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Full text of "The garden of desire; love sonnets to a Spanish monk"

THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 



THE 

GARDEN OF DESIRE 

LOVE SONNETS 
TO A SPANISH MONK 

BY 
EDNA WORTHLEY UNDERWOOD 




NEW YORK & LONDON 
MITCHELL KENNERLEY 

1913 



Copyright, IQIJ, by 
Mitchell Kenner/ey 



Printed in America 



I 

THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 



"O, holy God of Love, thou guidest there the 
heart where hindrances are." 

Kalidasa. (Malawika and Agnimitra) 



I HASTENED, homeward through the twilight 
lone 

While on my lips your kisses stung like flame, 
Burning to purest white the rose of shame 

That leaped between us, scarlet lipped, full 

blown ; 
Within my ears your Spanish speech made moan; 

I saw nor mud, mist, gray, wet streets ; there came 
As in a vision, Spain of splendid name. 
Your castle in Love's Land there, we, alone! 

Gone I Gone I Here by the window now I wait 

For him to whom I owe yet give not love ; 
Watching the bird-winged night drop from above, 
Grouped church spires, like frail hands up-flung 

to Fate, 
On windows through which answering night lights 

chime, 
I hear the passionless, cold rain of Winter time! 

[9] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

II 

How well, how well you woo me with soft speech, 

Fire swift my blood with wreathed word divine 1 
"If power to choose Love's own pure tongue were 
mine," 

You said, "I'd choose Italians to teach 
You how I love; but if I must beseech 

As penitent, mercy, pardon divine 
(As now in love's proud passion I seek thine) 

OI let us, Sweet, speak Spanish, each to each!" 

"But if in haughtiness I would command, 

See armies, nations, bow beneath my word, 
Then let the bitter English tongue be heard I" 
"Love! Love!" I cried, "stretch out your 

sceptred hand, 

Put from you the soft vowels that sing of Spain 
Look! Look! I kneel before you in love's 
pain!" 



[10] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

III 

No! No! I told you once, twice, thrice, this 
wise, 

And firmly I said it despite the hand 
That clung about my breasts, the vice-like band 

That passion set on me; despite your eyes 
That eagerly sought mine, their wild surprise 

That trembling with desire I could withstand 
The majesty of Love's greatest command 

Laid on us with the weight of destinies, 

I left, aye!- left you there and went my way. 

Outside I met a woman bent and old, 
A toothless, wrinkled hag, shrunk with Life's cold. 
That sight makes good all sin, I cried, Bright 

Day! 
If age were not and death O! then Here! 

Here! 
Outside your door keep me not waiting, Dear! 



THE GARDEN OE VES1RE 

IV, 

Upon our first great love-night, Heart of Mine, 

You whispered in that golden speech of Spain, 
"My home was Malaga beside the Main." 

'Twas there, I asked, where black the bunched 

grapes shine? 
O sweet, sweet South, I cried, sweet South of thine ! 

A silence fell. We spoke no more again. 
Within your eyes I saw an olden pain; 

O sad, sad South, I thought, sad South of thine I 

Upon my breast bunched black your bright curls 

lay 

Bacchante then and Pan were we that night; 
Grape-God, I call you witness to the sight; 

That night, Grape-God, beneath your mighty 

sway 

Lay not upon my breast in love's sweet pain 
Black grapes from Malaga beside the Main? 



[12] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

V 

You said: "To make more sweet that which will 
be, 

Let's play a part together, you and I. 
See ! I'm a monk, who, in his garden high, 

Doth fast and pray to banish things worldly. 
Down there you come, sad faced, dreaming of me. 

I feel that you 'twixt flowering trees draw nigh; 
I look not lest your lips let love flame high, 

But, rising, thus I bless you prayerfully." 

Senor! that tone! Those gestures strange yet 

stern ! 
Tell me, where did you learn them? Tell me 

true! 
Great God, Senor, an unfrocked priest are you! 

No, no ! No, no ! Enough, your kisses burn 
To-night I swear it! you shall be denied, 
Grief-stricken glooms o'er us The Crucified. 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

VI 

Upon my eyes like rain your kisses fall, 

Soft rain that maketh to be sweet the Spring, 
The time of fairest love's first flowering, 

When mating birds so softly call and call. 
Like rain upon my eyes your kisses fall, 

Bright rain the royal Summer's crown to bring, 
Soft rain upon shy trees that croon and swing, 

Sweet bridal veil of mist that hldeth all. 

Kiss me not thus ! No, no, not thus kiss me. 
The storm's kiss first! when black the day suns 

grow 

And winds nor height, depth, hell nor heaven know 
Yes, yes, the storm's kiss first! Thus thus 

kiss me ! 
Unchain the whirlwinds of your wild desire 

And blind me, blind me, with the lightning's fire ! 



[14] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

VII 

But when I'm worn and weary and would rest, 

And in my ears the storm sounds vaguely far, 
The lightnings fireless as that far night star, 

Then fold me in your arms, upon your breast. 
O ! fold me in your arms ! There let me rest, 

To watch, idly, the fleeing Storm-God's car, 
Rain-mist so soft it may not mark nor mar 

The lily's leaf when sleep and dreams are best. 

Then on my eyes like rain let kisses fall, 

Soft rain that maketh to be sweet the Spring, 

And Winter fields like pink pearls shimmering. 
The bridal veil of mist fall over all! 

From under, as shy crocuses do peep, 

New love shall bud and blossom while I sleep. 



[si 



THE GARDEN O.R DESJRE 

VIII 

Within a gloomy land our love did grow, 

Within a city gray with mist and smoke 
Whose roofs lone prairie levels roughly choke, 

Where no bright, seaward slipping rivers flow, 
Around us rose the din of toil and woe 

Straight church towers whence stern warring bell 

tones broke 

With words of warning when their iron tongues 
spoke, 

Such was the city that our love 'did know! 

Think you we saw it ? No, no 1 This saw we 
A waving field where flame-like flowers bloom, 

[(That fateful flower of old Sicilian doom 
Great Demeter, we thought not then of thee!) 

We plucked. We ate. The fruit was strangely 

sweet, 
And hell and heaven opened at our feet. 



[16] 



IX 

"Be at the opera" you write to-night 

The crimson rose I send on your breast wear, 
My lips had blessed it ere I sent it where 

They, too, have lain and learned love's speech 

aright. 
"I cannot wait" you say "till comes our night; 

Tu esposo I know, yes, he'll be there, 
But that I'll suffer if you'll grant me, Fair, 

One glimpse of you. O ! let me know. Write I 
Write!" 

Yes, Sweet ! and when the trumpets leap and sing, 
And fiddle-bows rise, fall, like trees swaying 

Beneath an angry storm when winds are strong, 
Ear-dulled, the present blotted with the past, 

My love shall rise and reach you, hold you fast, 
And vanish with you on the wings of song! 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 



What pictures do we see when memories frown 

Alone and here together, Dearest One! 
I first saw light beneath a pallid sun, 

The northern stars upon my youth looked down. 
You, where the earth wears best its flowery crown, 

Where fiercest, mightiest, doth blaze the sun, 
Not star-like to it was my pallid one, 

The Southern Cross upon your youth looked 
down. 

O! shed upon me all your blaze of lights, 
Fill well my soul for what it missed of yore, 

Enrich me ever with your flowery lore! 
I can recall no more the northern nights ! 

I know when on my mouth is set your mouth 
The sensuous, sweet savors of the South. 



[18] 



THE GARDEN OF DESJRE 

XI 

There was a little garden that I knew 

Far, far to north where still my childhood 

stays 
The garden of my girlhood, of its Mays, 

Where frail and strange, unreal, dream-flowers 

grew. 
Within that little garden that I knew, 

O ! prim the beds were, straight and white the 

ways, 

All simply made and plain for childhood days, 
There little Love, white-winged, unspotted, flew. 

Think you aught great there is for you I've done? 

My Dream-Tree I have plundered of its toys 
That grew within the garden of my joys I 

In little paths where once sweet Love did run, 
Roam wildly now the gaunt Wolves of Desire 

And blurred the ways, with dead flowers flecked 
and mire. 



[19] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XII 

Unto that little garden sometimes, Love, 

I hasten yet to to yes, to forget 
Tell all its quaintnesses again and let 

Myself learn peace of her who knew not love. 
Yes, yes, unto that garden sometimes, Love, 

I hasten yet to to yes, to forget 
To feel its dear, deep calm again and let 

Hover above my heart Youth's white, white dove. 

No, no! you need not worry lest I stay, 
Forget the lore that I of grief have learned, 

The lore sin red upon my soul has burned 
Tell me why should you worry lest I stay? 

Surely you've heard when of blood tigers taste, 
Not seas can keep them from it mountain 
waste I 



[20] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XIII 

They say that they who've sinned this sin of ours 
May never after death know aught of light; 
Naught can once cleanse their souls, nor make them 

white, 
Nor Lydian scents make sweet the sin-stained 

hours. 
A gate whose whirling swords have lightning's 

powers 

To blast and burn flash outward with such might 
The black and barren road is bleached to bright 
That leads down, downward, where the darkness 
cowers. 

Come, Sweet, lift up your eyes! Be not afraid. 

Behold! within that pit a giant rose, 
Its million, million petals, hearts of those 

Who sinned this sin of ours all undismayed, 
So rich, colossal, glorious and fair 

It dims the white sword-whirl of judgment there I 



[21] 



XIV 

"Quare, dum licet, internos laetemur amantes; 
Non satis est ullo tempore longus amor." 

PROPERTIUS 

Your love has clothed me with a garment fair 

That covers up all soil and smirch and sin, 

From folded feet folds whitely to the chin 

And hallows me as those the saints do wear. 

O, trust me I will keep it spotless, fair, 

For this, your gracious gift, my dreams shall win 

A purity serene, no more therein 

May creep a false thought ever anywhere. 

Yet underneath this love-robe gift of thine 
I know that you'd not sinned this sin of mine 

Nor broken sacred vows as I have done; 

Yet judge me not too harshly, Dear, Dear One, 

Than mortal women I have been most lone, 
The heart must have a home I Let that atone. 



[22] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XV 

Do you recall the day when first we met? 

In The Cathedral 'twas. The service o'er 
Friends introduced us, passed, and said no more, 

And we were left alone, strangers as yet. 
A sad monastic gloom on you was set. 

I sensed your thirst for life, more life, yet more; 
And I, too, was athirst because I wore 

The slave's badge that so sharply helps to whet. 

I went not home. I loathed the narrow streets. 

I longed for country lanes, deep peace of air. 
I left the black-roofed city, hastened where 

I saw the hills. Upon them O ! so sweet 
Thick-banked stood trees like pink mist in the sun, 

Aloud I cried: Thank God! The Winter's 
done! 



[23] 



XVI 

We must be kinder to each other, Dear, 

Than others are whose love by law is blest, 
Slower to wound, cavil, think ill grieve lest 

We break the iris band that binds us near! 
We must be crueller to each other, Dear, 

Than others are whose love by law is blest, 
Quicker to know Truth's shining scalpel's best 

'And use it bravely. No blot can be here ! 

Have you thought where 'tis set, this great love- 
dower ? 

There ! pendulous 'twixt sacrilege and shame, 
Uncertain, floating, impotent to bring 

A permanence. OI would ours were the power 
God-like to make, create a soul, a name, 

And touch it whitely with Life's deathless wing I 



[ 24 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XVII 

You've heard how after some great victory 

The Caesars triumphing came gayly home, 
Red-robed, gold palm-embroidered to Rome 

Gods like unto, with glory good to see, 
On cars charioted of ivory, 

Through gates triumphal, flower-up-built to dome, 
While at their feet the masses moaning roam 

And they, joy-drunk, cry: "/o TriompeJ" 

Thus, Love, at life's high noon enter my heart! 

(Not like one monkish bred, cringing with fear, 
Black clad, furtive of eye for dangers near,) 

Come as the Caesars came ! Be that your part, 
Bright robed, triumphant, bold for victory, 

And o'er my conquered soul cry "Triompe!" 



IE 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XVIII 

You praise'd my speech to-day. You said I'd caught, 

Wandering in many lands 'mong many men, 
Colorful vowel richnesses learned then 

Of many tongues. When first we met you 

thought 
This gave me added charm, that thus I ought 

Be not one woman O! proud praise again! 
But many since I had their tongues and then 

Their charm. Thus, thus you praised me who 
should not. 

But now what think you I have learned of you? 

The Tongue of Love! which I knew not before, 
Nor can they learn it who o'er books do pore. 

That taught you me. It sounds most sweetly too. 
I learned it easily as children play 

When first you said: "Yo t yo amo a te!" 



[26] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XIX 

From Peking westward thirty li there stands, 

To one forth faring through the Tschengi-Thor, 
The Lo-ku Bridge, buttressed, barred both sides o'er 

With lions cunningly so wrought by hands 
Long dead, no one who counts them lives, it stands 

Recorded. Whoso tries, counts o'er and o'er, 
May not cease counting, of aught else think more, 

But goes mad dreaming of a lion that stands 

Upon the Lo-ku Bridge. You said 'twas true. 

And added softer should life call me where 
You are not, and can never be, O ! there 

I'd go mad dreaming of the lips of you, 
Counting the kisses that you gave to me 

In midnights dark as old Teng's dynasty! 



[*7l 



THE GARDEN OF ^DESIRE 

XX 

You said O ! how the words did surge my soul 

And to far finger tips send blood to spin 
That always ere the bold day does begin 

You think of me ; your thoughts my thoughts con 
trol 
Ere day does of its noisy strife unroll; 

Far, far across the sweet, unreal, mist-thin 
City that sleeps, you claim me yours and win 

A space for us not time's unspotted, whole. 

And always in the dawn I feel you near. 

Then like souls in gray Hades we two go 
Forth through the silvery silence, there to know 
The things that they know not whose love's less 

dear. 
Be this our dwelling, this pale silent land 

Where Life a dream like day waits our com 
mand. 



[28] 



XXI 

Our love is like a Japan print, you think, 

Rare mulberry-paper one, like gold that's dead? 
Foreground a garden, kiosk-canopied 

O'er moon-eyed, magic flowers of black and pink; 
Curved, quaint-bridged river; temple on the brink 

Where lidless eyed sits Buddah unwearied, 
Dreaming that time is naught, the now even sped. 

To westward over all black bird-dots sink. 

Background, a fairy sea of dreamland blue 

Whence mountains rise that surely once we knew 

In some dim other life too sweet for words. 

Aye! Aye! our Love-Land! But those black, 
black birds 

Too like they are to monks who hovered where 
That old Greek garden of the world was fair. 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 



XXII 

"Flutes and mandolins a Spanish melody nothing more. 
Yet it seemed as if the night were speaking, or out of the 
night some passional life long since melted into Nature's 
mystery" . 

LAFCADIO HEARN 

Last night shall I forget it ere I die? 

I lay within a chamber curtained in 
With red rich hangings such as Arabs spin, 

Sombre of depth, tragic, where shadows lie. 
You reached your lute and played a song keyed high 

Upon soft undercurrents, trilled and thin, 
Weaving an old love-song of Spain's therein, 

Sprayed fine as waters are when winds are nigh. 

And then you played no more again that night. 

Nor of song's silver stream did I care more. 
I looked into your eyes. There black and bright 

An ocean did unroll sans sound, depth, shore 
Across it sped as once of old the dove, 

The golden, glittering, galleons of love ! 

[30] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 
XXIII 

"Quanta e bello giovinezzal 

Ma sen fugge tuttavia, 
Chi vuol esser lieto sia 

Di doman non v'e certezza" 

LORENZO DE MEDICI 

No, no, why talk of this, your faith, to me ! 

In life are nobler things than fast and prayer 
Or silent meditation cloistered where 

The real things cannot touch us vividly. 
Give me the storm, the struggle! Aye I give me 

A taste of all that is or here or there, 
For I would touch life richly everywhere 

An earth-lyre for emotion's mastery. 

Dear One, Dear One, I firmly do believe 

(O! look not at me thus with eyes that grieve!) 
That if there is the Heaven to which you pray 

Unto the cloistered will its keeper say: 
"A garden rich I gave you. Now speak truth 
What did you with my greatest gift 'your 
youth?" 

[30 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XXIV 

You spoke upon a sudden words like these 

Towering above me in the crimson room 
To anger stung by some word said too soon: 

"Aman terriblemente en mi pais!" 
Terriblemente aman en mi pais! 

Cold sensuality's not there the boon 
We crave; instead, the force, fury of noon 

Which like flame purifies impurities. 

The whirlwinds gulfed me from your passion's 
height 

And swept me outward, 'cross a sea of night, 
Night amethystine, purple, rich, and deep 

Where multi-colored stars their watches keep 
And sing in whirling splendor words like these 

"Aman terriblemente en mi pais/" 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XXV 

Mazeltov 

O! sweet is your forgiveness, Dear, to me, 

How sweet I think and think and cannot tell; 
If Love's a great, great thirst it is the well 

Where I, a desert wanderer, drink gladly; 
But if it's health and life lived brave and free, 

It is as pure white lilies that for a spell 
Cool fever's brow and of green meadows tell 

Such, Dear, has your forgiveness been to me. 

And then the little word with which it came, 
The Hebrew "mazeltov" To you joy's flame! 

I hug it to my heart as they of yore 

Who heard it, perchance, by the palace door 

Of one who gloried in proud Babylon 
And learned of love beneath a younger sun. 



[33] 



XXVI 

Mazeltov 

To-day is still the day that sweet word came 

Yet must I watch it ebb to Time's great sea 
And there to mingle with eternity, 

Lose sense and form and be no more a name. 
And yet 'tis still the day. The words I frame, 

While ocean-like night's mists rise stealthily; 
Beneath my window here there spreads a sea 

From which twin church-spires spin like fireless 
flame. 

Behold! the west has opened. Bless you, Day! 

You would be gracious to me? You would stay? 
And all the sky is flecked with tumbled light, 

Wave beating upon wave, outbreasting night, 
Up-wrapped as in a glory I do feel 

Seeing outflung the roses of Castile ! 



[34] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XXVII 

'Tis only these our bodies that are near! 

Our souls are sphered in two far heavens of space 
Where naught each of the other may we trace 

Nor feel the freshness of a love-wrung tear. 
All kindliness does your heaven ensphere, 

Mercy and the tender, piteous grace 
Of Judah's chosen, the divine, sad face 

That smiled its blessing down the ages drear. 

Within my heaven ideal Beauty stands, 

The chaste white goddess of the cruel hands 

And smileless lips who gives naught and asks all, 
From whom our praises slip as scorned gems fall. 

Yet would I have her other if I could? 

Her slaves have said Beauty's as great as Good ! 



[35] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XXVIII 

You asked me why I love you. This is why, 

Told in the Hebrew lore: The Mischna tells 
How Abraham, a boy, his idols sells, 

Then, tiring, searched for God both far and nigh. 
Night came. He saw the stars strew thick the sky, 

"Surely that's God !" The moon rose with her 

spells. 
"No, no, that's God!" Awe from his spirit wells: 

But moon and stars fade fast and night passed 
by. 

Rich with the fervor of its sun rose day. 

"I know now none has found God and none may! 
The force is He behind the day and night!" 

Cried Abraham in rapture at the light. 
Thus I love not for outward shows nor gold, 

But for the silent love your heart does hold. 



[36] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XXIX 

I, too, have touched Life's idols, found them clay, 

Then, broken-hearted, sought some better thing, 
The while unfolded o'er me like a wing 

The panorama of the night and day. 
A petty part I played within a play 

While Spring and Summer scenery did fling 
Round me fit for the great gods glorying, 

And set suns, gem-like, on the breast of day. 

At last the power behind it I did learn. 

I met you and the meaning was made clear; 
Then I built worthy of the garden here. 

My heart's a dwelling now gods may not spurn, 
So high it towers it tops the clouds above 

To house you fittingly, my Love, my Love I 



[37] 



THE GARDEN O.E DESIRE 

XXX 

Gale'd 

Jacob and Laban for their love's great need 

A stone tower built as Hebrew scholars know 
To mark the ending of a grievous woe, 

Upon stone then set stone, crying "God 
speed!" 
Finished, they prayed: "Be this now called Gale'd! 

Past it let each to other never go 
With thought of anger, grief, suspicion, woe, 

For peace must rest upon the tower Gale'd" 

Thus to us be, O Love! this crimson room 
So rich with curtains of an orient bloom 

Which sun-pale women wrought, dreaming of men 
Who'd rush to meet them with the dusk again; 

Whene'er we enter here let sad thoughts be 
Deep buried in our love's immensity. 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XXXI 

Faith is the soul's pure garment, is it not, 

That covers well from cold within a world 
Divine things had not been in, had not whirled 

From battlemented light the Demon, Thought; 
Whose soul-garment is richest he cannot 

See grief nor sorrow plainly, though unfurled 
The black, tear-dyed pinions of Death's own world 

A-flutter o'er his head, of horror wrought. 

Outside your sheltered warmth, a pilgrim, I 
Do come and lowly kneel where you sit high 

Soul-naked do I come as humble ones 

Who in some fair, far south seek meed of suns 

O ! crueller than to them rude Winter's wing, 
Life's storms to her who seeks such sheltering! 



[39] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XXXII 

That little song you sang to me, Dear One, 

Has blotted out the present, brought to view 
This painted vision that a pagan knew: 

Quai of Alexandria, low, fading sun, 
Frail, floating, purple night-shadows that run 

Across sands deeply bronze, dulled by no dew; 
A maid, nude, save for gauze crocus in hue 

Through which shines polished flesh like to a sun. 

Two flute players stroll past unto the feasts, 

Flower-ankleted and girdled Joy's young Priests; 

Beside the crocus maid they pause and sing 
In shrill tones colored like the bronze evening. 

She hears and trembles her gold gauzes through: 
"O le desir est douloureux et doux!" 



[40] 



XXXIII 

We met last night beside a northern lake 

Whirled there 'cross prairie levels bleached with 

heat, 
For rain athirst, as we athirst to meet 

And in the northern night our longing slake. 
Beneath our window spread, far, pale, the lake 

Crooning a song of sleep, belated, sweet, 
Away, away, the veiled moon did fleet, 

Dream shadow for the rhythmic night to wake. 

Clear came the dawn, and chill and coldly blue, 
Black, stern, upon the shore pines rose to view. 

Beneath our window floated in from far, 

Dead fish, silver, shining, as young moons are; 

Out o'er that azure distance pure as prayer 

I looked and knew that that night storms dwelled 
there. 



[40 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XXXIV 

Just as we left the lake I saw near by 

A night-bird sheltered in a black pine's shade, 
By bold bright thunder of the light dismayed, 

There fled to shelter till dusk touched the sky. 
Within his mimic night he nestled nigh 

Unto the great tree's trunk, blinking, afraid; 
Grief clutched my heart. Like him you are not 
made 

For noisy daylight, I think quick, and sigh. 

You are my black, black night-bird! Well I know 
You'll leave me for the dusk again and go 

Through twilights on and on, forgetful, free, 
Pale silences down-floating, far from me, 

And I shall be as in daylight a star 

That fades and falters where the lightnings are. 



[42] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XXXV 

O! Love's a crystal cup filled rim to rim 

And set for us by gods at Life's banquet, 
Where we may drink and drink as Titans yet 

Find always there is sweetness at the brim: 
When laughter's ringing loud, who sits there grim 

And scorns the gift, the best the gods have set, 
Will find it empty if he try to wet 

Late at Life's banquet board dead lips and dim. 

Come, Love, I pledge you in this goodly gift! 

High ! high ! above our heads the cup now lift I 
Let's drain it here together, you and I, 

For ages that come after we'll not sigh, 
For we have bought the best with this our breath 

Alone remembered joy is safe from death. 



[43] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 
XXXVI 

"Of palagio d'llio, in alta stanza " 

GABRIELE D'ANNUNZIO 

I'm grateful for that sonnet that you read 

With such a thrill of voice I seemed to see 
The laughing Cyclades again, gayly 

Ships slipping down the shining wind's roadsteac 
That sweeps to Troy. 'Twas like a frame you said 

That sonnet in the tongue of Italy, 
To frame one fine last line, clean-chiselled, free 

The love-night of two lovers long since dead. 

Helen, the white loved one, it said, grieved not 
Nor evermore of Greece, home, kindred, thought 

The while the ship sped on. There rose to mind. 
Like visions of the day unto the blind, 

A room wherein rich gems Love's luster shed 
Upon a cedar-wrought, gold, gleaming bed. 



[44] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 
XXXVII 

"Mujer mas pura que la luz serena, 
'Mas negra que la sombra del pecado." 

How I do love your voice when thus you read 
The poets of your soft and southern tongue 
Whose vowels are like silver prayer-bells rung 
Within the oratory of Love's creed, 
Where longing is the incense to up-speed, 
And consonants are hushed like prayer among 
Gray, gliding nuns, when vesper songs are sung 
And they ask pardon for sins sweet indeed. 

The last line ! How your voice did tremble there, 
Caressing lovingly each cadenced sound, 

Tonal sonorousness, new, rich, soon found 
To weave a magic on the waiting air I 

I love you for that subtle sense of art 
Where one with me forever is your heart. 



[45l 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XXXVIII 

My heart is filled with joy like spring-fed streams 
Which bubbling overflow a barren land, 
To leave with lavishness on either hand 
Green ripple of leaf-dance, and petal gleams. 
My heart is filled with joy like spring-fed streams 
By floating, fragile, white mist-billows fanned, 
Prismatic curtains by the sun's light planned, 
The substance iridescent of our dreams. 

My heart is filled with joy, for Love dwells there, 
New Heaven for me making and new Earth 

Love! Love! the God-dream, that to joy gives 

birth. 
'Tis this I know well makes the world so fair, 

'Tis this which is the music all things sing 
The crocus dawn the sunset crimsoning. 



[46] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XXXIX 

Late met we last night by the lake again 

When faint for dawn I felt the dark to be; 
Mist-veiled, the water lay all silently, 

An opal, mystic, dim, Hungarian. 
Beneath its milky whiteness I knew when 

The call of day came crisping clear and free, 
Troubling within the trees birds dream-drowsy 

A maze of misty flame would leap again. 

So from my heart as night mists dropped adown 
And earth became an opal for Love's crown, 

No real world anywhere, nothing but this, 
I knew that with sun-splendor of your kiss 

There'd come a wonder as with dawn there came 
And from Love's opal heart would leap a flame. 



[47] 



THE GARDEN OR DESIRE 

XL 

We waked not till again the cruel 'day came. 

The level lake with fire was burnished white. 
It bit into the eyes, wounded the sight, 

And all the barren land was like a flame. 
We lay beside a window wherein came 

The scent and sight of cedars, their slim height 
Above them, higher towering, black as night, 

One sad and sombre pine the badge of shame 

Within its glooming shadows I saw glare 
The night-bird of the wild and awful stare, 

My black, black Bird of Night, to you I cried, 
In peace let me a little, pray, abide, 

Then to your twilights take me, Bird of Night, 
Since now I'm one with you: I fear the light. 



[48] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XLI 

Again, again you ask how you can know 
How much I really love you? This to me! 
All women I do envy that I see 
If they have aught of youth or charm to show, 
And wonder, would you like me better so, 
If better thus, if thus changed I might be, 
Count o'er the years of youth still left to me 
Praying: "Dear God, make time go very slow!" 

For you I've plunged me from calm's peerless 

height, 

And dwarfed my soul for Envy's shabby door ; 
Yet know that I would cry: "Dear God, give 

more!" 

If for the asking I could have to-night 

Gold Helens and all dear dead ones' beauty 

Since for your love so little it would be. 



[49] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XLII 

He said when ready for the ball I stood 

Mi esposo "These gems will you not wear?" 
Down bending then to fasten pearl tears where 

You've set the rubies of Love's solitude. 
And I said, laughing strangely, wild of mood 

"I'd like a corsage gem of grapes to wear 
Upon my breast, my arms, my throat, my hair 

Black, bursting grapes, the fiercest suns hav 
wooed!" 

And all night while the music rose and fell 

I felt your black curls touch me, loved them well 

Felt float across my face spice scents from south, 
Felt on my lips the hot breath of your mouth, 

Vineyards I saw, gold-dusted grapes in stack 
Your black, black curls flung passionately back. 



[50] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XLIII 

How ebon rich, how wondrous, is your hair! 

When here it floats beside me darkly free, 
This is the vision that I seem to see: 

A roof in Nineveh the Ancient where 
Night long there pulses upward on the air 

The breath of the great earth-breast's heat 

fiercely, 
A Titan's passion like to, first set free 

With blackness of the night, exhaustless, there. 

A3 woman, passion-pale, with gems like rain, 
Leans listless by stone parapets, again 

Lifts arms voluptuous toward where afar 
A rider's armor shines beneath a star, 

Her jewels all a-shiver as a pearl 

When into ocean depths die sun-rays whirl. 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XLIV 

To-night a magic sail, Love, is your hair 

That wafts o'er waters that know not the sun, 
Where stars come not, nor bright the dawn lights 
run, 

And black a basalt palace towers there. 
There mingle all night long upon the air 

The murmurings of Love's oblivion, 
With songs of many waters, one by one 

Flung o'er stone dream of arches black and bare. 

Voluptuously listening here I lie 

Learning the languors of that unseen sea, 

Its rich accords, its magic, mystery. 

The night grows deep within your eyes my sky. 

There wild stars rise. Soon, soon our love will be 
Swelling the black night palace harmony. 



[52] 



THE GARDEN OR DESIRE 

XLV 

Your hair I love despite its selfish hue 

Made up of treasured sun-gold held in fee, 
Not one reflected ray has been set free, 

Therefore it is so brightly black to view. 
Ages of eastern passion made this hue 

Dark as its deepest midnights ere can be, 
Splendid as noons the skies strike blanchingly, 

So fiercely black, so cruelly bright it grew. 

Gold hair gives back again whate'er it takes, 
Much shine and shimmer in the sunlight makes; 

Your hair for aeons has drunk deep the sun; 
Slow ages swirl beneath me, one by one; 

Unto my heart come thoughts that I fear there, 
At sight of the black passion of your hair 1 



: [53l 



THE GARDEN OF, DESIRE 



XLVI 

When in your hair like this I hide my face 

I sense sharp savors of Autumn divine, 
See tree-boles black against the dusky shine 

Of early night; frost-blooms like flaunted lace 
Upon the hills; flocked birds sweeping through 
space; 

Sombre the forest aisles, all powdered fine 
With twilight dust sepia crystalline 

And to my heart, too, twilight comes apace. 

What is that numbing fragrance in your hair ! 

Down those dim forest aisles, lo ! dancing there, 
One scarlet clad! Slow notes shiver the night. 

They tremble down her head disks like sunlight; 
By subtle Moorish scents my face is fanned 

O ! dance for me again the Saraband 1 



TJ4] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XLVII 

Couleur tabac d'Espagne your eyes are, Love, 

Clearly and sweetly brown, with sun shone 

through 
At mid-day when of merry mood are you 

Mirth's mirrors, such as brooklets to the dove. 
Couleur topaz d'Espagne my tawny Love 

Topazes filled with diamond's eyes of you 
When shadows lengthen and soft falls the dew 

Dusk's jewelled passion Oh! my tawny Love! 

But when midnight her magic does distil, 
Then fathomless, a black abyss, your eyes 

Where death, destruction lurk, and whence arise 
Sweet danger calls that swift my pulses thrill. 

Yes, yes, 'tis Fate that's king and ruleth all; 
Lo ! I am one to whom the deeps do call. 



T5J] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

XLVIII 

Our arms together twined twin marbles are: 

Yours, brown, Numidian, warm, turquoise-veined, 
Mine, pale Pentelican, rose, faintly stained 

Two tinted figurines of Tanagra. 
In mine I see the north which snowfields mar, 

In yours I see the languors unrestrained 
Of Asiatic noons Afric regained 

Life lived beneath a sun oracular. 



Be to me, Sweet, a city of the south, 

The garden of its richness be your mouth; 

In kisses pour Egyptian lavender, 

The strange, sleep-swaying scents of Lydia, 

Pour on my arms to dull their sharp whiteness 
Rose-liquor from the mountains of Cyprus! 



[56] 



THE GARDEN OF. DESIRE 



XLIX 

"Chmnque venne qui, porto con se il suo mistero amoroso." 

MATILDE SERAO 

This vision of my childhood comes to me: 

A little river by my northern home, 
A mountain river, noisy, white with foam, 

Brave-hearted, full of laughter, song and glee, 
Myself like to in those old days care-free, 

It longed for other scenes and left the home ; 
I met it far away, now silent grown 

Mid meadows; sad, with nearness of the sea. 

O little mountain river I I'm like you, 

Hushed, silenced, by the wonder of life, too, 
Struck fear-dumb by the nearness of a sea 

Which, as for you the ocean, waits for me; 
Were it not there with cruel, baleful glow 

I'd not have lived life thus O no, no, no ! 



C57l 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

L 

O let me be a child to you to-night ! 

Take from me lore of love and all its pain, 

Then tell some fabled tale of olden Spain 

And let me listen with a child's delight! 

O let me be a child to you to-night ! 

So tired am I of stress and strife and strain 

Of life the puzzle naught can now make plain, 

Of balance keeping between wrong and right 1 

You've asked me often if I ever pray. 

Can any to that question answer nay? 
What are ambition, effort, life but prayer, 

What are all great desires everywhere? 
I'm praying now beneath your eyes' love-light 

O let me be a child again to-night I 



[58] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

LI 

Upon this point of time flung island-wise 

Between two boundless oceans deep as thought, 
With up-surge of the world-tides we are caught 

And for a moment held in poised surprise. 
The beacon of desire flames in our eyes, 

We stretch out tremblingly hands love-distraught 
And clasp each other close, caring for naught, 

High on the pinnacle of destinies. 

And you are happy, Love! You think we go 
On, on, hand clasped in hand, forever so, 

And carelessly kiss me with soft caress ; 
I kiss back with a passion measureless 

Because I know that even to hope is vain 
The deeps will never let us meet again 1 



[59] 



THE GARDEN OF, DESIRE 

LII 

I look out toward the gray Missouri Hills. 

Behold ! there Spring comes back to us again, 
Upon my window beats its first wild rain 

And scents of Summer now the dawn distils. 
Trees, prayerful, armed, ascetic, some joy thrills. 

Shining gun-metal gray the long streets stain 
Where pales the passion of the first Spring rain, 

Sweeping from off the gray Missouri Hills. 

Adown their shimmering length looking I see 
The colors as of rainbows steal softly; 

Unseen hands crocuses and jonquils fling, 
I see the splendors of immortal Spring 

And know 'tis but reflection of my heart 

Eternal Spring dwells where enthroned thou art. 



[60] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

LITI 

You took my fingers thus and bent them back, 

Slowly, then one by one, giving to each 
Some special love-name from your Spanish speech 

"Muy carinoso" sadly said Alack! 
Plucked them as petals from your passion's track, 

Stripped bare the trembling flower-heart to beseech 
The red, red rose your lips leaned low to reach 

Unto my palm the fingers thus bent back. 

You said: "Now close your hand, quick! quick, Dear 
One! 

I've sealed upon it there in Moorish guise 
The rose-tree seal of Allah's Paradise; 

Should I be ever where you're not, Dear One, 
Like Life's tree which by sacred Tesnim grew, 

This rose shall bud and blossom shelter you !" 



[61] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

LIV 

How can it matter what they were to me, 

The old, old lovers of the days long dead, 
Nor what they whispered fondly, what I said, 

Since it is all so far away from me ! 
O! blot not thus hours bought so bitterly 

By useless brooding o'er things vanished, dead; 
The past, Dear, is a tide that's hastened 

Back, back again unto the shoreless sea. 

O foolish, foolish fond one that you are! 

How much you owe them of the long ago 
Who taught me lore of love, its restless woe 

Love ! Love ! the bitter art whose masters are 
Than Spartan mothers crueller since they say 

The arms that bring you joy likewise must slay! 



[62] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

LV 

Sadly I watched the dancers gayly dressed 

A silken river of frail iris sheen 
O'er-fluttered by winged fans; watched heads down 
lean 

In languor to be sweetly word caressed; 
O ! weary was the heart within my breast 

Though ribboned light on mirrored walls such 

sheen 
Of bright foam flung, as when flowers overlean 

A river's marge and dance at wind's behest. 

Outside within the night your lute-string trilled. 

The yellow whirling ball-room floated far, 
We stood together 'neath the morning star; 

You reached a lilac branch with blossoms filled, 
O'er me was flung its jewelled, fragrant rain 

"Love! clasp me close," I cried, "the dawn 
again!" 



[63] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

LVI 

I dreamed a dream of fields vivid with Spring, 
Strown o'er with scentless flowers of fleckless 

white 
Which said: "We are thy youth's first loves!" 

Aright 

They seemed to me as snow upon the Spring. 
This dream passed. Next into Doom's Land I 

swing, 

Before from the abyss there rose to sight 
One giant amorous lily, black as night 
A flame of ebony the days there bring. 

The Doom-Pit and the lily were as one. 

I dropped down their entangling, dim twilight, 
In sable petals folded deep as night, 

Dreaming how once you said to me, Dear One, 
When eagerly you leaned my hair to kiss 

"Your eyes are a black dangerous abyss I" 



[64] 



LVII 

"Espejo encantado? . . . Espejo encantado 
gomo en el que Fans to mirb a Margarita, 

donde se proyecta, donde resuscita 
visiones efimeras todo lo pasado." 

FRANCISCO VILLAESPESA 

At night, twin urns, your eyes are filled with sleep 

From some far, silent sea I do not know, 
Some far, far sea whither I may not go, 

Where you do leave me for the tideless deep. 
At dawn when you come back again you keep 

Your soul so recessed, hidden from me so, 
Our old love seems as steps in melting snow 

Hastening unto the twin, dim urns of sleep. 

As one within a twilight lone I feel 

While gorgeous-winged some great strange bird 

sweeps past 
And brushes me with wings ah! brightly vast. 

The promise that Life longs for most I feel 
Has flashed its gold upon me. I can keep 
Only the shadow in the urns of sleep. 
[65] 



LVIII 

The Spring sun has swathed us in its toga'd light. 

O ! why were we not born in Sybaris ! 
I smell Damascus roses, sharp iris, 

See streets Lucanian, gay, thus by night: 
Rich balconies of marble hid from sight 

By tapestries and silks of Sybaris; 
The peplus purpling, the bold chlamys; 

Greeks ankleted in gems; while buskined bright 

Soft-footed Asiatics come and go; 

Women with pale eyelids powdered blue, 
Upon their lips that smile the sphinxes knew; 

Men calm of face as chiselled cameo, 
All sauntering unto some love-bought bliss. 

O ! why were we not born in Sybaris 1 



[66] 



THE GARDEN OF VESIRE 

LIX 

With a Gift of Eastern Perfume 

Egyptian baccharis! This gift I prize. 

Of old your slave as now I watched you go 
With one crowned with the pheasant's topaz glow. 

"Who's that," she cried, "whose heart shakes in 

her eyes?" 
To me pointing. I dared not run nor rise, 

But, crouching, o'er your baccar buds bent low. 
A slave with flowers only a queen may know? 

Some royal lover, hath she, I surmise ! 

Straightway within her eyes my doom I read. 

Like lightning blue the lances shook o'er me. 
I was not worth your crown I How could I be I 

But when within your eyes the look I read, 
I thought: "For this death's cheap aye I cheap 
the price 

For one such other I would meet it twice I" 



[67] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 
LX 

"Che fai tu, luna, in del? dimmi, che fai, 
Silenz'io sa luna?" 

LEOPARDI 

How sad, how sad the moon is, Dear, to-night, 

And strangely chill the wind, as if it came 
From barren space beyond the bright sun's flame; 

To-night there dwells a horror in the night. 
How sad, how sad the wind is, Dear, to-night, 

And O I so full of grief, regret, and shame 
And fear of thousand things that have no name 1 

The stars even wink back their tears, to-night. 

O! break upon me, storm of grief break! break! 

Hiding black hearts behind that pallid moon, 
The sooner will come calmness, sun, and noon. 

Take me within your arms, Dear, quickly take ! 
I'm so afraid of life, aye! love I seem 

To want to die awhile then wake to dream. 



[68] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

LXI 

How sad, how sad the moon is, Dear, to-night 

Pale woman in her grave-clothes seeking there 
Along the azure meadows of the air, 

The way that leadeth back to life and light. 
She trembles and her face with fear is white 

Astray amid that cold strange splendor there; 
Gold star-flowers stare with eyes that do not care 

.While she gropes broken-hearted down the night. 

Pull low that purple lilac ! Yes ! this way. 

When list! you kiss me thus, let her not see, 
She's so athirst for love she'd envy me, 

Poor, poor lost lonely one, wound her not, pray! 
Why, Dear, the glad great gods themselves I think 

For kisses such as these would cross death's brink ! 



[69] 



THE GARDEN OF. DESIRE 
LXII 

"Venisti. O nuntii beati." 

CATULLUS 

The stars are trembling wind-blown lamps to-night 
By nymphs upheld whose bare, white feet now flee 
Adown the winding stairs of ivory 
That cross the terraced Garden of the Night. 
Sly Nymphs! How they spin on in fluttered flight 
Their misty, gossamer gowns out-floating free, 
Dot-like, red, little mouths; eyes wide to see; 
Hair like sun-flushed tree-tops at sweet twilight. 

Unto the Opal Chambers of the Moon, 
The irised chambers of old revelry 
They hasten down Night's stairs of ivory. 
Faint grow the little star-lamps. They fade soon. 
But through frost ferns faint, pallid lustres creep 
Where white-armed little Nymphs sleep love's deep 
sleep. 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 
LXIII 

"Scrivo sol per sfogar I'interna doglia" 

VlTTORIA COLONNA 

My heart's a wound of piteousness to-day 

Because our crimson room last night was seen 

The shadow of all sin since time has been 
That color that Macbeth washed not away. 

Fear came between our kisses then. "Nay! nay! 
The world, how can it know our love has been?" 

The moon look! tells it now to stars that lean 

In eagerness; and they to winds that sway 

The talking trees. Ah! when I leave you, Dear, 
What horrors in the dawn upon me'll seize 

At many fingered mockery of leaves 

A-point at me ! The world will see will hear' 

The merciless white Day no one deceives, 
And O! all those black-fingered, scornful trees! 



II 

THE PASSING OF LOVE 



"Now, thou Hyacinth, whisper the letters on thee 
graven and add a deeper ai, ai to thy petals." 

Moschus 



"Partir c'est mourir un pen!" 

FRANCESCO PAOLO TOSTI 

1T\AY! and its light falls on a thousand hills! 
--^ Day ! and its strength flows in upon the heart I 
High up in air fine fleece-white clouds do part, 

And countless little valleys now light fills. 
Midsummer's ecstasy the whole world thrills; 

Drowsing the ox pulls slow the creaking cart 
Nor pauses at bird-trill to look, or start, 

Nepenthes with the Summer day distils. 

O Summer, red-lipped Summer, on my soul 

Pour all your sleep-sweet balms I There stop the 
roll 

Of longing, futile thought, repining pain 
That like thy hills I, too, may know again 

Though he be gone the mid-day's drowsy deep; 
Summer, for me dreamless nepenthes steep ! 



[75] 



THE GARDEN OR DESIRE, 

II 

The Dream of Spain 

Tad'ma's Italian Spring! the languor, light, 

That bathes in lucent waves that marbled sweep 
Veined rich as are those women there who keep, 

Idling by day, flower-crowned, a dream of night! 
Frail, blossom-hung, a pink Spring tree to right, 

Where silent, saffron-robed, one watch does keep 
O'er waters deep as are his own thoughts deep, 

Scorning near joys for fancy's fond delight. 

1 never yet saw sun a sea so blue, 
So Tyrian-toned, so violet-rich in hue ! 

There he who watches sees (or is't a dream, 
Or where sunbeams, glancing, on billows gleam?) 

Haze-crested hills, a gold and magic main, 
And whispers softly as now I : "Spain ! Spain !" 



THE GARDEN OF 'DESIRE 

III 

Let there be dance and laughter, sound of song, 

Soft glances interchange and merriment, 
That from Joy's too full cup to others sent 

Drops overflowing to me may belong. 
Let me be 'mid the laughter-loving throng, 

To my dead heart their life-passion be lent, 
Who now am but a beggar worn and bent, 

Crouched down by others' fires when winds are 
strong. 

That it could not have lasted, well I know 
Too few alas ! youth's years now left to me ; 

Love's spared itself a hideous tragedy, 

Than which none bitterer life has to show < 

The tragedy of them that Time has sold, 
The vision of a woman growing old! 



[77] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

IV 

Within the Summer dawn I 'dreamed a dream 

Of sand wastes where a strange procession came: 
Men patriarchal, stern, robed in white flame, 

Who knelt and lifted empty hands that seem 
To plead for something, while with scorn supreme: 

"Thy future years are we ! Ask not our name ! 
We empty-handed come. Each one the same." 

I knew they reached the gray horizon's gleam. 

"Look! Look behind 1" I cried "the cherubs 
there 

Upholding each a wine glass, rich, flower-crowned, 
Mirrored within whose radiant deeps is found 

My love and I immortal earth-gods fair. 
The future, stern, stern keepers, take ! 'tis thine. 

I care not, for that red rose past is mine I" 



[78] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 



If life and love are garments that grow old 

And frayed and soiled as those that beggars wear, 
I'll put them from me while they still are fair. 

And purply splendid, still undimmed their gold. 
I will not suffer word of them be told 

That's pitiful or hath a grievous air, 
Joy shall be on them blazoned everywhere 

As on twin standards of the warrior soul. 

I will not wait till Hope that coward bird 
Does backward fly becoming Memory, 

Untruths to prattle to me foolishly. 

The day that first my heart shall bring me word 

I'll leave forever these twin robes of state 

And laugh to know Grief could not make me wait 



[79] 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

VI 

For days I sit and think and cannot speak. 

Forgotten have I how to live, it seems, 
Without you altar-place of all my dreams 

The heart it is so pitiful and weak. 
For days I sit and think and cannot speak 

While round me living murmurs till it seems 
The rushing water round some wrecked ship's beams, 

Nor know day's joined with day, nor week with 
week. 

And then some word you said to me comes back, 
Some little word you whispered long ago, 

And I forget my grief and wake to know 
The miracle the rolling year brings back, 

The miracle of joy one word can bring 
That one small violet can make a Spring. 



THE GARDEN OF DESIRE 

VII 

To Spain, Good Stranger? There it is you go! 

I pray you then seek out one that I knew 
And for me tell him O ! I pray you to ! 

Look not for him where piled up gold's aglow, 
Nor where the servile courtier bendeth low, 

Nor yet indeed where banked spears filtering 

through 
Sharp steel light falls pallid and cold as dew, 

Where'er the humble kneel in prayer, there, go. 

'Tis there you'll find him where the tapers show 
His hands in blessing lifted. Then, O then, 

For me say this say it again ! again ! 

(I crave your pardon, Stranger. Say not so.) 

But is he happy? That I have not heard 
Look in his eyes and then then send me word ! 



[81] 



THE GARDEN OR DESIRE 

VIII 

Theocritus who sang in Sicily, 

By ./Etna where are shepherds' pipes a-ring, 
Made thus unto the night a maiden sing: 

"Moon- Wheel, the one I love draw unto me." 
O ! would that I could pray thus, Moon, to thee, 

And be as sure as she some peace to bring, 
Simaetha, 'neath the laurels silvering, 

In old Sicilian gardens by the sea. 

I pray to thee, Great Moon, make me forget ! 

O ! gracious Lady Moon, let me forget 
And love but beauty only as of yore ! 

Soon now upon the grass beside my door 
The Fall will fling the poplars' pallid gold 

Let me forget and love it as of old 1 



DATE DUE 



PRINTED IN US. A. 



PS3541 N55G3 1913 
Underwood, Edna Worthley, 

1873-1961 . 
The garden of desire 



UC SOUTHERN REGIONAL LIBRARY FAI 



AA 001 235140 9 



NIVERSITY OF CA 



UNIVERSIT 

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RIVERSIDE LIBRARY 



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