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Full text of "Galicia : her forbears and her offspring"

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EXTRACT FROM THE RULES. 



XX 
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GALICIA 

HER FORBEARS AND HER OFFSPRING 



m^^^M'T 




GALICIA 

HER FORBEARS AND HER 
OFFSPRING 



BY 

ALFRED E. T. WATSON 

ASSISTANT EDITOR OF "THE BADMINTON LIBRARY," SECTIONAL EDITOR OF THE 

"encyclopedia BKITANNICA," EDITOR "BADMINTON MAGAZINE," AUTHOR OF 

"king EDWARD VII AS A SPORTSMAN," "SKETCHES IN THE HUNTING 

FIELD," "RACECOURSE AND COVERTSIDE," "THE RACING WORLD 

AND ITS INHABITANTS," " THE TURF," "RACING AND 

'chasing," "lord derby's racehorses" (printed 
/or private circulation), ETC. 



WITH 30 ILLUSTRATIONS 



PRIVATELY PRINTED FOR MR. A. W. COX ("MR. FAIRIE") 



LONGMANS, GREEN AND CO. 

39 PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON 

FOURTH AVENUE & 30th STREET. NEW YORK 

BOMBAY, CALCUTTA, AND MADRAS 

I915 

All rights reserved 



CONTENTS 



I. GALICIA AND HER PARENTAGE 
II. BAY RONALD 

III. BAYARDO .... 

IV. LEMBERG .... 
V. SILESIA, ZIA, AND RADAMES 

VI. BAYARDO AT THE STUD 



33 

119 

157 
171 



The Pedigree of Bayardo 
The Pedigree of Lemberg 



177 

178 



I 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

Photographs by W. A. ROUCH and CLARENCE Hailey 

PHOTOGRAVURE PLATES 

Galicia .......... Frontispiece 

From a Painting in the possession of her Owner. 

Bayardo To face page 71 

From the Painting by A. C. Havell. 

Bayardo with his Trainer, Alec Taylor 

(D. Maher up) „ loi 

Cyllene „ 120 

Lemberg led in after winning The Derby, 

1910 » 132 

Lemberg just after winning The Derby, 

1910 „ 143 

Facsimile of Note by Owner on naming of 

Bayardo Between pages iiZ Si \i() 

HALF-TONE PLATES 

Galopin, Sire of Galicia To/ace page 2 

Speedwell Paddocks, Newmarket . . „ 12 

Green Lodge, Newmarket (Mr. J. Ryan in 
front), where Galicia was trained 
when she won her first Race at Ascot „ 23 

The Manton Stables „ 27 

Bay Ronald „ 33 

vii 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

"Mr. Fairie's" House on The Severals at 

Newmarket Tofacepage 69 

Bayardo as a Three-Year-Old ... „ 81 

Bayardo winning the Eclipse Stakes from 
Royal Realm, Santo Strato, and Your 
Majesty, 1909 „ 89 

The St. Leger Field, 1909. Bayardo on 

extreme left of the Picture ... „ 91 

Bayardo jumping off at the Start for the 

St. Leger, 1909 „ 92 

Bayardo winning the St. Leger from 

Valens and Mirador, 1909 ... „ 94 

Bayardo gets rid of his Jockey at the 

Start for the Ascot Gold Cup, 1910 . „ 103 

Bayardo leading the Field for the Ascot 

Gold Cup at the bottom turn, 1910 . „ 104. 

On the Manton Downs .... ,,106 

Lemberg as a Two-Year-Old .... „ 122 

Lemberg whilst in Training .... „ 128 

Lemberg winning the Derby from Green- 
back AND Charles O'Malley, 1910 . . „ 130 

Lemberg's Toilet at Sherwood's Cottage 

AFTER the Derby, 1910 .... „ 134 

Lemberg, on the right, jumping off for 
THE St. James's Palace Stakes, Ascot, 
1910 ,, 136 

Lemberg and Neil Gow dead-heating for 
THE Eclipse Stakes at Sandown Park, 
1910 ), 138 

Lemberg at the Stud „ 156 

"Mr. Fairie's" Paddocks at Newmarket . „ 164 

The latest Portrait of Galicia, taken 

while on a visit to Cicero, April 1915. „ 170 

Bayardo at the Manton Stud ... „ 172 

viii 



GALIGIA 

HER FORBEARS AND HER OFFSPRING 

CHAPTER I 

GALICIA AND HER PARENTAGE 

The reputation of a horse quickly fades. Ideas 
exist as to which were absolutely the best ever 
known, it being generally assumed that the ques- 
tion is between St. Simon and Ormonde, two 
who were never beaten — and it is exceedingly rare 
for any horse to escape at least one defeat — though 
admirers of other animals hold exalted opinions 
of them. But the great horse who has stood out 
from his contemporaries is soon forgotten, nor 
can accurate details concerning him, the achieve- 
ments on which his fame rests, be easily found. 
They are hidden away in the files of old sporting 
papers, of other papers, indeed, for at any rate 
of late years there have been few journals which 
have not devoted considerable space to racing. 
But these publications are not readily acces- 
sible. Articles in a magazine now and then, or a 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

chapter in a casual book which deals with the 
sport, would also supply particulars more or less 
authoritative if it were known where such infor- 
mation was to be discovered. But it is only in 
extremely rare cases that justice is done to the 
memory of the horses on whom the character and 
ascendency of the British thoroughbred mainly 
rest. 

It is for this reason that I have undertaken to 
write an account of Galicia, her Forbears and her 
Offspring ; for she herself sprang from the most 
aristocratic of parents, and her children include, 
besides a Derby winner, one who, notwithstanding 
that he missed that unique distinction, was beyond 
doubt the best horse in the Derby of his year; 
for I am of course speaking of Bayardo, who 
subsequently showed with the most unmistak- 
able distinctness what ought to have happened 
at Epsom, where the result of the classic was 
affected by an accident, to be described in its 
proper place. 

Before dealing with Galicia herself something 
must be said about her parents. In the year 
1897 Mr. A. W. Cox, known in racing history as 
'' Mr. Fairie," owned a mare named Isoletta, a 
daughter of Isonomy, and sent her to Galopin, 
then standing at the Blankney Stud Farm, and 
rated as the leading sire of his period. Nine of 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

his yearlings had been sold the previous year for 
an average of 1154 guineas. It is not certain 
that there was ever a much better horse — 
possibly in this connection the "much" should 
be omitted — than the son of Vedette and 
Flying Duchess ; and in saying this I am quot- 
ing the opinion of one who knew the horse well, 
and certainly was not in the least disposed to 
underrate the merit of Galopin's most distin- 
guished son, St. Simon aforesaid. It happened 
that for some years it was my custom during 
many mornings in every year to ride out and 
watch the work done by the late John Dawson's 
string, and it was from him that I gathered what 
can hardly be a very wrong estimate of Galopin. 
A famous horse in training at that period was 
Petrarch, Galopin's senior by a year. Petrarch, 
a son of Lord Clifden, won the Middle Park 
Plate, amongst other races, as a two-year-old ; as 
a three-year-old he carried off the Two Thousand 
Guineas and the Leger ; as a four-year-old he 
took the Ascot Cup. There can be little doubt, 
none indeed, about his merit, and John Dawson 
used to tell me that Galopin was always a con- 
siderable number of pounds and lengths in front 
of him. As just remarked, very few horses are 
found in Turf history who have not failed once 
or twice, and it is to a great extent because St. 

3 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

Simon and Ormonde were never beaten that they 
are so highly esteemed. There may be perfectly 
legitimate excuse for a defeat, possibly for a 
couple of failures, but these things are not re- 
garded : what men remember is that a hiatus 
has occurred in the series of winning brackets. 
Galopin carried well-nigh all before him, but he 
was not unbeaten. He did not actually win, that 
is to say come in first for, the Hyde Park Plate 
at Epsom (1874), which nevertheless stands to 
his credit. What happened is described in the 
Racing Calendar for that year. There was an 
objection, and the report of the race reads : 

''We are of opinion that Constable on Cach- 
mere cannoned unintentionally against Morris 
riding Galopin, which prevented the latter from 
winning. Galopin is therefore the winner of the 
Hyde Park Plate, and Cachmere is not entitled 
to a place. 

" C. Alexander. 

" W. S. Stirling Crawfurd (for Mr. Chaplin). 

"H.J. Rous." 

The son of Vedette then went on to Ascot, 
where he started twice, for the Fern Hill 
Stakes and for the New Stakes, favourite on 
both occasions at 6 to 4, and he won without 
difficulty. In the Middle Park Plate his only 
defeat occurred. A field of twenty-four went to 

4 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

the post, the largest with one e*xception which 
has ever assembled : there were thirty starters 
when Petrarch won next year. Galopin was 
backed at 6 to i, the favourite being- a colt 
called Holy Friar, the property of the Lincoln- 
shire clergyman who raced under the adopted 
name of '^Mr. Launde," and who is chiefly 
known in the annals of the Turf as the owner of 
Apology, the mare who won the One Thousand 
Guineas, the Oaks, the Leger, and as a five- 
year-old the Ascot Cup. Holy Friar, 2 to i, 
finished unplaced, there being a great fight 
between Mr. R. R. Christopher's Plebeian, Lord 
Dupplin's Per Se, and Galopin, heads only 
dividing them, and an objection for bumping 
followed, Tom Cannon on Per Se declaring that 
he had been prevented from winning by Mordan 
on Plebeian, whilst Morris appeared to think 
that with a fair field and no favour Galopin 
would just have got home. The objection, how- 
ever, was overruled. This was Galopin's one 
lapse. Afterwards he was only out twice as a 
two-year-old and neither race meant anything. 
He only found one opponent in a sweepstakes at 
Newmarket, an indifferent colt called Tresorier, 
whom he beat at his leisure with odds of 100 to 
7 on him, and he then walked over for a small 
stake at the Second October. 

5 



GALICIA : HER FORBEARS 

As a three-year-old Galopin led off with a 
match against Mr. Henry Chaplin's Stray Shot, 
destined to have her name writ large in Turf 
history as the dam of the Two Thousand and 
Derby winner Shotover. Galopin was set to 
give Stray Shot lo lb. over the Rowley Mile ; 
odds of 1 1 to 8 were laid on him, and he won in 
a canter by eight lengths. The Derby followed, 
and of this I give a record : 



Epsom, 1875. 

The Ninety-sixth Renewal of the Derby Stakes of 50 sovs. 
each, h. ft. for three-year-olds, colts 8 st. 10 lb., and 
fillies 8 St. 5 lb. ; the second received 300 sovs. and 
the third 150 sovs. out of the stakes. About a mile 
and a half, starting at the New High Level Starting 
Post. (198 subs. — £4g$o.) 

Prince Batthyany's b. c. Galopin, by 
Vedette .... 

Lord Aylesford's b. c. Claremont . 

Lord Falmouth's b. c. Repentance, by 
Macaroni .... 

Lord Falmouth's b. c. Garterley Bell 

Mr. Vyner's b. c. Camballo . 

Lord Aylesford's b. c. Telescope . 

Prince SoltykoflF's br. c. Balfe 

Mr. W. S. Cartwright's b. c. The Bay of 
Naples . . . . 

Lord Fitzwilliam's br. c. Breechloader 

Mr. H. Savile's b. c. Earl of Dartrey 

Mr. John Watson's b. c. Earlston . 

Mr. F. E. Brace's br. c. Fareham . 

6 



. Morris 


I 


Maidment 


2 


y 

F. Archer 


3 


. H. Jeffery 





J. Osborne 





Glover 





T. Cannon 





f 




Custance 





. F. Webb 





. W. Piatt 





Constable 





T. Osborne 






AND HER OFFSPRING 



Count F. de Lagrange's b. c. Gilbert 
Count F. de Lagrange's ch, c. Punch 
Mr. C. Bush's ch. c. Lord Berners 
Mr. Jos. Dawson's br. c. Seymour . 
Lord Ailesbury's ch. c. Temple Bar 
Mr. F. Swindell's ch. c. Woodlands 



Fordham o 

Carver o 

Parry o 

C. Wood o 

T. Chaloner o 

J. Goater o 



Betting. — 2 to i against Galopin, lOO to 12 Balfe, 9 
to I Camballo, 100 to 8 Repentance colt, 100 to 7 each 
Claremont and Bay of Naples, 20 to i Woodlands, 22 to 
I Temple Bar, 25 to i each Seymour, Breechloader, and 
Earl of Dartrey, 30 to i Telescope, 100 to 3 Fareham, 
1000 to I 5 each Lord Berners and Gilbert, and 100 to i 
each Garterley Bell and Punch. Won by a length ; six 
lengths between second and third. 

Why Galopin's Ascot exertions were con- 
fined to the Fern Hill Stakes I am not aware. It 
seems not a little odd that a Derby winner should 
have been brought out for a five-furlong race, 
though the fact is interesting as proof of his re- 
markable speed. Here he was backed at 2 to i 
on and won by four lengths. One of the speedi- 
est horses then in training was Lowlander, and 
what was thought of him is proved by the readi- 
ness of his owner to make a match with Galopin 
over the Rowley Mile, ^1000, ;^200 forfeit. It is 
remarkable, indeed, that Lowlander, then a five- 
year-old, however, should have attempted to give 
the Derby winner 12 lb. That was at the time 
4 lb. more than weight for age — the scale has 
been since slightly revised, and at the present 

7 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

time over a mile in October, five-year-old, six- 
year-old and aged horses give three-year-olds 7 
lb. Galopin, however, won his match, and was 
only seen once afterwards, when he took the 
Newmarket Derby, being subsequently sent to 
stand at Mr. Barrow's establishment at New- 
market at a fee of 100 guineas. 

This was the sire of Galicia, and more than 
passing reference should be made to her maternal 
grandsire, Isonomy. It is tempting to go back 
a generation and talk of the sire of Isonomy, 
Sterling, who must have been a remarkable stayer 
and weight carrier, though he did not win the 
races on which reputations are generally founded. 

This son of Oxford, dam by Flatcatcher, 

comes so closely into the record that he must not 

be hastily passed over. He was at any rate 

a remarkable horse. His start was humble 

enough ; he came out for the Castle Park 

Stakes at Warwick, 5 sovs. each, 50 added — 

in his day it will be perceived the minimum 

had not been raised to ^100. He started at 

evens and was beaten two lengths by a filly 

called Miss Lizzie, who never seems to have 

done anything. Sterling made some mark later 

in the season, however, for he won the Hopeful 

and the Rutland Stakes at the Newmarket First 

October Meeting. 

8 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

As a three-year-old the colt flew at high game, 
making his first appearance in the Two Thousand 
Guineas, in which Bothwell beat him a length. 
A well-known animal at this time was King of 
the Forest, whose form with Sterling must have 
perplexed those who endeavoured to derive guid- 
ance from it. In the Two Thousand Guineas 
King of the Forest finished third, three lengths 
behind Sterling. In the Prince of Wales's Stakes 
at Ascot Sterling's ability to stay seemed likely 
to give him a stronger advantage over the colt he 
had beaten at Newmarket, especially as King of 
the Forest carried 9 st. i lb.. Sterling 8 st. 13 lb. 
The former, however, won the race, Sterling not 
in the first three, and as a matter of course when 
they met at evens in a Biennial two days later 
odds were laid on King of the Forest. This time 
Sterling won by three lengths ! He had a busy 
three-year-old season. At the Newmarket July 
he won the Summer Stakes, carrying 8 st. 12 lb., 
from Azalea, 6 st. 4 lb., and Piquillo, 6 st. 2 lb. 
This was good, and his performance in the 
Chesterfield Cup at Goodwood far from bad, 
as he failed by only a length to give the winner 
33 lb. In the Great Eastern Railway Handicap 
he was burdened with 9 st. 6 lb. This race, by 
the way, led to trouble, some of the jockeys 
being reported by the starter. Archer was sus- 

9 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

pended "from September 28th to October 12th, 
both days inclusive," the sentence ran, Wheeler 
having to stop riding on the same date, his 
sentence being extended to the 19th. The extra 
week seems to show nice discrimination on the 
part of the Stewards. In the Cambridgeshire, 
one of the most sensational races for that handi- 
cap ever known, Sterling had 8 st. 11 lb. and 
ran a dead heat for second place with Allbrook, 
5 years, 6 st. 9 lb., Sabinus, 4 years, 8 st. 7 lb., 
winning by a head. Henry was favourite for this 
Cambridgeshire, and is returned at the unusual 
odds of 17 to 4 — one would have thought that 4 
to I was near enough ; and two Derby winners 
ran — Favonius, then, of course, a three-year-old, 
in at the same weight as Sterling, backed at 1 1 
to 2, and Kingcraft, the winner of the previous 
year, 8 st. 4 lb., an outsider at 40 to i. Sterling, 
it will be seen, had lost the Two Thousand by a 
length, and in the autumn at Newmarket finished 
several, if not many, lengths before the Derby 
winner of the year. Sterling's last appearance of 
the season was in the Free Handicap for Three- 
Year-Olds, which he won carrying 8 st. 6 lb. 

As a four-year-old he did little. The Craven 
Stakes was at this period, 1871, an optional 
Selling Race, worth ;^i75, and this represented 

the whole of the colt's winnings for the season. 

10 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

He ran for the Gold Vase at Ascot, favourite at 
7 to 4, and was beaten half a length by Albert 
Victor at lo to i, his last effort being in the 
All-aged Stakes, which on that occasion was 
certainly remarkable. The distance, it is perhaps 
needless to observe, is something" over five fur- 
longs, and the runners were, besides Sterling — 
who as just remarked had been out for the two- 
mile Gold Vase on the Tuesday of the Meeting, 
and was indeed an unquestionable stayer — Prince 
Charlie, who had run second for the Leger, and 
Wenlock, who had carried off the Doncaster 
classic. I do not remember any occasion on 
which three horses with such records have con- 
tested a sprint race. 

As for the Cambridgeshire, the race is de- 
scribed by Sterling's jockey in the volume of his 
Riding Recollections and Turf Stories. Custance 
writes : ''It was an unlucky day for me when I 
rode Sterling in the Cambridgeshire. It rained in 
torrents and was dreadfully cold ; I had been 
wasting for other races, and we were about three- 
quarters of an hour at the post. There were 
thirty-seven runners, and Sterling, who had be- 
haved himself pretty well the first ten minutes, 
became almost unmanageable afterwards. He 
reared, kicked, and did everything he should not 

have done, as his temper was upset. At last the 

1 1 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

flag" fell to a straggling start, and before we had 
gone two hundred yards I was in the first three 
with 9 St. 7 lb. When we had gone a quarter of a 
mile I was second, with my reins like soft soap. 
I ought really to have been about nineteenth or 
twentieth, with top weight on, but it could not 
be helped, as I was perfectly helpless ; my hands 
were numbed, and the sweat from the horse's neck 
made the reins quite past holding — in fact I was 
under every possible disadvantage, though I 
finished third." 

Elsewhere in the book Custance writes : "It 
is quite impossible for me to mention all the fine 
races I have seen Fordham ride. With one 
especially I was very much impressed, and so 
were many others who will corroborate me. This 
was when he won the Cambridgeshire of 1871 on 
Sabinus. This race especially was most beauti- 
fully timed and resolutely finished." It thus 
appears that Sterling must have been unlucky 
not to win. Fine weather, avoidance of long 
delay at the start, and an ordinary jockey instead 
of the redoubtable Fordham on Sabinus, might 
well have altered the result. 

An idea seems to exist — I have read it more 

than once, for when a blunder appears in print 

it is frequently reproduced — that Isonomy never 

ran as a two-year-old. As a matter of fact he 

12 




is 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

did so thrice, making his first appearance in 1877 
in the Brighton Club Two- Year-Old Stakes. 
Something was thought of him, for he was 
backed at 9 to 4, the race going to an even- 
money favourite, Mr. Ellerlie's Ersila, by Rosi- 
crucian, one of three colts — the other two being 
Blue Gown and Green Sleeves — between whom 
Sir Joseph Hawley seems to have been unable to 
make up his mind before the Derby of 1868. In 
this Brighton race Isonomy was a bad third. 
He came out again for the Second Nursery at 
Newmarket First October Meeting, and, an 
8 to I chance, won by half a length from the 
then Lord Lonsdale's Telegram, backed at half 
the price. His third outing was in a Nursery 
at the Houghton Meeting. Here he was not 
mentioned in the betting, but was only beaten a 
head by Mr. C. Best's Beadman in receipt of 
II lb. Of course there was nothing in all this to 
suggest that Isonomy was more than a moderate 
animal, very moderate perhaps ; but he made 
exceptional improvement, and next year it was 
decided by his owner, Mr. F. Gretton, to keep 
him for the Cambridgeshire, for which he was 
specially trained. In the circumstances, having 
done so little the previous season, it cannot be 
said that he was leniently treated with 7 st. i lb., 
and as will be seen from the record he started 



GALICIA : HER FORBEARS 



Mr. 



Morgan 



Fordham 



Hopper 



at the comfortable odds of 40 to i. Details 
follow : 

Newmarket, 1878. 
The Cambridgeshire Stakes (handicap) of 25 sovs. each, 

10 ft. and 5 only if declared by noon on September 

loth, with 300 added ; the second received 100 sovs. 

out of the stakes, and the third saved his stake ; 

winners extra ; entrance 3 sovs. Cambridgeshire 

Course. (171 subs., 48 of whom paid 5 sovs. each — 

;^2i87.) 
F. Gretton's Isonomy, by Sterling, 

3 yrs., 7 St. I lb. . 
Lord Rosebery's Touchet, 4 yrs., 7 st. 

7 lb 

Mr, R. Peck's La Merveille, 3 yrs., 

6 St. 3 lb. 
Lord Ellesmere's Hampton, 6 yrs., 9 st, 

3 lb 

Mr. Pulteney's Placida, 4 yrs., 8 st. 9 lb. 
Mr. C. Alexander's Thunderstone, 4 yrs., 

8 st, 3 lb 

Mr. T. Jenning's Ecossais, aged, 8 st. 

3 lb. (inc. 5 lb. extra) 
Duke of Hamilton's Midlothian, 4 yrs., 

8 St. I lb. 
Lord Falmouth's Lady Golightly, 4 yrs,, 

8 st 

Duke of St. Alban's Lord Clive, 3 yrs,, 

7 St. II lb, (car. 7 st. 13 lb.) 
Mr. R. C. Naylor's Jester, 5 yrs., 7 st. 

9 lb, (inc, 14 lb. extra) 
Mr. J. Prat's Faisan, 3 yrs., 7 st. 7 lb. 
Count F. de Lagrange's Clementine, 

3 yrs., 7 St. 6 lb, . 

14 



F, Archer 


4 


H. Jeffery 





J, Morris 





J. Goater 





Huxtable 





Constable 





Snowden 





A. Wood 





Fagan 





R. Morris 






AND HER OFFSPRING 

Lord Bradford's Manoeuvre, 4 yrs., 7 st. 

5 lb H. Wyatt o 

Count F. de Lagrange's Lina, 5 yrs., 

7 St. 5 lb. (inc. 10 lb. extra, car. 

7 St. 6 lb.) .... W. Johnson o 

Baron A. de Rothschild's Brie, 3 yrs., 

7 St. 4 lb. . . . . C. Wood o 

Mr. F. Gretton's Harbinger, 4 yrs., 7 st. 

4 lb C. Willis o 

Mr. M. H. Sanford's Start, 4 yrs., 7 st. 

3 lb. . . . . . H. Covey o 

M. Delatre's Clocher, 3 yrs., 7 st. 3 lb. Spreoty o 

Mr. J. H. Houldsworth's Attalus, 4 yrs., 

7 St. 3 lb. . . . . Hopkins o 

Capt. Machell's Master Kildare, 3 yrs., 

7 St. 3 lb. . . . . J. Watts o 

Mr. A. Baltazzi'sTallos, 4 yrs., 7 st. 2 lb. J. M'Donald o 
Duke of Hamilton's Greenback, 3 yrs., 

7 St. I lb. . . . . Lemaire o 

Count de Juigne's Mantille, 3 yrs., 7 st. 

I lb. . . . . . Fern o 

Prince Batthyany's Sidonia, 4 yrs., 7 st. Luke o 

Mr. E. Etches's Lancaster, 4 yrs., 7 st. W. M'Donald o 
Capt. Machell's Sign Manual, 4 yrs., 

6 St. I 2 lb. 
Mr. C. Perkins's Roehampton, 5 yrs., 

6 St. I 2 lb. 
Lord Anglesey's Grey Friar, 4 yrs., 

6 St. I 2 lb. 
Mr. M. L. Lasareff's Hermes, 3 yrs., 

6 st, 10 lb. 
Mr. W. Goater's Pero, 3 yrs., 6 st. 10 lb. 

(car. 6 St. 11 lb.) 
Mr. J. Johnson's Shillelagh, 4 yrs., 6 st. 

9 lb 

15 



Greaves 





Weedon 





Heather 





Baines 





Andrews 





Mallows 






GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

Lord Alington's Thistle, 3 yrs., 6 st. 9 lb. Jones o 

Mr, T. L. Reed's Macbeth, 3 yrs., 6 st. 

5 lb A. Hall o 

Mr. J. N. Barlow's Knighthood, 3 yrs., 

6 St. 3 lb. . . . . Kendall o 
Mr. G, Lambert's Edith Plantagenet, 3 

yrs., 6 St. . . . . . Collins o 

Mr. Whittaker's Miss Pool, 3 yrs., 5 st. 

13 lb Bell o 

Mr. W. S. Crawfurd's Broad Corrie, 3 

yrs., 5 St. 12 lb. (car. 5 st. 13 lb.) Gallon o 

Betting. — lOO to i 5 each against Macbeth and Green- 
back, 8 to I Tallos, 10 to I Touchet, 100 to 8 Placida, 
100 to 7 Start, 100 to 6 each Lord Clive and Master 
Kildare, 20 to i Hampton, 25 to i each Thunderstone, 
La Merveille, Sidonia, and Shillelagh, 33 to i each Ecos- 
sais and Brie, 40 to i each Roehampton, Clocher, and 
Isonomy, 50 to I each Mantille, Jester, Sign Manual, 
Manoeuvre, and Lancaster, 100 to i each Lady Golightly, 
Clementine, Faisan, Lina, Attains, Broad Corrie, Miss Pool, 
Edith Plantagenet, and Grey Friar. Won by two lengths, 
half a length between second and third, and a head between 
third and fourth. 

After this his career was one of almost un- 
interrupted success. As a four-year-old he ran for 
the Ascot Gold Vase, one of his two opponents 
being Lord Falmouth's Silvio — who had won the 
Derby of 1877 — and on whom 9 to 4 was laid, 
Archer riding ; but Tom Cannon on Isonomy, 11 
to 4, beat him half a length. Two days afterwards 
he was saddled for the Ascot Cup. There were 

six starters, and, favourite at 2 to i, he took the 

16 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

trophy, following on with the Goodwood Cup, 
and the subsequent week the Brighton Cup, 
which was then a two-mile race. In the Ebor 
Handicap he had 9 st. 8 lb., which did not deter 
backers from laying 11 to 8 on him. He won 
this, and going on to Doncaster added the Cup 
there to his spoils, 100 to 15 on, though this 
time there was nothing to spare, as he only got 
home by a head from Lord Falmouth's Jannette, 
who had carried off the Leger of the previous 
year. Isonomy had 9 st. 10 lb. in the Cesare- 
witch, a burden which has never been borne 
successfully — the 9 st. 5 lb. of Willonyx is the 
record. Isonomy was set to give no less a 
weight than t,i^ lb. to the good, honest, staying 
Chippendale, and it detracts little from his 
character that he could not do so. 

As a five-year-old Isonomy was only out 
twice, on the first occasion in the Manchester 
Cup, then run over a mile and five furlongs — the 
distance is now a mile and a half. There were 
twenty-one starters. Isonomy carried 9 st. 12 lb., 
and as his merit was not even yet fully recognised 
16 to I was laid against him, joint favourites 
being The Abbot and Blue Blood, 6 to i. 
Isonomy won by a neck from The Abbot, giving 
him 3 St. 3 lb. ; the second, as a three-year- 
old in May, had the great advantage of 20 lb. ; 

17 B 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

Isonomy, therefore, comes out nearly 2 st. the 
better. His other race was the Gold Cup, in 
which he was opposed by Chippendale and the 
French colt Zut. Seeing what had happened 
in the Cesarewitch it is not in the least strange 
that 9 to 4 should have been laid on Isonomy, 
though it does seem curious that backers should 
have been found ready to take 95 to 40 about Chip- 
pendale, meeting his former conqueror with no 
advantage, there being, it is probably needless 
to add, no penalties or allowances in this race. 

Few horses have had a more brilliant career 
at the stud, Isonomy's offspring including Com- 
mon, Isinglass, and a host of notable winners, 
amongst whom, however, his daughter Isoletta is 
not included. Like so many other mares famous 
for what they have produced she was no good 
as a racer, and indeed her daughter Galicia did 
little, as to which it can only be said that, as 
usual with her owner's animals, an ambitious 
programme was mapped out for her. 

Galicia first ran for the Kempton Park Two- 
Year-Old Plate on the 2nd of June 1900. 

Kempton Park, 1900. 

The Kempton Park Two-Year-Old Plate of 800 sovs. 

for the owner and 100 sovs. for the nominator of 

the winner, and 50 sovs, each for the owner and 

nominator of the second ; entrance 1 5 sovs., or 3 

18 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

sovs. if declared ; five furlongs, on the Straight 
Course. (99 subs., 48 of whom paid 3 sovs. each 
— ;^885.) 

Mr. R. S. Sievier's Toddington, by 

Melton, 9 St. 2 lb. 
Mr. A. Cohen's Royal River, 8 st. 9 lb. 
Mr. Fairie's Galicia, 8 st. 9 lb. 
M. Ephrussi's Mirande, 9 st. 2 lb. . 
Mr. J. Musker's Britannia, 9 st. 2 lb. 
Lord W. Beresford's Petronius, 8 st 

I 2 lb 

Lord W. Beresford's Volodyovski, 8 st 

I 2 lb 

Mr. E. Hobson's Lambourn Belle, 8 st 

9 lb 

Mr. P. Lorillard's Revera, 8 st. 9 lb 
Duke of Portland's St. Aldegonde, 8 st 

9 lb 

Mr. L. Pilkington's Elleray, 8 st. 6 lb 

Betting. — 11 to 10 against Toddington, 5 to i St. 
Aldegonde, 1 1 to 2 Britannia, 8 to i Mirande, and 100 
to 8 each Volodyovski and Galicia. Won by a neck, four 
lengths between second and third. 

It will be seen that at any rate she beat the 
future winner of the Derby, and her next attempt 
at Ascot was a successful one. 



S. Loates 


I 


. 0. Madden 


2 


K. Cannon 


3 


T. Loates 





Sloan 





. J. Reifif 





. T. Weldon 





F. Rickaby 





. L. Reiff 





M. Cannon 





Allsopp 






Ascot, 1900. 

The first year of the forty-third Ascot Biennial Stakes 
of 10 sovs. each, with 500 added, for two-year-olds ; 
second received 10 per cent, of the stakes. T.Y.C. 
(88 subs. — .^1232.) 

19 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 



Mr. Fairie's Galicia, by Galopin, 8st. 

lO lb 

Sir R. Waldie Griffith's br. f. by St. 

Simon — Sweet Duchess, 8st. lolb. 
Mr. G. F. Fawcett's Tin Soldier, 8 st. 

lolb 

H.R.H. Prince of Wales' Lord Quex, 

9 St. 
Lord W. Beresford's Nahlband, 9 st. . 
Sir E. Cassel's Sang Bleu, 9 st. . 
Mr. Arthur James' Fortunatus, 9 st. 
Sir J. Kelk's O'Donoghue, 9 st. 
Lord Rosebery's Menander, 9 st. 
Lord Crewe's Saltatrix, 8 st. 10 lb. 
Lord Ellesmere's Sabrinetta, 9 st. i lb. 
Sir S. Scott's br. g. by Kilwarlin — Jewel 

Song, 8 St. 10 lb. 



K. Cannon 



J. H. Martin 2 
F. Rickaby 3 



M. Cannon 





T. Weldon 





L. ReifF 





0. Madden 





Allsopp 





C. Wood 





T. Loates 





S. Loates 






Fagan 



Betting. — -2 to i against Sabrinetta, 7 to 2 the Sweet 
Duchess filly, 5 to i each Sang Bleu and Tin Soldier, and 
10 to I each Lord Quex and Galicia. Won by half a 
length, a length and a half between second and third. 

But this was her only victory. She ran for 
the Exeter Stakes at the Newmarket First July, 
when a serious accident befell her. 



Newmarket, 1900. 

The Exeter Stakes of ;^ 1046 for two-year-olds. Exeter 
Stakes Course, six furlongs. 

Sir Ernest Cassel's Sang Bleu, 8 st. 

12 lb L. Reiff" i 

Lord Ellesmere's Sabrinetta, 8 st. 

1 3 lb. . . . . . S. Loates 2 

20 



AND HER OFFSPRING 



Mr. J. S. Curtis's Joe's Luck, 8 st 

9 lb 

Sir Samuel Scott's g. by Kilwarlin — 

Jewel Song, 8 st. 9 lb. 
Mr. J. Musker's The General, 8 st 

12 lb 

Mr. Fairie's Galicia, 9 st. 3 lb. , 

Mr. P. Lorillard's Tantalus, 8 st 

12 lb 

Mr. J. P. Larnack's c. by Chillington — 

Manoeuvre, 8 st. 12 lb. 
Mr. Whitney's Attache, 8 st. i 2 lb. 
Sir R. Waldie Griffith's Glim, 8 st. 9 lb 



E. 


Jones 


3 


K. 


Cannon 


4 


J. 
M 


Sloan 
Cannon 


5 
6 



B. Rigby 

O. Madden 
M'Allister 
J. H. Martin 



Betting. — 11 to 10 The General, 5 to i Sabrinetta 
and Galicia, 8 to i Joe's Luck, 10 to i Sang Bleu, 
100 to 7 others. Won by length and a half; length 
second and third. 



According to the evidence of her jockey — 
and Mornington Cannon was one upon whose 
statements implicit dependence could be placed — 
Galicia was winning in a canter when she sud- 
denly faltered, and it was found that she had 
split her pastern. She was never anything like 
the same mare afterwards. 

She came out as a three-year-old for the One 

Thousand Guineas, and, quoted at 100 to 8, ran 

nowhere behind the favourite Sir James Miller's 

Aida, 13 to 8. Then followed the Oaks, taken 

by the American mare Cap and Bells II, who 

had never run in England before and who was 

21 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

never seen again. Galicia was seventh for the 
Coronation Stakes at Ascot. For a Triennial 
Produce Stakes at the Newmarket First October 
Meeting she was fourth, in front, however, of the 
favourite, Veles. 

Newmarket, 1901. 

The second year of the fifty-third Triennial Produce 
Stakes of 10 sovs. each, h. ft. for acceptors, with 
400 sovs, added for the owner and 100 sovs. for 
the nominator of the winner ; for three-year-olds ; 
second received 10 per cent, and third 5 per cent, 
of the whole stake ; entrance 3 sovs. each year, the 
only forfeit if declared by October 10, 1899. A.F. 
(79 subs., 24 of whom paid entrance only — 
£67^, IDS.) 

Mr. J. H. Houldsworth's Energetic, by 

Enthusiast, 8 st. 10 lb. 
Lord Harewood's O'Donoghue, 9 st. . 
Sir J. Blundell Maple's The Bishop, 

9 St. 5 lb 

Mr. Fairie's Galicia, 8 st. 11 lb. 

Sir R. Waldie Griffith's Veles, 9 st. 

51b 

Major E. W. Baird's St. Monans, 9 st. 
Mr. Arthur James' Cynical, 9 st. 

Betting. — 7 to 4 against Veles, 7 to 2 O'Donoghue, 7 to 
I Energetic, 100 to 12 each The Bishop, St. Monans, and 
Cynical, and 100 to 8 Galicia. Won by three-quarters of 
a length, the same between second and third. 

Her last appearance was in the Derby Cup. 

Here she was out by herself. Her jockey re- 

22 



0. Madden 


I 


Maher 


2 


S. Loates 


3 


Halsey 


4 


J. H. Martin 





F. Rickaby 





M, Cannon 







o 



^ 


< 


^^ 


a 


H 





^ 


< 


O 


f^ 


Pi 




U4 


H 




f/i 


^ 


a; 








h 


^. 




< 


c<i 


> 


w 


i^ 


K 


t-A 


:z 




t; 


(^ 


^ 


§ 


W 


^ — 


ffi 


H 


w 




2: 


< 





w 
o 

Q 

o 

M 
W 
Pi 
O 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

garded the race as won, when she broke down 
badly, stopped "as if she had been shot," to 
quote the famiHar phrase, and could never run 
again. 

Galicia was first of all sent to Eager, with a 
disappointing result. She had no foal ; but with 
regard to this horse something more than casual 
passing reference seems desirable, for Eager, 
prior to the appearance of the great horses with 
whom Mr. Fairie's name will always be asso- 
ciated in Turf history, was at least an animal of 
special note. Eager was a son of Enthusiast, 
whose victory in the Two Thousand Guineas of 
1889 remains one of the most extraordinary things 
on record. Enthusiast was the property of Mr. 
Douglas Baird, one of the four owners whose 
horses were trained at this period by James Ryan 
at Green Lodge, which overlooks the Severals at 
Newmarket. There were, besides Mr. Fairie, 
Mr. Douglas Baird and Mr. J. H. Houldsworth, 
both members of the Jockey Club, and Mr. 
John Wallace. It may certainly be said that 
the trainer was fortunate in his patrons, as like- 
wise that they were most efficiently served. 
Enthusiast beat the Duke of Portland's famous 
Donovan, Mr. Douglas Baird's colt being one of 
the three who got their heads in front of this well- 
nigh invincible horse during his career. There 

23 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

can be no doubt that the victory was purely attri- 
butable to jockeyship, indeed Tom Cannon — who 
wore Mr. Douglas Baird's crimson, silver-braided 
jacket on this occasion, as on many others — gave 
me his explanation soon after the race. The 
chief danger to Donovan, so far as any might 
be supposed to exist, was ''Mr. Abington's " 
Pioneer, and Tom Cannon beat him and Donovan 
by what at present seems to be considered the 
old-fashioned expedient of waiting, a method 
which nevertheless appears to be returning 
somewhat to vogue. "They had two little races 
all to themselves a good long way from the 
post," was Tom Cannon's description, "and 
when they started on a third I thought I would 
join in ! " He did this with such admirable 
effect that he beat Donovan a head, a result 
which past and future form, direct and collateral, 
proved to be ridiculously wrong. Enthusiast 
met Donovan more than once afterwards but 
never got near him. 

Mr. Fairie, however, thought sufficiently well 
of Enthusiast to send his mare Greeba to him ; 
and Eager, their son, made his first appearance 
on any course at Lincoln for the Brocklesby 
Stakes of 1896, ridden by F. Pratt, now known 
as a successful trainer, and a nephew of the 

famous Fred Archer. Eager, almost favourite, 

24 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

backed at 9 to 2, the actual favourite being Mr. 
Leopold de Rothschild's Jest, finished third to 
this filly, but soon started on a notably victorious 
career, deservedly earning" the character of being 
one of the speediest horses of his generation. 
He won the Royal Two-Year-Old Plate at Kemp- 
ton at his second attempt, a race worth ^2780, 
from Lord Rosebery's well-known mare Che- 
landry, who was to become dam of good horses, 
including Neil Gow, an animal destined to be 
closely associated with the fortunes of one of 
Galicia's two best sons. This opportunity may 
be taken of correcting an impression which largely 
prevails to the effect that Eager was merely a 
six-furlong horse. His great speed made him 
extraordinarily formidable over this distance, but 
some of his most notable achievements were in 
mile races, and sometimes, moreover, over miles 
on severe courses, the Rowley and the Bunbury 
amongst others. The greater part of the money 
he won was in these contests. 

As a three-year-old he ran in Galtee More's 
Derby, which, however, the odds of 50 to i against 
him suggest that he was not expected to win. 
Galtee More started at 4 to i on. At Ascot, Eager 
won the Rous Memorial over the Hunt Cup 
course, the Midsummer Plate at Newmarket 
up the steep Bunbury Hill, the Brighton and 

25 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

Derby Cups. A curious circumstance about 
this horse was that he constantly encountered 
Goletta and she always beat him, though Mr. 
Leopold de Rothschild has admitted to me that 
he does not believe his mare was really the 
better of the two. Their first encounter was 
in the Chesterfield Stakes at the Newmarket 
Second July, when Goletta — like Galicia a 
daughter of Galopin — was regarded as a practical 
certainty, and started at 7 to 2 on. Against 
Eager 4 to i was laid, and he was beaten a short 
head. The two then met in the Rous Memorial 
at the Newmarket First October, and Eager 
failed by a head for the second time. In the 
Criterion the pair were again opponents ; 
this time Goletta was second to King Edward's 
Oakdene, who had, however, an advantage in 
the weights. Eager fourth. As three-year- 
olds Eager, having won the Rous Memorial 
at Ascot and the Midsummer Plate aforesaid 
incidentally, resumed his antagonism with Goletta 
in the St. George Stakes at Liverpool. Here 
5 to 2 was laid on him, notwithstanding that 
the distance was a mile and three furlongs, 
which may be accepted as having been beyond 
his tether ; but Goletta was giving him a pound 
instead of receiving a sex allowance. She beat 

him by five lengths. Perhaps Eager was never 

26 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

better than as a four-year-old, when he won the 
Portland Plate, the Duchess of York Stakes, and 
other races, failing- only by a head in the Derby 
Cup, carrying 9 st. 6 lb., and giving 39 lb. to the 
winner, Waterhen, a useful filly of his own age. 
During four seasons he carried Mr. Fairie's white, 
orange sleeves and cap, but as a six-year-old 
became the property of Mr. L. Neumann, for 
whom he continued to win races. The horse had 
very small feet and weak ankles. Mr. Fairie did 
not care to use him as a sire, helping, however, 
by sending- a few mares, to give him a chance ; 
and he did much better at the stud than his 
original owner anticipated. 

Undeterred by the first failure, Mr. Fairie 
sent Galicia again to Eager in 1903, and this 
time she produced a colt who was called 
Eastern, and so enters into my story. He 
was a good-looking bay, who did not come 
to hand till late in the season, indeed it was 
not until September that Alec Taylor — for the 
horses had left Ryan's stable at Newmarket and 
gone to Manton — was able to bring him out 
in the Breeders' Foal Plate at Kempton Park. 
Major Eustace Loder's Galvani had acquired the 
reputation of being in all probability the best of 
his year, and odds of 1 1 to 4 were laid on him. 

I have a vivid recollection of the race, as whilst 

27 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

it was being run I happened to stand by Lord 
Rosebery, whose Bezonian, in receipt of lo lb., 
beat the favourite by a neck, though the owner 
of the winner had told me he entertained no hope 
of success. Lady de Bathe's Yentoi, who was 
to win the Cesarewitch two years later, was the 
only one quoted in the market with the excep- 
tions of Galvani and of Bezonian (lo to i), Eastern 
figuring among the "25 to i others"; but he 
showed some speed, and little more than a fort- 
night afterwards, at the Newmarket First October 
Meeting — we are talking of 1906 — easily won a 
Triennial Produce Stakes. He did not beat very 
much ; the two animals who followed him home, 
however, Lady de Bathe's Petchora and Sir R. 
Waldie Griffith's The Ring, had both won races, 
and it was demonstrated that Eastern was at any 
rate useful. He ran in the Prendergast without 
distinction, and only made one other appearance 
as a two-year-old, when he was second for a 
Nursery at Liverpool, in which, however, there 
were only three starters, and the best that can be 
made of it is that he was giving the winner 18 lb. 
I have never agreed with an idea which is 
held by some people that a horse is necessarily 
unlucky when he runs second. In these cases a 
stronger inference is that the winner would have 

been unfortunate had he been beaten. Eastern 

28 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

as a three-year-old was second on no fewer than 
six occasions, and he was thrice third, more- 
over, actually winning- only one race in fourteen 
attempts, and that by no more than a head. He 
came out for the Column Produce Stakes, in 
which the Duke of Devonshire's Acclaim had 
half a length the better of him, and in the New- 
market Stakes a month later either he did not 
do quite so well or Acclaim did better, for here 
the Duke's colt beat him a head and a length 
and a half, Linacre separating them. A third 
attempt, though not successful, was on the whole 
to Eastern's credit. This was for the ^looo 
Hurst Park Yearling Plate. Lord Rosebery's 
Traquair, another son of Chelandry, by Ayrshire, 
was favourite at 1 1 to lo, having been one of the 
best two-year-olds of his season, though unfor- 
tunately touched in the wind. Eastern beat him 
a neck but was beaten in turn three lengths by 
Portland Bay, the winner in receipt of lo lb. 

For the Trial Stakes at Ascot Eastern met a 
useful field. Dean Swift won from King Edward's 
Slim Lad, Eastern third, giving His Majesty's 
colt, one of the few sons of Laodamia who has 
ever been any good, 7 lb. He had established 
himself, indeed, as just a nice, useful colt, likely 
to win in his turn when the luck was with him. 

It was not expected that he would beat Lord 

29 



GALICIA : HER FORBEARS 

Derby's Bridge of Canny for the First Foal 
Stakes at the Newmarket Second July, Bridge of 
Canny being something more than useful, and 
winning by a length and a half, giving lo lb. 
more than weight for age. The Atlantic Stakes 
at the Liverpool Meeting must not be passed 
over without reference, for the favourite here was 
Orby, who had not been seen in England since 
he won the Derby. Odds of 7 to 4 were laid on 
him, and he finished last of the four starters. 
Eastern, however, being no nearer than third. 
He went to Goodwood and came near to victory 
in the Chesterfield Cup, where he met really 
good animals. Velocity, then a five-year-old, 
was favourite, and obviously deserved the posi- 
tion, as he won, though only by a neck from 
Eastern, who beat Dean Swift by a length and 
a half. Eastern and Dean Swift met on exactly 
the same terms as in the Trial Stakes at Ascot. 
There Dean Swift had beaten Mr. Fairie's colt 
four lengths and a half, now, as just observed, it 
was a length and a half the other way, so that, 
as it is certain from subsequent performances 
that Dean Swift was not deteriorating. Eastern 
must have been coming on. His one victory 
followed, at Hurst Park in the Lennox Plate in 
August. Here the favourite was Baltinglass, 
6 to 5 on. The son of Isinglass and Sibola, who 

30 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

was to run second for the Leger and start one of 
the hottest favourites on record for the Cesare- 
witch, at 9 to 4, was in receipt of 9 lb. from 
Eastern, and Mr. Fairie's colt won by a head. 
He wound up the season by missing the Free 
Handicap by a similar margin, All Black giving 
him I lb. and just beating him. This was East- 
ern's last appearance in England. The stud-book 
records that he was sent to Belgium, and what 
became of him I do not know. He inherited his 
sire's small feet and weak fetlocks, and his owner 
had an idea that it often hurt him to stretch 
himself out, especially when the ground was at 
all hard. Galicia had, however, taken rank as 
the dam of a winner. 

In 1905 Galicia gave birth to a bay colt by 
Isinglass v/ho was called Carpathian, and showed 
sufficient promise to induce Mr. Fairie to put 
him into the New Stakes at Ascot, the Chester- 
field at Newmarket, the Richmond at Goodwood, 
as also the Rous Memorial and the Molecomb, 
the Champagne at Doncaster, the Hopeful at 
Newmarket, the Middle Park and the Dew- 
hurst, the two-year-old races, indeed, in which 
reputation is to be chiefly won. But Carpathian 
was never seen on a race-course. Meantime 
Galicia had visited Bay Ronald, a sire who cer- 
tainly would not have been everyone's choice. 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

There is one detail which I must not omit. 
At the time of writing the mare whose offspring 
have won most money in stakes is understood to 
be the Duke of Portland's Mowerina, the sire of 
Donovan, Semolina, and other winners, pressed 
by King Edward's Perdita II, dam of the three 
brothers Florizel II, Persimmon and Diamond 
Jubilee. Galicia is not far from the front, and 
in all probability her total will be considerably 
increased. It may be anticipated with no little 
confidence that she will presently be found to 
rank as the most remunerative mare who has 
ever figured in the Stud Book. 



32 



AND HER OFFSPRING 



CHAPTER H 

BAY RONALD 

Bay Ronald was standing at Lordship Farm at 
a fee of 75 guineas. He had not produced 
anything of mark, and at this period the list of 
horses at the stud included many who looked 
tempting, though as regards most of them there 
was the question of inbreeding to be considered 
in dealing with a daughter of Galopin. Popular 
sires in 1905, however, besides the sons of St. 
Simon, included Ayrshire, by Hampton — Ata- 
lanta ; Carbine, by Musket — Mersey ; Cyllene, 
by Bonavista — Arcadia ; Gallinule, by Isonomy 
— Moorhen; Ladas, by Hampton — Illuminata ; 
Melton, by Master Kildare — Violet Melrose ; 
Rightaway, by Wisdom — Vanish, all these at 
fees varying from 100 to 250 guineas, and it may 
be incidentally observed that Flying Fox, the 
son of Orme and Vampire, was priced at 600 
guineas. Mr. Fairie made choice of Bay Ronald, 
how wisely the result was to show. 

Horses are seldom judged without prejudice. 
For one of various reasons their critics have a 

33 c 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

disposition to regard them either with favour or 
disfavour, and a perfectly true account of almost 
any horse can be so tinged as to make him 
appear better or worse than he actually is. Thus 
as regards Bay Ronald it might be observed that 
during the four years he remained in training 
he ran in twenty-six races and won only five of 
them, the one by which he is best known having 
been a handicap, the City and Suburban ; but 
no one pretends that such a summary would do 
the horse anything like justice. It is probable 
that when Bayardo first began to show what he 
was some doubts existed as to whether his career 
would continue brilliantly, simply because Bay 
Ronald was scarcely a sire from whom great 
things might have been expected. This is 
judging him superficially perhaps, by his not 
very brilliant performances whilst in training ; 
but when his descent was considered it became 
evident that Bay Ronald might be capable of 
anything if he came near to transmitting the ex- 
cellence of those from whom he was descended. 

Bay Ronald, the property of Mr. Leonard 
Brassey, was a son of Hampton and Black 
Duchess. Hampton himself was a remarkable 
animal for reasons to which reference will pre- 
sently be made. He in turn was the son of 
Lord Clifden, probably one of the best horses 

34 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

in the annals of the Turf, winner of a highly 
sensational Leger amongst other races. Lord 
Clifden was by Newminster, another St. Leger 
winner ; Newminster by the famous Touchstone, 
yet another winner of the Doncaster classic ; 
and on the dam's side Bay Ronald's descent is 
scarcely less distinguished, his dam having been 
Black Duchess, by Lord Falmouth's Galliard — a 
son of Galopin — winner of the Two Thousand 
Guineas of 1883, and of Black Corrie by Sterling. 
I must by no means omit somewhat extended 
comment on Bay Ronald's sire, Hampton. In 
his early days it cannot be denied that he ap- 
peared to be altogether unworthy of his ancestors. 
He was somewhat small, though a decidedly 
good-looking horse, but that he did not take 
everyone's fancy is sufficiently proved by the 
fact that after winning a little Selling Race as 
a two-year-old no one would bid more than 150 
guineas for him, at which modest price he was 
allowed to change hands. This was in 1874, ^"^ 
it seemed indiscreetly ambitious to put him into 
the Metropolitan at Epsom next season, a mere 
plater, as it could not be incorrect to describe 
him. Carrying 6 st. 3 lb. he won in the style 
which his two-year-old efforts were very far from 
suggesting. His improvement was, indeed, as- 
tonishing, the fact being, however, that he was 

35 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

a natural stayer for whom no course appeared 
to be too long, and he was also possessed of 
sufficient speed to do what was necessary at 
the finish. Even as a four-year-old his merit was 
scarcely recognised, or so it would seem from the 
circumstance of his having had no more than 
7 St. lo lb. in the Goodwood Stakes. There was 
certainly a good entry that year ; but nothing 
had a chance with Hampton. I well recollect 
the race, for a friend of mine, then Mr. Herbert 
Gardner, created afterwards Lord Burghclere, 
was also a great friend of the late Lord Ellesmere, 
Hampton's owner, and induced me to back the 
horse. Handicappers soon began to perceive 
what he was. His weight in the Northumberland 
Plate next year, 1877, was 8 st. 12 lb., and he 
had no trouble in beating the fourteen opposed 
to him. 

In his first season there had been no sort of 
ground to anticipate that Hampton would ever 
be able to win ordinary handicaps, whereas he 
proceeded to qualify as a Cup horse, and in 1877 
added the Goodwood and Doncaster Cups to the 
list of his successes. In 1878 he did better still, 
taking the Epsom Gold Cup, a race which was 
then run over two miles, from the French horse 
Verneuil, who must have been one of the very 
best ever sent across the Channel. Verneuil was 

36 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

a magnificent specimen of the thoroughbred, and 
Hampton's fame naturally advanced after the 
Ascot Meeting ; for here Verneuil won the 
Gold Vase on the Tuesday, the Gold Cup two 
days later, and was brought out again on the 
Friday for the Alexandra Plate, which he also 
secured. These triumphs of Hampton's were 
all accomplished in Lord Ellesmere's colours, 
and the once-despised plater became the sire of 
three Derby winners — Merry Hampton 1887, 
Ayrshire the following year, and Ladas 1894 — 
and very nearly of a fourth who would have 
been victorious in the colours of his owner 
— Highland Chief. This colt was only beaten 
a neck in 1883 by Sir Frederick Johnstone's St. 
Blaise, and Webb, who rode Highland Chief, 
pulled up under the confident impression that 
he had actually won. When the trainer, Charles 
Archer, drew Webb's attention to the number 
of St. Blaise displayed above the judge's box, 
the jockey was persuaded that it must certainly 
have been hoisted by a mistake which would be 
speedily rectified. The Two Thousand winner 
Galliard, ridden by Fred Archer, was, it may be 
remarked, third. Hampton was also a winner 
over hurdles, a matter, however, little regarded 
by devotees of the sport which is called legi- 
timate. He was a good second for the Grand 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

International Hurdle Race at Croydon to Chan- 
dos, who possibly never had a superior in this 
business, which is in a great measure, no doubt, 
a question of knack. James Jewitt, who used to 
ride Chandos, has told me that the horse took 
his hurdles in his stride with a perfect ease which 
hardly conveyed to his jockey the impression that 
he was jumping" at all. Excellence was, however, 
only to be expected from a son of Lord Clifden. 
I have mentioned this horse's sire Newminster ; 
his dam was The Slave, a daughter of Melbourne, 
whose lop ears, and what was called the "Mel- 
bourne blaze," have marked so many of his stock. 
Of late years the thoroughbred horse has 
enormously increased in value. In the sixties 
5000 guineas was considered a huge sum to give 
for any animal, though for Lord Clifden as a two- 
year-old Lord St. Vincent is said to have paid 
over 6000 guineas. Lord Clifden began his career 
by winning the Woodcote Stakes at Epsom, as 
several great horses have done, and after having 
been practically left at the post for the Cham- 
pagne at Doncaster he won that as easily as he 
had taken the Epsom race. Another of his two- 
year-old exploits was to beat Lord Falmouth's 
good filly Queen Bertha, winner of the Oaks of 
1863. There is little doubt that he was unfor- 
tunate in losing the Derby. Some time before 

38 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

the race he sHpped up and injured himself, with 
the result that his preparation was seriously in- 
terrupted, a fact, I believe, not generally known. 
What happened on training- grounds at that 
period was not common property, as it usually 
is to-day. There was in the stable an Irish 
horse called Bellman who greatly resembled 
Lord Clifden, and was mistaken for Lord St. 
Vincent's colt, the consequence being that work 
which Lord Clifden did not do, being at the 
time in his stable incapacitated, was attri 
buted to him. He was decidedly backward in 
condition at Epsom, but nevertheless only failed 
by a head to beat Macaroni. There were good 
horses behind him — Rapid Rhone, The Ranger 
who won the first Grand Prix, Saccharometer, 
Blue Mantle, and Hospodar. Lord Clifden's 
St. Leger was one of the most sensational on 
record. He was ridden by John Osborne and 
left at the post, to all appearances hopelessly out 
of it. To have hurried him would doubtless 
have been fatal, but his accomplished jockey 
allowed him to make up his ground gradually, 
so much so that at the Red House it is said he 
was fully fifty lengths last, and odds of 50 to i 
were shouted against him. By degrees he pulled 
his way to the front, winning comfortably by half 
a length from Queen Bertha, Borealis third, in 

39 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

front of The Ranger and Blue Mantle amongst 
others. The grandsire of Bay Ronald was also 
the sire of no fewer than four Leger winners — 
Hawthornden, 1870; Wenlock, 1872; Petrarch, 
1876 ; and Jannette, 1878. 

Newminster must not be omitted from com- 
ment. He too won the Leger, in 1851, and 
besides Lord Clifden, sired classic winners in 
Musjid, who carried off the Derby for Sir 
Joseph Hawley in 1869, and Mr. Chaplin's 
Hermit, victorious at Epsom in 1867. Hermit 
became one of the most famous sires in 
Turf history, his stock including the classic 
winners St. Blaise, Shotover, Thebais, St. 
Marguerite, and Lonely. Peter, Tristan, Queen 
Adelaide and St. Louis were likewise by 
him, as was Friar's Balsam, unquestionably 
the best two-year-old of his season. Odds 
of 3 to I were laid on Friar's Balsam for 
the Two Thousand Guineas of 1888, but on 
the way to the post an abscess which had 
formed in his mouth, and in some mysterious 
way escaped the observation of his trainer, 
broke, and he was quite unable to do himself 
anything distantly approaching to justice. In 
the New Stakes at Ascot Friar's Balsam had 
cantered away from the Duke of Portland's 

Ayrshire, who won the Derby, having previously 

40 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

taken the Two Thousand which Friar's Balsam 
missed. It will be seen how many of this family 
were winners of the Leg"er. Touchstone was so in 
1834, taking" also the Doncaster Cup next year 
and the Ascot Cup, as also the Doncaster Cup 
again in 1836, and his Ascot victory he repeated 
in 1837. When it is considered what these 
horses did, respect for their descendant Bay 
Ronald cannot but increase. 

Coming to Bay Ronald himself it has been 
said that he merely won five races in four years ; 
but in order to give a fair view of him it must be 
pointed out that the tasks set him were frequently 
severe. His first appearance was made in the 
Stanley Stakes at the Epsom Summer Meeting 
of 1895, when as he started at 10 to i it may be 
assumed that not a great deal was expected of him. 
He nevertheless finished third to the late Colonel 
Harry M 'Calmont's Devil-M ay-Care. Another 
colt belonging to Colonel M'Calmont — Cushen- 
dall — beat him out of a place at his next attempt, 
in the Windsor Castle Stakes at Ascot, and he 
just missed a place for the Lavant Stakes 
at Goodwood, behind the dead-heaters. Lord 
Houghton's Flitters — the then Lord Hough- 
ton, at present known as the Marquess of 
Crewe — and the Duke of Westminster's Omla- 
dina. It was hardly to be supposed that Bay 

41 



GALICIA : HER FORBEARS 

Ronald could have a chance for the Middle Park 
Plate, which went that year to Mr. Leopold de 
Rothschild's St. Frusquin, who beat Omladina 
by half a length, the favourite, H.R.H. the 
Prince of Wales' Persimmon, five lengths away, 
third ; and St. Frusquin found little difficulty in 
giving Bay Ronald lo lb. in the Dewhurst Plate, 
Mr. Leonard Brassey's colt finishing indeed last 
of the five. 

It will be seen that big things had been asked 
of the colt, and so it continued next season. The 
ground was very hard in the spring of 1896, and 
for that reason Mr. Leopold de Rothschild did 
not bring out St. Frusquin for the Newmarket 
Stakes, he having already won the Column Pro- 
duce Stakes and the Two Thousand. Galeazzo 
did duty for him, and shared favouritism with the 
Duke of Westminster's Labrador at 9 to 2, 5 to i 
being laid against the Duke of Devonshire's 
Balsamo, after whom in the market came Bay 
Ronald, 100 to 15. There were fifteen starters, 
and the fact of Bay Ronald being backed at this 
comparatively short price is evidence that he had 
wintered well. He ran, moreover, far from badly. 
Galeazzo had a neck the better of Balsamo, 
Bradwardine third, beaten three lengths, Bay 
Ronald fourth, in front of Labrador. There was 

some promise about this, but the colt continued 

42 



AND HER OFFSPRING 



to fly at the highest game, and next came out 
for the Derby, finishing fifth to Persimmon, who, 
as every one with any acquaintance with racing 
affairs is aware, beat St. Frusquin by a neck. 



Epsom, 1896. 

The One Hundred and Seventeenth Renewal of the Derby 
Stakes of 6000 sovs., by subscription of 50 sovs. 
each, h. ft. of 5 sovs. if declared, with 165 sovs. 
added ; for three-year-olds ; colts 9 st., and fillies 
8 St. 9 lb. The nominator of the winner received 
500 sovs., the owner of the second 300 sovs., and 
the owner of the third 200 sovs. out of the stakes. 
About one mile and a half. (276 subs., ^J of whom 
paid 5 sovs. each — ^^^5450.) 

H.R.H. the Prince of Wales' b. c. Per- 
simmon, by St. Simon 

Mr. Leopold de Rothschild's br. c. St 
Frusquin .... 

Mr. H. C. Beddington's br. c. Earwig 

Mr. B. S. Straus* br. c. Teufel 

Mr. L. Brassey's b. c. Bay Ronald . 

Mr. Leopold de Rothschild's b. c. Gulistan 

Mr. L. Brassey's b. c. Tamarind 

Mr. A. Calvert's br. c. Bradwardine 

Mr. J. Wallace's b. c. Spook . 

Mr. E. Cassel's b. c. Toussaint 

Mr. H. M'Calmont's b. c. Knight of the 
Thistle . . • . . 



J. Watts 

T. Loates 

Allsopp 

F. Pratt 

Bradford 

Calder 

Grimshaw 

Rickaby 

Colling 

Woodburn o 



M. Cannon o 
Mr. Rothschild declared to win with St. Frusquin. 

Betting. — 13 to 8 on St. Frusquin, 5 to i against 
Persimmon, 100 to 9 Teufel, 25 to i each Bay Ronald 
and Knight of the Thistle, 33 to i each Gulistan and Ear- 

43 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

wig, 40 to I Bradwardine, 100 to i each Spook and 
Toussaint, and 1000 to i Tamarind. Won by a neck; 
four lengths between second and third. 

There is a proverb about knowing a man by 
the company he keeps, and to some extent horses 
may be judged after the same fashion. Bay 
Ronald at least kept excellent company, and if 
he did not always shine in it, peculiar brilliance 
is necessary in order to obtain distinction among 
the highest class. It is not impossible that there 
have been years when Bay Ronald might have 
made at any rate what is called "a bold bid" for 
the Derby if he had not actually won it. Sup- 
posing he had been one year older it is far from 
certain that Sir Visto would have beaten him, 
and had he been two years younger, which would 
have made him a three-year-old in 1898, he 
might quite possibly have beaten Jeddah. That 
at least is the estimate I form of him, though of 
course one cannot speak with any approach to 
confidence about the relative merit of horses 
who never came into opposition. 

After Epsom Bay Ronald went to Ascot, and 
ran for the race which is called the Derby at that 
Meeting. There were only four starters, two of 
them on offer at odds of 20 to i, indeed the race 
was evidently looked on as a good thing for the 
Duke of Westminster's Conroy, a son of Bend Or 

44 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

and Grace Conroy, for odds of 9 to 4 were laid 
on him — Bay Ronald, nevertheless, being- quoted 
at 5 to 2. Conroy won, Bay Ronald beaten for 
second place three parts of a length by Mr. 
J. H. Houldsworth's Positano, and it may be 
assumed that the jockeys rode out for places, 
as in this race the second receives ^200, the 
third ^100. This was not Bay Ronald at his 
best, at the same time something must have been 
thought of the performance, for on the Friday 
we find him second favourite at 7 to 2 for the 
Hardwicke Stakes. The absolute favourite was 
another colt from Kingsclere, a stable companion 
of Conroy, the Duke of Portland's Shaddock, 
II to 8, and he won, Bay Ronald, though Shad- 
dock was giving him 12 lb., finishing no nearer 
than fifth. 

That race, it must freely be confessed, shows 
the horse in an unflattering light, but I have 
an idea that he was not seen in his true 
colours at this Ascot Meeting. At his next 
attempt he was engaged on a task which he 
could not be expected to fulfil. He was brought 
out for the Jockey Club Stakes at the Newmarket 
First October Meeting. At one time it had been 
supposed that Persimmon and St. Frusquin, 
unless the Leger had shown that one was un- 
questionably better than the other — a point which 

45 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

the Derby and the Princess of Wales's Stakes had 
left doubtful — would have met once more for this 
rich prize, St. Frusquin, however, had finally 
disappeared from active service on the race-course 
after winning the Eclipse Stakes. There was an 
idea that the late Colonel Harry M'Calmont's 
Knight of the Thistle, who was receiving 17 lb. 
from Persimmon, had some sort of chance, and 
the Duke of Westminster's Regret was considered 
to be not altogether hopeless, 100 to 12 being 
his price. Persimmon, however, 11 to 8 on, won 
by a couple of lengths from Sir Visto, Laveno 
filling the third place four lengths away. Some 
long prices were on offer, though there were only 
ten runners. Laveno and Utica stood at 66 to i, 
Bay Ronald and The Lombard at 100 to i, and 
300 to I was to be had, at least according to the 
return, against a filly called Bride of the Sea, 
and also against Kirkconnel, notwithstanding 
that he had won the Two Thousand Guineas 
the previous year. 

At length, however, Bay Ronald was to come 
to the front. He ran for the Lowther Stakes at 
the Second October Meeting with the following 
result : 

Newmarket, 1896. 
The Lowther Stakes of 20 sovs. each for starters, with 
5 GO sovs. added ; for three-year-olds and upwards ; 

46 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

second received 50 sovs. out of the stakes and third 
saved his stake; entrance 10 sovs. A.F. (28 
entries — i^500.) 

Mr. L. Brassey's Bay Ronald, by Hampton, 

3 yrs., jst. 9 lb. . • . Finlay i 

Lord Rosebery's Avilion, 3 yrs., 8st. 3 lb. S. Loates 2 
Duke of Westminster's Rampion, 3 yrs., 

8 St. I lb. Calder 3 

Mr. Leopold de Rothschild's Utica, 4 yrs., 

9 St. 2 lb. . . . • M. Cannon o 
Mr. H. E. Beddington's Earwig, 3 yrs., 

8 St. I lb Allsopp o 

Betting. — 13 to 8 against Earwig, 7 to 4 Rampion, 8 to i 
Bay Ronald, lOO to 12 Utica, and 10 to i Avilion. Won 
by three lengths ; four lengths between second and third. 

Earwig had been third to Persimmon and St. 
Frusquin at Epsom, beaten four lengths, as pre- 
viously noted Bay Ronald was fifth, and here 
Earwig was trying to give him 6 lb. If not a 
great performance it was at any rate a creditable 
one, and next time it may be said that he did 
better. 

Newmarket, 1896. 

The Limekiln Stakes of 50 sovs. each for starters, with 
1000 sovs. added ; for three-year-olds and upwards ; 
second received 150 sovs. out of the stakes and 
third saved his stake ; entrance, 1 5 sovs. R.M. 
(39 entries — ^^1085.) 

Mr. L. Brassey's Bay Ronald, by Hamp- 
ton, 3 yrs., 8 St. 7 lb. . , . Bradford i 

47 



GALICIA : HER FORBEARS 



Lord Rosebery's Avilion, 3 yrs., 8 st. 

3 lb. . . . . . . S. Loates 2 

Duke of Devonshire's Balsamo, 3 yrs., 

8 St. 7 lb. . . . . . Madden 3 

Mr. H. M'Calmont's Knight of the Thistle, 

3 yrs., 7 St. 9 lb. . . . . Allsopp o 

Mr. Leopold de Rothschild's Utica, 4 yrs., 

9 St. 2 lb. . . , . . T. Loates o 
Mr. J. H. Houldsworth's Laveno, 4 yrs., 

9 St. 8 lb F. C. Pratt o 

Duke of Westminster's Regret, 3 yrs., 

8 St. 12 lb. . . . . . M. Cannon o 

Betting. — 5 to 4 against Regret, 4 to i Balsamo, 8 to 
I Knight of the Thistle, 100 to 12 Avilion, 10 to i Bay 
Ronald and Laveno, and 100 to 8 Utica. Won by a 
length ; three lengths between second and third. 

Regret was always a disappointing" animaL 
That Bay Ronald had made a highly favourable 
impression was proved by the fact of his starting 
favourite for the Free Handicap for Three- Year- 
Olds, a race which dropped out of the Calendar 
about 191 2, though what may be called the com- 
panion stake for two-year-olds still continues. 

Newmarket, 1896. 

A Free Handicap Sweepstakes of 100 sovs. each, h. ft. ; 
for three-year-olds ; winners extra ; second received 
200 sovs. out of the stakes, and third saved his 
stake. A.F. (22 subs. — £^1050.) 

Mr. Leopold de Rothschild's Gulistan, by 

Brag, 9 St. . . . . . T. Loates i 

48 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

H.R.H. the Prince of Wales's Thais, 8 st. 

lo lb. . . . . . M. Cannon 2 

Prince Soltykoff's South Australian, 8 st. Toon 3 
Mr. L. Brassey's Bay Ronald, 8 st. 5 lb. 

(inc. 5 lb. ex.) .... Bradford o 

Lord Ellesmere's Miss Fraser, 8 st. 2 lb. Finlay o 

Mr. J. Wallace's Spook, 8 st. . . . Allsopp o 
Mr. Hamar Bass's ch. f. by Marden — 

Abeyance, 7st. 8 lb. . . . Fearis o 

Betting. — i i to 4 against Bay Ronald, 3 to i Spook, 
g to 2 Thais, 1 1 to 2 Gulistan, 10 to i each Miss Fraser 
and South Australian, and 100 to 6 the Abeyance filly. 
Won by three-quarters of a length ; same between second 
and third. 

The two races which Bay Ronald won were 
worth ^1585. 

Throughout his career Bay Ronald was des- 
tined to meet the Duke of Devonshire's Balsamo 
on several occasions. Both had started for the 
Middle Park Plate, the only occasion on which 
the son of Friar's Balsam and Snood was seen as 
a two-year-old. As will be noted, they had come 
together in the Limekiln Stakes ; in the New- 
market Stakes, when Balsamo was second, beaten 
a neck by Galeazzo, Bay Ronald fourth, some 
four lengths behind ; and they met again in the 
City and Suburban of 1897, with which the four- 
year-old labours of both of them began. The 
Limekiln Stakes had seemed to settle the question 

49 D 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

between the two, though it was contradictory of 
some earlier form taken through Shaddock. 
This last named was a fairly good colt. As a 
three-year-old he had won six of his eight races, 
worth ;^5852, but in the Hardwicke Stakes, as 
already set forth, he had shown great superiority 
to Bay Ronald, whereas in the Prince of Wales's 
Stakes at Ascot, Balsamo, in receipt of only i lb. 
from Shaddock, had run the Duke's horse to a 
neck. Nevertheless Balsamo was distinctly pre- 
ferred for the Epsom Spring Handicap. 

Epsom, 1897. 

The City and Suburban Handicap of 2000 sovs., by 
subscription of 35 sovs. each, 20 ft., or 5 sovs. if 
declared, with 805 sovs. added ; second received 
200 sovs. and third 100 sovs. out of the race. 
About one mile and a quarter. (62 subs., 18 of 
whom paid 5 sovs. each — £166$-) 

Duke of Devonshire's Balsamo, by Friar's 

Balsam, 4 yrs., 7 st. 4 lb. . . O. Madden i 

Mr. L. Brassey's Bay Ronald, 4 yrs., 

7 St. 7 lb. . . . . Allsopp 2 
Sir J. Miller's La Sagesse, 5 yrs., 7 st. 

12 lb 

Baron de Rothschild's Amandier, aged, 

8 St. 2 lb. 
Lord Ellesmere's Villiers, 5 yrs., 7 st. . 
Lord Rosebery's Quarrel, 6 yrs., 8 st. 

12 lb. (car. 8 St. 13 lb.) 
Mr. P. Lorillard's Diakka, 4 yrs., 7 st. 
12 lb. (car. 7 St. 13 lb.) 
50 



S. Loates 


3 


C. Wood 





S. Chandley 





J. Watts 





Bradford 






AND HER OFFSPRING 

Mr. Richard Croker's Santa Anita, 

6 yrs., 7 St. 12 lb. . . . J. Woodburn o 

Mr. B. I. Barnato's Stowmarket, 6 yrs., 

7 St. 10 lb. . . . . Finlay o 

Mr. Theobald's Phoebus Apollo, 4 yrs., 

7 St. 2 lb J. Wall o 

Mr, T. Simpson Jay's Rampion, 4 yrs., 

7 St. 2 lb. . . . . . K. Cannon o 

Prince Soltykoff's South Australian, 4 

yrs., 6 St. 1 3 lb. . . . Robinson o 

Mr. Straus' Teufel, 4 yrs., 6 st. 12 lb. . Toon o 

Lord Derby's Crestfallen, 3 yrs., 6 st. 

10 lb. (car. 6 St. 11 lb.) . . J. Sharpies o 

Mr. C. D. Rose's Melfitana, 3 yrs., 6 st. 

7 lb. (car. 6 st. 9 lb.) . . . Fearie o 

Betting. — 9 to 2 against Balsamo, 100 to 15 Stow- 
market, 9 to I Teufel, 100 to 11 Bay Ronald, 100 to 9 
each South Australian and Quarrel, 100 to 8 Crestfallen, 
100 to 7 Melfitana, 100 to 6 Amandier, 20 to i Diakka, 
28 to I Villiers, 33 to i Rampion, 40 to i La Sagesse, 
50 to I each Santa Anita and Phoebus Apollo. Won 
by half a length ; three lengths between second and 
third. Amandier and Villiers ran a dead heat for fourth 
place, beaten a short head. 

The first and second thus came out as nearly 
as possible the same horse, and the running was 
certainly meritorious. La Sagesse, after winning 
the Oaks, had afforded evidence of continued well- 
being by winning the Derby Cup as a four-year- 
old, after just missing the Newmarket October 
Handicap, giving 29 lb. to the winner — a three- 
year-old, however — and failing by only half a 

51 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

length. Bay Ronald was next seen at Ascot, 
and in an important race which, it will be per- 
ceived, he was confidently expected to take. 

Ascot, 1897. 

The Hardwicke Stakes of 10 sovs. each, with 2000 
sovs. added; for three-year-olds and upwards ; second 
received 10 per cent, and third 5 per cent, of 
the whole stake. Swinley Course. (61 subs. — 
;^2378, lOS.) 

Mr. L, Brassey's Bay Ronald, by Hamp- 
ton, 4 yrs., 9 St. 7 lb. . . . Bradford i 

Lord Cadogan's Lowly, 3 yrs., 7 st. 4 lb. . Robinson 2 

Mr. Hamar Bass's b. c. by St. Serf — 

Novitiate, 3 yrs., 7 st. 7 lb. . . F. Finlay 3 

Duke of Devonshire's Minstrel, 3 yrs., 8 st. 

8 lb M.Cannon 4 

Mr. C. D. Rose's Frisson, 3 yrs., 7 st. 12 lb. S. Loates o 

Lord Rosebery's Trawler, 3 yrs., 7 st. 7 lb. AIlsopp o 

Betting. — 11 to 10 against Bay Ronald, 4 to i each 
the Novitiate colt and Minstrel, 10 to i each Lowly and 
Trawler. Won by two lengths; six lengths between 
second and third. 

It may be said the opposition was not strong, 
for though Minstrel had won the Ascot Derby 
he had only been opposed by one very poor filly. 
After this Bay Ronald flew at high game. 

Tenth Renewal of the Eclipse Stakes of ;^9285. Eclipse 
Stakes Course. One mile and a quarter. 

H.R.H. the Prince of Wales's Persimmon, 

4 yrs., 10 St. 2 lb. . . . .J. Watts i 

52 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

Lord Rosebery's Velasquez, 3 yrs., 9 st. 

4 lb C. Wood 2 

Mr. Leonard Brassey's Bay Ronald, 4 3TS., 

9 St. 1 3 lb. . . . . . Bradford 3 

Mr. A. F. Calvert's Bradwardine, 4 yrs., 

9 St. 61b. . . . . . T. Loates 4 

M. Ephrussi's Beato, 4 yrs., 9 st. 10 lb. . T. Lane 5 

Betting. — 100 to i 2 on Persimmon, 100 to 8 against 
Velasquez, 25 to i Bay Ronald, 33 to i Bradwardine, 
40 to I Beato. Won by two lengths ; four lengths 
second and third. Time, 2 mins. 9I sees. 

The race came out, it will be noted, precisely 
in accordance with anticipation, Bay Ronald 
doing neither better nor worse than it seemed 
likely he would do. In the Champion Stakes at 
the Newmarket Second October Meeting he again 
encountered Velasquez. At Sandown he had 
been trying to give 9 lb. and had been beaten 
four lengths. At Newmarket, 2 to i being laid 
on Velasquez, Lord Rosebery's colt beat him by 
a couple of lengths, which might have been ex- 
tended to four had there been any object. Though 
constantly set tasks which he could not possibly 
accomplish his reputation suffered little, and by 
the time the Cambridgeshire Handicap was made 
it was supposed that a considerable margin sepa- 
rated him from his old antagonist Balsamo, for 
Bay Ronald carried 8 st. 6 lb., the Duke of 
Devonshire's colt 7 st. 10 lb. Neither had any- 

53 



GALICIA : HER FORBEARS 



thing to do with the finish, which was a question 
of heads between Comfrey, St. Cloud II, Sandia, 
and Cortegar. He was out once more as a four- 
year-old for the Liverpool Autumn Cup, not 
fancied, with 8 st. 3 lb., as the odds of 25 to i 
against him make plain. 

Liverpool, 1897. 

The Liverpool Autumn Cup (handicap) of 1200 sovs. by 
subscription of 2 5 sovs. each, 1 5 ft., or 5 sovs. if 
declared, with 595 sovs. added; second received 70 
sovs. and third 50 sovs. out of the race. Cup Course, 
one mile and three furlongs. (53 subs., 34 of whom 
paid 5 sovs. each — ;i^i075.) 

Lord Stanley's Chiselhampton, by 

Hampton, 4 yrs., 8 st. i lb. 
Capt. Bewicke's General Peace, 3 yrs., 

6 St. 12 lb. 
Duke of Westminster's Labrador, 4 yrs., 

8 St. 5 lb. (car. 8 st. 6 lb.) 
Lord W. Beresford's Nunsuch, 3 yrs., 

7 St. 8 lb 

Mr. Dobell's The Rush, 5 yrs., 9 st. . 
Mr. A. Cohen's Greenlawn, 6 yrs., 

8 St. 6 lb 

Mr. L. Brassey's Bay Ronald, 4 yrs., 

8 St. 3 lb 

Mr. A. F. Calvert's Bradwardine, 4 yrs., 

8 st 

Mr. Leopold de Rothschild's Jaquemart, 

3 yrs., 7 St. 6 lb. . 
Col. Paget's Waterhen, 3 yrs., 7 st. 

6 lb 

54 



S. Loates 


I 


N. Robinson 


2 


M. Cannon 


3 


0. Madden 


4 


J. Watts 


• 


Bradford 





F. Finlay 





C. Wood 






T. Loates 



T. Fiely 



AND HER OFFSPRING 



Mr. Jersey's Maluma, 5 yrs., 7 st. 4 lb. J. Sharpies o 
Mr. J. Bibby's Chin Chin, 6 yrs., 7 st. 

4 lb. . . . . Allsopp o 

Mr. H. C. White's Form, 5 yrs., 7 st. 

3 lb. . . . . . Sloan o 

Mr. Dobell's Sligo, 3 yrs., 7 st. 3 lb. . S. Chandley o 
Mr. F. C. G. Menzies' Laughing Girl, 

3 yrs., 7 St. I lb. (car. 7 st. 3 lb.) K. Cannon o 

Betting. — 9 to 2 against General Peace, 5 to i Labrador, 
100 to 14 each Greenlawn and Nunsuch, lOO to 12 The 
Rush, 10 to I Bradwardine, 100 to 8 Chiselhampton, 100 
to 6 Jaquemart, 20 to i each Waterhen, Maluma, and 
Sligo, 25 to I Bay Ronald, 40 to i Form, and 50 to i 
Laughing Girl. Won by a head ; two lengths between 
second and third. 

As a five-year-old in 1898 Bay Ronald led off 
by winning the race with which his name is 
chiefly associated, the City and Suburban. 

Epsom, 1898. 

The City and Suburban Handicap of 2000 sovs. by 
subscription of 35 sovs. each, 20 ft. or 5 sovs. if 
declared, with 970 sovs. added ; second received 
200 sovs. and the third 100 sovs. out of the race. 
About one mile and a quarter. (50 subs., 16 of 
whom paid 5 sovs. each — £166^.) 

Mr. L. Brassey's Bay Ronald, by 

Hampton, 5 yrs., 7 st. 12 lb. 

(car. 8 St.) .... Bradford i 

Mr. W. Cooper's Newhaven H, 5 yrs., 

8 St. 8 lb Rickaby 2 

Mr. F. R. Hunt, jun.'s, Craftsman, 

3 yrs., 6 St. 2 lb. . . . C. Purkis 3 

55 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 



Mr. H. M'Calmont's Knight of the 

Thistle, 5 yrs., 8 st. 6 lb. . 
Captain Greer's Kilcock, 6 yrs., 9 st. 

4 lb 

Mr. P. Lorillard's Sandia, 4 yrs., 8 st. 

4 lb 

Mr. Fairie's Eager, 4 yrs., 8 st. 4 lb. . Allsopp 
Lord Stanley's Chiselhampton, 5 yrs., 

8 St. 2 lb 

Lord Rosebery's Chelandry, 4 yrs., 

8 St 

Mr. J. R. Keene's St. Cloud II, 4 yrs., 

7 St. 13 lb. . 
H.R.H. The Prince of Wales' Nunsuch, 

4 yrs., 7 St. 6 lb. . 
Mr. H. T. Barclay's Ashburn, 4 yrs., 

7 St. 4 lb. (car. 7 st. 5 lb.) 
Mr. Theobalds' Phcfibus Apollo, 5 yrs., 

7 St. . 

Mr. C. D. Rose's Melfitana, 4 yrs., 

7 St. . 

Mr. Jersey's Brayhead, 4 yrs., 6 st. 

10 lb. (car. 6 St. 13 lb.) . 
Mr. T. Cannon's Amphidemas, aged, 

6 St. 12 lb. 
Mr. H. C. White's Form, 6 yrs., 6 st. 

1 2 lb 

Lord Ellesmere's Fortalice, 4 yrs., 6 st. 

1 1 lb 



M. Cannon 


4 


J. Watts 





S. Loates 





Allsopp 





N. Robinson 





C. Wood 





T. Loates 





0. Madden 





J. Sharpies 





Segrott 





R. Jones 





H. Toon 





T. Dunn 





J. Wall 





H. Jones 






Betting. — 8 to i each against Kilcock and Knight of 
the Thistle, 1 00 to 12 each Sandia and Bay Ronald, 9 to 
I each Eager and Nunsuch, 100 to 6 each Chelandry, 
Newhaven II, and St. Cloud II, 20 to i each Amphi- 
damas and Fortalice, 25 to i each Brayhead and Crafts- 

56 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

man, 40 to i each Ashburn, Phoebus Apollo, and Melfi- 
tana, 50 to i Chiselhampton, and lOO to i Form. Won 
by two lengths ; a head between second and third. 

Kilcock, the favourite, was, it will be seen, en- 
deavouring to give Bay Ronald 20 lb. Knight of 
the Thistle was a horse whose name has occurred 
several times in previous pages. The difference 
between 100 to 12 and 8 to i is so small that 
Bay Ronald may be described as having practi- 
cally started favourite, with Eager hardly less in 
demand. Bay Ronald, as already noted, had 
shown his liking for the course twelve months 
previously, and he won in good style from New- 
haven II, who was imported from Australia by 
the present Sir William Cooper. This horse was 
destined to follow Bay Ronald's example, for he 
won, carrying 9 st., the following season, as Mr. 
Leonard Brassey's horse had done after being 
second at his first essay on the course. In the 
Epsom Cup, then run over the Derby course as 
the Coronation Cup is at present. Bay Ronald 
showed that there was certainly no mistake about 
hit victory at the Spring Meeting. 

Epsom, 1898. 

The Epsom Cup of 500 sovs. (a Cup value 100 sovs. and 
the remainder in specie) added to a Sweepstakes of 
20 sovs. each, or 5 sovs. if declared ; second received 
50 sovs. out of the stakes. The Derby Course, about 

57 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

one mile and a half. (20 subs., one of whom paid 
5 sovs. — ;^8i5.) 

Mr. L. Brassey's Bay Ronald, by Hamp- 
ton, 5 yrs., 9 St. 6 lb. . . Bradford i 

Mr. William Cooper's Newhaven II, 

5 yrs., 9 St. 6 lb. . . . Rickaby 2 

Mr. J. C. Sullivan's Winkfield's Pride, 

5 yrs., 9 St. 6 lb. . . -J. Watts 3 

Mr. Jersey's Merman, 6 yrs., 8 st. 10 lb. C. Wood o 

Mr. Douglas Baird's Champ de Mars, 

3 yrs., 8 St, . . . . O. Madden o 

Betting. — 11 to 10 on Winkfield's Pride, 2 to i 
against Newhaven II, and 10 to i each Champ de Mars 
and Bay Ronald. Won by two lengths ; four lengths 
between second and third. 

This was indeed doubtless his best perform- 
ance, obviously better than in the Handicap, as 
here he was meeting Newhaven H at even weights 
instead of receiving 8 lb., as he had done five 
weeks previously. Here, too, was Winkfield's 
Pride, beating whom was certainly an achieve- 
ment, for he was really a good horse. He had 
run second to Persimmon for the Ascot Cup ; 
and, though very easily beaten, readily defeated 
in turn Mr. Hamar Bass's Love Wisely, and 
Limasol who had beaten Chelandry and others, 
including Goletta, in the Oaks. Among the 
runners for this last-named race was Galatia, a 
daughter of Galopin and Pamela, not of course 
to be confused with Galicia, who gives the title 

58 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

to this book. Winkfield's Pride, besides winning* 
the Lincolnshire Handicap with 8 st. 9 lb., had 
carried off the valuable Prix du Conseil Municipal 
in Paris in what was certainly a representative 
field, and the result was fully anticipated, more- 
over, as only 5 to 4 was laid against him, 5 to i 
against Omnium H and Masque, 10 to i against 
Elf, the three last-named having been considered 
good enough to send to England for the Gold 
Cup. A winner of the great Ascot race, Merman, 
was also in the Epsom Cup, in receipt, moreover, 
of 10 lb. from the three placed horses. After 
Epsom it is evident that Bay Ronald made ex- 
cellent progress, the betting for the coveted 
Ascot trophy furnishing proof. 

I have just been talking about the slight 
difference between 8 to i and 100 to 12 ; that 
between 100 to 30 and 7 to 2 is still less, a detail 
suggested by the betting- on the Ascot Cup. 

Ascot, 1898. 

The Gold Cup, value 1000 sovs., with 3000 sovs. in 
specie (of which the second received 700 sovs. and 
the third 300 sovs.), added to a Sweepstakes of 20 sovs. 
each, h. ft. ; three-year-olds, 7 st. 7 lb. ; four, 9 st. ; 
five, six, and aged, 9 st. 4 lb. ; m. and g. allowed 
3 lb. Starting at the Cup Post and going once round, 
about two miles and a half. (29 subs. — >^33 50.) 

Mr. J. de Bremond's ch. h. Elf II, by 

Upas, 5 yrs. . . . . E. Watkins i 

59 



. 0. Madden 


2 


> 

J. Torterolo 


3 


). M. Cannon 


4 


Bradford 


o 


Barlen 


o 


T. Lane 


o 


C, Grey 


o 


Rush and Masq 


ue 


lid, and lOO to 


6 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

Mr. Dobell's ch. h. The Rush, 6 yrs. 
Mr. P. Torterolo's ch. h. Cartouche III, 

aged .... 

Sir S. Scott's b. or br. c. History, 4 yrs. 
Mr. L. Brassey's b. h. Bay Ronald, 5 yrs. 
M. E. Blanc's b. c. Masque II, 4 yrs. 
M. E. Blanc's ch. c. Montegut, 4 yrs. 
M. E. Blanc's b. c. Longbow, 4 yrs. 

Betting. — lOO to 30 each against The 
II, 7 to 2 each Elf II and Bay Ronal 
History. Won by a length and a half; a bad third. 

Bay Ronald cannot be said to have run well. 
The Rush, though he had won the Gold Vase, 
beating Newhaven II, who was third, by half a 
dozen lengths, was generally rated as a mere handi- 
cap horse, and much the same may be said of Sir 
Samuel Scott's History. It will be observed how 
vigorous was the French attempt on the Cup this 
year, four of the eight starters having come from 
across the Channel, Longbow one of them in 
spite of his English name. He was a son of The 
Bard and a mare called Old Bow. 

The Epsom Cup was to be Bay Ronald's last 
victory. He tried again for the Hardwicke 
Stakes, which, as noted, he had taken the pre- 
vious season. 

Ascot, 1898. 

The Hardwicke Stakes of 10 sovs. each, with 2000 sovs. 
added ; second received 10 per cent, and third 5 per 
60 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

cent, of the whole stake. Swinley Course. (65 subs. 

— ^2242, los.) 
Duke of Westminster's Collar, by St. 

Simon, 3 yrs., 7 st. 12 lb. . . O. Madden i 

Mr, L. Brassey's Bay Ronald, 5 yrs., 

9 St. 12 lb. . . . . Bradford 2 

Mr. C. D, Rose's Cortegar, 4 yrs., 9 st. 

7 lb. . . . . S, Loates 3 

Sir J. Blundell Maple's Devon, 3 yrs., 

7 St. I 2 lb C. Wood 4 

Mr. L. Brassey's Merry Buck, 3 yrs., 

7 St. 1 2 lb. . . . T. Loates o 

Mr. Russel's Nenuphar, 3 yrs., 7 St. 12 lb. Toon o 

Sir M. FitzGerald's Sweet Hampton, 3 

yrs., 7 St. 4 lb. (car. 7 st. 5 lb.) . N. Robinson o 

(Mr, Brassey declared to win with Bay Ronald.) 

Betting. — i 5 to 8 against Collar, 9 to 4 Bay Ronald, 1 1 
to 2 Devon, 100 to 12 Cortegar, and 10 to i any other. 
Won by three lengths ; a length and a half between second 
and third. 

Weight for age over a mile and a half in June 

between a three-year-old and a five-year-old is 

20 lb., and Bay Ronald was giving 28 lb., so that 

without that advantage it may be assumed he 

would have won. It was not expected that he 

would beat Lord Rosebery's Velasquez in the 

Champion Stakes. The two ran at evens, odds 

of 1 1 to 4 on Lord Rosebery's colt, 1 1 to 4 

against Bay Ronald, 200 to i against the other 

runner, a colt called Goblin, who was a very bad 

third, Velasquez winning by a length. Bay 

61 



GALICIA : HER FORBEARS 

Ronald tried again in the Lowther Stakes two 
days later, but it may be that his previous race 
had done him no good. He was last of three 
behind Prince Soltykoffs Ninus and the Duke 
of Westminster's Batt. Ninus was very useful, 
however, and Batt, a half-brother to Flying Fox 
by Sheen, had won his two previous races, as 
also the Payne Stakes in the Spring, had run 
second for the Derby, beaten only three parts of 
a length by Mr. Larnach's Jeddah, and had also 
been second to Velasquez for the Eclipse Stakes. 
Mr. Leonard Brassey's horse was to make one final 
appearance. This was in the Jockey Club Cup. 

Newmarket, 1898. 

The Jockey Club Cup of 300 sovs. (a Cup, value 130 
sovs., and the remainder in specie), added to a Sweep- 
stakes of 20 sovs. each, h. ft. ; for three-year-olds 
7 St. 12 lb., four 8 St. 12 lb., five 9 st. i lb., six and 
aged 9 St. 2 lb.; m. and g. allowed 3 lb. ; second 
received 50 sovs. out of the stakes. Cesarewitch 
Course. (15 subs. — £4 1 o.) 

Mr. Jersey's ch. h. Merman, by Grand 

Flaneur, 6 yrs. . . . . M. Cannon i 

Mr. Dobell's ch. h. The Rush, 6 yrs, . O. Madden 2 

Mr. L. Brassey's b. h. Bay Ronald, 5 yrs. Bradford 3 

Belling. — 1 1 to 10 against Merman, 7 to 4 The Rush, 
and 5 to I Bay Ronald. Won by four lengths ; a bad 
third. 

It may be presumed that Bay Ronald was not 

so good a stayer as the other two ; indeed this 

62 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

may be accepted as beyond question, the Ascot 
Cup confirming' it in the case of The Rush, and 
as for Merman, a comparison of this Jockey Club 
Cup with the Epsom Cup tells its own tale. 

Bay Ronald retired to the Preston Stud Farm 
at Aylesford in Kent, and stood at a fee of 25 
g-uineas in the year 1900. To sum up his per- 
formances, as a two-year-old he was out five 
times without success ; as a three-year-old he 
won two stakes in eight attempts, of the value of 
^1585 ; his solitary win as a four-year-old in six 
attempts yielded ^2378, and his two five-year-old 
races produced ^2480. Thus altogether Bay 
Ronald ran twenty-six times, winning five races 
worth ^6443. The record is far from being a 
great one. 

It is always particularly interesting to have an 
owner's account of his horse, and Major Leonard 
Brassey, though busily engaged on duty with the 
Northamptonshire Yeomanry at the time when 
I begged him to give me some account of his 
horse, most kindly sent the following sketch : 

BAY RONALD 

Bay Ronald by Hampton — Black Duchess 

was bred in 1893 by Mr. T. Phillips at the 

Leybourne Grange Stud, and was sent up for sale 

at Doncaster in 1894 with Mr. Phillips' other 

6.1 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

yearlings. I recollect my trainer, Tom Jennings, 
jun., writing to me shortly after the Doncaster 
Meeting to say that he had seen a nice yearling 
of Mr. Phillips' there which had failed to fetch 
the reserve price of 500 guineas. Tom Jennings 
suggested that as I lived close to Leybourne 
Grange I might like to go over and see the colt. 
This I did, with the result that Bay Ronald 
became my property. 

I bought Black Duchess, the dam of Bay 
Ronald, at the sale at the Second October 
Meeting, 1896, curiously enough but a few 
hours before Bay Ronald won his first race, the 
Lowther Stakes. About the same time I remem- 
ber Mr, M. Gurry offering to sell me for ^200 
a half-sister to Bay Ronald, Black Cherry, by 
Bendigo — ^Black Duchess. This I declined, but 
Colonel W. Hall Walker — with better judgment — ■ 
purchased this mare, and she became the dam of 
Black Arrow, Cherry Lass (winner of the Oaks), 
Jean's Folly, and therefore the grand-dam of 
Night Hawk, winner of the St. Leger of 1913. 
As a two-year-old Bay Ronald was not of much 
account, nor indeed did he " come to hand " before 
the latter part of his three-year-old career, when 
he won the Lowther Stakes and Limekiln Stakes 
at Newmarket. He began his four-year-old season 
by running second to Balsamo in the City and 

64 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

Suburban, g-ivingf 3 lb. I always look upon this 
as perhaps the most unlucky race of my Turf 
career. As after events proved, Bay Ronald 
was an exceptionally good horse on the Epsom 
Course. He was very well on the day, and he 
should certainly have beaten Balsamo. Bay 
Ronald subsequently won the Hardwicke Stakes 
at Ascot, but could only run third to Persimmon 
and Velasquez in the Eclipse Stakes, and second 
to Velasquez in the Champion Stakes at New- 
market. 

As a five-year-old Bay Ronald won the City 
and Suburban and the Epsom Cup, beating- New- 
haven H and Winkfield's Pride. He was then 
trained for the Ascot Gold Cup, in which he ran 
unplaced. My action in this matter was scarcely 
judicious. The horse never showed ability to 
stay more than a mile and a half, and a severe 
preparation for the Cup, followed by the race on 
hard ground, in all probability had a permanently 
adverse effect. I think Bay Ronald* was never 
afterwards in the form he was when he so easily 
won the Epsom Cup. 

On the day following the Gold Cup he ran 

second to Collar in the Hardwicke Stakes. 

After his struggle the previous day on very 

hard ground I do not think this can be taken 

as Bay Ronald's true form. Collar had won 

65 E 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

the Trial Stakes on the first day of the 
Ascot Meeting, and John Porter sent the horse 
back to Kingsclere on the Wednesday, not in- 
tending to bring him out again at the Meeting. 
On the Thursday evening, reaUsing that horses 
which had run for the Gold Cup would probably 
not be at their best on the following day, and 
that the remainder of the opposition was not 
likely to be strong. Porter telegraphed for Collar 
to be sent back to Ascot, with the result that he 
won the nice stake of ;^2242 for the Duke of 
Westminster. 

There is little to relate of Bay Ronald's sub- 
sequent performances on the Turf, except that 
Tom Jennings — by no means one of the ''Cock- 
sure Brigade" — was rather confident that he 
would win the Goodwood Cup of that year. 
Owing to a family bereavement the day before 
the race I did not run him. 

Though Bay Ronald achieved a fair amount 
of success on the racecourse one cannot describe 
him as having been quite a first-class racehorse. 
His form was certainly somewhat variable, this 
being accounted for, I think, by the fact that his 
constitution as a young horse was not of a very 
robust character, and strong preparations for long- 
distance races may have rather taken the steel 

out of him later on. 

66 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

Bay Ronald with very limited opportunities 
was a distinct success at the Stud. His most 
conspicuous sons are Bayardo, Dark Ronald, 
and Macdonald H, the latter a first-class race- 
horse and a most successful stallion in France. 

One talks of "the glorious uncertainty" of 
the Turf. The glorious uncertainty of breeding- 
racehorses is hardly less. At the December sales 
at Newmarket in 1897 I recollect that Prince 
Pierre d'Arenberg and the Comte de Pourtales 
came round Tom Jennings' stables one evening. 
The former had bought at the sales that day a 
mare called Marie, and was doubtful what he 
should do with her. I suggested that he might 
send her to Bay Ronald, who was just about to 
commence Stud duties. This was done, and 
Macdonald H was the result. 

I sold Bay Ronald for ;^5000 to go to France, 
unfortunately before Bayardo and Dark Ronald 
appeared upon the scene. He did not, how- 
ever, live long to bring profit to his new 
owners or further fame to himself, as he died in 
1905. Bay Ronald grew into a beautiful and 
most bloodlike stallion, with a very perfect head 
and neck. 

So Major Leonard Brassey most kindly 
wrote. To continue my own narrative, it was 

67 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

not long before Bay Ronald began to make his 

mark at the Stud. In 1902 when his offspring 

first ran five of them won ten races worth ^3789, 

Rondeau securing five of these, and Arabi, a son 

of his owner's Merry Miser, taking the Great Foal 

Plate (^835) at Lingfield, and the Astley Stakes 

(;^69o) at Lewes, besides being placed in five of 

his other eight races. In the Bedford Stakes at 

the Newmarket Second July Arabi was second 

to Rock Sand, and on the occasion of his first 

appearance, in the Sandown Park Stud Produce 

Stakes, third to Our Lassie, who was to win the 

Oaks next year, and to Mr. Arthur James's good 

horse, Rabelais, who has been so brilliantly 

successful at the Stud in France. A result of all 

this was the increase of Bay Ronald's fee to 100 

guineas, and a note in the record states that he 

was full for 1904, Rondeau having continued to 

win in 1903, Merryman and Wild Oats also 

adding to his reputation ; in all his five young 

ones won twelve races worth ^6191. Merryman, 

who after a first appearance in the Brocklesby 

took three consecutive races worth ^2424, was 

an own brother to Arabi. In 1904 there was 

no new horse of note among his seven winners 

(of twelve races worth ^^3560). Merryman was 

out three times without success, and in 1905 

there was a drop, six horses winning ten races 

68 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

of small value, the whole amounting to only 

Mr. Fairie, however, had determined to send 
Galicia to the horse in 1905, though he can- 
not have been much gratified with Bay Ronald's 
record for the season. Arabi won four little 
races worth ^^799, an indifferent colt called 
Galhampton just got home by a neck for a 
Plate worth £262, and Ronaldo took a couple 
of minor stakes worth ;{!220. Thus seven 
races worth £12^1 was the total. In 1905 the 
fee had been reduced to 75 guineas. The year 
1907 produced only Dark Ronald of any real 
note, though Rousay won thrice and was second 
in four of his other five races. Dark Ronald 
only appeared on two occasions, the first time suc- 
cessfully in the Hurst Park Foal Plate, which he 
won, though only by a head, from a colt called 
Quimpert, who was giving him 3 lb. ; his second 
attempt was in the Great Foal Plate at Lingfield, 
when a remarkably speedy animal called Little 
Flutter, in receipt of 15 lb., beat him three 
lengths, odds of 6 to i being laid on the winner. 

Bay Ronald was on the up grade ; seven of 

his get won twelve races worth ^3660 ; but there 

seemed no reason to assume that such brilliant 

distinction as that which he achieved was in store 

for him, that he was going to rise speedily to 

69 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

eminence among sires ; for owing to Bayardo he 
took his place at the end of the 1908 season third 
in the list, following Persimmon and St. Frusquin, 
in front of Gallinule, St. Simon, Chaleureux — 
who, of course, owed his position to the amazing 
victories of Signorinetta — and Desmond. 



70 



AND HER OFFSPRING 



CHAPTER HI 

BAYARDO 

A NUMBER of good horscs have made their first 
appearance in the New Stakes at Ascot, and 
Bayardo's name figures among them. His trial 
at Manton on the 9th of June by no means 
strikes one as overwhelming. The distance was 
five furlongs. 



Bayardo, 2 yrs., 8 st. 8 lb. 
Seedcake, 3 yrs., 8 st. 8 lb. . 
Smuggler, 2 yrs., 7 st. i lb. . 
Lady Vista, 2 yrs., 8 st. 5 lb. 
Highness, 2 yrs., 8 st. 5 lb. . 



Madden i 

Toon 2 

Hulse 3 

Broadwood o 
Baker o 



Won easily by six lengths ; a length between second 
and third. 

Of course, it was something to beat a three- 
year-old at even weights ; but Seedcake had run 
in half a dozen races prior to this gallop without 
ever having been placed, three as a two-year-old, 
three in 1908, and in the Trial Stakes with which 
this Ascot Meeting opened he was last. Prob- 
ably he was a better horse at home than out. 

Four others were preferred to Bayardo in the 
71 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 



New Stakes, which is on the whole not strange. 
There was a strong favourite at 6 to 4 in Mr. 
(as he then was) WilHam Cooper's Perola, ridden 
by Maher. She had easily carried off the Wood- 
cote Stakes at Epsom, fourth in which race had 
been a colt of Lord Rosebery's called Perdiccas. 
At Epsom Perdiccas had been giving Perola 10 
lb., he being penalised for two successes. In 
the New Stakes he had 7 lb. the better of the 
weights with the filly, and it was thought that so 
great a variation would change the result. Mr. 
J. B. Joel's Sunflower II was backed on the 
strength of private reputation. But the race 
was never in doubt. 

Ascot, 1908. 

New Stakes of \?fio each, with ;^iooo added, of which 
second received 10 percent, and third 5 per cent, ; 
for two-year-olds. Five furlongs. (115 entries — 

£l2>l7y IDS.) 

Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, by Bay Ronald, 

8 St. 10 lb B. Dillon i 

Lord Rosebery's Perdiccas, 8 st. 10 lb. W. Higgs 2 

Mr. William C. Cooper's Perola, 9 st. D. Maher 3 

Mr. E.Carlton's Corinnus, 8 st. 10 lb. C. Leader o 

Mr. J. B. Joel's Sunflower II, 8 st. 

10 lb. . . . . . Walter Griggs o 

Mr. H. J. King's Pernambuco, 8 st. 

10 lb. . . . . F. Wooton o 

Mr. W. Raphael's Blankney II, 8 st. 

10 lb. . . . . . H. Jones o 

72 



W. Halsey 


O 


L. Lyne 


o 


W. Saxby 


O 


0. Madden 


o 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

Sir E. Cassel's Turban, 8 st. 7 lb. 
Sir Daniel Cooper's Vivid, 8 st. 7 lb. . 
Mr. E. L. Heinemann's b. f. by St. 
Maclou — Raniondia, 8 st. 7 lb. . 
Mr. J. H. Houldsworth's Doro, 8 st. 

7 lb 

Mr. W. M. G. Singer's b. f. by St. 

Maclou — Great Dame, 8 st. 7 lb. W. Broadwood o 
Mr. W. Hall Walker's Blue Cap, 

8 St. 7 lb H. Randall o 

Betting. — 6 to 4 against Perola, 5 to i Perdiccas, 
6 to I Sunflower 11, 7 to i Bayardo, 10 to i Doro, 
100 to 8 Blankney II. Won by one and a half lengths ; 
neck second and third. 

Writing at the time under the signature 
''Rapier" in the Illustrated Sporting and Dra- 
matic News^ my comment on the race was : "It 
soon became evident that Manton shelters the 
best colt of the season out so far," and there was 
no occasion to amend the last three words when 
the season was over. " Mr. Fairie has had some 
horses of high class," I continued, "and he tells 
me he thinks this undoubtedly the best he has 
ever owned." 

There could not well have been a more pro- 
mising start, and when Bayardo came out again 
for the National Breeders' Produce Stakes at 
Sandown, the most valuable two-year-old prize 
in existence, he was favourite as a matter of 
course. 

73 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 



Sandown, 1908. 

National Breeders' Produce Stakes of ;^5000, of 
which nominator of winner received ;^300, nomi- 
nator and owner of second each £^200, and 
nominator and owner of third each ;!{^ioo, by 
subscription of ;i^i each ; if left in after January i, 
1907, a further ^5 ; if left in after October 8, 1907, 
a further £16 ; and if left in after March 31, 1908, 
a further £2 i ; with £4^7 added ; for two-year-olds. 
Five furlongs. (268 entrants, viz. 71 at £4^, 43 at 
;i^22, 82 at £6, and 72 at ;^i — ;^4357.) 

Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, by Bay Ronald, 

9 St. 2 lb. 
Lord Howard de Walden's ch. c. by 

Gallinule — Excellenza, 9 st. i lb. 
Sir Daniel Cooper's Vivid, 8 st. 7 lb. . 
W. Raphael's Louviers, 9 st. 5 lb. 
Mr. C. Bower Ismay'sBalnacoil,9st.2 lb. 
Lord Rosebery's Perdiccas, 9 st. i lb. 
Mr. H. S. Goodson's Diospyros, 8 st. 

10 lb 

Colonel H. T. Fenwick's Hamerton, 

8 St. 10 lb 

Lord Michelham's William the Fourth, 

8 St. 10 lb 

Mr. R. S. Sievier's The Jabberwock, 

8 St. 10 lb 

Mr. J. B. Thorneycroft's Kilmein, 8 st. 

7 lb 

Mr. Reid Walker's Dinnet, 8 st. 3 lb. 
Lord Rosebery's Tantonie Bell, 8 st. . 
Mr. J. B. Joel's ch. c. by Sundridge — 

Sweet Story, 8 st. . 

Betting. — 7 to 4 against Bayardo, 5 to i Excellenza c, 
74 



D. Maher 

H. Randall 
L. Lyne 
H. Jones 
W. Saxby 
W. Higgs 

J. H. Martin 

W. Halsey 

Wm. Griggs 

B. Dillon 

F. Wootton 
O. Madden 

C. Trigg 



Walter Griggs o 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

10 to I Sweet Story c, loo to 9 The Jabberwock, 100 
to 8 Kilmein, 100 to 7 Perdiccas, lOO to 6 any other. 
Won by a length ; half a length second and third. Kilmein 
whipped round at the start and was left. 

The unfortunate thing about this race was 
the reputation it earned for the second, Lord 
Howard de Walden's Excellenza colt, afterwards 
named Glasgerion ; for as Bayardo's fame grew 
so did opinion as to what might be accom- 
plished by the animal who had run him to a 
length. That, however, is a matter which does 
not come into the present story. It is not by 
any means always that the best-looking horse 
is the best performer. Bayardo, however, was 
full of quality, and admiration for him steadily 
increased. There is a progression of stakes, 
as it may be called, in which one expects to 
find the very best two-year-olds, and the Rich- 
mond at Goodwood is one of them. Great 
names appear in the record of this event — 
Jannette, Wheel of Fortune, Bend Or, Dutch 
Oven, Friar's Balsam, Orme, Persimmon, and 
others ; and Bayardo won it at his leisure. 
No doubt was entertained of the result, but 
at the same time not a little was thought of 
Sir Daniel Cooper's Vivid, who, it will be 
seen, was receiving 12 lb. more than sex 
allowance. 

75 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

Goodwood, 1908. 
Richmond Stakes of £2$ each, 10 ft. for acceptors, with 
i^5oo added, of which second received ;^200 and 
third ;^ioo; for two-year-olds. Entrance £^, only 
ft. if declared. T.Y.C. Six furlongs. (73 entrants, 
ft. declared for 31 — £6$2.) 

Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, by Bay Ronald, 9 st. 

8 lb D. Maher i 

Sir Daniel Cooper's Vivid, 8 st. 7 lb. . L. Lyne 2 

His Majesty's Oakmere, 8 st. 10 lb. . H. Jones 3 

Mr. J. Buchanan's Sister Betty, 8 st. 7 lb, W. Halsey o 

Betting. — 3 to i on Bayardo, 4 to i against Vivid, 
20 to I any other. Won by three lengths ; two lengths 
second and third. 

Bayardo's task at the Newmarket First 
October Meeting was of the simplest. 

Newmarket, 1908. 

BucKENHAM (post producc) Stakes of ^^300 each, h. ft. ; 
for two-year-olds. T.Y.C. Five furlongs 134 
yards. (11 subs. — ;^I500.) 

Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, by Bay Ronald, 9 st. D. Maher i 
Mr. S. B. Joel's Bonnie Lassie, 8 st. 1 1 lb. H. Randall 2 
Duke of Portland's Vivario, 8 st. i i lb. . W. Earl 3 

Betting. — 2 5 to i on Bayardo. Won by three-quarters 
of a length ; four lengths second and third. 

Bonnie Lassie had been out half a dozen 
times without winning* ; Vivario, belonging to the 
Duke of Portland, a daughter of Ayrshire and 
Miss Gunning II, was sent from Kingsclere on 
an utterly hopeless errand. She was seen no 

76 






AND HER OFFSPRING 

more that year and only twice as a three-year-old, 
when it became unmistakably clear that it was 
useless to keep her in training. On the Friday 
of the Meeting Bayardo came out again for the 
Rous Memorial, opposed only by an animal 
called Auceps, who, though he had — unexpec- 
tedly — won a Maiden Plate on the first day of 
the Meeting, was very bad. 

Newmarket, 1908. 

Rous Memorial Stakes of ;^i5 each, 10 ft. for acceptors, 
with ;^400 added for owner and;6^ioo for nominator 
of winner ; for two-year-olds ; second received £$0 
out of the stakes ; entrance £^, only ft. if declared. 
Rous Course, 5 furlongs. (50 entrants, ft. declared 
for 21 — £7^0.) 

Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, by Bay Ronald, 9 st. D. Maher i 
Sir Daniel Cooper's Auceps, 8 st. 7 lb. , B. Lynham 2 

Betting. — 20 to I on Bayardo. Won b}^ a length 
and a half. 

There was never the slightest doubt about the 
odds of 20 to I laid on the son of Bay Ronald, 
and really no more doubt about the Middle Park 
Plate when that came on for decision. 

Newmarket, 1908. 

Middle Park Plate of .^{^500, added to a Sweepstakes of 
£2)0 each, 20 ft., of which second received ;^200 
and third £100; for two-year-olds; entrance £^ ; 
of the surplus, viz. £7 St second received two-thirds 

77 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

and third the remainder. Bretby Stakes Course, 6 

furlongs. (115 entrants — ^2505.) 
Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, by Bay Ronald, 

9 St. 3 lb. . . . . D. Maher i 

Sir Daniel Cooper's Vivid, 9 st. . O. Madden 2 

Mr. W. Raphael's Blankney II, 9 st. . W. Higgs 3 

Mr. L. Neumann's Shikaree, 8 st. 10 lb. , B. Dillon o 

Betting. — 6 to i on Bayardo, 10 to i against Vivid, 
100 to 6 Blankney II, 100 to i Shikaree. Won by a 
length ; four lengths second and third. 

I do not remember in the history of this race 
that there has ever been so hot a favourite, and 
there never was so small a field, though when 
one apparently invincible animal has gone to the 
post, there have on a couple of occasions been five 
starters : the number has extended to thirty, there 
having been nine-and-twenty behind Petrarch in 
1875. The procession of notable races to which 
reference has been made includes the Dewhurst 
Plate, and this brought out Bayardo for the last 
time as a two-year-old. 

Newmarket, 1908. 

Dewhurst Plate of ;^300, added to a Sweepstakes of ^25 
each, 15 ft., of which second received ;;^ioo ; for 
two-year-olds ; entrance £1. Last 7 furlongs of 
R.M. (83 entrants — £1477.) 

Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, by Bay Ronald, 

9 St. 5 lb. . . . . . D. Maher i 

Mr. William C. Cooper's Perola, 9 st. . O. Madden 2 

78 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

Mr. Arthur James's ch. c. by Persimmon 

— Lucina, 8 st. 9 lb. . . . H. Jones 3 

Mr. George Faber's Great Peter, 8 st, 

9 lb. W. Bullock o 

Mr. H. J. King's Carrousel, 8 st. 9 lb. . H. Randall o 

Mr. J. W. Larnach's Carbineer, 8 st. 9 lb. W. Saxby o 

Betting. — 75 to 20 on Bayardo, 10 to i against Car- 
rousel, 100 to 8 Perola. Won by three lengths; same 
second and third. 

Thus he had run seven times and never been 
extended. 

From the two-year-olds of 1908 it will be 
realised that Bayardo stood out, and as a matter 
of course he headed the Free Handicap for horses 
of his age. It naturally followed that he was a pro- 
nounced winter favourite for the Derby, and his 
position in this respect would have strengthened 
greatly but for the improvement which had taken 
place in King Edward's Minoru, not Sandringham- 
bred, as his other classic winners. Persimmon and 
his younger brother Diamond Jubilee, had been, 
but a son of Cyllene and Mother Seigel leased 
from Colonel Hall Walker, and born at the Tully 
Stud in Ireland. 

Minoru had been put in the Free Handicap 
at 7 St. 6 lb., in receipt of 22 lb. from Bayardo, 
and that he could have improved sufficiently to 
be a source of danger to Mr. Fairie's colt 
it was impossible to suppose prior to the time 

79 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

when racing started in 1909. Minoru then went 
to Newbury to run for the Greenham Stakes, 
and he had done so well under the care of 
Richard Marsh at Egerton House that he was 
backed at 9 to 2, Lord Carnarvon's Valens a 
favourite on whom slight odds were laid, sup- 
ported with more confidence as Minoru had to 
give him 5 lb. Visitors were, however, grati- 
fied by the spectacle of the success of the Royal 
colours. Minoru beat Valens a length and a 
half, and an idea sprung up that he might have 
an outside chance for the classics. This sug- 
gestion was chiefly advanced, however, by those 
who thought it would be a good thing for racing 
if the King won another Derby, particularly as 
no reigning King of England had done so in the 
history of the race. That Minoru could beat 
Bayardo few people seriously imagined, and 
when the Two Thousand came round odds of 
13 to 8 were laid on the son of Bay Ronald, 
4 to I against Minoru. Bayardo was by no 
means at his best. Of that there could be no 
question. It was thought, nevertheless, that even 
when backward in condition he could at any 
rate beat the lot opposed to him. Indeed, with 
the exception of Minoru, as will be seen from 
the report of the race, no danger was appre- 
hended. 

80 




o 



AND HER OFFSPRING 



Newmarket, 1909. 

Two Thousand Guineas Stakes of ;^ioo each, h. ft., for 
entire colts and fillies foaled in 1906; colts 9 St., 
fillies 8 St. 9 lb. ; second received ;^400 and third 
;^200 out of stakes. R.M. (193 entrants — ;^5ooo.) 

His Majesty's br. c. Minoru, by Cyllene, 

9 St. 

Duke of Portland's b. c. Phaleron, 9 st. 
Mr. W. Raphael's b. c. Louviers, 9 st. 
Mr. Fairie's b. c. Bayardo, 9 st. . 
Mr. J. Buchanan's b. c. Diamond Stud, 9 st. 
Mr. J. B. Thorneycroft's b. c. Grimmet, 

9 St. . 
Mr. Leopold de Rothschild's b. c. Fop, 9 st. 
Mr. L. Neumann's b. c. Fidelio, 9 st. 
Mr. Lionel Robinson's ch. c. Sealed 

Orders, 9 st. . 
Mr. Raphael's b. c. Blankney II, 9 st. 
Col. E. W. Baird's b. c. Orange Bud, 9 st. 

Betting. — 13 to 8 on Bayardo, 4 to i against Minoru, 
100 to 7 Louviers, 20 to i Diamond Stud, 25 to i Fop, 
Won by two lengths ; a length and a half second and third. 

Layers of odds knew their fate when the 
horses passed the Bushes, feeling convinced 
nevertheless that this could not be the real Bay- 
ardo. He ran without dash, and though his 
defeat was attributed to unreadiness a vague sus- 
picion arose that he might not be the horse he 
had shown himself the previous season. This 
notion so far strengthened as time went on as 

to depose him from his position of favourite for 

81 F 



H. Jones 


I 


. W. Earl 


2 


. G. Stern 


3 


. D. Maher 


4 


. W. Halsey 





Wm. Griggs 





. 0. Madden 





. B. Dillon 





3 

F. Wootton 





. W. Higgs 





B. Lynham 






GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

the Derby. Glowing accounts of the manner in 
which Minoru had been thriving came from New- 
market, and at the Turf headquarters another 
formidable rival had arisen in Mr. Louis Winans's 
Sir Martin, a son of Ogden and Lady Sterling, 
whom his owner had imported from the United 
States. 

Sir Martin was trained by Joseph Cannon at 
Lordship Farm, and early in the year I had been 
down to have a look at him, to find a colt lacking 
in quality, but nevertheless striking one as a 
racehorse. He was introduced to the course in 
a Welter Handicap at the Newmarket Second 
Spring Meeting on the 12th of May, exactly a 
fortnight before the Derby, and the class in this 
Handicap not being good, three-year-old as Sir 
Martin was, 9 st. 10 lb. was put on his back, 
the lowest weight being 7 st. Dusky Slave, a 
four-year-old filly belonging to Mr. J. B. Leigh, 
was favourite, carrying 7 st. 9 lb., and Sir Martin, 
giving 29 lb. and the year, equivalent to another 
stone having regard to sex allowance, won very 
easily by a length and a half, which might have 
been considerably increased. 

A result of this was that the American colt 

started actually favourite for the Derby. He and 

Minoru were so nearly on the same mark that 

if a regular frequenter of the racecourse had 

82 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

been asked just prior to the start what was 
favourite he would have been as likely to men- 
tion one as the other. Admirers of Bayardo 
had, nevertheless, lost little of their confidence, 
many of them had lost none, and were delighted 
at the possibility of obtaining odds of 9 to 2. 
The fact that Maher was riding much gratified 
a number of those who were interested in Mr. 
Fairie's colt, but was not regarded by every- 
one as immensely in Bayardo's favour. The 
American jockey had previously won the Derby 
thrice in four years — on Sir James Miller's Rock 
Sand in 1903, Lord Rosebery's Cicero in 1905, 
Major Eustace Loder's Spearmint in 1906, and 
in 1906 he had also won the Oaks on Lord 
Derby's Keystone IL Notwithstanding these 
victories, however, his percentage of successes 
at Epsom had been singularly low in comparison 
with the proportion of his victories on other 
courses, notably perhaps at Newmarket. 

Descending the hill towards Tattenham Corner 
Sir Martin fell. He was almost in front at the 
time, and what effect the accident had on the 
animals who were following him can never be 
precisely ascertained. Spectators who were near 
the scene of the mishap varied greatly in their 
accounts of it, the jockeys who rode in the race 
told contradictory stories, as is much more the 

83 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

rule than the exception in such cases, and from 
the neighbourhood of the winning-post it was 
impossible to make out, even approximately, what 
had occurred. I watched the race from the top 
of the Club stand, a good place for seeing — when 
other people's heads and hats do not obscure the 
view. I observed the wearer of Mr. Winans's 
black, white, and red hoops suddenly come to 
the ground, and some of the other runners being 
pulled out to avoid the fallen horse and jockey. 
Maher roughly calculated that he lost sixteen 
lengths. So far as I could make out Minoru 
near the rails escaped interference, and was 
fortunate in finding a clear course, as was also 
the case with Mr. Walter Raphael's Louviers. 

Minoru, it may be remarked, had been drawn 
No. I on the rails, and his jockey kept him on 
the inside. When once Tattenham Corner had 
been rounded, however, four or five appeared to 
be in it, Bayardo not far behind, and I gazed 
with confidence to see him assert his old supe- 
riority. The inference is that he had been 
thrown out of his stride and was unable to recover 
it sufficiently to do himself justice. A hundred 
yards from home the race seemed to have resolved 
itself into a fight between Minoru and Louviers, 
though it was not quite certain that William 
the Fourth or Valens might not get up, and a 

84 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

very faint hope that Bayardo might do so still 
lingered. It was not to be, however. The 
bearers of the Royal purple and scarlet, and of 
the dark blue, scarlet hooped sleeves, flashed 
oast the post as nearly as possible in a line, so 
much so that no one could say who had won, or 
whether, indeed, this was not a third instance of 
a dead heat for the Derby since the race was 
started in 1780 — the two previous ones having 
been between the Duke of Rutland's Cadland and 
Mr. E. Petre's The Colonel in 1828, Sir John 
Willoughby's Harvester and Mr. J. Hammond's 
St. Gatien in 1884. The scene of enthusiasm 
which followed the hoisting of the King's number 
need not be described. It is sufficient to say 
that Bayardo's subsequent running appeared 
most distinctly to prove that the Derby of 1909 
was not won by the best horse. 

Epsom, 1909. 

One Hundred and Thirtieth Renewal of the Derby Stakes 
of ;!o6500 (including ^^500 for nominator of winner), 
with ;^400 for second and ;^200 for third, by sub- 
scription of ^50 each, h. ft. or £^ if declared, with 
;^I2 50 added ; for three-year-olds, entire colts and 
fillies ; colts 9 st., fillies 8 st. 9 lb. About one mile 
and a half. (299 entrants, viz. 15 at ;^50, 184 at 
£2$, and 100 at ^5 — ;^6450.) 

His Majesty's br. c. Minoru, by Cyllene, 

9 St. . . . . . H. Jones i 

85 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 



Mr. W. Raphael's b. c. Louviers, 9 st. G, Stern 
Lord Michelham's ch. c. William the 

Fourth, 9 St. . 
Duke of Portland's b. c. Phaleron, 9 st. 
Mr, C. S. Newton's b. c. Sandbath, 9 st. 
Mr. R. Mills' br. c. Prester Jack, 9 st. 
Mr. W. Raphael's b. c. Brooklands, 

9 St. . 

Mr. J. Buchanan's b. c. Diamond Stud, 

9 St. . 

Lord Carnarvon's b. c. Valens, 9 st. . 
Mr. Fairie's b. c. Bayardo, 9 st. 
Mr. J. Barrow's br. c. Strickland, 9 st. 
Mr. H. G. Fenwick's br. c. St. Ninian, 

9 St. . 

Mr. J. B. Joel's ch. c. The Story, 9 st. 
Mr. A. H. Ledlie's b. c. Electric Boy, 

9 St. . 

Mr. L. Winans's ch. c. Sir Martin, 9 st. 

Betting. — 3 to i against Sir Martin, 7 to 2 Minoru, 
9 to 2 Bayardo, 8 to i Valens, 9 to i Louviers, 20 to i 
Phaleron and William the Fourth, 40 to i The Story, 50 
to I Diamond Stud and Strickland, 66 to i each Electric 
Boy, Sandbath, St. Ninian, and Prester Jack. Won by a 
short head ; half a length second and third. Sir Martin 
fell. 

Bayardo went on to Ascot, and there his 
friends had an excellent opportunity of backing 
him for the Prince of Wales's Stakes, for book- 
makers accepted short odds about the colt. He 
had to give 21 lb. to a filly called Verne, a 

daughter of Bill of Portland and La Vierge, who 

86 



W. Higgs 


3 


W. Earl 





R. Keeble 





W. Saxby 





D. Blackburn 





W. Halsey 





F. Wootton 





D. Maher 





Wm. Griggs 





C. Trigg 





Walt. Griggs 





W. Bray 





J. H. Martin 






AND HER OFFSPRING 

had made her first appearance in the Oaks — 

never having" run as a two-year-old — and had 

finished third. It seemed to be supposed that 

she had a chance, but as a matter of fact she 

never won a race of any kind, and the three 

parts of a length by which Bayardo beat the 

Duke of Portland's Cattaro might have been 

largely extended. 

Ascot, 1909. 

Prince of Wales' Stakes of £^50 each, h. ft., with ;^iooo 
added, of which second received ;^300 and third 
;^200 ; for three-year-olds. New Course, about one 
mile five furlongs. (63 entrants — ;£^2i5o.) 
Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, by Bay Ronald, 

9 St. 5 lb. . . . . D. Maher i 

Duke of Portland's Cattaro, 8 st. 13 lb. W. Earl 2 

Mr. J. B. Joel's Verne, 7 st. 12 lb. , Walt. Griggs 3 
Mr. J. W. Larnach's Via, 8 st. 8 lb. . B. Lynham o 
Mr. Leopold de Rothschild's King 

Charming, 8 st. 3 lb. . . O. Madden o 

Betting. — 6 to 4 on Bayardo, 7 to 2 against Verne, 
100 to 12 Cattaro. Won by three-quarters of a length ; 
five lengths second and third. 

Bayardo's only other engagement at Ascot 
was for the St. James's Palace Stakes, and he 
was not brought out, Minoru being left to 
deal with a couple of opponents, as he did 
without difficulty ; and it is to be suspected that 
Bayardo's absence here accounted for his price 
when he started ten days later for the Sandring- 

87 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

ham Foal Stakes at Sandown Park. Some people 
appear rashly to have concluded that Mr. Fairie 
had been unwilling to meet Minoru and that 
consequently Bayardo was deteriorating, an idea 
without the faintest justification. 



Sandown Park, 1909. 

Sandringham Foal Stakes of ;^20oo, viz. ;i^i5oo for 
owner and ;^2 50 for nominator of winner, ;^ioo for 
owner and £$0 for nominator of second, and £y^ 
for owner and £2^ for nominator of third ; for 
three-year-olds ; entrance £26, ;^i i if declared by 
January 5, 1 909, or ;^i if declared by October 8, 
1907. One mile and a quarter. (123 entrants, viz. 
32 at £26, 51 at £11, and 40 at £1 — ^^1724.) 



D. Maher 
J. Plant 
Walt. Griggs 
J. Howard 

G. Stern 



Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, by Bay Ronald, 

9 St. 10 lb. 
Mr. L. Neumann's Verney, 7 st. 
His Majesty's Oakmere, 8 st. 2 lb. 
Mr. J. Buchanan's Chanteur, 7 st. 3 lb 
Mr. W. Raphael's Louviers, 9 st 

10 lb. . 
Duke of Portland's Baillet Latour, 8 st 

3 lb 

Mr. H. Whitworth's Venti, 8 st. 3 lb 
Mr. H. M. Hartigan's Druce, 8 st. 
Admiral Lambton's Fizzer, 7 st. 4 lb 
Mr. W. B. Purefoy's Habana, 7 st. 

Betting. — 2 to i against Louviers, 4 to i each Bayardo 
and Verney, 6 to i Chanteur, 100 to 8 Oakmere. Won 
by one and a half lengths ; two lengths second and third. 
Druce dwelt at the start. 

88 



W. Earl 





J. Thompson 





E. Houlihan 





F. Fox 





C. Ringstead 







< ox 

•^ o 

O ox 

pi; - 



w 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

That Verney should have shared second 
favouritism with Bayardo is explained by the 
weights, for 38 lb. is a desperate handicap, but 
it will be seen that Bayardo and Louviers carried 
the same burden, and the fact that the Derby form 
was wrong had not yet been recognised. A clearer 
perception of the real state of the case had arisen 
before the Eclipse Stakes. Your Majesty was a 
Leger winner, indeed he had won four of the 
five races for which he had started the previous 
season, and had been favourite for the Princess of 
Wales's Stakes at Newmarket, for which he had 
been beaten by Dark Ronald, a colt of whom a 
vast deal was thought. At Sandown the race 
was never in any sort of doubt, though Bayardo's 
jockey seemed to take particular pains to keep 
him behind the leaders until the moment for 
making his effort had arrived. 

Sandown Park, 1909, 
Twenty-second Renewal of the Eclipse Stakes of ;^i 0,000, 
of which owner of second received ;^8oo, of third 
;^II5, nominator of winner ;^5oo, and of second 
;^iOO ; by subscription of £^ each for three-year-olds 
if declared by October 8, 1907, or ;i^io for four-year- 
olds if declared by March 26, 1907 ; if left in after 
those dates a further £21 each ; if left in after 
March 31, 1 908, a further ;i6^24 for three-year-olds, or 
£^2 for four-year-olds ; and if left in after January 5, 
1909, a further £ss ^or three-year-olds, or £s^ for 
four-year-olds; with ;^2 501 added. Eclipse Stakes 

89 



GALICIA : HER FORBEARS 

Course, one mile and a quarter. (167 entrants, viz. 
29 at ;^i I 5, 15 at £6^, 26 at ^60, 42 at ;^3 i, 22 
at £26, 14 at ;^io, and 19 at £$ — ;^8870.) 
Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, by Bay Ronald, 

3 yrs., 9 St. 2 lb. . . . D. Maher i 
Mr. W. Hall Walker's Royal Realm, 

4 yrs., 9 St. 8 lb. . . . Wm. Griggs 2 
Mr. Leopold de Rothschild's Santo 

Strato, 4 yrs., 9 st. 1 1 lb. . O. Madden 3 

Mr. J. B. Joel's Your Majesty, 4 yrs., 

10 St. . . . . . Walt. Griggs o 

Betting. — 85 to 40 on Bayardo, 100 to 30 against 
Your Majesty, 100 to 9 Santo Strato, 100 to 6 Royal 
Realm. Won by two lengths ; length second and third. 

Thenceforth Bayardo's position was estab- 
lished, and how little had come to be thought 
of the Derby form by the time the Hurst Park 
Meeting was held in July the Duchess of York 
Plate afforded unmistakable evidence. 

Hurst Park, 1909. 

Duchess of York Plate of ;Ci 300, viz. ;^iooo for winner, 
;£^200 for second, and ;^ioo for third; for three- 
year-olds ; entrance ;^2i, ;^i i if declared by March 
30, 1909, or £1 if declared by March 31, 1908. 
One mile and a quarter. (7 1 entrants, viz. 2 1 at 
j£^2i, 37 at £11, and 13 at ;^i — ;^979.) 

Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, by Bay Ronald, 

9 St. 10 lb. . . . . D. Maher i 

Lord Carnarvon's Valens, 9 st. 10 lb. . F. Wootton 2 

Sir Wm. Cooper's Perola, 9 st. 7 lb. . B. Dillon 3 

Betting. — 1 1 to 2 on Bayardo, 9 to i against Valens. 
Won by two lengths ; bad third. 

90 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

Valens had been doing distinctly well since 
the Derby. He had won the Whitsuntide Plate 
at the previous Hurst Park Meeting, the Home- 
bred Three- Year-Old Cup at Gatwick with odds 
of lOO to 6 on him, and had been second for the 
Hardwicke, he, as a three-year-old, giving the 
four-year-old Primer 4 lb. and running him to 
half a length. 

After the Duchess of York Plate on the 24th 
July, Bayardo was trained for the Leger, in which 
the struggle between him and Minoru was to be 
renewed. Richard Marsh was quite satisfied 
with Minoru's prospects, entirely as the Derby 
form had been upset ; for at Epsom Minoru had 
beaten Valens scarcely a length and what had 
happened when Valens met Bayardo had been 
seen. 

Doncaster, 1909. 

St. Leger Stakes of ;^6500 for winner, ;if400 for second, 
and ;^200 for third, by subscription of ;^5o each, 
h. ft., or ;^5 if declared, with ;^i 7 5 5 added ; for three- 
year-olds ; entire colts 9 st. and fillies 8 st. 11 lb. ; 
nominator of winner received ;^50o out of stakes. 
Old St. Leger Course, about i mile 6 furlongs 132 
yards. (310 entrants, viz. 7 at ^50, 174 at ;6^2 5, 
and 129 at ^^5 — ^6450.) 

Mr. Fairie's b. c. Bayardo, by Bay 

Ronald, 9 st. . . . . D. Maher i 

Lord Carnarvon's b. c. Valens, 9 st. . F. Wootton 2 

Mr. W. Astor's ch. c. Mirador, 9 st. . B. Dillon 3 

91 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

His Majesty's b. c. Minoru, 9 st. . H. Jones 4 

Mr. J. B. Joel's ch. c. The Story, 9 st. Walt. Griggs o 
Mr. H. J. King's ch. c. Carrousel, 9 st. C. Trigg o 

Mr. J. Lowry'sch. c. Bachelor's Double, 

9 St. . . . . -J. Thompson o 

Betting. — 1 1 to 10 on Bayardo, 7 to 4 against Minoru, 

100 to 8 Valens, 100 to 6 Bachelor's Double, 33 to i 

The Story, 40 to i Mirador. Won by one and a half 

lengths ; half length second and third. 

I may add my brief comment, written at the 
time in the Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic 

News : 

Marsh has seen so much of the ups and downs 
of racing that he rarely ventures to be anything 
like sanguine. He evidently did, however, most 
firmly believe that Minoru would, indeed that he 
must, win the Leger. He had never before got 
the King's colt quite so well, Minoru had not for 
a day been sick or sorry, had apparently come on, 
stayed well, fully retained his action, everything 
was in his favour. '* I know I have to meet a 
good one in Bayardo," he remarked to me, "but 
I can tell you that Bayardo has to meet a good 
one in mine ! " Well ! Bayardo won, as I thought 
he would, or rather not quite as I thought he 
would, for I did think he would have to stretch him- 
self out to beat Minoru, and no stretching was 
required. But for the facts that I had talked for 

a long time to Marsh on the morning of the race, 

92 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

knew that Minoru was at his very best, and had 
the evidence of my eyes to confirm it so far as 
looking goes — though Marsh's opinion was more 
than ample — I should have suspected that all 
could not have been well with Minoru, so badly 
did he run. Not for a moment did he suggest 
the possibility of success, and we gazed in amaze- 
ment when for a few moments it really appeared 
as if Mirador and Valens had it between them. 
Could it b.e that one more 40 to i chance was to 
win ? As we wondered, Maher brought up 
Bayardo, and the race was over. Three strides 
did it. The others could not live with him for 
two seconds when it came to racing. Mr. Fairie 
was escorted by a bevy of friends to the paddock, 
and though naturally the failure of Minoru dis- 
appointed a multitude of people, the cheers which 
welcomed back Bayardo were hearty. Probably 
it was Lemberg's defeat that raised doubts with 
regard to his brother, for on Wednesday after- 
noon, 1 1 to 8 having been laid on Bayardo the day 
before, a shade of odds against him was obtain- 
able, and at one time 6 to 4 was taken about 
Minoru. Why the King's colt ran so badly is 
inconceivable. 

There may be some excuse for Minoru. He 
only won a single race afterwards, and suffered 

93 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

from an affection of the eyes which not improb- 
ably influenced his general health. He never 
looked like winning, nor did Bayardo ever look 
like being beaten. So little had the Leger taken 
out of him that it was thought he might just as 
well be produced to run for the Doncaster Stakes 
on the Friday, and this proved a mere exercise 
canter. 

Doncaster, 1909. 

Doncaster Stakes of ;^io each starter, with ;^500 added, 
of which nominator of winner received £S'^} ^^^ 
owner and nominator of second each £2 5 ; for three- 
year-olds ; entrance £$. One mile and a half over 
Old Course. (64 entrants, 3 of which were with- 
drawn on payment of fine under Rule 108 — ;^475.) 

Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, by Bay Ronald, 

9 St. 5 lb. . . . . . D. Maher i 

Mr. L. Neumann's Verney, 7 st. 9 lb. , F. Wootton 2 
Mr. George Faber's Great Peter, 8 st. 

7 lb W. Bullock 3 

Mr. Reid Walker's Duke Michael, 8 st. 

9 lb. . . . . . . W. Higgs o 

Belting. — 7 to I on Bayardo, 10 to i against Verney, 
100 to 7 Duke Michael. Won by a length ; four lengths 
second and third. 

Mr. Fairie was not in the least afraid, indeed, 
of keeping his colt busy, and he was sent to New- 
market for the Second October Meeting, where 
he had a couple of engagements, both of which 

94 




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AND HER OFFSPRING 

he was to fulfil. The first was in the Champion 
Stakes on the Tuesday. 

Newmarket, 1909. 
Champion Stakes of ;!^5o each, 20. ft. (to fund), with 
;^iooo added, of which second received ;^i5o and 
third ^50 ; for three-year-olds and upwards. A.F. 
One mile and a quarter. (42 entrants — ;i^90o). 

Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, by Bay Ronald, 

3 yrs., 8 St. 7 lb. (car. 8 st. 8 lb.) . D. Maher i 
Mr. J. B. Joel's Dean Swift, aged, 9 st, . Walt. Griggs 2 
Mr. W. Hall Walker's White Eagle, 

4 yrs., 9 St. . . . . W. Saxby 3 

Betting. — 9 to 4 on Bayardo, 5 to i against Dean 
Swift, 1 1 to 2 White Eagle. Won by a neck ; length 
second and third. 

Dean Swift had proved himself something 
better than a handicap horse, and it was no dis- 
credit to Bayardo that he should not have 
absolutely cantered away from the dual winner of 
the City and Suburban. In the Lowther Stakes 
on the Thursday it will be perceived how hopeless 
White Eagle's chance was, for here he was try- 
ing to give Bayardo 12 lb., and in the Champion 
Stakes Bayardo had beaten him in receipt of just 
half as much. 

Newmarket, 1909. 

Lowther Stakes of ;i^20 each, h. ft. (to fund), with ;^5oo 
added, of which second received ^^50, third saved 
stake ; for three-year-olds and upwards. Last 

95 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

one mile and three-quarters of Cesarewitch Course. 

(37 entrants — ^470.) 
Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, by Bay Ronald, 3 

yrs., 9 St. 7 lb. . . . . D. Maher i 

Mr. W. Hall Walker's White Eagle, 4 yrs., 

10 St. 5 lb. . . . . W. Saxby 2 

Capt. Laing's Rousay, 5 yrs., 8 st. i 3 lb. . R. Keeble 3 

Betting. — 100 to 9 on Bayardo, 100 to 8 against 
White Eagle. Won by one and a half lengths ; bad 
third. 

That Bayardo had been so liberally engaged 
proved fortunate. He was in eighteen races as 
a three-year-old, and started for no fewer than 
thirteen of them. On the 21st of October he 
reappeared at Sandown on the Eclipse Stakes 
course for the Sandown Foal Stakes, his third 
essay, it will be perceived, over this mile and a 
quarter, he having taken the Sandringham Foal 
Stakes at the Summer Meeting as recorded, and 
he won very easily, though the verdict was the 
length and a half. That seemed to be the dis- 
tance which Maher usually thought sufficient. 
It was by a length and a half that he had won 
the Lowther Stakes, much about the same dis- 
tance in the Doncaster Stakes, a length and a 
half again in the Leger, rather more — two lengths 
— in the Duchess of York Plate and in the Eclipse, 
the familiar length and a half again in the San- 
dringham Foal Stakes. 

96 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

Sandown Park, 1909. 

Sandown Foal Stakes of ;i^2000, viz. ;^I500 for owner 
and ;i^2 5o for nominator of winner, ;(^ioo for owner 
and ;^5o for nominator of second, and ;^75 for 
owner and £2$ for nominator of third, for three- 
year-olds ; entrants £26, ;^i i if declared by January 
5, 1909, or ;^i if declared by October 8, 1907 ; of 
surplus, viz. £iig, second received two- thirds and 
third the remainder ; Eclipse Stakes Course, one 
mile and a quarter. (184 entrants, viz. 5 i at £26, 
66 at ;^ii, and 6y at £1 — £1^24). 

Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, by Bay Ronald, 

9 St. 7 lb. . . . . D. Maher i 

Mr. L. Neumann's Shikaree, 7 st. 9 lb. . F. Wootton 2 

Mr. Reid Walker's Legatee, 7 st. . . S. Wootton 3 

Mr. Leopold de Rothschild's King Charm- 
ing, 8 St. 3 lb. . . . . O. Madden o 

Betting. — 100 to 7 on Bayardo, 20 to i against 
Shikaree, 25 to i King Charming, 66 to i Legatee. 
Won by a length ; one and a half lengths second and 
third. 

Bayardo returned to Newmarket for the 
Houghton Meeting, and as I recollect behaved 
there as if he were getting rather tired of the 
place, being unwilling to go to the post for the 
Limekiln Stakes, not knowing what a very easy 
task was before him, and Maher had to take him 
round at the back of the stands. 

Newmarket, 1909. 

Limekiln Stakes of £2^ each, 10 ft. (to fund), with ;£"5oo 
added, of which second received ;iCioo ; for three- 
97 G 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

year-olds and upwards, A.F. One mile and a 
quarter. (42 entrants — £42^). 

Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, by Bay Ronald, 

3 yrs., 9 St. 8 lb. . . . D. Maher i 
Mr. H. P. Whitney's Perseus II, 3 yrs., 

8 St. 13 lb J. H. Martin 2 

Betting. — 33 to i on Bayardo. Won by fifteen 
lengths. 

He wound up the season at Liverpool. 

Liverpool, 1909. 

Liverpool St. Leger of £yoo, of which second received 
£SO\ for three-year-olds. Entrance ;^20 ; £it, if 
declared by January 5, 1909, or ;^3 if declared by 
March 31, 1908. One mile and a half. (32 entrants, 
viz. 16 at ;^20, 10 at £il, and 6 at £1 — ;^63o). 

Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, by Bay Ronald, i o st. D, Maher i 
Mr. Reid Walker's King Amyntas, 8 st. 

4 lb. . . . . . . W. Higgs 2 

Betting. — 66 to i on Bayardo. Won by half a 
length. 

His season's work brought in ;^ 24, 797. One 
result of it was to raise Mr. Fairie to the first 
place in the list of winning owners, with ;^37, 7 19 
to his credit, which was considerably more than 
twice as much as the total of his immediate fol- 
lower, the Duke of Portland, with ^^ 15, 064; and 
another effect was to elevate Bay Ronald to the 
second position in the table of winning sires. . 
This was headed by Cyllene with ;{^35,55o. Bay 

98 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

Ronald following with ^^34,361. Bayardo's figures 
have been given : besides the Princess of Wales's 
Stakes Dark Ronald won a couple of other races, 
the three yielding ^7104. 

Throughout the winter Bayardo went on in 
the right way, his owner's objective being the 
Ascot Cup. He was ready, however, by the 
Craven Meeting, and fulfilled his engagement in 
the Fiftieth Newmarket Biennial. It was hardly 
supposed to be a race, but it will be seen that 
the jockey was contented to win by a sufficient, 
though not extensive, margin. 

Newmarket, 1910. 

Second Year of Fiftieth Newmarket Biennial Stakes of 
£2$ each, 10 ft. for acceptors, with ;^5oo added, of 
which second received 10 per cent, and third 5 per 
cent. ; for four-year-olds ; entrance £S} o^^ly ft. if 
declared ; last one mile and a half of Cesarewitch 
Course. (22 entrants, ft. declared for 7 — £S73) lOs.). 

Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, by Bay Ronald, 

10 St. . . . . . D. Maher i 

Mr. George Faber's Great Peter, 9 st. . B. Dillon 2 

Duke of Portland's Cattaro, 9 st. . . W. Earl 3 

Mr. H. G. Fenwick's Tocher, 8 st. . J. H. Martin o 

Betting. — 100 to 9 on Bayardo, 100 to 7 against 
Cattaro. Won by three-quarters length ; six lengths 
second and third. 

A consequence of this race was to make 
people imagine that Great Peter must be a better 

99 



GALICIA : HER FORBEARS 

horse than he was in fact, and a good deal of 
money was therefore lost on him, for he never 
won afterwards under Jockey Club Rules, though 
when put to jumping he was fairly successful 
in carrying off minor stakes. 

Bayardo went on to Chester to run for the 
Vase, which during the last few years has usually 
attracted a few good animals, and here there was 
a sensational finish. 

Chester, 1910. 

Chester Vase of ;;^2000 (a Vase value i^ioo and remain- 
der in specie), of which owner of second received 
;^200 and of third £100; nominator of winner 
;^I2 5, of second ^^50, and of third £2$ ; by sub- 
scription of ;£i for three-year-olds or £2 for four- 
year-olds ; if left in after October 13,1 908, a further 
;^I0 for three-year-olds ; if left in after March 31, 
1908, a further ;^io for four-year-olds; if left in 
after March 30, 1909, a further ;^io for each ; and 
if left in after January 4, 1910, a further £8 for 
each ; with ;^293 added. One mile and a half. 
(149 entrants, viz. 12 at £30, 10 at ;£29, 12 at 
^1^22, 12 at £21, 26 at £12, 12 at j^ii, 32 at £2, 
and 33 at £\ — ;^I595-) 

Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, by Bay Ronald, 4 yrs., 

9 St. 9 lb D. Maher i 

Lord Michelham's William the Fourth, 4 

yrs., 9 St. 7 lb. . . . . B. Dillon 2 

Mr. D. M'Calmont's Malpas, 3 yrs., 6 st. 

13 lb. . . . . . .J. Evans 3 

Mr. Reid Walker's Duke Michael, 4 yrs., 

8 St. 4 lb. . . ... . W. Higgs o 

100 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

Mr. L. de Rothschild's Santa Fina, 3 yrs., 

7 St. 6 lb H. Watts o 

Duke of Westminster's Kalvemor, 3 yrs., 

7 St. 4 lb. . . . . . F. Fox o 

Betting. — 5 to i on Bayardo, 10 to i against William 
the Fourth, 100 to 6 Santa Fina. Won by a head; three- 
quarters length second and third. 

William the Fourth had not been out since 
the previous Ascot, when he won the Ascot 
Derby from three moderate opponents. He 
had, however, been doing well under the charge 
of Mr. Gwyn Saunders-Davies at Michel Grove, 
and if the quotation of the betting is accurate 
some people were willing to take 10 to i against 
him, which seemed a rash proceeding before the 
start. William the Fourth only ran once after- 
wards, and during the three seasons he was in 
training only won the single race at Ascot. Of 
course, seeing how near he was in the Derby, 
his friends protested that he "ought to have won " 
it. Such protestations are common, though at 
the same time it must be admitted that of late 
years the Derby has on several occasions been 
won by horses who could not have been the best 
in the race. 

Bayardo, so far from frightening away rivals 
in the Gold Cup, was one of the largest field 
which had ever started for that trophy since the 

lOI 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

contest for it was originated in 1807. It is very 
seldom in its history that the starters have run 
into double figures. The Marquis of Hastings' 
Lecturer was one of ten in 1867, and it was not 
until 1902, William the Third's year, when eleven 
went to the post, that double figures were again 
reached. The reason is obvious : so very few 
horses have any pretensions to win, and their 
owners do not consider it worth while to submit 
them to the ordeal of the necessarily severe pre- 
paration for a hopeless task. 

In 1910, however, Bayardo was one of a field 
of thirteen. In the two previous years there 
had been half a dozen starters, and there was 
the same number the year following. Consider- 
ing Bayardo's record the ring seems to have been 
extraordinary liberal in laying 7 to 4 against him. 
This was due to the fact that doubts must always 
exist as to the ability of a horse to last two miles 
and a half until he has proved his ability to do 
so, though Alec Taylor, who had charge of 
Bayardo, has been strikingly successful in training 
the winners of long-distance races — as his father 
was before him — and his confidence in the son 
of Bay Ronald was supreme. That Mr. Louis 
Winans's Sir Martin should have been backed at 
9 to 2 must be considered strange, for Joseph 

Cannon did not appear to be entirely satisfied 

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AND HER OFFSPRING 

that the American colt would stay, as he proved 
quite unable to do, and I suspect that he never 
recovered from the effect of his exertions. It is 
rather the exception for an American-bred horse 
to stay. Sir Martin, however, had been tried, 
in the opinion of his experienced trainer, good 
enough to win the Derby, and that there was no 
mistake about the trial was sufficiently demon- 
strated by the fact of his having had little diffi- 
culty in beating so good a horse as Bachelor's 
Double, to say nothing of Louviers who had 
lost the Derby by only a head, in the Coronation 
Cup at Epsom over the Derby course. Louviers 
finished nearly six lengths behind Sir Martin in 
the Epsom race, Batchelor's Double beaten a 
length and a half. 

Few years pass in which some French owners 
do not send over in the hope of winning the Gold 
Cup, and their efforts have on various occasions 
been successful — with Maxim II in 1903, Elf II 
in 1898, Verneuil in 1878, Boiard in 1874, Henry 
in 1872, Mortemer in 1871, and Gladiateur in 1866. 
Two French horses arrived to run against Bayardo, 
one with the disagreeable name of Sea Sick II, a 
colt who had much distinguished himself in his 
own country, and Aveu, of whom much less was 
thought. Sea Sick II, a son of Elf II whose name 

has just been mentioned, had won half a dozen 

103 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

races in France in eight attempts as a three-year- 
old, and had been second for the valuable Prix 
du President de la Republique, worth nearly 
;^50oo. He was a great stayer. One of his suc- 
cesses had been in the Prix de Longchamps, two 
miles and a furlong, another in the Prix de 
Chantilly over a slightly longer course, a third, 
the Prix Gladiateur, a few yards short of four 
miles. That he had retained his form was shown 
by a couple of victories gained shortly before his 
visit to Ascot, and it may be noted that on his 
return to France, in his first essay there, he took 
the Prix de Longchamps for the second time. 
He was, indeed, strongly fancied for the Cup at 
Ascot. 

Ascot, 19 10. 

Gold Cup, value ^500, with ;^3 500 in specie, added to a 
Sweepstakes of ;^20 each, h. ft., of which second 
received £yoo and third ;^300 ; for entire colts and 
fillies, three years old and upwards. Two miles and 
a half, starting at the Cup Post and going once round. 
(59 entrants — ^^3700.) 

Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, by Bay Ronald, 

4 yrs., 9 St. . . . D. Maher i 
Mr. W. K. Vanderbilt's Sea Sick II, 

5 yrs., 9 St. 4 lb. . . . F. O'Neill 2 
Mr. W. W. Bailey's Bachelor's Double, 

4 yrs., 9 St. . . . . H. Randall 3 

Mr. J. B. Joel's Pure Gem, 6 yrs., 9 st. 41b. Walt. Griggs o 
Lord Michelham's Southanan, 6 yrs., 

9 St. 4 lb. . . . . . H. Stokes o 

104 




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AND HER OFFSPRING 



Mr. W. Hall Walker's Royal Realm 

5 yrs., 9 St. 4 lb. 
Mr. A. Aumont's Aveu, 4 yrs., 9 st. 
Mr. C. S. Donnelly's Buckwheat, 4 yrs. 

9 St. 

Mr. H. J. King's Carrousel, 4 yrs., 9 st 
Lord Michelham's William the Fourth 

4 yrs., 9 St. . 
Mr. L. Winans's Sir Martin, 4 yrs., 9 st 
Mr. Carl Meyer's Apache, 3 yrs., 7 st 

7 lb. (car. 7 St. 8 lb.) . 
Mr. J. A. de Rothschild's Bronzino, 3 

yrs., 7 St. 7 lb. . 



Wm. Griggs 
C. Childs 

W. Saxby 
H. Jones 

B. Dillon 

J. H. Martin 

C. Trigg 
F. Fox 



Betting. — 7 to 4 against Bayardo, 9 to 2 Sir Martin, 
6 to I Sea Sick II, 7 to i Bachelor's Double, 100 to 9 
William the Fourth, 100 to 7 Buckwheat, 100 to 6 Avue, 
25 to I each Apache and Bronzino. Won by four lengths ; 
head second and third. 

Bayardo's victory was gained in the most 
brilliant and convincing fashion. When Maher 
asked him to leave his horses he came to the 
front and cantered home without the semblance 
of effort. This finish for the Ascot Cup dwells 
in the memory, and, great as Bayardo's reputa- 
tion was, the race vastly raised and strengthened 
it. Only a great horse could win as he did. 

I may perhaps be allowed to reproduce the 
description I wrote of the event at the time : 

I am inclined to fancy that Bayardo astonished 
everybody last week. Of course, Mr. Fairie has 

105 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

always had a tremendous opinion of his horse, 
and Alec Taylor has seen him every day for years 
past. They must have known something like 
what he was ; but nothing" that happens on a 
horse's own training ground can demonstrate just 
what he will do in the course of a race for the 
Ascot Cup against a good representative field. 
That is the point — the "good representative 
field." At home perhaps the Cup horse gallops 
with a couple of others, and there is something 
to jump in and lead him for the last mile. You 
never get the conditions in private that you get 
in public, and that is why I doubt whether any- 
body could be confident Bayardo had it in him to 
give the electrifying exhibition which will make 
his victory memorable. Why Maher has ridden 
him in the style with which we were familiar 
before Ascot it is utterly impossible to guess. 
On the morning of the Cup Day an owner who 
is among the very best judges of horses and 
racing that I ever met, and who, moreover, 
happens to be particularly well acquainted with 
the Manton stable, replied to my question whether 
he intended to back Bayardo with an unhesitating 
negative, and he added, '*I will never back a 
horse that is not genuine for an Ascot Cup!" 
That was the impression of Bayardo that he 

entertained. It may be that all Maher's wins on 

1 06 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

Bayardo have been miracles of unexampled genius 
in the way of jockeyship. The effect they have 
had is that just indicated. He has always striven 
to keep the colt behind others, and the well-nigh 
universally accepted explanation was that he 
"did not want to let Bayardo see what he had to 
do." There can be no sort of doubt that if any 
accident had prevented Bayardo from running* 
for the Cup he would have left the Turf under a 
strong suspicion of being a rogue, or at least of 
having a decided tendency to roguishness, and 
this because of the way in which Maher has been 
pleased to ride him. 

Now we all know how utterly unjust such a 
suspicion would be. No horse that ever trod on 
racing plates could have given a more gallant 
and impressive exhibition. The days have long 
since passed when French horses were lightly 
esteemed, and a particularly accomplished trainer's 
opinion with regard to Sea Sick H was that he 
would prove invincible. He stays, he has speed, 
he had never been so well in his life. He was 
genuine, and in France they knew, or thought 
they knew, all about Bayardo's suspected inclina- 
tion to turn it up if he saw a long stretch of 
galloping ground in front of him. It has now 
been proved that he has not this inclination ; but 

why on earth has Maher apparently been so 

107 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

careful to persuade us that he has had ? I am 
quite certain that the suspicion would have influ- 
enced his stud prospects. However, there was 
Sea Sick to beat, and was there not also Sir 
Martin ? I have often commented on the fact 
that American horses do not stay. That is now 
a commonplace. But Americans who knew most 
about Sir Martin were persuaded that he was an 
exception. Many people, on the ground that 
American horses do not stay, would not back 
him for the Coronation Cup. He won over that 
mile and a half course in a canter, which certainly 
suggested that he could have gone on a much 
longer way. Of course, it is very easy to declare 
that a son of Ogden was sure not to last over the 
Ascot Cup course ; but this absurdly obvious cir- 
cumstance was not realised till everyone had seen 
Sir Martin tailed off. Doubtlessa mile and ahalf 
at Epsom and two miles and a half at Ascot are 
different things ; nevertheless, in the face of 
Bayardo and of Sea Sick, a great many men, not 
necessarily all fools, took 4 to i about Sir Martin ; 
and a good many writers about racing, not con- 
genital idiots, expounded the opinion that his 
chance was a great one. A rank non-stayer 
would not have won the Coronation Cup without 
an effort. 

Sir Martin at home had galloped the Cup 
108 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

distance unfalteringly ; but that is the point dis- 
cussed above — to do this at home is one thing, 
to do it in a veritable Cup race is another. 
Bachelor's Double, on the other hand, had been 
trained for the Hunt Cup mile, and simply for this 
reason it was hard to imagine that he could stay 
sufficiently well to be dangerous. If he should 
be trained for the Gold Cup next year, it is far 
from unlikely that he may win it ; but it would 
require an equine marvel to carry off this Cup 
without a preparation, and it is most astonishing 
that he should have got where he did. Nobody 
out of the William the Fourth stable credited 
him with being nearly good enough, though his 
owner's refusal to pick up the Triennial on Tues- 
day, which the colt could not have missed, 
betokened faith. It is not the first time that the 
substance has been lost for the sake of the 
shadow. Men who, as it now appears, should 
have been wiser, backed Buckwheat both ways. 
He was '' a better horse than people thought," I 
was assured. Beyond these it seemed quite need- 
less to look. Pure Gem could not possibly be 
regarded as a Cup horse, nor could Royal Realm, 
though it is open to those with a fancy for support- 
ing outsiders to add, ''Nor could Bomba last 
year, or Throwaway, who was better than Bomba, 

surely, a few years before." This would be a 

109 



GALICIA : HER FORBEARS 

retort rather difficult to answer effectively ; for if 
you replied, "That sort of thing is not likely to 
happen again," there was the answer, " It was 
not in the least likely to happen last year ; only 
it did!" 

It is rather quaint to see a horse conscientiously 
making running for a stable companion to whom 
the pacemaker's efforts are not of the remotest 
service. Southanan performed this duty for 
William the Fourth, who could not take the least 
advantage of it ; and it may be incidentally re- 
marked that placing William the Fourth to win 
races will not be easy, for he is likely to find 
something to beat him in the Cups, and as for a 
handicap, his having run Bayardo to a head at 
2 lb. will ensure him plenty of poundage. I do 
not know if it is true that he has broken down. 
Sea Sick's jockey was not afraid to make use of 
him, and when Southanan retired, having had 
enough of it, the French horse went on. Unless 
Bayardo could really stay (my friend the good 
judge mentioned above finally backed him be- 
cause he looked so beautiful), the race must go 
to France; O'Neill was bent on running them 
out of it if it was to be done ; and meantime, 
where were Bayardo and Sir Martin ? Maher 
had been much nearer last than first for half the 

journey, and it was not till about a mile from 

no 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

home that somebody near me remarked, '* Bay- 
ardo is g^oing up a bit." He had improved his 
position and was fifth or sixth — which seems an 
odd thing- to write of a race for an Ascot Cup, 
the average number of runners being about four. 
Then, some six furlongs from home, Bayardo 
shot out in a fashion which can only be described 
as phenomenal. Maher had won in half a dozen 
strides. Of course, there was a good distance 
still to go, but practically the race was over. 
Bayardo led round the bend, sweeping on with 
effortless ease. Sea Sick was by no means done 
with. He still galloped steadily on without the 
least sign of flagging ; Bachelor's Double evoked 
profound amazement by sticking resolutely to the 
Frenchman, and for the matter of that we had seen 
on Wednesday what speed the Irishman possessed. 
But their endeavours to live with Bayardo 
were really absurd. It had been asked whether 
he could stay. Here he was, after going over 
two miles in time which misses the Cup record 
by the fraction of a second, striding out as freely 
and freshly as if the race were just beginning. 
But oh ! why has Maher done such cruel injus- 
tice to the horse and allowed such a totally false 
view of him to gain currency? His refusals to 
go to the post at Newmarket, more than once 

obliging his jockey to take him round by the 

1 1 1 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

back of the stands, were put down to an idea 
that he "did not like racing." Last year we 
saw how Maher jammed him into the heels of 
other horses. He looked so magnificent at Ascot 
that it seemed folly to back anything else to beat 
him, and I had previously expressed a conviction 
that he would win for reasons which I gave — a 
defeat would do him much more harm than a 
victory (an ordinary win, not such a splendid 
achievement as we witnessed) would do him 
good, and he would never be allowed to start 
unless no doubt were felt about his being at his 
best and certainly able to get the course. That 
it is excessively difficult to make sure of this last 
fact at home I have admitted ; but in that respect 
Alec Taylor seems to get at the truth as his father 
did before him. The record of Manton in long- 
distance races has been extraordinarily good, 
and this season the Chester Cup, Ascot Stakes, 
the Northumberland Plate, and above all the 
Gold Cup, have to be added to the long list. 
It is certain that Bayardo is now regarded in a 
way vastly different from that which obtained 
before Ascot. " I didn't quite like the style in 
which he won his race at Newmarket," some one 
said to me in the paddock on Thursday, just 
before the Cup. "Why, surely he beat Great 
Peter easily enough ? " I replied ; and his answer 

112 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

was a hesitating' " Yes — I suppose he did." 
The Chester race did want a deal of explaining 
away. Every one will now most readily accord 
Bayardo a place among the very best known in 
the history of the Turf. 

So I wrote when the impression was fresh on 
me, and now to resume once more. 

Bayardo's next engagement was in the Dul- 
lingham Plate at the Newmarket Second July 
Meeting, and Mr. Fairie thought that he might 
as well annex it, as he did with sufficient ease. 

Newmarket, 1910. 

DuLLiNGHAM Plate of ;^iooo, of which sccond received 
.^100 and third £$0 ; by subscription of ;^20, or ;^5 
if declared, with ;^S I 5 added ; for three-year-olds and 
upwards. Suffolk Stakes Course, one mile and a half. 
(37 entrants, viz. 20 at ;^20 and 17 at ;^5 — ;!{^830.) 

Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, by Bay Ronald, 

4 yrs., 10 St. 8 lb. . . . D. Maher i 
Duke of Portland's The Spaniard, 3 yrs., 

7 St. 1 2 lb. . . . C. Trigg 2 

Mr. W. Hall Walker's Royal Realm, 

5 yrs., 10 St. I lb. . . . Wm. Griggs 3 
Mr. H. S. Gray's Gog, 3 yrs., 8 st. i lb. F. Wells o 
Mr. P. Nelke's Lagos, 5 yrs., 10 st. 6 lb. B. Dillon o 
Mr. C. S. Donnelly's Buckwheat, 4 yrs., 

10 St. 4 lb. . . . . W. Saxby o 

Betting. — 8 to i on Bayardo, 100 to 6 against Royal 
Realm, 20 to i The Spaniard, 50 to i each Lagos and 
Buckwheat, 500 to i Gog. Won by a length ; five lengths 
second and third. 

113 H 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

He was not sent to Liverpool for the Atlantic 
Stakes in which he had been engaged, it being 
settled that his next race should be the Good- 
wood Cup ; and this was a tragedy. It is natural 
that the history of racing should contain few 
instances of horses who have been beaten with 
odds of 20 to I on them. In such a case, as a 
matter of course, the affair looks an absolutely 
foregone conclusion ; on the other hand, what is 
called the "glorious uncertainty" of racing at 
times leads to the most amazing results, as it 
did here. 

Goodwood, 1910. 

Goodwood Cup of ;^iooo (50 gs. of which was in plate), 
with a Sweepstakes of ;^20 each, h. ft. (to fund) ; 
second received i^200 and third ;^ioo out of the 
stakes ; for three-year-olds and upwards. Two and 
a half miles. (33 entrants — jCy 40.) By permission 
of the Stewards of the Jockey Club the starting gate 
was dispensed with for this race. 

Mr. H. E. Beddington's Magic, by 

Martagon, 3 yrs., 7 st. 2 lb. . F. Rickaby, jun. i 

Mr. Fairie's Bayardo, 4 yrs., 9 st. 

10 lb D. Maher 2 

Mr. J. A. de Rothschild's Bud, 3 yrs., 

7 St. 4 lb. . F. Fox 3 

Betting. — 20 to i on Bayardo, 20 to i against Magic. 
Won by a neck ; bad third. 

It seemed as if there could be no occasion for 

Bayardo to gallop. Magic had not run as a two- 

114 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

year-old and as a three had done little. He had, 
indeed, finished second, beaten only a head, for 
the Wood Ditton Stakes at the Newmarket 
Craven Meeting ; but the winner, a moderate 
animal, Rock Lane, was giving him 5 lb. In 
the Gold Vase at Ascot he had by no means 
distinguished himself, and the idea that he had 
the faintest chance of beating Bayardo appeared 
altogether too preposterous to be for a moment 
entertained. Mr. Beddington had told me that 
he was not altogether without hope, but as for 
this, an owner is frequently apt wildly to exag- 
gerate the capacity of his horse. Weight-for-age 
over two miles and five furlongs in July is barely 

20 lb. : at two miles it is 18 lb., at three miles 

21 lb. Here it will be seen Magic was in receipt 
of 36 lb., but this in no way altered the prac- 
tically universal opinion as to the chance of the 
younger colt. After the race it occurred to some 
of the critics that Bayardo was not looking 
himself; before the start this opinion was not 
heard. Magic never won afterwards, and truly 
his career was a strange one — to have taken a 
single race and that from Bayardo ! It was the 
last appearance of Mr. Fairie's champion, a 
summary of whose achievements may be given. 



1 1 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 



As A Two- Year-Old. 

The New Stakes, Ascot 

The National Breeders' Produce Stakes, 

Sandown .... 
The Richmond Stakes, Goodwood . 
The Buckenham Stakes, Newmarket 
The Rous Memorial Stakes . 
The Middle Park Plate 
The Dewhurst Plate . 



. ;^i,8i7 


10 





t 

. 4,357 








652 








1,500 








730 








. 2,505 








• 1,477 








.^13,038 


10 






As A Three-Year-Old. 

The Two Thousand Guineas . . £ 

The Derby ..... 

The Prince of Wales's Stakes, Ascot 

The Sandringham Foal Stakes, Sandown 

The Eclipse Stakes .... 

The Duchess of York Plate, Hurst Park 

The St. Leger ..... 

The Doncaster Stakes 

The Champion Stakes, Newmarket 

The Lowther Stakes .... 

The Sandown Foal Stakes . 

The Limekiln Stakes .... 

The Liverpool St. Leger 



116 



. 2,150 








1,724 








8,870 








979 








. 6,450 








475 








900 








470 








. 1,724 








425 








630 








^24,797 









AND HER OFFSPRING 



As A Four-Year-Oli 


3. 






The Goodwood Cup 


. £ 


. . 




The Newmarket Biennial 


573 


10 





The Chester Vase 


• 1,595 








The Ascot Cup .... 


• 3»7oo 








The Dullingham Plate . 


830 









;^6,698 10 o 

The total of Bayardo's winnings therefore 
amounted to ;{^44,534. 

What a horse accumulates in stakes is no test 
of his merits. There are three who have exceeded 
Bayardo's aggregate — the late Colonel Harry 
M'Calmont's Isinglass is first with ^57,185, 
the Duke of Portland's Donovan follows with 
^54,935, and then comes the late Sir James 
Miller's Rock Sand with ^45,618. It is im- 
possible to judge the relative value of the vic- 
tories of horses who never came together directly 
or collaterally, who were separated from each 
other by periods of years. I have always strongly 
entertained the idea that Bayardo was certainly 
a far better animal than Rock Sand, basing the 
conviction to a great extent on the fact that Rock 
Sand showed himself a long way inferior to 
Sceptre and to Ard Patrick. Suggestions have 
been made to explain Bayardo's defeats in the 

Two Thousand Guineas and the Derby. As 

117 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

regards the Goodwood Cup, his third failure in 
the twenty-five races for which he started, it can 
only be said that the form was manifestly alto- 
gether wrong. 

When Bayardo was at the height of his fame 
I asked Mr. Fairie one day how he came to name 
the horse, and he kindly sent me the explanation 
which I have thought it interesting to reproduce 
in facsimile. 



ii8 




^^ ^^ Am'/ ^^iy-u^ ^ /i^n^ A 4^rn^ 



A ^ ^^yyi,r^L^y /tX: ^^ ^^4^, 

^^ ^^^t^u^^ A4^{:r >^:^ ^j^^t^^^ 



AND HER OFFSPRING 



CHAPTER IV 

LEMBERG 

In the year 1906 Galicia was sent to Cyllene, 
then standing at a fee of 100 guineas, which was 
increased to 300 guineas the following year, and 
the result was Lemberg, bay like his half-brother, 
a decidedly handsome colt when later on his 
make and shape developed, but perhaps some- 
what deficient in the peculiarly high quality 
which distinguished Bayardo. It was early 
ascertained that Lemberg could gallop. He was 
tried on the 8th June as follows : 

Lemberg, 2 yrs., 8 st. 8 lb. . . . Clark i 

Benwhat, 4 yrs., 8 st. 3 lb. . . . Hulse 2 

Seedcake, 4 yrs., 8 st. 8 lb. . . . Toon 3 

Maid of Corinth, 2 yrs., 8 st. 7 lb. . . Ault o 

Won easily by a length and a half; three lengths 
between second and third. 

Here, it will be perceived again, the trial was 

not a high one. Sir William Bass's Benwhat 

was a bad animal. I think he never won more 

than a single little j^ioo race. One? he was 

second to an extremely moderate three-year-old 

who gave him 32 lb. and a year. Seedcake had 

* 1 19 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

failed to win anything since he tried Bayardo 
twelve months previously. Maid of Corinth, the 
superbly bred daughter of Cyllene and Sceptre, 
had not run : she was to win two races later and 
to be twice second. 

Fortunately a programme had been mapped 
out for Lemberg to a great extent following the 
lines along which the elder had travelled to 
fame. His first appearance was made in the New 
Stakes at Ascot, no more than 2 to i being 
offered against him in a field of twelve ; against 
Bayardo, as we have seen, 7 to i was laid. A 
son of Sundridge, not at the time named, after- 
wards called Sunningdale, running as the Sweet 
Story colt, was almost in equal demand with 
Lemberg, the returned odds being 5 to 2. The 
idea that there was anything like equality be- 
tween them was speedily dispelled ; here Sunning- 
dale finished third, four lengths behind Catrail, 
one of Mr. Leopold de Rothschild's breeding, by 
St. Frusquin — Catkin, who never rose to the first 
rank. 

Ascot, 1909. 
New Stakes of ;^io each, with ;^iooo added, of which 
second received 10 per cent, and third 5 per cent.; 
for two-year-olds. Five furlongs. (138 entrants — 
;^20I3.) 
Mr. Fairie's Lemberg, by Cyllene, 8 st, 

10 lb B. Dillon i 

120 



I 




^XJ^ 



AND HER OFFSPRING 



Mr. Leopold de Rothschild's Catrail, 

8 St. I o lb. 
Mr. J. B. Joel's ch. c by Sundridge — 

Sweet Story, 8 st. lo lb. . 
Sir E. Cassel's Conte d'Hoffmann, 

8 St. 10 lb. 
Lord Derby's Decision, 8 st. lo lb. 
Mr. Sol Joel's Sunder, 8 st. lo lb. 
Mr. J. W. Larnach's ch. c. by Jeddah 

Game Hen, 8 st. lo lb. 
Mr. D. M'Calmont's Counterpoise, 8 st 

lo lb 

Mr. Barclay Walker's Lawrenny, 8 st 

10 lb 

Lord Ebury's Dumella, 8 st. lo lb. 
Mr. E. de St. Alary's Photime, 8 st 

7 lb 

Mr. W. Hall Walker's Lily Rose, 8 st 

7 lb 



O. Madden 



Walt. Griggs 3 



W. Halsey 
D. Maher 
F. Wootton 



A. Templeman o 
S. Donoghue o 



C. Heckford 
H. Randall 



Wm. Griggs o 
B. Lynham o 



Betting. — 2 to i against Lemberg, 5 to 2 Sweet 
Story c, 6 to I Decision, 10 to i Sunder, 100 to 9 
Lawrenny. Won by one and a half lengths ; four lengths 
second and third. Decision whipped round when the 
barrier went up. 

It will be seen that Lemberg won by a length 

and a half, precisely as Bayardo had done, and 

no sort of doubt existed that Mr. Fairie had 

found another good one. It seems strange that 

Lemberg should have been omitted from the 

National Breeders' Produce Stakes at Sandown. 

For this Mr. Fairie had only nominated one, 

King Midas, a son of Persimmon and Bona 

121 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

Dea, who was never more than a useful animal. 
Lemberg was in the Chesterfield Stakes, how- 
ever, at the Newmarket Second July, and for 
that he ran. 

Newmarket, 1909. 

Chesterfield Stakes of £t,0 each, 20 ft., of which 
second received ;^ioo, third saved stake; for two- 
year-olds. Chesterfield Course, last five furlongs of 
B.M. (43 entrants — -^750.) 

Mr. Fairie's Lemberg, by Cyllene, 9 st. 

3 lb. . . . . 

Mr. Leopold de Rothschild's Catrail, 8 st. 

10 lb. 

Mr. A. F. Basset's Prince Rupert, 9 st. 3 lb 
Mr. L. Neumann's Gallifet, 8 st. 10 lb. 
Lady de Bathe's Jeton, 8 st. 10 lb. . 

Betting. — 2 to i on Lemberg, 4 to i against Prince 
Rupert, 6 to i Catrail. Won by two lengths ; one and 
a half lengths second and third. 

That 2 to I was laid on Lemberg" affords 
evidence of the manner in which he had won at 
Ascot. Neither he nor Catrail had been out 
again prior to this Newmarket race, but though 
Catrail was receiving 7 lb. he was not supposed to 
have anything like a real chance. Mr. A. F. 
Basset's Prince Rupert was a colt of some pre- 
tensions. He had won the July Stakes at the 

previous Newmarket Meeting, and intermediately 

122 



D. Maher 


I 


0. Madden 


2 


W. Saxby 


3 


W. Smith 





F. Fox 






AND HER OFFSPRING 

the Champagne Stakes at the Bibury Club Meet- 
ing at Salisbury. 

Lemberg went to Goodwood as his brother had 
done, running, however, for the Rous Memorial 
instead of for the Richmond Stakes. When odds 
of 6 to I are laid on a horse every one under- 
stands what it means. 

Goodwood, 1909. 

Rous Memorial Stakes of i^20 each, h. ft. for acceptors, 
with ;^50o added for owner and i^ioo for nomi- 
nator of winner ; second received ;^ioo out of 
stakes ; for two-year-olds ; entrance ;^5, only ft. if 
declared, these fts. being added to the Rous Memorial 
Fund. T.Y.C., six furlongs. (79 entrants, ft. 
declared for 18 — £112$.) 

Mr. Fairie's Lemberg, by Cyllene, 9 st. 

6 lb D. Maher i 

Mr. W. Hall Walker's Lily Rose, 8 st. 

2 lb. (car. 8 st. 3 lb.) . . B. Lynham 2 

Mr. Ernest Dresden's Gaily Bawn, 

8 St. 2 lb. . . . . Walt. Griggs 3 

Captain Forester's b. c. by Cupbearer — 

Lady Drake, 8 st. 5 lb. . . W. Saxby o 

Betting. — 6 to i on Lemberg, 7 to i against Gaily 
Bawn. Won by three lengths ; head second and third. 

Gaily Bawn, the only one whose success was 
conceived possible, was not altogether without 
form. She had won her two previous races, the 
second of them, the Plantation Plate at New- 
market, in a field of twenty-three, and Colonel 

12X 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

Hall Walker's Lily Rose, to whom it will be seen 

Lemberg was giving a stone more than weight- 

for-age, was an animal of some capacity, for on 

the occasion of her next outing she won the 

Gimcrack Stakes, a race for which Mr. Fairie is 

not accustomed to enter, possibly — though as to 

this I am only guessing — from a disinclination to 

undertake a penalty of success, the making of a 

speech at the annual dinner of the Gimcrack 

Club. 

Lemberg was next sent to Doncaster for the 

Champagne Stakes, and the betting on this race 

tends again to prove what was thought of him. 

All his three opponents were good winners. Lord 

Rosebery's Neil Gow, indeed, had taken the 

National Breeders' Produce Stakes at Sandown 

after getting badly away in easy fashion by four 

lengths ; Major Eustace Loder's Admiral Hawke, 

an own brother to the famous Pretty Polly, had 

carried off the Chesterfield Stakes at Newmarket 

and the Lavant at Goodwood ; Mr. H. P. 

Whitney's Whisk Broom, accepted as one of the 

best colts who has ever come from America, 

had easily secured the Prince of Wales's Plate at 

York. That odds of 15 to 8 should have been 

laid on Lemberg against such opponents is 

certainly a testimony to character ; but this was to 

be his one failure in his first season. 

124 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

Doncaster, 1909.' 

Champagne Stakes of £^0 each, 20 ft., or ;^5 (to fund) if 
declared, with ;^iooo added, of which second received 
;^ioo and third -^50 ; for two-year-olds. Red 
House in, 5 furlongs 152 yards. (114 entrants, 
ft. declared for 78 — ^^"1580.) 



Lord Rosebery's Neil Gow, by Marco 

9 St. 

Major Eustace Loder's Admiral Hawke 

9 St. 

Mr. Fairie's Lemberg, 9 st. 

Mr. H. P. Whitney's Whisk Broom, 9 st 



D. Maher i 

B. Dillon 2 

H. Jones 3 

J. H. Martin o 



Betting. — i 5 to 8 on Lemberg, 6 to i against Admiral 
Hawke and Neil Gow, 7 to i Whisk Broom. Won by 
one and a half lengths ; length second and third. 

It was afterwards demonstrated that between 
Lemberg and Neil Gow there was practically 
nothing- to choose ; here Lord Rosebery's colt 
beat him by two lengths and a half, form which 
was unquestionably wrong, and what added 
stronger proof of this was the position of Admiral 
Hawke, whom no one would rank with the son 
of Galicia. Lemberg's last three races were pre- 
cisely the same as those which Bayardo had 
taken. In the Rous Memorial at the Newmarket 
First October, Bayardo had met one altogether 
unworthy antagonist ; Lemberg was not to have 
quite so easy a task. 

125 



GALICIA : HER FORBEARS 

Newmarket, 1909. 

Rous Memorial Stakes of ^^15 each, 10 ft. for acceptors, 
with £S^'^ added for owner and ;^iOO for nominator 
of winner ; for two-year-olds ; second received £$0 
out of stakes ; entrance £$, only ft. if declared. Rous 
Course, five furlongs. (59 entrants, ft. declared for 
23 — ^^920.) The Rous Memorial Fund received 20 
per cent, of the value of the race, after calculating 
under Rule 117. 

Mr. Fairie's Lemberg, by Cyllene, 9 st. 
3 lb 

Lord Durham's Rochester, 8 st. 10 lb. . 

Mr. P. Nelke's Yellow Slave, 8 st. 
1 1 lb 

Mr. J. H. Houldsworth's Cedrus, 8 st. 
10 lb 

Mr. L. Neumann's GalHfet, 8 st. 10 lb. 

Mr. Leopold de Rothschild's Catrail, 8 st. 
10 lb 

Betting. — 2 to i on Lemberg, 3 to i against Yellow 
Slave, 100 to 7 Catrail. Won by a neck ; three lengths 
second and third. 

Lord Durham's Rochester, a son of Rock 

Sand and Caparison, had been talked about for 

some time previously, though the betting does 

not indicate any fancy for him, notwithstanding 

that Maher was riding. Mr. Nelke's Yellow 

Slave had shown herself a smart filly, having 

won four of the six races for which she had been 

out and finished second in the other two ; but 

she gave Lemberg no trouble. As for Rochester, 

126 



B. Dillon 


I 


D. Maher 


2 


W. Sax by 


3 


B. Lynham 





Walt. Griggs 





0. Madden 






AND HER OFFSPRING 



this was his only race as a two-year-old. He 
won the Column Produce Stakes by half a dozen 
lengths at his next appearance, as a three- 
year-old, but was only out twice more during 
that season, his trainer finding it impossible to 
get him quite right. 

Whisk Broom had been going on so remark- 
ably well in the autumn that Joyner, his really 
accomplished trainer, was not without some hope 
of winning the Middle Park Plate ; and the 
American colt by no means disgraced himself. 
Newmarket, 1909. 

Middle Park Plate of ;^iooo, added to a Sweepstakes of 
^30 each, 20 ft., of which second received ^200 
and third ;^ioo ; for two-year-olds; entrance ;^50. 
Bretby Stakes Course, six furlongs. (114 entrants 
— ;^3025.) 

Mr, Fairie's Lemberg, by Cyllene, 9 st 
3 lb 

Mr. H. P. Whitney's Whisk Broom, 9 st 

Major Eustace Loder's Admiral Hawke 

9 St. 3 lb. . 
Duke of Portland's Merry Jack, 9 st 

3 lb. . 

Mr. J. B. Joel's Pasquita, 9 st. 
Mr. J. W. Larnach's ch. c. by Jeddah — 

Game Hen, 8 st. 10 lb. 
Mr. J. B. Thorneycroft's Sloanston, 8 st 

10 lb 

Mr. L. Neumann's Moyglare, 8 st. 7 lb 

Betting. — 7 to 4 against Lemberg, 7 to 2 Whisk 
127 



D. Maher i 

J. H. Martin 2 

B. Dillon 3 

W. Earl o 

Walt. Griggs o 

W. Saxby o 

J. Williamson o 

F. Wootton o 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

Broom, 4 to i Admiral Hawke, 7 to i Moyglare, 100 to 
8 Merry Jack. Won by a neck ; three-quarters of a length 
second and third. 

Maher was, however, again riding- Lemberg, 
as he had done in the Chesterfield Stakes and at 
Goodwood, whenever, indeed, he was not claimed 
by Lord Rosebery or any other owner who had 
secured his services, and though winning by a 
neck is not without a distinct element of risk, 
especially on the wide Newmarket course, there 
is no doubt that the distance by which he beat 
Whisk Broom could have been greatly aug- 
mented. This was, in fact, shown unmistakably 
in the Dewhurst Plate. 

Dewhurst Plate, for two-year-olds. £1 ^zy. 
Seven furlongs. 

Mr. Fairie's Lemberg, 9 st. 5 lb. . . Maher i 

Mr. H. P. Whitney's Whisk Broom, 

8 St. 13 lb. . . . .J. H. Martin 2 

Betting. — 1 1 to 4 on Lemberg. Won by five lengths. 
I minute 3i| seconds. 

It will be observed that here Lemberg was 
giving 6 lb. instead of 3 lb. as in the Middle 
Park Plate, and the neck in the former race was 
now extended to five lengths. The Champagne 
Stakes had marred what would otherwise have 
been a record of complete success. 

Lemberg's first appearance as a three-year- 
128 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

old was made in the Two Thousand Guineas, a 
race for which there have frequently been sen- 
sationally close finishes ; and this was to be 
another. Partly because Neil Gow had already 
been out and had easily won the Craven Stakes, 
partly because he was ridden by Maher, he 
started a better favourite than Lemberg. The 
finish was, however, considerably closer than the 
betting indicated. 

Newmarket, 19 lO. 
Two Thousand Guineas Stakes of ;^ 100 each, h. ft., for 

entire colts and fillies, foaled in 1 907 ; colts 9 St., 

fillies 8 St. 9 lb. ; second received ^400 and third 

i^200 out of stakes. R.M. (125 entrants — ^6200.) 
Lord Rosebery's ch. c. Neil Gow, by 

Marco, 9 st. . . . . D. Maher i 

Mr. Fairie's b. c. Lemberg, 9 st. , . B. Dillon 2 
Mr. H. P. Whitney's ch. c. Whisk Broom, 

9 St. J. H. Martin 3 

Major Eustace Loder's ch. c. Admiral 

Hawke, 9 st. . . . . W. Saxby o 

Mr. J. Buchanan's b. c. Tressady, 9 st. . W. Higgs o 
Mr. W. M. Cazalet's b. c. San Antonio, 

9 St. . . . . . H. Jones o 

Lord Durham's b. c. Rochester, 9 st. . H. Randall o 

Capt. F. Forester's b. c. Placidus, 9 st. . G. Stern o 
Mr. J. A. de Rothschild's ch. c. Bronzino, 

9 St. . . . . . M. Henry o 

Mr. J. A. de Rothschild's br. c. Nankeen, 

9 St. . . . . . F. Fox o 

Sir R. W. B. Jardine's br. c. Sanctuary, 

9 St. . . . . . . Wm. Griggs o 

129 I 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

Mr. G. A. Prentice's ch. c. Montreal, 9 st. R. Keeble o 
Mr. St. Aubyn's b. c. Cardinal Beaufort, 

9 St. . . . . . C. Trigg o 

Betting. — 2 to i against Neil Gow, 7 to 2 Lemberg, 
6 to I Tressady, 100 to 8 Rochester, 100 to 7 Admiral 
Hawke and Whisk Broom, 100 to 6 Placidus, 25 to i 
Sanctuary and San Antonio. Won by a short head ; two 
lengths second and third. 

The two horses were very close together, so 
much so that Dillon was unable to use his whip 
in his right hand, and at any rate an idea existed 
that Mr. Fairie's colt was somewhat unlucky to 
have been beaten, that the result would have been 
different had the jockeys been reversed, which 
may or may not have been the case. The chief 
result of the struggle was to add interest to the 
coming Derby, and there was a rough gallop 
— Alec Taylor employs this term instead of 
describing it as a trial — at Manton on the 28th 
of May, the distance a mile and three-quarters, 
not the mile and a half that might have been 
expected : 



Rose I 

Mildenhall 2 
Murray 3 
Clark 4 

Baker o 



Lemberg, 3 yrs., 8 st. i lb. . 
Maid of Corinth, 3 yrs., 8 st. 5 lb. . 
Rosedrop, 3 yrs., 8 st. 5 lb. . 
Bayardo, 4 yrs,, 9 st. 8 lb. . 
Orphah, 5 yrs., 9 st. 8 lb. 

"Lemberg went much the best. Maid of 

Corinth and Rosedrop, who ran lazily, finished 

together. Bayardo went with no dash at any 

130 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

part of the gallop. Orphah jumped in and 
brought them along the last seven furlongs, 
finishing second." It will be understood that he 
is not placed there in the record as he was not in 
the spin all the way. It is not a little surprising 
to find the fillies giving Lemberg weight. He 
and Bayardo, it will be observed, were running at 
exactly weight for age. 

Neither Lemberg nor Neil Gow was out 
between their Newmarket struggle and Epsom, 
where the betting on the Derby certainly sug- 
gested that the Two Thousand was considered 
anything but a trustworthy guide. There were 
rumours to the effect that Neil Gow had not been 
doing particularly well in the brief interval between 
the races, but he was firm in the market at 1 1 to 4 ; 
a great many of his backers were, in fact, con- 
tent to take less, and it may safely be assumed 
that there was not much the matter with him, 
nor indeed was he far off at the finish. Lord 
Villiers' Greenback in getting to Lemberg's neck 
did much better than there had seemed reason to 
anticipate. He had won the March Stakes a few 
weeks before, and his two-year-old performances 
had been unmistakably good : he was out ten 
times, won six of his races and was second for 
three of the others ; but his victories had not 
been in the stakes which raise their winners 

131 



GALICIA : HER FORBEARS 

quite to the front rank, though they had been of 
sufficient account to bring in £^^^^. There was 
nothing discreditable to Lemberg in being pressed 
by a colt of that capacity, for Greenback won 
his next three races, including the Prince of 
Wales's Stakes at Ascot and the Royal Stakes 
at Newbury, in which latter he beat Mr. Waldorf 
Astor's good filly Winkipop by three parts 
of a length, third, a neck behind, being Mr. 
C. E. Howard's Willonyx, to whom Greenback 
was giving 1 1 lb. It must be added, however, 
that Willonyx was far better as a four-year-old 
than he had been as a three. One feels, never- 
theless, that Greenback was not, as a matter of 
real merit, within a neck of Lemberg. 

Epsom, 1 910. 

One Hundred and Thirty-first Renewal of the Derby 
Stakes of £6^00 (including ;^500 for nominator of 
winner), with ^400 for second and ;i^200 for third, 
by subscription of £S0 each, h. ft., or £$ if declared, 
with £6^0 added ; for three-year-olds, entire colts and 
fillies ; colts 9 st., fillies 8 st. 9 lb. About a mile and 
a half. (371 entrants, viz. i 5 at ;^5o, 195 at £2$, 
and 161 at ^5 — ^^^6450.) 

Mr. Fairie's b. c. Lemberg, by Cyllene, 

9 St. . . . . . B. Dillon I 

Lord Villier's b. c. Greenback, 9 st. . F. Templeman 2 
Mr. A. P. Cunliffe's b. c. Charles 

O'Malley, 9 st. . . . S. Donoghue 3 

Lord Rosebery's ch. c. Neil Gow, 9 st. D. Maher 4 

132 







'ZC'-a/i(j'J'(iMi,S: 



^-e^m^A^ y/ec/ x^n ,/^et Avtnnci^i^ /J/w.^ Q/i^Aly ^c^//^ 



AND HER OFFSPRING 



Mr. W. M. Cazalet's b. c. San Antonio, 
9 St. . 

Mr. E. A. Wigan's b. or br, c. Ulster 
King, 9 St 

Mr. St. Aubyn's b. c. Cardinal Beau- 
fort, 9 St. 

Major Eustace Loder's ch. c. Admiral 
Hawke, 9 st. . 

Mr. W. Hall Walker's b. c. Glaze- 
brook, 9 St. . 

Lord Derby's br. c. Swynford, 9 st. . 

Mr. J. J. Bell-Irving's b. or br. c. 
Rokeby, 9 st. . 

Mr. J. Wallis's ch. c. General Botha, 
9 St. . 

Mr. D. M'Calmont's b. or br. c. 
Malpas, 9 St. . 

Mr. J. B. Joel's b. c. Wildflower II, 
9 St. . 

Mr. H, S. Gray's ch. c. Gog, 9 st. 



H. Jones o 

G. Stern o 

C. Trigg o 

W. Saxby o 

A. Templeman o 

B. Lynham o 

Wm. Griggs o 

C. Foy o 

H. Randall o 

Walt. Griggs o 

F. Wells o 



Betting. — 7 to 4 against Lemberg, 1 1 to 4 Neil Gow, 
100 to 8 Admiral Hawke, Ulster King, and Greenback, 
33 to I Charles O'Malley, 40 to i Rokeby, 50 to i 
Swynford and Cardinal Beaufort, 66 to i Glazebrook and 
Malpas. Won by a neck ; two lengths second and third. 
Cardinal Beaufort dwelt and lost ground at the start. 
The Stewards called Wells before them to explain his 
reckless riding, and suspended him for the remainder of 
the Meeting, and reported him to the Stewards of the 
Jockey Club. The latter Stewards (Lord Durham acting 
for Lord Derby) having investigated the case, were of 
opinion that Wells' reckless riding was not intentional, 
but they cautioned him strongly as to his future 
riding. 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

Lembergf went to Ascot. He had three 
engagements — the Prince of Wales's Stakes, the 
St. James's Palace Stakes, and the Fifty-seventh 
Triennial. The second, of course by far the 
most valuable, being worth ^^2450, was chosen, 
and esteemed so great a certainty that odds of 
8 to I on him were laid. 

Ascot, 1 9 10. 

St. James' Palace Stakes of ^100 each, h. ft., with 

;6^300 added, of which second received ;^300 ; third 

saved stake ; for three-year-olds. Old Mile. (47 
entrants — ;i^2450.) 

Mr. Fairie's Lemberg, by Cyllene, 9 st. 
Mr. A. F. Basset's Prince Rupert, 9 st. 
Lord Derby's Swynford, 8 st. 7 lb. 
Mr. Reid Walker's Redwald, 8 st. 7 lb. 
Mr. August Belmont's Merry Task, 

8 St. 7 lb H. Watts o 

Mr. J. B. Joel's b. c, by Ayrshire — 

Yours, 8 St. 7 lb. . . . Walt. Griggs o 

Betting. — 8 to i on Lemberg, 10 to i against Swyn- 
ford. Won by three lengths ; length second and third. 

Afterwards it seemed somewhat strange that 
this should have been the price, in view of the 
circumstance that Lord Derby's Swynford was 
one of the other five runners and in receipt of 
7 lb. from Mr. Fairie's colt. The explanation 
of course is that Swynford was not ready. His 
first appearance of the season had been in the 

134 



D. 


Maher 


I 


H. 


Randall 


2 


F. 


Wootton 


3 


W 


. Higgs 






AND HER OFFSPRING 

Derby, when 50 to i was laid against him, 
and here it will be seen he was not even 
second. 

As regards Lemberg's unfortunate expedition 
to Paris for the Grand Prix, it can only be said 
that he did not show anything approaching to 
his true form. The journey, change of sur- 
roundings, &c., often affect horses adversely, and 
he must be rated as an example ; but I give 
details. 



Paris, 1 9 10. 

Grand Prix de Paris of ;i^i 4,406 for owner and i^8oo 
for breeder of winner, ;^I200 for owner of second, 
and ^600 for owner of third ; for three-year-olds. 
One mile seven furlongs. 



Nuage, by Simonian, 9 st. 2 lb. 


C. Childs 


I 


Reinhert, 9 st. 2 lb. . 


O'Neill 


2 


Bronzino, 9 st. 2 lb. . 


F. Fox 


3 


Charles O'Malley, 9 st. 2 lb. . 


S. Donoghue 


4 


Lemberg, 9 st. 2 lb. 


D. Maher 


5 


Sursis, 9 St. 2 lb. 


. M. Barat 





Secours, 9 st. 2 lb. 


Sharpe 





Or du Rhin II, 9 st. 2 lb. . 


P. Woodland 





Le Platine, 9 st. 2 lb. . 


R. Sauval 





Radis Rose, 9 st. 2 lb. 


J. Jennings 





Cadet Roussel III, 9 st. 2 lb. 


N. Turner 





Renard Bleu, 9 st. 2 lb. 


G. Bartholomew 





Cockfield, 9 St. 2 lb. . 


M. Henry 





La Frangaise, 8 st. i 3 lb. 


Wm. Griggs 





Marsa, 8 st. 1 3 lb. 


G. Stern 






135 



GALICIA : HER FORBEARS 

Hunyade, 9 st. 2 lb. . . . Bellhouse o 

Coquille, 8 st. 1 3 lb. . . . G. Clout o 

Won easily by three lengths ; three-quarters length 
second and third, half length third and fourth. 

Lemberg missed the Sandringham Foal Plate 

at Sandown, which would have been worth over 

;^i7oo, nor was he brought out for the Princess 

of Wales's Stakes at the Newmarket First July. 

He was also in the Zetland Stakes at the Second 

July Meeting, for which small event it was 

naturally not thought worth while to run him, it 

having been determined to keep him for the 

Eclipse, in which he was to meet his old 

antagonist, Neil Gow. It had been accepted as 

fact that Lord Rosebery's colt was not himself 

in the Derby, and in estimating chances at 

Sandown there was a reversion to the Two 

Thousand Guineas running, the question being 

whether, as alleged, Lemberg had suffered from 

interference when beaten a short head. The 

general idea that he ought to have won — with 

little or nothing to spare, doubtless, but still that 

with fair luck he would just have finished in 

front — was borne out by the betting on the 

Eclipse, in which it will be seen that Lemberg 

was just slightly preferred. Of the others, 

Placidus, though he had not done much in 

public, was reported able to do biggish things 

136 



f ^ 


-1 

u 

T. 


i ^ 


-< 


Y- ' 


v; 




;^ 


■« 


^(i 


*)''■ 


i; 




^ 




C/3 


>' 


.,, 


^^'^ 


'-• 




AND HER OFFSPRING 

at home, and he found a certain number of rash 
supporters in the face of the two favourites. 

A great race resulted. Sanguine backers of 
both Lemberg and Neil Gow persuaded them- 
selves during the moments before the numbers 
were hoisted that there was a head in favour 
of the colt on whom their hopes were fixed. 
Pessimists similarly supposed that the horse in 
whom they were interested was just beaten. 
After what seemed an unusually long time the 
verdict was given — a dead heat, the first in the 
history of the race, not a very long history, 
however — though some of the results had been 
extremely close. Thus Lemberg's name was 
written below that of his half-brother, but as 
one of a bracketed pair. 

Sandown Park, 1 9 i o. 

Twenty-third Renewal of the Eclipse Stakes of i^ 10,000, 
of which owner of second received £goo, of third 
j^ii5, nominator of winner ^^500, and nominator 
of second ;£ioo ; by subscription of j^5 each for 
three-year-olds if ft. declared by October 13, 1908, 
or ;£io for four- year-olds if declared by March 31, 
1908 ; if left in after those dates a further ;^2 1 
each; if left in after March 30, 1909, a further 
j^34 for three-year-olds or £^2 for four-year-olds; 
and if left in after January 4, 19 10, a further ^^55 
for three-year-olds or £^2 for four-year-olds ; with 
;^i809 added. Eclipse Stakes Course, one mile and 
a quarter. (192 entrants, viz. 30 at £11$, 14 
137 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

at ^^63, 26 at £60, 46 at £31, 18 at £26, 23 at 

£10, and 35 at £i^— -£2,770.) 
Mr. Fairie's Lemberg, by Cyllene, 3 yrs,, 

9 St. 2 lb. . . . . . B. Dillon o 

Lord Rosebery's Neil Gow, by Marco, 

3 yrs., 9 St. 2 lb. . . . • D. Maher o 

Captain F. Forester's Placidus, 3 yrs., 8 st. 

6 lb W. Saxby 3 

Mr. W. Astor's Mirador, 4 yrs., 9 st. 11 lb. H. Jones o 
Mr. W. Astor's Salamis, 3 yrs., 8 st. 6 lb. C. Trigg o 
Mr. G. A. Prentice's Montreal, 3 yrs., 8 st. 

6 lb. . . . . . .A. Taylor o 

Betting. — 5 to 4 against Lemberg, 6 to 4 Neil Gow, 
7 to I Placidus, 33 to i Mirador. A dead heat ; third 
beaten five lengths. Stakes divided. 

Lemberg- had of course been liberally entered. 
He was in the three chief races for which he was 
eligible at Liverpool, also the Duchess of York 
Plate and the Lennox Plate at Hurst Park ; but 
his owner had decided to have him trained for the 
Leger, and he was delivered at Doncaster fit and 
well, the last of the classics being regarded as so 
good a thing for him that odds of 5 to 4 on were 
laid. The only other one supposed to have any 
real chance was Swynford, though fillies have 
done such remarkable things at this period of the 
season that Mr. Waldorf Astor's Winkipop found 
backers at 10 to 1, and Sir William Bass's Rose- 
drop, winner of the Oaks — which it was main- 
tained, however, that Winkipop ought to have 

138 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

won — at loo to 7. Swynford was known to 
have come on extraordinarily since, as recorded, 
Lemberg" had so readily disposed of him in the 
St. James's Palace Stakes. That race had, 
indeed, brought him on sufficiently to enable 
him to win the Hardwicke Stakes next day, and 
Mr. George Lambton had tried him so highly 
that it was believed he could not be beaten for 
the Liverpool Cup, which he won in a canter by 
five lengths, carrying 7 st. 4 lb. In the Sep- 
tember of 1910, however, it was not supposed that 
Swynford was the equal of the Derby winner, and 
the Doncaster result was therefore somewhat 
surprising. 

Swynford, as just remarked, had made pheno- 
menal improvement. His admirers, and not 
without cause, were disposed to set him down as 
a great horse ; but the explanation of this Leger 
seems to be that Maher rode a very bad race on 
Lemberg. It is conceivable that Swynford might 
just have beaten him, but no one with an appre- 
ciation of form will believe that Lemberg ought to 
have been beaten by over a length and a half, 
and particularly that Mr. J. A. de Rothschild's 
Bronzino should have beaten the Derby winner 
by the margin given, or indeed by any sort of 
margin. In spite of the Grand Prix I should have 
been inclined to handicap Lemberg as fully a stone 

139 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

better than Bronzino. As a three-year-old this 
latter colt was out nine times and won a couple of 
races worth together ^^1859. As a two-year-old 
he was out nine times without getting nearer 
than third. As a four-year-old he won nothing. 
As a five-year-old he made one appearance. It 
may be said that he was trying to do something, 
but he did not do it. In all he ran in two-and- 
twenty races and won the odd two ; and this was 
the colt who beat Lemberg a length and a half ! 
Of course it was wrong, recognition of which, 
however, afforded little recompense to the layers 
of odds. 

Doncaster, 19 10. 

St. Leger Stakes of ;^6500 (including ;^500 for nomi- 
nator of winner), with ;^400 for second and ;^200 
for third, by subscription of ;^50 each, h. ft., or 
jCS if declared, with £8^$ added; for three-year- 
olds, entire colts and fillies ; colts 9 St., fillies 8 st. 
1 1 lb. Old St. Leger Course, about i m. 6 fur. 
132 yds. (338 entrants, viz. i i at ;^50, 204 at 
;^25, and 125 at ^5—^6450.) 

Lord Derby's br, c. Swynford, by 
John o'Gaunt, 9 st, . 

Mr. J. A. de Rothschild's ch. c. Bron- 
zino, 9 St. . 

Mr. Fairie's b. c. Lemberg, 9 st. 

Mr. P. Ralli's b. c. Wolfe Land, 9 st. 

Mr. H. Lytham's b. c. Marajax, 9 st. 

Prince Ladislas Lubomirski's br. 
Ksiaze Pan, 9 st. . 

140 



F. Wootton 


I 


F. Fox 


2 


D. Maher 


3 


Wm. Griggs 





S. Wootton 





. J. Winkfield 






AND HER OFFSPRING 

Sir W. Bass's ch. f. Rosedrop, 8 st. 

1 1 lb B. Dillon o 

Mr. W. Astor's b. f. Winkipop, 8 st, 

I I lb. . . . . . H. Jones o 

Mr. J. Musker's b. c. William Cope, 

9 St. . . . . . C. Trigg o 

Mr. G. Aston's ch. c. King of the 

Wavelets, 9 st. . . .A. Templeman o 

Mr. J. A. de Rothschild's br. c. Nan- 
keen, 9 St. . . . -J- M'Dermott o 

Betting. — 5 to 4 on Lemberg, 9 to 2 against Swyn- 
ford, 10 to I Winkipop, lOO to 7 Rosedrop, 20 to i 
Bronzino, 33 to i Wolfe Land, 40 to i Marajax and 
Ksiaze Pan, 100 to i William Cope, 200 to i Nankeen 
and King of the Wavelets. Won by a head ; one and a 
half lengths second and third. 

After the Doncaster week Lemberg had four 

engag-ements and fulfilled them all, a fact which 

gives evidence of his soundness. His first race 

was for the Jockey Club Stakes, one of the only 

two nominal ^10,000 races which now remain. 

The little spurt of extravagant prizes which 

marked the later eighties of the last century did 

not prove remunerative to the executives which 

organised them. It is difficult to suppose that 

Lemberg would not readily have won the Jockey 

Club Stakes from the best of those who were left 

in. As it happened he had comparatively nothing 

to beat. Ulster King had won the valuable 

Princess of Wales's Stakes at Newmarket, and 

141 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

there were supposed to be some possibilities 
about him as he came from what is known as a 
"dangerous stable." Manton, though it scarcely 
comes under that designation, for a dangerous 
stable is understood to imply the production of 
winners whose victories are not expected, has 
always been very dangerous indeed ; it was so in 
the days of Alec Taylor, senior, and has re- 
mained so under the control of his son. 

Newmarket, 1910. 

Jockey Club Stakes of ;^ 10,000, of which second re- 
ceived ;^I500 and third £7S0, nominator of winner 
;^400, and nominator of second ;^200 ; by sub- 
scription of ;^5 each for three-year-olds if declared 
by October 13, 1908, or £10 for four-year-olds and 
upwards if declared by March 31, 1908 ; if left in 
after those dates a further ;^2 1 ; if left in after 
March 30, 1909, a further ;^32 ; and if left in after 
January 4, 1910, a further £$2 each; with ;^842 
added ; last one mile and three-quarters of Cesare- 
witch Course. (212 entrants, viz. 8 at £iiS} 27 
at £110, 16 at £6t>, 31 at ^^58, 49 at ^^31, 18 at 
£26, 32 at ^10, and 31 at ;^5— ;^7440.) 



Mr. Fairie's Lemberg, by Cyllene, 3 yrs. 

9 St. 6 lb 

Mr. J. S. Morrison's Dibs, 5 yrs., 9 st 

1 1 lb 

Mr. E. A. Wigan's Ulster King, 3 yrs. 

8 St. 13 lb. 
Mr. Reid Walker's Duke Michael, 4 yrs. 

8 St. 12 lb. 

142 



D. Maher i 
F. Wootton 2 
W. Saxby 3 
W. Higgs o 







t 



^ 



\ 



\ 






AND HER OFFSPRING 

Mr. J. Daly's St. Michan, 5 yrs., 9 st. 8 lb. M. Colbert o 
Lord Durham's Charlemont, 3 yrs., 8 st. 

10 lb. . . . . F. Fox o 
Duke of Westminster's Dumella, 3 yrs., 

8 St. 7 lb. (car. 8 st. 8 lb.) . . H. Jones o 

Mr. L. Brassey's Bernard, 3 yrs., 8 st. 

1 1 lb. . R. Keeble o 
Chev. E. Ginistrelli's Star of Naples, 

3 yrs., 7 St. 4 lb. . . -J- Brown o 

Betting. — 3 to i on Lemberg, 100 to 9 against Ulster 
King, 100 to 6 Dibs, 20 to i Charlemont, 25 to i Duke 
Michael, 50 to i St. Michan and Dumella. Won by 
three lengths ; head second and third. 

Dibs, a self-willed creature who used to give 
a great deal of trouble at the start, was really no 
more than a handicap horse, and in fact Lemberg 
won without an effort. He came to Newmarket 
for the Champion Stakes at the Second October 
Meeting to encounter Dean Swift, an old gelding 
who was not to be despised though doubtless in a 
different class from the colt he was meeting here. 
Dean Swift, it need scarcely be said, for it is to 
be assumed that readers of these pages have 
some acquaintance with Turf affairs, had won the 
City and Suburban in 1906, again in 1908, and on 
other occasions had come near to success in the 
same Handicap. He seemed to improve with 
age, contrary to the usual order of things. In 
his race prior to the one under discussion he had 
been beaten two heads for the Chesterfield Cup 

143 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

at Goodwood, giving the winner, Captain J. G. 
R. Homfray's Land League, 13 lb. No one had 
any idea that he would beat Lemberg, however. 

Champion Stakes, ;^900- A.F., one and a quarter miles. 

Mr. Fairie's Lemberg, 3 yrs., 8st. 8 lb. 

(i lb. extra) . . . . D. Maher i 

Mr. J. B. Joel's Dean Swift, aged, 9 st. Walter Griggs 2 

Betting. — lOO to 12 on Lemberg. Won by six 
lengths. Time, 2 mins. 8| sees. 

As noted, Dean Swift had been out against 
Bayardo. A couple of days later Lemberg re- 
appeared for the Lowther Stakes, which looked 
quite as great a certainty, and I have no idea 
why bookmakers were willing to take a shorter 
price. 

Lowther Stakes, ;^490. Last mile and three-quarters 
of the Cesarewitch Course. 

Mr. Fairie's Lemberg, 3 yrs., 9 st. 7 lb. . D. Maher i 
Sir Ernest Cassel's Nimrod, 5 yrs., 8 st. 

10 lb. . . . . . E. Shaw 2 

Col. W. Hall Walker's Royal Realm, 

5 yrs., 9 St. 10 lb. . . . W. Griggs 3 

Mr. J. S. Morison's Dibs, 5 yrs., 9 st. 

4 lb. . . . . . F. Wootton 4 

Betting. — 4 to i on Lemberg, 8 to i against Dibs, 
100 to 12 Royal Realm, 33 to i Nimrod. Won by two 
lengths ; short head. Time, 3 mins. io| sees. 

Dibs had run for the Cesarewitch the previous 

afternoon, which was not likely to have done him 

144 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

any good, but the ease with which Lcmberg had 
beaten him in the Jockey Club Stakes when the 
five-year-old was giving 5 lb. showed that it 
practically made no difference whether he was 
giving or receiving what was in the circumstances 
a trifle. Royal Realm was a horse of some 
character, though not calculated to extend 
Lemberg. The colt's remaining engagement was 
at Sandown and gave him no sort of trouble. 

Sandown Foal Stakes for Three- Year-Olds. ^1724. 
Eclipse Stakes Course, one mile and a quarter. 

Mr. Fairie's Lemberg, 9 st. 10 lb. . D. Maher i 

Mr. Walter Raphael's Louvigny, 8 st. 

10 lb 

Lord Carnarvon's Munita, 8 st. 7 lb. 
Lord Durham's Brancepeth, 7 st. 11 lb. 

Betting. — 100 to 7 on Lemberg, 20 to i against 
Louvigny, 33 to i others. Won by two lengths ; five 
lengths second and third. Time, 2 mins. 42 1 sees. 

Louvigny was a half-brother to Louviers, who 
had run King Edward's Minoru to a head for the 
Derby, but he never did much. It is improbable 
that the fact of Brancepeth having been left at 
the post made any difference to the result. 
Lemberg had thus won seven of the nine races 
for which he started as a three-year-old, counting 
the Eclipse Stakes as a victory, and the very 
short head in the Two Thousand Guineas had 
cost him an eighth. 

145 K 



H. Jones 2 

W. Higgs 3 
F. Fox (left) o 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

As a four-year-old he did not entirely sustain 
his reputation throughout the season. That 
must be admitted if his career is critically re- 
garded, but he assuredly continued to show him- 
self a colt of very high character. He was not 
brought out until the Coronation Cup on the day 
after the Derby, and began his four-year-old 
season triumphantly, having shown himself to be 
well in a mile and a half gallop at Manton on the 
23rd May. Here are details : 



Lemberg, 4 yrs., 9 st. 9 lb. 
Phryxus, 3 yrs., 8 st. 4 lb. . 
Royal Eagle, 3 yrs., 8 st. 7 lb. 
Cyllius, 3 yrs., 7 st. 11 lb. . 
Declare, 5 yrs., 9 st. 2 lb. . 



Dillon I 
Trigg 2 
Clark 3 
Avery 4 
Ault 5 



Won by half a length ; five lengths between second 
and third. Lemberg won easily. 



Epsom, 191 1. 

Coronation Cup, a Gold Cup value ;^200, and ^^'looo in 
specie, added to a Sweepstakes of ;^2Q each, or £^ 
if declared, with ^100 added for second and ;^50 
for third ; for three-year-olds and upwards ; Derby 
Course, about one mile and a half. (25 entrants, 
viz. 23 at ;£20 and 2 at £^ — ;^i650.) 

Mr. Fairie's Lemberg, by Cyllene, 4 

yrs., 9 St. 3 lb. . . . B. Dillon i 

Lord Derby's Swynford, 4 yrs., 9 st, 

3 lb. . . . . F. Wootton 2 

146 



G. 


Stern 


3 


C. 


Trigg 


o 


S. 


Donoghue 


o 


F. 


Fox 


o 


F. 


Templeman 





D. 


Maher 


o 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

Sir George Murray's Bachelor's Double, 

5 yrs., 9 st. 6 lb. . 
Mr. C. S. Donnelly's Buckwheat, 5 yrs., 

9 St. 6 lb. 
Mr. A. P. Cunliffe's Charles O'Malley, 

4 yrs., 9 St. 3 lb. . 
Mr. J. A. de Rothschild's Bronzino, 4 

yrs., 9 St. 3 lb. 
Lord Villier's Greenback, 4 yrs., 9 st. 

3 lb 

Mr. P. Nelke's Yellow Slave, 4 yrs., 
9 St. . 

Betting. — 9 to 4 against Bachelor's Double and Lem- 
berg, 5 to I Swynford, 6 to i Bronzino, 100 to 7 Green- 
back, 100 to 6 Charles O'Malley. Won by three- 
quarters of a length ; head second and third. 

The great thing here Is that he beat Swynford, 
thus avenging himself for his defeat in the Leger 
the previous year ; and, moreover, Dillon, who 
wore Mr. Fairie's colours, was scarcely the equal 
of F. Wootton as a jockey, which is all to the 
credit of the colt Dillon rode. At the same 
time Mr. George Lambton declares that Swynford 
was backward at this period, though nevertheless 
rather more than a month before he had won the 
Chippenham Plate at the Newmarket First Spring 
Meeting, when, however, it is true that he had 
nothing to beat. The form was nevertheless 
accepted by racegoers at large, and when Lem- 
berg next appeared, for the Princess of Wales's 

147 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

Stakes at the Newmarket First July Meeting, 
odds were freely laid on him. 

Newmarket, 191 1. 

Princess of Wales's Stakes of ;^30 each starter, h. ft. or 
^3 if declared, with ^2000 added, of which owner 
of second received ;^300 and owner of third ^^200, 
nominator of winner ;^300 and nominator of second 
;^200 ; for three- and four-year-olds. Suffolk Stakes 
Course, one mile and a half. (172 entrants, ;^3 ft. 
declared for 55 — £126$.) 

Lord Derby's Swynford, by John 

O'Gaunt, 4 yrs., 10 st. i lb. . F. Wootton i 
Mr. Fairie's Lemberg, 4 yrs., 10 st. 

6 lb B. Dillon 2 

Lord Derby's King William, 3 yrs., 

9 St. . . . . . D. Maher 3 

Mr. Leopold de Rothschild's St. Andrea, 

3 yrs., 8 St. i lb. . . . C. Trigg o 

Mr. J. A. de Rothschild's Bryony, 3 

yrs., 7 St. 7 lb. . . . F. Fox O 

Betting. — 6 to 4 on Lemberg, 3 to i against Swyn- 
ford, 9 to 2 King William, 33 to i Bryony. Won by 
one and a half lengths ; length second and third. 

It will be observed that Lemberg was giving 

Lord Derby's colt 5 lb., a serious consideration 

over a severe mile and a half. Swynford had 

incidentally cantered away with the Hardwicke 

Stakes at Ascot, and was, there is no denying, 

an altogether exceptionally good animal. He 

was indeed the one horse then in training by 

148 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

whom it was no discredit to be beaten ; and that 
the form was sufficiently correct was demonstrated 
a fortnight afterwards in the Eclipse Stakes at 
Sandown, where the two met again, I cannot 
find that there was any excuse for Lemberg in 
this race, and it will be seen that he merely did 
what was expected, the betting being accepted 
as an indication. Swynford had been making 
the greater improvement ; it must have been so, 
as the Eclipse Stakes course was certainly quite 
as well suited for Mr. Fairies colt as for the 
long striding son of John o' Gaunt and Canter- 
bury Pilgrim. 

Sandown Park, 1 9 1 1 . 

Twenty-fourth Renewal of the Eclipse Stakes of 
.^10,000, of which owner of second received ;^90o, 
of third ;^I50, nominator of winner ;i^50o, and 
nominator of second ;^ioo; by subscription of ;^5 
each for three-year-olds if ft. declared by October 12, 
1909, or .^10 for four-year-olds if declared by 
March 30, 1909 ; if left in after those dates a 
further ;^2 I each ; if left in after March 29, 1910, a 
further £^4. for three-year-olds, or £^2 for four- 
year-olds ; and if left in after January 3, 1911, a 
further ;^5 5 for three-year-olds, or £^2 for four- 
year-olds ; with ;^349 added. Eclipse Stakes Course, 
one mile and a quarter. (205 entrants, viz, 42 at 
;^l I 5, 18 at £6^, 22 at £60, 44 at £^1, 23 at £26, 
25 at ;{^io, and 31 at £c, — £S7^s) 

Lord Derby's Swynford, by John o' 

Gaunt, 4 yrs., 10 st. . . F. Wootton i 

149 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

Mr. Fairie's Lemberg, 4 yrs., 10 st. . B. Dillon 2 

Mr. Leopold de Rothschild's Pietri, 

3 yrs., 8 St. 13 lb. . . . D. Maher 3 
Mr. H. P. Whitney's Whisk Broom, 

4 yrs., 9 St. 8 lb. . . -J. H. Martin o 
Mr. R. W. Burrows' Placidus, 4 yrs., 

9 St. 4 lb. . . . . J. Clark o 

Mr. G. Aston's King of the Wavelets, 

4 yrs., 9 St. 4 lb. . . . C. Trigg o 

Mr. P. Nelke's Yellow Slave, 4 yrs., 

9 St. 8 lb. . . . . F. Templeman O 

Betting. — ii to 10 on Swynford, 9 to 4 against 
Lemberg, 9 to i Whisk Broom, 100 to 6 Pietri, 50 to i 
Yellow Slave and Placidus, 500 to i King of the Wavelets. 
Won by four lengths ; same second and third. 

An interesting' question came up for exami- 
nation at Doncaster : whether Lemberg could 
stay? That his owner was convinced he could 
do so is shown by the fact of his having been 
put into the Doncaster Cup, run over a distance 
of two miles one furlong. There was one horse 
in the race whose capacity as a stayer had been 
thoroughly demonstrated — Lord St. Davids' 
Kilbroney, a son of The Wag and Innismakil. 
In the matter of class Kilbroney was admittedly 
in very poor contrast to the son of Cyllene and 
Galicia. Either a horse can stay or he cannot, 
however, and if he cannot, class is not of much avail 
against genuine stayers. Before going to Don- 
caster, Kilbroney had won the Goodwood Cup from 

150 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

a staying" filly, Martingale II, who afterwards 
ran second to Willonyx for the Cesarewitch. 
Kilbroney had won the Great Metropolitan at 
Epsom that Spring-, the Summer Handicap at 
the Newmarket Second July, giving i6 lb. to 
Clarenceux, a colt of his own age who started 
there a strong favourite at 2 to i. Prior to that 
Kilbroney had failed by a neck to beat a good 
horse called Pillo in the Northumberland Plate, 
giving- the six-year-old winner 6 lb. He was 
therefore by no means to be despised. 

Doncaster, 1 9 1 1 . 
DoNCASTER Cup, value ;^200, with ;^iioo in specie 
added, of which second received ;^200 and third 
;^iOO ; for three-year-olds and upwards ; entrance 
;^io, £s ft. Two miles one furlong over Old Course. 
(34 entrants — £ggo.) 

Mr. Fairie's Lemberg, by Cyllene, 

4 yrs,, 10 St. . . . . F. Wootton i 
Lord St. Davids* Kilbroney, 4 3^3., 

10 St. . . . . . Walt. Griggs 2 

Sir John Thursby's Adalis, 4 yrs., 8 st. 

5 lb C. Trigg 3 

Mr. P. Ralli's Wolfe Land, 4 yrs., 

9 St. 4 lb. . . . B. Dillon o 

Lord Rosebery's Black Potts, 3 yrs., 

8 St. I lb F. Fox o 

Mr. T. Frost's ch. f. by Count Schom- 

berg — Persil, 3 yrs., 7 st. 8 lb. . J. Howard o 

Betting. — 9 to 4 on Lemberg, g to 2 against Kilbroney, 
10 to I Wolfe Land, 100 to 7 Adalis and Black Potts, 

151 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

50 to I Persil f. Won by a neck ; four lengths second 
and third. 

The neck could have been extended, and the 
result must have been satisfactory to Lemberg's 
owner, who I am inclined to think had at any 
rate not imagined that staying was Lemberg's 
strong point. It is to be noticed that though he 
was entered for the Gold Cup he was not sent 
to Ascot. 

In the Jockey Club Stakes Lemberg was 
stopped by his weight. He encountered a really 
good animal in Lord Derby's Stedfast, one of 
the best horses of the period. Between Stedfast 
and Mr. W. Pilkington's Prince Palatine, winner 
of two Ascot Cups, it was agreed that for a 
long period there was nothing to choose — and 
Prince Palatine is standing at a fee of 400 
guineas. An accident on the road, a fall which 
severely injured his knees notwithstanding that 
he had caps on at the time, left ill effects on 
Stedfast. It must have been so, for in the Jockey 
Club Stakes of 191 2 Prince Palatine gave him 
13 lb. and beat him half a length, which could 
not have happened if Stedfast had been himself. 
He was at his best, however, when he met 
Lemberg in this race, and Mr. Fairie's colt, by 
reason of penalties which Stedfast had escaped, 
was giving 16 lb. more than weigh t-for-age. 

152 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

Stedfast benefited by a 9 lb. breeding allowance, 
and Lemberg was giving 2 st. instead of the 
12 lb. a four-year-old should give a three-year- 
old according to the conditions of the race. 

Newmarket, 191 1. 

Jockey Club Stakes of ;^ 10,000 ; second received ;Ci 500 
(being ;^I23 2, 13s. 4d, out of the stakes and 
£267, 6s. 8d. from surplus subscriptions), and third 
£7^0 (being £616, 6s. 8d. out of the stakes and 
;^I33, 13s. 4d. from surplus subscriptions); nomi- 
nator of winner received ;^400, and nominator of 
second ^200 out of the stakes ; by subscription of 
£$ each for three-year-olds if declared by October i 2, 
1909, or ;^io for four-year-olds and upwards if 
declared by March 30, 1909 ; if left in after those 
dates a further £21 ; if left in after March 29, 19 10, 
a further ^32 ; and if left in after January 3, 191 1, 
a further £^ 2 each ; last one mile and three-quarters 
of the Cesarewitch Course. (210 entrants, viz. 17 at 
.^115, 31 at ii"i 10, 20 at ;^63, 20 at ;^58, 56 at ;^3i, 
20 at ;^26, 26 at ;^io, and 20 at £s — ;^784i.) 

Lord Derby's Stedfast, by Chaucer, 3 yrs., 

8 St. 4 lb F. Wootton i 

Mr. Fairie's Lemberg, 4 yrs., 10 st, 4 lb. F. O'Neill 2 
Lord Derby's Hair Trigger II, 3 yrs., 

7 St. 1 2 lb, , . . . . F. Rickaby 3 

Mr. J. B. Joel's Lycaon, 3 yrs., 8 st. 

10 lb. . . . . . G. Stern o 

Lord Durham's Cyrano, 3 yrs., 8 st. 7 lb. J. Clark o 

Betting. — 2 to i on Stedfast, 9 to 2 against Lemberg, 
8 to I Lycaon, 10 to i Hair Trigger II. Won by four 
lengths ; three lengths second and third. 

153 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 



The betting shows that according to general 
opinion Lemberg was overtaxed. For the rest 
he walked over for the Champion Stakes at the 
Second October Meeting, and practically walked 
over for the Lowther Stakes, having only to meet 
a three-year-old called Bryony, who had got 
home once during the season in ten races. This 
was Lemberg's last appearance, and I may set 
out the record of his achievements as I have done 
in the case of his brother. 



As A Two-Year-Old. 

The New Stakes, Ascot 

The Chesterfield Stakes, Newmarket 

The Rous Memorial Stakes, Goodwood 

The Champagne Stakes 

The Rous Memorial Stakes, Newmarket 

The Middle Park Plate . 

The Dewhurst Plate 



;^2,oi3 

750 

1,125 

920 
3>025 
1,527 









£9,360 


As A Three- Year-Old. 


The Two Thousand Guineas . . . . £ ... 


The Derby .... 






6,450 


The St. James's Palace Stakes 






2,450 


The Eclipse Stakes 






4;385 


The Jockey Club Stakes 






7»440 


The Champion Stakes . 






900 


The Lowther Stakes 






490 


The Sandown Foal Stakes 






1,724 


The St. Leger 






... 




^23,839 



154 



AND HER OFFSPRING 



As A Four- Year-Old. 

The Coronation Cup, Epsom . 
The Prince of Wales's Stakes, Newmarket 
The Doncaster Cup .... 
The Champion Stakes .... 
The Lowther Stakes .... 



£i,6so 

990 

1,000 

470 

£4,1 10 



During his three years in training, therefore, 
Lemberg won in stakes a sum of £s7,3og. In 
this calculation I am taking the Eclipse Stakes 
at what it actually yielded to the owner, though 
in the totals published at the end of the 
season the whole amount of a stake is usually 
credited to a dead heater. To the aggregate 
named there is a considerable amount of place 
money to be added. As a two-year-old this 
was only a matter of ;^50 for his third in the 
Champagne Stakes. As a three-year-old Lem- 
berg earned ;^400 for his second in the Two 
Thousand Guineas, j{^200 for his third in the 
St. Leger. The second in the Princess of Wales's 
Stakes received ;^500, ^^300 going to the owner 
and ;^200 to the nominator. In the Eclipse 
Stakes the owner of the second horse received 
;{^900, the nominator an additional ;^ioo. Half 
this went to Lemberg. He was also, as recorded, 
second for the Jockey Club Stakes, which brought 

155 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

in jTiyoo. Including place money Lemberg's 
total of winnings therefore amounts to ;^40,659. 
In all he ran 23 races and won 17. Real good 
horse as Lemberg was, I think his owner reckons 
Galicia's elder son as distinctly the better of the 
pair, though he might pause for a long time 
before endeavouring to estimate the superiority in 
pounds. Lemberg's offspring have not run up 
to the period when I finish this book. 



156 



AND HER OFFSPRING 



CHAPTER V 

SILESIA, ZIA, AND RADAMES 

In 1909 the question arose to whom Galicia was 
to be sent, and Mr. Fairie decided on Major 
Eustace Loder's Spearmint, who was standing- in 
Ireland at a fee of 250 guineas. Spearmint was 
certainly one of the most extraordinary animals 
in the history of racing. With scarcely an ex- 
ception winners of the great classic races have 
been home-bred, that is to say, have victoriously 
carried the colours of their breeders. Spearmint, 
however, had been purchased at auction for the 
moderate selling plater price of 300 guineas. It 
is always well to avoid superlatives, but it may 
be doubted whether there was ever a cheaper 
horse than this son of Carbine and Maid of the 
Mint. At his first appearance he won the Great 
Foal Stakes at Lingfield Park, worth a nominal 
^1000 and really yielding ^^835. He was beaten 
for the Champion Breeders' Foal Stakes at 
Derby, finishing second to Colonel Hall Walker's 
Black Arrow ; and carrying 9 st. he ran well 
up, fourth, for a Nursery at Newmarket. As a 

157 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

three-year-old Spearmint was only out twice, 
once in England, when he won the Derby from 
one of the best fields known for several years, 
and once in France, where he won the Grand 
Prix, starting, moreover, at a shade of odds on. 
This was Spearmint's last appearance. He had 
run five races and won three of them worth 
;^i7,239. The Grand Prix varies largely in value ; 
in Spearmint's year it was ;^ 10,008, after which 
there was a marked increase, Sardanapale in 
1914 having brought in ^14,326. 

The result of Galicia's visit to Major Eustace 
Loder's horse was a filly foal whom her owner 
called Silesia. She was pronounced remarkably 
good-looking by those who have the gift of 
judging the very youthful thoroughbred, and 
as a matter of course she was entered much as 
her distinguished half-brothers had been, except, 
indeed, that her first engagement was the Acorn 
Stakes, which, needless to say, is exclusively for 
fillies. *' Races to Come" showed her in the 
Coventry and Windsor Castle Stakes at Ascot, 
the July Stakes, the National Breeders' Pro- 
duce Stakes at Sandown, the Great Lancashire 
Breeders' Produce Stakes of ^2000 at Liverpool, 
the Hurst Park Foal Plate of ^1500, the Rich- 
mond Stakes at Goodwood, as also the Prince of 
Wales's Stakes at the same meeting, a Breeders' 

158 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

Foal Plate at Kempton Park, a similar race at 
Manchester, the Buckenham Stakes, the Imperial 
Produce Plate at Kempton, the Cheveley Park 
Stakes and the Moulton Stakes, though for 
some reason she was left out of the Middle Park 
and Dewhurst Plates. Had she been in these 
her engagements would have seemed a model 
list of those which might be judiciously selected 
for a two-year-old of the highest class. 

I have a recollection of asking her owner one 
day how she was progressing, for at the time 
Bayardo and Lemberg had made great names 
for themselves, and there was natural curiosity to 
know whether their sister was likely to rival their 
achievements. In this book I am saying as little 
as possible about the owner himself, for reasons 
which many of those who see the little volume 
will understand. Mr. Fairie prefers to remain in 
the background ; but I may remark that he spoke 
with something approaching to enthusiasm of 
the promise Silesia was giving, of her resemblance 
to Bayardo in make and shape so far as a filly 
can resemble a colt, and furthermore in her 
action. Disappointment was expressed as the 
stakes into which she had been put passed by 
without her production. In fact, she did not 
run as a two-year-old, and next season was so 
far a further disappointment that she never 

159 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

won anything, though she took part in eight 
races. They were all, however, events of an 
important character. If Mr. Fairie had cared 
about the mere fact of winning, no doubt she 
might have run up a little score of successes. 
He kept her strictly to her engagements, she 
was sound and well, and she filled rather more 
than half of them, they having been fifteen in all. 
I shall not quote them in detail, seeing that her 
name never occupied the first place, but details 
of her performances in the classics may be given. 

One Thousand Guineas Stakes. ;!^4750. Three-year- 
old fillies, 9 St. each. Rowley Mile. 

Mr. Walter Raphael's Tagalie . 

Baron G. Springer's Alope 

Lord Falmouth's Belleisle . 

Mr. S. B. Joel's Polkerris . 

Mr. Lionel Robinson's Bill and Coo . 

Colonel W. Hall Walker's Lolette 

Sir Berkeley Sheffield's Fair Relative . 

Lord Derby's The Tylt . 

Lord Durham's Golden Note 

Mr. Eustace Loder's Mountain Mint . 

Mr. P. Nelke's Miss Spearmint . 

Mr. Fairie's Silesia .... 

Lord Rosbery's Charmian 

Betting. — 7 to 4 against Belleisle, 2 to i Polkerris, 9 
to 2 Charmian, 20 to i others. Won by a length and a 
half; three-quarters of a length second and third, i min. 
39?, sees. 

160 



L. H. Hewitt 


I 


B. Carslake 


2 


H. Jones 


3 


S. Wootton 


4 


F. Winter 


5 


W. Earl 


6 


C. Trigg 


7 


F. Rickaby 





J. Clark 





Walter Griggs 





F. Templeman 





J. H. Martin 





D. Maher 






AND HER OFFSPRING 



Silesia's position among the *' 20 to i others " 
shows that little was expected, and she started at 
20 to I, moreover, for the Oaks, a record of 
which may also be furnished. 

Oaks Stakes. Three-year-old fillies. ;^4950. 
9 St. each. About a mile and a half. 

Mr. J. Prat's Mirska . . .J. Childs i 

Mr. Leopold de Rothschild's Equitable F. O'Neill 2 

Mr. Lionel Robinson's Bill and Coo . F. Wootton 3 

Lord Derby's The Tylt . . . F. Rickaby 4 

Mr. Fairie's Silesia . . . .J. Clark 5 

Lord Falmouth's Merry Maiden . . C. Foy 6 

Mr. Walter Raphael's Tagalie . . G. Stern 7 

Duke of Devonshire's Preferment . W. Higgs 8 

Mr. L. Neumann's Sourabaya . . Walter Griggs 9 

Lord Falmouth's Belleisle . . . H. Jones o 

Mr. J. Musker's Jenny Melton . . F. Hunter o 

Sir Berkeley Sheffield's Green Cloth . C. Trigg o 

Mr. Peter Gilpin's Lovely Night . W. Saxby o 

Colonel Hall Walker's Lolette . . W. Earl (fell) o 

Betting. — 2 to i on Tagalie, 7 to i against Belleisle, 
10 to I Bill and Coo, 100 to 7 Preferment, 20 to i Silesia, 
25 to I each Green Cloth and Merry Maiden, 33 to i 
others. Won by three lengths ; three-quarters of a length 
second and third. 2 mins, 43 sees. 

Mr. Walter Raphael's grey filly, an odds-on 

favourite it will be perceived, did little. She had 

won the Derby two days previously and possibly 

may have been feeling the effects, though that 

this was not suspected prior to the race is abun- 

161 L 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

dantly demonstrated by the market. Silesia had 
a special quotation of 4 to i for a place instead of 
the ordinary fourth of the odds, 5 to i, evidence 
that she was expected to improve upon her One 
Thousand running, as it will be seen she did, 
beating Belleisle, for instance, not to mention 
Tagalie ; but Mirska won with a great deal to 
spare. 

Silesia was sent to Ascot for the Coronation 
Stakes, which was supposed to be a good thing 
for Polkerris. Odds of 1 1 to 8 were laid on this 
filly, Mr. C. Carroll's Melody, a daughter of 
Meddler and Ballantrae, making her first appear- 
ance of the season and sharing second favouritism 
with Silesia at 7 to i, in just slightly stronger 
demand than Mr. August Belmont's Qu'elle est 
Belle, a daughter of Spearmint. Silesia was 
fourth, Polkerris winning by a length from 
Melody, the latter giving her 4 lb. It should 
have been 7 lb., but F. Wootton, who rode, 
had to put up 3 lb. extra, being unable to ride 
less than 8 st. 6 lb. Silesia, with her maiden 
allowance, carried 8 st. 3 lb. 

Mr. Fairie sent her to the post for the Eclipse 

Stakes, remote in the extreme as her prospects 

obviously were. It was supposed that Stedfast 

could hardly be beaten, odds of 13 to 8 being 

laid on him, Tagalie second in demand at 9 to 

162 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

2, for her Oaks failure was excused, Prince Pala- 
tine 5 to I, Lycaon lo to i, Silesia ^;^ to i, La 
Boheme II loo to i, King William 150 to i, John 
Amendall 200 to i . I think that Stedfast ought 
to have won ; but O'Neill on Prince Palatine 
gave Maher no room, squeezed him on the rails 
in fact, and beat him by a short head. Lycaon 
was third, six lengths away, John Amendall 
fourth, King William fifth, and Silesia next, in 
front of La Boheme II and Tagalie. At Liver- 
pool it was thought that Silesia had some chance 
for the Knowsley Dinner Stakes. There were 
only three runners — Maiden Erlegh, a 9 to 4 on 
favourite, carried 9 st. 6 lb., Silesia only 7 st. 11 
lb., and she was backed at 1 1 to 4, being beaten 
a length and a half, with John Amendall bringing 
up the rear. Hurst Park was the scene of her 
next attempt, the Hurst Park Lennox Plate 
for three-year-olds the prize. Mr. Neumann's 
Oiseau Bleu, who at the time of writing is perform- 
ing with indifferent success over hurdles, shared 
favouritism with Honastir at 5 to 2, Silesia 7 to i, 
and the race was taken by the latter's stable com- 
panion Equanimity. This daughter of Bachelor's 
Button carried 7 st. 12 lb., and won by a head 
from Honastir, 8 st. i lb. ; Silesia, 8 st. 4 lb., third, 
beaten a length. A length and a head may per- 
haps be reckoned at something like 6 lb., so that 

163 



GALICIA.: HER FORBEARS 

» here Silesia comes out much about the same 
animal as the winner. 

It will be seen that she was seldom afforded 
anything like a real chance, and she certainly did 
not find one for the Jockey Club Stakes running 
aeainst Stedfast and Prince Palatine. These two 
had shown themselves practically inseparable, and 
as here Stedfast was receiving 13 lb. it was sup- 
posed that he could not be beaten. Apparently 

• he had not entirely recovered from the effects of 
his bad fall. Of this I have already written in the 
previous chapter. Those who had laid 9 to 4 on 
him, basing their calculations on his previous form 
with Prince Palatine, proved mistaken, the latter 
starting at 5 to i and winning by three parts of a 
length. Mr. Reid Walker's Adamite was third, 
five lengths away, Silesia fourth. Her last ap- 
pearance of the season was in the Newmarket 
Oaks against two others ; Lord Lonsdale's Eufro- 
sina, 5 to 4 on, gave Silesia, 7 to 4 against, 10 lb. 
and beat her a length. It had been reasonable 
to expect better things from the good-looking 
half-sister to the two famous sons of the d^m. 
•She left the Turf a maiden, however, and it 
remains to be seen whether she will follow the 
example of so many other mares who have won 
nothing when in training but have earned repu- 
tation in the paddocks. 

164 




< 

O 
O 

Q 
Q 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

In 1910 Gallcia was sent to Missel Thrush, 
his winning offspring having included a really 
good colt called Llangwm, whose three-year-old 
career had certainly been remarkable. After one 
failure in the Spring, in the Great Surrey Handi- 
cap, a five-furlong sprint down the Epsom hill, 
Llangwm had been out nine times and had won 
all his races with the exception of one, that one 
being the Derby, for which he had been third, 
beaten two lengths and a neck by Signorinetta 
and Primer. I have always entertained the strong 
impression that Llangwm ought to have won the 
great race, and probably would have done so if 
Maher, who rode, had been better acquainted with 
him, for on this occasion at least, or so it seemed 
to me, the jockey did not distinguish himself 
favourably. Later in the year, it is to be observed, 
Llangwm gave Primer 21 lb. and beat him a neck, 
which certainly seems to show that the Epsom 
running was ludicrously wrong ! At any rate, 
Llangwm's sire was chosen, and what might have 
been the result must remain a matter of specula- 
tion as the mare was barren, a lapse for which 
she made up -next year by producing twins to 
Radium, a chestnut filly who was born dead and 
a bay filly called Zia, Of this young one no great 
opinion was formed, as may be judged from the 
list of her entries. As a two-year-old she was 

165 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

only put into seven races, beginning with the 
Kineton Stakes at Warwick, 5 sovs. each for 
starters with 100 added, following on with the 
Osmaston Plate at Derby, a ^200 race, and the 
Mostyn Two-Year-Old Plate at Chester, a little 
stake of the same value. She was also in the 
Eglinton Stakes of ^150 at York and the Stud 
Produce Stakes at the Newmarket First July ; 
her other two entries were for Rous Plate at Don- 
caster, and, her owner taking a chance, somewhat 
in the nature of a leap in the dark, also nominated 
her for the valuable Buckenham Stakes of ^300 
each, half forfeit, at the Newmarket First October. 
That year there were only seven subscribers, and 
there is always, of course, a great possibility that 
nothing of any importance may be left in. 

The list of entries formed a striking contrast 
to the lists which had been made for Galicia's 
other offspring, and the event proved that Zia's 
owner had acted judiciously. The filly was not 
sent to Manton. She was committed to the 
charge of Mr. Francis Lambton, who as Captain 
Lambton met a gallant death on .the battlefield 
in France. Mr. Fairie's horses, with the excep- 
tion of two or three, remained at Manton ; but 
Mr. Francis Lambton was getting a stable to- 
gether at Newmarket, and his friends were anxious 

to help him. The races into which Zia had been 

166 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

put show that she was expected to do what little 
she could manage to accomplish early in the 
season ; but it was not until the last day of Sep- 
tember that she appeared, and then in a Two- Year 
Old Optional Selling Plate. She had no quota- 
tion and finished nowhere. Being fit and well, 
however, she was given another run for a similar 
Plate at the Second October Meeting. After 
these two exhibitions it is rather surprising to 
find her carrying 8 st. 1 1 lb. in the Downe 
Nursery at Liverpool, except, indeed, that none 
of the sixteen starters had less than 7 st. 4 lb. 
Zia did no more than she had done in her previous 
races, and coming out again for the Eglinton 
Nursery at Manchester, this time with 8 St., she 
did not attain to the mild distinction of having any 
price in the betting. As a three-year-old she 
made one appearance, in a handicap at the 
Newmarket Craven Meeting for animals of her 
age; she carried only 6 st. 11 lb., and made no 
show. It is to be feared that she must be set 
down as of small use for racing purposes. Lord 
Sefton bought her, however, it being arranged 
that if he sold her it must be to Mr. Fairie for the 
sum he had received, 500 guineas. Lord Sefton 
would have paid thrice as much, a mare so 
bred being valuable for the stud, but Mr. Fairie 
declined to accept more. 

167 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

In 191 1 Galicia was sent to Mr. Leopold de 
Rothschild's Radium, who was standing at a fee 
of 200 guineas, which, indeed, his performances 
seemed fully to have justified. This son of Bend Or 
and Taia, a remarkably good-looking horse, had 
been fourth for Spearmint's Derby, behind Picton 
and the subsequent Leger winner, Troutbeck, but 
in front of Beppo, Gorgos who had won the 
Two Thousand for Mr. Arthur James, Black 
Arrow, Sancy, The White Knight winner of two 
Ascot Cups, Lally who started favourite for this 
Derby but failed through inability to stay, and 
amongst others Mr. Fairie's Plum Tree, who 
won him the Goodwood Cup later in the season. 
Radium did not run again as a three-year-old, 
but made exceptional improvement, as a four- 
year-old he carried off the Newmarket Biennial 
by three lengths from Troutbeck — the Duke of 
Westminster's colt, however, giving a stone — and 
then afterwards was second for the Great York- 
shire Handicap, securing the Lowther Stakes, the 
Rutland Handicap with 9 st, 10 lb. — giving the 
second, Impression, a colt of his own age, 3 st. 
8 lb. — and the Jockey Club Cup, in which he 
beat The White Knight and that good stayer 
Torpoint. As a five-year-old Radium did still 
better. In the Coronation Cup The White 

Knight reversed the Jockey Club Cup form, as 

168 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

he did again in the Gold Cup, for which he beat 
Radium by a couple of lengths ; but after Ascot 
Mr. Leopold de Rothschild's horse was out five 
times without defeat. He took the Dullingham 
Plate with lo st. 6 lb. ; the Goodwood Cup, 9 st. 
2 lb., from Torpoint, 9 st. 7 lb., and The White 
Knight, 10 St. ; the Doncaster Cup, The White 
Knight this time fourth at even weights. For 
the Beaufort Stakes at the Newmarket First 
October Meeting the horse walked over, and 
this year he had only one moderate opponent 
in the Jockey Club Cup. 

Thus he went to the stud with excellent pros- 
pects, which may yet possibly be fulfilled. His son 
by Galicia was called Radames, a good-looking 
bay colt about whom up to the time of writing, 
however, there is little to be said. He came out 
for the New Stakes at Ascot, as his half-brothers 
had done ; but 100 to 7 was offered against him, 
and he "had nothing to do with the finish," in 
which Colonel Hall Walker's Let Fly beat Mr. 
A. F. Basset's Roseland (the latter giving 7 lb.) 
by a neck, the late Lord Cadogan's Redfern, a 
head behind, third. Radames, indeed, made no 
show. His only other appearance was in the 
July Stakes. Roseland, 9 to 2 on, beat Mr. 
Neumann's Elkington, 7 to i, by half-a-dozen 
lengths, Radames, 10 to i, another half-dozen 

169 L 2 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

lengths away. This brings up the history of 
Galicia's offspring to the present time. For the 
season of 191 5 all going well the successes of 
the family may be continued by a bay colt called 
Kwang Su, by Cicero, specially prominent now 
as sire of the King's Friar Marcus. Kwang Su 
is considered highly promising. 



170 



AND HER OFFSPRING 



CHAPTER VI 

BAYARDO AT THE STUD 

In 191 1 Bayardo went to stand at the Manton 

House stud at a fee of 300 guineas, and as a 

matter of course his subscription Hst was speedily 

filled. Among-st owners who sent mares was His 

Majesty the King, Loch Doon being chosen for 

the horse, and the result, a bay colt called Border 

Don, was generally admired. I remember Richard 

Marsh telling me that the colt '' looked like racing 

and showed all his sire's quality." Evidence of 

what is expected from a horse is furnished by the 

entries made for him, and Border Don was put 

into six-and-twenty races as a two-year-old. He 

did not thrive, however, and could not be brought 

out until late in the season, when he ran for the 

Great Sapling Plate at the Sandown Meeting in 

October. He was not expected to win, it being 

correctly supposed that the race lay between Lord 

Michelham's Plucky Liege and Lord Carnarvon's 

Volta, who finished first and second with a head 

between them ; Border Don figured in the betting, 

8 to I being taken. Mr. Fairie himself had very 

171 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

few foals by his own horse. A filly named Ferrara, 
a daughter of Bona Dea, was afforded chances 
if she were good enough to take them, being 
engaged in the New Stakes, the Middle Park 
Plate, and other notable events ; but she could 
not be produced. 

The horse had only one winner in fact, for- 
tunately one of some account, a filly called Good 
and Gay, her dam Popinjay, the property of 
Mr. Waldorf Astor. She came out for a newly- 
named race at Ascot, the Bessborough Stakes, 
apparently not much fancied, for she started at 
lOO to 8, there being a hot favourite in Mr. J. B. 
Joel's Polystome, Good and Gay winning, how- 
ever, though only by a head, from a black son 
of St. Frusquin and Menda called Rossendale 
belonging to Sir John Thursby. Good and Gay 
was almost favourite for the Chesterfield Stakes 
at the Newmarket Second July, in which she 
finished third to Colonel Hall Walker's Follow 
Up, but she took the Buckenham Stakes from 
the same owner's Sea Eagle, the favourite, the 
Duke of Westminster's Manxman, a colt who 
had shown good form, beaten four lengths for 
second place. Her fourth and last appearance 
was in the Bretby Stakes, in which she was beaten 
a couple of lengths by a really good filly of Mr. 

Hulton's called Silver Tag. Good and Gay's 

172 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

two races yielded £2>62i2, so that Bayardo had 
a not altogether humble place in the list of 
winning sires. 

Five of his yearlings were offered by auction 
in 1913. Bayardino, a son of Lady Raeburn, 
made 810 guineas, a son of The Broom 450 
guineas, another son of Royal Marriage 1500 
guineas, one of Alicia 3700 guineas, bought by 
Lord Lonsdale, and one of Cheshire Cat 3100 
guineas. In 1914 were sold three colts and a 
filly. Sir William Cooke gave 3000 guineas for 
a son of Dame d'Or, Captain J. G. R. Homfray 
1000 guineas and Mr. H. M. Hartigan 700 
guineas respectively for sons of Elizabeth M. 
and Evadne, and at the Second October Meeting 
the filly, a daughter of Star of the Sea, was 
purchased by Sir Thomas Dewar for 870 
guineas. 

In the spring of 191 5 two young Bayardos 
came out at Newbury, a three-year-old named 
Wordsworth, dam Rydal Mount, who had not 
run the previous season, and a two-year-old, Ali 
Bey, dam Mowsali. The race in which the 
former took part was the Greenham Stakes for 
three-year-olds, and some of the best of the age 
opposed him, all, however, it should be noted, 
giving him weight. He carried 8 st. 5 lb. 
Colonel Hall Walker's Let Fly (9 st. 4 lb.) and 

173 



GALICIA: HER FORBEARS 

Lord Carnarvon's Volta (9 st. i lb.) were equal 
favourites at 1 1 to 4, odds of 8 to i laid against 
Wordsworth, and, Volta being unable to stay, 
the race ended in a dead-heat between Let Fly 
and Mr. J. B. Joel's Sunfire (g st. 4 lb.). At 
Chester the son of Rydal Mount was backed 
at 5 to 4 for the Eaton Maiden Plate and 
beaten a length by St. Ronald, making his 
first appearance. Ali Bey was one of twenty- 
eight starters for the Beckhampton Stakes, 
which came immediately after the Greenham. 
This two-year-old race has almost always been 
won by the favourite, notwithstanding that the 
field is invariably large : as many as thirty- 
eight have run. Precedent was followed. 
Duggie won at 5 to 2, Ali Bey fourth. At 
Chester the son of Bayardo took the Mostyn 
Stakes, 4 to i on him, from two poor animals ; 
but next day, though beaten in the Ormonde 
Stakes, showed really good form. He finished 
second to Lord Derby's smart Marchetta filly, 
giving her 10 lb., that is 7 lb. more than weight 
for sex, in front of winners, Louviers d'Or and 
Dalnacardoch. Ali Bey was beaten half a 
length, and according to his jockey ought to 
have won. His failure was attributed to an un- 
usual reason. Some newspapers were being 
blown about in a high wind ; they baulked the 

174 



AND HER OFFSPRING 

colt as he rounded the last turn and threw him 
out of his stride. He should certainly win 
races. 

Sir William Cooke's Dame d'Or colt was also 
distinctly unfortunate to be beaten in the first 
race he ran, the Spring Stakes at the Newmarket 
Second Spring Meeting. He started at 1 1 to 
ID, and in more expert hands could hardly have 
lost. Donoghue on Captain Dermot M'Cal- 
mont's Roi d'Ecosse outrode the jockey on the 
favourite and won by a short head. Up to the 
time of writing the Dame d'Or colt has been out 
once more, and that successfully. He appeared 
at Windsor on the 22nd May, a memorable date, 
for on it was held the final meeting prior to 
a cessation of sport decried by the Government 
in consequence of the great war. For this 
Speedy Two- Year-Old Plate ten ran, and it was 
considered by most men, including Sir William, 
present in the khaki which at this period was so 
conspicuous on all courses, to be a good thing. 
At one time odds of nearly 2 to i were laid on 
the colt, but it became known that Lord Car- 
narvon's Sarrasin was much fancied, and the 
young Bayardo behaved very badly at the post, 
refusing to join his horses, so that his market 
position was affected, it being feared that he 
might be left. He started at 13 to 8 on, 

175 



GALICIA 

2 to I against Sarrasin ; but though the Dame 
d'Or colt was not off first he speedily took his 
place and won from Mr. Frank Curzon's Lady 
Binns, Sarrasin third. I wind up my book on 
the evening of this Windsor Meeting. 



176 



THE PEDIGREE OF BAYARDO 



M 
M 

m 
>, 

rt 

3 
C 
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1 

o 

Q 

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33 


CO 

oo 

m 

Q 

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< 


O N 

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Lord Clifden 
(B. i860). 


Nevvminster 
(B. 1848). 


Touchstone. 


Beeswing. 


The Slave 
(B. 1852). 


Melbourne. 


Volley. 


Lady Langden 
(Br. 1868). 


Kettledrum 
(Ch. 1858). 


Rataplan. 


Hybla. 


Haricot 
(Br. 1847). 


Lanercost. 
Queen Mary. 


Black Duchess 
(Bl. i886). 


Galliard 
(Br. 1880). 


Galopin 
(B. 1872). 


Vedette. 


Flying Duchess. 


Mavis 

(Ch. 1874). 


Marconi. 


Merlette. 


Black Corrie 
(Bl. or Br. "79). 


Sterling 
(B. 1868). 


Oxford. 


Whisper. 


Dau. of 
(B. 1861). 


Wild Dayrell. 


Lady Lurewell. 


00 
00 

£ 

o 

< 

u 

5 
C5 




Vedette 
(Br. 1854). 


Voltigeur 
(Br. 1847). 


Voltaire. 


Martha Lynn. 


Mrs. Ridgway 
(B. i849)t 


Birdcatcher. 
Nan Darrell. 


Flying Duchess 
(B. 1853). 


Flying Dutchman 
(Br. 1846). 


Bay Middleton. 


Barbelle. 


Merope 
(B. 1841). 


Voltaire. 
Velocipede's dam 


■" o 

23 


Isonoiny 
(B. 187s). 


Sterling 
(B. 1868). 


Oxford. 


Whisper. 


Isola Bella 
(B. 1868). 


Stockwell. 


Isoline. 


Lady Muncaster 
(Ch. 1884). 


Muncaster 
(Ch. 1877). 


Doncaster. 


Windermere. 


Blue Light 
(Ch. 1870). 


Rataplan. 
Borealis. 



177 



THE PEDIGREE OF LEMBERG 



(> 

>> 

nJ 
3 
C 
nJ 

>— > 

■a 
1 

i. 

o 

oi 
w 

CQ 


to 

00 

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a 

Z 

2 


Bona Vista 
(Ch. 1889). 


Bend Or 
(Ch. 1877). 


Doncaster 
(Ch. 1870). 


Stockwell. 


Marigold. 


Rouge Rose 
(Ch. iSfes). 


Thormanby. 


Ellen Home. 


Vista 
(Ch. 1879). 


Macaroni 
(B. i860). 


Sweetmeat. 


Jocose. 


Verdure 
(Ch. 1867). 


King Tom. 


Maybloom. 


■•5g 


Isonomy- 
(B. 1875). 


Sterling 
(B. 1868). 


0.xford. 


Whisper. 


Isola Bella 
(B. 1868). 


Stockwell. 


Isoline. 


Distant Shore 
(Ch. 1880). 


Hermit 
(Ch. 1864). 


Newminster. 


Seclusion. 


Land's End 
(Ch. 1873). 


Trumpeter. 
Faraway. 


00 

ON 

00 

M 

o 

u 
< 


am 


Vedette 
(Br. 1854). 


Voltigeur 
(Br. 1847). 


Voltaire. 
Martha Lynn. 


Mrs. Ridgway 
(B. 1849). 


Birdcatcher. 


Nan Darrell. 


Flying Duchess 
(B. 1853). 


Flying Dutchman 
(Br. 1846). 


Bay Middleton. 


Barbelle. 


Merope 
(B. 1841). 


Voltaire. 


Velocipede's dam 


M 

On 

"^' 
offl 
"1 1- 
•-< 


Isonomy 
(B. 187s). 


Sterling 
(B. 1868). 


Oxford. 


Whisper. 


Isola Bella 
(B. 1868). 


Stockwell. 


Isoline. 


Lady Muncaster 
(Ch. 1884). 


Muncaster 
(Ch. 1877). 


Doncaster. 


Windermere. 


Blue Light 
(Ch. 1870). 


Rataplan. 


Borealis. 



178 



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