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Full text of "Fourteenth Annual Report of The National Farm School November 1911"

FOURTEENT 


H 


ANNUAL- 




R^/PO.RT 




OF 




'I'tie National 


Ji^'arm School 


^- ^- ^' 




FARM SCHOOL, 




BUCKS COUNTY, 




PENNSYLVANIA. 




:s o V ;s M B E 


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1 y 1 1 



NOTABLES AT THE SCHOOL. 




Dr. Harvey W. Wiley (on the right) and Governor Edwin S. Stuart, 
examining display of apples at the annual meeting, October 15t*h, 1911. 



Officers of the National Farm School 

1911 — J912 



PRESIDENT, 
JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF, 

4715 Pulaski Avenue, Germantown. 



VICE-PRESIDENT, 
HARRY B. HIRSH 



TREASURER, 
ISAAC H. SILVERMAN 



SECRETARY, 

ISAAC LANDMAN 

334 Mutual Life Building, Philadelphia. 

LOCAL BOARD OF TRUSTEES 




JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF, President. 
1. H. SILVERMAN, Treasurer. 



HARRY B. HIRSIT, Vice-President. 
ISAAC LANDMAN, Secretary, 



HONORARY TRUSTEES 

(Having served consecutively for ten years.) 

ADOI.PH EICHHOLZ, HOWARD A. LOEB, I. H. SILVERMAN, 

MORRIS A. KAUFMANN. S. GRABFELDER, 

zVRNOLD KOHN 



Term Expires 1*912 
HART BLUMENTHAL 
HORACE HANO 
ALFRED M. KLEIN 
ISAAC LANDMAN 
BARNEY SELIG 



ELECTED TRUSTEES 

Term Expires 1913 
ALBERT T. BAMBERGER 
W. ATLEE BURPEE 
HARRY FELIX 
DANIEL GIMBEL 
JOS. N. SNELLENBERG, 



Term Expires 1914 
BERNARD BINSWANGER 
SIMON FRIEDBERGER 
HARRY B. HIRSH 
ABRAHAM ISRAEL 
LEON MERZ 



NATIONAL AUXILIARY BOARD 

LOUIS L AARON Pittsburg, Pa. 

JULIUS ADLER Portland, Ore. 

HENRY BEER New Orleans, La, 

I. W. BERNHEIM Louisville, Ky. 

HENRY FRANK Natchez, Miss. 

MAURICE FREIBERG Cincinnati, O. 

BERNARD GINSBURG ,.. Detroit, Mich. 

A.. HIRSHHEIMER LaCrosse, Wis. 

M. HORKHEIMER Wheeling, Va. 

ADOLPH LEWISOHN New York City. 

LOUIS NEWBURGER Indianapolis. Ind. 

E. RAAB Richmond, Va. 

EDW. E. RICHARDS Mobile, Ala. 

ALEX. SANGER Dallas, Tex. 

SIGMUND SONNEBORN Baltimore, Md. 

DAVID STERNBERG Memphis, Tenn. 

HARRIS WEINSTOCK Sacramento, Cal. 

FERD. WESTHEIMER St. Joseph, Mo. 

A. YOUNKER Des Moines, Iowa. 



(f!^. 



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OFFICERS OF THE NATIONAL, FARM SCHOOL. 



/ 



THE FACULTY 

JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF, D. D.. President. 
JOHN HOSEA WASHBURN, Ph. D., (Gottingen), 

Director and Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. 
WILLIAM H. BISHOP, B. Sc , (Mass, Agricultural College), 

Professor of Agriculture, Superintendent of the Farms. 
HARVEY B. PARSONS, Ph. B. (Layfayette), 

Instructor in Physics and Mathematics. 
WALTER F. FANCOURT (Kew Botanicail Gardens, England), Professor of Horticulture. 
GEORGE EATON, Jr., Assistant Professor in Agriculture. 
MRS. CHARLES NIGHTINGALE, Instructor in English. 

J. C. MICHINER,V. S., Professor of Veterinary Science and Farm Hygiene, 
MISS HETTY ABRAHAM, Matron. 
MRS. CLARA BARNES, Assistant Matron. 
HARMAN KRAFT, Foreman, Home Farm. 
HOWARD F. YOUNG, Foreman, Schoenfeld Farm No. 3- 

STANDING COMMITTEES 



COMMITTEE ON SCHOENFELD FARMS FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Barnett Binswanger, Chairman Harry B. Hirsh, Chairman 

Leon Merz Harry Felix Arnold Kohn Barnett Binswanger 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 

Alfred M. Klein, Chairman 

Hart Blumenthal Arnold Kohn Leon Merz Bernard Selig Harry Felix 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE HOUSE COMMITTEE 

I H. Silverman, Chairman Leon Merz, Chairman 

Abraham Israel A. J. Bamberger Jos. N. Snellenburg, Howard A. Loeb 

ADMISSION COMMITTEE 

Morris A. Kaufmann, Chairman 

Isaac Landman Alfred M. Klein 

PROPERTY COMMITTEE SUPPLY COMMITTEE 

Bernard Selig, Chairman Hart Blumenthal, Chairman 

Simon Friedberger Benj. Finberg Adolph Eichholz Harry B. Hirsh 

FARM PRODUCTS 

Daniel Gimbel, Chairman 

Harry Felix Samuel Grabfelder 

LADIES' EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Associated with the Local Board 

Mrs. Martha Fleish^r, Chairman, pro tem. Mrs. Joseph Guckenheimer, Treasurer 

Miss Jeanette Kahn, Secretary. 

Mrs. A. J. Bamberger Mrs. David Kirschbaum 

Mrs. Isidore Baum Mrs. A. M. Klein 

Mrs. Max Berg Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf 

Mrs. David Berlizheimer Mrs. M. F. Langfeld 

Mrs. Hart Blumenthal Mrs. Julia Raab 

Mrs. B. B. Bloch Mrs. Henry Rosenthal 

Mrs. C. Davidson Mrs. Meyer Schamberg 

Mrs. Adolph Eichholz Mrs. R. B. Schoneman 

Mrs. Simon Friedberger Mrs. I. H. Silverman 

Mrs. Harry B. Hirsh Mrs. Meyer Sycle 

Miss Frieda Jonas 

Honorary Surgeon to the School, Sidney L. Olsho, M. D., 1700 Walnut Street, Phila. 
Honorary Dentist to the School, L. I. Bernstein, D. D. S., 1901 N. 32nd St., Phila. 

Honorary Oculist to the School, J. Chas. Knipe, M.D., 2035 Chestnut Street, Phila. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Forward to the Soil 

Address by 

Rabbi Joseph Krauskopf, D. D. 

Founder and President of The National Farm School. 
AT ANNUAL MEETING. OCT. 15, 1911 



Whenever an unusual agitation disturbs the world, cartoonists 
are in the habit of picturing the earth as the face of an old man, 
seared and worn and harassed by the agonies of 
his .afflictions. The world may well wear a World wears 
troubled face in these days, for there is much troubled face. 
happening that is distressing, and that is sure to 
cause the inhabitants thereof grave anxiety. There are war and po- 
litical unrest ; there are calamities and horrible disasters ; there is, 
worst of all, the menace of scarcity of food. 

The disturbances in France, Belgium and Austria this summer, 
and the agitation in Germany against the increased prices for the 
necessities of life, are portents that do not augur 
well. They upset the conviction, which had be- Due to scare- 
come firmly rooted, that we had rid ourselves of ity of food, 
the fear of famine. Humanity, the world over, 
is confronted by the most serious problem of life — the problem of 
obtaining food. 

The Cry for Bread is an age-long lament. The migration of 
tribes and races from days of old even unto this hour have been 
impelled by the one purpose of gaining possession 
of more land, in order to sustain the life of man Nations' need 
and beast. This condition continues unto this day of more land, 
and, if not the sole, it is the primary cause of all 
the unrest which is disturbing our generation. Greater than ever 
is the need of food because larger than ever is the population of 
the earth. 

We are, therefore, not far afield in surmising that much of the 
political disturbances of nations today can be traced back to the 



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THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



desire for land. National expansion at home or abroad is motivated 
by the desire to possess more land for cultivation and settlement. 
This is the dominant reason that moves nations to hitherto unsettled 
or undeveloped countries. Hence, Morocco and Tripoli are, in 
more sense than one, a bone of contention between Germany and 
France, and between Italy and Turkey. Almost every European 
nation has some coveted country which it is eager to claim, in order 
to provide more land for its subjects. 

These facts are so self-evident that no further emphasis is 
required to force home the conviction that the nations of the 
world are, today, face to face with the primary necessity of obtain- 
ing sufficient substance for maintaining life. 

The trouble, already large, has become intensified by the fact 
that not all the land that is arable is cultivated, that not all the 
hands that are capable of producing food are used 
for that purpose. Large numbers of people have . , . . 

been concentrated in cities, and the number of food cultivated. 
producers has decreased alarmingly. Added to 
the embarrassment is the increasing number of incapacitated work- 
ers who have become unfitted by the strenuousness of modern in- 
dustrialism. Diseases, especially those germinated by congested 
centers, make heavy drafts on the working classes. Hospitals, 
as)dums, homes for old and infirm, are additional burdens which 
the people must endure. 

Were all the earth's surface so thickly inhabitated that no new 
lands remained to be redeemed, the situation would be equivalent 
to the doom of humanity. But this day is not in sight. Im- 
agination alone can conjure up the tragedy of that era 
when there are more mouths to be fed than means of 
feeding them. We are saved from the terror of the 
extreme situation because only a fraction of the earth's surface is 
under cultivation at the present time. In rich Canada, for instance, 
only ten per cent of all tillable soil is cultivated. The same may be 
said of millions of acres in the far-western sections of our own 
country. Even nearer home, in our own state and in our neigh- 
boring states, there are thousands of farms tenantless, capable 
of supporting tens of thousands of lives, yet deserted, while nearby 
are hundreds of families in need of daily bread, or supported by 
the charities. 

The situation, then, is eased by reason of this fact. The 
problem of our day is one of distribution. This is so in economics. 



FORWARD TO THE SOIL 



It has become so in agriculture. The people must 
More people ^^ returned to the soil in larger numbers to equal- 
gpjl ize the drain imposed by industrialism. To this 

task, the newer statesmanship of our day is ad- 
dressing itself. "More people must be returned to the soil." "Land 
for the Landless." "Back to the Soil." are the slogans of present- 
day agitation. And these movements are being initiated because 
there is still plenty of land, and the means of subjugating it to the 

uses of man are more adequate than ever. Industrialism, which has 
precipitated the embarrassment of a food scarcity, holds the antidote 
for its corrective by greatly increasing the means of productivity 
and lessening its burdens and isolation. New and improved farm 
implements have changed former-day hardships to comparative 
ease, and telephone and trolley and free rural mail delivery have 
made even the furthest-lying farm a suburb of the city. 

The conditions intimated are general, and they effect all classes 
of people. But we are primarily concerned with the social salva- 
tion of our brethern, whom more than a score of 
More especial- years of uninterrupted expulsion from Russian 
ly the Jew. lands has driven to our shores, and has dumped, 

for the most part, in the congested centers of our 
large cities. We can be pardoned this solicitude since each one, in 
his own way, seeks to apply the law of self-preservation to those 
nearest to him. Our people are especially effected by the conditions 
prevailing in the industrial world because — due to centuries-long 
expulsion from the soil and from their original agricultural pur- 
suits — they have become, more than others, city-dwelling folk. 

With the menacing conditions in the congested centeia of our 
sea-board cities we are quite familiar, since it has been the burden 
National Farm of many an annual message of ours. The com- 
School prepar- pelling motive to alter them is stronger today than 
ed to lead in ^^^^^ Fortunately, with the aid of The National 
the "Forward •' ' i-r i j 

to the Soil" Farm School, we are better qualified to contend 

movement. with the problem than we were when it first arose. 

The purpose for which this School was founded, although 
non-sectarian and attended by lads of different creeds, centers in 
the desire to aid especially our people in going "Forward to the Soil," 
to borrow a term happily suggested by the distinguished advocate 
of the people's rights, Louis D. Brandeis, Esq., of Boston. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



For fourteen years this School has been educating and train- 
ing lads in the science and practice of farming. A large family of 
scientifically trained youths Has been reared, who are now abroad 
in the land. Each, in his way, is spreading the purpose of this 
School. And slowly "^f arms are being obtained by them, whereon 
they demonstrate the purpose this School seeks to uphold. 

That our task was difficult is no secret. That objection and 
opposition were met with is natural. Our School had to demon- 
strate its usefulness. It had to show that young men in sufficient 
numbers were willing to learn practical and scientific agriculture 
and to pursue it as a calling after they have been taught it. The 
National Farm School has made good. Its growth from small be- 
ginnings bears testimony that a goodly number of people have 
recognized its usefulness. So we need no longer apologize for it. 
We have passed the first stage of our progress. We have founded 
a School, graduated farmers who are tilling the soil. 

But this does not end our mission. It but enables us to ap- 
proach the larger task, that of sending forth upon the soil larger 
numbers of our afflicted brethren than ever could have been done 
in previous years. 

We have never disguised the fact that we intended to graduate 

not only farmers but colonizers and teachers of colonists. Our 

purpose was not merely to enable a few lads to ,» , . x. 
^ ^ . •' . Colonization 

benefit from the instruction afforded, but to make jts chief pur- 
these graduates gather about them groups of pose. 
Ghetto inhabitants, so that, under the instruction 
of trained leaders of their own speech, faith or people, colonists 
might all the easier root themselves upon the soil and make all the 
speedier progress. 

There have been attempts made at colonization in this country 
and abroad, by philanthropically disposed individuals. The dismal 
failures of very many of these attempts have -en- . . 

gendered a certain skepticism in the public against onizations fail- 
colonization of our people. It is not in good ed. 
repute. Colonization spells calamity to those of 
our people who have not investigated the cau:ie of the failure, who 
do not know that the unfortunates were often more sinned against 
than sinning, that many of them failed because little or no oppor- 
tunity for success was given them. There was frequently poor 
judgment as to choice of land, and yet poorer judgment as to the 
choice of men. Pedlars and weaklings were expected to become 







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THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 11 

sturdy farmers over night. Little cognizance was taken that farm- 
ing, like other trades, requires due preparation, and that, especially 
when the soil is new and unbroken, years are required before any- 
thing like success can reasonably be expected. Unwisely selected 
and located, abandoned to their own fate before a livelihood was 
assured, what else than failure could have been the result? 

If succeed we would — and the urgent demands make success 
imperative — we must follow a different course from that hitherto 
pursued. 

There are certain pre-requisites that are absolutely necessary 

for an agricultural colony to succeed, and to encourage others 

into exchanging the ghetto for the country, and 

Prerequisites ghetto pursuits for farming. The land on which 
for succ6ssf u I 

^i„„-,,*- „ it is to be located must be fertile, must have 
colonization. _ ... 

abundant water, must aft'ord market facilities. And 
the people who constitute the colony must be, first, physically 
healthy; second, must be mentally equipped with a knowledge of 
the work they are to do ; third, must be accustomed to country 
life, or capable of accustoming themselves to it; fourth, must have 
a love for the free and independent life on the farm; fifth, must 
have sufficient means for a proper start, and for maintaining them- 
selves until producing. 

These are all requisites which but the fewest of those 
people possessed with whom colonization experimentations were 
made. 

Fortunately, we are in better position today. We have dozens 
of young men, graduates of our School, who are physically and 
morallv healthy; who are mentally equipped with the knowledge 
Farm School of the work they are to do; who are accustomed 
graduates ^^ country life on the farm. These are the chosen 

possess a ^^ q^^^ ^^ found a few colonies in different parts 

prerequisites . . ^, . . <• r^ ■, 

,jy^ QPg_ Of our contments. ihese are the chosen oi uod, 

to make, after a few years, a signal success of their undertakings. 
These are the chosen of God, to demonstrate by their successes, 
that a splendid living can be made on the farm, to invite large 
numbers of people to follow their example, and to settle on farms 
under their leadership. 

And the land is to be had by the thousands of acres at a small 



12 FORWARD TO THE SOIL 

Abundance of price — some almost for the asking — good lands, 
good land to lands on which fortunes are being made with 
be had. comparative ease. 

It was my privilege, during the past summer, to travel ex- 
tensively in Northwestern Canada. Through the kindness of Sir 
William Whyte, head of the western section of 
Observations the Canadian Pacific Railroad, special opportun- 

In Canada. jties for investigation were afforded me in the Pro- 

vinces of Manitoba, Saskatchiwan, Alberta and 
British Columbia. I visited there farm lands and fruit orchards. 
I talked with the farmers on their farms, entered their homes, 
broke bread with them at their tables. I saw the farms that yielded 
per acre from 40 to 60 bushels of wheat or barley, from 80 to 
100 bushels of oats, without the cost of one cent for fertilizer. 
I saw the gardens in which vegetables and berries were grown, 
that yielded from $250 to $1,000 per acre. I visited the orchards 
that yielded from $500 to $1,000 per acre; I saw fruit ranches of 
which many a tree yielded from $10 to $30 annually, and at 
Penticton they told me of a tree that yielded $100 worth of cherries 
in a single crop. On three feet of one branch of a tree, I counted 
127 plums; on the same length of branch on two other trees, I 
counted 115 delicious apricots and 27 luscious peaches, respectively. 

I saw farms, thousands of acres in extent, under cultiva- 
tion, requiring steam plows for their work, and heard the 
farmers complain that lack of farm hands kept them from 
cultivating more. For every farm cultivated, I saw miles upon 
miles of land equally as good that had never yet felt the touch 
of plow. I saw the possibilities in these provinces, that have 
an area equal to that of the British Isles, Germany, France, 
Austro-Hungary, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Belgium, Holland and Den- 
mark combined; but, while these latter realms have a population 
of over 250,000,000, the former provinces have but 2,000,000 of 
inhabitants. 

Seeing the comparative emptiness of these provinces, and com- 
paring it with the horrible congestion of our ghettoes, my heart 
ached, and the thought uppermost in my mind was, "How can these 
people be brought from their bondage and misery, into the freedom 
and plenty which here reign supreme?" And I saw but one solu- 
tion: The graduates of the National Farm School must become 
leaders in the movement from the ghetto "Forward to the Soil. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 13 

But there is a great difficulty in bringing such a movement 
to pass. While our graduates possess four of the pre-requisites 
for successful colonization, they lack the fifth — Farm School 
they have not the means to buy lands, to build graduates lack 
upon them houses and barns, to equip them proper- means for col- 
ly, and to maintain themselves until producing. omzation. 

Here is an opportunity for a philanthropist who means really 
to help his people, who means to show a practical way out of the 
ghetto on a plan entirely workable and profitable, |_oan of funds 
on a plan which, while it would inaugurate a move- would mean 
ment that would be epochal in the history of our Philanthropy 
people, would, at the same time, preclude forever ^^ "* P®'" ^®"*' 
the possibility of anti-immigrationists letting down the bar against 
unfortunate refugees of our people; a plan which, while doing in- 
calculable good, would, after all. but mean a PJiila)ifhrop\ at Five 
Per cent. It is not a gift to our graduates of land and homes and 
barns and implements, which we propose, but a purchase of these 
necessities by philanthropists, and the renting of them to colonists 
until such time when they shall be enabled, by the profits of their 
handiwork, to acquire them. 

And at no time could this be done better than at present. De- 
sirable lands, conveniently located to railroads and markets, are 
still to be had in large quantities in the western section of our 
country, and in Canadian lands to the north of it. The continuous 
increase in population, and its westward and northward migra- 
tion, is sure to increase the price of lands in the near future, and to 
absorb the most desirable locations. What can be done now easily 
and cheaply, will become a diilicult matter and, perhaps, almost 
impossible, at a time when, owing to continued persecutions in 
Russia, and severe immigration restrictions, the need of it might 
be the greatest. 

This colonization proposition of ours is one that should recom- 
mend itself especially to the Jewish Charity Federations of our 
different cities. Highly commendable as is their work at the pre- 
sent time, they have reached a stage when it 

, •' ° Consideration 

becomes their duty to look not to a constant in- ^f pia^ ^y 
crease of their annual collections and benefactions, Federations, 
but to a gradual decrease of them. Our records 
show that the larger the sums that are collected, the larger grows 
the demand for them. And it cannot well be otherwise. The 
number of poor and sick and dependent is increasing with each 



14 FORWARD TO THE SOIL 

year, and for good reason, seeing that little or nothing is being 
done in the way of prevention, in the way of lessening poverty, 
sickness, debility, dependency. What is needed is the removal of 
large numbers of these dependents, or of those likely to become 
dependent, to the country, where there is health and wealth and 
happiness in abundance, and for all who care to become possessors 
of its lands. 

But the only way to get them to go is to point to unquestion- 
able successess on the farm. 

And the only ones to make such successes are those especially 
trained and eager for it. If for no other reason than for purposes 
of demonstration — and there are other reasons — the means for such 
successes must be advanced to these young men — merely as loans, 
not as gifts. By and by, when these pioneer colonists shall have 
demonstrated the treasures of wealth and health and happiness that 
are to be harvested on the farm, they may be given charge of a 
number of colonies, made up of carefully selected Ghetto people, 
to repeat in each the success achieved in their own. 

Having devoted years to the study of this question, having 
discussed it with men prominent in colonization movements, having 
been assured by men of experience of the entire 
feasibility of the plan proposed, having studied the 
stupendous problems that weigh down our chari- 
ties and that are increasing with each year, I feel 
that this suggestion imperatively demands serious consideration on 
the part of the managers of the different Federations of Jewish 
Charities, that each one of them should set aside each year a certain 
sum of money to be devoted to preventive work, that these sums 
should be federated, to be known as The National Jezvish Coloniza- 
tion. Piind, and that a large part of it should be devoted to the 
starting of colonies on some such lines as suggested in this message. 

Not having had the proper young men to start such enterprises 
in the past, reasonably accounts for our past neglect. Present 
neglect would mean inexcusable blindness on our part, and increas- 
ed suft"ering to thousands of unfortunate brethren compelled to 
waste away physically, mentally and morally in tenement districts 
and sweatshops. 

It seems obvious that a group of such men, wisely selected and 
located on the proper soil, will make an unquestionable success 
with an experimental colony, and that, in due time, these would 



16 FORWARD TO THE SOIL 

become the leaders of larger colonies composed of hundreds of 
families who are waiting for just such leadership. 

A case in point is the experiment now being made in the 
State of Utah by 150 Jewish colonists, mostly of Philadelphia and 
New York. With a few exceptions, these are all family men, the 
great majority of them under thirty-five years of 
The Utah Ex- age, and but several over forty, for the most part 
periment. composed of former shop keepers and shop work- 

ers. Grown tired of city life and of the physical 
and moral disadvantages under which they lived, they sought an 
avenue out into the country. 

For a long time, the leaders of this association, eager to go 
forward to the soil, were fearful of the task before them, and 
sought care and guidance from men who have been trained in agri- 
culture, and who understand, more clearly, the practical difficulties 
of colonization. Finally, they came to the authorities of our 
School, conferred with its officers, and received the hearty en- 
couragement that had been wanting in their plans. 

They visited The National Farm School, and saw what was 
being done there with untrained lads from the city. They met a 
number of our graduates ; they visited some of them who are 
cultivating their own farms; they saw exemplified what they had 
dreamed — that trained young men can succeed on farms ; and 
now, the advance guard of these colonists are located in Utah and 
have begun the cultivation of a 6,000-acre stretch of land. They 
received a hearty welcome on the part of the Governor of the 
State, the land board and leading Jewish co-religionist. Located on 
rich soil, under favorable conditions, proceeding cautiously, 
the whole number not being dumped on the lands, but settling 
gradually, this fall a dozen, next spring half a dozen more, next 
fall 25 more, and so on until the whole colony is established, among 
them graduates of our School who are especially looked to 
by the colonists for leadership and instruction, these men are in line 
for establishing what, we feel sure, will be the most successful col- 
onization plan thus far conceived. 

But, even the one graduate of The National Farm School, 
who is among the first dozen pioneers, had to be backed by one of 
our officers with a loan that made it possible for him to join the 
colonists. Of the five seniors of our School, who are to join the 
Utah colony in the spring, as farmers on their own account and as 
voluntary instructors of those who have no agricultural training, 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 17 

only one, who is this year cultivating the Flora Schoenfeld Memorial 
Farm No. i, will have enough funds to purchase his own equipment. 
Many more of our graduates, and others who have taken but 
partial courses at the School, all fit in every respect of assuring 
success to the Utah enterprise, would accompany these pioneers 
but for the lack of means. 

Turning now to our School, the year's work affords much en- 
couragement. Of the agricultural part of that work the Director 
will tell us later in his report. Faculty and stud- 
ents have labored conscientiously, and both the Growth of the 
Gentlemen's and Ladies' Boards have co-operated School, 
with them harmoniously,' and have extended to the 
Director and Matron every aid in their power. There has been 
a steady growth in equipment and productivity. The new dormi- 
tory, toward which our Commonwealth donated five thousand dol- 
lars, and which bears the name of Pennsylvania Hall, has been 
completed, and is now occupied by nineteen students and one in- 
structor. A new heating plant has been installed in Segal Hall, 
and a sterilizing plant in the dairy. New roofs on the buildings of 
Schoenfeld Farm No. 3, a new engine house, an addition to our 
dairy, and the ice house now in course of construction, the gift of 

Mr. Louis L Aaron, of Pittsburgh, are the major signs of growth 
which the past year has witnessed. 

It is to be borne in mind that in all these buildings here enum- 
erated, the largest part of the construction work was done by our 
students, from the digging of the cellars to put- 
ting the slate or shingles on the roofs. The prac- ^ . . ' j.. 
, , . , ° ^ training added 

tical instruction given to our boys at our School ^g agriculturaL 
in the elementary mechanical arts proves to them 
a most valuable addition to their agricultural knowledge. A farmer 
who can build his own house, mix and pour his own cement, re- 
pair his wagons and harnesses, do his own plumbing and electric 
wiring, and run his own steam and gasoline engine, need have no 
fear of failure, or be in dread of not finding a position. 

The nursery which has become an added department of the 
School has been moved to the larger fields across the railroad tracks, 
and the School is now in the market to supply 
trees and shrubbery to those in need of them. An Extension of 
appropriate concrete memorial arch of Japanese nursery, 
design, twenty-two feet high and thirty-six feet 
wide, the gift of Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf, has been built therein, to 



18 



FORWARD TO THE SOIL 



lend distinction to the site — the whole plot being so planned as to 
attract attention by reason of its innate charm and potentiality. As 
many of our friends and supporters are liberal purchasers of 
nursery plants, and as our prices are no higher than those of any 
other reputable establishment, and as our guarantee goes with all 
the goods purchased from us, it is hoped that the Farm School will 
command at least a share of their patronage. 

The graduates of this year were fourteen in number and are 
now scattered in various parts of the country, following with en- 
thusiasm their chosen vocation, and, considering 
Graduates' that they are but beginners, with considerable suc- 

success. cess. Nearly all of their fellow-graduates who 

have preceded them, continue to give a good ac- 
count of themselves. Some of them have attained to positions of 
remarkable success. In addition to our graduates and seventy-three 

A WHEAT CROP. 




wix« ±±uuuifcd and Fitly Bushels ot i'uicaster beed \\ heat Going to 

Market. 



undergraduates we have given during the past year, as we have in 
the preceding years, partial courses of instruction to thirty young 
men. 

A growing institution, like a growing individual, is in constant 
need of larger support. Not a day but that we find ourselves 
Obliged to re- hampered in our work because of lack of means, 
fuse admission A plant as large as ours, consisting of 363 acres, 
to scores of de- and of more than a dozen buildings should have 
^ ■ three times our present number of students, and 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 19 

could have them, if we were not obliged to turn away scores of 
bright and promising lads who apply for admission, and whom for 
lack of room and means we cannot accept. During the months 
of April and May the number of applicants from all parts of our 
country, refused admission, averaged three a day. To make possi- 
ble our care of but 73 boys, our present number, among whom 
there is not a single pay-student, we are obliged to stint and scrape 
wherever we can, and even then we cannot keep out of debt. Our 
deficit on September the ist was $9001.93. Since that time, that 
noble friend of ours, and of dozens of other charities, Mr. Jacob H. 
Schiff, has kindly contributed $1,000 toward reducing our debt, 
making the deficit at the end of the fiscal year, September 30th, 
$8,082.47. 

The management of an institution such as this is, in 
itself, sufficiently troublesome, that it ought to be spared 
the additional burden of being in constant financial straits. Still 
more ought it be spared the criticisms heard every now and then 
that our School ought to be run more cheaply than it is. If there 
be those who can tell us how this is to be done, without depriving 
our students of the full agricultural 'training to which they are 
entitled, we would be only too happy to be told, or better still, we 
would gladly give them the chance to run it themselves. We have 
instituted comparisons between our School and a number of other 
similar institutions, and have found the per capita expense of ours 
decidedly lower than that of the others. 

To cite one instance : The Williamson Free School of Me- 
chanical Trades, located near Philadelphia, and working along lines 
similar to our School, expended last year $448.00 per student. It 
will be seen that, notwithstanding its splendid buildings and com- 
plete equipment, which reduce running expense and notwithstand- 
ing its larger number of students which lowers the per capita cost, 
the expense per student of that institution was nearly $100.00 
larger than was the per capita cost at our School. 

The Auditor General's Department at Harrisburg, whose duty 
it is to examine the books of all institutions receiving State aid, has 
repeatedly complimented us on the splendid, economic management 
of our School. 

And how could it well be otherwise? Our instructors receive 
smaller salaries than are paid elsevvhere. salaries far below their 
deserts. The number of help employed is about one-half of what 
we should have. A considerable part of the food consumed by our 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 21 

household is raised on our farms. When considering the gross 
expenditure of the year, cognizance must be taken that not all of 
it is expended on the running of the School, that a considerable 
part of it goes toward the up-building of our plant, which started 
with nothing fifteen years ago, and is today estimated to be worth 
one-quarter of a million of dollars. Substracting from our annual 
expenses the amounts spent for permanent improvements, which 
become part of our assets, the per capita expense per student is 
about $350 a year, which includes, besides his education, his board, 
lodging, clothing, laundry, etc., etc. That sum scarcely covers the 
mere boarding expense for a boy in the average boarding school. 

It is self-evident that a financial state such as this does not 
permit us to maintain as large a faculty as is required by such a 
practical educational institution as ours. Forest 
and fruit culture have become very important Need of an 
and very profitable branches of agriculture, and a orchardist. 
comprehensive knowledge of them is expected of 
our students when graduated and employed. Such education can 
be given only by one who has specialized in these branches and has 
acquired mastery in them. But our means will not permit such 
an additional expense, great as is the need of such a teacher. 
Having some 4,000 fruit trees growing on our farm, most of them 
two or three years old, and possessing a number of valuable groves, 
a teacher in fruit and forest culture could, besides the benefit he 
could confer upon our students as an educator, greatly enhance 
the value and income of our plant. I have had an opportunity to look 
into the splendid profits that are being made off fruit farms in the 
Province of British Columbia and in the States of Washington and 
Oregon, and I know that splendid success in this line could be 
attained on our own farm, under the care of a specialist and with 
the aid of our students. But we have not the means to engage the 
services of such a man. Will not some friend of ours take upon 
himself the payment of the salary of such a teacher for about three 
years? After that time, results of his work, shown in greatly in- 
creased sale of fruit, will enable us to take care of his salary our- 
selves. 

Being on the begging subject, I might as well continue with a 

statement of our other needs, no, not with all of them, as I do not 

think you care to stay here all night. I need hard- k, j r 

•' ^ •' ° Need of means 

ly state what is already known that we need to allow larger 
larger income to enable us to admit at least a part enrollment of 
of the large number of applicants who appeal to students. 



22 FORWARD TO THE SOIL 



US daily. I have been told that quite a number of our friends have 
remembered us in their wills. Might they not add years to their 
lives by the happiness they would derive from a knowledge of the 
splendid aid they have afforded, and the useful careers they have 
helped to open so much earlier to deserving young men, by making 
their gifts during their lives. 

With each year the household department of our School is 
becoming more and more inadequate for our present needs. With 
some eighty-five persons, comprising faculty, stud- 
Need of a ents, caretakers and domestics to provide for, we 
Household ^^.^ g^jjj obliged to cook in a kitchen that was orig- 
inally built for twenty-five students, and to make 
use of a dining room that was never intended to accommodate, 
comfortably, more than fifty persons. These rooms being, besides, 
located in one of our dormitories, greatly adds to the difficulty of 
the housekeeping department. Almost any tyro of a housekeeper 
knows that an institution such as ours, under present-day servant- 
girl troubles, especially when located in the country, requires every 
accommodation that will make housekeeping easy. We need most 
urgently a separate building to be devoted exclusively to household 
purposes, to contain, besides a kitchen with modern appurtenances, 
and besides a spacious dining room, also adequate quarters for the 
matron and her assistant, and for the domestics. 

Blessed will be the name of that man or woman in the history 
of our institution who will supply us with that want at the earliest 
day possible. 

Of just one more urgent need I shall speak at this meeting — 
should all these three be answered, I promise to have more of 
them next year. A good deal of work is being 
Need of a done at the Farm School of a kind that requires 

portable gaso- ^.j-^g ^-^^ q£ ^^ |g^g^ ^ twenty-horse power portable 
line engine. gasoline engine. The little one we have answers 

some purpose, but it is unsuited for our heavier work, such as 
threshing, silage-cutting, sawing, and the like. For the past few 
years we have been obliged to hire such an engine at the cost of 
five dollars a day, not including the price of the gasoline. An 
engine of our requirements could be purchased for about $750, 
The donor of it would prove himself, or herself — I wonder why I 
always address myself to the sterner sex — a real benefactor to our 
School, as it would lighten many of the harder labors, and lower 
to some extent its annual running expenses. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



23 



Blessed they 
who lend a 
helping hand. 



There is much more of which I would hke to speak, but time 
will not permit. Not one Annual Message, nor a dozen of them, 
can present an adequate picture of the work that 
is being done on these grounds, or convey a proper 
conception of its importance. Institutions such as 
ours are sociological problems that require years 
of study to enable one to comprehend their full import. A new 
story is being written upon these grounds whose ending no one can 
fortell. Here is the melting pot in which a long-abused people is 
being restored to its ancient and honorable calling. Here physical 
feebleness is minted into sturdy manhood. Here victims of perse- 
cution and of sweatshop life are being transformed into sterling 
and useful xA.merican citizens. Here lads are being fitted into be- 
coming future leaders of their people — out of the Ghettoes, "For- 
ward to the Soil." Blessed they who lend a helping hand. 



THE ORCHARD 




A View of the Two-Year Old Apple and Peach Orchard on Schoenfeld 
Memorial Farm No. 2 



DE\TH OF MAX SCHOENFELD 



From the President's Message. 



Talking of wants and benefactions, brings vividly to our 
attention the great loss our School has recently sustained in the 
death of the first and greatest of its benefactors, Mr. Max 
Schoenfeld, of Rorschach, Switzerland, formerly of Philadelphia. 
When our Institution was still in its infancy, only three years 
old, when its friends, even at home, were but few, and its 
decriers many, Mr. Max Schoenfeld recognized the full meaning 
of such a school as ours, as one of the most effectual means of 
solving the economic and social problems, which then already 
began to harass us, and which have since acquired far more 
gigantic proportions than was then foreseen. He came to us 
not only with hearty words of encouragement, but also with a 
gift of $10,000, given in memory of his departed wife, for which 
he asked us to buy two adjoining farms, one of them to be 
worked by advanced students or graduates, to acquire on it 
experience how to run a farm profitably by themselves, and to 
derive from it enough profit to enable them to make part pay- 
ment on a farm of their own. The plan has aided quite a num- 
ber of our graduates to obtain valuable experience and suffi- 
cient means to start for themselves. It is surprising that others 
have not followed this splendid precedent of worthy benefac- 
tion. 

Eminently pleased with the results of his first benefaction, 
he proceeded, after several donations of a thousand dollars each, 
with buying and donating to us a third adjoining farm, com- 
prising 163 acres, for which he paid the sum of $15,000. This, 
like his other donations, has proved of great benefit to us for 
educational purposes, and, in addition, it is becoming with each 
year more a source of income. That he had intended to con- 
tinue his benefactions to us, may be judged from his promise 
given a few months ago to import for us a number of choice 
specimens of Swiss cattle for breeding purposes. 

In the death of Mr. Max Schoenfeld, the School has lost 
its greatest friend, one who thoroughly appreciated its aim and 
work, one who did not wait with his aid until, for the very 
lack of it, the School might have succumbed. He gave his help 
and encouragement to us at a time when we most needed them, 
and that we have succeeded as well as we have is to a very 
large extent due to his princely generosity. It is of some com- 
fort to us to know that he has written his name over some 
two hundred acres of our land, and that, as long as The 
National Farm School will exist, so long will his name be fondly 
remembered and sacredly cherished. May God comfort his 
stricken family, and raise for us other men of means who, 
inspired by his example, may continue the good work he has so 
nobly begun. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 25 

The Tenth Graduation 

Farm School, Pennsylvania, February 26, 1911. 



"If we are to sustain the ten million farms which this 
country must soon contain, we must thoroughly educate all 
the farmers in the knowledge of scientific agriculture and 
home economics." 

This was the keynote of the Tenth Graduation at The 
National Farm School, as struck by the Honorable Willet M. 
Hays, of Washington, Assistant Secretary of Agriculture, who 
was the principal speaker. 

The Exercises were held in Segal Hall, on Sunday afternoon, 
February 26, Reverend Dr. Joseph Krauskopf, President and 
founder of the School, presiding. Among the other speakers were 
the Hon. Herman L. Hecht, of Philadelphia, member of the State 
Legislature, and Dr. John H. Washburn, the Director of the 
School. The Salutatory was delivered by Sylvan D. Einstein, 
and the Valedictory by Samuel Hausman. The opening prayer 
and benediction were offered by the Rev. G. N. Hausman, of 
New York, an uncle of the Valedictorian. 

The following were awarded diplomas : 

Jos. Atkatz Joseph Miller 

Sylvan D. Einstein Samuel Snowden Rocklin 

Benj. Goldberg Joseph Louis Sarner 

Samuel Hausman George Louis Sparberg 

M. Michael Halbert 

The following were awarded certificates : 

Samuel Allman Herman Erde Morris Rosenfelt 

Abraham Epstein Morris Moskovitz Harry Rubenstein 

On the day following the Graduation, both the diploma and 
the certificate graduates left for their respective agricultural posi- 
tions. One of them, Joseph Sarner, who, during his Senior and 
Junior years, was a tenant on Schoenfeld Memorial Farm, No. 1, 
purchased his own farm, near New Britain, Pa., with the money 
he earned while cultivating the Schoenfeld Farm on shares with 
the School. 



26 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



The Fourteenth Annual Spring Fe^ival 

Farm School, Pennsylvania, June 14, 1911. 



The installation of the new class of forty-one students, more 
than twice the number that was graduated in February; the dedi- 
cation of Pennsylvania Hall, the gift of the State of Pennsylvania 
to the School ; the planting- of Memorial Trees in honor of 
departed benefactors of the School, and the planting' of Festive 
Trees in honor of joyous events that occurred in the families of 
contributors to the institution, were the leading features of the 
Fourteenth, and most successful, Annual Spring Exercises held 
at the Farm School. 

The speakers of the day included Governor Tener, of the 
State of Pennsylvania; Mr. Jacob A. Riis, of New York city, a 
settlement worker of national reputation, an author of distinction 
and for many years a personal friend of ex-President Roosevelt ; 
former Senator Lafayette Young-, of Iowa ; Honorable John C. 
Bell. Attorney General of Pennsylvania ; Professor F. H. Green, 
of the West Chester State Normal School, and A. Leo A^^eil, Esq., 
of Pittsburgh, who presided. 

The day was opened Avith an invocation by Rabbi Isaac 
Landman, and Doctor Krauskopf, founder of the School, made 
some introductory remarks. Dr. Krauskopf, while expressing 
himself as being pleased with the progress of the last year, de- 
plored the fact that during that period not a single gift had been 
made the School, though its needs had doubled. He also ex- 
pressed regret that the recent Legislature had not thought it 
possible to increase the annual appropriation for the institution. 

Mr. AA'eil, in taking charge of the exercises, said that it was 
indeed a pity that any boy of the slums who had heard the call 
of the soil and had applied to the institution for admission in 
order to equip himself to answer it should have to be turned 
down. He expressed the hope that the time would come in the 
future when this would not be necessary. There is no doubt, 
he said, that the true solution of the slum problem is to get the 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 27 

inhabitant of the slum back to the soil and to equip him to 
succeed there. He then introduced Mr. Riis as a man who had 
spent his life in the study of the slum problem. 

Mr. Riis introduced his remarks with a message from Mr. 
Theodore Roosevelt, who told him, Mr. Riis said, on the day 
before, when he left New York for Farm School, to convey his 
warmest regards to the School, "and tell them they are doing 
exactly the thing that I would have them do to make good 
Americans of their young men." Mr. Riis then said, in part, that 
as far back as he could remember "he had cherished in his heart 
a picture of the Jew as a husbandman, content on the soil, all his 
troubles over." This was in his Danish home. Lately, in the 
great city across the sea, he had seen the Jew scarred and stunted 
by the slum, in an environment that made for all unrighteousness, 
struggling against influences that strove to corrupt him and his. 
Yet in the depth of his grinding poverty, in the darkest of vile 
tenements, he had seen the Jew's manhood rise triumphant over 
all the evils that beset him. 

"In this place," he continued, "Doctor Krauskopf has made 
good my dream. You have given it life. Here you are lifting 
the Jew out of the slough of centuries to live a free man upon 
the land. You are making a way out of the slum which we can 
all tread." 

At the afternoon exercises, after the Seniors of the School 
had reported on the work of planting the Memorial Trees and the 
Juniors on the work of planting the Festive Trees, and the 
Sophomores on the work of inspecting the Memorial Trees plant- 
ed in former years, and the Freshman class was presented for 
installation. Governor Tener dedicated Pennsylvania Hall. 

In his dedication address Governor Tener said: "I am here 
to dedicate a building, for the erection of which the State has 
supplied the money. Pennsylvania attempts much. Pennsyl- 
vania does much. It gives more to schools, it gives more to the 
sick than any other State in the Union." The Dedicatory Prayer 
was delivered by Rabbi Landman. 

Attorney General Bell tJien delivered the installation address 
to the members of the Freshman Class. He e»joined upon the 
students the importance of honesty, courage and loyalty, in addi- 
tion to gaining a scientific knowledge of farming. Former 
Senator Young then delivered a stirring address on the work and 
the possibilities of an institution like The National Farm School. 



28 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

Professor Green made a beautiful and poetic address in memory 
of those for whom trees had been planted, and Miss Gertrude 
Berg paid a special tribute to Fannie Stein Miller, late president 
of the Philadelphia section of the Council of Jewish Women. 
The Rev. Dr. Wm. Armhold read the Mourner's Prayer. Pro- 
fessor Green also spoke most happily at the Consecration of the 
Festive Trees. Before the exercises of the day were concluded 
awards of prizes for efficiency were made to the students by the 
Secretary of the School, and the farms and buildings were inspect- 
ed by the visitors. 



The Fourteenth Harve^ Pilgrimage 
and Annual Meeting 

Farm School, Pennsylvania, Odtober 15, 1911. 



Dr. Harvey W. Wiley, chief chemist and pure food expert 
of the Department of Agriculture, was the principal speaker at 
the Harvest Pilgrimage and the Fourteenth Annual Meeting of 
the School, held in Segal Hall, on Sunday, October 15, 1911. 
Honorable Harry Cutler, of Providence, R. I., member of the 
Rhode Island Legislature, who was introduced by the Honorable 
Henry M. Goldfogle, member of Congress from New York, pre- 
sided. Dr. Krauskopf, President and Founder of the School, read 
his message, "Forward to the Soil," printed in another part of 
the Year Book. Dr. Wiley, in an absorbingly interesting address, 
said in part : 

"The people will go back to the soil when it becomes 
more remunerative than the Ghetto. At the present time the 
great fault of the 'back to the soil movement' is the fact that 
thousands of people who have lived in the city most of their 
lives suddenly decide to become farmers and go to our un- 
settled lands in the West without the least experience. The 
result is that these colonists, who made more money in one 
week in the city than they did on their new proposition in a 
year, are either disgusted or starved and give up their plans 
in sorrow. 

"Before a man goes to settle on a farm, he should be 
thoroughly fitted for the obstacles which will be placed in his 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



29 



path as a farmer. There is an unimaginable quantity of good 
soil in this country that has lost its fertility after a few years' 
use by farmers who know little or nothing about their voca- 
tion. Virgin soils won't remain so, unless they become settled 
by practical farmers." 

Among the other speakers were former Governor of the State 
of Pennsylvania, Edwin S. Stuart, Rev. Louis B. Michaelson, of 
Trenton, N. J., who spoke on the Succoth Sentiment, and Dr. J. 
H. Washburn, the Director of the School. 

Reports were submitted by the Treasurer, the Director, Pro- 
fessor Bishop, head of the Agricultural Department ; Professor 
W. F. Fancourt, head of the Horticultural Department, and by 
Miss Hattie Abraham, the matron of the School, all of which are 
published in this Year Book. 

After the distribution of prizes. Dr. Krauskopf was re- 
elected President of the School ; Mr. Harry B. Hirsh, Vice Presi- 
dent, and the following were elected members of the Board for 
three years : Bernard Binswanger, Simon Friedberger, Harry B. 
Hirsh, Abraham Israel and Leon Merz. 



THE GREENHOUSES. 




Three Greenhouses have been erected at the School, in memory of 
Theresa Loeb, Rose Krauskopf and Frances E. Loeb 



30 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Bucks County Horticultural Society. 

Founded at Farm School, March 21, 1911. 



On Tuesday afternoon, March 21, 1911, The Bucks County 
Horticultural Society was founded at the Farm School, with Dr. 
John Hosea Washburn, Director of the School, as its first Presi- 
dent. 

More than a hundred fruit growers and truckers, covering a 
wide area of country in the vicinity of the School, attended the 
meeting in Segal Hall and started the Society on its mission of 
usefulness and profit. Professor H. A. Surface, the State Econo- 
mist Zoologist, was present and fathered the organization, which 
was brought about largely through the interest of 'Squire Loux, 
of Souderton, the Department's popular representative in Bucks 
County, who acted as temporary chairman. 

An election of officers resulted as follows: President, Dr. 
John H. Washburn, Dean of the Farm School ; A'^ice President, 
S. B. Dcnlinger, of Doylestown ; Secretary, J. J. Arney, of New 
Britain ; Treasurer, S. Paul AVoodman, of Rushland. 

The following Committee on By-Laws was selected : Fred 
Himmelwright, of Dyerstown ; E. J\I. Paxson, of Solebury ; 
Clarence H. Smith, of AA^ycombe. 

It was decided to have a meeting every three months, and 
Dr. Washburn offered Segal Hall as a place of meeting without 
expense, where several meetings of the Society have been held 
since its organization. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 3J 



Special Gifts 



General acknowledgment of thanks is hereby made for special gifts 
to the School during the past year. 

New Life Members: Alfred H. Heinsheimer, Jacob W. Mack, Louis 
Marshall, William Salomon, Felix M. Warburg and Paul M, Warburg, all 
of New York City; J. D. Shortell, Owensboro, Ky. 

Bequests: Estate of Adolph Leberman, Philadelphia, $100.00; 
Estate of Samuel Baldauf, Oskaloosa, Iowa, $300.00; Estate of Harriet 
B. Labe, Philadelphia, $100.00. 

Special Donations: N. S. Jaffe, Sacramento, Cal., $100.00 to Propa- 
ganda Fund; Henry A. Krolik, Detroit, Mich., $100.00 in honor of his 
75th birthday; Nathan Krauskopf, New York, $100.00 for the Nursery; 
Jacob H. Schiff, New York, $1,000.00 towards reducing deficit, and 
$250.00 to Propaganda Fund; Mr. and Mrs. Ferdinand Westheimer, St. 
Joseph, Mo., $100.00 in honor of their 50th Wedding Anniversary; Nathan 
Snellenburg. Philadelphia, $500.00, interest on $10,000 which he has 
set aside for The National Farm School in his will; Hermann Schloss. 
Philadelphia, $100.00 for the General Fund; Mrs. Bertha Rayner Frank, 
Baltimore, Md., $100.00 to the Wm. S. Rayner and Dr. Samuel L. Frank 
Scholarships Fund; Samuel Friedheim, Rock Hill, S. C, the proceeds 
of 2 bales of cotton, $126.45 and District Grand Lodge No. 7, I. O. B. B., 
New Orleans, La., $150.00 to the General Fund. 

Memorial Donations: Isaac Guckenheimer, Pittsburgh, $100.00 in 
memory of his mother; A. L. P^auh, Pittsburgh, $100.00, in memory of 
his wife; Harry Lipper and Mrs. A. Lieberman, Philadelphia, $500.00, 
in memory of their father; Joseph De Roy, Pittsburgh, $100.00, in 
memory of his wife. 

Fifteen of the twenty-one rooms in Pennsj'lvania Hall were furn- 
ished by the following: Max Berg, Philadelphia, in memory of Rebecca 
Berg and Mina Kohn, Instructor's Apartment; Mrs. Henrietta Bash New 
York, in memory of Jennie Bash Weinman, 3 rooms; Mrs. J. B. Greenhut, 
New York, 3 rooms; S. Lubin, Philadelphia, 3 rooms; B. B. Bloch, Phila- 
delphia, 3 rooms; Mrs. Irving Lehman, New York, 1 room; The Misses 
Lewisohn, New York, 1 room; Mrs. Henry Sonneborn, Baltimore, 1 room. 

In addition to these, we express our thanks to the firm of Kayser 
and Allman, who cancelled a debt of $119.10 from their bill towards 
the repainting of parts of Segal Hall. We are obligated to the State of 
Pennsylvania for its appropriation to our School of $10,000 a year, for 
two years, for maintenance, and to the Federation of Jewish Charities of 
Philadelphia which increased its annual appropriation from $6,400 to 
$7,500. We receive small annual contributions from the Federations of 
Indianapolis, Nashville, Memphis, Milwaukee, Kansas City, St. Paul and 
Toledo, ranging from $75 to $250. 



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THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL _S3 

Report of the Treasurer 

For the Year Ending September 30, 1911. 



An analysis of the Treasurer's Report for the fiscal year end- 
ing September 30, 1911, which follows, is interesting for the fact 
that our income has almost kept pace with our increases in 
expenditures, due to the added number of students. Our dues 
and donations, that is, the receipts from all over the country, as 
compared with last year, were increased by $3423.35 (this includes 
the special donation of $1000.00 toward reducing our deficit). 
Our expenditures for running the School were $37,120.55, as 
against a total income of $38,610.90, showing an increase of 
receipts over expenditures of $1490.35. Against this, however, 
the increased number of students, necessitating the immediate 
completion of Pennsylvania Hall and the other extraordinary dis- 
bursements, which have improved our properties, has given us a 
defieit for this year's work of $1633.55. The School owes, alto- 
gether, to date, $8082.47. 

An exceptionally remarkable feature of the Treasurer's Re- 
port is shown in the farm products figures : Last year we sold for 
cash products amounting to $4409.41, this year $5733.09, showing 
an increase of $1323.68 in actual cash received. In addition to 
thi-s must be added the $2500.00 worth of products transferred to 
the Boarding House, all of which indicates the remarkable state 
of cultivation of our farms and the splendid practical work that 
must be done by our students, and the all-important fact that 
farming, properly done, does pay. 

During the past year the sum of $7797.00 in bequests, special 
donations and life memberships, as shown below, has been re- 
ceived and placed in the endowment fund, making that fund now 
$84,820.13. 

The Flora Schoenfeld Memorial Farms, Nos. 1 and 2, are 
now inclu^ied in the financial report of the School. Of the Flora 
Schoenfeld Memorial Farm, No. 3, the Committee will give its 
own report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

I. H. SILVERMAN, 

Treasurer. 



34 REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

GENERAL FUND 

Deficit, September 30. 1910 $6,448.92 

RECEIPTS. 

Dues and Donations, Net $11,743.05 

State of Penusplvanla 10,000.00 

Federation of Jewish Charities 6,950.00 

Income from Investments 3,339.77 

Board and Lodging 246.25 

Sale of Farm Products 5,733.09 

Memorial Trees, Net 528.96 

Birch Trees, Net 40.00 

Library, Net 10.14 

Year Book, Net 19.64 38,610.90 



EXTRAORDINARY RECEIPTS. 

Ice House 500.00 

State of Pennsylvania, for Pennsylvania Hall 5,000.00 

Furnishing Pennsylvania Hall 684.15 6,184.15 



44,795.05 
$38,346.13 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Interest 161.84 

Insurance 434.52 

Taxes 452.27 

Brooms and Brushes 41.47 

Conveyance (Freight, Bxpressage, Telephone) 893.98 

Dry Goods 1,577.15 

Fuel 1,493.93 

Groceries 2,005.20 

jcg 47 31 

Lighting".".'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.*.'.".'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.".'.'.'.'.".".".'.'.".'.'.".*.'.'.'.".".'.'.'.".'. 1,355'.18 

Plumbing , 440.17 

Printing and Stationery 302.91 

Painting 225.95 

Provisions 5,175.93 

Rent 220.04 

Repairs 785.65 

Supplies, Educational 496.14 

Supplies, Farm ' 6,517.29 

Supplies Medical 117.35 

Salaries, Matron 1,020.00 

Salaries, Officers 1,924.16 

Salaries, Teachers 5628 75 

Wages 3'360'.25 

Sundries 1,203.21 

Horticultural Department 995.39 

Ladies' Auxiliary Board 70.00 

Spraying 85 24 

Nursery §9.27 37,120.55 



EXTRAORDINARY DISBURSEMENTS. 

Pennsylvania Hall 6,830 85 

Engine House ' ' 443 44 

Piggery 116.12 

Matron's Room 55 20 

Dairy Shed 2''7 48 

Spring and Fall Public Exercises .....' 238.03 

Propaganda " '_ 971 45 

Repairs, acct. Schoenfeld Farm No. 1 189 40 

Repairs, acct. Schoenfeld Farm No. 2 .'...'.".".".■.'.".■ 2.36."o8 9,308.05 46,428.60 

Deficit, Previous to 190S q p-n ok 

Deficit, 1908-09 sfilTd 

Deficit, 1909-10 lOfuOQ 

Deficit, 1910-11 ".■.".".".".".".".".".".";."."."." 1,633 55 8,082.47 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 35 

ENDOWMENT FUND ACCOUNT 

Bank Balance. October 1. 1910 ?l,8e3.38 

RECEIPTS. 

Bequests— Harriet B. Labe, Philadelphia $100.00 

Adolph Leberman, Philadelphia 100.00 

Samuel Baldauf, Oskaloosa 300.00 

Max Bamberger, Philadelphia 5,000.00 5,500.00 

Life Memberships— A. M. Heinsheimer, New York lOO.OO 

Jacob W. Mack, New York 100.00 

Louis Marshall, New York lOO.OO 

William Salomon, New York 100.00 

Felix M. Warburg, New York 100.00 

Paul M. Warburg, New York 100.00 600.00 

Special Donations- Louis I. Aaron, Pittsburgh 1,000.00 

Mrs. A. Lieberman and Mr. Harry 

Lipper, Philadelphia 500.00 

Joseph DeRoy, Pittsburgh, in mem- 
ory of his wife 100.00 

Mrs. Bertha Rayner Frank, Balti- 
more 97.00 1,697.00 7,797.00 

Principal on Mortgages— 814-30 Moramensing Ave 8,400.00 

775 S. Third St 2,000.00 10,400.00 

18,197.00 

The National Farm School Account Loan 2,100.00 2,100.00 

$22,160.38 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Purchase of Mortgage— 2871, 73, 75 Tulip St $1,500.00 

Wolf Street 1,400.00 

Randolph and Oxford Streets... 3,300.00 

2130 S. Tenth Street 1,200.00 

611 Pike Street 1,200.00 

2106 West Norris Street 3,000.00 

601 Dickinson Street 4,000.00 15,600.00 

Balance in Bank, September 30, 1911 $6,560.38 

INVESTMENTS. 

1st Mortgage, o.4%-2319-21-23 York Street 6,000.00 

2414 Sedgley Avenue 1.50O.OO 

323 N. Sixth Street 3,000.00 

1323 N. Seventh Street 3,000.00 

224 Washington Avenue and rear 

League Street 2,500.00 

2208-10 ^S. Tenth Street 4,000.00 

611 Lombard Street 2,000.00 

1035 South Street 5.000.00 

2871-73-75 Tulip Street 1,500.00 

Wolf Street Property 1,400.00 

S. E. cor. Randolph & Oxford Sts.. 3,300.00 

2106 West Norris Street 3,000.00 

601 Dickinson Street 4.000.00 

5y29fc-3n6 N. 6th Street 2,700.00 

• 1619 S. 19th Street 1,800.00 

5 %_N. W. cor. 32d & Berks Sts 4,000.00 

2130 South Tenth Street 1,200.00 

611 Pike Street 1,200.00 

6 %— 224 N. Ohio Ave., Atlantic City... 3,500.00 

117 N. Florida Ave., Atlantic City. 2,600.00 

Market Street L 4s, 4% 5,000.00 

P. & R. 4s, 4% 2,000.00 

Wisconsin Central 1st 4s. 4% 1,000.00 

P. R. R. Convertibles, Zy^% 5.000.00 

E. & P. 4s. 4% 2,200.00 

Participation Bond, Mortgage Trust Co., St. Louis, 5% lOO.OO 

Schoenfeld Farm No. 3, .5% ^-^^'^ „^ „-„ r- 

The National Farm School 3, (.59.75 78,2o9.(o 

$84,820.13 



36 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



The Director's Report 



The Student Body: The past year has shown a decided im- 
provement in the student body. The entering class was consider- 
ably larger than any other entering class, and the applicants were 
larger, older and consequently more earnest and mature. The 
amount of instruction acquired by the freshman class in the subjects 
of both theoretical and practical agriculture is considerably more 
than in previous years. This was due partly to the fact of the 
greater maturity of the class, and largely to the increased hours of 
instruction during the summer months. 

One hundred and three pupils have received instruction dur- 
ing the past year. Of these fourteen have left the School to take 
up agricultural work, eight of whom received diplomas and six 
certificates. Five others who have left the School to pursue 
agriculture will receive certificates in March, 1912. Thirteen have 
left who have been at the School for a period of less than two 
years ; some to take agricultural positions, some to return home 
to help their parents, and others finding themselves unfitted for 
agricultural work have withdrawn before the expiration of their 
probation. Seventy-three students are enrolled in the School at 
the present time. 

Instruction : — Both the theoretical and practical instruction, 
as outlined in our catalogue, has been systematically carried out by 
the Faculty. During the summer months, however, in addition to 
the practical work on the farms, class room instruction was also 
given to all the four classes. The Freshmen received instruction 
in arithmetic and theoretical agriculture ; the Sophomores in ele- 
mentary physics; the Juniors completed their course in chemistry 
and took up qualatative analysis ; the Seniors completed their course 
in surveying, each one surveying a farm, drawing a plot of the 
farm, placing the fields, roads, buildings, etc., on the plot. On 
rainy days, the whole or half of the day was often given to class 
room instruction. 

Horticulture : — In the spring, the Nursery was removed 
from the right of the Memorial Lane across the railroad tracks 
to a place permitting greater growth and to a soil more suited. 



THE DIRECTOR'S REPORT 37 

The removal of over 20,000 plants took much time. Prof. Fan- 
court and the pupils in the Horticultural Department deserve great 
credit for the very successful moving, losing but very few plants 
although the ground was very dry later in the season. The 
evergreens were especially difficult to move. The new position 
adds materially to the attractiveness of the School's grounds. The 
addition made to our last year's stock increases the size of the 
Nursery almost 100 per cent. 

The receipts from the green houses, it will be noticed, are in 
excess of the cost of conducting them. This I report as a highly 
satisfactory condition. It should be known that all the help in the 
green houses is student help, and that the pupils are constantly 
changing from one agricultural course to another, very few re- 
maining in one department. 

Tut Orchard : — The orchards have steadily improved in 
appearance and health of trees during the past few years. The 
apple orchard on Schoenfeld Memorial Farm Number Three when 
purchased was very badly infested with San Jose Scale which was 
not checked until this year. This San Jose scale has ruined a 
large number of the best orchards throughout this State, New 
York and New England. The fighting of it, the codling moth and 
the fungus diseases of the apple tree, together with the more 
numerous diseases of the peach, quince, cherry and plum, is done 
by spraying the trees with different solutions. 

No orchard can be properly sprayed by students unless a 
trained man with experience has his eye constantly upon the oper- 
ation. We have experienced this several times by having a block 
of trees sprayed by our best student help, and apparently it was 
well done, but portions of the top-most twigs were insufficiently 
covered with the solution to kill the scale and the next spring the 
tree would be covered again with this pest. Spraying both summer 
and winter requires experience more than any other orchard oper- 
ataion. I doubt if anybody ever sprayed properly during the first 
few years of his experience. 

The School needs an experienced, competent, working orchard- 
ist to work with our boys on the 25 acres of orchard now growing 
on our farms. It is hoped that next spring we shall set out more 
trees to extend our orchard several acres. It is a question if we 
ought to extend our orchards much more until we have more land 
for general farming purposes. It would be unfortunate for us to 
develop the orcharding at the expense of the other well organ- 
ized departments already doing good work at this School. A 



THE DIRECTOR'S REPORT 39 

working orchardist, however, is necessary not only in the fighting 
of disease and insect enemies, but at all times during the summer 
to superintend the summer spraying, hunting for borers, giving 
proper cultivation and fertilization, and especiaally in the fail 
months to properly harvest the crops raised and to teach the 
students the proper care of the fruit after picking and the market- 
ing of the same. 

An Imperative Need: — I beg to call the attention of the 
Board of Managers to another imperative need in the instruction 
given by the School. Namely, the positive necessity of an instruc- 
tor, for at least four or five months in the year, in biological subjects. 
Our instruction in botany is inadequate for an agricultural school 
v^ith young men the age of our pupils and spending the time that 
we require to graduate. The United States Department of Agri- 
culture, at Washington, has a Department of Agricultural Educa- 
tion. A bulletin has been printed on this subject giving courses 
in agricultural instruction for Secondary Schools. Their courses 
of instruction have been tested for a number of years in the many 
Agricultural High Schools established throughout our country. 
They recommend as most important a study of bacteriology in its 
practical relation to health and hygiene, the part played by bacteria 
in the spread of disease, the contamination of milk and water 
supplies, their function in digestion, and their indispensible service 
in the decaying organic matter, and its transformation into plat 
food. In addition, the science of animal life, the development of 
species in both animals and plants, the anatomy, physiology, and 
functional activities of the domesticated species, the laws of hered- 
ity and variation are all necessary to a proper understanding of 
the breeding of cattle, poultry, swine, corn, wheat, and other ques- 
tions which every day confront the progressive, intelligent, think- 
ing farmer. Also that part of biology relating to the life history 
of both injurious and beneficial insects is indispensible to an in- 
telligent market gardener or orchcardist. They must understand 
its life history before the insect can be successfully eradicated. I 
hope it will be possible for us to employ such a teacher for biologi- 
cal subjects during the coming winter. 

Improvements: — The general improvement of our farm, 
orchards and grounds have already been spoken of. This last 
spring we set out about 200 ornamental shrubs and trees along our 
drives and lawns, together with the following apple trees : 20 
Red Astrechan, 20 Yellow Transparent, 20 Duchess, 20 Fallowater, 
20 Fall Pippin, 10 Smokehouse, 10 Gravenstein, 10 Gans, 10 Grimes 



40 THE DIRECTOR'S REPORT 

Clapps Favorite, 20 Sickel, 20 Belle Lucrative, 20 Sheldon, 20 
Flemish Beauty, 20 L. B. Jersey, 20 Kiefer, 20 Duchess, 20 Graber, 
20 Lawrence ; and the following cherries : 10 Napoleon, 10 Win- 
sor, 10 Yellow Spanish, 10 Black Tartarian; and the following 
grapes: 50 Concords, 12 Moores' Early, 5 Campbell's Early, 12 
Agawan, 12 Delaware, 12 Wyoming, 24 Niagara and 12 Pokling- 
ton. 

The School roads have been improved by a thick dressing of 
gravel, especially the one leading to Schoenfeld Farm Number 
Three. An addition has been made to our dairy building for the 
purpose of a wood house and a place to prepare the spraying 
material for our orchards. The building of the new ice house 
to store 100 tons of ice for our School use has been begun in 
the grove near the pond. This building is to be built with three 
insulated air spaces in the walls, and will be a most appreciated 
addition to both our household and dairy interests. The new 
Pennsylvania Hall is a most satisfactory, comfortable building. It 
accommodates nineteen young men and a teacher. It is economi- 
cally lighted and heated and has no w^aste space. 

The Household: — The household has been conducted with 
its usual successful administration. It has served meals three 
times daily to about eighty to one hundred people. The meals have 
practically been on time, which is a great assistance to the other 
departments and shows most efficient work in the house. Besides 
this, it has laundered and mended the clothing for all the pupils, 
which) is an immensely increased activity over any other yeanv] 
The health of our School has been remarkably good during the 
year. 

Schoenfeld Memoriae Farm Number One: — This farm has 
been occupied during the past year by Senior Morris Salinger and 
Junior Jesse Marcus. They have worked well and received good 
results for their labors. They have sold some hay, the products 
from eight cows, fifty hens and several swine, the fruit from a 
small pear and apple orchard, the vegetables from an acre of 
truck and two acres of tomatoes. The farm house in which they 
live has housed ten pupils during the summer. These two young 
men, renters of the farm, acted as proctors to the students living 
in the farm house. The improvements at Farm Number One 
were the building of a barracks for straw, the renovating of the 
barn, making it possible to keep six more cows on the place, and 
building up the walls on the driveway to the barn to protect 
wagons and horses. 



THE DIRECTOR'S REPORT 41 

SciioKNFELD MiiMORiAL Farm Number Two : — This farm, is 
usual, has been worked by the home teams and boys. The sixteen 
acre peach and apple orchard bore a little this year; the orchard 
is three and one-half years old, in its fourth summer. A few of 
the apple trees bore. The quinces and two acres of asparagus 
have done well, the latter will be ready for cutting this coming 
spring. The care of these orchards as they increase in size will 
increase proportionally. 

•ScHOENFELD Memoriai, Farm NumbER ThreE '.^This farm 
will be reported on with the others by the Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Schoenfeld Memorial Farms. The success of the crops 
during the year has been good, especially when the dry season is 
taken into account. The improvements on the buildings consist 
of a new slate roof on the barns, ice house, straw house, wash 
house and dweUing house. This has added greatly to the appear- 
ance and utility of these buildings. 

A ten-acre pasture lot that had given small returns in grass 
during the past two years has been renovated, the trees, bushes, 
stumps and stones removed, and it has been planted to corn, giving 
more value and weight of cattle food during the summer than has 
been raised on this land for many years. Several fields needing 
liming have been limed, adding to the productive value of the land. 

It will be noticed that the cash receipts for the Agricultural 
and Horticultural Departments for the year ending September 
30th, 1911, amount to $5,106.57. In addition to the above pro- 
duce sold from Flora Schoenfeld Memorial Farm No. Three 
amounted to $4,447.13. The produce sent to the Boarding De- 
partment could have been sold for $2,519.83. This is deducting 
expenses connected with the vegetables for market, cartage and 
all other expenses connected with the disposal of the produce. 
The three amounts aggregate $12,073.53 as the value of produce 
sold from our farms. This amount does not include the many 
tons of silage, hay, corn and other crops used to support the 
cattle and horses. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN HOSEA WASHBURN, 

Director. 

Farm School, Pa., October 15th, 1911. 



42 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Agricultural Department Report 



Much of what was said in last year's report might be repeat- 
ed this year as, with the exception of growing no tomatoes as a 
farm crop, the operations have been continued along the same hnes 
and with marked improvement in certain directions. 

The class room instruction has been increased and consequently 
the hours of labor on the farm reduced. However, the cultiva- 
tion of our fields has been better done than ever before, and the 
neatness and workman-like appearance of the farm improved. 

Among the most important additions to the agricultural de- 
partment are the new wood house and steam sterilizer at the diary. 
The latter structure, built in the dairy room of reinforced cement, 
is of such capacity that all milk cans, pails, cooler and everything 
used in handling the milk can be placed therein and live steam 
turned in, thus materially improving the methods of keeping our 
dairy utensils germ free. 

Forestry: — The appearance of the dreaded Chestnut Blight 
and the demand for lumber in the repairs and new structures on 
the School property made it necessary to cut from our woods about 
20,000 feet of timber. Hauling this to the mill and cutting up the 
tops of the trees into fire wood kept us busy for some time during 
the winter. Taking out this ripe timber leaves more room for 
the developement of the young growth and all possible care is taken 
to destroy as little as possible of this during the lumbering 
operations. 

Fruit : — Apples. The crop of 1910, mainly harvested since 
the last report, was short about one-half that of the two preceding 
years, being about 531 bushels. This year's crop will probably be 
about 1000 bushels. Besides using all needed for the table, apples 
and cider to the value of $121.57 were sold. 

For the past three years much attention has been given to the 
care of our orchards. New methods of cultivation, fertilization, 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT REPORT 43 

pruning and spraying have been introduced with the resuh that 
one of our apple orchards is now bearing" its third crop in suc- 
cession, its habit in the past having been to produce a crop once 
in two years. While the apple crop of the country at large this 
season is probably more than three-fourths of a full one, our 
orchards must be credited with a full crop and a prospect for an- 
other crop next year, and each year thereafter. 

For the first time our Keiffer pear trees have given a full 
crop of good fruit. The young peach and apple orchard is making 
fine growth, and next year should give a good crop of peaches. 

Dairy: — In the Dairy we have handled 136,529 quarts of milk, 
of which the home farm produced about 7300 quarts; Schoenfeld 
No. 3, 35000 quarts and Schoenfeld No. i, 27500 quarts. The total 
number of milking cows on the three farms being about 51. 

On the home farm the average income per cow in the dairy 
has increased regularly for several years, being higher this year 
than ever before. We should now, having brought our herd to a 
high standard of production, seek to improve it still further by the 
addition of more pure bred cows and make it, besides being a good 
dairy herd, a good breeding herd for pure bred live stock. New 
stable fittings are urgently needed in order that our barn may be 
more easily kept clean and in sanitary and presentable condition. 

Corn : — The corn crop this season is probably the best we have 
ever raised, and certainly the largest. It shows that our land is 
continually becoming richer under the system of cultivation and 
fertilization that we have adopted. We shall probably harvest 750 
to 800 bushels of corn and 150 tons of silage. By testing differ- 
ent varieties and introducing better methods of growing and se- 
lecting seed corn we hope to go on improving our yields of this 
most important crop. 

Hay: — The limited amount of ground available for farming 
purposes on the home farm, and the possibility of getting greater 
gross returns per acre in other crops, has caused us to keep a min- 
imum amount of land in grass and in the past it has been possible 
for us to buy from the surrounding farms a sufficient amount of 
standing grass, which with the use of our own labor, we have been 
able to make into hay to supply our needs. This year, after buy- 
ing all the desirable grass within reach of us, we were unable to 
get enough to carry us through the coming season. 

The increasing numbers of students, the development of our 



44 AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT REPORT 

orchard, nursery and trucking interests are cutting down the acre- 
age devoted to pure farming and making it impossible to cultivate 
more land in agricultural crops. 

More land for pasture and for hay and other feed for our 
dairy stock is urgently needed. The soil and climate of our 
locality is especially suited to dairying and growing hay. Many 
years of experience of our own and of the best farmers of the 
vicinity shows this. Land, here, has not yet reached the price 
where it is desirable or necessary to place it all under the most 
intensive cultivation. Money wisely invested in land is more certain 
to give profitable returns than when invested in labor. 

The difference betweeen intensive and extensive cultivation is 
often the difference between putting a large amount of labor unto 
a smaller amount of ground and putting a smaller amount of labor 
on a larger piece of ground. In many cases, with land at present 
prices, the latter is by far the most profitable, as witness the prac- 
tice of a majority of good farmers. 

Potatoes: — The potato is always a most uncertain crop, and 
usually an unprofitable one, owing to our soil and climate being 
unfitted for its best development. Last season we had on the home 
farm a fair crop and sufficiently large for our needs. This sea- 
son's crop will be, from about the same acreage, only about one- 
fourth as large, and our crop compares favorably with that of 
most of the farmers of this section. For four years in succession, 
the dry weather in July has materially shortened the crop, and it 
would seem wise, in view of repeated failures, to reduce the acreage 
in this crop to a minimum. 

The crops: 

Corn 30 acres Oats and Peas 8 acres 

Potatoes 6 acres Peaches 16 acres 

Asparagus 2 acres Apples 4 acres 

Grass 10 acres Garden 7 acres 

Rye 7 acres Nursery i acre 

The total area plowed on the home farm and Schoenfeld No. 2, 
which is worked in connection with it, is 90 acres. 

The crops are about as follows, accurate figures on some not 
being possible at this date as the harvest is not finished. 

Potatoes 200 Bushels Pears 75 Bushels 

Mangels 200 Bushels Onions 50 Bushels 

Hay 16 Tons Wheat 113 Bushels 

Hay 62 Tons Oats 50 Bushels 

(From purchased grass.) Milk 73000 Quarts 

Silas-e 175 Tons Pigs IIS 

Apples 1000 Bushels 



AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT REPORT 



45 



Swine;: — We have sold pigs to the value of $473.69. Most 
of this has come from feeding the waste from the kitchen and 
farm, supplementing it at such times as the supply is short with 
farm-raised roots or other material not valuable for other pur- 
poses and occasionally using some purchased grain. The new 
piggery has proved to be satisfactory in all respects, and one of the 
best investments made on the farm. We have in it, now, breeding 
stock worth not less than $500, and young stock for sale which 
will bring us about $200 between now and midwinter. 

Respectfully submitted, 



W. H. BISHOP, 

Agriculturist. 



Farm School, Pa., Oct. 15, 191 1. 



IN THE WHEAT FIELDS 




Students Shocking Wheat Preparatory to Thrashing 



46 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Horticultural Department Report 



I have the honor to report that this department during the 
past year has shown considerable progress. It will be noticed, 
by comparing this with last year's report, that the green houses 
output is shoAving a marked increase. A greater diversity of 
plants have been grown which found a ready market in nearby 
towns and it is more than gratifying to observe results obtained 
in the propagation and caring for the most delicate plants where 
close attention to details is imperatively necessary to success, 
when it is remembered that all of the work connected with same 
is carried on entirely by stsudent labor. 

It was found necessary the past year to repair the workroom 
of the Theresa Loeb and Rose Krauskopf Memorial Greenhouses. 
These two houses, although built some years ago, still are in good 
condition. 

Francis E. Loeb Greenhouse, built three years ago, has just 
been planted with carnations and their condition promises the same 
good results previously obtained in this modern greenhouse. 

The most important outside improvement completed in this 
department was the transfer of the Nurrsery from Memorial 
Lane to the site just opposite the railroad station. The many 
thousands of plants were removed with scarcely any loss and the 
stock thus removed has made a splendid growth, emphasizing, 
as I remarked before, the perfect adaptation of our soil fcr nursery 
purposes. 

In its new position the Xursery adds to the attractiveness of 
the landscape and meets with much favorable comment. During 
the summer a concrete memorial arch was erected across the rail- 
road, the gift of Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf, in memory of Elise 
Binswanger, of Kansas City, Mo., her grandmother. From time 
to time, it is planned to use much more of the adjacent land for 
nursery purposes. 

The increased number of students made it necessary to again 
increase our area devoted to kitchen garden. The Matron's re- 



HORTICUIvTURAL DEPARTMENT REPORT 47 

port shows the vast quantities of vegetables consumed in the 
culinary department. For winter use, there will be stored large 
quantities of the different vegetables, as well as a goodly number 
of canned tomatoes, string beans, etc., put up by the Matron, assist- 
ed by students of this department. Owing to our bountiful crop 
of apples a plentiful supply will be stored for winter consumption. 

I regret we have not a cellar properly adapted for the storing 
of both fruits and vegetables. Being compelled to improvise all 
manner of means for their protection in the fields makes them dif- 
ficult of access in stormy weather. 

More interest was taken in the individual gardens than ever 
before. Through the generosity of our Presiddent, Dr. Krauskopf, 
I was enabled to oft'er prizes to the amount of $25.00, thus arous- 
ing a pleasing competition which resulted in better kept gardens. 
I regard this individual garden scheme a desirable feature in our 
teaching. 

The students have been taught the sacredness of the memorial 
trees and are careful in their sports not to injure them. 

A consideraable number of plants, some four thousand in 
number, were used in embellishing our grounds. These added 
to the attractiveness of the place and help to make farm life more 
enjoyable. 

Cash sales made in this department: 

Nursery Stock $187 . 12 

Carnations and other Cut Flowers 495 ■ 73 

Plants (Greenhouse) 89 . 77 

Tomatoes (Greenhouse) 57-71 

Vegetables 1 39-42 

Peaches from Old Orchard 16.15 

Total , J- • -.$885 -90 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. F. FANCOURT, 

Horticulturist. 
Farm School, Pa.. Oct. 15. 191 1. 



48 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Matron's Report 



Since the report for 1910 we have opened a new dormitory, 
Pennsylvania Hall, with accommodations for nineteen students 
and a suite of rooms for one instructor. This makes the fourth 
sleeping quarter on our grounds. 

The dining hall has not been enlarged, and is much too small. 
We must serve meals at different times, thus entailing an amount 
of extra work for the culinary department. 

Our household expenses have increased in proportion with the 
larger number of students enrolled. To manage the same the force 
has been increased by the employment of a general utility man. 
The pay roll approximately being $3,500.00. Meat, bread, milk, 
cream, butter, eggs and grocery bills have increased accordingly 
with the high price of foods and enlarged number in household. 
In placing these items before you, you will see that the feeding 
question is an enormous factor in the running expenses of this 
institution. 

There have been purchased for the Boarding Department throughout 
the year: 

Cofifee, 780 pounds $148 . 18 

Sugar, 26 barrels 518.20 

Tea, 550 pounds 1 1 1 . 20 

Groceries 1,497.96 

Meat, 30,000 pounds 2,795 .40 

Bread, 31,920 loaves 1,276.80 

$6,347.74 

There has been supplied from the kitchen garden and Dairy Depart- 
ment of the School : 

Cream, 451 quarts $107.07 

Milk, 24,570 quarts 974 ■ I9 

Butter, 698 pounds 241 . 10 

Potatoes, 343 bushels 208 . 70 

Lima Beans, 16 bushels 22.00 

String Beans, 35 bushels 31-20 

Cabbage, 2786 heads 90.48 

Carrots, 51 bushels 30.60 

Celery, 755 stalks , 22 .65 

Corn, 15,335 ears 156.10 



MATRON'S REPORT 49 



Cucumbers, 1275 j 8.25 

Beets, 85 bushels 52 .40 

Lettuce, 593 heads 22.45 

Parsley, 220 bunches 10.60 

Parsnips, 66 bushels 39.60 

Onions, 19 bushels . .^ 21 .95 

Squash, 75 3.00 

Tomatoes, 74 bushels 38.00 

Tomatoes (Greenhouse), 165 pounds 12.30 

Asparagus, 260 bunches 39.00 

Radishes, 700 bunches 21.00 

Salsify, 6 bushels 4.50 

Peppers, 70 .75 

Egg Plants, 293 8.79 

Peas, 4 bushels 5 .00 

Rhubarb, 700 bunches 21 .00 

Apples, 210 bushels 119.00 



$2,311.68 

Preserving for the winter includes large quantities of tomatoes, 
string beans, crab apples, cherries, pears, peaches and grapes. 
There are 240 bushels of apples stored in the cellar. 

The food consumed proves the health and appetite of the 
students. A number of the large Freshmen Class enrolled last June 
compared notes as to increase in weight soon after entering and 
it was remarkable how many gained from ten to sixteen pounds in 
about two months. The change from city life to outdoor exercise, 
regular hours, and plain, wholesome food doubtless is the cause. 

As in the past we are much indebted for donations of useful 
articles to the Ladies' Auxiliary Sewing Circle of The National 
Farm School ; to the Philadelphia Branch of the Needlework Guild 
of America; to a number of the large manufactoring firms for 
medicines, and to the Jewish Hospital for kindest treatment of 
our students upon all occasions, minor ailments or serious surgical 
operations. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HETTY ABRAHAM, 

Matron. 

Farm School, Pa., Oct. 15, 191 1. 



50 THE XATIOXAL FARM SCHOOL 

Report of the Flora Schoenfeld Memorial 
Farms Committee 



FARM Xo. I. 

Since the first of last March, the Flora Schoenfeld Me- 
morial Farm Xo. i has been conducted by Senior Morris Sal- 
inger and Junior Jesse Marcus. These young men have worked 
very diligently and enthusiastically and have attained good results 
for their labors. They have sold some hay; the product from 8 
cows ; 50 hens and several swine ; the fruit from a small pear and 
apple orchard; and the vegetables from an acre of truck and 2 
acres of tom.atoes. 

During the past year this Farm has been improved by the 
building of barracks for straw ; the renovating of the barn, to 
accommodate six sows ; and the building up of the walls on the 
driveways to the barn, to protect the wagons and horses. 

FAR:^! Xo. 2. 

This Farm, during the past year, has been worked by the 
Home Farm teams and the boys, as formerly. This Farm is used 
mainly as an orchard. The trees have yielded a little during the 
past season and give promise of yielding splendid returns when 
the orchard is in full growth. 

FARM Xo. 3. 

In making our third annual Report of the Flora Schoenfeld 
^Memorial Farm X'o. 3, we are taking the annual report for the 
fiscal year ending February 28th, 191 1, when we made a complete 
Inventory, and the following copy of our Balance Sheet gives the 
exact financial condition of this Farm, and shows also a profit of 
81,041.66, for the year ending February 28th, 1911. 

During the past year, the One Thousand Dollars given to us 
by ^Ir. ]\Iax Schoenfeld for the repair of the roads, has been 
entirely invested. In addition we have put new roofs on the dwell- 
ing, barn and outbuildings, have repaired the silo and thus greatly 
improved our property. 

Since the first of last !March, when the fiscal year begins, ever\-- 
thing has been working* in a most satisfactory manner. Our 



SCHOENFELD FARMS 51 

crops show excellent results and all those on the farm deserve great 
credit. It is ovtr hope that, by next year, we will be able to report 
that our indebtedness has greatly diminished. 

PROFIT AND LOSS, FEBRUARY 28, 191 1 

GAIN 

Sale of Farm Products $3,888.01 

Inventory, Februarj' 28th, 1911 1,263.50 

— $5,151-51 

LOSSES 

Depreciation on Live Stock, $ 173.91 

Depreciation on Implements 50.00 

Interest ^ 49-85 

Provisions . ., 353-09 

Wages 677 .31 

Repairs ; 429.26 

Plumbing 3 .05 

Insurance 2.12 

Farm Supplies (includes Inventor)- of Mar. ist, 1910) 2,371.26 

Net Profit February 28th, 1911 1,041 .66 

^$5,151-51 

B. BINSWANGER, 

Chairman. 



The Graduates' Aid Fund 



The Graduates' Aid Fund, founded by ]Mr. \Mlliam A'olker, 
of Kansas City, Mo., has for its object the building up of a fund, 
the interest of which is to be devoted to extending loans to such 
of the graduates of The National Farm School who shall establish 
themselves on farms of their own. 

Contributions have been received from : 

William Volker, Kansas City, Mo $150.00 

A. W. Benjamin, Kansas City, j\Io 100.00 

Henr}' Hellman, Xew York Cit\' 200.00 

Bernard Binswanger, Philadelphia 50.00 

Adolph Eichholz, Esq., Philadelphia 50.00 

Benjamin Finberg, Philadelphia 50.00 



52 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



The Alumni Association 



The Alumni Association celebrated their first year's existence 
at their Second Annual Meeting, held on October 15th, 191 1, at 
Segal Hall, Farm School. 

Twenty-one Alumni and former students, coming from as far 
west as Omaha, Nebr., were present. Numerous letters and tele- 
grams were received from graduates, who could not attend, assur- 
ing their loyal support to the Association and Alma Mater. 

The Secretary, Charles Horn, '06, reported that he has been in 
touch with a great number of graduates and 75 per cent, as per 
record attached, are engaged in some branch of agriculture. The 
next meeting will be held during the month of October, 1912, and 
an Alumni Banquet will be arranged for. 

Officers were re-elected for the ensuing year, as follows : 

President — Meyer Goldman, '03. 

Vice President — Henry Ratner, '06. 

Secretary and Treasurer — Charles Horn, '06. 

Executive Committee — Max Coltun, '10; and E. Solomon, '10. 



What some of the Graduates of The National 
Farm School are doing. 



Aarons, Harry, Dowsman, Wis. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Anderson, Victor, Sanatoga, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Atkatz, Joseph, care of F. T. Stryker, Highlands, N. J.— Farm manager. 

Berg, Henry, East Mansfield, Mass. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Blackman, Morris, Philadelphia — Farming. 

Borovick, George, Chicago, 111. — Pharmacist. 

Brown, Benj., Covington, Ky. — General farming. 

Burd, Louis, Philadelphia. — In business. 

Chodesh, Benj., Gap, Pa. — Doctor of veterinary. 

Coltun, Max J., New Brunswick, N. J. — Milk inspector. 

Condor, Louis J. — Died at Reistertown, Md., 1909. 

Einstein, Sylvan D., Norma, N. J.— Cultivating his own farm. 



WHAT SOME OF THE GRADUATES ARE DOING 53 

Erde, Herman W., E. Lansing, Mich. — Attending Michigan State Agricultural 

College. 
Feldman, N., Philadelphia — Horticulture. 
Fleisher, Max, Vineland, N. J. — Superintendent of dairy, N. J. Training 

School. 
Frank, Harry, Jr., care of S. Ettinger, Tinley Park, III. — Farm manager. 
Friedman, S., New York City — In business. 

Galblum, S., Norristown, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm (Skippack Farm). 
Glantz, Emanuel, Arwood Sta. "B," Omaha, Neb. — Dairying; will buy his 

own farm in spring, 1912. 
Goldberg, Benj., Clarkson, N. Y. — General agriculture. 
Goldman, Joseph, Sacramento, Cal. — Manager large dairy concern. 
Goldman, Me}^er, Norma, N. J. — Instructor in elementary agriculture to 

children of Jewish Colony. 
Green, Meyer, Elizabeth, N. J. — Civil Engineer. 

Halbert, M., care of J. W. Wynkoop, Erie, Pa. — General agriculture. 
Hausmann, Samuel, New York City — With a fertilizer company. 
Heller, Chas. J., Manchester, Mass. — In charge of Department of Market 

Gardening, Massachusetts State Agricultural College. 
Hirsch, Harry S., Chicago, 111. — Poultry. 
Hirsch, Louis, Pittsburgh, Pa. — In business. 
Horn, Charles, Philadelphia. — Ass't Superintendent, Philadelphia Vacant 

Lot Cultivation Association. 
Horn, Irving, Philadelphia. — In business. 

Ibaugh, George W., White Haven, Pa. — Farm manager. White Haven Sani- 
tarium. 
Kahan, Jacob, Rushland, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm. 
Klein, Julian, Chicago, 111. — Auditor. 

Krinzmain, Philip, Elizabeth, N. J. — Cultivating his own farm. 
Kysela, Rudolph, Denver, Colo. — Agricultural machinery. 
Lauchman, Wm., Richmond, Va. — Farm manager. 
Lebeson, Harry, Sylvania, Ohio. — General agriculture. 
Lebeson, Herman, Columbus, Ohio. — Attending Ohio State College. 
Lee, Elmore, Died at Denver, Colo., 1908. 

Leff, Isador, Novelty, Ohio. — Cultivating his own farm (Ivermoot Farm). 
Leib, Louis, Washington, D. C. — Manager of dairy company. 
Leiser, Monroe, Eagle Lake, Fla. — Cultivating his own fruit farm (with 

Jerome Levy). 
Leon, Marcus, Des Moines, la. — In business. 
Levy, Jerome, Eagle Lake, Fla. — Cultivating his own fruit farm (with M. 

Leiser). 
Levy, M., Salt Lake City, Utah. — General Manager United Cigar Stores. 
Major, Edward, Vineland, N. J. — Superintendent of Orchards, N. J. Training 

School. 
Malish, M., Philadelphia. — Dairy business. 
Margoliuth, Aaron, Minneapolis, Minn. — General agriculture. 
Michaelson, M., Indianapolis, Ind.— Manager National Tree Surgery Co. 
Miller, A., Chicago, Illinois. — Seeds and floriculture business. 
Miller, Joseph, Gunnison, Utah. — Cultivating his own farm and directing in 
the Settlement of Sevier River Jewish Colony. 



54 WHAT SOME OF THE GRADUATES ARE DOING 

Mitzmain, Maurice, B.A. ; M.Sc, Philippine Islands. — Entomologist Veter- 
inary Corps, Philippine Is. Dept. of Agriculture. 

Monblatt, Alex., Chicago, 111. — In business. 

Morris, Max, Birmingham, Ala. — In business. 

Moskovitz, Morris, care of C. H. Thomas, Herkimer, X. Y. — General 
agriculture. 

Naum, Harry, Liberty, N. Y. — Farm manager, Working Men's Circle Sani- 
tarium. 

Newman, Abe, Reno, Nevada. — Fruit raising. 

Norvick, Jacob, Philadelphia. — In business. 

Ostrolenk, Bernard. — Institute Work and Instructor of Dept. of Agriculture 
in Minn. 

Ostrolenk, Lewis, Gloversville, N. Y. — Dairying. 

Peyser, Sol., New York City. — Attorney. 

Ratner, Henry, Norristown, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm (Valley Brook 
Farm) with brother. 

Ratner, Jacob, Norristown, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm (Valley Brook 
Farm) with brother. 

Ratner, Joseph, Detroit, ]\Iich. — Farm manager. 

Rich, Harry, Weatogue, Conn. — General Mgr., Tobacco Planations of Am- 
erican Sumatra Tobacco Co. 

Rock, Louis, Philadelphia. — In business. 

Rocklin, S. S., care of H. H. Pearson, Jr., Claiborne, Md. — Stock raising. 

Rose, Leonard, Milwaukee, Wis. — Horticultuure. 

Rosenberg, N., Rome, N. Y. — General agriculture. 

Rosenfelt, IMaurice, Philadelphia. — Horticulture. 

Rudley, Samuel, Philadelphia. — Dairying. 

Sadler, Harrj-, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Manager, Standard Oil Company. 

Sarner, Jos. L., Do3destown, Pa. — Cultivating own farm. 

Serber, D., Land Title Building, Philadelphia. — Attorney. 

Snowvice, Wm., Mapple Valley, Wash. — General Manager, Dairy Farm. 

Sobel, Sol,, Ridgewood, N. J. — Farm manager. 

Serlin, Wm. J., Detroit, Mich. — In business. 

Silver, Chas., ^vlonroeville, N. J. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Schlesinger, Alphonse, New Orleans, La. — In business. 

Schulman, Harry, St. Louis, Mo. — Asst. ]\Ianager, Traffic Dept. Missouri - 
Pacific Ry. Co. 

Silverstein, Hyman, New York City. — General agriculture. 

Solomon, Emanuel, West Chester, Pa., care of Dr. Mitchell. — Horticulturist. 

Sparberg, Geo. L., Oshkosh, Wis. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Speyer, Aaron, Painesville, Ohio. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Tannenbaum, Israel, Sacramento, Cal. — Dairying. 

Taubenhaus, Jacob, Newark. Del. — Assistant Chief in Dept. Plant Pathology, 
Delaware Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Wallman, Israel, New York Cit\-. — General agriculture. 

Weinberg, Harry, Palestine, Texas. — In charge of tobacco plantations of 
Wm. Taussig Tobacco Co. 

Wiseman, J. H., Baychester, N. Y. — General agriculture. 

Wolf, E. H., Philadelphia. — In business. 

Zalinger, Bernie A., Chicago, 111. — Florist. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 55 



Report of the Ladies' Auxiliary 
Board 



The Ladies' Auxiliary Board of The National Farm School has 
passed a year of very successful work. The different Committees 
have made many innovations, beneficial to the household manage- 
ment, diet, etc. ; superintended the purchasing of all the food and 
kitchen utensils ; taken charge of the providing of the luncheon at 
spring and fall outings ; selected the help ; bought, sewed and pre- 
sented all the househeold linens. The report of the Sewing Circle 
will follow this and shoAt what good work has been done. The 
Visiting Committees, v.'hose activities were described in last year's 
report, continue their fortnightly visits. 

In addition, I wish to say we would be able to do very much 
more good in the different phases of our work, especially at the 
Sewing Circle, which meets every first and third Thursday, from 
October until April, if more ladies would interest themselves actively 
in the work to be done. We wish to thank those who have been 
so faithful in attendance at all times. 

The Treasurer's Report of the Ladies' Auxiliary Board and 
the Report of the Sewing Circle follow. 

MRS. MARTHA S. FLEISHER, 

Chairman. 



TREASURER'S REPORT 

Emergency Fund 

RECEIPTS 
1910. 

August 31, Balance on Hand $45-07 

Dec. 17th, Voucher No. 4879 35 -oo 

1911. 

Mar. 31, Donation from Mrs. Mjer Schamberg 5.00 

June 19th, Voucher No. 5330 35-00 

Nov. 15th, Voucher No. 5718 35 -OO 

$155-0/ 



56 LADIES' AUXILIARY REPORT 



DISBURSEMENTS 
1910 

Nov. 8th, N. Snellenburg & Co. 

Tumblers $11.00 

Garbage Can i . 75 

Oval Pot ,. .. 2.00 

$14-75 

Dec. 17th, N. Snellenburg & Co. 

12 doz. Plates $12 .00 

3 Buckets 2 . 85 

5 doz. Plates 2.25 

I Kettle 1 .45 

1 Boiler 5 . 20 

8 Dishes 5.20 

2 Slicers . i . 70 

I doz. Knives .72 

3 Buckets .75 

3 Ladels 60 

2 doz. Salt and Peppers i .20 

I doz. Bottles 1 .80 

12 doz. Plates 1 1 . 16 



Allowance i .60 

$45.28 

191 1, 

Apr. 18, N. Snellenburg & Co. 

I Collander 44 

1 Coflfee Urn 2 . 25 

4 Roasting Pans , 4 . 00 

4 I^adels 48 

$ 7.17 

June 20, N. Snellenburg & Co. 

3 Receptacles $8-25 

13 yds. Oilcloth 4.55 

2 Wire Mats 6 . 50 

I Boiler 5 . 25 

$24-55 

July 12, N. Snellenburg & Co. 

2 yds. Oilcloth $ .70 

$92.45 

Cash on hand Nov. 30th, 1911 $62.52 



LADIES' AUXILIARY REPORT 57 

Ladies' Auxiliary Fund 

RECEIPTS 
1910. 

Aug. 31, To Balance $45-58 

Nov. 29, Donation from ]Mrs. Jos. Guckenheimer 10.00 

Dec. 4, Donation from Mrs. J. N. Friedman, Rochester, N. Y., 

in memory of her daughter 10.00 

1911. 

June 4, Donation through Mrs. Jos. Krauskopf 14.00 

Donation through Mrs. Jos. Guckenheimer 2.00 



51.58 



DISBURSEMENTS 
1911. 

March 9, N. Snellenburg & Co., by check to Secretary Na- 
tional Farm School, in payment of their bill 
Dec. 31, '10 $9.88 



Cash on hand, Nov. 27th, 191 1 $71 -/O 

MRS. J. GUCKENHEIMER, 

Treasurer. 



The National Farm School Sewing Circle 

The Farm School Sewing Circle met twice every month from 
November 4th, 1910 until April 20th, 191 1. The meetings were 
well attended and good work was done. All material was bought 
with voluntar}^ contributions. 

Since the last report the following articles were made and sent 
to the School : 

354 Sheets, 87 Pillow^ Cases, 414 Face Towels, 78 Bath Towels, 6 Roller 
Towels, 43 Laundry Bags, 44 Waiter's Aprons, 42 Window Curtains, i 5-yd. 
Table Cloth, 164 Napkins. 

The following ladies have contributed money and material 
toward the work of the Sewing Circle : 

Mrs. I. Baum Mrs. M. F. Langfeld 

Mrs. B. Bloch Mrs. H. jSIitchell 

Mrs. D. Berlizheimer Mrs. H. Rosenthal 

:^Irs. A. Fleisher ^^^s Rosenbaum 

Mrs. T. Greenewald ^/^- If^^'^^^^ 

Mrs. M. Schamberg 

^Irs. R. A. Schoneman 

Mrs. N. Snellenburg 



Mrs. H. P. Goldstein 

Mrs. Harrison 

Mrs. H. B. Hirsh ^Irs. M. Sycle 

Mrs. Jos. Krauskopf ;\Irs. M. Weil 



Mrs. ROSA B. SCHONEMAN, 

Chairman, 



.^ 



lV^^/ 



m 



Scholarship and Prizes Endowed 



mm- 



Scholarships 



1908— "WM. S. RAYNER SCHOLARSHIP." The 

income of $5,000 contributed to the Endowment 

Fund by his daughter, Mrs. Bertha Rayner 
Frank, 

1908— "DR. SAMUEL L. FRANK SCHOLAR- 
SHIP." The income of $5,000 contributed to 
the Endowment Fund by his wife, Mrs. Bertha 
Rayner Frank. 



!'' 



rizes 



1907— "THE HERBERT T. HYMAN PRIZES." 
The interest of $150 donated by Mrs. Bernard 
Sluizer, in memory of her son. 

1908— "THE JOSEPH LOUCHHEIM PRIZES." 
The interest of $250 contributed to the Endow- 
ment Fund by Harry Louchheim, of New York, 
in memory of his father. 

1908— "THE JOSEPH LOUCHHEIM PRIZES." 
The interest of $250 contributed to the Endow- 
ment Fund by Mrs. Louis S. Eliel, in memory 
of her father. 

1910— "THE ANSHEL ROSENTHAL PRIZES." 
The interest of $500.00 being the income of a 
bequest. 

i9ii_-THE HARRIET B. LABE PRIZES." 

The interest of $100.00, being the income of a 
bequest. 



^^ 



11 ' m 

Prizes to Students 



The appeal made to friends of the school to contribute 
money prizes for efficiency in the various departments of 
the School, was answered, to so pleasing an extent, that, 
during the past year, $237.50, in cash, were awarded to the 
various students at the School for proficiency, effort and 
improvement. The m,oney for these prizes is contributed 
as follows : 

"The Herbert T. Hyman Prizes." The interest of 
$150.00 donated by Mrs. Bernard Sluizer, in memory of 
her son. 

"The Joseph Louchheim Prizes." The interest of 
$250.00 contributed to the Endowment Fund by Harry 
Louchheim, of New York, in memory of his father. 

"The Joseph Louchheim Prizes." The interest of 
$250.00 contributed to the Endowment Fund by Mrs. L. 
S. Eliel, of Philadelphia, in memory of her father. 

"The Anchel Rosenthal Prizes." The interest of 
$500.00 bequeathed to the Endowment Fund. 

"The Harriet B. Labe Prizes." The interest of $100.00 
bequeathed to the Endowment Fund. 

Mr. Samuel Grabfelder, Philadelphia (annual) $25.00 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf, Philadelphia (annual) . . 25.00 
Mr. Louis Loeb, New York, in memory of his wife (annual) 25.00 

Mr. Joseph Potsdamer, Philadelphia (annual) 25.00 

Mr. Max Berg, Philadelphia (annual) 10.00 

Mr. Ralph Blum, Philadelpiha (annual) 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Hart Blumenthal, Philadelphia, in memory 

of their son Ralph (annual) 10.00 

Mrs. Sol Blumenthal, Philadelphia, in memory of her hus- 
band (annual) 10.00 

Mr. David Kirschbaum, Philadelphia 10.00 

Mr. Moe Lieberman, Philadelphia (annual) 10.00 

Mr. I. L. Marks, Chicago (annual) 10.00 

Mr. I. H. Silverman, Philadelphia (annual) 10.00 

Harding & Fancoult, Philadelphia 5.00 

Mr. Samuel D. Lit, Philadelphia (annual) 5.00 

Mrs. Henry Rosenthal, Philadelphia 5.00 

Mrs. Jacob Weil, Philadelphia in memory of Hulda 

Oppenheimer (annual) 5.00 

Mrs. M. Oppenheimer, Philadelphia 3.00 

Mr. George C. Watson, Philadelphia 2.00 

§1 m 



^9* 



i.a./ 




60 




Buildings Donated 



I. Theresa Lceb Memorial Green House, 

In memory of Theresa Loeb, Ogontz, Pa., by her family. 
Erected 1S98. 

II. Ida M. Block Memorial Chapel, 

In memory of Ida M. Cloch, Kansas City, Mo., by her 
husband and famaly. Erected 1899. 

III. Zadok M. Eisner Memorial Laboratory, 

In memory of Zadok :M. Eisner, Philadelphia, Pa., 
by his wife. Erected 1899. 

IV. Rose Krauskopf Memorial Green House, 

In memory of Rose Krauskopf, Philadelphia, Pa., by 
her children. Erected 1899. 

V. Dairy, by Mr. and Mrs. Louis I. Aaron. 

Pittsburg, Pa. Erected 1899. 

VI. Adolph Segal Hall, 

Containing Library, Lecture Hall, Administration Of- 
fices and Dormitories, by Mr. Adolph Segal, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. Erected 1906. 

VII. Frances E. Loeb Vegetable Forcing 
Green House, 

In memory of Frances E. Loeb, by her husband. 
Erected 1908, 




c/ 



^ 




Permanent Improvements. 

I. Lake Archer Rosenthal 

In memory of Archer Rosenthal, Philadelphia, Pa., 
by his brother and sister-in-lajw, Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry Rosenthal, built in 1908. 

Elise Binswanger, Nursery 

In memory of Elsie Binswanger, Kansas City, Mo., 
by her grandson and granddaughter, planted in 1909. 

III. Samuel Strauss, Jr., Division of Nursery 

Rhododendrons and Roses in memory of Samuel 
Strauss, Jr., Philadelphia, by his wife, 1910. 

IV. Ice House 

In honor of his 70th birthday, by Mr. Louis I. 
Aaron, of Pittsburgh, Pa. Erected 191 1. 



,^^ 


l^^^ti^ *^d. i i ^^ 


m 


^ 


sMm^M^f^^ 


h^HHU^IbI^HH 




Ber^'^ «^*T_^^ 


WM 


^^ 


'' ^9^^l 




Hk^^ ^"^"-^^^ 


4, ; 


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HLhs^ 


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The Green Houses. 




«^ 



Legacies and Beque^s 

-exiling 



Money received in legacies and bequests is placed in the 
Endowment Fund. 

Estate of — 

1895 — In memoriam Jacob Tuck and wife, by their 

children, Philadelphia .$1,00000 

1899— Carolyn Parent Nirdlinger, Philadelphia. . . 500 00 

1903— Jacob H. Hecht, Boston, Mass. 500 00 

1905 — Moses Lichten, Philadelphia 500 00 

1906— Marx Wineland, Frostberg, Md., 500 go 

1907 — Frances Seligman, Philadelphia, 

(For Bernard and Frances Seligman Library Alcove). . . 20O OO 

" — Fannie Houseman, Philadelphia, 

(In memory of her son, Arthur Ballenberg Houseman), . 100 00 

" — Edward Popper, Greenville, Texas, lOO 00 

" — Samuel W. Goodman, Philadelphia, 200 00 

" — Fannie Simon, Philadelphia, 50 00 

" — Isaac Sailer, Philadelphia, 500 00 

1908 — Leah Bernheimer, Mobile, Ala., 100 00 

" — Eleanore Samuel, Philadelphia, 343 29 

" — Solomon Blumenthal, Philadelphia, 250 00 

1909 — Moses H. Stern, Philadelphia 500 00 

" —Esther Sailer, Philadelphia, 78 05 

" — Rebecca Haas, Indianapolis, Ind., 100 00 

" — Blanche Loeb, New York 1,000 00 

1910 — Anche Rosenthal, Philadelphia 500 00 

" — Abraham Lipman, Pittsburgh, Pa 500 00 

" — Henrietta Morgenroth, Louisville, Ky 500 00 

" — In Memory of Milton L. Snellenburg, by his 

Father 2,000 00 

191 1 — Samuel Baldauf, Oskaloosa, Iowa 300 00 

" — Max Bamberger, Philadelphia 5,ooo 00 

" —Harriet B. Labe, Philadelphia 100.00 

" — Adolph Leberman, Philadelphia 100 00 



63 



M 



emoria 



1 T 



rees 



'Planted in Spring, 1911, in ^M^emoiy of 



PHILADELPHIA 

Lizzie Aarons 

Albert Abraham 

Moses Anspacli 

Clarence K. Arnold 

Stanley Arart 

Rachel Bachrach 

Laser Bachrach 

David Bachrach 

Morrig Bernheimer 

Ruth Weyl Bernheimer 

Annie Cantor 

Charles C. Davidson 

Mathilde Dreifus 

Isaac Gartenlaub 

Leon Gans 

Gustavus Gerstley 

Henry Gerstley 

Hyman H. Ginsburg 

Minnie Goldsmith 

Louis Goldstein 

Caroline Goldsmith 

Meyer Goldsmith 

Aaron E. Greenewald 

Hattie Baer Herman 

Lena Halbert 

Julius Halbert 

Babette Hess 

Rachel Hano Hohenfels 

Henry Karpeles 

Mrs. Mason Hirsh 

Lillie Kline 

Sidney Kline 

Mrs. Manuel A. Koshland 

Moses W. Lipper 

Dr. Herman D. Marcus 

Mina Marcus 

Mark Marquis 

Gertrude Metzger 

Fannie S. Miller 

Samuel Noar 

Herman Pollack 

Mrs. Herman Pollack 

Frances M. Pollack 

Hannah S. Potsdamer 

Blanche Roman Rosenow 

Emanuel Rosenberg 

Morris Rosenberg 



Nany Rosenberg 

Malka Shor 

Fanny Lowenstein Stamm 

Mark Schneiderman 

F. A. Stechert 

Mina P. Sundheim 

Marcus Tobias 

Otto Walter 

Levi Wasserman 

Aaron Weinberg 

Abraham Marcus Wolfe 

Elias Wyman 

Jennie Bash Weinman 

Caroline Weber 

Dr. Bernard Zweighaft 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Henry Adler 
Jacob H. Cohn 
Fred Alexander 
Mrs. LI. B. Ferguson 
Pauline Frank 
Florence E. Goldman 
Asher Guckenheimer 
Ida Guckenheimer 
Dora Gross 
Solomon Lilienfeld 
Abraham Lippman 
Florence L. Morganstern 
Birdie Wertheimer Rauh 
Abraham Weiler 

POTTSTOWN, PA. 

Abram Weitzenkorn 

SHARON, PA. 

Joseph Jacobson 

BRADDOCK, PA. 

Henry H. Myers 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

Mrs. A. Beuesch 
Jennie Epstein 
Joseph Friedenwald 
Simon Greensfelder 
Yetta Green.sfelder 
Solomon Hamburger 
Mrs. Louis Kahn 



M. S. Levy 
E. Oppenheimer 
Louis Ottenheimer 
Rachel F. Ottenheimer 

ST. JOSEPH, MO. 

Mrs. Lena Binswauger 

Gustav Levy 

H. Marks 

Mrs. Meland Schlo.ss 

Nixon Stone 

BIGELOW, MO. 

Sum Kahn 

NATCHEZ, MISS 
Cass. Lowenburg 
Israel Moses 
Sam Zerkowski 

CINCINNATI, OHIO. 

Isidore Trager 

BAYONNE. N. J. 

Charlotte Goldstein 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

Mrs. Dinah J. Mann 

NEW YORK CITY. 

George N. Cardozo 
Dorothy Alice Levy 
Eva Simon 

DEMOPOLIS. ALA. 

Lewis Mayer 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Jacob Reinstein 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Bertha Michaelson 
Emil Stein 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Ada Benjamin 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Joseph Soudheim 



FESTIVE TREES 

Planted in Spring, 1911, in Honor of 

Carlyn J. Manasses, Birth, March 24, IfOS. 
Reda Berg, Confirmation, 1910. 

Bena Rosenthal, 12th Birthday, March 18, 1910. 
Edna F. Kraus, Confirmation, 1910. 

Mr. and Mrs. Marcus H. Burnstine. Wedding, June 6, 1910. 
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Lapat, Philadelphia, Wedding, January 10. 1910. 
Mrs. Arnold Kohn, Philadelphia, 70th Birthday, June 24, 1910. 
Carolvn S. Hirsch, Birth, April 28, 1910. 
Harold Kaplan, Birth, January 13, 1911. 

Arthur H. Finkelstein, Pittsburg, Birth, February 25, 1911. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Rubenstone, 25th Wedding Anniversary, March 28, 1911. 
Jeannette Belostosky. Betrothal. March 5th. 1911. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lionel J. Benjamin, Kansas City, Mo., Wedding, April 5, 1910. 
Rose Hirsh. Confirmation. 1911. 
Mr. and Mrs. Sydney Dreifus, Philadelphia. Wedding, May 29, 1911. 



^^ 



d^KJH^^'ZJr^ 



The National Farm School and The Federa- 
tion of Jewish Charities of Philadelphia 

From THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 

Twelve institutions are aided by the Federation of Jewish Charities of 
Philadelphia. Its method of collecting and redistributing moneys to the 
various institutions under their surveillance, meets with the approval of all 
who recognize organized and systematic charity. It is to be regretted that 
there are still very many who do not realize that the lump sum given by them 
annually is parcelled out among twelve institutions. Many a one of ample 
means who gives but $25 annually, or even less, would be ashamed of himself 
and of his gift, were he to consider that he has given but two dollars, or 
one dollar, for the care of the sick, and the same amount for the care of 
orphans, and a like sum to each of the other ten charities that comprise the 
Federation. Nothing can be clearer than that, if our Federation is to do 
larger work, the contributions to it would have to be large enough, not only 
to meet present remedial needs, but also to lay aside certain sums for pre- 
ventive work in the future. 

LEGACIES AND ENDOWMENTS 

TO THE FEDERATION OF JEWISH CHARITY OF 

PHILADELPHIA 
1902— MRb. CARRIE HAMBERG, in memory of her 

husband, Isaac Hamberg $ 100 00 

1902— CHILDREN OF DAVID ETTINGER, in memory 

of their father 1 00 00 

1903— MRS. ALICE HAGEDORN, in memory of her 

husband, John T. Hagedorn 5.0°° 0° 

1903— HERMAN TONAS 7.500 00 

1903— MRS. CARRIE HAMBERG (additional) 100 00 

1903— ERNST KaUFMANN 2,00000 

1904— MRS. CARRIE HAMBERG (additional) 100 00 

1904— AUGUSTLS MARKS, in memory of his wife, 

\'irginia Marks 50 00 

1904— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 1000 

1905— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 100 00 

1905— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 100 00 

1905— AUGUSTUS MARKS ("additional) 100 00 

1905— SIGINIUND ROEDELHEIM 50000 

T 905— MRS. Cx\RRIE KRIEGER, in memory of her 

husband, Samuel Krieger 1,000 00 

1905 — W!\L KRIEGER, in memory of his father, 

Sam.uel Krieger 100 00 

1005— HERMAN B. BLUMENTHAL 7,00000 

1905— S. M. and M. S. FRIDENBERG, in memory 

of Esther, wife of S. M. Fridenberg 1,000 00 

1906— ALTGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 100 00 

1906— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 4000 

1908— MRS. FANNIE A. LEBERMAN 50000 

1908— ISSAC HERZBERG 3.000 00 

1909— CHILDREN OF THE LATE SIMON AND 

ROSA FLEISHER, creating the Simon and Rosa 

Fleisher Endowment 5,000 00 

igog — r». Frank Creenewald, in memory of his mother. 

SpUie Gimbel Greenewald _. 2,000 00 

igoQ — ^dolph Wevl, in memory of his wife, Rose WeyL 50 00 

1909 — Estate of Herman Loeb. 3.000 00 

1909 — Estate of Henry Rothschild 1.500 00 

1910 — The 'Milton L. Snellenburg Fund 2,000 oc 

(Endowed by his father, Nathan Snellenburg.) 

191 1 — Estate of Simon Bacharach _. . . . . 200 00 

191 1 — Adolph \A'eyl, in Memory of his Wife (additional) 25 00 
191 1 — ^Irs, Florence Liveright. in memory of her son, 

Benjamin Kahn Liverieht 500 00 

1911 — Estate of Albert M. Nusbaum 1,000 00 

191 1 — Esther Bacharach 200 00 

1911 — Adolph Weyl, in Memory of his wife (additional) 25 00 

1911 — Estate of Abram Herzberg 500 00 

191 1 — Estate of Leon Gans 5,000 00 

iQi I — Estate of Charlotte Harburger 200 00 

iQii — Estate of Meyer Frank 200 00 



^,r 



SUNDRY DONATIONS 

Aschenbach & Miller, Philadelphia Quantity of Drugs 

Barnes, Mrs. J. W., Washington, D. C i6 Volumes for Library 

Bickley, Mr. J. Walter, Philadelphia Crate of Eggs 

Binswanger, Mr. B., Philadelphia Settee for School Grounds 

Binswanger, Mrs. B., Philadelphia Refrigerator 

Burk, Mrs. Louis, Philadelphia Donation of Sausage 

Burpee, Mr. W. Atlee, Philadelphia 

Subscriptions to Agricultural Papers and Magazines for Library, 
Amounting to over $30.00 

Burpee, ]Mr. W. Atlee, Philadelphia 

Flower and Vegetable Seeds, amounting to over $60.00 

Chicago Israelite, Chicago, 111 Free Subscription 

French, Mr. Harry B., Philadelphia Quantity of Drugs 

Fleisher, Mrs. M., Philadelphia . . 3 Carving Cloths and i doz. Huck Towels 

Friedberger, Mrs. S. W., Philadelphia 

4 doz. Bath Towels, 12 doz. Bath Mitts, and i doz. Roller Towels 

Friedman, Mr. B. C, Philadelphia 50 lbs. Motzos 

Goldfogle, Hon. H. M., New York 13 Volumes for Library 

Heller, Dr. Edward A., Philadelphia Horse 

Henning, Messrs. John, & Son, Philadelphia Quantity of Pipe 

Hirsch, Mr. Henry, Archbold, Ohio Sack of Seed 

Hirsch, Mr. H. B., Philadelphia 10 Settees for School Grounds 

Hires, Mr. Charles E., Philadelphia Quantity of Drugs 

Jewish Criterion, Pittsburgh Free Subscription 

Jewish Review and Observer, Cleveland Free Subscription 

Kayser & AUman, Philadelphia .. $119.00 Towards Painting of Dormitory 

Klein, Messrs. A., & Bro., Philadelphia 25 lbs. Motzos 

Kolb, Miss, Philadelphia Donation of Bread 

Labenberg, Dr. C. A., Richmond, Va Crate of Eggs 

Manischewitz, Mr. B., Cincinnati 100 lbs. Motzos 

Mayer, Mrs. F., New York 15 qts. Ice Cream 

National Farm School Sewing Circle, Philadelphia 

Bed and Table Linens, Towels, Waiter's Coats and Aprons, Large 
Quantity Sewing Materials 

Needlework Guild of America, Philadelphia 312 Garments 

Nixon, Messrs. Martin and W. H., Philadelphia Paper for this Book 

Oppenheimer, Mrs. Max, Philadelphia 15 quarts of Ice Cream 

Park, Davis & Co.. Philadelphia Quantity of Drugs 

Price, Thos. W. & Co., Philadelphia Paper for Cover of this Book 

Schoneman, Mrs. R. A., Philadelphia 

Quantity of Sewing Materials and Turkish Towels 

Shoemaker, Robert, & Co., Philadelphia Quantity of Drugs 

Shoemaker & Busch, Philadelphia Quantity of Drugs 

Silverman, Mrs. I. H., Rydal, Pa 5 yds. Linoleum for Kitchen 

Smith, Valentine H. & Co., Philadelphia Quantity of Drugs 

Snellenburg, Mrs. Nathan, Philadelphia 

Large Quantity of Flat Silverware, Glass and China 

Spitz, Mr. Samuel, Philadelphia Pail of Mince Meat 

The National Fruit Grower, St. Joseph, Mich. Free Subscription 

The Western Fruit Grower, St. Joseph, Mo Free Subscription 

Teller, Mrs. L. H., Philadelphia Volume for Library 

Wolf Brothers, Philadelphia Large Quantity of Envelopes 

Wyeth, John, & Bros., Philadelphia Quantity of Drugs 



/ 




THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 67 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

SENIOR CLASS 



DRUCKERMAN, BENJAMIN New York City, N. Y. 

FRIEHMAN, DAVID New York City, N. Y. 

GABRIEL, ISRAEL Philadelphia, Pa. 

LEVIN, JULIUS Pawtucket, R. I. 

LEVY, JEROME Chicago, 111. 

LUBIN, H.\RRY New York City, N. Y. 

MINKOWSKY, JACOB Brooklyn, N. Y. 

MOSKOVITZ, MORRIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

PACKER, BENJAMIN Philadelphia, Pa. 

ROSENFELT, MAURICE Philadelphia, Pa. 

RUBENSTEIN, HARRY Philadelphia, Pa. 

SALINGER, MORRIS Des Moines, la. 

JUNIOR CLASS 

EPSTEIN, ABRAHAM New York City, N. Y. 

FERESHETIAN, MARTIN Philadelphia, Pa. 

HARRISON, BERYL Des Moines, la. 

LEWIS, MORRIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

LIPSCHUTZ, NATHAN Philadelphia, Pa. 

MARCUS, JESSE Chicago, 111. 

PLOTKIN, MICHAEL Brooklyn, N. Y. 

POPOLOW, PHILIP Philadelphia, Pa. 

ROSENBERG, NATHAN Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SILVERGLATE, ELLIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

SCHLESINGER, EDWARD Philadelphia, Pa. 

WEISS, HARRY Philadelphia, Pa. 

WITKIN, ABRAHAM Philadelphia, Pa. 

WORK, JAMES Philadelphia, Pa. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

AMRUM, PHILIP ' Brooklyn, N. Y. 

BACHMAN, ARTHUR Philadelphia, Pa. 

BERMAN, MAURICE Philadelphia, Pa. 

BRODIE, SAMUEL Manchester, N. H. 

DESSELL, HERMAN Cleveland, Okla. 

DINTER, SOLOMON Philadelphia, Pa. 

EDLEMAN, JULIUS Boston, Mass. 

HARVEY, HARRY Pensauken, N. J. 

HOW, WILLLUl Philadelphia, Pa. 

KARMIOHL, WILLIAM New York City, N. Y. 

LEIBOWITZ, S.\MUEL Philadelphia, Pa. 

LEVINSON. JULIUS Chicago, 111. 

NETZKY, FRANK Camden, N. J. 

ROTHMAN, HARRY Philadelphia, Pa. 

SAMSON, MICHAEL Newark, N. T. 

STOLAROFF, MYER El Paso,' Texas 

TYOR, LEON New York City, N. Y. 



6/ 




68 ^ ' REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

- ■WEIGHTMAN, BENJAMIN Philadelphia, Pa. 

WISEMAN, PHILIP Pittsburgh, Pa. 

WOOLWICH, AARON Philadelphia, Pa. 

WOOLWICH, MORRIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

FRESHMEN CLASS 

ABRAMS, SAMUEL : Philadelphia, Pa. 

BOEHRET, RODNEY Chalfont, Pa. 

BROUDE, HARRY Philadelphia, Pa. 

CAPEK, THADDEUS New York City, N. Y. 

CHARON, OSCAR Philadelphia, Pa. 

CROHN, LAWRENCE New York City, N. Y. 

FINKEL, JACOB Philadelphia, Pa. 

FRIED, ALBERT Vermilion, O. 

FRIEDMAN, AARON Philadelphia, Pa. 

GLASER, MEYER Philadelphia, Pa. 

GINSBURG, LEO Pittstown, N. J. 

GOLDBERG, JACOB New York City, N. Y. 

GOLDBERG, JOSEPH Philadelphia, Pa. 

GORDON, ABE Rochester, N. Y. 

GOTTLIEB, JOS New York City, N. Y. 

HECKER, GEORGE : . . . Philadelphia, Pa. 

HALPERIN, ARTHUR Arlington, N. J. 

HELFAND, LOUIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

JAFFE, DAVID Philadelphia, Pa. 

KAHN, KARL Little Rock, Ark. 

KERNER, SAMUEL Pittsburgh, Pa. 

KRAVET, LEWIS New York City, N. Y. 

LERNER, SAMUEL J Philadelphia, Pa. 

LEYENSON, DAVID New York City, N. Y. 

LEVY, HENRY New York City, N. Y. 

LIGHTERMAN, ABRAHAM New York City, N. Y. 

MARCUS, SAMUEL Philadelphia, Pa. 

McCRACKEN, WILLIAM J Philadelphia, Pa. 

RASKIN, JACOB . New York City, N. Y. 

REDALIA, LEWIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

RICHKE, ISRAEL New York City, N. Y. 

ROSENBERG, SAMUEL M Philadelphia, Pa. 

ROSENTHAL, JOSEPH New York City, N. Y. 

RLTBIN, ELWOOD Philadelphia, Pa. 

SCHMOOKLER, MORRIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

SCHULDT, RUDOLPH Newark, N. J. 

SOBEL, ISADORE New York City, N. Y. 

VOYNOW, GREGORY Philadelphia, Pa. 

WARSHAW- MORRIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

WEIGLE, FRED '. Philadelphia, Pa. 

WOLF, HYMAN New York City, N. Y. 

YUCKMAN, PHILIP Philadelphia, Pa. 

ZAKON, GEORGE Boston, Mass. 

ZANGWILL, ARTHUR Philadelphia, Pa. 

ZIMMERMAN, EDWARD New York City, N. Y. 

ZWEIGHAFT, BERNARD Alliance, N. J. 



c^^ 




One payment of 
ALABAMA 
Mobile. 
Bernheimer, Mrs. L. 

CALIFORNIA 
Bakersfield. 

Cohn, C. 
San Francisco. 

Neustadter, Mrs. J. H. 
ENGLAND 
London. 
Meyer, Arthur 

ILLINOIS 
Champaign. 

Kuhn, Caroline L. 

Kuhn, Florence L. 
Chicago. 

Bauman. Mrs. Edw. 

Mandel, Mrs. Emanuel 

Mandel, Leon 

Peitler, Chas. 

Stettauer, Mrs. D. 
INDIANA 
Ligonier. 

Strauss, Ike 

Strauss, Jacob 
IOWA 
Waverly 

A. Slimmer 
Sioux City -, 

Wise, Mrs. Chas. 
LOUISIANA 
New Orleans. 

District Grand Lodge, 

Newman, Isadore 
MARYLAND 
Baltimore. 

*Rayner, Wm. S. 

MASSACHUSETTS 
Boston. 

Hecht, Mrs. Lina 

Shuman, A. 

MISSISSIPPI 
Natchez. 

Frank, H. 

MISSOURI 
St. Joseph. 

Westheimer, M r . 
& Mrs. Ferdinand 
St. Louis. 

*Rice, Jonathan 

Stix, C. A. 

NEW YORK 
New York. 

Abraham, A. 

Blumenthal, Geo. 

Budge, Henry 

Guggenheimer, Wm. 

Heinsheimer, Alfred 
M. 

Krauskopf, Mary G. 

Lewisohn, Adolph 

Mack, Jacob W. 
•Deceased 



$100.00, one time, into the 

Marshall, Louis 

Meyer, Wm. 

Salomon, Wm. 

Silberberg, G. 

Sidenberg, G. 

Warburg, Felix M. 

Warburg, Paul M. 
Niagara Falls. 

Silverberg, Bertha 
Rochester. 

Lowenthal,, M. 

Silberberg, M. 

Silberberg, G. 

Silberberg, G. 
OHIO 
Cincinnati. 

Block, Samuel 

Lowman, Leo. J. 

Meis, Henry 

Reiter, A. 
Columbus. 

B'nai Israel Sister- 
hood 

Lazarus, Fred'k 

Lazarus, Ralph 

Miller, Leopld 

Zion Lodge No. 62, 
I. O. B. B. 
Youngstown. 

Theobald, Mrs. C. 

PENNSYLVANIA 
Allegheny. 

Rauh, Mrs. Rosalie 
Altoona. 

Henry, S. Kline 
Langhorne. 

Branson, I. L. 
Philadelphia. 

Betz .& Son 

Bloch, B. B. 

Blum, Ralph 
* Blumenthal, Herman 

Blumenthal, Sol. 

Byers, Jos. J. 

Clothier, Isaac H. 

Federation Jewish 
Charities 

Fleisher, Martha S. 

Grant, Adolph 

Harrison, C. C. 

Hagedorn, Mrs. Alice 
*Jonas, Herman 

Kaas, Andrew 

Kaufman, Morris A. 

Kayser, Samuel 

Krauskopf, Harold 

Langfeld, A. M. 

Levy, Sol. 

Lit, S. D. 
*Merz, Daniel 

Merz, Mrs. Regina 

Muhr, Jacob 



Endowment Fund 

*Pepper, Dr. Wm. 
*Pfaelzer, Simon 
Raab, Mrs. Julia 
Reform Congregation 

Keneseth Israel 
♦Rorke, Allen B. 
Rosenberg, Grace 
Rosenberg, Walter J. 
Rosenberg, Walter I. 
Schloss, Mrs. Herman 
Schoch, Henry R. 
Swaab, M. M., Jr. 
Silberman, Mrs. Ida 
Silverman, L H. 
*Snellenberg J. J. 
Snellenberg, Nathan 
Snellenberg, Samuel 
Sternberger, Samuel 
♦Teller, Benj. F. 
Teller, Mrs. B. F. 
♦Teller, Joseph R. 
Trautman, Dr. B. 
Wanamaker, John 
*Weiler, Herman 
Wolf, I., .Tr. 
Zweighaft, Simon 
Pittsburg. 
Browarsky, Max 
Cohen, Aaron 
Cohen, Josiah 
Dreifus, C. 
♦Frank. Samuel, by his 
son Ed. K. Frank 
Guckenheimer, Isaac 
Hamburger, Philip 
Hanauer, A. M. 
Kaufman Bros. 
Marcus, Aaron 
Solomon & Rubin 
Weil, A. Leo 
Weil, J. 
SWITZERLAND 
Rorschach. 
Schoenfeld, Max 
TEXAS 
Dallas. 
Sanger, Alexander 
Sanger, Mrs. Philip 
Silberstein, A. 
VIRGINIA 
Norfolk. 
Ladies' Hebrew Be- 
nevolent Asso. 
Richmond. 
Milheiser, Gustave 
Milheiser, Mrs. R. 
WEST VIRGINIA 
Wheeling. 

Horkheimer, Mrs. B. 
WASHINGTON 
Seattle. 
Galland, Bonham 
Galland, Mrs. C. K. 



70 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Li^ of Members and Contributors 

For the Year ending September 30th, 1911. 



ALABAMA 

Alexander City 

Herzfeld, R $5.00 

Birmingham 

Adler, Morris ... 10.00 
Congregation 

Emanuel 5.00 

Gadsden 

Frank, Ferdinand. 5.00 

Huntsviile 

Ermann, Carrie & 

Gustav 5.00 

Mobile 

Council of Jewish 

Women 5.00 

Forchheimer, M. . . 25.00 

Hess, Henry 5.00 

Montgomery 

Kahn, M 5.00 

lyOeb, Jacques .... 5.00 

Kah], Montgomery 10.00 

Weil, Mrs. E. L. 5.00 

Uniontown 

Pake, ly. J 5.00 

Wetumpka 

Hohenberg, M. S: 

Co 5.00 

ARIZONA 

Tuscan 

Jacobs, Ivionel M. 10.00 

ARKANSAS 

Huntingdon 

Mayer, Herman . . 5.00 
Little Rock 

B'nai Israel Con- 
gregation 10.00 

Cohen, Mark M. .. 7.50 

Kahn Co., Her- 
man 10.00 

Mayer, Max 10.00 

Helena 

Solomon, Louis . . 2.oe 



CALIFORNIA 

Fresno 

Einstein, Louis, & 

Co 10.00 

La Jolla 

Lieber, W. S 5.00 

Lieber, Mrs. W. S. 5.00 
Lieber, Mr. and 

Mrs. W. S 5.00 

Los Angeles 

Bibo, Joseph 5.00 

Cohn, Kaspare . . . lo.or- 
Hecht, Rabbi S., 

D. D 2.00 

Hellman, Maurice 

S 10.00 

Hoffman, Hugo . . 5.00 

Isaacs, L 10.00 

Isaacs, Max 10.00 

Jacoby, Mrs. Rosa 5.00 
Kingsbaker, Mrs. 

Clara 5.00 

Meyer, Alex 10.00 

Meyer, Louis 5.00 

Newmark, Harris.. 10.00 

Newmark, M. H. . . 5.00 

Newmark, M. R. . 5.00 

Roos, Jacques .... 5.00 

Sacramento 

Bonnheim, A 10.00 

Cohen, Isidor .... 5.00 
Jaffe, M. S. ..... 105.00 

San Francisco 

Arnstein, Ludwig. 5.00 

Aronson, A 10.00 

Brandenstein, Ed- 
ward 10.00 

Brenner, Gus 10.00 

Esberg, Mrs. Ma- 
thilda 5.00 

Hirschfelder, Dr. 

J. O S-oo 

Kavifmann, W i 1- 

liam 5.00 

Lilienthal, Jesse 

W 10.00 

Sloss, Mrs. M. C. . 5.00 

Weinstock, Harris. 25.00 



COLORADO 

Denver 

Cohen, Samuel . . . 5.00 

Eisner, Jr. John... 5.00 

Kubitshek, Henry. 10.00 

Mayer, Leopold . . 5.00 

CONNECTICUT 

Hartford 

Lyon, Bernhard... 5.00 

New Haven 

Adler, Max S-oo 

Jacobs, George . . . 5.00 

Ullman, Isaac M.. 5.00 

Waterbury 

Chase, Isidor 5.00 

DELAWARE 
Seaford 

Greenabaum, E. • . S-oo 

Van Leer, Charles 5.00 

Wilmington 

Levy, Mr. D. L.... 10.00 

Levy, Morris 5.00 

Moses Montefiore 
Beneficial Socie- 
ty 5-00 

DISTRICT OF COLUM- 
BIA 

Washington 

Blumenfeld, Mrs. 

M 5-O0 

Cohen, Mrs. Ed- 
ward 12.00 

Cohen, Max 5.00 

Deborah Lodge . . 5.00 

Eisenmann, Jacob. 2.00 

Friedlander, H. . . 5.00 

Goldenberg, M. . . 5.00 

Hahn, Wm 5.00 

Hecht, Alex 10.00 

Hillman, Joel .... 5.00 

Kann, Sigmund . . 5.00 

Luchs, Leopold ... 5.00 

Rich, M. M 3.00 

Salamon, B 2.00 

Sondheimer, J. ... 5.00 



UST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTORS 



71 



Wallerstein, Mrs. 

G 1. 00 

Washington H e - 

brew Cong S-oo 

FLORIDA 

Jacksonville 

Hirschberg, Julius. lo.oo 
Miami 

Cohen, Isidor .... 5.00 

Pensacola 

H e b 1- e w Ladies' 
Benevolent So- 
ciety S-oo 

GEORGIA 
Albany 

Brown, S. B 10.00 

Atlanta 

Hebrew Benevo- 
lent Cong 15.00 

Hirshberg, Isaac . 5.00 
Mayer, Albert E. . 10.00 

Dublin 

Weichselbaum Co., 

Samuel 5.00 

Eastman 

Herrman, Mrs. J. 

D 500 

Sandersvilie 

Cohen, Louis .... 5.00 

Savannah 

Falk, David B. ... 10.00 

Mohr, Amson .... S.oo 

Solomon, J. A. . . 5.00 

West Point 

Hagedorn, P 5.00 

Hagedorn Z 5.00 

IDAHO 
Boise City 

L, a d i e s' Judith 
Montefiore So- 
ciety 5.00 

ILLINOIS 
Athens 

Salzenstein, C. S. . 5.00 
Wertheim, Bertha. 2.50 

Chicago 

Adler, Mrs. D. K. 5.00 

Alschuler, Samuel. 5.00 

Becker Bros. & Co. 10.00 

Born. M. & Co... 10.00 



Davis, James s-no 

Desores, Samuel . 5.00 
Eisenstaedt, Isi- 
dore 10.00 

Foreman, Oscar 

G 500 

Frank, Henry !,••■ :o.oo 
Friedman, Mrs. 

Mina 5.00 

Friend, A. S 10.00 

Gimbel, Charles A. 10.00 

Greenebaum, EHas. 10.00 

Greenebaum Sons. 5.00 

Harris, Mrs. S. H. 5.00 
Heyman, Emanuel 

S 10.00 

Isaiah Sabbath 

School 10.00 

Jacobson, Mrs. D. 5.00 

Katz, Eugene .... 10.00 

Klee, Max 10.00 

Kohn, Isaac 5.00 

Eebolt, J. Y 10.00 

Mandel, Simon . . 2.00 

Maxwell, Geo. H.. 20.00 
Phillipson, Mrs. 

Jos 5.00 

Richter, Simon ... 5.00 
Rosenwald, M. S. 5.00 
Rothschild, Maur- 
ice L 5.00 

Rubovits, Tobias . 5.00 
Schanfaber, Rev. 

Tobias 5.00 

Schwabacher, Mor- 
ris 10.00 

Stein, Adolph .... 10.00 

Stein, Ignatz, .... 10.00 

Stein, Sam 5.00 

Stolz, Rev. Dr. Jos. 5.00 

Stone, A. L 10.00 

Straus, A. S 5.00 

Subert, Mrs. A. . 5.00 

Zalinger, Bernard. 5.00 

Galesburg 

Jewish Aid Society 5.00 

Moline 

Rosenstein, L 2.50 

Park Ridge 

Silberman, Adolph. 10.00 
Peoria 

Emeth Anshai Sab- 
bath School .... 10.00 
Levi, Charles Rev. 5.00 

Rock Island 

Simon, E S-oo 

Washburn 

Fuiks, Jacob 3.00 



INDIANA 

Angola 

Stiefel, Mrs. L,. C. 3.00 
Attica 

Eevor, Levi S. ... 2.50 
Columbia City 
Ladies' Hebrew 
Benevolent So- 
ciety 5.00 

Fort Wayne 

Baum, Joseph ... 10.00 
Freiburger, L e o - 

pold 10.00 

Goshen 

Salinger, Nathan . 5.00 
Hartford City 

Weiler, Miss Amy. 5.00 

Indianapolis 

Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities . . . 200.00 
Newberger, Louis. 10.00 
Sommers, Chas. B. 5.00 

Kokomo 

Levi, J. S 5.00 

Lafayette 

Jewish Ladies' Aid 

Society 5.00 

Loeb, J. Louis . . . 5.00 

Ligonier 

Straus, I. D 25.00 

Straus, Jacob .... 10.00 

Mt. Vernon 

Rosenbaum, Jacob 

and Lee 5.00 

Muncie 

Hene, M 5.00 

Portland 

Weiler, Morris ... 5.00 

South Bend 

Cronbach, Rabbi 

Abraham 3.00 

Summitville 

Jewish Ladies' 
Auxiliary of Sum- 
mitville, Ander- 
son and Elm- 
wood 10.00 

Children of Anna 
Warner, in her 
memory 1 5.00 

Terre Haute 
Herz, A 5.00 



72 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



IOWA 
Charles City 

Hecht, Jos 10.00 

Decorah 

Bear, Ben S-oo 

Des Moines 

B'nai Jeshurun S. 

S 7-So 

Brody, F 5-oo 

Frankel, A S-oo 

Frankel, Mrs. B... lo.oo 

Sheuerman, L,. ... lo.oo 

Younker, M. S-oo 

Keokuk 

Weil, J. B 5-00 

Oskaloosa 

Bauldauf, Samuel. lo.oo 
Rosenblatt, Aaron. 5.00 

Sioux City 

Mt. Sinai Cong. 

Sabbath School.. 5.00 
Jewish Ladies' Aid 

Society 10.00 

KANSAS 
Leavenworth 

Woolfe & Winnig. 5.00 

Saiina 

Stiefel, Moses ' 5.00 

Stiefel, S 5-00 

KENTUCKY 

Danville 

Lyons, Sam and 

Henry 5.00 

Henderson 

Baldauf, Morris .. 10.00 

Lexington 

Shane, Miss R. ... 5.00 

Strauss, Phil 5.00 

Speyer & Sons . . . 5.00 

Weil, Jonas 10.00 

Wolf, Simon 5.0° 

Louisville 

Barkhouse, Louis.. 25.00 

Bernheim, B 25.00 

Bernheim, I. W. . . 40.00 

Blum, S 5.00 

Brooks, Mrs. Marie 10.00 
Council of Jewish 

Women 1 0.00 

Flarsheim, M. H... 10.00 

' Greenebaum, L. . . 3.00 

Kaufman, Henry . 5.00 

Sabel, & Sons, M. 10.00 



Sachs, Edward . . 5.00 

Sachs, Morris .... 5.0f> 

Sloss, Stanley E... 5.00 

Straus, Benjamin. 10.00 

Straus, Mrs. Sarah 5.00 

Trost Bros 5-oo 

Maysville 

Merz, Mrs. A. L-. 5-oo 

Merz, Eugene . . . 5.00 

Merz, Millard . . . 5-oo 

Owensboro 

Hirsch, Col. A. .. 10.00 
Rosenfeld, Mrs. A. 10.00 

Paducah 

Benedict, Mrs. J. . 5-oo 

Friedman, Herman 5.00 
Friedman, L. 

Joseph 10.00 

Israel Temple S.S. 5.00 
Weil, Mrs. Jean- 

ette 5-00 

Shelbyville 

The Jewish Liter- 
ary and Social 
Club 5-00 

Samuel Leopold . . 5.00 

LOUISIANA 
Alexandria 

Ginsberg, B 10.00 

Posner & Fried .. 5.00 
Simon Bros 10.00 

Donaldsonville. 

Nelter & Co 25.00 

Jeanerette 

Wormser, M., & 

Co. 5.00 

Monroe 

Gross, Mrs. Flor- 

antina 2.50 

Napoleonville 

Levy, Maurice ... 5.00 

New Orleans 

Aschaffenburg, A.. 5.00 

Bruenn, Bernard . 5.00 
Council of Jewish 

Women 35-00 

Godchaux, Mrs. 

Paul L 5.00 

Kohn, Joseph .... 5.00 
Marks, Ins. Ag., 

Ltd., Ferd 5.00 

Rosenthal Bros. .. 10.00 

Stern, Maurice . . . 25.00 
Weis, Julius, Est. 

of 25.00 



Plaquemine 

Levy, H.J 5.00 

Rayville 

Titche, Charles ... 5.00 

St. Francisville 

Teutsch, R 2.50 

Shreveport 

Heilperin, H. L. . . 5.00 

MARYLAND 
Baltimore 

Adler, Chas 5.00 

Adler, Simon C. . 5.00 

Adler, Mrs. S. J.. 2.00 

Burk, Charles .... 5.00 

Drey, Elkan 10.00 

Eisenberg, Abra- 
ham 5.00 

Epstein, Jacob . . . 5.00 

Goldenberg, Julius. 5.00 
Goldenberg, Mrs. 

R. H 10.00 

Gottschalk, Jos. ... 10.00 

Gottschalk, Levi... 5.00 

Gutmacher, Rev. A. 5.00 

Gutman, Mrs. Joel 5.00 
Hamburger, Manes 

J 5-00 

Hamburger, Regina 10.00 
Hamburger Bros & 

Co 5.00 

Hecht, Mrs. L. A. 10.00 

Hochschild Max . 5.00 

Kraus, Henry .... 5.00 

Leopold, Isaac ... 5.00 

Levy, Wm 10.00 

Oppenheim, Morris 5.00 
Rayner, Albert . . . 5.00 
Rosenau, Dr. Wil- 
liam 5.00 

Rothholz, J 3.00 

S a r 1 o n i s , Mrs. 

Sarah 5.00 

Sonneborn, Henry. 50.00 
Sonneborn, Moses 

S 5.00 

Sonneborn, Sig. B. 5.00 
Stro.use, Mrs. Hen- 

nie , 2.00 

Strouse, Isaac . . . 5.00 
Strouse, Mrs. Ma- 
thilda 5.00 

Ulman, Nathan ... 5.00 
Van Leer, Han- 
nah Mrs 5.00 

Walter, Moses R. 5.00 
Weinberg, Mrs 

Cecilia 5.00 

Cumberland 

Rosenbaum, Sus- 

man 5.00 

Rosenbaum, Simon 5.00 



LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTORS 



73 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Amherst 

Heller, C. S S^oo 

Boston 

Baer, Louis lo.oo 

Gordon, Nathan... 7S-oo 

Green, Joseph 2.00 

Koshland, J 500 

Morse, Godfrey . . S-oo 

Ratshesky, A. C... S-oo 
Schoener, Joseph 

Y 5-00 

Brookline 

Kaffenburgh, Mrs. 

J S-oo 

Roxbury 

Van Noorden, E. . S-oo 

Waltham 

Bayard, H S-oo 

Worcester 

Goding, Jacob L... S-oo 
MICHIGAN 

Alma 

Pollasky, M 5-oo 

Bay City 

Greenberg, Karl .. i.oo 

Charlotte 

Vomberg, M S.oo 

Detroit 

Fechheimer, H. M. 5.00 

Ginsburg, Bernard. 5.00 

Goldman, A S-oo 

Heineman, Sol. E. 5.00 

Krolik, Henry A.. 100.00 

Rothman, E. M. . . 5.00 

Schloss, Seligman. 30.00 

Siegel, Benjamin . 5.00 

Sloman, Eugene . . 10.00 

Van Baalen, I ... io.no 

Wineman, E 1500 

Elk Rapids 

Alpern, 11 5.00 

Grand Rapids 

Braudy, M., and 

Sons 5.00 

May, Bernard S. . 5.00 

May, Meyer S 5.00 

Pressburg, H. S. . 2.00 

Wolf, G. A 5.00 

Hawks 

Horwitz, Harris . 5.00 
Wolverine 

Eeve, Walter J. . . 5.00 



MINNESOTA 

Duluth 

Altschule, S. S. . S-oo 

Bondy, E- R S-oo 

Hammel, Eouis ... 5.00 

Minneapolis 

Barnet, H. M. ... S-oo 
Weil, Isaac 10.00 

St. Paul 

Bergman, D 10.00 

Goodkind, Benjam- 
in E S-oo 

Guiterman, A. ... 5.00 

Hirschman, A., & 

Co 5.00 

Marx, B 5.00 

Recht, S. H . 5.00 

MISSISSIPPI 

Cohn, David Z. . 10.00 

Brookhaven 

Cohn, David Z.... 10. on 
Cohn, Eouis 10.00 

Kosciusko 

Jewish Charity 

Fund 5.00 

Meridian 

Moskovitz, A. ... 5.00 
Threefoot, H. M. . 10.00 

Natchez 

Frank, Henry .... 5.00 
Zerkowsky, Chas.. 5.00 
Zerkowsky, Isaac . 5.00 

Vicksburg 

Bock, David 5.00 

Cong. Anshe 
Chased Relief 

Society 25.00 

The Eadies' He- 
brew Benevolent 
Association 10.00 

Yazoo City 

Wise, H 10.00 

MISSOURI 

Bigelow 

Kahn, Mrs. S. ... 10.00 
Kansas City 

Benjamin, H. E. •• 5-oo 
Davidson, Julius . 10.00 
Kansas City Feder- 
ation of Jewish 

Charities 230.00 

Eevy, Eeon 5.00 

Rieger, A S-oo 

Shane, M 5.00 



Lexington 

Sinauer, Henry . . 5.00 

Louisiana 

Michael Bros S-oo 

St. Joseph 

Binswanger, Simon 23.00 

Feffer, J. A i.oo 

Feltenstein, David. 2.00 

Fishmon, H i-oo 

Hassenbusch, Sam- 
uel S-oo 

Eowenstein, Mrs. 

Walter • 10.00 

Schloss, Moses A.. i-oo 
Westheimer, D. F. 5.00 
Westheimer, Eu- 
gene 10.00 

Westheimer, Ferd- 
inand 25.00 

St. Louis 

Bowman, Samuel . 10.00 

Bry, N. & E- ... S-oo 
Drey, Mrs. Eizzie 

H 15-00 

Frohlichstein, S. H. 5-oo 

Goldman, 1 10.00 

Creen, E. E-, & 

Son 5-00 

Eippman, Jos. M... 5-00 

Eittman, M 10.00 

Sale, Eee 5.00 

Scharff, Miss Een- 

nie 10.00 

Seelig, S S-oo 

Singer, James W. . 5.00 

Stix, Ernest W. . . 5.00 

Stix, Wm 10.00 

Waldheim, A 5.00 

Wolff-Wilson Drug 

Co 10.00 

Tipton 

Cohn, E S-oo 

MONTANA 
Great Falls 

Wertheim, Nathan. 5.00 

Missoula 

Eeiser, Esther .... 5.00 

NEBRASKA 

Lincoln 

Friend, Morris ... 5.00 

Mayer Bros 10.00 

Pepperberg, Julius. 5.00 

Weil, M S-oo 

Omaha 

Brandeis, Emil . . 5.00 

Gluck, Israel .... 5.00 

Eevy, M. 10.00 



74 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Rosenthal, B. & H. S-oa 
Rosewattr, Victor 5.00 

Rubel, Edgar S. .. 500 

NEW JERSEY 

Atlantic City 

Latz, Mr. and Mrs. 

Mack 25-00 

Zweighuft, S 50.00 

Camden 

Blank, Jacob Z. . . S-oo 
Pfeifer, Regene .. S-OO 

East Orange 

Back, Albert 5-oo 

Montclair 

Hirsh, Mrs. Sam- 
son 500 

Newark 

Bamberger, Louis . 10.00. 

Foster, Rev. Sol... S-oo 

Fuld, Felix 25.00 

Goetz, Joseph 500 

.Michael, Chas. . . . 5-00 

Michael, Oscar . . . 500 

Plaut, Moses 5-oo 

Steiner, Joseph ... s-oo 

Stein, Mrs. Carrie 5.00 

Straus, M., & Sons 5.00 

Plainfield 

Newcorn, Wm. . . . S-oo 

Somerville 

Mack, Alexander 

W 5-00 

Mack, Mrs. Louise 5.00 

NEW MEXICO 
Sante Fe 

Jaffa, Mrs. Nathan S-oo 
NORTH CAROLINA 
Durham 

Kronheimer, B. F. 5.00 

Goldsboro 

Weil, Sol 10.00 

Greensboro 

Cone, Caesar .... 10.00 

Wilmington 

Jacobi, Mrs. Jos. N. 5.00 



Solky, J. M. 



NORTH DAKOTA 
Fargo 

Stern, Max 500 

NEW YORK 

Albany 

Albany Cong. Beth 

Emeth 25-00 

Blair, Mrs. L. E- • 5-oo 
Sporborg, Mrs. 

Henry J 5-oo 

Waldman, Louis I. 10.00 

Binghamton 

Hirschmann, Sig- 

mund J 5-00 

Brooklyn 

Abraham, A 25.00 

Blum, Edw. C. ... 10.00 

Gibb, Walter 5-oo 

Joachim, Chas. J.. . 10.00 

Rothchild, S. F. .. 10.00 

Sternau, S 5-00 

Werbelovsky, Jacob 5-oo 

Buffalo 

Block, Mrs. Jos. .. 10.00 

Boasberg, Emanuel 5.00 
Fleischmann, S i - 

mon 5-00 

Jacobson, S 5-oo 

Keiser, August ... 5- 00 

Reiser, L ^S-oo 

Shroder, Milton .. 5-oo 

Wile, Herman .... 5-oo 

Winters, A 10.00 

Elmira 

Council of Jewish 

Women 5.00 

Friendly, H 3.00 

Far Rockaway 

Eiseman, Stella ... 5.00 

Glen Falls 

Baumann, Julius P. 5.00 
Herkimer 

Schermer, Benj. .. i.oo 

Mt. Vernon 

Samuels, Julius ... 5.00 

Newburgh 

Stroock, Jos 5.00 

Niagara Falls 

Silberberg, Moses 

L 5-00 

Clean 

Marcus, H. W. . . 5.00 

Rochester 

Adler, Abram .... 10.00 



Adler, Isaac 10.00 

Adler, Mrs. Lewis. 5.00 

Adler, Simon 5.00 

.'\dler, Solomon ... 5.0Q 

David, Marcus . . . 5.00 

Katz, Abraham J.. lo.oo 
Kirstein, Mrs. J. 

E 10.00 

Michaels, Jos 20.00 

Rosenbloom, Max 

Z 5-00 

Stern, Morley A... 10.00 

Weil, Katherine M. 5.00 

Wile, Julius M. .. 10.00 

Syracuse 

Eisner, Henry . . . 5.00 

Jacobson, Nathan. 5.00 

Marshall, Jacob ... 10.00 

Rubin, Moses D. . 10.00 

New York City 

Alexander, Arthur 

A 5-00 

Auerbach, Louis .. 10.00 

Backer, George ... 25.00 

Bash, Henrietta . . 20.00 

Bauer, Abram .... 5.00 

Benjamin, Geo. G. 5.00 

Benjamin, M. W. . 10.00 

Bernheimer, Louis. 5.00 

Bijur, Nathan .... 10.00 

Bing, A. M 10.00 

Mrs. J. B. Bloom- 

ingdale 10.00 

Blum, Jos. A 10.00 

Estate of J. Book- 
man 10.00 

Borg, The Misses 

Elsie and Edith. 30.00 

Brand, Herman . . 5.00 

T. Brill S-oo 

Buttenwieser, Jos. 

L 10.00 

Cardoza, Mrs. B. 

N 10.00 

Conheim, Herman. 10.00 
Centennial Lodge 
No. 763 F. & A. 

M 10.00 

Cohen, Joseph H.. 10.00 

Cohn, Salo 5.00 

Crohn, Theodore . 50.00 

Danenbaum, Chas. 5.00 

De Boer, David H. 5.00 

Denzer, E 5.00 

Dreyfuss, Ludwig.. 10.00 

Eiseman. S 10.00 

Erb, Newman .... 10.00 

Erlanger, A 25.00 

Estricher, Henry.. 5.00 

Falck, Harry 5.00 

Fisher, Mrs. A. J.. 5.00 

Fleischer, Nathan. 5.00 



LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTORS 



75 



Fogel, R. R 10.00 

Frank, Mrs. A. B. lo.oo 

Glazier, Mrs. S. W. 25.00 

Goldberg, Isaac ... 10.00 

Goklenberg, S. L. . 5.00 

Goldsmith, Herman 5.00 

Goodhart, Philip J. 20.00 

Gottheil, Paul .... 5.00 

Greenhut, J. B. . . 50.00 

(rreenhut, Mrs. J. B. 100.00 

Grossman, Emil . . 5.00 

Guinzburg, Victor.. 25.00 

Heavenrich, Julius. i.oo 
Hendricks, Mrs. 

Chas 10.00 

Herrman Mrs Es- 
ther 25.00 

Herrman, Nathan. 25.00 

Holzman, Ascher . 10.00 

Holzman, S. L,. . . 5.00 
Horkheimer, Es- 

telle S 10.00 

Jacobson, Henry H. 10.00 

Jonas, William 25.00 

Kahn, Leopold . . . 10.00 

Kahn, Louis 5.00 

Kauffman, Herbert 

M 10.00 

Kaufman, Julius . 10.00 

Kayser, Julius ... 10.00 

Kleinert, I. B 10.00 

Kohlman, Charles.. 10.00 
Kohnstamm, Leo, 
Edward and Jos- 
eph 25.00 

Krauskopf, Nathan 200.00 
Krovver, Louis .... 10.00 
Ladenburger, Theo- 
dore 25.00 

Lang, Gabe 5.00 

Lauterbach, Edw.. . 25.00 
Lehman, Mrs. Irv- 
ing 35-00 

Levenson, J 10.00 

Levi, Emil S 5.00 

Levi, Henlein .... 5.00 

Levi, Mrs. Leo N. 5.00 

Levine, J. Clarence 25.00 

Levor, Gustav .... 10.00 

Levy, Miss Fanny. 10.00 

Levy, Morris 5.00 

Lewisohn, Sam A. 10.00 

Loeb, Emil 5.00 

Loeb, Louis 5.00 

Loewenstein, Her- 
man 5.00 

Mack, Fred A. . . . 10.00 

Mack, Marx H. . . 10.00 
Martin, Herbert 

Spencer 10.00 

Mautner, Julius .. 10.00 

Mayer, Bernard . . 10.00 

Mayer, J. W 10.00 



Mayer, Otto L. ... 10.00 

Mendelson, Leon . 10.00 

Meyer, Harrison D. 20.00 

Modry, 1 3.00 

Morganstern, Al- 
bert G 25.0c 

Morgenthau, Gus- 

tave L 10.00 

Morgenthau, Henry 10.00 

Nathan, Fred 10. on 

Ochs, Adolph S. . . 25.00 
Oppenheim, Mrs. 

Laurent 5.00 

Ottinger, Marx . . 10.00 

Pulaski, M. H. ... 10.00 

Rice, S M 25.00 

Rich, Mrs. S 10.00 

Rossbach, Jacob .. 10.00 

Rothschild, Jacob . 5.00 
Rothschild, Mrs. 

H'm 5.00 

Sachs, Harry 25.00 

Sachs, Samuel . . . 25.00 

Schaffner, Abe . . . 5.00 
Schiff, Jacob H. ..1350.00 
Schoenfeld, Mrs. 

David 5.00 

Schoenfeld, Max .. 100.00 
Scholle, Mellville J. 5.00 
Seligman, Jeffer- 
son 25.00 

Sidenberg, Henry.. 5.00 

Silverberg, A. S. . 10.00 

Sondheim, Max ... 5.00 

Speyer, James .... 10.00 

Steinam, Abraham. 10.00 

Steiner, David . . . 10.00 

Steiner, Joseph ... 10.00 
Steiner, Joseph & 

Bros 10.00 

Steinhardt, Henry. 10.00 

Stern, Benjamin .. lo.oo 

Stern, Leopold ... 10.00 

Stern, Leopold . . . 5.00 

Strasser, Wm. W. . 5.00 

Stroock, Louis S.. 5.00 
Stroock, Robert 

Louis 5.00 

Sulzberger, Cyrus.. 5.00 
Tannenbaum, Sr., 

Leon 10.00 

Toch, Henry M. . . 5.00 
Uflaud, Abraham.. 5.00 
Untermeyer, Hen- 
ry 5.00 

Veit, B 5.00 

Vollter, A 5.00 

Weil, Max 10.00 

Weinberg, A 10.00 

Weinman, Rita ... 10.00 
Werner, A d o 1 p h, 

Prof 10.00 

Wertheim, Jacob . 10.00 



Wineburgh, Jesse . 5.00 

Wolf, Lewis S. ... 10.00 

Wolf, Sam 5.00 

Wolfe, S. Herbert. 5.00 
Wolff, Mrs. Alfred 

R 5-00 

Wolff, A. L 10.00 

Woolf, Morris L- . . 25.00 

Younker, Herman. 10.00 

Zeckendorf. Louis. 5.00 

Zinke, Isaac L. ... 10.00 

OKLAHOMA TERR. 

Tulsa 

Cohen, Isaac 5.00 

OHIO 

Akron 

The Akron Schwes- 

terband 5.00 

Polsky, A 10.00 

Archbold 

Hirsch, Henry .... 10.00 

Bellaire 

Blum, Mrs. Henry 5.00 

Blum, ;\Ir. Isaac. 5.00 

Chillicothe 

Schachne, Moritz.. 5.00 

Cincinnati 

Ach, Lawrence E. . 5-oo 

Ach, Samuel 5.00 

Ault, W. B 10.00 

Bettman, Levi .... 10.00 
Bettmann, Bern- 
hard 5.00 

Bing, Mrs. Ida ... 10.00 

Block, Abe 5.00 

Block, Leon 5.00 

Block, Joseph E. . 5.00 

Eichberg, Harry . . 5.00 

Englander, 1 5.00 

Ezekiel, Henry C. . 3.00 

Ezekiel, Miss Sallie 5.00 

Fox, Burton 5.00 

Fox, Henry 5.00 

Fox, Solomon .... 10.00 
Frank, Miss Paul- 
ine 5.00 

Freiberg, Abr 10.00 

Freiberg, Bernard. 5.00 

Freiberg, Harry A.. 5.00 

Freiberg, J. W. ... 10.00 

Freiberg, Maurice J. 25.00 

Freiberg, Sidney J. 5.00 

Fries, Gus R 5.00 

Furst, Joseph 10.00 

Greenbaum, Wal- 
ter G 5.00 

Guggenheim, Eli... 5.00 

Huttenbauer, Emil. 10.00 



76 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Holzman, Wallace. 5.00 

Hahn, Henry 10.00 

Jonap, Henry .... 5.00 

Kaufman, Eli B. . . 5.00 

Kaufman, Lee .... 5.00 

Klein, Joseph D. .. 10.00 

Krohn, Irwin M. .. 5.00 

Krohn, Louis 5.00 

Lavin, Samuel .... i.oo 

Lefkowits, Charles. 5.00 

Levy, Harry M. . . 5.00 

Magnus, Jos. A. .. 10.00 

Marks, Leslie V. . 5.00 

Marx, Louis 10.00 

May, Bros 5.00 

Mayer, E 10.00 

Mayer, Mrs. L. . . 5.00 

Meis, Nathan 5.00 

Meiss, Harry 5.00 

Meiss, Leon 5.00 

Mendel, Henry ... 10.00 

Miller, E. L 5.00 

Moch, E. J 10.00 

Nusbaum, M 10.00 

Offner, Alex 5.00 

Pentlarge, Mrs. Ul- 
rica 7.00 

Peyser, Sol. D. ... 5.00 

Phillips, Godfrey J. 10.00 

Plaut, Aaron 5.00 

Pollak, Emil 10.00 

Pritz, Carl E 5.00 

Pritz, Sidney E. . . 5.00 

Rauh, Louis S. ... 5.00 
Rheinstrom, Sig- 

mund 5.00 

Rosenthal, Samuel. 10.00 

Rosenthal, Wm. H. 5.00 

Roth, Chas To.oo 

Rothschild, Lester. 5.00 
Seasongood, Alfred, 

Est. of 10.00 

Seinsheimer, Mrs. 

Samuel 5.00 

Shohl, Chas 5.00 

Springer, Dr. Al- 
fred 5.00 

Stark, Dr. Sigmar. 10.00 

Stein, Hugo 10.00 

Stern, Max 10.00 

Stix, Mrs. Fanny. . 5.00 

Straus, Samuel ... 10.00 

Strauss, Albert I... 10.00 

Sturm, Simon 5.00 

Thurnauer, Charles 

M 5.00 

Trager, L Newton. 5.00 
Trager, Mrs. Isi- 
dore 10.00 

Trager, J. Garfield 5.00 

Trost, Saml. W. .. 10.00 

Troy, Ernest 5.00 

Ullman. Adolph . . 5.00 



Wallenstein, Geo. 

W 5.00 

Westheimer, Irwin 

F 5-0O 

Westheimer, Leo . 20.00 
Westheimer, Mor- 
ris 10.00 

Winkler, Eli 5.00 

Winkler, Mrs. I. . . 5.00 

Wolfstein, Jesse, . . 5.00 

Wyler, Isaac A... 5.00 

Cleveland 

Daughters of Is- 
rael, Lodge No. I 5-00 
Einstein, Mrs. 

Felix H 5.00 

Einstein, Leopold . S-oo 

Eisenman, Chas. . . 5.00 

Feiss, Paul L S-oo 

Forchheimer, B. . . 5.00 

Cries, Rabbi M. J.. 10.00 

Gross, Sam'l 10.00 

Halle, Mrs. Manuel 10.00 

Hartman, Saml. . . 10.00 

Hays, Joseph 5.00 

Hexter, Kaufman 

W 5.00 

Hexter, S. M 5.00 

Joseph, Sigmund . . 5.00 

Joseph, Isaac 10.00 

Korach, S 10.00 

Lowenstein, Ben . . 10.00 

Marks, M. A 5.00 

New, Benj 5.00 

New, Harry 5.00 

Peskind, Dr. J. A.. 10.00 

Schwab, Mrs. Flora 5.00 

Shlesinger, H, .... 5.00 

Shlesinger, Sig . . . 5.00 

Stearn, Abraham .. 10.00 

Weil, Meyer 5.00 

Columbus 

Lazarus, Jeffrey L. 3.00 

Crestline 

Reder, Jake 5.00 

Dayton 

Ach, F. J 10.00 

Daneman, Mrs. Jac- 
ob 1.00 

Lessner, Adam . . . 5.00 

Gallon 

Gottdiener, H 5.00 

Hamilton 

Kahn, Lazard .... 5.00 

Lima 

Michael, N. L 5.00 

Mt. Vernon 

Meyers, Mrs. Max. 5.00 



New Philadelphia 
Family of Fred Al- 
exander 10.00 

Norwood 

Klein, Mrs. Babetta 5.00 

Piqua 

Anshe Emeth Cong. 5.00 
Plymouth 

Spear, Mrs. Sol. . . 5.00 

Sandusky 

Kaplan, Samuel ... 5.00 
Springfield 

Thimble Social, 

The Jewish .... 5.00 

Toledo 

Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities ... 100.00 

Ycungstown 

Grossman, Dr. J. 

B 5.00 

Guthman, Leo . . . 5.00 
Hebrew Ladies" 
Benevolent So- 
ciety 5.00 

Hirshberg, B 5.00 

Hirschly, B 5.00 

Strouss, 1 5.00 

Weil, Mrs. Samuel. 5.00 

Zanesville 

Starr, A. E 5.00 

OREGON 



Portland 

Selling, Benj. 
Swett, Z 



20.00 
5-00 



PENNSYLVANIA 

Allegheny 

Sustein, A. J 10.00 

Sunstein, C 15.00 

Allentown 

Harris, Wm. T. . . 5.00 
Heinz, Frank and 

Irwin 5.00 

Hess, Chas. and 

Max .1 10.00 

Kline, Chas 5.00 

Bethlehem 

Fritz, John 5.00 

Reis, Louis 5.00 

Braddock 

Fromme, Mr. and 

Mrs. Alex 5.00 

Katz, Leo A 5.00 



LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTORS 



77 



Bradford 

Grecncwiihl, Daviil 

C 5-00 

Chester 

Levy, Moses i.oo 

Coatesvilie 

Brauenstein, Isaac. 5.00 

Doylestown 

Shoemaker, Harry 

J 5-00 

Easton 

Mayer, Jacob S-oo 

Sherer, S 5.00 

Harrisburg 

Astrich, Herman .. 10.00 

Hazelton 

Friedlander, M. ... 8.00 
Jenkintown 

Silberman, Max . . 5.00 

Johnstown 

Rothstein, M 5.00 

Kittaning 

Einstein, Jacob . . . 5.00 

Lancaster 

Cohen, 1). M 5.00 

Hecht, Mrs. Henri- 
etta 5.00 

Moss, S. R 5.00 

Rich, Israel 5.00 

Rosenthal, Morris . 5.00 

Siesel, Samuel .... 5.00 

Luzerne 

Freedman, Max.... 5.00 

New Castle 

Feuchtwanger, Mar- 
cus S-oo 

Pittsburgh 

Aaron, Chas. I.... 5.00 
Aaron, Louis I.... 10.00 
Aaron, Marcus . . . 5.00 
Aaron, Mrs. Mina. 5.0^ 
Aronson, I. Leon- 
ard 5.00 

De Roy, Jos. . . . 5.00 

Dreifus, C 5.00 

Ferguson, H. B. . . 5.00 
Floersheim, B e r - 

thold 5.00 

Frank, Isaac 25.00 

Frank, Samuel, 

"In Memoriam" 5.00 

Goldsmit, Louis . . 5.00 

Gross, Isaac 5.00 

Guckenheimer, Mrs. 

A 10.00 



Guckenheimer, Is- 
aac 100.00 

J. M. Gusky Or- 
phanage So-'""3 

Hanauer, Mrs. H.. 5.00 

Kann, W. L S-O" 

Kaufmann, Henry.. 10.00 

Kaufmann, Morris, 15.00 

Klee, Wm. B 10.00 

Oppenheimer, W. 

Oscar 10.00 

Raphael, Rudolph.. 5.00 

Rauh, A. L 105.00 

Rauh, Enoch .... 5.00 

Rauh, Marcus .... 5.00 

Rothchild, M. N. . . 5.00 

Sidenberg, Hugo . . 25.00 
Solomon, Kaskel .. 10.00 
Stadfield, Joseph 

Esq 5-00 

Weil, A. Leo, Esq. 25.00 
Weil, Jacques .... 5.00 
Wertheimer, Em. . 10.00 
Wertheimer, Isaac. 10.00 
Wertheimer, Sam- 
uel 10.00 

Wolf, Fred 5.00 

Pottstown 

Mosheim, S i.oo 

Weitzenkorn, Mor- 
ris 5.00 

Weitzenkorn, Mrs. 

A 5.00 

Reading 

Baer, 1 5.00 

Bash, Wm 5.00 

Cohen Bros 5.00 

Goldman, E 5-oo 

Goldsmith, I., & 

Son 5.00 

Heilbron, Louis ... 5.00 

Loeb, L 5.00 

Luria Bros 10.00 

Marcus, Nathan ... 5.00 
Schneeberger & 

Gretta 5.00 

Schweriner S. S. . . 10.00 

Sondheim, Jonas,.. 5.00 

Steppacher, W. . . . 5.00 

Whiteson, 1 5.00 

Rochester 

Rapport, H. T. ... 5.00 
Scranton 

Epstein, M. L. ... 5-oo 

Goldsmith Bros. . . 5.00 

Heinz, B 10.00 

Kleeman, Oscar ... 5.00 

Krotosky, Isidore. . 5.00 

Krotosky Brothers. 5.00 

Levy, K 5.00 

Moses, B 5.00 



Oettinger, Louis . . 5.00 

Rice, Max S-oo 

Roos, Dr. EHas J.. 5-oo 

Samter Bros 5.00 

Selin's Grove 

Weis, S 500 

Shamokin 

Gelb, W. B., & Co. 5-00 
South Bethlehem 

Weisenberger, S.... 5.00 

Wilkes-Barre 

Cohen, Mrs. C. . . . 5-oo 
Davidow, Edward 

B 5-00 

Heinz, Maurice ... 10.00 

Lazarus, H 10.00 

Long, Mrs. Dora . . S-oo 
Marks, Mrs. Lillian 

U 5-00 

Stern, Harry F. . . 5.00 

Strauss, S. J., Esq. S-oo 
Williamsport 

Goldenberg, C. N., 

& Co 5-00 

York 

Lebach, Lena Mrs.. 3.00 

Lehmayer, N i5-oo 

Philadelphia 

Acker, Finley .... 5.00 

Anspach, Mrs. M. . 10.00 

Arnold, Lizette and 

Julia 5.00 

Asher, Emanual ... 10.00 

Baird, J. E 10.00 

Baum, Saml 5.00 

Beckman, S 10.00 

Beerwald, Mrs. B. 

D 5.00 

Belmont, Leo 15.00 

Belostosky, Jean- 

ette 2.00 

Bernheimer, Mrs. 

E 5-00 

Blank, Mrs. H. . . . i.oo 

Blumenthal, Mrs. 

Sol 10.00 

Davidson, Mrs. F. 

S s-oo 

Delaney & Co. . . . 5.00 

Dreifus, Mr. and 

Mrs. Sydney . . . 5.00 

Eicholz, Mrs. Han- 
nah 50.00 

Elkish, Mrs. Louis 5.00 

Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities ...6950.00 

Feustman, Maurice 

M 5.00 

Frank, Beulah .... 5.00 

Gans, Mrs. Jeanette 5.00 

Gans, Mrs. L. ... 20.00 



78 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Gartenlaub, Mrs. A. lo.oo 

Gold, Walter C . . 5-oo 

Goldsmith, Miriam lo.oo 
Goldstein'?, L,., 

Sons 25-00 

Graves, N. Z 5.00 

Greensfelder, Jos.. 5.00 

Greenspan, Mrs. A. 5.00 

Halbert, M 10.00 

Hecht, Israel 25.00 

Heebner, Sam'l ... 5.00 
Heidelberger Char- 
les 5.00 

Hensell, Colladay 

& Co 5.00 

Herman, Meyer . . 10.00 

Herzberg, H 10.00 

Herzberg, Mrs. L. . 5.00 
Heymann, Mrs. 

Fannie 20.00 

Hilbronner, Fannie 2.00 
Hilbronner, Master 

S. J 5.00 

Hirsh, Mrs. Ga- 
briel 10.00 

Hoffman, Mrs. H. 

R 5-00 

Hohenfels, Miss 

H. A 5.00 

Isaacs, Mrs. M. R. 5.00 

Jacobs, Mrs. R. . . 5.00 

Jessar, B. Z 5.00 

Karpeles, Dr. M. 

J 15-00 

Kaufman, Mrs. C. 10.00 
Keystone Branch 
No. 157, Nation- 
al Assn. of Let- 
ter Carriers .... 25.00 
Kaufmann, Mrs. S. 5.00 
Kline, Mrs. M. L. 20.00 
Klinordinger, A. . 10.00 
Kohn, Miss Mina.. 10.00 
Koshland, I. M. . . 10.00 
Lane, David H. . . . 25.00 
Largman, Dr. S. . . 5.00 
Lieberman, Edith. 10.00 
Lipper, M. W. ... 10.00 
Lippman, Mrs. H. . 5.00 
Marcus, Bernhard 5.00 
Massman, Philip .. 20.00 
Metzger, Louis . . . 25.00 
Miller, Wm. W. . . 25.00 
The Moore & White 

Co 5.00 

Myers, Mrs. Yette 5.00 

Nachod, Julius E. 5.00 

Noar, Miss Cecelia 5.00 

Oppenheimer, Leon 5.00 

Ostheimer, Wm. J. 5.00 

Pollack, S. F. ...'. 15.00 
Potsdamer, Theo. 

B 10.00 



Raff, A. Raymond. 5.00 

Rolph, Wm. T. . . . 5.00 

Rosenberg, Birdie. 5.00 
Rosenberg, Mrs. 

M 10.00 

Rosenthal, Harry . 10.00 

Rosenthal, Mrs. H. 10.00 
Rubenstone, Mr. & 

Mrs. J 5.00 

Rubin, Mrs. Jos. . 30.00 

Schloss, Hermann. 100.00 

Schwacke, J. H. . . 5.00 

Schwerin, Mrs. A. 5.00 

Schwerin, B. G. . . 5.00 
Schwerin, Mrs. 

Emanuel 10.00 

Sharp, S. S 10.00 

Shor, Mrs. D. ... 5.00 

Showell, E. B. ... 5.00 
Silberman, Mrs. 

Ida 30.00 

Snellenburg, N. . . 500.00 

Solomon, Adolph . 20.00 

Springer, E 5.00 

Stamm, Miss Jean- 

ette 5.00 

Stamm, Jos 5.00 

Stein, Abe 5.00 

Steinhart, Mrs. 

Frances 3.00 

Stern, Mrs. Lina 
(in memory of) 
by Ida and Har- 
ry Stern, Mrs. 
Louis Schloss & 

Mrs. I. M. Koch 30.00 

Tobias, Miss Alma 2.00 

Voynow, C. B. ... 50.00 

Walter, Simon . . . 10.00 

Wasserman, Albert 10.00 

Weil, Eliz. Hulda. 5.00 

Weinberg, Mrs. A. 5.00 

Wieder, C. P 5.00 

Wile, Miss Rose . 8.00 

Wilson, Mrs. B. S. 5.00 

Wilson & Richards 5.00 

Work, R. D 25.00 

SOUTH CAROLINA 
Florence 

Sulzbacher, S. I. . 5.00 

Rock Hill 

Friedheim, Julius. 5.00 
Friedheim, Samuel 100.00 

TENNESSEE 

Clarksville 

Adler, M 7.50 

Knoxville 

Rosenthal, D. A. . 5.00 



Memphis 

Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities . . . 325.00 

Nashville 

Federation of Jew- 
ish Charities . . . 75.00 
Loveman, Adolph.. 5.00 

TEXAS 

Beaumont 

Deutser, B 5.00 

Ladies Benevolent 

Society 10.00 

Big Springs 

Fisher, Mrs. Anna 5.0a 

Dallas 

Burk & Co 5-00 

Hexter, Victor 

Henry 5.00 

Kahn, E. M 25.00 

Kahn, J 5-oo 

Levi, G. A 5-00 

Myers, Seymour . 5.00 

Ortlieb, Max 5.00 

Sanger Bros 5.00 

El Paso 

Aronstein, S 5-oo 

Kohlberg, E 5-oc) 

Stolaroff, 1 5-00 

Temple Mt. Sinai 

S. S 10.00 

Fort Worth 

Bath, Felix P s-oo 

Council Jewish 

Women 5-oo 

Friend, Alex M. .. 5.00 

Gernsbacher Bros . 5.00 

Levy, Samuel .... 5.00 

Marx, Herman . . . 5.00 

Galveston 

Cohen, Robert I. . 5.00 
The Hebrew Be- 
nevolent Society. 25.00 

Midland 

Halff, Henry May- 
er 10.00 

Mineola 

Bromberg, I. G. . . 5.00 

Palestine 

Maier, S 5.00 

San Antonio 

Halff, Mrs. M. . . . 25.00 

Halff, S 5.00 

Holzmark, Mrs. T. 5.00 
Victoria 

Levi, A., & Co. .. 10.00 



LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTORS 



79 



UTAH 
Salt Lake City 

F.aer, Adolpli S-oo 

Je\^•ish Relief So- 
ciety 5-00 

VIRGINIA 

Harrisonburg 

Oestieicher, S. ... i.oo 

Lynchburg 

Lazarus, L S-OO 

Norfolk 
Hecht, Jacob 5-oo 

Richmond 

Biuswanger Harry 

S 5-00 

Binswanger, ]\I. I. 5.00 

Kaufman, I S-oo 

Millhiser, INI r s . 

Clarence i5-oo 

Millhiser, Emanuel 5.00 
Raab, E S-oo 



Wallerstcin, Henry 

S 15-00 

Staunton 

Strauss, J,. G. ... 5-00 
WASHINGTON 

Everett 

Hochstadter, Bern- 
ard 5-'''0 

Seattle 

Eckstein, Mrs. Na- 
than 10.00 

Tacoma 

Feist, Theo 500 

Klaber, Herman . . .5^0 
Ladies' Montefiore 

Society 5-Oo 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Bluefield 

Heller, I\Irs. Flor- 
ence Simon .... 5-00 



Wheeling 

Bloch, Sam'l S. . . . 5-oo 
Horkheimer, Mor- 
ris 25.00 

Isenberg, Israel . . 5.00 

Rice, Albert M. . . 5.00 

Rice, S. M 5-00 

Sonneborn, M. ... 5.00 

WISCONSIN 

La Crosse 

Hirshheimer, A. . . 25.00 



Milwaukee 




Aarons, Lehman . . 


5.00 


Cohen, Mrs. Ger- 






5.00 


Heller, Simon .... 


10.00 


Miller, Morris 


5.00 


Schuster, Chas. ... 


3.00 


Tabor, L. L 


5.00 


Milwaukee Feder- 




ated Jewish 




Charities 


100.00 



BENEVOLENT ORDERS 







Independent Order B' 


nai 


BV 


ith 




ALABAMA 

Birmingham 

Birmingham Lodge 
No. 368, I. 0. B. 


5- 
5- 

5- 
5- 


00 
00 

00 
00 


GEORGIA 

Savannah 

Joseph Lodge No. 
76, I.. 0. B. B.. 

ILLINOIS 

Lincoln 

Liberty Lodge No. 
294, I. 0. B. B. 

Bloomington 

Lincoln, Abraham, 
Lodge No. 190, 
L 0. B. B 

Chicago 

Oriental Lodge No. 

189, I. 0. B. B. 
Ramah Lodge No. 

33, I. 0. B. B... 


5- 

5- 

5. 

10, 
10, 


00 

00 

,00 

,00 
.00 


IOWA 
Des Moines 

Des Aloines Lodge 
No. 330, I. 0. B. 
B 


S-oo 


Mobile 

Beth Zur Lodge 

No. 84 

Montgomery 

Alabama Lodge 


KENTUCKY 
Lexington 

Lexington Lodge 
No. 289, I. 0. B. 
B 




No. 299, I. 0. 
B B 


LOUISIANA 

New Orleans 

District Grand 
Lodge No. 7, I. 
0. B. B 1 

MICHIGAN 




CONNECTICUT 

New Haven 

Horeb Lodge No. 
25, L 0. B. B. 

COLORADO 


150.00 


Denver 

Denver Lodge No. 


10. 

LI 


00 
1- 


Springfield 

Ernes Lodge No. 
67, I. 0. B. B... 

INDIANA 


5 


.00 


Kalamazoo 

Mishan Lodge No. 
247, I. 0. B. B. 

MINNESOTA 


7-50 


DISTRICT OF CO 




UMBIA 






Fort Wayne 






Minneapolis 




Washington 

Argo Lodge No. 
413, I. 0. B. B.. 


5 


.00 


Emek B e r a c h a 
Lodge No. 61, I. 
0. B. B 


10 


.00 


Minneapolis Lodge 
No. 271, I. 0. B. 
B 


15.00 



80 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



MISSISSIPPI 
Greenville 

Deborah Lodge 
No. i6i, I. O. B. 
B 5-00 

Columbus 

Joseph Herz Lodge 
No. i8i, I. O. B. 

I> 2.00 

Jackson 

Manasah Lodge 

No. 202, I. O. 

B. B 3-00 

MISSOURI 
St. Joseph 

Joseph Lodge No. 

73, I. O. B. B... 10.00 

St. Louis 

Eben Ezra Lodge 

No. 47, I. O. B. 

B 10.00 

Missouri Lodge 

No. 22, I. O. 

B. B 5-00 

IViONTANA 

Butte 

Baron De Hirsch 
Lodge No. 420, 
I. O. B. B 5-00 

NEBRASKA 

Omaha 

Nebraska Lodge 
No. 354, I- O. B. 
B 5-00 



NEW MEXICO 

East Las Vegas 

J. E. Rosenwald 
Lodge No. 545, 
I. O. B. B 10.00 

NEW YORK 

Albany 

Gideon Lodge No. 

140, I. O. B. B. 5-00 

New York City 

Hebron Lodge No. 

5, L O. B. B. .. 5-00 
Henry Jones 

Lodge No. 79, I- 

O. B. B 2.00 

Washington Lodge 

No. 19, I. O. B. 

B 10.00 

Zion Lodge No. 

No. 2, I. O. B. 

B 10.00 

Piattsburg 

Joel Lodge No. 

118, I. O. B. B. 5.00 

Rochester 

Zerubbabel Lodge 
No. 53, I. O. B. 
B 10.00 

OHIO 

Cincinnati 

The Cincinnati 
Lodge No. 4, I. 
O. B. B 10.00 

Dayton 

Eschol Lodge No. 

55, I. O. B. B... 10.00 



OREGON 

Portland 

Portland Lodge 
No. 416, I. O. B. 

B 10.00 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allegheny 

Saar Sholem Lodge 

No. 154, I. O. B. 

B 10.00 

Jericho Lodge No. 

44, I. O. B. B.. . 15.00 

TENNESSEE 

Memphis 

Memphis Lodge 
No. 35, I- O. B. 

B 10.00 

Nashville 

Maimonides Lodge 
No. 46, I. O. B. 

B 5-0O 

TEXAS 
San Antonio 

Edar Lodge No. 

211, I. O. B. B.. 5-00 
Tyler 

Edward L a s k e r 
Lodge No. 347 i- 
O. B. B 500 

WASHINGTON 

Seattle 

Hildesheimer Lodge 
No. 503, I. O. B. 
B 5.00 

WISCONSIN 
Milwaukee 

Isaac Lodge No. 

87, I. O. B. B.. 5.00 
Gilead Lodge No. 

41, I. O. B. B. . 5.00 



Order B'rith Abraham 



MINNESOTA 
Minneapolis 

Minneapolis City 
Lodge No. 63, O. 
B. A 

NEW YORK 
Elmira 

Elmira City Lodge 

No. 272, O. B. A. 
New York 

Benj. Harrison 

Lodge No. 9, O. 

B. A 

PENNSYLVANIA 
Fittsburqh 
Hope Lodge No. 

210, O. B. A. . 2.00 



5.00 



3.00 



3-00 



RHODE ISLAND 

Providence 

Star of Rhode Is- 
land Lodge No. 
330, O. B. A.... 4 

TEXAS 

Dallas 

Alexander Kohut 
Lodge No. 247, 

O. B. A ; 

WISCONSIN 

Milwaukee 
Wisconsin Lodge 
No. 80, O. B. A. : 



Independent Order 
Free Sons of Israel 



CONNECTICUT 

New Haven 

New Haven Lodge 
No. 46, I. O. F. 
S. 1 5-00 

WISCONSIN 

Milwaukee 

Cream City Lodge 
No. 63, I. O. F. 
S. of 1 500 



Form A -5 

Babbi Joseph Krauskopf. D. B., 'President I. X. Sflverman, Treasurer 

47 I 3 Pulaski Avenue, Philadelphia 605 Land Title Buildina. Philadelphim 

Rabbi Isaac Landman, Secretary 

334 Mutual Life Building, Philadelphia 



noembersbtp of ^he IRattonal ifarm School 

I. the undersignerl, being m sympathy with the object of the 
'"National Farm School" — the training of lads in the practice and 
science of agriculture, for agricultural callings — do hereby agree to 
subscribe as one of the Maintainers of the institution, the dues of a 
Life Member ($100.00) Patron ($25.00) Supporte;r ($5.00) 
Friend ($50,00) Member ($10.00) 

Name 

Address 

Date 



NOTE — Underscore the class of membership you wish to join. Life Membership calls for but one 
(the first) payment. Make check payable to the NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL. 



form of Xeaac^ 

TO THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL. DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

I 

"/ give and bequeath unto the National Farm School, Bucks 

Co., Pa., near Doylestown, the sum of dollars, 

free from all taxes, to be paid to the Treasurer, for time being. 
for the use of the institution" 



Iform of H)evt0e 

OF REAL ESTATE OR GROUND RENT 

"/ give and devise unto the National Farm School, Buck's 
Co., Pa., near Doylestown, {here describe the property or ground 
rent), together with the appurtenances in fee simple, and all policies 
of insurance covering said premises, whether fire, title or otherwise, 
free from all taxes." 



GAS 



The use of Gas is spreading rapidly in 
parts of the country where its use has hitherto 
been a luxury. Now it is a necessity. 

We take some of the credit for this 
condition because we were the pioneers in 
giving Gas consumers GOOD SERVICE. 

We have had to plough through many 
difficulties but we have cultivated and gath- 
ered a crop of satisfied consumers because of 
our GOOD SERVICE. 

Besides light and fuel for cooking GAS 
can be, and is, applied in 800 different ways 
in industrial pursuits. 

And everywhere we have a consumer, 
U. G. I. Service (the standard for Gas) fol- 
lows. 

THE UNITED GAS IMPROVEMENT 
COMPANY 



The St. James 



Walnut and Thirteenth Sts, 



PHILADELPHIA 



With Best WisHes 



MacDONALD &t CAMPBELL 




THE MAJESTIC H OT El, broad st.&girard ave. 

The Heart Centre of Philadelphia 

Has no Superior in This Country or Europe in 
Construction, Equipment, Cuisine or Service 
BERL SKGAL^Gencral Manager 

As Philadelphia Leads the World So 

Ibarbwick d ^agee (Tonipan^ 

Lead Philadelphia in the Manufacture of 

IRugs anb Carpets 

The high standard of our well-known Vv^eaves 
has been uniformly maintained for years and 
today we enjoy the confidence and respect 
of the best houses throughout the country 

FORTY SIZES OF RUGS IN STOCK ' 

Special Sizes Made to Order 

Hardwick & Magee Company 



Successors tc I.Ins, Pietz & Mage" 
Retailers of All Standard Floor Coverings 

1220-1222 MARKET STREET 



DURABLE AS IRON 



SERYIGE ! 




DO YOU WEAR A "STETSON"? 

About two out of every three men who buy a hat at 
$3.50 or over wear a "Stetson.'' We believe many men 
who pay less can afford to pay more and get a "Stetson." 

The stiff hats this year are exceptionally handsome 
and the rough finish soft hats smart and stylish. 

John B. Stetson Company 



Stetson Store 



1 1 08 Chestnut Street 



Philadelphia 



AN APPRECIATION 

The following letters, entirely unsolicited, attest the high 
character of all our work: 
"My Dear Mr. Gutekunst: 

"Please accept my sincere thanks for the photographs you 
have made of me, and which have just reached me. They are 
certainly magnificent likenesses, and well attest the fact that 
the hand that has delighted Philadelphia with its art for the 
past half century has not yet lost its cunning. 

"Trusting that kind Providence may spare you to us and 
to your art yet many a year in health and good cheer, I am 
\'ery appreciatively yours. 
Rabbi JOS. KRAUSKOPF, D. D. "JOS. KRAUSKOPF." 

r. GUTEinUNST. 712 ArcK Street and I700 NortK Broad St. 




HOSKINS 



904-906 

CHESTNUT STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 



Printing Office Furniture 

Engraving Filing Devices 

Stationery Cutlery 

Blanl^ Books Kodaks 

Loose Leaf Devises Leather Goods 

^ Largest and mo^ Complete Stock in Philadelphia 
^ Facftory and Printery on the Premises 



COMMERCIAL STATIONERS 
and OFFICE OUTFITTERS 



'LEADS THAT NEVER VARY' 




DIXON'S 



PENCILS 



AMERICAN 

GRAPHITE 

Are tuiequaled for smooth, tough leads. 

ALL STATIONERS 

JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE COMPANY 
1020 ARCH STREET PHILADELPHIA 

Factory and Main Offices, Jersey City, N. J. " 



BLUM BROTHERS ^^n'th ^st'^** 

THE NEW SHOE STORE 

On Third Floor 
PROVES THAT FIT, COMFORT AND QUALITY ARE ELEMENTALS 

OF SHOE BEAUTY 

Shoes for women, misses and children are the work of this just opened 
Shoe Store. We have spent many months selecting these Autumn stocks 
and we have had before us this leading thought — SHOE FIT. We shall 
insist on that, and we have women here who know just exactly the kind 
of shoe that makes each type of foot look its best and feel its best. Re- 
fined, beautiful styles are the characteristic feature of shoes at all prices. 
See for yourself these select, pretty styles that are now ready. 

SHOES FOR WOMEN, RANGING IN PRICE, $3, $3.50 and up to $8 
WOMEN'S SLIPPERS, Plain or Fancy, $1 to $6 

All Colors, as well as Black and White 

SHOES FOR CHILDREN 

STURDY SCHOOL SHOES, BUILT STRONG WELT-SOLE BLUCHER 

FOR SERVICE AND NEAT EF- STYLE SHOES FOR BOYS, $1.75 

P^Qj AND $2.25 A PAIR 

Sizes 6 to 8 $1.40 a pair CHILDRENS SHOES OF HIGH- 

Sizes 814 to 11 $1.75 a pair EST GRADE 

Sizes 11^ to 2 $2.00 a pair sizes 5 to 8, $1.50 to $2.50 a pr. 

Sizes 2^ to 6 $2.25 a pair sizes 8i, to 11, $2 to $3.50 a pr. 

Blum's Third Floor Sizes 11i,, to 2, $2.50 to $4 a pr. 



MIKVE ISRAEL SYNAGOGUE 

Broad and York Streets Philadelphia 

BUILT BY 

THE CHAS. McCAUL COMPANY 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS 
Offices: Philadelphia Washington Baltimore Toledo Atlanta Savannah 



Cafe Colonnade 

CHESTNUT STREET AT FIFTEENTH 
PHILADELPHIA 

CORDIALLY invites you to visit its Beautiful New Palm Room. 
Vocal Concerts 7 to 8 P. M. ; 10.30 P. M. to i A. M. 

Victor Schertzinger. the artistic violin soloist, with the Orchestra, 
gives Three Sessions Daily. 

Extra Added Attraction — Continuous Music Tuesdays, Thursdays, 
and Saturdays, 12 o'clock noon until i A. M. 

M. E. GREENHOUSE, Proprietor 
S. M. W. BRIGGS, Manager 

HOBDELL 

PRACTICAL 

FEATHER DYER 

Ostrich Feathers Cleaned, Dyed, Curled and made to look like new. 
154-156 NORTH THIRTEENTH STREET 
Philadelphia 

N. CRAMER & SONS 

Manufacturers of 

Cloaks and Suits 

210-212 NORTH THIRTEENTH STREET 
Philadelphia, Pa. 




M. J. DALTON CO. 



CIGAR IMPORTERS 



Philadelphia 



9 



yans 

Theatre 
Ticket Offices 

THE BELLEVUE - STRATFORD 



Compliments of 



B. N. A. 



Cigar Importer, Manufacturer 
and Retailer 



ELEVENTH AND CHESTNUT 



MINT ARCADE 




Beauty, Style and Comfort 
<^rHZn andWOUEH 

'vt,i'\ USLE—SlUt LISLE— PURE SILK 

fOuafanlewlij 
Homo/ ! 




John M. Hodson Company 



Manufacturers of 



High Grade Ocean Pearl Buttons 



440-42-44-46 NORTH ORIANNA STREET 



Philadelphia 



DIAMONDS 

Nothing is more acceptable to refined people than diamonds. Not 
only can you buy to better advantage as to prices here (a fact too 
well known to need explanation), but you have far greater variety in 
rings, necklaces, brooches, cuff links, bracelets, pins — diamonds im- 
ported direct by us ; mounting done right here. 



3I» IBrPJBB Sc ^OttB Importers of Diamonds and Watches 



Established 1888 


Open Evenings 


J. Sellers Pennock 




Sanitary Plumbing 


SACKS BROS. 


and Heating 




S. E. Cor. 


1228 Cherry Street 


SEVENTH & FILBERT STS. 


- 



Meyer Cossoy 



Manufacturer of 



Office PartitloDs, Store fixtures 

AND ALL KINDS OF 

CflBlflET OlOHK 

624-626 FILBERT STREET, Philadelphia 



Telephones 

Bell, Market 2442 
Keystone, Main 60-68 D 




Make this memorandum for your week-end ordering: 



'A case of 




To be delivered Saturday." 

The nerve tonic of the best of hops, the nourishment of 
the barley-malt, the mild stimulation of the trifle alcohol when 
added to the rest at home, make you fit for the battle on Monday 
Morning. 

Order From Your Bottler, or From Us 

F. A. POTH & SONS, Inc. 

Thirty-first and JefTerson Streets 



PARK 874 



POPLAR 45 1 1 




MAULE'S SEEDS 

Once Grown Always Grown 

Write Today for the 

MAULE SEED BOOK FOR 1912 

It Contains Everything, Old and New, 
Wortli Having in Seeds, Plants and Bulbs 



WM. HENRY MAULE 
1707, 1709, 1711 Filbert St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



The Commonwealth Title insurance 
and Trust Company 

N. W. COR. CHESTNUT AND TWELFTH STS. 



CAPITAL, - - - . $1,000,000 
SURPLUS AND PROFITS, $1,428,352.45 

Insures Titles, Receives Deposits, Executes Trusts, 
Searches, Loans Money, Becomes Surety 
ACTS AS REGISTRAR OF STOCKS AND BONDS 
Safe Deposit Boxes to Rent for $3.00 and Upwards 



Issues 



OFFICERS 



Dimner Beeber, President 
Francis E). Brewster, First Vice-President 
Franklin L. Lyle, Second Vice-President 
Henry M. Dechert, 

Chairman of Board & Executive Com. 
James V. Ellison, Secretary & Treasurer 



Andrew T. Kay, Title Oificer 

Charles K. Zug, Trust Officer 

Edmund B. McCarthy, Asst. Sec'y & Treas. 

Robert J. Williams, Assistant Title Officer 

Charles E. Fellows, Real Estate Officer 

T. C. Jordan, Assistant Trust Officer 

R. F. Reaver, Safe Superintendent 



DIRECTORS 



Dimner Beeber Bernard Gilpin 

Francis E. Brewster George E. Kilpatrick 

Charles Carver Franklin L. Lyle 

Henrj' INI. Dechert Frederick McOwen 



Edward A. Schmidt 
E. Cooper Shapley 
Henry R. Shoch 
John H. Sloan 



Frederick Sylvester 
John T. Windrim 
Isaac D. Yocum 




1833 



1911 



NO^ IN OUR 78th YEAR 
Up-to-date and Exclusive Styles in 

FINE FURS 

WE INVITE YOUR INSPECTION 

E)avi8' jfur Sbop 

1120 CHESTNUT ST. 

Next to HeitHs PKiladelpHia 



THE STORE OF FAM- 




1 
1 


Asher's Dancing 


OUS SHOES is the mar- 






ketplace for FOURTEEN 

of the most famous brands 




and Swimming 


of trade marked Shoes 






made in America for Wo- 




School 


men. Men and Children, 






and for Famous Stockings 




OPEN ALL YEAR 


and Sox. 




Ball Rooms and Banquet Roonns 


The most expert fitting 






service in Philadelphia 




Can be Rented 


Geuting'S 




S. E. Cor. 22nd & Walnut Streets 

Philadelphia 


(Pronounced Gylina) 






The Store of Famous Shoes 




Boston and Drop a Specialty 


1230 MARKET STREET 




Bell Phone Circular 




r- 




,11 




[bj 


Miss L. Elfman 




WELLINGTON 

Hairdressing 


IMPORTING 




Parlors 


MILLINER 




1335 Columbia Ave. 

1 The most Saniiary and 

up-to-date Parlors up town 1 


1337-1339 




Shampooing 

Marcel Wave 


Columbia Avenue 




Scalp Treatment, Facial 


PHILADELPHIA 




Massage, Manicuring 

All Work done up-to-date by 


- 




first-class Operators, Cour- 




OPEN EVENINGS 




teous service. 






\£ 


3 [ 


□ 



OWEN LETTER'S SONS 



BE5T COAL 



Main Yard: 



Trenton Avenue and Westmoreland St. 



THERE MAY BE OTHER AS GOOD 



THERE'S NONE BETTER 







^ 1 1 ii r^ 



McNICHOL 

Paving & Construction Co. 



General dontractors 



BETZ BUILDING 



PHIIvADKLPHIA, PENNA 



Ji ll ll l^ 



B. HOOLEY & SON 



K nUIfS^JriiCTQREK 



435-439 NORTH BROAD STREET 



Philadelphia 



KEYSTONE, MAIN 390 —TELEPHONES— BELL, MARKET 409 

National Aniline & Chemical Co. 

—ANILINE COLORS, DYE STUFFS, CHEMICALS— 
log North Water Street Philadelphia 

Agents foi' Schoellkopf, Hartford & Hanna Co. A. Lee Company 



d. Scbmt^t .^* Sons 



121 Mahtut Street 



BalUngcr R pctvot 



12U Hrcb Street 



JSo^ertown :fl3uilDing 



NEW YORK: 345, 347 Broadway 



BOSTON: 67 Chauncy Street 



CHICAGO: 605 Medinah Temple 

Catltn S. dompan^ 

YARNS 

128-130 CHESTNUT STREET PHILADELPHIA 

COPS, SKEINS, CONES, TUBES AND WARPS 



F. C.JDickjey Co. 

LigKtiivg FixtMres 

ir^r CKestivMt 5tr^^t 

Philadelphia 



We especially call your attention to our new Fall line of Silk 



Shades and Portables for the Holidays 




OUR 1912 LINE COMPRISES SIX DIFFERENT MODELS 
RANGING FROM $900 TO $1800, including: 

Model 34, Runabout, equipped ....$900 

Model 35, Touring, equipped 1060 

Model 28, Roadster, equipped 1075 

Model 29, Touring, equipped 1250 

Model 43, Touring, equipped 1800 

All of these models combine, with the Buick's long estabHshcd 
reputation for power and endurance, beauty in lines, richness in 
finish, and a perfection of mechanism that makes the motor abso- 
lutely noiseless in operation — in fact — 

"No Noise but the Spark" 

BUICK MOTOR CO. 

235 N. BROAD STREET 



J. E. CALDWELL &t CO. 

JEWELLERS AND SILVERSMITHS 

II II [g] I I 'I 

Importers of Fine Watches and Clocks and European 
Objects of Decorative art. 

Sterling Silver for Weddings and Anniversaries. 

NEW ART ROOM FOR THE 

Display and Sale of the Artistic 
Productions of the Tiffany Studios 



2\ D 



902 Chestnut Street 

FURS 

or THE 

BETTER GRADE 

Theo. F. Siefert 

1426 Walnut Street 




HATS FOR MEN 
FURS MILLINERY 

The models displayed by this house have 
set the style standard in Philadelphia for 
over sixty-one years. 

BLAYLOCK & BLYNN, Inc 

Hatters, Furriers and Milliners 

1528 Chestnut Street Philadelphia 




CRANE'S ICE CREAM 

CARES Ca PASTRIES 

Have stood the Test of "Pure Food Laws" 
and have been pronounced "absolutely 
pure." No order too large or too small, but 
what will receive careful attention of ex- 
perts in their line. Goods shipped to all 
points. Bell and Keystone Phones at your 
service any hour of day or night. 

Tea Room, 1310 Chestnut Street 

open from 7 A. M. to 8 P. M. ; on Saturdays until 11 P. M. 



Kerr and Company 

Tailors to Gentle^vomen 



119 South 17th Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 




NEW CREATIONS 

The kind that excite admiration, and at the same 
time are within the reach of the majority of buyers. This 
has been our efforts and will continue to be so, because 
we think you believe in 

NEWLY CREATED JEWELRY 



E. J. HERTZ 

JEWELER AND IMPORTER OF DIAMONDS 

13th BELOW CHESTNUT ST. 



A. F. BORNOT BRO. CO. 

FRENCH SCOURERS 
AND DYERS 

SEVENTEENTH STREET AND FAIRMOUNT AVENUE 



BRANCHES: 
1535 Chestnut Street S. W. Cor. Broad and Tasker Sts. 

1714 North Broad Street N. E. Cor. Twelfth and Walnut Sts. 

PHILADELPHIA 
1224 E Street, WASHINGTON, D. C. 
716 Market St., WILMINGTON, DEL. 

Why not send us all your IMPORTANT CLEANING? 

"tr T 1^^ IT ITT Petticoats, fits without alteration. Made 
J.l.xvV^v^ j^ ^jj Petticoat fabrics and in all colors 

ON SALE AT ALL THE LEADING STORES 

Manufactured by 

QREENWALD BR05., Inc. 

Philadelphia 



ROYAL PALACE HOTEL 

Atlantic City, N. J. 

OPEN ALL YEAR 

SAMUEL HANSTEIN, Proprietor 
LYMAN J. WARTROUS, Manager 



Compliments of 



HOTEL TRAYMORE 



ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 




New Hotel Merion 

Atlantic City, N. J. 

Mack Latz & Co. 

VERMONT AVE. 

Open all the Year Near the Beach 



H. C. ALBERT & CO. 



APOTHECARIES 



States Avenue and Boardwalk 



Atlantic City, N. J. 



Compliments of 
P. E. SHARPLESS CO. 

FANCY TABLE BUTTER 

AND CHEESE 

813-819 N. Eleventh St. 

PHILADELPHIA 



Milliam (3or6on 

^eats, ptovieions 



1214 Htlanttc Hve» 

miantic Ctts, m. 5. 



1701 ipa00ipun?^ Hve» 

IPbilaDelpbia 



BEYOND COMPETITION 

BAILEY'S PURE RYE 

For the Use of Gentlemen who Can Ap- 
preciate a Perfedt Flavor and Aroma 
Combined with all the Requisities 
Necessary to Assi^ Convalescents When 
Recommended by a Physician. Fully 
Matured and Bottled. 



HUEY & CHRIST 

1308 ARCH STREET 



PHILADELPHIA 



THIS REPORT IS PRINTED BY 



(Eatictn Jpnnttng OInmpattg 

PRINTERS AND PUBLISHERS 

218 SOUTH FOURTH ST. : : PHILADELPHIA 

ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY FURNISHED J^ BOTH PHONES 

THE JEWISH EXPONENT 

DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS of the JEWISH PEOPLE 
Representative of Jewish Institutions 
and WeJlcomed in the Jewish Home 

— Published Every Friday — 
Subscription Price: $3.00 Per Annum 
Philadelphia Office, 608 CHESTNUT ST. 

Baltimore Office, 120 AISQUITH ST. 



Wm. Steele & Sons 
Company 



R. E. W. W. 



Capital $150,000 Surplus and Undivided Profits $275,000 

Sittb THational Bank 

N. W. Cor. Second and Pine Streets 

WM. S. EMLEY, President 

HENRY SHETZLIXE, Vice President 

DANIEL BAIRD, Cashier 

Let Me Estimate on Your Work 



A. P. Fraim 



CARPENTER AND BUILDER 

Office and Shop: 319 Market Street 

Jobbing Promptly Attended To 

Bell Phone Estimates Furnished Keystone Phone 



Established 1883 Both Phones 

Merchants Parcel Delivery 

STEWART & GRAHAM, Proprietors 

Packages Delivered to All Parts of the City at 
Lowest Rates. Special Arrangements made with 
Business Houses of Other Cities for Delivery of 
Packages in Philadelphia and Camden 

1010-1014 RACE STREET PHILADELPHIA 

jfivtb & jfoster Compan)^ 

Philadelphia 
DYERS AND FINISHERS OF PIECE GOODS 
\\'e are specially equipped for Fine All-A\'ool and Silk and ^^'ool 

Mixed Fabrics 
"BRIGHT COLORS— SUPERB LUSTRE" 

TKe JoKn Mawson 
HAIR CLOTH COMPANY 

Kensington Avenue Glenwood Avenue Venango Street 

NortI| prnn Mnnk 

Twenty-ninth and Dauphin Streets 

Capital $50,000.00 Surplus $10,000.00 

2 per cent Interest on Check Accounts 
3^ per cent Interest on Savings Fund Accounts 

Open Monday and Friday Evening until 9 P. M. 

Louis H. IMichel, President AMlliam Spratt. \^ice President 

Joseph Schlenz, A'ice President R. T. ^Moyer, Cashier 



GOOD 

.i?^i"7 ■, Hardwood 
r loors 




Parquetry, Wood 
Carpet and Grilles 

1706 Chestnut St. 





IMPORTER 

HATS GOWNS 
CORSETS FURS 
TAILORED 
SUITS 



Your Inspection is Invited 
1732 CHESTNUT STREET 



pbtlaDelpbta 

flOanufacturere fiDutual 

Ifire Uneurance Co* 

ARCADE BUILDING 
PHILADELPHIA 

EDWIN I. ATLEE, President 

USE BOYD'S 

PHILADELPHIA DIRECTORIES 

They Are Good Business Producers 

C. E. HOWE CO. 
208 South Fourth Street 



BOTH TELEPHONES 

THE ANTIQUE SHOPS OF 
J. M. WINTROB 

918-926 PINE STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 

Rare Old Pieces, Oddities 
Skillfully Reproduced 



MASTBAUM & FLEISHER 
REAL ESTATE 

605 MARKET STREET 

Philadelphia 



F. M. CAMPBELL CO. 

1804 Chestnut Street 

FURNITURE AND 
UPHOLSTERY STUFFS 
ART FABRICS 
CURTAINS, ETC. 

PHILADELPHIA 



O. FUHRMANN 

IDienna XaMc0* ITatlor 

1507 North Fifteenth St. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



THE MANUFACTURERS 
NATIONAL BANK 



CAPITAL, $500,000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 

$409,715.92 

William H. Heis'ler, President 

Samuel Campbell, Cashier 



J. SIMONS 

XaDics* IRatrDresser 

28 S. SEVENTEENTH ST. 

Special reductions for Weddings and 
Parties. Combings made up in any style. 
Work Guaranteed. Hair Dyeing a Spe- 
cialty. Gives Free Advice and tells how 
to use the safest and most reliable dye 
for grey hair. 



JUNGMANN'S 
BEEF, WINE AND IRON 






PINTS 
None Better 



Jungmann's Drug Store 
FOURTH AND NOBLE STS. 



The reason of our great success — 
Personal attention of the Pro- 
prietor — Sam'l Hornstein. 
THE RELIABLE LADIES' 

TAILORING COMPANY 
1223 Chestnut Street 
Formerly 1225 

0pp. Baily, Banks & Diddle 

Our Only Store 



ASA W. VANDBRGRIFT, Pres. 
F. W. HUDTWALCKER, Sec-Treas 

SHEIP & VANDEGRIFT 

Incorporated 

MANUFACTURERS OF CIGAR 
BOXES— LOCK-CORNER BOXES 

Nos. 814 to 832 Lawrence St. 
Philadelphia 



J. BRECHT'S SONS 

CIGAR BOX MANUFACTURERS 
109 and 111 N. Orianna Street 
Telephone Connection 



HENRY KAISER 




OPTICIAN 
i6i2 Germantown Avenue 

Prescription Work a Specialty 
Philadelphia 



ManufucUucTs >,i all kinds ot 
Hani Rubber, Elastic ami Leather-Covered 

TRUSSES 

Sole Makers of the Celebrated 

DR. McINTOSIT NATURAL UTERINE 

SUPPORTER 

For Home and Export Trade 

— Abdominal and Uterine Supporters, — 

Shoulder Braces, Crutches, Elastic Hosiery 

and P>ody Belts 

912 WALNUT ST., Phila., U. S. A. 



Hoffman-Corr Mfg. Co. 

Ask Your Dealer and insist on hav- 
ing your Awnings made from 
HOFFMAN GOLD MEDAL BRAND 

AWNING STRIPES 

Largest Rope and Twine House in 

the World 

CONTRACTORS TO THE 

GOVERNMENT 

Philadelphia New York 

312 Market St. 150 Duane St. 



FENNER 
DRUGS 



Broad and Columbia Avenue 



EL TEANO 

Mild Havana Cigars 15c, 2 for 25c 
Theobald & Oppenheimer Co. 

Makers Philadelphia 



S. W. Goodman Company 

PRINTERS 
ii6 North Third Street 

Philadelphia 




Charles I. Kent, Pres. William L. Guenther, Vice-Prcs. Leon Rosenbaum, Trcas. & Sec. 

J. JACOB SHANNON & CO. 
1744 Market Street 1744 

PHILADELPHIA 

Mill, Mine, Railroad, Builders' and 
Contractors SUPPLIES, HARD- 
WARE and EQUIPMENT 

Sanitary Plumbing Fixtures At Moderate Prices 

Steam and Hot Water Heating Materials 

"PRECISE HEAT" REDUCES THE COAL BILL 

Haynes- Thompson Company 

2107-09 VINE STREET PHILADELPHIA 

JosepK Call 

Ipatnter anb Becorator 



1727 N. Tenth Street 

Brick Fronts a Specialty 



THE H. B. SMITH COMPANY 

1225 ARCH STREET PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Manufacturers of 

BOILERS AND RADIATORS 

For the Heating of New or Old Buildings by Any System 

of Steam or Water 

Write for Catalog Mills Water Tube Boilers 



JOSEPH S. KEEN, Jr., Prcs't & Gen'l M'g'r 

GEORGE M. BUNTING, Vicc-Prcs't & Trcas. 

II. BAYARD HODGE. Sec'y & Ass't Treas. 

WM. H. ROTH, Assistant Secretary 

American Pipe and Construction Co. 

ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS 

112 North Broad Street Philadelphia 

J. W. LEDOUX, AM. SOC. C. E. JAMES H. DAWES 

Chief Engineer Gen'l Sup't Construction Dep't 

HAROLD PEROT KEEN, Gen'l Sup't Operating Dep't 

Ube IDulcanite paving Compan>2 

112 North Broad Street Philadelphia 

General Contractors for Reinforced Concrete Construction, Asphalt, Mastic 

Water-proofing, Insulation, Belgian Block 
Asphalt Block and Vitrified Brick Paving 

Asphalt, Mastic and Cement Floors our Specialty 



DISINFECTANTS AND DISINFECTING APPLIANCES 

HOUSES SCIENTIFICALLY FUMIGATED 
WE ARE EXPERTS IN THE LINE 

West Disinfecting Company, Inc. 

THE LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF DISINFECTANTS AND DISIN- 
FECTING APPLIANCES IN AMERICA 

MAIN OFFICE AND LABORATORY, NEW YORK 
PHILADELPHIA OFFICE, 1303 RACE STREET 
Charles Auerbach, Mgr. Both Phones 



Diehl Manufacturing: Co. 

J. S. Kenyon, Mgr. 

ELECTRIC GENERATORS, MOTORS, EXHAUST 
WHEELS, FANS, ETC. 

Philadelphia Office: 1305 RACE STREET 



WRIGLEY'S 
BIG 10 
CLEANER 
BETTER 
CLEANER 
BIGGER CAN 
AT ALL 
GROCERS. 



TYPEWRITERS 

50 STANDARD MAKES 

Densmore, Remington, Smith-Pre- 
miers, Olivers & Underwoods, 
from 

$10.00 to $45.00 

Rebuilt and equal to new, one year 
guarantee 



New Method of Renting 



$ 



1 



-pvENTAL 

IVATEON 



Typewriters 

-6 months' rental allowed on 
purchase. Rebuilt like new 



Liberty Typewriter Company 



911 Walnut St, Philadelphia 




Handsome and Ap- 
propriate Gifts. 

Large Assortment 
of attractive Sub- 
jects. 

Artistic Picture 
FRAIVIING 
Largest line & most 
exclusive mould- 

ings at lowest 
prices. 

OTTO SCHEIBAL 
20 N. 9th St., Phila. 



BBBBB 



> ^i> ! iLi ' JU ' A>A' JJ JJJg.u.'^u-'am-iUC 




STANTON H. HACKETT 

242 SOUTH SECOND STREET 

Chairs & Mission Furniture 




THE PEN-DAR CONSUMER 
A New and Safe Idea 

Made entirely of Galvanized Wire and 
Iron, almost indestructible, used for Burning 
Waste Paper and other combustible material, 
also a neat Basket for Waste Paper, Leaves, 
etc. 

No. I, 20 in. dia, x 30 in. high $3.00 

No. 2, 17 in. dia. x 25 in. high 2.00 

No. 3, 14 in. dia. x 21 in. high 1.80 

No. 4, 12 in. dia. x 18 in. high 1.50 

We also manufacture Wire Cloth, Wire and 
Iron Work, Wire Garden Furniture, Trellis & 
Flower Bed Border, Lawn and Poultry Fenc- 
ing and Gates. Everything in Wire and Iron. 



Pen-Dar Leaf Racks — Used on wheel- 
barrows with removable sides, for 
gathering 1 eaves, cut grass and rub- 
bish ; capacity, 10 bushels; made of 
galvanized Wire, bolted to a wooden 
case. Price, (not including wheelbar- 
row) $4.00. "Ask for Catalog of what 
you may want." 

Manufactured by 




r 1 1 rV 1 C- C /^ I Address Department 

tdward Uarby cc J>ons Co., Inc., 233 & 235 Arch street 

Genuine "PHILADELPHIA" Lawn Mower* 

Always have been the Standard of the World 




"Graham" 

All Steel 

For over 42 years the 

"Philadelphia" Lawn Mowen 

have maintained unchallenged 

supremacy amongst Lawn 

Mower Manufacturers 

18 Style High Grade Hud 
Mowers. 

5 Style High Grade Horse 
Mowers. 

Their New All Steel Mower 
the "Graham" the perfection 
of Lawn Mower Construction 



The Philadelphia Lawn Mower Co. 



Thirty-first and Chestnut Streets 



Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 



GOLD SEAL BEER 



BREWED BY THE 



Continental Brewing Co. 

JVla de from the very finest 
quality of Malt, and the 
best growths of Hops = = 



BREWERY 

21st Street and Washington Avenue 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



THE INTEGRITY TITLE INSURANCE 

TRUST AND SAFE DEPOSIT CO. 
S. W. Cor. 4th & Green Sts., Philadelphia 

Capital Stock, Full Paid, $500,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits, 1.045.143.20 

Deposits 4,061,880.12 

BANKING DEPARTMENT 

Receives money on deposit, subject to check 
on siglit, allowing 2 per cent, interest. Rents 
boxes for safe keeping of valuables in burglar 
and fire-proof vaults, for $3.00 and upwards. 
Letters of Credit and International Checques 
for Travelers issued, available everywhere. 
SAVING FUND DEPARTMENT 
Open from 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. 
Monday to 7 P. M. Saturday to 1 P. M. 
3 per cent, interest allowed on deposits 
TITLE AND REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 
Examines and insures titles to real estate. Collects rents, dividends, interest, etc. 
Money loaned on mortgage and mortgages for sale. Attends to all details pertaining to 
buying, selling and conveying of real estate. 

TRUST DEPARTMENT 
Transacts all Trust Company business and acts in the capacity of executor, adminis- 
trator, guardian or Trustee taking entire charge of estates. All valuables received for safe 
keeping. Wills receipted and kept in safe boxes without charge. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 




OFFICERS: 

President 
GEORGE KESSLER 
First Vice-President 
PHILIP SPAETER 
Second Vice-President 
PHILIP DOERR 
Secretarv and Treasurer 
HERMAN WISCHMAN John Greenwood 

philS"e. guckes 5)ic 31Scamten sprecben Dcutscb 



George Kessler 
Philip Doerr 
Frederick Orlemann 
Charles G. Berlinger 
Philip Spaeter 
Wm. H. Rookstool 
Albert Hellwig 



Fred'k Gaeckler 
George Nass 
C. J. Preisendanz 
Daniel W. Grafly 
J. Edwin Rech 
A. P. Kunzig 
Albert Schoenhut 
Chas. \V. Miller 



Wm. G. Berlinger 
Chas. Strickler 
Jacob Kramer 
"I. P. Strittmatter, 

M.D. 
J. McGlynn 
Jos. Medicus 
Gustav A. Kirchner 




Works : 

New Britain 
Connecticut 
U. S. A. 



P. & F. Corbin 



&ii\[^ 



Supply Locks 

And All Other Necessary 
BUILDER'S HARDWARE 

for all classes of 
Private or Public Buildings 



Warerooms : 
New York 
Philadelphia 
Chicago 




There's Good Fun, Good Appetite and Health Behind a Sure, 
Steady, Smooth-running Lawn-mower 

ALL STYLES FOR ALL CONDITIONS OF LAWNS 

NOTE — Pennsylvania Golf Ball Bearing Mowers are used on the Greens of 
the Philmont Country Club, The Huntingdon Valley Country Club, 
and on numerous other Golf courses throughout the World. 
SOLD EVERYWHERE 



SUPPLEE HARDWARE COMPANY 



Philadelphia 



Discriminating Electricians Use 



ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 

Frank A. Stewart 

Electrical Company 

35 North Seventh St., Phila. 



Telephone 

CONKLING-ARMSTRONG 
TERRA COTTA CO. 

Manufacturers of 
Architectural Terra Cotta Works 

PHILADELPHIA 
Office: Builders' Exchange, Phila. 



The Stern Mfg. Company 
Manufacturers of 
FULL AUTOMATIC KNITTED 
NECKTIE MACHINES 
109 North Tenth Street 
Philadelphia, Pa 
Makers of All Kinds of Needle 
Cylinders. Repairing and Remod- 
eling of All Makes of Machines. 



Bell Phone Keystone Phone 

AUGUST GEIGER 

Heating and Contracting Engineer 
Steam and Hot Water Heating 

114 North Sixth Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Harry R. Rust 

Store and Office Fixtures, Etc. 

— Contractor, Carpenter, Builder — 

ROLLING STORE LADDERS 

Office and Mill 

724-26 LUDLOW STREET 

828 FILBERT STREET 

Telephones PHILADELPHIA 



If its Tools or Hardware 

We have it 

It is our aim to carry the most complete 
line of Hardware and Tools to_^ be found 
anywhere. 

And all our goods are selected for "Qual- 
ity" regardless of price, 

But — you'll find our prices exceptionally 
reasonable — you'll get full value for every 
dollar. 

Let us quote on your requirements. Man- 
ual Training outfits a specialty. 



V 



ANCE 

HARDWARE SHOP 

324 MARKET ST., Phila. 



Both Phones 

Let Us Estimate on Anything 
EDWARD FAY & SON 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS 

1521 Ranstead Street 
(15th above Chestnut) Phila. 



BANK & OFFICE PARTITIONS 

[.WRiCiPili. 

Cabinetmakers 



1719 N. 10th STREET 
Philadelphia 



WM. R. DOUGHERTY 

Carpenter an^|Butl^er 

1608-1610 Sansom St. 
Philadelphia 
Jobbing Work of All Kinds Attend- 
ed to 



THE BEST 
SEEDS 

PLANTS 

BULBS 

Catalogues mailed free 
Henry A, Dreer 

714 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Reliable Ladies Tailoring Co. Thompson, Taylor & Co. 



9tK &i MarKet Streets 



Philadelphia 



Compliments of 



D. ATLAS 



BERGER BROS. CO. 

TINNERS' HARDWARE 
AND ROOFERS' SUPPLIES 

237 Arch Street, Phila. 



CHRISTIAN PFAFF 

Wholesale Wine and Liquor 
Dealer 

Southeast Corner 
Passyunk Ave. and Catherine Sts. 

PHILADELPHIA 



CARNWATH, BELL & CO. 

STEAM 

Packing Box Manufacturers 
613 and 615 Cherry Street 
608 and 610 Quarry Street 

Telephone Philadelphia 



Wholesale Grocers 
206 S. Front St. Philadelphia 



B. Devitt D. R. Worman 

442 Bourse, Philadelphia 

Dealers in Grain and Feed 

Agents for Gluten, Peanut Cake, 
Dried Brewers Grains and Buck- 
wheat and Rye Flour, etc. 



EZRA LEVINSON 

Dealer and Jobber in 

—PAPER BAGS— 

For Neckties, Notions, Segars, etc. 
Printed or Imprinted 

Wrapping Paper in Roll or Sheet 
— Twines for Any Business — 
Envelopes, Toilet Paper, Etc. 
26 SOUTH FIFTH STREET 

Both Phones Phila., Pa. 



MARGOLIN & BLOCK 



203 South Fifth Street 



Both Phones 

JOHN HAAG COMPANY 

EGGS, BUTTER AND POULTRY 

Reading Terminal Market 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



THE TENTH NATIONAL BANK 

OF PHILADELPHIA 
Broad Street, south of Columbia Avenue (New Bank Building) 

Established Dec. 14, 1885 

Capital $200,000.00 

Surplus and Profits 35,228.66 

ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 
Dividends Paid to Date (May, 191 1) 260,000.00 

The GLASS & NAGHOD BREWING CO. 

SOLITAIRE BEER IS GOOD 

Bottling Beer a Specialty 

1720-38 MERVINE STREET PHILADELPHIA 



SAMUEL B. MacDOWELL & SON 



BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 






1927 MONTGOMERY AVENUE 
PHILADELPHIA 



1762 



I9I2 



®scau B. jfow S. Son 
MEATS 

STALLS 1234 TO 42 READING TERMINAL MARKET 

Arch Street Front 



Telephone Connection 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



EXCELSIOR LAUNDRY CO. 

Will Treat You Right 



PROMPT DELIVERY PHILA. OR SUBURBS. PHONE OR POSTAL 

DAILY SERVICE OFFICES IN CENTRAL LOCATIONS 
MAIN OFFICE - _ - - - 19th AND MONTGOMERY AVENUE 



9308 



$ 1 ,800,000 

patrons have more than the above amount on 
deposit here. 



The Northwestern Trust Company 

RIDGE AND COLUMBIA AVENUES 

WILLIAM PREIHOFER, President 




LIGHTING BY 







'^^■^^"•^^^^^^ 



ELECTRICITY is safe, economi- 
cal, and convenient when install- 
ed by competent men. Do not 
make the mistake of having the 
cheapest wiring installed. Cheap 
work means future expense, annoy- 
ance and trouble. You will save 
yourself this if you send to 

ALBERT GENTEL, Inc. 
1503 Columbia Ave. 

4466 Germantown Ave. 
Philadelphia 



Emanuel Asher 

1602 DIAMOND STREET, PHILADELPHIA 

Bell Phone, Diamond 898 
Keystone Phone, Park 979 

The entire building, 1602 Diamond 
Street, is now devoted to the busi- 
ness, and is at the disposal of our 
patrons for the care and burial of 
their dead. Funerals can be held at 
the parlor at any time. 

ATLANTIC CITY, 22 N. Delaware Avenue 
Atlantic Coast Phone — 222 

RESIDENCE, 1814 ERIE AVENUE 
Bell Phone, Tioga 7663 



Bell, Poplar 896 TELEPHONES Keystone, Park 67-71 

Bell, Poplar 897 
Bell, Poplar 3369 A 

NEVER CLOSED 

Haag Stable Company 

Limited 

SIXTEENTH STREET, BELOW DIAMOND 

Philadelphia 

UP-TO-DATE EQUIPAGES 

OPERA BUSSES BRIDAL COACHES VICTORIAS 

CABRIOLETTE HANSOMS BROUGHAMS CUT UNDERS 

COACHMEN IN FULL LIVERY 

Established 1855 

TKomas DelaKunty 





Marble 


Granite 


WorKs 





Underground Vaults and 
Mausoleums a Specialty 

3811 to 3821 Ridge Ave. 

Opposite 



NortH Laurel Hill Cemetery 



PHILADELPHIA 



EXECUTES TRUSTS PAYS INTEREST ON DEPOSIT INSURES TITLES 

ffiucks County ^tU8t Company 

AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $250,000 PAID IN CAPITAL, $125,000 

SURPLUS, $170,000 

Hugh B. Eastburn George Watsox 

President and Trust Officer Assistant Trust Officer 

T. O. Atkinson Geo. H. Miller 

Treasurer Assistant Treasurer 

COURT AND BROAD STREETS DOYLESTOWN, Pa 



John S. Williams 
Vice President 



R. 



L. CLYMER 

Dealer in 

Dry Goods, Groceries, Notions 

AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Opposite P. & R. R. Depot 



JAMES BARRETT 

Dealer in 
Paints and Oils, Cement, Terra 
Cotta Pipe, Horse Clothing and 
Full Line of Hardware, Etc. 
Cor. Main & Ashland, Doylestown 



W. H. SWARTLEY 

Manufacturer of 

CIDER AND VINEGAR 

Cor. State and West St. 

P. O. Box 412, DOYLESTOWN, Pa. 



WM. J. HOHLEFELDER 

Successor to Buckman & Co. 

LUMBER AND COAL 

Doylestown, Pa. 

Largest Storage Rooms with E^levator 
Packing and Moving Done. Terra Cotta 
Pipe, Flue Linirie, Fire Clay, Ce- 
ment, Lime, Sand and Other Building 
Supplies. Established 1865. Both Phones. 



HENRY S. BEIDLER 

Doylestown, Pa. 
COAL, FLOUR, GRAIN, FEED, 
CLOVER SEED, TIMOTHY AND 
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, 
FERTILIZERS, LIME, ETC. 



"GET IT AT PEARCE'S AND 

IT WILL BE RIGHT" 

SAMUEL R. PEARCE 

PHARMACIST 

HART BUILDING, Doylestown, Pa. 



LEHMAN & SONS 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
All Kinds 

FRESH and SALT MEATS 

Curers of Hams, Bacon and Dried 
Beef Sausage and Scrapple in 
Season. 

Doylestown. Pa- 



WM. P. ELY & SON 

Dealer in 

Ready-to-Wear Clothing for Men, 

Boys, Children; Gent's Furnishing 

Goods, Hats, Caps, Boots and Shoes 

OPPOSITE P. & R. DEPOT 

DOYLESTOWN 



Bell Phone, No. 9 

FRANK J. McGLADE 

23 East Oakland Avenue 

Doylestown, Pa. 
Plumbing and Heating 



Oakland Avenue Blacksmith Shop 
Doylestown, Pa. 
THOMAS F. SCOTT 
Practical Horseshoer and 

General Blacksmith 



The Doylestown Blacksmith and 
Repair Shops. Doylestown, Pa. 

HARRY FLUCK 
Carriage and Wagon repairing a 

Specialty. 
Charges very Reasonable 



Bell Phone 86 

SHIVE BROTHERS 
Fish, Oysters, Clams, 

Fruit and Vegetables 
Pine St., between Oakland and 
States Streets, Doylestown, Pa. 



Doylestown National Bank 



Capital $10,500.00 

Surplus aud Profits 

JOHN M. JACOBS, President 



21,000.00 

JOHN N. JACOBS, Cashier 



JOHN J. RUFE & SONS 
MECHANICS HEATER WORKS 

Sole Manufacturers of Rufe's 
Patent Steam and Hot Water 
Heaters and Elevator Govern- 
ors. Plumbing, Heating and 
Ventilation Engineers. Works 
on South Main Street 
Doylestown, Pa. 



JOHN DONNELLY 

Dealer in Stoves, Heaters, 
Ranges, Tinware, Plumbing, 
Steam and Hot Water Heating 
Tin Roofing and Spouting 
Cor. Main St. and Oakland Ave. 



HENRY BELL, President 
HENRY K. W^ALT, Vice-President 
FREEMAN S. HUNSBERGER, 

Treasurer 

BELL, WALT & CO., Inc. 

WHOLESALE 
Boots, Shoes and Rubbers 
47 N. THIRD STREET 



JOSEPH FISHER 

722 Sansom Street 



BELL PHONE 164A 
C. LOUIS SIEGLER, D.D.S. 

Opposite New Hart Building 

MAIN STREET Doylestown, Pa. 



David Weber 



Theo Greenwald 



DAVID WEBER & CO. 

PAPER BOX MAKERS 
Corrugated Paper 

Corrugated Bottle Wrappers 
Corrugated Shipping Cases 
Folding Boxes, Bottle Boxes and 

Metal Edge Boxes 
N. W. Cor. Fifth and Locust Sts. 



Bell Phone 184A 

EMIL PEITER 
Bakery and Confectionery 

Pure Ice Cream 
Opp. Masonic Hall, Doylestovi/n, Pa. 



Phone 279 X 

BcrUowtts Bro9» 

TAILORS, CLOTHIERS 

AND FURRIERS 

Tailors for Men and Women 

28 SOUTH MAIN STREET 

Doylestown, Pa. 



C. S. WETHERILL 

COAL, LUMBER & MILL WORK 

143 WEST STATE STREET 
and 
242 WEST ASHLAND 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 



H. B. ROSENBERGER 
Coal, Lime, Cement, Hay 

W. ASHLAND STREET 

Dovlestown, Pa. 



Joseph Windholz 

Thomas F. Courtney 

Htn^ljolg $c (Eourlttpy 

PAINTING & PAPERHANGING 

Paints, Oils, Glass, Etc. 

Estimates Given. Bell Phone 244D 

STUCKERT BLDG., MAIN ST. 

Doylestown, Pa. 



Columbia Avenue Trust Company 

Broad and Columbia Ave. 

Capital Paid in $400,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (Earned) $450,000.00 

Patronage Solicited 

SYI,. A. LEITH, President ' WM. AI,LEN, Vice-Pres- 

WM. A. CARLILE, Sec'y and Treas. 

Electric and Hand Vacuum Machines For Sale and Hire 

GEORGE E. McLaughlin 

Plumbing and Gas Fitting 

1324 COLUMBIA AVENUE 
Complete line of Welsbach Lights and Dining Room Domes 
Both Phones 

George L. Sipps 

CARPENTER, BUILDER AND CONTRACTOR 
912 LOCUST STREET 



WHEN DISSATISFIED WITH 
YOUR WORK TRY 

FORREST LAUNDRY 

1221-23-25 COLUMBIA AVENUE 

Lace Curtains, Floor Linens a Specialty 
BOTH PHONES 



WAMPOLE'S 

FORMOLID 

(Antisei)tic Solution) 
A CONCENTRATED, BUT HARMLESS ANTISEPTIC 



FORMOLID. properly diluted may be used with perfect free- 
dom in the treatment of diseased or inflamed conditions of the 
mucous membrane of the mouth, nose, throat, etc. and as a lotion 
in the treatment of cuts or other abrasions of the skin. 

Excellent as a mouth-wash or s"are"le. 



PREPARED SOLELY BY 



HENRY K. WAMPOLE & COMPANY 

— Incorporated — 
MANUFACTURING PHARMACISTS 

PHILADELPHIA, U. S. A. 



A TOWEL THAT MAKES YOUR BODY TINGLE 
After your cold bath and one rub-down with a 

San-KNIT-ary TOWEL 

You will know the real pleasure of bathing. The body will simply 
cry out for its rough caress. Will not sour or mildew. Won't mat, 
and always remains fresh because it continually breathes fresh air 
through its pores. Needs no ironing; will not lint. Packed in indi- 
vidual, sealed, germ-proof packets, ready for immediate use. 

Send us your name and address and ONE DOLLAR IN 
CASH OR STAMPS and we will send you, all charges prepaid, a 
Box containing : 

TWO FACE TOWELS, TWO BATH TOWELS, AND A WASH CLOTH 

Use them for a week; then if you are not thoroly satisfied, you 
may return them and we will promptly and cheerfully refund your 
money without any unpleasant correspondence. Send for the Box today. 
— address : 

San=KNIT=ary TEXTILE MILLS, Inc. 

2147 N. WARNOCK ST. PHILADELPHIA 



3 DC 



The Continental 

In the heart of the shopping district 

AN UP-TO-DATE HOSTELRY 
IN EVERY DEPARTMENT 

IDEAL FACILITIES FOR 

Banquets, Meetings, Concerts, 

2)ances, Mebbings anb 

IPrivate parties* 

POPULAR MIDDAY LUNCHEON 

Concerts three times daily by the famous 
Continental Orche^ra. 

FRANK KIMBLE, Manager. 
I I T ][51| l ^[5]|l ^^