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Full text of "Fourteenth census of the United States: 1920 .."

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FOURTEIEIN-TH CENSUS OF THE! UNITED STATES: 1020 

BULLETIN 



DERARXM EPVJT 
OR OOtMMERCE 



A O O F- 
E N 8 U 8 



POPULATION : OCCUPATIONS 



COMPARATIVE OCCUPATION STATISTICS FOR THE UNITED STATES 

Prepared under the supervision of WILLIAM C. HUNT, Chief Statistician for Population, hy Dr. ALBA M. EDWARDS, Expert Special Agent 



CONTENTS. 



TEXT. 



I'agc. 

Introduction 1 

Changes since 1910 1 

Changes in specified occupations 3 

Delivcrynien 3 

Ditchers (farm) 3 

Electricians and electrical engineers 3 

Farm laborers 3 

Foremen and overseers — " Other transportation'' 3 

Locomotive engineers and firemen 3 



SU.M.\I.\HV T.MiLES. 

1. Number and proportion of persons gairifnlly occni>icd. by se.\: 

2. Total persons 10 years of age and over engaged m gainful occ 

tributcd l)y sex and general divisions of oecupalions: 1920 an 

DET.VILEI) TABLE. 

:!. Total persons 10 years of age and over engaged in each specified ucen[)alion, 
classified by sex, for the United .States: 1920 and 1910 



Page. 

1!<'<I>-1920 1 

Illations, dis- 
d 1910 2 



INTRODUCTION. 

Tlic occupation .sfatislics in this htiilctin iirc pro- 
spnt('(i in three tai)lcs. Tal)le 1 is it stnnmtiry t!il)le 
showing, by sex, tiie ntinilxT tiiid pro|)oi'tion of per- 
sons engagetl in gainful occiipulions in the Inited 
States at each census from IS.SO to HI2(). Table 2, 
also a summary table, shows, for both sexes and for 
each sex separately, a number and it percentage dis- 
tribution of the gainful workers in 1920 and in 1910 
by general divisions of occnjjations. Table 3 is a de- 
tailed table showing the total persons, the mtiles, :ind 
the females engageil in each specilied occujiatioii in 
1920 iind in 1910. 

CHANGES SINCE 1910. 

Since the occupation classilication used ;it the 
Fourteenth Census differs somewhat from that of the 



Tliirteenlh Census, a few occupations arc here pre- 
si'jitcd under dillVrcnl gi'iicral ihvisions from those 
under wliich they were presented ;it the Thirteenth 
Census. Mtiinly through such trttnsfers the total 
numl)er of jiersons in ccrttiin general divisions of 
occiipiitioiis litis been changed slightly for 1910. 
PrinciptiUy through the tittnsf'er of electrictil and 
nieclumicttl engineers ffdui nninufjicturing and me- 
chanical industries to iirol'essioniil service, the total 
number in miinufiicturing tiiul mechanical industries 
hits been icvluced .'iO. l.")() and the tottil number in 
professional ser\ice incretiserl 29,792. Also, through 
other chiinges, the totttl number in tigriculture, 
forestry, tind aninitil husbttndry litis been reduced 121 
;ind thtit in trtinsportiition 2.")l ; tind the total number 
in extraction of minertils litis been increased 345 and 
that in domestic tind persontil service 385. 



Table 1.— NUMBER AND PROPORTION OF PERSO.N'S UAllN FULLY OCCUPIED, l!Y SEX: 1880-1920. 



^1 



.SEX .4ND rEN-.n-S YEAR. 


Total 
populalioTi. 


I'opnlation 

10 years of 

age :ind over. 


PERSONS 10 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER 

ENGAGED IN GAINFUL OCCUPATIONS. 


Number. 


Percent 
of total 
popula- 
tion. 


Per cent 
of popu- 
lation 10 
years of 
age and 
over. 


Both Sexes. 

1920 

1910 

1900 

18901 

IfWO 


lO.i.710,620 
91,972,266 
75,9H4,.';75 
62,622,2.10 
.'■.0.1.5.1,783 


.82,739,31.1 
71.580,270 
.57,949,824 
47, 413, .559 
36,761,607 


41,614,248 
38, 167, 336 
29,073,233 
'23,318,183 
17,392,099 


39. 4 
41.5 
:iS.3 
37. 2 
34. 7 


.511.3 
.53.3 
50. 2 
49.2 
47.3 


MALE. 
1920. . 


.i3,900.«l 
47,332,277 
38, 816, 448 
32,067,880 
2.i,.ilS,S20 

."il. 810. 189 
44,639,989 
37, 178, 127 
30, 554, 370 
24,6.36,963 


42. 2S9, 969 
37, 027.. 5.58 
29, 703, 440 
24,3.52,6.59 
18.735,980 

40, 449, 346 
34,. 552, 712 
28,246,384 
23, 060, 900 
18 025,627 


.33.064,737 
:iO,091,.564 
23,7.53,836 
: 19.312.651 
14.744,942 

8, .549, 511 
8.075. 772 
5,319,397 
M, 005, ,532 
2.647,157 


61.3 
63. 6 
61.2 
60. 2 
57.8 

16.5 
l.S. 1 
14.3 

Ki. I 
in. 7 


7.8.2 
81.3 
80.0 
79. 3 

78.7 

21.1 
23.4 

18.8 
17.4 
14.7 


1910 


1900 


1S901 


1880 

FEMALE. 
1920 


1910 


1900 


1890' 


ISSO... 









' Figures for ISM are exclusive of persons in Indian Territory and on Indian reservations, area specially oniinionilpd al that census, but for which occupation statistics 
are not available. 

2 Corrected figures; for explanation, see Occupation Report for 19(K), pp. LXVI-LXXIII. 



92790 



-1 



POPULATION. 



Table 2. — Total Persons 10 Years of Age and Over En- 
gaged IN Gainful Occupations, Distributed by Sex and 
General Divisions of Occupations: 1920 and 1910. 



SEX AND GENERAL PIVISION OF 
OCCri'ATIONS. 



Both Sexes. 
All occupations 



Acricultiiro, forestry, find animal hus- 
bandry 

Extraction of minerals 

Manufacturing and mechanical industries. 

Transportation 

Trade 

Public service (not elsewhere classified). . . 

Professional service 

Pomestic and personal service 

Clerical occupiitions 



MALE. 

All occupations 

.\gricuUure, forestry, and animal hus- 
bandry 

Extraction of minerals 

Manufacturing and mechanical industries. 

Transportation 

Trade 

Public service (not elsewhere classified).. . 

Professional service 

Pomestic and personal service 

Clerical occupations 

FEMALE. 

All occupations 

Agriculture, iorestry, and animal hus- 
bandry 

Kxtraction of minerals 

Manufacturing and mechanical industries. 

Transportation 

Trade 

Public service (not elsewhere classified ) 

Professional service 

Pomestic and personal service 

Clerical occupations 



1920 



Per 
cent 
dis- 
tribu- 
tion. 



100.0 



10,9.";.3,15S 
1,090,223 

12,SlS,r)24 
3,firxi,.=i82 
J, 242, 979 
7711, 41)0 
2. 143, S89 
3,404,892 
3, 12(1, .541 



26.3 
2.6 

30.8 
7.4 

10.2 
1.9 
.'). 2 

sii 

7.5 



33,064.737 



9,809,030 
1,087,3.59 
IS, SSS, 183 
2, 8.50, .528 
3, .57.5, 187 
748, fi06 
1.127.391 
1,217,908 
1.700.42.5 



8,649,511 



1,084.128 

2,864 

1.930,341 

213,0,54 

li()7. 792 

21 794 

l,oTBi49S 

2, 180, 924 

i; 426, 116 



100.0 



29.8 
3.3 

32.9 
.8.6 

10.8 
2.3 
3.4 
3.7 
,5.1 



12.7 
(=) 
22.fi 
2. ,5 
7.8 
0.3 
11.9 
25.6 
16.7 



1910 



Number. 



38,167,336 



112,6.59,082 

1 %5, 169 

110,628,731 

' 2, a37, 420 

3,614,670 

4.59,291 

1 1, 693, 361 

13,772,559 

1,7,37,053 



Per 
cent 
dis- 
tribu- 
tion. 



'10, 8,51, ,581 

1 964,075 
18,808,161 
1 2, .530, 79.5 

3, 146,. 5,82 
445, 733 

1 959, 470 
I 1,241,338 

1,113,829 



8,075,772 



1,807, ,501 

1,094 

1,820, ,570 

106, 625 

468,088 

13,, 558 

1 733,891 

12.631,221 

593, 224 



33. 1 

27, 8 
6.9 
9.5 
1.2 
4. I 
9,9 
4,6 



100 



36. 1 
3,2 

29. 3 
8,4 

10. 5 
1,5 
3.2 
4,1 
3, .S 



22, I 

(=1 

22, 5 

"b3 
,5.8 
0,2 
9.1 

31,3 
7.3 



1 Corrected figures; see text, p. 1. 



- Less than one-tenth of 1 per cent. 



The (Ictailod statistics presented in Table 3 siiow 
that in many occupations there were marked in- 
creases or decreases from 1910 to 1920 in the number 
of workers. Most prominent of tlie causes which 
contributed to these increases and tk'creases were 
tlie change in census (hite, the WoHd War, and 
the changes made in the occupation classification. 

Tlie change in the census date from Api-il l.j in 1910 
to Januaiy 1 in 1920 (h)ubtk>ss had a pronounced effect 
on the number of workers returned as pursuing those 
occupations whicli are seasonal or largely seasonal. 
In most sections of the United States agricultural 
work, especially the work of field laborers, is at or 
near its lowest ebb in January. Because of this fact, 
taking the census in January undoubtedly resulted in 
a smaller number of agricultural workers being re- 
turned by the census enumerators than would have 
been returned had tlie census been taken as of April 
15, as it was in 191U. A comparison with the 1910 
statistics for the respective tigricullural pursuits 
indicates strongly that, especially in the case of 
farm laborers, the marked decrease from 1910 to 
1920 probably was due in large part to an under- 
enumeration in 1920.' On the other hand, the large 
increase from 1910 to 1920 in the number of laborers, 
and in the number of semiskilled operatives in fruit 
and vegetable canning, etc., probably resulted to a 
considerable extent from changing the census date to 

' For further discus.sion, see "Farm laborers," p. 3. 



r 



a time nearer the latest harvest season for fruits and 
vegetables. 

The World War brought about dnistic and rapid 
changes in many of our industries. To meet wai 
needs new industries sprang into existence and some 
existing industries, because not needed to further the 
war efforts of the Nation, rapidly ;leclined in impor- 
tance. Along with these industrial changes went 
corresponding changes in tne occupational activities 
of the people. Of the 4,000,000 or more persons who 
entered military pursuits during the war the great 
majority were drawn from civil pursuits. While to a 
large extent persons not gainfully occupied at the 
beginning of the war took up gainful pursuits to replace 
the large number of gainful workers draAvn from civil 
to milittiry pursuits, these new entrants into civil 
pursuits did not sim])lv fill up the ranks in the occu- 
pations from which those entering the military service 
hail been drawn, but went where their immediate 
services were most needed for war work. Also, to 
meet the demands, many persons gainfully occupied 
prior to the war changed from tlieir usual occupations 
to new ones. As results of these occupational changes 
tlie numlier of workers declined rapidly in some occu- 
pations and increased rapidly in others. Large num- 
bers of workers were drawn from the fields to the 
factories, and from factories jiroducing luxuries or 
nonessentials to those producing munitions or essen- 
tials. The readjustment to a peace-time basis was 
only partially completed at the date of the census. 
Hence, it is believed that many of the changes from 
1910 to 1920 in the number of workers in the respective 
occupations may properly be ascribed in large patt 
to the changes brought about by the World War. 
The marked increases in the number of laborers and 
semiskilled operatives in ship and boat building and 
in powder, cartridge, dynamite, etc., factories are 
striking examples of the occupational effects of the 
war. And to the war should also be ascribed in part, 
it is believed, the great decrease in the number of farm 
laborers.' 

The occupation classification used at the Four- 
teenth Census is the result of a careful revision of the 
one used at the Thirteenth Census. In making this 
revision it has been necessary, occasionally, to trans- 
fer an occupational designation to a different occu- 
pation group from that umler which it was classi- 
fied at the Thirteenth Census. While such transfers 
have improved the accuracy of the Fourteenth 
Census occupation classification and statistics, they 
have made comparison with the Thirteenth Cen- 
sus occupation statistics more difficult. Because of 
these changes a moderate increase or decrease from 
1910 to 1920 in the number of workers in an occupa- 
tion may be appai'ent only and due to a difference in 
classification. The occupations appreciably affected 
by transfers of designations are confined mainly to 
manufacturing and transportation pursuits. 

A few of the principal occupations affected by these 
three causes are noted in the following paragraphs. 



•'<^H^I * I* 1 II I M.^|,,| 

liora'ry of congress 'n 

'WAIVED I 

MAY 251922 



DOCOSIrifeNT;> uiV,.jlON 



■, "^> 



( )( '( 'T'P ATK )XS UN ITED .STATES. 



s 



CHANGES IN SPECIFIED OCCUPATIONS. 

Deliverymen. — The marked deciea.se fruiii I'.HO to 
192(J in the nuiuber of deliverymen, especially in the 
numl)er of deliverymen for stores, is believed to have 
resulted largely from the substitution of motor for 
horse-ilrawn delivery wagons, since this substitution 
increased greatly the mileage covered by a delivery- 
man in a day. In part the decrease proi)ably re- 
sulted from the classification of operators of motor 
<leli\-ery wagons, in 1920, as chauffcm's. 

Ditchers (farm). — Since ditching on farms usually is 
not carried on extensively during the winter months, 
the great tlecrease from 1910 to 1920 in the nundjer of 
ditchers (farm) ])robably resulterl largely from the 
change of tlie cen'^;us date from .\pril 1.") in 1910 to 
Jainiary 1 in 1920.' In part, no doubt, the decrease 
was due to other causes. 

Electricians and electrical engineers. — Since in most 
of the industries the electricians and the electrical 
engineers were classified together in 1910, there an; no 
statistics showing the number of persons in each of 
these occupations at that date. Therefore the j)rob- 
able number in each occupation in 1910 was estimated. 
In this estimate it was assumed liiat tlu; nund)er of 
male electricians and electrical engin{>ers, respec- 
tively, constituti'd the same prt)pi_)rtion of the total 
number of male electricians and electrical engineers 
in 1910 as in 1920, ant! that in 1910 there were SO 
female electricians and B female electrical engineers. 

Farm laborers. —The great decrease from 1910 to 
1920 in tlie number of farm laborers, and especially in 
the number of farm laborers on the home farm, is 
believed to have been due in large measure to the 
change of the census date from a very busy farming 
season in 1910 (April 1-5) to a comjjaratively ilull 



See, below, the discussion of "Fiirni laborers.' 



farming season in 1920 (January 1). It is believed 
that when the enumeration was made in 1920 (as of 
January 1) many persons usually employed as farm 
laborers were not tiien jit work and were not retm-iu'd 
by the census enumerators as gainfully occupied. 
This ajjpeai's to have been true especially in the cas(^ 
of children living on the home farm. The enumer- 
ators' schedules show that a considerable proportion 
of such children were I'eturned as neither attending 
school nor being gainfully occupied. Also, the de- 
crease of farm laborers doubtless was partly due to the 
fact that during tlu^ war large numbers of them left 
the farms for the factories or the military service 
and had not returned t-o the farms or lieen replaced 
there by others at the date of the census. 

Foremen and overseers "Other transportation." — The 
very nuirkcd increase between 1910 and 1920 in the 
nundx'r of foremen and overseers in "other transpor- 
tation'' doubtless was due in large measure to the 
great increase in the number of garage foremen, 
here classified, but in part, probably, to a large in- 
crease in the numl)er of pipe-line foremen, also classi- 
fied in this group. 

Locomotive engineers and firemen. — In 1920, as in 
1910. the enumerators did not always distinguish 
carefully between locomotive engineers and the sta- 
tionary engineers employed by steam railroads, or 
betwe(Ui locomotive firemen and other firemen em- 
ployed by steam railroads. It is probable, therefore, 
that at each census some stationary engineers are 
included with the locomotive engineers and that some 
other firemen are included with the locomotive fire- 
men. Also, at each census, the excess in the number 
of locomotive engineers over the number of locomotive 
(ii-emen. and over tlie numljcr of contluctors (steam 
railroad), indicates that the number of locomotive 
engineers rep(jrted is excessive. 



4 POPULATION. 

Table 3.— TOTAT. PERSONS 10 YEARS OF ACiE AND OVER ENGAGBH IN EACH SPECIFIED OCCUPATION, CLASSIFIED 

BY SEX, FOR THE UNITED STATES: 1920 AND 1910. 

[The figures for lyio for certain of the division totals and, also, for certain individual occupations have been corrected to conform to the classilicalinn for 1920: see text and 

footnotes to tableH 



OCrUPATIOX. 



Population iq Y?:ars of Ac.e and Over., 



All occupations , 

Agriculture, forestry, and animal husbandry. 



Dairy farmers, farmers, and stock raisers 

Dairy farmers 

Farmers, general farms 

Farmers turpentine farms 

Stock raisers 

Dairy farm, farm, and stock farm laborers 

Dairy [arm laborers 

Kami laborers (home farm) ' 

Farm laborers (working out) ' 

Farm laborers ( tiiriientinc farm) 

Stuck herders, drovers, and feeders 

Dairy farm, farm, (garden, orchard, etc., foremen. 

Dairy farm foremen 

Farrii foremen , general farms 

Farm foremen, turpeutme farms 

Farm foremen, stock farms 

Garden and grcenliouse foremen 

Orchard, nursery, etc., foremen : 



Fishermen and oystermcn 

Foresters, forest rangers, and timber cruisers 



Gardeners, llorists. fruit growers, aiid nin'serymcn,. 

Florists 

Fruit growers 

Gardeners 

Landscape gardeners 

Nurserymen 

Garden, greenhouse, oreliard. and i.msery laborers. 

Cranberry bog laborers ". 

Garden laborers 

Greenhouse laborers 

Orchard and nursery laborers 



Lumbermen, raftsmen, and woodcho]:tpers 

Foremen and overseers .' 

lusjjectors, scalers, and surveyors 

Teamsters and haulers 

Other lumbermen, raftsmen, and woodcho|)pers. 
Owners and managers of log and timber camps 

Managers and officials 

Owners and proprietors* 



Other agricultural and animal husbandry piirsuils. 

Apiarists .' 

Corn shelters, hay balers, grain threshers, etc. . . 

I>ilche]s (tarm) ' 

in igalors lukI (iitch lenders 

ri)Ultr.\ raisers 

Poultry yard laborers 

(.)ther and not si)eciried pursuits 



Extraction of minerals. 



Foremen, overseers, and inspeciuis 

Foremen and overseers 

Inspectors 

Operators, officials, and managers. 

Managers 

omcials 

Operators 



Coal mine operatives 

Copper mine operatives 

Gold and sliver mine opei-alives. 
Iron mine operatives 



Operatives in other and not specified mines 

Lead and zinc mine operatives 

Other sj>ecified mine operatives 

Not specified mine operatives 

Quarry operatives 

Oil, gas, and sail well u|ieialives 

oil and i;as well n|iiTarl\ es 

Salt well and works ()[icratives 



Manufacturing and mechanical industries. 



Apprentices to building and hand trades 

Hlacksniiths' apprentices * 

Holler makeis' apprentices 

Cabinetmakers' apprentices 

Carpenters' apprentices 

Coopers' apprentices 

Electricians' apprentices 

Machinists' apprentices^ 

Masons ' apprentices 

Painters', glaziers', and varnishers' appreiuiees. 

Paper hangers' apprentices 

Plasterers' apprentices 

Plumbers' apprentices 

Roofers' and slaters' apprentices 

Tiusmitlis' and coppersmiths' apprentices 



1920 



Total. 



41,614,248 



10,953,158 



1,2111,261 

11S,,S13 

;,()04,.5SO 

309 

77,5.59 

,041,627 

(i.'!,'!67 

,8SI1, 119 

',l).5.'-.,276 

16,099 

.ill, 76li 

93, 04.S 

2,479 

79, nis 

724 

4,894 

1,,«74 

4, 0.')9 

52, S36 
3,653 



169, 



'205, 315 
6,090 
2, 344 
17, 106 

179, 775 
S,410 
2, 095 
6,315 

40,599 
2,893 
9,041; 
5, 379 
2,600 

14,111; 
4,599 
1,366 



1,090,223 



3i;,931 
27,945 

.8,986 
34,323 
14,4i;9 

2 .522 
17! 3,^4 

733, SHi; 
36,054 
:i2, 700 
38, 704 

41,389 
20, 798 
11,320 

9,271 
45, li;2 
91,022 
85, 0.50 

.5, 472 



12, 818, 524 



"3,953 

2,061 

2,005 

1,020 

4,805 

365 

9, 562 

39,46:) 

1,434 

1,616 

172 

398 

I 7,3Si; 

I 2.50 

I 2,Sli; 

' For a diseussinn of the figures for this nccupat ion, see p. :i. 

■- Totals include figures for occnpalions dotal, 91,:(:)9; male, 88,770; female, 

3 Comparable lis^'ures for 1910 not available. 

< Figures !,„■ iMiii al)))roximate only. 

'Manv oi I he •■.Machinists' apprentices" probably are machine tenders. 



Male. 



42, 289, 969 



9,869.030 



5, 947, 425 
114,867 

5, 7.57, 327 

309 

74, 922 

3, 248, 712 
60, 770 

1,273,477 

1,843,307 
15, 790 
55. 368 
78, 70s 

2, :!39 
05, 251 

724 
4, 800 
1,69,-; 

3, .896 

,52, 457 
3, 651 

160, 116 

7,407 

52, 208 

93, .523 

4,377 

2, 601 

127, 5S9 

236 

75, 234 

1.5,075 

,37, 044 

205, 036 
fi, 090 
2, 344 
17, 106 

179, 496 
8,397 
2,090 
6,307 

36,9:i9 
2,759 
9,642 
5,379 
2,597 

11,792 
3,5S7 
1, 18a 



1,087,359 



.36,923 
27,939 

8,984 
34, 143 
14,44i; 

2, 481 
17,216 

732,441 
35, 918 
32.li66 
38, 605 

41,282 
20, 749 
11,271 

9, 262 
45, 084 
90, 297 
85,303 

4.994 



Female. 



40, 449, 346 



253, 836 

3,946 

247, -253 



2, 637 

792,915 

2, .597 

.576, 642 

211,969 

309 

l,:i98 

14, 340 

140 

13, 767 



94 
176 
163 

379 
2 

9, '283 

93S 

3.194 

5, 068 

25 

58 

9,421 

5 

6, '298 

1, 164 

1,954 

279 



279 
13 

5 

8 

3,660 

134 

4 



3 

2,324 

1,012 

183 



1,82 
23 
41 

lis 

1,495 
13(; 
34 
99 

107 
49 
49 



725 
247 
478 



10,888,183 


1,930,341 ,( 


73,897 
'2,i;59 
2,005 


56 
2 


1,020 




4,797 
365 


8 


9, 557 

39, 448 

1,434 


5 
15 


1,59S 
165 
398 


IS 

7 


7,386 




2,50 




2,815 


1 1 



71,580,270 



38,167,336 



12,659,082 



5,979,340 

61,816 

5, 864, 492 

511 

52, .521 

6,069.321 

35,014 

3, 310,,5:i4 

2,636,966 

27, .557 

69, 2.50 

51, 195 

1,0,86 

41,. 521 

,S99 

3,604 

1,311 

2,774 

68, 276 
4, 332 

139, 255 

9, 028 

43, 531 

79, 894 

3,792 

3,010 

133, 927 

1, 384 

81,314 

17, 7,57 

33, 472 

161,268 
4,798 
2,110 
15, 038 

139, 322 
7,931 
1, 7'25 
6,206 

44,238 
2,145 
5,617 

1,5, 198 
2,883 

12,151 

3, 'sa 

3,011 



965,169 



23, 338 

22, 142 
1, 196 

25,234 
9,798 
1,149 

14,287 

613, 924 
39,270 
55, 436 
49,948 

47, 252 
19,4St; 
7,945 
19,821 
80, 840 
29,927 
25, 5<;2 

4.:!(;5 



(') 



<2,S16 






I') 



(■') 



<2,(;6i 



<2,303 
* 2,062 

444 

< 669 

< 9,903 

304 



Male. 



30,091,564 



10,851,581 



5, 717, 384 

69, 240 

5, 606, 789 

508 

60,847 

4, 551, 247 

32, '237 

2,133,949 

2, 299, 444 

27,241 

58, 376 

43,419 

1,001 

34,017 

898 

3, 693 

1,223 

2,687 

67, 799 
4,332 

131,421 

7,977 

41,2,55 

75, 481 

3,777 

2,931 

126,453 

1,316 

76, 372 

16, 796 

31,969 

161, 191 
4,798 
2,109 
15, 038 

139, 246 
7, 927 
1, 725 
6, 202 

40,408 
2,020 
5,617 

15,198 
2,874 
8,921 
2,836 
2,922 



964, 075 



23,328 

22, 133 
1,195 

26,127 
9,780 
1,140 

14,201 

613,519 
39, 251 
65, 397 
49,90tl 

47, 169 
19,471 

7,891 
19, 807 
SO, 795 
29,580 
25,548 

4,0.'!2 



(') 
*2, 

(») 
(■') 
< 6,< 
(') 

'2,( 
(') 



!, .501 
>, 653 

440 
I 669 
1,899 

302 



2, .569) omitted in detail because ntit comparable with 1920 fig 



Female. 



34, 5.52, 712 



8,075.772 



1,807.601 



261,9.56 

2,576 

2.57, 703 

3 

1,674 

1, 618, 074 

2,777 

1, 176, 685 

337, 522 

31'. 

874 

7,776 

85 

7,504 

1 

11 

88 

87 



7,834 

1,051 

2,276 

4,413 

15 

79 

7,474 

68 

4,942 

961 

1,503 



77 

"i 



76 
4 



3,830 
125 



9 

3,230 

377 



10 

9 

1 

107- 

12 
9 

86 

405 
19 
39 
39 



15 
54 
14 
45 

347 
14 

333 



(•') 






(■■<) 



n 



{') 



OCCUPATIONS— UNITED STATES. 

RS (»F AGE AND OVER ENGAGED IN EACH SPE 
, FOR THE UNITED STATES: 1920 AND 1910—1 

(The figures for 1910 for certain of the division totals and, also, lor certain individual occupations have been corrected to conform to the classilicalion for VM). see text and 

footnotes to tabic. 1 



Tari.e :J.— total persons 10 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER ENGAGED IN EACH SPECIFIED OCCUPATION. (■|,.\SS1FIED 

BY SEX, FOR THE UNITED STATES: 1920 AND 1910— Contimiod. 



IICCUP.VTIU.N. 



SO 
911 
',11 
92 
>W 
lit 
O.'i 
'.Hi 
!17 
HS 
99 
1(1(1 
101 

\n> 
1(1.1 
KM 
10."i 

ini) 

107 

los 

109 

no 
111 
Hi 
ll.i 

HI 



lie 

117 

lis 

119 

1211 
121 
\22 
\X\ 
\>\ 
1 2:'> 
121) 



r-'S 
129 
Kid 

i:u 



131 

i:i.-> 

I.IR 

i:t7 
las 



110 

111 

142 

1« 
111 

!!.'> 

ml 

H7 
us 
149 

l.-|0 
l.il 
l.Vi 1 

i.i:i 

l.i4 i 

l.W 

l.W 

1,">7 

Lis 

i:i9 

in(i 

Kil 
1112 

l(i:i 
KM 

16.1 

166 \ 

167 

168 I 

169' 

170 

171 

172 

173 



Manufacturing and mechanical industries— ('iiiUniic'l. 
.Apprentices to dressmakers and milliners 

Dressmakers' apprentices 

Milliners' apprentices 

.Vpprentices, other 

.Vrchitects', designers', and draftsmen's apprentices 

.lewelers', watchmakers', {.'oldsiniths', and silversmiths' appren. 

Printers' and bookbinders' apjireiitices 

olhcr apprentices 

Bakers 

Hlacksniiths, forgemen, and hammermen 



Black 



Forgemen, hammermen, and welders 

Boiler makers 

Brick and stone masons 

Builders and building contractors 

t-abiiiel makers 

Carjienters 

Compositors, linotypers, and typesetters 

Coopers 

Dressmakers and seamstresses (not in factory). 

Dyers 

Kiectricians 



Elect rotypers, stereol yjiers, and lithographers 

KletM,rotypers and stcreotypers 

Ivilhographers 

Kngiiieers (stationary), cranemen, hoistmeii, etc. . 

F^ngineers (stati(>nar>') 

Cranemen. dorricknlen. hoislnieii, etc 



Kiigravers - 

Filers, grinders, butTers, and pnlishers (inetall. 

BiilTers and polishcis 

Filers 

( Irindcrs , 



Firemen (except locomotive and fire deiiarlmenl i . 

l''oremeri and overseers (nianufacluringl 

Fiirnaccinen, sniellennon, heaters. poiirer>, clc 

Furnacemen and smell ernicii 

Healers 

l.adlersand poiirers...' 

I'llddlers 



(Mass blowers 

.lewelers. watchmakers, goldsmilhs, and silveisniilhs. 

lioldsmithsand silversmiths 

■lewelers and lapidaries (factory) 

.lewelers and watchmakers (not in factory) 

Laborers (n. o. s.6); 

Building, general, and not specified laborers 



Chemical and allied industries 

Ferl ilizcr fact ories 

Paint and varnish factories 

Powder, cartridge, dynamite, fuse 

.sioap factories 

( ither chemical factories 

Cigar and tobacco factories 



ami fireworks factories. 



Clay, glass, and stone industries 

Brick, tile, and terra cotta factories 

tJlass factories 

Lime, cement . and artificial stone factories , . . 

Marble and si one yards 

Potteries 

Clothing industries 

Corset factories 

Glove factories 

Hat factories i felt ) 

Shirt, collar, and cuIT factories 

.Suit, coat, cloak, and overall factories 

Other clothing factories 

Food industries 

Bakeries 

Butter, cheese, and condensed milk factories . 

Candy factories 

Fish curing and packing 

Flour and grain mills 

Fruit and vegetable canning, etc 

Slaughter anil packing houses 

Sugar factont^s and refineries 

Other food factories 



Harness and saddle industries 

Helpers in building and hand trade: 



Iron and steel Industries 

.'VgricuIturaUmplemeiit factories 

.Automobile factories 

Blast furnaces and steel rolling mills ' 

Car and railroad shops 

Ship and boat building 

Wagon and carriage factories 

Other iron and steel factories " 

Not specified metal industries 

1 Comparable figures for 1910 not available. 
" Figures for 1910 approximate only. 
' In 1910 mo.st of the " Cranemen, derrii-kmeii 
6 Not otherwise specifietl. 

92796—22 2 



Total. 



4. :i26 

2. 7l.i 

1,611 

6.'), S9S 

:t,777 

2,k:W 

11,60:1 

47. SS.i 

97.94(1 

221. 121 j 

I'.r., 2,V) 
2(1. 166 
74 (INS 

l;i 1.2(14 
'.10, 109 
4.i. .'.1 1 

Ss7.:i79 

11(1, IS.I 
19.066 

2:t.i, S5.') 
l.">, 109 

212.964 

i;i,71fi 

.1, 494 

S 222 

'279/!is4 

242. 096 

.■i7,S.S.S 

l.i.n.W 

.19, 7S.-, 
30,,M1 
in,9,'i9 
IS -SI.-, 



I4:i, 


K7.1 


;in7 


413 


40, 


S(16 


IS, 


201 


16 


470 


1. 


020 


■'. 


11.1 


9, 


144 


.19 


.192 


4 


.S2S 


s 


7.17 


26, 007 


(123 


203 


74 


2S9 


12 


943 


1 


S41 


S 


467 


4 


71.1 


43 


323 


3.5 


157 


124 


.144 


4S 


6:i6 


2.S 


937 


311 


Oil 


,1 


0S4 


11 


s:i6 


12 


7711 






1 


7.17 




9S9 


o 


7ns 


3 


9M 


■> 


.167 


\X 


.53.1 


s 


31,1 


1.1 


190 


6 


,5X4 


(' 


:<(H), 


IS 


,121 


!:■ 


05S 


.11 


, ,54S 


1." 


,7;i3 


If 


,6Sli 



13 


OSS 


.19 


.54S 


1.5 


733 


16 


6Sli 


1 


SS.1 


63 


519 


729.613 11 


11 


409 


S3 


341 


2.5S 


s:io 


.53,643 II 


69 


196 


9 


SI 7 


179 


607 


63 


770 



Male. 



17 

4 

13 

60. .132 

3,479 

2,247 

I0,:i66 

41.44(1 

9:i,347 

221.416 

19,1,2.11 

26,161 : 

7t,l).s.s 

i:; 1.2.17 
90.(1:10 
41. .io:i 

SS7.20S 

12S.S.59 

19.061 

:i:irt 

14.97S 
212.941 



l3,.i:io 


5. 4S4 


S. 046 


279,940 


212.0(>4 


:i7.s76 



14.492 

,17.311 
2S, 4S4 
10, S9:i 
17,'J3S 

143, S62 

277, 242 

40,sflO 

IS, 197 

16, I<1S 

1,020 

1, 1 11 

9, n.V) 

37,914 
4.771 
7,701 

25, 442 

60S, 071 

70,994 
12, SOS 
4,677 
7,S21 
4, 346 
41.342 

21, -295 



120. 


215 


4S.099 


26, 


461 


IS) 


SS4 


■5, 


061 


10 


710 


6 


414 




191 




S99 




S2.1 


1 


317 


o 


219 




960 


143 


397 


6 


S69 


14 


174 


4 


:19S 


,5 


261 


17 


9S3 


9 


743 


.^.^ 


4:i6 


11 


414 


14 


119 


1 


7''T 


63 


112 


717 


022 


11 


292 


sc 


S74 


2.56 


54S 


5S 


2S0 


6S,917 


f 


.594 


173.734 


62 


,VS3 



Female. 



4.. 30!) 
2.711 1 
l,.19S 
i.:t66 
29K 
3S6 
1,2:17 
3, 441 
4.. 193 

4 

I 



171 
.:t06 

.519 
131 
19 

ISO 
10 

176 
44 



'. 170 
.027 



13 

:iO. 171 



1910 



1,67S 


57 


1 , 0.16 


,165 


15, 12S 


3, 295 


1,35 


164 


646 


369 


1,9S1 


13,S62 


4,329 


537 


2, 476 


167 


23 


1.126 


(1.:162 




S5S 


164 


1,391 


1.765 


1 , 607 


16, 13S 


1,446 


1,016 


2,1X6 


1,039 


i:ss 


3.315 


4.112 


319 


2, .167 


bis 


107 


12. .591 


117 


2,167 


2.2,S2 


■m 


27£ 


22:' 


5,.S73 


9X7 



Total. 



12.011 
:,. 9i)6 
6.011 
(') 

1,1.13 
- l,KKI 
■ 12,:195 
I') 

X9..131 

240,174 

2:12, 9SS 

7,1X6 

41.761 

3 169. 402 

174. 422 

41.S92 

S17, 120 

127. 1S9 

2.1. 29*.! 

449.342 

14.0.10 

' 120, '24 1 

12..1(«; 
4.:!6S 
S. 13S 
(') 

231.041 
(■■) 

13.967 

49, .125 
3(1. 496 
10, '2:16 

S, 793 



Male. 



I11.'24X 


175. 09S 


:i6,'211 


19.731 


10, 120 


679 


5,717 


15.,'«4 


32, .574 


5, 7.17 


10,631 


16. 1.S6 


S69, 47S 


41,741 


9,M7 


2,959 


4.277 


3.433 


21.221 


16, 392 


1.14, X2fi 


77,9.14 


24,634 


36, 0X3 


6,915 


9, 240 


10, 240 


,S34 


S70 


1,7,19 


•2,1X4 


2,920 


1,673 


X2,015 


4,510 


4, S16 


2,978 


4,S7(1 


9,243 


4,671- 


33,90.-? 


s,7.15 


8. '270 



8. '270 


I,-29X 


66,303 


4S2,941 


11.067 


1.1, 7S3 


•202, :i92 


4S, 342 


11,983 


12,391 


13X,0,19 


42.9-24 



31 

24 
i') 

1, 110 
: 1,770 
= 11, 454 
(') 

SI, 7.12 

240. 143 

2:(2.9.17 

7, 1X6 

44.761 

■' 169.3X7 

173.. 173 

41.SS4 

S17.(1X2 

113..13S 

■25. -292 

I., 1x2 

l:t.:i96 

< 1-20. 1.11 

11.9-29 
4.-26S 
7.661 



Female. 



hoi^tmcn, etc.,' 



■' The 1910 figures include cemen 
' Figures for"1910 estimated: see 
were classified with (he semiskiUe 



^ Includes tinplate mills. 



t finishers, 
discussion 
1 operative 



s, 7.S3 
1.1,701 

.S,13,679 

.39,711 
9,757 
2. S42 
3.947 
3, 173 

19. 992 

11,436 

1.12, 43.S 

77,333 

23,686 

31,931 

6,847 

S,641 

.5,4-24 

2S6 

446 

1,,141 

821 

1,651 

679 

75,691 

3,7.11 

4,6XS 

1,845 

4,637 

9,152 

3.6X3 

;i2.471 

X.647 

6,813 

1.'210 , 
(16,222 

476.801 
10.913 I 
15.644 

-201.030 
48,114 ' 
11,971 
12.-2;i2 I 

134,-295 
42,55S ; 



the<e niimbereil 7,621 in 1920. 
0.3. 

s of the respccti\e industne.s. 
^ Includes iron foini'lrios. 



1 1 . 980 
.1. 9X9 
1,991 



(') 



43 

!69 

: 941 

) 

4, 779 

31 

31 



' 15 
X49 



14,011 
447.760 



614 

' X6 



100 
477 



(■-) 
(■■) 



46,679 


2.X46 


2S. 191 


2 305 


lO.Od'.l 


167 


s,419 


374 


111.-24S 




1.15. :15S 


19,740 


36. -2-26 


2.5 


19.719 


16 


10,111 


9 


679 




5,717 




15.474 


!.0 


30,037 


2, 537 


.1. .5.13 


■204 



2, 030 


90 


117 


:):io 


-260 


1,-233 


4,956 


2, 3SX 


621 


948 


152 


6X 


.199 


4,S16 


548 


424 


218 


1,363 


1.-269 


994 


6, 324 


7.15 


1'28 


1,133 


233 


91 


987 


1,432 


108 


1,457 


8S 


81 


6,110 


114 


139 


1..363 


228 


8 


159 


3,764 


366 



6 POPULATION. 

Table 3.— TOTAL PERSONS 10 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER ENGAGED IN EACH SPECIFIED OCCUPATION, CLASSIFIED 

BY SEX, FOR THE UNITED STATES: 1920 AND 1910— Continued. 

(The figures tor 1910 for certain of the division totals and, also, for certain individual occupations have been corrected to conform to the classification for 1920; see text and 

footnotes to table.] 



OCCUPATION. 



1»10 



174 
175 
176 
177 
178 
179 
180 
181 
182 

183 
184 
185 
186 
187 

188 

189 
190 
191 

192 
193 

194 
195 
196 
197 
198 
199 
200 
201 
202 
203 
204 
205 
206 

207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
213 
214 
215 
216 
217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
222 
223 

224 

225 
226 
227 
228 



230 
231 
232 
233 
234 
233 
236 

237 
238 

239 
240 
241 
242 



244 
245 
246 
247 
248 
249 

2.i0 
251 
252 
253 
254 
255 
266 
257 



Manufacturing and mechanical industries— rontmucd. 
Laborers (n. o. s.i)— Continueii. 

Other metal industries 

Brass mills 

Clock and watch factories 

Copper factories 

(Jold and silver factories 

Jewehy factories 

Lead and zinc factories 

Tinware, enaniehvare, etc., factories 

Other metal factories 



Lumber and furniture industries. 

Furniture factories 

Piano and orjian factories .... 

Saw and planing mills ' 

Other woodworking factories. 

Paper and pulp mills 



Printing and publishing 

Blank Ijook, envelope, tag. paper bag, etc., factories. 
Printing, publishing, and engraving 



8hoe factories 

Tanneries 

Textile industries — 

Carpet miUs 

Cotton mills 

Knitting mills 

Lace and embroidery mills 

Silk mills 

Textile dyeing, finishing, and printing mills. 

Woolen and worsted mills 

Other textile mills 

Hemp and jute mills 

Linen mills 

Rope and cordage factories 

Sail, awning, and tent factories 

Not specified textile mills 



Other industries 

Broom and brush factories 

Button factories 

Charcoal and coke works 

Electric light and power plants 

Electrical supply factories 

'Jas works 

Leather belt, leather case, etc., factories. 

Liquor and beverage industries 

Papier tiox factories 

Petroleum refineries 

Rubber factories 

Straw factories 

Trunk factories 

Turpentine distilleries 

Other miscellaneous industries 

Other not specified industries 



Loom fixers. 



Machinists, millwrights, and toolmakers. ... 

Machinists 

Millwrights 

Toolmakers and die setters and sinkers- 



Managers and superintendents (manufacturing) . 



Manufacturers and officials 

Manufacturers 

Officials 

Mechanics ( n. o. s.* ) 

(^.unsmiths, locksmiths, and bellhangers. . 

■Wheelwrights 

Other mechanics 



Millers (grain, flour, feed, etc.). 
Milliners and millinery dealers. 



Molders, founders, and casters (metal) 

Brass molders, founders, and casters.. 
Iron molders, founders, and casters.. . 
Other molders, founders, and casters. 

Oilers of machinery 



Painters, glaziers, varnishers, enamelers, etc 

Enamelers,lacquerers, and japanners 

Painters, glaziers, and varnishers (building). 

Painters, glaziers, and varnishers (factory) . . 

Paper hangers 

Pattern and model makers 



Plasterers and cement finishers 

Cement finishers 

Plasterers 

Plumbers and gas and steam fitters. . . . 
Pressmen and plate printers (printing). 

Rollers and roll hands (metal) 

Roofers and slaters 

Sawyers 



Total. 



67,887 

IS, 4S5 
3, lOS 

10,963 
2,272 
1,421 
s,927 

17,605 
5,106 

320,613 

35, 272 

5,321 

245,683 
34,337 

52, 263 

11,4,3" 
3, 4,55 
7,9S1 



19, 

27, 

3, 
76, 
11, 

10, 
10, 
22, 
17, 
1, 

4, 

10, 

463, 

2, 

1, 

9. 

15, 

26, 

18, 

3, 

10, 

3, 

31, 

51 



84, 
191, 



210 
480 

953 
315 
943 
944 

o.so 

605 
227 
243 
254 
458 
268 
283 
980 

,891 
,800 

,4or 

384 
417 
789 
845 
578 
530 
384 
795 
467 
577 
486 
731 
337 
.364 



15.961 

.S94,6(i2 

801,901 

37, 669 

55,092 

201,721 

231,615 

1 S3, 3Sfi 
48.229 

281,741 
4,645 
3,727 

273,369 

23, 272 
73,2.55 

123,681 
7,2,38 

114,031 
2,412 

24,612 

323,032 
4,137 

248, 497 
70,398 
18,746 
27, 720 

45, 876 
7,621 
38,2.55 
206,718 
IS, 683 
25,061 
11,378 
33,809 



62,771 

17,614 
1,929 

10,908 
2,061 
1,255 
8,859 

15,436 
4,709 

309,. 874 

32,600 

4,. 596 

241,334 
31,344 

49,786 

8,886 
2,646 
6,240 

14,194 
26, 703 

3,378 

.59,646 

6,603 

677 

7,350 

9,885 

IS, Z3S 

14,564 

1,110 

364 

3,805 

237 

9,048 

426,398 

2,407 

1,093 

9,352 

15,2.55 

23,562 

18,787 

3,274 

10, 295 

2,401 

31,566 

47,515 

513 

2,269 

9,605 

77,583 

170,921 

I5,9.n8 

894, 6.54 

,801,896 

37,669 

56,089 

196,771 

223,289 

178,441 
44,848 

281,690 
4,638 
3,727 

273,325 

23,265 
3,6.57 

123,668 
7.2,38 

114,022 
2,408 



24, 568 

319,697 
3,168 

248. 394 
68, 1,35 
18,338 
27,663 

45, .870 
7,621 
38,249 
206,715 
18,683 
25,061 
11,378 
33,800 



Female. 



5,116 

871 

1,179 

55 

211 

166 

68 

2,169 

397 

10, 739 
2,672 
725 
4,349 
2,993 

2,477 

2, .5.50 

S09 

1,741 



.T(0 


16,669 


5,340 


267 


2, 730 


720 


3,9X9 


2,679 


144 


94 


463 


46 


1,932 


37,493 


.193 


314 


32 


162 


3,227 


5S 


304 


2:!.5 


983 


229 


3,952 


64 


217 


126 


6,754 


20,443 



5 
3 

4,9.50 

8.326 

4,945 

3,381 

51 

7 

44 

7 
69, .598 



44 



3,335 
969 
103 

2,263 
408 
57 



'Not otherwise specified, 
includes box factories (wood). 



Total. 



44,773 

10,885 I 

1,S79 i 

11,586 I 

1,277 

668 

7,946 

7,587 

2,946 

317,244 
23,618 
4,459 

260, 142 
29,025 

31,388 

7,041 
1,,557 
5,484 

10, 277 
20, 798 

3,769 

37,804 

7,804 

705 

3,798 

9,958 

12,290 

11,018 

1,462 

738 

3,797 

264 

4,7»7 

246,677 

1,,565 

1,105 

11,446 

8,176 

11,434 

16,549 

1,908 

IS, 8,57 

1,403 

11,215 

13, .546 

413 

985 

6,405 

32, 237 

109,433 

13,2.54 

488,049 

461 344 

17,442 

9,263 

104,210 

2.56, 591 
235, 107 
21,484 

3,251 
3,732 
(') 

23, 152 
127, 906 

120,900 
6,. 512 

112,122 
2,2(56 

14,013 

337,355 
2,999 

273,441 
60,915 
25, .577 
23,5.59 

< 47,682 
(<) 

47,682 
148,304 
20,084 
18,407 
14,078 
43, 276 



Male. 



42, 1.34 
10,606 
1,262 
11,. 5.32 
1,101 
528 
7,871 
6,709 
2,525 

313, 22S 
23, 089 
4,099 

258, 361 
27,679 

29, 959 

5,217 
1,096 
4,121 



120,783 
6,. 509 

112,070 
2,204 

13,990 

334,814 
1,968 

273,060 
59,786 
24,780 
23,006 

< 47,676 

(<) 
47,676 

148,304 
19,892 
18,384 
14,078 
43,257 



Female. 



2,639 
279 
617 
54 
176 
140 
74 
S7S 
421 

4,016 

529 

360 

1,781 

1,346 

1,429 

1,824 

461 

1,363 



7,952 


2, 325 


20,491 


307 


3,4,37 


332 


32,037 


5,767 


4, 264 


3,540 


468 


237 


2,686 


1,112 


9, 362 


596 


10,245 


2,045 


8, 608 


2,410 


1,295 


167 


479 


259 


3,131 


666 


234 


30 


3,469 


1,2.88 


229,517 


17,160 


1.340 


225 


700 


315 


11,431 


15 


8,011 


165 


10,0,53 


I,3S1 


16,534 


15 


1,757 


151 


18,294 


563 


791 


612 


11,151 


64 


12,224 


1,322 


319 


94 


909 


76 


6,3.54 


51 


29,836 


2,401 


99,723 


9,710 


13,254 




487,9.56 


93 


461,271 


73 


17,442 




9,243 


20 


102.748 


1,462 


251 , SH2 


4,699 


230,800 


4,298 


21,083 


401 


m 


(') 


3,218 


3 


3,7,32 


, 


(') 


C) 


23,093 


59 


5,459 


122,447 



117 
3 

.52 
62 

23 

2,541 

1,031 

381 

1,129 

797 

553 



(') 



<6 
6 



192 
23 



' Comparable figures for 1910 not available. 

< Cement finishers were included with •' Brick and stone masons" in 1910. 



OCCUPATIONS— UNITED STATES. 7 

Table 3.— TOTAL I'KKSoXS 10 VEAUS OF AGE AND OVER ENGAOEl* IN EACH SPECIFIED OCCUPATION, CLASSIFIED 

BY SEX, FOR THE UNITED STATES: 1920 AND 1910— Continued. 

[The figures for 1910 for certain or the division totals and, also, for certain individual occupations have been corrected to conform to the classification for UKO: see text and 

footnotes to taole-l 



2,')S 
259 
2B0 
261 
262 
26.) 



0(.<rP.\TII)N. 



Hanufacturlng and mechanical Industries— Continued. 
Semisliilled operatives (n. o. s.'): 

Chemical and allied industries 

Fertilizer factories 

Paint and varnish factories 

Powder, cartridge, dynamite, fuse, and fireworks factorie,~. 

Soap factories 

Other chemical factories 



Total. 



26.5 
266 
267 
268 
269 
270 

271 
272 
273 
274 
27,5 
276 
277 
27S 
279 
2S0 
2S1 
2S2 
2« 
2S4 
2S5 
2S6 
2.S7 

2S8 

2R9 
290 
291 
292 
29.'i 
291 
295 
296 
297 

29S 
299 
:i()l) 

■.w\ 

302 
31)3 
304 
3().i 
.306 

307 

30S 

309 

310 

311 

312 1 

313 

31.. j 

316 
317 

31S 
319 
320 
.321 
322 
323 
324 
32.5 
326 
327 
32.'' 
329 
330 



331 
332 
333 
334 
335 
336 
337 
33S 
339 
340 
341 
342 
343 
344 
345 
346 
347 
348 



Cigar and tobacco factories. 



Clay, glass, and stone industries 

Brick, tile, and terra cottafactorics 

Glass factories 

Lime, cement, and artificial stone factories. 

Marble and stone yards 

Potteries 



Clothing industries 

Corset factories 

niove factories 

Hat factories I felt) 

.Shirt, collar, and culT factories 

Suit, coat, cloak, and overall factories 

Other clothing factories 

Foocl industries 

Bakeries 

Butter, clieoso, and condensed niilkfa'tories 

Candy factories j 

Fish curing and [lacking ; 

Flour and grain mills 

F'ruit and vegetable canning, etc 

Slaughter and packing houses 

.Sugar factories an<l refineries ' 

Other food factories 



Harness and saddle i ndnstries. 



Iron and steel itidustrios 

Agricultural implenient factories. . . . 

.\utuniobile factories 

Blast furnaces and steel rolling mills 

Car and railroad shops 

Ship and l.oat l.inlcling 

Wagon and carriage factories 

Other iron and steel factories ' 

Not specified metal industries 



Other metal industries 

Brass mills 

Clock and watch factories 

Copper factories 

Gold and silver factories 

Jewelry factories 

Lead and zinc factories 

Tinware, enamelware, etc., factories. 
Other metal factories 



Lumber and furniture industries 

Furniture factories 

Piano and organ factorie^s 

Saw and planing mills ' . , 

Other woodworking factories 

Paper and pulii mills 

Printing and publisliing 

Blank book, enveloi)C. tag. paper bag. etc., fa( 

Printing, [lublishing, and cii^ra\ irig 

.shoe factories 

Tanneries 

Textile industries — 

Carpet mills 

Cotton mills 

Knitting mills 

Lace and embroidery mills 

Silk nulls ". 

Te-^tile dyeing, finishing, and printing mills.. 

Woolen and worsted mills 

Other textile mills 

Hemp and jute mills -. .. 

Linen mills 

Rope and cordage factories 

Sail, awning, and tent factories 

Not specified textile mills 

Other industries 

Broom and brush factories 

Building and hand trades 

Button factories 

Charcoal and coke works 

Electric light and power plants 

Electrical supply factories 

Gas works 

Leather belt, leather case, etc., factories 

Liquor and beverage industries 

Paper box factories 

Petroleum refineries 

R ubber factories 

Straw factories 

Trunk factories 

Turpentine distilleries 

Other miscellaneous industries 

Other not specilied industries 



,50, 341 
1,407 
.5, 521 
7,379 

6, 2S.S 
29, 746 

145,222 

S5, 434 
9,9S7 
41,S31 

7, 633 
3, 346 

17, 437 



Male. 



40il 


361 


12 


642 


23 


357 


21 


17.S 


52 


377 


U3 


S72 


1 ."..', 


935 


Iss 


SH., 


20 


441 


In 


Ml 




2,S1 


7 


3.S6 


s 


112 


11 


204 


4:( 


991 


:i 


Sim 


17 


033 



IS, 135 

0S9, 980 

12\, liii 
93,627 I 
97,979 I 
97,666 ' 
9, 130 ; 

24.5,1.50 ! 
16,942 II 

91,291 I 
I7,-1S2 jl 
l.S,244 

2,9S6 

6,239 I 
15, IKi I 

2, 161 ' 
19,3.51. 

9, 4:i7 



Ui 



719 
.5.5, 717 
19,.S52 
.57,320 I 
35,,S30 
51,669 
Ml, 103 
13,1.94 
06, 709 



206, 


225 


32, 


226 


23 


3.S7 


302 


4.54 


107 


604 


19 


UKi 


115 


721 


17 


736 


126 


lis 


79 


994 


4 


16,S 




574 


s 


4.54 


3 


543 


61 


255 



622.662 
12,606 

7, 003 
12,977 

1,722 
13,949 
64,841 

9,462 
17, 1S9 
13, 655 
20, 4.52 

S,R91 
S6, 204 
14, 102 

.5,436 

1,1.38 
121,968 
207,047 



F'emale. 



1910 



Total. 



32, 072 

1,352 

4, 0S6 

4,SI1 

3, 2.39 
I7,9S4 

61, 262 

72, 269 

9,357 
37, 636 

7,426 

3, 47S 
12, 372 

143,718 

1,115 

0, 584 
14,716 
10,361 
79, 357 
31,. 585 
116,493 

8, 85s 
16,096 
20,913 

1, 363 
7, 524 
3, 89S 

41,906 
3, 1 14 
9,791 

17, 573 

632, 161 

7, 136 

108,376 

59, 526 
97.0113 
97, 175 

s, 719 

2119, 112 

1.5,0.81 

60, s( 1 
13, .576 
10,043 

2, 834 
4, 132 
X, 946 
2, 1 sli 

12, 167 
6,660 

1.50,079 
IS, 906 
16,919 
51,106 
30,2OS 
41,321 
39, 281 
5 117 
34. 164 

132, S13 

2.s,.598 

13, 0113 
1.53,269 

26,922 

6, 086 

42, 9.53 

12,131 

61,703 

,34,944 

1,951 

860 

4,714 

2, as 

24,881 

410,2.56 

10, 219 

6,983 

7, 768 

1,692 

15,610 

37,4.52 

9, 294 

12,. 809 

14,9.50 

7,077 

8, 229 

67, 370 

7.751 

4,644 

1 , 1.30 

75. 772 

121.496 



18, 269 
^0 
.S33 

2, ,568 

3, 019 
11,762 

8,3, 960 

13, 165 

630 

7, 195 

207 

68 

5,065 

265, 643 
11,-527 
16, 773 
6, 462 
42, 016 
64,515 

124,3.50 
72, 402 
1 1, 58.3 

2, 745 
31,368 

3, 223 
5S.8 

6,306 

s, 0S5 

662 

7,842 



562 1; 


57,819 ' 


586 


12,7.88 


4,101 \ 


970 


491 


681 


36,338 


I,S58 


30,117 


3, 906 


8, 201 


1,807 


6, 137 


278 


7, 189 


2,777 


18,040 i 



0,S11 
2,903 
3,3IU I 
5,622 
13,348 1 
41.122 I 
S, .577 
32,545 j 

73,412 
3,628 

111,384 

149, 185 

SO, 682 

12,997 

72, 768 

5, 582 

61,715 

■15,050 

2,217 

1,714 

3,710 

1,005 

36,374 

212,406 

2, 387 

20 

5,209 

30 

339 

27, 389 

168 

4,3.80 

695 

13,375 

662 

18,8.34 

6,351 

.812 

8 

46,196 

85. 551 



Female, 



I Not otherwise specified. 



3 Includes tinplate mills. 



3 Include.- iron foundries 



30, 705 
635 

3, 920 
,5, 263 

4, 443 
16,444 

151, .801 

,88,691 
13, 407 
41,877 

.8, 609 

8,539 
16, 259 

386, 136 
13,073 
1 9, 33'-l 
33, 020 
60, 169 
138, 042 
122, 493 
105, 2S3 
8,938 
1 1, .598 
30, 943 
2. 776 
3,992 H 
5,290 , 
25.897 |i 
1,871 I 
13,978 1 1 

22,650 ;| 

369,040 'i 
4,.S66 : 
21,091 ' 
70,273 
47,7.S3 
14, ,530 ; 
22,339 

1.54,720 \ 
33, 438 [ 

69,815 1 

16,885 

1.5,628 

1,968 

5, 8;)1 
10, .834 

1,913 
10,611 

6, 143 

16S,271 
44,640 
18,953 i 
66,060 
38,618 1 
36,38:1 
68, 790 
10,032 
58,758 

181,010 
33,6.52 ! 

37,:il7 

280,149 

,87,866 

16,027 

79,:i79 

16,371 

105,186 

67.22-8 

4, 621 

1,984 

6,517 

3, :i65 

.50,741 

346, 4.30 

11,163 

11.733 

11,461 

1,6.34 

S, 880 

24, 677 

5, 732 

11,553 

31,. 503 

17,917 

1.739 

3 1,, 593 

5,915 

4,944 

1,449 

71,0,50 

93, 4S7 



' Includes box faclories (woo.l) 



17, 1.58 

622 

3, 292 

2, 858 

2, 516 I 

7, S70 

79,9,56 

79, 230 
12, 649 
37, 927 

8,480 

8, 3S9 
11,785 

1 IS, S66 
l,:i75 
5, 353 

22, 702 
13,311 
75, 444 
30, 681 
68, 683 

3, 008 
11,065 
13,608 

1,7.86 

3, 7,50 
2, 127 

23, 492 
1,655 

8, 192 

21,958 

345, iKi 

4, 494 
20, 243 
67, 889 

47, 406 
14,464 
21,235 

13-8, 677 
31,0.55 

48, 9-56 
14,3.50 

9, 252 
1,915 
4, 141 
6, 3:)4 
1, 632 
6, 674 
1, 638 

151,324 
40,9:i6 
17,100 
6:t , 1.84 
:i2,304 
25,-803 
32, 851 
3,422 





■»-' 1 


121 


744 


31, 


746 


17 


655 


i:t9 


4,8:1 


•yy 


.528 


4 


3:i6 


29 


019 


11 


168 


.53 


bill 


■20 


287 


2 


007 




70.3 


3 


022 


2 


324 


18 


231 


222 


111 



222 


111 


9 


017 


10 


212 


6,682 


1 


618 


S 


704 


13 


6)6 


.", 


6S9 


s 


473 


29 


664 


4 


862 


1 


669 


21 


170 


1 


945 


•1 


381 


1 


141 


41 


211 


51 


.6S4 



13, 547 


13 


628 


2, 405 


1,927 


8, .574 


71,845 


9, 461 


7-58 


3, 950 


129 


150 


4,474 


2:17, 270 


11,698 


13,986 


10,318 


46, -S5s 


62, 598 


91,812 


36, 600 


5, 930 


5:i3 


17,;)35 


990 


3, 163 


2,405 


216 



692 

23, 5-57 
372 

848 
2, 384 
377 
66 
l,0-'4 
10, 043 
2, 383 

20, 859 
2, 5:(5 
6,376 
-53 
1,6'JO 
4, 500 
263 
:i, 937 
1,-505 

13,947 
3.701 

1 , ;.,.:) 

2,:i76 
6,314 
10,580 
35, 9:i9 
6,610 
29, 329 

59,266 
l,9l«; 

19,692 

140,606 

65, 338 

11,691 

,50,360 

5,203 

52, 056 

40,941 

2,614 

1,281 

3,495 

1,041 

32, 510 

124,:119 

2, 126 

1,-521 

4-779 

16 

176 

11,041 

43 

3, OSO 

I , XiV 

13,055 

70 

10.423 

3, 970 

.5i\3 

8 

29, 806 

41,s03 



8 POPULATION. 

Table 3.— TOTAL PERSONS 10 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER ENGAGED IN EACH SPECIFIED OCCUPATION, CLASSIFIED 

BY SEX, FOR THE UNITED STATES: 1920 AND 1910— Continued. 

[The figures for 1910 for c-ertaiii nf ilic ilivi.sirai totals and, also, lor certain indiyidiial occupations have been corrected to conform to the classification for 1920; see text and 

footnotes to table,] 



0CCUP.4TI0N. 



349 

350 
351 
352 
363 
354 

355 
356 
357 

358 
359 
360 



363 
304 
365 
360 

307 
308 
309 
370 
371 
372 

373 
374 
375 
370 

377 
378 

379 
3,80 
381 

382 
383 
384 
385 

386 
387 
388 
389 
390 
391 
392 
393 

394 
395 
396 

397 
398 
399 

400 
401 
402 
403 

4111 

40.^ 
406 
407 
40,'< 

409 
410 
411 
412 
413 

4M 
415 
416 
417 
418 

419 
420 
i21 
422 
423 



MannfactUTing and mechanical Industrles-Conlinued. 
Shocmalcers and cobblers (not in factory) 

Slcilled occupations (n, o. s.') 

.\nnealers and temperers (metal) 

F'iano and organ tuners 

Wood carvers 

Other skilled occupations 

Stonecutters 

Structural iron workers (building) 

Tailors and tailoresses 



Tinsmiths and coppersmiths 

Coppersmiths 

Tinsmiths and sheet metal workers.. 

Upholsterers 



Transportation. 



Water transjiortation (selected occnjiations): 

Boatmen, canal men, and lock keepers 

Captains, misters, mates, and pilots 

Longshoremen and stevedores 

Sailors and deck hands 

Road and street transportation (selected occupations); 

Carriage and hack drivers 

Chauffeurs 

Draymen, teamsters, and expressmen - 

Foremen of livery and transfer companies 

Garage keepers and managers 

Hostlers and stable hands. 



Ijaborers (garage, road, and street) 

Garage 

Road anrl street building and repairing. . 
Street cleaning *.......... 



Livery stable keepers and managers 

Proprietors and managers of transfer companies . 
Railroad transportation (selected occupations): 

Baggagemen and freight agents 

Baggagemen 

Freight agents 



Boiler washers and engine hostlers. 

Brakemen 

Conductors (steam railroad) 

Conductors (street railroad) 

Foremen anr] overseers 

,^team railroad 

street railroad 

Laborers 

Steani railro.ul 

St reel riilrnad 

Loeomol i\'e eniiineers ■' 

Locomotive firemen :* 



Motormen 

Steam railroad . 
Street railroad . 



Officials and superintendent 

Steam railroad 

Street railroad 



Switchmen, flagmen, and yardmen 

Switchmen and ilagmen 'steam railroafl). 
Switchmen and flagmen (street railroad ) . 
Yardmen (steam railroad)... 



Ticket and station agents 

Express, post, lelc'^raph, and telephone (selected occupations): 

Agents (express companies) 

Express messengers and railway mail clerks 

Ext^ress messengers 

Railway mail clerks 



Mall carriers 

Telegraph and telephone linemen 

Telegraph messengers 

Telegraph operators 

Telephone operators 

Other transportation pursuits: 

Foremen and overseers (n. o. s.') 

Road and street building and repairing.. 

Telegraph and telephone . .' 

Water transportation 

other transtiortation ^ 



Inspectors 

Steam railroad 

Street railroad 

Telegraph and telephone . 
Other transfiortation 



Total. 



78,859 

19,395 
2,913 
7,047 
3,025 
0,410 

22.099 

18, ,830 

192,232 

74,90.8 
5.233 
69,735 

29,605 



3,063,583 



6,319 
26, .320 
85,928 
54,.S32 

9,057 
286,045 
411,132 
3,808 
42,151 
18,970 

l.%8,482 
3I,4.5(1 

ll5,,S3f, 
11,190 

11,240 
23, 497 

10,819 
11,878 
4,941 

25,305 
114,107 
74, .5.39 
03,760 

T9.294 

73,046 

6,248 

495,713 

470, 199 

2,1.514 
109, 899 

91,345 

66,519 

3,500 

62, 9.59 

35, ,881 

32,426 

3, 4.55 

111,. 505 

101,917 

2,. 500 

7,148 

20,. 585 

5,293 
25,005 

9, 138 
15,867 

91,451 
37,917 
9, 403 
79, 434 
190, 160 

25,995 
9, 568 
6 .822 
3!488 
6,127 

,50, 233 

42, 721 

3,451 

2,821 

1,240 



Male. 



78,599 

19,326 
2,910 
7,007 
3,008 
6,401 

22,090 

18,. 8.16 

160,404 

74,957 
5,232 
69,725 



2,850,523 



0,286 
26,318 
85,605 
54,, SCO 

8,906 
284,09li 
410,4,84 
3,.SO0 
41,944 
18,973 

1,58,204 
31,3.39 

115.673 
11,192 

11,168 
23,231 

10,7,89 
11,875 
4,914 

2.5,271 

114,107 

74, .539 

63,507 



79,210 

72. 980 

0.2:56 

488,659 

463,613 

25,040 
109, .899 

91,345 

66,499 
3.. 560 
62. 939 

35, 830 
32, 385 
3,445 

111,000 

101,3.5tl 

2.496 

7. 145 

24.324 

5, 193 
24,990 

!1, 129 
15,867 

90, 13 1 
37, 905 
8,969 
62, 574 
11,781 

25,958 
9, .5.57 
6,797 
3,488 
6,116 

49,848 

42,675 

3.445 

2,491 

1,237 



Female. 



260 

69 
3 
40 

17 
9 



11 

1 

10 

2,267 



213.054 



323 
32 

91 
949 
648 

207 
3 

278 

111 

163 

4 

73 
2{>6 

30 
3 



1910 



253 

78 

66' 

12 

7,0.54 

6,-5S6 

108 



51 
41 
10 

.565 

558 

4 

3 



100 
9 
9 



1,320 

12 

4.34 

16,860 

178.379 



385 
46 

6 
330 

3 



Total. 



69,570 

10,. 808 
1,901 
6,633 
5,368 
2,906 

.35,731 

11,427 

204,608 

59,833 
3,410 
50,433 



2,637,420 



5,. 304 
24, 242 
62,857 
46,510 

35,370 
45, 785 
408,469 
6,600 
5,279 
03,388 

194,882 
4,4tV8 

l.Sn.46S 
9.940 

34,795 
15.598 

17,0.33 
12,273 
4,760 

10,409 
92,572 
6,5,604 
50,932 

69, 933 
65,260 
4.673 
570,975 
,543, 16S 
27. .807 
%, 229 
70,381 

58. 705 
2,4S7 
.56,218 

22, 238 
19, ,805 
2,433 

,85, 147 
73,419 
2, 1,53 
9,575 

24,138 

5,875 
22,021 

6, 781 
15,240 

80,078 
28, 3.50 
9,152 
69, 9,53 
97, ,893 

14.738 
7,064 
3,W3 
3,016 
S15 

33,2,37 

27,661 

2,268 

2,619 

689 



68,788 

16, .560 
1,894 
0,528 
i,30S 



Female. 



782 
248 
10.5 



2,830 

35,726 
11,427 


76 
6 


103,793 

59,809 
3,410 


40,813 
24 


56,399 
18,928 

2,530,795 


24 
1,293 

106,625 


5, 289 
24,242 


15 


62,813 
40,498 

35,339 

45,7.52 

408,390 

0, 600 


44 
12 

37 
33 
73 


5,256 
63, ,382 

194,876 
4,463 

180, 468 
9,946 

,34,012 
15, .308 

17.028 
12,273 
4,7,55 

10,409 
9"' 572 


23 
6 

6 
6 


183 
230 

5 

5 


65,604 
56,932 

69,693 

65,038 

4,6.55 

.567, 522 

539,920 

27.602 

96,229 






240 

222 

IS 

3.4.53 

3.2-18 

205 


76 381 




58, 705 




2 487 




.56, 218 

22, 2:56 
19,803 
2 433 


2 

2 


85,095 
73,367 
2, 1,53 
9, 575 


.52 
52 


22,930 

5,. 804 
22.018 

6, 778 
15 240 


1 , 20S 

71 
3 
3 


79,667 
28,317 

9, 074 
61,734 

9,63! 

14,333 
7 064 


1,011 

3 

78 

8,219 

88,262 

405 


3,439 

3,016 

814 

32,962 
27,525 
2,265 
2,485 
687 


404 


1 

275 

136 

3 

i:i4 

2 



1 Not otherwise specified. 

2 Teamsters in aericiilture, forestry, and the extraction of minerals are classjfie<! wilh the other workers in tliose industries. re.^^pecfivGly: nnfi <lrivcrs for tnikeric:- and 
laundries are cl^issi Tied with delivcrymen in trade. 

3 For a discussion of the figures for this occupation, see p. 3. 



OCCUPATIONS— UNITED S1^ATP]S. 9 

Tahi.k 3.— TOTAT, persons 10 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER ENGAGED IN EACH SPECIFIED OCCUPATION, CLASSIFIED 

BY SEX. FOR THE UNITED STATES: 1920 AND l!)10— Continued. 

[Tlie figures for 19UI for cortuin of llir division tolals, and also for certain individual occupations have been corrected to conform to the classification for 1920; see text antl 

footnotes to table.] 



424 
42.1 
426 
427 
428 
429 
430 
431 
4.32 
433 
434 
43.-> 
43(i 
437 
438 
439 



441 
442 
443 
444 
445 
446 
447 
448 
449 
450 

4.il 
452 
4.« 

4.54 
455 
456 
457 

45S 
459 
460 
461 
402 
463 
464 
465 
466 
467 
468 

469 
470 
471 
472 
473 
474 

475 
476 
477 
478 
479 
480 
481 
482 
483 
484 
48S 
486 
487 
488 
489 
490 
491 
492 
493 
494 
495 
496 
497 
498 
499 
500 
501 
502 
503 
504 
.505 
506 
507 
508 
509 
510 
511 
512 
513 
514 
515 
516 
517 



l.)C(;iIl'ATI()N. 



Transportation— Continued. 
Other transportation pursuits -Continued. 

Laborers (n.o.s.') 

Express companies 

Pipe-lines 

Telegraph and telephone 

Water transportation 

Other transportation 

Proprietors. olTicials, and managers (n. o. s.')- 

Telegrai)h and telephone 

Other transportation 

Other occupations (semiskilled) 

Road and street building and repairing. . . 

Steam railroad 

Street railroad 

Telegraph ami telephone 

Water Iransjjortation 

other transportation 



Trade . 



Hankers, broliers. and money lenders 

Bankers and bank othcials 

Commercial brokers and commission men. 

Loan brokers and loan company ollicials. . 

Pawnbrokers 

Stockbrokers 

Brokers not specified and promoters 

Clerks in stores ^ 

Commercial travelers 

Decorators, drapers, and wintiow dres.sers 



Delivcrymen 3 

Bakeries and laundries ■* 

Stores 3 

Floorwalkers, foremen, and overseers 

Floorwalkers and foremen in stores 

Foremen (wareliouses, stockyards, etc.). 
Inspectors, gangers, and samjilers 



Insurance agents and ofiicials 

Insurance agents 

OtTicials of insurance companies 

Laborers in coal and lumber yards, warehouses, etc. 

Coal yards 

Elevators 

Lumberyards 

Stockyards 

Warehouses 

Laborers, porters, and helpers in stores 

Newsboys 



rroprietors, officials, and managers (ii. o. s.'}. 

Employment office keepers 

Proprietors, etc., elevators 

Proprietors, etc., warehouses 

Other proprietors, ollicials, and managers 
Real estate agents an<i ofiicials 



Retail dealers * 

Agricultural implements and wagons 

.\rt stores and artists' materials 

Automobiles and accessories 

Bicycles 

Books 

Boots and shoes 

Butchers and meal dealers 

Buyers and shi pipers of grain 

Buyers and sliijipers of live stock 

Buyers and shippers of other farm produce 

Candy and confectioner.v 

Cigars and tobacco 

Carpets and rugs 

Clothing and men's furnishings 

Coal and wood 

Coffee and tea 

Crockery, glassware, aitd queensware 

Curios, antiques, and novelties 

Delicatessen stores 

IJepartment stores 

Drugs and medicines, including druggists and pharmacists. 

Dry goods, fancy goods, and notions 

Five and ten cent and variety stores 

Florists (dealers) ^ 

Flour and feed 

. Fnut 

Furniture 

Furs 

( ias fi-xtures and electrical supplies 

( lenerai stores 

I ; roceries 

Hardware, stoves, and cutlery 

Harness and saddlery 

Hucksters and peddlers 



Ice 

Jewelry 

Junk 

Leather and hides 

Lumber 

Milk 

Music and musical instruments. . 
Newsdealers 



1920 



Total. 



4,242.979 



161,613 

82. 375 

27, .5.i2 

4. 385 

1, 0,S8 

29,609 

16. 604 

413,918 

179, 320 

8,853 

170, 235 
20, S88 

149.347 
26, 437 
20, 604 
5,8,33 
13,714 

134, 978 

1X9,918 
15, 060 

125, 609 
25, 192 
11,312 
43,351 
22,888 
22, 866 

125,007 
27,961 

34,776 
3,0'26 
8, 858 
6,353 
16, 5.39 
149, 135 

1,. 328, 275 

7,789 

2,646 

28,768 

2,221 

3,035 

22, .544 

122, 105 

7,305 

30,464 

10, 540 

40,091 

19,141 

1,132 

46, 653 

26, 556 

5,044 

1,618 

3,353 

4, 333 

11,7,52 

80, 157 

63,909 

5,968 

5,746 

9,309 

23,385 

26,013 

4,789 

4,420 

80,026 

239, '236 

41,144 

2,706 

50,402 

8,203 

21,433 

22,749 

4,350 

27,687 

13, 104 

7,909 

8,474 



Male. 



Female. 



33, 2'29 
9,067 
7,362 
5,011 
5, 963 
5, 826 

18, 384 

ll,0.->9 
7, 325 

46,1)34 
4, 331 

27, 91li 
9, 08S 
1.410 
1,7.53 
2, 136 



21, 

12(1, 



1,56, ,309 

78, 149 

27,, '3,58 

4. 255 

1,066 

2<.l, 233 

10, 248 

243.. i21 

176.514 

7,698 

170,039 
20, 858 

149, ISl 
22, 307 
16, 565 
5, 802 
12, 683 

129, ,5,H9 

114,835 
14, 7.54 

124,713 
25, 157 
11,244 
43, 297 
22, .8.59 
22, 1.56 

1 16, 602 
27, 635 

.33,715 
2,357 
8, 836 
6,310 
16,212 
139,927 

,249,295 

7, 760 

l,9S9 

28, 626 

2,'2IX) 

2, 1.(10 

7S1 

,940 

7,2ss 

:i(i, 4:i:i 

10,507 

32, 36S 

l.S,031 

1,116 

43, 440 

26,057 

4, 766 

1,505 

2, .593 

3, 505 

10, ,S00 

76, 995 

56, 158 

4,S99 

4,7.-M 

9,212 

22, 185 

'25,337 

4, 434 

4,.')35 

76,317 

216,0.59 

40, 4.53 

2, 685 

48,493 

8,166 

20, 652 

22,596 

4, 307 

27. 589 

12,509 

7,360 

7,808 



203 

22 

7 

77 

3 

94 

573 

544 

29 

1,490 

104 

705 

171 

421 

21 

68 



667, 792 



5. 304 

4, 2'26 
194 
130 

22 

376 

356 

170,397 

2.80ti 

1,1,55 

196 

30 

IfiO 

4.070 

4.039 

31 

1,031 

5. 389 

5. 083 

306 

896 

35 

68 

54 

29 

710 

5, 405 
326 

1,061 

669 

22 

43 

327 

9, 208 

78,980 

29 

657 

142 

21 

435 

763 

1, lf.5 

17 

31 

33 

7,723 

1,110 

16 

3,213 

499 

278 

113 

760 

768 

9,52 

3. 162 

7,751 

1,069 

962 

97 

1,200 

676 

355 

85 

3.709 

23, 177 

691 

21 

1,909 

37 

781 

153 

43 

98 

595 

549 



Total. 



26. .5.55 

3, 010 
2. 605 
.5,312 

14, 267 

1,361 

14, 839 

10. 089 

4, 7.50 
38. 742 

5, 076 
24, 424 

5, 187 

1,213 

1, 945 

897 



3, 614, 670 



1910 

Male. 



105,804 
511, {C.'.t 
24,009 

2, 111 
1,232 

13,729 
K, (;(',4 ' 

38", 1S3 

163, (i20 

5,341 

229,619 
24, 030 

205,589 
20, 724 
17, 946 
2,778 
13, 446 

97, 964 
8^, 463 

9,501 
81, 123 
16, 663 

6, 346 
43, 3'.IS 

5, 99.S 

8,718 
102,333 
29, 708 

22, :t62 
2,260 
,5,118 
4,393 
10, 591 
125,,S62 

1,195,029 
8,518 
2, 370 
4, ,597 
1,532 

3, lis 
19,346 

124,048 

11,535 

32,516 

6,864 

29,5.38 

17,728 

1,238 

35,273 

24,466 

5,351 

2,508 

2,735 

3,031 

8,970 

67, 575 

65,283 

4,331 

2,934 

9,469 

19,000 

22,209 

2,280 

1,526 

88,059 

195,432 

39,663 

7,541 

80,415 ! 

7,361 I 

29. 962 

15,219 

2,475 

27, 250 

14,694 

5,222 

7,075 



26. .300 
2, 979 
2, 605 
5, 251 

14,177 
1,2,SS 

13,411 
8. 6.80 
4.731 

37, 749 

4, 726 
24, 125 

5, 147 
992 

1, 905 
854 



103, 170 

54, 387 

23,090 

1,989 

1,191 

13, .522 

8,391 

275, .5.89 

161,027 

4,902 

2'29, 469 
24,012 

205, 4,57 
17, 649 
14,900 
2,749 
11,685 

95, 302 
85,926 

9. 376 
SO, 4.50 
16,655 

6, 335 
43, 389 
5, 991 
8, 080 
98, 169 
29, 435 

21,352 

1,.540 

5, 105 

4,368 

10,339 

122, 935 

1,127,926 

8,410 

1,955 

4, ,545 

1,486 

2,796 

18.470 

122,7,57 

11,454 

32,346 

6,806 

21,601 

16,375 

1,152 

34,229 

2;), 942 

5,112 

2,298 

2. 377 
2,313 
8,561 

65,414 

57,:)21 

3, 294 

2,527 

9, 363 

18,228 

21,739 

2,043 

1,497 

84,734 

176,993 

38,980 

7,484 

76, 630 

7, 220 

29, 403 

15,079 

2,436 

26,997 

13, 851 

4,963 

6,534 



Female, 



61 

90 

73 

1,4'2S 

1,409 

19 

993 

3.50 

299 

40 

221 

40 

43 



468, 088 



2, 634 

1,C>72 

319 

122 

41 

207 

273 

HI,, 594 

2,593 

439 

150 

18 

132 

3,075 

3.046 

29 

1,761 

2,662 

2, 537 

125 

673 

8 

11 

9 

7 

638 

4.164 

273 

1,010 

720 

13 

25 

252 

2, 927 

67, 103 

108 

415 

.52 

46 

322 

876 

1,291 

81 

170 

58 

7,937 

1,3,53 

86 

1,044 

524 

239 

210 

358 

718 

406 

2,161 

7,962 

1,037 

407 

106 

772 

470 

237 

29 

3,325 

18,439 

683 

57 

3,785 

141 

5.59 

140 

39 

253 

843 

259 

541 



' Not otherwise spex-ified. 

' Many of the "Clerks in stores" probably are "Salesmen and saleswomen." 

' For a discussion of the figtu^es for this occupation, see p. 3. 



' includes, also, managers and superintendents of retail stores. 
^ Crowers of flowers are shown under "Agriculture," p. 4. 



10 



POPULATION. 



Table 3.— TOTAL PER.SONS 10 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER ENGAGED IN EACH SPECIFIED OCCUPATION CIASSIFIED 

BY SEX. FOR THE ITNITED STATES: 1920 AND 1!)]0— Continued. 

[The figures for I9i0 for certain of the division totals and, also, for certain individual occupations have been corrected to conform to the classification for 19'JO: see text and 

footnotes to table.) 



518 
519 
520 
521 
522 
523 
624 

525 
52fi 
527 
.'i2S 
529 

630 
531 

532 
533 
534 
535 
530 



537 

6,38 
539 

540 
541 
542 
543 
544 
545 
546 
547 

648 
519 
5.50 
551 
552 
653 
564 

555 
566 

657 
658 
559 
560 



661 

502 
563 
.'J64 
566 
566 
567 
663 
569 

670 
571 
572 
673 

674 
576 
576 
677 

578 
679 
5S0 
581 
582 

583 
584 
585 
586 
587 
588 
,'-.89 
6'JO 

,191 
592 

693 
.594 
695 
596 



OCrt^PATIiiS. 



Trade— Continued. 
Retail dealers i— Continued. 

Oil, paint, and wall paper 

Opticians 

Produce aud provisions 

Raes 

Stationery 

Cither specified retail dealers. 
Not specified retail dealers. . . 



Salesmen and saleswomen 

Auctioneers 

Demonstrators 

.Sales agents 

Salesmen and saleswomen (stores). 



Undertakers 

Wholesale dealers, importers, and exporters. 

Other pursuits (semiskilled) 

Fruit graders and packers 

Meat cutters 

Packers, wholesale and retail trade 

Other occupations 



Public service mot elsewhere classified 



Firemen (fire department) 

Guards, watchmen, aud doorkeepers 



Laborers (public service) 

Garbage men and scavengers. , 
Other laborers 

Marsh.als, sheriffs, detectives, etc . . 

Detectives 

Marshals and constables 

Probation and truant officers., 
SlierilTs 



Officials and inspectors (city and county) 

Othcials and inspectors (city) 

Otficials and inspectors (county) 

Officials and inspectors (state and "United States). 

Officials and inspectors (state) 

Postmasters 

Other United States officials 



Policemen 

Soldiers, sailors, and marines^ 



er pu 
Life-; 



I>ife-savers. 
Lighthouse keepers. 
Other occnitations .. 



Professional service. 



.\ctors imd showmen 

Actors 

Showmen 

-Architects 

Artists, sculptors, and teachers of art. 
Authors, editors, and reporters 

Authors 

Editors and reporters 



Chemists, assayors, and metallurgists. 

Clergymen 

College presidents and professors *. . . . 
Dentists 



Designers, draftsmen, and inventors.. 

Designers 

Draftsmen 

Inventors 



Lawyers, judges, and justices 

Musicians and teachers of music. . 

Osteopaths 

Photographers 

Physicians and surgeons 



Teachers 

Teachers (athletics, dancing, etc.). 

Teachers (school) 

Technical engineers 

Civil engineers and surveyors 

I'^leetrical engineers 

Mechanical eugiueers' 

Mining engineers 



Trained nurses 

Veterinary surgeons. 



Other jirofessional pursuits. 

.\erouauts 

Librarians 

Other occupations 



Total. 



6, 577 
12,032 
34,473 
2.024 
5,951 
52. 0.'il 
05,728 

1,177,494 

5,048 

4,823 

41,841 

•1,125,7,82 

24,4i;9 
73, 574 

07,011 
8,074 
22,884 
19,701 
16,9,52 



770,460 



50,771 
115,553 

106,915 
5,481 
101,434 
.32,214 
11,955 
6,897 
2,679 
10,083 

.55, 597 
33,505 
22,092 
80,334 
9,126 
31,936 
39,273 

82, 120 
225,603 

21,453 
2,287 
1,463 

17,703 



2, 143, 889 



4S, 172 
28,361 
19,811 
18, 185 
35,402 
40,865 
6,668 
34, 197 

32, 941 
127,270 
33,407 
66, 152 

70,651 

1,5, 410 

62, 865 

2,376 

122, 619 
130, 265 
6, 030 
34, 259 
144, 977 

761,766 
9,711 
752, 055 
136, 121 
64, 660 
27, 077 
37, 689 
6,695 

149, 128 
13, 494 

35, 018 

1,312 

15, 297 

18,409 



' Includes, also, managers and superintendents of retail stores. 

2 Ineluiles only those resident in continental United States at the date of the enumeration, 

3 Aeronauts were inehukd with "Showmen," in lUUI. 

< Probably include .some teachers in schools below collegiate rank. 



Male. 



6,298 
11,743 
32,873 
1,9.S5 
5,200 
49,956 
59,483 

.816,362 

5,046 

1 , 639 

40,207 

7(i9, 461 

23,342 
72,780 

52, 106 
4,988 
22,,S04 
13,603 
10,711 



748,666 



Female. 



m, 771 
115,154 

105, 386 

6,475 

99,910 

30,96S 

11,602 

6, ,880 

1,899 

10, 627 

50,74S 
31,91,8 

is,.s:io 

li7,;H4 
S.Mf, 
20,727 
38,621 

S1,S.S4 
225, 503 

20, .309 

2,285 
1,442 

it;,.w2 



1.127,391 



33, 818 
13, 124 
1.8.694 
1.8,048 
20,783 
32, 129 ! 
3,662 j 
2!>,467 I 

31,227 , 
125, 483 
23,332 I 
54,323 ; 

02,987 I 
9, 758 I 

50, 880 
2, 349 

120, 781 
57, 587 
3,367 
27, 140 

137, 758 

122, .'.25 
5,677 
110,848 
136,080 
04, 642 
27, 063 
37, 67.8 
6, 695 

5,464 
13, 493 

15. 745 
1,304 
1, 795 

12,646 



279 

889 

1,600 

39 

691 

2,726 

0,245 

301,142 

3 

3,184 

1,034 

350, .321 

1,127 
794 

15,505 

3,086 

80 

6, 098 
6,241 



21,794 



.399 



1,530 



1,524 

1,246 

393 

17 

780 

66 

4,849 

1,587 

3,262 

12,. 390 

530 

11,208 

652 

236 



1,144 



21 
1.121 



1910 



14,3.54 
13, 237 
1,117 
137 
14,617 
8,736 
3, 006 
5,730 

1,714 
1,787 
10, 075 
1, 829 

7,664 

.5,652 

1, 085 

27 

1,738 
72, 678 
1,663 
7,119 
7,219 

639, 241 
4, 034 

035. 207 
41 
IS 
12 
U 



143,664 
1 

19, 273 

8 

13, 602 

5,763 



Total. 



6,818 

0,284 

29, 639 

1,975 

5,823 

38,612 

45,621 

921,130 
3,990 
4,380 
35,622 

.877,238 

20, 734 
51,048 

41,640 
4,715 
15,405 
13,401 
8,119 



459,291 



35,600 
78,271 

67,234 
4,227 
63,007 
23,699 
0,349 
9,073 
1,043 
7,134 

52,254 
33,210 
19,044 
52,926 
7,202 
27.849 
17,876 

61,9.80 
77,153 

10,208 
2,168 
1,593 

6,517 



1,693,361 



48, 393 
28, 297 
s 20, 096 
16,613 
34, 104 
38, 750 
4,368 
34, 382 

16, 273 

11.8,018 

15, 608 

3D, 997 

47, 449 

11,788 

33, 314 

2,347 

114,704 
139,310 

C) 

31, 775 

5151,132 

599, 2:37 

3, 931 

595, 306 

8S, 7.'i5 

52, H33 

5 15, 27X 

14,514 

6.930 

82. 327 
11.0:,2 



(') 



7,423 
8,254 



Male. 



0, 596 
5,954 
28,358 
1,805 
5,130 
30,866 
41,493 

063,410 

3,985 

1,250 

31,424 

626,761 

19,921 
50, 123 

34,068 
2, 077 
15,378 
10,392 
5,621 



445,733 



.35,606 

78,168 

66,605 

4,227 

02,278 

23,219 

0,102 

9,071 

855 

7,131 

49, 668 
32, 199 
17, 469 
43,389 
0, 662 
19,127 
17,600 

61,980 
77,153 

10, 045 
2, 158 
1,562 
6,335 



959,470 



35, 293 
10, 305 
> 18, 988 
16,311 
18, 675 
32,511 
2,310 
30, 201 

15,694 
117,333 
12, 710 
38, 743 

44, 437 
9,211 

32, 923 
2,303 

114, 146 

54, 832 

26,811 
5142,117 

121, 210 

2, 768 

11.8,442 

88, 744 

52, 028 

e 1,5, 272 

14,514 

6, 930 

5, 819 
11,032 



O 



1.594 
5, 991 



Female. 



222 

330 

1,2.81 

170 

687 

1,746 

4,128 



257, 



20 
5 

3,130 

4,098 

150,487 

813 
926 

7,672 

2,038 

27 

3,009 



729 



729 
380 
187 

2 
188 

3 

2,686 
1,011 
1,575 
9,537 

540 
8,722 

275 



223 



41 

182 



733.891 



13, 100 
11,992 
J 1, 108 
302 
13,429 
6,239 
2,058 
4,181 

579 

685 

2,968 

1, 254 

3,012 

2,577 

391 

44 

558 
84, 478 



(') 

4,964 
= 9,016 

478, 027 

1,163 

476, 864 

11 

5 

"6 



76, 508 



1,092 



(») 



5 Osteopaths were included with " Physicians and surgeons" ii 

5 Figures for 1910 estimated; see discussion, p. 3. 

7 Includes, also, all technical engineers not elsewhere classified. 



5,829 
2, 263 



in I'.ilO. 



()( '( 'UPATIONS TTNITJ-:!) STATES. 



11 



T^niF rj -TOTM. I'KRSONS 10 YKAKS OF AGE AND (3VER EN(iA<iEL) IN EACH srEClFlEI) OCCtiPATION, CLASSIFIED 

BY SEX. FOR THE UNITED STATES: 1920 AND J i» 10— Continued. 

ITht! (iRdrcs f„r 1910 fnr (.■.•il.aiii ..f i.lic divlsicm tcilals and. also, for certain individual occupations have liocn corrected to contorni lo Ihc classification for IKO; sec text and 

footnotes to tabic] 



.WS 

rm 
(ion 

Ml 
(i(>2 

I'm 
im 

(107 

oos 

l)(W 
OH) 

fill 
fii'i 

fiKi 
U14 



01. -i 

010 

017 
filS 
Ol'J 

O'JO 

o_n 

02J 

o:'3 

024 
625 
626 
627 
02.'< 

029 
630 
fl:!l 

o:t2 

IVM 

tv.u 
o:i5 

C30 
637 
63S 
63!) 
040 
641 
642 



044 
04.-> 
040 
647 
648 
649 
6.iO 
651 
652 

633 

654 
655 
656 
057 
658 
659 
060 
66! 
602 



604 
065 
666 
667 
668 
669 
670 

671 
672 
673 
674 
675 
676 
677 



OCClTPATKtN. 



Total. 



Professional service Continued. 

Semiprofessional pursuits 

.\bstractors. notaries, and justices of peace 

Fortune tellers, iivpnotists. .spiritualists, etc 

Healers (except o.steopatlis and pliysicians aud siirRcons) 

Keepers of charitable and penal institutions 

Keepers of pleasure resorts, race trades, etc 

Ofticials of lodges, societies, etc 

Religious, charity, and welfare workers 

Theatrical owners, managers, and oliicials 

Turfmen and sportsmen 

Other occupations 

.\ttendants and lielpers (professional service) 

Dentists' assistants and apprentices 

Librarians' assistants and attendants 

Physicians' and surgeons' attendants 

Stage hands and circus helpers 

Theater ushers 

Other attendants and helpers 

Domestic and personal service 

Iiarl)ers, liairdrcssias, an<i manicurists 



Billiard room, dance liall, skating rink, etc., k* 

Billiard and pool room keepers 

Dance hall, skating rink, etc, keepers 



Boarding aiul lodging house keepers 

liootWacks 

Cliarwomcn and cleaners 

Klevator ten tiers 

Hotel keepers and managers 

Housekeepers and stewards 

Jairitors and sextons 

Laborers (domestic anil professional service). . 
Launderers and laundresses (not in laundry). 

I.arunlry operatives '- 

Foremen aud overseers 

Laborers 

Ottier operatives - 

L:unidry owners, oliicials, ami managers- 

Managers and oliicials 

Owners and propri(?tors • 



•pers 



116,555 

10,071 

928 

14,774 

12, .884 

3,300 

11,736 

41,078 

18,395 

■ 1,826 

1,503 

31,712 
0, 708 
2,279 
7,051 
5,803 
5,221 
4,050 



3,404,882 



Mid wives and nurses (not trained) 

Midwivcs -• 

Nurses (not trained) 

Porters (except in stores) 

Porters, domestic and professional service. 

Porters, steam railroad ...'. 

Other porters (excei)t in stores) 

ReslauranI, cafe, and iiuu h room keepers . , . . 



servants 

Bell boys, chore boys, etc. 

Butlers '. 

Chambermaids 

Coachmen and footmen 

Cooks 

Ladies' maids, valets, etc. 

Nurse maids 

Other ser\-ants 



Waiters. 



Other pursuits 

Bartenders 

Bathhouse keepers and attendants 

Cemetery keepers 

Cleanersand renovators (clothing, etc).. 

Hunters, trappeis, and guides 

.Saloon keepers 

Umlirella menders aud scissors grindei's. 
Other occupat ions 



Clerical occupations. 



Agents, canvassers, and colled ois 

Agents 

Canvassers 

Collectors 

Bookkeepers, cashiers, and accoimtanls. 

Accountants and auditors 

Bookkeepers and cashiers 



Clerks (except clerks in stores) 

.Shipping clerks 

Weighers 

Other clerks 

Messenger, bundle, and office boys and girls ^ 

Bundle and cash lioys and girls 

Messenger, errand, and office boys anti girls 3 . 

.Stenographers and typists 



24,897 
22, 1 10 



133,392 
15.175 
30,803 
40,713 
55,583 

221,612 

17.8,628 
.32,893 

390, 756 

120,715 
3,011 
13,107 
103,997 
13,092 
4,005 
9,027 

150,769 
4,773 

151.990 
88, 108 
43,208 
22, 513 
22,447 

87.987 

1,270,940 

17,231 

lO.OilO 

29, 302 

2,427 

398,475 

5,791 

11,890 

795, 140 

228,985 



Male. 



3,126,541 



175,772 
130,338 
14,705 
30,729 
734,fiN8 
118,451 
610,237 

1,487,905 
123,084 
10,229 
1.347,992 
113.022 
0,973 
100,049 

015, l.M 



70, 620 

8,5.88 

230 

0, 872 

7,9.53 

3.163 

9,.i74 

14,151 

17,138 

1,825 

1,1. -12 

14,693 
l,7li8 
1 , 007 
041 
5,377 
2,808 
2,972 



182,905 

■2\.tar, 
22,007 
2,.>s.s 

18,6,52 
15,142 
11,818 
33,370 
41,449 
17,2(i2 
149,590 
31,224 
10,882 

39,9(i8 
2,070 
0,570 
31,322 
12,239 
4,081 
8,1.58 

19,338 

" 19,338 ■ 
S7, 683 
42,92'.) 
22, 480 
22, 208 

72,343 

2,58,813 

10,472 

10,089 

2.50 

2,4-27 

129, .8.57 

l,2(i8 

11 

97, .8:19 

112,004 

78,475 
25,970 

2,032 

5,496 
17,094 

7, 2.88 

17,312 

899 

2,378 



Female. 



45,929 

1,483 

698 

7.902 

4,931 

197 

2. Ui2 

20,927 

1,2.57 

1 

,371 

17,019 
4,940 
1,212 
6,410 
420 
2,353 
1,078 



2,186,924 



33,246 



1,W,941 
121,428 
10,514 
27, 999 
37.5, .504 
105,073 
270,491 

1,015,742 

118,944 

14,730 

882,008 

98, 708 

2, .500 

96,262 

.'■fl,41() 



109 



114 



40 

33 

24,9.55 

7,. 3:17 

14,134 

204,:i.5l) 

29,038 

l,0ti9 

.■185, 874 

.80,747 

1 , ,536 

0,.5:i7 

72,075 

1,4.5.3 

.584 

809 

l:i7,431 

4,773 

i:i2,0.58 

485 

219 

27 

179 

15, 044 

1,012,1.33 

759 

I 

29,052 



208, 618 
4,. 523 

11,S79 

fi97,:)oi 

110,921 

0, 492 

109 

826 

44 

4,, 573 

44 

523 

18 

3.55 



15,831 
8,910 
4,191 
2, 730 
3.59, 124 
13,378 
345,746 

472, 103 
4,740 
1,499 

465,924 
14,2,54 
4,407 
9.7,87 

.504,744 



1910 



Total. 



f4,926 
7,446 
1 , 000 
0.834 
7,491 
2, 929 
8,215 
15,970 
ll,:)22 
2,744 
376 



(') 



,01S 
3,299 
4,14(1 
6, n:!0 
2,27s 



3,772,559 



10 


761 


13 


.S.59 


2 


902 


105 


4.52 


14 


020 


31 


031 


25 


035 


04 


.504 


1N9 


273 


113,081 


f>3,4.S0 


533,697 


112 


204 


3 


071 


8 


786 


100 


407 


18,043 


2 


(i02 


15 


441 


1.3:1 


043 





205 


120 


K,3S 


84 


128 


54 


012 


17 


298 


12 


2IS 



Male. 



l^,329 
13, 10,s 
39, 7.S9 
25, 067 
450,440 

24,222 

1,000,010 

18,S293 

199,119 

101,234 

4,, 595 

4,,S42 

14,800 

3,887 

08,215 

1,0,53 

433 



1, 737, 063 



105, 127 
50, 785 
IS, ,595 
35, 747 

480, 700 
39, 239 

447,401 

720,498 
80,3.53 
11,564 
628, 5S1 
108,035 
10,866 
97, 169 

310,693 



44,532 
6, 660 
.3.S0 
2,162 
5,240 
2,700 



Female. 



18' 
25, 007 
117,004 

2, 436 

80, ,517 

102,495 

192,931 

100,9,84 

3,125 

4,K11 

12,215 

3, 840 

00, 724 

1,010 

216 



1,143,829 



90,325 
4S,495 
13, (ISO 
3:!,S5(I 

299,, '145 
35,053 

203, 892 

,')97,,833 
7S, 192 
10,984 

508, 657 

90, 748 

4,274 

92,474 

.53,378 



20, 394 

785 

1,220 

4,(i72 

2, 245 

223 



6I245 ! 


1,970 


7,081 


8,, 889 


11,027 


295 


2,743 


1 


282 


94 


(') 


(') 


544 


1,504 


,507 


2,792 


(JS9 


3,451 


0,444 


;i92 


2,131 

(') 


147 


1,241,338 


2,531,221 


172,977 


22,298 


15,943 


818 


13,700 


159 


2,243 


659 


23, 052 


142,400 


14,000 


20 


7,195 


26,839 


25,010 


25 


50, 209 


14, -235 


15,940 


I73,3:i3 


91,629 


21,452 


60,265 


3,215 


13,693 


520, 004 


35,909 


76,355 


1,674 


1,397 


5, 4:12 


3,364 


28, ,803 


71.604 


17,057 


986 


2,:i62 


240 


14,695 


740 


15,926 


117,117 




0,205 


15,920 


110,912 


84,0.55 


73 


,54,. 500 


.52 


17,297 


1 


12,198 


20 


.50,316 


10,516 


202,670 


l,:i09,,549 


17,067 


002 


13, los 





39,1x12 
':«,■),' 4.3ti 

21,786 
914,003 

85,798 

0, 188 

2.'il) 

1 , 470 

31 

■2,645 

47 

1,491 

37 

217 

593.224 



S, 802 

2, '290 
4,013 
1,897 

187, 155 

3, .iSO 
l,s:i,.509 

122,065 
2, 101 
5,M) 
119,924 
11, -287 
0,592 
4,695 

203,315 



1 Comparable figures for 1910 not available. 

' Some of the owners of hand laundries probably are included with laundry operatives. 

3 Except telegraph messengers. 



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013 827 391 R # 



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./1 3 




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