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Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 







Francis Bartolozzi esq r 



"Connoisseur" Extra Number 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 



A Biographical Essay 

By 

J.T.Herbert Baily 



With a Catalogue of the Principal Prints, 
and a Six Years' Record of Auction Prices 



LONDON : 
Published by 

OTTO LIMITED 

CARMELITE HOUSE, B.C. 
1907 



LOAN STACK 






FRANCESCO BARTOLOZZI, R.A. 

A Biographical Sketch. 



THE name of Bartolozzi can hardly be mentioned by the 
connoisseur and the print collector without a little thrill 
of emotion. To possess a few of his famous stipple 
engravings makes any man's study a place of pride and 
pleasure, and the possessor himself a person to be envied by his 
friends. For these engravings have not only steadily increased 
in commercial value — which, after all, is one test of artistic 
immortality — but they are now prized by students of engraving 
as the most perfect and beautiful expression of what is now 
nearly a forsaken art — the stipple being little used as a means 
of reproduction. Although it cannot be claimed (though it is 
often, and wrongly, claimed) that Bartolozzi introduced this 
form of engraving to England, he stands alone as the pre-eminent 
master of it. It was he who caused it to be " all the rage " among 
the connoisseurs of the eighteenth century, it was he who founded 
a school of stipple engraving which had many good and gifted 
disciples, and by his genius and industry he founded, single-handed, a 
great collection of prints, which are now amongst the most treasured 
things in the world of art. It is not to be disputed that he had 
certain qualities which placed him above all his contemporaries 
who practised stipple engraving. The extraordinary ease and 
grace with which he wielded the graver, the exquisite delicacy 
of his touch, his greater sense of light and shade, give to his 
engravings, from the point of view of technique, a perfection which 
no one else obtained in this medium. And this technique is the 
perfect means of expressing his ideals of beauty. One may marvel 
at the extraordinary sensitiveness of his touch when one examines 
one of his prints through a microscope, but after all, that is not 
the way to look at a print, and putting technical analysis on 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 

one side, Bartolozzi's works appeal to everyone by their qualities of 
softness and their luminous effect, by their charming gracefulness 
and tenderness, and — to the popular mind — by their elegant 
sentimentality. 

To the student of English social life, and of art as it affects 
society, Bartolozzi prints have another significance — they are com- 
pletely characteristic of the culture and taste newly awakened at 
that period in England, and expressed by the old-fashioned word of 
"chaste." Directly inspired by the Italian Renaissance, they 
appealed strongly to the love for classical art, which, very late 
compared to the other nations of Europe, now invaded the middle 
classes of this country, after belonging exclusively to the aristocracy. 
It must be confessed, that in pictorial art, England has been very 
backward. We can boast of very few painters before the eighteenth 
century— the court painters of the Stuarts, Sir Peter Lely and 
Sir Godfrey Kneller, were both Germans — but at the time when 
Bartolozzi came to England we had begun our history of painting 
in a blaze of glory. Many of the great names in English art belong 
to this period — Reynolds, Gainsborough, Raeburn, Romney; 
Hoppner, Wilson, Hogarth, Morland, Lawrence, to mention but a 
few, come in a cluster in the latter half of this wonderful eighteenth 
century. Their genius penetrated downwards to classes which 
before had been darkly ignorant of art, and even the host of medio- 
crities who surrounded them, helped at least to cultivate certain 
ideals, and to establish a certain standard of taste. The classical 
ideals of Italy were dormant. In quite a "chaste" way the English 
people allowed themselves to taste a pleasure in the beauties of the 
human form, though they still preferred it "decently draped." 
Cupids however were not thought to be too shocking, and these, 
with beautiful nymphs slightly robed, were subjects permitted even 
to be copied in young ladies' academies, and were lavishly used in 
designs for book-plates, head and tail pieces, and invitation cards. 
We may smile now at many of these feeble little strivings after the 
classical ideals of beauty, but at least they were evidence of a newly- 
awakened sense of art in English Society. 

Bartolozzi was one of the men who came on the tide of this 
enthusiasm for classic art, and he lifted it above the merely pretty 

vi. 



A Biographical Sketch 

trifling of amateurs. He gave the English public their cupids and 
their nymphs, and they loved him for them, but his cupids and 
nymphs were drawn with perfect and delicate skill ; and he gave 
them something more ; he reproduced for them many of the great 
works of the Italian masters, so that they had before them the true 
ideals of beauty. He worked also hand-in-hand with their own 
English masters, and such men as Joshua Reynolds were happy in 
having engravers of skill, among whom Bartolozzi takes high rank, 
to interpret their genius in black and white, and make it familiar to 
the great public. Bartolozzi, indeed, more than other engravers of 
his time, expresses most perfectly the characteristics of English 
taste and beauty belonging to his period, and both in his classical 
subjects and in his reproductions of portrait-paintings, this Italian 
is closely associated in our minds with the spirit of culture and 
fashion in eighteenth century England. 

Francesco Bartolozzi, to give him his full name, was born at 
Florence, in the year 1727, and was the son of Gaetano Bartolozzi, 
a goldsmith. His family was already an honourable one in Italy, 
and belonged in earlier days to the noble order rather than to the 
bourgeois class. For a future artist it was well to be born in 
Florence, and the son of a goldsmith, for in such a city, and in such 
a home, a child's imagination would be quickly stirred by the works 
and tools of Italian art. Though art in Italy was decadent at this 
time, the genius of the great masters remained as a glorious 
heritage and tradition. The very stones of Florence cried out the 
fame of the painters of the Renaissance, who had lived and 
laboured here. The Florentine galleries and churches contained 
many of the immortal and priceless treasures of the classical 
school. Florence itself, a city built in beauty, and haunted by old 
ideals, was a continual inspiration to an artistic soul. So young 
Francesco, born in this environment, was naturally educated in 
classical forms of beauty, and in the goldsmith's shop learnt, as many 
other goldsmith's sons, to handle, when still a child, the pencil, the 
graver, and the brush. His father was an engraver as well as a 
craftsman — there are specimens of his work in the British Museum 
— and he did not baulk the ambition of his young son to become 
something more than a designer in metal. Having learned the 

vii. 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 

elements of drawing, and to use the graving tool with ease and 
dexterity, Francesco, at an early age, became a pupil in the Academy 
at Florence, under the instruction of Ignazio Hugford,an Englishman 
born in Flanders. Hugford was an historical painter of no great 
ability and of but little inspiration, and young Bartolozzi could have 
learnt nothing worth learning from him as regards colour and 
brush-work. But he provided models and gave lessons in artistic 
anatomy, and in this school Bartolozzi learnt to draw the human 
form with an accuracy of line and gracefulness of touch which 
became afterwards his most valuable qualities as an engraver. 
Here, also, in these early years, he studied the antique with an 
awakened enthusiasm, and soaked his spirit in classical traditions. 

Not only Italy of the Renaissance was to be seen by him in 
Florence with all her beauties of colour and form, but some of the 
glories of Greece and Rome from which the Florentine painters had 
received their vita nuova were gathered in the great galleries of the 
city with their divine realisation of the perfect human form. It is 
not surprising, therefore, that Bartolozzi should have been a 
life-long interpreter of classic models. 

During his boyhood in Florence Francesco made one comrade 
who was to be in after years his closest friend and his constant 
collaborator. This was Giovanni Battista Cipriani, a pupil like 
Bartolozzi at the Florentine academy, and curiously like his 
fellow-student in temperament and taste. Cipriani was influenced 
in the same way by the Italian classics, and had the same enthu- 
siasm for the beauty of the human figure, and especially for female 
loveliness. He belonged to an old Pistoja family and received his 
first instruction from an English painter named Heckford who had 
settled at Florence. After some years' study in Rome his graceful 
drawings gained great popularity and attracted the attention of 
Sir William Chambers, and Wilton the sculptor, who invited him 
to England, to join a little band of brother-artists of Italy 
who were exercising a great and worthy influence upon the new 
English school of art. Cipriani, therefore, came to our country in 
1755, and settled in London as a member of the St. Martin's Lane 
Academy, where his charming designs soon attracted the favour 
of art patrons and connoisseurs. It was to this friend and 

viii. 



A Biographical Sketch 

compatriot that Bartolozzi first turned when he too, some years later, 
received a call to England. But before that time he had perfected 
his training in other schools. After a brief visit to Rome, where 
he received the revelation which the Eternal City always has for 
the soul of an artist, he was articled, at eighteen years of age, for 
a term of six years, to Joseph Wagner at Venice. This man 
Wagner was an engraver of historical subjects, and a print-seller 
with a European connection. As an artist he was of little account, 
and there is no doubt that but for Bartolozzi's early influence and 
natural genius he would hardly have escaped degradation during 
this apprenticeship. Wagner was simply a man of business, and 
he set his pupils to reproduce any pictures that pleased the fashion 
of the time, in order to supply the market. Bartolozzi seems to 
have been his drudge, and wasted his talents in engraving with 
laboured diligence the enormous plates of Giacomo Guarana, and 
ecclesiastical subjects by Italians of second-rate ability. Some of 
these are signed Gian Batta Piazzetta, pin. {F. Bartolozzi, sculp. 
J. Wagner, recognorit et Vend.). But in spite of this hack-work 
Bartolozzi's taste was not ruined, while his hand naturally acquired 
a technical ability. In Wagner's print-manufactory (it was nothing 
else than that) he at least learnt very thoroughly various processes 
of the engraving art, and a quickness and certainty of execution 
very valuable to him later on. At the same time he allowed his 
originality some scope. " Nor indeed," says Tuer* in his biogra- 
phical study of Bartolozzi, " can any grave deterioration or serious 
arrest of development be traced in his work as a result of the 
copying of bad pictures at this stage of his career. A certain 
waste of time and the negative loss of the advantage of fine models 
must of course be lamented, but as soon as he was emancipated 
from working for corrupt tastes, his free and masterly style and 
sweetness of touch became more and more apparent. In the 
course of a short time he may be said to have loosed his graver 
from all restraint and thenceforward to have given full play to his 
transcendent abilities." While still working for Wagner he 
indulged his fancy in original composition, and his favourite means 
of expression were drawings in black and red chalks on white 
paper. The influences of his early life were now revealed in 

• Bartolozzi and his Works," by Andrew W. Tuer, F.S.A. 2 Vols., 1882. Leadenhall Press. 

ix. 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 

these delightful examples of his original art. The Greek and 
Roman mythologies were the source of his inspiration, and in his 
goddesses and Bacchanals, his nymphs and cupids, he shows that 
wonderful knowledge of the human anatomy and that delicate 
sense of female beauty which he had learnt rather by intuition 
than training in his native city. These drawings have all the 
qualities of his later work in engraving, a beautiful luminance, an 
exquisitely graceful line, a softness of touch, and a sweetness of 
expression, which have been so often praised and must never 
cease to be admired. They prove conclusively that Bartolozzi 
was no mere copyist, that as an engraver he did not rely only 
on mechanical fidelity of reproduction of other artists' designs, 
but that in taking a design or interpreting a painting by the 
graver he gave full scope to his own temperament and invested 
his subjects in his own characteristic spirit. 

During his apprenticeship in Venice, Bartolozzi met, and fell in 
love with, a young lady of high birth, named Lucia Ferro. One 
would like to know more about this lady and of the romance that 
entered into the life of this young artist, but, to tell the truth, 
history is silent about much concerning Bartolozzi. There has 
been no revelation of the man's soul, save as it is expressed in his 
work. In England he was, it seems, a simple, genial man, open- 
handed with his money, devoted to his work, and modest about his 
abilities ; but of his passion, or of the weakness of his heart we know 
little. Yet there is some secret behind his relations with the 
Donna Lucia. We may guess that her family was not too well 
pleased with the match between their daughter and this young 
Florentine, who at that time was unkown to fame, and of no fortune 
save the skill of his right hand ; but we know that soon as his 
apprenticeship was over, he gave hostages to fortune, and married 
her. It was doubtless owing to her family influences as well as to 
his own talent, that he received the patronage of one of the great 
ecclesiastics of Rome, Cardinal Bottari, and at the invitation of his 
powerful friend, the young husband and wife took up their residence 
in the Eternal City. Here a son was born to them, whom they 
christened Gaetano, and doubtless in those early days poverty was 
a thing to laugh at, with love around a little cradle, and with the 



A Biographical Sketch 

glamour of future fame before their eyes. For some reason or 
other, however, Bartolozzi does not seem to have succeeded much 
in Rome. He was always industrious, and seized his opportunity 
to copy the works of Domenichino, and other great masters. 
Commissions for engravings or paintings, or the red chalk 
drawings, did not flow in as fast as might have been hoped from the 
influence of the Cardinal. It is claimed by his early biographers 
that he was favoured by Ferdinard IV. of Naples, by the Emperor 
Francis I. of Austria, and by the Medici rulers of Tuscany, but this 
patronage could not have amounted to much, as some years later, 
he was willing to exile himself for the not very magnificent salary 
of £300 a year. We find also that he returned to Venice with his 
wife, and again took commissions from Joseph Wagner and other 
print sellers, through whom he became known to the collectors and 
connoisseurs in London, where there was now an eager demand for 
classical paintings and engravings. His reputation came to the 
knowledge of Richard Dalton, keeper of the Royal collection, who, 
in 1763, was sent by George III. to Italy to purchase pictures, 
drawings, medals and sculptures. Dalton's career was very 
curious, and deserves a word or two. He was born about 1720, at 
Deane, in Cumberland, and was of quite humble origin. Coming to 
London, he was apprenticed to a coach-painter in Clerkenwell, and 
while painting armorial bearings on coach panels, discovered in 
himself a talent which he thought was worthy of better things. He 
studied drawing and engraving, and became an etcher of a certain 
mechanical ability, though without much native genius. He 
produced a number of plates which found favour with the public, 
and made his name well known, among other subjects being the 
Holbein heads, of which Tuer says, rather cruelly, that " the best 
that can be said of them is that a quantity of good copper was 
spoilt." For a time he studied in Rome, and here, meeting Lord 
Charlemont, accepted an invitation to accompany him to Greece. 
Upon his return he was appointed librarian to the Prince of 
Wales, afterwards George III., and, as already mentioned, was 
subsequently sent by the King on a mission to Italy. 

Whatever may be said of Dalton's own work, he at least 
deserves praise for having recognised the genius of Bartolozzi, and 

XI. 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A 

praise also, as a business man, for driving a good bargain. It was 
he who offered Bartolozzi a contract of £300 a year for a term of 
three years, if he would go to England in his employ, with a 
promise of becoming engraver to the King. He also commissioned 
him on the spot to do a series of etchings from drawings by 
Francesco Barbieri, commonly called Guercino. Bartolozzi 
accepted both his commission and the contract, and in 1764, at the 
age of thirty- seven, left Italy for ever. 

He left it alone, and Lucia, his wife, not only remained behind 
then, but never rejoined her husband. She had borne him several sons 
and daughters, though all died young save Gaetano, the eldest, who 
afterwards, as a young man, went over to his father in England, 
while his mother still remained. What was the meaning of this 
separation ? Why did Lucia Bartolozzi stay solitary in Venice, 
while her husband, whom she had married for love, for whom she 
had left her family, when he was poor and far beneath her in 
social rank, was now living in comparative luxury, flattered by 
great men, and famous throughout Europe ? History is often 
annoying in its silence. There are so many things we would like to 
know, and we can only grope blindly in the caverns of the past. 
This is one of the secrets which history does not reveal, and by 
an amazing coincidence, there is another secret, and another 
marriage of another artist, living at the same period as Bartolozzi, 
and precisely similar in the bald facts which suggest a hidden 
drama. George Romney left his wife, when, as a young man, he 
came in poverty to London to seek his fortune. With him and 
her it had been a boy and girl marriage, as with Francesco 
Bartolozzi and Lucia Ferro. He had parted from her when London 
had called to him with that seductive voice which has lured so 
many men on to ambition, to fame, to fortune, or to despair and 
death. Romney was one of those who gained success, but his 
wife never came to share it, and man and woman who had been 
"joined together till death do part," joined each other after their 
separation, only when death beckoned to one of them — the husband. 
This also is a mystery that has never been explained, though Mrs. 
Humphrey Ward has imagined an explanation in her novel, 
" Fenwick's Career." Not even a novelist has suggested an 

xii. 




t'Atrtte, 



^t^Qe&tta/ovzjL, OLjf^icufy 



The G I RL and KITTEN 






A Biographical Sketch 

explanation of Bartolozzi's case. What passionate antipathy had 
taken the place of love, what coldness had chilled two hearts which 
once had loved, what secret tragedy had made it better for 
Francesco and Lucia to live apart, we have no means of 
knowing. The woman's fate was the worse. In such cases it 
always is. Bartolozzi, at least, had the consolation and the 
joy of his work. His wife had not even the consolation of her 
children. All but one died like the flowers of spring, and that one 
— Gaetano, the first-born, left her to go to his father. She was 
lonely, lonely in the worst way, when, long after the death of 
the husband with whom she had not lived for so many years, she 
became blind before she groped her way at last to the restful 
grave. It is all a curious tragedy, very pitiful, whatever may be the 
details of it. 

As already mentioned, it was to his former schoolfellow and 
comrade Cipriani, that Bartolozzi turned upon his first coming to 
England, in order not to feel quite friendless in a foreign country. 
Cipriani, who had been here some years, received his compatriot 
warmly. They shared lodgings together in Warwick Street, 
Golden Square, then a place of some style. According to 
Tuer, Bartolozzi's first work in England was to complete the 
commission for the series of engravings from Guercino's drawings, 
which had then passed into the Royal collection, and among other of 
his prints of this period which immediately gained the admiration of 
the collectors were the famous line engraving, called "The Silence," 
after Carracci, representing the Virgin and Child and St. John, and 
the most beautiful and charming " Sleeping Boy " after Sirani. 
But Bartolozzi soon discovered that in order to satisfy the 
fashionable taste of English society, he must adopt a new method 
of reproduction — the stippled style of engraving. This method had 
been known, but not extensively used, by artists of the sixteenth 
century, such as Diirer and Lucas van Leyden. Later it was 
adopted by Ludwig von Siegen, the inventor of mezzotint, who (as 
we learn from that admirable book by Mr. Alfred Whitman — "The 
Print Collector's Handbook ") alluded to it in his letter to the 
Landgrave of Hesse, dated 1642, as "a method hitherto very 

xiii. 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 

uncommon, called puncturing, executed entirely with points, and 
with great labour." 

But although not a new discovery, it was not until the eighteenth 
century that stipple engraving with an improved method of 
technique became really fashionable, the impetus being given to it 
in France, to which England owes such an enormous debt in all 
branches of art. A few words of explanation as to the process 
may be interesting to those unacquainted with this technique. In 
the ordinary way of engraving, a copper plate was coated with wax, 
and the engraver then sketched out his subject with an etching 
needle, these lines afterwards being bitten on to the plate with acid. 
The wax was then removed, and the engraver went over the bitten 
dots with a finely pointed tool called a stipple graver, with which he 
put in, at the cost of considerable labour, and only by the surest 
and most sensitive touch, the fine effects of light and shade required 
in this style of engraving, which depended entirely for its success 
upon the appearance of softness and delicacy. 

The first English engraver to successfully adopt this method 
was William Wynne Ryland, who had learnt it from the French 
engraver Jacques Philippe le Bas, and who reproduced, in stipple, 
the pretty, but rather insipid, water-colour drawings of Angelica 
Kauffman, that beautiful and charming creature who had just 
come to live in London. Ryland gained a widespread popularity by 
his association with " Miss Angel," as she was called by her English 
friends, and it was the cause of a turn of the wheel in his amazing 
ups and downs of fortune. Born within the dark shadow of the 
grim Old Bailey, where his father, an engraver also, was imprisoned 
for debt, William Wynne Ryland was marked out for a tragic 
destiny, though he enjoyed a brief flight of dazzling success. The 
story is well known how Blake, the poet artist and visionary, was 
taken as a child to see this famous engraver, and said with the gift 
of prophecy: "I don't like that man's face. He looks as though 
he were born to be hanged." And truly enough in the intellectual 
melancholy face of Ryland there seems to have been a kind of fore- 
warning of a tragic fate. But for a time fortune seemed to flout 
this ill-omen. Ryland went to Paris, studied under the famous 
painter Boucher, learnt le Bas's secret, and came to England again 



A Biographical Sketch 

with this new style, which become a fashionable craze. He was 
appointed engraver to George III., and afterwards, in partnership 
with a pupil named Henry Bryer, opened a print-shop at the Royal 
Exchange. He might have made a fortune, and did earn a very 
large income ; but he led a life of dissipation, and his wild 
extravagance was far in excess of his earnings, so that he became 
a bankrupt in 1771. It was then that he went to Angelica 
Kauffman, penniless, to beg her for the loan of her portfolio 
so that he might reproduce her water-colours in stipple for 
coloured prints. The success of these reproductions was 
immense. Angelica's sentimental designs appealed enormously 
to the English public as they were interpreted by Ryland's exquisite 
skill, and the engraver once more enjoyed prosperity, starting a new 
business, for the sale of his prints, at 159 Strand. To that shop 
Bartolozzi went frequently, and from William Ryland he received 
his first lessons in stipple engraving. It is to the credit of Ryland 
that he met this Italian, not as a rival to be feared, but as a friend 
to be encouraged, and it does not lessen Ryland's own genius, and 
his merit in having been the first to introduce the style into 
England, that Bartolozzi soon became pre-eminently the greatest 
master of that style, giving to it a delicacy and grace and charm 
which even Ryland could not equal. It was to Bartolozzi that 
Ryland turned in his last agony. There was in his soul some 
moral weakness which led him to destruction. Though he had 
recovered from the first ruin of his fortune he plunged again into 
reckless expenditure, and then into disastrous debt. Perhaps 
he could not escape from the evil influence of that grim prison 
in which he had passed his childhood, where poor devils boasted 
of their prodigal adventures, fostered the gambler's instinct 
of a toss for fortune, with ruin on the wrong side of the dice, 
and dulled the fine edge of conscience and the moral code by 
rubbing shoulders with rake-hells and men who had staked and lost 
their honour. Faced with social disgrace Ryland madly endeavoured 
to retrieve his position by a criminal act. Using his skill as an 
engraver he forged some notes, and as was inevitable, was found 
out. It was no longer social disgrace that faced him. Death, 
in those days, was the punishment for forgery, and it was death, 

XV. 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 

that, after his madness, Ryland faced like a gentleman. To us 
who do homage to his genius, who have lingered long and lovingly 
over his superb prints, it is a frightful thing that King George 
should not have exercised his royal prerogative of mercy upon his 
own engraver, and though Ryland had been guilty of a grave 
crime, our blood boils at the vision of that young man (described 
in such vivid detail and in such loving language by Mr. Horace 
Bleackley in his interesting and scholarly book "Some Distinguished 
Victims of the Scaffold") passing in a felon's cart amidst a foul- 
mouthed crowd, but holding his head high, and gazing with steady 
eyes into the face of King Death, to that shameful gallows. While 
he was in prison he begged for a brief respite that he might com- 
plete a partly finished plate after Hamilton of " King John ratifying 
Magna Charta." His wish not being granted he sent to his friend, 
Bartolozzi, and asked him to finish it for the benefit of his wife. 
Bartolozzi promised to fulfil the doomed man's desire — one would 
have liked an account of that last tragic interview between two of 
the greatest engravers of the age, and between these two men 
who had known each other intimately and had worked with 
enthusiasm for the same ideals — and the Italian engraver faithfully 
carried out the commission, lavishing all his skill upon the plate 
in which every line was haunted with the painful memory of the 
unfortunate gentleman, so it is generally regarded as one of 
Bartolozzi's finest achievements. 

During his three years' engagement with Dalton, our engraver 
worked industriously, and reproduced many of the paintings in the 
Royal Collection, and in other collections in England. As soon as 
he was liberated from his contract he was able to make a consider- 
ably larger income owing to the commissions which were eagerly 
thrust upon him by the print-sellers and connoisseurs. Among 
his best employers was Alderman Boydell, the celebrated publisher, 
from whose printing presses at the shop in Cheapside came so many 
of the finest and most famous engravings of the Eighteenth 
Century. John Boydell, Bartolozzi's friend, was a man of genuine 
artistic knowledge and taste, and of fine enthusiasm for the en- 
graving arts. As a generous patron of the engravers he helped 
many a young and unknown man to fame and financial success, 



A Biographical Sketch 

and though at the same time, of course, Boydell was consolidating 
his own fortune, yet it was not in an entirely commercial spirit 
that he conducted his business. Very daring and adventurous, for 
instance, was his illustrated edition of Shakespeare's works, which 
involved him in an expenditure of £150,000, and nearly caused his 
ruin owing to the French Revolution, and the loss of so many of 
his distinguished patrons on the other side of the channel. From 
90, Cheapside, Boydell removed to the Shakespeare Gallery, at 6, 
Pall Mall, which became the rendezvous of fashion and art. With 
many noble connoisseurs it was a usual thing, after breakfast, in 
St. James's, to " see what Boydell had got in the way of a new 
thing," and to pass judgment upon the method and style of some 
new painter or engraver brought to their notice by Mr. Boydell. 
This fashionable world still comes to the exhibition at Messrs. 
Henry Graves & Sons', the direct successors to the Boydells. The 
present print-publishing business is carried on in best traditions of 
Mr. Alderman Boydell, and is renowned inthe world of art. Bartolozzi 
engraved a great collection of plates for this firm, including a large 
number after Guercino, Annibale, Carracci, Carlo Dolci, and after 
his friends Cipriani, Angelica Kauffman, and Joshua Reynolds. 
Among the most celebrated plates, however, which he engraved for 
the Boydells are his "Venus, Cupid and Satyr," from Luca Giordano, 
" The Lady and Child," from Sasso Ferrato ; " Mary Queen of 
Scots and her son James I," from Zucchero, and his " Clyte," from 
Carracci, which is generally considered to be his masterpiece. 

At this time, Bartolozzi was a man of some social standing in 
England. As officially-appointed Engraver to the King, he had a 
kind of diploma, which at that time was of some account, and in 
1765 he became a member of the Incorporated Society of Artists, 
in whose rooms he exhibited annually original drawings, and proofs 
and plates after Carracci, Giordano, and others. The greatest 
honour, however, that was given to him by those whose opinions 
he prized most, was his appointment as an original member of the 
Royal Academy, which was founded in 1769, with Joshua Reynolds 
as its first president. It was certainly due to Reynolds, who had 
the highest opinion of Bartolozzi's ability, that the engraver took 
his seat by the side of the foremost painters of England, receiving 

xvii. 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A . 

their homage to his genius as " The Engraver of the Graces," as he 
was rather felicitously called. It is pleasant also to know that 
Battista Cipriani, his old schoolfellow at Florence, was also one of 
the first members of the Academy. Seldom in art has there been 
two friends whose services so closely coincided. Both born in 
Florence, both trained by English masters, domiciled in Italy, fol- 
lowing each other closely to Rome and then to England, they were 
united here again by a delightful partnership of talent which pro- 
duced many of the most charming prints which the collector may 
possess. It may be claimed that Cipriani was the more original of 
the two friends, for it was he who provided many of the designs 
for Bartolozzi's stippling-graver. But really it was a very close 
collaboration. Cipriani owed as much to Bartolozzi as the latter 
to his friend. Their style and choice of subject were very similar, 
and when Cipriani rapidly sketched out a classical design of nymphs 
and cupids and graceful creatures of an allegorical character, 
Bartolozzi engraved them with a wealth of new detail, and elabo- 
rated them with an exquisite sense of form and decorative effect 
which gives him a sufficient share of originality. The two men 
thus worked hand in hand to supply the public demand for these 
stipple engravings of classical sentiment, and neither cared to 
claim any superior merit. It was sufficient for them both that 
together they were able to produce, with immense rapidity, and 
always with the most conscientious care for the ideals of their art, 
such a number of beautiful plates. It is not often that two artists' 
minds have worked in such harmony without the slightest jealousy 
or egotism. One branch of their art was of a somewhat modest 
character, and would nowadays be considered beneath the dignity 
of celebrated men. They produced an immense number of "benefit 
tickets," and invitation cards for fashionable balls, and noble or 
civic receptions. In many cases Bartolozzi engraved these for his 
patrons free of charge. He worked so rapidly, and was so naturally 
modest and generous with regard to his work, that to engrave a 
design for an entertainment seemed to him of not much account 
except as a means of showing a little graceful courtesy to distin- 
guished patrons. Yet, many of these " benefit tickets," as they 
were called, are gems of art, and prized by collectors now as most 

xviii. 



A Biographical Sketch 

precious treasures. The majority of them were designed by 
Cipriani with his graceful allegorical fancy, and Bartolozzi engraved 
most of them entirely by hand, instead of setting his pupils (as was 
his practice when he became successful) to work in the roughest 
part of his stipple before he transformed them by his delicate and 
magic touch. In many ways they are most characteristic of the 
genius of the two friends, as well as of the artistic taste of 
their time. " How very chaste ! " would have been the expression 
of the charming ladies who received such invitation cards to balls 
and events at Holland House, cards to be treasured up in the fancy 
boxes where the pretty Jane or the gentle Lucy kept her dance 
programmes ticked with the dances for which she had obtained 
partners, with a few pressed flowers fragrant with tender memories, 
with a packet of scented love letters which perhaps had led to 
matrimony and a nursery full of charming children, or perhaps 
only to a secret little romance which would call tears to the eyes of 
spinster ladies when they remembered their youth. Some of these 
benefit tickets may still be found occasionally in country houses, 
treasured by the great-great-grand-daughters of those dear ladies 
who had been ravished by the genius of Mr. Bartolozzi when they 
received an invitation to a ball at the Mansion House, or to a soiree 
at the beautiful Duchess of Richmond's. 

It is also interesting to note here that the stipple engravings of 
Bartolozzi and his school were not only sought after by London 
Society and fashionable patrons of art. They spread an artistic 
culture throughout the substantial middle class of England, which 
until that time in the Georgian period had been but little influenced 
by art. And in small country houses far from London, and even 
in farm houses and the rustic dwellings of comparitively poor but 
" genteel " folks, the walls of the ladies' sitting room were adorned 
with engravings and colour prints in the classical and allegorical 
style then so much in favour. Many of them were feeble imitations 
of Cipriani and Bartolozzi, pretty enough in their oval frames, but 
insipid and sentimental. But here and there, far away from 
London, the connoisseur who goes into these old country 
houses, is surprised and delighted to find (sometimes relegated to 
the bedrooms), a genuine print with Bartolozzi's signature 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 

attached, beautiful on the walls, where it has hung for several 
generations. It is one of those interesting signs that the art 
movement in eighteenth century England was exceedingly popular, 
and spread throughout the country. 

Bartolozzi's nomination as an original member of the Royal 
Academy, was the cause of one of his masterpieces of engraving, 
for he was entrusted with the task of engraving the Diploma to 
which the King puts his sign manual when an artist is appointed 
an academician or an associate. It was Cipriani who invented 
the design, which is one of real beauty and dignity. Art, 
represented as a beautiful woman, crowned and enthroned, is 
supported by Hercules and Apollo, on either side, representing 
labour and genius, while at the feet of Art, listening to her dictates, 
sit the three sisters, Architecture, Sculpture, and Painting. On the 
left is Britannia, with the British lion posing at her feet and gazing 
upon the scene with that stolid air of stupidity, which is, it must be 
confessed, the general attitude of the British public towards the 
ideals of art, though less so at that time than now. 

Cipriani had sketched out this quite effective design, but the 
greatest credit is due to Bartolozzi for the magnificent work of his 
engraving, so perfect in its technique, so full of grace, and beautiful 
light and shade. It was a worthy diploma for the membership of 
an institution, which, in spite of all later abuse, has always been 
of the greatest influence in English art. Nowadays there are few 
things more prized by collectors than one of these proofs inscribed 
with the name of the academician and signed with the Royal hand. 

Unfortunately Bartolozzi's honour in being one of the original 
members of the Royal Academy did not go unchallenged. By the 
terms of membership he was not strictly eligible by his profession 
as an engraver, and he was elected formally as a painter. It is 
generally supposed that he exhibited a painting for this purpose, 
but there is no record of any such picture having been presented, 
and indeed, although in his early days he had used the brush as 
well as his graver and his pencil, it is almost certain that at this 
period of his life he was entirely occupied with his plates. Sir 
Joshua Reynolds, who recognised his genius, and the great debt due 
to his power of reproduction in which there was so much originality 




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A Biographical Sketch 

and individualism, showed the best judgment in placing such a man 
upon the first roll-call of his Academicians, but by doing so he 
excited the jealousy of other engravers, who considered themselves 
to have an equal right of election as Bartolozzi, one of them did not 
hesitate to challenge the academy on this score. This was Sir 
Robert Strange, whose Scottish temperament was roused to 
intense anger by the preference shown to his Italian competitor. 
Strange himself was an engraver of high merit, exhibiting a fine 
boldness of line, though his drawing was considered by contemporary 
critics to be somewhat faulty. He had more than one grudge 
against Bartolozzi, for he had come in conflict with him when he 
was still in Italy. That was when Dalton, the keeper of the King's 
collection, had gone on his mission to obtain Italian works of art, 
and to commission Italian engravers to reproduce the works of the 
old masters. Having taken Bartolozzi under his protection, he 
used his own name and office to obtain permission for him to 
reproduce pictures not accessible to ordinary engravers. Strange 
accused him of working in this way in an underhand and 
dishonourable manner, pretending that he thought of purchasing 
such pictures on behalf of George III., in order to get access to 
them for Bartolozzi, to the prejudice of others who could not 
command such influence. Strange alleges that in the case of the 
Aldrovandi " Sleeping Cupid " he was refused permission to copy 
it on the ground that Bartolozzi was making a drawing of it to 
submit to George III. through Richard Dalton who had recommended 
its purchase, whereas the truth was that the drawing was never 
sent to the King, but remained in Bartolozzi's possession for the 
purpose of an engraving. Another of Strange's charges was even 
more serious against the honour of Dalton, and in the opinion of his 
accuser, against Bartolozzi himself. When Strange first met Dalton 
at Bologna, Dalton replied unsuspiciously to the Englishman's 
questions as to what pictures he intended to copy, in order to engrave 
them afterwards. Among those he mentioned were " The Circum- 
cision," and " Abraham putting away Hagar" by Guercino, and " Ss. 
Peter and Paul," and the " Cupid " by Guido Reni. To Strange's 
surprise and mortification he found that Bartolozzi was commissioned 
by Dalton to reproduce exactly the same pictures, in spite of the 

wi. 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 

emphatic denial of any such intention. When Bartolozzi first came 
to England, Strange inspired certain paragraphs in the newspapers 
hostile to his reputation, and afterwards upon his election to the 
Academy returned to the charge in a pamphlet, published in 1775, 
entitled " An Inquiry into the Rise and Establishment of the Royal 
Academy of Arts, to which is prefixed a Letter to the Earl of 
Bute." Among the other accusations against Bartolozzi, was one 
pretending that the Italian engraver had gone to his friend and 
compatriot Cipriani to beg for an exhibition painting, for the 
purpose of securing his own election to the Academy. 

At this date it is extremely difficult to enter into the merits of 
Strange's arguments. The last charge may be dismissed entirely, 
for there is no evidence that Bartolozzi ever did present a picture 
to the academy before his election, and in any case he had enough 
original genius, as is proved by his works, not to need the assistance 
of any friend so to obtain any honour in a fraudulent way. As 
regards the accusation about obtaining access to the works of 
the Italian masters, it does seem as though Dalton had rather 
strained his influence as the agent of the English King in order to 
obtain an unfair advantage over other engravers. But be this as 
it may, there is nothing that reflects upon the honour of Bartolozzi 
himself, who was entirely in the hands of Dalton, and had no 
reason to refuse his commissions. The whole business must be 
read in the light of Strange's character. He was an impetuous, 
self-willed, hot-tempered Scotsman, whose early training and 
temperament tempted him to a violence of statement in excess of 
the plain facts. As a young man he had wielded the claymore 
at Prestonpans on behalf of the Pretender, and he was never a 
man of peace, though to all accounts an honest and courageous 
gentleman. He took himself and his art seriously, and at one 
time seriously neglected his opportunities by contemptuously 
refusing to engrave certain poorly inspired pictures in the 
collection of King George in order to follow his own inclinations 
to reproduce the great masters of Italy. But his admirable talent 
secured for him later a strong reputation in Europe, and, as he 
described himself with pardonable pride on the title page of the 
pamphlet mentioned above, he was a " Member of the Royal 

XJCli. 



A Biographical Sketch 

Academy of Painting at Paris, of the Royal Academy of Rome, 
Florence and Bologna, Professor of the Royal Academy at 
Parma," etc. He always possessed some characteristics of the 
soldier of fortune with a swash-buckling manner and a truculent 
temper, and though, as already said, he took himself seriously, his 
self-opinion was not altogether shared by his contemporaries. 

Bartolozzi was urged by his friends to reply to the attack, but 
very wisely answered not a word and accepted it with philosophical 
indifference, the result being that it was quickly forgotten, and 
did not in the least injure Bartolozzi's reputation in England. 
William Carey, one of the Italian engraver's most intimate friends, 
wrote in "The European Magazine" for 1815, that Bartolozzi was 
never conscious of having intentionally offended or injured Strange, 
either abroad or at home, and that he was of opinion that it was 
only natural for an artist of Strange's acknowledged abilities to 
feel hurt by the reception of a foreigner, like himself, into the 
Royal Academy, when the governing body refused to admit their 
own distinguished countryman. The private feud which had been 
fanned into flame by Sir Robert Strange eventually died down in 
the heart of that artistic Scotsman, and in after years there was 
no ill-feeling between the two masters of engraving. Each of them 
paid a generous homage to the other's genius, and while Strange, 
remembering the silence with which Bartolozzi had met his attack, 
uttered cordial words of admiration, not only for the beauty of his 
work but for the kindly heart of this foreign artist, Bartolozzi was 
not reluctant in the praise he gave to Strange for the strong effects 
of light and shade he produced in his engravings, for the realism 
of his flesh tints, and for the general excellence of his technique. 
He could not be blind to his rival's faulty drawing, but he merely 
remarked what a pity it was that Strange had not had the 
advantage of an early training in the study of the human figure. 

Somewhere about the year 1780 Bartolozzi, who was now 
at the height of his fame, went to live at North End, Fulham, 
not far from where, at a later period, that great and solitary genius 
Turner used to go to those low-class haunts, where, in the tap-rooms 
of the taverns, he would dream visions of gold and mist, and ponder 
upon the mysteries of light which would put a glamour upon 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A . 

the most sordid scene. Like many other artists Bartolozzi, though 
he earned considerable sums of money, could never keep much 
of it for a rainy day, and his prodigality and generosity kept him 
poor. There is no suggestion among his early biographers that 
he had the wild spirits and Bohemian temperament of such a man 
as Morland, whose drinking bouts were truly gargantuan in the 
consumption of strong liquor. We are told, however, that a day's 
outing with his friend Cipriani cost him £50, and that is a sum 
which takes some spending on a summer's day. It must not 
be forgotten that hard drinking was the fashion of Georgian 
England, and doubtless the Italian, who would prefer good 
Burgundy to English beer, and a good horse to Shanks's nag, 
was not inclined to be economical in his pleasure. But here again 
we do not find much to help us in a revelation of Bartolozzi's 
true character. It is suggested he was a gay fellow, and certainly 
his income was not always in excess of his expenditure, so that he 
was often tempted to engrave inferior work for the sake of 
immediate payment. A contemporary account of Bartolozzi's 
grand-daughter (of whom something will be said later) in a little 
anecdotal work called " Memories of the Life of Madame Vestris," 
asserts that the engraver was " fond of his bottle," and tells 
a somewhat amusing anecdote, which as it is one of the few 
recorded of Bartolozzi deserves to be quoted. 

" Lord Craven, who fancied himself an artist, sent for Bartolozzi, 
and engaged him to make one of his best engravings from an East 
India design of his, for which he agreed to give him six hundred 
pounds. 

" ' Good God,' 'tis little money, put I will do it, mine lort, you 
are my very goot friend. 

" Everything was arranged ; the engraver was to work in the 
house, and dine at his lordship's table. Lord Craven was only 
liberal unto his mistresses. The first day after the bottle had 
passed, he showed the engraver into his working room and there 
left him. Bartolozzi had no idea but this was only a visit of 
ceremony, to inspect the apparatus, and then return to his ' bottle 
and friend ' ; so he untied his neck-cloth according to custom, 
spread it over his face, threw himself in his arm-chair, and fell asleep. 

joriv. 




Dr/urn kEiigravcd by G Bartotuz.t.L. 

Cere s. 



A Biographical Sketch 

" About two hours after, Lord Craven, anxious to see the 
progress of the engraver, went, himself, to call Bartolozzi to take 
coffee. Entering the room he was surprised to find the artist 
asleep, and snoring like the sound of his brother's* fiddle. His 
lordship looked round, and, horror-stricken, found all was in statu 
quo, — no stroke of the engraver was visible on the plate ; upon 
which his lordship shook him by the collar until he awoke him. 
The engraver was in very ill humour ; he possessed the irritation 
of genius in a painful degree, and exclaimed, ' Why wake me when 
I was dream for your lordship's good.' 

" ' My good,' bellowed his lordship in surprise, ' Why, Bartolozzi, 
my man, you have not put a graver upon the plate 1 ' 

" Bartolozzi now got up and replied : ' Oh yes, my lort, all my 
engraving tools are there, laying upon the plate, and dere dey may 
lay, and be damn ! ' 

" ' What is the meaning of this ? ' said his lordship, ' Are you 
going mad ? ' 

" ' Yes, wid vexation ; you take me away from good table, lock 
me up in cold room, and I can't do things more vorse than at my 
own house. You go back and trink, and trink, and eat, and eat de 
fruits, and then come to see vot I do in this hungry dungeon. My 
lort, ven I vork, I must eat and trink, and smoke at the same time ; 
you send me mine bottle of port, mine shiggar, and mine piskeat, 
and I will do you ; but I must have mine own things, and mine own 
way, or tammee, I give up de bargain.' His lordship took the hint, 
and every day supplied him with the three things he mentioned, 
and his engraving was soon finished. Bartolozzi's port, his cigar, 
and his biscuit, were always a necessary part of his working tools. 
This anecdote was given on the authority of the Lord Redesdale, 
of that day." 

Another detail of Bartolozzi's " working tools " was his snuff- 
box, which was inseparable. He, like the men of fashion of the 
period, consumed large quantities of snuff, and as he bent over his 
plates with the graver which produced such magic effects of beauty 
of dot and line, he would dip into the box and scatter the powder 
about the room, as he replenished his nostrils with that curious 

* This should be " his son's " ; referring to Gaetano, who was a musician. 



Francesco Barto/ozzi, R.A. 

stuff, which has now gone out of fashion (save among printers and 
compositors, among whom it is always found), but which, like 
tobacco, acts as a narcotic as well as a stimulant, according to the 
activity of the brain. 

Bartolozzi's hand and brain were seldom idle, for whatever 
may have been his personal indulgence in the way of port wine, 
and other good things, he was the most industrious of mortals. 
William Carey tells how he often used to pass the engraver's house 
at Fulham late at night, and there in an upper window he would 
see a light burning, showing that the great man was still dot, dot, 
dotting with his stipple upon the plate, or still putting on the 
etching grounds before tracing in one of his elegant designs. Not 
only did he work thus late into the night, but also rose early in the 
morning to begin the labour of a new day. A lady named Mrs. 
McQueen, the mother of two well-known copper-plate printers, 
remembered her father going frequently to Bartolozzi's house 
at Fulham as early as six o'clock in the morning, to prove his 
plates under the artist's personal superintendence. 

Of the few personal anecdotes recorded about Bartolozzi, nearly 
all of them reveal two pleasant characteristics of the great 
engraver, his admirable modesty about his own work and his gene- 
rous and enthusiastic appreciation of other masters. They are 
both rare qualities to the artistic temperament, which, generally, is 
essentially egotistic. As a rule, an artist feels so much his own 
individuality, and is— to a certain extent he should be — so confident 
that his own method of expression is the right and perfect 
one, that he is more prone to criticise than to admire 
the work of his competitors. But Bartolozzi had an Italian 
geniality and enthusiasm of soul. He loved to enlarge to his 
visitors upon the merits of other artists, and, turning a deaf ear to 
their praise of his own work, would point out the beauties of 
various prints hanging upon his walls, produced by other hands. 
His rooms, of course, contained many of his own plates, and his 
walls, we are told, were decorated with many proofs of musical 
tickets designed by Cipriani, including the "Clytie," the "Silence," 
and his etchings after Guercino. There was also a proof of his 
rendering of the figures in Zuccarelli's picture : " The Italian Ball 



A Biographical Sketch 

and Wedding," the landscape in which had been engraved by the 
French engraver, Vivares ; but when a friend expressed his ad- 
miration for these achievements by Bartolozzi, he shrugged his 
shoulders and protested that they were inferior productions merely 
put up to cover the walls, and then immediately pointed out the 
charm of Vivares' style, exclaiming ardently : " Vivares ! Ah, he is 
the finest landscape engraver in the world ; his needle points upon 
the copper so light, so full of taste, so airy ; his skies are in motion ! 
I esteemed it an honour to engrave the figures in his landscapes, 
for then I was sure to live for ever." There spoke a generous soul, 
eager to extol others, while ignoring his own skill and spirit. There 
were many others besides Vivares for whom Bartolozzi had warm 
words of praise. Thomas Burke, the Irish Engraver, who had 
studied the art of stippling from Ryland, and who, even better than 
Ryland, reproduced the pictures of Angelica Kauffman with a soft, 
rich, and illuminating tone which is a joy to all who understand 
the qualities of a good print, was ever special favourite with 
Bartolozzi, who recognised in Burke qualities of technique, of 
which he himself was a master. 

Hogarth was another man for whom he had a deep reverence. 
He was profoundly impressed by the wonderful character and 
realism which Hogarth put into all his studies of contemporary life ; 
and this was remarkable, because there was nothing in common 
between Hogarth's intensely modern spirit, and Bartolozzi's love 
and reverence for the classical ideals of the Renaissance. Hogarth 
was not untouched by those ideals, and there are in many of 
the subordinate details of his pictures, evidences of Renaissance 
design. But he was not successful in this way, being strictly a 
humourist and caricaturist. Yet Bartolozzi would not acknowledge 
any defect in the genius of this great artist. " Hogarth," he says 
once, " knows everything ; he is a designer and painter ; his prints 
are a theatre of human life, and if he had been born in Italy he 
would have been a great Italian." By his curt words he probably 
meant that if Hogarth had studied in the Italian schools, and been 
inspired with the traditions of the great masters, he would have 
been one of the world's most glorious artists, with a trained sense 

xxvii. 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R A. 

of beauty to complete his genius for realism and the characteristics 
of human nature. 

In the course of Bartolozzi's life in England, two thousand or 
more plates were produced, bearing his name as their engraver. 
In spite of his splendid industry it is not to be claimed that this 
prodigious number of plates was the work of one man's hand. 
It must not be forgotten that Bartolozzi was the head of a great 
school of stipple engraving, and it is almost certain that many of 
his prints to which he put his signature contained but little of the 
master's own engraving. When success came to him, and his 
fame was secure, when also his genius had made the stipple style 
of engraving the most fashionable form of reproduction, so that 
the demand for such prints was enormous, and other methods of 
engraving were not accepted as formerly by collectors and amateurs, 
quite a large number of distinguished young men came to Bartolozzi 
to learn the secrets of his style, and paid high premiums for the 
privilege of being his pupils, and whose work in association with 
the great master of the art contributed not a little to further in- 
crease his own reputation. But, as Mr. Alfred Whitman says in 
his delightful " Print Collector's Hand Book," which has been 
previously quoted here, " we must remember that it redounds 
to Bartolozzi's genius and ability that he was able to train and 
produce such distinguished pupils. The output ascribed to 
Bartolozzi was therefore that of an atelier rather than the work 
of a single craftsman." 

Among the most eminent of the master's disciples were such 
men as Tomkins, Cheesman, Ogborne, John Jones, Richard Earlour, 
J. Raphael Smith, William Dickinson, Thomas Watson, William 
Ward, Charles Turner, Schiavonetti, Thomas Ryder, Charles Knight, 
and Charles Wilkin. Some of these men were not actually in 
Bartolozzi's work-shop, though they were directly influenced by his 
style and technique. Others however, and not the least eminent, 
were actually his pupils, working for a time under his direction, and 
preparing some part at least of the plates to which he put his 
name. 

Luigi Schiavonetti for instance, came from Italy in 1790, and 
was at once associated with Bartolozzi. He made certain 

xxviii. 



A Biographical Sketch 

improvements in the technicalities of the process, and helped 
Bartolozzi to supply the demand for those fancy, allegorical 
subjects, on small plates, which were then a craze, and a very 
charming and cultured craze, in all classes of society. Afterwards 
he launched out on his own account, and there is no need to remind 
print collectors of his delightful reproductions of Wheatley's 
" Street Cries of London." Among the other famous plates are 
"The Mask" (from the picture of the Marlborough family) after 
Sir Joshua Reynolds, the portrait of Lady Cawdor, after H. Edridge, 
and " The Hon. Anne Damer," after Cosway, and his celebrated 
engraving after Stothard, of " The Canterbury Pilgrims." 

According to present-day connoisseurs, Bartolozzi's best pupil 
was Petro William Tomkins, the son of a landscape painter, 
William Tomkins. He acquired something of Bartolozzi's best 
qualities, and something also of his spirit. He was particularly 
fond of children's subjects, and had a pretty fancy also in allegory, 
while as a portrait engraver he is not easily to be surpassed. He 
collaborated with Bartolozzi in the magnificent edition of 
Thomson's " Seasons," after William Hamilton's designs. After 
leaving Bartolozzi he became historical engraver to Queen 
Charlotte, and drawing master to the Princesses. He also set up 
a print-shop, at 97 Bond Street, from which he produced many 
beautiful works. Among his most familiar and exquisite prints 
was the stipple engraving of Mrs. Siddons' portrait, by John 
Downman ; and his " Morning " and " Evening," after Hamilton. 

Thomas Cheesman was, as we have said, a pupil of Bartolozzi, 
and his engravings of religious and mythological subjects from the 
Italian masters were very full of his master's influence. Among his 
best portrait engraving, everyone will recollect his rendering of 
Romney's beautiful portrait of Lady Hamilton as " The Spinster," 
that charming figure of this beautiful woman, in white, sitting at 
the spinning wheel. Another famous plate of his is the engraving 
" Lord Grantham and his Brothers," after the picture by Reynolds. 

John Ogborne, Bartolozzi's other pupil, is now a favourite 
engraver among collectors. He, like Cheesman, reproduced some 
of Romney's portraits, his " Mrs. Jordan, as a Country Girl" being 
especially prized. Many of the best eighteenth century portraits 

xxix. 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 

were engraved by this man, and they were all admirable in 
expression and " sensibility," as it used to be called in those days. 

John Raphael Smith, though he worked in all styles of 
engraving and was a master of them all, being a man of acute 
artistic taste, and a fine and delicate temperament, was strongly 
influenced by Bartolozzi. His reproductions of Morland's figure 
pictures " Delia in Town " and " Delia in the Country," " The Fair 
Penitent," " Domestic Happiness," etc., are to be found now on 
the walls of many old houses, having been handed down through 
the family since they first adorned the walls in the days of our 
great-grandmothers. 

Thomas Burke, for whom Bartolozzi formed such high admira- 
tion, was at first a mezzotint engraver, but the new fashion, 
popularised by the Italian, soon mastered him, and his stipple plates 
are all that Bartolozzi said of them, in richness of tone, delicacy 
of touch, and beauty of expression. After the death of Ryland, 
who had been her devotee, Angelica Kauffman preferred Burke 
before all others to reproduce her works, and in this she showed 
the best judgment, for truly his stipple engravings after her 
pictures are as charming and graceful as anything produced in 
that century of art. 

Charles Knight, another pupil of Bartolozzi, has many good 
qualities, and worked very closely with his master. It is generally 
believed that he did most of the work upon the famous portrait of 
Miss Farren with her muff, after Thomas Lawrence, although 
Bartolozzi's name appears upon the finished state of the portrait. 
But Knight was more than the "ghost" of Bartolozzi. He 
achieved an honourable reputation as an engraver upon his own 
account, and such men as Reynolds, Lawrence, Hoppner, and 
Wheatley owed much to him for his conscientious and expressive 
reproductions of their pictures. 

The list might be extended considerably of those who worked 
under Bartolozzi's direction, or were directly inspired by his 
method and genius. But enough has been said to show that 
Bartolozzi was the head of a great school of stipple engraving 
which practically carried for a time all other schools of engraving 
before it by its surging tide of popularity. There are some people 



A Biographical Sketch 

perhaps who may fail to acknowledge the credit due to Bartolozzi 
himself for this immense amount of beautiful work produced in 
the stippling style, yet, without taking away any of the individual 
merit of these distinguished engravers, each of whom had well 
defined characteristics and qualities, too much homage can hardly 
be paid to the man who inspired, and to some extent trained, this 
great number of brilliant craftsmen whose works constitute not the 
least glory of the eighteenth century. 

By the mysterious separation between Bartolozzi and his wife 
he was deprived of one pupil who should have followed most 
closely in his footsteps and increased the illustrious reputation of 
his name, — his son, Gaetano, whom he had left as a child in Venice. 
We can imagine how the warm-hearted and enthusiastic Italian 
would have rejoiced in expounding the principles of his art to the 
youth as he grew in intelligence, how the father would have 
watched with eagerness the development of his artistic taste, and 
trained him in the traditions which he, the elder Bartolozzi, had 
received from the great masters of Italy, and how he would have 
taught this son to wield the graver with the same ease and grace 
so that he might have given an additional glory to the school of 
stipple engraving, productive already of so much splendid talent. 
But that was one of the joys denied to the master, by circumstances 
of which we have no explanation, until the child had grown into 
young manhood, beyond the age when his character and taste 
could be easily moulded by a father's influence. But after many 
years Gaetano did rejoin his father, and showed that by inheritance, 
if not by training, he had all the qualities that might have made 
him a great engraver. But the passion for another art was more 
dominant in his soul. As he grew up in Italy, having forgotten, we 
may imagine, all but the existence of the being who had given him 
birth, though the fame of the elder Bartolozzi had spread through 
Europe, and must have been known to that mother, who, for some 
reason, refused to share its glamour in England, the boy had 
developed a genius for music. He took to the fiddle instead of to 
the graver, and upon what was then called the " tenor violin," found 
a medium for those emotions of art and beauty which in two 
earlier generations had been expressed in light and shade. As to 

jocxj. 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R A. 

all the details of his life we are again baffled by silence. We do 
not know who was Gaetano's master, or what professional success 
he obtained as a musician. But his character was thoroughly in 
accordance with what is known as the artistic temperament. He 
was erratic in his moods, easily swayed by the passion of the 
moment, devoted to his instrument and art, but unstable and 
wayward, and like other Italians of his type, charming 
and humble, but not industrious, self-reliant, or estimable. 
Having lived abroad until he reached manhood he seems to have 
fallen for a time upon evil days, or at least been pressed for an 
immediate need of funds. The idea came to him, or perhaps was 
suggested by others, that he should cross over to England, where, 
by good luck, he had a father earning noble sums of money, and 
living splendidly in the art-world of London, amidst the homage of 
his brother artists, and with the patronage of great personages. 
Possibly among his young ambitious and Bohemian friends the 
splendour of the elder Bartolozzi was exaggerated by romantic 
renown. Doubtless to Gaetano, after the idea of rejoining his 
father had taken hold of his mind, it may well have seemed a 
prudent and natural thing to make acquaintance with such a great 
man, who, by all the unwritten laws of paternity, was bound to 
provide him with some of his good fortune. 

So it was that one day Francesco Bartolozzi, sitting over his 
plates at North End, Fulham, found himself face to face with one 
of his forgotten masterpieces, this handsome young man who called 
him father, and whom he had not seen, since, as a child, this son of 
his had been held to his wife's breast, as weeping, surely weeping, 
whatever the quarrel between husband and wife, she had said fare- 
well, for ever. This meeting between father and son must not 
have been without emotion, at least on one side. The elder 
Bartolozzi may have seen his own youth again in the face of that 
young man, and remembered how many years had passed by, 
turning him to a grizzled man, since, with a brave heart, he had gone 
courting the beautiful Lucia Ferro, very daring in his aspiration 
towards the daughter of a proud family. Being as we know an 
emotional Italian, with a big, generous heart, he may in that 
moment of meeting, have been filled with a great remorse for that 

xxxii. 




to 






O 
to 

3 

O 



a: 



ai 



A Biographical Sketch 

long separation from his wife and family, a great and surging regret 
for that long loneliness which had been his fate, in spite of many 
who called themselves his friends. 

And the young man, how did he meet his father, whose very 
face was unknown to him ? Perhaps with first a swift look of 
surprise at this snuffy old man, with hands stained by his etching 
acid, and with shoulders rounded by long hours and stooping over 
his plates : a swift glance followed by graceful and easy words, 
expressing respect, and hoping that he might share the labours and 
the home of his new-found father. 

All this of course is guess work, yet some such scene must 
have taken place. We know for certain that Gaetano did take up 
his dwelling for a time with the elder Bartolozzi, and it is certain 
that he became one of his father's pupils. Possessing a natural 
talent for art — it was in his blood — he studied his father's methods 
of engraving, and if his diligence had been equal to his ability, he 
might have achieved success. Even if he had done the " hack- 
work," as it were, of engraving the plates, having his father to put 
in the delicate effects of shading, and so give that magic touch of 
his which transformed the work of all his pupils, the young man 
would have earned more than board wages, for the demand for this 
style of print was in excess of all possible supply. But Gaetano 
had no staying power. Though the few plates of his that have 
been recognised reveal considerable talent, he did not really 
establish himself as an engraver. The elder Bartolozzi now 
started him on a business career, which gave him a chance of 
making a fine fortune. He established him as a print-publisher 
in premises at Great Titchfield Street, under the style of 
F. Bartolozzi & Co., and Gaetano produced from this place many 
of his father's engravings. It has already been mentioned how 
Alderman Boydell founded a magnificent business which still exists 
under the name of Graves & Co. There was no reason why 
Gaetano Bartolozzi should not have obtained an equal prosperity. 
He not only had the " first call " upon his father's work, for which 
there was a steadily increasing demand, but he had, at once, a 
unique connection with the other eminent engravers of the day, 
many of whom had been his father's pupils, and all of whom had 

xxxiii, 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 

the greatest reverence for the name of Bartolozzi. But both 
father and son lacked the qualities which go to make artistic 
success. It has already been mentioned that the elder Bartolozzi 
was often financially embarrassed in spite of his success, and his 
money, like that of the proverbial school-boy, burnt holes in his 
pocket. Gaetano inherited the same failing. Instead of attending 
strictly to his shop he was too much charmed with the society in 
which he found himself in London owing to his father's position. 
Gay hours with congenial companions, the encouragement to waste 
his time fiddling in drawing-rooms, where his musical talent 
brought him praise and flattery, naturally proved more to his taste 
than the time spent in his little publishing house at Great Titchfield 
Street. Then in May, 1795, he married a young lady with whom 
for a time he seemed perfectly matched in temperament. This was 
a Miss Jansen, the daughter of a well known dancing master at 
Aix-la-Chappelle. Like Bartolozzi, she was devoted to music, 
being a talented pupil of Clementia, the brilliant pianist, whose 
famous " exercises " have trained many other great pianists, and 
by the hands of amateurs tortured many poor souls. The marriage, 
however, was not altogether successful. One artistic temperament 
is generally enough in one household, and sometimes too much. 
Gaetano Bartolozzi was not induced by his new responsibilities to 
pay more attention to business, and owing to his ill-success, his wife 
had to give music lessons partly to support the little household. 

But Gaetano deserves more credit as a father than as an 
engraver, and he made the next generation his debtors by presenting 
them with two very beautiful women, one of whom delighted 
thousands of people by her grace. His daughter Lucy married 
Armand Vestris, the grandson of the famous dancer, who at Paris 
was called "La Dieu de la Danse." It was this daughter who 
became the celebrated Madame Vestris, and who afterwards, as 
the wife of Charles Matthews, the younger, appeared at the 
King's Theatre, Haymarket, and at the Theatre Royal, Drury 
Lane, and was admittedly one of the most talented actresses 
and opera-singers of the early nineteenth century. The second 
daughter, Josephine, became the wife of a public singer named 
Anderson, and was noted as one of the loveliest women of her day. 



A Biographical Sketch 

The mother of these two graces, the younger Bartolozzi's wife, 
was not so celebrated for beauty, though it is probable that in her 
young maiden days she was very charming. After her husband's 
death she returned to Calais, like poor Lady Hamilton, " Nelson's 
Emma," and passed the remaining years of her life there. 
According to a caricature of her at that time by a sister of George 
Cook the engraver, she was a fast woman who dressed in a loud 
and extravagant style. She is said to have been a very vain 
woman, who adopted artificial aids to beauty, and was inordinately 
proud of her small feet. 

To return to the career of Gaetano, it must be recorded 
that his lack of business instincts led to an inevitable result. In 
1797 he failed altogether, and his stock of plates, prints, and 
drawings was sold up at Christie's. In Tuer's book on Bartolozzi, 
the catalogue of this sale is reprinted as follows : 

"A Catalogue of the genuine and entire stock of capital and 
valuable Prints, Drawings and Copperplates (some of which have 
never been published), and a few pleasing Cabinet Pictures, the 
property of Mr. G. (Gaetano Stephen, Francesco Bartolozzi's son) 
Bartolozzi (retiring from business), comprising an extensive 
assemblage of Prints of the first impressions ; drawings by 
Cipriani and Bartolozzi ; and amongst the plates the celebrated 
one by N. Poussin, in the possession of the Marquis of Lansdowne ; 
a ditto, after the "Four Elements" of Albano ; and a capital 
engraving in strokes, after the celebrated picture of the " Madonna 
del Sacco," of A. del Sarto, at Florence, by Bartolozzi, lately 
finished, and it may truly be deemed the finest plate ever executed 
by that artist. Which will be sold by auction by Mr. Christie, at 
his great room in Pall Mall, on Friday, June 23rd, 1797, at 
12 o'clock." 

Tuer gives an interesting record of the prices obtained for 
some of these works. " At the sale," he says, " a great number 
of minor undescribed subjects by Bartolozzi were disposed of in 
lots from a couple to three dozen prints in each, and so far as can 
be judged realised good prices: some drawings, academy pictures 
by Cipriani and Bartolozzi, about a couple of shillings each ; and 
the original drawing of " Acis and Galatea," by Bartolozzi, brought 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A, 

ten guineas. A set of four — "The Elements" — after Albano, by 
F. Bartolozzi, brought seven guineas, an extraordinary high price, 
considering the times. Some copperplates by Francesco Bartolozzi, 
with the stock of engravings, coloured and plain, proofs and prints, 
realised in some cases remarkable prices, and from them may be 
gathered an idea of the relative estimation in which his works 
were held. A pair of copperplates, "Love" and "Innocence," 
corrected by Bartolozzi (the engraver's name is not given), with 
fifty-four plain impressions, and fourteen printed in colours, only 
brought £3 3s. A copperplate of " Princess Charlotte in the 
Cradle," after Cosway, with thirty-eight proofs, three etchings, 
thirty-four impressions, and twelve coloured ditto, brought 
£13 9s. 6d. The plate of an unfinished head, representing 
"Honour," after Cipriani, brought £3 8s. "The Holy Family," 
after the original picture by N. Poussin, in the collection of the 
Marquis of Lansdowne, with four etchings, ninety-three proofs 
(some with variations), forty-eight impressions, and one proof in 
colours — the only one taken off this plate, brought £130. The 
celebrated " Madonna del Sacco," of A. del Sarto, ornamented 
with a portrait of the painter, with a drawing by Fide, of Florence, 
and the finished proof, brought £350. The " Elements," after 
Albano (four plates), with one hundred and fifteen complete sets 
of etchings, twenty-eight odd ones, thirty-nine in colours, and the 
original drawings by F. Bartolozzi, highly finished in crayon and 
chalk, realised the extraordinarily high sum of £350." 

The account of this sale will read like a dream to modern print 
collectors who know the present prices obtained for Bartolozzi 
prints ! 

Gaetano, after this sale, which ended his business as a print 
publisher and engraver, went to Paris, where he opened an academy 
of music and fencing, which was moderately successful. So he 
passed the remainder of his days. 

In spite of the anxiety caused by his son's instability of 
character, Bartolozzi must have felt his departure keenly. The 
family of Gaetano, must have brought some sunshine and sweetness 
into a life rather lonely in its devotion to art. That he was not 
insusceptible to the tenderness of domesticity, and that his heart 

xxxvi. 





Bacchus and Ariadne. 



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.i'uhliih'J N0V-1V17H7 byVJ r.rt'KlS'S&N.Kr >] aver ^ewliond Street 



A Biographical Sketch 

was capable of a most gentle affection, is shown by a letter he 
wrote to his " beloved Signor Colnaghi," from North End, Fulham, 
in which he recommends to his care his " dear little girl " (probably 
one of his grand-daughters), whose departure, he says, causes him 
great grief, and from which he will probably suffer in his health, as 
he feels pain already at the thought of it. The letter is full of the 
most earnest solicitude for the welfare of this child ; and the great 
artist expresses as many wishes for her comfort, health and safety, 
as any mother for her first-born babe. 

" I pray you too, as earnestly as I know how," he writes, " to 
recommend her to the care of your friend Signor Gasperini, and to 
that of his good wife, so that they may guard her in every possible 
way, and give her up safe and sound to the arms of her parents, 
otherwise I should have the keenest heart-ache I ever endured." 
He is anxious that they shall give the little one no meat for supper, 
and as little butter as possible. He particularly trusts that they 
will keep sharp eyes upon her, for she is so lively that she might 
escape and be run over by carriages and Sedan chairs. " She must 
not go near a door, a thing which children are very fond of doing. 
Let them be careful not to allow her to sleep in damp beds. But 
I pray them besides, to keep her with that strictness to which she 
has always been accustomed — that is, not to allow all her little 
caprices, and to make her obey ; also to keep her in practice in 
French and in a little Italian, I know it is difficult to make her read 
on a journey, but in some intervals of travel it would give me great 
pleasure that she should not forget the little Italian that she has 
learnt ; and they will find that the child is good, but she must not 
be left to her own will." 

So he goes prattling on for all the world like an anxious parent. 
He reiterates the instruction that the child must have no meat in 
the evening, but be satisfied with good bread for supper. And he 
hopes they will not forget to make her say her prayers morning and 
evening, as she has been accustomed. To his friend, he suddenly 
brings himself to a halt, with an apology. " I think I hear you say, 
' Oh, what a fool ! ' But you are a father, and know what love for 
children is." It is one of the few letters of Bartolozzi's that have 
been preserved, and it reveals the kindliness of the engraver's 

xxxvii. 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A- 

nature, and his love for the little one. It deepens the mystery also 
concerning his married life, for this is not the letter of a selfish, 
ambitious man, who would have deserted wife and children for the 
sake of founding a fortune in a foreign land. At the time it was 
written however, he was an old man, and perhaps towards the end 
of his life he felt that need of loving and being loved which is not 
so essential to all men's happiness when they are in the strife and 
clash of existence. There are so few anecdotes recorded by his 
contemporaries that it is impossible to form an all-round estimate of 
Bartolozzi's character. One of the few goes to show that, in spite 
of the generous way in which he praised his fellow-craftsmen, 
he had at times a hasty temper which led him to violence of 
expression. It is related in his reminiscences of Henry Angelo, 
that the engraver named Gresse, worked in his youth for old Mr. 
Boydell, and that Bartolozzi improved his productions with his 
invincible hand. " This is likely enough, for that most ingenious 
and liberal engraver gave up half his time at least in rendering those 
important services to his friends. Bartolozzi had a great esteem 
for Gresse, who had been a favourite pupil of his estimable 
colleague, Cipriani. Indeed he lived with this painter for many 
years, and was a very close imitator of his style. Gresse had 
studied under other masters ; so many indeed that Bartolozzi, who 
was doing some professional service for a friend of Gresse's, 
unfortunately differed with the engraver, who, Italian like, was 
hasty, and Gresse harping on the word "style," he exclaimed 
"Cot-dam, Mister Gresse, hold your tongue; you have copy so 
many masters you have not left no styles at all." 

Bartolozzi suffered perhaps the greatest loss in his life by the 
death of his bosom friend, his fellow-pupil in the old days at 
Florence, and his continual collaborator in England, Giovanni 
Battista Cipriani. He died at Hammersmith on the 14th of 
December, 1785. Between those two men there had been the 
closest intimacy for many years, and the harmony of their ideas 
had produced one of the most perfectly successful partnerships in 
the history of art. Bartolozzi owed much to Cipriani. Cipriani 
owed much to Bartolozzi. It is difficult to say exactly where was 
the dividing line between design and execution. Their names will 



A Biographical Sketch 

be linked together as long as they are remembered, and as long as 
the prints bearing those two names are treasured by all who 
reverence the beauty of eighteenth century engravings. One little 
anecdote may be quoted, quite trivial in itself, yet interesting and 
amusing, because it shows these two men in a natural way, when 
they were both in the hey-day of their success. 

In the house occupied by Bartolozzi at North End, there was, 
we are told, a window of ground glass. " Stand still, Chip," said 
the engraver, as Cipriani was one day passing on the other side, 
and I will draw your portrait." The profile was drawn on the 
window pane, and then the other artist came into the room. 
" What, my portrait ! " he cried, " you have given me the air of a 
voluptuary," and he dashed his hand through the pane. But, as it 
happened, the face on the glass was not destroyed, and, according 
to Tuer, who tells the anecdote, it was afterwards the copy for 
an engraving of Cipriani's portrait. 

Doubtless the death of this good friend, and the departure from 
England of Gaetano and his family, had a depressing effect upon 
Bartolozzi's spirits. Loneliness closed in upon him, as old age 
crept closer also. Then, too, it is probable that his income was 
not so large as before. For a time he had been almost a monopolist 
in the art of stipple engraving, but he had trained a school of 
brilliant men who were now his rivals and competitors. Doubtless 
also his hand was not so quick, his enthusiasm not so keen, his 
industry not so great. Generous to all friends, ready to give his 
work to those whom he wished to favour or who asked a favour, 
careless of money, perhaps in spite of his great success a little 
sore that he had not received greater official recognition, perhaps 
also, with the pessimism of old age, believing at times that he had 
wasted his great talents in producing what, after all, was not 
great, original work, such as the masters of Italy had painted, he 
grew restless and discontented. The opportunity for plunging into 
a new sphere of activity, and of obtaining in his last years new 
laurels of renown, came to tempt him from England, after a 
residence here of thirty-eight years, and when he was seventy-five 
years old. It was an invitation, thrice repeated, from the Prince 
Regent of Portugal, to found a school of engraving at Lisbon. 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 

The promise was held out to him that he should receive a hand- 
some pension and the honour of knighthood. It was flattering to 
Bartolozzi's pride, and though naturally a modest man, he had 
the pride of an artist who expects, and is entitled to, recognition. 
After some hesitation, and probably against the advice of those 
many friends who loved and admired this master, and feared for 
his health as much as they lamented the prospect of his loss, 
he left England on November 2nd, 1802, never to return to the 
country of his adoption, the home of his long labours, and the 
nation whose artistic taste he had done so much to educate. 

His first words from Lisbon were of good cheer. "In this 
country," he wrote, " to which destiny in the evening of my mortal 
course has sent me, I have experienced from every one the most 
flattering reception. The cordiality and affability with which I 
have been treated by their distinguished noblemen have surpassed 
my most sanguine expectation. It is the more flattering to me, as 
for a series of years I have not been accustomed to such kindly 
behaviour from those I have looked up to as my patrons. I have 
had the honour of dining with some of the first personages at this 
place, and to-morrow I am invited, and shall be introduced to the 
Prime Minister. I am most perfectly contented, and hope to God 
I shall be able to show by my exertions, old as I am, my gratitude 
for the celebrity with which all my friends are pleased to distin- 
guish me." 

It is the letter of an old man, touched in his emotion by the pride 
of recognition for a life of labour in the cause of art. As an Italian 
he liked the outward show of homage, that warm and graceful 
compliment, which comes so readily from the Latin people, and which 
certainly adds to the warmth and sunshine of life. They made him 
a knight, and his title was not scorned by the artist though 
posterity has forgotten it. And though his Government salary as 
the head of the Lisbon School of Engraving was not more mag- 
nificent than £160, or so, a year, he could live on it in fair comfort. 
An English friend meeting him in Lisbon, expressed astonishment 
that he, who could make a thousand a year in England, should be 
content with such a beggarly wage in Portugal. 




SUMMER. 




A Biographical Sketch 

" Ha, ha ! " said the old man gaily, " In England I was always 
in debt for the honours showered on my talents, and I was quite 
tired of work. Here I go to Court, see the King, have many 
friends, and on my salary can keep my home and drink my wine. 
In London it would not allow me a jackass and a pot of porter." 
There is some truth in this comparison even now, for a man may 
"live like a lord" in many places on the Continent, having the 
respect of all who meet him, and many of the little luxuries of a 
life, whereas, on the same income in England he would have to live 
in a small street in a London suburb, with one servant to do his 
cooking badly, and no one in his neighbourhood, perhaps, to take 
the slightest interest in his individuality. 

It is said that in Lisbon Bartolozzi astounded his pupils, and 
Portugese artists generally, by his amazing industry, by his still 
perfect skill with the graver, and by the celerity of his work. But 
this activity could not, in the nature of things, last long. As he 
approached his eightieth year, his hand did at last lose something 
of its cunning ; his brain began to yield a little, and his memory 
to fail. An English friend called upon him at Lisbon in March, 
of 1814, and gives rather a pathetic account of him. He was still 
at work, bending over a large plate of the Duke of Wellington's 
head. But he was very feeble, physically, and so infirm, indeed, 
that he could hardly totter across the room. His mind, too, 
wandered during the conversation, and he could remember nothing 
whatever of important correspondence of recent date, which had 
previously reached him. He was then eighty-six years of age, and 
it was a gallant thing that the old man should still have been 
working at all. In a letter he wrote at this time there are some 
pathetic expressions of loneliness, of poverty, of feelings that he 
was neglected and forgotten. He talks about the infirmities of his 
advanced age which keep him from going out. " My legs being 
so feeble," he writes, " and the streets so bad, that I run the risk 
of falling any moment." He thanks a pupil of his (J. Minasi) for 
a letter which affords him great consolation, as it shows his cor- 
respondent keeps in remembrance " a poor old man already 
forgotten in the world, though you know that I have done a great 
deal, and that my humble performances have been borne with. 

xli. 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 

Now they are despised, but so it happens when one reaches the 
age of eighty-six years. Yet God gives me His grace to be able to 
continue to do something." 

He longs to get back to England, that good country where he 
worked so long, and laments that he has been prevented by his 
indifferent state of health, and want of strength. With a pessimism 
that was pardonable in the old master at his great age, he avers 
that he could have no expectation of obtaining employment there, 
especially as there were so many eminent men of his profession. 
It was perfectly true, of course. His day was done, and the 
younger men, whom he had trained, had come forward to take his 
place. Pitifully he goes on in this spirit of complaint and regret. 
" Some of the dealers, you well know, have made fortunes by my 
poor works — now there is no fortune to be made. Since, however, 
Divine Providence has wrought so great a miracle as to send us 
peace, let us hope that things will change in this respect also." 

He goes on to say how his son had been in hopes that if he 
(the father) returned to England, the Prince Regent would do 
something for him. But he does not trust to much hope. 

" I would nevertheless have sacrificed everything, with pleasure, 
to revisit that country, to which I owe such a debt of gratitude for 
the benefits that I have received from it, that will never be erased 
from my memory, and which I shall ever humbly pray to the 
Almighty to prosper as it deserves." 

Then, querulously, as old men will, he expressed his 
dissatisfaction again with his present condition. 

"Here at present," he writes, "we are destitute of every 
requisite in our profession ; gravers, varnish, tracing paper, and 
black for printing, are all very dear and very bad. I have engraved 
one of the views of Lisbon ; the copper furnished me resembled 
lead ; so that with a bad drawing and worse copper, I have made a 
wretched thing of it. Thus is an artist sacrificed ! " 

Too much has been made of this letter. Biographers, anxious to 
" make out a case," have heaped their indignation upon the 
ingratitude of England for thus leaving to die " in abject penury," 
a great genuis who had done more than any other man of his period 
to educate the English in art, and give a great tradition and 

xlii. 



A Biographical Sketch 

example to the school of engraving, and they have been equally 
wroth with " the treachery " of the Portugese in enticing this 
master to their shores and then leaving him to perish in want. 
But the truth is that such language is merely fantastic and absurd, 
biographers having taken a serious view of expressions used 
by an old man in his dotage. It is certain that Bartolozzi 
received until his death a Government pension, and it is probable 
that he added to his income by the sale of his prints. It is of 
course remarkable that a man of such genius, who had produced an 
enormous number of popular prints, should not have died worth a 
fortune. As he truly remarked, the fortune was made by his 
print-sellers, but that was due in no small degree to the artist's 
own carelessness and ignorance of business. Unfortunately the 
artistic temperament is always at the mercy of men of commerce, 
and it often happens now, as formerly, that the man who creates, 
gets but a poor share of the value of his work. Bartolozzi, in this, 
was as unfortunate as other artists and men of letters. But at 
least we need not have the discomfort of believing that so great a 
man died in actual want, or without those little luxuries which do 
much to sweeten the last days of an old man's life. He died at his 
house in the Travessa de Sunta Quiteria, Lisbon, on the 9th of 
March, 1815, aged 88 years, and was buried in the Chapel of 
Santa Isabel of that City. 

It must be admitted that the biographer of Bartolozzi has not 
a store of material from which to draw the thread of an interesting 
narrative, a few bold facts, the skeleton as it were, of his life's 
history, are known, three or four light anecdotes, a few character- 
istic traits — and that is all. It is strange indeed that a man who 
took such a leading position in the most popular art of the day, 
who had what was practically an atelier and school of art, who was 
the master of so many brilliant engravers, and the inspiration of 
many others, should have been left without a Boswell to describe 
his career and perpetuate his memory in reminiscences. The 
newspapers of the day frequently mention his name but do not 
enlighten one much as to the details of his career and private life. 
Thus, in The Morning Post of Saturday, June 18th, 1785, the 
following paragraph appears : 

xliii. 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 

" Mr. Bartolozzi gives the public notice to all gentlemen, 
artists, and others, to take care not to be imposed upon by a 
Foreign Woman as being an object of charity recommended by the 
said Bartolozzi, she having been already to the Royal Academy for 
the list of all the Academicians to impose on their humane disposi- 
tion under the said false recommendation, (signed, F. Bartolozzi)." 

In The Morning Post also of Monday, September 26th, 1785, we 
find the following item : 

" Bartolozzi has made considerable progress in his print of 
" The death of Chatham." The drawing was made by Cipriani, 
junior, and it is said to possess all the spirit of the original, in the 
exhibition of which Copley cleared £5,000." 

In The Morning Herald of Wednesday, February 7th, 1787, we 
find the following : 

" Bartolozzi is engaged to engrave the Duke of Norfolk's 
portrait by Gainsborough. He charges five hundred guineas for 
the plate." 

In The Oracle for Saturday, July 14th, 1792, a paragraph alludes 
to an illness of the engraver : 

" Bartolozzi, every lover of the Arts will rejoice to hear, is 
amending from a severe indisposition." 

Again in The Oracle of Thursday, February 21st, 1793, there is 
the following reference : 

" What a grateful triumph it must afford to such a man as 
Bartolozzi to see some of his works increase in price 1,000 per 
cent. . . . Fine first proofs of his "Death of Chatham" are now 
rarely to be had . . . they cost thirty guineas." 

Bartolozzi's acceptance of the invitation to take up his 
residence at Lisbon, and his subsequent departure are thus 
noticed : 

" Mr. Bartolozzi is invited by the Court of Portugal to reside 
at Lisbon on a pension, which the Queen has offered him." — 
Morning Post, Mon., Feb. 22, 1802. 

" Bartolozzi intends to make Portugal the seat of his future 
residence. His last chef-d'oeuvre was a portrait of Bonaparte." — 
Morning Post, Wed., Sep. 1, 1802. 

xliv. 



A Biographical Sketch 

" Mr. Bartolozzi leaves this country for Lisbon in a few weeks : 
this great man, in the graphic department, has not only amended 
the national taste, but has been the cause of adding to our revenue 
at least a million sterling. He is now nearly four score years old, 
and is invited by the Prince of Brazil to end his days in the 
Portugese capital on a pension." — Morning Post, Mon., Oct. 25, 1802. 

Such newspaper paragraphs as this are not very satisfying to 
the Bartolozzi enthusiast eager for every scrap of fact relating 
to his life, but they show that the engraver was a man of consider- 
able importance in public estimation, and that the newspapers, 
those barometers of public opinion, could not afford to ignore his 
presence in this country. 

Nevertheless, Bartolozzi's personal life and character are 
rather shadowy and obscured, and he lives now only in his work, 
those prints which are so eagerly sought after by collectors, at prices 
which would stagger the engraver himself, if his ghost appeared 
at Christie's. 

One must, of course, restrain his admiration of these engravings 
to avoid overestimating the genius of Bartolozzi. He had not 
the great, original power, and the profound imagination, of such a 
man as Diirer. His engravings from Cipriani's designs, and from 
his own designs, in a similar style, delightful as they are, have 
qualities of grace and tenderness rather than strength and vitality. 
He was, indeed, well called " The Engraver of the Graces." On 
the other hand, it would be most unfair to think that his genius 
was limited by his classical prettiness which so appealed to the 
hearts of maiden ladies with a love of fat little cherubs and beauti- 
ful creatures of luscious charms. In his renderings of the works 
of Italian masters like Guercino and Carracci, he had a boldness of 
stroke, and a perfect sympathy with the spirit of the originals, 
which show him to have been unfettered by any convinced 
mannerism. His portrait work, too, was extraordinarily expressive 
and sensitive. Again, his technique was not a mere mechanical 
dexterity or a series of brilliant tricks. His graver was always 
natural in its play, and his effects were obtained by a lightness of 
touch, a perfect discrimination in the handling of detail, a splendid 
skill of craftsmanship, and an intuitive sense of colour values 

xlv. 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 

expressed in black and white. He was always more than a mere 
copyist. Often he would not only reproduce the original, but improve 
upon it. Thus, when in a painting various details were suggested 
vaguely and indiscriminately, he would develope them for the 
purpose of the engraving, where this vagueness would be weak and 
unimpressive, with his most brilliant finish and originality. When 
reproducing the work of third-rate painters to the order of his 
publishers and printers he would invariably correct faulty drawing, 
and give a new meaning to the design. Even in his treatment of 
works after the first painters of the day he allowed himself liberties 
which were quite justified by success. Sir Joshua Reynolds, for 
instance, showing a print by Bartolozzi from one of his portraits, 
once said: "The hands in my picture were very slight, and now they 
are beautifully drawn and finished, Mr. Bartolozzi having made 
them what they really ought to be ; we are all much indebted to 
him." 

It was only from men swollen by their own conceit, or from 
critics eager to dig their talons into any reputation, that Bartolozzi 
was blamed for this method of altering or developing an original 
design. The majority of his contemporary artists recognised his 
superior genius, and his claim to originality. Robert Meadows, a 
talented stipple engraver, spoke on behalf of his fellow-craftsmen, 
when at a lecture at the Surrey Institution, in 1809, he said " By 
what epithet shall I do justice to the genius, taste, and fancy of 
that mighty master of grace, elegance, and beauty, Mr. Bartolozzi, 
whose high example during his long residence in this country 
contributed above all things to the improvement of British 
engraving ; and whose best works, being executed amongst us, 
and therefore considered as English prints, in no small degree 
enhance the reputation of British art from all the rest of Europe." 

After Bartolozzi's departure from England the print-sellers 
could hardly satisfy public demand for his work, and his reputation 
was so universally recognised that fraudulent members of the trade 
were tempted to pass off imitations of his style. One trick of these 
gentry was to sign spurious prints with the legend " Engraved by 
Bartolozzi," to cheat unwary customers into the belief that they 
were by the master of stipple engraving. 

xlvi. 



A Biographical Sketch 

Since that time his reputation has steadily increased, and his 
name stands pre-eminent among the stipple engravers of the 
eighteenth century, for although each of the many brilliant men 
who formed such a school of engraving in England as never existed 
in this country before or since, had special qualities which appeal 
to the Connoisseur, Bartolozzi's work has a joyousness, with 
exquisite delicacy, a chaste and classical beauty, a perfection of 
line and light, which distinguished him above all his fellows. 

One may sigh in vain for such works to-day. When one sees 
the multitude of cheap books, illustrated by photographs of no 
artistic value, one realises how much more beautiful and valuable 
were the publications in the days of our great-grandmothers, 
adorned with the designs of engravers who had such elegance and 
taste. The spread of cheap literature, and the advent of the 
picture postcard have not been to the advantage of national culture, 
and the decadence of engraving is one of the most lamentable 
things in modern art. The eighteenth century was the golden age 
of the English engravers ; and though he was an Italian, it cannot 
be denied that the work of Bartolozzi was one of the most 
supremely important influences in the English renaissance. 



xlvii. 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY. 

Although almost every Cyclopaedia and Handbook of general information, as 
well as every Dictionary of Artists and History of Engraving treats of 
Bartolozzi, surprisingly few authors have devoted monographs or even 
important magazine articles to him and his art. The encyclopaedic works generally 
draw upon their predecessors without troubling much to control facts or enlarge the 
information they offer. Among the older works of this class it is advisable to consult 
Fiorillo " Geschichte der Zeichnenden Kiinste," Vol. v., pag. 777 ; and the 2nd 
edition of G. Gori Gandellini " Notizie degli Intagliatori " Siena 8vo. : 1809, 
vol. vi., pp. 102 — 116. The classic, G. Nagler, " Kiinstler Lexikon " Munich : 8vo. : 
1835, Vol. I. pag. 298 — 299, is rather more brief than is his custom, and the " revived 
Nagler," viz. J. Meyer's " Kiinstler Lexikon" Leipzig : 8vo. : 1885, which stopped 
publication after its 3rd volume, treats Bartolozzi on pp. 74 — 7 of Vol. iii., allotting 
him comparatively little space. In Redgrave's " Dictionary of Artists of the 
English School " London : 8vo ; 1878, pp. 30 — 31, we find a fair account, but without 
any catalogue, whereas that in Portalis et Beraldi " Les Graveurs du i8me. 
Siecle " Paris : 8vo. : 1880, Vol. i., pp. 98 — 106 is superficial, like almost everything 
that the portentous Baron had a hand in. In Dr. Williamson's new edition of 
" Bryan " London : 8vo. : 1903, Vol. i., p. 91, the account is singularly unsatisfactory, 
being in fact left virtually the same as it appeared in the earlier editions of the 
sixties. One may cast a glance at Spooner " Biographical History of the Fine 
Arts," New York, 1865, Vol. i., p. 76, before turning to the only work of this kind 
that it really pays to consult, namely the 3rd Vol. of the " Dictionary of National 
Biography " London : 8vo. : 1885, where Ernest Radford writes up Bartolozzi on 
PP- 337 — 339- Upon the whole it may be said that Radford's estimate rather under- 
states Bartolozzi's importance ; we entertain at present perhaps a more generous 
view of the style of those days than he did nearly twenty-five years ago. 

I now enumerate some Magazine Articles : — 

"Gentleman's Magazine." — Vol. 57, p. 876; Vol. 72, pp. 1156 and 1221 ; 
Vol. 75, p. 794; Vol. 78, p. 1 1 16; Vol. 80, I., pp. 598 and 662 ; Vol. 83, 
I., p. 179; Vol. 88, I., p. 377; Vol. 88, II., p. 11 (according to 
Radford). 

Baron R. Portalis in the " Gazette des Beaux Arts," 1889, I., pp. 38 — 39 in 
a rather poor series of articles on " La gravure en couleurs." 

R. Artioli. — " F. Bartolozzi e la sua opera" in " La Bibliofila" 1899, I., p. 73. 

„ in " Emporium " 1889, fascicolo V. 

F. Hermanin in " Rivista d' Italia " 1899, fascicolo III. 

xlviti. 




The Fa i 



Bibliography 

Hodgson and Eaton in the " Art Journal " Vol. 42, p. 109, London, 1890, in a 
paper on the Original Members of the Royal Academy, with a portrait 
drawing of Bartolozzi, by Dance. (Other portraits, by the way, are 
enumerated in the J. Meyer " Lexikon " loc. cit). 

E. Mauceri in "L'Arte" 1899, pp. 119 — 120 in a report on a Bartolozzi 
exhibition held at the Print Room in Rome, with transcript of two 
autograph letters shewn there. 
E. Paton in " The Printseller " London : Vol. I., pp. 295 — 302. 
J. Grego in " Bartolozzi's tickets for the benefit of charitable institutions " in 
" The Connoisseur," London, Vol. III., pp. 245 — 249. 

Melchiorre Missirini is cited as the Italian Biographer of Bartolozzi. His 
works not being accessible to me at this moment, I am unable to say in which one 
of them his " eulogy" of Bartolozzi appears (" Elogi di Le Uomini illustri, etc.," Forli : 
4to : 1 840 ; " Degli illustri I taliani.etc," Siena : 8 vo : 1 838 ; " Del genio d' I talia dimostrato 
ne suoi famosi Artisti, etc.," Firenze : 8vo : 1841 ; "Celebrita Italiane nell' Archi- 
tettura e Pittura, etc.," Firenze: 8vo : 1847). The standard biography of Bartolozzi 
for the majority of his admirers, however, is doubtless Andrew W. Tuer's opulent 
two- volume publication of 218 and 158 pages which appeared in 1882 in London. 
The only later monograph that I am able to lay hands upon is Mr. S. Brinton's 
little 1 12 page volume in the Langham Series of Art Monographs, London : 8vo : 1904. 

Among the earliest catalogues of Bartolozzi's prints that in Gandellini's 
" Notizie " (see above) is pretty long, and arranged according to painters' names. 
The sale catalogue of the Molteno collection which was dispersed 1824, in 
London, is perhaps next in importance. Ch. Le Blanc, in his well-known 
"Manuel," Paris: 8vo: 1854, Vol. I., pp. 163-174, catalogues 700 numbers, 
Mr. Tuer in his 2nd volume over 2,000. But the latter gentleman likewise simply 
gives titles, without descriptions or even dimensions. Strangely enough some of 
the very plates that his book is illustrated with, are not enumerated in his list. 
Possibly this is amended in a 2nd edition which I have seen quoted as having 
appeared in 1885, though I have not come across the edition itself. 

I cannot close without the mention of two works, although they have not yet 

appeared but are only upon the eve of publication, because they promise to be the 

most important of all. The new " Allgemeines Lexikon der bildenden Kiinstler," 

edited by Dr. Thieme and Dr. Becker, of Leipzig, will make it possible to dispense 

with all previous encyclopaedic works, when the 2nd volume, containing Bartolozzi, 

which is to be issued early in 1908, has appeared. At the end of the article a 

carefully sifted bibliography will be inserted. Further, Sig. A. de Vesme, the 

author of the excellent " Peintre-Graveur Italien," which supplements Bartsch, 

has been for years at work upon a critical and thoroughly scientific catalogue of 

all the engraved work of Bartolozzi. This book is due in the course of the year 

1908, and promises to satisfy all the demands, in the direction of thoroughness and 

accuracy, which collectors can fairly raise. 

PROF. DR. HANS W. SINGER. 

xlix. 




YOUTH. 



Rd. Cosway, R.A., Pinxt. F. Bartolozzi, R.A., Sculp. 




G. B. Cipriani, Del 



P. Btutolvzzi, Sculf. 




Gainsborough Dupunt, Pinxt. 



F. Bartolozzi, R.A., HisloricalJCugraver to His Majesty. Sailpr. 1790. 
THE RIGHT HONBLE. WILLIAM PITT. 




M. Beneilitti, 1783. 



F. Bartolozzi, Sculp., R.A., Engraver to His Majesty, 1785. 
CATHERINE 11"., EMPRESS OF RUSSIA. 




K.' C-on*a*f -R-A dcO. 



si Portrait of a Lady 

in a Crcaan I)refs 




U 




Thos. Lawrence, Pitut. 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A., Sculpt. 



H.R.H. THE PRINCESS AMELIA. 




B. West, Inv. 1787, K.A. Etched by F. Bartolozsi, 1787. 

PAX ARTIUM NUTRIX. 




F. Bartoluzzi, Inv. anil Sculpr., 1791. 

GUARDIAN ANGELS, OR SILENCE. 



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G. Amicoui, Pinxt 



F. Bartolozzi, Sculpt. 



EUPHROSINE. 




G. B. Cipriani, K.A., Piuxt 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A., Sculpt. 



PSYCHE GOING TO BATHE. 




Sir Thomas Lawrence. 



F. Baitulozzi. 



MISS FARREN. 



10 




Jtu//i6?d wjs t/p>- 7-aj/t^4€i^Jtey9tou£j 




Sir Joshua Reynolds, PR. A., Pinxt. 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A., Sculpt. 



ANGELICA KAUI'FMAN. 



II 




Sir y. Reynolds, Pin.x. F. Bartolozzi, Sculp. 

THAIS. 



/ B. Cipiia 




R A., Sculpt. 



CHARITY. 



12 




G.U Cipriani, I lift 



F. Bartolozzi, Sculpt. 



AUTUMN. 




G. B. Cipriani, Invt 



F Bartolozzi. 



JUPITliR AND JUNO. 



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G. B. Cipriani, Del. 



F. Bartolozzi, Sculp. 



THE FAIR STUDENT. 



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Innocence taught hy love & Friendship. 




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Lady Diana Beanclerk. F. Bartolozzi, R.A. 

PORTRAIT OF ELIZABETH AND MARY BEAUCLERK. 



16 




F. Bartolozzi. 



THE DANCE. 





sir joshua reynolds's visiting card. 

By Bartolozzi. 



MRS. PARKER S VISITING CARD. 
By Bartolozzi. 



17 




Colibei t, Dclt 



Francesco Bartvlozzi,R.A.,Sitilf , t. 



ZEI'HYRUS. 




Colibert, Dclt 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A., Sculpt. 



FLORA. 



»9 




R. Coiway, R.A., Dcliut. 



20 



F. Bartolozzi, R.A., Sculpt. 



MARIA COSWAY. 



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^Ztzi-nZZtC- 1siss*&L-> 




G. B. Cipriani, R.A., Del. 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A., Sculpt. 



HEBE. 



21 




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25 




26 




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J. Hoppner, R.A., Pinxi. 



F. Bartolozzi, R.A., Sculpt. 



THE RIGHT HONBLE. LADY JANE DUNDAS. 



28 





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29 




F. Albano. 



F. Bartolozzi, Sculp. 



CUPID S MANUFACTORY. 





Gucrcino. 



F. Bartolozzi. Gucrcino. 



F. Bartolozzi. 



INFANT ST. JOHN. 



MOTHER AND CHILD. 




K) 






a. 









3' 




Ang. Kauffman, Pinx. 



F. Bartulozzi, Sculp. 





STERNE S " MAKIA OF MOULINES. 



THE GYPSY FORTUNE TELLER. 



32 




J.lt'/tt 



■ ■ 



JEa*$msvttl &p J* Ffirh'fnzrr 



CU7>IT>S. 




THE FAIR ARIADNE. 



F. Bartolozzi, R.A., Del it Sculpt. 
33 




THE .-BA.TLJL VAT-THE'MA¥SiOI- HOVSE.^. 
^' ■- : ; v. : ■ ..^--APRII,- XVII-^-DCCLXXV*; 

r' ■■■ ~ -' " " , - BIX 

TTHE RIGHT. HON, I OHM; WILKES, LORD, ABATOR 




MANSION HOUSE TICKET. 



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36 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A., Sculpt. 



MASTER PHILIP YORKE. 



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G. B. CIPRIANI, K.A. 



Pubd. as the Act directs, the 24 of Deer., 1785, by M. Bova, 
No. 105, Swallow Street. 



38 




Fr. Bartolozzi, R.A., ad vivum, Del. 

HIS GRACE THE DUKE OF MARLBOROUGH. 
Engraved by jf. Ogbonic, from a Drawing by F. Bartolozzi, R.A. 



39 




P. Bartotozzi, R.A., Sculpt. 
PASTORAL SUBJECT. 





W . Hamilton. F. Battolozzi. 

JOHN PHILIP KEMBLE. 



Saml. Shelley, Del. Francesco Bartotozzi, R.A., Sculpt. 

GEORGE, THIRD DUKE OF MARLBOROUGH, 
CAROLINE HIS DUCHESS AND CHILD. 




Raphael, Pinxt. Francesco Bartotozzi, R.A., Sculpt. 

MADONNA DEL PESCE. 



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F. Bartolozzi, Sculp., 1779. 



A NAIAD. 



42 




VENUS AND ADONIS. 



43 




BUSINESS CARD FOR WM. WILSON. 
By Bartolozzi. 




G. B. Cipriani, Inv. et Del. F. Bartolozsi, Sculp., 1773. 

ARIOSTO'S "ORLANDO FURIOSO." CANTO XXXV. STANZA XII. 



44 










C ' nolo >'/•// ' /yrS'(A)a,l6?uiiz/,f{A. 



'€is (AScJ u#*wi<ewJSL2 





/. ('• Cipriani, Delt., R.A. 



F. Bartolozzi, Sculpt. R.A., 
Ungraver to His Majesty. 



PSYCHS GOING TO DRESS, 



45 




F. Whcatley. 



P. liartoloizi. Sculpt. 



WINTER. 



46 




O B. Cipriani Inv. 



MATERNAL LOVE. 



F. Bartolozzi, Scul/>x. 



47 




R. Wcstall. 



/■'. Ilartolozzi, Sculpt. 



SPRING. 



48 




Revd. Mr, Peters, Pinxt. 



F. Bartolozzi, R.A., Sculpt. 



THE TRIUMPH OF VI%TUE. 




G. B Cipriani, Del. 



Francesco Burtolozzi, R.A., Sculpt. 



HERCULES AND OMl'HALE. 





Sir yosliua Reynolds, 
PR. A., Pinxt. 



Francesco Barlolozzi, 
R.A., Sculpt. 

VENUS CHIDING CUPID. 



F. Barlolozzi, R.A.'Invt., Belt, ami Sculpt. 
HOPE. 



49 




Angelica Kaiiffman 



F. Bartolozzi, Sculp. 



RINALDO AND ARM1DA. 



5° 




GRISELDA. 



51 




52 



HARRIET, VISCOUNTESS BULKELEY. 
Engraved by /•'. Bartolozzi, after K. Cosway ,R.A. 







Sportive Innocence 




R. Cosway, Inv., R.A 



F. Bartoloxzi, Sculps. 



DONALD AND JKSSIE. 



53 




Drawn by Larinia, Countess Spencer. 

HENRIETTA FRANCES, VISCOUNTESS DUNCANNON. 



h'r. Bartohzzi ; Etchd. 



54 




W. Hamilton, R.A ., Pinxt 



F. Bartuluzzi, R.A ., Sculpt. 



THE RT. HONBI.E ANNE COUNTESS COWPER. 



55 




G. B. Cipriani, Invt 



F. Bartoluzzi, Sculp. 



NYMPHS AT FOUNTAIN. 



56 




jj ST. JAMES'S BEJ1UTY. 



APPENDIX I. 



A List of Published Engravings 
by Bartolozzi. 



Admission Tickets : — 

Anacreontic Society : Lawrenson ; 3J X 4I 
Bach and Abel's Concert: Cipriani; 4J x 3 
Banti, Madame: Burney ; 5^ x 3f. 1795 
4 x 3i 
6 X 4i- 1797 
Bessborough, Countess of: Ball; 3} x 3 
Borghi Benefit, May II, 1789 : Cipriani; s., 3J x 4J 

,, May 21st : Cipriani; 3 1 x 4 

Concert of Ancient Music : N. Dance ; 5I x 4I 
Cox's Museum ; Rebecca; 5 x 3J. 1772 
Dragonetti's Benefit : Burney ; 5J x 4 
Fierville's Ball : 3J X 4J, oval 

„ Cipriani ; 3} x 3 
Giardini Benefit : ,, 4! x 4, oval 

>. (Comedy and Tragedy) 4J x 3} 
,, ,, ,, (Apollo and the Muses) 5 x 4J 

,, „ ,, (Mercury Inventing the Lyre) 

4x5 
,, ,, (Apollo Crowned) 4 j" circle 

,, .. .1 (Triumph of Venus) 3! x 4^ 

,, ,, „ (Apollo and Pan) 4J x 4 

,, ,, ,, (Cupid inspiring Sappho) 

3j x 4L 1780 
„ ,, ,, (Female and twoCupids)4" circle 

three „ 3 f X 3J 
,, ,, ,, (Male and Female running) 

5i x 5 
,, „ ,, (Maleand Female running with 

Dogs) 4 J x 3J 
Guadagni ,, ,, same design 
Guildhall Banquet : 8 x 10}. 1763 
Hanover Square Masquerade : Cipriani ; 4 x 4 
„ Concert, 1788 ; ,, 3 x 2f 
1789: .. 34 x 2J 
1790: .. 3i x 2J 
1793 : ,. 3 x 2j 
1791- 4 x 3}, 
Jones Benefit : Cipriani ; 2! x 2} 
Legard Benefit : A. Kauffman, 1781 ; 7 x 5! , oval 
Mansion House Dinner : Cipriani, 1775 ; 8 x 7! 
,, ,, Ball ,, 1796; same design 

,. ,, ,, Hamilton, 1791 ; 5| X 4 

New Club Masked Ball : Cipriani, 1775 ; -j\ x 10J 
Pacchierotti Benefit : Burney ; 3 x 2J 
Ranelagh Mosque : 1776, Cipriani ; 4 x 5} 

,, Regatta Ball : 1775, Cipriani ; 8 x 6} 
Reynolds's, Sir J., Funeral : Burney; 6J x 5 
Royal Cumberland Freemasons' School: Stothard; 

s> 4? x 3 J, oval 
St. Margaret's Church : 1794, Smirk ; 5J x 7 
Salomon Benefit: 1794, Rebecca; 3| x 2 \ 



Salpietro Benefit (Music) : s , 4 x 5, oval 
1785, Cipriani ; 3| x 2| 
,, ,, Bartolozzi; 4J x 3|, 1773 

,, ,, Vieira; 4I x 4^ 

Savoia Benefit : Cipriani ; s., 3j x 4I 
Scavoir-Vivre : 1775, Cipriani ; 4 x 54 
Shane's Castle Masquerade : ,, 4$ x 5 J, oval 
Subscription Ball, Hickford's Rooms, 1795: 35 x 2J 
Tenducci Benefit Cipriani ; 4j x 4 
Walker's Lectures : Hamilton ; 35 x 5 
Wynnstay Theatre: Bunbury ; s., 5 x 6J oval 
Abercrombie, Sir Ralph : J. Hoppner ; s., 10 x 10J 
Abington, Mrs., as " Thalia" : R. Cosway ; s., 7J x 9J. 

1783 
Achilles and Briseis : Burney ; line, 2J x 4J 
Adam and Eve : see Milton 
Addison, J : G. Kneller ; line, 2§ x 4! 
Adelaide in the Gardens of Bagnieres: Bunbury ; stipple 

c.p. ; circle I2in. 1785 
Adelaide or the Shepherdess of the Alps : Cipriani ; s. , 

10J x 13J, bistre. 1784 
Admiral, Portrait of : A. Poggi ; s., 14 x 18. 1788 
Admiration : P. Violet; s., 3J x 3!, bistre. 1797 
Adoration (The) : Piazzetta; line, 2§ x 4J. Companion 

to the Assumption 
Adoration of the Magi : G. F. Barbieri ; s., i6i x 11 
iEmilius Paulus with her Children : Kauffman ; s., 

18 x 1 4 J, bistre 
Avarice, Charity, Devotion, Sacriledge (four on one 

plate) : W. Hamilton ; s., 7 x 9. 1780 
Amelia, Princess: Lawrence; s., 5J x 6J; pub. 

line only. 1790 
Amelia, Princess : Lawrence ; s. 5J x 6J ; fully 

lettered, pub. 1792 
Amoret and Britomart : Opie; s., 13! x I7f, blk. 
Angel Gabriel : see Gabriel 

Angelica and Medora : Cipriani ; stipple, nj x 9; B.M. 
3 states 
1st with names of a. and e. and pub. line 1787 
2nd, the same with title added 
3rd, with figures 47 above title 
Angelica appearing to Sacripant : Ang. Kauffman ; line, 

4i x 5J. 1783 
Angelic Child: Robinson; s., 2 x 2J, oval. B.M., 2 
states 

1st with names of a. and e. and pub. line 1790 
2nd with the same, with e.l.t. and dedication 
Antinoiis : s., 2 J x 3, oval 
Antony and Cleopatra, Act 5, Sc. 2 : Moreau le jeune ; 

s., 3x5. 1786 
Antony and Cleopatra : H. Tresham ; etching, 16J X II. 
1794 



57 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 



LIST OF PUBLISHED ENGRAVINGS— continued. 



Annunciation (The) : Dom Zampieri ; this is composed 

of the prints " Angel Gabriel," and " Virgin in kneeling 

posture." B.M. has impressions both on one sheet, 

and separately 
Apollo holding a Lyre: G. B. Cipriani; s., 3 x 3S, 

oval, red. 
Ariadne : G. B. Cipriani ; e., 8J x gf . 1788 

in Naxos : s., 6| x 8, blk. 
Assumption of the Holy Virgin : Piazzetta ; line, 2f x 4! 
Ascension, The : Jacobus Guarana ; line, 17 x 18 
As You Like It : Rosalind : Ang. Kauffman, s., 3J x 4, 

oval. 1781 
As You Like It: Colia: Ang. Kauffman, s., 3J x 4, oval. 

1781 
Ash, John : Sir Joshua Reynolds ; s., 13J x 22. London, 

published March 1st, 1791, by E. Walker & Co., and 

J. Tomkins 
Ashburton, Lord: Sir Joshua Reynolds ; s., 13J x i6f. 

1790 
Athanasius, Saint : Dom Zampieri ; Nic. Vanni del ; 

line, 6x11 
Atalanta and Hippomanes : B. Luti ; line, 9J x 14}, 

pub. by Read, 1791 
Atalanta and Hippomanes : B. Luti ; line, gj x 14J, 

pub. by T. Bradford, Fleet Street, excudit 1st July, 

1763 
Auld Robin Gray: Bunbury ; 1783, stipple, 11J" circle, 

brown 
Autumn : R. Westal ; s., 6J x 7J, bistre. 1790 
Autumn : Cipriani (Girl with cup and staff), s., 3J x 4J, 

oval, brown 
Autumn : Cipriani (Girl with grapes) ; s., 3 J x 4J, oval, 

bistre. 1782 

Bach, J. C. : A. Carlini ; line, 8 x 13. 1782 
Bacchanalian Children : M.Franceschini; line, 15J x ioj 

,, Group : C. Cignani ; e., 9f x 7J 

Bacchante (with cup in hand) : s., 12J" circle. 1799 

,, Bartolozzi ; s., o x 7J, oval, red 
Bacchantes : Kauffman ; s., 12" circle, bistre 
Bacchus (Head of) : Stothard ; line, 2|" circle. 1796 
Bacchus, as a Child seated astride a Barrel : e., 3J x 3J, 
B.M., 2 states 

1st " etch'd by Bartolozzi, 1796 " 
2nd " engraved by R. H. Cromek, pupil of Franc. 
Bartolozzi, R.A." 
Bacchus and Ariadne : Cipriani ; s., 5J x 4J. 1787 
Baldwin, Mrs. : see Portrait of a Lady in Grecian Dress 
Barbieri, G. F. : line ; 9J x nj. 1764 
Baronagium Genealogicium (Edmonson's), Front to 

Vol. v. : Cipriani ; 9J x 16J 
Bathing Machines and Figures : A. Pasquin ; e., 3J x 2 J 
Beauclerk.Daughtersof Lady Diana : Lady D. Beauclerk ; 

s. and e., n x 10J. 1780 
Beauty : G. B. Cipriani ; s., 5 x 6J, oval, in red. 1783 
Beauty Charmed by Music : Kauffman (1804) ; 7 x 5J, 
oval, same design as Legard Ticket 



Beckford, Mr., Private Plate for: Cipriani 15x7} 
Beggar's Opera (The), Illus. to : Ibbetson ; line, 3J x 5J. 

1791 
Bellamy, George Anne; Coates and Ramberg ; s., 

2| x 3f, oval. 1785 
Bell's Poets, Title Pages :— 

To Churchill's Poems: Cipriani; s. and e., 2JX4. 1779 

To Hammond's Poems: Ang. Kauffman; s. and e., 
2} x 4J. 1781 
Bembo, Cardinal: Titian; s., 5J x 7J, title PetrusBembus 
Besborough, Countess of : Lavinia, Countess Spencer ; 

e., 8J x 11J. 1787 
Bingham, Lady Anne : Reynolds; s., 6} x 8J, bistre 
Blair, Dr. Hugh: Raeburn ; s., 10 x 12J. 1802 
Blind Man's Buff: A. Kauffman; e., 11 x 10. 1784. 

' Angelica ' spelt ' Angchia ' 
Benevolent Lady (The) : J. T. Barralet ; Plate engraved 

with Morris, 12 X 15J. 1780 
Berettini Pietro : Medallion supported by Time, who is 

striking down Envy : C. Maratti ; line, nf x 17 
Boat rushing over a Waterfall : line, 8} x 5! 
Book Plate : Sir Foster Cunliffe, Bart ; 3} x 3$ 
Borghi's Six Overtures, Title page to : etching, 7} x 10. 

1787 
Borghi's Six Solos, Title page to : Cipriani ; etching, 

7f x 10J. 1783 
Boy Sleeping: E. Sirani ; line, 11J x 8£ 

,, Guercino ; s., 7! x 8, bistre. 1798 

Bride of Otaheite (Woman with huge skirt) ; e., 7 x 8| 
BritanniarewardingMusicand Literature ; W. Hamilton ; 

s., 8J" circle. 1792 
Bromley's Fine Arts, Front to : see Pax Artium Nutrix 
Brunton Miss : R. Cosway ; s., 2} x 3J, oval 
Buffett the Bear: s., 8 x 6J ; oval, bistre, 1794 
Bulkeley, Viscountess : R. Cosway; s., 7 x 9J, bistre 
Burghersh, Lord : Reynolds; s., 7$ x gj, o.l.t. 1788 
Burney, Charles: Reynolds; s., 6 x 7J. 1784 
" But Ah ! let pity turn her dewy eyes " : R. L. West ; 

e., 5J x 4J. 1801 
Bute, Countess of : Romney ; s., 7J x gf 

Cajetanus, Saint: line, 9J x n| 
Camden, Earl : Gainsborough ; Dupont ; s., 13J x 17 
Capell, Edward : Roubilliac; s., 4J" circle. 1759 
Caractacus : W. Hamilton ; s., 14I x n|, blk. 1788 
Caroline, Princess of Wales and Princess Charlotte : s., 

5j x 9 
Cathcart, Lady J. : A. Callot ; s., 6 x 7 J, oval, in red 
Catherine de Ricci, Saint, in prayer: A. D. Gabbiani ; 

Plate for " Cento Pensieri," line, 5$ x 8J. 1791 
Catherine II., Empress of Russia: M. Benedetti ; s., 

9J x 14I. 1785 
Cecilia : T. Engleheart ; s., 3 x 3}, oval, red. 1783 

„ Saint: B. West; s., 3$ x n\, oval. B.M., 

2 states 

1st, with publication line. 1783 
2nd, ,, ,, i7 8 4 



List of Published Engravings 



LIST OF PUBLISHED ENGRAVINGS— continued. 



Celadon and Amelia: Hamilton; s., 10 x 13, blk. 1794 
Cephalus and Aurora: P.daCartona; line, 16} x lof.blk. 
Cephalus and Procris : Cipriani, Marcuard, sculp. 

Bartolozri, direc. ; s., 5J x 4J, oval 
Ceres : s.c.p,, 8j( x 10 
Chamberlain's Imitations : see under titles 
Chambers, A Dissertation on Oriental Gardening, Title 

page to : Cipriani ; e., 6 x 4! . 1772 
Charity ; H. Ramberg ; line, 3 X 5J. 1788 
Charles I., before the Execution : s., 17J x 14I 
Charlotte and Werter : Charlotte sitting with her Sisters ; 

stipple, nf" circle. 1783, bistre 
Charlotte, Queen : Beechey ; s., 12 x 17J, bistre 
Cherubins : Bartolozzi; s., nj x 7$. 1792 
Chesterfield, Earl of : Bartolozzi ; line, 3f" circle 
Child asleep on a Basket : Barbieri ; e., 9J x 7 
Child interfering with a Cockfight: s., 3 J x 5, oval, 

bistre 
Child pointing to a Tablet covered with drawings of ears : 

Bartolozzi; e., 4 J x 3 J 
Children (two, giving a third a ride by means of crossed 

hands) : s., 5J x 6f, bistre. 1791 
Child Sleeping ? The Silence : s., 7J x 6, bistre 
Child Sleeping (with title " Beauteous emblem of 

sweetest innocence) : s., 7 x 8J, bistre. 1786 
Child Stringing Leaves : Lady D. Beauclerk ; s., 5 J x 4 J, 

bistre, 1796 
Child with Cat in her Arms : s., 3J x 5, oval, red 
Children Fighting: Cipriani; io| x 8J, bistre, 1787 
Children at Play (three boys with a goat) : s., 7" circle, red 
,, (seven ,, and sleeping satyr.) : 

M. Franceschini ; I5§ x iof . 1765 
Chryseis restored to her Father: G. B. Cipriani; s., 

14J x 11 J, oval. 1786 
Churchill's Poems, Title page to : see Bell's Poets 
Cicero : Cipriani ; line, 4J" x 6J 1780 
Cignani, Carlo : Medallion with Time and Two Lovers 

beneath ; C. Maratti ; line, 10J x 16 
Cipriani, G. B. : s., 5J x 6J, oval. 1785 
Cipriani's Rudiments of Drawing : all s., 11 x 7$, Title. 
1786 
I., Ears. II., Feet. III., Hands and Feet. IV., 
Two Girls and an Old Man. V., Four Curly 
Headed Youths, one with wings. VI., Eyes. 
VII., Three Cupids, one with a cup. VIII., 
Hands. 
Clypeus Votivus : line, 7" circle. 1794 
Clytie : A. Caracci ; line, 16J" circle, 1772, Cabinet 

picture of J. Strange 
Cobbett : Smith, J. R. ; s., 8J x 9i, blk. 1801 
Colia ; see As You Like It 
Comedy : Cipriani ; (Small Oval, half length figure), s., 

3J x 4, blk. 1784 
Comedy: Cipriani; (Group of 5 figures), s., oj x II, 

bistre. 1788 
Comedy of Errors, Act 5, Sc. 1.: Hamilton; line, 
3i x si- 1785 



Composition : A. Kauffman ; s., 10J x gj, oval, blk. 

1787 
Conjugal Love : G. B. Cipriani ; s., 8| x 7 
Contentment: Cipriani; s., 6J x 7 J, red. 1782 
Cook, Capt. J. : Webber ; s., 3} x 4I, bistre. 1784 
Cordelia : Ang. Kauffman; s., 10J x 12J, oval. 1784, 

brown 
Coriolanus: A. Kauffman; s., 17 x 13I, oval, bistre. 1785 
Cornelia, Mother of the Gracchi: A. Kauffman; s., 

14! x nj. 1788 
Cornelia, Mother of the Gracchi : B. West ; 5J x 4J, 

oval. 1783 
Cornwallis, Marquis of : Hamilton, H. D. ; s., 2J x 3}, 

oval, red. 1781 
Cosway, Maria: R. Cosway ; s., 5J x 8J 
Country Girl Going Reaping : F. Wheatley ; s., 8 x 10J, 

bistre. 1797 
CoutinhoD. Rodrigo de Sousa : Siqueira; s., 5x9. 1812 
Cowper, Countess : W. Hamilton ; s., 5 x 6, oval 
Cowper : Lawrence ; s., 7 x 9, o.l. title and 4 line verse, 

bistre. 1805 
Cox, Lt. Col. : Hounsom, G. ; s., 8J x 12J, blk. 1799 
Crouch, Mrs. : Romney ; s., 6J x 8, bistre 
Cupid with wand and ball : s., 2 x 2g, oval. 1785 
,, ,, bow, club and lion's skin : s., 2 x a§, oval. 

1785 
Cupid with harp, seated on a lion : s., 3§ x 3J, oval, 

1785 
Cupid making his bow : Corregio ; s., 9} x 13}. 1785 
Cupid shooting his arrow : line, 9J x 12} 
Cupidon achettd trop cher : J. Tturts ; s., 7J x 5J, oval, 

1786 
Cupid bending his bow : M. Franceschini ; line, 

6j x 9j 
Cupid and Psyche : Lavinia, Countess Spencer ; line, 

4x6, oval. 1792. This is 1442 in Tuer's list, 

Cupid binding an Amulet on the Arm of Beauty 
Cupid and Psyche (cupid with torch): s., 7J x 8^. ; 

pub. by Boydell. 1789 
Cupid and Psyche : s., 7J x 6, oval ; pub. by Humphreys 
Cupids with an Anvil (? Cupid's Forge) : s., 3!" circle 
Cupid's Manufactory: F. Albani ; s., 14J x 10J, oval. 

1800 
Cupid Sleeping on Woman's Lap, another Cupid nearby: 

Kauffman ; s., 5 J x 4J, oval 
Cupid Unveiling the face of a Sleeping Female : Cipriani ; 

s., 7f x 6J, oval 
Cupid with a Mirror : 4J x 5J, oval. 1794 
Cupids at Play: G. B. Cipriani; s., 7^" circle. 1773, 

in red 
Cupids (three) one with Wreath of Flowers : Lady D. 

Beauclerk; s., 7J" circle 
Cupid with Torch, leaning on Pedestal with book : 

Ramberg ; e., 2} x 2. 1788 
Cupid with Torch and Laurel Crown: Ramberg; e., 

3 x 2f. 1788 
Cupids (four) one sleeping : Cipriani ; e., g x 6f . 1787 



59 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 



LIST OF PUBLISHED ENGRAVINGS -continued. 



Cupids (four) with a Lamb: Simone de Pesaro ; s., 

!3f x 9i. re d- 1770 
Cupids (three) one has hold of others, hair : Lady D. 

Beauclerk ; s., 5 J x 6f 
Cymbeline : Imogen's Chamber: W. Marten; 1786, s., 

13 x 8|, bistre 
Cyrillus, Saint : D. Zampieri ; N. Vanni del, line, 6 x 11 



Dorset, Marchioness of : Holbein ; s.c.p., 9 x I2§. 

1793 

Duncannon, Henrietta, Frances Viscountess; Lavinia 

Countess Spencer ; e., 8J X 11 J 
Dundas, Lady Jane : Hoppner ; s., 6| x 8J, blk 
Dunning, John: Sir Joshua Reynolds ; s., 6£ x 8, oval. 

1787 



D' Ageno : Gainsborough ; s., 3 x 4! , bistre 

Da' 1' esca un picciol, &c. : Zucarelli ; line, 17^ x 12} 

Damascenus, Saint : D. Zampieri ; N. Vanni del, line, 

6 x 11 
Damon and Delia : Ang. Kauffman ; stipple, 6 x 7J, 

oval. 1780, bistre 
Damon and Musidora : Ang. Kauffman ; stipple, 6J x 7§, 

oval. 1782, red 
Damon and Musidora: Opie ; stipple, 13J x 17J. 1796 
Dance (The) : H. Bunbury ; s., u£ x 12J 
Death of Cleopatra : G. B. Cipriani ; line, 10 x 7}. 

1787 
Death of Clorinda : Ang. Kauffman; 1785, stipple, 

6J x 7j, oval, bistre 
Death of Cora; H. Ramberg ; 1788, stipple, 6J x 7}, 

oval, brown 
Death of the Stag : see Diana Hunting the Stag. No. 3 
Death of St. Francis : Cigoli ; line, 3! x 5J 
Death of St. Justine : L. Giordano ; line, 12J x 20J 
Death of Queen Eleanor: W. Martin; s., 15 x 11J, 

bistre 
" Delightful Task to rear the tender thought " (Illus. to 

Thomson's Season's) : Guercino ; stipple, oval, 

7l x 9i' re ^ 
Deserted Village (The) : F. Wheatley ; s., 17J x 14, 

red 
Design : Ang. Kauffman ; s. , 10J x 9, oval, bistre. 1787 
Devonshire, Duchess of : see Foster and Georgiana 
Diana and Endymion : s., 9} x 13, blk 
Diana Hunting the Stag ; Gabbiani ; line, 15J x 12J, 
oval, B.M., 3 states 

1st, names of a. and e., and ded. in italics, ending 

Niccolo Pagni ; d.d.d., blk 
2nd, names of a. and e., and different ded., ending 

Jgn. Hugford ; d.d.d., bistre 
3rd, names of a. and e., title : " The Death of the 
Stag," and pub. line. 1791, bistre 
Diana preparing for Hunting : G. B. Cipriani ; line, 

4j x 6 
Dido : Cipriani ; line, 17J x 13. 1778 
Dimond, W. and Miss Wallis as " Romeo and Juliet" : 

C. Shirriff ; s., 5 J x 7J, oval 
Diploma of Royal Academy : — 
Cipriani ; line, 6x3} 

„ 17J x uj, top half 
,, 17J x 13 lower 
,, ,, 17J X 24J, complete 

Donald and Jessie : R. Cosway ; s., 7J X 9 
Doralice : s.c.p., 7 x 8|, oval 1777 



Eagle Killing a Man : Carigiasi ; e., 8 x 5J, oval 
Edward, Prince (Heroism of) : Cipriani ; s., 14J x 10J, 

bistre. 1789 
Egerton, John, Bishop of Durham : Gausett ; s., 

3| X 4§ , oval, with arms below 
Elements, The. Earth, Air, Fire and Water ; G. B. 

Cipriani ; s., set of 4, each, 6x8, oval 
Elizabeth, Queen of Edward IV., surrendering her son, 

the Duke of York: G. B. Cipriania; s., 15 x 11. 

1786 
Elizabeth, Philippine Marie, Helene de France, s., 

2 J x 3, oval 
Elliott, T, Knight : Holbein ; s., 8 x io|. 1794, 

bistre 
Elliott, T. Knight : Holbein ; the same with name in 

open letters on the print 
Erato: s.c.p., 5$ x 7J, oval. 1779 
Essex, Earl of: Oliver; s., 3I x 4j. 1791 
Euler, Leonhard : Darbes ; s., 45 X 5J, oval, bistre 
Euphrosine : G. Amiconi ; s., 9J X nf, oval. 1784 
Eurydice : A. Kauffman; s., 10J x 12J, oval. 1790 
Eve and the Serpent : see Milton 
Eyre, Miss, with Dog: Cosway; s. and e., 3 x 4§. 

1778 



Faery Elves : see Milton 

Fair Alsatian: Kauffman ; s., jj x 7J, oval, red, title; 

spelt ' Alsacien.' (1779) 
Fair Student (The) : G. B. Cipriani ; s., 7$ x 9J 
Faith: s., 3 x 4J, oval, bistre 

,, Cipriani; s., 6} x 5$, oval 
Family Praying : Barbieri ; De Pinacotheca Gen- 

nariorum, e., 15J x 10L 1784 
Fancy's Sweetest Child: A. Kauffman; s., 10 x 12J, 

oval, blk. 1782 
Farren, Elizabeth, Countess of Derby : Lawrence ; 

commenced by Knight, and finished by Bartolozzi ; 

s., 12J x I7J. 1791 
Faun: Cipriani: s., 8 x 12J. 1787 
Female Bust to right : A. Kauffman ; s., 5J x 6f , oval. 

1779 
Female Head to left, draped: G. Hussey; s., 3J x 5, 

oval. 1775 
Female Head to left, draped ; G. Hussey ; s., 3f x 5, 

oval. 1776 
Female sitting, looking at a picture which a Cupid is 

showing her. Cupid with torch behind her: s., 

7 x 5li bistre 



60 



List of Published Engravings 



LIST OF PUBLISHED ENGRAVINGS— continued. 



Female sitting at table, with books and basket : Chin- 

nery ; s., 6 x 7J 
Female with Lamp held over fire: A. Kauffman ; s., 

8| x uj, oval. 1783 
Females (two) sitting before a drawing board, sup- 
ported by a Cupid : Cipriani ; e., 10J x 8|. 1788 
Females (five) bathing: Cipriani; s., 10J x 8 J. 1767 
,, and Cupids asleep beneath a tent : Cipriani ; 

e., n x 9. 1787 
Fitzgibbon, Lord: Cosway, R. ; s., 4J x 5, oval. 1790 
Flanders, Jane, Countess of Mountford, assembling the 

inhabitants of Rennes : Rigaud;s., 14J x 11J, 1789 
Flight into Egypt : C. Maratti ; P. Violet, del., s., 

13J x 16J, bistre. 1797 
Flora : Ang. Kauffman (Illus. to Thomson's Seasons) ; 

s., 10J x 12, oval, blk 
Flora : Colibert ; s., 5J x 7J, oval, bistre. 1788 
Foote, Samuel; e. ,4 x 3. 1778 
Foote's Elegy on Death : Title page to " Weep, Thaly, 

Weep"; etching, 4x3. 1778 
Foreign Nobleman with band across shoulder and 

flowing wig : Pellegrini; s., 11 x 13, bistre. 1793 
Foster, Lady Elizabeth, Duchess of Devonshire : 

Reynolds ; s., 6| x 8. 1787 
Fothergill, Dr. : Livesay ; s., 3 x 4, oval, red. 1782 
Francis de Sales, St., beating down Heresy : J. Amiconi ; 

line, 12J x 20J 
Francis, Saint, praying for Sinners : J. a. S. Joannes; 

line, 18J x 13 
Francis, Saint, restoring a Woman's Eyesight : J. a. S. 

Joannes ; line, 17J X 12J 
Freemasons' Hall : Cipriani and Sandby ; line, 7J x 8} 
Friendship: G. B. Cipriani; s., 6 x 7$, red. 1782. 

B.M. also has state with title and pub. line only 



Gabriel (Angel) : D. Zampieri, Nic. Vanni, del ; line, 
8J x 8. This is a pair with " Virgin in kneeling 
posture " 
Gabriel (Angel) : G. B. Cipriani ; s., 3J x 4}, oval. 1776 
Gardens (The) : by Mrs. Montolieu, 1805 ; Illustra- 
tions to — 

Front., after Portoensis ; 7x3 

,, to Canto 2 ,, 6J x 4j 
Tailpiece ,, 2, Bartolozzi ; 3J x 3J 
Front, to Canto 3, Portoensis ; 6 x 3} 
Tailpiece to ,, 3, Bartolozzi ; 3} x 3 
4. ., 3j X 2j 

Galatea (Metastasio's) : G. B. Cipriani ; 3J x 5J. 1783 
Gate of Heaven : see Milton 
Gay : see Beggar's Opera 

Genius and Beauty : G. B. Cipriani ; s., 7 x 9. 1782 

George III., Medallion Portrait on a cloud surrounded 

by Cupids with Britannia, Lion and Assassin 

beneath : Part by Collins remainder by Corbould ; 

s., 14I x igj. 1802 

George, Prince of Wales : P. Violet ; s., 3" circle. 1791 



Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire : Lady D. Beauclerk ; 

s. and e., 7 X 6J. 
Georgiana, Countess Spencer: Gainsborough; s., 

4x5, oval 
Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire : Nixon ; s., 3 x 4, 

oval. 1783 
Geography : Cipriani ; s., 7 x 8}, bistre. 1789 
Girl in a Turban : Bartolozzi; s., 7} x n. 1780 
Girl looking upwards, half length : Cipriani ; Dedicated 

to W. Lock, 1772 ; s., 9" circle 
Girl and Kitten, The: Reynolds; s., 7 x 8J. B.M. 
2 states 

1st with name of a. and e. and pub. line, 1787, bistre 

2nd with o.l. t. and quotation from Dryden added, 

colours 

Girl reading letter and Playing with Dog ; e., 3 x 4, blk. 

Girl before a Mirror: A. Kauffman; s., 5J x 7J, oval. 

1793 
Girl pouring water into a Shell : J. F. Rigaud ; s., 

5i x 6i' bistre 
Good Samaritan, The : E. Edwards ; delin. line, 2§" circle 
Gozzi, Gasparo : A Frontispiece ; Vanezia ; 1758; line, 

4 x 4 j 
Graves, Thomas Lord : Northcote ; s., 13J x 17 
Gray's Elegy ; Illus. to : I. B. Cipriani ; 1782 ; etching, 

5i x 74 
Grey, Lady Jane : W. Martin; s., 15 x 11 J, bistre 
Gregorius Nazianzenus, Saint : Dom Zampieri ; 

Nicolaus Vanni, del ; line, 6x11 
Gregorius Nyssenus, Saint : Dom Zampieri ; Nicolaus 

Vanni, del ; line, 6xn 
Griselda : A. Kauffman; s., 10 x 13, oval, blk. 1784 
returning to her Father; s., 8J x 10J, oval, 
red. 1784 
Griselda and Gualtherus ; s., 8J x 10J, oval, red. 1784 
The above are subjects from Boccaccio's Story of 
Griselda 
Group of Men and Women inside a Temple Dancing ; 

13 x 8J 
Guercino : — Engravings from the original drawings of 
Guercino, in the collection of His Majesty. 2 vols. 
Volume I. Eighty-two Prints — 
Banditti quarrelling ; 12 x 8 
Companion to the preceding; 11J x 8j 
Boy with a Lamb ; 9J x 8J 
Circumcision, The ; 7J x 10 
Concert, A ; 16 x 11 
Cupid, with a Dart ; 6f x 6£ 
Eight Heads, Men and Women ; 10 x 7J 
Five Boys Playing ; 10J x 7j 
Flora, with a Boy ; 10 x 8 
Flora, with Boys; 11} x 9} 
Four Women, with a Boy ; 10J x 7 
Guercino's Daughters; s., 9J x 12, oval. 1772. 
B.M. 2 states 

1st 9J x 12, oval, title in one line, blk. 
2nd gj x n, title in two lines, red 
Lady, Boy, and two Old Men 



61 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 



LIST OF PUBLISHED 

Guercino :— Engravings from Volume I.— continued. 
Male Portrait with Shoulders draped ; 6J x 8 
Naked Woman lying down with a Child ; 8J x 6J 
Old Man Weeping ; 7J x 10J 
Old Man, Woman, and a Boy, with a Model of a 

Town; 6J X 10J. 1764 
Pope with a Book ; 7 x o| 
Portrait of a Lady ; 7J x o£ 
Portrait with a long Beard; 9$ x 11J 
Portrait of Guercino 
Portrait of a Woman ; 6J x 8f 
Portrait of a Young Man ; 7$ x 9 
Queen Esther and Ahasuerus ; nj x 8f 
Sacrifice, A ; 15J x 10J 
St. Jerome; gf x n J 
St. John in the Wilderness ; 7j x gf 
St. John with a Cross ; 10J x 8J 
St. John Writing ; 7J x 9 

St. Matthew, with an Angel and Book ; 154 x iof 
St. Paul Reading ; 8 x io| 
Salvator Mundi with Globe and Cross ; 9 x 8| 
Sibyl with a Book ; 10J x 12 
Sophonisba with a Bowl ; 8 x 9 
The Almighty in the Clouds, with two Boy Angels ; 

7 | x 8J 
Three Women, with a Boy lying down ; nj x 8 
Three Women, with a Palette and Sketch of a Design ; 

i5i x 9f 

Turkish Woman Reading ; 8J x 8J 

Two Boys ; 8 x iof 

Two Men Playing on a Guitar and Singing ; 11J X 9 

Virgin and Child holding a Book ; 6J x 9! 

Virgin, Infant, and Joseph, with an Angel playing on 

a Violin; i6J x 10J 
Virgin, Infant, and St. John ; 8 x io£ 
Virgin Mary, Joseph, and Child with a Globe ; 11 X 8J 
Virgin teaching the Infant Jesus ; gj x 7 
Vocal Concert ; 12 x 7f 
Warrior with a Truncheon ; gj x 1 1 
Woman and two Boys ; 5 x 6 
Woman on her knees with a Child ; 8 x 9 
Woman with a Book ; 7 x 9 

Ditto, with naked shoulders ; 8J x 6f 
Woman with a Turban ; 7J X 8J 
Young Man with a Boy, and a Boy in the Clouds ; 

7 x 10 
Young Woman in a thoughtful attitude ; 6J x 7! 

All the above are etchings unless otherwise described. 

Volume II. Seventy-three prints — 
Boys Dancing ; e., 12 x 7! 
Boys with Garlands of Flowers ; s., 114 x 6J 
Boys Pressing Grapes; s., nfc X 7I 
Cupid and Psyche with Dart; s., g.J x 6 
Flora with a Cupid : s., 8J x 9* 
Peter and Paul ; s., gj x 10J 
St. Matthew ; s., g£ x nj 



ENGRAVINGS— continued. 

Gunnin, Miss: Saunders; s., 2J x 3J, oval 
Guy, Thomas : Bacon ; line, iof x 19 

Hamlet. Hamlet and His Mother: Hamilton; s., 

6J x 8J, oval. 1786 
Hamlet. Ophelia: J. Nixon; s., 3j x 4J, oval. 1784 

,, ,, Tresham ; line, i6f x 11 

Hammond, Louisa, writing a letter: Kauffman, 1781 ; 

s.c.p., 10 X I2| 
Hammond's Poems, Title page to : see Bell's Poets 
Handel Composing : Cipriani ; e., 6J x 7f . 1784 

,, Cipriani; line, iof X 16 
Hands, Studies of: Bartolozzi; s., 11J x 7j,blk. 1792 
Happy Meeting (The) : Gurney Gilpin, Plate engraved 

with Morris; line, 12J x 15J. 1780 
Hardwicke, Lord Chancellor : W. Gardiner; s., 5I x 6J, 

blk. I7gg 
Harrington, Countess of, and Children : Reynolds ; 

s., g x 11$. i78g 
Harris, James : Bartolozzi ; 4J x 6J. 1766 
Hatred, Love, Moderation, Fury (4 on one plate) : 

W. Hamilton; e., 7 x g. i77g 
Haydn: s., sf x 6J, oval 
"He was wounded for our Transgressions": Guido; 

s.c.p., 14 x 17J. 1802 
Head of a Youth, with turban, full face: L. da Vinci; 

s., 5 x 7|, blk. 
Head of a Youth, curly hair, profile: L. da Vinci; s., 

6 x 8 J, red. 
Head of a Youth, curly hair, profile: L. da Vinci ; s., 
6 x 8J, blk., with names of a. and e. and pub. line. 
1796 
Hebe: G. B. Cipriani; s., 34 x 4$, oval, pub. line. 

1782 
Hebe : G. B. Cipriani ; the same, with pub. line. i7gg 
,, ,, s., g x 11J. i7gi 

Ang. Kauffman; s., 5J x 6J, oval. 1782 
Hector and Andromache : G. B. Cipriani ; oval, 

10J x 13, bistre. 1786 
Henderson, Mr., as " Iago " : Stuart ; s., 3§ x 4J, oval 
Henry VI. of England : Sherwin ; gj x 174 
Henry and Emma: Opie ; s., 13J x 17J, blk. 
Henry VIII. : Holbein; s„ n| x 7J. 1800 
Hercules and Omphale : G. B. Cipriani ; s., 5J x 4J 
Hercules assisting Dejanira to take her Seat on the 

back of Charon : L. P. Lugduneus ; line, 11 J x 15 
Hermaphrodite: Cipriani; s., 8 x 12J. 1787 
Heroism of Prince Edward : see Edward 
Hieronymus : H. Constantini ; 6£ x 8f 
History: G. B. Cipriani; s., 7J X 5}. 1782 

s., 7j x s, oval. 1786 
The above two are the same design. 
History: Bartolozzi, I7g2 ; 3 x 34, oval. I7g3 
Holbein's Heads : see under titles 
Holbein, Hans: s., 15 J x 20, bistre 
Holbein's Wife : Holbein ; s., 13J x 20J, bistre. I7g8 
Holy Family : A. D. Gabbiani ; e., 13 x 10 



List of Published Engravings 



LIST OF PUBLISHED ENGRAVINGS— continued. 



Holy Family : B. Luti ; line, n x 7J 
Holy Virgin and Infant Jesus : Barbieri ; e., 7J x 7J 
,, Infant Jesus, St. John at the door : Carlo 

Maratti ; e., 7 x 10. 1785 
Holy Virgin, Infant Jesus, an Angel and St. Joseph : 

Barbieri ; e., 15 x 10 
Holy Virgin, Infant Jesus, and St. Anne: Barbieri; e., 

9l X ii| 
Holy Virgin, Infant Jesus, and St. John: A. Carracci ; 

line, 19J x I4j 
Holy Virgin, Infant Jesus, and St. Joseph : Barbieri ; 

e., 10J x 14J 
Holy Virgin, Infant Jesus, St. Jerome, Mary Magdalene 

and an Angel : A. Allegri ; line, 10 x 12^ 

From a picture in the Dresden Museum known as 

"Night." The plate left unfinished by Bartolozzi, 

who commenced it at the age of 85, was finished after 

his death by H. C. Muller. 
Homer: J. Brown; s., 7$ x 10, oval. 1788 
Hope : s., 4J x 5J, oval, bistre. 1794, single figure 

,, Cipriani ; s., 7 x 5J, oval, bistre. 1784, 3 figures 
Howard "On Prisons," Illus. to: 1780; etching, 

5i x 6| 



" I have laid the Foundation, etc." : Cipriani ; etching, 

3i x 5i 
II Ruggerio : see R. 
II Mercurio Italico : see M. 
Infant John the Baptist : Barbieri ; e., ioj x 14 
Innocence taking Refuge in the Arms of Justice : L. E. 

Le Brun ; s., 16J x 13. 1782 
Invention : A. Kauffman ; s., 10J x 9J, oval, bistre. 

1787 



Jacob returning to his Father's House : B. Castiglione ; 

line, 15J x 10J 
Joan of Arc : R. Westal ; s., 17J x I2J, blk. 1792 
John Nepomucene, Saint, in heaven : F. Riviera ; line, 

10J x 15J 
John the Evangelist, Saint: Barbieri; e., 6J x 9 
Johnson, Samuel : line, circle, 4I". 1785 
Jonah : B. West ; Title-page to an oratorio, line, 5§ x 7J 
Joseph and Elizabeth of Spain : J. Z. Florentius ; line, 

7 x 8} 
Judgment of Britannia : H. Richter ; stipple, i8| x 13J, 

bistre 
Judgment of Paris : G. B. Cipriani ; stipple, 7J x 5j, 

oval, bistre. 1785 
Judgment of Paris : Burney ; 1790, 6^X4! 

,, ,, : A. Kauffman ; s., 17 x 13^, oval 

Jupiter and Europa : Guido Reni ; s., lof x 13J, 

bistre. 1771 
Jupiter and Io : Correggio ; s., 9! x 13^, red 

,, and Juno : Cipriani ; s., 6£ x 5J, oval. 1784 
Jupiter Dodonaeus: G. Hussey ; s., 5 x 6|, oval. 1774 



Justice and Peace : 3 x 2J, oval 

Juvenis ascultans Seni de divinis admonenti (My son 

attend unto my wisdom, etc.. Proverbs, Chap. 5) : 

Pellogrini Tibaldi, del. ; line, 12 x 16 



Kauffman, Angelica : Reynolds ; s, 8 x gj, oval. 1780, 

red 
Kemble, J. P., as " Richard III." : Hamilton, W. ; s., 

16 x 22. 1764 
Kilwarden, Lord: Hamilton, H.; 9 X IX, 1800 
King, Capt. James : Webber ; s., 3I x 4J, bistre. 1784 
King Lear (Lear and Cordelia) : etching, i6| x 11J 
King Lear : see also Cordelia 
Kingston, Duchess of : Cosway ; S., 2§ X 3! , oval ; red. 

1781 
Kippis, Andrew : W. Artaud ; s.c.p., 9x11 



Lady and Child : Salsa Ferrata ; 5J x 7J. B.M. 1767 

Landscapes : — 

View of a Castle, river in foreground ; 10 x 7J 
after Poussin : figure fording a stream ; 9J x 6f 
,, P. de Cortona : mountainous scene ; 13 x 8|. 

i7 6 3 
after A. Caracci : men bathing ; 19J x 14 
,, Clerisseau : Interior of Castle, three figures in 
foreground ; 6J x 7f . 1783 
after Clerisseau : Exterior of Castle, figures and 

animals in foreground ; 8f x 5J. 1783 
after Clerisseau : Interior of Castle, figures and 

animals in the foreground ; 8f x 5J. 1783 
after Clerisseau : Ruins of Castle, three men to 

left; 8f x 7£ 
after Zocchi : Boar hunt ; 16J x 15 
,, ,, Stag and hounds ; 16J x 15 

,, Claude: e, 7} x 5|, dedicated to Mr. Hudson 
Lauretta: Loutherbourg, figures only by B. ; 12J" 

circle 
Lavinia : Gainsborough ; s., 13! x 18, blk. 
Lazzarini Domenico ; 4 x 4J, oval 
Lear and Cordelia : see King Lear 
Lenox, Mrs. A. : Reynolds; s., 3I x 4I, 1792 
Lesbia : Reynolds; s., 6J x 8J, bistre, and also in cols. 

1788 
Liberty seated on a globe, holding olive branch, staff 

and cap of liberty ; 8J x 9 
Lodona: M. Cosway, 1792; stipple, 17J x 14. B.M, 
two states. 

1st, title in open letter, blk, 
2nd, title in closed letters, bistre. 
Loughborough, Lord: Northcote ; e. ands., 13 x 16J 
Love Rejected : s., 44 x 3$, oval, in red 
Lovelace in Prison : I. F. Rigaud ; s., 12J x 10J, oval 
Lovely Berenice was now fourteen, &c. (The) : 

Hamilton ; 4! x 6J. 1799 
Lucy of Leinster : Bunbury ; s., 18 x 13! 



63 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 



LIST OF PUBLISHED 
Luke, Saint, painting the Virgin : Simon Cantarini ; 

line, 7} x of 
Lunardi, Vincent : R. Cosway ; s., 4 x 4}, bistre. B.M. 

2 states. 

1st with names of a. and e., and pub. line. Oct. 

4th, 1784 
2nd with title, ded, and e.t. added, and pub. line. 
October 5th, 1784 

M, : Agrippa ; s., 3i" circle 

Macbeth, Act 1, Sc. 2 : de Loutherbourg ; 3} x $\. 1784 

same print with title spelt ' Mackbeth ' 
Macklin's Poets' Gallery : see The Deserted Village 
Madonna and Child : s., 5" circle 

,, Carlo Dolci ; line, 6 x 7$. 1769 

Madonna : Carlo Dolci ; Cabinet picture, Clotworthy 

Upton, line, 4x6 
Madonna della Seggliola : Raphael Zanzio ; s., 7J" circle. 
B.M, 3 states, 

1st s. in blk., Raffael pines ; F. Bartolozzi, del. and 

sculp. Pub. 1st April, 1773 
2nd s. in red. Pub. April 15th, 1778 
3rd s. in red, Raffael pinx ; F. Bartolozzi sculp. Pub. 
1st May, 1778 
Madonna del Sacco : Andrea Vannechi ; line. B.M. 
2 states. 1797 

1st picture only, 23 x n J, semi-circular 
2nd with portrait below. 1797. 
Madonna with the Fish : Raphael ; G. B. Cipriani, del. 

line, 7x9 
Magnus Basilius : Dom Zampieri ; N. Vanni, del., line, 

6 x 11 
Maggi, M. M. : B. Rebecca ; s.. 3f x 4I oval, 1788 
Malone, E. : Reynolds; s., 2} x 3i 
Mallet, Title page to : A. Kauffman ; line, 2J x 4 
Man in Act of Execution : Guercino ; e, ioj x I4i 
Man of Easter Island : W. Hodges ; line, 7 x 8|. 1777 
Mansfield, Earl of: Reynolds; s., 13 x iOf. 1786 
Marc Antony ; s., 3J" circle 
Marie Antoinette ; s., 2J x 3, oval 
Margaret's Tomb : Bunbury ; stipple, 17I x 14 blk. 
Market of Love : s„ 8} x 7 

Marlborough, Duke of, and Family : Shelley ; s., 3 J x 4 
Marlborough Gems : 1789-90; 2 vols. 
Front, to Vol. 1 : Cipriani; 8| x 11 
Plate I. Publius Scipio Africanus : s., 2§ x 3|. 

oval 
Plate II. Lucius Cornelius Sylla : s., fl| x 3$, 

oval 
Plate III. Julius Caesar : 2} x 3$, oval 

,, IV. Marcus Junius Brutus : 2} x 3|, oval 
V. ,, ,, ■• w i'h caduceus: 

s., 2| X 3£, oval 
Plate VI. Lepidus : 2J x 3J, oval 

,, VII. Augustus, crowned, to right : 2J x 3J, 
oval 
Plate VIII. Augustus, crowned, full face : 3J x 3}, 
oval 



ENGRAVINGS— continued. 

Plate IX. Marcellus, son of Octavia : 1} x 2§, 

oval 
Plate X. Livia and Tiberius : s., 3I X 3J 
,, XI. Tiberius : s., 2| x 3j, oval 
,, XII. Germanicus: 2§ x 3 J 
,, XIII. Agrippina, wife of Germanicus, 2j x 3J, 
oval 
Plate XIV. Agrippina as " Ceres" : 3i x 4J, oval 
„ XV. Galba, to right : s., 2$ x 3f, oval 
,, XVI. Galba, to left : s., 2} x 2J, oval 
,, XVII. Nerva, full face : s., 2$ x 3$ 
,, XVIII. Nerva, to left : 2J x 3S, oval 
,, XIX. Marciana : 3§ x 4J, oval 
„ XX. Sabina : z\ X 2f , oval 
„ XXL Antinous : 2 x 2$, oval 
,, XXII. Caracalla, full face: s., 4 £ x 5|, oval 
,, XXIII. Caracalla, to left: s., 2f x 2J, oval 
,, XXIV. Julia Domna : s„ 2j x 3i, oval 
,, XXV. Laocoon : 2J x 3^, oval 
,, XXVI. Semiramis : 2§ x 25, oval 
,, XXVII. Minerva Alcida : s., 3§ x 4$, oval 
,, XXVIII. Phocion: s., 2g x 2 J, oval 
„ XXIX. Jupiter and Juno : s., 3$ x 3J, oval 
,, XXX. Venus: s.. 2J x 2J, circle 
,, XXXI. Bacchante : s., 2J x 3J, oval 
,, XXXII. Hercules Bibax : 3J x 5, oval 
,, XXXIII. Bacchus: 3§ x 4J, oval 
,, XXXIV. Faun: 4 | circle 
,, XXXV. Athlete: 4! x 5f, oval 
,, XXXVI. Mercury : s., 3i x 5|, oval 
,, XXXVII. Mars : 3§ X 4§, oval 
„ XXXVIII. Soldier descending a rock, 3J x 4$, 
oval 
Plate XXXIX. Diomedes and Ulysses : si X 4|, 
,, XL. Marine Deities: s., 5 J X 5, oval 
,, XLI. Wounded Soldiers : 3 J x 3|, oval 
„ XLIL Soldier defending Comrade : s.,4fx 3} 
oval 
Plate XLIII. Woman and Girl Walking : s., 

3i x 54. oval 
Plate XLIV. Faun teaching child to play the 

Flute : s., 2f x 4i, oval 
Plate XLV. Alexander The Great ; 2J x 4I, oval 
,, XLVI. iEneas Saved by Apollo: 6 J x 6, 
oval 
Plate XLVII. Festival in Honour of Victory : s., 

2| x 6 
Plate XLVIII. Dying Amazon : 3} x 3|, oval 

XLIX. Festival in honour of Bacchus : 
5| X 4 
Plate L. Marriage of Cupid and Psyche : s., 

6x5, oval 
Frontispiece to Vol. II. : Cipriani ; 8} x 11J 
Plate LI. Ptolomacus : 2§ x 3^, oval 
,, LII. Metrodorus: s., 3J x 4i. ° val 
,, LIII. Socrates and Plato : s., 3$ x 3, oval 
,, LIV. Alexander the Great : s., 2| x 3i 



64 



List of Published Engravings 



LIST OF PUBLISHED ENGRAVINGS— continued. 



Marlborough Gems : — Continued. 

Plate LV. Sappho : 3J x 4J, oval 
,, LVI. Phryne : s., 2f x 3J, oval 
,, LVII. Pyrrhus : s., 3 x 3}, oval 
„ LVIII. Unknown Head, to right : s, 3J x 4, 
oval 
Plate LIX. Unknown Head, full face : s., 2$ x ]j 
,, LX. Medusa, to left: s., 2J x 2§, oval 
,, LXI. Medusa, full face : s., 3| x 3! 
,, LXII. Minerva : s., 2f x 3§, oval 
,, LXIII. Bacchus: s., 2| x 3§, oval 
,, LXIV. Goddess Libera : s., 3J x 3$, oval 
,, LXV. Bacchante: s., 2g x 3, oval 
„ LXVI. Mercury : s,, 2J x 2J 
,, LXVII. Isis : s., 2$ x 4J, oval 
,, LXVIII. Hercules, and Iole : s.,each, 3x3!, 
oval 
Plate LXIX. Lucius Junius Brutus : s., 2J X3§,oval 
Plate LXX. Hannibal : 2J x 3J, oval 

„ LXXI. Lucius Cornelius Sylla: s., 3J x 3J, 
oval 
Plate LXXII. Mecsenas: s., 2j x 3§, oval 

,, LXXIII. Marcus Agrippa : s., 2| x 3$, oval 
,, LXXIV. Livia Drusilla : s., 2| X 3§, oval 
,, LXXV. Drusus, son of Tiberius : s.,2§X3j, 
oval 
Plate LXXVI. Drusus, son of Germanicus : s., 

2J x 3j, oval 
Plate LXXVII. Antonia or Agrippina : s., 2§ x 3§, 

oval 
Plate LXXVIII. Domitia or Julia : s., 3J x 3J 
„ LXXIX. Hadrian : s., 2| x 3J, oval 
,, LXXX. Antinoiis : s., 2J x 3J, oval 
,, LXXXI. Unknown Head : s., 2f x 3|, oval 
„ LXXXII. Lucilla: s., 2j x 3 
,, LXXXIII. Didius Julianus Augustus and 
Manlia Scintilla Augusta : s., 5| x 4|, 
Plate LXXXIV. The Dog Sirius : s., 2| x 3g, oval 
„ LXXXV. Cows : 3J x 3|, oval 
,, LXXXVI. Horses : 4 x 3i, oval 
,, LXXXVII. Lion Killing a Bull : s.. 3§ x 2$. 
oval 
Plate LXXXVIII. Temple of Mercury : 4} x 5, 

oval 
Plate LXXXIX. Emperor Vanquishing an Enemy : 

3§ x 3j. oval 
Plate XC. Apollo and Coronis : 48 x 5$, oval 
,, XCI. Cupids: 3§ x 3|, oval 
,, XCII. Ganymede: s., 3J x 4J, oval 
,, XCIII. Ganymede and the Eagle : s., 
2J x 2J, circle 
Plate XCIV. Hercules Strangling a Lion : s., 

ij x 2§, oval 
Plate XCV. Faun : s., 3I x 4$, oval 
,, XCVI. Omphale : s., 3J x 4J, oval 
,, XCVII. A Triumph : s., 4 x 3J, oval 
,, XCVIII. Biga, fragment : 5J x 3j, oval 



Plate XCIX. Biga, restored : s., 6 x 4 J, oval 

,, C. Silenus, Tiger, &c. : 5 x 4 J 
Tailpiece to Vol. 2., 5 x 4J. 
Martial, Title page to : Cipriani ; 3! x 6J. 1783 
Maternal Love : G. B. Cipriani ; s., 8| x nj 
Mary Queen of Scots : s., 4J x 5J. 1797 

with her Son : Zucchero ; 
10J x 15}, 1779 
Mason's Ode to a Water Nymph, Illus. to : see A Naiad 
Mater Dolorosa, with five Cherubim's Faces : line, 

6f x 10J. 1808 
Matilda, The Empress, and Queen of Stephen : Rigaud, 
s., 15 x 11J, B.M., 3 states 

1st, names of a. and e. and pub. line. 2nd March,i789 
2nd, the same with title and ded. added 
3rd, the same with title and ded., but pub. line, 
dated 4th May, 1803 
Maty, M. : s., circle 4J" 
Measure for Measure, Act 4, Sc. 3 : de Loutherburg ; 

3x5 
Medal, Design for a: E. Edwards; 2 ins. ob. inscr., 

s-eculi felicit, rev. ins., VICISSIT TEMP 
Medea : Cipriani ; 8J x 9, 1787 
" Me, me adsum," &c. : Vieira ; etching, 3} x 5J 
Memoirs of Thomas Hollis, 1770, Allegorical Title-Page : 

Cipriani ; 6} X 9! 
Memorial Card of James Thompson : s., 8 x 10 

11 ,. by Lady D. Beauclerk : s., 8J x nj, 

1796 

Mercurio Italico (II.) : Burney ; e., 4J x 3f. 1789, 
B.M., 2 states 

1st, p.b. title 

2nd, with o.l. title and quotation from Lucretius 
Mercury inventing the Seven-stringed Lyre : line, 

4 x 5j 
Mercury instructing Cupid : B. Luti ; s., 3i x 2J 
Merry Wives of Windsor, Act 3, Sc. 3 : P. J. de 

Loutherbourg 13x5. 1785 
Metastasio's Galatea : see Galatea 
Milton's Paradise Lost, Illus. to : Hamilton : — 

Eve and the Serpent : 3J x 4J 

Adam and Eve : 3J x 4$ 

Adam and Eve reclining : 3J x 4J 
Milton's Paradise Lost, Illus. to ; Stothard : — 

Faery Elves : s., 6 x 5. 1792, bistre 

The Morning Hymn : s., 8| x 6J. 1796, bistre 

Satan : s., 8£ x 4. 1792, bistre 

Satan : s., 10 x 5. 1793, black 

Adam and Eve, with Angel: s., loj x 5. 1793, 
bistre 

Morning (unpublished) : s., 10J x 5J, bistre 

Uriel, on a Sunbeam: s., 6f x 5 

Pandemonium : s., 10J x 5. 1792 

Sin and Death : s., 6} x 5. 1792 

The Gate of Heaven : s., 7 x 5J. 1793 
Minerva Visiting the Muses: G. B. Cipriani; line, 
«7i x 4i- I777i B.M., has a state with o.l.t. 

MlNERUA VlSSITING THE MUSES 



65 



Francesco Barto/ozzi, R.A. 



LIST OF PUBLISHED 

Miranda : see The Tempest 

Monkey on a Man's shoulder (Georgian Scene) : T. 

Mortimer ; line, 3J x 5J 
Montague, Mrs. : Reynolds; s., 3! x 4I. 1791 
Montelicus, Enchanted Plant, Front to : line, 4} x 7 
Months, The : G. Zocchi ; set of 12, i6J x I2f 
Monument to the Woodmason Children : C. R. Ryley ; 

4} x 6. Pub. 1798. Note : Republished, 1825 
Monument to Lord Chatham : J. Bacon ; etching, 

7i x 12J. 1779 
Moore, Title Pages to : Rebecca ; line, 2§ x 4J. 1782 
Morning : see Milton 
Morning Hymn : see Milton 

Mortal che sei ? un nulla: Ramberg ; 1788, 3 x ft. 
Mother and Child : Cipriani ; e. , 5 J x 7. 1768 
Mountford, Countess of : see Flanders 
Music : — 

Kauffman ; line, 2! x 3i, oval. 1782 
Cipriani : s., 4J x 3J, oval. 1793 
e., 7$ x 5J, bistre 1782 
,, e., same picture, black. 1785 

s., 7! x si, oval, black. 1786 
Music, seated below a Figure of Pan : s., 4 x 4J, oval, 
bistre 

Naiad (A),Illus. to Mason's Ode : Cipriani ; s., 8J x ii|, 

oval, bistre. 1779 
Naked Child Sleeping: E. Sirani ; 11J x 8J 
Napoleon I. : Appiani ; s., 13 x 15 
Narcissus : B. Luti ; line, 10 x 13 ; pub. 1791 
Natter, Laurence : A. Salvi ; ij" circle 
Neptune and Amphitrite : G. B. Cipriani ; line, B.M., 2 

states 

1st, 8J x 2f 
2nd, 17} x 4 
Nevernois, Duchesse de : Marie Therese de Brancas; s., 

5j x 5| 
Nilus, Saint: Dom Zampieri ; N. Vanni, del., line, 

6 x 11 
Northumberland, Duke of : Hugh Smithson ; 3f x 5, 

oval 
Nymph of Immortality: G. B. Cipriani ; s., g| x iij, 

oval, bistre. 1784 
Nymphs at Fountain : G. B. Cipriani ; s., 5J x 6J, oval 
Nymphs Bathing : G. B. Cipriani; s., 8} x 5},, oval 
Orlando Furioso di Lodovico Ariosto : Birmingham. 

1773, 8vo. :— 

(1) Canto I., Stanza xxv. 

" Vede di mezzo il fiume un Cavaliero 
Insino al petto uscir, d' aspetto fiero " ; 3§ x 5 J, 
line 

(2) Canto II., Stanza X"? 

" Ecco Rinaldo con la spada addosso 
A sacripante tutto s'abbandona" ; 3J x 5, line 

(3) Canto X° , Stanza xxvii" 

" Che debbo far ? che poss'io far qui sola ? 
Che mi daajuto, oime, chi mi consola ? " ; 3! x 5 J, 
line 



ENGRAVINGS— continued. 

(4) Canto XI? , Stanza lxii? 

" Lo corse ad abbracciare, e a fargli festa, 
Trattasi la celata ch' avea in testa" ; 3§ x 5}, 
line 

(5) Canto XIX., Stanza xxxvi. 

" Angelica, e Medoro in varj modi 
Legati insieme di diversi nodi ; " 3f x 5J, line 

(6) Canto XXIV., Stanza lxxxiii. 

" Zerbin la debol voce rinforzando 
Disse : lo vi prego e supplico, mia Diva ; " 3I x 5 J , 
line 

(7) Canto XXXV., Stan2a xii. 

" , . . scuote 
II lembo pieno ; e nella torpid' onda 
Tutte lascia cader 1' impresse note;" 3! x 5J, 
line 

(8) Canto XXXVI., Stanza lviii. 

" In quel momenta il monte, e il piano scosse 
Un gran tremuoto ; e si senti con esso, 
Da quell' avel, che in mezzo il bosco siede, 
Gran voce uscir, ch' ogni mortale eccede ; " 
3i x 5j, line 

(9) Canto XL., Stanza xxxvi. 

" E d' uccider se stesso in pensier venne 
E lo facea, ma il Re Sobrin lo tenne ; " 3! x 5$, 
line 

(10) Canto XLIIL, Stanza clxxxv. 

" Stava ella nel sepolcro ; e quivi attrita 
Da penitenza, orando giorno e notte ; " 3J x 5J, 
line 

Note No. 2, B.M. has an impression with name spelt 

' Bartholozzi ' 
Note No. 4, B.M. has an impression with name spelt 

' Bartholozzi ' 
Note No. 5, B.M., has an impression with names spelt 

' Bartholozzi ' and ' Cipriany ' 
Note No. 6, B.M. has an impression with name spelt 

' Barthollozzi ' 
Note No. 8, B.M. has an impression with name spelt 

' Bartollozzi ' 
Note No. 10, B.M. has an impression with name spelt 

' Bartolozi ' 

Octavia : s., 3 J" circle 

Omai, a Native of Utaietea : Nathaniel Dance ; e. and 

s., 11J x 18. 1774 
Ophelia : see Hamlet 

Orange Girl : J, H. Benwell ; s., 6f x 8|, blk. 1787 
Oriental Gardening, a Dissertation on : see Chambers 
Origin of Design : s, 4^ x 3 J, oval 
Orlando Rescuing Olympia : Canto X 15I x 15 
Orpheus, Title page to: s., 3} x 5, oval, bistre 

Painting: G. B. Cipriani ; s., i\ x 5, oval. 1787 
Pandemonium : see Milton 
Paradise Lost : see Milton 

Parental Affection: W. Hamilton; s., io| x 13, blk. 
1795 



66 



List of Published Engravings 



LIST OF PUBLISHED 

Parnell's Poems, Illus. to(The Three Graces ?) : Hamilton ; 

etching, 3x4. 
Parting of Achilles and Briseis : E. F. Burney ; e., 

2} x 4i. 1794 
Parting of Achilles and Briseis ; G. B. Cipriani ; s. , 

145 x 11J, oval. 1786 
Pasquin, A: s., 2} x 3^ 
Pastoral : line, 3! x 5J 

Paul, St., at Melita : B. West; line, 14J x 26J. 1790 
Pax Artium Nutrix : B. West ; etching, 7J x 8f . 1787 
Peasants Feasting : Bartolozzi and Vivares ; 18 x 17J 
Dancing: ,, ,, '774. 

18 x 17! 
Pegasus : G. Cipriani ; line, 4! x 3|. 1790 
Peter, the Wild-boy, in 1782: J, Alefounder : s., 

2 i x 3J, oval. 1784 
Peter, the Wild-boy (face slightly to left): s., if x 1$, 

oval 
Peter St. Regalato : G. Zocchi, Trovandosi ; line, 

7 x 10 
Peter St. Regalato ; G. Zocchi ; line, 7! x 9J 
Pitt, William : Gainsborough Dupont ; s., 13J x ij\. 

1791 
Pitt, William : Copley ; s., 4J x 5, oval ; p.b.t. 

with artist's name spelt ' Coply ' 
Pitt, William : Copley; s., 4J x 5, oval ; title and pub. 

line, 1789, added and name corrected 
Poetry : A. Kauffman ; 3} x 4I, oval., B.M., 2 states 
1st, names of a. and e., and pub. line. 1781 
2nd, title in fancy type, but without pub. line 
Poetry : Le Brun ; s., 5J x 6, oval, red. 1775 
Poetry and History, presenting Painting with subjects 

for the Pencil : Hamilton ; e., octagonal, 3} x 5. 

1794 
Ponsonby, Hon. Caroline : R. Cosway ; s., 2J x 3, 

oval. 1788 
Portland Vase : Cipriani ; line, 7 x 10J. 1786 
Portrait of a Lady in Grecian Dress (Mrs. Baldwin) : 

R. Cosway; s., 8 x uj, in red. 1782 
Portrait of a Gentleman, with dog : by Earl ; s., 

I if X 14!. 1802 
Portrait of an old Lady: R. Duppa ; s., 3J x 4J. 1796 
Portraits, six on one sheet : Mater Dolorosa ; Ecce 

Homo; St. Maddalena; St. Martha; St. Peter; 

St. Giovanni. Gio Batta: Cinoldor, e. Figlio, line, 

each, 2§ x 3f 
Potts, Miss, as "Thais": Reynolds; s., 10J x 17. 

1792 
Power of Beauty: G. B. Cipriani; s., 5! x 4f, oval, 

brown. 1786 
Prayer Books, Plates to : Stothard ; stipple, without 

titles 

Burying the Dead : 5! x 6|, before all letters, in blk 
Confimation : 5J x 6J, before title. 1792, in blk 
The Nativity : 5J x 6|, before pub. line and title. 
1791, bistre 
Prosperity : Cipriani ; s., 6 x 5, oval, in red. 1783 



ENGRAVINGS— continued. 

Prospero Disarming Ferdinand : Bunbury ; stipple, 

17J x 14^, blk. 1792 
Private Cards : B. Costa ; e., 3J x 2|. 1791 

,, ,, Mrs. Parker : Cipriani ; e., 2§ x 2J, oval 

,, ,, Sir J. Reynolds; e., 2| x 2J 

Prudence: G. B. Cipriani; s. , 5 x 6J, oval, bistre. 

1786 
Psammetichus and Rhodope : Ang. Kauffman ; s., 

I2| x 10J. 1782, bistre 
Psyche going to Dress : G. B. Cipriani ; s., 7 x 8}, 

oval. 1786 
Psyche going to Bathe : G. B. Cipriani ; s., 7 x 8f . 

1786 
Ptolomaeus Philadelphus : s., 2J x 3, oval 

Quirino, Andreas : s., 6f x 7f , oval 

Rape of Dejanira : G. B. Cipriani ; c, nj x g. 1787 
Ratclifl'e, Lady: Holbein; s.c.p., 7J x n. 1793 
Reading Magdalen (The): Correggio; s., 10J x 15, 

bistre 
Rebecca hiding her Father's Idols : P. Berettini ; e., 

I4i x 10. 1765 
Repose in Egypt : N. Poussin ; c, 17J x 23 J. 1795. 

B.M. 2 st. 

istF. Bartolozzi; etch d. 1795 
2nd „ R.A. ,, ,, 

Resurrection of Lazarus : B. Castiglione ; e., 15J x 10J 
" Rhodope," Front, to: A. Kauffman; 5J X 6 
Rinaldo and Armida : A. Kauffman ; s., 6J x 7f, oval 
Roger's Century of Prints, Title pages to : G. B. 

Cipriani; s., 10J x 14J, vol. 1, red. 1766 
Roger's Century of Prints, Title pages to : B. Rebecca ; 

s., g£ x 14, vol. 2, red 
Romeo and Juliet: W. Hamilton; s., 6J x 8J, oval. 

1785 
Romeo and Juliet : see also Dimond. 
Rooke, Sir G. : J. Faber ; s., 3J x 4J, oval 
Rosalind : see As You Like It 
Rosalba Camera : Rosalba; s., 3 x 3I, oval in red. 

1778 
Ruggerio (II.) : Illus. to Act 3, Sc. 4 : Cipriani ; etching, 

3j x 5}. 1781 
Rural Innocence : S. Harding ; s., 6 x 8J, o.l.t., bistre. 

1785 
Rutland, Duchess of : s., 3J x 4, oval. 1780 

Sacking of Rome : S. Ricci ; etching, 22 x 16 
Sacrifice to Jupiter : G. B. Cipriani ; line, 18 x 4J. 1777 

,, of Noah : B. Castiglione ; e., 16 x 10J 
Sacrifice to Cupid : Cipriani ; s., 10 x 7J, oval. ' Sacri- 
fice ' spelt ' Sacrafice ' 
Sacrifice to Diana : P. Berrettini ; e., 17 x ioj. 1776 
Saints : see under their names 

(Three) of St. Dominic in a Cave: Piazzetta 
line, 12J x 21J 



67 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 



LIST OF PUBLISHED ENGRAVINGS-cofirmued. 



Saints (Three) of St. Dominic before the Holy Virgin : 

A. Balestra ; line, 13J x 21 
St. Giles's Beauty : J. H. Benwell ; s., 4I x 6J, oval, 

1783 
St. James's Beauty: J. H. Benwell; s., 4! x 6J, oval 
Samson breaking his Bands : Rigaud ; line, 12J x 10J 
Sancho, Ignatius: Gainsborough; s., 2f x 3 J, oval 
Sancho's Letters : Titlepages to Vol. I and 2 ; 2}" 

circle, line. 1802 
Satan : see Milton 

Savile, Statue of Sir G. : J.Fisher; 13 x 24J. 1790 
Seasons, The : see Spring, Summer, Autumn, and 

Winter 
Seasons (The), (Family Group) : Hamilton ; s., 6J x 5, 

bistre. 1793 
" Sed Placidam Pueri, etc.": Mortimer; etching, 

3l X 4}. 1778 
Selim, or the Shepherd's Moral: A. Kauffman ; s.c.p., 

I7i x 14I 
Sentimental Journey : W.Harding ; s., 1 if" circle, bistre 
Serenity : G. B. Cipriani ; s., 3J x 4, oval. B.M. 2 states 
1st with name of a. and e. and pub. line. 1782, 

only red 
2nd with title and two-line quotation added, bistre 
Sforzata e vinta, etc. : G. B. Cipriani; 1779, line, 

5i x 8 
Shakespeare : see under titles of each play 
Shepherdess of the Alps : A. Kauffman; s., 10J x 13$, 

oval, red. 1785 
Shepherdess of the Alps : Loutherbourg, figures only 

by Bartolozzi ; I2|" circle 
Shore, Jane : nude half figure ; s., 3J x 4J, no frame 

,, S. Harding ; s., 4J x 5J, with frame. 1790 
Shrimp Girl: Hogarth; s., 6$ x 8, red. 1781 
Siddons, Mrs.: H. Hone; s., 3 x 3J, oval. 1785 
Simplicity (Miss Gwatkin) : Reynolds ; s., 7 x 8J. 1789 
Sin and Death : see Milton 

Six Overtures, by Borghi : Titlepage to ; set Borghi 
,, Solos ,, ,, ,, 

,, Quartettes, Titlepage to: Cipriani; line, 8J x 12 
,, Sonatas „ ,, 8| x 7 

Smyth, Lady, and Children: Reynolds; s., 9 x 11J, 

bistre. 1789 
Snuff Box (The) : Loutherbourg ; circle 13", blk. 
Note — By Bartolozzi and Byrne 

Socrates in Prison : A. Kauffman ; etching, 5 x 6J, 
oval. B.M. 2 states. 1780 

1st with names of a. and e. and pub. line, Ap. 27. 

1780 
2nd title, Socrates in etched letters, and pub. 
line, Ap. 28 
Song (The): Bunbury; stipple, nf" circle, in red. 
B.M. 2 states 

1st with pub. line (July 1st, 1782) only 
2nd fully lettered and pub. line. July 10th, 1782 
Sophia and Olivia: s., 5J x 7, oval. 1784, bistre 



Sophia Matilda, Princess : P.Jean; s.,2joval2|. 1791 
Specchio son l'acque, etc. : Zucarelli ; 17 x 13 
Spencer, Countess: G. Pointz ; s., 4 x 4}, oval, red. 

1782 
Spencer, Lavinia, Countess: Reynolds; s., 6| x 8, 

bistre. 1787 
Spencer, George John, Earl : 3J x 5J. 1792 

,, ,, s., 4§ x 7J (same design) 

Spring : R. Westal ; s., 6J x 7J, bistre. 1790 

,, Cipriani; s., 3J x 4J, oval, bistre. B.M. 2 st. 
1st names of a. and e. only 
2nd with e. 1. title and pub. line, 1783 added 
Stanhope, Hon. Leicester: Reynolds; s.,6| x 8, bistre. 

1789 
Stanhope, Hon. Leicester : Reynolds ; s.c.p., 6} x 8 
Steele, Sir Richard : J.Richardson; s., 3 x 4J. 1803 
Summer : F. Wheatley ; s., 6J x 7j, bistre. 1789 
,, Cipriani ; s., 3J x 4j, oval, ,, 1783 
(3 Cupids) ; s., 7f x gj ,, 1800 



Tancred and Erminia: G. B. Cipriani; 1784, stipple, 

u| x 9, in red 
Telemachus and Mentor in the Island of Calypso : A. 

Kauffman; s., 14} x nj, bistre. 1786 
Tempest (The) : Miranda. B. Meyer ; s., 3 x 3f , oval, 

1779 
Thais, see Miss Potts 
"The Mourning Widow shows her dying Son": line, 

2j x 4 
Thomson's Seasons, Illus. to: Hamilton; "Youth 

reclining on a Bank," s., 6J x 5. 1798 
Thomson's Seasons, Illus. to: Hamilton; "Domestic 

Scene," s , 6J x 5. 1793 
Thomson's Seasons: see also " Delightful Task, &c" 

"Flora" 
Thornton, R. J.: Russell; s., 5 x 5|, " A View of Guy's 
Hospital," by Woolnoth, after Elmes, 8J x 5J, 
beneath. 1799 
Thurlow, Edward Lord : Reynolds ; s., 12J x 17. 
B.M states 

1st, with names of a. and e., and pub. line 1782 
2nd, ,, ,, and unlettered arms 

3rd, the same with o.l. title, pub. line, April 15th, 

1782, and arms completed 
4th, the same with pub. line, May 25th, 1782 
Tobias led by the Angel : C. Maratti ; e., 15 x 19! 
Trade Cards : M. Bovi ; s., 4} x 3 

,, W. Humphrey ; line, 4J x 3j 

by B. West : T. Sandby ; e., £ x 7. 1791 
Tragedy : Cipriani ; 3^ x 3$. Full length seated figure 

with arm raised 
Tragedy : Cipriani ; s., 3J x 4, oval. Half length 
figure. 1784 



68 



List of Published Engravings 



LIST OF PUBLISHED ENGRAVINGS— continued. 



Triolus and Cressida : H. Tresham, R.A. ; 1794, etching, 

17 x 11. B.M., 2 states 
1st, p.b.l., bistre 

2nd, with names of a. and e., and pub. line 1794, blk. 
Triumph of Venus (with three Cupids) : G. B. Cipriani ; 

line, 11x8. 1737 
Triumph of Venus (with Cupids and Doves) : s., 10 x 7J, 

oval, bistre 
Triumph of Venus (with Sea gods, &c.), line, 8x3 
Triumph of Virtue: Rev. Mr. Peters; s., 24J x i8| 
Turkish Beauty : G. B. Cipriani ; s., 9 x 11, oval, red. 

■775 

Udney, Mrs. : Cosway ; s., 5J x 9 
Uriel on a Sunbeam : see Milton 

Van Dyck's Wife and Child : 6 x 7f. 1770 
Van Juchen, Martin : A. Schouman ; e., 9$ x 12J 
Venus presenting the Cestus to Juno ; G. B. Cipriani ; 

s., 6J x 5J, 1784 
Venus recommending Hymen to Cupid : Bartolozzi ; s., 

17 x nj. 1800 
Venus surrounded by Cupids: G. B. Cipriani; s., 

6x5, oval 
Venus : Bacon ; line, 4! x 7I 
Venus and Adonis: Cosway; s., 6 x 7^, oval, 1778 

,, ,, Barbieri;e., 15! x ioj 

Venus attired by the Graces : G. B. Cipriani; s., 

oval. 1785 
Venus Chiding Cupid : Sir J. Reynolds ; s., 8 x 9J, oval. 

1784. B.M., 2 states 
1st, with pub. line at bottom of sheet 
2nd, ,, round ,, print 

Venus attired by the Graces : Cipriani ; same subject, s., 

3i x 4J, oval. 1784 
Venus Cupid and Satyr : Earlom after L. Giordano ; 

line, i8£ x 134, 1767 
Venus Sleeping : Carracci ; s., 13! 
Verdiani, St., Kneeling before 

Gabbiani ; line, 8J x [I. 1791 
Vestris, the Dancer: E. Dance; s,, 12J x 
Victory : Cipriani ; e., 9fc" square, 1787 
Vigilance; Cipriani ; s., 3^ x 4, oval. B.M., 2 states 
1st, names of a. and e., and pub. line, 1782 
2nd, with e.l. title, and 6 line verse added 
Virgil : A. Kauffman ; s., 13 x 10J, oval 



.7* x 5l. 



x gi, oval, 
a Crucifix 



1785 
A. D. 



12$. 1781 



Virgin and Child : Guercino; s., 7} x 11 J 

,, Guido Reni ; s., 10J x 8J, red, 1767 

A ,. line, 6J x 7} 

,, Parmigianino ,, 6 x 8£ 
Virgin and Infant Jesus, with the Eternal Father ; B. 

Castiglione ; e., 15 x io4 
Virgin in kneeling posture : Dom Zampieri : N. Vanni, 

del ; line, 8} x 8 
Vulcan and Venus ; G. B. Cipriani ; line, 17! x 4, 1777 

Wales, Piince and Princess of: H. D. Janory ; s., 

2f x 3j, oval 
Wallis, Miss: s., 12J x 19 
Watts, Isaac : 2} x 4I 
" Weep, Thaly, Weep " : see Foote 
Wentwortb, Lord: Holbein ; s., 11 x 12J, bistre. 1793 
Wilmot, Sir J. E. : s., 6j x 8 

Winter : Cipriani ; s., 3J x 4J, oval. B.M., 2 states 
1st, with names of a. and e., and pub. line, 1783 
2nd, with title and dedication added 
Winter: F. Wheatley ; s., 6| x i\, bistre, 1789 
,, (3 Cupids) : s., 8 x g\, bistre. 1800 
,, Cipriani (4 women and 2 children) : s., circle 
10", in red 
Winter's Tale, Act 2, Sc. 3 : W. Hamilton ; etching, 

6J x 8J 
Wishart, Sir James: s., 3 x 3 J 
Woide, Dr. C. G. : s., 3! x 4^, oval. 1791 
Woman taken in Adultery: A. Caracci ; line, 15J x laj. 

1787 
Woman with Child in her Arms and Boy by her Side : 

M. Angelo ; s., 9 x 13 
Women (two), playing with Child and offering it Grapes : 

s., 12" circle 
Woollet, Wm. : T. Hearne ; e., 3 x 3§ , oval. 1795 
Wynn, Sir Richard : C. Janssens ; 4I x 5J 

Yorke, Philip : Reynolds ; s., 7J x 9J, bistre. 1788 
Young Woman kneeling before Cupid, with basket : F. 

Vieira ; Frontispiece to " The Gardens ; A Poem," 

line, 6\ x 3J 
Youth : R. Cosway; s.c.p., 2§ x 2$ 

Zara (Mrs. Loutherbourg), s., 5J x 6J, oval, bistre 
Zephyrus : Colibert ; s., 5J x 7 J, oval, bistre. 1788 
Zeuxis composing the Picture of Juno : A. Kauffman ; 

e., 15 x 1 1 J, red. 1785 
Zoraida: A. Kauffman ; s., 3 x 3J, oval, bistre. 1778 



Abbreviations: — s., stipple; e., etching; c.p., colour-print ; p.b.l., proof before 
letter title; i.l.t., etched letter title; a. and e., artist and engraver; pub. line., 
ded., dedication ; B.M., British Museum. 

The measurements are in inches, the width first. 



letters; o.l.t., open 
publication line ; 



69 



APPENDIX II. 



List of Engravings by Bartolozzi sold 
by Auction from 1901-1907. 



Artist. 


Title. 


Albano ... 


Four Elements, The... 


An sell 


English and French 




Rooms 


Appiani ... 


Buonaparte, Napoleon 



Dressing 



Barker Woodman, The 

Bartolozzi, F. ... Cupid and Psyche, Cupid and 
Hymen 

Market of Love, The 

Wallis, Miss 

Benwell, J. H. ... Jemmy's Farewell; Jemmy's Return 
Orange Girl, The 



St. Giles's Beauty, A ; Prudence 

and Beauty 

St. Giles's Beauty, A 

St. James's Beauty, A 

St. James's Beauty, A ; St. Giles's 
Beauty, A 



Serena 

Browne, M. ... Buller, Sir Francis 

Bunbury, H. ... Auld Robin Gray 

Helena 

Love and Honour 

Mother and Children 

Mouse's Petition ; Blind Beggar ... 

Mouse's Petition ; and Marion 

Cipriani, G. B. ... Adelaide 

Bacchante, A 

Beauty 

Ceres; and Pomona 

,.. Comedy ; and Tragedy 

Comic Muse, The 

Cupid ; and Psyche 

Cupids at Play; and Children at 

Play 

Cupids Instruction ; and Venus 

with a Mirror ; Nymphs Bathing ; 

and Venus Sleeping 

Damon and Musidora ; and Celadon 

and Amelia 



Remarks, 
c.p., set of 4, circles 

s.p.b.l., in bistre 

s.o.l.p., brown 

s.o.l.p. 

c-P 

c.p., pair 

pair 

s.p.b.l., and the etching 

o.l. p 

s., in bistre, pair 

s.p.b.l 

s.p.b.l 

s.p.b.l 

s. pair, and another 

s.p.b.l., in red 

stipple, p.b.l., in black... 

c-P 

stipple, in red 

c. p., pair.withuntrimmed margins 1903 

pair 

pair, c.p 

pair, in bistre 

pair, in red 

pair, in red 

p.b.l. 

PP- . 

in red 

c.p., proof 

p.b.l. 

fine I., c.p., p.b.t. 

c-P- 

c.p., pair 

p.b.l., in red 

c-P- 

C -P: , 

s. in red 

e.l.p. 

c.p., p.b.l. 

pair 

in red 



p.b.l. 
p.bl., in red 



Year of 


Price. 


Sale. 


£ s. 


(l 


t9°3 ■ 


. 42 





1907 . 


• 32 II 





1902 . 


. 21 O 





1907 . 


• 9 9 





1906 . 


2 





1905 . 


. 26 5 





1907 . 


• 1 15 





1907 . 


• 1 5 





1902 . 


• 7 17 


6 


1902 . 


7 10 





1907 . 


• 13 13 





1906 . 


• 7 17 


6 


1902 . 


6 10 





1904 . 


. 63 





1906 . 


. 6 16 


6 


1906 . 


. 6 





1907 . 


■ 7 17 


6 


1906 . 


■ 5 5 





s 1903 ■ 


• 135 





1903 . 


• 35 M 





1905 . 


. 28 7 





1903 . 


. 26 5 





1907 . 


■ 15 15 





1907 . 


• 13 13 





1907 . 


• 5 





1907 . 


• 4 5 





1906 . 


• 5 5 





1906 . 


. 3 10 





1907 . 


• 4 4 





1907 . 


• 9 5 





1907 . 


. 12 1 


6 


1905 . 


. 50 8 





1907 . 


• 9 19 


6 


1906 . 


. 8 8 





igo6 . 


. 2 15 





1907 . 


. 11 11 





1907 . 


1 





1907 . 


. 9 


a 


1902 . 


. 29 8 





1902 . 


• 5 





1907 .. 


. 4 





1902 .. 


• 3 






70 



List of Engravings 



LIST OF ENGRAVINGS SOLD BY AUCTION— continued. 



Artist. 
Cipriani, G. B. 



Colibert ... 
Cosway, R. 



Title. 

Edward IV., Dowager Queen of; 
Dukes of Northumberland and 
Suffolk, with Lady Jane Gray ... 

Elements, The 



Fortune and Prosperity, Nymphs 

Bathing 

Fortune ; and Prosperity 

Harmony ; Prudence ; Meekness ; 

and Beauty 

Hebe ; a Bacchante ; and Comedy... 
Jupiter and Juno, Venus and Juno 
Jupiter and Juno on Mount Ida, 

and Venus presenting the Cestus 

Lais ; Lamia 

Love ; Liberty ; Harmony ; 

Sincerity ; and Felicity 

Love Repulsed ; and Companion ... 
•> ,t ••• 

Lovers' Meeting, The 

Music ; and Painting 

Nymphs Bathing ; and Nymphs 

after Bathing 

Nymphs Bathing ; Nymphs going 

to Bathe 

Nymph of Immortality 

pi it ti ••• ... 

Nymph Sleeping ; and Venus and 

Cupid , 

Perseus; and Andromeda 



Power of Beauty 
Power of Love ; 
Beauty 



and Power of 



Prudence ; and Beauty 

Prudence and Beauty ; and Genius 

and Beauty 
Sacrifice to Cupid ; and The 

Triumph of Cupid and Love ... 
Sculpture ; Painting ; Music ; 

History ... 

Spring ; Summer ; Autumn ; 

Winter 

ii »i it ••• 

Tragedy and Comedy 

Virtue ; Prudence ; Honour 

Wisdom 

Flora ; and Zephyrus 

Abington, Mrs. 



Baldwin, Mrs. 
Bulkeley Viscountess 



Charlotte, Princess, and Child 
Cosway, Maria 

Fair Moralist, The 

Fair Moralist, The, and Her Pupil 
(Mrs. Harding and Son) 



Remarks. 



c.p., pair ... 
proofs, set of 4 



in red 



c.p., pair ... 
proofs, in red 

set of 4 
proofs 
c.p., pair ... 

in red 
c.p., pair ... 

proofs, in red 

c.p., pair ... 

o.l. p., pair 

c.p. 

c.p., pair ... 

p.b.l., in red 

p.b.l., in red 

in red 

p.b., the verses 



Year of 
Sale. 



1902 
1907 
1907 
1902 

1907 
1907 

1907 
1907 
1901 

1907 
1902 

1907 
1906 
1902 
1906 
1907 

1907 

1902 
1907 
1907 



Price. 
£ s. d. 



p.b.l 1907 

pair, proofs in bistre and the 

etchings 

cp 



c.p., pair 

c.p., pair 

o.l.p., pair 
proof in red, pair 
c.p., pair 

p.b.l., in red 

proofs, in red 

p.b.l., set of 4 ... 

p.b.l., set of 4 ... 

set of 4 

o.l.p. 

c-P 

cp 

p.b.l., in bistre, pair 
c.p., margin cut... 
p.b.l., in bistre ... 
p.b.l., in bistre ... 
proof, in red 
proof, in bistre ... 

fine 

p.b.l 

c-P 

c-P 

in brown 

c-P 

c-P 

o.l.p., in brown ... 



1902 
1906 

1907 
1907 
1902 
1907 
1906 

1907 

1907 

1902 

1907 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1906 
1907 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1907 
1902 
1907 
1906 
1907 
1907 
1907 
1905 

1901 
1902 



7 7 
6 6 
4 10 



7 7 
2 7 



2 10 o 

200 

13 10 o 

550 

24 o o 

5 15 
9 19 6 

2 12 6 
260 

13 15 o 

12 12 o 

4 14 6 
220 
220 

1 10 o 

3 5o 

2 18 o 



15 o 

10 10 

3 13 
2 2 

13 a 

5 5 

16 16 

5 10 

15 15 

5 10 
2 12 

4 4 

11 11 

6 6 
42 o 

14 14 

7 o 
4 10 

11 o 

8 o 

4 4 

5 5 
11 11 

2 4 
68 5 



64 o o 
16 5 o 



71 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A- 



LIST OF ENGRAVINGS SOLD BY AUCTION— continued 



Artist. 

Cosway, R. 



Cosway 



Cotes, F. 
Coypel 



Dance, N. 
Downman, J. 



Engleheart, G. ... 
Gainsborough, T. 

■ • *• 
Gilpin 

Guttenbrunn 

I, »•• 

Hamilton, W. ... 



Title. 

Fair Moralist (Mrs. Baldwin) and 
her Pupil 

Fair Moralist and her Pupil 

Hardinge, Mrs., and Son 

Infancy (Miss Ponsonby) 

Love and Innocence 

Abington.Mrs., "Crowning Shakes- 
peare" 

Affection ; and Instruction 

Hours, The 

Udney, Mrs 

Venus and Adonis ; and Bathing, 
after Cipriani 

Wales, Caroline, Princess of, and 
Child 

Beauclerk, Lady Catherine 

Zephyr and Flora 

Zephyr and Flora, Vertumne and 
Pomone 

Clive, Lord 

Devonshire, Duchess of 



Devonshire, Duchess of ; and Lady 

Duncannon 

Duncannon, Lady 



Devonshire, Duchess of ; Duchess 
of Richmond : Lady Duncannon ; 
and Mrs. Siddons 

Devonshire, Duchess of ; Lady 
Duncannon ; Mrs. Siddons ; and 
Miss Farren 



Gibson, Mrs 

Hobbinol and Ganderetta ; and 
Lavinia 

Lavinia 

Happy Meeting and The Benevolent 

Lady 

Apollo and the Muses 



Ball, The ; and The Pincushion ... 
Birdcage, The ; and The Mousetrap 

Children Bathing 

Children Playing with a Bird (by 

Bartolozzi) ; and another 
Hot Cockles ; Hunt the Slipper ; 

and Swinging 

Hot Cockles ; and Hunt the 

Slipper 

Maternal Affection 

Maternal Love 

Mischievous Sport ; and Sportive 

Innocence ... 
Months, The 



Remarks. 



C-P 

c.p. 

c-P 

c-P 

proof 

c.p., pair 

c-P 

p.b.l 

proof, in red, pair 

p.b.l 

in red 

c.p. 

c.p., pair... 

p.b.l 

stipple 

c-P 

c-P 

c-P 

o.l. p 



c.p., 

c.p. 

p.b.l 

c.p. 

c.p. 



pair ... 
, in brown 



tinned. 

Year of 


Price. 


Sale. 


£ s. 


d. 


IQ07 • 


■ 14 M 





1907 • 


• 12 5 





I907 • 


. 3 1 10 





1907 • 


2 





1907 • 


. 3 10 





1907 • 


■ 8 5 





1902 . 


. 11 11 


. 


... 1907 . 


. 6 





1907 • 


• 3 13 


6 


... 1907 . 


2 





1902 . 


12 12 





1907 • 


1 10 





... 1907 .. 


. 27 6 





1906 . 


. 14 





... 1904 .. 


. 14 10 





... 1906 .. 


. 11 11 


6 


... 1906 .. 


. 50 8 





... 1902 .. 


• 19 19 





... 1902 .. 


. 13 2 


6 


... 1906 .. 


. 11 11 





... 1902 .. 


. 88 4 





... 1907 .. 


. 31 10 





... 1902 .. 


■ 3° 





... 1904 •• 


. 29 8 





... 1902 .. 


. 11 11 






By Bartolozzi and T. Burke 



c.p., set of 4, by Bartolozzi and 
Tompkins 



1907 



p.b.l. 



c.p., a pair, by Bartolozzi and 

Tompkins 

c-P- 

o.l. p 

c-P 

c-P 

c.p., pair 

p.b.l 

c.p., oval 

c-P 

in bistre 

p.b.l 

c-P 

c-P 

cp. _ «. 

c.p., set of 12 (by Bartolozzi and 
Gardiner) 



25 4 o 



1904 . 


.. 100 


16 





1907 . 


• • 3 


10 





1903 . 
1905 . 


.. 21 

•• 44 


1 
2 







1907 . 
1903 . 

1906 . 


•• 3 

•• 17 
.. 9 


3 

17 
9 







1907 . 
1907 

1902 . 


•• 3 
•• 5 
.. 19 


13 
5 



6 
O 




1907 . 


5 


15 


6 


1902 . 


.. 14 


r 4 





1907 . 

1907 . 
1907 . 


.. 11 
.. 16 
.. 26 




16 
5 







1907 . 


•■ 32 


11 





1907 . 


.. 220 


10 






72 



List of Engravings 



LIST OF ENGRAVINGS SOLD BY AUCTION— continued. 



Artist. 
Hamilton, W. 



Harding, S. 
Harding, W. 



Hoppner, j 



Isabey 
Kauffman, A. 



Title. 
Months, The ... 



July; 



Months, The, " May ; June ; 

and September" 

Months, The, "June; September; 

October ; and December " 
Months, The, "June; July; and 

December" 

Months, The, "January; and 

December" 

Months, The, "May; and Sep- 
tember" 

Months, The, "June" 



"December " 

Morning and Evening 

Playing at Hot Cockles ; and 
Thread the Needle 

Playing at Marbles ; Thread the 
Needle ; Hot Cockles ; and Hunt 
the Slipper 

Seasons, The 

Thread the Needle ; and Hot 
Cockles 

Rural Innocence 

Libertine Reclaimed ; and The 
Companion 

Prelude to Matrimony ; 
Libertine Reclaimed 

Sword ; and The Dance 

Abercombie, Sir R 



and 



Dundas, Lady Jane 

Grenville, Lady 

Napoleon at Malmaison 

Bacchus teaching the Nymphs ; 
and Telemachus in grief for the 
sufferings of Ulysses (By J. M. 
Delattre) 

Cleone 



Remarks. 

c. p., set of 12 (by Bartolozzi and 

Gardiner) 

c.p., set of 12 (by Bartolozzi and 

Gardiner) 

stipple, set of 12 (by Bartolozzi 

and Gardiner) 

in bistre, set of 12, ovals (by 

Bartolozzi and Gardiner) ... 
c.p., set of I2(by Bartolozzi and 

Gardiner) 

set of 12, of which 6 are proofs 

(by Bartolozzi and Gardiner) 
set of 12, including 1 proof 

before letter, and 6 open letter 

proofs 

in bistre, set of 12 

set of 12 (By Bartolozzi and 

Gardiner) 

set of 12 (By Bartolozzi and 

Gardiner) 

set of 11, November missing, 

(By Bartolozzi and Gardiner) 

c.p., set of 4 

c.p., set of 4 

set of three proofs 

c.p., ovals, pair 

c.p., pair 

pair 

p.b.l 

p.b.l., in bistre 

c.p., oval 

c.p., o.l. p. 

c.p., pair 

c.p., pair 

cp. 



set of 4 
set of 4 

proofs 
c.p. 

p.b.l., pair 

c.p., pair 

p.b.l. 

o.l. p., in brown 

e.l.p. 
o.l. p. 

b.l., stipple 
p.b.l. 

p.b.l. 



Year of 
Sale. 


Price. 
£ 8- d. 


1906 


• 173 5 





1905 . 


. 162 15 





1901 


• 152 5 





1903 ■ 


. 102 18 





1904 . 


• 99 15 





1902 . 


. 92 8 





1902 . 
1906 . 


.. 51 19 
.. 50 







1906 . 


■• 33 12 





1907 . 


.. 25 4 





1903 . 


.. 99 10 





1905 . 


■■ 53 " 





1904 . 


•• 37 16 





1907 . 


.. 19 19 





1903 . 
1902 


21 
.. 19 8 



6 


1907 . 
1902 . 

1902 . 
1907 . 

1903 . 
1905 . 
1905 . 


.. 7 17 

.. 12 12 

11 11 

•95 
.. 22 1 
• • 5° 8 
•• 38 17 


6 
O 











1903 



1907 



24 3 



1907 . 


.. 17 6 


6 


1902 . 


.. 168 





1907 . 


.. 8 18 


6 


1902 . 


■ 17 17 





1907 . 


• 5 15 


6 


1902 . 


• 35 





1907 . 


• 3 3 





1906 . 


2 10 





1906 . 


1 6 





1902 . 


• 15 





1907 . 


6 6 





1902 . 


16 





1907 . 


• 9 19 


6 



c.p., pair 
in red 



1907 
1907 



9 10 o 



35 o o 

660 



73 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. 



LIST OF ENGRAVINGS SOLD BY AUCTION— continued. 



Artist. 
Kauffman, A. .. 



Kauffman and 
Cipriani 

Lawrence, Sir T. 



Title. 

Diana and Nymph ; and Damon 
and Delia 

Eurydice 

Fancy's Sweetest Child ; Shakes- 
peare's Child 

Fancy's Sweetest Child 

Fatima and Cossucia ; and Zoraida 

Girl Dancing ; and Girl with 
Tambourine 

Griselda ; and The Shepherdess of 
the Alps 

Hammond, Louisa 



Horace; and Virgil 

Judgment of Paris 

Modesty; and Vanity 

Nymphs after Bathing, and Bac- 
chanalians 

Nymph Dancing, Rosalina and 

Celia 

Paris and Aenone ; and Damon 

and Delia ... 
Paulus iEmilius ; and Cleopatra 

and Cossucia ... 

Rinaldo and Armida ; and Morte di 

Clorinda 

Rinaldo and Armida ; and the 

Death of Clorinda 
Rinaldo and Armida ; and the 

Death of Clorinda 

Seasons, The 

Selim, or the Shepherd's Moral ... 

Tancred and Erminia ; Tancred 

and Clorinda 

Telemachus Grieving for Ulysses ; 

Bacchus amid Solitary Rocks ... 
Venus attired by the Graces ; and 

The Judgment of Paris 

Venus attired by the Graces ; and 

The Judgment of Paris 

Venus attired by the Graces 



Venus Presenting the Cestus 
Wisdom ; and Religion 

Griselda ; and Adelaide 

Amelia, " Princess of England ' 

»i ft <i 
Derby (Countess of) 



Remarks. 

p.b.l., in red 

p., in bister 

p., in red 

p.b.l., in red 

p.b.l., in red 

p.b.l., in brown, pair 

p., in red, pair 

in red 

p.b.l., in bistre 

p.b.l., in red 

in red 

c.p., a pair 

p.b.l., in bistre 

oval, in brown, with full margin 
p.b.l 

c.p., pair 

p.b.l., in red 

p.b.l., in red 

proofs, in red 

o.l. p., in red 

proofs 

p.bl 

c.p., set of 4 

in bistre 



in red 

c.p., pair 

c.p., pair 

c.p., pair 

oval, in red, with full margin. 

e.l.p., in bistre 

cp 

cp- •• 

oval, in red 

in red 

oval, in red, large margins 

in red 

proof, in red 

C-P- 

oval, in brown 

c.p., p.b.l. 

in bistre 

c.p., pair of ovals, framed 

cp 

o.l. p 

c-P 

c.P 

c.p 

c.p., creased and torn ... 



Year of 
Sale. 



1907 
1907 

1906 
1906 
1907 

1906 

1907 
1907 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1904 
1902 
1907 
1907 

1905 
1907 
1902 
1907 
1907 
1902 

1902 

1903 
1902 
1906 

1907 

1903 
1005 

!9°5 
1907 
1902 
1903 
1902 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1902 
1907 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1907 

1907 

1901 
1906 
1907 
1903 
1905 
1907 
1902 
1907 



Price. 

£ s. d. 

10 10 o 

7 17 6 

12 12 o 

8 18 6 
7 10 o 

12 15 o 



16 16 
15 15 

11 o 
9 19 

5 ° 
*5 4 

12 12 
7 o 

6 6 



3 15 
3° 9 



40 o 

28 7 
27 o 

24 3 

23 12 

23 2 

23 o 

21 1 

ig 10 

15 4 

13 ° 

9 9 

9 o 

11 11 

1 14 

13 o 

45 ° 

4 4 

178 10 

54 12 
42 o 
21 o 

'5 5 
6 16 



20 9 6 
10 10 o 

4 4° 

2 10 o 

14 14 o 

600 



30 9 o 



74 



List of Engravings 



LIST OF ENGRAVINGS SOLD BY AUCTION- continued. 



Artist. 
Lawrence, Sir T. 



Title. 



Derby (Countess of) 

Farren, Miss (Countess of Derby). 



Farren, Miss 



Remarks 

c-P 

c.p., untrimmed margin, record 
price for Bartolozzi print ... 

whole length, proof with title in 
open-etched letters, and ad- 
dress of J. Jeffryes only, 
framed 

proof 

c-P 

c-P 

c.p., ist state 

c-P 

stipple, whole length, p.b.l., in 

bistre 

p.b.l., whole length, in brown 

c-P 

p.b.l 

p.b., title 

p.b.l., in bistre 

stipple, in bistre 

p.b.l 

in bistre 

p.b.l 

in bistre ... 

in black 



p.b.l 

before alteration of inscription 
c-P 



Year of 
Sale. 

1907 
1907 



igo2 
1902 
1902 

1905 
1904 
1901 
1903 

1905 
1902 
1902 
1906 
1904 
1902 
1907 
1903 
1902 
1905 
1903 
1902 
1901 
1904 
1902 

1905 
1903 
1904 
1907 

1903 
1904 
1907 
1904 
1905 



Price. 
£ s. d. 

3 3° 
609 o o 



63 o 
42 o 
30 9 
183 15 
157 10 
144 o 
107 2 

79 16 

70 o 

69 6 

63 o 

58 16 

52 10 

39 18 

37 16 

36 15 

28 7 

7 
o 

5 
2 
o 
I 
o 
o 
o 

21 O 
20 9 
16 
II 



28 
28 
26 
23 
23 
22 
21 
21 
21 



5 
o 

9 19 



Nixon, J. ... Devonshire, Georgina, Duchess of 

Opie Edwin and Emma 

Ramberg ... Sorrows of Werter 

,, ... Squire Thornhill and Olivia and the 

companion 

Reynolds, Sir J. Affectionate Brothers, The, Peniston 

Lamb Children 

,, Affectionate Brothers, The 

,, Annette 

,, Ashburton, Lord 

>■ ,» 1, 

,, Bartolozzi, Francis ... 

,, Bingham, The Hon. Miss 



in brown 1906 ... 4 12 6 

cp- 1907 ••• 3 13 6 

proofs in red, a pair 1907 ... 220 

proofs in bistre 1907 ... 990 

c.p., framed 1902 ... 44 2 o 

c.p. 1907 ... 19 19 o 

in bistre 1906 ... 880 

e.l.p 1907 ... 11 o 6 

fine proof 1907 ... 650 

in bistre — after Sir J. Reynolds 

by Marcuard 1907 ... 2 2 

c.p. 1906 ... 127 10 

c.p. 1902 ... 119 14 

c.p. 1903 ... 63 o 

c.p. igo6 ... 58 16 

p.b.l., in bistre 1906 ... 57 15 

brilliant p.b.l., in brown ... 1903 ... 33 o 

c.p. 1905 ... 30 9 

c.p. 1906 ... 29 o 

c.p. 1907 ... 21 o 

stipple-p.b.l., in red 1904 ... 18 18 

2nd state, in bistre 1902 ... 15 15 

proof, in red 1902 ... 15 4 



75 



Francesco Barto/ozzi, R.A. 



LIST OF ENGRAVINGS SOLD BY AUCTION— continued. 



Artist. 
Reynolds, Sir J. 



Title. 
Bingham, The Hon. Miss 



Bingham, The Hon. Miss; and 
Countess Spencer 



Burghersh, Lord 



Burke, Edmund 

Cottagers, The 

,, ,, (Mrs. Macklin and 

Family) 

Foster, Lady Elizabeth 



Girl with Kitten 



Girl with Kitten ; and Simplicity ... 
Grantham, Lord, and his brothers 

Gwatkin, Miss 

Harrington, Jane, Countess of, and 
children 



o.l.p., stipple 



proof 



in brown, large margin 
in bistre 



Remarks, 
stipple 
c.p. 
c.p. 

in bistre ... 
in red 

c.p., pair ... 

c.p. 

c.p. 

c.p. 

c.p. 

c.p. 

proof before arms, pair 
c.p., stipple 
o.l.p 

p.b.l., in brown .. 
c.p., full margin.. 
c-P 

o.l.p 

c.p. 

c.p., 

c.p. 

c.p. 

c.p. 

c.p. 

c.p. 

c.p. 

c.p. 

p.b.l., 

p.b.t. 

p.b.a. '.'.'. '.'.'. '.'.'. '.'.'. 

p.b.t 

c-P 

C-P 

in bistre 

C-P 

c-P 

c-P 

p.b.l., in brown, large margin 
with the inscription 

c-P- ». ■ ••• 

early imprint, in brown, mended 

c-P 

p.b.l 

c-P 

c-P 

c-P 

o.l.p., in bistre... 

c.p., pair 

p.b.l., in bistre 

in bistre 

c-P 

cp 

c-P 

ist state, b.l 

c-P 

c-P 

ist published state 

c.p., stipple 

ist state 

CP 



Year of 

Sale. 

1902 

I905 
1906 
1907 
1907 

1902 

I903 
1907 
1902 

1903 
1906 
1907 

I905 
1902 
1902 
1907 
1906 
1901 
1904 

1907 
1907 
1902 

I905 
1902 
1903 
. 1905 
1902 
1901 
1902 
1907 
1906 
I902 
I9t>5 
1903 
1903 

1905 
1902 
1903 

I903 
1904 

1907 
1907 
1906 
1906 
1905 
1902 
1902 
1907 
1907 
1906 
1903 
1907 
1907 
1902 

1902 
1906 
1906 
1902 
1902 
1903 
1906 
1903 
1907 
1903 



Price. 
£ s. 
13 10 
10 10 
10 10 
4 14 
3 10 



3 

160 
126 
126 
92 
90 
86 
79 
75 
73 
7i 
56 
52 
49 
43 
42 
36 
35 
33 
32 
26 



r 3 5 

13 2 

6 6 

2 15 
17 10 
11 o 



9 
5 
5 
4 
21 
26 



3 13 

15 15 

147 o 

94 10 
90 o 
68 5 
65 o 

54 12 
42 o 
41 o 
34 13 
33 12 



138 o o 

126 6 o 

77 14 ° 

75 o o 

58 16 o 

40 19 o 

25 4 ° 

12 1 6 

52 10 o 

17 17 o 

2 12 6 

12 o o 

36 15 o 

9 19 6 



76 



List of Engravings 



LIST OF ENGRAVINGS SOLD BY AUCTION— continued. 



Artist. Title. 

Reynolds, Sir].... Harrington, Jane, Countess of, and 
children 



Harrington, Jane, Countess of ; 
Lord Viscount Petersham ; and 
The Hon. Leicester Stanhope ... 

Kauffman, Angelica ... 

Lamb, Peniston, and his brothers... 



Lesbia 

Mansfield, William, Earl of 



Potts, Miss Emily, as Thais 



Simplicity (Mrs. Gwatkin) . 



Smyth, Lady, and 



Children 



Smyth, Lady, and Children ; and 
Jane, Countess of Harrington, 

and Children ... 

ii )i ... ... 

Spencer, Countess 



Remarks. 

proof, in bistre 

in bistre ... 

ist proof ... 

in bistre ... 

2nd state ... 
c.p. 
stipple 



stipple, 2nd state 

in red 

ist state, b.l. 

ist published state 

cp 

c.p., stipple 

p.b.l 

p.b.l 

p.b.l. 

o.l.p., in brown ... 

o.l. p., in brown ... 

o.l.p 

o.l.p., in brown ... 
stipple, ist published state 
c.p., ist state 
cp 

ist state, b.l. 

c-P 

c-P 

c.p., framed 
p.b.l., in brown ... 

ist state 

c-P 

ist state 

stipple 

stipple, proof, in bistre 

c.p., p.b.l. 

ist published state, full margin 

in bistre 

with wide margin 

stipple 

in brown ... 

stipple, in bistre... 

in bistre 

2nd state 



c.p., pair 

stipple, in bistie... 

c-P 

c-P 

c-P 

p.b.l 

p.b.l, in bistre ... 

c-P 

stipple, ist pub. state, in red 
ist published state 
c-P 



if ear of 




J rice. 


Sale. 


£ 


s. 


d 


1902 . 


■ 27 


6 





1904 . 


• 23 


10 





1903 . 


■ 23 


2 





1906 . 


• 23 








1906 . 


.. 18 


7 


6 


1907 . 


. 18 


7 


6 


1902 . 


■ 15 








1902 . 


. 11 


15 





1902 


. 22 


to 





1902 . 


. 6 








1902 . 


• 37 


16 





1903 . 


• 32 


11 





1903 . 


■ 35 


4 





1902 . 


• 3° 


9 





1907 . 


■ 13 


10 





1906 . 


. 11 


10 





1906 . 


■ 3 








1906 . 


• 32 


12 





1906 . 


• 29 


10 





1902 . 


• 24 








1907 . 


. 24 








1906 . 


.. 23 








1904 . 


. 16 


16 





1906 . 


• 5° 








1901 . 


• 19 


8 


6 


1902 . 


. 12 


12 





1902 . 


. 84 








1902 . 


■ 71 


8 





1905 . 


• 65 


2 





1902 . 


• 63 








1902 . 


. 62 








1907 . 


• 57 


15 





I905 ■ 


• 54 


12 





1903 . 


. 40 








1902 . 


• 30 


9 





1903 . 


. 28 


7 





1903 • 


. 28 








1905 . 


• 27 


6 





1906 . 


. 26 


5 





1904 . 


21 








1903 . 


20 


9 


6 


1902 . 


• 19 


19 





1905 . 


• 17 


5 





1902 . 


. 16 


5 





1906 . 


• 15 


'5 





1907 . 


• 15 


4 





1906 . 


• 9 








1902 . 


. 8 








1904 . 


. 200 








1905 . 


• 45 


3 





1903 . 


. no 


5 





1905 . 


. 88 


4 





1903 . 


• 54 


12 





1902 


■ 52 


10 





1902 


■ 34 


'3 





1906 . 


• 30 








1904 . 


• 29 


8 





1907 . 


• 29 


8 





1904 . 


. 28 


7 






77 



Francesco Bartolozzi, R A. 



Artist. 
Reynolds, Sir J. 



Romney 
Roslin 



LIST OF ENGRAVINGS SOLD BY AUCTION— continued. 

Title. 
Spencer, Countess 



Remarks, 
in bistre ... 
ist state ... 



Sprightliness (Master Stanhope) 
Stanhope, The Hon. Leicester 



Stanhope, Master Leicester 

Stanhope, Mr. Leicester ... 
Stanhope, Master Leicester 
Thurlow, Lord 



Venus and Cupid 
Venus Chiding Cupid 

Yorke, Mr.' Philip" 

Crouch, Ann 

Marie Christine, Queen 



proof before the arms 

2nd state 

in bistre 

in brown 

in red 

in brown 

c.p., ist state 

c-P 

cp 

c.p., cut 

c-P 

c-P 

in b stre 

c-P 

p.b.l 

p.b.l 

p.b.l 

o.l.p. 

cp 

in red 

in red 



p.b.l. 

p.b.l., in red 
p.b.l., in red 
o.l.p., in red 



if ear of 


Price. 


Sale. 


£ s. 


d 


1902 


. 18 18 





1904 . 


. 18 7 


6 


1906 . 


. 12 15 


CI 


1902 .. 


12 1 





1905 .. 


. 10 10 





1907 . 


. 10 10 





1901 . 


• 9 19 


6 


1902 .. 


• 7 17 


6 


1907 . 


• 7 17 


6 


igo6 . 


7 10 


o- 


1906 . 


. 40 


i) 


1902 . 


. 76 





1904 . 


■ 44 


<> 


1905 . 


. 22 10 





1906 . 


. 21 





1902 . 


• 19 15 





1907 .. 


• 14 3 


C 


1904 .. 


. 12 5 





1902 . 


• 13 2 


6 


1907 .. 


. 12 10 





1906 .. 


. 8 





1906 .. 


. 6 6 





1906 .. 


10 10 





1902 .. 


• 9 19 


6 


1902 .. 


6 





1906 .. 


. 6 16 


6 


1907 .. 


. 8 8 





1902 .. 


. 40 





1902 .. 


• 3° 15 





1906 .. 


■ 3° 9 






Shelley ... Heathcote, Lady, and Child ; 
Signora Rosalba ; and The Marl- 
borough Family 

Smith, J. R. ... Lecture on Gadding 



Tompkins, P. W. Affection and Innocence 

He Sleeps 

Fool of Quality (Illustrations to the) 



Walker, R. ... Oliver Cromwell 

Walton, H. ... Young Maid ; and The Old Sailor... 

West, B. ... Clarence, Duke of 

Westall (see Wheatley) 

Wheatley, F. ... Country Girl going Reaping ; and 
the Watercress Girl 

,, ,, ... Going to Market ; and The Return 
from Market 

,, ,, ... Newcastle, Duke of (Return from 
Shooting) 



all proofs 

c.p. 

c.p. 

e.l.p. 

c.p. 

c.p. 

o.l.p., in bistre 

in brown ... 



c-P 

proof, in bistre 

c.p. 

pair 



o.l.p. 
in bistre 
p.b.l. 



p.b.l. 



c.p., pair 

c.p. 
c.p. 
c.p. 
c.p. 



1907 . 


• 4 14 


6 


1902 . 


. 58 16 





1906 . 


■ 45 





1907 . 


• 38 7 





1905 . 


■ 36 15 





1904 . 


. 29 8 





1902 . 


. 28 7 





1907 . 


■ 14 r 5 





1902 . 


. 28 





1907 . 


• 5 5 





1904 . 


27 6 





1907 . 


1 n 


6 


1907 . 


. 9 6 





1902 . 


12 1 


6 


1906 . 


• 4 4 





1907 . 


• 13 2 


6 


1907 •. 


3 3 





1907 . 


. 31 10 





1907 . 


. 42 2 





1904 .. 


. 26 5 





1902 . 


• 17 17 





1904 .. 


. 16 16 





1907 . 


• 3 3 






78 



List of Engravings 



LIST OF ENGRAVINGS SOLD BY AUCTION— continued. 



Artist. 
Wheatley, F. . 
Wheatley and 
Hamilton 



Wheatley, 
Westall 



Wheatley, 



F. and 



Title. 
Return from Shooting 

Return from Shooting ; with Com- 
panion, by A. Cardon 

Scenes from Faust 

Seasons, The 



,, (Summer ; and Winter ; 

and Autumn) 

Seasons, The (Summer, and Winter) 



(Summer) 
(Winter) 
Show, The ; and The Fair 



Remarks. 



c.p. 



c.p., pair ... 
c.p., pair ... 
c.p., pair ... 

p.b.l., set of 4 
p.b.l., set of 4 
p.b.l., set of 4 
o.p.l., set of 4 
p.b.l., set of 4 
in bistre, set of 



all p.b.l., very fine 

c.p., two 

p.b.t., c.p., pair ... 



c.p. 

p.b.l., brilliant impression in 
brown, full untrimmed margins 

cp. 

p.b.l., brilliant impression in 
brown, full untrimmed margins 

c.p., pair 

o.l.p 



Year of 




Price. 


Sale. 


£ 


s. 


d 


1905 .. 


■ 25 


4 





1907 .. 


. 84 








1902 .. 


• 50 








1902 .. 


• 17 


17 





1906 .. 


. 86 








1902 .. 


• 55 


■3 





1906 .. 


• 50 


i 





1902 .. 


• 33 


12 





I903 •• 


■ 24 


3 





1907 .. 


. 18 


10 





1906 .. 


. 18 


7 


6 


1903 .. 


• 5° 








1902 .. 


■ 183 


5 





1905 .. 


• 9i 


7 





1907 .. 


• 13 


13 





1904 .. 


• 67 


4 





1903 .. 


• 34 








1902 .. 


• 50 


8 





1903 .. 


• 35 








1902 .. 


• 43 


1 





1907 .. 


• 5 









Abbreviations:— c.p., colourprint ; s., stipple; p.b.l., proof before letters ; e.l.p., etched letter proof ; 
p.b.t., proof before the title ; o.l.p., open letter proof. 

Note. — The description in each case is that given in the auctioneers' catalogue. 



79 



CONTENTS. 

PAGE. 

Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. A Biographical Sketch - v- — xlvii. 

Bibliography of Books relating to Bartolozzi - - xlviii. — xlix. 

Illustrations ,,,.-»»- 1 56 
List of Published Engravings by Bartolozzi- - - - 57 — 69 

List of Engravings by Bartolozzi sold by Auction from 1901-1907 70—79 



80 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Colourplate. Frontispiece. 

Facing page 



Francesco Bartolozzi. By R. Marcuard after Sir Joshua Reynolds 
Venus Surrounded by Cupids. G. B. Cipriani. Colourplate 

From a print in the possession of Mr. Frink Sabin. 

The Girl and Kitten. Sir Joshua Reynolds. Colourplate 

From a print in the possession of Mr. Frank Sabin. 

The Jealousy of Lord Darnley. G. B. Cipriani. Colourplate 

From a print in the possession of the Rev. T. Elphege Power, O.S.B. 

Ceres. Drawn and engraved by Bartolozzi. Colourplate 

The Mouse's Petition. Colourplate. From a print in the possession of Mr. Frank Sabin 

Bacchus and Ariadne. G. B. Cipriani. Colourplate - 

From a print in the possession of Messrs. J. Rimell & Son. 
Summer. F. Wheatley. Colourplate. From a print in the possession of Mr. Frank Sabin 

The Fair. Wheatley. Colourplate 

Youth. R. Cosway. Colourplate - 

Market of Love. Colourplate - 

Hon. Mr. Leicester Stanhope. Sir Joshua Reynolds. Colourplate 

Innocence Taught by Love and Friendship. G. B. Cipriani. Colourplate 

Simplicity. Sir Joshua Reynolds. Colourplate 

Playing at Marbles. W. Hamilton. Colourplate 

Cupids. Lady Diana Beauclerk. Colourplate 

Conjugal Love. G. B. Cipriani. Colourplate 

Cupids. Lady Diana Beauclerk. Colourplate 

Lord Burghersh. Sir Joshua Reynolds. Colourplate 

The Triumph of Virtue. Rev. Mr. Peters. Colourplate 

From a print in the possession of Mr. B. Jacobson. 

Sportive Innocence. W. Hamilton. Colourplate 
A St. James's Beauty. J. H. Benwell. Colourplate 

Beauty. G. B. Cipriani. From a print in the possession of Mr. Frank Sabin - 

The Right Honourable William Pitt. Gainsborough Dupont 

By permission of The Autotype Co., 74 New Oxford Street, W.C. 
Catherine II., Empress of Russia. M. Beneditti. From a print in the possession of Mr. B. Jacobson 

Portrait of a Lady in Grecian Dress. R. Cosway .... 

H.R.H. Princess Amelia. Thos. Lawrence. By permission of The Autotype Co., 74 New Oxford St., W.C. 

Pax Artium Nutrix. B. West. Do. Do. 

Guardian Angels, or Silence. Do. Do- 

Georgiana, Countess Spencer. Gainsborough. From a print in the possession of Mr. Frank Sabin 



Do. 
, 74 New Oxford St., W.C. 
Do. 



Do. 



Do. 



Vincent Lunardi. R. Cosway 

Euphrosine. G. Amiconi. By permission of The Autotype Co., 

Psyche Going to Bathe. G. B. Cipriani. 

Miss Farren. Sir Thomas Lawrence 

Angelica Kauffman. Sir Joshua Reynolds. Do. Do. 

Thais. Sir Joshua Reynolds. By permission of Messrs. Siegle Hill ft Co. - 

Charity. I. B. Cipriani. By permission of The Autotype Co., 74 New Oxford Street, W.C. 

Autumn. G. B. Cipriani. Do. Do. 

Jupiter and Juno. G. B. Cipriani. Do. Do. 

The Fair Student. G. B. Cipriani. From a print in the possession of Messrs. J. Rimell & Son 

Duchess of Devonshire. J. Nixon. From a print in the possession of Mr. Frank Sabin - 

Mrs. Siddons. H. Hone - - Do. Do. 

Portraits of Elizabeth and Mary Beauclerk. Lady Diana Beauclerk 

The Dance. H. Bun bury. ..... 

Visiting Cards : Sir Joshua Reynolds's .... 

Mrs. Parker's ..... 

Zephyrus. Colibert. By permission of The Autotype Co., 74 New Oxford Street, W.C. 
Flora. Colibert. Do. Do. 

Maria Cosway. R. Cosway. From a print in the possession of Mr. Frank Sabin 



Page 



xx. 

xxiv. 

xxxii. 
xxxvi. 

xl. 

xlviii. 

1 

4 

10 

14 

20 

28 

32 

36 

40 

44 

48 



52 
57 

1 
2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

6 

7 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

12 

13 

13 

14 

15 

15 

16 

17 

17 

17 

18 

19 

20 



81 



List of Illustrations. 



Hebe. G.B.Cipriani. By permission of The Autotype Co., 74 New Oxford Street, W.C. 
Fire. C.B.Cipriani. From a print in the possession of Messrs. J. Rimell & Son. 

Air. G. B. Cipriani. Do. Do. 

Earth. G. B. Cipriani. Do. Do. " - 

Water. G. B. Cipriani. Do. Do. 

Lovelace in Prison. I. F. Rigaud From a print in the possession of Mr. B. Jacobion. 

The Judgment of Paris. Angelica Kauffman. From a print in the possession of Mr. B Jacobson. 

The Right Honble. Lady Jane Dundas. J. Hoppner. From a print in the possession of Mr. Frank Sabin 

Zeuxis Composing the Picture of Juno. Angelica Kauffman 

From a print in the possession of Mr. B. Jacobson. 
Cupid's Manufactory. F. Albani. By permission of Messrl. Siegle Hill * Co. 

Infant St. John. Guercino. Do. Do. 

Mother and Child. Guercino. Do. Do. 

The Deserted Village. F. Wheatley. By permission of The Autotype Co., 74 New Oxford Street, W.C. 

Horace. Ang. Kauffman. By permission of Messrs. Siegle Hill 4 Co. 

Sterne's " Maria of Moulines." I. H. Benwell - 
The Gipsy Fortune Teller. I. H. Benwell 

The Fair Ariadne. By permission of The Autotype Co., 74 New Oxford Street, W.C. 

Mansion House Ticket. G. P. Cipriani 
„ „ „ (Proof state) 

Masonic Frontispiece ..... 

Master Philip Yorke. Sir Joshua Reynolds. By permission of The Autotype Co., 74 New Oxford St., W.C. 

Boys Playing with a Lamb. Simone de Pesaro .... 

By permission of The Autotype Co., 74 New Oxford Street, W.C. 
Four Boys with a Vase. Guercino. By permission of The Autotype Co., 74 New Oxford Street, W.C. 
An Italian Concert. Guercino. By permission of Messrs. Siegle Hill & Co. 

Holy Family with Angel. Guercino. Do. Do. 

G. B. Cipriani, R.A. From a print in the possession of Mr. Frank Sabin - - 

His Grace the Duke of Marlborough. Engraved by J. Ogborne after F. Bartolozzi - 

From a print in the possession of Mr. B. Jacobson. 
Madonna del PeSCC Raphael. By permission of The Autotype Co., 74 New Oxford Street, W.C. 

George, Third Duke of Marlborough, Caroline his Duchess, and Child. Saml. Shelley 

By permission of The Autotype Co., 74 New Oxford Street, W.C. 

John Philip Kemble. W. Hamilton. Do. Do. 

Pastoral Subject. Do. Do 

Eve and the Serpent. W. Hamilton - - . . 
Charity (Queen Charlotte as Charitable Benefactress) 

A Naiad. G. B. Cipriani. From a print in the possession of Messrs. J. Rimell & Son 

Venus and Adonis. Cosway. Do. Do. 

Ariosto's " Orlando Furioso." Canto XXXV. Stanza XII. G.B.Cipriani 
Business Card for Wm. Wilson .... 

Psyche Going to DreSS. I. G. Cipriani. From a print in the possession of Mr. Frank Sabin 
Winter. F. Wheatley. By permission of The Autotype Co., 74 New Oxford Street, W.C. 

Maternal Love. G. B. Cipriani .... 

Spring. R. Westall. Do. Do. 

Hope. Do. Do. 

Venus Chiding Cupid. Sir Joshua Reynolds. By permission of The Autotype Co., 74 New Oxford St., W.C 
Hercules and Omphale. G. B. Cipriani. Do. Do. 

Rinaldo and Armida. Angelica Kauffman. From a print in the possession of Mr. Frauk Sabin 
Griselda. Angelica Kauffman. By permission of The Autotype Co., 74 New Oxford Street, W.C. 

Harriet Viscountess Bulkeley. R. Cosway - 

Donald and Jessie. R. Cosway. From a print in the possession of Mr. Frank Sabin 

Henrietta Frances Viscountess Duncannon. Lavinia, Countess Spencer 

From a print in the possession of Mr. Frank Sabin. 
The Rt. Hon. Anne Countess Cowper. W. Hamilton From a print in the possession of Mr. Frank Sabin 

Nymphs at Fountain. G. B. Cipriani - - Do. Do. 



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37 
37 
38 
39 

40 
40 

40 
40 
41 
41 
42 
43 
44 
44 
45 
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82 



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