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LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



HISTORIC/^ SU 




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THE FOUR MINUTE 
MEN OF CHICAGO 



BY 

THE HISTORY COMMITTEE 




Limited Edition 
Printed for Subscribers 
This is Number * ' 7 



1919 

HISTORY COMMITTEE OF THE FOUR MINUTE MEN 

OF CHICAGO 

72 West Adams Street, Chicago 







"Now that this work has come to its conclusion and the name 
of the Four Minute Men has become a part of the history of the 
great war, I would not willingly omit my heartfelt testimony to 
its great value to the country, and indeed to civilization as a whole, 
during our period of national trial and triumph." From President 
Wilson's Farewell Letter to the Four Minute Men of America. 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

The Four Minute Men of America 7 

The Four Minute Men of Chicago 9 

Facts and Figures 20 

President Wilson's Letters 22 

The Part of the Four Minute Man 24 

Illustrated Section Following page 16 

The Roster 26 

Officers 26 

The Committees 28 

Speakers and Workers 32 

Prominent Guests 39 

Honorary Members 89 

Reserve Speakers 40 

Four Minute Men in the Army or Navy 42 

The Theatres '. 43 

Auxiliary Speakers 51 

Fraternal Section 51 

Labor Section 53" 

Church Section .53 



THE FOUR MINUTE MEN 

The Four Minute Men were a nation-wide organiza- 
tion of public speakers under Government control dur- 
ing the period of America's participation in the World 
War. 

Although the idea and early plans for the Four Min- 
ute Men originated in Chicago in the early part of 
April, 1917, the work officially became a division of 
the Committee on Public Information, on June 16, 1917, 
when the national headquarters were removed to Wash- 
ington. The national organization and all its branches 
ended official existence on December 24, 1918. 

Between these dates the Four Minute Men of Amer- 
ica, numbering about 75,000 speakers, throughout 37 
speaking campaigns, delivered over 750,000 speeches 
to audiences totalling 315,000,000 persons. The 
speeches were delivered almost exclusively in the motion 
picture theatres of the country during "four minute" 
intermissions. The work was organized in 7,448 cities 
and towns, including every State in the Union. 

The part of the work done by the Four Minute Men 
of Chicago is the subject and scope of the following 
pages. 



THE FOUR MINUTE MEN 
OF CHICAGO 

TO CHICAGO belongs the honor of originating 
the plan for the nation-wide organization of 
public speakers known as the Four Minute Men. 
To Chicago also fell the task of working out many of 
the details of local organization which afterwards became 
a part of the standard plan for other centers throughout 
the country. 

This history of the Chicago branch of the Four Min- 
ute Men is written in part as a souvenir for those who 
were privileged to take part in the work, and in part 
as a permanent record of a typical unit of a great 
national organization that attained for itself a place in 
the history of the United States and its part in the great 
war. 

I. EARLY DAYS. 

The first period of the History of the Four Minute 
Men extends from the inception of the idea in Chicago 
until the establishment of national headquarters in 
Washington. 

To Donald Ryerson, of Chicago, belongs the un- 
disputed title of Originator of the Four Minute Men. 
He was the first to see the tremendous possibilities of 
a national organization of public speakers for patriotic 
service, the first to make an experimental four-minute 
speech in a motion picture theatre, and the first to assume 

9 



the burden of establishing such an organization as an 
instrument of the Government for war time service. 

Although the formal declaration of a state of war 
with Germany was not made until April 6, 1917, when 
Congress met in extraordinary session, it was an almost 
universally accepted opinion for some time prior to that 
date that war was inevitable. Diplomatic relations with 
Germany had been severed on February 3rd, and the 
situation was hourly growing more tense. During 
this state of the public mind the urgent need for more 
adequate military preparedness was the one uppermost 
subject of thought and conversation. 

The latter part of March, with war coming as a moral 
certainty, found every patriotic citizen eager to see his 
personal line of duty, and his opportunity for service 
to the country. The Chamberlain bill for universal 
military training, which had been left pending when 
Congress adjourned on March 4th, was then in high 
favor and seemed at that time to represent the best 
judgment of the nation. 

The imperative need of arousing the public to an 
appreciation of the tremendous problems involved in 
preparing for war was evident. A group of Chicago 
men at the Saddle & Cycle Club were engaged in an 
informal after-dinner discussion of the war prospect 
and the Chamberlain bill, when the importance of de- 
veloping public sentiment in favor of the Chamberlain 
bill became the topic. This discussion brought out the 
idea of making brief speeches to this effect before picture 
audiences. 

One of the men was Donald M. Ryerson, to whom 
the idea appealed with special force. Another was 
Senator Medill McCormick, who strongly endorsed the 
idea and did much to strengthen Mr. Ryerson's deter- 
mination to make it his work to bring the plan into 

10 



reality. Another with whom the idea was discussed that 
evening was William McCormick Blair, who promised 
his support, and who afterwards succeeded Mr. Ryer- 
son as national director of the organization. Another 
was Arthur G. Cable, later decorated for service over- 
seas, who gave Mr. Ryerson his immediate and practical 
assistance in getting the work started. 

The first form the idea took was that of constituting 
a patriotic committee to send speakers to motion picture 
theatres to urge upon the public an appreciation of the 
importance of military preparedness as then provided 
in the Chamberlain bill for universal military training. 

When it was found that four minutes was the limit 
of available time for speaking during the intermission 
in most motion picture theatres, the name "Four Minute 
Men" was adopted, carrying with it also a reminder of 
the patriotic spirit of the "Minute Men" of the Revolu- 
tionary War. 

Mr. Ryerson's first move was to seek the advice and 
endorsement of representative citizens. When he was 
assured by all with whom he consulted that the idea was 
sound, he made arrangements with the Strand Theatre 
of Chicago, for permission to make a trial four-minute 
speech. This was done on the evening of March 31, 
1917. 

On April 2, Mr. Ryerson invited a group of men to 
meet for luncheon at the University Club, where he out- 
lined the need and opportunity for patriotic service, and 
the idea of the Four Minute Men. The meeting ended 
with a plan of organization agreed upon, with the fol- 
lowing officers : Donald M. Ryerson, President ; Stephen 
Gardner, Treasurer; George R. Jones, Secretary; Keith 
J. Evans, Assistant Secretary. A call for volunteer 
speakers was issued, and some of those present were 
enrolled for the work. A temporary office was estab- 

11 



lished at the University Club, luncheon meetings were 
held almost daily, and a committee was appointed to 
arrange a schedule of four minute talks at motion pic- 
ture theatres. 

After a number of speeches had been made by the 
Four Minute Men on behalf of the Chamberlain bill, 
and after war had been declared, it became evident that 
the Chamberlain bill, which did not meet the war time 
emergency, was to be dropped, and another bill put for- 
ward, known as the "Universal Selective Service," and 
afterwards popularly known as the "Draft." 

This made it necessary to change the plan of the Four 
Minute Men. The nation was now at war, the leader- 
ship of the President under the war-time powers granted 
by the Constitution was undisputable, and the need of 
acting only with the approval of the Government became 
a matter of course. It was plain that all further talk 
on the Chamberlain bill would be out of order ; and until 
Congress had enacted a law or the President had out- 
lined a policy for civilian activity, it could not be known 
whether the Four Minute Men were helping or hinder- 
ing the plans of the Government. 

A meeting of the Four Minute Men was called on 
April 9th, and the situation laid before them. It was 
the sense of the meeting that Mr. Ryerson should go 
to Washington and lay before the Government his plan 
for a nation-wide organization of public speakers under 
some form of Government control. Accordingly Mr. 
Ryerson went immediately to Washington to see what 
could be done. 

On April 14, President Wilson had created the Com- 
mittee on Public Information, and it at once became 
apparent that if the Four Minute Men were to obtain 
a standing as an agency of the Government it must be 
as a division of this Committee. Mr. Ryerson inter- 
is 



viewed George Creel, the newly appointed chairman of 
the Committee on Public Information, who in turn 
secured for the plan the approval of the President, and 
on April 20 Mr. Ryerson telegraphed to his associates 
in Chicago that he had written arrangements with Mr. 
Creel which placed the Four Minute Men on an official 
basis as a division of the Committee on Public Infor- 
mation. 

The control of the organization at first remained 
vested in the original committee in Chicago. The first 
subject, "Universal Selective Service," together with 
typical arguments to be advanced by speakers, were 
approved in Washington by Mr. Creel before being 
released to the speakers. It was soon found, however, 
that the national headquarters for the work must be 
established in Washington. This was done on June 16. 
At that time Mr. Ryerson, who had previously received 
a commission in the Navy, and who had secured a two 
months' leave in order to establish the work of the Four 
Minute Men, relinquished control of the organization. 
William McCormick Blair, of Chicago, was then ap- 
pointed National Director of Four Minute Men and 
took up his residence in Washington. The responsi- 
bilities of national leadership, although still vested in 
Chicago men, thus passed to Washington, and Chicago 
thereafter took its rank as one of the local units of the 
national organization. 

The subsequent history of the Four Minute Men of 
Chicago is that of a unit acting under the general direc- 
tion of the national headquarters at Washington, as a 
division of the Committee on Public Information. 

II. THE PERIOD OF SERVICE 

The second period of the history of the Four Minute 
Men of Chicago dates from the reorganization on June 

13 



16, 1917, to the conclusion of the work on December 
24, 1918. 

The Chicago members were organized into a local 
unit, and George R. Jones was appointed Chicago 
Chairman by the National Director. In him was vested 
all authority and responsibility so far as relations with 
the national organization were concerned. This was in 
accordance with the standard plan of the national organ- 
ization, each local chairman receiving an official appoint- 
ment which carried with it the complete authority neces- 
sary to the conduct of the work. 

The plan of local organization worked out in Chicago 
included much that was afterwards adopted by the na- 
tional organization as the standard plan for all local 
chairmen to follow, and also many features that re- 
mained peculiar to Chicago. The authority vested in 
the Chicago Chairman was delegated by him to com- 
mittees covering every branch of the work, and the chair- 
men of all committees together constituted the Chicago 
Governing Committee. All matters of policy affecting 
the work were discussed and voted upon by the Com- 
mittee, although the power of veto necessarily remained 
with the chairman in order to fulfill his personal respon- 
sibilities to the Government. This plan gave at once the 
advantages of centralized and unquestioned authority 
and the wisdom and interest of a large board. 

One of the necessities of the work was that each local 
unit should be financed by local contributions, prefer- 
ably from a few patriotic persons able to give gen- 
erously rather than by appeal to the public. In view of 
this plan it was a matter of great service to the Four 
Minute Men of Chicago that Samuel Insull, afterwards 
Chairman of the Illinois State Council of Defense, gave 
the use of offices and equipment in the Edison building 

14 



and later secured for the work the support of the State 
Council of Defense. 

The Monday luncheon meetings, which began with 
the inception of the work in Chicago, continued through- 
out the entire period to be the center and inspiration for 
Four Minute Men, and was largely adopted in other 
local organizations throughout the country. 

These luncheon meetings were held at first at the 
Grand Pacific Hotel but later and for the remainder 
of the period at the Morrison Hotel. The program 
usually consisted of one or more addresses by speakers 
of note, always on some topic of interest in connection 
with the war. Open meetings were also held upon 
occasion, giving any member an opportunity to raise any 
topic, and also giving all an opportunity to hear repre- 
sentative four minute speeches then being delivered by 
some of their fellow speakers. 

The various committees met as occasion demanded, 
and called for a great amount of hard work and pat- 
riotic sacrifice of time. These committees were : 

Chicago Governing Committee. Composed of the chairmen of all 
other committees. Advised on all matters of policy. 

Admissions Committee. Passed on the qualifications of applicants 
for membership. 

Assignment Committee. Arranged the schedule for speakers and 
theatres. 

Speaking Committee. Visited theatres and reported on the work 
of individual speakers. 

Speakers Conference Committee. Assisted individual speakers in 
perfecting their work. 

Theatre Committee. Arranged for the co-operation of the theatres. 

Program Committee. Arranged the programs for the Monday 
luncheons and other meetings. 

Publicity Committee. Represented the organization in its rela- 
tions with the press. 

Liberty Loan Theatre Committee. Arranged for speaking in regu- 
lar theatres during the Liberty Loan drives. 

Committee Representing Regular Theatres. Advisory. 

15 



Committee Representing Motion Picture Industry. Adrisory. 

Public School Committee. Arranged for speaking at public 
schools. 

Public Parks Committee. Arranged for speaking in parks during 
the summer. 

Amusement Parks Committee. Arranged for speaking in amuse- 
ment parks during the summer. 

Church Section. Arranged with ministers to use the official bulle- 
tins for patriotic talks to their congregations. 

Convention Section. Arranged for speaking at various conven- 
tions being held in Chicago. 

Fraternal Section. Arranged for speaking in various secret so- 
cieties and fraternal meetings. 

Labor Union Section. Arranged for speaking at labor union meet- 
ings. 

Wabash Avenue Section. Arranged for speaking by colored men 
to colored audiences. 

For the first year after the work began in Chicago 
George R. Jones was Chicago Chairman and also State 
Director for Illinois. But the work of organizing the 
435 towns in the State so often required his absence from 
the city and made such demands on his time that Mr. 
Jones finally relinquished the active supervision of the 
Chicago branch, although continuing to serve as a mem- 
ber of the Governing Committee. He was succeeded by 
Ernest Palmer, who was appointed Chicago Chairman 
on March 25, 1918. Throughout the remainder of the 
war period Mr. Palmer was the conspicuous and dom- 
inant figure of the organization, and the work in Chicago 
owed much of its spirit and success to his exceptional 
ability and unfailing geniality. 

The topics for speaking were governed by Bulletins 
sent out from national headquarters fixing the period 
of their use and providing a budget of facts and typical 
arguments to assist speakers in preparing their speeches. 
Thirty-seven of these bulletins were issued, each usually 
representing a new subject, although some subjects re- 
quired two or more bulletins. These bulletins were 

16 





DONALD M. RYERSON 
GEORGE R. JONES 



WILLIAM McCORMICK BLAIR 
ERNEST PALMER 





THIS CERTIFICATE OF HONOR 

js Presented Jo 



Untke^ccasionojkisJionorMeiyfscnaroe 
fromweverviceoftne United States, and 

Jn recoqnitionof 
J^oifal andJjevoted Service as a 

FOUR-MINUTE MAN 

aftk* 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC INFOEMATO 
iDuTinq meHbrof 
1917-1918 



COMMITTEE ON PIWLIC INFORMATION 

Vecretaru offjtate 
o syar. 



x^' 



yitvn unJerourlianJ&sfolthu24 -Jaya} December 
1<)18intl>el4S-iiiro/tlirJUei>fn<itnce of '///I/ (S 




TYPICAL CERTIFICATE OF HONOR 



THIS CERTIFICATE OF HONOR 



FOUR-MINUTE MEN 

V*. 
COMMrTTEE ON PUBLIC INFORMATION 



V-^y^T^^H^- 

! W- in y thTl^ r^^-' oFZuni, 



ent of the United States as 
' ,he Four Minute Men 




CERTIFICATES ISSUED TO THEATRES AND TO THE FRATERNAL, 
CHURCH AND LABOR SECTIONS 




SOME OF THE SPEAKERS' BULLETINS ISSUED 







NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS AT WASHINGTON 



HKH^MHV& 

MINUTE 
MEN 








Minute 
Men 



This Theater has been appointed by the 

Goverameat in receive these official messages 
The privilege f its sta&e has been granted 
exclusively tit the Four Miaule Men. 




MtHUTE MfN I 



4MM4 



POSTERS USED IN THEATRE LOBBIES 

OFFICIAL TRADE-MARK SERVICE BUTTON 

IDENTIFICATION CARD 




MAIN OFFICE, CHICAGO 

CHICAGO CHAIRMAN'S OFFICE 

STATE CHAIRMAN'S OFFICE 



cTcr Errjest Pointer 



At the final luncheon of the Chicago Four Hinute 
lien, held at the Korriaon Hotel on L'onday, the Sixteenth 
Day of Decenber, Nineteen Hundred and Eighteen, a resolu- 
tion was unanimously adopted instructing the undersigned 
committee to record in permanent form the appreciation of 
the Pour Minute Men of Chicago for the splendid work done 
by you as their Chairman. 

Upon its entrance into the grt war our country 
was confronted with the problem of combating the insidious 
propaganda with which Germany was then attempting to poison 
our sources of information and communication. You were 
called upon to take charge, as Chairman, of one of the most 
important units of a national organization whose responsib- 
ility it was to nullify the enemy's propaganda and keep the 
people of American informed of the ideals of our country in 
the war and morally pledged to its prosecution to success- 
ful issue. 

You have performed the duties of your office with 
untiring efforts and unselfish devotion. Through your per- 
sonality, your ability as presiding officer, and your sound 
judgment in executive natters, you have kept high the ideals 
of the Four Minute Men and brought the organization into 
great repute in and beyond the community. Through you the 
work of the Four Minute Men in Chicago has been crowned with 
success. 

Therefore the Four Minute Hen of Chicago express 
to you their appreciation of your remarkably successful work 
as Chicago Chairman; their esteem and affectionate regard 
for you; their regret that with the termination of the ac- 
tivities of the Four I_inute Hen the association which they 
have had with you must cease; their hope that the future 
may offer many opportunities for other pleasant relations 
with you; and their wish that the years to come may hold 
for you happy memories of the Four Minute Ken. 

For the Chicago Four liinute Men, 




/? 



FAC SIMILE OF A TESTIMONIAL TO THE CHICAGO CHAIRMAN 



issued in the following order and were used during the 
period named: 

Universal Service by Selective Draft, May 12-21, 1917. 

First Liberty Loan, May 22- June 15. 

Red Cross, June 18-25. 

Food Conservation, July 1-14. 

Why We Are Fighting, July 23- August 5. 

The Nation In Arms, August 6-26. 

The Importance of Speed, August 19-26. 

What Our Enemy Really Is, August 27-September 23. 

Unmasking German Propaganda, August 27-September 23. 

Onward to Victory, September 24-October 27. 

Second Liberty Loan, October 8-28. 

Food Pledge, October 29-November 4. 

Maintaining Morals and Morale, November 12-25. 

Carrying the Message November 26-December 22. 

War Savings Stamps, January 2-19, 1918. 

The Shipbuilder, January 28-February 9. 

Eyes for the Navyi February 11-16. 

The Danger to Democracy, February 18-March 10. 

Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, February 12. 

The Income Tax, March 11-16. 

Farm and Garden, March 25-30. 

President Wilson's Letter to Theatres, March 31-April 5. 

Third Liberty Loan, April 6-May 4. 

Second Red Cross Campaign, May 13-25. 

Danger to America, May 2 7- June 12. 

Second War Savings Campaign, June 24-28. 

The Meaning of America, June 29-July 27. 

Mobilizing America's Man Power; July 29-August 17. 

Where Did You Get Your Facts? August 26-September 7. 

Register, September 5-12. 

Fourth Liberty Loan, September 28-October 19. 

Fire Prevention, October 27-November 2. 

United War Work Campaign, November 3-18. 

Red Cross Home Service, December 7. 

What We Have Won, December 8-14. 

Red Cross Christmas Roll Call, December 15-23. 

A Tribute to the Allies, December 24, 1918. 

A number of special events of more than ordinary 
interest to the Four Minute Men were held during the 
lifetime of the organization. Of these may be mentioned : 

Friday, Nov. 9, 1917. Get-Together Dinner, field 
day, and entertainment at the Edgewater Golf Club. 

17 



Dec. 24, 1917. Monday Luncheon in the Ball Room 
of the Morrison Hotel. Guest of honor Capt. Paul 
Perigord, special representative of the French Govern- 
ment. 

February 5, 1918. Get-Together Dinner at the 
Stevens Building Cafe. Guest of honor, Donald M. 
Ryerson, Founder of the Four Minute Men. 

May 6, 1918. Get-Together Dinner at the Midday 
Club. 

May 29, 1918. Luncheon in honor of 103 French 
"Blue Devils" in the ball room of the Morrison Hotel, 
which was supplemented by an automobile drive through 
the city and a reception to the public at the Auditorium 
in the evening under the auspices of the Four Minute 
Men. 

November 11, 1918. Armistice Celebration Lunch- 
eon, at the Morrison Hotel. Guest of honor, Hon. Wil- 
liam Howard Taft. Songs for the occasion by the 
Liberty Chorus. 

November 22, 1918. Victory Dinner, in the ball room 
of the Hotel La Salle. A festival occasion designed to 
mark the official close of the work, although speaking 
assignments continued until December 24. Guest of 
honor, Wm. H. Ingersoll, National Director of the Four 
Minute Men. 

December 16, 1919. Final Monday Luncheon. Fare- 
well address by Samuel Insull, Chairman of the State 
Council of Defense. 



18 



PERMANENT ORGANIZATION 

A Resolution was passed at the Victory Dinner, at 
Hotel LaSalle, November 22, 1918, providing for a 
permanent organization of the Four Minute Men of 
Chicago as an honorary body to perpetuate the friend- 
ships formed during the period of service. The incum- 
bent officers were chosen to continue the organization, to 
which were specially added the names of Donald M. 
Ryerson, William McCormick Blair, and George R. 
Jones. The Chicago Governing Committee, with 
Ernest Palmer, Chairman, accepted their further re- 
sponsibilities under the resolution, and elected to their 
number those who in the past had served as members 
of this committee. It was the sentiment of the members 
present at the Victory Dinner that an annual reunion 
dinner should be provided for, the matter being left in 
the hands of the Governing Committee. 



19 



FACTS AND FIGURES 

FOUR MINUTE MEN OF CHICAGO 

Number of speakers enrolled 

Workers who served on Governing Committee 

Total workers on Committees 

Theatres cooperating 

Members who served in Army or Navy 

Killed in Action 

Speakers in the Fraternal Section 

Speakers in the Labor Section 

Speakers in the Church Section 

Reserve Speakers 

Number of speaking campaigns 

Number of speeches made in Chicago 50,000 

Total of audiences reached, estimated 25,000,000 

Monday luncheon meetings held. 84 

Standing Committees 20 



20 



PRESIDENT WILSON'S LETTERS TO 
THE FOUR MINUTE MEN. 

I. 

The White House 
Washington, November 9, 1917. 

To the Fifteen Thousand Four-Minute Men of the 
United States: 

May I not express my very real interest in the vigor- 
ous and intelligent work your organization is doing in 
connection with the Committee on Public Information? 
It is surely a matter worthy of sincere appreciation that 
a body of thoughtful citizens, with the hearty coopera- 
tion of the managers of moving picture theatres, are 
engaged in the presentation and discussion of the pur- 
poses and measures of these critical days. 

Men and nations are at their worst or at their best in 
any great struggle. The spoken word may light the 
fires of passion and unreason or it may inspire to highest 
action and noblest sacrifice a nation of freemen. Upon 
you Four-Minute Men, who are charged with a special 
duty and enjoy a special privilege in the command of 
your audiences, will rest in a considerable degree, the 
task of arousing and informing the great body of our 
people so that when the record of these days is complete 
we shall read page for page with the deeds of army and 
navy the story of the unity, the spirit of sacrifice, the 
unceasing labors, the high courage of the men and women 
at home who hold unbroken the inner lines. My best 
wishes and continuing interest are with you in your work 
as part of the reserve officer corps in a nation thrice 
armed because through your efforts it knows better the 
justice of its cause and the value of what it defends. 

Cordially and sincerely yours, 

WOODROW WILSON. 

22 



II. 

The White House 
Washington, November 20, 1918. 

To All the Four Minute Men of the Committee on 

Public Information: 

I have read with real interest the report of your activi- 
ties, and I wish to express my sincere appreciation of 
the value to the Government of your effective and in- 
spiring efforts. It is a remarkable record of patriotic 
accomplishment that an organization of seventy-five 
thousand speakers should have carried on so extensive a 
work at a cost to the Government of little more than one 
hundred thousand dollars for the eighteen-month period 
less than one dollar yearly on an individual basis. 
Each member of your organization, in receiving honor- 
able discharge from the service, may justly feel a glow 
of proper pride in the part that he has played in holding 
fast the inner lines. May I say that I, personally, have 
always taken the deepest and most sympathetic interest 
in your work, and have noted, from time to time, the 
excellent results you have procured for the various De- 
partments of the Government. Now that this work has 
come to its conclusion and the name of the Four Minute 
Men (which I venture to hope will not be used hence- 
forth by any similar organization) has become a part of 
the history of the great war, I would not willingly omit 
my heartfelt testimony to its great value to the country, 
and indeed to civilization as a whole, during our period of 
national trial and triumph. I shall always keep in mem- 
ory the patriotic cooperation and assistance accorded me 
throughout this period and shall remain deeply and 
sincerely grateful to all who, like yourselves, have aided 
so nobly in the achievement of our aims. 

Cordially and sincerely yours, 

WOODROW WILSON. 

23 



I am a Four-Minute Man. 

I am the Mouthpiece of Democracy. 

I make men THINK. 

I wield the most potent power of Human Endeavor THE 
SPOKEN WORD. 

The Blind do not read the Ignorant cannot read the Dullard 
will not read but ALL MEN must harken to my message. 

My appeal is universal elemental primitive. 

I was a Roving Shepherd. I came back to my tribe and told of a 
Far Country, green with pastures. My message reached Abraham. 
He led his tribe forth and founded a great people Israel. 

Again, I was a Nomad Slave. I returned to my people, groaning 
under the fetters of Pharaoh, and told of a beautiful land beyond the 
desert. My tidings came to the ears of Moses and he led his Chosen 
People to the Promised Land. 

Again, I was a Wandering Monk. To the High and Low, I 
brought the tale of the Holy Land, suffering under Moslem oppres- 
sion. My appeal inspired the Great Crusade. 

Again, I was a Wayfaring Mariner, spreading strange rumors of 
unknown lands, beyond the seas. Columbus heard my message 
set sail and discovered a New World. 

Thus it is, that the destinies of Humanity have been swayed and 
directed by the SPOKEN WORD. 

Today, my appeal is more compelling more potent more uni- 
versal than ever. 

I am a Stoker for the Great Melting Pot. In four minutes, I 
breathe the flame of true American Patriotism to people of all kinds 
and creeds. 

I am a Soldier. I fight German propaganda, intrigue, falsehoods, 
treachery. 

I am a Teacher. I set forth in 240 seconds, lessons in loyalty, 
duty, thrift, conservation, co-operation. 

24 



I am a Herald. I sound the clarion call for men to serve their 
country. I summon help for the Y. M. C. A. and the Red Cross. 

I am a Salesman. I sell Liberty Bonds and Thrift Stamps. 

I am a Preacher. Using the text that all men are equal, I invoke 
Loyalty, Patriotism, Devotion. 

I am a Doctor. I give four-minute treatments for disloyalty, un- 
Americanism, selfishness, laziness. I eradicate apathy and listless- 
ness and instill "pep" and enthusiasm. 

I am a Lawyer. Before a jury of all races and creeds, I indict 
old world standards of caste, class distinction, privileges and false 
pride. 

I am an Efficiency Engineer. I plead for the elimination of waste 
and carelessness and the practice of economy and conservation. 

I am an Optimist. I have faith in the triumph of Truth and Right 
over Might and Brute Force. 

I am a Prophet. I predict the doom of Despotism and Autocracy 
and the triumph of Liberty and Democracy. 

I am a Lover. I love the Stars and Stripes. I love to think that 
this nation under God is having a new Birth of Freedom and that 
Government of the people, by the people and for the people shall 
not perish from the earth. 

I am the Mouthpiece of Democracy. 

I make men THINK. 

I am a Four-Minute Man. 

Note. This composition was awarded a prize offered by the State Chairman 
for Illinois for the best manuscript on "The Part of the Four Minute Man In 
the War." The author is Fred A. Wirth, one of the Four Minute Men of Chi- 
cago. 



25 



ROSTER 

( Status at the close of the work. ) 

OFFICERS 

ERNEST PALMER, Chairman 
JAMES C. JEFFERY, Vice-Chairman 
HENRY G. MILLER, Vice-Chairman 
WILLIAM S. ELLIOTT, Treasurer 
JOSEPH A. RUSHTON, Secretary 

Past Officers 

GEORGE R. JONES, Chairman 

STEPHEN GARDNER, Treasurer 

FREDERIC ULLMANN, Secretary 

KEITH J. EVANS, Secretary 

HENRY C. CHANDLER, Secretary 

Louis W. MACK, Secretary 

NATHANIEL SEEFURTH, Assistant Secretary 



26 



CHICAGO GOVERNING COMMITTEE 

ERNEST PALMER, 
Chicago Chairman 



HENRY G. MILLER, 

Vice-Chainnan 

WILLIAM S. ELLIOTT, 

Treasurer 

JOSEPH A. RUSHTON, 

Secretary 

JAMES C. JEFFERY, 

Chairman Admissions Committee 

FREDERICK F. NORCROSS, 

Vice-Chairman, Admissions 
Committee 

LLOYD C. WHITMAN, 

Chairman Amusement Parks 
Section 

HARRY J. DUNBAUGH, 

Chairman, Assignment Committee 

GODFREY H. ATKIN, 

Chairman, Church Section 

R. E. PATTISON KLINE, 

Chairman, Conventions Section 

E. A. ABBOTT, 

Chairman, Fraternal Section 

JOHN H. CLAYTON, 

Chairman, Labor Union Section 

J. W. PALMER, 

Chairman, Program Committee 

JOHN L. LOVETT, 

Chairman, Publicity Committee 

Past Members of 

DONALD M. RYERSON 
SOLOMON H. CLARK 
W. R. DICKINSON 
KEITH J. EVANS 
STEPHEN GARDNER 
C. H. G. HEINFELDEN 
ROGER B. HULL 
THOMAS J. MEEK 
BERTRAM G. NELSON 



NATHAN ASCHER, 
WILLIAM E. HEANEY, 
JOSEPH HOPP, 
MAX HYMAN, 
PETER J. SCHAEFFER, 

Representing Motion Picture 
Industry 

GEORGE R. FOLDS, 

Chairman, Public Parks 
Committee 

HERBERT J. FRIEDMAN, 

Chairman, Public Schools 
Committee 

HARRY J. POWERS, 
HARRY J. RIDINGS, 

Representing Regular Theatres 

JOHN J. PECKHAM, 

Chairman, Speakers' Conference 

WILLIAM A. DURGIN, 

Chairman, Speaking Committee 

GEORGE R. JONES, 

State Chairman 

DONALD M. WOOD, 

Chairman, Theatre Committee 

HENRY P. CHANDLER, 

Chairman, Colored Section 

WALDO P. WARREN, 

Historian 

Governing Committee 

MORTIMER M. NEWFIELD 
WILLIAM G. SAGE 
ANDREW R. SHERIFF 
OSCAR D. SEAVER 
FREDERIC ULLMANN 
Louis W. MACK 
A. CLEMENT WILD 
JOHN P. WILSON, JR. 
NATHANIEL SEEFURTH 
27 



ADMISSION COMMITTEE 

JAMES CLARKE JEFFERY, Chairman 
FREDERICK F. NORCROSS, Vice Chairman 

HENRY G. MILLER WILLIAM S. ELLIOTT 

HENRY P. CHANDLER JOSEPH HOPP 

HOLLO L. LYMAN ARCHIBALD CATTELL 

WILLIAM A. DURGIN HENRY HORNER 

CHARLES O. RUNDALL GLEN A. BISHOP 



AMUSEMENT PARKS COMMITTEE 

LLOYD C. WHITMAN, Chairman 

RAYMOND C. COOK J. W. PALMER 

J. Q. STEPHENS 

ASSIGNMENT COMMITTEE 

HARRY J. DUNBAUGH, Chairman 

GRANT GORDON J. W. PALMER 

WALTER A. MURPHY W. W. Ross 

Past Members of Committee 

WILLIAM A. DURGIN EDGAR B. ELDER 
WILLIAM O. FREEMAN 

CHURCH SECTION 

GODFREY H. ATKIN, Chairman 
JUDGE JOHN P. McGooRTY MORRIS L. JOHNSTON 

28 



PUBLIC SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

HERBERT J. FRIEDMAN, Chairman 
WASHINGTON FLEXNER WILLIAM SHELBY REED 

Past Member of Committee 
HOLLO L. LYMAN 

PUBLIC PARKS COMMITTEE 

GEORGE R. FOLDS, Chairman 
LIONEL THOMPKINS CHARLES ALLING 

Past Member of Committee 
ANDREW R. SHERIFF, Chairman 

SPEAKING COMMITTEE 
WILLIAM A. DURGIN, Chairman 

DR. M. L. AREN JOHN J. PECKHAM 

H. H. BATCHELLER G. M. PETERS 

JOHN R. BENTLEY W. R. PINCKARD 

CHARLES B. BLACK H. E. SMOOT 

J. H. CAMERON J. Q. STEPHENS 

W. G. DOOLEY W. S. UNDERWOOD 

CARLISLE DURFEE IGNATIUS WALSH 

J. J. FORSTALL GEORGE HUNT 

O. M. Fox GEORGE R. JONES, 
E. J. GOODSPEED Exofficio 

GRANT GORDON ERNEST PALMER, 
JOHN J. HENNESSY Exofficio 

E. L. JOHNSON JAMES CLARKE JEFFERY, 
B. C. LINGLE Exofficio 

ROLLO L. LYMAN 

THEATRE COMMITTEE 

DONALD M. WOOD, Chairman 

JOHN J. CLEARY CHARLES R. BIXBY 

CHARLES H. ELDREGE F. H. ELWERT 

29 



CONVENTION SECTION 

R. E. P. KLINE, Chairman 
G. M. PETERS JOHN S. LORD 

Past Member of Committee 
C. H. G. HEINFELDEN 

FRATERNAL SECTION 

E. A. ABBOTT, Chairman 
WILLIAM A. STILES C. G. WHIPPLE 

Past Members of Committee 

MORTIMER M. NEWFIELD BURRELL J. CRAMER 
GEORGE W. MANIERRE 

LABOR UNION SECTION 

JOHN H. CLAYTON, Chairman 

HOPE THOMPSON EDWARD O'GRADY 

BENJAMIN BUSCH GEORGE FOLDS 

JOHN R. BENTLEY 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS REPRESENTING 
CHICAGO LABOR UNIONS 

JOHN FITZPATRICK VICTOR OLANDER 

SIMON O'DONNELL 

PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

J. W. PALMER, Chairman 

JOHN H. CLAYTON CHARLES A. BARRY 

J. Q. STEPHENS 

Past Members of Committee 

FREDERIC ULLMANN A. C. WILD 

WALDO P. WARREN 
so 



PUBLICITY COMMITTEE 

JOHN L. LOVETT., Chairman 
GEORGE MORRIS HUGH MAXWELL 

BEN KENDALL FRANK HONEYWELL 

CHESTER KEEL WALLACE SMITH 




SPEAKERS CONFERENCE COMMITTEE 

JOHN J. PECKHAM, Chairman 

ROLLO L. LYMAN BERTRAM G. NELSON 

R. E. PATTISON KLINE 

LIBERTY LOAN THEATRE COMMITTEE 

HENRY G. MILLER, Chairman 
WALTER D. HERRICK GUY M. PETERS 

JAMES CLARKE JEFFERY HARRY J. RIDINGS 
CARL R. LATHAM HARRY J. POWERS 

MORTIMER M. NEWFIELD PETER J. SCHAEFER 

REPRESENTING MOTION PICTURE 
INDUSTRY 

NATHAN ASCHER JOSEPH HOPP 

WILLIAM E. HEANEY MAX HYMAN 

REPRESENTING REGULAR THEATRES 
HARRY J. POWERS HARRY J. RIDINGS 

HISTORY COMMITTEE 

George R. Jones, Chairman 
Waldo P. Warren, Historian 

George R. Folds Rollo L. Lyman 

31 



FOUR MINUTE MEN OF CHICAGO 



SPEAKERS AND WORKERS 



ABBOTT, E. A. 
AIKIN, EDWARD J. 
ALDEN, FRANK A. 
ALESHIRE, O. E. 
ALEXANDER, A. M. 
ALLAN, W. A. D. 
ALLEN, W. A. 
ANDERSON, DANIEL 
AREN, DR. M. L. 
ARNOLD, EUGENE P. 
ARTHUR, WILLIAM H. 
ARVEY, JACOB M. 
ATKIN, GODFREY H. 
AT WILL, A. T. 
ASCHER, NATHAN 
AVERY, CHARLES P. 
BACK, LLOYD E. 
BADENAUX, RALPH G. 
BADENOCH, BEN H. 
BALDWIN, FRANCIS E. 
BARNES, D. E. 
BARRY, CHARLES A. 
BARTON, LESTER C. 
BASKIN, BARRON H. 
BASSETT, F. P. 
BATCHELLER, HENRY H. 
BECK, NORMAN A. 
BECKWITH, EDWIN B. 
BELL, WILLIAM A. 
BENTLEY, JOHN R. 
BERNHARD, EDGAR 

BlENEMAN, W. C. 



BIERMA, HARRY 
BISHOP, GLENN A. 
BIXBY, CHARLES R. 
BLACK, CHARLES B. 
BLAKE, REV. JAMES V. 
BLATCHFORD, NAT H., JR. 
BLOCK, Louis I. 
BLUIM, HENRY L. 
BOOTH, SHERMAN M. 
BOSKIE, B. H. 

BOUSFIELD, DR. MlDIAN O. 

BRAESE, O. C. 
BRECKENRIDGE, WILLIAM 
BRILE, JOHN J. 
BRODMAN, H. C. 
BRODFUEHRER, O. M. 
BRUGH, REV. AVERY 
BRYANT, JOHN M. 
BRYDGES, DR. J. C. 
BUDD, GEORGE H. 
BULL, FOLLETT W. 
BURKHALTER, ROBERT P. 
BURTON, OWEN ABBOTT 
CALLIS, HENRY A. 
CAMERON, JOHN H., 
CANAVAN, WILLIAM H. 
CARNAHAM, CHARLES C. 
CARPENTER, ARTHUR H. 
CARPENTER, JOHN C. 
CASE, WILLIAM W. 
CATTELL, ARCHIBALD 
CERVENKA, JEROME J. 

32 



CHAMBERLAIN, CLARENCE 

K. 

CHANDLER, HENRY P. 
CHAPMAN, JOHN W. 
CHAPMAN, REV. BENJ. E. 
CLARK, CHARLES G. 
CLARK, S. H. 
CLARKE, DR. ARTHUR 
CLARKE, FREDERICK M. 
CLAYTON, JOHN H. 
CLEARY, JOHN J., JR. 

CODDINGTON, A. O. 

COHEN, ARCHIE H. 
COLBY, RICHARD H. 
COLEMAN, HAMILTON 
COLTMAN, BERTRAM 
CONNELLY, WILLIAM 
CONRAD, HENRY C. 
CONRAD, A. H. 
COOK, RAYMOND 
COOPER, JOSEPH R. W. 
COYLE, JAMES G. 
CRAMER, BURRELL 
CRAWFORD, WARREN 
CROY, HARRY C. 
CRUMMER, W. F. 
D'ARMOND, L. B. 
DAVIDSON, JOHN L. 
DAVIS, DAVID F. 
DAVIS, JEFFERSON 
DAWSON, HORACE L. 
DENISON, W. L. 
DICK, HERMAN A. 
DICKINSON, WILLIAM R. 

DlXON, WlLLARD J. 

DOLAN, BENNETT G. 
DOOLEY, WILLIAM G. 
DOWNING, ELLIOTT R. 

DUGGAN, F. E. 

DUKE, CHARLES S. 



DUNBAUGH, HARRY J. 
DURHAM, E. D. 
DURFEE, CARLISLE 
DURGIN, WILLIAM A. 
EDMONDSON, STUART B. 
EICHER, B. L. 

ElSENDRATH, D. S. 

ELDER, EDGAR B. 
ELDREDGE, CHARLES H. 
ELLIOTT, J. KENTNER 
ELLIOTT, WILLIAM S. 
ELWERT, F. H. 
ERRINGER, DR. JAMES W. 
EVANS, KEITH J. 
EWEN, WILLIAM R. T. 
FAY, R. C. 
FEGEN, N. A. 
FENN, GEORGE H. 
FEUCHTW ANGER, JOSEPH 
FINE, LAWRENCE M. 
FISHER, HARRY M., HON. 
FLEXNER, WASHINGTON 
FOLDS, GEORGE R. 
FORBRICK, W. F. 
FORDYCE, WILLIAM J. 

FORSTALL, J. J. 

FOSTER, GEORGE H. 
FOWLER, R. FORMAN 
Fox, OWEN M. 
FOXTON, DR. HAROLD C. 
FRANK, CHARLES S. 
FRANKEL, M. G. 
FREEMAN, WILLIAM O. 
FRIEDMAN, ED. 
FRIEDMAN, HERBERT J. 
FRISBIE, C. O. 
GARRISON, J. L. 
GEKAS, JOHN C. 
GEMMILL, HON. H. S. 
GIBSON, GEORGE H. 

33 



GlFFORD, R. H. 

GODEHN, PAUL M. 
GOLMAN, ALEX M. 
GOODSPEED, EDGAR J. 
GOODWIN, JUDGE C. N. 
GORBY, CAPT. JOHN W. 
GORDON, GRANT 
GORDON, LESTER B. 
GORDON, SPENCE 
GRAY, VANDORF 
GROFF, JAMES O. 
GUERIN, HON. HENRY 
GUERIN, MARK E. 
GURTLER, FREDERICK H. 
GUSTAFSON, JOHN C. 

GUTKNECHT, JOHN 

HALLENBECK, FRANK M. 
HANK, JACOB J. 
HANKS, HOWARD H. 
HARMON, HARRY 
HARRIS, FRANK F. 
HAWXHURST, R. R. 
HAZEL, PAUL M. 
HEALY, FRANCIS V. 
HEINFELDEN, C. H. G. 
HENKE, H. E. 
HENDERSON, D. M. 
HENDERSON, J. C. 
HENNESSY, JOHN J. 
HERBERT, JOSEPH D. 
HERRICK, WALTER D. 
HETH, LLOYD DAVID 
HEYMAN, ALEXANDER H. 
HILL, SAMUEL A. 
HOAG, PARKER H. 
HOLE, PERRY L. 
HOLLEB, A. PAUL 
HOLMES, C. M., JR. 
HOLTON, CHARLES R. 
HOOKER, H. A. 



HOPP, JOSEPH 
HORNER, HON. HENRY 
HOSHOUR, HARVEY 
HOWARD, BERT 
HOY, IVAN A. 
HOYNE, MACLAY, HON. 
HUGHES, H. D. 
HULL, MAJ. ROGER B. 
HUNT, EARL R. 
HUNT, GEORGE C. 
HUNT, THEODORE 
HUTCHENS, HARRY LEE 
HYDE, HENRY NEAL 
HYMAN, MAX A. 
JACKSON, A. L. 
JAFFE, BENJAMIN E. 
JARECKI, HON. E. K. 
JEFFERY, JAMES CLARKE 
JENSEN, G. P. 
JOHNSON, EDWIN L. 
JOHNSON, W. M. 
JOHNSTON, MORRIS L. 
JONES, GEORGE R. 
JONES, S. MINOT 

JUNKERMAN, LESLIE L. 

KANDEL, JOHN S. 
KASPERS, LAMBERT 
KELLY, GEORGE A. 
KELLY, RAYMOND 
KERR, WILLIAM D. 
KLINE, R. E. P. 
KNAPPEN, FRED F. 
KOBICK, HENRY G. 
KOLB, THEODORE A. 
KORSHAK, MAX M. 

KORTMEYER, BENJ. 

KRAUTH, HARRY E. 
KUIT, S. N. 
KUMPFER, HERBERT L. 
LAADT, ANTON 

34 



LAMPMAN, CLINTON P. 
LANE, FRAYSER T. 
LARASH, REV. G. IRWIN 
LAVERY, URBAN A. 
LEE, GUY F. 
LEVINSON, M. K. 
LEWIN, HENRY J. 
LEWIS, DR. JULIAN H. 
LEWIS, W. E. 
LINDSAY, WILLARD C. 

LlNGLE, B. C. 

LINK, JOHN H. 
LISTER, WILLIAM 
LITTLE, JOSEPH A. 
LONG, ALBERT L. 
LORD, JOHN S. 

LORENZ, O. C. 

LOVETT, JOHN L. 
LOWITZ, LEO H. 
LUEBECK, EDWARD H. 
LUST, H. C. 
LUTKIN, H. C. 
LYMAN, ROLLO L. 
LYMAN, WILLIS M. 
LYON, GEORGE W., JR. 
MACCLINTOCK, SAMUEL 
MACCOLLIN, W. X. 
MACGILL, WILLIAM V. 
MACGREGOR, JOHN H. 
MACK, Louis W. 
MACINTYRE, W. A. 
MAC KAY, GEORGE 

MACMlLLAN, DR. D. P. 

MAHON, L. D. 
MAHONY, JAMES H. 
MAIN, F. W. 
MAINE, A. B. 
MALINA, ARTHUR 
MANIERRE, GEORGE W. 
MARCUS, CARL L. 



MARTIN, FRANK A. 
MASON, ROSWELL B. 
McBRiDE, ROBERT J. 
MCCARTHY, J. L. 
MCCARTNEY, REV. A. J. 
MCELROY, CHARLES F. 
McGooRTY, HON. JOHN P. 

McGREGOR, D. A. 
McHANEY, G. W. 

McKEE, WILLIAM L. 
McKEowN, JOHN A. 
McKiNLEY, DONALD S. 
McMAHON, BERNHARD 
MCNAMEE, WILLIAM 
MCNEAL, H. E. 
McNiCHOLs, GEORGE F. 
McQuEEN, ALEXANDER M. 
MEAGHER, JOHN T. 
MEE, WILLIAM L. 
MEEK, THOMAS J. 
MENGES, PAUL O. 
MERRIFIELD, FRED 
MERRITT, J. B. 
MEYERS, JOHNSTON 
MIDDLETON, SYDNEY 
MILLARD, REV. W. B. 
MILLER, ALBERT G. 
MILLER, HARRY B. 
MILLER, HENRY G. 
MILLER, J. K. 
MILLER, W. S. 
MILLS, CALVIN H. 
MILLS, MATTHEW 
MILNER, DUNCAN C. 
MISHKIN, CHARLES 
MITCHELL, C. C. 
MORRIS, G. MAURICE 
MORRISON, M. A. 
MORRISON, REV. S. J. 
MORRISON, WILLIAM J. 

35 



MORSE, EDW. L. C. 
MUNFORD, H. M. 
MURPHY, JOHN C. 
MURPHY, WALTER A. 
MURRAY, FRANK B. 
NARAMORE, MILTON O. 
NATHANSON, MORRIS J. 
NELSON, BERTRAM G. 
NELSON, P. B. 
NELSON, WILLIAM J. 
NEWFIELD, MORTIMER M. 
NEWMAN, EDWIN R. 
NEWMAN, SAMUEL 
NORCROSS, F. F. 
NORDIN, DR. HENRY A. 
NORTON, ALBERT J. 
O'BRIEN, QUINN 
O'CONNOR, JAMES J. 
O'DONNELL, ANDREW J. 
O'DONNELL, JOHN S. 
O'GRADY, EDWARD 
OGREN, JOHN W. 
OHAN, WILLIAM J. 
OLDS, WALTER F. 
OLIVER, DAVID 
PALMER, ERNEST 
PALMER, J. W. 
PAM, JUDGE HUGO 
PAPOT, BENEDICT 
PEARSON, HAYNIE R. 
PECKHAM, JOHN J. 
PERSONS, ALBERT D. 
PETACQUE, MAX WARREN 
PETERS, G. M. 
PFLAUM, WILLIAM K. 
PHILLIPS, E. J. 
PHILLIPS, ERNEST L. 
PICKERING, J. FRANK 
PDERSON, HAYNIE R. 
PIERSON, DR. H. W. 



PlNCKARD, W. R. 

POIRIER, WALTER J. 
POLLARD, W. L. 
POOR, EDWIN L. 
PORTER, JAMES HALE 
POTTER, MERLE H. 
PRESCOTT, PATRICK B., JB. 
PURCELL, EDWARD 
RATHBUN, CHAS. F. 
READ, GARDNER 
READ, IRVING E. 
REED, WILLIAM SHELBY 
REID, LEONARD C. 
REIN, THEODORE E. 
REINHARDT, FRED W. 
REINHOLD, W. C. 
REMY, VICTOR A. 
REYNOLDS, J. J. 
RICE, ARTHUR H. 
RICHARDS, FRANK W. 
RIDINGS, HARRY J. 
RISLEY, W. J., SR. 
RISELEY, LT. W. J. 
ROBBINS, JOHN W. 
ROBINSON, A. J. 
ROGERS, JOSEPH B. 
RONEY, CHAS. H. 
ROSBOROUGH, O. A. 
ROSENHEIM, DAVID 

ROSENTHAL, AfiRAM I. 

Ross, WALTER W. 
RUBECAMP, JOHN W. 
RUNDALL, CHAS. O. 

RUSHTON, JOS. A. 

RYERSON, DONALD M. 
SACHS, PHILIP P. 
SALSMAN, THOS. J. 
SANDERS, HORACE C. L. 
SCHACHT, F. W. 

SCHOFIELD, C. M. 
36 



SCHOOLMAN, RALPH B. 
SCHULZ, ADOLPH M. 
SCHULZE, WILLIAM C. 
SCHWARTZ, U. S. 

SCHWARTZBACH, AflRAM A 

SEEFURTH, NATHANIEL 
SHAVER, HARRY L. 
SHERIFF, ANDREW R. 
SHUDNOW, FRANK 
SKINNER, JULIAN 
SLEEPECK, WILLIAM 
SMITH, HAROLD B. 
SMITH, DR. H. REGINALD 
SMITH, DR. OAKLEY 
SMOOT, HARRY E. 
SOLDAN, WILLIAM G. 
SOLOMON, L. J. 
SOLOMON, J. J. 

SONNENSCHEIN, EDWARD 

SPRAGUE, WILLIAM C. 
STAMP, ERNEST E. 
STEAD, JAMES R. 
STEPHENS, J. Q. 
STEVENS, J. H. 
STEVENS, R. A. 
ST. GEORGE, M. J. 
STIFLER, FRANCIS C. 
STILES, WILLIAM A. 
STONE, GEORGE 
STREYCKMANS, FELIX J. 
SUGRUE, G. H., JR. 
SWAN, HARRY 
TEBOREK, JAMES J. 
TELLER, CARROLL A. 
TEEVAN, JOHN C. 
THIEDE, JOHN C. 
THOMAS, WILLIAM N. 
THOMPKINS, LIONEL 
THOMPSON, HOPE 
THORSEN, JAMES B. 



THORSEN, SAMUEL B. 
TILTON, GEORGE FRANCIS 
TITUS, LT. ROBERT V. 
TOPLAN, IRVING S. 
TORUP, FREDA. 
TREACY, PHILIP H. 
TRUMBULL, V. H. 
TRUSDELL, R. V. 
TURNER, CHAS. W. 
TYSON, JOHN R. 
UFER, HENRY W. 
ULLMANN, FREDERICK 
ULLRICK, DELBERT 
UNDERWOOD, WALTER 
UNGARO, G. M. 
VANDER, MUELIN, C. 
VEASEY, EDWARD T. 
VON AMMON, ERNEST CARL 
VON OBSTFELDER, HUGO 
WALSH, IGNATIUS 
WALSH, L. J. 
WALTER, WILLIAM S. 
WARFIELD, WILLIAM S. 
WARREN, REV. CLAUDE W. 
WARREN, WALDO P. 
WATTERS, JAMES E. 
WEBB, ALEXANDER 
WEILER, JOHN 
WEINBERG, MORRIS A. 
WEIPLE, ALBERT 
WEISS, IGNACE E. 
WEISS, MORTON B. 
WENDELL, EDWARD E. 
WERMUTH, GEORGE H. 
WHEELOCK, EDGAR T. 
WHIPPLE, C. G. 
WHITING, CLIFFORD W. 
WHITMAN, LLOYD C. 
WHITMAN, R. D. 
WHITTLE, AMOS B. 



WILD, A. C. 
WILLIAMS, JOHN L. 
WILLIAMSON, GEORGE H. 
WILLNER, Jos. Z. 
WILLNER, MEYER M. 
WILSON, CHARLES S. 
WILSON, EUGENE S. 
WILSON, JOHN P., JR. 
WINSHIP, FRANCIS A. 
WIRTH, FRED A. 
WOOD, CHARLES J. 



WOOD, DONALD M. 
WOOD, MILTON G. 
WORMSER, LEO F. 
WRIGHT, ARTHUR C. 
WYMAN, VINCENT D. 
YEOMANS, ALFRED B. 
ZIMMERMAN, E. A. 
ZIMMERMAN, W. J. 
ZINKIN, ARTHUR A. 
ZOLLA, EMIL N. 



PROMINENT GUESTS 

HON. WILLIAM HOWARD MAJOR STANLEY FIELD 

TAFT S. J. DUNCAN-CLARK 

MAJOR-GEN. WM. H. SECRETARY OF THE NAVY 

CARTER JOSEPHUS DANIELS 

BRIGADIER- GENERAL E. D. WILLIAM A. HEATH 

SWINTON R. E. PATTISON KLINE 

103 FRENCH BLUE DEVILSMAJOR K. B. FERGUSON 
CLARENCE D ARROW SHAILER MATTHEWS 

SAMUEL INSULL WILLIAM MATHER LEWIS 

HON. FRANCIS W. PARKERDR. HUGH BIRCKHEAD 
LT. GEORGES FLACHAIRE WILLIAM H. INGERSOLL 
LT. HENRI FARRE WILLIAM McCoRMiCK 

LT. JOSEPH DOBELLE BLAIR 

RUSTON RUSTONJEE DONALD M. RYERSON 

HARRY A. WHEELER CHARLES WOODS, F.R.G.S. 

H. H. MERRICK CAPTAIN PAUL PERIGORD 

C. H. McNiDER MAJ. CARSON MCCORMACK 



WILLIAM A. BRADY MAJOR-GENERAL E. D. 
DR. HUGH BIRCKHEAD SWINTON 

WELLINGTON CROSS JULIUS TANNER 

WILL CRESSY WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT 
MAJ. CARSON MCCORMACK TAYLOR HOLMES 

JOHN T. McCuTCHEON LEO CARILLO 

Louis MANN WILLIAM ROCK 

WILL ROGERS JACK GARDNER 
SIDNEY SMITH 



39 



RESERVE SPEAKERS 



Men subject to call in important campaigns, and 
others who rendered valuable assistance to the organiza- 
tion. 



CARL R. LATHAM 
EDWARD R. LITSINGER 
Louis E. HART 
GEORGE I. HAIGHT 
CHARLES S. DENEEN 
J. A. BLOOMINGSTON 
FREDERIC BURNHAM 
PANDELE ANASTAS 
CHAS. T. BURRAS 
JUDGE WELLS M. COOK 
S. J. DUNCAN-CLARK 
PERCY B. ECKHART 
REV. CHARLES W. GILKY 
CHARLES H. HAMILL 
JUDGE HOWARD HAYES 
C. R. HOLDEN 
JOHN H. S. LEE 
AMOS C. MILLER 
FRANCIS O'SHAUGHNESSY 
ALEX F. REICHMANN 
REV. R. KEENE RYAN 
FRANK H. SCOTT 
JAMES M. SHEEAN 
JUDGE BEN M. SMITH 
HORACE K. TENNEY 
FRANK F. WINANS 



HENRY M. HYDE 
D WIGHT S. BOBB 
STEPHEN GARDNER 
CHAS. H. WACKER 

A. H. REVELL 
W. T. ABBOTT 
M. R. EBERSOLE 
E. W. LLOYD 
CHARLES W. FOLDS 
CHARLES H. SCHWEPPE 
MARQUIS EATON 

H. H. MERRICK 
GEORGE P. MERRICK 
ROGER SHERMAN 
EDGAR A. BANCROFT 
JOHN D. BLACK 
.WALTER S. BREWSTER 
JUDGE FRANK JOHNSTON 
ERNEST T. GUNDLACH 
PETER MORTENSEN 

B. J. MULLANEY 
JULIAN F. MASON 
S. E. THOMASON 
DAVID R. FORGAN 
J. R. CATLOW 
JOSEPH FEUCHTWANGER 



CHICAGO MEN WHO SERVED IN 
WASHINGTON 

DONALD M. RYERSON ERNEST T. GUNDLACH 

WILLIAM McCoRMicx THOMAS JONES MEEK 

BLAIR BERTRAM G. NELSON 

KEITH J.EVANS SOLOMON H. CLARK 

HENRY ATWATER WALDO P. WARREN 

WOMEN ON THE OFFICE STAFF 

MRS. JOSEPHINE M. LLOYD GLENDORA KNIGHT 
MRS. FRANCES D. TALCOTT SARA KNISLEY 
MARY ESTHER McLEAN HELEN HIQBEE 
YVONNE BEAUVAIS MRS. HILDEGARDE W. 

ELEANOR G. READY WARFIELD 



FOUR MINUTE MEN IN THE 
ARMY OR NAVY 



HARRY BIERMA 
B. H. BOSKIE 
DR. ARTHUR CLARKE 
RICHARD H. COLBY 
HAMILTON COLEMAN 
WARREN CRAWFORD 
W. R. DICKINSON 
BENJAMIN L. EICHER 
R. FORMAN FOWLER 
DR. HAROLD C. FOXTON 
ED. FRIEDMAN 
PAUL M. GODEHN 
JOHN W. GORBY 
SPENCE GORDON 
VANDORF GRAY 
JOSEPH D. HERBERT 
HARVEY HOSHOUR 
ROGER B. HULL 
BENJAMIN E. JAFFE 
HENRY G. KOBICK 
HERBERT L. KUMPFER 
URBAN A. LAVERY 

O. C. LORENZ 

J. B. MERRITT 
FRED MERRIFIELD 
Louis W. MACK 



JAMES H. MAHONEY 
ALBERT G. MILLER 
CHARLES MISHKIN 
REV. S. J. MORRISON 
G. MAURICE MORRIS 
MORTIMER M. NEWFIELD 
ANDREW J. O'DONNELL 
EDWARD PURCELL 
VICTOR A. REMY 

W. J. RlSELEY 

DONALD M. RYERSON 
OSCAR D. SEAVER 
NATHANIEL SEEFURTH 
FRANK SHUDNOW 
J. JOSEPH SOLOMON 
R. A. STEVENS 
HARRY SWAN 
J. J. TEBOREK 
HOPE THOMPSON 
ROBERT V. TITUS 
IRVING S. TOPLAN 
FREDERIC ULLMANN 
L. J. WALSH 
WILLIAM S. WARFIELD 
ALBERT WEIPLE 



Killed in Action 

AMOS B. WHITTLE LESTER C. BARTON 

EDWARD T. VEASEY 



LIBERTY CHORUS 

Of the Four Minute Men of Chicago 

M. R. EBERSOLE, Director EUGENE KAMMERER 

S. MORGAN BUSHNELL G. H. LOUNSBERY 

F. L. CURTIS CLARENCE MCCARTHY 

W. DAVIES P. N. H. MUNSON 

W. B. EGAN ALBERT A. OLSON 

O. J. EMMONS CARL A. PFAU 

W. J. FITZPATRICK ROBERT H. SMITH 

C. COY GLIDDEN H. D. SULCER 

W. E. GODSO HARRY WEESE 

GEO. H. JONES E. S. WILSON 



THEATRES 

The following Theatres in Chicago, including both the 
Motion Picture Theatres and Regular Theatres, gave 
full cooperation to the work of the Four Minute Men, 
and received the Government's Official Certificate 
acknowledging their service. 

ACME APOLLO 

5241 North Clark St. 47th & Forestville 

ADELPHI ARCHER 

7070 North Clark St. 2008 W. 35th Street 

ALCAZAR ARGMORE 

69 Madison Street 1040 Argyle St. 

ALMA ARISTO 

54th & Wentworth Ave. 2650 Lincoln Ave. 

ALPHA ARMITAGE 

5419 South Ashland Ave. 3553 Armitage Ave. 

ALVIN ARROW 

860 E. 63rd St. 1438 Fullerton Ave. 

AMERICAN ASHLAND 

8 North Ashland Ave. 1613 W. Madison St. 

43 



ASHLAND 

4717 South Ashland Are. 

ATLANTIC 

8950 West 26th Street 

ATLAS 

1619 West 68rd St. 

ATLAS 

4716 South State St 

AUDITORIUM 

56 E. Congress St 

AUSTIN 

5619 W. Madison St. 

AVERS 

3825 W. 26th Street 

AVENUE 

11307 Michigan Ave. 

AVENUE 

3106 Indiana Ave. 

AVON 

3325 Fullerton Ave. 

BANDBOX 

125 West Madison St. 

BELL 

3064 Armitage Ave. 

BELL 

2407 West Madison St. 

BELL 

1539 Milwaukee Ave. 

BELL PALAIS 

2138 West Madison St. 

BEN HUR 

3065 Cicero Ave. 

BERTHA 

4717 Lincoln Ave. 

BIJOU DREAM 

114 South State Street 

BlOGRAPH 

2433 Lincoln Ave. 

BLACKSTONE 

60 East 7th Street 

BLAINE 

3743 Southport Ave. 

BLOCK 

1310 South Halsted St. 

BOSTON 

25 N. Clark Street 

BOULEVARD 

1606 West 55th Street 



BOWEN 

3092 E. 92nd Street 

BROADWAY 

5206 Broadway 

BROADWAY STRAND 

1641 W. 12th Street 

BROOKLINE 

7107 South Chicago Ave. 

BRYN MAWR 

1125 Bryn Mawr Ave. 

BUCKINGHAM 

3319 N. Clark St. 

BUGG 
3940 W. Robey St. 

BURNSIDE 
9314 Cottage Grove Ave. 

BUTLER 

518 W. 26th Street 

CALIFORNIA 

3434 West 12th Street 

CALO 

5406 North Clark Street 

CALUMET 

9206 S. Chicago Ave. 

CASIMIR 

4760 Milwaukee Ave. 

CASINO 

3606 South Halsted Street 

CASINO 

68 West Madison Street 

CENTRAL PARK 

3535 W. 12th Street 

CENTURY 

1421 W. Madison St 

CHARM 

4303 S. Halsted St 

CHATEAU 

3810 Broadway 

CHICAGO 

614 S. State Street 

CIRCLE 

3241 West 12th Street 

CLERMONT 

3220 North Clark St 

CLIFTON 

1136 Wilson Ave. 

44 



COHAN'S GRAND OPERA 
HOUSE 

121 North Clark St. 

COLONIAL 

24 W. Randolph St. 

COLUMBIA 

11 North Clark St. 

COLUMBUS 

6238 S. Ashland Ave. 

CORT 

126 North Dearborn St. 

COSMOPOLITAN 

7938 S. Halsted St. 

COVENT GARDENS 

2653 North Clark St 

CRAWFORD 

19 S. Crawford Ave. 

CRESCENT 

2915 Milwaukee Ave. 

CRITERION 

1220 Sedgwick St. 

CROWN 

6123 Wentworth Ave. 

CROWN HIPPODROME 

4011 West 26th Street 

CRYSTAL 

2701 West North Ave. 

CRYSTAL 

1720 W. 63rd St. 

CASINO HIPPODROME 

403 North Clark St. 

CASTLE 

6 South State Street 

CENTER 

1161 W. Madison Street 

CRYSTAL 

4921 S. Ashland Ave. 

DANTE 

813 West Taylor Street 

DEARBORN 

40 West Division Street 

DELPHI 

225 E. 31st Street 

DELUXE 

1141 Wilson Ave. 

DELUXE 

814 E. 63rd Street 



DOUGLAS 

3236 West 22nd St. 

DRAKE 

2905 Milwaukee Ave. 

DREXEL 

858 E. 63rd Street 

DRURY LANE 

2736 N. Clark Street 

EAGLE 

3324 S. Morgan Street 

EAGLE 

764 Milwaukee Ave. 

E. A. R. 

6839 Wentworth Ave. 

EASTERLY 

2766 Lincoln Ave. 

EDWARDS 

2419 Wentworth Ave. 

ELBA 

3115 Indiana Avenue 

ELMO 

2404 W. Van Buren St. 

ELMWOOD 

Oak Park, Ills. 

ELSTON 

3167 Elston Ave. 

EMMETT 

4338 Wentworth Avenue 

EMPIRE 

673 W. Madison Street 

EMPRESS 

6226 South Halsted Street 

ENGLEWOOD 

726 W. 63rd Street 

EROS 

641 N. Clark Street 



10106 Ewing Ave. 

FAMOUS 

3644 West Chicago Ave. 

FOUNTAIN 

35th & South Park Ave. 

FRANCIS 

2407 W. 12th Street 

FRANCISCO 

2917 West Madison Street 

FRANKLIN 

328 E. 31st Street 
45 



FROLIC 

951 E. 55th Street 

GAIETY 

9205 Commercial Avenue 

GARDEN 

3305 N. Marshfield Ave. 

GARFIELD 

2844 W. Madison Street 

GARFIELD 

5531 S. Halsted Street 

GARRICK 

58 West Randolph Street 

GAIETY 

531 S. State Street 

GEM 

450 South State Street 

GLEN 

2852 Armitage Avenue 

GOLD 

3411 W. 12th Street 

GRAND 

3433 W. North Ave. 

GRAND 

3110 S. State Street 

GREAT NORTHERN 

23 Quincy Street 

HALFIELD 

5451 S. Halsted Street 

HALSTED 

320 S. Halsted Street 

HALSTED 

6202 S. Halsted Street 

HAMILTON 

2150 E. 71st Street 

HAMLIN 

3826 W. Madison Street 

HARMONY 

411 E. 43rd Street 

HARPER 

5236 Harper Avenue 

HARRISON 

603 S. Kedzie Ave. 

HARVARD 

6312 Harvard Ave. 

HAYMARKET 

722 W. Madison St. 

HILLSIDE 

1515 W. 69th Street 



HOMAN 

3346 W. 26th Street 

HOME 

3749 W. 26th Street 

HOME 

5035 S. Halsted Street 

HOWARD 

1630 Howard Avenue 

HOYBURN 

Evanston, Ills. 

HUB 

1746 West Chicago Ave. 

HYDE PARK 

5314 Lake Park Avenue 

IDEAL 

1622 Larrabee St. 

ILLINGTON 

2118 W. 22nd Street 

ILLINOIS 

61 East Jackson Blvd. 

INDIANA 

219 East 43rd Street 

lOLA 

1238 Milwaukee Ave. 

IRIS 

5743 W. Chicago Avenue 

IRVING 

4003 Irving Pk. Blvd. 

IRVING PARK 

4835 Irving Pk. Blvd. 

JACKSON PARK 

6711% Stoney Island Ave. 

JANET 

617 W. North Ave. 

JEFFERSON 

1523 East 55th Street 

Ju ANITA 

5038 W. Chicago Ave. 

JULIAN 

918 Belmont Ave. 

KARLOV 

4048 Armitage Ave. 

KEDZIE 

3204 W. Madison Street 

KEDZIE ANNEX 

3210 W. Madison Street 

KENMORE 

1039 Wilson Ave. 
46 



KENWOOD 

1225 E. 47th Street 

KEYSTONE 

3912 Sheridan Rd. 

KlMBARK 

6240 Kimbark Ave. 

KNICKERBOCKER 

6217 Broadway 

KOZY 

40 S. Clark Street 

KRITERION 

2138 W. Madison Street. 

LAKESIDE 

4730 Sheridan Road 

LANE COURT 

328 Center Street 

LANGLEY HIP. 

63rd and Langley Ave. 

LASALLE 

lia West Madison St. 

LASALLE 

152 W. Division Street 

LELAND 

4716 Lincoln Ave. 

LEXINGTON 

1162 E. 63rd Street 

LEXINGTON 

715 S. Crawford Ave. 

LIBERTY 

3705 Fullerton Ave. 

LIBERTY 

1180 Milwaukee Ave. 

LINCOLN 

3132 S. State Street 

LINCOLN 

1846 W. Madison Street 

LINCOLN HIPPODROME 

3162 Lincoln Ave. 

LINDEN 

743 W. 63rd Street 

LITTLE KIMBARK 

Kimbark and 75th Street 

LOWY'S 

740 Milwaukee Avenue 

LYCEUM 

3851 Cottage Grove Ave. 

LYRIC 

1217 Milwaukee Ave. 



LYRIC 

320 S. State Street 

MABEL 

3956 Elston Ave. 

MADISON SQUARE 

4740 W. Madison Street 

MADLIN 

1910 W. Madison Street 

MAGNOLIA 

2810 Fullerton Ave. 

MAJESTIC 

18 W. Monroe St. 

MAPLEWOOD 

2811 Diversey Ave. 

MARION 

3446 S. Halsted Street 

MARLOWE HIPP. 

6254 Stewart Ave. 

MARSHALL SQUARE 

2871 W. 22nd Street 

MARSHFIELD 

1650 W. 12th Street 

MAY 

3159 Elston Ave. 

McVlCKERS 

17 W. Madison Street 

MELROSE PARK 

Melrose Park, Ills. 

METROPOLE 

238 W. 31st Street 

METROPOLITAN 

4644 Grand Blvd. 

MICHIGAN 

5441 S. Michigan Ave. 

MIDWAY HIPP. 

6248 Cottage Grove Ave. 

MlLDA 

3138 S. Halsted Street 

MlLFORD 

3311 N. Crawford Ave. 

MODEL 

4151 W. Madison Street 

MODEL 

1348 S. Halsted Street 

MOHAWK 

539 W. North Ave. 

MONARCH 

2123 W. Division St. 

47 



MONOGRAM 

8520 S. Halsted Street 

NATIONAL 

608 S. State Street 

NATIONAL 

6221 S. Halsted Street 

NEW AMERICUS 

3437 Ogden Avenue 

NEW APOLLO 

1640 N. Crawford Ave. 

NEW ASHLAND 

4856 South Ashland Ave. 

NEWBERRY 

864 N. Clark Street 

NEW ILLINOIS 

8116 Wentworth Ave. 

NEW MAYWOOD 

Maywood, Ills. 

NEW PARK 

840 East 61st St 

NEW PARIS 

618 S. State St. 

NEW REGENT 

6826 S. Halsted Street 

NEW STRAND 

2111 W. Division St 

NEW WONDERLAND 

734 W. Madison St 

OAK 

2004 N. Western Ave. 

OAKLAND SQUARE 

3947 Drexel Blvd. 

OAKLEY 

2320 West Chicago Ave. 

OAK PARK 

Oak Park, Ills. 

OGDEN 

2336 W. 12th Street 

OLYMPIC 

166 N. Clark Stret 

OLYMPIA 

4619 S. Ashland Avenue 

ORCHARD 

669 W. North Avenue 

ORCHESTRA HALL 

216 S. Michigan Ave. 

ORPHEUM 

112 S. State Street 



ORPHEUS 

1613 W. 12th Street 

OWL 

4663 S. State Street 

PALACE 

127 N. Clark Street 

PALACE 

1146 Blue Island Ave. 

PALAIS ROYALE 

1710 W. Madison Street 

PANTHEON 

4644 Sheridan Road 

PARAMOUNT 

2648 Milwaukee Ave. 

PARKSIDE 

1660 N. Clark St 

PARK MANOR 

361 E. 69th Street 

PARKWAY 

11063 S. Michigan Ave. 

PASTIME 

760 W. 79th Street 

PASTIME 

66 W. Madison St 

PAULINA 

1339 North Paulina Street 

PEERLESS 

3966 Grand Blvd. 

PERSHING 

716 W. 12th Street 

PHOENIX 

81st & State Street 

PlCKFORD 
108 East 35th Street 

PINE GROVE 

717 Sheridan Road 

PLAISANCE 

660 East 63rd Street 

PLAISANCE 

466 North Parkside Avenue 

PLAISIR 

8947 North Crawford Ave. 

PLAYHOUSE 

410 S. Michigan Avenue 

PLAZA 

808 W. North Avenue 

POWERS 

124 West Randolph Street 

48 



PRAIRIE 

6748 Prairie Avenue 

PRINCESS 

819 South Clark Street 

QUEEN 

2643 West North Avenue 

RAINBOW 

11311 S. Michigan Ave. 

REGENT 

6746 Sheridan Road 

REX 

6848 S. Racine Ave. 

RlALTO 

336 South State Street 

RIVIERA 

Broadway & Lawrence 

ROGERS 

2516 Fullerton Ave. 

ROSE 

63 W. Madison St. 

ROSE 

2860 Milwaukee Avenue 

ROSELAND 
11331 S. Michigan Ave. 

ROSEWOOD 

1823 Montrose Blvd. 

SAVOY 

4346 West Madison Street 

SCHINDLER'S 

1009 West Huron Street 

SHAKESPEARE 

942 East 43rd Street 

SHEERIN 

663 North Clark Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO 

South Chicago, 9223 Commercial 
Ave. 

SOUTHERN 

828 South Oak Park Ave., Oak 
Park 

SPRINGFIELD 

3857 W. 12th Street 

STANDARD 

760 N. Clark Street 

STAR 

68 West Madison Street 

STAR 

1453 Milwaukee Ave. 



STAR 

Evanston, Ills. 

STAR 

1415 Fullerton Ave. 

STAR & GARTER 

815 West Madison Street 

STATES 

3507 South State Street 

STRAND 

3031 Lincoln Ave. 

STUDEBAKER 

418 S. Michigan Ave. 

TRIANGLE 

Evanston, Ills. 

TEMPLE 

3121 Lincoln Ave. 

TERMINAL 

3308 Lawrence Ave. 

THALIA 

1215 W. 18th Street 

TIFFIN 

4045 West North Ave. 

TRIANGLE 

7219 Wentworth Ave. 

TULANE 
6108 South Halsted Street 

TWENTIETH CENTURY 

4708 Prairie Ave. 

TWENTIETH CENTURY 

3630 W. 12th Street 

UNION 

4650 South Ashland Ave. 

UNITED STATES 

646 S. State Street 

VAUDETTE 

3044 E. 92nd St. 

VERNON 

436 East 61st Street 

VILLAGE 

Wilmette, Ills. 

VIRGINIA 

210 East 43rd Street 

VISION 

2660 W. Division St. 

VISTA 

824 East 47th Street 

VlTAGRAPH 

3137 Lincoln Avenue 

49 



WABASH 

1838 S. Wabash Are. 

WALLACE 

622 W. 31st Street 

WAVERLY 

627 South Halsted Street 

WEST END 

121 N. Cicero Ave. 

WHITE PALACE 

1609 S. Kedzie Ave. 

WILSON AVENUE 

1048 Wilson Avenue 

WINDSOR 

1235 N. Clark Street 



WINDSOR PARK 

2644 E. 75th Street 

WINNETKA COMMUNITY 
HOUSE 

Winnetka 

WOODLAWN 
853 East 63rd Street 

WOODS 

64 West Randolph Street 

WORLD 

61 West Randolph Street 

YALE 

Maywood, Ills. 

ZlEGFELD 

624 S. Michigan Ave. 



SO 



AUXILIARY SPEAKERS 

Three auxiliary organizations were developed by the 
Four Minute Men. These included speakers who spoke 
only in Fraternal Societies, Churches, and Labor 
Unions. These speakers, although not regularly listed 
as Four Minute Men, did effective service in their re- 
spective fields, followed the schedule of official topics, 
and acted in accordance with instructions from the Chi- 
cago Chairman. These lists comprise only those who 
spoke in five campaigns, the basis of the award of the 
Honorable Discharge Certificates. 



FRATERNAL SECTION 



Aiken, E. J. 
Allegrette, Francis B. 
Alesh, Frank 
Alexander, R. G. 
Alexander, J. A. 
Almcrantz, Hilton O. 
Amerson, G. W. 
Andelman, M. L. 
Anders, "W. F. 
Anderson, Mabel B. 
Anderson, A. G. 
Anderson, Ole 
Anssem, Peter 
Avallove, D. G. 
Armbruster, C. A. 
Ayers, G. L. 
Backus, Theo. B. R. 
Badger, Carlton S. 
Banks, Anna S. 
Bartisek, Frank 
Basener, Emil A, 
Bauer, Henry J. 
Baum, Wm. L. 
Bayer, F. A. 
Beck, Norman A. 
Becker, John 
Berg, A. G. 
Berg, J. M. 
Bertram, Wm. H. 
Besdorf, M. H. 
Besold, G. C. 
Bienman, W. C. 
Bllek, Frank J. 
Birma, Harry 



Blattan, John H. 
Blencoe, W. H. 
Block, J. L. 
Blomquist, Wm. < 
Bloom, J. B. 
Bluim, Elmer 
Booth, Sherman M. 
Brakeneld, Helen M. 
Bricker, Olive 
Brouillet, H. A. 
Brown, S. G. 
Burnett, Marlon S. 
Campbell, W. P. 
Canmann, Harry L. 
Carey, Judge F!dward J. 
Carmody, M. E. 
Cato, Frank 
Chlsholm, Thomas M. 
Chrystal, W. L. 
Claffy, Thos. J. 
Conlon, Andrew A. 
Cohan, E. J. 
Cromley, P. J. 
Curlleux, E. E. 
Davis, J. W. 
Day, L. W. 
Deachman, T. W. 
Delson, L. J. 
Del Vecchio, C. J. 
Dempsey, R. G. 
Denison, W. L. 
Denman, Sarah H. 
Derebey, Nellie P. 
Dickhert, H. E. 

51 



Dixon, Frank 
Donat, A. I. 
Donnell, Andrew J. O. 
Doran, Mary E. 
Dorner, Albert W. 
Doud, Wm. P. 
Downey, Wm. 
Drechsler, Charles 
Duffy, W. P. 
Eckberg, Carl O. 
Edholm, Eli E. 
Edwards, Helga 
Eiselen, F. C. 
Euler, John 
Ewerts, Peter 
Farrow, P. R. 
Feick, Henry 
Ferrin, J. C. 
Fey, Wm. 
Finn, Martin J. 
Fischer, Edw. J. 
Fixmer, H. J. 
Flekhan, Otto W. 
Frey, J. Fred 
Friend, Hugo M. 
Fischer, W. E. 
Funk, Mrs. Melva Garten 
Gaede, H. H. 
Geiger, Louise E. 
Cellar, Louis H. 
Geslason, A. 
Gibson, Francis P. 
Gisling, George 
Glickman, Louis 



Gordon, Lester 


Lapham, Anna Rose 


Gorman, John J. 


Larsen, Andrew 


Graham, Wm. 


Lasdon, Morris 


Grank, Luke 


Lathrope, W. G. 


Green, Geo. E. 


LeGros, Hulda 


Hagberg, E. H. 


Leiff, Calvin W. 


Haiman, Laura 


Leviton, Phillip P. 


Hall, C. B. 


Linder, Charles P. 


Harnew, William H. 


Linn, Robert F., Jr. 


Harper, Henry 


Loehol, Carl C. 


Harris, James H. 


Luebeck, E. H. 


Hart, Mrs. Anna 


Luik, Christian 


Hart, Henrietta G. 


Lumby, O. M. 


Hazzard, W. J. 


Lurie, Harry J. 


Hearl, A. F. 


Luttge, Wm. B. 


Heilemann, E. A. 


McAuliffe, John P. 


Heineman, W. F. 


McConkey, E. V. 


Heist, Chas. 


McCrae, Robert J. 


Helton, W. R. 


McKean, Thomas 


Hering, Henry 


McKeough, R. S. 


Heron, James S. 


McNair, Alexander 


Heydorn, F. K. 


MacArthur, P. D. 


Heyman, Alexander H. 


MacDonald, P. C. 


Hibbeler, Mathew 


Maier, John 


Hillis, Frank N. 


Main, C. J. 


Hoffman, H. I. 


Malek, E. 


Hogberg, E. H. 


Mammosee, J. E. 


Holmes, Chas. E. 


Manning, Arthur 


Hoopes, A. M. 


Maschek, Theo 


Hoover, W. H. 


Maud, Mrs. Maude R. 


Horst, Chas. M. 


Meloling, Grant U. 


Houle, Frank R. 


Merely, George F. 


Hoy, Ivan 


Merensky, Joseph J. 


Huebsch, Arthur 


Mertel, W. 


Huehl, Mrs. Amalia 


Meyer, L. E. 


Huehl, A. H. 


Meyer, M. A. 


Hutchinson, Charles G. 


Meyers, Francis B. 


Irrmann, Walter P. 


Miller, Mrs. Dorothea 


Jaeger, T. A. 


Miller, Joseph 


Janovsky, Felix B. 


Miskelly, A. C. 


Jenkins, Mrs. X. K. 


Miller, J. G. 


Joens, J. John 


Moak. Chas. L. 


Johnson, Chas. J. 


Moran, Wm. F. 


Johnson, Peter J. 


Moroney, Harold P. 


Johnson, Walter A. 


Mueller, Conrad A. 


Jones, David 


Muntmyler, L. E. 


Jordan, O. F. 


Murmann, A. F. 


Kallschener, A. J. 


Murray, Chas. F. 


Kater, Wm. C. 


Nehls, C. F. 


Keegan, John J. 


Nelson, A. W. 


Kelleher, J. M. 


Nelson, Pearl E. 


Kemdson, Chas. S. 


Nesbitt, Geo. S. 


Kennedy, Chas. F. 


Noack, Chas. E. 


Kenney, Harry P. 


Noble, Lillian 


Kenner, Mrs. Nettle 


Nolan, Walter B. 


Kerbs, Ferd A. 


Norton, William. 


Kerr, James 


Norwood, Benj. I. 


Kerze, Frank 


O'Donnell, Andrew J. 


Kilbey, Geo. A. 


Oakey, J. D. 


Kilcran, James 


Olin, C. E. 


Kimball, Clyde A. 


Olin, William O. 


King, P. 


Olson, A. P. 


Kinney, George A. 


Olson, Geo. A. 


Kittler, J. R. 


Oram, H. K. 


Klepke, Wm. C. 


Ord, Chas. 


Klinke, A. W. 


Patterson, William 


Kluetsch, Nic. Jos. 


Paul, John 


Knight, C. M. 


Pember, Mrs. Lydia 


Kock, Agnes 


Peterson, Harry K. 


Koepke, Frank 


Pfeifer, Oscar T. 


Kolmos, Jesse 


Pflum, August J. 


Koss, Wm. A. 


Phillips, Edgar 


Kreer, John G. 


Pollard, Annie L. 


Krueger, Mary M. 


Porter, Frederick 


Kunze, Emmy 


Prince, Hyman A. 


Anderson, Mabel B. 


Proctor, Howard C. 


Kurtz, Henry D. 


Quinlan, John M. 


Kurtz, John 


Rahn, August H. 


Lamb, Edward J. 


Raven, Alfred 


Lambert, Josephine 


Read, Thomas 


Lamble, Thomas W. 


Reese, Samuel 




52 



Reinbold, S. H. 
Resag, Fred K. 
Reynolds, Fred E. 
Richter, E. H. 
Roche, Stephen F. 
Roller, Mrs. Jennie 
Roner, A. F. 
Rosenueig, Geo. K. 
Rountree, Hiram P. 
Rowland, R. B. 
Rowley, J. F . 
Rund, John 
Russell, Thomas H. 
Rust, Mrs. Mattie 
Samuels, Dr. M. W. 
Schatz, W. J. 
Schmitz, Claribel 
Schmitz, Fred A. 
Schooler, Miss Rose 
Schuler, Chas. F. 
Seese, Peter 
Shaw, William B. 
Shawcross, Chas. 
Shimek, Frank 
Skubic, Edw. P. 
Slaski, Leo 
Smeltz, R. M. 
Smerling, Albert L. 
Smith, Walter 
Spachner, Albert 
Spitzer, Sam 
Sproul, Grace A. 
Stanfleld, C. W. 
Steffen, Walter P. 
Steinberg, Samuel L.. 
Stemwedel, A. W. 
Straus, Gertrude 
Button, C. Earl 
Swanson, G. 
Sward, Chas. E. 
Tallkuehn, Frank F. 
Taylor, Oscar E. 
Teller, S. H. 
Theorell, F. J. 
Thiel, J. A. 
Thompson, F. M. 
Thorelius, P. William 
Tinsley, William 
Toskett, H. E. 
Traub, W. F. 
Trimmer, Miss Kate 
Trusman, James J. 
Tulett, W. H. 
Turner, Arthur W. 
Valentine, G. 
Van Houghton, Geo. 8. 
Von Huf, Chas. 
Van Sickle, Georgia 
Vickers, E. P. 
Von Hollen, Geo. 
Waldo, Rev. Alfred 
Walker, Guy M. 
Walsh, Lawrence J. 
Watson, Chas. 
Weiland, F. L. 
Weinberg, Morris A. 
Weinert, John 
Weiss, G. A. 
Welch, Wm. Spence 
Wetherell, F. S. 
Wetmore, B. F. 
White, W. K. 
Whitmore, John W. 
Wiggins, F. H. 
Wilber, Albert W. 
William, A. G. 
Wirts, Fred S. 
Young, Jos. W. 
Youngberg, Carl 
Zavadil, Louis G. 
Zeitich. Julius 



LABOR SECTION 



Atkinson, R. C. 
Bauser, John M. 
Billingsley, Edw. 
Booth, Milton 
Cleveland, Wm. E. 
Crosby, P. H. 
David, John W. 
Debs, Alfred 
Defaut, Eugene 
Diederich, Dr. J. J. 
Drexel, John 
Elzinga, Edward G. 
Fahy, John J. 
Farnam, Joseph 
Feeney, John J. 
Geenty, Patrick F. 
Gold, Joseph 
Hague, Ira 
Hamilton, John 
Harrison, George W. 
Hawkins, Patrick 
Jackson, Frank 



Jackson, John 
Jameson, Evald Peter 
Jones, John 
Joureaux, Phillip 
Kearns, James B. 
Kelly, John 
Kennedy 
Kenth, Harry 
Kerr, Walter 
Kinney, E. J. 
Lam pa, Edward 
McBreen, Thomas 
McKinley, J. D. 
Mangan, John 
Marsh, Harry 
Meehan, Michael S. 
Minion, A. J. 
Murphy, Martin 
Neighbar, Clarence J. 
O'Connor, J. J. 
Oleomor, John 
Peck, Joseph 



Raymond, Arthur B. 
Read, John 
Reed, A. J. 
Rossell, Wm. 
Sauer, H. R. 
Schmidt, Hugo 
Selandee, Oscar 
Snow, Walter 
Snyder, John 
Stoner, Clettes 
Stringer, John R. 
Sughura, F. D. 
Sutfin, O. T. 
Trost, Wm. 
Turba, Louis 
Walsh, Michael 
Webster, George V. 
Weidermeyer, Bruno 
Weiss, Louis 
Wild, H. M. 
Wills, Charles F. 



CHURCH SECTION 



Aiken, E. J. 
Albritton, Rev. J. M. 
Aldeen, Rev. C. A. 
Allen, Rev. Ira W. 
Allen, Rev. Paul Riley 
Althoff, Rev. Chas. B. 
Ames, Rev. E. S. 
Anastase, Rev. Joseph 
Anderson, Rev. C. P. 



Brown, Rev. Arthur T. 
Brown, Rev. Clarence T. 
Brown, Rev. Henry S. 
Brugh, Rev. Avery 
Bryant, Mr. John M. 
Budlong, Rev. Fred G. 
Budzinsky, Rabbi Na- 
than 
Burhaus, Rev. Frank D. 



Anderson, Rev. Frank L. Burke, Rev. Thomas 
Anderson, Rev. Frank O. (C. S. P.) 
Anderson, Rev. J. C. Burns, Rev. J. Calhoun 

Anderson, Rev. Joseph L. Butterfield, Rev. Ray 
Anderson, Rev. Marten Esan 
E. Byas, Rev. A. J. 

Byrnes, Rev. E. 

Cahill, Rev. Wm. F. 

Cain, Rev. Louis P. 

Caldwell, Rev. Ray T. 

Callagan, Rev. J. F. 
(LL.D.) 

Cannell, Rev. F. P. 

Cardon, Rabbi Abraham 



Andrien, Rev. Carl J. 
Angeletti, Rev. Joseph 
Arell, Rev. O. W. 
Arnold, Rev. Edwin C. 
Baikie, Miss Jean S. 
Baker, Rev. T. P. 
Barnum, Rev. F. W. 
Barr, Rev. Norman 
Barry, Mr. Chas. A. 
Barton, Rev. Wm. E. 
Baxter, Rev. T. M. 
Beattie, Rev. Robt. H. 
Beckstrom, Rev. J. M. 
Bennett, Rev. John T. 
Berenson, Rabbi Meyer 



I. 

Carlson, Rev. Eric 
Carlson, Rev. Gustar G. 
Case, Rev. Carl D. 
Casey, Rev. Joseph A. 
Cattermole, Rev. E. G. 
Cawthorne, Rev. H. L. 



Berghoefer, Rev. Fred J. Chapman, Rev. Benj. E. 



Berry, Rev. Ira P. 
Biermann, Rev. P. L. 
Bigger, Rev. Robt. R. 
Blahunka, Rev. V. 
Bleam, Rev. Wm. M. 
Bloemer, Rev. Henry F. 



Charters, Rev. Thomas 
Chenuil, Rev. P. (C. S. 

Chddiewicz, Rev. F. M. 
Chvatal, Rev. Joseph 
(O. S. B.) 



Bloomquist, Rev. W. C. Clarke, Rev. A. S. C. 
Blumberg, Rev. Fred Cloud, Rev. _M. H. 
Bobal, Rev. Thomas J. 
Bona, Rev. Thomas P. 
Bonifas, Rev. Theodore 



Code, Rev. George C. 

Code, Rev. J. J. 

Coffee, Rabbi Rudolph I. 

Bortak, Rev. Joseph Paul Cohen, Rabbi Samuel S. 
Bowman, Rev. H. L. Cook, Rev. Wm. 

Corktrom, Rev. T. O. 

Corwin, Rev. Jones Earl 

Covert, Rev. Wm. Chal- 



Boyd, Rev. William S. 

Brand, Chas. A. 

Breed, Rev. Dwight P. 

Briggs, Rev. Walter A. mers 

Braden, Rev. Samuel R. iCox, Rev. Clinton C. 



Brosseit, Rev. F. W. 



Crabtree, Rev. Allan 
58 



Crane, Rev. C. W. 
Crawford, Rev. John O. 
Crosby, Rev. K. O. 
Cummings, Rev. C. A. 
Dahl, Rev. Edwin S. 
Dandanville, Rev. E. Li. 
Darcy, Rev. J. J. 
Darden, Rev. Robt. L. 
David, Rev. Samui 

David 

Davies, Rev. J. W. V. 
De Carlo, Rev. Pasqaale 
Denison, Mr. W. L. 
De Long, Rev. John E. 
Dembinski, Rev. Francis 

(C. R.) 

de Norus, Rev. R. 
Dennison, Rev. John J. 
Dent, Rev. Joseph Croft 
Derengowski, Rev. S. 
Dickey, Rev. Chas. J. 
Diether, Rev. L. C. 

(O. C. C.) 

Dinman, Rev. W. A. 
Dixon, Rev. C. G. 
D'Lacy, Rev. John H. 
Doble, Rev. Wm. B. 
Dock, Rev. Herbert W. 
Doran, Rev. J. P. 
Drens, Rev. Henry 
Drummond, Rev. A. C. 
Duha, Rev. Frank W. 
Dunne, Rev. P. W. 

(P. R.) 

Egan, Rev. Thomas F. 
Eisenbacher, Rev. Geo. 
Elfentein, Rabbi Israel 
Ellis, Rev. Wiles A. 
Engwall, Rev. Swan A. 
Epstein, Rev. Chas. H. 
Epstein, Rabbi Ephraim 
Epstein, Rev. F. J. 
Erkenawick, Rev. C. A. 
Ernstiiifi, Rev. M. C. 
Evans, Rev. B. B. 
Faber, R<v. W. G. 
Fahringer, Rev. Fred H. 
Fant, Rev. O. A. 
Farmiloe, Rev. F. F 



Feinberg, Rabbi Nathan Hunt, Rev. Theodore C. 

Ferguson, Rev. James B. Hunter, Rev. Austin 

Findley, Rev. Samuel W. Hyde, Rev. Henry Neal 

Finn, Rev. John S. 

Fischer, Rabbi M. 

Fischer, Rev. P. W. 

Fitch, Rev. Frank F. 

Fitzgerald, Rev. J. 

Flock, Rev. G. K. 

Ford, Rev. S. T. 

Fortin, Rev. J. C. 

Foster, Rev. L. E. 

Foster, Rev. Theodore B. der 

Fritsch, Rev. H. Samuel John, Rev. John 

Fuerstenau, Rev. A. F. 

Gage, Rev. A. H. 

Gambera, Rev. C. G. 

Gardner, Rev. A. M. 

Garrison, Rev. J. L. 

Gelinas, Rev. P. T. 

Giambastiane, Rev. L. 

Gibson, Rev. Samuel M. 

Gilky, Rev. Chas. W. 

Gillispie, Rev. George R. 

Gilmartin, Rev. M. S. 

Godden, Rev. Wm. C. 

Gordon, Rev. G. B. 

Gordon, Rev. F. (C. R.) 



Martin, Rev. E. T. 

Martin, Rev. Francis Jas. 

Martin, Rev. J. B. 

Hyde, Rev. R. Scott Melody, Rev. John W. 

Hyde, Rev. W. J. (D. D.) 

Hynes, Rev. J. A. Meredith, Rev. John 

Jagodzinsky, Rev. Henry Mertius, Rev. Franz Gus- 
Jedlicka, Rev. F. W. tav 

Johnson, Rev. Albert Messing, Rabbi A. J. 

Jenkinson, Rev. Henry S. Meyers, Rev. Johnston 
Jennings, Rev. Jas. J. Miles, Rev. W. C. 
Jenkins, Rev. J. Alexan- Misecka, Rev. Joseph 

Mohns, Rev. Arthur W. 



Jordan, Rev. F. J. 
Jones, Rev. Daniel H. 
Karabasz, Rev. F. J. 



Moore, Rev. Aubrey S. 
Moore, Rev. Walter 

Howard 
Morrissey, Rev. John J. 



Kaufman, Rev. Wesley M. Mullaly, Rev. James J. 



Gorske, Rev. A. 'S. (D. D.) 
Grant, Rev. Fred C. 
Gratiot, Rev. Fred L. 
Greer, Rev. J. F. 
Griswold, Rev. S. M. 
Gronkowski, Rev. C. I. 
Grose, Rev. Wm. E. 
Gross, Rev. Theo. G. 



Kearney, Rev. W. L. 
Kearns, Rev. J. J. 
Kellogg, Rev. Theodore 
Kelly, Mr. Raymond 
Keough, Rev. Edward S. 
Kestle, Rev. I. 
Kessler, Rev. C. M. 
Kinsela, Rev. W. J. 
Klasen, Rev. M. 
Klein, Rev. N. (C. 

C. R.) 
Knapp, Rev. L. H. 
Knight, Rev. H. W. 
Kotecki, Rev. Max 
Kowalski, Rev. E. A. 
Kramer, Rev. Edward 
Kramer, Rev. Isaac A. 
Kralecet, Rev. V. 



Guilbert, Rev. Edward S. Kriesella, Rev. Wm. J. 



Gwyn, Rev. Herbert B. 
Hales, Rev. Chas. H. 
Halgas, Rev. A. 
Hall, Rev. Logan 
Hallden, Rev. Eric 
Haman, Rev. Bernard 

(O. S. B.) 

Hammitt, Rev. Leon L. 
Hanley, Rev. Mathew 
Hanson, Rev. K. 
Hare, Rev. Logan 
Harris, Rev. A. L. 
Harris, Rev. R. A. 
Harrison, Rev. H. 
Hart, Rev. Thomas 
Haslam, Rev. J. B. 
Hedeen, Rev. J. V. 



Kruszka, Rev. Joseph H. 
La Marre, Rev. J. V. 
Land, Rev. Geo. B. 
Langfort, Rev. Theo. 
Lauer, Rev. P. 
Leggett, Rev. Thomas 
Leonard, Rev. A. E. 
Leonard, Rev. Frank H. 
Leoppert, Rev. A. L. 
Leoppert, Rev. H. C. 
Levi, Rabbi Gerson B. 
Levy, Rabbi Felix A. 
Linden, Rev. Fredrik 
Linkletter, Rev. C. S. 
Logren, Rev. Francisco 
Loidman, Rev. C. S. 



Murray, Rev. Roderick 
Muskin, Rabbi R. E. 
Murray, Rev. Walter B. 
Nabholz, Rev. O. C. 
Nash, Rev. F. B. 
Navacek, Rev. A. J. 
Nelson, Rev. Carl J. 
Nelson, Rev. Swaney 
Nesmith, Rev. George 
S.Netstraeter, Rev. Wm. 
Newman, Rev. Julius 
Nicely, Rev. John W. 
Nickless, Rev. Alfred S. 
Northcott, Rev. H. Clif- 
ford 

Nybladh, Rev. Carl A. 
Nyman, Rev. Chas. A. 
O'Brien, Rev. D. P. 
O'Brien, Rev. F. M. 
O'Brien, Rev. Terence 
O'DonnenY Rev. Ed. M. 
Ohon, Rev. Wm. 
O'Reilly, Rev. E. 
O'Shea, Rev. W. J. 
Ostema, Rev. James 
O' Sullivan, Rev. M. 
Otto, Rev. Benj. 
Palmer, Rev. Edwin C. 
Papitto, Rev. O. 
Parrott, Rev. H. Irving 
Patterson, Rev. D. R. 
Peache, Rev. Alfred 
Perry, Rev. Albertus 
Petersen, Rev. Robert P. 
Peterson, Rev. P. Arnold 



Henderson, Rev. Norman C. B.) 



Lorenzon, Rev. R. (C. S. Petrajtes, Rev. A. 



B. 



Luhman, Rev. F. H. 
McCabe, Rev. F. X. (C. 

M. LL. D.) 

McCroken, Rev. A. A. 
McDevitt, Rev. T. J. 

(LL. D.) 

McGuire, Rev. Martin J. 
McKay, Rev. H. Z. 



Helming, Rev. O. C. 

Hepburn, Rev. Henry 

Heresel, Rev. LeRoy C. 

Heresh, Rabbi Joseph 

Heron, Rev. R. A. 

Hickman, Rev. Jesse D. 

Hirsch, Rabbi Emil G. 

Hirschberg, Rabbi Abram McKenna, Rev. M. J. 

Hisben, Rev. D. D. 

Hix, Rev. L. B. 

Hoff, Rev. J. H. 

Hoffman, Rev. P. J. 

Hogue, Rev. L. E. 

Homburger, Rev. Dr. 

Oscar 
Hoover, Rev. Henry C. 



Hopkins, Rev. John 

Henry 
Hosenstab, Rev. Philip J. 
Hoskins, Rev. A. S. 
Hosmer, Rev. Frank A. 
Howie, Rev. J. L. 



McKitrick, Rev. J. W. 
McNamee, Rev. W. J. 

(P. R.) 

MacAdams, Rev. Geo. 
MacAfee, Rev. Wm. 

MacLogan, Rev. James. 

MacWhorter, Rev. Gard- Relie, Rev. Max 

ner Reutershoff, Rev. F. -J. 

MacWhorter, Rev. Hugh Roberts, Rev. Ralph M, 



Pierce, Rev. Elmer 
Pierce, Rev. Wm. H. 
Prince, Rev. Herbert W. 
Pugney, Rev. R. 
Putnam, Rev. Chas. H. 
Pyterek, Rev. P. H. 
Quigley, Rev. A. M. 
Rabakowski, Rev. J. V. 
Rabinowitz, Rabbi Joseph 
Randall, Rev. Edwin J. 
Rappaport, Rabbi J. 
Rasp, Rev. C. D. 
Reace, Rev. Wm. 
Rebec, Rev. A. 
Reilly, Rev. A. M. 
Reiner, Rev. E. L. 



M. 

Magor, Rev. Martin J. 
Main, Rev. F. W. 
Malone, Rev. J. Walter, 

Jr. 



Huben, Rev. Wm. Henry Margolis, Rabbi Joseph 



Hughes, Rev. R. D. 



Martin, Mr. A. C. 
54 



Robinson, Rev. C. E. 
Robinson, Rev. Eugene P. 
Rogers, Mr. Frank C. 
Rogers, Rev. Joseph B. 
Roland, Rev. Edward I*. 
Romerowsky, Rabbi 
Samuel 



Rowley, Rev. J. F. 
Ruyle, Rev. W. L. 
Ryan, Rev. John P. 
Sandberg, Rev. O. G. 
Sayers, Rev. Frank G. 
Scanlon, Rev. J. M. 
Schanfarber, Rabbi 

Tobias 
Schildgen, Rev. Francis 

J. 

Schmitz, Rev. M. 
Schneck, Rev. G. H. 
Schneider, Rev. John M. 
Scott, Rev. Walter C. 
Searles, Rev. Geo. J. 
Seate, Rev. Robert D. 
Seely, Rev. M. 
Selden, Rev. Frederick 

L. 
Seriflnas, Rev. Francis 

B. 

Shannon, Rev. T. V. 
Sheviey, Rev. W. E. 
Shumadzu, Rev. Mesaki 
Silver, Rabbi Saul 
Sirca, Rev. Ambrose 
Slaatte, Rev. I. T. 
Sladek, Rev. Edward 
Slaminski, Rev. C. F. 
Sloltz, Rabbi Joseph 
Smith, Rev. Ernest D. 
Smith, Rev. Horace G. 



Smith, Rev. J. H. O. 
Smith, Rev. J. P. 
Smith, Rev. Roy L. 
Smyth, Rev. H. P. 
Sonnenschein, Mr. 

Edward 

Soper, Rev. A. D. 
Spencer, Rev. Hugh I. 
Stahl, Rev. K. L. 
Stamm, Rev. John S. 
Stauffacher, Rev. A. D. 
Stead, Rev. Jas. R. 
Stephenson, Rev. A. T. 
Stifler, Rev. Francis C. 
Stifler, Rev. James M. 
Stixrud, Rev. A. O. 
Stock, Rev. H. T. 
Stone, Rev. John 

Timothy 

Stoskoff, Rev. Wm. B. 
Studebaker, Rev. H. A. 
Swaney, Rev. B. G. 
Swenson, Rev. Wm. 
Swift, Rev. P. H. 
Symonds, Rev. E. W. 
Sztuczko, Rev. G. 
Thomas, Rev. J. M. 
Thompson, Rev. Ermine 
Turner, Rev. B. A. 
Ungerleider, Rabbi N. 
Valetti, Rev. L. 



Vallentyne, Rev. James 
W. 

Van Heertum, Rev. J. A. 

Vaniscak, Rev. G. K. 

Wagner, Rev. C. A. 

Waldo, Rev. A. F. 

Wallendorf, Rev. G. E. 

Warren, Rev. Claud W. 

Way, Rev. Wm. C. 

Way, Rev. W. E. 

Wedderspood, Rev. W. 
R. 

Weiler, John 

Welch, Rev. J. C. 

Whitcomb, Rev. Leslie G. 

White, Rev. Arel M. 

Wilcox, Rev. Lee A. 

Williams, Rev. J. J. 

Williams, Rev. T. 
Yeoman 

Williamson, Rev. John 
H. 

Wilson, Rev. Gilbert 

Wishart, Rev. C. F. 

Woftalewicz, Rev. M. 

Yarrow, Rev. Phillip 

Young, Rev. Chas. Her- 
bert 

Young, Rev. Robert C. 

Zampiere, Rev. P. S. 

Zumbrunnen, Rev. A. C. 

Zwierzchowski, Rev. J. 



55 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 



THE FOUR MINUTE MEN OF CHICAGO CHGO