(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Future homemakers [serial]"

THE LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 




THE COLLECTION OF 
NORTH CAROLINIANA 



C6U0.5 
F99n 
v.8-12 
1950-55 



This book must not 
be taken from the 
Library building. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://www.archive.org/details/futurehomemakers19501955 




North Carolina Association 



/OLUMEVII! 



OCTOBER 1950 



NUMBER 1 




Dear F. H. A. Members— GREETINGS: 

This is the beginning of our new year and I hope it will be a very in- 
teresting one for every member and it will be if you take an active part in 
all the activities in your chapter. The national membership for 1949-50 
was 286,351 — of this number North Carolina had 14,266 members. We 
are proud of our steady growth in membership in the State F.H.A. but 
this number represents only about one-third of the girls enrolled in the 
homemaking classes. What can we do to interest more girls in becoming 
active members? Our program of work is full of wonderful suggestions 
that should be interesting to every member, study it carefully and make 
some reports to our news bulletin about your activities. 



Cordially, 



Clara Jean Hunter, President. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



STATE OFFICERS 

President — Clara Jean Hunter, Pilot Mountain Mrs. 

Vice-President — Martha Fulcher, Davidson Miss 

Secretary — Nancy Bright, High Point Miss 

Treasurer — Lorena Pace, Olivia Miss 

Reporter — Virgie Melton, Wilmington Mrs. 

Parliamentarian — Katie Lee Pittman, Richlands Mrs. 

Historian— Toddy Smith, Bethel Mrs. 

Song Leader — Mary Ann Simpson, Asheville Miss 



District Advisers 

Emma Robertson, Union Grove 
Mary Niblock, Concord 
Ruth Wagner, Stokesdale 
Mary J. Cothran, Franklinton 
Gertrude McRae, Rockingham 
Jane Ferguson, LaGrange 
Myrtle D. Stogner, Scotland Neck 
Mavis Allman, Glen Alpine 



State Adviser 

Miss Cathernine T. Dennis 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 
Division of Vocational Education 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 




Left to right — Bottom Row: Rachel Beasley, Mayodan; Mary H. Cooke, Franklinton; Martha Eaton, Franklin- 
ton; Jean Puckett, Raleigh; Betty Rand, Garner; Eloise Estes, Davidson; Virginia Herman, Taylorsville; 
Clara Jean Hunter, Pilot Mountain; Jo Ann Blake, Stedman; Jo Ann McGill, Stedman; Second Row: Peggy 
Anne Cox, Richlands; Annie Marie Browning, Bryson City; Louise Lambert, Albemarle; Mrs. Clara Reid, 
Richlands (Adviser); Virgie Melton, Wilmington; Toddy Smith, Bethel; Lorena Pace, Broadway; Evelyn Eury, 
Concord; Janice Strickland, Stedman; Maxine Averitte, Stedman; Peggy Williford, Stedman; Third Row: 
Sue Alley, Stoneville; Frances Richardson, Liberty; Nancy Bright, High Point; Martha Fulcher, Davidson; 
Kitty Williams, Ellerbe; Barbara Nichols, Pilot Mountain; Polly McDonald, Rockingham, Betty Ann DeBorde, 
Elkin; Mrs. Mary B. Frederick, Stedman (adviser); Top Row: Betty Carter, Wentworth; Lucy Younts, Lexing- 
ton; Mary Ann Simpson, Asheville; Katie Lee Pittman, Richlands, Ann Kelly Gardner, Jacksonville; Nancy 
McBride, Taylorsville; Mrs. Gertrude McRae, Rockingham (Adviser); Mrs. Thelma Harrill, Cullowhee (Ad- 
viser); Catherine T. Dennis, Raleigh, (State Adviser); Elizabeth Martin, Winston-Salem (Adviser). 



Why the Family Bought a New Car 



When I told my dad about my 
experiences trying to catch the 
train going to Kansas City, he 
said it sounded like something 
that happens only in the movies. 
I'll agree that it sounds fan- 
tastic, but believe me it really 
happened. That morning is one 
I will never forget as long as I 
live. 

I was supposed to catch the 
train in Goldsboro at 5:00 
o'clock Monday morning. 
Mother decided to go on to 
Tabor City and visit my grand- 
ly mother for a week. Dad couldn't 
v ^r> leave home at this time so at 
-,^> 3:00 o'clock that morning if you 



had ridden by my house you 
would have seen my mother, my 
smallest brother, a colored man 
to drive the car home from 
Grandmother's (Dad was plan- 
ning to trade that week), and 
me piling sleepily into the car. 
But about 10 miles from home 
we woke up — flat tire number 
one had occurred! This didn't 
alarm us too much because we 
had left home early — just in case 
something happened. With a 
spare ready we were on our way 
in twenty minutes. With good 
luck we could still catch the 
train in Goldsboro. That car was 
taking its last drive but believe 



me if those tires never turn 
again they were flying that 
morning. At 4:55 a.m. we were 
about 3 miles from Goldsboro 
when my heart touched my toe- 
nails, we had flat tire number 
two! 

Here we were only 3 miles 
from Goldsboro with a flat tire 
and no spare. I was just sitting 
there petrified while mother 
was waving a car to stop. It 
stopped but when mother saw 
the three drunk men in it she 
decided I had better wait for 
another ride. In about two 
minutes a nice old farmer came 
by and mother sent me on to 
Goldsboro to find out about 
catching a plane or hiring a taxi 



to catch the train. I could have 
done this except that in the ex- 
citement I left my bags in the 
car, three miles from Goldsboro. 
When I rode into Goldsboro 
the first person I met was Miss 
Hinnant, my adviser. She was 
going to see me off on the train. 
I recognized her car but you 
should have seen her face when 
I jumped out of that car about 
10 minutes after the train had 
left and with no bags. Mother 
had sent my seven year old 
brother with me — for protection 
I guess. Anyway, he got the idea 
I was going to leave him in 
Goldsboro so he let a yell that 
would scare Tarzan! 

After thanking the farmer, 
Miss Hinnant, John, and I went 
to the train station to try to 
find out about a plane. The 
earliest one was at 1:00 o'clock 
that afternoon, of course, that 
was too late. So we jumped in 
her car to go to find mother but 
when we got to the car nobody 
was there. I got my bags and we 
started back to Goldsboro think- 
ing that mother had caught a 
ride in to the train station. I 
hadn't the slightest idea where 
the colored man was. We went 
back to the train station but 
mother wasn't there. Hoping 
that she might have come in for 
help and gone back to the car, 
we started to the car again. This 
time the colored man was there 
and he said Mother had gotten a 
ride into Goldsboro to try to 
find some help. Miss Hinnant, 
John, and I decided to go back 
to the train station and wait. 
Sooner or later mother was 
bound to go there. 

If you want to find peace and 
solitude, just go to the train 
station in Goldsboro about 5:30 
in the morning. At least, it was 
quiet until we heard a blood 
curdling siren and the fire 
chief's red car drive up. I^ow the 
fire station was the last place on 
earth I expected to find mother, 
but that was the only place open 
at that hour so that's where she 
went. She had seen us go to the 
car both times but couldn't stop 
us. Finally one kind fireman 
took the chief's car and chased 
us down. 

In the meantime mother had 
called the owner of the Fire- 
stone station. He was very nice 
and sent for the car. While two 
new tires were being bought, 
mother called the Raleigh- 



Durham airport and made reser- 
vations for me on the 9:00 
o'clock plane going to Greens- 
boro. 

Telling Miss Hinnant good-bye 
and thanking her for her help, 
mother took the wheel. I had to 
be at the airport at 8:45 at the 
very latest. Probably most 
people would have said it was 
impossible to make it, but my 
mother is a very determined 
woman and because she was 
driving, I got there. 

I was rushed out to get on 
the plane with my make-up kit, 
one large bag, and my evening 
dress in a separate box. I 
learned as the plane waited that 
I couldn't take the box, so while 
everyone was waiting I opened 
my suitcase, stuffed my evening 
dress in, and boarded the plane. 
Waving good-bye to mother I 
heard her say, "If you don't 
catch the train in Greensboro, 
fly on to Asheville." My last 
glimpse of John was when he 
was standing there with his 
mouth dropped open and his 
eyes about to pop out looking at 
the airplanes. 

On the plane I relaxed for the 
first time since about 3:15 that 
morning. Everyone was nice and 
so interested in my trip. Dr. and 
Mrs. Frank Graham sat across 
the aisle from me and they were 
so nice. It was the first time I 
had ever been up so I was really 
excited. 

Thirty minutes later the plane 
landed at the Greensboro-High 
Point airfield. I caught a taxi 
and walked into the Greensboro 
train station the same time the 
train came in. By this time, I 
felt as if I had already been to 
Kansas City. 

That train looked like a 
golden carriage when I finally 
saw it and it was, because it 
carried me on a wonderful trip 
and gave me many golden 
memories. 

You can guess what happened 
to the car when mother finally 
got it home! Now we own a new 
black Packard instead of the old 
red one, but I'll never see a 
maroon Packard that I will not 
think of catching that train and 
I'll remember why the family 
bought a new car. 

Toddy Smith, 
Historian. 



Reminder 

National F.H.A. Week, 
November 12-18, 1950 



F.H.A. Girl Wins 
Scholarship 

Laura Frances Pope, of the 
Coats Chapter won the 1950 
Farmers Cooperative Essay Con- 
test over more than 2,000 con- 
testants. Her essay stressed the 
importance of educating rural 
boys and girls in order that they 
might use their influence and 
training to make rural condi- 
tions better. In her essay, she 
dedicated herself to a life of 
service in a rural community. 
She declared: "The farm pro- 
gram of tomorrow cannot be de- 
veloped and put into effect until 
we, the boys and girls of today, 
plan carefully the part that we 
are to play in this program." 

She outlined for herself a five- 
part program as her contribu- 
tion to better rural communities. 

First, she said, she actually 
plans to live on a farm, and she 
called on other boys and girls to 
return to the farm after securing 
an education. 

"Our farms," she declared, 
"are crying out for the educated 
youths who leave never to re- 
turn." 

After she receives training in 
one of the teacher colleges of the 
state, Miss Pope said she will 
return to a rural community 
where she will strive to give 
farm youngsters a clearer pic- 
ture of the part they can play 
in making rural improvements. 

"In the school in which I 
teach," she said, "I will endeavor 
to promote organizations such as 
the 4-H Club and Future Home- 
makers of America so as to build 
character and help fit young 
people for rural life." 

Laura received a one year col- 
lege scholarship and $100 in 
cash. She entered Campbell Col- 
lege in September and is still un- 
decided between music and 
home economics. In either field 
she will be an asset. 



TODAYS YOUTH 






MARROW'S HOMENRTE 



.1 




F 



kwv 



\\jn 



Left to Right: Mr. Vernon W. Welch, Montana, Dolores Pyle, North Dakota, Mrs. R. K. Bent, Arkansas, Miss 
Amy Holmblade, Michigan, Leader, Connie Bennet, Montana, Virgie Melton, North Carolina and Bill Varney, 
Kansas, discussing Future Homemakers in the Homes of America. 



F.HA PROJECTS FOR YEAR 



At the National F.H.A. Con- 
vention, it was decided to con- 
tinue the following projects for 
the coming year: 

1. International projects 

a. World Christmas and 
Chinukah Festival 

b. Adoption of Foreign 
Homemaking Classes 

c. United Nations Day Ob- 
servance — October 24, 
1950 

2. National F.H.A. Week — 
November 12-18, 1950 

3. Families Together 

Since there are three Interna- 
tional Projects, perhaps your 
chapters may wish to select only 
one. 

The World Christmas Festi- 
val literature describing the two 
plans for making up packages 
has been mailed to each chapter. 

If your chapter has adopted a 
foreign homemaking class, it 
would be well for you to con- 
tinue to send to the same school. 



Some of the teaching supplies 
which are urgently needed 
are white sewing thread, un- 
bleached muslin or other cotton 
material, sugar and feed sacks, 
knitting yarn, crochet thread, 
kitchen utensils and packaged 
staple foods. Don't forget that 
these students would also like 
to receive letters from your 
chapters. 

The Families Together Proj- 
ect should encourage activities 
which keep families playing, 
working, planning, studying, 
earning and worshipping to- 
gether. It should make for more 
happy family life for all. This is 
the project which everyone can 
individually participate in. Look 
over your chapter program of 
work and make plans to present 
some program on family life to 
your chapter and your school 
and, if possible, to your com- 
munity. Then as a chapter mem- 
ber, resolve to make your family 
life most satisfying by some ac- 
tion on your part. 



National F.H.A. Week — No- 
vember 12-18. What activities 
have been planned for your 
chapter members? Take a good 
look at our State and National 
Program of Work. It is brim- 
ming over with ways to cele- 
brate our "special week." Since 
everywhere F.H.A. members 
will be doing special things be 
sure to join in the spirit. 

Make pen pals through writ- 
ing these girls describing our 
ways of doing things together. I 
am including the report given 
on Projects at the National Con- 
vention. 

Martha Fulcher, 
Vice-President. 



How do you like Caro- 
line's new outfit? It was de- 
signed by Sybil Carlyle of 
the LaGrange Chapter? 



"IF I WERE A FUTURE HOMEMAKER' 



Talk made before the Second 
National Convention, Future 
Homemakers of America July 
1, Music Hall, Municipal 
Auditorium. 

By REV. W. E. PHIFER 

"I am not unmindful of the 
high honor which has been con- 
ferred upon me in the opportun- 
ity of making this address. When 
the invitation to speak to two 
thousand young women was first 
received the only dubious person 
as to my acceptance was Mrs. 
Phifer. However, my deep desire 
to have the opportunity of see- 
ing so many young women 
gathered together in one place 
prevailed, and consent from all 
quarters was gained. Happily 
for me I am here with you this 
morning. 

"The theme of your program 
has intrigued me, 'Today's 
Youth and Tomorrow's Home- 
makers.' I am profoundly inter- 
ested in both the youth of today 
and the world of tomorrow, and 
the two are so closely related 
that one can scarcely think of 
one without calling to mind the 
other. Some of us are worried a 
bit about each, and some of us 
are extremely optimistic about 
each. Those of us who have 
walked a little further along the 
road of life are prone to look 
back, a bit wistfully at times, 
and occasionally to find short- 
coming of modern youth which 
we are too ready to condemn, 
pessimistically prophesying a 
woeful take into full account 
that a young person's faith is apt 
to seek a different expression 
than ours, for they are not 
stirred by the same thought 
forms, any more than sitting in a 
cozy chair by the fireside all day 
appeals to a normal, healthy, 
young, person. But in the sincer- 
ity of your purposes and the ad- 
venture of your living, I, for one, 
have every confidence. 

"Therefore, I come to you this 
morning not so much that I may 
bring you advice for your fu- 
ture as that I may share with 
you the reflections of some years 
of experience in this matter of 
homemaking. Granted that my 
role has been the more humble 
one of husband and father, I 
have been a part of a home for 
slightly more than twenty years, 



and have had occasion to ob- 
serve the art of homemaking at 
first hand, while trying to con- 
tribute the best that I could to- 
wards the process, with the 
usual masculine ineptitude. Cer- 
tain convictions have grown 
upon me with the passing of the 
years and these I would like to 
bring to you this morning. They 
may be grouped in four general 
areas of life: knowledge, faith, 
service and humility. We are 
privileged to live in a day when 
the accumulated wisdom of the 
ages is at our disposal. What we 
shall do with all the understand- 
ing and insights that are ours is 
a decision that we must make as 
individuals, but here is this ac- 
cumulated body of fact which 
we may use or misuse as we 
choose. Man has developed his 
intellectual capacities to an al- 
most unimaginable degree and 
secrets of the universe are be- 
ing wrested from their hiding 
places almost daily. While it is 
true that much of this has been 
in the field of science, and not 
enough in the field of art and 
philosophy, it is an astounding 
accumulation that confronts us 
today. A young person of seven- 
teen likely knows a great deal 
more than her grandmother did 
at the age of thirty-seven. High 
schools today offer many sub- 
jects that previously had been 
considered the work of college 
mentality, because our whole 
mental horizon has been so 
greatly enlarged in this present 
generation. 

"The most conspicuous failure 
in this realm has come about be- 
cause we have not seen clearly 
that knowledge is of no benefit 
if we try to divorce it from per- 
sonality. The scientist who 
spends long hours in the labora- 
tory studying cancer cultures 
does so not because he is inter- 
ested in the culture, as such, but 
because cancer is a disease that 
destroys human life and he is 
one among many seeking a way 
to overcome this hazard. He may 
not, at the moment, realize such 
is the case, and it may seen to 
him that his entire goal is mere- 
ly a clearer understanding of 
that which appears in the field 
of his microscope. But simply to 
know all about cancer makes no 
difference it is the application of 



his knowledge to life that makes 
it significant and valuable. 
Knowledge must be nurtured 
and cultured by spiritual in- 
sights if it is to have the utmost 
value to mankind, for it is man 
himself who determines the 
proper use of that knowledge. 
What you know is not really so 
important as HOW you use your 
knowledge. 

"Further, it should be pointed 
out that we must never consider 
knowledge alone as the answer 
to all of life's questions. You will 
never be able to build the sort of 
homes that deep in your hearts 
you would like to build if you 
depend upon the mere accumu- 
lation of knowledge as your 
foundation. The man who at- 
tempts to build a life solely upon 
that which he knows has a very 
shakey bridge upon which to 
cross the stream. Our capacity 
for knowledge is so sharply lim- 
ited, and we are so finite in our 
abilities to absorb truth, that a 
life planned upon facts alone is 
sure to be a failure. To say that, 
you are going to plan a life only 
upon that which you know is to 
miss some of the most thrilling 
experiences that life offers. 

"For example, there is the 
whole of the emotional life. 
Young lovers are wont to ex- 
amine one another with an age 
old question, "But how do you 
know you love me?" There is no 
better answer to the query than 
the one most frequently given 
"Because you are you." When 
you break that down in analysis 
it is really no answer at all, yet 
all lovers will agree that it is as 
satisfying as rain after a pro- 
longed drouth. Emotional life 
does not need a mathematical 
formula to prove its worth and 
make significant its values. One 
may have a very thorough 
knowledge of the weight, height, 
perhaps age, physical character- 
istics, and habits of life in gen- 
eral of the loved one. While 
these may have some contribu- 
tion to make to the whole pic- 
ture, they are never the basis of 
the love. That transcends mere 
knowledge and stands upon its 
own merits in an entirely separ- 
ate field of human relations. 

"Your years in high school, 
and the future years of college 
for many of you, are your grand 
opportunity to lay hold upon 
that which the ages can teach 
you. To be sure there are some 



things that you may learn which 
will never prove of immediate 
value to you, but no man ever 
added a bit of wisdom to his col- 
lection without being a richer 
person because of it. Many 
things that we take for granted, 
such as radio, talking pictures, 
airplanes, would have been 
miracles to the past generation. 
Knowledge has produced them 
for us, developed them to a high 
degree of usefulness, and thus 
added immeasurably to the 
pleasure of living. Yours is a rich 
inheritance, make sure that you 
use it wisely. 

"This leads me to second sug- 
gestion, your knowledge must 
be well mixed with faith. Every 
man must walk by faith or he 
will not walk at all. You simply 
cannot prove everything with 
which you deal by some scien- 
tific formula. Faith is simply the 
ability of a person to see a bit 
further than his reasoning 
power can take him, and it is of 
consuming importance in the 
building of a structure of life. 
There is no way that you may 
prove that music is beautiful, 
you may count the keys on the 
piano, examine the structure of 
the instrument, even calculate 
the number of vibrations in a 
note, but one of these things will 
make a Mozart composition har- 
monious to you. You may take 
a rose apart, count the petals, 
weigh the pollen, examine the 
different parts, and know all 
about the composition of the 
flower, but none of these will 
thrill your heart with the exhila- 
rating sense of beauty that 
comes from a dew-laden rose. 

"It is from faith that we drive 
the convictions by which we 
live. Every man must believe 
something. Some pitch their be- 
liefs upon a low level, and then 
wonder why they seem fettered 
and bound in all that they at- 
tempt. Others allow their mind 
and heart to range free upon the 
wideopen spaces of faith, and 
they are the one on whom the 
world must depend for its prog- 
ress. You must develop a seeing 
eye and a reaching heart, and 
these things come only to the 
woman who is willing to take 
much of life upon faith, and to 
walk confidently where the path 
cannot be seen. 

"In becoming a good home- 
maker you will need faith in 
yourself. Of course, there is al- 



ways a danger in developing an 
over amount of self confidence 
that makes one an insufferable 
egotist, but there is also a real 
danger in lacking the confidence 
in one's own abilities to such an 
extent that a creeping paralysis 
of inferiority destroys all possi- 
ble usefulness. There may be 
some things that are impossible 
for you. In my own instance, I 
have no talent for art. It is al- 
ways extremely difficult for me 
to draw even a straight line, and 
the blending of color on a can- 
vass will always remain beyond 
my reach. Nor am I a musician. 
I can appreciate the fine art of 
those who have cultivated their 
voices, but for me to sing would 
make those in the immediate vi- 
cinity wish to 'gnaw on a file and 
flee to the wilderness.' No 
amount of faith in myself would 
ever serve to make me outstand- 
ing in these fields of human 
achievement. But by the same 
token, there are some things 
that I believe I can do, and God 
willing I shall keep on trying to 
do them to the best of my ability 
as long as I live. You may not 
be gifted with many talents, few 
people are, but a confidence in 
yourself will go far toward help- 
ing you make an adequate and 
proper use of that which you do 
possess. Do not try to prove 
these things — just use them, and 
you will be amazed at the rapidi- 
ty of their development. 

"Then, of course, you must 
have a good deal of faith in those 
round about you. The woman 
who believes that all of her 
friends are gossiping cats will 
find that their claws sink into 
her own flesh. The soured peo- 
ple of the world are the ones 
who have never found a good 
word to say for their neighbors. 
Believe in your family, in your 
friends, in your acquaintances, 
and the probabilities are that 
they will live up to the high ex- 
pectations that you have for 
them. Speak a good word for 
those with whom you have to 
do, and such bread cast upon 
the waters will come back a 
thousand fold. 

"This suggests yet a third atti- 
tude toward life that each of us 
should seek to realize, the atti- 
tude of humility. A young man 
once said to his father, 'Father, 
when I am as old as you are I 
hope I will know more than you 
do.' The father replied, 'Son, I 





■. 


I <: 

■fit" 


' ifl^^ 1 


mbe^^^' 


9k 



Hillsboro girls entertain children 
at pre-school clinic. 

will go you one better. I hope 
when you are as old as I am you 
know as much as you think you 
know now.' Now I tell this not 
disparingly, for it is likely true 
that a youth of eighteen today 
knows more than a man of forty 
some generations ago. His ex- 
perience may not be as wide, but 
his factual knowledge is much 
broader than formerly, and edu- 
cation today is so much more 
complete that knowledge comes 
quickly to those who wish it. 
But it would be a good idea for 
most young people to take stock 
of themselves once in a while to 
see whether or not they have 
fostered in their living the grace 
of humility; whether or not they 
realize that much of the world's 
effort is drudgery and no person 
is too good to have a share in it. 
Sometimes in our churches we 
sing a song that has a line in it, 
'I'll go where you want me to go; 
I'll do what you want me to do.' 
Unfortunately, it is not always 
with deep sincerity that we in- 
tone the words. It is a perfectly 
human characteristic that each 
of us has a desire to be the lead- 
er, forgetting that without fol- 
lowers the leaders would have 
no one to inspire. The lesser ac- 
tivities of human life are of 
much more importance than we 
have sometimes allowed them, 
and every successful person 
should cultivate in his or her life 
the grace of humility sufficiently 
to share these lesser responsi- 
bilities. 

"Now, in order to make all of 
this meaningful, there is yet one 
area that we should touch, and 
that is encompassed by the 
word service. If you would be- 
come a homemaker of which this 
organization could rightfully be 



proud, if you would rear for 
yourself a monument of remem- 
orance upon this earth, you must 
make a characteristic of life a 
willingness to be of service. Here 
again we cannot escape from 
tne fact that much of xnis will 
be rendered in realms of com- 
parative insignificance, and may 
not serve to make your name 
heralded from the river to the 
ends of the earth. Life is not a 
little bundle of big things, it is a 
big bundle of little things, and as 
long as we remain faithiul to the 
little things we shall build a 
house that will stand in spite of 
the buffetings that may come. 
Do you remember the lines: 
'Not what we have, but what we 

use, 
Not what we see, but what we 

choose, 
Not what seems fair, but what 

is true, 
Not what we dream but what 

we do, 
Not as we take, but as we give, 
Not as we pray, but as we live, 
These are things that mar or 

bless 
The sum of human happiness.' 

"The one word that threatens 
to drop out of the active vocabu- 
lary of men today is unselfish- 
ness. Not that we will discard 
the word itself, but we have too 
often hedged it about with our 
own desires, and failed to weave 
it into the warp and woof of hu- 
man experience. You will not be 
able to build a brave new world, 
founded upon the rock of 
brotherhood, until you get an 
outlook beyond your own per- 
sonal welfare and comfort. 

"James Russell Lowell's poem, 
The Vision of Sir Launfall, illus- 
trates the thought. When Sir 
Launfall was a young man he 
made a vow to seek for the Holy 
Grail. One fine spring morning 
he rode forth on his mission 
richly dressed, astride an excel- 
lent horse, and with a pouch 
well filled with pieces of gold. 
As the drawbridge clanged down 
across the moat the sun scintil- 
lated in a thousand prismatic 
rays from off his burnished ar- 
mor. Riding across the bridge he 
saw there on the other side a 
leprous beggar who stretched 
out his hand to receive an alms. 
Sir Launfall reached into his 
pouch and selected a gold coin 
and tossed it to the beggar in 
scorn, and then rode on his way. 

"The years passed and Sir 

6 




F. H. A. Girls Entertain at Hobo Party. 



Launfall never discovered the 
Holy Grail. At last, an old man, 
he turned his steps back to- 
wards the castle that had once 
been his home. No longer did he 
have a pouch filled with gold, his 
clothing was tattered and torn, 
his horse was long since gone. 
Mellowed and enriched by the 
experience of the years of his 
fruitless searching, he came to 
the moat surrounding the castle 
to discover that the leprous beg- 
gar still lay there seeking an 
alms. Sir Launfall was a wiser 
and better man than the youth 
who had ridden forth so gaily 
many years before, and as the 
beggar asked for something Sir 
Launfall slowly drew from his 
clothing a mouldy crust of bread, 
which was all that he had in the 
world. He went down to the 
stream nearby and broke the ice, 
for it was in mid winter, and 
dipped up a gourd full of water 
for the beggar. Breaking the 
crust of bread in two parts, he 
gave one to the beggar as he 
handed him the drink of water. 

'Twas a mould crust of course 

brown bread, 
Twas water out of a wooden 

bowl — 
Yet with fine wheater bread 

was the leper fed, 
And twas red wine he drank 

with his thirsty soul.' 



"And as Sir Launfall mused 
with a downcast face, he saw no 
longer the beggar at his side but 
the glorified Christ who spoke 
softly to him: 

'Not what we gave, but what we 
share, 

For the gift without the giver is 
bare; 

Who gives himself with his alms 
feeds three, 

Himself, his hungering neigh- 
bor, and me.' 
"Out of service of his nature 

has the world found its light and 

its salvation. 

"If I were a Future Home- 
maker I think I should be very 
proud to have the opportunity of 
living in this generation, with all 
its accumulation of wisdom and 
understanding. I trust that I 
would be brave enough and wise 
enough to use these things in the 
weaving of a garment of serv- 
ice that would fit across the 
shoulders of the cold and the 
homeless, the helpless and suf- 
fering, and make of this world a 
cleaner, more descent, finer 
place in which to live. Your op- 
portunities are boundless, may 
God grant that your strength 
shall be equal to your tasks. As 
you continue your journey I sa- 
lute you, and wish for you God- 
speed along the way." 



UNESCO DEFINES OBJEC- 
TIVES, PLANS NEW 
ACTIVITIES 

The following statement of 
aims was adopted by the Gen- 
eral Conference of the United 
Nations Educational, Scientific 
and Cultural Organization at its 
recent meeting in Florence: 

1. To eliminate illiteracy and 
encourage fundamental educa- 
tion. 

2. To obtain for each person 
an education conforming to his 
aptitudes and to the needs of so- 
ciety, including technological 
training and higher education. 

3. To advance human rights 
throughout all nations. 

4. To remove the obstacles to 
the free flow of persons, ideas, 
and knowledge among the coun- 
tries of the world. 

5. To promote the progress 
and applications of science for 
all mankind. 

6. To remove the causes of 
tensions that may lead to wars. 

7 To demonstrate world cul- 
tural interdependence. 

8. To advance through the 
press, radio, and motion pictures 
the cause of truth, freedom, and 
peace. 

9. To bring about better un- 
derstanding among the peoples 
of the world and to convince 
them of the necessity of cooper- 
ating loyally with one another 
in the framework of the United 
Nations. 

10. To render clearing house 
and exchange services, in all its 
fields of action, together with 
services in reconstruction and 
relief assistance. 

United Nations Day will be 
observed October 24, 1950. The 
theme for the day will be, "To- 
day's Best Hope for Peace is 
U.N. and you!" This offers the 
F.H.A. a fine opportunity for 
chapters to plan school and com- 
munity programs so that we 
may all have a better under- 
standing of the purposes and 
functions of the United Nations. 

If there are displaced families 
living in your community, plan 
to visit them and learn some- 
thing about their customs. Re- 
member they are lonesome for 
friendship and love. Try to 
imagine yourself in their place! 
What would you want your new 
neighbors to do? Then act at 
once so these folks will learn 
that America is a friendly 
nation! 





®aprer dfafer 

,^,i„„i, , i,.-i,i,r„i„i,.,.,i'.,..i .', ; ""■ ■■ •■■-<■■■■■• 



One hundred two Future Home- 
makers of America attended the 
Carteret County Rally Tuesday 
afternoon and night at the More- 
head City High School and the 
Newport Chapter won the attend- 
ance prize, a red rose bush. 

There was also a rose ceremony 
during which bushes were planted 
on the school lawn. One of the 
bushes was presented by the Beau- 
fort Chapter. The band played 
"America the Beautiful" and "The 
Last Rose of Summer." 

Members of the Morehead FHA 
who took part in the ceremony 
were Hilma Piner, narrator, Jean 
Davis, Laurah Mitchell, Violetta 
Willia, Mary Eaton, Jean Morton, 
and Anna Lee Bell. 

Barbara Willia, Morehead FHA 
president, dedicated the bushes and 
corsages were presented to her and 
Jean Bowles, county president. The 
chorus sang "Our Red Rose." 

A fried chicken supper was 
served in the home economics 
room. At the evening session 
Margaret Hall, of the Morehead 
City club, conducted the devo- 
tionals and G. T. Windell, principal, 
extended greetings. 

County officers were installed by 
Miss Jo Ann Collier, Pikeville, 
State F.H.A. Historian. A quartet, 
from Newport, composed of Claud- 
ette Slaughter, Jessie Bell, Frances 
Craig, and Arminta Lilly sang 
"Moonlight and Roses." The ac- 
companist was Miss Rachel 
Mundine. 

The Newport chapter also pre- 
sented the Future Homemakers' 
Song, music by Miss Mundine. 

Following the business session, 
Mrs. Gilbert Potter of Beaufort, 
spoke on Life in England. 

County officers, in addition to 
Miss Bowles, are Edith Lewis, 
Beaufort, vice-president; Clare 
Jean Oakley, Newport, secretary; 
Callie Bland, Smyrna, treasurer; 
Annette Guthrie, Morehead City, 
reporter; Faye Merrill, Beaufort, 
parliamentarian; Rachel Mundine, 
Newport, historian; Genevieve 
Gwynne, Smyrna, song leader; and 
Mrs. Florence Cordova, Morehead 
City, Adviser. 

About 400 girls attended the 
Annual Harnett County Rally held 
at LaFayette High. An enjoyable 
program was presented. The new 
officers for the federation were 
elected as follows: President, Jen- 
nie Ruth Barbour, Dunn; Vice- 
President, Betty Hart, Angier; 
Secretary, Wilma Barnes, Coats; 
Treasurer, Emily Graham, Erwin; 
Historian, Ernestine O'Quinn, 
Boone Trail; Parliamentarian, 
Dorothy McDonald, Lillington; Re- 
porter, Genevieve Johnson, La- 
Fayette; Song Leader, Betty Lou 
Currin, Benhaven. 

The new officers of the Morehead 



City Chapter of the Future Home- 
makers of America were installed 
at the regular meeting of the 
regular meeting of the chapter in 
the Civic Center on Tuesday even- 
ing. 

The meeting was called to order 
with the opening ritual, and after 
regular business, Betsy Wade and 
Jane Howerton, seniors, told of the 
points of interest in Washington 
which they visited last week. 

The following officers were in- 
stalled: Jean Davis, president; 
Hilma Piner, vice-president; Ad- 
die Jane Willis, secretary; and 
Myrna Hedgecock, treasurer; 
Janice Ray Lewis, reporter; Marga- 
ret K i t r e 1 1, parliamentarian; 
Annette Guthrie, historian; Mary 
Laura Guthrie, song leader; and 
Ann Darden Webb, pianist. 

Miss Emily Knox, sophomore 
home economics student at New 
Hanover High School, received the 
DAR cash award for the best 
dress made in the home economics 
classes during the year. 

The award was presented this 
week by the local Stamp Definance 
Chapter of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution. 

Mrs. Charles Lee Bragg was 
chairman of the Girl Homemakers 
department which sponsors the 
award. 

Miss Knox's dress, a tailored 
green butcher rayon with matching 
cloche, was selected from garments 
made by approximately 425 home 
economics students in the clothing 
classes thoughout the year. 

"Let it rain, let it pour," but the 
F.H.A. girls continue their work. 
Many girls in Pitt County were 
disappointed Tuesday morning, 
May 2, when they awoke to find it 
raining after having anticipated an 
afternoon at Whichard's beach 
with F.H.A. girls from every 
chapter in the county. But shortly 
after lunch the rain disappeared, 
therefore, the meeting was carried 
on as planned. 

Mr. Bill Powell, of ECTC, 
directed the recreation. The in- 
stallation service was very inspira- 
tional and gave the new officers 
the enthusiasm and vigor needed 
to improve the county meetings and 
make the work of the county more 
announced and worthwhile. 

The new officers elected were: 
President, Shirley Newton, Farm- 
ville; vice president, Carolyn 
Branch, Greenville; secretary, Bar- 




President of Taylorsville Chapter 
pinning emblem on first year girl 
during Initiation Ceremony. 



bara Worthington, Winterville; 
treasurer, Joanne Padley, Ayden; 
historian-r e p o r t e r, Bobby Ann 
Smith, Chicod; parliamentarian, 
Mary Burgess, Grimesland; song 
leader, Jean Cullifer, Bethel. 

Moore County Future Home- 
makers of America held its last 
executive council meeting for the 
1949-50 school year at Lakeview in 
June. County projects, yearbooks 
and rallies for the coming year 
were discussed. Accompanied by 
their F.H.A. advisers, the Voca- 
tional Homemaking teachers in the 
schools of the county were the 
following county F.H.A. officers 
who compose the council: presi- 
dent, Jean Muse; vice-president, 
Mary Ellen Hail; secretary, Cather- 
ine Cockman; treasurer, Patricia 
Farmer; reporter -historian, 
Dorothy McNeill; parliamentarian, 
Faye Johnson; song leader, Mary 
Ransdell; pianist, Louise Kennedy. 

At the close of the business ses- 
sion, cokes and ice cream were 
enjoyed by those present. 

On July 19th Vass-Lakeview 
F.H.A. Executive Council members 
met in the school Homemaking 
department. In accordance with 
requests made at the County Ex- 
ecutive Council, these Vass-Lake- 
view Future Homemakers noted 
suggestions for county projects, 
rallies and yearbook which will be 
presented by their representative 
to the County F.H.A. Executive 
Council at its regular August meet- 
ing. A local unit program of work 
including program outlines, proj- 
ects, and socials was written. 

Vass-Lakeview F.H.A. officers 
who compose its executive council 
are: president, Lois Hinesley; 
vice-president, Joanne Chappell; 
secretary, Polly Bridgers, treasurer, 
Annie Ruth Hudson; parliamenta- 
rian, Winkie Laubscher; reporter, 
Kathryn Blevins; song leader, Mary 
Ransdell; historian, Mary K. Page. 

During the social hours, home- 
made cookies and punch were 
enjoyed. The F.H.A. colors were 
used as a decorative touch for de- 
partment atmosphere and refresh- 
ments. 

The Winecoff Chapter of the 
Future Homemakers of America 
met Friday, September 1 at the 
school. 

Officers elected were: president, 
Jo Frances Carpenter; vice-presi- 
dent, Joanne Clanton; secretary, 
Mary Sue Holden; treasurer, Jane 
White; parliamentarian, Barbara 
Landrum; historian, Nancy White; 
pianist, Shirley Griffin; and song 
leader, Margaret Dinnard. 

This was the first meeting of the 
school term and was devoted to dis- 
cussing plans for the year. Mary 
Sue Holden made a report on the 
June camp at White Lake. The 
group also discussed selling Christ- 
mas cards in order to raise money 
for the organization. 

The Executive Council of the Tri- 
High Chapter of the Future Home- 
makers of America met with Mrs. 



Mildred H. Reid, chapter adviser, 
at her home in Rutherfordton 
Thursday evening, to plan the 
program of work for the year. 

Delois Hamrick, chapter presi- 
dent conducted the meeting. Each 
officer and committee chairman 
presented their plans for chapter 
activities. Planned events included 
the district rally in October, initia- 
tion and installation of new mem- 
bers, an exchanged program with 
the Harris F.H.A. Chapter regular 
monthly meetings and several 
socials. The Christmas party and 
April tea are the social highlights 
for the year. Community, school, 
and homemaking department proj- 
ects were outlined by the project 
committee chairman Peggy Cudd. 
Lura Huskey, membership chair- 
man, outlined a number of ideas 
for interesting new members in 
F.H.A. work. Julia Ann Francis, 
social chairman told of plans for 
a "Welcome Back to School," social 
for all girls in school. 

Others present were: Jerry 
Mitchell, secretary; Patricia Holli- 
field, reporter; Jo Ann Rollins, song 
leader and Patricia Neal, chair- 
man project committee. 

The Polkton F.H.A. Chapter 
started this season off with a 
"bang" on September 11, 1950, at 
the first fall meeting, held in the 
Home Economics Department. 
What was the purpose of this 
meeting? We met for the purpose 
of electing the officers for this 
coming term. Here are the results 
of our meeting: president, Frances 
Smith; vice-president, Hazel Lee; 
secretary, Aileen Carpenter; 
treasurer, Cora Holman; reporter, 
Anne Martin; parliamentarian, 
Barbara Allen; song leaders, 
Katherine Allen and Minnie L. 
Turner; historian, Mildred Hil- 
dreth; program, chairman, Betty 
Thomas; adviser, Miss Elizabeth 
Tolbert; and our thoughtful and 
generous chapter mothers are: Mrs. 
Watts, Mrs. Holman and Mrs. 
Allen. 

We have several promising new 
members this year and we are 
planning for a bigger and better 
club. 



STEDMAN CHAPTER 

The members of the Stedman 
Chapter have had a busy, as well 
as enjoyable summer. Our officers 
for this year have been installed 
and are ready to lead the chapter 
through another busy year. Our 
officers are President, Joann Blake 
Vice-president, Joann McGill 
Secretary, Betty Lou Graham 
Treasurer, Joyce Faircloth; Re- 
porter, Barbara Autry; Parliamen- 
tarian, Vada Lee Smith; Historian, 
Betty Joyce Hughes; Song Leader, 
Bettie Melvin; Pianist, Pat Jones. 

Janice Strickland was chosen 
from our chapter by the Red Cross 
of Cumberland County to be sent 
to Green Code Camp at Henderson- 
ville, N. C. for two weeks. A mem- 
ber from our chapter was chosen 
because of the outstanding work 
done by our members during the 
past year. Janice will be sent to 
other schools in the county to tell 
her experiences at camp. 

Another highlight of our summer 
was the week at camp at White 
Lake. Several of our members and 
our adviser attended. Our chapter 
sends its new president each year 
so as to enable her to learn more 
about the total F.H.A. program. 

Everything during the summer 
was wonderful but there was a 
Special Event that we will never 
forget — that was The Trip to 
Kansas City. We are proud that 
five of our members and our ad- 
viser were present for the Second 
National Convention. Surely a trip 
could not have been more enjoy- 
able and educational than that one. 
Our members who made the trip 
are Joann Blake, Joanne McGill, 
Peggy Williford, Janice Strickland 
and Maxine Averitte with Mrs. 
Mary B. Frederick, our adviser. 
Maxine Averitte was on one of the 
programs at the Convention. We 
are especially grateful to the 
merchants and business men of 
Fayetteville and Stedman who 
donated money to help us finance 
our trip. We hope to be able to 
show them how much we appre- 
ciate their wonderful help. 




Moore County F. H. A. Installation Service. 



TAYLORSVILLE GIRLS WIN! 

Not just the ball game, but 
better Mother - Daughter relation- 
ships! 

At the first executive council 
meeting of Taylorsville F.H.A., 
Mrs. Madge Young, their adviser, 
suggested a soft ball game between 
F.H.A. girls and their mothers. 
Taylorsville, a little town in the 
foothills, has a newly acquired 
town playground. During the sum- 
mer months children of all ages 
have enjoyed the swings and see- 
saws, and small boys have played 
ball on the ball field. Each evening 
the men have had soft ball games. 
So the girls decided it was time 
their mothers played a little. Some 
of the mothers were astonished on 
being asked to participate for they 
had never played ball. Others were 
over-anxious for they were great 
players in "their day." The night 
set for the game arrived and 
mothers, fat and thin, come to the 
town park bringing with them the 
whole family. If there were any 
with a feeling of hesitancy about 
playing, the feeling vanished amid 
the joking and laughter of organ- 
izing the team as to playing 
positions. Finally the game got 
under way. The fathers laughed 
heartily as they held the babies 
and little brothers rolled with glee 
as they saw the stupid plays of the 
mothers. The referees became so 
tickled they could hardly call the 
game. Everyone present entered 
into the spirit of joviality and 
agreed it was the most fun they 
had ever had at a ball game. In- 
cidentally the score (as near as 
could be determined) was sixteen 
and twelve in the girls' favor. The 
women had so much fun they felt 
they had won. Everyone went home 
with a relaxed feeling of fellowship 
which only an evening of play can 
bring! 

Margie Chapman, 

Taylorsville Chapter Reporter. 



Reminder 

National F.H.A. Week, 
November 12-18, 1950 




Remember the two minutes allowed for "Newspaper dressing in the 
Fashion show at camp!" 



NORTH CAROLINA ASSOCIATION 
FUTURE HOMEMAKERS OF. AMERICA 



WHITE STUDENT CLUB ORGANIZATION 
SEPTEMBER 1, 1949 to AUGUST 31, 1950 



Receipts 

Bank Balance September 1, 1949 

Receipts from Fees (14,266 members 

@ $.50) $7,133.00 

National Convention Receipts 1,006.50 

Miscellaneous Receipts 348.53 

Camp Fund Donations 160.00 

Total Receipts 

Total Balance and Receipts 

Refunds — overpayment of fees 

Total Balance, Receipts & Refunds.... 



Less: Expenditures 

National Dues $1,484.40 

District Rally Expenses 120.00 

Executive Board Expenses 186.04 

Audit (1948-49) 25.00 

Postage, Printing and Supplies 631.48 

Newsletter (4 issues) 3,781.54 

Delegate Expenses to National Convention 1,131.50 

Pictures 70.80 

To Petty Cash 20.00 

State Convention 447.03 

Honor Awards and Pins 42.31 

Miscellaneous (handbooks and Guides) 5.03 

Camp Fund Donations 160.00 

Total Expenditures 

Refunds - 

Total Expenditures and Refunds • 

Balance 

Petty Cash Balance 

Total Balance 



$1,698.18 



8,648.03 

10,346.21 

10.65 

$10,356.86 



8,105.13 
10.65 



$2,241.08 
8.49 



3,115.78 



$2,249.57 



guy 



mLJOAJijjGEnimLjgjj ^^ 



Future Homemakers of America 

CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 




CAROLINE SA\S 



TIME FOR EVERYTHING 

Take time to work — it is the price of success. 

Take time to think — it is the source of power. 

Take time to play — it is the secret of perpetual 
youth. 

Take time to read — it is the foundation of wisdom. 

Take time to be friendly — it is the road to happi- 
ness. 

Take time to dream — it is hitching your wagon to 
a star. 

Take time to love and be loved — it is the privilege 
of the gods. 

Take time to look around — it is too short a day to 
be selfish. 

Take time to laugh — it is the music of the soul. 
Old English Prayer. 



VrTTTItTrrTTTITTTITITrTrT ^ ^ 



EffiS 




FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association * 



VOLUME VIII 



DECEMBER 1950 



NUMBER I 




Puddings steaming, candles 
gleaming, 

Branches weighted down. 

Christmas on the farms and 
ranches! 

Christmas in the town! 

Christmas on the mountain 
ridges! 

Christmas on the sea! 

May your Christmas day be 
merry 

Wheresoe'er you be! 

— Selected. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



STATE OFFICERS 

President — Clara Jean Hunter, Pilot Mountain Mrs. 

Vice-President — Martha Fulcher, Davidson Miss 

Secretary — Nancy Bright, High Point Miss 

Treasurer — Lorena Pace, Olivia Miss 

Reporter — Virgie Melton, Wilmington Mrs. 

Parliamentarian — Katie Lee Pittman, Richlands Mrs. 

Historian — Toddy Smith, Bethel Mrs. 

Song Leader — Mary Ann Simpson, Asheville Miss 



District Advisers 

Emma Robertson, Union Grove 
Mary Niblock, Concord 
Ruth Wagner, Stokesdale 
Mary J. Cothran, Franklinton 
Gertrude McRae, Rockingham 
Jane Ferguson, LaGrange 
Myrtle D. Stogner, Scotland Neck 
Mavis Allman, Glen Alpine 



State Adviser 
Miss Cathernine T. Dennis 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 
Division of Vocational Education 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 




FHA Exhibit at North Carolina State Fair. 



Future Homemakers Grow Step By Step 



Presented at 1950 National Con- 
vention 
Cast: FHA members and ad- 
viser, dressed in school 

clothes. 
Connie is working toward her 

Chapter Homemaker degree 

(10th grade). 
Anne is working toward the 

Junior Homemaker degree 

( 9th grade ) . 
Mary Lou thinks she might like 

to work toward a degree ( 9th 

grade ) . 
Miss Sanford, The homemaking 

teacher and chapter adviser. 
Scene: Homemaking room, 

Whitemore High School. 

Connie and Anne are sitting 
at a table looking at the Chapter 
FHA scrapbook; Miss Sanford 
has stopped to talk to them a 
minute before going on to make 
some telephone calls. Mary 
Lou walks up to Miss Sanford. 

Mary Lou: Miss Sanford, 
could you talk to me now about 
beginning to work for a Junior 
Homemaking degree? 

Miss Sanford: Mary Lou, I'm 
sorry, I'm just on my way to 
call Mrs. White and Mrs. Dick- 
son about helping the FHA with 
our story telling project at the 
library. I must call them before 
four. Could you come in tomor- 
row noon? 



Connie: Maybe Anne and I 
could help her now. 

Miss Sanford: Fine, if you 
will. I'll be back in ten or fifteen 
minutes and if your questions 
aren't all answered by that time 
we can talk a bit more. ( Miss 
Sanford leaves and Mary Lou 
sits down to talk with Connie 
and Anne ). 

Connie: I'm glad you're going 
to work toward a degree, Mary 
Lou. I've surely learned a lot 
working toward mine. 

Mary Lou: Well, I'm not 
really sure I want to work for 
a degree yet. I just thought I'd 
find out more about it. Do you 
really think I should? 

Anne: Connie and I can't tell 
you that. Don't you remember 
that at the first of the year Miss 
Sanford said we'd each have to 
decide for ourselves whether we 
should work toward a degree? 
We could tell you some of the 
things we've done, though. 

Mary Lou: What I want to 
know is, just what do you think 
you've gotten out of working 
toward a degree? 

Anne: Well, for instance I 
don't quarrel with my brother 
anywhere near so much as I 
used to. We used to fight all the 
time. He'd tease me and I'd get 
mad. 



Mary Lou: That wouldn't 
help me. I don't even have a 
brother. 

Connie: You wouldn't do the 
same things for a degree as Anne 
would anyway, silly! That's one 
thing Miss Sanford explained to 
us. Everyone has to take a good 
look at herself, her home and 
her chapter before she can de- 
cide what she should work on. 
Each of us is different. 

Mary Lou: What did you do, 
Connie? 

Connie: I've done some things 
and I still have a lot more I 
want to do for my Chapter 
Homemaking degree. For one 
thing I've been writing news 
articles about chapter activities 
for the school paper. Miss John- 
son is helping me. We thought 
this was one way I could learn 
to write better — and it would 
help the chapter, too. 

Anne: You helped collect 
clothes to send to our family in 
Italy, too, didn't you? 

Connie: Yes, I really feel that 
we are doing something to help 
that family when we send them 
things they need. I also gathered 
information about the part of 
Italy where they live. I've been 
writing letters to them too. 
Gives me more practice in writ- 
ing better. 

Mary Lou: You've helped 
with lots of the FHA meetings, 



I know. You've done a lot more 
than Louise has. She's working 
toward a Chapter degree, too, 
isn't she? 

Connie: Yes, she is. But you 
should have been there when 
Miss Sanford explained that we 
shouldn't compare what two 
people do for a degree. You 
should just compare what they 
could do when they started with 
what they can do now. 

Anne: I think that's right too. 
Louise has to work a lot at home 
and she hasn't as much time as 
I have to work on chapter things. 
Have you noticed how much 
more she speaks up in FHA 
meetings than she did? 

Connie: She said that was one 
of the things she was working 
on as part of her degree work. 
That's one part of degree work 
I like. Everyone can plan how 
she can improve as an individual 
and what she can do to help im- 
prove her home, chapter, school, 
and even the world. 

Mary Lou: I'd like that. But 
how would I tell what I need 
to work on? 

Anne: Well, you might ask 
yourself what are the things 
that bother you. That's how I 
decided to work on getting along 
better with my brother. I talked 
it over with my mother and she 
thought it would help, too. She 
was the one who gave me the 
idea of talking with Bill about 
those planes he makes. I've 
learned a lot about planes, by 
the way. 

Connie: I think you get ideas 
of what to work on in home- 
making class, too. That was 
where I got the idea of re-finish- 
ing that chair for our living 
room. 

Mary Lou: Connie, do you do 
different things when you work 
toward the Chapter Homemak- 
ing degree? 

Connie: In a way they are 
different and in a way alike. 
You see, what you do for your 
second degree builds on what 
you've done for the first one. 
For the Junior Homemaker de- 
gree I learned about the FHA 
organization and what it stands 
for. And for the Chapter degree 
I've been helping other people 
to know about FHA and our 
homemaking class, too. I think 
these things make me a better 
FHA member. 

Mary Lou: Say, what about 



that key you get to wear on 
your pin when you become a 
Junior Homemaker? 

Connie: Miss Sanford helped 
us understand that, too. That 
is the way the chapter recog- 
nizes us for the improvement 
we have made and for our con- 
tribution to our homes and 
schools. 

Mary Lou: You know that 
ceremony when you got your 
degree — that's when I began to 
think about working for a de- 
gree. 

Anne: It is an impressive 
ceremony. I got goose pimples. 
And every one of those girls had 
done a lot to make herself and 
others better. 

Mary Lou: Say, how do you 
know when you've done enough 
to earn a degree? ( Miss Sanford 
comes in. . . .) 

Miss Sanford: All your ques- 
tions answered, Mary Lou? 

Mary Lou: A lot of them — I 
just asked how do you know 
when you've done enough to 
earn a degree. 

Miss Sanford: (Sits down at 
the table). Well, maybe we can 
explain it this way — suppose we 
think a little about how we 
learn in homemaking class. Re- 
member our study of personal 
grooming — how we set up our 
goals, then checked our progress 
at different times to see if we 
were making any improvement? 
Remember those diaries we kept 
for several weeks? 

Mary Lou: Yes, I remember 
— I took learning how to have 
more attractive hair and keep- 
ing my clothes neat and clean as 
my two things to work on. 

Anne: I remember that we 
had some little check lists, too, 
which I used to find out what 
I needed to work on. 

Mary Lou: In my diary I kept 
a list of everything I did to keep 
my hair nice and to keep my 
clothes neat and clean. Also, I 
kept comments which my 
mother and my friends made 
about my hair and clothes. 

Miss Sanford: I believe you 
kept your diary for about six 
weeks, didn't you, Mary Lou? 

Mary Lou: Yes, I think so. 
Then at that time I felt I had 
habits started which would stick 
by me, so I didn't have to write 
things down any more. 

Connie: You probably talked 
over your diary with Miss San- 



ford before you quit keeping it, 
didn't you? We did that when 
I was studying grooming in 
ninth grade homemaking. 

Miss Sanford: Yes, most of 
the girls like to talk things over 
to see if we all think they have 
really made progress. 

Mary Lou: I think we are 
rather far away from degrees — 
what is the connection? 

Miss Sanford: Well, you see, 
in working toward a degree you 
set goals and check progress 
just like we did in class. Do 
you want me to go into a little 
more detail about the degrees 
now? 

Mary Lou: Yes, please, I 
really want to know how to get 
started. 

Miss Sanford: Connie, you 
and Anne can help me with this. 
First, there are certain things 
which every FHA girl wants to 
do if she is a good member. 
These are: first, be an active 
member of her chapter; second, 
take homemaking in school and 
third, understand what the 
homemaking program in her 
school is all about. 

The Junior Homemaker de- 
gree says that you will need to 
be an active member of an FHA 
chapter for one semester, satis- 
factorily complete one semester 
of homemaking, and be able to 
show that you understand the 
goals of the homemaking pro- 
gram. This last means that you 
must know what homemaking 
education includes — personal 
grooming, care of children, get- 
ting along with friends and 
family, foods, clothing, and so 
forth. 

Mary Lou: That's easy. I have 
done all those. 

Connie: Then, Mary Lou, if 
you are an active FHA member 
you will want to understand 
what the FHA is all about. 

Anne: To meet this Junior 
Homemaking standard, you need 
to know the Creed by heart so 
you can use it at chapter meet- 
ings, and know what the em- 
blem, colors and flower stand 
for. This makes the FHA really 
mean a lot to you. 

Mary Lou: I think I know the 
Creed, but I couldn't do the 
others. 

Anne: Also, you need to show 
that you understand our eight 



purposes. These are really what 
our FHA stands for. 

Mary Lou: I have some idea 
what they are. I remember the 
girls said them as they lighted 
the candles at the installation 
ceremony, didn't they: They 
sounded wonderful. 

Miss Sanford: These next 
standards or qualifications are 
not quite as set as the ones we 
have mentioned. The first one 
says you will need to make a 
real contribution to your chap- 
ter program. 

Connie: That is the one I'm 
working on in my news writing. 
You remember I said I was writ- 
ing articles about chapter activi- 
ties. This helps me and my chap- 
ter too. I don't know, maybe 
I'd like to be a writer some day. 

Anne: Members do different 
kinds of things — some of them 
fix an FHA nook, help on a com- 
mittee, or help others under- 
stand the organization. But 
whatever they do, it is supposed 
to help both the member and 
the chapter. You probably can 
think of lots of things to do. 

Miss Sanford: Let's look at 
another part of the Junior 
Homemaker's work — this one is 
different. It says that one needs 
to do something to help her 
home and family. As stated, it 
reads, "she shows evidence of 
contributing to satisfying family 
life." 

Anne: I think learning to get 
along with my brother helped 
our family to be happier . . . 
hope so, anyway! But I did 
some other things at home too. 

Mary Lou: What did you do? 

Anne: Well for one thing, I 
learned to keep my own room 
clean and in order. It used to 
be such a mess my mother was 
ashamed of it. 

Connie: I've taken the Satur- 
day lunches to fix. Often times 
my Mother goes shopping in the 
morning and my Dad isn't home 
on Saturdays, so I fix lunch for 
my Mother, brothers and me. 
It is fun and I've really learned 
a lot. 

Mary Lou: I'm sure there are 
lots of things I could do at home. 
My mother is always fussing at 
me because I don't help much. 

Miss Sanford: There is still 
one more thing you need to work 
on to earn your Junior Home- 
maker Degree — you need to 



work on something to improve 
yourself. I think we have talked 
enough about that so it shouldn't 
be hard, should it? 

Mary Lou: No, I guess there 
are lots of things I can do to 
improve myself. 

Miss Sanford: So, that is a 
little picture of some things you 
will try to do to become a Junior 
Homemake r — have we ex- 
plained everything enough? 
Maybe I should repeat them now 
all together: 

1. Be interested in the study 
of homemaking by taking home- 
making in school for at least 
one semester and knowing what 
we learn in home making. 

2. Be an active member of an 
FHA chapter for at least one 
semester, understand what the 
FHA stands for and help to make 
a better chapter program. 

3. Do something to improve 
yourself. 

4. Do something to improve 
your home and family. Prob- 
ably you would also want to do 
something to help your com- 
munity although this is not 
especially listed. Any ques- 
tions? 

Mary Lou: No, I don't think 
so — could I read over that list 
to get it stuck in my mind? 

Connie: You will have fun 
working on the things which will 
make you a Junior Homemaker, 
Mary Lou. It isn't so hard and 
it really gives you the feeling 
that you are growing step by 
step — in being a better all 
around chapter member, family 
member, community member — 
and just a better girl, I guess. 

Anne: Yes, you see, being a 
Junior Homemaker is the first 
step; then being a Chapter 
Homemaker, the second step, 
and so on. 

Miss Sanford: Suppose you 
study over the list, Mary Lou, 
then if you really think you can 
grow by working toward being 
a Junior Homemaker, you fill 
out your Declaration of Inten- 
tion — here is a copy of that. 
After you have done that, if you 
come in, I'll help you make a 
plan for working on each of the 
goals which we have talked 
about. As we work together we 
shall try to find ways to show 
just how much you have grown. 
Maybe your folks and friends 



can also help you decide on your 
goals and on your rate of im- 
provement. 

Connie: That is the helpful 
part — talking things over with 
others. They can really help 
you to see if each goal or stand- 
ard has been reached. When 
that happens then you are ready 
to become a Junior Homemaker. 
The chapter then gives you the 
little key to wear on your pin. 
It's really a thrill because you 
feel you have learned so much 
— and when others also get their 
pins — it makes one feel the 
FHA is just wonderful, because 
it helps you so much! 

Mary Lou: I'm getting real 
excited! May I read this stuff 
and then see you again? 

Miss Sanford: When, girls? 

Anne: I could stop in tomor- 
row noon for a little while — 
my bus leaves right after school. 

Connie: I can too. 

Miss Sanford: Shall we say 
12:30? 

Mary Lou: O. K., and thanks 
so much. I'll go now and read 
this over. See you. 

Anne and Connie: See you to- 
morrow. 

Questions for Discussion 

1. What did these girls mean 
when they said they "grow step 
by step" when working on the 
degrees of achievement? 

2. What were the reasons 
which these girls gave for work- 
ing on a degree? What are some 
other reasons for working to- 
ward a degree? 

3. What did they mean by set- 
ting goals and working toward 
them? 

4. What will be the different 
things which Mary Lou will 
need to do to become a Junior 
Homemaker? 

5. She will follow the same 
steps when she works toward 
these three standards — making 
a contribution to the chapter, 
contributing to satisfying fam- 
ily life, and improving herself? 
What are these steps? 

6. If Mary Lou tries to do all 
these things which are listed as 
standards for the Junior Home- 
maker Degree, how will it be 
decided whether or not she 
earned the degree? 




Honorary Degrees 

The State Executive Board 
has the privilege of conferring 
as many as four honorary de- 
grees on state level each year. 
These degrees are conferred as 
a token of appreciation to indi- 
viduals who have promoted the 
growth and development of 
youth through their personal 
interest and professional in- 
fluence, especially through the 
homemaking program and other 
endeavors which promote state- 
wide interest in the needs and 
interests of youth. 

Your Executive Board de- 
veloped the following criteria 
for selection of candidates: 

Criteria for Selecting Honorary 
Members 

1. Has promoted the work of 
the FHA. 

2. Has promoted personal and 
family development of young 
people in schools in North Caro- 
lina. 

3. Is interested in and has 
contributed to the advancement 
of the FHA organization. 

4. Has been a member of the 
FHA and has through personal 
and professional development 
reflected credit upon the organi- 
zation. 

If there are persons in your 
community whom you think 
deserve this recognition send 
their names and qualifications 
to the State Adviser. 



Ruth "Jeanne" Allen, Betty "Jean" 
Wilson and Dorothy "Jean" Gooch, 
all had birthdays during their week 
at camp. They are from Creedmoor 
Chapter and occupied Cabin 14 at 
White Lake. 

Bits of Interest 

Last year the Durham FHA 
Chapter put on a radio program 
about their work. One listener 
wrote as follows: "I just heard 
the program the Home Econom- 
ics Club had on the radio and 
wanted to write and tell you 
how much I enjoyed it. I laughed 
when the girls told about 
refinishing the sewing machines 
because I remember only too 
well the hours I scraped on the 
machines trying to get the paint 
off. All the paint that I did get 
off went straight from the sew- 
ing machines onto my clothes. 

"One of the girls said some- 
thing about how much fun they 
had cooking, etc. I agreed with 
her, but how I hated that clean- 
ing up. Many a time I've stood 
in the kitchen up to my elbows 
in soap flakes as I watched all 
my friends getting out of school 
and going up to the drugstore. 
I pity the poor girls who have 
home economics last period be- 
cause I know how many times 
I had to stay after school to clean 
up. You'd be proud of how neat 
I keep my room here. We have 
room check twice a week and 
we always make an 'A.' Of 
course that means that we clean 
up our room every Monday and 
then for the remainder of the 
week my roommate and I sleep 
on top of the covers so we won't 
have to make the beds up every 
day, and we dress and undress 
in the closets so that we won't 
accidentally leave clothes lying 
around. The room does get kind 
of dusty every once in a while 
but if the other girls would pay 
attention to our sign on the front 
door which says 'Take off shoes 
before entering' we'd get so 
we'd never have to worry. 
Never say that a girl who takes 
two years of home ec. in Durham 
High School isn't the ideal 
housekeeper. 

"Give my love to all the girls 
who were in my classes. Hope 
you all are having as much fun 
this year as I had last year in 
your class. It really made my 
high school life complete. 
Love," 
Pat Dula. 



Degree Guides 

All advisers and chapter mem- 
bers will be interested to know 
that National Headquarters now 
has available guides to help in 
evaluating the achievements of 
the FHA members who are 
working for degrees. The pri- 
mary purpose of the two publi- 
cations is to provide guidance at 
the local school level in improv- 
ing practices in evaluating the 
growth of students. They are 
made available with the under- 
standing that they may or may 
not be used in the local FHA 
program, advisers and members 
see fit. States are free to develop 
their own evaluation procedures 
or to use the material for general 
evaluation purposes not neces- 
sarily connected with degree 
work. 

The titles are "A Guide to 
Help You Grow as a Future 
Homemaker" and "A Guide for 
Helping Students Evaluate 
Their Own Growth." Chapters 
are encouraged to order copies 
for their own group at one time. 
Each guide sells for 25 cents. 
Send your orders to: 

Future Homemakers of Amer- 
ica 
Office of Education 
Federal Security Agency 
Washington 25, D. C. 

Since it will take several 
weeks to fill an order, send for 
copies immediately. Chapter 
members who are working for 
the Junior and Chapter degrees 
will want personal copies for 
their use. 



OUR COVER 

Grace girls making Christ- 
mas wreaths. They are sitting 
left to right, Billie Hyatt, 
Evelyn Sprinkle, Peggy Mc- 
Dowell, Joan Glenn, Ida Phil- 
lips, Rhoda Constance, and 
Hazel Crawford. Standing 
left to right, Ruby Arrowood, 
Betty Anderson, Etta Mae 
Langford, Beverly Hawkins, 
Mrs. Smith, Margaret Green, 
Helen Coffey, Virginia Crab- 
tree, Florence Bryan, Barbara 
Hensley, Marion Swilling, 
Sara Roberson, Vesta Herron, 
and Nelly Tesner. 



"Will My Motion Be 
Carried?" 

Future Homemakers did you 
ever stop to realize just what 
you gained from various meet- 
ings or why meetings are even 
important? If you stop and 
think for a moment you will 
realize that meetings have more 
meaning than just something to 
pass the time away. They help 
you to be able to express your 
opinion, bring about coopera- 
tion, create a friendly air, and 
provide a way for all members 
to work toward a single goal. 

Do your meetings meet the 
qualification or do they lag be- 
hind on some particular point? 
Maybe they lack pep. If that is 
your trouble why not follow 
your parliamentary rules? These 
rules of order will get you 
through a meeting quickly. 

Parliamentary procedure may 
sound rather technical but 
actually it is the happy way of 
doing things. It is helpful in 
running any meeting smoothly 
and in a business like manner. 

Parliamentary law is as old 
as the idea of popular govern- 
ment. It can be based on four 
principles. One, justice and 
courtesy to all; two, one thing 
at a time; three, the rule of the 
majority; and four, the rights of 
the minority. 

The president and the parlia- 
mentarian should be well versed 
on parliamentary law. Not only 
should they know the rules but 
the members as well must be 
on their toes to see that justice 
and courtesy is extended to all. 

Your Parliamentarian is a 
guide to questions concerning 
parliamentary law. Keeping the 
constitution up to date and see- 
ing that chapter meetings are 
conducted systematically is only 
half of her duty. As important 
as these is the ability to inter- 
pret, explain, and correct errors 
of procedure made during meet- 
ings. 

Now as never before we 
need to use our rules of order 
to promote the sharing of ideas 
and cooperation. I move that 
we strive toward higher goals 
in our future meetings. Future 
Homemakers, will my motion 
be seconded? If so, will it be 
carried? 

Katie Lee Pittman, 
State Parliamentarian. 




Pitt County Fair Exhibit. Left to right, Supt. J. H. Conley; Shirley 
Newton, Farmville, President of Pitt County FHA Federation; Mrs. 
Castelloe, Winterville Chapter Mother; and Toddy Smith, FHA State 
Historian. 



Initiation fun at Shelby High 




Exhibit of Christmas toys put on by Black Creek FHA members for 
benefit of local home demonstration club. 



OUR DISTRICT RALLIES 



DISTRICT I 
October 14 
CRESWELL 

Seven hundred FHA delegates 
and visitors from District I at- 
tended their Rally which was 
held in the C r e s w e 1 1 High 
School. 

Miss Toddy Smith of the 
Bethel chapter, who is State 
Parliamentarian and also served 
as District President for District 
One, called the meeting to order 
and conducted the opening FHA 
ceremony. The Ayden FHA 
chapter conducted the devo- 
tional. Miss Lona B. Weatherly, 
a Creswell FHA chapter mother, 
extended greetings to the visi- 
tors. 

During the business session 
Miss Peggy Wiggins of the Mur- 
freesboro chapter called the roll. 
Miss Julia Leggett of the Au- 
lander chapter gave the treas- 
urer's report. 

Miss Frances Carr of the Ply- 
mouth FHA chapter rendered a 
beautiful vocal solo Indian Love 
Call. 

The guest speaker for the 
morning the Rev. Paul B. Nick- 
ens of Plymouth was introduced 
by Miss Betty Riddle of the 
Plymouth chapter. 

The Rev. Mr. Nickens spoke 
on the subject Make Your Life 
Count, stressing the importance 
of the FHA members making 
their life count for the highest 
and best things. 

"Let me urge each of you fu- 
ture homemakers to do at least 
three things, first live each day 
to the fullest, second accept and 
use whatever life brings you and 
refuse to live your life on a low 
level. Live your life at its best 
for the sake of others," he urged. 

A special feature was a tap 
dance number by Miss Dotdee 
Jones of the Farmville chapter. 

Miss Clen Twiddy of the 
Edenton chapter presented the 
candidates placed in nomination 
for the office of State Parlia- 
mentarian who were the follow- 
ing: Doris Etheridge of Central, 
Juanita White of Perquimans; 
Katherine Woodard of Scotland 
Neck and Betty Castelloe of 
Winterville. 

The luncheon was held at 
12:15 o'clock in the various 
classrooms of the school which 

6 



were very attractively deco- 
rated. A delicious chicken salad 
plate with ice cream and cup 
cakes were served. 

The afternoon session opened 
with a vocal solo Alice Blue 
Gown by Miss Agnes Congleton 
of the Aurelian Springs chapter. 
Miss Dot Hunning of Roanoke 
Rapids gave a tap dance number 
and a cow girl chorus composed 
of Myrtle Jackson, Ann Mayo, 
Frances Carr, Janice Sommer- 
ville, Mary Brown, Joan Nooney 
and Jane Crofton, all of Ply- 
mouth presented several songs 
and skits. 

The return of the Charleston 
was presented by Janie Edmund- 
son and Lecky McWhorter of 
the Bethel chapter. Miss Millie 
Tripp of the Ayden chapter, 
gave a reading, The Frivolous 
Girl in Church. A baton solo 
was rendered by Miss Geraldine 
Wheeler of Williamston and a 
piano solo was rendered by Miss 
Evelyn Smith of Greenville. 
The talent show was concluded 
with a vocal solo by Miss Fran- 
ces Carr of Plymouth who sang 
If I Loved You. 

Miss Dorothy Lee Jones, pub- 
lic school music teacher of the 
Creswell High School led the 
group in several songs. 

The highlight of the afternoon 
session was the election of Miss 
Katherine Woodard of Scotland 
Neck as State Parliamentarian 
and also District President with 



Miss Betsy Castelloe of Winter- 
ville being elected alternate. 

Also attending the rally were : 
Mrs. Myrtle D. Stogner of Scot- 
land Neck, district adviser, and 
Miss Mabel Lacy of Greenville, 
district supervisor. 

DISTRICT II 

October 7 
KINSTON 

The giant rally of District II 
began early Saturday morning 
at Grainger High School, with 
around 1,000 FHA girls, advisers 
and chapter mothers in attend- 
ance, representing 43 FHA chap- 
ters from 10 Eastern Carolina 
counties. 

Katie Lee Pittman of Rich- 
lands, State Parliamentarian, 
presided over the forenoon ses- 
sion. Kinston Superintendent 
Jean P. Booth spoke on "Japa- 
nese Children" and welcomed 
the group to Kinston. The 
Grainger High School band 
played during registration of 
delegates. 

A barbecued chicken dinner 
was served at the Kinston Air- 
port, when the group was enter- 
tained by Mrs. Jackie Hale's 
square dance team from Lovit 
Hines Recreation Center. 

The afternoon session at 
Grainger High opened with a 
talent show, with Charles Mc- 
Cullers, manager of the Kinston 



All girl chorus at District II Rally. 

_i J - - _ 




tt*7wm<i,m<mmM\ 



Chamber of Commerce, as mas- 
ter of ceremonies. Members of 
the Lee Woodward chapter pre- 
sented a skit in Negro dialect; 
Warsaw chapter members gave 
a tap dance; one of the Pikeville 
members presented a humorous 
reading; a dance team from the 
LaGrange chapter performed a 
Spanish dance; and Olena Grant 
from Wheat Swamp sang several 
solos. Between acts, McCullers 
gave the delegates a preview of 
what the huge new DuPont ny- 
lon plant at Graingers will mean 
to Eastern Carolina. 

Pearline Ennis of Goldsboro 
was elected State Reporter to 
serve during the coming year. 

Suzanne Davis of Moss Hill 
was runner-up in the election. 

Members of the chapters from 
the two host counties, Greene 
and Lenoir, presented an inter- 
esting skit, Recreation by the 
Dozen, which portrayed ways in 
which a family can have fun 
together at little expense. The 
skit was directed by Leah Mose- 
ley, home economics adviser at 
Grainger High, who was pre- 
sented a gift for her services. 

The rally ended with the sing- 
ing of the FHA Prayer Song by 
an all-district chorus, comprised 
of about 40 girls representing 
each chapter in the district. The 
chorus was directed by Olena 
Grant of Wheat Swamp. 

DISTRICT III 

October 7 
LAURINBURG 

With Virgie Melton, State Re- 
porter, of Wilmington presiding, 
about 425 delegates attended the 
fall rally of the District III, Fu- 
ture Homemakers Association, 
held in Laurinburg, October 7. 

Hostess chapters with Laurin- 
burg were: Ellerbe, Hamlet, 
Wagram, Laurel Hill, Raeford 
and Rockingham. The stage was 
attractively decorated with the 
FHA flower, red roses, and the 
emblem, as well as long leaf 
pine. While the delegates were 
registering, the Laurinburg 
Band, in kilts, played several 
enjoyable numbers. 

Registration was handled by 
the Cameron Chapter, while 
Shallotte was responsible for 
the badges. 

After the invocation by the 
Red Springs Chapter, Bobby 
Snead, President of the Laurin- 



burg Student Government As- 
sociation, welcomed the dele- 
gates. Mr. W. H. Coble, principal 
of Laurinburg High School, also 
brought greetings. The response 
was given by Betty McDonald 
of Rockingham. 

The Wagram Chapter, using 
a large poster, led the group in 
saying the creed. Several songs 
learned at the National Conven- 
tion were used as "relaxers." 

The main feature of the pro- 
gram was a picture "Are You 
Popular?" followed by a panel 
discussion. Members of the 
panel were a minister and a 
high school from Laurinburg; 
a chapter mother and a high 
school girl from Wilmington. 

The Elizabethtown Chapter 
was in charge of the voting and 
after much campaigning, Joan 
Kelly of Cameron, was elected 
State Treasurer for 1951-52. 
Naomi Melton of Wilmington 
was alternate. 

A skit on the Kansas City 
Convention was given by several 
girls from Stedman. A tap 
dance by a young Laurinburg 
girl, was enjoyed by all. 

This year instead of a National 
Convention, there is to be a 
Work-Shop. It was proposed 
and voted that each chapter be 
responsible for fifteen cents per 
member to help send the officer 
and district adviser to this work- 
shop. 

The lunch, which was bounti- 
ful was served picnic style. 

Miss Mary Hines Leonard, As- 
sistant Supervisor of Home Eco- 
nomics Education, was present 
and gave an inspiring talk. 

The meeting adjourned after 
saying the FHA prayer. 

DISTRICT IV 

November 11 

DURHAM 

Five hundred and fifty mem- 
bers, advisers and chapter moth- 
ers met in the Central Junior 
High for our district rally with 
Lorena Pace, State Treasurer, 
presiding. After the opening 
ceremony, the Four Oaks Chap- 
ter members led the devotions 
and talked on Thanksgiving. 
Anne Jones and Mr. Cook wel- 
comed us to Durham and their 
chapter members graciously 



looked after our needs during 
the day. 

Nellie Cobb, Henderson Chap- 
ter, acted as secretary during 
the day. The District voted to 
pay 15 cents per member to take 
care of the expenses of delegates 
to the National Leadership Con- 
ference. 

Then the campaign managers 
presented the four candidates 
who were running for the state 
office of secretary. The final run- 
off showed Betty Talbert of 
Franklinton as winner with 
Peggy Lou Jones of Cary as 
alternate. 

Harriet Harris, of Franklin- 
ton, led the group with several 
relaxers, while Lorena Pace, 
Jean Puckett, Betty Rand, Mar- 
tha Eaton, Mary Harrison Cooke 
and Miss Dennis gave a graphic 
description of the return home 
on the train from the convention 
in Kansas City. 

During the entertainment 
period of the program, Malda 
Gray gave a piano solo, Jennie 
Sue Parrott, Gerald Rene Hite, 
Jean Bullock, Gwen Sherman 
and Frances Clayborn of Gran- 
ville County chapters presented 
a skit "At the Ice Cream Parlor." 
Margaret Ann Mitchell, Little- 
ton Chapter, accompanied her- 
self with a rendition of St. 
Louis Blues. Not to be outdone 
by this "stealing of thunder" 
was Mildred Cameron of Broad- 
way who presented St. Louis 
Blues with her own interpreta- 
tion, accompanied by Sarah 
Buchanan. Variations in the 
program were some dancing 
— tap, ballet and acrobatics by 
Betty Barnhart and Betty Sel- 
lars of Sanford Chapter. A 
bountiful picnic lunch was 
spread in the school cafeteria 
and everybody enjoyed this time 
of relaxation. 

Hugh Morson Chapter invited 
the district to meet with them 
in 1951. The Courtesy Commit- 
tee gave a good report. Lorena 
then presented the new state 
officer, Betty Talbert to the 
group and closed the session 
with the ritual. Despite the cold 
rainy weather 52 chapters had 
representation present. 

7 



DISTRICT V 
October 21 
MAYODAN 

Twenty-five chapters with 267 
delegates were present at the 
rally. Nancy Bright State Secre- 
tary, presided and the FHA 
Ceremony was used for the 
opening of the session, followed 
by the prayer song and devo- 
tions. Club mothers and official 
guests were given recognition. 

Politics entered the picture 
with the presentation of the 
candidates who were running 
for state office of vice-president. 
Elizabeth Crews of Mayodan 
won the election. 

A program of entertainment 
including group singing and re- 
laxers, tap dancing and recita- 
tions followed. A buzz session 
was held to give an opportunity 
to exchange ideas of ways to 
observe National FHA Week. 
The following ideas were pre- 
sented: FHA Open House, Radio 
Programs, Dances, Plays, Fash- 
ion Shows, Window Displays, 
Church Recognition, Date Day, 
Mother Daughter Banquets with 
mother and daughter relation- 
ships, Plant Red Roses, Basket- 
ball Game, Chapel Program, 
Minstrel show, and talent shows. 

Lunch was served at Washing- 
ton Mills Park. Club mothers 
in Rockingham County arranged 
the picnic meal and the mill 
gave free transportation to those 
who needed it. 

The district voted to pay fif- 
teen cents per member toward 
sending all the state officers and 
advisers to the national work- 
shop. 

DISTRICT VI 

November 11 

OAKBORO 

The Oakboro Chapter was 
hostess at the District VI Rally 
of the Future Homemakers on 
Saturday, November 11. 

In spite of a chilly, rainy day 
about 550 FHA members and 
their advisers, chapter mothers, 
and one chapter father were 
present. 

Martha Fulcher, State Vice- 
president, presided over the all 
day meeting; and Avanelle Bar- 
bee of the Oakboro Chapter 
served as recording Secretary. 

Greetings and welcome were 
extended to the group by Mr. 
J. M. Hanyes, principal of the 
Oakboro School. 

8 




District II presents Supt. H. H. Bullock with a birthday cake. It coin- 
cided with our FHA District Rally Day. 



After a brief business session 
a group of FHA members of the 
Harrisburg Chapter and Mrs. 
Stafford, their adviser, showed 
the film, "Choosing for Happi- 
ness" and conducted an inter- 
esting discussion both preceding 
and following the movie. Par- 
ticipating in this discussion were 
Linda Hilton, Janie Love, Shel- 
by Stowe, Phyllis Sosman, Doris 
Teeter, Doris Smith, Willie Mae 
Deaton and Helen Hooper. 

A bountiful picnic lunch was 
spread and enjoyed, after which 
the afternoon session opened 
with a talent show. Each county 
in district VI entered a partici- 
pant. Peggy Johnston of Albe- 
marle and Nan Morris of Morven 
served as mistresses of cere- 
monies. Participants in the 
show were Nancy Wilson of the 
Berryhill Chapter, Peggy Jo 
Cline of Mt. Pleasant; Joanna 
Steed of Candor; Betty Allman 
of Endy; who, incidentally gave 
Miss Leonard, the district super- 
visor some good advice by sing- 
ing to her all the verses of "It's 
Later Than You Think." District 
VI will be waiting to see what 
she does with this advice. Gerry 
Carter of Lilesville, dressed in 
the FHA camp costume of white 
FHA Jacket and red shorts gave 
a tap dance. 

An amusing as well as infor- 
mative report of last summer's 



trip to the National FHA Con- 
vention was given by four mem- 
bers who attended the conven- 
tion, Louise Lambert of Endy; 
Evelyn Eury of Hartsell; Eloise 
Estes and Martha Fulcher of 
Davidson. The Lilesville Chap- 
ter gave a most impressive end- 
ing to the District VI rally by 
presenting the FHA emblem 
service. The stage was effec- 
tively lighted and the following 
members participated using an 
emblem they made : Julia 
Hough, president of the Liles- 
ville Chapter; Gerry Carter; Ha 
Grace Gaddy; Pansy Dennis; 
Myrtle Harrington; Mamie Ruth 
Harrington; Joyce Downer; 
Mary Elizabeth Bunn, and Mary 
Ann Strater. 

Miss Mary Niblock, district 
VI adviser, recognized Martha 
Fulcher, who will be the new 
state FHA president and she led 
the group in the closing ritual. 

Just before she climbed on 
the bus to go home one Future 
Homemaker was heard to say 
"Oh! it was a good meeting and 
I had a good time." 

DISTRICT VII 

October 14 
THOMASVILLE 

The District VII rally met in 
Thomasville at the Main Street 
High School. 



The weather was perfect for 
a perfect day! 

While Fairgrove Chapter was 
doing such an excellent job at 
the registration desk, and Den- 
ton Chapter, presiding at the 
Bulletin board, pinning up all 
of the various name badges, the 
Thomasville High School Band 
was entertaining the early- 
comers in the auditorium. 

The program started at 10 
o'clock with the State President, 
Miss Clara Jean Hunter, presid- 
ing. After the opening Ritual, 
the Clemmons Chapter con- 
ducted the Devotional. Mildred 
Coggins and Nell Newby, co- 
presidents of the Thomasville 
chapter gave a hearty welcome 
to all. Rev. Wilson O. Weldon, 
of Memorial Methodist Church, 
gave a short but inspiring mes- 
sage. Greetings from Miss 
Louise Lowe, District Super- 
visor of Home Economics were 
followed by the introduction of 
the District Adviser, Mrs. Emma 
Robertson of Union Grove. 

After the roll call and minutes 
by the Acting Secretary, Miss 
Kathleen Shumaker of Union 
Grove, the business of electing 
the new officer, song leader 
really started in earnest with 
Yadkinville Chapter in charge. 
Each of the four candidates led 
the group in singing familiar 
songs. After the Second ballot- 
ing Carmel Long of Griffith 
High School in Forsyth County 
was elected, with Peggy Dunn 
of Clemmons as alternate. 

Lucy Yount of Arcadia, Betty 
Ann DeBoard of Elkin, Barbara 
Nichols and Clara Jean Hunter 
of Pilot Mountain, and a member 
of Taylorsville chapter gave 
interesting reports on the Na- 
tional Convention. 

Sally Alspaugh of South Fork 
Chapter reported on the Na- 
tional Leadership workshop to 
be held in Kansas City next 
summer for the State officers 
and district advisers in place of 
the National Convention. The 
district voted to send 15 cents 
per member for expenses of the 
state officer elect and adviser 
elect to that workshop. 

Tables were set in the gym- 
nasium so that the chapters 
could spread their picnic lunches 
and enjoy fellowship with 
others. 

The high spot of the day came 



in the afternoon session after 
Betty Jo Sprinkle of East Spen- 
cer introduced the speaker, Dr. 
Lyda Gordon Shivers, Professor 
of Sociology in the Woman's 
College of the University of 
North Carolina in Greensboro. 
She discussed "Boy and Girl Re- 
lationships." Dr. Shivers went 
directly into her subject with an 
emphasis on courtship and mar- 
riage. She told the girls that 
there is safety in having many 
dates; that there is a thing called 
infatuation is mistakenly re- 
garded as love at first sight. Also 
that girls should meet boys by 
going where there are boys, that 
is, such places as recreational 
centers; that they should culti- 
vate friendships among the same 
sex; that they should take an 
active part in sports; that the 
thing called infatuation should 
not be mistaken for love; that 
real love can see ahead into 
problems and can wait. 

After the delightful address 
by Dr. Shivers, Mrs. Vera Pen- 
ner of Rural Hall announced the 
talent parade which included 
humorous readings, vocal guitar, 



and piano selections by chapters 
in Iredell and Forsyth counties. 

Taylorsville chapter gave the 
courtesy committee report. Mrs. 
Janie Tarleton of Mocksville ex- 
tended an invitation to the group 
to meet in Mocksville next year 
with the Mocksville chapter 
acting as hostess. 

The registration committee re- 
ported 683 in attendance, with 
53 schools represented, 611 FHA 
members, 51 advisers, 3 chapter 
mothers, 1 chapter father and 
6 non-affiliated members from 
two schools with their teachers. 

District VII was delighted to 
have as special guests the six 
seniors majoring in home eco- 
nomics, from Woman's College. 
There were Misses Sarah Baker, 
Dorothy Clodfelter, Nancy El- 
liot, Kathleen Caston, Laura 
Jenkins, and Rachel Poole. 

The planning committee for 
the rally was composed of the 
following : 

Miss Louise Lowe, District 
Supervisor, Mrs. Laura Sides, 
Mrs. Margaret De Journette, 
Miss Elizabeth Martin, Miss 
Bettie Allison, and Mrs. Emma 




Candidates for office from District V. Left to right, Clara Williams, 
Reidsville, Barbara Priddy, High Point and Elizabeth Crews, Mayodan. 



Robertson, Advisers, with Betty 
Spinkle and Janet Small from 
East Spencer, Clara Jean Hun- 
ter and Barbara Nichols from 
Pilot Mountain, Sally Alspaugh 
from South Fork, Nancy Myers 
and Linda C 1 o d f e 1 te r from 
Thomasville, Wanda Speece and 
Kathleen Shumaker from Union 
Grove. 

After the closing Ritual, the 
meeting was adjourned. 

DISTRICT VIII 

October 21 
SHELBY 

Saturday was "district rally 
time in Caroline" at Shelby 
Senior High School for 1,025 
Future Homemakers, and ad- 
visers of District VIII. Mary 
Ann Simpson, Lee Edwards 
High School, Asheville, district 
president, presided. 

"Today's Youth and the 
World" was the theme of the 
program. Miss Truus Kox, a 
Dutch citizen, highlighted this 
theme by telling about the cus- 
toms of family life in Holland. 
The girls also were delighted 
with the accounts of her experi- 
ences while visiting in the 
United States, especially her 
thinking that every man was a 
gangster. 

Annie Marie Browning, Swain 
County FHA Chapter, Bryson 
City, reported on the National 
Convention she attended in 
Kansas City in July. Annie 
Marie led group singing and 
"relaxers" throughout the day's 
program. 

Jane Crawford, president of 
Shelby FHA Chapter, gave a 
welcome to the group. Carol 
Long, Rutherfordton - Spindale 
Chapter, responded. Other FHA 
girls who participated on the 
program were: Lillian Vinay, 
Valdese; Nancy Carswell, Glen 
Alpine; Eleanor Watson, Mor- 
ganton; and a member of the 
Hendersonville and Cullowhee 
Chapters. 

Cleveland County FHA mem- 
bers were hostesses. The cover 
of the program depicted cotton 
picking time in Cleveland Coun- 
ty and songs such as Mammy, 
Mammy; Dixie; Carry Me Back 
to Ole Virginny and the dances 
by a boy from Cleveland County 
Training School added to the 
local color. Other features of 
entertainment were selections 

10 



from Shelby High Band, folk 
dancing in the gymnasium and 
a style revue with FHA girls 
from Boiling Springs, Fallston, 
Kings Mountain, Lattimore, 
Polkville, Shelby, Waco and Bel- 
wood participating as models 
and narrator. A feature of the 
afternoon session, the revue was 
an exhibit of clothes suitable for 
the teen-ager's wardrobe for fall 
and winter. 

Special guests were represent- 
atives of the homemaking de- 
partment of North Carolina 
School for the Deaf, Morganton, 



chapter mothers Mr. J. H. Grigg, 
Superintendent, Cleveland 
County Schools and Mr. J. G. 
Hagaman, principal, Shelby 
Senior High School. 

During the business session 
Thelma Mayfield, Swannanoa 
Chapter, was elected historian 
of the North Carolina Associa- 
tion of Future Homemakers of 
America. This district voted to 
make contributions according to 
the recommendations of the 
FHA Executive Council for 
sending state officers and ad- 
visers to National Workshop. 



Third Finger — Left Hand 



Greetings to all of you F.H.A. 
girls and sponsors. Some of you 
may remember me — others may 
not, but we all have one thing 
in common; we are all home- 
makers. You are the Future 
Homemakers so I'd like to take 
this opportunity to tell you a 
little of how it is being a present 
homemaker. 

When that tiny gold band is 
slipped upon your third finger, 
left hand and you cease being 
"Miss," your entire life is 
changed. You now have someone 
other than yourself to think 
about. You'd be surprised to 
know how much those words "I 
Do" can get you into. Everyone 
who is married or has ever been 
married has his own special 
adjective for describing married 
life — to some it's wonderful, 



sweet, pleasant, happy, blissful, 
etc.; but to others it's sad, awful, 
unhappy, one big mess, or ter- 
rible. To me it's just what I make 
it — right now, that's TERRIFIC. 
The first few weeks were the 
hardest because of the adjust- 
ments I had to make. One morn- 
ing, for example, the coffee was 
too strong; the next, it was too 
weak. You see, I had never had 
to make coffee before as no one 
in my family drinks it regularly. 
Finally, after much experiment, 
I struck the happy medium. 

I think that finding out just 
what your husband's likes and 
dislikes are is one of the harder 
problems of adjustment. This is 
especially true if he is from 
another section of the country 
and his mother is an excellent 

(Continued on page thirteen) 




Registration at District II Rally. Each chapter pinned a rose on the map 
at the location of her chapter. 




"How much do you think it will 
sell for?" "Now girls don't get 
your hopes up too high." "With 
those girls, Madam, and that to- 
bacco, you are bound to do good." 
"Well, anyway, everything will be 
profit." These were some of the 
remarks that could be heard as the 
Ahoskie Chapter of Future Home- 
makers waited in the warehouse 
for their baskets of tobacco to be 
sold, September 15. 

Bringing tobacco from home and 
collecting from farmers at the local 
warehouses was one of the projects 
that the Ahoskie Chapter is plan- 
ning to carry this year. The to- 
bacco, when sold, brought above 
$100. 

Other projects they are planning 
are a box supper with a party after- 
wards and selling candy, and greet- 
ing cards. 

The money made will be used to 
give a Mother-Daughter Banquet, 
and make improvements in the 
Home Economics Cottage, such as, 
buying Venetian blinds, tablecloths, 
curtains and covering the sofa. 

Leaders of the Chapter this year 
are Carolyn Early, president; Nita 
Parker, vice-president; Ann Taylor, 
secretary; Betty Ann Askew, treas- 
urer; Sara Willoughby, parliamen- 
tarian; Annie Laura Brown, his- 
torian; Helen Moore, reporter; Ann 
Benthall, program chairman; and 
Hannah Earley, social chairman. 

Chapter-Mothers are Mrs. Luther 
Brown, Mrs. J. B. Earley, Mrs. O. E. 
Willoughby, and Mrs. Vance Gray. 

This year the girls decided they, 
also, wanted mascots which are 
Audrey Nancy Britton and Deena 
Kaye Harmon. 

Mrs. Margie H. Minton is the 
sponsor of Ahoskie's Chapter. 

The Junior FHA Club of Spencer 
School gave a party Monday in 
honor of their 25 new members 
who had just been initiated into 
the club. The party was held in 
the newly-modernized home eco- 
nomics laboratory. 

The guests were greeted by the 
following new club officers: Nancy 
Spake, social chairman; Mary Helen 
Morgan, president; Janet Lemmon, 
vice-president; Sharon Talbert, sec- 
retary; Janelle Queen, treasurer; 
Ann Fargis, song leader; Nancy 
Talbert historian, and Mrs. Julia 
Slate, faculty adviser. 

Following games and contests, the 
group enjoyed ice cream and cake. 
Other guests present were Mrs. 
H. H. Hair, PTA president; Mr. and 
Mrs. Johnson H. Steelman, Mr. and 
Mrs. Owen Corwin, Mr. and Mrs. 
Fant Kelly, Mrs. Lucille Williams, 
Miss Marie Barrier, Miss Clara 
Davis, Marvin Miles and Mrs. W. D. 
Spake, club Mother. 

The new members were initiated 
at school yesterday during a day 



devoid of make-up, combed hair, 
and with clothes worn backwards. 

Officers for the year were elected 
by the Future Homemakers of 
America Club of Henderson High 
School Thursday at the first meeting 
of the year. Barbara Wortham was 
named president; Florence Wheeler, 
vice-president; Nellie Cobb, secre- 
tary; Louise Whittemore, treasurer; 
and Louise and Mildred Whitte- 
more, song leaders. 

Plans for the year were discussed 
at the meeting. 

The Beaufort Chapter is well 
organized with 60 members and the 
membership drive is still in prog- 
ress. The new officers are: presi- 
dent, Elizabeth Woodard; vice- 
president, Mary Olive Martin; Sec- 
retary, Evelyn Graham; treasurer, 
Sue Gibbs; reporter, Barbara Good- 
win; song leader, Ruth Whitehurst; 
parliamentarian, Phyllis Piner; his- 
torian, Patsy Becton; and pianist, 
Barbara Harris. 

The adviser, Mrs. David Bever- 
dige, has chartered a bus to carry 
the Atlantic, Newport, Morehead 
City and Beaufort Chapter mem- 
bers to the District II Rally in Kins- 
ton, October 7. 

Edith Lewis was appointed chair- 
man of the degrees committee. She 
has compiled a questionnaire for 
the Junior Homemaker and Chapter 
Homemaker Degrees. All members, 
especially the officers, are being 
urged to achieve at least the first 
degree before FHA Week. Edith 
is also president of the Carteret 
County Organization. She is mak- 
ing plans with the chapter members 
for the Beaufort Chapter to be 
hostess to the County Rally during 
National FHA Week. 

The Ways and Means Committee 
has ordered Christmas Cards for 
the members to sell. 

Initiation day was endured by 
new members and enjoyed by old 
members, the last Friday in Sep- 
tember. The onions on strings that 



were worn around the new mem- 
bers' necks and the Blue Waltz 
perfume they were obliged to wear, 
made the entire school (and town) 
conscious of their importance on 
this significant day. 

The "dirty-work" was followed 
by the customary candlelight initia- 
tion. 

The senior club of the Thomas- 
boro Chapter of the Future Home- 
makers of America held its first 
meeting of the school year yester- 
day and elected the following offi- 
cers: Betty Gregory, president; 
Jean Noble, vice-president; Valoree 
Knight, secretary; Martha Crocker, 
treasurer; Clara Oliver, reporter; 
Patsy Hipp, parliamentarian; Ann 
Keever, historian, and Frances Os- 
borne, song leader. 

On Friday, September 22, 1950, 
the John Graham Chapter of the 
FHA held an installation service 
in the school auditorium, Warren- 
ton, North Carolina, installing the 
new officers for 50-51. 

Each new officer was brought in 
and assigned to duty by the old 
officers of the club. Standing from 
left to right are: Mary Eleanor 
Ayscue, reporter; Ruby Riggan, 
treasurer; Mattie Hunter, secretary; 
Mary Fleming, vice-president; 
Geraldine Pittard; president; Shir- 
ley Gupton, song leader; Betty Jean 
Reavis, pianist; Julia Peoples, his- 
torian; Lillie Shearin, parliamen- 
tarian. 

The new officers as seated from 
left to right are: Sallye Faye Cheek, 
reporter; Margaret Jones, treasurer; 
Willie B. Overby, secretary; Connie 
May, vice-president; Anne Neal, 
president; "Dody" Miller, song 
leader; Kathleen Overby, pianist; 
Annie Rosa Edmonds, historian; 
Jeannette Hayes, parliamentarian. 

The Cullowhee Chapter of FHA 
won a blue ribbon for an exhibit 
put up for the three day achieve- 
ment day sponsored by the ex- 
tension works in Jackson County. 




John Graham FHA Officers for 1950-51. 



11 



All FHA Chapters and FFA Chap- 
ters were invited to send exhibits. 
Our exhibit was put up by a stu- 
dent-teacher and four high school 
girls. 

The theme, "Today's Youth Are 
Tomorrow's Homemakers" will 
guide the sixty members of the 
Stoneville Chapter in having a bet- 
ter chapter than ever before. The 
year's activities were started with 
a bang and a hooray when the new 
members participated in an initia- 
tion directed by the old members. 
One was reminded of Halloween 
to see faces painted every color in 
the rainbow, hair in pigtails, skirts, 
worn upside down, kitchen utensils 
as necklaces, buckets for book 
satchels and toys for play things. 
The members will formally be 
initiated at the regular October 
meeting. In looking over the year's 
program, planned at a pre-school 
planning meeting, there are many 
enjoyable and constructive pro- 
grams to expand the knowledge 
and experiences of the members. 
Each program is planned around 
one of the light purposes of the 
National FHA Activities include, 
attending of State Fair, attending 
district and state rallies, entertain- 
ing fathers and mothers in home- 
making department, having FFA 
boys as guests parties during holi- 
day seasons, and planned recreation 
after each meeting. 

The members will gain social, 
economics and spiritual enrichment 
through carefully chosen projects. 
This year's projects will emphasize 
school and community sanitation 
and international good will. 

The Red Springs high school 
chapter of the FHA sent represent- 
atives to the District Rally at 
Laurinburg last Saturday. Gale 
Simpson, Jaunita Nurnberger. Irene 
Lane, Myrtis Boone Johnson, Shir- 
ley Kennedy, Janet Kennedy and 
their adviser, Mrs. Ben Stanton, 
represented the local chapter. The 
students also took part on the pro- 
gram. 

Myrtis Boone Johnson was elect- 
ed president of the Red Springs 
FHA at a meeting of the group held 
last week at the High School. Other 
officers named at this time were: 
Shirley Kennedy, vice-president; 
Joyce Cribb, secretary; Mary Hut- 
son, treasurer; Sally McArthur, 
historian; Peggy Coxe, parliamen- 
tarian; Rosalind Davis, song leader; 
Joyce Russell, reporter. 

Mabel Shook was named chair- 
man of the ways and means com- 
mittee: Betsy Watson, social chair- 
man; Gale Simpson, entertainment 
chairman. Mrs. Ben Stanton is the 
club adviser; Mrs. Walter Dudley 
and Miss May Boone are honorary 
club members. Plans were made 
at the meeting to attend the district 
FHA Rally in Laurinburg last 
Saturday, October 7. Myrtis Boone 
Johnson was on the district rally 
program. 

The FHA Chapter of Chapel Hill 
had their first meeting Tuesday 
night, October 10, 1950. At this 
meeting the following officers were 
elected: President, Carolyn Thomp- 

12 



son; Vice-President, Rachel Thomp- 
son; Secretary, Jane Durham; 
Treasurer, Carol Zachery; Program 
Chairman, Betty Mae Bradshaw; 
Historian, Carol Whitesell; Re- 
porter, Nancy Gentry, and Parlia- 
mentarian, Eleanor Saunders. 

The third year Home Economics 
girls were the hostesses and served 
refreshments of punch and cookies, 
while the second year girls had 
charge of the program and the 
business side. 

Group meetings are held in each 
class immediately after the monthly 
night meeting. Four classes voted 
to become members of the FHA, 
making the membership of more 
than 60 in this year's chapter. 

The Future Homemakers class of 
Lexington High School has the most 
finished exhibit in the building, ac- 
cording to many comments. Beauti- 
ful dolls illustrate the club aims 
of worthy home membership, 
wholesome recreation, interest in 
home economics, promotion of 
international good will; develop- 
ment of homemaking; encourage- 
ment of democracy, and devel- 
opmen of creative leadership. 

The Vass-Lakeview FHA Chap- 
ter held its first meeting of the year 
September 27, with Lois Hinesley 
presiding. Miss Jane Lewis, voca- 
tional home economics teacher, 
discussed the FHA District Rally 
to be held at Laurinburg on Octo- 
ber 7, and tentative transportation 
plans for attending the rally were 
made. Ruth Hudson gave a report 
on District Rally news and Mary 
Ransdall reported on a County 
Executive Council meeting held at 
Carthage. The topic of the pro- 
gram was "Making Our Own 
Clothes and A Family Reminder 
Board." Ideas for making hats, 
dresses and reminder boards for 
homes were demonstrated by John- 
sie Richardson and Faye Hardy. 
The FHA creed was repeated in 
unison and the meeting was ad- 
journed. During the recreation 
period, songs and refreshments 
were enjoyed. 




A Beaufort FHA boy was given 
high honors while receiving his 
diploma in May. Delmas Lewis was 
awarded the Honorary Home Eco- 
nomics Medal and presented with 
an exclusive plaque which the 
school had designed and engraved 
with the meaningful worded in- 
scription: 

B. H. S. 

Service Recognition 

presented to 

A. Delmas Lewis 

by the Trustees 

and Faculty for His 

Unfailing Interest 

and Tireless Efforts 

in the School's Behalf 

T. G. Leary 

It was well earned prestige and 
respect from both students and 
teachers. As a senior, he enrolled 
in second year home economics and 
was so interested in the home- 
making program that he used a 
study period to enroll with a first 
year class (without credit). The 
FHA Chapter was honored with his 
membership and he was the only 
boy who attended the district II 
Rally in Jacksonville last fall. 

The chapter Ways and Means 
Committee is grateful for his As- 
sistance in selling hot-dogs at the 
basketball games where he served 
as electrician (for hot plate) and 
team manager. 

The FHA Recreational Commit- 
tee is indebted to Delmas for his 
help with the amplifying system 
and his ability and desire to direct 
wholesome recreation at local and 
county entertainments. 

The adviser, Mrs. David L. Bev- 
eridge, Chapter members and stu- 
dents will miss the aid that Delmas 
gave in keeping the department 
equipment repaired and orderly. 
Even the home economics adult 
class members enjoyed the assist- 
ance of Delmas with their sewing 
problems: and the lunchroom work- 
ers will sorely miss his daily help 
and information. 

The town has gained Delmas as 
a business man in "Alex Lewis and 
Son Auto Paint and Repairing" 
establishment. Delmas is the second 
member of the Lewis family to win 
the home economics medal. Mar- 
garet Ann Lewis, his sister, won 
the medal the year before. She 
was also an active FHA member. 






A 



Margaret Ann and Delmas Lewis, 
sister-brother team who have won 
the home economics medal at Beau- 
fort, two years in succession. 




The meal is prepared — the table is 
set — the food is enjoyed — a pro- 
gram is given — step by step in 
Mother - Daughter buffet supper 
given by Lexington FHA Chapter. 

THIRD FINGER— LEFT HAND 

(Continued from page ten) 
cook. If it hadn't been for 
the four years of Home Ec train- 
ing that I had — where would I 
have been? Right in the middle 
of disaster! 

After much misunderstanding 
and a little too much starch in 
some shirts and not enough in 
some others, I had the laundry- 
situation licked. I have a very 
wonderful husband, in fact, he's 
much too helpful at times. For 
instance, there was the time 
when I went to town and upon 
my return, to my great surprise, 
my sweet husband greeted me 



HOW DOES YOUR CHAPTER RATE? 

1. Have you paid your state and national dues? 

2. Have you prepared a yearbook and program of work? 

3. Are you keeping a good chapter scrapbook? 

4. Have you selected a chapter mother? 

5. Have you mailed packages for the World Christmas Festival? 

6. Have you celebrated National F.H.A. week and mailed a report 

into the state office? 

7. Have you kept your promise to mail a package to your adopted 

Foreign Home Economics class? 

8. Have you entertained any other group or organization? 

9. Have you put on a high school assembly program? 

10. Have you had daddy or mother's night? 

11. Have you prepared regular publicity for local and high school 

newspaper? 

12. Have you reported interesting activities to the F.H.A. North 

Carolina F.H.A. Newsletter? 

13. Have you made plans for a school and community improve- 

ment program? 

14. Have you attended the District F.H.A. Rally? 

15. Have you sent a delegate to the State F.H.A. convention? 

16. Have you made plans to send a delegate to the F.H.A. Regional 

meeting in June? 

17. Have you made plans to attend the F.H.A. summer camp? 

18. Have you started working for your degrees of membership? 

19. Have you written an article for Teen Times'! 

20. Have you given each member a definite chapter responsibility? 

Adapted from the Nevada F.H.A. 

F.H.A. RATING SCALE 

20 — Excellent — We're proud of your chapter. 

17-19 — Good — Work a little harder for an excellent rating. 

14-16 — Fair — Let's all pull together and put F.H.A. on top. 

11-13 — Poor — Take time to evaluate your chapters program. Set 
up new goals and see that thev are accomplished. 

10- — Very Poor — Plan a program of work for the year. Delegate 
a definite responsibility to each member. Check each point 
off of the rating scale as it is accomplished. Watch your 
Chapter climb to the top of the rating scale. The success 
of your chapter depends upon each individual member. 



with love shining in his eyes and 
said that he had done the wash- 
ing. Naturally, my first thought 
was to inspect his good deed. 
Everything was lovely — includ- 
ing the beautiful bright pink 
dye job (caused from fading a 
red blouse) he had done on two 
of the sheets, his undershirts, 
and my new chenille robe. Of 
course, I didn't know whether to 
laugh or to cry — these sheets 
were my mother's — so I just 
stood there and thanked him as 
best I could. 

Then there's the budget that 
never seems to come out right as 
it did in school. I just can't 
understand it but I guess I'll 
survive. Any suggestions from 
the readers will be very wel- 
come. 

Every day I learn something 
new. and I don't have any 
teachers to call to my rescue 
when the cake is falling and I 
expect company, or when the 



pudding is beginning to lump 
and I can't stir it and keep the 
spinach from burning at the 
same time. So you can see it's 
not all play but then there are 
the happy times, too, when the 
dinner is delicious and you see 
the light shining in the pair of 
eyes across the table from you; 
when he brings you flowers or 
candy as a surprise; or asks why 
don't you buy a new dress. Yes, 
there are happy times, too! 

My advice to any of you who 
plan to marry someday, be it 
soon or later, is to take all the 
training you can get at home or 
at school. For, you see. you'll 
soon find you're not as smart as 
you thought you were!!! 

(Greetings from Dorothy Godlin 
Ellison, a former Future Home- 
maker, who is now a present 
homemaker in Wyoming. Thank 
you, Dorothy, for your most en- 
joyable letter and good advice.) 



Enxrfzronxujjjjnia^ 



Future Homemakers of America 

CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 



CAROLINE SATS 




CHRISTMAS GRACE 

Be present at our table, Lord; 

Be here and everywhere adored, 

From Thy all-bounteous hand 
our food 

May we receive with gratitude. 

We humbly thank Thee, Lord, 
our God, 

For all Thy gifts on us bestowed; 

And pray Thee graciously to 
grant 

The food which day by day we 
want. 



E 



y^xnxxsxirnnxxTcnxnxc^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^ 




FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association * 



VOLUME VIII 



FEBRUARY 1951 



NUMBER 3 



1950-1951 F.H.A. National Officers 



President — Nancy Caton, 
Presque Isle, Maine. 

Vice-president Central Region — 
Judy Rasmussen, Olivia, 
Minnesota. 

Vice-president Pacific Region — 
Connie Bernet, H el e n a , 
Montana. 

Vice-president Southern Region 
— Karleen Guilbeau, Sun- 
set, Louisiana. 

Vice-president North Atlantic 
Region — Emily Pruett, 
Charleston, West Virginia. 



Vice-president of Recreation — 
Barbara West, Union City, 
New Jersey. 

Vice-president of National Proj- 
ects — Thelma Woolcock, 
Sparks, Nevada. 

Vice-president of Public Rela- 
tions — Dorothy Sheets, To- 
peka, Kansas. 

Secretary — Shirley Rae Allen, 
Gunnison, Utah. 

Treasurer — Barbara O'Neel, 
Hagerston, Indiana. 

Historian — Mary Leta Gilbert, 
Vienna, Georgia. 

Parliamentarian — Billie Lou 
Tarpley, Montezuma, Tenn. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



STATE OFFICERS 

President — Clara Jean Hunter, Pilot Mountain Mrs. 

Vice-President — Martha Fulcher, Davidson Miss 

Secretary — Nancy Bright, High Point Miss 

Treasurer — Lorena Pace, Olivia Miss 

Reporter — Virgie Melton, Wilmington Mrs. 

Parliamentarian — Katie Lee Pittman, Richlands Mrs. 

Historian — Toddy Smith, Bethel Mrs. 

Song Leader — Mary Ann Simpson, Asheville Miss 



District Advisers 

Emma Robertson, Union Grove 
Mary Niblock, Concord 
Ruth Wagner, Stokesdale 
Mary J. Cothran, Franklinton 
Gertrude McRae, Rockingham 
Jane Ferguson, LaGrange 
Myrtle D. Stogner, Scotland Neck 
Mavis Allman, Glen Alpine 



State Adviser 
Miss Catherine T. Dennis 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 
Division of Vocational Education 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 




FHA girls entertain children in the Orthopedic Hospital at a Christmas party. 



World Peace Begins in the Family 



At this critical moment in his- 
tory when our total resources are 
needed for creating a peaceful 
world, we urge families to rec- 
ognize that they have a part in 
establishing peace and under- 
standing. Their own way of liv- 
ing can either support or hamper 
the efforts of church leaders 
and statesmen to assure a last- 
ing peace. Homes characterized 
by love, cooperation and a dem- 
ocratic spirit have an incalcula- 
ble power for good. Homes lack- 
ing these qualities add to the 
conflict and bitterness of the 
world. 

Unstable families create a 
vicious circle by sending into 
the world maladjusted persons 
who make trouble for themselves 
and others, aggravate social 
evils, and then they marry and 
set up other unstable families. 



How largely nervous and emo- 
tional ailments, delinquency and 
crime stem back to such homes 
is a matter of common knowl- 
edge. 

But there is also a "blessed 
circle" in the life of wholesome 
families. They are happy in 
themselves and characterized 
by mental and emotional health. 
They are cooperative, self-re- 
specting and considerate of 
others. They practice democ- 
racy at home and send out cur- 
rents of good into the world. 
In their turn their offspring 
achieve a high average of suc- 
cess in the homes which they 
establish. 

In the family circle we learn 
to appreciate the best in one 
another, we encourage each to 
excel in his own way and we 
learn to settle our differences 



constructively. By creating 
peace, even with forgiveness 
where necessary, in the smallest 
and most fundamental unit we 
make it more possible that peace 
and reconciliation shall prevail 
in the world outside. The Chris- 
tian family can be a generating 
center of good will that radiates 
out into life, not limiting its 
concern to its own family group 
nor confining its fellowship to 
its own race or creed. 

Families which practice good 



Governor Scott crowned 
Carolyn Thornburg, 15, of 
Durham "Miss North Caro- 
lina Wildlife of 1950" at the 
close of the banquet. The 
statewide competition was 
based upon ability in shoot- 
ing and other outdoor sports 
as well as beauty. 



neighborliness and cultivate 
acquaintance across national and 
racial lines help to bind the 
world together in fellowship. 
Homes in which world problems 
are discussed sympathetically 
and in which prayer is offered 
for people in all lands become 
promoters of world understand- 
ing. Basically it is the home that 
determines the course of na- 
tional life. 

When we recognize the pri- 
mary importance of family val- 
ues and family security for our- 
selves we realize that concern 
for other families is helpful to 
world cooperation. Nations are 
made up of families whose in- 
terests are as precious to them 
as ours are to us. If we think 
of other people as families with 
their ties of love, their needs 
and their aspirations we shall 
be less likely to be forced by 
events to think of them as foes 
seeking to destroy us. 

In a new age when man's 
techniques are being revolu- 
tionized and his values tested 
anew there is a possibility of 
building up a type of family 
life fitting the times and as fine 
as the world has ever seen. 
Character development will pro- 
vide stability and fineness. New 
power over material resources 
quate basis of support. Research 
will provide new understanding 
of the interactions of personali- 
ties. Sound practical wisdom will 
take advantage of all these and 
will also make better use of 
available means of culture for 
enriching family life. Religion 
will bring people closer to one 
another and to God. 

If family life is sound, society 
will be sound at heart. If family 
values are neglected and family 
will make possible a more ade- 
stability lost in a welter of con- 
fusion and conflicting interests, 
all else that we accomplish will 
fall far short of providing either 
security or happiness. 

We recommend, therefore, 
that each Christian family rec- 
ognize it to be a part of its voca- 
tion. 

( 1 ) To conduct its own life 
in fellowship and mutual appre- 
ciation, as a God-given respon- 
sibility and by God's grace, 
thus making its home a healthy 

* By permission of The Federal Coun- 
cil of the Churches of Christ in America, 
Commission on Marriage and the Home, 
297 Fourth Ave., New York 10, N. Y. 



cell in the body of the church 
and of humanity; 

(2) To accept primary re- 
sponsibility for the religious 
nurture of its children by shar- 
ing with them a vital Christian 
work, play, love, thought and 
life rich in the fellowships of 
worship; 

(3) to share richly together 
in the life of the church, which 
supplements the home in reli- 
gious education and provides a 
sustaining fellowship in high 
ideals and in the knowledge of 
God; 

(4) to give generous help to 
those who are in distress, and 
especially at this time to have at 
its own table some symbol and 
reminder that when we feed 
the hungry and minister to the 
needy we are doing it to the Lord 
Christ himself; 

( 5 ) to begin world betterment 
through the fellowships of the 
family with people of other 
races and groups; and 

(6) to practice a type of citi- 
zenship and to support such na- 
tional policies as shall be most 
likely to spread justice and good 
will among all peoples.* 



LET'S SING 

A Song of Peace 
(Tune: Finlandia) 

This is my song, O God of all 

the nations, 
O song of peace for lands afar 

and mine; 
This is my home, the country 

where my heart is, 
Here are my hopes, my dreams, 

my holy shrine; 
But other hears in other lands 

are beating 
With hopes as true and high as 

mine; 
My country's skies are bluer 

than the ocean, 
And sunlight beams on clover 

leaf and pine. 
But other lands have sunlight, 

too and clover, 
And skies are everywhere as 

blue as mine. 
Oh hear my song, thou God of 

all the nations, 
A song of peace for their land 

and for mine. 



Five Rules for 
Happiness 

1. Cultivate the habit of al- 
ways looking on the bright side 
of every experience. 

2. Accept cheerfully the place 
in life that is yours, believing 
that it is the best possible place 
for you. 

3. Throw your whole soul 
and spirit into your work, and 
do it the best you know how. 

4. Get into the habit of doing 
bits of kindness and courtesies 
to all those who touch your life 
each day. 

5. Adopt and maintain a sim- 
ple, childlike attitude of confi- 
dence and trust in God as your 
own Father. 

Dr. Charles Barker. 



FHA Represented 
at Florida State Fair 

Toddy Smith, State Historian, 
was selected to represent North 
Carolina at the Florida State 
Fair in Tampa, Feburary 1 to 
4th. The Atlantic Coast Line 
Railroad Company gave the trip 
to representatives of FHA — 
FFA in six of the southern 
states. Toddy gathered ideas 
from the Florida Fair to pass on 
to our State FHA Fair Com- 
mittee. 

Clyde Jones, Hobbsville, N. C. 
represented the North Carolina 
Future Farmers of America or- 
ganization. Both report a won- 
derful trip with all the trim- 
mings to make it a "big mem- 
ory." Incidentally the Fair ex- 
hibits were excellent. 



NORTH CAROLINA COUNCIL 

ON FAMILY RELATIONS 

STATE CONFERENCE, 

NOV. 15-16, 1950 

Jean Puckett, Hugh Morson 
Chapter, and Betty Rand, Garner 
Chapter represented the FHA 
at the annual conference held 
in Raleigh. Both participated in 
the discussion. 




Oak Grove Chapter members taking care of children while parents attend PTA meeting. FHA mem- 
bers, left to right: Jean Griffin, Vida King, Joan Griffin and Carolyn Tice. 



Midcentury White House Conference on 
Children and Youth, December 3-7, 1950 



Five conferences on children, 
one each ten years, has been 
called by the President of the 
United States, for the purpose 
of bettering child life in Amer- 
ica. In 1909 President Theodore 
Roosevelt called the first con- 
ference which gave momentum 
to a national movement to help 
dependent children stay in their 
own homes and to find home 
care for homeless children. The 
conference in 1919, called by 
President Wilson speeded up 
public demand for child labor 
legislation. The outcomes of the 
1930 conferences called by Pres- 
ident Hoover pointed up the 
need for specialized training for 
people working with children 
and advanced the profession of 
pediatrics and progressive edu- 



cation while the emphases in 
1940, called by President Frank- 
lin Roosevelt were on develop- 
ing democratic principles and 
services necessary for the well- 
being of children. 

As you can see these con- 
ferences have had far reaching 
affects upon child care and de- 
velopment. The fifth of these se- 
ries of conferences, called by 
President Truman was devoted 
to focusing our concerns for chil- 
dren and youth, present up to 
date knowledge point up the 
needs of parents, look at the en- 
vironment in which children are 
growing up and initiate plans 
for working together to achieve 
the recommendations coming out 
of the conference. 

Everyone present was inter- 



ested in learning more about 
helping children and youth de- 
velop into well-rounded person- 
alities. Among the 5,000 dele- 
gates were many, many youth 
who spoke for themselves and 
others regarding their interests 
and needs. "Personality devel- 
opment is influenced by hered- 
ity, early experiences within the 
family, and the events of later 
life. Many of the adverse in- 
fluences of early childhood can 
be corrected by later experi- 
ences in life" was a hopeful 
statement by Dr. Franz Alex- 
ander. 

Being a good American citizen 
came in for much discussion. 
All people must be taught (1) 
to participate in government; 
(2) to value the free choice in 
a free society; (3) to develop 
greater regard for the general 
welfare of all; (4) grow up 
with respect for the democratic 
system. Youth must participate 



in local community affairs in 
order to be ready to assume 
the later responsibilities of citi- 
zenship. "Life is meaningless 
without religion" said Msgr. 
John J. McClafferty. Because a 
religious person does not feel 
that he lives in a hostile world 
he is much less subject to emo- 
tional disturbances. Religion 
stresses the importance of the 
individual and imports a feel- 
ing of brotherhood with all man- 
kind. 

In the concluding address by 
Dr. Katherine F. Lenroot she 
stated "it is more important 
that young people have clear 
ideas of freedom, the worth of 
each individual, and man's re- 
lation to God, than that they 
understand atomic fission. . . ." 
The day has passed when we 
can be concerned with ourselves 
only. What we want for our- 
selves, we want for all people. 
We recognize our responsibili- 
ties as good citizens. These are 
the goals we have set for our- 
selves as young people ( Advis- 
ory Council on Youth Partici- 
pation) to achieve in coopera- 
tion with adults. 

PLEDGE TO CHILDREN 

TO YOU, our children, who 
hold within you our most 
cherished hopes, we the mem- 
bers of the Midcentury White 
House Conference on Children 
and Youth, relying on your 
full response, make this 
pledge : 

From your earliest infancy we 
give you our love, so that you 
may grow with trust in your- 
self and in others. 
We will recognize your worth 
as a person and we will help 
you to strengthen your sense 
of belonging. 

We will respect your right to 
be yourself and at the same 
time help you to understand 
the rights of others, so that 
you may experience coopera- 
tive living. 

We will help you to develop 
initiative and imagination, so 
that you may have the op- 
portunity freely to create. 
We will encourage your curi- 
osity and your pride in work- 
manship, so that you may have 
the satisfaction that comes 
from achievement. 
We will provide the conditions 
for wholesome play that will 




Mangum FHA members frame and hang FHA Charter in department. 



add to your learning, to your 
social experience, and to your 
happiness. 

We will illustrate by precept 
and example the value of in- 
tegrity and the importance of 
moral courage. 
We will encourage you always 
to seek the truth. 
We will open the way for you 
to enjoy the arts and to use 
them for deepening your un- 
derstanding of life. 
We will work to rid ourselves 
of prejudice and discrimina- 
tion, so that together we may 
achieve a truly democratic 
society. 

We will work to lift the 
standard of living and to im- 
prove our economic practices, 
so that you may have the ma- 
terial basis for a full life. 
We will provide you with re- 
warding educational oppor- 
tunities, so that you may de- 
velop your talents and con- 
tribute to a better world. 
We will protect you against 
exploitation and undue haz- 
ards and help you grow in 
health and strength. 
We will work to conserve and 
improve family life and, as 
needed, to provide foster care 
according to your inherent 
rights. 

We will intensify our search 
for new knowledge in order 
to guide your more effectively 
as you develop your poten- 
tialities. 

As you grow from child to 
youth to adult, establishing 



a family life of your social re- 
sponsibilities, we will work 
with you to improve condi- 
tions for all children and 
youth. 

Aware that these promises to 
you cannot be fully met in a 
world at war, we ask you to join 
us in a firm dedication to the 
building of a world society based 
on freedom, justice and mutual 
respect. 

SO MAY YOU grow in joy, 
in faith in God and in man, and 
in those qualities of vision and 
of the spirit that will sustain us 
all and give us new hope for the 
future. 



Do you take an active part to 

help the club along? 
Or are you satisfied to be the 

kind to "Just Belong"? 
Do you ever visit a member 

who is sick? 
Or leave the work to just a few, 

and talk about the clique? 
There's quite a program sched- 
uled, that means success, 

if done; 
And it can be accomplished with 

the help of every one. 
So attend the meetings regularly 

and help with hand and 

heart, 
Don't be just a member, but 

take an active part. 
Think it over, member, are we 

right or are we wrong? 
Are you an active member, or 

do you "Just belong"? 
The Program Committee, 
Martins Ferry, 
Woman's Club, Ohio. 



^Aieet your State Officer* 



The president of the North 
Carolina Future Homemakers 
of America is a remarkable 
young woman, Miss Clara Jean 
Hunter of Pilot Mountain. 

Clara Jean, a junior in the 
Pilot Mountain High School in 
Surry County, is sixteen years 
old. She has made numerous ac- 
complishments in her high 
school activities which include 
dramatics, the French Club, 
Science Club, Music, Home Eco- 
nomics, and 4-H Club. For the 
past four years, Clara Jean, an 
honor student, has worked in 
the school store. She has com- 
pleted three projects in home 
economics, canning, painting, 
and sewing. Her most outstand- 
ing work has been in FHA. She 
has been a member for three 
years and held the following of- 
fices: Treasurer and Vice-presi- 
dent of her chapter, and vice- 
president and president of the 
state organization. Of the three 
district meetings she has attend- 
ed she presided over two. She 
has attended three county ral- 
lies, two state rallies, and the 
national rally in Kansas City 
last summer. Clara Jean has al- 
ready obtained her junior and 
chapter degree in FHA and 
hopes to get her state degree 
this spring. 

Aside from school and FHA 
Clara Jean likes to read, to 
travel, and to collect auto- 
graphs, but the favorite hobby 
is her club work. After she 
graduates from high school 
Clara Jean plans to train for 
the nursing profession. 

Martha Fulcher, State Vice- 
President of the FHA, is five 
feet, six and one-half inches tall, 
has blonde hair and blue eyes. 
She is president of the Junior 
Class, reporter of the Star Club, 
and a member of the Bible Club. 
This is Martha's third year of 
FHA work. She was secretary 
of a section of her Sophomore 
Class. Martha is entering her 
third year as a basketball play- 
er, being both a guard and a 
forward. She is also quite active 
in young people's church work. 
A pleasing personality is one of 
her top characteristics. She 
makes friends easily and does 
not limit her circle of friends 



to her home town. She is willing 
to cooperate, doing her part in 
all activities. These are a few 
examples and reasons why she 
is capable of being a leader in 
any organization. Martha is 
planning to go to college when 
she graduates from Davidson 
High School and major in home 
economics. 

Lorena Pace, our State Treas- 
urer, is the oldest daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Pace, Route 
1, Broadway. She is one of a 
family of six children. Rudine, 
her next sister is also an active 
FHA member. Lorena is a junior 
at Benhaven High School, hav- 
ing attended the same school 
since the day she entered the 
first grade. During her school 
career she has taken part in 
many school activities, includ- 
ing piano, glee club and 4-H 
Club as well as FHA. For two of 
her high school years she has 
been elected to a class office. 
However, her chief interests lie 
in the fields connected with 
homemaking. She is reporter of 
the local FHA chapter, and pres- 
ident of the 4-H. At the county 
FHA dress revue last spring she 
won first place in the suit class, 
and for the past two years has 
been county winner in the 4-H 
dress revue. She has also been 
county winner in the 4-H Dairy 
Foods Demonstrations for the 
past three years and district 
winner last year. She has at- 
tended FHA Camp and 4-H 
short courses, and her trip to 
Kansas City to the National 
FHA Convention was one of the 
most outstanding events in her 
life up to this time. Her ambi- 
tion is to attend college, major 
in home economics and teach. 
Mrs. Pace, Lorena's mother, is 
Benhaven's chapter mother, and 
encourages her daughters in 
their class and extra curricular 
work. In spite of the fact that 
her days are filled with school 
activities, Lorena also enjoys 
the things we all do, just for 
fun — dates, dancing, movies, 
ball games, etc. In short she is 
an all round girl! 

Mary Anne, a vivacious 
blonde with hazel eyes, is just 
teaming with fun and enthusi- 



asm. All of her friends say she 
really has the "gift of gab." 

She has been a very faithful 
member of the Lee Edwards 
Chapter of the Future Home- 
makers of America for the past 
three years. She was elected sec- 
retary of her local club in her 
second year, and is now song 
leader for her local chapter, the 
county, eighth district and the 
state. She is interested in knit- 
ting, housework, and music. Her 
hobbies are collecting records, 
traveling, and collecting small 
whatnots. She is assistant to the 
Dean of Girls and a member of 
the Haywood Street Methodist 
Church. 

Katie Lee Pittman, State 
Parliamentarian, has always 
lived on a farm and knows how 
to do any kind of farm work 
and enjoys it. The fact that she 
knows so much about the farm 
work does not mean that she 
does not help her mother with 
the housework for she knows 
how it is done too. She has been 
doing the family sewing since 
her first year in home econom- 
ics. She enjoys sewing so much 
that she sews for people outside 
the family when she has time. 
When she did a sewing project 
in school, she did more than 
was required. She has won prizes 
for the best project program in 
her chapter. The first prize was 
a ten dollar bill and the second 
prize was a twenty-one dollar 
pressure cooker. 

She has had three years of 
home economics and would take 
a fourth year if it were offered. 
She too has been an FHA mem- 
ber for three years and holds 
her Junior and Chapter Home- 
maker degrees. She hopes to re- 
ceive her state homemaker de- 
gree in the spring. 

Katie Lee says, "My trip to the 
Second National Convention was 
a most enjoyable and worth- 
while one. I want to thank each 
one who helped to make it pos- 
sible for me to attend the con- 
vention." The convention was 
very profitable to Katie Lee. 
She brought back many worth- 



while ideas which she has passed 
on to our chapter and others. 
She always appreciates sugges- 
tions and gladly helps others 
when they wish her help. 

Katie doesn't mind putting 
her better self into anything 
that she starts to do and she 
usually makes a success. 

When we think of Toddy 
Smith, we think of a person who 
not only possesses pleasant 
charm but one whose posses- 
sion are diversified — "A Jack 
of all trades — and Master of 
them all." 

Scholastically, Toddy has been 
the top ranking honor student 
in her class for the past three 
years, and from all indications, 
she will be valedictorian this, 
her senior year. The faith her 
fellow students have in her is 
evidenced by the many school 
offices to which she has been 
elected. She has been president 
of the Junior Class, Reporter on 
the school paper, and has held 
offices in the Beta Club, The 
F.B.L.A., the Student Council, 
and the FHA. At present she is 
Editor of the School Annual. 
Athletically she has proven her 
worth in basketball and cheer- 
leading. 

Toddy's interests are not con- 
fined to the school. She has en- 
tered into the activities of the 
community with zeal and pur- 
pose. She has done outstanding 
work in the Girl Scouts, the 
Methodist Youth Fellowship, is 
assistant pianist at Sunday 
School and is President of her 
Sunday School Class. 

Her prime interest of late has 
been FHA work to which she 
has given much effort and in 
which she has received marked 
recognition. She has been local 
song-leader and president, vice- 
president and president of the 
Pitt County Unit, Chairman of 
the Membership Committee, 
and was District President and 
State Historian for the year 
1950-51. She is also a member 
of the National Public Relations 
Committee. 

If you are one who connects 
the word "bright" with some- 
thing sunny, happy, and mighty 
nice, you are also one who 
should know a certain person 
named Nancy. Her full title is 
Nancy Gwendolyn Bright, she 



hails from High Point, and she 
is State Secretary. 

Nancy comes from a family 
of five and is one of those lucky 
girls who claim not one, but 
two big brothers. She will be 
suddenly attentive when ath- 
letics, dancing and one member 
of the opposite sex whom we 
will call Darrell are mentioned. 

Ask almost anyone at High 
Point High School and they will 
tell you something nice about 
Nancy as she is very active in 
school activities, social and gov- 
erning activities. 

Ask someone down Missouri 
way and they might not recog- 
nize the name until something 
about "pockets" is also men- 
tioned. Seems she collected quite 
a few souvenirs at the recent 
FHA Convention. Hmmm! 

When Nancy asked me to 
write this sketch there was only 
one logical comment. "It would 
be a pleasure." And that it was. 
She is one swell gal! 

"Yes, Inez, I really did spend 
a memorable weekend with 36 
girls, teachers, and advisers." 

This was the end of a long 
conversation with Virgie Mel- 
ton, 1950's State Reporter, about 
her trip to Kansas City and the 
National Convention. 

Virgie's personality has made 
her tops with all her friends. 



She is sincere and loyal. She goes 
out of her way to meet people 
and then farther out of her way 
to help them. She has a ready 
smile and sparkling eyes that 
dance with merriment and pleas- 
ure. She has a high sense of 
values and enjoys a variety of 
wholesome activities. Above all, 
she is very capable and depend- 
able. She is conscientious to- 
ward any responsibility that is 
hers. These characteristics Vir- 
gie has proved as an outstand- 
ing FHA member for almost 
four years. 

Virgie is a Senior this year 
at New Hanover High School, 
Wilmington. Here she has been 
active in a variety of things. 
These activities include: home- 
room chairman; Red Cross rep- 
resentative; Spanish Club; leg- 
islature representative for two 
years; Y-Teens for four years; 
FHA reporter; Vice-president 
and president; president of Dis- 
tributive Education class. 




On Thursday, November 16, the Four Oaks Chapter gave a radio 
broadcast. The girls are from left to right: Willie Wilkins, Ila Frances 
Allen, Dorothy Temple, Jo Linda Moore and Shirley Smith. 




The Beaufort Chapter has con- 
ferred the Junior Homemakers De- 
gree to the following twelve girls: 
Patricia Daniels, Francis Fulcher, 
Bobbie J. Herring, Evelyn Graham, 
Peggy J. Lewis, Elizabeth Wood- 
ard, Barbara Harris, Barbara Good- 
win, Patsy Becton, Sue Gibbs, Ruth 
Whitehurst, and Phyllis Piner. For 
those who passed their J. H. D. 
the degree chairman, Edith Lewis, 
gave a boat party. 

The Sandy Ridge FHA Chapter 
entertained their mothers and mem- 
bers of the school faculty at a 
Christmas Banquet Wednesday 
night at 7:00 p.m. in the high school 
gymnasium. Lois Dodson, president, 
presided. The gymnasium was dec- 
orated with red and green crepe 
paper streamers. A huge Christmas 
tree was placed at one end of the 
gymnasium. Chapter members pre- 
sented a Christmas program. Ap- 
proximately 125 people attended. 

The Bertie County Fair was held 
in the Tobacco Warehouse and our 
Windsor FHA Chapter was the 
only entrant in the FHA group. 
For our exhibit, we used the theme, 
"Stairway to the Stars," letting 
each step represent a phase of 
Home Economics. Two FHA dolls, 
dressed in red and white, stood at 
the bottom of the stairs, looking 
up to a house, centered in a star, 
representing the home of tomorrow. 
We used a black background with 
gold stars, the Windsor High School 
Colors, and our steps were pastel 
green. 

We received the second prize of 
ten dollars ($10.00) for our exhibit. 

We had a question and answer 
session on teen-age problems at 
our last Bailey FHA meeting. Each 
girl was given the opportunity to 
put questions in a box which were 
sorted before the meeting to avoid 
asking the same question twice. To 
discuss the questions, we had Mrs. 
Laurine T. Lassitor, commerce 
teacher, Mrs. Zettie Stott, mother 
of one of our members, Mr. M. W. 
Weaver, principal, Mr. John Wells, 
agriculture teacher, and Rev. I. T. 
Poole, minister in our town. We 
received very helpful ideas and en- 
joyed the meeting very much. 

The Lee H. Edwards Chapter of 

FHA entertained patients at the 
Asheille Orthopedic Hospital on 
November 11. 

Joan Baker was in charge of the 
party at the hospital attended by 
FHA members advisers and par- 
ents. The Lee Edwards Boys Quar- 
tet sang several selections. There 
were also piano solo's and readings. 
The program concluded with group 
singing. 

Betty Kirby, president, presided 
at the earlier meeting that after- 
noon held at the school, at which 
Mrs. W. S. Burleson demonstrated 
Christmas package wrapping and 
decorating techniques. 



The next Friday, November 15, 
three girls — Joan Baker, JoAnn 
Page and Jean Brent went to the 
Orthopedic Hospital and distributed 
comic books among the children. 
This was the chapters -local project 
for FHA week. 

The new officers of the Mebane 
FHA Chapter are President, Sylvia 
Craddock; vice-president, Gail 
Ward; secretary, Juanita Darnell; 
treasurer, Betty Wynn; Program 
chairman, Brenda Richardson; fi- 
nance chairman, Faye Freshwater; 
social chairman, Sue Freshwater; 
yearbook chairman, Jo Lambert; 
reporter, Betsy Allen. Other busi- 
ness included the discussion of the 
objectives of our club and goals 
for the year. 

Spencer FHA Chapter presented 
an interesting program "Musical 
Turntable" based on an entirely new 
idea of colored television. With 
Jimmy Morris as Master of Cere- 
monies, the show was a big success. 

The cast was composed of many 
celebrated celebrities. Among them 
were: Billy Eckstine Miller, Doris 
Day Girdler, Hank Williams Potts, 
Frankie Laine Barrier, Bob Hope 
Hoffner, Margaret Whiting Palmer, 
Gloria De Haven Barnes, Spike 
Jones Little with his City Slickers, 
Eddie Fisher Broadway, Kay Starr 
Trexler, Tennessee Emit Young, 
Frank Laine Hoffner, and Henri 
Foltz. Popular songs were sung by 
the players while the theme was 
being enacted by silhouette figures 
on the screen. 

During intermission, candy, 
cakes, and cookies were sold at 
the door. 

The program was presented by 
the Senior FHA Club to secure 
funds for the Christmas Dance. It 
was an annual project of the club. 

The Boyden High Chapter has 

recently elected mother-and-father 
chapter members. They are Mrs. H. 
H. Miller, the mother of Louise 
Miller, Mrs. G. W. Plyler, Janet 
Plyer's mother, and Mr. P. L. New- 
som, the father of Mary Virginia 
Newsom. Other activities of the 
FHA this year have been: a meet- 
ing for the old members; an as- 
sembly program for the freshman 
girls to tell them about the organi- 
zation and the initiation of new 
members. The new members were 
required to wear red aprons and 
dunce hats, to wear their hair 
rolled in socks, and to carry dolls 
during the day at school. Miss 
Anne Hall and Mrs. Kate Haskins, 
teachers in the home economics de- 
partment, are the advisers of the 
FHA. 

The Executive Council of the 
Carteret County FHA held a plan- 
ing meeting recently in the Ann 
Street Methodist Church in Beau- 
fort. Jean Bowles, county president, 
presided. The policy concerning the 
election of county officers was dis- 
cussed. In observance of FHA Week, 
November 12-18, it was asked that 
all chapters attend some church 
service. Plans were made for a 
dance to be held in the Morehead 
City gymnasium in November. 



Beaufort members and their ad- 
visers served soft drinks and cook- 
ies during a social hour. The fol- 
lowing from Morehead City were 
present; Jean Bowles, county presi- 
dent, Annette Guthrie, county re- 
porter, and Mrs. Florence Cordova, 
adviser. Beaufort members present 
were Edith Lewis, county vice- 
president, Faye Merrill, county par- 
liamentarian, Elizabeth Woodard, 
president of the Beaufort chapter 
and Mrs. Geraldine Beveridge, ad- 
viser. Newport was represented by 
Jackie Edwards, county secretary, 
Rachel Mundine, county historian, 
Mary Frances Craig, president of 
the Newport chapter, and Mrs. 
Ruby Simmons, adviser, Barbara 
Hancock, Mollie Gillikin, Wilma 
Piner, and Mrs. Gladys Lollis, ad- 
viser, were present from the 
Smyrna Chapter. 

The Spencer FHA Chapter 

cleared $16.00 on a food sale. This 
money was used to pay for club 
picture in annual. Other plans are 
to purchase a new electric refrig- 
erator for Food Laboratory and in 
order to raise this money they are 
selling stationery. To date they 
have sold $119.00 worth. The money 
for this project will be used to buy 
small equipment for food lab. 

Second and third year home eco- 
nomics students of the Winecoff 
School's Future Homemakers of 
America presented a fashion show 
at Friday morning's chapel pro- 
gram. Skirts and Weskets were 
shown first, these garments being 
made of gabardine and corduroy. 
Models in this group were Barbara 
Landrum, Jo Frances Carpenter, 
Jane Hopkins, Annie Cline, Mar- 
garet Haynes, Melba Hurlocker, 
Wanda Sifford, Shirleen Graham, 
Susie Donohue, and Ruby Tomlin. 
Skirts and blouses in most dressy 
and tailored designs were shown 
by Betty Simmons, Bobbie Kier, 
Dorothy Rushing, Willodean Wad- 
dell, Hilda Sherrill, Hazel Lee, An- 
nie Teel, Christine Mullis, Virginia 
Hancock, Colleen Farrington, Doro- 
thy Funderburke, Imogene Wingler, 
and Joan Clanton, and Patsy 
Castor. Boleros, with and without 
sleeves, were next on the program. 
Models were Elsie Linker, Gladys 
Talbert, Sarah Rogers, Lessie Ruth 
Walters, Effie Linker, Carol Wig- 
gins, Mary Simons, Ruth Myers, 
and Ruth Sigmon. Corduroy suits, 
modelled by their makers, were 
then shown by Annie Eddleman, 
Mary Downum, and Hoyce Eddle- 
man, Miss Downum also made a 
blouse to harmonize with her suit 
and lined her suit jacket. 

Modelling jumpers and blouses 
were Marlene Beaver, Virginia 
Furr, and Martha Drye, and 
Phyllis Goodman. Dresses of vari- 
ous types were modelled by Bar- 
bara Dorton, Jewel Biggers, Shirley 
Pope, Peggy Cleaver, Patsy Castor, 
Juanita Moris, Cloie Sides, Barbara 
Landrum, Anne Garver, Evelyn 
Pipkin, Cora Mae Moore, Mary Jo 
Clark, Frances Carpenter, Martha 
Jane Alene Shoaf, Helen Shephard, 
Jo Winecoff, Betty Simmons, Doris 



Beck, Carol Newton, Nancy White, 
and Barbara Dorton. 

Even though you haven't heard 
much about the Elizabethtown FHA 
members this year we are quite 
alive. We elected the 1950-51 of- 
ficers at our last meeting and they 
are as follows: President, Nancy 
Morgan; Vice-president, Mary Anne 
Russ; Secretary, Sally McKoy; 
Treasurer, Jeanette Collier; Re- 
porter, Alease Lennon; Historian, 
Clara Campbell; Pianist, Annie 
Byrd; Song Leader, Anne Stevens; 
Club Mother, Mrs. Channing Glenn; 
Club Adviser, Mrs. Sam Cross; 
Social Chairman, Clara Campbell; 
Refreshment Chairman, Geraldine 
Stanley; Parliamentarian, Anne 
Glenn; Project Chairman, Anne 
Dosher; Degree Chairman, Hilda 
Raly; Initiation Chairman, Paulina 
Graham, Decoration, Helen Aver- 
atte. 

Some of our other activities thus 
far have been a tea for the new 
FHA members, a magazine cam- 
paign, a wiener roast at Mrs. 
Cross's, A Thanksgiving Turkey 
Party which is an annual affair to 
pay our FHA Dues, An Initiation 
Party, A Christmas Chicken Supper 
with the FHA boys, and also reno- 
vating toys for underprivileged 
boys and girls for Christmas. 

In order to make clear the pur- 
poses of the FHA to its members 
and to others as well, Taylorsville 
chapter planned to use one of the 
eight purposes for each of the 
monthly meetings during the year. 
One of the most interesting and 
helpful so far was in October on 
the second purpose "The Impor- 
tance of worthy Home Member- 
ship." 

This meeting was in the form of 
a Mother-Daughter panel discus- 
sion. For two weeks prior to the 
meeting date a "question box" was 
placed in the Homemaking Depart- 
ment in which the girls were to 
place all questions they wished an- 
swered by the mothers. The day 
before meeting day the questions 
were divided and sent to each of 
the mothers agreeing to take part 
in the program. 

As the group assembled in the 
auditorium there was a feeling of 
excitement. All ninety-nine chapter 
members were present and several 
F.F.A. boys who had heard about 
the meeting. All mothers were in- 
vited but only five were selected 
to take part in the discussion. As 
the chapter officers read the ques- 
tions the mothers were ready with 
the answers. Excellent arguments 
were put up by the girls, but the 
mothers held the audience spell- 
bound with their broad-minded 
and "down-to-earth" answers. When 
9:30 was given as the hour in an- 
swer to "How late should a girl be 
allowed to stay out on week day 
dates" there was a gasp of disap- 
proval from the audience. After- 
wards, the girls living out from 
town pointed out it was impossible 
to see a movie, get a soda after- 
wards, and get home before 9:45. 

At the close of the discussion 

8 



Mrs. Young showed a film entitled 
"Is Your Home Fun?," emphasizing 
the importance of individual re- 
sponsibility in the home, and Family 
Council rather than dictatorship. 

The Alliance FHA Chapter, now 

in its second year, have completed 
one of the best records of achieve- 
ment ever accomplished by a simi- 
lar group in their area, in the opin- 
ion of school and county farm and 
home officials. 

As part of its participation in 
FHA Week, the Alliance Club com- 
pleted these activities: filed and 
forwarded a gift package of hard- 
to-get items to a school group in 
Italy; wrote individual letters to 
school children in Italy; prepared 
and displayed a special homemak- 
ers exhibit in local stores; led a 
drive to clean up and beautify the 
school grounds; and staged school 
exercises celebrating the week. 

The Alliance Club, the only one 
• of its kind in Pamlico County, was 
made directly possible a year ago 
when the Alliance High School 
membership was doubled through 
the merger of the Stonewall High 
School classes with the Alliance 
School. 

The Vass-Lakeview home eco- 
nomics department was the scene of 
a picturesque banquet given by the 
senior girls in honor of their 
mothers on Monday, December 
18th, at 7 o'clock. 

A Christmas atmosphere was set 
by the decorations used through- 
out the department. In addition to 
a Christmas tree and other tradi- 
tional decorations, a different scene, 
that of a choir in which the angels 
as choirsters were flanked in the 
background by a stained glass win- 
dow, was portrayed. 

Banquet tables were centered 
with silver greenery and poinset- 
tias. 

Following the dinner games were 
played and Christmas carols were 
led by Miss Faye Hardy. 

The mistress of ceremonies, Miss 
Eunice Parker, gave significant 
words of welcome. The daughters 
sang an appropriate song in dedi- 
cation to their mothers. The even- 
ing was concluded by a friendship 
circle formed around the Christmas 
tree at which Miss Parker bade 
everyone adieu. 

The teachers and their escorts 
were feted at a formal banquet, 
given by the Henderson FHA Chap- 
ter on November 21, in the home 
economics department. Barbara 
Wortham, the club president, gave 
the welcoming speech. Following 
this, Mrs. Cobb, the FHA Director, 
introduced our chapter father and 
mother, Dr. and Mrs. Gregg. The 
dinner consisted of tomato juice 
as the appetizer with baked ham, 
string beans, candied yams, candied 
apple salad, hot rolls and butter, 
coffee, and cocoanut cake. Dr. Gregg 
was the speaker for the evening. 
In his speech he told the guests 
the value of pure healthy food to 
our body. Thanks were extended 
by the president to all that helped 
in preparing the banquet. 



The Oak Grove Chapter of the 

Future Homemakers of America 
has, as one of its projects, the care 
of children for parents during the 
monthly P. T. A. meetings. 
The FHA girls plan games, 
stories, drawing and painting, and 
show movies for children up to the 
age of eight. There have been as 
many as thirty-five children to at- 
tend and the average attendance is 
about twenty-five. 

The picture, showing the girls 
caring for the children was made 
in the first grade room, showing the 
furniture for which the 
girls made a bedspread and chair 
covers and pillows as another proj- 
ect. The FHA members pictured, 
left to right, are Jean Griffin, Vida 
King, Joan Griffin, and Carolyn 
Tice. 

The officers of the FHA Chapter 
of Asheboro went to Farmer to 
help the home economics students 
of Farmer High School recognize 
a chapter. 

Sue Haskins, president of the 
Asheboro Chapter introduced the 
officers as follows: Joan Carlton, 
reporter; who told some of the Ash- 
Hi Club activities; Joanne Scott, 
Historian; and Carolyn Maness, 
vice-president, who explained the 
degrees; Betty Humble, song leader, 
who told about rallies and conven- 
tions; and Stella Anne Kemp, treas- 
urer, who told us about dues and 
the state summer camp. Betty Hum- 
ble then lead the singing of the 
FHA song. Dorothy Marion, secre- 
tary, and Peggy Lamar, parliamen- 
tarian, were unable to attend the 
meeting. 

After the meeting, the girls of 
the Farmer Home Economics De- 
partment served refreshments of 
punch and cookies to our guests. 

The Belmont High School FHA 
entertained their mothers and the 
faculty at an informal tea on Thurs- 
day afternoon, December 14, from 
3:30 to 4:30. Christmas decorations 
were used throughout the Home 
Economics laboratory. The tea ta- 
ble centered with an illuminated 
arrangement of Christmas greens 
surrounded by lighted tapers. 
Another arrangement which at- 
tracted particular interest was the 
most artistic Christmas wreath 
created from turnip greens, onions, 
carrots, popcorn, and camberries. 
Christmas records were played 
softly during the afternoon. Trudy 
Black, Lois Jean Shuler and Miss 
Margaret Blair greeted guests at 
the door, and Anne Dixon poured 
tea. Sandwiches, cookies, and can- 
dies carrying out the Christmas 
theme were served by Joann Sor- 
rells, Delores Hoover, Jacqueline 
Arrowood, and Alma Poteat. Dur- 
ing the afternoon fifty guests called. 




Maybe it Will Rain I 




American Beauties 




ARE YOU PLANNING 

TO ATTEND THE 

STATE CONVENTION 

AT 

HIGH POINT 

APRIL 21? 



Sleepy-time Gals 



Easter Parade 




Camping Ideas 



Making Plans 




All Alone 



r^CTX3X!XCTni!XDrm X 



c 



1 



B 



Future Homemakers of America 

CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




'The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 



CAROLINE SA1S 




HOUSE BLESSING 

Bless the Four Corners of this 
House, 
And be the Lintel Blest; 
And bless the Hearth, and bless 
the Board, 
And bless each Place of Rest: 
And bless the Door that opens 
wide 
To Stranger as to Kin; 
And bless each crystal Window- 
pane 
That lets the Starlight in; 
And bless the Rooftree overhead 

And every sturdy Wall; 
The Peace of Man, the Peace of 
God, 
The Peace of Love on all! 

Source unknown 



Lirc'reri'YTr^^r^^ 







FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association * 



VOLUME VIII 



NUMBER 4 





Colleen Cooper — State Parliamentarian 
replacing (Mrs.) Katie Lee Pittman 
Teachy. 



Hr 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



402 Chapters— 16,087 Members 



State Officers 
1950-1951 

President — Clara Jean Hunter, Pilot Mountain 

Vice-President — Martha Fulcher, Davidson 

Secretary — Nancy Bright, High Point 

Treasurer — Lorena Pace, Olivia 

Reporter — Virgia Melton Moser, Wilmington 

Parliamentarian — Colleen Cooper, Goldsboro 

Historian — Toddy Smith, Bethel 

Song Leader — Mary Ann Simpson, Asheville 



State Officers 

1951-1952 

President — Martha Fulcher, Davidson 
Vice-President — Elizabeth Crews, Mayodan 
Secretary — Betty Talbert, Franklinton 
Treasurer — Joan Kelly, Cameron 
Reporter — Pearline Ennis, Goldsboro 
Parliamentarian — Kathryn Woodard, Scotland Neck 
Historian — Thelma Mayfield, Swannanoa 
Song Leader — Carmel Long, Griffith 



State Adviser 
Miss Catherine T. Dennis 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 
Division of Vocational Education 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 




These Earned Their State Homemaker Degrees 

First row: Helen Alexander; Joan Baker; Mary Frances Champion; Jane Cook; Colleen Cooper; Jane Crawford; Nanette Creasy; 
Elizabeth Crews. Second row: Rose Carolyn Crouse; Jean Davenport; Joetta Doby; Martha Eaton; DeLois Hamrick; Eloise 
Hardwick; Nancy Holloway; Betty Humble. Third row: Jerane Page; Joann Nelson; Corena Murray; Colleen Maynard; Joanne 
McGill; Patricia Ann McByrd; Patricia Anne Long; Ann Lassiter. Fourth row: Fannie Lou Simmons; Evelyn Sherman; Betty 
Shepard; Betty Rose Powell; Mae Phelps; Genevieve Johnson; Mary Johnson; Janette Kennedy. Fifth row: Betty Lou Spruill; 
Wilma Todd; Hilda Grey Toler; Marie Vaught; Hilda Westbrook. Fifth row: Leverne Wilborn. Absent: Martha Fulcher; Lo- 
rena Pace; Toddy Smith; Patricia Ann Neal; and Mary Lois Ridings. 

Sixth Annual State Convention 



One thousand, three hundred 
and thirty-five F.H.A. delegates, 
their advisers and guests met on 
April 21, for the sixth state conven- 
tion. The day was perfect, the set- 
ting beautiful and the friendly chat- 
ter of the F.H.A. 'ers will long be 
remembered. Following the color 
bearers the executive board pro- 
ceeded to the platform promptly at 
ten o'clock. The opening ceremony 
was followed by devotions led by 
Rock Spring delegates. A warm wel- 
come was extended to the group by 
Nancy Holloway, President of the 
High Point Chapter and a friendly 
talk by Mr. Niles Hunt, director of 
vocational education in the school. 

Miss Dennis, our State Adviser, 
gave us a brief resume of the work 
of the year and then discussed the 
plans for the National Leader- 



ship Conference which is to be held 
in East Lansing, Michigan, July 2-6, 
1951. Since District C of the South- 
ern Region is eligible for a vice- 
president, we got busy and elected 
Nancy Bright of High Point to be 
our candidate for the office. Colleen 
Cooper, the new parliamentarian 
conducted the campaign. 

Martha Fulcher, State Vice-Presi- 
dent, then presented Barbara Geer, 
of Rutherfordton, who is working 
hard to complete the requirements 
for the American Homemaker De- 
gree. Our best wishes are for you, 
Barbara! 

Toddy Smith, in her usual charm- 
ing and friendly manner presented 
the various special numbers of the 
program. We were delighted with 
the way the Taylorsville Chapter 
put on the play "The Ins and Outs." 



In the same interesting way, Boy- 
den and Spencer girls led a panel on 
the play which gave us many sug- 
gestions about relationships and 
personality development. 

Both Olema Grant of Deep Run 
and Juanita Nurnburger accom- 
panied by Shirley Kennedy, of Red 
Springs are to be congratulated for 
their special talent. They have love- 
ly voices. A spontaneous applause 
was given often to Betty Sellers while 
she demonstrated her remarkable 
acrobatic ability. And Gaynelle 
Buff, in costume, ended this part of 



The water is fine — come on down 
to White Lake — May 28 - June 2 
and June 4-9. Girls swimming at 
Camp. 




Clara Jean awarding Honorary State Membership to Mr. Rueben Baughn of Mayodan. 



the 



with three humorous 



program 
songs. 

The luncheon was delicious and 
all of us appreciate the efforts of 
Mrs. Meta Jackson and her corps 
of workers in the luncheon room. 

Kenneth Perry, State President of 
the F.F.A., was introduced by 
Mary Ann Simpson, our song leader. 
He not only brought us greetings 
but also a lot of blarney which 
women like to hear. 

The Association conferred State 
Honorary Membership upon Mr. 
Reuben Baughn of Mayodan for his 
enthusiastic interest and constant 
support to the local chapter, the 
district and state. We are happy to 
recognize the efforts of a Chapter 
Father. 

The new officers for 1951-52 
were duly installed and the meeting 
ended with the closing ceremony 
promptly at three o'clock. It had 
been a long day but one full of 

2 



beauty and interest. Our thanks go 
to High Point Chapter, High School, 
the local advisers, Kern Bray and 
Pete Jones, and all the others who 
helped to make it such a grand 
occasion. 




Anson Youths Hold 
Unique Conferences 

Some 250 Anson County high 
school youths, pitching headlong in- 
to questions their parents often fear 
tackling, have concluded one of the 
most unique conferences ever held 
in North Carolina. Their parents 
should have heard them — talking in 
all earnestness about such things as 
"going steady," blind dating, man- 
aging the family's money, puppy 
love, use of the family auto, race 
relations, growing up emotionally, 
courteous auto driving, and numer- 
ous other things. 

Hobbies on inhibitions were 
loosed; the youngsters gave vent to 
their ideas and ideals, their aspira- 
tions and taboos. 

They came here from each of the 
eight Anson County high schools. 
All the senior classes were here, 
and many representatives of the 
lower classes. 

It was entitled "Youth Day," and 
the conference — rather the confer- 
ences — went on under sponsorship 
of the Morven High School Future 
Homemakers of America, the Mor- 
ven chapter of Future Farmers of 
America and the Morven Parent- 
Teacher association. 

Listening to these youngsters, 
boys and girls, freely express them- 
selves on problems which perplex 
every youth and stump most par- 
ents, one couldn't help from feeling 
that the future of Anson County and 
North Carolina will be safe in their 
hands. 

After meeting in eight separate 
discussion groups, presided over by 
adult leaders from various parts of 
the state, the youths assembled in 
the auditorium to report on the con- 
clusions reached in their respective 
talkfests. They had their conclu- 
sions written down, too. "Going 
steady" with one boy or one girl is 
detrimental to the best interests of 
both. Blind dates, they agree, were 
not generally enjoyable. "Courtesy 
in driving is more important than 
courtesy in other things because it's 
a matter of life and death." 

The discussion group which 
tackled the question, "How to get 
along with Mother and Daddy," 
really should have been monitored 
by all parents. The kids weren't 
critical; they were charitable, 
searching, forthright, intelligent. 



"God's Garden Spot" 

By DR. RALPH W. SOCKMAN 

When we put down the daily pa- 
per on a typical morning, we are 
prone to be depressed. The power 
of the Kremlin seems to be casting 
an ever lengthening shadow across 
the world. The Orient appears to be 
disintegrating into an increasingly 
dangerous condition. Western Eu- 
rope is so divided that help is diffi- 
cult. Our own capital echoes with 
cries of accusation and alarm. On 
every side are the signs of cold war 
with fears of future hot conflict. 

But on these May mornings we 
also see another aspect of God's 
world. In this northern hemisphere 
the earth is bursting with the life- 
giving forces of spring. Beauty is 
covering the scars of winter. Nature 
puts away the hooded cloak of cold- 
ness and dons the mantle of grace. 

And amid this general beautifi- 
cation of nature, which is to be seen 
in every hedgerow and forest, there 
are dotted gardens where man is 
co-worker with God in the creation 
of loveliness. In these gardens the 
hard earth is mellowed into soft 
beds where seeds are laid, there to 
leave their shells and rise into rich 
colors and graceful forms. When we 
stop to ponder it, the mystery of 
growth as seen in gardens restores 
the soul and renews a right spirit 
within us. 

What the garden is to nature, the 
home is to human nature. It is the 
spot where the soil is prepared for 
life, where the seeds of life take 
root, and where the roots of life 
grow into the fruits of the spirit. 
And on this Mother's Day I want to 
look with you at God's Garden Spot, 
the home. 

Back in the twelfth chapter of 
Genesis, the eighth verse we read of 
Abram, the first of the Hebrew pa- 
triarchs, these words: "And he 
pitched his tent . . . and budded an 
altar . . . and called upon the name 
of the Lord." In the very beginning 
of Hebrew history the home is 
linked with God. This union of 
family life and religious faith is the 
bond which helped to hold the He- 
brew people together during their 
enslavement in Egypt, their wan- 
dering in the wilderness, their exile 
in Babylon, and their persecution in 
the centuries since. 

And the history of the Christian 
faith attests the same dependence 
on the home as the center of reli- 
gious culture. In the Book of Acts 
we read of the early Christians: 



"Not for a single day did they cease 
to teach and preach the gospel of 
Jesus the Christ in the temple and 
at home." Yes, the home is God's 
Garden Spot. 

First of all, the home is the gar- 
den where the soil is prepared for 
life. When we hear an adult say, 
"The world owes me a living" we 
deny his doctrine. The world does 
not owe a living to drones. But it 
does to infants. The child is brought 
into the world not at its own be- 
hest; and the parent who does not 
assume responsibility for the care of 
his child, we rightly call inhuman. 

No infant could survive more 
than a few hours unless the soil was 
prepared for its start. The very ele- 
ments which make for a child's 
growth have to be adjusted to it or 
they would destroy it. The sunlight 
must be filtered in the right degree 
lest it impair the vision of the in- 
fant's opening eyes. The little one 
must be guided to its food lest it 
starve or poison itself. Without a 
specially prepared soil, the tender 
plant of childhood would quickly 
perish. 

And we grown-ups, if we are to 
have a life worth living, must have 
some garden spots where the soil is 
more congenial than the hard street. 
We need some places where we can 
get away from the curious, unfeel- 
ing stare of the crowd and look into 
eyes that understand and sympa- 
thize. We need some circle where 
we can unpack our hearts with 
words and where listening love sifts 
the wheat from the chaff of our 
chatter and goes on caring for us in 
spite of our weaknesses. We need 
those home spots where we can 
get away from the cutting edge of 
competition and allow our better na- 
tures to be brought out by coopera- 
tion and compassion. 

Not all of us find congenial mates 
and make homes through marriage. 
But few of us are so alone that we 
do not have some ties with the 
homes of our childhood, our rela- 
tives or our friends. And how brave- 
ly some persons who live alone 
make their rooms into homey places 
by surrounding themselves with 
tokens and objects of affection. We 
adults never outgrow the need and 
longing for a home. 

Granted all this, what does reli- 
gion add to the soil of a home? Re- 
cently I saw a chart showing that 
homes in which the members had 
no church affiliation had almost 
three times as high a divorce rate as 
those whose members belonged to 
some church. God puts into the soil 



of the home certain fertilizing ele- 
ments. 

For instance, true godliness trans- 
forms the possessiveness of love 
into a sense of trusteeship. So often 
we become selfishly possessive of 
our husbands or wives or children. 
That attitude makes for jealousy 
and bitterness. Was it not Professor 
George Herbert Palmer who said of 
his wife Alice Freeman, "I never 
called her mine." He loved her 
deeply but he avoided treating her 
as his possession. Rather he sought 
to be the trustee of her interests, 
ever with an eye to her welfare. 
Such is the kind of love godliness en- 
genders in a home. 

Also God develops the grace of 
forgiveness. Into every home mis- 
understandings come. There are 
times when our affections freeze up 
because of some change in the fami- 
ly weather. But when we let in the 
sunlight of God's presence, the 
icicled springs of the heart thaw out, 
and oh, what fun it is to "make up." 
God replenishes the supply of 
grace which is needed to lubricate 
the wheels of the home, for even af- 
fection can develop friction through 
intimate contact. But a truly godly 
home is a place of gracious hospi- 
tality, a place where mothers make 
it pleasant for their daughter's 
friends, where boys like to bring 
their buddies, where in short there 
are the things which are nice "to 
come home to." 

In my youth I was greatly moved 
by Charles Rann Kennedy's drama, 
"The Servant in the House." The 
humble workman who came to fix 
the drain in the church was the em- 
bodiment of the Nazarene Master. 
And he transformed the whole 
household from a place of lifeless 
self-centeredness to a place of gra- 
cious and radiant living. And I re- 
member, too, that the home to 
which this wonder-working Servant 
came was the home of a clergy- 
man, for we ministers who handle 
the sacraments of the church and 
the most sacred moments of hu- 
man life need the ever renewing 
consciousness of God to keep us 
sensitive to the mystery of a new 
baby, the beauty of baptism, the 
romance of marriage and the sor- 
row of bereavement. 

Yes, both as infants and adults 
we need the garden spots of God 
where the soil is specially prepared 
for living. 

Secondly, the home is God's gar- 
den spot where the seeds of life take 
root. So early does this process of 
sowing begin in childhood that Hor- 



ace Bushnell, one of the most 
formative preachers America has 
produced declared: "Let every 
Christian father and mother under- 
stand, when their child is three 
years old, that they have done more 
than half of all they will ever do for 
his character." 

That may seem hard to believe 
But the magic spell of a good and 
happy home begins to work on a 
little heart long before the age of 
conscious memory. That is why a 
certain young mother began to pray 
aloud with her baby almost immedi- 
ately after it was born. 

In those early impressionable 
years a child absorbs attitudes. And 
in our changing world attitudes are 
more important than skills. The 
skills we learn today may be out- 
moded twenty years hence. The au- 
tomobiles of 1980 may be driven 
by atomic energy and our skill in 
driving the present motors may not 
be adequate for the new day, al- 
though I must confess some of our 
youth seem to be driving by atomic 
energy even now! But while skills 
may become useless, good attitudes 
do not. The child that catches a 
positive, courageous, hopeful atti- 
tude toward life will be blessed 
thereby to the end of his days. 

Ideas as well as attitudes take 
root. When a child asks, "Mother, 
if I hadn't been your little girl, who 
would I have been?" She is opening 
her mind to ideas about the mean- 
ing and worth of being a person. A 
prominent minister, with a large 
family whose members have been 
born in various places where he has 
served, was explaining to his young- 
est child that one brother was born 
in Oregon, one sister in Ohio, an- 
other in New York, and so on. 
Whereupon the little girl said, 
"Daddy, isn't it funny how we all 
came to get together?" She was get- 
ting at the secret of the family. And 
the little boy who asked, "How can 
God think of me when there are so 
many things for him to do in the 
world?" was beginning to face the 
inexhaustible question of our Heav- 
enly Father's care. 

And when a child asks his 
mother about God and life, she can- 
not put him off by saying, "I'll look 
it up in the encyclopedia." No en- 
cyclopedia can be a substitute for a 
parent's spiritual experience. Out of 
the heart must come the issues and 
the answers of life to life. 

Moreover, the answers to these 
questions take root according to the 
child's experience. How can you ex- 
plain to a little fellow the trust- 



worthy love of a Heavenly Father if 
he has never known the love of an 
earthly parent whom he can trust? 

Not only do the seeds of atti- 
tudes and ideas take root in the ear- 
liest childhood, but values as well. 
If at the family table the talk is all 
about getting a new car or new 
clothes or new furnishings, the child 
gets the impression that the most 
important interests of life are ma- 
terial things. He may hear at the 
church that we must put God first 
but he knows that in his home things 
come first. 

There are some things which our 
forefathers made in their homes but 
which we now buy outside. Once 
women spun the flax on the family 
spinning wheel. Now we get our 
clothes made outside. There is one 
thing however, which cannot be 
produced as well outside the home, 
and that is religious faith. 

Bobbie Burns beheld the cotter 
in his humble home on a Saturday 
night with the children around him 
and the Bible before him and he 
wrote : 
"From scenes like this old Scotia's 

grandeur springs 

Which makes her loved at home, 

revered abroad." 

And if the simple old home had 
such potency, the modern home can 
have immeasurably more, for into 
our family circles can be brought 
now the world's best music, and the 
world's news. With this as material 
for conversation and enjoyment, the 
home life can be enriched and so- 
cial outlooks on races and nations 
can be widened. 

Ah, yes, with all respect to 
the good old-fashioned homes, the 
homes of today with their better 
housing, their longer leisure, their 
wider insights, can be made richer 
gardens of God than our grand- 
father enjoyed. 

And now let us remember that 
the home is the garden of God 
where not only the soil is prepared 
for life and the seeds of life take 
root but also the roots grow into the 
fruits of the spirit. 

A marriage is not necessarily 
good merely because it lasts. We 
have known homes which never 
went to the divorce courts and yet 
were so drab in their love life that 
daughters became utterly disillu- 
sioned about marriage. We talk 
about "making love" as if it were 
something that takes place before 
marriage. The real test of love-mak- 
ing comes after we have won our 
mates. The heartiest congratulations 
are due to the two persons who can 



take one marriage and make it into 
a rich and growing experience. 

Such love is the result of cultiva- 
tion. Love, like a garden must be 
tended. Recently I read a list of 
ten suggestions for enriching home 
life. Among them were such things 
as having fun together, developing 
common interests, celebrating spe- 
cial days, singing together — simple 
homely things, yes, but it is little 
homely things that make homes 
richer. Some homes have a family 
council, in which the parents and 
children, especially from twelve 
years up, plan together their pro- 
grams of expenditures and amuse- 
ments. Thus the family becomes a 
partnership of free minds in which 
the experiences of the elders sup- 
plement the experiences of the 
younger. 

And of course, in the list of sug- 
gestions for bettering the home was 
that of worshiping together and also 
sacrificing together. When sister 
Mary gives up something so that 
John can finish high school, a bond 
is strengthened into the home. And 
when all make some sacrifice for 
God's work through the church or 
mission field, the family is not im- 
poverished but greatly enriched. 

The home is God's Garden Spot 
and so long as we are willing to be 
workers together with God in culti- 
vating the soil of love, sowing the 
seeds of life, and raising the fruits of 
the spirit, our homes give no ground 
for hope in a better and braver 
world. 

PRAYER: Eternal God, who 
committest to us the swift and sol- 
emn trust of life, teach us to num- 
ber our days that we may apply our 
hearts unto wisdom. We beseech 
Thee for all who are near and dear 
to us; for little children that they 
may grow in grace and goodness, 
for the aged that they may have 
clear shining at eventide, for men 
busy with the affairs of hfe and 
women burdened with household 
cares, that the peace of God may 
fill their hearts and minds. We 
praise Thee this day for mother 
love which has blessed the earth 
with the best gifts of life, and we 
pray that all the mothers of men 
may reap the harvest of their labors 
in lives made better and a world 
made more brotherly. Guard the 
families of our land and guide us 
into the family of nations that we 
may be worthy to enter Thy eternal 
home: through Jesus Christ Our 
Lord. Amen. 

Permission for use by Dr. Sock- 
man, National Radio Pulpit. 



Democracy in the Home 



In most families where there are 
three or more children there is usu- 
ally conflict between them as to 
who does what job unless it's been 
arranged satisfactory by the parents 
or at a family council. And I think 
most of you will agree that every- 
one should have a certain job. 
Well, here's where the part of de- 
mocracy comes in. I don't know 
whether many of you and your 
families have a family council as 
they had in "Cheaper by the Doz- 
en" or not, but if we would have 
them, we could use this time to dis- 
cuss all the reasons why we should 
do Bill's job, and he ours, or who 
should have the bathroom first in 
the mornings or anything of this 
sort. This would be democracy in 
action in the home — free speech 
settling disputes. 

In days of old it was a popular 
maxim that children should be 
seen and not heard, but wiser home 
builders have come to the conclu- 
sion through their own experience, 
that children are people and that it 
is beneficial both to the child, its 
family, and good home relation- 
ships for them to be given the 
privilege of expressing their own 
opinions. This doesn't mean that 
children nowadays are given full 
rein and free choice in every im- 
portant decision they are to make. 
This was popular a few years back, 
both in the home and in the school. 
This was after the First World War. 
Today's homemakers are working 
hand in hand with teachers to give 
the children more careful guidance 
in choice of opinion, and that is 
expected to build up good citizen- 
ship and democracy in the home 
which in turn will help to build a 
more democratic community, state, 
and nation. 

I think Democracy in the home 
means that each child and parent 
feel a responsibility to the home 
and that it is his duty as well as a 
privilege, to contribute to good 
home life. 

I wonder if you could say there 
is democracy in a home where the 
mother does all your work, clean- 
ing your rooms, and picking up all 
your clothes, and choosing all your 
clothes for you if your Dad tells you 
every move to make. 

No, I'm sure you would say there 
isn't any democracy in this home, 
but we can do away with unpleas- 
ant things in a home by working 
together in planning our work and 



play and learning to compromise 
when the occasion demands it. 

Nancy McBride 
Taylorsvillc Chapter. 




Bulletin Board at Rutherfordton High 




Scotland Neck "F. H. A.-ers" ready for 
the tobacco market. 




Money! 
Money! 
Money! 



Rachel Jones and Dorothy Haynes mak- 
ing shell ear-bobs at Cliffside. 



Is your chapter one which affili- 
ates early and has funds available 
for activities planned during the 
year? If not the following sugges- 
tions might be helpful. Why not set 
a definite time for dues to be in so 
you can get your state and national 
dues in early. Elect a secretary who 
knows her P's and Q's; then you 
will have accurate records of cash 
receipts and disbursements, which 
is important to any chapter. 

Plan your budget for the year 
early. Before you can have a good 
budget planned you must have a 
program of work. Have the treasur- 
er to serve as chairman of the 
financial committee, and the chair- 
man of the program of work com- 
mittee as another member of the 
committee. I think five is a good 
number of members to serve on the 
committee. 

The financial committee should 
take the program of work, and esti- 
mate the cost of each activity 
planned. They should plan ways of 
raising the necessary money to meet 
the activities planned. After this 
is done announce your estimated 
budget. Be careful to try not to esti- 
mate it too high or too low. Hit a 
mid-way mark if possible. 

Are you having any money prob- 
lems that can be helped? Well, 1 
hope these suggestions will help you. 
Lorena Pace. 
State Treasurer. 

Bethel in Haywood sold furniture 
polish and ice cream. 

Cliffside chapter has found "shell 
craft" to be both popular and prof- 
itable. They made money selling 
ear-ring pin sets. 

Wilton sold cards for special oc- 
casions. 

Scotland Neck collected tobacco 
and sold it on the Tarboro Market. 

Sandy Ridge sold vegetable gar- 
den-seed. 

Stovall sold Christmas cards. 

Sherrill's Ford made and sold 
sandwiches and cup cakes at ball 
games. A cake walk netted $30.00. 

Biltmore sold flavoring. 

Franklinville Chapter raised the 
money by having a "Cake and 
Goody" Sale. 



February 23, 1951 
Barnesville, North Carolina 

Dear Betty Sue, 

I know that you haven't heard 
much about the F. H. A. club down 
here but when Joan told me you 
were Interested, I couldn't resist the 
temptation to write and let you 
know about a few of the things 
we've done this year. 

Early this fall the officers, we elec- 
ted last spring, were installed and 
now are well acquainted with their 
duties. 

Maybe you know some of the 
girls. They are: President, Nettie 
Ruth Grainger; Vice-president, Mary 
Lou Scott; Secretary, Peggy McLel- 
lan (surely you know her); Treas- 
urer, Joyce Ivey; Parliamentarian, 
Genola Patterson; Song Leader, 
Molly Ivey; Recreation Leader, 
Charlotte Britt; Historian, Joe Anne 
Gibson; Pianist, Betty Gale Floyd; 
and Reporter, Ann Lee. 

Some of the highlights of our 
year's program have been: 

(a) Compiling a year book and 
distributing them among the club 
members. 

(b) Initiation was lots of fun for 
the whole school. I wish I could go 
into detail and tell you all about it, 
but it would take entirely too long. 
Maybe I can some other time. 

Our club sponsored a Christmas 
card sale in early fall. It was in the 
form of a contest. The club was di- 
vided into teams and the losing 
team gave the team that sold the 
most cards a party. We took in well 
over a hundred dollars. 

I guess you heard about the 
Christmas Party we gave in honor 
of our boy friends on December 2 1 . 
It was formal and we had lots of 
fun. But it never could have been 
done without lots of planning and 
work and the help of our adviser, 
Mrs. H. L. Burleson. 

Our club was well represented at 
District Rally this year 

An officer, member of our club, 
was our candidate for the county- 
wide "Christmas Jubilee Queen"; 
she was our school queen — Ann 
Lee. 

Also at Christmas time we 
packed an overseas gift box of 
needed articles and sent it to teen- 
age boys and girls in Germany. 

Several of our members have ac- 
quired the Chapter Homemaker De- 
gree and the Junior Homemaker 
Degree. 



On February 14th, we, the F. H. 
A. Club honored our mothers with 
our annual Mother-Daughter Ban- 
quet. The valentine motif was car- 
ried out in red and white. Our chap- 
ter mother, Mrs. J. T. Gibson, gave 
an interesting and inspiring talk as 
a response. 

Now, I hope that you aren't in 
the fog as much as before and I 
hope you're interested in becoming 
a club member. 

Until I have more news and bits 
of interesting data to pass on, I 
remain 

As ever, 

Beverly Hardin. 




Rutherford County F. H. A. officers — 
Margaret McGinnis, song leader; Evelyn 
Carswell, Vice-President; Ann Fisher, 
President; Doris Hunt, Secretary (seated); 
Doreen Carver, Parliamentarian; Eloise 
Cobb, Treasurer; Joan Jenkins, Reporter 
(standing). 




Clara Jean takes time out to chat with Kenneth Perry, State F. F. A. President. 




Rachel Beasley, Mayodan Chapter, is 

secretary of the Interstate (North Caro- 
lina-South Carolina) Tri Hi. She was 
elected at the meeting held in Spartan- 
burg, S. C. 

The project committee of Franklin 
F. H. A. (Surry County) has been active 
in redecorating the girls' rest room. They 
painted the walls and all the woodwork 
in two shades of green. A long dressing 
table was built along one wall. This and 
the windows were curtained with gaily 
flowered material. The members who did 
this project combined fun with their 
work as they stayed after school to paint 
and as some painted others cooked a 
hamburger supper. 

The Red Oak Chapter served the local 
Ruritan Club twice and sold Christmas 
Cards. About one hundred-thirty dollars 
was cleared on these projects. That is 
not the only way we received money. At 
the Rocky Mount Agricultural Fair we 
entered an exhibit and won first place 
which added fifty dollars to our treasury. 
Our exhibit was on refinishing old furni- 
ture which showed a refinished dresser 
into a dressing table, a chest, a recovered 
chair, a waste can made from an ice 
cream container, and lamps made from 
bottles. We were very proud of our ex- 
hibit as it expressed what we had done in 
classwork during our housing unit. 

With some of this money, we used it 
to help pay for refinishing our classroom 
tables, make draperies, and refinish our 
floors. We have the same furniture but 
since it has been refinished, it looks like 
new. To our classroom walls have been 
added our F. H. A. creek, our eight pur- 
poses, the emblem, the degrees and their 
meanings — all framed. 

The F. H. A. girls at Zeb Vance en- 
tertained their mothers at the annual 
Mother - Daughter Banquet Thursday, 
February 22, at 6:30 o'clock. The open- 
ing and closing ritual was used and after 
dinner a play was given titled "Home 
Sweet Home." The dinner was served 
buffet style with the colors of the club, 
red and white, being used. 

Awards were presented to members 
completing their work for the Junior and 
Chapter Homemaker degrees. The fol- 
lowing received keys for the Junior 
Homemaker degrees: Geneva Woodlief, 
Jo Anne Moss, Elizabeth Mustian, 
Louise Sloan, Mary Frances Kerley, Mary 
Lou Stone, Barbara Langston, Vernelle 
Johnson, Mary Jane Clayton, Jean Gris- 
som, Elsie Anna Coghill, Barbara Kit- 
trell, and Ruby Pernell. Those receiving 
the scroll were Margie Brown, Sally Jo 
Coghill and Clarice Coghill. 

Mrs. W. A. Watson, the Club Adviser, 
presented a gavel guard to Margie Brown, 
the president of the club for her work 
through the year. We all had a wonder- 
ful time and hope that next year we will 
be able to have a hundred per cent at- 
tendance. 

SherrilPs Ford Chapter has made 
many contributions to Purpose 4 — helped 
raise money for the polio drive raised 
money to send delegates to National 
Leadership Conference; collected waste 
paper in the community drive; and served 
at the annual Alumni Banquet. 



Etowah Chapter decided to adopt a 
foreign homemaking class as our project 
for this year and next. Our sponsor told 
us about two foreign missionaries in 
Borneo who conduct a school in connec- 
tion with their mission work. Mrs. 
Baughman teaches homemaking to the 
girls in the school. We will correspond 
with these girls and also plan to send 
several boxes to the school during the 
year. 

The F. F. A. boys helped the Seaboard 
Chapter when they served the meal at 
the Mother-Daughter banquet which was 
held in the school cafeteria earlier this 
spring. 

Stovall girls went formal when they 
entertained "the best boy-friend" at the 
home of their adviser, Mrs. L. C. Boyd. 
It proved very exciting because Mr. V. S. 
Puckett stopped in and took flash pic- 
tures of the group. 

Cornelius F. H. A., reports a busy 
year for that chapter. 

The Nash-Franklin F. H. A., held its 
spring rally at Coopers High School. In 
the absence of the president, Jane Ed- 
wards, vice-president, presided. The open- 
ing ceremony was used in the beginning 
of the rally. Red Oak had devotional 
which was followed by greetings from 
Coopers. 

Roll call of schools was answered by 
a talent from each school. This offered 
quite a variety, all of which were thor- 
oughly enjoyed. 

The Louisburg Chapter presented the 
candidates for offices and gave their 
campaign managers a few minutes to 
campaign for them. Those elected were: 
Doris Garner, president; Red Oak; Jea- 
nette Joyner, vice-president, Nashville; 
Nancy Edwards, secretary, Spring Hope; 
Sarah Miller, treasurer, Bailey; Sue Man- 
ning, song leader, Middlesex. Middlesex 
won the attendance prize which is a 
large F. H. A. banner. 

The meeting was adjourned with the 
closing ceremony. 

Two Rockingham F. H. A. members 
won in the dress contest sponsored by 
Simtex National Young Designers. Mary 
Cecil Brown entered a quilted reversible 
circular skirt and wesket. Brown wool 
jersey on one side and lime cotton flan- 
nel on the other. It was quite individual 
and showed much originality. She won 
first prize in the State on this garment 
made principally of the cotton flannel. 
She received a $25.00 Savings Bond. 

Eloise Bogan entered a pajamas and 
robe set. This was also very original as 
she changed both patterns quite a bit. 
For this she received the highest certifi- 
cate of award for 1950 (in the state). 
The Future Homemakers of Vance and 
Warren counties held their annual meet- 
ing at Middleburg High School. The devo- 
tions was given by Littleton followed by 
a talent show with Henderson High in 
charge. Everyone enjoyed the songs and 
acting. Norlina won the badge contest 
for having the most attractive badges. 
Zeb Vance High showed three short mov- 
ies which we all enjoyed. After the meet- 
ing adjourned refreshments were served 
in the Home Economics Department at 
Middleburg. Approximately one hun- 
dred seventy-six members were present. 
The new officers for next year are: 
President, Geneva Woodlief; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Mattie . Hunter; Secretary, Louise 
Sloan; Parliamentarian, Ann Tucker; His- 
torian, Jewel Rose; Song Leader, Ruth 



Gill; Treasurer, Betty Barnes; Reporter. 
Ruth Turner. 

While the F. H. A. classes at Red 
Springs have been studying agriculture 
and shop work, the Future Farmers have 
been busy learning a few things about 
Home Economics, that will probably 
come in mighty handy one of these 
days soon. A rough outline of some of 
the things we learned includes how to 
cook certain things, how to match colors, 
what to do and how to act on certain 
occasions. 

Ninety-four chapter officers, advisers 
and chapter mothers of the Surry-Yadkin 
Federation of Future Homemakers of 
America had a banquet at the Blue 
Ridge Hotel, the occasion of the third 
annual officers banquet of Future Home- 
makers of America. 

Betty Jo Quesinberry of the Franklin 
Chapter presided over the banquet in the 
absence of the president. Mildred Leo- 
nard, Franklin, who was ill. The invoca- 
tion was sung by the group using the 
F. H. A. Prayer Song which was led by 
the song leader, Barbara Nichols of Pilot 
Mountain Chapter. A varied program of 
music, contests, and stunts was given 
with each of the ten chapters making a 
contribution. 

The climax of the evening was the in- 
stallation of new officers for the year 
1951-52 with the Franklin Chapter in 
charge of the candlelight service. The 
new officers and the chapters they rep- 
resent are as follows: President, Kay 
Venable, Copeland; Vice-president, Ed- 
na Guyer, Elkin; Secretary, Jo Ann 
Hodges, Dobson; Treasurer, Annie Mae 
Hiatt, Flat Rock; Reporter, Nancy Jones, 
Pilot Mountain; Historian, Lola Spain- 
hour, Jonesville; Parliamentarian, Betty 
Jean Moxley, Boonville; Song Leader, 
Bonnie Williams, Yadkinville; Recrea- 
tion Chairman, Iris Nichols, Franklin; 
Chaplain, Janice Dobson, Mount Airy. 

Since this was Franklinville's first year 
of F. H. A. affiliation we wanted to in- 
troduce the chapter and its purposes to 
mothers and friends, as well as to do 
something for their mothers. We chose 
an Easter Tea for the event. The Home 
Economics Department is a very small 
one. and packed with equipment, so our 
only choice of a place was the High 
School Library. You'd be surprised what 
a transformation took place in a matter 
of hours. The room was cleaned from 
top to bottom, tables pushed aside and 
decorated with jonquils and other spring 
flowers; students talented in art drew 
pictures on the blackboard suggestive of 
the Easter season, and, of course, the 
lovely arrayed tea table captivated the 
center of interest. During the hour from 
four until five about fifty guests were 
welcomed. The only program they 
planned was a group of Easter songs, 
because they wanted to spend their time 
in knowing and entertaining their moth- 
ers. A bulletin board was arranged to 
explain the symbols, emblem and pur- 
poses of the club. 

The Burke-McDowell unit of the Fu- 
ture Homemakers met at the Morganton 
High School for a F. H. A. Rally. Over 
200 girls registered with advisers. Chap- 
ter Mothers, principals and other guests. 
The meeting was called to order by 
the president, Betty Rose Powell, with 
the welcome given by Bette Davis of the 
Morganton Chapter, and the response 
by Drexel Chapter. Nebo Chapter was 









in charge of devotions. The program 
"F. H. A. in Focus" consisted of skits 
representing various phases of home life. 

The president then recognized the 
guests and introduced the county offi- 
cers. Special recognition was given to 
Miss Louise Swann, Assistant State Su- 
pervisor of Home Economics Education; 
Miss Mavis Allman, Western District F. 
H. A. Adviser; and Mrs. DeLanie Win- 
chester, County F. H. A. Adviser. A 
number of principals and chapter 
mothers. 

The New Bern F. H. A. girls toured 
Raleigh Thursday, March 29, 1951, chap- 
eroned by Mrs. Kenneth Spruill and Mrs. 
L. H. Banks. They visited the State 
Capital Textile School at State College 
which proved very interesting and en- 
joyable; the Hall of History. Fred Fletch- 
er's Radio Program; Sears Roebuck and 
Hudson Belks stores and the State 
School for the Blind. The group had 
lunch at the S & W before returning 
home. They arrived in New Bern at 
9:30 p.m. 

Dorothy Clark, president of the Brag- 
town FHA, represented her school in 
the Constitution Contest sponsored by 
the American Legion in February. She 
was judged second in the county. She is 
also a member of the Bragtown debating 
team and was chosen best speaker. 

On March 27, Daphine Mayton, treas- 
urer of the Bragtown FHA, represented 
her school in the Soil Conservation Con- 
test sponsored by the State Bankers As- 
sociation. She won second place in the 
county. She was also an alternate on 
the debating team and is a member of the 
cast of the senior play, "Oliver Twist." 



The Greatest Mystery of American History 



The Peachland Chapter of the 
Future Homemakers of America 
Association was shocked and sad- 
dened by the sudden death of its 
Chapter Father, the Reverend Mr. 
Powell Sherrill, by heart attack. 

Mr. Sherrill had taken an active 
interest in the Association. He had 
attended the District and County 
Rallies. His passing was greatly 
felt by the members. 



Only the twig-cracking footfalls 
of the men broke the awful stillness, 
as Governor John White hastened 
his little detachment through the 
open gate of Fort Raleigh. 

Inside the pointed-log stockade, 
more silence met them. Dead sil- 
ence. A mysterious, frightening quiet 
which hung like a heavy blanket over 
the first English settlement in the 
New World. 

The Governor halted the group 
— and the eerie scene froze the men 
where they stood, with each pair of 
eyes straining, searching for a single 
sign of life ... or even, death. 

But outwardly there was nothing 
amiss. No hint of violence. No mark 
of fire or warfare. 

The Governor bewilderedly 
scratched his beard and pondered 
two solitary facts: One was carved 
upon a tree ... a mysterious mes- 
sage in a single word, "CROA- 
TOAN." The other fact was evident 
. . . 117 human beings — includ- 
ing the Governor's own grandchild, 
Virginia Dare — had vanished from 
the spot! 

Today, you can judge for your- 
self what became of the Lost Col- 
ony. After more than 350 years, you 
can see and hear this exciting mys- 
tery re-enacted on the very spot 
where it occurred! 

At Roanoke Island, N. C. — site 
of Sir Walter Raleigh's ill-fated 
settlement in 1587 — Paul Green's 
great symphonic drama is presented 
each July and August and on until 
Labor Day, nightly except Mondays 
and Tuesdays. 



Staged in a huge outdoor amphi- 
theater within reconstructed Fort 
Raleigh, The Lost Colony features 
a cast of almost 200 actors, plus a 
host of singers, dancers, and musi- 
cians. 

Telling the complete story of the 
colony, the play depicts Sir Walter's 
plans in Elizabethan England. . . 
the arrival of the colonists . . . the 
birth of Virginia Dare — first child of 
English parentage in the New World 
— on August 18, 1587. . .Governor 
White's return to England. . .Indian 
attacks. . .and the colonists marching 
into the dim recesses of time. 

Were they massacred by Indians? 
Was the colony exterminated by 
Spaniards then at war with England? 
Did they escape to the nearby is- 
land of Croatoan and intermarry 
with friendly Indians? 

Draw your own conclusions, as 
you watch this epic pageant unfold 
not only the greatest mystery of all 
history. . .but one of the most stirring 
chapters in our American heritage! 



F. H. A. DAY — AUGUST 17th 
AT THE 

Jip&t Colony, 



A Point of Attraction 



Can You Do This? 




Tennessee Waltz 



Our Singers 






Future Homemakers of America 

CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. >, 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 
of today" 




CAROLINE SA\S 



Our ways of doing all the everyday 
things, from the moment we begin a day 
till its closed, our entrances and exits, our 
manner of sitting and rising, speaking, 
walking, talking, meeting friends, giving 
orders, doing business, entertaining and 
being entertained, going here and there 
about the earth, form the exterior which 
is all most people ever get of us. There 
may be pure gold deep down inside, but 
we can't ask the busy world to stop and 
mind us to find out. The evidences of its 
being there had better come to the sur- 
face in the "happy way" if we want to be 
appreciated, to get the most out of living, 
and to give the most. We owe it to our- 
selves — and those with whom we travel 
— to be a pleasure person. Some of the 
most worthy people in the world go un- 
loved and unappreciated to their graves 
because of their bad manners. Let us be- 
gin to remedy this defect in our national 
living, and let us begin the remedy where 
we begin the defect — in the home. 
—From "SINGING IN THE RAIN" 

by Anne Shannon Monroe. 



:^c^i^:^fe^^^€vdH^ 










FUTU 

* North Carolina Association 



VOLUME IX 



OCTOBER 1951 



NUMBER 1 




Pamela Bigham — State President 
replaces Martha Fulcher 




North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1951-1952 

President — Pamela Bigham, Charlotte 
Vice-President — Barbara Priddy, High Point 
Secretary — Betty Talbert, Franklinton 
Treasurer — Joan Kelly, Cameron 
Reporter — Pearline Ennis, Goldsboro 
Parliamentarian — Kathryn Woodard, Scotland Neck 
Historian — Thelma Mayfield, Swannanoa 
Song Leader — Carmel Long, Griffith 



District Advisers 
1951-1952 

Miss Jane Grey Brumley, Huntersville 

Mrs. Frances Howard Rich, Graham 

Mrs. Sallie M. Broughton, Garner 

Mrs. Martha Black, Bladenboro 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman, Black Creek 

Miss Miriam Scott, Edenton 

Mrs. Mildred Reid, Caroleen 

Mrs. Elizabeth Martin Green, Winston-Salem 



State Adviser 
Miss Daphne Eller 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 
Raleigh, North Carolina 




NORTH CAROLINA DELEGATES TO LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE 

First row, left to right: Kathryn Woodard; Joan Kelly; Nancy Bright; 
Catherine T. Dennis; Pearline Ennis; Peggy Woods; Elizabeth Crews; 
Barbara Geer; Thelma Mayfield. Second row: Miriam Scott; Pamela 
Bigham; Mrs. Frances Rich; Betty Talbert; Jane Grey Brumley; Carmel 
Long; Barbara Priddy. Absent were: Mrs. Sallie Broughton and Mrs. 
Martha Black. 



ALL ABOARD! 

(A diary by the delegates) 



Yes, the last North Carolina girl 
has boarded the "Southern" headed 
for the National Future Home- 
makers of America Leadership Con- 
ference at East Lansing Michigan 
to be held during the week of July 
2-6. 

By one o'clock on Saturday, June 
30, we were all starving and two of 
our advisers, Mrs. Black and Mrs. 
Broughton had prepared a lunch 
for us — picnic style. 

From North Carolina to Ten- 
nessee to Kentucky to Ohio and to 
Michigan we were accompanied by 
car loads of sailors. We must admit, 
however, that the day would have 
been lonesome without them. 



Five times the North Carolina 
Southern Bell had to \erse the 
yankee sailors in a repeat of the 
civil war. 

Many times they would remark 
and tease about our speech and they 
would constantly say of our organi- 
zation "Future Homemakers." 

Once we were lucky enough to 
get a laugh off one of the officers. 
One of the North Carolina Home- 
makers remarked about the pretty 
cows in a pasture as we past and 
a sailor politely told her that she 
made the "u" sound too long. Then 
an officer kindly said to them "What 
difference does it make where I 



Lost? Does this explain why Mrs. 
Broughton and Mrs. Black were not 
present when the group picture was 
taken? 

came from we call cows bulls any- 
way." 

Some of us had never ridden on 
a train or on a pullman anyway, 
but it was really an experience to 
crawl into the berths on Saturday 
night. Well, that is if you were lucky 
enough not to get sick. 

Saturday — June 30 — Pearline 

Oh boy! Sunday morning. A few 



more hours and we would be in 
Lansing. Sunday seemed to slip by 
fast though because all of us girls 
were well occupied with the sailors 
on our car. We sang songs and 
talked to them and as northerners 
always do, they teased us about 
our accent and called us "Southern 
Belles." We didn't mind the teasing 
too much until one of our Belles 
from the South said, "Have you all 
seen my suitcase." Then the whole 
car load of sailors went up in an 
uproar and mocked the way she 
said, "you all." 

We really did enjoy the trip but 
we all wanted to get to the college 
where we could take a hot bath and 
where we could walk without having 
to brace ourselves against some- 
thing to keep from falling. 

When we finally reached Lansing, 
we took a bus out to the college 
and were awed by the sight cf the 
beautiful campus and buildings. 
Then we registered and, I can't 
truthfully say slept, but we did go 
to bed. 

Sunday — July 1 — Kathryn 

As usual we were awaken by the 
gentle (?) rap on our doors at 6:45 
on Monday morning. After eating 
our eggs and toast, several of us 
went walking around the front of 
the dormitory where we saw the 
biggest cow we'd ever seen! (In 
the pasture, across the street, of 
course.) 

Our jobs assigned, we all went to 
our respective groups, to receive 
training and instruction for the jobs 
we were to have for the rest of the 
week. Most of us were either host- 
esses, observers, recorders, con- 
sultants or discussion leaders, so we 
went to hear Mr. Larry Taylor ex- 
plain our jobs. One of us was on 
the Evaluation Committee. 

After lunch we had our first gen- 
eral session in Fairchild theatre. 
That afternoon most of us went 
shopping in East Lansing. The 
clerks were so amused with our 
southern drawl, that in many cases 
they made reduction on our pur- 
chases! 

After eating another wonderful 
meal, we walked, harmonizing as 
we went to the music building to 
have our meetings. Again today, 
our hearts were glad for Miss Allen, 
who led us in more singing. 

Some of the tired ones returned 
to their rooms after this, while 
others sat in the lounge and watched 
television and enjoyed the fellow- 
ship with other girls, and then to 

a 



bed — another busy, profitable, en- 
joyable day was done. 

Barbara Geer & Nancy. 

Tuesday— July 3, 1951 
Dear Diary: 

This morning at 6:45 we were 
awakened by a knock at our door. 
At first we were startled, but then 
we realized it was Miss Dennis 
waking us. We dressed and had 
breakfast, after which we went to 
the morning conferences where Dr. 
Sponbery talked to us about parlia- 
mentary procedure. We then went 
to lunch, which was very good. The 
afternoon program consisted of our 
group discussions and sub-regional 
meetings. At sub-region Nancy 
Bright was introduced as our can- 
didate for vice-president, and we 
discussed the 1951-52 Program of 
Work. 

The highlight of the day was our 
F.H.A. Banquet at 5:30. We were 
served a very delicious meal, and 
group singing was enjoyed by all. 

The evening session consisted of 
group singing and discussions led 
by Mr. Larry Taylor. After the 
evening session Barbara, Nancy, 
Peggy, Betty, Barbara Ann, Miss 
Brumley, Miss Scott, Mrs. Rich, and 
I went uptown to the movie. We 
saw "My Forbidden Past." The day 
was packed with fun and even sur- 
prises for Mrs. Rich who celebrated 
a birthday. After returning from 
the movie we tucked our weary 
selves away. Thelma. 

Since Wednesday, July 4th, was 
Independence day no general ses- 
sions were held. 

After breakfast we were divided 
into twelve interest groups, "Future 
Homemakers Look at Program 
Planning." These will prove very 
helpful in planning our program of 
work. In these we discussed ways 
we could have more active partici- 
pation from each member of our 
chapters. Serving on committees 
seemed to be our best solution. 

Next came the meeting we had 
all looked forward to. The Sub- 
regional meeting, during which time 
the election of our national vice- 
president was to be. Can't you just 
imagine the anxiety of the girls from 
North Carolina since Nancy Bright 
from High Point was one of our 
candidates. Our region was made 
up of the states of Virginia, Ten- 
nessee, and North Carolina. Vir- 
ginia was also running a candidate. 
So you can see we really had to work 
on Tennessee. We are so happy to 
say that Nancy won the election. 



Today offered our first day of 
recreation. Many interesting and 
enjoyable games were held. I think 
the most popular form of recreation 
was ice skating. A few of us had 
a good many bruises Thursday but 
nevertheless it was something never 
to be forgotten. 

Today indeed was light because 
after supper we had a most enjoy- 
able evening of Folk and Square 
dancing. A group of girls from 
North Carolina led by Betty Talbert 
taught the girls from all the states 
a square. 

Then all the delegates were invited 
to Nancy Bright's room for a party 
of celebration. This was a wonder- 
ful chance to talk over our week's 
events up to now. After the party 
since all the girls had had a full day, 
we returned to our rooms for a 
wonderful night's sleep in the cool 
of these Michigan nights. Pam. 

Thursday morning. 

We had our sixth general session. 
It was opened by Amelia from 
Puerto Rico. We had the public 
relations clinic. Thelma Mayfield, 
our historian participated in the 
program. Following that, a program 
of photography was presented by 
Mr. Wesley who took pictures of 
the delegates. 

Thursday night we had a very 
interesting program. Several of our 
girls participated in the skit. This 
was the end of a very enjoyable day, 
which everyone enjoyed very much. 
Peggy Wood & Betty. 

In this cloudy, dreary morning, 
all of the North Carolina girls 
awakened to the tune of "How well 
I remember just two days 'til home"? 
Why? — well, maybe it was because 
it was the last day of our training 
conference. 

After eating a delicious breakfast, 
everyone went to Fairchild audi- 
torium to the seventh general as- 
sembly meeting. The observers of 
the interest groups gave a mock 
radio program. At 11:45 we were 
dismissed for lunch. 1:30 found the 
North Carolina delegation in a state 
meeting. One of the most interesting 
subjects we discussed was "Dating," 
and as many of the girls didn't have 
dates the subject was not carried 
too far. 

When dismissed from the state 
meeting, most of the girls had two 
free hours, those who did not have 
special meetings went to their rooms 
to finish the packing they had started 
the night before. 

Dinner was served at 5:30 p.m. 
After such a nice feast everyone 



went to the music hall for the last 
general assembly meeting. There 
Nancy Bright, the vice-president 
elect was installed. Nancy looked 
lovely. After general assembly 
everyone went back to the dormi- 
tories to finish packing and to do 
the last minute things that had to 
be done before they went home. 
Respectively submitted, 

Carmel and Lib. 

Saturday — July 7th. 

At last the day finally came. The 
day we were to go home, and you 
bet everyone was ready to go home. 
Miss Dennis didn't have to call any- 
one the second time Saturday morn- 
ing. We were up, dressed, and 
packed, and ready to leave at 6:45 
and the bus wasn't suppose to come 
until 7:30, and the train wasn't due 
until 8:51, but we were going to 
make sure we were there on time. 
We sure welcomed the C&O, for 
most of us were hungry by that 
time. We certainly enjoyed eating 
on the C&O for they cooked and 
served the food better' than on the 
N.Y.C. After breakfast we settled 
down for the nice long ride to 
Detroit. The ride to Detroit was 
a pleasant one, but my, how dirty 
and nasty the baggage car was. I 
suppose you wonder why we were 
on the baggage car. It was because 
the delegates from Virginia, Ken- 
tucky and North Carolina were all 
on the train. In Detroit we left the 
Virginia delegates but the Kentucky 
delegates continued with us to Cin- 
cinnati, but to our joy the C&O 
put on another coach in Toledo, and 
we didn't have to stay in the baggage 
car. We were thrilled to see a bride 
in her pretty white gown coming 
out of the church near the railroad 
track, and we were horrified to see 
a little boy of about two years old 
playing with an axe, but it so hap- 
pened that he didn't cut himself. 

The trip home doesn't seem to be 
as exciting as going up, because 
we didn't have the sailors to talk 
to. 

In Cincinnati we had a four hour 
lay over, but we didn't mind that. 
Most of us went to the beautiful 
dining hall and enjoyed a delicious 
dinner. After dinner we explored 
the train station gift shop and the 
park. Before I say anymore I want 
to tell you about some of the beauti- 
ful things and scenery we saw. One 
was the full moon rising behind the 
lake. The moon beams shining 
across the water is something that 
can't be described, nor can the 
lights of Detroit reflecting in the 



water. The beauty of this is only 
explained by poets. 

The mountains are something else 
that is hard to describe. The beauti- 
ful mountain streams, splashing 
against the rocks, and little islands 
out in the midst of them, and if 
you watched close enough you might 
even see a fish jump up out of the 
water. To see fishermen pull fish 
out as you ride by makes you want 
to get off the train and help them. 
When you look up as you are riding 
by these streams you can see nothing 
but mountains. Some are covered 
with trees, others with scattered 
trees and grass. It is really a sight 
to be seen. I cannot take up any 
more space by telling you of the 
things we saw along the way. 

Saturday night, four of the teach- 
ers had the pleasure of spending the 
night in compartments. 1 hey seemed 
to enjoy this very much. 

Breakfast Sunday morning wasn't 
too exciting, because most of us 
slept late and were a little drousy. 
After breakfast we had to get ready 
to change trains in Nashville and 
again they didn't have enough room 
and had to add another coach. We 
exchanged addresses and talked 
until lunch. To our horror some of 
us had to wait two and even three 
hours for lunch. After lunch came 
the sad part of the day. We had to 
start saying goodby to some of the 
girls and as we went through North 
Carolina we dropped them off at 
different stations, until finally we 
came to Raleigh. But we all aren't 
home yet, Pearline still has to go on 
to Goldsboro. I can grant you this, 
we have all learned a lot and have 
had a very enjoyable trip. The 
friends we have made is a souvenir 
we can always treasure. 

Saturday and Sunday — 
July 7th and 8th. 

Joan. 



DATES TO REMEMBER 

State Fair— October 16-20 

United Nations Day — October 24 

World Christmas Festival — 
November 1 

National F. H. A. Week- 
November 4-10 

Family Life Council, Asheville — 
November 13-14 

Deadline for State Degrees — 
November 15 



Anson-Union F.H.A. 
Summer Rally 

On Tuesday, August 21, picnicing 
and swimming at Cheraw Beach, 
S. C, were enjoyed by about three 
hundred Future Homemakers of 
Anson and Union counties and their 
friends, chapter mothers and fath- 
ers, honorary members, principals, 
superintendents and advisers. 

This was the first summer rally 
of the Anson-Union F.H.A. of 
which Julia Hough of Lilesville is 
president and Mary Jewel Short of 
Morven is secretary. Adviser par- 
ticipation was led by Mrs. Kathleen 
Nicholson of Benton Heights School, 
Union County, chairman of the 
Anson - Union Home Economics 
teachers and Mrs. Clarinda Britt of 
Morven School, Anson County, 
F.H.A. Adviser to the two-county 
group. Plans for the rally were 
made during the previous school 
year and the details worked out by 
a committee in the early part of the 
summer. Most of the schools of 
the two counties participated very 
enthusiastically in the rally which 
accounted for its huge success. 

The details were worked out by 
two girls from each school, who 
scheduled the gathering to begin at 
three o'clock and provided swim- 
ming for those who like to swim 
and croquet, softball, and shuffle- 
board for those who did not swim. 
The supper committee had the co- 
operation of the advisers in spread- 
ing the picnic supper each girl had 
brought for herself and friends. 

After the invocation by Mr. 
Powell, principal of Lilesville school, 
the group formed two lines and 
passed by the tables on which the 
committee had arranged the food 
and served themselves. As the 
meal proceeded, it was a lovely 
sight to observe the fellowship of 
the groups sitting on the grass 
around the edge of the lake. 

A clean-up committee, made up 
of two girls from each school saw 
that good citizenship was observed 
by leaving the picnic grounds in 
order. 

The outstanding comment by the 
adults attending the rally and the 
management of the beach was the 
high type of character and co- 
operation exhibited by all. And as 
for the young people themselves, all 
were saying: "Let's have a summer 
rally every year." 




many members as possible were in- 
cluded in the year's activities. Some 
of the activities were: sending our 
president Sue Ally to National Con- 
vention; participating in F.H.A. 
Week; open house for parents; at- 
tending rallies, State Convention 
and camp; World Christmas Festi- 
val; and a reception given at grad- 
uation for seniors, their parents 
and friends, faculty and guests. 

I am anxious to meet all of you 
and work with you. If I can help 
you in any way, please write me 
or come by to see me. My address 
is State Department of Public In- 
struction, Education Building, Ra- 
leigh, North Carolina. 



Meet Your 



I am Miss Daphne Eller, your 
new State F.H.A. Adviser, from 
Lansing, North Carolina, a small 
town in the mountains. 

You may think, oh how boring 
to live in such a place with nothing 
to do! On the contrary, we had 
loads of fun! Picnics, hikes, skating, 
sleigh riding in the winter, playing 
all sorts of games, candy making, 
and many other activities, which 
united our families and our com- 
munity. 

I entered into the usual school 
activities, studies, sports, dramatics, 
and all the other extra curricular 
activities. After graduation I at- 
tended Mars Hill Junior College 
and graduated from Woman's Col- 
lege, UNC, Greensboro. I later 
studied at the University of Minne- 
sota and received my Master of 
Science degree in home economics 
from W.C.U.N.C. 

My major interest was of course 
home economics and I taught in 
Gastonia Junior High School and 
Stoneville Senior High School. 
Stoneville is a rural community but 
has a large school and very fine 
student body. We enjoyed having 
student teachers come out from 
Woman's College for two weeks and 
every one anxiously awaited the 
arrival of the new ones and re- 
luctantly bid the others good-by. 

The F.H.A. Chapter is very active 
and participated in many projects, 
both local and national in scope. 
Our year's work was planned during 
the summer by officers and com- 
mittee chairmen. Yearbooks were 
made for every member and as 



President 

Pamela Bigham, who is replacing 
Martha Fulcher as your president, 
lives in Charlotte and is a member 
of the senior class of the brand new 
West Mecklenburg High School. 
She has brown hair and eyes and 
is about five feet, six inches tall. 
Pamela says, "my favorite sports 
are basketball and baseball. I guess 
my hobbies are having a good time 
and traveling. History and home 
economics are my pet subjects." 
She is very active in many extra 
curricular organizations, having been 
a member of the F.H.A. chapter 
for three years, serving as reporter 
last year; a member of the mono- 
gram club three years, serving as 
vice-president last year; and captain 
of the varsity basketball team. She 
also represented her school at Girls' 
State. "Being able to represent you 
as North Carolina's president of 
F.H.A. at the National Leadership 
Conference has been the highlight 
of my life. I was very much aware 
of the application of many of our 
purposes at the conference, espe- 
cially fostering the development of 
creative leadership. I realized that 
leaders are made, not born and that 
anyone can grow into leadership. 
Let's all strive to be good leaders 
in our chapters and gain new 
horizons for the F.H.A." 

Vice-President 

Barbara Priddy, your vice-presi- 
dent, hails from High Point. She 
says, "I learned so many wonderful 
ideas at the National meeting for 
chapter boosters and how to carry 
out our 8 purposes in chapters, 
schools and communities. We can 
play an important part in the future 
by informing others about our 
organization, its purposes, and its 



activities through interesting, well 
planned programs, an attractive 
bulletin board in your homemaking 
department or school hall, or a pos- 
ter downtown. Good program ideas 
can be found in your Teen Times, 
programs of work, and Newsletter. 
Your Guide has suggestions for such 
service as initiations, emblem, de- 
grees of achievement, election of 
officers, and all the other interesting 
facts and honors that concern 
F.H.A." Barbara says that she has 
found that so many girls don't ever 
see Teen Times and the Newsletters 
and suggests that these be displayed 
in an F.H.A. nook at school. "If 
we will work together we will be- 
come the kind of Future Home- 
makers of which America will be 
really and justly proud." 

Secretary 

Betty Talbert, secretary, is from 
Franklin and a senior at Franklinton 
High School. She has been a mem- 
ber of the F.H.A. Chapter for the 
past four years, in the Glee Club 
and in the Monogram Club. Much 
of her time has also been given to 
the basketball team as a guard and 
co-captain. This year she will be 
sports editor of the school paper. 
Betty says, "I wish to thank you for 
electing me to the office of state 
secretary. I hope I shall not disap- 
point you." "I also want to thank 
you for making it possible for me to 
attend the National meeting. I was 
asked to take part on the program 
called "Let's Use Teen Times," 
which gave the group an opportunity 
to exchange ideas about how to use 
the magazine in our chapters and 
to recommend the type of articles 
we would like to have printed. 
North Carolina is to have an article 
in the April issue. Be looking for 
it." "I shall never forget my trip. 
It makes me proud to know that I 
belong to an organization which is 
striving to achieve such high goals." 



Offi 



icers 



Treasurer 

Meet Joan Kelly, Treasurer, who 
is a senior in the Cameron High 
School and very active in all school 
activities. She belongs to the Beta, 
Commercial and Glee Clubs. She 
represented her school in the State 
F.H.A. Fashion Show in her sopho- 
more year. "Jo" has been an active 
member of our local F.H.A. each 
year and holds Junior and Chapter 
degrees. "My most happy memories 
are of the wonderful trip to East 
Lansing, Michigan to the National 
Leadership Conference. I also en- 
joyed attending F.H.A. Camp and 
the District and State Rallies." Joan 
plans to attend college after gradua- 
tion. She takes her studies seriously, 
but she also has time for social 
activities which all teen agers enjoy. 
She enjoys basketball, softball and 
swimming. Joan is a farmer's 
daughter and she loves a close as- 
sociation with nature. Aside from 
working on her father's farm she 
is also one of the cute "soda-jerks" 
at a local drug store. 

Historian 

Meet Thelma Mayfield, a true 
mountaineer from Swannanoa High 
School. She is your state historian 
and has the responsibility of pre- 
paring the pages of the state scrap- 
book. Thelma reminds all chapter 
historians, "History has a way of 
slipping into the forgotten past if 



you don't take care of it in the pres- 
ent. Future members depend on 
you to keep the records. of what your 
members are doing now. Don't let 
them down. Keep those scrapbooks 
up-to-date!" 

Parliamentarian 

Your parliamentarian, Kathryn 
Woodard, is five feet, one and one- 
half inches tall with short dark 
brown hair and blue eyes. She 
likes to swim and dance and has 
been a cheerleader for three years. 
Kathryn has been a busy girl as 
secretary and treasurer of the Stu- 
dent Council, secretary and treasurer 
of her class and secretary and vice- 
president of the F.H.A. Chapter. 
She says, "I really do love working 
with the F.H.A. Chapter and since 
I have been to Michigan, our chap- 
ter and district I have such good 
ideas to pass on to you. I hope to 
see all of you at the State Rally 
next spring." 

Song Leader 

Carmel Long, our song leader 
from Griffith High School in Wins- 
ton-Salem, really meets the require- 
ments because music is her big 
interest and she plans to be a music 
teacher. She has taken piano and 
voice and sings in the Glee Club 
and Church choir. She joined the 
F.H.A. as a freshman and is presi- 
dent of the chapter this year. Car- 
mel says, "I have learned some 
catchy tunes which you will really 
like. You may hear some of them 
at the district and state rallies. Sing- 
ing is a wonderful form of recrea- 
tion. Use some songs at every 
chapter meeting." 




COVER PICTURE 

The newly elected state officers 
are all smiles as they receive in- 
structions from their president. 
Reading from left to right: seated, 
Martha Fulcher; Pearline Ennis; 
Kathryn Woodard; Joan Kelly; 
standing, Betty Talbert; Thelma 
Mayfield; Carmel Long; Elizabeth 
Crews. 



Reporter 

Pearline Ennis, our reporter, "The 
F.H.A. is my favorite pastime and 
if you do a good job, it takes a lot 
of time. I have been on a number 
of committees and served as secre- 
tary of my chapter." She also en- 
joys working on the school paper 
as reporter, is a member of the 
student council, calendar committee 
and serves as senior class scholastic 
marshal. She is also kept busy with 
a two year old brother, church work 
and her school activities. 

Pearline urges you to publicize 
your F.H.A. Chapter and to let the 
community know the wonderful 
things you are accomplishing. If 
you don't get it in your local paper 
the first time don't give up but keep 
trying. She says, "Above all send 



NANCY BRIGHT ELECTED 
REGIONAL VICE-PRESIDENT 

Nancy Bright of the High Point Chapter 
was recently elected Vice-President of 
the National Organization Future Home- 
makers of America at the Leadership 
Conference held on the campus of Michi- 
gan State College in Lansing, July 2-6. 
Nancy has been an active member of 
the F.H.A. and has held the offices of 
Chapter President and State Secretary. 
She is a leader in her school and is 
serving as president of the Student Coun- 
cil at High Point High School this year. 
iT e _? re Proud to have Nancy represent 
North Carolina Future Homemakers. 



news to your state magazine. We 
all want to know what other chap- 
ters are doing. If you have pictures 
of unusual projects or activities, 
short stories, skits, or new ideas 
for progtam-spicers, share them with 
us. I hope to be reading about you." 

Kathryn Woodard, your Parlia- 
mentarian, recommends these book- 
lets to solve your problems on 
parliamentary procedure: "The 
Meeting Will Come to Order" by 
Harold Sponberg, extension bulletin 
294; "A Score Card for Organiza- 
tion Secretaries," extension bulletin 
275; and "A Score Card for Organi- 
zation Chairmen," by Don Phillips 
extension bulletin 274. Each of the 
bulletins cost 10c and may be se- 
cured from Michigan State College, 
Extension Service, East Lansing^ 
Michigan. 



Reminder 
F. H. A. Week 
November 4-10 



We deeply regret that Martha Ful- 
cher, our recently elected president 
has left North Carolina and gone 
with her parents to Washington, 
D. C, where her father has accepted 
an important position with the Navy 
Intelligence. Martha sends this 
challenge to all F.H.A. members: 

We, the youth of America, have 
a job before us that is much more 
grave and important than that which 
faced our parents and grandparents. 
For this task we must prepare our- 
selves while we are young — now! 
At the present time we naturally 
find our attention centered around 
the world situation. On this par- 
ticular day we are giving special 
thought to the purposes of our own 
F.H.A., therefore, it seems that this 
would be the logical time to apply 
our purposes to the present-day 
crisis. Let's take a look at the ap- 
plication of these purposes. 

I will take one and four together 
since they are so closely related: 
"To promote a growing appreciation 
of the joys and satisfactions of 
homemaking," and "To work for 
good home and family life for all." 
Until we can realize and appreciate 
what our homes stand for, all our 
efforts to preserve and improve our 
present way of living hold little 
meaning for us. 

Second — "To emphasize the im- 
portance of worthy home member- 
ship" — that is, to emphasize the 
importance of being a valuable 
home member, particularly im- 
portant now if we are to make our 
homes what they should be — a place 
worthy of a growing appreciation. 

Third — "To encourage democ- 
racy in home and family life" — In 
a time when our people are com- 
batting the would-be destroyers of 
democracy, we need to put increased 
emphasis on this our most precious 
heritage. To do this, we must start 
at the roots, which are our homes. 

Fifth — "To promote international 
good will." The importance of that 
purpose in this critical era is so ob- 
vious that it seems almost absurd 
even to mention it. However, we 
need constantly to be reminded lest 
we become blinded by selfishness or 
by fear of our neighbors that our 
efforts in that direction become lax. 
At no time has this purpose held so 
many possibilities for real value. 

Sixth — "To foster the develop- 
ment of creative leadership in home 
and community life." At no time 



in history has there been a greater 
need for distinguished leaders. 
Though not all great people have 
come from such environments, there 
can always be found a person or 
element that has inspired them. In 
the home, members of a family are 
influenced far more than is realized. 

Seventh — "To provide wholesome 
individual and group recreation." 
Our minds, taxed with worries and 
the seeking of knowledge would 
soon break down if there was no 
letup. Relaxing comes with recrea- 
tion. 

Eighth — "To further interest in 
Home Economics." We read and 
hear over and 6ver again that so 
many of our troubles as a nation 
are the result of breakdowns in 
our homes. If that is true, we cer- 
tainly need to turn our attention 
more to our homes. We need more 
trained homemakers who are inter- 
ested in all phases of home life. 

How simple it sounds — yet, when 
once the work has begun, it seems 
not so easy. Only with determina- 
tion, willingness, preservance and 
the want to get ahead will we be 
able to meet what may come as wise 
and ready adults. 

Yes, "We ARE The Future 
Homemakers of America. 

And we SHALL face the future 
with warm courage and high hope." 



TEEN TIMES SCHEDULE 
FOR 1951-52 

Do you like to see your name in 
print and read of activities of which 
you participated? Well, here is an- 
other opportunity for your F.H.A. 
chapter and State to be in the lime- 
light. North Carolina has been 
asked to contribute news for the 
"Parade of States" in the April issue 
of "Teen Times." If your chapter 
has done an outstanding job of some 
unusual and interesting activity, send 
complete details and pictures if 
possible to the State Office by Jan- 
uary 20. The news must be in by 
that time in order to be published 
in the April issue. Come to the 
aid of your State and help publicize 
your Future Homemakers organiza- 
tion! 



Notice 

U. N. Day 

October 24th 



Suggestions for Fun 

When the evenings are long and 
the cold wind whistles outside your 
living room window or when a 
group of folks gather in a com- 
munity center, always there's a de- 
sire to do something for fun's sake. 
A few ideas have been garnered 
from several sources which you 
might enjoy doing with your family 
at home or with a larger group as- 
sembled together at church, school 
or community center. 

Have a scavenger hunt for ar- 
ticles commonly used in the home. 
Limit the time of the hunt and 
award a lollipop to the persons find- 
ing and identifying the most articles. 

Divide the group into couples. 
Give each couple three sheets of 
newspaper with which to style 
"Fifth Avenue" fashions. Limit the 
stunt to three minutes and see what 
styles are originated during that 
time. 

Give each person a piece of pa- 
per and a pencil. Turn out the lights 
for two minutes and see what each 
one draws during that time. The 
theme of each drawing could be re- 
lated to the home. 

Form groups of four. Place a box 
containing four postcards cut in ig- 
saw style on each table. Each per- 
son can take two pieces of the puz- 
zle at a time in rotation, returning 
the piece not belonging to this puz- 
zle after each try. The person com- 
pleting his card first is the winner. 

An interesting sit-down game is 
putting together slogans of well- 
known products or manufacturer. 
When couples are paired, give each 
a list of ten slogans or first lines 
selected at random from magazines, 
to which they are to add the name 
of the product or its manufacturer. 
The first couple turning in a com- 
plete and correct list wins. 

A guessing contest, too, is fun. 
Try the two described below. 

(Answers are names of fabrics) 

1. What you see in the news 
paper, print 

2. Two letters of the alphabet. 
P. K. 

3. Part of the American Flag. 
Stripes 

4. Heard in the clock shop, ticking. 

5. What fisherman use. net. 
(Continued on page eight) 



Our Five Projects for 1951-52 



Here we are — looking toward 
new horizons and working together 
to reach the same goals by the same 
ideals. Which of these projects will 
your chapter choose and how will 
you sponsor them? 

These chapters chose the follow- 
ing methods last year: 

Observing F.H.A. Week 

Warsaw reported that recognition 
of F.H.A. Week was given in all 
of the churches in the community. 
The ministers were most co- 
operative in giving the work of the 
F.H.A. a space in their sermon 
plar.s. The girls of each church 
sat in a body. The ministers had 
them to stand in a group for the 
congregation to see them and repeat 
the purposes of our organization. 

National Future Homemakers 
Week was a busy one for the sixty- 
nine members of the Tri-High 
Chapter. Greeting the girls early 
Monday morning in the front hall 
of the school building was a cherry 
red and white bulletin board show- 
ing the planned activities for each 
day of the week. 

Laurinburg Future Homemakers 
gave a radio program interpreting 
work of the chapter to the com- 
munity. 

Hallsboro made a display in a 
local store window of lovely dresses 
and accessories made by the girls 
during sewing units. Posters and 
emblems were used to carry out 
purposes of F.H.A. 

Franklinton chapter chose activi- 
ties which gave girls an opportunity 
to carry out many of their objectives 
in homemaking. 

Families Together 

Candor chapter reported that an 
"Honor Mother's Day" was ob- 
served in which each member 
pledged to take over all of mother's 
tasks for that day. 

Tri-High chapter members used 
as their theme for this project: Fam- 
ily working together, playing to- 
gether, and praying together. 

Taylorsville chapter began on 
this project in the fall by having a 
softball game between the F.H.A. 
girls and their mothers at the town 
recreation park. The game was well 
publicized and whole families came 
to see it. It was quite successful in 
that both spectators and participants 
enjoyed absurd mistakes made by 



the mothers. It certainly helped to 
create better relationship between 
their girls and their mothers. 

Bethel chapter observed Family 
Day in which each member was to 
do something for their family or 
plan some type of recreatioin for 
the family together. 

The Troy F.H.A. girls and F.F.A. 
boys combined chapters and had a 
get-together of parents and children 
for a picnic. Games were played 
by parents as well as children. 

One of New Hanover chapter's 
most successful "families-together" 
events was a square dance. 

Snow Hill chapter reported a 
home project in which all family 
members, even an uncle who lived 
with the family, helped Shirley make 
her bedroom more attractive. 

World Christmas Festival and 
Adoption of a Foreign Homemaking 
Class are for the purpose of im- 
proving international good will. 

Summerfield chapter had the 
pleasure of having a German Ex- 
change Student in their high school. 
He explained customs in his land 
and described the kinds of foods 
he liked. He was invited to eat with 
one of the homemaking classes and 
they prepared one of his favorite 
dishes. Many of the girls have said: 
"I like German people better be- 
cause of Siefred Kaegel being in our 
school. And it is the best thing that 
could have happened in our school 
and community to promote inter- 
national good will." 

Vass-Lakeview chapter sends a 
letter received from a high school 
girl in Rome. She writes it first in 
Italian and then in English. 

Roma 

26 Gennaio 135e. 

Mico caro Carol, 

To mi chiamo Nancy e to no uno 
ragazzo o li fuottordici anni, e 
studio italiano, inglese, fisica, eco- 
nomia domestica e ginnastica. Tano 
di origine ungherese ho i capelli 
liondi e gli occhi azzurri. Vorrei 
essere two arnica per corrispon, 
denza e vorrei che mi mondazzi lo 
two fotografia. 

I pero che saremo presto una 
two lettero. Ha avuto il two 
indirizzo da una mia arnica di scuola 
perch'e a me non mondate perche 
eiana poche. 

To mi viole serivere anche fuolche 



tuo amico, sarocontento sc mi 
mandera delle lcttere. 

Per oro ti soheto e ti lacio e pero 
che aveo presto uno tuo lettero. 

Sineeramente, 
Nancy Kert'e'sz 

Which means — 

Rome 

26th January 1951 

My dear Carol, 

Ime call Nancy and I am one girl 
of 14 years old, and I study italian, 
english, physics, economy domestic, 
ginnastica. I should want to be 
friend for mail and I should want 
who you me writed. 

You write soon and send ours 
photograph. 

I think who we will be good 
friend. 

I write also in italian and you 
make the translation. 

Sincerely 
Nancy Kert'e'sz 
Via Asmara 3'5 
Roma 

United Nations Day 

The National Executive Council 
voted to make this our fifth project, 
which is to be observed October 24. 
United Nations Day is the only day 
of dedication to peace and progress 
which is honored throughout the 
world in countries of many races, 
religions, interests, and outlook. 
How can Future Homemakers help 
achieve world peace? Plan ways 
and means to increase information 
and understanding of the United 
Nations through your community. 
Some program suggestions are: flag 
making projects, radio and chapel 
programs, and studying the work 
of the UN so that you may set up 
an information booth to help inform 
the school and community. 



Wanted! 



News for 



Chapter Chatter 



F.H.A. Has Helped Me Choose a Career 

By Carol Coffee, of the Hallsboro Chapter 



F.H.A. is what a member makes 
of it. It can be helpful and worth- 
while. As an example read the fol- 
lowing account of my two years in 
the chapter. This is my third year 
as an F.H.A. member. 

When I entered high school in '49, 
I was eligible to be an F.H.A. mem- 
ber since I was taking home eco- 
nomics. I joined it because I thought 
it would further my interest in home 
economics, that it would help me 
appreciate the joys and satisfactions 
of homemaking, and also, it would 
provide some wholesome recreation 
for me. I was elected club reporter 
the first year. Reporting was alto- 
gether new to me. Mrs. Baldwin, 
our adviser, helped me the first year. 
After each meeting I sent the write- 
up to our local paper. The first year 
was a hard one but I began to like 
reporting, (a little bit). 

The second year, in the tenth 
grade, I was re-elected F.H.A. re- 
porter. This time I really became 
interested. I began to feel capable 
of being publicity chairman for 
seventy F.H.A. members. 

During my second year in high 
school, the school students decided 
to have a weekly column in our 
city paper. Carolyn Bullard, another 
F.H.A. member, and I were elected 
to write it. This was really a pleas- 
ure for me. We called our column 
"Bogue Chatter" since it concerned 
the happenings in and around 
"Bogue University," as we liked to 
call our school, Hallsboro High 
School. 



Mr. Willard Cole, the editor of 
"The News Reporter," in Whiteville, 
N. C, for which we were writing 
became impressed with my writing. 
He offered me a regular job at the 
office this summer but due to not 
having the secretarial course I was 
unable to accept. 

The editor then asked me to con- 
tinue a column during the summer. 
I decided it would be fun writing 
a "Summer Vacation" column. I 
called it "What's What" and it be- 
came a favorite with teen-agers. It 
was loads of fun to write it because 
our teen-agers would have a column 
all their own. Thus I could interpret 
the F.H.A. program to prospective 
F.H.A.'ers. Now in my junior year, 
I am looking forward to going 
farther in my reporting career. I'm 
planning to continue "Bogue Chat- 
ter" and I'm also a local candidate 
for F.H.A. reporter. 

Mr. Cole has promised to have 
an opening for me next summer on 
the local paper. I'm taking the com- 
mercial course this year so there 
will be no hold-back after next 
summer, and perhaps the next, I 
will really know if I'm interested in 
journalism. From the looks of things 
now, that's my career and it all 
started from having been elected 
F.H.A. reporter in my freshman 
year, and re-elected last year. 

So you can see what F.H.A. has 
meant to me. Of course it may not 
mean careers to all you members 
but, really, it's a wonderful club. 
Won't you join this year? 




CERRO GORDO F.H.A. GIRLS 
TAKE TRIP 

F.H.A. Camp comes in a very 
busy season in our section so we 
planned a trip to the mountains in 
the fall since we could not attend 
camp. 

September 1st five girls left as 
soon as school was out for western 
North Carolina in the Blue Ridge 
Mountains. Some of the highlights 
of the trip included: A trip through 
Linville Caverns, seeing the under- 
ground fairy land; several views of 
Linville Falls; a climb to Grand- 
father's mountain; a wade in a 
mountain stream; sight seeing into 
Virginia and Tennessee; ordering , 
and eating in cafes; spending nights 
in tourist homes and hotels; and 
some rough mountain roads. 

Only one of the group had seen 
the mountains before so we had 
some new experiences. We missed 
the fellowship of other girls at camp 
but had an enjoyable vacation. 

Those attending the trip were 
Dorothy Black, Dorothy Faye 
Knight, Doris Ann Mercer, Jackie 
Nance, Ruth Jenkins and their 
sponsor Mrs. Blanche P. William- 
son. 



6. 

7. 
8. 
9. 

10. 

11. 

12. 

13. 

14. 
15. 
16. 



The Stedman Chapter has grown from a very small group to 140 members. They 
participated in many activities last year including initiation of our new members, 
observing F.H.A. Week and F.H.A. Church Sunday, hobo and Christmas parties, 
and mother-daughter banquet, State Convention and camp. 

8 



SUGGESTIONS 

(Continued from page six) 
What stylish ladies used to 
wear, lace 
A vacation, outing 
Good as cash, checks 
A pillow cover and an ani- 
mal call, chambray 
How a chair use to be used. 
sat in 

Badge of mourning, crepe 
What is seen on a penny. 
Indian head 

What happens when the wait- 
ress drops her tray, crash 
A bed and 2000 pounds. Cotton 
What makes a nice yard, lawn 
A bright beam and a preposi- 
tion, rayon 

Nut-Guessing Game 

What nut is a sandy shore. 

beachnut 

What nut is a girl's name. 

hazelnut 

What nut is a stone fence. 

walnut 

What nut is a large, strong box. 

chestnut 

What nut is one of our mission 

fields, brazilnut 

What nut makes quite a hit 

with our servicemen, doughnut 

What nut is a vegetable, peanut 

What nut is good for bad boys. 

hickorynut 




F.H.A. girls making yearbooks during an interest group at White Lake Camp. 



NORTH CAROLINA ASSOCIATION 

FUTURE HOMEMAKERS OF AMERICA 

WHITE STUDENT CLUB ORGANIZATION 

SEPTEMBER 1, 1950 to AUGUST 31, 1951 

RECEIPTS 

Bank Balance September 1, 1950 

Receipts from Fees (16,087 members @ $.50) fcTnTok'n 2 > 2 41-08 

Leadership Funds „.ZZLZ-~ " i'maI 

Miscellaneous Receipts lil'ta 

Total Receipts 2£i^ 

Total Balance and Receipts. . ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ ZZZZ ZZZjSSJS 

LESS: EXPENDITURES 

National Dues 

District and State RalliesZZZZ $ SI'S 

Executive Board Meeting ,,„„ 

Audit (Account 1949-50) win 

Delegates Expenses to East Lansing " , „ . 

Supplies, postage ..ZZZ" " 7x1*1 

Newsletter (4 issues) "" iio'la 

Honor Awards and pins ~~ 8 0S 

Miscellaneous (Handbooks, guides, etc.) 119 8? 

North Carolina Family Life Council Inn 

Total Expenditures. — 

8,724.61 

Check outstanding. $ 4,333.45 

BALANCE — h§3 

$ 4,335.09 

CAMP— 1951 

RECEIPTS 

Total receipts from camp „ . ___ on 

Less: Expenditures $ !'S!"?2 

Balance .. 5,346.15 

Petty Cash Balance ~™!H~ $ JI'Io 

Total Savings Account ZZZ""Z"ZZZZZZ""Z"$- 1,522."87 



Future Homemakers of America 

CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 




CAROLINE SA1S 



You cannot bring prosperity by dis- 
couraging thrift. 

You cannot strengthen the weak by 
weakening the strong. 

You cannot help the wage earner by 
pulling down the wage payer. 

You cannot further the brotherhood 
of man by encouraging class hatred. 

You cannot help the poor by destroying 
the rich. 

You cannot establish sound security 
on borrowed money. 

You cannot keep out of trouble by 
spending more than you earn. 

You cannot build character and cour- 
age by taking away a man's initiative and 
independence. 

You cannot help men permanently by 
doing for them what they could and 
should do for themselves. 

Attributed to Abraham Lincoln 




iKERS 

North Carolina Association * 




CHRISTMAS MEANS MUCH MORE THAN HAPPY HOURS 

AND SPARKLING GIFTS AND MOMENTS 

BRIGHT AND GAY, 

IT STANDS FOR FRIENDSHIP, FAITH AND LOVE 

WITHOUT PEER, 

THE JOY OF HELPING OTHERS DAY BY DAY. 

MAY BLESSINGS SUCH AS THIS ENRICH YOUR LIFE, 
AND EACH NEW DAY KEEP BRINGING ADDED CHEER 

TO YOU WHO KEEP THE JOY OF CHRISTMAS TIME 
WITHIN YOUR HEART ALL SEASONS OF THE YEAR. 

Your State F.H.A. Adviser. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1951-1952 

President — Pamela Bigham, Charlotte 

Vice-President — Barbara Priddy, High Point 

Secretary — Betty Talbert, Franklinton 

Treasurer — Joan Kelly, Cameron 

Reporter — Pearline Ennis, Goldsboro 

Parliamentarian — Kathryn Woodard, Scotland Neck 

Historian — Thelma Mayfield, Swannanoa 

Song Leader — Carmel Long, Griffith 



District Advisers 
1951-1952 

Miss Jane Grey Brumley, Huntersville 

Mrs. Frances Howard Rich, Graham 

Mrs. Sallie M. Broughton, Garner 

Mrs. Martha Black, Bladenboro 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman, Black Creek 

Miss Miriam Scott, Edenton 

Mrs. Mildred Reid, Caroleen 

Mrs. Elizabeth Martin Green, Winston-Salem 



State Adviser 
Miss Daphne Eller 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 

Raleigh, North Carolina 





j^B l^M^BW* * ■ - i| ^Mfift 




lP£- • --ar^X- "■•■"■■ ' 




: MttrcUfflufnukers learn lo 




j pmide wholesome Umaliou 


II 


kfor tltf fanuL' at Home ■ 


? 




t^l^&fJ&M**^^ 


^mwf^" 




=^fl^*8LwBT 




/Itaift ol 
Tbmoiiou-- Inthe 

of Today- .-.. 



F. H. A. Exhibit at North Carolina State Fair. 



F.H.A. EXHIBIT AT FAIR 



The Future Homemakers' Exhib- 
it at the North Carolina Fair was 
built around the theme, "The 
Homes of Tomorrow are in the 
Hands of the Youth Today," with 
different phases of homemaking 
education being used to show what 
activities are carried on in the class- 
room. 

The exhibit was divided into 
three sections. In the center hung 
the F.H.A. emblem; a boy and girl 
stood just beneath it to represent 
the youth of today. In one section 
the slogan, "A Family Who Plays 
Together Stays Together," was illus- 
trated by showing different types of 
games and books the entire family 
could enjoy together. The other sec- 
tion emphasized fighting inflation 
by using what you already have on 
hand. 

Chapel Hill chapter contributed 
a table and chair which had been 



refinished and recovered. The girls, 
with the help of their teacher, had 
removed dark paint from the chair 
and table and finished the wood in 
its natural color, a light maple. The 
cushions of the chair were recondi- 
tioned and covered in a chartreuse 
upholstery material. 

Red Oak chapter used dark 
green prune bottles to make bed- 
room lamps for their department. 
They also made shades of yellow 
organdy to match a dressing table 
in the classroom. 

The Coats chapter displayed a 
beautiful purple velveteen dress 
made by one of the students. 

All of these articles showed ex- 
cellent workmanship and have 
served as good interpretation of, 
what the Future Homemakers are 
learning today to make better 
homes tomorrow. 



WELCOME 

We Future Homemakers are de- 
lighted to welcome the following 
chapters into our organization: 
Farm Life, Moore County, Hope 
Valley, Main Street, Ansonville, 
Wadesboro, Richfield, Herring, 
Oakley, King's Creek, Colfax, 
White Oak, Jones Central, Dixon, 
Mills River, Maxton, Princeton, 
Grifton, Mingo, Clayton, West 
Mecklenburg, Pamlico County 
High. 





ATTENTION ! 




The 


February issue of 


"News- 


letter" 


will feature money 


making 


activities of individual chapters. 


Send 


your articles and 


action 


pictures to this office by 


January 


10. 







National Executive Council Meets 



By MRS. FAYE T. COLEMAN and NANCY BRIGHT 



Attending the National Executive 
Council in Chicago, October 17-20 
was an experience we wish every 
Future Homemaker and adviser 
could have shared with us. 

The purpose of the meeting was 
to make plans for the coming year. 
Each of the twelve officers was great 
ly concerned with formulating pro- 
cedure and methods of reaching 
every local chapter and getting in- 
dividual participation in local, state, 
and national programs and projects. 
You are a part of the National Or- 
ganization and what you think and 
feel are important to the organiza- 
tion. 

The meetings were conducted in 
a democratic and business like man- 
ner. A concentrated effort was 
made on the part of each to apply 
the correct rules of parliamentary 
procedure and to encourage indivi- 
dual participation. Bits of philo- 
sophical advice learned at the 
Leadership Conference were con- 
tinually repeated. Some of these 
were: 

"The mind can absorb only what 
the seat can endure." 

"When we share, we really care; 
when we care, we share." 

"A good leader is humble." 

Ways and means of recognizing 
members for worthy contributions 



and individual growth were dis- 
cussed at length by the council 
members. They disfavored types 
of contests and award presentations 
which concluded in limiting the win- 
ners to a select few. The program 
of work should be so broad that 
every member of a chapter has a 
chance to make a contribution and 
should be recognized accordingly. 
However, unwarranted publicity is 
to be guarded against. There are 
numerous methods we can employ 
in giving recognition. Sincere, ver- 
bal expressions of appreciation may 
be sufficient in many cases. The 
primary purpose is to make each 
member feel that she is of value to 
the organization. 

Each officer reviewed her yearly 
responsibilities as an officer and as 
a committee chairman and planned 
procedures for carrying them out. 
Committee reports were given on 
Saturday afternoon before we all 
departed for our home states. The 
reports were both interesting and 
inspiring and represented some 
sound profound thinking. 

It was a busy week for all who 
attended, but with the business ses- 
sions interspersed with relaxers and 
our evenings free, with the excep- 
tion of one, we were able to take in 
some of the entertainment places 



of the city, and enjoy food at some 
of the finer restaurants. We saw 
South Pacific — and it was wonder- 
ful. Most of the group attended the 
Ice Follies. We had dinner in the 
restaurant A Little Bit of Sweden 
one evening, and in Le Petite Gour- 
met another evening. 

Meeting such outstanding people 
as our National Adviser, Miss Lela 
Smartt, Assistant National Adviser, 
Miss Jerline Kennedy, Editor of 
Teen Times, and others was a privi- 
lege for both the girls and the local 
chapter advisers. 

Our organization is one of which 
we can be justly proud. It has made 
wonderful progress during its seven 
years of existence, and we, as pres- 
ent members and advisers, are 
challenged to continue this growth 
in the same ratio. Can we do it? 
Of course we can, if we have faith 
in ourselves and what our chapter 
stands for. 




ANNOUNCEMENT!!! 

At last "Fun for F.H.A.," a 
pamphlet on recreation for F.H.A. 
groups, is available!!! 

"Fun For F.H.A. ," is the tangible 
result of many good times F.H.A.'rs 
have shared through the years. It 
would not have been possible with- 
out the enthusiastic demands of 
many chapters and the concen- 
trated effort of the National Com- 
mittees on Recreation, nor the 
splendid co-operation of Miss Cath- 
erine Allen who so ably directed the 
recreational activities during the re- 
cent Leadership Conference. 

"Fun for F.H.A." contains mix- 
ers, socializers, and ice breakers, 
quiet games, songs and relaxers, 
folk games, active games, cooking 
for camp, hints to leaders, and a 
"Mellerdrama." 

The small booklet promises to 
meet a long felt need of advisers 
and F.H.A. girls, and to be the 
source of much wholesome fun for 
a long time to come. 

This booklet is available at 
twenty-five cents a copy from: Fu- 
ture Homemakers of America, Of- 
fice of Education, Federal Security 
Agency, Washington 25, D. C. 



Mrs. Faye Coleman and Nancy Bright returning from their trip to Chicago. 



REMINDER 

Deadline for affiliation dues 
January 15, 1952. 



Homemaking Girls Play Santa Claus 



It was sewing time for the third 
year girls; however, we were not 
particularly interested in making 
clothes for little children. None of 
us had "little sisters" at home, and 
besides we would much rather sew 
for ourselves. One of us said, "I 
need a new formal." Another said, 
"I want a new blouse and skirt"; 
thus our comments ran through the 
group. Just about this time Miss 
Lentz, from the first grade, invited 
us down for a discussion on child 
care and discipline. On telling us 
how much home environment and 
background experiences meant to 
the little beginner, our attention was 
called to an adorable little girl, 
named Issy. Her background was 
pathetic and from observation we 
knew that she was badly in need of 
clothes. We were amazed when we 
learned that Issy had never had a 
doll in all her life. From her picture 
you can see that she is a darling 
and in a matter of minutes she had 
capitavated us with her warm smile 
and her innocent blue eyes. Seeing 
her condition and learning her story 
touched our hearts. As we went back 
to our classroom we were all "bub- 
bling" over with plans to make Issy 
a Christmas wardrobe. The idea 
seemed to come from every mind, 
and we were thrilled to think we 
could help someone. We were no 
longer the girls who wanted a new 
formal, a blouse and skirt. We 
would sew for Issy. 

The very next day we brought in 
used garments and materials from 
home. We began by planning eight 
garments for Issy, one for each girl 
in the class. Our enthusiasm was 
contagious and before we knew 
what was happening the Sophomore 
and Freshmen girls were claiming 
Issy too. The days were happy ones. 
We could hardly wait for "sewing 
lab" period to arrive. We planned, 
we measured, we cut ,and the hap- 
piest periods were the days when 
Issy came for her "fittings." She 
loved beauty and her life had seen 
so little of it. She would lovingly 
touch the materials and say, "It is 
so 'purty'," and her big blue eyes 
would shine with happiness. We 
were most surprised when the gar- 
ments were counted, and we had 
thirty-one instead of the eight we 
had planned. 

The pastel colored cotton dresses, 
the little blouses and skirts, the 
warm suit and jacket, and the dain- 
ty undies, that we had made for 



Issy were only the beginning. For 
we had taken the story of Issy home 
with us and it caught the interest of 
our parents and spread into the 
community too. Mrs. Weant and 
Mrs. Phifer, mothers of two of our 
girls, sent money for a pair of shoes. 
A snow suit and a cap were bought 
with the money also, and Mrs. Wil- 
liams sent money for a sweater and 
socks. 

The Christmas season was ap- 
proaching and naturally our 
thoughts were filled with the idea 
of playing Santa Claus to Issy. We 
had asked her many times what she 
wanted for Christmas and the an- 
swer was always the same; "a baby 
doll," a baby doll "tarriage" and a 
"twicycle." And, of course, she had 
to have just that. So we started a 
community-wide search for all the 
things she wanted. Perry Moore 
provided a baby doll, Mary Helen 
Morgan gave a baby doll carriage 
(which we painted pink — Issy's fa- 
vorite color). Lillie Mae Murff, a 
senior girl, not even in the home- 
making class, gave the tricycle and 
her father volunteered to paint it. 
Others gave story books, paint 
books, crayons, double-decker doll 
bed, in fact, everything a little girl 
could want. We made pillows, mat- 
tresses and spread for the bed and 
carriage. 

On December 20, Santa Claus 
paid an early visit to Issy in the 
Home Ec. Department and the oc- 
casion was made special because a 
photographer was there to make 
pictures of "Cinderella" who was 
none other than "our Issy." Words 
cannot express the joy of the mo- 
ment. You will just have to imagine 
the happiness that was hers when 
she saw all the things she had 
wanted and all the "purty" clothes. 
The pictures tell you part of the 
story of happiness. 

We truly agreed with our teacher 
when she said, "The material things 
you gave Issy were wonderful, but 
you received far more than she did 
because never before have I seen 
such a spirit of love and co-opera- 
tion. You have found the true 
meaning of Christmas." 

And when Christmas comes 
again with its message of peace and 
good will, we will know from ex- 
perience that "it is more blessed to 
give than to receive." We know too, 
that it was the best Christmas this 
Home Economics Department ever 
had. 



TIPS FOR A GAY PARTY 

1. Pick out a definite place for 
guests to put their wraps — girls' 
in your bedroom, boys' in the hall 
(you might use your brother or fa- 
ther as hat-check man.) 

2. Introduce guests to Mom and 
Dad and to each other after they 
have disposed of their coats. Intro- 
duce parents by saying Mother or 
Dad, this is John Smith who lives on 
Lee Street. In presenting guests to 
each other if they are not already 
friends, present the boys to the girls, 
which means you mention the girls 
name first: "Sally Jones, I'd like 
you to know John Smith." 

3. Don't wait for everyone to ar- 
rive before starting the fun. Get 
things perking early with an ice 
breaker. Late comers can join in 
when they arrive. 

4. When there are those who are 
timid about joining in, organize 
trick dances and games that involve 
everyone. 

5. Have a couple of special games 
up your sleeve for that moment 
when the party seems to get dull. 
An indoor scavanger hunt is an ex- 
cellent stimulant. 

6. Don't send your parents to a 
movie. They will enjoy meeting 
your friends, Mom will be valuable 
help in the kitchen, and they will 
help you keep things under control. 

7. To discourage any petting in 
the dark corners, keep all the rooms 
well lighted and have so much fun 
planned that there will be no time 
for smooching. 

8. Avoid games that turn into 
free-for-alls and keep the music and 
your own voice down to a moderate 
pitch. 

9. Give a signal for refreshments 
before a lull in the party. 

10. For those who try to stay and 
stay, ask them to help clean up, 
carry out glasses, or empty ash trays. 
They will take the hint! 



Sittin' and wishin' 
Won't change your fate; 
The Lord provided the fishin' 
But you have to dig the bait. 

Practical Home Economics. 



COVER PICTURE 
Issy and the homemaking girls 
at Spencer High School enjoying 
Issy's Christmas party. 




Glenn Twiddy presenting Mrs. Fletcher 
with a corsage of red roses— the F. H. A. 
flower. 



DISTRICT I 

October 6 
Edenton 

Eight hundred sixty five F.H.A. 
delegates and visitors attended heir 
Distnct Rally which was held at the 
Edenton High School. 

Hostess chapters were Edenton 
Chowan and Perquimans. While the 
delegates were registering, special 
music was rendered by Marjone 
Thippen from Edenton 

Kathryn Woodard, State Parha- 
mentarian, called the meeting to or- 
der and conducted the open- 
ing ceremony. Others Palpating 
were Betty Casteloe, Winterville 
chapter; Marvina White, Perqui- 
mans chapter; Shirley Elliott, 
Chowan chapter; Kitty Campen, 
Edenton chapter. 

The Elizabeth City chapter gave 
a very inspiring devotion consisting 
of scripture, a prayer, and a solo 
"Sweet Hour of Prayer." Mr John 
A. Holmes, Supt. of Edenton Public 
Schools, extended greeting. Follow- 
ing recognition of guests Miss 
Miriam Scott, of Edenton, District 
Adviser, gave some beneficial sug- 
gestions on F.H.A. Week. After roll 
call by the Perquimans chapter, a 
relaxation period was enjoyed by the 
congregation singing songs. 

The guest speaker for the occa- 
sion was North Carolina's First Lady 
of Colonial History, Dr. Inghs 
Fletcher, who was introduced by 
Kitty Campen. Dr. Fletcher held 
her audience spellbound as she 
went into the Elizabethan back- 
ground of North Carolina, stating 
fhat the year 1585 was considered 



the golden age. After her speech 
Dr Fletcher was awarded a gift ot 
appreciation by the Future Home- 
makers. .„, 
Ann Byrd, of Windsor, sang My 
Hero," after which Kathryn gave an 
interesting report of her "Michigan 
Roundup." Patsy Roberson pre- 
sented the candidates for state re- 
porter. These were: Louise Byrd, 
Aulander; Kitty Campen, Edenton; 
Zula Mae Boyd, Grimesland; Hazel 
Paul, Pantego; and Anne Timber- 
lake,' Woodland-Olney. 

One of the highlights of the morn- 
ing session was the campaign 
speeches by the various chapters 
seeking their favorite for the office. 
Kitty Campen was elected witn 
Anne Timberlake as fust alternate 
and Hazel Paul, second alternate 

Following announcements by 
Glenn Twiddy, the group went to 
the Edenton Armory where a de- 
licious barbecue dinner was served 
by the ladies of the American Le- 
gion Auxiliary. 

The afternoon session featured 
a talent show "The Olde South" with 
Sylvia Vaughn as narrator and the 
following chapters participating: 
Chocowinity, Aulander, Colerain, 
South Edgecombe, Tarboro, Weldon 
Murfreesboro, Williamston, Wood- 
land, Olney, Central, Winterville, 
Pantego, Robersonville and Eden- 
ton These girls provided good en- 
tertainment of tap dancing, singing, 
piano solos, skits, and minuet. 

Kathryn Woodard thanked Miss 
Mabel Lacy, District Supervisor 
Miss Scott, and all others who had 
worked to make the rally such a 
successful one, and then adjourned 
the 1951 Rally with the closing 
ceremony. 



OUR DISTf 



DISTRICT II 

November 3 
Rock Ridge 

The Rock Ridge Chapter was 
hostess at the District II Rally ot 
the Future Homemakers on Novem- 
ber 3 While the eight hundred and 
fifty delegates from eleven counties 
were registering, Mr. and Mrs. Rus- 
ty Williams were entertaining early 
comers with a comedy act Mr Wil- 
liams is deputy sheriff of Wilson 
County. The meeting began at 1U 
o'clock with Pearline Ennis, State 
Reporter, presiding. After the open- 
ing ceremony, Wheat Swamp con- 
ducted an inspirational devotional 
which was concluded by a musical 
reading by Clint Faris, assistant 
manager of W.G.T.M. Radio Sta- 
tion. 



The highlight of the afternoon 
was the pageant "Life in These 
United Nations" based on one ot 
the FHA. purposes "To Promote 
International Good Will." Songs, 
dances, and readings carried out 
the idea representing various coun- 
tries in the United Nations. Those 
chapters participating in the pag- 
eant were: Morehead City, New 
Bern, Elm City, Kenansville, B. f . 
Grady, Saratoga, Lee Woodard, and 
Lucama, with Lee Woodard chap- 
ter as narrator. 

Betty Phillips of Warsaw, Ro- 
maine Glover of Rock Ridge, and 
Betty Hatton of Goldsboro were 
candidates for state treasurer. Betty 
Hatton of Goldsboro was elected. 
DISTRICT HI 

October 6 
Vass-Lakeview 
Four hundred and eighty-three 
members, advisers, and fourteen 
chapter mothers met at Vass-Lake- 
view for our District Rally with Joan 
Kelly, State Treasurer, presiding. 

After the opening ceremony, Mr 
John McCrummer, principal ol 
Vass-Lakeview School and Jo Anne 
Chappel, local F.H.A. president, 
welcomed us to Vass and their 
chapter members graciously looked 
after our needs during the day. 

While Hoke County Chapter was 
doing an excellent job at the regis- 
tration desk, the Southern Pines 
Band was entertaining the early- 
comers in the auditorium. 

Every one felt that the program 
was off to a good start as the pre- 
siding officer led the group in the 
F.HA. Creed. This was followed 
with an inspiring devotion by Pem- 
broke Chapter. . 

After the roll call and minutes 
by the acting secretary, Betty Jean 
Adams of Bladenboro, a short busi- 
ness session was held. Miss Mary 
Hines Leonard, Assistant State Su- 
pervisor of Home Economics in 
North Carolina, encouraged the 
members to affiliate early, and to 
work diligently on Degrees ot 
Achievement during the year. 

Shallotte Chapter reminded us 
that "politics was in the air," as they 
presented the Nominees for State 
Secretary. After the second ballot- 
ing, Cerro Gorde Chapter an- 
nounced that Betty Lou Graham ot 
Stedman was elected; with Jerry 
Carpenter, Rockingham, and Hazel 
McLean, Hoke County High, run- 
ning second and third respectively. 



RALLIES 



The high spot of the day came 
when Miss Denny Lee Bryson, Di- 
rector of Christian Education and 
Music, Methodist Church, Sanford, 
N. C, interestingly inspired us on 
"Building for International Good 
Will." 

A beautiful picnic lunch was en- 
joyed by all, after which girls were 
directed to the gymnasium for 
dancing and group singing, under 
the direction of Sally Ann Munroe, 
Clarkton Chapter. 

The highlight of the afternoon 
session was an Acrobatic and Ballet 
Dance by Shirley Allen of White- 
ville. 

The District voted to pay ten 
cents per member to take care of 
expenses of delegates attending the 
National meeting next year. 

Joan Kelly, Cameron, and Mrs. 
Martha Black, District Adviser, Bla- 
denboro, gave "Highlights of the 
National Leadership Conference" 
which was held at Lansing, Michi- 
gan, July 2-8. 

The Waccamaw Chapter pre- 
sented the gavel to Magnolia In- 
dian Chapter as a reward for having 
one hundred per cent membership 
present at the rally. 

Williams Township gave the 
Courtesy Committee report, and 
Ellerbe Chapter had charge of re- 
ceiving invitations for the rally next 
year. Rockingham, Whiteville, and 
Fayetteville High Chapters ex- 
tended an invitation to have the 
rally meet with them next year. 

Misses Shirley Fisher and Doris 
Jean Hester, of Bladenboro, led the 
group with several relaxers. 

Others participating on the rally 
program were Tabor City, Aber- 
deen, Elise, Carthage, Southern 
Pines, Pinehurst, West End, Camer- 
on, and Hamlet Chapters. 

Official guests included Miss 
Mary Hines Leonard and Mr. H. L. 
Thomas, Superintendent of Moore 
County Schools. 

The meeting adjourned with the 
Hamlet Chapter singing the F.H.A. 
Prayer Song. 

DISTRICT IV 

October 6, 1951 
Hugh Morson, Raleigh 

Seven hundred and eighteen 
F.H.A. girls and advisers met at 
Hugh Morson High School in Ra- 
leigh for their annual District rV 
meeting. Betty Talbert, Franklinton, 
who is state secretary presided and 



Mrs. Saliie Broughton, District Ad- 
viser, helped supervise the day's 
activities. 

Morning highlights included an 
election of our state vice-president, 
getting acquainted with our new 
State Adviser, Miss Daphne Ellcr, 
and a song fest led by Dr. Hoffman, 
state director of music. 

The election returns revealed 
that Jean Faulkner from the Red 
Oak School in Nash County is our 
new vice-president, with Leah Wil- 
der, Franklin County and Annie 
Lee Jones from Wake County as 
second and third alternates respec- 
tively. 

Miss Eller, in a short talk, urged 
us to better ourselves and, in turn, 
better our chapters. She left this 
thought with us: 

"I am only one, 
But I am one. 
I can't do everything, 
But I can do something; 
And what I can do, 
By the grace of God, 
I will do." 
Dr. Hoffman taught the group 
some new tunes and directed us in 
singing some old familiar verses. 

The noon day attraction was a 
picnic lunch, and needless to say 
there was wholehearted participa- 
tion from each girl. 

During the afternoon we listened 
to a most interesting panel discus- 
sion on "Teen-Age Dating." Panel 
members included Dr. W. D. Perry, 
U.N.C., Dr. Roy Armstrong, 
U.N.C., Donald Christopher, stu- 
dent council president at Chapel Hill 
High School, Rachel Thompson, 
Chapel Hill F.H.A. president, and 
Miss Margaret Fischel, Chapel Hill 
F.H.A. adviser. 

Betty Talbert presented our new 
vice-president and ended a success- 
ful meeting with the closing cere- 
mony. 

DISTRICT V 

October 6 
Altamahaw-Ossipee 

The District Rally of the Future 
Homemakers of America was held 
Saturday at the Altamahaw-Ossi- 
pee High School with five counties 
being represented: Alamance, Guil- 
ford, Caswell, Rockingham, and 
Randolph. A total of 331 were 
present. 

After registration was closed, 
Barbara Priddy, State vice-president 
from High Point chapter, opened 
the morning session. The Randle- 
man chapter had charge of the 
F.H.A. opening ceremony and the 
Alexander Wilson the devotional 



Brl III IWH 



District V elects Carolyn Abernathy, 
from Alexander Wilson, to the office 
of vice-president, to replace Barbara 
Priddy. 

program. Bill Phillips from the 
Alexander Wilson Future Farmers 
of America chapter was guest solo- 
ist. V. Mays Bundy, Altamahaw- 
Ossipee principal, and Kathlyn 
Thomasson, Altamahaw - Ossipee 
chapter member, greeted the visit- 
ing chapters. The chapter mothers 
and fathers were recognized as spe- 
cial guests. 

During the business session, 
Carolyn Abernathy from the Alex- 
ander Wilson chapter, was elected 
first alternate state vice-president 
with Nancy Jean Wilson, Sumner 
Chapter; and Frances Sumner, Dra- 
per Chapter, second and third state 
vice-presidents. 

J. Allan Lewis, superintendent of 
Rockingham County Schools, led 
group singing. 

The Altamahaw-Ossipee chapter 
members and mothers served lunch 
in the school cafeteria under the 
direction of Mrs. Rachel Troxler, 
home economics teacher. 

During the advisers' meeting at 
lunch time, three advisers were 
nominated to succeed Mrs. Frances 
Rich, as district supervisor for next 
year. Gibsonville chapter issued an 
invitation for the district rally for 
1952. 

Claire Williams, Reidsville chap- 
ter, opened the afternoon session 
with a report of F.H.A. day at 
Manteo in August which was fol- 
lowed with reports by Nancy Bright, 
High Point chapter, and Elizabeth 
Crews, Mayodan chapter, on the 
National Work Shop at Lansing 
Mich., in July. Nancy Bright was 



elected national vice-president in 
Lansing. 

After J. Allan Lewis had a short 
period of entertainment, Toby King 
from the Graham Chapter, intro- 
duced the guest speaker, Dr. Lyda 
Gordon Shivers from Woman's Col- 
lege. Dr. Shiver used as her topic: 
"The Problems of Dating and 
Courtship," which was of interest to 
all the chapter members. 

Bethany chapter gave a report 
from the courtesy committee and 
they stated that this was the best 
rally yet. Barbara Priddy then led 
the group in the F.H.A. closing 
ceremony. 

DISTRICT VI 

East Mecklenburg 
November 3 

Four hundred and thirty Future 
Homemakers were present at Dis- 
trict VI Rally, which was held at 
the beautiful new East Mecklenburg 
High School. While Benton Heights 
and Marshville chapters were regis- 
tering the Future Homemakers, the 
East High Band was rendering spe- 
cial music in the auditorium. The 
program was called to order at 10 
o'clock by the State President, 
Pamela Bigham, who used the open- 
ing ritual. After an inspiring devo- 
tional, Mr. D. K. Pittman, principal 
of East Mecklenburg, extended a 
hearty welcome and challanged the 
Future Homemakers to take their 
responsibility and privilege serious- 
ly. Greetings from Miss Mary Hines 
Leonard were followed by the intro- 
duction of Miss Daphne Eller, State 
F.H.A. adviser, who urged the girls 
to make this a profitable and mean- 
ingful year for F.H.A. 

Miss Laurice White, guest speak- 
er, delighted the group with a dis- 
cussion of "Boy and Girl Relation- 
ships." Her sparkling voice and 
vivacious personality immediately 
won the attention of everyone pres- 
ent. 

A new note of interest was intro- 
duced during the campaign for next 
year's song leader. Two young men 
for East High, F.H.A. members, 
acted as campaign managers for 
Jeanette Phillips, who taught the 
group "She'll Be Coming Around 
The Mountain." Shirley Tarleton, 
from Morven, sang an original song, 
and Clara Burris from Endy, sang 
"Sweet Violets." Clara Burris was 
elected to the office of State Song 
Leader. 

After a delicious lunch served in 
the cafeteria, Mrs. Ruth Cathey 
opened the afternoon session with 



some catchy rounds. Miss Jane 
Grey Brumley, District Adviser, 
and Pamela Bigham brought home 
the National Leadership Conference 
by using a skit on correct parlia- 
mentary procedure. The courtesy 
committee reported that everyone 
had thoroughly enjoyed the District 
VI Rally, and the President ended a 
prefect day with the closing ritual. 

DISTRICT VII 

October 13 
Mocksville 

The District VII rally met in 
Mocksville at the Mocksville High 
School with Carmel Long of Griffith 
State Song leader, presiding. The 
North Wilkesboro chapter conduct- 
ed the devotions* using a skit to 
depict the Biblical scene of Mary 
and Martha. 

Ivey Nell Basley, of the Mocks- 
ville Chapter, and Mr. C. L. Tar- 
land, principal of the Mocksville 
High School, extended a warm wel- 
come to all guests. Greetings from 
Miss Louise Lowe, District Super- 
visor of Home Economics, were fol- 
lowed by the introduction of the 
District Adviser, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Green of South Fork. 

After the roll call and minutes by 
the acting secretary, the candidates 
for state historian and their cam- 
paign manager were presented. Peg- 
gy Dunn of the Clemmons Chapter 
was elected to serve in 1952-53. 

Carmel Long gave a graphic de- 
scription of her trip to the Leader- 
ship Conference in East Lansing, 
Michigan, and taught the group sev- 
eral songs which she learned at the 
conference. 

A delicious picnic lunch was en- 
joyed by all the members and 
«uests. 



The feature of the afternoon 
session was a discussion by Mrs. 
Besse M. Rosa, professor at Wom- 
an's College, Greensboro, whose 
theme was "Getting Along with Our 
Families and Friends." Vocal talent 
was supplied by Wanda and Vir- 
ginia Speas, of the Union Grove 
Chapter. 

The registration committee re- 
ported five hundred and sixty-four 
in attendance, with fifty-six schools 
represented from twelve western 
counties. District VII enjoyed hav- 
ing as guests Miss Louise Lowe and 
Miss Daphne Eller, State F.H.A 
Adviser. 

DISTRICT VIII 

Valdese 
November 3 

Working with the theme "Peace 
at Home Makes Peace Abroad," 
896 girls from 56 chapters in 22 
counties throughout Western North 
Carolina met at Valdese High 
School to attend District VIII Rally. 

Rev. James Fitzgerald, pastor of 
the Connelly Springs circuit, spoke 
on the theme of the rally, fol- 
lowed by a choral selection, "Song 
of Peace" by Canton chapter. 
Everyone was more conscious of the 
need for peace as the girls sang: 
"This is my home, the country 
where my heart is, Here are my 
hopes, my dreams, my holy shrine; 
But other hearts in other lands are 
beating with hopes and dreams as 
true and high as mine." Dorothy 
Street of the Valdese chapter gave 
a welcome to the group and Sally 
Kate Wilkerson, Mill Spring chapter, 
responded. R. L. Patton, Superin- 
(Continued on page eight) 




Candidates for Song Leader from District VI: Clara Burris, Endy; Jeannette Phillips, 
East; Shirley Tarleton, Morven. 




The initiation of new members of the 
B. F. Grady chapter hit a high note of 
hilarity when the girls modeled originally 
designed hats, one of the most outstand- 
ing ones was fashioned from a colander. 

The forty-three members of the Wine- 
coff chapter plan to raise money for 
the chapter by selling Christmas and 
all-occasion cards. Inspection of girls' 
rest room in the new high school building 
was chosen for the school project. The 
newly-elected officers are: Shirley Griffin, 
president; Joan Clanton, vice-president; 
Mary Sue Holden, secretary; Pansy 
Stowe, treasurer; Janice Little, historian; 
June Mills, parliamentarian; Barbara 
Moose, pianist; Margaret Crider, song 
leader. 

The Oakboro chapter began planning 
early to make the activities of their chap- 
ter more interesting and worthwhile by 
using the opening and closing rituals for 
the regular monthly meetings. The yearly 
program topics were chosen with con- 
sideration of education as well as enter- 
tainment, and chapter members were 
carefully selected to plan and present 
these programs. At the first regular 
meeting the new members were initiated, 
and year books were distributed which 
included: club officers, work, degrees, 
program, and finance committees; open- 
ing and closing rituals, programs for 
the year, financial and recreational in- 
formation. Peggy Carpenter was in 
charge of the program entitled, "Fall 
and Winter Styles." Members taking 
part on the program were: Peggy Broth- 
ers, Carol Lee Barbee, Ruby Eudy, 
Gloria Nance, Jane Whitley, Annette 
Hunneycutt, Annie Lee Crisco, and Joan 
Little. Everyone enjoyed a very inter- 
esting report on F. H. A. night at the 
Lost Colony given by Jane Whitley and 
Bobbie Kay Brattain. 

The year's theme for the Tri-High 
chapter is to improve individual and 
group recreation in- our homes, school, 
and community. One of the projects pre- 
sented by the projects committee was 
a lending library of games and reference 
books on recreation for the entire student 
body to enjoy at school or take home 
for family members or friends to enjoy. 
Other projects suggested were: sending 
cards to sick in the community, making 
joke books for hospitals, and the estab- 
lishment and operation of a first aid-room 
at the school. The social highlights of 
the year will be: "Welcome Back to 
School Social," a Christmas party, and 
the April tea. An attractive yearbook 
has been prepared, using colorful oil 
cloth backs. 

The Concord chapter installed their 
newly elected officers at their annual 
Mother-daughter meeting. The highlight 
of the ceremony was the candle service 
in which each new officer was presented 
a lighted candle upon accepting the oath 
of office. After the installation service, 
Mrs. E. F. Litaker spoke to the group. 
Refreshments of soda floats and cookies 
were served by the refreshment commit- 
tee. Chapter Mothers, Mrs. J. R. 
Mothershed, Mrs. J. L. Sides, and Mrs. 
A. R. Hoover, Jr., were special guests. 
New officers for the chapter are: Eliza- 
beth Poplin, president; Viola Carriker, 



vice-president; Ruth Nance, secretary; 
Janice Tucker, treasurer; Francis Smith, 
parliamentarian, Carrol Pucket, historian; 
Wanda Yow, reporter; and Ruth Leigh, 
song leader. 

The Asheboro chapter met September 
25 at Miss Phillips' home for the initia- 
tion of new members. Thirty-five mem- 
bers enjoyed a picnic supper in the back 
yard, with the ceremony in the dining 
room after the meal. Joanne Scott, 
president, presided over the meeting. 
The table was decorated with red and 
white, using a vase of red roses in the 
center of the table, flanked with red 
and white candles. The chapter emblem 
was used at the right of the roses. Each 
girl was given a miniature emblem. 
During the business session, plans were 
made to attend the District Rally at 
Altamahaw-Ossipee. Those planning to 
attend were: Jo Ann Scott, Althea Rus- 
sell,, Helen McPherson, Marian Cox, 
Yvonne Rick, Reva Garner, and Esther 
Parrish. 

The Booneville chapter began their 
fun early this year. The chapters of the 
Federation in Yadkin and Surry counties 
held their annual meeting at the Fire- 
man's Grill, at the fair grounds in Mt. 
Airy, with Miss Venable from the 
Copeland chapter presiding. The Chap- 
lain, Janice Dobson from Mt. Airy, 
conducted the devotions, then we all 
joined in singing songs led by Martha 
Leigh and Wilma Moxley of Booneville. 
The crowd enjoyed a weiner roast after 
which the meeting was adjourned and 
everyone was free to go to the County 
Fair at Mt. Airy. There were enough 
rides for everyone to have fun. Every- 
one went home with sleepy heads, but 
they were filled with memories. 

The Ellerbe chapter began its new 
year with a meeting Monday night, 
September 11, in the Home Economics 
building. Reba McCall, vice-president, 
presided over the meeting. After the 
business, she led a very interesting pro- 
gram entitled, "Family Relations in the 
Home." She also told the club about 
the year's work and the yearbook. After 
the program, the F. F. A. boys were 
invited in for recreation and refreshments. 
With twenty-five members this year, we 
are loking forward to a good year in 
learning to be better homemakers. The 
new officers for the year are: president. 
Ann Broadway; vice-president, Reba 
McCall; secretary, Betty Harris; treas- 
urer, Carol Ellerbe; parliamentarian, 
Mary Louise Smith; reporter, Lillian 
Mclnnis; historian, Johsie Sugg. 

The Mount Holly chapter has gotten 
well underway this year with seventy- 
five members, which doubles their last 
year's membership. Some of the goals 
selected for the year are: to acquaint 
the public with F. H. A. and its various 
activities; to sponsor two group proj- 
ects, open house in December, and a 
fashion review in April; to participate in 
district, state, and national projects; to 
provide wholesome individual and group 
recreation; and to promote leadership, 
responsibility, and co-operation. Tfieir 
first meeting, which was held jointly 
with the F. F. A. boys, was planned 
around a film, "The Late Date," which 
explained in a vivid manner the perils 
of reckless driving. The officers are: 
Sharon Herring, president; Evelyn Stil- 
well, vice-president; Jo Anne Edwards, 
secretary; Harriet Lee. treasurer; Peggy 



Dietz, reporter; Paula Ballard, parlia- 
mentarian; Faye Abernathy, song leader; 
and Patsy Rabb, pianist. 

The Laurel Hill chapter held an im- 
pressive candle light ceremony in chapel 
on October the 9th to initiate their 
twenty-four new members. A centerpiece 
of red roses was used on the table. The 
officers were seated around the table, 
with the president presiding. The pur- 
poses of the organization were given by 
eight guides. The vice-president read the 
creed and explained the emblem. Small 
felt emblems were pinned on the new 
members. The program was concluded by 
the entire group repeating the creed in 
unison. 

Ten high schools represented Rowan 
County in the seventh district F. H. A. 
rally at Mocksville, Saturday. The high 
schools represented were Boyden, Cleve- 
land, China Grove, East Spencer, Granite 
Quarry, Landis, Mount Ulla, Rockwell, 
Spencer, and Woodleaf. The rally began 
at 9 a.m. and adjourned at 3 p.m. 

Five girls of the Henderson chapter 
and their adviser, Mrs. Cobb, attended 
the District 4 Rally which was held in 
Raleigh, Saturday, October 6. The rally 
was an all day affair, in which Sarah 
Pulley, vice-president of the Henderson 
chapter, was in charge of the devotional 
period. The club held its first meeting 
September 20, during which the officers 
of the club were elected. They are: 
Clee Ester Burrier, president; Sarah 
Pulley, vice-president; Jane Renn, secre- 
tary; and Joyce Faulkner, treasurer. 

The Red Springs F. H. A. held its 
first meeting last Thursday in the audi- 
torium and officers were elected at this 
time. Shirley Kennedy was named as the 
new president; Gale Simpson, vice-presi- 
dent; Jean Sanders, secretary; Betty Sue 
McGoogan, treasurer; Joyce Mize, his- 
torian; Irene Lane, parliamentarian; 
Myrtis Boone Johnson, reporter; Juanita 
Nurnberger and Millie Culbreth, song 
leader; Hilda Gray Maness, social chair- 
man; Betsy Watson, recreational chair- 
man. Mrs. Ben Stanton is the sponsor. 
The meeting was called to order by the 
retiring president, Myrtis Johnson, who 
also extended a welcome to all new mem- 
bers and told them of the club activities. 
This year's enrollment hits the top with 
a total of 71 members. The club has one 
meeting and one social each month. On 
Saturday, October 6, representatives from 
the club attended the District rally at 
Vass-Lakeview, accompanied by Mrs. 
Stanton and Miss May Boone. Shirley 
Kennedy, the newly elected president, 
took part on the program giving a brief 
history of Robeson County and also 
called the County Club roll. 

Eighty members of the High Point 
chapter were special guests at the regular 
Sunday morning worship service at the 
First Methodist Church in High Point. 
Dr. Goodson welcomed them with the 
folowing remarks: We are pleased to 
have as special guests at our morning 
worship service some eighty young 
women who are members of an organi- 
zation known as "Future Homemakers 
of America." There is no need in our 
land quite as great as the re-establishment 
of the American home as the basic unit 
in society for the cultivation of proper 
moral and spiritual ideals which have 
always been the basis on which this 
Republic was founded. We welcome 
these young women into the service at 
First Church and bid them come again. 



SCOTLAND NECK CHAPTER 
ENTERTAINS AT CHRISTMAS 

Scotland Neck Future Home- 
makers look forward to what has 
become their annual Christmas par- 
ty. Last year they really had a gala 
affair. 

Each member invited her best 
beau and all the chapter Mothers 
and their hubbys were there — near- 
ly 95 in all!!! 

Entertainment was provided 
from the time a Christmas corsage 
was pinned upon each arrival until 
the last crumb and decoration were 
cleaned up after most of the guests 
had gone. Dancing was in one 
room, games in another, and a roll- 
ing log fire in a fireplace in still 
another room. This room also had 
a glimmering Christmas tree piled 
high with gifts which were distri- 
buted to all the guests. Tasty re- 
freshments completed a delightful 
party. 

Scotland Neck girls recommend 
this method highly as one which 
makes the men love F.H.A. 



NEVER MIND TROUBLE 

Oh, it's just the little homely things, 
The unobtrusive, friendly thing, 
The won't - you - let - me - help - 

you things, 
That make our pathway bright; 
And it's just the jolly joking things, 
The never-mind-the-trouble things, 
The laugh - with - me - it's - funny 

things, 
That make the world seem right. 

Missouri 



Suggestions for 
Christmas Gifts 

For Mom: Get up the third time 
instead of the seventh time Moth- 
er calls you for school — for the 
rest of this school year. 

For The Family: Stay home once 
a month and give Mom and Dad 
a night out, and get acquainted 
with the younger members of 
your family. 

For Dad: Ask for the car before 
you use it; instead of demanding 
it. Might try walking once in a 
while too, it does wonders for 
one's figure. 

For the Girls: Get your F.H.A. and 
other dues in before the various 
treasurers wear out their new 
Christmas shoes trying to collect 
it from you. 

For the State F.H.A. Send in a thing 
for the state newsletter, some- 
thing from you will be greatly 
appreciated, no matter what the 
"THING" is. 

For Yourself: Give yourself a good 
disposition, a cheerful air, that is 
sure to bring to you a Merry 
Christmas and a Happy New 
Year with many, fine new friends. 

For Your Boy Friend: Thoughtful- 
ness; a happy smile, a sweet dis- 
position, and an unselfish nature. 

Taken from the 1950 Nevada 
Newsletter. 



A Very Merry Christmas 

and a 
Happy, Happy New Year. 





New Hanover Future Homemakers pack- 
ing boxes for the Salavation Army. 

OUR DISTRICT RALLIES 

(Continued from page six) 
tendent of Burke County Schools, 
extended greetings. 

Some of the lunch hour features 
were: Look at scrap book on exhib- 
it, visit the home economics house, 
recreation, and forum for local 
presidents on National F.H.A. 
Week. Approximately forty chapter 
presidents attended the forum, which 
semed to indicate a need for in- 
forming officers of national proj- 
ects. 

The afternoon session stressed 
one of our purposes by a skit, 
"Promoting International Good Will 
Through the Christian Festival," 
presented by the Black Mountain 
chapter. 

Everyone was thrilled by local 
talent. Jean Hunt, Cool Springs 
chapter, danced the Charleston; 
Ruth Griffin, of Cliffside, sang "Be- 
cause of You"; Lucretia Rhadarm- 
er, of Canton, sang a ballad; Gail 
Hamrick, a relaxer; and the Sand 
Hill and Candler chapters presented 
an interesting skit, "Further Careers 
in Home Economics." 

Mrs. Mildred H. Reid, District 
F.H.A. Adviser, and Miss Louise 
Swann, Assistant Supervisor of 
Home Economics, were in charge 
of general plans for the rally. Thel- 
ma Mayfield recognized La Salle 
Light of the Old Fort chapter as the 
newly elected State Parliamentarian 
and adjourned the 1951 District 
VIII Rally. 



Wanted! 

News for 

Chapter Chatter 



Carmcl Long from Griffith presents the gavel to Peggy Duns from Clemmons, 
newly elected Historian. 




All this crowd were served pretty Christmas cookies, candies, nuts, and hot chocolate. 




Initiation of new F. H. A. members at 
IS. F. Grady. The girls wore originally 
designed hats. (The hat on the left is 
a colander.) 



Girls from Hoke County F. H. A. have 
fun making cookies. 





F. H. A. girls at District VIII Rally having fun during lunch time. 



Future Homemakers of America 

CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. « 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 




CAROLINE SA1S 



It isn't the gift a fellow gets, if isn't 
the shape nor the size, that sets the heart 
to beating and puts sunshine in your 
eyes; it isn't the value of the thing, nor 
how it's wrapped nor tied, it's something 
else aside from this that makes you glad 
inside. 

It's knowing that it represents a love 
both deep and true, that someone carries 
in his heart and wants to slip to you. It's 
knowing that some folks love you and tell 
you in this way — just sorta acting out the 
things they long to say. So it isn't the gift 
a fellow gets, nor how it's wrapped nor 
tied; it's knowing that folks like you, that 
makes you glad inside. 

Selected 




FUTURE HOMEMAKER 

* North Carolina Association 



VOLUME IX 



FEBRUARY 1952 



NUMBER 3 




North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1951-1952 

President — Pamela Bigham, Charlotte 

Vice-President — Barbara Priddy, High Point 

Secretary — Betty Talbert, Franklinton 

Treasurer — Joan Kelly, Cameron 

Reporter — Pearline Ennis, Goldsboro 

Parliamentarian — Kathryn Woodard, Scotland Neck 

Historian — Thelma Mayfield, Swannanoa 

Song Leader — Carmel Long, Griffith 



District Advisers 
1951-1952 

Miss Jane Grey Brumley, Huntersville 

Mrs. Frances Howard Rich, Graham 

Mrs. Sallie M. Broughton, Garner 

Mrs. Martha Black, Bladenboro 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman, Black Creek 

Miss Miriam Scott, Edenton 

Mrs. Mildred Reid, Caroleen 

Mrs. Elizabeth Martin Green, Winston-Salem 



State Adviser 
Miss Daphne Eller 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



( ^r~ranJii 




CtOte 



ike <~>ea 



• • • 



. . . Future Homemakers share 
friendship and good will with 
our neighbors of other lands. 



Members of the Lee 
Edwards Chapter are 
shown packing a relief 
box for overseas. Included 
in the box are school sup- 
plies and home economics 
equipment such as thread, 
needles, scissors, and sew- 
ing kits, soap, hand lotion 
and other cosmetics. The 
box was sent to the Na- 
tional Office in New York 
for overseas shipment. 
Shown inspecting items to 
be included are, left to 
right, Shirlee Bordner, 
Barbara Whitley, and 
Jeanne Pritchard. 



"We are the voices of three bil- 
lion people who live on this planet, 
our planet. Three billion human 
beings who differ in race, in creed, 
in culture, in color, in religions, and 
in beliefs. But we are united by the 
universal needs of all mankind. . . . 
We are united in our determination 
to learn how to make three billion 
dreams come true." 

Future Homemakers are helping 
a great deal to make many dreams 
come true by building a strong feel- 
ing of international friendship. The 
800 delegates who attended the Dis- 
trict Rally at Rock Ridge learned 
through a pageant "Life in these 
United Nations" that international 
friendships and good will may be 
developed through an honest ef- 
fort to understand our world neigh- 
bors. The girls learned that though 
their governments, education, eco- 
nomics and home life may differ that 
we all have universal pastime activi- 
ties — principally that of music and 
dancing. After having some insight 
into the brighter side of the lives 
of other countries, more effort will 
be given to create a better under- 
standing and hence bring unity and 
peace among all nations. 

Pamlico County Future Home- 
makers believe that world peace be- 




gins at home and chose to learn 
more about displaced persons who 
are living in their community. 

"It there anything else to have 
for breakfast besides bread?" 

Americans and Pamlico Countians 
could not imagine having any such 
poor selection of foods offered to 
them for breakfast. This was the 
answer given by Pamlico County's 
Displaced Persons family when they 
were asked what they would have 
for breakfast. No American knows 
the acute gnawing of hunger and 
fear as do the Alexander Wynmyks, 
and neither does any American know 
the wonderful feeling of blissful re- 
lief at being in a land where "every- 
body is so good to us." 

The Wynmyks are Russian 
Ukrainians who first met in Germany 
while "visitors" of the German 
people, in a work camp. Later their 
"hosts" were replaced by the Rus- 
sians. Neither the German nor the 
Russian doctrine appealed to them. 

When the chance came to live 
in America, as American citizens, 
through the Oriental Methodist 
church, and the Methodist Overseas 
Commission of New York, they took 



it gladly, for to them it was the out- 
look of a better life to come, a new 
hope and prosperity. 

Their wildest dreams were an- 
swered when they first arrived and 
found a little three-room home wait- 
ing for them — a roof over their 
heads, a new experience — belonging 
to their employer, W. B. Gooding of 
Pamlico. And this dream was made 
even greater when they found it 
almost completely furnished by 
members of the Oriental Methodist 
church, who did not plan to bring 
their charges here and drop them. 

Crowning the generous help of 
the Methodists came the results of a 
week's work by the county's Future 
Homemakers of America Chapter, 
when they took a box of food, gifts, 
clothes, and little things to the 
family. 

With tears in her eyes — tears of 
gratitude and appreciation — Mrs. 
Wynmyk repeated over and over again 
phrases strange to the girls, but 
phrases which she had tried to make 
her countless other benefactors un- 
derstand. And Mrs. Gregory quietly 
said, "She asked me to Tell you that 
she and her husband and her chil- 



1 



dren never knew that people could 
be so kind, just as I've heard her 
say so many times before." 

The Laurinburg Chapter feel that 
they will be better friends to Ger- 
many after having two German 
teachers visit in their school for two 
weeks. 

The visiting teachers had very 
few criticisms of America and those 
were ones which could be corrected, 
such as young people not rising 
when older people come into the 
room and the government not letting 
Germany build up again. 

Differences in style of dress, 
meals, sports, and schools were 
somewhat amusing to the German 
teachers and theirs to the student 
body. Brighter colors are worn in 
America than in Germany. Also the 
visitors stated that in their country 
the teachers and girls never wear 
lipstick, high heeled shoes, or cos- 
tume jewelry to school. 

According to Misses Doermer and 
Schrader, German meals do not have 
as much variety as those in the 
United States; at each meal they 
serve potatoes. Another difference is 
that the Germans have four meals 
a day. Emily Post would not get far 
in Germany for the left hand always 
stays on the table — never in the lap. 

Baseball is said to be THE 
American sport, but it is not so 
popular in Germany. A long walk of 
ten or twelve miles is what the 
children and older people look for- 
ward to in Germany. Most Amer- 
icans would find no enjoyment in 
this sport. Also American football 



is rarely played but tag football is 
popular. 

In Laurinburg the schools are 
crowded. German children go to 
school at different times each day 
because the schools are inadequate 
to room all of them. The curricu- 
lum is set down for German students 
with no choice in subjects. Holidays 
from schools do not come in a three- 
months period as here in the United 
States, but at all of their national 
holidays school is out for about 
three weeks each time. 

The German girls are larger 
boned than the American girls. The 
visitors said American girls were 
very slim. Girls in the United States 
always seem to worry about their 
weight; so this makes them feel bet- 
ter. American boys are taller than 
the German boys. 

One of the trends the visitors 
especially liked about the people of 
the United States was that there is 
no class distinction. They found this 
to be a loving and friendly nation. 

Many chapters now have a feel- 
ing of good will toward Japan after 
a visit of four Japanese supervisors 
and one principal to North Carolina 
schools. 

The Japanese visitors could read 
some English but spoke very little 
of our language and, therefore, were 
accompanied by an interpreter. The 
visitors were greatly impressed with 
the friendliness and informality of 
the students toward their teachers, 
and the fact that men have great 
respect for women. In Japan men 
precede women. 





Future Homemakers in Laurinburg have German teachers as Guest Speakers. 
Standing left to right: Betty Bledsae, pianist; Ann Still, secretary; Peggy Lackey, 
historian; Julia Jones, treasurer. Seated are: Miss Ilehna Schroder of Bremen, 
Germany and Hiss Ursula Doermer of Kassel, Germany. 



Wedding 1 Attire of Japanese Girl 

Those of you who were able to 
see their native costume, noted the 
bright colors of the long flowing 
kimonos and the big sleeves with 
concealed pockets. The most inter- 
esting part of ensemble was a wide 
sash called obi. Japanese girls and 
women do not wear lipstick, rouge, 
or finger nail polish. For school, all 
girls wear dark skirts and middy 
blouses, and straw or wooden shoes 
with a strap which goes between the 
big and second toe. 

The visitors enjoyed American 
food but did not like our tea. In 
Japan they eat rice, a great deal of 
fish, with raw fish a very special 
dish! They like soybeans, egg plant, 
tomatoes, onions, and beans. They 
also enjoy fruits, and grow wonder- 
ful peaches and satsuma oranges. 

Baseball is a popular sport in 
Japan. They also enjoy movies. Spe- 
cial occasions to which they look 
forward are festival days, similar to 
our holidays. The favorite for young 
people is the Peach Fete or the 
Festival of the Dolls, held March 3. 
Dolls are kept as sacred possessions 
and some of them are hundreds of 
years old. 

While the Japanese were here 
they were able to participate in 
many varied activities such as visit- 
ing the new Walter Williams High 
School in Burlington; Eli Whitney 
School; Dunn homemaking depart- 
ment; a meeting of Cumberland 
County teachers; Hugh Morson, 
Rolesville, Wake Forest, and Mor- 
ganton Schools; and the Family Life 
Council Meeting in Asheville. They 
were especially interested in F. H. A. 
and stressed the desire of Japanese 
boys and girls to hear from Amer- 
ican youth. 



What Does F.H.A. Mean to You? 



If you were approached with the 
question, "What does F. H. A. mean 
to you?," how would you reply? 
Would your answer really interpret 
the true meaning of our orgainza- 
tion? Would you explain the eight 
purposes of our organization and let 
the interested person know that 
Future Homemakers are really striv- 
ing to learn to appreciate every as- 
pect of home life, to improve the 
homes and stimulate democratic liv- 
ing for all members of that family 
unit, to contribute to less fortunate 
persons in other countries in the 
hope of establishing lasting peace, 
to develop creative leadership and 
to combat idleness and restlessness? 

Patricia Carpenter of the Shelby 
Chapter explains what F. H. A. 
means to her: 

"The Future Homemakers organi- 
zation is not just a group of girls 
sitting at a dull meeting several 
times a year but a group of active 
girls all working for the same pur- 
pose of promoting a better under- 
standing of family and community 
life. Any and every girl who has ever 
been enrolled as a member of the 
Future Homemakers knows what a 
great value she has achieved and 
how knowledge of these two things 
will make her better prepared to take 
her place in the community. 

The Future Homemakers of 
America means a great deal to me 
for it has bettered my understanding 
of people and their everyday prob- 
lems. It has given me a chance to 
correspond with people in foreign 
countries, give Christmas presents to 
the needy and watch their eyes light 
up with the joy that comes during 
a life time, and bring a little joy 
into a person's life who may have to 
stay in the hospital for months. After 
I had once seen the tears of gladness 
roll down some unfortunate person's 
face it makes my heart leap with joy 
to know that our club had made 
someone happy. Maybe, in your 
small way as a member of the 
Future Homemakers you too can 
know the happiness and the whole- 
some enjoyment of knowing that 
you with your club have benefited 
the community in which you live." 

What program or activities has 
your chapter planned to show the 
members, school, and community 
that you are learning to live better 
in order that our lives and those 
of our families may be better to- 
morrow? 

Does your chapter emphasize the 
many values of F. H. A.? Does 



your school and community think of 
you as a social club or an organiza- 
tion which is working Toward New 
Horizons? 

The Murphy High School chapter 
has spent a great deal of time study- 
ing the organization and functions 
of F. H. A. We have tried to give 
every girl, or at least help each 
one, learn the purposes of the organ- 
ization. 

"Our officers have worked hard 
on their programs and on several 
community projects. The best of 
these was helping with the pre-school 
clinic. 

F. H. A. is a very definite part of 
our homemaking education program. 
Next year we plan to try to get into 
State F. H. A. work. We felt that 
it would be best to center our work 
around local problems this year, but 
we certainly want to work on the na- 
tional and international projects next 
year." 

La Grange chapter made an in- 
teresting F. H. A. center in their de- 
partment by painting a desk, book 
case, and two chairs to match a 
rocking chair left to the department. 

Walstonburg chapter sponsored a 
Christmas party for children under 
six years of age. The 1st year home- 
making class selected games, rec- 
ords, and stories to read. The 2nd 
year class selected, planned, and 
prepared simple refreshments. The 
F. H. A. members not enrolled in 
homemaking classes were hostesses 
and decorated for the party. By 
giving the party the girls were learn- 
ing to accept and enjoy their respon- 
sibilities in their homes. 

Cooleemee chapter emphasized 
the importance of worthy home 
membership by conducting a panel 
discussion on "Making a Happy 
Home." This was an assembly pro- 
gram with five members and a chair- 
man taking part. 

Oakhurst observed a "Be Courte- 
ous Week." Each member took as 
her duty to do an extra good deed 
for someone. "Be Courteous" was 
used as the topic of one of the 
monthly meeting and each member 
reported the deed performed for 
someone. The chapter also gave as 
a chapel program a one act play 
"How Courtesy Helps in Everyday 
Living." 

Roxboro members worked toward 
creating better understanding of the 
community needs when they took as 
a project the painting of the two 
assembly rooms of the county home. 
They bought some lovely jade green 



paint with money from their treasury 
and with a special donation made 
by a local civic club. For four after- 
noons the adviser and a group of 
girls worked, painting and washing 
windows. After having finished, they 
were proud of the gay walls which 
replaced the drab brown ones. 

Murfreesboro chapter learned 
new ways of practicing democracy in 
their homes by studying about family 
councils and how to set them up in 
their own family circles. 

Troy chapter reports: Three girls, 
F. H. A. members living in the 
same community, became interested 
in putting over a "Family Sunday" 
in their church, and as a result of 
their work nine families (all mem- 
bers) went to both Sunday School 
and Church. They sat together in 
Church and created even more in- 
terest. From reports this resulted in 
four people going to Church who 
hadn't been in three years, and ten 
going to Sunday School, some who 
hadn't been in as much as eight 
years. 

Family fishing trips and picnic, 
from a Mother's report — "Just to 
please Janet, for she had her heart 
set on all of us going together for 
a good time, and we really did have 
such a good time and are going to do 
it again." 

During National F. H. A. Week 
we had publicity in the paper. In- 
formation in the school by posters 
and a talk in chapel. 

Each member looked up in maga- 
zines members of the school and re- 
ported an interested fact about 
F. H. A. club members' work. 

Durham chapter promoted inter- 
national good will by wrapping gifts 
for teen-agers in Korea. Some of the 
gifts sent were wash cloths, tooth 
brushes and tooth paste, Bibles, 
blouses, skirts, ties, socks, towels, 
sweaters, and many other useful 
things. 

Etowah chapter decided to adopt 
Mrs. Burr Boughman's homemaking 
class in Borneo. Mr. Burr Boughman 
and his wife are Methodist mis- 
sionaries but she has a homemaking 
class in connection with their mis- 
sion work. She teaches the girls how 
to cook and sew, similar to our 
classes here in America except thev 
don't have the modern equipment 
we have. They also have different 
habits and a lower standard of liv- 
ing than we have. We plan to send 
some boxes of things they will be 
able to use in their classes. The 
girls in the school range from 6 
to 16 years of age. 

Cameron sent approximately $20 



worth of books and a box of clothing 
to a needy family in Japan. 

Williams Township chapter adopt- 
ed local families. During November 
the chapter discussed collecting 
clothes, canned food, candy and 
fruit for two poor families for Christ- 
mas. The girls worked hard prepar- 
ing the boxes but they seemed to 
enjoy it very much. They were doub- 
ly repaid for their efforts by the 
looks of gratitude on the faces of the 
families. 

Cobb Memorial took as their spe- 
cial project Leadership. The mem- 
bers learned how to make reports, 
correct parlimentary procedure and 
how to preside at class meetings. 
They were given opportunity to par- 
ticipate in programs in order to gain 
poise and self confidence. 

B. F. Grady learned to accept and 
enjoy responsibilities in their homes 
by having their chapter meetings in 
individual homes. Each girl is quite 
anxious to have the meeting in her 
home and accept this responsibility 
with great pride. In order to be pre- 
pared for this occasion one monthly 
meeting was devoted to the topic 
"Manners in the Home." 

Valley Springs members felt that 
there was a definite need for Purpose 
No. VI, as they do not have a student 
government, or an organization in 
which the young people can learn 
and practice group leadership. Most 
activities are teacher directed rather 
than teacher guided. 

"The programs and activities were 
planned by a committee of mem- 
bers. Our sponsor helped and gave 
suggestions when we asked, or 
needed help. Everyone had a chance 
to be a leader, as different members 
were used at every meeting. The 
leadership was enjoyed by all. Great 
progress was noticed when the last 
meeting was compared with that of 
the first last fall. 

Harrisburg had a program on ca- 
reers available to girls based on dif- 
ferent requirements and amounts of 
education. The fields of Home Ec. 
were stressed. 

Huntersville chapter had discus- 
sions on opportunities for Home 
Economists and some of the out- 
standing points concerning this field. 




cut 



fen fail 



You have no doubt learned that 
it is really the little things in life 
that count, such as a friendly smile 
or a warm hello. In building inter- 
national good will, the warm hellos 
and friendly greetings are far reach- 
ing in promoting a lasting peace. 
Would you like to have an interest 
in building a secure and peaceful 
world? How? By choosing a pen 
pal! Boys and girls in other coun- 
tries love to tell you of their in- 
terests and to learn of yours. Did 
you know that baseball is very popu- 
lar in Japan, arid that they have 
movies but no drive-ins because of 
the scarcity of cars? 

In letters received, many contain 
descriptions of the beautiful scenery 
of their countries, the activities of 
their families, their interest in know- 
ing other people, but never giving 
any hint of envy of Americans, or 
self pity, and "not wanting" some- 
thing, as we are prone to believe. 

We have been given the names 
and addresses of some Japanese high 
schools, all of which have home eco- 
nomics, and many F. H. A. chapters. 
Which will YOU choose? 

Niigata Chuo, Senior High School, 
Niigata City, Niigata Prefecture, 
Japan. 

Sanjyo Higashi, Senior High 
School, Sanjyo City, Niigata Prefec- 
ture, Japan. 

Murakami Sakuragaoka Senior 
High School, Murakami-Machi, Iwa- 
funegun, Niigata Prefecture, Japan. 

Nishi-Shibata Senior High School. 
Shibata City, Niigata Prefecture, 
Japan. 

Niitsu Senior High School, Niitsu 
City, Niigata Prefecture, Japan. 

Daini Nagaoka Senior High 
School, Nagaoka City, Niigata Pre- 
fecture, Japan. 

Tochio Senior High School, 
Tochio-Machi, Koshigun, Niigata 
Prefecture, Japan. 

Tokamachi Senior High School. 
Tokamachi, Naka-Uonumagun, Nii- 
gata Prefecture, Japan. 

Kashiwazaki Tokiwa Senior High 
School, Kashiwazaki City, Niigata 
Prefecture, Japan. 

Arai Senior High School, Arai- 
machi, Nakakubikigun, Niigata Pre- 
fecture, Japan. 

Sado Chuo Senior High School, 
Kanazawa nura, Sadogun, Niigata 
Prefecture, Japan. 

Takada Kitashiro Senior High 



School, Takada City, Niigata Pre- 
fecture, Japan. 

Sado Senior High School, Ka- 
waharada-Machi, Sadogun, Niigata 
Prefecture, Japan. 

Naoetsu Senior High School, 
Naoetsu - Machi, Nakakubiki - gun, 
Niigata Prefecture, Japan. 

Yoita Senior High School, Yoita- 
machi, Santo-gun, Niigata Prefec- 
ture, Japan. 



Now that you have chosen a 
school, what will you write about? 

1. Yourself mostly, your family, 
friends, pets, hobbies. They are in- 
terested in "you." 

2. About their country, the good 
and nice things you know about it. 
The people you know personally or 
about who came from their country. 
Things their country has given or 
done for ours. France gave us the 
Statue of Liberty, etc. 

3. The holidays that are approach- 
ing — Valentine, Easter, etc. What 
they stand for and how we celebrate 
them. 

4. Youth organizations, FHA of 
course, FFA, Scouts, Hi-Y, Church, 
etc. 

5. Your school, the subjects you 
like, the books you read, movies, 
songs, etc. 

6. Your plans for the future. 

7. Find out when their birthday 
is and send them a card. They would 
probably like receiving cards at 
Christmas, etc., and all the other 
days "we" have special cards for! 

In writing, it is wise to remember 
the boys and girls may not have as 
much as you do in material things. 
Try not to ever make them un- 
happy by telling too much of the 
things you have — concentrate more 
on the things you do. 

Write clearly, in short well worded 
sentences. If you use slang expres- 
sions, be certain you explain to them 
that it is slang, and what it means. 

Have a sense of humor — they may 
enjoy an occasional cartoon on "us." 
Susie Q or Penny or Nancy. 

Be certain you include your own 
name in full and complete address. 
You "do" want an answer. 

Learn some words in their lan- 
guage. Japanese boys and girls write 
complete letters in beautiful English. 
Surely we can learn a few words of 
the language of our friends across 
the sea. 



Money Makers 

Future Homemakers have more 
suggestions for money makers than 
Bob Hope and Bing Crosby have 
jokes All make money — more or 
less. It is wise to concentrate on two 
or three big jobs each year rather 
than to piddle along with two dozen 
small ones. Such factors as weather, 
size of school and town, and ef- 
ficiency of operation naturally affect 
the projects produced. 

In choosing your money-making 
schemes, there are considerations 
other than the anticipated returns. 
Is the activity a worthwhile one that 
your parents, your school, and com- 
munity approve? Will it help teach 
members to co-operate, to share and 
to develop other talents? Does it 
meet good homemaking standards'' 
Is it good publicity for F. H. A.? Is 
it fun-raising as well as fund-raising? 
Will you be learning while earning? 
Garner Chapter contributes this 
suggestion for making money: "Our 
treasury being almost exhausted of 
funds, we decided that something 
had to be done. Having made this 
brilliant deduction, a capable finance 
chairman and committee were ap- 
pointed. A trip to the nation's capital 
was our goal, and for such a trip we 
needed money and plenty of it 
(considering the size of our chanter 
roll, 74). 

"The finance committee put their 
heads together and decided upon a 
scheme that had been very profitable 
in the past. We had good saleswomen 
in the chapter, why not sell 'Modern 
Methods,' a complete line of house- 
hold products and cleansers. All 




.,n T H C n irlS S !'°T ab u° V . e are the four Home Economics girls from Shelby who won a 
en dollar prize for their canned foods at the Cleveland County Fair last September 

Ledbetter.' g "" CeraWine M ' X ' Barbara L ° VelaCe ' Ruth Guthrie, IdTaWcia 



members then proceeded to plague 
the neighborhood housewives. 

"Having proved ourselves first-rate 
saleswomen, we embarked on selling 
Christmas cards. When Christmas 
season passed, we switched types of 
cards. This time, birthday cards, 
personalized stationary, and all oc- 
casion greeting cards were sold suc- 
cessfully. 

"During our football, basketball, 
and baseball seasons we made candy, 
lemonade, popped corn, and parched 
peanuts for sale to the spectators. 
These refreshments were also sold 
at some of the other school func- 
tions. 

"So now, with many thanks to our 




Before the fun some work must be done, 
loft in preparation for 



These Polkville girls are cleaning the 
the square dance. 



fine finance chairman and committee, 
and members, the Garner Future 
Homemakers of America Club 
proudly announces that they are 
Washington bound!" 

The Polkville Future Homemak- 
ers have some interesting and help- 
ful news to pass along. "It all came 
about as we planned our scheme to 
raise money for our district of- 
ficer's expenses to the National Con- 
ference. 

"We decided we would like to 
have an old fashioned barn dance, 
but the question was how would we 
get needed money? After much 
'bickering,' it was suggested that 
we charge admission by the size of 
one's foot. In other words if your 
shoe size was 7 2 2, you paid 15c. 
You might know we gave special 
invitations to all those with big feet! 
New Bern Chapter really knows 
how to make work turn into ready 
cash. The girls had an exhibit at 
the Tri-County fair and won first 
premium which was $25.00. They 
sold Christmas cards to make extra 
money for the treasury. The girls 
are divided into two teams to see 
which team could make the most 
money. The losing team had to give 
the winning team a Christmas party. 
The chapter now has $142 in the 
treasury. 

Oak Hill Chapter makes money 
by having rummage sales on Satur- 
days. 

Some good old stand-bys are: 
hobo days, baby sitting, school 
dances, beauty contest, and basket- 
ball games. 



^4- J \lew l/Vau to <=^4-lJL <=^yatelat€ c^cka&L 



7 



7 



Is your chapter one of the many 
to write to State or National Head- 
quarters for a foreign school to adopt 
only to find, to your disappointment, 
that none were available? 

A new program has been an- 
nounced which makes it possible to 
aid foreign schools through the 
United Nations. This program is 
called the Unesco Gift Coupon 
Plan. Through it, by buying a 
coupon for only 25c, an individual 
can make his gift count toward 
something that war-devasted or un- 
der-developed countries badly need. 

The program seems to be a good 
way for F. H. A. Chapters who have 
been unable to secure a foreign 
school for adoption to carry out their 
goal of promoting international good 
will as well as their national project 
of adopting foreign home economics 
classes. 

For the present, while the plan 
gets under way, members will have 
to sell enough gift coupons at 25c 
each to fill one $10 book. 

One of the urgent needs of people 
overseas is equipment for schools, 
most people now have at least a 
minimum of food and clothes, but 
the schools lack the tools to teach 
the necessary skills. A number of 
schools in such countries as the 
Philippines, Austria, and the Middle 
East need sewing machines, cooking 
equipment, and audio visual aids. 
You can't buy a sewing machine 
for 25c or even $10, but you can 
make a contribution, which, com- 
bined with other donations, will 
eventually get that sewing machine 
overseas. 

National headquarters of Future 
Homemakers will keep a supply of 
$10 gift books filled with 25c cou- 
pons. If your chapter is interested in 
the plan, you should send the fol- 
lowing information to National 
headquarters. 

1. Name of your chapter 

2. Address 

3. Name of adviser or officer 

with whom they should 
correspond 

4. Country you prefer to help, 

listing 1st, 2nd, and 3rd 
choices 

5. Number of books at $10 

each you want. 
When you have sold $10 worth 
of stamps, you return the money to 
National Headquarters and they in 
turn forward it to U. N. When all 
the arrangements have been com- 



pleted, your chapter will receive a 
Gift Coupon, which is your receipt, 
and which you will send directly to 
the school you selected. 

Address your letters to Miss Jerline 
Kennedy, Assistant National Ad- 



viser, Future Homemakers of Amer- 
ica, Federal Security Buildina, 
Washington 25, D. C. 

If you want to join this peace- 
saving plan, send for your gift books 
now. 



Many people have asked where 
one should write to secure the loan 
of the Japanese file, "For Brighter 
Home Life." The film is deposited 
with and may be secured from: 

Chief, New York Field Office 

Reorientation Division 

Office of Occupied Areas 

Office of Secretary of the Army 

Department of the Army 

139 Centre Street 

New York 13, N. Y. 



COVER PICTURE 

These Japanese visitors who 
spent two weeks in North Carolina 
studying democracy in the public 
schools, are having an enjoyable 
time brousing in the N. C. Art 
Gallery. Even though Japan is 
noted for beautiful fabrics, they 
are learning that North Carolina 
is also famous for textiles. 



Plan an F. H.A. Corner 



How to keep every member in- 
terested in Future Homemakers of 
America thirty days a month is a 
problem every F. H. A. officer and 
adviser would like to have solved. 
Have you thought of an F. H. A. 
corner or nook? 

An ideal situation would provide 
for a reading table, and shelves, 
comfortable chairs and good lights, 
a bulletin board and a space to hang 
the emblem, banner, or creed. 

This corner would provide a place 
to store back issues of the "News- 
letter" and "Teen Times" for future 
use. Program, money-making, party, 
helps on parliamentary procedure, 



and many other ideas printed one 
year are j ust as good the next year. The 
secretary's record book, publica- 
tions, scrapbooks, and other material 
can be efficiently kept and used as 
needed. 

The bulletin board is needed to 
post announcements concerning 
chapter activities, program sugges- 
tions, newspaper clippings and other 
bits of interest. 

Why not plan now to have an 
F. H. A. center in your school. It 
could be arranged similar to the at- 
tractive one in the accompanying 
picture from Hoke County High 
Homemaking Department. 




A group of Hoke County F. H. A. girls enjoying the F. H. A. nook in their 
homemaking department. 




The Franklin Chapter began early in 
the summer to have an active F. H. A. 
this year and they are really a wide awake 
group. Seven members attended camp at 
White Lake last summer, and they were 
represented at the District Rally at Mocks- 
ville and the Surry- Yadkin Rally and 
picnic. After getting a lot of enthusiasm 
and good ideas from these meetings, they 
were able to take an active part in the 
Christmas festival and National F. H. A. 
week. 

Included in the activities were collect- 
ing food and clothing for a needy family 
and school cleaniness. Members washed 
the windows in the hall of the high school 
building, washed the blackboards and 
did various other clean-up and repair 
jobs. The highlight of the week was a 
tea for Mothers and the school faculty. 
Sixty-eight people signed the guest book. 

The tea table was decorated with 
chrysanthemums and candles. An ex- 
hibit of F. H. A. materials and activities 
was displayed. Officers and committee 
chairmen greeted the guests, presided 
at the guest book and tea table. Members 
from the tenth grade made the refresh- 
ments which consisted of spiced tea, 
sandwiches, and cookies. 

The Bertie County Fair was held in 
Windsor, November 12 through the 17, 
in the Rogers' Warehouse. The three 
F. H. A. Chapters, Aulander, Colerain, 
and Windsor, had as their exhibit theme, 
"Toward New Horizons." We had a 
slanting table display 16' x 8' x 3'. We 
had the paths leading from the home, 
the church, and the school to the main 
path, which led to the horizon. The 
dolls, representing various vocations, were 
placed on these paths, and we hope con- 
veyed the thought of the three units 
working together to lead the F. H. A.'s 
on to a better and brighter future. We 
tied the table display to the background, 
a horizon, with red and white streamers. 

The Colerain chapter was responsible 
for the dolls, the Aulander chapter for the 
buildings, and the Windsor chapter for 
the table, background, etc. We received 
twenty-five dollars for our exhibit, and 
after the expenses were taken out each 
chapter received seven dollars for their 
treasury. 

Cerro Gordo Chapter members are 
learning to be more worthy home mem- 
bers by having a panel discuss social 
and family problems. 

The panel made up of two local minis- 
ters, Rev. Eugene Purcell and Rev. C. E. 
Brisson, the F. H. A. chapter mother, 
Mrs. Grace McClelland, and the teen- 
agers, Ruth Jenkins, and Beamon Nance. 
Jr. 

Mrs. McClelland, who is the mother of 
a teen-age girl, said she sympathized with 
the girl who is old enough and mature 
enough to date but whose mama and papa 
says, "no can do." 

Miss Jenkins and young Nance agreed 
that 10 p.m. is a good curfew on school 
nights, and thought 16 was a good age 
for boys and girls to begin dating. 

The Rev. Mr. Brisson took the view 
that 20 is the youngest age that any per- 
son should marry, while Rev. Mr. Purcell 
put it in other language: "Marriage is 



for adults." A boy or girl, immature in 
mind or emotions, should not marry 
early. Rev. Mr. Purcell said, adding that 
"some people should never marry because 
they never grow up." 

Rev. Mr. Purcell led the discussion on 
problems in dating, the wearing of lip- 
stick, the division of household tasks, 
marriage and religious matters. Many 
helpful opinions and suggestions were 
given by the various members of the 
panel. 

The program was arranged by the 
Future Homemakers of America, under 
the supervision of Mrs. Blanche William- 
son, home economics teacher. 

In November the Mangum F. H. A. 
chapter initiated 14 new members into the 
club in a formal installation service. Red 
roses flanked by red and white candles 
formed an impressive background for 
this first F. H. A. assembly program of 
the year. 

The officers for 1951-52 were intro- 
duced to the student body. The ideas and 
purposes of the F. H. A. were explained 
by the club officers. Barbara Gilchrist, 
president, pinned the F. H. A. colors on 
each new member. This portion of the 
program was closed with the F. H. A. 
prayer song. 

After a short interlude the first year 
homemaking class, under the direction 
of Mrs. Goldston, presented an original 
style review of winter cotton dresses. 

The Mangum Chapter also observed 
National F. H. A. Week by setting out 
a red rose bush in front of the Home 
Economics Cottage. 

The Henderson Chapter held its regu- 
lar meeting Tuesday, November 13, in the 
home of Mrs. Edward Cobb. 

In the business meeting a very short 
discussion was held on the plans for the 
future. Doctor and Mrs. Gregg were se- 
lected as the club mother and father. 

Following the business, refreshments 
were served consisting of cookies, candy, 
and cold drinks. 

Classrooms of the school were bright- 
ened considerably by the beautiful roses 
furnished of the F. H. A. in recognition 
of National F. H. A. week. 

The Vass-Lakeview F. H. A. Chapter 
held its regular monthly meeting in the 
home economics department on Thurs- 
day, December 20. at 12:45 o'clock. After 
the regular business session was con- 
cluded the seniors presented a very in- 
teresting program on "Marriage In 
Foreign Countries." This was a part of 
their world Christmas festival. All pres- 
ent joined in repeating the club creed 
after which refreshments were served. 
After presents were exchanged the meet- 
ing adjourned with the singing of Christ- 
mas carols. 

The club attended a Christmas party 
for the Moore County FHA members 
at the American Legion hut near Car- 
thage on December 13. Two chapter 
mothers, Mrs. Bullen and Mrs. Womack, 
and the club adviser. Miss Jane Lewis, 
accompanied the twenty-six representa- 
tives from Vass-Lakeview. All enjoyed 
the talent show, skits and Christmas 
carols around the open fire. The evening 
was concluded with the serving of de- 
licious refreshments which were served 
in a holiday motif. 

On Thursday night. December 13, 
the Moore County F. H. A. girls opened 
the Christmas season with a party at 
the Carthage Legion hut. 



The Aberdeen Chapter had charge of 
the entertainment which included several 
games and singing of the Christmas 
carols by the open fireplace. The Four 
Bills from Carthage High School, Bill 
Fry, Bill Flinchum, Bill Sabislon, and 
Bill Holder, gave a musical treat with 
"Shortening Bread," "In the Evening" 
and "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot," which 
was greatly enjoyed by all the group. 

The room was beautifully decorated 
with greenery and candles in the win- 
dows and the refreshment table made a 
delightful picture. Carthage chapter, as- 
sisted by Vass-Lakeview, decorated. 
Cameron chapter served holiday punch 
and cookies. 

During National F. H. A. Week the 
Aycock Chapter put special emphasis on 
interpreting the organization to fathers of 
club members. On Thursday evening the 
Aycock Chapter entertained with a 
Daddy-Daughter-Date night — which con 
sisted of a hamburger supper, music, and 
humorous stunts. Fifty-four people were 
present. The event proved so successful 
that plans are being made to continue this 
idea annually. 

Three cheers for Winterville Chapter. 
During F. H. A. week the members were 
guests of the Winterville Baptist Church 
and the minister was so impressed that 
the girls were asked to present the Em- 
blem Service the following week in place 
of the regular mid-week prayer service. 

Taylorsville Chapter reports a rather 
unusual activity for F. H. A. week. A 
slumber party in the homemaking de- 
partment with forty-three girls and the 
F. H. A. adviser and one chapter mother 
present. A football game was played on 
the home field that night, which the girls 
attended in a group. Later they bunked 
down for the night, each girl on her 
own blanket which she had carried from 
home. Before going to sleep they treated 
themselves to candy, popcorn and soft 
drinks. Everyone thoroughly enjoyed the 
party, except perhaps the chaperones. 
who were a little stiff from their ex- 
perience of bunking on the floor for 
the night. 

Rock Springs members entertained the 
school during lunch time by singing songs 
in the cafeteria — Song of Peace, F. H. A. 
Prayer Song, Emblem Benediction, and 
Happy Birthday to F. H. A. All members 
sat together and helped eat a delicious 
white birthday cake decorated with red 
roses. 

Boyden Chapter has a super idea for 
increasing the enrollment, which you 
will want to include in next year's plans 
for your chapter. A Future Homemakers 
of America Assembly for freshman girls 
was held to acquaint the girls with the 
organization. 

Pat Bernhardt, president, presided. 
Virginia Atwell explained the F. H. A. 
pin; Jane Bradshaw, the flowor, the red 
rose, and the motto, "Toward New Hori- 
zons"; and Ann Isenhower. the emblem 
and the color. 

Degrees were brought to the attention 
of the girls by Shirley Deal, who ex- 
plained the junior homemaker's degree; 
Regene Molton, the chapter homemak- 
er's degree: and Pat Hamilton, the state 
homemakers degree. 

Jean Stanback explained the F. H. A. 
as an organization, its function, and the 
freshman initiation. 

You have not heard much about the 
F. H. A. from Elizabethtown this year. 



however, we are not sleeping on the job — 
so I would like to tell you about us. 

We organized in September with a 
membership of 89, ten more than we 
had last year. We attented the district 
rally at Vass Lakeview with 13 members 
from here. Our next event was our float 
on Farmer's Day, with the officers riding. 
We pulled the trailer with a jeep that was 
quite decorated. Several pictures of us 
were made and some were shown at 
the movie the following week. 

We observed F. H. A. week Novem- 
ber 4 through 11. using the F. H. A. 
calendar as the guide. The highlights of 
the week were the F. H. A. weiner roast. 
The new members were initiated at this 
and finished the initiation on Friday 
during school (we took their pictures). 
Another interesting event of F. H. A. 
week was F. H. A. Sunday. We had 
about 30 girls that attended Church at 
the Presbyterian Church and some were 
on the program. We felt real proud of 
the club as were recognized. The rest 
of the F. H. A. members attended at 
other churches, however this was the 
largest group at one church. 

We have had some excellent pro- 
grams under the direction of Lynette 
Suggs, the vice-president. One week our 
program was a round table discussion — 
composed of F. F. A. members, F. H. A. 
members, a teacher, and a mother on 
"Youth Marriages." 

Our officers are President, Hilda Ray; 
Vice-President, Lynette Suggs; Treasurer, 
Clare Glenn; Reporter, Iula Lennon; His- 
torian, Jean Ray Robbins; Parlimentarian, 
Mary Anna Russ; Song Leader, Ann 
Glenn; Club Mother, Mrs. Charles 
Averette: Sponsor, Mrs. Sam Cross. 

We sold Christmas cards to pay our 
F. H. A. fees. 

Hi! We're the Future Homemakers of 
SUMNER and we'd like to tell you 
about a few of our activities. 

We chartered a bus and 24 members 
attended the District V Rally at Altama- 
haw-Ossipee on October 6. We found this 
rally to be at the top of the list with 
Dr. Shirvers speaking to us during the 
afternoon session. 

During National F. H. A. week we 
initiated our new members and gave a 
prize for the most original costume. 

For our project this year we have 
chosen baby-sitting at the local P. T. A. 
meetings. We F. H. A. members keep 
the small children in another room while 
the parents attend the P. T. A. program. 

The High Point Chapter celebrated 
F. H. A. week with a number of special 
activities, one of the most successful of 
which was publicity day. 

On Monday, publicity day was observed 
with Miss Barbara Morrison in charge. 
Two attractive bulletin boards were on dis- 
play, one explaining the five purposes of 
the organization and the other explain- 
ing the eight parts of the emblem. A show 
case in the library also displayed past 
activities of the club, and a display in 
front of the home economics laboratory 
was in the form of a fence with peep- 
holes for the students to observe the dif- 
ferent phases of the department. On that 
day. the members made red roses, the 
emblem of the club which were worn 
to distinguish the club members. 

Hallsboro Chapter planned special 
events for each day of F. H. A. week 
which would emphasize work as in- 
dividuals, work as a group, and work 
as a chapter. 



The F. F. A. and F. H. A. organiza- 
tion of the Red Springs high school held 
a Christmas dance and party in the 
Philadelphia agriculture building. 

After a delicious fried chicken dinner, 
square dancing in the workshop was en- 
joyed by the approximately 50 present. 

One project the Dallas chapter has 
chosen is helping the Red Cross with 
their bloodmobile donors in Dallas. 

"As Dallas has never met their quota, 
we really just made a canvas of the town. 
Each member took five cards to get 
people to sign. In addition to this, two 
F. H. A. girls did the typing for them 
and several other girls worked after 
school serving light refreshments. 

"We feel that we not only helped our- 
selves, but the community as well." 

The Black Mountain members are 
working hard to have a better chapter 
than ever. Thus far they have sixty 
members in the chapter and have spent 
a lot of time learning and putting into 
practice their responsibilities as F. H. A. 
members. 

The members of the Emma Chapter 
raised money for the chapter by making 
pillows cases, stuffed toys, shoe bags, 
cakes, and aprons for a Christmas baz- 
zaar held at the P. T. A. meeting. The 
bazzaar was a great success. Our newly 
elected officers are: Peggy Smith, presi- 
dent; Billie Lunsford, vice-president; 
Carolyn Bass, secretary; and Peggv 
Parker, treasurer. 

An attractive scrapbook of the various 
activities is being made by the members 
and plans are also being made for the 
annual F. H. A. banquet. 



Otf n Jii J. a les <^^o t 



A 



onotat 



f 



.2). 



eateez 



The constitution of the North 
Carolina Association of the Future 
Homemakers of America provides 
for the awarding of four honorary 
state memberships each year. Any 
individual is eligible for this honor 
who has helped to advance the 
homemaking program or has ren- 
dered outstanding service to the 
Future Homemakers in this state. As 
you know, these honorary degrees 
are awarded each year at the State 
Convention. As yet, no candidates 
have been presented. Please send 
the name of the candidate you want 
honored with complete information 
concerning her qualifications. This 
information must be in the State 
office by March 1. 



REMINDER 

Those of you who are working 
for State Homemakers Degrees 
must have your materials properly 
prepared and signed in the state 
office by March 1. 



PLAN NOW TO ATTEND 
STATE CONVENTION! 

The Executive Council is very 
happy to announce that the State 
Convention will be held March 22 
at Hugh Morson High School in 
Raleigh. Begin making plans now 
to send delegates. Many treats are 
in store for you. More details will 
follow later. 



HISTORY IN THE MAKING 

Some people think a historian is 
a person holding an office with 
nothing much to do. Actually, his- 
tory is important for future reference, 
to create interest, to help publicize 
F. H. A., and to help evaluate ac- 
tivities of the organization. If you 
have any interesting or unusual ar- 
ticles or pictures of your chapter 
you would like to have in the State 
Scrapbook, please send them to me 
soon. Your State Historian 

Thelma Mayfield 
Swannanoa, N. C. 



I had rather be a "Could-Be" 
If I couldn't be an "Are" 
For a "Could-Be" is a "May- 
Be" 
With a chance of reaching par. 
I Had rather be a "Has-Been" 
Than a "Might-Have-Been," 

by far — 
For a "Might-Have-Been" has 

never been 
And the "Has-Been" was once 
an "Are." 



— inS 


^ja 1_J 


%££&■'' ^H 






K 


HsSBtestja,^ ' 


flft 39 



HOMECOMING QUEEN 
Morganton F. H. A. Chapter sponsored 
Homecoming Dance. This picture was 
taken during 1 the crowning of Queen. The 
girl is Katie Ross and Bobbie Fox, 
captain of football team, is crowning 
her. About 250 people attended (he 
dance. 



North Carolina Confernce 
on the Family 

By PATRICIA NEAL, Tri-High Chapter and THELMA MAYFIELD, 

Swannanoa Chapter 



Many Future Homemakers who 
live around Asheville were fortunate 
to be able to attend the Fourth 
Annual North Carolina Conference 
on the Family, which was held No- 
vember 15 and 16. 

The highlight of the conference 
was an address on Thursday night 
by Dr. Evelyn Duvall. Her topic 
was — Learning to Live with Differ- 
ence Begins in the Family. Pat says, 
"The main thoughts or points of 
advice Dr. Duvall gave were as fol- 
lows: 

(1) Everyone must learn to ac- 
cept conflict and differences as a 
part of family life. 

(2) One should attempt to under- 
stand differences by listening to the 
other person's point of view. 

(3) Channel your own points ef- 
fectively — keep your emotions un- 
der control. 

(4) One must recognize the fact 
that everyone needs affection, love, 
and appreciation. 

One of Dr. DuvalFs other thoughts 
was that peace is made not only 
around council tables, at the U. N., 
and on the battle fields; but peace 
is made also by learning to live with 
differences and to blend them -afto 
harmony — harmony in hearts." 

Our organization was officially 
represented by Thelma Mayfield, 
State Historian, who comments on 
the discussion groups held on Friday. 

"The discussion groups of the 
Family Life Council meeting were 
the most interesting ones I have at- 
tended. Probably the reason for en- 
joying them so much was the fact 
that they were different. Usually we 
think of these groups discussing 
only such problems as dating, 
petting, and other boy-girl relation- 
ship problems; but these discussion 
groups were based on home and 
family life. We started off by dis- 
cussing how to bettter understand 
our parents' viewpoints, the value of 
a family circle, and the art of feeling 
free to discuss our problems with 
members of our family. After com- 
ing to this conclusion — teen-agers 
shoud enter into a circle with their 
parents and discuss problems freely, 
we then discussed our dating prob- 
lems. The topics for this were based 
on what to do on a date and should 



you go steady. These problems were 
thought about by every person pres- 
ent before beginning the discussions. 
By doing this we better understood 
the problem and felt free to offer 
our suggestions. 

"After meeting in groups we re- 
assembled in the auditorium to have 
our problems discussed together. 
This was led by Drs. Rueben Hill 
and Evelyn Duvall. 

"These groups were very interest- 
ing and we're looking forward to 
the ones next year." 




A RELAXER USED AT THE 
CONFERENCE 

I'M A NUT 

(Twinkle Twinkle Little Star) 

1. I'm a little acorn brown, lying 
on the cold, cold ground. 
Everybody steps on me; that is 
why I'm cracked, you see. 

Refrain 

I'm a nut, tch, tch 
I'm a nut, tch, tch 
I'm a nut, tch, tch 
I'm a nut, tch, tch 

2. I called myself upon the phone, 
just to see if I was home 
Asked myself about a date; at 
the latest, half past eight. 

Refrain 

3. I love myself, I think I'm grand; 
at the movies I hold my hand 
Put my arm around my waist; if I 
get fresh I slap my face. 

Refrain 



ji..J?.A~lp*- < W«*Jt 



tauJLlu! 



The F. H. A. pin is not just another piece of jewelry. It is a symbol! 
One part of the pin is the emblem of the organization with a home upheld 
by two hands, the hands of a boy and girl, signifying that the homes of the 
future are in the hands of the youth. Rays of light which extend from the 
center point toward new goals for the future. The name of the organization, 
Future Homemakers of America, and the motto, "Toward New Horizons" 
are written along the border which is octagonal in shape symbolizing 
our eight purposes. 

The emblem is attached to a guard with a small chain. The guard is 
shaped like a house with the letters F and H forming the sides and letter 
A forming the roof. An honorary member substitutes an H pin for the guard. 

A girl who has earned a degree of achievement in her chapter may 
wear a symbol of that degree on the chain. The first degree, Junior 
Homemaker, is represented by a key; the second degree, Chapter Home- 
maker, by a scroll; and the third degree, State Homemaker, by a torch. 

Active, associate, or graduate member of a chapter may wear the 
F.H. A. pin. The pin symbolizes her sincerity and love for the organization 
and its activities. In wearing the pin, she must place it over her heart on 
her dress or jacket and never on lapel or collar; neither should it be 
worn on a formal dress. It should always be worn with the guard to its 
left. No other pin should be attached to it because it shows membership 
to the F. H. A. organization. 

This is your pin. Wear it proudly! 



:i?*^fc*te?^::i§*::#^ -s^:^^: ^^^s^g^s?. 



4 



Future Homemakers of America 

CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. ' 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 



(ft 




CAROLINE SAYS 



A leader is best 

When people barely know he exists, 

Not so good when people obey and ac- 
claim him, 

Worst when they despise him. 

Of a good leader who talks little, 

When his work is done, his aim fulfilled, 

They will all say, "We did this ourselves." 

Selected. 



*A 



% 




FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association • 




The Future Homemakers were happy to confer upon Mr. D. W. Sanders 
a state honorary membership, the highest honor afforded adults by the 
State F.H.A. Association. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 

432 Chapters — 17,694 Members 



State Officers 
1951-1952 

President — Pamela Bigham, Charlotte 

Vice-President — Carolyn Abernathy, Alexander- Wilson 

Secretary — Betty Talbert, Franklinton 

Treasurer — Joan Kelly, Cameron 

Reporter — Pearline Ennis, Goldsboro 

Parliamentarian — Kathryn Woodard, Scotland Neck 

Historian — Thelma Mayl'ield, Swannanoa 

Song Leader— Carmel Long, Griffith 



State Officers 
1952-1953 

President — Carolyn Abernathy, Alexander-Wilson 

Vice-President — Jean Faulkner, Red Oak 

Secretary — Betty Lou Graham, Stedman 

Treasurer — Betty Hatton, Goldsboro 

Reporter — Kitty Campen, Edenton 

Parliamentarian — LaSalle Light, Old Fort 

Historian — Peggy Dunn, Clemmons 

Song Leader — Clara Burris, Endy 



State Adviser 
Miss Daphne Eller 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



r~T 



i 



/ 



These earned their State Homemaker Degrees: Beverly Adams, Sue Barbour, Nancy Bright, Betty Jane Brown, Sarah Carpen- 
ter, Doreen Carver, Joanne Chappell, Margaret Ann Craver, Peggy Anne Cudd, Peggy Ann Dail, Nina Davis, Mary Ann 
Garner, Ruth Ann Garner, Rebecca Gaylord, Mary Winifred Grady, Beverly Greene, Mary Ann Hampton, Thelma Harrel- 
son, Rachel Hathcock, Alice Hodgin, Mebree Hubbert, Ruth Hydne, Bobbie Lou Jackson, Fay Jackson, Joan Kelly, 
Juanita Leonard, Carol Long, Joan Mauney, Barbara Jean McBryde, Betty Jean Melvin, Annie Ruth Parrish, Barbara Priddy, 
Greta Gale Simpson, Daphne Spear, Mary Katherine Sprouse, Clara Muriel Stroud, Edna Earle Stroud, Erma Lee Thompson, 
Barbara Tucker, Lionell Webster, Nancy Jean Wilson, and Kathryn Woodard. 




LLC 



If you attended the State F. H. A. 
Convention at the Hugh Morson 
High School March 22nd, you had 
the rare experience of traveling 
south of the border down Mexico 
way to learn something of the cul- 
ture of our southern neighbors. Ac- 
cording to Senor Roberto de la 
Rosa, Cultural Agent from Mexi- 
co, our convention speaker, all of 
their activities are centered around 
the home and the family members. 

He won the heart of everyone 
present as he told of the many cus- 
toms his people enjoy. He illustrated 
his program with music and songs 
from his native land. Those of us 
who heard him gained new respect 
for Mexico and their American way 
of life and decided we want to visit 



our neighbors south of the border. 

The day for the Convention was 
perfect and everyone was made 
welcome by the friendly greeting ex- 
tended by Peggy Wood, president 
of Hugh Morson Chapter, and Mr. 
D. W. Sanders, principal. A spirit 
of reverence reigned as Windsor 
led the devotional. 

Miss Eller, our State Adviser, 
presented plans for the National 
F. H. A. meeting and Kathryn 
Woodard, parliamentarian, con- 
ducted a campaign to elect voting 
delegates to the meeting. 

After the entertaining talk by 
Senor Rosa, lunch was served in the 
cafeteria. Our many thanks go to 
Mrs. Madge Cooke, Mrs. Jolene 
Edwards and the Hugh Morson 



aitveiiuau 



Chapter for serving a delicious 
lunch to the group of hungry dele- 
gates! 

Immediately following lunch the 
Future Homemakers were delighted 
to hear the words of greeting and 
blarney from Grover Boyd, presi- 
dent of our brother organization, 
the Future Farmers of America. 
Thank you Grover, for being with 
us! 

State Honorary membership was 
conferred upon Mr. D. W. San- 
ders, principal of Hugh Morson 
School, for his enthusiastic interest 
and constant support to the local 
chapter, district and State organi- 
zation. 

After committee reports came the 
lovely candlelight installation cere- 

,1 



mony in which the new officers and 
advisers were installed for next 
year. 

Orchids to Pamela, our president, 
for the fine manner in which she 
presided over the meeting. Her 
poise and self-confidence made us 
truly proud of her. Thanks to the 
other officers for the contributions 
they made toward the success of the 
Convention. 

At 3:30 came the tea at the Gov- 
ernor's Mansion with Governor and 
Mrs. W. Kerr Scott present to greet 
each Future Homemaker. Yes, this 
was the real climax, the grand 
finale, the end of a perfect day! 



Have you been sending letters to Pen Pals? 

Perhaps you will receive one similar to this 

Abetter from J\eiko Oi 



IMPORTANT ! ! ! 
Have you contributed to the ex- 
penses of the delegates going to 
the national meeting? Each mem- 
ber pays 10c and each adviser 25c. 
Send in your dimes and quarters 
NOW ! ! ! 



Peggy Anne Wood, of the Hugh 
Morson Chapter, recently received 
a letter from Reiko Oi, daughter of 
one of the Japanese visitors who 
was in our State last November. The 
visitors stayed in Peggy's home in 
Raleigh and she had an opportunity 
to get acquainted with Reiko's 
mother. Peggy has consented to 
share the letter with you. 

Dear Peggy: 

I am a girl who lives in Japan and 
I thought I would like to corres- 
pond with a friend in America. I 
heard your name from my Mother, 
who returned from America on 5 
January, 1952. Did you remember 
my Mother Hide Oi yet? She is 
taller than the other Japanese wom- 



Senor Roberto de la Rosa, guest speaker at the State Convention. 




en. I am her daughter. I heard 
about your family, your school, 
yourself, your state from my Moth- 
er. At first, I will tell you about 
myself. My name is Reiko Oi, I 
am 21 years old. I have not a broth- 
er or sister and my father died when 
I was 13 years old. I am attending 
Niigata University, and now I 
sophomore (but I become junior 
soon) because I have had final ex- 
amination, about three weeks ago, 
now I'm having Spring Vacation 
from 1st March to April 15. My 
major course is English and Ameri- 
can Literature. One of the most in- 
terest things to me, it is to write a 
letter to a friend in a foreign coun- 
try, and I like to see movies. Es- 
pecially I like American, England 
and French movies. I go a Cinema 
about four times a month. I'm also 
interested in reading very much. 
Lately I read two or three novels, 
one a modern novel, "The Bridge 
of San Luis Rey" by Thornton Wild- 
er. It was quite difficult to me, 
because I don't know about real 
meaning religion. This novel is very 
religious, but I was charmed by it. 

My hobbies are to play tennis and 
piano. I'm just simply mad about 
music. Especially I love "Sym- 
phony" by Beethoven and classical 
music. I cannot understand about 
jazz and boogie-woogie. But now in 
Japan, they are very fond of them. 

After college I shall go abroad 
for the study of youth movement 
and Girl Scouts in America and 
other countries. When I come back, 
I hope to work hard to advance the 
position of women, and I expect to 
become a good leader of youth. 

What does your country look 
like? How do you spend your holi- 
day? I spend every Sunday for Girl 
Scout meeting. Tell me about your 
school, how the daily studies are 
carried on, how the schools operate. 
Please write as soon as you can. 
Yours truly, 
Reiko Oi. 





COVER PICTURE 




Our 


leaders of tomorrow: 


State 


F.H.A 


president, Pamela Bigham, 


discussing Convention plans 


with 


State 


F.F.A. president, Grover 


Boyd. 







BECOMING A LEADER 



Experience is supposed to be the 
best teacher and the F.H A. Orga- 
nization is an excellent place to gain 
experience in being a good leader. 
Many chapters plan definite ways 
in which every member may have 
an opportunity to gain poise and 
self-confidence in appearing before 
a group. 

The Anson-Union Federation, 
who believe you learn by doing, 
held a workshop last fall for the of- 
ficers of the different chapters to 
plan for the year's activities. 

All the presidents, vice-presi- 
dents, secretaries, and other officers 
met together in groups with student 
and teacher adviser leaders to study 
and plan better methods for per- 
forming the duties and responsibili- 
ties of the office to which each had 
been elected. In addition to the 
chapter advisers, several well quali- 
fied persons helped in some of the 
groups. 

The vice-presidents learned bet- 
ter and more interesting program 
and project ideas. The new ritual 
and correct order of business was 
the theme of the presidents' group. 

Secretaries learned what infor- 
mation should be included in the 
minutes and the correct way to re- 
cord this so the business of her 
chapter may be more efficiently 
conducted. The treasurers consid- 
ered the chapter budgets and felt 
having one would be a better way 
of planning chapter expenses. Ap- 
proved methods of keeping accounts 
were studied. 

Parliamentarians learned sim- 
ple parliamentary procedure and 
gained a better understanding of the 
importance of their office. Keeping 
a record of the activities of the chap- 
ter was stressed with the historians. 
As a means of stimulating better 
records, the group suggested a con- 
test among the chapters of the 
two counties for the best scrap book 
displayed at the spring rally. The 
editor of the local paper gave the 
reporters valuable pointers on the 
correct way to write newspaper and 
magazine articles telling of the chap- 
ter activities. The song leaders and 
pianists were helped by the music 
teacher of Union School. Each song 
leader felt she could do a better 
job after the workshop. 

The girls planned another work- 
shop in January to evaluate the 
work of the chapters during the first 
semester and to plan for the second 
half of the year. Two recommen- 
dations were made by the group: 



to have the workshops a regular 
part of the F.H. A. work and to have 
the retiring officers meet with the 
incoming officers. Plans were also 
made to have fall and spring rallies 
to awaken interest and increase en- 
thusiasm of the members. 

After the meeting, Marshville, 
Benton Heights and Unionville 
Chapters served delicious refresh- 
ments to the group. 

The Buncombe County Chapters 
held an officers' Training Workshop 
during National F.H. A. Week, us- 
ing the theme "What is Leader- 
ship?" One of the highlights was the 
discussion of the qualities of leader- 
ship by Joe Seveir, President of the 
Lee Edwards High School Student 
Council. The 112 girls then divided 
into groups to discuss "What is my 
Responsibility for Leadership?" 
with the county officer of each divi- 
sion in charge of the discussion. 

As a result of the workshop, the 
officers felt more security and self- 
confidence in leading their local 
chapters toward bigger and better 
activities. 

The Rutherford County Officers 
included their Chapter Mothers in 
their study of "Qualities and Re- 
sponsibilities of Good Leaders." 
This was a means of not only in- 
forming Chapter Mothers of their 
role in the F.H.A. but of letting the 
community know of the work of the 
organization. 

County Rallies 

County rallies enable all chapter 
members to participate in the ac- 
tivities and to gain insight of a 
program larger than their local 
chapters. These meetings are an ex- 
cellent method of training future 
district and state officers who have 
to preside at the Fall and Spring 
Rallies. 

The Stanly County Rally is an 
annual meeting held early in the 
fall, conducted in a manner simi- 
lar to the State Convention, using 
the official ceremonies for each ac- 
tivity. This year one hundred and 
seventy members, Chapter Mothers, 
and guests were present. High- 
lighting the morning session was 
a fashion review conducted by 
the Albemarle Chapter displaying 
clothes from local stores and show- 
ing the latest in fall fashions for the 
high school student. A safety movie, 
"The Late Date," was shown to the 
group, followed by discussion led by 
two of the Endy girls. A humorous 
skit, depicting the behavior of the 



county homemaking teachers was 
presented, after which the mem- 
bers joined in group singing led by 
Clara Burris of Endy. During the 
afternoon session a talent show was 
presented by the county song lead- 
er candidates. 

Cleveland County high schools 
used "Family Relationships" as the 
general theme of their rally. Mrs. 
Roland Leath of Shelby was the 
guest speaker at the meeting, point- 
ing out the origin, purpose, and 
goals of the family and citing dan- 
gers common to all families. 

The afternoon session included 
talent numbers followed by a film 
on family relationships. 

Durham-Orange County Chap- 
ters met for a picnic and to plan 
for the year's activities. After rec- 
reation led by the Durham city rec- 
reation director, a business meeting 
was conducted during which each 
person submitted program sugges- 
tions. This gave the chapters an in- 
sight into different activities and 
ideas for the year's work. Other 
problems which were discussed were 
how to get members to attend the 
meetings, project activities, methods 
of interpreting the program, and 
ways of raising money. It was voted 
to have an annual get-together and 
Janice Kesterson was elected chair- 
man of the group. 

Everyone then enjoyed eating the 
delicious picnic supper. Each per- 
son felt this was a very worthwhile 
meeting. 

The annual officers' banquet of 
the Surry- Yadkin Federation was 
held in the Blue Ridge Hotel, Mt. 
Airy. Approximately one hundred 
officers, advisors, and Chapter 
Mothers attended. The delicious 
food and the entertaining program 
were enjoyed. 

The highlight of the evening was 
the impressive installation of the 
new officers. 

"How To Help the Child from 
Six to Ten Years of Age," was the 
theme of the third Wayne County 
Rally. The discussion, which was 
led by Reverend H. L. Harrell, 
dealt with answering a child's ques- 
tions on God, Where Heaven Is, 
and other religious subjects. 

These discussion groups con- 
tinue from one meeting to the next, 
choosing a higher age group each 
time. One hundred and seventy-five 
girls attended the rally. 

Local Chapters 

The best experience, however, 
comes from working together in 
(Continued on page six) 

3 



J. A J. 

IS WHAT YOU MAKE IT 



. . . so why not take this opportunity 

to gain experience in a worth-while 

vocation which may be a stepping stone 
to a career in home economics. 




We Future Homemakers think that helping to make 
happy homes, now and in the future, is the most 
important thing that youth can do for democracy. Our 
chapter programs and projects are planned to give 
us training in the wonderful job of homemaking. 
Many of these activities may also be the first step of 
the ladder for the climb to a successful career. 

The Future Homemakers of Shelby "answered" 
an editorial in the local paper recommending that 
the high schools organize a course to qualify baby- 
sitters. The organized classes which followed con- 
sisted of discussion on understanding the child, 
responsibility of a baby-sitter, reading or story-telling, 
piay activities, and First Aid and accident preven- 
tion. The baby-sitters also learned their responsi- 
bilities, such as dependability, courtesy, interest in 
welfare of children, neatness, willingness to learn and 
promptness. Parents are now able to engage the serv- 



ices of dependable, trained and certified baby-sitters, 
most of whom are anxious to earn money for clothes, 
vacations or further study. 

The Lee Edwards members were hostesses for the 
All-Electric Cooking School sponsored by the Ashe- 
ville Citizen Times Company and merchants of the 
city and conducted by the National Live Stock and 
Meat Board. Homemaking students and their teach- 
ers from more than 100 high schools in Western Coun- 
ties were extended special invitations. 

Taylorsville Chapter has gone all out for the Na- 
tional Project of Families Together, an outgrowth of 
an interesting and inspiring Family Relationships unit 
in the homemaking classes. These lessons began for 
the second year girls with the making of a list of 
"Pet Peeves of Teen-agers" or "What I Don't Like 
About Parents." As the girls added to the list from 
day to day, Mrs. Young, teacher-adviser, made a 
similar list of "Peeves of Parents" which she se- 
cured from the girls' parents during her visits. The 
first year girls began with a check sheet for personal 
improvement. Informal discussions, skits, and use of 
a question-box gave each girl a chance to take part in 
this better family relationship study. At one chapter 
meeting one class presented a skit, "Granny Comes 
to Stay." 

The picture at the left shows Hendersonville Chap- 
ter devoting part of a clothing unit to making card 
table covers for the veterans' hospital, Moore General, 
in Oteen, North Carolina. 

Boys Are a Wonderful Addition! 

The East Mecklenburg Chapter has four male 
members. These boys — Jimmie Brewer, John Gar- 
land, Lamar Jenkins, and Ronald Griffin — are mem- 
bers of an all-boy homemaking class. They have 
made many interesting and helpful contributions, such 
as committee, social, and program work. Ronnie and 
Jimmie presented East Mecklenburg's candidate for 
state officer and helped with the District Rally. 

Our programs this year are based on boy-and-girl 
relationship. One of these programs was presented 
as a panel discussion on which the following members 
served: John Garland, Josephine Butler, Jimmie Brew- 
er, Lela Morris, and Rev. Harold Simpson, pastor of 
a local church. 



Members of the Shelby Chapter learning bow to bathe a baby. 




Joan Kelly shares with 
you her thrilling trip to the 



<^^iatida <^>tate <^ycut 



Thursday morning at eight 
o'clock, February 8, there no more 
excited girl in North Carolina than 
I. My bags were all packed and 
I was on my way to Fayetteville, 
where I was to board the train to 
leave for Tampa, Florida, as a 
guest of the Atlantic Coast Line. At 
Fayetteville I joined Curtis Dowd, 
the Future Farmer Delegate from 
North Carolina. Mr. A. R. How- 
ard, Mr. J. L. Sistar, Mr. V. W. 
Lewis, their wives, and the dele- 
gates from Virginia were already 
aboard. The morning was spent get- 
ting acquainted with each other. We 
met the brother of Senator May- 
field of South Carolina. He was 
coming home from New York, 
where he had been working on some 
tax laws. The delegates from South 
Carolina joined us at Charleston 
and Kingstree. The large planta- 
tions that we could see from the 
train windows were beautiful. We 
also saw the Dante Cooper Dam. 
We talked and played cards until 
we reached Jacksonville, Florida. 
Here the representatives from Geor- 
gia, Alabama, and Florida and Mr. 
and Mrs. O'Kelly, the General Agri- 
culture and Live Stock Teacher and 
his wife joined us. We were greeted 
by Mr. S. D. Hurst, Executive Vice- 
President, Mr. Julian Fields, Traf- 
fic Vice-President, and Mr. L. S. 
Jefferds, Operation Vice-President 
of the Atlantic Coast Line. 

We arrived in Tampa, Florida 
about seven o'clock on Friday 
morning. We went immediately to 
the Hillsboro Hotel, where we 
stayed while there. We ate break- 
fast at the Morrison's Cafeteria, 
which amused me a lot for it had 
pictures of Tampa painted on the 
walls. After breakfast we went to 
the fair, where we walked through 
and saw all the exhibits in general. 
Then at eleven o'clock we went 
back to the hotel, where Miss 
Champion, and Miss Lucy Lang, 
State F.H.A. Advisers, and Carolyn 
Black, State President, met us and 
took us to the Neptune Room, 
where they served us a delicious 
dinner.- As place cards they had 
beautiful corsages. 

After lunch we went back to the 
hotel, where the Chamber of Com- 
merce had enough cars to take us on 
a tour. The first stop was the dock. 
There a banana boat was being 
unloaded that had just arrived from 



Central America. We watched this 
process with great amazement. We 
were told that it was the largest 
banana port and the second largest 
shrimp port j_n the United States. 
The next stop was the Hava-Tampa 
Cigar Company, where we watched 
the cigars being made. Next we saw 
what the outskirts of Tampa looked 
like. We went out to the Brandon 
School, one of the consolidated 
schools in the county, and visited 
the agriculture building and class- 
room. We met the teachers and 
some students there. They gave us 
as a souvenir, a box of strawberries. 
Then we went to Ruskin, to visit the 
Dickman Farm. The farm contained 
around fifty thousand acres. They 
raise cattle and vegetables and have 
their own packing plant. We went 
through their plant and saw the 
complete process of how the food 
was being prepared and packed. 
They also make their own cello- 
phane bags, and some of the ma- 
chinery that they use there in the 
plant. 

Friday night we went to Ybor 
City, the Spanish part of Tampa, 
and were entertained at a banquet 
in the famous Columbia Restau- 
rant. The Spanish food was very 
different and delicious. 

Saturday morning we had break- 
fast at the Hillsboro Hotel dining 
room, and afterwards went to the 
fair. We took notes and special no- 
tice of some of the booths. 

The F.H.A. booth had on the 
right, the creed, and on the left, 
the purposes. These was on red pa- 
per. On the inside of this was white 
paper, which had the facts and ac- 
tivities. The emblem was in the cen- 
ter. The place where the house was 
supposed to be was a film made 
of the different activities. In the 
same building was every kind of 
furniture and home appliance that 
could be used in the home. 

The Hillsboro County display 
was very attractive. It consisted of 
a landscape of Florida as the back- 
ground. In the center was a small 
spring with a small strawberry patch 
out front. It looked tempting to 
reach down and pick the berries. 
They had various kinds of citrus 



fruits and canned fruits that came 
from that county. They had flow- 
ers in the background that were 
grown in that county. There was 
one cabbage there that weighed 
about ten pounds. All the displays 
of the different counties were very 
attractive, and they all told the story 
of that county. So if you really 
stopped to study them you would 
have a good knowledge of the agri- 
cultural products of Florida. 

The best commercial display 
was the Atlantic Coast Line Rail- 
road Company. As a background 
in the center back was a large pic- 
ture of one of its trains. On the 
right were vegetable fields and on 
the left were orange groves and 
trees, by which the Atlantic Coast 
Line ran. It had double tracks, one 
a passenger train, the other a freight 
train. They had little electric trains 
running on these tracks. 

The horticulture exhibits were 
simply out of this world. There were 
some of the most beautiful flowers 
there that I have ever seen. Some 
of the tropical plants and blossoms 
were so beautiful that you would 
have to pinch yourself to realize 
you weren't in South America. 

The Mantee County display was 
very unusual. They had the dif- 
ferent fruits of that county arranged 
in a table setting, which was very 
attractive. They did that because 
most of the fruits can be eaten for 
breakfast. 

The boys and girls were all very 
wonderful and it seemed as if we 
had known each other for a long 
time. The most unpleasant thing or 
the trip was parting, for in that short 
time we had grown very fond of 
each other. You can be sure we had 
everyone's address before we left. 
The chaperones were all so very 
wonderful and most helpful. I don't 
think it would have been possible 
to have learned so much if it had 
not been for them. 

I could never put down in 
words what the trip meant to me. 
The appreciation of the experiences 
I gained, the things I saw, I can 
never express. I can't think of any 
better thing that the ACL could do 
to help develop the Future Home- 
makers and Future Farmers of 
America. 

I want to say thank you again 
to the Atlantic Coast Line and its 
assistants for such a wonderful trip. 



National 
Delegates 
Meeting 

Stop! Look! Listen! What's com- 
ing? Important national delegates 
meeting — for summertime is F.H.A. 
time in Green Lake, Wisconsin from 
July 14-17. Who's going? Carolyn 
Abernathy, state president; Betty 
Lou Graham, secretary; Peggy 
Dunn, historian; Nancy Bright, na- 
tional officer; your State Adviser, 
and a teacher adviser. 

Many problems will be discussed 
and long-range plans made. F.H.A. 
finances will come up — to raise 
or not to raise the dues being the 
question. The program of work and 
projects for the coming year will be 
set, too, from suggestions you have 
sent in. 

Some goals have been planned 
for the meeting. One is to learn how 
to make group decisions and an- 
other is to find ways of making local 
chapters feel closer to the national 
ganization. 

These delegates are representing 
YOU. Success of the meeting de- 
pends on how well you instruct your 
delegates on how to make these de- 
cisions. Send suggestions ■ and in- 
structions to your state adviser, who 
will work with the delegates. This 
is Your meeting. Act Now! 



BECOMING A LEADER 

(Continued from page three) 
individual chapters. Here you can 
speak freely and have an oppor- 
tunity to see how effective your 
ideas and suggestions are. 

Being an active member in your 
local chapter gives you an oppor- 
tunity to work with other F.H.A. 
members and learn that they also 
have good ideas and suggestions for 
making your chapter run smoothly. 
Every member can make a contri- 
bution sometimes during the year to 
a portion of the intricate work of 
F.H.A. Your duty as a member and 
a future leader of your community 
is to see that every other member 
feels a part of the activities and can 
share the things you are learning. 
If you can make every member glad 
she joined the F.H.A. — then I say 
you are becoming a leader. 



No More . . . 

Soon North Carolina F.HA.'ers 
will be saying "No more golden rule 
days, at least not for a while. 
School's out, no more assignments, 
no more rushing around to get there 
before the bell rings!" 

But, have you realized that a 



Little did Margaret Harper dream when she was a Future Homemaker in the 
Littleton Chapter that she would ever be secretary to the State Adviser. She is 
seen here making plans with Miss Eller for the May issue of the "Newsletter." 




whole summer stretches out before 
you? Summer vacation is a good 
time to get things done. How about 
earmarking some of its hours for 
fun and some for profit. 

Would your chapter profit by 
having the new president appoint 
the committee chairmen so that they 
can spend some of their hours work- 
ing on topics for chapter programs, 
money making ideas, plans for 
newspaper and school publicity, 
plans for bang-up parties and chap- 
ter projects? You might form com- 
munity groups to carry on some of 
these activities. 

Your pre-school planning might 
include a get-acquainted picnic or 
party for next year's freshmen, mak- 
ing a sample copy of next year's 
chapter yearbook or a training 
workshop for new chapter officers 
and committee chairman. 

Perhaps you'd like to do some 
things to improve your homemaking 
department, if your advisor and 
principal approve, now that you will 
have more time and no lessons to 
do. 

For fun try sponsoring a one-day 
trip to a nearby place of interest. 
Include your members, past mem- 
bers and friends of your chapter. 
Harness your hobby you've col- 
lected, traded, begged and created 
for years. Why not make some 
decorative use of your hobby this 
summer? 

Maybe you will be one of the 
lucky "misses" who can go to a 
summer camp this summer, or go 
on a motor trip with your family or 
friends. 

Examine the possibilities for such 
summer outings as hiking trips, ball 
games, swimming parties, slumber 
parties, a waffle breakfast or a 
camping trip. 

Some profitable experiences which 
you might share at home are can- 
ning or freezing foods, "baby 
sitting," growing and arranging 
flowers, refinishing furniture, reno- 
vating, repairing and making gar- 
ments, and catching up on all the 
latest "best-sellers." 

You might even collect a few 
coins if you venture oh a job hunt. 
Vacation gives you a chance to try 
out various jobs for size, to learn 
now where you will fit best in later 
years. 

Use these ideas for thinking up 
other and better ways for using your 
spare moments. 

May you have a happy summer 
vacation ! ! ! 
— From the Alabama Newsletter. 




To foster international goodwill, one 
of our purposes, the Morehead City 
Chapter had as their guests at the Jan- 
uary meeting Mr. and Mrs. John Berbe- 
rich. Mrs. Berberich, born of Japanese 
parents in Denver, Colorado, studied at 
the University of Colorado and is now 
working at Cherry Point. She and Mr. 
Berberich, who is in the Marine Corps 
Reserves, have been living in Morehead 
City for 18 months. 

Mrs. Berberich told the group some- 
thing of Japan, the customs of the peo- 
ple there and in the Japanese colony in 
and around Denver. The members were 
especially interested in the language and 
the lack of words to express love and 
the romantic side of life. Marriage, until 
the occupation of U. S. forces in Japan, 
was usually arranged by parents, and 
surprisingly, there were very few di- 
vorces. 

The members entertained their Moth- 
ers at a buffet supper in the homemak- 
ing department. The supper consisted 
of meat loaf, stuffed potatoes, butter 
beans, tossed salad, rolls, cream puffs, 
coffee and soft drinks. The table was 
covered with a white cloth and centered 
with yellow daffodils and yellow can- 
dles. The motifs in the room and on the 
tables were silver moons and blue stars. 

After supper Sue Conner and Audrey 
Mitchell led in a program of songs and 
stunts. Seventy-five enjoyed the evening. 

The Morganton Future Homemakers 
had their annual Mother-Daughter Ban- 
quet on Monday night, February 18th. 
The banquet was held in the high school 
cafeteria with about 65 mothers and 
daughters present. The theme was Val- 
entine and placed over the guest table 
was a big heart with "Mother, I love 
you." 

Katherine Booth, the president, pre- 
sided as toast-mistress. Catherine New- 
ton gave the invocation and then 
Katherine had the welcome. The toast to 
the mothers was given by Mary Lee 
Copeland and the response by Mrs. Ad- 
kins. Music was by Maude Morrison, the 
F.H.A. song leader, and Carolyn Can- 
non. 

The toast to the chapter mothers was 
given by Maxine Lybrand and the re- 
sponse given by Mrs. Cannon, due to the 
absence of Mrs. Mabe. 

The girls who received degrees of 
achievement were Betty Sue Williams, 
Barbara Johnson, Barbara Berry, Mar- 
garet Kincaid, Katherine Booth, Maude 
Morrison, and Minnie Ruth Adkins. 

The entertainment was a tap dance 
by Phyllis Mitchem, a ballet by Nancy 
Honeycutt and songs by Maude and 
Carolyn. The banquet was ended by ev- 
eryone standing and repeating the 
F.H.A. creed. 

Isabelle Mull, the vice-president, pre- 
sented Katherine Booth with a present 
from the chapter as a token for her 
good work as president of the chapter 
this year. 

Those serving were Dottie Whisnant, 
Margaret Waldrop, Betty Keller and An- 
na Sloan. 

The EUerbe Chapters of the Future 
Homemakers and Future Farmers of 
America held their annual Mother- 



Daughter, Father-Son banquet. February 
13, in the school cafeteria. The valen- 
tine motif was observed with colors of 
red and white. 

Rev. W. J. Neese said grace followed 
by the welcome by Ann B. Asbill. 
Mr. W. H. Rummage responded. Harris 
Rummage gave a toast to the parents. 

Lovely center pieces were made of 
red paper around a doily with a candy 
sucker in the center. Red ribbon con- 
nected the center piece to the place 
cards which were heart-shaped and con- 
tained the program. 

A delicious meal of fried chicken, 
creamed potatoes, gravy, green beans, 
cranberry salad, celery and carrot sticks, 
rolls, hot coffee, tomato juice, ice cream 
and cake, was served to the ninety-six 
people present. 

Reba McCall introduced the guest 
speaker. Rev. W. J. Neese. He gave a 
very helpful talk concerning our homes 
and our duties as farmers and home- 
makers to improve our homes. He en- 
couraged the boys to stick with the farm 
and the homemakers to continue prepar- 
ing themselves. "Nothing is more won- 
derful than being a homemaker," he 
said. "Nothing is better than the green 
pastures." He described the types of 
homes we all should have. We should, of 
course, have love and understanding, 
wholesome recreation, and religion, 
"the old family altar." 

The banquet closed with the group 
singing, "Let Me Call You Sweetheart." 

The Middlesex Chapters of F.H.A. 
and F.F.A. met jointly last month with 
both chapters contributing to the pro- 
gram and entertainment. The girls ex- 
plained the purposes of F.H.A., our 
projects, and activities. Everyone was 
especially interested in our camp life at 
White Lake. The entertainment was en- 
joyed by all. Two girls gave a tap dance, 
two boys played French harps, and one 
bov played the guitar. 

Special guests present were Professor 
Scorborough, agriculture professor at 
State College, and two student teachers 
from State College. Delicious refresh- 
ments were served to the group. 

The eighty members of the Benvenue 
Chapter have participated in various ac- 
tivities this year. Thirteen members at- 
tended the District Rally at Raleigh. 
The Benvenue Chapter had a float in 
the Harvest Festival parade from which 
the chapter received five dollars. 

When National F.H.A. Week rolled 
around we really began working. During 
this week we put a display on F.H.A. 
in a local store window. The members 
made favors and sang to the aged peo- 
ple at the Nash County Home. F.H.A. 
Week was recognized at church and a 
quartet sang a hymn. The F.H.A. Birth- 
day was celebrated by having six cakes 
baked for the occasion. In the Home 
Economics room the table was decorated 
and six candles were lighted. 

As Christmas projects, we played San- 
ta Claus to a needy family and gave a 
program to the aged people at the Coun- 
ty Home. For funds we sold Christmas 
cards and had cake sales. Some of the 
members went on a "hobo" day for more 
funds. 

After the first semester, seven girls 
for the first time in the Benvenue Chap- 
ter, received Junior Homemaker Designs. 
A fashion show was conducted by 
F.H.A. members for a Woman's Club 
in Rocky Mount. We have taken a 



corner in our Home Economics room 
and fixed a bulletin board on F.H.A. 
and on the table we have our scrapbook 
and magazines, so we now have a F.H.A. 
corner. 

The Mcbane Chapter found the mon- 
ey-making suggestions in the F.H.A. 
magazine very helpful. We used the idea 
of selling cards which profited us a lot. 

One of our own ideas for raising mon- 
ey was a pajama party. Each member 
invited prospective members and paid an 
admission. This way we worked to seek 
new members as well as raising money. 

Our next project was that of making 
a quilt. Each member was responsible 
for making one square. We invited our 
mothers to help with the project and 
to teach us how to quilt. The Mehanc 
Kiwanis sold our quilt for us at an auc- 
tion sale. 

We all enjoyed an open house party 
where we sold food, flowers and 
clothes. 

We found all of these projects very 
successful. 

Members of the Lee Woodard Chap- 
ter of the Future Homemakers of Ameri- 
ca practiced "Tea Etiquette" on Friday 
afternoon, February 29th, when they en- 
tertained the boys and girls of the bas- 
ketball squad and the school faculty. 
The decorations and preparation of the 
refreshments were supervised by mem- 
bers of the third year class as a part of 
the unit, "Special Problems in Food." 

Rockingham Chapter of 119 strong 
has engaged in numerous projects dur- 
ing the year. Some of the most interest- 
ing were: sending presents overseas for 
the World Christmas Festival. Each 
day some member receives a letter from 
a friend in Germany, Denmark, Norway, 
etc. We received special notice of sec- 
ond place at our home-coming game, 
when we sponsored a float. A horse and 
buggy were obtained. Gracie Allen was 
the bride and Eloise Martin, the groom. 

In January we made $121.26 by spon- 
soring a picture, "The Second Chorus." 
This money is being used to pay 10 
cents per member to send our delegate 
to Green Lake, Wisconsin, also to put 
our picture in the annual and to enter- 
tain various groups. 

Recently, the three first year classes 
entertained three sections of the 8th 
grade. The refreshments consisted of hot 
dogs, Pepsi-colas, and cup cakes made 
by the members. The napkins carried 
out the St. Patrick idea. The flowers 
brought by the girls were beautiful. 

March 20th, the second year girls en- 
tertained the 112 seniors, faculty and 
F.H.A. members at an informal tea. The 
F.H.A. officers who received were 
dressed formally, while the senior of- 
ficers formed the receiving line. The cen- 
ter of interest was the dining room table, 
with a lovely arrangement of green and 
white flowers. Lime punch and cookies 
were served. The cookies were shaped 
like shamrocks, with green sugar, also 
chocolate hats decorated with shamrocks. 
Classical music was played softly dur- 
ing the afternoon. 

Our seven delegates really enjoyed the 
State Convention this year. They liked 
the talk made by the Mexican and the 
tea at the Governor's Mansion, also. 

We are eagerly looking forward to 
our fashion show in April and later on 
camp at White Lake. 

January 28th was an important date 
on the calendar of the F.HA. Chapter 



of Griffith School in Winston-Salem. 
This was the day to elect second semes- 
ter officers. Those elected were: Presi- 
dent. Betty Ball; Vice-President, Willie 
Sue Welborn; Secretary, Carole Beckel; 
and Treasurer, Ethel Davis. 

Under the leadership of our officers 
and faculty sponsor. Miss Dorla Evans, 
we are trying to sell several cases of 
furniture polish. The results of this sale 
will he used to buy silverware for our 
new Home Economics lab. 

The Selma chapter, to round out their 
Christmas, adopted a needy family. The 
girls contributed food, which was fruit, 
nuts, and canned goods; clothes, which 
were blouses, skirts, sweaters, and cot- 
ton dresses; and toys for each of the 
children. A doll was carried for each of 
the girls to be put away until Christ- 
mas morning. 

On Thursday before Christmas they 
carried a tree to the house and decorated 
it. They children were filled with ex- 
citement as they kept saying, "How pret- 
ty it is, how pretty it is." 

The family consisted of two girls, one 
boy, and the parents. One of the girls is 
in the first grade and the other girl is in 
the third. The small boy doesn't go to 
school. 

They brightened up the patients in 
the Johnson County Memorial Hospi- 
tal on St. Patrick's Day. They made corn 
cob pipes and put Bible verses in each, 
which was given to each patient on a 
green shamrock made of paper. 

Soon plans will be made for the Moth- 
er-Daughter banquet which will be in 
April. 

The F.F.A. chapter entertained them 
at a party on March 14. This is an an- 
nual affair which each person anxiously 
looks forward to. 

The Bladenboro chapter got off to a 
good start with the election of nine good 
officers and the enrolling of 110 mem- 
bers. 

Buzz! Buzz! Yep, that is it! We 
planned each program by the six-six 
method which gives the girls a better 
chance to have programs they like. 

Bands were playing, clowns were 
prancing and crowds were cheering as 
our nine attractive officers rode by on 
a beautiful float in the Bladen County 
Farmer's Day parade. 

Have you ever been knocking on 
doors The door opened. . . . "Lady, 
would you like to give us some shrubbery 
cuttings to use around the Home Eco- 
nomics cottage?" You should have seen 
our results, enough shrubbery to land- 
scape the entire cottage grounds. 

Broke in September; rich in Decem- 
ber. We are the proud owners of $277.37 
brought to us by cheerful spirits and 
lots of good hard work. We raised the 
money by selling magazines, Christ- 
mas cards, gift wrappings and tyings, 
all-occasion cards, vanilla flavoring, and 
by sponsoring a Harvest Day sale. 
We bought a new electric sewing ma- 
chine and we plan to use the remainder 
for cottage improvements. 

Sharing together the hearbreak of one 
of our girls whose home was destroyed 
by fire and sharing together the heart- 
ache of foreign countries, our chapter 
went all out and made some wonderful 
contributions to two charity boxes. 

Circle left, circle right as the F.H.A. 
girls and their dates enjoyed a square 
dance at their annual F.H.A. party held 
in the Bladenboro Club house. What 



else? A banana-eating contest, Folk danc- 
ing, and last but not least the wonderful 
works of our refreshment committee. 

Our biggest event of the year was the 
crowning of our F.H.A. Queen during 
National F.H.A. Week. The Queen was 
Betty Jean Adams and she was attended 
by two maids of honor, eight attendants, 
and eighteen candle holders. All the 
girls participating in the coronation cere- 
mony were selected on a point basis. 

The gavel sounded and quietness 
reigned. The meeting came to order. Our 
officers presented a program on parlia- 
mentary procedure to the Bladen-Colum- 
bus Home Economics teachers. 

Guess what the Rotary Club wanted 
us to do? They asked us to give a pro- 
gram. All heads got together and a panel 
discussion on F.H.A. work was presented. 
We're conceited I know, but we really 
think they liked it. 

Congratulations, girls! Three of our 
girls received F.H.A. jackets in our Jan- 
uary meeting and. four members were 
given F.H.A. pins. A great big hand- 
shake for Marguita Billingsley and Pat- 
sy Stephens, who received their Junior 
Homemakers Degree. What is that ap- 
plause for? Gee, Betty Adams, Betty 
Jean Gunter. Irene Anderson, Ada Beth 
Hickman, and Annie Ruth Prevatte 
just received their chapter Homemaker 
Degree. 

The Bladenboro Chapter looks back 
proudly on '51, but looks anxiously to- 
ward '52. 

Hear ye! Hear ye! Fruit cake sale at 
the Weldon Home Economics Depart- 
ment. This has been our slogan since the 
fall of 1950 when we first started tak- 
ing orders for fruit cakes. Our adviser 
asked us if we thought we could make 
any money on this project. We said we 
were willing to try anything once, and 
all of us were eager to do so. 

We began taking orders early in No- 
vember and sold approximately 150 
pounds by the middle of December. We 
were so pleased that we tried again this 
year and again sold about 200 pounds. 
We plan to make this an annual affair 
because it brings in the money and 
helps us get so many of the things that 
we need for our department. 

The Deep Run Chapter has empha- 
sized wholesome recreation and worthy 
home membership in their activities this 
year. In December their mothers were 
honored at a reception which was fol- 
lowed by a dance to which the F.F.A. 
boys were invited. Everyone had a won- 
derful time joining in the fun. 

There was dancing for the Beaufort 
chapter when they sponsored a Valentine 
dance at the Scout hut after the basket- 
ball game with Smyrna. Admission was 
25 cents and dancing was from 10 until 
11:30. 

Pretty Peggy Smith, ninth grade stu- 
dent of Saratoga High School, was 
crowned F.H.A. Queen of Hearts at a 
Valentine party held in the beautifully 
decorated home economics cottage on 
February 14, 1952. Queen Peggy won the 
title with 930 votes over three other 
lovely contestants, Ann Webb, Mavis 
Thigpen, and Rosa Lee Harrell. 

Aside from the impressive ceremony of 
crowning the queen by the F.H.A. presi- 
dent, Dorothy Saunders, several enter- 
taining games were played such as mak- 



ATTENTION MEMBERS ! ! ! 
We want to apologize ! ! ! A 
mistake was made in the camp 
bulletin. The statement should 
read: Only active F.H.A. members 
who were affiliated before January 
15, 1952, are eligible to attend 
camp. 



ing a newspaper dress for their mak 
partners and also remodeling their faces 
by putting nylon stockings over them 
Refreshments consisting of drinks, 
sandwiches, cookies and nuts were serveo 
to complete the evening. 

Henderson F.H.A. members, ana 
teachers, along with special guests, Mr. 
and Mrs. Payne and Dr. and Mrs. Gregg, 
were royally entertained at a banquet giv- 
en by the Future Homemakers of Ameri- 
ca, Thursday, January 10. in the Home 
Economics Department. 

Decorations of red and white with a 
center piece of a large red candle sur- 
rounded by red and white carnations 
lent a festive note to the occasion. 

Turkey and all the trimmings, pre- 
pared by F.H.A. members, made up the 
menu for the banquet. 

Following the meal the chapter father 
and mother, Dr. and Mrs. Gregg, were 
recognized and Mr. Gregg announced 
that he would again give the award to 
the girl making the most progress in 
Home Economics during the year. 

Mr. Payne spoke to the group giving 
advice, both serious and humorous to 
F.H.A. members on what to keep in 
mind when choosing a life's partner. 

The banquet was directed by Mrs. 
Cobb, Home Economics teacher. 



ANNUAL REPORT DUE 

You have probably found the 
mimeographed sheet enclosed with 
your Newsletter. This annual re- 
port should be filled out immediate- 
ly and sent back to the State Office 
so that we can make North Carolina 
one of the most active associations 
by sending in a glowing report 
snowing activities of individual 
chapters. 

Put on your thinking caps and 
go to work ! ! ! 



MISSING ! ! ! 

By this time you should have 
noticed a mimeographed sheet at- 
tached to your camp bulletin 
marked, "Program of Work." If you 
have been reading your "Teen 
Times" you know that this blank 
sheet is to be filled in with sug- 
gestions for next year's program of 
work. Please send this in with your 
annual report so that it can be sent 
to the national office. 



Don't forget Camp 

at White Lake 

Get your reservations in early! 




I shook hands with Governor and Mrs. Scott! 

Getting pretty before the guests arrived 

Peggy Ann Wood, the young lady responsible for the 
beautiful background music at the tea. 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^.1 



*A 



Future Homemakers of America 

CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 




CAROLINE SAYS 



The good ole summertime with no classes to meet 
or homework to prepare will soon be here. Combine 
work and play with your family to make this the best 
vacation ever. Plan a picnic or a week-end outing with 
the entire family; or resolve to give Mother more free 
time by washing the dishes after meals or cooking 
one meal daily. Spend time playing with the younger 
children or family reading in the evenings. You will be 
amazed and thrilled to find what good sports Mom 
and Dad are! Try it this summer. 




FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association • 



volume x 



OCTOBER 1952 



NUMBER 1 




Dear F.H.A. Members — Greetings: 

At this, the beginning of a new year, our hopes and aspirations for the coming 
year should be bright with success. Last year North Carolina had 17,694 mem- 
bers. We are proud of our steady growth in the short time F.H.A. has existed. Al- 
though we are a young organization, our activities have been worthwhile and 
numerous. Our concern is for all the girls enrolled in homemaking classes who 
are missing these wonderful opportunities. As F.H.A. members, let us strive to 
reach new horizons in our organization this year. 

Cordially, 

Carolyn Abernathy, President 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1952-1953 

President — Carolyn Abernathy, Alexander-Wilson 

Vice-President — Jean Faulkner, Red Oak 

Secretary — Betty Lou Graham, Stedman 

Treasurer — Betty Hatton, Goldsboro 

Reporter — Kitty Campen, Edenton 

Parliamentarian — LaSalle Light, Old Fort 

Historian — Peggy Dunn, Clemmons 

Song Leader — Clara Burris, Endy 



District Advisers 
1952-1953 

Mrs. Queenie Warren, Robersonville 

Mrs. Thelma Dilday, B. F. Grady 

Mrs. Mary Frederick. Stedman 

Mrs. Louise Winslow, Aycock 

Mrs. Rebecca Smith, Randleman 

Mrs. Clarinda Britt, Morven 

Miss Anne Hall, Boyden 

Mrs. Lucille Brintnall, Swain County 



State Adviser 
Miss Daphne Eller 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



Have You Started 




on National Projects? 



You should have no difficulty in 
launching the national projects this 
year because they are the same ones 
you worked on last year. Now is 
the time to begin making plans for 
the projects your chapter will par- 
ticipate in this year. 

National F.H.A. Week 

Probably the project which is 
most important and needs very care- 
ful planning is National F.H.A. 
Week, November 2-8. At this time 
you have an opportunity to interpret 
to your school, community, and state 
the importance and significance of 
our Future Homcmakers of America 
organization. 

Oxford Chapter began observing 
National F.H.A. Week by giving 
each teacher a rose and a note ex- 
plaining the purpose of the rose. 
This was really the talk of the school 
— boys and girls asking, "Why the 
rose?" The teachers said it was the 
nicest gesture ever displayed at 
school. Tuesday was initiation of 
new members which was very hi- 
larious and successful. Wednesday, 
the Projects' Chairman and her com- 
mittee had written a radio script in 
which the officers participated, tell- 
ing about F.H.A. and the observ- 
ance of F.H.A. week. Thursday, 
during lunch, the F.H.A. members 
brought their plates to the home- 
making department and had a lunch- 
eon honoring the new members. 
After lunch they worked on favors 
to take to the hospital. Friday 
found the girls taking the favors to 
the hospital to put on patients' trays. 
The week was climaxed by a square 
dance in the gym. 

Taylorsville Chapter included a 
money-raising campaign in their 
week's activities. Each girl was 
given a number of plastic bowl 
covers to sell. 

Candor Chapter asked each 
teacher to list jobs which she needed 
done in her room to make it more 
attractive and pleasant. The chap- 
ter members divided themselves into 
committees to wash windows, wood- 
work and rearrange book shelves. 
After finishing individual requests, 
they cleaned the interior of the 
buildings and rest rooms. They 
made posters asking for co-operation 
in keeping the school clean. They 
also drew names during the week 
and did a special favor for the per- 
son whose name was drawn. 



Another suggestion for celebrating 
F.H.A. Week: Sunday — Church 
day; Monday — Publicity day; Tues- 
day — Community day; Wednesday 
— School day; Thursday — Family 
day; Friday — Good deed day; Satur- 
day — Fun and Finance day. 

Families Together 

Families Together is an equally 
important project because it signifies 
many of the purposes of our organi- 
zation. 

Spencer Chapter emphasized this 
project by sponsoring a "Do a Good 
Deed Week" in which each girl was 
to do something nice for each mem- 
ber of her family. The reports made 
at a meeting were excellent, showing 
that by doing and sharing we can 
contribute to a happier family life. 

The Cleveland Rally with its 
theme "Family Members Today — 
Family Molders Tomorrow" was an 
excellent way to emphasize this goal. 
Later each chapter had speakers and 
follow-up discussions which served 
to help the girls carry these sugges- 
tions into their own homes and plan 
for the future. 

Many activities can be planned 
around this project. If you haven't 
already done so, why not plan a 
"Daddy Date Night" or have a 
special night each week to be at 
home with all the family, or plan 
something special for your mother. 

Other ideas, invite your parents 
to a chapter meeting and have 
recreation for all ages afterwards. 



Lets plan now to carry out this 
project and learn now to be better 
family members so that our lives and 
those of our families will be better 
tomorrow. 

International Projects 

There are several international 
projects from which you may choose 
one or more for your chapter. 

Celebration of U. N. Day, 
October 24 

There is a drive this year to get 
every school to celebrate U. N. Day 
in some way. The purpose of this 
project is to create interest for 
further study of the U. N. and its 
function. For a suggested list of 
ways to observe U. N. Day, see 
your National projects bulletin and 
Teen Times, September, 1952. 

World Christmas and Chamkah 
Festival 
You will want to begin work 
on this one at once, because gifts 
must arrive at the warehouse of 
World Friendship Among Children 
not later than November 1, in 
order to reach other children across 
the seas before Christmas. The pur- 
pose of this project is to help other, 
less fortunate, people enjoy Christ- 
mas. Gifts sent through this project 
are not relief but tokens of friend- 
ship. This is one excellent way to 
make our neighbors across the sea 
a little closer to us. For detailed 
instructions, see your mimeographed 



The Richland girls made a United Nations Flag which was displayed in the hall 
where everyone could see it on October 24. Posters were made telling about the 
United Nations Day and how the Richland girls were to observe the day. 




bulletin on national projects and 
your special fall issue 1 952 of Teen- 
Times. 

Unesco Gift Coupon Plan 
This is a way chapters can help 
other schools, teachers, and students 
in war-torn parts of the world get 
badly needed books, audio-visual 
aids, equipment, and scientific ma- 
terials. There are five specific proj- 
ects we have been asked to choose. 
Lefkohori, Greece ■ — a village 
which needs first aid equip- 
ment. 
Middle East — equipment for sew- 
ing centers for Arab refugee 
girls. 
Boys' Town, Manilla, Phillippines 
— elementary and advanced 
dictionaries. 
Bombay, India — Society for Re- 
habilitation of crippled children 
— needs occupational therapy 
equipment. 
Libya, North Africa — primary 
schools need cooking and sew- 
ing equipment. 
How can your chapter partici- 
pate? Select a country you wish to 
help from the above list. Since 
Unesco gift stamps are put in units 
of $10, decide how much you will 
raise, or if you will work with neigh- 
boring chapters on sending gift 
stamps. These stamps are secured 
from the National F.H.A. office and 
come in books of 40 stamps, which 
sell for 25 cents apiece, amounting 
to $10. Send the money you have 
collected to the National office, who 
will send you your gift coupon and 
all instructions for sending these to 
your selected project. You send 
the coupon directly to the school or 
group you have chosen. 

Pen Pals Abroad 
Last year 367 chapters in North 
Carolina participated in this project. 
The chapters reported that as a re- 
sult they understood many of the 
existing conditions in other coun- 
tries, and have received a better 
understanding of the customs, their 
schools, and way of life. You may 
secure addresses from the National 
F.H.A. office if you wish to corres- 
pond with any of the following 
countries: England, Japan, Ger- 
many, India, Austria, Holland, 
Ecuador, Formosa. For other names 
see your February 1952 Newsletter. 

Adoption of Homemaking 

Classes 
No new classes are being adopted 
at the present time, but those which 
have already been adopted should 
be kept if possible. Corresponding 
with them is good. 



*7ap. Piiye Watt Ly 

FUTURE HOJHEMAKER 



By BETTY RAND, Garner 



I guess Daddy really deserves 
credit for the phone call I got on 
June 26, 1952. He was the one 
who insisted that his girls take 
"home ec." and that's how I learned 
to sew. This knowledge in turn 
opened up doors to undreamed of 
surprises. The phone call on that 
memorable day was from New York. 
The fashion co-ordinator from Mc- 
Call's Pattern Corporation was call- 
ing to say that I'd won first prize 
in the junior division of the McCall's 
Easter Parade Fashion Contest!!! I 
could hardly believe my ears. It was 
true that I'd had wild dreams of 
maybe an honorable mention when 
I entered the contest in April— but 
first prize!! I certainly blessed the 
day when my adviser, Mrs. LaVerne 
Fails, told us about the opportunity 
that McCall's was giving to the 
home sewers of the nation to display 
how well they could select and com- 
bine styles, fabrics, and accessories. 
In reality, they knew nothing of how 
well we sewed other than judging 
from pictures. They were more con- 
cerned with how well we applied 
our sewing knowledge together with 
our fashion knowledge to make a 
becoming outfit. The ensemble 
which I chose was made from a slate 
blue celanese tweed-textured suiting. 
It consisted of a sleeveless sheath 
dress with a high rounded neck and 



a matching flared bolero jacket, 
which I trimmed with white linen 
collar and cuffs. I made the cos- 
tume versatile by making extra 
jackets of white, navy, and pink. I 
wore navy calf shoes, white gloves, 
and a white straw hat and carried 
a navy calf bag. 

The first prize was a trip for two 
to Hollywood or New York for a 
week. I chose Hollywood, but as it 
turned out I got three trips to New 
York. One came when McCall's 
asked me to be their guest for three 
days so they could meet me and I 
could get some ideas of how pat- 
terns are born and become ac- 
quainted with the parents in the 
wonderful McCall family. 

My mother, who went with me, 
and I also left for and returned 
from California via New York so 
I actually got a "double" first prize. 

In New York, we met the Mc- 
Call's stylist from the West Coast 
who accompanied us on our trip to 
serve as a companion-guide. 

Our week in Hollywood was full 
of one exciting event after another. 
We visited MGM studio where I 
met the head designer, Helen Rose; 
took a tour of the costume depart- 
ment; ate dinner at the commissary; 
and, to top it all, met Greer Garson 
and Walter Pidgeon on the set of 
(Continued on page seven) 



Betty models the prize winning dress. 

U,i';ills- Hulls 




7&e 'P*e&e«t£ . . . 



OUR NEW OFFICERS 



Your State officers were elected 
by You at your district rallies last 
fall and installed at the State Con- 
vention in Raleigh last Spring. 

Our President 

Carolyn Abernathy comes from 
Alexander-Wilson school in Ala- 
mance County. "Nearly" blonde 
and very attractive, 17-year-old 
Carolyn is a senior in high school 
and wants to attend Phieffier Junior 
College and then study to be an 
X-ray technician. She has one sister 
who loves to attend F.H.A. activities 
with Carolyn, and two school teach- 
ers for parents. Carolyn enjoys all 
sports, sewing, and cooking. She 
makes most of her clothes and helps 
her mother with food preparations. 
English is her favorite subject and 
math the most dreaded. She is very 
active in many extra curricular 
activities, having been a member of 
the F.H.A. for three years and served 
as historian and parliamentarian of 
her organization. 

Carolyn says, "I learned so many 
wonderful ideas at the National 
delegates meeting for furthering our 
organization and interpreting our 
purposes to the school, community, 
and state. Let's strive to make 
F.H.A. far reaching in scope and 
gain new horizons!" 

Our Vice-President 

Jean Faulkner, our vice-president, 
is from Red Oak and a junior in high 
school. She has brown hair and eyes, 
weighs 110 pounds and is five feet 
four and a half inches tall. Jean's 
favorite sport is basketball and she 
has played on the team for three 
years. She has been very active in the 
school organizations and in her 
Sunday School. One of her talents 
is music and she plays the piano for 
Church. She enjoys being with a 
crowd, especially at dances and 
swimming parties. 

Jean attended White Lake Camp 
last summer and learned a great 
deal about the organization during 
leadership training. She says, "I 
have learned how important it is to 
have well-planned programs for our 
organization to grow. Good pro- 
gram ideas can be found in your 



program of work, Teen Times, and 
Newsletter. So many of us are guilty 
of never reading our F.H.A. maga- 
zines. If we will work together we 
will make our organization one of 
which we will be proud." 

Our Secretary 

Betty Lou Graham is one of seven 
children and lives on a 120 acre 
farm near Stedman. She is a seven- 
teen-year-old senior with brown 
hair and blue eyes. She attends 
church every Sunday and plays the 
piano for Sunday School. Betty en- 
joys sewing, music, basketball, 
growing flowers, and keeping scrap- 
books. "F.H.A. has played an 
important part in my life during the 
past four years. The highlights of 
these years have been my selection ' 
as State Secretary and the wonderful 
trip to Wisconsin as a North Caro- 
lina delegate. I shall never forget 
these experiences and am proud to 
be a part of such a great organiza- 
tion. I want to urge each of you to 
make the most of your opportunities 
in F.H.A. because we are the leaders 
and moulders of America's future. 
Always keep the purposes of the 
organization in mind and strive to- 
ward our goals." 

Our Treasurer 

Betty Hatton, your State Treas- 
urer, hails from Goldsboro. She has 
served as parliamentarian and re- 
porter and assisted on many F.H.A. 
committees. Betty says that while 
she was working on her junior 
degree of achievement she realized 
just how important the F.H.A. is. 
"Little did I realize that one day I 
would be a state officer." Betty has 
also been active in extra curricular 
activities of the school and enjoys 
all kinds of recreation, especially 
swimming. After graduation from 
high school, she will enter the Rex 
Hospital School of Nursing and will 
eventually major in surgery. 

Our Historian 

Meet Peggy Dunn, your historian, 
who is five feet four inches tall and 
one of four children. She is a senior 
at Clemmons High School and en- 
joys biology and home economics 



most of all her subjects. Peggy says 
if she has a hobby it would be caring 
for her eight months' old redhead 
sister. She also enjoys cooking, 
sewing, knitting, horseback riding, 
swimming, and reading. Her talent 
is singing and she enjoys being a 
member of her church choir. Peggy 
hopes to enter Nurses' School when 
she graduates from high school. 
She would like to do social work 
or go to Germany to work in a 
refugee hospital in the childrens' 
section. Peggy says, "I want . to 
thank each of you for making it 
possible for me to attend the Na- 
tional Delegates Meeting. It was the 
most wonderful experience I have 
ever had." 

Our Parliamentarian 

LaSalle Light is a mountain gal 
who lives in Old Fort at the foot 
of the Grandfather Mountain. La- 
Salle is the tallest of our officers, 
with a height of five feet nine and a 
half inches. Her school interests are 
English, basketball and club work. 
She plans to enter W.C.U.N.C. after 
graduation from high school and 
major in English. LaSalle has a 
great interest in F.H.A. and believes 
in its purposes. 

Our Reporter 

Kitty Campen is an Easterner 
from down Edenton way. After 
graduation from high school, she 
plans to enter college. Kitty has 
brown hair and eyes and a pretty 
smile. She urges all chapter re- 
porters to publicize your F.H.A. 
chapter and to let the community 
know of your activities. Plan special 
publicity features for National 
F.H.A. Week November 2-8. Don't 
forget to send your news to your 
state magazine. Let others know 
what you are doing. On the mark, 
get set for publicity for F.H.A. 

Our Song Leader 

State F.H.A. Song Leader Clara 
Burris, a sixteen-year-old, five feet 
four inch, blonde senior at Endy 
High School in Stanly County, is a 
young lady with a great deal of 
"Wim, Wigor, and Witality." Dur- 
ing four busy years in F.H.A., Clara 
has held the offices of secretary and 
song leader, has earned her Junior 
and Chapter degrees, and has at- 
tended a pair each of state and 
county rallies. Recognized as a 
mainstay of the basketball team, 
Clara also participates in church 
work, plays, class projects, and a 
wide range of other activities. In 
her rare spare time, Clara enjoys 
music and singing, sewing, and col- 
lecting photographs. 



The much awaited day finally 
arrived. We were on our way to the 
National F.H.A. Meeting in Green 
Lake, Wisconsin. . . . This was a 
new and wonderful experience for 
us, because most of us had never 
been on a long train trip, and here 
we were planning to ride the most 
modern streamliners on the Norfolk 
and Western line! 

Our first stretch was rather slow 
because we were on a local train 
which stopped at every crossing and 
didn't make more than 40 miles 
per hour. However, at Roanoke we 
boarded the pullman and settled 
down for a night's ride. 

Were we happy when the conduc- 
tor announced that the dining car 
had been added and we could eat! 
Eating on the train was another new 
experience and we soon began 
wondering if we would be able to hit 
our mouths with our food, because 
of the swaying of the train. 

Our compartments were out of 
this world! When you first walked 
in, all you saw were two beds, bunk 
fashion. There were buttons for 
everything. One turned on the 
lights, another a fan. another opened 
the closet door and one summoned 
the porter. Can you imagine our 
delight when we discovered a tiny 
bathroom all folded up in the wall 
— one button opened up a lavatory, 
another turned on cold and hot 
water. Did we feel like queens in 
a castle!! 

After exploring the lounge car, we 
returned to our compartments and 
to a wonderful night's sleep! Well, 
not entirely wonderful! We were 
going through the West Virginia 
mountains which caused the train 
to sway more than usual, to not 
even mention the squeaking and 
banging of the cars. 

We changed trains the next morn- 
ing in Cincinnati and had time to 
explore the most beautiful station 
in the U. S. It was like being in a 
city underground. During our sec- 
ond day's journey we had time to 
discuss some of the things we ex- 
pected at the meeting and what our 
responsibilities were. For the first 
time we realized what responsibili- 
ties we assumed by representing all 
of North Carolina at the National 
Meeting. 

In Chicago we changed stations, 
which gave us an opportunity to 
see some of Chicago as we crossed 
the city. It was exciting to pass the 
Conrad Hilton Hotel and see the 
skyline of the city. The taxi driver 
was from Georgia so we enjoyed 
our chat with him. 



We finally boarded the "Olympian 
Hiawatha" for our last stretch to- 
ward Wisconsin. After what seemed 
like ages, we arrived in Portage, 
where we took a bus for our last 
50 miles to Green Lake. 

What a relief to step on firm 
ground! After registering and find- 
ing our rooms, we realized how tired 
we were, but happy to have reached 
our much anticipated destination. 

You can imagine our surprise 
when we were told that we were at- 
tending an "open-ended" or "un- 
structured" meeting, which means 
that the program is not planned in 
advance. The delegates do all the 
planning. It's a self-organizing, or 
plan-as-you-go meeting. What the 
delegates do and what they get out 
of it is up to them. 

During the first session, we held 
buzz sessions right and left to decide 
exactly what we wanted to get out 
of the conference. This turned out 
to be rather hectic, but we decided 
what we would discuss, how we 
would discuss it, and when. 

Mr. Russell Becker, our consul- 
tant, explained the philosophy of 
the open-ended meeting. "The well- 
ordered program and the well- 
ordered schedule of procedure 
makes everybody feel that every- 
thing is taken care of — everything 
under control, so they feel secure 
and content with the conference. 
The open-ended program arouses a 
lot of inner feelings of discomfort 
and that is the basis of making every- 
one feel that he or she has to pitch 
in and help. In other words, they 
feel that if they don't come to the 
rescue, it will flop. So, everyone 
pitches in." 

Monday night we enjoyed a 
pageant showing the growth of 
F.H.A. since its beginning. Maybe 
the reason we liked it so much was 
that North Carolina was in it. 

We found it terribly hard to 
crawl out of bed the next morning, 
but knowing there was only one 
call to breakfast, we hastened our 
preparations. We were kinda hun- 
gry! 

After breakfast the entire morn- 
ing was spent in a general session 
devoted to dues. Miss Francis 
Swain, our bursar, told us all about 
where our F.H.A. money comes 
from, where it goes, and how we 
would benefit if the delegation voted 
to increase the national dues five 
cents. 

This was followed by a timely 
and very interesting skit on dues, 
with members from the national 
office participating. During this 



Us. IATI0ML I 



By CAROLYN ABERNATHY, BET 



presentation, we also learned a little 
about how our national office con- 
ducts its business. Very interesting! 

The skit was followed by a panel 
discussion on the "pro's and con's" 
of increasing the national dues. The 
panel was well represented by a 
member from the national office, a 
state adviser, a local adviser, a dele- 
gate from a large state, one from a 
small state, and two from average 
states. A general poll was then 
taken on the question of an increase 
in dues, the results being thirty-nine 
states for, seven states against. 

We were pretty well exhausted by 
this time and were quite ready to 
eat the delicious food set before us. 

In the afternoon each one of us 
went to one of the twelve work 
groups. We were then allowed 
free time, which was welcomed by 
all. We eagerly set out to explore 
our surroundings. Green Lake is 
owned by the American Baptist and 
used as Assembly grounds, covers 
1,100 acres of wooded land with two 
and one-half miles of lake frontage. 
During our stay we had an oppor- 
tunity to tour the grounds by bus 
and view the lake front by boat. 
We hiked up to the Indian Village 
to see the Judson Tower, which was 
originally a prayer tower, located on 
the Assembly grounds. It is now the 
home of the famous Carillonic Bells, 
which chime out every hour. (These 
are the chimes that awakened us 
every morning.) The great totem 
pole is also an outstanding attrac- 
tion. 

A talent show was given that 
night by delegates from the various 
states. The most enjoyable presenta- 
tion was performed by the girls from 
Hawaii, during several versions of 
the Hula. After the show, the dele- 
gation received baby orchids from 
them, small samples of cheese from 
Wisconsin, and small boxes of sugar 
from Louisiana. 

Our next general session was 
devoted to Mr. Russell Becker, our 
director for this "open-ended" 
meeting. He spoke on how to help 
a group function more effectively. 
One of the most important points 
brought out was helping each per- 
son to truly feel a part of the group. 
After this, we again went to our 
work groups. 

An exchange of ideas by states 
took place during the afternoon. 



GRAHAM, AND PEGGY DUNN 



Ideas on camps, handbooks, pub- 
licity, stimulators for chapter mem- 
bers, and election of officers were 
just a few of the many topics dis- 
cussed. 

The night was devoted to a very 
enjoyable recreation program. Our 
toes and throats ached from all the 
folk dancing and singing. This was 
our first chance to enjoy recreation 
with the group, besides the many 
pajama parties held each night. 

We surprised one of the delegates 
from Illinois (our next-door neigh- 
bors at the hotel) with a birthday 
party, along with the groups from 
Ohio and Hawaii. The Hawaiian 
girls brought some of their native 
food. We learned that dried coco- 
nut meat, preserved Chinese candies, 
and lichee fruits aren't bad eating 
at all! 

Each of us is just beginning to 
realize that this "open-ended" meet- 
ing is important to all. We really 
feel that we've had a part in this 
conference and it's up to us, if it's 
a successful one. 

Next to our last day! We're be- 
ginning to realize how hard it will 
be to tell the many friends we've 
made good-bye and we're determ- 
ined to make every minute count. 

The last morning session was de- 
voted to sub-regional meetings, 
where the new national officers were 
elected, and to the business of the 
conference. The final vote was 
taken on the question of a dues in- 
crease and the results were eighty- 
two delegates for, eleven against. A 
report was heard from each work 
group and the recommendations 
turned over to the national office. 
This had been a long morning and 
we were very ready when lunch time 
was announced. 

Reports from national officers, 
the adoption of the national pro- 
gram of work, and a resume of the 
meeting took place during the after- 
noon session. All in all, it had been 
a successful conference and we had 
learned the responsibility that comes 
with not having a printed program. 
Our banquet and installation 
service were held that night, and 
I'll have to admit there weren't many 
dry-eyed girls at its conclusion. We 
went back to the hotel then to do 
all that packing, which had to be 
done by early Friday morning. It 
was late when we finally went to 



sleep. There had been many pajama 
parties to attend and lots of ad- 
dresses to exchange! 

Friday, July 18, found us up 
bright and early. Not because we 
weren't sleepy, but because this was 
the parting day from Green Lake. 
We were anxious to tell all of our 
new friends goodbye and then, too, 
the last minute packing was to be 
done. 

At breakfast, we did the last 
goodbye by singing to each other. 
The South sang "Dixie" and the 
North "Yankee Doodle," each try- 
ing to be a little louder than the 
other. After this quieted down, we 
sang to the National Adviser, and 
other Advisers, the President of the 
campus, the waitresses and waiters, 
who were college students, and the 
cooks. The BIG surprise came 
when four boys, who acted as help- 
ers at the Inn, came in and sang us 
a parting song. I believe this is the 
way it goes. "We're sorry to see 
you go, we're sorry to see you go — 
we know we'll miss you, we wish 
we could kiss you, we're sorry to 
see you go." We thought the song 
was very nice, and they harmonized 
well, too. 

After breakfast with all baggage 
packed, we boarded the bus to 
Portage to begin the long trip home. 
The weather was rainy and very 
cold. 

Our first big stop coming home 
was in Chicago where we had a two- 
hour stay. We changed train stations 
and it was then that delegates separ- 
ated from the Advisers and we 
received severe orders to be back 
at the station at 4 o'clock sharp 
ready to leave. Well, we delegates 
walked down the street to buy a 
few souvenirs and to tour the Con- 
rad Hilton Hotel. We received the 
thrill of our lives when we looked 
up the street to see Estes Kefauver, 
Candidate for President, going into 
the hotel. Try as we may, we 
weren't able to get his autograph. 
We did, however, go up to the third 
floor and get some Russell badges. 

It was still raining so we caught 
a cab back to the train station. Time 
to board the train — no Miss Eller 
and no Mrs. Britt. Time for the 
train to pull out — still no Advisers. 
We were getting kinda worried and 
yet we laughted because they had 
warned us so about being on time. 
The part that wasn't funny was that 
they had our pullman tickets. 

As the Conductor called all 
aboard, we caught a glimpse of two 
figures racing down the board walk 
and heard one say, "Don't leave us 



— don't let that train pull out!" 
Our minds were a little eased when 
we saw that the figures weren't pro- 
fessional racers at all, but Miss 
Eller and Mrs. Britt, just in time 
to board as the train ' pulled out. 
Miss Eller said later, "Anyway, we 
feel we could have won any track 
race — even in high heels." 

We found that they had been to 
Marshall Fields, the largest depart- 
ment store in the world, and a taxi 
had taken them to the wrong train 
station on the way back. "When 
they handed the conductor their 
tickets, lo and behold, they were 
at the wrong train station and it 
was time for our train to pull out. 
So here they went racing back across 
town, making it just in time to board 
the right train. 

It wasn't time to settle down until 
we reached Cincinatti, Ohio that 
night. Here we boarded our pull- 
man to sleep as we traveled through 
the mountains. When we went \o 
bed (finally) we had the intention 
of getting up at 7 o'clock in the 
morning to make plans on how to 
bring the meeting back to you. Our 
intentions were good, but the will 
had the way, for it was 9:30 when 
we awoke. There was still time to 
plan though before Peggy and Mrs 
Britt parted from us in Roanoke 
Virginia. Miss Eller, Carolyn, and 
Betty Lou went on to Durham. We 
might add that we met a rather 
nice-looking Air force man from 
Durham on the train. 

The trip was very nice and every- 
one was friendly. To prove it, I'll 
tell of two instances on the train. 
One of the conductors was very 
nice and not too very old, so we 
talked him into letting us see the 
engine room, so at Indianapolis. 
Indiana, he took us up to the engine 
for a tour. 

On the dining car, the head waiter 
asked us who we were, so we told 
him, "Future Homemakers of Amer- 
ica.'' "Oh!" he said, "Future Moth- 
ers," and out he came with baby 
bibs for each. With the train rock- 
ing, it was so hard to get the food to 
find the mouth that we even thought 
of using the bibs ourselves. 

The trip was very inspiring as 
well as fun and educational It 
would have been nice if all Future 
Homemakers from North Carolina 
could have gone, but since we all 
couldn't, we as your delegates, will 
do our best to bring it all back to 
you — the education, inspiration, 
and even the fun of the trip. 



We Grow By Degrees oe 

HcmemmeHt 



The degrees of achievement pro- 
gram is one way in which the Future 
Homemakers Organization gives rec- 
ognition to its members who have 
worked effectively toward achieving 
the purposes of the organization, 
contributed to the improvement of 
their chapters, homes, schools, and 
communities, and who have planned 
for their own growth as individuals. 
There are three degrees of achieve- 
ment at present — the junior degree, 
chapter degree, and state degree. 
These are received after certain 
goals, set up in the State Handbook, 
are achieved. Last year there were 
945 junior homemaker degrees 
earned in North Carolina, 328 chap- 
ter degrees, and 42 state degrees. 
Perhaps hearing the experiences of 
others would help you as you work 
toward your degree this year. Bever- 
ly Adams of the Lee Edwards Chap- 
ter in Asheville writes: 

"To me, a few years ago, the 
State Homemaker Degree seemed 
too high an honor to ever achieve. 
The girls I had known at Lee Ed- 
wards, who had received the degree, 
were such fine girls and excelled in 
so many ways, that I had little hope 
of ever being included with them. 
After observing them, I realized 
that they did not receive the degree 
through pure luck, but it was the 
result of good planning and hard 
work. With that in mind, I started 
working toward my first degree. By 
the end of the year, I was thrilled 
to receive the second degree. 

"Before summer our advisers had 
a conference with all candidates for 
the State Homemaker Degree for 
the next year. I saw the blank which 
I would fill in at the end of the year 
and it was indeed a challenge. 
During the summer I kept a diary in 
which I wrote down all F.H.A. ac- 
tivities I participated in. I tried to 
plan to include as much as possible. 
For example: I was on the staff at 
Sky Valley Camp. My duties in- 
cluded baby-sitting, cooking, plan- 
ning menus; and being pianist. As a 
result of this summer, I asked to re- 
turn as Assistant Dietitian for the 
following camp season of 1952. I 
have just returned from the camp 
and feel that this experience will be 
very valuable to me as I enter Wom- 

6 



an's College at Greensboro this fall, 
majoring in Home Economics. 

"All during the school year I 
worked faithfully following plans 
outlined at the first of the year. As 
I received the State Homemaker De- 
gree blank, I was aware that I needed 
to work on many phases of home- 
making. So I chose a relationship 
problem as one, of my Home Ex- 
periences. This one I am still work- 
ing on but I feel that this interest 
made me more aware of relationship 
problems. 

"During my three years at Lee 
Edwards High School, I grew in- 
tensely interested in the field of 
homemaking and decided that I 
would make it my career. This, of 
course, gave me a goal to work for 
and this goal was the State Home- 
maker Degree. 

"The State Homemaker Degree 
takes a good deal of work and 
planning. I had a lot of fun making 
a scrapbook of everything that I had 
done while working on this degree, 
to turn in with the required standards 
written in form. 

"The work was hard and some- 
times discouraging, but the reward 
very great. I feel that having this 
degree is a start in my life of home- 
making, and that it will encourage 
me as I begin my college life at 
W. C. this fall majoring in Home 
Economics." 

The following challenge comes 
from Carol Long, Mary Ann Hamp- 
ton, Sarah Carpenter, Joan Mauney 
and Ruth Hyder of the Rutherford- 
Spindale Chapters. 

"Why does F.H.A. have Degrees 
of Achievement? It isn't required 
that Future Homemakers attain 
them, so what was the reason for 
their origination? You may be ask- 
ing questions like these and wonder- 
ing how working toward these goals 
will help you. We wondered that 
too, when we were very new Future 
Homemakers, and we found the 
answer. Maybe we can help you as 
you consider starting on degree 
work. So read what we have to tell 
you and let it be a challenge to you. 

"In our chapter, we have an active 
degrees committee. When we joined 
the chapter, we were introduced to 
the different degrees by that com- 



mittee. We decided then that we 
needed a goal to work toward, some- 
thing challenging, and the F.H.A. 
Degrees of Achievement were just 
what we were looking for. The de- 
grees committee explained the stand- 
ards for the Junior Degree and we 
began memorizing the creed; and 
the symbolism of the emblem, the 
colors, and the flower. With the as- 
sistance of the adviser, the com- 
mittee planned a specific time to help 
all the girls working on the degree. 
We found that by doing what we 
were asked to do by the chapter, 
we had contributed to its program. 
Our mothers pointed out some def- 
inite ways we could contribute more 
to family life. By taking part in all 
the activities of the organization, we 
learned to work more effectively with 
others. The degrees committee had 
guided us right and we were sur- 
prised at how interested other people 
were in helping us. That was all there 
was to attaining the first degree and 
it had helped us so much in feeling 
that we were really doing something 
purposeful. 

"When we were ready to work on 
our Chapter Homemaker Degree, the 
degrees committee was again on its 
toes and ready to help. We read the 
State F.H.A. Constitution and By- 
Laws. We loved reading the News- 
letters as they came in, too. By 
doing this reading, we were enabled 
to demonstrate the F.H.A. programs 
of works at all levels. We became 
members of committees and some 
of us were even made chairmen of 
them. We learned to co-operate with 
the other committee members in 
planning the various activities which 
we were responsible for. By helping 
to carry on our chapter meetings in 
an orderly way, we learned the cor- 
rect parliamentary procedures. We 
could see that we were making prog- 
ress in working effectively with 
others. The degrees committee gave 
those trying for the Chapter Degree 
an examination covering the stand- 
ards of the degree. They were 
checked and discussed by the Execu- 
tive Council. 

"After we had received the two 
local degrees, we began wondering 
if it would be at all possible for us 
to get the State Degree. It was a 
big step to take, but there it was 
looming up before us, challenging 
us to fight until we attained it. So 
we started to work again. We took 
notes on every activity we had a part 
in. We held office, took positions of 
leadership outside our chapter, and 
made contributions on our chapter, 
school, community, homes, churches, 
state, and nation. We followed the 



instructions on our application 
blanks and made accurate charts of 
the things we did, giving the dates 
and quality of the contributions. It 
wasn't hard to climb the ladder of 
degrees and feel ourselves grow. We 
made it and so can you! 

"At our Mother-Daughter Ban- 
quet held in the spring, the highlight 
of our F.H.A. year, the candidates 
for degrees received public recogni- 
tion for their work. As we achieved 
higher degrees, we looked forward 
to the time when we would be recog- 
nized for our work. In the candle- 
light ceremony, as suggested in the 
guide book, our president, historian, 
and secretary presented the awards. 

"The State Degree is not given in 
this manner, of course. Rather, we 
considered the highlight of all our 
years in F.H.A. as being the day we 
received this degree. The State De- 
gree is conferred at State Conven- 
tions. We received our degrees on 
the stage of Hugh Morson High 
School in Raleigh' With all eyes of 
the convention upon us, could we 
help but feel that all our time and 
efforts had been repaid with a high 
rate of interest? The beauty of this 
ceremony coupled with the glory of 
becoming a State Homemaker made 
the convention one we shall always 
remember. We could now wear the 
F.H.A. pin with all three emblems; 
the key, the scroll, and the torch! 

"Yes, it was exciting as we 
reached high ideals. We have learned 
a lesson, one that every girl in the 
world needs to know. Not only in 
F.H.A., but in any phase of life, 
we need to aim the things we do 
toward a definite goal. We have 
more determination to meet life with 
a smile and say 'Yes, we can do it if 
we try!' We challenge you to set 
your goals high and work diligently 
toward them." 



TOP PRIZE 

(Continued from page 2) 
their forthcoming movie. We also 
took a boat trip to Catalina Islands; 
viewed a movie, as yet unreleased 
to the public, from a projection 
room at Warner Bros.; went to a 
concert under the stars at the Holly- 
wood Bowl; attended a radio show 
and I appeared as a guest on two 
TV shows. Since getting back home, 
I've been busy as a bee getting 
ready to enter Mary Washington 
College. I'll be there when you 
read this so if you're ever in Fred- 
ericksburg, Va., come to see me 
and I'll show you my souvenirs 
from a marvelous trip. 



Campaigning for 

STATE F.H.A. PARLIAMENTARIAN 

By REGENE MODLTON, Boyden High School Chapter 



Campaign plans are like budgets 
— they look good on paper, but it 
takes a little finesse to carry them 
out. 

For a number of months I have 
been actively engaged in organizing 
and carrying out what I hope will be 
a successful campaign which will 
help me win an office in the State 
organization. 

Every office requires different 
qualifications. Primarily, the candi- 
date for any office should have a 
sincere interest in the organization. 

My interest in F.H.A. was 
aroused in my freshman year when 
I joined the local chapter. Being an 
active member, I had the oppor- 
tunity during that year to attend a 
County rally at Boyden High, a Dis- 
trict rally at Thomasville, and a State 
rally at High Point. The following 
year I attended the State rally in 
Raleigh and late in the spring as 
vice-president of my local chapter 
I went with my adviser, Miss Anne 
Hall, who is district adviser, to the 
meeting at which plans for this year's 
district meeting were made. 

Attending these meeting did much 
to stimulate my interest in the ac- 
tivities of the organization as a 
whole, and to hold a district or 
State office soon became my desire. 
In the meantime I have been active 
in my local chapter. During the 
school year, 1951-1952, 1 was 
elected vice-president, chapter par- 
liamentarian and program chairman. 
One of my duties for the past two 
years has been welcoming freshmen 
and informing them of our chapter's 
activities. 

At a chapter meeting in May of 
this year, I was nominated to run for 
the office of district president and 
State parliamentarian. The president 
of our local chapter offered to be my 
campaign manager immediately fol- 
lowing my nomination. Later at 
F.H.A. Camp her assistance was 
very beneficial to my campaign. The 
annual summer F.HA. Camp at 
White Lake was actually where I 
began my campaign for State par- 
liamentarian. There I took a course 
in parliamentary procedure and par- 
ticipated in a final report given by 
this group before the entire camp. 

During September the principal of 
our hish school wrote letters of rec- 



ommendation which were sent to 
each district chapter. Postal cards 
announcing my election plans and 
qualifications were sent as a follow- 
up to the letters. 

At the district rally at Mount 
Airy in October we plan to hand 
each chapter a mimeographed sheet 
entitled "Regeme Moulton's Parlia- 
mentary Procedure in Nine Steps," 
which I had found on the back of 
the April 1951 issue of Teen Times. 
This will present the systematic 
scheme I plan to carry out if elected. 

The F.H.A. has been an interest- 
ing challenge. I count it an honor 
that I have been able to achieve my 
Junior Degree in my sophomore year 
and my Chapter Degree in my junior 
year. Two years from now when I 
enter college I plan to major in home 
economics and continue my work 
in F.H.A. 

Our group has been one willing to 
undertake any task which is bene- 
ficial to the school. This fall we 
volunteered our services before 
school opened to help copy schedules 
for the individual students. Being the 
only officer in town at the time, I 
assumed the responsibility for find- 
ing workers. 

Did I win the election? That I can- 
not answer. In order to meet the 
publication deadline of the "News- 
letter" it was necessary to send this 
in before actual election time. As 
I said at the beginning, "Campaign 
Plans are like budgets — they look 
good on paper but it takes a little 
finesse to carry them out." 




Regene is shown calling on other F.H.A. 
members for help in her campaign. 



COVER PICTURE 

Our New State Officers — Jean 
Faulkner, Betty Hatton, Kitty 
Campen, Peggy Dunn. Betty Lou 
Graham, Clara Burris, Carolyn 
Abernathy, LaSalle Light. 




At left is a very popular type of publicity for the homemaking 
department and the F.H.A. Chapter. Why not give the fashion 
show a new flavor and let the little tots show off their spring 
frocks. This idea comes from Mount Holly and the dresses were 
made by big sisters. 



It Pays 

to Advertise . . . 

is your 




PUBLICITY SHOWING? 



The above picture is a fair exhibit but could be used as a window display. This idea comes from 
East Mecklenburg. Displays, floats, exhibits, posters, pictures, radio skits, and newspaper articles help 
interpret F.H.A. and tell what your chapter is doing. What's news? Any of your activities ! ! ! Got 
some good projects underway? Tell the public in a display, whether it be World Christmas Festival, 
Unesco, or a baby sitting project! And don't forget to celebrate National F.H.A. Week! Use every op- 
portunity to publicize F.H.A. and you will make it that much easier to put across your next project or 
activity. 



An ingenious float for 
a parade. The idea 
comes from Bayboro 
Chapter and was 
used in a Christmas 
parade. The sign and 
emblem tell at a glance 
the purpose of our 
organization and is very 
effective. Why not try 
this in your community? 




White J^ake Camp — 1952 



Six hundred and seventy-two members and advisers evening entertainment. Talent scouts would have dis- 

attended F.H.A. Camp at White Lake during the two covered beauty queens, fashion designers of bathing 

weeks' period. Ole Man Weather was kind and con- suits, crooners, and dancers, to say nothing of the 

siderate and gave us two wonderful weeks of warm healthy boosters from the onlookers, 
sunshine and balmy breezes. As usual, the most popular 

periods of the day were swimming and activity periods, The spiritual growth of the campers was not neg- 

which include crafts, singing, dancina, and sports. Com- lected - At fla § raisin g in the calm and beaut y ot ' the 

petitive spirit was shown between cottages during the earl y morning, and again at the close of the day, an 

out door sports tournaments. It was an excellent way inspirational devotion was g.ven by some of the 

to combine exercise and getting a sun tan! During the campers. 



leadership training period, the members learned new 
and better ways of reaching our purposes in F.H.A. and 
interpreting F.H.A. to the community. 



At the close of the week, the girls had made many 
new friends, realized that they had thoroughly enjoyed 
the week, and that they had received many new ideas 
Another very popular phase of camp life was the for better F.H.A. work. It was a wonderful week for all! 



NORTH CAROLINA ASSOCIATION 
FUTURE HOMEMAKERS OF AMERICA 

WHITE STUDENT CLUB ORGANIZATION 
SEPTEMBER 1, 1951 TO SEPTEMBER 15, 1952 
RECEIPTS 

Bank Balance September 1, 1951 $ 4,335.09 

Receipts from Fees (17,604 Members @ 50c) .. $ 8,847.00 

Contributions to National Workshop 1,320.33 

Miscellaneous Receipts 66.30 

Total Receipts $10,233.63 

Total Balance and Receipts _: $14,568.72 

LESS: EXPENDITURES 

National Dues $ 1,798.70 

District and State Rallies 515.75 

Newsletter (4 Issues) 4,513.97 

Miscellaneous (Guides, Pictures, etc.) . 185.48 

Executive Board Expenses 194.79 

Printing (5,000 Envelopes) 50.10 

Postage and Supplies 597.06 

National Executive Council 137.53 

Auditing F.H.A. Books 30.00 

National Delegates Expenses 727.28 

Total Expenditures 8,750.66 

BALANCE $ 5,818.06 

CAMP— 1952 

Total Receipts from Camp $ 7,782.70 

Less: Expenditures 6,269.46 

Balance $ 1,513.24 

Petty Cash Balance..... 12.39 

Total Savings $ 1,525.63 

Total Invested in N. C. Credit Union 

Savings $16,913.83 

Bonds 1,600.00 

Total Savings $18,513.83 



Future Homemakers of America 

CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. " 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 



A> 




CAROLINE SAYS 

A wide-awake progressive F.H.A. Chapter will plan a cal- 
endar for the year's activities, so that plans will be made well 
in advance of the activity and nothing will be overlooked in 
the rush and bustle of school life. Why not make yours similar 
to this? 

JULY- AUGUST 

Have chapter and county Leadership Training Workshops for 
officers. Attend National Convention July 2-6. Plan for year's 
work. Make a nook or corner for F.H.A. 
SEPTEMBER 

Complete planning. Campaign for new members. Initiation of 
new members. Begin working on degrees. Have county rallies. 
OCTOBER 

Pay State and National dues. Observe U. N. Day. Plan for 
Na'tional F.H.A. Week. Attend District Rally. Attend State 
Fair. 

NOVEMBER 

Observe National F.H.A. Week. Observe World Christmas 
Festival. Send article to local paper and Newsletter on F.H.A. 
activities. Send in Intentions for State Degrees. 
DECEMBER 

Make toys for needy children. Encourage the spirit of giving. 
Send greetings to Pen Pals. 
JANUARY 

Plan and have family fun night. Deadline for State and Na- 
tional dues. Article for Newsletter. 
FEBRUARY 

Publicize F.H.A. in some special way. Have a Daddy-Date 
party. Sponsor money-making project for expenses to National 
Convention. 
MARCH 

Help plan for state meeting. Have a career program. Send in 
applications for State degrees. 
APRIL 

Attend State Convention. 
MAY 

Elect officers for next year. Evaluate year's work. Observe 
Mother's Day. Plan to attend camp. Send in annual report. 
JUNE 

Attend camp at White Lake. Plan to send delegate to National 
Convention. 



-/• 



-"Sj^,,^'' 



<■' 






FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association * 



VULUMt A 



DECEMBER 1952 



NUMbtK L 




Our wish for you at Christ- 
mastime . . . health, happiness 
and all the good things in life. 



The Staff 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1952-1953 

President — Carolyn Abernathy, Alexander-Wilson 

Vice-President — Jean Faulkner, Red Oak 

Secretary — Betty Lou Graham, Stedman 

Treasurer — Betty Hatton, Goldsboro 

Reporter — Kitty Campen, Edenton 

Parliamentarian — LaSalle Light, Old Fort 

Historian — Peggy Dunn, Clemmons 

Song Leader — Clara Burris, Endy 



District Advisers 
1952-1953 

Mrs. Queenie Warren, Robersonville 

Mrs. Thelma Dilday, B. F. Grady 

Mrs. Mary Frederick, Stedman 

Mrs. Louise Winslow, Aycock 

Mrs. Rebecca Smith, Randleman 

Mrs. Clarinda Britt, Morven 

Miss Anne Hall, Boyden 

Mrs. Lucille Brintnall, Swain County 



State Adviser 
Miss Daphne Eller 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



Christmas ^ls 

Opt fan flake It 



The true spirit of Christmas, is not in the gift you give, but in the 
giving of your thoughts and your hearts. Christmas is the time when we 
think of the less fortunate, when we have peace and good will for our 
fellowmen, when we want to share a little of ourselves to make those 
around us happy. 

The Morganton Chapter portrayed the real spirit of Christmas when 
they had a Christmas party for the children at the Deaf School. It was 
touching to see those little faces light up as each one received a gift. 

Many chapters collect worn and discarded toys and refinish them for 
less fortunate children. Others pack gifts for families in the neighborhood. 

Mount Holly Chapter held an open house to display the clothing, gifts, 
and toys they had made for underprivileged children. They also helped 
to give people ideas for making economical Christmas gifts. Some of 
the gifts displayed were serving trays from paint can tops, luxurious 
jewel boxes made from cigar boxes, purses, dolls and toys made from 
socks, pot holders, scarves, luncheon sets, lamps from bottles, footstools 
and many others. 

Christmas is also the time for families to unite for fun, caroling, and 
harmonious living. In making your Christmas list this year, plan to share 
yourself with each member of your family in spending some time in the 
way he or she would like. Maybe your little sister wants to play dolls, 
your little brother wants to look in the fields for a special kind of rock. 
Grandmother enjoys having someone read to her, or Daddy wants to go 
riding through the country. And as you share, each moment of happiness 
you give will come back in a sense of satisfaction that will make the 
whole holiday a big success. 

Making up cast for "Where's That Report Card?": Anne Lawson making up Larry 
Peeler, Jean Stanback making up Lonnie Coulter, Ann Cornelius making up Barbara 
Peacock, District VII F.H.A. Rally on October 4, 1952, Mount Airy, N. C. 




IReacfy fin (fyii&Cnttu 

"Ready for Christmas," she said 
with a sigh, 
As she gave a last touch to the 

gifts piled high, 
Then wearily sat for a moment 
and read 
Till soon, very soon, she was nod- 
ding her head. 

Then quietly spoke a voice in her 

dream, 
"Ready for Christmas? What do 

you mean? 
Ready for Christmas, When only 

last week 
You wouldn't acknowledge your 

friend on the street? 

"Ready for Christmas, while hold- 
ing a grudge? 

Perhaps you had better let God be 
the judge. 

Why, how can the Christ-child 
come and abide, 

In a heart that is selfish and filled 
with pride? 

"Ready for Christmas, when only 

today 
A beggar lad came and you 

turned him away 
Without even a smile to show that 

you care? 
The little he asked — • it could 

have been spared. 

"Ready for Christmas? You've 
worked, it is true, 

But just doing things that you 
wanted to do. 

Ready for Christmas? Your cir- 
cle's too small, 

Why, you are not ready for Christ- 
mas at all." 

She awoke with a start, and a cry 

of despair, 
"There's so little time, and I've still 

to prepare! 
O' Father, forgive me, I see what 

you mean, 
To be ready means more than a 

house swept clean!" 

Yes, more than the giving of gifts 
and a tree, 

It's the heart swept clean that He 
wants to see, 

A heart that is free from bitter- 
ness — sin 

Ready for Christmas and ready 
for Him. 

North Dakota Newsletter 




F. H. A. Exhibit 



AT THE STATE FAIR 



As the crowds drifted through 
the exhibit halls at the N. C. State 
Fair, many remarks were over- 
heard, like this: "North Carolina Fu- 
ture Homemakers, Oh! That's me! 
Look Sue, here's our exhibit!" "Say 
I wonder if my picture is up there." 
"Who canned the corn?" "Isn't the 
jelly pretty!" "Look at the pretty 
dressing table." The most gratifying 
but challenging remark was made 
by a foreign student who said: "Fu- 
ture Homemakers of America — 
You mean you have a club to learn 
to be better homemakers? Ah, 
there's the answer to our building 
of a better world!" 

At the left of the exhibit a large 
board displayed scenes of F.H.A. 
activities and homemaking educa- 
tion. To the center front a table 
held canned fruit and vegetables 
from Bethesda High School, Dur- 
ham County, and to the right was 
an attractive dressing table and 
stool made by the Chapel Hill 
Homemaking girls for their cottage. 
An enlarged picture revealed the 
girls at work putting the finishing 
touches to the project in their class- 
room. In the background is a form 
draped with material which repre- 
sents one area of the homemaking 
program, clothing. 



Of course, no exhibit would be 
complete without the F.H.A. em- 
blem and motto. The one used in 
this exhibit was contributed by the 
Lee County group. All of this in- 
terprets to the public that with the 
training F.H.A. 'ers receive in home- 
making classes and F.H.A. Chap- 
ters, we are working for better and 
happier home life for everyone and 
that we believe helping to make 
happy homes, now and in the fu- 
ture, is the most important thing 
that youth can do for democracy. 



1953 NATIONAL CONVENTION 

Most of you already know that 
the 1953 National F.H.A. Conven- 
tion will be held in Columbus, Ohio, 
July 2-8, and that North Carolina 
is allotted 81 members and 20 
adults. Have you started your mon- 
ey-raising project to send a dele- 
gate from your school? It is 
estimated that each delegate will 
need approximately $150 for the 
trip, but more definite information 
concerning travel and expenses will 
be given you later. Make North 
Carolina shine by filling our quota 
of delegates! Plan to send a dele- 
sate to Columbus next summer! 



9. W. rf'e* 70u* 

North Carolina Apple Growers in 
conjunction with Appalachian Ap- 
ple Service and the Women's Com- 
mittee of State Horticultural 
Societies sponsored an Apple Pan 
Dowdy Baking Contest this year 
for the apple-producing counties in 
the State. This contest was open to 
Future Homemakers, 4-H girls and 
those studying Home Economics. 
Linda Bolick of the Taylorsville 
F.H.A. Chapter was selected state 
winner, after competing with one 
hundred and twenty-four girls from 
her school, three other county 
schools, and the neighboring coun- 
ty of Wilkes. As State winner, 
Linda won an all-expense-paid trip 
to Washington, D. C. to compete in 
the all-eastern states contest; a uni- 
form, and a dress from Florida 
Fashion Frocks, Inc. This was 
Linda's first trip to the Capitol City 
which was filled with interesting 
experiences such as taking part in 
a radio program and her appear- 
ance on television. Mrs. Madge 
Young, her adviser, whose expenses 
were paid also, accompanied her 
to Washington. 

If there are any Future Home- 
makers who do not know what an 
Apple Pan Dowdy is, just write to 
the Taylorsville Chapter and they 
will be glad to enlighten you. Apple 
Pan Dowdy, an old English dish, 
has become quite popular in Alex- 
ander County, which is one of the 
State's leading apple producing 
counties. 



7^e 7Ro£e a£ 

CHAPTER PARENTS IN THE F. H. A. 



One of the most important but 
most neglected leaders of the 
F.H.A. is a chapter parent. A chap- 
ter Mother or Dad is an adult who 
has been chosen by F.H.A. mem- 
bers to serve for a definite period 
of time as an adviser. He encour- 
ages the chapter in its work, helps 
to interpret it to others, and gives 
support and guidance to the activi- 
ties carried on by the chapter. 

Why have a chapter Mother or 
Dad (or both)? If we are to have 
better and happier home and com- 
munity life, it is always wise to have 
a parent's viewpoint in choosing 
activities to promote these goals. 
Having chapter parents also brings 
about a better understanding of 
our purposes and more interest in 
our activities on the part of people 
in the community. Chapter par- 
ents are also needed to assist with 
many of the activities planned. 

What are some "for instances"? 
So many times chapter parents are 
able to provide transportation to 
meetings, rallies, or conventions. In 



launching a worthwhile project, such 
as a nutrition program or a com- 
munity clean-up, it helps to have 
the support of an adult in the com- 
munity in securing the needed co- 
operation. Chapter parents are also 
able assistance in money making 
activities for such causes as sending 
a delegate to the national conven- 
tion or needed equipment in the 
homemaking department. 

Who makes a good chapter 
Mother or Dad? You, of course, 
want someone who is interested in 
teen-agers and in the F.H.A. and 
who enjoys and understands you. 
Your F.H.A. parent should also 
have a pleasing personality and be 
a successful homemaker. And, if 
possible, choose a person who will 
have some time to devote to the 
F.H.A. and its activities. 

Chapter parents may be selected 
at the beginning of school or at the 
time chapter officers are elected in 
the spring. They are of valuable 
help during the summer in keeping 



the F.H.A. work going. The local 
chapter may determine how a par- 
ent is to be elected, whether by 
a nominating committee or from the 
floor. A record of chapter Mothers 
and Dads should be kept in the 
scrapbook as a part of the history 
of the chapter. 

There are responsibilities, how- 
ever, of the chapter to chapter par- 
ents. Show appreciation to them for 
their services and let the public 
know how they are helping you. Al- 
ways make them feel welcome when 
they attend social activities and 
make them honored guests at spe- 
cial functions. Talk to them about 
your activities. Remember them at 
Christmas and other special days 
with a card or note. Keep them 
informed of chapter activities and 
send them copies of all materials. 
Seek their advice and help as it is 
needed, and co-operate with them 
in every way possible because they 
are working to strengthen Your 
F.H.A. 



Hear Ye! Hear Ye! 



IMPORTANT! 



Clara Burris, State Song Leader, 
and all other North Carolina Fu- 
ture Homemakers are very anxious 
for North Carolina to have a state 
F.H.A. song! There must be plenty 
of talent for song writing in the Tar 
Heel State, so why not let your 
talent show? The song may be an 
individual or group contribution. 
Don't let North Carolina down! ! ! ! 
Get busy and write a song for 
F.H.A. 

The rules were written by the 
Executive Council and are as fol- 
lows: 

1. Words have to be original. 

2. Song must give reference to 
F.H.A. 

3. Music may be original or an 
old familiar tune. 

4. Song must be one that each 
girl will be proud to call her state 
F.H.A. song. 

5. Send your song to your dis- 
trict officer by first week in Jan- 
uary. 

6. Songs must be mailed to State 
office by January 15, 1953. 



Noth Carolina will be allowed to 
run a candidate for a national office 
next year. This election will be held 
at the National Convention in Co- 
lumbus, Ohio. Our state candidate 
will be chosen at the State Conven- 
tion in April. Carefully study the 
qualifications of a leader and 
choose a candidate who possesses 
these qualities and who will win at 
the National Convention. We want 
North Carolina to have a National 
Officer. Begin preparing your can- 
didate now! ! ! ! 



3fn JWemoriam 

Mary Moore, F.H.A. member of 
the Massey Hill Chapter who died 
November 1, and Lillie Hardee of 
the Hope Mills Chapter who died 
November 12. 




NATIONAL F.H.A. ADVISER 
VISITS STATE 

Shown above is Miss Marguerite 
Scruggs, National F.H.A. Adviser, 
as she is being introduced at the 
District IV Rally by Jean Faulkner, 
presiding officer. 



DISTRICT I 

Greenville 
Kitty Campen, Presiding 

The Austin Auditorium on the 
College Campus at Greenville was 
the home of the District I Future 
Homemakers of America Rally, 
Saturday, October 25. 

Kitty Campen of Edenton, State 
Reporter, called the meeting to or- 
der by using the F.H.A. Opening 
Ritual. Other officers taking part 
in the opening Ritual were: Ann 
Timberlake — Vice-President; Hazel 
Paul — Secretary; Jane Manning — 
Treasurer; and Helen Corbett — Par- 
liamentarian. 

A very inspiring Devotional was 
rendered by the Pamlico County 
Chapter. Immediately following 
this, the entire group was led in the 
singing of the United Nations Hymn 
by the Williamston Chapter. 

Dr. Bessie McNiel, Director of 
the Department of Home Econom- 
ics at Greenville, extended to all 
Future Homemakers a hearty wel- 
come to the college. She invited 
us on a tour of the campus im- 
mediately following our meeting and 
also to a tea given in our honor. 

Special guests of the day were 
introduced, among them Miss Alice 
Strawn, an honorary member of our 
Future Homemakers Organization. 
Miss Strawn was responsible for the 
lovely red roses used for decora- 
tions. 

Mrs. Queenie Warren, District I 
Adviser, introduced to us our State 
Adviser, Miss Daphne Eller. Miss 
Eller told us about attending the 
National meeting and about the new 
ideas she gained during her trip. 

New business discussed was the 
raising of the Club dues from the 
present 50 cents to 70 cents. After 
a very thorough discussion, a mo- 
tion was made that the dues be 
raised. This motion was then voted 
on and carried by a large majority. 
Another item for discussion was the 
fact that our North Carolina Future 
Homemakers have no State Song. 
All interested club members are 
uged to begin working on plans for 
a song. The words must be original 
and have reference to the F.H.A. 
All definite plans must be sent to 
our State Officer, Kitty Campen, by 
the first week in January. 

Our Guest Speaker for the day, 
Dr. J. D. Messick, was introduced 
to us by Emily Faircloth, President 
of the College, Home Economics 
Club. Dr. Messick's address cen- 
tered attention upon the importance 

4 



of personality. In defining person- 
ality, he laid emphasis upon quali- 
ties arising from the moral, spiritual, 
and intellectual life of the individual. 
He continued by telling us the great 
opportunities that exist for the girl 
who is trained in the home econom- 
ics department and who continues 
this training until completion of a 
college course. At the conclusion of 
his address he was presented a red 
rose, symbol of Future Homemak- 
ers Organization. 

The chairman of the Nominating 
Committee then presented the cam- 
paign managers of all nominess for 
State Treasurer. The nominees were 
as follows: Eleanor Payne, Ayden; 
Irene Waters, Bath; Shirley Barber, 
Jamesville; Peggy Spruill, Pamlico 
County; Jane Crofton, Plymouth; 
Becky Gaylord; Roper; Joan 
Averett, Winterville; Betty Lou 
Beach, Woodland-Olney; and Au- 
drey Todd, Scotland Neck. 

After a very enjoyable lunch in 
the college cafeteria, reports were 
made from the Registration Com- 
mittee stating that 727 members were 
present along with 133 guests mak- 
ing a total of 860 people present 
for our Rally. The Invitation Com- 
mittee reported that no invitations 
had been received for next year's 
Rally. The Advisers reported the 
election of Pauline Robbins of Pam- 
lico County as District Adviser. 

Following these reports, Mr. 
George E. Perry of the Department 
of Music at the college gave us a 
very interesting talk on "Music in 
the Home." He then presented a 
delightful variety of organ reveries. 
His selections proved very enjoy- 
able and entertaining. 

The climax of the day was the 
naming of the State Treasurer which 
was Peggy Spruill of Pamlico Coun- 
ty, with Joan Averett of Winter- 
ville — first alternate, and Jane 
Crofton of Plymouth — second al- 
ternate. 

Immediately following the ad- 
journment of our meeting, the Col- 
lege Home Economics Staff and 
Club led us on a tour of the cam- 
pus and afterwards to a tea in the 
Flanagan Building. Things we ob- 
served taught us many facts 
concerning college and makes it 
something to look forward to upon 
our high school graduation. 

Many thanks to Miss Mabel 
Lacy, District Supervisor, Mrs. 
Queenie Warren, and all the others 
who worked so hard to make such 
an enjoyable day possible for us 
Future Homemakers. 



OUR DISTI 



DISTRICT II 

Kenansville 
Betty Hatton, Presiding 

More than 800 girls and their 
advisers from eleven counties trav- 
eled to Kenansville for District II 
Rally. 

Exactly on schedule, the stage 
curtain was drawn and revealed 
Betty Hatton behind the micro- 
phone in front of a background of 
palms and pines. Lovely red roses 
were on the speakers' table. On 
the stage with Betty were Sally 
Newton, Romaine Glover, Jeanette 
Kelly, Betty Phillips, and Mr. Z. W. 
Frazelle, Principal of Kenansville 
School, and Mr. O. P. Johnson, 
Superintendent of Duplin County 
Schools, to welcome officially the 
members of the Rally. The Beau- 
fort and Morehead City Chapters 
gave the devotion. 

During the business session, plans 
for dues were discussed by our 
F.H.A. Adviser. It was voted and 
carried that our dues should be 
raised since everything else has 
gone up in price. 

Alice Manning, of the Richlands 
Chapter, presented the candidates 
for State Secretary. Barbara John- 
son, Joyce Whittle, and Glenda No- 
ble were presented, and I must say 
we had hot politics in Kenansville. 
Warsaw displayed beautiful posters 
and many artistic features for their 
candidate, while Glenda Noble took 
the show in rendering her musical 
numbers with the ukulele and her 
marvelous talent in singing to the 
group. Everyone displayed wonder- 
ful talent but after the campaign 
ended Glenda came out winner. 

Mrs. L. K. Alderman rendered 
a lovely musical number in addi- 
tion to her relaxers. The group was 
fascinated with the whistling and 
piano number which she presented. 

We always enjoy our guest 
speaker, and if they're all as good 
as Mrs. Bess N. Rosa we'll take two 
speeches next time. She gave some 
good tips to the girls about dating 
and their future-to-be. In fact the 
whole talk was interesting and edu- 
cational. Mrs. Rosa is Associate 
Professor of Home Economics, the 
Woman's College of the University 
of North Carolina, Greensboro. 

No one had to announce lunch 
twice. Our hats are off to Grif- 
fins from Goldsboro for being able 
to feed so many so efficiently. The 



T RALLIES 



dinner consisted of barbecue chick- 
en and all the other things which 
made up a good dinner for only a 
small sum of seventy-five cents. 

The grand finale of the District 
Rally was the very lovely Pageant, 
"Our American Heritage" given by 
Goldsboro F.H.A. Chapter, directed 
by Mr. Clifton Britton, Director of 
Dramatics, Goldsboro High School. 
More than forty girls took part in 
this pageant and brought many facts 
to us concerning the Future Homes 
of America. 



DISTRICT III 

Fayetteville 

Betty Lou Graham, Presiding 

Members, Advisers, Chapter 
Mothers, and other distinguished 
guests attended the District III Ral- 
ly at Fayetteville High School, Oc- 
tober 25. This was a glorious day 
with the sunshine filling the bedlam 
world of campaigning around Fay- 
etteville High School with warmth 
and beauty. Delegates arriving were 
greeted by bells and the shouting 
voices of the campaigners for the 
four candidates for State Vice-Presi- 
dent. Three of the candidates run- 
ning from Cumberland County 
were: Mary Le Grand Parks, Fay- 
etteville; Norma Sue Davis, Hope 
Mills; and Betty Calhoun, Seventy- 
First. Fay Dark, the fourth candi- 
date, came from Hoke County High 
in Hoke County. Betty Calhoun was 
elected to serve as Vice-President for 
1953-54 and she will automatically 
become President in 1954-55. 

Lt. Colonel Wallace M. Hales of 
Fort Bragg, the main speaker of 
the morning session, spoke to the 
group on "Home Life in Italy." 
He told the Future Homemakers 
"that the majority of people in 
Italy place the emphasis on home 
life and make their homes a place 
filled with generous, hospitable at- 
mosphere." 

During the business session the 
District III group voted almost 
unanimously to give five cents to 
the State Office to cover expenses 
and fifteen cents to send an officer 
to Columbus, Ohio. 

The all-day annual meeting got 
under way at ten o'clock in the au- 
ditorium with a welcome from 
C Reid Ross, Superintendent of 
Fayetteville schools. Ross was intro- 



duced by Beth Bowen, President 
of the chapter. 

Presiding at the morning and af- 
ternoon sessions, which were de- 
voted to district reports, was Betty 
Lou Graham, State F.H.A. Secre- 
tary. Mrs. Mary B. Frederick, Dis- 
trict Adviser, and Miss Mary Hines 
Leonard, District Supervisor, were 
on hand for the meeting. 



DISTRICT IV 

Henderson 
Jean Faulkner, Presiding 

The annual meeting of District 
IV met on October 4 in Henderson 
High School with 668 girls, Ad- 
visers and Chapter Mothers present. 
After the opening ceremony, led 
by Jean Faulkner, State Vice-Presi- 
dent, Mills Chapter conducted an 
inspirational devotional, followed 
by Jean Crews from Creedmoor, 
who beautifully sang "Bless This 
House." The group was then wel- 
combed to Henderson by Mr. Kes- 
ler, Principal, and Sarah Pulley, 
President of F.H.A. Charlotte Noell 
from Benhaven, Sylvia Matthews 
from Sanford, and Leah Wilder 
from Franklinton assisted with the 
business of the day. 

Miss Daphne Eller, State F.H.A. 
Adviser, gave a report of the Na- 
tional Convention, which was held 
in Greenlake, Wisconsin. She told 
us that 81 members and 20 adults 
would be allowed to go to the Na- 
tional Convention next year. She 
also reminded us to look for candi- 
dates for the National Officers. 

Invitations for the 1953 rally 
were issued from the Benhaven and 
Franklinton Chapters. 

The group voted to pay 15 cents 
per member to send delegates to 
the National Convention in Colum- 
bus, Ohio, and five cents to cover 
increase in national dues. 

Mrs. Louise Winslow, District IV 
Adviser, then talked to us about 
our national projects and how we 
could participate in these in our 
local chapters. 

The highlight of the meeting and 
an especial honor for us was the 
presence of Miss Marguerite 
Scruggs, National F.H.A. Adviser, 
who spoke on "F.H.A. in Focus." 
She explained our place in the na- 
tional organization and what we 
might do to gain new horizons for 
for F.H.A. 

We were also honored to have 
Mrs. Charlotte Glover from Ger- 
many tell us of family life in Ger- 
many and how it differed from ours. 
Other special guests present were 



Miss Catherine T. Dennis, State Su- 
pervisor of Home Economics, and 
Mrs. Sturgess Collins, who led the 
group in folk songs. 

Due to the fact that Chapel Hill 
and Bethcsda Chapters were unable 
to attend because of polio, the pa- 
geant which they were to present 
was cancelled. Everyone was dis- 
appointed to miss such a treat. 

After the closing ceremony, 
lunch, which was served picnic style 
in the gymnasium, ended a very 
successful meeting. 



DISTRICT V 

Gibsonville 
Carolyn Abernathy, Presiding 

The F.H.A. Rally for District V 
was held at Gibsonville High School, 
October 11, 1952. Registration be- 
gan at 10:00 a.m. and at 10:30 
Carolyn Abernathy, State President, 
called the meeting to order. The 
Ramseur Chapter led the opening 
ceremony. Devotional was by the 
Summer School with a solo by Wen- 
da Lou Hodgin. The president 
recognized Mr. M. C. Freeman, 
principal of Gibsonville High 
School, and Barbara Engelbright, 
Vice-President of the local F.H.A. 
chapter, who extended a friendly 
welcome to those attending the Ral- 
ly. Special guests recognized were 
Miss Daphne Eller, State F.H.A. 
Adviser; Mrs. Rebecca Smith, Dis- 
trict Adviser; Miss Louise Lowe, 
the Methods Class for W.C.U.N.C, 
and Chapter Mothers. Then those 
F.H.A. members having earned 
their State, Chapter, and Junior de- 
grees were recognized. 

Carolyn Abernathy then intro- 
duced the candidates for state song- 
leader and their campaign man- 
agers who gave their qualifications. 
Carolyn called upon Harriet Shelton 
of High Point, Ollie Welborn of 
Trinity, and Joe Anne Wright of 
Ramseur to demonstrate their abil- 
ity before the group. 

A business session followed with 
reading of the minutes and roll call 
by Pleasant Garden Chapter and 
treasurer's report by the president. 
Miss Eller explained the increase in 
national dues. The move was made 
and passed to send an additional 
five cents per member with national 
dues and 15 cents per member to 
send advisers and state officers to 
national convention. Rules concern- 
ing the writing of a F.H.A. song 
were listed by the president. 

The following remaining four can- 
didates for songleader gave their 
demonstrations: Margaret Monnett 




The three leading candidates for song leader from District V smile charmingly for 
the photographer. They are: Ollie Welborn, Margaret Monnett, and Anne Lawson. 



of Pleasant Garden, Annie Jo Law- 
son of Madison, Wenda Lou Hodgin 
of Sumner, and Sara Galyon of 
Randleman. Voting for the top three 
candidates was under the direction 
of Alexander-Wilson and Leaksville 
Chapters. 

Lunch was served picnic style on 
the school grounds followed by rec- 
reation and exchange of ideas of 
club activities in the gymnasium. 

The afternoon session began with 
the commencement of Annie Jo 
Lawson, Margaret Monnett and Ol- 
lie Welborn as the first three in the 
morning voting. These candidates 
demonstrated again and the voting 
which followed showed Annie Jo 
Lawson as State Songleader. First 
alternate, Ollie Welborn; and sec- 
ond alternate, Margaret Monnett. 

The guest speaker for the Rally 
was Mrs. J. Winston Pearce who 
discussed "The Girl's Responsibili- 
ties in the World Today" encourag- 
ing us to claim our unused talents, 
to finish tasks we have begun, and 
to make our place known in some 
service. We enjoyed her talk very 
much. 

Monticello Chapter announced 
278 members, 28 advisers, and eight 
guests registered at the Rally. 
Jamestown chapter extended thanks 
to all chapters and persons contrib- 
uting to the success of the Rally, 
especially Gibsonville for the enjoy- 
able visit to their school. Ramseur 
led the F.H.A. closing ceremony 
and the 1952 F.H.A. District V Ral- 
ly was adjourned. 



DISTRICT VI 

Wingate 

Clara Burris, Presiding 

Wingate High School, with the 
Anson-Union Federation assisting, 
was hostess to the District VI Rally 
of Future Homemakers of America 
on November 15. About five hun- 
dred members and guests from 
Anson, Cabarrus, Mecklenburg, 
Montgomery, Stanley and Union 
counties attended the Rally. 

An excellent concert by the Win- 
gate High School Band was the 
first feature of the program and 
received enthusiastic applause from 
the audience. 

Dr. C. C. Burris, President of 
Wingate Junior College, gave the 
invocation. 

The feature of the morning pro- 
gram was an informal lecture by 
Mr. Loy Sigmon, Jr., Interior De- 
signer, for Maiden Fabrics, Inc. 
Combinations of color and texture 
in the popular periods of decora- 
tion were illustrated by materials 
to show the good and bad effects 
produced by proper or improper se- 
lections. Mr. Sigmon made interior 
decorating seem so alive and vital 
that many girls were heard express- 
ing a desire to enter the field as a 
profession. 

The highlight of the afternoon 
was the Pageant, "Where We Have 
Been, Where We are, and Where 
We Are Going" presented by the 
Mecklenburg County Chapters. 
This pageant was especially written 
for the National Delegates Meeting 
of F.H.A. at Green Lake, Wiscon- 



sin, this summer and presents the 
past, present and future of our or- 
ganization interestingly and amus- 
ingly. 

Miss Mary Hines Leonard, As- 
sistant State Supervisor, helped plan 
the Rally and was a platform guest 
at both sessions. Many Chapter 
Mothers and Fathers, Honorary 
Members and friends of F.H.A. at- 
tended. 

During the lunch hour Miss Ter- 
rine Holleman met with the Chap- 
ter Mothers and Fathers. They 
discussed the important role they 
have in F.H.A. and exchanged 
ideas. They compiled many excel- 
lent suggestions which will make the 
nucleus of a handbook for Chapter 
Mothers and Fathers which we hope 
to print in the near future. 

At the Advisers meeting held dur- 
ing the lunch hour, Mrs. Idelle 
Tucker — North Mecklenburg; Mrs. 
Elizabeth Troutman — Asheboro; 
Mrs. Kathleen Nicholson — Benton 
Heights; were nominated as District 
Advisers for 1953-54. 

After an enthusiastic campaign, 
Evelyn Bruton, of Candor, was 
elected State Historian. Frances Bur- 
ris, of Wingate, was elected first al- 
ternate and Peggy Adams, of Odell, 
was elected second alternate. 

Clara Burris, State Song Leader 
of Endy Chapter, presided over 
the meeting. Mrs. Clarinda A. Britt, 
Morven Chapter, was Adviser. 



DISTRICT VII 

Mount Airy 

Peggy Dunn, Presiding 

The District VII annual rally of 
the Future Homemakers of Amer- 
ica met at the Mount Airy High 
School, October 4, 1952, with the 
Mt. Airy Chapter acting as hostess 
under the supervision of Miss Ethel 
Bailey. Nine hundred and forty- 
one members, advisers, and Chap- 
ter Parents were present. 

The Dobson Chapter was in 
charge of the registration which 
lasted from ten until ten-thirty. 

The program began at ten-thirty 
with State Historian Peggy Dunn 
of the Clemmons Chapter, presid- 
ing. 

After the opening ritual, inspir- 
ing devotions were conducted by the 
Thomasville Chapter. 

Betty Gunnel of the Mt. Airy 
Chapter and Mr. Finch, principal of 
Mt. Airy High School, extended a 
hearty welcome to all. 

The honor guests which were rec- 
ognized were: Mrs. R. S. Furgeson, 
honorary member of the F.H.A.; 






Mr. Finch, principal of Mt. Airy 
High School; Miss Louise Lowe, 
District Supervisor of the F.H.A.; 
Miss Ethel Bailey, F.H.A. Adviser 
at Mt. Airy; and Miss Anne Hall, 
District Adviser of the F.H.A. 

Each Chapter Mother and Fa- 
ther present was recognized and one 
member from the Chapter pinned a 
red rose, our F.H.A. flower, on 
them. 

After the minutes and roll call 
by Acting Secretary Ann Isenhour 
of Boyden, and the Treasurer's re- 
port by Acting Treasurer Jane Brad- 
shaw of Boyden, Emily Atwood of 
the Clemmons Chapter explained 
the raise from ten to fifteen cents 
per member for National Dues. 
Each Chapter was asked to discuss 
this matter with their own club and 
be ready to vote at the Spring Rally 
which will be held in Raleigh. 

Elaine Allen, Mocksville Chap- 
ter, explained how the balloting 
would be carried on for the election 
of Parliamentarian. Irene Wilhelm, 
Cleveland Chapter, introduced each 
candidate and her campaign man- 
ager. After their campaign manager 
told something about them, the can- 
didates told something of their 
knowledge of parliamentary proce- 
dure. Candidates were Mary Ber- 
rier, North Davidson, with man- 
ager Eva Penry; Regene Moulton, 
Salisbury, with manager Anne Law- 
son; and Joe Ann Woosley, South 
Fork, with manager Sonja Tish. 

After the balloting Peggy intro- 
duced those who told about the 
National Projects. The projects ex- 
plained were: Pen Pals by Alex- 
ander County; Families Together, 
Lexington Chapter; In Other Lands, 
Spencer Chapter; U. N. Day, 
Stokes County; F.H.A. Week, Ire- 
dell County; U.N.E.S.C.O., Forsyth 
County; and Program of work, Coo- 
leemee, Reeds, and Robert B. Gleen 
Chapters, and Alexander, Caldwell, 
Iredell, Stokes, and Wilkes coun- 
ties. 

Miss Lowe told about the Na- 
tional Meeting which is to be held 
this coming summer. North Caro- 
lina can send 81 chapter members 
and 20 adults this year. The con- 
vention will be held in Columbus, 
Ohio. It was requested that each 
chapter send in fifteen cents per 
member to send the state officers 
to the convention. Any chapter may 
send delegates and any chapter 
member may go at her own expense. 
If the District votes to send the Dis- 
trict Adviser, then each Chapter will 
be participating. 



After the announcements, the 
meeting was adjourned for lunch. 

The afternoon session began 
promptly at two o'clock with a re- 
port from the Election Commit- 
tee. Jo Ann Woosley was elected 
State Parliamentarian with Regene 
Moulton, first alternate and Mary 
Berrier, second alternate. 

The group voted to pay fifteen 
cents per member to send the state 
officers to the National Convention. 

After Peggy told a little of her 
experiences at Green Lake this 
past summer, a play, Where's That 
Report Card? was presented by the 
Boyden Chapter. This proved to be 
the highlight of the day. 

Iredell County was in charge of 
the Talent Parade and Bobbie Ban- 
field, announcer for the show, be- 
gan by playing "September Song" 
on the piano. Wanda Speece, Union 
Grove, sang "Danny Boy"; Snuff, 
a recitation, was given by Jo 
Ann Steele, Stony Point; Scottie Mul- 
lis played "Prelude" on the piano; 
Ann Summers accompanied Wini- 
fred Morrow, Ellen Pope, and 
Ellen Watts as they played two num- 
bers on the cornet as a trio; Ann 
Souther sang "Old Man River" and 
Pat Morrison, Taylorsville, ended 
the parade with the piano solo, 
"Charge of the Uhlans." 

The Courtney Chapter pre- 
sented the song skit, "Way Up In 
North Carolina," and two girls from 
Booneville led in group singing. 

A report was given by the Roving 
Reporter and the Invitation Com- 
mittee announced that the next Dis- 
trict VII F.H.A. Rally would be 
held at Mineral Springs. 



Booneville won the attendance 
prize of a rose bush presented by 
Peggy Dunn. They had 27 out of 
35 members present with one ad- 
viser. 



DISTRICT VIII 

Clyde 

La Salle Light, Presiding 

Clyde High School was the scene 
of much excitement on Saturday 
morning, October 4, as approxi- 
mately 900 girls from 56 Chapters 
met to attend their annual District 
VIII Rally. 

During the registration hour an in- 
formal music program was presented 
by several students of Clyde High 
School. Following the registration 
La Salle Light, State Parliamen- 
tarian, called the meeting to order. 
Mr. Stanley Livingston, Principal, 
and Mary Frances McCracken, 
president of the Clyde Chapter, ex- 
tended a warm welcome to the large 
delegation and Ann Dillingham of 
Barnardsville Chapter gave the re- 
sponse. After an inspiring de- 
votional by Martha Fortune, Bre- 
vard, a business meeting was 
conducted by La Salle Light with 
Charlotte McDougal of the Ruther- 
fordton-Spindale Chapter and Caro- 
lyn Wilkie of the Flat Rock Chapter 
assisting. 

A light note of interest was in- 
troduced by Janice Pipes and Gail 
Hambricks, who led the group in 
some relaxers. 

Virginia Huffman reminded ev- 
eryone that it was election time 
and that a good F.H.A.'er votes for 
the best candidate. It was a difficult 

(Continued on inside back cover) 



Shirley Crotts, member of District VIII planning committee who spoke briefly on the 
National Convention to be held in Columbus, Ohio, this summer, is shown talking 
over her comments with some fellow F.H.A. members. Shirley is seated on the right. 




Pictune* *7eM o£ g&ajtte* rfctivtUu 




Top row, left to right: Linda Bolick is shown serving her adviser, Mrs. Young (both of Taylorsville chapter) a helping of 
her state-prize-winning Apple Pan Dowdy. Ann Harris, Historian of Bragtown Chapter, is carrying out her responsibility of 
keeping the chapter scrap book up to date. Center row: Quin County Federation Meeting. Mrs. Clyde Cole, Chapter Mother 
at Bartlett Yancey, inspects garments being made by the homemaking class. No, you're not in need of glasses! This is just 
the way the Beaufort F.H.A. girls looked during F.H.A. initiation. In the circle: A Greek student made happy by having her 
birthday remembered by F.H.A.'ers. Bottom row: Mr. John Gunn, Chapter Father at Bartlett Yancey. Morganton F.H.A. 
Chapter gives Christmas party for deaf children. 



?ed&utfio*t 7%eeti*ty 

On September 20, fifty-two ad- 
visers and Future Homemakers of 
America representatives for four- 
teen chapters in Jones, Duplin, 
Sampson, Onslow and Pender coun- 
ties met at the Katy-Did Cottage 
at Carolina Beach for a day of plan- 
ning and fun. After a dip in the 
ocean, a delicious picnic meal was 
enjoyed by a gang of hungry girls. 
Then to work on planning for the 
programs of the Federation, the big 
event being the spring rally. The 
officers reported for their respec- 
tive offices, then everyone partici- 
pated in the planning. Quite an 
interesting program was set up for 
the rally and all chapters were 
assigned jobs. Everyone had a grand 
time and gave many thanks to their 
hostess, Mrs. Kathleen Snyder, ad- 
viser of the Warsaw Chapter, for 
making it possible for them to be at 
the beach on such a gorgeous fall 
day. Betty Blanchard, Annette Boy- 
ette, Peggy Kornegay, Molly Hipp 
and Betty Phillips were co-hostesses 
with Mrs. Snyder. Thanks again, 
girls, for a wonderful day. 

The officers of the Quin County 
Federation are: President, Alyce 
Manning, Richlands Chapter; Vice- 
President, Bert Walton, Jacksonville 
Chapter; Secretary, Betty Blan- 
chard, Warsaw Chapter; Treasur- 
er, Gwyn Kelly, B. F. Grady 
Chapter; Reporter, Shirley Britt, 
B. F. Grady Chapter; Song Leader, 
Christine Shaw, Richlands Chapter; 
Parliamentarian, Mildred Tanner, 
Jacksonville Chapter; Historian, 
Peggy Grady, B. F. Grady School; 
Adviser, Mrs. Clara D. Reid. 



RECIPE FOR ACQUAINTING 
NEW MEMBERS 

(For Old Members Only) 

1. Mix them in at a special meet- 
ing. 

2. Lighten them with talks about 
purposes, colors, emblems, etc., giv- 
en by chapter members. 

3. Stir them to action by inform- 
ing them of F.H.A. activities. 

4. Fold in ideas from State and 
National Meetings. 

5. Whip up interest with a spe- 
cial ceremony of pledging and wear- 
ing of pledge ribbons. 

6. Pour in a pan of F.H.A. meet- 
ings, bake, and frost with fun. 



How do you make people out- 
side the Chapter better acquainted 
with F.H.A.? People can become 
better acquainted through newspa- 
pers, radio programs, skits, and just 
through the individuals themselves. 

First, let's take newspapers. Each 
of you, I know, has a reporter in 
your Chapter. Some may make 
their articles very interesting; others 
dry. Good for you if you have one 
that's really good! But, if she isn't, 
don't just look down upon her. 
Help her; give her some interesting 
points, talk to the editor and ask 
him what kinds of articles he likes, 
have articles in on time, and in- 
clude all events that your chapter 
does. Also ask someone like the 
composition teacher to help her 
make her things interesting. 

To make a meeting or a pro- 
gram different give the emblem 
ceremony, or a short skit on de- 
grees. It may not only help the 
public, but maybe many of vou 
members as well. Also you may 
give such skits to the P.T.A. and 
other various groups. 

Each individual helps people 
know what the F.H.A. is by her 
examples. If you are one who likes 
to help people and in doing so. tell 
them about your chapter, then good 
for you; but if you are one who 
doesn't help other people, then 
you're no F.H.A. member. So let's 
remember to tell people about 
F.H.A., and they might be more 
willing to help you and your chap- 
ter.* 



Teen Times 



DISTRICT RALLIES 

K ontinued from page seven) 
decision to make, but after a healed 
campaign, election returns revealed 
that Garrie Freeman from Ruther- 
I'ordton-Spindale was chosen State 
Reporter with Susie Carmichall 
from Sand Hill and Ann Sillingham 
from Barnardsville as first and sec- 
ond alternates. 

The special feature of the morn- 
ing session was the talk by Mrs. 
C. O. Newel, who spoke on "Teen- 
Age Problems." Her talk dealt 
mainly with dating, boy-girl rela- 
tionships and the best methods of 
solving average teen-age problems. 

The lunch hour featured discus- 
sion groups on "We Share When We 
Care" led by members of the dif- 
ferent Chapters. Another special at- 
traction was the entertainment by 
the Blue Ridge Ramblers. A hot 
lunch was served in the school lunch 
room, followed by a choice of going 
to the gymnasium for games or to 
the auditorium for group singing. 

The highlight of the afternoon 
session was a style show presented 
by the Canton Chapter through the 
courtesy of Simplicity Pattern Com- 
pany and Seventeen Magazine. It 
showed the versatile wardrobe that 
can be made with only six patterns 
and a few alterations of each. 

Official guests present were: Miss 
Louise Swann, Assistant Supervisor 
of Home Economics; Mrs. Lucille 
Brintnall, District F.H.A. Adviser; 
and Donald Hips of Canton, who 
directed games in the gymnasium. 
Chapter Mothers and other guests 
were also recognized. The meeting 
promptly adjourned at 3 o'clock 
with the closine ritual. 



Shown above are a few of the special guests at District III Rally. From left to right 
are: Mrs. Mary Frederick, District Adviser; Lt. Colonel Wallace M. Hales, Speaker; 
Miss Mary Hines Leonard, Asst. State Supervisor; Beth Bowen, President of Fayette- 
ville Chapter; Melree Hubbard, Acting Secretary; Betty Lou Graham, Presiding 
Officer, and Barbara Autry, Acting 1 Parliamentarian. 




sfc?: 



Future Homemakers of America 

CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




'The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 



X 




CAROLINE SAYS 



Are you willing . . . 

To stoop down and consider the needs and desires 
of little children; 

To remember the weakness and loneliness of people 
who are growing old; 

To stop asking how many of your friends love you and 
ask yourself if you love them enough; 

To bear in mind the things that other people have to 
bear on their hearts; 

To try to understand what those who live in the same 
house with you really want, without waiting for them 
to tell you; 

To trim your lamp so that it will give more light and 
less smoke, and carry it in front so that your shadow 
will face behind you; 

To make a grave for your ugly thoughts and a garden 
for your kindly feelings, with the gate open . . . 

Are you willing to do these things even for a day? 

If so, then you can keep Christmas. 

Henry Van Dyke. 



m 







. HOMEMAKERS 

North Carolina Association * 



VOLUME X 



FEBRUARY 1953 



NUMBER 3 




We work together for 

better and happier 

home life for everyone. 




North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1952-1953 

President — Carolyn Abernathy, Alexander-Wilson 

Vice-President— Jean Faulkner, Red Oak 

Secretary — Betty Lou Graham, Stedman 

Treasurer — Betty Hatton, Goldsboro 

Reporter — Kitty Campen, Edenton 

Parliamentarian — LaSalle Light, Old Fort , 

Historian — Peggy Dunn, Clemmons 

Song Leader — Clara Burris, Endy 



District Advisers 
1952-1953 

Mrs. Queenie Warren, Robersonville 

Mrs. Thelma Dilday, B. F. Grady 

Mrs. Mary Frederick, Stedman 

Mrs. Louise Winslow, Aycock 

Mrs. Rebecca Smith, Randleman 

Mrs. Clarinda Britt, Morven 

Miss Anne Hall, Boyden 

Mrs. Lucille Brintnall, Swain County 



State Adviser 
Miss Daphne Eller 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



Our ways of doing all the everyday things, from the moment 
we begin a day till it's closed, our entrances and exits, our 
manner of sitting and rising, speaking, walking, talking, 
meeting friends, giving orders, doing business, entertain- 
ing and being entertained, going here and there about 
the earth, form the exterior which is all most people ever 
get of us. There may be pure gold deep down inside, 
but we can't ask the busy world to stop and mine us to 
find out. The evidences of its being there had better come 
to the surface in the "happy way" if we want to be ap- 
preciated, to get the most out of living, and to give the 
most. We owe it to ourselves — and those with whom 
we travel — to be a pleasure person. Some of the most 
worthy people in the world go unloved and unappreciated 
to their graves because of their bad manners. Let us 
begin to remedy this defect in our national life, and let 
us begin the remedy where we begin the defect — in the 
home. 

From "SINGING IN THE RAIN" 
By Anne Shannon Monroe 



to the human relationship of love in 
a home when it says in the fifth 
chapter of Ephesians, "Husbands, 
love your wives, even as Christ also 
loved the Church and gave himself 
for it . . . and the wife see that she 
reverence her husband." This 
specific direction for a sacrificial 
love and respect betweer husband 
and wife will go a long way in fur- 
ther strengthening the home we are 
building on the foundation of Truth, 
that Truth being Christ, Himself. 

Third: SECURITY. We hear a 
lot today about providing security 
from a financial standpoint and, of 
course, that is important in plans of 
future home builders. But in that 
kind of security, we are quite lim- 
ited in our ability to provide for it 
and guarantee that it is able to 
stand the tests. But the fundamen- 
tals of home building include a kind 
of security that will stand, though 
all the world about us crumbles un- 
der the pressure of sin and destruc- 
tion. Again Jesus gives us the 
answer: "My sheep hear my voice 
and I know them and they follow 



T)ne Urue Meaning, 0/ Our Creed 

cA devotional by- Cdythe 9uller, Mill* Chapter and presented at the Jbhtrict IV /Rally 



As Future Homemakers of Amer- 
ica, we will pause for a few min- 
utes to give thanks to our Savior who 
has made our organization a success 
because of our many prayers. We 
must continue to give thanks 
through prayer and ask for the tools 
that make a happy home life where 
living will be the expression of 
everything that is good and fair. 

We state in our Creed that we, 
the Future Homemakers of Amer- 
ica, are going to be builders of 
homes where "truth, love, security 
and faith" are realities, not dreams. 
That presents to us a great chal- 
lenge if we mean it with all our 
hearts and it is something more than 
than just the words of a creed 
that sounds good to us now. So, for 
our devotional today, suppose we 
take a few minutes to analyze these 
four words and see what these es- 
sentials of homemaking really are: 

First: TRUTH. Jesus, during his 
mock trial before Pilate made 
this statement: "To this end was I 
born, and for this cause came I into 
the world, that I should bear witness 



unto the truth. Everyone that is of 
the truth heareth my voice." Pilate 
asked, "What is truth?" and left the 
scene with this question unan- 
swered. However, we need not be 
left in the position of Pilate today 
for Jesus answers the question in 
John 14:6 where he said, "... I am 
the way, the TRUTH, and the life. 
. . ." And again in his high priestly 
prayer of John 17, He said to the 
Father, ". . . Thy word is TRUTH." 
So we see that in order to build a 
home with the first essential men- 
tioned in our creed, we must have as 
its foundation none other than our 
Savior, Jesus Christ and His Word 
as TRUTH. 

Second: LOVE. Here again we 
meet practically the same require- 
ment for we probably all learned 
that very short verse in Sunday 
School as a small child, "God is 
love." Of course the reference to 
love in our creed is very probably 
human love — but a human love 
patterned after the divine love of 
the Lord is the only human love 
that lasts. The Bible gives direction 



me: And I give unto them eternal 
life; and they shall never perish, 
neither shall any man pluck them 
out of my hand." (John 10:27). 
We cannot hope to build a home in 
which security is a reality unless we 
first of all accept from Christ His 
gift of eternal life and rest in the 
provisions He makes for His own. 

Fourth: FAITH. This is really 
the key to all the other three basic 
fundamentals of homebuilders re- 
ferred to in our great Creed. For 
it is only as we exercise complete 
trust and faith in the One who is 
Truth and Love and who alone can 
guarantee security that we can even 
hope to enjoy these things in our 
individual lives now or in our fu- 
ture homes. "For by grace are ye 
saved through FAITH: and that not 
yourselves; it is the gift of God." 
So we must first admit the truth of 
the verse in the Bible that says "All 
have sinned . . ." and then, realizing 
that includes each one of us, 
we may repent of our sinful nature, 
asking God to forgive us and give 
(Continued on page five) 




This scene shows the newly slip-covered chair and ottoman. 
The tahle by the chair was also purchased and refinished. 
Those helping were, left to right: Mary Frances Ivey, Betty 
Jean Clarke, Alma Bullard, Martha Hedgepeth, Ellen Jane 
Bryon. 



Beds were purchased at War Surplus store and refinished. 
Bed spread flounce was made from nylon parachute. Girls 
helping are, front of bed: Bonnie Pait; Left to right: Eloise 
Evers, Christine Deaver, Emma Gryton, Julia Vann Bailier. 



BLADENBORO F*H<A'ers 



Jeeps, tanks, and trucks, that's 
what we expected to see on our 
first visit to the War Surplus Ware- 
house in Raleigh. What can we use 
that the Army doesn't need? Yep, 
that was the favorite question of 
113 Bladenboro F. H. A. members. 

Do take a journey with us through 
the warehouse, as it was most ex- 
citing. Two chapter members and 
our adviser arrived at the ware- 
house. Mr. A. C. Carver greeted us 
and offered his assistance. We were 
very grateful to him, as we felt rath- 
er lost in our surroundings. I took a 
quick glance around only to rea- 
lize that we were ready for a lot 
of fun, but ready to make that de- 
cision—what shall we buy? 

From the far corners of the ware- 
house I could hear — "Look at this, 
how wonderful, we can use that for 
curtains." When our list was com- 
pleted, we found ourselves the proud 
owners of two hospital beds, a small 
typewriter table, one odd chair, 
two secretary chairs, one desk, five 
ottomans, ten sofa pillows, two para- 
chutes, and three cases of mos- 
quito netting and, oh, I must tell 
you about the free room! Mr. Car- 
ver invited us to visit this room, and 
he instructed us that all items in 
this room were available without 
cost. Imagine that! It was from this 
room, that we secured six cases of 
neckties, two lamp shades, and a 
luggage rack. 



The time had come for our bill 
to be added and we were really 
shaky, as our chapter budget had 
allowed us only $70.00 for cottage 
improvements. We reluctantly ac- 
cepted the bill, but we found our- 
selves rejoicing in that we had spent 
only $28.00. 

Luck was really falling our way, 
as the county moved the merchan- 
dise to Bladenboro. Guess what? 
The county Board of Education re- 
imbursed us $10.00 on the amount 
we had spent. We were really in 
high spirits, as that left us $52.00 
to purchase re-upholstering supplies 
and other necessary items. 

The refinishing, slip-covering, 
and re-upholstering were heaps of 
fun. I must tell you how we used 
the mosquito netting and para- 
chutes. The nylon parachutes were 
used for flounces on the beds we 
refinished. The mosquito netting 
made lovely bedroom curtains. The 
lamp shades even found a place in 
our new home, as they were used 
for wall flower containers. The free 
gift that we enjoyed most was the 
six cases of neckties and you should 
see our rug that we braided using 
the ties. 

The secretaries chairs made won- 
derful fire-side chairs. The otto- 
mans, desk, and table completed 
the vacant spots in our home. 

Our task is now completed, and 
we are truly thrilled with our much 



fJU, IN FOCUS 

"F. H. A. In Focus" has been re- 
vised. Have you been wondering 
what to do with those attractive 
pamphlets? They were designed for 
the purpose of publicing F. H. A. 
and interpreting the organization to 
interested people. 

How To Use F.H.A. in Focus 

Hand copies to: 

1. Civic Club members when 
you appear on their programs 

2. F. H. A. members 

3. Prospective F. H. A. mem- 
bers 

4. Businessmen in town 

5. People attending a special 
F. H. A. program or banquet 

6. Radio and newspaper people 

7. People viewing an F. H. A. 
exhibit 

8. Chapter parents 

9. Nearby schools which don't 
have F. H. A. 

10. Legislators 

11. Anyone you ask to appear 
on an F. H. A. program. 

Additional copies may be ordered 
from the National office for one 
cent each. Be sure to us your 
"F.H.A. in Focus" whenever pos- 
sible. 



improved department. Thanks to 
war surplus supplies, as we are not 
in the red but have a balance of 
$11.36 to spend on other needs. 



Careers In Homemakinj* 



usually in department and furniture 
store sales; textile or furniture de- 
signs; home decorators; writing; or 
teaching. 



Many of you are approaching the 
time in your high school career 
when you have to make one of the 
most important decisions of your 
life — what to do after you grad- 
uate. There are many opportuni- 
ties awaiting you. Why not choose 
a career in home economics. In the 
field of home economics, as never 
before, new doors are being opened. 
Although some of these fields re- 
quire a B.S. degree with a major 
in home economics from an accred- 
ited college or university, there are 
many opportunities awaiting a per- 
son who knows what he wants and 
who is willing to work from the 
ground floor up. 



Teaching 

Probably the most inspiring and 
rewarding of all homemaking ca- 
reers is the one with which you are 
most familiar — teaching. What is 
more wonderful than helping a 
group of pupils gain experiences 
which serve as a means of meeting 
the day by day needs of home and 
family living? A teacher should 
have a keen understanding of the 
relationship of personal develop- 
ment to everyday living, and the 
contributions that these make to 
home and society. She must have 
an understanding of youth and a 
desire to provide learning exper- 
iences which will help them meet 
the problems of daily living. 

The teaching profession is very 
versatile in that it becomes a back- 
ground and stepping-stone for other 
opportunities. Some examples are: 
College teaching; supervisor; local 
and federal government personnel 
and counselors; demonstrators; or 
any specialized field discussed later 
in this article. 

To be a teacher requires a B.S. 
degree from any accredited college 
or university and a love for youth! 



Journalism 

Journalism is a profession in 
which job opportunities are on the 
up and up. More and more people 
are anxious to gain information on 
family relations, new labor saving 
devices, ideas and fashions in cloth- 
ing, foods, decoration and even 
home management. "Journalism" 
may include newspapers, maga- 



zines, radio, television, advertising, 
publicity, and all ways of reaching 
the public. 

This profession requires quick in- 
telligence, a keen curiosity, interest 
in people, creative instinct, and a 
"know-how" with words. 

Anyone aiming for a career in 
journalism will need varied exper- 
iences before reaching the top, such 
as working on a newspaper, radio 
station, advertising departments — 
anything that helps in meeting the 
public. 



Clothing 

Is clothing your big interest now? 
If you have a knack for making 
something out of nothing, for taking 
an ordinary garment and giving it 
that certain flair, then you may have 
a talent for the clothing field. Anne 
Fogarty, talented young designer, 
who introduced wasp waistlines and 
crinaline petticoats actually began 
designing as a young girl when she 
transformed hand-me-downs from 
that cast-off look into smart cos- 
tumes. Some of the opportunities 
for clothing majors are teaching; 
selling; designing; research; news 
writing. 



Decorating 

The urge to paint up and fix up, 
to try something new and different, 
to combine colors, may indicate you 
have the necessary requirements 
for the field of decorating. Again, 
the sky is the limit if you want to 
apply yourself. 

This field requires being able to 
analyze the public's likes and dis- 
likes, to have a gift for trying the 
unusual, and to be patient in climb- 
ing to the top. There is keen com- 
pecition in decorating, and even the 
most famous decorators have had 
wide and varied experiences, not 
all of them successful. 

To gain experience, and to de- 
cide if you really are interested in 
decorating, why not work in a fur- 
niture or department store on Sat- 
urdays or during the summer, or 
even decorate your room as a home 
project. Use every chance to learn 
more about color, design, room ar- 
rangement, textiles, and art prin- 
ciples. 

Opportunities in this field are 



Child Care 

Jobs in the expanding field of 
child care vary from baby-sitting to 
testing toys in a scientific lab. 
Clothing, feeding, amusing, guiding 
and understanding children pro- 
vides almost unlimited possibilities. 
Every experience, whether it be 
dressing a neighbor's child or work- 
ing in a nursery school will be just 
one more step up the ladder to suc- 
cess. 

To help you decide if you really 
want to work in this field, ask your- 
self if you really like children, if 
you have the patience and gentle- 
ness required to listen to children 
hour after hour, to guide without 
bossing, and to be sympathetic to 
their whims. If you make good in 
this field, the sky is your limit! 



Home Management 

If you have an air for efficiency 
and economy, why not try home 
management? This phase of home 
economics requires a love for facts 
and figures, and a yen to improve 
and change. With this train- 
ing and experience, one may be- 
come a housing consultant; budget 
expert; appliance demonstrator; 
government worker, with other 
fields opening. 



Foods 

If you find food fascinating, if 
you love to putter around in the 
kitchen and plan family meals, then 
you would probably find enjoyment 
in food beyond the mere eating. 
The science of nutrition and food 
go hand in hand, however, and you 
have to know how to put your 
knowledge to work for people. 

With the proper training in foods, 
one may become a dietitian, nu- 
tritionist, demonstrator, sales per- 
son, restaurant manager. Television 
and journalism also offer many pos- 
sibilities. 



Business 

Probably the most challenging 
and untried is the business field. If 
you have a pioneering spirit, lots 
of curisoity, and determination to 
improve what has already been 
tried, then you're going places. The 
climb may be slow and you may 
fall down and have to begin again, 

(Continued on inside back cover) 




Above is one way in which Haywood County F.H.A.'ers modeled evening dress at 
their County rally. Left to right: Barbara Chase, Waynesville; Lydia West, Bethel; 
Elizabeth Ann Crawford, Crabtree-Ironduff; Nell Scruggs, Waynesville. 




Cloydia Carstarphen is seen checking the 
hem of Peggy McClain's evening dress as 
they prepare for a fashion show at Lee 
Edwards High. 

Something unexpected always makes a 
hit. Mikell McGinvis and Anne Wood- 
ward from Lee Edwards modeled pedal 
pushers, and for a comic touch they 
added fancy lace garters with their names 
stamped on them. 



When Spring Comes the 
Future Homemakers turn to thoughts 
of New Clothes and . . . 



FASHION SHOWS 



Giving a fashion show is fun and very worthwhile. 
It not only entertains friends and family members, it 
gives them an opportunity to admire the garments 
so carefully made in homemaking classes. A fashion 
show also provides an excellent chance for the par- 
ticipants to gain stage presence, poise and self con- 
fidence. It can be a glamorous method of recruiting 
prospective F.H.A. members and an easy way to 
make money for chapter projects. 

A successful fashion show, however, is no acci- 
dent. Every step must be carefully planned. The ul- 
timate aim should be a smooth running show, 
attractively presented, and geared to the audience's 
interests. 

The first rule is to choose a definite theme and 
catchy title. Themes may be built around hobbies, 
sports, good books, favorite tunes, current events, 
holidays, etc. The latest fashion magazines always 
have timely suggestions. 

Another rule is to choose a good narrator with a 
pleasing voice and a conversational style and one who 
can make lively comments on the models and keep 
things moving. 



A very important must is emphasis on good groom- 
ing and careful choosing of accessories. A final 
check should be given the models to see that no hems 
sag or slips show, that the hair is neatly arranged and 
shoes are shined. 




A clever theme is a television show. Talent can be used be- 
tween groupings of models to add interest and variety. Shown 
here are left to right: Jean Harrelson, Peggy McClain, Shirley 
Smith and Margaret Jarman from Lee Edwards High. 



Helps For 



1/VdtJ 



Chapters 



3u JH 



inimnatu 



Does your chapter have that tired, 
run down spirit that comes to so 
many organizations just after Christ- 
mas and just before spring? 

Keeping the interest and enthusi- 
asm of all members is not as easy as 
it sounds. Maybe these suggestions 
will help. 

1. See that programs are well 
planned with the needs and interests 
of the members in mind. An out- 
side speaker will usually create en- 
thusiasm. 

2. Keep members informed of 
local and state plans and activities. 
An attractive bulletin board or 
an F. H. A. nook with Teen 
Times and Newsletters displayed 
gives members an opportunity to 
"browse." 

3. Have as many members as 
possible working on activities, proj- 
ects and programs. The adviser 
should give support and be in- 
formed, and be able to give direc- 
tions, but leave the planning and 
carrying out of the activities to the 
initiative of the members and of- 
ficers. 

4. Have meetings at a definite 
time when all will know about it. 
Publicize the time of each meeting 
and the program planned. An- 
nounce any outside speaker. 

5. Maybe it's time to have a party 
or social for your parents. Have you 
tried a Daddy-Date night? Or a fam- 
ily night, inviting the entire family 



to a specially planned program 
with games for all ages and refresh- 
ments afterwards? 

6. Hold a social of some nature 
for the eighth grade girls. 

7. Have a skating party and in- 
vite F. F. A. boys. 

8. Begin planning for that officer 
leadership training workshop. Or- 
ganize capable committees and set 
up activities which will strengthen 
next year's program and renew en- 
ergy for the remainder of this year. 

9. Begin a campaign to send a 
chapter officer or member to the 
National Convention in Columbus, 
Ohio, in July. 

10. Plan some special publicity 
for your chapter. If you aren't doing 
anything special, get busy! Have 
you thought of a career day for the 
seniors, inviting seniors from sur- 
rounding schools, with interesting 
personalities to speak on different 
professions? 

1 1 . A stimulating project may be 
just the thing! A clean-up cam- 
paign with the F. H. A. sponsoring 
it, or helping a displaced family, or 
a visit to the orphanage to play 
with the children. 

12. One chapter decided to ser- 
iously study parliamentary proce- 
dure and carry out the rules of order 
in every meeting, whether in 
F. H. A. or some other organiza- 
tion. And it was just what the doctor 
ordered! 



CAMP 

White Lake Camp will again be 
open for F. H. A. members from 
May 25 to June 6. Begin making 
plans now to attend one of these 
weeks. The schools getting out early 
should apply for May 25, leaving 
the last week for schools closing la- 
ter. More definite information will 
be sent you later. 

NATIONAL CONVENTION 
COLUMBUS, OHIO, JULY 2-8 

Is your chapter sending one or 
more representatives to the National 
F. H. A. Convention in Columbus, 
Ohio, July 2-8? North Carolina is 
allotted 80 members and 21 adults. 
Let's fill that quota! Please send 
the names of those planning to go 
to Miss Daphne Eller, State F. H. A. 
Adviser, Education Building, Ra- 
leigh, by April 1. 



THE TRUE MEANING 

(Continued from page one) 
to us that wonderful salvation that 
He refers to when He said ". . . ye 
are saved through faith. . . ." He 
even gives the faith with which to 
believe Him for salvation, and sal- 
vation is simply accepting Jesus as 
our Savior and yielding our lives and 
our futures in His direction. Then 
we can trust him with that faith to 
provide in our individual hearts and 
in our future homes Truth and 
Love, Security and Faith. Even our 
Creed challenges us to early take 
our stand with that great character 
of the Old Testament, Joshua, who 
took a firm stand for the Lord when 
he said, "As for me and my house, 
we will serve the Lord." He threw 
out the challenge to the Israelites 
then that is ours today: "Choose 
ye this day whom ye will serve." 




The sudden death of Dr. Clyde A. 
Erwin, State Superintendent of Pub- 
lic Instruction, brought sadness to 
Future Homemakers and friends 
everywhere. 

Dr. Erwin, known nationally for 
his interest in vocational education, 
was among the first to be selected 
for honorary membership in the 
North Carolina Association of 
F.H.A, 

North Carolina F.HA'ers. have 
lost a friend and an ardent sup- 
porter. Those of us who have 
worked with him will always cherish 
the warm spirit and helpful advice 
he so freely gave. 

Hearts were again saddened at 
the death of Mrs. Erwin, who died 
shortly after her husband. Mrs. 
Erwin's helpful and stimulating in- 
fluence will be greatly missed. Mrs. 
Erwin attended many of our state 
conventions and was always present 
with her warm smile, and a word of 
welcome. 



F.H.A. STATE CONVENTION 

The State Convention will be held 
in the Raleigh Memorial Auditor- 
ium, May 2, 1953. Many plans 
are being made to have the best 
State Convention ever! You will 
soon receive more definite informa- 
tion concerning the meeting. 



COVER PICTURE 
Betsy Hoy, president of the 
Hugh Morson Chapter of Future 
Homemakers, is shown presenting 
Dr. Charles F. Carroll, State Su- 
perintendent of Public Instruction, 
the revised issue of "F.H.A. in 
Focus." 



The Best Part of a Party 



Are you pulling hair because you 
can't dream up some "different" 
games for your party? Do you have 
trouble getting all your guests to join 
in the fun? Is there always that 
slump in enthusiasm? Maybe these 
suggestions will help you plan the 
best party of the year. 

Plan an ice breaker to get things 
going from the moment the first 
guest arrives. If you have a piano, 
ask a friend to be on hand early to 
start the gang singing. Or use a 
record player and specially picked 
records to draw the crowd together. 

"Who's that Under the Sack?" is 
an excellent one to get everyone 
into the swing of things. Everyone 
who enters is given a paper sack, a 
card, a pencil and a slip of paper 
with a number on it. The players 
pin the numbers on, tear eye-holes 
in the sacks and pin the sacks over 
their heads, then begin to hunt for 
people that they know. When the 
player finds a friend, he writes the 
name and number on the card — but 
he doesn't let anyone find out who 
he is! The one getting the most 
names wins. 

"Ping-pong Basketball" will get 
any party rolling. Place a waste 
basket at one end of the room and 
draw a line approximately 10 feet 
away. Give the guest a ping-pong 
ball. Each player has five shots at a 
time; each "basket" counts one; 
first player to get 10 wins. (Of 
course, you will have to rearrange 
the furniture to avoid knocking over 
any of Mother's prize possessions.) 

A perfect dancing game for spe- 



cial parties is the "Lemon Drop 
Dance." Each couple gets a lemon 
which they must balance between 
their foreheads while they dance — 
to make it more fun, the dance 
tempo could be changed from a 
slow waltz to a fast jitterbug or 
shag. The last couple to hang onto 
their lemon wins a prize. (Cello- 
phane wrapped popcorn balls may 
be substituted for lemons.) 

A nutty-but-fun dancing game is 
Balloon Smash. Each couple gets an 
inflated balloon, which the boy ties 
to his ankle. The idea is to burst 
the other couples' balloons while 
dancing, but keep your own intact. 

Have you tried a scavenger hunt? 
Have everyone gather at your house 
in comfortable, not best, clothes. 
Divide the guests into hunting 
teams — if its a date affair send 
them out in couples or foursomes; 
or place all the girls' names in a 
box and let the boys draw part- 
ners; or have each girl place one 
shoe in a pile and let the boys 
scramble for one — the girl who has 
the matching one is his partner. 

Then pass out the lists. Give each 
team an identical list of the craziest 
but possible-to-find items you can 
think of. A kelly green tie, a baby 
rattle, a copy of last year's phone 
book, for example. Add a little sea- 
sonal flavor by asking them to bring 
back a Easter egg or a rabbit. 

Have a definite time to return. 
Its a good idea to give a certain 
area in which to look. Check each 
team's haul and give the winners 
their prizes. 



The Ronda Chapter has grown from a very small chapter to a strong, enthusiastic 
one. They have done this by well planned programs and capable officers to keep 
activities going all year long. 




Degrees of 
Achievement . ♦ ♦ 
♦ . ♦ Recommendations 

One cold day last March, twenty- 
two F.H.A. girls, advisers, and the 
state adviser met in the Rocky 
Mount homemaking department to 
evaluate fifty-seven applications for 
state homemakers degrees. The 
group divided into small committees 
and read through the applications 
and made certain recommendations. 
Then the entire group listened to 
the summary of each application 
and the recommendations submitted. 
After several hours of careful study 
and analysis, forty-two applications 
were accepted. 

The responsibility of having to 
make these decisions was deeply 
felt by everyone present and several 
recommendations were submitted 
for making the job this year a little 
easier. 

As you work for your State Home- 
maker Degree this year, please fol- 
low these instructions carefully 
because they will serve as a guide for 
the next state degree committee. 

1. A candidate for the State 
Homemaker degree must secure a 
form of Declaration of Intention 
from the State office which must be 
appropriately signed and returned 
to this office by November 15. 

2. A clear, definite goal should 
be set up for each purpose as nearly 
as posisble with a well-laid plan for 
achieving each goal. 

3. Do not elaborate on projects 
done in other clubs or organizations. 
Remember you are working for a 
degree in F.H.A. 

4. Include, except where abso- 
lutely necessary and required, only 
activities engaged in while working 
for the State degree. 

5. Give in detailed form the prog- 
ress shown while working for the 
State degree. This is the only way 
the committee receives a picture of 
your growth. 

6. Be sure that the applicant has 
done sufficient work for every 
standard. 

7. Have proper signatures and 
dates required. 

8. The completed application 
form must be in the State office on 
or before March 15. 

The chapters which served on the 
evaluation committee were: Red 
Oak, Spring Hope, Rocky Mount, 
Scotland Neck, and Elm City. 




Richlands F.H.A.'ers Have Busy Fall. 
To begin the year, Barbara Jean Brown, 
local club president, attended a planning 
meeting in Kenansville to plan for the 
District II Rally. 

Barbara Jean Brown, Alyce Manning, 
Quin-County President, and Mrs. Clara 
Reid, our adviser, met at Carolina Beach 
with other advisers and officers of the 
Quin-County Organization to plan for 
our Quin-County Rally to be held in 
March. 

In October we initiated 50 new mem- 
bers. 

Mrs. Reid, 22 F.H.A. girls, and 2 
chapter mothers attended the District II 
Rally at Kenansville. Alyce Manning 
took charge of the election that day. 

In October we elected our officers for 
the school year. Our vice-president steps 
up into presidency and doesn't have to 
be voted on. The old officers continue 
with their duties until the new ones are 
elected. 

On October 24, each class club gave a 
program to their group on United Na- 
tions. Various materials on United Na- 
tions were displayed in the classroom, 
including the flags which represent the 
60 nation members, and the United Na- 
tions flag that we made last year. 

On Tuesday before F.H.A. Week be- 
gan on Sunday, we gave a chapel pro- 
gram presenting the Emblem Service and 
giving two girls chapter degrees in the 
degree service. We feel that this was 
good and started everyone to thinking 
more about F.H.A. 

During F.H.A. Week this was our pro- 
gram: 

Sunday — Church Day 

1. Every member was urged to attend 
Church and Sunday School. 

2. To find out how F.H.A. may be of 
help to the Church. 

Monday — Publicity Day 

1. Got story to newspaper. 

2. Put up posters and began wearing 
F.H.A. badges. 

Tuesday — Fun-D Day 

1. Had a white elephant sale in the 
home economics classroom before school 
and at lunch. 

2. Concentrated on our money making 
projects: 

a. sold flavoring 

b. sold greeting cards 

Wednesday — Courtesy Day 

1. Put slogans on each high school 
blackboard. 

2. Got money off for Korean gift 
package. 

Thursday — Community Day 

1. Brought to school outgrown clothes 
for needy. 

2. Offered help to Civil Defense. 
Friday — Fun and Achievement Night 

1. F.H.A. members exhibited some 
of their work. 

2. Parents and interested persons in- 
vited to school that night 7:30 to 8:30. 

3. Had short program telling of our 
purposes and achievements and after- 
wards had games, singing, and refresh- 
ments. 



Saturday — Family Day 

1. Fixed one or all meals for the family. 

2. Planted red rose at home or made 
plans for planting. 

3. Accepted some new home responsi- 
bilities. 

The Bath Chapter of Future Home- 
makers of America had an exhibit at the 
Beaufort County Fair and won the first 
prize of $25. 

The idea of this exhibit was, that these 
two future homemakers, as they travel 
down the road to the homes of tomor- 
row, must go through all these steps to 
have a happy and complete home. 

Winecoff's Future Homemakers hon- 
ored new members of the organization at 
a social. 

The courtesy was held in the Home 
Economics department with Mrs. Miller, 
adviser, greeting the guests. 

Games were played and prizes were 
awarded the winners. 

Punch and cookies were served. 

The chapter now has a membership of 
76. 

F.H.A. girls from the Meadow, Ben- 
son, Four Oaks, Selma and Glendale 
schools attended the annual meeting of 
the Fourth District of the North Caro- 
lina Association of Future Homemakers 
of America in Henderson last Saturday. 

A teacher from each of the schools 
accompanied the girls. 

More than 500 girls and their advisers, 
representing 50 schools, were present at 
the District Rally. 

The Mount Holly girls of the Future 
Homemakers of America organization 
have had more honors heaped upon 
them. 

The local girls rode on the Red Cross 
float in the Safety Parade in the Spindel 
City and demonstrated the various ways 
to roll and wrap bandages. The float won 
first prize in the Parade, winning out 
over the 20 other floats entered. 

Two different scenes were depicted on 
the float. The first portrayed an auto- 
mobile accident and the students dem- 
onstrated what to do in case of an auto 
accident on the highway, while the sec- 
ond was a classroom scene in which the 
students demonstrated the various band- 
ages. 

The F.H.A. girls who participated in 
the event were: Margaret Allen, Jo Ann 
Edwards, Harriett Lee, Barbara Huff- 
man, Pat Huffstetler, Peggie Greene, 
Frances Hamilton, Kay Warren, and 
Sharon Herring. Others were: Jane Stove, 
Carolyn Lee, Jerry Harris, and Tommy 
Lee. 

Most of the F.H.A. members here have 
completed the standard 20-hour first aid 
course, the two purposes of which are to 
do the right thing at the right time and 
to learn to prevent accidents. 

The parade was witnessed by more 
than 15,000 persons in Gastonia. 

First prize in the event is an 18-inch 
loving cup, which will be put on display 
at the high school in the near future. 

Laurel Hill Chapter organized early in 
the year and now has a total of forty- 
three members. One of its first activi- 
ties was presenting a short skit in the 
school auditorium on Friday, October 24, 
in observation of United Nations Day. 
It was entitled "The United Nations and 
Grandma's Ice Box" and was taken from 
the October issue of Teen Times. It 
brought out the purposes and high ideals 
that all free people hope to achieve 
through this fine organization. The pro- 



gram was opened with the United Na- 
tions' Hymn sung by Barbara Edwards, 
Martha Coleman, Calton Gibson, and 
Jimmy Bunch, and closed with a prayer. 
Those taking part in the program were 
Shirley Tyncr, Mildred Sampson, Nancy 
Gibson, Jackie Gibson, Norma Goudc, 
and Margaret English. 

The Benvenue Chapter has been using 
the scale, "How does your chapter rate?," 
to help in planning activities. One of the 
20 items listed is to report activities of 
the chapter. They are sharing their 
F.H.A. Week activities. 

On Sunday we in a group attended 
Calvary Baptist Church, as a duet sang 
two hymns, and the F.H.A. and our ad- 
viser were recognized by the minister. 

Monday — the upstairs hall bulletin 
board was fixed appropriately and photos 
of our initiation and the making of our 
float were displayed. 

Tuesday — The club carried fruits and 
a program of hymns was sung to both 
white and colored people at the Nash 
County Home for the aged. They acted 
as though they enjoyed it immensely. 

Wednesday — The girls assembled and 
gave the Home Economics Room a thor- 
ough cleaning. 

Thursday — each girl fixed at least 
one family meal and said special grace. 

Friday — we had ten cakes baked by 
the girls. We had one pretty birthday 
cake in the center with the appropriate 
number of candles on it. At one end of 
the table we had fruit punch served. At 
the other end, cake was served. The 
Home Economics Room was decorated 
attractively with burning tapers adding 
the right note. All high school faculty 
were invited and two boys who had 
helped us on our float in the Harvest Fes- 
tival, which won 2nd place. All F.H.A. 
girls attended the party. 

Saturday — all girls did extra special 
work around their home for their par- 
ents. 

Boonville Chapter observed National 
F.H.A. Week in the following manner: 

Sunday, all members sat with their 
families in church. 

Monday, some of the members gave a 
radio program over WIFM in Elkin. The 
members taking part in the program 
were: Wilma Moxley told the purpose of 
the program; Martha Moxley said our 
F.H.A. creed and described our emblem; 
Shirley Williams described our club 
colors and flower; Eunice Brown re- 
cited the 8 purposes of F.H.A.; Aladene 
Stinston announced our schedule of this 
week and how our Boonville chapter is 
to observe National F.H.A. week. 

Tuesday, we had lots of fun initiating 
our new members. There were 25 new 
members. 

Wednesday, we had a table reserved 
at our school cafeteria for all members. 
our adviser, Mrs. Anita Reece, and our 
club mother, Mrs. Graham Stinston. 
There was a banquet of red roses in the 
center of the table and the F.H.A. let- 
ters stood out very pretty on the white 
table cloth. It was extremely pretty and 
we certainly enjoyed it. 

Thursday, was publicity day. We had 
an article in the Yadkin Ripple about 
our activities. A red rose was pinned 
on each high school teacher. 

Friday, every F.H.A. member enjoyed 
doing good deeds at school. 

Saturday, all members did good deeds 
at home by making the family happier. 

All members of the faculty, our ad- 
viser, our club mother, and other stu- 



dents worked very nicely to help us 
observe National F.H.A. Week. 

On September 25 the officers of 
Pleasant Garden Chapter and their ad- 
visers went to Bessemer School to help 
organize a F.H.A. chapter there. Miss 
Forward, our adviser, discussed briefly 
the importance of a F.H.A. chapter and 
the different advantages and aspects of 
such a chapter. Then each officer told 
what her duty in the chapter was, and 
some activities of our chapter. Miss For- 
ward gave the Bessemer girls hints on 
how to get a chapter started and to 
arouse enthusiasm. We believe we were 
a big help to them, and as officers, we 
were inspired to do our best by empha- 
sizing just how important each girl's con- 
tribution is. 

On October 11, we attended the Dis- 
trict V Rally at Gibsonville School. This 
Rally was a very exciting one for us be- 
cause we had a candidate for state song- 
leader. She was Margaret Monnett. Al- 
though Margaret did not win first, we 
were very proud of her because she won 
second alternate. 

Some things we have done to inspire 
members in our chapter are: get-together 
swimming party at first of school, the 
giving of a duty to as many members 
as possible, the making of a yearbook 
showing all our plans for the year to be 
given to each member, the starting of 
another F.H.A. chapter at another 
school, making all plans for the year at 
the beginning of the year and running a 
candidate for state officer. These have 
all seemed to add interest to our or- 
ganization. 

The South Edgecombe Chapter has re- 
cently had a bazaar and Brunswick stew 
supper. The supper was held in the school 
lunch room and the bazaar in the Home 
Economics department. 

At the bazaar were sold various items 
such as; hand-made dolls and pot hold- 
ers, attractive aprons and roll covers, and 
delicious cakes and candies. 

The Stanly Chapter observed National 
F.H.A. Week in many ways. On Mon- 
day posters were placed over the school 
telling of the F.H.A. Club and its ac- 
tivities. On Tuesday a display was placed 
in the lobby of our school. Cakes, cook- 
ies, and candy were the interests on Wed- 
nesday. A program over the Public 
Communication System in our school 
was presented by the F.H.A. members 
on Thursday morning. Thursday after- 
noon the F.H.A. officers of the Dallas 
Chapter came and talked to the Stanly 
officers about their plans for the year 
and ways of raising money. The display 
was left out in the lobby all week for 
the interest of the pupils, visitors and 
faculty. Many people learned the work 
of the F.H.A. Club. 

The Kernersville Chapter was sad- 
dened by the death of the agriculture 
teacher, Mr. Entrekin, who was killed 
in an automobile accident November 30. 
Instead of the usual Christmas party for 
the F.F.A. boys, they decided to con- 
tribute a gift of money to the Entrekin 
children. The F.F.A. boys joined in the 
project and to date $77.00 has been con- 
tributed. 

The Cool Spring Chapter has really 
worked during the year. First they had 
a food stand at the annual F.F.A. Dis- 
trict Field Day which was held at their 
school. Next they had a rummage sale. 
With the money from both projects, the 
club members painted the living room 

8 



and dining room of the Home Econom- 
ics Building. They also had the couch 
re-upholstered. The third year girls are 
going to recover the chairs, make some 
wastebaskets, and lamps. One member 
painted a picture to go over the fire- 
place. They are proud of their depart- 
ment, as they should be. 

When Iredell County had its annual 
fair, the F.H.A. Chapter entered a booth, 
"What Hands Can do." This was a bed- 
room in which everything was home- 
made. Even the bed was made by the 
F.F.A. Club. The booth won second prize 
and thirty-five dollars. 

On the fourth of October nine of our 
forty-five members with our adviser and 
Chapter Mother went to Mount Airy to 
the District Rally. They really enjoyed 
it. 

Plans are being made for several 
projects to be done this coming year. 

Red Springs Future Homemakers of 
America, under the sponsorship of Mrs. 
Ben Stanton, hohie economics teacher, 
have been busy during the first two 
months of school this year. They have 
elected officers, participated in a District 
Meeting, and made plans for the cele- 
bration of F.H.A. Week. 

Officers of the F.H.A. include Margie 
Humphrey, president; Gale Simpson, 
vice-president and program chairman; 
Betsey Watson, secretary; Audrey Tay- 
lor, treasurer; Rosalyn Gibson, reporter; 
Sue Stubbs, parliamentarian; Dawn 
Simpson, historian; Joyce Russell, song 
leader; Nola Mae Owens, social chair- 
man; Margaret McPhaulm, food chair- 
man. 

At the District Rally of the F.H.A., 
held in Fayetteville, the Red Springs 
Chapter had charge of the devotional. 
Margie Humphrey read the scripture; Sue 
Stubbs led the prayer; the three Russel 
girls, Peggy, Joyce, and Becky, sang in 
three parts "Cleanse Me." One of the 
speeches which the girls said they enjoyed 
most was "Home Life in Italy," delivered 
by Lt. Col. Wallace M. Hale of Fort 
Bragg. 

The chapter observed National F.H.A. 
Week by participating in an activity 
every day. The members had a busy 
week but one that made them remem- 
bered as an energetic group. 

Gale Simpson, vice-president of Red 
Springs Chapter, presented a panel on the 
various views of the two candidates for 
president of the United States at a chap- 
ter meeting. In the panel it was brought 
out that Future Homemakers must be 
good voters and that the citizens of this 
community be urged to be good "nation- 
makers" by voting. 

Morehead Future Homemakers spon- 
sored a sock dance at the recreation cen- 
ter recently. Admission to this dance was 
determined by the length of tne foot. 
Charges were two cents an inch. Shoes 
were checked at the door and everyone 
was required to dance in stocking feet. 
The prizes for the largest feet went to 
Jerry Willis and Barbara Oglesby. For 
the smallest feet, Bobby Robinson and 
Harriet Willis copped the honors. Ade- 
laide Guthrie and Claude Wade won the 
bop contest. 

The officers of the F.H.A. met at the 
home of the president, Helen Pipkin. The 
program for the new year was discussed. 
Planned for this year are rallies, dances, 
projects and degrees for members. After 
the meeting, soft drinks, cookies, mints 
and nuts were served. 



Shelby members are planning to have 
a rummage sale for which all the girls 
are donating old clothes to be sold. Chap- 
ter Mothers and the F.H.A. girls are us- 
ing a store up town in Shelby for selling 
all sizes of clothes and jewelry. 

At the Halloween Carnival, held in 
Shelby High School, the Future Home- 
makers had a country store at which 
various F.H.A. girls sold candy, cook- 
ies, punch, and pop corn. This booth was 
run all during the carnival, each girl 
having a chance to help with the work. 
All the articles sold were made by the 
F.H.A. girls. 

Using green and wine as the predom- 
inating colors, the chapter chose as their 
project redecorating the teachers' lounge. 
The girls made an attractive dressing 
table cover out of wine and green taf- 
feta, re-upholstered the furniture, cleaned 
the rug, waxed the floor, and made wine 
taffeta drapes with a green sway. Also, 
there was added to the room an at- 
tractive waste paper basket, to match the 
drapes and dressing table, three lamps, 
and a magazine rack. 

When the work was completed, the 
girls entertained at an open house for 
the faculty members. Halloween decora- 
tions were carried out at the refreshment 
table. Welcoming the guests were Dot 
Dover, Sarah Lee Garver, and Doris 
Tate. Presiding at the tea table were 
Carolyn Biggerstaff and Bobbie Guthrie. 
Helping to entertain were Burnie Bor- 
ders, Christine Davis, Carolyn Kidd, 
Margie Killian, Helen Spangler, and 
Flora Brendel. 

At the Cleveland County Fair several 
girls entered exhibits to be judged and 
inspected. There were many exhibits en- 
tered but four of the Shelby High F.H.A. 
girls came out in the top list. Shirley 
Mitchell won 1st prize on her rug; Chris- 
ten Davis, 1st prize on jelly; Sarah 
Farrow, 2nd prize on apple jelly; and 
Janice Sarratt, 2nd prize on her pear 
preserves. 

At the Executive Board meeting of the 
Stedman Chapter we decided that we had 
been a little selfish in our projects for 
the benefit of others, and in carrying out 
our purposes to the fullest. In thinking 
over something that our chapter could 
do in the betterment of community life, 
we found that one of our former mem- 
bers was in a local hospital and had been 
there for six months. 

It was decided in our September meet- 
ing that each member was to contribute 
a gift to be taken out to Betty Laverne 
Faircloth. On the appointed day, we were 
proud to load around ninety-six gifts 
into cars and then with several mem- 
bers and our adviser, Mrs. Mary Fred- 
erick, we set out as a little sunshine 
band to visit Betty. 

We had a most enjoyable visit, for 
within our hearts there was a glow of 
sunshine because we had done some- 
thing for someone else and our hearts 
were made glad by her joy at our coming. 

National F.H.A. Week was observed 
by Home Economics Students all over 
America and Hallsboro joined the others 
in celebrating the occasion. They carried 
out special activities each day in obser- 
vation of F.H.A. Week. Chapter mem- 
bers are also promoting international 
goodwill through observance of World 
Christmas Festival. 

Henderson Chapter was host to 500 
high school girls and their sponsors, rep- 
resenting 50 schools, on October 4, for 



the annual meeting of the fourth district 
of North Carolina Association of Fu- 
ture Homemakers of America. 

Speakers for the program were people 
who are very outstanding in the home- 
making field. 

After the program, luncheon was 
served in the high school gym. 

Stage decorations were planned by the 
Henderson Chapter. Attractive and ar- 
tistic arrangements of red roses were dis- 
played on the stage with a background 
formed by an elaborate arrangement of 
pine. 

Mills Future Homemakers held their 
first call meeting on September 10, 1952. 
Officers were elected as follows: Presi- 
dent, Jetta Godfrey; Parliamentarian, 
Virginia Bass; Historian, Mary Pusey; 
Secretary, Joyce Knott; Reporter, Rebec- 
ca, Glickman; Treasurer, Edith Fuller; 
Pianist, Barbara Medlin; and Song 
Leader, Nancy Gordon. Installation of 
officers is planned in the near future. 

This year, under the direction of Mrs. 
Leonard, monthly meetings will be held 
at the homes of various members. F.H.A. 
members were in charge of the Chapel 
Program September 18. Since this was 
initiation week for the new members, 
they were the topic of the program. 

Boyden Chapter passes on a money 
making idea. Copy schedules to be given 
Boyden High School students on the 
opening day of school proved to be a 
new and interesting money making idea 
for our F.H.A. chapter. Sixteen girls 
spent sixty-four hours and twenty min- 
utes away from their late summer ac- 
tivities to help prepare student schedule 
cards for this year and to earn over 
twenty dollars for the chapter treasury. 
Regene Moulton, vice-president of the 
chapter, called the girls who were in 
town. Miss Anne Hall, F.H.A. adviser, 
assisted the girls. The girls enjoyed the 
work which really proved to be an easy 
money making idea. Try it in your 
club!!! 

Approximately 20 parents attended the 
first meeting of the Home Economics 
Council held in the Home Economics 



Lab at Boyden High School. The Coun- 
cil is composed of the students taking 
home economics, interested parents, and 
teachers in the department. 

Miss Anne Hall, head of the depart- 
ment, presided over the meeting, which 
she opened by explaining the work of 
the department and the council. 

Representatives from the various 
classes reported on what they had been 
doing. 

A feature from the second year class 
was the report by Jimmie Don Williams, 
one of the five boys taking the course. 
Jimmie Don said that they were inter- 
ested in cooking and sewing because they 
thought it would help them when they 
joined the Navy, for some of them as- 
pired to be cooks. Then too they would 
know how to sew their buttons on. Ser- 
iously, he said, he thought it would be 
fine to have a full class of boys so that 
they could do the things boys especially 
wanted to do. 

Nancy Carson and Shirley Bailey re- 
ported for third year students. Jean 
Cauble and Ann Isenhower, seniors, and 
the only two taking fourth year work, 
told of their work in preparing meals 
and the extra work they are doing in 
helping with the F.H.A. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Coleman, who 
atte.idej the District Rally with their 
daughter Regene, told the council that 
they were amazed at the number of girls 
in attendance and at the poise with 
which the girls spoke before an audience 
of 900 people. They think that more 
adults should support the work of F.H.A. 

Mrs. Sam Swartz, mother of Sarah 
Swartz, praise J the F.H.A. camp held 
each year in June. She said that Sarah 
made many friends th vc, a few of whom 
she will correspond with. 

The Franklin Chapter, Surry County, 
observed United Nations Day in a most 
impressive manner. On October 24, 
some of the students presented a play 
entitled, United Nations and Grandma's 
Old Ice Box, which was taken from 
Teen Times. The students taking part 
were: Nancy Miller, Dorothy Beasley, 



The Weldon Chapter entertained their parents at a Christmas tea in the Home 
Economics department. The department was decorated with Christmas arrangements. 
Shown here are Jane Milliken pouring punch for Mrs. Mary Davis Faison, home- 
making teacher and Faye Pierce serving coffee to Mrs. J. W. Brown. Chapter mother. 
A very special guest was Miss Catherine T. Dennis, State Supervisor of Home Eco- 
nomics Education. Approximately ISO guests called during the afternoon. 



Joyce Hill, Nancy Hooker, Nelda Jean 
Chappell, Jewel Holder, and Iris Nichols, 
program chairman, with the help of Miss 
Coltrane, chapter advisor. Also an at- 
tractive bulletin board on United Na- 
tions was arranged in the high school 
building. 

The Franklin Chapter entered an ex- 
hibit in the Greater Mount Airy Fair, 
entitled "A New Look For Old Furni- 
ture." The steps were shown of making 
an old upholstered chair into a modern 
chair. The exhibit won first prize of 
seventy-five dollars in competition with 
five other schools in Surry County. 
The prize money will be used in the im- 
provement of the department. 

Members of the F.H.A. entertained 
members of the faculty and parents to a 
"come as you are" tea from 3:15 until 
5:30 on Thursday, November 6, 1952, 
in the Home Economics room. This was 
one of the things the chapter did to 
celebrate National F.H.A. Week. Offi- 
cers of the chapter greeted the guests, 
presided at the register and served spiced 
tea, attractive sandwiches and cookies 
which were prepared by F.H.A. members. 
The tea table was attractively decorated 
with a centerpiece of fruits, nuts, colored 
leaves and candles. 



CAREERS IN HOMEMAKING 

(Continued from page three) 
but every experience will help each 
step become a little easier. Re- 
search, product demonstration, ad- 
vertising, and home service are just 
a few of the many openings. Why 
not decide to make a place for your- 
self in the business world? 




Family Life 

The most popular of all the ca- 
reers in home economics, and the 
one to which we all aspire, is being 
a wife and mother. Although this 
career does not require formal 
training, every course in homemak- 
ing helps one more easily meet the 
day by day problems. A college 
education presents many op- 
portunities in this field, such 
as Family-life Consultant; 
counselor; social worker; psy- 
chology fields; church and 
charitable organizations; jour- 
nalism. 

For further information on 
these and other careers in 
home economics, consult your 
homemaking teacher or write 
to American Home Economics 
Association, 1600 Twentieth 
Street, N. W., Washington 9. 
D. C, who will send you 
pamphlets on any or all of 
these careers. 



4 >f 



Future Homemakers of America 

CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




'The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 




CAROLINE SAYS 



Life Needs Us All 

There is so much that we can do- — 
A kind word spoken here and there 
Will ease another's weight of care; 

Life needs us all. The splendid few 

Who rise to fame, with all their skill 
Your past and mine can never fill. 

If we who have not wealth or fame, 
Should fail in all our little deeds, 
The world would sink beneath its needs, 

Not by the greatness of a name. 
Nor by the splendor of success 
Are hearts restored to happiness. 

About us all are those who need 

The gifts which we have power to give; 
We can be friendly while we live, 

And by some thoughtful, kindly deed, 
Can help another on his way, 
And that is service, come what may. 

Edgar 



iS^S*::^; 




** 



■MB 




If^S^' 




t™ 



I* 



North Carolina Association * 



{food Cornea Tfta&e (^<^cC s4menic6Ui4, 

"The earth belongs, always, to the living generation." My torch remains lighted only so long as 
that for which I stand, freedom, abides in our country. The fuel for my torch comes from simple, 
everyday democratic, consecrated living. It is replenished each time one of our great personal free- 
doms is exercised or defended; its flame glows brightest when a single injustice, large or small, is 
made right, a prejudice removed, a personal responsibility assumed, or a kindness shown. I find 
most of my warmth in the homes of my nation. My hope for pereptttal light lies in the future 
homes of America. You, who are now within the sound of my voice — / charge you — LIVE 
WELL YOUR CREED for, "Good Homes Make Good Americans!" 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 

19,214 Members in 424 Chapters 



State Officers 
1952-1953 

President — Carolyn Abernathy, Alexander-Wilson 

Vice-President — Jean Faulkner, Red Oak 

Secretary — Hazel McLean, Hoke County 

Treasurer — Betty Hatton, Goldsboro 

Reporter — Kitty Campen, Edenton 

Parliamentarian — LaSalle Light, Old Fort 

Historian — Peggy Dunn, Clemmons 

Song Leader — Clara Burris, Endy 



State Officers 
1953-1954 

President — Jean Faulkner. Red Oak 

Vice-President — Betty Calhoun, Seventy-First 

Secretary — Glenda Noble, Deep Run 

Treasurer — Peggy Spruill, Pamlico County 

Reporter — Garrie Freeman, Rutherfordton-Spindale 

Parliamentarian — Jo Ann Woosley, South Fork 

Historian — Evelyn Brutton, Candor 

Sons Leader — Anne Joe Lawson. Madison 



State Adviser 

Miss Daphne Eller 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



St 



a ti 



onvenuoii 



tli 



The hum of feminine activity heard in Raleigh, 
May 2, was the Future Homemakers from all 
over the Tar Heel State convening for their annual 
State Convention. This time the big event was held 
in the Memorial Auditorium, leaving all the teen-age 
charm facing Favetteville Street. 



Some of the Bethel girls take time out to say hello to the 

Wake Forest Chapter as they register. 

Ruth Hunt from Zeb Vance and Virginia Harris of Littleton 

as they get into their harness to carry the flags. 





An umbrella was a friend in need to Ester Griffin and Flora 
Boseman of the Aurelian Springs Chapter. 

Things were off to a flying start from the first 
sound of the gavel by Carolyn Abernathy of Alex- 
ander-Wilson High School to the bearing of the 
colors by the Zeb Vance and Littleton Chapters. A 
warm welcome was extended to the visiting girls by 
Dr. Charles Carroll, State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction. 

The high-light of the morning session was a pro- 
gram presented by Dr. Maude Williamson, visiting 
professor from Woman's College, who gave us a 
very interesting talk on "Future Homemakers in 
Other Lands." Dr. Williamson has traveled exten- 
sively and had much to do with the organizing of 
Future Homemaking chapters in Japan. This type 
of program helps us to fulfill one of our purposes: 
"To promote international good will!" Dr. William- 
son brought out the influence of Americanization 
and democratic living in the Far East. 

No Future Homemakers Rally would be complete 
without the good wishes of our brother organization. 
Harold Lineberger, State Future Farmer President, 
was on hand to do that. We like to have these F.F.A. 
boys around! (Right, girls?) 

Following the opening ceremony, the Taylorville 
Chapter had charge of the invocation. Miss Daphne 
Eller, State Adviser, told us of the coming National 
Convention to be held in Columbus, Ohio, the first 
week in July. This year we have the privilege of 
running a candidate for the National Presidency. 
Following a few other announcements, the nomina- 
tions for our presidential candidate were made and 
candidates introduced. Frances Burris of Wingate, 
was elected and will represent us at the National 
Meeting. 

(Continued on page eight) 

1 



Chapel Hill F.H.A.'ers Discovered 

That TV 1$ Fun and Exciting, Too! 




Future Homemakers at Chapel 
Hill have shown a true pioneering 
spirit equal to that of our great- 
grandmothers by being the first 
chapter in North Carolina to use 
Television as a means of interpre- 
ting to the TV fans some of the ac- 
complishments of our high school 
homemaking classes. 

Here is how Chapel Hill became 
TV stars — all in one lesson: 

Early last fall Miss Fischel, Chap- 
ter Adviser, made a trip to Greens- 
boro to confer with the Woman's 
Editor about the possibility of her 
class presenting a 30-minute pro- 
gram on TV. They decided that a 
Fashion Show would be of interest 
to everyone in the TV audience and 
would give more F.H.A.'ers an op- 
portunity to appear on the show. 

Then began the work on gar- 
ments to model, choosing a theme 



— their's was "Around the Clock" 

— painstaking dress rehearsals on 
the stage, practicing walking as a 
model should, a special class on 
grooming, study of accessories, and 
those million little things that have 
to be done just right! 

The F.H.A.'ers collaborated with 
the English teacher who helped 
them write a detailed and elaborate 
75-word description of each cos- 
tume. This made the basis of the 
script which was narrated by Miss 
Carolyn Stoker, Woman's Editor for 
WFMY. 

The piano teacher was a life- 
saver at rehearsals, choosing a song 
suitable for each costume. Other 
persons helping in the organization 
were the superintendent and princi- 
pal who planned transportation and 
granted excuses from school. 



Left to right: Dorothy 
Greulach, red velveteen 
coat and dress; Ann 
Gobbe), peacock blue 
and peach; Susan San- 
ders, brown flannel with 
beige; Patsy Poythress, 
peach and white with 
red; Kay Proctor, navy 
and white cotton; Mere- 
dith Stringfield, red 
flannel nightie. 



Some TV Tips: 

The girls found these points help- 
ful and would like to pass them on 
to you: 

• Careful planning and rehearsals 
are a must!! 

• Timing is very important (Chapel 
Hill used nine models and two cos- 
tumes each). Time was allotted for 
dressing, climbing two flights of 
stairs, and getting "that model 
look" before going on stage. 

• Choose simple but effective props 
— theirs was a wooden clock, 
painted grey and black. 

• Choose a variety of costumes and 
check hems and pressing! 

• Darker tones of color show up to 
a better advantage than light. Tex- 
ture should be considered. 

• Watch posture! Keep head up, 
chin in and walk gracefully! 

• Stage personality is very impor- 
tant. Get over stage fright. 



1L T 7, =2), J H tL SUMMERTIME 

<z=^J&* <^'iin and <z=LS.sJ-r.<=?4-* 



Summer vacation is an ideal time 
to get things done! Maybe now is 
the time for your chapter to estab- 
lish a twelve months' program and 
make definite plans to do things you 
don*t have time for during the 
school year. Such as — a leader- 
ship training workshop. Bladenboro 
chapter members attended a three 
day workshop last summer. The 
following plan was used: First 
Meeting: Officers selected subjects 
for further study. (Study was done 
at home and their suggestions made 
out at home.) Second Meeting: Re- 
view of Leadership material from 
National meeting. Report and sug- 
gestions from each officer. President 
— Read The Meeting Will Come to 
Order. Wanted committee members 
to volunteer. Set up plans for class 
and general meetings. Vice-Presi- 
dent — Made plans for F.H.A. pro- 
gram for year to be decided by 
members at first meeting using 66 
methods. (Excellent Results.) Sec- 
retary — Read Score Card for Or- 
ganization Secretaries;- set up record 
books for year. Treasurer — Out- 
lined money raising projects and 
plans for carrying out projects. 
Each member had a part with some 
project. (Made $321.62.) Good 
results. Parliamentarian — Read 
The Meeting Will Come to Order. 
Worked on public relations. Ideas 
were to participate in Farmers 
Day Parade, Mother-Daughter Tea, 
Window Display, pass information 
of Michigan Conference on to 
others, talk to one civic organiza- 
tion. (Met all of these.) Song Lead- 
er — Made song sheets for use at 
meetings. Worked on recreation for 
chapter also. Pianist — Learned 
to play above songs. Also worked 
on recreation. Reporter — Sug- 
gested one article in school pa- 
per each time. An article in county 
paper. Historian — Outlined plans 
for keeping chapter records. (All 
officers read The Meeting Will 
Come to Order.) Third meeting: 
Planned ways in which officers 
could get information they had 
learned across to members. Decided 
to have at first meeting in the fall 
the following: Panel Discussion, 
give members chance to volunteer 
for committee, plan program for 



year using 66 methods. Several Re- 
laxers. (Results were very good.) 
This workshop definitely helped our 
chapter. All of our members have 
served on either a class program or 
general meeting. 

The Anson-Union Federation has 
a Summer Rally at Cheraw Beach 
to combine fun and recreation with 
a planning meeting for the coming 
year. This Federation also has a 
fall leadership training workshop 
and a spring rally. 

Cliffside is planning a series of 
square dances during the summer to 
supplement recreational facilities 
for teen-agers. 

Last year Tri-High officers were 
elected in April and installed in 
May with committee chairman ap- 
pointed. During the summer they 
went right to work on a sample 
copy of the year's yearbook. Pro- 
grams were planned, money raising 
ideas organized, local projects dis- 
cussed and an over-all campaign for 
new members started. 

Southwood F.H.A.'ers have each 
planned a definite project to im- 
prove themselves as family mem- 
bers during the summer months. 

Franklinton emphasizes the 
"Families Together" project during 
summer vacation 'cause that's an 
ideal time for family picnics and 
outings. Sometime during vacation 
a family picnic is planned by the 
chapter for all parents to get to- 
gether. Everyone has loads of fun! 

Littleton uses the summer time 
to plan the year's work. Topics for 



ALWAYS FINISH 

If a TASK is once begun, 
Never leave it till it's done. 
Be the labor great or small, 
Do it well or not at all. 

Anonymous 



LOOK UP 

Look UP and not down. 
Look forward and not back. 
Look out and not in. 
Lend a hand. 

Edward Everett Hale 



programs are chosen and chairmen 
for each committee selected. Each 
member had an opportunity to 
choose one committee and one pro- 
gram to be on for the year. This 
gave everyone a feeling of belong- 
ing to the organization. 

There are many other activities 
for those "What Can I Do Today?" 
days!! Make your pet project a se- 
ries of radio programs or newspaper 
articles, "Around Town with the 
Future Homemakers." The series 
might include: Summer Plans for 
F.H.A.'ers, Summer Shortcuts in 
Cooking, Cool Dishes for Hot Days, 
Good Buys for Shoppers, and many 
others. Wouldn't it be a thrill to 
persuade your local radio manager 
or newspaper editor to let your 
chapter run a series of programs or 
articles! Who knows — a new star 
may be born or a writer discovered! 

Or your town may need a baby- 
sitting bureau. And what an enter- 
taining way to earn some pin 
money and learn more about "What 
Makes a Child Tick?" There are 
lots of books available for infor- 
mation and what better source than 
your child-care class in homemak- 
ing? 

Still another suggestion is to study 
parliamentary procedure and make 
the F.H.A. a shining example of 
carrying out a business meeting 
correctly and successfully. This in- 
formation is also helpful in other 
clubs. Robert's Rules of Order or 
The Meeting Will Come to Order 
are excellent references. 

Then there are scads of individ- 
ual projects — making your sum- 
mer or fall wardrobe, spending 
more time with your family, teach- 
ing your younger brother or sister 
new games, helping with the cook- 
ing and house duties, reading those 
books you have been casting aside 
or taking a job downtown to gain 
experience and earn pin money. 
Remember this, tho; whatever you 
plan to do, carry it through 
to completion! And do the job well! 
You are not only interpreting your- 
self, you are interpreting the 
F.H.A., homemaking department 
and school! Good luck and a happy 
summer vacation! 



/4U /i&<wid fan 

THE NATIONAL f.HX CONVENTION 



It will be a hot but happy day in 
July when the North Carolina dele- 
gates board the Norfolk and West- 
ern train for Columbus, Ohio, to 
attend the National F.H.A. Conven- 
tion. This year all convention dele- 
gates will be together at the Dashler- 
Wallick Hotel which is twenty 
stories high and has 1,000 rooms, 
21 meeting rooms and six elevators! 

The Convention theme is "Homes 
for America's Future." Most of 
the program will be given by 
F.H.A.'ers and North Carolina is to 
have a big part in the activities. 
There will be a parade of regions 
pageant, "F.H.A. at Home across 
America," A Sunday Night supper 
with an international theme, All- 
States Chorus, and many, many 
other well-planned surprises for 
your enjoyment! 

Our three voting delegates will be 
kept busy setting up the program of 
work and national projects and 



other business matters. Every Tar 
Heel will be especially anxious to 
hear the results of the election. Who 
knows, we might have a Tar Heel 
president! 

Other North Carolina delegates 
will be participating in discussion 
groups, parade of regions, and other 
important events. 

Who can go? T he State officers, 
the national candidate-elect, and 
any chapter member who is affili- 
ated this year until our quota is 
filled!! 

What will it cost? North Carolina 
will get a special car for thirty or 
more passengers which will cut the 
cost of the trip from $150 to ap- 
proximately $75. Help North Caro- 
lina fill its quota of eighty members 
and twenty-one adults! 

What to wear? Columbus will be 
hot and rainy — cotton dresses, sum- 
mer suits, skirts and blouses will be 
most suitable and comfortable. In- 



clude a sweater or jacket for unex- 
pected cool nights. Take a raincoat, 
cap or umbrella for that rainy 
weather, and proper apparel for at- 
tending church on Sunday morning, 
such as hose, hat, and gloves. For 
the Sunday Night supper a party 
dress or dressy dress will be ap- 
propriate. For travel on the train 
a simple tailored suit, preferably 
dark, will be most appropriate. 
Don't forget your most comfort- 
able shoes for walking between 
sessions. And pack only what 
you need! Try to limit yourself to 
one suit case, packing carefully 
with tissue paper to prevent 
wrinkles. There will be no time or 
place for pressing! And don't forgel 
to wear your F. H. A. pen at all 
times! 

And the most important thing 
to have with you at all times is 
your courteous, well-behaved man- 
ner! 

See you in Columbus. 



^>ay-(fonl ^eiatca^icfr 'Day 



Here's How One Chapter Found the 
Answers 

Bethesda Future Homemakers 
decided to find some answers to 
their questions on teen-age prob- 
lems by sponsoring a "Boy-Girl Re- 
lationship Day," and include the 
parents as well as the student body. 

As a builder-upper to this day's 



program, the F.H.A.'ers had as their 
program a round table discussion on 
teen-age problems, inviting the boys 
to participate. Persons representing 
the home, community, school and 
church were invited to lead the dis- 
cussions. Some questions aired were: 
what about going steady? How im- 
portant are character traits in teen- 




age problems, dating curfew, and 
where do parents fit in? The girls 
and boys had an opportunity to dis- 
cuss traits they like in the "opposite 
sex. 

With this background of informa- 
tion and views, the student body- 
was better prepared to listen to Mrs. 
Ethel Nash, accredited marriage 
counselor, University of North Caro- 
lina, who was the guest speaker 
for the Boy-Girl Relationship Pro- 
gram. Her topic was "Courtship 
Facts and Fantasies," which was fol- 
lowed by a panel discussion. Later 
in the day Mrs. Nash spoke to the 
parents on "Keeping up with Teen- 
Agers." 

As a result of the day's program, 
the girls feel that they and the mem- 
bers of the opposite sex understand 
each other more and that they can 
discuss their problems more freely 
with their parents. 



Shown here: Mrs. Nash, after a discussion group, clearing up some questions for the 
girls and some of the panel members who led the discussion on teen-age problems. 
On the panel were representatives from the school, community, home and church. 



COVER PICTURE 
Shown here are Carolyn Aber- 
nathy. President, and Jean Faulk- 
ner, incoming President, as they 
talk to Dr. Maude Williamson, key 
note speaker for the State Con- 
vention. 



MY F* H. A. TRIP TO FLORIDA 



By ANNIE LEE JONES 
Apex, North Carolina 



On Thursday morning, February 
5th, everyone was very excited 
around my house. Why? Because 
this was the day that 1 was to leave 
for Tampa, Florida, to represent the 
F.H.A. of North Carolina at the 
Florida State Fair. 

About 9:15 a.m. Mrs. Lewis, my 
Home Economics teacher, and some 
of the students arrived to take me 
to Fayetteville where I was to board 
the train. Roger Hill, the F.F.A. 
delegate from 

North Carolina, 

was going to start 

from there also. 

The train, the Ha- 
vana Special, was 

to arrive at 11:15. 

On hearing the 

train approaching 

I began to get a 

little nervous. 
The F H.A. 

and F.F.A. had a 

special car and it 

was the last one. 

Mr. Lewis and 

Mr. Howard met 

Roger and me at 

the train and 

helped us with our 

baggage. The girls 

began teasing me 

about getting it 

confused, but of 

course I didn't 

think it would 

happen. 

After bidding 

everyone good- 
bye, we were on 

our way. Having 

walked through a 

number of cars, 

we finally reached 

the one with "F.F.A." on it. Mr. 

Howard carried my bags to the 

drawing room, which was to be the 

accommodations for delegates from 

Virginia, South Carolina, and North 

Carolina. 

The big moment came when I 
met the boy and girl from Virginia, 
Mrs. Howard, and Mrs. Lewis. We 
were given a very pretty badge with 
our name and address on it and it 
also indicated what we were repre- 
senting. 

Then the fun really started. While 



I was back in the drawing room 
pulling my coat and hat off, Mr. 
Howard came back and asked me 
if I had the right bags. I looked at 
the bags and sure enough there was 
"ROGER HILL" in big letters. 
Well, we got our bags all settled. 

Now to settle down for the long 
trip. After getting acquainted with 
the group, we all went to the diner 
for lunch. Meals on the train were 
quite expensive, but I enjoyed eat- 




Annic Lee is seen here packing for the 

ing just the same. Fortunately, 
Roger had bought a set of Canasta 
cards. So after lunch four of us 
played Canasta. 

The girl from South Carolina got 
on at Yemassee. It was interesting 
to know that they call their organi- 
zation J. H.A. rather than F.H.A. In 
Savannah, Georgia, Emmett Mc- 
Cracken from South Carolina and 
Betty Exley from Georgia joined 
us. We arrived in Jacksonville, 
Florida, about 8:30 p.m. There the 
other delegates joined us along with 



Mr. and Mrs. O'Kelly. Since the 
train didn't leave Jacksonville until 
10:45, we all stayed at the station 
for a while. 

Upon arrival in Tampa the next 
morning, we checked in at the Hill- 
boro Hotel, which was to be our 
headquarters while in Tampa. After 
breakfast, we went to the State Fair. 
During that morning we made a 
supervised study of the home and 
agricultural exhibits. The "Hav-A- 
Tampa" exhibit 
was very interest- 
ing, but I think 
the citrus fruit ex- 
hibits were the 
most impressive 
to me, especially 
the one of the 
outline of Flori- 
da filled with 
oranges. The 
flower exhibits 
were very color- 
ful. One electrical 
^ exhibit that I 
especially noticed 
was the demon- 
stration changing 
an old kitchen to 
a modern one. 
While at the fair 
one of my new 
experiences was 
the feeding of a 
fawn. It was really 
amazing to see 
how well-trained 
it was. 

On Friday eve- 
ning, the Cham- 
ber of Commerce 
took us on a tour 
< r 'P- of Tampa and its 

environs. 
Arriving back in Tampa a little 
late, we had to get ready for the 
banquet which was to be held at a 
Spanish restaurant in Ybor City. As 
our guest, we had the Florida State 
F.H.A. and F.F.A. officers and su- 
pervisors. 

Saturday morning began another 
big day for us. It had been desig- 
nated as F.F.A. and F.H.A. Day. 
That morning we had a chance to 
visit the mid-way. After lunch we 
were platform guests of the F.F.A. 
(Continued on page eight) 



iQ-a 



J 




Has your F.H.A. Chapter ever 
sponsored a "Good Luck Dance?" 
The Hugh Morson Chapter in Ra- 
leigh recently sponsored an affair 
of this kind. The main purpose of 
the dance was to make money to 
send the president of next years' 
chapter to the National Convention, 
this summer. 

Special dance committees were 
chosen for the dance and the two 
advisers, Mrs. Jolene Edwards and 
Mrs. Jacqueline Amnions assited in 
the preparations. Chapter officers 
were chairmen of the various com- 
mittees. 

The big feature of the dance was 
the crowning of a King and Queen 
which was not announced until the 
night of the dance. A school election 
was held to determine the King and 
Queen. Each class nominated a king 
and queen to represent their class. 
Another election was held to de- 
termine a school king and queen. 
Carrying out "good luck" and Saint 
Patrick's Day, the gym was deco- 
rated with green and white. As 
couples entered the gym through a 
huge archway of white with green 
shamrocks, they found little green 
shamrocks hanging from the ceil- 
ing. Two big green shamrocks out- 
lined with white lights were behind 
the throne. The other end of the 
gym had a shamrock with a boy 
and girl silhouette. A wishing well 



at ice 



flanked by camellias and ivy cov- 
ered fences was made for couples to 
throw pennies in and make wishes. 

At intermission, after crowning, a 
cart-wheel figure with green stream- 
ers to act as spokes was formed. The 
figure was composed of the king 
and queen, class attendants, chap- 
ter officers, unit presidents, and 
unit program chairmen with escorts. 
Each girl carried a bouquet of white 
carnations with green ribbon. 

Of course there was entertain- 
ment for the majesty and court. A 
quartet and a duet sang Irish songs. 
Two dance numbers by four girls, 
and then one girl, also carried out 
Irish performances. 

One interesting factor about the 
Queen that was chosen which made 
the Hugh Morson Chapter proud 
was that she has been very active in 
F.H.A. activities. The Queen, Faye 
Wheeler, a senior, has been unit 
president, chapter secretary, and 
just ended a years' work as county 
treasurer. Faye has been to many of 
the rallies and to camp at White 
Lake. 

Even though the preparations 
and decorating took a lot of time, 
the Hugh Morson Chapter was 
proud of the dance they held and 
are hoping to send their next year's 
president to the National Conven- 
tion, July 2-8. 




Betsy Hay crowns Faye Wheeler, F.H.A. member, queen of Hugh Morson school. 
6 



State Degrees 

The degrees committee met 
March 28, 1953, in the Buncombe 
County Courthouse, Asheville, 
North Carolina, to evaluate the ap- 
plications for State Homemaker de- 
grees. 

LaSalle Light, State Parliamen- 
terian, served as chairman. Chap- 
ters serving on the committee were: 
Barnardsville, Old Fort, Clyde, 
Black Mountain, Oakley, Miss 
Daphne Eller and Miss Louise 
Swann. 

Seventy-four applications were 
evaluated. Those receiving the 
State Homemaker degrees were: 
Edna Duvall, Swain County; Patri- 
cia Carpenter, Shelby; Ada Beth 
Hickman, Betty Jean Adams, Bla- 
denboro; Billie Marie Clark, Hart- 
sell; Margie Humphrey, Red 
Springs; Sylvia Craddock, Meb- 
ane; Mikell McGinnis, Lee 
Edwards, Helen King Pipkin, More- 
head City; Tenny Hill, Mangum; 
Betty M. Blanchard, Warsaw; Betsy 
Watson, Red Springs; Gladys Faye 
Hidey, Catherine Smith, Janet 
Campbell, Benvenue; Loyd Royel, 
Stedman; Marjorie Lattimore, Shir- 
ley Lillian Grotts, Mary Ann Fettes, 
Sana Lee Shehan, Charlotte Ann 
McDougal, Willia Mae Byers, Max- 
ine Whiteside, Rutherfordton-Spin- 
dale; Marcia Lee Boyd, Bath; 
Anne Beatty, Rutherfordton-Spin- 
dale; Frances Revels, Patsy Upton, 
Gladys Dobbins, Tri-City; Lynda 
Hampton, Lee Edwards; Marie 
Small, Susie Smith, Glenda Noble, 
Jean Elizabeth Noble, Annie Jean- 
ette Noble, Deep Run; Sue Grubbs, 
Barbara Jane Hicks, Sue Peyran, 
Thelma Veach, Walkertown; Irene 
Waters, Bath; Faye L. Branch, Joan 
Averette, Winterville; Shirley Jean 
Tarleton, Myrtle Paradice, Morven; 
Pearl Hill, Randleman; Roberta 
Lou Halls, Gretchen Askew, Rose- 
wood; Elizabeth Wilkinson, Caro- 
lyn Hice, Jackie Alspaugh, South 
Fork; Marina S. Crummey, Juani- 
ta Patrick, Creswell; Jo Ann Woos- 
ley, South Fork; Clara Burris, Endy; 
Joyce Whittle, Warsaw; Carolyn 
Abernathy, Alexander-Wilson; Jan- 
ice Claudine Little, Winecoff; Fran- 
ces Cohoon, Greenville; Macy 
Duncan, Betty Jo Amos, Sumner; 
Joyce Angel, Walkertown. 




The Cleveland Chapter in Rowan 
County has been doing something all the 
time. We have 61 members and we meet 
every Wednesday. We have four chapter 
mothers and two chapter fathers The 
three money making projects for this year 
were completed first semester: they were 
cooking and serving Lion's Club suppers 
for three months; second, a pie and cake 
"■? f an , d *»«& selling Christmas cards 
This fall the FHA decided to re-decorate 
the Home Economics Department. Our 
Adviser sanded the floors, we made lined 
draperies, upholstered a living room 
chair ( and also our dining room chair? 
and then refinished all our furniture in 
enmj l,V,ng ™ om and fining room and 
some machines. We also had the FFA 
boys make the cornice for the three 
rooms in our department. The Home Ec 
IV class sponsored an open house for 

seeing the department. We also bought a 
new sofa and lamp for the living room 

»»?n U [ 1 M a - ,onal FHA: 0n Sunday we 
attended Christ Episcopal Church a Z 
FHA group, sang The FHA Prayer Song 
and our adviser put the club flowers in 
the church for the altar flowers Mon 
day we gave each teacher a rose and 
tha .night, gave a program to the Lion's 
CI ub. Tuesday, we had a clothing drive 
to itderjmvWpd children in our 
school. Wednesday, we gave a chanel 

a r ^hoo 1 C ^ Cernin8 FHA also £°«K 
a school clean-up campaign, Thursday 
Open House for Families, Friday no grfae 
and courtesy day. g p 

We have had either movies, skits or 
speakers for each of our programs which 
were based on each of the purpose" 

former P FHA d p- f r ApriI ~ " r th ^ 
rormer FHA girls, now married, to talk 

on how homemaking has helped them a 
minister to discuss "Family Life" and the 
™ y °' l ° discuss "Our Community " We 
have had several parties, the Mothers and 

roast er s S ka g t a n V " U l a h T ide and wi ^ner 
IZ I,! 8 ? arty ' and Christmas party 

we nought $10 Unesco stamps and also 
a Friendship among Youth" package 
To us this has been the bes" FHA year 
yet, never a dull moment. y 

The Washington Chapter held its 
Tuesd a a r y meet,ng fa the sch °° l lunchroom 

th. A f SI l eCial £ eature of this meeting was 

year home Sh ° W PreSented by the ^cSd 
year home economics students 

Uirls modeled corduroy jumpers with 

blouses suitable for school ffipectltor 

f^ scCl^nfT 3nd W6SkitS Suita ^ 
ior school, and dress-up suits. The girls 

Sve . PraiS£ f ° r ** well-made 8 at 
Flnr h garments - Those modeling were 

Griffin* J P a e n r P 7'r Edna Hales ' Jose PWne 
£3VS Cara way. Betty Jean Alli- 

Kfch rft B r eVerly And erson, 
T TuTp ' Je , an Duke - Ja ne Duke Marv 

p af H 0W i erS ' Son > a War ^n, Ann Duke 
Pat Hodges, Bettie Britt, Shelly Walker' 
Glenda Mizelle and Peggy Joyce She": 

The Morganton chapter held its annual 



Mother-Daughter banquet on Thursday 
evening in the high school cafeteria 

Isabelle Mull, chapter president, was 
toastmistress and the invocation was 
given by Catherine Newton, after which 
Carolyn Cannon lead the group in the 
t-HA prayer song. Mrs. Morrison re- 
sponded to the toast given by the presi- 
dent with "An If for Girls" by Kipling. 
Maude Morrison, chapter treasurer, gave 
a report of chapter activities. Mary 
Frances Garrison gave the toast to chap- 
ter mothers and Mrs. Carl Mabe re- 
sponded. 

"^ The nA he . me for the ban quet was the 
Oay 90 s. ' This was very effectively ear- 
ned out in decorations and floor show 
Ine barbershop quartet, composed of 
Barbara Johnson, Margaret Kincaid, 
Carolyn Cannon and Betty Sue Williams 
entertained the group with songs of the 
period. Other numbers on the program 
were 'Frankie and Johnnie" and "A Bi- 
cycle Built for Two." 

Maxine Lybrand introduced the "Gay 
90s Fashion Show" by contrasting the 
teen-age fashion of today with fashions 
during that period. Outstanding costume 
!?° de,s Qri we ,re two bathing suits of the 
Gay 90s. The prize for the best cos- 
tume was won by Betty Laningham. 

I he high-light of the program was rec- 
ognition given to 21 girls for their years 
of service to the chapter. The president 
called attention to the fact these girls 
who are seniors have been chapter mem- 
bers four years. They take part in school 
activities and are active in community 
lite. They are outstanding students in 
school. They are listed as: Minnie Ruth 
Adkins, Barbara Berry, Norma J. Bras- 
well, Katherine Booth, Carolyn Cannon 
Mary Lee Copeland. Linda Deal, Frances 
Garrison, Barbara Johnson, Margaret 
Kincaid, Maxine Lybrand, Phillis Mitch- 
urn. Maude Morrison. Isabelle Mull 
Catherine Newton, Frances Rhodes, Joan 
Smith Carol Wayt, Lucille Whisenant, 
Betty Sue Williams, and Barbee Win- 
chester. 

Barbara Johnson, Maude Morrison and 
Barbara Winchester plan to major in 
home making in college. 

Carolyn Erwin presented Isabelle Mull 
president, with a spoon in her silver pat- 
tern. It has been the custom of the chap- 
ter to present the outgoing president with 
a piece of her silver. 

F. H. A. pins were presented to the 
three mothers. Mrs. Wells, Mrs. Bright 
and Mrs. Mabe, and a pair of china vases 
were given to the adviser, Mrs. Jack 
Winchester. 

March 28 will be Hobo Day for the 
members of the Boydan Chapter. 

Final plans to make this a successful 
day will be made at the regular monthly 
meeting to be held at Judy Russey's home 
Monday night. 

Following a plan used by chapters 
throughout the nation, the Boyden girls 
have decided to have Hobo Day to raise 
money to send a delegate to the national 
meeting to be held in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
in July. Because these national meetings 
are held only every third year, the local 
FHA is quite eager to send a delegate to 
this once-in-a-life-time meeting. 

The idea of Hobo Day is this: The 
hoboes want very much to do odd jobs 
such as baby-sitting, window-washing 
ironing, raking the yard, and cleaning 
house. They know that many housewives 
in Salisbury will need help next Saturday 
with their Easter housecleaning. They are 



hoping thai they will have a chance to 
do some of this work. 

They have not set a price on the 
various jobs. They are asking their em- 
ployers to pay whatever they think the 
jobs are worth. 

The day of work for the hoboes will 
be climaxed with a picnic in the coun- 
try. 

Ann Lawson. president of the club is 
the general chairman for the project The 
committees are: Jean Cauble and Bar- 
bara Burns, to divide the members into 
groups and assign territories; Loretta 
Jones and Susan Swartz, telephone: Mary 
Frances Davis, Becky Atwell, Jane Cro- 
gan and Mildred Erwin, publicity Misses 
Anne Hall and Lucille Morrison are ad- 
visers to the club. 

A panel discussion on the behavior of 
the child featured the February meet- 
ing of the Boyden chapter of the FHA 
held recently at the home of Hope Ed- 
wards in Milford Hills. Twentv-four 
members were present. 

Participating in the panel were six 
freshmen girls: Laura Jane Craig, Mary 
Frances Davis, Mildred Erwin. Frances 
Lynn Foil, Jane Crogan, and Judy Rus- 
sey. 

During the business session the mem- 
bers decided to ask the home economics 
department to help them collect old 
clothes to be sent to Korea. 

Refreshments carrying out the FHA 
theme were served by Hope, Assisted by 
her mother, Mrs. W. L. Edwards, and 
her aunts. 

In connection with the approaching 
bicentennial celebration, ten freshman 
girls at Boyden High School, under the 
direction of Miss Lucille Morrison have 
dressed dolls in colonial costumes 

Mrs. J. H. Nettles, a member of the 
Rowan Public Library staff, furnished 
!? k e dol ' s for a display for the library, 
the dolls have been on display in the 
home economics show cases on the third 
floor and will be on display at the public 
library during March. 

Girls dressing dolls were: Phyllis 
Brandt, Mary Frances Davis, Mildred Er- 
win, Ann Gabriel, Jane Grogan. Doris 
Price, Patsy Ramsey, Judy Russey. Bar- 
bara Schofield, and Delores Trexler. 

In striving for their goal, interna- 
tional understanding, the F. H. A. at 
their monthly meeting on February 2^ 
prepared a box of clothing to be sent to 
either Holland or Korea. 

Each year the F. H. A. contributes 
to the World Friendship among Children 
by sending personal gifts, money, or old 
clothes. 

Miss Hall, adviser to the F. H. A.. 
has a knowledge of the needs of the Ko- 
reans from her visit there a number of 
years ago and is very much interested 
in helping them. She said, "Anyone hav- 
ing any old clothes he would like to give 
away should see me, and I will send them 
to Korea." 

The Morchead City chapter elected 
three new chapter mothers at its regular 
monthly meeting Tuesday night at the 
civic center. 

Mrs. Esmond Brock. Mrs. Jack Roberts 
and Mrs. L. O. Crewe were named chap- 
ter mothers. Mrs. Brock, who was pres- 
ent, was presented with a red rose by 
Helen Pipkin, president of the group. 

The program featured home econom- 
ics. One of the purposes of the F. H. A. 
is to increase interest in home economics. 
Eight members spoke on women who 



have been trained in home economics, 
teaching, journalism, clothing, food, in- 
terior decorating, management, child- 
care, and family life. 

The group voted to put on a campaign 
to raise funds to send two delegates to 
the national convention of the F. H. A. 
in Columbus, Ohio, in July. 

In April the chapter will hold its an- 
nual Mother-Daughter supper. Commit- 
tees were appointed to make preparations 
for the dinner. Iced drinks and cakes 
were served after the program and busi- 
ness meeting. 

Helen Pipkin, president of the More- 
head City Chapter of the F. H. A., gave 
a talk at Newport recently on "Keeping 
the Spirit of F. H. A." Also attending 
the meeting from Morehead City was 
Mrs. Florence Cordova, home economics 
teacher. 

A meeting of the F. H. A. was held 
Tuesday at 1:30. Discussion was on the 
Mother-Daughter banquet or buffet sup- 
per to be held April 7. and on ways to 
raise money to send a delegate to the 
national convention at Columbus. Ohio, 
in July. 

Nothing was decided upon. Helen Pip- 
kin gave a short talk on the advantages 
of the F. H. A. and she and Mrs. Cor- 
dova told of their recent trip to the New- 
port club. 

Members of the Pamlico Chapter un- 
der the direction of their adviser, Mrs. 
Pauline Robbins, entertained members of 
the Parent Teachers Association with a 
fashion show at the regular monthly 
meeting Thursday night. 

Girls from the combined classes of 
Mrs. Robbins modeled dresses which they 
had made themselves, during home eco- 
nomics classes and as home work proj- 
ects. 

Narrator for the event was Miss Peggy 
Spruill. while Miss Jeanette Banks and 
Miss Anne Holton played key parts in 
the production. 

The review was acclaimed as one of 
the best programs yet presented to the 
young P.T.A.. and Mrs. Robbins and her 
girls were highly complimented by the 
president, Mrs. Ruth Hudson of Vande- 
mere. 

The business session of the meeting 
was very slack, and after adjournment, 
Mrs. Robbins and the Home Economics 
.girls played hostesses to the more than 
150 parents, teachers and guests at a so- 
cial hour in the Home-Ec. lab. 

The Henderson Chapter has been busy 
planning for their annual banquet which 
was held at the high school on February 
12. 

Mrs. Cobb, along with two representa- 
tives, attended a meeting at Middleburg 
on February 4 to plan the District Rally 
at Zeb Vance on March 18. The Hen- 
derson Club decided to take care of the 
registration and entertainment at the 
rally. 

The Mills Chapter is sponsoring a con- 
test to find the ugliest man in town for 
the purpose of making money to buy 
equipment for the new home economics 
department. 

The following men are entering and 
their campaign managers are as follows: 
"Simie" O'Neal — Virginia Bass, "Doc" 
Elam — Jetta Godfrey, Edward Leigh 
Best — Nancy Gordon, Asher Johnson, 
Jr. — Joyce Knott, Lewis Scoggin, Jr. 
— ■ Barbara Medlin. 

The ugliest will be crowned on April 
1st in the school auditorium at the Tom- 
Thumb Wedding. 

8 



?4 ^>Oid'&-Sfyc 1/teuA a£ 

F. H. I C4IHP DOII'S 



When the summer sun comes 
boiling down and examinations 
come rolling around, one's thoughts 
just naturally turn to something 
more pleasant, such as those happy 
days at Camp! Yes, Camp time is 
here again with more and better 
plans than ever for a week of fun 
and frolic!! We are most fortunate 
to have Mr. Carl Gradd as pro- 
gram director, who has had wide 
and varied experience with athle- 
tics at Glenn High School in Win- 
ston-Salem. Mrs. Gradd will be our 
nurse and always on hand to take 
care of any aches and pains. We 
will also have on our staff persons 
trained in crafts, music, swimming 
and other phases of camp life to 
help make this week an enjoyable 
one for everyone. 

Some time is given each day to 
the discussion of F.H.A. problems 
and some ways of improving 
F.H.A. chapters. There seem to be 
a lot of things that members don't 



understand or want to learn more 
about, and what place is better than 
White Lake Camp to find the an- 
swers? 

The evening entertainment is al- 
ways loads of fun with something 
different planned for each evening: 
Monday night is "Get Acquainted 
Night"; Tuesday, Talent Night; 
Wednesday, Games; Thursday, 
Goldston Beach; and Friday, Open 
House. 

We have been informed that 
many improvements have been 
made on the grounds and an ad- 
ditional pier built for swimming and 
sun bathing. Don't forget to bring 
shoes for land sports, and a sweat- 
er and an extra blanket for warmth. 

For additional information on 
camp life, ask your adviser for the 
Camp bulletin recently released. 
Get busy now and make plans to 
come to camp! Dates: May 25-30, 
June 1-6. 



TRIP TO FLORIDA 

(Continued from page five) 
in front of the grandstand. Many 
F.F.A. boys paraded down the 
tracks to the grandstand. Following 
the program we had box seats for 
the auto races. 

Well, the trip was about to come 
to an end. We arrived in Fayette- 
ville at 5:00 p.m. On the trip there 
was a photographer who took pic- 
tures at different points of interest. 
During the trip we were the center 
of attraction. People would stop us 
and read the badges to see what we 
were representing. 

I really enjoyed the trip, not only 
in Tampa, but on the train as well. 
I don't see how any other group 
could have enjoyed it any more 
than we did — even on Saturday 
afternoon when it rained. 



STATE CONVENTION 

(Continued from page one) 
A lovely pageant was presented 
in the afternoon session by the 
Goldsboro High School under the 



direction of Clifton Britton who also 
directs the Lost Colony. The theme 
of this program was "Our American 
Heritage; Good Homes Make Good 
Americans." 

At the close of the pageant the 
officers and advisers were installed 
in a very impressive ceremony: 

As the sun sank lower on the 
western horizon, there were some 
tired and weary girls who turned 
their faces homeward. Nevertheless, 
the experiences encountered, the 
friendships made, the inspiration 
gained and the praises won, fur- 
nished each with memories that will 
keep a glow in a young heart until 
convention time again next year. 



7(/eCca*ite. 
Hew (tyafitm&f 



Jbo tlte^e &cene£ look lamiliar? 

3 m Aure tnoie attending, camp lait year will recognize them 




Future Homemakers of America 

CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. t 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 




CAROLINE SAYS: 

Have a wonderful vacation! and take with you 
this bit of philosophy: 

Somebody said that it couldn't be done, 

But he with a chuckle replied 
That "maybe it couldn't," but he would be one 

Who wouldn't say so till he'd tried. 
So he buckled right in with the trace of a grin 

On his face. If he worried he hid it. 
He started to sing as he tackled the thing 

That couldn't be done, and he did it. 

Somebody scoffed: "Oh, you'll never do that: 

At least no one ever has done it.'" 
But he took off his coat and he took off his hat. 

And the first thing we knew he'd begun it. 
With a lift of his chin and a bit of a grin. 

Without any doubting or quiddit. 
He started to sing as he tackled the thing 

That couldn't be done, and he did it. 

There are thousands to tell you it cannot be done. 

There are thousands to prophesy failure; 
There are thousands to point out to you, one by 
one, 

The dangers that wait to assail you. 
But just buckle in with a bit of a grin. 

Just take off your coat and go to it; 
Just start to sing as you tackle the thing 

That "cannot be done," and you'll do it. 

Edgar A. Guest 




*%■ fit 



; f* 



ill 



. HOMEMAK 

North Carolina Association * 



Volume XI 



OCTOBER 1953 



Dear F. H. A. Members — Greetings: 

If you have corresponded with the State Office this school year, you will no doubt have 
noticed a different signature on the mail directed to you. You may not know that Miss Daphne 
Eller now Mrs. George A Leonard, has moved into an apartment in Greensboro, and in addi- 
tion to being a Present Homemaker is teaching homemaking to the students of Bessemer High 
School along with supervising student teachers from the Woman's College. 

Although I am new in this position, the Future Homemakers of America is an organization 
with which I am very familiar since I was chapter adviser in the Lee Woodard School in Wilson 
County for six years. During 1951-52 my work with Future Homemakers branched out to in- 
clude all of District II, since that was the year I enjoyed the honor of being District Adviser. 
In October of 1951, I had the privilege of attending the National Executive Council Meeting 
in Chicago. Nancy Bright of North Carolina was the national officer that year. Incidentally, 
Nancy is at present a sophomore at Woman's College majoring in home economics. 

Yes, the Future Homemakers of America is an organization in which • I sincerely believe, and 
I truly feel that the lives of tomorrow will be enriched because of FHA members who also have 
this faith. 



Let's make this a wonderful year! 



Cordially, 

(Mrs.) Faye T. Coleman 

State Adviser 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1953-1954 

President — Jean Faulkner, Red Oak 

Vice-President — Betty Calhoun, Seventy-First 

Secretary — Glenda Noble, Deep Run 

Treasurer — Peggy Spruill, Pamlico County 

Reporter — Garrie Freeman, Rutherfordton-Spindak 

Parliamentarian — Jo Ann Woosley, South Fork 

Historian — Evelyn Bruton, Candor 

Song Leader — Anne Jo Lawson, Madison 



District Advisers 
1953-1954 

Mrs. Mary Lanier Jarrett, Fuquay Springs 

Mrs. Maude K. Stanton, Red Springs 

Miss Clara D. Reed, Richlands 

Mrs. Pauline Robbins, Pamlico County 

Mrs. Charlotte R. Turner, Hendersonville 

Miss Ethel Bailey, Mount Airy 

Mrs. Kathleen Nicholson, Benton Heights 

Mrs. Pauline Hoover, Tri-City Central 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



V. 



'V* 




WE GO TO THE NATIONAL CONVENTION 



There was the excitement of last 
minute inspection of our suitcases; 
then we were into the car and off. 
When we reached the train station in 
Durham there was a general rush to 
put identification tabs on our suit- 
cases, to check with our advisers, 
and then pile into the train. 

Within minutes we had all made 
friends with the girls sitting around 
us, and the train was alive with 
singing and merry laughter. About 
five o'clock in the afternoon we 
rolled into the station in Lynchburg, 
Virginia. Everyone was ready for 
the delicious box supper of fried 
chicken, ham and cheese sandwiches, 
pickles, and cake which was brought 
on the train at that time. 

Because of poor ventilation the 
Virginia girls, who were staying on 
the car next to us, were forced to 



THURSDAY, JULY 2, 1953 

move into our car. In spite of the 
fact that they had to stand in the 
aisle we had a grand time telling 
them what a grand state good ole 
North Carolina is. 

The conductors were very patient 
with our continual trips to the club 
car. The passengers in the other cars 
must have felt that they knew every 
face in our crowd. 

It was beginning to grow late and 
we had become very tired. Of course, 
there were a few of us who stayed 
awake all night, but the rest had 
dropped off to sleep into the world 
of tomorrow when the real fun 
would begin. 

Friday 

Rolling along together was ex- 
actly what we were doing around 
six o'clock a.m. on July 3. The 



train was moving nearer and nearer 
to Columbus and we were trying 
ever so hard to get our eyes open. 
If you've heard the song "Through 
a Long and Sleepless Night," you 
have heard our theme song as we 
walked into the Deshler-Wallick 
Hotel. 

We were beginning the most excit- 
ing time that we had ever enjoyed. 
Everyone was rushing around 
registering, un-packing, eating break- 
fast, attending all-state chorus prac- 
tice, and supposedly attending 
requested state meetings. Some of 
us missed the North Carolina meet- 
ing because we just had to have our 
bacon and eggs. 

"Who's here from where?" was 
the theme of Louisiana's part on 
program Friday afternoon. They 
spelled out FHA with flowers from 



each state represented as well as 
Puerto Rico, Guam, and Hawaii. It 
was most impressive. Miss Edna 
Amidon, chairman of the national 
advisory board, gave an inspiring 
talk on "FHA in Homes and Com- 
munities and the Nation." 

Following the afternoon session we 
were free to wander over the city! 
Can you imagine 2,000 girls wander- 
ing around? It's truly a sight to see. 
The most used word on the trip 
was pooped and believe you me by 
the time Friday night rolled around 
we were pooped. 

Saturday 

Today started with a bang, as 
sleepy-eyed girls came to the dif- 
ferent sessions in all parts of the 
Deshler-Wallick Hotel. The session 
that I attended was "Our share is 
our homes," which was very inter- 
esting. We discussed each other's 
problems and told of some of our 
experiences. 

Tonight was the night of the "Pag- 
eant," to which everyone had been 
looking forward. The theme was 
"Our American Heritage." Girls 
dressed in costumes representing dif- 
ferent periods of time in our Amer- 
ican history were placed around the 
"Statue of Liberty." Then the "Read- 
er" would read stories concerning 
the period that was represented on 
the stage. Everyone had a wonderful 
time. The only thing we have to 
complain about is our poor aching 
feet. And when I say aching feet, 
I mean aching feet. 

Sunday 

My roommate and I planned so 
faithfully to get up in time to go 
to 11:00 o'clock mass at the Catho- 
lic Church. We woke up bright and 
early (we thought) but it was 9:45 
and we couldn't get dressed, eat 
breakfast and get to church by 1 1:00. 
On top of that we didn't get any 
breakfast. We walked all over town 
to find a place to eat. We finally 
wound up on the same street as the 
hotel. 

Monday 

At 9:00 a.m. Monday July 6, the 
girls from Virginia, North Carolina 
and Tennessee met in the Hall of 
Mirrors to elect a vice-president. To 
our delight our North Carolina can- 
didate, Frances Burris, won. Then 
the voting delegates discussed the 
amendments to the constitution. 

From 10:30 to 11:30 the North 
Carolina girls met in the Ohio State 
Building where we received direc- 




It all happened so quickly! At the Na- 
tional Convention in Columbus, Ohio, 
Frances Burris was elected Southern 
Regional Vice-President in charge of 
recreation. This is one of the twelve 
offices to be filled each year in the 
National organization of Future Home- 
makers of America. Frances is from the 
Wingate Chapter in Wingate, North 
Carolina. Congratulations, Frances! 

tions as to how and when we would 
leave the hotel for the train. 

At 1:00 o'clock the Sixth General 
Session was held. The minutes of the 
1952 Business Session were given. 
The Constitution was read and dis- 
cussed. Only the voting delegates 
could vote. So one of my room- 
mates and I went back to our room 
to pack so we could be out by 4:30. 

At 7:30 in the evening we held 
the seventh and last session. The 
all-state chorus sang "Look for the 
Silver Lining." 

I think it would be hard to put 
into words how everyone enjoyed 
the Installation of Officers. 

By ten o'clock all of us were at 
the depot, hovering around about 50 
suitcases and loaded with gifts, 
candy, cake and fruit. The train 
did not leave until eleven o'clock 
so we got ready for bed. Then 
what a time followed! With the 
help of a ukelele and 32 voices 
we raised the roof of the car, ending 
with the Bunny-hop down the aisle 
of the car. Miss Dennis finally called 



COVER PICTURE 

State Officers for 1953-54. Left 
to right: Jo Ann Woosley, Clenda 
Noble, Garrie Freeman, Evelyn 
Brutton, Anne Jo Lawson, Peggy 
Spruill, Betty Calhoun, Jean Faulk- 
ner. 



out for quiet at midnight and we 
settled down to sleep. Ever try sleep- 
ing four in two seats? Well! You 
surely have to fit together and turn 
together too. 

Breakfast on the train Tuesday. 
It was a lot of fun but did it cost 
money? Fortunately, Miss Dennis 
had already collected our money for 
the chicken "picnic-style" lunch 
or some of us might have gone 
hungry. When we reached Roanoke 
12 of the group left us to take the 
train to Winston-Salem. The rest 
of us just talked, sang and slept 
until we reached the North Carolina 
state line; then we got dressed-up to 
meet our friends and relatives at 
the Durham station. Thus ended a 
glorious week full of fun, excitement 
and new experiences. We recom- 
mend the trip to all North Carolina 
FHA'ers. 

"Your Roving Reporters" 

To me the most unique and im- 
pressive feature of the National FHA 
Convention was the way the officers 
presented their reports on Monday. 

The president's report was in the 
form of a letter to the FHA Girls in 
Guam, Puerto Rico, Alaska and 
Hawaii giving them a diary of her life 
as National President.. 

The four vice-presidents donned 
their aprons and assembled their 
equipment to mix up a program of 
work. The first ingredient to go into 
the bowl was a box of ready-mix 
Programs of Work. Then they 
stirred in a large can of goals 
new and condensed, a cup of 
co-operation and a pinch of 
participation. Willingness to work 
and punctuality were folded in last. 
The mixture was poured into the 
states of enthusiasm to be served 
to FHA Chapters for use in 1953-54. 

The vice-president of recreation 
was packing her trunk to bring to 
the newly elected vice-president of 
recreation who incidentally is our 
own Frances Burris. 

Her program of work was care- 
fully laid in the bottom of the trunk. 
Then the letters of the committee 
members co-operation filled every 
corner of the trunk and the booklet 
"Fun for FHA" was carefully placed 
on top. 

The last report was given by the 
historian who was dressed and spoke 
like a French artist. She had also 
prepared an enlarged scrapbook that 
could be seen from the stage which 
illustrated her work for the year. 
"Adviser's Report" 
Mrs. Pauline Hoover. 



GARHiR'S 
CAROLINA 
CARAVAH 



The Garner chapter worked espe- 
cially hard this year to raise funds 
for the "Carolina Caravan" that was 
planned earlier in the year. It has 
been the custom for the Chapter to 
take a trip every other year and 
this was the year. 

June the eighth found us board- 
ing a chartered bus bright and early 
with a picnic lunch (to save time 
and money). There were twenty-nine 
girls, two chapter mothers, and our 
adviser, Mrs. LaVerne Fails. Mrs. 
Fails had worked with our school 
principal for some time in planning 
all the complete and last minute de- 
tails. On this particular morning we 
were headed for Asheboro. 

In Asheboro, we were met by 
Mr. Harry Barlow of the Chamber 
of Commerce, Home Demonstration 
Agent, and the President and Vice- 
President of the Asheboro FHA 
Chapter. They escorted us to the 
Bassong Hosiery Mill, where we saw 
ladies' full-fashioned nylons being 
made from yarn to the finished cello- 
phane envelope for our purchase. 

From Asheboro we went to Badin, 
where the Chief of Police opened 
up his siren and led us to the top 
of the dam, where the source of 
energy is harnessed for manufactur- 
ing of aluminum. Badin happens to 
be the world's largest aluminum 
plant. There we saw the huge cakes 
of the metal ready to depart for 
factories where they will be made 
into wares for our great American 
public. 

In Charlotte we visited the House 
of Lance and saw all kinds of 
cookies, nabs, and peanuts being 
made and packaged. Here we were 
each given a box of Lance treats 
which we enjoyed later in the tour. 
That night we attended the Hender- 
son School of Dance Program at one 
of the local theaters. 

The following morning, we were 
at the Cleveland Cloth Mills by the 
time the morning shift was under 
way. Mr. McBrayer had several 
helpers conduct us through so that 
we could get more out of it. We 
saw over five hundred patterns being 
woven into fabrics that we will soon 




be wearing. After the tour, the com- 
pany treated us in their commissary 
and the girls were permitted to pur- 
chase fabrics at a reduced price for 
their sewing projects. 

At the Stonecutter Mills, Mr. 
C. A. Denson helped us to under- 
stand the difference between spin- 
ning, weaving and knitting, which 
had been purely textbook terms up 
until now. We were also permitted 
to purchase materials here too. 

Needless to say, we didn't have 
enough time at any one place, if 
we were to maintain our schedule — 
so on to Chimney Rock, Lake Lure 
and up to the Biltmore Estate by 
the middle of the afternoon. It would 
take books to tell our complete en- 
joyment of this enchanted place. 
Our accommodations at the YWCA 
in Asheville were super! All nights 
were planned for the larger cities so 
that we might have cafeterias at 
which to select our food. Here we 
had the experience of actually 
stretching the food dollar! 

Bright and early the next morn- 
ing, we were playing nip-and-tuck 
with the clouds up on the Blue Ridge 
Parkway. We had to have a permit 
to take a bus up on the Parkway — 
but that had been taken care of. 
Such tunes as "We Are Climbing 
Jacob's Ladder," and "On Top of 
Ole Smoky," filled the bus as these 
happy teen-age merrymakers sang 



most of the time. Never could we 
have picked a better time to see the 
Mountain Laurel and the Rhodo- 
dendron in their full glory! A trip 
through the Linville Caverns made 
many of the terms that we had 
learned in science more meaningful. 

At Elkin, we enjoyed Chatham 
Manufacturing Company, which we 
had previously thought manufac- 
tured only those lovely blankets. To 
our great surprise, they were mak- 
ing material for coats, suits and even 
automobile upholstry for one of the 
automobile industries. 

Our last day out was the most 
crowded and probably offered the 
greatest variety of experiences. Our 
first stop was a trip through the 
Home Economics Department of 
Woman's College in Greensboro. 
Dr. Keeney conducted us through 
and we were much impressed with 
such a lovely school which most 
of us would like to attend some day. 
Books could be written about the 
facilities there but I shall not go 
into detail — better still, visit these 
yourself sometime. 

Leaving Greensboro, we went to 
the Decorative Fabrics Division of 
Burlington Mills. After Mr. J. A. 
Boland, Jr. spent hours taking us 
through ... we can truly under- 
stand their "Woven into the Life of 
America" Trademark. There we saw 
(Continued on page 8) 




1. Adults gathered for refreshments after the fashion show. 2. Baby winner being crowned. 3. FHA members adopt and help a 
needy child. 4. Seeing the Delegates off as they board the train to Columbus, Ohio, is Mrs. Robert Woody. In the center is Fay 
Woody and waving goodbye is Miss Catherine T. Dennis, State Supervisor of Home Economics Education. The other girl (right) 
is Becky Murdock, the delegate from Bragtown. 5. FHA girls and a chapter mother packing for the World Christmas Festival. 6. 
FHA members preparing for Glamour Party. 7. A Home Economics student, Johnny Hamilton, introduces the Chinese boy, Mr. 
Chin to one of the Classes. 8. Shirley Ferrell, FHA member and representative of local beauty salon. 9. FHA Mother-Father- 
Daughter Banquet. 



MEMOS 



We would do well to "back up," 
and review, and browse around 
some before continuing further with 
our program-of-work for 1953-54. 
Renewed inspiration and ideas creep 
into the picture as we observe and 
examine old pitcures of past activi- 
ties and read of past experiences. 
The accomplishments of the Bethes- 
da Chapter are phenomenal in scope. 
You will think so too after studying 
some of their experiences of one 
year as recorded and illustrated on 
these pages. 

Observation of UN Day 

Bethesda FHA members observed 
UN day in a very interesting way. 
In preparation for the day the FHA 
girls planned a program for the 
entire school. Three foreign students 
were invited to participate in the 
program. One Chinese student, one 
from Germany, and one from India 
made the day a success. The first 
two periods of the school day were 
issued for the foreign students to 
visit all the classes of the high school 
in order that they might form better 
relationships with the entire student 
body. The third period of the day 
was devoted to a chapel program. 
The Indian girl did three Indian 
dances. The German girl, only 12 
years of age, did a German song and 
explained the meaning of her native 
flag. The Chinese boy, working on 
a Ph.D in economics at the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, spoke on 
"Relative Characteristics of Amer- 
ican schools to Chinese schools." 

During the lunch hour, all of the 
FHA girls ate together and enter- 
tained the foreign students. The 
principal and local minister also 
ate with the group. 

The afternoon was devoted to the 
touring of the grades 1-8. Each 
foreign student had something to say 
to each grade and the grades were 
given a chance to ask questions. 
Many questions, have been asked as 
to when the foreign students will 
be back and everyone was extremely 
interested in them. (See photo seven.) 

Participation in the World 
Christmas Festival 

Before the FHA meeting for pack- 
ing boxes was held an FHA member 
notified grades 1-12 and explained 
why FHA girls were doing this and 
asked each grade to contribute some- 
thing for the boxes. A list of ma- 
terials which could be included were 



a 



7/ 



eat in 



tL 



(^-haptet 



given each room. On the morning of 
the gift wrapping day, FHA repre- 
sentatives collected the gifts, and so 
many people contributed each FHA 
member was bubbling over with en- 
thusiasm. Every grade in the school 
contributed something. Our FHA 
meeting was devoted to packing 
boxes and after this day a letter was 
sent to each grade thanking them 
for their participation and helping 
to make this project a success. 

By doing things of this nature, 
the FHA girls helped to interpret 
FHA to the entire school. (See photo 
number six.) 

Fashion Show and Baby Contest 

The Bethesda FHA members pre- 
sented a fashion show, sponsored 
a baby contest, and enjoyed a social 
hour all in one afternoon. Some 
would think it couldn't be done, but 
it was. It must be admitted, how- 
ever, that it was merely the climax 
of hours of preparation in careful 
planning and skillful execution. The 
Fashion Show consisted of the fol- 
lowing: second year home economics 
class members who made woolen 
garments, adults who had been en- 
rolled in an adult tailoring class, 
and third year home economics girls 
who made tailored garments. 

Special attraction at intermission 
was a baby contest. A baby show 
had been scheduled about two weeks 
before the fashion show date. Each 
home economics girl sponsored a 
baby and was responsible for doing 
the campaigning for it. Votes were 
1 penny and the baby receiving the 
most votes was crowned during the 
intermission. Before the announcing 
of the winner each participant was 
called to the stage, escorted by the 
Home Economics student sponsor, 
and introduced to the audience. 
Each was given an inexpensive pres- 
ent and then the winner was an- 
nounced. The winner was given a 
complimentary photograph by one 
of the local photography shops. 

By doing such a project as this, 
the entire family participated and 
there was extreme interest built up 
as far as home economics is con- 
cerned. (See photos one and two.) 

Glamour Party 

A glamour party was the program 
for one of our FHA meetings. It 
was most successful. A representa- 
tive of a local beauty salon was on 
hand to give demonstrations and to 



answer questions. Mothers of FHA 
girls were invited and any girl in 
high school who wanted to attend 
could do so. Refreshments were 
served by the FHA members. (See 
photos five and eight.) 

FHA Mother-Father-Daughter 
Banquet 

During the year the home eco- 
nomics department has been trying 
to make the program as family cen- 
tered as possible. When time came 
for the FHA banquet several mem- 
bers asked why their father could 
not come. The FHA executive coun- 
cil met and discussed the pros and 
cons of the fathers attending the 
banquet and decided to let each 
girl vote secretly as to whether or 
not she wanted her father to attend. 
The majority voted to have their 
fathers come to the banquet. 

Enough money had been raised 
to pay for the mother and daughter. 
The next question was "what shall 
we do about financing the fathers 
dinners?" This was discussed and 
since the year was practically gone, 
the group decided to have each 
girl pay for her father's plate. 

Chapter mothers, a local depart- 
ment store, and FHA members 
worked beautifully together in get- 
ting food and decorations ready for 
the banquet. Every FHA member, 
was responsible for a duty and each 
chapter mother was responsible for 
some activity. 

The school cafeteria was used to 
decorate as a summer flower garden 
and after the decorations were com- 
pleted the atmosphere was wonderful. 
The windows were made into trees, 
the floor was covered with funeral 
grass, the little white picket fence 
was entwined with rose buds. In 
the center of the garden was placed 
a bird bath and fish pond, and the 
entrance which was an archway 
was beautifully labeled with red 
sparkling letters, "Welcome to the 
FHA Flower Garden." Most beauti- 
ful of all was the real yellow canary 
which chirped at intervals and made 
the flower garden a reality. 

The program consisted of the fol- 
lowing things: 

1. One FHA girl gave a report 
entitled "What FHA Means to Me" 
which she had written for an English 
theme during the year. 

2. Mr. C. H. Chewning, Durham 
County Superintendent spoke on 
"The Importance of Home Econom- 



ics in the Secondary School Curric- 
ulum." 

3. One FHA girl gave a report on 
the yearly work of the Bethesda 
FHA chapter. (This let the parents 
know what had been done in FHA. 
It was also a good evaluation for the 
principal and the FHA members.) 

4. First and second degrees were 
issued by the local adviser. 

5. A representative from the Belk- 
Leggett Store in Durham presented 
the chapter with a plaque to be used 
for the standards of achievements. 

The girls came to the conclusion 
that we cannot have totally effective 
FHA programs unless the fathers as 
well as the mothers are included on 
all occasions and this year they 
plan to include them in their total 
program. (See photo nine.) 

Participation in Farm Youth 
Festival 

The Farm Youth Festival is held 
annually in Durham. The 1953 Farm 
Youth Festival was in co-operation 
with the Durham centennial and all 
of the floats represented in the 
parade were supposed to be of the 
centennial idea. The Bethesda FHA 
girls portrayed the old and the new 
schoolroom. For costumes the girls 
had to use their grandmothers' and 
great-grandmothers' clothing. 

Chapter Project — "Helping Others" 

A little girl about ten years of 
age was made extremely happy when 
FHA members made such a fuss over 
her last year. This was one phase 
of chapter's project — "Helping Oth- 
ers." The girls instructed and helped 
the child in grooming and presented 
her with gifts of clothing. All ihe 
first grade children were invited to 
the home economics cottage to see 
the department. They were served 
light refreshments and they played 
games under the supervision of the 
FHA girls. While this project helped 
others — it helped the FHA chapter 
also. It improved relationships and 
did much toward interpreting the 
FHA program to the school and to 
families in the community. (See 
photo three.) 

Delegate Sent to National 
Convention 

The Bethesda Chapter was one of 
the forty-three chapters in North 
Carolina represented at the National 
Convention in Columbus, Ohio dur- 
ing July. The chapter hopes now 
to benefit from the experiences of 
Fay Woody who was their delegate, 
and it is certain that Fay received 
untold benefits from her rich ex- 
perience. (See photo four.) 

6 






More and more reports tell of 
chapter officers, county officers, and 
officers of bi-county, tri-county, and 
quin-county federations of the Fu- 
ture Homemakers getting together 
for a workshop before school open- 
ing. For most groups it is an occasion 
for serious and reflective thinking 
interspersed with periods of fun and 
recreation. 

Rockingham County Future 
Homemakers Hold Officers Day 

Wednesday, August 25, 1953 was 
officially declared O-day in Rock- 
ingham County when officers from 
the nine high schools of the county 
descended upon Mayo Park, Mayo- 
dan, N. C. for a leadership workshop 
and some Future Homemaker Fun. 
Small group meetings were held dur- 
ing the morning session, with officer 
training in mind. There was a sep- 
arate group meeting for each office, 
led by a student with an adviser as 
a resource person. A bag lunch was 
enjoyed at noon with free milk for 
all. (See photo below.) 

Reports were heard after lunch 
and the song leader group led in a 
song fest. The meeting was ad- 



journed for swimming and games 
the remainder of the afternoon. This 
is the first meeting of this type ever 
to be held in Rockingham County 
and it was agreed by all to have been 
very successful. Each girl departed 
with "Let's do it again next year" 
on her lips. 

Cumberland County has found 
that one of the best ways to stimulate 
and exchange ideas in Chapter work 
is to have a joint meeting of retiring 
and incoming presidents and chapter 
advisers. This meeting is held in the 
spring of each year. Here each 
Chapter reviews its year's accom- 
plishments with special emphasis on 
project work and program planning. 
In this manner the incoming presi- 
dents receive inspiration and infor- 
mation to begin their years work. 

The Durham-Orange bi-county 
federation held their workshop at 
Duke Park in Durham August 27ih. 
An officer from each chapter was 
elected by his own chapter. A rota- 
tion system of officers similar to that 
used by the state association was 
planned, presented, and adopted. 
The FHA federation is eight years 
old. 

(Continued on page 8) 




Time out for lunch! These girls are FHA officers in Rockingham County. Left to 
right: Ruth Carter, Mayodan; Jo Anne Carter, Wentworth; Frances Joyce, Mayodan; 
Nancy Chapman, Reidsville; Anne Jo Lawson, Madison (State Song Leader); Denecia 
Wheeler, and Jo Anne Lashley, Wentworth. 




Mills FHA is getting off to a big start; 
they're not letting any grass grow under 
their feet this year. 

To start the year with a bang our 
chapter planned a hayride to Lake Glad 
for Tuesday. August 25. All those who 
will be new members this year were 
invited to join the old members. 

Thirty-five girls, several visitors, a chap- 
ter mother, and FHA adviser met at 
Mills School to go to Lake Glad near 
Wendell for a picnic supper. 

Upon arriving at Lake Glad the first 
activity was swimming. At 5:00 o'clock 
came the picnic, consisting of every type 
of food possible. After eating, the girls 
danced for several hours, then a water- 
melon cutting, followed by more dancing 
and joy ride home to tunes furnished by 
the girls. 

To help make our chapter meetings 
more interesting this year, a special com- 
mittee is planning new yearbooks. We 
have a designer working on a new type 
of cover, and the pages are to be mimeo- 
graphed. These yearbooks are going to 
be our best yet. The theme for the year 
is "Knowing Your FHA." 

This certainly is going to be a grand 
year for our FHA, for we have many 
things to look forward to. We have a 
tip-top chapter and we're all going to 
work together to make this the greatest 
year ever for FHA. 

Boyden FHA Chapter held its final 
meeting for the 1952-53 school year in 
the home of Anne Lawson to install new 
officers and award homemaking degrees. 
It marked the winding up of a school year 
which was filled with many and varied 
activities. 

At a meeting of Jane Grogan, Becky 
Shuping was elected delegate to the 
National FHA Convention which was 
held in Columbus, Ohio, July 2-8. 

Becky is also parliamentarian for the 
local FHA. Other officers are: Sissy 
Swartz, president; Frances Lynn Foil, 
vice-president; Hope Edwards, secretary, 
and Jane Grogan, treasurer. 

An important part of the FHA pro- 
gram is the FHA camp held each year at 
White Lake. At least seven Boyden FHA 
members planned to go in June: Nancy 
Clark, Hope Edwards, Jane Grogan, 
Loretta Jones, and Sissy Swartz. The pur- 
pose of the camp is to help members in 
problems concerning their club activities. 

Miss Ann Hall, FHA adviser, says that 
the FHA camp has helped Boyden's club 
to come up from one of the poorest clubs 
in the county to one of the best. She 
also said that interest in Home Economics 
has been keen this year, with both boys 
and girls and that if enough boys showed 
interest next year an all-boy class will 
be planned with courses the boys would 
enjoy. 

The Stedman FHA Chapter was very 
glad to have six delegates including their 
adviser to attend the National FHA Con- 
vention in Columbus, Ohio. The girls 
raised the money for the trip by soliciting 
business firms and working different 
projects in the community. We are very 
proud of Loyd Royal, a member of the 
senior class, who received her state de- 
gree in Raleigh last spring. 



The Beaufort FHA Officers make plans 
early for an interesting and busy year. 
Ada Sue Owens, Reta Mason, Jane Safrit, 
Ada Mae Lewis, Faye Mason and Nancy 
Broda met in the home of their adviser 
before school opened to plan their ac- 
tivities of the year. During the meeting 
the officers planned their money making 
projects for the year. Chapter members 
will sell vanilla flavoring, Christmas cards, 
school emblems, school pencils and they 
will have a concession stand at the 
basketball games. 

The members who sell the largest num- 
ber of money making articles will receive 
prizes of sterling silver FHA pins. 

The Beaufort Chapter is planning to 
purchase a washing machine, a dryer, 
garbage disposal, automatic toaster and 
waffle iron for the homemaking depart- 
ment. 

The chapter meetings will be held 
in the school auditorium every Thursday 
from 11:08 to 11:48. New officers will be 
installed at the first meeting, which will 
be held on Thursday, Sept. 17. The 
Future Homemakers of America and the 
Eighth Grade girls elected new officers 
last April. 

The South Edgecombe officers of the 
FHA chapter were called together for a 
meeting by Miss Ruth Haislip, our ad- 
viser, on August 12 at the home of Mrs. 
George Webb. 

The plans for the coming year were 
arranged. First, a social hour along with 
a short FHA program was planned in 
order for the freshmen girls to meet the 
FHA members and to get acquainted 
with the club. Any upper classmen girls 
who were interested in the FHA were 
invited also. Light refreshments of choco- 
late drop and refrigerator cookies, pea- 
nuts and fruit juice punch were planned. 

As soon as the initiation of the new 
members is over, a candle light ceremony 
will be held to initiate the new members 
into the club. 

As a result of some confusion over the 
refreshments at each meeting last year it 
was decided to have refreshments only on 
special occasions if desired by the club 
members. 

Our chapter projects for this year are 
to buy an electric water cooler for the 
school and to plant red rose bushes on 
the school grounds. 

Projects for the department are to fix 
a dressing room inside the home eco- 
nomics department for the sewing stu- 
dents to dress in and to buy more kitchen 
equipment. 

FHA Degrees committee to be ap- 
pointed at the first meeting. 

Handbooks were partly planned. These 
books are to consist of the FHA song, 
creed, the different committees, plans for 
the year and other things which will help 
the FHA member. 

This year we have a new home eco- 
nomics teachers, who is our FHA adviser 
also. We are looking forward to this 
year under the supervision of Miss Ruth 
Haislip orginally from Oak City. We are 
sure she will help us improve our club 
and we know we will all benefit by her 
advice and co-operation among the Home 
Economics students and members. Good 
luck, Miss Haislip, for we are looking 
forward to this year with you. 

The Bartlett Yancey chapter in Cleve- 
land County has summer projects too. 
We wish all of you could see Jean 
Foster's project. Jean took her room for 
her project. She made a good plan then 
carried out the plan. First she wall- 



papered her room in a lovely pattern of 
green, yellow and brown with a con- 
trasting solid color around the windows, 
with yellow and brown with a contrast- 
ing solid color around the windows, with 
yellow organdy curtains. You would never 
know the her lovely dressing table was 
made of orange crates. It has a beautiful 
full flounce of matching materials. The 
bedspreads are green and she dyed the 
rugs to match. 

Gerlyne Watson from Prospect Hill 
won honors in Home Economics last 
year. She has an average of 97. She has 
been an active member in FHA. She 
represented Yanceyville at the National 
Convention in Columbus. 

We are now making plans for next 
year. We hope to get some shrubbery, 
some folding tables for cutting tables, a 
spigot on the outside, put down inlaid 
linoleum on the two kitchens and sewing 
laboratory floors. We have $66.88 left 
from the PTA gift that we are saving to 
add enough to it to buy the linoleum 
this summer. We hope to have it put 
down before school starts. 

We bought nine new reference books 
this year. We can't say they have been 
kept as clean as our walls. They have 
really been used. The name of some are 
"Teen times." "The Girl Grows Up," 
"Behave Yourself," "Your Carriage, 
Madam," "Personal Problems of the 
High School Girl," "If You Please," 
"House Furnishing," and other similar 
topics. You see by the title why we have 
used them. 

Our hats are off to our librarian. Miss 
Theo Strum. She adds several new books 
in Home Economics to the Library this 
year. She has been a great help to us 
since we were short of textbooks. Many 
times she got together books for us. 

We want to thank Mr. Abell for his 
interest and help to us last year. He 
has attended all our FHA meetings, and 
backed us in everything we have tried to 
do. He even came down and checked our 
clothing project. Why not? We have a 
book entitled "Men Wear Clothes, Too." 

At the end of the school term last 
spring we helped Mrs. Wooten take 
inventory of all books and equipment. 
We also helped her with her annual 
report. We are so proud of the financial 
report that we are putting a copy of this 
in our scrapbook. 

The John A. Wilkinson Chapter in 
Belhaven feels that having "Open House" 
in the home economics department is a 
good type of publicity. This they did 
last spring. Esther Leigh Hayes and 
Stephanie Fussell greeted guests at the 
door, Glenda Jordan served punch, and 
Barbara Davis and Carolyn Knicker- 
bocker served sandwiches, cookies, mints 
and nuts. 

The refreshment table was centered by 
a bouquet of red roses, the official FHA 
flower. Arrangements of spring flowers 
were used throughout the department. 

Mount Holly Chapter reports on a 
Fashion Revue which was led by a 
Kiddie Parade. The parade featured 
young tots modeling their cool organdy 
dresses made by their older sisters. 

A unique feature of the Kiddie Parade 
was Barbara Hoffman's baby brother who 
modeled from his stroller his yellow 
pique suit. 

In every program, they say, is some- 
thing that stands out just a bit more than 
the rest. The same held true with the 
Fashion Revue. What was this? The 
presentation of degrees. All this year the 



girls had worked toward their degrees 
and the night of the Revue they were 
awarded certificates of achievement for 
their work. Later they will receive their 
keys or scrolls. How many girls re- 
ceived degrees? Fifty-one girls received 
the Junior Homemaker Degree and twen- 
ty-six received the Chapter Homemaker 
Degree. Isn't this working "TOWARD 
NEW HORIZONS"? For the first time 
in the history of our chapter, two people, 
Mr. W. L. Dixon, Principal of our 
school, and Mr. Ned Burgess, reporter 
for the "Mount Holly News." were pre- 
sented an honorary award for their 
interest and co-operation in our organiza- 
tion. 



GARNER'S CARAVAN 

(Continued from page 3) 
the difference between the Jacquard 
Loom and the conventional type. 
There we saw patterns still being 
woven that were over twenty years 
old but still in demand by the Amer- 
ican manufacturers and general pub- 
lic. We saw avenues of vocations 
open that we never knew existed 
before. 

A trip through White Furniture 
Company at Mebane conducted by 
the President himself really increased 
our knowledge in selecting fine furni- 
ture and will prove valuable in years 
to come. Now we can talk intelli- 
gently about veneers and solid 
woods! We know that some of the 
lighter woods are birch, magnolia, 
and pine and the darker ones are 
mahogany and walnut. 

By this time we were really be- 
ginning to look forward to getting 
home and telling everyone what we 
had done. After six-hundred miles 
of travel in our own state, we were 
more convinced than ever that 
North Carolina is the grandest state 
in the whole union — and after such 
a trip for six dollars and fifty cents 
plus meals, wouldn't you say so, 
too? 



PRE-SCHOOL PLANNING 

(Continued from page 6) 
The Quin-County Federation in- 
cluding Duplin, Sampson, Onslow, 
Jones, and Pender counties, have 
recently completed plans for the 
Quin-County Rally to be held dur- 
ing the spring of 1954. Mrs. Kath- 
leen P. Snyder invited officers and 
advisers from all the chapters in the 
five counties to her sister's cottage 
at Carolina Beach. The rally is 
planned with emphases on more 
wholesome recreation. 

8 



In the Event Your Chapter 
Has Not Yet Affiliated 



The mention of money and dues 
can be almost embarrassing, but each 
of us knows that an organization 
can not function and grow without 
funds. We can dream of a handsome 
inheritance from a rich uncle one 
of these days but at the present time 
we must struggle on our own. If you 
are confused about the amount of 
your dues perhaps the following ex- 
planations will answer your ques- 
tions and clear all doubts. 

This year the dues required to 
become affiliated with the state and 
national organization are 55c per 
member. Then in addition to this 
the districts voted to send an ad- 
ditional 10c per member for dele- 
gates' expenses to National and 
Regional meetings. This 10c is not 
mandatory for affiliation but the 
state executive board members also 
voted that it be sent in with the 55c 
dues. If 65c per member is sent to 



the office it will be separated as 

follows: 

15c is sent to the National Office 
40c is deposited in State Treasury 

for the magazine, rallies, etc. 

10c deposited in a special fund 

for delegates' expenses to National 

and Regional Meetings. 



NEWSLETTER FEATURES 

October — National Meeting, Pre- 
school Planning, Summer FHA Ac- 
tivities, Program for Year. 

December — "What Christmas 
Means To Me," Publicity-Exhibits, 
Interpreting FHA, District Rallies. 

March — Projects — Local, State, 
National, County, Bi-County, Tri- 
County and Quin-County Rallies, 
Money Making Projects. 

May — The State Convention, 
Camp, Suggestions for Summer Ac- 
tivities, Announcing the Regional 
Meeting. 



cAre y[ou J\eady, to J3eg,in 
Work On your State 3)eg,ree? 



If so, write to the state office and 
ask for Declaration of Intention 
blank. Fill in the blank and return 
to the office not later than Novem- 
ber 15. 

If you are beginning either the 
Junior or Chapter degrees why not 
order a personal copy of the booklet, 
A Guide to Help You Grow As 
Future Homemaker of America (30c 
per single copy) from: Future Home- 
makers of America, Office of 
Education, Room 4639 U. S. De- 
partment of Health, Education, and 
Welfare, Washington 25, D. C. 



JOINT FHA AND 
FFA MEETING 

The FHA chapter of Fair Grove 
and the FFA chapter of Davis 
Townsend held a joint meeting in 
the Home Economics Department of 
Fair Grove. Around sixty members 
attended. 

The FHA chapter of Fair Grove 
was in charge of the program en- 



titled "The Emblem and What it 
Represents." 

The FFA of Davis Townsend was 
in charge of the entertainment. Mr. 
Kearny, the adviser and director of 
the FFA led the boys and girls in 
"Getting Acquainted Games." Other 
games and folk dances were en- 
joyed by everyone. Refreshments 
were served buffet style. 

The Bath Chapter of Future 
Homemakers of America are proud 
to announce that they are the win- 
ner of the first premium, which was 
$30.00 for their exhibit they had on 
display at the Beaufort County Fail 
during the week of September 11-17. 

The exhibit was based on how 
the eight purposes of the F.H.A. 
lead to or help us to understand 
and carry out the four purposes of 
the United Nations with emphasis of 
the fifth purpose of the F.H.A., 
"To promote International Good 
Will." 

F. H. A. DAY AT THE 
STATE FAIR 

Friday, October 23. 



Our Officers Speak . 



"Hi youse guys" was the common 
way I was greeted at the National 
Convention in Columbus, Ohio, but 
since I'm from the south and every- 
body says I have such a southern 
drawl I guess I'd better greet you 
with "Hey you all." 

I'm Jean Faulkner, your past veep 
and present president. I hail from 
Red Oak situated in Nash County. 
I attend Red Oak High where I am 
a senior. 

I am 17 years old a brownette 
with hazel eyes and a height of five 
feet four and one-half inches. My 
family consists of my parents and 
two younger sisters. 

My favorite sport is basketball, 
my food shrimp and I like all my 
classes in school. Do I have a boy 
friend? Well, let's not go into that. 

I belong to a number of clubs 
and organizations, I have been in 
the FHA for four years and during 
that time serving as reporter, treas- 
urer, and president. 

My denomination is Baptist and 
I'm the assistant pianist for my Sun- 
day School Department. I also be- 
long to the Y.W.A., a church 
organization. 

The four largest breath-taking 
events in my past have been: being 
elected State Veep and President of 
the FHA, being selected as Chief 
Marshal for the Commencement ex- 
ercises, having been given the invi- 
tation to attend the Army-Navy 
football game, and last but not least 
winning the County Conference and 
County Championship in basketball. 

Upon graduating from Red Oak 
High I plan to enter Duke University 
and there major in Polincal Science. 
I've set my goal to become a lady 
lawyer and I hope I'll be able to 
accomplish this someday. 

I think I can express what FHA 
has meant to me in one word, 
"everything." It has really taught me 
to meet and work with the public. 

Before I sign off I'd like to say 
thank-you to a marvelous group of 
girls and teachers for the wonderful 
work you are helping carry on. I'm 
sorry I haven't gotten to meet all of 
you but before the year is over I 
hope I know each one of you per- 
sonally. 

Good-by and I'll see you all at the 
State Convention or even before, 
who knows? 

Jean Faulkner, 
State President. 



Hello there! I'm Betty Calhoun 
and your state vice-president for 
1953-54. I'm going to tell you a little 
about me so we can become better 
acquainted. 

I'm sixteen years old, and I'm a 
Junior in high school this year. I 
attend Seventy-first High School in 
Cumberland County, near Fayette- 
ville. I adore going to school and I'll 
sort of regret it when I graduate. 
I'm a cheerleader and enjoy basket- 
ball and football games. The thing 
I like most about going to school is 
participating in FHA activities. We 
have a very active chapter in our 
school. My favorite subject in school 
is French. 

My taste in clothes lean toward 
casuals. I'm more the "casual" type, 
being rather tall, five feet and six 
inches, and have brown hair and 
blue eyes. My favorite color in 
clothes is black. 

I'm simply wild about hamburg- 
ers, chocolate shakes, long dangle 
earrings, ford convertibles, Frankie 
Laine, onions, Robert Wagner, crew 
cuts, blond-headed boys, and hats 
with long feathers. 

I plan to attend either Flora Mac- 
donald or Peace College. My am- 
bition is to become State FHA 
adviser. Look out, Mrs. Coleman. 
I also want to get married someday. 

My family is rather small, having 
only four members. I have a 
younger sister, Alice, who is thirteen 
years old. 

My favorite part of FHA is the 
rallies which are held every year. I 
love to attend these rallies. You 
learn so much from them. It's al- 
ways thrilling at the District Rallies 
to take part and watch the cam- 
paigns for office. 

All the state officers, including 
myself, are looking forward to see- 
ing you at the state rally. So good- 
bye for now. 

Betty Calhoun, 
Vice-President. 



Garrie Freeman hails from Ruth- 
erfordton-Spindale High School. 
Garrie is a 17-year-old senior and 
wants to attend W.C.U.N.C. next 
fall to major in home economics. 
She is always happy and always 
says "Just don't worry about it." 
Garrie enjoys sports, dancing, read- 
ing, and sewing. She makes most of 
her clothes. This year history is her 
favorite subject and French is the 



most dreaded. Garrie is very active 
in her church and would like to go 
to Hawaii someday and teach. 

Garrie says "The National Con- 
vention was the most wonderful ex- 
perience I have ever had. I love 
FHA and certainly believe in it's 
purposes. It is certainly great being 
a state officer and I hope that the 
officers in the future will enjoy it as 
much as I. Don't forget to plan 
special publicity features for Na- 
tional FHA Week and to send your 
news to your state magazine. Pub- 
licize your club everywhere you go." 

Garrie Freeman, 

Reporter. 



I don't know how much of this 
Mrs. Coleman will print, but we 
state officers have been asked to 
tell you FHA members who elected 
us just a little about ourselves. 

My name is Glenda Noble. I have 
two sisters, one older, one younger. 
Until I entered high school (and 
pretended to grow up) I was the 
"boy" in the family. I live with my 
family on a 432-acre farm and we 
raise tobacco. In the summer I work 
at the barns six days per week. 

When I entered high school and 
started taking Home Economics I 
became interested in FHA — nor, 
have I missed a school, county, 
district, or state meeting since. I 
have held various offices in my 
school and county and am now the 
state secretary. 

I like variety — I am an active 
member of the Glee Club, Beta Club, 
4-H Club, Church, M.Y.F., and am 
a cheerleader and teach the Primary 
Sunday School Class at my church. 

Playing the ukelele is my present 
favorite pastime, although I used to 
be a "terrific shot" with an air rifle. 

In looks — well, I suppose I am 
average, not pretty, anyway 5 ft. 4 
inches tall, I have blond hair, brown 
eyes, and a fair complexion. By the 
way, I am 17 years of age. 

I hope you feel that you know me 
better now. I do appreciate the 
wonderful opportunity you have 
given me of serving you and I am 
endeavoring to do my best as your 
secretary. 

The FHA is a wonderful organiza- 
tion, but in it, too, you get from it 
what you put into it. 

Glenda Noble, 
State Secretary. 



^^^^^^^^^^i^^^:^^^^^^^^:^^^^^^^^'^^^^^^ 



Future Homemakers of America 

CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. , 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 




CAROLINE SAYS: 
You don't have to tell how you live each day; 
You don't have to say if you work or you play; 
A tried, true barometer serves in the place. 
However you live, it will show in your face. 

The false, the deceit that you bear in your heart, 
Will not stay inside where it first got a start; 
For sinew and blood are a thin veil of lace. . . . 
What you wear in your heart, you wear in your face. 

If your life is unselfish, if for others you live, 
For not what you get, but how much you can give: 
If you live close to God in His infinite grace. . . . 
You don't have to tell it, it shows in your face 

Selected. 








T^M»- 









ijtet 1 '■'■'v 






ase 



7 



I 



FUTURE HOMEMA 

* North Carolina Association 



DECEMBER 1953 



NUMBER 2 



KtfYkat (jkristrnas Jneam to Jrle 



To me, Christmas involves the 
spirit of love and of giving both 
spiritual and material gifts which 
are ours if we have attained the 
true spirit of God. It is a time when 
mankind seems to forget its selfish- 
ness and considers the needs of its 
fellowmen. Christmas unveils the 
hearts of people and we see them 
as they are, in the image and like- 
ness of God, expressing love as He 
would express it, by kindness. Some 
are able to express it by gifts of 
material wealth; others, only by love, 
but no matter what the nature of 
the expressions, Christmas is the 
season of good will toward men. 

Eleanor Payne 
Ayden High School 




Christmas is the most wonderful 
time of the year to me. Oh no, it's 
not because of the gifts I receive, 
but something even greater than 
that, a gift which was given to every- 
one nearly two thousand years ago; 
not a gift that will soon fade away 
but a gift that will always be ours 
if we will only accept it. 

Everyone should give, not hoping 
to receive at Christmas; love, not 
hoping for love in return and in so 
doing we are presenting our gifts 
to Christ as the wise men did at 
Christmas Eve, long ago. On Christ- 
mas Eve we should take our Bibles 
and gather around the fireside and 
read together the story of our first 
Christmas and we would all get the 
true meaning of Christmas. 

Annie Mae Hollifield 
Weaverville FHA Chapter 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1953-1954 

President — Jean Faulkner, Red Oak 

Vice-President — Betty Calhoun, Seventy-First 

Secretary — Glenda Noble, Deep Run 

Treasurer — Peggy Spruill, Pamlico County 

Reporter — Garrie Freeman, Rutherfordton-Spindale 

Parliamentarian — Jo Ann Woosley, South Fork 

Historian — Evelyn Bruton, Candor 

Sons, Leader — Anne Jo Lawson, Madison 



District Advisers 
1953-1954 

Mrs. Mary Lanier Jarrett, Fuquay Springs 

Mrs. Maude K. Stanton, Red Springs 

Miss Clara D. Reed, Richlands 

Mrs. Pauline Robbins, Pamlico County 

Mrs. Charlotte R. Turner, Hendersonville 

Miss Ethel Bailey, Mount Airy 

Mrs. Kathleen Nicholson, Benton Heights 

Mrs. Pauline Hoover, Tri-City Central 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLTC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



We Can Sell Our Program to Mr. and Mrs. John Doe 



The most popular products on today's 
markets did not reach their stage of popu- 
larity entirely on their own merits. In a com- 
plex and competitive society as ours, the art 
of catching the eye of the public and getting 
the public alerted enough to see and appre- 
ciate the merits and value of a product 
sometimes requires ingenuous techniques in 
dealing with people. 

And so with an organization such as ours; 
we must exercise some special skills in put- 
ting our FHA program on the popularity 
list, and in seeing that our projects and 
activities are appreciated by others. 

We realize that most of us are not 
naturally gifted with this particular artistry, 
but there are many practices with which we 
might experiment in learning to acquire this 
ability. We have no way to determine to 
what degree the techniques which were used 
by groups illustrated on these pages were 
successful but we have reason to believe 
that similar techniques could be tried by 
others with a deep sense of satisfaction that 
the results will be far reaching in informing 
our lay people of our true value. 

The methods of interpretation used have 
been quite varied. Sometimes chapter ad- 
visers and members deemed it wise to (1) 
Spell out their accomplishments through 
media such as the television show, the news- 
paper, the radio program, floats at festivals, 
dramatizations, and various types of dis- 
plays. (2) Interpretation at times was 
in the form of co-operation with various 
individuals and groups in projecting pro- 
jects for improvement of conditions and for 
promotion of good public relations with 
people outside the organization. (3) A spec- 
ial effort to strengthen family living through 
special planned and organized programs is a 
method of interpretation used by some chap- 
ters. (4) Recruitment of members, even 
boys, through personal expressions of satis- 
factions gained from membership, may be 
one of the most valuable salesmanship techni- 
ques used by many. 

1. Use of Television, Newspaper, Radio, 
Festivals, Exhibits, and Dramatization. 

If the families in and around Mount Holly, 
and even Charlotte, are not informed of the 
benefits derived from Future Homemaker 
Activities, they have not been reading their 
newspapers; or they did not visit the Exhibit 
Hall at the Spindale-Center Fair; or possi- 
bly, they are not television fans. The Mount 
Holly Chapter has recently received much 
well-deserved publicity. It isn't too difficult 
to publicize when you have something to 
tell and the Mt. Holly Chapter had quantities 
and qualities about which they could inform 
people. 

The following is what they proudly report: 





Approximately 15 chapter members ap- 
peared on television in a half-hour preview 
show of the Mount Holly Future Home- 
makers Gaston County Fair Exhibit. The 
program originated in the studios of station 
WBTV in Charlotte, with Jimmy Patterson 
of the station acting as Master of Ceremonies. 
The program was sponsored by the Spin- 
dale-Center Fair. 

The first part of the program was a fash- 
ion show with FHA members as models. 
The garments were made by the models. 
Some were made from material manufactured 
by the American and Efird Mills, Inc.. Other 
garments were made from feed bags at very 
little expense. Pat Huffsteller — a candidate 
for the state degree — poses in her ensemble 
in Panel A, picture 1. Pat also made match- 
ing coat of same material of orlon and wool 
manufactured by American and Efird Mills. 
One special feature of this portion of the 
program was the Kiddie parade featuring 
children modeling garments made by FHA 
members — and the "Big Sister — Little Sister" 
models wearing garments made up in like 
design. 

The narrators were FHA president Peggie 
Greene and Betty Gzeekowictz — a chapter 
member. 

The second part of the program was de- 
voted to exhibiting a sampling of the many, 
many articles which were to be on display at 
the fair the following week. These consisted 
of a variety of articles such as, stuffed ani- 
mals, bedroom slippers, aprons, blouses, 
place mats, embroidered samples, and a 
tablecloth. Cost was announced for each 
item since it is important that the girls be- 
come consumer wise at the same time they 
are becoming creatively and mechanically 
trained. 

During Fair Week 90 girls from the Mount 
Holly Chapter entered over 1,000 individual 
items. 



Did you see Sue Simpson and Mrs. Pau- 
line Kuykendall on WSJS Television on 
Monday, November 2? Sue is President of 
the Kernersville Chapter and Mrs. Kuy- 
kendall is the adviser. They had five minutes 
and did their part to put National FHA 
Week across in that section of the state. 



Let's entertain during the holidays! 



The Taylorsville Future Homemakers won 
first place in their exhibit at the Alexander 
County Fair this fall. The theme of the 
exhibit was taken from one of the eight 
purposes of the FHA — Better Living 
Through Spiritual Training in the Home. 

The title of the exhibit was "Religious 
Homes — Hope for the Future." The booth 
was built to represent the side of a house 
with a large picture window through which 
could be seen a little child kneeling beside 
her bed in prayer; beside her lay a Bible. 
The exhibit was outstanding in simplicity, 
neatness, and clarity of purpose. 

Durham County residents should be bet- 
ter informed concerning the Future Home- 



makers organization, since the Youth 
Festival Parade in Durham last spring. The 
FHA Float led the parade. The president of 
each chapter in the county was honored by 
appearing on the float in a beautiful formal 
gown, as pictured in panel A, No. 3. 



Chapters in Forsyth County jointly spon- 
sored two exhibits at the Forsyth County 
Fair last spring. Outsiders were bound to 
have taken note of the kindred spirit with 
which the girls seemed to work together in 
setting up the exhibit — an exhibit which in 
itself told a beautiful story. Each chapter in 
the county was responsible for helping pre- 
pare and arrange the exhibit as seen in panel 
A, picture 2. 

2. Co-operation with Individuals and 
Groups Outside the FHA Organization. 

How can one choose a better way to prove 
his worth than an honest sincere effort to 
help others in some way? Any small act of 
generosity may mean a wealth of benefits 
to someone else. 

The Bragtown Chapter recently let the 
school administrators and parents know that 
they enjoy lending a helping hand. They 
prepared refreshments at the school to serve 
to visiting P.T.A. Members during "Open 
House" held in observance of Education 
Week. Helen Dunlap and Sylva Goodwin 
can be seen in Panel B, picture 3, as they 
prepare refreshments. 

Also the Bragtown Chapter members sent 
packages to Korea for Christmas. Enough 
articles of clothing were included to furnish 
two average size families of 4 members. 
Some of the members can be seen in picture 
1, Panel B, as they participate in the World 
Christmas and Chanukah Festival. 

Students and faculty members alike should 
appreciate the efforts of the Pikeville FHA 
members, who cheerfully set about the task 
of "doing over" the sick room. They wanted 
to make the room as pleasant and attractive 
as possible for those patients who occasion- 
ally, due to unexpected illnesses, find it nec- 
essary to spend hours there. You can see 
them in action in picture 2, Panel B. 

3. Special Effort to Strengthen Family 
Living. 

An evening of pleasure for the whole 
family was spent in Bath on October 28, 
with the Bath FHA Chapter furnishing the 
entertainment. After an eventful day of in- 
formal initiation at school, old and new 
members and their families gathered to- 
gether for an evening of fellowship and 
enjoyment. Part of the program was inspira- 
tional and part of it was light entertainment. 

The six chapter mothers were recognized 
for their parts in the program. 

To climax the evening everyone was in- 
vited over to the Home Economics building 
for a silver tea. There was plenty of food, 
fun and laughter for all of the 200 people 
who attended. 

(.Continued on page six) 




FHA'ers we are no longer a Sorority. 




We are proud of our accomplishments.' 



DISTRICT I 

Pamlico County High School 

Bayboro, N. C. 

Peggy Spruill, Presiding 

Nearly 700 Future Homemakers 
of America with their guests and 
advisers attended the annual fall 
rally Saturday, October 3 at Bay- 
boro's Pamlico County High School. 
More than 50 schools in the 16 
Eastern Carolina Counties were 
represented. 

S. R. Cotton, principal of the host 
school and A. H. Hartsell, superin- 
tendent of Pamlico County Schools, 
greeted the group and expressed 
interest in the work of the clubs. 

Miss Shirley Rouse, of Winter- 
ville, was elected state secretary. 

Ideas developed in the national 
convention held in Columbus, Ohio, 
during July were presented at the 
District I meeting by Mrs. Pauline 
H. Robbins, district adviser and 
Pamlico County High teacher. Miss 
Peggy Spruill, state treasurer and a 
member of the Pamlico County 
Chapter, and Miss Becky Gaylord 
of the Roper Chapter. 

"This Is Our Creed," a dramatiza- 
tion produced by the Pitt County 
Federation and which followed a 
similar dramatization given at the 
national convention highlighted the 
day. This dramatization forcibly 
reminded those present of the im- 
portance of FHA on the local, state 
and national level. 

Mrs. Robbins expressed her sin- 
cere appreciation to her fellow 
teachers and the students of the high 



DISTRICT RALLIES SP0TLIG1 



school for their splendid co- 
operation which helped make the 
program a success. 



DISTRICT II 

Morehead City High School 

Glenda Noble, Presiding 

Over 650 Future Homemakers of 
America members registered for 
District II Rally in Morehead City 
on October 17. The girls came 
from 43 schools throughout the 
21 -county district. A square dance 
demonstration was given by the 
La Grange Chapter. The theme of 
the meeting was "Homes for Amer- 
ica's Future." A very impressive 
pageant "This Is Our Creed" was 
presented by the Wilson County 
Federation. Mr. Jack Humphery, 
principal of the Lucama High 
School directed the pageant. An 
FHA flag made by Peggy Taylor, of 
the Warsaw Chapter, was presented 
at the rally for the first time. It is 
the first FHA flag made in North 
Carolina and from our present 
knowledge the second in the United 
States. You will hear more about 
this later. The State Vice-President 
for 1952-55 was elected at the rally. 
She is Carroll Lynn Garris from the 
Pikeville Chapter, Wayne County. 
The district adviser for this year is 
Mrs. Clara B. Reid, Richlands, and 
the adviser for the Morehead City 
Chapter is Mrs. Delfido Cordova. 




DISTRICT III 

Fairview Heights School 

Hamlet, N. C. 
Betty Calhoun, Presiding 

The 1953 District III Rally of the 
Future Homemakers of America' 
was called to order by the State 
Vice-President, Betty Calhoun, at 
the Fairview Heights School in 
Hamlet, October 10. 

Hilda Manes, Red Springs Chap- 
ter, modeled the National FHA 
jacket, which was adopted this sum- 
mer at the National Convention in 
Columbus, Ohio. 

The Stedman Chapter gave an 
interesting skit on their trip to the 
National Convention in Ohio. 

Relaxers were given by the acting 
president. 

The special feature of the morning 
program was a fashion show given 
by Mrs. Kay Wittemore from Kay's 
in Rockingham. 

The afternoon session opened 
with the Hamlet Chapter presenting 
a most enjoyable show entitled 
"Arthur Godfrey and His FHA 
Friends." It was based on Arthur 
Godfrey's Round the Calendar TV 
Show. 

The Chapter Mothers and Fathers 
were recognized and each was given 
a red rose, the club flower, from the 
beautiful flower arrangement that we 
had enjoyed throughout the day. 



A Scene at District VIII Rally at the Lee Edwards School 



DISTRICT IV 

Fuquay Springs High School 

Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

Jean Faulkner, Presiding 

The annual meeting of District 
IV met on October 10, 1953 in the 
Fuquay Springs High School with 
more than 800 attending. 

The principal of Fuquay Springs 
High School, Mr. E. N. Farnell, and 
two Fuquay FHA members wel- 
comed us to their school. Mr. 
Farnell also talked about FHA and 
its importance. 

The election for state song leader 
came next. Candidates were: Patsy 
Ingram, Patsy Jackson, Sarah Eason, 
Billie Jean Parker, June Watson, 
Ann Wilson, and Dixie Jackson. 
These candidates were voted on to 
determine the top three. 

The report of the National Con- 
vention held in Columbus, Ohio, was 
given by Miss Dennis, and a group 



IE IEWS Mil THIS F4LL 




The LaGrange Dance Team at District II 



of girls told of their interesting 
experiences while attending the Na- 
tional Convention. 

An interesting show of the early 
styles was given. 

Barbara Adams, of Fuquay, then 
sang "Summertime." 

Following this came another fash- 
ion show, only this time the rirls 
were modeling styles of 1953. The 
fashion shows were put on by FHA 
members from Fuquay and Wendell, 
and Belk-Tylers, of Wendell and 
Fuquay. 

Chapel Hill and Franklinton is- 
sued invitations for the 1954 rally. 

Immediately following this the 
president announced that the votes 
for state song leader had been 
counted and that Sarah Eason had 
been elected. 

The meeting was then adjourned. 



candidates for State Historian. Win- 
ners in the final run-off were Judy 
Bowman from Alexander Wilson 
High School, Historian; Maholia 
Lemons, Stokesdale High School 
first alternate, and Audrey O'Farrell 
second alternate. 



DISTRICT VI 

Wadesboro High School 

Wadesboro, N. C. 
Evelyn Bruton, Presiding 

Wadesboro was the scene of Dis- 
trict VI Rally en November 14 with 
the Wadesboro FHA members act- 
ing as hostess. 

After an inspirational devotional 
by the Marshville Chapter the visi- 
tors were welcomed and greeted by 
the following people: Mr. W. L. 
Wildermuth, Supt., Wadesboro City 
Schools; Mr. J. C. Baucom, Princi- 
pal, Wadesboro High School; Mr. 
J. O. Bowman, Supt., Anson County 
Schools. 

The main feature of the morning 
program was the speech by Miss 
Laurice White, Director of Teen-age 
Activities of the Y.W.C.A. of Char- 
lotte. 

The afternoon feature was none 
other than a skit prepared and pre- 
sented by the Wingate Chapter. The 
skit entitled "Carolina Goes Places" 
presented a revealing story of how 
our National Future Homemakers 
Organization operates. Frances Bur- 
ns, one of twelve of our national 
officers and her chapter adviser, Mrs. 
Violet Home, came back from the 
National Executive Council Meeting 
in Chicago with a deeper apprecia- 
tion of FHA and great pride in 
North Carolina's place in the Na- 
tional organization. Part of the skit 
is being published in this very 
magazine. 



DISTRICT V 

W. C. U. N. C, Greensboro 
Anne Jo Lawson, Presiding 

District V is getting bigger and 
better each year. There were 548 
people present at the Woman's Col- 
lege of the University of North Caro- 
lina in Greensboro on October 24. 
-There were 485 chapter members, 
35 advisers, 2 fathers and 14 moth- 
ers, and 12 guests. There were six 




Roll Call at District I Rally — Shirley Rouse who was Newly Elected State Officer 
Mrs. Pauline Robbins, District I Adviser, Peggy Spruill, State Treasurer and Peggy's 
Mother and Father, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Spruill, Honorary Chapter Parents for the 
day. 




Girls From Rockingham Taking Part in the Fashion Show at District III 
Rally in Hamlet 



DISTRICT VII 

Mineral Springs High School 

Mineral Springs, N. C. 
Jo Ann Woosley, Presiding 

The District VII Annual Rally of 
the Future Homemakers of America 
met at the Mineral Springs High 
School in Forsyth County, October 
10, 1953, with more than 800 in 
attendance. 

Miss Becky Shuping, from the 
Boyden Chapter in Salisbury, gave 
a most interesting report of the 
National Convention she attended 
in Columbus, Ohio, in June. 

The attendance prize was won by 
the Woodleaf Chapter with 41 pres- 
ent. For the largest numbers of 
mothers present the Denton Chapter 
won. 

Every one was then entertained 
by a wonderful movie entitled, "The 
Home Economics Story." 

The Yadkin County Chapter 
closed the program with the FHA 
Emblem Service. 



DISTRICT VIII 
Lee Edwards High School 

Asheville, N. C. 
Garrie Freeman, Presiding 

Over 900 FHA members, chapter 
parents and advisers were present 
for the District VIII Rally which 
was held in the Lee Edwards High 
School in Asheville, North Carolina 
October 17, 1953. A unique and 
interesting way for reporting the 
National Convention was used in 
the form of an exhibit. High-lighting 
the morning program was a talk 
"Better Homes for America's Fu- 
ture" by the Reverend Warren R. 
Thurston, pastor of the First Presby- 
terian Church of Hendersonville. 
The entertaining features of the 
afternoon session were the Style 
Show given by the Lee Edwards 
Chapter and a square dance team 
from the Vance School. 

Garrie Freeman and Louise 
Coston, of the Etowah Chapter, re- 
ported of the National Convention. 



WE CAN SELL 

(Continued from page three) 

Jean Jenkins is a member of the 
Garner Chapter. She should be 
better prepared for the responsibility 
of parenthood after practicing all 
the chores of a young mother in- 
cluding living through those mo- 
ments of crisis when there seems to 
be just no way out. As she takes 
over the care of a young one, seen 
in picture 1 , Panel C — can't you just 
hear her say "Now let's see! Do 
you suppose this will do the trick"? 

4. Recruitment of Members. 

Whenever an FHA girl writes 
about the accomplishments of her 
chapter and expresses pride in the 
progress of the chapter it is certain 
that others in her chapter catch her 
enthusiasm and spread it to outsiders 
— the final result is — increased 
membership. 

Peggy Norman, Publicity Chair- 
man of the Shelby chapter writes: 
"Our chapter is proud of its accom- 
plishments toward interpreting FHA 
to the public, and we will be honored 
to have a picture and write-up in 
the FHA magazine." 

By October 20 Shelby Chapter 
had sold 150 Shelby High Pennants. 
Money earned will be used for im- 
provement of the chapter and par- 
ticipation in service projects. Fifteen 
members won prizes at the Cleve- 
land County Fair. Members made 
and sold candy at the Halloween 
Carnival. 

An inactive chapter may soon 
fade away — so the secret of recruit- 
ment is to keep something going all 
the time and remember the ability 
to enjoy doing things whether it is 
work or play rests within one's self. 

The Shelby Chapter observed 
National FHA Week with great 
enthusiasm. The various projects 
undertaken during the week were 
well received by the public. 

Among the projects were making 
and selling candy, selling Shelby 
High Pennants, placing a red rose 
on the desks of each of the faculty 
members, and sending notices to the 
various churches of Shelby so that 
these notices would appear in the 
bulletins sent out weekly by the 
churches in our city. Several of the 
girls in our club planned to set out 
red rose bushes. Two projects of the 
Shelby Chapter are illustrated in 
picture 3 of Panel C. One is the sale 
of Shelby High Pennants for funds 
to expand their program. The other 
project is planting rose bushes on a 
church lawn and later presenting red 
roses to faculty members during 
FHA Week, 



FROM THE EAST MECKLEN- 
BURG CHAPTER COMES 
THIS REPORT: 

This year in our FHA here at 
East Mecklenburg, we are very 
fortunate in having boys in our 
FHA. Some of them can be seen 
in picture 2, Panel C. They have 
been taking an active part in the 
work of our chapter and we feel 
that we should pass this on to other 
chapters. 

An original poem was prepared 
at one of our meetings. 

This year in our FHA, 
We are privileged in a special way; 
We have added something new. 
Tall, dark, and handsome might give 

you a clue. 
To be in FHA, as in the rule book, 
You must journey one year, into 

the home ec. nook. 
Boys have, at last, found a way, 
To enter the "girls'" FHA. 
Home Arts is one course they may 

take, 
And family life will give them a 

break. 
Either of these two give them the 

right, 
To view FHA from an inside light. 
If your chapter wants this same 

privilege as we. 
Get busy and work and make out 

a key, 
A key to success and luck on the 

way, 
Just simply this, boys in FHA. 




It seems only fair that the dis- 
guised efforts of the Chapter advisers 
should be recognized in this whole 
matter of interpretation. Where a 
good program is in progress, mem- 
bers would do well to pay tribute 
to their chapter adviser. Chapter 
advisers feel rewarded for their 
efforts in the evidences of growth 
and improvement of the members 
with whom they work, but they, too, 
may need to feel appreciated by you. 



COVER PICTURE 

Hugh Morson Chapter is be- 
ginning again their Annual Christ- 
mas Festival. These three leaders 
shown on the cover are fixing one 
of the many boxes that will be 
turned in to the Welfare Depart- 
ment for needy families in Raleigh. 
The School project is sponsored 
by the FHA but cannot be a suc- 
cess without the help of everyone 
in school. Clothing, toys and 
canned foods are collected by the 
FHA girls. Left to Right — Beverly 
Wecker, representing first year girls 
(Unit President); Mary Lou Parker, 
President of the FHA Chapter; 
June Watson — Vice-President of 
the FHA Chapter. 



B. F. Grady Chapter had fun and at 

ine same time made their initiation pro- 
gram meaningful this year. The reporter 
Charlotte Outlaw writes, "Our initiation 
iasted only one day. All new members 
wore red and white ensembles which 
included an apron that they had made 
themselves, a new "hair-do," and a red 
rose. 

Each new member did something nice 
for each of her teachers and reported 
this to an old member at the end of the 
day. The teachers in our school remarked 
that this was the nicest initiation we had 
ever had. 

The night initiation consisted of a pic- 
nic supper for new members and chapter 
mothers and fathers, more initiation, and 
recreation. Initiation and recreation in- 
cluded sack racing, rolling a peanut across 
the gym floor, the bunny hop and others. 

The Oxford FHA members decided 
that one activity which would help to 
increase their membership would be to 
entertain the freshman girls early in the 
year even before school opening. Pat 
Dickerson sent in the following report: 
On Friday. September 4, from 4:00 to 
5:00 p.m. at the Home Economics Cot- 
tage last years FHA'ers entertained at a 
coca-cola party for the high school 
Freshmen girls and their mothers. 

The cottage was beautifully decorated 
with summer flowers and exhibits of 
refinished furniture which was done by 
the Home Economics classes. A complete 
fall wardrobe was displayed which was 
made by the classes. The FHA girls wore 
dresses which they had made. 

The dining room table was centered 
by a bread tray in which were coca-colas 
and ice. Flowers and magnolia leaves 
were used around the tray. 

The Granite Quarry Chapter observed 
National FHA Week with a full schedule 
of activities. The program started Sunday 
with church services honoring chapter 
mothers. Monday a box was sent over- 
seas to underprivileged children. Tuesday 
the members attended the rally at Boyden 
High School. Wednesday members gave 
roses to all high school teachers and 
Thursday they displayed their work. Fri- 
day there was a candy sale. 

The Winecoff Future Homemakers of 
America, with a membership of 79 
organized in August. Officers are the 
same as last year except for two senior 
replacements. Shirley Garver succeeded 
Ann Garver as vice-president and Sue 
Chewning replaced Nancy White as 
historian. 

The first meeting was a social honoring 
the new members. At the second meeting 
the point system was discussed, and new 
members were told how they could be- 
come eligible for FHA Degrees. 

A movie, "Choosing Your Marriage 
Partner," was shown at the next meeting. 
Selling Christmas and all occasion cards 
is the club's treasury-building project. 

The chapter sent several representatives 
to the district rally at Wadesboro on 
November 14. 

Oakley FHA members observed Na- 
tional FHA week as follows: 

Monday was initiation day when 28 
new members were taken into the school 
chapter. 

The new members were dressed in 



something red and white, with an apron, 
arm band, a vegetable, some jewelry, and 
each carried a household utensil. Other 
members wore the FHA badge which they 
had made in class. 

Tuesday was school day. Each teacher 
was given a red rose, and each allowed 
a few minutes during homeroom period 
for discussion on "What is FHA?" 

Wednesday was health day. Carrot 
parties were planned for the first and 
second grades, and FHA members gave 
talks, Movies were shown to high school 
students. 

Thursday was chapter day, and the 
girls presented an original skit and fash- 
ion show. The skit was entitled "Every- 
one Has a Fairy Godmother." Skirts 
and blouses were modeled by the mem- 
bers. 

Friday was "Share-With-Others-Day." 
The main feature was a silver tea for 
members, faculty and parents. Funds will 
be used for the project — shoes for chil- 
dren overseas. 

A FHA bulletin board was featured 
in the main hail and the homemaking 
room. 

The Taylorsville Chapter of the Future 
Homemakers of America observed Na- 
tional FHA week with a full schedule. 

On Sunday the girls attended church 
in a group at the Presbyterian Church. 
On Monday they planted a red rose on 
the school ground. Committee meeting 
was held on Tuesday to work on plans 
for the years program. Posters were 
made for display on Wednesday. Pack- 
ages for "Friendship Among Children 
and Youth" have been mailed already 
for observance of one of the national 
projects of the FHA — to promote Inter- 
national Goodwill. To wind up the week 
the girls held their annual "Slumber 
Party" in the Department. They as- 
sembled in the room and left in time to 
attend the football game, after which re- 
freshments were served in the room. Then 
each girl having brought her own 
blankets, they bunked down for the 
night — but not to sleep. Mrs. Young, 
their adviser, Mrs. Ridenhour, and Mrs. 
Mando were the chaperons for the party. 
Red Springs FHA'ers who are enrolled 
in Home Economics I Class learned about 
freezing on September 15 when they 
observed operations at the local freezer 
locker plant. We were introduced to Mr. 
Clark, who explained things to us. 

First we were taken to the back of the 
plant where the meat is brought in and 
weighed. Next, we were shown the boiler 
where the lard is cooked. From there 
we went to a room where meat is smoked. 
This room was very interesting, but we 
moved on to the chilling room where 
meat is chilled before freezing. 

We were next shown the different 
articles in the main room such as the 
chopping tables, the electric saw, the 
meat grinder, and the place where the 
meat, after being cut, is packaged and 
stamped with the date and locker number 
of the person it belongs to. 

We continued on to the curing room 
where hams, shoulders, legs, etc., hang. 

As we came to the end of the main 
room we were taken on a tour of the 
coldest locker room. Later we were 
shown the individual lockers and the 
place where the school's meat is kept. 

Boyden chapter has 48 new members 
this year. The total enrollment is 86 
which is the largest enrollment in its 
history. This is one indication that the 
chapter has been alive and active and 
that leadership has been exercised. 



Congratulations Are Now In Order 
to DISTRICT VII 



The State Association of Future 
Homemakers recently received from 
District VII a check for $50.00 as 
a contribution to the Permanent 
Camp Fund. The Association wishes 
to thank every member in District 
VII for making this contribution 
possible. 

To Miss Annie Hall, adviser of 
the Boyden Chapter in Salisbury, 
we are indebted for the story about 
the contribution. 

Interest in FHA (Club) work has 
always been high in District VII. 
When the old student club work was 
reorganized in 1943 into the present 
FHA under the State Department 
this took place at an all-day meeting 
in Salisbury as it was centrally 
located. 

The new organization grew and 
by 1946 the state newsletter was 
being printed and Mrs. Will Frances 
Sanders was slate adviser. Mrs. 
Julia Slate, of Spencer, was district 
adviser and was urging all Rowan 
schools to organize clubs. Surry 
County was already well organized 
and Elkin had had one or two dis- 
trict rallies. The district rally this 
year was held at Boyden with all 
of the clubs in the county as joint 
hostess. This was a large meeting 
with 200 delegates present. A hot 
meal was served by the Home Eco- 
nomics Department. 

In 1947 Mrs. Jacqueline Leonard, 
of Lexington, was adviser and 
nearly 300 were present at the meet- 
ing in Elkin again. Miss Mary 
Holland invited the group to meet 
at the lovely Y there each year, 
but it was decided that rotating 
around the district would be better. 

The next year the district rally 
was open to all who wished to come 
instead of a delegated group. That 
practice has been followed ever 
since. Mrs. Lois Robertson, of King, 
was adviser and 520 girls and ad- 
visers met at Griffith High School 
near Winston-Salem. This was the 
year "More bags" and picnic 
lunches became the Vogue. In 1949 
around 600 met at Flat Rock High 
School near Mt. Airy with Miss 
Mary K. Williams of Cleveland ad- 
viser. This was the first year the 
programs were printed. 

In 1950, 683 girls, advisers and 
chapter parents met in Thomasville 
with Mrs. Emma Robertson of 
Union Grove adviser. Again picnics 
were the Vogue — in the gym this 



time. Chapter parents were urged to 
advisers were beginning to talk of 
a surplus that had accumulated from 
the 10c registration fees charged. A 
committee was appointed to decide 
what to do with this money. 

In 1951 Mrs. Elizabeth M. 
Greene, of Winston-Salem, was 
adviser and there were 564 present 
at the rally in Mocksville. An out- 
door picnic and a luncheon for 
special guests in the Home Econom- 
ics lab were high-lights. 

Mt. Airy's lovely new high school 
was the scene of the 1952 rally 
with Miss Anne Hall, of Salisbury, 
adviser. A preliminary planning 
program in the spring, and attend- 
ance prize and an effort to get each 



county participating brought the 
attendance at this meeting to 941. 
Club mothers and fathers were 
honored by presenting a red rose 
to each one present. In 1953 the 
district again met at a lovely new 
building, Mineral Springs High 
School, with Mrs. Ethel Bailey, of 
Mt. Airy adviser. 854 were present. 
At this time the committee ap- 
pointed to take care of the surplus 
presented 2 felt emblems and a 
banner that had been bought. They 
also recommended that a $50.00 
contribution be made to the Per- 
manent Camp Fund. This was 
passed unanimously by the advisers 
and then by the girls. 

Each successful rally has helped 
build up interest in the district. 
Large attendance and careful hoard- 
ing of the left over balance from 
each meeting still leaves District 
VII with a small nest egg to get 
ready for the next meeting. 



l^equOiemmfo 'pet ^^^ t Deyiee& 



JUNIOR HOMEMAKER 
DEGREE 

1. Know: (a) The Creed; (b) 
The 8 purposes; (c) The Motto; 
(d) The prayer song; (e) The state 
and/or chapter song. 

2. Be able to explain: (a) The 
emblem; (b) The colors; (c) The 
flower. 

3. Be familiar with the FHA 
constitution. 

4. Applicant must have success- 
fully passed V2 year of home ecom- 
ics. 

5. Applicant must attend 95 per 
cent of her chapter meetings. 

6. Applicant must have served on 
at least three committees for FHA. 

7. She must have assisted with 3 
of the following: (a) FHA ban- 
quets; (b) Sending gifts overseas for 
those in service; (c) Collecting and 
distributing clothing to needy fami- 
lies; (d) Selling to make money for 
the chapter; (e) FHA club project; 
(f) Major improvements in the 
H. E. department or cottage; (g) 
Others. 

8. Has officially been admitted to 
a Future Homemaker chapter. 

9. Help to further interest in the 
organization by explaining the 
emblem, the colors and the flower to 
a new member or one who has not 
yet worked on her first degree. 

10. Has purchased and wears 
her FHA pin. 

11. Must have Junior Home- 



maker Degree to be 
other than president. 



a local officer 



CHAPTER HOMEMAKER 
DEGREE 

1. Set some goals which you 
need to work toward to improve: 
(a) Your local FHA chapter; (b) A 
community club. 

2. Make a definite contribution 
to your club in the form of a: (a) 
Program; (b) Social activity; (c) 
Selling $10.00 worth of merchandise 
for FHA. 

(Have these approved by the 
Adviser) 

3. Applicant must have attended 
at least one District Rally. 

4. Applicant must have been 
chairman of one committee since 
receiving Junior Homemaker De- 
gree. 

5. Has successfully completed 
one year of home economics. 

6. Has made an original contri- 
bution to her club in one of the 
following ways: (a) Club song; (b) 
FHA poem; (c) History of organi- 
zation; (d) Playlet concerned with 
some phase of FHA; (e) Paper on 
"What FHA has Meant to Me." 

7. Take an active part in at least 
one Chapter Program. 

8. Has had one home project 
concerning community or family re- 
lationships. 

9. Must have Chapter Degree to 
be president of any FHA organiza- 
tion. 



(fact 'Piacea" 

Written and Produced by Wingate 
F. H. A. Chapter. 

Stage arrangement: 1 sofa, 3 arm 
chairs, table with bowl of fruit, and 
magazine rack. 

Properties: 1 True Confession 
Magazine, 1 Funny Paper, 1 Space 
Cadet Comic, and Posters of Maga- 
zines. 

Curtain: Girls are lounging in 
living room on chairs and sofa 
reading comics, books, true story 
and comic strips. General chatter 
about school, what characters in 
books are doing and etc. 

Frances Mangum: Oh, Boy! I see 
where Tom Corbett is going on 
another space trip — I can't wait to 
see what happens. 

Kathryn: Speaking of trips, I 
can't wait to hear about the space 
trip Frances Burris and Mrs. Home 
took. You know they went to the 
National Executive Council and Ad- 
visory Board Meeting in Chicago. 

Mary Wilson: I paid 10c to help 
send delegates to our national meet- 
ing and I want to know how they 
spent my dime. 

(Frances Burris enters) 
Frances B.: Hi, girls. What's new? 
Let me in on the latest news. 

Kathryn: We were just wondering 
about your trip to Chicago. 

Linda: Did you learn anything? 
Mary Wilson: Did you have a 
good time? 

Frances M.: Did you meet any 
cute boys? 

Frances B.: Wait a minute girls, 
we went to Chicago for strictly 
business reasons, although we did 
have a wonderful time. I didn't meet 
any cute boys but I met plenty of 
important people. Take Mrs. 
Scruggs for instance — She is a neat 
looking woman of about — well I 
don't know how old she is but she 
has brown hair and a nice figure 
and a wonderful personality Miss 
Dicks, our assist. National Adviser 
is just darling — cute as a doll — 
only weighs about 100 lbs., and her 
clothes always look smart. I met 
Miss Anadon, who is National Ad- 
viser of Home Econ. and she is as 
smart as a whip. 

Kathryn: Say, Frances your 
F. H. A. pin really looks good on 
that sweater. 

Frances B.: That's something else 
— you girls should be proud to be a 



member of the F. H. A. and wearing 
your pins is one way you can let 
people know you are a Future 
Homemaker. 

Mary Wilson: Frances, 1 see you 
have both your Chapter and Junior 
homemaker keys on. 

Frances B.: Yes, we discussed 
the wearing of pins in Chicago. A 
recommendation was made that the 
girls be allowed to wear all their 
keys instead of just one, since, a girl 
has to work hard to earn her Junior, 
Chapter, and State degrees. 

Linda: You know wearing your 
pins are good advertisement for 
F. H. A. 

Frances B.: That's something else 
we discussed in Chicago. We should 
give F. H. A. all the publicity we 
can. When we were discussing pub- 
licity for F. H. A. we decided to 
go down to Don McNeil's Breakfast 
Club. We got up at six o'clock one 
morning and went down but it was 
worth losing a little sleep. We were 
recognized as Future Homemakers 
and why we were in Chicago. Our 
national president was on the quiz 
program. The radio always makes 
good publicity for F. H. A. Let's 
let our home folks know what 
F. H. A. really means. 

Frances M.: My mother and 
father and little sister know what 
it is. But I was just wondering if 
Tony Curtis knows. 

Freida: How about the folks next 
door? Do they know what it means? 
Kathryn: Say, why couldn't we 
send an F. H. A. girl to the dif- 
ferent clubs and organizations in our 
towns and let them explain to them 
what we do and what we stand for. 
Frances M.: I'll be glad to go to 
the Lion's Club. 

Freida: I'll go to the Woman's 
Club. 

Linda: I'll go to the Rotary Club. 
Mary Wilson: I'll go to the Civitan 
Club. 

Frances M.: That's a splendid sug- 
gestion. Let's make plans to do this 
right away. 

(Model enters wearing F. H. A. 
jacket. ) 

Frances M.: Look at Lou Anne 
and what she is wearing. 

Model: This is our new F. H. A. 
jacket — Isn't it smart looking? 

Linda Moore: I've just got to have 
one — But how can I ever get the 
money? 

Mary Wilson: Think I'll cut out 
cokes and some comics. 

Frances M.: Yep, but what are 
you going to read when you aren't 
studying? 



Frances B.: You girls surprise me. 
We have splendid reading material 
in our Home Economics Dept. 

(Teen Times and N. C. State 
Magazine enters crying, they are 
wearing plaques that are duplicate 
of the front and back covers of 
October issue of Teen Times and 
N. C. Future Homemakers.) 

Frances M.: Say, what are you 
bawling about? 

Teen Times: No one ever reads 
us. 

State Mag.: Yes, and we are filled 
with ideas and news about F. H. A. 

Frances M.: Well, what do you 
know. 

Teen Times: Do you know it cost 
$60,000 a year to publish me and 
then you don't read me. (Cries.) 

Frances M.: Say, What is in you 
that cost so much? 

Teen Times: (Points to girls on 
stage) How many of you have read 
this special issue? (Tells what is 
found in her.) 

I have been neglected and my 
feelings are hurt, especially when I 
have such interesting articles as I 
have in my new edition. (Explana- 
tion of the contents of magazine.) 

Freida: Texas leads the nation in 
total number of chapters. But 
would you believe that N. C. is in 
fourth place with a total number of 
426 chapters? 

Frances: It is wonderful that 
N. C. is so outstanding in F. H. A. 
work. Lets strive to make it even 
better. 

Frances M.: You know I have a 
heart of stone but this makes me 
feel bad. I'm throwing away this 
space cadet comic book. 

Freida: Yes, here goes this true 
confession. 

Kathryn: Here goes the funnies. 

State Mag.: That makes us feel 
better. 

Teen Times: Yes, if you once 
read us we know you will learn to 
love us. (Exit — happy and laugh- 
ing.) 

Linda: I can't wait until I get 
to school tomorrow. I'm going to 
see if I can't find all those interest- 
ing things in Teen Times and our 
North Carolina Future Home- 
makers Magazine. 

Frances M.: I sure would like to 
know what went on at the National 
Convention. 

Frances B.: Evelyn Bruton was 
there. Tell us about it Evelyn. 
(Evelyn tells about the Con- 
vention.) 

Frances B.: Girls, we've got to 
get out of here. This is our Daddy- 
Date night. 



Future Homemakers of America 

CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where livinc will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 




CAROLINE SAYS: 

Jackie Shaw, president of Oxford F. H. A. takes 
credit for this beautifully expressed sentiment on 



li W\&t Christmas Jfleansi to ifle." 

"What is it about Christmas that makes my heart 
beat faster, my eyes sparkle with anticipation, and 
my lips open voluntarily in a joyous smile? It is some- 
thing more than the prospect of the nice long holiday 
from school and the gifts under my Christmas tree on 
Christmas: it is the Christmas spirit. Christmas trees, 
gay paper and tinsel, Santa Claus — all are symbolic 
of happiness and gaiety. Why am I happy and gay? 
Surely not because of the material things connected 
with Christmas although they do play a part, but I 
am happy because I know that no matter what happens 
there will always be a wonderful gift that only One 
has the power to give. Jesus Christ was God's Christ- 
mas gift to the world. This gift is one that never grows 
old but becomes more meaningful as the years pass; 
it is a gift that offers never-ending service, yet never 
loses its beauty. This is the true meaning of Christmas 
to me." 




'mi -- i WBt 
^fyj '-I -4 , /•JV*/* 



FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association * 



VOLUME XI 



FEBRUARY 1954 



NUMBER 3 




Peggy Spruill, State Treasurer, goes to the Florida State Fair 
in February to represent our North Carolina Future Homemakers 
Association. Says Peggy: "Every young girl has dreams, ideals, 
and ambitions concerning every phase of her future life. After 
having been associated with and participated in a modern home 
economics department and the Future Homemakers of America, 
which is so intimately connected with the department, I feel that 
my life has been enriched. I trust that in choosing home economics 
as my life's work I may guide others to a richer and fuller life." 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1953-1954 

President — Jean Faulkner, Red Oak 

Vice-President — Betty Calhoun, Seventy-First 

Secretary — Glenda Noble, Deep Run 

Treasurer Peggy Spruill, Pamlico County 

Reporter Garrie Freeman, Rutherfordton-Spindale 

Parliamentarian— Jo Ann Woosley, South Fork 

Historian — Evelyn Bruton, Candor 

Song Leader — Anne Jo Lawson, Madison 



District Advisers 
1953-1954 

Mrs. Mary Lanier Jarrett, Fuquay Springs 

Mrs. Maude K. Stanton, Red Springs 

Miss Clara D. Reed, Richlands 

Mrs. Pauline Robbins, Pamlico County 

Mrs. Charlotte R. Turner, Hendersonville 

Miss Ethel Bailey, Mount Airy 

Mrs. Kathleen Nicholson, Benton Heights 

Mrs. Pauline Hoover, Tri-City Central 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



FHA PROJECTS . . . 

Home, School, Community, State, and National 
Individual Wise and Group Wise 



There is something about the 
word Project which seems to connote 
Challenge — challenge for FHA 
members and FHA chapters to 
swing into action. A unique char- 
acteristic of a project as against 
some other activities or experiences 
is that a project indicates a planned, 
designed, or schemed activity invol- 
ving constructive thinking with per- 
haps some theorizing. 

Although every individual affiili- 
ated chapter should have received a 
copy of the National Program of 
Work for 1953-54, and the chapter 
programs have probably long since 
been carefully planned, but based 
on the many requests for program 
ideas it seems advisable that we 
emphasize and re-emphasize the 
importance of using this National 
Program of Work as a guide through- 
out the year. It is hoped that every 
member of a program committee, 
of a projects committee, and in fact, 
every member will review the varied, 
practical, and almost innumerable 
suggestions for individual and group 
activities listed under the four big 
goals for the year! 

Goal I. Developing greater under- 
standing among the homes of the 
world. 

Goal II. Training and improving 
ourselves to be more democratic in 
all phases of life. 

Goal III. Teaching ourselves to 
•realize and accept our responsibili- 
ties in our home. 

Goal IV. Understanding what 
home-making can contribute to our 
future lives at home or in business. 

Future Homemakers in other 
states have also expressed need for 
help in making the most use of the 
National Program of Work. During 
August 1953, when the North Cen- 
tral Area of Tennessee held its 
Fourth Annual FHA Workshop, the 
main goal of the workshop was to 
help chapters see better ways of 
using and interpreting the National 



Program of Work in the local chap- 
ter. A publication of the results of 
the workshop is in the North Caro- 
lina State Office. Scripts for four 
programs with a description of how 
they were developed are included. 
These wese presented to the 150 
advisers and members present at the 
workshop to illustrate ways in which 
chapters can develop programs from 
the suggested ideas included in the 
National Program of Work. The 
scripts were meant to offer sugges- 
tions for use of the Program of 
Work in developing scripts and pro- 
grams rather than to be presented as 
they were written. 



National Projects 

Families Together — FHA Week — 

Civil Defense — World Christmas 

Festival— UNESCO 

The only additional one this year 
is Safety and Civil Defense. Pen Pals 
are no longer a national project but 
they can be a personal or chapter 
project. Addresses can be obtained 
by writing to one of organizations 
listed in the Special Fall Issue of 
Teen Times. This issue of Teen 
Times was sent to all chapters affili- 
ated for 1952-53. New chapters who 
do not have this issue may get the 
information by requesting it from 
the State FHA Adviser. One address 
listed in Teen Times is Student Let- 
ter Exchange, Mr. R. C. Mishek, 
General Manager, Waseca, Minne- 
sota. Ages 10-20 Fee: 15c a name. 

The echoes — from all corners of 
the State — concerning the observ- 
ance of National FHA Week this 
year have been encouraging notes. 
In FHA, as with other phases of 
the home-making program, stronger 
chapters seem to result when chap- 
ters in a county unit join forces and 
plan and work co-operatively on 
common interests. The unit may con- 



sist of more than one county, of 
course. In regard to FHA Week, 
many groups reported observing the 
week on a co-operative county 
basis. One example is the Cumber- 
land County Federation. Early in 
the year a meeting was called of the 
chapter advisers and FHA repre- 
sentatives of the six chapters, whose 
membership totals 538. Activities 
for each chapter for each day of 
FHA Week were carefully planned. 
Consideration was given to the pub- 
licity as well as to the recommen- 
dation for participation in other 
national projects during the week. 

In Durham County representa- 
tives from the various chapters 
called on the Chairman of the 
County Board of Commissioners, 
Mr. George F. Kirkland, who pro- 
claimed the Week of November 1-7, 
inclusive, as "National Future Home- 
makers of America Week" in Dur- 
ham County. 

Was yours one of the chapters 
which participated in the World 
Christmas and Chanukah Festival 
in 1953? If you were too late, maybe 
you will be especially interested in 
the UNESCO Gift Coupon plan. 
One of FHA's UNESCO projects 
this year is a women's community 
center attached to a vocational train- 
ing school in Libya. The center was 
completely bare at the beginning of 
the project. The total cost of this 
project is $1,200. For further in- 
formation on how you can co-operate 
with the UNESCO Plan see the 1952 
and the 1953 Special Issue of Teen 
Times or make special requests from 
the State Office. 

The Bladenboro Chapter sold $5 
worth of coupons and requested that 
contributions be applied to Libya 
project materials for dresses. 

The Mount Olive Chapter sold 
stamps amounting to $10 and re- 
quested their contribution be ap- 

1 



plied to the Philippine project 
refrigerators. 

You may be interested in devot- 
ing a program to the UNESCO 
Plan. 

In connection with the UNESCO 
Gift Coupon Plan word has come 
to the State Office here from the 
North Carolina Library Commission 
that five sets of UNESCO exhibit 
material are available from that li- 
brary upon request. The address is 
North Carolina Library Commission, 
Post Office Box 2388, Raleigh. 

There is a possibility that one 
exhibit may be secured from the list 
of libraries below. There has been 
no confirmation from them received 
by the office, but the list was sent 
from the National FHA Office. 

Mr. Hoyt R. Galvin, Director 
Public Library of Charlotte and 
Mecklenburg County, 310 N. Tryon 
Street, Charlotte 2, North Caro- 
lina — 3 exhibits. 

Margaret H. Ligon, Librarian, 
Pack Memorial Public Library, S. 
Pack Square, Asheville, North Caro- 
lina — 1 exhibit. 

Clara M. Crawford, Durham Pub- 
lic Library, E. Main Street, Durham, 
North Carolina — 1 exhibit. 

Paul S. Ballance, Librarian, 
Greensboro Public Library, 220 
Church St., Greensboro, North Caro- 
lina — 1 exhibit. 

Elizabeth Gurley, Librarian, High 
Point Public Library, 412 North 
Main Street, High Point, North 
Carolina — 1 exhibit. 

Miss Clyde Smith, Librarian, 
Olivia Raney Public Library, 107 
Hillsboro Street, Raleigh, North 
Carolina — 1 exhibit. 

Mrs. Emma W. MacMillan, Wil- 
mington Public Library, Wilmington, 
North Carolina — 1 exhibit. 

Jeannette Trotter, Librarian, Car- 
negie Public Library, Winston- 
Salem, North Carolina — 1 exhibit. 

Preceding or paralleling the sale 
of coupons could be an assembly 
program or a chapter program at 
a local meeting which would give 
emphasis to better understanding of 
cultures and homes of other coun- 
tries — Goal I. Ever try seeking the 
co-operation of a fourth or fifth 
grade teacher? She would probably 
be more than willing to work with 



Refreshment time for three mothers dur- 
ing the Hoke-Hi Homecoming Dance. 
FHA girls had charge of refreshments. 
Shown here left to right: Sheila Balfour, 
FHA Member, Mrs. Hodgen, Mrs. 
Bracey, and Mrs. McLean. 



her students and prepare them to go 
to your meeting to recite some in- 
teresting facts which they have 
learned about homes and home life 
in other countries. Do you have in 
your community a native of another 
country? He or she may be flattered 
to be asked to be on one of your 
programs. Additional ideas along 
this line are in your National Pro- 
gram of Work. 

When you sent gifts overseas or 
money to be used for gifts, you were 
participating in the UNESCO proj- 
ect also. 

Taylorsville FHA girls wrapped 
and packed in large boxes twenty- 
eight gifts for shipping overseas. This 
project was repeated in many, many 
chapters throughout North Carolina. 
Taylorsville sent their gifts to Yugo- 
slovia. Other chapters sent gifts to 
Germany, Austria, Belgium, Den- 
mark, England, Finland, France, 
Greece, Holland, India, Israel, Italy, 
Japan, Korea, Luxemburg, Norway, 
Switzerland. 



Chapter and 
Individual Projects 

Becky is the flower arranger for 
the Madison FHA, the Rockingham 
County Federation, and the District 
V Rally. As a result of a home 
project, selected last spring, Becky 
has made several of these FHA 
meetings more beautiful and impres- 



sive, with her lovely flower arrange- 
ments. 

All summer long Becky toiled, 
making flower arrangements each 
week of her summer vacation. This 
work was made easier for Becky 
because of her father who is an ar- 
dent rosarian. The Marshburn's en- 
tire back yard blooms profusely 
during the long summer months. 
Becky's arrangements were made 
from her father's roses; other flowers 
and plants were added to comple- 
ment the roses. 

One of her special arrangements 
using two dozen red roses was pre- 
pared for the Rockingham County 
Future Homemakers Leadership 
Workshop. Becky also made the 
beautiful arrangement used at the 
District V Rally at the Woman's 
College in Greensboro in October. 
This was an artistic design which 
gave to the stage just the needed 
touch. We think Becky has carried 
out a very fine home project and 
we, her chapter mates, would like 
to acknowledge the pleasure and 
enjoyment she has given us and 
other Future Homemakers in our 
county and district through sharing 
the results of her home project with 
us. 

If you are interested in roses and 
how to arrange them, Becky recom- 
mends Roses and Home Flower 
Arranging, by Edna Whitsitt, from 
Greystone Press, New York. 

The Randleman FHA girls had 
fun and at the same time raised 
funds for their chapter treasury with 




a Christmas bazaar on December 11. 
The bazaar was held in a local de- 
partment store, and the girls sold 
handmade Christmas gifts, Christ- 
mas corsages, and foods. The most 
popular item was a Christmas cor- 
sage made by the girls from mate- 
rials which they bought. The chapter 
voted to contribute most of their 
profit toward furnishing the Home 
Economics department living room. 

The next project of our group is 
the sponsoring of a baby-sitting class 
in co-operation with the Randolph 
County Health Department. The 
girls who complete the course will 
contribute a percentage of their earn- 
ings to the chapter treasury for a 
certain period of time. The FHA 
chapter will publish the list of cer- 
tified baby-sitters for the benefit of 
parents in the community. 

The following account is of a 
home economics class project, but it 
is a good illustration of effective 
planning and successfully carrying 
through with a project. 

The principal at Cliffside School, 
Mr. Beatty, asked that the home 
economics department give a pro- 
gram on table manners, stressing 
particularly the things that are most 
applicable to our school lunchroom. 
This project was assigned to the boys' 
class for they were at work on table 
manners at the time. They did most 
of the planning, but asked the help 
of a few girls in presenting the 
program. "This work may seem a bit 
elementary, but our assembly pro- 
gram includes grades one through 
twelve, we were very enthusiastic 
and discussed several possibilities 
and finally assigned two boys to 
provide a planed board, and a 
stand; or each one to cut, color, 
and mount cardboard models; one 
listed properties as it became evident 
they were needed; several worked 





Mrs. Ruth Ferguson, center, was the guest speaker at the Dinner for Parents in 
Hillsboro. On her left is Shirley Hines and to the right, Billie Jean Parker. 



The FHA float of the Chapel Hill FHA 
in the Christmas parade. 



on the script, and two worked on 
what we call 'A Forerunner.' Copies 
were made and carried to the 
principal and to . each teacher in 
school. The 'forerunner' encour- 
aged several teachers to have dis- 
cussions in the classroom, and later 
copies were posted on several of the 
classroom bulletin boards. Two 
teachers asked to borrow the record, 
'Manners Can Be Fun,' to use in 
the classroom," writes Mrs. Harris, 
adviser. 

"The narrator was very good and 
the fact that the material was pre- 
sented almost as it was written 
meant that we were able to get the 
points across, almost unrehearsed. 
Only once did all the boys and 
girls get together for practice." 

The Chapel Hill FHA Chapter 
won first prize ($50) for their float 
in a Christmas parade of 28 floats. 
The float represented Santa's Work- 
shop with an igloo adjoined. Es- 
kimos, Elves, Teddy Bears, Jacks-in- 
the-Box, the Jester and French Dolls 
— all dressed in appropriate cos- 
tumes were busily working on toys. 
There was a toy bag all packed 
for the midnight ride. Mrs. Santa 
was ironing Santa's suit. Santa sat 
in his union suit. Chicken wire was 
used for the sides on a trailer and 
a tractor and white paper napkins 
covered the wire. The top of the 
igloo was covered with blocks of 
ice paper. The FHA sign was lighted 
in red. From the rear was a large 
spotlight. 

One of the projects of the Aycock 
Chapter is collecting books to send 
to the Institution for the Mentally 



111 at Camp Butner. For earning 
money members are selling sweet 
potatoes and old newspapers. 

One of the many projects carried 
on in the Bartlett Yancey Chapter 
was preserving and arranging flowers 
this past summer and fall. 

During the summer marigolds, 
zinnias, cosmas, and other flowers 
were dried for winter arrangements. 
Corn tassles, okra, peppergrass, 
snakeplant, persimmons and drift- 
wood were also collected. 

The county NCEA called on a 
group of FHA girls to decorate the 
Club House for a meeting that was 
to be held there. They advised that 
the cost for the decorations would 
be about $1.50. Well, how much 
can you buy for $1.50 today? The 
group got their heads together and 
their thoughts together. They re- 
membered their flower garden proj- 
ect and their stored dried flowers. 

This class project with the help 
of Mr. Ralph Saddler, FFA adviser, 
and Mrs. Grace Wooten, the FHA 
adviser, turned out wonderfully. The 
results were plenty of flowers for the 
Home Economics Cottage, flowers 
to carry to friends, and the arrange- 
ments for the NCEA meeting at the 
club house. 

The Beaufort Chapter has an- 
nounced its Spring project. The proj- 
ect selected by the Ways and Means 
Committee will be the selling of Ro- 
Co Extracts, formerly sold by the 
Lizzie Chadwick Church Circle. 
Vanilla, pure lemon, pure almond, 
and black walnut will be sold in 6 
(Continued on page eight) 




A Must Id Developing a Well Rounded 
Personality 



Dining out with parents as guests 
is a form of recreation which the 
Hillsboro FHA members highly rec- 
ommend. They enjoyed the occasion 
so much last year they did it again 
this year. It' was the day after 
Thanksgiving when the dinner party 
was served in the historical Colonial 
Inn in Hillsboro. Three honorary 
members, Mrs. George Gilmore, 
Mrs. Chaiborne Wilkerson, and Mr. 
G. A. Grown were present. Mrs. 
Ruth Ferguson, ex-State FHA Ad- 
viser, was the guest speaker. 

Swing your partner, skip to my 
Lou, was the cry heard in the Hugh 
Morson gym on Saturday night last 
November 21. The entire FHA 
chapter and their dates turned out 
for a gala time, square-dancing to 
the lively music of Red Rose and his 
Dixie Mountain Boys. Between the 
rounds of square dances, the couples 
relaxed by doing the Bunny Hop 
and the Mexican Hat Dance, and of 
course the couples all joined in the 
regular round dances. 

The decorations were all hand- 
made and depicted a real Western 
Dude Ranch. A red barn overflowed 
with caricature cows, pigs, and hens. 
Hay, oil lanterns, and big straw hats 
helped turn the gym into a festive 
ranch-style farm scene. 

Western hot dogs, home-made 
cookies, candies, and cup-cakes, and 
lots of drinks were sold during the 
entire dance from a large covered 
Chuck Wagon. 

The entire profit from the dance is 
to be put into the treasury and will 
be used to send Hugh Morson's 
delegate, June Watson, to the Re- 
gional Meeting in Daytona Beach, 
Florida, this summer. The entire 
chapter co-operated in every possible 
way and the dance was a success, 
both financially and in the good 
time had by all. 

The Cliffside FHA Chapter 

cooked up a clever idea for a 



Christmas party at which every 
member received a gift but no money 
was spent for gifts. They had a 
White Elephant party and Christmas 
party all in one. The invitations 
were typed on cut-outs from white 
paper and in the shape of elephants. 
Previous to the night of the party 
elephant heads had been drawn on 
number 14 paper bags and each bag 
numbered. As guests arrived each 
was given a sack, a pencil and a 
sheet of paper. The bags were slipped 
over the head and eyes were torn 
in the bag. Each elephant hunted for 
people he knew, and when he found 
a "Friend" he wrote the name and 
number on his sheet, being careful 
not to give his own identity away. 
The elephant with the greatest num- 
ber of friends (correctly named and 
numbered) was crowned "QUEEN" 
of the elephants. (The crown and 
throne had been provided.) 

The Queen was given a box of 
small white elephants with "Wit- 
tiest," "Most Courteous," "Neatest," 
"Most Dependable," etc. written on 
the back. She called the elephants 
up by number, and gave each a 
small elephant to give to the person 
who most nearly answered the de- 



scription on the back. After all the 
elephants were distributed, the per- 
son holding the largest number re- 
ceived a prize. 

The guest were then given a book- 
let enclosed in an old Christmas 
card. The booklet contained contests 
pertaining to FHA and to White 
Elephants. 

After the contests, and while re- 
freshments were being made ready, 
the White Elephant packages, which 
were collected as the guests entered, 
were distributed, and while they 
were being passed along lively music 
was played. When the music stopped 
the gift each held was his own. Re- 
freshment plates carrying out the 
Christmas theme were served. The 
group gathered around the piano, 
sang Christmas carols and went 
home a happy and relaxed bunch. 



Some form of recreation is most 
always included in large gatherings 
of much duration. At the Stanly 
County FHA Rally last fall, twenty 
minutes of the program was devoted 
to group singing. Shelby J. Almong 
Whitley, old song leader of the 
County Federation, and Bonnie Mul- 
(Continued on page eight) 




Square Dance in the Hugh Morson Gym. 




Peggy Taylor and her project. 



NORTH CAROLINA FHA FLAG 



Why It's Here and How It Came About 



For the story, we take you to 
Warsaw and Peggy Taylor report- 
ing. . . . 

Early in the fall of 1953 our ad- 
viser and two chapter members were 
called to Jacksonville, North Caro- 
lina, to work on the District II 
Planning Committee to make final 
plans for our Annual Rally. At this 
meeting the adviser and delegates 
who had attended the National FHA 
Convention last summer described 
the FHA Flag they saw at the con- 
vention, which was the first one 
made in the United States. They ex- 
pressed a desire for our District to 
make the second flag and display it 
at the District Rally. Our Warsaw 
group volunteered to get this flag 
made in our chapter. 

Since I had hand-painted and 
made a 24 x 38 inch white silk 
banner for our Chapter Room, Mrs. 



Kathleen Snyder, our Chapter Ad- 
viser, asked me if I would like to 
make this FHA Flag as a special 
project. I volunteered to do the work 
to the best of my ability, and with 
her help made the paper pattern. 

Then came the task of finding 
materials for making the flag. Our 
District II FHA Adviser, Mrs. Clara 
Reed, searched and wrote for sam- 
ples many days before we could 
find suitable materials. We desired 
a heavy quality of double-faced satin. 
Being unable to secure this, we se- 
lected a heavy, one-faced duchess 
satin for the flag. Not able to find 
the right shade of wide red satin 
ribbon to bind the flag, which 
matched our paint, we chose a nar- 
rower ribbon of the proper shade, 
and I faced the flag both back and 
front. We almost despaired of finding 
the cord and tassels for the flag. 



Flag companies had the supplies in 
colors, but nothing in white or red. 
Our friends joined the search with 
us, and finally Mrs. Wilbur Garner, 
one of our Chapter Mothers, found 
a green set of tassels in a near-by city 
and worked a whole morning re- 
moving the color; hence, we finally 
had our white cord and tassels. The 
total cost of the flag materials was 
$11.50. 

The satin for the flag arrived on 
Tuesday, October 6, before our rally 
date of October 17. That day at 
school was spent measuring satin, 
pulling threads and cutting the ma- 
terial straight and transferring our 
design. With faith and a prayer, I 
started on Wednesday morning 
painting the flag with Amaza-art 
paint. 

I live in the country, three miles 




Faison Smith, Chapter Father, and 
daughter, Lou Gene Smith of the B. F. 
Grady Chapter doing a comical dance 
number at Mother-Daughter Banquet. 



from Warsaw, and have a job work- 
ing in a Warsaw store on Saturday. 
Sunday morning I attended Sunday 
school and church, but as I had two 
hours free time Sunday afternoon. 
I used it painting the flag. I finally 
finished painting the flag Wednesday 
night, October 25. Thursday and 
Friday were spent in lining the flag 
front and back. On Friday after- 
noon, my mother came out and 
helped my Chapter Adviser to hold 
the flag while I put buttonholes in 
the tabs and sewed them on for 
attaching the flag to the flag staff, 
which we borrowed from a local 
church. I then pressed the flag, at- 



tached it to the staff and wrapped 
it for the journey to Morehead City 
the next morning. 

There I proudly sat back and 
saw displayed my handiwork, which 
was, so far as we know, the second 
FHA Flag to be made in the United 
States. 

It has been a pleasure to make 
the flag. 1 feel humbly proud to 
know that the State FHA Adviser 
and our District State Supervisor 
wanted the flag to be presented as 
our North Carolina FHA Flag. 

Peggy Taylor, 
Warsaw FHA Chapter Member. 



FAMILY LIFE 



WHAT ABOUT MEMBERSHIP? 

We are still working on figures 
and numbers but our record book 
indicates as of January 15th, dead- 
line for affiliation, a total of 454 
chapters and a membership of a 
little over 19,000, an increase in 
chapters this year but a slight de- 
crease in the number of members. 

Twelve chapters in the state have 
a membership of over a hundred. 
Hugh Morson heads the list with 196 
members. Following in order are: 
Pembroke, Rutherford - Spindale, 
Fuquay Springs, Garner, Mt. Holly, 
St. Stephens, Taylorsville, Rocking- 
ham, Seventy-first, Bath, and 
Bladenboro. 




This is a group of the Jonesville FHA Officers following an assembly program 
during which the Emblem Service was presented. Reading left to right, they are: 
Pat Shoemaker, Barbara Boles, Nancy York, Peggy Joyner, Pat Person, Shirley 
Draugh, and Inez Simmons. 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Jo Ann Woosley, who along with 
Frances Burris, represented our State 
FHA Association at the annual 
Family Life Council Meeting in 
November, reports: 

Some points and ideas that were 
brought out at this meeting were: 

1. The best way to make friends 
is to be a friend. 

2. Girls like boys who are neat, 
who know their way around, and 
who give them a lot of attention. 

3. Boys like girls who are at- 
tractive, friendly, who appreciate 
what the boys do for them and those 
who talk but do not jabber. 

4. It is not wise to accept an 
engagement ring while in high 
school. 

5. How a girl can get a date: 

a. be attractive. 

b. be a friend. 

c. be around where the boy is. 

d. talk to the boy and ask 
about things that interest 
him. 

e. be neat and clean. 

f. a boy wants a date he can 
be proud of. 

Dr. Dorothy Dyer suggested some 
things that everyone should know 
or do before getting married. Here 
is the list: 

1. Know what is involved in mar- 
riage. 

2. What does marriage require 
of me? 

a. hard work. 

b. hard adjustments. 

c. associations with his family. 

d. maturity. 

e. understanding. 

f. Unselfishness. 

3. See each other under all cir- 
cumstances. 

4. Are you in love enough to 
marry? 

a. love can be tested against 
time. 

b. personality factors such as 
quick temper or selfishness 
may test your love. 

(Continued on page eight) 



rer uiarrr 



The Beaufort FHA members enjoyed 
group singing and a skit, "Make a House 
a Home," at the regular meeting held 
in the auditorium balcony Thursday. 

Ada Sue Owens served as program 
chairman and Paula Jones operated the 
opaque projector for the program mem- 
bers, Jane Safrit, Sue Sewell, Donna 
Lewis, Nancy Brodda, Ruby "Polly" 
Chadwick, Rita Mason, "Winky" Willis 
and Clyda Taylor. 

It was reported that a bountiful supply 
of food and clothing was contributed 
by the members for a needy family dur- 
ing November. 

The group is indebted to Sadie Harris 
for cutting the stencils and mimeograph- 
ing the material for the FHA 1953-54 
yearbooks. The books were distributed to 
members at the December meeting. 

Lib Stallings served as refreshment 
committee, serving chilled soft drinks to 
the members. 

Elizabeth Dixon and Polly Chadwick 
served as helpers at the X-ray trailer 
Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. 
Polly and Margaret Springle served Sat- 
urday at the same hours. 

The faculty is helping the FHA members 
sell green school pencils. The pencils have 
the name of the school stamped in white 
and contain No. 2 lead. They cost five 
cents apiece. The members are also sell- 
ing white and green school emblems 
made of felt to be worn on sweater or 
coat sleeves, fronts and backs. 

A school sanitation campaign being 
sponsored by the FHA chapter will soon 
be under way with attractive posters be- 
ing posted in each rest room in school. 
Elizabeth Stallings and Kay Prytherch 
are heading this campaign. 



The Boyden FHA Chapter served a 
luncheon to a joint meeting, of the Si 
and Epsilon chapters of the Delta Kappa 
Gamma, teachers' organization, in the 
Boyden Home Economics Lab on De- 
cember 5. 

Miss Catherine Whitner, Miss Julia 
Groves, Mrs. Bessie Ragland, and Mrs. 
Minnie M. Gaston greeted the guests in 
the front hall of the school, where they 
were served appetizers of tomato and 
yellow juices. Sissie Swartz, a junior, 
and Ilene Chinn, a sophomore, served 
the appetizers. 

The tables in the lab were decorated 
gold and brightened with crimson 
Christmas balls. Whole crystalized grape- 
fruits filled with crystalized fruits and 
candies decorated each end of the tables. 
Standing cookies in the shape of "Ru- 
dolph," the reindeer, and miniature trees 
made of dried fruits and nuts were placed 
before each plate. 

The menu for the luncheon consisted 
of turkey a la king served on fried 
noodles, creamed sweet potatoes on 
pineapples rings topped with marshmal- 
lows, buttered spinach, biscuits, cran- 
berry salad, assorted relishes, coffee, and 
ambrosia and pound cake. 



The program was presented by Miss 
Elizabeth Black, Miss Johnsie McKinley, 
and Mrs. Mary Moyle Montgomery. The 
topic was "Training Women for Educa- 
tional Leadership." Miss Sarah Lopp led 
the group in a responsive reading of a 
Christmas story from Isaiah and Luke's 
Gospel. 

Mary Louise Poplin and Shirley Rex 
presided over the kitchen duties. Those 
serving the luncheon were: Eleanor Ollen, 
Rachel Allen, Phyllis Brandy, Sally 
Brown, Nancy Clark, Annice Coe, Mil- 
dred Erwin, Ann Miller, Janice Mitch- 
ell, Dorothy Moore, Marylin Rufty, 
Becky Shuping. Martha Sink, Phyllis 
Walser and Ann Yost. Miss Anne Hall, 
adviser to the FHA members, supervised 
the luncheon. 

The fifty members of the Si and Epsi- 
lon chapters present for the luncheon 
came from Albemarle, Concord, Kan- 
napolis, Lexington, and Salisbury. 

The Red Springs FHA Chapter had 

as their theme for the December meeting 
"The True Meaning of Christ's Birthday 
on Christmas." 

President Juanita Nurnberger opened 
the meeting with the impressive FHA 
opening ceremony. The scripture reading 
on the birth of the Christ Child was given 
by Audrey Tucker with the prayer by 
Sylvia Beeson. A Christmas poem was 
read by Virginia Lee Hutchinson. 

Hilda Gray Maness read the story 
"The Keeper of the Inn," followed by a 
poem "Once in a Stable" by Charlotte 
McGoogan. Juanita Nurnberger made a 
talk on "Let's Put Christ Back into 
Christmas," after which Millie McNeill 
played the record, "Put Christ Back into 
Christmas." 

After the business meeting, the club 
members joined in the singing of Christ- 
mas Carols with Millie McNeill leading 
and Ann McKay at the piano. 

Refreshments of cookies and mints 
were served to the 64 club members and 
their adviser, Mrs. Ben Stanton. The 
second year home economics students 
made the refreshments as part of their 
class project for Christmas. 

The Mills FHA members received 
some good advice from Rev. W. M. Latta, 
Episcopal minister. He stated: "Through 
your environment and proper condition- 
ing, you can become what you want to 
be. We should live so that those in our 
families now and in years to come can 
be proud of us." 

Introduced by Miss Jetta Godfrey, Mr. 
Latta centered his remarks about the 
topic "Are you a good branch of your 
family tree?" 

Miss Annette Fuller taught the mem- 
bers several songs. 

Hostesses were Barbara Leonard, Caro- 
lyn Pergerson, Marie Atkins, Jean Lloyd, 
Carol Sutherland, Lois Smith, Jean At- 
kins, Joyce Spencer and Mary Jo Leonard. 

The Bartlett Yancey FHA Chapter 

sponsored a Christmas party in the Club 
House on Saturday evening, December 19. 
Seventy-one boys and girls assembled, 
honoring the Club Parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Sam Bason and Mr. and Mrs. W. C. 
Jackson. Christmas colors prevailed in 
the decorations and refreshments. 



Mrs. J. G. Wooten, adviser, introduced 
the honor guests. Isabelle Crook social 
chairman, presided over the program 
which consisted of Christmas Carols, 
games, and dancing. 

Mrs. Bason presided at the punch 
bowl, assisted by Peggy Poteat and Billie 
McLendon. Ann Aldridge and Marie 
Gwynn served cookies and candy. 

The interest shown by our club parents 
is a great inspiration to the members of 
FHA. 

The committee on arrangements were: 
Isabelle Crook, Carolyn Wood, Billie 
McLendon, Marie Gwynn, Ann Aldridge, 
Gail Stuck, assisted by Peggy Poteat and 
Jim Long. 

On Thursday night, December 17, the 
home economics students participated in 
a fashion show featuring garments made 
by each girl. The occasion was the 
monthly P. T. A. meeting. Prior to the 
show the emblem service was given, with 
girls explaining the various parts of the 
FHA emblem. Then, Geralyne Watson of 
Prospect Hill, former president of Bartlett 
Yancey FHA, gave a brief report on her 
trip to Columbus, Ohio, last summer to 
attend the National FHA Convention. 
Mrs. Marnie Beason, Club Mother, sang 
"Bless This House," accompanied by 
Mrs. R. W. Wilson. Mrs. Jim Aldridge 
was narrator for the fashion show. 

The home economics girls gathered 
around the fire and Christmas tree Tues- 
day, December 22, in the cottage for a 
last get-together before the holidays. Mrs. 
Bill Jackson and Mrs. Sam Bason were 
honor guests. The group presented them 
with gifts in appreciation of their in- 
terest in the group. The program com- 
mittee led the group in games and cards. 
Refreshments were served. 

The Vance FHA Chapter has elected 
their Chapter Parents for this year, Mr. 
and Mrs. W. G. Bryant. Honorary 
Mother and Father are Dr. and Mrs. A. D. 
Gregg. Mrs. Edward G. Cobb, home 
economics teacher, is the adviser of the 
club. Mary Alice Gupton is president. 

The Franklin Chapter of the FHA 

held a buzz session early in the year and 
the girls made suggestions on the kind 
of programs they wanted and different 
money-raising projects. 

Soon an officers' and committee chair- 
men's meeting was held at President Iris 
Nichols', where plans were drawn up for 
the entire school year and what they 
hoped to accomplish. The programs of 
coming meetings were planned and given 
to different girls. 

Programs for the first semester were 
planned around such topics as "What is 
expected of a baby sitter?" "Gotta date," 
"Codes of good behavior," and "Panel 
on problems of dating." 

A spaghetti supper for the community 
was held in October and it was a great 
success. From the profits of this supper 
a fund was started to buy shrubbery and 
improve the school grounds. 

As a school project the girls decided to 
make small crinoline Christmas trees for 
the Surry County women at the Black 
Mountain Sanatorium. 

The Chapter also joined in the World 
Christmas Festival and had a total of 28 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

The Southern Regional FHA 
Meeting will be in the Princess 
Issena Hotel, Daytona Beach, 
Florida. The quota for the entire 
Southern Region is 408. North 
Carolina's quota is 40. The theme 
for meeting is, "Are You a Leader 
for Better Homes?" If your chap- 
ter has a member who wishes to 
attend and plans to attend, please 
send the name and address to Mrs. 
Faye Coleman, State FHA Adviser, 
Department of Public Instruction, 
Raleigh, North Carolina, before 
March 15. Additional informa- 
tion can be sent to you as soon as 
all information concerning cost, 
program, and other details about 
the meeting is available. 



packages that were sent. We voted to 
send them to Korea. 

The FHA and FFA had joint party 
and square dance at the school gym- 
nasium. 

About 40 members attended the Surry- 
Yadkin Rally at Veteran's Park in Mt. 
Airy in October. There were 13 members 
who attended the District VII Rally at 
Mineral Springs High School. 

The Creedmoor FHA'ers have been 
engaged in a series of profitable activities. 
Some of the activities were class projects. 
Examples of these are: Feed bags were 
used for making pillow slips. The pillow 
slips were bleached, embroidered, and 
gift wrapped for Christmas gifts. Cloth- 
ing, food, and toilet articles were packed 
before Christmas for presenting to needy 
families before Christmas. First year 
students enjoyed preparing Christmas 
decorations to use in their homes during 
the holidays. They also received practice 
in preparing dishes appropriate for a real 
Christmas dinner. The dishes were as- 
sembled and the dinner was served with 
Mr. Lamb, the athletic coach, as the 
special guest. There was evidence that 
the earlier training in table setting and 
service had not been a waste of time. 
One of the FHA projects which should 
please all the girls who use the gym- 
nasium is the project of making the girls' 
rest room more attractive and homelike. 



WHOLESOME GROUP 
RECREATION 

(Continued from page four) 
linaix, the new song leader, led the 
singing. Each chapter presented a 
talent number lasting approximately 
two minutes, which was both rec- 
reational and entertaining. Of course 
this Rally was not all recreational. 
There was the devotion, andgreetings 
from the principal of the Norwood 
School, the scene of the Rally. The 
registration committee report indi- 
cated approximately 150 members, 
advisers, and chapter parents were 
present. 



QUOTING FROM A RELEASE 

SENT BY THE WINSTON 

BOOK COMPANY 

"Nothing about Bill Martin, Jr., 
foretells his fame as a successful 
author of children's books and a 
talented American Storyteller. He's 
a tall man with a friendly smile and 
a humble appearance. When he 
steps before his audience, he looks 
like "your neighbor next door" who 
just stopped by to say hello. 

Then this teller of tales unfolds 
his wares — and the magic spell is 
cast! From his rich lore of time- 
tested stories and games comes a 
wondrous array . . . kings and 
queens . . . cowboys and Indians 
. . . gallant horses of the raw range 
lands . . . kindly old grandfathers 
and grinning little boys . . . talking 
animals . . . spluttering old trains 
chugging up a mountain. For forty 
minutes the parade continues against 
a background of orchestral music 
and humorous sound effects. With 
voice, pantomime, and well-chosen 
material, Bill Martin recaptures the 
Golden Age of Childhood. 



Most every FHA member in 
North Carolina has no doubt heard 
by now, either directly or indirectly, 
reports from the North Carolina 
delegates to the 1953 National FHA 
Convention. You will recall in all 
reports, Bill Martin's storytelling 
seemed to the highlighting feature of 
the entire convention. 

Your quota for attendance and 
additional information should reach 
you soon. 

Bill Martin Minstrel-Program is 
advertised as Entertainment for 
"Children from 4 to 99." 



PROJECTS 

(Continued from page three) 
oz. bottles at 50 cents each. The 
FHA member who tops the sales in 
this project will be awarded a sterl- 
ing silver chapter pin. 

The winners in the first term 
project — the selling of Christmas 
Cards — were each awarded a silver 
pin. They were Elizabeth Dixon, 
Millan Buttry, and Johnise Hardesty. 
From this project the Future Home- 
makers report a profit of $71. The 
patrons and friends who purchased 
cards were thanked in the Beaufort 
newspaper, a thoughtful act which 
seems worthy of mention here. 



"What Is FHA" — is a skit writ- 
ten and presented by members of 
the Winecoff Chapter. 

This proves it: chapter and as- 
sembly programs don't have to be 
blue prints of some professional 
thinking and organizing. Why not 
find and use the hidden talents of 
your own chapter members. Ideas 
for skits present no problem. Sug- 
gestions are found in nearly all FHA 
publications. Writing your own 
script entails the bringing together 
and applying ones knowledge and 
understanding of English, Home 
Economics, and Dramatics. What a 
profitable project for any individual 
or group! 

The skit "What Is FHA"— was 
written by the four members: Janice 
Little, Pat Flowe, Shirley Garver, 
and Anne Whitley. It was staged in 
assembly in December, preceding a 
Fashion Show and the Ceremony 
for awarding Junior and Chapter 
degrees. 



FAMILY LIFE 

(Continued from page six) 

5. Know the family background. 

a. Is he from a happy home? 

b. Is there any insanity in the 
family? 

6. What values does he place on 
religion? 

7. What about children? 

8. How does he feel about sex? 
Is it a feeling of shame, fear, or 
guilt? 

How can the school better pre- 
pare the student for family living? 

1. Family life classes. 

2. Guidance Councillor. 

3. Students submit questions to 
a question box with no name on 
the question. Discuss questions in 
class. 

4. More unified approach to the 
needs of the people. 



COVER PICTURE 

This picture was taken during 
an FHA Semi-Formal held last 
year in the Mount Holly chapter. 
These girls (left to right) Linda 
Pryor, Betty Gzeckowiz, and Ruth 
Haney were first year FHA mem- 
bers. The one candle represented 
work accomplished during the year. 



Ttew&f SfocUffo foam Ti/edt&w TisUavt 



RB247 AC370 KA 297 1954 Jan 26 PM 4 35 

K. LLA638 PD KANSAS CITY MO 26 239PMC 

MRS FAYE T COLEMAN. FUTURE HOME MAKERS OF AMERICA 
STATE DEPT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION RALEIGH NCAR 

HAPPY TO ACCEPT YOUR INVITATION TO BE ON YOUR PROGRAM 

APRIL 3RD LETTER FOLLOWS 
BILL MARTIN JR 



Yes, its true, America's Beloved Storyteller is to appear on the program at our North Carolina State Con- 
vention scheduled for April 3 in the Raleigh Memorial Auditorium. His letter which followed the wire is so 
friendly and warm in expression, you will want to read it: 



Dear Mrs. Coleman: 



How very kind of you to want me on your program at the annual 
State FHA Convention in Raleigh, Saturday, April 3. As I 
wired you earlier, I am delighted to accept the invitation and 
am looking forward with keen excitement and pleasure to that 
meeting with the 3000 Future Homemakers of North Carolina. 

Except for the payment of my expenses, there will be no charge 
for the program, Mrs. Coleman. The John C. Winston Company, 
publisher of our books, is providing the storytelling lecture- 
entertainment to groups such as yours, as a public service, 
and you will receive directly from the Winston office another 
confirmation of my availability April 3. I have already cleared 
the date with the office in a telephone conversation. 

Let me know what you need in the way of press releases, etc., 
so that we can get them to you in ample time. Again my thanks 
and abiding good wishes. 

Cordially 

Bill Martin, Jr, 



^^^^^^^^^^-^^^^^^^^ 



% 



Future Homemakers of America 

CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage. 
And high hope. 




'The homes of tomorrow are 
the hands of the youth 
of today" 




Caroline Says: 

My Symphony written by William Henry Channing 
(who lived 1810-1884) expresses the same beauty in 
living in 1954 as in 1854. 

My Symphony 

To live content with small means. 

To seek elegant rather than luxury, and refinement 
rather than fashion. 

To be worthy, not respectable, and wealthy, not rich. 

To study hard, think quietly, talk gently, act frankly. 

To listen to stars and birds, to babes and sages, with 
open heart. 

To bear all cheerfully, do all bravely, await occasion, 
hurry never. 

In a word, to let the spiritual, unbidden and tin 
conscious, grow up through the common. 

This is to be my symphony. 




FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association * 



State Homemaker Degree Winners 



Barbara Crawford 

Dianne Mosley 

Janet Norville 

Faye Woody 

Carol Lynn 

Faye Walker 

Judy Pressley 

Julie Frances Kennedy 

Bessie Hill 

Sue McKinney 

Pansie Cameron 

Mona Weeks 

Kate Yeargin 

Portia Banks 

Harriett Shelton 

Mary Elizabeth Kenyon 

Ruby Lee Wilkerson 

Norma Sue Davis 

Mary Lou Parker 

Alice Ann Oliver 

Hazel Wiggins 

Frances Massey 

Henrietta Wolschlag 

Patsy Ann Foust 

Ruth Wilson 

Joan Yancey 

Anne Louise Thomas 

Sharon P. Herring 

Geraldine Rich 

Kay Warren 



Frances D. Hamilton 

Rosie Miller 

Peggie Greene 

Ruby Mae Keever 

Raye Dycus 

Faye Dycus 

Berline Keever 

Judie Ellis 

Peggy Spruill 

Carrie Davis 

Emily Cox 

Jean Carolyn Tharrington 

Jean Faulkner 

Asheton Johnson 

Julie Hudgins 

Geraldine Parton 

Linda Queen 

Anne Warren 

Caroline Pruitt 

Garrie Freeman 

Mary Ella Robertson 

Tonita Lewis 

Mary Killian 

Faye Pate 

Betty Calhoun 

Barbara Ledbetter 

Elizabeth Gold 

Beth Peterson 

Glenda Faircloth 

Jane McDonald 



Christine Dowd 
Maholia Lemons 
Vera Ann Huffines 
Billie Honeycutt 
Melba Emily Moore 
Emilie Piercy 
Shirley Putman 
Nancy Ensley 
Carolyn Dobbins 
Annie Myers 
Marie Kirby 
Martha Carter 
Reba Sauls 
Jackie Fussell 
Lucy Dunn 
Nancy Hardy 
Peggy Sheppard 
Anna Aurelia Heilig 
Frances Burris 

Honorary Membership was be- 
stowed upon the following: Mrs. 
Faye T. Coleman, State FHA Ad- 
viser; Miss Viva Playfoot, Professor 
of Home Economics Education, 
Woman's College; Mrs. Sam Bason, 
Chapter Mother of the Bartlett 
Yancey FHA Chapter; Mr. J. Allen 
Lewis, Superintendent of Rocking- 
ham County Schools. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1953-1954 

President — Jean Faulkner, Red Oak 

Vice-President — Betty Calhoun, Seventy-First 

Secretary — Glenda Noble, Deep Run 

Treasurer — Peggy Spruill, Pamlico County 

Reporter — Garrie Freeman, Rutherfordton-Spindale 

Parliamentarian — Jo Ann Woosley, South Fork 

Historian — Evelyn Bruton, Candor 

Son" Leader — Anne Jo Lawson, Madison 



District Advisers 
1953-1954 

Mrs. Mary Lanier Jarrett, Fuquay Springs 

Mrs. Maude K. Stanton, Red Springs 

Miss Clara D. Reed, Richlands 

Mrs. Pauline Robbins, Pamlico County 

Mrs. Charlotte R. Turner, Hendersonville 

Miss Ethel Bailey, Mount Airy 

Mrs. Kathleen Nicholson, Benton Heights 

Mrs. Pauline Hoover, Tri-City Central 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



Treasures Untold . . . 

may be found right on your 
own bookshelves . . , in your 
storage cabinets or closets 



Lets have a treasure hunt! Then 
examine each discovery. As useful 
materials are uncovered — don't 
waste time being remorseful about 
what you might have done, but 
concern yourself with what you can 
do now, this summer, or early fall 
in making preparations for a whole 
new year's homemaking program. 

Perhaps the following list of sug- 
gestions will offer some aids in filling 
in your skeletal outline of programs 
for local chapter meetings: 

1. Suppose your program is cen- 
tered around "citizenship." With a 
little planning and imagination, some 
Future Homemakers might develop 
a dialogue from the article "What 
Can Just One Person Do?" found 
in the 1954, March, issue of Teen 
Times, page 7. Such a program 
should help each member to realize 
the importance of himself or herself 
in society. 

2. "Try a Courtesy Week — In 
Your School." Read the page full of 
ideas on page 1 1 of the November, 
1953, Teen Times. 

The Lucama Chapter undertook 
this project and reported it's suc- 
cess to parents and teachers during 



the Mother-Daughter, Father-Son 
Banquet in the the spring. Even the 
report was extremely interesting and 
beautifully done by two members 
of the chapter who spoke clearly and 
with just the right emphasis where 
emphasis was needed. 

The Bragtown Chapter called 
their week related to courtesy a 
"No Gripe Week." The members 
sent the following report: 

The week of February 8-13 was a 
busy and exciting one for the Brag- 
town Chapter of FHA. The cause 
for the excitement was the "No 
Gripe Week" and the square dance, 
which concluded the week's ac- 
tivities and the crowning of "Mr. 
and Miss No Gripe," who were 
chosen from the whole student body 
and teachers. 

How did we go seven days 
without griping? Well believe me 
it wasn't easy, but we did it. In 
order to enforce the rule of no 
griping for a week the FHA girls 
wore badges and became police- 
women which most of us thoroughly 
enjoyed. Any person given a ticket 
by one of the policewomen was 
requested to appear in the Kangaroo 




Court, which was made up of mem- 
bers of Student Council. The Court 
was held on Wednesday, Thursday, 
and Friday. Anyone found guilty 
of griping by the judge and jury was 
fined and made to wear a "No 
Griper" sign. The court offered 
much entertainment to the student 
body, that is, those of us who did 
not have to appear in court. 

The dance was held Saturday 
night, 7:30 to 10:30, in our school 
gym. Ray Moore from Duke Uni- 
versity was the caller for the dance 
and we all enjoyed him very much. 
He taught us some new and interest- 
ing dances as well as calling some 
"real gone" square dances. After 
all the dancing most of the students 
were very hungry as well as thirsty, 
but the FHA girls provided for that, 
too. We cooked cupcakes and candy 
to sell and also had plenty of drinks 
on hand. Chances were sold for a 
box of candy and a beautiful heart- 
shaped cake, decorated and baked 
by Beck Murdock's mother. The 
high light of the evening was the 
drawing of the lucky number for the 
candy and cake and also the crown- 
ing of Mr. and Miss "No Gripe" 
of the whole school. 

Our chapter members feel that 
this project was most successful and 
with the money we plan to buy a 
much-needed water fountain for the 
gym. As well as buying something for 
the school we all think the "No 
Gripe Week" increased the student's 
interest in FHA and caused the 
student body to think before they 
gripe and this made everyone 
happier. 

As FHA girls of Bragtown we 
would like to say we think we have 
thought of a very interesting and 
worth-while project and we all are 



The Bragtown Chapter sponsored a "No 
Gripe Week." The girls pictured below 
the poster are left to right: Delores 
Strickland, Kay Parrish, and Becky Mur- 
dock. 



sure that if you try it you will find 
it as much fun as we did. 

Here are some jingles we used to 
remind the students of "No Gripe 
Week." These jingles were written 
by different girls in the club. 

Gripes make no-one happy 

It's actually quite sad, 

We overlook so much good in life, 

By dwelling on the bad! 

The grass isn't always greener 
On the other side of the fence, 
So why be unhappy, at your own 

expense? 
Life is too short to while away 
So put on a smile, Do it, Today! 

Smile unto others, 

As you'd have them smile unto you, 

Try it just once 

See how much good it will do! 

"I wish I were never born," 
Many gripers often say, 
This attitude is hard on you, 
And will spoil even a sunny day! 

"Isn't this a rotten day," 
Said griper one, to griper two. 
Don't let this kind of conversation 
Become a part of you! 

Pack all your gripes in a suitcase, 

Request the girls of FHA 

For comes next Monday 

No Gripes! Is the order of the day! 

Remember no gripes into class 
should creep, 

For February the eighth to the thir- 
teenth is, "No Gripe Week! ! !" 

3. If there are no neighbors in 
your community who have lived in a 
foreign country and can help on 
program dealing with international 
relationship, use the article "My 
Students Were British" which ap- 
peared in the March issue of Teen 
Times. 

4. Have you used the skits listed 
below? 

"Madam Homeca's Crystal Ball" 
March, 1954, Teen Times 



ANNUAL REPORT 

Reminder! It is time to be- 
gin filling in those Annual 
Report Forms. Don't wait un- 
til that last minute. 

All Photos of State Con- 
vention were made by Quincy 
Cooke. Orders may be mailed 
to Quincy Cooke, Oakdale 
Motor Court, Cary, N. C. 




The Beaufort FHA President Clyda Ruth 
Taylor and song leader Mildred Johnson 
enjoy reading their "Teen Times" maga- 
zine in the FHA corner of their 
Department. 

"The House That Wasn't Haunted" 
Jan., 1954, Teen Times 
"To Make a House a Home" 

Nov., 1953, Teen Times 

5. A Program Idea from Aycock 
Chapter. 

The Aycock Future Homemakers 
celebrated last month with a Chuck 
Wagon Supper. The occasion was 
the annual Daddy-Daughter Date, 
at which time the girls date their 
daddys. A supper of baked beans, 
slaw, hot dogs, crullers, and coffee 
was served from behind a covered 
wagon — western style. After the 
meal the group was entertained 
by talented Future Homemakers. 
Frances Tate acted as Emcee. Betty 
Jane Walters did a song and dance 
act, "Tennessee Wig-Walk," after 
which Betty Joyce Woods did a 
pantomime based on "Dark Town 
Strutters Ball." The Senior girls, led 
by Anne Wilson, did a special ar- 
rangement of "On Top of Old 
Smokey." As a climax to the eve- 
ning, Peggy Roberts, assisted by 
Frances Tate and Elizabeth Talley, 
directed a game, "Two for the Pea- 
nuts" — an adaptation of "Two for 
the Money" using raw peanuts for 
the pay-off. Seventy daddys and 
daughters were present and the af- 
fair was considered quite a success. 

6. Program Ideas from 71st 
Chapter. 

Chapel Program: "This is our 
creed" a dramatization which fol- 
lowed a similiar dramatization given 
at the National Convention this sum- 
mer was presented by the Seventy- 
first F.H.A. Chapter to the high 
school on Monday, December 14. 
All chapter members participated. 
This program was given in order 
to better acquaint the chapter mem- 
bers and the student body with our 
F.H.A. creed and its real meaning. 



Christmas Party: The F.H.A. and 
F.F.A. of Seventy-first School held 
a Christmas party on the evening of 
December 17 in the new high 
school gym. Approximately 150 
chapter members, advisers Mrs. 
Warren and Mr. McKethan and one 
chapter mother, Mrs. B. F. Woodard 
attended. 

A unique feature of the party- 
was that all attending danced and 
played in gaily colored stocking feet 
to protect our new gym floor. Pat 
Carter and Susan Burdette, the 
couple winning the prize for the 
most dressed-up feet, received color- 
ful socks as their prize. 

Chapter Programs: Thomas W. 
Martin, Jr., floral designer, arranger, 
and lecturer of Fayetteville was the 
guest speaker of the Seventy-first 
Chapter at the November meeting. 
Mr. Martin gave an interesting and 
informative demonstration on mak- 
ing dried arrangements. He ex- 
plained the various methods of 
drying flowers so that they retain 
their natural color and beauty. 

He touched briefly on the ar- 
rangement of fruits and vetetables 
for holiday motifs and special oc- 
casions. He displayed an exotic 
sample arrangement. 

Approximately 100 members of 
the F.H.A. Chapter was present 
for the lectures and demonstrations. 
The members of the high school 
faculty were special guests of the 
chapter. 

On January 20, Mr. Otto Edwards, 
Safety Director from Fort Bragg, 
talked to the F.H.A. and F.F.A. 
girls and boys on safety. He told 
us there were several things lead- 
ing up to an accident. Among these 
were (1) distant cause (2) underlying 
causes and (3) an unsafe act or con- 
dition. He stated that if these unsafe 
acts or conditions would be done 
away with that accidents and injury 
could be prevented. He ended the 
program by showing two movies, 
one entitled "Once Too Often," and 
the other "Safety on the School 
Bus." 



COVER PICTURE 

These officers were installed at 
the State Convention on April 3. 
From left to right they are: 
Betty Calhoun, President: Nancy 
Christenberry, Parliamentarian; 
Carol Lynn Gams, Vice-President; 
Margo Sicho, Treasurer; Claudette 
Belton, Reporter; Sarah Eason, 
Song Leader; Shirley Rouse, Sec- 
retary; and Judy Bowman, His- 
torian. 



Treasures Untold . . . 



may be found right on your 
own bookshelves . ♦ .. in your 
cabinets or closets 



storage 



Lets have a treasure hunt! Then 
examine each discovery. As useful 
materials are uncovered — don't 
waste time being remorseful about 
what you might have done, but 
concern yourself with what you can 
do now, this summer, or early fall 
in making preparations for a whole 
new year's homemaking program. 

Perhaps the following list of sug- 
gestions will offer some aids in filling 
in your skeletal outline of programs 
for local chapter meetings: 

1. Suppose your program is cen- 
tered around "citizenship." With a 
little planning and imagination, some 
Future Homemakers might develop 
a dialogue from the article "What 
Can Just One Person Do?" found 
in the 1954, March, issue of Teen 
Times, page 7. Such a program 
should help each member to realize 
the importance of himself or herself 
in society. 

2. "Try a Courtesy Week — In 
Your School." Read the page full of 
ideas on page 1 1 of the November, 
1953, Teen Times. 

The Lucama Chapter undertook 
this project and reported it's suc- 
cess to parents and teachers during 



the Mother-Daughter, Father-Son 
Banquet in the the spring. Even the 
report was extremely interesting and 
beautifully done by two members 
of the chapter who spoke clearly and 
with just the right emphasis where 
emphasis was needed. 

The Bragtown Chapter called 
their week related to courtesy a 
"No Gripe Week." The members 
sent the following report: 

The week of February 8-13 was a 
busy and exciting one for the Brag- 
town Chapter of FHA. The cause 
for the excitement was the "No 
Gripe Week" and the square dance, 
which concluded the week's ac- 
tivities and the crowning of "Mr. 
and Miss No Gripe," who were 
chosen from the whole student body 
and teachers. 

How did we go seven days 
without griping? Well believe me 
it wasn't easy, but we did it. In 
order to enforce the rule of no 
griping for a week the FHA girls 
wore badges and became police- 
women which most of us thoroughly 
enjoyed. Any person given a ticket 
by one of the policewomen was 
requested to appear in the Kangaroo 




Court, which was made up of mem- 
bers of Student Council. The Court 
was held on Wednesday, Thursday, 
and Friday. Anyone found guilty 
of griping by the judge and jury was 
fined and made to wear a "No 
Griper" sign. The court offered 
much entertainment to the student 
body, that is, those of us who did 
not have to appear in court. 

The dance was held Saturday 
night, 7:30 to 10:30, in our school 
gym. Ray Moore from Duke Uni- 
versity was the caller for the dance 
and we all enjoyed him very much. 
He taught us some new and interest- 
ing dances as well as calling some 
"real gone" square dances. After 
all the dancing most of the students 
were very hungry as well as thirsty, 
but the FHA girls provided for that, 
too. We cooked cupcakes and candy 
to sell and also had plenty of drinks 
on hand. Chances were sold for a 
box of candy and a beautiful heart- 
shaped cake, decorated and baked 
by Beck Murdock's mother. The 
high light of the evening was the 
drawing of the lucky number for the 
candy and cake and also the crown- 
ing of Mr. and Miss "No Gripe" 
of the whole school. 

Our chapter members feel that 
this project was most successful and 
with the money we plan to buy a 
much-needed water fountain for the 
gym. As well as buying something for 
the school we all think the "No 
Gripe Week" increased the student's 
interest in FHA and caused the 
student body to think before they 
gripe and this made everyone 
happier. 

As FHA girls of Bragtown we 
would like to say we think we have 
thought of a very interesting and 
worth-while project and we all are 



The Bragtown Chapter sponsored a "No 
Gripe Week." The girls pictured below 
the poster are left to right: Delores 
Strickland, Kay Parrish, and Becky Mur- 
dock. 



sure that if you try it you will find 
it as much fun as we did. 

Here are some jingles we used to 
remind the students of "No Gripe 
Week." These jingles were written 
by different girls in the club. 

Gripes make no-one happy 

It's actually quite sad, 

We overlook so much good in life, 

By dwelling on the bad! 

The grass isn't always greener 
On the other side of the fence, 
So why be unhappy, at your own 

expense? 
Life is too short to while away 
So put on a smile, Do it, Today! 

Smile unto others, 

As you'd have them smile unto you, 

Try it just once 

See how much good it will do! 

"I wish I were never born," 
Many gripers often say, 
This attitude is hard on you, 
And will spoil even a sunny day! 

"Isn't this a rotten day," 
Said griper one, to griper two, 
Don't let this kind of conversation 
Become a part of you! 

Pack all your gripes in a suitcase, 

Request the girls of FHA 

For comes next Monday 

No Gripes! Is the order of the day! 

Remember no gripes into class 
should creep, 

For February the eighth to the thir- 
teenth is, "No Gripe Week! ! !" 

3. If there are no neighbors in 
your community who have lived in a 
foreign country and can help on 
program dealing with international 
relationship, use the article "My 
Students Were British" which ap- 
peared in the March issue of Teen 
Times. 

4. Have you used the skits listed 
below? 

"Madam Homeca's Crystal Ball" 
March, 1954, Teen Times 






ANNUAL REPORT 

Reminder! It is time to be- 
gin filling in those Annual 
Report Forms. Don't wait un- 
til that last minute. 

AH Photos of State Con- 
vention were made by Quincy 
Cooke. Orders may be mailed 
to Quincy Cooke, Oakdale 
Motor Court, Cary, N. C. 




The Beaufort FHA President Clyda Ruth 
Taylor and song leader Mildred Johnson 
enjoy reading their "Teen Times" maga- 
zine in the FHA corner of their 
Department. 

"The House That Wasn't Haunted" 
Jan., 1954, Teen Times 
"To Make a House a Home" 

Nov., 1953, Teen Times 

5. A Program Idea from Aycock 
Chapter. 

The Aycock Future Homemakers 
celebrated last month with a Chuck 
Wagon Supper. The occasion was 
the annual Daddy-Daughter Date, 
at which time the girls date their 
daddys. A supper of baked beans, 
slaw, hot dogs, crullers, and coffee 
was served from behind a covered 
wagon — western style. After the 
meal the group was entertained 
by talented Future Homemakers. 
Frances Tate acted as Emcee. Betty 
Jane Walters did a song and dance 
act, "Tennessee Wig-Walk," after 
which Betty Joyce Woods did a 
pantomime based on "Dark Town 
Strutters Ball." The Senior girls, led 
by Anne Wilson, did a special ar- 
rangement of "On Top of Old 
Smokey." As a climax to the eve- 
ning, Peggy Roberts, assisted by 
Frances Tate and Elizabeth Talley, 
directed a game, "Two for the Pea- 
nuts" — an adaptation of "Two for 
the Money" using raw peanuts for 
the pay-off. Seventy daddys and 
daughters were present and the af- 
fair was considered quite a success. 

6. Program Ideas from 71st 
Chapter. 

Chapel Program: "This is our 
creed" a dramatization which fol- 
lowed a similiar dramatization given 
at the National Convention this sum- 
mer was presented by the Seventy- 
first F.H.A. Chapter to the high 
school on Monday, December 14. 
All chapter members participated. 
This program was given in order 
to better acquaint the chapter mem- 
bers and the student body with our 
F.H.A. creed and its real meaning. 



Christmas Party: The F.H.A. and 
F.F.A. of Seventy-first School held 
a Christmas party on the evening of 
December 17 in the new high 
school gym. Approximately 150 
chapter members, advisers Mrs. 
Warren and Mr. McKethan and one 
chapter mother, Mrs. B. F. Woodard 
attended. 

A unique feature of the party 
was that all attending danced and 
played in gaily colored stocking feet 
to protect our new gym floor. Pat 
Carter and Susan Burdette, the 
couple winning the prize for the 
most dressed-up feet, received color- 
ful socks as their prize. 

Chapter Programs: Thomas W. 
Martin, Jr., floral designer, arranger, 
and lecturer of Fayetteville was the 
guest speaker of the Seventy-first 
Chapter at the November meeting. 
Mr. Martin gave an interesting and 
informative demonstration on mak- 
ing dried arrangements. He ex- 
plained the various methods of 
drying flowers so that they retain 
their natural color and beauty. 

He touched briefly on the ar- 
rangement of fruits and vetetables 
for holiday motifs and special oc- 
casions. He displayed an exotic 
sample arrangement. 

Approximately 100 members of 
the F.H.A. Chapter was present 
for the lectures and demonstrations. 
The members of the high school 
faculty were special guests of the 
chapter. 

On January 20, Mr. Otto Edwards, 
Safety Director from Fort Bragg, 
talked to the F.H.A. and F.F.A. 
girls and boys on safety. He told 
us there were several things lead- 
ing up to an accident. Among these 
were (1) distant cause (2) underlying 
causes and (3) an unsafe act or con- 
dition. He stated that if these unsafe 
acts or conditions would be done 
away with that accidents and injury 
could be prevented. He ended the 
program by showing two movies, 
one entitled "Once Too Often," and 
the other "Safety on the School 
Bus." 



COVER PICTURE 

These officers were installed at 
the State Convention on April 3. 
From left to right they are: 
Betty Calhoun, President; Nancy 
Christenberry, Parliamentarian; 
Carol Lynn Garris, Vice-President; 
Margo Sicho, Treasurer; Claudette 
Belton, Reporter; Sarah Eason, 
Song Leader; Shirley Rouse, Sec- 
retary; and Judy Bowman, His- 
torian. 



@ou*ttcf, ^>i-7*i-4Md< tZuin- (jaunty - - - 



Early in February two FHA members and the 
advisers from several schools in Guilford County met 
to discuss the possibility of forming a county FHA 
Federation. The chapter representatives voted to form 
the organization and at this meeting a constitution 
was adopted. Plans were made for the first county 
rally to be held April 13, and for a leadership train- 
ing course for officers and a county rally to be held 
each year in the fall and spring, respectively. It was 
decided that one officer would be selected from each 
of the 10 county chapters, with the various offices 
rotating to the different chapters on a yearly basis. 

On April 13, the first county rally was held at 
Bessemer High School with over 200 girls in at- 
tendance. A very interesting day was begun with 
Rose Cude, President of the Bessemer Chapter giving 
the address of welcome. The highlight of the morn- 
ing program was a panel discussion led by Mrs. 
Bess N. Rosa of the Woman's College School of 
Home Economics, on teen-age problems. Repre- 
sentatives from High Point, Gibsonville, Bessemer, 
Summerfield, Pleasant Garden, and Jamestown par- 
ticipated in the discussion. The group was quite 
fortunate to have Mr. J. Allen Lewis, Superintendent 
of Rockingham County Schools to lead in group 
singing and entertainment. Everyone agreed that 
he was simply wonderful. 

At lunch the girls ate picnic fashion in the Bes- 
semer cafeteria, with discussion groups being held 
during this time. 

Two features of the day which were quite inter- 
esting were a scrapbook contest and a name tag 
contest. We particularly felt that the scrapbook 
contest caused all of the chapters to take more in- 
terest in their scrapbooks. First place in the scrap- 
hook contest went to Jamestown FHA, and second 
place went to Pleasant Garden. Stokesdale won first 
place in the name tag contest with their interpreta- 
tion of the emblem, and Bessemer was chosen second 
place winner. 

Special guests for the day were Mr. Cude, princi- 
pal of Bessemer School; Mr. Pierce, instructional 
supervisor of Guilford County High Schools, and 
several Chapter mothers. 

Everyone is really enthusiastic about the new 
organization, and we feel it will provide more leader- 
ship training than was otherwise possible for the 
Guilford County FHA girls. 

Mrs. Daphne Eller Leonard, Former State FHA 
adviser, served as adviser for the first rally. 

The Durham-Orange Federation Has Held Meetings 
Bi-Monthly Throughout the Year 

The Durham Chapter of Future Homemakers of 
America was host to Durham-Orange County Fed- 
Members of the newly organized Guilford County Federa- 
tion as they examine scrapbooks from the various chapters 
during the spring rally, March 13. 



eration on February 25. The meeting was held in 
the Durham High School Auditorium. 

Barbara Eddins, vice-president of the bi-county 
organization opened the session. The Chapel Hill 
Chapter gave the devotional message. Jackie Rich- 
ards, president of the Durham Chapter, welcomed 
the visitors. 

The program, which followed the business ses- 
sion, was a mock T.V. show over WDHS, Channel 
FHA. Phyllis McCauley, vice-president of the Dur- 
ham Chapter, acted as mistress of ceremonies. 

A social hour was held in the Home Economics 
cottage following the program. Committee chair- 
men were: Phyllis McCauley, program; Catherine 
Griffin and Barbara Rich, decoration; Carolyn 
O'Briant, programs; Margie Sloan, refreshments: 
Miss Betty Austin and Miss Doris Crouse, home 
economics teachers at Durham High, advisers. 

Refreshments are served to members of the Orange-Durham 
Federation which met at Durham Senior High Home Eco- 
nomics Cottage in February. 




Scene £ from the Convention 







Early in February two FHA members and the 
advisers from several schools in Guilford County met 
to discuss the possibility of forming a county FHA 
Federation. The chapter representatives voted to form 
the organization and at this meeting a constitution 
was adopted. Plans were made for the first county 
rally to be held April 13, and for a leadership train- 
ing course for officers and a county rally to be held 
each year in the fall and spring, respectively. It was 
decided that one officer would be selected from each 
of the 10 county chapters, with the various offices 
rotating to the different chapters on a yearly basis. 

On April 13, the first county rally was held at 
Bessemer High School with over 200 girls in at- 
tendance. A very interesting day was begun with 
Rose Cude, President of the Bessemer Chapter giving 
the address of welcome. The highlight of the morn- 
ing program was a panel discussion led by Mrs. 
Bess N. Rosa of the Woman's College School of 
Home Economics, on teen-age problems. Repre- 
sentatives from High Point, Gibsonville, Bessemer, 
Summerfield, Pleasant Garden, and Jamestown par- 
ticipated in the discussion. The group was quite 
fortunate to have Mr. J. Allen Lewis, Superintendent 
of Rockingham County Schools to lead in group 
singing and entertainment. Everyone agreed that 
he was simply wonderful. 

At lunch the girls ate picnic fashion in the Bes- 
semer cafeteria, with discussion groups being held 
during this time. 

Two features of the day which were quite inter- 
esting were a scrapbook contest and a name tag 
contest. We particularly felt that the scrapbook 
contest caused all of the chapters to take more in- 
terest in their scrapbooks. First place in the scrap- 
book contest went to Jamestown FHA, and second 
place went to Pleasant Garden. Stokesdale won first 
place in the name tag contest with their interpreta- 
tion of the emblem, and Bessemer was chosen second 
place winner. 

Special guests for the day were Mr. Cude, princi- 
pal of Bessemer School; Mr. Pierce, instructional 
supervisor of Guilford County High Schools, and 
several Chapter mothers. 

Everyone is really enthusiastic about the new 
organization, and we feel it will provide more leader- 
ship training than was otherwise possible for the 
Guilford County FHA girls. 

Mrs. Daphne Eller Leonard, Former State FHA 
adviser, served as adviser for the first rally. 

The Durham-Orange Federation Has Held Meetings 
Bi-Monthly Throughout the Year 

The Durham Chapter of Future Homemakers of 
America was host to Durham-Orange County Fed- 
Members of the newly organized Guilford County Federa- 
tion as they examine scrapbooks from the various chapters 
during the spring rally, March 13. 



eration on February 25. The meeting was held in 
the Durham High School Auditorium. 

Barbara Eddins, vice-president of the bi-county 
organization opened the session. The Chapel Hill 
Chapter gave the devotional message. Jackie Rich- 
ards, president of the Durham Chapter, welcomed 
the visitors. 

The program, which followed the business ses- 
sion, was a mock T.V. show over WDHS, Channel 
FHA. Phyllis McCauley, vice-president of the Dur- 
ham Chapter, acted as mistress of ceremonies. 

A social hour was held in the Home Economics 
cottage following the program. Committee chair- 
men were: Phyllis McCauley, program; Catherine 
Griffin and Barbara Rich, decoration; Carolyn 
O'Briant, programs; Margie Sloan, refreshments: 
Miss Betty Austin and Miss Doris Crouse, home 
economics teachers at Durham High, advisers. 

Refreshments are served to members of the Orange-Durham 
Federation which met at Durham Senior High Home Eco- 
nomics Cottage in February. 




Scene* from the Convention 

w I 




Resounding Notes . . . 

of the Convention Continue 
to Echo Throughout the State 



"The 1954 Future Homemakers 
of America Convention was an- 
nounced and the good word went 
out Y'all Come, and Y'all Came 
from far and wide all over the state. 

Now it is my happy privilege to 
add another good word Y'all Wel- 
come! Welcome to the fun, the 
friends, and the fill of inspiration 
provided for the day. To the Future 
Homemakers of America I repeat 
the words that have been passed 
down through generations of good 
homemakers in the Old South, with 
their traditional, You all are wel- 
come!" 

More than 3,200 Future Home- 
makers and guests were on hand to 
receive the Welcome quoted above. 
Betty Calhoun, vice-president of the 
state association and next year's 
president of the organization was re- 
sponsible for that warm welcome. 

The Association deemed it a real 
honor to have Dr. J. Warren Smith 
present for the meeting and appreci- 
ated his hearty Greeting from the 
Department of Public Instruction. 
Dr. Smith is Director of Vocational 
Education in North Carolina. 

Shortly after 10:00 o'clock on the 
morning of April 3rd, a hush sud- 
denly descended on the huge dele- 
gation assembled in the Raleigh 
Memorial Auditorium. The color 
bearers from the Lucama, Stovall, 
Warsaw, and Bethesda chapters had 
begun the procession down the aisles 
of the auditorium. The morning 
program had begun. 

Jean Faulkner gave 4 raps of 
the gavel and everyone realized that 
the annual meeting of the state as- 
sociation had been called to order. 

When the Invocation — the story 
of "The Sacrifice" — was told and 
illustrated most aptly by Burt Walton 
of the Jacksonville Chapter, the 



Seen on opposite page: (1) Winners of 
State Homemakers Degree. (2) Scene 
from dramatization "So Live In Faith." 

(3) Bill Martin, Jr., telling his stories. 

(4) and (5) Bobby Futrelle, State FFA 
President; Jean Faulkner, State FHA 
President and Betty Calhoun, State FHA 
Vice-President. Jean Faulkner conferred 
honorary membership in the State As- 
sociation on Miss Viva Playfoot and 
Mrs. Faye Coleman. 



audience was appreciatively and 
reverently inspired. 

The state association is now the 
proud possessor of a beautful FHA 
flag. 

The flag is a gift from District II. 
It was presented by members 
of District II Planning Commit- 
tee to the association in a very 
impressive manner during the 
morning session of the Convention 
Day program. Annie Jo Lawson, 
state Song Leader, graciously ac- 
cepted the flag, a gift which the State 
Future Homemakers will continue 
to treasure and cherish as the years 
go by. 

Dr. A. E. Hoffman, State Music 
Supervisor, with the State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction helped 
the audience to relax as he directed 
the group in singing some familiar 
and favorite tunes, "Climbing 
Jacob's Ladder" was especially en- 
joyed, and it was indeed a beautiful 
sound, the combination of 3,000 
voices — singing first slowly and 
softly, then louder and faster. 

"Some of you will create the homes 
of our leaders in the future genera- 
tions, and in creating them you will 
be responsible for the ideas, actions, 
and beliefs that these leaders will 
develop in the homes that you will 
make." stated Bobby Futrelle, Presi- 
dent of the State Future Farmers of 
America, as he spoke to the Future 
Homemakers, and brought greetings 
from his organization. His greeting, 
so well expressed and so sincerely 
voiced, made a very favorable im- 
pression on all present. 

The feature entertainment of the 
day was about to be presented at 
last. Evelyn Bruton, State Historian, 
stepped up to the microphone and 
began her introduction of Bill Mar- 
tin, Jr., famed American author and 
storyteller. She finished her introduc- 
tion with "Mr. Martin spoke to the 
2,000 Future Homemakers at our 
National Convention in Columbus. 
Those of us who heard him then are 
more than happy to have this great 
opportunity again. You who are 
meeting the "Winston Storyteller" 
for the first time, I assure you, 
have a real treat in store. It is indeed 
an honor and a pleasure for me to 



present to you Mr. Bill Martin, Jr., 
"The Winston Storyteller." 

Almost every person in the audi- 
ence seemed to be absolutely en- 
grossed with every word or sentence 
he uttered. 

In addition to his stories about 
our state and other stories, Mr. 
Martin explained how homes of 
America can be united through the 
media — story-telling, group-singing, 
and family prayers. The Future 
Homemakers are better prepared 
to become good homemakers today, 
he stated, but he warned the group 
concerning the time element. "Good 
parents are parents who don't watch 
clocks, for conflicts between the 
parent and child usually are the re- 
sult of the time element. The child 
lives in eternity; the parent lives by 
minutes." 

Those who had the opportunity to 
talk with Bill Martin informally 
found him to be an unusually fasci- 
nating person. He was at all times 
very humble and extremely thought- 
ful of every one whether it was the 
janitor, an FHA member, adviser, 
or parent. 

The dramatization "So Live In 
Faith" was presented by the Chapel 
Hill Chapter under the direction of 
Joseph Rosenberg of the Carolina 
PI ay makers. The story was con- 
cerned with the value of the 
UNESCO Plan. It was a splendid 
performance, in spite of the sound 
difficulty which was most unfortu- 
nate. But this did not prevent the 
audience from being extremely, ap- 
preciative and understanding. Some 
chapters have written to the state 
office requesting a copy of the script. 

By 3:30 in the afternoon the 
throng of girls began pouring out of 
the auditorium. The brisk steps 
noted in the early morning were 
now more of a hop or drag. Occa- 
sionally there would be a complete 
stop while some member of a group 
stooped to adjust a high-heeled" shoe 
on that aching foot. 

The State Convention of 1954 had 
turned another leaf in its book of 
the association's history. Very soon 
a new leaf will begin to fill and, as 
always, we hope for continued prog- 
ress with each passing year. 



'My Wid-TVint&i <V*ctiti<M" 



I could hardly believe that my 
ears were relaying the correct mes- 
sage to me, when it was announced 
at the state board's executive meet- 
ing in September of 1953, that I 
was to be the FHA representative 
from North Carolina to attend the 
Florida State Fair. This event was 
to be held in Tampa from February 
4-7 and was sponsored by the At- 
lantic Coast Line Railroad Com- 
pany. The all-expense paid trip was 
given to one FHA member and one 
FFA member from six Southern 
States, consisting of North and South 
Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, Ala- 
bama, and Florida. During conver- 
sation, I learned later that the 
Atlantic Coast Line had been spon- 
soring this trip for over twenty 
years. 

Florida had always seemed to me 
a little like the Garden of Eden, with 
its beautiful beaches, fruits, and 
tropical gardens. As everyone must 
do, I had long dreamed of visiting 
this state and now that this privilege 
was given to me, February seemed 
such a long time away. 

It seemed as if my bags had been 
packed for weeks for I was anxiously 
awaiting my "winter vacation." 
Everything had been arranged with 
my teachers and principal and even 
my classmates had done a bit of 
secret arranging. The afternoon be- 
fore my departure proved to be quite 
a surprise for me. The student body 
assembled to bid me good-bye and 
presented me with many lovely gifts. 
For the first time in my life, I be- 
lieve, I was speechless. 

The daylight trip from Wilson to 
Jacksonville was very exciting. The 
train traveled at a terrific rate of 
speed and I still marvel as to how it 
can possibly stay on two tiny rails. 
I'll leave that to the engineers 
though. 

Spanish moss should be the route 
marker for the Havana Special for 
a big part of the country through 
which we traveled was covered with 
it. 

I had never slept on a Pullman 
before so this was an entirely new 
experience for me. The Northern 
Division girls had the drawing room. 
Our Porter had just finished mak- 
ing our berths when we said good- 
night. Nora Jean wanted to sleep 
in the "cage" (our name for the up- 
per berth), so after quickly getting 

Preparing for the big race at the Florida 
State Fair. 



By PEGGY LOVE SPRUILL 

ready for bed we jumped in and off 
went the light. I fell asleep immedi- 
ately, which proves that there is an 
exception to the rule that one can- 
not sleep on a train. In fact, I could 
see little difference between this and 
my own bed at home. 

When we alighted from the 
Champion the next morning the 
ACL's photographers took pictures 
of the group. After this we were 
taken by taxi to the Hillsboro Hotel 
which was to be our headquarters 
while we were in Tampa. Probably 
my first thought of Tampa was, 
"Poor taxi drivers, you must get up 
so early!" 

Later we took taxis to the Fair- 
grounds and were given passes for the 
Fair, which we used the entire time we 
were there. Mr. Howard carried us 
on a tour of the agricultural and 
home exhibits. The thing that im- 
pressed me most concerning the ex- 
hibits was the cleanliness of them. No 
dust could be seen and all were 
chained off. I also noticed that the 
exhibits spoke for themselves so 
there was little need for a lot of 
writing and figures. So much color 
added to the beauty and some mo- 
tion in all the exhibits drew your at- 
tention to them. In short, the exhibits 
were excellent and all should have 
been given Grand Champion rib- 
bons. After a bird's eye view of the 
exhibits we met some of the Fair 
officials. 

The exhibits of Florida counties 
formed a colorful panorama of the 
Sunshine State's diversified re- 
sources. The elaborate displays of 



agricultural, industrial, and com- 
mercial products are the result of 
many months of planning. The 
artistry and originality reflect the 
intense pride and enthusiastic inter- 
est each county takes in its contri- 
bution to Florida's progress and 
economic welfare. 

Friday afternoon, after lunch, the 
Greater Tampa Chamber of Com- 
merce provided us with a tour of 
some of the places of interest in and 
around Tampa. 

The first stop was at the Hav-A- 
Tampa Cigar Company. Here we 
were shown through the factory by 
a guide who explained each step 
through which the cigar goes. We 
were given a souvenir here — a cigar. 

From here we went to the Cali- 
fornia Packing Company where we 
saw fruits being peeled, sectioned, 
and canned. These also had to go 
through many processes before be- 
ing put on the market. When we left 
we were given a can of Del-Monte 
grapefruit. 

Next on our schedule was a visit 
to a citrus grove. Here I actually 
picked lemons, oranges, tangerines, 
and grapefruit from the trees. The 
grove was full and the fruit delicious 
as we can testify since Mr. Lenfestey 
peeled at least two dozen oranges 
and put them into our hands. I 
brought an orange blossom home 
to make sure I would have one 
from some source. Our only worry 
here was that we had to keep moving 
for large black ants were on our trail. 

At the Dickman Farms we ob- 
served the packing of fresh vege- 
tables read for the kitchen. We saw 
the waste being removed; vegetables 
(Continued on page eight) 




Resounding Notes . . . 



of the Convention Continue 
to Echo Throughout the State 



"The 1954 Future Homemakers 
of America Convention was an- 
nounced and the good word went 
out Y'all Come, and Y'all Came 
from far and wide all over the state. 

Now it is my happy privilege to 
add another good word Y'all Wel- 
come! Welcome to the fun, the 
friends, and the fill of inspiration 
provided for the day. To the Future 
Homemakers of America I repeat 
the words that have been passed 
down through generations of good 
homemakers in the Old South, with 
their traditional, You all are wel- 
come!" 

More than 3,200 Future Home- 
makers and guests were on hand to 
receive the Welcome quoted above. 
Betty Calhoun, vice-president of the 
state association and next year's 
president of the organization was re- 
sponsible for that warm welcome. 

The Association deemed it a real 
honor to have Dr. J. Warren Smith 
present for the meeting and appreci- 
ated his hearty Greeting from the 
Department of Public Instruction. 
Dr. Smith is Director of Vocational 
Education in North Carolina. 

Shortly after 10:00 o'clock on the 
morning of April 3rd, a hush sud- 
denly descended on the huge dele- 
gation assembled in the Raleigh 
Memorial Auditorium. The color 
bearers from the Lucama, Stovall, 
Warsaw, and Bethesda chapters had 
begun the procession down the aisles 
of the auditorium. The morning 
program had begun. 

Jean Faulkner gave 4 raps of 
the gavel and everyone realized that 
the annual meeting of the state as- 
sociation had been called to order. 

When the Invocation — the story 
of "The Sacrifice" — was told and 
illustrated most aptly by Burt Walton 
of the Jacksonville Chapter, the 



Seen on opposite page: (1) Winners of 
State Homemakers Degree. (2) Scene 
from dramatization "So Live In Faith." 

(3) Bill Martin, Jr., telling his stories. 

(4) and (5) Bobby Futrelle, State FFA 
President; Jean Faulkner, State FHA 
President and Betty Calhoun, State FHA 
Vice-President. Jean Faulkner conferred 
honorary membership in the State As- 
sociation on Miss Viva Playfoot and 
Mrs. Faye Coleman. 



audience was appreciatively and 
reverently inspired. 

The state association is now the 
proud possessor of a beautful FHA 
flag. 

The flag is a gift from District II. 
It was presented by members 
of District II Planning Commit- 
tee to the association in a very 
impressive manner during the 
morning session of the Convention 
Day program. Annie Jo Lawson, 
state Song Leader, graciously ac- 
cepted the flag, a gift which the State 
Future Homemakers will continue 
to treasure and cherish as the years 
go by. 

Dr. A. E. Hoffman, State Music 
Supervisor, with the State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction helped 
the audience to relax as he directed 
the group in singing some familiar 
and favorite tunes, "Climbing 
Jacob's Ladder" was especially en- 
joyed, and it was indeed a beautiful 
sound, the combination of 3,000 
voices — singing first slowly and 
softly, then louder and faster. 

"Some of you will create the homes 
of our leaders in the future genera- 
tions, and in creating them you will 
be responsible for the ideas, actions, 
and beliefs that these leaders will 
develop in the homes that you will 
make." stated Bobby Futrelle, Presi- 
dent of the State Future Farmers of 
America, as he spoke to the Future 
Homemakers, and brought greetings 
from his organization. His greeting, 
so well expressed and so sincerely 
voiced, made a very favorable im- 
pression on all present. 

The feature entertainment of the 
day was about to be presented at 
last. Evelyn Bruton, State Historian, 
stepped up to the microphone and 
began her introduction of Bill Mar- 
tin, Jr., famed American author and 
storyteller. She finished her introduc- 
tion with "Mr. Martin spoke to the 
2,000 Future Homemakers at our 
National Convention in Columbus. 
Those of us who heard him then are 
more than happy to have this great 
opportunity again. You who are 
meeting the "Winston Storyteller" 
for the first time, I assure you, 
have a real treat in store. It is indeed 
an honor and a pleasure for me to 



present to you Mr. Bill Martin, Jr., 
"The Winston Storyteller." 

Almost every person in the audi- 
ence seemed to be absolutely en- 
grossed with every word or sentence 
he uttered. 

In addition to his stories about 
our state and other stories, Mr. 
Martin explained how homes of 
America can be united through the 
media — story-telling, group-singing, 
and family prayers. The Future 
Homemakers are better prepared 
to become good homemakers today, 
he stated, but he warned the group 
concerning the time element. "Good 
parents are parents who don't watch 
clocks, for conflicts between the 
parent and child usually are the re- 
sult of the time element. The child 
lives in eternity; the parent lives by 
minutes." 

Those who had the opportunity to 
talk with Bill Martin informally 
found him to be an unusually fasci- 
nating person. He was at all times 
very humble and extremely thought- 
ful of every one whether it was the 
janitor, an FHA member, adviser, 
or parent. 

The dramatization "So Live In 
Faith" was presented by the Chapel 
Hill Chapter under the direction of 
Joseph Rosenberg of the Carolina 
Playmakers. The story was con- 
cerned with the value of the 
UNESCO Plan. It was a splendid 
performance, in spite of the sound 
difficulty which was most unfortu- 
nate. But this did not prevent the 
audience from being extremely ap- 
preciative and understanding. Some 
chapters have written to the state 
office requesting a copy of the script. 

By 3:30 in the afternoon the 
throng of girls began pouring out of 
the auditorium. The brisk steps 
noted in the early morning were 
now more of a hop or drag. Occa- 
sionally there would be a complete 
stop while some member of a group 
stooped to adjust a high-heeled shoe 
on that aching foot. 

The State Convention of 1954 had 
turned another leaf in its book of 
the association's history. Very soon 
a new leaf will begin to fill and, as 
always, we hope for continued prog- 
ress with each passing year. 



'%? Wtd-TOutte* 1/<icsitio*t" 



I could hardly believe that my 
ears were relaying the correct mes- 
sage to me, when it was announced 
at the state board's executive meet- 
ing in September of 1953, that I 
was to be the FHA representative 
from North Carolina to attend the 
Florida State Fair. This event was 
to be held in Tampa from February 
4-7 and was sponsored by the At- 
lantic Coast Line Railroad Com- 
pany. The all-expense paid trip was 
given to one FHA member and one 
FFA member from six Southern 
States, consisting of North and South 
Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, Ala- 
bama, and Florida. During conver- 
sation, I learned later that the 
Atlantic Coast Line had been spon- 
soring this trip for over twenty 
years. 

Florida had always seemed to me 
a little like the Garden of Eden, with 
its beautiful beaches, fruits, and 
tropical gardens. As everyone must 
do, I had long dreamed of visiting 
this state and now that this privilege 
was given to me, February seemed 
such a long time away. 

It seemed as if my bags had been 
packed for weeks for I was anxiously 
awaiting my "winter vacation." 
Everything had been arranged with 
my teachers and principal and even 
my classmates had done a bit of 
secret arranging. The afternoon be- 
fore my departure proved to be quite 
a surprise for me. The student body 
assembled to bid me good-bye and 
presented me with many lovely gifts. 
For the first time in my life, I be- 
lieve, I was speechless. 

The daylight trip from Wilson to 
Jacksonville was very exciting. The 
train traveled at a terrific rate of 
speed and I still marvel as to how it 
can possibly stay on two tiny rails. 
I'll leave that to the engineers 
though. 

Spanish moss should be the route 
marker for the Havana Special for 
a big part of the country through 
which we traveled was covered with 
it. 

I had never slept on a Pullman 
before so this was an entirely new 
experience for me. The Northern 
Division girls had the drawing room. 
Our Porter had just finished mak- 
ing our berths when we said good- 
night. Nora Jean wanted to sleep 
in the "cage" (our name for the up- 
per berth), so after quickly getting 

Preparing for the big race at the Florida 
State Fair. 



By PEGGY LOVE SPRUILL 

ready for bed we jumped in and off 
went the light. I fell asleep immedi- 
ately, which proves that there is an 
exception to the rule that one can- 
not sleep on a train. In fact, I could 
see little difference between this and 
my own bed at home. 

When we alighted from the 
Champion the next morning the 
ACL's photographers took pictures 
of the group. After this we were 
taken by taxi to the Hillsboro Hotel 
which was to be our headquarters 
while we were in Tampa. Probably 
my first thought of Tampa was, 
"Poor taxi drivers, you must get up 
so early!" 

Later we took taxis to the Fair- 
grounds and were given passes for the 
Fair, which we used the entire time we 
were there. Mr. Howard carried us 
on a tour of the agricultural and 
home exhibits. The thing that im- 
pressed me most concerning the ex- 
hibits was the cleanliness of them. No 
dust could be seen and all were 
chained off. I also noticed that the 
exhibits spoke for themselves so 
there was little need for a lot of 
writing and figures. So much color 
added to the beauty and some mo- 
tion in all the exhibits drew your at- 
tention to them. In short, the exhibits 
were excellent and all should have 
been given Grand Champion rib- 
bons. After a bird's eye view of the 
exhibits we met some of the Fair 
officials. 

The exhibits of Florida counties 
formed a colorful panorama of the 
Sunshine State's diversified re- 
sources. The elaborate displays of 



agricultural, industrial, and com- 
mercial products are the result of 
many months of planning. The 
artistry and originality reflect the 
intense pride and enthusiastic inter- 
est each county takes in its contri- 
bution to Florida's progress and 
economic welfare. 

Friday afternoon, after lunch, the 
Greater Tampa Chamber of Com- 
merce provided us with a tour of 
some of the places of interest in and 
around Tampa. 

The first stop was at the Hav-A- 
Tampa Cigar Company. Here we 
were shown through the factory by 
a guide who explained each step 
through which the cigar goes. We 
were given a souvenir here — a cigar. 

From here we went to the Cali- 
fornia Packing Company where we 
saw fruits being peeled, sectioned, 
and canned. These also had to go 
through many processes before be- 
ing put on the market. When we left 
we were given a can of Del-Monte 
grapefruit. 

Next on our schedule was a visit 
to a citrus grove. Here I actually 
picked lemons, oranges, tangerines, 
and grapefruit from the trees. The 
grove was full and the fruit delicious 
as we can testify since Mr. Lenfestey 
peeled at least two dozen oranges 
and put them into our hands. I 
brought an orange blossom home 
to make sure I would have one 
from some source. Our only worry 
here was that we had to keep moving 
for large black ants were on our trail. 

At the Dickman Farms we ob- 
served the packing of fresh vege- 
tables read for the kitchen. We saw 
the waste being removed; vegetables 
(Continued on page eight) 





The Moyock Chapter reports: "We had 
our Mother-Daughter banquet and I 
think it was a success. As we understand 
it is the first one held in this school and 
everyone seemed thrilled over the idea. 

I hardly know how to describe the 
decorations, but it was all in green and 
white (St. Patrick's Day being our idea). 
Flowers were used very generously — not 
all in green and white, however. The 
tableclothes were white with shamrocks 
scattered over them. The napkins were 
green. 

The FHA Emblem Service we used is 
the one found in the Official Guide for 
Future Homemakers of America, pages 
27-31. This service was very effective and 
everyone learned more about the emblem 
than ever before. The girls are more 
impressed now. I have read it several 
times myself but I had never noticed 
that the two hands were different. The 
mothers present learned about FHA in 
this way and we surely learned more. 

The Winterville Chapter was indeed 
fortunate to have as guest speaker on 
their FHA banquet program Dr. Clinton 
Prewett, who is dean of men at East 
Carolina College. 

"Democracy rests on four foundations, 
churches, schools, political institutions 
and the home," Dr. Prewett told guests at 
the annual Mother-Daughter banquet of 
the Winterville Future Homemakers of 
America chapter. 

In speaking on the subject "Our Amer- 
ican Homes" Dr. Prewett said "It's almost 
old fashioned to talk about the home. 
Our modern youth have equated progress 
with 'late models.' 

"The best home is built on love, un- 
derstanding, co-operation and faith," Dr. 
Prewett continues. "These cannot be 
bought but they can be developed in the 
home." 

Dr. Prewett spoke to approximately 
170 FHA members and parents at the 
banquet. 

The parents were welcomed to the 
supper at Respess Brothers Barbecue 
Stand by Shirley Rouse. The invocation 
was given by the Rev. E. G. Cole. The 
mothers were toasted by Peggy Mobley 
and the response was given by Mrs. J. H. 
Mobley. 

Special guests at the banquet were 
toasted by Rose Waters with a response 
by Mrs. Rommie Mallison. Maggie Cas- 
telloe toasted Miss Alya Ray Taylor, 
club adviser, and presented her with 
an engraved bracelet on behalf of the 
club. Miss Taylor responded to the toast. 

Following the dinner the speaker was 
introduced by Joan Averette and after 
Dr. Prewett's speech music was furnished 
by a trio composed of Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard David and Mrs. Virginia Taylor. 

The creed was given by FHA members 
to close the meeting. 

The Beaufort FHA Chapter presented 
a skit at their last meeting. Mildred 
Johnson had charge of the program. 
Those who took part in the skit "The Red 
Coat" were Barbara Downum, "Polly" 
Chadwick, and Margaret Springle. Presi- 
dent, Clyde Ruth Taylor, read a message 
from the "World Friendship for Children" 



organization, thanking the group for their 
gift of two pairs of shoes for overseas 
orphans. 

The first year Home Ec girls did a 
beautiful job of impressing their teachers. 
Mrs. Lionel Salter, Mrs. Mary Sue Noe, 
Miss Lena Duncan, Miss Gladys Chad- 
wick, and Mrs. Ruth Davis with their 
culinary art. 

Each of these teachers was invited to 
a nicely prepared luncheon. Steaming 
bowls of vegetable soup were served with 
toasted cheese sandwiches and iced tea. 
Dessert varied according to the group 
serving, from rich gingerbread and 
whipped cream to a delicious fruit jello. 

The FHA Chapter of Mills School met 
at 7:30 on February 15, 1954 in the 
Home Economics building. There were 
34 members present and our adviser, Mrs. 
Leonard. 

New business which came up con- 
sisted of (1) the FHA Bi-County Rally 
which is to be held on March 6 at Bailey. 
Our school could run a candidate for 
President and Jetta Godfrey was elected 
to run. A committee was chosen to 
campaign for Miss Godfrey. They are as 
follows: Shirley Catlette, manager; Nancy 
Gordon, Mary Murphy, Joyce Mustian, 
Barbara Medlin, Ann Whelless, Mary 
Pusey, Kay Kerley, and Barbara Bumgar- 
ner. Our Scnool also has the honor of having 
the Registration Committee for the rally 
which is as follows: Frances Merritt, Sarah 
Brown, Helen Allen, Shirley Catlette and 
Mildred Merritt. (2) The President set 
a permanent date tor our FHA chapter 
to meet on the first Monday night of each 
month. (3) There were suggestions of 
having an FHA dance on April 2, but 
nothing definitely was planned. 

The meeting adjourned with a prayer. 
Soft drinks, cookies, and potato chips 
were served by our refreshment commit- 
tee. 

The W. R. Milk Chapter of the FHA 
had the pleasure of having as its guests 
Monday night, March 1, the FFA Boys 
of Epsom High School. 

The boys presented a very interesting 
program. Claude Edwards spoke on the 
FFA program of work. Billy Edwards 
told about the local, State and National 
Contest. Harold Fraizier familiarized the 
group with Farm and Home projects of 
FFA students, and Alton Foster discussed 
FFA membership and FFA degrees. 
Questions were asked concerning these 
talks and answered by the FFA members. 

The meeting then adjourned with the 
closing ritual. Delicious refreshments 
were served. 

The Morehead City Chapter of Future 
Homemakers played host to ninety mem- 
bers of the Future Homemakers and 
their mothers at a buffet supper held in 
the Morehead City School Library in 
March. The buffet table was centered 
with arrangements of daffodils and pussy 
willows. 

Yellow daffodils were arranged 
throughout the room, carrying out 
a color scheme of yellow and green. 
The supper, prepared by the sophomore 
home economics classes, consisted of 
chicken salad in lettuce cups, potato 
chips, deviled eggs, sliced tomatoes, hot 
Parker House rolls, butter beans, lemon 
and chocolate tartlets and iced tea. 

The FHA prayer song was sung as a 
blessing and Geraldine Best, president, 
welcomed the mothers. After supper 
a short skit, "It Pays to Budget," was 
cleverly given by Ellen Bordeaux and 



Rose Daniels, sophomores, who have 
been studying this subject in their class. 

A number of the girls, led by Mary 
Lou Davis, song leader, sang several 
numbers, then led the whole group in 
singing. 

Renec Kemp directed a group of fun 
provoking stunts in which several girls 
and their mothers took part. The mothers 
thanked the girls and their teacher, Mrs. 
Dellido Cordova, for an enjoyable 
evening. 

The Future Homemakers of the 
Morehead City High School met during 
homeroom period. Geraldine Best, presi- 
dent, presided. Reports showed that $35 
was made selling Christmas cards and 
Patsy Holt received the FHA pin for 
selling the most. 

Letters were read from Mrs. Mabel 
Hall and Mrs. Reed, FHA officials, thank- 
ing the chapter, the band and Mr. Win- 
dell for their part in making the 
District II FHA rally a success. The 
rally was held at Morehead City. 

As a school project it was decided 
to have a "Service Room" in the girl's 
rest room. Doris McQueen was appointed 
chairman. 

Having a radio program was discussed 
and Patricia Smith and Barbara Olsen 
were appointed to see about it. Beadie 
Lewis, chairman of the program com- 
mittee, announced that the March 2 meet- 
ing would be the annual Mother-Daugh- 
ter Buffet Supper. Plans will be worked 
out by the sophomore Home Ec classes. 

The finance committee was asked to 
decide what should be done with the 
money on hand. Members were urged 
to work for their junior degree and to 
take a pen pal for better international 
relations. 

The treasurer reported that dues this 
year were paid by 92 members. 

The Piedmont Chapter is progressing 
rapidly. With only a few months ex- 
perience we have already done some 
worthwhile things. By cooking a suc- 
cessful Boy's Scout supper we obtained 
enough money to finance our trip to the 
State FHA Convention in Raleigh. 

We were all delighted to get to visit 
our capital. We visited many places of 
interest while we were there. We enjoyed 
the convention and learned more about 
the importance of good homemaking. 

The Pinehurst Chapter of Future 
Homemakers of America held its initia- 
tion meeting of the year on the third 
of February. It was held in the Home 
Economics department and a social hour 
was enjoyed after the initiation service. 
Mrs. Kanoy, chapter mother, had charge 
of the games. 

At the beginning of the year we had 
eleven members, one member moved 
from Aberdeen and joined us after 
Christmas, and with our seven new 
members we now have a grand total of 
nineteen members. Since we started out 
new last year we are rather proud of 
our growth. 

Our activities have been limited be- 
cause it seemed that all our members 
were also members of the ball team and 
the glee club and had to share time 
with all three. We made some dried 
flower arrangements for the State Fair 
booth, attended the District Rally in 
Hamlet, the County Rally in Robbins, 
are making a knitted afghan to send to 
Korea and are busy trying to raise enough 
money to buy pins for the entire mem- 
bership. 



The Ciarkton FHA Officers met in 
February at the home of their adviser, 
Mrs. Frank Baldwin. After the group 
enjoyed a delicious Bar-B-Q supper, 
served by the hostess, program plans 
were made. Some of the programs in- 
cluded plays, groups discussions on boy- 
girl relationship and costume designing. 

The Lee Woodard FHA'ers displayed 
some of their fine skill in sewing at 
a Fashion Show held in the auditorium 
of the school. Those participating were 
members of the second and third year 
Home Economics students. Several small 
children modeled some of the garments. 
There was a variety of outfits from 
pajamas, dresses, weskits and skirts, to 
spring suits. 

Also on February 12 the Sophomore 
FHA'ers honored the Senior Class and 
School Faculty at a Tea held in the 
Home Economics cottage. The cottage 
was decorated with attractive flower ar- 
rangements. The table was centered by a 
punch bowl surrounded with flowers and 
greenery. Refreshments other than lime 
sherbet punch were pinwheel, checker- 
board, and open-face sandwiches; potato 
chips, and peppermint heart candy. 

Our club had a worth-while Christmas 
Party also. We met in the department 
and instead of giving each other presents 
gave money and gifts of food to a needy 
family in the community. 

Money-making projects were selling 
Christmas cards and a "bake sale." The 
"bake sale" was held in our community 
building and the food was prepared by 
our FHA members. We are planning a 
"hobo week" from which we hope to 
make more money for our charter. 

The Mebane FHA Chapter rendered 
their service to the school by decorating 
the gymnasium and serving refreshments 
at the Home Coming Dance. The out- 
standing project for making money for 
the year was the selling of fruit drops. 
The chapter made approximately seventy- 
two dollars. This money will be used 
for the activities of the chapter for the 
remainder of the year and to buy 
equipment for the Home Economics 
Department. One of these being the 
purchase of material to slip-cover a 
chair for the living room. 



MY MID-WINTER VACATION 

(Continued from page six) 

being washed, cut up, mixed, and 
packed in celophane packages, and 
being put in a room of 30° F. to 
chill. Mr. Dickman gave us a most 
interesting talk on our duty as future 
citizens and parents. He then took 
us over his very large farm and there 
we saw all kinds of vegetables grow- 
ing. 

We had only thirty minutes to 
dress and I had no idea I could make 
it to Ybor City to the Columbia 
restaurant in time for our banquet. 
This restaurant was the most beauti- 
ful I have ever seen with its Spanish 
atmosphere. The Spanish waiters 
dashed in and out, speaking one of 
the romance languages with pride. 
We met the Florida FFA officers 
and the Florida FHA President, 



State Supervisor, and Adviser. The 
different dishes, many I did not 
recognize, were delicious. I can 
well understand why this restau- 
rant is world famous. After a 
delightful dinner, we were given un- 
til twelve o'clock to do as we liked. 
We all went to the Fairgrounds to 
take in the the Mid-Way. 

"Good-morning — Time 6:30," 
were the words of the operator that 
woke me Saturday morning. We 
hurriedly dressed and breakfasted, 
then assembled for our appearance 
at the Fair. 

We were platform guests for the 
Florida FFA Day program Satur- 
day morning. Approximately 8,000 
FFA and FHA'ers were on hand for 
the big event. All the platform guests 
were introduced, many of them of- 
ficials of the Fair. Between intro- 
ductions, we witnessed the state 
champion harmonica player, string 
quartet, and vocal quartet. State 
honorary awards were conferred and 
the state FFA sweetheart was pre- 
sented. She favored us with a hula 
dance. Also the state awards were 
presented to the winners. The only 
thing wrong with this part of our 
trip was the weather; it was cold on 
the platform, but who cared too 
much, we were having a wonderful 
time. 

We decided to tour the exhibits 
before attending the Grandstand 
performance. We studied more 
closely the farm and home exhibits, 
and the conservation exhibits. The 
horticulture exhibits were alive with 
flowers growing from all sides and 
the grass and other greenery was 
grown there in the exhibits, not 
imitated. From there we went to 
see the "New Worlds in Motion" 
exhibition. 

At 2:00 p.m. we entered the 
Grandstand for the auto races. 
The races were very fast and 
exciting and each of us had a pri- 
vate wager as to whom would win. 
Between the races we were en- 
tertained by several acts, consisting 
of Wells and His Four Fays (an 
acrobatic act), Baudy's Greyhounds 
and Monkeys (a very good act in 
which the greyhounds and monkeys 
did many tricks that were the fruits 
of long training), and the Holly- 
wood Sky Ballet. The latter was a 
sensational aerial act displaying per- 
fect form and harmony between the 
six partners. Everyone was held 
spell-bound by the danger. 

When we boarded our car we had 
a little farewell party. All along the 
route back home the delegates grad- 
ually left us. I left the group at 



Dunn — saddened to be leaving so 
soon new friends acquired while on 
the trip. 

I can indeed say this was the trip 
of my lifetime. Truly no trip could 
have been more perfect, thanks to 
the Atlantic Coast Line and its 
employees. 



SERVICE PROJECTS— HELP 
OTHERS— HELP CHAPTER 

When the Red Cross Bloodmobile 
visited Alexander County on two 
occasions this year, the Taylorsville 
Future Homemakers volunteered to 
assist in the blood drive as a part of 
their national projects participation. 
Their help was in the nature of 
publicizing, soliciting donors, and 
baby sitting. 

The Mingo Chapter, a newly or- 
ganized chapter this year, made bun- 
nies for the pre-school children in 
the Falcon Orphanage as an Easter 
project. Thirteen costumes for fourth 
graders were made by FHA mem- 
bers. The costumes were worn in an 
assembly program. With the co- 
operation of some boys and one of 
the men teachers, the home eco- 
nomics students set out to make 
their homemaking department more 
attractive and homelike. The girls 
mixed colors and painted their new 
wall cabinets to harmonize with the 
wall paint. The base cabinets were 
varnished by the girls and the boys 
covered them with linoleum. The 
tables had to be refinished and the 
girls proceeded to get this done also. 



The Bethesda FHA girls worked 
hard on the Civil Defense Project. 
A Civil Defense staff member from 
the filter center in Durham has 
worked with them helping them to 
realize "How the FHA Girls Can 
Promote Civil Defense." A chapel 
program by the FHA members fol- 
lowed; and then a radio program 
was presented. Now the chapter 
members are concentrating on 
Safety. 

CORRECTION OF ERROR IN 

FEBRUARY ISSUE OF F.H.A. 

MAGAZINE 

In the list of Chapters having a 
membership of over a hundred re- 
ported in the February issue of the 
North Carolina Future Home- 
makers magazine, the name of the 
Stedman Chapter, having a member- 
ship of 163 was omitted. Instead of 
12 chapters with membership ex- 
ceeding one hundred, there are 13 
chapters. 



atrter (natter 



»»» 



The Moyock Chapter reports: "We had 
our Mother-Daughter banquet and I 
think it was a success. As we understand 
it is the first one held in this school and 
everyone seemed thrilled over the idea. 

I hardly know how to describe the 
decorations, but it was all in green and 
white (St. Patrick's Day being our idea). 
Flowers were used very generously — not 
all in green and white, however. The 
tableclothes were white with shamrocks 
scattered over them. The napkins were 
green. 

The FHA Emblem Service we used is 
the one found in the Official Guide for 
Future Homemakers of America, pages 
27-31. This service was very effective and 
everyone learned more about the emblem 
than ever before. The girls are more 
impressed now. I have read it several 
times myself but I had never noticed 
that the two hands were different. The 
mothers present learned about FHA in 
this way and we surely learned more. 

The Winterville Chapter was indeed 
fortunate to have as guest speaker on 
their FHA banquet program Dr. Clinton 
Prewett, who is dean of men at East 
Carolina College. 

"Democracy rests on four foundations, 
churches, schools, political institutions 
and the home." Dr. Prewett told guests at 
the annual Mother-Daughter banquet of 
the Winterville Future Homemakers of 
America chapter. 

In speaking on the subject "Our Amer- 
ican Homes" Dr. Prewett said "It's almost 
old fashioned to talk about the home. 
Our modern youth have equated progress 
with 'late models.' 

"The best home is built on love, un- 
derstanding, co-operation and faith," Dr. 
Prewett continues. "These cannot be 
bought but they can be developed in the 
home." 

Dr. Prewett spoke to approximately 
170 FHA members and parents at the 
banquet. 

The parents were welcomed to the 
supper at Respess Brothers Barbecue 
Stand by Shirley Rouse. The invocation 
was given by the Rev. E. G. Cole. The 
mothers were toasted by Peggy Mobley 
and the response was given by Mrs. J. H. 
Mobley. 

Special guests at the banquet were 
toasted by Rose Waters with a response 
by Mrs. Rommie Mallison. Maggie Cas- 
telloe toasted Miss Alya Ray Taylor, 
club adviser, and presented her with 
an engraved bracelet on behalf of the 
club. Miss Taylor responded to the toast. 

Following the dinner the speaker was 
introduced by loan Averette and after 
Dr. Prewett's speech music was furnished 
by a trio composed of Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard David and Mrs. Virginia Taylor. 

The creed was given by FHA members 
to close the meeting. 

The Beaufort FHA Chapter presented 
a skit at their last meeting. Mildred 
Johnson had charge of the program. 
Those who took part in the skit "The Red 
Coat" were Barbara Downum, "Polly" 
Chadwick, and Margaret Springle. Presi- 
dent, Clyde Ruth Taylor, read a message 
from the "World Friendship for Children" 



organization, thanking the group for their 
git't of two pairs of shoes for overseas 
orphans. 

The first year Home Ec girls did a 
beautiful job of impressing their teachers. 
Mrs. Lionel Salter, Mrs. Mary Sue Noe, 
Miss Lena Duncan, Miss Gladys Chad- 
wick, and Mrs. Ruth Davis with their 
culinary art. 

Each of these teachers was invited to 
a nicely prepared luncheon. Steaming 
bowls of vegetable soup were served with 
toasted cheese sandwiches and iced tea. 
Dessert varied according to the group 
serving, from rich gingerbread and 
whipped cream to a delicious fruit jello. 

The FHA Chapter of Mills School met 
at 7:30 on February 15, 1954 in the 
Home Economics building. There were 
34 members present and our adviser, Mrs. 
Leonard. 

New business which came up con- 
sisted of (.1) the FHA Bi-County Rally 
which is to be held on March 6 at Bailey. 
Our school could run a candidate for 
President and Jetta Godfrey was elected 
to run. A committee was chosen to 
campaign for Miss Godfrey. They are as 
follows: Shirley Catlette, manager; Nancy 
Gordon, Mary Murphy, Joyce Mustian, 
Barbara Medlin, Ann Whelless, Mary 
Pusey, Kay Keney, and Barbara Bumgar- 
ner. Our Scnool also has the honor of having 
the Registration Committee for the rally 
which is as follows: Frances Merritt, Saran 
Brown, Helen Allen, Shirley Catlette and 
Mildred Merritt. (2) The President set 
a permanent date tor our FHA chapter 
to meet on the first Monday night of each 
month. (3) There were suggestions of 
having an FHA dance on April 2, but 
nothing definitely was planned. 

The meeting adjourned with a prayer. 
Soft drinks, cookies, and potato chips 
were served by our refreshment commit- 
tee. 

The W. R. Mills Chapter of the FHA 
had the pleasure of having as its guests 
Monday night, March 1, the FFA Boys 
of Epsom High School. 

The boys presented a very interesting 
program. Claude Edwards spoke on the 
FFA program of work. Billy Edwards 
told about the local, State and National 
Contest. Harold Fraizier familiarized the 
group with Farm and Home projects of 
FFA students, and Alton Foster discussed 
FFA membership and FFA degrees. 
Questions were asked concerning these 
talks and answered by the FFA members. 

The meeting then adjourned with the 
closing ritual. Delicious refreshments 
were served. 

The Morehead City Chapter of Future 
Homemakers played host to ninety mem- 
bers of the Future Homemakers and 
their mothers at a buffet supper held in 
the Morehead City School Library in 
March. The buffet table was centered 
with arrangements of daffodils and pussy 
willows. 

Yellow daffodils were arranged 
throughout the room, carrying out 
a color scheme of yellow and green. 
The supper, prepared by the sophomore 
home economics classes, consisted of 
chicken salad in lettuce cups, potato 
chips, deviled eggs, sliced tomatoes, hot 
Parker House rolls, butter beans, lemon 
and chocolate tartlets and iced tea. 

The FHA prayer song was sung as a 
blessing and Geraldine Best, president, 
welcomed the mothers. After supper 
a short skit, "It Pays to Budget," was 
cleverly given by Ellen Bordeaux and 



Rose Daniels, sophomores, who have 
been studying this subject in their class. 

A number of the girls, led by Mary 
Lou Davis, song leader, sang several 
numbers, then led the whole group in 
singing. 

Renee Kemp directed a group of fun 
provoking stunts in which several girls 
and their mothers took part. The mothers 
thanked the girls and their teacher, Mrs. 
Deliido Cordova, for an enjoyable 
evening. 

The Future Homemakers of the 
Morehead City High School met during 
homeroom period. Geraldine Best, presi- 
dent, presided. Reports showed that $35 
was made selling Christmas cards and 
Patsy Holt received the FHA pin for 
selling the most. 

Letters were read from Mrs. Mabel 
Hall and Mrs. Reed, FHA officials, thank- 
ing the chapter, the band and Mr. Win- 
dell for their part in making the 
District II FHA rally a success. The 
rally was held at Morehead City. 

As a school project it was decided 
to have a "Service Room" in the girl's 
rest room. Doris McQueen was appointed 
chairman. 

Having a radio program was discussed 
and Patricia Smith and Barbara Olsen 
were appointed to see about it. Beadie 
Lewis, chairman of the program com- 
mittee, announced that the March 2 meet- 
ing would be the annual Mother-Daugh- 
ter Buffet Supper. Plans will be worked 
out by the sophomore Home Ec classes. 

The finance committee was asked to 
decide what should be done with the 
money on hand. Members were urged 
to work for their junior degree and to 
take a pen pal for better international 
relations. 

The treasurer reported that dues this 
year were paid by 92 members. 

The Piedmont Chapter is progressing 
rapidly. With only a few months ex- 
perience we have already done some 
worthwhile things. By cooking a suc- 
cessful Boy's Scout supper we obtained 
enough money to finance our trip to the 
State FHA Convention in Raleigh. 

We were all delighted to get to visit 
our capital. We visited many places of 
interest while we were there. We enjoyed 
the convention and learned more about 
the importance of good homemaking. 

The Pinehurst Chapter of Future 
Homemakers of America held its initia- 
tion meeting of the year on the third 
of February. It was held in the Home 
Economics department and a social hour 
was enjoyed after the initiation service. 
Mrs. Kanoy, chapter mother, had charge 
of the games. 

At the beginning of the year we had 
eleven members, one member moved 
from Aberdeen and joined us after 
Christmas, and with our seven new 
members we now have a grand total of 
nineteen members. Since we started out 
new last year we are rather proud of 
our growth. 

Our activities have been limited be- 
cause it seemed that all our members 
were also members of the ball team and 
the glee club and had to share time 
with all three. We made some dried 
flower arrangements for the State Fair 
booth, attended the District Rally in 
Hamlet, the County Rally in Robbins, 
are making a knitted afghan to send to 
Korea and are busy trying to raise enough 
money to buy pins for the entire mem- 
bership. 



The Clarkton FHA Officers met in 
February at the home of their adviser, 
Mrs. Frank Baldwin. After the group 
enjoyed a delicious Bar-B-Q supper, 
served by the hostess, program plans 
were made. Some of the programs in- 
cluded plays, groups discussions on boy- 
girl relationship and costume designing. 

The Lee Woodard FHA'ers displayed 
some of their fine skill in sewing at 
a Fashion Show held in the auditorium 
of the school. Those participating were 
members of the second and third year 
Home Economics students. Several small 
children modeled some of the garments. 
There was a variety of outfits from 
pajamas, dresses, weskits and skirts, to 
spring suits. 

Also on February 12 the Sophomore 
FHA'ers honored the Senior Class and 
School Faculty at a Tea held in the 
Home Economics cottage. The cottage 
was decorated with attractive flower ar- 
rangements. The table was centered by a 
punch bowl surrounded with flowers and 
greenery. Refreshments other than lime 
sherbet punch were pinwheel, checker- 
board, and open-face sandwiches; potato 
chips, and peppermint heart candy. 

Our club had a worth-while Christmas 
Party also. We met in the department 
and instead of giving each other presents 
gave money and gifts of food to a needy 
family in the community. 

Money-making projects were selling 
Christmas cards and a "bake sale." The 
"bake sale" was held in our community 
building and the food was prepared by 
our FHA members. We are planning a 
"hobo week" from which we hope to 
make more money for our chapter. 

The Mebane FHA Chapter rendered 
their service to the school by decorating 
the gymnasium and serving refreshments 
at the Home Coming Dance. The out- 
standing project for making money for 
the year was the selling of fruit drops. 
The chapter made approximately seventy- 
two dollars. This money will be used 
for the activities of the chapter for the 
remainder of the year and to buy 
equipment for the Home Economics 
Department. One of these being the 
purchase of material to slip-cover a 
chair for the living room. 



MY MID-WINTER VACATION 

(Continued from page six) 

being washed, cut up, mixed, and 
packed in celophane packages, and 
being put in a room of 30° F. to 
chill. Mr. Dickman gave us a most 
interesting talk on our duty as future 
citizens and parents. He then took 
us over his very large farm and there 
we saw all kinds of vegetables grow- 
ing. 

We had only thirty minutes to 
dress and I had no idea I could make 
it to Ybor City to the Columbia 
restaurant in time for our banquet. 
This restaurant was the most beauti- 
ful I have ever seen with its Spanish 
atmosphere. The Spanish waiters 
dashed in and out, speaking one of 
the romance languages with pride. 
We met the Florida FFA officers 
and the Florida FHA President, 



State Supervisor, and Adviser. The 
different dishes, many I did not 
recognize, were delicious. I can 
well understand why this restau- 
rant is world famous. After a 
delightful dinner, we were given un- 
til twelve o'clock to do as we liked. 
We all went to the Fairgrounds to 
take in the the Mid-Way. 

"Good-morning — Time 6:30," 
were the words of the operator that 
woke me Saturday morning. We 
hurriedly dressed and breakfasted, 
then assembled for our appearance 
at the Fair. 

We were platform guests for the 
Florida FFA Day program Satur- 
day morning. Approximately 8,000 
FFA and FHA'ers were on hand for 
the big event. All the platform guests 
were introduced, many of them of- 
ficials of the Fair. Between intro- 
ductions, we witnessed the state 
champion harmonica player, string 
quartet, and vocal quartet. State 
honorary awards were conferred and 
the state FFA sweetheart was pre- 
sented. She favored us with a hula 
dance. Also the state awards were 
presented to the winners. The only 
thing wrong with this part of our 
trip was the weather; it was cold on 
the platform, but who cared too 
much, we were having a wonderful 
time. 

We decided to tour the exhibits 
before attending the Grandstand 
performance. We studied more 
closely the farm and home exhibits, 
and the conservation exhibits. The 
horticulture exhibits were alive with 
flowers growing from all sides and 
the grass and other greenery was 
grown there in the exhibits, not 
imitated. From there we went to 
see the "New Worlds in Motion" 
exhibition. 

At 2:00 p.m. we entered the 
Grandstand for the auto races. 
The races were very fast and 
exciting and each of us had a pri- 
vate wager as to whom would win. 
Between the races we were en- 
tertained by several acts, consisting 
of Wells and His Four Fays (an 
acrobatic act), Baudy's Greyhounds 
and Monkeys (a very good act in 
which the greyhounds and monkeys 
did many tricks that were the fruits 
of long training), and the Holly- 
wood Sky Ballet. The latter was a 
sensational aerial act displaying per- 
fect form and harmony between the 
six partners. Everyone was held 
spell-bound by the danger. 

When we boarded our car we had 
a little farewell party. All along the 
route back home the delegates grad- 
ually left us. I left the group at 



Dunn — saddened to be leaving so 
soon new friends acquired while on 
the trip. 

I can indeed say this was the trip 
of my lifetime. Truly no trip could 
have been more perfect, thanks to 
the Atlantic Coast Line and its 
employees. 



SERVICE PROJECTS— HELP 
OTHERS— HELP CHAPTER 

When the Red Cross Bloodmobile 
visited Alexander County on two 
occasions this year, the Taylorsville 
Future Homemakers volunteered to 
assist in the blood drive as a part of 
their national projects participation. 
Their help was in the nature of 
publicizing, soliciting donors, and 
baby sitting. 

The Mingo Chapter, a newly or- 
ganized chapter this year, made bun- 
nies for the pre-school children in 
the Falcon Orphanage as an Easter 
project. Thirteen costumes for fourth 
graders were made by FHA mem- 
bers. The costumes were worn in an 
assembly program. With the co- 
operation of some boys and one of 
the men teachers, the home eco- 
nomics students set out to make 
their homemaking department more 
attractive and homelike. The girls 
mixed colors and painted their new 
wall cabinets to harmonize with the 
wall paint. The base cabinets were 
varnished by the girls and the boys 
covered them with linoleum. The 
tables had to be refinished and the 
girls proceeded to get this done also. 



The Bethesda FHA girls worked 
hard on the Civil Defense Project. 
A Civil Defense staff member from 
the filter center in Durham has 
worked with them helping them to 
realize "How the FHA Girls Can 
Promote Civil Defense." A chapel 
program by the FHA members fol- 
lowed; and then a radio program 
was presented. Now the chapter 
members are concentrating on 
Safety. 

CORRECTION OF ERROR IN 

FEBRUARY ISSUE OF F.H.A. 

MAGAZINE 

In the list of Chapters having a 
membership of over a hundred re- 
ported in the February issue of the 
North Carolina Future Home- 
makers magazine, the name of the 
Stedman Chapter, having a member- 
ship of 163 was omitted. Instead of 
12 chapters with membership ex- 
ceeding one hundred, there are 13 
chapters. 



Annual Dances 



HUGH MORSON'S ANNUAL 
GOOD LUCK DANCE 

Morsonites and their dates were really in for a 
wonderful evening March 13, as they entered the 
Diamond Horseshoe Club and stepped into the 
romantic atmosphere of Billy Rose's night club. 
Through a big picture window could be seen the 
skyline of Manhattan, overhead hung elaborate chan- 
deliers and a net full of balloons, a bar — complete 
with big oranges and other exciting beverages (cokes, 
no less) plus homemade cookies, like fudge and 
Toll House cookies — was in one corner and at the 
right there was a stage with two handsome thrones 
where the king and queen were crowned. 

Mary Lou Parker, FHA President, crowned 
Seniors Betty Bryant, Queen, and Billy Hunter, 
King. Following the coronation, the FHA officers 
and their dates, and the other candidates for Queen 
and King from each class, formed the figure. What 
a lovely sight this was! Jon Pearce, Jo Anne 
Pleasants, Joanne Farmer entertained Queen Betty 



Eve Thomas is crowned Valentine Queen at the Creedmoor 
FHA Valentine Dance. Crowning her is Jackie Currin, 
President of the Chapter. 




A scene at the Hugh Morson annual "Good Luck" dance. 
Silhouettes on the wall were cut out by Joan Wilder. 
From left to right: Jane Watson, Chapter Vice-President, 
Mary Lou Parker, Chapter President, and Lillian Hick- 
man, Unit Vice-President. 



and King Billy with song and dance, and then the 
high light of the night, 12 FHA high stepping 
chorus line girls all dressed in black satin tights and 
vest, top hats, gloves and canes really took the 
crowd by surprise. The routine was right profes- 
sional looking, too. 

Many thanks to the FHA gals who spent so much 
time and energy decorating the gym and doing all 
sorts of things toward making the dance successful. 



CREEDMOOR VALENTINE DANCE 

Creedmoor Future Homemakers are already look- 
ing forward to next year's Valentine Dance which 
they sponsor annually. This is a real occasion for 
teenagers around Creedmoor. This year Eve Thomas 
won the title as Valentine Queen. Jackie Currin, 
FHA president takes pleasure in crowning their 
Queen. (See photo.) 



fe^^:^:^^^:^:^:^^^^^^fc^:^^i^^^: 



* 



Future Homemakers of America 

CREED 

Wc are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. * 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
Wc face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 




CAROLINE SAYS: 

To acquire the art of beautiful living — one must play 
the game to win. Methods need not be difficult but 
must be skillfully manipulated. 

Some hints may be found in the following quotations: 

"Be wiser than other people if you can, but do not 
tell them so." — -Anonymous. 

"Forget it. Drop the subject when you cannot agree; 
there is no need to be bitter because you know 
you are right." — Anonymous. 

"You can easily determine the caliber of a man by 
ascertaining the amount of opposition it takes 
to discourage him." — Anonymous. 

"To think a thing is impossible is to make it so. 
Courage is victory, timidity's defeat." — Anony- 
mous. 

John Ruskin says, "I believe every right action and 
true thought sets the seal of its beauty on person 
and face." 




FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association * 



VOLUME XII 



OCTOBER 1954 




In order to comply with the many requests for suggestions and information 
concerning Degrees of Achievement, a goodly portion of this issue of Future 
Homemakers is devoted to some of the "How To-Do-Its" with degrees. 



Frances Burris from Wingate, North Carolina, who served as National vice- 
president in charge of recreation last year, has sent a hearty "thanks" to all Future 
Homemakers of North Carolina. For the co-operation and support she received 
from all the members of the state association she is indeed grateful. 

The Future Homemakers of North Carolina are grateful to you too, Frances, 
for "doing us proud" in so capably performing the duties of a Vice-President of 
Recreation. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1954-55 

President — Betty Calhoun, Seventy-First 

Vice-President — Carol Lynn Garris, Pikeville 

Secretary — Alice Parish, Edenton 

Treasurer — Margo Sicha, Lee Edwards 

Reporter — Claudette Belton, Old Town 

Parliamentarian — Nancy Christenbury, East Mecklen- 
burg 

Historian — Judy Bowman, Alexander-Wilson 

Song Leader — Sara Eason, Franklinton 



District Advisers 
1954-55 

Mrs. Albertine McKellar, Rowland 

Mary Elizabeth Ridge, Goldsboro 

Carolyn Brinkley, Plymouth 

Meredith Whitaker, Andrews 

Mrs. Rosa W. Parker, North Davidson 

Mrs. Louise M. Porter, West Mecklenburg 

Mrs. Sallie P. Moore, Liberty 

Frances Wilson, Bailey 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 
Raleigh, North Carolina 






What causes a Future Home- 
maker to want to work toward a 
Degree of Achievement? It may be 
one or more of several reasons. We 
can be certain, however, that the de- 
cision to begin work in earnest is 
not made until one is familiar with 
the meaning of degrees and can ap- 
preciate the value to herself and 
others in achieving the degree. 

Claudette Belton, our state re- 
porter from Old Town School in 
Forsyth County, stated that she felt 
that every chapter should devote 
one meeting to interpreting the de- 
gree program; and that this program 
should be presented early in the 
school year. In the chapter, of 
which Claudette is a member, a skit 
was presented which gave all mem- 
bers a greater understanding of the 
degrees. The booklets A Guide To 
Help You Grow as A Future Home- 
maker and the teacher's handbook 
A Guide For Helping Students 
Evaluate Their Own Growth were 
used in preparing the script for the 
dramatization. These booklets can 
be ordered from Future Homemak- 
ers of America, U. S. Office of Edu- 
cation, Health and Welfare, Wash- 
ington 25, D. C. 

You may be asking — must one 
work toward a degree in order to 
grow as a Future Homemaker? The 
answer would have to be "no." The 
purpose of this article is not to per- 
suade or to plead, but rather to try 
to help each Future Homemaker see 
the value of organizing her activities 
and experiences in terms of her own 
personal goals and the goals set up 
by the degree committee, and also 

When a home experience or a class ac- 
tivity is planned in terms a goal selected 
toward earning a degree, there is integra- 
tion of the degree program with the total 
homemaking program. In the top photo 
Amelia McGinnis, a candidate for the 
State Homemaker Degree from the 
Mount Holly Chapter shares a glazed 
peach pie topped with whipped cream 
(part of a planned home experience) with 
her parents — Mr. and Mrs. Harold Mc- 
Ginnis, and brother and sister — Monty 
and Nancy. 

In the lower photo second year home 
economics students of the Bailey High 
School learn about new fall fabrics and 
are guided in the selection of suitable 
colors, designs, and styles for members 
of the Class. Pictured are left to right 
Polly Vick, Christine Perry, Mrs. Taylor 
and Mr. Jefferies of Belk-Tyler's Store 
in Wilson, Faye McKeel and Phyllis 
Bissette. 



to help her realize that this experi- 
ence of reflectively and objectively 
analyzing her own growth is a part 
of growing itself. Can you imagine 
industry succeeding without plan- 
ning and organization? An architect 
would not build a house without a 
vision of the completed structure 
and a plan for making the vision a 
reality. The future of the homes of 
America concerns every loyal Fu- 
ture Homemaker, and if you want 
to grow into a really successful 
homemaker why not go about this 
growing in a systematic business- 
like manner. Recognition for having 
completed certain standards and for 



having met certain qualifications 
can bring to any Future Home- 
maker a deep inner sense of satis- 
faction and a definite incentive to 
continue growing. It is quite possible 
that as you work toward your goals 
you will discover in yourself capa- 
bilities which you did not dream you 
possessed. 

Suppose you have become fa- 
miliar with the degree program, 
and you have decided you want to 
get started working toward your 
Junior or Chapter Homemakers 
Degree, what are your next steps? 
1 . First of all find out from your 
degree committee the date which 
has been set for the deadline for 
filing your declaration of inten- 
tion and secure a form for this 
purpose. Below is a sample blank 
which a degree committee might 
like to use. 



DECLARATION OF INTENTION TO WORK ON AN F.H.A. DEGREE 

Realizing that the attainment of a degree in the Future Homemakers of America 
represents the successful completion of many planned activities in fulfilling all the 

standards set up for a degree, I 



(Name ) 



herby declare my intention this _ 

19 , to begin work for the 

Degree in the 



day of 



Homemaker 



Chapter of the 



(Name of State) 



( Name of Chapter ) 
Association of the Future Homemakers of America. 

To make this declaration official I have obtained the approval of the follow- 
ing people 



(Chairman, Chapter Degree Committee) 



( Chapter President) 




2. Next a special meeting needs to be held of all who are working on the same degree to study and discuss the 
standards and qualifications. Nancy Christenbury, state parliamentarian from Mecklenburg County highly rec- 
ommends working in groups, and she thinks it is wise if members of each group plan activities and set dates 
for the completion of each step or standard, "By concentrating on a little at the time, rather than facing all 
the steps at one time," she said, "the candidate will be less likely to become discouraged." 

QUALIFICATIONS FOR ACHIEVING THE "JUNIOR HOMEMAKER" DEGREE AND SUGGESTIONS 

FOR "REPORTING" 

Summary (May be used at beginning or end of report) 



(Name of Member) 



Has met the requirements for eligibility for the Junior Homemaker degree. 

1 . Has been a member of a local affiliated chapter for at 

least one semester or one-half of a school year. _ 

2. Has been a member of a homemaking class for at 
least one semester or one-half of a school year. _ 



(Signature of Chapter Representative) 



(Signature of Homemaking Teacher) 

HAS SATISFACTORILY MET QUALIFICATIONS FOR THE JUNIOR HOMEMAKING DEGREE 





Satisfactory 


Opinions and Signatures of Persons Who Can Best Tell if 


Qualifications 


progress 


Member Has Met Qualifications 




(Yes or No) 


If Opinion Is "No," Give Suggestions for Improvement 


Has Made Satisfactory Progress 






Towards: 






1 . Getting a better understanding 






of the organization 






( a ) Understanding of the 






creed and repeating it 






from memory 






(b) (c) (d), etc. 






2. Growing as an individual, a 






member of a home, a member 






of a chapter, and a member of 






a school and community 






(a) (b) (c) (d), etc. 







3. Has indicated the purposes of the National organization to which the work done toward this degree has con- 
tributed and explained how it has contributed. 



(Member) 



(Member's Parents or Guardian) 



(Chapter Adviser) 

We therefore recommend that the 



(Name of Member) 



(Chapter Representative) 

recognize the work of 



(Chapter) 

by making her a Junior Homemaker. 



(Member's Parent or Guardian) 



(Chapter Adviser) 

PROGRESS REPORT 

I. Getting a Better Understanding of the F.H.A. Organization. 

(a) Have I repeated the Creed from memory? 

(b) Have I shown an understanding of the meaning of the F.H.A. creed, emblem, colors, and flower? 



My plan for showing an 
understanding 



Did I follow my plan? 
(Yes or No) 



If answer is "No," what I did instead 
and why I changed plan 



The Creed 
The Emblem 



(c) Have I shown an understanding of the purposes of the national F.H.A. organization? 

My plan for showing an un- Did I follow my plan? If answer is "No," what I did instead of 

derstanding of the purposes (Yes or No) following my plan and why I changed 

of National Organization 

1 . To promote a growing of the joys and satisfaction of homemaking. 
2. 

Note: Understanding of (a) (b) and (c) maybe shown by explaining in an exhibit, a skit, a talk, a 
written statement or test. 

(d) Am I beginning to understand and use parliamentary procedure? 

My plan for beginning to Did I follow my plan? If answer is "No," what I did in- 

understand and use parlia- (Yes or No) stead of following my plan and why 

mentary procedure I changed 

T 
2. 

Note: May be shown by using accepted procedure in chapter meetings, taking part in a skit or demon- 
stration, or by any other effective method. 

II. Growing As An Individual, A Member of a Home, A Member of a Chapter and A Member of a School and 
Community By: 

(a) Choosing goals which the member believes are important and desirable to work toward. (A goal is 
whatever a person works to accomplish or become.) (b) Plan for working toward goal (c) Checking 
progress (d) Evidence of progress toward accomplishment 

Chart for reporting: 

My reasons for choosing My plan for working Ways I will check to see if I 
My goals each goal toward each goal am making progress toward 

each goal 

Individual (at least one) Member of home (at least one) 

Member of chapter Member of school and community (at least one 

Note: Suggestions for doing the above: 

Ask yourself these questions as you select your goals 

(1) What proof or reason do I have that I need to grow toward this goal? 

(2) How will work toward this goal help me to grow? 

( 3 ) How will this goal make it possible for me to help others? 

Remember: Your parents, brothers and sisters, chapter adviser, and others may be able to give you 

suggestions for goals that are important to you. 

You don't need to decide at one time on all of the goals you want to work toward. You may want to 

choose one goal and work toward it for a while before selecting a second goal. You will get ideas as 

you work along. 

You will find these helps in the booklet, A Guide to Help You Grow As A Future Homemaker: 
Some goals which other homemaking students thought were important for them to work toward are 

listed on page 5-9. An example of two goals which were chosen by a homemaking student, the plans she 

made to work toward the goals, and the ways she planned to check her progress are on pages 16-17. 

EVIDENCES THAT I HAVE MADE PROGRESS TOWARD EACH GOAL 

Note: 1. Evidence is to furnish proof or make clear; therefore, diaries, check sheets, score cards, and other 
records, will help you and others decide if you have changed in your actions or feelings. 
2. Examples of evaluation devices are found on pages 10-15 in the Guide to Help You Grow As A 
Future Homemaker. 

III. Indicating the Purposes of the National Organization to Which the Work Done Toward This Degree Has 
Contributed and Explaining How It Has Contributed: 

Check (x) the purposes of the national or- Give brief specific examples of the way the work 

ganization to which you believe work for toward this degree has contributed to the purposes 

this degree has contributed. of the National organization. 

To promote a growing appreciation of the joys and satisfactions of homemaking. 

To emphasize the importance of worthy home membership. 

To encourage democracy in home and community life. 

To work for good home and family life for all. 

To promote international good will. 

To foster the development of creative leadership in home and community life. 

To provide wholesome individual and group recreation. 

To further interest in home economics. 






SCENES OF THE SOUTHERN REGIONAL F.H.A. CONVENTION 
1. All the forty-four N. C. delegates who attended. 2. Three delegates from District IV — June Watson, Sara Eason and Sarah 
Murray. 3. The roll call of states by North Carolina. 4. A typical scene of the natural landscaping around Daytona Beach. 
5. Carol Lynn Garris in her role of chairman of one of the discussion groups. 6. The Princess Issena Hotel with Welcome 
sign. 7. The winning three national officers — Frances Burris — presiding. 



The Southern Regional Meeting, Daytona Beach, Florida 

June 22-25, 1954 



Forty-four North Carolina Future 
Homemakers were among the 
nearly 400 Future Homemakers 
from 12 southern states and Puerto 
Rico who registered at the Princess 
Issena Hotel at Daytona Beach, 
Florida June 21-25, 1954 for the 
Southern Regional Meeting of Fu- 
ture Homemakers. Each of the 19,- 
102 members of the North Carolina 
Association of Future Homemakers 
has every right to be proud of the 
quantity and the quality of the par- 
ticipation of the North Carolina rep- 
resentatives at this meeting. All 
eight of the officers of the North 
Carolina Association were members 
of one of the twenty leadership 
teams which functioned so effec- 
tively throughout the convention. 
All four members of each leader- 
ship team received excellent train- 
ing and experience during the week. 
For each group of leaders there 
was an adult coach. The twenty 
leadership teams were each com- 
posed of a chairman, a recorder, an 
evaluator, and a hostess. The lead- 
ership assumed by the officers of 
the N. C. Association was as fol- 
lows: 

Chairmen — Betty Calhoun — 
Carol Lynn Garris 

Recorders — Margo Sicha — Alice 
Parrish 

Evaluators — Claudette Belton — 
Nancy Christenbury 

Hostesses — Judy Bowman — Sara 
Eason 

The purpose of these discussion 
groups was two-fold (1) to train 
every member of each group in 
democratic procedures of decision- 
making and problem-solving and 
(2) to train leaders for group dis- 
cussions. With the aid of two 
consultants, Dr. Floride Moore, Uni- 
versity of Georgia, and Dr. John 
Keltner from Kansas State, the lead- 
ers were able to stimulate the mem- 
bers into creative thinking and wor- 
thy participation. 

The delegates learned that dis- 
cussion can be a vital device if there 
is knowledge behind it, and if dur- 
ing the discussion decisions are 
made and problems solved. Some 
do's and don'ts of good discussions 
as learned at the convention are: 

Do 

1. Remember that members of the 
group who are discussing a top- 



ic are people with feelings. Un- 
derstanding the various person- 
alities in the group will help 
to make each member more 
productive. 

2. Ideas are important. From raw 
material which should be fur- 
nished before the discussion 
search your own mind for ideas 
which are based on your ex- 
periences or the experiences of 
others. 

3. Learn how to communicate 
with people. If you want peo- 
ple to understand you, let them 
see you express yourself. Look 
at the person to whom you are 
talking. Be careful to use words 
which mean the same to all in 
the group. 

Don't 

1. Come unprepared. There is no 
point in meeting together if you 
have nothing to share. 

2. Take more time than is neces- 
sary for making a decision or 
solving a problem. 

3. Get off the track. Once you 
decide what you want and need 
to discuss, stick to it. 

All the problems which were dis- 
cussed at the group meetings cen- 
tered around the theme of the Con- 
vention. "Are You A Leader For 
Better Homes?" Examples of the 
problems discussed are: 

1. How can we have more demo- 
cratic leadership in our fami- 
lies? 

2. How can we get our family to 
take part in family projects? 

Evaluation 

The relative value of each gen- 
eral session and of each group meet- 
ing was carefully considered and 
weighed by every single delegate. 
The opinions of every person were 
summarized and reported by the 
hostesses and the trained evalua- 
tors, who made summaries of their 
own evaluations. All summaries 
were reported each day during gen- 
eral assembly. Each report was 
presented in a skit with the use 
of charts and various other illus- 
trations. For example, in one pres- 
entation a doctor, nurse, and patient 
were used. The doctor was the con- 
sultant, the nurse was the trained 
evaluator and the patient the av- 
erage delegate (the opinions of all 



delegates were averaged). Mouth 
was checked by doctor for partici- 
pation in discussion (chart checked 
each time or was recorded on chart 
each time). Head was checked for 
absorption of ideas. Eyes were 
checked for observation and per- 
ception, etc. 

One clever device used by Fran- 
ces Burris, (from Wingate, N. C), 
National Vice-President in charge of 
recreation, who introduced the can- 
didates for the three national offices 
was to test the delegates as well as 
the candidates. First the candidates' 
credentials were presented; each 
candidate demonstrated her ability 
to fill the office she was seeking 
and she answered questions which 
illustrated her understanding and ap- 
preciation of the Future Homemak- 
ers organization. Delegates then 
were quized on what they remem- 
bered about the candidate's cre- 
dentials and her physical make-up. 
This is a good idea to try out in 
your own chapter in checking mem- 
bers on what they know about the 
candidates before they vote. 

During the meeting of the 20 
recorders, Margo Sicha, our State 
Treasurer, recorded suggestions 
which would be helpful to all re- 
recorders. Also these suggestions 
might be helpful to secretaries. 

1. Record selectively. 

2. Try such methods as labeling 
one page "problems," another 
"agreements and decisions," 
and still another "bright ideas." 

3. Record pertinent content. This 
will help greatly in organizing 
on the spot summaries. 

4. State the problem. Note the 
major points of agreement and 
disagreement, and the conclu- 
sion. 

5. Organize and summarize points. 

6. Ask the group for an occasional 
evaluation of your notes. Some 
criteria might be: 

a. What was unnecessary? 

b. What was left out? 

c. How could the form of the 

record be improved? 

7. One method for recording is 
to take down everything and 
organize later. However, try to 
organize for final presentation 
as you go along. 

8. Be ready to give a summary 

(Continued on cover 3) 




Officers of the N. C. Association of Future Homemakers meet annually with the 
Advisory Board to make plans and form policies for the Future Homemakers 
activities during the current school year. These officers, who are examining the 
Scrapbook of the Seventy-First Chapter are left to right: Sarah Eason, song leader; 
Margo Sicha, Lee Edwards, Claudette Belton, reporter; Betty Calhoun, president; 
Mary Frances Goodrich, filling in for Alice Parrish, secretary; Judy Bowman,' 
historian; Nancy Christenbury, parliamentarian; and Carol Lynn Garris, vice- 
president. 

Report of the North Carolina 
Executive Board and Council Meeting 



The State Program of Work as 
adopted by the Executive Council 
is almost a copy of the National 
Program of Work. When a chapter 
is affiliated with the State and Na- 
tional organization for 1954-55, 
it will receive from the state of- 
fice a copy of the state-program- 
of-work membership cards, receipt 
of dues, and the form for the annual 
report. The development of each 
chapter's program of work can be 
reported on this form. It is im- 
portant that each chapter file this 
annual report form and fill it in all 
during the year. The annual report 
is due in the state office by the end 
of the school year. 

North Carolina's state projects 
for 1954-55 are: Unesco — Fami- 
lies Together — F.H.A. Week — Civil 
Defense. Please make an effort to 
participate in one, two, or all of 
these projects. 

The affiliation dues for member- 
ship in the state and national or- 
ganization is 55 cents per mem- 
ber. An additional 10 cents per 
member is requested to pay ex- 



penses of our state officers and ad- 
visers to national meetings. 

Those Future Homemakers who 
wish to work on the State Home- 
makers Degree must have the Dec- 
laration of Intention form filled in 
and mailed to the state office post- 
marked not later than November 
the 15th. The Declaration of In- 
tention forms and the Standards for 
the State Homemaker Degree will 
be mailed to any member or ad- 
viser requesting them from the of- 
fice of the State F.H.A. Adviser, 
Department of Public Instruction, 
Raleigh, North Carolina. The dead- 
line for the final report of activities 
in working toward the degree is a 
month prior to the State Conven- 
tion the date of which has not yet 
been decided. All applicants will 
be notified of the deadline as early 
as possible. 

Members of the State Executive 
Council and Advisory Board con- 
sist of the eight state officers, the 
eight district advisers, and the home 
economics supervisory staff. 



Chapters Report on 
Training For Officers 

For the last few years the 
Cumberland County F.H.A. Chap- 
ters from Fayetteville, Stedman, 
Seventy-First, Massey Hill, and 
Hope Mills schools have held the 
Cumberland County F.H.A. Offi- 
cers Institute in September soon af- 
ter schools have opened. 

For a couple of hours on an after- 
noon all the F.H.A. officers in all 
the schools in the county and their 
advisers come together at a school 
and spend some time concentrating 
on how to do the job as an F.H.A. 
officer. 

This year in September — the In- 
stitute was held in the Massey Hill 
School. There was registration and 
then a brief social hour with a re- 
freshing drink for everyone. Then 
the Reverend Mr. Thomas L. Rich, 
pastor of the Cedar Creek Baptist 
Church, spoke to the group on Re- 
covery of Family Life. 

This inspiring message helped to 
set the stage and get everyone in 
the right frame of mind for spend- 
ing the next hour learning more 
about how to be a better F.H.A. 
president, vice-president, secretary, 
treasurer, song leader, reporter, his- 
torian, or parliamentarian as the 
case might be. 

The presidents met together, the 
vice-presidents together and so on 
down the line and worked with the 
advisers. Incidentally the Public 
School music teacher from Seventy- 
First School met with the song lead- 
ers to give them some on-the-spot 
training and the Woman's News 
Editor from the Fayetteville paper 
met with the reporters group to give 
some pointers on writing news. In 
the words of Betty Calhoun, the 
State Future Homemakers Presi- 
dent, who is also a member of this 
Cumberland County Officers Insti- 
tute "we feel that this kind of meet- 
ing really helps our officers to get 
a good start on doing their job 
early in the year and we recom- 
mend an Officers Institute to other 
counties." 



In order that plans could be made 
for the following year, the old and 
new officers of the Shelby Senior 
High School Chapter decided to 
take a little trip to Crescent Beach. 
Along with getting a definite start 
in the year's work, the girls enjoyed 
(Continued on cover 3) 



Shelby Chapter Makes TV Debut 



If you had turned on a television 
set to channel three anytime be- 
tween 10:30 and 11:30 a.m. last 
May 7th you would have realized 
that F.H.A. stands for Future 
Homemakers of America as well as 
Federal Housing Administration. 

You see, it all began with a sug- 
gestion that our chapter try to get 
on the program "Man Around the 
House." Several members and our 
adviser, Mrs. Holton, were not long 
in making arrangements for the 
program. Since our debut date was 
near Mothers Day we decided to 
have a mother-daughter program. 
Appearing on the program were six 
mothers and their daughters, Mrs. 
Harriette Holton, our adviser, and 
Marie Gifford, a home economist 
who was holding a Cooking School 
in Shelby. The Marie Gifford Cook- 
ing School was sponsored by our 
F.H.A. Chapter. 

We left early Friday morning for 
Charlotte and took our photog- 
rapher, a boy who was a senior, 
with us. On the way the car in 
which the photographer was riding 
had a flat tire. We were surely glad 
to have, "a man around" to change 
it. 



The television studio was not 
completely new to all of us for on 
the way to the State Convention in 
Raleigh a few weeks before we had 
stopped and viewed a program from 
the control room and so knew some- 
thing of what we were to face. 

We were introduced to Alan 
Newcomb who gave each of us a 
lovely corsage. With nervous chatter 
and laughter caused by Mr. New- 
comb's humor and charm the pro- 
gram began. The first game was a 
contest between a mother and her 
daughter and another mother and 
daughter. On a blackboard was a 
chart and when questions such as 
"When is the time for a girl to wear 
lipstick" or "go out on her first 
date," were asked, the mothers filled 



SAFETY POEM 

I am quite a mathematician said 

carelessness 
I can add to your troubles 
I can subtract from your savings 
I can multiply your aches and pains 
I can divide your attention 
I can take interest from your work 

and discount your safety. 



in one side of the chart as to when 
they did these things and the girls 
put down when they felt they should 
be able to do these things on the 
other side of the chart. Prizes to 
the winners were for the daughter, 
a certificate for a record album and, 
for the mother, a thermometer set. 

In another game, a mother and 
daughter were each given cards on 
which there were printed charac- 
teristics or qualities of persons such 
as honesty, personality, etc. The 
mother was to put up in the correct 
order the things that she would look 
for in a husband for her daughter 
and the daughter put up what she, 
herself, would look for in a fel- 
low. The girl started off with "good- 
looking," "good dancer," "football 
player," etc. While her mother put 
"honesty, integrity," etc. 

This T.V. show helped to inter- 
pret to the television fans and others 
some of the purposes and goals of 
our organization. The postmaster's 
wife invited all the members to her 
home for a social. She said she felt 
that someone in town should do 
something for a group of girls as 
fine as ours. 

Beth Peterson 



Scenes Behind the Scenes — Prior to 
the Day of the District Rally 

It is difficult for the average 
Future Homemaker to visualize — 
even remotely the vast amount of 
detailed planning which goes on in 
each of the eight districts preceding 
the District Rally. Planning com- 
mittee members must think up 
ideas, play with ideas, plan the 
execution of ideas selected, practice 
diplomacy and democracy in alloca- 
ting responsibilities and in making 
all contacts concerned with the 
Rally. There are dates to keep in 
mind at which time certain tasks 
must be completed. Finally there 
are the last minute arrangements 
and preparations. In some respects 
it might be compared to the prepa- 
ration for a big wedding. "We just 
can't let anything go wrong," but it 
just isn't normal or natural unless 
some flaw or flaws creep in, and 
that is exactly what usually hap- 
pens. But when it is all over every- 
one who participated in planning 
and executing the program feels 
happy because after all this is the 
best of all Rallies — which is as it 
should be. 



Making plans for District II Rally are seated: Mrs. Mabel L. Hall, Assistant State 
Supervisor of Home Economics; Hazel Gurley, Janice Teachey, Janice Andrews, 
Miss Mary Elizabeth Ridge, District II F.H.A. Adviser; Mrs. Janice Chase, Carol 
Lynn Garris, vice-president of the N. C. Association of Future Homemakers; and 
Miss Dorothy Fitzgerald, her adviser. Standing left to right: Mary Love Taylor, 
Nancy Edmundson, Margaret Morris, and Sandra Hicks. This meeting was held 
in the homemaking department of the Goldsboro High School. 




"dFapfer (faffer 



The Beaufort homemaking department 
has a 1955 Westinghouse deluxe model 
washing machine. The Future Home- 
makers of America purchased the ap- 
pliance on the "5-year replacement plan 
for schools" which entitles the depart- 
ment to a new machine each year for 
five years. The washing machine will be 
used in laundering the first-aid room 
linens and the table linens used in the 
foods laboratory. 

The homemaking department is shin- 
ing with a new coat of paint applied by 
the second year home economics girls. 
The kitchen walls are Lennox green and 
the clothing laboratory walls are rose. 
The girls re-dyed the curtains and 
draperies in the automatic washing 
machine. 

The kitchen curtains are canary yellow 
and the clothing lab draperies are Mar- 
garet rose. A map of Carteret County 
(secured from the Chamber of Com- 
merce) has been framed and hung on 
the clothing laboratory wall. 

The 1st year home ec girls have 
pickled red pepper relish, canned and 
preserved pears, canned and froze butter- 
beans, and made hot pepper vinegar 
while studying food preservation. 

The Beaufort Future Homemakers of 
America met Labor Day in the school 
auditorium and installed Ada Sue Owens 
as president; Nancy Davis, vice- 
president; Jackie Young, secretary; Judy 
Mason, treasurer; Jane Safrit, reporter; 
Catherine Potter, pianist; Linda Fodrie, 
song leader and Johnise Hardesty, as 
parliamentarian. 

Ada Sue, the president, presented 
Clyda Ruth Taylor with a sterling silver 
gavel to be worn on the chain guard of 
her F.H.A. pin. 

The president appointed a committee 
to type and compile the yearbooks for 
the members. Winky Willis is heading 
this committee. 

Money making projects were discussed 
and the group voted to continue selling 
school pencils, concessions at basketball 
games and to sponsor school dances in 
the Scout Building after football games. 

Mrs. Beveridge. the chapter adviser, 
reported a balance of $269.83 in the 
F.H.A. school treasury. The members 
voted to purchase an automatic washing 
machine and a dryer for the homemaking 
department. A balance of $12.70 was re- 
ported in the local treasury. 

Sept. 27 was set as the date for fresh- 
men F.H.A. initiation and razzing party. 
All chapter members must have dues 



COVER PAGE 

The Shelby Future Homemakers 
presented a Mother-Daughter Tele- 
vision Show over station WBTV 
last spring. The participants in the 
program pictured here are left to 
right: Mrs. R. A. Peterson, mother 
of the chapter president, Mrs. Har- 
riette Holton, chapter adviser, Alan 
Newcomb, master of ceremonies, 
and Beth Peterson, president of the 
Shelby Chapter. Description of pro- 
gram found on page 7. 



paid by this date in order to participate 
in the initiation and be included in the 
F.H.A. picture for the school annual 
which will be made Sept. 30. 

A bus was chartered to carry the More- 
head City and Beaufort F.H.A. members 
to the District II Rally held in the 
Goldsboro High School, Oct. 2. 

Linda Fodrie, the song leader, and 
Catherine Potter, the pianist, led the 
group in group singing. 

The closing ritual was used to dismiss 
the meeting. 

The first Monday of each school 
month has been scheduled as the meeting 
date. 

The Morehead City Chapter of the 

Future Homemakers of America held its 
first meeting of the year in the school 
auditorium Wednesday. After the singing 
of the prayer song, the meeting was 
called to order by the president, Beadie 
Lewis, Mary Lou Davis, vice-president, 
conducted the rest of the meeting. 

The minutes were read by Gloria Hall, 
secretary, and the treasurer, Shirley 
Ebron, gave her report, asking that the 
annual dues be paid by the first week in 
October. 

Several committees were formed and 
the projects for the year were discussed. 
Committee appointments: finance com- 
mittee. Shirley Ebron, chairman; pub- 
licity, Ellen Bordeaux; projects, Judy 
Willis; initiation, Libby Wade and Lina 
Wade; service room, Doris McQueen; and 
program, Mary Lou Davis. 

Members were urged to attend the 
district rally in Goldsboro Saturday and 
plans were made to go by bus with the 
Beaufort Chapter. 

Thirty-eight new members will be 
initiated Tuesday and it was voted to hold 
the meeting in the school auditorium and 
invite parents of the old and new mem- 
bers. Former presidents of the chapter 
have been invited in recognition of the 
10th year since the organization of the 
Future Homemakers in this state, and 
school. 

The chapter voted to give $25 to the 
home economics department for new 
equipment. A vote of appreciation was 
expressed and a note written to the 
faculty for allowing the chapter to meet 
at the first period. 

The officers of the Rolesville Future 
Homemakers of America chapter met 
Thursday night, Aug. 19, at the Home- 
making cottage to discuss plans for the 
coming year. 

Programs were planned for each 
month's meeting and the following proj- 
ects were discussed: A "Join F.H.A. 
Day" for freshman girls, improvement of 
the cottage grounds, better methods of 
clothing construction, and the addition 
of an automatic washing machine to the 
department. 

A buffet supper was served and 
pictures were made for the Chapter year- 
book. 

Another meeting — a morning meet- 
ing to clean-up and dress-up the Home- 
making cottage for the opening of school 
— was set for Sept. 1, 9 a.m. 

Initiation for the 27 new Rolesville 
F.H.A. members was held Sept. 23. at 
Rolesville High School. Each new mem- 
ber was dressed in an "outlandish 
costume" and was required to follow 
procedures set up by the chapter F.H.A. 
officers. The day was filled to the brim 
with fun and surprises for all the 27 



girls as well as the other students. After 
a very exciting day, the girls returned 
home, now real F.H.A. members. 

On the following day the Rolesville 
F.H.A. "old" girls entertained the F.F.A. 
boys and "new" freshman F.H.A. girls 
at an old-fashion ice-cream party. The 
Chapter officers served homemade ice 
cream in three flavors, vanilla, pine- 
apple, and chocolate, under the trees 
behind the cottage to over 100 F.H.A. 
and F.F.A. members. 

At the same time the F.F.A. boys 
initiated their new freshman members 
so the girls could enjoy the fun with 
them. The freshman boys were all sports 
enough to eat the girls' ice-cream, dosed 
up with celery seed, without spoons. And 
they still said it was "good." 

The Future Homemakers of the 
Spencer High School gave a reception 
during the first part of the school year 
to honor the freshmen F.H.A. girls, their 
parents and members of the faculty. 

The department was decorated with 
red roses, ferns and mixed autumn 
flowers. Each of the honored girls was 
given a corsage of red roses. 

Nancy Kester, Jeanne Waddell, Dot 
Holt, Ruth Long, Mary Sigmon, Ruth 
Lambe and Rosalie Myers met the guests 
at the door and introduced them to the 
receiving line which included Peggy 
Peacock, vice-president of the Junior 
F.H.A., Beverly Brannock, president, 
Carolyn West, secretary, and Miss Jane 
Buie, Treasurer. 

Susie Sherlin directed the guests to 
the register which was kept by Georgia 
Dorsett. Punch, mints, and cookies were 
served by Marilyn Grant, Becky Wright, 
Betty Lou Trexler and Christine Agner. 
Good-byes were said to Joyce Smith. 
Mrs. Lester Slate is adviser. 

The Spencer Dance Band provided 
music for the occasion. 



Congratulations to Four F.H.A.er's 
of the Cobb Memorial Chapter 

When time came for the Chal- 
lenge Program to be presented in 
the Cobb Memorial School District 
of Caswell County, the homemaking 
side was presented by four F.H.A. 
members. These members who as- 
sisted their Agricultural teacher 
in presenting this program were: 
Frances Ingram, Lemma Jane 
Strader, Carolyn Austin and Bar- 
bara Hughey. They gave this pro- 
gram in three Caswell County 
Schools. 

These girls have already received 
their Junior Homemaking Degrees. 
They are now working on their 
Chapter Degree. They are members 
of the sophomore class and are 
second year Homemaking girls. 



REMINDER FOR 1954-55 

A good project for an individual or 
uroiip is an organized and usable F.H.A. 
file. Help is found in the Adviser's 
Handbook, page 30. 



(fyafet&i 'Ptoyiam ^dea^ 



HOMEMAKER vs. HOUSEWIFE 

Introduction: When asked their 
occupation many women say, Oh, 
I'm. only a housewife, insinuating 
that they are playing very insignifi- 
cant roles. However, as Future 
Homemakers, we already realize 
that being a homemaker is quite a 
complicated and very important 
profession. To be a good home- 
maker, one must be highly qualified 
for many types of work, not just a 
specialist in one field. However, like 
many of our mothers, we prefer 
homemaker instead of housewife, 
but there seems to be a stubborn 
refusal to accord us this title. 

A woman we heard of went the 
other day to transact some business 
which required the filling out of a 
form. The following conversation 
ensued: 

The girl behind the desk who is 
acting the part of a man interviewer 
is Ann Stem, the part of the home- 
maker is played by Virginia Ingram. 

(Man is seated behind desk; 
homemaker enters.) 

Man: Your name please? 

HM: Mrs. Joe Brown. 

Man: Your address? 

HM: Lavaca, Arkansas. 

Man: Occupation? 

HM: I am a dietitian. Wait a 
minute, don't write yet. I am also an 
interior decorator. 

Man: What shall I put? 

HM: Let me think a minute. I 
have a small clothing factory, too, 
where I make children's clothes. It's 
a seasonal job, and I'm the sole 
operator of my one machine. 

Man: Shall we say manufacturer? 

HM: Well, maybe not. That 
doesn't give a full picture. You see, 
I'm a chef also. 

Man : A regular working chef or a 
short-order cook? 

HM: Oh both. It depends on 
the meal. Then, too, you could call 
me a custodian. I give custodial 
care, as I believe government 
agencies call it, to a single, eight- 
room house. 

Man: Madame, you must make 
up your mind. What are you? 

HM: Well, I am also the tutor 
of four small children, an etiquette 
expert, and social secretary for the 
whole household, taking telephone 
messages, arranging bridge parties, 
and so on. Besides that, I'm the 
purchasing agent, and oh, I mustn't 
forget! I am the official hostess, the 
glamorous character without a care 



in the world, who entertains so 
graciously, or else! 

Man: Or else — what, Madame? 

HM: Or else, I hear about it 
later. 

Man: Now, if you please, mad- 
ame, let us fill out this form. You 
say you don't know what to call 
yourself. Let me help you out. You 
are a housewife. 

HM: Unh — uh! 

Man: But it says so right here in 
my book. 

HM: But I don't care what it 
says in your book. 

Man: We must put something. 

HM: May I ask you a question? 
What is your racket? 

Man : My racket, as you call it, is 
that of a Junior Personnel Consult- 
ant. Civil Service classification num- 
ber four. 

HM: I see. Why don't you just 
call yourself a "working man"? 

Man: I see no reason why I 
should, Madame. 

HM: Why not? You're a man. 
And you work? 

Man: Of course. 

HM: Then you are a "working 
man," and I don't understand your 
strange reluctance to describe your- 
self as a working man. It's just as 
noble a term as housewife. You're 
not ashamed of working are you? 

Man : Far from it. I just don't like 
the term "working man." 

HM: And I don't like the term 
"housewife." 

Man: Madame, let's just leave 
that space blank! 

Skit taken from the Arkansas 
Future Homemakers of America 
Magazine, February 1954. 



THE SOUTHERN REGIONAL 

(Continued from page 5) 
of what has gone on if your 
group requests it during the 
meeting. 
9. Encourage the group to cor- 
rect and to amend your rec- 
ord when you are in doubt. 

10. Number the pages of your notes. 

11. Ask the group to finish up the 
problem at hand before going 
on to another one. 

The 44 delegates to the Southern 
Regional Meeting at Daytona 
Beach, Florida were: Miss Carolyn 
Brinkley, Plymouth; Mary Eliza- 
beth Ridge, Goldsboro; Frances 
Wilson, Bailey; Mrs. Sallie P. 
Moore, Liberty; Mrs. Louise M. 
Porter, West Mecklenburg; Mrs. 



Rosa W. Parker, North Davidson; 
Meredith Whitakcr, Andrews; Edith 
Councilman, Sumner; Dorothy Fitz- 
gerald. Pikeville; Alice Parrish, 
Edenton; Carol Lynn Garris, Pike- 
ville; Betty Calhoun, Seventy-First; 
Sara Eason, Franklinton; Judy 
Bowman, Alexander-Wilson, Nancy 
Christenbury, East Mecklenburg; 
Claudette Belton, Old Town; Margo 
Sicha, Lee H. Edwards; Ann Al- 
dridge, Bartlett-Yancey; Mary Eliza- 
beth Berrier, North Davidson; Pa- 
tricia Buffaloe and Ann Rowe, 
Garner; Frances Burris, Wingate; 
Evelyn Cook, Stokesdale; Mary 
Cook and Barbara LaMarr, Sum- 
ner; Carolyn Davis, East Mecklen- 
burg; Jane Frazier and Sarah Mur- 
ray, Franklinton; Carol Gilbert, Tri- 
City, Hazel Gurley, Rosewood; 
Betty Haithcock, John Graham, 
Loretta Hillard, Lowe's Grove; Bo- 
Peep Kuykendall, Kernersville; Sue 
Lassiter, Plymouth, Patricia Mor- 
gan, Lowe's Grove; Orlanda J. 
Pope, Stokesdale; Betty Love Pot- 
ter, Pamlico County; Ruth Temple, 
Wakelon; Rebecca Truelove, Fu- 
quay Springs; Minnie Lee Van- 
hoy, Walkertown; Faye Walker, 
Bethesda; June Watson, Hugh Mor- 

CHAPTERS REPORT 

(Continued from page 6) 
planning, preparing and serving 
their own meals. 

Part of the program at the beach 
was spent on evaluation of last 
year's work. The group helped to 
complete the State F.H.A. Yearly 
Report, and reviewed back copies 
of the F.H.A. magazines gathering 
many ideas from other chapters 
throughout the state. 

The officers feel that this type of 
planning plays an important part in 
the way the chapter functions. 
There is time to lay plans and talk 
them through before the hustle and 
bustle of the school year begins. 
Several committee chairmen were 
appointed, and committees were set 
up. This early appointment gave 
members ample time to begin look- 
ing for good ideas. This has really 
proved to be one of the best ways 
of planning for the years program of 
work because the girls really get to 
know each other and have a won- 
derful time together — even if it does 
mean a little extra dish washing too. 
"We hope more of you will try it — 
we think it's great!" stated Mar- 
garet Gold, President of Shelby 
F.H.A. Chapter. 

son; Louise Williams, Benton 
Heights; and the State F.H.A. Ad- 
viser, Mrs. Faye T. Coleman. 



Future Homemakers of America 

CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 




CAROLINE SAYS: 

Did you know that Miss Catherine T. Dennis, your 
own North Carolina State Supervisor of Home Eco- 
nomics Education, is a September Cover Girl? In ad- 
dition to being the cover page on the fall issue of 
Seventeen at School she may also be found in Practical 
Home Economics, September 1954 on pages 28 and 32 
and in the Journal of Home Economics, September 
1954 on pages 448, 470 and 471. Be sure to look her 
up; she's our "FHA Member of the Month." 



&$&&&&£&&&& 







FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 



IakHiHbiIIi' 




VOLUME XII 



DECEMBER 1954 



NUMBER 2 




To create more interest in F.H.A. and 
F.F.A. our advisors helped us to sponsor 
a contest to select Miss F.H.A. and Mr. 
F.F.A. of Mountain Park. Melba Wood 
won the title of Miss F.H.A. and Freddy 
Gentry, Mr. F.F.A. Melba is a freshman, 
15 years old, has blue eyes, blond hair, 
5 feet 4 inches tall, weighs 105 pounds. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1954-55 

President — Betty Calhoun, Seventy-First 

Vice-President — Carol Lynn Garris, Pikeville 

Secretary — Alice Parish, Edenton 

Treasurer — Margo Sicha, Lee Edwards 

Reporter — Claudette Belton, Old Town 

Parliamentarian — Nancy Christenbury, East Mecklen- 
burg 

Historian — Judy Bowman, Alexander-Wilson 

Song Leader — Sara Eason, Franklinton 



District Advisers 
1954-55 

Mrs. Albertine McKellar, Rowland 

Mary Elizabeth Ridge, Goldsboro 

Carolyn Brinkley, Plymouth 

Meredith Whitaker, Andrews 

Mrs. Rosa W. Parker, North Davidson 

Mrs. Louise M. Porter, West Mecklenburg 

Mrs. Sallie P. Moore, Liberty 

Frances Wilson, Bailey 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



All members of the home economics supervisory staff in the State Department of Public Instruction join me 
thanking every Future Homemaker and every adviser for her contribution to the progress of the state association 
through contributing to the success of Fall Rally programs. Special tribute goes to each district adviser and to 
each state officer in North Carolina. 



May your Christmas Season be joyful and your New Year filled with happiness. 



Faye T. Coleman 



The Year — 1954 

The Week — Oct. Mm. 6 

The Event — National F.Hi. Week 



Wouldn't it be interesting, reveal- 
ing, and truly inspiring if every Fu- 
ture Homemaker in North Carolina 
could have a composite picture of 
all the many F.H.A. activities which 
were in progress during the 1954 
National F.H.A. Week? It is now 
evident that Future Homemakers in 
North Carolina are doing more than 
just familiarizing the public with the 
name of our organization. They are 
demonstrating, illustrating and liv- 
ing the principles for which the 
organization stands. 

The stories of the projects and 
activities which you are about to 
read are examples of activities and 
projects thousands of Future Home- 
makers throughout North Carolina 
and the nation were engaged in dur- 
ing F.H.A. Week. 

Perhaps not unique, but certainly 
a most appreciated and worthy en- 
deavor on the part of the Future 
Homemakers of the Roxboro Chap- 
ter was the morning devotions pre- 
sented each morning over the Pub- 
lic Address System as a part of their 
week's program in observance of 
National F.H.A. Week. Two of 
these devotional services by the 
Roxboro Chapter are as follows: 

Devotional for "Proclamation of 
F.H.A. Week." Day — Monday 

"As president of the Roxboro 
Chapter of the Future Homemak- 
ers of America I would like to an- 
nounce that we are observing this 
week 'National F.H.A. Week.' As 
one phase of our program members 
will give the devotional each morn- 
ing this week. 

"Today we begin our program 
and activities. We realize that the 
leaders and members of any organi- 
zation endeavoring to do their best 
will automatically influence not only 
those who participate but those who 
see and hear. With this thought in 
mind, I shall read verses taken from 
the Sermon on the Mount. Here 
Christ discusses the importance of 
influence. Matthew 5: 14, 15, 16. 

"This poem came to a high school 
girl one Sunday morning as she 
sat in church and heard her pas- 



tor speak on the influence of 
individuals: 

Some time ago, I went to church 
Not feeling very bright 
The day before had all gone wrong; 
I hadn't slept that night. 

Somehow I dragged through Sunday 

school 
And stayed for service, too, 
But just to breathe enough to live 
Seemed all that I could do. 

Then, going out, I passed a girl 
Who saw that I felt blue; 
She said, 'Hi there, we play grown- 
up a lot, 
And I always play I am you.' 

At first it so surprised me 
That I could hardly see. 
To think that such a tiny girl 
Would want to be like me. 

I thanked her for the compliment 
And slowly walked away; 
I felt much better, lifted up, 
I saw where my path lay. 

For she taught me a lesson 

I had never fully known, 

That someone else would help me 

reap 
The crop which I have sown. 

Since then I've tried to say what's 

right 
To think what's right, and do 
Exactly what I'm sure I'd have 
That little girl to do. 

And when I am tired or worried 

And feel that no one is true 

I remember 'Hi there, we play 

grown-up a lot 
And I always play I am you.' 

"Let us pray: 

"Eternal Father, forgive us for 
the many ways when we failed to 
influence others in the right way. 
May we ever keep in mind the fact 
that somewhere someone is using us 
as a guide, and may our lives be 
worthy of this honor. Amen." 



Today is "What F.H.A. Means to 
Me Day" (Thursday) 

"I shall read Philippians 3: 13, 
14 and chapter 4:13. Paul offers 
here a challenge to each of us to 
reach forth unto those things which 
are before and press toward the 
mark for the high calling of God. 
Being a member of the Future 
Homemakers of America, to me, 
gives each girl a chance to press to- 
ward the mark of the calling of God 
when preparing herself in any way 
to become a future homemaker. For 
the young lady of today there could 
be no greater challenge. It isn't and 
won't be an easy job. In the play 
'Green Pastures' you remember Ga- 
briel looks down upon the earth with 
this sad observation 'There ain't 
nothing fastened down there no 
more.' There are many indications 
that the homes of today are not fas- 
tened down as they should be. It is 
becoming clear that happy and nor- 
mal homes are a vital need of our 
times. This fact should lead each 
of us to consider carefully how we 
may make our homes now happier 
and more secure and how we can 
best prepare ourselves for our fu- 
ture role as a homemaker." 

Prayer: 

"We thank thee, O God, for our 
homes. Help each of us to do his 
best to make his home brighter, 
happier, and suitable for thine in- 
dwelling. And while we pray for this 
blessing, we remember those for var- 
ious reasons who are homeless. 
Dwell with and comfort these also 
in Jesus' dear name. Amen." 



The Bryson City Chapter of Fu- 
ture Homemakers presented a sha- 
dow show entitled "Oops, Your 
Manners Please" in assembly dur- 
ing National F.H.A. Week. The 
script was written to suit the situa- 
tion at Swain County High School. 

Before the show "The Lord's 
Prayer" (devotional given at Day- 
tona Beach) was given also in sha- 
dow, and was very effective. 

All signs used were cut out of old 
window shades, with colored cel- 
lophane taped over the cut-out let- 
ters to give color to the words on 
the screen, when the light was 
turned on behind them. 

Script: 

Narrator: 

LISTEN ALL! 

I have a story to tell ... a story 
of great interest, for its beginning 
dates back to the time when man 
first associated with man, many, 
many years ago . , , but, before I 



H IP ' f -' A 


ooes, MM^WBW 

^ P cease / \J\ \J O* '^B 

[■^ ■■ * _sk i Ji B 



Scene from the shadow show entitled "Oops, Your Manners Please" by the Bryson 
City Future Honieniakers at the Swain County High School during National F.H.A. 
Week. Script for this show begins on page 1. 



go on with my story, I want to pre- 
sent to you Jessica (pause) and 
James (pause), who will help me 
tell my story . . . and their helpers 
(pause for appearance). 

Now you noticed that Jessica was 
a polite little lady, who curtsied 
when introduced to you, and you 
might have supposed her to be a girl 
who lived in some far-gone period 
of our history; but actually she is 
a student of Swain High, and she 
was only showing her respect for a 
very special group of people — YOU, 
students of Swain High — and I'm 
telling you this story because I be- 
lieve in you, and I believe, too, that 
you are interested enough in YOUR 
school to make it the best possible 
school ever. Now if Jessica were 
meeting a queen, of course she 
would curtsy, but if she were meet- 
ing one of you, personally, she would 
extend her hand and say "How do 
you do?" Just remember, that is the 
accepted way to meet a stranger in 
our country. You are not living in 
Alaska where people rub noses 
when introduced, or in Africa where 
a hearty good head bump is quite 
the proper way to become ac- 
quainted. So remember, you never 
say "Pleasedtameetya," but a 
friendly "How do you do?" 

Now to get back to my story, I 
considered myself extremely lucky 
one day when I was invited to 
spend the day at Swain High, and 
there I was able to observe, first 
hand, the actions of Jessica and 
James and all their classmates. As 
I have told you before, the origin 
of accepted forms of behavior be- 
gan with the earliest mankind; and 
it was then that people and ani- 
mals lived in groups and herds in 



order to receive protection. If a 
prey should suddenly descend upon 
them, they would stampede, running 
for safety, irregardless of whatever 
should be in their path. It is only a 
logical deduction on my part, that 
for some mysterious reason, on that 
day, at exactly 1:10 o'clock, the en- 
tire student body suddenly reverted 
to a very primitive form of behav- 
ior, and stampeded across the cam- 
pus to the safety of the lunchroom. 
In this civilized age I wondered just 
what caused such behavior — and 
you should have seen Jessica and 
James! They were leading the stam- 
pede with nothing short of "ninety." 
Just suppose for one moment, what 
would happen, if one lone femme, 
should trip and fall. She would sim- 
ply be fit for burial — that's all! 

Oh, you laugh my friends! 
But think further with me . . . 
Imagine how valuable your life 

would be, 
Should you be the one to trip on 

the stair, 
In gathering you up, they'd find 

scarcely a hair! 

When Jessica and James reached 
the lunchroom they suddenly be- 
came- civilized human beings again, 
and oh such manners! They didn't 
push ahead of anyone in the line 
. . . although I saw several others 
who considered themselves privil- 
eged bluebloods, and too important 
to wait their turn. James held Jes- 
sica's chair, and helped her be 
seated. They enjoyed their food and 
each other's company, and even told 
the cooks how much they enjoyed 
their lunch as they put up their 
trays. But you should have seen the 



couple at the next table. You would 
have thought they were eating for 
wages; they talked with their mouths 
full of food, and really shoveled the 
food in, and the surprising thing 
was, when they finished they sat and 
sat, while others waited all around 
them for a place to sit down. A-N-D 
that big football hero I heard so 
many speaking of, well, he certainly 
must have used all his energy on 
the field for he didn't have the 
strength to lift his food to his mouth, 
but sat doubled up over his food — 
so the load would be lighter I 
suppose! 

As I finished my lunch I fol- 
lowed the crowd around the corner 
to the left, and immediately saw the 
attraction — ice cream! 

I noticed the school had very 
thoughtfully placed trash cans for 
the convenience of all civilized stu- 
dents — but what do you think I saw? 
Plenty of people who had not yet 
learned to think; for if they had, I'm 
sure so much paper and trash 
would not have been thrown around 
for someone else to clean up. 

Scarcely had I gulped my last lick 
of ice cream when the bell sounded, 
and surprisingly enough the students 
didn't run to the high-school build- 
ing as they did to the lunchroom. 
This was hard to understand but I 
just chalked it up to progress! 

I slipped into a back seat in one 
of the classrooms and tried to lock 
very inconspicuous . . . and even 
if I kept one eye closed you would 
be surprised at what I saw. The 
tardy-bell sounded, and after a mo- 
ment in walked a prima donna who 
evidently thought she could make a 
more dramatic entrance by being 
late. She had not heard that time 
waits for no one, so why should any- 
body else? That started me to think- 
ing of just what kind of a lecture 
I would deliver to all those corny 
Casanovas, who are unduly im- 
pressed with themselves and are al- 
ways arriving late to class. Tardi- 
ness is a serious social sin — yes, even 
at school! So step up your steps la- 
dies and gents — but no stampeding 
please! 

For an old scholar like me, my 
ears fairly split when the "Kings 
English" was "murdered." SOME, 
very thoughtlessly used the most ex- 
pressive language on earth in a man- 
ner which marked them as being 
both lazy and indifferent. So as long 
as we are being judged by the Eng- 
lish we use, let's polish it up a bit, 
and soon you'll find that it has pol- 
ished you. Incidentally, its no com- 



pliment to your school to use poor 
English — haven't you noticed those 
gray hairs in Mr. Wikle's head — he 
got those from trying to teach you 
better — so be a good sport and learn 
your grammar well! 

That buzz session in the back of 
the room ... it went on and on — 
I was beginning to wonder if some 
humans were a bit mixed up and 
were trying to manufacture honey 
— but, of course not! Someone just 
hadn't heard that it was very poor 
taste to talk when the teacher was 
talking. Someday the tables might 
turn, and when YOU have the floor 
you'll find out how that really is! 

Please someone, give that boy a 
button — didn't you hear what I 
heard? He just asked the teacher if 
he could close the windows for her. 
It was the end of the period, and 
no more classes in that room for the 
day. How thoughtful and consider- 
ate! Why can't everyone be that 
way? 

Well, bless all my seventeen but- 
tons, if I didn't really strike it lucky! 
Someone must have known football 
was my favorite sport, for before I 
got out of the building I had landed 
a free ticket to what was supposed 
to be the hardest-fought game of the 
season. 

WHAT A GAME! The going 
really was close — and those cheer- 
leaders were earnestly at work. But, 
the game was spoiled by a few poor 
sports who could never see the same 
things the referees saw — and what 
boos, temper and language they 
exhibited for all listeners! Now, if 
you think I'm going to tell you those 
poor sports were from Swain High 
— oh no, they must have been from 
Sylva! I was happy to learn that 
Swain High students showed bet- 
ter sportsmanship — keep up the 
good work! 

Perhaps you think I have already 
given the climax to my story. Oh 
no, this story has an anticlimax, 
and you can judge for yourself 
whether or not it detracts, as in all 
good stories there is a possibility 
that it might. I found out that Jes- 
sica and James were really in love 
— at least, I-think-they-were. . . . 
This is how I found out — against 
my good judgment to get more rest, 
I was persuaded to go the owl show. 
Frankly, I don't remember a great 
deal about the picture for I found 
more amusement just two seats 
ahead. Jessica and James were put- 
ting on their own show — for all the 
public — and the public eye was 
really on them. 




Left to Right are Leona Rick, Betty Bzukowicz modeling suits they made for the 
Christmas Fashion Revue. The models are Mount Holly F.H.A. members. 



A moral there has been to my story; 
A moral that has been plain to see — 
If the manners at Swain County 

High improve, 
It will be up to both you and me! 



A CHRISTMAS FASHION 
REVUE— FEATURE OF 
DECEMBER PROGRAM 

On December 10, 1953, the 
Mount Holly Chapter of the F.H.A. 
presented a Christmas play and a 
fashion revue for the P.T.A. meet- 
ing. 

Approximately seventy F.H.A. 
and home economics students par- 
ticipated in the activities. 

The comedy play, presented as 
the first part of the program, was 
entitled "Aunt Carrie's Christmas 
Carol." The play concerned an old 
lady who had not seen her suitor 
in 20 years because of a misunder- 
standing. One of the girls was 
dressed as a Negro maid and sang 



Negro spirituals. The audience was 
in an uproar at various intervals. 

The fashion show was narrated 
by three candidates for state degree, 
Peggie Greene, president of F.H.A.; 
Sharon Herring, Frances Hamilton, 
reporter. 

An "Old-Timy" living room and 
a large Christmas tree was the scene 
of the Fashion Revue. 

The students modeled suits, coats, 
jerseys, skirt and westkit combina- 
tions, that they had made themselves 
from wool, velveteen, gabardine, or- 
lon and wool, and cotton jersey. 

The closing feature of the Fash- 
ion Revue was the Bunny Hop. The 
Bunny Hop was danced by the girls 
who made pajamas and one little 
brother of an F.H.A. member who 
was dressed as a bunny. Material 
used was manufactured by Ameri- 
can and Efird Mills in Mt. Holly. 

Following the Fashion Revue, a 
(Continued on cover 3) 




Five members of the planning committee for District VI Rally as pictured here are: 
seated — Nancy Christenbury, East Mecklenburg, State Parliamentarian; Mrs. 
Louise M. Porter, Adviser District VI; Linda Waddell, Concord, president, and 
incoming State Reporter; standing — June Richie, Concord, Reporter; Phyllis 
Kellough, Concord, Vice-President. 



Each of you is a member of one of 
the eight districts and as such you are a 
member of the North Carolina State 
Association and the National Organiza- 
tion of Future Homemakers. Some of 
you may not have attended the rally in 
your district and would enjoy digesting a 
report of the entire day's program of 
each. Every district rally program holds 
similarities to the program every other 
district has. Each district, however, has 
its unique and distinctive characteristics 
different from every other district. Since 
space is limited a selection, a picture, or 
some item telling a part of the story of 
each rally is included in this article. 



DISTRICT I 

Excerpts from Mrs. J. F. Herbert's 
Speech — Roanoke Rapids, October 9. 

(Mrs. Herbert is a homemaker and 
the wife of a minister.) 

Your Future Homemakers Organiza- 
tion is a training ground for your future 
homemaking responsibilities, in your 
own home during these very days . . . 
with your own families. There you can 
learn all the skills of housekeeping and 
homemaking in normal life situations. 

But I am not thinking primarily, today 
of the skills of housekeeping — of cook- 
ing, preserving, of sewing, design and 
interior decorating. 1 have read through 
your Homemaker 's Manual and as I read 
your purpose and your creed I saw in 
every line something that goes deeper 
than technical skills, deeper than effi- 
ciency and economy, deeper than exterior 
beauty. I saw such words as joy, and 
courage, and truth and love. 

AND THIS is really what I want to 
say to you today — when any queen 



takes off her wedding veil and turns to 
take care of her castle . . . when any 
girl enters upon a lifetime career as a 
homemaker, she will need, above all, a 
spiritual approach to her new life. I 
don't want the word spiritual to go over 
your head. For the things of the spirit are 
love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, 
goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self- 
control — and those are the qualities 
that can turn a house into a home. 

These qualities made for (in words 
of your own Homemaker's Creed) 
"Homes where truth and love and 
security and faith will be realities, not 
dreams." 

And just as you can best learn the 
skills of housekeeping in your own 
homes, it is there, too, where you can 
be perfecting in these years these 
spiritual skills. Your own homes, your 
brothers and sisters, your parents, your 
own communities provide the best and 
dearest situations and materials upon 
which to practice these skills of the 
spirit . . . these skills of getting along 
happily together with lots of fun and 
laughter, lots of understanding and self- 
control and co-operation. This is your 
field for creative leadership. How can a 
girl develop these intangible, spiritual 
qualities in her home and in her com- 
munity? 

You know how. It's just the same way 
you develop any skill — physical skills, 
such as playing piano, sewing — 
creatively and persistently and with con- 
stant practice . . . and remember that a 
leader must keep ahead, but must feel a 
close fellowship with those whom she 
wants to lead. 

Of all the hidden hungers, the deepest 
is that hunger for the security of love, 
and that is the greatest responsibility of 




A scene at the District VIII Rail;, 
Miss Louise Swann, Assistant St 
Judie Ellis;; Judy Pressley; Miss Bi 
Standing is Margo Sicha of Lee V 



a homemaker. You can paint and paper 
the walls of your houses; you can hang 
drapes and pictures and mirrors; you can 
wax and carpet your floors; you can fill 
your deep-freeze with food and hang 
your closets full of clothes . . . but you 
have only a house until those who live 
in it make it a home by filling it with 
warmth of happy, companionable and 
purposeful living . . . and this is not done 
in an atmosphere of tension; it is done 
with skills of the spirit against the back- 
ground of a relaxed mind and heart. 

Future Homemakers of America, 
practice your fine skills of housekeeping, 
but make them come alive with a 
spiritual purpose and gentleness and 
beauty. If you serve the most delicious 
food with bitter words, what has your 
family to eat? ARE YOU A LEADER 
FOR BETTER HOMES? Then lead your 
family and those in your community to 
develop their many arts and skills, but 
lead them, too, into the realm of the 
spirit. Lead them into the art of keeping 
their homes orderly and beautiful — but 
show them, too, how to fill them with 
happy and gentle living. 



CAMPAIGN SPEECH 
BETTY LOVE POTTER 

Pamlico County Chapter 

F.H.A. means to me a better way of 
life, a pleasant life of opportunity and 
service. A girl cannot participate in the 
activities of a group such as we are here 
today without having her life enriched, 
nor can she sit among hundreds of girls 
from all parts of the South, such as at 
the Southern Regional Convention which 
I attended this past summer, without 
being inspired to truly work toward the 
goals of our organization: Better Living 
Today and Better Homes for America's 
Future. 

F.H.A. creates an atmosphere in 
which we as young people grow and 
develop. It has given me the opportunity 
to develop leadership and poise, to travel, 
to work democratically with others and 
to make everlasting friendships. It also 




;ht: Beth Peterson; Shirley Putman; 
of Home Economics Education; 
(taker, District VIII F.H.A. Adviser, 
iter, State F.H.A. Treasurer. 




"The Pajama Party," an informal means of telling the audience what happened at 
the Southern Regional Convention at Daytona Beach last June. Left to right are: 
Mary Alice Far-ham, Walkertown; Minnie Lou Vannhoy, Waikertown; Norma Evans, 
Kernersville; Bo Peep Kuykendall, Kernersville. 



has given me the opportunity to appear 
before you as a candidate for the Vice- 
Presidency of our organization. I con- 
sider it a privilege to be able to stand 
before you and express my ideas. 

F. H. A. has also shown me the im- 
portance of being a worthy member of 
my family and has helped me to under- 
stand these words taken from our Creed: 

We are the builders of homes — 
Homes where truth and love and 

security and faith 
Will be realities, not dreams. 

Are these — truth, love, security and 
faith — not also the basis of world 
peace and happiness? 

If thousands of girls all over the U. S. 
are working toward these goals, our in- 
fluence is bound to be felt. I am proud 
to be a part of such an organization — 
an organization that teaches us to have 
faith in ourselves and others, to be 
democratic at all times; and above all, to 
strive for what is best for everyone. 

In conclusion, I should like to say 
that I would greatly appreciate your sup- 
port, and I will earnestly endeavor to 
fulfill the office to the best of my ability 
if I am elected as your State Vice- 
President of the Future Homemakers 
of America. 

Thank you. 



DISTRICT II 

"Our Heritage," a most inspiring 
drama portraying American democracy 
in the freedom of life, liberty, and the 
pursuit of happiness presented by the 
Goldmasquers, was the high-lighting fea- 
ture of the day's program at District II 
Rally in Goldsboro on October 3. The 
pageant was directed by Mr. Clifton 
Britton who is an honorary member of 
the State Association of Future Home- 
makers. Mr. Britton also directed "Fall 
Portraits," a showing of fall fashions 
modeled by Future Homemakers with 
all the grace and beauty of professional 
models. With the perfect background and 
the "just-right" lighting used for each 



model — one had a feeling that she 
must be dreaming what she was seeing. 
Real talent was demonstrated by the 
members of the Quin-County Federation 
in District II. Lack of time prevented 
some of the members from displaying 
their talent, however. 

DISTRICT III 

"Programs on Parade" featured during 
the afternoon session of District III 
Rally in Williams Township School 
October 2, proved to be entertaining, 
educational, and related to the purposes 
of the F.H.A. Furthermore, each pro- 
gram could be taken back to the local 
communities. "Programs on Parade" was 
introduced by the Lumberton Chapter. 
The programs were as follows: "Tater 
Family," by the Red Springs Chapter; 
"Builders of Homes" (See page 2 No- 
vember 1954 issue of Teen Times for 
skit), by the Barnesville Chapter; and 
"From Here to Eternity and Back," an 
original skit by the Rowland Chapter. 

OUTLINE OF SKIT 

OF REGIONAL MEETING 

IN DAYTONA BEACH 

PRESENTED AT 
DISTRICT IV RALLY 
Narrator: Frances Wilson, District IV 
adviser. 

I wish all of you could have attended 
the Regional Meeting in Daytona Beach, 
but since wishes can't always come true 
we want to take you to Daytona Beach 
in an imaginary way. 
(Introduction. ) 



Now just what are the girls wearing 
at this meeting? Well here's a girl from 
Texas. (Texas girl comes out with petti- 
coats.) 

At the first general session. North 
Carolina is responsible for roll call. (Roll 
call demonstrated.) 

Thought-promoting and picturesque de- 
votions are given at each general ses- 
sion to produce the atmosphere needed 
for the remainder of the meeting. One is 
the "Builders of Homes" where a house 
is built — foundation, walls, roof, win- 
dows, doors, chimney, steps, shrubbery 
and flowers — each part signifies a 
special meaning in a home. A musical 
background and such songs as "Bless 
This House" and "Home Sweet Home" 
are sung as part of the service. Another 
devotion is the speech, "I Am an Ameri- 
can," read by a reader off stage while 
a statue of liberty was viewed by the 
audience. 

We are fortunate to have such wonder- 
ful consultants for helping us become 
leaders for better homes. Etcetera. I now 
introduce to you Mama and Papa. 

(Impersonation of Dr. Moore and Dr. 
Keltner.) 

We completed our discussion groups 
yesterday. There were twenty small 
groups of girls with a chairman, recorder 
and hostess in each. The chairmen of 
the groups are ready to give you their 
report now. (Pantomime by all chair- 
men.) 

I thought we had a lot of fun at fish 
fry, but that band concert! And I sure 
am looking forward to that banquet 
Friday night, too. 

We can't forget our National Officer 
at the meeting. She did a wonderful job 






of presiding and she carried off that 
election of officers like it just came 
natural. 

I always like plays and I know you 
do, too. That one called "Moonlight, 
Magnolias and Ghosts" is one f especially 
like. Each state is represented by an 
outstanding homemaker and North Caro- 
lina has Dolly Madison. (Ruth Temple, 
dressed as Dolly Madison, steps on stage 
and speaks.) 

I want you to meet Maria from Puerto 
Rico, who is grand at doing those 
Spanish dances. (Maria dances.) 

(Girls come on stage with basket of 
souvenirs.) Sarah, what are you doing 
with all these things in your basket? My, 
this is a very lovely compact. And these 
earbobs! (Souvenirs displayed and ex- 
plained.) 

DISTRICT V 

Quotes from an article which appeared 
on the front page of the Greensboro 
Daily, on Sunday, November 14. 

F.H.A. MEMBERS POLITICK AT 
MADISON MEETING 

By Barton Hickman 
Madison, November 13 

"About 500 girls from six Piedmont 
counties held a convention here today. 
For most, it was their first experience 
in the big-scale working of democracy. 

"The girls were all members of the 
Future Homemakers of America. The 
occasion was the annual rally of F.H.A. 
District Five. The high-light was the 
election of one of the top eight officers 
in the state F.H.A. 

"There was buttonholing of delegates 
out in the corridors, passing our favors 
(penny candy in this case) and, between 
the first and second ballots, hasty con- 
ferences and decisions to vote whole 
school delegations in blocs. 

"The delegates represented the home 
economics classes of about 25 high 
schools in Rockingham, Caswell, Guil- 
ford, Alamance, Randolph and Chatham 
counties. Each school F.H.A. chapter 
was allowed one vote for each five 
F.H.A. members they had enrolled last 
year. 

"Some schools sent more delegates 
than they had votes. Others were allowed 
more votes than they had delegates pres- 
ent. Bloc-voting by schools thus fre- 
quently occurred. But there were also 
those rugged individualists who exercised 
their right to cast separate ballots. 

"Charles Fleming, principal of Madi- 
son High School, welcomed the F.H.A. 
delegates after which the youngsters ef- 
ficiently took over the operation of the 
meeting themselves. The four candidates 
were introduced, each by a classmate 
sponsor, in the traditional "a girl who" 
method. 

"Mr. J. Allen Lewis, Superintendent 
of Rockingham Schools, furnished both 
light and serious entertainment during 
the afternoon session. Mr. Lewis is an 
honorary member of the State Associa- 
tion of Future Homemakers. 

"The program ended with an inspira- 
tional talk by Rev. Howard Alfred, 
pastor of Draper Methodist Church." 

DISTRICT VI 

Two honorary members of the Con- 
cord Chapter of Future Homemakers of 
America and the Chapter President were 
among those getting the District VI rally 
off to a good start on Saturday, No- 
vember 13, in the Concord High School. 

The two honorary members were none 



other than the Superintendent of Con- 
cord City Schools, Dr. R. Brown McAllis- 
ter, and the Concord High School Princi- 
pal, Mr. Ralph A. Glenn. They brought 
words of greeting and welcome as did 
Miss Linda Waddell, local chapter presi- 
dent. Incidentally, Linda, was elected 
during the day to the office of State 
Reporter, coming from District VI. 

Program features during the day were 
a talk by Mrs. E. A. Morgan, Chapter 
Mother, from Star, on "The Real Value 
of Future Homemakers" and a talk by 
Mr. Shaw Smith, Co-ordinator of Stu- 
dent Activities, Davidson College. 

Mr. Smith's unusual topic was "Leisure 
Time, Fun or Funny" and he proved to 
be a most entertaining speaker, con- 
vulsing his audience with laughter, and 
yet emphasizing the fact that homemak- 
ing is the most important job a girl can 
prepare herself for — revealing a keen 
understanding of his youthful audience. 

Frances Burris, former National 
F.H.A. officer from North Carolina, 
who is now a student at Wingate Col- 
lege, and incidentally preparing to major 
in home economics, appeared on the 
program during the day, and she had 
with her also the members of the 
Wingate College Sextet, of which 
Frances herself is a member. They gave 
some special music throughout the day. 

DISTRICT VII 

The main feature of the day's program 
was a very beautiful and inspiring pa- 
geant presented by the Forsyth and 
Stokes county chapters. The theme, 
"F.H.A., Yesterday, Today, and To- 
morrow." Narrators Phylis Thompson, 
Bo Peep Kuykendall and Pat Smith, told 
the story while various scenes were en- 
acted. Eight lovely girls dressed in white 
evening gowns and holding lighted 
nosegays of red roses represented the 
spirits of F.H.A. Other scenes such as 
"The F.H.A. Girl in the Family Group"; 
"School Club"; "Christmas Time"; 
"Grandmother"; "The F.H.A. Girl and 
a Younger Child"; "Public Relations"; 
"City and Country Girl"; "Detectives"; 
"Funs-a-FIying King Club"; and "F.H.A. 
Carpenters" were illustrated. Music fur- 
nished by choral groups added beauty 
and meaning to the pageant. 

Special guests were recognized by 
Lansing Chapter. Those present were 
Miss Louise Lowe, District State Super- 
visor of Homemakjhg; Miss French, a 
pioneer in F.H.A. work, from Catawba 
College and Mrs. R. S. Fergueson, who 
is an honorary F.H.A. member. 

Mrs. Faye Benton, F.H.A. Adviser at 
Old Town, and Mrs. Rosa Parker, F.H.A. 
Adviser at North Davidson and District 
VII F.H.A. Adviser, were given special 
recognition by the acting president, 
Claudette Belton. 

DISTRICT VIII RALLY 

"TODAY IS MY FUTURE," a sym- 
posium by five state homemakers, was 
the high-light of the afternoon session 
of District VIII Rally held at Lee Ed- 
wards High School, Asheville, Octo- 
ber 9. Margo Sicha, State Treasurer, 
presided. 

A few less than 1,000 attended. F.H.A. 
Members, Advisers, Chapter Mothers, 
and other guests came from all parts of 
western North Carolina seeing the first 
fall colors in the mountain foliage, many 
traveling the new four-lane highway be- 
tween Old Fort and Ridgecrest for the 



first time, and many attending a district 
meeting of Future Homemakers for the 
first time. Ruth Bryan, Chapter President 
at Lee Edwards, and her hostess com- 
mittee gave these delegates a most hearty 
welcome. 

A panel of youths and parents dis- 
cussed questions from the audience and 
high-lighted the general topic, "Person- 
ality — A 1954 View." Mrs. Mary Anee 
Duke, Family Life Co-ordinator in Ashe- 
ville, was panel leader and participants 
were: Mr. W. F. Algary, Rev. Mark 
Jenkins, Mrs. Leon Lachman, and four 
Lee Edwards students; Nell Cherry, 
Mary Ann Dermind, John Wilson and 
Bill Algary. 

Eight candidates for State Secretary 
for 1956-57 were presented and their 
qualifications given by Carolyn Erwin, 
Morganton Chapter. Miss Martha Morri- 
son, Rutherfordton-Spindale, was elected. 

During the symposium five state home- 
makers reported on what F.H.A. has 
meant to them, and gave delightful ac- 
counts on various activities they had par- 
ticipated in during last year. These girls 
were: Shirley Putman, Tri-High, Caro- 
leen, "Local Chapter Projects"; Betty 
Jackowitz, Mount Holly, "My Experience 
in Working on Degree Committee"; Ju- 
die Ellie, Oakley, reported on chapter 
activities; Caroline Pruitt, Rutherfordton, 
"Opportunities for Leadership and Worth- 
while Community Effort Through Coun- 
ty F.H.A. Organizations," and Judy Press- 
ley of Clyde Chapter, told how she 
worked on personal goals. 

Other features of the program were: 
Devotional, "The Lord's Prayer in the 
Life of a girl," Waco Chapter, Anna 
Dodd, Joan Cline, and Judy Pope; group 
singing led by Mr. Seth Perkinson, Com- 
munity Recreational leader; pictorial map 
for roll call by Haywood County. 

Dr. Jack Fellows, Black Mountain, 
talked to the group on "Recreation, 
Group and Individual," at the close of the 
afternoon session. The Lee Edwards Jazz 
Band entertained after lunch. 

NUMBER ATTENDING 

DISTRICT FUTURE 

HOMEMAKERS RALLIES 

IN NORTH CAROLINA 

I— 789 

H_ 844- 

III— 698 

IV— 847 
V— 470 

VI— 408 
VII— 829 
VIII— 987 

Total— 5,872 

NAMES OF OFFICERS 
ELECTED FOR 1955-56 

I — Jeannette Worthington — Vice- 
President — Ayden 
II — Carol Lynn Garris — President 

— Pikeville 
III — Betty Olsen — Song Leader — 

New Hanover 
IV — Judy Hamlet — Historian — 

Lowe's Grove 
V — Jane Honeycutt — Parliamen- 
tarian — Trinity 
VI — Linda Waddell — Reporter — 

Concord High School 
VII — Becky Shuping — Treasurer — 

Boyden 
VIII — Martha Morrison — Secretary ■ — 
Rutherfordton-Spindale 




Bailey Chapter began observing Na- 
tional F.H.A. Week with the initiation 
of new members. One entire page of the 
Bailey Bugle, the school newspaper, was 
devoted to interpreting the meaning and 
value of the Future Homemakers organi- 
zation. Activities continued throughout 
the week. 

The Beaufort F.H.A. Chapter members 
have been busy and active all fall. They 
sponsored a dance in the Scout Building 
one Saturday night. Forty teen-agers at- 
tended the dance. They observed Na- 
tional F.H.A. week doing something 
interesting and worth-while each day. 
Sunday they furnished flowers for the al- 
tar and were recognized on the printed 
program. To earn money for project 
actvity the chapter is selling green and 
white school emblems and football boost- 
erette pins. Thirty-eight Beaufort and 
Morehead City F.H.A. 'ers chartered a 
bus to the state fair. Mrs. T. P. Allen 
and Mrs. Edna Gibbs served as chaper- 
ons. The chapter purchased a 1955 Ben- 
dix Deluxe dryer. The committee 
members appointed to take care of the 
schools first-aid room each month es- 
pecially enjoy the machine. 

The Boyden Chapter encouraged mem- 
bership by having a social for the old 
members and sponsoring an assembly 
program for prospective members. First- 
year home economics girls prepared the 
refreshments (punch and cookies) for the 
social, which was held after school. Boy- 
den was host to District VII Rally which 
was held October 16. 

The Lillington F.H.A. Chapter won 
first prize of $50.00 for their fair exhibit 
at the Four-County Fair in Dunn this 
year. The theme of the exhibit was 
"Attractive Inexpensive Table Settings." 

The Morehead City Chapter of Future 
Homemakers was honored to have Mrs. 
Grayden Willis, the first president of the 
Morehead City Chapter to speak at one 
of their meetings in October. Mrs. Willis, 
the former Rachel Brock, told the mem- 
bers of the benefits which could be de- 
rived from being a member of the Fu- 
ture Homemakers of America. Thursday 
of Education Week, Beadie Lewis, our 
president, gave a 2Vi -minute radio talk 
on F.H.A. Each day one or two of our 
school organizations were on the radio. 
This was very good. 

The Mount Holly Chapter is using a 
system of organization and program exe- 
cution which was worked out by the 
members and their adviser to fit into the 
situation in their school, with large 
membership and a full schedule. If you 
are interested, a copy of the procedures 
sent in by Eulanda Auten, chairman of 
the Mount Holly second-year F.H.A. 
members can be sent to you upon re- 
quest to the State F.H.A. Adviser. 

The Mountain Park Chapter displayed 
an exhibit at the Mount Airy and Moun- 
tain Park Community fairs. We also 
sponsored the cake walk at the Hallow- 
een carnival. We attended the officers' 
workshop at Franklin School. Our atten- 
dance was good for the District VII 



Rally, Salisbury. We attended the county 
rally at Mount Airy and participated in 
the program. We also observed F.H.A. 
week. The outstanding things we did 
were to bring unused clothing for needy 
families in our own community and to 
send others overseas. We eliminated 
some of our complaints by having "No- 
Gripe" Day and made our parents ap- 
preciate us more by doing some of their 
chores and showing our appreciation for 
them. 

The Red Springs Chapter had 17 dele- 
gates to attend the District III Rally at 
the Williams Township School on Octo- 
ber 9. The Red Springs Chapter presented 
a skit "The Tater Family," a very en- 
tertaining portrayal of varied types of 
human personalities. The cast consisted 
of Betty Gray Dorman, narrator, and 
Anne Bodenheimer, demonstrator. 

In the Shelby High School fifty-eight 
home economics students were initiated 
into Future Homemakers of America in 
special services during school hours on 
Thursday with final initiation in the eve- 
ning at 7:00 o'clock in the school 
auditorium. 

The girls, all students of Mrs. Har- 
riett Holton and Mrs. Carlyle Cornwell, 
attended classes yesterday in their Sun- 
day-best, complete from heels to ear- 
rings, and carried their books in boxes 
decorated in the chapter colors of red 
and white. Each girl did at least one good 
deed during the day to complete her re- 
quirements for initiation, these require- 
ments having been drawn up by a com- 
mittee of juniors including Marjorie Lou 
Costner, chairman, Nancy Pendleton, 
Nancy Faison and Martha Reid. 

Myra Eskridge was a candidate for 
state secretary at District VIII Rally. 
Beth Peterson was on the program as 
acting secretary for the day. 

The Wilton Chapter held a Mother- 
Father-Daughter banquet during Na- 
tional F.H.A. Week. Their theme was 
"Shine on Harvest Moon — On Our 
Homes of Yesterday, Today, and To- 
morrow." The program was consistent 
with the theme — songs and dances of 
yesterday and today were dramatized. 
The program ended on a more serious 
note with a pageant — Builders of Homes 
— followed by a solo, "Bless This 
House." 



National F.H.A. Week 

at Lee Edwards School 

Asheville 

An F.H.A. project was carried out 
each day during the week. The clos- 
ing was marked by a trip to the Or- 
thopedic Home. A talent show was 
given there by the following: Gail 
Wyatt, Mary Sue Anderson, Betty 
Guthrie, Rose Marie Dunn, Libby 
Ballard, Shirley Clark and the "Jazz 
Band" of Lee Edwards. At the end 
of the program, magazines and can- 
died apples were passed out to the 
children. 

The chapter also made over fifty 
dollars with a talent show which was 
given at school. This money will be 
used for different projects. 



On November 3, the installation 
of the F.H.A. officers was held in 
the school auditorium with a candle- 
light service. John Wilson, president 
of the student body, installed the 
new president, Ruth Bryan. Other 
officers who were installed are as 
follows: Jill Batts, vice-president; 
Betty Masters, secretary; Nelle 
Cherry, treasurer; Sandy Chruch, 
chaplain; Margo Sicha, historian; 
Shelby Church, reporter, Norma 
Slauder, song leader; and Margie 
Thomas, pianist. 



F.H.A. Week John Graham 
Warrenton 

Doing for others was the theme 
of the John Graham Chapter of Fu- 
ture Homemakers during National 
Future Homemakers of America 
Week, October 31 -November 6. 

As a part of this program, Mayor 
Ed Rooker of Warrenton had a red 
rose pinned upon the lapel of his 
coat at the school by Betty Haith- 
cock, president of the class. 

Sunday many members attended 
the Warrenton Baptist Church and 
sat in a group, and the chapter flow- 
er, red roses, were placed on the 
altar. 

On Monday, as a continuation of 
the rose-pinning ceremony, Mayor 
Rooker proclaimed October 31- 
November 6 as National Future 
Homemakers of America week. On 
Tuesday a red rose was placed on 
each high-school teacher's desk. On 
Wednesday the girls gave the school 
an extra cleaning. On Thursday 
some of the members visited older 
people and carried them a favor 
from the chapter. Friday, during the 
chapel program, this year's officers 
were formally installed. On Satur- 
day the members concluded the ob- 
servance of the special week by act- 
ing as baby-sitters so their parents 
might have a night off. 



F.H.A. Week, Morehead City 

Sunday: Attended Free Will Bap- 
tist Church, Mrs. Florence Cordova, 
adviser, told something about the 
F.H.A. 

Monday: All members wore a 
small red and white ribbon bow all 
week. 

Tuesday: Put up an exhibit in 
Spinning Wheel Shop window on, 
"Families That Play Together Stay 
Together." Suggestions for Family 
Fun were displayed and dolls repre- 
senting a family were seated at a 



table in front of the house playing 
a game. 

Wednesday: Packed gifts for 
Christmas Festival and sent off. 

Thursday: Held a Sock Dance in 
Recreation Center. Charged one 
cent an inch for both feet. Every- 
one danced in their socks and there 
were several guessing contests with 
the winners being awarded prizes. 
A good time was had and a small 
amount of money was realized. 

Friday: An article was put in the 
paper telling about the Future 
Homemakers organization. The edi- 
tor did this as well as an editorial. 



Endy F.F.A. and F.H.A. 
Join Hands for the Future 

At the beginning of the new 
school year the agriculture teacher 
at Endy, Mr. Eller, the home eco- 
nomics teacher, Mrs. Pratt C. Mc- 
Swain, came to the conclusion that 
the young people of the Endy com- 
munity needed more social contacts 
together, more planning, woiking 
and playing together now, as young 
people, if they are to bridge the gap 
in their lives from "high school to 
marriage." 

Mr. Swaringen, principal cf the 
Endy School for the past fifteen to 
twenty years, joined hands with the 
teachers in this project and gave 
every student the opportunity to join 
this "Joint F.F.A. and F.H.A. Un- 
dertaking." At the first meeting 
nearly every high-school girl and 
boy met in the high-school audi- 
torium for the first meeting with the 
F.F.A. boys presiding and the 
F.H.A. girls putting on the program. 
Two high-school teachers joined the 
group and later described it as one 
of the most worth-while projects un- 
dertaken in the school. 

From the time the meeting was 
called to order everything moved 
like clock work. The business meet- 
ing was conducted in a fine and 
business-like manner by the boys 
and this was followed by an out- 
standing program on "Building a 
Better Personality." Films had been 
secured from the State Health De- 
partment and they proved to be very 
instructive and helpful. Following 
the showing of the film, the two 
teachers led a discussion on "Good 
Personality and Good Grooming" 
and the interest was so intense that 
you could have heard a pin drop 
every minute of the meeting. Eighty- 
three boys and girls declared this to 
be a meeting that was most instruc- 
tive and educational and it is truly 

8 



hard to wait until the next meeting. 
This is the largest number of boys 
and girls ever to join these organi- 
zations at Endy. The interest has 
become so intense that films have 
been booked for four weeks — one 
good film to be shown each week 
to a joint home economics class and 
agriculture class on "Good Man- 
ners," "Good Grooming," Success- 
ful Family Life" and "Foods for 
Health." 

If the boys and girls work hand^ 
in-hand now in these meetings, work- 
ing out their programs and planning 
for the future, they should he the 
best adults we could ever call on 
when they establish homes of their 
own in the community. 



national menu. Future Homemakers 
sponsored the observance and went 
dressed in costumes of various coun- 
tries. The five foreign visitors were 
Mike Furahata from Japan; R. Desi- 
cran from India; Berry Hughes of 
England; M. M. Siddique of Pakis- 
tan; and Dr. E. Shafa of Iran. 



United Nations Day Observed 
by Future Homemakers 

A United Nations Day Service for 
all F.H.A. members (their friends 
and parents) of the Rutherfordton- 
Spindale Chapter was held in the 
Presbyterian Church at Spindale. 
The president's proclamation con- 
cerning U.N. Day was read. The 
speaker was Rev. W. H. Pruitt, 
who had attended a recent conven- 
tion where there were several United 
Nations workers. The history teach- 
er in the Rutherfordton-Spindale 
School was on the October program 
of our chapter. She gave the mem- 
bers an insight into the workings of 
the United Nations. The United Na- 
tions is one of the history teacher's 
sideline interests and she was able 
to create a great deal of interest on 
the part of the girls. 

Bethesda School observed United 
Nations Day this year by entertain- 
ing foreign visitors, watching an orig- 
inal skit and eating from an inter- 



COVER PICTURE 

Miss Catherine T. Dennis (an 
honorary member of the State As- 
sociation of Future Homemakers) 
who has made good, cannot afford 
to wait until the last minute to 
wrap Christmas packages and to 
address Christmas cards. I ler's is a 
very, very busy schedule. Although 
her responsibilities as President of 
the American Home Economics As- 
sociation and State Supervisor of 
Home Economics are many, varied, 
and quite time-consuming, Miss 
Dennis — the typical present and fu- 
ture homemaker — is still able to 
so manage her time and energy as 
not to neglect members of her own 
family at Christmas or at any other 
time. 



Here's What Some of the 
Counties are Doing! 

The first annual meeting of the 
Stanly County Federation of the Fu- 
ture Homemakers of America was 
held Thursday, October 7, at the 
Richfield High School. 

The following officers weie in- 
stalled to serve during the coming 
year: Linda Barringer, president, 
Richfield; Jane Hinson, vice- 
president, Stanfield; Elaine Swarin- 
gen, secretary, Albemarle; Joyce 
Whitley, treasurer, Endy; Lottie Ma- 
bry, parliamentarian, Norwood; 
Arilla Nash, reporter, New London; 
Margaret Bell, historian, Badin; 
Ann Poplin, song leader, Oakboro. 

Schools represented at this meet- 
ing were New London, Richfield, 
Stanfield, Albemarle, Endy, Nor- 
wood, Badin and Oakboro. One 
hundred and eighty members, chap- 
ter mothers and guests were present. 

A fashion show and flower ar- 
rangements were high-lights of the 
evening. Girls from all chapters 
modeled charming clothes for differ- 
ent occasions. Hiram Saunders dis- 
played several beautiful flower ar- 
rangements. Between the fashion 
show and flower arrangements the 
group enjoyed relaxing and group 
singing. 

Officers of the Wayne Federation 
of Future Homemakers of America 
for 1954-55 have been installed 
in ceremonies at Grantham School. 
Approximately 150 persons at- 
tended the annual rally. 

Nancy Edmondson of Eureka is 
the new president. She succeeds 
Jane Gardner of Pikeville. 

Other officers for the 1954-55 
academic year are: Hazel Gurley, 
vice-president, Nahunta; Carrol 
Lynn Garris, secretary, Pikeville; 
Peggy Mitchell, treasurer, Rose- 
wood; Ellen Gray, reporter, New 
Hope; Emma Sanderson, parliamen- 
tarian, Seven Springs; Rebecca 
Oliver, historian, Mount Olive; Jo 
Ann Bryan, song leader, Grant- 
ham; Evelyn Hill, pianist, Golds- 
boro; Peggy Taylor, news editor, 
Brogden. 

Nahunta F.H.A. Chapter pre- 
sented the program. A skit with the 
theme of "Personality in the Pro- 



Preparing a float and exhibit, an F.H.A. 
Rally, election and installation of offi- 
cers, have kept many Homemakers of 
Elizabethtown, Clarkton and Bladenboro 
occupied during the past week. Fifty-six 
chapter members with advisers attended 
the District No. ill Rally at Williams 
Township. Sybil Butler of the Bladen- 
boro Chapter was elected first alternate 
for State Song Leader. 

Many Future Homemakers enjoyed 
Farmer's Day in Clarkton, October 7-8. 
Their exhibit. "The Dawn of Better Liv- 
ing," depicting life yesterday and today, 
was a true picture of the past and present. 
Riding in the F.H.A. float made of 
white ruffles and red roses were: Pa- 
tricia Harrelson, president Clarkton 
F.H.A. Chapter; Annie Fulton Thomp- 
son, president Bladenboro Chapter; and 
Sue King, president of the Elizabethtown 
Chapter. 



Float of the Four Oaks Chapter at the 
Mule Dav Parade in Benson Septem- 
ber 10. 




fessional World" was featured. It 
was a showing, by contrast, of poor 
and good personality in homemak- 
ing, nursing, secretarial work and 
the teaching professions. 

After the program, refreshments 
were served by the host club, Grant- 
ham, in the school cafeteria. 

The Surry County Federation of 
the Future Homemakers of Amer- 
ica is very active. The year started 
off with a meeting of a planning 
committee composed of represen- 
tatives from Mount Airy, Mountain 
Park, Pilot Mountain, Beulah, Dob- 
son, Franklin, Flat Rock, Elkin and 
Copeland schools. 

A workshop for the officers was 
planned and carried out at Frank- 
lin School. The workshop was fol- 
lowed by a delicious supper served 
in the school cafeteria. A recrea- 
tional program was enjoyed and the 
installation service, as usual, was 
very impressive. 

The county rally was another very 
interesting event. Chapters from all 
the schools were present. Games 
were enjoyed before the Wiener 
Roast. After this, each school pre- 
sented some type of entertainment 
which was very good and enjoyed 
by all. 



RELAXER— I'M A NUT 

(Twinkle Twinkle Little Star) 

1. I'm a little acorn born, lying 
on the cold, cold ground. 
Everybody steps on me; that is 
Why I'm cracked, you see. 

Refrain 

I'm a nut, tch, tch 
I'm a nut, tch, tch 
I'm a nut, tch, tch 
I'm a nut, tch, tch 

2. I called myself upon the phone, 
just to see if I was home 
Asked myself about a date; at 
the latest, half past eight. 

Refrain 

3. I love myself, I think I'm grand; 
at the movies I hold my hand 
Put my arm around my waist; if I 
get fresh I slap my face. 

Refrain 



FASHION REVUE 

(Continued from page 3) 
reception was held in the school 
cafeteria for everyone attending. 

The Weldon Chapter has used this 
delicious recipe for a Christmas tea 



ANNOUNCING! 
10th Anniversary Celebration of 
the N. C. Association of Future 
Homemakers — at State Conven- 
tion—May 14, 1955. 



one year and plan to use it again 
this year. You will want to try it, 
too. 

Cranberry Punch 

1 qt. fresh cranberries 

2 cups water 
1 cup sugar 

3 cups apple juice 
Vi cup lemon juice 

1 lemon sliced thin 
Ginger ale 

Combine cranberries, water and 
sugar; cook until cranberries are 
very soft. Strain through food mill; 
cool. Combine strained cranberry 
juice with apple and lemon juice. 
Chill thoroughly. To serve, place 
ice in bowl. Pour equal parts of 
punch and ginger ale over ice. Float 
thin slices of lemon on bowl. 



Attention all Future Home- 
makers! 

The deadline for affiliating with 
the State association of Future 
Homemakers and the National Or- 
ganization is January 15, 1955. 

You may be interested to know 
that on Nov. 30 the enrollment 
for 1954-55 is 14,000 plus in 325 
chapters. We do hope to reach our 
goal of 20,000 members and 450 
or more chapters for the current 
year. 



Future Homemakers of America 

CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 




CAROLINE SAYS: 

I like to think of my local unit of Future Home- 
makers as a chapter rather than a club. Somehow 
being a member of a chapter makes me feel as if I 
am a character in a volume of books. The volume in 
which I play the most important role is entitled North 
Carolina State Association of Future Homemakers. 

Of course if I am a member of my local unit but 
never did affiliate with the State Association and Na- 
tional Organization I think I should call my local unit 
a club and it wouldn't seem very ethical to call it the 
Future Homemakers Club. At least as a bonafide mem- 
ber of the Springfield Future Homemakers Chapter — 
that is how I feel. 







MAKERS 

North Carolina Association * 



VOLUME XII 



FEBRUARY 1955 



NUMBER 3 



Emblematic 




Materials 



The National Advisory Board has 
recommended that the following 
items sold by the L. G. Balfour 
Company be discontinued at the end 
of this fiscal year. 

1. Official award plaques 

2. Felt arm bands 

3. Felt pennants 

4. F.H.A. jar labels 

5. F.H.A. name cards 

6. F.H.A. Christmas cards 

The following items purchased 
from Chapter Supply Company will 
be discontinued at the end of this 
fiscal year. 

1. Pep shirts 3. Rain jackets 

2. Sailor hats 4. Mittens 

It was recommended that the na- 
tional adviser investigate a new 
source of supply to provide a better 
quality of product for the following 
items: 

1. Treasurer's notebook 

2. Secretary's notebook 

3. Chapter scrapbook 



New emblematic items which are 
approved are: 

1. Honorary membership certifi- 
cate which might be given along 
with the key or pin. 

2. Guard for chapter or state 
parents: 

a. M. for mothers 

b. F. for fathers 

c. P. for parent 

3. F.H.A. flag — It was recom- 
mended that L. G. Balfour Com- 
pany be instructed to prepare a 
sample flag with a standard and 
submit it to the national office for 
approval. 

Use of the F.H.A. emblem — 
a tentative report regarding pro- 
posed policies governing states' and 
chapters' use pf the official emblem 
was prepared by the committee on 
emblematic materials. It was agreed 
that the national advisers secure 
legal advice before the report is 
completed and submitted to the ad- 
visory board and states for further 
recommendations and approval. 



The North Carolina Association 
of Future Homemakers of America 
boasts a membership of 19,900 
for the current year 1954-55. The 
membership is distributed in 455 
chapters. Each chapter is chal- 
lenged to action. We should be as 
strong in deed as we are in 
number. 



COVER PICTURE 

The value of a well-planned and 
organized classroom experience is 
immeasurable in the personal 
growth of any Future Homemaker. 
The girls featured on the cover 
page of this issue are home eco- 
nomics students at the Lucama 
High School and are members of 
the Lucama Chapter of Future 
Homemakers of America. The 
girls, left to right, are: Beth 
Johnson, Nell Simpson, and June 
Whitley. 



HONORARY MEMBERSHIP 

Each year at the State Conven- 
tion the North Carolina Associa- 
tion of Future Homemakers of 
America has the privilege of con- 
ferring honorary membership on 
four persons who have helped to 
advance the homemaking program 
or have rendered outstanding serv- 
ice to the State Association of Fu- 
ture Homemakers of America. If 
you would like to submit a name 
for consideration by the Executive 
Board, please send the name with 
credentials to Mrs. Faye Coleman, 
State F.H.A. Adviser, Department 
of Public Instruction, not later 
than March 15. 




North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1954-55 

President — Betty Calhoun, Seventy-First 
Vice-President — Carol Lynn Garris, Pikeville 
Secretary — Alice Parish, Edenton 
Treasurer — Margo Sicha, Lee Edwards 
Reporter — Claudette Belton, Old Town 
Parliamentarian — Nancy Christenbury, East Mecklen- 
burg 
Historian — Judy Bowman, Alexander-Wilson 
Song Leader — Sara Eason, Franklinton 



District Advisers 
1954-55 

Mrs. Albertine McKellar, Rowland 
Mary Elizabeth Ridge, Goldsboro 
Carolyn Brinkley, Plymouth 
Meredith Whitaker, Andrews 
Mrs. Rosa W. Parker, North Davidson 
Mrs. Louise M. Porter, West Mecklenburg 
Mrs. Sallie P. Moore, Liberty 
Frances Wilson, Bailey 



State Adviser 
Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



A Letter from Eight Officers— Your State Officers 



Dear Presidents: 

"The meeting will come to or- 
der." As you speak these words, you 
feel a sense of pride in your position 
as president of your F.H.A. chapter. 

But let's stop and think a minute. 
Why did those girls elect you as 
president? Was it because you are 
the most popular girl in school, or 
was it because you have the quali- 
ties of a good leader? Let's assume 
that it was the latter reason. 

Now let's talk about a few of the 
things that help make a good F.H.A. 
president. 

First— and I think the most im- 
portant thing — the girl should be 
very active and interested in F.H.A. 
work. She should have a good per- 
sonality and be able to get along 
with the members. She must be 
friendly and tactful. 

Another important item for a 
good F.H.A president to know is 
parliamentary procedure. The suc- 
cess of the whole meeting depends 
on her to a great extent; if she is 
businesslike, so are the members; 
but if she "hems and haws" the meet- 
ing is quite likely to get out of hand. 

The majority of the people think 
that being president of an organiza- 
tion is just a "bed of roses." That's 
the under-thought of the year. The 
president's job is to see that the 
other members do the work and 
do it correctly. That's the biggest 
job of all, believe it or not. A good 
president can get the members and 
committees to do the work quickly 
and effectively without appearing 
to be overbearing or aggressive. 

Of course, the duties and re- 
sponsibilities of the president in- 
clude presiding over the meetings 
and representing her chapter at 
other meetings and events. Her ap- 
pearance should be considered also. 
She need not be pretty, but she must 
be clean and neat. 

Those are just a very few of the 
many duties and qualities that are 
required to make a successful presi- 
dent. To all of you presidents, pres- 
ent and future, here's to you and 
your F.H.A. chapter. 

Betty Calhoun 
State F.H.A. President 



ery meeting possible and take 
careful notice of the manner of the 
presiding officer. It is very import- 
ant that you learn to speak slowly 
and distinctly. A good officer should 
try to stimulate interest in her chap- 
ter by bringing to the members ideas 
and suggestions she learned in exec- 
utive board meetings and at regional 
and national conventions. By keep- 
ing up to date on all F.H.A. ac- 
tivities, she can also play an im- 
portant role in acquainting the 
school and community with the 
F.H.A. program. 

The vice-president must be ready 
to aid the president in every possible 
way and she should take an active 
part in all council meetings. 

The constitution of many local 
chapters states that the vice- 
president automatically becomes 
president. Her year as vice- 
president, then, is a training period. 
It is also a year filled with many 
other responsibilities, since she is 
chairman of the program commit- 
tee and needs to see that every 
member has an opportunity to serve 
in some way. Much of the interest 
and attitude of its members depend 
upon how well the vice-president 
manages her special duties as listed 
on page 37 of the Official Guide. 

Always she should maintain high 
ideals and goals, never lose sight of 
them, but work and grow toward 
them constantly. 

Doing these things should aid in 
developing a good officer, an im- 
proved Future Homemaker, and a 
better person. 

Carol Lynn Garris 
State Vice-President 



Dear Vice-Presidents: 

As Vice-President, much time and 
effort should be spent in preparing 
to accept the duties and responsi- 
bilities of the presidency. Attend ev- 



Dear Secretaries: 

To be efficient as secretary of 
your chapter you must, first of all, 
be thoroughly familiar with the du- 
ties of your office which are listed 
on page 37 of Your Official Guide. 
In addition to this list of musts, you 
will want to apply your training 
from your English courses and prac- 
tice good composition in expressing 
facts well and interestingly. You will 
want to be able to read clearly and 
distinctly. This requires practice, 
also. It isn't easy to record all hap- 
penings during a meeting in an or- 
ganized manner — so that interpre- 
tation is easy when time is available 
for writing the minutes of the 
meeting. 



Do you have difficulty in writing 
letters? Then you will need to work 
at this, too, not only on form and 
expression, but also promptness. 
There are times when fast action 
is required. 

To hold the office of secretary, 
or any office, for that matter, you 
have to be interested in your work. 
I shiver to think of a person holding 
any important office — or any office, 
for that matter — due to popularity 
instead of capability. That could 
soon put an end to interest in an 
organization. When a person enjoys 
what she is doing it makes all the 
difference in the world in the 
amount of effort which is put 
forth and the work that can be 
accomplished. 

I must mention that neatness 
helps and that politeness is a divine 
quality. 

Let us all strive to do our very 
best as secretaries and I believe that 
each of us will feel fully rewarded. 
Alice Parrish 
Secretary 



Dear Fellow Treasurers: 

Did you know that many of your 
worries would be over if you had 
a budget for your chapter? A sensi- 
ble, well-planned budget should be 
a "must" with you, for it is the 
easiest, most foolproof way to man- 
age your chapter's finances. If your 
officers have pre-school planning 
meetings in the latter part of the 
summer, it would be well for you to 
work out the budget at that time in 
co-operation with the program-of- 
work committee. The program-of- 
work committee can inform you of 
the financial demand of their 
planned program. By following the 
budget closely, you should have 
smooth sailing from there on. A 
budget necessitates careful expendi- 
tures of funds and can often curtail 
undue expenses. 

There is a wonderful guide for all 
treasurers to use in planning for the 
revenue and expenditure of their 
chapter on page 28 of the Adviser's 
Handbook. 

There's a thought for you: Just 
think of what a wonderful experi- 
ence it is to be in charge of your 
chapter's finances. One of these 
days you'll be dropping your title 
of "future homemaker," and it will 
be your responsibility to plan the 
budget for your own family. The 



practice you're having now will help 
you in the future. 

Margo Sicha 
State Treasurer 



Dear Reporters: 

"Know your F.H.A." and "Let 
others know" what Future Home- 
makers are doing — are two guides 
that most reporters could profit by 
following during this year. Con- 
gratulations to those reporters of lo- 
cal chapters, and reporters of county 
organizations, who have informed 
us about your activities by sending 
articles to our State Newsletter. 

We have also heard reports that 
many of you have contributed news 
items to local and county newspa- 
pers throughout the year so that the 
communities are more aware of 
homemaking education in our high 
schools and of the Future Home- 
makers organizations. 

Don't forget that school paper! 

I wonder how many of you work 
with a publicity or public relations 
committee? 

Very newsy yours, 

Claudette Belton 
State Reporter 

Dear Parliamentarians: 

Say, do you chapter members 
know the "do" and "don't" of a 
successful meeting? Well, what 
happens when they come to the spot 
in the meeting and they don't know 
what to do when a motion is on the 
floor? Here's their secret answer — 
you — their Parliamentarian] You 
are there to rescue and save them 
from an embarrassing moment. "It 
is the duty of the parliamentarian 
to rule on points in question con- 
cerning parliamentary procedure 
and assist in conducting meetings in 
a businesslike way to keep the con- 
stitution up to date." 

It might help if you parliamen- 
tarians would ask the vice-president 
to consider including in one of the 
chapter programs a little role play- 
ing on correct parliamentary proce- 
dures in order to help the members 
and officers learn how to address a 
chair, to make a motion, to amend a 
motion, submit a committee report, 
etc. 

When you are elected parliamen- 
tarian you will want to ask your 
treasurer to order one or two of the 
booklets listed on page 44 of the 
Adviser's Handbook. One booklet 
which could be quite helpful is: 
Help In Mastering Parliamentary 
Procedure. Send orders to Dr. W. F. 
Stewart, Department of Agricultural 
(See LETTER, page 8) 



Mother, Daughter, Father and Son Banquet 
Held in Elm City School 



The spacious dining hall of the 
Elm City High School was turned 
into a dreamy winter wonderland 
Friday night, December 3, as the 
F.H.A. girls and F.F.A. boys en- 
tertained their parents at a Mother- 
Daughter, Father-Son Banquet. 
Even Santa himself would have felt 
very much at home with the 
"Christmasy" air which prevailed. 

Each window was decorated with 
a Christmas scene using pyra- 
canthia and holly throughout. The 
guest table was beautiful with its 
centerpiece of snow-in-den drift- 
wood with multicolored Christmas 
Balls. There were a variety of 
Christmas arrangements for the 
other tables. Red burning tapers 
furnished light for the occasion. 

The toastmistress, Loretta 
Barnes, presided over the event. 
After thanks had been returned by 
Reverend Tommy White, Peggy 
Davis, F.H.A. president, gave a 
toast to the mothers, and Dick Ty- 
son, F.F.A. president, welcomed 
the fathers. Responding for the 



school board was Mr. J. M. Bras- 
well, Chairman of the Board. 

The gala event was sparkling with 
entertainment as the F.H.A. Sextet 
composed of Betty Smith, Sylvia 
Davis, Loretta Barnes, Peggy 
Davis, Louise Winstead, and Linda 
Wiggs sang at different intervals the 
"F.H.A. Prayer," "Winter Wonder- 
land," and "Jingle Bells," and the 
F.F.A. Playboys, Eliza Williams, 
Joe Smith, J. E. Wood, rendered a 
couple of numbers. 

Welcome to the guests was done 
by Mr. P. T. Fugate, superintendent 
of the Elm City Schools. He told 
the group of 200 people of the great 
advantage the boys and girls of to- 
day have. He further stated that he 
has great faith in the youth of today. 

Lynn Sharpe added to the enjoy- 
ment of the event with her spectacu- 
lar performance of tap-dancing to 
"Sleigh Bells." 

Reverend Tommy White, pastor 
of the Sharpsburg Baptist Church, 
was guest speaker for the occasion. 
He told the group that strange 



"Planning a series of radio programs to be given by the girls of home economics de- 
partments at Brevard and Rosman high schools is serious business for the group 
pictured below. They will present one program each month on the Farm and Home 
Hour on subjects related to their courses. Those on the committee include John 
Dellinger, program director of WPNF, and reading around the group from him, 
right to left: Joanne Wickliffe, Brevard; Melba Whitmire, Ophelia Searcy, both 
Rosman; Miss Louise Swann, Assistant State Supervisor of Home Economics; 
Marjorie Wilson, Margaret Heath, both Brevard; Shirley Jamerson, Rosman; Mrs. 
S. C. Clapp, Rosman home economics teacher; Freda Owen, Rosman; Mrs. Glenn 
Burrell, Brevard home economics teacher; and Dorothy Powell, Rosman. 




things happen to all of us, teachers 
included, and that we should pre- 
pare ourselves for the future. Abra- 
ham Lincoln, he stated, prepared 
himself to be president, although his 
mother warned him that it was a 
noble ambition, but was not likely 
to happen to him. 

Mr. Charlie Batten, agriculture 
teacher, awarded degrees to de- 
serving boys. He informed the en- 
thusiastic guests that agriculture 
work does not stop within the class- 
room, but goes into the boys' out- 
side life as well. He asked the 
fathers to encourage the boys. 

Annette Barns, secretary of the 
F.H.A. chapter, told of the work 
and activities of the F.H.A. and the 
home economics department thus 
far this year and some of their plans 
under the supervision of Miss 
Lucile Wright, home economics 
teacher and chapter adviser. She 
awarded Peggy Davis her Junior 
and Chapter degrees and Lynn 
Sharpe a sterling silver F.H.A. 
bracelet for being high salesman in 
the Christmas card campaign. Two 
F.H.A. girls, Betty Smith and An- 
nette Barnes, were recognized for 
working on their State Homemaker's 
degree, the highest degree which can 
be obtained in the organization. 

Special recognition with a gift 
was given to Mrs. W. A. Flowers 
for her support and co-operation to 
the chapter of the Future Home- 
makers. The banquet was con- 
cluded in the real spirit of the 
season with everyone singing 
"Silent Nighty 

A Salute to F.H.A. 

When all other clubs have vanished 

And every organization has failed, 

The ideals of the F.H.A. 

Will always be upheld. 

For, what we as Future Home- 
makers believe in, 

Will not vanish in a year, an hour, 
or a day, 

But will live forever in our hearts 

As a light to guide our way. 

We learn to live better with our 
family, 

As well as lead in community life; 

We learn that if there is to be in- 
spiration 

In any home, it must come from the 
capable wife. 

So here's to you, F.H.A. 

And may you always find success 

In keeping your home a place of 
love 

For those whom you love best. 
Peggy Davis 
F.H.A. President 
Elm City Chapter 




No, these aren't the latest fashions. They are the styles of the "Roaring 20's" which 
were presented at a fashion show given by the F.H.A. in Valdese, N. C. The girls 
are, left to right: Carol Ann Perrou, Jewel Wilson, Patricia Ramsey, Joan Michaels, 
Carolyn Byrd, Louise Johnson, Rachel Burns, Sandra Spencer, Amelia Bridges, 
Jean Greene, Charlotte Pearson, and Edith Pearson. 



Jaihion (Rfiview at the 

Valaeie School 

The Valdese F.H.A. Chapter pre- 
sented a fashion show on Decem- 
ber 2, 1954. The show consisted of 
fashions from the 20's to the 
present. The audience thought the 
most hilarious part was when the 
"flappers" gave their rendition of 
the "Charleston." Everyone of the 
models were beautiful especially 
Carol Ann Perrou and Edith Pear- 
son. Carol Ann was chosen as "Miss 
Burke County" and Edith placed 
third in this contest. 

After the flappers finished the 
Charleston, some breath-taking 
present-day fashions were pre- 
sented. These fashions were from 
the Style Shop, one of the leading 
clothing stores in Valdese. The Style 
Shop gave the F.H.A. a check for 
ten dollars for advertising. 

Our vice-president, Rachel 
Burns, did a wonderful job in plan- 
ning this extravaganza. It was her 
own idea and she did most of the 
work herself. The show was held 
in the elementary school audi- 
torium. No admission was charged 
and there was a nice crowd at the 
show. I can end this only by saying 
that everyone should have seen this 
delightful show. 



NATIONAL MEETING PLANS 

FOR 1955 AND 1956 

ANNOUNCED BY 

MISS SCRUGGS 

NATIONAL ADVISER 

Present plans for national meet- 
ings are: 

1. National Meeting, July 18-22, 

1955, Iowa State College, Ames, 
Iowa. Approximate attendance 300. 

2. National Convention, July 3-6, 

1956, Conrad Hilton Hotel, Chi- 
cago, Illinois with an approximate 
attendance of 2,500. 

At the 1955 national meeting 
North Carolina will have a quota ot 
five delegates and two adults. The 
eight state officers have the prob- 
lem of electing the five delegates to 
represent North Carolina. At this 
meeting Miss Scruggs states "Dele- 
gates will take a critical look at what 
we have done well in the ten years 
of the organization and what we can 
improve." 



F.H.A. CAMP— WHITE LAKE 
MAY 30 TO JUNE 11, 1955 

The Future Farmers Camp will 
be rented again for the two weeks 
period. If your school closes before 
May 30, you are asked to choose 
the first week for attending camp. 




DO YOU RECOGNIZE ANY OF THESE PERSONS? 
HONOR CONFERRED AT STATE RALLY— 1948 
The first Honorary memberships in the State F.H.A. Association were conferred upon four persons by the president, Betty Lou 
Merrill at the State Convention. 

Those chosen for the awards were, left to right: T. E. Browne, State Director of Vocational Education; Miss Catherine T. 
Dennis, State Supervisor of Home Economics Education; Mrs. R. S. Ferguson, member of the State Board of Education; and Miss 
Marguerite Billiard, home economics major at Meredith College. Marguerite was the first State F.H.A. President. 

FIRST EXECUTIVE BOARD MET IN SEPTEMBER 1945 
Reading left to right: Sybil Johnson, Stedman High School (substituting for Peggy Tatum, treasurer, of same school); Helen Dun- 
can, Historian, Murfreesboro High School; Sue Black, Pianist, Waco High School; Betty Lou Merrill, Vice-President, Beaufort 
High School; Marguerite Bullard, President, Stedman High School; Miss Mabel Lacy, Club Adviser, East Carolina Teachers Col- 
lege; Ida Williford, Song Leader, Central High School, Cumberland County; Betsy Lea Ware, Secretary, Reidsville High School; 
Miss Catherine T. Dennis, Club Consultant, State Department of Public Instruction. Joyce Weant, Reporter. Spencer High School, 
was absent. 

RECEIVING LINE AT EXECUTIVE MANSION— MAY 4, 1946— FIRST STATE CONVENTION AFTER FOUNDER'S DAY 
From right to left: Mrs. R. Gregg Cherry, Betty Lou Merrill, retiring State F.H.A. President, Beaufort High School; Mrs. Will 
Frances Sanders, State F.H.A. Adviser, State Department of Public Instruction, Raleigh; Kiltie Cannady, National F.H.A. Of- 
ficer, Franklinton High School; Georgie Tsitouris, newly-elected State F.H.A. President, Benton Heights High School; Marguerite 
Bullard, first State F.H.A. President, Meredith College; Gladys Sealey, retiring State F.H.A. Secretary, Barnsville, N. C; Mabel 
Rickman, retiring State F.H.A. Treasurer, Leaksville High School; Jacqueline Collie, retiring State F.H.A. Reporter, Bailey High 
School; Henrietta Davis, retiring State F.H.A. Song Leader, Candler High School. 



future J4omemaker£ of cAtnerica 
founder A Jbay — June 11 > 1945 

10th Year Anniversary Celebration at State Convention, May 14, 1955 



We have grown in size and num- 
bers since "Founder's Day," June 
11, 1945. As we approach the 10th 
anniversary of the Future Home- 
makers of America, it seems only 
natural that all advisers who were 
with the program in its early be- 
ginning and many former Future 
Homemakers will begin to remi- 
nisce, and in so doing, will recall the 
fast-moving events in the early de- 
velopment of the organization. 

Before birth certificates became 
a legal requirement many babies 
were given no name until days or 
weeks after birth. The North Caro- 
lina Association of Future Home- 
makers was actually born one year 
prior to being named. It's birth fol- 
lowed many years of study and con- 
templation on the part of teachers, 
supervisors, and students in all parts 
of America concerning the need and 
value of such an organization. Be- 
fore its official name was selected 
this new organization which was 
born in the spring of 1 944 and went 
into operation at the beginning of 
the school year 1944-45, was called 
the North Carolina Association 
of High School Home Economics 
Clubs. 

In March, 1944, invitations were 
issued to all the states by the Ameri- 
can Home Economics Association 
to attend a national meeting in 
Chicago for the purpose of initiating 
plans for developing a national or- 
ganization of high school home eco- 
nomics clubs. Home Economics 
Education workers from 29 states 
accepted the invitation. Among 
these home economists was Mrs. 
Mabel Lacy Hall representing our 
state of North Carolina. Mrs. Hall 
is Itinerant Teacher Trainer at East 
Carolina College and Assistant State 
Supervisor of Home Economics 
Education. The American Home 
Economics Association and the 
Home Economics Service in the 
U. S. Office of Education became 
sponsors of this new organization 
at once. 

One month later in Raleigh, 
North Carolina, a State Rally was 
held to elect officers of this new 
organization, and to discuss plans 
for formulating policies and a con- 
stitution. Approximately 300 mem- 



bers and advisers came to Raleigh 
and the Hugh Morson High School 
for this Rally. The person who was 
elected president of this infant or- 
ganization was Marguerite Bullard 
from the Stedman Chapter in Cum- 
berland County. Other officers 
elected at this State Rally were: 
vice-president, Betty Lou Merritt, 
Beaufort; secretary, Betsy Lea 
Ware, Reidsville; treasurer, Peggy 
Tatum, Stedman; historian, Helen 
Duncan, Murfreesboro; reporter, 
Joyce Weant, Spencer; song leader, 
Ida Williford, Central High School, 
Cumberland County; and pianist, 
Sue Black, Waco. These officers 
were elected to serve during the 
school term 1944-45. 

It would be interesting to know 
what followed in the professional or 
personal life of each of these of- 
ficers and officers of later years. 
Would you like to read about them 
in the next issue 6f the F.H.A. 
Magazine? Then, an appeal is made 
to you readers to send such informa- 
tion to Mrs. Faye T. Coleman, State 
F.H.A. Adviser, Department of 
Public Instruction, Raleigh, North 
Carolina. 







The North Carolina Association con- 
ferred the State Homemaker Degree upon 
Gloria Enman and Betty Goss of the 
Lee Edwards Chapter, This is the first 
time this degree was awarded. The girls 
are wearing the dresses they wore in the 
Fashion Revenue at the State Rally, 
April 3, 1948. 



The newly organized State As- 
sociation of High School Home 
Economics Clubs grew rapidly dur- 
ing this first year. It was affiliated 
with the national organization with 
200 chapters and 2,473 members. 
During this first year the state 
adviser was not a member of the 
supervisory staff, but was elected 
from the teacher group. Miss 
Francis E. Woolworth, then home 
economics teacher in the Durham 
High School, served the Association 
as its first state adviser. Miss Wool- 
worth and other pioneers in the de- 
velopment of the program will be 
featured in Mr. Clifton Britton's 
production — a "panorama," com- 
memorating the 10th anniversary of 
the Association which will be pre- 
sented at the State Convention 
May 14, 1955. 

In October 1944 the first issue 
of the State F.H.A. Newsletter 
brought this letter of commendation 
from Dr. Highsmith, Director of In- 
structional Service at that time: 

October 20, 1944 
Miss Catherine Dennis 
State Department of Public Instruc- 
tion 
Raleigh, North Carolina 
Dear Miss Dennis: 

I have read with keen interest 
the first issue of the Newsletter for 
Home Economics Clubs. I wish to 
commend the effort being made to 
organize a Home Economics Club 
in every high school where home 
economics is taught. Such a club, 
when properly organized and con- 
ducted, affords an excellent oppor- 
tunity to carry on social and cultural 
activities of first-rate importance. 

Let me comment, also, the plan 
to organize a State Home Eco- 
nomics Student Club. This organi- 
zation can be made a potent factor 
in the proper development of 
hundreds of thousands of our young 
women as they assume more and 
more the duties of citizenship. 

You have my best wishes for 
the largest measure of success. 

Cordially yours, 

J. Henry Highsmith, Director 

Division of Instructional Service 

There was no State Rally or State 

(See FOUNDER'S DAY, page 6) 



Report of the National Projects 



The national projects committee 
prepared the following criteria for 
evaluating the proposed national 
projects: 

1. A national project should be 
of service to one or more of the 
following: home, school, commun- 
ity, nation, or world. 

2. A national project should 
help to fulfill one or more of the 
eight purposes. 

3. A national project should be 
one in which most chapters, large 
or small, can participate. 

4. A national project should help 
to meet the current demands of 
society. 

5. Consideration should be given 
to the number of national projects 
being undertaken at any one time 
which require the raising of money. 

6. Consideration should be given 
to the amount of time required at 
national headquarters for the ad- 
ministration of a national project. 

The following projects met the 
above criteria: 

1. UNESCO Gift Coupon Plan 

2. Families Together 

3. Safety and Civil Defense 
According to the committee, the 



following projects did not seem to 
meet all of the requirements. 

1 . World Christmas Festival (The 
committee recommended that chap- 
ters continue to articipate in the 
project.) 

2. F.H.A. Week (F.H.A. Week 
is a tradition and, therefore, should 
not be a national project.) 

The committee recommended that 
a new project be added — Beau- 
tification of Home, School, and 
Community. 



J^pcal Projecti in the 
J\ocxinahatn Chapter 

Members of the Rockingham 
Chapter went to the welfare de- 
partment to get names of needy 
families. After that several girls and 
Mrs. McRae, chapter adviser, vis- 
ited these families to see the chil- 
dren and understand their needs 
better. The white family had four 
small children, including a tiny 
baby. The father is blind; the mother 
rather inadequate. 

The second family was a Negro 
family with six girls. One had been 
to college two years but the father 




had varicose veins and needs an 
operation. The mother is quite in- 
telligent and wants to move to a 
college town where her girls can get 
a college education. One girl, 16, 
is a senior, and one, \A l /i, is a 
junior. 

We took presents, especially for 
the small children, clothes, includ- 
ing shoes, and food. Christmas Eve 
we went again, to take meat, fruit, 
and cake for their Christmas dinner. 

We also bought a five pound 
ham. We felt very happy over these 
experiences as they help us to have 
a common bond and unite us. 

For the cafeteria decorations, we 
went on a Saturday afternoon, 
picked up the holly, magnolia 
leaves, etc., and started making 
swatches to go over the arches; also 
painted leaves for the tables and 
windows. 

After working awhile some of us 
stopped and we fixed supper, in- 
cluding hamburgers, french fried po- 
tatoes, slaw; for dessert ambrosia, 
fruit, and pound cake. 



This project which (he Rockingham girls are working on (in top photo) is decorating 
the "Cafeteria for Christmas." Back row: Martha Snead, Norma Spencer, Julia 
Ballard. Front row: Sarah Collins and Margie Boon. 

Lower photo: Project is "Helping two families at Christmas." Left to right, the girls 
are: Martha Snead, Joan Hines, and Faye Capel. 



FOUNDER'S DAY 

(Continued from page 5) 
Convention held during this forma- 
tive year (1944-45) of the new 
state association due to wartime re- 
strictions but there were eight dis- 
trict rallies held — one in each of 
the state's designated districts. The 
program was becoming recognized 
throughout North Carolina. 

The national organization was 
progressing rapidly, also — a pace 
ahead of the states. Sub-regional 
meetings were being held through- 
out the United States, Sub-region C, 
of which North Carolina is a part, 
held its meeting at Guilford College, 
North Carolina, during the early 
spring of 1945. The first National 
Adviser, Dr. Hazel Frost, was pres- 
ent at this sub-regional meeting to 
work with the delegates on the many 
problems of this organization — on 
the local level, the state level, and 
the national level. 

The sub-regional meetings was 
followed by a national meeting in 
Chicago, June 11-16, 1945. The 
purpose of this meeting was to 
decide on the name of the new or- 
ganization, the purposes, the motto, 
the national executive council, the 
national advisory board, and the na- 
tional magazine. It was during this 
memorable meeting that the name 
— Future Homemakers of America 
— was adopted for the new organi- 
zation of High School Home Eco- 
nomics Clubs. 



(taprer differ" 



The Bailey F.H.A. girls collected out- 
grown clothes. These clothes were fitted 
to needy students in school, who could 
use them in their wardrobes. Approxi- 
mately 40 garments were collected and 
many of these were reworked to fit the 
students to whom they were given. 

Approximately 60 members of the Bai- 
ley F.H.A. attended a Christmas party 
on Monday, December 13. It took place 
at the Bailey Clubhouse at 7:00 p.m. 
Special guests were three chapter moth- 
ers. To add the Christmas spirit, each 
member brought a small gift, which was 
numbered and placed under the Christ- 
mas tree and duplicate numbers were 
deposited in a box. Mrs. Fred High gave 
out these gifts after the numbers were 
drawn. 

After the distribution of the gifts, the 
chapter mothers were presented with 
small vases. Then refreshments were 
served and games were played. A record 
player furnished music. The party ended 
about 10:00 p.m. According to the at- 
tendants, a good time was had by all. 

Aprons for Christmas were made by 
the home ec. girls. These aprons were 
stitched on the new swing-needle sewing 
machine purchased earlier this year. Ap- 
proximately 65 aprons, designed in many 
colors, were made and sold for $1 each. 
This money was added to the Home 
Economics fund to help pay for the 
sewing machine. 

The Bartlett- Yancey Chapter members 
are to be congratulated for the happiness 
they must have given to many children 
during the Christmas season. Fifty 
stuffed toys were made by the members 
and sent to the local Rotary Club for 
distribution to needy children. A "Chil- 
drens' Center" has been set up in the 
homemaking department this year also. 
This addition will mean that the home 
economics girls will have an increased 
knowledge and understanding of children 
and how to care for them. 

The Beaufort F.H.A. members en- 
joyed a program on "Beauty Tips" at the 
regular meeting last month. The program 
chairman, Catherine Potter, presented 
Jean Dixon, who gave an interesting talk 
and answered questions pertaining to 
"Care of the Hair." Miss Dixon stressed 
cleanliness and becoming hair styles for 
the individual's hair. She repeated the 
saying, "A woman's hair is her glory." 

The F.H.A. members voted to give 
$10 to the senior annual. They also voted 
to contribute $20 to UNESCO, the 
F.H.A. national project for helping the 
people overseas. The fifth purpose of 
the organization is to promote interna- 
tional good will. 

The Beaufort Chapter gave a dance 
in honor of the Morehead City members 
and escorts Thanksgiving night. The 
Scout building was decorated in the na- 
tional colors, red and white. The refresh- 
ment committee served fruit punch and 
sugar cookies and peanut butter cookies 
made Wednesday by the first-year home 
economics girls. 

The Beaufort members and their es- 
corts contributed a basket of canned 
and packaged foods for a needy family. 

The home economics girls are laun- 



dering and repairing the football suits. 
The girls are finding the automatic wash- 
ing machine and dryer to be wonderful 
time and labor saving devices. 

Mrs. Beveridge demonstrated making 
Christmas candles before the Christmas 
holiday. She plans to give them to the 
Methodist Church bazaar. 

The Boone Trail Chapter of the Fu- 
ture Homemakers of America held its 
annual Mother and Daughter banquet 
Saturday night, December 18, at 8:00 
o'clock in the school dining hall. Festive 
decorations were used in helping with 
Yuletide Season. Invocation was by Nor- 
wood E. Jones, principal. Turkey, dress- 
ing, giblet gravy, green beans, cranberry 
salad, rolls, coffee, and fruitcake were 
served by the following: Laura Lee Babb, 
Elizabeth Nordan, Peggy Stewart, Faye 
Clark, Shelby Jean Taylor, Judy Mat- 
thews, Jenny Patterson, Pat Adcox, and 
Gaynelle Brown. Service of the food 
was supervised by Mrs. Colon Stewart. 
Sixty members and their guests were 
present; also, Mr. G. T. Proffit, Rev. 
and Mrs. L. T. Marsh, the four chapter 
mothers: Mrs. Bruce Ray, Mrs. N. E. 
Jones, Mrs. George Hester, Mrs. Harvey 
O'Quinn; and Chapter Grandmother, Mrs 
Tom Cameron. The guest were welcomed 
by Ann Thomas. A toast to the Mothers 
was given by Norma Stewart. Mrs. Har- 
vey O'Queen responded. Georgia Lee 
O'Quinn made announcements and pre- 
sented Mrs. Ralph Hales, home econom- 
ics teacher, and Mrs. Tom Cameron 
beautiful gifts. The Christmas Story was 
conducted by Lois Ray and Janet Har- 
rington. In the cast was Janet Mc- 
Cormick, Elaine Nordan, Ann Mason, 
Cleta Stewart, Leona Bullard, Janero 
Johnson, Myrtle Patterson, Wesley 
Brown, Bill O'Queen, Jerry Baker, Bobby 
Thomas, Donald O'Quinn, Clyde Hes- 
ter, Ralph O'Quinn, and Laura Knight. 
"A Sisterhood Apart" was given by 
Barbara Brown and "The Gift" was given 
by Georgia Lee O'Quinn. In closing, the 
group said the creed together, joined 
hands and sang the emblem benediction. 

The Mills F.H.A. Chapter was winner 
in the Float Contest. Onlookers attend- 
ing the Armistice Day Parade smiled, 
took a second look, and then gave the 
Mills High float a hand. Perhaps it was 
this that influenced the judges, or maybe 
it was the smiling faces of the lovely 
girls who were seated on the float. The 
float was the third-year home economics 
students project. This class includes sev- 
eral boys. Bobby Robbins was rewarded 
for his hard work on the float by being 
made a member of the F.H.A. The third- 
year girls and the officers of the F.H.A. 
adorned the red and white float. A minia- 
ture house was used to represent Amer- 
ica's future homes. The octagonal emblem 
curved gracefully over the house. 

Johnson Cotton Company furnished 
the tractor and Mr. H. B. Cottrell pro- 
vided the trailer used for the float. 

The December meeting was held in 
the form of a dance. It was held on 
December 4 at the Greenhill Country 
Club. The Country Club was decorated 
for Christmas in the F.H.A. colors. 

From the opinions expressed, everyone 
had a grand time. Mrs. F. W. Wheless, 
Jr., was the sponsor. 

The hostesses for the dance were as 
follows: Helen and Martha Allen, Clin- 
ton Bunn, Annette Fuller, Jeanner Joy- 
ner, Anna Green Partin, Peggy Perry, 
Patricia Wilson, and Sarah Brown. 



The Morehead City Chapter of the 
Future Homemakers sponsored a square 
dance in the gym on December 19. Ty 
Frost and His Melody Boys furnished 
the music. All present had a wonderful 
time, but the girls lost money on the 
dance. Too many other events were 
taking place. 

Hurricane Hazel left us of the New 
Hanover Chapter with many opportuni- 
ties for projects. One of our members, 
Anne Rooks found her home completely 
demolished. Our chapter collected money 
and gave to Anne to purchase clothes. 
At Thanksgiving we had a pounding and 
gave canned goods to her family. 

We have forty affiliated members in 
our chapter. At one of our meetings 
Margaret Olsen presented an entertain- 
ing program on the homes in Denmark 
and England. She showed several articles 
her father brought with him on his recent 
return from Denmark. 

For our first fund-raising project we 
sold vanilla flavoring and made a profit 
of thirty dollars. 

Twelve members and two advisers rep- 
resented us at District III Rally. 

We had a very interesting Christmas 
program, presented by our vice-president, 
Barbara Rivenbark. We made apple treats, 
in the form of Santa Claus, to take to 
the children's ward at our hospital. Our 
chapter officers are as follows: Anne 
Wigg, president; Barbara Rivenbark, vice- 
president; Jo Easterling, secretary; Mick- 
ey McFadden, treasurer; Carol Holden. 
parliamentarian; Jo Anne Hatley, his- 
torian; and Annell Mohr, reporter. 
Annell Mohr 
New Hanover H. S. 

The Shelby High School student body 
heard a lively panel discussion of cur- 
rent teen-age problems in December. The 
local Future Homemakers of America 
sponsored the program. The panel was 
made up of an equal number of students 
and adults, including Mr. Athos Rostan. 
parent; Mrs. Cecil Gilliatt, parent and 
former teacher; Don Howard, student: 
Jane Rostan, student; Mrs. Raymond Bar- 
ry, parent and P.T.A. president; Charles 
Lampley, student; Susan Lutz, student; 
and Rev. Leo Rippy, parent and minister. 

Mrs. Gilliatt was moderator of the 
panel, and as an introduction to the dis- 
cussion she pointed out the importance 
of teen-agers living clean, healthy, happy 
spiritual lives now in order to make good 
parents and to build good homes in the 
future. Some wise person has said: "If 
there is righteousness in the hearts, there 
will be beauty in the characters. If 
there is beauty in the characters, there 
will be harmony in the family homes. 
If there is harmony in the homes, there 
will be order in the nations. When there 
is order in the nations, there will be 
peace in the world." Mrs. Gilliatt added 
that harmony in the family homes is the 
big issue. 

Judge W. I. Gatlin, a judge of the 
juvenile and domestic relations courts in 
Charlotte, has said that there are five 
major factors causing broken homes, 
broken hearts, and delinquency. These 
include lack of the training for parent- 
hood, lack of spiritual training, the prob- 
lem of misguided attitudes about sex, 
the problem of alcohol, and a lack of 
"togetherness" in the modern day home. 

Students in the assembly were asked 
to write their particular problems or ques- 



tions on a piece of paper, and these 
were handed to the panel. 

The panel members gave varied and 
interesting opinions on such questions as: 
"Are you a total failure if you do not 
date?" "What do boys look for in girls, 
and what do girls look for in boys." 
"What are the advantages and disad- 
vantages in going steady?" "What do 
parents expect of the person their teen- 
ager dates?" "How old should a girl 
be before she starts dating?" "What 
are the advantages and disadvantages of 
dating a boy four or five years older 
than yourself, considering the fact that 
girls mature faster than boys?" 

The students enjoyed and were aided 
greatly by this open-air discussion of 
their problems. 

This program ties in with the adult 
work through the Vocational Homemak- 
ing Department, on Family Relationship, 
sponsored by Mrs. Harriette Holton. The 
A.A.U.W. is also stressing the need of 
courses being taught from the seventh 
grade through high school. 

The Seventy-First Future Homemakers 
of America Chapter had a health pro- 
gram during November, which was pre- 
sented by Mrs. Kate Williamson and the 
school nurse, Mrs. R. D. Humphrey. The 
title for the month's program was "Com- 
munity Health" and the two movies en- 
titled "Rodney" and "Don't Let T.B. Get 
You Down" were shown to the girls in 
the F.H.A. 

Mrs. Williamson and Mrs. Humphrey 
talked to us and stressed that teenagers 
were as likely to have T.B. as anyone 
else and she urged us to have a chest 
X-ray as soon as possible and to continue 
having them every six months. 

Sheets were passed out to all the mem- 
bers telling the time and dates that a 
person can have a chest X-ray at the 
Cumberland County Health Department. 

Mrs. Williamson said, "You are the 
Future Homemakers of America and it 
is your duty to your future families and 
to your community to keep yourself and 
others free from the dreaded germs of 
T.B. Have a chest X-ray regularly." 

We, as Future Homemakers, would 
like to thank Mrs. Humphrey and Mrs. 
Williamson for giving us such an in- 
teresting talk on the program. 

Valley Springs Future Homemakers 
met on December 21, at 7:30 p.m., 
in the high school library. The purpose 
of the meeting was to honor the moth- 
ers of the 65 members. Jean Bridges, 
program chairman, introduced Mrs. W. S. 
Burleson of Ivey's Department Store, who 
demonstrated Christmas-gift wrapping. 
After the program the group went into 
the Home Economics Department, where 
a Christmas tea was served. Gifts and 
decorations made by the girls were on 
display. 

The chapter chose Eliada Home for 
their Christmas project. Instead of draw- 
ing names within the chapter they drew a 
name for a boy or girl at the orphanage. 
These gifts were placed under the tree 
Wednesday night. 

Donna Ann Ledbetter is our presi- 
dent and Mrs. C. H. Rector is our 
adviser. 

The Gatesville Future Homemakers 
have had a busy, interesting, and fruitful 
1954. The way Myrna Johnson, the 
chapter reporter, described how each day 
of National F.H.A. Week was observed, 
gives the reader an impression that this 

8 





Top photo — Members of the Gatesville 
Chapter serving tea during F.H.A. Week 
are, left to right: Treasurer, Florence 
Eure; President, Gwendolyn Eure; Sec- 
retary, Anita Eure. 

Lower photo — Members of the Gatesville 
Chapter setting up an exhibit for Na- 
tional F.H.A. Week. 

is a happy and active chapter and that 
the members appreciate their homemak- 
ing department. Here is her report as 
published in her county paper: 

"It was a busy and interesting week 
for the members of the Gatesville Future 
Homemakers of America Chapter. It was 
National F.H.A. Week and each girl 
had a part in its observance. 

"On Monday a committee prepared a 
bulletin board for the home economics 
room and an exhibit which was placed 
in the window of Walter Harrell's gro- 
cery store. The faculty and members en- 
joyed a tea Tuesday afternoon. Cake and 
punch were served and each teacher was 
given an American Beauty Rose to carry 
back to his or her room. We did enjoy 
entertaining in our newly-furnished so- 
cial area. It so happened that Wednesday 
afternoon was our regular meeting date. 
We planned our chapel program to be 
given the next day, and our adviser, 
Doris Mitchell, explained to us about 
degrees of achievement. Karen Brown and 
Nita Eure were in charge of the devo- 
tion, an impressive explanation of the 
Lord's Prayer at our chapel program. 
Janice Harrell, and Rebecca Langston 
sang the F.H.A. Prayer Song. Ann Saw- 
yer and Myrna Johnson gave a playlet 
"Housewife vs. Homemaker," and the 
sesecond-year clothing class modeled 
dresses they had just completed. The 
freshmen girls were a little disturbed on 
Friday because that night was the annual 
initiation party planned by Betty Lou 
White, Edna Mae Wilson and Janice 
Harrell. It turned out to be fun for all." 



LETTER 

(Continued from page 2) 

Education, Ohio State College, Co- 
lumbus 10, Ohio. Send cash with 
order — 15c per copy unless order 
is in lots of 10 or more to one 
address — then the cost is 10c per 
copy. When every member uses cor- 
rect parliamentary procedure a 
meeting will proceed with greater 
ease and much more can be ac- 
complished once this technique has 
been mastered. 

Nancy Christenbury 
Parliamentarian 



Hi Girls, 

I am Judy Bowman, a senior at 
Alexander Wilson High School, 
Graham, North Carolina, and your 
State Historian. Since that big and 
exciting day last April 3, when I 
was installed to the office of his- 
torian, I have led a very active life 
in F.H.A. 

As you know from your F.H.A. 
Manual, the duties of a historian 
are to keep an accurate history of 
the organization and to compile all 
material for and be the custodian 
of the State Scrapbook. 

Along with this, I have had the 
privilege and honor of helping or- 
ganize the District Rally at Madi- 
son High School. After the plans 
were completed, I waited for the 
day when I could see them ma- 
terialize. I was quite excited be- 
cause it was my duty to preside, 
this being one of the biggest re- 
sponsibilities of a state officer. 

Last summer I had one of the 
best times I can remember at the 
Southern Regional Convention at 
Daytona Beach. Each girl was ex- 
pected to bring back to her chapter 
and district some of the ideas ex- 
pressed there. It was my privilege 
to relate some of the experiences of 
the week to the North Carolina Vo- 
cational Home Economics Teachers. 

My term of office has been filled 
with many exciting events and I 
feel that I have benefited a great 
deal by serving as your State His- 
torian. Meeting and getting to know 
so many of you has been most 
pleasant. 

Best wishes, 

Judy Bowman 



Dear Song Leaders: 

When I was asked to offer some 
advice to song leaders throughout 



North Carolina, I had an inspira- 
tion and for four hours I worked on 
a little playlet entitled "Advice to 
Songbirds." The characters include 
such stars of the musical world as 
Sophie Tucker, Louis Armstrong, 
Liberace, and the late, late Bee- 
thoven. You can secure a copy of 
this skit by writing to me or to 
Mrs. Coleman, State F.H.A. Ad- 
viser. The advice given in the play- 
let, however, is listed below: 

A song leader should know how 
to read music and have a bit of 
singing voice — one that will carry 
tunes. 

A good strong voice that carries 
far will be an asset. 

Being able to accompany the 
singing on a piano would certainly 
prove valuable. 

In leading a song, a person should 
be familiar with it. 

To serve actively on the recrea- 
tion committee of your chapter will 
make for improved recreational pro- 
grams and wholesome attitudes on 
the part of the members. 

When introducing a new song, 
one should go over the words and 
tune several times with an audience. 

Personality counts, too. 

You need to have some drive 
and force when leading singing. Be 
able to lead the beat with your 
hands. 

I sincerely hope the above hints 
will prove helpful to you fellow song 
leaders. 

Sara Francis Eason 
Song Leader 



Civil defense Project, "CONELRAd" 



Miss Lois Oliver, Assistant Na- 
tional Adviser, Future Homemakers 
of America, sent to the state ad- 
visers the following letter of infor- 
mation about "Conelrad" and she 
explains just what you can do in 
your chapter: 

We advisers in the national office 
and representatives in the Federal 
Civil Defense Office have put our 
heads together and come up with 
a civil defense project that every- 
one can do, and we think, enjoy. 
Best of all, it doesn't take any 
money and is related directly to the 
home and the safety of its 
members. This project is called 
"Conelrad." 

As you know, Conelrad is the 
only safe broadcasting system yet 
devised to keep us informed of im- 
portant civil defense news and in- 
structions without helping enemy 
bombers reach their targets. There 
is a booklet, Conelrad, which ex- 
plains this broadcasting system 
completely. There are also stick- 
ers with which e^ery family can 
mark their radios to tell them where 
to tune in. 

I feel that it will be rather late 
to wait until the next issues of Teen 
Times and Chatterbox to get infor- 
mation on this project to you; there- 
fore, I am including suggestions to 
chapters for carrying out this proj- 
ect so that you may use it as you 




The First F.H.A. Rally in District V — 1944-45. Front: Jean Grey Delancy, Mrs. 
Furgerson, Ann Miller, Louise Lane, Miss Edwards, Miss Watkins. 



have the opportunity and feel it is 
desirable. 

Here's how an F.H.A. or N.H.A. 
Chapter Civil Defense Committee 
might proceed with this project: 

1. Get a sufficient number of cop- 
ies of the leaflet, Conelrad, and 
radio receiver dial markers (90 
markers to each book) for every 
home in the community. These may 
be secured from your local Civil 
Defense director or, in instances 
where he does not have them, from 
your State Civil Defense Director. 

2. Find out from your local civil 
defense office or radio station which 
frequency (640 or 1240) will be 
used in your community. The two 
officially designated CD frequen- 
cies • — 640 and 1240 kilocycles 
— are marked as 64 or 124 on 
most radio dials. 

3. Have a chapter meeting to in- 
form all members of "Conelrad" and 
to let them know how the project 
might be carried out. 

4. Divide the homes in the com- 
munity into areas and let members 
volunteer to go to certain areas to 
deliver the Conelrad leaflets and 
the radio receiver dial markers. 

5. Place an article about this proj- 
ect in the local newspaper several 
days before the house to house calls 
begin. 

Suggested Newspaper Article 

FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

(OR NEW HOMEMAKERS) 

WILL KNOCK AT YOUR DOOR 

The civic-minded Future Home- 
makers (or New Homemakers) of 
America will call at your home with- 
in the next few days. They'll bring 
you a booklet, Conelrad, which tells 
you about the Conelrad system of 
Public Emergency Broadcasting, 
one of the surest and fastest ways 
of getting word to you in case of 
an enemy attack. 

The F.H.A. (or N.H.A.) lads and 
lassies will also give you a sufficient 
number of radio receiver stickers 
to mark your AM radio dial on 
every radio in your home and in 
your car. 

Learn about Conelrad and mark 
your radios. Then when you need 
authoritative civil defense informa- 
tion in an emergency, you'll know 
where to tune in. 



Future Homemakers of America 

CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 

We face the future with warm courage. 

And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 

Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. * 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage. 
And high hope. 




'The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of todav" 




DIRTY DISHES 

Thank God for dirty dishes; 
They have a story to tell: 
And by the pile I have, 
We must be living well. 

While people in other countries are starving, 
I haven't the heart to fuss, 
For by the stack of evidence. 
God's very good to us. 

— Written by a high school girl in New York. 

It has been said that there is no end to what one can 
accomplish so long as he cares not who gets the credit. 

If I take your money, you are poorer; if you take my 
money I am poorer. But if you have an idea and I have 
an idea and we exchange them, we are both the richer 
for the idea and the experience. 





IS Il]k'il¥ilii3iifi 



North Carolina Association 



VOLUME 




MAY 1955 



NUMBER 4 



Have You Earned Your Junior and 
Chapter Homemaker Degree? 



If so you will want to begin early 
next year setting up goals for work 
on the State Homemaker Degree. 
Please be guided by the following 
instructions: 

1. Write to the State F.H.A. Ad- 
viser requesting application forms. 
*A Declaration of Intention form 
with Application 72b3 will be 
mailed to you. 

2. You are to fill out the Declara- 
tion of Intention Form and return 
to the State Office not later than 
November 15th. 

3. When you have declared your 
intention to work toward the de- 
gree you begin right then setting up 
your goals and planning activities 
and experiences which will help you 
meet these goals. 

4. You will be notified the date for 
sending your application forms and 
reports to the state office (usually 
this date is one month prior to the 
date of the State F.H.A. Conven- 
tion). 

5. A State Degree Committee 
evaluates the reports and the appli- 
cant is notified whether or not she 
will receive the award. 



NOTE: This year a number of 
requests for application forms came 
to the office as late as January and 
February. These requests could not 
be filled. Because thoughtful plan- 
ning is essential in earning this de- 
gree, the deadline date for filing the 
Intention is November 15th. If you 
are interested it would be advisable 
to discuss now with your adviser 
your desire so that a request can be 
made early after school opening 
next fall. 



COVER PICTURE 

It seems appropriate as we make 
plans to visit the capital city 
May 14th for the annual State 
F.H.A. Convention and our 10th 
anniversary celebration to feature 
on the cover page of the issue a 
scene of our State Capitol Building 
in Raleigh, N. C. Of North Caro- 
lina's Capitol Gutzon Borglum, the 
famous sculptor, once said: "I con- 
sider that there is no building in 
the country of its size which for 
color, for care in construction, and 
purity of style, is its superior." 



Morehead FHA Entertains 

Seventy-five members and their 
mothers attended the Morehead 
City F.H.A. Buffet Supper in the 
school library on March first. The 
F.H.A. theme was carried out in the 
decorations and the program. White 
mats with red letters and a red rose 
were used on the individual tables 
while on the main table was used a 
centerpiece of white gladiolas and 
red camellias. The menu consisted 
of Chicken Salad, Candied Sweet 
Potatoes, Lima Beans, Hot Rolls, 
Relishes, Iced Tea, Jello with 
Whipped Cream and Cup Cakes 
which were topped by the letters, 
F.H.A. in red. 

For the program, Deanna Ballou 
led in a number of songs; a group 
consisting of Mildred Whealton, 
Thelma Midgett and Jean Ingram, 
sang two numbers. Patsy Holt con- 
ducted two stunts in which both 
mothers and daughters participated. 
The Emblem Service was presented 
by eight freshman members dressed 
in white blouses and red skirts 
against a white background: Fan- 
ella Cooper, Sabra Eubanks, Pris- 
cilla Ebron, Jessie White, Faye 
Jones, Jean Brown, Hilda Morton 
and Jane Oglesby. Beadie Lewis, 
president, announced the program 
in clever rhyme. 



STATE HOMEMAKER DEGREE 

Standard 1. Has held the Chapter Homemaker Degree for at least one year prior to the conferring of the State 

Homemaker Degree. 

Standard 2. Has a 2-year record of active membership in a local chapter. 

Standard 3. Has satisfactorily completed at least 2 years (4-semesters) of Homemaking Instruction. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1954-55 

President — Betty Calhoun, Seventy-First 
Vice-President — Carol Lynn Garris, Pikeville 
Secretary — Alice Parish, Edenton 
Treasurer— Margo Sicha, Lee Edwards 
Reporter — Claudette Belton, Old Town 
Parliamentarian — Nancy Christenbury, East Mecklen- 
burg 
Historian — Judy Bowman, Alexander-Wilson 
Song Leader — Sara Eason, Franklinton 

State Adviser 
Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Hivision of Vocational Education 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



District Advisers 
1954-55 

Mrs. Albertine McKellar, Rowland 
Mary Elizabeth Ridge, Goldsboro 
Carolyn Brinkley, Plymouth 
Meredith Whitaker, Andrews 
Mrs. Rosa W. Parker, North Davidson 
Mrs. Louise M. Porter, West Mecklenburg 
Mrs. Sallie P. Moore, Liberty 
Frances Wilson, Bailey 



What F.H.A. Has Done For Others— It Can Do For 



fa&t tead t£i& tetten cvn.itte*t &y Sylvia p<dly,. 'Pxe<Udc*tt a£ (6e "i^&ie&ona (tyafrt&t 



Dear Mrs. Coleman: 

We think we have a wonderful and inspiring story 
to tell you about how the Roseboro home economics 
girls have organized such a large new chapter of Fu- 
ture Homemakers. 

We began our year's work the very first week of 
school. We had a call meeting of all the home eco- 
nomics girls and Mrs. Williams explained the purposes 
of the organization as well as how many officers we 
had to elect and the duties of each. A nominating 
committee was selected and a meeting was set for one 
week later in order to elect our officers. 

With the election of the best officers and chapter 
mothers a chapter could ask for, we immediately began 
working. The president had several call meetings of all 
the officers to inform each of her responsibilities and 
duties. We set the third Friday in each month as 
F.H.A. chapter meeting date. We made large attractive 
posters of F.H.A. plans, purposes, motto, emblem, 
fall meetings and placed on the hall bulletin boards 
each week. The membership drive was on! The whole 
school was aroused. You could hear students say 
"What is F.H.A.?"— "Who can join F.H.A.?" "Are 
you going to join this new club, F.H.A.?" Well, that 
was the kind of conversation we wanted to hear. 

By the October meeting we had sixty-five members 
and most of them were paid members. We were off 
to a big start. The girls were very much interested and 
were willing to help out in any way possible. 

Very soon committees were appointed: program 
committee and ways and means committee and others. 
Five girls are responsible for the program each month, 
and the programs have been both informative and en- 
tertaining. Examples are: A program about our Na- 



tional and State F.H.A. officers and the work they 
are doing — informative. Another was a most interest- 
ing program carried out like the TV program "I Have 
a Secret." The secrets were related to funny happen- 
ings in home economics classes. 

Our ways and means committee has really put us 
to work since Christmas. Each day during the week 
of mid-term exams, ten girls were to make candy or 
cookies to be sold in the home economics room. Most 
of the days the candy was gone before the bell rang 
for school to begin and we were already making fast 
money. We made around $25 on the project. Then we 
sold 200 boxes of all occasion cards in one week and 
cleared $120. One F.H.A. member sold 23 boxes and 
she received a gift. Now we have money to buy a 
gavel, emblem, and many other things a new chapter 
needs. 

We think our Christmas party is worth mentioning, 
too. We had a covered dish buffet dinner, and every 
member plus two chapter mothers were present. The 
food was wonderful! Each girl prepared her own dish 
with maybe a tiny bit of help from mother. We had a 
talent show, exchanged Christmas gifts, and sang 
Carols. We plan to have a spring social soon and in- 
vite our mothers. 

Now as we have passed the half-way mark for this 
school year, we are vere confident that "We are facing 
the Future with warm courage and high hope." 
Respectfully, 
Sylvia Jolly 
Roseboro F.H.A. President 

Be sure to read about Betty Leigh's home project and how 
it affected the lives of many in her community. The story 
will appear in this magazine — November 1955 issue. Betty is 
a member of the Roseboro F.H.A. Chapter. 




The first grade children at C, G. Credle School in Oxford hold 
with pride animals made by the homemaking girls from Oxford 
High School. The first graders cut the patterns and brought 
nylon hose for stuffing. 



The Children's Play Center in the Bartlett Yancey Home Eco- 
nomics Department is the result of the co-operative efforts of 
the homemaking pupils — through F.H.A. projects, class proj- 
ects, and individual projects. With the addition of this "Center" 
— and children in the dapartment — the Child Development and 
Family Relations units have new meaning. 



Future Farmers, Future Honiemakers 

Honor Parents at Richlands Dinner 



Before an enthusiastic gathering 
of parents, teachers and guests, the 
Future Homemakers of America 
held their annual Mother and 
Daughter and Father and Son Ban- 
quet at the Richlands High cafe- 
teria at 7 o'clock Friday evening 
March 1 1 . 

The delicious dinner was accom- 
panied with a question and answer 
game conducted by Richard H. 
William. After the food had been 
served, vice-president Roy Jones of 
the F.F.A. announced the program 
for the evening. 

In quick order followed a toast to 
the parents by Betty Jarman, a re- 
sponse by Jeff Brinson, a solo 
rendered by Yvonne Huffman, ac- 
companied on the piano by Frances 
Jarman, and the recognition of 
guests by Mrs. Clara Reid. 

An amusing skit lampooning 
mothers-in-law then followed with 
Judy Home and Kenneth Barbee in 
the starring roles. 

Rev. Brisson of Richlands Chris- 
tian Church added a serious note to 
the affair by urging all East North 
Carolinians to do something about 
the unattractiveness of the surround- 
ing areas. He said that the country- 
side needed a conservation and rec- 
lamation program to restore the 
beauty that was once evident. This 
lack of beauty is what is contribut- 
ing to local boys shying away from 
farming, claimed Rev. Brisson. 

County Superintendent I. B. 
Hudson disagreed with Rev. Bris- 
son. Hudson felt that many boys are 
taking up farming. He then pro- 
ceeded to tell the audience how he 
loves farming and actually is a man 
of two vocations, teaching and farm- 
ing. Hudson closed his remarks by 
humorously stating that when he 
makes enough money teaching, he 
will return to the farm. 

Mrs. Clara Reid awarded the 
Betty Crocker-Better Homemaker 
award to Annis Huffman of Rich- 
lands who will compete for state 
honors in the near future. 

President Betsy Kesler of the 
F.H.A. presented Junior Home- 
maker Degrees and pins to Linda 
Brinson, Edna Home, Judy Home, 
Mary Alyce Newbold, Anne Fen- 
deisn, Nancy Fountain, Carolyn 
Kinsey, Nelva Sandlin and Ruth 
Dixon Hood. She also bestowed 



Chapter Homemaker Degrees on 
Elizabeth Pittman, Shelby Pittman, 
Audry Pittman and Betty Lou 
Jarman. 

Raeford Hudson was awarded a 
$25 dollar war bond for excellence 
in supervised practice in school agri- 
culture. R. H. Williams made the 
presentation for E. W. Taylor who 
was unable to attend. Hudson was 
praised for his genuine interest in 
wanting to become a future farmer. 

Lamar Heath and Jim Hudler por- 
trayed two country boys in the city 
for the first time in a skit entitled 
"Green As Grass." The play, 
written in a humorous vein, showed 
the farm boys, awed and confused 
by the big city, quitting it and re- 
turning to the quieter and simple 
way of life. 

Principal E. W. Morgan of Rich- 
lands High said a few words com- 
plimenting the group on its excellent 
work. R. H. Williams ended the 
program by initiating a well- 
deserved round of applause for the 
women who prepared the food. 



Old Mother Goose Motif 
at Broadway FHA Affair 

Old Mother Goose was in 
prominence in the decorations and 
appointments in the Broadway 
School Cafeteria when the members 
of the Broadway Chapter enter- 
tained at a banquet to honor their 
mothers. The motif was further ac- 
centuated in the menu and program. 

On the walls of the cafeteria were 
large, colorful cardboard charac- 
ters from Mother Goose Nursery 
Rhymes. The guest table was 
centered with a large pie with "four 
and twenty blackbirds" peeping out. 
On the other tables were center- 
pieces of standing Mother Goose 
characters, balloons, candles, and 
paper grass, giving a carnival effect. 

An elaborate menu consisting 
of Cock Robin (tomato juice); 
Humpty Dumpty Potatoes (Potato 
Salad); Jack's beans (string 
beans); Peter Piper Pickled Pep- 
pers (crabapples); Polly's tea 
(iced tea); and Jack Horner's pie 
with Jack Frost (cherry pie with 
ice cream) was served by girls from 
the eighth grade. 



Mistress Mary Quite Contrary 
(Betty Anne Thomas), our F.H.A. 
President, served as Toastmistress. 
After the Invocation all of the girls 
stood and repeated in unison the 
F.H.A. Creed. Little Miss Muffet 
(Josephine Patterson) welcomed our 
mothers and the Queen of Hearts 
(Mrs. Clayton Thomas) responded. 
Then everyone enjoyed the game of 
"Mother Goose Fantasy." 

During the meal Mother Knows 
and Faith of Our Mothers were 
sung by a quartette from our 
chapter. Also the poem "Mother Is 
Always Right" was recited by 
Patty Sue Mize. Little Harry 
Stevens did some singing and tap 
dancing. Old Mother Hubbard 
(Mrs. Hal Thomas) talked on What 
My Daughter Means To Me and 
Little Bo-Peep (Laura Jane 
Thomas) responded with What My 
Mother Means to Me. 

The Story Book Ball, a Mother 
Goose Selection, was sung and acted 
out by Margie Smith, Doris Jean 
Davis, Mary Jo Pattishall, Adelle 
Thomas, Nora Douglas, and Mar- 
garet Ann Kelly, accompanied at 
the piano by Quincey Arnette. Our 
banquet was closed with the singing 
of the F.H.A. Prayer Song. 

There were 100 in attendance at 
our banquet. Mrs. John Womble is 
our adviser. Our chapter has 54 
members. Our officers: Betty Anne 
Thomas, President; Barbara Taylor, 
Vice-President; Lillian Sloan, Secre- 
tary; Janet McNeil, Treasurer; 
Dorothy Smith, Reporter; Dot 
Thomas, Parliamentarian; Margaret 
Sloan, Historian; and Song Leader 
and Pianist Josephine Patterson 
and Quincey Arnette. 

An attractive corner where Future Home- 
makers can read about F.H.A.'ers and 
collect program ideas. This is a scene in 
the home economics department in the 
Weldon School. 





and *? amity ^oaco^ wp 'Deyieet 



If examples help — then "help yourself" to 

reviewing the selections listed below. The statements selected 

to serve as examples are taken from the reports 

of many applicants for the State Homemaker Degree. 



The tables which some applicants used 
in reporting are not easy to reproduce 
here, but it is hoped that you get a 
general idea of how the reporting can be 
done without sacrificing the initiative or 
originality of the individual applicant. 

Standard I through III are more or less 
factual, or statistical but should you be 
interested read the section of Degrees on 
the inside cover of this issue of the 
magazine. 

Under all the standards each individual 
statement is taken from a different appli- 
cant's report with only a few exceptions. 

Standard 4. Has held responsible posi- 
tions in connection with school and 
chapter activities. 

Responsibility — Delegate to Student 
Council Conventions, Date — 1952-54. 
Quality of Contribution — This was 
another time for me to represent our 
school and bring back new ideas to 
them. Also, I got to meet many people 
from other schools. These really have 
added interest to my high school life, 
just like the F.H.A. Conventions have 
done." 

"I am co-chairman of a music com- 
mittee in our chapter. We are having song 
books made of F.H.A. songs. This, we 
hope, will encourage singing more." 

In home room I have been the 
secretary for two years. Aiding the 
teacher by calling the roll when re- 
quested, filling out records, and sending 
sympathy cards to members of the class. 
Responsibility: Presided over Panel Dis- 
cussion in Chapel 
Date: 1954 

Quality: Gave everyone a chance to con- 
tribute. Outlined discussion for panel 
members 

For the Citizenship Week project I 
worked cleaning the tables and chairs, 
shelves, and windows in the library. We 
polished and washed all these things in 
the library. Also, I made fifty out of the 
eight hundred book marks that we made. 
Responsibility: Vice-president of Student 

Council 
Date: 1954-55 

Quality of Contribution: In addition to 
assuming the duties of the president 
when he is absent, the vice-president is 
chairman of the homeroom representa- 
tives. She is co-editor of The Gavel 
the Student Council's weekly bulletin. 
The vice-president is a member of the 
committee to compile the School Scrap 
Book." 

Signed by 



Standard 5. Participates effectively in 

community activities which contribute to 

better family life. 

Community Activity: Daily Vacation 

Bible School 
Date: July, 1954 
Quality: Led Bible School songs and 

choirs 
Community Activity: Volunteer Work 
Date: October 1954 
Quality: Stayed with a bereaved family 

of mother, small son and daughter 

for four nights, keeping up the work 

and doing what I could for them 
Community Activity: "Poplar Ridge 

Friends Center" (Church Activity 

Building) ' 

Date: October, 1954 
Quality: Cleaned four times. Cleaned all 

silverware and rearrangeed in order. 

"I am a member of the West Asheville 
Presbyterian Church and have carried 
out the following activities in connection 
with it: 

"1. I am pianist for the Junior Depart- 
ment during Sunday School and assistant 
teacher of the Junior Girls. 

2. I am a member of the Presbyterian 
Youth Fellowship (PYF) of my church 
and have held or do hold the following 
offices: Secretary, Vice-President and 
Program Chairman, and Chairman of the 
Christian Faith Commission. 

3. For the past two summers I have 
been a Bible School helper and pianist 
in the Primary Department. 

4. I am a member of the Adult Choir 
which sings during morning services. 

5. I act as a substitute pianist for 
Prayer-meeting on Wednesday nights and 
once I played for the evening service in a 
duet with the organ. 

Standard 6. Participates in an outstanding 

way in activities provided for in the 

State F.H.A. program of work. 

Activity: Read Teen Times and N. C. 
Future Homemakers magazine 

Quality of Contribution: Learned about 
F.H.A. and how others work in it. 

Activity: Attended County Leadership 
School 

Quality of Contribution: Served as dele- 
gate and attended discussion group. 
Also, was on welcoming committee to 
the visitors. 

Activity: Attended the Southern Regional 
Meeting, Daytona Beach, Florida 

Quality of Contribution: Have partici- 
pated in local, county, and district 
programs to give to other F.H.A. mem- 
bers the benefit of some of the things 
which we learned attending the meet- 
ing. Such as, ways of working in 



groups, program ideas, and pointers on 
improving family living. 
Activity: Participated in Career Day 
Quality of Contribution: Investigated job 
opportunities requiring homemaking 
training. Decided on a Home Eco- 
nomics Career. 
Activity: Have a pen pal in Norway. 
Date: 1955 

Quality of Contribution: Learn about 
conditions in Norway and exchange 
recipes. 

I attended F.H.A. Camp during sum- 
mer of 1954. Served on camp council. 
Willingly attended the leadership group 
and participated in discussions. Helped to 
interpret camp policies to members in 
my cabin and took an active part in 
sports. 

Standard 7. Has assumed responsibility 
for some worth-while homemaking acti- 
vity for a period long enough to show 
definite improvement. 

I have taken over the family devo- 
tionals. I ask different members of the 
family each morning to read from the 
"Upper Room" (a church magazine). 
This only takes about 5 minutes and 
seems to draw our family closer together 
as well as to begin each day with com- 
munion with God. 

I make some of my clothes. This is an 
outgrowth of training in Home Eco- 
nomics and especially of a home project 
I carried out in Home Economics II. This 
project was making night clothes. Since 
then I have made other garments which 
show a decided improvement in sewing. 
I select the materials and patterns and 
try to keep in mind the idea of good 
quality as well as economy. I also select 
the accessories for my clothes. This re- 
sponsibility saves my mother much time 
and gives me needed experience for future 
years. 

My Mother works away from home so 
the responsibility of the house work falls 
to me. Usually the work would take most 
of the day until I worked out a schedule 
to save time and energy. Before I worked 
out my schedule I wasted time in washing 
dishes and washing clothes, also I wasted 
time when I vacuumed because I would 
dust before I vacuumed and spread dust 
over the furniture all over again. Another 
thing that I learned was I really didn't 
have to sleep all morning. Sleeping only 
made me drowsy when I slept late, and 
also it got too hot to work later on in 
the morning. Another thing I learned was 

(Continued on page eight) 




Harriet and Rebecca Springs are sisters and Future Homemakers at the Mount Holly School. As one of their summer projects 
they dried foliage and flowers from their summer flower garden to use in arrangements when fresh flowers are not available. 
(Read more in Chapter Chatter.) 

Future Homemakers of the Lowe's Grove School in Durham County planned a special program for Assembly on February 23rd 
in Observance of Brotherhood Week. Included in the Forum reading from left to right are: Loretta Hillard, President; 
Mr. Gutieney, El Salvador; Mr. Bhattacharya, India; Mr. Ocbi, Japan; Dr. Takeshima, Japan; and Sandra Hamin, Program Chair- 
man. See Chapter Chatter. 

The Future Homemakers of William R. Davie School and some of the chapter mothers met in the home economics department 
under the direction of Mrs. Annie S. Hyde, F.H.A. adviser, to mend over 200 articles of clothing collected by the P.T.A. during 
a recent clothing drive. (For details and for names see Chapter Chatter.) 



Portraits of Growing Chapters 



We've a story to tell — we Future 
Homemakers — and the more con- 
vincingly our tales are told the more 
we will grow and grow — the more 
interesting the activities the more 
emphatically our tales can be told 
— and sold. 

Take the many-fold activities of 
the Bartlett-Yancey Chapter, and 
the Mills Chapter, and the Mount 
Holly and many others. 

From the Bartlett-Yancey Chap- 
ter — 

1. An exhibit at the Danville Fair 
earned for the F.H.A. Chapter some 
good publicity as well as a financial 
reward. $35 was received. Now we 
are the proud owners of a 57 piece 
set of hand painted bone china. 

2. "Are you planning to sell pansy 
plants again this _year?" people 
around were asking and then added 
"I hope so. They were so fine last 
year." $40 was cleared. More could 
have been sold but due to a short- 
age of plants some orders had to be 
canceled. The plants were ordered 
in lots of 25-50 at cost and were 
sold at the florist price. 

3. In December the F.H.A. mem- 
bers had charge of the devotion at a 
P.T.A. meeting. Janice Powell, who 
is working on her Chapter Degree 
told in her words the story of the 
Birth of Christ as taken from the 
second chapter of Luke. This was 
followed by the impressive presenta- 
tion of the Lord's Prayer — voice of 
a girl in prayer, voice of conscience 
off-stage and closing with a member 
singing the Lord's Prayer. The harp 
was used for music. 



The following Sunday we had this 
same program in church except for 
a few changes. This program was re- 
quested. Many people spoke of the 
worshipful atmosphere and ex- 
pressed their appreciation for this 
type of work being done by the 
homemaking girls. 

4. Ann Aldridge, who attended 
the Regional Meeting of Future 
Homemakers at Daytona Beach, 
Florida, reported the meeting and 
her experience during the week of 
the meeting in a radio program. The 
people of Yanceyville were gen- 
erous in their praise of this program. 

5. For a P.T.A. program mem- 
bers of the F.H.A. Chapter demon- 
strated a regular class experience 
in the Child Guidance unit. A panel 
discussion was presented followed 
by a general discussion with audi- 
ence participation. , Expressions of 
appreciation for our homemaking 
program came from parents after 
the meeting. 

6. A five night Study Course was 
held at one of the churches during 
the week before Christmas. F.H.A. 
girls assumed the responsibility of 
decorating for this group. Among 
the decorations used was a large 
lighted map which remained in the 
church all week. 

7. For three weeks we had a dis- 
play in a store window down town 
of garments made in class, some 
were cotton dresses, wool skirts and 
cotton blouses, skirts and stoles, 
taffeta dresses, all wool lined suits, 
toppers, house coat and slippers to 
match, and an evening dress. We 



used a poster for necessary equip- 
ment needed for clothing construc- 
tion. 

Two windows were filled with 
toys made by the class: kittens, dolls, 
dogs, elephants, monkeys, humpty 
dumpty, doll beds made from cigar 
boxes and spools and clothes pins. 

8. Around 100 gathered at the 
clubhouse to honor the chapter 
parent. Valentine decorations were 
used and a three tier cake, punch, 
cheese biscuits and mints were 
served. All had fun dancing, play- 
ing games, singing songs, etc. The 
club mother sang 2 popular songs. 
Present were the principal, faculty, 
Carolina Power and Light Co. rep- 
resentative, adviser, 75 F.F.A. and 
F.H.A. and all the past and present 
chapter parents. 

9. Nell Walker really received 
recognition when she made the 
wedding gown for her sister. She is a 
second year pupil. It was a white 
satin gown with a lace yoke and seed 
pearls, a long gathered skirt. Nell is 
completing her work for a chapter 
degree. At present she is making a 
list of things we can do for civil 
defense and will have them mimeo- 
graphed and given out at our next 
meeting. She is also planning to get 
a first aid kit set up for the depart- 
ment. Other projects have been: 
Redecorating her room, made a full 
lined coat for her younger sister 
and a topper for herself. For a 
school project she helped to raise 
money to buy equipment for the 
department. For her community 
project she helped to buy a trash 




The two pictures on the left were taken at W. R. Mills School, Louisburg, North Carolina of some of the girls who worked on 
a Saturday to improve the Home Economics Department, after it was built. The girls here are: Peggy Perry, Annette Fuller, and 
Sarah Brown. Both boys and girls worked together to clean the windows of the new home economics building as seen in the 
picture on the right. 




SCENE FROM ONE OF THE SKITS 
Sociodrama technique was used by mem- 
bers of the Rockwell F.H.A. Chapter to 
teach correct and incorrect manners. 
How harmony in the home can be main- 
tained in the use of the family television 
was being acted out when the camera 
caught this scene. 



can for the square up town. We 
have had such good reports from 
her community. 

From the Mills Chapter — 

1. The F.H.A. Emblem made into 
a float with the home inside the 
huge octagonal frame being sup- 
ported by youth Future Home- 
makers won for the Mills Chapter 
first prize in the Armistice Day 
Parade at Louisburg. 

2. The Future Farmers of 
America joined the Future Home- 
makers of America for a program 
of interpretation. The boys ex- 
plained what it means to be a Future 
Farmer. The girls explained what 
membership in the F.H.A. meant to 
them. 

3. With a new home economics 
building the Future Homemakers 
took pride in its care. Both boys 
(boys are enrolled in Home Eco- 
nomics III) and girls enjoyed wash- 
ing windows and several girls gave 
time on a Saturday to help improve 
the exterior of the building. 

4. Recognition was given and ap- 
preciation expressed for services 
rendered by individuals. This was 
expressed before the entire student 
body — following a fashion show 
by adults and 2nd year home eco- 
nomics girls. 

5. A panel of adults and teen- 
agers set F.H.A. members to think- 
ing about doing some self-analysis 
during March meeting when panel 
members discussed such problems of 
the parent and the teen-ager. 

From the Mount Holly Chapter — 

Some interesting group projects 

carried out by the Mount Holly 



Chapter thus far this year are: 

1. Fashion Revue at Spindle 
Center Fair. 

2. Participation in Harvest Festi- 
val was 3-fold: 

1st. Presented a program to some 
500 guests. 

(a) 50 F.H.A.'ers modeled gar- 
ments made in class — or had other 
members of family model garments 
made for them. 

(b) Presented play "Difference 
Between House and Home" (Taken 
from Teen Times). 

2nd. Held "Open House" in the 
homemaking department for the 
500 guests. 

3rd. An exhibit depicting many 
phases of the homemaking program 
were prepared as special projects of 
individuals and small groups. 

The special exhibits were: 

(a) Quick and Easy Methods to 
Make Jelly. 

(b) Dried Flower Arrangements 

(c) Thanksgiving Corsages 

(d) Easy To Make Pocket-books 
and Hats 

(e) Easy to Make Collars 

(f) Special Cake and Salad 
Recipes 

(g) Christmas Toys 
(h) Making Candles 

The exhibit remained in the de- 
partment for a week. During the 
week 40 adults — mothers, women, 
came in to see the display. 

3. Polio Drive — Some 30 
F.H.A.'ers worked on Saturday for 
March of Dimes. Collected $101.87. 
Had charge of school campaign. 
Raised $387.00. 

4. Magazine sale — Curtis Pub- 
lishing Co. Profit made — purchased 
new equipment. 

5. Bloodmobile — 22 F.H.A.ers 
helped with this project. Held in 
Home Economics department. Total 
hrs. worked by members — 98. 

6. Social F.H.A. II — Some 90 
students and guests attended Valen- 
tine Semi-formal, Feb. 11. 

7. F.H.A. Publicity — Articles 
appeared in local newspapers — 
Gastonia Gazette, Gaston Citizen, 
Charlotte Observer, Future Home- 
makers Magazine, Teen Times. 

8. An important event in F.H.A. 
is Brotherhood Week. Each of the 
six groups has a speaker who tells 
how, by being friendly and co- 
operative, we can get along better 
with others. 

9. The second year had a party 
which was attended by some 90 peo- 
ple. The party proved to be a learn- 
ing situation also. Beforehand we 
learned party manners and how to 
prepare party foods. 



"dfaprer dFatffr" 



Attending the Bailey Mother-Daughter 
Banquet in the School cafeteria were 143 
mothers and daughters. 

Part of the program was the traditional 
pinning of roses on each other by the 
mother and daughter. 

The chapter mothers were honored by 
the chapter's giving them sterling silver 
thimbles with F.H.A. on them. 

The Beaufort Future Homemakers of 
America issued a cordial invitation to the 
parents and friends of each chapter mem- 
ber and home economics student to attend 
the March meeting of the F.H.A. which 
was held in the school auditorium during 
activity period from 11 to 11:45 o'clock. 

Dorothy Jarman was chairman of the 
program which included a devotional 
service and a fashion show of garments 
made by the second year girls. At the 
close of the meeting the members invited 
their guests to the homemaking depart- 
ment where they were served homemade 
cookies and punch made by the first year 
girls. 

Donna Lewis and Jean Chadwick re- 
ceived sewing baskets for entering the 
sewing contest sponsored by Belk's. 
Donna made a printed pongee dress, and 
Jean made a nylon print, and both dresses 
were modeled at school. 

The first aid committee for March was 
composed of Mary Lou Temple, Sue 
Webb and Bronna Willis. Care of the first 
aid room is the major school project of 
the Future Homemakers. 

The F.H.A. chapter received a $10.00 
check from the Methodist Church for 
serving a supper to children while their 
parents attended the Methodist Building 
Fund Dinner. 

Jackie Young was elected president for 
1955-56. Seven officers will be elected 
at the meeting in May. 

The care of the first-aid room com- 
mittee for April is composed of Jean 
Cole, Wanda Jervis and Eloise Dudley. 

Nina Darling and Bronna Willis will 
serve on the devotional and lunch com- 
mittee for the ninth grade girls this week. 

Pam Morris of the Boyden F.H.A. 

chapter was selected from eighty-nine 
senior girls at Boyden as Boyden's Betty 
Crocker Homemaker of Tomorrow. 

She received the highest score in a 
written examination which tested the 
homemaking knowledge and attitudes of 
the senior girls in the graduating class. 

The classes of the B. F. Grady F.H.A. 

and F.F.A. have changed for a two-week 
course of F.H.A. for the boys. Miss 
Thelma Dilday is teaching the boys and 
they plan to study several different 
phases of homemaking. 

There are committees of which the 
whole class takes part. They are: 1 — 
Recreation, 2 — Bulletin Board, 3 — Pub- 
licity, 4 — Courtesy, 5 — Clean Up. 

The boys are to study cooking, danc- 
ing, clothing, and good manners. Several 
movies will be shown on these topics. 
Mrs. Sarah Jones, a home economist with 
Carolina Power and Light Company, is 
coming to give a demonstration on cook- 
ing. A representative from a department 
store in Kinston is coming to give infor- 
mation on how to dress. Also, Dr. Powers 



of the County Health Department is to 
come and talk. 

The Lowe's Grove Future Homemak- 
ers of America chapter planned a special 
day in observance of Brotherhood Week 
on Wednesday, February 23. 

An assembly program was held in the 
school auditorium with the vice-president 
of the F.H.A. Faye Randolph, presiding. 
Sandra Hamm, program chairman, intro- 
duced four foreign students from Duke 
University. They were Dr. Takeshima, 
Japan; Mr. Gutierrez, El Salvador; Mr. 
Bhattacharya, India; and Mr. Ochi, Japan. 
Picture on page 4. 

Immediately following the assembly 
program a coffee hour was held in the 
Home Economics Cottage for the foreign 
students, faculty and F.H.A. members. 
Then the guests visited various classes 
throughout the school. They answered 
many questions concerning their country 
and customs. 

At lunch, a special menu was planned, 
with the co-operation of the cafeteria 
staff. The decorations used in the cafe- 
teria were based on the Brotherhood 
Week theme. 

The F.H.A. girls were pleased that two 
of the chapter Mothers, Mrs. Joe Mann 
and Mrs. Monroe Hudson, could attend 
the program. 

We, at the Lowe's Grove Chapter were 
honored recently when Miss Iqbal Dar 
visited our school. Miss Dar, a college 
teacher from Pakistan, is in the United 
States on a Fulbright Scholarship. She is 
an exchange student and will be here in 
our country for six months. During this 
time she will be touring many schools 
throughout the eastern part of the United 
States. 

An interesting talk about Pakistan was 
given by our visitor in Miss Clay's room, 
and those present enjoyed the discussion 
about her native country very much. 

After an enjoyable talk, Miss Dar and 
the faculty were entertained at a coffee in 
the Home Economics department. 

The Durham-Orange Bi-County F.H.A. 
Rally was held at Hope Valley School, 
Wednesday night, February 16, at 8 
o'clock. Lowe's Grove, Hope Valley and 
Durham High were co-hostesses for the 
event. A representative from the Civil 
Defense Bureau spoke to the group on 
the importance of Civil Defense. After 
the talk, the co-hostesses presented a 
talent show. Judith Hamlett from Lowe's 
Grove was mistress of ceremonies. 

The Morehead City Chapter of the 

Future Homemakers of America met in 
the auditorium for the March meeting. 
Beadie Lewis, President, conducted the 
opening ceremony. 

The program was given by a number of 
sophomores to emphasize one of the Na- 
tional Projects — "Families Together." 
Mary Lou Davis introduced the program 
by saying, "Families that pray together, 
work together and play together, usually 
stay together." Norma Harper, Lois 
Becton, Betty Conway and Betty Lou 
Morton gave a morning devotional suit- 
able for a family. Mildred Lampley told 
of a number of hobbies families could 
enjoy together; Mary Leonard suggested 
a number of projects which could be 
carried out by family members together; 
and June Seamon and Doris McQueen 
demonstrated several games which could 
be played with improvised articles. A 
family council showing how not to plan 
a family budget was presented by Patsy 



Holt, Mary Leonard, Doris McQueen and 
June Seamon, while afterward, Joan 
Seamon, Ruth Brinson, Joyce Robinson 
and Gloria Hall planned the family 
spending in the correct way. Deanna 
Ballou, song leader, then led the group 
in a number of songs and relaxers which 
the family might sing together. 

Some 90 second year F.H.A.'ers of 
Mount Holly Chapter and their guests 
celebrated Valentines Day with that 
special occasion, our semi-formal. 

We were delightfully entertained by 

1. Pantomimes of Red Buttons and the 
McGuire Sisters. 

2. Special music by F.H.A.'ers and 
guests. 

3. Play "The Family Meets the Wife" 
presented by some second year girls. 
(10 minutes) 

Everyone was served cold plates and 
punch by first and third year girls. 

Junior Homemaker Degrees were con- 
ferred upon three members of the Nor- 
lina Chapter of Future Homemakers of 
America by Mrs. W. K. Delbridge, spon- 
sor, at the regular monthly meeting of 
the chapter in the school auditorium on 
Tuesday. 

Receiving the degree were Alice Marie 
Rooker, Phillis Norvell and Nancy 
Stevenson. 

Following the presentation of the de- 
grees a program displaying the talent of 
many of the girls was given. Ann Hagen 
dramatized "Mary Had a Little Lamb." 
Gwen Lloyd, Betty Read, Lillie Denton 
and Carolyn Salmon sang "Sincerely," 
with red carnations as a part of the em- 
phasis upon the song. A quartet composed 
of Elsie Nau, Shirley Holtzman, Evelyna 
Martin and Martha Bowers sang 
"Tweedle-De-Dee." Another highlight of 
the show was the acting of Ellen Fuller, 
Faye Draffin, Annice Perkinson and 
Phillis Norvell in presenting "The 
Naughty Lady of Shady Lane." 

In the Red Springs Chapter of the 

Future Homemakers of America this 
month the program was on "Using Your 
Time Wisely." The auditorium was in 
darkness with a large clock with glowing 
numbers on the stage. Voices were 
heard over a microphone through the 
darkness. Then a light was shone on the 
face of an Indian girl to stress using 
your time for others. Next a light brought 
a picture of Christ into view to stress 
using your time for Christ. 

Thursday night, February, 10, was the 
scene of a gay and rather unusual party. 
The party was given by the Future Home- 
makers of America Club of Red Springs 
High School and approximately 50 girls 
attended. The part was out of the or- 
dinary because it was a costume party and 
almost every girl was dressed differently. 
Among the varied costumes were cowboy 
outfits, a tramp, a Japanese, a gypsy, a 
pirate, Martha Washington, Frankie and 
Johnny, a hobo, a fairy, a Hawaiian 
(grass skirt and all), a "cool cat," Little 
Miss Valentine, and many other interest- 
ing outfits. 

We do not have Emily Post around to 
tell us how to do or how not to do 
things, so the Rockwell F.H.A. Club pre- 
sented a program of skits which drama- 
tized the right and wrong way to engage 
in various activities such as dating, use 
of the family car, and house work. 

Since T.V. has become America's No. 
1 gray hair maker, our main feature dealt 



with the right and the wrong way to 
make use of the T.V. set. Our group 
acted out the state of confusion which 
arises when each member of the family 
demands to see his own program on his 
own channel at his own time. Needless to 
say this resulted in turning off the set 
completely, and the mother exhausted 
from the battle, wearily holds up the 
white flag. 

As shown in the picture on page 2 
a compromise has been worked out, with 
each member of the family agreeing to 
hear each other's programs in order to 
preserve a sort of peace and quiet on 
the T.V. battle front. Our actresses are 
left to right, Joan Heilig, Midgie Honey- 
cutt, and Juanita Eagle. 

Notice our stage props. A chair and a 
large piece of paper is the T.V. Chairs 
were used for the couch. 

Here is hoping that this is the solution 
to the problem of television and the re- 
turn of peace and quiet in the American 
home. 

Rolesville F.H.A. girls presented the 
play The Secret In The Old Attic in the 
school auditorium at 8:00 p.m. Friday 
night, March 18. Each year the F.H.A. 
girls present a play with an all-girl cast to 
raise money for department activities. 
This year they plan to spend their money 
for a new electric range. 

The cast included: 
Nancy Drew, a girl detective. Diana Renn 
Bess, her serious friend. .Frances Rogers 
Georgia, her frivolous friend 

Louise Baker 
Mrs. March, a sweet old lady 

La Rue Jones 
Susan, her granddaughter. .Ann Mullen 
Mrs. Lally, a neighbor 

Nancy Hines Merritt 
Diane, her talkative daughter 

Mabel George 

Miss Jenner, a visitor Sue Pearce 

Effie, the maid Peggy Daniel 

The Secret In The Old Attic is a Nancy 
Drew mystery in three acts. After the 
death of her son Philip, Mrs. March and 
Susan are unable to find his valuable 
music manuscripts. They needed the 
money from the sale of the music. Mys- 
terious noises from the attic frighten 
them and as a last resort they call upon 
Nancy Drew. Of course, along with 
Nancy come her best friends, Bess and 
Georgia. 

Nancy does indeed come to their 
rescue. Behind the old wardrobe in the 
attic she discovers a secret room contain- 
ing the piano and the lost manuscripts. 
She finds out that Diane and Mrs. Lally 
have been searching the attic for the 
missing manuscripts and that Diane is 
the "ghost" in the attic. But perhaps the 
smartest character is Mehitabel, the 
dressmakers dummy who "sees all, hears 
all, tells nothing. — The Perfect Woman." 

The ushers for the play were Joanne 
Murray, Phyllis Poole, Marie Lewis, and 
Mary Garrett. 

Both the F.H.A. mothers and the 
F.F.A. boys and their advisor, Mrs. 
John L. Perkinson, helped with the play. 
The mothers helped secure old furniture 
and clothing for the stage props. The 
F.F.A. boys erected the scenery. 

On Tuesday evening, March 8, 1955, 
nearly 250 persons, members of the Row- 
land Chapters of the Future Homemak- 
ers of America, and the Future Farmers 
of America, their parents, and other 
guests crowded into the Rowland School 
Lunchroom for a barbecue supper and 



entertainment. After the meal and enter- 
tainment, the group moved to the gym- 
nasium for dancing. 

The lunchroom was decorated in 
mingled colors of red and white for the 
F.H.A. and blue and gold for the F.F.A. 
The colors were combined in long 
streamers lettered with F.H.A. and 
F.F.A. on the tables. 

The parents and other guests were wel- 
comed by Mr. C. E. Morrison, Voca- 
tional Agriculture teacher and F.F.A. ad- 
visor. Music was furnished by the girls' 
trio. 

The F.F.A. presented its portion of the 
program with the president, presiding. 
The purposes of the F.F.A., the F.F.A. 
creed, and the achievements were given. 
The organization motto is "Learning to 
do, doing to learn, earning to live, living 
to serve." 

Two songs were presented by the boys' 
quartet. An F.F.A. member of the Barnes- 
ville High School was heard in a piano 
solo. 

The F.H.A. program was next pre- 
sented, with the president in charge. She 
gave a report of the homemaking depart- 
ment, which was followed by the F.H.A. 
creed and a revision of the skit, "Builders 
of Homes," closing with a solo, "Bless 
This House." The F.H.A. motto is 
"Looking Toward New Horizons." Mrs. 
Albertine McKellar, F.H.A. advisor and 
Vocational Homemaking teacher, made 
several announcements. The program in 
the lunchroom concluded with the sing- 
ing of "America." The guests then moved 
to the gym for the grand march and danc- 
ing; punch was served in the gym. 

A barbecue supper was served by 
Griffin of Goldsboro, with Rowland 
apple pie and coffee. 

Present for the Parents' Night were 
members of the F.F.A. and F.H.A.; their 
advisors; their parents; members of the 
local school board and their wives; presi- 
dent of the P.T.A.; members of the 
county school board; the mayor of Row- 
land; the town clerk; and friends and 
supporters of the two chapters. 

The Shelby F.H.A. Club appeared on 
the T.V. program "Man Around the 
House" March 23 in Charlotte. A bus 
was chartered and approximately sixty 
girls went down for the show. Mrs. Hari- 
ette Holton, advisor; Mrs. Carlyle Corn- 
well; Mrs. Forest Wolfe, club mother; 
Mrs. A. C. Suttle; and Mrs. Charles 
Lampley accompanied the group. 

The ten girls seated around the guest 
table were asked by Allen Newcombe to 
introduce themselves, and he also talked 
informally with Mrs. Holton about the 
purposes and activities of the Future 
Homemakers of America. 

The following girls participated in var- 
ious "Beat the Clock" contests: Mar- 
garet Gold, president; Lynn Sutz; Martha 
Reid; Nancy Rosenthal; Myra Estkridge; 
Rachel Dedmon; Martha Elam; and 
Ella Foy Suttle. Lovely prizes such as a 
watch, a Lincoln Library, a sweater set, 
and a fur muff were won by each con- 
testant. 

We were very proud of the fact that the 
Shelby Future Homemakers were the first 
live audience that WBTV of Charlotte 
invited to visit their new building. 

On Thursday night, February 17, the 
parents and teachers of Shelby High 
School were pleasantly surprised by the 
aroma of fresh homemade cakes. It seems 
the local Future Homemakers of America 
had brought 23 cakes to the P.T.A. meet- 

8 



ing in the hope of making some money to 
send a bus to the T.V. program in which 
they are participating in Charlotte on 
March 23. 

There were many beautiful cakes rep- 
resenting some of the best cooks in 
Shelby. Among them was a delicious 
chocolate cake made by Mrs. Roger 
Laughridge, the club grandmother. 

Mrs. Forest Wolfe, who makes won- 
derful cakes herself, helped the girls in 
their pricing and selling. 

When all the cakes were gone, the 
girls, who said they could have sold 20 
more, found they had made a profit of 
35 dollars. 

The Unionville F.H.A. Chapter en- 
tertained the Benton Heights Future 
Homemakers on February 16 at a Valen- 
tines Party at Unionville. Approximately 
seventy-five members were present for 
the party. Recreation was led by Mr. and 
Mrs. Tom Morgan, and Miss Ann Ponder. 
They led us in various folk dances during 
the evening. Partners were distinguished 
by crepe paper ties. 

The decoration committee, Helen 
Latham, Beckie Braswell, Phyllis Ed- 
wards and Flora Griffin (Unionville's 
F.H.A. President) had decorated with 
red and white crepe paper streamers 
across the ceiling, and with valentines. 

In charge of refreshments were Peggy 
Outen, Pat Mullis, Joyce Benton, Nina 
Pressley and Flora Griffin. They served 
dainty cookies, open faced sandwiches, 
cake and Pepsi-Colas. 

Others present were our chapter 
mothers, Mr. and Mrs. Purser, Union- 
ville's principal, Kenneth Baucom. pho- 
tographer and our advisors, Mrs. Kath- 
leen Nicholson from Benton Heights and 
Miss Gwen Williams, advisor for Union- 
ville. 

This year in order to make money for 
the Mother-Daughter banquet the Waco 
F.H.A. Chapter decided to have a Hobo 
Day. On Hobo Day we were to do any- 
thing in the community anyone wanted 
done. 

Plans were completed several days in 
advance. On the morning of Hobo Day 
the F.H.A. members came ready to go. 
Many of the girls enjoyed many interest- 
ing experiences such as learning to work 
in a restaurant, doing the family wash- 
ing and washing windows for $1.00 an 
hour and taking time out for refresh- 
ments. The community co-operated and 
agreed that it was a fine undertaking. We 
are sure we will try this again next year. 
The proceeds were $40.00. There were 
about 35 girls working. 

The Future Homemakers of William R. 

Davie School and some of the chapter's 
mothers met in the home economics de- 
partment under the direction of Mrs. 
Annie S. Hyde, the teacher, to mend over 
two hundred articles of clothing collected 
by the P.T.A. during a recent clothing 
drive. The clothes are to be put in a 
closet at school and used as needed for 
indigent children. During the afternoon 
the group mended, darned, patched, sewed 
on buttons, washed, ironed, pressed, and 
even polished shoes. Refreshments were 
served to the group. 

Shown in the picture on page 4 enjoy- 
ing the sewing party are left to right, 
front row: Lois Bailey, Sylvia Wallace, 
Alice Daniel, Gay Underwood, Janice 
Hux, Ann Thomason. Second row: Mrs. 
Robert Connell, Mrs. Lillian Shearin, 
Martha Bobb, Ann Shearin, Mrs. Walter 



Hux, Betty Mobley. Back row: Mrs. 
George Harrison (not visible, back of 
Mrs. Connell), Zettie Mae Hux 
Carol Ann Hux, and Mrs. Oscar Love' 



DEGREES 

(Continued from page three) 
to clean one room at a time not run from 
one room to another. 

Standard 8. Has thought through her 
personal goals in the light of needs, in- 
terests, and abilities and is following a 
plan for the wise use of her resources to 
achieve her goals. 
Another of my personal goals is 
"Learning to carry out a share of Chapter 
Responsibilities." In this way, I can help 
make my chapter a better one, learn to 
become a better homemaker, learn the 
rights and wrongs of homemaking, and 
take over responsibilities without having 
to be told. I have learned to be more 
attentive, co-operative, and a more active 
member in chapter duties. 
Goal: Major in Home Economics. Choose 

a Career in that field 
Reasons for Choice: Interested in Home- 
making and homemaking activities. 
Visualized the importance of success- 
ful home life 
Plans for Achievement: Take courses in 
home economics in high school. 
Choose a college, preferably co-ed. 
Practice skills in everyday life. 
Progress: Has passed two years of home- 
making and is now enrolled in third 
year. Practices homemaking skills in 
present life. Is considering two colleges 
for enrollment. 
Goal: Improving my personality 
Reasons for choosing: I think all of us 
want to be liked and respected by the 
people we come in contact with. An- 
other reason why I chose this goal is 
when I go to parties I often feel left 
out and I feel if I understood myself 
and the others around me I would not 
feel this way. 
Plans for achieving: I plan to find peo- 
ple whose personalities I admire and 
see what I can do to develop a winning 
personality. I plan to get all the worth- 
while literature I can find on person- 
ality. 
Progress Made: I have read a lot of the 
materials on personality. I have talked 
with qualified people on how to achieve 
a pleasing personality. I have found 
some models and have set up my 
standards for my ideal personality. 
Goal: To help promote international good 

will 
Reasons for Choosing: I want my chil- 
dren to live in peace and feel secure 
and I believe this can come about if 
someone tries to do so. 
Plans & Progress: I have a pen-pal in 
France, Joseph Motta, and we discuss 
the religions and government of our 
different countries. I also have heard 
illustrated lectures about Europe es- 
pecially France. This helps me to see 
and understand this way of living. 
I want to have a good education. A 
good education to me means having a 
good High School record of achievements 
and four years of college — more if de- 
sirable for your occupation. A person — 
I think must know how to act, how to 
speak correctly, how to get along with 
others, and he must also be well versed 



on most subjects and appreciate art-music- 
painting-literature. 

I have taken the required subjects for 
college entrance and have tried very 
hard to learn the many thing offered me. 
I have taken all the subjects allowed 
each year so that my knowledge would 
be varied. I also worked this summer — 
saving my wages in savings bonds and in 
the bank. In other years I have saved 
and bought bonds to aid me during 
college. 

Standard 9. Helps others in the com- 
munity to understand the goals of a 
broad homemaking education program. 

Activities and Individuals or groups 

reached: My aunts (3) 
Means used: Two dresses and one skirt 

I made for them. 
Evidence of results: They wear the 

dresses and have asked me to make 

more. They appreciate homemaking 

education very much. 
"I am a member of the newspaper staff. 

One of my assignments is to cover the 

activities of the F.H.A. In this way I 

can give F.H.A. the publicity she 

needs." 
"Babysitting is an excellent way to 

demonstrate the skills and knowledge 

acquired in homemaking. I have proven 

to my employers that I am capable of 

caring for children of nearly all ages. 

They do not hesitate to leave me with 

full responsibility." 

Helping with church suppers and teas 
at school put the value of homemaking 
education before the public. I have par- 
ticipated in several such activities and 
have heard favorable comments on how 
well home economics students do. 

At the Southern Regional Meeting of 
F.H.A. last summer, I gained a wonder- 
ful understanding of how individuals can 
improve as family members. I came home 
and immediately set to work at this type 
of self-improvement. My parents had al- 
ways realized but this, more than ever, 
made them know how much I am learn- 
ing from home economics activities. We 
can all see a tremendous change for the 
better in our family relationships. 

My friends, who observe readily how 
much I am gaining ask me for tips on the 
newest cookie and candy recipes, for in- 
stance. Just this year I have heard many 
girls comment that they wish they had 
taken the course. I am doing all I can to 
keep their interest alive so that they will 
take it next year. 

I have written newspaper articles, so 
others could know what the F.H.A. really 
is and what is means to each of us. 



Louise Webb, an F.H.A. member of 
W. R. Mills Chapter, Louisburg, North 
Carolina, is shown receiving a presenta- 
tion from Sarah Bailey at a Night Meet- 
ing in one of the members home. 
Date: Winter of 1946. 



Future Homemakers of Yesterday— Homemakers Today 




Bettie Cannady — National Officer 
1946 

Bettie Cannady, the first Na- 
tional officer from North Carolina, 
is married to Mr. Perry Wheeles. 
Mr. Wheeles works for F.C.X. 
Bettie was a registered nurse of Rex 
Hospital and worked there until she 
married. She then moved to North 
Wilkesboro and worked in the hospi- 
tal there till her first baby was born 
June 1, 1953. She continued to do 
private duty occasionally and keep 
house. Second child born was in 
January 1955 and both are girls. 
They moved to Macon, N. C, in 
February and bought a house. 

Betty Lou Merrill — State President 
1945-46 

Betty Lou Merrill was graduated 
from Beaufort High School in May 
of 1947. 

Entered freshman class at 
Woman's » College, Greensboro, 
North Carolina, the following Sep- 
tember and received a Bachelor of 
Arts Degree from that school in May 
of 1951 — majored in English. Dur- 
ing college years served on student 
legislature and Greater University 
Council. Was staff member of Caro- 
linian and the Yearling. College 
Social Chairman senior year. Mem- 
ber of May Court. Writer and di- 
rector of Junior Show. 

After graduation was employed 
by Army Special Services as enter- 
tainment and recreation specialist. 

Taught at Beaufort High School 
in 1953-54. 

Married July 17, 1954, to Rob- 
ert L. Rose of Havelock and Smith- 
field, N. C. 

Georgia Tsitouris — State President 
1946-47 

Georgia served as State F.H.A. 
President 1946-47. She graduated 
from high school in 1947 with 
honors. After graduation from Ben- 
ton Heights School, Georgia at- 
tended Richardson Beauty School 
in Charlotte. 

After graduation from Beauty 
School, Georgia worked in Monroe 
where she met Charles Brooks who 
was just out of Lenoir-Rhyne Col- 
lege. They were married in 1950. 

Georgia and Charles now make 
their home in Wingate along with 
their two lovely children, Charles, 
Jr., age 4, and Janet, age 3. 

Georgia is now co-owner of a 
beauty and gift shop in Marshville, 
North Carolina. 



Although she works, she takes 
great pride in her family, and her 
excellent ability as a homemaker is 
displayed throughout her home. 

Louise Ellis Webb — State Treasurer 
1946-47 

Louise Webb graduated from 
Mills High School in Louisburg in 
1949. 

In the fall of 1949, she entered 
Greensboro College. She majored 
in history and received her A.B. 
Degree in 1953. While at G. C. she 
took part in several campus 
activities: 

Officer in Y. W. C. A. 

Secretary of Student Association 

President of Student Association 
during senior year 

Attended the N. C. State Student 
Legislature several years — was 
reading clerk in the Senate one year 

Represented G. C. at a student 
government meeting in New Or- 
leans in 1952 

Member and officer of several 
clubs in connection with history 
courses 

Louise writes: 

"I guess the month of June 1953 
was one of the most important in my 
life so far. On the morning of June 
the first I received a contract for 
my first teaching job in Siler City 
and on that same morning I walked 
across the stage of Odell Audi- 
torium to get my long awaited di- 
ploma. Just a little over three weeks 
later I became the bride of Frank 
'Yank' G. Brooks, Jr., of Siler City 
in the Louisburg Methodist Church. 
My husband is a graduate of the 
University of North Carolina 
Pharmacy School and is now in 
business with his father. 

"The news of a coming 'blessed 
event' changed my plans for teach- 
ing a second year and although I 
missed my school children I was 
really thrilled over a new member 
of our family. Our baby was due 
March 1 but 'little Leah' put in her 
appearance on January 20 shortly 
after the heaviest snow we've had 
here in years. Leah weighed 5 lbs. 
3 oz. at birth and was a 'little' 
girl indeed, but she has gained 
steadily and now weighs over 1 1 
pounds. We are mighty proud of our 
'Future Homemaker' and believe 
me I've seen how much homemak- 
ing education can do already where 
'Child Care and Development' are 
concerned." 



"A&SZ 



Future Homemakers of America 

CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 

We face the future with warm courage, 

And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 

Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 




CAROLINE SAYS: 

I wonder whatever became of Bettie Cannady — the 
first North Carolina Future Homemaker to be elected 
to a national office??? 

And what happened to Betty Lou Merrill, State 
President— 1945-46??? 

And Georgia Tsitouris? 

And Louise Ellis Webb? 

Editor's Note : Just turn this page for answers. 

And where are all the other earlier officers??? 

Editor's Note: Editor is in the dark!!! 

Any information leading to the whereabouts of these 
F.H.A. pioneers will be appreciated. Your help is 
solicited.