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Full text of "Frankford direction of a greater Philadelphia;"


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FRANKFORD 



Direction of a 
Greater Philadelphia 



SOUVENIR Booklet and 
Program published to 
commemorate the open- 
ing of the Frankford 
Elevated Railway. 



NOVEMBER 
FOURTH TO 
ELEVENTH, 
NINETEEN HUNDRED 
TWENTY* TWO 




ALVIN A. SWENSON 

Largest Ford Dealer in Northeast 



AUTHORIZED 



^foyzcC d 



EALER 



TH» UNIVERSAL CAH 



LINCOLN MOTOR CARS 
FORDSON TRACTORS 



Phones 
FRANKFORD 2787-38 
EAST 7923 



4120-50 Kensington Ave. 



% 



TWO BIG ACHIEVEMENTS 

Opening Frankford L and Swenson's 
New Service Station 

I am now prepared to serve the tremendous army of 
Ford Users. Everything must be as represented or no 
charge. 



Prompt Deliveries 
on all cars. 




Cash or very con- 
venient time 
payments 



OUR INTEREST IN YOUR CAR DOES NOT CKA»B 
ON CELIV3RY 



BUY YOUR FORD FROM SWENSON 



This 


hook 


is dedicatee 


to 


those 


pub 


ic spirited 


ad- 


vertisers 


who made 


its 


(nthl'i 


:atior\ possible. 





FRANKFORD 

Direction of a Qreater Philadelphia 

Published to commemorate the celebration of the opening 

of the 

FRANKFORD ELEVATED RAILROAD 
November 4th to 11th, 1922 



H 



Compiled by 

GUERNSEY A. HALLOWELL and THOMAS CREIGHTON 



°$ 



Program Committee 

Thomas Creighton, Guernsey A. Hallowell, 

Henry S. Borneman, Judson Yerkes, 

David Tuteur, R. C. Buzby 



F? 
Committee ox Celebration 









Presidenl 

THOMAS CREIGHTON 

1327 Foulkj.ui St. 

Secretary 

HARRY .M. HILLEGASS 

1206 Foulkrod St. 



FINANCE 
Alvin A. Swenson, Ch'rnian 

John E. Gossling 
Emmett O'Neill 

B. E. Effing 

I'" rank B. Baldwin 

< 'has. J. McGough 

Edwin Hulley 

J. Harry Schumacker 

George Royle 

Allen M. Stearne, Esq. 

James F. Curia n 

J. A. Edgar 

Norman S. Castor 

Edward J. Gall en 

M.E. Zeak 

David Tuteur 

Hon. James A. Dunn 

Edward M I. Ward 

Oliver Stout 

John Sinn 

William G. Streit 

George A. Williams 

PRESS AND BOOSTING 
E. C. Patterson, Chairman 
Benjamin Hepworth 
James France 
George W. Henrj 



HISTORICAL 



Vice-President 
HARRY SCHUMACKER 

12«i4 Wakeling St. 

Treasurer 
BENJ. S. THORP 

5012 Penn St. 

INDUSTRIAL 



Dr. J. .Mendenhall, Ch'r 
Prof. T. Worcester W >rrell 

Thomas Creighton 
Guernsey A. Hallowell 
John T. Shaw 
G. Alvin Snook 
( :. Fiank Lever 
Harry M. Hillegass 
William B. Gilmour 
Henry S. Borneman, Esq. 
James A. Adams 
Edna R. Worrell 
\Vni. Corson 
Frank Ma\ 

PUBLIC SAFETY 
William R. Horn 
John A. Quinn 
Thos. W. Schumacher 

BABY PARADE 

J. Harry Schumacker. 

( 'hairinan 
John T. Shaw 
\Y. S. Diamond, Jr. 
J. Ellwood McKinley 
Joseph Candy 
W. Howard Holden 



PROGRAM 
Thos. Creighton, Chairman 
David Tuteur 
Judson J. Yerkes 
< ruernsey A. Hallowell 
Henry s. Borneman, Esq. 
R. L. Buzby 

MUSIC 

( has. A. I )isne.\ 
C. Grant Lucas 
I. Ellwood McKinley 
Hon. James A. I )unn 
J. A. Allwein 
Gustav liecker 
Joseph Candy 

ENTERTAINMENT 
Edward Gallon 

B. E. Filing 

C. Grant Lucas 



Jos. B. Seaman, 
Edwin Ilullev 



DECORATING 
Judson J. Yerkes, Ch'rman 
Win. Craig 

POPULARITY CONTEST 
John A. Quinn, Chairman 
B. Davis 

Thomas G. Williams 
J. Ellwood McKinley 
George Haberbush 
Wm. Hepworth 
l>arrell W'iinsor 
Clifford K. Fowler 
John J. J. Clabby 
Francis P. M'Oitz 
I leorge W. Henry 
• reo. Tauraccio 
.1. Block 
I )a\ id Tuteur 
Chas. Booth 
Frank B. Baldwin 
H. F. Holme 
Chas. W. Bea\ er 
Judson J. Yerkes 

LIGHTING 
Chairman. I. Walter Fastburn Dl I >hn \' 

Harrj M. Hillegass Ellwood S. 



George Gray, Chairman 
Bernard Davis 
('has. I. McGough 
I). R. Greenwood 

W. Howard Holden 
Jaiiu . S. McMaster, Jr. 
Thomas N. Murray 
George Roj le 
John Sidebotham 
Franklin Smedley 
John M. Williams 
Lawrence Woodhouse 
Eugene A. Burgin 
Fred P. Burkhart 

F. S. Putney 

Robert L. Sheppard 

John N. Williams 

FRATERNAL 
Jos. I'. Candy. Chairman 
Robert H. Ashmead 
I leorge E. Earnshaw 
Alberl J. Welsh 
Wm. J. Randall 
Frank Henry 
R. John Boyd 
Fdw. D. Boehmer 
.1. J. Steele 
Chas. H. Harvey 
John J. J. Olabbv 
John A. Quinn 
James L. Adams 
Dr. Thomas C. Ross 
C. ( rant Lucas 
Evan C. Patterson 
\)v. lobn Y. Allen 
John M. I. Ward 

PUBLICITY 
Bernard I lavis, Chairman 

Judson J. Yerkes 
Thomas G. Williams 
c. Warren Allen 
William B. Gilmour 
William E. Allen 
Chas. II. Button 
Howard George 
W. Hepworth 

James France 
John I. J. Clabbj 
T. s. Hodgins 



Allen 
1 >avis 






LIBKArvY Of 

deo wm 

OOCUMtN^ 



FRANKFORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



FRANKFORD TRANSIT 

An Old Problem Recurring in Progressive Phases Since the 
Days of Perm 

FRANKF< >RD had a vision of elevated rapid transit to and from 
the centre of the city almost thirty years ago, when a short section 

of elevated structure was erected on Front St. north of Arch. It 
remained there for a few months and then was taken down and 
removed to Pencoyd, where it is now doing duty as a trackway for a 
traveling crane. Still Frankford cherished hope, and if it be true that 
a patient waiter is no loser, the accumulated credits for hopeful wait- 
ing during three decades, compounding interest, ought to bring a hand- 
some reward in the form of up-to-the-minute transportation service 
when the trains finally run over the red skeleton on which the North- 
east now pins its hope. 

Transit problems are indigenous to the northeast. It was in that 
direction following the settlement of the old city that the Provincial 
Council ordered the first King's Highway built about Philadelphia. 
The first "kick" about delayed transit to the northeast appears to have 
come from William Penn himself, when in 1/(K), he wrote a sharp note 
to the members of the Council asking when they were going to build 
the bridge over the Pennypack and the Poquessing, so that he could 
come to town in comfort from his up-river home. 

As early as 1725 an enterprising Philadelphian apparently found 
it profitable to run "four-wheeled chairs" from the old Three Tuns 
on Chestnut Street above Second to Frankford. Four ticket- for a 
quarter now seem but a song compared with his transportation rate 
to Frankford of ten shillings for each passenger. For nearly a century 
and a quarter after that date the means of traveling to and from 
Frankford were limited to the slow -going coach, while the rates oi 
fare continued high and operated as a continuing check against the 
growth of that part of Philadelphia County. 

The infrequency of the service was the chief cause of dissatis- 
faction, as most of the lines discontinued service shortly after sundown 
and an indication of the limited extent of transit accommodations may 
be noted in an advertiseme.it in the middle of the past century 
announcing that a special night bus would leave the centre of the 
city, "on Saturday nights only." at twelve o'clock. 

Although one of the earliest settled regions outside of the city- 
proper, as late as 1840 the population of Frankford did not number 
twenty-eight hundred. At that tune three regular bus lines were in 
operation, one from Frankford, one from Holmesburg and another 
from Bustleton, twenty-five tents being charged for a ride from 
Frankford to Market Street, and fifty cents from either of the other 
two points. Now and then, however, a resident of Frankford desiring 
a quick journey townward could pick up a vacant scat on one of "the 
Hying machines," the speed; and light four-horsed carriages that 
traveled between Philadelphia and New York, or secure a seal on one 
of the mail coaches as it passed through the borough. 



FRANKFORD — DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



The "L" Program 

Some Features of the Big Celebration 



FRIDAY NIGHT, NOVEMBER 3rd— In the Hail of the 
Frankford Library, Lecture by Mr. George II. Pattison on the Pasl 
Historj of Frankford. 

SATURDAY, AT NOON, NOVEMBER 4th— Bells will 
ring and whistles blow to usher in the beginning- of the Celebration. 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON, NOVEMBER 4th, at 2.30 
O'Clock — Historic Pageant on the Avenue showing the develop- 
ment of Frankford Avenue within the Past Half Century. 

SATURDAY NIGHT, NOVEMBER 4th — Community 

Dance on < Kerington and other streets of the town, under the super- 
vision of Miss Walt/., superintendent of dancing. 

SUNDAY MORNING, \'< >VEMBER 5th- -Preaching in the 
churches on the Religious Development of Frankford. 

SUNDAY AFTERN< »< >N AT 3.30— Gathering of the Sunday 

Schools on the High School Plaza and singing of hymns and patri- 
otic songs. 

MONDAY NIGHT, NOVEMBER 6TH Street Dancing and 
display of industries in the store windows, and music by the hand- 
on the Avenue. 

TUESDAY, \T 7.30, NOVEMBER 7th (hand Baby Pa- 
rade on the Avenue. 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, NOVEMBER 8th Parade 

of school children. 

WEDNESDAY NIGHT, \'< >VEMBER 8th Open. 

THURSDAY NIGHT, NOVEMBER 9th Industrial parade, 
by Manufacturers and Merchants. 

FRIDAY NIGHT, NOVEMBER 10 Big Fraternal Parade. 

SATURDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER Urn Burning of 
the Mortgage at the Legion House on Paul Street, and Parade ol 

the Service Bi 13 S. 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON, NOVEMBER Htm Dedica 
tion d!" World War Service Boys.' Memorial on Community Field. 



-RANKFORD DIRECTION 01- A GREATER PHILADEL1 



ESTABLISHED 1881 



Smedley Bros. Co. 

LUMBER AND MILLWORK 

Complete Saw and Planing Mill Facilities, 

Stairwork, Bulks and All Kinds 

of Special Millwork 




_ 







Distributors of 

UPSON WALL BOARD 
UPSON FIBRE TILE 

UPSON 

PROCESSED A wood fibre board which looks and 
P\ Jj[\ t\ \j works like wood. The nearest perfect 




.THE UPSON COMPANY^ 

LOCKPOBT 

NY 



lining for walls and ceilings. 



ASBESTOS AND ASPHALT SHINGLES 
BISHOPRIC STUCCO BOARD 

For all kinds of Stucco Work 

RED CEDAR POSTS 

Frankford - - - Bridesburg 

Philadelphia, Penna. 



8 FRANKFORD — DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



The Oldest Bank in the Northeast 

Established 1864 

SECOND NATIONAL BANK 
OF PHILADELPHIA 

At Frankford 



CAPITAL AND SURPLUS - - $1,000,000.00 H 

DEPOSITS $8,000,000.00 5 

RESOURCES - - $9,500,000.00 B 

S 
s 

Over a Half Century the history 
of this Bank has been a record 
of efficient service to the com- 
munity. Our success has been 
largely due to the generous sup- 
port of our patrons. 



WE SOLICIT YOUR ACCOUNT 






FRANKFORD- DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 

1886 1922 

G. FRANK LEVER 

REAL ESTATE INSURANCE 

FIDELITY BONDS 

4304-4306 FRANKFORD AVENUE 

PHOENIX OF LONDON FIRE - ESTABLISHED 1782 
PHOENIX INDEMNITY CO., NEW YORK 



If You Want 

Fresh Drugs, Pure Chemicals, Toilet 
Articles, Sick Room Requisites, Bath 
Room Supplies, or Choice Cigars, 

Go to JOHN T. SHAW 

Prescription Druggist 

MAIN AND FOULKROD STREETS 
FRANKFORD, PHILADELPHIA 

Prescriptions accurately and promptly compounded at all hours 



FRANKFORD — DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 




LAFR'NCE OUR MILLS 

demonstrating the latest achievements in 
Jacquard Weaving will he open to visitors 

1 " " ■■ " ■ " ' ciurin» L Celebration, and to all interested 

from educational point of view and at certain hours after 
the celebration. 

La France Textile Co. 

Frankford Ave., Unity and Paul Sts. 
Frankford, Philadelphia 




FRANKFORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPH1 



LI 



KEYSTONE PHONE. EAST 8493 



BELL PHONE, FRANKFORD 0125 



3Frankftirft Ctal anft ICtm? (Eo, 

JOHN J. SINN 

Sttilfora' fHatrrtals, Anthraritr mb 
Sttumtnoua (Uual 

443II Jfeun §>tort 



QUALITY 




SERVICE 



Consistent Since 1898 



FRANKFORD — DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



-\ I0L55 5M5jnr tttt to j / to l . 
1 



? l i : ;, i -i: ^ ^n im : a i ImI i^ !■"•: :■"•: :-: '- : 'i "■: :-: v-i v>: :"•: i^i y- 



FURNITURE 

Of the Better Kind 

Courtesy and Service Reign Supreme 
Charge Accounts Solicited 




HUB FURNITURE CO. 

Three Stores in Philadelphia 

4734 FRANKFORD AVE., FRANKFORD 
22 and 24 W. CHELTEN AVE., GERMANTOWN 

and 
2205 SOUTH STREET 



Established 1907 



M. Huh & Sons, Prop's 



1 

t ft: ft: ft: fti W ft: ft: s&sisffiz ssaeaJB SS fti:fti ft: ft: ft: ft:fti ftrftift:ftTft:^ft^ft:ft:ft: 3 



PRANKFORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 13 



Established - 1909 



CHARLES A. DISNEY & SON 






Artistic Marble and Qranite 
Memorials 






5119 - 25 FRANKFORD AVENUE 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

QUALITY SERVICE 

Both Phones 



1-i I-RAXKFORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



THE BUSINESS MEN'S 

and 

TAXPAYERS' 

ASSOCIATION 

of 
FRANKFORD 

A live, progressive band of citizens 
who work for the ^ood oi a com- 
munity. 

Meets third Tuesday ol each month 
at eight o'clock p. m. 

FRANKFORD LIBRARY HALL 

FRANKFORD AVE. at OVERINGTON ST. 
Organized April 28th, 1806. 

ANYTHINQ AND EVERyTHINQ 
TO BOOM FRANKFORD 



FRANKFORD DIRECTION OF V GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



Established - 1913 



CHAS. H. J31TTOX 



DEPARTMENT 
STORE 



Frankford Avenue and Sellers Street 
FRANKFORD 



16 FRANKFORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



Notary Public Insurance 

Established January, 1903 

E. M. JEANNISSON 

Realty in All Its Branches 



« 



4628 FRANKFORD AVENUE 
Frankford, Phila. 



Bell Phone, Frankford 0513 



IS FRANKFORD -DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 




The 92 Homes on the 
FRANKFORD "L" 

are the first in the series for the 
development of Northeast 

Frankford Real Estate Co. 

4413-15 Frankford Avenue 

MORTGAGES BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 



NOTARY PUBLIC 



INSURANCE 



REAL ESTATE IN ALL BRANCHES 



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FRANKFORD DIRECTION OP A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



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20 FRANKFORT — DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



Recent delays, discussions and disagreements over the rapid tran- 
sit proposals for the relief of that section had a counterpart shortly 
after that time in the quibbling and squabbling thai attended the first 
efforts to introduce "modern'' tramway traffic to that section in the 
years preceding the Civil War. Frankford Avenue, known as "Mam 
Street" within the confines of 'hat borough, then was under the con- 
trol of the Frankford and Bristol Turnpike Company, and the bridge- 
way across Frankford Creek was like a bottle-neck through which all 
traffic to that section had to pass unless the rider or driver made a 
detour of about a mile and a half to avoid toll charges. When the first 
transit proposal was advanced for rail service tin- promoters lo 
not only to connecting the city-proper with its northeastern borough 
hut projected a line running from Fifth and Cherry Streets to the 
Delaware Gap, the incorporating Act. adopted by the Legislature of 
1854, authorizing the laying of a railway from the Cherry Street term- 
inal to Frankford, to Hatboro, Riegelsville and Easton. I'm before 
the Philadelphia and Delaware River Railroad Company began opera 
tion its charter rights were confined to the cit) and its corporate privi- 
leges acquired by the Frankford and Southwark Citizens' Passenger 
Railway Company. 

The latter company built and operated the first horse car line 
m the city, hut before it was started a vigorous remonstrance was filed 
against it and Richard Garsed, Coffin Colket, Jacob Peters and other 
principal stockholders in these early roads had to conduct an energetic 
canvass of residents along the right of way and iss U e a number of 
appeals for public support. One of the arguments advanced againsl 
the construction of the road was that it was being projected entirely in 
the interest of the manufacturers of Frankford and Southwark, who 
desired to connect those districts and the mills ol Kensington and 
Moyamensing by rail, so that an eas) and direct line of freight trans- 
port could he developed through the centre of the city. Any such in- 
tention was disclaimed promptly by the owners, whose pica- for public 
support read like phrases from recent transit arguments. The I'hila 
delphians and Frankfordites of that day were informed that the road 
was projected in the interests of workmen, artisans and craftsmen, 
that such a line meant "cheap rents, speedy transit and pure air." and 
that no less than "three-quarters of a million people" were concerned 
in the projected service. 

When the road was started, early in 1858, it was equipped with 
horse cars, hut the haul from Morris Street on the ?outh, to ( 'rthodox 
Street on the north by thai means proving too Ion- and time consum- 
ing, the method of operation was changed at the upper end of the 
road. In 1863 Frankford thus came into possession of the first "all- 
rail high-speed intra-urban" line in the city, independenl of the steam 
roads, when the upper part of the Frankford line, north of Cumber- 
land Street, was equipped and operated with "ilinuniv engines." 
Kates of fare, however, were high over these old roads, and when, in 
1880, the fare from Frankford to Philadelphia was reduced from 
twelve to ten cents it was heralded as a notable victory in obtaining 
cheap transportation for the extreme northeast. 

n'nued on Pa 



FRANKEORD DIRECTION OS A. GREATER PHILADELPHIA 21 



READ THIS NOW! 

and decide to read 

THE FRANKFORD DISPATCH 

Every Week 



ALL THE LOCAL NEWS 
THE LARGEST CIRCULATION 
THE BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM 



22 FRANKFORD- DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 

r 



Kinkerter & Sheppard Co. 

HARDWARE HOUSEFURNISHINGS 

CHINA AND GLASSWARE 

LINOLEUM 

CUTLERY TOOLS 

SEEDS EVERGREENS BULBS 

POULTRY SUPPLIES 

Stoves 




Red Star Oil fi)CjE wialSfu^i Miller ( )i] 

Cooking Stove LJylJBifA^S^M' 1 ) Heating Stove 



RADIANTFIRE GAS HEATER 

To resl or -hop or buy our Store is at your service 
Celebration Week &rsd every other week on the 
calendar. 



Bright Corner Frankford, Pa. 



FRAN KEORD— DIRECTION <U ; A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 23 




THE OLD FRANKFORD HIGH SCHOOL 



Established 1875 



KIRST BROS. 

Slate, Tin and Tile Roofers 

4815 FRANKFORD AVENUE 
Philadelphia 

Happy is the Man With a Qood Roof Over His Head 



ing I 'romtly Attended to 



Bell I 'hour 



24 FRAN KFORD — DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



AN INSTITUTION 

that has fulfilled every promise made 
to the people of Frankford, 

THE FRANKFORD THEATRE 

You always get more real, clean amuse- 
ment here than elsewhere in Philadel- 
phia for less admission price. 

A Three-in-One Show changed Monday 

and Thursday. Get the Frankford 

Vaudeville and Picture Habit 

Direction of 

C. STAMPER 



PRANKFORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 25 



BALDWIN DAIRIES 

Office and Plant 

Foulkrod and Duffield Streets 

Frankford, Phila. 

PASTEURIZED 
MILK and CREAM 



Special Milk for Infants and Invalids 



Drink BALDWIN'S CREAM 

BUTTERMILK 

For Better Health 

Your Inspection Invited 



26 FRANKFORD — DIRECTION <>!•' A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



We wish to thank the 
people of Greater Phila- 
delphia for the patronage 
given our Frankford 
Bakery. 

You know what Old Town 
Bread is. Our other products 
are just as good. 

Cinnamon Buns Coffee Cakes 

Doughnuts Crullers 

Pies and Pastry 

And the Best Reading Pretzels 

TRAINER BAKING CO. 

4668 Frankford Avenue 
OTHER STORES 

5514-16 Germantown Ave. 3525 Haverford Ave. 

7157 Germantown Ave. 100 Market St. 

8425 Germantown Ave. 



FRANKFORD DIRECTION OF V GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



>7 



1889 



1922 



Thos. E. Boysen 

4312 FRANKFORD AVE. 

PAINTING AND 

PAPERHANGING 

Lucas' Tinted Gloss readj mixed 
paint, stains, varnishes, enamels and 
brushes. Oils, glass, window shades 
and wall paper for sale. 

Pratt & Lamberts' 61 Floor Varnish, 
38 preservative varnish and Vitralite 
the long life enamel. 

The present business was stalled 
by George H. Boysen, Sr., in 1889, a1 
i^Ts Frankford Ave., in 1891 the busi- 
ness was moved to the present ad- 
dress 4312 Frankford Aveune, being 
successfully conducted by George H. 
Boysen, Sr., until his death which 
occurred in January, 1909. Thomas 
E. Boysen, son of George H. Boysen, 
Sr., succeeded his father in business 
and is still carrying on the business of 
:!;! years standing. 



Bell Phone, Frankford 2110 



A. GOLDSTEIN 

Up-to-Date Clothier 

CLEANING 

PRESSING 

REPAIRING 

DYEING 

SCOURING 

4813 Frankford Ave. 
Philadelphia 



"Say it with Flowers" 


HEMSTITCHING AND 


No more beautiful or 


PLEATING 


expressive testimonial of 


Buttons Covered 


fond recollection than 


W. G. COUNSIL 


flowers- both for the dead 


4809 FRANKFORD AVE. 


and the living. 


Formerly 4353 and 4526 




SEWING MACHINES-We 


HilPs Flower Shop 


Repair all Makes 


4465 FRANKFORD AVE. 


Vacuum Sweepers and 
Electric Washers 


Bell Phone, Fkd. 770 


Vocalain Records 

Phone Frankford 047 1 



2£ FRANK-FORD — DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



Bread is the Staff of Life - Therefore 
Eat Qood Bread 

This business was founded in 
1845 by Ernest Shopher. In 1851 
it was sold to two young men, Mr. 
Thorn and HofT. Business was 
afterwards bought by Wm. Vedity 
and at his retiring to Henry- 
Becker, passing at his death to the 
present owner. 

GUSTAV BECKER 

4310 Frankford Ave., 

Frankford, Phila. 

BAK1NQ CATERINQ 

We Invite Your Patronage 



I-K.W KEORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



29 



REAL ESTATE SPECIALISTS 
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS 

Real Estate in tdl its branches 

Cassidy Bros. 

REAR OF FRANKFORD LIBRARY 
FRANKFORD, PHILA. 



Smallest Margin of Profit Ever Attempted in the Shoe World 



Wonderful 
Shoes 




Exclusive 

Styles 



FOR MEN V DOYS 
STORES ETV-ERYWKERE 

4611 FRANKFORD AVENUE 



NEW FALLSIllirrSAXI) \KCKWKA 

GLOVES, SWEATERS, KMT JACKETS 
UNDERWEAR 

THOS. J. MURRAY 

SHOPS FOR MEN A XI) WOMEN 

4:n:M5 b^rankford avenue 

Let Munsin&wear Union Sun You 



, : ,() FRANKFORT)—- DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 

S 

The Elevated will cut down the time to and from the city, but ^ 
[J you will save time and money by trading here. Thirty years con- 3 

\j\ tinuous service proves it. G 

ft ft 

VICTROLAS KODAKS a 

ft ft 

GUNS AMMUNITION 
| GENERAL SPORTING GOODS 

HOWARD GEORGE 

4359 Frankford Avenue 

Opposite Second National Bank 
Both Phones Open Mon., Friday and Sat. Evenings tg 

ft s 



Frankford Booster 

GEORGE M. HOLCOMB 

Real Estate and Insurance 

OXFORD AVE. below FOULKROD ST. 
FRANKFORD, PHILADELPHIA 

Bell Phone. Frankford 2378 



I'R'ANKFORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 31 

Guernsey A. Hallowell 

Conveyancer and Real Estate Broker 
Notary Public 

4510-14 Frankford Avenue, Philadelphia 

BUILDING ASSOCIATION 

and 

INSTALLMENT MORTGAGES 

ESTABLISHED 1891 



Our Business is Sixty-five Years Young ! 

( >ur unique record stands as a bright lighl in Frankford's history. 
Starting in 1857 .it Unity St., the business prospered through the 
successive ownership of Mr. Gilliams and Mr. G. S. R. Wright. 
A firm foundation was built through application of our slogan 
"Quality plus real friendly service." 

In 1913 the store was purchased by Charles J. Seltzer, who has 
carried forward all policies and traditions that have done so much 
toward making the store popular. < >ver 500,000 prescriptions have 
been filled since 1857 in the Unity Street store. 
In 1920 the store at 4662 Frankford Avenue was established. 
Through the two stores we are supplying popular demand for over 
9,000 distinct items of evevy-day use. 

THE SELTZER DRUG STORES 

4662 FRANKFORD AVENUE 

4 doors above Empire Theatre) 

4401 FRANKFORD AVENUE 

(at Unity Streeti 
PHONE, FRANKFORD L406 REXALL STORES 



IRAN Ki-okD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 




NEW HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING 



Courtesy o/ Mi 



This service, along with the semi-suburban train service fostered 
l/\ the Reading and the Pennsylvania railroads in tapping thai section 
hi the city, developed Frankford until its growth reached a point 
where electric transportation succeeded in uniting it to the city, at 
points, in an unbroken row oi buildings. At the time of the conver- 
sion of the horse car and dummy lines into electric roads the Frank- 
ford "I," project came to the front, along with proposals for similar 
high speed lines on other main thorough fares of the city. But outside 
of the minor start made at Front and Arch Streets nothing happened 
until Dr. S. S. Neff, about twelve years ago, proposed a new elevated 
road branching off from Broad and Lehigh Avenue. Then the Xcl'f 
proposals, along with the renewed interest in high speed transit caused 
by the building of the Market Street Elevated and Subway, started a 
new era of development in die northeastern transit field. The year 
I'd 5 witnessed the actual beginning of the present line, when it was 
believed three years would suffice to put it into operation. Planned 
then to om six millions oi dollars, running as tar as Rhawn Street, 
in 1 iolmeshnrg, it has now taken six years in carry to its presenl 
state, while the rising cost of railroad construction has raised its 
financial requirements to fourteen million- to furnish ;i road as far 
as Bridge Street Evening Bulletin, June 21, 1921. 



FRANKFORD- DIRECTIOJ' "l A t.kl-ATKK PHILADELPHIA 



18H8 1922 

"3W a £faut Sfomkfnri) 

aufi a Okratpr Nnrtbpaat" 

"THE FRANKFORD GAZETTE" 

Oldest Suburban Weekly in Northeast Philadelphia 
Fifty-fifth Year 



An ideal community newspaper welcomed in the homes be- 
cause it appeals to every member of the family. 

An interesting weekly feature is the word picture of our < )ld 
Nome Town as it was hack in the Eighties. Contained in the New- 
Events gleaned from back issues of "The Gazette. 

Mailed anywhere in the United States, postage 
free, for one dollar a year. 

For 38 years the present editor has been for the progressive 
uplift of Frankford, and tor 33 years we have advocated an Ele- 
vated Railroad thai would give better transit, and comfort to the 
people of this section. 

Therefore "The Gazette", along with thousands 
of others, takes special pride in this Great Event 
we now celebrate, because it means so much in 
the way of Real Rapid Transit and Greater Pro- 
gress and Prosperity for Frankford and the Greater 
Northeast. 



Always keep your light shininga little ahead of the next 



FRANKFORT - ) DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



ESTABLISHED 1S50 



PAINTING 



I cannot imagine a live and 
energetic painter of to-day who has 
not been stimulated and encouraged 
by the campaign: 

"Save the Surf ace and you Stive All" 

A painter should feel proud oi 
his business and of the fact that he 
has helped the house owner to 
protect and beautify his property. 

A house that is well painted 
and painted with good taste is a 
lasting advertisement of a good 
citizen and a ^ood painter. 

Thomas Crei<j;hton 

SHOP RESIDENCE 

4817 FRANKFORD AVE. 1327 FOULKROD ST. 



PRANKEORD DIRECTlOf OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 35 

The History of the Dummy Car 

l'.\ Tii' i mas Creighton 
Read before the Historical Society of Frankford, January 28, 1 ' ' l-< • 

The question of rapid Transit between Frankford and Philadel 
phia has always been an important one. The stage roach ol 1830 was 
entirely too slow, and so in February, 1832, the Philadelphia and Tren 
ton Railroad was incorporated as a steam road, and for a shorl time 
cars thai were pulled by horses conveyed the good people ol Frankford 
to the city. Vgain in May, 1857, the Philadelphia and Delaware River 
Railroad was chartered, giving them a right to build the road from 
Philadelphia to Frankford, upon which cars drawn by horses could be 
used. These were all in the line of quick transit, and no doubt was a 
greal improvement over the stage coaches which were drawn by horses 
over hilly constructed roads that were almost impassable in bad 
w father. 

But at last relief was al iiai d. The clouds were rolling away and 
a rax of sunshine seemed to gild all Frankford, for real rapid transit 
was coming at last. The horse cars that had been in use from Janu- 
ary 8, 1858, to November 17, 1863, were laid away, and the horses, 
like those used in the stages, had to find other employment, for the 
dummies were coming to the relief of the inhabitants oi Frankford. 

True, there was ;i line of cars drawn by horses on Paul Street, 
l»ui nearly everybody patronized the dummies in order to make 
quicker time. 

It was a gala day in Frankford when the first dumni) arrived. It 
was called the Alpha. The engine and boiler were situated in the trout 
part of the car, and as the boiler was an upright one there was a nar- 
row seat for the engineer between them. Hack of him. looking into the 
car. was a tiny square window that answered tor ventilation in sum 
mer and was a means of communication with the conductor. I know 
that this scat hack of the window was a favorite one of mine, lor from 
there I could catch a glimpse (over the shoulder of the engineer) ol 
the road over which we were to traverse. 

It is said of this car that on one of her trips she collided with a 
shifting engine of the Reading Railroad, called "The Bee." The 
dummy car was not damaged, hut the engineer in his excitement re- 
versed his engine and hacked at full sped to the depot at Fourth and 
Berks Streets, where the car fell into the salt pit and was badly dam 
aged. There is no mention of what befell die passengers. 

At first there were only two cars. 1 have mentioned the Alpha. 
The other car was called the Sea (hill, and there was an oval picture 
painted on the outside of the car. In it there was a view oi the sea 
with a great wave, and skimming over that was a picture ol a sea gull 
1 suppose an emblem of how this dummy would skim over the tracks 
from Frankford to Philadelphia. 1 well remember tin- car. for as all 
of the school children had a holiday to celebrate its arrival we were 
all taken in it for a ride, and when we reached Frankford Creek al the 
border of the town, were politel) told thai thai was the end ol the 

:.,-,/ on f>.l» w 



36 1K.WKI tON OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 

WM. F. LA REAU, Mgr. Bell Phone, Frankford 3241 

Frankford Paint, Varnish 
and Glass Company 

A COMPLETE LINE OF WALL PAPER 

4430 FRANKFORD AVENUE 
Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa. 

ESTABLISHED 1850 

S I G NS 

YES, SIGNS For Many Years 

The Business of CORSON, the House and Sign 
Painter, was established and carried on by Wm. A. 
Corson; afterwards taking into partnership his son, 
Joseph W. In 1882 Joseph W. took entire control 
of the business. In 1901 his brother, Wm T. 
Corson, succeeded him and is now located at 

4339 Frankford Avenue 



FRAN KFC-KD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



37 



p 



Why is it McCall c?in sell 
sweaters, mufflers, shirts in 

fact, all kinds of MEN'S FUR- 
NISHINGS cheaper than the 
larsje stores? 



S 



ANSWER 

mall store 

mall rent 

mall overhead 

mall profit 



4817 FRANKFORD AVE. 



Ln 
jBell Phone, Fkd. 443 

Established May II. 19121 



Our Business Making Clothing 

W. E. ALLEN r2 

TAILOR 

4616 Frankford Ave. 
Frankford, Pa. 

Dyeing, Scouring, Pressing and 
Repairing 

Established 10 12 



ELMER H. SWALLOW 



Richard G. Hadly ck Son 



Plumbing — Heating 



Watchmakers and Jewelers 



4831 Darrah St. 



Bell Phone 0758-J 



Fine Watch and Jewelry Repairing 

Masonic Marks a Specialty 

Hme waits for no man. therefore 

treasure time 



Always at Your Se 



48 1 2 Frankford Avenue 



3b FRANKFORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 




1898 



1922 



JOHN A. QUINN 

Plumbing and Heating 

4324 Paul Street 

Frankford 



FRANKFORD DIRECTION "I A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 39 

THE HISTORY OF THE DUMMY CAR - Continued 

trip and we could walk home again. As the business of the road 
increased other cars were added until there were six, and they were 
known bj their numbers. The Alpha and Sea Gull were Nos. land 1. 

The numbers were increased as additional ears were placed on the 
n tad. 

For thirty years, from 1863 to 1893, these cars conveyed the 

people ot Frankford from their homes to the city, and I suppose even 

one ot middle age has a vivid recollection of them. I well remember 
that not many years ago, while in New York, I met a gentleman who 
inquired where 1 lived. I told him in Frankford, and then he laughed 
and said: "1 well remember your dummies. I rode out there once 
from the city. There were two long seats, one on each side, and as wc 
traveled Kensington Avenue with a great noise and jolting, I was 
amused to watch the people trying to keep their seats and their balance. 
1 want to say that I have traveled all around the world, hut never 
experienced anything like your dummies." 

!n 1893, when the trolley was first introduced, there were eight 
dummies. In order to accommodate more people the old horse cars 
were used in the rear of the dummies as trailers, and the roof was 
utilized also. A spiral stairway made of light iron was hooked on the 
rear end of the car as a means of access. This ladder was patented 
by Thomas Carter, of Frankford. The model is now in the possession 
of this Society. For the comfort ol those riding on the top of the 
trailer an awning was placed over the seats. These seats were always 
occupied in fair weather, as they afforded the passenger a splendid 
view of the country on the way to the city. When the cars reached 
the covered bridge at Frankford Creek there was a rush and a roar, a 
rattling of planks, and there was very little room between the awning 
frame and the roof of the bridge. These trailers were not heated in 
winter, hut to keep the feet warm the bottoms of the cars were tilled 
with salt hay. It is needless to say that this soon became a disagreeable 
mass after a rain or snow storm. 

The dummies had a seating capacity ot thirty-two people, the 
trailers thirty-two also, while the top would accommodate twenty. It 
is needless to say that the art of crowding a car was done as success- 
fully then as now. and Mr. Thomas Kim told me that on one .Me- 
morial Day he carried 2384 passengers. 

The question has keen asked, why were these cars called dummies: 
and it might he answered as follows: These cars have been called 
dummies from the desire of the inventor to make them look like a 
horse car. and yet to he propelled hy -team power. A car that would 
run without noise or smoke. 

Some of the dummies w :re considered taster than others. It is 
said that No. 9 was capable of making the quickest run to the city. 
( )n one of these occasions the conductor of \o. 9, Joseph Ritman, was 
desirous of taking the Reading train for New York that left at 12 
o'clock, midnight, to see Bud Howe compete in a walking match in 
New York City. Mr. Frank Golden, who was engineer of the car. 
left Frankford ai 11.30 and arrived at the depot, Kensington Avenue 
and Cumberland Street, in eleven minutes. Continued on page 4i 



40 



FRANKFORD — DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



KtBOlvtb tltat UNITY BUILDING & LOAN 
ASSOCIATION of Frankford, run by the people of 
Frankford, shall stand for the Progress of Frankford. 
Subscriptions for Single and Double Shares received 
by Officers. No entrance fee charged. 

Officers 



PRESIDENT 

RONALD B. DUNCAN 

Supt. U. G. I. Co., 1226 Wakeling St, 

Frankford 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

MISS ELIZABETH M. H. KEYES 

Office Manager, Foerderer Company, 

Bridesburg, Phila. 



SECRETARY 

CLIFFORD P. ALLEN, 3rd 

Allen .v Barnes, Real Estate, 2515 

Germantown Ave.. Phila. 

SOLICITOR 

JollN H. GOSSLINC 

Atty.-at-Law, Stephen Girard Bldg.. 

and 4320 Frankford Ave.. Phila. 



TREASURER 

FRANK ADSHEAD 

Cashier, Second National Rank of 

Phila., at Frankford, 927 Herbert 

St., Frankford. 

Conveyancers 



EDWIN STEARNE 

Real Estate, 4320 Frankford Ave., 

Frankford 

EUGENE M. JEANNISSON 
Real Estate, 4628 Frankford Ave., 



Frankford 



RALPH R. STEARLEY 

Real Estate, 1618 Frankford Ave.. 

Frankford 

HERBERT HARGRAVE 

Real Estate, 6039 Torresdale Ave. 

Wissinoming 



Directors 



FREDERICK J. WILKES 

President Frankford Machine Co.. Inc. 

1099 Frankford Ave., Frankford 

ALFRED P. GRAY, M. D. 

4923 Penn St., Frankford 

WILLIAM F. SPILKA 

Construction Engineer, Sears-Roebuck 

Co., Roosevelt Blvd., Frankford 

MISS ADELAIDE W. PETERS 

Chief Clerk, Bond Dept., Second 

National Bank, 1628 Howarlli St., Fkd. 

BERNARD DAVIS 

La Prance Textile Company, 1419-27 

Frankford Ave., Frankford 

UEORGE ALLAN WILLIAMS 

Williams Brothers, Printers, Engravers 

Kinsey and Josephine Sts. 

JEREMIAH KEYS 

Presidenl Alva Mills Co., Kinsey and 

Hedge Sts., Frankford 

i EORGE GRAY 

Frankford Bleacheries 

1330 Factors St., Frankford 



EDWARD T. BENDER 
Builder, 601 I Torresdale Ave. 

Wissinoming 

GEORGE S. WARDLE 

Contractor, 1689 Harrison St.. 

Frankford 
C.HORCK R. OSliORNE 

Builder. 5014 Saul St., Frankford 

joseph p. McCartney 

Amusement Enterprises, 1600 Pilling 
St., Frankford 
I »»s hi -H B. SEAMAN 
Districi Manager, Phila. Electric Co., 
Frankford Ave. and Orthodox St., 
Frankford 
ERNEST HARGRAVE 
Interior Decorating, 3200 Comlj St., 
Wissinoming 
GEORGE W. MacINTYRK 
.Manager !•' rank ford Branch Metropol- 
itan Lite Insurance Co., Postoffice 
Building, Frankford 
THOMAS C. WILLIAMS 
w> in, The U. <;. i. Co., I iit-lm 
Frankford Ave.. Frankford 



FRANKFORD DIRECTION Hi- A GREATEB PHILADELPHIA II 



History of the Hardware Firm of 

N. M. Holden & Brother 



The original business was established by Samuel 
Huckel in the year of 1850, situated on the west side of 
Frankford Road, which is now 432') Frankford Avenue. 

Samuel Huckel sold this hardware business out to 
John Holden, the present owner's father, in the year of 
1858. The stock at that time was comprised of about 
$500.00 worth of merchandise. 

In the year 1861 John Holden purchased the property 
now 4325-27 Frankford Avenue from Edward C. Knight, 
and in the year 1862 moved into the building now occupied 
by the firm of X. M. Holden & Brother. 

The original floor space was at that time 24 feet \ 
30 feet, but since that date there has been several additions 
to the building and at the present time the business occu- 
pies three floors 35 feet x 120 feet each. 

This is the oldest hardware store in Frankford. En- 
gaged in business since the year of 1850. 



Building Hardware, Cutlery, Tools, Etc. 
MILL SUPPLIES 

4325-27 Frankford Avenue 

FRANKFORD 



FRANKFORD — DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADEI, 



1891 1922 

James F. Curran 
GROCER 



To our many 
Friends and Patrons: 

We take this opportunity of 
thanking you for our success. 

Our efforts without your 
assistance would all have gone for 
naught. 

With our thirty-one years in 
the Grocery Business and ten years 
as a prelude, we hold the palm for 
the longest and most successful 
career in the Grocery Business in 
the town. 

We not only say to our 
friends and patrons, "We thank 
you", hut "God Bless ^ on". 

1500-02 Church Street 
1628 Bridge Street 

FRANKFORD, PHILA. 



Frankford L Celebration 

PROGRAM 

FRIDAY, NOV. 3rd, 2.30 P. M. 

Announcement by Mr. Henry S. Borneman through radio of Girnbel 
Bros, to all the Country of the Opening of the Frankford L. 

FRIDAY EVENING, NOV. 3rd 

Lecture in the Free Library by Mr. George H. Pattison on Old 
Frankford. 

SATURDAY, NOV. 4th 

Noon— Blowing of whistles, ringing of bells. At 2.15 starting of 
Parade on the Avenue from Worrell Street to Bridge, returning by 
the way of Penn St. to Orthodox, showing by groups of figures the 
development of a great highway. 

Mayor Moore and Directors will formally open tfie ceremonies and 
view parade from stand in front of residence of Dr. John V. Allen. 
• At 3.30— Bridge St. and Bustleton Ave. The ceremony of the trans- 
fer of the Elevated Road from the City, represented bv Mayoi 
Moore to the Traction Co., represented by Mr. Thomas P. Mitten, 
will take place. The Formal Opening of the road will be made by 
Mayor Moore, who by pressing a button will turn on the power to 
start the running of all trains. 

Evening — Dancing in costume on Harrison St.. side of High School 
No masks allowed. 

SUNDAY, NOV. 5th 

Preaching in the Churches on the Religious Growth of Frankford. 
Afternoon, 3.30— Singing on the Campus of High School. 

MONDAY, NOV. 6th 

Bands on the streets. Display in windows. 

TUESDAY, NOV. 7th 

Evening at 7 — Baby Parade on the Avenue. Over 300 entries 
Many prizes. 

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 8th 

Afternoon at 2 o'clock— Parade of School Children on the Avenue 
Dancing and drills at Brown's Field. 

THURSDAY, NOV. 9th 

Industrial Parade by Manufacturers and Merchants. Mills thrown 
open to visitors during the day. 

FRIDAY, NOV. 10th 

Evening at 8— Fraternal Parade. Mr. Pattison's Lecture in Free 
Library. 

SATURDAY, NOV. 11th 

Morning— Burning of the mortgage of the Legion House. 
Afternoon — Dedication of Memorial on Community Field. 
MONDAY, NOV. 13th 

Mr. Pattison's Lecture at 8 o'clock in the Free Library. 

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 15th 

Frankford Theatre. Crowning of the most Popular Lady in Frank- 
ford. A stupendous affair. 



Monday Evening is reserved in case it should rain on Saturday Afternoon 
Wednesday Evening is reserved in case of rain for Baby Parade 

The Frankford Camera Club will have an exhibition of Photographs 
in main room of Free Library. 

Visitors will be taken on the afternoon of such days as there are no 
parades to the Sears-Roebuck Company's plant on the Boulevard. 

The rooms of The Frankford Historical Society, 1507 Orthodox St. 
will be open to visitors from 2 to 5 on the afternoons of the days in 
which there are no parades. 

A splendid exhibition of Rugs will be shown in Second National Bank 



FRANKFOJRD DIRE< flON "I A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 43 



THE HISTORY OF THE DUMMY CAR - Continued 

- About the year 1872 nearly all of the horses in Philadelphia had 
the disease called the epizooty. This seriously crippled the horse car 
lines and experiments were made of running the dummies to Jackson 

Street. One car made the round trip, going down Fifth Streel to 
Jackson Street and returning by the way of Sixth Street. This little 
outing of one of the dummies created quite an excitemenl in the centre 
of the city and the streets were lined with people. The experiment 
was not a success, however, and as horses were brought to the city 
from the wesl the running of the horse cars was resumed. 

Sad was the ending of the useful dummy ears which had so faith- 
fully performed their work so man) years. After the entrance of die 
new mode ol trolley transit in 1893 the cars were sold. The first one 
to leave, No. 8, was boughl b) the Bangor and Portland Railroad, 
running from Bangor to Portland at the entrance to the Water Gap, 
and some ten years ago the writer had the privilege of riding in it 
between the two town-. It seemed like a little hit of old time- a- 1 
rode in the car through the hilly country of die Gap. Another, No. ( >, 
was sent to Barnegat, where il conveyed passengers along shore for 
several years. The remaining cars were sent to the ear barn at Llan- 
erch to run on the West Chester Pike between Sixty third Street, at 
Market, and Newtown Square, a distance of twelve miles. They were 
used by the company for a special purpose, as by their charter at that 
time they could not use trolley privileges on this road, bul were com- 

•i page 48 



OFFIC1 HOURS 9 to 5 BELL PHONE. FRANKFORD 1429 

Monday, rhursday, Friday Evenings 

Maude B, Crans 

DOCTOR OF CHIROPODY 

4660 Frankford Avenue, Frankford, Phila. 



George Schweizer 
BAKER 

1743 ORTHODOX STREET 

Fresh Bread, Rolls and Buns daily after 3 p. m. 

Sundays after 4 p. m. 

Birthday and Wedding Cakes a Specialty 



44 FRAXKFORD — DIRECTION Of A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



SAMUEL D. KNORR 

Wholesale and Retail 

Paints Glass 
Painters' Supplies 




Agents for 

LOWE BROTHERS HIGH STANDARD 

PAINTS AND VARNISHES 

The Quality Lasts 
Long after the price is forgotten 

1817 Orthodox Street 

Bell Phone FRANKFORD 1290 Keystone, EAST 8670 



VNKFORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 45 



INCORPORATED - 1843 




The Frankford Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company 



°2> 



INSURANCE BUILDING £ 



4510-14 FRANKFORD AVENUE 
FRANKFORD, PHILADELPHIA 



Cs^s^5zs^s^s^s^s^s^S£^s^5^s^s^sHs^s^s^5^5^szs"^is^s^5^5^SHSHS^s^s^s^sHS^J^s^ 



46 




FRANKFORD- DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 

■SESH5HSaF2SZ5ZSESHSESHSBSZ5HSE5H5SSESHSHSHSHSH5asa5La 



Historical Data 



Kj 



1682 Colonel William Markham bought for Penn the first piece S 
of land purchased in Pennsylvania. [n 

1919 Captain John K. Markham. l\ S. V. bought for the War S 
Department the Camp Travis, Texas, reservation. ]h 

1922 — John E. Markham. Real Estate Broker, sold land for Frank- 
ford's largest dwelling operation at Bridge and Duffield Sts. 

Reliable Real Estate Service 

MARKHAM j 

1567 PRATT STREET, FRANKFORD 1 

At Frankford Avenue Ej 

Frankford Motor Vehicles, Inc. 

DURANT AND STAR 




5107-09 Frankford Avenue 



FRANKFORD DIRECTION OV \ GR1 VTEE PTIILADF.l PHIA H 



Keystone, East 8915 Bell, Franktord 2281 

HERBERT G." STAGG, President 

Estabiisfied 1895 

ittrQiamUauit $tatummi (£u., 3nr. 

Manufacturing 
STATIONERS, PRINTERS, ENGRAVERS 

BLANK BOOK MAKERS 



V 



4426 Frankford Avenue 
Philadelphia 

The Only Large Uptown Stationer 

Prompt Auto Delivery Service 



T s FRA.VKFORD- -DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 

THE HISTORY OF THE DUMMY CAR - Continued 

polled to use steam power. The dummy cars were not successful there. 
They could not ascend the steep hills, and one night at a fire which 
destroyed the car barn, they were all burned except one; thai was 
fitted up a- a freight car and carried milk to the city for many years. 

No history of the dummies would he complete unless mention is 
made of the famous curve at the entrance to the town. Mere, aftei 
leaving Kensington Avenue, a graceful curve is made, and on a grade 
of 167 feet to the mile man_\- a car has met its defeat. How it would 
puff and blow, stop, and then go on, and finally stop altogether, go 
hack again, try it all over, and perhaps some of the athletic passengers 
would gel out and help push. It required 125 pounds of steam to make 
the ascent with a trailer, and 60 pounds without one: and if an engi- 
neer did not have that amount of steam at Buckius Street, he would 
>top at Adams Street and blow up his tire. Near Adams Street was 
the switch, and here the trailers were left or taken on as the load 
warranted. 

Great difficulty was experienced in running these cars during the 
winter months. During the blizzard in the winter of 1866 the road 
was tied up for several days. It is related that the four-horse sleigh, 
belonging to Mr. Xester, of Fox Chase, who ran the stage line, arrived 
in Frankford one morning while the employes were waiting at the 
depot. They all left the depot, took a day off and a sleigh ride to fox 
Chase and return. In March, 1888, the road was blocked by deep 
drifts from Sunday night until the following Thursday. 

Many stories are related of the dummies. One of the best is as 
follows: A new hostler, employed at the depot, was instructed to till 
the boiler with water. Xot knowing the right valve he put the hose 
down the smoke stack, and as the water would naturally run out of 
the grate at the hoi torn he became alarmed and informed the boss that 
the "bottom had fell out of the boiler." 

Another story is as follows: A stranger in Frankford, alter wait- 
ing on a street corner for ;i long time to take the car to the city, 
became impatient and stopping a passer-by inquired in angry tones: 
"How often does these tool car- run?" 

The average time from Frankford to Fourth and Berks Streets 
was thirty minutes: to the new depot at Kensington Avenue and Cum- 
berland Street, twenty minutes. The last car from the city would 
arrive in frankford at 12.55 at night, and the first car would leave in 
the morning at ?.Hl During the rush hours they would run from 
fifteen to twenty minutes apart. In the middle of the day every thirty 
minutes. The time from frank ford to Market Street was about fifty- 
eight minutes. Conductors were paid $2.50 per day of from twelve to 
fourteen hours. Engineers were paid by the month aboul ^7^ each. 
They also received a bonus of Sod a year, paid quarterly if their 
engines were kept in first-class condition and had no accidents to 
occur. Men who worked on Sunday received $3.50 per daw 

In 1S7J the following persons had charge of the six dummies then 
running: No. 1. Engineer Thomas Golden; Conductor. Elwood Cox; 
No. 2., Engineer Thomas ECim; Conductor Daniel McCool; No. 3, 

c Continued on pagi • i 



FRANKFORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 49 



Strong Reliable Sound 

FRANKFORD TRUST CO. 

4344 FRANKFORD AVE., PHILA. 

CAPITAL, $250,000.00 TRUST FUNDS, $3,700,000.00 

SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS, $650,000.00 

Deposits $5,700,000.00 

DIRECTORS 

EMMETT O'NEILL J. W. R. HARDING JOHN B. HARTMANN 

A. H. GILMOUR WILLIAM H. SMEDLEY F. L. DEGENER, Jr. 

ALLAN J. GILMOUR NEWTON M. HOLDEN CHAS. C. DAVIS 

JOHN H. GLOVER T. COMLY HUNTER 



Interest Paid on Deposits 
We Insure Titles 

OFFICERS 

EMMETT O'NEILL, President CHAS. R. CORNELL, Secretary 

JOHN B. HARTMANN, Vice-Pres. and Trust Officer 

CHAS. B. COLEBAUGH, Treas. and Asst. Trust Officer 

ELMER S. CARLL, Title Officer WM. WICK, Asst. Treas. 



What Its Name Implies 

A Trust Company should be exactly what its name implies, a TRUST Com- 
pany. As such, it is better fitted to Administer Trusts than the private in- 
dividual. This Company is equipped for ACTIVE— EFFICIENT— SERVICE 
— Try it. 



WILLS WRITTEN AND SAFELY KEPT, WITHOUT CHARGE 
where this Company is named as Executor, Trustee, etc. 

FRANKFORD TRUST CO. 

Open Banking Hours Every Day and on FRIDAY EVENINGS, 6 to 9 o'clock 



50 FRANKFORD DIRECTION iiF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



Established I'M I 

Miss Clara Weidenmuller 
MILLINER 

4852 Frankford Avenue 
Frankford, Phila. 



Real Estate Broker Notary Public 

Conveyancer Insurance 



"Our Business Is lo Boost the Northeast" 

HERMAN T. GRUNINGER 

2312-14 Orthodox Street 

Bell Phone, Fkd. 1228 FRANKFORD, PHILA. 



FRANKEORD DIRECTION Of A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 51 

M. LOTMAN & SON Established I HH7 

Lotman's Variety Store 

DRY GOODS NOVELTIES 

HOUSEFURNISHINGS 

A Full Line of TOYS 

The Store of UnEqUaLeD VaLuEs 

4433 FRANKFORD AVENUE 



THE HISTORY OF THE DUMMY CAR - Continued 

Engineer Howard Adams; Conductor George Gibson; No. 4, Engineer 
I.cwi> Miller, Conductor Joseph Shoch; No. 5, Engineer John fohns- 
ton; Conductor Archie Hoff; No. 6, Engineer Edward Swope, Con- 
ductor William Swope. 

Some account should be made of the roadbed of that time. At 
first the rails used were of cast iron, each one only eight feet long. 
These would be spiked on long stringers. In summer time these rails 
would expand and spring up, then the engineer would stop and take 
the spikes and the sledge hammer, which he carried with him, and 
repair the track. There was the same trouble with deep water during 
rains at the railroad crossing at Harrowgate then as there i- now, and 
the cars would have to stop until the water had subsided. Sometimes 
the tracks would he covered to a depth of three feet. The tracks were 
watched by a man employed for that purpose, who devoted his whole 
life to the watchful care of other-, and it is -aid he was expected to 
walk every day from Frankford to the depot, Fourth and Berks 
Streets, hut that he was allowed to ride hack. 



FRANKFORD- DIRECTION iH ; A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



I 1 



1 



Modernize by Electrifying 



JAMHS A. CUMMINGS & CO. 



Frankford, Philadelphia 



E.st abli shed il)oj 



The quality of an installation 
will long be remembered after 
the price is forgotten. 



^sm^- , 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS AND I 

CONTRACTORS I 



R&5BS5 mi^iizzmmM ■i.&tittfcttfc^^^v^tefcmmififfitv 



PRANKEORD MiviM flON "l A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



Benjamin F. Getz 

4842 Frankiord Avenue 

FINE SHOES 

In the Fall of I 9 I 5 when this 
store was first opened the trading 
district of Frankford did not ex- 
tend much above Margaret Street. 
We believed that with the com- 
pletion of the "L" Frankford 
would expand rapidly and that 
Harrison Street would be a busi- 
ness centre. This belief has 
been well borne out. 
When we made our first display 
of Fine Shoes, some said that the 
people of Frankford would never 
buy shoes of such high character. 
But we believed that the people 
of Frankford wanted the highest 
grade of Shoes. This, too, has 
been borne out. 

It is our firm conviction that 
Shoes should be comfortable as 
well as good looking and durable. 
To this end we make a specialty 
of fitting, giving personal atten- 
tion to each customer. 
Because of increased business we 
have twice increased the size of 
our store, until now we are in a 
position to offer personal service 
to a larger number. 
Our Shoes are of the finest 
quality obtainable, and priced 
within reason. 
You can make no mistake if you 

"Always Choose 
Qetz Shoes'' 



(ZZe'^Aa/un/i 



4656 Frankford Avenue 
Established 1905 

When this business was estab- 
lished on September lb, 1905. 
Frankford was a town apart from 
Philadelphia. In these I 7 years 
it has grown rapidly until now it 
is looked upon as the direction in 
which a Greater Philadelphia 
will rise. 

The business established here in 
1905 has grown along with the 
community. Today Ale and 
Graham are the largest distribu- 
tors of Arrow Collars in Greater 
Northeast Philadelphia, and sole 
distributors of Belber Traveling 
Goods. 

Many important changes have 
taken place in Men's Furnishings 
since we first began retailing 
them. The comfort of the 

wearer is given more considera- 
tion than ever before, while 
quality and good appearance are 
never lost sight of. 
It has been our pleasure during 
these past I 7 years to serve 
many of the best men of North- 
east Philadelphia. Numbered 
among our customers you will 
find the leading men of this com- 
munity, the men who are help- 
ing most to make Frankford what 
it is destined to become. 
By catering to the comfort, con- 
venience and satisfaction of the 
many men who will come to our 
midst with the increased popula- 
tion we hope to merit the patron- 
age of an ever-increasing num- 
ber. 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

LADIES' HANDBAGS 

LADIES' UMBRELLAS 

EVERSHARP PENCILS 

LEATHER GOODS 



54 



FRANKFORT) — DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 




A STAGE COACH OF 1845 
This line of Coaches ran from Frankford to Philadelphia. Starting from 
Mrs. Rice's Hotel, Frankford Avenue and Ruan Street, every morn- 
ing, arriving in Philadelphia at the Sign of the Camel, Third 
and Vine Streets, and returning same day 



Transportation 

By Guernsey A. Hallowell 

The principal means of travel at the time of the settlement by 
the Swedes was by boats. The country was not cleared and the roads 
were in had condition for many years. Wagons were very seldom 
used for some time after the arrival of the English on account of the 
stumps in the roads, and travel was principally niton horseback. 

As the country began to be more thickly settled, a better means of 
travel was established, and stage-coaches came into use. 

The first stage-coach of which we have an authentic record was 
in November, 1756, when "a new stage left John Butler's sign of 
'The Death of the Fox,' in Strawberry Alley, Philadelphia, for Ww 
York." The trip was made one way in three days once each week. 
Previous to this, in 1733-34 there was a stage line to Nev\ York by 
way of Burlington and Amboy. Passengers from Philadelphia took 
the boat to Burlington and then proceeded by stage to New York. 

In 1765, John Barnhill was proprietor of a line of stages known 
as the "Flying Machine," which was advertised to make the trip to 
New York in two days during the summer. 

In 1773, John Bessonet & Co. established a line of stages from 
Philadelphia to New York, making the trip in two days. 

Si ion after opening the bridge over the Delaware River at Tren- 
ton, on February 1, 1806, four new lines of stages were started from 
Philadelphia to New York, which proceeded the entire distance with- 
out change. These lines, which ran daily (except Sunday), passing 
through Frankford, were the "Diligence," at X A. M . ; the "Industry," 
:ii 9 \. M.; the "Mail Pilot," at 10 A. M.. and die "•.Mail" at noon. 
The last carried only six passenger-. 

In 1810 the "Expedition" line of stages made die trip to New 
\ ork m one day. commued on . 



FRANKFORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 
Established 1882 

P. BOWES & SON 

PAINTERS and PAPER HANGERS 
1528 CHURCH ST., FRANKFORD 

Phone Frankford I 499-J 

GOOD ICE is not a luxury — but a necessity 

JOSEPH A. CARROLL 

COLUMBIA ICE COMPANY 
1521 Womrath Street, Frankford, Phila. 

LSZSHSSSR5E5E5HSHSiSZ51i5ZSHSHSHii't5HSHSZSZSHSZSaFE5Z5H3ESE5H5a5ZSHSE 

GEORGE E. HAINES 

Manufacturer of WEB BELTS 

Bathing Belts a Specialty 

1645 Pratt Street, Frankford, Phila. 

Phone Frankford 3087 \\ 
'^ZnSZSaSZ5Z5aSZ5ZSZ5Z5aSZSZSc^^5Z5E5c^ZSZSZSZ?E5a5ZSaSZ5Z5ZSZ5Z5"£ 

Business founded in 1863 i>v \l fohn Cocker, Si 

PAINTING 

IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 

George Washington Cocker 

1517 Arrott Street 

FRANKFORD. PHILA. 

IV <7? <7? T? T? T? T? <T? T? S? T? T? T? <7? S? S? T? TP <T? T? =7? <7? T? T? T? <7? T? TR T?. I 7?-5?-5?_Tri<7 



56 FRAN KK)Ri>- DIRECTION 01- A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



Compliments of 

RUSH BROS. 

Contractors and Builders 

Founded 1 890 by Thomas Rush 



We give our 

best efforts to 

build a 

Greater Frankford 



1006 HARRISON STREET 

FRANKFORD 



PRANKEORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



Best wishes to those who 
have been responsible for 
my continued success. 

George A. Sinn 

Bridesburg, Pa. 



58 



FkAXKFORD — DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



J. A. ALLWEIN 

Established 1904 

Located at CHURCH STREET "L" STATION 

Our Low Cost of Doing a Cash Business Enables 
Us to Give You Better Value 



Frankford's Only Store 
Carrying an All-Inclusive 
Line of the Famous 

Bear Brand 
Yarns 

Bucilla Products 

Glossilla Rope 







Visit Our ART NEEDLEWORK DEPARTMENT 

Finished Models on Display 
Free Instruction If Desired 

HOSIERY- 
UNDERWEAR— 

INFANTS' WEAR 

Use Our Popular 

ANEITA BRAND HOSE 

for dependable service. Quality and style to suit 

FOR MEN, WOMEN, CHILDREN 

Satisfied customers are our best asset 

Can we count on you as one? 

Watch Our Windows for "DAISY-DAY SALES" 

4284 and 4286 FRANKFORD AVENUE 



ERANKEORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA ' 59 




AN OLD HORSE CARI 



Aftam (!I. $tmuirr 
ImVrtakm* 



4346 Frankford Avenue Frankford, Phila 

PHONE, FRANKFORD 0213 






60 FRAN KEORD— DIRECTION Of A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



Progress for Frankford 



s 



George Royle & Co. gladly add 
their humble voice to the general 
shout of joy at the opening of the 
Frankford L - an event which will 
result in not only speedier trans- 
portation but in increased pros- 
perity for every manufacturer, 
every retailer, every individual in 
our progressive community. 



% 



GEO. ROYLE & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS 
FRANKFORD, PHILA. 



FRANKEORD DIRECTION OV A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 

45 ^ c i is m I r.i nkford 

THOMAS J. EAGAN 

REAL ESTATE 

STEAMSHIP PASSENGER AGENT 

Notary Public Insurance Estates Managed and Settled Mortgages- 

Rents and Interest Collected 

Agent for 
.American Line, Anchor Line, Cunard Line, Leyland Line. 
Panama Pacific Line, Red Star Line, White Star Line 

4281 FRANKFORD AVENUE 

Bell Phone, Fkd. (Ho 7 




ROTH-BUICK CO. 



4661 PAUL STREET 



Frankford I I 48 



62 [•' RANK FORD- DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



John T. Schofield 

EST VBLISHED 1904 

In ye olden days the people of Frankford journeyed 
7 miles to Philadelphia in poorly equipped and slow 
moving transit facilities to get a pair of spectacles. 

Nowadays you can have your eyes properly cared for 
by Eye Specialists and your prescriptions promptly 
and accurately filled right here at your own door. 

Because we are 

Manufacturing Opticians 

we car, fill any prescription in the shortest space oi 
time. Saving you mone) as well as valuable time. 

Your prescription is Kepi on rile here, enabling us to 
give you record replacement service in case oi acci- 
dental breakage. 

With 18 years oi practical experience behind us we 

are in a splendid position to render you expert service. 

4915 Frankford Avenue 



Grind in q of Lenses and all Repair Work Pour at This Addre 



I'KAN KI'OKD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 00 



•: i 






Diamonds Jewelry Watches 

"GIFTS THAT LAST" 

X/fAY we serve you whenever you desire 
artistic jewelry, reflecting elegance and 
good taste. We also offer a varied and 
extensive selection of silverware, beautiful 
in design and moderate in price. 

S. J. LYONS 

3f?tupl?r 
4612 Frankford Avenue 

2258 N. Front Street 2846 Kensington Avenue 

OPEN MONDAY, FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHTS 



Phone Frankford 2076 

QUALITY 

LAUNDRY 

Family Wash 

FOULKROD AND DUFFIELD STREETS 



64 PRANKEORD — DIRECTION OK A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 

TRANSPORTATION - Continued 

In 1830 three coaches often ran at one time through Frankford 
to New York, carrying both mail and passengers. The arrival of 
the coaches from New York was then an event of daily interest. 

As earl) as 1830, and for many years subsequent, the great lottery 
companies <<\ New York maintained a daily express between that city 
and Philadelphia. The express consisted of men on horseback who 
changed every ten miles. A blast of a horn was a signal for the 
hostlers at the inns upon the route to have another horse in readiness. 

All stages ceased running to New York in 1836 because of the 
opening of the Philadelphia and Trenton Railroad. This railroad was 
incorporated February 23, 1832. The road was completed from Kens- 
ington to Morrisville, November 1. 1834. Cars drawn bv horses ran 
from Frankford to Third and Willow Street-, on this road, for several 
years. 

In 1840 three lines ol stages were running between Frankford and 
Philadelphia, including one from Holmesburg, and one from Bustle- 
ton, owned by David Maguire. The fare between Philadelphia and 
Frankford was twenty-five cents. The coaches for Frankford left 
Nail's Hotel on Second Street below Arch. 

( >ne of the earliest lines of stages between Frankford and Phila- 
delphia was conducted by John Haines, and ran from the Seven Stars 
I [< itel in Frankford. 

In 1845 Thomas Rorer was proprietor of a stage line which ran 
from the Eagle Hotel, now numbers 1-42 and 4244 Frankford Avenue. 
Later, Mr. Rorer purchased the property on the southeast side of 
Frankford Avenue, northeast of Unity Street, and transferred his 
he,:' [quarters there. 

About this time Allen Pickup conducted a stage line to Phila- 
delphia, which ran from the Eagle Hotel, lie sold the business to 
Clayton Conner. 

After November 27, 1845, William II. Shallcross & Co. ran a 
stage from the Jolly Tost Motel, now 4612-14 Frankford Avenue, at 
5 I'. M. in the evening, for the city. Returning, it left the Sign of the 
Camel, on Second Street between Race and Vine Streets, starting in 
lime to reach Frankford by midnight. 

Besides the Stages mentioned, stage lines to the city were con- 
ducted by Messrs. Gallagher, Fries, Van Brunt, and [ohn O'Brien. 

Lines of stages have also been run from time to time between 
Frankford and Fox Chase, and Frankford and Bustleton. 

In 1855 agitation was started for the establishment of a better 
means of transportation to the city. In December of that year a 
meeting of business men was held in Frankford to consider the 
organization of a horse car line, and as a result, in May. 1857, the 
Legislature granted a charter to the Philadelphia and Delaware River 
Railroad Company for a line between Southwark and Farnkford. The 
first car ran January 8, L858, and the line was opened to the public in 
the city January 20, 1858. The first car ran to Frankford March 15. 
1858, There was much Opposition to the horse car line at first by the 

i. 'ontinued on page 



PRANKFORD — DIRECTION Of" A CRF.ATF.K PHILADELPHIA 65 

ALBERT H. ENTWISTLE 
Pharmacy 

Autumn. 1922 
Fellow -residents : 

This commemorates an epoch in the annals ol our town. 
We have been patient and now we may enjoy the materializa 
tion of <»ur cherished dream. Frankford has made rapid strides 
in recent years — but to use the opportunity for greater growth. 

Here as everywhere the Pharmacy, an individual unit, 
lias played its part. We have endeavored to offer the besl 
service and the best merchandise. PURITY, QU \1.ITY WD 
EFFICIENCY have been OUR STANDARDS. Your patron- 
age has shown your appreciation oi these. We shall continue 
to meet your demands with the purest ingredients, of the besl 
quality in the most efficient manner. 

We invite your patronage of the many thousand articles 
included in our stock. For greater Pharmaceutical Service, 
we remain, 

Sincerely \ ours, 
ALBERT II. ENTYN ISTI.K 

Harrison St. and Frankford Ave. 
Frankford - Phila., Pa. 



66 



PRANKFORD — DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



Zanzinger 
HATS 




Styled for Young Men 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

STETSON HATS 
SCHOBLE HATS 




7§§}fRANKF0RD AVE. 



;hats of quality 

*Frankford Theatre Block 



ESTABLISHED 1909 

When You Build 
BUILD RIGHT 






For 

Stability, Quality and 
Workmanship 






GEORGE RIMER 

4842 Hawthorne St. 



Phone 



FRANKFORD 



FRANKFORD— DIRECTION OF a CREATF.K PHILADELPHIA 



67 




AN OLD DUMMY CAR WITH TRAILER 



TRANSPORTATION - Continued 

omnibus owners. They were finally compelled to withdraw the stages. 
The first cars run on this line were constructed by Thomas Castor, 
• it Frankford. 

There was much agitation at this tune aboul the cars running on 
Sunday. Those running to Frankford were compelled to stop on Sun 
day at a one-story frame building, which once stood in what is now 
the hed of Kensington Avenue, northeast of Adam- Avenue. It was 
not many months, however, before the cars ran on Sunda) to the depol 
on the north corner of Frankford Avenue and Arrott Street. 

In 1858 the Second and Third Street car line was chartered, and 
cars were soon after run to Frankford from the city over this hue. 
the terminus of which in Frankford was Frankford Avenue and 
Harrison Street. 

On November 17. 1863, the dummy cars were first run from 
Fourth and Berks Street- to Frankford. These car- had a cab in the 
front in which were a vertical engine and boiler. The former horse 
cars were then used as trailer- for the dummies. These trailer- were 
provided with seats on the top and a spiral ladder to the top oi the 
car. Some rears later a new depot v , a s built at Kensington Wenue 



68 



FRANKFORD — DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 




New Home of La France Art Institute, 4420 Paul St. Free Education 
in Art to Deserving Boys and Girls 



and Cumberland Street, and the dummies then ran no further than 
the new depot, where a change was made to the horse-cars which ran 
down Kensington Avenue to Front Street, thence to Berks Street, 
thence to Sixth Street, and south on Sixtli Street to Jackson Si reel. 
Returning, the cars came north on Fifth Street. 

In 1893 the trolley cars were first introduced in Frankford. 
These cars supplanted the dummies and horse cars. Soon after this 
the trolley cars were run from Frankford to Jackson Street without 
change. 

( >n July 2, 1894j the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad Compan) 
began running trains to Frankford from the Reading Terminal, Phil- 
adelphia. 

In 1903 the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company acquired the 
property on the northwesl side of Frankford Avenue, northeast of 
Pratt Street, and the largesl brick car-barn in the world was erected 

" ,( ' 1 COn, Continued on page 82 



PRANKPORD DIRECTION OP .\ GREATER PHILADELPHIA 69 



Frankford and Qas Service 



In the development of Frankford from a village 
its present huge proportions, gas service has played a vital 

part. 

In the greater development toward which this com- 
munity is advancing with lusty strides, gas will be called 
upon more than over to perform mam important services 
in the industries and in the homes. 

It is not too much to say that Frankford cannol con- 
tinue to expand without the efficient co-operation of gas 
service of the same type which has been enjoyed in the 
past. 

Appreciating to the full the friendship which has ex- 
isted between Frankford and U. G. I. service, we shall 
continue to strive to the utmost of our ability for the 
greater glory and prosperity of Frankford. 

No great result can be obtained without adequate 
investment of capital, and should we tail in performing 
the maximum service which Frankford expects of us it 
would be only because of financial limitations. 

Frankford and gas service should co-operate for 
mutual advantage. 



THE UNITED GAS IMPROVEMENT 
COMPANY 



70 FKANKFORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



THE HENNIGAR PHOTO STUDIO 

Oxford and Frankford Avenue 

Established 1902 Bell Phone. Fkd. 4580 

PHOTOGRAPHING IN ALL BRANCHES 

Special Attention Paid to 
WEDDINGS and COMMERCIAL WORK 



FRANKFORD CAMERA CLUB 

Photographic Section of Wright's Institute 

A workshop to encourage the cultivation of an interest in, and 
an understanding of, the art and science of Photography 



Buy -- UNITY -- Brands 

FROM YOUR GROCER 

Good Enough For Anyone at Prices Anyone Can Pay 



ELIZABETH K. MAYES 

491 1 Frankford Avenue Frankford 

Exclusive Styles in all Seasons of 

MILLINERY 

AT POPULAR PRICES 

Special Attention to Remodeling Phone, Frankford 0116 






l-'KANKFORD — DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



The materials and the methods 

used by me are as modern 

in my line as the 



as a method of 
transporation 



U. GRANT CROMWELL 

4617 Penn Street 
Frankford 



HEATING and PLUMBING 



All Branches of PIPE FITTING For Factories 



11 Phone, Frankford 0356 






72 FRANKFORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



"On the Avenue Since I 899' 



Recently a man called in our store purchasing a 
suit of clothes. He remarked, "You have been 
selling me for over thirty years." 
Confidence is sometimes worth more than money. 



Service— CLOTHES— Quality 

ROBERT LAWSON 

Frankford Avenue and Margaret Street 



RUDOLF NEFF CORSON 

Law Real Estate Building Associations 

Established 1879 

1533 ORTHODOX STREET 
Frankford 



FRANKFORD — DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA /S 



THE HISTORY OF THE DUMMY CAR - Continued 

As the covered bridge at the Frankford Creek was ..unci by the 
railroad Company, a watchman was employed there to prevent fires, 

and no wagons or teams were allowed to cross it under penalty of $1<>. 
The reversing or turning of these dummUs was quite a problem. 
At first a temporary turn-table was built on the street at Frankford 
Avenue and Arrott Street, but was afterward placed in the rear of the 
present stone depot. 

The most serious disaster that ever occurred on the road was a 
collision at the grade crossing at Harrowgate with an excursion tram 
returning from New York. This happened at 9 o'clock on Sunday 
night, September 26, 1875. Two persons were instantly killed, Thomas 
Adams and Mrs. O'Donnell, while three others died within a feu 
days. Many others were injured. Thomas Adams was an engineer 
on the road, but on the night of the accident was riding inside as a 
passenger. Mr. Harry S. Adams, whom we all know so well, was 
with his father at the time of the accident. They were sitting in the 
rear of the dummy near the door. Mr. Adams stepped outside of the 
door on the platform to speak to the brakeman, and seeing the 
approaching train, he jumped and was instantly killed, while his son 
inside was not injured. The conductor of the car was Charles \\ il 
liamson and the engineer was Tony Evans. They both jumped and 
so escaped injury. This disaster cost the road over $65,000 damage-. 
but still it was a good year, as they paid 12 per cent, dividend. 

Mr. Thomas Kim, through whose kindness I have collected the 
data for my story, tells me that he was in bed on the night of the 
accident. That he was sent for and told to take car No. 1 to the plai e 
of the disaster, and that he gathered many fragments of the bodies, 
among them a head. These he placed in a keg, and placing it before 
him in the engine room of his car, he conveyed them to the police 
station at Frankford. 

Something must be said of the executive work of the road. Mr. 
Albert Worrell had full charge of the running of the cars, and we all 
remember how he would blow his whistle, a signal for the starting oi 
the cars. Mr. Samuel Ford cared for the construction work. While 
at the depot there was a machine shop where new cars were made and 
old ones repaired. Cars were also built by outside shops. The firsl 
dummies used on the road were built by the ('.rice & Uong Co., whose 
works were on Beach Street. The engine was what was known as a 
twin engine with a 6 by 10^ stroke, and was of 15 horsepower. The 
boiler was an upright one and about 1600 pounds of hard coal was 
used during the day. The temperature often exceeded 100 degrees in 
the small engine room. 

I must mention the bell and whistle of the dummy ear. The bell 
was on the roof of the car suspended between two upright posts, and 
was pulled by a cord from the engine room. There was also a u histle 
lontrolled by the engineer. These signals were in great demand in 
going down Kensington Avenue, notifying the fanners to clear the 
tracks. And it is said that if a man with a load of hay refused to 

Continued c- page ~ 



74 



FRAN KEORD— DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



Established i88g 
Well Built Houses For Sale 

Qeorge R. Osborne & Son 

Builders 

5014 SAUL STREET 
FRANKFORD, PHILA. 

Bell Phone, Frankford 1145 ESTIMATES 

PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS - REAL ESTATE 



■ : 



I 



Harrison Garage and Auto Livery 

Established 1912 




LIMOUSINES AND TOURING CARS TO HIRE 



i'KANKFOkl? — DIRECTIOM m- a CKKATKK PHILADELPHIA 



WILLIAM KUHN. Jr. 





KUHN & LOWERY 

REAL ESTATE 

Mortgage and Insurance Brokers 

Conveyancing Notary Public 

TWO OFFICES: 

S. E. Cor. Fifth and Rockland Streets 

— and — 

4665 Paul Street, at Frankford Avenue 

Conveyancers for 

Fifth and Rockland B. and L. Association 
New Olney B. and L. Association 
Olney Suburban B. and L. Association 
Patriot B. and L. Association 
Rosehill B. and L. Association 
Tabor B. and L. Association 
Wyoming Ave. B. and L. Association 
Lindley B. and L. Association 



Special Attention Given to Building Operations 



Ground for Builders a Specialty 

1st and 2nd Mortgages 
OFFICES OPEN MONDAY AND FRIDAY EVENINGS 



76 



FRAXKFORD — DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



?SBSZSZSZ5ZSZSZSZ5Z5ZSES^5Z5d5Z5E5ZSZ5ZSZ5Z5ZSZSBSZ5^5Z5Z5d5Z5 Z5 iSI52SZ5Z^ 



% 




Residence of Frank W. Hollingsworth 



Edward W. Taylor 

Successor to C. West & Co. 



I. 



Builder of Modern Homes 



OXFORD AVE. and WAKELING ST. 
FRANKFORP, PHILA. 

i 
I 



frankford — direction: or a orkater pnn.AnF.t.rrTTA 



/ / 



THE HISTORY OF THE DUMMY CAR - Continued 




-,* 



_ a 




4« 






leave the track sonic of the engineers would fire up, causing a cloud 
of sparks to till the air. This him was always sufficient for the driver 

of a load of hay. 

The old depot at Fourth and Berks Streets was abandoned in 
lanuary, 1872, and the company moved into the new one ai Cumber 

land Street and Kensington Avenue. Thomas Scott, who had the 
honor of taking the first dummy into the new depot, was SO overcome 
with the privilege that he could not wait until the doors were opened 
hut backed his car through them, tearing them off their hinges. Some 
of the men who worked in this shop included Kphraim Woodhouse, 
who painted, gilded, grained and adorned the cars with landscape-. 
< Hhers were John Burns, William Pendlebury, Elijah English, Roberl 
'I nornton, Cary MacDonald and Samuel Bryan, who was the black 
smith. 

The question of fare was an interesting one. Previous to the war 
the fare from the city to Frankford or return was ten cents, making 
the fare for the round trip to the city twenty cents. It was after- 
wards reduced to seven cents, and then to five cents to Columbia 
Avenue, which was. in force several years. Round rubber buttons 
with a hole in the center and strung on a leather throng were used as 
tickets, and these were sold six for a quarter. Workmen's tickets. \1 
cents for the round trip, were also sold. School children's tickets 
were sold twelve for $1.00. 

About 1892-93, a register was introduced for the collection ot 
lares. It was a harp-shaped design, nickel-plated, and was hung 
around the neck of the conductor by a leather strap, resting on his 
breast. There were two leather cords hanging beneath, and there was 
a great pulling and jingling of bells as the fares were collected. 

Among all of the employes of this road there is one man whose 
name should have special mention, that of James Lord, who was 
employed at the Frankford depot as hostler. It was his duty to look- 
after the cars, clean them, rub them down and keep them in condition. 
He spent many years there and was a quiet, industrious citizen and 
did his work well. 

There is no doubt thai in the preparation of this Article I have 
neglected to mention the names of some of the employes of the road. 
Tf I should have done so I would appreciate any additions, also any 
reminiscences that would add to the interest of the paper. 

I desire to thank the following persons who have s,, kindly 
assisted me: Mr. Thomas Kim, Mr. Lewis Miller. Mr. Charles \\ . 
Castor, Mr. Robert T. Corson, Mr. Elwood Castor, James France, 
files of Holmesburg and Frankford Gazette. 



78 



FKWKFORD- DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



8??= 



i.^i.ii.lljInl l lll ll l il i i ll i lHI il l li ll l ll l l l lHIII II III I IIII 



Stiiropraclic has a h%fa for each.Htttf 6f (fey 

»rt Jj6ut^el|a|ju^e5an(f (font k a f rtij 




FRANKFOKI) DIRECTION (>F A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 79 




ARAMINGO 

NAPPING, PRINT, DYE 

and 
FINISHING WORKS 



§ 



a 



Mens Fine Suit Linings 



Pendlebury & Son 

FRANKFORD, PHILA. 



(lSZSZn52SZS2S2S^5^5£ ESH5Z5H5ZSZnSZ5Z5?.SZ525E5ZS 




to 



FRANKFORD — DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 




To the Discriminate Home 
Seeker who will eventually 
settle in Frankford, I offer 
these Master-Pieces of home 
architecture. 

Located in the Exclusive 
and Dignified Northwood 
Section of Frankford. On 
the famous Roosevelt 
Boulevard at Kenwyn 
Street. 



FRANKFORD- DIRFCTIO RF.ATF.R PI I I LADELP I II \ 



SI 



To such I dedicate this 
effort of my twenty years 
experience as a builder of 
homes. 



HARRY R. MOYER 
2035 E. Allegheny Avenue 



Bell Phones: 

GARFIHLH 0646 

rRANk'FORP IJ'M 




82 



FRANKFORD — DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHIEADEEPHIA 



WATER TRANSPORTATION - Continued 
would again sel them free. Whether the party stuck to the ship 1 am 
unable to say, but undoubtedly the ship stuck to the mud. The next 
morning all had disappeared." 

Iu 1852 a stock company was formed to inaugurate a line of 
steamboats on Frankford Creek under the name of the Frankford, 
Aramingo, Bridesburg and Whitehall Steamboat Company. The com- 
pany was capitalized at SKHXX), with shares at a par "value of $10 
each. The constitution set forth that the Board of Managers should 
have power to contract for tiie building of a steamboat to run on the 
Delaware River and Frankford Creek between Philadelphia and 
Frankford. They also appointed the officers and men to run the boat. 
The Committee on Navigation was authorized to make the necessary 
alterations and improvements to the creek, clean the channel and as- 
sure a clear highway to the river. The landing-place was at the old 
wharf which existed on the south hank of the stream, about fifty yards 
east ot the six-inch bridge. 

Work was at once commenced on the boat, which on a smaller 
scale was modeled after the first "Edwin Forrest."' The operation of 
the line, however, was attended with such disheartening results that 
the effort was abandoned after a half do/en trips. On each occasion 
the boat would he stranded in mid-stream, to the delight of the small 
hoys who congregated on the hanks. It was soon apparent that the 
stage coach lines to the city were much quicker and cheaper, and thus 
it came about that the little steamer built for the Frankford Creek, 
was sold and sent down the river to ply on one of the Jersey streams. 
Since that attempt the placid waters of the stream have been navigated 
up to recent years only by scows and canal boats, which often un- 
loaded cargoes of coal for Hilles's yard or lumber for Duffield's saw 
mill, both of which were located on the creek, near Frankford Road. 



Additional Information About the Dummies 

By J. K. Jen ks 

The dummies running from Kensington Avenue and Cumberland 
to Arrott and Frankford Avenue was the continuation of the Fifth 
and Sixth Street line and there were eight dummies in all and they 
made about eighty-four trips in all each 21 hours and their running 
time from depot to depot was 20 minutes, and they often had a trailer 
on to haul the loads more comfortable. 

Bach dummy had an engineer and conductor, and when we had 
a trailer on they often had a brakeman. The names of the conductors 
and engineers are as follows: Conductors: No. 1. John Stewart; 
Xii. 2, Rittenhouse Holmes; No. 3, Charles Lukins; No. 4, J. R. Jenks; 
No. 5, Budd Howe; No. <>, James Schlafer; No. 7, William Coon; No. 
8, Joseph Ritman. Engineers: No. 1, Thomas Goldin ; No. 2, Thomas 
Kim; No. 3. Howard Adams: No. I, Louis Miller; No. 5, John Johns- 
ton; Xo. 6, Edward Swope; No. ~, Frank Golden; No. 8, Jacob Puder, 



FRANKFORD DIRECTION OJ A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 83 




BUILDERS ENTERING FRANKFORD AVENUE 



[■]< \\ KI-(iKi) DIRECTION Of A. GREATER PHILADELPHIA •^•' 1 



J 3£30i 55 .35 55 Jjg 55 55 irn 55 ttj 55 55 ■ . . . .; ■..- .; 7 v •; .; 



H 



The Kensington Trust Company 

Kensington and Allegheny Avenues 

AT THE 
ALLEGHENY AVENUE STATION 

HAS OVER 

NINE MILLION DOLLARS ON 
DEPOSIT 

and over 

28,000 Depositors 



nQ3 



•- 



I 
5 



Total Resources, $10,205,000.00 

IfiHOz^^Z^ SB £fi SB jj & sQZ'SQz^g ffi an >■ " '" a* ag a> r^ to an Sii ffi M & ^ & jj M ^ M J 



86 FRANKFORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 




It was shortly after the Centennial Exhibition that o com- 
pany was organized and established to furnish electric light and 
power to Frankford and vicinity; service then being supplied 
from a small direct current plant installed at Paul and Meddow 
Street in a small two-story building. 

As Frankford grew and expanded, the limits of this class 
of service were recognized and after the formation of another 
company, which was later acquired by this Company, a more 
adequate plant was located on the Delaware River at Delaware 
Avenue and Robbins Street and which, to this day, is a cog in 
the huge wheel of The Philadelphia Electric Company System. 

As the welfare of the community is inseparably linked with 
the progress of its industries, so is the Central Station one of 
the mightiest factors in its growth and prosperity, as evidenced 
by the increased use of our service — both in the home, factory 
and office in and around Frankford. 

It is our pride that PHILADELPHIA ELECTRIC SERVICE 

will supply the current to operate the new FRANKFORD "I.". 



The Philadelphia Electric Company 



l'KAN ki'okd DIRECTION "1 \ r,Ki;.\Ti:k PHILADELPHIA 



87 



"Nothing Succeeds Like Success" 

is an old proverb that can be applied to Schlater's Bakery, 
corner of Frankford Avenue and Sellers Street. Probably 
no business has had a larger share in developing Frank- 
ford Avenue as the Fifth Avenue of the Northeast than 
this well-known linn of bakers. Beginning in a modest 
establishment on the avenue 71 years ago Schlater's Baker) 
has grown in a remarkable way until it ha- become neces 
sary for the firm to double the capacity of their plant many 
times. Regardless of expense they have kept pace with 
the modern development in bakery methods and have, from 
time to time, installed new and up-to-date equipment m 
order to turn out a satisfactory article at all time-. Clean 
liness is the first principle of this business, together with 
the very highest grade of materials, which are selected with 
scrupulous care. There are thousands of families in the 
northeast, and in fact all over the City of Philadelphia, 
who patronize this well-known concern. Merely to say 
thai it is "Schlater's" is a sufficient guarantee of the 
quality of the goods supplied by this progresshe bakery 
concern. The appearance of the store is always a credit 
to the avenue and is one of the conspicuous sights as one 
passes up and down the street. There is probably no busi- 
ness where cleanliness and quality mean more to the human 
family and where the most exacting scruples ought to he 
exercised in the manufacture and sale of a commodity 
than the bakery business. A visit to thelplanl of this con 
cern is sufficient to convince the most skeptical that in 
Schlater's Frankford has a business of which the citizens 
can he jusly proud. 

SHOP AT HOME. Make Schlater's your SHOPPING 
CENTER. ( Hir bread is for sale at all stores. 



IF IT ISNT 




IT ISNT THE BEST 



We Solicit Your Business 






- 



FRANKFORD- DIRECTION Of A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 




/ 



-y 



v 






Pals Thru Life 






Bell Phone 

GARFIELD 

0588 



ESTABLISHED 1896 

SIEGFRIEDS 
DRUG STORE 



One of the oldest established drug 
stores in Frank ford. 

Remodeled and greatly enlarged; and 
Complete in Every Detail. 

FRANKFORD AVE. at ARROTT ST. 
FRANKFORD 



'RANKFORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



X'» 




"An organization through ivhich 
its public spirited citizens may 
express themselves collectively on 
community welfare and through 
which they may make their public 
desires eft ectwe 



PRANKFORD — DIRECTION Of A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



F. SEITTER'S SONS 

Manufacturers of 

Building, Paving and Sewer Bricks 



Office and Works 

Nicetown Lane and "G" Street 



Firm was founded about 1859, at what is known 
as White Hall Commons; moved about 1867 to 
Kensington Avenue, near Ontario Street, about 
1870. Located at Harrougate Lane above Erie 
Avenue, and in 1883, moved to present address 
and have been continually operating in this loca- 
tion almost forty years. 







FRANKFORD DIRECTIONS "l A. GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



91 



FRANCE-BUILT 
HOMES 

Frankford's Standard for 35 Years 



Copy of Advertisement in 
The Frankford Gazette," August 30, 1889 



CHEAPEST NEW HOUSES 
in Frankford, situated on Sellers 
and Wingohocking Streets. These 
houses have seven nice rooms, w ill 
Bath, Hot and Cold Water, Front 
and Back Porch, good sized yards, 
nicely papered, and everything to 
make a comfortable home. The) 
will be' sold at very low prices. For 
further particulars, inquire of A. T. 
France, 121 Sellers Street, or to 
\\ in. M. France, Adams Street. 



WM. FRANCE SONS, INC. 
Builders 

Frankford, Phila. 



PRANKFORD— DIRECTION OF A GREATER I'l I I l.AI >KI.I" 1 11 A 



Established WOO 



The Leading 
Art Nf-rMiumuk 

(Sift §>hup 






M. WEST 

4627 FRANKFORD AVENUE 



PRANKFORD- DIRECTION 01 \ CREATE I; PI UIA 93 

WATER TRANSPORTATION 

SOME years ago there appeared in The Gazette the following 
article concerning navigation on Frankford Creek: The hundreds 
who dail) pass over the Frankford Creek by trolley al Frankford 
Road, where the bed of the stream al times is almost dry, would smile 
at any suggested scheme of navigating the stream, yet the shrill whistle 
and pull bi the steamboat was heard close by that point main years 
before the Civil War. The following anonymous communication to 
the editor of the North American and United States Gazette, was 
written on the occasion of the town's first novel experience with a 
steamboat : 

"Frankford, July 11th, 1848. 
Ti i tii e Editor : 

On Tuesday afternoon between the hours of five and six, just as 
the tide m the creek was about its height, the good people of this 
place who happened to be near the scene, were startled by a bursl of 
steam gushing forth with such puffs as to satisfy .ill that there was 
something more than usual to cause this peculiar sound on the tran- 
quil waters oi Tacony Creek. As each puff gave hack its echo, each 
seemed to draw nearer and nearer. The bend or turn of the water 
course with its thick growth of trees and bushes, obstructed our view 
and hid the mystery from us. All seemed: anxious to discover the 
cause, as they watched the bend; curosity seemed to increase and very 
many had now keen drawn to the spot. At last there was seen round- 
ing the bend, to the surprise oi all. a steamboat— it was not the "John 
Stephens," hut a regular steamboat pursuing her course as steadily up 
the creek as it it was no uncommon occurrence. Most oi those present 
had looked upon such an undertaking as impossible, hut it was not the 
first time that a steamboat attempted to navigate our waters, for a few 
years ago a small boat was built here by a Mr. Castle, and made sev- 
eral excursions up and down the creek, and the day is not far distant 
when the sound of the steamboat will he heard making daily trips 
between Frankford and Philadelphia. Now to the surprise and won- 
der of all, on she came, puff! puff! puff! until she was fairly brought 
to a stand, head up to the wharf. At this time, as 1 have said before, 
the tide was at Us full, and admitted no delay verifying the old adage 
"that Time and Tide" will wait for no one, and with no little exertion 
did those on hoard get her off again, with a loud huzzaw from the 
delighted party, she left the shore. The company consisted oi a tew 
gentlemen who lett Philadelphia on a pleasure excursion and every 
appearance on hoard gave evidence that they had spent a pleasant day. 

They, however, had not proceeded far on their return down the 
creek, when the steersman, owing to his ignorance as to the channel 
of the creek, run the boai into the mud and stuck. Now here was a 
dilemma not expected. All the power of -learn was oi no avail and 
a long time spent in fruitless efforts to get off before they were 
convinced that twelve hours would have to elapse before the waters 

linued '"' page >j^ 



94 FRANKFORD — DIRECTION OB A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



When you read this- 

Remember it is for Frankford 

and do not forget E. B. K. 

Telephone 3358 

32 Years in the business 

PAINTS, OILS, GLASS 

EDWIN B. KNORR 

1748 ORTHODOX STREET 



William T\ Rose 

IhuVrtaluT 

AUTOMOBILES TO HIRE 

1822 Orthodox Street 

Bell Phone, Frankford 1232 



FRANKFORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA ' >5 

TRANSPORTATION - Continued 

In 190-1 the Philadelphia Transit Company began running a line 
ol ti'ulU'N cars to Tacony. Another line from Bridesburg, through 
Frankford to Olney, Germantown and Falls of Schuylkill, had been 
started. 

Previous to this a line oJ trolleys had been run from Bridge 
Street to Torresdale on the Bristol Turnpike, and another line from 
Frankford Avenue and Bridge Street, over Bridge Streel to Tacony 
Street, and thence on Tacony Street to Tacony and Holmesburg. 

For the accommodation ol people living in Somerton and Bustle- 
ton a line of automobiles lias been running for the past two years from 
Frankford Avenue and Bridge Street, aboul two hours apart each day. 
In l'Ul the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company established a 
trolley freight service between the city and Frankford. 

On February 1. 1912, trolleys were run for the first time without 
change to Tenth and Market Streets. 

On April 1, 1912, the latest and most improved near-side trolleys 
were introduced between Frankford and Philadelphia. We now have 
three lines of these cars: One which runs down Second Street and 
up Third Street; another down Sixth Street and up Fifth Street, via 
Lehigh Avenue; another down Tenth Street and up Eleventh Street, 
via Berks Street. 

Three Years in North America 

By James Stuart, Esq. 

Published 1833, Vol. 2 

lau. 2 ( ', 1830. Arrived in Frankford, a clean, well situated vil- 
lage a few miles from I'hila., where I had the pleasure ol staying a 
few days with Colonel Burn, an American by birth, hut who had 
keen long in Britain, being possessed of property in Scotland, llis 
manners and mode of living were as much British as American, lie 
commanded the American Calvary during the late war, hut had now 
retired and lived very hospitably in Frankford. At Col. Burn's house 
I first tasted terrapin— a small land turtle of which excellent soup is 
made. I also first saw here in perfection the canvass hack duck o! the 
1'otomac, winch is recorded the greatest delicacy in America. 

While in Frankford 1 visited the Markets in i'hila. Meat is very 
plentiful at an average of about two pence half penny a pound. The 
price of a large wild goose is three quarters of a dollar. 

1 left Colonel Burns house in Frankford on the 2nd of February. 



96 FRA.VKFORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



JAMES B. CUNNINGHAM 

1747 ORTHODOX STREET 
Cigars, Tobacco, Confectionery, Notions, School Supplies 

Orders taken for Breyer's Ice Cream 
Phone, Fkd. 3297-W 

Bell Phone, Frankford 1040 

S. KRUGER & CO. 

Dealer in 

Furniture, Carpets, Oilcloth, Matting 

Ladies' and Gents' Clothing 

1821 ORTHODOX STREET 

FRANKFORD PHILADELPHIA 

ZSZSZSZ5 r!SZ5ZS ^SZ5ZSZS?SZSZ5?S?S"rl5Z [ 7ZSZSRSZSZS?S?FrlS?S^5?SHSZSZ5ZF. 

Ladies' and Gents' Suits Made to Order Fur Coats Relined and Repaired 

Garments Remodeled 

D. CHAITKIN 

TAILORING SHOP 

Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Altering a Specialty 
At Reasonable Prices 

1734 Orthodox Street, Frankford 

Cor. Hawthorne St. 

Bell Phone 305 2 J 

Best Workmansii ip A Tn;il Will Convince 

HSHSZSZSZSBEia£ZSHSHSESZ£iE5HSZSZ5HS"rlSHSZSZE?5Z52SZS?5Hii"HSlSHSHSia5HSl 

B. YOUNG 

Cigars, Tobacco, Stationery and Candies 
2001 ORTHODOX STREET 

E. F. YOUNG, Manager 



t-'RAXKEORD DIRECTION OV A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 

Towards Frankford points the way to greater Philadelphia. 
Towards our store points the way to get Good Eats it 

BUZBY'S GROCERY 

1737 ORTHODOX STREET, (Since 1886) 

Bell Phone 0346 

B. HARWOOD 

Dry Goods, Notions, Hosiery, Men's Furnishings and Ready- 

Made Garments 

1728 ORTHODOX STREET 

Phone 

L. F. LEUPOLD 

ICE CREAM PARLOR 

1922 Orthodox Street 

A Select Line of Fine Confections Fancy Chocolates a Specialty 

Ice Cream Served Promptly For All Occasions 
Bell Phone 180 1 Keystone Phone 1802 

HSZSBSHSHSZSZ£HSZSH51SH5HSZSH515HSHSHSZSZSHSH5ZSHSH5ZSZ52SHSHSiSlS"i 

J. ROSENBERGER 

Hardware and Housefurnishing Goods 
1905 ORTHODOX STREET 

Phone 2374 



98 FRANKFORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



A 
L 



Bell Phone, Fkd. 1076-J Estimates Cheerfully Furnished 



BUILDERS 



JOBBING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO 



A 
D 



£ BUZBY & PROPERT D 



R CARPENTERS I 

A — and— 

T 
I 

^ TY STREET, FRj* 

Established 1912 



I 
O 

N N 

i>l Established 1912 „ 

s s 



PRINTING and ENGRAVING 

"Of the Better Sort"' 

Done Quickly and to Your Liking 

Ideas Submitted on Cards or Catalogs 



CALENDARS 

May Be Ordered a Year in Advance 



CHRISTMAS CARDS 

Personal and Commercial 

Designed a Year Ahead. Orders Taken at Any Time 

I Individual Small Lot Orders Expedited) 



Loose Leaf Ledgers and Special Forms 
Carbon Papers and Typewriter Ribbons 



We Make Our Own Type on the Monotype 



Our Non-Plate Engraving Process Saves YOU Money 

Adams' Envelope Service Excels 

Printed envelopes delivered within 24 hours, if desired 



Bell FR\ 1190 Kevstone, EAST 843 7 

H. S. ADAMS 

1 660 FOULKROD STREET, FRANKFORD, PHILA. 

(Corner of Darrah Street) 

"Here Type Can Serve You" 



1'kan KFoKD -Direction op a greater Philadelphia 99 



PATRIOTIC IRATERNAL BENEFU I \l 

BROTHERHOOD OF AMERICA 

Organized in Independence Hall 1854 
Incorporated Under the Laws of Pennsylvania 

INDEPENDENCE CIRCLE, No. 38 

Instituted in Frankford, November 7, I 894 

Every Friday Evening, Sellers Street, at Paul Street 



WM. KRACK 
Chief Washington 

3405 Vankirk Street 
A. L. WELSH L. R. MURPHY 

Hon. Register Hon. Scroll Keeper 

4265 Paul Street 45 20 Penn Street 

Pays Sick and Death Benefits 

Worth of Circle upwards $24,000 

Membership 257 



In addition to above, optional with membership, Death Benefit Fund 
under direct management of the Supreme Circle paying $250 to $500, ac- 
cording to age. 



Gross Assets $103,114.14 

Claims Paid Since Institution of Fund $2,537,451.14 

Claims Incurred Since 1890 from Institution of Fund 5,318 



FRANKFORD — DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



JOSEPH BRENNIAN 
COMPANY :: Printers 

Beil Phone, Frankford 4581 

OUR AMBITION TO GIVE SERVICE 

is best evidenced by the fact that in all that section of Philadel- 
phia North of Allegheny Ave. and East of Broad Street, com- 
prising upper Kensington, Frankford, Olney, Wissinoming, 
Tacony, Holmesburg. Logan. Oak Lane. Fox Chase. Torresdale. 
etc., we were — 

FIRST 

To Install Automatic Printing Presses 

FIRST 

To Install Line Typesetting Machinery 

FIRST 

To Install Folding Machinery for Mail Advertising 

FIRST 

To Install Printers' Furniture Moulding Machinery 

FIRST 

To Install Power Perforating and Punching Machinery 

FIRST 

To Install Type Routing and Mortising Machinery 

FIRST 

To Install Automatic Gumming Machinery 

FIRST 

To Equip entire plant with Individual Motors 

FIRST 

To Inaugurate Daily Automobile Delivery Service 

FIRST 

To Install a Cost System 

FIRST 

TO GIVE REAL SERVICE 

1632-34 Meadow Street, Frankford 



PRANKEORD DIRECTION 01? A GREATER I'll I I.AIM-I.l'll I A 



101 



/oris 
Fabrics 



Snmtrr UnrBtrft Olmnymut 

Manufacturers of 

"Made in Frankford" 

1615 Foulkrod Street 
Frankford, Phila. 



William Bateman 
President 






George R. Dugan 

Treasurer 



[ 



102 FRANKFORD DIRECTION OF A GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



The Ladies' Committee 

Owing to later arrangements which were made 
after the contract for printing this booklet was 
awarded, a large Committee of Ladies was formed 
to work for the movement. It is through their 
loyal and efficient work that our celebration is such 
a success. 

We take this opportunity of expressing our 
appreciation. 

There is on exhibition at the rooms of The Historical Society 
of Frankford, 1507 Orthodox Street, the following interesting ex- 
hibits : 

A model of the first horse car, also of the spiral ladder used to 
ascend to the upper deck of the car used as a trailer, rear of the 
dummies, these were invented, made and sold by Thomas Carter, 
Frankford. 

The large register used in the dummies, a large gong used by the 
conductor of the horse car to notify the driver to go ahead. 



Public meetings were held in Frankford in 1857 protesting against 
building the horse car road on Alain Street, as it would destroy the 
quietness of the street. 

For several months after the running of the horse car line to 
Frankford in 1858, the cars were compelled to stop on Sundays at the 
lower part of the town at Adams Street, the reason being that the 
noise would interfere with the services in the churches. 

Girard's Talk of the Day 

If it was worth a song when "Yankee Doodle came to town, rid- 
ing on a pony," it is surely worth a celebration when Frankford comes 
to town riding on the new L. 

A school boy's short essay on the capital of Italy: "Rome was 
and is," may be applied to Frankford. 

Tt has a past, a present and a future. Being now and for sixty - 
eight years past a part of Philadelphia, folks forget that Frankford 
has its own history. 

It was recorded a century ago that the then oldest inhabitant had 
a legend about how Frankford got its name. They said a negro named 
Frankford had a ferry across the creek, really a ford, and so Frank's 
Ford soon became Frankford. 

There i^ <>ne trouble with that tradition. It isn't true. Anyhow, 
the creek is labeled Frankford, clear as day, on Holmes' original map 
of Philadelphia of 1682. 



l-KANkl-okn I)lKhi"Tlo> "I \ GREATER PHILADELPHIA 



103 






Not the First 

But the Practical Printers of 
the Northeast 

Quality is the Natural Result 
of Our Experience 

IS 

WILLIAMS BROTHERS 

PRINTERS - ENGRAVERS - STATIONERS 
Kinsey and Josephine Streets 

A Word To Ye Book Lovers 

Drop in and find that book you 
have been looking for. Miss Powell 
will be glad to discuss your book 
problems with you. °% °$ 

THE BOOK SHOP 
5016 Frankford Avenue 



i 



WWBMM HE wWBBTftK BE HE WHEWaE imliiiMM M MM urnm M MM M M M M MM ! 



Index to 



V 

Page 

Adams, 11. S 98 

Allen. Wm. E :;; 

Alt' & Graham 53 

Allwein, Dry Goods 58 

it 

Baldwin Dairies "5 

Becker, Gustav lis 

Boy sen, Thomas 27 

Brennian, Joseph, Co 100 

Brotherhood of America 99 

Bright, John, Shoes 29 

Button, Charles II 15 

P.n/.by's i irocery 97 

Buzby lV Propert 98 

c 

Cassidy Bros 29 

Carroll, Jos 55 

Chaitkin D 96 

Corson, R. N 72 

• 'orson. Win :;•'> 

cocker. George W 5.j 

i 'ounsil. W. < I -7 

( 'r;iiis, Maud 43 

Creighton, Thomas 34 

< Iromweli, U. Grant 71 

i lurran, .lames 40 

Cummings, J ' 'o. ... 52 

Cunningham, .lames 9t> 

I) 

Disney, Charles & Sons 13 

l»nrant Automobile 4t> 

Dorence Worsted Company HI 

E 

Bntwistle, Albert II Km 

Eagan, Thomas til 

F 

Erankford Bakery 20 

Prankford Camera I 'lull 711 

Erankford Dispatch -'1 

Erankford Business Men's Ass 14 

Prankford Gazette 33 

l'i 'ankford Mutual Eire Ins. Co 42 

Erankford Paint Store •"•<■' 

Erankford Real Estate is 

Erankford (irocery Co 70 

Erankford Trust Com] > 49 

Erankford Theatre 2 1 

Fischer's Dairies ss 

Era nee. Wm. & Son 91 

Erankford Bakery 2<i 

G 

< ieorge, 1 toward 30 

i irui Inger 1 1. T "><• 

i loldstein, A 27 

Getz, B ">:; 

lla.lle.v . ft. G. .V Son -'.7 

I [aines, < ieorge 55 

Eolcomb, George M 30 

Hallowell, <i A 31 

Ballowell, Grant 71 

I [ennigar Studio 70 

Hills Flower shop 27 

llohien. N, M. & Brother 41 

I I lib Kin-nil me i 'o 12 

llarwood. B 97 

.1 
Jeannisson, E. M 16 



Advertisers 

Iv 

Page 

Kensington Trust Co 85 

Kirst Bros 2-". 

Kinkerter Sheppard Co 22 

Knorr. Edward B 94 

Knorr, Samuel |> 44 

Kruger, s 90 

Kuhn & Lowery 7"i 

I. 

I.nl-Tauee Textile Mills 10 

I. ever. G. F !l 

Lawson, R 72 

Leupold, U 11 !i7 

l.oinian & Son 51 

Lyons, s. s i;:: 

M 

Markham. .1. C 46 

Mayes, E. K 711 

McCall, J 37 

McCausland, Stationery 4~ 

McGough, c .1 :;,| cover 

Mover. Real Estate 80,81 

Murray, Thomas 29 

N 

Northeast Chamber <>f Commerce. .. 89 



Osborne, George & Son 74 

oxford Bank of Frankford 4th sover 

Pendlebury iV.- Son 7n 

Philadelphia Elect ric Co 8(5 

<t 
Quinn, John 38 

it 

Rimer, < ieorge * »< » 

Rose, W. T 94 

Etosenberger, .1 u, 

Roth-Buick til 

Rush Bros "it; 

Royle Co., George tin 

s 
Sehiaier's Bakery S7 

Sehweizer. George 43 

Seltzer. Drugs 31 

Second Nal Lona l Bank 8 

Schofield, Optician *>'_' 

Siegfried, II. .1 88 

sinn. ( Ieorge A 57 

Sinn. John II 

Shaw. .John 9 

Smed ley Bros. Co 7 

Stanger, A. C ."iti 

Stewart, Win 11 »>:; 

Stuart. Dr. < 'harles 7s 

Seitter's Sons, F 90 

Swenson, Alvin 2d cover 

Swallow. E. 11 37 

T 

Taylor. Edward . * » 

I 

[Tnitj Building \ Loan Asso U 

l niieii Gas I mprovenient 1 "o 89 

w 
Weidenmuller, C 50 

West. M 9L 1 

Williams Brothers, Printers 103 

Williams Garage 71 

Womlliouse. S. I l!l 

Y 

1'oung, B 9(i 

z 
Zanainger, 1 latter t'>i; 



/Lor 3% 




ontrol 
*^\| your^ Prosperity ! 

"Dost thou love life! Then do not squander time, for 
that is the stuff life is made of." Benjamin Franklin, who 
said these words, not only understood the value of time, 
but put a price on it that compelled others to appreciate 
its worth. 

Time is money and therefore if you are squandering it, 
you are wasting money. Waste no time and you will lose 
no money. Working, saving and putting your money at 
work spells Thrift. Be thrifty with your time and deposit 
your savings here. SQUANDER NO MORE. 

Oxford Bank of Frankford 

Frankford Ave. and Overington St. 

Bridesburg Branch 

Thompson and Ash Sts. 



Wissinoming Branch 

5906 Torresdale Ave. 



Member Federal Reserve System 
Safe Deposit Boxes for Rent 

"We Are Here to Serve You" 



Phone, Frankford j |?|| 



CHARLES J. McGOUGH 

DODGE BROTHERS 
MOTOR VEHICLES 



4744-46 Frankford Avenue 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



-: 



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