(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Fun with Shakespeare"

Study is like 
the heaven's 
lorious sun 

i 

1 at will not 



FUN WITH 

SHAKESPEARE 



LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOST 



NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS 



PRESENTS 




SHAKESPEARE 

IN AMERICAN COMMUNITIES 



SHAKESPEARE 

SAID IT 

FIRST 



Did you know that Shakespeare is given credit for 
introducing nearly 2,000 words into the English lan- 
guage either by bringing into usage foreign words, 
making conjunctions of two or three other words, 
using nouns as verbs, or by inventing new ones? 
Check out these words and phrases — that we still 
use today — attributed to Shakespeare. 



alligator 


frugal 


luggage 


puke 


auspicious 


gloomy 


majestic 


rancorous 


castigate 


gnarled 


manager 


reinforcement 


critical 


hoodwinked 


mimic 


rumination 


dauntless 


impede 


mountaineer 


torture 


divest 


jaded 


obscene 


unmitigated 


equivocal 


laughingstock 


outbreak 


worthless 


eyeball 


leapfrog 


pedant 


zany 


eyesore 


lonely 


petition 




all that glitters is not gold 


good riddance 




dead as a doornail 




heart of gold 




elbow room 




sorry sight 




full circle 




too much of a 


good thing 



FAMOUS 
QUOTES 



These Shakespearean lines are still well known today. 



Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend 

me your ears. 

(Julius Caesar, Act III, Scene 2) 

Brevity is the soul of wit. 
(Hamlet, Act II, Scene 2) 

All the world's a stage, and all the men 
and women merely players: 
(As You Like It, Act II, Scene 7) 

A horse! a horse! my kingdom for 

a horse! 

(Richard 111, Act Y Scene 4) 

What's in a name? that which we call a 

rose by any other name would smell as 

sweet; 

(Romeo and Juliet, Act II, Scene 2) 

Double, double toil and trouble; 
Fire bum, and cauldron bubble. 
(Macbeth, Act IY Scene 1) 



The course of true love never did run 

smooth; 

(A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act I, 

Scene 1) 

But I will wear my hean upon my 
sleeve for daws to peck at: I am not 
what I am. 
(Othello, Act I, Scene 1) 

But be not afraid of greatness: some 
are bom great, some achieve greatness, 
and some have greatness thrust 
upon 'em. 
(Twelfth Night, Act II, Scene 5) 

We are such stuff as dreams are 
made on, and our little life is 
rounded with a sleep. 
(The Tempest, Act IV Scene 1) 



COINED BY SHAKESPEARE 




ACROSS 

4 one who handles, 
controls, or directs 

8 ludicrously comical 

9 to be a hindrance or 
obstacle to 

1 1 the act of pondering 
or meditation 

1 8 marked by success 
or favorable 
circumstances 

19 provides additional 

strength 

20 of a doubtful or 
uncertain nature 



DOWN 

1 avoiding waste 

2 worn out or weary 

3 one who puts on an 
air of learning 

5 something offensive 
to the eye or sight 

6 offensive to one's 

moral standards 

7 to deprive ol status 
or authority 

10 without qualification 
or exception 



1 2 to request or entreat 

1 3 progress by large 
jumps 

14 knotted or twisted 

15 to criticize severely 

16 lull of deep-seated 

resentment 

17 invulnerable to fear 



For help finding the answers to the clues above check out 

www.shakespeareinamericancommunities.org 



TEST YOUR 

SHAKESPEARE 



1 . When was Shakespeare born? 

a. July 4, 1776 

b. April 23, 1564 

c. September 2, 1490 

2. In what town did 
Shakespeare grow up? 

a. London 

b. Dublin 

c. Stratford-upon-Avon 

3. Who were the two 
reigning monarchs during 
Shakespeare's life? 

a. Henry VI and Richard III 

b. Elizabeth I and James I 

c. William and Mary 

4. Who was one of 
Shakespeare's most well known 
contemporaries? 

a. Arthur Miller 

b. Christopher Marlowe 

c. Dante 



6. Who helped publish 
Shakespeare's First Folio after 
his death? 

a. His wife 

b. Two actors from his 
company, John Heminge 
and Henry Condell 

c. His lawyer 

7. What three genres were 
Shakespeare's plays divided into 
in the First Folio! 

a. Comedy, History, and Tragedy 

b. Action, Drama, and Romance 

c. Slapstick, Western, and Tragedy 

8. Which are the longest and 
shortest plays written by 
Shakespeare? 

a. Hamlet and Comedy of Eirors 

b. The Tempest and Taming of the 
Shrew 

c. Romeo and Juliet and All's Well 
that Ends Well 



5. In what outdoor theater did 
Shakespeare present most of 
his plays? 

a. The Rose 

b. The Bear Garden 

c. The Globe 



9. Who did not portray 
Hamlet on film? 

a. Mel Gibson 

b. Colin Fanell 

c. Ethan Hawke 

10. In what poetic meter did 
Shakespeare compose the 
majority of his plays and verse? 

a. terza nma 

b. anapestic trimeter 

c. iambic pentameter 



nAIIOHAI INDtWMlNi fu« : HI A»I . 




w 



NATIONAL 
ENDOWMENT 
FOR THE ARTS 



SHAKtSI'tARE 

AN (UMMUNllllS 



Am 



MIDWEST 



301 : qa 

:q> :qe:D T :qi 
SH3MSNV