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Full text of "Free correspondence courses in agriculture"

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537 
C3A25 



UC-NRLF 




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njvr 
JUL ao 1919 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

BENJ. IDC WHEELER, President 
THOMAS FORSYTH HUNT, DCAN AND DIRECTOR 
H. E. VAN NORMAN. Vice-Director and Dean 
University Farm School 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
BERKELEY 



CIRCULAR No. 113 

(Revised May, 1919*) 

FREE CORRESPONDENCE COURSES IN AGRICULTURE 

By F. L. GEIFFIN 

(Special Note. — We request all receiving this circular to save it carefully for 
future reference. When through with it, kindly pass it on to an interested 
neighbor.) 



CONTENTS p^^^ 

Information for students I 

Correspondence Courses in Agriculture: 

Course No. 1. Alfalfa Culture : - 4 

3. Corn Culture V- 4 

5. Onion Culture 4 

8. Barley Culture 4 

10. Dairy Husbandry 5 

11. Swine Husbandry 5 

12. Sheep Husbandry 5 

13. Milch Goat Raising 5 

14. Poultry Husbandry 5 

15. Bee-keeping \ 6 

17. Pear Culture .^^j:^«.-.«^.:-: 6 

19. Plum and Prune Culture .^^;^j;^^„ii..K.A^^^^'^2iw,. 6 

21. Walnut Culture y^.. _ .^..... 6 

22. Almond Culture //. PIJ.1!:... ...AL.. 7 

23. Grape Growing i^.Kiy..^.HA.lXl/. ' / 

24. Citrus Fruits '^V-r ""- -A--^/- 7 

25. Olive Growing !:^.i4tip;i^^- 7 

26. Fig Culture 1 'Zl'. 8 

27. Home Floriculture 8 

28. Home Ground Ornamentation '. 8 

30. Canning and Preserving „... 8 

31. Date Culture 9 

32. Semi-Tropical Fruits 9 

33. Vegetable Gardening 9 

34. Normal Nutrition 9 

35. Avocado Culture 9 

37. Lumber and Its Uses 10 

38. Business Aspects of California Agriculture 10 

References _ r ^ 10 

Publishers of References ., 15 

State Agricultural Experiment Stations 16 

Department of Agriculture 16 



Addresses 



^ r State 
"^ I U. S. 



6th edition. 



9^57 



For Whom Intended. — These courses are prepared for farmers, 
farm managers, suburban dwellers cultivating the land, prospective 
settlers, and others desiring specific and detailed information on the 
production of farm crops and animals and on the conditions of suc- 
cessful agriculture in California. It is not intended merely to send 
out reading matter on a certain subject but rather to furnish infor- 
mation which students will study until they understand it thoroughly, 
as indicated by the answers to the questions. Through this personal 
relation with the students it is hoped to make the information in the 
courses more useful. 

It is obviously impossible to cover in the lessons fully the local 
conditions in the different sections of the state with regard to a given 
industry. However, students are invited to ask questions regarding 
local or community problems and on any points in the lessons or with 
regard to the subject studied which are not clear to them. These 
questions will be answered as helpfully as possible by specialists of 
the University. 

By WJiom Prepared. — The courses are prepared by specialists in 
the faculty of the College of Agriculture with reference to agricultural 
conditions in California. The methods discussed may readily be 
adapted to any section of the state. 

How to Enroll. — Any person desiring to enroll as a student in 
one of the Correspondence Courses should fill out the application card, 
which is enclosed in this circular or which will be sent on request. 
Students may enroll for only one course at a time. After filling out 
the blank, mail it to the Division of Agricultural Education, Uni- 
versity OP California, Berkeley, Cal. 

Expenses. — No charges are made for the agricultural correspond- 
ence courses and no University credit is given for them. All that 
the University asks is that the work be taken up in earnestness and 
that the student pursue it with diligence so that he may receive the 
greatest benefit from it. After a student has enrolled in one course, 
he is expeced to complete it before enrolling in another. If the student 
wishes to change from one course to another, he may do so by paying 
a fee of one dollar ($1) for each course commenced until the course 
from which he transferred is completed. In such cases money order 
or check should be made payable to the Regents of the University 
OP California, and sent to the Division of Agricultural Education, 
University of Californlv, Berkeley, Cal., stating the change in reg- 
istration desired. 

Sending Out Lessons. — Upon receipt of an application card prop- 
erly filled out the student wiU be given a file number, which will be 



LLC 



used in keeping records of the work. The first two lessons of the 
course will be sent to the student with questions on each lesson. 

Preparing and Returnmg Answers. — Each student should care- 
fully study the first lesson until all points are thoroughly understood. 
When he is able to answer all of the questions at the end of the lesson, 
he should lay aside the text and write out the answers in his own 
words, numbering the answers to correspond with the questions asked. 
The Division of Agricultural Education is ready at all times to aid 
students in answering questions not well understood. 

Answers to questions should be carefully and clearly written out 
in ink or typed on paper about the size of that on which the lessons 
are written. As far as possible write only on one side of the paper. 
Special questions enclosed with the answers should be on a separate 
sheet of paper. Mail the answers to Lesson 1 and start work on 
Lesson 2. 

Correction of Answers. — Lesson 3 will be mailed after receipt of 
answers to Lesson 1, with corrections of the same. On receipt of 
answers to questions on Lesson 2, a fourth lesson will be sent, and so 
on until the end of the course, the student being constantly supplied 
with a lesson to be studied. 

Certificate of Completion. — When the student has satisfactorily 
completed the course, a card so stating will be sent. 

Special Requests. — In case the student lives at such a distance or 
under conditions that prevent receiving the lessons as rapidly as 
needed, more than one lesson will be sent if requested by the student. 
But in no case will several lessons be sent at one time if the student 
does not show a willingness to answer promptly. 

The lessons are sent out in an order that is designed to make the 
subject matter easily understood. At times, however, students may 
want certain information before it is reached in the course. In such 
a case the needed lesson will be advanced if the conditions seem to 
justify it. 

References. — No text books are required with any of the courses. 
Various references are listed in the courses for the benefit of students 
wishing to read further on a particular subject. The State Librarian 
and many county and city librarians have signified their desire to 
assist in promoting the work of the correspondence courses and aiding 
students in taking the work. Where a book or reference is not found 
in the local library, it will frequently be possible for the librarian to 
secure its loan from another library. 

Free bulletins and circulars of the United States Department of 
Agriculture and State Agricultural Experiment Stations may be 



secured by writing to the department or the state concerned. For 
addresses see page 16. 

Organization and Classes. — While the courses are intended for 
individual students, various organizations of adults, as well as of 
boys' and girls' classes in grammar and high school, may prefer to 
discuss the courses together. Such study classes are often quite help- 
ful, but in all cases the students enrolling are held responsible indi- 
vidually for the completion of the course. Teachers having their 
students enroll for courses are requested to encourage completion of 
all work taken up. All members of study groups should understand 
that the studying and answering of the lessons is an individual re- 
sponsibility and that the work can be continued separately from any 
class formed. 

CONTENTS OF COURSES 

COURSE 1— ALFALFA CULTURE 

B. A. Madson, Assistant Professor of Agronomy 

10 Lessons 

1. Habits of growth. 2. Varieties. 3. Soils. 4. Irrigation. 5. 

Preparation of seedbed. 6. Seeding. 7. Care of field. 8. Enemies. 

9. Harvesting. 10. Breeding. 

COURSE 3— CORN CULTURE 

B. A. Madson, Assistant Professor of Agronomy 

10 Lessons 

1. Habits of growth. 2. Climatic and soil requirements. 3. Types 

and varieties. 4. Preparation for the crop. 5. Seed selection. 6. 

Planting. 7. Care of crop. 8. Enemies. 9. Harvesting. 10. Breeding. 

COURSE 5— ONION CULTURE 

S. S. Rogers, Associate Professor of Olericulture 

5 Lessons 

1. Habits of growth, soils and varieties. 2. Fertilizers, planting. 

3. Transplanting, seed production. 4. Harvesting, growing from sets. 

5. Diseases and insects. 

COURSE 8— BARLEY CXJLTURE 

B. A. Madson, Assistant Professor of Agronomy 

9 Lessons 

1 and 2. Requirements for growth, species and varieties. 3. Barley 

culture. 4. Preparation and care of the land. 5.. Seeding. 6. Care 

after seeding. 7. Enemies. 8. Harvesting. 9. Breeding. 



COURSE 10— DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

G. H. True, Professor of Animal Husbandry, and L. M. Davis, formerly Assistant 

Professor of Dairy Industry 

17 Lessons 

1. Selection of herd. 2. Herd sire. 3. Pure-bred dairy cattle. 4. 

Care of the heifer from breeding to calving. 5. Feeding. 6. Testing. 

7 and 8. Diseases. 0. Composition and secretion of milk. 10 and 11. 

Babcock test. 12. Sources of milk and cream contamination. 13. 

Separating. 14. Market milk production. 15. Butter making. 16. 

Cheese making. 17. Ice cream making. 

COURSE 11— SWINE HUSBANDRY 
J. I. Thompson, Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 

6 Lessons 

1. Origin, domestication, types. 2. Bacon type. 3. Breeds. 4. 
Important factors in swine production. 5. Feeds. 6. Selection, man- 
agement, breeding, diseases. 

COURSE 12— SHEEP HUSBANDRY 
R. F. Miller, formerly Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 

7 Lessons 

1. Origin, markets, types. 2. Breeds. 3. Feeds. 4 and 5. Man- 
agement. 6. Diseases. 7. Wool production. 

COURSE 13— MILCH-GOAT RAISING 
E. C. VOORHIES, Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 

8 Lessons 

1. General considerations. 2. Breeds. 3. Milk of the goat. 4. 
Uses of milk and other goat products. 5. Testing. 6. Breeding. 7. 
Diseases. 8. Feeding. 

COURSE 14— POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

(Chickens only are considered) 

J. E. Dougherty, Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry 

16 Lessons 

1. General characteristics. 2. Classifications. 3. Selection for vigor. 
4. Selecting and laying out plant. 5. Hatching with incubator. 6. 
Hatching with hens. 7. Brooding and rearing of chicks. 8. Brooder 
houses, feeding chicks. 9 and 10. Poultry house essentials. 11 and 
12. Feeds. 13. Feeding. 14. Breeding. 15. Meat production. 16. 
Marketing. 



COURSE 15— BEE-KEEPING 
C. W. WooDWORTii, Professor of Entomology 
14 Lessons 

Required of each student: (1) To have a swarm of bees with 
which to work; (2) to be in a position to study the bees during the 
daytime and carry on some experiments; also to study California 
honey plants. Those unahle to meet these requirements sho^dd not 
apply for the coicrse. 

The course consists of fourteen lessons, two preliminary ones and 
one for each month of the year, thus requiring at least twelve months' 
time for completion. 

1. Honey plants. 2. Starting in bee-keeping. Jan. Bee diseases, 
experiments with disinfectants. Felj. Hive temperature, feeding. 
March. Flight of bees, life history. April. Queen rearing. May. 
Brood rearing. June. Grading honey. July. Propolis, pollen, ven- 
tilation. Aug. Flower insects, beeswax. Sept. Preparation for winter, 
feeding. Oct. Bee hunting, structure of the bee. Nov. Food prefer- 
ence, food consumption, structure of the bee. Dec. Feeding bees, 
anatomy. 

COURSE 17— PEAR CULTURE 

R. E. Smith, Professor of Plant Pathology 

8 Lessons 

1. Characteristics of trees, soil and climate requirements, uses. 2. 

Varieties, rootstocks and propagation. 3. Planting and care of the 

young orchard. 4. Orchard practice. 5. Fruit handling. 6. Insects. 

7. Pear blight. 8. Minor diseases. 

COURSE 19— PLUM AND PRUNE CULTURE 
A. H. Hendrickson, Assistant Professor of Pomology 
12 Lessons 
1. General requirements, regions. 2. Stocks. 3 and 4. Propagation. 

5. Top working. 6. Choosing site and planting. 7. Care of orchard. 

8. Pruning. 9. Insects and control. 10. Diseases. 11. Varieties. 12. 
Handling and marketing. 

COURSE 21— WALNUT CULTURE 
R. E. Smith, Professor of Plant Pathology 
16 Lessons 
1. Species and habits. 2. Species, soils and climates. 3, 4, 5, and 

6. Varieties. 7. Propagation. 8. Ways of starting. 9. Grafting. 10. 
Budding. 11. Planting orchard. 12. Culture of walnut. 13. Crop 
handling. 14, 15, 16. Enemies of the walnut. 



COURSE 22— ALMOND CULTURE 
R. H. Taylor, Assistant Professor of Pomology 
10 Lessons 
1. History, uses, characteristics, climate and soil requirements. 

2. Unfavorable conditions and their treatment. 3. Propagation. 4. 
Almond sections, varieties. 5. Preparation of soil and planting. 6. 
Cultivation. 7. Irrigation. 8. Pruning. 9. Insects. 10. Harvesting. 

COURSE 23— GRAPE GROWING 
F. T. BioLETTi, Professor of Viticulture and Enology 
28 Lessons 
1. Nature and habit of the vine, species, varieties. 2. Requirements. 

3. Choice of location. 4. Cost and returns. 5. Selection of raisin and 
shipping grapes. 6. Selection of wine grapes. 7. Propagation. 8. 
Rooting cuttings. 9. Grafting. 10. Grafting vinifera cuttings. 11. 
Grafting resistant vines. 12. Bench grafting cuttings. 13. Callusing 
grafts. 14. Management of nursery. 15. Preparation of land. 16. 
Vineyard plans. 17. Care of vineyard. 18. Pruning. 19 and 20. 
Principles of pruning. 21 and 22. Practice of pruning. 23 and 24. 
Parasitic disease of the vine. 25. Non-parasitic diseases. 26 and 27. 
Insects. 28. Gathering crop. 

COURSE 24— CITRUS FRUITS 
J. E. CoiT, Professor of Citriculture, and I. J. Condit, Assistant Professor of 

Citrieulture 
21 Lessons 
1. History and general consideration. 2. Botany and habits of 
growth. 3. Geography and climatology. 4. Varieties. 5. Propagation. 
6. Selecting site, leveling, water supply and root stocks. 7. Laying 
out and planting. 8. Cultivation and fertilization. 9. Irrigation. 
10. Pruning and top working. 11. Frost and frost protection. 12. 
Diseases. 13, 14. Insects and other pests. 15. Fumigation. 16. 
Picking and packing oranges. 17. Picking and packing lemons. 18. 
Blemishes and their prevention. 19. By-products. 20. Marketing. 
21. Profit and loss. 

COURSE 25— OLIVE GROWING 
F. T. BioLETTi, Professor of Viticulture and Enology, and W. F. Oglesby, formerly 

Assistant in Viticulture 

10 Lessons 

1. History, climate, finances. 2. Propagation. 3. Preparation of 

land and planting. 4. Care of young orchard. 5. Care of bearing 

orchard. 6. Pruning. 7. Harvesting and handling. 8. Pickling. 9. 

Insects and diseases. 10. Varieties. 



COURSE 26— FIG CULTURE 
J. E. CoiT, Professor of Citriculture, and S. P. Frisselle, Superintendent of 

Kearney Farm 
10 Lessons 
1. History and climatic requirements. 2 and 3. Classes. 4. Propa- 
gation. 5. Soils and location, preparation. 6. Laying out and planting. 
7. Varieties. 8. Care of orchard, yields, pests. 9. Harvesting and 
packing. 10. Costs and returns. 

COURSE 27— HOME FLORICULTURE 

J. W. Gregg, Professor of Landscape Gardening and Floriculture, and R. T. Stevens_, 

formerly Assistant Professor of Landscape Gardening and Floriculture 

16 Lessons 

1. Location and exposure. 2. Soils. 3. Fertilizers. 4. Spraying. 
5. Violet culture. 6. Roses. 7. Pansies, petunias. 8. Sweet peas. 9. 
Dahlias. 10. Chrysanthemums. 11. Begonias, cinerarias. 12. Pri- 
mulas, cylamen, gloxinias, calceolarias. 13. Carnations. 14 and 15. 
Bulbs. 16. Ferns. 

COURSE 28— HOME GROUND ORNAMENTATION* 
J. W. Gregg, Professor of Landscape Gardening and Floriculture 
15 Lessons 
1. Definition of the art; history. 2. Selection of site and location 
of home. 3. Making and care of lawns. 4. Styles of landscape design. 
5. Planting and care of vines; landscape use. 6 and 7. Planting and 
care of shrubs; landscape use. 8. Planting and care of trees. 9. 
Planting and care of annuals and biennials. 10. Planting and care 
of perennials. 11. Unity, utilitj^ and variety in composition. 12. 
Arrangement and construction of walks and drives. 13. Garden fea- 
tures and furniture. 14. Water as an element in design. 15. Care 
and treatment of grounds. 

COURSE 30— CANNING AND PRESERVING 
F. T. Bioletti, Professor of Viticulture and Enology, and W. V. Cruess, Assistant 

Professor of Zymology 
12 Lessons 
1. Causes of spoiling. 2. Modes of food preservation. 3. Fruit 
juices. 4. Home canning and bottling of fruits. 5. Home canning 
of vegetables. 6. Syrups; jams and jellies. 7. Pickling. 8. Dried 
fruit and vegetables. 9. Vinegar. 10. Raisins. 11 and 12. Bread 
making. 



* Prepared for the amateur gardener. 



COUESE 31— DATE CULTURE 
J. E, CoiT, Professor of Citriculture 
8 Lessons 
1. Economic considerations. 2. History and geography. 3. Cli- 
matic adaptation. 4. Soils, irrigation. 5. Propagation. 6. Varieties. 

7. Orchard management. 8. Harvesting and packing, pests. 

COURSE 32— CERTAIN SEMITROPICAL FRUITS 
I. J. CoNDiT, Assistant Professor of Citriculture 
12 Lessons 
1, 2, 3. Loquat. 4, 5. Persimmon. 6. Guava. 7. Pomegranate. 

8. Cherimoya. 9. Pistachio nut. 10. Mango. 11. Papaya. 12. Tuna, 
passion fruit, pineapple, litchi nuts, and other minor fruits. 

COURSE 33— VEGETABLE GARDENING 
S. S. Rogers, Associate Professor of Olericulture 
14 Lessons 
1. Types of gardens, status of gardening. 2. Districts, selection and 
location of crops. 3. Location and selection of crops. 4. Irrigation, 
hot beds, cold frames. 5. Specific directions for gardening. 6. Pota- 
toes. 7. Sweet potatoes, onions. 8. Tomatoes, melons. 9. Cabbage, 
cauliflower. 10. Celery, lettuce. 11. Root crops, peas, beans. 12. 
Sweet corn, eggplant, cucumbers, peppers. 13. Ehubarb, asparagus. 
14. Pumpkins, home vegetable garden. 

COURSE 34— NORMAL NUTRITION 

Agnes Fay Morgan, Assistant Professor of Household Science 

14 Lessons 

1. Normal nutrition. 2. Fats. 3. Carbohydrates. 4. Proteins. 5. 

Minerals. 6. Fuel values. 7. Digestion in mouth and stomach. 8. 

Digestion in intestines. 9. Variations in energy requirement. 10 and 

11. Body substance need. 12 and 13. Need of mineral and other food 

constituents. 14. Summary and dietary making. 

COURSE 35— AVOCADO CULTURE 
I. J. CoNDiT, Assistant Professor of Citriculture 
10 Lessons 
1. Economic considerations. 2. History and geography in other 
countries. 3. History and distribution in California. 4. Soil, climate, 
moisture requirements. 5. Botany. 6. Propagation. 7. Planting, 
orchard management. 8. Classes and varieties. 9. Harvesting, pack- 
ing, marketing, pests. 10. Food value, uses. 



10 

COUESE 37— LUMBER AND ITS USES 
M. B. Pratt, formerly Assistant Professor of Forestry 
]0 Lessons 
1. Structural properties of wood. 2. Physical properties. 3. 
Mechanical properties. 4. Grades and sizes. 5. Structural timbers. 
6. Seasoning timber. 7. "Wood preservation. 8. Finishing and fire- 
proofing. 9. Comparative costs of construction. 10. Specific uses. 

COURSE 38— BUSINESS ASPECTS OF CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE 
R. L. Adams, Associate Professor of Agronomy 
10 Lessons 
1. Farming as a business, essentials for success. 2. Personal ele- 
ments. 3. Capital. 4. Selecting a farm business. 5. Planning. 6. 
Information needed in farm management. 7. Requirements and 
methods of growing special crops. 8. Testing farm business. 9. Farm 
land values. 10. Leasing farm lands. 

REFERENCE BOOKS FOR COURSES 

^COURSE NO. 1— ALFALFA CULTURE 
The Book on Alfalfa '(O) 

Alfalfa in America (S) 

Alfalfa Farming in America (S) 

Alfalfa (O) 

COURSE NO. 22— ALMOND CULTURE 
California Fruits (P) E. J. Wickson 3.00 

COURSE NO. 35— AVOCADO CULTURE 
No reliable reference book. Bulletins are listed in the lessons. 

COURSE NO. 8— BARLEY CULTURE 



F. D. Coburn 


«$2.00 


J. E. King 


2.00 


Wing 


2.00 


F. D. Coburn 


.60 



Dry Farming 


(M) 


J. A. Widtsoe 


1.50 


Field Crops 


(W) 


Wilson and Warburton 


1.50 


Forage Crops and Their Culture 


(M) 


C. V. Piper 


1.75 


Small Grains 


(M) 


M. A. Carleton 


1.75 


COURSE NO. 15- 


-BEE-KEEPING 




ABC & XYZ of Bee Culture 


(Ro) 


A. L Root 


2.50 


Bee-keeping 


(M) 


E. F. Phillips 


1.50 


How to Keep Bees for Profit 


(M) 


D. E. Lyon 


1.50 


Modern Bee Farm 


(Ro) 


S. Simmins 


2.00 


Productive Bee-keeping 


(L) 


F. C. Pellet 


1.50 


COURSE NO. 38— BUSINESS ASPECTS OF CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE 


Farm Development 


(O) 


W. M. Hays 


1.50 


Farm Management 


(M) 


G. F. Warren 


1.75 


Farm Management 


m 


F. W. Card 


2.00 


Farm Managemient Notes 


(St) 


R. L. Adams 


1.50 


The Farmstead 


(M) 


I. P. Roberts 


1.50 


The Farmers' Business Handbook 


(M) 


L P. Roberts 


1.25 


Principles of Bookkeeping and Farm 








Accounts 


(AB) 


Bexell & Nichols 


2.00 



* Books in the general list are valuable for reference for all subjects. 

' All capital letters in parenthesis designate publishers given on page 15. 

' All prices listed are net. 



11 



COURSE NO. 30— CANNING AND 

Bacteria in Relation to Country Life (M) 

Bacteria, Yeasts and Molds in the Home (O) 

Canning and How to Use Canned Foods (N) 

Canning, Preserving and Jelly Making (Li) 

Home and Farm Food Preservation (M) 
Science and Experiments as Applied to 

Canning (Sp) 

Successful Canning and Preserving (L) 



PRESERVING 

J, G. Lipman 1.50 

H. W. Conn 1.00 
A. W. Bitting and 

K. G. Bitting Free 

Janet M. Hill 1.00 

W. V. Cruess 1.00 

G. E. Colby Free 

O. Powell 2.00 



COURSE NO. 32— CERTAIN SEMITROPICAL FRUITS 
Publications referred to in the course. 



COURSE NO. 24- 


-CITRUS FRUITS 




Citrus Fruits 


(M) 


J. E. Coit 


2.00 


Citrus Fruits and Their Culture 


(0) 


H. H. Hume 


2.50 


COURSE NO. 3- 


-CORN CULTURE 




The Study of Corn 


(0) 


V. M. Shoesmith 


• .60 


Corn Crops 


(M) 


E. G. Montgomery 


1.60 


Manual of Corn Judging 


(0) 


A. D. Shamel 


.60 


Corn 


(B) 


Bowman and Crossley 


2.00 


COURSE NO. 10— DAIRY HUSBANDRY 




The Book of Butter 


(M) 


E. S. Guthrie 


1.75 


Cheese Making 


(Men) 


John W. Decker 


1.75 


City Milk Supply 


(H) 


H. N. Parker 


5.00 


Common Diseases of Farm Animals 


(L) 


R. A. Craig 


2.00 


Dairy Cattle and Milk Production 


(M) 


C. H. Eckles 


1.60 


Dairy Technology 


(J) 


Larsen and White 


2.00 


Diseases of Cattle 


(US) 


U. S. D. A. (free through 








' member of Congress) 


1.00 


Feeds and Feeding (Revised) 


(Men) 


Henry and Morrison 


2.25 


First Lessons in Dairying 


(0) 


Van Norman 


.60 


Manual of Farm Animals 


(M) 


M. W. Harper 


2.00 


Manual of Milk Products 


(M) 


W. A. Stocking 


2.00 


Principles of Modern Dairy Practice 


(J) 


F. W. Woll 


2.00 


Productive Dairying 


(L) 


R. M. Washburn 


1.75 


Productive Feeding of Farm Animals 


(L) 


F. W. Woll 


1.75 


Testing Milk and Its Products 


(Men) 


Farrington and Woll 


1.25 


The Business of Dairying 


(0) 


Lane 


1.25 


The Farmer's Veterinarian 


(0) 


C. W. Burkett 


1.50 



The principle and Practice of Judging 
Live Stock 



(M) C. W. Gay 



COURSE NO. 31— DATE CULTURE 
Date Growing in the Old World and the New (I) P. B. Popenoe 

COURSE NO. 26— FIG CULTURE 
Publications referred to in the course. 



1.50 



2.00 



COURSE NO. 23- 



California Fruits 



-GRAPE CULTURE 

(P) E. J. Wickson 



COURSE NO. 27— HOME FLORICULTURE 



American Flower Garden 

Bulbs and Tuberous-Rooted Plants 

California Garden Flowers 

Carnation Culture 

Ferns and How to Grow Thein 

Garden Making 



3.00 



(I>) 


N. 


B. Doubleday 


1.50 


(0) 


C. 


L. Allen 


1.50 


(P) 


E. 


J. Wickson 


1.50 


(W) 


L. 


L. Lamborn 


1.50 


(D) 


G. 


A. Woolson 


1.10 


(M) 


L. 


H. Bailey 


1.50 



12 



Suggestions for Utilizing of Home Grounds 



Home Floriculture (O) 

Parsons on the Eose (O) 

The American Flower Garden (D) 

The Chrysanthemum (O) 

The California Book of Gardening (E) 

The Garden Beautiful in California (C) 

The Practical Flower Garden (M) 

Water Gardening (De) 



E. E. Rexford 
S. B. Parsons 
Neltje Blanchan 
A. Herrington 
Bell Summer Anglers 
Ernest Braunton 
Helen R. Ely 
Peter Bissett 



COURSE NO. 28— HOME GROUND ORNAMENTATION 



Garden Design in Theory and Practice (L) 

Garden Planning (D) 

Gardens for Small Country Houses (Sc) 
How to Lay Out ihe Suburban Home Grounds (J) 

How to Plan Home Grounds (D) 

Landscape Gardening (Cen) 

Practical Landscape Gardening (De) 

The Art of Landscape Architecture (Put) 

Th^ Landscape Gardening Book (Win) 



Agar 

Rogers 

Jekyll and Weber 

Kellaway 

Parsons 

Root and Kelley 

Cridland 

Parsons 

Tabor 



Books Dealing With the History of Landscape Gardening 



American Gardens 
Art and Craft of Garden Making 
Formal Gardens of England and Scotland 
Gardening in California, Landscape and 

Flower 
Gardens of England 

Gardens of England — Northern Counties 
Gardens of Italy 
Italian Villas and Their Gardens 



(Ba) Lowell 

(Sc) Mawson 

(Sc) Triggs 

(Rob) McLaren 

(M) Cook 

(Stu) Chas. Holme 

(Sc) Latham 

(Cen) Wharton 



COURSE NO. 37- 
Economic Woods of the U. S. 
Lumber and Its Uses 
Wood and Forest 



-LUMBER AND ITS USES 

(J) S. J. Record 
(R) R. S. Kellogg 
(MA) Wm. Noyes 



COURSE NO. 
Goat Keeping for Amateurs 
The Book of the Goat 



13— MILCH GOAT RAISING 

(Sc) H. S. H. Pegler 
(W) S. H. Pegler 



COURSE NO. 34— NORMAL NUTRITION 



Analysis and Cost of Ready to Serve 

Foods (Amer) 

Chemistry, of Food and Nutrition (2d ed.) (M) 

Feeding the Family (M) 

Food and Dietetics (WW) 

Food in War Time (S) 

Food and the War (H) 



1.00 
1.50 
5.00 
.60 
1.25 
LOO 
2.00 
2.50 



2.00 
1.10 
5.00 
2 00 
150 
2.00 
1.50 
3.50 
2.00 



7.50 
15.00 
25.00 

3.75 
2.50 
3.00 
18.00 
6.00 



1.25 
1.00 
3.00 



.50 
2.00 



Food Products 

Nutrition and Clinical Dietetics 

Nutritional Physiology (2d ed.) 
The Food Problem 

The Fundamental Basis of Nutrition 
The Newer Knowledge of Nutrition 

COURSE NO. 25- 
California Fruits 



(M) 
(LF) 

(S) 

(M) 
(Y) 
(M) 



Gephart and Lusk .50 
H. C. Sherman 1.50 
Mary Swartz Rose 2.10 
Hutchinson 4.00 
G. Lusk .50 
U. S. Food Administra- 
tion .75 
H. C. Sherman 2.25 
Carter, Howe and 

Mason 5.50 

P. G. Stiles 1.25 

Kellogg and Taylor 1.25 

G. Lusk .50 

E. V. McCollum 1.50 



-OLIVE GROWING 

(P) E. J. Wickson 



COURSE NO. 5— ONION CULTURE 
The New Onion Culture (O) T. Greiner 

Vegetable Gardening (W) S. B. Green 



3.00 



.50 
1.00 



13 



COURSE NO. 17— PEAR CULTURE 




Pear Culture for Profit (0) P. T. Quinn 
California Fruits (P) E. J. Wickson 


1.00 
3.00 



COURSE NO. 19— PLUM AND PRUNE CULTURE 
Plums and Plum Culture (O) F. A. Waugh 

COURSE NO. 14-^POULTRY HUSBANDRY 



COURSE NO. 21- 



The Nut Culturists 



-WALNUT CULTURE 

(O) A. S. Fuller 



1.50 



American Standard of Perfection 


(A) 


American Poultry Ass 'n 


2.00 


California Poultry Practice 


(P) 


Susan B. Swaysgood 


1.00 


Diseases of Poultry 


(M) 


Pearl, Surface and 








Curtis 


2.00 


Diseases of Poultry 


(F) 


D. E. Salmon 


1.00 


Hatching and Rearing Chicks 


(W) 


H. A. Nourse 


.25 


How to Raise Chicks 


(Re) 


P. T. Woods 


.60 


Poultry Breeding and Management 


(0) 


Jas. Dryden 


1.60 


Poultry Appliances and Handicraft 


(0) 


G. B. Fiske 


.60 


Poultry Production 


(LF) 


W. A. Lippincott 


2.00 


Productive Poultry Husbandry 


(L) 


H. R. Lewis 


2.oa 


Progressive Poultry Culture 


(T) 


A. A. Brigham 


1.50 


Principles and Practice of Poultry Culture 


(G) 


J. H. Robinson 


2.50 


Poultry for Profit 


(C) 


Jean Koethen 


1.00 


Poultry Diseases 


(0) 


E. J. Wortley 


.75 


Poultry Houses and Fixtures 


(Re) 


Reliable Poultry Jour- 








nal Co. 


.50 


The Beginner in Poultry 


(M) 


C. S. Valentine 


1.50 


COURSE NO. 12— SHEEP HUSBANDRY 




Productive Sheep Husbandry 


(L) 


W. G. Coffey 


1.50 


Sheep Farming in America 


(M) 


Craig and Marshall 


1.50 


Sheep Farming in America 


(S) 


J. E. Wing 


1.00 


Sheep and Their Diseases 


(Eg) 


W. A. Rushworth 


1.50 


The Management and Feeding of Sheep 


(0) 


T. Shaw 


2.00 


COURSE NO. 11— SWINE HUSBANDRY 




California Hog Book 


(P) 


W. S. Guilford 


2.00 


Diseases of Swine 


(S) 


C. F. Lynch 


5.00 


Forty Years' Experience as a Practical 








Hog Man 


(Fr) 


A. J. Lovejoy 


1.25 


Judging Live Stock 


(K) 


J. A. Craig 


1.50 


Productive Swine Husbandry 


(L) 


G. E. Day 


1.50 


Swine in America 


(0) 


F. D. Coburn 


2.50 


Swine Husbandry 


(0) 


F. D. Coburn 


1.50 


The Hog Book 


(Br) 


H. C. Dawson 


1.50 


Types and Breeds of Farm Animals 


(G) 


C. S. Plumb 


2.40 


COURSE NO. 33— VEGETABLE GARDENING 




Bean Culture 


(0) 


G. C. Sevey 


.60 


California Vegetables 


(P) 


E. J. Wickson 


2.00 


Garden Farming 


(G) 


L. C. Corbett 


2.00 


Garden Steps 


(Si) 


E. Cobb 


.60 


How to Grow Mushrooms 


(W) 


W. Falconer 


1.00 


Peas and Pea Culture 


(0) 


S. Eraser 


.60 


Principles of Vegetable Gardening 


(M) 


L. H. Bailey 


1.50 


Success in Market Gardening 


(D) 


W. W. Rawson 


1.10 


The Potato 


(O) 


S. Eraser 


.75 


The Potato 


(D) 


Grubb and Guilford 


2.00 


Tomato Culture 


(0) 


W. W. Tracy 


.60 


Vegetable Forcing 


(0) 


R. L. Watts 


2.00 


Vegetable Gardening 


(0) 


R. L. Watts 


1.75 



1.50 



14 



GENERAL REFERENCE BOOKS 



AGRICULTURE 

A Handbook for Farmers and Dairymen (J) 

Common Diseases of Farm Animals (L) 

Co-operation in Agriculture (M) 
Cyclopedia of American Agriculture - (M) 

Farmers' Law (W) 

Law for American Farmers (M) 
How Farmers Co-operate and Double Profits (O) 
One Thousand Questions and Answers in 

California Agriculture (P) 

Second Thousand Questions Answered (P) 

The Farmer's Manual of Law (O) 

The Federal Farm Loan System (O) 

The Marketing of Farm Products (M) 



F. W. Woll 
R. A. Craig 

G. H. Powell 
L. H. Bailey 
L. V. Koos 
J. B. Green 
C. Poe 

E. J. Wickson 
E. J. Wickson 
H. E. Willis 
H. Myriek 
L. D. H. Weld 



AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE 



Plant Breeding (M) 

Fertilizers and Crops (O) 

Soils (M) 

Soils, Their Properties and Management (M) 

Soil Conditions and Plant Growth (LG) 

Soil Fertility and Permanent Agriculture (G) 



2.00 
1.50 
1.50 
20.00 
.50 
1.50 
1.50 

1.50 
1.50 
2.00 
1.00 
1.60 



L. H. Bailey 1.35 

L. L. Van Slyke 2.50 

E. W. Hilgard 4.00 

Lyon, Fippin, Buckman 1.90 



Russell 

C. G. Hopkins 



DISEASES AND PESTS OF PLANTS 



Diseases of Economic Plants 
Fungous Diseases of Plants 
Manual of Fruit Diseases 
Insects of Economic Importance 
Spraying Crops 
Spraying of Plants 



(M) Stevens and Hall 

(G) B. M. Duggar 

(M) Hesler and Whetzel 

(M) G. W. Herrick 

(O) C. M. Weed 

(M) E. G. Lodeman 



1.50 
2.00 



2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.00 
.60 
1.50 



Book of Wheat 

Cereals in America 

Dry Farming 

Farm Grasses of the U. S. 

Forage and Fiber Crops 

Forage Plants 

Small Grains 

Southern Field Crops 

The Corn Crops 

FRUIT 
Bush Fruits (New Edition) 
Cyclopedia of American Horticulture 
Fruit Growing in Arid Regions 
The Pruning Manual 
Farm and Garden Rule Book 
Principles and Practice of Pruning 
Productive Orcharding 



FIELD CROPS 

(O) 
(O) 
(M) 
(O) 
(O) 
(M) 
(M) 
(M) 
(M) 



GROWING 

(M) 
(M) 
(M) 
(M) 
(M) 
(O) 
(L) 



P. T. Dondlinger 
T. F. Hunt 
J. H. Widtsoe 
W. J. Spillman 
T. F. Hunt 
C. V. Piper 
M. A. Carlton 
J. F. Duggar 
E. G. Montgomery 



F. W. Card 

L. H. Bailey (6 vols.) 

Padock and Whipple 

L. H. Bailey 

L. H. Bailey 

M. G. Kains 

F. C. Sears 



IRRIGATION PRACTICE 



Irrigation and Drainage 
Irrigation Farming (Revised) 
Irrigation Practice and Engineering 



Practical Irrigation and Pumping 
Principles of Irrigation Practice 
Use of Water in Irrigation 



(M) 
(O) 
(M) 



(J) 
(M) 
(H) 



F. H. King 

L. M. Wilcox 

B. A. Etcheverry (3 

vols.), vol. 1, Use of 

Irrigation 
Fleming 
J. Widtsoe 
Fortier 



2.00 
1.75 
1.50 
1.00 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
1.60 



1.75 
36.00 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 



1.50 
2.00 



2.00 
2.00 
1.75 
2.00 



15 



STRUCTURES, ENGINERING AND MACHINERY 
Equipment for the Farm and Farmstead 
Farm Structures 
Farm Concrete 
Modern Farm Buildings 
Silos: Construction and Service 
Agricultural Drafting 



Agricultural Engineering 

Farm Machinery and Farm Motors 

Gas Engine Handbook 
Modern Gas Tractor 



(G) 


H. E. Ramsower 


2.25 


(M) 


K. J. T. Ekblaw 


1.75 


(M) 


K. J. T. Ekblaw 


1.60 


(Mc) 


A. Hopkins 


2.50 


(W) 


M. L. King 


.50 


(J) 


C. B. Howe 


1.25 


^RM M 


APS 




(W) 


J. B. Davidson 


1.50 


(0) 


L. W. Chase and J. B. 






Davidson 


2.00 


(Ga) 


E. W. Roberts 


1.50 


(He) 


Page 


2.00 



PUBLISHERS 

(A) Appleton & Co New York 

(AB) American Book Co Chicago, 111. 

(Amer) American Medical Association Chicago, 111. 

(Am) American Poultry Association Mansfield, Ohio 

(B) Bowman & Crossley Ames, Iowa 

(Ba) Bates and Guild Co Boston, Mass. 

(Br) Breeders Gazette Chicago, 111. 

(C) California Cultivator Co Los Angeles, Cal. 

(Cen) Century Co New York 

(D) Doubleday, Page & Co New York 

(De) De La Mare Publishing Co New York 

(E) Paul Elder, Publisher San Francisco, Cal. 

(Eg) Alex. Eger „ Chicago, 111. 

(F) Feather Publishing Co Washington, D. C. 

(Fr) Frost Publishing Co Springfield, 111. 

(G) Ginn & Co San Francisco, Cal. 

(Ga) Gas Engine Publishing Co Cincinnati, Ohio 

(H) McGraw Hill Book Co., W. 39th St New York 

(He) Henley Publishing Co New York 

(HM) Houghton, Miffin Co Chicago, 111. 

(I) West India Gardens _ Altadena, Cal. 

(J) John Wiley & Sons New York 

(K) Kenyon Printing Co Des Moines, Iowa 

(L) J. B. Lippincott Co Philadelphia, Pa. 

(LF) Lea & Febiger Philadelphia, Pa. 

(LG) Longmans, Green Co New York 

(LI) Little, Brown & Co Boston, Mass. 

(M) Macmillan Co., 609 Mission St San Francisco, Cal. 

(MA) Manual Arts Press Peoria, 111. 

(Mc) McBride & Co New York 

(Men) Mendota Book Co Madison, Wis. 

(N) National Canners Association Chicago, 111. 

(O) Orange Judd Co _ ..New York 

(P) Pacific Rural Press San Francisco, Cal. 

(Put) Putnam's Sons _ New York 

(R) Radford Architectural Co Chicago, 111. 

(Re) Reliable Poultry Journal Publishing Co Chicago, 111. 



16 



(Eo) A. I. Eoot Co Medina, Ohio 

(Eob) A. M. Eobertson, Publisher San Francisco, Cal. 

(S) Saunders Publishing Co Chicago, 111. 

(Sc) Chas. Scribner's Sons New York 

(Si) Silver, Burdette Co New York 

(Sp) Sprague Canning Machinery Co Chicago, 111. 

(St) Students' Co-operative Store, U. of C Berkeley, Cal. 

(Stu) "The Studio" New York 

(T) Torch Press Cedar Eapids, Iowa 

(US) U. S. Superintendent of Documents Washington, D. C 

(W) Webb Publishing Co St. Paul, Minn. 

(Win) J. C. Winston Co ,-.. Philadelphia, Pa. 

(WW) William Wood Co .- New York 

(Y) Yale University Press New York 

In addition to the reference books listed, students will find many 
state and United States publications very helpful. The United States 
Farmers' Bulletins apply especially to general conditions and may 
be obtained free upon application to the Chief of the Division of 
Publications, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C, 
as long as the department 's supply lasts. After this is exhausted, the 
publications may be obtained from the Superintendent of Documents, 
Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C, but by purchase only. 
The prices will be sent on request to the above office and all money 
should be sent by postal money order or New York draft. Stamps 
not accepted. Money sent at sender's risk. 

STATE AGEICULTUEAL EXPEEIMENT STATIONS AND U. S. 
DEPAETMENTS OF AGEICULTUEE 

Alabama, Auburn. Nebraska, Lincoln. 

Arizona, Tucson. Nevada, Eeno. 

Arkansas, Fayetteville. New Hampshire, Durham. 

California, Berkeley. New Jersey, New Brunswick. 

Colorado, Foi^t Collins. New Mexico, State College. 

Connecticut, New Haven. New York, Ithaca. 

Delaware, Newark. North Carolina, West Ealeigh. 

Florida, Gainesville. North Dakota, Agricultural College. 

Georgia, Experiment. Ohio, Wooster. 

Idaho, Moscow. ^ Oklahoma, Stillwater. 

Illinois, Urbana. * Oregon, Corvallis. 

Indiana, Lafayette. Pennsylvania, State College. 

Iowa, Ames. Ehode Island, Kingston. 

Kansas, Manhattan. ' South Carolina, Clemson College. 

Kentucky, Lexington. South Dakota, Brookings. 

Louisiana, Baton Eouge. Tennessee, Knoxville. 

Maine, Orqno. Texas, College Station. 

Maryland, College Park. Utah, Logan. 

Massachusetts, Amherst. Vermont, Burlington. 

Michigan, East Lansing. Virginia, Blacksburg. 

Minnesota, St. Paul. Wasliington, Pullman. 

Mississippi, Agricultural College. West Virginia, Morgantown. 

Missouri, Columbia. Wisconsin, Madison. 

Montana, Bozeman. Wyoming, Laramie. 

Division of Publications, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 



YC 67d42 





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f?n7750 




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c 


3f\7~5 


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY