEN'S WEEK 



Film - "Accomplished Women" 



Demonstration and Exhibit - 
"Women In the Arts" 

Career Panel Discussion - 

Liz Patterson - State Senator 
Dr. Floride Martin - Educator 
Bobbi Kennedy - Television Executive 



MARCH 3-7 




9:00 a.m. 


M215 


10:00 a.m. 


M215 


11:00 a.m. 


M215 


10:00 a.m. - 


Hodge Center 


1:00 p.m. 


Lobby 


12:15 p.m. 


A209 



Tuesday, March 4 Male Awareness Program - Bob Addleton 
"Changing Men in a Changing World" 
includes film "The Last of the Great 
Male Chauvanists" 



12:15 p.m. 



Wednesday, March 5 Health and Fitness Program - 

Health Issues - American Cancer Society 
Physical Fitness - Barbara Gibbs, YMCA 

One-Mile Fun Run 

Video Tape - "Off Your Duff" 



12:05 p.m. 


HC247 


12:35 p.m. 


HC247 


1:30 p.m. 


Hodge Center 


3:00 p.m. 


HC248 



Thursday, March 6 



Human Sexuality Program - 

"Sexual Attitudes: Where Are We and 
How Did We Get Here?" 

Pam DeFore - LaMaze Instructor 
Joan Foss - Social Psychologist 



12:15 p.m. L26S 



Friday, March 7 "Changing Roles of Women in the Movies' 
Dr. Bryan Lindsay 

Movie - "A Star Is Born" starring 
-.- --- . Judy Garland 



12:00 noon Tukey 
12:30 p.m. Tukey 



MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25 — SUNDAY, MARCH 2 



MONDAY, February 25 

7-9:00 pm -- " Early Identification of Pre-Deliguenf -Continuing Education shortcourse. Fee 
$15.00. Additional session on March 3 and 10. Media 218. For more information contact 
Continuing Education, ext. 422. 

TUESDAY, February 26 

7:00 pm -- Great Decisions Lecture Series . "Vietnam and Its Neighbors" -speaker- Chancellor 
Sansbury. Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more information contact Conway Henderson, ext. 374. 

7-8:30 pm -- " Coping with Children " -Continuing Education shortcourse. Feb. 26-April 8 
(Tuesdays). Fee $35.00. Media 122. For more information contact Continuing Education, 
ext. 422. 

WEDNESDAY, February 27 

9:00-5:30 pm -- Career Carousel . Interviews will be held in the Media Center and the Library 
building. For specifics contact Counseling and Career Development, ext. 412. 

12:15-1:00 pm -- Self-Study Program . Library 268. For more information contact Lee Holcombe, 
ext. 332. 

4:30 pm -- Science Seminar : "The Fat Cell Theory" (Fat Cells and Obesity), -by Mr. Alan 
Pritchard (USCS senior). Administration 325. 

8-9:30 p.m. -- Trancendental Meditation . Free lecture by Andy Ptak. Administration 209. 

THURSDAY, February 28 

8:15 pm -- " The Shadowbox " -presented by the Shoestring Players. Tukey Lecture Theatre. For 
more information and reservation contact the Shoebox, ext. 397. 

FRIDAY, February 29 

12:15-1:00 pm -- Self-Study Program . Library 268. (Questionaire Day). For more information 
contact Lee Holcombe, ext. 322. 

8:15 pm -- " The Shadowbox " -presented by the Shoestring Players. Tukey Lecture Theatre. For 
more information and reservations contact the Shoebox, ext. 397. 



SATURDAY, March 1 

8:15 pm -- " The Shadowbox " -presented by the Shoestring Players. Tukey Lecture Theatre. For 
more information and reservations contact the Shoebox, ext. 397. 




^14ii 






i/OL. IV No. 21 A Newsletter For The Faculty 0/ L/SCS Monday, March 3 



I. OFFICIAL 

FACULTY: On Friday, March 14, President 
Holderman will talk with the faculty at 12:15 
in the Tukey Lecture Theatre. Please plan to 
DC there. The faculty has submitted ques- 
tions to Dr. Holderman in order to convery 
Dur interests. 

SPARTANBURG PROJECT 70001: Effective March 
3, 1980, Dr. Jan Yost will serve as the 
administrator of the project for the Univer- 
sity. You will recall the CETA funded project 
is located on S. Pine St. and provides GED 
and pre-employment skills training as well as 
job placement and supervision for Spartanburg 
County youth. 

FACULTY: During the week of March 3 Admini- 
strative evaluations will be mailed to the 
faculty and administration. Please take a 
few minutes and complete these and return 
to Jacki Sherbert (A109). If you have ques- 
tions about the evaluation forms, contact 
sither Eb Barnes, ext. 254 or Lou Hunley, 
sxt. 371. 

FROM BOB CONNELLY: Effective Feb. 29, 1980, 
payroll distribution will be held in the 
Conference Room on the second floor of the 
Administration Building from 10:00-12:00 noon. 

FROM AL GRAY: I am pleased to announce the 
procedures for the 1980-81 Faculty/Staff 
Scholarship application process. To be eli- 
gible for a Faculty/Staff Scholarship an 
applicant must be accepted for admission or 
)3e a continuing student at any campus of the 
Jniversity for the 1980-81 academic year and 
be the dependent of a U.S.C. employee. In 
Drder to apply, the applicant should write 
the Office of Student Financial Aid and 
Scholarships indicating the following: 1. 
They are apply for a Faculty/Staff Scholarship 
for 1980-81, 2. The name of the parent employ- 
ed, 3. The department in which the parent is 
employed. Application letters may be sent via 



campus mail or to the Office of Student 
Financial Aid and Scholarships, 1710 College 
Street., Columbia, S.C. 29208. The deadline 
for receipt of application is March 8, 1980. 

II. UPCOMING CAMPUS EVENTS 

THE THIRD ANNUAL WOMEN'S WEEK will be held at 
uses during this week. A list of activities 
to be held was attached with last weeks FYI 
and events are listed on the attached calendar. 
Individuals may contact Student Affairs for 
more information on activities at ext. 336. 

STAGE SOUTH, the state theatre of S.C, will 
present the play by Athol Fugard, "Sizwe 
Banzi Is Dea," March 10, at the USCS Hodge 
Center. Curtain time is 8:00 p.m. and admission 
is free. More information is available from 
Janella Koob, ext. 210. 

THE GREAT DECISIONS LECTURE SERIES continues 
this Tuesday, Mar. 5, with a presentation by 
Dr. John McAlhany on "The Energy Crisis." The 
lecture begins at 7:00 p.m. in Tukey Lecture 
Theatre and is free and open to the public. 

ON MARCH 10-13 Dr. Charles R.Tolbert, Prof, of 
Astronomy at the University of Virginia, will 
be visiting USCS as a lecturer with the Harlow 
Shapley Visiting Lectureship Program sponsored 
by the American Astronomical Society. Dr. 
Tolbert will give a lecture at l:40-2:30pm on 
Tuesday, Mar. 11 in Tukey Theatre entitled - 
"The Life Cycle of a Star." A discussion of 
the process by which a star forms out of the 
galactic gas; its evolution, and its final 
stages of existence. Topics covered include: 
Supernovae, Red Giants, White Dwarfs, and Black 
Holes. At 7:30 pm in Tukey Theatre, he will 
give the Harlow Shapley Lecture entitled - 
"Inscrutable Astronomy." A discussion of some 
of the things we know exist, but can't explain. 
For example: Quasars, the lack of Solar Neu- 
trinos, X-ray stars, high velocity hydrogen 
clouds, etc. Both lectures are free and the 
public is invited co attend both. For more 
information contacu Eb Barnes, ext. 254. 



llPrn MING CAMPUS EVENTS continued 

A PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT featuring the works 
of Mark Olencki will open Tuesday, Mar. 4 in 
the Library Art Gallery. The gallery is open 
from 7:30 am to 9:30 pm Monday through Thurs- 
day; from 7:30 am to 5:00 pm on Fridays; from 
10:00am to 2:00 pm on Saturdays and from 
2:00pm to 6:00pm on Sundays. Olencki, a mem- 
ber of the South Carolina Artist Guild, is 
interested in both printmaking and photography 
but in this exhibit he will concentrate on 
pictures including some new color photographs 
made on a recent trip to the Everglades. 

SCIENCE SEMINAR: Wednesday, Mar. 5, the will 
be a presentation by Michael D. Smith, USCS 
senior on "Fertilization Today." The seminar 
will be held in A325 at 4:30 pm. 

II. CAMPUS NOTES 

FROM LISA ROBINSON, Carolana staff, to ALL 
FACULTY: The yearbook staff this year is 
made up of entirely new people. These ex- 
perienced staff members have put together a 
fantastic yearbook for the 79-80 year. Un- 
fortunately, in order to get this project 
rolling, we, the entire Carolana staff must 
sell 100 more yearbooks before March 7. If 
we do not sell these yearbooks, we will be 
forced to decrease the size of the 1979-80 
yearbook. We urge each and every faculty 
member to buy a yearbook from us and to 
announce this sale in your classrooms. Any- 
one wishing to buy a Carolana should drop 
by the Carolana office at H214 or call ext. 
387. If there is not one in the office, 
please contact student affairs, ext. 337. 
As a personal plea from the entire Carolana 
staff, we urge you to please buy a yearbook 
from us before Mar. 7. 

THE DEADLINE for applying for college scholar- 
ships offered by the James F. Byrnes Founda- 
tion is March 15. Applicants must be S.C. 
residents who have lost one or both parents. 
For applications, write the James F. Byrnes 
Foundation, P.O. Box 9506, Columbia, S.C, 
29290. Selection is based on scholastic 
achievement, leadership qualities, financial 
need and involvement in community and school 
activities. The scholarships provide $1,100 
a year for each recipient. Byrnes, whose 
father died when Byrnes was a youngster, 
started the scholarship program in 1947 with 
proceeds from his book, "Speaking Frankly." 



DISOUNT MOVIE TICKETS - ONLY $11 

Discount movie tickets ($1) can be purchase 
in the USCS Bookstore and the Science Divi 
si on and are redeemable at the Royal Cinema 
1,2, and 3; Camel ot Drive-In and the Greer 
Drive-In, through April 3. Anyone can buy 
and use them. Now showing at the Royal 
Cinema: Now showing at the Royal Cinema: 
Fatso, Midnight Madness, and Living Legend, 



THE SCHOOL of Education and the Office of 
Continuing Education have just completed a 
workshop for the six session program which 
focused in mathematics, science, language 
arts, arts/crafts, drama/music, and social 
development skills for three, four, and 
five year old children. The staff was drawn 
from USCS (School of Education, USC 
Graduate Education), Converse College, 
Charles Lea Center, and Sptg. District 6. 
Ed White was the workshop coordinator. 

JANICE LIPSCOMB, Counselor in the Title IV, 
Special Services grant in Developmental 
Studies at USCS received the Spartan Handi- 
capped Citizen of the Year Award from 
Mayor Frank Allen at City Hall on Feb. 27, 
1980. The award is presented for her contri 
butions toward the encouragement of the 
handicapped citizens in the Spartanburg 
area. Despite her handicap, Ms. Lipscomb 
continues to contribute to the students 
at USCS as a career, academic and personal 
counselor and as an example to all Spartan- 
burg citizens. Mayor Frank Allen called her 
will to achieve against the heaviest odds 
a lesson all Spartans can heed. 

FRENCH VISITORS: A few homes are still 
needed for the French Graduate Students who 
will be visiting textile operations in S.C. 
in early April. Anyone who would like to 
host one or more of these students from 
Monday, April 7 through Saturday morning, 
April 12, please contact Jim Brown, ext. 
433. 

GEORGE LABANICK (Science & Math) spoke to 
the Science Club at Converse College on 
February 27, 1980. The topic was "Mimicry 
in Southern Appalachian Salamanders." 



CAMPUS NOTES continued 

INTERNATIONAL OPPORTUNITY: National Endow- 
ment for the Humanities Summer Seminars 
offer an excellent opportunity for advanced 
study or research in a variety of fields. 
They are designed for those who teach at 
institutions such as USCS, and preference 
is given to those who have been teaching at 
least three years and who have not recently 
had the opportunity to use the resources of 
a major library. Participants receive a 
stipend of $2500. In addition to a number 
of 'international' topics in such disciplines 
as Anthropology, Area Studies, Comparative 
Literature, History, Modern Languages, and 
Political Science, this year's seminars in- 
clude four located outside the U.S.: "Shakes- 
peare, Poet and Playwright," at Stratford-on 
-Avon, England; "Communism in Southern Europe," 
Rome, Italy; "Colonies of Early Rome," Rome, 
Italy; and "Greece in the Middle Ages: Emer- 
gence of the Byzantine Tradition," Athens, 
Greece. The deadline for applications is 
April 1, 1980, with announcement of awards 
April 21, 1980. Additional information is 
posted in the SBS/FALL mail room, or contact 
Jim Brown, ext. 433. 

GRANT PROPOSALS SUBMITTED: Two proposals re- 
questing equipment have been submitted to the 
National Science Foundation's Institutional 
Scientific Equipment Program: (1) "Improvement 
of Undergraduate Chemistry Courses by the Use 
of NMR Spectroscopy" for $10,680. Principle 
Investigator: Dr. Ron Sobczak (Chemistry). 
(2) Improvements in Experimental Psychology 
Curriculum" for $8,072. Principle Investigator: 
Dr. Evan Krauter (Psychology). The School of 
Nursing has requested $13,000 for audiovisual 
equipment from The Helene Paul Health Trust. 
Principal Investigator: Ms. Judy Kugler, 

MARTE HARKER (nursing) is serving as a volun- 
teer driver for field trip with the Museum of 
Natural Sciences. More drivers are needed to 
ensure field trips this spring, individuals 
who are interested may contact Marte at ext. 
305. 

HOLLY CROCKER (nursing) gave a presentation 
on Breast Self Examination - The Technique 
and Its Importance to the members of the 
Spartanburg Newcomers Club at the Spartanburg 
Arts Center on Feb. 26. 



and International Studies in the 80s at 
use at Columbia. Dr. Brown was moderator 
of a panel on "Support Needed for Interna- 
tional Studies in the 80 's: The Practi- 
tioner's View." 

THE FOLLOWING STUDENTS travelled to Knox- 
ville, Tennessee, on Thursday and Friday, 
Feb. 28 and 29, to attend the Southern 
Conference of the American Choral Directors 
Association: Wendy Nelson, Lisa Robinson, 
Rhonda Barnhill, Alyson Pugh, Betsy Gregory, 
Gina Senl grove, Amanda Peninger, Ann Morgan, 
Pam Pattillo, Linday Wayner, Elizabeth 
Byrnes, Inez Lyles, Rosie Poole, Debbie 
Weaver, Wendy Lou Hughes, Mary Ann Walker, 
Wesley Craven, Jr., Jan Reginald Harris, Jr., 
Todd Hyatt, Tony Exall , Chris Self, Chris 
Bryant, Glen Plumley, Russell Gaffney III. 
This group, the USCS Singers, was accomp- 
anied by Bryan Lindsay, Beth Burgess, and 
Darlene Chappcll . 

MOVING— Doyle Boggs is moving, and has the 
following items for sale: wooden study 
desk with six drawers, $25; nice Hollywood 
double bed with matching dresser. Matress 
and springs will probably need replacing, 
$75; living room chair, $25; assorted 
kitchen pots and pans are available too. 
If you are interested, please call ext. 
210 or 211. 



REGIS ROBE AND JIM BROWN attended a recent 
"Symposium on Funding For Foreign Languages 



USCS-.THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, MARCH 3 — SUNDAY, MARCH 8, 1980 



- - * Signifies III Annual Women's Week Activities 

onday, March 3 

10:00-1:00 pm — *Women in Arts - demonstration and exhibit. Hodge Center Lobby. 

12:15 pm — *Career Panel Discussion with Liz Patterson, Dr. Floride Martin and Bobbi Kennedy. 
Administration 209. 

7:00-9:00 pm -- How to Succeed in College English . Monday & Wednesday, Mar. 3-12. Fee $20.00 
Library 273. For more information contact Developmental Services, ext. 343 or 344. 

uesday, March 4 

'12:15 pm -- *Ma1e Awareness Program with Bob Addleton. Media 218. 

4-5:30 pm — Kappa Delta Pi meeting . Media 122. 

7:00 pm -- Great Decisions lecture series . "The Energy Crisis"-by John McAlhany. Tukey Lecture 
Theatre. For more information contact Con Henderson, ext. 374. 

7:00-9:00 pm -- Study Skills Make The Difference. Tuesday & Thursday, Mar. 4-13. Library 273. 
Fee $20.00. For more information contact Developmental Services, ext. 343 or 344. 

ednesday, March 5 

9:00-3:00 pm -- Student Teaching Seminar . Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more information contact 
Bill Reitmeier, ext. 379. 

12:05 pm -- * Hea1th Issues -American Cancer Society. Hodge Center 247. 

12:30 pm -- * Physica1 Fitness - Barbara Gibbs, YMCA. Hodge Center 247. 

1:30 pm --* One-Mile Fun Run , meet in Hodge Center Lobby. 

3:00 pm — *Off Your Duff " -video tape. Hodge Center 248. 

hursday, March 6 

12:15 pm -- * Human Sexuality Program - "Sexual Attitudes: Where Are We and How Did We Get 
Here?" -Pam Dufare and Joan Foss. Library 268. 

3:30-6:00 pm -- Our Changing Environment . Continuing Education course. Thursdays, Mar. 6- 
Apr. 17. Fee $35.00. Library 267. 11-14 year olds only. For more information contact 
Continuing Education, ext. 422. 



riday, March 7 

12 noon — ^Changing roles of Women in the Movies ^Bryan Lindsay. Tukey Lecture Theatre, 
12:30 pm — *A Star is Born -mo vie starring Judy Garland. Tukey Lecture Tfjeatre. 



Friday, continued 

7:00 pm — Meds vs. Feds basketball game, Hodge Center Gym. 

Saturday, March 8 

3:00 pm -- What Parents Need to Know About Reading Instruction . Continuing Education course. 
March 8 and 15. Fee $10.00. Media 213. For more information contact Continuing Education 
ext. 422. 







Vol. IV No. 22 A Newslefter For The Faculty Of USCS Monday, March 1 1,1 98o 



I. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

This is an abbreviated version of FYI, 
Several items had to be omitted or 
shortened due to illness on the In- 
formation Services staff and a personnel 
shortage in the Word Processing Center. 
Regular publication will resume next 
week. 

PRESIDENT HOLDERMAN will meet with the 
faculty at 12:15 Friday, March 14, in 
the Tukey Lecture Theatre. The faculty 
has pre-submitted a number of questions 
to Dr. Holderman. Questions from the 
floor will also be in order. 

THE FACULTY ADVISORY COMMITTEE will meet 
in Tukey Lecture Theatre following Dr. 
Holderman 's address. The agenda will 
include: (1) discussion about nominations 
for officers for next year; (2) filing 
committee reports for 1979-80; (3) 
chairpersons for 1980-81; (4) the need 
for a constitution and by-laws committee, 
and (5) planning the agenda for the March 
21 Senate meeting. 

THE FACULTY SENATE will meet meet Friday, 
March 21 at 12:15 p.m. in Library 267. 

SCANDINAVIAN OPPORTUNITY: The Danish 
Institute of Copenhagen has announced 
nine Scandinavian Summer Sem»inars for 
1980, to be taught in English. At least 
a portion of each seminar will be con- 
ducted in Copenhagen, and most include 
trips and observation in other cities of 
Denmark. Cost varies from $215 to $850. 
Jim Brown, L236, ext. 433, has complete 
details. 

THE USC-COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 
is accepted applications for a student ex- 
change progrma with the University of 
Warwick in England. Call 777-5195. 



II. CAMPUS EVENTS 

Monday, March 10— STAGE SOUTH, the 
state theatre of South Carolina, will 
present the play "Sizwe Banzi Is Dead" 
at 8 p.m. in the Hodge Center Gym. 
Admission is free and the public is 
invited to attend. 

Tuesday, March 11-- Dr. Charles R. 
Tolbert will deliver two lectures on 
astronomy in the Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
He will be speaking on "The Life Cycle 
of a Star"at 1:40 and "Inscrutable Astrono- 
my"at 7:30. The public is invited to 
attend both these presentations which 
are sponsored by the Harlow Shapley Foun- 
dation. 

Wednesday, March 12— International Film 
Coup de Grace, a 1977 German Film. The 
movie begins at 7 p.m. in Tukey. 

Wednesday, March 12-- Senior Science Seminar 
by Cheri Burnett in Room A325. The presen- 
tation begins at 4:30 p.m. 

Golf Matches: Limestone at Lan-Yair, 
Monday, 1:30 p.m.; Newberry at Newberry, 
Tuesday, 1:30 p.m.; Pfeiffer, Belmont 
Abbey and Limestone at Gaffney, Thursday, 
1:30 p.m. 

Tennis Matches: Erskine at Erskine, Mon- 
day, 2 p.m.; Belmont Abbey, home, Wednes- 
day, 2 p.m.; Newberry at Newberry, 
Thursday, 2:30 p.m.; Wofford, home, 
Friday, 2 p.m. 

Friday, March 14— Encore presentations of 
three computer related short courses for 
those who missed them in February. Please 
contact Andy Crosland for more information. 







il. IV, No. 23 



A Newslelter For The Faculty Of USCS 



March 14, 1980 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

SPRING HOLIDAYS will be observed at USCS 
from Monday, March 24, through Saturday, 
March 29. USCS classes will meet on 
Good Friday, April 4, and Saturday, April 5. 
An announcement will be made later this 
week regarding USCS office hours and 
working hours for twelve-month employees. 

THE FOLLOWING STUDENTS will be participating 
in the State-wide Arts Festival to be held 
at Coastal Carolina College March 19-21. 
They are scheduled to perform at 11 a.m. 
on Thursday. They will depart the campus 
Wednesday morning and will return on 
Thursday evening: 

Debbie Weaver 
Kathy Turner' 
Wendy Hughes 
Pam Patillo 
Elizabeth Byrnes 
Patti Moss 
Clary Oglesby 
Teresa Poteat 
Angie Hicks 
Wanda Bragg 
Tracey Easier 
Laura Daniel 
Nina Ledford 
Gina Snel grove 
Ann Morgan 
Debbie Smith 
Terea Martin 
Lindy Wayner 
Sheri Rose 
Alyson Pugh 



Russ Gaffney III 
Glen Plumley 
Chris Bryant 
Chris Self 
Brian Morris 
Mark Roddy 
John Sinderman 
Tony Haney 
Todd Hyatt 
Gerard Goodwin 
Wesley Craven 
Lyndon Harris 
Jan Harris 
Oscar Mooney 
Rhonda Barnhill 
Lisa Robinson 
Wendy Nelson 
Penny Beaty 
Amanda Peninger 
Betsy Gregory 



THE SENIOR CLASS is sponsoring a senior 
hall of fame. Candidates will be chosen 
on the basis on athletics; social, service 
and religious activities; campus govern- 
ment; journalism, speech, and the mass 
media; and intramural s. The ten members 
will be chosen by the SGA executive council 



and by the underclassmen in the Senate, 
Nominations, including addresses and 
telephone numbers, should be sent to 
SGA President Robert Brown by March 27. 



BULLETIN BOARD 

Former Congressman Wilbur Mills will visit 
the campus Friday, March 21. Mr. 
Mills will lecture in room 218 of the 
Media Center at 11 a.m. and will also 
meet with news media in the Media 
Center lobby at 12 noon. Faculty and 
their guests are invited. 

THE DPMA Club will visit Firestone on 
Friday, March 21, at 2 p.m. Firestone 
personnel will discuss the firm's data 
processing facilities as well as conduct 
a tour of the plant. Anyone at the 
university is welcome to participate. 
Contact Dr. Bert Menees in the School of 
Business Administration to obtain a 
visitor's permit. 

MR. ROGERS WEED, Director of Data Processing 
at Associated Petroleum Carriers, will 
speak to students in Accounting Control 
Systems on Tuesday, March 18 in room 
M320. The general topic will be "in- 
ternal controls in a common carrier of 
petroleum based products," The faculty 
is invited. Contact Dr. Bert Menees for 
more information. 

THIS WEEK'S SCIENCE SEMINAR features a 
presentation by Craig Bramlett on 
"Sex Hormones and Brain Development." 
The presentation begins Wednesday in 
Room A325 at 4:30 p.m. 

CONGRATULATIONS TO John and Margaret Carol 
May on the birth of an 8 lb, 7 oz. son 
James Hunter May, on March 1. 



CHARLES QUINNELLY is a commentator on a 
session in criminal justice administration 
at the Sixth Annual Conference on the 
Urban South at Norfolk State University. 

FRED WENZ will read a paper entitled "Anomie, 
Loneliness, Self Evaluation and Suicide 
Ideation-- Experiences Among Selected Social 
Area Populations: A Contextual Analysis," 
at the Pacific Sociological Association 
meeting in San Francisco this April. 

RON EAGLIN'S ARTICLE, "Stress: How to Cope," 
appeared in the January 1979 issue of 
Tempus Fugit , a monthly newsletter for 
time management in higher education. 

ED WHITE, School of Education, has just com- 
pleted a training program co-sponsored by 
the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools (SACS) and the S.C. SACS Commission 
in Elementary Education. As a result of 
this training, Ed will be one of 40 people 
certificated to be a visiting committee 
chairperson or SACS consultant to schools 
seeking accreditation from SACS. 

ALICE HENDERSON, DONALD KNIGHT AND ELIZABETH 
DAVIDSON each have articles in the newly 
published American Writers In Paris (ed. 
by Karen L. Rood), volume 4 of the Dictionary 
of Literary Biography. The articles are 
about William L. Shirer, Charles Henri Ford, 
and Ernest Walsh. 

ANDY CROSLAND spoke to the Sunrise Service 
Club on computer science and data processing 
curricular at USCS. He also has a computer 
program which can be used to score the reading 
difficulty of textbooks. If you are interested 
in using this aid, please contact him at 
extension 404. 



FROM DOYLE BOGGS: Congratulations and 
thanks to Tom Allen, Ron Romine, and 
Ellenor McCaughrin for defeating 
Spartanburg Tech on the Bill Drake 
radio program Friday morning. Ron 
Romine has also been very helpful by 
serving as an expert commentator for 
election coverage on both WSPA radio 
and television. 



JIM BROWN was interviewed for an hour by Bill 
Drake on WSPA radio recently about the inter- 
national community is Spartanburg and about 
international programs at USCS and our efforts 
both to serve and to benefit from the local 
international community. 



FROM CECILIA BROWN: To facilitate your requests for data, I 
have attached to this issue of FYI a request form. These 
forms should be completed and returned to me in A228. 



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA AT SPARTANBURG 



REQUEST FOR INFORMATION FORM 



Person Making Request: 



For I-That Purpose Is Information/Data Requested?_ 



Audience (s) Intended: 



Level Of Sophistication/Analysis Desired: 



Deadline for Receipt Of Information/Data; 



CMcDB 3/12/8 



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA AT SPARTAJIBURG 



REQUEST FOR INFORMATION FORM 



Person Making Request: 



For What Purpose Is Information/Data Requested?_ 



Audience (s) Intended: 



Level of Sophistication/Analysis Desired; 



Deadline For Receipt Of Information/Data: 



GMcDB 3/12/80 



uses— -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, MARCH 17 — SUNDAY, MARCH 23 



MONDAY. March 17 

?:00 pm -- Tennis match. USCS vs UNC-Ashevi11e at USCS. 

7-9:00 pm -- " Early Identification of Pre-De11nquent Youth " - Continuing Education shortcourse. 
Fee $15.00. Media 218. For more information contact Continuing Education, Ext. 422. 

BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT for recreation league. Hodge Center Gymnasium. 3:30-ll:00pm Monday 
& Tuesday; 4-10:00 pm Wednesday & Thursday, 6-9:00 pm Friday. For more information 
contact Student Affairs, Ext. 336. 

JESDAY. March 18 

■7:00 pm -- Tennis Coaches Clinic . Fee $20.00. Recreation Building. For more information 
contact Continuing Education, Ext. 422. 

■10:00 pm -- Orientation Session . Tukey Lecture Theatre and Library 268. For more information 
contact Student Affairs, Ext. 336. 

)1f match in Augusta, Georgia. March 18 and 19. For more information contact Sports 
Information, Ext. 250. 

3:50-12:00 pm -- " Internal Controls in a Common Carrier of Petroleum-Based Products ." Guest 
speaker - Mr. Roger Weed, Director of Data Processing, Associate Petroleum Carriers. 
Media 320. For more information contact Bert Menees, Ext. 280. 

IDNESDAY. March 19 

2:15 pm -- Women's Softball Doubleheader. USCS vs Barrinqton University at USCS. For more 
information, contact Sports Information, Ext. 250. 

00 pm -- Tennis match. USCS vs Winthrop at Winthrop. For more information contact Sports 
Information, Ext. 250. 

30 pm -- Sex Hormones and Brain Development . Science Seminar - by Mr. Craig Bramlett. 
Administration 325. 

30-9:00 pm -- " Fishing Tips ." Continuing Education shortcourse. Fee $10.00. Library 
257. For more information contact Continuing Education, Ext. 422. 

iURSDAY, March 20 

00 pm — Tennis match. USCS vs Wofford at Wofford. For more information contact Sports 
Information, Ext. 250. 



FRIDAY, March 21 

8-5:00 pm -- Meeting of the South Carolina Bar Association . Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more 
information contact John May, Ext. 422. 

11:00 am — Lecture by Mr. Wilbur Mills . Media 218. Open to the public. For more information 
contact Information Services, Ext. 210. 

12:00 pm -- Meeting of the Teacher of the Year Committee . Hodge 248. For more information 
contact Student Affairs, Ext. 336. 

2:00 pm -- DPMA Club will tour Firestone plant . For more information contact Bert Menees, 
Ext. 280. 







EXTRA 



A Newsletter for The Faculty Of USCS 



March 18,1980 



I. Official Announcements 

uses will observe spring holidays from Monday, March 24, through Saturday, 
March 29. No classes will he held during this period. 

All USCS offices will be open on a regular schedule (8:30 a.m. -5 p.m.) 
from Monday, March 24, through Thursday, March 27. Supervisors will ensure 
that regular services are available throughout the week. 

USCS offices will be closed on Friday, March 28, for an official university 
holiday. 

USCS classes will meet as scheduled and all offices will be open on 
Friday, April 4. Saturday classes will meet on April 5. 

The next issue of FYI will be published on Monday, March 31. Items 
for publication should be submitted to the Office of Information Services 
by 5 p.m. on Wednesday, March 26. 



II. Bulletin Board 

Faculty are reminded of the appearance of former Congressman Wilbur Mills 
on our campus this Friday in Room 218 of the Media Center at 11 a.m. Please 
urge all students and any interested people from the community to attend. 







i/ol. IV, No. 24 



I. OFFICIAL 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS 



March 31, 1980 



'LEASE TAKE NOTE OF THE FOLLOWING APRIL 

IVENTS: 

-April 10-12 -- Piedmont Regional Science 

■air, Hodge Center Gym. Jack Turner is the 

Fair director. 

•April 11 -- SGA "Big Event." 

■April 15-19 -- "Godspell," produced by the 

ihoestring Players. 

•April 16 -- Spartanburg County Mini Olympics" 

'or sixth graders. Coordinated by Regis Robe, 

loyce Miller, and Jim Brown. 

April 15 — Arts Open House. Coordinated by 

iryan Lindsay. 

[April 16-17 -- Nursing Alumni Days "Festival 

f Workshops. " 

April 23 -- Maggie's Drawers Literary Contest 

uncheon, directed by Don Knight and Andy 

rosland. 

April 24 (tentative) -- George Plimpton con- 

ocation and Sports Banquet. 

April 25 -- Honor's Day and SGA Last Dance. 

April 26-27 -- Alumni Golf Tournament, coor- 

inated by Charles Stavely. 

^ay 16 -- Commencement. 

^E USCS CALENDAR is already crowded. If you 

re considering scheduling a campus-wide event, 

lease coordinate carefully with the offices 

F Student Affairs and University Relations 

) ensure that no conflicts occur. If you 

ive planned an event that is not on this list, 

ease notify the Office of Information Ser- 

ces IMMEDIATELY! 

lOM MIKE DRESSMAN: The Advisory Council for the 
vision of Fine Arts, Languages, and Literature 
It with the division faculty on March 19. 

BULLETIN BOARD 

Y FACULTY OR STAFF interested in playing and 
coaching Softball should contact Tom Davis, 
t. 336. 



FROM STUDENT AFFAIRS: Representatives of the 
Air Force ROTC Program will be at USCS on 
Wednesday, April 2, to meet with students 
planning to go to USC in Columbia. They will 
be on the second floor of the Library Building 
from 10 a.m. -noon and in the Hodge Center 
from noon-1 p.m. 

VOTER REGISTRATION will be held at USCS on 
April 22 in the Library Building, 2nd floor, 
from 10a.m. -2p.m. and from 6p.m. -8p.m. 

FROM GRACE MARVIN: On April 2 (Wednesday), 
Doris Wilson Johnson will be a guest speaker 
in my Sociology 308 class, "Sociology of 
Community Organization." This grass roots 
organizer, who closely "identifies with the 
people," played a major role in founding 
Spartanburg's Rape Crisis Center. I encourage 
you to attend and to invite your students to 
also listen, question, and disucss. The class 
meets in Media 321 at 3 p.m. 

DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES in conjunction with 
Continuing Education is again offering pre- 
college seminars for high school juniors and 
seniors or any prospective college student who 
may have been out of school for an extended 
period. The first conference is designed to 
ease the often difficult transition from high 
school to college English courses. The second 
conference emphasizes the importance of study 
skills for college success. 

I. How to Succeed in College English, April 
8-17, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 7-9:00 p.m. 
Fee - $20.00. 

II. Study Skills Make the Difference, April 
7-16, Monday and Wednesday, 7-9:00 p.m. Fee - 
$20.00. 

If you know of anyone who may be interested 
please call Joyce Miller, ext. 344 or Dr. Jane 
Davisson, ext. 343. 



EASE TAKE NOTE OF THE CPR COURSE FOR UNIVERSITY FACULTY/STAFF ON THE BACK OF THIS PAGE! 



FROM INFORMATION SERVICES: Several job open- 
ings have become available with the South 
Carolina Educator Improvement Task Force. 
They are 1) an Evaluation Training Program 
Supervisor; 2) a Teacher Evaluation Program 
Supervisor; 3) a Teacher Testing Program 
Supervisor; 4) Secretary; 5) Administrative 
Assistant. 

The information and qualifications for these 
jobs may be obtained from the personnel 
office. 

III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

FROM MRS. MATTIE BOOKER, Custodian-A-Bldg. , 
to all uses Faculty and Staff: Thank you 
very much for the gifts, cards, and tokens 
of appreciation sent to me during my 
recent illness. They really helped to 
brighten my days while I was away and 
even made my return to work something 
special to look forward to. 

HOLLY CROCKER (nursing) gave a presentation 
on Breast Self Examination to the Spartan- 
burg Newcomers Club on March 19 at the 
Spartanburg Arts Center. 

GEORGE LABANICK co-authored "Relative 
Palatability, Defensive Behavior, and 
Mimetic Relationships of Red Salamanders, 
Mud Salamanders, and Red Efts" that appeared 
in the December 1979 issue of HERPETOLOGICA. 

MICHAEL DRESSMAN delivered a paper on 
"Flexibility in Writing Placement Examina- 
tions and Writing Programs" to the Georgia- 
South Carolina College English Association 
meeting in Columbia on March 7. He also 
attended the semi-annual meeting of the 
Southeastern Conference on Linguistics in 
Memphis, March 28-29, as a member of that 
organization's Executive Committee. 

DR. SHARON Y. CHERRY attended the Fourth 
Annual Meeting of The Philological 
Association of the Carolines on March 14, 
1980. 



FROM ADDY KLOEPPER (nursing): A 12 hour 
course in cardiopulmonary resuscitation 
(CPR) will be held for all university 
faculty and staff on April 1, 3, 8 and 10 
from 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm each Tuesday and 
Thursday evening. Classes will meet in the 
new Student Activities building. The size 
of the class will be limited to 24 and there 
will be a $5.00 charge to defray the cost 
of materials and refreshments. The course 
is sponsored by the School of Nursing and 
the Continuing Education Department. Par- 
ticipants must complete all 12 hours to 
be certified in this life saving technique. 
For further information or to reserve a 
place in this class call Becky Walker in 
Continuing Education, ext. 422. 



FROM INFORMATION SERVCIES: JAN CALDWELL has joined the university staff as Printing Services 
Manager, with responsibilities for the Word Processing Center and for assisting the Director 
for Information Services in the contracting of external printing. Mr. Caldwell has more 
than ten years experience in the printing business and his presence will mean a great deal 
to us in the quality and speed with which we can deliver more sophisticated printing and 
reproduction. 

Because of his added responsibilities, we again ask faculty and staff cooperation in 
making the Word Processing Center more efficient. Please keep the following suggestions in 
mind: 

1. The WPC does not provide personal secretarial service. Rather it is designed for fast 
typing and reproduction of legible copy at a lower cost. Please make sure that your drafts 
are clean, that all words are spelled as you want them to be on the finished product, that 
any addresses required are furnished with your order, and that instructions are clear. 

2. Please allow at least 24 hours for delivery of academic work, and three to five days 
for delivery of second priority materials. During the academic year, this is the best 
service we can provide because of sheer volume. Of course, the center is trying to meet 
emergencies and will continue to do so but the amount of "emergency work" now coming into 
the center is excessive and could be reduced by better planning. Many users are using the 
term "ASAP" (as soon as possible) for their requisitions. Jobs with this designation will 
receive routine treatment. If you need to meet a specific deadline, or have a pressing 
need for the material, you should indicate a date and time required. 

3. The proper way to submit materials to the WPC is to place them at the appropriate 
pick-up station -- there is one in each building, and there are pick-up and delivery services, 
both at mid-morning and mid-afternoon. If you must bring something to the center yourself, 
the item should be brought to the Office of Information Services and given to Janella Koob. 
Faculty access to the typists remains in effect provided the job is properly logged in, but 
cooperation in keeping interruptions to an absolute minimum will be most sincerely 
appreciated. 

Because of budgetary limitations, the WPC has been severely understaffed all year, and 
yet has undertaken to do an ever-increasing volume of work. Because of the strain, the 
cooperation of everyone on campus is urgently needed if services are to be maintained and 
needed improvements made. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE INFORMATION FOR ADVISORS - FROM REGIS ROBE 

1. Placement . A student with two years of high school language or one college semester and a 
B average in the language should be placed in 102. A student with more than two years of high 
school language or two college semesters and a B average in the language should be placed in 
201 or 205. 

2. Placement Test . In the case of a student who has not taken a language course in many years 
(say, ten), a placement test can be administered. Have the student see Dr. Robe or Dr. Cherry 
for more information. 

3. Credit . Remind students that they will receive credit for foreign language courses lower 
than the level they placejnto if they receive a grade of C or better in that course. 

4. Summer Sessions . Spanish 101 and 102 will be offered as an intensive course during the 
first summer session. French 101 and 102 will be offered during the second. 

5. Business Reading Course . Of special interest to students majoring in Business will be the 
reading course in Business German offered in the fall and- the reading course in Business 
French in the spring. These courses are introductory in nature and have no pre-requisite. They 
can be taken for 3 hours of credit in the regular curriculum or without credit through Con- 
tinuing Education. 

6. Spanish 205 , offered in the fall, is Elementary Spanish Conversation and is at the same 
level as 201. 



uses— THIS WEEK 


m 


MONDAY, MARCH 31 -- SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1980 


iday, March 31 

1:30 pm — uses golf team vs. Presbyterian College at Lan~Yair Country Club. 



>sday, April 1 

?:00 pm -- uses tennis team vs. Erskine College at USCS. 

>: 30-9: 30 pm -- Faculty/staff CPR course . Fee $5.00. Student Activities Building. For more 
information contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 



4 



Inesday, April 2 

.O:00-noon -- Representatives of the Air Force ROTC Program. 2nd floor Library Building, For 
more information see this weeks FY I. 

ioon-l:00 pm -- Representatives of the Air Force ROTC Program . Hodge Center. For more infor- 
mation see this weeks FYI. 

1:00 pm -- USCS tennis team vs. Winthrop College at USCS. 

1:00 pm -- Guest speaker Doris Wilson Johnson in Grace Marvirfs Sociology 308 class. Media 
Building 321. For more information see this weeks FYI. 

irsday, April 3 

': 00-9: 00 pm — "Antiques - Refinishing/Restoring . " Continuing Education course. Fee $30.00. 
Thursdays thru April 17. Course will be held at Woodruff House Antiques. For more infor- 
mation contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 






iday, April 4 

.2-1:30 pm -- Teacher of the Year Committee Meeting . Hodge Center 248. 



I 



^ 



vo 



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA AT SPARTANBURG 
Office of Institutional Research 
An Overview 



What is "Institutional Research?" 

For our purposes, a working definition of IR follows: 

"Institutional Research" is a multidisciplinary approach 
to the analysis of data collected on USCS students, 
curriculum, faculty, physical plant and processes and 
operations (eg. student personnel services, space utilization, 
plant and business operations which impinge on the academic 
program communication and decision-making system) for the 
purpose of facilitating policy formation and decision-making. 
In summary, IR is a variegated term of organizational self- 
study designed to help us gather an expanding range of 
information about our internal operations and the effectiveness 
with which we use our resources. 



Why the Office Exists? 

The Office has major responsibility for planning, executing 
and coordinating institutional research, collecting pertinent 
data; interpreting or otherwise distributing and translating 
such data to the University community; providing a central 
depository for same; assisting related internal efforts and 
responding to inquiries from external agencies. 

The collection and the translation of this data into useful 
knowledge is necessary (a) to understand and to interpret 
the institution; (b) to make intelligent decisions about 
current operation or plans for the future; and (c) to improve 
the efficiency and effectiveness of the institution. 



I 



What are the major functions of the Office? 

To achieve these ends, the Office currently performs six (6) 
major functions: 

1. Data collection 

2. Analysis of data 

3. Preparation of Operating^ Statistical and Analytical Reports 

4. Preparation of special studies including studies in support 
of educational development 

5. Provision of research and comparative studies, references 
and other resources to facilitate institutional research 
conducted by faculty and staff 

6. Central depository for internally and externally generated 
research 

7. Staff work other than research, as the institutional researcher's 
skills are tapped 



Office of Institutional Research 
An Overview 
Page 2 



What is the Current Focus of the Office? 



The major focus of the office during 1979-80 is to generate 
operating reports. These include enrollment, student aid, 
financial and other types of data presented in a tabular 
form. These reports are fundamental to building IR capability 
as well as helpful to the self study process. 

To facilitate the self-study process and to increase general 
understanding of the University's development, fact sheets 
will be generated regularly and attached to FYI . Each fact 
sheet will be an operating report on a particular set of data 
available from 1974 to 1979. The fact sheets will be on 
3-hole paper for your convenience in making a desk reference . 

A fact book is best described as a collection of summaries 
from operating and analytical reports covering a period of 
years in a form that permits ready reference and easy annual 
updating. The fact sheets distributed during the current academic 
year will constitute the majority of a proposed fact book. 
The first edition of a USCS factbook is projected for 
November 1, 1980. 



At a small institution like USCS, the total responsibility 
of institutional research cannot rest on one person's 
shoulders. The aid and interest of all is invited. 



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OFFICE OF INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH 
FACT SHEET No. 1 







7^ 



EXTRA 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS April i, i98o 



At the request of Lawrence Moore, the Office of Information Services is issuing the 
following clarification of the April calendar printed in the March 31 FYI. No effort was 
made to include any academic dates or faculty meetings, because these events are not 
related to the news media or to promotional efforts. The failure to list such events 
DOES NOT indicate that they have been cancelled. However, persons scheduling such events 
should be aware of the various campus and community-wide programs listed on the schedule. 

Faculty should add the following events to the April listings: 

Mr. Tom Hammond, Associate Professor of Art at the University of Georgia, will open an 
exhibition of recent drawings and prints in the Library Art Gallery on April 8. The opening 
reception will be held in the gallery from 6-8 p.m. that Tuesday evening. Mr. Hammond will 
also give a lecture on April 7 at 8 p.m. in media 218. 

The Faculty/Staff Appreciation Day Luncheon, sponsored by the SGA, will be held on Monday, 
April 7, at 12 noon in the Hodge Center Gym. Invitations are forthcoming. 

On Monday, April 14, the USCS Jazz Band and Chorus will give a concert beginning at 12 noon 
in the gym. At 8:00 p.m. in the evening they will be presented in a concert at the 
Spartanburg Arts Center. 

Advisement for the summer and fall 1980 semesters will be held beginning Monday, March 31 and 
ending Friday, April 11. Materials and instructions may be picked up in the School offices 
now. Please inform your classes of these dates and the importance of advisement in the 
CAR system. 




-^ 



"pat 



Vol. IV, No. 25 A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS Apni 7, i98o 



I. OFFICIAL 

FROM ALBERT GRAY: Please announce to your 
classes that financial aid applications 
for the 1980-81 academic year may be 
picked up from the Tutoring Lab in the 
Library Bldg., the Student Affairs Office 
in the Hogde Center, the Counseling and 
Career Development Center in the Media 
Bldg., or the Financial Aid Office in 
the Administration Bldg. Interested stu- 
dents need to complete these forms not 
later than April 15, 1980 if they plan to 
attend either Summer I/II or Fall /Spring, 
1980-81. I will be happy to assist any- 
one who has any problems with form com- 
pletion, etc. 

DR. THOMAS F. JONES, former President of 
the University of South Carolina and now 
a faculty member at MIT, will deliver the 
commencement address and receive this 
year's honorary degree on May 16 on the 
campus quadrangle. The ceremonies will 
begin at 7 p.m. 

EARL GORDON has been named the Dean of 
Students for USCS. His new responsibilities 
include Counseling and Career Development, 
Academic Advisement for undeclared majors, 
jcampus discipline, health services, handi- 
Icapped student services and the orientation 
program. As part of this reorganization of 
;Student Affairs, Judy Belser Kyser has 
!been named Coordinator for Counseling and 
jCareer Development Services and will work 
in this area in addition to her teaching 
responsibilities. 

II. BULLETIN BOARD 

MR. TOM HAMMOND, Associate Professor of Art 
at the University of Georgia, will open an 
exhibition of recent drawings and prints in 
the Library Art Gallery on April 8. The 
opening reception will be held in the 



gallery from 6-8 p.m. that Tuesday evening. 
Mr. Hammond will also give a lecture on 
April 7 at 8 p.m. in media 218. 

USCS WILL BE HOSTING the 24th Annual Piedmont 
Regional Science Fair, Apr. 10-12 in the 
Hodge Center Gymnasium. Exhibits will be 
set up on Thursday and open to the public 
on Friday from 9-5 p.m. and Saturday from 
9-12 noon. An awards ceremony on Saturday 
will be held at 11:00 a.m. Jack Turner, 
(Science) is the fair coordinator. 

USCS WILL CONTINUE its foreign film series 
on Monday, Apr. 7, with "La Belle Americaine" 
(French with English subtitles). The film 
begins at 7:00 pm in the Tukey Lecture 
Theatre and is free and open to the public. 

TODAY, MONDAY, Apr. 7, at 12:15 in L-263, 
Dr. Alaba Ogunsanwo will speak on "African 
International Affairs," to the International 
Club. Everyone is welcome. Professor 
Ogunsanwo is a Nigerian who currently is a 
visiting scholar at Princeton University. 
His areas of specialization are China-Africa 
relations and Nigerian Foreign Policy. 

ALL FACULTY WOMEN AND WIVES planning to 
travel to Columbia for Friday's luncheon 
should meet in the Hodge Center at 9:15 am. 
It is anticipated that the time of departure 
will be around 9:30 am. 

"THE ROLE OF HISTONES IN THE CELL" by Mark 
Tate will be presented in a Science Seminar 
on Wednesday, Apr. 9. The seminar will be 
held at 4:30 pm in A325. 

GODSPELL, a joyful musical interpretation of 
the gospel of St. Matthew, will be staged 
by the USCS Shoestring Players on April 16-20. 
Performances are at 8:15 pm, Apr. 16-19 and 
at 3:15 pm on Sunday, Apr. 20. Performances 
will be held in the Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
For reservations call the Shoebox, ex. 397. 



(Bulletin Board continued] 



III. FACULTY NOTES 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING will celebrate its 
fourth annual Alumni Day activities on 
Apr. 15-16. Workshops on "Documentation 
of Patient Care" and "Quality Assurance" 
will be presented by Ellen Vassey. Both 
workshops may be attended for $35.00. 
Interested persons should contact Addy 
Kloepper in the School of Nursing. 

THE OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION and 
the International Club will be hosting 
the "Mini Olympics" for 6th graders on 
Apr. 16. Competition will begin at 1;30 pm 
and will end at 4:00 pm. The students will 
participate in various events and were 
encouraged to reprodcue a flag of the 
country which they are representing. USCS 
also provided speakers to give the stu- 
dents background information on the 
different countries. Dr. Regis Robe, Dr. 
Jim Brown and Joyce Miller have planned 
and organized this event. 

ON MONDAY, Apr. 14, the USCS Jazz Band and 
Chorus will give a concert beginning at 
12 noon in the gym. At 8:00 pm in the 
evening they will be presented in a con^ 
cert at the Spartanburg Arts Center. 

CHINA TRIP: Dr. Ed Jones, Furman Univer- 
sity, will be conducting a tour of 
seven Chinese cities this summer, August 
14-September 4. The cost, including 
accomodations, most meals, and round-trip 
transportation from Atlanta is $2,827. 
Itineraries have been designed highlight- 
ing the educational system of China and 
student interchange. For further infor- 
mation contact Jim Brown, L236, ext. 433, 



GRANT PROPOSALS SUBMITTED: 1) Dr. George 
Labanick (Biology) has submitted a research 
proposal entitled "Life History of Rock-face 
Plethodon yonahlossee" to the USC Research 
and Productive Scholarship Fund for $681. 
2) Dr, Andy Crosland (English and Director 
for Computer Studies) has submitted a research 
proposal entitled "Computer-Assisted Revision 
of English Compositions" to the Apple 
Education Foundation for $7,643. 

LYLE CAMPBELL attended a meeting of the 
Geological Society of America, Southeastern 
section, in Birmingham, Alabama on March 27- 
28. Lyle also participated in the 
initiation of a Southeastern Section of the 
Paleontological Society, and attended a 
symposium of the American Association of 
Geology Teachers. 

BERT MENEES was recently elected incoming 
President of the Spartanburg Area Chapter, 
National Association of Accountants for 
the fiscal year beginning June 1, 1980, 



uses— -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, APRIL 7 -- SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 1980 



ionday, April 7 

12 noon -- Faculty/Staff Appreciation Day Luncheon . Hodge Center Gymansium. 

12:15 pm -- International Relations Club meeting , with guest speaker Professor Alaba Ogunsanwo 
(Professor of Political Science at University of Lagos, Nigeria), Library 263. For more 
information contact Jim Brown, ext. 433. 

2:00 pm -- USCS Tennis Team vs. UNC Asheville (Away). 

7:00 pm -- Foreign Film - "La Belle Americaine" (French film with English subtitles). Tukey 
Lecture Theatre. For more information contact Regis Robe, ext. 430. 

7-9:00 pm -- "I Move That" (pari imentary procedures)-C,E. course. Fee $10.00. Library 225. 
For more information contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 

7-9:00 pm -- "Study Skills Make The Di fference, "-pre college workshop -C.E. course. Fee $20.00. 
Library 273. (Monday/Wednesday). For more information contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 

8:00 pm -- Lecture by Mr. Tom Hammond (Associate Professor of Art, University of Georgia). 

Media 218. For more information contact Katie Hicks, ext. 335. 
************************************************************ 

uesday, April 8 

2:00 pm -- USCS Women's Varsity Softball Team vs, Central Wesleyan (Home). 

6-8:00 pm -- Art opening , featuring works of Mr. Tom Hammond (Associate Professor of Art, 
University of Georgia). Library Art Gallery. For more information contact Katie Hicks, 
ext. 335. 

6:30-9:30 pm -- "Real Estate Fundam ental s"-C. E. course. (Apr. 8-May 15/Tuesdays/Thursdays). 
Fee $110.00. Library 276. For more information contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 

7-9:00 pm -- "How to Succeed in College Engl1sh "-pre college workshop-C.E. course. (Apr. 8-17/ 

Tuesdays/Thursdays). Fee $20.00. Library 273. For more information contact Continuing 

Education, ext. 422. 
************************************************************************************************** 

ednesday, April 9 

12 noon — Universal Love Skit . Hodge Center Lobby. 

12 noon — Psychology Club meeting. Faculty Conference room. Administration Bldg. 

2:30 pm -- USCS Tennis Team vs. North Greenville (Away). 

3-5:00 pm -- "Microwave Oven Workshop "-C. E. course. Fee $5.00. Will be held at Microwave 
1 Ovens Ltd. For more information contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 

4:30 pm — Science Seminar . "The Role of Histones in the Cell," -presented by Mark Tate. 
*******5-l***^**^ft**il*i-************************************************************ **************** 

hursday , April 10 
--11SCS Golf TsaiT participates in the Citadel Invitational Golf Tournament (Away). Apr. 10-12. 



Calendar continued 

Friday, April 11 

THE BIG EVENT 

9-5:00 pm -- Piedmont Regional Science Fair . Hodge Center Gymansium. For more information 
contact Jack Turner, ext. 262. 

2:00 pm -- USCS Tennis Team vs. Gardner Webb (Home). 

2:30 pm -- USCS Women's Varsity Softball team vs. Francis Marion (Away). 

3-5:00 pm -- " Lawn and Garden Worl<shop "-C.E. course. Fee $5.00. Media 320. For more infor- 
mation contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 

Saturday, April 12 

9-12 noon -- Piedmont Regional Science Fair . Awards Ceremony at 11:00. Hodge Center 
Gymnasium. For more information contact Jack Turner, ext. 262. 



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ri _ Cecilia Brown, Update 



Office of Institutional Research 

Fact Sheet No. 2 

CMcDB 







IVol. IV, No. 26 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS April i4, i98o 



I. OFFICIAL 

DN TUESDAY, April 15, and Wednesday, April 
16, some members of Bruce Wilson's Health 
classes will be going to USC Columbia to 
participate in the Health Enrichment Week 
there. Therefore some students may be 
Hissing classes on these days. We will be 
leaving campus each day around 10:30 a.m. 
and returning around 7:00 p.m., hopefully. 
Excuses will be sent to all applicable 
faculty later in the week. If you have 
any questions, fell free to call Bruce 
Wilson, ext. 372. 



FROM EB BARNES: To All 
for your cooperation in 
Administrative Evaluati 
not returned them, plea 
did not receive a label 
one you feel you should 
of the blank forms in t 
need an extra form, see 
A-109 or call ext. 214. 
Edmunds form was left o 
and Humanities packets) 



Faculty: Thank you 
returning the 
ons. If you have 
se do so. If you 
ed form for some- 
evaluate, use one 
he package. If you 
Jacki Sherbert in 
(Example: Dr. 
ut of the Science 



FACULTY MEETING: The annual spring Faculty 
Meeting will meet in Tukey Lecture Theatre 
at 12:15, Friday, April 18. Election of 
officers and Promotion and Tenure Committee 
nembers (4) will be the main business. The 
Faculty Senate will meet immediately after 
the general faculty meeting. 

FROM ERIC JOLLY, Director of Records: 
Grades for all degree candidates will be due 
in the Records Office, Friday, May 9, at 
12 Noon. Grade Sheets will be sent to the 
Deans as soon as they are received. Please 
be sure to meet this deadline. 

FROM RON EAGLIN: In the past there has been 
some confusion in advisement in determining 
A/ho should sign as dean for undecided majors 
and branch specials. Earl Gordon will coordi- 
■'te the advising of these students and John 
-^ds will serve as their Academic Dean. 



FROM TOM DAVIS: Nominations are being accepted 
through Wednesday, April 16, for the Algernon 
Sidney Sullivan Award. This award is presented 
annually at commencement to an outstanding 
male and outstanding female graduate on the 
basis of the following criteria: 1) Outstanding 
service to USCS. 2) Active participation in 
campus activities. 3) Community service. 4) 
Nobility of character. 5) Academic achievement. 
Students, faculty and staff may nominate any- 
one who graduated from USCS last summer or 
fall or will graduate this spring. Names should 
be submitted to one of the following members 
of the selection committee: Ricky Walker, 
Roger Luttrell, Harriett McDuffie, Niles Brown, 
Paul Small, Vicki Stoddard, and Tom Davis. 

II. BULLETIN BOARD 

"ABNORMAL HUMAN HEMOGLOBIN DEVELOPMENT" by 
Bonnie Carson will be presented in a Science 
Seminar on Wednesday, April 16. The seminar will 
be held in A325 at 4:30 p.m. 

THE MINI OLYMPICS, a "for fun" athletic compe- 
tition for teams of sixth graders from twenty 
schools from all over Spartanburg County, will 
be held on our campus April 16th. Competition 
in eight different events will begin at 1:30 pm 
and end with an awards ceremony at 4:00 pm. 
The awards will be individual gifts from a 
variety of other countries. The events will be 
held on the quadrangle and in the gym. Each 
school has chosen a different country to 
represent and to study. The event is a project 
of the International Club, in cooperation with 
many others on campus. Frank Kohlenstein will 
be field director for the day and many USCS 
faculty and students will be participating. 
Everyone is welcome to share the fun. 

THE USCS CONTEMPORARY MUSIC WORKSHOP, which 
consists of the USCS Jazz Band, University 
Singers, and the Near Misses, USCS Dance Team, 
will present a series of concerts, "The Spring 
Thing," beginning with a performance at 12:15 
today (Monday) in the Hodge Center Gym. A 

(continued) 



copy of the program is attached to FY I and 
all students, faculty and staff are en- 
couraged to attend. This program will be 
repeated tonight at 8:00 p.m. at the Spar- 
tanburg Arts Center. 

TO ALL FACULTY: Copies of the USCS Educa- 
tion Division NASDTEC Self-Study have been 
sent to all divisions. If anyone wishes to 
peruse this, the copies are located in the 
offices of all Deans and Division Chairper- 
sons, 

April 21-23: The National Association of 
State Directors of Teacher Education and 
Certification (NASDTEC) will be visiting 
USCS for the purpose of evaluating the 
teacher education programs of the School of 
Education. Part of this process involves the 
committee interviewing faculty from various 
Schools. The normal procedure is for the 
NASDTEC committee to decide who they will 
interview and to set up appointments with 
these faculty members on the morning of 
Monday, April 21. 

On Monday, April 14, at 5:00, there will 
be a social given by the Education Division 
for the NASDTEC Self-Study Conmittee. This 
social is open to all faculty and will be 
held in the Student Activities Building. 

POSITION AVAILABLE: Applications are now 
being taken for a Clerk III, Grade 15, in 
the Word Processing Department for this 
campus. Employees must notify the Personnel 
Office of their interest in a specific 
vacancy by completing and submitting to 
the Personnel Office a "Request for Transfer" 
(P-15). The Personnel Office will arrange 
interviews for the employee whose overall 
qualifications are best suited for the 
position. 

SPARTANBURG 70001 WINS AWARDS: Five of the 
projects' associates (students) traveled 
to St. Louis, Missouri, to compete with 
approximately eighty associates from across 
the nation in events such as Telephone Sales, 
Textile Sales, Human Relation-Decision 
Making, Oral Communications, Employment 
Interviewing, and Pre- Employment Skills. A 
total of twelve awards were won including 
Teresa Moss' and Cinda Crockers' second, 
and third place trophies in Telephone Sales! 



GODSPELL, a joyful musical interpretation of 
the gospel of St. Matthew, will be staged by 
the USCS Shoestring Players on April 16-19. 
Performances are at 8:15 pm, Apr 16-19 and 
at 3:15 pm on Sunday, Apr. 20. Performances 
will be held in the Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
For reservations call the Shoebox, ext. 397. 

THE SCHOOL OF NURSING will celebrate its 
fourth annual ATufani Day activities on April 
16-17. Workshops on "Documentation of Patient 
Care" and "Quality Assurance" will be pre- 
sented by Ellen Vassey. Both workshops may be 
attended for $35.00. Interested persons 
should contact Addy Kloepper in the School 
of Nursing. 

GRANT PROPOSAL SUBMITTED: A proposal entitle 
"Pilot Program in Interdisciplinary Studies" 
has been submitted to the National Endowment 
for the Humanities for $48,308. The purpose 
of the project will be to plan pilot implemen 
and evaluate three courses in the humanities. 
Tom Allen, Mike Dressman, Alice Henderson, 
Katie Hicks, and Bryan Lindsay will be involvec 
in the project. Principal Investigator: Tom 
Allen (Philosophy). 

THE WIL LOU GRAY ADULT READING COUNCIL SPRING 
CONVENTION will be held at the Holiday Inn, 
Spartanburg, South Carolina on April 17th and 
18th. President-elect Dr. Jane Davisson, Con- 
ference Coordinator, will be glad to share 
a program with any interested faculty who 
might like to attend specific meetings. 
III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 
BILL BRUCE, School of Education has been 
elected Presi dent-Elect of the South Carolina 
Middle School Association. He will serve as 
President during the 1981-82 academic year. 
Bill also presented a paper at the Association 
for Supervision and Curriculum Development 
National Convention in Atlanta March 31. The 
paper was entitled "A Multicultural Discriptor: 
Needs Assessment and Staff Development for 
Multicultural Education. 



ED WHITE, SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, presented a 
curriculum briefing to the 1980 Conference 
of the Association for Supervision and 
Curriculum Development on "The Status of 
Science Education (K-12) in the United States.' 
At the same conference he also conducted a 
two-day Action Lab on "Preservice Elementary/ 
Middle School Science Training." 

GORDON MAPLEY presented a paper entitled 
"Developmental Chances in Personality Among 
Mature Returning Students" at the Southeastern 
Psychological Asso. Convention in Washington 
D.C. on March 28th. 



/ 



April 10, 1980 

To: Faculty, Administration and Staff 

From: Lee Holcombe, Chair, Self-Study Steering Committee 

Subject: Q and R 



Heartiest thanks are due to each and every one of you who helped 
to make the Q part — ^^^uestionnaires — of the self-study process a sucess: 
to those faculty members who sacrificed all or a good portion of class 
period to administering the questionnaire to their students, and to 
those faculty, administration and staff members and to the alumni who 
conscientiously filled out and returned their own questionnaires. 

The results of these efforts were: 

Students - 61 classes surveyed; 
877 computer answer sheets and 
585 personal comments returned. 

Faculty/Administration - 161 surveyed; 
137 computer answer sheets and 
121 personal comments returned. 

Staff - 104 surveyed; 

78 computer answer sheets and 
61 comments returned. 

Alumni - 1,253 surveyed; 

373 replies received to date. 

As for the R part, _results of the questionnaires will be printed 
and circulated through the campus mail as soon as possilbe. 

Again, thanks! 



SPECIAL PLACEMENT BULLETIN 



Arthur George, Coordinator of Placement, recently attended the S.C. Placement 
Association Conference at Myrtle Beach and was elected Vice President. 

CAMPUS RECRUITING FOR THE MONTH OF APRIL - Please announce the following 



schedule 



i4/l6/80 
4/16/80 
/j/17/80 
it/17/80 
i»/22/80 
V23/80 - 4/2V80 
k/lk/%0 
4/28/80 
(Cancellation) 4/24/80 



U. S. Army (9:00-5:00) 

Norrel Services (9:00-5:00) 

Liberty Financial Management 

WSPA (9:00-4:00) 

Reeves Brothers (9:00-1:30) 

Kinney Shoes (9:00-5:00) 

Daniels Construction (1:30-5:00) 

Variable Annui t ies 

S.C. School for the Deaf & Blind 



Negotiations are under way with IBM, Sears, and several other companies relative 
to rescheduling campus visits. 

SUMMER JOB OPPORTUNITIES are available with P.C.A., Firestone, Hoechst, Mmii<en, 
and various other companies. The list is still growing. All referrals will be 
handled through USCS Placement Office. Students will be referred by the Place- 
ment Office on a first come first served basis. Current listing is over 300 
summer jobs. 

SUMMER YOUTH WORK EXPERIENCE PROGRAM slots are available again this year to USCS. 
The forms will be sent out shortly, and the request must be returned to P.C.A. 
by April 28th. Students can work 25 hours per week. Call the Placement Office 
for detai Is, ext . 4l4. 



NOTE OF THANKS to faculty 
directly to employers, 
may have and refer stud 
interest in having USCS 
report to them with our 
the 1 iabi 1 i ty that is i 
applicants to employers 
happy to furnish intere 
requirements under Titl 



and staff who have 
However, I will be 

ents di rectly . A n 
students referred 
special placement 

ncurred under Title 
constitutes an emp 

sted persons with a 

e V I I publ ished by 



assisted in referring students 

happy to follow up any job lead you 
umber of employers have expressed an 
through the Placement Office, and 
referral card. I am concerned about 

VII. The laai states that referring 
loyment agency contract. I will be 

copy of the new employment agency 
College Placement Council. 



NOTE: Students need to visit the Placement Office to get company applications. 

Many companies such as Sears, Hoechst, and Firestone, take applications 

on a continuous basis rather than contacting the Placement Office each 
time there is an opening. 

COMING SOON: A list of companies registered with the Placement Office will soon 
be publ ished. 



uses- -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, APRIL 14 — SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 1980 



MONDAY, April 14 

12 Noon -- uses Spring Thing . Concert by USCS Jazz Band, Chorus and Near Misses. Hodge 
Center Gym. See attached flier for more information. 

3:00 p.m. -- Women's Varsity Softball vs. Limestone (home). 

8:00 p.m. -- USCS Spring Thing . Concert by USCS Jazz Band, Chorus and Near Misses. Spartan- 
burg Arts Center. See attached flier for more information. 

TUESDAY, April 15 

-- Golf team vs. Erskine, Limestone, and Presbyterian at Star Fort County Club. 

5:30-7:30 p.m. -- National Association of Accountants meeting . Hodge Center 2478. For more 
information contact Bert Menees, ext. 280. 

WEDNESDAY, April 16 

8:30-4:00 p.m. -- "Festival of Workshops" - Nursing Alumni Days. Student Activities Building. 
For more information contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 

1:30-4:00 p.m. -- "Mini Olympics" for sixth graders. Sponsored by the International Club. 
Campus Quadrangle and Gym. For more information contact Jim Brown, ext. 433. 

5:30 p.m. — Arts Open House , featuring the USCS Jazz Band, Chorus and Near Misses. For 
more information contact Bryan Lindsay, ext. 244. 

8:15 p.m. -- "Godspell "- presented by the Shoestring Players. Tukey Lecture Theatre. For 
information and reservations contact the Shoebox, ext. 397. 

THURSDAY, April 17 

9-5:00 p.m. - " Festival of Workshops "- Nursing Alumni Days. Student Activities Building. 
For more information contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 

17th-19th -- NAIA District Championship (Golf). Sweetwater County Club. 

17th-19th -- Tennis District Tournament. 

8:15 p.m. -- "Godspell "- presented by the Shoestring Players. Tukey Lecture Theatre. For 
information and reservations contact the Shoebox, ext. 397. 

FRIDAY, April 18 

3:00 p.m. -- Women's Varsity Softball vs. Furman University (away). 

8:15 p.m. -- "Godspell "- presented by the Shoestring Players. Tukey Lecture Theatre. For 
information and reservations contact the Shoebox, ext. 397. 

SATURDAY, April 19 8:15 p.m. - "Godspell" - presented by the Shoestring Players. Tukey Theatre, 

SUNDAY, April 20 — 3:15 pm - " Godspell "- presented by the Shoestring Players. Tukey Theatre. 



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The 1980 Schedule 



uses. Hodge Center Gym 
April 14, 12:16 noon 

Spartanburg Arts Center 
April 14, 8:00 pm 



uses Arts Open House 



uses Jazz Band 



Trumpets 

Russ Gaffney III 

Brian Morris 

Mark Roddy 

Al Gray 

Trombones 

Cliff Mitchell 

Gene Hutsell 

Glen Plumley 

Roland Salley 

Mike Hutsell 

Saxophones 

Gerard Goodwin 

Tony Haney 

Sheri Rose 

Todd Hyatt 

Flutes 

Kathy Turner 

Penny Beaty 

Bass 

Jason Lindsay 

Guitar, Tuba 

Andy Copeland 

Drums 

John Sinderraan 



uses Singers 

Sopranos 
Rosie Poole 
Lisa Robinson 
Rhonda Barnhill 
Lindy Wayner 
Elizabeth Byrnes 
Wendy Nelson 
Debbie Weaver 
Mary Ann Walker 
Beth Burgess 
Altos 

Amanda Peninger 
Wendy Hughes 
Betsy Gregory 
Alyson Pugh 
Pam Pattillo 
Becky Dale 
Gina Snelgrove 
Ann Morgan 
Inez Lyles 
Tenors 

Chris Bryant 
Chris Self 
Jan Harris 
Basses 

Russ Gaffney III 
Glen Plumley 
Wesley Craven 
Lvndon Harri5? 



uses Contemporary Music Workshop: THE SPRING THING! 



Program 

I Got Rhythm George and Ira Gershwin 

arr. by John Higgins 

Children of Sanchez Chuck Mangione 

arr. by Jeff Tkazyik 

uses Jazz Band 



Highlights from "A Chorus Line". 



.Marvin Hamlisch & Edward Kleban 
arr. by Harry Simeone 



uses Singers 

Muddy Bottom Bryan Lindsay 

Killer Joe Benny Golson 

arr. by John Higgins 

The Loser Bryan Lindsay 

Hello , There ! Bryan Lindsay 

Maggie ' s Drawers Bryan Lindsay 

uses Jazz Band 



Boogie Shoes K. C. and the Sunshine Band 

arr. by Steve Sherrill 

01' Time Rock 'n Roll Bob Seeger & Silver Bullet Band 

arr. by Steve Sherrill 

Championship: CBS Sports Fanfare & Theme. .Keith Mansfield 

arr. by John Higgins 

Near Misses, USCS Dance Team 



Sunshine Song David Lee Roberts 

You Are The Sunshine of My Life Stevie Wonder 

arr. by Chuck Cassey 

You Are My Sunshine Jimmy Davis & Charles Mitchell 




7^ 



Vol. IV, No. 27 A Newsleiter For The Faculty Of USCS Apni 21, i98o 



I. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FROM RON EAGLIN: The Deans' Advisement Tour 
will be held at USCS on Tuesday, April 22. 
Frances Hackett is coordinating this event 
for USCS. Faculty members who wish to meet 
with the deans, should contact Frances 
Hackett to schedule a time which would be 
convenient. 

FROM FRIEDRICH WENZ, Faculty Marshal: All 
Faculty members are to be on the first 
floor of the Administration Bldg. at 
6:30 p.m., Friday, May 16 for the Commence- 
ment Exercises. Please be on time as the 
procession will begin at 7 p.m. SHARP. 

FROM USCS PERSONNEL: For members of the 
use Federal Credit Union: Please be advised 
that as of Monday, April 7, 1980, the 
interest rate charged will be 15 per cent. 
This change will effect all personal loan 
applications processed in this office April 
7 forward. Interest is computed on the un- 
paid balance at the rate of 1.25 per cent 
per month. 

********************* 

II. BULLETIN BOARD 

ON MONDAY, April 21 (today) at 5:00 p.m., 
there will be a social given by the Educa- 
tion Division for the NASDTEC Self-Study 
Committee. This social is open to all 
faculty and will be held in the Student 
Activities Building. 

INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF THE CHILD Display & 
Exhibit will be located in the Media 
Center Lobby all of this week. The display 
belongs to USC Columbia and was shown 
at the State Fair. Faculty and students 
are invited to come by for a visit. 



THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION would like to express 
its appreciation for the cooperation and help 
given by the faculty with the visit and 
evaluation of our Teacher Education programs 
by the NASDTEC committee. We would also like 
to give special thanks to the following for 
their valuable assistance: Bryan Lindsay, 
Nancy Moore, Alice Henderson, Don Knight, 
Andy Crosland, Jeanne Stuart, Fay Riddle, 
John Edmunds, Ron Romine, Jerry Lehman, Mike 
Dressman, and Eric Jolly. 

"TERATOGENIC EFFECT OF DRUGS ON THE FETUS" by 

Cindy Wofford will be presented in a Science 

Seminar on Wednesday, April 23. The seminar 

will be held in A325 and begins at 4:30 p.m. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-STEVENS POINT is 
seeking nominations and applications for the 
position of Vice Chancellor for Academic 
Affairs. Persons who are interested in the 
position may contact Janella Koob, Information 
Services, ext. 210. for more information. 

THE USCS ATHLETIC AWARDS BANQUET will be held 
on Tuesday, April 29 in the Hodge Center Gym. 
The featured speaker will be George Plimpton, 
a writer for>Sports Illustrated, TV personality, 
magazine editor and author of a series of best 
selling sports books. Tickets for the banquet 
may be purchased at Student Affairs, University 
Relations or from USCS athletes. Tickets for 
the banquet are $5.00 for adults, $3.00 for 
children and include a barbeque dinner. 

FVJ and USCS -- THIS WEEK oAZ pixbtUhzd mtkly 
by thz t))$j{^ce o^ ln{^ofunoJu.on SoAvi-cu. V-Li- 
iAyibuXlon -ci on. lAondoiy o{, Q,ach weefe. VzoAUjiq, 
{^oh. annoancejrmnt6 , notQJ>, o^id-Lc-ial buZteXAJii>, 
qXc. , U> on Thauday alteAnoon at 5:00 p.m. 
loh. tho, mxt Mzzk' i> zdAjtlon. lAatoJujol. fizcQA.vtd 
a{,tM. 5:00 p.m. on ThuAAday iMlZ fae ke£d uyvtil 
the. {lOUoMlng loeefe .{^o^ pUbticdtton. Annoanc^- 
m2.nti> should be 6ubniittzd -in M^viting to 
Janella Koob, In^^onmation SeAvlce^, Admtn^tAa- 
tton EuAMLing. 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

BILL BRUCE, School of Education, presented 
two papers at the Southeastern Teacher 
Corps Network in St. Augustine, Florida on 
April 17 & 18th. The papers were: "Multi- 
cultural Needs Assessment," and "Simula- 
tions - A Teaching Strategy for Education 
That Is Multicultural ." 

CONTRATULATIONS TO Terri and Fred Eggers 
who became the proud parents of Christine 
Elizabeth on April 13. Christine was born 
at Greenville General Hospital and weighed 
in at 71 bs 8k. oz. 

ALICE HENDERSON will address junior and 
senior high school social studies teachers 
from South Carolina on recent developments 
in European history at the state-wide con- 
ference at Columbia sponsored by the USC 
history department on April 26. 

BILL BRUCE AND JIM BROWN recently taped a 
program intended to help explain the 
American education system to the inter- 
national community of Spartanburg. The 
program was produced by Communications 
Services Inc., which produces programming 
for Cable Television of Spartanburg, and 
is one of a series of programs on various 
aspects of American life. The series has 
been .jlanned and coordinated with the help 
of Fred Wenz, Sociology, who is a member 
of the board of Communications Services. 
The tapes will also be available for use by 
international clubs and businesses in the 
community. 



MIKE BRUCE, Director of Public Safety at USCS, 
has been elected President of the S.C. Campus 
Law Enforcement Association. Mike served as 
Vice President of the Association last year 
and is currently on the USCS Criminal Justice 
Advisory Council . 

JOYCE MILLER AND JIM BROWN recently attended 
a day of workshops on International Education 
Services put on by the National Association 
of Foreign Student Affairs (NAFSA) at USC 
Columbia. 

JIM BROWN attended the Southeastern Regional 
Seminar in African Studies at USC Columbia, 
Saturday, April 12. Dr. Brown is treasurer 
for the seminar and was a co-ordinator of the 
meeting. 

DR. ELEANOR LADD recently completed a series 
of keynote addresses to reading associations 
throughout the country. She addressed the 
Appalachian State University Annual Reading 
Conference on Great Expectations . The topic 
for the Alabama State Council of the Inter- 
national Reading Association was Fundamental 
Problems in Reading Instruction . Content and 
Context in Reading Instruction was the focus 
for the Arizona State Reading Council meeting. 
The address to the Keystone (Pennsylvania) 
State Reading Association was Analyzing a 
Comprehension Skill . The Parameters of the 
Reading Problem was the subject for the Murray 
(Kentucky) State Annual Reading Conference. At 
the North Carolina Council of the International 
Reading Association luncheon meeting the topic 
was Reality in the Classroom - Current Issues . 



uses- -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, APRIL 21 -- SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 1980 



Monday, April 21 

12 noon -- Piedmont Regional Scholars Luncheon . Activities Building. 

12:15-1:30 p.m. -- Fine Arts, Languages and Literature Division meeting . Library Building 255. 

6-9:00 p.m. -- Kappa Delta Phi meeting . Hodge Center 247 A&B. 

7-9:00 p.m. -- " Computers for Those Who Sit and Wait " -Continuing Education course. Monday 
and Wednesday, April 21 and 23. Fee $10.00. Library Building 255. For more information con- 
tact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 

Tuesday, April 22 

10:00-2:00 p.m. -- Voter Registration . Library Building, 2nd floor. 

3:30 p.m. - Women's Varsity Softbal l vs. Newberry (home). 

6-8:00 p.m. -- Voter Registration . Library Building, 2nd floor. 

7:30-9:30 p.m. -- " Getting Along With and Understanding Computers " -Continuing Education 
course. Tuesdays, April 22-May 27. Fee $35.00. Media Building 217. For more information 
contact Continuing Education, ext, 422. 

Wednesday, April 23 

12 noon -- Maggie's Drawers Literary Luncheon . Activities Building. 

12-1:00 p.m. -- Science meeting . Administration Building 115. 

4:30 p.m. -- Science Seminar - "Teratogenic Effect of Drugs on the Fetus" -presented by 
Cindy Wofford. Administration Building 325. 

Thursday. April 24 

Women's Varsity Softball - Staf Playoffs. April 24, 25 and 26. Columbia. 

12 noon - Concert by USCS Contemporary Music Workshop at Greenville Technical College. 



Friday, April 25 
12 noon -- Awards Day. Hodge Center Gym. 


Saturday, April 26 

Alumni Golf Tournament. Peach Valley Golf Course. 
Relations, ext. 203. 


For more information contact University 





Sunday, April 27 
Alumni Golf Tournament. Continued from Saturday at Peach Valley Golf Course. 




uses 

THLETIC 
AWARDS 
BARBECUE 



FEATURING 



6:00 PM TUESDAY 
APRIL 29, 1980 



HODGE CENTER GYMNASIUM 



TICKETS... $5.00, $3.00 FOR CHILDREN 



FOR TICKETS CALL STUDENT AFFAIRS 

OR 
UNIVERSITY RELATIONS AT USCS. 578-1800 



ae 




•m»»» 






Vol. IV, No. 28 A Newslefter For The Faculty Of USCS April 28, i98o 



I. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FROM PERSONNEL: Attached to this week^s FYI 
is the latest supplement to your Blue Cross/ 
Blue Shield Handbook. 

FROM CAROL SMITH: A reminder to advisors who 
advise undeclared majors. Please return all 
folders for undeclared advisees to the Student 
Affairs Office. The advisement process for 
undeclared majors is being moved to the 
CCDC under the direction of Earl Gordon. We 
would like to start him off with a complete 
set of folders. 

RESEARCHERS USING THE COMPUTER: The faculty 
computer committee is developing five year 
budget recommendations. Please write or tell 
Ed Babin (x333) what your current problems 
are and what future use of the computer 
your research will require. 

FROM CECILIA MCDANIEL BROWN: The Office of 
Institutional Research will annually update 
its listing of institutional research con- 
ducted by faculty and staff. Although much 
of your research may be unsupported and/or 
"informal," the results are still useful 
to many others at USCS. Please share with 
others, through this office, your in-house 
research related to institutional research. 
If you desire a form on which to report 
iyour findings, please contact me at ext 
389/200. Please forward your summaries by 
May 9. 
* ********************* 

II. BULLETIN BOARD 

|all faculty, STAFF, and STUDENTS are in- 
vited to see and hear Dr. William Kreml , 
icandidate for the U.S. Senate. His platform 
and topic will be "Constitutional and Con- 
gressional reform: Alternatives to an 
Archaic Governmental System." Dr. Kreml 
«/ill speak on Tuesday, April 29 at 3:00 
in the Tukey Auditorium. For more infor- 
nation contact Tom Hawkins, ext. 336. 



USCS WILL AGAIN field a team in the Twilight 
Slow-Pftch Softball League for this summer. 
All interested faculty and staff members are 
encouraged to participate. In addition, 
spouses of faculty and staff are eligible for 
the team. The season extends from the first 
week of June through the end of July. Games 
are scheduled at 7:00 p.m. Mondays through 
Thursdays. Typically, each team is scheduled 
to play two games per week. 
If you are interested, please contact either 
Tom Allen (ext. 375), or M.B. Ulmer (ext. 216). 

ARTHUR GEORGE was recently elected to serve 
on The Advisory Committee of Spartanburg 
Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP). He 
has been assigned to the Transportation 
Committee. RSVP Volunteers are available to 
work at USC. These volunteers are paid by 
the program and there would be no cost to 
the University. Faculty request for volunteers 
or further information should be directed 
to Mr. George, ext. 414. 

FROM JAMES "CURLY" MCARTHUR: Many thanks to 
all of the faculty and staff for cards, 
letters, flowers and other remembrances during 
my recent hospitalization. I am thankful 
to be back at work and coming back to join 
such nice thoughtful people makes it a 
double pleasure. 

THE USCS ATHLETIC AWARDS BANQUET will be held 
Tuesday, April 29 in the Hodge Center Gym. 
George Plimpton, Sports Illustrated writer, 
will be the featured speaker. Tickets to 
attend the banquet are available from the 
Student Affairs Office. A Barbeque Dinner 
will be served. For more information about 
the Athletic Awards Banquet contact Sports 
Information, ext. 250. 

SCIENCE SEMINAR - "Development of Diabetes 
Mellitus" by Frankie Rice will be presented 
on Wednesday, April 30 in A325 at 4:00 p.m. 



THE INTERNATIONAL CLUB would like to express 
its appreciation for the cooperation and 
volunteered help given by the faculty for 
the Mini -Olympics. We would like to give 
special thanks to: Robert Addleton, Ed 
Babin, Joe Bowman, Tom Hawkins, Bill Hinson, 
Guy Jacobson, Frank Kohlenstein, Gordon 
Mapley, Bill Reitmeier, Ronald Sobczak, 
Charles Stavely, and M.B. Ulmer. 

TWO NORWEGIAN STUDENTS are interested in 
attending USCS next school year. These 
students need sponsors, who would provide 
housing and meals. Interested Faculty 
or Staff should contact Frank Kohlenstein, 
ext. 223 for more information. Interested 
persons who could not become sponsors 
may also make a monetary contribution to 
help defray expenses. 

NACEL, the North Atlantic Cultural Exchange 
League, which was discussed at the faculty 
meeting at the beginning of the semester, 
brings French teenagers to the U.S. for 
a month's stay in American homes. All of 
the students have studied English. They 
are not to be 'entertained' but instead are 
to be treated as members of the family. This 
year's students will be here between July 
13 and August 13. For further information 
or an application form, contact Jim Brown, 
L236, ext. 433. 

TEACH ABROAD. An excellent way to get to 
know another culture is through living and 
working in it. In this case it could even 
be financially rewarding. The Nigerian 
Universities Office in Washington, D.C. is 
currently recruiting qualified candidates 
to fill vacant academic and professional 
staff positions at a number of Nigerian 
Universities. Academic positions are in 
a variety of fields with varying 'classifi- 
cations' (and salaries) for different 
levels of qualifications. Salaries are good, 
and transportation (including dependents) 
and subsidised housing are provided. Con- 
tracts of 18 to 24 months are preferred, but 
not essential, and result in a 10% salary 
supplement. For fufcther information contact 
Jim Brown, L-236, ext. 433. 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

REGIS ROBE has received a Fellowship from 
the National Endowment for the Humanities 
to attend a summer seminar on the "Modern 
European Novel" at Princeton University. 
Consequently, his second summer session 
French classes have been cancelled. 

ED WHITE, School of Education, served on 
the 10-year Review of Berea (Greenville) 
Middle School as Chairperson of the 
Visiting Team (April 14-17, 1980). 

JIM BROWN spoke recently on the local 
international community and the impact of 
international business on the Spartanburg 
community to the Humanities classes at 
Dorman High School. Jim also attended the 
South Carolina Consortium for International 
Studies (SCCIS) meeting at Converse 
College, Saturday, April 19. He completes 
his term as Secretary of SCCIS this year. 



********************** 



OUTLINE OF HEALTH INSURANCE BENEFITS FOR S.C. STATE EMPLOYEES AND PUBLIC SCHOOL EMPLOYEES 

(This is a brief, non-legal description of available benefits) 
*** CoordlnaClon of benefits Is applicable to all benefits described In this leaflet. 



PLAN A 
Bl^^- Crosa (Hospital) Benefit 



Hospital Seml'prlvate coon or Intensive Car 
PAID IN FULL - 70 days. 



HlscclUneous Hospital CItarges - PAID IN FULL - 
DEDl'CTIBLE - $25 



Mental and nervous conditions, drug addiction, 
and alcoholism - 30 days per calendar 



Emer;;..'ncy room chaises (accident) - Initial 
trejtaujnt only - covered hospital 
charti^s - PAID IN FULL 

Emerptfncy room cliar»;es (out-patient - 

.eur^crj) ct'v«red hospital cliarRea - 
PAID IN KULL 

rtobpltal (jhar^us for out-patient therapy 
(rnaiatlon, inhalation, physical) - 
covcr.J hospital charges PAID IN FULL 

Blue Shield (Physician) Benefits 

5urgton*s charges - The surgical schedule 
rates surgical procedures according 
to difficulty and assigns an appro- 
priate unit value. The fixed allowances 
for surgery will be 5.50 times the unit 
value for the surgery performed. 

Usistant Surgeon - Faynent equal to 20Z 
uf surgical allowance. 

,ln-hospital medical - 515 first day» $10 
second day, and S3 per day, total 70 
days. Thirty (30) day limit per calen- 
dar year for mental and nervous conditions, 
drug addiction and alcohollsn. 

ntensiv,- Medical Care - $30 first day. $20 

second day, and $10 third through 14th day. 

ilflwrgency First Aid - When received for the 
I Initial treatment after an accident and 
for which no surgical service Is payable, 
«D allowance of $15 will be paid for 
I physician's care. 

In-hospltal consultation allowance: $30 

' limited examination - $50 complete exami- 
nation; one consultation per consulting 
physician for each continuous period of 
I disability. 

[-Ray, Laboratory, aad Pathological exami- 
: nations are covered under the basic 
I Insurance: 

1. Uhen ordered by the attending 
physician for a registered bed 
patient; and, 

2. When done in the physician's office 
or outpatient department of the 
hospital In connection with the 
initial treatment of an acciden- 
tal Injury, or In conjunction 
with surgery. 

wtetrlcal Service Allowance - S150 
routine delivery, $250 complicated 
delivery. 

Itlal Pediatric Medical Examination (if 
done by other than the delivering 
physician) $15 



PLAN B 
Cross (Hospital) Benefit 



Hospital Seml-prlvate room or Intc 
PAID IN FULL - 365 days. 



Hospital Charges - PAID IN FULL 



Mental and nervous 
and alcoholls 
year 



conditions, drug addiction, 
I - 30 days per calendar 



Emergency room charges (accident) - Initial 
treatment only - covered hospital 
charges - PAID IN FULL 

Emergency room charges (out-patient - 

surgery) covered hospital charges - 
PAID IN FULL 

Hospital charges for out-patient therapy 
(radiation, inhalation, physical) - 
covered hospital charges PAID IN FULL 

Blue Shield (Physician) Benefits 

Surgeon's charges - 1002 allowable charge . 
Under this insurance, the maximum allowed charges 
for doctor's services will be the doctor's cus- 
tomary charges or the prevailing charges of at 
least 902 of other such doctors In South Carolina, 
whichever Is less. 

These are allowances that reflect doctor's actual 
charges during the prior calendar year. Each year 
usually In July, these allowances are revised ac- 
cording to doctor's charges In the year just past. 

Assistant Surgeon - payment equal to 20Z of 
surgical allowance. 



In-hospltal Medical - Pays fo 
by a physician when taembi 
non-surgical condition - 
limit per calendar year 



■ one visit per day 

?r is confined for a 
365 days; 30 day 
'or mental and nervous 



conditions, drug addiction and alcoholism. 

Intensive Medical Care - pays allowable charge for 
one visit per day, not to exceed 14 days. 

Emergency First Aid - When received for the initial 
treatntent after an accident and for which no 
surgical service is payable. Pays allowable 
charge for Initial treatment rendered. (NOTE: 
This Is a limited benefit designed to help pay 
for physician services for stopping bleeding, 
cleaning and dressing the Injury.) 

In-hoapltal consultation - One consultation per 

consulting physician for each continuous period 
of disability. Pays allowable charge. 

X-rays, Laboratory and Pathological examinations 
are covered under the basic Insurance: 

1. When ordered by the attending physician 
for a registered bed patient; and, 

2. When done in the physician's office or 

' outpatient department of the hospital in 
connection vlth the Initial treatment of 
an accidental injury, or In conjunction 
with surgery. 

Obstetrical Service - Pays Allowable charge. 



MAJOR HEUrCAL 
Plans A tt B 

Life time maximtim per person - $50,000 



Deductible - $100.00 per person, per benefit 
period, limited to throe (3) deductibles 
per family. (The $25.00 Pl-in A hospital 
deductible does not count toward the $100.00 
Major Medical Deductible.) 



Coinsurance Rate Pla 



80% 



te Plan B - 80/ f,.r th« first 
$5,000 in payments, then 1007 of ellRlhle 
charges are paid for chat benefit period. 

Automatic restoration of benefits - Up to *^5.(jO0 
per year. On July 1st each year there shall be 
an automatic restoration of benefits paid for 
each Eiployee/Dependenr provided such restoration 
shall not exceed S5,00U per yfcdr, and furtha 
provided that the existing Ufetime naxlnum shall 
never exceed $50,000. 

Out-patient psychiatric care - covered medical 

expenses limited to $32.00, or 80 percent of 

$40 per visit, for 20 visits a year ($640 max/year) 

■Some exanples of covered expenses are: antulance 
'Charges, prescription drugs, hone and office 
physician visits, diagnostic x-rays and lab tests 
after the basic benefit of $200. prosthetic 
appliances such as braces, crutches, and hospital 
beds. Your insurance booklet explains these and 
other expenses in detail. 

************** 



k****«****«*******« *««*«**«* 



SURVIVING SPOUSE WAIVER OF PREMIUM 



Plan B provides waiver 

spouse and/or children 



'f premium for surviving 



DEPENDENTS 

Spouse and/or all utmarried dependent chtldrea 
up to age 23, vho are dependent on you for at le, 
51Z of Chelr support and ■alntenance. Mentally 
retarded or physically handicapped children, 
who are dependent upon the contract bolder are 
I overed regardless of age as long as the inca- 
p.iclty occurs prior to age 23. Proof of 
incapacity must be submitted to Blue Cross/Blue 
Shield and State Personnel prior to the 23rd 
birthday and annually after age 25. 

OUTPATIEKT DIAGNOSTIC 

This outpatient diagnostic coverage pays the 
reasonable charges In a physician's office or In 
ii hospital outpatient department for diagnostic 
K-ray and laboratory tests. There is a limit 
of $200 per person per fiscal year. 

Excluded from coverage under the Outpatient 
Diagnostic option are charges for: routine 
physical examinations or checkups, fluoro- 
scopic examinations, and pre-raartial or pre- 
employment examinations. 



Initial Pediatric Medical Examination - Pays allow- 
able charges (if done by other than the delivering 
physician). 

Plan A Plan B 

Employee 
Employee/Spouse 
Employee/Children 
_ Full Family 

All Types of Membership will carry maternity for female employees and covered spouses. 
46c Should be added to the above payroll deductions If dependent life is selected. 

13 



00.00 


1.S8 


22. t6 


27.36 


10.06 


13.02 


32.80 


4C.04 



OUTLINE OF A PLAN OF CROW LIFE INSURANCE FOR S.C. STATE EMPLOYEES AND PUBLIC SCHOOL EMPLOYEES 
(This Is a brief, non-legal description of available benefits) 



SCHF.OULE OF INSURANCE 

BENEytT S FOR YOU 

Before the first day of the month in which your 70th birthday occurs 

On .r after the first day of the oonth in which your 70th birthday occurs 



$ 3,000.00 
$ 1,500.00 



Accidental I>c;ith .-inti 
Dismemberment Benefits 



$ },000.00 
$ 1,500.00 



LOSi TLKM DISABILITY 

Monthly Benefit' 
Elimination Period 
Maximum Payment Period 



60X of Basic Monthly Salary, but not more than $600.00 from Metropolitan Life 

90 consecutive days 

The period ending on the day before your 65th birthday If you become disabled before age 60. 



. 1 [N ATION UITH OTHER INCOME 

V.iur monthly benefit will be offset by certain Income you may receive from other sources, such as sick pay. Social Security (excluding benefits 
tor depLMidents), Workman's Compensation, other disability insurance for which your employer pays any part of the cost, retirement or pension 
plans, etc. Please refer to your booklet for full details. 



PRL-EX1ST[N(: CONDITIONS 

Benefits will not be paid for any period of disability caused by or resulting from injury or sickness for which thu Enployee incurred expenses, 
revived medical treatment, cook prescribed drugs or medicines, or consulted a physician during the six (6) month period immediately prior to the 
effective date of the Employee's Insurance. 

This exclusion is applicable to employees Insured on or after July 1, 1977. This exclusion will not apply to any period of disability which 
ea after the Employee has been Insured for 12 months. 



BENEFITS FOR YOUR QEPENOENTS 

Dependent Wife or Husband 

Dependent Children age S years but less than 23 years 

Dependent Children age 14 daya but leas than 5 years 



Dependent Life Insurance 

$ 1,000.00 
$ 1,000.00 
Up to $ 800.00 according to age 



MONTHLY COST 



For your personal coverage 
For your eligible dependents 



NONE 
$ 0.46 (regardle 



of the number of dependents) 



WHEN YOUR INSURANCE BEGINS 

All fuU-tlma employees currently employed on July 1, 1978, are automatically enrolled on that date if they have signed the required forms. 
Employees hired on or after July 1, 1978, and their dependents will be covered on the first day of the month coincident with or following the 
date of employment, provided an appropriate Notice of Election Is filed and necessary payroll deductions are authorized within 31 days of the 
date of employment. For any employee hired on the first working day of a month, coverage will begin on that day provided you are actively- 
at-work. "Activaly-at-«ork" means performing the regular duties of your employment on a full-time basis. If you are not actlvely-at-work 
when your insurance would normally begin. It will begin on the first day of the calendar month following the date you return to work. 



WHO ARE YOUR DEPENDENTS 

Your eligible dependents Include your wife or husband and your unmarried children who are at least 14 days but less than 23 years old, excluding 
any dependent eligible to be Insured under this plan on his or her own account, or who Is on active duty with the armed forces of any country. 



uses- -THIS WEEK 

MONDAY, APRIL 28 — SUNDAY, MAY 4, 1980 
Onday, April 28 - No activities scheduled 

uesday, April 29 

12 noon -- George Plimpton Convocation . Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more information contact 
Information Services, ext, 210. 

6:00 p.m. -- USCS Athletic Awards Banquet . Featured speaker - George Plimpton. Hodge Center 
Gym. For ticket information call Information Services, ext, 210. 

ednesday, April 30 

12:15-2:00 p.m. — Faculty Salad Bar . Student Activities Building. For more information 
contact Alice Henderson, ext. 331, 

4:30 p.m. -- Science Seminar. "Development of Diabetes Mellitus" -presented by Frankie Rice. 
Administration Building 325. 

lursday. May 1 - No activities scheduled 

'iday, May 2 — LAST DAY OF CLASSES 

8:30-4:30 -- "Conflict Management in the Health Care Setting". Nursing Continuing Education 
Workshop. Student Activities Building. For more information contact Addie Kloepper, ext. 438 

12 NOON -- BIG EVENT - USCS QUADRANGLE 



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Data Source: USCS Commencement Programs 

Office of Institutional Research 

use, Columbia 

Office of the Registrar, USCS 



Office of Institutional Research 

Fact Sheet No. 4 

CMcDB 







Vol. IV. No. 29 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS f^^y s 



1980 



I. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FROM EB BARNES: 

—Senate will meet May 5, 11:00-1:00 pm 
in Tukey (continuation of the April 18 
meeting. ) 

--The next scheduled meeting of the Senate 
will be July 9 at 11:15-1:00 pm in Tukey. 
--Faculty Advisory Committee meetings will 
be on the 2nd Friday of the month during 
1980-81. 

--Senate meetings will be on the 4th 
Friday of the month during 1980-81. 
--THINKING AHEAD -- What topics or pro- 
grams would you like to see for the opening 
faculty meetings in August? Now is the time 
to pass some suggestions along before you 
leave for the summer. 

FROM FRED WENZ, Faculty Marshal ; All 
faculty members are to be on the first floor 
of the Administration Building at 6:30 pm, 
Friday, May 16, for the Commencement Exer- 
cises. Please be on time as the procession 
will begin at 7:00 pm SHARP! 

FORMER use PRESIDENT, Dr. Thomas F. Jones, 
will give the commencement address at USCS' 
commencement exercises on May 16. Now Vice 
President for Research at the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology (MIT), Dr. Jones was 
president of the university from 1962-1974. 
Dr. Jones also played a key role in the 
establishment of USCS in 1967, and is return- 
ing to the campus where he first made a 
commencement address in 1972. Following the 
ceremonies, the alumni association will spon- 
sor a reception for graduates and their fami- 
lies. All USCS alumni and friends of the 
campus are invited to attend. 

A SPECIAL FACULTY MEETING is called for 12:15 
to 1:30 pm on Wednesday, Oct. 31 in Room 209 
of the Administration Building. A forum on 
S.C. Law 154 on State Employees and the pos- 
sible amendments to that law will provide a 
discussion and information time. The study 



materials were printed in the Oct. 15 edition 
of FYI. All faculty members are urged to 
attend. 

*********************** 

THE loAt -a>Uit oi VVJ and USCS--ThAj> Weefe 
mJit 6e mx.t Monday, May 12. ThfioaghouX: the, 
AummoA, VVI LoLll be pubLuhed on June, 2, ,^ 
July 1 , and August 4. V^adLineJ> ioh. thei>z 
AJiiiixeA afie, May 29, June 27, and July 3J. 
F^I mZt ^e-iime weekly pubticatlon on 
Monday, Aagait 25. Que,i,tloni, conceAnAng 
FVl on. the Calendar should be dlfiected to 
JanelXa Koob, In^^onmatlon SeAvtceA, ext. 210. 

*********************** 

II. BULLETIN BOARD 

TWO EXHIBITS created by the S.C. Museum Com- 
mission will be on display at the USCS 
Library Art Gallery during May. "South 
Carolina Through The Mails" features a 
grouping of post cards available in the early 
years of the 20th century. Accompanying the 
post card exhibit is a display of sculpture 
from the state art collection. The original 
penny post card emerged as a way to send a 
short, friendly greeting around 1898. Be- 
cause post cards were frequently printed in 
small quantities, there were usually num- 
erous photos taken of the same subject over 
a short period of time, thus providing an 
excellent chronological history and an 
excellent source for local research. 

A BEACH CAMPING TRIP for faculty, staff and 
the Outdoors Club, is being organized for 
the week following graduation at Hunting 
Island State Park. If you would like to 
join - for any part of the week - please 
contact Ron Sobczak or Lawrence Moore. 



(continued] 



FREE FILMS: Because of USCS's membership 
in the Southern Atlantic States Association 
for Asian and African Studies (SASASAAS) 
uses faculty have free use of the SASASAAS 
collection of films on Asia and Africa. 
These are good, recent films and anyone 
interested should consult the film catalog 
in the Audio-Visual Production Center, M134, 
ext. 264, or contact Jim Brown, L236, ext. 
433. 

TEACH ABROAD: Ful bright award openings for 
1981-82 have been announced. The awards 
generally are for a year of teaching in a 
university in another country and normally 
cover roundtrip travel for the individual 
and one dependent, a maintenance allowance 
for family living costs, and an "incident- 
als" allowance. In some cases foreign 
language competance is required. The dates 
for applications are June 1, 1980 for the 
American Republics, Australia, and New 
Zealand; and July 1, 1980 for Africa, Asia, 
and Europe. The American Republics, Africa, 
Asia, and Eastern Europe receive less de- 
mand, and later applications for these areas 
are often accepted. One does not have to be 
"a well-known scholar in his field" to re- 
ceive a Fulbright and anyone interested in 
such teaching (for which one can usually 
take a leave of absence from USCS) should 
consider applying. For further information 
contact the Council for International Ex- 
change of Scholars, 11 Dupont Circle, 
Suite 300, Washington, D.C. 20036, or Jim 
Brown, L236, ext. 433. 

USCS WILL SPONSOR four (week long) basket- 
ball camps this summer. The dates for the 
camps are: July 6-11, 13-18, 20-25 and 
July 27-Aug. 1. Applicants must be between 
the ages of 8-18. Registration including 
all meals and overnight camping is $100.00, 
excluding overnight, $60.00. Deadline for 
registration is May 15. For more information 
contact Bill Hinson, ext. 223. 

USCS WILL SPONSOR a soccer camp Aug. 4-8. 
Boys and Girls, ages 6-16 are eligible to 
attend. Frank Kohlenstein, USCS soccer coach 
and USCS soccer players will instruct. Fee 
for the camp is $20.00. Registration deadline 
is July 28. For more information contact 
Continuing Education, ext. 422. 



MISSING WHAT? Denoyer-Geppert model #70102 
"The 'Talking' Eye" has "disappeared." If 
you "see" it, please return to Hodge Center 
249. We feel sure it is hiding in a corner 
of an office or classroom and simply can't 
find its way home. Persons having informa- 
tion concerning the whereabouts of the 
missing 'EYE' should contact Jan Dimsda'ie, 
ext. 315. 

POSITION AVAILABLE: System Special Assis- 
tant For International Projects. 
-Senior administrative position reporting 
to the University President with responsi- 
bility of planning and overseeing inter- 
national projects of research and service 
units throughout the nine campus system 
of two and four year institutions. Candi- 
dates should have extensive experience 
with university and profesional society 
administration along with a record of 
foreign research and service. Preference 
will be given to candidates with a pro- 
fessorial background and familiarity with 
private and governmental funding organi- 
zations. Letters describing professional 
interests and complete resumes should be 
sent to Ms. Donna R. Pretty, Assistant 
Provost, University of South Carolina, 
Columbia, S.C. 29208. Deadline for receipt 
of applications is Friday, May 16, 1980. 
Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity 
Employer. 

■*■**■*■■*•**■*■■*■***■*•********* 

III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

JIM BROWN attended the spring meeting of 
the Southern Atlantic States Association 
for Asian and African Studies meeting, 
Saturday and Sunday April 26-27, at 
Warren Wilson College, Swannanoa, N.C. 

NANCY AND LAWRENCE MOORE attended the 
Danforth Associate Regional Conference at 
Wrightsville Beach, N.C. April 10-13. 

LAWRENCE MOORE served on a National Science 
Foundation panel April 23-26 in Baltimore. 
The panel reviewed proposals to NSF under 
the Instructional Scientific Equipment for 
Undergraduate Science Education program. 
The program, which last year made 285 
awards totaling $3.2 million, may have to 
delay its 1980 awards due to recent efforts 
to balance the Federal budget. 



CONGRATULATIONS TO SYLVIA AND JAMES MOORE 
who became the proud parents of Jason 
Robert on 4/17. Jason was born at Mary 
Black Hospital and weighed in at 61bs, 
8 ozs. 

M.B. ULMER attended the meeting of the 
Southeastern Section of the Mathematical 
Association of America in Boone, N.C. on 
April 12. He also represented the Americal 
Statistical Association at the inauguration 
of Clemson President Bill Achtley on 4/18. 

REMINDER FROM DAVID TAYLOR — Contributions 
for the "Living Memorial" (Bob Harvey tree) 
should be sent or brought to Jacki Sherbert 
(A109) by May 14. 

BARBARA MILLER AND DEANE LEDFORD, along with 
nine nursing students, attended the National 
Student Nurses Association meeting April 
23-28 at Salt Lake City, Utah. "Reaching Out, 
Reaching Through" was the conventions theme. 
Much learning and fun took place as issues 
and theory based information was presented, 
as well as some site seeing in the city and 
the Rockies. 

MICHAEL DRESSMAN attended the annual meeting 
of the North and South Carolina Association 
of Linguists which was held in Chapel Hill, 
N.C, on April 26. The subject of the con- 
ference was bilingual education and instruc- 
tion in English as a second language. 

BRYAN LINDSAY was one of four participants 
on a national panel dealing with outstand- 
ing leadership at the 1980 international 
conference of the Council for Exceptional 
Children and The Association for the 
Gifted, in Philadelphia during the week 
of April 21. Panel members included Paul 
Plowman, Gifted Education Consultant, Cali- 
fornia State Department of Education; Bill 
Foster, Curriculum Laboratory, University of 
Illinois; and Ursula Kamich, Portland Public 
Schools, Maine. Bryan's paper was entitled, 
"Questing for Excellence: Some Roads Not 
Taken. " 



FROM NANCY MOORE - News of Former Faculty: 
-- Lynn Lamoreux will go to Yale University 
next year. While she will teach some graduate 
students, most of her time will be spent in 
research. 

-- Bob Harvey is manager of Chemical Stores at 
Southern <Oregon State in Ashland, Oregon. He 
and Rose have purchased a house with a 
beautiful view of the mountains. 
-- A1 bertha Sistrunk is serving as interim 
president of the College of West Africa, 
Monrovia, Liberia. She went to Liberia as 
a Methodist Missionary to build an English 
Education program. 

ED WHITE, School of Education, has been 
awarded a $12,000 grant for middle/junior 
high principals from the National Science 
Foundation. The project will focus on up- 
grading the knowledge level of the partici- 
pants (Spartanburg School Districts #1-6) 
in the area of science education. In the 
Spring of 1981 the project will co-sponsor^ 
a statewide conference in science education 
with the S.C. Middle School Association. 

BILL BRUCE, School of Education, presented a 
paper at the Fifth Annual "Educational 
Equity Conference" in Myrtle Beach, S.C. 
April 29, 1980. The conference was sponsored 
by The Mid-Atlantic/Appalachian Race De- 
segregation Assistance Center, the Title 
IX Training Institute, The Southeast Sex 
Desegregation Assistance. Bill's paper was 
"Recognizing and Eliminating Sex and Race 
Bias in the Classroom." 



FROM: THE PLACH^ENT OFFICE - USCS - ENRICHMENT PROGRAM - SU^f4ER YOUTH PR0GRAr4 



Outlined below is a sampling of topics and areas for an enrichment and 
development program for students 14 - 22 years old who will be assigned to 
USCS ty P.C.A. This model program at USCS if successful will possibly be a 
requirement for all agencies next year. 

Possible benefits to USCS: 

Recruitment 
^ — Summer enplbyment for USCS faculty eirployed for 9 or 10 Months. 
An inproved pi±ilic image 

First Week: Session I - Welccsne, Assessment, Orientation, Value Clarification, 
Film — Southern Bell 
Carol Smith, Earl Gordon, Al Gray, Dr. 01 in Salisbury 

Second Week: Session II - Motivation, Self Awareness, Self Concept, Personal 
Develop:>ent, Film - 70,001 
John Allen - Milliken, Judy Kizer 

Third Week: Session III - Study Skills, Enployment Skills, Pre-SAT, College 
Admission, Financial Aid, Film - Reading & Listening - Math. 

Fourth Week: Session IV - Plant tour. Career Library, Abbott Lab., Spartanburg 
Dairy 
Tape - Journey thru texioo - USCS Library 

Fifth Week: Session V - Good Health Habits, Tour and Use of the Library 

Sixth Week: Session VI - Music and Art Appreciation, Library Usage, 
Re-assessirent, Tape - Parenting 
Bryan Lindsay, Katie Hicks, Library 



For further information contact: Arthur George - extension 414 

Request forms for student workers are available from the Deans and Division 
Chairpersons Office or the Placement Office. 



uses— -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, MAY 5 — SUNDAY, MAY 11, 1980 



MONDAY, May 5 

11:00-1:00 pm -- Senate Meeting . Tukey Lecture Theatre 

8:00-1:00 pm -- Exams - All 11:00 am M-W-F classes. 
1:00-4:00 pm -- Exams - All 12:15 pm T-TH classes. 
6:00-9:00 pm -- Exams - All 8:20 pm M-W classes. 



TUESDAY, May 6 






11:30 am - 


-- Science Meeting. Administration 115, | 


8:00-1:00 


pm — 


Exams - 


All 8:00 am T-TH classes. 


1:00-4:00 


pm -- 


Exams - 


All 3:05 pm T-TH classes. 


6:00-9:00 


pm — 


Exams - 


All 5:30 pm T-TH classes. 


WEDNESDAY, May 7 






8:00-1:00 


pm -- 


Exams - 


All 8:00 am M-W-F classes. 


1:00-4:00 


pm -- 


Exams - 


All 3:00 pm M-W classes. 


6:00-9:00 


pm -- 


Exams - 


All 6:55 pm M-W classes. 


THURSDAY, May 8 






8:00-1:00 


pm -- 


Exams - 


All 10:00 am M-W-F classes. 


1:00-4:00 


pm -- 


Exams - 


All 10:50 am T-TH classes. 


6:00-9:00 


pm -- 


Exams - 


All 8:30 pm T-TH classes. 


FRIDAY, May 


_9 






9:00-3:00 


pm -- 


Student 


Teachers Seminar. Tukey Lecture Theatre, 


8:00-1:00 


pm -- 


Exams - 


All 9:25 am T-TH classes. 


1:00-4:00 


pm -- 


Exams - 


All 1:30 pm M-W classes. 


6:00-9:00 


pm -- 


Exams - 


All 6:55 pm T-TH classes. 


>ATURDAY, May 10 






Exams - All Saturday cl 


asses. 







Vol. IV. No. 30 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS 



May 12, 1980 



I. OFFICIAL 

FROM FRED WENZ, Faculty Marshal: All 
faculty members are to be on the first floor 
3f the Administration Building at 5:30 pm, 
Friday, May 16, for the Commencement Exer- 
:ises. Please be on time as the procession 
^ill begin at 7:00 pm SHARP! 

FORMER use PRESIDENT, Dr. Thomas F. Jones, 
f^^]^ give the commencement address at USCS' 
:ommencement exercises on May 16. Now Vice 
President for Research at the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology (MIT), Dr. Jones was 
president of the university from 1962-1974, 
Dr. Jones also played a key role in the 
establishment of USCS in 1967, and is return- 
ing to the campus where he first made a 
commencement address in 1972. Following the 
ceremonies, the alumni association will spon- 
sor a reception for graduates and their fami- 
lies. All USCS alumni and friends of the 
campus are invited to attend. 

JSCS' SCHOOL OF NURSING will present caps 
and pins to 58 associate degree graduates in 
impressive candlelight ceremonies at First 
Presbyterian Church, Thursday night. May 15. 
Dr. G.B. Hodge, Chairman of the Spartanburg 
Zounty Commission for Higher Education, will 
j3e the speaker during the program, which 
Degins at 7:30 pm and is open to the public. 
During the ceremonies, the graduates will be 
awarded the distinctive white cap displayed 
jy registered nurses, and the USCS School of 
Cursing pin, traditionally worn on the nurse's 
jniform. They will receive the academic degree 
3f Associate in Science in Technical Nursing 
iuring commencement activities Friday. After 
)assing the state examination later this sum- 
ner, the graduates will begin practice as 
registered nurses. Many are expected to con- 
:inue their education in the USCS Bachelor of 
jcience in Nursing Program on a part-time 
)asis. The new graduates are expected to find 
1 warm welcome in the Piedmont health-care 
ommunity, since the region is experiencing a 



shortage of nurses. Spartanburg General 
Hospital now needs 55 nurses to complete its 
staff and is expected to hire the majority 
of the new USCS graduates. 

FROM JIMMY DAWKINS, computer room: The com- 
puter room hours, beginning Monday, May 12 
and continuing through the summer will be 
from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm. 

*********************** 

1^1x^6 lf> the. lent U&uz oi Vn and USCS--Tka> 

Weefe ayvtUL June Z. ^atoJilal iofi thz Jane 2 

-c44ae muui,t be idYit to JanelZa Koob, In^o^- 

matlon SoAvlczi,, no lateA. than ThuAAday, May 

29. 
*********************** 

II. BULLETIN BOARD 

MISSING WHAT? Denoyer-Geppert model #70102 
"The 'Talking' Eye" has "disappeared," If 
you "see" it, please return to Hodge Center 
249. We feel sure it is hiding in a corner of 
an office or classroom and simply can't find 
its way home. Persons having information con- 
cerning the whereabouts of the missing 'EYE' 
should contact Jan Dimsdale, ext. 315. 

FROM HEIDI FROM, Director, Child Development 
Center: The CDC will have several openings 
for children 3 to 5 years of age this summer. 
Fees are reasonable and part-time openings 
may be available. Contact the CDC, ext. 399 
if interested. 

ALL FACULTY and STAFF: The Spring picnic for 
Faculty/Staff will be held at the home of 
Alice and Don Henderson, 211 Bryan Ct., on 
Sunday, May 18, from 4-7 pm. Bring a covered 
dish or salad and canned drinks. Paper plates, 
silverware and tea will be provided. You 
might also wish to bring swim suits and fish- 
ing equipment for use in Hillbrook Lake, and 
blankets or folding chairs to sit on. Family 
and friends are welcome. Maps will be available 
from division secretaries. 



TO THE uses FACULTY AND STAFF: A Special 
Thanks for your expressions of Kindness 
and Sympathy during the recent loss of 
my loved one. -Mrs. Mary Johnson, Custodial 
Worker-Hodge Center. 

FROM DR. Arthur E. Justice: An analysis of 
the National Teacher Exam taken by our stu- 
dents in February 1980 is as follows: 85% 
of the students who took the exam scored 
at or better than the minimum acceptable 
score. 83% of the Early Childhood Education 
students scored at or better than the re- 
quired minimum score. 86% of the Social 
Studies education students scored at or 
better than the required minimum score. 
100% of the students in Elementary Education, 
Physical Education, Science Education, Math 
Education and English Education scored at or 
better than the required minimum score. 

THE NEWCOMEN SOCIETY BOARD OF TRUSTEES has 
announced its awards for 1979. Katrina 
Lawrimore of USC Columbia won a $250 award 
for a thesis in industrial history. The 
foundation awards numerous prizes and fellow- 
ships in business and industrial history. 
More information is available from the 
Newcomen Society in North America, Box 113, 
Dowington, Pa. 19335. 

A BEACH CAMPING TRIP for faculty, staff and 
the Outdoors Club, is being organized for 
the week following graduation at Hunting 
Island State Park. If you would like to 
join - for any part of the week - please 
contact Ron Sobczak or Lawrence Moore. 

INTERNATIONAL LECTURERES: The Institute of 
International Education (HE) is establishing 
an International Faculty Lecture Bureau. The 
bureau will serve as a computerized clearing- 
house through which US academic institutions 
and professional associations can invite 
foreign scholars and other specialists who 
are temporarily affiliated with other US 
institutions to give lectures, conduct semi- 
nars, or consult with US colleagues on matters 
of mutual professional interest. (A recent 
survey showed that fully two-thirds of foreign 
faculty on US campuses were concentrated at 
only 28 institutions.) During 1980-81 regis- 
tration with the bureau will not cost anything, 
but the inviting group must bear the cost of 
expenses and honoraria. For further infor- 
mation contact Jim Brown, L236, ext. 433. 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 



JIM BROWN spoke to the Bre^fast Sertoma 
Club, 8 May 1980, on International Education 
and the International community in Spartan- 
burg. 

THE INTERNATIONAL READING ASSOCIATION re- 
cently held its 25th Annual Convention in 
St. Louis, Missouri. Dr. Eleanor Ladd, 
education, is serving on the Associations' 
nine-member Board of Directors. The IRA is 
a nonprofit organization devoted to the 
improvement of reading instruction and pro- 
motion of the lifetime reading habit among 
people worldwide. 

SEVERAL GRADUATES of the USCS Associate 
Degree Nursing program have recently assumed 
new positions at Spartanburg General Hospita' 
Linda Fowler has been promoted to head nurse 
on the fourth floor South; Tru Muriel Lawterj 
and Curtis Walker have been named relief j 
supervisors; and Kay Langston has been 
transferred to the Nursing department as 
patient education coordinator. 

MEYER DRUCKER was the moderator for a seminal 
on Accounting for Attorneys on April 25, at 
the USC Law School in Columbia. 

STUDENTS IN PROF. DRUCKER' S Individual Tax 
Planning classes completed their fourth 
consecutive year of providing a free tax 
service to area residents. Marsha Cudd, the 
student coordinator for this project was 
assisted by members from the National 
Association of Accountants. 

MRS. VERGENE COLLOMS has been elected presi- 
dent of the 1980-81 Spartanburg Community 
Concert Series. 

BERT MENEES will be one of the featured 
speakers at the SMALL COMPUTER CONFERENCE 
at Clemson University May 22. His topic will 
be "Business Applications Software for the 
IBM 5120." 

MICHAEL JILLING and MOHAMMED OMER recently 
attended an Economic Symposium at Myrtle Bch, 
on the problems of the US steel industry. The 
symposium was sponsored by the Iron and Steel 
Institute and was organized by the College o1 
Business at USC Columbia. Mike also attended 
the annual meeting of the Eastern Finance 
Association at Savannah, Georgia. 



uses— -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, MAY 12 — SUNDAY, MAY 18, 1980 



MONDAY, May 12 

8:00-4:30 pm -- S.C. State Board Review - Nursing. Hodge Center 247 A&B. 
5:00 pm -- Outdoors Club Meeting . Activities Building. 



TUESDAY, 


May 13 






















8:00-4: 


30 pm — 


S.C. State 


Board Re\ 


/iew 


- Nursing. 


Hodge 


Center 


247 


A&B 




WEDNESDAY 


, May 14 






















12:00-1 


:00 pm - 


■ Psychology 


Faculty 


Meet 


ing. 


Admin 


istration Bui 


Iding 


Conference 


Room. 



THURSDAY, May 15 

3:30-6:00 pm -- "Exploratory Science "-C.E, course. Fee $35.00. Library Building 257. For 
more information contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 

6:30 pm -- Universal Love End of Year Banquet . Activities Building. 

7:30 pm -- Nurses Pinning and Capping Ceremony . First Presbyterian Church, Spartanburg. 

■RIDAY, May 16 

3:00-5:00 pm -- " Publicity and Public Re1ations "-C.E. course. Fee $12.00. Media Building 321. 
For more information contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 

6:30 pm -- Faculty members to meet on first floor Administration Building for commencement 
processional . 

7:00 pm -- Commencement Exercises . USCS quadrangle. 

lATURDAY, May 17 - No scheduled activities 

;UNDAY, May 18 

4:00-7:00 pm -- Spring Faculty/Staff Picnic . Home of Alice and Don Henderson, 211 Bryan Ct., 
Spartanburg. For more information, check May 12 issue of FYI, Bulletin Board Section. 







Vol IV. No. 31 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS 



June 2, 1980 



I. OFFICIAL 

THE IRON CLAD AGREEMENT, a professional 
touring theatre company, from Pittsburgh, 
will present the play "My Dear Sisters" at 
the Tukey Lecture Theatre on June 6 at 
12:30 pm. "My Dear Sisters" is the story 
of the Grimke sisters, who became 
abolitionists, carried their cause to 
Philadelphia and Boston, and championed 
women's rights long before the Suffragist 
movement popularized in America. The play 
is being co-sponsored by the S.C. Committee 
for the Humanities and the Dept. of English 
at use and is free and open to the public. 

********************** 

Thz mxt -ciiae o{i F'/I M^ti be pabtUkud 
Mondaif, Jane 30. VzadLlm ion. ge;ttting 
Itej/ni in the, Juno. 30tk U,6Ui2. U> 5:00 p.m. 
on ThiViiday, June. 26. Jtemi ihoutd be 
ient to Jane-Ua Koob, Inlonmcution SeAvtae.i. 

********************** 

II. BULLETIN BOARD 

POSITION AVAILABLE - Applications are now 
being taken foran Admission Counselor, Grade 
26, in the Admissions Office for this Campus. 
Employees must notify the Personnel Office 
of their interest in a specific vacancy by 
completing and submitting to the Personnel 
Office a "Request for Transfer" (p-15). The 
Personnel Office will arrange interviews for 
the employee whose overall qualifications are 
best suited for the position. 

NOMINATIONS AND APPLICATIONS are invited for 
the position of Dean of the College of In- 
dustrial Management and Textile Science, 
Clemson University. The dean will serve as the 
chief administrative officer for the College, 
which contains the departments of Accounting 
and Finance, Economics, Industrial Management, 
and Textiles, and the Office of Professional 
Development. Closing date for nominations is 



August 1, 1980. Closing date for applications 
is September 1, 1980. Nominations and 
Applications may be sent to Dr. Hugh Macaulay, 
College of Industrial Management and Textile 
Science, Clemson University, Clemson, S.C. 
29631 

FROM PERSONNEL: Blue Cross/Blue Shield Pre- 
miums for 1980-81 - Both the University and 
employee contributions for the State Group 
Insurance Program (Blue Cross/Blue Shield and 
Metropolitan) will increase effective July 1, 
1980. As premiums are paid one month in 
advance, the revised deduction will be re- 
flected in the June 15 and June 30 payrolls 
for employees paid on a twelve month basis. 
The revised deduction for employees paid on 
a nine month basis was incurred in the May 
15 payroll. Revised monthly rates are as 
follows: Plan A (Standard): Employee 00.00; 
Employee/Spouse $26.24; Employee/Children 
$12.00; Full Family $38.70. 
Plan B (Expanded): Employee $1.76; Employee/ 
Spouse $31.66; Employee/Children $15.30; Full 
Family $46.76. 
Dependent Life Insurance: $0.46. 

AVAILABLE POSITION: Assistant Dean for Student 
Services: USC at Sumter, a two-year campus, 
seeks applicants for the position of Assistant 
Dean for Student Services. This position will 
report directly to the Dean of the University 
and will have responsibility for a comprehen- 
sive program of student services. Applicants 
should possess a terminal degree in student 
personnel services, the necessary credentials 
for the assignment of faculty rank, and should 
have had related professional experiences at 
an appropriate level of responsibility. Effec- 
tive date of appointment will be Aug. 1, 1980. 
Letters of applications should be sent no 
later than June 15, 1980 to Dean J.C. Anderson, 
Jr., USC at Sumter, Miller Road, Sumter, S.C. 
29150. USC at Sumter is an Equal Opportunity 
/Affirmative Action Employer. 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

GRANTS AWARDED: (1) George Labanick (Biology) 
has been awarded $681. from the USC Research 
& Productive Scholarship Fund to conduct his 
research entitled "Life History of Rock-face 
Plethodon yonahlossee". Congratulations, Dr. 
Labanick! 

(2) Jeanne Stuart and Jack Turner (Biology) 
have been awarded an additional $862. from 
the USC Research & Productive Scholarship 
Fund to continue their research entitled "A 
Study of Factors Affecting the Pathogen, 
Naegleria." Congratulations, Dr. Stuart 
and Dr. Turner! 

GRANT PROPOSAL SUBMITTED: USCS has submitted 
a $68,136 grant request to the S.C. Dept. of 
Social Services to provide funds for the 
operation of the Child Development Center. 
Program director: Ms. Heidi From. 

DAVE BERMAN, part-time instructor of 
anthropology, will be spending six weeks on 
a study tour of India this summer. 

ON MAY 6th, Michael Jilling and Mr. Lawrence 
Girard, General Manager of Hergeth Inc., 
discussed Multinational Corporations in 
general and foreign investment in the 
Spartanburg area in particular with members 
of the International Studies Club at 
Chapman High School . 

SEVERAL STUDENTS already enrolled at USCS or 
planning to attend the university this fall 
have been awarded scholarships by community 
groups. Mrs. Shirley Hudson, who is majoring 
in business administration, was recently 
awarded a $750 scholarship by the Spartan 
Chapter of the American Business Women's 
Association. The ABWA made its award May 19. 
Karen Rhymer, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jack 
Rhymer of Lyman, won a $200 Helen T. Bruce 
Scholarship. A future nursing major, Tammy 
Brian of Inman, has received a $300 
scholarship from the Spartanburg County March 
of Dimes. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
William Brian of Inman. 



DR. ROBERT D. TOWELL, lecturer in Psychol oc 
and in private practice of Marriage and 
Family Therapy in Sptg. and Clemson, has 
been invited to present a paper on "Family 
Therapy" to the Third International Con- 
ference on Comparative Criminal Justice at 
the Fachhoschule in Monchengladbach, West 
Germany. Dr. Towel 1 delivered a paper at 
the First International Conference enetitld 
"Treatment of Delinquent Families" that 
has since been published in a book in West 
Germany. He has authored additional chap- 
ters that were published nationally and 
internationally. 

DR. CHARLES QUINNELLY has been selected as 
one of 30 students at a national Institute 
of Corrections. The conference is called 
"Training of Jail Trainers — Practical Law 
for Correctional Personnel." It is designed 
to acquaint crminal justice authorities wit 
methods of teaching prison inmates, so they 
can assist in the development of educationa 
programs in the various state correctional 
systems. The conference will be held in 
Boudler, Col., from June 1-June 6. 



JUNE 1980 
Calendar of Events 



June 2, Monday 

All Day - Orientation and Advisement for transient students. HC247 A&B and HC 248. Contact 
Carol Smith, ext. 336 for more information. 

9-6:30 pm -- Registration for Summer I. Hodge Center Gym. For more information call ext. 246. 

7-9:00 pm -- Continuing Education "Speedreading" course. Fee $35.00. Library 272. Mondays and 
Wednesdays, June 2-25. For more information call ext. 422. 

une 3, Tuesday - CLASSES BEGIN 

10-12 noon -- Late Registration. Hodge Center Gym. For more information call ext. 246. 

1-5 pm -- Personnel "Training Workshop." Student Activities Building. For more information 
call ext. 323. 

4-6 pm -- Late Registration. Hodge Center Gym. For more information call ext. 246. 

6:30-9:30 pm -- Parents Anonymous meeting. Hodge Center 248. Contact Jerry Lehman, ext. 362 
for more information. 

7-9 pm -- Continuing Education course "Understanding Depression in Women." Fee $40.00. Media 
217. Tuesdays and Thursdays, June 3-19. For more information call ext. 422. 

jne 4, Wednesday - LAST DAY TO ADD A COURSE OR CHANGE A SCHEDULE 

10-12 noon - Late Registration. Hodge Center Gym. For more information call ext. 246. 

4-6 pm -- Late Registration. Hodge Center Gym. For more information call ext. 245. 

7-8:30 pm -- Continuing Education course "Discovering Your Creative Potential." Fee $20.00. 
Media 319. Wednesdays, June 4-25. For more inforamtion call ext. 422. 

jne 6, Friday 

12:30 pm -- "My Dear Sisters" -play by the Iron Clad Agreement, a professional touring theatre 
from Pittsburgh. Tukey Lecture Theatre. Free and open to the public. For more information 
call ext. 210. 

jne 9, Monday 

8:30-4:30 pm -- Continuing Education course "Real Estate Fundamentals-Course I." Fee $110.00. 
Library 268. Monday-Friday, June 9-13. For more information call ext. 422. 



jne 10, Tuesday 

6:30-8 pm -- Continuing Education course "Furniture Refinishing." Fee $20.00. Outside media 
building. Tuesdays and Thursdays, June 10-19. For more information call ext. 422. 

6:30-9 pm -- Parents Anonymous meeting. Hodge Center 248. Contact Jerry Lehman, ext. 362 
for more information. 



June 11, Wednesday - LAST DAY TO APPLY FOR AUGUST GRADUATION; LAST DAY TO DROP A COURSE WITHOUT 

ACADEMIC PENALTY 



June 14, Saturday 

8-1 pm -- Orientation session. Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more information call Carol Smith 
ext. 336. 

9-11 am -- Orientation session. Library 268. For more information call Carol Smith, ext. 336. 



June 16, Monday 

1-5 pm -- Continuing Education course "Women's Volleyball Camp." Fee $25.00. Hodge Center Gyi 
Monday- Friday, June 16-20. For more information call ext. 422. 

6:30-8:30 pm — Continuing Education course "How to Succeed in College English." Fee $20 00 
Library 276. Monday-Friday, June 16-20. For more information call ext. 422. 



June 17, Tuesday 

6:30-9:00 pm — Parents Anonymous meeting. Hodge Center 248. Contact Jerry Lehman, ext 362 
for more information. 



June 18, Wednesday 

9-12:30 pm-- Back to School Seminar. Student Activities Building. For more information call 
Carol Smith, ext. 336. 



June 19, Thursday 

^"^•^° P^ T" ^^^^■^°.5^'^°°"' Seminar. Student Activities Building. For more information call 
Carol Smith, ext. 336. 



June 23, Monday 

2-4:30 pm — Continuing Education course "Mainstreaming: P.L. 94-142 and the Restrictive 
Environment ' Media 122. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, June 23-25. For more information 

^"97^ m" ^°"^^"^i"9 Education course "How to Succeed in College Math." Fee $20.00. Library 
276. Monday-Friday, June 23-27. For more information call ext. 422. 



June 24, Tuesday 
5-8 pm - Orientation. Library 268. For more information call Carol Smith, ext. 336. 
5-10 pm - Orientation. Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more infomiation call Carol Smith, ext. 336 
^'for^more'informati ^"°"^'"°^' meeting. Hodge Center 248. Contact Jerry Lehman, ext. 362 



1 







Vol. IV No. 32 



I. OFFICIAL 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS 



THE FACULTY/STAFF 4th of July Picnic will 
be held at the home of Alice and Don 
Henderson, 211 Brian Court, on Friday, July 
4th, from 4-10 p.m. Faculty and staff plan- 
ning to attend should bring a covered dish 
and drinks. Ice and tablewear will be pro- 
vided. People may also want to bring swim 
suits and fishing equipment for use in 
Hi 11 brook Lake. 

FROM BILL REITMEIER: Andrea Morrison, a 
candidate for Health and Physical Education 
Instructor/Women's Basketball Coach position, 
will be on campus Tuesday, July 1, 1980. 
She will be making a presentation on 
Community Health in M218, at 1:30 p.m. 
All Faculty and students are invited to 
attend. 

********************** 

THE NEXT ISSUE OF FYI will be distributed 
on Monday, August 4. Items to be published 
in this issue should be sent to Janella 
Koob, Information Services, by 5:00 p.m. 
on Thursday, July 31. 



************* 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 



********* 



IGRANT PROPOSAL SUBMITTED: A grant proposal 
entitled "Sunbelt International: A Series 
of Lectures/Symposia" for the sum of $3,360.00 
has been submitted to the S.C. Committee for 
the Humanities. The project involves bringing 
Alfred Kahn, Han Suyin, and Edward Breathwaite 
as guest speakers, with local citizens and 
faculty also involved in the project. This 
oroject is submitted through the Cultural 
Affairs Cormiittee. The project director is 
pecilia McDaniel Brown. 



ALL FACULTY are encouraged to send copies 
of correspondence from their alma mater's 
alumni association and/or athletic office • 
to Charles Stavely. 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION is planning a faculty 
and alumni party for Saturday, August 9. 
The format will follow that of Spring Sports 
Day and will include a challenge volleyball 
match between the Steve Billings 1976 in- 
famous Volleyball Team and the USCS faculty. 
The Billing's team will do almost anything 
to gain pocession of the 01 in B. Sansbury 
memorial volleyball trophy. Please make 
plans to attend this family affair. Further 
information will be forthcoming. 

USCS WILL SPONSOR A SOCCER CAMP during Aug. 
4-8, from 9:00-1:00 p.m. Participants should 
be from ages 6-16 and the fee is $20.00. 
Further information about registration 
may be obtained from Coach Frank Kohlenstein 
or Dr. John May. 

THE SPARTANBURG ARTS CENTER publishes a 
bi-monthly Spartanburg Arts Calendar which 
is mailed to approximately 8,000 families 
and distributed through the Chamber of 
Commerce and the Welcome Wagon. The deadline 
for listing September and October events is 
July 1. If you have planned or know of 
campus events which are firmly established 
for this period, please call the Office of 
Information Services immediately so that 
they may be included . Other deadlines for 
this calendar are November-December 1980, 
September 5; January-February 1981, November 
5; March-April, January 9; May-August 1981, 
March 5. 

SEVERAL MAJOR ANNOUNCEMENTS regarding the 
construction of a new building for the 
School of Nursing will be made Tuesday, July 
1, at a news conference which is scheduled 
for Room 217 of the Media Building at 2 p.m. 
Over the weekend, the Spartanburg Herald- 
Journal announced a $100,000 contribution 
to this project. 



Bulletin Board continued 



LEARN GERMAN IN GERMANY. Faculty members NOT 
teaching in the fields of German, modern 
languages, and literature, are eligible for 
grants for eight-week language courses at 
Goethe Institutes in Germany during the 
summer of 1981. The grants do not cover 
transportation, but cover tuition, room, 
partial board and a subsidy, all of which 
comes to a total of about $3,400. Anyone 
interested in such a possibility contact 
Jim Brown, L-236, Ext. 433. 

SCHOLAR-DIPLOMAT SEMINARS: The U.S. State 
Department runs a series of "Scholar-Diplomat 
Seminars" in which faculty members, par- 
ticularly younger Ph.D.s, spend a week in 
the State Department observing the foreign 
policy process and discussing current 
policy issues. A key element of the pro- 
gram is the assigning of each scholar to 
a host officer whose interest most nearly 
matches that of the scholar to a host 
officer whose interest most nearly matches 
that of the scholar. Some of the seminars 
focus on specific world areas, such as the 
Middle East, Europe, or East Asia, while 
others focus on topics, such as Politico- 
Military or Economic-Business. Most costs 
are covered by the State Department. For 
further information and tentative dates for 
the various 1980-81 seminars contact Jim 
Brown, L-236, Ext. 433. 

RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS IN INDIA: The Indo-U.S. 
Subcommission on Education Culture offers 
fellowships for research in India. The 
objective of the program is to draw into 
educational exchange individuals who are NOT 
Indian specialists but whose disciplinary or 
professional skills can be enhanced by the 
opportunity to carry out research in India. 
The awards are offered without restriction 
as to field, but 1 si ted areas of interest 
include the natural, applied, and social 
sciences, business, medicine, public health, 
and creative arts. (English is spoken in 
India.) The subcommission offers short-term 
awards for two to three months, or long-term 
awards for six to ten months. The stipends are 
generous and include transportation (but only 
long-term awards include money for dependents). 
The application deadline for 1981-82 has 
passed, but anyone interested in this type of 
opportunity should plan ahead for next year's 
competition. For additional information or to 
see the things requested on the application, 
contact Jim Brown, L-236, Ext. 433. 



TEACHING AND RESEARCH ABROAD: Various announce 
ments have appeared in FY I over the past year 
about teaching and research opportunities 
abroad. Though application deadlines for most 
of these have now passed, several points are 
worth making. Most of these opportunities are 
available each year, they are not only-once 
programs. Announcements of awards frequently 
come only relatively shortly before applications' 
are due, but deadline dates are usually the 
same from year to year, so it is wise to plan 
ahead and not wait for the official announce- 
ments to begin planning or preparing one's 
application. Further, applications are fre- 
quently required well in advance of the time 
one would actually go abroad. Fulbrights, for 
example--as discussed in the May 5 FYI--are 
not unusual in requiring applications in the 
spring for grants to be used in the fall of 
the following calendar year— some fifteen 
months later. Obviously, planning ahead is 
essential. In addition to the scholarly/dis- 
ciplinary advantages of teaching and/or re- 
search abroad, such opportunities provide an 
excellent means to expand one's horizons and 
to get to know another culture--and thus often 
one's own--better. And while such experiences 
are also enormously educational for one's 
children, they are generally not as disruptive 
of the children's formal education as commonly 
presumed. Anyone interested in further infor- 
mation or in seeing application forms for some 
of the programs contact Jim Brown, L-236, Ext. 
433. 

RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS IN GERMANY: The Deutscher 
Akademischer Austauschdienst (DAAD) awards 
grants to individual research projects in the 
Federal Republic of Germany and West Berlin 
lasting up to three months. Living, research, 
and local travel expenses are covered, but not 
international travel or dependents. The grants 
are open to scholars in all disciplines. 
Application deadlines are October 31, 1980 and 
January 31, 1981. For further information, 
including a sample application form, see Jim 
Brown, L-235, Ext. 433. 

DR. FRANK B. RAYMOND III, a native of Danville, 
Va., has been named dean of the College of 
Social Work at the University of South Carolina 
in Columbia. Raymond, who has served as acting 
dean of the college for the past year, was 
selected for the post after a national search 
and review of candidates. 



JULY 1980 
Calendar of Events 



F uESDAY, July 1 

1:30-2:30 -- Presentation by Andrea Morrison, candidate for USCS Women's Basketball Coach. 
Media 218. For more information contact Bill Reitmeier, ext. 379. 

HURSDAY, July 3 

3-5:30 pm -- Minority Affairs Advisory Committee meeting. Library 273. 



RiDAY. July 4 - INDEPENDENCE DAY HOLIDAY 



DNDAY^ July 7 - Last Day of Classes for Summer I 



JFSDAYi July 8 - Summer I Final Exams 
5-10 pm -- Orientation, Tukey Lecture Theatre. For more information contact Student Affairs. 
3-6 pm -- Graduate Registration. Media 217. 

iDNESDAY^ July 9 - Summer I Final Exams/End of first term of Summer Session 



11:15-1:00 pm -- Faculty Senate Meeting. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
8:00 pm -- USCS Softball team vs. Wofford at Berry Field. 



iURSDAYy July 10 - Registration for Summer II 
7:00 pm -- USCS Softball team vs. Milliken II at Brotherhood Field. 

?IDAY^ July 11 - summer II Classes Begin 

All Day - Orientation for Transient Students. Hodge Center 248. 
All Day - Advisement for Transient Students. Hodge Center 247 A-B. 
12-1:30 pm -- Area Psychologists Meeting. Student Activites Building. 



\TURDAY. 
8:15-12: 


July 12 - 

30 pm -- SAT Exam. Student Activities 


Building. 










)NDAY. J 


ULY m - Last 


day tc 


add a course or change a schedi 


jle 


for 


Surmier 


II. 


IDNESDAY 
7:00 pm 


. July 16 

-- uses Softball 


team 


vs. 


Covenent Methodist at Berry 


Fie 


Id. 






lURSDAY, 
8:00 pm 


July 17 

-- uses Softball 


team 


vs. 


Krispy Kreme 


; at Brotherhood 


Fie 


Id. 






)NDAY, July 21 - Last 


day to 


drop a course without academic 


penalty 


for Si 


jmmer II. 


;dnesday 

8:00 pm 


, July 23 

- uses Softball 


team 


vs. 


Milliken II 


at Berry Field. 










tURSDAY. 


July 24 


team 


vs. 


Spartanburg 


Tech at Brotherhood 


Fie 


Id. 




6:00 pm 


-- uses Softball 







Vol. IV No. 33 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS Monday, August 



I. OFFICIAL 

SAUDI STUDENTS: For anyone not yet aware of 
it there are 32 Saudi Arabians on our campus 
for a six-week Continuing Education Institute. 
They are staying at the Regency Motel and 
will be here through the end of August. They 
are here especially to improve their 
English, and they want to have interaction 
with our students and faculty. The super- 
visor for the group, Mr. Mohammed Al-Ateiq, 
speaks good English and is willing to speak 
to classes. Anyone who would like to have 
him speak in a summer session II class, or 
who might like to make a video tape for 
future use, please contact Jim Brown, L-236, 
ext. 433. 

FROM CON HENDERSON: The following are the 
advances the SCSEA has helped produce for 
1980. USCS faculty and staff should give 
special attention to items six and eight 
and make sure they are credited accordingly. 

1. Cost-of-living raise of 7%. 

2. Merit increments of 3.5% average. 

3. Longevity increases of 5%. 

4. An additional 2% for retirees to again 
provide a 6% increase from State Retirement. 

5. Full payment of health insurance pre- 
miums for retirees which means approximately 
$17 more per month for those enrolled now, 
or in the future, in the program. 

6. Increased mileage reimbursement to 20 
cents per mile. 

7. Establishment of a retirement cost-of- 
living fund to pay for retiree cost-of-living 
increases to about the year 2000. 

8. Passage of legislation to excuse state 
employees for work missed because of bad 
weather on February 6, 7 and March 3, 4. 

****■*•■*•■*•**■*•**•*■*****■*■■*■* 

FVI mil KUu/m lt6 fKigaloA. 6akzduLz on 
Monday, AuguAt 25. Any iZzm^ ion. pubticcvtion 
on tkn 25th should be ^e^t to JanelZa Koob 
by 5:00 on AagiUt 11. ^yi lt> pubtl{>h&.d dack 
Monday du/ving tkz fizguZoA. acadzmic yzat. 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 

FREE FILMS: In planning fall semester classes, 
you are reminded that if you can use films 
on Asia and Africa, there are free films 
available through the South Atlantic States 
Association for Asian and African Studies 
(SASASAAS). Catalogues are available 
from Jane Bradley (M134) and Jim Brown (L236) 

A REMINDER TO ALL ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENTS: 
First priority work in the Word Processing 
Center remains the preparation of classroom 
work for faculty. It is anticipated that 
this workload will be extremely heavy 
during the class syllabus typing season, 
August 17-August 29. Additional temporary 
help has been arranged during this period 
so that hopefully all faculty deadlines will 
be met. However, it may not be possible to 
do non-academic work such as fliers or other 
promotional materials during this period. 
Therefore, all administrative offices who 
anticipate needing such materials before 
September 7 whould submit their requests 
to Jan Caldwell in the WPC as soon as possible. 

THE CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER will again spon- 
sor a After-School Enrichment Program which 
will include after-school pick-up, snacks 
and planned activities. The fee will be $15. 
a week and (there is no charge) for people 
with a demonstrated financial need. Contact 
the CDC at ext. 318,319 if interested. 

TUTORING LABORATORY - All Deans, Department 
Chairpersons, and Faculty are asked to help 
in referring academically talented students 
to work in the Tutoring Lab for 1980-81 
school year. There are openings for tutors 
in math, English, business, accounting; and 
one graduate assistantship in math or 
English. Refer interested students to Jane 
Davisson, Director, Developmental Studies. 



BULLETIN BOARD (continued ) 

COOPER LIBRARY in Columbia is able to search 
a wide variety of data bases in the DIALG 
system by computer, and this service is 
available to USCS faculty and students. 
In order to use the service, it is necessary 
to call Mike Haevener (4866) in Columbia 
to schedule an appointment with a librarian. 
After the search is run, the information will 
be mailed to the user; it will not be 
available the same day the user goes to 
Columbia. Fees charged are based on the 
cost per hour of a particular data base, the 
telephone connect charge, and the number of 
citations listed. If you have questions 
about the computer searches, please call 
Valerie Burnie or Ellenor McCaughrin (410 
or 411) in the library. 

GRANT PROPOSAL SUBMITTED: USCS has submitted 
an application entitled "Appalachian Program 
for Academically Talented Juniors" to the 
Appalachian Regional Coimiission requesting 
$24,189. The proposed project will involve 
a summer program for 50 academically talented 
students who have completed their junior year 
in high school. Career guidance, college- 
credit courses and individual academic diaa- 
nosis will be provided. Program Coordinator: 
Dr. John May, Director of Continuing Edu- 
cation. 

GRANT AWARDED: USCS has received a grant 
for $73,100 from the S.C. Department of 
Social Services to operate the Child 
Development Center next year. Project 
Director: Mrs. Heidi From. Congratulations, 
Mrs. From! 

ALL FACULTY AND STAFF: Mr. Michael Zabarac, 
Service Manager at Boyce Ransom Ford, Inc., 
has announced that a 25% discount will be 
given on all parts purchased from their 
Parts Department. 

GRANT AWARDED: USCS has received a graont 
of $70,876 from the Department of Education 
to continue the Piedmont Area Talent Search 
project. The purpose of the project is to 
aid 1,000 Piedmont youth of financial and 
cultural need and academic potential in 
the completion of their secondary education, 
in gaining admission to postsecondary 
education, and/or in the completion of their 
postsecondary education. Principal Investi- 
gator: Dr. Jane Davisson, Director of 
Developmental Studies. Congragulations, Dr. 
Davisson! 



THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS ARE NOW AVAILABLE 
AT USCS. USCS is a coeducationa, senior 
college, and a unit of the University System 
of South Carolina. Interested persons should 
contact the Personnel Office for more 
information concerning these positions. 
-- Teacher's Aid/Cook's Helper - CETA positi 

(must qualify through Job Service) 
— KEY and PEO Operator 11; Application dead! 

August 6. 
--Secretary I; Application deadline, August 
--Tutorial Lab Manager - CETA position (must 

qualify through Job Service.) 
--English Classroom Teacher - CETA position 
(must qualify through Job Service.) 
--Reading Classroom Teacher - CETA position 

(must qualify through Job Service) 
--Clerk Steno - CETA position (must qualify 

through Job Service.) 

NOMINATIONS AND APPLICATIONS are invited for 
the newly vacant position of Vice President 
for Academic Affairs at the Georgia Institue 
of Technology, an institution of the 
University System of Georgia. More informatii 
concerning this position may be obtained 
from Janella Koob in the Office of Informatii 
Services. 

III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

TO THE USCS FACULTY AND STAFF: I would like 
to express sincere thanks to my many friends 
here at USCS for the many cards, flowers, 
and words of comfort during my recent loss. 

Mrs. Mattie Booker 

Custodian-Administration Bldg. 

STEPHEN FENDLEY thanks everyone at USCS for 
the cards, flowers and get well wishes durin^ 
his recent stay at Spartanburg General 
Hospital . 

EB BARNES will be demonstrating vegetable 
dyeing at the Uth Annual Foothills Festival 
on August 16 and 17 at the Old Market Square 
in Easley, SC. Maggie Barnes will be 
exhibiting weaving during the show. 

MICHAEL DRESSMAN guest lectured at Wofford 
College on July 21. He spoke to Dr. Harris 
Chewning's graduate seminar for teachers 
of Advanced Placement English courses. 



RONALD EAGLIN, son of Dr. and Mrs. Ronald 
Eaglin of 240 Heathwood Drive, has re- 
ceived the Rensselaer Medal from Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute. The award is given 
to high school students for outstanding 
achievements in the study of mathematics 
and science during their junior year. 



ED WHITE, School of Education, will be working 
as a consultant to Delta Education (Nashua, 
N.H.) in their effort to have their Elementary 
Science Program adopted in the Commonwealth 
of Virginia. Ed also recently attended an NSF 
Project Director's Meeting (Washington) in 
conjunction with the Palmetto Middle/Junior 
High School Science Project just awarded at 

uses. 



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA AT SPARTANBURG 

Faculty Schedule 
August 25-29, 1980 



August 25, V. 



August 26, 1980 



9:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m. 



9:00 a.m. 



August 27, 1980 



August 28, 1980 



8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

10:00 a.m. -12:00 p.m. 

8:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. -7:00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 

August 29, 1980 9:00 a.m. -11:00 a.m. 



11:00 a.m. -3:00 p.m. 



September 1, 1980 
September 2, 1980 



Faculty In-Service 

Individual School and 
Division Meetings 



Student Advisement 

New Faculty Orientation 

Student Advisement 

Registration 

Part-time Faculty 
Orientation 

Workshop on Faculty 
Evaluation Procedures 

Optional Faculty 
Workshop 

Holiday 

Classes Begin - Late 
Registration 



Tukey Auditorium 
Library Building 

School of Business 
Administration - Media 
Building - Room 321 

School of Education - Dr. 
Eleanor Ladd's Home - 
Mill Springs, N.C. 

School of Humanities and 
Sciences - Tukey 
Auditorium 

School of Nursing - Hodge 
Center - Room 248 

Individual Faculty Office 

Library Building - Rm 259 

Individual Faculty Office 

Hodge Center 

Library Building -Rm 255 

Tukey Auditorium 

TBA 



The General Assembly approved several amendments to the Retirement Act 
during the 1980 Session. 

Amendments effective July 1, 1980 applicable to members of the South 
Carolina Retirement System and the Policy Officers Retirement System 
include: 

1. an increased earnings limitation for retired members who 
return to covered employment from $4,500. to $5,000. in 
a fiscal year; and, 

2. free coverage for eligible retirees under the Group Health 
Insurance (Blue Cross/Blue Shield) Program for retired 
employees of the State and School Districts. Premiums 
will be charged only for dependent coverage. 

Amendments effecting the Policy Officers Retirement System include: 

1. the elimination of overtime and other special pay in average 
final salary calculations for retirement benefits. Average 
final compensation is now defined as remuneration paid to an 
employee for normal working time plus an amount up to and 
including forty-five days termination pay for unused annual 
leave; and, 

2. the elimination of the five year service requirement for 
disability retirement, if the disability results from an 
injury incurred in the line of duty, is total, and likely 
to be permanent. 



Effective May 1, 1980, the Major Medical maximum was increased from 
$50,000. to a $250,000. life-time benefit. 

Benefit changes effective July 1, 1980 include the addition of: 

1. chiropractic care in accordance with the new state law; and, 

2. provision for out-of-state treatment for Alcholism in JCAH 
approved hospitals. 

Claims payment changes which have been implemented are: 

1. the Inclusion of payment for Speech Therapy when medically 
necessary; 

2. increasing the outpatient psychiatric care maximum limit 
from $640. to $800. per member; and, 

3. the payment of allergy scratch tests under the Outpatient 
Diagnostic Provision. 



On July 2, 1980, a new voluntary benefit program for South Carolina 
I'ubllc employees was announced, "Tlie South Carolina Deferred Compen- 
sation Plan". 

The purpose of this program is to give public employees the opportunity 
to save and invest a portion of their before tax earnings. Two options 
are now available: (1) a Guaranteed Annuity Contract underwritten by 
the Great West Life Insurance Company of Winnipeg, Canada; and, 
(2) a Survivor's Salary Continuation Benefit underwritten by the Life 
Insurance Company of Topeka, Kansas. 

Iliis program will be administered under the direction of the South 
Carolina Public Employee Deferred Compensation Commission. They have 
designated the Public Employees Benefit Services Corporation (PEBSCO) 
as its plan administrator. PEBSCO has the responsibility to explain 
this program, answer questions, and assist employees in enrolling. 

PEBSCO will work with each State agency to arrange group meetings at 
which representatives can outline the program and answer questions. 
All University employees will be notified as soon as meetings can be 
scheduled by PEBSCO. 



I^* 



iff 





DON'T FORGET! 



uses Alumni and Faculty Summer Picnic 

Saturday, August 9, 1980 

11:30-5:30 




' "00, Ext. 203 



uses 

Spartanburg, SC 29303 



.^-'^ 



l^ 



It^' 



__.^ v^ 






ciAL EDITION £H63 A Newslotter For The Faculty Of USCS August 19, 



"he Chancellor has requested that all faculty review this special report of the Board of 
"rustees meeting in Columbia, August 12, 1980. 

The use Board of Trustees met in Columbia, Tuesday, August 12, 1980. At this meeting 
;he Board approved the creation of a Center for Child and Family Studies to be operated 
n the College of General Studies on the Columbia campus. This will be an administrative 
mit to coordinate activities which currently exist in the College of General Studies. 
t will address itself to the investigation of various influences on family and the 
irovision of services related to the findings of these studies. The Governor has 
ixpressed considerable interest in this project. 

The Board also passed a proposal extending the probationary period for Columbia 
'acuity appointed at the rank of associate professor and professor. The probationary 
leriod for both will now be six years. This action affects tenure only at the Columbia 
:ampus. Additional action on grievance policies for the two and four year campuses 
/as delayed until the September 13 meeting of the Board. 

An affiliation agreement between the USC Medical School and the Greenville 
lospital System was approved by the Trustees, as well as the creation of study 
:ommittees to review Trustees by-laws and the general policy on naming buildings, 
lowever, the Trustees did agree to name the Federal Building the James F. Byrnes 
nternational Center. 

In the President's report, Dr. Holderman presented the Formula Budget Request 
•ubmitted to CHE on August 4. Attached are three sheets showing the budgets for 
■.he University and for other elements of higher education. In his presentation to 
•HE, Dr. Holderman stressed the tremendous difference that is developing between South 
Carolina and other Southeastern states in terms of tuition and fees charged our students, 
he Commission appeared to respond positively to this concern. However, the Commission 
ixpressed reservations about the number of new positions requested. The breakdown on 
■.he new positions requested included: 



Columbia 


120 


Medical School 


4 


Ai ken 


17 


Coastal 


15 


Spartanburg 


18 


Beaufort 


4 


Lancaster 


12 


Salkehatchie 


8 


Sumter 


3 


Union 


3 



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Vol. V No. 1 



A Newslefter For The Faculty Of USCS 



August 25, 1^80 



OFFICIAL 

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION is the topic of 
today's in-service. The speaker, Robert 
Black, is the Project Director of the Edu- 
cation and the World View Project of the 
Council on Learning. A special issue of 
C hange magazine has recently been published 
by the Project. Limited numbers of the 
issue are available in each school/division 
office for those who are interested in 
reading it. If you do not wish to keep a 
copy for your permanent collection, please 
return it to the school/division office 
for the use of others. For additional 
copies, contact Jim Brown, ext. 433, L-236. 

INTERNATIONAL COURSES . Attached to this 
issue of FYI you will find a list of 
courses that "by definition" are interna- 
tional in content and that are among the 
Fall '80 course offerings. (This list 
does not include the offerings in French, 
German, & Spanish, which will be found 
together in the schedule.) The list may 
be of use in advising students this week. 

ALL FACULTY, from Jimmy Dawkins, Computer 
Room: In order to schedule student work- 
ers' hours to coincide with the student 
demand for access to and assistance in 
the computer room for Fall semester, it 
will be necessary for all instructors of 
courses requiring the use of the computer 
facilities to supply us with a copy of the 
course syllabus and a schedule of antici- 
pated program assignments. 
Please advise your classes that beginning 
September 8^ 1980, the computer room will 
be open from 8:30 am- 10; 00 pm, Monday 
through Thursday, 8:30 am-5:00 pm on Friday 
and 9:00 am-l:00 pm on Saturday. Also, 
batch runs will be every 30 minutes. 
Thank you! 



BzginnA.ng with thl& Z^^ae., Vyi and USCS--lhAJ> 

Weefe, mIZ be, pubtUhzd on a iMte.kly bcUs-U 
{iMXh the. e-xczptlon o{, -i,orm holiday pe/Ucd^} 
thtoaghoat thz acjidemlc yzoA. ¥VJ -c6 pab- 
LLdheA on FAAxLay, theAe.{iOfL^ matoAJjit mait be 
6ubrrUtte.d by 5:00 p.m. on Thu/uday {^ofi the. 
{^oZZoWAjiQ Mondny'^ z.dAjyion. McuteAAXiI. 6houZd 
be. submitted -in the {,onjm you M<j>h tt to 
appe.aA. Jtejf>u> should be. iznt to JaneZla. Koob, 
InionmaXlon SeAvtceJ>. Vacuity and 4;tai^^ a/ie. 
uAgtd to iabmtt. nejM of^ theJji pn.o ie^^-ional 
actLvAJU.eA cti uiell. a6 tt:ejn6 o{i an olltcJjxl. 
natu/LZ. 

BULLETIN BOARD 

IBM HAS DONATED four dual trace oscilloscopes 
to psychology through arrangements made by 
Mr. Chuck Wuest, a student at USCS and 
employee of IBM. Any faculty who may desire 
to use these instruments should see Evan 
Krauter. 

PASTEL DRAWINGS by Claire Hopkins will be 
featured during the September Art Exhibit at 
USCS. The exhibit will open with a reception 
on Sunday, Sept. 7, in the Library Art Gallery 
from 2-3 pm. The exhibit itself will remain 
on display throughout the month of September. 
Everyone is welcome to attend the opening 
reception. 

DRS. EZELL & PACK, Optometrists, P. A. has 
initiated a group vision program for public 
service employees and teachers. His office 
is offering a professional courtesy discount 
to the Teachers in the Spartanburg area, at 
a saving of 20% of professional services and 
optical materials. If you are interested in 
the program drop by his office on 399 E. 
Henry Street, Spartanburg and pick up a 
vision card and additional information. 



GRANT AWARDED: USCS has received $3,460 
from the South Carolina Comnittee for the 
Humanities for a project entitled "Sunbelt 
International: A Series of Lectures/ 
Symposia." 

Planned by the USCS Cultural Affairs Com- 
mittee, the lectures/symposia will feature 
name speakers: Alfred Kahn, Han Suyin, and 
Edward Brathwaite. Project Director: 
Cecilia McDaniel Brown. 

GRANT PROPOSALS SUBMITTED: 1) A proposed 
project entitled "Perinatal Update for the 
Grass Roots Nurse" has been submitted to 
the Public Health Service requesting 
$13,687 for the conduct of six continuing 
education workshops for nurses. Project 
Director: Addie Kloepper, School of 
Nursing. 
2) A request for $43,037 has been sub- 
mitted to the Appalachian Regional Commis- 
sion for furnishings and equipment for the 
new School of Nursing building. Principal 
Investigator: Cecilia Cogdell, Dean, School 
of Nursing, 

FROM ANDY CROSLAND: Computer Services in 
Columbia has a group of short, computer- 
related courses on video tape. Any faculty 
or staff member wishing to take one can 
have it sent to USCS. Tapes are available on 
the following topics: Data Processing 
Concepts; Introduction to Computer Systems; 
Introduction to JCL; Computer Programming 
Fundamentals; MVS Environment Part I - 
Virtual; MVS Environment Part II - MVS & 
JES2; MVS/JES2 for Operators; Advanced 
MVS/JES2 for Operators; JCL; Structured 
Cobol ; Assembler Language Programming; 
Introduction to TSO; TSO/SPF; CICS Com- 
mand Level Programming; VSAM; MVS/SVS 
Debugging; MVS Dumps (JES2); Direct 
Access Storage Devices (DASD); Communi- 
cations Systems Concepts; Async & Bisync 
Concepts for Programmers; Structured 
Design Series; Structured Analysis; IMS 
Concepts & Facilities; IMS DL/1 Segment 
Retrieval Coding; IMS Data Base Manipu- 
lation; IMS Teleprocessing Programming; 
IMS Design Techniques; IMS/VS Enhancements; 
IMS/MFS. Andy Crosland (ext. 404) has a 
catalog of these offerings. If you are 
interested in viewing any of the tapes, please 
contact him. 



FROM USCS PERSONNEL: Prudential Group Life 
Insurance Changes Effective September 1, 
1980: The amounts of the Prudential Group 
Term Life Insurance will increase from a 
maximum of $100,000 to $150,000 and (9) 
earnings classes will be added to the schedtj 
of amounts. The University Insurance and 
Annuity Committee, with the approval of the 
President, will use dividends to n"°et the 
cost of the increased maximum benefits. 
Participants will receive a rider to attach 
to their certificate reflecting the increase 
amount of insurance. 
Prudential premium changes due to salary 
increases and the new earnings classes will 
be reflected in the August 15 paycheck for 
other than nine (9) month employees and in 
the August 31 paycheck for all nine (9) 
month employees. 

FROM USCS PERSONNEL: Positions Available. 

1) Student Counselor I. Salary: Grade 
22; Salary range $11,045-$15,655. Applicatic 
deadline: August 27, 1980. 

2) Clerk III. Salary: Grade 15; Salary 
range $8,394-$ll,897. Application deadline: 
August 27, 1980. 

For more information about these positions 
contact USCS Personnel Office. 

NOTES 

EVAN KRAUTER AND TWO FORMER COLLEAGUES rec- 
ently have had three papers accepted for 
publ ication: 

Krauter, E.E., Wallace, J.E., and Campbell, 
B.A. Sensory-motor function in the aging ral 
Behavioral and Neural Biology , in press. 

Wallace, J.E., Krauter, E.E. and Campbell, 
B.A. Animal models of declining memory in 
the aged: short-term and spatial memory in 
the aged rat. Journal of Gerontology , 1980, 
35, 355-363. 

Wallace, J.E., Krauter, E.E. and Campbell, 
B.A. Motor and reflexive behavior in the 
aging rat. Journal of Gerontology , 1980, 35 , 
364-370. 

The data for these reports were collected a 
Princeton University and the papers were 
written primarily at the University of 
Northern Iowa (Jill Wallace) and at USCS. 

DR. JEANNE STUART, Biology, has been elected 

Vice President of the Board of Directors for 

the American Cancer Society of Spartanburg 
County. 



EARL GORDON addressed the staff of the R.D. GEORGE LABANICK (Biology) attended the joint 
Anderson and Daniel Morgan Vocational Cen- annual meeting of the Society for the Study 
ters at their opening of school for the of Amphibians and Reptiles and the Her- 
1980-81 school year. The address was made petologists' League, August 7-9, in Mil- 
August 18, 1980. Earl also conducted a waukee, 'Wisconsin, and presented "Inheritance 
workshop on August 19, for Greenville of the Red Cheeked and Red-Legged Traits in 
County Schools ESAA Program, which is the Salamander Desmognathus ochrophaeus ". 
under the supervision of Carol L. Fisher. 

CATHERINE TALLEY, Acting Director of the 
Baccalaureate Nursing Program, and her 
husband Scott are the PROUD PARENTS of 
Michael Thomas born July 23. Michael 
weighed 101 bs, 4 oz. and was 22" long. 
Both parents and baby are doing well] 



INTEKtJATIONAL COURSES 
uses, FALL 1980 



COURSE NO/SEC. 



COURSE TITLE 



ANTH W 102 101 UNDERSTAND OTHER CULT. 



ARTH W 106 001 
ARTH W 106 101 



BADM W 452 101 



ECON W 503 101 



SEGL W 400 001 
SEGL W 411 001 



HIST OF WESTERN ART 
HIST OF WESTERN ART 



CRED. 



PLACE 



TIME 



ANTHROPOLOGY 

"3 LIB. 266 TTH 8:20-9:35pin 

ART HISTORY 



ADM. 209 
ADM. 209 



TTH 9: 25-10 :40am 
MW 5:30- 6:45pm 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
INTERNATIONAL MARKETING 3 MED. 320 TTH 8:20- 9:35pin 

ECONOMICS 



INTERNATIONAL EDONOMICS 3 MED. 319 

ENGLISH 



SURVEY-EARLY ENGLISH LIT 3 
ENGLISH LIT 1660-1800 3 



MW 



LIB. 263 M^^^F 11 : 30-12: 20pm 
LIB. 267 TTH 9:25-10:40am 



PROFESSOR 



BERMAN 



LINDSAY 
LINDSAY 



MCLAUGHLIN 



5:30- 6:45pm JILLING 



DAVIDSON 
KNIGHT 



GEOGRAPHY 



GEOG W 121 001 
GEOG W 121 101 
GEOG W 121L001 
GEOG W 121L101 



SGIS 


W 


210 


101 


GINT 


W 


315 


001 


GINT 


W 


340 


001 


HIST 


W 


101 


002 


HIST 


W 


101 


003 


HIST 


W 


101 


004 


HIST 


W 


101 


101 


HIST 


w 


106 


001 


SHST 


w 


111 


001 


SHST 


w 


111 


101 


SHST 


w 


112 


001 


SHST 


w 


112 


002 


HIST 


w 


322 


001 


HIST 


w 


556 


001 



PRIN OF REGIONAL GEOG 
PRIN OF REGIONAL GEOG 
PRIN OF REG. GEOG LAB 
PRIN OF REG. GEOG LAB 



LIB. 261 
LIB. 259 
LIB. 265 
LIB. 259 



MWF 
TTH 
T 
W 



GOVERNMENT AND INTERNATIONAL 



US AND WORLD PROB. 3 ADM. 325 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 3 LIB. 265 

CONDUCT US FOREIGN POL. 3 LIB. 263 

HISTORY 

INTRO TO EUROPEAN CIVIL 3 LIB. 266 

INTRO TO EUROPEAN CIVIL 3 LIB. 266 

INTRO TO EUROPEAN CIVIL 3 LIB, 266 

INTRO TO EUROPEAN CIVIL 3 LIB. 265 

INTRO TO AFRICAN HISTORY 3 LIB. 267 

INTRO TO WESTERN CIVIL 3 LIB. 266 

INTRO TO WESTERN CIVIL 3 LIB. 267 

INTRO TO NON-WESTERN CIV. 3 LIB. 266 

INTRO TO NON-WESTERN CIV. 3 LIB. 267 

CONTEMPORARY EUROPE 3 LIB. 265 

ENGLAND AGE OF REVOL. 3 LIB. 266 



Ml^ 

MWF 

MWF 



10:30-ll:20am 
6:55- 8:10pm 
1:40- 3:40pm 
7:00- 9:00pm 



5:30- 6:45pm 

8:30- 9:20am 

10: 30-1 1:20am 



MWF 11:30- 
TTH 8:00- 
TTH 12:15- 



TTH 

M^^fF 
TTH 



5:30- 
8:00- 
8:30- 
5:30- 



MWF 10:30- 

MWF 8:30- 

MWF 11:30- 

M[^FF 9 : 30- 



12:20pm 
9:15am 
1 : 30pm 
6:45pm 
9:15am 
9:20am 
6:45pm 

11:20am 
9:20am 

12:20pm 

10:20am 



BAB IN 
BABIN 
BABIN 
BABIN 



SANSBURY 

HENDERSON 

HENDERSON 



BROWN 
WILSON 
WILSON 
HOL COMBE 

BROvra 

HENDERSON 

HENDERSON 

WILSON 

WILSON 

HENDERSON 

HOLCOMBE 



(See the fall schedule for the FRENCH, GER^IAN, & SPANISH offerings.) 



uses- -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, AUGUST 25 — SUNDAY, AUGUST 31, 1980 



MONDAY, August 25 

Priority drop/add day for paid CAR participants only - H.C. Gym 
9:00-4:00 pm -- Faculty In-Service . Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
5:00-8:00 pm -- Orientation . L268. 
5:00-10:00 pm -- Orientation. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 



TUESDAY, August 26 
9:00 am -- Individual School Division Meetings . 

6:30-9:00 pm -- Parents Anonymous Meeting . HC248. Contact person - Jerry Lehman. 
7:30-9:00 pm -- Piano Tunning . Continuing Education course. A209. Contact person - John May. 



WEDNESDAY, August 27 
8:00-7:00 pm -- Nursing Advisement . HC247. 
8:30-5:00 pm - Student Advisement . 
10:00-12 noon -- New Faculty Orientation. L259. 



THURSDAY, August 28 

30-12 noon -- Student Advisement. HC247 A&B. 



30-12:30 pm -- Student Teaching Seminar. M217. Contact person - Bill Reitmeier. 

00-7:00 pm -- Registration. Gym, 

00-9:00 pm -- 70,001 Graduation exercises. Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact person - Jan Yost. 



FRIDAY. August 29 
9:00-11:00 am -- Workshop on Faculty Evaluation Procedures. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
11:00-3:00 pm — Optional Faculty Workshop . Place/TBA. 



SATURDAY, August 30 
Volleyball Camp, all day. Gym. 







Vol . V No 2 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS 



September 2 1980 



I. OFFICIAL 

ALL PUBLICATIONS and advertisements which are 
designed to attract students or employees 
must carry an affirmative action statement. 
The suggested statement is: The University 
of South Carolina at Spartanburg is committed 
to a policy of affirmative action which 
assures equal opportunity in education and 
employment to all qualified persons regardless 
of race, sex, religion, credd, handicap, disa- 
bility, veteran status, national origin or 
ancestry. 

THE FOURTH ANNUAL CAMPING TRIP to Hunting 
Island is scheduled for October 3-5, 1980. 
For further information call Nancy Moore 
ext. 408, Lawrence Moore, ext. 255 or 
Jeanne Stuart, ext. 253. 

THE S.C. STATE PERSONNEL DIVISION, Training 
and Development Unit, is sponsoring train- 
ing programs each month for state employees. 
Listed below is a list of programs to be 
held throughout the state during the month 
of September. Interested University employees 
should contact the USC Personnel Training 
Office in Columbia (6578) for further infor- 
iTiation. 
--9/4-5 Motivating the Underachieving 

Employee - Columbia. 
-9/4-5 Human Relations - Charleston. 
--9/9-10 Fundamentals of Long Range Planning 

- Columbia. 
-9/15-16 Advance Business Writing - Green- 
ville. 
-9/16&16 -- Building an Effective Work Group 

Charleston. 
-9/15-19 Systems Design and Analysis -Colum- 
bia. 
-9/18&19 Human Relations - Columbia. 
-9/24&25 Flowcharing for State Auditors - 

Columbia. 
-9/24&25 Women in Management - Columbia. 
-9/29&30 Performance Appraisal - Columbia. 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 

FROM TOM ALLEN: The USCS faculty-staff soft- 
ball team completed its fifth season of play 
in the Twilight Softball League. USCS 
finished 10-10 overall. The highlight of an 
otherwise struggling season was a runnerup 
finish in the league championship tourney. 

This year's batting crown goes to Ron 
Romine who led the team in several offensive 
categories: average (.676), slugging per- 
centage (1.059), and home runs (4). Sam 
Sloan and Eber Blackwood led the team in 
runs batted in with 23 each. Al Gray was tops 
in extra bases with a total of 22. In addition 
several other players had excellent offen- 
sive seasons earning batting averages above 
the .500 mark: M.B. Ulmer (.600), Bill 
Reitmeier (.563), and Gene Hutsell (.545). 

The defensive golden glove goes to Jerry 
Baker. Jerry completed the season with a 
.952 mark in 62 chances. 

Tournament MVP honors are shared by Jerry 
Baker and Bill Reitmeier. Bill batted .640 
during seven games, this includes 10 RBI's 
and 9 doubles. Jerry played to a .545 
average and a team high of 12 RBI's. Likewise 
both contributed some outstanding defensive 
plays during that tourney. M.B. Ulmer de- 
serves kudos for his team high B.A. of .667 
including the game winning hit that put USCS 
in the championship game. 

We are looking forward to next season's 
play when the league expands to sixteen 
teams--doubling its present size. Moreover, 
next year's league winners will qualify for 
the first time for city and statewide 
championship competition. 

JAPANESE MOVIES: For the next three Sundays, 
beginning September 7th, outstanding Japa- 
nese movies will be shown on ETV (Channel 29) 
at 11:30 a.m. The first of these will be 
"Pilgrimage of a Thousand Days," It will last 
90 minutes and will be shown in Japanese 
with English sub-titles. 



INTERNATIONAL NEWS: Those interested in re- 
ports and analysis of events around the 
world should be aware of the magazine World 
Press Review: News & Views from the 
Foreign Press, which is available in the USCS 
library. The current issue will be found 
with other periodicals in the "soft-chair" 
section of the library, with back issues 
on the periodical shelves. The magazine is 
not just a selection of "news" stories, 
but includes major articles from both 
magazines and newspapers/as well as columns 
by a World Press Review staff member for 
each major world geo-political area, dis- 
cussing the past month in the press of 
that region. Nor is the focus exclusively 
political. The current issue contains 
shorter pieces on such topics as the arts, 
medicine and health, the environment, and 
business, along with mejor articles on the 
Caribbean, Iran, South Africa, the selling 
of DNA, Reagan (written by a South Asian), 
and an interview with Jean-Louis Servan- 
Schreiber on the post-political era. 

ALLIANCE FRANCAISE: A new year has begun 
for the Alliance Francaise du Piedmont. 
The Alliance's purpose are to encourage 
interest in French culture, its history, 
the language and closer ties with the 
people of France. A knowledge of the 
French language is not required, and all 
are welcome to join or to visit. This is 
an easy and painless way to increase one's 
contacts with those from another culture, 
or to brush up on one's French. They 
usually have one meeting a month. The first 
meeting of the year will be a wine & 
cheese party, Saturday, 13 September, 
8:00 pm in the auditorium of the Arts 
Center, 385 S. Spring Street. Membership 
costs are: family, $16; individual, $10; 
student, $5. For further information con- 
tact Jim Brown, L236, ext. 433, or Regis 
Robe, L230, ext. 430. 

COOPER LIBRARY IN Columbia is able to search 
a wide variety of data bases in the DIALG 
system by computer, and this service is 
available to USCS faculty and students. In 
order to use the service, it is necessary 
to call Mike Haevener (4866) in Columbia to 
schedule an appointment with a librarian. 
After the search is run, the information will 
be mailed to the user; it will not be avail- 
able the same day the user goes to Columbia. 
Fees charged are based on the cost per hour 
of a particular data base, the telephone 



connect charge, and the number of citations 
listed. If you have questions about the compute] 
searches, please call Valerie Burnie or Ellenor 
McCaughrin (410 or 411) in the library. 

ALL FACULTY, from Jimmy Dawkins, Computer Room: 
In order to schedule student workers' hours to 
coincide with the student demand for access to 
and assistance in the computer room for Fall 
semester, it will be necessary for all in- 
structors of courses requiring the use of the 
computer facilities to supply us with a copy 
of the course syllabus and a schedule of 
anticipated program assignments. 

Please advise your classes that beginning 
September 8, 1980, the computer room will be 
open from 8:30 am-10:00 pm, Monday through 
Thursday, 8:30 am-5:00 pm on Friday and 9:00 
am-l:00 pm on Saturday. Also, batch runs will 
be every 30 minutes. Thank you! 

III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

BERT MENEES attended an Advanced Programming 
Class in BASIC sponsored by IBM, Customer 
Support Center in Columbia, S,C. on August 20. 

DR. ROBERT TOWELL, Lecturer in Psychology, 
USCS, and in private practice has been invited 
to deliver a paper entitled "The Use of 
Biofeedback in the Diagnosis, Monitoring and 
Treatment of Anxiety in Patients with Sexual 
Dysfunction," to the Sixth International 
Congress of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and 
Gynecology in West Berlin, Germany, Sept. 5th. 
Dr. Towel 1 has authored seven chapters in 
various books regarding his research and treats 
ment of anxiety and stress in marriages and 
the family unit as well as sexual dysfunction. 

BRYAN LINDSAY enjoyed a rather busy back-to- i 
school schedule in early August: he flew to I 
Pensacola, Florida, to deliver the keynote 
to the Escambia County Teachers of English, 
then drove to Belton-Honea Path, Edisto 
(Orangeburg District 4) and Lexington District 
2 to conduct workshops on articulating gifted 
/mainstream programs as well as making 
motivational speeches to the faculties and 
staffs in those districts. 

TOM ALLEN recently participated in a workshop 
on the teaching of ethics for professionals at 
Vassar College, July 13-^0. The workshop was 
sponsored by the Hastings Center, the Insti- 
tute of Society, Ethics, and the Life Sciences, 

A principal feature of the workshop was the 
diversity of backgrounds among the participants, 

(continued) 



Educators in nursing, law, business RONALD SOBCZAK had an article published in 

adimm strati on, and philosophy were joined the German publication Zeitschr ift fur 

by professionals from health care insti- Kristallographie . The article "Towards the 

tuitons, the military, corporate management, synthesis of dodecahedrane" was written and 

law, and the federal government. submitted by Ron and Leo A. Paquette. 

MICHAEL DRESSMAN published an article, 
"Goodrich's Geography and Whitman's Place 
Names," in the Walt Whitman Review for 
June 1980. 



FIFTY MINUTES: A NEW ONE-CREDIT COURSE ON WORLD AFFAIRS 

Course plan: Each week a topic of international significance will be discussed. 
Instead of a lecture on the subject, interviews with men and women who have 
been involved in the problem area will be scheduled. We will present conflicting 
points of view on each question and encourage audience questions. 

Time: The programs will be held each Monday during the fall term, from 12:30 to 
1:30 p.m. 

Place: The September 8 organizational meeting will be held in L268. Tukey Lecture 
Theatre will be used when available. 

Who may enroll: All students are eligible, regardless of class standing. 

How to enroll: Students should fill out Add Forms, which will be available at late 
registration or from the office of the Dean of Humanities and Sciences, Library 
Building. The course number and title may be listed as either GINT 491 (Topics 
in Government and International Studies) or HIST 492 (Topics in History), depending 
on whether the course is to be used to fulfill Group III or Group IV requirements. 
There is no additional fee for students who are currently enrolled for 12 to 18 hours. 
Other students will need to pay $33. 

Assignments: Approximately one hour of reading of related material in periodicals 
or the Great Decisions book will be expected each week. Students will write either 
7 short news articles or 2 longer background articles on topics discussed. 

Grades: Students may use the pass-fail grading option. 

Instructor: Alice Henderson 

First program: September 15 - Poland and its Dissident Workers 
Guest will be Gerhard Faulstich, Vice-President of the Inman Division of International 
Wire Corporation. Mr. Faulstich, a native of Poland, returned with his family this 
summer to stay with friends near Gdansk, Poland. He will talk about current 
conditions in Poland and attitudes of the Poles toward their government. 

Visitors from the community, along with faculty, staff and students, are cordially 
invited to attend all class meetings. 



uses- -THIS WEEK 



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2 - SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1980 



TUESDAY, September 2 Late Registration Begins. 

8:00-11:00 am — Orientation session. Library 268. Contact person - Carol Smith, ext. 336. 

8:00-1:00 pm - Orientation session. Tukey Lecture Theater. Contact person - Carol Smith, ext 
336. 

10:00-12:00 noon — Late Registration. Hodge Center Gym. Contact admissions, ext. 246. 
4:00-6:00 pm — Late Registration. Hodge Center Gym. Contact admissions, ext. 246. 



WEDNESDAY, September 3 

10:00-12:00 noon — Late Registration. Hodge Center Gym. Contact admissions, ext. 246. 

4:00-6:00 pm — Late Registration. Hodge Center Gym. Contact admissions, ext. 246. 

5:30-6:45 pm - Introductory Reading in Business and Technical German. Continuing Education 
Course. Library 257. Contact Continuing Education, ext. 422. 



THURSDAY, September 4 

10:00-12:00 noon — Late Registration. Hodge Center Gym. Contact admissions, ext. 246. 

4:00-6:00 pm ~ Late Registration. Hodge Center Gym. Contact admissions, ext. 246. 



FRIDAY, September 5 Last Day of Late Registration 

10:00-12:00 noon — Late Registration. Hodge Center Gym. Contact admissions, ext. 246. 

4:00-6:00 pm -- Late Registration, Hodge Center Gym. Contact admissions, ext. 246. 



SATURDAY, September 6 

uses Fall Tennis Tournament. All Day. USCS Tennis Courts. Contact Dr. Eaglin, ext. 426. 



SUNDAY, September 7 

USCS Fall Tennis Tournament. All Day. USCS Tennis Courts. Contact Dr, Eaglin^ ext., 422, 

2:00-3:00 pm — September Art Exhibit Opening, featuring works of Claire Hopkins. Library 
Art Gallery. Contact person - Katie Hicks, ext. 335. 




Vol. V No. 3 



»^ 






A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS 



September 8, 1980 



I. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FROM EB BARNES: The Faculty Advisory Com- 
Tiittee Meeting will be Wednesday, Sept. 
10, at 12:30 pm in the Faculty Conference 
Room. 

rO ALL FACULTY: Faculty Meeting will be 
Friday, Sept. 19, at 12:30 pm in Tukey 
Lecture Theatre. Business: Senate at 
Large Delegates; Committee Elections; and 
Faculty Marshall Elections. 

ROM ED WHITE: The 1980-81 USCS Academic 
Affairs Committee is composed of the 
following faculty members. Chairperson, 

d White (Education), Secretary, Cathy 
rally (Nursing); Grade Changes, Sarah 
^ook (Business); Lyle Campbell (Math/ 
science); Sharon Cherry (FAFL) & TBA 

Social/Behavioral Sciences). Weekly 
neetings are scheduled for Wednesdays at 
3:30 pm in Room 215, Media Building. 

ROM BRYANT REEVES: The Bookstore will be 
)pen the following hours this week. Monday 
:hrough Thursday from 9:00 am-7:00 pm and 
)n Friday from 9:00 am-5:00 pm. The book- 
tore will resume its regular hours (Monday 
hrough Friday, 9:00am-5:00pm) next. week. 

ROM USCS PERSONNEL: The following two 
)Ositions are available at USCS. 1) 
:ustodial Worker II; Grade 11, $7,175 and 
I) Clerk III - Word Processing Center; 
Jrade 15, $8,394. 

•or information on these positions, please 
:ontact USCS Personnel, ext. 323. 

************************ 
I. BULLETIN BOARD 

■ROM JIM BROWN: JAPAN: Sunday, 14 Sept., 
1:30 am, ETV Channel 29, there will be a 
)roadcast of the Japanese movie A Family , 
(hich won Japan's National Arts Festival in 
978. The film begins in a Japanese temple 
(continued) 



that people visit to pray for sudden and 
painless death. The film focuses on two 
people who visit the temple--an elderly woman 
who is making a pilgrimage on behalf of her 
ailing husband and a 20-year-old wanderer 
disillusioned with life. This is a ninety 
minute movie which will be shown in Japanese 
with English subtitles. 

FROM JIM BROWN: SHOGUN, based on the best^ 
selling historical novel by James Clavell, will 
be a major television production of the new 
season. NBC has spent considerable time and 
effort to produce a "block-buster" of excep- 
tionally high quality. The National Education 
Association praises the production, saying 
'Shogun' is a culturally broadening adventure 
story set in feudal Japan three centuries ago. 
The drama initially reflects the alienation of 
a Western captive but ultimately portrays his 
gradual acceptance of Japanese culture. The 
viewer soon understands how the captive West- 
erner can come to appreciate and identify with 
the culture that at first seemed so alien and 
unacceptable. We strongly recommend this 
powerful and rich drama." The program will be 
aired on five consecutive nights, beginning a 
week from today on September 15, 9-12 pm. It 
stars Richard Chamberlain. An example of the 
effort at authenticity is the use of English 
subtitles when Japanese is being spoken. The 
program should be a very enjoyable way to 
easily increase one's knowledge of a tradi- 
tional non-western culture. For a viewer's 
guide for the program, contact Jim Brown, ext. 
433, L 236. 

GRANT PROPOSALS SUBMITTED: (1) A proposal en- 
titled "Infant Stimulation" has been submitted 
to the Child Development compnent of the 
Appalachian Regional Commission requesting 
$31,500. The purpose of the project will be to 
provide training in infant stimulation to 
teenage parents in Spartanburg County. Principal 
Investigator: Dr. Leo Bonner (Early Childhood 
Education). (2) A proposal has been submitted 
to the National Science Foundation's Under- 

(continued) 



graduate Research Participation Program re- 
questing $12,830 for six students to partici- 
pate in independent psychological research 
projects. Principal Investigator: Dr. 
Gordon Mapley (Psychology). 

THE COMMUNITY CONCERTS of Spartanburg presents 
at the Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium the 
following series open to thepublic for season 
membership Sept. 8-13. To join use the invi- 
tation brochure placed in your mailbox last 
week or contact one of USCS' Community Con- 
certs representatives: Hodge Center - Jan 
Dimsdale; Administration Building - Vergene 
Colloms; Library - Rita Weaver or Dean Eaglin; 
Media Building - Arthur George, Vivian Watson, 
or Earl Gordon. (Note: Checks may be post- 
dated through September. ) 

Schedule: Tommy Dorsey Orchestra, Oct. 12; 
Danny Davis, Nashville Brass, Nov. 11; Woody 
Herman Orchestra, Jan. 15; Young Americans 
with George Gershwin, Feb. 9; Straw Flowers, 
Apr. 2; 

Membership includes reciprocity with 
Anderson. 

These dates should be added to the invita- 
tion Brochure: Maggie and Friends, Oct. 18; 
Irish Light Orchestra of Dublin, Nov. 22; 
Broadway Encore, Jan. 20; Ballet Folclorico 
de nationale de Mexico, Feb. 22; Big Band 
Festival of the Fabulous 40' s. Mar. 13. 
(there is a possibility of 2 more concerts). 
SPECIAL: Contact Arthur George, ext. 414 
for information on how you can earn one (1) 
free membership to Spartanburg Community 
Concerts. He is President for membership 
of the 1980-81 Series. ACT TODAY! 

THE INTERNATIONAL CLUB IS ORGANIZING AN 
"Open House" to welcome all the foreign 
students on campus. Interested faculty mem- 
bers are invited to join the club on Wed- 
nesday, Sept. 10, from 12:30 to 1:30 in 
the main lobby of the Administration Build- 
ing. For more information contact Regis 
Robe, ext. 430. 

FROM ARTHUR GEORGE: "CAREER EXPLORATION 
FAIRS" - USCS Faculty and students may 
benefit by taking advantage of one or all 
of the Career Exploration Programs out- 
lined below: 

1. Company representatives are available to 
meet with faculty for lunch or to speak to 
classes during their campus recruiting visits. 
(Contact the Placement Office for schedule 
and details. ) 

2. use Columbia "Career Fair" is scheduled 



for Sept. 17th, from 10:00 am until 2:00 pm. 
USCS Placement Office has arranged Bus Trans- 
portation for interested students and faculty. 
(Please announce to your classes that sign-up 
will take place in the Career Development 
Center M-213.) Request will be handled on a 
first come basis. 
3. "Careers in Textile" - Monday, Sept. 29tt' 
has been set aside for USCS to participate in 
this annual National Program. Last year a filn 
was shown to several classes and industrial 
representatives met with students. This is 
an ideal program for students considering 
careers. No more than fifteen (15) class 
requests can be handled, so please forward 
your request to me in writing if possible by 
Thursday, Sept. 16th. Please include your 
name and title, course, number of students in 
each class, building, room number and the 
time.) 

The following company representatives par- 
ticipated last year: Milliken, Spartan Mills, 
Lowenstein and Rockwell International. 
USCS CAMPUS RECRUITING SCHEDULE FOR 
SEPTEMBER IS: Sept. 23 - Mutual of Omaha; 
Sept. 24 - Radio Shack. 

FROM DOYLE BOGGS: As part of the expanded 
recruiting effort next year, USCS will be 
publishing brochures describing individual 
academic programs. In order to conserve money 
and staff time, a common format has been de- 
signed and approved by the Administrative 
Council, and a blanket purchase order has 
been secured with an outside printing firm. 
The first two brochures, a financial aid pamp- 
let and a Computer Science mini -catalog, have 
already gone to press, and brochures on 
nursing, criminal justice and "The Arts at 
USCS" are in preparation. Departments wishing 
to be represented in the series should start 
planning now, as funds may be limited. Within 
the limitations of the common format depart- 
ments will be able to write, choose colors, 
and design their own books. 

For this program, additional campus photo- 
graphs are badly needed, and Becky and Alan 
Gray will need to visit some classrooms during 
the next several weeks to make both still 
pictures and slides. We especially need more 
and better photographs of the computer center 
and the science laboratories. Every effort 
will be made to keep interruptions to a mini- 
mum and to make pictures in the first few 
minutes of class. Our faculty has always been 
exceptionally cooperative in such efforts, 
and it has been most appreciated. j 



LAST MONTH'S TIMES NINE contained the pro- 
motion and tenure announcement for the USCS 
faculty. Somehow, the names of Ellenor 
McCaughrin and Judy Dye, who received tenure 
as librarians, were misplaced as the list 
was sent from the USC Board of Trustees to 
the Columbia Information Office. This error 
will be corrected in the next issue of 
Times Nine . 

THE CONTINUING EDUCATION DIVISION in con- 
junction with the USCS School of Business 
Administration, recently held a seminar 
at the Holiday Inn in Spartanburg. The 
seminar "Inventory Control Systems" was 
very well attended, received and evalua- 
ted by the participants. Mohammed Omer 
was the seminar leader. 

DR. REGIS ROBE has been elected on the 
Executive Board of the Alliance Francaise 
of the Piedmont. 

MOHAMMED OMER and his wife Lamah became 
proud parents of a baby boy on Sept. 2. 
Hani, weighed in at lOlbs, 2 ozs, and was 
born at Spartanburg General Hospital, 
Congratulations to the parents. 

MARY AND RON STROSSNER announce the birth 
of a daughter Dagney Marie Strossner, 
born Sept. 2, 1980. Dagney Marie weighed 
in at 7 lbs., 12 ozs., and was 21 " long. 



University of South Carolina at Spartanburg 

Soccer Team 

1980 



Sept. 9 




Brevard (club) 


10 




Citadel 


11 




use 


12 




PC 


15 




Wofford 


17 




Wake Forest 


20 




Montreat (club) 


23 




Furman 


24 




Newberry 


25 




Warren Wilson 


Oct. 1 




Newberry 


2 




UNC-A 


8 




Winthrop 


15 




C of C 


16 




Baptist 


21 




Coker 


23 




PC 


29 




Davidson 


Nov. 1 




Brevard (club) 


Coach-Frank Kohlenstein 
Phone - 578-1800 





Home 4:00 

Away 7 : 30 

Away 

Home 3:00 

Home 3:00 

Home 12:00 

Home 2:00 

Home 

Home 3:00 

Away 4:00 

Away 3:00 

Home 3:30 

Home 3:00 
Away 

Away 3:00 

Away 4 : 00 

Away 3 : 30 

Away 3 : 30 

Away 2:00 



NEW FACULTY PROFILiS 

These facu'ity profiles were taken from information sheets sent to the Office of 
Information Services by our new faculty members. We appreciate them taking the time to 
provide us with the information, and welcome them to our campus. 

In addition to those faculty members listed below, Ms. Nancy I. Kaplan is now a teaching 
associate in nursing, and Dr. Malinda K. Willard is an assistant professor in English. Their 
sketches will be published next week. 

Kevin Smith - is the new Director of Admissions. He comes to USCS from Transylvania 
University in Lexington, Ky. , where he was associate director of admissions. He holds a 
Master's degree in Higher Education Administration from Ohio State University, and he plans 
to start work on his doctorate in the near future. He and his wife Linda Jean have a three 
year old son Ryan Lance. 

Dr. Thomas H. Gunter - is the new Dean of the School of Business Administration and 
Economics. Dr. Gunter comes to USCS from Old Dominion University, where he was chairman of 
the Marketing Department. He holds the doctorate from Georgia State University, and has 
twice won national compettive fellowships. He has published more than 20 articles in the 
areas of sales selection and training, consumer life style, and technology transfer between 
government and industry. Both Dr. Gunter and his wife Lorraine have been active in consulting 
with industry in sales selection, consumer analysis and strategy planning. 

Dr. Sarah Pridgen Rook - is now assistant professor in the School of Business Administra- 
tion and Economics. She holds the Phd in economics from N.C. State. She is interested in 
environmental economics and the economics of regulation, and her hobbies are jogging and 
tennis. 

Jan Jackson - is an instructor in the School of Education with emphasis on reading. 
Her hobbies are pottery and painting. 

Andrea Morrison - is the new women's basketball coach and instructor in the School of 
Education. She is a native of Elmira, N.Y., and holds a Master's degree from the University 
of Tennessee. She comes to USCS from St. John's High School in Darlington, where she had a 
career record of 83 wins and 72 losses in women's basketball. 

Linda Wilson - is an instructor in the School of Education, specializing in Early Child- 
hood Education. She comes to USCS from Greenville, where she taught in the kindergarten 
program. She earned her bachelor's degree from Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, 
La, and her Master's degree from Clemson University. She is a First Aid and Water Safety 
instructor and enjoys camping, canoeing, swimming, hiking, reading and photography. 

Karen A. Peel - is an instructor in the School of Nursing. She holds a BSN from the 
University of Texas at Galveston and a Master of Nursing from the LSU Medical Center. She 
has been an active worker for the Girl Scouts and the American Heart Association and enjoys 
sewing, cooking, gardening, and refinishing old furniture'. 

Alison Rushing - is an instructor in the School of Nursing. She holds a master of Science 
in Nursing degree from the Medical College of Georgia. She has written a paper on treatment_ 
and nursing intervention in hypertensive patients, and is interested in treatment of alcholism 
and drug addiction. Her hobbies are reading and sewing. 

Dr. Elizabeth Brown - who completed the requirements for a PhD from Florida State Uni- 
versity this summer, is a new assistant professor of English. Her major fields of interest 
are drama and black literature. Her hobbies are bowling, basketball, volleyball, sewing, 
cooking, creative writing and reading. She is interested in setting up preparatory classes 
for high school juniors and seniors, especially disadvantaged students. 

Jerry Waters - is the new men's basketball coach. He comes to USCS from a post as bead 
coach at the University of the South. He was a highly successful high school coach in South 
Carolina before going to Sewanee, winning four state championships and setting the all 
time state record with 54 consecutive wins. A native of Glenville, Ga., he did his under- 
graduate work at Belmont College in Nashville, Tenn., and his post-graduate work at South 
Carolina State College. 



uses— THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 8 — SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1980 



MONDAY, September 8 

12:30-1:20 pm -- Organizational meeting for Great Decisions Class. L258. Contact Person - 
Alice Henderson. 



TUESDAY, September 9 

12:30-1:30 pm -- International Club meeting. Student Activities Building. 

7:00-9:00 pm -- "Computer Technology and the Professional Practice." Continuing Education 
Course. Activities Building. Contact Person - John May. 



WEDNESDAY, September 10 

8:00-5:00 pm -- "Practical Law for Correctional Officers." Continuing Education Seminar. 
Activities Building. Contact Person - John May. 

12:30-1:30 pm — International Club invitational meeting. Administration Building Lobby. 

12:30-1:30 pm -- Faculty Advisory Committee Meeting. Faculty Conference Room. 

3:30 pm -- Academic Affairs Committee Meeting. M215. 

4:00 pm -- USCS Soccer team vs. Brevard (club) at USCS. 



THURSDAY, September 11 

8:00-5:00 pm -- "Practical Law for Correctional Officers." Continuing Education Seminar. 
Activities Building. Contact Person John May. 

7:30 pm -- USCS Soccer team vs. The Citadel (away). 



FRIDAY, September 12 
3:00 pm — USCS Soccer team vs. Presbyterian at USCS. 



SATURDAY, September 1 3 
USCS Fall Tennis Tournament. Tennis Courts. Contact Person - Ron Eaglin. 



SUNDAY, September 14 
USCS Fall Tennis Tournament. Tennis Courts. Contact Person - Ron Eaglin. 







Vol . V No 4 



k Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS September is, i98o 



I OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

PRESIDENT HOLDERMAN has invited all faculty 
members, at USCS to attend his annual recep- 
tion at the President's home in Columbia 
on Tuesday evening, September 30 from 7 to 
9 p.m. Transportation for USCS faculty 
desiring to attend will leave from the 
front of the Hodge Center that afternoon 
at 5 p.m. Faculty members interested in 
attending should reserve a seat by calling 
Rita Weaver in Academic Affairs, ext. 426. 

THE ACADEMIC AFFAIRS COMMITTEE will meet 
on Wednesday, September 17 at 3:30 in 
Media 215. The agenda will be 1) SACS - 
Standard III, Curriculum; 2) Grade changes; 
3) Revision of SEDS 475-481, Directed 
Teaching in Secondary Education. Note: 
Fred Wenz is now the SBS representative in 
Academic Affairs. 

ON SEPTEMBER 23 (12:30, L276) and September 
24 (4:00, L276) there will be an important 
meeting of all Secondary Education Majors 
to explain changes in their program as 
required by Act 187 effective July 1, 1981. 
Please advise any student who is in or may 
transfer to the School of Education to 
attend one of these meetings. All faculty 
are welcome. 

USCS HAS BEEN AWARDED a certificate of 
commendation by the South Carolina Associa- 
tion for Retarded Citizens for efforts in 
the recent Good Health appeal. 

FROM BILL REITMEIER: The last day to apply 
for admission to the Student Teaching Pro- 
gram is September 30. Special note should 
be taken by Secondary Majors in Psychology, 
History, etc. Applications are available 
in the Office of the Coordinator of Field 
Experiences, Media Building, room 139. 



FROM THE CHANCELLOR: As many of you have heard, 
the news about enrollment this fall is ex- 
tremely good. The student body this fall num- 
bers 2608, up 8 per cent from last year, and 
the FTE count was 1891, up 7.7 per cent and 
considerably above our projection of 1827. This 
will give us a strong case when we ask the 
legislature for additional capital money and 
faculty slots next spring. Of course, this 
did not happen by accident, especially during 
a time when other colleges in our area were 
recruiting vigorously. The "One Good Course" 
advertising campaign designed by Information 
Services produced almost 50 students, return- 
ing our investment three-fold and giving us 
added visibility in the community. Kevin Smith 
and Cathe Emmerth, who came on board in the 
Admissions Office late in the summer, did an 
excellent job in helping us counsel and admit 
a large number of late applicants. The staff 
worked many extra hours under some trying 
circumstances. However, most of the credit 
goes to the faculty. Many faculty members 
participated in the effort to contact directly 
every student who had applied but who had 
not attended orientation or completed the 
admissions process. And of course, the quality 
of our faculty and their willingness to give 
individual attention and assistance is be- 
coming widely known in the community and is 
having a dramatic impact on college choices. 
I'm most pleased with our start this year. 
To say it again, "We've arrived." 

FALL SPEAKERS - USCS has scheduled the follow- 
ing convocations programs during the fall 
semester. On October 2, Tom Wicker, Associate 
Editor of the New York Times will speak on 
campus on the Future of Southern Politics. On 
October 15, Ray Vernon, from the Harvard Cen- 
ter for International Affairs, Kennedy School 
of Government will speak on "Economics and 
the International on the Sunbelt." On Nov. 3, 
novelist Han Suyin, will speak on "The Roles 
and Lifestyles of Chinese and Sunbelt Women." 
All of these programs are important university 
wide events which should be attended widely by 

continued 



. . .Official Announcements continued. . . 

students and the community. Please hold 
these dates open on your own personal calen- 
dars and do everything possible to assist in 
promoting them. 

FROM TOM OWENS: There will be a mathematics 
faculty meeting Tuesday, September 16, in 
A-207 (David Taylor's Office) at 9:00 a.m. 

NEW TUTORING LAB COORDINATOR - We're pleased 
to announce the appointment of Susan Montjoy 
to the position of Tutoring Lab Coordinator, 
in the Department of Developmental Studies. 
Student referrals, prospective tutors, and 
specific questions can be directed to her 
at ext. 359 or ext. 343 in the Library 
Building. Welcome to the staff at USCS, 
Susan. 

DR. MALINDA K. WILLARD AND MS. NANCY I. 
KAPLAN have joined the USCS faculty in 
addition to those members whose sketches 
were printed in last week's FYI. 

Dr. Willard, assistant professor in 
English, received her PhD from the 
University of South Carolina. Her research 
interests include American literature and 
she has had teaching experience abroad 
in Brazil and Japan. Outside her profes- 
sional interests she enjoys concerts, 
plays and sports events. 

Ms. Kaplan joins the faculty as a teaching 
associate, and holds a Bachelor of Nursing 
degree from Boston University. She was 
nominated for the position of chairperson 
of the S.C. Nurse's Association and her 
professional interests include heart 
surgery and Reye's Syndrome. 

II. BULLETIN BOARD 

JAPANESE MOVIE: The Scapegoat will be shown 
on Sunday, September 21, 11:30 am, Channel 
29 (ETV). This Japanese movie (with English 
subtitles) explores Japanese bureaucracy 
through the central character, Yamada, a 
junior government official who sinks into 
despair when faced with the prospect of 
little chance for job advancement because 
he does not belong to the upper class. 

SHOGUN: A reminder that Shogun (see last 
week's FYI) begins tonight, Channel 4 
(NBC), 9-12. 



SCIENTISTS TO FRANCE: The National Science 
Foundation sponsors an exchange program wit 
France for young scientists to study or 
work in the mathematical, physical, chemica 
engineering, biological, and social science 
including economics. Awards are only open -' 
to those who will have earned a doctoral 
degree or its equivalent not more than 5 
years prior to the beginning of the exchange 
visit. The period of exchange should be be- 
tween 5 and 15 months. "All" expenses are 
covered, including dependents. Some knowledg 
of French is expected. The application shoul 
include a research proposal and, ideally, an 
invitation from a French institution. 
Application deadline is November 1, 1980, fo 
this year's competition. Approximately 18 
awards will be given. For further informatio 
and an application form contact Jim Brown, J 
L-236, ext. 433. I 



SPARTANBURG LITTLE THEATRE'S 35th anniversar 
season will begin September 25th, with 
Roger and Hammerstein's The King and I. In 
November will come Tribute, by Bernard Slade 
followed by On Golden Pond , by Ernest 
Thompson, in February, and You Can't Take 
It With You , by Moss Hart and George S. 
Kaufman, in April. An adult membership is 
$20 for the season. Contact Spartanburg 
Little Theatre, 385 S. Spring St., Spartanbu 
S.C, 29301, tel. 585-8278. 

GRANT PROPOSAL SUBMITTED: A request for 
approximately $18,000 has been submitted to 
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture for food expenses 
at the Child Development Center. Program 
Director: Ms. Heidi From. 
GRANT AWARDED: USCS has received $48,308 
from the National Endowment for the Human iti 
to plan and pilot implement three inter- 
disciplinary courses in the humanities. 
Involved in the project will be: Tom Allen , 
(Philosophy), Mike Dressman (English), Alice: 
Henderson (History), Katie Hicks (Art) and 
Bryan Lindsay (Humanities). Project Director 
Dr. Tom Allen. Congratulations, Dr. Allen! 

ALL MEN interested in trying out for the 
tennis team are invited to meet at the tenni 
courts on Wednesday, Sept. 17th, at 3 p.m. 
or leave your name and number at ext. 336. 
If it rains come the next day, same time. 
ALL WOMEN interested in playing fall tennis 
as a club sport are invited to meet at the 
tennis courts at 12:15 Thursday, Sept. 18th 
for tryouts or leave your name at ext. 336. 
If it rains come the next day, same time. 



...Bulletin Board continued... 

FROM ARTHUR GEORGE: USC Columbia "Career 
Fair" is scheduled for Sept. 17th, from 
10:00 am until 2:00 p.m. USCS Placement 
Office has arranged Bus Transportation 
for interested students and faculty. 
(Please announce to your classes that 
sign-up will take place in the Career 
Development Center M-213). Requests will 
be handled on a first-come basis. Faculty 
are asked to excuse students from their 
classes to attend this Career Fair. A 
roll will be taken of all students 
participating and will be published in 
the next issue of FYI. 

III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

BRYAN LINDSAY'S name appeared in the 
current (41st) Edition of Who's Who 
In America. 

GEORGE LABANICK (Biology) co-authored a 
paper entitled "An experimental study of 
Bates i an mimicry between the red-legged 
salamanders Plethodon jordani and Desmo- 
gnathus ochrophaeus , recently accepted for 
publication in the Journal of Herpetology. 

BILL BRUCE of the School of Education has 
had the following papers accepted for presen- 
tation: 

Nov. 12-15, 1980 National Middle School 
Association, Annual Conference, Nashville, 
TN. "Education that is Multicultural: Build- 
ing Education Equity in the Middle School" 

Feb. 17-20, 1981 American Association of 
Colleges of Teacher Education, Annual Meet- 
ing, Detroit, Michigan, "Excellence in Edu- 
cational Equity: Assessing and Fulfulling 
NCATE Standards Concerning Multicultural 
Education. 

Feb. 13-19, 1981 Association of Teacher 
Educators, Annual Convention, Dallas TX, with 
Bill Reitmeier. "Implementation of the Santa 
Barbara Instructional Supervision Training 
Program: A Case Study of the University of 
South Carolina at Spartanburg." Also, 
"Assessing and Fulfulling NCATE Standards 
for Multicultural Education." 

Mar. 7-11, 1981 Association for Supervision 
and Curriculum Development, Annual Conference, 
St. Louis, Mo., "Alternative Teaching 
Strategies for Developing Multicultural 
Awareness." Also "Implementation of the Santa 
Barbara Instructional Supervision Training 
Program: A Case Study. 



BRENDA HARDEN (nursing) has had an abstract 
of her thesis topic "Pediatric Nurses' 
opinions concerning their Patients' Rights" 
published in Nursing Research in the South 
by Southern Regional Education Board. 

DR. ELIZABETH SIKES DAVIDSON, English, re- 
viewed the book, A Concordance to Conrad's 
Victory ", by James W. Parins, Robert J. 
Dilligan and Todd K. Bender, for Conradiana , 
volume 12, number 3. 

JAN YOST has been selected as one of 33 
individuals who will participate in the first 
class of LEADERSHIP SPARTANBURG which is 
sponsored by the Chamber of Corrmerce. The 
purpose of Leadership Spartanburg is to 
identify leaders from all segments of the 
community and through a nine month program, 
provide them with background and contacts to 
help them become more effective in solving 
problems and achieving goals within the 
community. 



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA AT SPARTANBURG 

PERSONAL FINANCE SEMINAR SERIES 
FALL 1980 

FOR ALL INTERESTED FACULTY AND STAFF 

There will be a series of luncheon seminars on personal 
financial planning conducted on this campus by Personnel 
and chaired by Professor Myer Drucker during the Fall of 
1980. The following meetings are planned: 

SEPTEMBER 24, 1980 - 12:15 P.M. - Wednesday 

Subject - "Retirement "and"lnsurance" 
By: Jane Jamison from 

University Personnel 

OCTOBER 21, 1980 - 12:15 P.M. - Tuesday 

Subject - "Your Taxes" and"Estate Planning" 
By: Professor Myer Drucker 

NOVEMBER 19, 1980 - 12:15 P.M. - Wednesday 

Subject - "Tax Sheltered Annuities" 

By:pu]3iic Employees Benefits Service Corp. 



This is a new deferred compensa- 
tion plan for teachers and State 
employees which has just been 
announced. 



These meetings will be luncheon meetings held in the "Activities 
Building". 

For further information call Personnel, phone 323. 



uses- -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15 — SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1980 



MONDAY, September 15 

12:30-1:20 p.m. -- "50 minutes" ^ Guest speaker - Gerhard Faulstich, V.P. of the Inman Mills 
Division of International Wire Corporation. Mr. Faulstich, a native of Poland, will speak 
on "Poland and its Dissident Workers." L268. Contact person - Alice Henderson. 

3:00 p.m. -- USCS soccer team vs. Wofford at USCS. 

5:00 p.m. - Gifted Association meeting. Faculty Conference room. Contact person - Al Gray. 



TUESDAY, September 16 

3:00 a.m. - Mathematics Faculty meeting. A107, 

3:30-10:30 a.m. -- "English as a Second Language." Tuesdays/Thursdays through Nov. 20. Con- 
tinuing Education course. M124. Contact person - John May. 



€DNESDAY. September 17 

12:00 noon - USCS soccer team vs. Wake Forrest at USCS. 

J:00 p.m. - Men's Tennis Team meeting. USCS tennis courts. 

5:00-4:30 p.m. -- Promotion and Tenure committee meeting. Faculty Conference room. 

5:30 p.m. -- Academic Affairs committee meeting. M215. 

':00 p.m. — Foreign Film series - "La Ligne de marcation" -French film with English subtitles. 
Contact person - Regis Robe 

J HURSDAY, September 18 

[»:00-12:00 noon - Science Education Seminar. Student Activities Building. Contact person - Ed 
I: White. 

|.2:15 p.m. -- Women's Tennis Club meeting. USCS tennis courts. 

ii 

\ 

' RIDAY, September 19 

j0:30 a.m. - Administrative Council meeting. Chancellor's conference room. 

2:30 p.m. — Faculty meeting. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 

:.00 p.m. — S.C. State Employment Association meeting. Faculty conference room. Contact person- 
Con Henderson. 



ATURDAY, September 20 

:00 p.m. — USCS soccer team vs. Monreat at USCS. 







d1 . 4 No 5 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS September 22, i98o 



I. OFFICIAL 

FROM EB BARNES: The Faculty Senate will meet 
Friday, September 26, in L268 at 12:30 p.m. 

FROM EARL GORDON: The staff of the Counseling 
and Career Development Center is appreciative 
for the professional requests that have been 
made for Road Shows this semester. We are 
open to offer additional services to our stu- 
dents, in the event a faculty member is 
away for professional reasons. The Road 
Show has served several purposes. 

1) It brings career information into the 
classroom. 2) It serves as an instrument 
in introducing our services to students, 
faculty and staff. 3) It introduces an 
opportunity for follow-up for the student 
within the counseling staff. 

Requests for Road Shows should be made 
with Earl Gordon, Dean of Students. We 
would appreciate a week's notice. 

THE PROMOTION AND TENURE COMMITTEE has sent 
notification to all full-time faculty of 
1) the need to request Committee considera- 
tion if one is seeking promotion or tenure 
or both and 2) the need to prepare or update 
Promotion and Tenure Files by 31 October 
1980. If you received notification, please 
complete and return the acknowledgement/ 
request form as soon as possible. If you 
should have received notification and did 
not, please call this omission to the 
attention of the chairperson, Lawrence 
Moore (ext. 255). Criteria and procedures 
relating to promotion and tenure are 
found in the Faculty Manual (pp. 9-13) and 
in the Faculty Handbook (pp 1-7 and I-IO). 
Additional information from the fall 1979 
workshop on the Preparation of Promotion 
and Tenure Files is available on Reserve 
in the Library. 

PLEASE MAKE THE FOLLOWING ANNOUNCEMENT IN 
CLASSES: In order to make the bookstore 
more accessible to evening students, the 
following revised operating hours have 



been established. On Monday-Thursday, the 
bookstore will be open from 10:00 a.m. to 
7 p.m. Friday operating hours are 10 a.m. 
to 3 p.m. 

GARY K. BARNARD is the new Student Counselor 
in the Piedmont Area TalentSearch (PATS) 
Program. He comes to USCS after completing a 
Masters of Arts in Educational Counseling at 
Suffolk University, Boston, Mass. His B.A. 
is in psychology, which he received from 
USCS. Gary is married to the former Sandy 
Auman of Spartanburg. He enjoys skiing, 
jogging, and soft ball. 

FROM BILL REITMEIER: The last day to apply 
for admission to the Student Teaching Program 
is September 30, 1980. Special note should 
be taken by Secondary Majors in Psychology, 
History, etc. Applications are available in 
the Office of the Coordinator of Field 
Experiences, M139. Please announce to classes. 

ON SEPTEMBER 23 (12:30, L276) and Sept. 24 
(4:00, L276) there will be an important 
meeting of all secondary education majors to 
explain changes in their program as required 
by Act 187 effective July 1, 1981. Please 
advise any student who is in or may transfer 
to the School of Education to attend one of 
these meetings. All faculty are welcome. 

POSITION AVAILABLE: Staff Assistant I - Grade 
19, Salary $9,820. Interested applicants 
should send a letter of application and 
resume to: USCS Personnel Office. 

II. BULLETIN BOARD 

THE SENIOR NURSING STUDENTS will be perform- 
ing a free Blood Pressure screening clinic 
as a public service. They will be at the 
Post Office in Taylors on Sept. 22, 1-4 p.m.; 
on the campus of USCS (in Hodge Center) on 
Sept. 26, 1-4 p.m.; and at the Piedmont Post 
Office on Sept. 29, 1-4 p.m. 



...Bulletin Board continued... 

W.J. BRYAN DORN and Dr. George Graham, the 
South Carolina Democratic and Republican 
Party Chairmen, have agreed to a debate on 
Presidential politics at USCS on Oct. 8 at 
12:30 p.m. The program is being sponsored 
by the university's Political Science Club. 
Following the debate, the USCS club will 
conduct a mock-election for students. 

DR. MOHAMMED OMER will be the visiting ex- 
pert Monday, Sept. 22 as the USCS world 
affairs discussion group continues with a 
program on the Middle East. The class meeting 
begins at 12:30 p.m. in L268, and is chaired 
by Dr. Alice Henderson. Dr. Omer is a data 
processing professor in the USCS School of 
Business. Everyone is invited to attend, 

MS. JAYNE LYBRAND, speaker, humorist and 
communication consultant, will be giving a 
program on "Hip-swinging, Eye-winking 
Politics," on Tuesday, Sept. 23rd, The 
convocation is being sponsored by the USCS 
SGA and will be presented in Tukey Lecture 
Theatre at 12:15 p.m. Students, fauclty 
and staff are invited to attend. 

TITLE IV, TALENT SEARCH: The Piedmont Area 
Talent Search Program (PATS) sponsored by 
USCS, USC-Union, and Spartanburg Technical 
College was refunded for two years effective 
Sept. 1, 1980. The primary responsibility 
of PATS is to assist the youth and young 
adults, ages 14-27 of the Piedmont area in 
continuing and completing their educational 
goals through personal, academic, and 
career counseling, PATS will serve the 
students at USCS who are potential drop-outs 
or stop-outs. You, as a faculty or staff 
member, can assist these students by refer- 
ring them to the PATS staff located in room 
260 in the library building. Lynn Mello is 
the new receptionist. You can contact her at 
ext. 346, 348, or 350. Your assistance in 
assuring that the students at USCS receive 
maximum utilization of available services 
is appreciated. If you have further questions 
about PATS services, please call or stop by 
the office. 

THE WORD PROCESSING CENTER established a new 
record for printing and duplication during 
the Aug. 15-Sept. 15 billing period. On the 
offset press the center produced a total of 
218, 490 copies and the IBM copier II account- 
ed for 18,000 impressions. The press can make 
a cooy for an average of 1.5 cents per impres- 



sion compared to about 4.5 cents per impres 
sion on a photocpier, and additional savings 
are realized by automated two-sided copying 
Nevertheless, printing and duplicating are 
big expenses at USCS and all departments are 
asked to encourage conservation. 

A SPECIAL SHOWING of the multi -media slide 
presentation "We've Arrived" will be held in 
room 124 of the Media Center on Wednesday, 
Oct. 1. The presentation will be shown at 
12:15, 12:30 and 12:45. All faculty, staff 
and students who have not seen this program 
are invited to attend. There have been 
several changes in the program in response 
to faculty suggestions after the showing in 
Tukey Lecture Theatre in August, and it has 
now been successfully presented to several 
area civic clubs. Faculty and staff who are 
members of civic clubs who usually have this 
type of program are urged to assist in getti 
this presentation out. For more information, 
please get in touch with Doyle Boggs at 
extension 210. 

ALL FACULTY are invited to attend a salad 
bar "dutch treat" hosted by the School of 
Nursing faculty on Oct. 1, 1980 from 11:30- 
1:30 p.m. in the Student Activities Building' 
Cost for the luncheon will be $1.25. If you 
plan to attend please sign up with your 
division secretary by Sept. 24, so that we 
will know how many to prepare for. For fur- 
ther information, contact Glenda Sims, ext. 
309. 

FROM NANCY P. MOORE: Information on the 
annual Faculty Beach Trip to Hunting Island, 
S.C, for the weekend of Oct. 3rd will be 
at division/school mailboxes this week. Ther 
will also be a sign-up sheet at the mailboxe 

SHOGUN REVISITED: An informal faculty lunch- 
eon will be held on Tuesday, Sept. 30, 12:15i 
1:30 in the Activities Building. Mr. Satoru 
Honda, the Japanese gentleman who was here 
for the faculty in-service, will be with us 
to discuss and answer questions about Japan 
and Shogun. He is not a historian, but will 
be happy to discuss the Japanese reaction to 
Shogun, the role of traditional Japanese 
culture in modern Japan, and other such top- 
ics. For those who were left wanting more 
after Shogun ended (and even for those who 
weren't) this will be an excellent opportuni 
for follow-up. Everyone is welcome, but thos 
wishing to eat the "Ankies" lunch, at $1.50 
per person at the door, please contact Jim 
Brown by Friday noon, Sept. 26th. Either 



...Bulletin Board continued... 

send a brief note through campus mail or 
call ext. 433 and leave your name. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES will 
offer a four-week course in SPEED READING 
beginning Oct. 7. The course is designed 
to increase comprehension and reading sfjeed 
through the use of various techniques to 
improve reading habits. Contact person: 
Joyce Miller. Days - Tuesdays and Thursdays; 
Dates - October 7-30; Time - 7:00 p.m-9:00 
p.m.; Location - Library 273; Fee - $35.00 

GRANTS FOR RESEARCH IN CHINA: A federally 
funded program of research in China for 
the 1981-82 academic year has been announced 
by The Coirmittee on Scholarly Corraiunication 
with the People's Republic of China. The 
program is open to candidates in the natural 
sciences, engineering, social sciences and 
humanities. Applicants must be U.S. citizens 
and have received their doctoral degrees by 
July 1, 1981. Grants cover "all" expenses 
for the recipient, but there is no stipend 
for dependents. Grant tenure may extend 
from three months to one year in the 
natural sciences and six months to one year 
in the social sciences and humanities. The 
deadline for applications is November 7, 
1980. For further information and an appli- 
cation form contact Jim Brown, L-236, ext. 
433. 

GREEK NITE: Be international at the 10th 
annual "Greek Nite," Friday, Sept. 26, 
8 p.m. to midnight, at Spartanburg Memorial 
Auditorium. The event is sponsored by St. 
Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church and includes 
Greek food with wine and pastries, a folk 
dance exhibition, and Greek and American 
dancing for all. Music will be provided by 
"Tykie and the Grecian Keys" of Warren, 
Ohio. For reservations and ticket information 
call John Polydorou, 578-7570. 

AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT: The Southern Center for 
International Studies will host a symposium 
on "Problems of African Development," Thurs- 
day, October 2, 1980, at Atlanta University, 
7:30-10:00 p.m. For further information con- 
tact Jim Brown, ext. 433, L236. 

FALL SPORTS DAY will be held Friday, Sept. 
26. Tea and Pizza will be served and a band 
will provide entertainment. For more infor- 
mation contact Student Affairs, ext. 336. 



ID'S WILL MADE MONDAY-FRIDAY in the Public 
Safety Office. (Sept. 22-26). The hours 
will be 10-12:00 and 2-4:00 p.m. 

GRANT AWARDED: USCS has received $144,995 
from the Office of the Governor/CETA Division 
to continue the Spartanburg 70,001 program 
for another year. The purpose of the program 
is to assist Spartanburg City youth who 
are unemployed and high school dropouts in 
employment and furthering their education. 
Program Administrator: Dr. Jan Yost. Program 
Manager: Mr. Gerald Jennings, 

III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

ANY FACULTY OR STAFF MEMBER who would like 
to make a donation to the First Baptist 
Church, Spartanburg, in memory of Mrs. Gene 
Hutsell , is asked to contact Janella Koob 
by Wednesday, Oct. 24. The family has re- 
quested that donations be made in lieu of 
flowers. 

BILL BRUCE, School of Education, has been 
invited to present a paper to the South 
Carolina Elementary and Middle School Princi- 
pals Association on November 6, 1890 in 
Columbia. The paper will be "Developing and 
Expanding Middle School Curriculum." 

ED WHITE will be making a presentation to the 
Virginia State Board of Education on Sept. 24, 
1980 in Richmond, Virginia. His topic will 
focus on the procedures and criteria to be 
used in the selection of elementary science 
program for Virginia. 

JEANNE STUART, biology, has been elected a 
vice-president of the Spartanburg County 
American Cancer Society. 



uses— -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22 — SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1980 



Monday, September 22 

12:30 p.m. -- World Affairs Program. "The Middle East" - Dr. Mohammed Omer. L268. Contact 
person - Alice Henderson. 



Tuesday, September 23 

12:15 p.m. -- "Hip-swinging, Eye-winking Politics" -Jayne Lybrand. Convocation sponsored by 
the uses SGA. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 

12:30 p.m. -- Secondary Education Majors meeting. L276. Contact person - Ed White. 

4:30-6:00 p.m. -- Gamma Beta Phi meeting. L257. 



Wednesday, September 24 

9:30 a.m. - S.C. League for Nursing Executive Council meeting. Faculty Conf. Room. Contact 
person - Addie Kloepper. 

12:15 p.m. -- "Retirement" and "Insurance" -program by Jane Jamison from University personnel 
Luncheon meeting in the Activities Building. Contact person - Treva Hamrick. 

12:30-1:30 p.m. -- Gamma Beta Phi meeting. L257. 

3:00 p.m. -- USCS soccer vs. Newberry at USCS 

3:30 p.m. -- Academic Affairs Committee meeting. M215. 

4:00 p.m. -- Secondary Education Majors meeting. L276. Contact person - Ed White. 

6:00 p.m. -- Women's Volleyball w/Limestone, PC, and USC Aiken in the Hodge Center. 

Thursday, September 25 
4:00 p.m. -- USCS soccer vs. Warren Wilson (away). 

Friday, September 26 



I FALL SPORTS DAY 

USCS VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT - Hodge Center. 
I 12-1:30 p.m. -- Psychology Faculty meeting. Student Activities Building. 

12:30 p.m. -- Faculty Senate Meeting. L268. 

1:00-4:00 p.m. -- Free Blood Pressure Checks by senior nursing students. Hodge Center. 

Saturday, September 27 
Volleyball Tournament. - Hodge Center. 




s*. 






Vol. 4 No. 6 



A Newslefter For The Faculty Of USCS September 29, i98o 



I. OFFICIAL 

FACULTY/STAFF and STUDENTS may have their 
ID'S made this week in the Public Safety 
Office in the Administration Building. 
ID'S will be made between 10:00-12:00 noon. 
2:00-4:00 p.m., and 6:00-8:00 p.m. Please 
announce to your classes. 

FROM BILL REITMEIER: The last day to apply 
for admission to the Student Teaching 
program is September 30. Special note 
'should be tak-en by Secondary Majors in 
Psychology, History, etc. Applications 
are available in the Office of the 
Coordinator of Field Experiences, Media 
Building, room 139. 

THE PROMOTION AND TENURE COMMITTEE has 
sent notification to all full-time faculty 
3f (1) the need to request Committee con- 
sideration if one is seeking promotion 
3r tenure or both and (2) the need to 
prepare or update Promotion and Tenure 
-iles by October 31, 1980. If you received 
lotification, please complete and return 
:he acknowledgment/request form as soon 
is possible. If you should have received 
lotification and did not, please call 
:his omission to the attention of the 
:hairperson, Lawrence Moore (ext. 255). 
Criteria and procedures relating to 
iromotion and tenure are found in the 
acuity Manual (pp. 9-13) and in the 
acuity Handbook (pp. 1-7 and I-IO). 
additional information from the fall 1979 
'orkshop on the Preparation of Promotion 
nd Tenure Files is available on Reserve 
n the Library. 

OM WICKER, columnist and associate editor 
f the New York Times will speak at USCS 
n Thursday, Oct. 2. Wicker will deliver 
lecture in Bob Elmore's class in M218 
t 10:50 a.m. and a lecture on "Current 
rends in Southern Politics" in Tukey 
scture Theatre at 7:15 p.m. Faculty, staff 



and students are invited to attend. For more 
information about either of these programs, 
contact Information Services, ext. 210. 

II. BULLETIN BOARD 

GRANTS AVAILABLE: Proposals to the USC Research 
and Productive Scholarship Fund are due by 
October 31, 1980. Contact Jan Yost for guide- 
lines and application. 

ON TUESDAY, Sept. 30, Mitchell Korn, guitarist 
will play a recital in A209 from 12:30-1:30 pm, 
and will talk about his experiences as a pro- 
fessional musician. Faculty, staff, students 
and the public are invited to drop by. More 
information may be obtained by calling Bryan 
Lindsay. 

A SPECIAL SHOWING of the multi-media slide 
presentation "We've Arrived" will be held in 
room 124 of the Media Center this Wednesday. 
The presentation will be shown at 12:15, 12:30 
and 12:45. All faculty, staff and students 
who have not seen this program are invited to 
attend. There have been several changes in the 
program in response to faculty suggestions 
after the showing in Tukey Lecture Theatre in 
August, and it has now been successfully pre- 
sented to several area civrc clubs. Faculty 
and staff who are members of civic clubs who 
usually have this type of program are urged 
to assist in getting this presentation out. 
For more information, please get in touch with 
Doyle Boggs, at ext. 210. 

ALL FACULTY AND STAFF are invited to attend a 
salad bar "dutch treat" hosted by the School 
of Nursing faculty on Wednesday (Oct. 1) from 
11:30-1:30 p.m. in the Student Activities 
Building. Cost for the luncheon is $1.25. If 
you plan to attend and have not signed up with 
your division secretary, please call Glenda 
Sims, ext. 309. 

ATTENTION CAMPERS: Those faculty and staff who 
are planning to go camping at Hunting Island 



...BULLETIN BOARD continued... 

on Oct. 3-5 are requested to stop by the 
"Camper" table at the Oct. 1 salad bar in 
the Student Activities Building. This will 
permit last minute coordination of rides 
and cooking arrangements. Also, Becky and 
Alan Gray will make available their slides 
of last year's camping trip at this time. 

FACULTY "SHOGUN" LUNCH: Don't forget the 
lunch and discussion tomorrow, Sept. 30, 
12:15-1:30 in the Activities Building. Mr. 
Satoru Honda will be the resource person 
for a question and answer discussion on 
Shogun and Japan. Lunch for those who signed 
up last week, will be $1.50 at the door. 
Those who did not sign up are welcome to 
bring a sack lunch or just come for the 
discussion. 

MARTY BEAR, guitarist and singer, will be 
performing in the Hodge Center at 12:15 
today, Sept. 29. This performance is 
sponsored by the Student Affairs Office 
in conjunction with the SGA and is free 
and open to everyone. 

FROM JERRY BAKER: There will be a Fall 
Dinner Dance on Saturday, Oct. 25. By 
popular demand, Dixie Dawn, will again 
provide the entertainment for this event. 
The dinner dance is open to faculty, 
students, staff and friends of the uni- 
versity. Cost will be $7.50 per person 
for adults and $5.00 per person for stu- 
dents. The dance will be held in the 
Hodge Center from 8:00 until midnight. 
Please mark your calendars and plan to 
attend now. 

THE OCTOBER EXHIBIT in the Library Art 
Gallery will feature pottery by Ron 
Myers. The display will open on Oct. 6 
with a reception from 8 to 9 p.m., and 
continues through Oct. 31. Mr. Myers will 
also give a public lecture on pottery 
on Oct. 6 at 7:30 p.m. in Tukey Lecture 
Theatre. For more information contact 
Katie Hicks, ext. 335. 

GREENVILLE LIBRARY, for those living in 
the Greenville area, has a display about 
local services of an international nature 
and services available to the international 
community. USCS is prominently represented. 



FROM ARTHUR GEORGE: Careers in Textiles: A 
schedule and a reminder of USCS Career Pro- 
gram, Mon. Sept. 29, 1980. Thanks to Dr. 
Gunter, Dr. McAlhany, Ron Young who arranged 
for the program schedule. Again the program 
will consist of a film on Careers in Textiles 
and representatives from Mil liken. Jack 
Ellis - J. P. Stevens & Co., Frank Stephens 
and Charles McElrod from United Merchants anc 
Manufacturers. 
Mon. - 9:30 a.m. - M218 
Mon. - 10:30 a.m. - M321 
Mon. - 11:30 a.m. - M219 
Mon. - 3:15 p.m. - M319 

Each session will last approximately fifty-fi 
(55) minutes. These are repeat sessions there 
fore one may attend only one session. A class 
roll will be taken. 

APIE PHON-A-THON RESULTS: The Alumni Partners 
in Education Phon-a-thon held recently had to 
be considered a resounding success. A total 
of $3,717 was pledged to the Alumni Associa- 
tion fund this year, leaving the Association 
very close to its annual goal of $5,000. Per- 
haps more importantly, 207 alumni pledged to 
contribute, which is a 400 per cent increase 
in the number of alumni who have participated 
in previous fund raising efforts. 
Many persons contributed to this success. A 
special thanks goes to Karen Michaud, a USCS 
alumna and manager of the Sheraton Inter- 
national on Hearon Circle, who arranged for 
a dinner for two for the person raising the 
most money, and to Vergene Colloms of the 
faculty who donated a family membership in 
Community Concerts for the person securing 
the most $25 pledges. 
Listed below are the volunteer callers who 
assisted in this program: Alumni: Holly 
Crocker (faculty member); Jan Dimsdale, Beth 
Burgess, Bennett Wilson (on the staff); David 
Anderson, David Lawson, Danny Wilson, Yasmin 
Manji, Rozina Manji, Stan Huggins, David 
Brannon, Chuck Beyseigel, Bill Swofford, Kathj 
McConnell, Carol Powell, Ken Tuck, Annie 
Simmons. 

Faculty and Staff: Jane Davisson, Meyer 
Drucker, Lou Hunley, Leo Bonner, Jeanne 
Stuart, Bill Bruce, Joe Bowman, Nancy Babb, 
Gordon Mapley, Ron Romine, Earl Gordon, M.B. I 
Ulmer, John Dean, Martha Manley. 
Students: Amy Dobson, Tony English, Phillis 
Eledge, Susan Fasig, Pat Gosnell, Ronnie Lowe, 
Eric Snow, Dot Stil linger, Lyndon Harris, Beth 
Hart, Jerry Hayes, Angela Howe, Becky Hughey, 
Rhonda Barnhill, Hank Anderson, Mike Blackwell 
Keith Bradley, Terry Brock, and Kathy Millinor 



...BULLETIN BOARD continued... 

CUBAN REFUGEES: The Cuban/Haitian Task 
Force at Fort Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania, 
still needs sponsors for refugees who re- 
main at the camp. Approximately 75% of the 
entrants have been reunited with family 
members who were U.S. citizens, but some 
3,400 refugees remain, who must wait for 
sponsorship by the general public. The 
camp is scheduled to close on Oct. 15, 
1980. If your church, civic group, or 
other organization would like information 
about sponsoring a refugee or refugee 
family, a brochure about the sponsorship 
program is available from Jim Brown, 
L236, ext. 433, or you can call toll 
free, 800-233-7545. 

OKTOBERFEST is the traditional German fall 
festival--a time to "eat, drink, dance and 
be merry." Oktoberfest has been brought 
to Spartanburg by the German community. 
The German-American Club's Oktoberfest will 
be held this Saturday, Oct. 4, 8:00 p.m., 
at the Kinghts of Columbus hall, (1701 S. 
Pine Street). The cost is $11 per person 
for German food and a live German band 
(The Continentals). Inexpensive pitchers 
of beer will be available, or bring your 
own beverages. Reservations should be 
made soon by calling Mrs. Hannelore Path, 
592-1739. A larger Oktoberfest will be 
held at Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium, 
Friday Oct. 17 and Sat. Oct. 18. Some 
people even come from other parts of the 
country for this one. Cost is $17.50 per 
person for German-style food, unlimited 
beer, and dancing to the Bavarian Festival 
Show Band from Meersburg, Germany. Tickets 
for Friday night (Saturday is fully booked) 
are available from Mr. Gerhard Faulstich, 
350 Heathwood Drive, 579-2927. The Inter- 
national Club has a table reserved for 
Friday night; contact Regis Robe, L230, 
ext. 430. For additional information on 
any of the above, contact Jim Brown, 
ext. 433. 

FROM BETH LITTLEJOHN, ETV Assistant Director, 
Publications and Information: By now you 
have probably heard about COSMOS, the excit- 
ing new public television series written and 
hosted by Dr. Carl Sagan. We believe COSMOS 
will have exceptional value for professors 
and students in a variety of science-related 
areas. This series will air on Sundays at 
8 p.m. on channel 29. A variety of 
supplemental materials are also available, 



including college course materials, viewer's 
guide, a "Cosmos 1981" calendar, poster (de- 
scribed as "a graphic teaching tood for use 
in classroom study of the universe"), video- 
cassettes and 16 mm films. "Cosmos," the book 
written by Dr. Sagan with lavish illustrations 
is a Book-of-the-Month Club selection. There 
is also a multi -media planetarium show which 
was offered to planetaria throughout the 
country and may be showing in your area. If 
you would like additional information on any 
of this, please give Beth a call at 758-7284. 

III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

FROM JOE BOWMAN: On Sept. 9, the Women's 
Volleyball Team conducted a volleyball clinic 
at St. Paul United Methodist Church. The 
clinic was held for the 14 teams in the Saint 
Paul Volleyball League. 



ADDY KLOEPPER of the 
cently appointed to a 
on the Task Force on 
on Higher Education ( 
Statewide Master Plan 
Education). She will 
Carolina Nurses Assoc 
Kloepper is currently 
on the Board of Direc 
for Nursing and will 
as Chairperson of the 
medical-surgical nurs 



ursing faculty was re- 
second three year term 
Nursing of the Commission 
formerly known as the 
ning Committee for Nursing 
represent the South 
i at ion on this body. Ms. 
serving a two year term 
tors of the S.C. League 
complete a two year term 
State Interest group on 
ing in November. 



CHUCK STAVELY will be attending a conference 

sponsored by Southern Bell Telephone on "Fund 

Raising by Telephone" in Greenville on Sept. 
29. 

HOLLY CROCKER'S (nursing) abstract of her 
graduate research entitled "A Comparison of 
the Levels of Knowledge of Hospital and Home 
Health Nurses Regarding the Criteria for Home 
Health Services Referrels" was recently 
published in the Southern Regional Education 
Board's, Abstracts of Nursing Research in 
the South . Vol. 2. 

BRYAN LINDSAY was guest lecturer with the 
gifted class of future studies at Wade Hampton 
High School in Greenville on Sept. 19. 

ARTHUR GEORGE, President for College of South 
Carolina College Placement Association attend- 
ed the fall meeting held at Lander College, 
Sept. 25-26. Arthur was also appointed acting 
Treasurer in July -1980 to serve until the 
fall meeting. 



...FACULTY/STAFF NOTES continued... 

ARTHUR GEORGE reported that the trip to 
use Columbia was highly successful. More 
than 50 companies, government and Graduate 
School participated. The van load of stu- 
dents made personal contacts and over half 
of them have arranged interviews or have 
begun exploring career option through help 
and materials from the Career Development 
Center. Why not encourage your students 
in your class to visit the Counseling and 
Career Development Center, M-213, for 
Career exploration materials, handouts, 
information and assistance? 



IV. uses SPORTS RESULTS 

THE uses SOCCER TEAM, under the coaching 
of Frank Kohlenstein, is now 6-6 on the 
season. Last week the soccer team lost to 
Furman on the road, 2-1 and then came 
back to beat Newberry on Wednesday 18-0. 
On Thursday, the team traveled to Warren 
Wilson where they came away with a 3-2 
victory. 

CONGRATULATIONS goes out to the USCS 
Women's Volleyball team after taking three 
victories in their opening quadrangel meet 
last Wednesday in the Hodge Center. The 
victories came with wins over USC-Aiken, 
Limestone and Presbyterian. 



C/dC^d"'""""# #^#4]| ^^jT^'Mv 



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 - SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1980 



tonday, September 29 



"tJon'-ConUct'pe'rsoT^'o^rry'BikeV"' ""''^" ""'"' ''"'"- '°'''- ''""'"' ""-"'SGA convoca- 

5:15-4:30 p.m. - Publications Board meeting. L255. Contact person - Harold Kelly 

i:30 p.m. -- uses Volleyball team vs. Central Wesleyan and Presbyterian at Central. Contact 
person - Joe hiowman. 



uesday, September 30 



ast day to apply for Student Teaching Program. Contact person - Bill Reitmeier. 

2:15-1:30 p.m. - Luncheon/Discussion with Mr. Satoru Honda on Shogun. Activities Building 
Contact person - Jim Brown. uu.iuiny. 

^Lindsa^° ''''^' " ^""^^"^""^^ ''^'''^^'^ ^^ Mitchell Korn, guitarist. A209. Contact person - Bryan 

:-9:00 p.m. -- Annual Reception at President Holderman's home. Bus leaves from Hodge Center at 
' 5:00 p.m. Contact person - Rita Weaver. 

-9:00 p.m. - Parents Anonymous meeting. Faculty conference room. Contact person - Jerry Lehman, 



ednesday, October 1 

^rl^.ll'l^ p.m. - Faculty Salad Bar. Sponsored by School of Nursing. Student Activities Building, 
. Contact person - Glenda Sims. lumy, 

^m^/ l^''? I ^^'^^ ■; "?^'^^ Arrived" -multi-media slide presentation. Will be shown in 
M124. Contact person Doyle Boggs. 

12:30-1:00 pm. — CWS Workshop. A125. Contact person - Al Gray. 

,:00 p.m. — uses soccer team vs. Newberry at Newberry. Contact person - Frank Kohlenstein. 

|:30 p.m. -- Academic Affairs Committee meeting. M215. 

:00-10:00 p.m. Nursing Program. HC247. Contact person - Addy Kloepper. 



Vrsday, October 2 

I 

:t. 2,3,4 and 5 - USCS volleyball team in tournament play at Central Florida University. 
Orlando, Florida. Contact person - Joe Bowman. 

00-12 noon - Science Education Seminar. Activities Building. Contact person - Ed White. 
|):50 a.m. -- Class lecture with Tom Wicker. M218. Contact person - Bob Elmore. 
p30-l;00 p.m. — CWS Workshop. A325. Contact person - Al Gray. 



...Thursday continued... J 

3:30 p.m. -- USCS soccer team vs. UNC-Asheville at USCS. Contact person - Frank Kohlenstein 

7-9:00 p.m. -- Parents Anonymous meeting. Faculty conference room. Contact person - Jerry Lehma 

7:15 p.m. -- "Current Trends in Southern Politics" -Tom Wicker. Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact 
person - Bob Elmore. 

Friday, October 3 

10:30 a.m. -- Administrative Council meeting. Chancellor's Conference room. 

12:00-1:30 p.m. -- Psychology Faculty meeting. Activities Building. 







_--- s*. 









/ol. 4 No 7 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS 



October 6, 1980 



i. OFFICIAL 

-ROn ED WHITE: The Academic Affairs Com- 
littee will meet on Oct. 8, at 3:30 p. m. in 
ledia <:!15. Tlie agenda includes 1) Grade 
^^hanues; Z) Humanities Course Proposal (SBS) 
5) AP and CLEP Policies; 4) Suspension Sys- 
:era. All members of AA have the materials 
)n each of these issues and faculty members 
ire urged to voice their opinions to their 
\A representative before this meeting. 

■ROM EB BARNES: The Faculty Advisory Com- 
littee will meet Friday, October 10 in the 
;onference Room in the Administration Build- 
ng at 12:30 p.m. 

'HE FACULTY SENATE will meet Friday, October 
.7, in L268 at 12:30 p.m. 

■ROM DAVID TAYLOR: There will be a Science, 
Engineering and Mathematics Division meeting 
londay, October 6, at 12:30 p.m. in A115. 

I. BULLETIN BOARD 



IRANTS AVAILABLE: Proposals to the USC Re- 
earch and Productive Scholarship Fund are 
!ue by October 31, 1980. Contact Jan Yost 
'or guidelines and application. 

.RAf\;T PROPOSAL SUBMITTED: A proposal entitled 
Computer Careers for Women and Minorities" 
Ids been submitted to Title I-A/Community Ser- 
'ice and Continuing Education Program request- 
ng $3,835. The project will involve a six- 
lour continuing education seminar on computer 
areers for minority members and women who 
re unemployed or underemployed. Principal 
nvestigator: Dr. Andy Crosland. 

iRANT AWARDED: The School of Nursing has re- 
eived a Nursing Capitation grant for $4,868 
support the BSN program. Program Director: 
s. Cecilia Cogdell, Dean, School of Nursing, 
ongratulations, Ms. Cogdell! 

i'ROM BRYANT REEVES: Book orders are due in 
jhe Dookstore by Oct. 15. Requests should 
>e routed through the Division Chairpersons 
;o be signed and forwarded to the bookstore. 



GRANT AWARDED: USCS has received $1,900 from the 
Office of Education/HEW for College Library Re- 
sources for a period beginning 10/1/80 to • 
8/30/81. This grant can be used to purchase 
books, periodicals, documents, and audio visual 
materials such as motion picture film, phono 
records^ video tapes, and microfilm. Principal 
Investigator: Jan Yost. 

W.J. BRYAN DORN and DR. GEORGE GRAHAM, the S.C. 
Democratic and Republican Party chairman, have 
agreed to a debate on Presidential politics at 
USCS on October 8 at 12:30 p.m. The debate will 
take place in Tukey Lecture Theatre. Sponsored 
by the USCS Political Science Club, there will 
be a mock-election following the debate for all 
USCS students. Admission is free and the public 
is invited. 

CHOONG LEE, will be guest speaker for the USCS' 
"Fifty Minutes" class today, October 6. The 
class meets at 12:30 p.m. in M217, and is open 
to the public. 

KENNEDY'S CHILDREN will be presented by the 
USCS Shoestring Players this week on Oct. 9, 10 
and 11. Performances will begin nightly at 8:15 
p.m. in Tukey Lecture Theatre. Reservations may 
be made be calling ext. 397 or 416 between 1 
and 5 p.m. daily. 

DR. RAYMOND VERNON, the distinguished inter- 
national economist from Harvard University, will 
visit USCS on Oct. 15, to open a symposium 
series called "Sunbelt International." Dr. 
Vernon will speak at 7:30 p.m. on Oct. 15 on 
"Foreign Manufacturing Firms in the Sunbelt: 
Motivations and Goals." Following the presenta- 
tion, there will be a panel discussion moder- 
ated by Dr. John McAlhany, and featuring com- 
ments by Max Heller of the State Development 
Board, Dr. A.J. Njuko of Benedict College, and 
Dr. Michael Jilling. The following day, Oct. 16, 
Dr. Vernon will talk on "The Changing Position 
of the U.S. Economy at 12:15 p.m. Both lectures 
will be delivered in Tukey Lecture Theatre. 



FROM JERRY BAKER: The Fall Dinner Dance 
win be held on Saturday, Oct. 25, in 
the Hodge Center. Dixie Dawn will provide 
the entertainment. The dinner dance is 
open to all USCS faculty, staff and students 
as well as alumni and friends of the univer- 
sity. Tickets are $7.50 for faculty and 
staff and $5.00 for students. The dance 
will begin at 8:00 p.m. and will conclude 
at midnight. Tickets may be purchased in 
the Student Affairs Office. 

"CAREERS IN TEXTILES" - Arthur George of 
the Counseling and Career Development Cen- 
ter reports that the program was presented 
to four classes. Over 140 students saw the 
career film: "loi Does It's Bit" and met 
with Jack Ellis of Milliken, John Medlin 
of Reigel Textiles and Charles Elrod of 
United Merchants. Please encourage your 
students to participate in Career Programs. 

THE SOUTHERN CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL 
STUDIES, in Atlanta, has announced several 
luncheon lectures. On Friday, Oct. 10, 
Young Shik Kim, Korean Ambassador to the 
U.S. and Kie Wook Lee will speak on "Direc- 
tions for the Political and Economic Future 
of South Korea." On Monday, Oct. 20, Jacobo 
Timerman, a former political prisoner in 
Argentina, will speak. He will also speak 
that evening at 7:30 at Emory University 
on "Protecting Human Rights: The Role of 
the Journalist." On Thursday, Oct. 23, 
Jose Miguel Alfaro, Second Vice President 
of Costa Rica, will speak on "Costa Rica's 
Economic Prospects in a Turbulent Region." 
For further information contact Jim Brown, 
L236, ext. 433. 

THE USCS SOMEN'S BRIDGE CLUB is starting 
back Tuesday, Oct. 14th, for the 1980-81 
year. If you are interested, but have not 
been called, please call "Muffet" Sansbury 
at 579-0322 or Libby Menees at 579-2261. 
The club will meet-at 7:30 p.m. at the 
Activities Building at USCS. 

FACULTY AND STAFF: Please return your 
United Way Cards and Pledges to Mim Shelden, 
HC123 by Friday, October 10. 

THE OCTOBER EXHIBIT in the Library Art Gal- 
lery will feature pottery by Ron Meyers. The 
display will open Oct. 6 with a reception 
from 8 to 9 p.m. Preceeding the reception, 
Mr. Meyers will give a lecture in Tukey 
Theatre at 7:30. 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

BERT MENEES has volunteered to provide data 
processing services without compensation to 
the ETV ENDOWMENT OF S.C, a non-profit fund- 
raising organization with headquarters in 
Spartanburg. The ENDOWMENT has acquired an 
IBM computer and Bert will design the systems, 
write the computer programs and train voluntee 
operators. Bert will be working with the organ 
zation's Financial Officer, Mr. Gilman Hooper, 
a former Milliken executive and former Direc- 
tor of the Charles Lea Center. The project 
will have indirect benefits to the ETV station 
on our campus. 

JIM BROWN attended the Fall Board Meeting of 
the Southern States Association of Asian and 
African Studied (SASASAAS), Sept. 19-20, at 
St. Andrews Presbyterian College, Laurinburg, 
N.C. Faculty are reminded of the free films on 
Asia and Africa available from SASASAAS. For 
a catalogue of the holdings see Jane Bradley, 
M134, or contact Jim Brown, L236, ext. 433. 

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: 

Thank you, Myk and I are '^ery grateful for 
the many expressions of kindness and sympathy 
from faculty, staff, and students following 
the recent loss of our wife and mother. -Gene 
Hutsell , Associate Chancellor for University 
Relations 

CAROL SCHWARTZ, nursing, had a research abstra 
entitled "Dietary Management of the Learning 
Disabled Child" published in Southern Regional 
Education Board's Abstracts of Nursing Researc 
in the South , Vol. 2 . 

ED WHITE, School of Education, was recently 
elected to the Executive Board of the S.C. 
Association for Supervision and Curriculum 
Development. On Oct. 3-4, Ed traveled to 
Fredericksburg, VA to present a paper on "Pro- 
cedures and Criteria for the selection of 
Elementary Science Programs" at the State 
Science Teachers Conference. 

TOM HAWKINS has had a paper published "Educa- 
bility in the Contemporary Sense." Tom will 
be traveling to Virginia Commonwealth Univer- 
sity in Richmond on Oct. 18 to deliver this 
paper to the South Atlantic Philosophy in 
Education Society. 

THE FACULTY WELFARE COMMITTEE will meet on 
Friday, October 10, at 12:15 p.m. in A114, 



uses- -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, OCTOBER 6 — SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1980 



lONDAY, October 6 

12:30 p.m. -- Science, Engineering and Mathematics Division Meeting. A115. 

12:30 p.m. -- "Fifty Minutes", guest speaker -Choong Lee. M217. Contact person - Alice Henderson 

4:00-7:00 p.m. -- Education Advisory Committee meeting. Activities Building. Contact person - 
Jim Brown. 

6:30 p.m. — USCS Volleyball team vs. USC Aiken, (away) 

7:30 p.m. -- Pottery lecture by Ron Meyers. Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact person - Katie Hicks. 

8:00-9:00 p.m. -- Art exhibit opening reception, featuring pottery by Ron Meyers. Library Art 
Gallery. Contact person - Katie Hicks. 



UESDAY, October 7 

12:15 p.m. — Commission for Higher Education meeting. Activities Building. Contact person - 
Doyle Boggs. 

1:30 p.m. -- Ceramics and Pottery Workshop by Ron Meyers. Art studio. Library Building. Contact 
person - Katie Hicks. 

6:00 p.m. -- USCS Volleyball team vs. Gardner Webb, (away) 

7:00-9:00 p.m. -- "Divorce" -Continuing Education class. Oct. 7-28-Tuesdays. L267. Contact 
person - John May. 

7:00-9:00 p.m. -- "Piano Tuning" -Continuing Education class. Oct. 7-Nov. 6-Tuesdays and 
Thursdays. A209. Contact person - John May. 

7:00-9:00 p.m. -- Parents Anonymous meeting. Faculty Conference Room. Contact person - Jerry 

Lehman. 

IDNESDAY, October 8 

12:30 p.m. -- Political debate with Bryan Dorn and George Graham. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
Contact person - Doyle Boggs. 

3:00 p.m. -- USCS soccer team vs. Winthrop (at USCS). 

3:00 p.m. -- Promotion and Tenure committee meeting. Faculty conference room. Contact person 
- Lawrence Moore. 

3:30 p.m. — Academic Affairs committee meeting. M215. 

7:00-9:00 p.m. -- Introduction to U.S. History and Politics. Continuing Education course. 
M218. Contact person - John May. 



THURSDAY, October 9 

7:00-9:00 p.m. -- Parents Anonymous meeting. Faculty conference room. Contact person - Jerry 
Lehman. 

7:00-9:30 p.m. -- Nursing workshop. Continuing Education course. Activities Bulding. Contact 
person - John May. 

8:15 p.m. -- Kennedy's Children -presented by Shoestring players. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
Contact person - Jim Cox. 

FRIDAY. October 10 

Last day to drop a course without Academic Penalty. Last day to apply for December graduation 

12:15 p.m. -- Faculty Welfare committee meeting. A118, 

12:30 p.m. -- Faculty Advisory committee meeting. Faculty conference room. 

8:15 p.m. -- Kennedy's Children -presented by Shoestring players. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
Contact person - Jim Cox. 

SATURDAY, October 11 

6:00 p.m. -- USCS volleyball team vs. Gardner Webb (home game). 

8:15 p.m. -- Kennedy's Children -presented by Shoestring players. Tukey Lectuee Theatre. 
Contact person - Jim Cox. 




s*. 






.1. 4 No, 



A Newsleiter For The Faculty Of USCS 



October 13, 1980 



. OFFICIAL 

ROM ED WHITE: All proposals which must be 
eviewed by Academic Affairs must be received 
)y Dec. 1 1980. Please try to get such re- 
[uests to the committee as soon as possible 
;o allow sufficient time for action by the 
lenate. 

HE ACADEMIC AFFAIRS committee will meet on 
lednesday (Oct. 15) at 3:30 p.m. in Media 
15. The agenda is: 1) SPHL 310- Ethics 
or the Professions (new course); 2) Review 
)f policy on transfer credits (time limit); 
i) Course description changes- Geology 103, 
Chemistry 232, Chemistry 231, Computer 
icience 509, Physics 201, and SNUR 321,322 
md 361. If you have questions about these 
)lease contact your school/division repre- 
;entative. Also each AA representative has 
laterial relative to our Advanced Placement 
md CLEP Programs. Please discuss these 
:opics at your school/division meeting. 
■Ed White. 

"HE FACULTY SENATE will meet on Friday, 
)ct. 17, at 12:30 p.m. in L268. 



I. BULLETIN BOARD 



iRANTS AVAILABLE: Proposals to the USC Re- 
learch and Productive Scholarship Fund are 
lue by Oct. 31, 1980. Contact Jan Yost for 
luidelines and application. 

"ROM BRYANT REEVES: Book orders are due in 
;he bookstore by Oct. 15. Requests should 
)e routed through the Division Chairpersons 
;o be signed and forwarded to the bookstore. 

D's FOR FACULTY, STAFF and STUDENTS will 
le made this week on Wednesday and Thursday 
Oct. 15 and 16) in the Public Safety Office. 
D's may be made from 10:00-12:00 noon; 
::00-4:00 p.m. and 6:00-8:00 p.m. This will 
le the last time that ID's will be made 
jr.i semester. 



DR. RAYMOND VERNON, the distinguished inter- 
national economist from Harvard University, 
will visit USCS this Wednesday, Oct. 15, to 
open a symposium series called "Sunbelt Inter- 
national." Dr. Vernon will speak at 7:30 p.m. 
on Oct. 15 on "Foreign Manufacturing Firms 
in the Sunbelt: Motivations and Goals." Follow- 
ing the presentation, there will be a panel 
discussion moderated by Dr. John McAlhany, 
and featuring comments by Max Heller of the 
State Development Board, Dr. A.O. Njuko of 
Benedict College, and Dr. Michael Jilling. 
On Thursday, Dr. Vernon will talk on "The 
Changing Position of the U.S. Economy at 12:15 
p.m. Both lectures will be delivered in Tukey 
Lecture Theatre and are free and open to the 
public. 

THE 3rd POETS DAY of this fall will be held 
this Friday. Activities will include enter- 
tainment by Locomotion-Vaudeville and Burritos 
will be served at a nominal cost. Everyone 
is invited to come and enjoy the activities 
at the Hodge Center. 

IF YOUR STUDENTS are not terribly excited 
about taking the National Teachers Exam, have 
them attend a study skills and testing 
strategies seminar that is being conducted by 
Developmental Services. This program, which 
is free of charge, has been especially designed 
to help alleviate the pretest anxieties that 
accompany the approaching test date. The 
seminar will be held on Oct. 29 and Nov. 5, 
from 12:15-1:15 in Library 272. Please announce 
to your classes. 

RONALD REAGAN WON, but a student straw vote 
at USCS last Wednesday was probably more re- 
markable because of the dissatisfaction it 
showed with both major candidates. Reagan 
snared 45 per cent of the vote, followed by 
Carter with 34 per cent, John Anderson with 
13 per cent and Ed Clark with 8 per cent. The 
straw poll was held as part of a Political 
Science Club project after the debate with 
Dorn and Graham. About 10% of the USCS student 
body participated in the mock election. 



...Bulletin Board continued... 

FROM JERRY BAKER: The Fall Dinner Dance 
will be held on Saturday, Oct. 25, in 
the Hodge Center. Dixie Dawn will provide 
the entertainment. The dinner dance is 
open to all USCS faculty, staff and students 
as well as alumni and friends of the univer- 
sity. Tickets are $7.50 for faculty and staff 
and $5.00 for students. The dance will begin 
at 8:00 p.m. and will conclude at midnight. 
Tickets may be purchased in the Student 
Affairs Office. 

THE USCS BATTLE OF THE BRAINS team won 
their 3rd match in a row last Friday. The 
team members are Ed Babin, Tom Allen and 
Ellenor McCaughrin. The USCS team will play 
for the championship this Friday at 9:30 
a.m. on the Bill Drake radio show when 
they face the Spartanburg Association of 
Accountants. 

FROM ARTHUR GEORGE: The following 
companies will be on campus during October 
for recruiting. Students should sign up 
in the Placement Office (M-213) if they 
desire to have an interview. 

Thurs., Oct. 14 - Spartan Food Systems, 
Inc. -Mr. Mike Hunsacker. 

Wed., Oct. 15 - Minnesota Mutual Life, 

- Mr. Ted Snipes. 

Wed., Oct. 15 - United Parcel Services, 

- Mr. Phil Roper. 

Thurs., Oct. 23 - Life of Virginia - Mr. 
Wade Rost. 

Mon, Oct. 27 - Brooks Fashions - Ms. 
Cheila Kalet. 

Tues., Oct. 28 - Metropolitan Life - Mr. 
William Parks. 

Wed., Oct. 29 - Law School of Walter F. 
George, Macon, Ga., - Prof. Michael 
Sabbath, J.D. 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

FROM NANCY P. MOORE: Thirty-five people 
enjoyed beautiful weather at Hunting Island 
State Park at the fifth annual faculty/staff 
beach camping trip. 

CAROL RENTZ (nursing) attended the NAACOG 
(Nurses Association American College of Ob- 
stetricians and Gynecologists) District 
Meeting in Washington, D.C., on Sept 28- 
Oct. 1. 



NANCY P. MOORE and LYNN HARRILL presented a 
paper, "Gwendolyn Brooks: A Model for Teach- 
ing the Elements of Poetry and for Encouragin 
Creative Writing," at the Southeastern Con- 
vention of the National Council of Teachers 
of Engl ish. 

NANCY BABB and BETTY PRYOR attended the 
Primary Nursing Care Workshop sponsored by 
Spartanburg General Hospital and held at 
Spartanburg Technical College on Sept. 16 and 
17. 

JIMM COX recently wrote and staged the Safety 
Sam show for the Spartanburg City Police 
Department. On Oct. 16th he will be conduc- 
ting workshops in theatre at Byrnes High 
School and on November 6 he will be enter- 
taining at Landrum High School. On November 
5 he will be conducting communication work- 
shops for the South Carolina Association of 
Volunteer Administrators. On Oct. 18 he will 
accompany several students to the Columbia 
campus for a production and plans are under- 
way to provide an opportunity for USCS acting 
students to enjoy workshops with the Royal 
Shakespeare Company form Stratford-on-Avon 
during January. 

IV. USCS SPORTS RESULTS 

THE LADY RIFLES are 11-9 on the season in 
volleyball. Scores from last weeks games are 
Rifles vs. Gardner-Webb, 15-5, 15-8; vs. 
Winthrop, 11-15, 16-14, 11-15; vs. Lander, 
15-1, 15-6; vs. use Aiken, 15-4, 8-15, 6-15. 
This week the volleyball team will face 
Gardner-Webb, Newberry, Erskine, Winthrop anc 
use Aiken. On Friday the team will travel to 
Conway to participate in the Coastal Tourna- 
ment. 

THE SOCCER TEAM is now 8-6, defeating Winthrc 
3-2 last Wednesday. Opponents this week will 
be College of Charleston and Baptist College. 

THE CROSS COUNTRY team suffered a loss to 
the Citadel last Tuesday (22-32). This 
Saturday they will travel to UNC Charlotte 
for a meet. 



uses— THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, OCTOBER 13 — SUNDAY, OCTOBER 19 




)NDAY, October 13 




6:00 p.m. -- USCS Volleyball team vs. Newberry/Erskine. Hodge Center 





JESDAY, October 14 



10:30-12:00 noon -- Special Ed - Meeting with area superintendents. Activities Building. Contact 
person - Betty Ebert. 

7:30-11:00 p.m. -- University women's bridge club meeting. Acitivities Building. Contact person 
- Muffet Sansbury. 

:DNESDAY, October 15 



TBA(?) -- USCS Soccer team vs. College of Charleston, (away) 

3:30 p.m. -- Academic Affairs Committee meeting. M215. Contact person - Ed White 

6:00 p.m. — USCS Volleyball team vs. Winthrop/USC Aiken, (away) 

7:00 p.m. -- Foreign Film Series. "Die Bekenntnissee des Hochstaplers Felix Krull" -German 
film with English subtitles. Media Building. Contact person - Regis Robe. 

7:00-9:00 p.m. -- "Introduction to U.S. History and Politics." -Continuing Ed course. M218. 
Contact person - John May. 

7:30 p.m. -- "Foreign Manufacturing Firms in the Sunbelt: Motivations and Goals." -Ray Vernon 
guest lecturer. (Sunbelt Symposium) Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact person - Cecilia Brown. 

^URSDAY, October 16 

9:00-12:30 p.m. -- Science Education Seminar. Activities Building. Contact person - Ed White. 

12:15 p.m. -- "The Changing International Position of the U.S. Economy." -Ray Vernon, guest 
lecturer. (Sunbelt Symposium) Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact person - Cecilia Brown. 

3:00 p.m. -- USCS Soccer Team vs. Baptist College, (away) 

UPAY, October 17 

12:00 p.m. -- USCS Volleyball team at Coastal Tournament. (Oct. 17 and 18) 
12:30-1:45 p.m. -- Faculty Senate meeting. L268. Contact person - Eb Barnes. 
12:00 noon - Poet's Day. Entertainment by Locomotion-Vaudville. Hodge Center. 

\TURDAY, October 18 - No Activities Scheduled 

JNDAY, October 19 

00-5:30 p.m. -- Business and Professional Women's Cliib meeting. Activities Building. Contact 
person - Vivian Watson. 




i*»^ 






\/ol. IV No. 9 



k Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS 



October 20, 1980 



I. OFFICIAL 

THE ACADEMIC FORWARD PLANNING COMMITTEE will 
have an initial meeting on Wednesday, 
October 29, in Dr. Eaglin's Office. The 
Tieeting will begin at 12:30 p.m. 

FROM LAWRENCE MOORE: The Promotion and 
Tenure Committee will meet on Wednesday, 
October 29, at 3:10 p.m. in the Faculty Con- 
ference room of the Administration Building. 
[At this meeting we will discuss the file 
ireview process. If you have other matters 
for the agenda, please contact me at ext. 
255. 

TO: FACULTY, ADMINISTRATION and STAFF, from 
Lee Holcombe, Chair, Self-Study Steering 
Committee: D Day-Deadline Day, for sub- 
'nission of Standard Committee reports for 
pur self-study --has come and gone. The 
next stage of the self-study process will be 
the institutional review of these reports. 
Please be assured that e'^ery member of the 
University community--faculty, administra- 
tion, staff and students--will have the 
opportunity to read these reports and to 
nake comments, queries and criticisms. Pre- 
cise details about the procedures for this 
institutional review will be forthcoming 
in FY I as soon as possible. Meanwhile, the 
Alord Processing Center is busy making copies 
Df all self-study reports so that enough 
A/ill be available to make possible the 
thorough institutional review which we need 
and want. 

:ANDIDATES for promotion and/or TENURE are 
reminded that October 31 is the deadline 
for preparation of their promotion and 
tenure files. Vita and Vita Update forms 
are being sent to all candidates for in- 
clusion in their files. If you do not re- 
ceive one, please call Toni McKissick, ext. 
200. 



TO FACULTY AND STAFF: You should by now have 
received fron> Jack Turner a package of 
materials concerning the Educational Founda- 
tion fund drive. This USC System effort pro- 
vides us with an excellent method of support- 
ing exactly those university causes which we 
choose to endorse. I urge all faculty and 
staff to respond generously to this once-a- 
year appeal on behalf of OUR institution. 
--01 in Sansbury 

ELECTION DAY, November 4, is a state holiday. 
The university will be closed and no classes 
will be held, or offices open. 

GRANTS AVAILABLE: Proposals to the USC Re- 
search and Productive Scholarship Fund are 
due by October 31, 1980. Contact Jan Yost 
for guidelines and application. 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 

FIFTY MINUTES, the world affairs discussion 
group, will hear this week from Habib Goudarzi 
He is a native of Iraq, who will discuss the 
current war in the Middle East. The discus- 
sion begins at 12:30 p.m., October 20 (today) 
in room 217 of the Media Center. On October 
27, Scott Hall ford, the Deputy Director of 
the U.S. State Department's Office of China 
and Mongolia, will visit the class. The pro- 
grams are open to all members of the USCS 
Community. Dr. Alice Henderson is the instruc- 
tor. 

DONUT NIGHTS - Donut Nights are designed for 
our evening students to meet in a relaxed 
atmosphere with administrators, the Deans of 
their Schools, faculty members, and student 
leaders. The Student Affairs Division is spon- 
soring two donut nights this semester. The 
schedule is as follows: Tuesday, Oct. 21, 
Library Lounge (2nd floor) and Wednesday, 
Oct. 22, Media Lobby. Both programs are 
scheduled from 5:00-8:00 p.m. For these pro- 
grams to be successful we need for faculty 

(continued) 



...BULLETIN BOARD continued... 

to come and bring their classes. We will 
have donuts, coffee, and lots of informa- 
tion of interest to evening students. PLEASE 
ANNOUNCE TO YOUR CLASSES. 

FROM uses PERSONNEL: The second in the 
Personal Financial Planning series of 
luncheon seminars will be conducted on this 
campus by Personnel and chaired by Professor 
Meyer Drucker. Dr. Drucker will provide the 
opportunity for employees to learn about the 
benefits from estate planning and wills. Also 
at the meeting we have coming from the South 
Carolina Retirement Systems state office Ms, 
Meta Webster to answer the unanswered ques- 
tions at the first session on the South 
Carolina Retirement System. If you plan 
to attend and have lunch, please return the 
response slip that you received in the mail 
last week, to the Personnel Office. The 
seminar is scheduled for Oct. 21, 12:15 p.m., 
in the Student Activities Building. 

STUDY SESSION FOR THE NTE: Faculty members 
from the School of Education and Developmental 
Services are hosting two NTE Study Skills 
Seminars. The programs are scheduled as 
follows: 

Wednesday, Oct. 29, M-124 from 12:30-2:00. 
Subjects to be discussed: Important Theories 
and Theorists; Schools of thought; Legislation; 
Measurement and evaluation; New Trends and 
issues in education. 

Wednesday, Nov. 5, M-124 from 12:15-1:15. 
Subjects to be discussed: Study Skills; Test 
Taking Strategies. 

Please announce these seminars to your 
classes. 

FROM ARTHUR GEORGE: USCS Placement Director's 
family, Geraldine, Jammie, Arthur Jr., and 
Arthur Sr. , participated in the recent "March 
of Dimes" walk-a-thon last week. They walked 
a total of 16 miles. If you wish to contribute 
please channel your contribution thru Arthur 
George, M-213 this week. Your financial support 
toward the fight against birth defects is 
appreciated. Note: Make check payable to: "March 
of Dimes." 

FREE FILMS: The National Film Board of Canada 
has an international reputation for producing 
films of high quality. Many of these films are 
available free from the Canadian Embassy. The 
films cover a variety of topics, including 
the creative arts, science, and athletics, 
(continued) 



"Film Canada," a catalogue of these films 
is available from Jane Bradley in the Audio 
Visual Production Center, M-134, ext. 264, 
or Jim Brown, L-236, ext. 433. 

CANADIAN FELLOWSHIPS: The Canadian govern- 
ment sponsors a Canadian Studies Faculty 
Enrichment Programme designed to provide 
U.S. faculty an opportunity to undertake 
study and research relating to Canada and 
to devise, as a result, new courses on an 
aspect of Canadian studies that they will 
offer as part of their regular teaching 
load. The new course does not need to be 
devoted entirely to Canadian studies. 
Monthly stipends of up to $1,250 for up to 
six months are offered. The deadline for 
awards to be held from April 1, 1981 throug 
March 31, 1982 is October 31, 1980. For 
additional information and application 
procedures, contact Jim Brown, L-236, ext. 
433. 

DISCOVER SRI LANKA: On Wednesday, Oct. 22, 
12:30-1:30, in L-255, Mr. Ananda 
Wranasuriya, a native of Sri Lanka (Ceylon) 
and father of one of our foreign students, 
will show a sound film he made himself and 
discuss his country and its culture. The 
event is sponsored by the International Clu 
and all are welcome. 

THE SEVENTH annual Winthrop College Writers 
Conference has been scheduled for Thursday, 
November 13 through Saturday, November 15. 
Featured this year are Alice Cabaniss, Ann 
Cameron, Grace Freeman, Louis Gallo, Daniel 
Hal pern, Dorothy Hill, Rodger Kamenetz, 
James Laughlin, Herbert Liebman, Susan 
Ludvigson, Sally McMillan, Ruth Moose, 
Robert Sutherland, and Robert Wallace. A 
brochure is available in Information Servic 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

MIKE ALSTON AND ARTHUR GEORGE received from 
Kiwanis of North Spartanburg, awards for 
outstanding service. Arthur is a director 
and Mike is a member of the club. 

BOB ADDLETON AND BECKY EDWARDS, Counseling 
and Career Development Center, presented a 
paper, "Career Counseling: Another Brick in 
the Wall? at the Southeastern Conference 
of Counseling Center Personnel, October 16, 
at Louisville, Kentucky. 



j.. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES continued... 

IrTHUR GEORGE, ROSANNE BARKER and JOHN 
)ANILUK, Placement Directors, have had a 
)aper accepted by Southern College Place- 
iient Association "The Consortium Approach." 
[Career Carousel.) The paper is to be pre- 
sented to the association's convention. 

)0N BROWNING, director of general services 
it uses, recently completed the Executive 
Housekeeping Certificate Program at Mary 
Jlack Hospital. Don is now eligible to 
ipply for membership in the National 
Executive Housekeeping Association, Inc. 

3ARBARA MILLER, nursing, attended the 
National Nursing Care Workshop, sponsored 
Dy Spartanburg General Hospital Continuing 
Education Department on October 9 and 10. 
Speakers included Dr. Elhassani, director 
3f intensive care nursing at SGH, Dr. Rao, 
resident of SGH and Carol Rentz, professor 
in nursing at USCS. 

kEGIS ROBE introduced the Rev. H.L. Stein- 
Schneider, Pastor of the French Protestant 
Church of Washington, D.C., and moderated 
a discussion of Huguenot history at the 
(Alliance Francaise meeting, Oct. 10. JIM 
3R0WN performed a similar function when 
Rev. Stein-Schneider spoke at the Church 
pf the Advent, Saturday morning, Oct. 11. 
Rev. Stein-Schneider's visit to Spartanburg 
A/as partially funded by a grant from the 
|5outh Carolina Committee for the Humanities 
ritten by ALICE HENDERSON. 



THE VOLLEYBALL TEAM had 4 wins last week and 
one loss, bringing their record to 15-10. Wins 
came over Gardner-Webb, Newberry, Erskine and 
USe-Aiken, while losing to Minthrop. At the 
time of publication, the volleyball team was 
playing in the Coastal Tournapient. Games 
this week will be against Presbyterian, Lander, 
Columbia College, North Greenville and Furman. 



IV. COMMUNITY EVENTS 

3N WEDNESDAY, October 22 
Tales, Caucer's "sondrey 
jin Rob Inglis' one-man s 
i^ethodist College. The p 
[SMC's Humanities 101-102 
gram begins at 7:30 p.m. 
'\udi tori urn and is free a 
Dublic. More information 
by calling Steve Brannon 



The Canterbury 

folk" come alive 
how at Spartanburg 
rogram is part of 

course. The pro- 

in the Camak 
nd open to the 

may be obtained 

at SMC. 



\l. USCS SPORTS RESULTS 



FHE SOCCER TEAM now stands at 8-7-1, with 
i loss of 2-0 to the College of Charleston 
and a 2-2 tie with Baptist College last 
veek. Opponents this week are Coker and 
^resbyterian College. 



There are limited funds available for faculty release time for the 
spring semester. Please submit the attached USCS Faculty Released 
Time Proposal Form to the Faculty Secretary no later than Wednesday ^ 
November 12. 

USCS FACULTY RELEASED TIME PROPOSAL 



Name 



Division or school 



3. Type of project (check one) 

Development of new course 

Improvement of existing course 

Research or experimentation in teaching techniques 

^Professional development to improve your breadth or depth in 



course content 
_Research or productive scholarship 



_Other (please specify) 



Summary of proposal (approximately 250 - 500 words) 
Include: 

(1) An outline of the methods which you intend to follow 
in carrying out the proposal. 

(2) A statement of how your time will be allocated for 
work on the project (averaging about ten hours a 
week) . 

(3) The specific benefits to the University that will 
result from the project. 



uses— -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, OCTOBER 20 — SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1980 



)NDAY, October 20 

:00-5:00 p.m. -- Nursing Continuing Education workshop. Activities Building. Contact person - 
John May. 

3:30 a.m. -- Administrative Council meeting. Chancellor's conference room. 

?:30 p.m. -- 50 Minutes world affairs discussion group. Guest speaker - Habib Goudarzi . 
M217. Contact person - Alice Henderson. 

:00-5:00 p.m. -- Computer Services committee meeting. Faculty conference room, administration 
building. Contact person - Dick Oilman. 

:00 p.m. -- Volleyball team vs. Presbyterian and Lander (away). 

JESDAY, October 21 

l:\b p.m. -- "Your Taxes" and "Estate Planning" -Meyer Drucker. Personnel luncheon meeting. 
Activities Building. Contact person - Treva Hammrick. 

:00 p.m. -- Soccer team vs. Coker (away). 

:00-8:00 p.m. -- Donut Night. Library lounge - 2nd floor. Contact person - Carol Smith. 

:00-9:00 p.m. -- Bookkeeping and Accounting for the Small Businessman -continuing education 
shortcourse. Tuesdays and Thursdays, Oct. 21-Oct. 30. Fee $25.00. M328. Contact person - 
John May. 

:00-9:00 p.m. -- Parents Anonymous meeting. Faculty conference room, administration building. 
Contact person - Jerry Lehman. 

[DNESDAY, October 22 

.:00-2:00 p.m. -- Movie - "Oh God!" - Tukey Lecture Theatre. SGA presentation. 

,30 p.m. -- Academic Affairs Committee Meeting. M215. 

00-8:00 p.m. -- Donut Night. Media Lobby. Contact person - Carol Smith. 

00 p.m. -- Volleyball team vs. Columbia College (away). 

00-9:00 p.m. -- Movie - "Oh God!" - Tukey Lecture Theatre. SGA presentation. 

30-9:30 p.m. -- AYSO Soccer meeting. A209. 

1URSDAY, October 23 

05-4:30 p.m. -- New faculty advisors workshop. L255. Contact person - Carol Smith. 

30 p.m. -- Soccer team vs. Presbyterian (away). 

00-9:00 p.m. -- Parents Anonymous meeting. Faculty conference room, administration building. 
Contact person - Jerry Lehman. 



FRIDAY, October 24 

8:00-2:00 p.m. -- In-Service Training Workshop. Activities Building. Contact person - Andy 
Crosland. 

9:00-2:00 p.m. -- Student Teaching Seminar. Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact person - Bill 
Reitmeier. 

1:30-3:00 p.m. -- New Faculty Advisors Workshop. L272. Contact person - Carol Smith. 

6:00 p.m. -- Volleyball team vs. N. Greenville and Furman (home). 

SATURDAY, October 25 

8:00-12:00 p.m. -- Fall Dinner Dance. Hodge Center Lobby. For tickets and information contact 
Student Affairs. 




•M/h, 



u \0 






/oi. IV. No. lu A Newsletter for The Faculty 0/ USCS October 27 



1980 



; OFFICIAL 

[HE ACADEMIC FOKWAKD PLANNING COI-IMITTEE will 
lave an initial meeting on Wednesday, October 
^9, in Dr. Eaglin's Office. The meeting 
;in begin at 12:30 p.m. 

-ROi'i LAWRENCE MOORE: The Promotion and 
fenure Committee will meet on Wednesday, 
October 29, at 3:10 p.m. in the Faculty Con- 
ference room of the Administration Building. 
M this meeting we will discuss the file 
review process. If you have other matters 
for the agenda, please contact me at ext. 
255. 

CANDIDATES FOR PROMOTION AND/OR TENURE are 
reminded that October 31 is the deadline 
for preparation of their promotion and 
tenure files. Vita and Vita Update forms 
are being sent to all candidates for in- 
clusion in their files. If you do not re- 
ceive one please call Toni McKissick, ext. 
200. 

ELECTION DAY, November 4, is a state 
holiday. The university will be closed 
and no offices will be open or classes 
held. 

FROM ERIC JOLLY: COMPUTER ASSISTED REGIS- 
TRATION (C.A.R.) will be held from November 
3 through November 14. Please urge students 
to see their advisor's during this time. 

THERE WILL BE A CALLED MEETING of the 
Science, Mathematics and Engineering 
Division, Monday, October 27, 12.30 p.m. 
A115. 

THE INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION COMMITTEE will 
meet Wednesday, October 29, 12:30-1:30 p.m. 
in L257. 

THE FACULTY ADVISORY COMMITTEE will meet 
Wednesday, October 29, at 4:00 p.m. Please 
meet at the Faculty Conference Room, 
Administration Building. 



EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION FUND: We have had a 
good beginning for our faculty/staff fund 
drive. As of Thursday, 2/23/80 we have pledged 
a total of $2,338. This compares with $4,867 
pledged in two drives during calendar year 
1979. REMEMBER, you will be asked only one 
time during this fiscal year. Return your 
commitment cards by November 1 (even if you 
do not make a pedge or contribution). 
-Jack Turner 

ALL FACULTY AND STAFF: Please note that the 
phone extension numbers for the School of 
Education were left off the front of the new 
campus phone directories. That extension is 
373 or 378. If your phone extension or room 
number changes, please contact the switchboard 
or Janella Koob in Information Services, so 
that this information may be kept up-to-date. 

II. BULLETIN BOARD 

HAVE LUNCH WITH AN AUSTRALIAN: On Friday, Oct. 
31, 12:30-1:30 p.m., there will be an informal 
luncheon in the Activities Building ($1.50 at 
the door) for interested faculty and staff. 
The guest will be Mr. Frank Hurley, Head of 
the Department of Humanities and Social 
Sciences at Ballacat College, Victoria, 
Australia. Mr. Hurley has extensive experience 
in the Australian public school system and 
M.A.s in politics and history. He will be 
happy to answer questions about whatever topics 
related to Australia you may wish to ask. 
Please sign up at division/school mailboxes 
or contact Jim Brown, L-236, ext. 433, by 3:00 
p.m., Wednesday, October 29. 

THE FALL DINNER DANCE, originally scheduled for 
this past Saturday, October 25, was postponed 
until later this fall. Information will be 
forthcoming in FY I as soon as a new date is 
decided upon. 

FROM JERRY BAKER: The Student Activities Office 
is now accepting information on events for the 
Soring 1981 calendar. Special note should be 
taken by faculty advisors of student clubs and 

(continued) 



...BULLETIN BOARD continued... 

organizations. Please turn event dates in 
so that they will be noted on the calendar. 

THE STUDENT AFFAIRS OFFICE will be accepting 
nominations for Who's Who in American 
Colleges and Universities through 5:00 p.m., 
October 31. Students should be nominated 
on the basis of academics and campus partici- 
pation and have earned 75 hours credit and 
have at least a 2.5 GPR. Nominations may 
come from faculty and staff. 

STUDY SESSION FOR THE NTE: Faculty members 
from the School of Education and Develop- 
mental Services are hosting two NTE Study 
Skills Seminars. The programs are scheduled 
as follows: 

Wednesday, Oct. 29, M-124 from 12:30- 
2:00 p.m. Subjects to be discussed: Impor- 
tant Theories and Theorists; Schools of 
Thought; Legislation; Measurement and 
Evaluation; New Trends and Issues in 
Education. 

Wednesday, Nov. 5, M-124 from 12:15 to 
1:15 p.m. Subjects to be discussed: Study 
Skills; Test Taking Strategies. 

Please announce these seminars to your 
classes. 

FROM JERRI GREENE, Sesquicentennial Com- 
mission: One of the major aims of the 
Sesquicentennial Celebration is to involve 
as many segments of the population as pos- 
sible. We especially want to involve the 
youth of the county. To begin this public 
in-put, the Commission is seeking ideas 
in a motto contest. People are requested 
to submit ideas in writing (no phone calls). 
There is no age limit. The motto should 
not be longer than eight words, and the 
prizes will be $100, $50, and $25. The 
chosen Sesqui motto will be used along 
with the logo on all Sesqui publicity. 
Written entries may be sent to the 
Sesquicentennial Commission, Chamber of 
Commerce, P.O. Box 1636 (29304) or deposited 
in Sesqui Motto drop boxes in stores on 
the Main Street Mall. The contest will 
run from Monday, Oct. 13 to Friday, Oct. 
31. 

ARTHUR GEORGE was elected chairperson of 
the Advisory Board for Spartanburg Retired 
Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) last week. 
The program operates on a budget of approxi- 
mately $57,000 per year. Volunteers are 
assigned to USCS. Contact Arthur George, 
(continued) 



ext. 414, if you are interested in having a ': 
volunteer assigned to your department. Word 
orders such as bulk mail, some typing and 
other jobs can be arranged. This assistance 
is FREE. 

LAST WEEK, the United States announced a 
major grain sale to the People's Republic of 
China. On Monday, October 27, USCS will have 
a campus speaker who is one of the most 
qualified individuals in the country to dis- 
cuss the implications of this development. Hi 
is Scott Hall ford. Deputy Director for the 
Office of the People's Republic of China and 
Mongolia for the US State Department. Mr. 
Hallford will visit several USCS classes and 
will make a public presentation in Room 217 
of the Media Center at 12:15 p.m. Please L 
encourage your students to attend. | 

Another program on China is scheduled as 
part of the Sunbelt International convocatio 
series on Nov. 5. Novelist Han Suyin will be 
speaking that day at 12:15 in Tukey Lecture 
Theatre on "Sino-American Relations: China's 
Foreign Policy and the Role of American 
Women in China." Her evening address, aat 7:3 
p.m. will be on the subject "W.iat Si no- 
American Relations Mean to the World." 

ON FRIDAY, October 31, Student Affairs and 
Budweiser are sponsoring the First GREAT 
PUMPKIN RUN, to begin at 12:30 beside the 
Hodge Center. The entry fee will be $1.00 
which will entitle the first 100 entries 
who finish to a t-shirt and free beer. 

The faculty should note that they have been 
challenged to organize a team to compete for 
the $25.00 first prize. 

Registration and more information may be 
obtained in the Student Affairs Office. 

FROM KATIE HICKS: The works of McArthur Good 
win will be featured during November in the 
Library Art Gallery. Goodwin is a teacher at 
Spartanburg High School and is on the USCS 
Fine Arts Advisory Council. The multi-media 
exhibit will open on Nov. 3 with a short 
lecture by Goodwin at 7:30 in Tukey Lecture 
Theatre and an opening reception in the Art 
Gallery from 8:00-9:00 p.m. 

FEDERAL EMPLOYMENT -SEASONAL EMPLOYMENT - 
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT: Applications are now 
available in USCS Placement Office for those 
interested in applying. Application deadline 
are rapidly approaching. Job titles include: 
Park Aid/Technician/Ranger, Secretaries, 
Clerks, Bookkeepers, All Government Depart- 
ments. Agencies include: U.S. Dept. of the 
(continued) 



..BULLETIN BOARD continued. 



Interior; U.S. Dept. of Labor; and the 
U.S. Dept. of Defense, all government 

/|o|i,Tr- 1 MiPTi I -. 

ARTHUR GEORGE announces that "OPERATION 
NATIVE SON" an annual career and recruiting 
program will be held December 30 in Asheville, 
N.C. This two (2) day program involves over 
one hundred (100) companies and conducts 
over one thousand (1000) personal interviews. 
Any uses students, graduates, faculty and 
staff members who would like to attend, 
further information is available in the 
placement office M-213. Contact or sign-up 
in the Placement Office or call Arthur 
George at ext. 414. 

III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

Nine School of Nursing faculty worked in 
direct clinical practice during the summer 
of 1930. Their work facilitated meeting some 
of the health care needs of clients in our 
area of the state, supported community and 
University relationships, and enabled 
faculty to remain in contact with clinical 
needs and direct nursing practice. They 
were: 

BRENDA HARDEN was employed as a staff 
nurse at Spartanburg General Hospital on 
the Pediatrics Unit. 

KAREN PEEL worked as a staff nurse in the 
Coronary Care Unit at Spartanburg General 
Hospital and served on a part-time basis as 
charge nurse on that unit during the evening. 

SUSAN ROBINSON worked at Spartanburg 
General Hospital in the Well Baby Nursery 
and the Intensive Care Nursery. 

BETTY PRYOR worked for Surgical Associates 
of Spartanburg, P. A. (The office of Dr. 
Colvin, Jeffords, Morris, and Evans). 

HOLLY CROCKER worked as a private duty 
nurse and worked part-time at the Spartan- 
burg County Health Department in Home Health 
Services. 

DEANNE LEDFORD worked in general medical - 
surgical nursing at Mary Black Hospital. 

BARBARA MILLER worked on the post-partum 
unit and general medical-surgical units at 
Mary Black Memorial Hospital. 

ALISON RUSHING was employed by Greenville 
General Hospital Systems to work in the In- 
tensive Care Units and to cover other nursing 
units as the need arose. 

MARY STROSSNER worked as a Community Health 
nurse in Home Health Services at the Greenville 
County Health Dept. She also served as nurse 
practioner at Henry Woodward Clinic in Greenv. 



HOLLY CROCKER, BRENDA HARDEN and JUDY KUGLER 
participated in a blood pressure screening 
at Westgate Mall during S.C. Nurse Week. The 
screening was sponsored by the Piedmont Dis- 
trict Nurses' Association. Approximately 176 
blood pressures were taken during the four 
hour period on October 17, 1980. 

BRENDA HARDEN attended the Second Annual 
Neonatal -Pediatric Clinicourse on Cardio- 
pulmonary Critical Care at the Hyatt Hotel 
in Birmingham, Alabama on Oct. 9-11. The 
clinicourse was sponsored by the Academy of 
Allied Medical Services. 

GLORIA CLOSE, Education Coordinator for 
Spartanburg 70001, has recently participated 
in several professional activities. On Sept. 
24, 1980, Mrs. Close conducted a training 
seminar for the instructors of Spartanburg 
Technical College's Project Employability. 
The seminar was entitled, "The Adult Learner: 
the Ages and Stages of Adult Development as 
Related to the Teaching-Learning Transaction.' 
She also participated in Seventy Thousand 
and One Career Association (SEVCA) planning 
workshops held in Wilmington, Delaware, 
September 28-30, 1980. Most recently, Mrs. 
Close served as an adult basic education 
panelist at the Employability Skills for the 
1980' s Conference sponsored by Spartanburg 
Technical College and Columbia University. 
The conference was held in Spartanburg, Oct. 
8-10, 1980. 

SHARON CHERRY, PEGGY NICKSON and REGIS ROBE 
attended the Southern Conference on Language 
Teaching in Charleston on October 3, 4, 1980. 
As President of the South Carolina Conference 
on Foreign Language Teaching, Dr. Regis Robe 
Presided over two of the sessions. 

IV. uses SPORTS RESULTS 



THE WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL TEAM is 21-14 for the 
season with wins last week over Presbyterian, 
Lander and Columbia College. Results of 
games with North Greenville and Furman over 
the past weekend will be published next week. 
This week the volleyball team will face 
Newberry, Baptist, Erskine and Limestone. 

THE SOCCER TEAM IMPROVED their record to 
10-7-1, with wins over Coker and Presbyterian 
College last week. However, USCS has learned 
that it will have to forfeit six of its 
soccer victories this fall due to ineligibility 
of one of its players. According to Tom Davis, 
the situation was discovered during a routine 



check of player records. It was found that 
one player, an older student who had made 
the varsity through efforts on the USCS 
club team a year ago, dropped a course on 
Sept. 4, due to conflicts with his full-time 
off campus job. This action left him with 
10 semester hours attempted, two short of 
the NAIA's definition of full-time status. 
Davis said that USCS immediately held the 
player out of action pending a ruling by 
NAIA District 6, which was received last 
Tuesday. Davis stated: "There is no 
question that under the rules, the player 
was ineligible. We are certainly disappointed 
for the players, who had an excellent chance 
to make the district playoffs in our first 
season in the sport. However, we feel that 
we have had a very successful soccer season, 
and this does not make any difference in 
the way we feel about the outstanding job 
our players and Coach Frank Kohlenstein have 
done this year. As an indication of the 
character of the team, they have won two 
straight shutout victories since they learned 
of the situation. " 
USCS has three games remaining this season, 
road trips to Presbyterian, Davidson, and 
Brevard. 



ATTENTION ALL ACADEMIC ADVISORS: 

The following courses are not in the 1980-1981 USCS catalog, 
but they either have been through the Academic Affairs process or 
currently are nearing completion of that process and may appear in 
the spring, summer, and fall schedules before a new catalog is 
printed. Please tear this sheet off and insert it into your 
catalog for reference purposes. 

*SEGL 275 Masterpieces of World Literature I . (3) Selections from 
the literature of Western and non-Western cultures from ancient 
times through the seventeenth century. 

SEGL 276 Masterpieces of World Literature II . (3) Selections from the 
literature of Western and non-Western cultures from the eighteenth 
century to modern times. 

*SEGL 279 Survey of American Literature I . (3) An intensive survey 
of the writings of American authors from colonial times to 1860. 

SEGL 280 Survey of American Literature II . (3) An intensive survey 
of twentieth-century American poetry, drama, and prose from 1860 to 
the present. 

*ENGL 289 Survey of British Literature I . (3) An intensive survey of 
British poetry, drama, and prose from the Old English Period to 1800. 

*ENGL 290 Survey of British Literature II . (3) An intensive survey 
of British poetry, drama, and prose from 1800 to the present. 

SEGL 322 Contemporary Literature . (3) A survey of prose, poetry, and 
drama written in the second half of the twentieth century. 

SEGL 423 British Literature, 1900-1950 . (3) This survey of the literature 
of the first half of the twentieth century includes representative readings 
from major poets, dramatists, and fiction writers. 

SEGL 425 American Literature, Beginnings to 1830 . (3) A study of writing 
in colonial and revolutionary America, with special attention to literary 
types and to the influence of religion and politics on these types. 

SEGL 426 American Literature, 1830-1865 . (3) Readings of representative 
works of Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Longfellow, Holmes, 
Lowell, and others. 

SEGL 427 American Literature, 1865-1910 . (3) Readings in representative 
works of Dickinson, Whitman, Twain, Howells, James, Norris, Crane, 
Dreiser, Adams, and others. 

SEGL 428 American Literature, 1910-1950 . (3) Readings from representative 
poets, dramatists, and fiction writers of the period. 



*SPHL 310 Ethics for the Professions . (3) A critical examination of 
selected moral issues and problems of current concern within the 
professions. Specific topics for study vary, but they are of special 
interest for the fields of medicine and health care, law and criminal 
justice, business, and journalism. 



*These courses appear on the spring 1981 schedule 




intra -office memo 



^ 



Date ^Q/"/^ 



From: PLACEMENT OFFICE 
To: HI 



5y)j:gj.f. SCHEDULE FOR SENIORS ON "RESUME AND INTERVIEW HDRKSHOPS" 

ARTHUR GEORGE HAS PLANNED A SERIES OF JOB SEARCH WORKSHOPS FOR THE MORE 

THAN 5Q0 SENIORS. EIGHT (8) SECTIONS OF THE 501 SERIES WILL BE CONDUCTED. 

PLEASE ANNOUNCE THE ATTACHED SCHEDULE TO SENIORS AND POST AFTER ANNOUNCING 

TO ALL YOUR CLASSES. 

501 - RESUME AND INTERVIEW TECHNIQUES WORKSHOPS SERIES. 

NOTE: ATTENDANCE IS REQUIRED AT ONLY ONE SECTION OF THE 501 SERIES. THE 

5Q2 SERIES WILL BE OFFERED NEXT SEMESTER. 



SCHEDULE 



Section 1 - Monday, Oct. 27 
Section 2 - Monday, Oct. 27 
Section 3 - Tuesday, Oct. 28 
Section 4 - Tuesday, Oct. 28 
Section 5 - Thursday, Oct. 30 
Section 6 - Thursday, Oct. 30 
S(H t ion 7 - Monday, Nov. 10 
N(H:t, ion 8 - Wednesday, Nov. 12 



12:20pm - 1:45pm 
4:30pm - 5:30pm 
9:25am - 10:40am 
4:20pm - 5:30pm 

10:50am - 12:05pm 
1:40pm - 2:55pm 

11:30am - 12:20pm 

10:30am - 11:20am 



Room L-259 
Room L-259 
Room M-215 
Room M-215 
Room M-215 
Room M-215 
Room L-272 
Room L-272 



uses -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, OCTOBER 27 -- SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1980 



MONDAY, October 27 

12:20-1:45 p.m. -- Resume and Interviewing Workshop. L259. Contact person - Arthur George. 

12:30 p.m. -- "50 Minutes" -guest lecturer, Scott Hallford, Deputy Director of the U.S. State 
Department's Office of China and Mongolia. M217. Contact person - Alice Henderson. 

12:30 p.m. -- Science, Mathematics and Engineering Division meeting. A115. 

12:30-1:45 p.m. -- Computer Science Majors meeting. Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact person - 
Andy Crosland. 

2:00-4:00 p.m. -- Lecture by Dr. Joseph Hodge, Medical University of S.C. A304. 

4:30-5:30 p.m. -- Resume and Interviewing Workshop. L259. Contact person - Arthur George. 

TUESDAY, October 28 

9:25-10:40 a.m. -- Resume and Interviewing Workshop. M215. Contact person - Arthur George. 

3:30-4:30 p.m. -- Resume and Interviewing Workshop. M215. Contact person - Arthur George. 

6:00 p.m. -- Volleyball team vs. Newberry and Baptist at Newberry. 

7:00-9:00 p.m. -- Parents Anonymous meeting. Faculty Conference room. Administration Building. 

WEDNESDAY, October 29 

12:30-1:30 p.m. -- International Education Committee meeting. L257. 

12:30 p.m. -- Academic Forward Planning Committee meeting. Dr. Eagline's Office. Contact 
person - Eb Barnes. 

12:30-2:00 p.m. -- NTE Study Session. M124. Contact person - Carol Smith. 

2:00-4:30 p.m. -- New Faculty Advisors Workshop. L272. Contact person - Carol Smith. 

3:00-6:00 p.m. -- Minority Affairs Committee Meeting. Activities Building. 

3:10 p.m. -- Promotion and Tenure Committee meeting. Faculty Conference Room. 

3:30 p.m. -- Academic Affairs Committee Meeting. M215. 

3:30 p.m. -- Soccer team vs. Davidson, away. 

4:00 p.m. -- Faculty Advisory Committee meeting. Meet at Faculty Conference Room. 

Continued 



...CALENDAR continued 

THURSDAY, October 30 

9:00-12:30 p.m. -- Science Education Seminar with area principals. Activities Building. 
Contact person - Ed White. 

10:50-12:05 p.m. -- Resume and Interviewing Workshop. M125. Contact person - Arthur George. 

1:40-2.55 p.m. -- Resume and Interviewing Workshop. M125. Contact person - Arthur George. 

6.30 p.m. -- Volleyball team vs. Erskine and Limestone at Due West. 

7:00-9:00 p.m. -- Parents Anonymous meeting. Faculty Conference Room. 

FRIDAY, October 31 

12:30 p.m. -- First Great Pumpkin Run. Hodge Center. Contact Student Affairs for more 
information. 

12:30-1:30 p.m. -- Informal luncheon with Frank Hurley. Activities Building. Contact person 
Jim Brown. 

8:00 p.m. -until -- SGA Halloween Party. Hodge Center. For more information contact Student 
Affairs. 

SATURDAY, November 1 

2:00 p.m. -- Soccer team vs. Brevard Club, away. 







/oi. IV. No. 11 A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS November 3, i98o 



1 1. OFFICIAL 

JELECTION DAY, November 4, is a state 
Inoliday. The university will be closed 
land no offices will be open or classes 
held. 

FROM ERIC JOLLY: COMPUTER ASSISTED REGIS- 
TRATION (C.A.R.) will be held from November 
j3 through November 14. Please urge students 
to see their advisor's during this time. 

THE ACADEMIC FORWARD PLANNING COMMITTEE 
will meet in L259, Wednesday, Nov. 19, 
at 12.30. The agenda includes what services 
should be expanded for night students and 
whether limitations on remedial courses 
are appropriate. Contact person - Ron 
Sobczak. 

FROM REGIS ROBE - To Academic Advisors: 
For the first time, a Business French Course, 
SFRN 103, is offered this Spring. This 
course is a reading course for beginners. 
It concentrates on translating skills in 
the area of business (or sciences). It 
can be taken as a credit course for 3 
credit hours or through Continuing Education. 
This course does not count toward language 
requirements but can be taken as an elective. 
It is particularly recommended for Business 
I'lajors. 

FROM MIM SHELDEN: United Way Summary: 80 
faculty and staff members contributed $2924.00 
to the United Way campaign. 47 people returned 
cards and 119 faculty and staff gave no re- 
sponse. 

POSITION AVAILABLE: Financial Aid and Veterans 
Affairs Officer - Grade 29, $14,535. Available 
January 7, 1981, Deadline for applications - 
November 15, 1980. For more information, contact 
USCS Personnel . 



THE FOLLOWING IS THE USCS POLICY ON cancella- 
tion of classes due to bad weather. Please 
give this policy the widest possible dissemina- 
tion. The Director for Information Services is 
responsible for notifying the following news 
media on the opening and closing of the univer- 
sity: radio stations WASC, WORD, WKDY, and 
WSPA in Spartanburg: WFBC and WGXL in Green- 
ville and WEAC in Gaffney. Also WSPA-TV and 
WFBC-TV will be called. 

The Public Safety Office will update the re- 
corded telephone answering service to reflect 
current information, and every effort will be 
made to establish normal switchboard opera- 
tions as soon as possible. 
The university opens or closes as a whole, and 
the decision to close or open the campus will 
be binding on all classes and activities in- 
cluding athletic events, convocations, graduate 
regional studies courses, continuing education, 
the Burroughs Child Development Center, and 
various service functions. If there is a pres- 
sing need to vary this policy, contact should 
be made with Doyle Boggs at home (574-1459), 
prior to 6:30 a.m. for day events and 3 p.m. 
for night events. Under no circumstances will 
any faculty or staff member other than the 
Director for Information Services contact the 
news media about cancellations. 
For morning classes, the university will follow 
the policy of the Spartanburg County Schools 
on the first day of a winter storm. The decision 
to open or close the university will be 
announced by 6:30 a.m. A decision to open or 
close the university during the evening hours 
(classes meeting after 5 p.m.) will be made by 
the Chancellor and will be announced by the 
news media not later than 3 p.m. After a major 
storm, the Chancellor will evaluate the condi- 
tion of parking lots on the campus and may 
direct a USCS reopening earlier than for the 
public schools. In that event, announcements 
will be made through the regular media channels. 
Faculty and students should be aware that they 
may be required to make up any class hours lost 
due to bad winter weather. Twelve month employ- 

(continued) 



...OFFICAL NOTICES continued... 

ees are not authorized snow leave. They have 
the option of (1) reporting for work; (2) 
making up time lost at the discretion of the 
supervisor; or (3) taking annual leave. 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 

GRANT PROPOSALS have been submitted to the 
use Research & Productive Scholarship Fund. 
They are: (1) Dr. Gordon Mapley (Psychology) 
has requested $3, 282. to conduct his re- 
search entitled "The Effect of Prior Mock 
Jury Experience on Jurors' Subsequent De- 
cisions of Guilt." (2) Dr. Con Henderson 
(Political Science) has requested $3,891. 
to conduct his research in Stockholm on 
"Swedish Influence on Finnish Conceptions 
of Civil Liberties and Political Rights." 

uses GREEN AND WHITE BASKETBALL GAME: Music, 
dancers, contests, drawings, and exciting 
basketball are all on tap Thursday, Nov. 
6, at 7 p.m. in the Hodge Center, as 
Coach Jerry Waters inroduces the 1980-81 
Rifle men's basketball team. Come out 
and bring the family to join the cheer- 
leaders, pep band and dancers in kicking 
off the season with the annual intrasquad 
scrimmage. 

THE FRENCH FILM, "La Religieuse," originally 
scheduled to be shown at USCS on Nov. 5 has 
been rescheduled for Nov. 6. The film, 
which is part of USCS' Foreign Film Series, 
will begin at 7:00 p.m. in Tukey Lecture 
Theatre and is free and open to the public. 
For more information contact Regis Robe. 

MAC ARTHUR GOODWING, a leading Spartanburg 
artist, will present a multi-media exhibit 
at the Library Art Gallery at USCS beginning 
Nov. 3. Mr. Goodwing will present a lecture 
at 7:30 p.m. in Tukey Lecture Theatre, 
followed by a reception in the library art 
gallery at 8:00 p.m. 

FROM DOYLE BOGGS; I appreciate very much 
the faculty response to the draft copy of 
"Experts" which has been circulating on 
campus this week. We received many worthwhile 
suggestions that will help make the publication 
very useful to the community. Clary Oglesby, 
who has done much of the very extensive work 
needed to compile the brochure, is now in 
the process of incorporating the requested 
changes into a final working copy. If you 



have not returned your copy of the draft, 
please do so before November 4. 

THE STUDENT ACTIVITIES OFFICE is now acceptin- 
information on events for the Spring 1981 
calendar. Special note should be taken by 
faculty advisors of student clubs and organi- 
zations. Please turn event dates in so that 
they will be noted on the calendar. 

US BUSINESS COMPETITIVENESS: The Southern Ceri' 
ter for International Studies in Atlanta is 
sponsoring a regional conference on European 
Industrial Policies: Successes, Failures and 
Lessons for America," to be held November 14. 
1980, in Atlanta. For further information, 
contact Jim Brown, L236, ext. 433. 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

JIM BROWN, history, has published a review of 
Richard Jeffries, Class, Power and Ideology 
in Ghana: The Railwaymen of Sekondi , in 
Africana Journal , Vol. 10, no. 4. 

FROM AGNES SOLESBEE: I would like to thank 
each of you for your many acts of thoughtful nt 
during my stay in the hospital. It was so ver\ 
nice to be remembered in such a nice way. 
Thanks again. 

CAROL RENTZ participated in a Neonatal Nursinc' 
Workshop apsonsored by Spartanburg General 
Hospital by presenting "Breastfeeding" and 
"Current Practices in Maternal Child Nursing.' 
The workshops were held at the Holiday Inn 
in Spartanburg on Oct. 9 and 10. 

BRYAN LINDSAY was one of the featured present- 
ers at the Illinois State Gifted Conference ir 
Chicago this past Monday. He conducted a four 
hour workshop for teachers, "Cornerstones 
and Keystones: Humanities for the Gifted and 
Talented." 



IV. COMMUNITY EVENTS 

ALBERT J. WOOL, naturalist and film maker will 
be available to answer questions and discuss 
film making and nature photography, on Tuesday 
Nov. 4, at 7:00 p.m. at Quincey's (Hillcrest) 
at a Dutch Treat Dinner. On Wed., Nov. 5, Mr. 
Wool will present his film "Coastal Carolina" 
in Hartness Auditorium, Carmichael Hall, at 
Converse College. Admission is $2. For more 
information call 583-1820. These programs are 

(continued) 



...COMMUNITY EVENTS continued... 

sponsored by the Audubon Wildlife Film 
Series. 

LESLIE EXTON, Visiting Artist, (Converse), 
fiU] show works at Mill i ken Gallery Nov. 3-25. 
The hours for exhibit are 1-4 p.m. Monday- 
Friday. Exton teaches at Crocoran Gallery of 
i\rt in Washington, D.C. 

THEATRE/CONVERSE will present "The Enchanted" 
by Jean Giraudoux in Hazel Abbot Theatre 
November 6-8. at 8:00 p.m. Admission is 
$3, $2.50 for students, $1.50 for groups 
of 20 or more. A Sunday matinee will be 
held at 2:30 p.m. on November 9. For more 
information call 585-6421, ext. 266. 



V. uses SPORTS RESULTS 

THE CROSS COUNTRY TEAM hosted the district 
meet at USCS this past Saturday. Teams 
participating were USCS, Voorhees, and SMC. 
Results will be forthcoming in next weeks 
FYI. 

THE SOCCER TEAM stands 12-7-1 so far this 
season. The team beat Davidson 2-0 last 
Wednesday and went against Brevard Club 
last Saturday in an afternoon match. 

THE VOLLEYBALL TEAM is 23-17 for the season 
after losing to North Greenville, Furman 
and Baptist in matches last week and wins 
over Newberry and Erskine. 

THE MEN'S BASKETBALL team will play an 
intrasquad scrimmage (the green and white 
game) and November 6, at 7 p.m. in the 
Hodge Center. Everyone is invited out to 
see a preview of this year's team. 



TO: All Members of the Faculty, Administration and Staff 

FROM: Lee Holcombe -^ 

SUBJECT: Institutional Review of Self-Study Report 

The instituional review of our self-study report will begin 
during the week of Nov. 3 and continue through the week of Dec. 8. 

Completed copies of this report should be "in place" by 
Thursday, Nov. 6, in the following of f ices/ locations: 

Office of the Chancellor - A 217 

Office of the Vice Chancellor - L 256 

Office of the Associate Chancellor for Administration - A 110 

Office of the Associate Chancellor for Student Affairs - H 212 

School of Humanities and Sciences 

FALL and SBS - L226 

S&M - A 109 
School of Business Administration - M 314 
School of Education - M 118 
School of Nursing - H 220 
Library - reserve shelf 

All members of the University community are urged to review 
this document and to share their opinions — criticisms, concerns, queries- 
about it. All suggestions relative to the self-study report should be 
addressed in writing to me (L 202) for consideration by the Steering 
Committee, the Editor and the Standard Committee Chairs. 

It should be pointed out that this is not the final version 
of the self-study report that will be submitted to SACS and to the 
SACS-appointed Evaluation Committee which will visit USCS next April. 
This is a second draft, which will be edited for format and style as 
well as for content by subcommittees of the Steering Committee. 

Your interest will be appreciated, and your concerns will be 
given due consideration in the preparation of the final version of the 
self-study report. 



University of South Carolina at Spartanburg 
Sunbelt/International Symposia 



Symposium #2 



November 5, 1980 
12:15-1:30 p.m. 
Tukey Lecture 
Hum I. re 



November 5, 1980 
7:30 p.m. 
Tukey Lecture 



"Sino-American Relations; the American Woman's 
Role in Sino-American Relations; China and India 
in the World Tomorrow" 

Guest Lecturer; Han buyiii, author dnd physician 

Special Guest: Col. Vincent Ruthnaswany 

Moderator: Ellenor McCaughrin, Librarian, USCS 

Student Discussants: Robert Brown 
Stan Wenz 
Sandra Sandov 

"What Sino-American Relations Mean to the World" 

Guest Lecturer: Han Suyin 

Special Guest: Col. Vincent Ruthnaswany 

Moderator: Dr. John Seitz, Professor of History, 
Wofford College 

Discussants: Linda Bilanchone, Wofford College 

Choong Lee, Research Associate, USCS 
Dr. Jeanne Stuart, Associate Professor 
of Biology, USCS 

BI OGRAPHICAL NOTES 

"I could not stay in peace in Europe while China was being 
invaded by Japan." -1938 

These words by Han Suyin probably best describe the basic motivation for 
much of her life and work. The daughter of a Chinese father and a Belgium 
mother, Han Suyin was moved by the poverty sickness in her native Peking to 
study medicine, despite her mother's disapproval. Financing her initial 
studies at Yenching University, she later obtained a scholarship to Belgium 
where she completed her pre-medical studies (1936-38). Practicing mid-wifery 
in interior China during the Sino-Japanese War, she wrote her first book. 
Destination Ch ungkin g. In the foreword to A Many-Splendored Thing , a later 
work, Chuji^kjn^ is described as a "vivid picture of Free China, the suffer- 
ing of the Chinese People and life in the old feudal provinces of Western 
China. In its last chapter Han Suyin foreshadows prophetically the coming 
struggle between the Chinese Nationalists and Communists." 

In 1942 she accompanied her husband. General Tang, to England. Han Suyin 
remained in England after his death during the civil war in China in 1947. 
Obtaining a scholarship from the British Council, she completed her medical 
studies while in England. She also worked in her spare time to support herself 
and her adopted daughter, Yungmei . 

In 1949 she accepted a medical post in Hong Kong. There she wrote A 
Many Splendored Thing, the book upon which the motion picture "Love is a 
Many-Splendored Thing" is based. This is a memoir of her love affair with 
a British correspondent later killed while covering the war in Korea, the 
background of the novel. 

In 1952 Han Suyin moved to Malaya where she practiced medicine until 
1964. During her spare time there, she wrote A nd the Rain My Drin k. 
While in Malaya she also taught contemporary Asian literature for 3 
years at Nan Yang University. In 1956 she went to Nepal to attend 
the coronation of the King of Nepal. There she wrote The Mountain 
Is Yqu^g. 

Between 1964 and 1968 Han Suyin published three works which combine 
her autobiography with a history of China (T he Crippled Tree , A Mortal 
Flower and Birdle ss Summer . ) M y House Has Two Doors. recently published, 
covers the years from 1949 to 1976. 

During the 7-year period from 1968 to 1975, Han Suyin was engaged in 
writing a monumental work: the life of chairman Mao Tsetung and its 
impact on China. The work was published in two volumes: The Morning 
Deluge and W ind in the Tower . Mao's death and the downfall of his 
wife and her acolytes are treated in a paperback series Han Suyin 
published in 1977 and 1978. 

An individual of many talents, she also lectures regularly on Chinese 
military affairs at the French Military Academy and at the Staff 
Colleges in England and in India. 



uses— -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3 -- SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1980 



'■lONDAY, November 3 

5:00 p.m. -- Volleyball team vs. Limestone, away. 

7:30 p.m. -- Lecture by MacArthur Goodwin, Spartanburg artist. Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact 
person - Katie Hicks. 

8:00-9:00 p.m. -- Reception with MacArthur Goodwin. Library Art Gallery. Contact person - 
Katie Hicks. 



TUESDAY. November 4 - ELECTION DAY HOLIDAY 
6:00 p.m. -- Volleyball team vs. Wofford, away. 



WEDNESDAY, November 5 

9:00-3:00 p.m. -- Physical Exam by Child Development Center. Activities Building. 

12:15 p.m. -- Sunbelt International Symposium -guest lecturer -Han Suyin. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
"Sino-American Relations; China's Foreign Policy and the Role of American Women in China." 
Contact person - Cecilia Brown. 

12:15-1:15 p.m. -- NTE Study Session. M124. Contact person - Carol Smith. 

3:30 p.m. -- Academic Affairs Committee Meeting. M125. 

6:00 p.m. -- Volleyball team vs. Wofford, home. 

7:30 p.m. -- Sunbelt International Symposium -guest lecturer -Han Suyin. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
"What Sino-American Relations Mean to the World." Contact person - Cecilia Brown. 



THURSDAY, November 6 

5:00-10:00 p.m. -- Orientation. Activities Building. Contact - Student Affairs. 

7:00 p.m. -- Foreign Film Series. "La Religieuse" -French Film with English subtitles. Tukey 
Lecture Theatre. Contact person - Regis Robe. 

7:00-9:00 p.m. -- Green and White intrasquad scrimmage. Hodge Center Gym. Contact - Student 
Affairs. 



FRIDAY, November 7 

10:30 a.m. -- Administrative Council Meeting. ,. 

12:30-2-00 p.m. -- Psychology Faculty meeting. Activities Building. 
2:00-8:00 p.m. -- Chamber of Commerce meeting. Activities Building. 
2:00-1:00 p.m. -- Miss USCS Dance. National Guard Armory. Contact - SGA. 




s*. 






Vol. IV. No. 13 



A Newsletter for The Faculty Of USCS 



November 17, 1980 



I. OFFICIAL 

THE ACADEMIC AFFAIRS COMMITTEE will meet 
Nov. 1.9, in Room M2i5 at 3:30. The agenda 
includes 1) Review of Standard Ill-Curriculum 
2) Proposed earth science concentration in 
Secondary Education 3) Revisions of the 
history, psychology, political science, and 
English Secondary Education Programs. 

THE FACULTY SENATE will meet Friday, Nov. 
21 at 12:30 p.m. in L268. 

THE ACADEMIC FORWARD PLANNING Committee 
will meet in L259, Wednesday, Nov. 19, at 
12:30 p.m. The agenda includes what services 
should be expanded for night students and 
whether limitations on remedial courses 
are appropriate. Contact - Ron Sobczak. 

THE 1980 EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION DRIVE was 
a tremendous success. We raised $4791. from 
73 contributors. This represents an average 
of $66.54 from our faculty and staff. Below 
you will find a list of the different areas 
receiving funds: 

Unrestricted -$455.; General Scholarship - 
$340.; School of Education Scholarship - 
$417.; Scientific Equipment -$100.; Child 
0;-velopment Center -$50., Murph Loan -$116.; 
Science & Math Scholarship -$868., Frances 
Hackett Scholarship -$350.; Political 
Science -$100.; Library -$35.; Women's 
Athletics -$150.; Tennis -$120.; Athletics 
-$495., International Education -$20.; 01 in 
B. Sansbury, Jr. Scholarship -$400.; Fine 
Arts -$160., School of Nursing -$240.; 
Nursing Building -$20., Business Administration 
-$35.; Accounting -$100.; Social & Behavioral 
Sciences -$100.; Columbia Campus -$120. 

Even though our drive for this year has 
ended, you can still make contributions by 
contacting Gene Hutsell in the University 
Relations Office. 

--Jack Turner. 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 



THE SHOESTRING PLAYERS will present Ghosts 
in a November 20, 21 and 22 production. 
Written by Henrik Ibsen, Ghosts is a classic 
story of the sins of the fathers visited upon 
their children. The setting is Norway in 
1880.- Performances will begin at 8:15 p.m. 
nightly in Tukey Lecture Theatre. Reserva- 
tions may be made by calling ext. 397 or 416 
between 1:00-5:00 p.m. Monday-Friday. 

DR. JAMES BROWN will be the guest lecturer 
today (Nov. 17) in the 50 minutes class. The 
film "A Plague Upon the Land," about the 
disease commonly known as River Blindness, 
will be shown, followed by discussion of the 
problems of disease and their relation to 
development in Third World Countries. The 
class meets at 12:30 in M217. For more infor- 
mation contact Alice Henderson. Everyone is 
invited. 

THE SPEAKER for next Monday's "50 Minutes" 
class (Nov. 24) will be Mr. Ralph Stewart^ 
the Consul General of Canada for the South- 
east. Mr. Stewart formerly- served on the 
Conference on Security Cooperation in Europe, 
which is presently meeting in Europe and 
being reported on regularly because of the 
Russians willingness to discuss human rights. 
Mr. Stewart will be speaking about his work 
on the conference and the question of human 
rights as an issue in foreign policy. The 
class meets at 12:30 in M217. Everyone is 
welcome. For additional information contact 
Alice Henderson. 

FACULTY, STAFF and STUDENT ID'S will be 
made November 24, 25 and 26 in the Public 
Safety Office. ID's may be made between the 
hours of 10-12 noon, 2-4 p.m., and 6-8 p.m. 

FYI AND THE CALENDAR will not be published on 
Monday, December 1, due to the Thanksgiving 
Holidays. Publication will resume on Monday, 
December 8. Individuals are reminded that the 
deadline for FYI is 5:00 p.m. on Thursdays. 
Notices should be submitted in writing to 
Janella Koob, Information Services. 



...BULLETIN BOARD continued... 

THE THIRD IN THE PERSONAL FINANCIAL 
PLANNING series of luncheon seminars will 
be conducted on this campus by Personnel 
and chaired by Professor Meyer Drucker on 
Tax Sheltered Annuities. At this meeting 
an introduction to Tax Sheltered Annuities 
will be explained by Dr. Drucker and a 
representative from the PEBSCO Corporation 
will explain and give the opportunity to 
enroll in the new benefit program for 
public employees. The program referred to 
as the South Carolina Deferred Compensation 
Plan permits employees to voluntarily defer 
income up to 25% of gross salary, or $7500. 
annually, whichever is less, and thereby 
defer income taxes as well. The luncheon 
meeting will be Nov. 19, 12:15 p.m. in 
the Activities Building. For more infor- 
mation contact Treva Hamrick. 

THE uses HUMANITIES AND SCIENCES Building 
has been ranked among the top ten projects 
on the priority list of the state Commission 
on Higher Education. This $5.4 million 
building was funded last year, but was 
shelved by Governor Riley's veto. 

DR. MATTHEW J. BRUCCOLI, generally regarded 
as this nation's leading authority on F. 
Scott Fitzgerald, will be speaking on 
"Fitzgerald in The Twenties" at USCS on 
Tuesday, Nov. 25, in L276. Dr. Bruccoli, 
Jeffries Professor of English at the Univer- 
sity of South Carolina-Columbia, is currently 
offering a course in the literary career of 
Fitzgerald over S.C. Educational Radio, 
heard locally on WEPR-FM. The course, 
which may be taken for graduate or under- 
graduate credit at USC, will be offered 
pqain during the spring semester. 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

BRYANT REEVES, bookstore, attended the South- 
east Regional Convention of National Associa- 
tion of College Stores, where he chaired the 
S.C. Association of College Stores program 
titled "Increasing Management Efficiency 
Manuals, Forms, Process and Procedures." 
This was the first program ever presented 
by the S.C. Association and proved to be 
very successful 1 . 



CECILIA COGDELL attended the 71st Conventic 
of S.C. State Nurses' Association on Nov, 
5-7, 1980 in Columbia. The convention them( 
was "Chance = Stress: Health Care in the 8( 
How will Nursing Adapt?" One of the main 
speakers was Dr. Shirley Smoyak, Professor 
and graduate director for the College of 
Nursing, Rutgers University, N.J. Business 
meeting topics included resolutions regard' 
Collaboration between Nursing Education an( 
Nursing Service; Baccalaureate Programs in 
Nursing; Minority Representation in Nursinc 
Education; Implementation and Evaluatiorj oi 
Career Mobility Guidelines; Ethics in the 
Nursing Curriculum; Support to various 
Legislative Issues, etc. At the meeting 
Cecilia was re-elected to the Board of 
Directors for a 2-year term. 

SHARON CHERRY READ A PAPER at the Mountain 
Interstate Foreign Language Conference at 
Clemson University, Oct. 23-25. Regis Robe 
chaired a section at the same time. 

DR. SANSBURY will be part of a delegation ( 
ten state college and university administra 
tors to visit India, Dec. 2-17. He is 
scheduled to go to Bombay, Hyderabad, and 
Madras. The invitation was extended to the 
American Association of State Colleges and 
Universities by the University Grants Com- 
mission of India to strengthen educational 
and cultural linkages between the colleges 
and universities in the two countries. The 
U.S. delegation will review with Indian 
educational officials developing trends in 
higher education in both countries with 
specific reference to the international izat 
of American education and the expansion of 
cooperative education programs. Dr. Sansbur 
was tapped for the AASCU delegation because 
of his service on the Association's Com- 
mittee for Urban Affairs and because of his 
academic background in international studie 

DR. JANE DAVISSON presented a paper at the 
opening session of the College Reading Assoc 
tion in Baltimore, Maryland on October 30. 
The paper was entitled "The Intergration of 
Reading Instruction on the College Level." 

JIM BROWN attended the fall board meeting 
of the South Carolina Consortium for Inter- 
national Studies, Saturday, November 8, 
at Benedict College, Columbia. 



...FACULTY/STAFF NOTES continued... 

ENGLISH FACULTY members attending the 
annual convention of the South Atlantic 
Modern Language Association in Atlanta, 
Nov. 6-8, included Elizabeth Davidson, 
Merike Tamm, Donald Knight, Emmanuel 
Seko, Michael Dressman, and Malinda 
Willard. Dr. Tamm, a part-time instruc- 
tor who has taught at USCS for three 
years, presented a paper in a discussion 
circle on "Women's Issues and the 
Traditional Class: The Composition Course. 
Dr. Dressman spoke on "Linguistics in the 
University Curriculum" and presented a 
paper to a session of the Southeastern 
Conference on Linguistics on "The Suffix 
-EE." 



or $3.00 for both nights. Faculty, staff and 
students with a USCS ID will be admitted free 
to all home games. 

VOLLEYBALL - The volleyball team will partici- 
pate in the Region 5 Tournament Friday and 
Saturday, Nov. 21-22. The volleyball team 
finished fourth at last weekends' State 
Tournament in Florence. The Region 5 
Tournament will be held at the Hodge Center, 
hosted by USCS. Teams will be drawn from 
S.C., N.C., Tennessee, Kentucky and Virginia. 
Play will be from 9:00 to 5:00 p.m. on 
Friday, November 21 and 9:00-2:30 p.m on 
Saturday, November 22. Admission is $2.00 
for adults and $1.50 for students. 



ED WHITE was in Washington, D.C., Nov. 
13-15, reviewing elementary science grant 
proposals for the U.S. Department of 
Education. Ed has also just completed a 
series of special science classes for 
gifted elementary children in Spartanburg 
District Five and follow-up workshops 
for teachers. 



IV. COMMUNITY EVENTS 

THE SPARTANBURG WIND ENSEMBLE, sponsored 
by the Music Foundation Series, will per- 
form Thursday, Nov. 20, at Twitchell 
Auditorium, Converse College, at 8:00 p.m. 
Admission is by series ticket or $2. for 
adults and $1. for students. For more 
information call 583-2776. 

ON NOVEMBER 21-22, there will be a Perform- 
ing Arts Showcase at the Spartanburg Arts 
Center. For more information call 583-2776. 



V. USCS SPORTS 



MEN'S BASKETBALL -The men's basketball team 
will open their 1980-81 season Tuesday when 
they face Newberry at Newberry at 7:30 p.m. 
The 1980 McDonalds Basketball Classic will 
be held Nov. 21-22 in the Hodge Center. 
USCS will play Lenoir-Rhyne Friday at 7 p.m, 
followed by Voorhees and Gardner-Webb at 
9 p.m. On Saturday, Voorhees will play 
Lenoir-Rhyne at 7 p.m. and USCS will face 
Gardner-Webb at 9 p.m. Admission is $3.00 
per night for adults or $5.00 for both 
nights and $2.00 per students per night 
(continued) 



To (Ila^sb^ 




lite i^^eAT AmxieA/if jm«« Oaf 

HALLV 



O^EMMR /9 J 12 :30P.M. 

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Not to StA^t 

SPeAKZ^ : Me.]>iCAl f(E5lDGl<iT f^OM SpT. 

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.. .CALENDAR continued... 

Friday, November 21 

7:00 p.m. -- McDonald's Classic. Lenoir Rhyne vs. USCS, 7:00 p.m.; Gardner-Webb vs. Voorhees, 
9:00 p.m. Contact person - Hank Anderson. 

8:15 p.m. -- "Ghosts" -Shoestring Players production. Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact person 

- Jimm Cox. 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 22 

9:00-2:30 p.m. -- Region 5 Volleyball Tournament. Hodge Center Gym. Contact person - Mim Shel( 

7:00 p.m. -- McDonald's Classic. Voorhees vs. Lenoir Rhyne, 7:00 p.m.; Gardner-Webb vs. USCS, 
9:00 p.m. Contact person - Hank Anderson. 

8:15 p.m. -- "Ghosts" -Shoestring Players production. Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact person 

- Jimm Cox. 




It \H 






Vol. IV. No. 14 



jshftBr For The Faculty Of USCS November 24, i98o 



I. OFFICIAL 

FROM ERIC JOLLY: Friday, December 12, will 
be the last day of classes for the Fall 
1980 semester. 

THE ACADEMIC FORWARD PLANNING COMMITTEE 
will meet in L259, Wednesday, December 10, 
at 12:30 p.m. For information contact 
Ron Sobczak. 

ALL FACULTY AND STAFF: The Public Safety 
Office has asked that all outgoing mail be 
marked with a return address and the name 
of the sender, or the department, division 
or school. In this way, mail that is re- 
turned to USCS for some reason, may be for- 
warded to the sender for further action. 
This is for your benefit, and will save time 
and confusion when something is returned. 
Your cooperation is appreciated. 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 

FYI WILL NOT BE PUBLISHED next Monday, Dec. 
1, due to the Thanksgiving Holidays. FYI 
will resume publication Monday, December 8. 
Items for FYI or the calendar should be 
submitted by 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, prior 
to ufK' Monday's publication. Items should 
be submitted to Janella Koob, Information 
Services. 

BILL DRAKE will be the Master of Ceremonies 
for the annual USCS Talent Show today, Mon- 
day, Nov. 24. The talent show is sponsored 
by Sigma Pi Mu and will begin at 12:30 p.m. 
in the Hodge Center. Cash awards will be 
given to 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners. 
p^'^jse announce to your classes. 

TV, STAFF and STUDENT ID's will be 

maut this week on Monday, Tuesday and 
Wednesday (Nov. 24, 25, 26) in the Public 
Safety Office. Hours are 10-12 noon, 2-4 p.m. 

^no ^-3 p.m. 



THE SPEAKER FOR TODAY'S "50 Minutes" class is 
Mr. Ralph Stewart, the Consul General of 
Canada for the Southeast. Mr. Stewart formerly 
served on the Conference on Security Coopera- 
tion in Europe, which is presently meeting in 
Europe and being reported on regularly be- 
cause of the Russians willingness to discuss 
human rights. Mr. Stewart will be speaking 
about his work on the conference and the 
question of human rights as an issue in 
foreign policy. The class meets at 12:30 p.m. 
in M217, Everyone is welcome. For additional 
information contact Alice Henderson. 

DR. MATTHEW J. BRUCCOLI, generally regarded 
as this nation's leading authority on F. Scott 
Fitzgerald, will be speaking on "Fitzgerald 
in The Twenties" at USCS on Tuesday, Nov. 25, 
in L276. Dr. Bruccoli, Jeffries Professor 
of English at the University of South Carolina, 
Columbia, is currently offering a course in 
the literary career of Fitzgerald over S.C. 
Educational Radio, heard locally on WEPR-FM. 
The course, which may be taken for graduate 
or undergraduate credit at USC, will be offered 
aqain during the spring semester. He will speak 
ax 7:30 p.m. 

FROM CAROL SMITH: Please announce to all 
classes. Are you thinking about graduate 
school and need more information? You should 
attend the Counseling and Career Development 
Center's annual "Road to Grad School" program 
on Wednesday, Dec. 3, at 12:30 p.m. in room 
M122. The program is open to all prospective 
graduate students and will include general 
discussion about choosing and applying to 
graduate schools, national testing dates and 
information, test-taking tips, financial aid 
information, and a presentation of graduate 
opportunities at USCS. In addition, each per- 
son attending will receive a free copy of 
"The Road to Grad School," a booklet published 
by the CCDC, 

(continued) 



...BULLETIN BOARD continued... 

THE SHOESTRING PLAYERS will participate in 
acting workshops with the Royal Sakespeare 
Company from Stratford-on-Avon from January 
27-31, 1981. Arrangements completed by 
Jim Cox. The Shoestring Player will audition 
in the performers showcase at the Spartanburg 
Arts Center on Thursday, November 20. 

SUSAN MONTJOY, Tutoring Lab Coordinator, 
would like to report the Tutoring Lab has 
been '•/ery busy during the fall semester. 
In October, 178 students were tutored for a 
total of 458 sessions. Ms. Montjoy, along 
with the entire tutoring lab staff, would 
like to thank the faculty for their referrals, 
assistance, and cooperation. The tutoring 
lab anticipates an equally busy semester in 
the spring and is looking forward to en- 
lightening minds in math, business, accounting, 
education, nursing, English, and foreign 
language courses. Deans, department heads, 
and faculty are requested to please refer, at 
any time, academically talented students to 
tutor in the lab for the 1981 school year. 

GRANT PROPOSALS SUBMITTED: 1) The Mary Black 
School of Nursing has submitted applications 
for Nursing Capitation Grants for the 
Associate and Baccalaureate programs. The 
amount of funding is based on enrollment and 
determined by the Public Health Service. 
Project Director: Mrs. Cecilia Cogdell, 
Dean, Mary Black School of Nursing. 2) A 
proposal entitled "Palmetto/Piedmont Metric 
Education Project" has been submitted to 
the DE/Metric Education Program requesting 
$60,345. The proposed project involves the 
implementation of metric education into 
the elementary school curriculum in three 
s:I:ool districts in Spartanburg County. 
Principal Investigator: Dr. Arthur Justice, 
Dean, School of Education. 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

SHARON CHERRY was a judge at Clemson Univer- 
sity's annual Foreign Language Poetry 
Declamation Contest on November 15. 

bA-SARA MILLER (nursing) was one of 8 delegates 
f.oi\ Piedmont District Nurses' Association who 
attended the S.C. Nurses' Convention in Colum- 
bia Nov. 5-7. Resolutions supporting ERA, human 
sexuality education and quality health care 
""".. minorities were passed. 



AT THE RECENT S.C. Nurses' Association Con- 
vention, Holly Crocker participated in a 
forum presentation. The panel consisted of 
members of the S.C. Economic and General 
Welfare Committee. Holly's topic was "Infla 
tion-It's Effects on Nursing." 

JEANNE STUART, Biology, has recently revievi 
the text, Human Anatomy, by J.D. Crouch for 
Mayfield Press, Palo Alto, California. 



IV. COMMUNITY EVENTS 

ON DECEMBER 3rd, Floyd Kalber, NBC News Cor 
respondent, will be guest lecturer at Spar- 
tanburg Methodist College. The program begis 
at 7:30 p.m. in the Camak Auditorium, Barrel 
Learning Center. Free and open to the publi, 
more information may be obtained from Mr. 
Steve Brannon at SMC. 

THE IITH ANNUAL INVITATIONAL CRAFTS EXHIBIll 
sponsored by The Gallery, Spartanburg Arts 
Association, will be at the Arts Center Nov 
24 through Dec. 19. The exhibit features a 
wide variety of crafts for Christmas giving 
including woodwork, baskets, pottery, weav- 
ings, paintings, batik and more. Hours are 
10-12:30 and 2:30-4:30 Monday through Frida. 
Other hours by appointment. For information 
telephone 582-7616. 

THERE WILL BE A faculty recital, featuring 
Virginia Gore and Hans E. Schmettau, on Novi 
24th at 8:00 p.m. in Daniel Recital Hall, \ 
Converse College. The public is welcome. 

ON THURSDAY, December 4, the National Shake: 
peare Company will present "Comedy of Error; 
Presented at Wofford College at 8:00 p.m., 
details may be obtained by calling 585-48211 

"STEAL AWAY HOME," a youth theatre productit 
with music will be presented Dec. 4-6 at 
the Spartanburg Little Theatre. Admission b^ 
season ticket or $2.00 per person. For infor 
mation telephone 583-2776. 

THE SPARTANBURG BALLET GUILD presents the 
Pittsburg Ballet performing "The Nutcracker' 
Saturday, Dec. 6. One performance only at 
3:00 p.m. at Spartanburg Memorial Auditoriun 
For information telephone 583-2776. 

THE WOFFORD GLEE CLUB AND ENSEMBLE will pre- 
sent their Christmas Concert on Sunday, Dec. 
7 in Leonard Auditorium, Wofford College. 
Time is 6:00 p.m. 



V. SPORTS RESULTS 

MEN'S BASKETBALL -- The Rifles opened their 
1980-81 season with an 85-80 victory over 
Newberry last Tuesday evening. Over the 
weekend the McDonald's Classic was held 
at the Hodge Center. Results will be pub- 
lished in the next FYI. This Saturday 
(Nov. 29) the Rifles travel to Atlanta 
to play Georgia State at 7:35 p.m. On 
December 2nd the Rifles will face Central 
Wesleyan (at Central) at 7:30 p.m. 

WOMEN'S BASKETBALL — The women's team 

will open their 1980-81 season Monday, 

December 1, at Newberry (game at 5:30 p.m.) 

On December 5 and 6, they will travel 

tc Clinton to compete in the Presbyterian 

Tournament. 

FACULTY AND STAFF are reminded that they 
may attend USCS home basketball games 
free of charge with a USCS I.D. card. 



uses— THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24 — SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 30 



MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24 

10:30 a.m. -- Administrative Council Meeting. Chancellor's Conference room. 

12:30 p.m. — Talent Show. Master of Ceremonies - Bill Drake. Hodge Center Gymnasium. 
Contact person - Vergene Colloms. 

12:30 p.m. -- "50 Minutes class". Guest speaker - Mr. Ralph Stewart. M217. Contact person 
Alice Henderson. 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 25 

7:30 p.m. -- "Fitzgerald in the Twenties". Guest lecturer - Dr. Matthew J. Bruccoli. L276. 
Contact person - Mike Dressman. 



WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 26 

3:30 p.m. -- Academic Affairs Committee meeting. 


M215. 


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 27 - THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY 


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 28 -- THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY 



SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 29 

7:30 p.m. -- Men's Basketball team vs. Georgia State, away. 



USCS—'TH/S WEEK 



MONDAY, DECEMBER 1 — SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7 



MONDAY. DECEMBER 1 

5:30 p.m. -- Women's Basketball vs. Newberry, away. 

7:30-9:00 p.m. -- Outdoors Club meeting. Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact person - Ron Sobczak, 

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 2 

8:30-4:30 p.m. -- Nursing Continuing Education Workshop. Activities Building. Contact person 
- John May. 



7:00-9:00 p.m. -- Parent's Anonymous meeting. Faculty Conference room. Contact person 
Jerry Lehman. 

7:30 p.m. -- Men's Basketball vs. Central Wesleyan, away. 



i™ 



WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3 

12:30 p.m. -- Road to Grad School program. M122. Contact person - Carol Smith, 

3:30 p.m. -- Academic Affairs Coranittee meeting. M215. 

THURSDAY. DECEMBER 4 

9:00-12:00 p.m. -- Science Education Seminar. Activities Building. Contact person - Ed White. 

12:00-7:00 p.m. -- Kindergarten Workshop. Continuing Education course. Activities Building. 
Contact person - John May. 

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5 



-Women's Basketball team at PC Tournament (at Clinton). 



- TJRDAY, DECEMBER 6 

7:30 p.m. — Men's Basketball vs. the Citadel, away. 

--Women's Basketball team at PC Tournament (at Clinton), 




- — - ^_. "^ 






VOL. IV. No. 15 A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS December 8, i98o 



I . OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

ALL USCS OFFICES will close for the Christ- 
mas holidays at 5 p.m. Tuesday, December 
23, and will reopen on Monday morning, Jan. 
5, 1981. Closing the university in this 
manner allows reduction in thermostats 
during the period and permits a considerable 
savings in energy costs and other operating 
expenses. 

Since there will be \iery few persons on 
campus during this holiday break, the 
public safety officers will be patrolling 
to ensure that there is no theft or 
vandalism. Faculty members desiring to work 
in their offices should therefore notify 
the Public Safety Office (telephone ext. 
269 or 578-7827) when they come on campus. 
Faculty or staff using university facilities 
over the holidays are asked to be very care- 
ful to keep all doors locked and make sure 
any lights or utilities are turned off 
when they leave. 

FROM RON EAGLIN: In order to expedite 
research support, procedures for research 
service requests have been set up as de- 
scribed in the attachment to the FYI. The 
Request For Research Services forms will 
also be available in Choong Lee's office, 
L2^1. 

FROM £j BARNES: 1) The Faculty Advisory Com- 
mittee will meet December 8, 12:30 p.m. in 
the Faculty Conference room. PLEASE NOTE: At 
the Senate Meeting of November 21, the Sen- 
ate set up a new Advisory Committee of Senate 
members. The old Advisory Committee of Chair- 
persons is now to be known as the Nominating 
Committee. 2) The Faculty Senate will meet 
December 12, 12:30 p.m. in L268. 3) The 
Nominating Committee (old Advisory Committee) 
is currently seeking nominations for Founders' 
Day recognition for service to USCS. If 
there is someone you think the faculty should 
honor in this way, please pass the name of 

oerson and a biographical sketch to Eb 

es as soon as possible. 



NEXT WEEK'S EDITION OF FYI, dated December 15, 
1980, will be the last issue of the fall 
semester. Publication will resume on January 
12, 1981. 

FROM ERIC JOLLY: Friday, December 12, will be 
the last day of classes for the Fall 1980 
semester. 

THE ACADEMIC FORWARD PLANNING Committee will 
meet in L25 9, Wednesday, Dec. 10, at 12:30 
p.m. Contact person - Ron Sobczak. 

FROM TED EILENBERG: Effective Monday, December 
8, reservations for the use of the Tukey Lecture 
Theatre and the Activities Building should be 
made through the Physical Plant Office, ext 
439. This should facilitate proper Sit-up for 
each event and allow for clean-up by maint- 
enance personnel. Bennett Wilson or Pat Mitchell 
are available to assist you in planning your 
activity or event for these two facilities. 
The Student Affairs office will continue to 
handle the scheduling of all other campus 
events. 

FROM ED WHITE: Academic Affairs: Agenda for 
December 12, 1980, M215, 3:30 p.m. 1) Revision 
of secondary education programs in history, 
psychology, political science, and English, 

2) Revision of Business programs (major courses). 

3) English - new courses: ENGL 480 a,b,c- 
Studies in Literary Theory; SEGL 606 - Creative 
Writing, Contact your Academic Affairs Committee 
representative for details. 

ATTACHED TO THIS WEEK'S FYI is the USCS spring 
activities calendar ^'or 1980-81 as prepared by 
the cultural affairs coordinator and the office 
of information services. All faculty are urged 
to make appropriate notes of the key dates and 
to note several changes, the most important of 
which is the changed date for commencement. 
If you know of any errors or if you are 
planning other public events which should be 
added to the calendar, please contact Cecilia 
McDaniel Brown immediately. 



...OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS continued... 

ALL FACULTY AND STAFF: F ederal regulations 
require review and approval before any re- 
searc h (a formal investigation designed to 
develop or contribute to general izable know- 
ledge) can be conducted at USCS which involves 
human subjec ts (persons about whom or from 
whom an investigator obtains data through 
intervention or interaction with the persons 
or identifiable private information). Sub- 
jects may include persons involved in be- 
havioral science studies such as students, 
normal volunteers, and members of the gen- 
eral population. The Ethics Committee at 
USCS will provide the review and approval 
for nonfederal ly funded research. The USC 
Institutional Review Board for the Use of 
Human Subjects will provide the review and 
approval for federally funded research. 
Contact Dr. Leo Bonner, Ethics Committee 
Chair, or Dr. Jan Yost for further informa- 
tion. 



I I. BULLETIN BOAR D 

INTERNATIONAL TRADE CLUB of Western South 
Carolina, which is open to anyone wishing 
to attend, will have its next meeting Wed- 
nesday, December 10. The program will in- 
clude a film, 'To Better World Trade," 
covering the latest methods of packaging, 
handling and transportation being used at 
various seaports around the world. Meetings 
are at Textile Hall in Greenville. A social 
hour begins at 6:30 p.m. with dinner served 
at 7:00 p.m. at a cost of $4.00 per person. 
For reservations call Mrs. Cole, 233-2562, 
For further information contact Jim Brown, 
L236, ext. 433. 

AGAIN THIS CHRISTMAS, USCS has an official 
greeting card which can be used to express 
holiday best wishes from the faculty and 
staff. These cards are appropriate for 
mailing to colleagues, vendors, members of 
advisory committees, or others who have 
special relationships to USCS. This year, 
the Christmas card mailing is being handled 
through the Chancellor's office. If you 
desire to have a university card sent to 
any individual, please send names and 
addresses (include ZIP codes) to Toni 
McKissick. 



FROM GREG PACK, Publicity Committee, Tutorin 
Lab: Susan Montjoy and the staff of the 
Tutoring Lab invite all students. Faculty an 
staff of USCS to come by L274 on Dec. 16, 
from 11-2 and 4-6 for the Annual University 
Wide Holiday Study Break. Refreshments will 
be served, so please inform your students of 
this opportunity to relax in a Holiday atmos 
phere between study periods and exams. 

GRANT PROPOSAL entitled "Alternatives in the 
Generation of Electrical Energy" was submitt 
to the Department of Energy requesting $6,04 
for a three week, summer workshop for junior 
and high school science teachers. Project 
Director: Dr. Ron Sobczak (Chemistry). 

TEACH IN CHINA. The USC system has signed an 
agreement with Shanxi University in China's 
Shanxi Province for faculty and student ex- 
changes. The first faculty will probably go 
China in the fall of 1981. The Chinese will 
provide accomodations (including dependents) 
and USC is attempting to raise money to 
cover transportation costs. Exchange will 
normally be for a full academic year. The 
exact number who will go for the first year 
is not yet known. The Chinese are most interl 
ested in having faculty in the sciences, and; 
anyone in the sciences will likely receive 
\/ery serious consideration. Other possibilit; 
include those with experience teaching the 
English language. Anyone at all interested, 
or anyone desiring more information, contact 
Jim Brown, L-236, ext. 433. 

THE USCS CONTEMPORARY MUSIC WORKSHOP will 
present its annual Holiday Pops Concerts 
today (Dec, 3) under the direction of Bryan 
Lindsay. Performances are scheduled for 12:3 
p.m. in the Hodge Center Lobby, and 8:00 p.m. 
in the auditorium at the Spartanburg Arts 
Center, Both performances are free and the 
public is invited. 

STUDENT EXCHANGE WITH CHINA. Anyone with 
students who might be interested in studying 
in China, especially studying the Chinese 
language, as part of the USC exchange agree- 
ment with Shanxi University, should have ther 
contact Jim Brown, L-236, ext. 433. 

FREE MOVIES ON ISLAM. The film series "The 
Traditional World of Islam,' consisting of 
six, thirty-minute, color films is now 
available, free, from the SASASAAS film 
library. These are recent films on various 
aspects of Islam — including the religion 
itself. Islamic art, and Islamic mysticism, 
(continued) 



...BULLETIN BOARD continued. 



IV. COMMUNITY EVENTS 



Descriptions of each film will be found in 
the SASASAAS film catalogue in the Audio- 
Visual Production Center, M134, ext. 264. 
A teacher's handbook for use with the series 
is in the office of the Director of Inter- 
national Education, L236, ext. 433. 

THE FOREIGN FILM SERIES will continue 
Monday (December 8) with the showing of 
"Lazarillo". This is a Spanish film with 
English subtitles. The film begins at 
7:00 p.m. in Tukey Lecture Theatre and 
is free and open to the public. For 
more information contact Regis Robe. 

EARLY CHILDHOOD AND ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 
students will be holding a special exhibit 
of games, activities and learning centers 
on Thursday, December 11. Approximately 
35 tables will be set up on the first and 
second floor of the Media Center to display 
the work of the USCS students in the 
School of Education. Hours are from 9 to 5. 
Contact person - Bill Bruce. 



I II. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

CATHERINE TALLEY, acting director of the 
B.S.N, program has recently been elected 
as a member of the S.C. Nurses' Association 
Council on Education. 

NANCY BABB attended the conference 'The 
Department Chairperson-Leader and Manager" 
in New York on Nov. 18-20. The conference 
was co-sponsored by American Associate of 
Community and Junior Colleges and Council 
of Associate Degree Programs, National 
League of Nursing. 

JEANNE STUART, Biology, has had a paper 
accepted for presentation at the annual 
meeting of the Association of Southeastern 
Biologists at the University of Tennessee. 
The paper is entitled, 'The Use of 
Polygonal Diagrams in Determining a 
Phylogemy of the Gentianaceae." 

BETTY G. DAVIS attended the Southern 
Regional Education Board Council on Collegiate 
Education for Nursing in Atlanta on Oct. 
29-31. Topics receiving special emphasis 
were: 1) ''Recruitment, Retention, and Rewards 
for Faculty and for Students" and 2) "Prior- 
.lies for the Council during the next ten 
years." 



AUDUBON WILDLIFE FILM SERIES continues with 
"Footloose in Newfoundland," an intriguing 
ramble through this hauntingly beautiful east- 
ern edge of North America, shown and narrated 
by Thomas A. Sterling. Sponsored by Piedmont 
Audubon Society. 8:00 p.m., Hartness Auditorium, 
Carmichael Hall, Converse College. Tickets are 
$2. for single admission and may be purchased 
at the door. For more information, telephone 
583-2776. 

FESTIVAL OF LESSONS AND CAROLS will be pre- 
sented at 7:30 p.m. in Twitchell Auditorium, 
Converse College, Dec. 11. The program is 
free of charge. 



V. USCS SPORTS RESULTS 

MEN'S BASKETBALL - The Rifles suffered their 
first loss of the season Nov. 29, falling to 
Georgia State 63-61 on a 12 foot jumper with 
4 seconds remaining. The Rifles, however, 
gained a first place ranking in this weeks 
Krause Count for District 6. On Tuesday, the 
men picked up an 89-83 victory over Central 
Wesleyan. 

Over the weekend, the Rifles traveled to 
the Citadel, while this week the Rifles will 
travel to Rock Hill to play Winthrop (Monday, 
Dec. 8) and will host Wofford at USCS on 
Thursday night at 8:00 p.m. 

WOMEN'S BASKETBALL -The Rifles opened their 
season last Monday night with a 63-61 victory 
over Newberry. Debra Jackson led the team with 
17 points, followed by "Boot" Crawford with 
15, and Shirley Hamilton with 13. Over the 
weekend the women participated in the Presby- 
terian Tournament. Results will be posted 
in next week's FY I. 



USCS—THiS WEEK 



MONDAY, DECEMBER 8 -- SUNDAY. DECEMBER 14 



lONDAY. DECEMBER 8 

Shriners Bloodmobile will be at the Hodge Center all day. 

12:30 p.m. -- Holiday Pops Concert by USCS Contemporary Music Workshop. Hodge Center Lobby. 
Contact person - Bryan Lindsay. 

12:30 p.m. -- Faculty Advisory Conmittee meeting. Faculty Conference room. Contact person - 
Eb Barnes. 

7:00 p.m. -- Foreign Film Series. "Lazarillo". Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact person - Regis 
Robe. 

8:00 p.m. -- Holiday Pops Concert by USCS Contemporary Music Workshop. Spartanburg Arts 
Center. Contact person - Bryan Lindsay. 

8:00 p.m. — Men's basketball vs. Winthrop (away). 

UESDAY, DECEMBER 9 

I Shriners Bloodmobile will be at the Hodge Center all day, 

lEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 10 
12:30 p.m. -- Academic Forward Planning committee, L259. Contact person - Ron Sobczak, 
12:30-1:30 p.m. -- International Club meeting. Activities Building. 
3-4:30 p.m. -- Promotion and Tenure Committee meeting. Faculty Conference room. 

HURSDAY, DECEMBER 11 

9:00-5:00 p.m. — Early Childhood and Elementary Education exhibit. Media Building. 
, Contact person - Bill Bruce. 

8:00 p.m. — Men's basketball vs. Wofford at USCS. 

RIDAY. DECEMBER 12 

Last day of classes for 1980 Fall Semester. 

11:00-2:30 p.m. -- Student Nurses Association meeting. Activities BuiTding. 

12:00 p.m. -- Faculty Advisory Committee meeting. Faculty Conference room. Contact person 
Eb Barnes. 

12:30 p.m. -- Faculty Senate meeting. L268. Contact person - Eb, Barnes. 

3:30 p.m. — Academic Affairs Committee meeting. M215. Contact person - Ed White, 



TIPS FOR SPRING 1981 COMPUTER 
ASSISTED REGISTRATION 

The registration schedule and calendar will be mailed Dec. 
read them carefully. 



4. Please 



WALK- IN 
PAYMENT - 


1 
2 


MAIL-IN 


1 


CREDIT-CARD 


1 


CANCELLATION 


1 



FREE TUITION 



PRE-PAYMENT 
BEFORE DEC. 12 



EARLY 

FEE RECEIPT 



BALANCE DUE 
CHECKS 



MONEY 



NON - FINANCIAL AID STUDENTS 

Bring cash, check or money order to the Business Office before 
Jan. 8. 
PLEASE don't wait until the last day. 

Make your correct payment so that it arrives BEFORE Dec. 22. 

Take your Visa or Master Charge Card to the Business Office. 

Computer cancellation is Jan. 8. If you fail to pay on or before 
Jan. 8, you will be automotically cancelled. 

NANCIAL AID STUDENTS 



Free tuition students must mail or take your Financial Aid Source 
Card and A-Form to the Business Office to get a validated receipt. 
If you do not get a validated recepit on or before Jan. 8, you 

WILL BE CANCELLED. 

Please mail or take your Fin. Aid Source card and A- Form to the 



Business Office on or BEFORE Dec. 



12, so that you can get your 
13. 
12, you cannot get your Balance Due 



Balance Due Check early - on Jan. 

If you do not register before Dec 

Check until Jan. 19-23. 

Keep your validated fee receipt. 

Balance Due Check. 

Balance Due Checks will be issued on Jan. 13 and Jan. 



You must have it in order to get your 



19-23 ONLY. No 



Balance Due Checks will be issued during Card Packet Registration. 
If your Financial Aid does not cover your fees BE SURE to include 
that differance with your A-Form and Financial Aid Source Card. 



REFUNDS 

APPLICATION 1) It is your responsibility to apply for Refunds and Course Drop - 

see Ms. Frances Hackett in the Records Office. 
WHERE Complete Withdrawal - see Mr. Earl Gordon - MM 202. 

REFUND Through: January 23 100% minus 10.00 for a complete 

SCHEDULE withdrawal or course drop. 

Through: January 26-February 2 - - - - 80% refund for complete withdrawal 

or dropping course. 

After: February 2----------- No refund for dropping course. 

Through: February 9---------- 60% refund for complete withdrawal. 

Through: February 16 --------- 40% refund for complete withdrawal. 

After: February 23 - No refund for complete withdrawal. 



IMPORTANT GENERAL NOTES 



A- FORM 



1) If you discover any errors or have any questions on your A-Porm, please 
contact the appropiate office BEFORE making any payments to The 
Business Office. 



WHERE 



PROBLEM 

1) RESIDENCY 


STATUS 


2) 
3) 


SCHEDULE 
FINANCIAL 


AID 


4) 


FEES 





OFFICE 

Mr Kevin Smith, Director of Admissions. 
Records Office 
Financial Aid Office 
Business Office 



HOLIDAYS 



1) Christmas Holidays - Dec. 24 - Jan.l. 



CHANGES WHICH AFFECTS FEES: 



SCHEDULE 
CHANGES 



1) Schedule reductions which affect amount in the fees to be made should 
be made in The Record's Office prior to making fee payment. 

2) Schedule increases: Pay amount on A-Form and pay additional amount 
when hours are added. 

Have a safe and happy holiday. """ 



DEC. 12 




DEC. 24 - 


JAN.l 


JAN. 8 




JAN. 12 





SPRING 1980 - 81 REGISTRATION 
IMPORTANT DATES 



Deadline for C.A.R. Financial Aid Students to pay fees. 
CHRISTMAS HOLIDAYS 

C.A.R. Fee Payment Deadline and COMPUTER CANCELLATION . 

Priority Drop/Add Only for Students who did not Receive 
the Schedule Requested. (10-6, Gym) 



JAN. 13 Balance Due Check pick up fDr Financial Aid Students Who 

Paid Fees on or before Dec. 12. (9-5,A125B) 

JAN. 14 Card Packet Registration. (10-12 & 4-7, Gym) 

JAN. 19 1) Classes Begin 

2) Late Registration ONLY for Late New Studnets. NO DROP /ADD . 
($5.00 late fee will be charged) (10-12 & 4-6, Hodge Lobby) 

3) Balance Due Check Pick Up for Financial Aid Students Who 
Paid Fees AFTER Dec. 12. (9-5,A125B) 

JAN 20-23 1) Late Registration (10-12 & 4-6, Hodge Lobby) ($5.00 late fee) 
2) Balance Due Check Pick up for Financial Aid Students Who 
Paid AFTER Dec. 12. (9-5,A125B). 



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA AT SPARTANBURG 
REQUEST FOR RESEARCH SERVICES PROCEDURES 



1. Originator of the project will complete the appropriate areas of 
Research Service Request Form. 

2. Originator will send the form to the Department Chairperson /Assistant 
Dean for approval . 

3. The Department Chairperson/Assistant Dean will send the form to the 
Dean for consideration. 

4. The Dean will submit the request for research services to the 
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs for consideration, 

5. If approved, the project data will be sent to the Researcher for 
processing. The project data must be in the order and form 
required by the Researcher. (Prior consultation is recommended 
as to structuring and organizing the data.) 

6. The Researcher will converse directly with the project originator 
if problems occur in processing the data. 

7. The completed data will be sent directly to the project originator. 

8. The project originator is to make copies of the completed data for 
the Dean, and the Department Chairperson/ Assistant Dean when the 
project is completed. 



(OVER) 



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA AT SPARTANBURG 
REQUEST FOR RESEARCH SERVICES 



DATE: 



DEPARTMENT : 



GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF PROJECT; 



DATE NEEDED :_ 
APPROVALS : 



PROJECT ORIGINATOR: 

(Name) 
CHAIRPERSON/ ASST. DEAN; 



DEAN: 



(Signature) 



(Signature) 



DATE: 
DATE: 

DATE: 



(OFFICE USE ONLY) 
REQUEST APPROVED_ 
REQUEST DENIED 



COMMENTS : (Priority) 



VICE CHANCELLOR FOR 
ACADEMIC AFFAIRS-USCS 



(Signature) 

DATE : 



PROJECT COMPLETED 



PROJECT NOT COMPLETED_ 
PROBLEMS : 



RESEARCHER : 



(Signature) 



DATE ; 



uses CALENDAR OF EVENTS 
JANUARY 1981 

Wednesday, January 14 — First annual Richard E. Tukey Memorial Business and 

Economics Outlook Lecture, Speaker: Arnold B. Barach, 
Editor, Special Projects, Kiplinger Washington Editors. 
Tukey Lecture Theatre. 7:00 p.m. Contact person - 
Doyle Boggs. 

Monday, January 19 -- Classes begin, 

Wednesday, January 28 — Foreign Film Series. "Der brave Soldat Schweik." German 

film - English subtitles. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 8:00 p.m. 
Free and open to the public. Contact person - Regis Robe. 



FEBRUARY 1981 

Monday, February 2 -- "Teaching Art to Children" -Frank Wachowiak. Tukey Lecture 

Theatre. 7:00-8:00 p.m. Free and open to the public. Contact 
person - Katie Hicks. 



Monday, February 2 



Saturday, February 2 -- 



Art opening exhibit and reception. "Art of the Children of 
Japan" -Frank Wachowiak. Library Art Gallery. 8:00-9:00 p.m. 
Free and open to the public. Contact person - Katie Hicks. 

uses Homecoming. 6:00 p.m. -^ Women's basketball team vs. 
use Aiken. 8:00 p.m. — Men's basketball team vs. 'JSC Aiken. 
Homecoming dance following games to be held either in the 
Hodge Center Annex or the National Guard Armory. 



Monday, February 16 -- Founders' Day ceremonies. Speaker: Dr.' Noah Langdale, Jr., 
President, Georgia State University. 11:15 a.m. Hodge Center 
Gymnasium. Contact person - Doyle Boggs 

Monday, February 16 --Foreign Film Series. "Le Regie du jeu." French film - 

English subtitles. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 8:00 p.m. Free 
and open to the public. Contact person -Regis Robe. 

Taesday, February 24 -- Sunbelt International Symposium. Dr. Edward Braithwaite 
(historian, Oxford poet) "The Caribbean and the Sunbelt". 
Tukey Lecture Theatre. 7:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. 
Contact person - Cecilia Brown. 

Wednesday, February 25 -- Sunbelt International Symposium. Dr. Edward Braithwaite 

(historian, Oxford poet) "The Creative Caribbean and the 
Sunbelt". Tukey Lecture Theatre. 12:30 p.m. Free and 
open to the public. Contact person - Cecilia Brown. 



Thursday-Saturday -- 
Februray 25-28 



"Say boodnight Gracie" -Shoestring Players production. Tukey 
Lecture Theatre. 8:15 p.m. Nominal fee. Contact person - 
Jimm Cox. 



MARCH 1981 

Sunday, March 1 -- Art exhibit opening and reception. Featuring works of Betty 
Jane Bramlett. Library Art Gallery. 2:00-3:00 p.m. Free and 
open to the public. Contact person - Katie Hicks. 

Saturday, March 14 — History Day (all day). Competition to determine 4th 

Congressional District representatives to the state history 
day program in April. Contact person - Doyle Boggs. 



Monday, March 16 



— Sunbelt International Symposium. Dr. Maxwell Goldberg (Danforth 
Distinguished Visiting Scholar), "de Tocqueville Revisited." 
Tukey Lecture Theatre. 7:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. 
Contact person - Cecilia Brown. 



Wednesday, March 18 — Foreign Film Series. "Tristana." Spanish film - English 
subtitles. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 7:00 p.m. Free and open 
to the public. Contact person - Regis Robe. 



APRIL 1981 

Friday, April 3 -- USCS "Big Event" (Spring Sports Day). Contact person - Jerry 
Baker. 

Friday-Saturday -- Piedmont Regional Science Fair. Hodge Center Gymnasium. 
April 9-11 Project set-up - April 9; Open to the public - April Hi Awards 
ceremonies - April 11. Contact person - Jack Turner. 

Saturday, April 11 -- (tentative) -- Maggie's Drawers Art Competition exhibit. 
Library Art Gallery. Contact person - Doyle Boggs. 

Thursday-Saturday -- "The Gingerbread Lady." -Shoestring Players Production. 
April 23-25 Tukey Lecture Theatre. 8:15 p.m. Nominal fee. Contact person - 
Jimm Cox. 

Saturday, April 23 -- (tentative) -- Maggie's Drawers Literary Luncheon. Place and 
time to be announced. Contact person - Don Knight. 

MAY 1981 



Monday, May 4 -- Lecture/Workshop by Maggie Barnes -"Weaving: Natural Dyes and 
Spinning." Tukey Lecture Theatre. 7:00-8:00 p.m. Free and open 
to the public. Contact person - Katie Hicks. 

Monday, Mary 4 -- Weaving exhibit and opening reception. Works by Maggie Barnes. 
Library Art Gallery. 8:00-9:00 p.m. Free and open to the public. 
Contact person - Katie Hicks. 

Sunday, May 17 -- Commencement exercises. Hodge Center Gymnasium. 3:00 p.m. Contact 
person - Doyle Boggs. 




•^ 






VOL. IV. No. 16 A Newslelter For The Faculty Of USCS December 15, i98o 



I. OFFICIAL 



FACULTY AND STAFF SHOULD NOTE the memo 
attached to FYI concerning the Christmas 
Holidays. 

THE FACULTY WELFARE Committee will meet 
on flonday, December 15, at 11 a.m. in 
A115. Contact Person - Jeanne Stuart. 

ALL FACULTY AND STAFF: Federal regulations 
require review and approval before any 
research (a formal investigation designed 
to develop or contribute to generalizable 
knowledge) can be conducted at USCS which 
involves human subjects (persons about 
whom or from whom an investigator obtains 
data through intervention with the persons 
or identifiable private information). Sub- 
jects may include persons involved in 
behavioral science studies such as students 
normal volunteers and members of the 
general population. The Ethics Committee 
at USCS will provide the review and approval 
for nonfederally funded research. The USC 
Institutional Review Board for the Use of 
Human Subjects will provide the review 
and approval for federally funded research. 
Contact Dr. Leo Bonner, Ethics Committee 
Chair, or Dr. Jan Yost for further infor- 
mation. 



II. BULLETIN BO ARD 

THIS EDITION OF FYI is the last one for 
the 1980 calendar year. FYI will resume 
publication on January 12 1981. Items for 
the January 12th issue should be sent 
to Janella Koob, Information Services, no 
later than 5:00 on January 8th. 

ONE OF OUR STUDENTS, Susan Mattison, has 
lost her home and everything in it in a 
fire on December 9th. She has 3 children - 
boys aged 5 and 8 and a 10 month old girl, 
(continued) 



If you can spare any household goods, kitchen- 
wares, clothing or toys, please bring these 
to Jeanne Stuart, A310 or A109. 



GIFT RECEIVED: USCS has received $1,670 from 
the South Carolina National Bank for the 
purchase of a printing press and related press 
equipment and tools to support the visual arts 
curriculum. Project Directors: Katie Hicks 
(Art) and Jan Yost. 

GRANT AWARDED: USCS has received $750 to con- 
duct History Day 1981 in the Spartanburg- 
Greenville area. Students in grades 6 through 
12 explore the theme ''Work and Leisure in 
History", present imaginative projects, original 
performances, or research papers, and compete 
locally for the opportunity to be selected for 
state and then national competitions. Project 
Coordinator: Doyle Boggs (History). 

MEMBERS OF THE RIFLE REGIMENT are invited to 
the "Poweder Keg", the Rifle Regiment 
hospitality room. The room will be open at 
most home basketball games. The next home 
game is Friday, December 19 when USCS plays 
the College of Charleston. Come out an enjoy 
an evening of Rifle Basketball. 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

CAROL SCHWARTZ attended the Virginia C, 
Community Health Day in Columbia, S.C. 
18, 1980. 



Phillips 
on Nov. 



LYLE CAMPBELL attended the Atlantic Coastal 
Plain Geological Association Find Conference 
in Williamsburg, Virginia on November 1 and 2. 
On the 17th and 18th he attended the national 
meeting of the Geological Society of America, 
held in Atlanta, Georgia. 

NANCY KAPLAN was elected chairperson of the 
South Carolina Nurse Association Medical- 
Surgical Interest Group at the S.C. Nurses 
Association in Columbia on November 5-7. 



FACULTY/STAFF NOTES continued.. 



IV. uses SPORTS RESULTS 



DEANNE LEDFORD and BARBARA MILLER accom- 
panied fifteen members of the Student 
Nurses Association to Columbia for the 
SCSNA Workshop on Oct. 25, 1980. The 
subject for the workshop was Death: The 
Final Stage of Life. The workshop was 
held at Richland Memorial Hospital. 

DEANNE LEDFORD attended a lecture by Dr. 
Madeline M. Leininger on Transcultural 
Nursing in Charleston on November 12. 
Dr. Leininger established the subfield 
of transcultural nursing (or cross 
cultural nursing) as an important area 
for study for nurses in the early 1960's. 
Dr. Leininger is the first professional 
nurse in the world to complete a doctoral 
degree in anthropology. Dr. Leininger has 
organized and chaired six National Trans- 
cultural Nursing Conferences and three 
National Caring Conferences. The lecture 
was sponsored by the College of Nursing 
Cooperating with the Division on Continuing 
Education of the Medical University of 
South Carolina. 



THE WOMEN'S BASKETBALL TEAM is 2-1 going into 
the holiday break. On December 5 and 6 the 
Rifles participated in the PC Tournament, losing 
the first game 76-71 to Columbia College. The 
Rifles won the consolation game against Newberrji 
61-56. The Lady Rifles play their next game 
on January 10 against Furman University in 
Greenville. 

THE MEN'S BASKETBALL TEAM lost against the 
Citadel 75-70 on December 6 and to Winthrop 
88-77 on December 8. In the cross-town rivalry 
game with Wofford on December 11, the Rifles ^ 
lost 70-69 in double overtime. This gives M 
the Rifles a 4-4 record with the next game 
on December 19 when the Rifles host The College 
of Charleston at the Hodge Center., 



CAROL RENTZ, BARBARA MILLER and MARY ANN 
SAWICKI conducted a family enrichment work- 
shop entitled "Positive Sexuality" for 
ages 6-adult at Holy Communion Lutheran 
Church. The workshop was held Nov. 16 and 
23 and December 8. 



JULIA KUGLER and NANCY BABB attended a 
conference: "Personal and Professional 
Strategies for Career Advancement" spon- 
sored by the S.C. Network of Women Admini- 
strators in Higher Education on Dec. 4-5. 
The conference was held in Charleston, S.C, 




-oiiice memo 




Date 



December 11, 1 ! 



p. Ted R. Ei 1 enberq 
rrom: — 

To: ^/J 



Subject: 



CHRISTMAS VACATION CLOSING 



The Holiday period begins at 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, December 23, I98O. 
All offices will reopen on Monday, January 5, 1981. 

FACILITIES 

In order to conserve energy, we are planning to lower the heat in all 
buildings and turn off all air handling equipment on December 23, 1S80 
at 5:00 p.m. Thermostats will be set between 55 and 60 . If you 
need to make special arrangements for laboratory experiments, etc. please 
contact Physical Plant--ext. '439--by December 19, 1980. This will give 
them adequate time to make plans for specific requests. 



The Library and Switchboard will also be closed for the above time frames. 

Public Safety Division will be working as will Physical Plant. To con- 
tact either division, please call 578-7827. If you must be on campus 
for any reason, please notify Public Safety at 578-7827 or come by the 
Publ ic Safety Office. 

The Hodge Center road will be open to traffic; the westside drive will 
be closed for the holiday period. 



MAIL SERVICE 

Incoming mail to USCS will be sorted daily with the exception of Christmas 
Day. 

All mail will be bagged and stored in the Mail Room to be distributed 
on January 5 , 1981 . 

Any outgoing mail should be taken to the USCS post office for stamping 
and forwarding to the Post Office. 



uses- -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, DECEMBER 15 - TUESDAY, DECMEBER 23, 1980 i 

1 


MONDAY, DECMEBER 15 

11:00 a.m. -- Faculty Welfare Committee meeting. A115. Contact person ■ 


- Jeanne Stuart. 



TUESDAY, DECMEBER 16 



5:30 p.m. -- Minoritiy Affairs Committee meeting. Activities Building. Contact person - Ricky 
Walker. 

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 17 an THURSDAY, DECEMBER 18 — No activities scheduled. 

THURSDAY, DECMEBER 19 

9:00-2:00 p.m. -- Student Teaching Seminar. Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact person - Bill 
Reitmeier. 

8:00 p.m. -- Men's basketball team vs. College of Charleston. Hodge Center. 



SATURDAY, DECEMBER 20 through TUESDAY, DECEMBER 23 — No activities scheduled. 




— _. •«>*. 






ol. IV No. 17 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS January 12, i98i 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

IHE FACULTY ADVISORY COMMITTEE will meet 
ianuary 16 at 12 p.m. in the Conference 
oom in the Administration Building. 

HE FACULTY ADVISORY COMMITTEE, WELFARE 
OMMITTEE, and ACADEMIC FORWARD PLANNING 
OMMITTEE will meet jointly in L268 on 
anuary 14 at 12 p.m. 

HE FACULTY SENATE will meet January 23 
n L268 at 12:30 p.m. 

OMINATIONS FOR THE FACULTY AWARD for 
ounders' Day are still open. Please send 
our nominations with biographical infor- 
ation to Eb Barnes. 

ROM BOB ELMORE: Due to a scheduling error, 
INT 571 - Public Financial Administration - 
as left off the Spring Schedule. This class 
ill be offered on Tuesdays and Thursdays 
his spring from 1:45-3:00 p.m. The class 
ill be taught by Wayne Plyler, Assistant 
ity Manager of Spartanburg. 

ID CARDS SOON .CCESSARY 
FOR BORROWING LIBRARY BOOKS 

LL FACULTY MEMBERS ARE ASKED TO READ THE 
3LL0WING NOTE IN EACH FIRST CLASS OF SPRING, 
981. The library staff appreciates your help 
n getting word to the students about the 
hange soon to take place. 

In the near future, the library will have a 
5w circulation system in operation, and in 
rder to check out books all borrowers, faculty, 
taff, and students, must have ID cards. If you 
D not have an ID card, you can have one made 
1 the Security Office Monday-Thursday, Jan. 
?-22 between 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon, 1:00 p.m. 

3:00 p.m., and 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. 



FROM THE CHANCELLOR — Earlier this fall, 
the School of Business and the Carolina 
Piedmont Foundation decided to begin a 
jointly sponsored lecture series which would 
provide a business and economic outlook for 
the community each January. With the approval 
of the Tukey family, the series has been 
named in honor of the late Richard E. Tukey, 
who was a member of the Foundation Board and 
a strong supporter of USCS through the years. 

We will be very fortunate this year to have 
Arnold B. Barach in Spartanburg this January. 
He is the editor of special projects for the 
Kipplinger Washington letters, and is one of 
the top economic forecasters in the nation. 
Mr. Barach has agreed to deliver the first 
annual Tukey Lecture while he is in the city. 
The program will be held on Wednesday, 
January 14, in the Tukey Lecture Theatre. 

We realize that this particular evening 
comes at a hectic time for faculty and 
students, but it seemed that the opportunity 
to have Mr. Barach on our campus to begin 
the lecture series made up for the disad- 
vantages. I hope that many of the faculty 
and staff will attend the program, and that 
members of the university community will 
contact friends and students who may not 
have heard of this special opportunity to 
begin the spring semester with a stimulating 
program. 

POSITION AVAILABLE: Clerk, Ceta Position. 
Perform routine or standardized duties in- 
volving typing, filing, xeroxing and re- 
searching information. For more information 
about this position contact the USCS Personnel 
Office. Application deadline is Jan. 23, 1981. 

FACULTY and STAFF are reminded that the 
deadline for getting an article published in 
FYI is leach week on Thursday at 5:00 p.m. 
Articles received by Thursday will appear in 
the following Monday's edition. Material 
should be submitted in writing to Janella 
Koob, Information Services. 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 



C. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION NEWS 



A. Campus 

FROM VALERIE BURNIE: Faye Henderson, 
librarian at Spartanburg General Hospital, 
has extended the service of computer 
searches, on a trial basis, to USCS faculty 
members. The resources include DIALOG 
which covers a wide range of disciplines; 
most files cost between $45 and $90 per 
hour to use, and most searches take be- 
tween 10 and 15 minutes. Because of the 
heavy workload in serving her own clientele, 
Faye must have at least a weeks notice be- 
fore a search is needed, and searches cannot 
be done for students. Her phone number is 
573-6220. 

MR. GEORGE KHOURI, manager of the Spartan- 
burg Holiday Inn, was the winner of a pair 
of Gator Bowl tickets in a drawing sponsored 
by the Rifle Regiment. The drawing was held 
for Rifle Regiment members and advertisers 
in the 1980-81 Sports Yearbook. 

B. GRANT NEWS 

GRANT PROPOSALS SUBMITTED: 1) A request for 
$53,931 to support a project entitled 
"Improving Critical Reading Skills Through 
a Four-Year, Academically - Oriented-Reading 
Program" has been submitted to the Fund for 
the Improvement of Postsecondary Education 
(FIPSE). The proposed project would involve 
cooperative ventures by the Developmental 
Services staff and faculty from a variety of 
disciplines in the designing and teaching of 
one hour laboratory courses emphasizing 
critical reading skills. Project Director: 
Dr. Alice Henderson (History). 



2) A request for 
"Palmetto Project 
the National Scien 
ject will involve 
si on of a previous 
dissemination of s 
and processes to p 
in middle/junior h 
County. Project Di 
tion) . 



INTERNATIONAL CONTINUING EDUCATION: Several 
courses that may be of interest to someone 
you know will be offered during the coming 
semester. The first three begin Monday, Jan. 
19, so convey the information soon. "Practical 
Writing in Business and Industry," a course 
emphasizing written English for non-native 
speakers, will be taught by Don Knight. 
"Introductory Conversational German" will be 
taught by Peggy Nickson. "Introductory Reading 
in Business and Technical French," which may 
also be taken for credit, will be taught by 
Regis Robe. "Conversational English for Non- 
Native Speakers (Intermediate)" will be taught 
by Malinda Willard on Tuesday and Thursday 
mornings beginning on January 27. 
There will also be a one-session "Basic 
Approaches to Exporting Seminar" on March 4. 
Additional information is posted in mail 
rooms or available from Jim Brown, ext. 433, 
or from Continuing Education, ext. 422. 

TRADE CLUB: The International Trade Club of 
Western Carolina, which is open to anyone 
interested, will meet Wednesday evening, 
January 14, 1981, at Textile Hall, Greenville. 
The speaker will be Dr. Robert N. Brady, of 
Barter Systems, Inc., who will speak on 
"Barter--An Idea Whose Time Has Come Again." 
For additional information, contact Jim Brown, 
L236, ext. 433. 



$16,662 to support the 
11" has been submitted to 
ce Foundation. This pro- 
the teachers as an exten- 
grant which dealt with 
cience education materials 
rincipals and administrators 
igh schools in Spartanburg 
rector: Dr. Ed White (Educa- 



GRANT AWARDED: Dr. Gordon Mapley (Psychology) 
has received $1400 from the USC Research & 
Productive Scholarship Fund to support his re- 
search proposal, "The Effect of Prior Mock 
Jury Experience on Jurors Subsequent Decisions 
of Guilt." Congratulations, Dr. Mapley!! 



AMONG THE TEN COUNTR 
Market, the citizens 
highest standard of 
ingly, they also pay 
for tax revenue (inc 
payments) as a perce 
product include the 
50%; Netherlands 47%: 
and UK 34%. 

D. COMMUNITY EVENTS 



lES of the European Common 
of Luxembourg enjoy the 
living. Perhaps interest- 
the most taxes. Figures 
luding social security 
ntage of gross domestic 
following: Luxembourg 
; France 41%; Germany 37%; 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 13-FEB 5 - Exhibit of paint- 
ings by Betty Jane Bramlett and Mary Ellen 
Suitt at The Gallery. 

THE FILM "Picasso - War, Peace, Love" will be 
presented at 12 noon in the Arts Center Board 
room on Jan. 13. Admission is free. Lunch 
(minimum charge) reservations may be made by 
calling 582-7516. 

(continued) 



.Community Events continued. 



SPARTANBURG COMMUNITY CONCERTS ASSOCIATION 
presents the Woody Herman Band on Thursday, 
Jan. 15, 8:00 p.m. in the Spartanburg 
Memorial Auditorium. Admission by season 
tickets or box office. For information 
phone 582-8107. 

CONVERSE COLLEGE OPERA WORKSHOP presents 
"L'EGISTO" by Cavalli on Friday, Jan. 16 
in Daniel Hall, Blackman Building. Free and 
open to the putDlic. 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

WITH PLEASURE we announce that Gloria Close, 
Education Coordinator for the Spartanburg 
70001 program, has defended her dissertation, 
''An Investigation of Factors Related to 
Selected Dimensions of the Self-Concept of 
Adult Basic Education Students," and success- 
fully completed the requirements for an Ed.D. 
from North Carolina State University. 
Congratulations, DR. CLOSE!! 



IV. SPORTS RESULTS 

MEN - The men's basketball team broke a three 
game losing streak by defeating the College 
of Charleston 53-49 December 19 just before 
taking an 18-day Christmas break. The Rifles 
returned to action January 6 when they were 
handed a 59-55 defeat by Lenoir-Rhyne. 
Wendell Gibson used a 23 point effort in that 
game to become the first USCS player to 
score over 1000 career points, Wendell now 
has a total of 1002 points. 

The men's team travels to Due West Monday 
night to take on Erskine before returning 
home Thursday to host Winthrop, and Saturday 
to host Coastal Carolina. All three games 
begin at 8:00 p.m. 

WOMEN - The women's basketball team travels 
to Erskine Monday night for a 6:00 p.m. game. 
Thursday night is the women's home opener, 
they host Winthrop at 6:00 p.m. The Rifles 
travel to Demorest, Georgia, to participate 
in the Piedmont College Tournament Friday 
and Saturday. 



USCS-"THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, JANUARY 12 -- SUNDAY, JANUARY 18, 1981 



QNDAY, JANUARY 12 -- Advisement - check with individual deans for specifics, 
0:00 a.m. -- Orientation. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 



:00 p.m. -- Women's basketball vs. Erskine (at Due West). 
:00 p.m. -- Men's basketball vs. Erskine (at Due West). 



UESDAY, JANUARY 13 -- Advisement - check with individual deans for specifics. 
:00 a.m. -- School of Education meeting. Activities Building. 

EDNESDAY, JANUARY 14 -- Advisement - check with individual deans for specifics. 

: 00-12 noon - Registration. Hodge Center Gym. 
: 00- 7: 00 p.m. - Registration. Hodge Center Gym, 

2 noon - Faculty Advisory Committee, Welfare Committee and Forward Planning Committee 
joint meeting. L268. 

:00 p.m. -- Business and Economics Outlook Lecture. Speaker - Dr. Arnold Barach. Tukey 
. Lecture Theatre. 

HURSDAY, JANUARY 15 

1:00-3:00 p.m. -- Faculty In-Service Training. L255. Contact person - Leo Bonner. 

:00 p.m. -- Women's basketball vs. Winthrop (Hodge Center). 
:00 p.m. -- Men's basketball vs. Winthrop (Hodge Center). 

RIDAY, JANUARY 16 

:30-4:30 p.m. -- Nursing Workshop. Hodge Center 247 A and B, 

:00-12 noon -- Student Teaching Workshop. M217. 

I noon - Faculty Advisory Committee meeting. Faculty Conference room. 




j-Jj^aicr 



•^ 






'ol. IV No. 18 



k Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS January 12, i98i 



IF FICIAL 

iLL FACULTY AND STAFF SHOULD NOTE THE FOLLOWING CORRECTIONS TO THE MONDAY, JANUARY 12th 
idition of FYI and The Calendar (Vol. IV, No. 17). 



he announcement concerning the Business and Economics lecture is correct except that 

he time is 7:00 p.m. in Tukey Lecture Theatre and not 8:00 p.m. as listed in The Calendar. 



he calendar lists Faculty In-Service for Thursday, January 15 at 11:00-3:00 p.m. The 
orrect time is 9:00 a.m. 







DL. IV, No. 17 



A Newslelter For The Faculty Of USCS 



Januarv 19.1981 



, OFFICIAL ANNOUCEMENTS 

REPRESENTATIVE from the Couth Carolina Pub- 
ic Employees Deferred Compensation Plan (PEBSCO) 
.11 be on this campus January 21 from 11-4 
m. If you have not had an opportunity to 
;arn of this program or enroll in the program, 
.ease call the Personnel Office for an ap- 
)intment for that day. 

;PRESENTATIVES will be at the campus book- 

;ore Feb. 3-4 to take orders for Gaps and 

»vms and graduation invitations. Times 

■e from 9-2 on Feb. 3 and 4, and 5-7 on 

ib. 3. Other details may be obtained from 

•yant Reeves. 

IE ACADEMIC FORWARD PLANNING COMMITTEE will 
;et Wednesday, January 28 at 12:30 p.m. in 
pom L259. 

IE MINORITY AFFAIRS ADVISORY COMMITTEE will 
iet on January 27 (Tuesday) at 6 p.m. in the 
;tivities Building. For more information, 
intact Ricky W^alker. 

;. BULLETIN BOARD 



LOM THE CHANCELLOR: The first annual Richard 
Tukey Memorial Easiness and Economic Out- 

lok Lecture, held Wednesday night in the 

ikey Lecture Theatre, was very successful. 

ith Mr. Barach and Mrs. Tukey were appreciative 
the large turnout by the faculty of the 

liversity and by the community as v/ell. 

wish to add my personal thanks to the many 

mbers of the faculty who supported this pro- 

ct. 

E LIBRARY has the 1981 Tax Guide for College 
achers and Other College Personnel in the 
ference Collection for use in the library 

ly. 



THE GIRL RANGERS (Boy Scouts of America) are 
attempting to earn money for trips by collec- 
ting proof of purchase slips from various 
local merchants under the Community Club 
Awards program. Gil Newberry asks that 
faculty consider helping by saving slips 
from the following merchants: Quincy's, 
Wendy's, Rollerland, Peeler's Milk, Belk's, 
Community Cash, Patelli's Pizza, Pinewood 
Cinema, Yel ton's Flour and Com Meal, and 
Spa Lady. Gil would also appreciate dona- 
tions of aluminum . cans, foil, or other 
goods. 

POSITION AVAILABLE: Deans of Arts and 
Sciences at the State University of New 
York College at Cortland. For more information. 
contact Janella Koob at extension 210. 

III. Faculty-Staff Notes 

BILL BRUCE, School of Education, served as 
a consultant to the Grand Rapids (Michigan) 
Public Schools on Jan. 7, 8, 9, and 10. 
Bill conducted training sessions for 40 
individuals who comprise multicultural 
leadership teams for various schools in 
Grand Rapids. These teams were trained 
to use the Multicultural Descriptor system 
to identify the status of education that 
is multicultural. The Multicultural 
Descriptor was written by a group of edu- 
cators, including Bill, who founded the 
Institute for Education That is Multicultural. 
Bill will also provide this training for 
faculty at the University of Maryland- 
College Park on Jan. 21-24, 1981. 



r.v. 



uses Sports Results 



VI. Addendum 



MEN'S BASKETBALL— the men's team grabbed 
the Greater Spartanburg Sertoma Tournament 
championship for the second consecutive year 
last weekend, defeating Wofford 83-74 in the 
championship game. They moved into the 
finals by defeating Central Wesleyan 85-79. 
Traveling to Due West Monday night, the men 
lost to Erskine 70-59. This leaves the 
Rifles at 7-6 going into games Thursday 
night against Winthrop and Saturday night 
against Coastal Carolina. Currently USCS 
is ranked third in the latest Krause Count. 
The top eight teams in this ranking system will 
qualify for the district playoffs, and the top 
four will host first round games. 
The men travel to Clinton Monday night to play 
Presbyterian before hosting Francis Marion on 
Wednesday and traveling to USC-Aiken on Saturday. 

WOMEN'S BASKETBALL — The women's team returned to 
action after a five week break Saturday, losing 
to Furman 61-60. They were defeated by Erskine 
64-53 Monday. The women, now 2-3, play double- 
headers with the men against P.C, Francis Marion, 
and USC-Aiken this week. Francis Marion, which 
will be at the Hodge Center Wednesday night at 
6 p.m., is one of the top women's basketball teams 
in the A I AW. 



V. Community Events 

THE SPARTANBURG MUSIC FOUNDATION CONCERT SERIES 
presents a Symphony Concerto Concert at Converse 
College Tuesday night at 8 p.m. Admission is 
free. For more information, telephone 583- 
2776. 



ON JANUARY 29, the Admissions Office will 
host a program to honor the thirty semi- 
finalists in the Piedmont Scholar com- 
petition. This year we included all the 
counties in our region and actively pro- 
moted the scholarships in all schools. 
Students were asked to complete a scholar- 
ship application and forward a high 
school transcript and SAT scores to our 
office. The selection procedure was based 
on academic ability, student activities 
and community involvement. 

When the students and their parents 
arrive on campus on the evening of the 
29th, they will be greeted by Dr. Sansbury, 
Dr. Eaglin and Dr. Davis. The counselors 
will also give a short presentation on 
Choosing a Career. The semif inalists and 
their parents will then be escorted to the 
academic school of their choice to meet 
with faculty and selected students. We 
will conclude the evening with a reception 
in the Activities Building. 

The Piedmont Scholar program is an exceller 
opportunity for USCS to attract students with 
strong academic backgrounds to our campus. 

We are very pleased with this year's 
strong response, and feel that it justifies 
increasing the number of these scholarships 
we can award in years to come. 

The Admissions Office would welcome any 
suggestions or involvement that might improve 
the program. 



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At-Large 



Senators 

T. Gunter 
M. Jilling 
R. Luttrell 

B. Addleton 
L. Bonner 
W. Bruce 
J. Davisson 
B. Gray 
E. White 

S . Cherry 
N. Moore 
E. Seko 
J. Yost 

E. McCaughrin 

N. Babb 

B. Hardin 
A. Kloepper 

C. Rentz 
G. Sims 

L. Moore 
R. Sobczak 
J . Turner 
M. Ulmer 

A. Henderson 

J. Kizer 

E. Krauter 

G. Map ley 

J. Yehl 



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D. Codespoti 

J. Newberry 

R. Walker 



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uses— -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, JANUARY 19 — SUNDAY, JANUARY 25, 1981 



MONDAY, JANUARY 19 

CLASSES BEGIN, LATE REGISTRATION BEGINS 

10:00 - 12:00 p.m. - Late registration in Hodge Center. 
4:00 - 6:00 p.m. - Late registration in Hodge Center. 

;6:00 - Women's basketball vs. Presbyterian (at Clinton) 
8:00 - Men's basketball vs Presbyterian (at Clinton). 



T UESDAY, JANUARY 20 

10:00 - 12:00 p.m. - Late registration in Hodge Center. 
4:00 - 6:00 p.m. - Late registration in Hodge Center. 



W EDNESDAY, JANUARY 21 

10:00 - 12:00 p.m. - Late registration. Administration building, 1st floor. 
4:00 - 6:00 p.m. - Late registration. Administration building, 1st floor. 

6:00 p.m. - Women's basketball vs. Francis Marion College (Hodge Center). 
8:00 p.m. - Men's basketball vs. Francis Marion College (Hodge Center). 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 22 

8:00 - 5:00 p.m. - CPR class. Activities building. Contact person - Judy Kudger. 

10:00 - 12:00 p.m. - Late registration. Administration building, 1st floor. 
4:00 - 6:00 p.m. - Late registration. Administration building, 1st floor. 

8:15 p.m. - "The Runner." Shoestring Players performance, Tukey Lecture Theatre. 

FRIDAY, JANUARY 23 

LATE REGISTRATION ENDS 

8:00 - 5:00 p.m. - CPR class. Activities building. Contact person - Judy Kudger. 

i 10:00 - 12:00 p.m. - Late registration. Administration building, 1st floor. 
4:00 - 5:00 p.m. - Late registration. Administration building, 1st floor. 

12:30 p.m. - Faculty Senate meeting. L268. 

8:15 p.m. - "The Runner." Shoestring Players performance. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 



(continued) 



SATURDAY, JANUARY 24 

9:45 a.m. - "Second Annual USCS Run for the Health of It" road race. Hodge Center. 

6:00 p.m. - Women's basketball vs. USC-Aiken (at Aiken). 

00 p.m. - Men's basketball vs. USC-Aiken (at Aiken). 

15 p.m. - "The Runner." Shoestring Players performance. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 25 

8:15 p.m. - "The Runner." Shoestring Players performance. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 







fecial Edition 



A Newsleiter For The Faculty Of USCS 



January 20,1981 



WITH THE APPROVAL of Mrs. Gordon and the other members 
of Earl Gordon's faimly, a number of friends have 
established the Earl Gordon Memorial Endowment at USCS. 
The interest on this fund will be used to aid the 
students of the university. Faculty, staff, and stu- 
dents who desire to remember Dean Gordon in this way 
may make contributions to the Carolina Piedmont Foun- 
dation (Earl Gordon Memorial Fund) In the Office of 
University Relations. 



THE FACULTY WELFARE COMMITTEE is working on revising 
the Faculty Handbook. Please take a few minutes 
to look through the handbook and if you have any 
suggestions for changes, please send them to Carol 
Rentz, HC 235, by January 26, 1981. 



THE ANNUAL FOUNDERS' DAY ceremonies have been scheduled 
for Monday, February 16 at 11:15 a.m. in the Hodge 
Center Gymnasium. The guest speaker will be Dr. 
Noah Langdale^ President "of Georgia State. University 
in Atlanta. Please place this date on. your calencars. 



\ 




•^ 









VOL. IV, NO. 18 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS January 26, i98i 



I. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

REPRESENTATIVES will be at the campus book- 
store Feb. 3-4 to take orders for caps 
and gowns and graduation invitations. Times 
are from 9-2 on Feb. 3 and 4, and 5-7 on 
Feb. 3. Other details may be obtained from 
Bryant Reeves. 

BEGINNING FEBRUARY 8, new procedures will 
be in effect for the USC-Columbia telephone 
system which will impact on USCS users of 
the Columbia lines. To call a number within 
the use system, it will then be necessary to 
dial 7 before the usual 4 digit number. To 
access the USC WATTS line, it will be 
necessary to dial 5, 1, the area code, and 
then the seven digit telephone number. For 
calls within the Columbia area, dial 9, 
then the seven digit number. For more 
information, contact the Public Safety 
Office at ext. 269. 

ALL FACULTY AND STAFF: Federal regulations 
r equire review and approval before any re- 
search (a formal investigation designed to 
develop or contribute to general izable 
knowledge) can be conducted at USCS which 
involves human subjects (persons about 
whom or from whom an investigator obtains 
data through intervention or interaction 
with the persons, or identifiable private 
information.) Subjects may include persons 
involved in behavioral science studies such 
as students, normal volunteers, and members 
of the general population. The Ethics Com- 
nittee at USCS will provide the review and 
approval for nonfederal ly funded research. 
The USC Institutional Review Board for the 
Use of Human Subjects will provide the re- 
view and approval for federally funded re- 
search. Contact Dr. Leo Bonner, Ethics 
Committee Chair, or Dr. Jan Yost for further 
information. 



THE ADMISSIONS OFFICE will be having a program 
for the Piedmont Scholar semi -finalists on 
Thursday, January 29, 1981 at 7:30 p.m. in 
Tukey Auditorium. It will be an excellent 
opportunity to meet some of the outstanding 
high school students in our area. Faculty, 
staff and students are welcome to attend. 

THANKSGIVING SERVICE - MONDAY, JANUARY 26, 
12:30 P.M., TUKEY AUDITORIUM. A brief 
service of Thanksgiving for the 52 American 
Returnees. Contact Person - David Taylor, 
ext. 214/215. 

THE MINORITY AFFAIRS ADVISORY COMMITTEE will 
meet on January 27, 1981 in the Activities 
Building at 6:00 p.m. Contact person - Ricky 
Walker. 

THE ACADEMIC FORWARD PLANNING COMMITTEE will 
meet Wednesday, January 28 at 13:30 p.m. in 
L259. Contact person - Ron Sobczak. 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 

A. CAMPUS 

DURING THE PERIOD FEB. 1 through August 31, 
1981, the Director for Information Services 
will be engaged in a special consulting pro- 
ject for an area firm. As part of the agree- 
ment, this firm has agreed to fund a temporary 
part-time position for a staff writer in the 
Office of Information Services. The compen- 
sation will be $5 per hour for a maximum of 
25 hours per week. The staff writer will 
assist the Director for Information Services 
by assuming much of the responsibility for 
USCS publications during the six month period. 
It is anticipated that several booklets about 
various academic programs will be produced, 
and a number of fund raising publications will 
be needed. In addition the staff writer will 
be responsible for preparing news features 
and for developing ideas about increased 

(continued) 



...Bulletin Board continued... 

publicity efforts about and for women and 
minorities. Minimum qualifications are a 
college degree or at least two years 
experience in public relations or journalism. 
Candidates should apply through the USCS 
Personnel Office. 

FROM JIMMY DAWKINS: The computer room 
will be open the following hours during 
the spring semester: Monday-Thursday - 
8:30 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.; Friday - 8:30 a.m. 
-5:00 p.m.; Saturday - 9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m.; 
Sunday - 2:00 p.m. -6:00 p.m. 

TO USCS FACULTY AND STAFF: The poinsettia 
received during our beloved's illness and 
all expressions of condolence are greatly 
appreciated by the family of Dr. Abraham 
H. McDaniel. -Cecilia McDaniel Brown and 
family. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI in- 
vites applications and nominations for the 
position of Vice President for Academic 
Affairs. Applications and nominations should 
be sent no later than March 1, 1981. For 
the address and other information, contact 
Janella Koob, Information Services. 

GERMAN FILM: The foreign film series con- 
tinues this week with "Der Brave Soldat 
Schweik" (The Good Soldier Schweik,) 
Wednesday evening, 7:00 p.m., Tukey Lecture 
Theatre. This film (with English sub-titles) 
is one of the most famous of all German 
Comedies, a thoroughly delightful and 
enjoyable film whether you know German or 
not. 

THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN 
is holding its annual Used Book Sale at West- 
gate Mall on Apr. 3-4, If anyone has any books 
he or she would like to donate please contact 
Janella Koob, Information Services. 



B. GRANT NEWS 

GRANT PROPOSAL SUBMITTED: USCS has submitted 
a request for $97,691 to the Department of 
Education to continue the Piedmont Area 
Talent Search project for another year. The 
purpose "of the project is to aid 1,000 Pied- 
mont youth of financial and cultural need 
and academic potential in the completion of 
their secondary education, in gaining admis- 
sion to postsecondary education, and/or in 
the completion of their postsecondary edu- 
cation. Project Director: Mr. Malcolm San- 
ders (Developmental Services). 



GRANT PROPOSAL SUBMITTED: Dr. Lou Hunley 
(Education) has requested $12,840 from the 
National Institute of Education to conduct 
her proposed research project, Paivio's 
Dual Encoding Examined in the Science Class 
room of Grade 7. The research will examine 
the effects of dual encoding (mental 
picturing as well as verbal labeling) and 
verbal encoding by students on their learn- 
ing of science materials. 

C. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION NEWS 

INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS: The countries whose 
populations enjoy the longest lifespans are 
Iceland, Japan, Norway, and Sweeden. Life- 
span for newborns in Iceland and Japan is 
73+ years for males; in Iceland it is 79+ 
years for females, and in the remaining 
three countries it is 78+ years for females 

KENT UNIVERSITY EXCHANGE: The USC system 
has an exchange program with the University 
of Kent, in England. It is open to students 
who will have completed sixty hours by the 
time they begin their studies. The exchange 
is for a full academic year. Tuition pay- 
ments are the normal USCS tuition (against 
which financial aid may be applied), but 
room/board/transportation and other expense 
will probably bring the total cost to over 
$6,000 per year. Academically (and 
financially) eligible students should be 
made aware of this opportunity. Further 
information and application forms are 
available from Jim Brown, L-236, Ext. 433. 

TEACHING IN CHINA: Anyone interested who 
has not already expressed interest in the 
possibility of teaching at Shanxi Universit, 
China, either in 1981-82 or later, under 
the USC-Shanxi exchange that has been pre- 
viously announced, should contact Jim Brown 
L-236, ext. 433, soon. 

YUGOSLAVIAN AMBASSADOR: Budimir Loncar, the 
Ambassador of Yugoslavia to the U.S. will 
speak in Columbia, Thursday, January 29, 191 
4:00 p.m., in the auditorium of Gambrell 
Hall. A reception will follow. This is the 
second lecture in a series to inaugurate 
the new James F. Brynes International Center 

CONTINUED 



.....BULLETIN BOARD continued... 

WOMEN IN THE MIDDLE EAST: Nouha Alhegelan, 
wife of the Saudi Arabian Ambassador, will 
speak in Atlanta, 4 February 1981, 1:00 p.m., 
on "The Changing Role of Women in the 
Middle East." The lecture, sponsored by the 
Southern Center for International Studies, 
will address the developing conflict between 
the growing need and desire to utilize 
female human resources in the work force on 
one hand and resurgent Muslim fundamentalism 
on the other. For additional information, 
contact Jim Brown, L-236, ext. 433. 

P. COMMUNITY INTEREST 

ROYAL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY: Four actors from 
the Royal Shakespeare Company will be in 
residency at Furman University during the 
week of January 27-31. Several of their 
programs and performances will be open to 
the public. For reservations and information 
contact Dr. Judith Gatlin, Furman University, 
294-2222, or for further information, contact 
Jimm Cox, L-237, ext. 397. 

A PLAY ENTITLED BAYOU RELICS , written by Dr. 
Elizabeth Brown of USCS, will be produced at 
the Arts Center on March 13, 14, and 15. 
Bayou Relics presents characters in a nursing 
home, sharing their feelings about each other, 
the management, their children, their 
sexuality, and their mental and emotional 
conditions. It is a play in which comedy and 
pathos come together. Some of the characters 
complain about their misfortunes, but we see 
through their with the "I'm not ready to give 
up" attitude. These characters are full of 
life, contrary to popular belief about nursing 
home patients. They want what all (youthful) 
people want: to love and to be loved. There 
are three black male and three black female 
roles. Anyone interested in helping with the 
production should contact Dr. Elizabeth Brown 
at 578-1800, ext. 400 (L-240), or 574-3999. 

MONDAY, JANUARY 26 

--Music Foundation concert series presents 
Eugene Fodor, Violinist. Admission by series 
ticket. Possibility of single tickets, tele- 
phone 583-2776. Twichell Aud., Converse 
College, 8:00 p.m. 

--Speaker: Mahmed A. Faksh speaks on "Religion 
of Islam," Hartness Aud., Converse College, 
7:00 p.m. 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28 
--Ron Hudson in Concert, an international 
master guitarist from Guatemala. Spartanburg 
Methodist College. Camak Auditorium, 7:30 p.m. 
Free and open to the public. 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 29 

--Filmsouth, 7:30 p.m. Hartness Aud., Converse 
College. Regional film competition. For infor- 
mation, telephone 585-6421. 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

TERESA EGGERS, KAREN PEEL, and MARY STROSSNER 
attended a workshop on "Managing Work Related 
Conflict" given by Priscilla Taylor, RN, M.N, 
M.Ed, from MUSC, Charleston, S.C. on Jan. 16, 
1981 at the Hodge Center. Ms. Taylor reviewed 
conflict, factors determining outcome of con- 
flict, and strategies for handling conflict. 

ED WHITE has just completed a series of science 
workshops. In District Five he taught three 
sections of gifted science students at D.R. 
Hill Middle School. A workshop for science 
teachers and gifted high school students was 
held after school. On January 16th he conducted 
two staff development sessions for District 
Three on procedures for developing science 
programs (7-12) and innovative teaching 
techniques (4-6). 

CECILIA COGDELL has been invited by the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 
to serve on a visiting committee evaluating 
Fayetteville State University in North 
Carolina March 1. She will be examining 
Fayetteville State's nursing program. 

DR. MIKE JILLING has been selected to par- 
ticipate in the Scholar-Diplomat Seminar on 
Economic and Business Affairs by the Department 
of State. The seminar will be held at the 
Department of State in Washington on March 2-6, 
1981. We congratulate him on this honor. 

USCS FACULTY AND STAFF: Thank you for the 
beautiful fruit basket. I appreciate your 
thoughts and concern for me while I'm recover- 
ing. Hope to see you soon. -James "Curley" 
McArthur. 



IV SPORTS RESULTS 

MEN'S BASKETBALL - The men's basketball team 
was upset by Coastal Carolina 69-66 Saturday 
night. That defeat caused the Rifles to drop 
from third to sixth in the latest Krause 
Count for District 6. The men came back 
through winning two straight, defeating 
Presbyterian 77-69 and Francis Marion 48-32. 
The men host Erskine Monday night at 8 p.m. 
and travel to Coker Saturday. 

WOMEN'S BASKETBALL - The women traveled to 

the Piedmont College tournament Friday and 

Saturday. The Rifles fell to Lee College 

74-60 in the opening round but finished 

third by defeating North Georgia 84-78. The ■■ 

women made a comeback against Presbyterian i 

moving to within one point of the Blue 

Hose with only seconds remaining, but PC 

held on to win 72-70. The women fell to 

tenth-ranked Francis Marion Wednesday 

night 82-59. 

The Lady Rifles host Erskine Monday at 
6 p.m., and play at Wofford Thursday 
night at 6 p.m. 

HOMECOMING 

The 1981 Homecoming has been set for Saturday, February 7, when the USCS men and women 
basketball teams entertain USC-Aiken. As in the past the contest for Homecoming Queen will 
be run by the Student Government. 

Each student organization is asked to nominate one contest to run for Homecoming Queen 1981. 
Qualifications are that the nominee be a full time student at USCS, nominee does not have to 
be a member of the organization nominating her. All contestants must be able to supply their 
own escort and be able to attend all required meetings. 

January 26-5:00 p.m. -- all nominations turned into Student Affairs Office 

January 26 and 27 - complete application blank and have picture taken for contest 
- Student Affairs Office 

January 29 and 30 - voting in Hodge Center - all contestants 

February 2-8:00 p.m. - Halftime men' s basketball game- all contestants and escorts. 
Announcement of finalist. 

February 5 and 6 - voting on finalist 

February 6 - Spring Dinner Dance - Hodge Center 8:00 p.m. 

February 7 - 8:00 p.m. - Halftime men's game - all finalist and escorts. Crowning 

of Homecoming Queen 1981 




INTRA-OFFICE MEMO 



Date: 



JANUARY 22, 1981 



To: 
From: 



ALL FACULTY AND STAFF 



Campus: 



SPARTANBURG 



OLIN SANSBURY 



Campus: SPARTANBURG 



Subject: 



COORDINATING COMMUNITY PROGRAMS 



The past few years have brought great changes in the variety 
and complexity of USCS' activities in and for the Greenville-Spartanburg 
community. Thanks to the many hours devoted to these programs by 
the faculty and staff, the upstate has responded to these efforts 
in a very positive fashion. During the past several weeks, however, 
a number of unfortunate happenings illustrated that some of these 
activities are not being properly coordinated. In one instance, 
incorrect information was furnished by an unauthorized individual 
to a community publication, and on other occasions, persons have 
engaged in uncoordinated fund raising efforts in competition and 
conflict with approved projects. Such efforts are frankly counter- 
productive and have the potential for creating serious embarrassment. 

Therefore, I want to restate briefly our existing policies which 
relate to this problem: (1) no faculty or staff member should 
approach anyone in the community for contributions to USCS without 
coordinating this activity with the Associate Chancellor for 
University Relations; (2) before any contact with any news media 
outlet (or any informational publication) is made, it is necessary 
to contact the Director for Information Services (or Sports 
Information Director, if appropriate); and (3) any campus event 
that will be open to the public must be placed on the official 
USCS Cultural Affairs Calendar, which is maintained by Cecilia 
McDaniel Brown. 

Experience has shown that most of our faculty and staff understand 
these policies and the reasoning behind them. We certainly have no 
intention of limiting freedom of speech or action, and in fact 
encourage participation by faculty and staff in community cultural 
activities, development, fund raising and public relations. However, 
it is important that we present ourselves to the community as a 
campus which has an organized, professional approach toward these 
types of programs. 



uses- -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, JANUARY 26 — SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1981 



lONDAY, JANUARY 26 

12:30 p.m. -- Thanksgiving Service for the 52 American Returnees. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
Contact person - David Taylor. 

6:00 p.m. -- Women's basketball vs. Erskine, Hodge Center 
8:00 p.m. -- Men's basketball vs. Erskine, Hodge Center 

'UESDAY, JANUARY 27 

8:00-5:00 p.m. -- Staff Development Workshop. Activities Building. Contact person - Judith 
Prince. 



9:30-10:30 a.m. -- Conversational English, Continuing Education course. Media 218. Contact 
person - John May. 

6:00 p.m. -- Minority Affairs Advisory Committee meeting. Activities Building. Contact 
person - Ricky Walker. 



6:45-8:15 p.m. -- Guitar Class. Continuing Education course. A209. Contact person - John May 



I 



lEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28 
12:30 p.m. -- Academic Forward Planning Committee meeting. L259. Contact person - Ron Sobczak. 

12:30 p.m. -- Ski Club meeting. L257. 

7:00-9:30 p.m. -- Nursing Continuing Education program. Activities Building. Contact person - 
Addie Kloepper. 

7:00 p.m. -- Foreign Film "Der Brave Soldat Schweik" - German film with English subtitles. 
Tukey Lecture Theatre, Contact person - Regis Robe. 



HURSDAY, JANUARY 29 
9:00 a.m. -- Area Principals meeting. Activities Building. Contact person - Ed White. 

1:00-5:00 p.m. -- Nursing faculty development workshop. Activities Building, Contact person - 
Addie Kloepper. 



7:30 p.m. -- Piedmont Regional Scholars Program. Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact person - 
Kevin Smith. 

9:00 p.m. -- Reception for Piedmont Regiona Scholars Semi-finalists. Hodge Center. Contact 
person - Kevin Smith. 



i 



RIDAY, JANUARY 30 

12:00-2:30 p.m. -- Student State Legislative meeting. Activities Building. Contact person - 
Jerry Baker. 



\ 



ATURDAY, JANUARY 31 
8:00 p.m. — Men's basketball vs. Coker College at Hartsville. 




•^ 






fOL. IV, 



19 A Newslefter For The Faculty Of USCS February 2, i98i 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

REPRESENTATIVES will be at the campus book- 
itore Feb. 3-4 to take orders for caps 
ind gowns and graduation invitations. Times 
ire from 9-2 on Feb. 3 and 4, and 5-7 on 
■eb. 3. Other details may be obtained from 
Jryant Reeves. 

HE ACADEMIC FORWARD PLANNING Committee is 
kheduled to meet Wednesday, February 11 
lit 12:30 in L257. We will not meet Feb. 4. 
;\lso come prepared to set another meeting, 
[we have several things to discuss). -Ron 
^obczak. 



I I. BULLETIN BOARD 

\. CAMPUS 

\ PLAY ENTITLED BAYOU RELICS , written by Dr. 
ilizabeth Brown, will be produced at the Arts 
>nter on March 13, 14, and 15. Bayou Relics 
^resents characters in a nursing home, shar- 
ing their feelings about each other, the 
lanagement, their children, their sexuality, 
ind their mental and emotional conditions. 
[t is a play in which comedy and pathos come 
:ogether. Some of the characters complain 
ibout their misfortunes, but we see through 
:heir with the "I'm not ready to give up" 
ittitude. These characters are full of life, 
;ontrary to popular belief about nursing 
lome patients. They want what all (youthful) 
)eople want: to love and to be loved. For 
lore information about the performances, 
)lease contact Dr. Elizabeth Brown. 

;EVERAL PERSONS have inquired about contri- 
)utions in memory of Roy Shelton (Betty 
itavely's father). Contributions may be 
lade in the University Relations office. 
Checks should be made payable to the 
Carolina Piedmont Foundation. 



FROM DOYLE BOGGS, Director for Information Ser- 
vices. The Dean's List for the USC system 
which is now appearing in various newspapers 
in the area is not the official USCS Dean's 
List. This list is a computer printout re- 
leased by the Information Services Office on 
the Columbia campus. It habitually contains 
wholesale errors because no opportunity is 
given the USCS Records Office to check it be- 
fore it is released. USCS students should 
assume they are on the Dean's List if they 
have an official grade report showing they 
meet the criteria established on page 34 of 
the catalog. 

THE STUDENT AFFAIRS OFFICE will be offering a 
Total Health and Wellness program for faculty, 
staff, and students. The goal of this program 
is to offer mutual support, enjoyment, and 
methods to alter potentially negative health 
habits. The program consists of: lifestyle 
assessment questionnaires with individualized 
print-out results, physiological measurements, 
weekly seminars on various health topics, 
regular motivational gatherings, referral 
information, and 6 week groups (additional ^ 
fee for these groups - $18.). This program 
will begin Feb. 16 and will cost $5.00 per 
participant and is limited to 100 participants. 
To join or for further information call Bruce 
Wilson or the Student Affairs office, ext. 336. 
Please make this announcement to your classes. 

ENGLISH POET, critic, and editor, Stephen 
Spender, a friend of poet W.H. Auden and a 
leading intellectual of this century, is serving 
as use's Dag Hammarskjold Professor during this 
spring semester. The Hammarskjold chair was 
established in 1979 and rotates through the 
departments of USC-Columbia's College of 
Humanities and Social Sciences. 

CANDLELIGHT COUNSELING: The Counseling and 
Career Development Center has evening hours. 
Please remind the evening students that the 
Center is open until 7:00 pm Tuesday through 
Thursday. 

(continued) 



...Bulletin Board continued... 

WALK-ALONG-WITH-US - Bob Addleton, Carol 
Smith and Becky Edwards are walking for the 
health of it. It's sociable, sensible and 
fun-able. We leave the Media Building at 
3:00 p.m. each afternoon and proceed clock- 
wise. There is already a sizable group 
walking, so watch for us from your building . 
and join in. 

THE PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICE would like to advise 
you that a number of purses have been found 
missing recently, after being left unattended 
in offices, on desks, etc. Please make sure 
you do not leave your purse, or other valuables 
unattended if you must leave your office. 

ONE OF THE NATION'S leading authorities on 
the teaching of art to children will appear 
at uses Monday night, Feb, 2. Frank Wachowiak, 
now retired fron a post as Professor of Art 
and Art Education, at the University of 
Georgia, will lecture on the "Teaching of 
Art to Children" at 7 p.m. in the Tukey 
Lecture Theatre. Following the program will 
be a reception and opening of an art exhibit 
featuring works of Japanese Children in the 
Library Art Gallery. For more information 
contact Katie Hicks. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES will 
be coordinating a Brown Bag Seminar during 
the months of February and March. The 
seminars will be held every Wednesday (except 
February 18th) in L-273 from 12:00-1:45. 
Some of the topics to be discussed include: 
"Memory," "Taking the Essay Exam," and 
"Effective Time Management." Members of the 
faculty, staff and students are encouraged 
to come and be a part of these seminars. 
Bring a bag lunch and munch with us, if you 
desire. For more information contact Ann 
Sims. 

FROM GILL NEWBERRY: Dr. Duane Rohlfing from 
the Botany Dept. at USC-Columbia will speak 
on "How to Reduce the Trauma of an Oral 
Presentation" in Science Seminar, Wed., 
Feb. 4, at 4:30-5:20 in A325. This is an 
excellent talk and would be of value to any 
student giving an oral presentation this 
semester. 

FROM BILL REITMEIER: ATTENTION EDUCATION 
MAJORS!!! The last day for turning in student 
teaching applications is February 27, 1981. 
All applications must be approved and signed 

(continued) 



by the Advisors before they will be process - 
for student teaching in the Fall. Applica- . 
tions may be turned in to the Office of the: 
Coordinator of Field Experiences Media 
Building, Room 139. 

THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY 
WOMEN is holding its annual used book sale 
at Westgate Mall on Apr. 3 and 4. If anyonel 
has any books he or she would like to donat; 
please contact Janella Koob, Information 
Services. 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY AT CARBONDALE 
is conducting a search to fill the position 
of Vice President for Academic Affairs and 
Research. Applications and nominations must 
be submitted by February 9, 1981. More 
information is available from Janella Koob, 
Information Services. 

B. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION NEWS 

FASCHING PARTY: Fasching is a German cele- 
bration comparable to the French Mardi Gras 
--usually a costume celebration before the 
beginning of Lent. Fasching has been brough 
to Spartanburg by the German Community, wit 
an annual Fasching Party open to the public 
sponsored by the German-American Club. 
This year's party (costumes optional) will 
be February 14, 8 p.m., at the Knights of 
Columbus Lodge, Highway 176 south. The Jerr 
Goodman Band will provide the music. Cost 
is $13 per person, and tickets are availabl« 
from Geiss & Sons Jewelry, Ankies, and 
Still -Newton's westside office. For further 
information contact Jim Brown, L-236, ext. 
433. 

INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS: For those who believe 
the Third World is very distant from U.S. 
concerns: Birds play an important role in 
controlling insect pests in American forest: 
and croplands. Most species of Eastern U.S. 
birds, including song birds, migrate each 
winter to the tropical forests of Central 
and South America and the islands of the 
Caribbean. They return with the seasonal 
appearance of forest and grassland insects. 
But the birds' habitat in the tropical 
forests is being destroyed at an acceleratir 
rate as population pressures and resource 
scarcity in developing countries increase. 
Populations of almost all migrating bird 
species are smaller than a decade ago, and 
substantial declines are expected by the 
end of the century. As bird populations de- 
cline, insect pests could take an increasing 
toll on U.S. crops and forests. 



FACU L TY/STAFF NOTES 



COMMUNITY INTEREST 



AROL RENTZ presented a program "Parent- 
nfant Bonding" to the Spartanburg Junior 
lomen's Club on January 22 at the Arts 
enter. 

ECILIA J. COGDELL, Acting Dean, Mary Black 
chool of Nursing, spoke at a luncheon 
teeting of the Kiwanis Club of Spartanburg 
n January 14. Her topic was "Meeting the 
ealth Needs of Our Community through 
ursing Education". The Kiwanis Club mem- 
ers were very interested in the activities 
f the Mary Black School of Nursing and how 
he University was meeting the health care 
eeds of our area of the state. 

ATHERINE TALLEY, Cecilia Cogdell, Katy 
urphy and Glenda Sims represented the Mary 
lack School of Nursing at the Medical 
ociety's Annual Banquet. As the group re- 
lected on the accomplishments of the 
edical Society during the past year under 
he leadership of Dr. John Simmons, physician 
inancial support of the new School of Nursing 
uilding, physicians service as Adjunct 
rofessors to the Mary Black School of Nursing 
nd the positive relationships between the 
edical community and the University, and 
he Mary Black School of Nursing were 
nnounced. 

IM BROWN attended the Executive Committee 
eeting of the Southern Atlantic States 
ssociation for Asian and African Studies, 
anuary 30 and 31, at Duke University. 

IKE DRESSMAN'S essay "Linguistics in the 
niversity Curriculum" has been accepted for 
ublication by Papers on Language and 
iscourse , distributed by UNC-Greensboro. 

ILL BRUCE, School of Education, served as a 
onsultant to the College of Education, Uni- 
ersity of Maryland, College Park on January 
1-24. He trained a team at the University to 
onduct multicultural needs assessments 
sing the "Multicultural Descriptor." 

HE SOUTH CAROLINA MIDDLE SCHOOL ASSOCIATION 
ill hold a regional conference (Piedmont 
rea) at USCS, Feb. 7, 1981. The conference 
ill deal with the S.C. Basic Skills Act as 
t relates to Middle Schools. Please contact 
ill Bruce (ext. 368) if you have any 
uestions. 



February 2 

--CHAMBER ORCHESTRA CONCERT, Hans Schmettau 
conducting. 8 p.m., Daniel Recital Hall, 
Converse College. 

February 3 

--RUSSELL KIRK, noted author, syndicated 
columnist, and lecturer, speaks on American 
Higher Education and the Mission of the 
Liberal Arts College. Daniel Hall, Converse 
College, 7:30 p.m. 

February 4 

--ALPHA-OMEGA PLAYERS, Repertory Theatre of 
America, "The Diary of Adam and Eve", 7:30 pm, 
Spartanburg Methodist College, Camak 
Auditorium. 

III. SPORTS AT USCS 

THERE WILL BE A MEETING on Wednesday, Feb. 4 
at 1:30 p.m. in the Student Activities Bldg., 
for all men who are interested in trying 
out for the tennis team. If you cannot attend 
this meeting, please call ext. 336 and leave 
your name, address and phone number. -Jim 
Newcome . 

FROM HANK ANDERSON: Please announce in class 
that the Rifles have a big District 6 game 
tonight against Newberry, all USCS students 
are admitted free with I.D. Come out and 
support your team! 

THE USCS VOLLEYBALL TEAM and Dr. Joe Bowman 
conducted a volleyball clinic for all physical 
education classes at Dorman High School on 
Tuesday, January 27th. These young ladies 
received many thanks and praise from the 
Dorman staff and were fine representatives 
for USCS to the more than 800 students they 
worked with. Those participating were: Vanessa 
Hardin, Bonnie Watts, Donna Cannon, Boot 
Crawford, Miranda Poulos, Connie Dobson, Sonja 
Summerlin, Cheryl Fowler, Lisa Coggins, Sharon 
Rice and Lynn Thomason. 

WOMEN'S BASKETBALL - The Lady Rifles fell to 
USC-Aiken 68-55 and Erskine 76-50, but came 
back to blast Wofford 76-46 on Thursday night. 
The Lady Rifles, now 4-9, host Newberry 
Monday night. Coastal Carolina Thursday, and 
USC-Aiken Saturday. All games begin at 6 p.m. 



MEN'S BASKETBALL -- The men extend their winning 
streak to four games by defeating USC-Aiken 
75-57 last Saturday and Erskine 76-67 on 
Monday. The Rifles, now 12-7, regained the 
third place in the District 6 Krause Count 
behind Lander and Wofford. 
The men resume a full schedule next week, 
hosting Newberry Monday night at 8 p.m. 
After traveling to Gardner-Webb on Thursday, 
the Rifles return home Saturday for 
Homecoming when they host USC-Aiken. 



uses TOTAL HEALTH & 
WELLNESS PROGRAM 

Salad Bar 

^^Aen: ^2:30 - ^:30 ^ed. ^el. 4 a^d S'AuA^ ^^. 5 



o^ tAeSPiuetenf tyi0€Uu ^^ice ^xt. 336 



uses-— THIS WEEK <| 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 2 — SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1981 i 



lONDAY, February 2 

6:00 p.m. -- Women's basketball vs. Newberry in the Hodge Center. 
8:00 p.m. -- Men's basketball vs. Newberry in the Hodge Center. 

7:00 p.m. -- "Teaching of Art to Children" -Frank Wachowiak. Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact 
person - Katie Hicks. 

8:00 p.m. -- Art exhibit opening and reception. Library Art Gallery. Contact person - Katie 
Hicks. 



UESDAY, February 3 

8:00 a.m. -- Breakfast for Dr. Holderman with all Club Presidents. Activities Building. 
For more information contact Student Affairs. 

9:00-2:00 p.m. -- Cap and Gown Representatives will be in the Hodge Center. 

10:00 a.m. -- Business Affairs Meeting. Activities Building. Contact person - Mr. Eilenberg. 

5:00-7:00 p.m. -- Cap and Gown Representatives will be in the Hodge Center. 



:DNESDAY, February 4 

9:00-2:00 p.m. -- Cap and Gown Representatives will be in the Hodge Center. 

12:00-1:45 p.m. -- Brown Bag Seminar sponsored by the Dept. of Developmental Studies. 
L273. Contact person - Ann Sims. 

12:30-1:30 p.m. -- International Club meeting. L255, 

1:30 p.m. -- Tennis Team meeting. Activities Building. Contact person - Jim Newcombe or 
Student Affairs. 

4:30-5:20 p.m. -- Science Seminar "How to Reduce the Trauma of an Oral Presentation." A325. 
Contact person - Gill Newberry. 



lURSDAY, February 5 

6:00 p.m. -- Women's basketball vs. Coastal Carolina in the Hodge Center. 
7:30 p.m. -- Men's basketball vs. Gardner-Webb at Boiling Springs, N.C. 



IDAY, February 6 

^'^l?^ P/"^; "" Spartanburg Area Psychologist meeting. Activities Building. Contact person • 
Dr. Map ley. 

^•°2:^2:30 p.m. - Dinner-Dance. Hodge Center Lobby. For more information contact Student 
Affai rs. 



SATURDAY, February 7 - USCS Homecoming Activities. 

9:00-12 noon -- Winter Regional Conference of the S.C. Middle School Association. Activitii 
Building. Contact person - Bill Bruce. 

6:00 p.m. -- Women's basketball vs. USC-Aiken in the Hodge Center. 
8:00 p.m. -- Men's basketball vs. USC-Aiken in the Hodge Center. Crowning of Homecoming QuelB 
during halftime. 

9:00-1:00 p.m. -- Homecoming Dance. Hodge Center. For more information contact Student Affai 



« 







VOL. IV, NO. 20 A Newsleifer For The Faculty Of USCS February 9, i98i 



I. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 



FROM TED R. EILENBERG: 
campus activities this 
that reservations for 
Theatre and Activities 
early . Please contact 
or Bennette Wilson (ex 
available dates. Even 
Forms are available th 
mental secretary to as 
up and confirm your re 



Because of numerous 
Spring, we suggest 
the Tukey Lecture 
Building be made 
either Pat Mitchell 
t. 439) to check on 
t/Work Order Request 
rough your depart- 
sure the proper set- 
servation. 



ID CARDS will be made this week in the 
Public Safety Office. Hours are Monday- 
Thursday from 9:00-12 noon, 1:00-5:00 p.m. 
and 6:00-9:00 p.m. On Friday hours will 
be from 9:00-12 noon and from 1:00-5:00 p.m. 

THE ACADEMIC AFFAIRS COMMITTEE will meet 
February 11 at 3:30 p.m. in Media 221. The 
agenda includes 1) Math 100-119; 2) Revision 
of Academic Affairs description in Faculty 
Handbook; 3) Consideration of requesting 
that the Chairperson of Academic Affairs be 
given released time comparable to Faculty 
Secretary of the Senate; 4) Revision of 
Physical Education Program. 

FROM EB BARNES: 1) there will be a Senate 
meeting, Monday, Feb. 9 at 12:30 p.m. in 
L268; 2) Faculty Advisory Committee meeting 
on Friday, Feb. 13 at 12:30 p.m. in the 
Faculty Conference room; 3) Senate meeting 
on Friday, Feb. 27, at 12:30 p.m. in L268. 

THIS WEEK HAS BEEN DESIGNATED AS BLACK 
HISTORY WEEK AT USCS. The Afro-American 
'\ssociation has done an excellent job in 
putting together a number of observances 
this week including two guest speakers. On 
i^lednesday, Dr. Norris Hogans will speak in 
Fukey Lecture Theatre at 12:15 p.m., and on 
rhursday. Dr. John H. Corbett will be speak- 
ing in room 218 of the Media Center. All 
faculty, staff, and students are urged to 
Participate in these and other events of 
31ack History Week. 



FOUNDERS' DAY CEREMONIES are scheduled at USCS 
for Monday, Feb. 16, at 11:15 a.m. in the 
Hodge Center. All 10:30 classes will be sus- 
pended at 11 a.m. so that students and faculty 
may come together to the gymnasium for this 
program. This is a very important university 
event, with Dr. Noah Langdale of Georgia State 
University scheduled to speak and many of our 
most important supporters in the audience. All 
faculty and staff are urged to attend, and are 
asked to urge students and persons from the 
community to do so as well. 

POSITION AVAILABLE: Clerk Ill-Graduate Office. 
Grade 15, Salary $8,394. Available immediately. 
For job description and qualifications contact 
the USCS Personnel Office. 

PLEASE ANNOUNCE TO CLASSES: Education Majors 
Remember : The last day to apply for admission 
to the Professional Program is February 28. 
You may pick up your forms in Education, M118 
from Shirley Ridgeway. 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 

A. CAMPUS 

FROM ALICE HENDERSON: Jim Brown and Emmanuel 
Seko will be the guest speakers in the "50 
Minutes" class today (Feb. 9). The topic to 
be discussed is "Racial Tensions in South 
Africa." The class meets at 12:30 in M217 and 
is open to the public. 

THE ISRAELI CONSUL-GENERAL in Atlanta, Mr. Joel 
Arnon, will speak on the current situation in 
the Middle East on Friday, Feb. 20, at 12:30 
in Tukey Lecture Theatre. Those with classes 
for which the subject is appropriate are 
asked to encourage attendance. 

continued. . . 



FROM THE PLACEMENT OFFICE: Career Carousel 
'31 will be held on the USCS campus again 
this year. February ii25th is the "Big Day." 
Faculty and staff members have been coopera- 
tive in providing assistance for this 
special once-a-year joint recruiting event. 
Approximately 35-40 company representatives 
are expected to participate again this year. 
The Placement Staff would appreciate it if 
faculty and staff will encourage seniors, 
graduates and alumni to participate. A 
notice to solicit the use of faculty offices 
on that day will be circulated within a few 
days. Contact Arthur George for details 
at ext. 414. 

THE STUDENT AFFAIRS OFFICE will be adminis-- 
tering the Lifesityle Assessment Questionnaire 
form next week. This questionnaire is part 
of the Total Health and Wellness Program 
which is being sponsored by Student Affairs. 
The questionnaire will be given from 12-1:30 
on Feb. 16, 17 and 18 in M218. The program 
is filling up fast and this is the last 
week to join. Individuals who wish to join 
or who have questions about the program, 
should contact either Bruce Wilson or the 
Student Affairs Office. The program is open 
to USCS students, faculty and staff. 

MS. WENDY OGLESBY, a former student of USCS 
and a graduate of USC, has been appointed 
assistant director of the USC News Bureau. 
Ms. Oglesby, a 1978 USC journalism honors 
graduate, has worked as a writer in the 
News Bureau since her graduation. As a 
student at USCS, Wendy worked in the USCS 
Information Services office, with the 
Gaffney Ledger , and the Greensboro Record , 
and the governor's press office and the 
lieutenant governor's office. 

THE USCS NURSE RECRUITMENT CAREER FAIR 
will be held Monday, Feb. 9, from 11:00 a.m. 
- 12:00 noon and 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. in 
the Activities Building. Students and 
faculty are encouraged to participate. To- 
date approximately 25 hospitals will partici- 
pate. 



B. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION NEWS 

SEMESTER IN INDIA: Students at USCS, as a 
result of our membership in the South 
Atlantic States Association of Asian and 
African Studies, are eligible for a program 
of study in India, at Madras University and 

continued. . . 



with the Archaeological Survey of India at 
several sites in India, from late August to 
mid-December. The program is designed for 
juniors, seniors and mature sophomores, who, 
must have a 2.75 GPR and a declared major 
in which South Asian studies can play at 
least a complementary role. Students will u 
ceive 13-15 hours of credit, including some 
independent study. The cost includes round- 
trip travel from New York to India, room an( 
board, group travel in India, tuition and 
administrative costs, and cultural programs,' 
A grant has been applied for and seems like"! 
If the grant is received, the cost per stud(i 
will be approximately $l,800--a real bargait 
If the grant is not received, the cost may 
run as high as $3,500. Applications are beir 
accepted through March 16, 1981. Please adv" 
appropriate students of this opportunity. 
Further information and application forms a» 
available from Jim Brown, L236, ext. 433. 

HUMAN RIGHTS IN RUSSIA will be the topic of 
two programs on the USC-Columbia campus. On 
Tuesday, Feb. 10, professors David Danow anc 
Gordon Smith will discuss their personal 
experiences in the USSR, at 7 p.m. in room 
203 of the Russell House. Recently immigrate 
Soviet Jews will discuss conditions in the 
USSR on Thursday, Feb. 12, 7 p.m., room 204 
of the Russell House. The programs are beinc 
presented by the Amnesty International Campi 
Network. Amnesty International is a world-wi 
organization that works for the release of 
"prisoners of conscience" — persons imprisor 
anywhere for their religion, sex, ethnic 
background, language or political beliefs, 
provided they have neither used nor advocate 
violence. The independent organization was 
awarded the 1977 Nobel Peace Prize. For 
additional information call Pat Marinelli, 
in Columbia, at 7-2733 or 7-4881. 

INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION: Anyone interestec 
in a series of 8% x 11 charts illustrating 
statistical information on the countries of 
the European Economic Community (the "Commor 
Market"), please contact Jim Brown, L-236, 
ext. 433. The topics covered include such 
things as population, education, labor force 
energy, industry, trade, health services, ar 
standard of living. If you are only interest 
in particular charts, please so indicate. 

INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS: For every 100 babies 
born in West Africa, 15 die before they reac 
1 year of age and 33 die before age 5. In 
come countries the figures are substantially 

continued. . . 



above the average; in Upper Volta 50% die 
before they are 5 years old. They are victims 
of malnutrition and disease. 



C. COMMUNITY INTEREST 

"ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR THE VISUALLY 
IMPAIRED STUDENT" will be the topic of a 
meeting on March 10 in the auditorium of 
Greenville Memorial Hospital. Chuck White 
with the S.C. School for the Deaf and Blind 
will conduct the meeting. Interested persons 
are invited to attend. Time - 7:30 p.m. 
(Di recti ens - follow Hwy. 29 through Green- 
viTle, Turn left at the K-mart store.) 

A NEW PERFORMING ARTS SERIES, statewide in 
scope and featuring some of the top per- 
forming artists in the world, has been 
announced by USC for the 1981-82 season. 
Carolina Concerts will open its inaugural 
season Sept. 11 with a performance of the 
Cleveland Orchestra, one of the world's 
top symphonies. Four other events are 
scheduled through spring 1982. The full 
schedule is expected to be announced in 
about two weeks. Season subscriptions 
will be on sale in March only and will cost 
just $15 for the series. No individual 
tickets will be sold. For more information 
contact Chip Gray at 777-2555. 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9 

--Spartanburg Community Concerts Association 
presents The Young Americans in an all 
Gerschwin Program. Spartanburg Memorial 
Auditorium; 8:00 p.m. Admission by series 
ticket, out of town guest tickets available 
at Spartanburg Mem. Auditorium. Telephone 
582-8107. 

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10 

--Photography as an Art Form, film and 

commentary by Judy Jones, Converse College 

Art Dept. faculty member. Arts Center Board 

Room; 12 noon, free and open to the public. 

Information - 582-7616. 

--Feb. 10-Mar 4 -- Exhibit of Paintings by 

Sara Dame Setzer. The Gallery, sponsored by 

the Art Association. Information - 582-7616. 

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11 

--Faculty concert featuring Stephen Sweedish, 
Hans Schmettau, and Jerrie Lucktenberg. 8:00 
p.m., Daniel Hall, Converse College. Infor- 
mation - 585-6421. 

--Harry Turner, music of the Fifties. Camak 
Auditorium, SMC, 10:15 a.m. 



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12 
--Piedmont Audubon Society Wildlife Film 
Series "Return to the Tetons." Narrated by 
naturalist Charles "Ty" Hotchkiess. Hartness 
Aud., Carmichael Hall, Converse College. 
Admission by series ticket or $2. per person. 
Information - 583-2776. 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

JULIA S. KUGLER recently attended the Second 
National Conference about Learning Resources 
Centers in Schools of Nursing where she 
attended meetings on philosophy, management 
and teaching methods in the LRC. Theme of 
the conference was "Meeting the Challenges 
in Nursing Education: The Role of the Learn- 
ing Resources Center." Ms Kugler continues 
to participate in the ongoing research con- 
ducted at these National Conferences. 

DR. LORIN W. ANDERSON, Associate Professor 
of Education and Chairman of the Department 
of Educational Research and Psychology at 
USC presented a workshop on "Test Construction 
and Analysis" for the School of Nursing 
Faculty. on January 30. Item validity, item 
writing, and item analysis were discussed. 
The nursing faculty found Dr. Anderson's 
presentations '^ery imformative. It provided 
the opportunity for evaluation of test items 
currently used and stimulated interest in 
further examination of paper and pencil tests. 

ALBERT SMITH, Attorney in Spartanburg, USCS 
graduate and parttime instructor in Business 
Administration spoke to B'nai B'rith on 
February 3 on "Minorities". 

JEANNE STUART, Biology, recently reviewed 
grant proposals for the National Science 
Foundation in Washington, D.C. These pro- 
posals were for Comprehensive Aid to Under- 
graduate Science Education (CAUSE) and were 
funded for amounts up to $250,000. 

FOUR SPARTANBURG 70001 ASSOCIATES participated 
in the 1981 Southern Regional Seventy Thousand 
and One Career Association (SEVCA) Employment 
and Training Seminar in Orlando, Fla., Jan. 
14-16. Accompanied by Dr. Gloria Close, 
Spartanburg 70001 associates Anita Irby, 
Abigail Leak, Ken Meadows and Gene Hawkins 
won several awards in the areas of employment 
interviewing, oral communications, radio 
commercials and human relations decision-... 
making. The Spartanburg program was also 

continued. . . 



awarded the Silver Chapter Award (second in 
overall achievement from a field of fourteen 
programs in six states). 



IV. uses SPORTS NEWS 

MEN'S BASKETBALL - The men's team defeated 
Coker 84-52 Saturday night in Hartsville. 
The win helped propel the Rifles to the 
number two slot in District 6 according to 
the latest Krause Count. 

The men then returned home Monday and 
took an 84-67 victory over Newberry, which 
extended the Rifles win-streak to six 
games, the longest since USCS became a 
four-year school. That streak was broken 
though, when Gardner-Webb squeaked by the 
men 98-97 in Boiling Springs, N.C. The men 
are now 14-8 on the season. 

The men travel crosstown to Wofford 
Monday night, the USCS-Wofford series this 
season stands at 1-1. The men then host 
Central Wesleyan Thursday night before 
traveling to Coastal Carolina and Francis 
Marion this weekend. 

WOMEN'S BASKETBALL - The Lady Rifles used 
a three-game win-streak to improve their 
record to 6-9. The women defeated Wofford 
at home last Thursday 67-45, handed New- 
berry a 61-52 defeat Monday night, and 
took a 59-47 victory from Coastal Carolina 
Thursday night. 

The Lady Rifles travel to Wofford Monday 
night for a rematch with the Lady Terriers, 
and to Coastal Carolina to take on the 
Lady Chants Saturday night. Both games 
start at 6 p.m. 

ALL PROFESSORS - Please announce in class 
-Tonight, the top two teams in District 5 
square off when USCS takes on Wofford. 
The Rifles need your backing. Please come 
out and support your team in the Johnson 
Arena on the Wofford campus. A pep bus 
will leave from the Hodge Center at 5:30 
p.m. for the women's game, and 7:30 for 
the men's game. There is no charge. 



BLACK HISTORY SCHEDULE OF EVENTS 



Monday, February 9, 1981 



Film - 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
Viewing at 50 minute intervals. 
"Martin Luther King" 
Hodge Center 



Tuesday, February 10, 1981 



Film - 10 a.m. to 2 a.m. 
Viewing at 50 minute intervals. 
"Martin Luther King" 
Hodge Center. 



Wednesday, February 11, 1981 



Convocation. 12:15 p.m. 

Tukey Lecture Hall 

Speaker: Dr. Norris Hogans, Principal 

Washington Carver H.S. 

Atlanta, Georgia 



Reception in the Media Bldg. Lobby 

Display in the Hodge Center of 
prominent Blacks in the greater 
piedmont area and other material 
pertaining to Black history. 

Film. 

"Martin Luther King" 

Hodge Center 



Thursday, February 12, 1981 



Film - 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
Viewing at 50 minute intervals. 
"Martin Luther King" 
Hodge Center.. 



12 noon - Afro-American Association 
Meeting Open to Public, Media Building, 
Room 218 

Speaker: Dr. John H. Corbett, Pastor 
Springfield Baptist Church 
Greenville, South Carolina 



Friday, February 13, 1981 



Topic: "Blacks in Education" 

A soul food dinner in the Activity Bldg. 
12:00 till 2:30 p.m. Price $2.50 




BROWN BAG 
SEMINAR 

12:30 - 1:^5 - Room L-273 




Wednesday^ February 4 



Jan Jackson "Memory" 



Wednesday^ February 11 



Hermenia Gardner "Cornell 
System #6 - Note Taking" 



Wednesday. February 25 



Jane Davisson "relaxation 
Techniques for Better Test 
Taking" 



Wednesday^ iMarch k 



Harriet McDuffie "Taking the 
Essay Exam" 



Wednesday. March 11 



Susan Nontjoy "Effective Time 
Management" 



Wednesday^ March 18 



Deborah McBride "Improving Your 
Concentration" 



Bring a bag lunch (if you desire) 



Come enjoy yourself and become more informed at the same time. 



Conducted by: DEVELOPMEr' ..l Studies Staff 



uses- -THIS WEEK 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9 -- SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1981 



^ 



10N DAY, FEBRUARY 9 

9:00-5:00 p.m. -- Nursing Career Fair. Activities Building. Contact person - Arthur George, 

12:30 p:m. -- Faculty Senate meeting. L268. 

12:30 p.m. -- "50 Minutes class" -topic "Racial Tensions in South Africa." M217. Contact 
person - Alice Henderson. 

12:30 p.m. -- Gamma Beta Phi meeting. L257. 

6:00 p.m. -- Women's basketball vs. Wofford at Wofford, 
8:00 p.m. -- Men's basketball vs. Wofford at Wofford. 



UESDAY, FEBRUARY 10 

7:00-9:00 p.m. -- Parents Anonymous meeting. Faculty Conference room. Contact person - Jerrv 
Lehman. 



EDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11 

12:00-1:45 p.m. -- Brown Bag Seminar. "Cornell System #6 - Note Taking',' presentation by 
Hermenia Gardner. Sponsored by Developmental Studies. L273. Contact person - Ann Sims. 

12:30 p.m. -- Academic Forward Planning Committee meeting. L257. Contact person - Ron 
Sobczak. 

3:30 p.m. -- Academic Affairs Committee meeting. M221. Contact person - Ed White. 

6:00-9:00 p.m. -- Nursing Continuing Education program. "Major Health Problems and the 
Elderly." Activities Building. Contact person - John May. 



; HURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12 

(9:00-12:00 noon -- Area principals meeting. Activities Building. Contact person - Ed White, 

3:30 p.m. -- Academic Affairs meeting. M221. Contact person - Ed White. 

8:00 p.m. -- Men's basketball vs. Central Wesleyan at the Hodge Center. 



UDAY, FEBRUARY 13 
12:30 p.m. -- Faculty Advisory Committee meeting. Faculty Conference room. 

12:00-6:00 p.m. - Validation Field Test for Basic Skills Program. Tukey Lecture Theatre 
Contact person - Dr. Justice. 



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14 

12:00-6:00 p.m. -- Validation Field Test for Basic Skills Program. Tukey Lecture Theatre, 
Contact person - Dr. Justice. 

6:00 p.m. -- Women's basketball vs. Coastal Carolina at Coastal. 
8:00 p.m. -- Men's basketball vs. Coastal Carolina at Coastal. 



SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 15 
3:00 p.m. -- Men's basketball vs. College of Charleston at Charleston. 







)L IV, NO. 21 A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS February le, i98i 



[. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

-OUNDERS' DAY CEREMONIES are scheduled at 
JSCS for today (Feb. 16), at 11:15 a.m. in 
:he Hodge Center. All 10:30 classes will 
)e suspended at 11 a.m. so that students 
ind faculty may come together to the gym- 
lasium for this program. This is a very 
important university event, with Dr. Noah 
.angdale of Georgia State University 
scheduled to speak and many of our most 
important supporters in the audience. All 
'acuity and staff are urged to attend, and 
ire asked to urge students and persons 
'rem the community to do so as well. 

;DUCATI0N FAIR: A group of education 
lajors are going to Columbia for an annual 
iducation Fair on Tuesday, Feb. 17, 1981. 
"his is an excellent opportunity for our 
students to view the latest educational 
laterials. Please exuse the following stu- 
ients from class for Tuesday, Feb. 17: 
lichael Rates, Jenean Lawson, Gabriel Miller, 
Jrenda Morris, Rhonda Nesbitt, Jan Walker. 
:f you have questions about the program, 
:ontact Carol Smith at ext. 338. Thank you 
'or your cooperation. 

iEGINNING MARCH 2, all USCS faculty, staff 
ind students will have to have ID cards in 
)rder to check out library materials. ID 
;ards are made in the Public Safety Office. 

■ROM BRYANT REEVES: Bookorders for both Sum- 
ler Sessions are due in the bookstore by 
larch 16. Bookorders for Fall Semester are 
iue by April 15. 



I. BULLETIN BOARD 
. Campus 



DUC ATION MAJORS REMEMBER The last day to 
pply for admission to the Professional Pro- 
ram is Feb. 28. You may pick up your forms in 
ducation Media 118 from Shirley Ridgeway. 



DUANE PARIS, a free lance photographer, will be 
taking pictures on campus during the next 
several weeks to be used in several academic 
program brochures and for next year's catalog 
and viewbook. He may want to make a very few 
classroom pictures, but will take these either 
at the \/ery beginning or the \/ery end of the 
hour in order to keep interruption to a minimum. 
The help of all faculty and staff will be very 
much appreciated. -Doyle Boggs. 

THE ISRAELI CONSUL-GENERAL in Atlanta, Mr. Joel 
Arnon, will speak and answer questions on cur- 
rent conditions in the Middle East and Israel 
on Friday, Feb. 20, 1981, at 12:30 in Tukey 
Lecture Theatre. Mr. Arnon was born in Germany, 
where his parents perished in the Holocaust. 
He has resided in Palestine since 1937, be- 
coming a member of a Dubbutz and of the under- 
ground army, Hagana. He has been a member of 
the civil service since the establishment of 
the Israeli state, having served in the 
Ministries of Transportation, Treasury, and 
Foreign Affairs. He also served for four years 
with the Israeli Mission to the U.N. Please 
inform students of this opportunity. For further 
information, contact Jim Brown, L-236, ext. 433. 

FOR THOSE WHO HAVE SIGNED UP for the USCS Total 
Health and Wellness Program, the lifestyle 
questionnaires will be administered Feb. 16, 
17, 18 (this Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday) in 
M-218; 12:00-1:30. The participant should bring 
their $5.00 to the questionnaire administration 
except those who will take the questionnaire on 
Wednesday. These people must pay on either 
Monday or Tuesday at M-218, 12:00-1:30, or in 
the Student Affairs Office. If you have any 
questions, call Bruce Wilson or the Student 
Affairs Office. 

FROM USCS PERSONNEL: There will be a Blue Cross/ 
Blue Shield Seminar on this campus Feb. 18 at 
12:30 p.m. in the Activities Bldg. The seminar 
speaker will be Mr. Jim Davis of Columbia, S.C. 
a Blue Cross/Blue Shield Representative. The 
purpose of the seminar is to become more inform- 
ed about the Blue Cross/Blue Shield coverage 

(continued) 



—-BULLETIN BOARD continued- — 

and filling out and submitting claim forms. 
For information contact USCS Personnel. 

BARRY GRIFFIN, candidate for an opening 
in Management and Data Processing, will 
give a presentation today (Feb. 16), on 
"Estimating Frequencies and Duration in 
Behavior Sampling." All faculty are invited 
to attend the presentation which begins at 
1:45 in M321. 

FROM HANK ANDERSON- Please announce to 
your classes: SGA elections will be held 
March 2 and 3. Constitutional seats open 
are President, Vice President, Secretary 
and Treasurer. Also open are Senior, Junior, 
and Sophomore class presidents and senate 
seats. Students may sign-up in the Student 
Affairs Office February 23-27. 

Please announce also that nominations 
are being taken for Teacher-of-the-Year. 
Nominations may be placed in the offices 
of the Schools of Education, Business, 
Nursing, or Humanities and Sciences, in 
a sealed manilla envelope. Deadline for 
nominations is February 25. 

FROM THE PLACEMENT OFFICE -- Career 
Carousel 1981 is scheduled here at USCS 
on Feb. 25, 1981. This is a major campus 
recruiting event regarding employment for 
our Seniors and Graduates. Approximately 
50 faculty offices in the Library and Media 
Building are needed for student interviews. 
Monday, Feb. 16, is the deadline for stu- 
dents to make their selection of company 
interviews. We solicit your cooperation 
in helping to make the Carousel '81 out- 
standing. Questions regarding the Carousel 
Program should be directed to Arthur 
George. 



THE PLACEMENT OFFICE is 
the Nurse Recruitment Ca 
winners for 1981. T-shir 
up by the inners by pro 
identification (School I 
Placement Office, M-213. 
Charlene Martin, Ginger 
Daniel, Carole Beverly, 
Sharon Lee, Melodie Gree 
Sara Woolen. Congratulat 



happy to announce 
reer Fair T-Shirt 
ts may be picked 
viding proper 
D card) in the 
Winners are: 
Kingsmore, Nancy 
Sheila Bright, 
r, Paula Goodwin, 
ions! 



CONTINUING EDUCATION COMPUTER COURSES: Two 
short programming courses in BASIC and APL 
will be offered March 3-19, 1981, Tuesday 



and Thursday nights, 7:00-9:00 p.m. Faculty,' 
staff and students can attend for half price 
For further information call Continuing Edu- 
cation 422 or 423. 

I 



B. Grant News 

GRANT PROPOSALS SUBMITTED: (1) "Great Decisi 
1981 and 1982", a proposal involving a serie 
of lectures on international affairs, has 
been submitted to the S & H Foundation reque 
ing $2,500. Project Director: Dr. Alice Hend 
son (History). (2) "Human Anatomy Course 
Adaptations for Emerging Student Needs", a 
proposal to produce a television lecture/ 
demonstration course emphasizing human anato 
has been submitted to the National Science 
Foundation requesting $29,867. Project Direc 
tor: Dr, Jeanne Stuart (Biology). 



C. International Education News 

THE INTERNATIONAL TRADE CLUB of Western S.C, 
which usually meets in Greenville, will meet 
in Spartanburg this month. Everyone is welco 
to attend. The meeting will be Thursday even 
February 19, 1981, at the Sheraton. The prog 
will be presented by the National Maritime 
Council, on the capabilities and operations 
of the U.S. merchant marine. The program wil 
also include a discussion of the Soviet Mer- 
chant Marine, why it is government subsidize 
and its military capabilities. The schedule 
for the evening is social hour at 6:00, dinn 
at 7:00 ($9.00), program at 7:45. For reser- 
vations call Kathy Cole, Textile Hall, Green 
ville, 233-2562, before Feb. 17. A limited 
number of tickets may be available at the 
door. For further information contact Ms. Co 
or Jim Brown, L-236, ext. 433. 

INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS: Among the nine Europea 
Common Market Countries (excluding recently- 
joined Greece), though overall population 
has increased since 1970, the birthrate is 
going down. Germany has the lowest birthrate 
Britain has the highest death rate, but in 
both Germany and Luxembourg deaths are out- 
stripping births. Marriages are steadily de- 
creasing, with the Germans keenest on stayin' 
single, but for those who do marry, they 
generally do so at a younger age than in 196 
The divorce rate is rising in all countries 
except Ireland, where there is no legal pro- 
vision for divorce. Illegitimacy is rising, 
led traditionally by the Danes, with 279 in 

(continued) 



—BULLETIN BOARD contiuned— ^ 

every 1,000 born out of wedlock. The Dutch 
and Belgians have the fewest illegitimate 
babies, 31 in every thousand. 



D. Community Interest 

THE MENSA SOCIETY will be offering an 
Intelligence Test on Feb. 21 at Furman 
University. Fee for the test is $12.00. 
Persons desiring more information about this 
test should call 235-3666 or 232-2050. 

Wednesday, February 18 

--Feb. 18-Mar. 16 -- Exhibit of works by 

Nancy Davidson, Visiting Artist. Mil liken 

Gallery, Converse College. 

--B arn Burning , a film of William Faulkner's 

great short story. 10:15 a.m., Camak 

Auditorium, Spartanburg Methodist College. 

Information - 576-3911. 

T hursday, February 19 

--Feb. 19-21 -- Theatre/Converse presents 
■'Veronica's Room" by Ira Levin. 8:00 p.m. 
each evening. Hazel Abbott Theatre - Con- 
verse College. 

--Feb. 19-21 -- Wofford Theatre presents 
"Twelfth Night" by Shakespeare. 8:00 p.m. 
each evening. Campus Life Center, Wofford 
College. 

--John Q. Hill Lecture, free of charge, 
7:30 p.m.. Conference room B, Burwell 
Building, Wofford College. 



third annual meeting of the South Carolina 
society of the Social, Historical, and Philo- 
sophical Study of Education in Columbia. 

ED WHITE, School of Education, was recently 
appointed to the Curriculum Committee of 
the National Association of Supervision and 
Curriculum Development (ASCD). The Curriculum 
Committee is a representative body of the 
44,000 members of ASCD who are charged with 
the task of translating curriculum theory 
into practice. 



IV. uses SPORTS NEWS 

MEN'S BASKETBALL - The Rifles handed USC Aiken 
an 89-85 defeat Saturday night, the win helped 
move uses to the number one spot in the latest 
Krause Count. The men dropped a narrow 69-66 
decision to Wofford on Monday night, but came 
back to defeat Central Wesleyan 77-60 on 
Thursday. 

The season begins to wind down this week with 
the final home game coming Tuesday night with 
Presbyterian College. The final game of the 
regular season will come Saturday night against 
Francis Marion in Florence. Both games are 
critical for the Krause Count. 

WOMEN'S BASKETBALL - The Lady Rifles fell to 
USC Aiken 88-62, and to Wofford 64-59 last 
Saturday and Monday. 

The Lady Rifles will host Presbyterian in 
their final home game of the season Tuesday 
at 6 p.m. Their season concludes Saturday 
night when they travel to Francis Marion. 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

JIM BROWN participated in the Southeastern 
Regional Seminar in African Studies, which 
(net at North Carolina Central University, 
in Raleigh, N.C., Saturday, 7 March. 

BARBARA McNEILL and DEANNE LEDFORD attended 
the S.C. State Student Nurses' Association 
Convention in Columbia on Feb. 6-8. These 
two A.D. nursing instructors attended the 
convention as advisors along with seven 
students. The theme of the convention was 
"Potpourri - Short Courses for Nurses". 
Two ADN students were elected to offices 
on state level . 

TOM HAWKINS has had a paper accepted for 
presentation and publication for the April 



EDWARD KAMAU BRATHWAITE 



Born in Barbados, Mr. Brathwaite earned his Bachelor of Arts in History 
with honors from Cambridge University (1953) and his Doctor of Philosophy from 
the University of Sussex (1968) . 

He served in many capacities including director of the children's theatre 
and broadcaster for Radio Ghana as Education Officer, Ministry of Educationin 
Ghana (1955-62) . As Resident Tutor at the University of the West Indies at 
St. Lucia (1962-63), his duties included theatre producer for the St. Lucia 
Arts Festival (1963) and radio producer and broadcaster for the Windward 
Islands Broadcasting Service. Mr. Brathwaite has served as Lecturer (1963-72), 
Senior Lecturer (1972-76) and Reader (1976 to present) at the University of the 
West Indies at Kingston, Jamaica. 

Mr. Brathwaite' s research has received support from a University of the 
West Indies/University of Sussex Research Fellowship (1965-68) ; a Ford Founda- 
tion Research Grant (1969); City of Nairobi, Kenya, Fellowship (1971); and a 
Guggenheim Fellowship (1972-73). 

Mr. Brathwaite has served as a Visiting Professor in Creative Writing and 
Caribbean Studies at Boston University (1975-76) and at the University of 
Southern Illinois at Carbondale (1970). Recently, Mr. Brathwaite served on the 
UNESCO Commission for the 1980 edition of UNESCO's History of Man . 

Mr. Brathwaite has authored numerous books, pamphlets, articles and reviews 
in History, Caribbean culture and studies, creative literature as well as 
bibliographies and bibliographical studies. He has delivered conference papers 
on various topics including cultural diversity and national understanding in 
the West Indies, oral history in the Caribbean, creolization, and Black poetry 
of the Americas. Recordings include his triology: Rights of Passage (London, 
1967), Masks (Argo-Decca, London, 1972) and Islands (Argo-Decca, London, 1973). 
Mr. Brathwaite serves as editor or on the board of journals in the U.S., Nigeria 
and in the West Indies. He also serves in an advisory capacity to the Barbados 
Yoruba Foundation, to the Inter-American Foundation and to the government of 
Barbados. 

An international citizen, Mr. Brathwaite has conducted lectures, seminars 
in history, literature, socio-culture throughout the West Indies, and in the 
USA, United Kingdom, Nigeria, Kenya, Holland, Cuba, Haiti, Guyana and Gaudeloupe. 
Topics have included Poetry of the Americas, Slavery in the Americas, Creolization, 
and Slave Trade from Africa. 



PREP TALK - EDWARD BRATHWAITE USCS Cultural Affairs Committee 



"A sophisticated tough intelligence saturates the archetypal material. His 
technique dazzles, and through the handling of rhythm and image he makes the world 
his own, and ours..." So says The Sunday Times , critiquing the work of Edward 
Kamau Brathwaite, poet, scholar, and internationally known lecturer on history, 
literature, and socio-culture. Dr. Brathwaite will visit the USCS campus on Feb- 
ruary 24 and 25, as part of the on-going series of "Sunbelt/International Symposia." 

Brathwaite, who earned his Bachelor of Arts degree from Cambridge University 
in 1953, and his Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Sussex in 1968, will 
explore the topic, "The Creative Caribbean and the Sunbelt," during his stay here. 
On Tuesday, February 24, at 7:30 PM, Dr. Brathwaite will participate as the lead- 
ing speaker on a forum which will include several members of the USCS faculty and 
the surrounding community. In discussing the topic Brathwaite notes, "The term 
'Caribbean' refers both to the personality and the geographical area." The theory 
which underlines Dr. Brathwaite 's lecture is that personality derives from the en- 
vironment. Dr. Brathwaite 's comments will be discussed in detail by the panel and 
questions from the audience will be considered. This lecture/ symposium is open 
to the general public as well as the USCS community. 

On Wednesday, February 25, at 12:30 PM, Edward Brathwaite will read from his 
own works. This presentation should be a much interest to students in the area of 
literature, history, and sociology, as well as the other liberal arts. Faculty are 
encouraged to schedule their students for participation in these events. 

Both presentations will take place in Tukey Auditorium and are free to the 
public. This program is funded in part by a grant from the South Carolina Com- 
mittee on the Humanities. 

Materials pertinent to the presentations are on reserve in the library. 
A tape recording of the Brathwaite album, "Rights of Passage," and a copy of 
the book. Contradictory Omens , are available on three-day reserve. The tape 
can also be listened to in the library, upstairs in the A/V Center. Commenting 
on the aural quality of the poetry, Peter Orr says, "^Rights of Passage'... is a 
poem which needs to be heard for its fullest effect." Orr has written the liner 
notes to the album, made in England by Argo Records, and he concludes his com- 
ments with, "This has been an exciting record to make and presents a piece of 
writing, conceived on a large scale, which I believe to be important, not only 
in a contemporary context, but in that greater area where literature and history 
combine to present us with matters of essential significance." 

Students and faculty alike are encouraged to prepare themselves for the 
visit of Dr. Brathwaite by spending some time with his work. His presentations 
promise to be provocative, challenging, and intellectually exciting. 

USCS, Spartanburg, SC 29303 Tom Owens, Chairman 

February 13, 1981 Cultural Affairs Committee 

Notes: 



uses— -THIS WEEK 



Monday: February 16 -^ sunday, February 22, i98i 



MONDAY, February 16 -- FOUNDERS' DAY 

8:00-4:30 p.m. -- Nursing Continuing Education workshop. "Adventures in Attitudes." L-273. 
Contact person - Addie Kloepper. 

11:15 a.m. -- Founders' Day Ceremonies. Hodge Center Gymnasium. 

7:00 p.m. -- Foreign Film series - "Le Regie du jeu,'' French film with English subtitles. 
Tukey Lecture Theatre. Free and open to the public. Contact person - Regis Robe. 

rUESDAY, February 17 

6:00 p.m. -- Women's basketball vs. Presbyterian in Hodge Center, 
8:00 p.m. -~ Men's basketball vs. Presbyterian in Hodge Center, 

7:00-9:00 p.m. -- Parent's Anonymous meeting. Faculty Conference room. Contact person - Jerry 
Lehman. 

■J EDNESDAY, February 18 
8:00-10:00 a.m. -- Educational Learning Session. M-244. Contact person - Arthur Justice. 

12:30 p.m. -- Blue Cross/Blue Shield Seminar. Activities Building, Contact person - Treva 
Hamrick. 

3:15-5:30 p.m. -- Nursing workshop for nursing faculty. Audio Visual department. Contact 
person - Addie Kloepper. 

mURSDAY. February 19 - No activities scheduled 

-RIDAY, February 20 

12:30 p.m. -- Convocation - Lecture by the Israeli Consul General, Mr. Joel Arnon. Tukey 
Lecture Theatre. 

SATURDAY, February 21 

6:00 p.m. -- Women's basketball vs. Francis Marion, away. 
8:00 p.m. -- Men's basketball vs. Francis Marion, away. 







A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS 



I. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

DR. EDWARD KAMAU BRATHWAITE, poet, scholar, 
and an internationally known lecturer on 
history, literature and socio-culture, will 
visit the USCS campus Tuesday and Wednesday. 
He will speak at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday night 
and at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday afternoon. 
Both programs will be held in Tukey Lecture 
Theatre, and will be open to the public 
free of charge. For more information, see 
FYI, February 16, 1981, or contact Cecilia 
Brown. 

BFiJINNING MARCH 2, all USCS faculty, staff 
and students will have to have ID cards in 
order to check out library materials. ID 
cards are made in the Public Safety Office. 

FROM BRYANT REEVES: Book orders for both 
summer sessions are due in the bookstore 
by March 16. Book orders for the fall 
semester are due by April 15. 

FACULTY: WANT A LITTLE EXTRA $ TO DO SOME 
PRODUCTIVE SCHOLARSHIP OR RESEARCH? The 
use Research and Productive Scholarship 
Committee has set March 9, 1981, as the 
next proposal submission deadline. Many 
small requests (less than $500) and a few 
large requests (up to $4,000) will be 
funded. Funds have been set aside for 
faculty at the two and four-year campuses. 
Potential for securing outside funding for 
the project will be de-emphasized when 
proposals are evaluated. For further 
information, contact Jan Yost (a member of 
the use Research and Productive 
Scholarship Committee) . 

ALL FACULTY are invited to attend 
presentations by candidates for an account- 
ing position in the USCS School of Business 
Administration. The schedule: Ronald S. 
Barden, Tuesday, Feb. 24; Thomas Upham, 
Wednesday, February 25; and Augustus Harper, 
Friday, February 27. All presentations will 
be held in M317 at 1:30 p.m. 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 

THE SHOESTRING PLAYERS will present Neil 
Simon's comedy-drama. The Gingerbread 
Lady this week. Curtain times are 8:15 
p.m. on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, 
with a 3 p.m. matinee on Sunday. All 
performances will be in Tukey Lecture 
Theatre. General Admission is $3 and 
student tickets are $2. Reservations 
may be obtained by calling extensions 297 
or 416, or tickets may be purchased at 
the door. 

PREVOST FOUSHEE, area manager for Anheuser- 
Busch, Inc., presented a video tape of The 
Great Kings of Africa to the USCS Afro- 
American Association, Feb. 18. The tape 
is available for viewing by history and 
art classes. For more information, 
contact Cecilia Brown. 

GIL NEWBERRY has announced the following 
schedule for Science and Outdoors Clubs 
this spring: March 1, Bradley Falls — Ice 
Hike; April 3, Columbia to attend the 
Worst Film Festival; April 12, Wildf lower 
Hike in Polk County, N.C.; April 18, 
Wildf lower Hike to Gap Creek; April 25, 
Biltmore House; May 17-22, Trip to 
Smithsonian Institution in Washington, 
D.C; May 25, Trip down Section IV of the 
Chattooga River. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-EAU CLAIRE is 
searching for a Dean of its School of 
Arts and Sciences. For more information, 
contact Information Services at extension 
210. 

COMPUTER SERVICES in Columbia has offered 
to bring short courses on the statistical 
packages SAS and SPSS, the text processor 
SCRIPT and the USPC system to USCS if 
sufficient interest exists. Please 
contact Andy Crosland (M242, extension 
297) immediately if you would like to 
take one or more courses. 



BULLETIN BOARD continued 

FROM HANK ANDERSON: Plea? , announce to your 
classes: SGA elections will be held March 2 
and 3. Constitutional seats open are Presi- 
dent, Vice President, Secretary and Treasurer, 
Also open are Senior, Junior, and Sophomore 
class presidents and senate seats. Students 
may sign up in the Student Affairs Office, 
February 23-27. 

Please announce also that nominations 
are being taken for Teacher-of-the-Year . 
Nominations may be placed in the offices of 
the Schools of Education, Business, Nursing, 
or Humanities and Sciences, in a sealed 
manilla envelope. Deadline for nominations 
is February 25. 

FROM THE PLACEMENT OFFICE — Career Carousel 
1981 is scheduled here at USCS on Feb. 25, 
L981. This is a major campus recruiting 
event regarding employment for our Seniors 
and Graduates. Approximately 50 faculty 
offices in the Library and Media Building 
are needed for student interviews. Monday, 
Feb. 16, is the deadline for students to 
make their selection of company interviews. 
We solicit your cooperation in helping to 
make the Carousel '81 outstanding. 
Questions regarding the Carousel Program 
should be directed to Arthur George. 

THE ALLIANCE FRANCAISE and the USCS 
International Club will hold a joint 
meeting, Thursday, February 26 at 7:30 in 
the USCS Activities Building. Everyone is 
welcome, and this provides a good oppor- 
tunity to meet members of the local French 
community. French foods will be served and 
the University Singers will present a 
program of international music. 



B. International Education News 

JAPANESE VIDEOTAPES ~ USCS now owns a set 
of videotapes on Japan. There are two 
sets, one called "Japan: The Living 
Tradition" and the other "Japan: The 
Changing Tradition." Both sets have been 
shown on the local ETV channel. The sets 
consist of half-hour programs on various 
topics, including Japanese history, the 
visual arts, literature, the performing 
arts, religion, and contemporary economics, 
politics and society. Viewing notes and a 



study guide are also available. The 
tapes are intended for classroom use and 
are an ideal way to introduce an 
international dimension to a class, 
especially where the professor may not 
feel sufficiently knowledgeable about the 
Japanese situation to initiate an 
"unaided" lecture or discussion. For 
those not used to using a videotape 
player, an instruction sheet is available. 
For further information, contact Jim 
Brown, L-236, Ext. 433. 

AFRICA and the Reagan Administration will 
be the subject of a lecture, in Atlanta, 
sponsored by the Southern Center for 
International Studies, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 
1981, 12:15 p.m. The speaker will be 
Mr. Hal Gulliver, editor of The Atlanta 
Constitution , who has iust returned from 
a trip to Africa, where he assessed the 
African reaction to probable changes in 
U.S. Foreign Policy toward Africa under 
the new administration. For further 
information contact Jim Brown, L-236, 
Ext. 433. 

INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS: Eighty percent of 
the farms in developing countries are 12 
acres or less, and half are under 2.5 
acres. Ninety percent of the people 
inhabiting the tropics depend on woodfuel 
for their domestic needs. The number of 
children who die of malnutrition each year 
in the Third World equals the number of 
children under 15 in California, New York, 
Illinois and Texas together. 



III. FACULTY /STAFF NOTES J 

SCRATCH PAPER NEEDED — 8J5 x 11 paper thaf 
is clean on one side is wanted by Dr. 
Lawrence Moore (A-317) and Dr. Nancy Moore 
(L-248). 

KATY R. MURPHY attended the "Assessing 
Prior Learning" Conference in Atlanta, 
Georgia on February 13, 1981. The 
Conference which was sponsored by A.C.T. 
focused on principles and practices of 
assessing prior learning in nursing 
education which is essential for upward 
mobility for nurses. 



CONGRATULATION., TO COACH JERRY WATERS and the men's basketball team. 
The Rifles clinched a fourth place finish in the 17 team NAIA District 
Six by defeating Presbyterian College 71-54, Tuesday night. USCS will 
host a first round playoff game Wednesday night at 7:30 p.m. in the 
Hodge Center. The opponent will be USC-Aiken unless the Pacers lose 
Saturday night at PC while Wofford downs Erskine. All faculty, staff, 
and students must purchase tickets for this game since proceeds are 
used to send the district champion to Kansas City for the national 
tournament. Ticket prices are $3 for students and adults, and tickets 
will go on sale Monday in the Student Affairs Office. This is the 
third straight year for the men's basketball team to participate in 
the district playoffs, and special credit goes to L. A. Hill, Bill 
Weathers, and Brack Home, senior members of that team. The Rifles 
took a 17-11 record into Saturday night's regular season finale at 
Francis Marion. 



COACH ANDREA MORRISON'S Lady Rifles scored a major upset Thursday night, 
knocking off Columbia College 51-49 on the Koala's home court. 
Shirley Hamilton led the scoring with 14 points and Jackie Middleton 
and Deborah Jackson had nine each. The Lady Rifles now have a 7-13 
record, and close out the regular season against Francis Marion 
Saturday night. Senior players are Jackie Middleton and Sharon Rice. 



STATE EMPLOYEES ASSOCIATION NEWS 



Each year, the South Carolina State Employees Association identifies additional 
benefits it feels the state should provide its employees and retirees. SCSEA 
will then lobby the legislative and executive branches of government for these 
improvements. The Spartanburg Chapter of SCSEA scheduled its Legislative 
Luncheon on February 9, 1981, and Dr. Alice Henderson, Legislative Chairperson, 
spoke on behalf of area members. Those of the local delegation attending were 
Senator Horace Smith; House Members Hudson Barksdale , Sterling Anderson, David 
Hawkins, Edwin Lake, Rick Lee and T. W. Edwards. 

uses is well represented on the SCSEA Spartanburg Unit in that Rita Weaver 
serves as Vice President; Arthur George, Board of Directors (Phoebe Crosland, 
Board of Directors) and Conway Henderson, Past President. 

Any South Carolina State Employee is eligible to join SCSEA. Dues are based on 
the employee's salary and are payable with application for membership. Member- 
ship is for one year from the time of joining and includes a subscription to 
the Scroll. Please use the scale below to compute your annual membership dues. 



Salaries to $3,000 $ 3.00 $15,001 - $18,000 18.00 

$ 3,001 - $ 6,000 6.00 Over $18,000 21.00 

$ 6,001 - $ 9,000 9.00 Associate Member 21.00 

$ '9,001 - $12,000 12.00 State retirees pay dues on their 

$12,001 - $15,000 15.00 income from State Retirement ONLY. 

Please fill out the membership application form below, enclose your dues for 

the current year, and mail to SCSEA, P. 0. Box 5206, Columbia, S.C. 29250. 



MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION 
NAME AMOUNT OF DUES 



ADDRESS CHARGE $ TO MY VISA/MASTERCARD 

SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER # EXP. DATE 



STATE AGENCY WHERE EMPLOYED SIGNATURE 



uses— -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23 


— SUNDAY, MARCH 1, 1981 




MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23 






No activities scheduled. 






TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24 






7:00-9:00 p.m. -- Parents Anonymous Meeting. 


Faculty Conference Room. 


Contact person - 


Jerry Lehman. 







7:30 p.m. -- Sunbelt International Symposium. Lecture by Dr. Edward Brathwaite Tukey 
Lecture Theatre. Contact person - Cecilia Brown. 

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25 

LAST DAY TO DROP A CLASS. LAST DAY TO APPLY FOR MAY GRADUATION. 

9:00-5: OOpiit —Career Carousel . Library-classroom building. Contact person - Arthur George. 

12:30 p.m. -- Sunbelt International Symposium. Lecture by Dr. Edward Brathwaite Tukey 
Lecture Theatre. 

12:30-1:45 p.m. -- "Relaxation Techniques for Better Test Taking." Brown bag seminar. 
L273. Contact person - Jane Davisson. 

3:00-7:00 p.m. -- Portraits exhibit. Activities building. Contact person - Cecilia Brown. 

7:30 p.m. -- 1st round Men's Basketball playoff. Hodge Center. (Tentative). 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26 

9:00-12:00 p.m. -- Area Principals - Continuing Education program. Activities building. 
Contact person - Ed White. 

7:00-9:00 p.m. -- Foreign film. Activities building. Contact person - Regis Robe. 

8:15 p.m. -- "The Gingerbread Lady." Shoestring Players Production. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
Contact person - Jimm Cox. 

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27 

12:30 p.m. -- Faculty Senate meeting. L268. Contact person - Eb Barnes. 

8:15 p.m. -- "The Gingerbread Lady." Shoestring Players Production. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
Contact person - Jimm Cox. 



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28 

10:00-1:00 p.m. -- AKA Sore, ity Career Fair. Tukey & Library-classroom building. 
Contact person - Tom Davis. 

8:15 p.m. -- "The Gingerbread Lady." Shoestring Players Production. Tukey Lecture 
Theatre. Contact person - Jimm Cox. 

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 29 

2:00-3:00 p.m. -- Opening Art Exhibit and Reception. Featured works of Betty Jane 
Bramlett. Library Art Gallery. 

3:00 p.m. -- "The Gingerbread Lady." Shoestring Players Production. Tukey Lecture 
Theatre. Contact person - Jimm Cox. 




Tfowt 



OL. IV, NO. 23 



A Newslefter For The Faculty Of USCS 



March 2, 1981 



I. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

THE FACULTY WELFARE COMMITTEE will meet at 
12:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 4, in Room 
A115, 

FYI is published each Monday morning. 
Items for FYI should be submitted in 
wr it ing to Janella Koob in the Office of 
Information Services by the preceding 
Thursday afternoon at 5 p.m. We regret 
that we cannot accept announcements for 
FYI over the telephone. 

BECAUSE OF INCREASING COMMUNITY USE of the 
campus tennis courts on weekends, students, 
faculty, and staff are encountering 
difficulty in obtaining a court. There- 
fore, the Student Affairs Office will now 
accept tennis reservations from members of 
the university community. For more 
information, contact Susan Smith in the 
Student Affairs Office. 



II. Bulletin Board 



CAMPUS 



CONGRATULATIONS to the men's basketball 
team, which won its 19th game of the season 
Wednesday night with a first round District 
6 playoff victory over USC-Aiken. The team 
will play the College of Charleston tonight 
(Monday, March 2) at 7 p.m. in Greenwood in 
the District semifinals. Admission to that 
game will be $3 for students and $4 for 
adults. The Student Activities Office is 
planning to take an activity bus to Green- 
wood for any students and supporters who 
would like to attend the game. More 
information and reservations may be 
obtained from Jerry Baker at extension 336. 
The district finals are scheduled for 
Tuesday night, March 3 at 8 p.m., also at 
Greenwood. 



THE INTERNATIONAL CLUB will hold its 
regular monthly meeting Thursday, March 5, 
at 3:30 p.m. in the Hodge Center parking 
lot. They will be going to Kusters and 
Zima Corporations for tours. All faculty 
and students are welcome to attend. 

B. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION NEWS 

"THE AFGHAN PROBLEM, Choices for the Reagan 
Administration," will be the subiect of a 
lecture in Atlanta, sponsored by the 
Southern Center for International Studies, 
Monday, March 9, 1981, 12:15 p.m. The 
speaker will be Ms. Jane A. Coon, Deputy 
Assistant Secretary of State for South 
Asian Affairs, who has extensive experience 
in South Asia. It now appears that 
Pakistan is reluctantly moving to recognize 
the Soviet- installed government in Afganis- 
tan in the absence of military support from 
the U.S. or China. At the same time, the 
non-aligned nations have called for Soviet 
withdrawal. Ms. Coon will discuss U.S. 
options. For further information contact 
Jim Brown, L-236, ext . 433. 

THE INTERNATIONAL CLUB will hold its 
monthly meeting Wednesday, March 4 In L-255, 
at 12:30 p.m. All faculty and students are 
welcome. to attend. 

BAVARIAN NIGHT will be held April 3, 1981, 
at the Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium. 
This is the first year for this spring 
"German" night, which will be similar to 
the popular Oktoberfest celebration of the 
fall. It is being sponsored by the 
International Festival Society (the non- 
profit organization that holds the Oktober- 
fest). A German meal, with unlimited free 
beer, and music by Hank Haller's Bavarians 
will cost $17.50 per person. For tickets 
call 583-9518 or 579-2927. For additional 
information, contact Jim Brown, ext. 433, 
or the numbers above , 



INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS: Third World Nations 
now have debts exceeding $500 billion, 
largely accumulated within the past decade, 
and a number of bankers r .d government 
officials are beginning to worry about 
defaults and possible bank failures. 

C. COMMUNITY INTEREST 



THE TRYON RIDING AND HUNT CLUB has initiated 
a new admissions policy for the Block House 
races on April 4. There will be no general 
admissions parking this year. Instead 
infield parking and admission will be $55, 
and "Reserved Pasture Parking" will be $30. 
Parking spaces MUST be reserved in advance at 
the Tryon Riding and Hunt Club, P.O. Box 1095 
Tryon, N.C. (or phone 704-859-601<?) . 

DR. IRWIN ALTMAN of the University of Utah 
will speak at the annual Barnwell Symposium 
sponsored by the Department of Psychology of 
USC-Columbia. The program will be held on 
Thursday, March 5, at 2 p.m. in Gambrell Hall 
153. The topic is "A Cross-Cultural Analysis 
of Homes. " 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

HOLLY CROCKER AND CATHERINE TALLEY from 
the Nursing Division spoke to the Spartanburg 
Branch of the AAUW on February 12 on the 
subject "The Aging Family Facing Change." 

JIM BROWN of the History Department gave 
several presentations on Africa last week at 
Carver Junior High School during their Black 
History Fair. 

ELIZABETH BROWN of the English Department has 
worked several weeks with Mary H. Wright 
Elementary School as a resource person for the 
planning of Black History Week Activities. On 
February 19, she served as Mistress of 
Ceremonies for the School's Black History 
Program. Also, in connection with Black 
History Week, Dr. Brown served as a role model 
at Broome High School and lectured to two 
English classes as a representative of USCS. 

ARTHUR JUSTICE, Dean of the School of 
Education, was a recent keynote speaker 
at Spartanburg County School District 2's 
Faculty In-Service Program. His topic was 
ACT 187 — the New South Carolina Teacher 
Certification Law." He was also invited 
to speak on the same topic at a national 



meeting in Detroit, February 17-20. Dr. I 
Justice will keynote the Lexington 1 
District 5 Second Teachers In-Service I 
Program on Friday, February 27, 1981. His 
topic will be "Mirror, Mirror on the Wall- 
A Handicapped Child's Lament.: He will 
also act as a responder to two panels 
relating to the unmotivated child and 
present "ACT 187" to two discussion groups 
in the afternoon. 

Dr. Justice has also been selected by 
the S. C. Educator Task Force as one of 
six outstanding teacher educators in the 
state. He will select and chair a Blue 
Ribbon Committee to be composed of public 
school personnel to review and validate 
teacher behavior as required under the new 
Teacher Certification Law, ACT 187. 

CONGRATULATIONS TO GEORGE AND DEBBIE 
LABANICK, who are the proud parents of an 
8 lb., 15 oz. baby boy, Thomas Michael 
Labanick, born February 25 at Spartanburg 
General Hospital. 

THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT ELECTION is being 
held today and tomorrow. All students are 
eligible to vote in class elections and fo 
constitutional officers. Students can vot 
in the Hodge Center Lobby. * 



uses— -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, MARCH 2 — SUNDAY, MARCH 8, 1981 



MONDAY, MARCH 2 

B:00-3:00 p.m. -- Blood Mobile. In front of Hodge Center, 

3:30-4:30 p.m. -- "Adventures in Attitudes" nursing workshop - final session. L263. 
Contact Addie Kloepper. 

7:00 p.m. -- Men's basketball semi-finals. USCS vs. College of Charleston . Greenwood 
Civic Center. A bus will be leaving USCS Monday afternoon. For departure time 
and seat reservations, contact Student Affairs. 

rUESDAY, MARCH 3 

3:00-3:00 p.m. -- Blood Mobile. In front of Hodge Center. 

':00-9:00 p.m. -- Parents Anonymous Meeting. Faculty Conference Room. Contact Jerry 
Lehman. 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4 

12:30-1:45 p.m. -- "Taking the Essay Exam." Brown Bag Seminar. L273. Contact Harriet 
McDuffie. 

rHU RSDAY, MARCH 5 

1IDP0INT IN SEMESTER 

3:30-5:00 p.m. -- "Post Operative Wound Care Program" nursing workshop. Activities 
Building. Contact Addie Kloepper. 

[2:00-2:00 p.m. -- Spartanburg Area Psychologists Meeting. Activities Building. Contact 
Gordon Mapley. 

•RIDAY. MARCH 6 

.2:15 p.m. -- Spring Tennis Tournament - organizational meeting. Contact Jerry Baker. 

.2:30 p.m. -- COED Softball - organizational meeting. Contact Jerry Baker. 

lATURDAY, MARCH 7 and SUNDAY MARCH 8 



lo activities scheduled. 







VOL. V, No. 24 A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS March 9, i98i 



[. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

5ECAUSE OF INCREASING COMMUNITY USE of the cam- 
)us tennis courts on weekends, students, 
'acuity, and staff are encountering difficulty 
in obtaining a court. Therefore, the Student 
Affairs Office will accept tennis reserva- 
;ions Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. - 
.1 a.m. ONLY from members of the university 
;ommunity. For more information, contact 
iusan Smith in the Student Affairs Office. 

lORRECTION: Beginning with Vol. V, No. 5 
September 22, 1980) and continuing through 
'ol V, No. 23 (March 2, 1981), the volume 
lumber in the heading of FYI has been incor- 
•ectly listed as "Vol. 4" or "Vol. IV", not 
'Vol. V". 

"HE ACADEMIC FORWARD PLANNING COMMITTEE will 
leet Wednesday, March 11 in L257 at 12:30. 
'lease bring comments on the possible re- 
'ision of the BA and BS general education 
:ourses (Groups I through VII). We will also 
iddress competency requirements in English, 
lontact person - Ron Sobczak. 

[EQUEST FROM THE FACILITIES UTILIZATION AND 
'LANNING COMMITTEE: It is hoped that the 
iroposed Arts and Sciences Building will 
:lear all legislative and executive hurdles 
;his year. Completion of this building will 
;ake approximately three years from the date 
if its final approval. However, in order 
;o assure adequate funding for the remodeling 
if the facilities which will be vacated by 
;he Arts and Sciences faculty when they 
love to their new building, the Facilities 
Itilization and Planning Committee must begin 
;o draft a remodeling plan. If you have any 
suggestions regarding the use of areas cur- 
•ently used by the School of Arts and Sciences 
•lease submit them to Gordon Mapley, chair 
if the FUP Committee. 

Additionally, within the next two weeks, 
ir. Sansbury will be appointing five faculty 
one from each faculty "voting unit" not 
;urrently represented on the FUP Committee) to 
erve with the existing FUP Committee to 



draft plans for the remodeling noted. Volun- 
teers for this ad hoc committee would be 
appreciated. 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 
A. CAMPUS 



REPRESENTATIVE CARROLL CAMPBELL heads a list 
of distinguished guests at the awards cere- 
mony of the Fourth Congressional District 
History Day March 14. The ceremony will be 
at 5 p.m. in the Tukey Lecture Theatre. 

The National History Day Program provides 
for 10 awards, five in both the junior and 
senior divisions. First place winners in 
each category will be eligible for state 
competition during South Carolina History 
Day at Furman University April 25. 

The local contest is sponsored by the USCS 
history faculty. The public may view the 
displays and performances at USCS from 2:30 
to 5 p.m. March 14. Displays will be 
exhibited on the second floor of the Library 
Buiilding and performances will be given in 
the Tukey Lecture Theatre. 

THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA will be the 
discussion topic in Monday's (March 11) 
Great Decisions class. Tsukuru Hirashima, 
a student at Wofford who recently returned 
to Spartanburg from a six-week visit to his 
parents in the People's Republic, will be 
the speaker. Choong Lee of the USCS faculty 
will also be on the program. The class 
meets at 12:30 in M217. 

DR. AUGUSTA BAKER, Storyteller in Residence 
at use, will be featured at USCS March 19th 
in two programs. The convocations will be 
held in Tukey Lecture Theatre from 10:45- 
12:05 and again at 1:40-2:55. Everyone is 
invited to attend. 

MARCH 15-21 has been declared American 
Energy Week. Its goals are (1) to alert the 
public to American dependence on foreign 



oil; (2) to encourage energy conservation 
and (3) to encourage development of American 
Energy Resources. Though announcement of 
this has just reached me, information is 
available on suggested activities. And while 
I cannot provide substantive coordination of 
proposed activities, I can act as a clearing- 
house. Persons interested in this week and/or 
proposing specific related activities during 
this week should contact me. There may be 
special interest in circulating a petition, 
a Declaration of Energy Independence to be 
presented to President Reagan and the U.S. 
Congress. -Cecilia Brown, ext. 249. 

FROM MIKE BRUCE, Director of Public Safety: 
Have you noticed lately there has been an 
absence of false alarms in the Library and 
Media buildings? This has been cleared up 
by making some technical adjustments to the 
systems. You can heT|i by not smoking in 
hallways and classrooms. A fire drill will 
be conducted on April 15 at 11 a.m. Please 
announce this to your classes. Your coopera- 
tion is appreciated. 

B. GRANT NEWS 

GRANT PROPOSALS SUBMITTED: 

1. A proposal entitled "Improvement of the 
Undergraduate Physiology Laboratory" has been 
submitted to the National Science Foundation 
requesting $10,100 for the purchase of 
equipment. Principal Investigator: Dr. Jeanne 
Stuart (Biology). 

2. Two proposals have been submitted to the 
use Research and Productive Scholarship Fund: 
Lyle Campbell (Geology) has requested $1,618 
to conduct his research proposal, "Survey of 
the Mollusk fauna of the South Carolina 
Scallop Beds". Jan Yehl (Psychology) has re- 
quested $2,550 to conduct her research pro- 
posal, "An Illustration of the Theory of 
Signal Detection as a Methodology to Assess 
Mediating Processes of Social Influence." 

3. A proposal entitled "Refresher Course for 
Inactive Registered Nurses" has been sub- 
mitted to the state office of Title I-B 
(Continuing Education Outreach) programs 
requesting $9,079. Project Director: Addie 
Kloepper (Coordinator for Nursing Continuing 
Education) . 

C. I INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION NEWS 

PROF., DAV^D R. GOLDFIELD, of the University 
of Stockholm, will give a public lecture, 
"Magnolias on Main Street," Thursday, March 
12, 1981, 4:00 p.m., in Room 429, Gambrell 
Hall, use Columbia. The lecture is presented 



by the USC Department of History. A reception 
will follow. 

INTERNATIONAL BREIFS: "Shogun" also captured 
the imagination of Japan. Japan's fascination 
with the first Englishman in Japan continues 
with the recent publication of a Japanese 
biography of William Adams — "Blackthorne" 
in Clavell 's novel . 

INTERNATIONAL TRADE CLUB of Western South j 
Carolina, which is open to anyone interested, 
will hold its monthly meeting at Textile Hall 
Greenville, Wednesday, March 11. Mr. Richard 
D. Fearrington, VP and Head of the Inter- 
national Department of Bankers Trust, will 
speak on the financing of foreign accounts. 
The social hours begins at 6:30, the program 
at 8:00. For reservations, call Kathy Cole 
at Textile Hall (233-2562). For further 
information, call Ms. Cole of Jim Brown, 
L-236, ext. 433. 

PANAMA WILL BE THE TOPIC of a luncheon addres 
sponsored by the Southern Center for Inter- 
national Studies, in Atlanta, on Tuesday, 
March 17. The address will be given by Juan 
Hose Amando, Ambassador of Panama to the U.S. 
It is now more than a year since the transfer 
of the Panama Canal to Panama. Panama appears 
to be satisfactorily administering the 
operation of the canal and is experiencing 
a considerable boom as an international 
banking finance center based on convertibilit 
of its currency and the absence of any foreic 
exchange controls. The good prospects for 
future stability are in marked contrast to 
the situation in another Center American 
country currently in the headlines. El 
Salvador. For further information, contact 
Jim Brown, L-236, Ext. 433. 

GRIFFIN BELL, former Attorney General of the 
US, will give a luncheon address, sponsored 
by the Southern Center for International 
Studies, in Atlanta, on Tuesday, 24 March. 
His topic will be "Is Cooperation on Human 
Rights and Security in Europe Still Possible? 
Mr. Bell was Chairman of the American Dele- 
gation to the Conference on Security and 
Cooperation in Europe (CSCE) in 1980. The 
recent deemphasis on human rights by the 
Reagan administration raises the question of 
whether the U.S. will be able to press the 
Eastern bloc on this issue, or will the CSCE 
process become, as the Soviets would like, 
a Europe-wide forum exclusively for 
disarmament discussions. For further infor- 
mation, contact Jim Brown, L-236, ext. 433. 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 



IV. uses SPORTS NEWS 



JOHN WILSON, ED BABIN, and JIM BROWN attended 
a conference on "Islam: A Future Based on a 
Traditional Past" at Quail Roost Conference 
Center, Durham, N.C., over this past weekend, 
March 7 & 8. The conference was sponsored by 
the Southeastern States Association for 
Asian and African Studies (SASASAAS) for 
member institutions. It was structured 
around the recently-acquired series of six 
films "The Traditional World of Islam," 
which is available through the SASASAAS 
film library. 

MS. JAN JACKSON, Instructor in Developmental 
Studies, presented a paper entitled "Creative 
Reading Through History" at the Wil Lou Gray 
Adult Reading Council's Annual meeting on 
February ll-13th in Columbia. 

DR. JANE DAVISSON, President of Wil Lou Gray 
A.R.C., presided at the Ninth Annual Con- 
ference held February ll-13th in Columbia. 

DEANNE LEDFORD, faculty advisor to the 
Student Nurses Association and five student 
nurses conducted a blood pressure screening 
at Westgate Mall on Saturday, Feb. 14, 1981. 

JULIA S. KUGLER attended the 1981 AECT of 
S.C. Annual Conference on Feb. 19-20 in 
Columbia. The theme was "Media are Basic: 
Because all Student Instruction is Basic". 
Sessions attended included Basic Photography 
and Slide Reproduction, Porta-pak Video 
Production and a workshop presented by Dr. 
David McMillan "Time Organization and 
Management." 

MICHAEL DRESSMAN (English) has been asked 
by the National Endowment for the Humanities 
to serve as a reviewer of grant proposals 
presented to the Division of Education 
Programs. 

NANCY P. MOORE presented "Charting: Outlining 
Structure in Literature and Composition" at 
the S.C. Council of Teachers of English 
Conference. 

ED WHITE hasjust completed a series of work- 
shops in Spartanburg School Districts 5 and 6. 
Ed taught demonstration science lessons 
during the regular school day to students 
in the K-8 range. He then conducted a two 
hour ;analysis session with classroom 
teachers using video taypes of the lessons. 



The men's basketball team defeated Lander 
65-61 Tuesday night to win the NAIA District 
Six Championship. USCS had defeated the 
College of Charleston 55-48 on Monday night 
to gain the right to play in the finals. 
First year coach Jerry Waters and his 
team left Saturday at 6 a.m. for Kansas City 
and the NAIA National Tournament. The Rifles 
will play Henderson State from Arkansas 
Tuesday night at 11:15 p.m. (EDT). The game 
will be broadcast on WSPA radio. 

HELP! KANSAS CITY & BROKE 

Would you consider making a contribution to 
the Rifle Regiment to help meet the expenses 
of sending our Cheerleaders, pep band and 
dance team to Kansas City. Make your check 
payable to the Carolina Piedmont Foundation 
and designate it for the Kansas City Trip. 
Contributions should be turned in to Wanda 
Gibson in the University Relations Office. 
Thanks -Chuck Stavely. 

V. Addendum 



POSITION AVAILABLE: Early Chilhood Education - 
Assistant Professor, Doctorate in Early 
Childhood Education. Teaching Experience at 
the 1-4 Level. Responsibilities include 
teaching in Early Childhood Education, Methods, 
teaching Math to young children and super- 
vising Field Experiences. Available August 
15, 1981. Application Deadline April 15, 1981. 
Send resume to: Dr. Arthur Justice, Dean, 
School of Education, University of South 
Carolina at Spartanburg, Spartanburg, South 
Carolina 29303. The University is an affirma- 
tive action, equal opportunity employer. 

THE COMPUTER ROOM has available March 9 - 
March 27 two short courses on Information 
Processing and The Computer System . These 
videotaped courses are intended for any 
management or staff personnel who need a 
basic knowledge of data processing. The 
courses have no prerequisites and assume 
no prior knowlege of data processing on the 
part of the viewer. If you are interested 
in taking these courses, please contact 
Jimmy Dawkins or Martha Manley at ext. 257 
or 295. 



use 

INTRA-OFFICE MEMO 



p. . March 3, 1981 
Date: ! 



To: ^^^"^<^y .—. Campus: Spartanburg 




From: Eb Barnes, Faculty Secretary J^{/\J Campus: Spartanburg 
Subject: Meeting Dates 



1. The Faculty Senate will meet Monday, March 9 at 12:30 p.m. in L-268 to 
complete work on the agenda for February 27. 

2. The Faculty Senate will meet Monday, March 30 at 12:30 p.m. in L-268. 
This is the March meeting of the Senate. The agenda will be set at 
the March 13 meeting of the Faculty Advisory Committee. 

3. The Faculty Advisory Committee will meet Friday, March 13 at 12:30 p.m. 
in the Faculty Conference Room. 

4. Faculty Release Time Proposals for the fall semester are due March 16. 
Please use the attached form and forward to Eb Barnes, A311. The faculty 
should be aware that proposals recommended may not be given release time 
since the fall schedule is now complete. 

5. The Faculty Advisory Committee will meet Wednesday, March 18 at 12:30 
p.m. in the Faculty Conference Room for consideration of release time 
proposals. 

6. Faculty Release Time proposals for the Spring of 82 are due Friday, 
September 25. 

7. The Committee on Nominations (this Committee consists of the chairpersons 
of the faculty committees) will meet Friday, April 10 at 12:30 p.m. in 
the Faculty Conference Room to make recommendations to the faculty on 
nominees for: 1) Faculty Secretary-Elect; 2) Recording Secretary. 

8. The faculty will meet Friday, April 24 at 12:30 p.m. in Tukey Theatre. 
This is the spring meeting for election of the: 1) Faculty Secretary- 
Elect; 2) Faculty Recording Secretary; 3) Members to the Promotion and 
Tenure Committee. 



7. 



uses FACULTY RELEASED TIME PROPOSAL 



1 . Name 



2. Division or school 



3. Type of project (check one) 

Development of new course 

Improvement of existing course 

Research or experimentation in teaching techniques 

Professional development to improve your breadth or depth in 

course content 

Research or productive scholarship 

_____ Other (please specify) 



4. Summary of proposal (approximately 250 - 500 words) 
Include: 

(1) An outline of the methods which you intend to follow 
in carrying out the proposal. 

(2) A statement of how your time will be allocated for 
work on the project (averaging about ten hours a 
week) . 

(3) The specific benefits to the University that will 
result from the project. 



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA AT SPARTANBURG 

SUNBELT/INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM 

"de Tocqueville Revisited" 

Monday, March 16, 1981 
Tukey Theatre, USCS Campus 

The Fourth and culminating Symposium in the Sunbelt/International Series is 
entitled 'de Tocqueville Revisited." The Symposium will focus on the writings 
of Alexis de Tocqueville. A French nobleman, de Tocqueville toured the United 
States in 1831-1832. He came to America to examine democracy at work in America, 
the country he considered most democratic. He interviewed Americans in all 
walks of life from President Andrew Jackson to Black slaves. Based on these 
interviews and his observations, de Tocqueville made various predictions about 
the future of democracy, relations between the North and South, blacks in 
America, etc. 

This Symposium is designed as a "colloquery", a unique approach in this 
series. Dr. Maxwell Goldberg, our guest lecturer, will lead us in this venture. 
Dr. Goldberg is a prize winning graduate of the Boston Latin School (1923) and 
a summa cum laude graduate of the University of Massachusetts (B.S. Biology, 
Rural Education; 1928). Later he earned the M.A. (1932) and the Ph.D. (1933) 
from the Yale University Graduate School. 

After service to the University of Massachusetts as head of the English 
Department and in many other capacities. Dr. Goldberg was named "Emeritus 
Commonwealth Professor of Humanities" (1955) by the Board of Trustees of the 
University. A Goldberg section in the University Archives has also been 
established. Having served as Professor of English and Humanities and Associate 
Director for Continuing Liberal Education at Pennsylvania State University, he 
was named to his second emeritus professorship (1972). In the same year 
Converse College, Spartanburg, called Dr. Goldberg to the newly established 
Andrew J.R. Helmus Distinguished Professorship in Humanities and Literature. 
Upon retirement, the Converse Board of Turstees voted that Dr. Goldberg hold 
that title prefixed by "Emeritus" for life. 



While residing in Spartanburg, Dr. Goldberg has directed the Converse 
College Committee for the Humanities-South Carolina Committee for the Humanities 
Project, "Greater Spartanburg in Transition," and the Bicentennial Community 
Forums on Greater Spartanburg, "Horizons Unlimited." For the latter, he 
received a Governor's citation. 

Dr. Goldberg has been internationally recognized for numerous accomplish- 
ments. Among these is his listing in the International Directory of Scholars 
and several other biographic compilations. 

A Renaissance Man of the first order, Dr, Goldberg will direct this 
colloquery, guiding us through explored and unexplored terrain of history, 
past and present. 

Alice Henderson, moderator of the panel, joins a distinguished group of 
citizens. Panelists include foreign-born personalities now residing in 
Spartanburg: Dr. Paul Forester (Executive Vice President for Operations, 
Hoechst Fibers Industries), Dr. Hans H. Kuhn (Honorary Consul of Switzerland 
and Department Manager at Deering Mi Hi ken Research Corporation), Bryan Lyttle 
(President, Bryan Lyttle, Inc.), and Dr. Regis Robe (Assistant Professor of 
French, USCS). Rick Walker (Instructor in Sociology, USCS) rounds out 
the panel . 
**************************************** 

SUNBELT/ INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIA are partially funded by the S.C. Committee for 

the Humanities, an agent of the National Endowment for the Humanities. 
**************************************** 




s*t 









/OL. V, No. 25 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS 



March 16, 1981 



[. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

1AXWELL HENRY GOLDBERG, scholar, author and 
lecturer, will speak at the Sunbelt Inter- 
lational symposium at USCS on March 14. 
■ollowing Dr. Goldberg's presentation, "de 
"ocqueville Revisited", a panel of inter- 
lational visitors to the local community 
/ill discuss their observations of modern 
ipartanburg. The symposium will begin at 
':30 p.m. in the Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
>unbelt International is supported in part 
>y a grant from the S.C. Committee for the 
lumanities, an agency of the National 
Endowment for the Humanities. 



I. BULLETIN BOARD 



I. CAMPUS 

he six week groups offered by the Total 
lealth and Wellness Program will begin this 
'eek. These groups include weight control, 
xercise, stress management, and aerobic 
ance. Also, the Wednesday seminar will be 
n Assertiveness offered by Becky Edwards, 
his is open to the public. Due to mis- 
jcheduling, the weight control seminar by 
jruce Wilson will be rescheduled and par- 
jicipants notified. Sorry for the in- 
[onvenience. For more information contact 
jruce Wilson. 

PANISH FILM: Tristana , a Spanish film with 
nglish subtitles, will be shown as the 
inal film of this year's foreign film 
eries, Wednesday, March 18, 7:00 p.m., in 
ukey Lecture Theatre. A 1970, color film 
irected by the famous Spanish director 
Jis Bunuel , the film features the beautiful 
atherine Deneuve in the title role and 
?rnando Rey and Franco Nero as the men in 
2r life. Filmed in Spain and set im'lhe 
320s of Bunuel 's young adulthood, the film 
5 about a young, innocent girl who becomes 
ie mistress of her aging, corrupt guardian, 
imission is free and all are welcome. 



INTERNATIONALIZING COURSES: Anyone interested 
in adding an international dimension to an 
existing course, in creating a new course 
with international content, or in some other 
international curriculum project, should pre- 
pare a memo explaining the proposal and sub- 
mit it to Jim Brown, Director of International 
Education, L-236. Dr. Sansbury is interested 
in trying to facilitate such efforts, 
expecially work that can be undertaken during 
the summer, and he, along with Dr. Eaglin and 
Dr. Brown, will evaluate the proposals re- 
ceived for possible help with such an endeavor. 

FROM HEIDI FROM: On March 26 and March 27, the 
Child Development Center staff will be par- 
ticipating in First Aid and CPR Training 
from 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. There is space 
available for several more people to par- 
ticipate. The cost is $6.50 for the CPR 
training and $3.30 for the Multi Media First 
Aid course. Anyone vjho is interested should 
call Heidi From at ext. 318 or 319. 

THE PROMOTION AND TENURE COMMITTEE voted a 
Resolution of Commendation and Thanks to 
TONI MCKISSICK at its March 11 meeting. Ms. 
McKissick has done an outstanding job as 
staff secretary to the committee this year. 

FROM CAROL SMITH: Please announce to your 
classes: Mini Career Decision Making Workshops. 
Carol Smith and Becky Edwards are conducting 
a series of Career Decision Making Workshops 
designed to help students begin the process 
of major and career selection. They will be 
held on the following dates. March 16 - 
9:30-10:30, 10:30-11:30, 11:30-12:30, 12:30- 
1:30; March 17 - 10:50-11:50, 12:15-1:15; 
March 18 - 1:45-2:45, 3:00-4:00, 5:30-6:30; 
March 19 - 1:40-2:40. All workshops will be 
held in M-215 except for March 18, the 5:30- 
6:30 workshop will be held in M-213. For 
more information about these workshops, 
contact Carol Smith, Student Affairs. 



...BULLETIN BOARD continued 

THE BROWN BAG SEMINAR this week will be 
on "Math and Math Anxieties" presented 
by Tom Owens. The seminar will be held 
in L273 from 12:30-1:45 on Wednesday, 
March 18. Participants are invited to 
bring a bag lunch, beverages will be pro- 
vided. For more information contact Ann 
Sims, ext. 341. 



B. GRANT NEWS 

GRANT PROPOSAL SUBMITTED: USCS has submitted 
an application to the College Library Re- 
sources Program requesting $10,000 for the 
purchase of library materials. Project 
Director: Jan Yost. 



C. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION NEWS 

"THE NETHERLANDS, Gateway to Europe: New 
Opportunities for Trade and Investment for 
the Southeast" will be a seminar held Tues- 
day morning, March 31, in Atlanta, co-spon- 
sored by the Southern Center for Inter- \ 
national Studies and the Atlanta Chamber of 
Commerce. For further information, contact 
Jim Brown, L-236, ext. 433. 

NEH SUMMER SEMINARS: The National Endowment 
for the Humanities has announced its 1981 
Summer Seminars. These seminars are to pro- 
vide undergraduate teachers an opportunity 
for advanced study or research in their 
own or related fields. There are over 100 
seminars, which last eight weeks, at 
various locations, with a stipend of $2500, 
much of which is tax-free. Alice Henderson, 
Mike Dressman and Regis Robe have par- 
ticipated in these seminars and would be 
glad to answer questions about them. The 
application deadline is April 1, with 
announcement of awards April 24. A number 
of the seminars also offer a means of 
internationalizing one's academic background, 
wich such diverse topics as Asian Performing 
Arts, Brazilian National Culture, Muslim 
Minorities in the USSR, Chinese History, 
Power and Class in Africa, Twentieth Century 
Latin America, South Asian Literature, the 
American Role in East Asia, the Political 
Culture of Modern Britain, Chinese 
Literature, the Spanish American Short Study, 
Contemporary German Culture and Society, 
and a Comparative Study of Slavery. A catalog 
with a complete listing is posted in the 
second-floor Library mail room. 



MASADA will be a television "event" Sunday, 
April 5, through Wednesday, April 8, 9-11 p.m. 
on ABC. Madada is a huge rock butte in the 
Judean wilderness where in 73 A.D. a group of 
Jewish "freedom fighters" made a last stand 
against a much larger force of Roman soldiers. 
Subsequently Madada became a symbol of the 
more .general Jewish struggle against oppressioi 
The story opens with the Roman re-conquest of 
Jerusalem in 70 A.D. after a Jewish revolt. It, 
focuses on the clash between two cultures and 
between two opposing, charismatic leaders — 
one Jewish, one Roman. A Viewer's Guide, 
which includes suggestions for ways the progran 
can be used in the classroom and for classroom 
discussion is available from Jim Brown, L236, 
ext. 433. 

FRENCH TEENAGERS: NACEL (The North Atlantic 
Bultural Exchange League) will again be bring- 
ing French teenagers to our area this summer 
to stay in American homes. The students range 
in age from 13 to 19 and have all studied 
English. They will arrive on July 16 and leave 
August 13. They live with an American family 
as a family member, to learn about American 
family life and practice their English. Host 
families do not need to speak French or to 
have teenagers, though there should be the 
opportunity for the French student to meet 
other young people among friends, neighbors 
or relatives. The program offers an excellent 
opportunity, especially for one's children to 
get to know someone from another culture. If 
you would like to host a French teenager or 
would like further information, contact Jim 
Brown, L-236, ext. 433, or Andre and Raluca 
Goineau, 229 Greengate Lane, Spartanburg, 
585-3945. 

FACULTY WITH TEENAGE CHILDREN. who have studied 
French should be aware of the NACEL French 
Homestay Program. American teenagers stay in 
French homes for approximately a month, after 
an orientation and tour in Paris. A group 
flight leaves Knoxville, Tennessee, June 30 
and returns July 29, at a cost of $1,050 in- 
cluding fees, insurance, etc. There are still 
spaces available, but application should be 
made soon. For further information contact Jim 
Brown, L-236, ext. 433, or Andre and Raluca 
Goineau, 229 Greengate Lane, Spartanburg, 
585-3945. 

INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS: The Peace Corps celebrate 
its 20th anniversary this year. In two decades 
of service more than 80,000 volunteers have 
been assigned in 85 developing countries. 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

JIM BROWN gave a presentation titled "Update 
on Africa" to the South Carolina Council 
for Social Studies, a group of high school 
teachers and social studies coordinators 
in Columbia, March 6. 

BRYAN LINDSAY'S "Red, White, and Blue Game" 
has been purchased by Engine-uity, Ltd., of 
Phoenix, Arizona, who will market it as a 
teaching tool for the gifted and talented. 
According to Bryan, the game is "an intra- 
group/intergroup creative problem solving 
process that emphasizes non-verbal com- 
munication." The Red, White, and Blue Game 
is scheduled to go on the market later 
this spring. 

ED WHITE attended the national conference 
of the Association for Supervision and 
Curriculum Development March 6-10 at St. 
Louis. During the conference he conducted 
a workshop on the "Elementary Science Study" 
and also made a presentation in the "Status 
of Science Education" using a multi-media 
approach. Ed was also elected to the chair 
of ASCP's national conmittee on Curriculum 
Development and Change . 

HOLLY CROCKER attended the 19th annual 
Vianna McCown Lecture at the USC College 
of Nursing in Columbia. Guest speaker was 
Dr. Luther Christman. 



uses— -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, MARCH 16 — SUNDAY, MARCH 22, 1981 



MONDAY, March 16 

7:30 p.m. --Sunbelt International Symposium. Featuring Dr. Maxwell Goldberg. Tukey Lecture 
Theatre. Contact person -Cecilia Brown. 

rUESDAY, March 17 J 

11:00-2:30 p.m. -- Barbecue Sale, sponsored by the Student Nurses Association. Hodge Center Lobby. 

':00 p.m. -- Foreign Film Series. Tristana , Spanish film with English subtitles. Tukey Lecture 
Theatre. Contact person -Regis Robe. 

WEDNESDAY, March 18 

5:00-10:00 a.m. -- Learning Session. Media 244. Contact person -Arthur Justice. 

.2:30-1:45 p.m. -- Brown Bag Seminar. "Math and Math Anxieties" -presented by Tom Owens. L273. 

v:30 p.m. -- NAIA All Star Basketball game. Hodge Center Gymnasium. 

"HURSDAY, March 19 



:l:00-2:30 p.m. -- Hotdog and Bake Sale, sponsored by the Student Nurses Association. Hodge 
Center Lobby. 

':30 p.m. -- Orientation Session. L257, Contact person -Carol Smith 
■RIDAY, SATURDAY and SUNDAY - No activities scheduled. 




-^_. •«)*. 



KJ.IL 






/OL. V, No. 26 A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS March 29, i98i 



[. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

-ROM BRYANT REEVES: Book Requests for Fall 
>emester are due April 15. Book requests 
For summer school are overdue and should 
)e turned in immediately if not already 
in. 



[I. BULLETIN BOARD 

\. CAMPUS 

fhe Total Health and Wellness Program will 
De offering a seminar this week on Exercise, 
fhe seminar will be conducted by Frank 
(ohlenstein and will be held in M-218 on 
Wednesday from 12:30-1:30. All interested 
jersons are invited. For more information 
:ontact Bruce Wilson, ext. 336. 

FHE USCS ALUMNI ASSOCIATION invites all 
irea golfers to enter the second annual 
Fommy Caldwell Amateur Golf Championship. 
Fhe tournament will be held April fourth 
jnd fifth at the Village Green Golf Club. 
Fhe entrance fee is twenty-five dollars and 
the deadline for entry is Wednesday, April 1. 
Interested persons should contact Chuck 
itavely, ext. 218. 

JAPANESE CONSUL GENERAL. Mr. Ryo Kawade, 
the Japanese Consul General in Atlanta, will 
;peak in M-217, next Monday, April 6, at 
12:30. His topic will be Japanese-American 
delations, and there will be time for 
:iuestions. Japanese-American economic re- 
lations are wery significant for the eco- 
lomic health of both nations, as recent news 
items have indicated. Please announce this 
)resentation to classes. All are welcome. 

"HE S.C. POLITICAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION will 
lold a meeting here on April 11. Repre- 

entative Bob Sheheen will discuss re- 
apportionment in S.C. at 9:15 and the 

uncheon speaker will be Jack Bass. All 



faculty and students are invited to attend. 
For details about the luncheon, contact 
Ron Romine. 

"Drug Abuse: Medical, Research, and Social 
Aspects" will be the topic for the American 
Chemical Society's meeting on April 16, 1981. 
The speaker is Joseph M. Benforado, M.D., 
Professor of Medicine at the University of 
Wisconsin School of Medicine. A social hour 
will be held at 6:00 p.m., followed by dinner 
($8.00) at 6:30 p.m. and the meeting at 8:00 
p.m. The meeting and/or dinner are open to 
the public and will be held in the Student 
Activities Building at USCS. Contact Dr. 
Lawrence Moore for reservations. 



B. GRANT NEWS 

FACULTY INTERESTED IN PURSUING GRANTS: Attached 
to this issue of FYI is a form which requests 
faculty interested in learning about grant 
opportunities to return the completed form to 
Jan Yost. 



C. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION NEWS 

INTERNATIONALIZING COURSES: Anyone wishing to 
apply for assistance toward internationalizing 
a course or course (see FYI, March 6, 1981) 
should submit a proposal to Jim Brown, Director 
of International Education, L-236, by Wednesday 
April 8. 

"CHINA'S PLANS for Economic and Industrial 
Development in the Coming Decade," will be the 
topic of a luncheon address by Ambassador 
Quing Ling, Permanent Representative of the 
People's Republic of China to the United 
Nations, on Friday, April 10, 1981, in Atlanta. 
The address is sponsored by the Southern Center 
for International Studies. The topic is timely 
in light of China's current efforts to build 
an economic system that combines central plan- 

(continued) 



ning with a market system--a fundamental 
change in Chinese policy. For further infor- 
mation contact Jim Brown, L-236, Ext. 433. 

MIDDLE EAST TRIP. The International Council 
on Education for Teaching (ICET) and the 
American Association of Colleges for Teacher 
Education (AACTE) are offering an educational 
program in the Middle East to educators this 
summer. The program is designed to provide 
insight into educational and cultural 
characteristics of selected countries and 
cities of the Middle East. Participation 
includes the 1981 ICET World Assembly in 
Cairo, August 10-14, focusing on the theme 
"Basic Education for the Real World: Inter- 
national Perspectives on Human Resource 
Development." Different packages, at different 
rates, are available. For further information 
contact Jim Brown, L-236, ext. 433. 

INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS: Stomach cancer 
accounts for more than half of all the cancer 
cases in Japan, but it is very likely to be 
cured completely through early detection. 
In fact, 70 to 80 per cent of all stomach 
cancer in Japan is cured because of exten- 
sive early diagnoses. This is a far greater 
success rate than that of the U.S. and 
Western Europe, although the technology of 
cancer treatment is not better in Japan. 
Developing nations that have imported 
Japanese detection technology have made 
significant progress in reading their 
cancer mortality rates. 



cological and Neonatal nurses. Topics in- 
cluded current issues such as the Pap Smear 
controversy. Toxic Shock Syndrome, Alter- 
natives to traditional hospital delivery, 
sibling involvement in the birth process, 
management of the pregnant diabetic, 
persistent fetal circulation, the failure 
to thrive infant, and possible effects of 
environmental contaminants in breast mild 
and formula. 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

JIM BROWN spoke to the Northside Rotary Club 
Monday, 23 March, on "International Education 
at uses." 

DR. MOHAMMED OMER presented a Palestinian's 
view on the Middle East dilemma to the 
regular March meeting of Binai Brith. Meyer 
Drucker, President-elect of Binai Brith, 
reports it was an open and frank exchange, 
which in the long run should help promote 
better understanding on both sides. 

BETTY PRYOR AND MARY ANN SAWICKI attended 
the 11th Annual Conference of the North 
Carolina Section of the Nurses Association 
of the American College of Obstetricians and 
Gynecologists on March 12-15 in Raleigh. 
The purpose of this conference was to bring 
continuing education to Obstetrical, Gyne- 



The following students will be participating in the USC Arts Festival at 
Coastal Carolina College on April 1, 2, and 3: 



uses JAZZ BAND 

Mark Roddy 
Rene Blackwell 
Shelia Lynch 
Jill Robbins 
Kim Coates 
John Sinderman 
Glen Plumley 
Richard Ashford 
Scott Womble 



UNIVERSITY SINGERS 

Chris Bryant 
Wendy Hughes 
Lisa Hixson 
Amanda Peninger 
Louis K. Blander, Jr. 
Wesley Craven, Jr. 
Carole D. St. Clair 
Kathy Wooten 
Rhonda Kay Barnhill 
Sandra Scott 
Dell Jones 
Pam Pattillo 
Massie R. Holland 
Jan R. Harris, Jr. 
Debbie Weaver 
Rene Humphries 
Christopher D. Brown 
Oscar D. Mooney 
Gina Snelgrove 
Betsy Gregory 



NEAR MISSES 

Lou Lyn Gilbert 
Teresa Martin 
Dana Banks 
Tracey Ann Easier 
Kathy Hawkins 
Angel i a Hicks 
Nina Ledford 
Clary Oglesby 
Jane Tillotson 



These students understand that they are to work out any necessary make-up work 
with their professors. Please excuse them from class during these days. Thank 
you for this consideration. 



Bryan Lindsay, Director 
Contemporary Music Workshop 



FROM: 



Jan Yost 

Director for Development & Sponsored Projects 

(Administration Bldg. , rm. 202) 



TO: 



All faculty 



SUBJECT: 



Grant Opportunities 



I would like to update my files so that I may better disseminate grant 
information to you. If you are interested in learning about grant 
opportunities, please fill in the bottom of this form and return it 
to me. 

If you have submitted this information to me previously, and if your 
interests have not changed, it will not be necessary to return this 
form. 

Thank you. 



NAME: 



My area/s of specialization and/or interests are: 



Specific grant programs I am interested in are: 




Vk. 






VOL. V, No. 27 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS April 6 



1981 



I. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 



TO: ALL FACULTY ADVISORS; From: Student 
Activities Office - Reminder- Club budgets 
are now being reviewed for 1981-80. Please 
submit all requests to the Student Activities 
Office as soon as possible. 

PLEASE SUBMIT NOMINATIONS by April 15, to Dr. 
Tom Davis in the Student Affairs Office for 
the following awards: ALGERNON SYDNEY 
SULLIVAN AWARD - This award will be renamed 
in memory of Earl Gordon. One female and one 
male graduate will be recognized at commence- 
ment for outstanding service to USCS. Students 
who graduated in the Summer or Fall of 1980, 
as well as those graduating in May, 1981 are 
eligible. ODK FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE LEADERSHIP 
AWARD - This award is presented at Awards 
Day by ODK to the outstanding leader in the 
Freshman or Sophomore class. Leadership and 
participation in campus activities is the 
primary factor used in selecting the 
recipient. 

FROM RICKY WALKER: The Minority Affairs 
Wvisory Committee will meet in room 266 of 
the Library on Wednesday, April 8, at 4:30 
p.m. Guest speaker will be Dr. James Bostic, 
Jr., Chairman of the S.C. Commission on 
Higher Education. 

ro ALL ADVISORS from John Edmunds: For 
advisement purposes please note that Theatre 
140 now requires the pre-requi sites of 
English 101 and 102. Thank you. 

rHE FYI DEADLINE for the issue to be published 
)n April 13 will be Wednesday, April 8 at 
j:00 p.m. The reason for the early deadline is 
that the Information Services Office will be 
supporting the Science Fair on Friday, April 
LO. FYI will resume its regular deadline 
schedule for the remainder of the academic 
/ear. Faculty and staff are reminded that 
items must be submitted in writing by 5 p.m. 
)n the Thursday preceding Monday publication. 



GOOD FRIDAY, April 17, is an academic holiday 
at USCS, and classes will not meet that day. 
However, it is a working day for all twelve 
month employees. USCS will observe an 
Independence Day Holiday on Monday, July 6, 
rather than Friday, July 3. This is the only 
change in the 1981 USC system holiday schedule 
as announced in the current issue of Times 9, 



Other holidays are Labor Day, Sept. 7; Thanks- 
giving, Nov. 26-27; and Christmas, Dec. 25- 
Dec. 31. Friday, New Year's Day, 1982, will 
also be a holiday. It is possible that Governor 
Riley may proclaim Christmas Eve as an 
additional holiday for state employees. 

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION OFFICER - The Chancellor's 
Administrative Assistant has been serving as 
the USCS Affirmative Action Officer for the 
past several years. While the USCS record in 
affirmative action has been good, in view of 
the State's expanded commitment, the decision 
has been made to assign this responsibility 
to some other appropriate faculty or staff 
member on a parttime basis. This person should 
be sensitive to the goals of a positive 
affirmative action program and aware of the 
problems in achieving meaningful progress 
towards those goals. The current duties of the 
person selected should be such that appropriate 
arrangements can be made to provide adequate 
release time for effective accomplishment of 
affirmative action responsibilities. These 
responsibilities will include making recom- 
mendations to the Chancellor for constructive 
modification of existing affirmative action 
policies and procedures, for updating of 
affirmative action goals, and for the develop- 
ment of programs to attain these goals. The 
Affirmative Action Officer will monitor all 
such programs, including employment procedures, 
and will work with the appropriate faculty and 
university committees in this area. Adequate 
clerical and staff support will be provided. 
This appointment will be for a five-year term. 
Letters of application should be submitted to 
the office of the Chancellor by April 20. The 
Faculty Advisory Committee has been asked to 
assist in the selection process. Appointment 
is anticipated by May 15. 



...OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS continued... 

POSITION AVAILABLE: (1) Part-time GEO in- 
structor, Spartanburg 70001 program. 
Bachelor degree required, GEO teaching 
experience preferred. Salary negotiable. 
Application deadline - April 10. Contact 
the Personnel Office at USCS for more 
information. 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 

DR. JIM FERGUSON, a local psychologist, 
will be the guest speaker for this week's 
Total Health and Wellness program. The topic 
will be stress management and Dr. Ferguson 
will be offering some current research and 
possibly innovative approaches for stress 
management. Dr. Ferguson is currently doing 
some work with Spartanburg General Hospital's 
Cardiac Rehabilitation Program. The seminar 
will be in Media 218, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Wednes- 
day, and is open to any interested persons. 

JAPANESE CONSUL GENERAL in Atlanta, Mr. Ryo 
Kawade, will speak on "Japanese-American 
Relations" today, Monday, April 6, at 12:30 
p.m. in M-217. Mr, Kawade has served as 
Director of the Economic Affairs Bureau of 
the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs. He 
has served in the Japanese Foreign Service 
since 1952, holding positions in Finland, 
Poland, the USSR, Nigeria, and the Federal 
Republic of Germany. He will speak to Alice 
Henderson's Current Events class, which is 
open to all and includes time for questions 
and answers. 

FROM BRUCE WILSON: Health Fair 81 will be 
conducted this week in Spartanburg County. 
The sights are Monday at the YMCA from 
11-7:30 p.m.; Tuesday and Wednesday at the 
Hodge Center on the USCS campus from 12-8 
p.m.; Thursday at the Red Cross Office from 
11-8 p.m. and Friday and Saturday at West- 
gate Mall from 11-8 p.m. There will be 
free screening -vision, height, wieght, 
anemia, blood pressure and blood analysis 
(a charge of $7.00 will charged for blood 
analysis), and oral cancer. Some sights 
will screen pulmonary functions and percent 
body fat. Education material and displays 
will be available from health agencies, 
and the public is invited to visit any 
of these sights. 



FROM MIKE BRUCE: Interstate United our new 
food services personnel will have their hot 
dog stand in the Hodge Center on Monday, Apri 
6 and 7. If you like good hot dogs, stop by 
for lunch and try one out. 

FROM DOYLE BOGGS: Several faculty advisors 
have inquired about the nature of the Special 
Topics in History course which will be offerei 
during the second summer session. This offeri' 
is a seminar in oral history, which will con 
centrate on Spartanburg County textile mills 
between 1900 and 1950. This course would be ai 
ideal special project for juniors or seniors 
in journalism, history, political science or 
business. It is suggested that it be taken on 
a pass-fail basis, although grades can be 
awarded. I will be happy to discuss the outlir 
of this special Spartanburg Sesquicentennial 
project with anyone who is interested. 

THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION cordially 
invites all faculty/staff to the 1981 faculty/ 
staff appreciation luncheon on Wednesday, Apri 
15 at 12:30 in the Hodge Center gym. You are 
asked to R.S.V.P. to the Student Affairs Of fie 
ext. 336. Lunch, entertainment, introduction 
of finalists for the Teacher of the Year award 
are planned. 



THE SILVER ANNIVERSAY OF THE PIEDMONT REGION i 
III SCIENCE FAIR will be held at USCS April 
9-11. Competition will feature about 400 
exhibits representing schools in seven countie 
Jack Turner of the USCS faculty is the Science 
Fair Coordinator. Project setup is Thursday 
afternoon, the fair will be open to the public 
from 9 to 5 p.m. on Friday, and the awards 
ceremony will be at 10 a.m. on Saturday mornini 
Everyone is invited to visit the Hodge Center 
to view the displays. 

THE ANNUAL MEETING of the S.C. Political Sciem 
Association will be held at USCS on Saturday, 
April 11. Representative Bob Sheheen, chairman 
of the S.C. House Judiciary Committee, will ' 
speak on reapportionment in this state. FolloW' 
ing lunch, S.C. author and journalist Jack Bas: 
will speak on Southern Republican judges and 
civil rights. The meeting will be held from 
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Tukey Lecture Theatre. The 
meeting is open to the public, but lunch 
reservations should be made in advance. Contad 
Ron Romine for additional information or 
reservations. 



...BULLETIN BOARD continued... 

THE SHOESTRING PLAYERS will be presenting 
John Van Druten's comedy, "Bell, Book, and 
Candle," April 15-18 in Tukey Lecture 
Theatre. Performances will begin at 8:15 
p.m. each evening. Tickets are $3 for 
adults and $2.50 for students. Reservations 
may be made by calling ext. 397. 

THE WESTERN CAROLINAS SECTION of the 
American Chemical Society will meet in the 
activities building at USCS Thursday, April 
16. Dr. Joseph M. Benforado, professor of 
medicine at the University of Wisconsin 
School of Medicine will dicuss "Drug Abuse: 
Medical, Research, and Social Aspects." The 
meeting will begin at 8 p.m. The public is 
invited to attend the meeting. There will 
be a dinner at 6:30 p.m., people wishing to 
attend the dinner should make reservations 
by corfitacting Lawrence Moore. The cost for 
the dinner is $8.00. 

AREA RESIDENTS can take a unique look at 
part of their urban heritage beginning 
April 22 at USCS. The university library is 
hosting an exhibit of Berne, Switzerland 
beginning that day and continuing through 
May 15. There will also be a lecture and a 
slide presentation by Professor Erdmann 
Schmocker of Illinois Institute Technology 
in Chicago. This program will be in Tukey 
Lecture Theatre at 12:30 p.m. and again at 
7:30 that evening. For more information 
about this program contact Dr. Jim Brown. 



INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 



FEAST, FAMINE, 
lecture, will 
Schama, at USC 
4:00 pm, room 
reception foil 
former Fellow 
and Lecturer i 
the well-known 
him the "leadi 



AND RENAISSANCE MAN, a public 
be given by Professor Simon 

Columbia, Tuesday, April 7, 
429, Gambrell Hall, with a 
owing. Professor Schama is a 
of Brasenose College, Oxford, 
n European History. J.H. Plumb, 

British historian, has called 
ng historian of his generation.' 



GREEK FOOD. The annual Greek luncheon and 
pastry sale will be held on Wednesday, April 
at St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, on 
the Asheville Highway--not far away. The 
pastry sale begins at 9:00 a.m. and will last 
until things are gone. The lunch will be 
from 1:00 am. to 2:00 p.m. 



TEACH IN TAIWAN. The American Association of 
State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), to 
which USCS belongs, has concluded arrange- 
ments with the Ministry of Education of the 
Republic of China (Taiwan) to receive AASCU 
professors who will teach in Taiwan for a 
period of a half year or a year depending on 
the field and needs of ROC universities. A 
number of positions are open in a variety of 
fields for 1981-82 and 1982-83, including: 
computer science (year), and organic chemistry, 
inorganic chemistry, analytic chemistry, 
physical chemistry, and plant entomology (all 
half-year), and general marketing economics. 
Appointments will carry a local salary, 
housing, a monthly stipend, and round trip 
transportation for faculty and spouse. For 
further information contact Jim Brown, ext. 433. 

PROFESSOR KENNETH BOURNE, of the London School 
of Economics and Political Science, University 
of London, will give a lecture on "The Educa- 
tion of Harry Temple (Lord Palmerston) ; The 
Making of a Foreign Secretary," Monday, April 
13, 4:00 pm, room 429, Gambrell Hall, USC 
Columbia. A reception will follow. 

AFRICAN CULTURE will be featured Thursday, 
April 9, at a special program of the Southern 
Center for International Studies, in Atlanta, 
8:00-10:30 pm at the Goethe Institute, 400 
Colony Square. Film, sculpture, and music 
will be included. For further information con- 
tact Jim Brown, ext. 433. 

INTERNATIONALIZING COURSES: Anyone wishing to 
apply for assistance toward internationalizing 
a course or courses (see FYI March 16 & 30) 
should submit a proposal to Jim Brown, Director 
of International Education, L-236, by Wednesday 
April 8. 

"MISTAKES EXPORTERS ARE MAKING" will be the 
topic of the monthly meeting of the Inter- 
national Trade Club of Western South Carolina, 
Wednesday evening, April 8, at Textile Hall 
in Greenville. The meetings are open to all. 
The speaker will be Mr. Jesse Martinez, Export 
Supervisor for Monsanto in Greenville. For 
further information contact Jim Brown, ext. 
433. 

INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS: The average Japanese 
citizen saves over 20% of his after- tax income; 
far more than his counterparts in other indus- 
trialized countries. The following savings 
rates are based on data collected by the Bank 
of Japan during 1979: Japan, 20.1%; France 



...INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION continued... 

14.9%; W. Gennany,13.9%; UK, 10. 7%; Canada, 
10.2%; U.S., 5.1%. One reason for the high 
Japanese personal savings rate is that an 
individual may invest up to $70,000 in 
banks and other savings institutions without 
being taxed on the interest. 



FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

DR. EILIZABETH BROWN was a guest speaker at 

Macedonia Baptist Church on March 25 at the 

memorial held for the murdered black children _ 

of Atlanta. i 

CECILIA McDANIEL BROWN and DR. ELIZABETH 
BROWN chaperoned Afro-American students on a 
weekend (cultural experience) stay in Atlanta 
on March 27-29. 

MICHAEL DRESSMAN (English) has had his paper 
"The Suffix -EE: Laughing All the Way to 
Acceptance" accepted for publication by the 
SECOL Bulletin , published by the Southeastern 
Conference on Linguistics. 

JIM BROWN attended the spring meeting of the 
South Carolina Consortium for International 
Studies, Friday, April 24, in Columbia. 

JACK TURNER attended the annual meeting of the 
South Carolina Academy Science in Columbia 
on March 27 and 28. Jack was elected President- 
El ect of that organization for this year 
and will assume the duties of President of 
the Academy in March of 1982. It was the 
academy's 54th annual meeting. 







VOL. V, No. 28 A Newslefter For The Faculty Of USCS Apni 13, i98i 



I. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FROM TOM GUNTER: In class student survey 
- at Dr. Holderman's request- a study of the 
Economic Impact of USCS is being performed 
this semester. Student input is requested 
the week of April 13-17, 1981. Questionnaires 
should be administered during the 11:30-12:20 
classes on M W F and the 9:20-10:45 T/TH 
sections to obtain maximum response rates 
from day classes. The 5:30 M/W and T/TH 
sections give maximum coverage of evening 
classes. The impact of USCS on our community 
can be one of the strongest influences on 
our legislators in justifying our budget 
request for this and future year's funding. 
You assistance is requested in assuring a 
maximum response to these questions so 
that we may gain the best possible estimate 
of the impact of USCS. 

FROM VALERIE BURNIE: The library received 
word recently that the S.C. State Depart- 
ment of Education will no longer run com- 
puter searches of the ERIC data base. 
Faculty members who need these searches 
must now have them done through Cooper 
Library in Columbia. Please see FYI, 
Monday, August 4, 1980 for information on 
Cooper's policies or call one of the 
reference librarians on our campus. 

FROM RON EAGLIN: In a recent deans and 
directors meeting, I was asked the impor- 
tance of student evaluations of faculty 
in administrative recommendations for merit 
pay. Faculty who do not have student 
evaluations during that fiscal year will 
not receive a recommendation for merit pay 
by me. Any faculty member who wishes to 
be considered for merit pay by me must 
have current student evaluations in his or 
her file. 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 

THE SHOESTRING PLAYERS will be presenting John 
Van Druten's comedy, "Bell, Book, and Candle," 
April 15-18 in Tukey Lecture Theatre. Per- 
formances will begin at 8:15 p.m. each evening- 
Tickets are $3 for adults and $2.50 for 
students. Reservations may be made by calling 
ext. 397. 

THE WESTERN CAROLINAS SECTION of the American 
Chemical Society will meet in the activities 
building at USCS Thursday, April 16. Dr. 
Joseph M. Benforado, professor of medicine 
at the University of Wisconsin School of 
Medicine will discuss "Drug Abuse: Medical, 
Research, and Social Aspects." The meeting 
will begin at 8 p.m. The public is invited 
to attend the meeting. There will be a dinner 
at 6:30 p.m., people wishing to attend the 
dinner should make reservations by contacting 
Lawrence Moore. The cost for the dinner is 
$8.00. 

THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION cordially 
invites all faculty/staff to the 1981 faculty/ 
staff appreciation luncheon on Wednesday, 
April 15 at 12:30 in the Hodge Center gym. 
You are asked to R.S.V.P. to the Student 
Affairs Office, ext. 336. Lunch, entertainment 
and introduction of finalists for the Teacher 
of the Year award are planned. 

TODAY (Monday, April 13) there will be a hot 
barbecue sandwich stand in the Hodge Center. 
Also on Tuesday, April 14, there will be hot 
soup and sandwiches. Serving will begin at 
9:00 a.m. and end at 1:00 p.m. Stop by for 
a good lunch. 

FACULTY AND STAFF who would like to find out 
what's happening in the areas of theatre, 
music, dance, and the visual arts at USCS are 
invited to an ARTS OPEN HOUSE on the Library 
porch beginning at 6:00 pm, Thursday, April 16. 
The Contemporary Music Workshop will open the 

(continued) 



...BULLETIN BOARD continued... 

program, followed by a light supper and a 
visit to the Mini-gallery. Complimentary 
tickets to "Bell, Book, and Candle," 
Shoestring Players' current production will 
also be available. That's the ARTS OPEN 
HOUSE, Thursday evening at 6:00 p.m. 

DR. ELAINE ZEIGHAMI, research scientist from 
Oak Ridge Associated Laboratories, will 
speak at USCS on April 15. At 11:30 am, 
in A113, she will discuss "The Environmental 
and Health Aspects of Coal Conversion." At 
4:30 pm, in A325, she will discuss "Cancer 
and Food Additives". Faculty, staff and 
students are welcome. Please announce to 
your classes. 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION has designated the 
annual picnic date for Saturday, August 1. 
It is a family affair, and we hope to have 
activities for children and adults. Last 
summer we had soccer, a tennis tournament, 
Softball, kickball, volleyball and a magic 
show. Please mark your calendars and plan 
to join the extended USCS family for an 
afternoon of food, fellowship and sporting 
events. -Charles Stavely. 

"BERNE, SWITZERLAND, A Medieval City Today," 
will be the topic of a slide-lecture 
presentation at USCS on Wednesday, April 22, 
in Tukey Lecture Theatre, at 12:30 p.m. and 
again at 7:30 p.m. The lecture will be 
presented by Professor Erdmann Schmocker, 
an architect-planner at the Illinois 
Institute of Technology. Berne was founded 
in approximately 1160 A.D., and is an 
example of early, medieval city planning. 
Life styles, the functions of the city, and 
the world have changed greatly since the 
Middle Ages, but Berne still shows, more 
than most cities, its links to the past. 
Schmocker is the author of the new book 
Old Berne--New Berne, A City Image Through 
History , a pioneering urban study. The 
lectures should be of interest to a variety 
of students, especially those in history 
and art history, and sociology. Please 
announce to classes. The lectures will open 
an exhibit on Berne in the USCS Library, 
which will run through May 15. 

USC-SUMTER is celebrating its second annual 
Renaissance Week from April 22 through May 
1. The program features a May Day program 
called "Faire Daye," which includes music 



a puppet show, and a Lancing Tournament. USC 
Sumter has extended a special invitation to 
faculty, staff, and students to attend these 
events. More information and schedules may 
be obtained from Mike Dressman, or from 
Information Services. 

BECAUSE OF THE ABSENCE of Jan Caldwell, Word 
Processing services will be limited during 
the week of April 20-24. No interruption of 
first priority academic support to the faculit 
is anticipated, but it will be difficult if 
not impossible to provide non-academic quick 
printing services during that week. Depart- 
ments are urged to note this announcement 
and plan their printing schedules accordingli 

THE 1981 "South Carolina Plan for Equity and 
Equal Opportunity in the Public Colleges and 
Universities" from Governor Riley is on 
reserve in the library for interested readers 
An additional copy is in the Chancellor's 
of f i ce . 



GRANT NEWS 

GRANT PROPOSAL SUBMITTED: USCS has requested 
$86,813 from the South Carolina Department 
of Social Services to operate the Burroughs 
Child Development Center next year. Project 
Director: Mrs. Heidi From. 



INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION NEWS 

THE USCS INTERNATIONAL CLUB will host the 
German swim team presently visiting Spartan- 
burg at 7:30 p.m., tomorrow night, April 14, 
in the Activities Building. This will be the 
clubs last activity of the semester, and all 
are invited to welcome the German young peopl 
to USCS and to Spartanburg. 

ENGLISH INSTRUCTION. If you know anyone de- 
siring intensive instruction in English as a 
second language, USC-Columbia has established 
an English Program for Internationals (EPI). 
It is intended for potential undergraduate 
and graduate students, with instruction at 
six different levels of proficiency. Classes 
meet five hours a day, five days a week, for 
10 weeks. Sessions begin in January, March, 
June, and September. The next session will 
run June 8th-August 14th. Housing is provided 
Total estimated cost, including tuition and 
living expenses is $1890. For further 

(continued) 



...INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION NEWS continued... 

infomation contact Jim Brown, ext. 433, or 
EPI in Columbia, 7-3867 or 7-7461. 

INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS: USC personnel may be 
interested to note that this is the year of 
Cock, according to the zodiac calendar 
originating in China, which has each of 
the calendar's 12 divisions represented by 
an animal. People born in the Year of the 
Cock are supposed to be endowed with a sense 
of fashion and are sociable' and farsighted, 
but tend to be choosy and lacking in prudence, 
(source: Japan and the Southeast. Jan.. 1981.) 



FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

KAREN PEEL (nursing) attended a conference 
on "Hemodynamic Monitoring" offered by the 
American Association of Critical Care Nurses. 
Topics included wave form analysis, 
"trouble-shooting" monitoring problems, 
cardiac output, andphysiological significance " 
of hemodynamic monitoring parameters. 
The conference was held March 28 in Charlotte. 

REGIS ROBE PRESIDED over the annual meeting 
of the South Carolina Conference on Foreign 
Language Teaching April 4 at Columbia College. 
Sharon Cherry served as program chairperson. 

GEORGE LABANICK attended a USC system-side 
meeting on teaching non-majors biology 
courses held at Myrtle Beach on April 3-5, 

JIM BROWN attended the Southeastern Regional 
Seminar in African Studies, Saturday, May 11, 
held at Emory University, Atlanta. 

BRYAN LINDSAY'S article, "The Prometheus Perplex; 
-eadership Giftedness and Future Studies," 
ippears in the current issue of Roeper Review . 



April 13, 1981 



TO: 



FRCM: 



All Faculty, Administration and Staff Members 



iv^ 



Lee Holcombe, Chair, Self-Study Steering Committee 



SUBJECT: Conclusion of Institutional Self-Study - 

Visit of SACS Evaluation Committee to USCS, April 26-29 



The USCS institutional self-study, begun in 19T9, is now 
drawing to a close. The self-study report, to which so many of you 
have contributed so much, is now being printed in Word Processing, 
and copies will be placed on reserve in the library as soon as pos- 
sible — probably during the week of April 13— for those of you vho 
wish to see it . 

The SACS Evaluation Committee will be on campus from 
Siuiday evening, April 26, to Wednesday noon, April 29. The members 
of this committee, their institutional affiliations, and their re- 
sponsibilities with respect to our evaluation are as follows: 



Dr. Alice S. Mandanis, Dean 
Marymount College of Virginia 
Arlington, Va. 



Chair; Faculty 



Dr. Alfred B. Rollins, President 
Old Dominion University 
Norfolk, Va. 



Organization and 
Admini st r at ion 



Dr. W. Darrell Stump, Dean 
School of Arts and Sciences 
Radford University 
Radford, Va. 



Humanities and Sciences 



Dr. James L. Hester, Chair 
College of Administration 

and Business 
Louisiana Tech University 
Huston, La. 



Business Administration 



Dr. M. Gardner McCollum 
Dept. of Curriculum 

and Instruction 
University of Alabama 

in Birmingham 



Education 



Mrs. Martha S. Buhl er 
Georgia Southwestern College 
Americus, Ga. 



Nirrsing 



-2- 



Dr. Thomas B. Hogancamp, 

Ebcecutive Director 
Murray State University Foundation 
Murray, Ky. 

Ms. Shirley R. Glazener, Librarian 
George Mason University 
Fairfax, Va. 

Miss Mildred English, 

Director of Placement 
University of North Carolina 

at Charlotte 



Financial Resources 



Library/Learning Resources 



Student Development 
Services 



Accompanying the committee will be Dr. Jack Allen of the SACS office 
in Atlanta. 

With respect to the committee's visit, may I make these two 
requests of you: 

(1) Please plan to be "on hand" and available for consultation 
with committee members on Monday, April 27, 8:30-1^:00 and 
on Tuesday, April 28, 8:30-2:00. Specific appointments for 
committee members to meet with particular persons on campus 
will be handled by Toni McKissick in the Chancellor's office. 
In addition, according to the committee chair. Dr. Maadanis,' 
the committee members will generally be circulating around 
campus to talk— with administration, faculty and staff mem- 
bers and with students. 

(2) Be sure that the syllabi for courses which you teach, kept 
on file in the Deans' offices, are complete and up-to-date. 
The Evaluation Committee members will be looking at these, 
and they will also be interested in seeing copies of ex- 
aminations which you give and other materials you use in 
your courses, if you'll be so good as to place some ex- 
amples of these in the files. 



Thanks, good people, for all your help. 



USCS--THIS WEEK 





MONDAY, APRIL 13 — SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 


1981 


MONDAY, April 13 
12:30-1:45 p.m. — 


Library Committee meeting. L255. 





TUESDAY, April 14 

6:00-10:00 p.m. -- International club meeting. Activities Building. Contact Regis Robe for 
more information. 

WEDNESDAY, April 15 

11:30 a.m. -- "The; Environmental and Health Aspects of Coal Conversion" -presented by Dr. 
Elaine Zeighami. A113. Contact Jeanne Stuart for more information. 

12:30 p.m. -- Faculty Appreciation Day. Hodge Center Gym. Contact Student Affairs for more 
information. 

4:30 p.m. -- "Cancer and Food Additives" -presented by Dr. Elaine Aeighami. A325. Contact 
Jeanne Stuart for more information. 

8:15 p.m. -- "Bell, Book and Candle" -performance by the Shoestring Players. Tukey Lecture 
Theatre. Contact ext. 397 for more information. 

THURSDAY, April 16 

6:30 p.m. -- American Chemical Society meeting. See FYI Bulletin Section for details. Contact 
Lawrence Moore for more information. 

8:15 p.m. -- "Bell, Book and Candle" -performance by the Shoestring Players. Tukey Lecture 
Theatre. Contact ext. 397 for more information. 

FRIDAY, April 17 

Easter Break - no classes, but 12 month staff will work. 

8:15 p.m. -- "Bell, Book and Candle" -performance by the Shoestring Players. Tukey Lecture 
Theatre. Contact ext. 397 for more information. 

SATURDAY, April 18 

8:15 p.m. -- "Bell, Book and Candle" -performance by the Shoestring Players. Tukey Lecture 
Theatre. Contact ext. 397 for more information. 




s*. 









OL. V, No. 29 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS April 20, i98i 



. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

ROM DR. EAGLIN: Position open: Reading 
aculty-For developmental classes to work 
ith minorities and non-traditional students 
n laboratory setting. Ph.D. preferred. Send 
esume to Dr. Jane L. Davisson, Director of 
evelopmental Services, USCS, Spartanburg, 
C 29303. USCS is an affirmative action, equal 
pportunity employer. 

OSITION AVAILABLE: Secretary I, School of 
ursing. Secretary for general office duties 
n an administrative office. Typing, take 
nd transcribe dictation, filing, record 
eeping, scheduling appointments, etc. 
vailable immediately. Salary: 8,071., Grade 
4. Interested applicants should contact the 
SCS personnel office. 
OSITION AVAILABLE: Student Development 
pecialist I. Supervise maintenance of 
ecords for undergraduate students, maintain 
nd supervise large flow of data between 
niversity offices, coordinate all details 
nd paper work involved with registration, 
uspensions, and applications for degrees 
nd certificates. BA or BS degree required, 
asters preferred. Position available: July 
, 1981. Salary: 11,487, Grade 23. Interested 
ersons should contact the USCS personnel 
ffice. 

SCS is committed to a policy of affirmative 
ction which assures equal opportunity in 
ducation and employment to all qualified 
ersons regardless of race, sex, religion, 
reed, handicap, disability, veteran status, 
ational origin, or ancestry. 



I. BULLETIN BOARD 

ROM THE CHANCELLOR: This week, April 20-24, 
s National Secretaries Week. I urge all 
jpervisors and faculty to join me in recog- 
izing the very capable clerical staff on this 
smpus and extending to them sincere thanks 
3r the tremendous contributions they make to 
>CS. 



THE ANNUAL GOOD HEALTH APPEAL is being re-opened. 
Meyer Drucker reports that the donations have 
been very low this year. Please send your 
donations and pledges to Meyer. 

ON WEDNESDAY, April 22, the Library Audiovisual 
Distribution Center will have on display the 
American History Slide Collection that was 
recently purchased. The set consists of 2,100 
slides that are divided into 18 major categories. 
A descriptive index is available. Everyone is 
invited to come by between 9 am and 5 pm, have 
some coffee, and enjoy the collection. 

THE COMPUTER SCIENCE FACULTY at USCS will present 
a free career workshop Tuesday (April 21) in 
the Hodge Center at 7 p.m. The seminar is 
designed to give high school juniors and seniors 
a basic idea of what computer science majors 
learn, and enlighten them about career oppor- 
tunities in the computer field. Anyone in- 
terested in obtaining an undergraduate computer 
degree may attend the program, but should con- 
tact Andy Crosland for reservations. 

THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS will hold a symposium on 
the Reagan Economic program today (April 20) 
from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in Tukey Lecture 
Theatre. Dr. Michael Jilling and Dr. John 
McAlhany will give the presentations. Topics 
will include "Inflation: The U.S. Experience," 
"Inflation: What Can be Done About It?" and 
"Supply Side Economics." The general public 
may also sit in on any sessions. 

THE MARY BLACK SCHOOL OF NURSING will host its 
fifth annual Alumni Day Workshop April 23. 
Author and nationally known speaker M. Lucille 
Kinlein, R.N., M.S.N.E., will present a pro- 
gram on "Self Care: A Nursing Practice Strategy." 
Registration for the day-long workshop will 
begin at 8:30 a.m. in the Tukey Lecture Theatre. 
A $20 fee includes lunch and workshop materials. 
For additional information call Addie Kloepper. 
"I 

...Bulletin Board continued.. 



...BULLETIN BOARD continued... 

ROBERT W. HEMPHILL, Senior U.S. District 
Court Judge for the South Carolina District, 
will address a class at USCS on Friday, May 
1. The class in Judicial Process will meet 
in Tukey Lecture Theatre at 9:30 a.m. and 
the public is invited. Judge Hemphill's 
visit is in connection with Law Day and he 
is expected to speak on the Constitution and 
the American Court System. Appointed by 
President Johnson, Mr. Hemphill has served as 
U.S. District Court Judge since 1964. He 
represented South Carolina's fifth Congress- 
ional District from 1957 to 1964. 

ON MONDAY, Tuesday, and Wednesday, April 20, 
21, and 22, Interstate United will have 
their fast food cart in the Hodge Center 
from 10:00-2:00. The menu for those three 
days will be: Mon. Footlong Hot Dogs, Tues. 
Barbeque, Wed. Hot Soup and Sandwiches. 
Please stop by for a hot and tasty lunch. 

FORMER SOUTH CAROLINA GOVERNOR John C. West, 
the outgoing United States ambassador to 
Saudi Arabia will address a class at 
USCS on Monday, April 27. The class, which 
has been involved in a semester-long dis- 
cussion of the 1981 Great Decisions topics, 
will meetinTukey Lecture Theatre at 12:30 
p.m. Mr. West is scheduled to speak on his 
personal experiences as ambassador and to 
describe the current situation in the 
Middle East. His visit was arranged by 
W.J. Bryan Dorn, Distinguished Lecturer 
in American Politics at the university. 
A democrat from Kershaw County, Mr. West 
was governor of S.C. from 1971-1975. Prior 
to his governorship, Mr. West served as a 
member of the state senate and lieutenant 
governor. The public is invited to attend 
the class. 

FROM DOYLE BOGGS: The Office of Information 
Services would like to apologize to Lyle 
Campbell, whose name was omitted from the 
list of Science Fair co-directors in some 
of the publicity about this year's silver 
anniversary event. Also, as Jack Turner 
completes an extremely successful five-year 
tenure as fair director, I would like to 
thank him for all his cooperation in our 
efforts to gain favorable publicity for the 
university. With the help of all the faculty 
of the Division of Science and Mathematics, 
he has made the fair one of USCS' most note- 
worthy contributions to the community. 



THE READING CLINIC in cooperation with Develop 
mental Studies is offering two SUMMER READING 
PROGRAMS this year. These 3-week programs 
are designed for grade level students and stu-{ 
dents with mild reading difficulties. The fee! 
is sixty dollars ($60.00) for the general 
public or fifty dollars ($50.00) for faculty 
and staff. For further information call Joyce 
Miller at ext. 344 or Dr. Jane Davisson at 
ext. 343. 

FROM TOM ALLEN: Softball season is upon us. TJJ 
year USCS shall compete again in the Twilight! 
Softball League. The league, however, has been 
completely revamped; and, it promises to be ' 
even more competitive than last year. Our firs 
two practices are scheduled for Tuesday, April 
21 and Wednesday, April 22. Both will be at j 
5:00 p.m. on the field behind the Media Buildi 
The season starts earlier than last year. In 
fact, it starts with a preseason tourney on 
April 29, 30, and May 1. (One week after 
practice!) The regular season commences the 
following Wednesday, May 6. This means that 
the scheduled practices will be extremely 
important for organizing the team. We'll pro- 
vide more details on the league and the new 
rule changes on next Tuesday. The team is oper 
to all faculty and staff as well as their 
spouses. If you are interested, please call 
either Tom Allen at ext. 375 or M.B. Ulmer 
at ext. 216. 

A SLIDE LECTURE on "Berne, Switzerland— A 
Medieval City Today" will be presented by 
Professor Erdmann Schmocker of the Illinois 
Institute of Technology, Chicago, on Wednesday 
April 22, at both 12:30 and 7:30 in Tukey 
Lecture Theatre. The lectures will open an 
exhibit on Berne in the USCS Library, which wi 
run through May 15. Schmocker says he hopes tfi 
presentation and exhibit will help people 
realize that a city need not be destroyed and 
rebuilt, but that "you can adapt and change 
an old city and make it work." 

THE SHEPHERD'S CENTER in connection with the 
Spartanburg Sesqui centennial will be sponsorir 
a number of programs this spring showing the 
forces and events which shaped the develop- 
ment of this area over the past two centuries. 
The program this week will be on Wednesday 
at 11:00 a.m. in the Chapel of the First 
Presbyterian Church. The guest speaker will 
be Mr. Robert L. Stoddard, former mayor, city 
of Spartanburg, and attorney. He will be 
speaking on Political Figures of the Past. 
The public is invited. 



III. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION NEWS 



IV. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES' 



"VENEZUELA: Will Petrowealth Ensure Economic 
Growth and Political Stability?" will be the 
topic of a luncheon address in Atlanta, 
Wednesday, April 29, 1981, given by Mr. 
Perez-Chiriboga, Ambassador to the U.S. from 
Venezuela. For additional information, con- 
tact Jim Brown, L-236, ext. 433. Venezuela 
plays a leading role in the economy of 
Central American and the Caribbean Basin 
and is vying with Cuba to become a pre- 
dominant force in the region. The country 
has given billions of dollars in project 
loans and foreign aid in an attempt to pro- 
mote stability and democracy in the area. 
However, with the highest per capita GNP in 
South America, Venezuela is still having 
difficulty in distributing its oil money in 
a manner which benefits the 30% of the popu- 
lation still living in poverty. 

AFRICA IN THE 1980s will be the topic of a 
symposium at Spelman College, Atlanta, 
Thursday evening, April 23, 1981. The sym- 
posium is the last in the Southern Center 
for International Studies' series on sub- 
saharan Africa. The featured speaker will be 
Donald F. McHenry, former US Ambassador to 
the UN. For further information, contact 
Jim Brown, L-236, ext. 433. 

SPONSORED FOREIGN STUDENTS in the sciences or 
technologies may be interested in a special 
ten-week summer academic preparation program 
on the Columbia campus, June 5-August 15, 
1981. The main focus of the program will be 
science, and is intended for those already 
proficient in use of English. The cost, in- 
cluding room and board, is $5000. Any foreign 
student interested should contact his spon- 
sor regarding authorization, and sponsors 
should notify the Office of International 
Services no later than Friday, May 1st of 
their desire to request one of the 100 seats 
in the program. For further information con- 
tact the Office of International Services in 
Columbia, 7-7461. 

INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS: Rapid urban growth is 
common throughout the Third World. Cairo, 
.agos, Jakarta and Mexico City are among the 
fastest growing cities in the world. But 
3nly in Latin America do cities contain the 
najority, or nearly the majority of the 
national population. For example, in Veneuzela 
50% of the people live in cities of 100,000 
3r more, Mexico 51%, Argentina 61%. According 
to the Population Action Council, half of the 
(vorld's population will live in cities by the 



FROM MAXINE MILLER, I would like to express 
my appreciation for the kindness and sympathy 
shown me during the recent loss of my husband. 
Your warmth and friendship mean a great deal 
to me. -Maxine Miller and family. 

JIM BROWN attended the Executive Committee and 
Board meetings of the Southeastern States 
Association of Asian and African Studies 
(SASASAAS), April 10-12, in Atlanta. Among the 
Board's actions was the purchase of several 
films on Japan, which will be added to the 
SASASAAS film library. SASASAAS films are 
available free of charge to member institutions. 
A catalogue of these films is available in 
Audio-Visuals. 

SHARON CHERRY took her Spanish 202 class to 
perform in the Festival, or non-competitive, 
portion of Dionysia, Clemson University's 
annual drama competiton for foreign language 
students, on April 11. The nine students pre- 
sented two scenes from contemporary Spanish 
plays. 

REGIS ROBE attended the 1981 Foreign Drama 
Festival at Clemson University on April 10 
and 11 where he served as a judge for the 
French contest. 

ED WHITE has just had a new science reader 
published by OBSERVE, Inc. of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. Classifying in a supplemental test 
for students in grades 3-6 which provides 
background information on the process of 
classifying. Another reader for grades 1-3, 
Growing Seeds , will be published in early 
May, 1981. 

ELIZABETH BROWN attended the University of 
N.C. -Chapel Hill's "Black Scholars and Scholar- 
ship" Conference on April 3-4. Elizabeth also 
wasthe guest speaker for Special Services 
Awards Night at SMC on April 15. 

BILL BRUCE AND ED WHITE directed the Science 
for Middle and Junior High School Conference 
held at USCS April 10-11, 1981. The conference 
was jointly sponsored by the S.C. Middle 
School Association (President, Bill Bruce) and 
the Palmetto (NSF) Middle Junior H.S. Project 
(Director, Ed White) . 

...Faculty/Staff Notes 

continued. . . 



.FACULTY/STAFF NOTES continued. 



ASSISTANT PROFESSOR EMERITUS Jim Sloan was on 
campus Saturday, April 11, attending the 
Annual Conference of the S.C. Political Science 
Association. As a retired professor, Jim is an 
honorary member of the association. You may 
recall that Jim underwent serious colon cancer 
surgery last May 30. He sent his best regards 
to all of his colleagues, expressing sincere 
appreciation for their many expressions of 
concern-flowers, cards and letters, visits, 
phone calls, and their prayers. Jim seems to 
have snapped back admirably since his 
indisposure. Last November, as chairman of 
the Laurens County Election Commission, he 
presided over the election manager training 
session and conducted the General Election. 
In December, Jim and Alice, spent four days 
at The Princess in Bermuda. He attends the 
quarterly meetings of the Board of Trustees 
of the John de la Howe School, serving as 
the Board's secretary. In recent months he 
has prepared more than 15 articles for the 
History of Laurens County , now being compiled. 
He teaches the Men's Bible Class each Sunday 
at Clinton's Associate Reformed Presbyterian 
church. On Friday, April 17, Jim and Alice 
left on British Airways from Dulles Airport 
for a three-week trip to England and Scotland 
(mostly Scotland, he says) to study his and 
his church's roots around Edinburgh, Sterling, 
Perth, Kinross and Dunfermline. The Sloans 
will return on the Queen Elizabeth II. Jim's 
quarterly check-ups by Charleston doctors 
afford time for crabbing at Breach Inlet, 
one of Jim's hobbies, along with traveling, 
boiling peanuts, playing Roy Acuff records, 
and reading historical books, especially 
biographies. Of course his and Alice's 
happiest moments are spent entertaining their 
pride and joy, their 20-month-old grandson, 
James Park Sloan IV, Edwin's boy. It comes 
as no surprise that the Sloans' Olds 98 
car tag reads "JPS-IV." 



DR. JOHN EDMUNDS, professor of history, was 
elected president of the South Carolina 
Historical Society at its annual meeting 
in Charleston recently. Dr. Edmunds is 
also the author of a profile of Spartanburg 
which appeared in the publication "Faces 
of South Carolina." 

DR. MIRIAM SHELDEN, associate professor of 
physical education, has been named to 
represent women's athletic programs in five 
Southern states on the National Executive 
Board of the Association for Intercollegiat 
Athletics for Women (AIAW). 



uses- 'THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, APRIL 20 — SUNDAY, APRIL 26, 1981 



NATIONAL SECRETARIES WEEK 

MONDAY, April 20 

9:00-2:30 p.m. -- Symposium for high school students on Reagans Economic Program. Tukey 
Lecture Theatre. Contact Mike Jilling for more information. 

TUESDAY, April 21 

5:00 p.m. -- Softball practice for the USCS Twilight League Softball team. Will be held on 
the field behind the media building. Contact person - Tom Allen or M.B. Ulmer. 

7:00 p.m. -- Criminal Justice Career Workshop. Hodge Center Gymnasium. Contact Andy Crosland 
for more information. 

WEDNESDAY, April 22 

12:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. -- "Berne, Switzerland, A Medieval City Today." -lecture and slide 
presentation by Erdmann Schmocker. Tukey Lecture Theatre. Exhibit on Berne in Library will 
run through May 15. Contact person - Jim Brown. 

3:00-4:30 p.m. -- Publications Board meeting. Library 272. 

5:00 p.m. -- Softball practice for the USCS Twilight League Softball team. Will be held on 
the field behind the media building. Contact person - Tom Allen or M.B. Ulmer. 

mURSDAY, April 23 
8:30-5:00 p.m. -- Nursing Alumni Day. Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact person - Addie Kloepper. 

-RIDAY, April 24 

12:00-5:00 p.m. -- Spring Sports Day. Activities at the Hodge Center and the Activities 
Building. Contact person - Jerry Baker. 







'OL. V, N. 30 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS Apm n, i98i 



:. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

'HE ACADEMIC FORWARD PLANNING committee will 
leet Wednesday, April 29 at 12:30 p.m. in 
■257. Contact person - Ron Sobczak. 

'ROM VERGENE COLLOMS, Graduation Marshall: 
Jl faculty are requested to be in the 
[odge Center upstairs, to line up for the 
irocessional at 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, May 17. 
Iring your cap and gown. 

'ROM TOM DAVIS: Our annual Honors Day pro- 
;ram will be held Friday, May 1, 1981, at 
2:30 p.m. in the gym. Since attendance is 
isually low, faculty are encouraged to 
ittend and make every effort to bring their 
itudents. Recipients of awards should be 
lOtified to attend by the academic depart- 
lent or school making the presentation. 

HE COMMENCEMENT SPEAKER at USCS this year 
111 be United States Senator Mark 0. Hatfield. 
e is now chairman of the Senate Appropriations 
ommittee and one of the most senior Republican 
lembers of Congress. In order to avoid con- 
licts with other commencements in the Univer- 
ity System and to make it possible for Senator 
atfield to speak, it was necessary to schedule 
ur exercies for 7 p.m. on Sunday night. May 
7. All faculty and staff are also reminded of 
he Alumni Association reception which will 
ollow the program, and also of the Mary Black 
chool of Nursing's Pinning and Capping 
eremony, which will be held at First Presby- 
erian Church of Spartanburg at 7 p.m. on 
ay 15. 



BULLETIN BOARD 



Campus News 



HE COUPLES BRIDGE CLUB will meet May 8, at 
:30 p.m. in the Activities Building. Please 
.S.V.P. to "Muffet" Sansbury, 579-0322, and 
Ian to bring a covered dish. 



FORMER S.C. governor John C. West, the outgoing 
U.S. ambassador to Saudi Arabia will address 
a class at USCS today (April 27) at 12:30 p.m. 
in Tukey Lecture Theatre. Mr. West is scheduled 
to speak on his personal experiences as ambas- 
sador and to describe the current situation in 
the Middle East. His visit was arranged by W. 
J. Bryan Dorn. Everyone is invited to attend 
the address, more informatnion may be obtained 
by contacting Ron Romine. 

ROBERT W. HEMPHILL, Senior U.S. District Court 
Judge for the S.C. District, will address a 
class at USCS on May 1 (Friday) . The class in 
Judicial Process will meet in Tukey Lecture 
Theatre and everyone is welcome to attend. 
Judge Hemphill's visit is in connection with 
Law Day and he is expected to speak on the 
Constitution and the American Court System. 
Appointed by President Johnson, Mr. Hemphill 
has served as U.S. District Court Judge since 
1964. He represented South Carolina's fifth 
Congressional District from 1957 to 1964. 

A TALK ON THE 'Psychophysiology of Aging' will 
be given by Dr. Gail Marsh of Duke University's 
Center for the Study of Aging and Human Develop- 
ment on April 29, at 12:30 p.m. For more infor- 
mation contact Gordon Mapley and Evan Krauter. 

FROM ARTHUR GEORGE: A limited number of student 
assistant positions may be funded on campus 
this summer. As you probably know, workstudy 
slots are few for the summer. If you need a 
student helper in your office, we may be able 
to help. Contact the Placement Office for 
details at ext. 414. A few departments on cam- 
pus have already written job descriptions and 
have asked me to consider placing a student 
in their office this summer. 

SPARTANBURG 70001 WAS AWARDED the Bronze Chap- 
ter Award at the Fifth National Emplojmient and 
Training Seminar held in Chicago, 111., April 
12-16, 1981. The award recognizes Spartanburg 
70001 as being the third, from a field of 55, 
most effective 70001 chapter in the nation. 

. . .continued. . . 



...Bulletin Board continued... 

Spartanburg 70001 helps 16-21 year old 
economically disadvantaged school dropouts 
to prepare for, find and keep unsubsidized 
jobs in the private sector. It is spon- 
sored by Spartanburg County Council and 
administered by the University of South 
Carolina at Spartanburg. 

THE 502 RESUME & INTERNVIEWING WORKSHOP 
series will begin within a few days. Please 
encourage your students to attend at least 
one section of the series, if they did not 
attend the 501 series last semester: 

Tuesday, April 28 — 9:25-10:40, 1:40-2:55, 

and 4:20-5:30. 
Wednesday, April 29 ~ 10:30-11:30, 12:20- 

1:45, 4:30-5:30. 
Thursday, April 30 — 10:50-12:05, 3:05- 

4:20, 4:20-5:30. 
Monday, May 4 ~ 9:30-10:20, 11:30-12:20, 

4:30-5:30. 

All sessions will be held in Media 218. 
For more information contact Arthur George. 

DR. BILL HAMMILL, a cardiologist at Spartan- 
burg General Hospital, will be the speaker 
at this weeks Health and Wellness Program 
seminar. Dr. Hammill is the director of 
Spartanburg General's Cardiac Rehabilitation 
program in addition to his private practice. 
He has also been instrumental in trying to 
obtain an open heart surgery unit and its' 
capabilities for the hospital. Dr. Hammill 
will be discussing heart disease, the risk 
factors, and methods to minimize these 
factors and rehabilitate from heart disease 
and its effects. Dr. Hammill, as a result 
of his job functions, must keep current 
with new developments within this area and 
will be able to provide some of this new 
information. Anyone is invited to attend 
this seminar which will be held this 
Wednesday, April 29 at 12:30-1:30 in 
M-218. Contact person: Bruce Wilson, ext. 
336. 

DR. PERRY ASHLEY, Director of Research at 
the College of Journalism at USC-Columbia 
was on campus last week to discuss the 
possibility of offering a Master of Mass 
Communications degree through the USCS 
Graduate Regional Studies program. Con- 
siderable interest has been expressed by 
members of the working news media and 
various public information officers in the 
area, and it seems possible that the first 



course might be offered as early as next fal 
If you know of anyone who might have a poten 
tial interest in these courses, have him or 
her contact Dr. Judith Prince in Graduate 
Regional Studies. 

THE SPARTANBURG BOARD OF REALTORS honored 
three USCS students on Thursday, April 21, 
for their winning essays submitted in a con- 
test. The essay contest entitled "How Freedo 
to Own Property Will Affect my Future." 
warded cash prizes to Hazel Smith, 1st place 
$100.00; Linda Tate, 2nd place, $50.00; and 
Tim Mitchum, 3rd place, $25.00. The students 
submitted the essays in conjunction with a 
class project. Hazel Smith and Tim Mitchum 
are students of Emmanual Seko, Linda Tate 
is a student of Nancy Moore. Seko and Moore 
were also honored for being the teachers. 
Seki was awarded a $100.00 cash prize. The 
presentation was made at a lunch at the 
Holiday Inn. 



B. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION NEWS 

TEACH ABROAD: Fulbright award openinings for 
1981-83 have been announced. The awards 
generally are for a year of teaching in a 
university in another country and normally 
cover roundtrip travel for the individual ani 
one dependent, a maintenance allowance for 
family living costs, and an "incidentals" 
allowance. In some cases foreign language 
competance is required. The dates for applic 
tions are June 1, 1981 for the American 
Republics, Australia, and New Zealand; and 
July 1, 1981 for Africa, Asia, and Europe. 
The American Republics, Africa, Asia, and 
Eastern Europe receive less demand, and late 
applications for these areas are often 
accepted. One does not have to be "a well- 
known scholar in his field" to receive a 
Fulbright and anyone interested in such teacl 
ing (for which one can usually take a leave 
of absence from USCS) should consider applyi: 
For further information contact the Council 
for International Exchange of Scholars, II 
Dupont Circle, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20036, ( 
Jim Brown, L-236, ext. 433. 

A "HOUSE OF FESTIVALS" will be held at Templ( 
B'nai Israel, Sunday, May 3rd, 1-5 p.m. and 
Monday, May 4th, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The festii 
will depict and explain the major Jewish 
holidays, for the better understanding of 
the non-Jewish community. There is no charge 
and everyone is welcome. 



, continued. 



•Bullatin Board continued... 

INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS: The U.S. has become 
the world's No. 1 tourist attraction, taking 
in $8.3 billion in tourist dollars during 
1979. Italy was a close second, taking in 
$8.2 billion; France followed with $6.8 
billion. West German tourists were the 
world's biggest spenders, leaving $18 
billion behind in various countries, with 
U.S. travellers a distant second, spending 
$9.4 billion. 



III. FACUT.TY/STAFF NOTES 

TOM GUNTER, Dean of the School of Business, 
spoke to the regular meeting of the Spartan- 
burg Sales and Marketing Executives Associa- 
tion on April 21. His topic was "So What's 
New in Marketing and Marketing Education — 
A Look Into the Future." 

EB BARNES eggspected an eggceptional eggers- 
cize in eggtemporaneous eggspertise and 
eggemplary eggecution in Wednesday's 1st 
Annual Egg Catch eggshibited by the Engineer- 
ing Society. Eggscuses eggsuded from eggspect- 
ant egg catchers as eggs eggsploded over their 
eggsteriors. . .with the eggsception of Betsy 
Gregory whose eggsemplary eggshibition of 
eggscelance gave her the winning catch. It 
was an eggsceptional eggsperience. 

MEMBERS OF THE Mary Black School of Nursing 
Faculty recently completed a slide/tape 
presentation complete with a script booklet 
entitled "Starring Carrie in her First 
Operation." The presentation is designed to 
orient children to the hospital and prepare 
them for the surgical experience and to 
orient student nurses to the pediatric unit. 
The slide/film was made at Spartanburg 
General Hospital and first presented on 
i^pril 17. Faculty participants were Betty 
Davis and daughter, Judy Kugler, Catherine 
Talley and son, Mary Strossner and daughter, 
Glenda Sims, Holly Crocker, Nancy Babb, 
Norma Hendra and Brenda Harden. Alan and 
Becky Gray did the photography and graphics, 
^lan also participated in the film, while 
Eleanor Ladd acted as the narrator. It was 
directed by Judy Kugler, while Brenda Harden 
vas responsible for the script. 

ElON ROMINE was elected president of the S.C. 
Political Science Association on April 11. 
rhe association held their meeting at USCS, 
ion says it was very successful. 



BRYANT REEVES attended the S.C. Association of 
College Stores annual meeting on April 9, 10 
and 11. Bryant was elected vice president of 
the association to serve during the upcoming 
year. The meeting was held in Charleston, S.C. 

LAWRENCE MOORE, Ron Sobczak and Barry Parris 
attended the American Chemical Society National 
meeting in Atlanta, March 30 and 31. 

ARTHUR GEORGE attended the Spring meeting of 
the South Carolina College Placement Associa- 
tion in Charleston last week. He is serving 
as treasurer of the association. 

Dr. James E. "Eb" Barnes and his wife Maggie 
have been named Danforth Associates. The 
Danforth Foundation recently announced the 
appointment of 531 persons in colleges and 
universities throughout the United States to 
the Danforth Associate Program. Activities 
of the Foundation traditionally have emphasized 
the theme of improving the quality of teaching 
and learning. Dr. Barnes joined the USCS 
faculty in 1974 and teaches physics, astronomy, 
and engineering. He received his Ph.D. from 
Clemson University. Mrs. Barnes works in the 
Spartanburg community as a weaver, natural dyer 
and spinner, giving demonstrations at the 
public schools and state parks. Her work has 
been exhibited at shows in N.C., S.C. and 
Georgia, where she has won numerous awards for 
technical excellence. The Barnes have three 
children, Katie, Dick and Beth, who participate 
in crafts work with both their parents. 

NANCY I. KAPLAN (nursing) has become certified 
as a critical care nurse, as a result of 
passing the national certification exam. The 
initials CORN are now part of her legal 
title. 




INTRA-OFFICE MEMO 



Date: 



A pril 21. 1981 



To: 
From: 



Doyle Boggs 



Campus: Spartanburg 



Treva Hamrick ,-p/ , ff^Ci^rt<^'^L^'^^:>-^ Campus: Spartanburg 



For Next Issue of FYI 



TRAINING SEMINARS OFFERED FOR UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEES 

S. C. State Personnel Division, sponsors training programs each month for 
state employees. The following is a list of programs to be held throughout 
the state during the month of May. Interested University employees should 
contact the USCS Personnel Office for further information. 



DATE : 

May 1 

May 5-6 

May 5-6 

May 5,6 

May 7-8 

May 12-13 

May 12-14 

May 14 
May 14-15 
May 25-26 
May 26 
May 26-27 
May 28-29 
May 28-29 
May 29 



WORKSHOP TITLE : LOCATION : 

Effective Time Management Greenville 

Data Processing Concepts Columbia 

Performance Appraisal Santee 

& 7 Supervision for the 80' s Anderson 

Introduction to Personnel Administration Florence 
How to Get By With Less: A New Era of 

Mangement Beaufort 
Advanced Cobol Programming with 

Structured Techniques Columbia 

Records Keeping Santee 

Managerial Interpersonal Relations Charleston 

Data Base Concepts Columbia 

Dynamics of Effective Leadership Greenville 

Written Communication Conway 

Written Communication Charleston 

Human Relations Columbia 

Fixed Asset Accounting Columbia 



uses- -THIS WEEK 

MONDAY, APRIL 27 — SUNDAY, May 3, 1981 

)NDAY, April 27 

12:30 p.m. -- 50 Minutes Class. Guest speaker: Former S.C. governor John West, outgoing 
ambassador to Saudi Arabia. Tukey Lecture Theatre. 

JESDAY, April 28 - no events scheduled 

EDNESDAY, April 29 

?:30 p.m. -- "Psychophysiology of Aging" -lecture by Dr. Gail Marsh, Duke University. Activities 
Building. Contact persons: Gordon Mapley or Evan Krauter. 

?:30 p.m. -- Academic Forward Planning Committee meeting. L257. Contact person: Ron Sobczak. 

?:30 p.m. -- Health and Wellness Program. Guest speaker Bill Hanmill, cardiologist at 
Spartanburg General Hospital. M218. Contact person: Bruce Wilson. 

MSDAY, April 30 - no events scheduled 

gPAY. May 1 

9:30 a.m. -- Law Day Convocation. Speaker: Robert W. Hemphill, U.S. District Court Judge. 
Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact person: Ron Romine. 

12:30 p.m. -- Honors Day Program. Hodge Center Gym, Contact person: Tom Davis. 




s*. 






ol. V, No. 31 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS May 6, i98i 



. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

HE FACULTY ADVISORY COMMITTEE will meet 
ednesday. May 6, from 12:30-1:30 p.m. in the 
acuity Conference room. Administration Bldg. 

HE INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION ADVISORY Committee 
ill meet Wednesday, May 6, at 4:45 p.m. in 
he Activities Building. 

LL FACULTY: Grades for all graduating 
eniors are due at 12 noon on May 8, in the 
ecords Office. Grades for all other 
tudents must be turned in by 9:00 a.m. on 
ay 18. 

LL FACULTY AND STAFF: The items listed 
elow could not be located during the recent 
nventory of equipment on campus. If you 
row where the equipment is, or have any 
nowledge of the equipment, please contact 
ill Blum, ext. 271. 

1) Control Dissolve Media Master USC#114276 

2) Recorder Reel to Reely Sony USC#133351 

3) Amplifier Bogan USC#138086 

4) Hydraulic Floor Jack (Black Hawk) 

USC#147322 

3ISITI0N AVAILABLE: Secretary to the Project 
dministrator of Spartanburg 70001, to per- 
Drm a variety of general office functions 
slating to the project. Grade 14; $8,071. 
nterested applicants should contact the 
5CS Personnel Office for more information. 

HE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF USCS has just 
stablished a $400. scholarship for a 1981 
igh school graduate. We would appreciate 
^le help of the faculty and staff in en- 
Duraging worthy students to apply. The 
cholarship will be awarded on the basis of 
articipation in high school activities, 
itizenship, and scholarship. For further 
iformation contact the USCS Admissions 
ffice or Charles Stavely. 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 

A. Campus 

FROM CHRIS FRYE: Interstate United will have 
their hot food cart in the Hodge Center on 
Monday, May 4, with foot-long hotdogs and 
on Tuesday, May 5, with barbeque. They will be 
in the Hodge Center between 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 
p.m. Take a break between classes and try one 
out. 

A FACULTY SALAD AND SANDWICH BAR Luncheon will 
be held on Thursday, May 7, from 11:30 until 
1:00 in the Student Activities Building. It 
will honor outgoing Faculty Secretary Eb Barnes 
and faculty who are leaving USCS at the end of 
this year. Cost will be $1.25, to be paid at 
the luncheon. Sign up on the lists by your 
mailboxes. Further information is available 
from Alice Henderson. 



B. INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION NEWS 

FULBRIGHT AWARDS: Promising students who will 
graduate by summer 1982 should be made aware 
of the opportunities available through Ful- 
bright Grants for Graduate Study Abroad. 
The 1982-83 competition has recently been 
announced. Approximately 516 awards to 50 
countries will be available. Applicants must 
be U.S. citizens at the time of application, 
who will generally hold a bachelor's degree 
or its equivalent before the beginning date 
of the grant and, in most cases, will be 
proficient in the language of the host 
country. This year we had a Rhodes Scholar, 
so why not think about Fulbright possibilities. 
Last year the Fulbright Committee failed to 
award a single grant to a South Carolinian. 
There is an initial screening -by USCS, which 
would be done next fall. For further infor- 
mation send prospective students to Dr. Alice 
Henderson, USCS Fulbright Program Advisor, 
L-201, ext. 331. 



. . .continued. . . 



...Bulletin Board continued... 

DO RESEARCH IN INDIA: The Indo-U.S. Sub- 
commission on Education and Culture is offer- 
ing 12 long term (6-10 months) and nine 
short-term (2-3 months) research awards for 
1982-83 without restriction as to field. The 
fellowship program seeks to open new channels 
of communication between academic and pro- 
fessional groups in the U.S. and India, and 
to encourage a wider range of research 
activity between the two countries than has 
existed previously. Scholars and professionals 
who have limited or no experience in India 
are especially encouraged to apply. The 
application deadline is July 1, 1981. For 
further information contact Jim Brown, L-336, 
ext. 433. 



ELIZABETH BROWN hosted a covered dish supper 
at Key Pines Clubhouse for SEGL 291 class 
on April 24. Students ate and danced until 
the cows came home. 



INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS: As a result of improved 
relations with China, gardeners and farmers 
in the U.S. can look forward to improvements 
in crops and perhaps some new types of 
crops. China is an extremely rich source 
of plant germ plasm, according to a repre- 
sentative of the U.S. Agriculture Depart- 
ment vegetable laboratory in Charleston, and 
U.S. scientists are bringing back seed and 
life specimens from many types of plants. 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 



ON SATURDAY, April 25, Guy Jacobsohn partici- 
pated in the March of Dimes - 30 km WALK-A- 
THON held in Spartanburg. He collected $60.00 
in pledges for this event. 

HOLLY CROCKER was guest speaker on April 27 
to three home economic classes at Boiling 
Springs High School. Her topic was Self 
Breast Examination. 

KATHY FITZPATRICK, School of Business, spoke 
to the regular meeting of the Spartanburg 
Credit Women on April 21. Her topic was 
"Women in Management." 

MICHAEL DRESSMAN (English) presided at the 
afternoon session of this year's annual 
one-day conference of the North and South 
Carolina Association of Linguists (NASCAL) 
in Columbia, April 11. He led a discussion 
on current trends in linguistic textbooks 
and curricula. He is also the editor of 
the NASCAL Newsletter. 



USCS--THIS WEEK 



Monday, May 4 -- Sunday, May 10, 1981 



ND AY, May 4 

00-9:00 p.m. -- Continuing Education "Self Defense for Women." Monday and Wednesday, May 4-27, 
Fee - $20. Hodge Center gym. Contact: John May, ext. 422. 

00-8:00 p.m. -- Lecture/workshop - "Weaving: Natural Dyes and Spinning." Tukey Lecture 
Theatre. Contact: Katie Hicks. 

00-9:00 p.m. -- Weaving exhibit and opening reception. Library Art Gallery. Contact: Katie 
Hicks. 

ESD AY, May 5 

30-9:30 a.m. -- Continuing Education "Jazzercise." Tuesday and Thursday, May 5-28. Fee - $15. 
Hodge Center Gym. Contact: John May, ext. 422. 

DNESDAY. May 6 

:30-l:30 p.m. -- Faculty Advisory Committee meeting. Faculty Conference room. Administration 
Building. 

45 p.m. -- International Education Advisory committee meeting. Student Activities Building. 

00-9:00 p.m. -- Continuing Education "How to Start and Manage a Small Business.'" May i and 
May 13. Fee - $25. M218. Contact: John May, ext. 422. 

JRS DAY, May 7 

:30-l:00 p.m. -- Faculty Salad and Sandvnch Bar. Student Activities Building. Contact: Alice 
Henderson. 

I DAY, May 8 
Noon - Grades are due in the Records Office. 




s*. 






VOL. V, No. 32 A Newsleiter For The Faculty Of USCS May ii, i98i 



I. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FROM VERGENE COLLOMS, Graduation Marshal : 
^^^ faculty are requested to be in the 
4odge Center upstairs to line up for the 
orocessional at 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, flay 17. 
Bring your cap and gown. 

FHE COMMENCEMENT SPEAKER at USCS this year 
vill be United States Senator Mark 0. 
Hatfield. He is now chairman of the Senate 
Appropriations Committee and one of the 
nost senior Republican members of Congress, 
[n order to avoid conflicts with other 
commencements in the University System and 
i:o make it possible for Senator Hatfield 
po speak, it was necessary to schedule 
)ur exercises for 7 p.m. on Sunday night, 
lay 17. All faculty and staff are also 

eminded of the Alumni Association re- 
:eption which will follow the program, 
ind also of the Mary Black School of Nurs- 

ng's Pinning and Capping Ceremony, which 
/ill be held at First Presbyterian Church 
>f Spartanburg at 7:30 p.m., on May 15. 

ROM ADMISSIONS: As the Spring Semester 
Iraws to a close the Admissions Office 
fould like to highlight some of the latest 
idmissions information. We are pleased to 
nnounce that the following students have 
een selected as Piedmont Scholars for 
981-82: Sherri Hardin - Boiling Springs 
.S., Pamela Pittman - Blue Ridge H.S., 
ebecca Bratton - Gaffney H.S., Tracie 
ettys - Spartanburg H.S. In addition 
;o these awards, 10 other area students 
ere selected as Commended Students and will 
eceive $100 scholarships next year. At 
his time the Admissions Office has visited 
ver 130 high schools and 2-year colleges, 
e have also contacted the National Merit 
emi-finalists and National Achievement 
cholarship Program for Outstanding Negro 
tudents Semi-finalists in our recruiting 
rea. In April over 125 high school stu- 
ents and counselors attended a Computer 



Science workshop sponsored jointly by Dr. Andy 
Crosland and the Admissions Office. An infor- 
mation display was set up at the area malls 
during December and April yielding very positive 
results from the communities involved. 

The continued goal of the Admissions Office is 
not only to increase our student body but to 
improve the quality of entering students as 
well. The continued support from faculty and 
staff will be needed if we are to accomplish 
this goal. We certainly appreciate the assis- 
tance that has been given to our recruiting 
effort this year and as we begin to plan for 
this fall's schedule if anyone has any suggest- 
ions that might improve our program please feel 
free to contact the Admissions Office, 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 

A, Campus 

THE FACULTY SPRING PICNIC will be held on 
Saturday, May 16, 1981 from 4:00-7:00 p,m, at 
the home of Alice and Don Henderson, f1ore details 
will be put in faculty mail boxes later. 

FROM THE SPARTANBURG HERALD, May 3: In Spartan- 
burg County High Schools, fewer than 50 per 
cent of the students in the 1978-79 school year 
in five of the seven school districts continued 
into post secondary (college or technical 
college) education. The figures were: School 
District 1 - 38,5%; School District 2 - 39%; 
School District 3 - 26,9%; School District 4 - 
34%; School District 5 - 45.5%; School District 
6 - 52,4%; School District 7 - 64,6%. 



B. GRANT NEWS 

GRANTS AWARDED: Two USCS faculty have been 
awarded research grants from the USC Research 
and Productive Scholarship Fund. Dr. Lyle 
Campbell (Geology) received $1,500 for his pro- 
ject, "Survey of the Mollusk fauna of the South 

continued, , , 



...Grant News continued... 

Carolina Scallop Beds". Dr. Jan Yehl 
(Psychology) received $1,760 for her 
project, "An Illustration of the Theory 
of Signal Detection as a Methodology to 
Assess Mediating Processes of Social 
Influence". CONGRATULATIONS, DRS. 
CAMPBELL AND YEHL! 



C. International Education News 

GERMAN STUDENT: Miss Cornelia Wagner, an 
eighteen-year-old German student, will 
come to the U.S. and take an English 
course at USCS during Summer Session II. 
She would like to have an American roommate 
or live with an American family. She will 
have use of a car and will pay for her 
living costs. If you would be interested in 
having her stay in your home, or if you 
know of any students who would like a 
roommate for SS II, please contact Jim 
Brown, L-236, ext. 433. 

NACEL (The North Atlantic Cultural Exchange 
League) is still looking for homes for 
French teenagers between July 16 and August 
13. (See FYI, Mary 16, 1981). The students 
range in age from 13 to 19, and live with 
American families to learn about American 
family life and practice their English. 
For more information contact Jim Brown, 
L-236, ext. 433. 

NATIONAL SECURITY will be the topic of two 
programs sponsored by the Southern Center 
for International Studies, in Atlanta. On 
Saturday, May 23, 9:30 am to 1:00 pm, at 
the Atlanta Historical Society, there will 
be a program on "National Security: Stra- 
tegic Options for the 1980s," which will 
include Dean Rusk, former Secretary of 
State; Lord Chalfont, former British Minis- 
ter of State for Foreign Affairs; General 
Bernard Rogers, U.S. Army & Supreme Allied 
Commander, Europe; Gerald Steibel, Director 
of Foreign Affairs for the Research Institute 
of America; and Drew Middleton, Military 
Correspondent for the New York Times . There 
will be another program, "The Navy and 
National Security in the 1980s," on Thursday, 
May 28, 1981, at 12:15 pm. The speaker will 
be Admiral Thomas B. Hayward, Chief of Naval 
Operations, US Navy. For further information 
on these programs contact Jim Brown, L-236, 
ext. 433. 



INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS: Nearly 30% of the 
world's population, 814 million people, 
cannot read or write, according to a UNICEF 
report. 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

JAN YOST has been selected as one of 25 
women administrators in South Carolina highe 
education to attend the S.C. American Counci 
on Education State Forum on "The Future of 
the Humanities: The Viewpoints of Post- 
secondary Administrators" at Fripp Island on 
June 4-5, 1981. 

LYLE CAMPBELL presented two papers: Animal 
Substrate Interrelationships in a Pliocene 
Shoal Complex; andPaleoecologic and Isotopi( 
Resolution of the Corbicula Problem in the 
Pliocene of Eastern North America, as part 
of a symposium on Coastal Plain Mollusks 
sponsored by the Southeastern section of 
the Paleontological Society, held March 
18-20 at Hattiesburg, Mississippi. 

THE LUNCHEON BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL 
WOMEN'S CLUB recently honored Mrs. Vivian 
Watson, the club's charter president and 
member of the staff of the Counseling and 
Career Development Center. Mrs. Watson was 
presented with a silver tray and a past 
president's pin. She will be attending the 
National B&PW Club convention in San 
Francisco in July. 




INTRA-OFFICE MEMO 



Date: Mav 5. 1981 



To: All Faculty Campus: Spartanburg 

From: Dr. Ron Eaglin ^ Campus: Spartanburg 



Subject: ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW (<^pp rPVPr<;p ^idp) 



Several faculty were interested in "normative" data of the 
annual administrative review of faculty. Similar data are 
available on each school/division at the dean's office. 



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uses- -THIS WEEK 



MONDAY, MAY 11 — SUNDAY, May 17, 1981 



)NDAY, May 11 

:00-ll:00 a.m. — EXAMS - All 8:30 a.m. M-W-F classes. 

):00-12 noon -- Continuing Education "Market Wizadry," Fee $12.00. M218, Contact person: John 
May. 



.:30-2:30 p.m. — EXAMS - All 11:30 a.m. M-W-F classes, 
00-6:00 p.m. — EXAMS - All 3:15 p.m. M-W classes. 
30-9:30 p.m. — EXAMS - All 5:30 p.m. T-TH classes. 



lESDAY. May 12 

00-11:00 a.m. — EXAMS - All 8:00 a.m. T-TH classes. 

.:30-2:30 p.m. — EXAMS - All 10:50 a.m. T-TH classes. 

00-6:00 p.m. — EXAMS - All 3:05 p.m. T-TH classes, 

30-9:30 p.m. — EXMAS - All 6:55 p.m. T-TH classes. 

30-8:00 p.m. -- Continuing Education "Personal Checkbook Reconciliation." Fee $5.00. M218. 
Contact person: John May. 

:DNESDAY, May 13 

00-11:00 a.m. — EXAMS - All 9:30 a.m. M-W-F classes. 

:30-2:30 p.m. — EXAMS - All 1:45 p.m, classes. 

:50 a.m. -- Spartanburg County Delegation of S.C. Network of Women Administrators in Higher 
Education meeting. Western Steer on Reidville Road. Contact person: Jan Yost. 

:15-2:30 p.m. -- Health and Awareness Luncheon. Activities Building. Contact person: Bruce 
Wilson. 



30-9:30 p.m. — EXAMS - All 6:55 p.m. M-W classes. 



URSDAY, May 14 

00-11:00 a.m. — EXAMS - All 9:25 a.m. T-TH classes. 

:30-2:30 p.m. — EXAMS - All 12:15 p.m. T-TH classes. 

30-9:30 p.m. — EXAMS - All 8:20 p.m. T-TH classes. 

30 p.m. -- State Women's Political Caucus meeting, Tukey Lecture Theatre. 



I 



FRIDAY, May 15 

8:00-11:00 a.m. — EXAMS - All 10:30 a.m. M-W-F classes, 

9:00-3:00 p.m. -- Student Teaching Seminar, Tukey Lecture Theatre. Contact person: Bill 
Reitmeier. 

11:30-2:30 p.m. — EXAMS - All 1:40 p.m, T-TH classes. 

12:00-2:00 p.m. — Maggie's Drawers Literary Contest Luncheon. Activities Building, Contact 
person: Don Knight, 

6:30-9:30 p.m. — EXAMS - All 8:20 p.m. M-W classes. 

7:00-11:00 p.m, -- Universal Love Banquet. Activities Building. 

7:30 p.m.,-- Nurses Pinning and Capping Ceremony. First Presbyterian Church of Spartanburg. 

i 

SATURDAY, May 16 

5:00 p.m. -- Outdoors Club Social. Activities Building. 

4:00-7:00 p.m. -- Faculty Spring Picnic. Alice and Don Henderson's home, 

SUNDAY, May 17 

7:00 p.m. -- Commencement Exercises. Hodge Center Gymnasium. 




7^ 



OL. V, No. 33 



A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS May is, i98i 



|. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

ROM PERSONNEL OFFICE: Special Reminders: 
I) Insurance changes due to marriage must 
b made within 31 days from the date of the 
arriage. 

) The addition of dependent children must 
e made within 31 days of birth or adoption. 
) If a spouse (who may or may not be a 
SCS employee) loses insurance coverage due 
D job change or termination of employment, 
he other spouse (who is a USCS employee) 
ay add those members of the family whose 
nsurance coverage terminated provided such 
dditions are made within 31 days of the 
oss of insurance coverage. 

ROM TREVA HAMRICK, Personnel Office: Checks 
or Summer I faculty will be paid in one 
heck and distributed July 9th. Checks for 
Limmer II faculty will be paid in two checks 
nd distributed July 31st and August 15th. 

DSITION AVAILABLE: Teachers Aide (Child 
2velopment Center); Assists the classroom 
sacher in all activities pertaining to the 
jpervision and the instruction of twenty 
re-school children in a lab school setting; 
rade 10, $6,899. Interested applicants 
nould contact the USCS Personnel Office 
Dr more information. 

^E AIKEN CAHPUS of the University of South 
jrolina invites nominations and applica- 
ions for the position of Acting Vice 
lancellor for Academic Affairs. Applicants 
3r this interim position should be 
/ailable from June 15, 1981 through July 
, 1982. Preferred qualifications include an 
irned doctorate with college level teaching 
id administrative experience. Applicants 
lould understand that the person chosen for 
lis position will be ineligible for the 
Jll-time position which will be searched 
1th: 1981-1982 academic year. To apply, 
lease send vita and a statement of experience 
): Professor Frankie Cubbedge, Vice Chair- 
;rson, Vice Chancellor Search Committee, 
5C Aiken, Aiken, S.C. 29801. 



II. BULLETIN BOARD 

A. Campus 

FROM STUDENT AFFAIRS - There is a possibility 
that Duke Power bus service directly to campus 
will be provided. The Student Affairs Office 
has prepared a questionnaire to help determine 
if there is sufficient demand for such service. 
If you are interested in riding the bus to 
USCS, please obtain a questionnaire from Student 
Affairs or the Personnel Office. A poster 
showing all routes and schedules is on display 
in Student Affairs. 

THIS WILL BE the last issue of FYI for May. 
Beginning with June 1, FYI will be published 
during the first week of each month until Fall 
semester. Deadlines for these issues will be 
May 28th for the June 1st issue, July 2nd for 
the July 7th issue, and July 30th for the 
August 3rd issue. Items to be published in 
FYI must be submitted in writing to the Office 
of Information Services by 5:00 p.m. on the 
date of the deadline. 



B. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

JO ELLA FANT of the Child Development Center 
will graduate from Dorman High School on May 
28, 1981. She has gone to night school for 
the past several years to accomplish this goal 
Congratulations to her on this achievement! 







VOL. V, No. 34 A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS June i, i98i 



. OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEriENTS 

)NDAY, JULY 6, will be an official university 
jliday. There will be no classes and all 
liversity offices will be closed. Final 
cams for Summer I classes will begin on 
jly 7, and end on July 8. Classes for 
jmmer II will begin on July 10. 

:W AUDIOVISUAL EQUIPMENT SCHEDULING: Beginning 
jne 1, the following new procedures will be 
jcessary for scheduling AV equipment. All 
)rtable equipment, i.e. anything other than 
jmm projectors or video equipment, will 
jve to be picked up from and returned to the 
jdiovisual Production Center (M-128). 16mm 
"ojectors and video cassette players will 
?main in each building, but films will have 
) be picked up from and returned to the APC. 
18 24 hour notice is still in effect and 
ist be followed more than ever. Budget 
its are responsible for these changes and 
i ask your assistance and encouragement in 
iking a smooth transition. -Becky Gray. 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

RON SOBCZAK spoke to the Greer running club 
on "Food Additives" on May 14. 

DR. JOSEPH C. BOWMAN has had an article 
accepted for publication in Athletic Journal . 
The name of the article is "Teaching the 
Forearm Pass in Volleyball" and will be 
published in the upcoming publishing year of 
1981-82. 

DR. EDWARD ANDERSON (part-time, English) was 
honored at commencement exercises at Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania on May 23. Dr. 
Anderson, who retired from that University 
before moving to Spartanburg, was awarded the 
title of Professor Emeritus" 

DR. MICHAEL DRESSMAN (English) was the 
featured speaker at the J.L. Mann High School 
Banquet at Furman University on May 18. 



:. BULLETIN BOARD 

\E NEXT ISSUE OF FYI is scheduled to appear 
1 July 7. Announcements for this issue 
lould be sent to Information Services, in 
-iting, no later than 5:00 p.m. on July 2. 



!ANT NEWS 

!ANT AWARD: USCS has received a grant of 
.7,279 to operate the Child Development 
inter this summer. Project Director: Ms, 
iidi From. Congratulations, Ms. From! 




Tfowt 



VOL. V, No. 



35 A Newsletter For The Faculty Of USCS J^^iy 7, i98i 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

^E NEXT ISSUE OF THE FACULTY/STAFF NEWSLETTER 
ni be published on August 3. Material should 
2 submitted to Infonnation Services by 5:00 p.m. 
n Thursday, July 30. Regular weekly publi- 
ation will resume on Monday, August 31. 

ROUNDBREAKING CEREMONIES for the new building 
ar the Mary Black School of Nursing will be 
eld on the construction site at 10:00 a.m. 
n Friday, July 24. The speaker will be 
overnor Riley, and many of the financial 
ontributors to this project will be present. 
11 faculty and staff are urged to attend the 
rief program and reception. 

LL FACULTY ARE REMINDED that examination 
chedules are published in the official class 
chedule. No final examination may be held 
utside of the stated time without the prior 
ermission of the Vice Chancellor for 
cademic Affairs. 

EW AUDIOVISUAL EQUIPMENT SCHEDULING: Beginning 
une 1, the following new procedures will be 
ecessary for scheduling AV equipment. All 
ortable equipment, i.e. anything other than 
5mm projectors or video equipment, will have 
be picked up from and returned to the Audio- 
isual Production Center (M-128). 16mm 
rejectors and video cassette players will 
■emain in each building, but films will have to 
'6 picked up from and returned to the APC. The 
4 hour notice is still in effect and must be 
ollowed more than ever. Budget cuts are 
esponsible for these changes and we ask your 
ssistance and encouragement in making a smooth 
transition. 



I. BULLETIN BOARD 



ISCS HAS BEEN CHOSEN as the site for one of five 
lational 1981-82 institutes for the American 
ssociation of Colleges of Teacher Education, 
he program will be held from October 14-16, 1981 
nd is scheduled to discuss "Multi-cultural 



education." "We are delighted that we will 
have the opportunity to host such a program," 
said Dr. Arthur Justice, Sr. , Dean of the 
USCS School of Education. "To my knowledge, 
this is the first time that the AACTC has 
selected a location in South Carolina for a 
national workshop." Dr. Justice said that 
about 100 deans, department heads, and 
faculty members from colleges all across 
the country can be expected to attend the 
institute. 

THE SOUTH CAROLINA STATE DATA CENTER was 
recently established to act as the primary 
clearina house in the state for Bureau of 
the Census Products. While the center will 
be in Columbia, the affiliate center and 
library in our area are: S.C. Appalachian 
Council of Governments, P.O. Box 6668, 
Greenville, SC 29606 - Tom Moore; 
Spartanburg County Library, 333 S. Pine 
St., Spartanburg, SC 29304 - Linda Morgan. 
For additional information, please contact 
Jan Yost. 

COLUMBIA, SC— SARA BARRETT FISHER, a former 
vice president with First National Bank of 
South Carolina, has been named the director 
of the University of South Carolina Credit 
Union. A graduate of Agnes Scott College 
and the S.C. Bankers School at Carolina, 
Ms, Fisher assumed her new duties May 26. 
As director, Ms. Fisher plans expansion of 
the services offered to members of the USC 
Credit Union and improvement in credit union 
services and facilities through a move to a 
recently renovated university property. 

GRANT PROPOSAL SUBMITTED: USCS has made 
application for a Special Services for Dis- 
advantaged Students grant program requesting 
$101,809 for next year. You will recall 
USCS had this grant program (known as CORE 
on our campus) in 78-79 and 79-80. The 
program involves providing special support 
services (developmental instruction, 
tutoring, and counseling) for economically, 
' culturally, academically, and/or handi- 
capped students. Project Director: 
Dr. Jane Davissoru 



II. BULLETIN BOARD (cont'd.) Hooks and Regional Administrator of the 

Small Business Administration, as the 
GRANT PROPOSAL SUBMITTED: A proposal, keynote speaker for the installation of 

"Great Decisions '81," requesting the Alliance's officers, May 17. 

$5,660 to bring guest lecturers on 
international issues to USCS has been 
submitted to the South Carolina Committee 
for the Humanities. Project Directors: 
Dr. Jim Brown and Dr. Alice Henderson. 



III. FACULTY/STAFF NOTES 

DR. ARTHUR JUSTICE, Dean of the School of 
Education at USCS, has been selected chair- 
man of the South Carolina Council of Education 
Deans for the 1981-82 school year. As such, 
he will serve in an advisory capacity for both 
the State Board of Education and the state's 
Education Improvement Task Force. Dr. Justice, 
who came to USCS in the fall of 1977, has 
served as the first Dean of USCS' School of 
Education since 1979. He holds his doctoral 
degree from Duke University and is a graduate 
of the prestigious Harvard Institute of 
Educational Management. 

JAN YOST has been appointed for a one-year 
term on the Leadership Spartanburg Board of 
Regents by Reddick Still, President of the 
Spartanburg Area Chamber of Commerce. Her 
selection was based on balloting by 
participants in the 1980-81 Leadership 
Spartanburg program. 

CHOONG LEE was awarded his Ph.D. in political 
science at commencement exercises at the 
University of Georgia, June 13. 

CECILIA McDANIEL BROWN has delivered two 
lectures on African sociocultural survival 
in the New World. As humanities scholar, 
she delivered the third lecture on June 14 
in a series co-sponsored by the Georgetown 
Association for the Study of Black Life and 
History. On May 28, she was guest lecturer 
for the South Spartanburg Sertoma Club. 
Ms. Brown has also provided socio-cultural 
background for four articles on the Yoruba 
Village in the Beaufort Gazette. She is 
also providing additional background for a 
mini -documentary on a related topic for 
national television this fall. Ms. Brown 
is also co-chairperson of the Spartanburg 
County Black Alliance. She engaged Richard 
Earl Barber, former Deputy Executive 
Director of the national NAACP under Benjamin 



FYI IS CHANGING 



Beginning with the September issues, FYI tentatively will become USCS--This Week , 
with a streamlined new look. Information Services plans to keep what is good 
about the current publication-- such as free access to all faculty and staff, 
but at the same time we want to take this opportunity to make changes that will 
make the newsletter more widely read. Please take a moment to answer the 
questions below and return to Information Services, or give feedback to Doyle 
Boggs (ext. 210). 

I. Is FYI widely read in your office or division/school? If not, what could be 
done to encourage faculty and staff to read USCS--This Week? What could be 
done to encourage faculty to pass appropriate information along to students? 

II. Considering the adverse budget situation that now exists, do you think the 
facul ty/stafi_a ewsle tj:j£r should be eliminated, made bi-weekly, reduced in 
size, or-( Wt as it isT ) ^ {W ^<v^^-*^«^^^^J^^ -..^^^ ^^ 








If/ USCS--This Week should be limited to one page, front and back, what 
"Matures could be eliminated? Sections of the newsletter now are 
"Official Announcements," "Bulletin Board" (includes campus events), 
"International News," "Faculty/Staff Notes," "Community Interest," and 
the calendar page. 



IV. Currently, FYI deadlines are 5:00 p.m, on the Thursday preceding Monday 
distribution, In order to provide time for more careful editing and 
proofreading, it might be desirable to move this deadline to 5;00 p.m. c 
the Wednesday preceding Monday distribution, Would you have strong 
objections to this step? Would a distribution date other than Monday 
morning be preferable? 



V. Please feel free to use this space for other suggestions, 



1 EDD DfiD2SS^^