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Full text of "Gazetteer and business directory of Onondaga County, N. Y., for 1868-9"

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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 




833 01178 3286 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 




WHOLESALE MUSIC HOUSE, 

No. 2 Wieting Block, Salina Street, 

SYRACUSE, IV. Y. 
O-xrexr 3E*ifty Varieties of 

PUD FORTES, ORGANS, 



^-xa-d. 



MELODEONS, 

Of First-Class Makers, including the 

gteinway, Dunham, Bradbury, Central, Arlon, Hallet A: Davis, 
ITIcCammon (Boardnian & Gray,) Vose, Miller, and others. 

Also tie SdQ Orp, Bnrflett Orp, and Other 

FIRST CLASS MAKE. 

Sheet Music and Musical Merchandise of all kinds. Wholesale and 

Retail Prices the same as at New York and Boston. 

SATISFACTION WARE A NT ED IN EVERY TRANSACTION. 

Money Saved by calling on or writing to 

REDINCTON & HOWE, 

MUSIC PUBLISHERS AND DEALERS, 

No. 2 WIETING BLOCK, Opp. Main Entrance to Syracuse House. 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



NOTTINGHAM & TUCKER, 

Real Estate Brokers 



AND 



LAW OFFICE, 

33 South Salina Street, 

(American Express Building,) Syracuse, N. Y. 

Farm, City and Village Property, 

Of all Descriptions and In Every Section, 
BOUGHT, SOLD AND EXCHANGED on individual account and on commission. 

We ask no Commission unless Sale is perfect- 
ed, and no Charge to Purchasers under 
any Circumstances. 

Particular attention paid to the drawing of all kinds of papers, and examinations 
of titles. Al*o 

NEGOTIATION OF LOANS. 

We Make a Speciality of Farm Property. 

The call for Farm Property is greater than the supply. Give us the opportu- 
nity and we will sell your Farms. 

J. A. NOTTINGHAM. W. L. TUCKER. 



DBBHHESBBi 



AT THE - 
No. 2 Wietir 

The Public find 




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Sheet JIusic and Mns- 
the IiOwest New 

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FOR 




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1868-9 




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COMPILED AND PUBLISHED BY 



'.HAMILTON CHILD . 

m. 

L WAYNE, ONTARIO, SENECA, CAYUGA TOMPKINS ££»*«* 
{ , STEUBEN, CHEMUNG AND SCHUYLER, NIAGAEA, CORTLAND, 
V . — „„ n x. D ^ttwtv TiTRECTORIES. 



AND OTHER COUNTY DIRECTORIES. 



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I 2? -P THIS BOOK FOR FUTURE REFERENCE, 

CO* ~~ 



SYRACUSE : 

™, ^xt^tvtat nwwTPP 2<*&24E WASHINGTON STREET. 
PRINTED AT THE JOURNAL OFFICE, Z6 &#k&. yy^-vj"^ 

1866. 



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WHEN" YOU WISH ANYTHING IN 




FOR YOURSELF OR BOYS, 

IT WILL PAY YOU TO CALL AND SEE 

GATES & FECK. 



S.3 




33 South Salinl 

(American Express Building,) Syracuse 

Farm, City and Village Pi(; 

Of all Descriptions and in Every Section, 
BOUGHT, SOLD AND EXCHANGED on individual account and on comrr 

We ask no Commission unless Sale is peri 
eel, amino Charge to Purchasers undei 
any Circumstances. 

Particular attention paid to the drawing of all kinds of papers, and 



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181 



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of titles. Also 



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NEGOTIATION OF LOAN 



1 i 



We Make a Speciality of Farm Property 



nitv T n 'n',i w!\fin Fa n m Pro J ert yis greater than the supply, 
nity and \vu will sell your Farms. 



J.A.NOTTINGHAM. 



Give us the opportu- 



W. L. TUCKER. 



GAZETTEER 



AND 



BUSINESS- DIRECTORY 



OF 



ONONDAGA COUNTY, ff. Y., 



FOR 



1868-9. 



COMPILED AND PUBLISHED BY 

HAMILTON CHILD. 

AUTHOR OF WAYNE, ONTARIO. SENECA, CAYUGA, TOMPKINS, MADISON, ONEI- 
DA, STEUBEN, CHEMUNG AND SCHUYLER, NIAGAEA, CORTLAND, 
AND OTHER COUNTY DIRECTORIES. 



HANG UP THIS BOOK FOE FUTUEE EEFEEENOE. 



SYRACUSE : 

PRINTED AT THE JOURNAL OFFICE, 23 & 24 E. WASHINGTON STREET. 

1866. 



6 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 




MANUFACTURED EXCLUSIVELY BY US, IJSDERBETNOLBS' 
PATENTS for Tempering Steel without the aid of any liquids, received the only award 
at the Great National Implement Trial, held at Auburn, in I860. They possess the fol- 
lowing superior qualities : 

1. Th«y are made with a fine Cutlery Temper at the edges. 

2. They hold only a Spring Temper at the center and at the heel. 

3. They are warranted perfectly uniform, every knife being exactly alike in temper. 

4. We warrant they can be ground from 8 to 10 times without losing their cutting 
edge. 

5. Finally, we will warrant them to cut from 40 to 50 acres of grain or grass without 
being once ground. 

We are the sole Manufacturers of these Kui?es in ths United States. 



REYNOLDS, BARBER & CO, 

Steel Tempering Works, Auburn, N, Y. 



INTRODUCTION. 






INTRODUCTION. 



In presenting the initial number of the " Gazetteer and Directory 
of Onondaga County" to the public, the publisher desires to return 
his sincere thanks to all who have so kindly assisted in obtaining 
the valuable information which it contains, and without whose aid 
it would have been impossible to have collected, in the brief space 
of time in which it is essential that all such works should be com- 
pleted. Especially are our thanks due to the several editors of 
the Syracuse Journal, Syracuse Standard, Syracuse Courier and 
Union, Syracuse Central Democrat, Syracuse Union, Weekly Re- 
corder, Fayetteville, Onondaga Gazette, Baldwinsville, Jordan 
Transcript and Skaneateles Democrat, for the uniform kindness 
which has been evinced in calling public attention to the au- 
thor's efforts ; and to them and many other gentlemen of Onon- 
daga County, for essential aid in furnishing material for the work. 

The historical items as contained in the Gazetteer, it is believed 
will, in the main, be found truthful and interesting. The general 
plan of that portion of the work is similar to that on which French's 
State Gazetteer was compiled, and we have, to some extent, drawn 
from that work. We have also made extracts from " Clark's On- 
ondaga," and gleaned items of interest from " Sweet's Sketches of 
Onondaga." 

J. K. Comstock and Newman Blowers, Esqr's, School Commis- 
sioners from the 2nd and 3rd districts, kindly furnished items in 
regard to school matters for the various towns in their respective 
districts. Mr. J. O. Wright, Commissioner for the 1st district, al- 



8 



INTRODUCTION. 



though intending to furnish items for the several towns under his 
charge, failed for some reason (probably press of other duties,) so 
to do ; hence the absence of school statistics in the historical sketch 
of the towns comprising the 1st School Commissioner's District. 

The canvass for the Directory has been made with great care, 
each road in the County having been passed over. 

That errors may have occurred in so great a number of names 
and dates as are here given, is probable, and that names have been 
omitted that should have been inserted is quite certain. We can 
only say that we have exercised more than ordinary diligence and 
care in this difficult and complicated feature of book-making. To 
such as feel aggrieved in consequence of error or omission, we beg 
pardon, and ask the indulgence of the reader in marking such as 
had been observed in the subsequent reading of the proofs, and 
which are noted in the Errata, following the Introduction. 

It is also suggested that our patrons observe and become familiar 
with the explanations at the commencement of the Directory. 

The Map of the County was engraved with great care by Messrs. 
" Weed, Parsons & Co.," of Albany, and, it is believed, will prove 
a valuable acquisition to the work. 

The advertisers represent many of the leading business men 
and firms of this and adjoining counties, and we most cheerfully 
commend them all to the patronage of those under whose observa- 
ation these pages may come. 

With thanks to friends generally, we leave our work to secure 
the favor which earnest endeavor ever wins from a discriminating 
business public. 

HAMILTON CHILD. 



Business College.— The consolida- 
tion of Mead's Oswego Business College 
with the Bryant & Stratton College, of this 
city, offers the student additional advan- 
tages. Messrs. Warren and Meads are 
both practical men and successful educa- 
tors. Without enumerating the many ad- 
vantages to be obtained by going through 
a course at their College, we would advise 
every young man to send for their College 
paper, which will be sent gratuitously, and 
will impart more information than we have 
room for. See card on County Map. 



Gates & Peck, Merchant Tailors and 
dealers in Ready Made Clothing, 36 North 
Salina street. The gentlemen composing 
this firm are both young men ; Mr. Gates, 
an accomplished salesman, and Mr. Peck, 
a first class cutter and tailor. They keep a 
large variety of cloths from which to se- 
lect, and also keep well stocked with fash- 
ionable ready made goods. Farmers and 
business men will find them gentlemanly 
and obliging, ever ready to sell goods at 
fair and reasonable prices. See card on 
County Map. 



ERRATA. 



ERRA.TA.. 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS. 



GA.ZETTEER. 



Cicero.--On page 57, third paragraph, the area of the town should be "29,000" acres 
instead of 2,900. 

Elbridge.— A new post office has been established at Half Way, since our canvass. 

Lafayette.— Linn post office has been abolished, and Collingwood is a post office a 
little north of it. 

Ii ysander.—Among the early settlers of Lysander, we desire also to mention the 
names of Dea. George White, Capt. Job Green, Jacob Dikeman, Abraham Gillet, Otis 
Drake, Caleb Sweet, Manly Vickey, Reuben Porter, David Porter, Joseph Abbot, Wni. 
Willett, Abraham Doolittle, Palmer Frisbee, Ephraim Bogardus, John Bogardus, Jacob 
Coffin, Channcey Betts, Eli Sprague, Asa Abbott and others, all of whom experienced 
their full share of the trials and deprivations of pioneer life. 

Van Buren. --The following items in regard to the history of this town have been 
received since the printing^ of the Gazetteer : 

The early settlement of van Buren furnishes little of unusual interest or importance. 
Its first settlers necessarily experienced a share of the hardships incident to pioneer 
life, but we find nothing of especial prominence to mark its early history. 

The first settler was Joseph Wilson, who located near Memphis, (formerly Canton,) in 
1796. At nearly the same time came John Wigent, father of Burr Wigent, formerly of 
Baldwinsville, who built the first log house, just east of Memphis, near the line between 
Van Buren and Camillus. In this log house was subsequently held the first election 
in the town. About 1800 came William Lakin, who had purchased a soldier's right for 
600 acres of land, consisting of what is now lot 38. The first frame house was built for 
Joseph Wilson at Iona, Isaac and Nathan Bentley doing the carpenter work, and Phineas 
Barnes the mason work. The house is now owned and occupied by Charles M. Snow, 
Esq. The first frame barn was built by Isaac Earll, on the farm now owned by Marcus 
Earll, near Hardscrabble, and another about the same time by Joseph Wilson, near 
Memphis. The first school house was built of logs, and was located just north of Iona. 
The first church was the Christian, at Iona, now removed to Memphis. The first mar- 
riage was James Wilson to Robey Tabor, daughter of Gardner Tabor, and the first child 
born was Betsey Haynes, daughter of David Haynes and sister of Thaddeus Haynes. 
John Tappan gave the ground for the first cemetery, just west of Iona. The first super- 
visor was Col. Gabriel Tappan, and the first post office opened was at Iona, Charles H. 
Toll, post master. 

Among the other early settlers was Delanson Foster, who made the first clearing at 
Van Buren Center in 1808. He was soon followed by Heman, Seth and Henry Warner, 
Jonathan and Samuel Skinner, Samuel Wiilard, Peter Peck, John and Eber Ingolsby, 
Samuel Marvin, and others. In the western part of the town, Eber Hart, Moses Rogers, 
Daniel Bartholomew, James Williams, Capt. P. Meiggs and Amos Warner; in the north- 




Dolph and Joseph Robinson, were among the first to establish their homes in the then 
wilderness, and assist in transforming it into what is now but little short of a blooming 
garden. Cyrus H. Kingsley, Esq., was also among the earliest pioneers, and subse- 
quently became one of its most prominent public men. He was supervisor of the town 
for a number of years in succession, and in 1846 was elected a member of the Constitu- 
tional Convention. 



10 ERRATA. 



DIRBCTOEY. 

ISal divinsville. — On page 252, " Clany, Andrew" should read " Clarry, Andrew." 

On page 253, "Esmel, John," should he " Esmee, John." 

On page 255, "Norden, Amaziah," should be "Worden, Amaziah." 

Cicero.— On page 153, "*BRUNT, SYLVESTER," is also proprietor of steam saw- 
ing and stave mill, (having purchased the interest of J. H. Young,) and should have 
been starred as an advertiser. 

Elbridge.—" Abrams, Harvey, (Jordan,) proprietor livery stable and owns Revere 
House," should have been added. 

On page 201, " Congdon & Merrill, (Jordan,) props. Abrams House ;" the name has 
been changed since our canvass to Revere House. 

On page 205, "Martin, Wm. A., (Half Way,) postmaster," should have been added. 

Ijjsa iider. — On page 247, " Onderkirk, Benjamin," " Onderkirk, Elizabeth," and 
" ONDERKIRK, PONTA," should be "Ouderkirk." 

On page 24T, "MAYNARD, L. B.," has 122 acres. 

Manlius.— On page 257, "Bailey, — Rev., (Manlius,) Episcopal clergyman," should 
have been added. 

On page 258, "Bigelow, — Rev., (Eayetteville,) Presbyterian clergyman," should have 
been added. 

On same page, " Bowman, John A. Rev., (Fayetteville,) Episcopal clergyman," should 
have been added. 

On page 259, "Cobb, — Rev., (Manlius,) M. E. clergyman," should have been added. 

Onondaga.— On page 295, " STOLP, JOHN" resides on lot 76, instead of 74 as 
printed. 

Pompey.— On page 307, "HIBBARD, ISAAC B.V," should be "HIBBARD, ISAAC 

Skaneateles.— On page 327, the "NATIONAL HOTEL" has been changed to the 
"PACKWOOD HOUSE" since our canvass. 

Spafibrd. — Persons indicated as owning farms in Sempronius, Cayuga County, are 
residents of that part of the town of Spafford set off from the town of Sempronius ; all 
are residents of Onondaga county. 

Syracuse.— On page 351, " ALLIS, A. G. S." should be located at 34 Wolf street. 
On page 358, "BENNETT, EDWIN A." has removed to 62 S. Salina since our can- 
vass. 

On same page, "Biddlecom & Howard, (Wm. C. Biddlecom and Dexter Howard,) 
pump makers, 7 Willow," should have been added. 

On page 369, " *FISKE & TITUS" should have been capitalized and starred as adver- 
tisers. 

On page 373, " Fross, James Q." has removed his office to his residence, 47 W. Gene- 
see, since our canvass. 

On page 375, " Gibbs, Willis, livery, W. Fayette," has opened business since our can- 
vass. 

On page 381, "Holohan, James, saloon, corner Spruce and E. Water," has opened 
business since our canvass. 

On same page, " Howard, Dexter, (Biddlecom & Howard,)" should have been added. 

On pnge 386, "Lehnen, Peter, blacksmith, corner Spruce and E. Water," should have 
been added. 

On page 391, " Martin, Miss, dealer in worsteds, embroideries, silks &c, 84 S. Salina," 
has opened business since our canvass. 

On page 413, " Stroh & Schneider" have dissolved partnership since our canvass, the 
business being now conducted by Chas. Stroh. 

Messrs. Schneider & Lochman have purchased the saloon, 42 E. Water, formerly kept 
by Jacob Balzhauser. 

On page 355, Jacob Balzhauser has sold out to Schneider & Lochman. 

On page 419, Wainwright & Johnson have dissolved partnership since our canvass. 

On page 364, CONNELLY BROS., have removed to new Granger Block, East Genesee 
and Washington Sts. 

Tally.— "Remington & Smith, (Tully,) (John Remington, of Oswego, and Isaac 
Smith,) lumber dealers," have commenced business at Tully since our canvass. 



GENERAL CONTENTS-INDEX TO BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



11 



GENERAL CONTENTS. 

PAGE. 

Almanac or Calendar for 20 years 140 

Brilliant Whitewash 137 

Business Directory 143-423 

Capacity of Cisterns or Wells t 136 

Census Report 423-424 

Chemical Barometer 137 

County Officers 425 

Courts in Onondaga County ]6 

Discount and Premium 136 

Errata 9-10 

Facts on Advertising 136 

French Decimal System of Weights and Measures 131-135 

Gazetteer of County 21-51 

Gazetteer of Towns 52-94 

Government Land Measure... 130 

now to get a Horse out of a Fire 137 

How to Judge a Horse 139 

How to Secure the Public Lands 125-126 

How to Succeed in Business 121-125 

Interest Table 135 

Law Maxims 129-130 

Leech Barometer 137 

Measurement of Hay in the Mow or Stack 139 

Postal Rates and Regulations 117-119 

Post Offices and Postmasters 17 

Rules for Detecting Counterfeit or Spurious Bank Notes 120-121 

Stamp Duties 110-1 16 

Table of Distances 432 

Table of Weights of Grain, Seeds, &c 136 

The States, their Settlement, &c 95-103 

The Territories, their Area, Boundaries, Population, &c 108 ~H° 

To measure Grain in a Bin J|? 

U. S. Internal Reyenue Officers ; AA'ffn 

Valuable Recipes 138-139 



INDEX TO BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



PAGE. 

Baldwinsville, 252 

Camillus, 143 

Cicero, 153 

Clay 169 

DeWitt 187 

Elbridge, 199 

Fabius, 215 

Geddes, 227 

Lafayette, 230 

Lyeander, 237 

Manlius, 257 



C lias. W. Cornell, dealer in Books, 
Stationery, Wall Paper &c, No. 19 South 
Salina street, has been long established in 
trade here. The house is widely known 
throughout this and adjoining Counties, 
for the strict integrity and good business 
qualities of its proprietor. Persons in 
search of anything in the literary line can 
find no better place than " Cornell's" at 
which to purchase. Call and see him when 
in town. See card on County Map. 

H. Lazier, Photographer, No. 6 South 
Salina street, publishes a card on County 
Map. Mr. Lazier has been located here 
for nearly ten years, during which time he 
has gained an enviable reputation for the 



PAGE. 

Marcellus, 274 

Onondaga, 265 

Otisco 296 

Pompey, *'* 

Salina »™ 

Skaneateles, £** 

Spafford, *» 

Syracuse, *>« 

Tully, |" 

VanBuren, 6i6 



excellence of his work. He has now more 
than 20,000 negatives on hand, and will 
take as many more as the people desire, at 
prices as reasonable as the times will ad- 
mit. 

E. B. Grlswold, dealer in Hats, 
Caps and Furs, No. 44 South Salina street, 
Syracuse, from long experience and ac- 
quaintance with the trade has become thor- 
oughly posted as to the wants of his cus- 
tomers. He is a good judge of the quality 
of his goods, keeps stocked with all the 
latest novelties in his line, and sells them 
at liberal prices. See card on Map of 
County. 



12 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



PAGE. 

Academies and Schools. 

Dryden Seminary, Dryden, 338 

Warren & Meads, (business college,) 
Syracuse, on map 

Agent Hamburg Steamship 
Line. 

Hoffmann, Joseph A., Syracuse, 186 

Agricultural Implements. 

{See also Mowers and Reapers.) 

Bramer & Pierce, Fabius, 38 and 55 

Gregg, Piyer & Co., Trumansburg, 212 

Amber Digcstlne, Etc. 

Hardman, Dr., Syracuse, 16 

Architects and Builders. 

Johnson, Ranson, Syracuse, 206 

Russell, A., Syracuse, 352 

White, H. N., Syracuse, 280 

Auctioneers and Commission 
Merchants. 

Salmon, Jesse, Syracuse, 190 

York, Smith & Hinman, Syracuse, 284 

Bakers and Confectioners. 

Jenkins, Thos. & Co., Syracuse, 166 

Marshall & Lockwood, Skaneateles, 158 

Banker. 

Bagg, Stanley, Syracuse, 353 

Banner Painter. 

Segar, Wm. S., Syracuse, 250 

Bell Bangers. 

Brower, H. C, Syracuse, 182 

Durston, H., Syracuse, 316 

Billiard Booms. 

Furman, Z. B., Skaneateles, 216 

Blacksmiths. 

McChesney & Stokes, Brewerton, 182 

Bonnet Bleachers Etc. 

Gillmore, F. H. , Syracuse, 164 

Hall & Morse, Syracuse, 174 

Book Binders, 

Masters & Lee, Syracuse, 433 

Miller, Jacob, Syracuse, 426 

Books and Stationery. 

Bouttelle Bros., Tully, 272 

Cornell, Chas. W., Syracuse, on map 

Knapp & Howe, Syracuse 240 

Boots and Shoes. 

Bennett, Edwin A. , Syracuse, 124 

Coonley, Irving, Cicero, 352 

Doren, Chas., Syracuse, 206 

Fitzgerald & Dixon, Baldwinsville, .... 216 

Fowler, J. H., Syracuse, 20 

Gay, C. B., Syracuse, 141 

McDougali, E., Syracuse, ..'.." "407 



PAGE. 

Pap worth, Philip, Syracuse, 190 

Root, A., Syracuse, 210 

Silliman, W. C. Syracuse, 248 

Troendle Frank A., Syracuse, 164 

Woodworth, J. F. & Son, Baldwinsville, 214 

Brass Founder. 

Brower, H. C, Syracuse, .182 

Brewers and Malsters. 

Green way, John, Syracuse, opposite 88 

Haberle, Benedict, Syracuse, 352 

Broom Handles, Etc. 

Burhans, G. W., Jamesville, 182 

Cancer Doctor. 

Kingsley, Dr., Rome, 300 

Canes, Umbrellas, Etc. 

Brnmelkamp, P. J., Syracuse, 158 

Spencer, A. C. & Co., Syracuse, 188 

Canvassing Agent. 

Jeffery, S. T., Syracuse, 406 

Carpenter and Joiner. 
Heath, Wm., Syracuse, 170 

Carpet Dealers. 

Price, Milton S. & Co., Syracuse,. .on map 

Carriage Makers. 

Catery, S. W., Tully 264 

Clark & Williams, Apulia Station, 228 

Higgins & Sanwald, Syracuse, 148 

Hurst & Leamy, Syracuse, 272 

McChesney & Stokes, Brewerton, 182 

Carving, Scroll Sawing, Etc. 

Dickison & Gillett, Syracuse, 234 

Schott, Max, Syracuse, 256 

Chair Maker. 

Sinclair, F. A. , Mottville, 356 

Cider Mill. 

Bryant, Harlow, Syracuse, 272 

Clothes Renovator. 

Levy, S., Syracuse, 238 

Smith, A., Syracuse, on map 

Clothes Wringers. 

Dryer, A. G., Tully, 245 



Clothiers. 

Bloom & Goldsmith, Syracuse, 188 

Gates & Peck, Syracuse, on map 

Hayden Bros., Syracuse, 390 

Isbell, M. H., Syracuse, 374 

Morris & Co., Syracuse, 18 

Peters, N. & Bro. , Syracuse 170 

Smith, James H., Skaneateles, 216 

Cole Patent Trace Buckle. 

Harrell & Sargeant, Syracuse , 280 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



13 



Costumor. 

PAOK. 

Steingrebe, E. F. , Syracuse, 184 

Crockery, Glassware, Etc. 

Nichols & Eldridge, Syracuse, 389 

Dentists. 

Chandler, Chas. L., Syracuse, 218 

Neariug, L. A., Syracuse, 174 

Nellis. F. D., Syracuse, 374 

Smith, D. D., Syracuse, 276 

Dress and Cloak Makers. 

Avery, A. N. Mrs., Syracuse, 246 

Mack, E. Mrs., Syracuse, 406 

Druggists. 

Fiske & Titus, Syracuse, on map 

Lehnen, N., Syracuse, 174 

Dry Goods. 

Bouttelle Bros.,Tully 272 

Burke, Fitzsimons, Hone & Co., Roches- 
ter 211 

Brewster, P. R. & Co., Syracuse, 146 

Coonley, Irving, Cicero, 852 

Fitzgerald & Dixon, Baldwins ville, 216 

Peters, N. & Bro., Syracuse, 354 

Price, Milton S., Syracuse, on map 

Trowbridge, S. C, Tully 354 

Woodworth, J. F. & Son, Baldwinsville, 214 

Dye Works, 

Smith, A., Syracuse, on map 

English Thorn Quicks. 

Rooney, Samuel, Liverpool, 184 

Engravers and Printers. 

Silcox, Geo. W., Syracuse, 246 

File Works. 

Auburn File Works, Auburn, 344 

Ireland & Co., Syracuse, 196 

Fish and Oysters. 

Johnson Bros., Syracuse 256 

Flagging and Stone. 

Quigley, A. H. & E. P., Trumansburg, . .352 

Flour, Feed, Etc. 

Coonley, Irving, Cicero, 352 

Marshall & Lockwood, Skaneateles, 158 

Peters, N. & Bro., Syracuse 170 

French Yoke Shirts. 

Brumelkamp, P. J., Syracuse, 158 

Fringe, Braid, Etc. 

Gottschalk, A. C, Syracuse, 184 

Furniture Dealers. 

Cook, C, Syracuse, 254 

Cook, E. H., Tully 2S0 

Hayden, S. C. & Co., Syracuse, 336 

Schott, Max, Syracuse, 256 

Walch, Fr., Syracuse, 214 

Wolf, F. & Bro., Syracuse, 316 

General Merchants. 

Bouttelle Bros., Tully, 272 

Coonle v, Irving, Cicero, 352 

Fitzgerald & Dixon, Baldwinsville, 216 

Peters, N. &Bro., Syracuse, 170 

Trowbridge, S. C, Tully, 354 

Woodworth, J. F. & Son, Baldwinsville, 214 



Gents' Furnishing Goods. 

PAGE. 

Brumelkamp, P. J., Syracuse, 158 

Smith, James H., Skaneateles, 216 

Spencer, A. C. & Co. , Syracuse, 188 

Starin, S. H., Syracuse, 231 

Gold and Silver Platers. 

Dureton, H., Syracuse, 316 

Shallish, Jerry, Skaneateles, 326 

Twitchell, W. & Son, Syracuse, 176 

Groceries, Provisions Etc. 

Bouttelle Bros., Tully, 272 

Coonley, Irving, Cicero, 352 

Fitzgerald & Dixon, Baldwinsville, 216 

Peters, N. & Bro. , Syracuse, 170 

Robinson, C. G., Syracuse, 150 

Story, E. J., Syracuse, 281 

Thalheimer, M. , Syracuse, 388 

Trowbridge, S. C, Tully, 354 

Van Auken, J. H. & Co., Syracuse, 389 

Woodworth, J. F. & Son, Baldwinsville, .214 

Hair Dresser. 

Engleman, Fred. , Syracuse, 220 

Hardware, 

Davis & Vedder, Syracuse, 262 

Dryer, A. G., Tully 245 

Everson, Giles & Co., Syracuse, 150 

Hayford, M. W., Tally 123 

Merriam, Thos. , Syracuse, on map 

Shallisb, Jerry, Skaneateles, 326 

Townsend, Grant & Co., Syracuse, 142 

Hat Manufacturer. 

Gobs, Henry, Syracuse, 172 

Hats, Caps and Furs. 

Griswold, E. B., Syracuse, on map. 

Stevens, Geo., Syracuse, 19 and 180 

Woodworth, J. F. & Son, Baldwinsville, .214 

Hoop Skirts. 

Aaron, S., Syracuse, 196 

Hosiery. 

Starin, S. H., Syracuse, 231 

Hotels. 

Allen, O. E. Jr., Syracuse, 434 

Bennett, M. G., Tully 317 

Greenman, S. S., Fabius, 353 

Hale, C. H., Fayetteville, 224 

Kidder, E. Wood, Skaneateles, 200 

Motsiff, Frederick, Cardiff, 224 

Onondaga House, Syracuse, 148 

Owen, Sylvester, Summit Station, 318 

» Howe's Ajfue Cure, Etc. 

Howe, C. B., Seneca Falls, 210 

Human Hair Goods. 

Loftie, Henry, Syracuse, .166 

Loftie, W. E., Syracuse, 334 

Insurance Agents. 

Bagg, Stanley, Syracuse, 353 

Broughton & Babcock, Syracuse, 142 

Bruyh, J. , Syracuse, 290 

Foot & Noxon, Syracuse, 144 

Moorhead, Wm. S. , Syracuse, 263 

Newell, Edward, Syracuse, 160 

Robertson & McCarthy, Syracuse, 37 

Sawyer, Geo. C, Syracuse, 282 

Stryker & Woodworth, Syracuse, 299 

Truair & Fitch, Syracuse, 435 

Truesdell & Karr, Syracuse, 435 



14 



INDEX TO ADTEBTISEMENTS. 



Iron Founders and Machinists. 

PAGE. 

Brower^ S. P., Syracuse, 172 

Cobb, Herrick & Co., Syracuse, 250 

Craig, W. H., Syracuse, 170 

Porter & Luther, Syracuse, 206 

Powell, Archibald C, Syracuse, 242 

Jewelry, Watches, Etc. 

Becker & Colwell, Syracuse, 226 

Hall, Lyman, Skaneateles, 202 

Harlow, Wm., Syracuse, 184 

Manwaring, M. B. , Camillus, 148 

Stern, Abraham & Co., Syracuse, 238 

Lawyers, 

Beach & Marble, Syracuse, 334 

Gray, Fred. H., Syracuse, 276 

Nottingham & Tucker, Syracuse, 2 

White, N. M., Baldwinsville, 272 

Leather Dealers, Etc. 

Phillips, Bentley & Co., Syracuse, 154 

Livery Stables. 

Bennett, M. G., Tully 317 

Jones, Edwin A., Baldwinsville, 256 

Locksmiths. 

Brower, H. C, Syracuse, 182 

Durston, H., Syracuse, 316 

Lumber Dealers. 

Brunt, Sylvester, Cicero, 272 

Burhans, Blanchard & Co., Payetteville,262 

Clark. E. & Co., Syracuse, 206 

Hamill, A. P. & Co., Baldwinsville,. . . .276 
Nelson, Sperry & Short, Syracuse, 372 

Marble "Works. 

Francis & Duffy, Syracuse, 168 

Linihan, C, Syracuse 204 

Miller Bros., Syracuse, 164 

Stanton & Son, Syracuse 392 

Marvin's Indian Syrup and Scro- 
fula Ointment. 

Marvin, C, Syracuse, 178 

Melodeon and Organ Manuf. 

Dodge & Lord, Ithaca, 388 

Merchant Millers. 

Barns, W. & J. W., Mottville, 200 

Weston & Gove, Jamesville, 234 

Model Makers. 

Brower, S. P., Syracuse, 172 

Craig, W. H., Syracuse, 170 

Mowers and Reapers. 

(See also Agricultural Implements.) 

Bramer & Pierce, Fabius, 38 and 55 

Gregg, Plyer & Co., Trumansburg, 212 

Johnson, G. B.,Brewerton, 168 

Preston, Cheney & Snook, Manlius, 56 

Mower and Reaper Knives. 

Eeynolds, Barber & Co., Auburn, 6 

Music andMusical Instruments. 

Redington & Howe, Syracuse, on map 

and page \ 

Williams, A. M., Syracuse,....'..'."."'. .284 



News Rooms. 

PAGE. 

Baker, J. C, Syracuse, 154 

Winston, D. S., Syracuse, 356 

Nurseries. 

Harradence, Wm., Syracuse, 408 

Smith, Clark & Powell, Syracuse, 281 

Oriental Syrup and Ralm of Gil- 
ead Ointment. 

Taft, G. T. & Co., Seneca Falls 20 

Orio Manufacturer. 

Farnham, S. M., Tully, 194 

Oxygenised Air Institute. 

Brower, J. P. , Syracuse, 162 

Painters. 

(Rouse, Sign, Etc.) 

Akin, L. M., Geddes, 231 

Baumgras, W. & F., Syracuse, 182 

Phillips & Gilbert, Syracuse, 222 

Segar, Wm. S., Syracuse, 250 

Painters' Supplies. 

Baumgras, W. & F., Syracuse, 182 

Paper Dealers. 

Garrett, J. & F. B. , Syracuse, 4S8 

Shumway & Hinman, Syracuse, 218 

Paper Mills. 

Tremain, Chas. & Co,, Manlius, 260 

Patent Agents. 

Morley & Co., Syracuse, 204 

Patent Right Dealers. 



Jeffery, S. T., Syracuse, 

Johnson, G. B., Brewerton,. 



.406 
.168 



Photograph Artists. 

Bonta & Curtis8, Syracuse, 192 

Jordan Bros. , Syracuse, 202 

Lazier, H., Syracuse, on map. 

Ranger, W. V., Syracuse, 371 

Wooster, Milo T., Tully, 299 

Photograph Colorists, 

Perrior, Geo. H., Syracuse, 159 

Segar, Wm. S., Syracuse, 250 

Physicians. 

Brower, J. P., Syracuse, 162 

Earll, I. B., Syracuse, 290 

Farnham, S. M., Tully, 194 

Genung, B. M. , Brewerton, 148 

Kingsley, Dr., Rome, 300 

Merrill, C. F., Skaneateles, 194 

Price, W. H., Syracuse, 256 

Roberta, Emmett, Syracuse, 408 

Seward & Miller, Syracuse, 216 

Watson, W. R., Syracuse, 430 

Picture Frames, Brackets, Etc. 

Hendricks, Francis, Syracuse, 152 

Howard, J. & Co., Syracuse, on map 

Tholens Bros., Syracuse, 180 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



15 



Planing and Saw Mills. 

PAGE. 

Brunt, Sylvester, Cicero, 272 

Burhans, Blanchard & Co., Fayetteville,262 

Burhans, G. W., Jamesville, 182 

Dickison & Gillett, Syracuse, 234 

Nelson, Sperry & Short, Syracuse, 372 

Poudrette Works. 

Lavington & Co., Salina, 334 

Plumbers, Gas Fitters, Etc. 

Shallish, Jerry, Skaneateles, 326 

Tily, Alfred, Syracuse, 174 

Printers' Supplies. 

Shumway & Hinruan, Syracuse, 218 

Printing Offices. 

Central Democrat, Syracuse, 186 

Courier and Union, Syracuse, 308 

Journal, Syracuse, 320 

Masters & Lee, Syracuse 433 

Onondaga Gazette, Baldwinsville, 302 

Recorder, Fayetteville 198 

Silcox, Geo. W., Syracuse, 246 

Skaneateles Democrat, Skaneateles, 236 

Smith, B. Hermon, Syracuse, . . .facing 228-9 

Southern Onondaga, Tully, 220 

Standard, Syracuse, 298 

Produce Dealers. 

Coonley, Irving, Cicero, 332 

Marshall & Lockwood, Skaneateles, 158 

Midler, Byron, Syracuse, 105 

Raspberry Plants. 

Wright, Warren, Waterloo, 344 

Real Estate Brokers. 

Nottingham & Tucker, Syracuse, 2 

Roofing. 

Hatch, W. B., Syracuse, 184 

Talbott, Thos. Jr., Syracuse, ... .334 and 374 

Saddlery Hardware. 

Harrell & Sergeant, Syracuse, 280 

Salt Pans and Ladles. 

Kennett, J. R., Geddes, 231 

Sash, Blinds and Doors. 

Burhans, Blanchard & Co., Fayetteville,262 

Burhans, G. W., Jamesville, 182 

Dickison & Gillett. Syracuse, 234 

Everson, Giles & Co., Syracuse, 150 

Second Hand Clotbing. 

Levy, S., Syracuse, 238 

Seeds, Etc. 

Everson, Giles & Co., Syracuse, 150 

Sewing Machines. 

Barber, E. P. & Co., Syracuse, 156 

Fowler, J. H., Syracuse, 20 

Harris, Robinson & Co., Syracuse, .... 242 

Marvin, F. N. & Co., Syracuse, 434 

Orcutt, W. C, Syracuse 193 

Rainey, W. W. & Co., Syracuse, 222 



Stair Builder. 

PAGE. 

Heath, Wm., Syracuse, 170 

Steel Tempering Works. 

Reynolds, Barber & Co., Auburn, 6 

Stencil Plates. 

Banning, W. E., Syracuse, 290 

Stone Sawing and Polishing Ma- 
chines. 

Stanton, Sidney, Syracuse, 392 

Stone Yard. 

Graff & Nies, Syracuse 276 

Miller Bros., Syracuse, 164 

stoves, Tinware, Etc. 

Clough, J. H., Syracuse, ..inside first cover 

Davie & Vedder, Syracuse, 262 

Downes, Nicholas & Co., Syracuse, 335 

Dryer, A. G., Tully 245 

Everson, Giles & Co., Syracuse, 150 

Hayford, M. W., Tully 123 

Shallish, Jerry, Skaneateles, 326 

Silcox & Foote, Syracuse, 268 

Stafford & Leonard, Syracuse 208 

Sulphur Baths. 

Sweet, Mary A. Mrs., Syracuse, 170 

Tobacconists. 

Baker, J. C, Syracuse, 154 

Hamilton & Wilburn, Syracuse, 144 

Rapp & Hirsh, Syracuse, 164 

Toys, Confectionery, Etc. 

Wood, R., Syracuse, 226 

Trunks, Traveling Bags, Etc. 

Brumelkamp, P. J., Syracuse, 158 

Spencer, A. C. & Co., Syracuse, 188 

Undertakers. 

Cook, E. H., Tully, 2S0 

McChesney & Stokes, Bre werton, 182 

Rust, S. M., Syracuse, 406 

Sherwood, LeGrand, Syracuse, 196 

Wagons and Carts. 

Kennett, J. R., Geddes, 231 

Water Filters. 

Downes, Nicholas & Co., Syracuse, 335 

Waterlime, Land Plaster, Etc. 

Bryant, Harlow, Jamesville, 272 

Weston & Gove, Jamesville, 234 

Wax and Sperm Candles. 

Will, R. Mrs., Syracuse, 170 

Window Shades, Etc. 

Tholens Bros. , Syracuse, 180 

Woolen Mills. 

Burke, Fitzsimons, Hone & Co., Roch- 
ester ...•••. 211 

Cady, Geo . B., Clockviile,. ...'.'.'..'.'.. .'.'..106 
Hayden Bros., Syracuse and Port By- 
ron, 390 



1 6 ONONDA OA CO JJNTY B VSINESS DIRECTOR T. 

This Card is Addressed Specially 

TO THOSE WHO ARE 

Seeking for Health, 

The Cure of Diseases 

AND THE RENEWAL OF LIFE. 

Dr. HARDMAN'S Pure Remedies : 

FIRST— Amber Digesting contains no alcohol in any form. It is purely vegetable, 
somewhat bitter,— not unpleasantly so ; is in liquid form, scientifically prepared, and in 
action prompt, positive and direct, and is the only blood renovator known. It sweetens 
the stomach, removes the cause of foul breath, promotes a natural digestion, tones up the 
Liver, expels unhealthy matter, causes the vital blood to circulate freefy in the small blood 
vessels, — the seat of nutrition and strength, and removes from the system the very germ 
of disease ; and is therefore safe, speedy and reliable for Stomach and Liver Diseases, 
indicated by Headache, Indigestion, Bad Breath, Jaundice, Costiveness, Bilious Vomiting, 
Biles, Bilious Disorders, Furred Tongue, Loss of Appetite, Worms, &c, &c. 

2dL Elixir of Campliori 

This almost priceless preparation is a pure nervine, a diffusive stimulant and safe ano- 
dyne. It almost instantly relieves pains, removes spasms, cures cramps, warms the 
body and equalizes the circulation, and stimulates the system to throw off disease. 

It is vastly superior to Hot Drops, Essences, Paregoric, Pain Removers, Soothing 
Syrups, Laudanum, Antespasmodics; and removes Stomach, Bowel, Uterine and Menstrual 
Pains with astonishing rapidity. (See our circulars for other remedies.) 

Office & Manufactory No. 2 Kimber Block, cor. James & Warren Sts., 

SYRACVSE, N. T, 

COURTS IN ONONDAGA COUNTY, 

1868—1869. 

TO BE HELD AT THE COURT HOUSE IN SYRACUSE. 



CIRCUIT COURTS AND COURTS OP OYER AND TERMINER. 

_ A ,, , . 1868. 1869. 

First Monday in February, Morgan, Justice, Bacon, Justice. 

Fourth Monday in May, ; Foster, Justice, Morgan, Justice. 

Third Monday in September, Morgan, Justice, Foster, Justice. 

SPECIAL TERMS. 

SecondTuesday in January, ' Morgan, Justice. 

First Tuesday in July Morgan, Justice. 

Fourth Tuesday in November, Morgan, Justice. 

IftflQ 

Third Tuesday in March, , .. Morgan, Justice. 

First Tuesday in July _ . .Morgan, Justice. 

Fourth Tuesday in November, '.'.'.'.'.'..*. Morgan, Justice. 

COUNTY COURT AND COURT OF SESSIONS, FOR 1868. 

First Monday in March ; Second Mondav in June ; Second Monday in October ; First 
Monday in December. 

HENRY RIEGEL, County Judge, presiding. 



POST OFFICES AND POST MASTERS. 



17 



Post Offices and Post Masters in Onondaga 

County. 



POST OFFICB. 



TOWN. 



POST MASTER. 



Amber, Otisco, Alfred J. Niles. 

Apulia Fabins, Miles B. Hackett. 

Baldwinsville, Lysander, D. S. Wilkins. 

Belle Isle Camillas, Thomas Machan. 

Borodino, Spafford, Charles M. Rich. 

Brewerton, Cicero, Orsamus Johnson. 

Camillas, Camillas, Albert Harmon. 

Cardiff, Lafayette, Robert S. Park. 

Cicero, Cicero, Josiah H. Young. 

Clay, ., Clay Orris Barnes. 

Coliamer, ." Dewitt, John J. Furbeck. 

Collingwood, Lafayette, Luther Cole. 

Delphi, Pompey, William A. Bates. 

Dewitt, Dewitt, Henry C. Goodell. 

Elbridge Elbridge, Walter P. VanVechten. 

Euclid, Clay Richard Piatt. 

Fabius, Fabins, Oril Pope. 

Fairmount Camillas, Henry Jerome. 

Fayetteville, . Manlius, Henry Ecker. 

Geddes, Geddes, Hubbard Manger. 

Hart Lot, Elbridge, Albert L. Chatfleld. 



HowlettHill,. 
Jack's Reef,. 
Jamesville, . . 

Jordan 

Kirkville, 

Lafayette, 



Lamsons, Lysander,.. . 



. Onondaga, Helen C. Robinson. 

.Elbridge, Eli Tator. 

.Dewitt, Samuel Hill. 

.Elbridge, W. C. Rogers. 

.Manlius Joseph Hoag. 

Lafayette, Sarah M. Gage. 



Liverpool, 

Little Utica, 

Mandana, 

Manlius 

Manlius Center, . 
Manlius Station, 

Marcellus 

Marcellus Falls, . 

Marietta, 

Memphis,. 



. .M. 8. Thompson. 



.Balina, . . .' J. T. Crawford. 

.Lysander Loran Dunham. 

. Skaneateles, Harvey Folts. 

.Manlius, E. Duell. 

.Manlius, Ralph Chapin. 

. Manlius, Perry O. Weaver. 

. Marcellus, Thomas D . Condres. 

.Marcellus, Edward Steele. 

.Marcellus, Richard Salisbury. 

.VanBuren, David Sharpley. 

Mottville Skaneateles, Henry Hunsiker. 

Navarino, Onondaga, Martin L. Gardner. 

North Manlius, Manlius, „ . . D. J^Dewey. 



.Onondaga, Stephen Yielding. 

Onondaga, John G. Jackson. 

. Onondaga, George B. Clark. 

. Pompey, Julius Candee. 

'.Otisco, James C. Gardner. 

.Lysander, Benjamin D. Schenck. 

'clay, Gran viDe Baum. 

.' Pompey i Daniel E. Hayden. 

^Pompey, Judson Candee. 

Salina,! '. .... .... ..... ........... .Syracuse, 1st Ward, Samuel J. Abbott. 

Skaneateles, Skaneateles, Horace Hayzen. 

Spafford, Spafford William W. Lege. 

South Onondaga, Onondaga, Eben North. 

Summit Station, Fabius, John J. Blaney. 

Syracuse, Syracuse, George L. Maynard. 



Onondaga 
Onondaga Castle, 
Onondaga Valley, 

Oran, , 

Otisco 

Plain ville, 

Plank Road 

Pompey, 

Pompey Center, 



.Marcellus, Allen Brown. 

.Tnlly, Hiram Chapin. 

. Lafayette, Avery P. Shue. 

.VanBuren, Rufus Foster. 

. Van Buren, Stephen W. Betts. 

..Tnlly, Kirtland C. Arnold. 

Watervale, Pompey, Edward M. Thompson. 



Thorn Hil. 

Tally, 

Tully Valley 

Van Buren, 

Van Buren Center, 
Vesper 



18 



ONONDA GA CO UNTT B USINE8S DIRECTOR Y. 




MORRIS & CO., 



MERCHANT 




AND DEALERS IN 



CLOTH 



FURNISHING GOODS 



AND FINE 



CLCTH1MC 



FOR 

v"-'w>>/'. »'.'>,'.,'.«...w-.(<.. ( .'n'.<»,>>, '«<>,/•. m. "^i. (%>w"w'.«. »w^ lYl Jj IN • I U U JL ll io 



\ 



BOYS' CLOTHING, 

l OF ALL STYLES AND SIZES, 

|From 3 Years' Size to Manhood. EOVS OU CIllldrBil 



36 South Salina Street, (Globe Hotel Building,) 
SITU.-A.OXJSDEJ, KT- Y. 

Make SPECIALITIES of NEW STYLES, as they come out in New York. 

Remember, that you can always find at our Store GARMENTS READY-MADE of as 
Fine Qualities of Goods, as good Style of Cut and Make as those made to Measure ; and 
it will be well for every one, whether they are used to getting their Clothing Ready- 
Made or made to Order, to CALL and EXAMINE our STOCK, and SEE FOR THEM- 
SELVES before purchasing. 

Overcoats, Business Suits, 

DRESS SUITS, WALKING COATS, &C, 

FINE, STYLISH AND CHEAJP. 

A Large Assortment of the New Styles of Walking Coat Suits, Overcoats, Boys' Suits, 
&c, of the Best Qualities of Goods, Elegantly Cut and Made (by DEVLIN & CO., 
Broadway, New York,) just received, and will be sold at very Low Prices. 

Call and see the largest stock of Fine Cloths and Clothing in Syracuse. 

L&fDDDIC fi# Pfl 36 South SaUna Street, Globe Hotel Block. 

mUnnlO CL OUij Syracuse, n. r 



PUBLISHERS NOTICES. 



G-IESO. JST , E3"VE3KT!S, 



Manufacturer and Dealer in 



Ladies' Furs, Buffalo & Fancy Robes, 

HATS, CAPS, STEAW GOODS, &c, 
16 SOUTH SALINA ST., 

SYRACUSE, TV. Y. 

See also Card osi Page 1 80. 



Truair & Fitch, General Insurance 
agents, at No. 12 Bastable Block, Syn.cu.se, 
are prepared to take Fire, Life or Accident 
risks. They are energetic business men 
and represent sound and reliable companies. 
They are deserving of a liberal share of 
patronage. We especially recommend 
those contemplating life insurance, to call 
at their office and look into the merits of 
the " interest bearing policies," as issued 
by the company they represent. See card, 
inside lust cover. 

Rust's Undertaking Ware- 
Rooms, at 71 South Salina street, in 
charge of T. A. E. Brown, contain Coffins, 
Caskets, and everything usually found in a 
first class establishment. Orders promptly 
attended to at all hours. The business is 
carried on by Stiles M. Rust, Administrator 
of the late Charles Rust. See card on 
page 406. 

Mrs. E. Mack, Fashionable Dress 
and Cloak Maker, 30 South Salina street, 
is prepared to execute all work entrusted 
to her care in the best manner. Those who 
know her need no recommendation from 
us. See card, page 406. 

S. TT. Jeffrey, Canvassing Agent, and 
dealer in Patent Rights, publishes a card 
on page 406. He is agent for O. Serly's 
Patent Reaction Dash Churn, Vegetable 
Weeder and Digger, and various other 
valuable articles. Persons in want of the 
articles, or of town and County rights for 
the same, will call at 112 E. Washington 
street, or leave orders at No. 2 Journal 
Building, up stairs. He is agent for the 
Baldwinsville Forks, and for English's Pat- 
ent Stove Damper. 

Fiske Sc Titus, Druggists and deal- 
ers in Patent Medicines, &c, in the Em- 
pire Block, North Salina, corner of West 
Genesee Sts., Syracuse, publish a card on 
the County Map. Their store is a favorite 
place at which to buy goods in their 
line. They have one of the best soda foun- 
tains in the city. Customers can here find 
a choice article of tea or coffee,— Messrs. 
F. & T. being agents for the " Great United 
States Tea Company." We commend the 
firm to - he liberal patronage of our citizens. 

Preston, Cheney & Snook,manu- 
facture the -'Onondaga Chief" Mower 



and Reaper, at Manlius. This machine haB 
many advantages, the principal ones of 
which may be learned by referring to page 
56, where may also be seen a cut of the 
machine. They have a very convenient 
hand and self raking attachment, which 
adds materially to its value and conven- 
ience. For a better idea of the machine, 
see advertisement on page 56. 

Ranger's Photograph Parlors, 
No. 28 East Genesee St., Syracuse, have 
become a favorite resort for those desiring 
first class likenesses. Mr. Ranger has for 
a long time been noted as being a superior 
artist. He has established galleries in 
Geneva and Palmyra, both of which are 
now doing a prosperous business. Parties 
calling on Mr. Ranger at his rooms in 
the Franklin Buildings, will find him ever 
ready to accommodate. See card, page 371. 
Dr. Hardman's Amber Diges- 
tine and Elixir of Camphor, are 
advertised on page 16. Dr. Hardman has 
made the study of medicine a speciality for 
many years past. The medicines he ad- 
vertises are the result of his investigations. 
They are entirely free from spiritous liquors 
of any kind, yet are so carefully distilled 
and prepared that they will keep perfectly 
pure and good in any warm climate. Read 
the Doctor's card; you may be benefited 
thereby. , ,. , 

A. Smith, Steam Dyer, publishes a 
card on the '-County Map." -'The old 
Syracuse Dye Works,"have long been noted 
for the superior work done there. Mr. 
Smith is a Scotchman, of more than 40 
years experience at his profession, and 
what he don't know in regard to colors, 
and their application to fabrics, has yet to 
be discovered. Customers at a distance 
may send goods by express with entire 
safety. 

Morris & Co., Merchant Tailors and 
Clothiers, in the Globe Hotel Block, South 
Salina street, are gentlemen of large ex- 
perience in their business, and well calcu- 
lated to please their customers. Their 
goods, both custom and ready made, are of 
extra quality and finish. In addition to 
their general business, they make a spec- 
iality of boys' clothing. They deserve the 
liberal patronage they receive. See adver- 
tisement, page!8. 



20 



0N0NDA OA CO U~NTY B USINESS DIRECTOR Y. 



THE SYRACUSE 

km St$t t; 






No. 3 WIETING BLOCK, 

Opposite the Main Entrance to the Syracuse House, is the great and popular Emporium 

of Central New York for 

S & SH 

TRUNKS, BAGS & VALISES 

In endless variety, and at prices to suit the times. This House also has the General 

Agency for the World Renowned 

EMPIRE SEWING MACHINE, 

Simple in its Construction and perfect in its Working. Agents wanted in every town 

in Central New York. Apply to 

JOBQST BL FOWLER, 

3 "Wieting Block, Syracuse, IV. Y. 



MOTHERS! READ THIS. 

Are your children restless, irritable, wakeful, feverish ? Are they cutting teeth f Are 
the gums red and painful ? Have they diarrhoea ? Have they fits or spasms ? If so, 

USE THE ORIENTAL SYRUP. 

It is the only Syrup or Cordial, or CHILD MEDICINE in market free from Opium, Mor- 
phine, or Paragoric. These you can't give ; or, at least, you ought not to. They de- 
stroy the functions of the BRAIN ; the child grows pale ; its eyes grow wild ; its flesh 
becomes soft ; it loses its mind ; it becomes an Idiot. Mothers, these are facts 1 To be 
convinced, try it. The Oriental Syrup contains NONE of those poisons. It is per- 
fectly harmless. It is soothing— quieting. The child sleeps sweetly, and awakes refresh- 
ed and lively. The teeth penetrate the gums without pain. It is good for aged and ner- 
vous people. TRY IT. 

DR. G. T. TAFT & CO., Proprietors, 

Seneca Palls, N, Y. 



THE BALM OE GILEAD ! 

SIR ASHLEY COOPER, in one of his lectures to his class, says :— I have used the 
Balm of Gilead in my practice, in one form or other, for more than forty years • and for 
Old Sores or Ulcers, Eruption*, Rheumatism, Burns, Chilblains, 
Scalds, Piles, Chafes, &c., it surpasses every other known remedy. 

Rosenberger's Balm of Gilead Ointment 

Is composed of Oils and Balsams from trees and shrubs, and for all the diseases referred 
to by Dr. Cooper, we warrant it almost a specific. For Gall, Grease and 
Wounds of Horses, it has no equal. We warrant it; therefore do not hesitate 
to try it for every kind of Wound, Bruise or Sore. 

DR. G. T. TAPT & CO., Proprietors, 

Seneca Falls, N. Y. 



ONONDAQA COUNTY. 21 



ONONDAGA COUNTY. 



THIS COUNT F 'derives its name from the tribe of Ononda- 
ga Indians who formeidy inhabited this portion of the old Onondaga 
Reservation, being the third of the five great nations formerly unit- 
ed for common interest and self-preservation. The Grand Coun- 
cil which united the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas and ; 
Senecas, was held at the place now known as Liverpool, four miles 
from Syracuse, but Onondaga was always considered as the oldest 
and most venerated council grounds, where the fires of the nations 
united until their alliance with the English in 1665, when they were 
induced to remove to Albany, planted the tree of friendship, and, 
after a number of years, returned to the old Council Ground again at 
Onondaga. 

The County was formerly a part of Herkimer, in the original 
Military Tract, but became a separate county March 5th, 1394. 
Cayuga County was afterwards taken from Onondaga, March 8th, 
1799; Cortland April 8th, 1808, as also a part of Oswego, March 
1st, 1816. It is centrally located, and its surface is naturally divid- 
ed by an east and west line, or rather the base of the Central 
Alleghany Mountains apparently ceases here, leaving a fine flat 
surface, or, at most, a rolling land towards the north. 

The geological formation of the County consists of alternate 
strata of shale and lime-stone, overlying each other, in nearly hori- 
zontal layers. On the south shore of Oneida Lake, is the Clinton 
group of shale, and successively above these, towards the south, the 
Niagara lime-stone, the red and green shales and gypsum, belong- 
ing to the Onondaga salt-group ; the water-lime group, Oriskany 
sand-stone, Onondaga lime-stone, corniferous lime-stone, Seneca 



22 ONONDAGA COUNTY. 



lime-stone, Marcellus shales, Hamilton shales, Tully lime-stone, 
Genesee slate and Ithaca shales. The last four mentioned are found 
upon the summits of the southern hills. The salt group occupies 
the base of the hills, and the lime-stones crop out along their de- 
clivities in an east and west line, extending through the center of 
the County. The celebrated Onondaga Salt Springs lie in the val- 
ley of Onondaga Lake, and the salt water is found above or within 
the strata of red shale. The salt wells are 200 to 400 feet deep. 
The green shales, embracing the upper formed strata; the magne- 
sian or vernicular lime, and large quantities of gypsum in isolated 
masses, lie immediately above the red shales, and form the first de- 
clivities of the ranges of hills. The gypsum is one of the most im- 
portant minerals in the State, and in the regions where it is formed, 
numerous tunnel-shaped cavities are met, from 5 to 30 feet deep, and 
about the same in circumference, caused by the underlying rocks be- 
ing slowly dissolved by the rains. Above these shales is the water- 
lime stone, which is used for making cement, when burned and 
ground, and was used in constructing the locks on the Erie Canal. 
It forms one of the most valuable exports of the County. The On- 
ondaga lime-stone is valuable for building purposes, and nearly all 
of the lime-stone strata furnish quicklime of a superior quality. 
The Hon. George Geddes says, "these systems of rocks constitute 
the basis of our soils ; their particles, separated by the action of the 
elements, have been decomposed, and in process of time rendered 
fruitful. Besides these rocks we have beds of gravel and rounded 
stones that have been brought to us from the far north by water ; 
and we often see large bowlders of granite rocks that were brought 
here on islands of ice that once drifted about in the sea, that, in a 
period far back in the world's history, submerged all this part of 
the continent. The springs that flow from the lime rocks depo&it 
tufa, in many instances in sufficient quantities to make farm fences 
and to burn lime. So highly are many of these springs charged 
with carbonate of lime that as soon as the water meets the air it 
parts with a part of the lime andincrusts leaves and twigs, or what- 
soever may be encountered ; these substances perhaps then decay, 
leaving perfect forms upon the solid rocks. Marl deposits are also 
found here ; one east of Syracuse is finely shown by the rail cutting 
through it. The great Cicero Swamp is rich in this valuable fer- 
tilizer. Lake Sodom, in Manlius, is constantly depositing this min- 
eral ; the trees that fall into the lake are whitened with it. Onon- 
daga Lake is surrounded by a marl bed. The lakes of Tully are 
also marl lakes. 

In variety, strength and fertility, and in all the elements of per- 
petual productiveness, the soil of this County is not surpassed by 
that of any other county in the State. 



ONONDAGA COUNTY. 23 



The principal lakes of this County are the Oneida, Onondaga, 
Cross, Skaneateles and Otisco Lakes, which, in connection with the 
streams, water the County abundantly. Oneida Lake extends 
along the north-east border of the County, is about 30 miles long, 
and forms a portion of the chain of the internal navigable waters of 
the State. The outlet is navigable, and a canal, seven miles in 
length, connects Wood Creek, one of its tributaries, with the Erie 
Canal at Higginsville. 

Onondaga Lake, celebrated for the salt springs which are found 
in its immediate vicinity, is about five miles long. A low piece of 
ground, about two miles in length and one in width, extends south- 
ward from the head of this lake, and is bordered by steep bluffs, 15 
or 20 feet high, probably the ancient border of the Lake. In and 
around this marsh, the salt springs are found. Cross Lake, upon 
the north-west border of the County, is a shallow body of water, 
about five miles long, and may be considered as simply an enlarge- 
ment of Seneca River. Skaneateles Lake, 16 miles long, occupies 
a deep and narrow valley among the hills, and is considered one of 
the finest sheets of water in the State. The banks along the south 
part rise precipitously to a height of several hundred feet, and the 
scenery is singularly wild and rugged. Towards the north, the 
summits decline in height, and the land gradually slopes down to 
the very edge of the water, forming a rich and exceedingly beauti- 
ful landscape. Otisco Lake is about four miles long, and is nearly 
-surrounded by steep hills, 400 to 800 feet above its surface. In 
the region occupied by the water-lime and Onondaga lime-stone for- 
mations, are many deep rents and fissures, from 50 to 200 feet be- 
low the surface, some of which contain little sheets of water. These 
remarkable depressions are evidently the result of subsidence, as 
the faces of the cliffs are nearly perpendicular, and the surface of 
the rocks above is much broken. These lakes are sometimes called 
crater lakes, from their peculiar form, and sometimes termed 
green lakes, from the color of their water. The streams of the 
County nearly all flow in a northerly direction, and discharge their 
waters through the Oswego River into Lake Ontario. In their 
course from the highlands, they often flow over perpendicular ledges, 
and through narrow ravines, forming a great number of beautiful 
cascades. Oswego River, which forms a part of the east boundary 
of Lysander, is formed by the junction of the Seneca and Oneida 
Rivers. Seneca River enters the north part of the County from the 
west, and pursues a winding course, until it unites with the Oneida 
River. This stream forms the drainage of nearly all the small 
lakes in Central New York. Large sums of money have been ex- 
pended in deepening its channel at Jack's Reef, upon the west bor- 
der of the County, for the purpose of draining the extensive marshes 
near the outlet of Cayuga Lake. The enterprise has been partially 



24 ONONDAGA COUNTY. 



successful, and a large amount of valuable land has been reclaimed. 
The river is broad and deep, and has upon it a series of rapids, 
which have been converted into a valuable water power. In the 
lower part of its course it makes a broad sweep or bend from a 
south-east to a north-west course, and at its extreme south point, it 
receives the Onondaga outlet from the south. Oneida River, the 
outlet of Oneida Lake, is a deep, sluggish, crooked stream, 18 miles 
in length, and forms a link in the chain of internal navigable wa- 
ters of the State. Lime-stone and Butternut Creeks, after flowing 
through narrow and deep parallel valleys among the hills, unite in 
the north part of the town of Manlius, and flow into Chittenango 
Creek, a few miles above its entrance into Oneida Lake. Otisco 
Inlet, a small stream, entering the County from the south, may be 
considered the head branch of Nine Mile Creek. 

Skaneateles Outlet discharges its waters into Seneca River, just 
beyond the west border of the County. Several small streams take 
their rise in the south part of the County, and, flowing south, form 
the head branches of Tioughnioga River. 

The New York Central Rail Road extends through Man- 
lius, DeWitt, Syracuse, Geddes, Camillus, Van Buren and Elbridge. 
From Syracuse, two divisions of this road extend westward to 
Rochester; one through Clyde and Lyons, called the Direct Road, 
and the other through Auburn and Geneva, called the Auburn Road. 
The Oswego and Syracuse Rail Road extends from Syracuse, north, 
through Geddes, Van Buren and Lysander ; and the Syracuse, 
Binghamton and New York Rail Road extends from Syracuse, 
south, through Onondaga, DeWitt, La Fayette, Fabius and Tully, 
uniting with the New York and Erie road at Binghamton. A third 
rail has been added on the Syracuse and Oswego Rail Road, mak- 
ing it a broad gage as well as narrow gage road, and cars are now 
run from Oswego direct to Jersey City via S. & O. and S. & B. 
R. R. to Binghamton, and from thence via the Eue road. 

The County-seat is located at Syracuse. The first courts were 
held in barns and private residences at Onondaga, Levana, on the 
shore of Cayuga Lake, in Cayuga Co., and Ovid, Seneca County. 
The first Court House was erected at Onondaga Hill, in 1805-6. 
Asa Danforth, George Ballard and Roswell Tousley, were appoint- 
ed commissioners to select the site. In 1829 an act was passed to 
remove the County-seat to the village of Syracuse, and John Smith, 
Oren Hutchinson and Samuel Forman, were appointed commission- 
ers to select the site. The Court House was built on a lot about 
midway between the rival villages of Salina and Syracuse. It was 
destroyed by fire in 1850, and the present structure erected soon 
after. It is a beautiful and substantial structure of Onondaga Lime- 
stone, situated on West Genesee street, near the center of the city. 
It is one of the finest in the State. The County Clerk's office is a 



ONONDAGA COUNTY. 25 

fire-proof brick building, on North Salina street, corner of Church. 
It contains rooms for the Surrogate and Supervisors. 

The Onondaga Penitentiary is a city and county prison and 
work-house, situated about one mile north-east of the Court House. 
It is a large brick structure, and contains apartments for a jail, and 
is used also for the confinement of criminals, sentenced for short 
terms. Prisoners are received from several other counties. 

From the Report of the Supt. of the Penitentiary, we learn 
that the whole number received from Nov. 1, 1866, to Nov. 1, 
1867, was 426. Of these 68 were committed for intoxication, 
72 for drunkenness and disorderly conduct, and 56 for assault and 
battery. Of the whole number convicted 321 were from Onondaga 
Co., and 106 from other counties. 93 were under twenty years of 
age, and 146 between twenty and thirty. 320 were males and 106 
females. 154 were married and 272 were single. Ill can neither 
read or write, and 54 can read only. Of the whole number, 426, 
392 admit themselves to be intemperate, and only 34 claim to be 
temperate. 

The Poor House is located upon a farm of thirty-six acres, on 
Onondaga Hill, four miles from Syracuse. The whole number of 
persons in the County Poor House and Insane Asylum, Novem- 
ber 10, 1866, was 219, and the number received during the year 
was 336. The number remaining at the close of the year was 191. 
Of these 80 were insane, nine were idiots, and 7 blind. Seventy of 
the 191 were born in the United States, and 121 in foreign coun- 
tries. The number of weeks' board furnished in the Poor House 
and Asylum during the past fiscal year, was 12,634, and the aver- 
age weekly expense $1.48 for each inmate. 

The stock upon the farm consists of one pair of horses, six cows 
and 18 swine. The productions of the farm and garden were 20 
tons hay, 155 bushels corn in the ear, 432 bushels potatoes, 266 
bushels beets, 153 bushels turnips, 125 bushels carrots, 40 bushels 
onions, about 20 bushels tomatoes, 5 loads corn-stalks, 9 barrels 
cider, 30 bushels apples, 2 loads pumpkins, 1 600 heads of cabbage, 
and one half barrel of pickles. 

The whole amount of expenditures for Poor House and Asylum, 
for the fiscal year, was $20,773.47. 

The Onondaga County Orphan Asylum, for the care of orphan 
and destitute children is situated on East Fayette street, corner of 
Walnut, Syracuse. It was incorporated April 10, 1845, and is 
supported by public appropriations and private donations. The 
children are'well provided for, and, at the proper age, are bound 
out in respectable families. The school is under the control of the 
Board of Education of Syracuse. 



26 ONONDAGA COUNTY. 



In a lecture delivered before the " Onondaga Historical Associ- 
ation," by Charles E. Fitch, Esq., of Syracuse, he says : 

"There have been published in the County, enumerating all the 
changes which various journals have undergone, about 130 papers. 
Of these Syracuse has had over 90, Salina 3, Manlius 9, Onondaga 
Valley 3, Onondaga Hill 2, Skaneateles 9, Jordan 3, Baldwins- 
ville 2, Fayetteville 4, Fabius 1, Mottville 1, and Clay 1. Of 
weekly political journals there have been over 60, a prolific crop. 
Of religious papers there have been 6, of which only one, — The 
"VVesleyan — an able organ of its denomination, survives. Of edu- 
cational and literary papers there have been 9, as I count them. 
Of temperance papers there have been, as near as I can ascertain, 
7. *There have been some two or three medical journals, and a 
few papers especially devoted to the interests of the juvenile por- 
tion of the population. Of campaign papers, published only dur- 
ing exciting political campaigns, there have been some 5 or 6, the 
most of which were issued from the offices of the Standard and Jour- 
nal. To a few papers I need to make short special reference. On the 
18th of January, 1834, appeared in Syracuse the first number of 
" The Spy," with the ominous motto, " Castigat Ridendo Mores.''' 1 
Though established with the avowed purpose of exposing the de- 
linquencies and lashing the eccentricities of the community, I can- 
not regard "The Spy " as a particularly malicious journal. A few 
winced under its whip, but the community good naturedly bore it, 
and liberally patronized it. It rarely indulged in ridicule that was 
not deserved, and never, that I can find, invaded private sanctities 
that should have been sacred. A. B. F. Ormsby, who is still 
among us, was its proprietor. It was continued through nine num- 
bers, its publication being discontinued on account of the great fire 
which destroyed the Standard office and compelled the return of 
the materials used by the Spy, but belonging to the Standard, to 
the latter office. Of the fire itself, in its last issue, the Spy gives 
a graphic and minute account. The chief value of the Spy now 
consists in its very complete register of the business of the village. 
As an evidence of the changes which thirty years will make, it ap- 
pears that of the one hundred and twenty-three persons and firms 
then engaged in business here, but twenty-four are left in life 
among us, and only seven are engaged now in the same business as 
then. These are Eichard Woodworth, Attorney ; Mather Wil- 
liams, Physician; D. J. Morris, Clothing Merchant; H. W. Van 
Buren, Leather Dealer ; B. C. Lathrop and W. K. Blair, Grocers ; 
and Luke Collins, Butcher." 



♦The " Onondaga League," a weekly paper devoted to the cause of temperance, has 
recently been added to the list. Its first number was issued from the "State League" 
office in March of the present year, 1868.— Ed. 



ONONDAGA COUNTY. 27 



The following statistics in regard to the various papers published, 
are gleaned partly from the " Gazetteer of the State of New York," 
by J. H. French, and partly from Mr. Fitch's lecture, and will un- 
doubtedly be found interesting and valuable to many. 

The Derne Gazette, established at Manlius in 1806, by Abraham 
Romeyn, was the first paper published in the County. At that 
time an unsuccessful effort was made to change the name of the vil- 
lage from " Manlius" to " DerneP The paper was continued about 
one year. 

The Herald of the Times was started at Manlius in 1808, 
by Leonard Kellogg. In 1813, its name was changed to 

The Manlius Times, and it was successively issued by James 
Beardsley, Seneca Haleand Daniel Clark. October 28, 1818, Mr. 
Clark changed its name to 

The Onondaga Herald. Soon after it was changed to 

Tlve Times, and continued about three years. June 27, 1821, 
Thurlow Weed became editor, and the name was changed to 

The Onondaga County Republican. Oct. 27, 1824, it passed into 
the hands of Laurin Dewey, who changed it to 

The Onondaga Republican. Luman A. Miller soon after became 
proprietor, and the name was changed to 

The Manlius Repository . It afterwards passed into the hands of 
L. Stilson, and was continued about five years. 

The Onondaga Flag was published at Manlius a short time in 
1831, by Fonda. 

The Lynx was started at Onondaga Hollow in 1811, by Thomas 
C. Fay, and was continued about two years. Thurlow Weed com- 
menced his apprenticeship in this office. 

The Onondaga Register was established at Onondaga Hollow in 
1814, by Lewis H. Redfield, and was continued until 1829, when it 
was removed to Syracuse and united with the Gazette, under the 
name of 

The Onondaga Register and Syracuse Gazette. In 1832 it passed 
into the hands of Sherman & Clark, who changed it to 

The Syracuse Argus, and continued it about two years. 

The Onondaga Gazette was established at Onondaga Hill in 1816, 
by Evander Morse. Wm. Ray, author of "The Horrors of Slavery," 
was editor at one time. In 1821 it passed into the hands of Cephas 
S. McConnell, and was changed to 

The Onondaga Journal. In 1827, Vivus W. Smith, became 
proprietor, and in 1829 he removed it to Syracuse and united it 
with the Syracuse Advertiser, the combined paper taking the name 
of 

THE ONONDAGA STANDARD, Sept. 10, 1829, published by 
Wyman & Smith. S.F., T. A., and A. L. Smith, W. L. Crandall, and 
Marccllus Farmer, were subsequently interested in its publication 



28 ONONDAGA COUNTY. 



at different times till 1848, when it passed into the hands of Agan 
& Summers. In 1856 Agan sold his interest to Wm. Summers. 
The paper was continued by Summers & Brother till July 1st 
1866, when it passed into the hands of Summers & Co., by whom 
it is still published. 

THE SYRACUSE DAILY STANDARD was started in 
June 1846, by Smith & Agan, and was continued three months. It 
was revived January 1, 1850, and is now published by Summers 
&Co. 

The Onondaga Gazette was established at Syracuse in April, 
1823, by John Durnford, and was the first paper started in Syra- 
cuse. About a year afterward it was changed to 

The Syracuse Gazette and General Advertiser, and continued till 
1829, when it was united with the Onondaga Register. 

The Syracuse Advertiser was started in 1825, by John F. Wy- 
man and Thos. B. Barnum. Norman Rawson was afterwards con- 
nected with it, but John F. Wyman soon assumed the entire con- 
trol, and continued it till ] 829, when it was united with the Jour- 
nal, and its name changed to the Standard. 

The Salina Sentinel was started in October, 1826, in what is 
now the First Ward of Syracuse, by Reuben St. John. In 1827 
it was changed to 

The Salina Herald, and it was issued a short time by Josiah 
Bunce. 

The Courier was published at Jordan a short time in 1831, by 
Fred. Prince. In 1832 it was removed to Salina and changed to 

The Salina Courier and Enquirer, but was discontinued, after a 
few numbers. 

The Onondaga Republican was started at Syracuse in 1830, by 
VV. S. Campbell. In 1834 it passed into the hands of J. B. Clark 
& Co., and its name was changed to 

The Constitutionalist. In 1835, L. A. Miller became its propri- 
etor, and changed it to 

The Onondaga Chief. In 1837 it was sold to J. M. Patterson, 
and published as the 

The Syracuse Wliig. In 1838 J. K. Barlow became proprietor, 
and continued it about one year. 

The Syracuse American was started at Syracuse in 1835 by John 
Adams, and was continued about one year. 

The American Patriot was started at Franklin Village, (now 
Fabius,) in 1836, by J. Tenney, and was continued for three years. 

The Western State Journal was started March, 20, 1839, by V. 
W. & S. F. Smith. In 1844 its name was changed to 

THE SYRACUSE WEEKLY JOURNAL. In 1847 it was 
published by Barnes, Smith & Cooper, and in 1849 it passed into 
the hands of V. W. Smith. In 1850 Seth Haight became propric- 



ONONDAGA COUNTY. 29 



tor, and George Terwilliger, editor. In 1853 Danforth Merrick 
became proprietor. In 1854 it was purchased by T. S. Truair, and 
Andrew Sherman was made editor. In 1855 J. G. K. Truair 
bought the. establishment, and on the 1st of September, 1850, An- 
son G. Chester assumed the editorial control, which position he oc- 
cupied for about three years. It has since been published by J. G. 
K. Truair & Co., Truair, Smith & Miles, and is now issued by 
Truair & Smith. 

THE SYRACUSE DAILY JOURNAL was established July 

4, 1844, by S. F. Smith, and has since been continued by the va- 
rious proprietors of the Journal establishment. It is now pub- 
lished by Truair & Smith. 

The Empire State Democrat and United States Revieio, was start- 
ed in 1840, by Hiram Cummings, and continued about three years. 

The Onondaga Messenger was started in 1841 by Joseph Bar- 
ber. In 1842 it was changed to 

The Syracusean, and was continued about one year. 

The Evening Mail (the first daily paper in Syracuse,) was pub- 
lished for three months in 1833, by Vivus W. Smith. 

The Morning Sentinel, (daily,) was started in January, 1813, by 
N. M. D. Lathrop, and was continued about a year, when it was 
changed to the 

Onondaga Sentinel, and issued weekly, with few intervals, till '50. 

THE WEEKLY SOUTHERN ONONDAGA has just been 
started at Tully by Frank Hale. 

The Democratic Freeman was started in 1844, by J. N. T. 
Tucker, continued a short time with Jas. Kinney as publisher, and 
J. N. T. Tucker as editor, when it was changed to 

The Syracuse Star. In 1846 it was published by Kinney, Marsh 
& Barnes; in 1847--48 by Kinney & Marsh; in 1849-50--51 by 
Kinney & Masters. It soon after passed into the hands of George 
F. Comstock, publisher, and Winslow M. Watson, editor. In 1852, 

5. Corning Judd became editor and proprietor. In Oct., 1853, it 
passed into the hands of Edward Hoagland, who changed it to 

The Syracuse Republican, and continued about a year. 

The Syracuse Daily Star was established in 1846, and issued with 
the Weekly Star until 1853, when it was changed to 

The Syracuse Daily Republican, and discontinued in about one 
year. 

The Bugle Blast, a campaign paper, was published about three 
months in 1844, by S. F. Smith. 

Young Hickory, another campaign paper, was issued about the 
same time by Smith & Farmer. 

The Religious Recorder (Pres.) was started in May, 1844, by 
Terry & Piatt. In 1847, it passed into the hands of Avery & Hu- 
lin, who continued it until 1853. 



30 ONONDAGA COUNTY. 

The Liberty Intelligencer was started in 1345 by Silas Hawley, 
and was continued about one year. 

The Young Ladies' Miscellany was started Nov. 7, 1845, by a 
committee of young ladies belonging to the Syracuse Female Sem- 
inary, and was continued twelve weeks. 

The Teachers' Advocate was commenced in 1846, by L. W.Hall, 
publisher, and Edward Cooper, editor. In 1847, it passed into the 
hands of Barnes, Smith & Cooper, and was continued about one 
year, when it was sold to Joseph McKean and removed to New 
York. 

Zh<i Onondaga Democrat w as started in the spring of 1840, by 
Chirk & West, Wm. L. Crandall, editor. In 1847 it was sold to 
J ohn Abbott, who changed it to 

The Syracuse Democrat. At the close of one year, it was sold to 
Wm. W. Green, and in 1847 to Agan & Summers, and merged in 
the Onondaga Standard. 

The District School Journal, organ of the State School Depart- 
ment, was removed from Albany to Syracuse in 1847, and pub- 
lished two years by L. W. Hall, and one year by Barnes, Smith & 
Cooper, when it was returned to Albany. 

The Syracuse Reveille, (daily,) was started in 1848, by Wm. L. 
Palmer and W. Summers, and was continued till Jan. 1, 1850, 
when it was sold to the Standard. 

The Free Soil Campaigner, a campaign paper, was published 
three months in 1848, by Agan & Summers. 

The Clay Banner, a campaign paper, was published about the 
same time from the Journal office. 

The Impartial Citizen, (semi-mo. ,)was started in 1848 by Samuel 
R. Ward, and was continued about one year. 

The Crystal Fountain was started in 1848, by A. B. F. Ormsby, 
and continued three months. 

The Adventist was published three months in 1849 by L. Delos 
Mansfield. 

The Literary Union was commenced April 7, 1849, by W.W. 
Newman, J. M. Winchell and James Johannot, and was continued 
about a year and a half. 

The Free School Clarion was published a few montn.- In the fall 
of 1849, by William L. Crandal. 

The Liberty Party Paper was started July 4, 1849, by John 
Thomas, and was continued two years. 

The Central City (daily,) was published a short time, in 1849, 
by Henry Barnes. 

The Syracusean (monthly,) was established in 1850, Wm. H. 
Moseley. In 1851 it was changed to 

The Syrcuseanand United States Review, and in 1856 to The Sy- 
racusean and Onondaga County Review. 



ONONDAGA COUNTY. 31 



The Syracuse Independent was published about three months in 
1850. 

The Evening Transcript (daily,) was started in 1850 by Wash- 
ington Van Zandt. 

The Archimedean was commenced in 1850 ; B. F. Sleeper, pub- 
lisher, and John Abbott, editor. It was discontinued in 1851. 

The Central New Yorker was commenced in 1850 by L. P. 
Rising, and was continued but a short time. 

The Family Companion (monthly,) was published a short time 
in 1850. 

The Temperance Protector (semi-monthly,) was commenced in 
1850, by Wm. H. Burleigh, and was continued about two years. 

The Carson League was started in 1851, Thomas L. Carson, pub- 
lisher, and John Thomas, editor. It was continued about two years 
when it was removed to Albany. 

The American Medical and Surgical Journal, (monthly,) was 
started Jan. 1,1851, by Potter & Russell, and was continued till 
1850. 

The Journal of Health was published about six months in 1851, 
by S. H. Potter. 

The Onondaga Democrat (German,) was started in September, 
1852, by George Saul. In October, 1856, it was changed to 

The Syracuse Democrat, and subsequently to 

THE SYRACUSE UNION. It is now published by John L. 
Roehm. 

The Deutsche Republican (German,) was issued a short time in 
1852. 

The Free Democrat was started in 1852, by J. E. Masters, pub- 
lisher, and R. R. Raymond, editor. In Feb. 1853, it was changed 
to 

The Syracuse Chronicle. The paper was owned by a joint stock 
company, and edited by R. R. Raymond about one year, when 
George Barnes became proprietor. In June, 1855, Samuel II . 
Clark bought the concern, and S. W. Arnold assumed the editor- 
ship of the paper. In February, 1856, the office was burned, and 
the paper was merged in the Journal. 

The Evening Chronicle, (daily,) was issued from the Chronicle 
office during the continuation of the weekly paper. 

The Seraph's Advocate (monthly,) was started in the fall of 1852, 
by Miss Keziah E. Prescott, and was continued one year. 

La Ruche, a French paper, was started in 1852, by A. L. Wal- 
liot. A few numbers only were issued. 

THE AMERICAN WESLEYAN was removed from New York 
to Syracuse, Jan. 1, 1848, by L. C. Matlack. In October 1858, 
Cyrus Prindle became editor. Adam Crooks is its present editor. 



32 ONONDAGA COUNTY. 

THE JUVENILE INSTRUCTOR (semi mo.,) is issued from the 
Wesleyan office, and is under the same management. 

The Reformer was published a short time in 1854 by A. Pryne. 

The Unionist,{mox\t\i\y,) and The Union JIerald,(month\y,)were 
issued from the Reformer office. 

The Evangelical Pulpit was started in Jan. 1854, by Rev. Lu- 
ther Lee, and was continued about two years. 

The Rome Circle was published by L. W. Hall in 1855, about 
one year. 

The American Organ (daily,) was commenced in 1855, by Way 
& Miuier. It soon passed into the hands of H. P. Winsor and con- 
tinued about a year. 

The Onondaga Hardshell was started October, 26, 1855, and 
was discontinued after the publication of the second number. Sup- 
posed to have been edited by J. J. Peck and John A. Green, Jr. 

The Syracuse Daily News was started in 185G by C. B. Gould, 
but was discontinued in a short time. 

The Syracuse Zeilung, (German,) was started August 15, 1855, 
by Otto Reventlow, and was continued a short time. 

The Syracuse Weekly Courier was started October 1, 185G, by F. 
L. Hagadorn. In November 1858, it passed into the hands of Hal- 
sted & Co., and was changed to 

The Onondaga Courier, and is now published by D. J. Halsted, 
as 

THE ONONDAGA COURIER AND UNION. 

The Syracuse Daily Courier was started at the same time as the 
weekly. In 1858 it passed into the hands of Halsted & Co., and 
its name was changed to 

The Central City Daily Courier. During the campaign of 1860, 
Mr. Halsted withdrew from it and established 

The Syracuse Union. Upon the close of the campaign the two 
papers were united under the name of 

THE SYRACUSE DAILY COURIER AND UNION, and 
is still published by Daniel J. Halsted. 

THE SYRACUSE CENTRAL DEMOCRAT (German,) was 
started July 2d, 1858, by Joseph A. Hofman, and is still pub- 
lished. 

THE STATE LEAGUE was started in August 1858, by Thos. 
L. Carson, and is still published by him. 

THE SKANEATELES DEMOCRAT was commenced in 
1840 by William M. Beauchamp. It was subsequently issued by 
W. IT. Jewett, Philo Rust and Jonathan Keeney. About 1851 it 
passed into the hands of Harrison B. Dodge, its present editor and 
proprietor. 

The Naval Bulletin was issued from the Democrat office a short 
time in 1853. 



ONONDAGA COUNTY. 33 



The Minerva was issued a short time in 1844, by W. H. Beau- 
champ, and was finally merged in the Democrat. 

The Juvenile Repository was published at Skaneateles in 1838 
by Luther Pratt. In 1840 it was removed to New York, and soon 
after discontinued. 

The Citizens' Press was published six months at Onondaga Hol- 
low, in 1832, by E. Russell Webb and James S. Castle. 

The Fayetteville Times was published at Fayetteville in 1836, 
by Henry W. De Puy. 

The South Cortland Luminary was removed to Fayetteville in 
1839, by Hon. Wesley Bailey, and its name changed to 

The Fayetteville Luminary. It was published about three years. 
Its name was afterwards changed to the Methodist Reformer and 
removed to Utica. 

The Fayetteville Gazette was started by J. E. N. Backus, about 
1859, and subsequently sold to T. E. Hitchcock, but it was short 
lived. 

THE FAYETTEVILLE RECORDER was started in 1866, by 
F. A. Darling, by whom it is still published. 

The Communist was started at Mottville, Nov. 27, 1844, by John 

A. Collins, as the organ of the Skaneateles Community. It was 
continued about a year. 

The Baldwinsville Repiiblican was started in 1844, by Samuel 

B. West. In Oct. 1846, it passed into the hands of C. M. Hosmer, 
and was changed to 

THE ONONDAGA GAZETTE. In 1848 it was published by 
Sheppard & Hosmer. It is now published by J. M. Clark. 

The Jordan Tribune was started in 1849 by P. J. Becker. In 
1853 it was changed to 

THE JORDAN TRANSCRIPT. It was subsequently pub- 
lished by Nathan Burrell, Jr., and by Charles B. Park. It is now 
published by H. P. Winsor. 

The Pearly Fountain (monthly,) was published by Park & 
Cheal, John G. Cheal, editor, for a short time, at Jordan. 

This County being the chief-seat of the Onondaga Nation of In- 
dians, the central of the Five Nations, its early history and that of 
the Indian Nations cannot be separated. Until the arrival of Eph- 
raim Webster in 1786, the first white settler after the Revolution, 
the history of the County would-be nothing more than the few in- 
cidents occuring from an occasional visit of the French traders, to- 
gether with a missionary's call to the hunting grounds of the chil- 
dren of the forest. 

At the time of the settlement of New York by the Dutch, in 1610, 
there were in their immediate vicinity numerous tribes of Indians, 
denominated, from their weakness and inferiority, "the Bushes," 
by their more powerful neighbors the Five Nations. As many as 



34 ONONDAGA COUNTY. 



thirteen different tribes, all of whom are now extinct, are supposed 
to have had their allotted territories on Long Island, and exercised 
exclusive jurisdiction and control over their several portions of do- 
main ; but the distinguished Five Nations, firmly bound and con- 
centrated in one, held the ascendency over all the North American 
tribes. The territory proper, extended from the Hudson River on 
the east, to the Niagara, on the west, from Lake Ontario on the 
north, to tlfe Alleghanies on the south. At one time their actual 
domain extended from the Sorel, south, by the great lakes, to the 
Mississippi on the west, thence east to the Santee, and coast-wise 
back to the Hudson. Their territory possessed more fertile land, 
combined with a temperate and healthy climate, than any other 
tract of the same extent in the world. 

They were called by the French, Iroquois, by the English the 
Confederates or Five Nations, by the Dutch the Maquas and by them- 
selves Mingoes ; meaning by all United People. The English 
retained the name of Maquas for the Mohawks, along time after the 
Dutch had relinquished the country. Webster, the Onondaga in- 
terpreter, says this great league of confederation was arrived at 
at about two generations before the whites became traders with the 
Indians. Mr. Clark, in his history of the County, thinks that the 
period is unknown, but that it is of.a much earlier date than Web- 
ster speaks of, from the permanency of their institutions, the pecu- 
liar structure of their government, the intricacy of their civil affairs, 
the stability of their religious beliefs and the uniformity of their 
pagan ceremonies, differing from other Indian nations in important 
particulars, we are inclined to the opinion that their federative exis- 
tence must have had a much longer duration. The story of Ta- 
oun-ya-ivatha, the Deity who presides over fisheries and hunting 
grounds coming down from his place in the clouds to teach those peo- 
ple how to cultivate the soil, cannot be anything more than Indian 
Mythology, or what is more likely yet, the visit of some early white 
man. While he was living with them there was an alarm caused 
by the sudden approach of a ferocious band of warriors from north 
of the great lakes. Many had been slain, and ultimate destruction 
seemed to be the consequence either of bold resistance or of a quiet 
relinquishment of absolute right. At this trying moment, Hi-a- 
wat-ha, was sought for advice, and no statesman of to clay could 
more fully advise them than he did in a few words. " Become a 
united people and you will conquer your enemies. Dispatch run- 
ners in all directions and notify the chiefs of a grand council to be 
held on the banks of the Oh-nen-ta-ha, (Onondaga Lake.) I shall 
sit in council with you." The council fire had been kindled three 
days, but the venerable Hi-a-wat-ha had not made his appearance. 
On approaching his hut he was found in a melancholy state of mind. 
The old man told them he had evil forebodings, and that he had 



" 






OXONDAGA COUNTY. 35 



concluded not to attend the great Council. But the chiefs had de- 
termined not to deliberate in council without the presence of Hi-a- 
wat-ha, and he was finally prevailed on to go, accompanied by his 
darling child, an only daughter of twelve years of age. On the ap- 
proach of the venerable wise man, a general shout of joy resounded 
through the assembled host, and every demonstration of respect 
was paid his presence. 

As he landed and was passing up the steep bank towards the coun- 
cil ground, a loud sound was heard like a rushing and mighty wind. 
All eyes were instantly turned upwards, and a dark spot was dis- 
covered rapidly descending from on high among the clouds. It 
grew larger and larger as it neared the earth, and was descending 
with fearful velocity into their midst. The utmost confusion pre- 
vailed throughout the assembled multitude, and all but the venera- 
ble Hi-a-wat-ha sought safety by flight. He gravely uncovered his 
silvered head and besought his daughter to await the approaching 
danger with becoming resignation, at the same time reminding her 
of the great folly and impropriety of attempting to obstruct or pre- 
vent the designs or wishes of the Great Spirit. No sooner had his 
resolution become fixed, and his last words uttered, than an im- 
mense bird, with a long and pointed beak, and wide spread wings, 
came down with a mighty swoop and crushed the beautiful girl to 
the earth. His darling daughter has been killed before his eyes in 
a marvellous manner, and her destroyer has perished with her. It 
was found on examination that the animal in its descent had com- 
pletely buried its beak, head and neck, up to its body, in the ground. 
It was covered with a beautiful plumage of snowy white, and every 
warrior, as he advanced, plucked a plume from this singular bird 
with which he adorned his crown, and from this incident the braves 
of the confederate nations for ever after made choice of the plumes 
of the white heron as their most appropriate military ornament 
while upon the war-path. : In despair and dejection, Hi-a-wat-ha 
remained three days and nights prostrate on his face on the ground, 
and while every one participated in his afflictions, no one seemed 
inclined to approach or disturb his entranced state, and the Indians, 
almost despairing of a council, were about to depart, but a few of 
the leading chiefs consulted together, and resolved that nothing 
should be attempted without the voice of the wise man, and a suita- 
ble person was thereupon dispatched to ascertain whether he 
breathed. Finding that he lived, Ho-see-noke was directed to 
arouse him by his merry heart, to whisper kind words in his ear, 
and call him from his revery. After much ceremony and persua- 
sion he recovered so far as to converse, and after several messages 
had passed between the assembled chiefs and himself, he arose and 
desired some food. He was afterwards conducted to the presence 
of the Council, when all eyes were turned towards the only man who 



36 ONONDAGA COUNTY. 



could with precision foretell their future destiny. Various schemes 
were proposed to repel the enemy. Hi-a-wat-ha listened in silence 
till the speeches of all were concluded. After briefly referring to 
his own calamity, he thus spoke of the threatened invasion. " This 
is a subject that requires mature reflection and deliberation. It is 
not fitting that one of so much importance should be treated lightly, 
or that our decision should be hasty and inconsiderate. Let us de- 
fer our deliberations for a day, that we may weigh well the words 
of the wise chiefs and warriors who have spoken. Then I will com- 
municate my plan for your consideration. It is one which I am con- 
fident will secure our safety." 

After the expiration of that time, they again met, when the wise 
man thus addressed them : 

"friends and Brothers: You have come, many of you, a great 
distance from your homes ; you have convened for one common 
purpose, to promote one common interest, and that is to provide for 
our common safety. To oppose these hordes of northern foes by 
tribes, singly and alone, would prove our certain destruction. We 
can make no progress in that way ; we must unite ourselves into 
one common band of brothers. Our warriors united would surely 
repel these rude invaders, and drive them from our borders. Let 
this be done and we are safe. You, the Mohawks, sitting under the 
shadow of the " Great Tree," whose roots sink deep into the earth, 
and whose branches spread over a vast country, shall be the first 
nation, because you are warlike and mighty. You, Oneidas, a 
people who recline your bodies against the " Everlasting Stone" 
that cannot be moved, shall be the second nation, because you give 
wise counsel; You, Onondagas, who have your habitation at the 
" Great Mountain" and are overshadowed by its crags, shall be 
the third nation, because you are greatly gifted in speech and mighty 
in war. And you, Cayugas, a people whose habitation is the 
"Dark Forest" and whose home is everywhere, shall be the fourth 
nation, because of your superior cunning in hunting. You, Senecas, 
a people who live in the open country, and possess much wisdom, 
shall be the fifth nation, because you understand better the art of 
raising corn and beans, and making cabins. You five great and 
powerful nations must unite and have but one common interest, 
and no foe shall be able to disturb or subdue you." 

Immediately on this was formed the celebrated Aquinuschioni, 
or Amphictyonic League of the great confederacy of Five Nations, 
which to this day remains in full force. 

By the early French writers, the Mohawks and Oneidas were 
styled the lower or inferior Iroquois ; while the Onondagas, Cayu- 
gas and Senecas, were denominated the upper or superior Iroquois, 
because they were located near the sources of the St. Lawrence. 
The Onondagas were always considered the third nation, and the 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



37 



INSURANCE IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. 



Robertson & McCarthy's 

GENERAL 

(Kirk Block, 2nd Floor, over Fowler & Lyons,) 

50 S. SALINA ST., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 





CITY FIRE INSURANCE CO., of Hartford, Ct., Capital and Assets, $500,000.00 

C. T. Webster, President. Geo. W. Lester, Secretary. 

BUFFALO CITY INSURANCE CO., Capital and Assets. - - $277,720.19 

Wat. G. Fargo, President. Henry T. Smith, Secretary. 

(Semi-annual dividend of 5 per cent, paid July 1, 1868.) 

WIDOWS & ORPHANS BENEFIT LIFE INS. CO., of N. Y., Capital & Assets, $1,200,000 

For Liberality, Security and successful Management, this Company is for the term of its 

existence, the First Life Insurance Company in the World. 

AETNA LIVE STOCK INS. CO., OF HARTRORD, CT. 

This Company Insures Horses and Cattle against death by Fire, Accident or Disease. 

Farm Risks written for one, three or five years, at current rates. 
All Losses liberally adjusted and promptly paid at this Agoucy, 



B# 



CALL AND SEE US, 



OXONDAGA COUNTY. 39 



grand council-fire was always kept by them, as also the key of the 
great council house ; the Mohawks holding the door on the east as 
did the Senecas on the west. All business of importance had also 
to be transacted at Onondaga. Among the Onondagas, the line of 
descent is through the female branch of the family. As for in- 
stance, it was said that La Fort was the son of a chief, but on that 
account had no claim to the chieftainship ; and had not his mother 
been the sister of Oundiaga, he would have been excluded from his 
right to an election. The son or grandson of a chief's daughter or 
sister, is eligible to office, but his own son would not be eligible. 
The inference drawn from this is that the son is certainly derived 
from the mother but may not be from him whom he acknowledges, 
as his father. 

Among the Onondagas are five civil chiefs and one war chief. — 
Anciently they had a greater number ; sometimes as many as 
twelve or fourteen, with as many sub-chiefs or advisers. The On- 
ondagas were regarded as a sacred nation, and their chiefs more 
influential than those of any other. Before locating here, they appear, 
to have been living on the St. Lawrence, near Montreal, under the 
Adirondacks, then the most powerful nation in the north. Several 
hundred years before the discovery of America, they ar^se upon 
their oppressors, but were defeated. They then fled up the St. 
Lawrence to Lake Ontario, coasted along the lake to the mouth 
of the Oswego river, and went up and settled upon the Seneoa, 
near Three River Point. The nation finally divided into five tribes, 
and the central or Onondaga tribe went up the valley and settled 
near Onondaga Lake. Their principal villages lay on the border 
of this lake. It was here they were first found by Champlain in 
1G15, who claims to have been the first white man entering the 
country ; but from an inscription found upon a stone it would ap- 
pear to have been visited by some Spaniards as early as -1520. 
The stone,- bearing the name of Leo De Lon, VI. 1520, which is 
preserved at Albany, bears evident signs of some comrade wishing 
to mark the resting place of his unfortunate companion. We are 
told of Spaniards penetrating the country from the way of. the 
Mississippi, and there is no doubt of their being in the country as 
far back as the early part of the 16th century. 

In the summer of 1015, Samuel Champlain, with ten French- 
men, accompanied a party of Hurons in an attack upon the Iro- 
quois. A battle was fought before the principal fort of this Onon- 
dagas, but the invaders were repulsed and obliged to retreat. The 
French at an early period sent missionaries, the first- of whom was 
Father Isaac Joques, in 1642, who, after sewing the seeds of a 
christian church among the pagans, was murdered by the Mohawks 
at Caughnawaga, Montgomery County. He was followed by over 
60 other missionaries in the next century, together with about 50 
c 



40 ONONDAGA COUNTY. 



Frenchmen, who settled on the north shore of Onondaga Lake, near 
the principal Indian village, where they continued to flourish until 
the jealousies of their Indian neighbors were aroused, and in March, 
1659, they determined to exterminate them ; but through the 
friendship of an Indian, the whites became aware of their danger 
and escaped. This massacre was set on foot by by the Mohawks, 
who induced the Onondagas to agree to the murder of the French 
-on a certain day. 

A favorite young Frenchman with the head Chief, induced him 
to have a general feast, a few days previous to the proposed exter- 
mination ; and while the Indians were sleeping off the effects of the 
debauch, the French escaped in several light boats which they had 
constructed privately in the Jesuits' storehouse. The Indians, not 
having any knowledge of the existence of the boats, were astonish- 
ed to find their proposed victims far out of their reach. If the mis- 
sionaries were alone in the work of subjugation, they would be safe 
at all times in the hands of the savage tribes; but the rival gov- 
ernments of France and England continually thwarted their work, 
and rendered the lives of all at times insecure. When the Mohawk 
conspiracy had died away, and the Onondagas, becoming sorry for 
giving the French reason to doubt their sincerity, and feeling the 
loss they had sustained in driving them away, the principal Chief sent 
an invitation to them again to establish themselves among them. 
In 1665 a number of French families returned under the guidance 
of the missionaries, and settled near the Indian fort and village, 
which stood in the vicinity of the present village of Jamesville. — 
After living in peace for about three years, some Spaniards to the 
number of about 23, came in company across the country from 
the Mississippi, with some Iroquois, who had told the Spaniards of 
something white and shining on the banks of the lake which they 
had thought to be silver, but were quite disappointed on finding it 
salt. These Spaniards and the French settlers, from some unknown 
cause, had to band themselves against the Indians, but were finally 
murdered by them. Several other attempts were made by the 
French to colonize the country, as in many of the old fortifications 
French arms and merchandise have been found. The French 
doubtless found many of the fortifications built, and took posses- 
sion of them. In Pompey were found several of these,' and a con- 
siderable amount of land cleared, and it is supposed that quite a 
flourishing French settlement was here utterly destroyed. Went- 
worth Greenhalgh, in 1677, made a journey among the five nations, 
and visited their several villages. His journal is preserved among 
the Brodhead papers, and speaks of the Onondagas as " having 
but one town, but it is very large, consisting of about one hundred 
and forty houses, not fenced, is situated on a hill that is very large, 
the bank on each side extending itself at least two miles, all cleared 



ONONDAGA COUNTY. 41 



land, whereon the corn is planted. They have likewise a small 
village about two miles beyond that, consisting of about 
24 houses. They lie to the south-west, about 36 miles from the 
Onyadas. The Onondagas are said to be about 850 fighting men. 
They lie about 15 n,iles from Tshisoqui." This Tshisoqui is men- 
tioned as being Lake Teshisoque, near the village of the Onyadas, 
and is evidently Oneida Lake, at the outlet of which was an Indian 
village of considerable extent. 

Among the principal treaties made with the Indians, are those of 
Fort Stanwix, by Gov. Clinton and the Commissioners on behalf of 
the people of the State of New York, and the Onondagas, the 12th 
day of September, 1788, wherein the Indians cede to the people of 
the State for ever, all their lands, in consideration of one thousand 
French crowns in money, and two hundred pounds in clothing; but 
the Indians and their posterity shall enjoy forever the free right of 
hunting in every part of said ceded land and in fishing in all the 
waters of the same. It is also provided that the Salt Lake, and the 
land for one mile around the same, shall forever remain for the com- 
mon benefit of the people of the State of New York, and of the On- 
ondagas and their posterity, forever, for the purpose of making salt, 
and shall not be granted or in anywise disposed of for other pur- 
poses. And the people of the State of New York shall pay an- 
nually to the Onondagas and their posterity, forever, on the first 
day of June in every year, at Fort Schuyler, five hundred dollars 
in silver, unless the Onondagas or their posterity should select or 
choose to have this said yearly payment made in clothing, by giv- 
ing six weeks notice to the Governor of the State. 

In the survey of the Military Tract, of which Onondaga County 
forms a part, the famous Col. Tyler, of A-aron Burr notoriety, bore 
an important part, being well acquainted with the County, having 
settled here in 1788, and has the credit of felling the first tree and 
of constructing the first piece of turnpike road in the State, west of 
Fort Stanwix, and of assisting in the first manufacture of salt. Col. 
Tyler was known to the Indians by the name of To-whan-ta-gua, 
meaning one that is double, or one that is a laboring man and a gen- 
tleman at the same time. Col. Tyler obtained his first cow from 
Judge White, as well as some grain and corn for seed. He ground 
his corn in a mortar made in an old stump, which was standing un- 
til 1845, near the barn of Mrs. Thaddeus M. Wood, when it was 
grubbed out and burned to add to the improvements of the age. 
Major Asa Danforth is also mentioned as one of the first settlers of 
the County. He came at the same time with Col. Tyler, but Oli- 
ver Phelps appears to have been the most conspicuous of the early 
settlers, having opened the first land office in America, at Canan- 
daigua, in 1789, and for the first time conveyed land by "article," 



42 ONONDAGA COUNTY. 



a new device of American origin, wholly unknown to the English 
system of granting possession without fee. 

At the time Onondaga was organized it was divided into eleven 
towns : Homer, Pompey, Manlius, Lysander, Marcellus, Ulysses, 
Milton, Scipio, Ovid, Aurelius and Romulus. At the new organi- 
zation, in 1801, after Cayuga was set off, Onondaga was divided into 
nine towns as follows: Solon, Homer, Fabius, Onondaga, Pompey, 
Manlius, Lysander, Camillus and Marcellus, and contained about 
one hundred and twelve thousand inhabitants. In 1810, the Coun- 
ty had about twenty-six thousand; in 1825, forty-eight thousand; 
in 1830, fifty-eight thousand; in 1845, over 70,000; 1850, eighty- 
five thousand eight hundred and ninety ; in 1855, eighty-six thou- 
sand five hundred and seventy-six; in 1860, ninety thousand six 
hundred and eighty-six; and in the last census of 1865, it was nine- 
ty-three thousand three hundred and thirty-two. 

In 1790 or 1791, a company of emigrants, under the direction of 
Gen. Wadsworth, opened the first road through this County, from 
the settlement at Whitestown to Canandaigua, through an entire 
wilderness. It crossed the County line a little north of the Deep 
Spring, where William Sayles kept a tavern in 1793. After pas- 
sing Morehouse Flats, it bore south, and crossed the Butternut 
Creek, nearly a mile south of Jamesville, then bearing a little south 
of west, entered Onondaga Hollow at Danforth's, nearly a mile 
south of the present road; thence north-west to Mickle's Furnace; 
thence continued until intersected by the present road near Gen. 
Hutchinson's. Emigration greatly increased after this road was 
opened, as previously to its being traveled, emigrants had no other 
means of transportation than pack horses ; this permitting them to 
move on sleighs. A road six rods wide was authorized by the Leg- 
islature in 1794, from Fort Schuyler, on the Mohawk River, to the 
Cayuga Ferry, as nearly straight as the country would permit, and 
from thence, through Canandaigua, to the settlements of Canawagos, 
on the Genesee River. The singularity of this road is in its width, 
being two rods wider than the widest of any of our modern roads. 
In 1797, the Legislature authorized three lotteries, for the purpose 
of raising forty-five thousand dollars for the improvement of roads, 
and thirteen thousand nine hundred of this was appropriated for 
opening and improving the Great Genesee Road, in all its extent, 
from old Fort Schuyler road to Geneva. 

A Mr. Langdon, in 1797, first carried the United States mails 
through this County, traveling on horseback from Whitestown to 
Genesee, distributing papers and letters on the way, before regu- 
lar offices were established. A Mr. Lucus succeeded Langdon in 
1800, but the mail matter becoming so heavy, it required a wagon 
to transport it. Mr. Lucus also tried the experiment with a hack, 
for transporting passengers also, and did a thriving business. The 



ONONDAGA COUNTY. 43 



first four-horse mail coach was sent through once a week by Jason 
Parker, in 1803, and in 1804, commenced running regularly from 
Utica to Canandaigua, twice a week. In J804, an act was passed 
granting J. Parker and Levi Stephens the exclusive right for seven 
years of running a line of stages for the conveyance of passengers 
along the Genesee Road, or Seneca Turnpike, between the above 
places. They were bound to furnish four good and substantial cov- 
ered wagons or sleighs, and sufficient horses to run the same ; the 
fare not to exceed five cents per mile for each passenger, with four- 
teen pounds of baggage. The time allowed was forty-eight hours, 
and should not carry more than seven passengers in one carriage, 
except by the unanimous consent of the said seven passengers. — 
And if four passengers above the seven applied, they were bound 
to fit out an extra conveyance ; or a number less than four could 
have the same accommodation by paying the fare of four. 

The salt springs of Onondaga County are perhaps the most in- 
teresting, if not the most valuable, of any mineral production of 
the country ; not even excepting the gold fields of California. The 
manufactured salt, when sent from the works, gives from 96 
to 99 per cent pure salt, the remainder sulphate of lime and water. 
The springs are situated on the southern banks of the Onondaga 
Lake, from the village of Liverpool to the outlet of Nine Mile 
Creek, a circuit of about nine miles. Father Jerome Lallemant, in 
his Relation of 1645-46, is considered the first writer who mentions 
the Salt Fountains of Onondaga. Father Le Moyne, a Jesuit mis- 
sionary, who was here in 1653, is supposed to be the first white 
person who personally noticed the springs. His declaration of the 
discovery was pronounced "a Jesuit lie" by the Dutch of New 
Amsterdam. The Jesuit missionaries Joques, Creuxius, Char- 
levoix, and many other Jesuit Fathers, frequently allude to the 
salt springs at Onondaga, but not until 1787, when Comfort Tyler 
and Asa Danforth commenced to manufacture and distribute it, was 
it considered much of a sinecure. The springs formerly issued 
naturally from a black muck which composed the surface of the 
marsh, which in most places was'destitute of grass and other vege- 
tables, except samphire, and when the sun ahone, the water was 
evaporated from the surface of the mud, leaving it covered with 
chrystalized salt. These appearances are annually diminishing. 
Col. Tyler in one of his letters says, "In the month of May, (1788,) 
the family wanting salt, obtained about a pound from the Indians, 
which they had made from the water of the springs upon the shore 
of the lake. The Indians offered to discover the water to us. Ac- 
cordingly I went with an Indian guide to the lake, taking along an 
iron kettle of fifteen gallons capacity ; this he placed in his canoe, 
and steered out of the mouth of Onondaga creek, easterly, into a 
pass, since called Mud Creek. After passing over the marsh, then 



44 ONONDAGA COUNTY. 



flowed by about three feet of water, and steering towards the bluff of 
hard land, (since the village of Salina,) he fastened his canoe, 
pointed to a hole, apparently artificial, and said there was the salt." 

At this time Col. Tyler says he made about thirteen bushels of 
salt. Asa Danforth, Esq., commenced making salt the same year 
by carrying a five pail kettle from his residence at Onondaga Hol- 
low. He placed his coat on his head, inverted the kettle thereon, 
and it has been said, carried it the whole distance without taking it 
off to rest. Comfort Tyler accompanied him, carrying an ax, 
chain and other necessary implements for the purpose of making 
a suitable erection to " boil salt." They set up two crotches, sus- 
pended their kettle on a chain around a pole, between them, and 
thus carried on the business of making salt. This practice was con- 
tinued till the following year, when Nathaniel Loomis came to Salt 
Point with a few kettles, in a boat, by way of Oneida Lake and River, 
and during that winter made from 500 to 600 bushels of salt, which 
he sold for one dollar a bushel. In 1793, Moses DeWitt and Wil- 
liam Van Vleck entered into a co-partnership, and erected an arch 
containing four potash kettles, supplying the inhabitants of the sur- 
rounding country. Soon after, the Federal company organized and 
made salt on what was then considered a stupendous scale. James 
Geddes, well known as an engineer and chief promoter of the Erie 
Canal, commenced the manufacture of salt at Geddes, and very soon 
after, John Danforth at Liverpool. The business was -so much in- 
creased in 1797 that the Legislature in that year passed their first 
laws in reference to the manufacture of salt at the Onondaga Salt 
Springs. 

The Surveyor General was directed to make a survey in person ; 
lay out the salt springs reservation into lots not exceeding ten acres, 
with five acres of salt marsh, for the convenience of persons engaged 
in the manufacture of salt ; and to execute a lease for three years 
to any person who had already erected and occupied salt works, 
upon the following terms : For every kettle or pan used or to be 
used the lessee should cause to be made at least ten bushels of salt 
annually, and pay as a rent for the premises four cents for every 
bushel of salt made thereon during the time. If a manufacturer was 
not able to extract all the salt from the water on his premises, the 
next manufacturer to him was entitled to it, and so on till it was all 
turned into use. The process of procuring salt was confined to 
boiling until the year 1821, when the first solar works were erected, 
and with so much opposition that the Legislature had to pass special 
laws for their protection. Another improvement in the manufac- 
ture of salt was the introduction of bittern pans, and a number of 
experiments have been made, but the process must essentially 
remain the same as at first. The addition of alum to the water 
rendered the crystallization more perfect. The engineer, (Simeon 



ONONDAGA COUNTY. 45 



Ford, Esq.,) in his report to the Legislature in 1826, says, "There 
can be no doubt that there are large beds of fossil salt in the neigh- 
borhood of Salina, and recommends the carrying down of a shaft 
to a considerable depth. The probability being that the fresh 
water which enters into the salt pits enters the ground on the oak 
hills, back from the lake, passing over the rock, becomes more or 
less impregnated, according to the quantity admitted and the time 
taken up in passing over the rocks. The reason why the water is 
supposed to come from the oak hills is, that, whenever the present 
well is cleansed, acorns, hickory nuts, leaves, sticks and pieces of 
oak wood, will be found rising through the orifices in which the salt 
water appears, from the bottom of the well. A large mandrake 
rose through one of the crevices at the bottom, and was taken out 
in a complete state of saturation." 

In 1827, wells were opened at Geddes, Salina, and one mile north 
of Salina, which gave an abundance of brine, equal in all respects 
to the old well at Salina. An analysis of the water is as follows : — 

Common salt 173.50 

Sulphate of lime &c. 8.50 

Water 818.00 



1.000.00 



35 gallons of water give a bushel of salt, weighing 56 lbs. The 
temperature of the water as it rises from the ground is from 50 to 
52 Fahrenheit. Lime is the principal ingredient made use of in ac- 
celerating the precipitation of impurities. It is sometimes cast into 
the kettles but oftener it is sprinkled in the reservoirs where it 
mixes the heterogeneous ingredients and the impure mass subsides 
to the bottom. 

Tne State levies a duty of one cent per bushel on all salt manu- 
factured, and from this revenue the State works are kept up. 

In visiting the works, what strikes a stranger most are the ex- 
tensive solar works, consisting of acres of shallow vats, construct- 
ed of wood, and placed upon posts, two to three and a-half feet 
above the ground. Each vat is 16 feet square, or 16 by 18, and 9 
inches deep. Movable roofs are so constructed that the vats can 
easily be covered on the approach of rain, and exposed in dry 
weather. An acre of ground contains about 60 vats, giving an 
evaporating surface of more than 15,000 square feet. Over 500 
acres are now covered by solar works. Solar salt is much coarser 
than that produced by boiling. 

In 1797, William Stevens was appointed first Superintendent of 
the Onondaga Salt Works, in which office he remained until his 
death. The Superintendent was authorized to settle all disputes, 
and his award was final. No manufacturer could receive more 



46 ONONDAGA COUNTY. 



than sixty cents a bushel for salt, and no salt should be sold on the 
leased premises, but should be put into barrels or casks and deliv- 
ered to the Superintendent, and by him stored until sold. 

The duties, of the Superintendent obliged him to store all salt, 
brand his name and the year when made on each cask, and to de- 
liver the same to the respective owners as they sold the same, upon 
receiving from them the lawful rent and one cent per bushel for 
storage ; always taking care to keep in store at least two thousand 
bushels, and after the first year, five hundred bushels for each year,, 
which quantity was to be kept in store for the citizens of the State 
of New York, who depended on obtaining their supply from these 
works. He was also to sell to any citizen for family use, at a price 
not exceeding sixty cents a bushel, reserving for rent and storage 
five cents per bushel, and return 55 cents to the maker. Owners 
of stores were allowed to store salt in them, but the keys should 
be kept by the Superintendent. In such case the owner had no 
storage to pay. Not having room for the immense quantity of salt 
manufactured, it was enacted in 1798, that lessees should account 
to the Superintendent, under oath, for the quantity made, and 
leases were allowed to pay rent according to the capacity of their 
kettles, at the rate of two cents per month for every gallon of the 
capacity of their pans or kettles, instead of rent of four cents per 
bushel. All salt should be sold at the factory by weight, at the 
rate of fifty -six pounds per bushel. In 1799, an act was passed for 
the assortment of salt when necessary ; the first quality to be free 
from dirt and filth, with the bitterns properly separated and fully 
drained from brine ; the second quality to be free from impurities, 
dry, and not more than twenty -five per cent inferior to the first 
quality; to be packed in good, seasoned, white oak casks, water 
tight, having twelve hoops, three on each end and three on each 
bilge, to be thirty inches long, and the diameter of each head to be 
nineteen inches. Any person packing uninspected salt was fined 
five dollars; five dollars forfeited also for buying or selling, or ship- 
ping uninspected salt. The canals are the great highways used in 
the transportation of salt, the great Erie being the chief. 

The fathers of this stupendous work should be forever venerated 
for their perseverance in overcoming the opposition that they had 
to contend with, both from individuals as well as from the infancy 
of the country they had to penetrate and depend on for the means 
to carry it through. We must always admire genius struggling 
against fate, with an infatuated mind that will not allow itself to be 
dethroned from its high position, overcoming all obstacles and de- 
fying fate itself in the contest. A few miles of aqueduct, construct- 
ed by the wealthy eastern nations in the height of their prosperity, 
was considered a great achievement ; but what nation in its youth 
would have courage enough to undertake 350 miles of a canal, with- 



ONONDAGA COUNTY. 47 



out having even an engineer of their own who had earned confidence 
enough among them to be deemed worthy of their confidence. It 
was well that the Englishman, to whom they applied for assistance, 
felt that his reputation might be endangered by having to come to 
the wilds of America to earn $5,000 a year, for it threw them 
again on their own resources, and they were not Ions: in discover- 
ing that there were actually among them better engineers than they 
could import, and whose services could be obtained for 1,500 dol- 
lars. The Hon. Jas. Geddes is a sample of what genius will do, 
and of the wonderful resources of the mind of man in its trials to 
overcome difficulties. Self-educated and self-relying, without the 
aid of artificial help, he became eminent in the profession of his 
adoption which will associate his name with the noblest works of 
the age. He had many able assistants, one of whom, on account of 
the remarkable level taken by himself and Mr. Geddes, is worthy 
of notice. In 1817 the levels and surveys of the previous years 
were reviewed, and in order to test their accuracy it was deemed 
expedient that Mr. Geddes should start at a given point on the ca- 
nal line at Rome, and Mr. Wright from another given point, to the 
place where Mr. Geddes had terminated his line, a distance of near- 
ly 100 miles, and see what their difference of level would be. It 
was less than an inch and a half. Such a result is unparalleled. It 
is not easy to do justice to the few men who bore the brunt of the 
early battle, before men's minds were capable of comprehending 
such a noble work as the Erie Canal. Who had firmness to ad- 
vocate it when men like Mr. Jefferson looked on it as little short of 
madness or emanating from over-heated minds which should have 
at least one hundred years to cool. But if the scheme was wild it 
had men to deal with who were accustomed to the " wilds ;" so it 
was carried. Thanks to Messrs. Geddes, DeWitt Clinton, Joshua 
Forman, Jesse Hawley, Dr. Williamson, Mr. Gallatin, General 
Philip Schuyler and others. 

With thousands the idea of a canal was scouted as wild and chi- 
merical ; still there were those men of comprehensive minds- who 
believed and advocated the plan as feasible and worthy of adoption. 
Judge Joshua Forman, of Onondaga, being enlisted in the cause, in 
1807 was elected a member of the Legislature by the people of 
Onondaga, with express reference to moving in that body the grand 
project of a canal. In 1808 a law was passed authorizing the Sur- 
veyor General to draw upon the Treasury of the State for such sum 
or sums as he might require to prosecute the survey contemplated 
in the resolutions of the joint committee; that was a survey of the 
most direct route for a canal, to open a communication between 
the tide waters of the Hudson River and Lake Erie ; not exceeding 
in the whole the sum of six hundred dollars, which was all that 
was appropriated for the first survey and exploration of the grand 



48 ONONDAGA COUNTY. 



Erie Canal. Mr. Geddes was appointed by the Surveyor General, 
but the appropriation was so small very little could be done ap- 
parently ; but Mr. Geddes, by overrunning the appropriation by 
seventy-three dollars, submitted a report in 1809 of three different 
routes. The report was favorable on the practicability of an inte- 
rior route from Lake Erie, and it is worthy of remark that Judge 
Geddes' plan and route was mainly followed in the final location 
of the canal. Thus, by the operations of 1808, through the instru- 
mentality of the true men of Onondaga, the fact was satisfactorily 
established that a canal from the Hudson river to Lake Erie was 
practicable ; yet it was not until three or four years after the war 
of 1812, that the project germinated into a reality. The first con- 
tract was dated 27th June, 1817, and given to Judge John Rich- 
ardson, of Cayuga. The remaining part of the middle section was 
soon under contract, and on the 4th of July following, the excava- 
tion was commenced at Rome with appropriate ceremonies. In 
1819, the middle section, from Utica to Seneca River, including a 
lateral canal to Salina, about 94 miles, was reported by Gov. Clin- 
ton, in his annual message of 1820, as completed. By the open- 
ing of this portion of the canal, the resources of Onondaga were 
more fully developed. Her salt, gypsum and lime, found then- 
way to a ready market, so that a new and vigorous impulse was 
given to her advancement and prosperity, which placed her among 
the first counties of the Empire State, which position she is des- 
tined long to enjoy. The first ground broken on the Erie Canal in 
the County of Onondaga, was by Mr. Elias Gumaer, in the town 
of Manlius. The first boats used on the canal were the Mohawk 
boats, with wide walking boards for poling up the Mohawk River. 
Oliver Teall was appointed the first Superintendent on the Erie 
Canal, and Joshua Forman the first Collector. In 1819 the Canal 
Commissioners recommended the construction of a water commu- 
nication from the Erie Canal to the salt works of Salina, which 
work was completed simultaneously with the middle section of the 
Erie Canal. The following year the Legislature directed the Canal 
Commissioners to open a boat navigation between the village of 
Salina and Onondaga Lake and the Seneca River. This was named 
the Salina Canal, but afterwards, when the improvement was con- 
tinued to Oswego, the whole was designated as the Oswego Canal, 
which was completed in 1827, and is now the greatest avenue for 
the exportation, of salt. I have said in a former paragraph that the 
great Erie Canal was the broadway for salt ; but I shall be forgiven 
if the statistics show a surplus in favor of the route that the white 
man had persued in discovering it. 

What is known as the Military Tract was laid out into 25 town- 
ships ; three more were added, making 28 in all. In the month 
of February, 1788, Mr. Webster, in company with two Indians, 



ONONDAGA COUNTY. 49 



proceeded on a hunting excursion into the lower part of Montgome- 
ry county. Late one afternoon they came to a small clearing in 
the town of Mayfield, where they met a man whose residence was 
convenient, of whom they asked a night's lodging in his barn. He 
refused, but insisted that they should spend the night with him in 
his own house by the fire. During the evening conversation, 
Webster remarked that he lived at Onondaga, a much more fruit- 
ful and inviting country than the one he was located in, and finally 
so much was said in favor of Onondaga, that it was agreed Webster 
•should solicit permission from the Indians to let him settle there, 
and if successful, was to return or send an Indian to inform him of 
the fact. The host was Mr. Asa Danforth, who became the pioneer 
of Onondaga County. An Indian carried the information to Mr. 
Danforth, that he could come and settle with them at Onondaga 
Hollow, and it was so arranged that he should come out immediate- 
ly. Early in May, Mr. Danforth embarked with his family, house- 
hold goods, and farming utensils, in two flat bottomed boats, ac- 
companied by three boatmen, and after a tedious voyage up the 
Mohawk River, through Oneida Lake and river and Onondaga 
Lake, landed at the mouth of Onondaga Creek. Here they met 
Mr. Webster, and Mr. Danforth's son Asa, a young man, who, with 
Comfort Tyler, had been sent across the country with the stock in- 
tended for the New Settlement, and who had arrived some time in 
advance of the boats. The boats were lightened of their freight and 
pushed up the creek to where Mr. Danforth settled, a little south of 
Onondaga Hollow, May 22, 1788. The head civil Chief of the On- 
ondagas at this time was called Ca-whie-do-ta, and the second, Ta- 
whis-quanta. Although treated with great kindness, they were liv- 
ing under the apprehension of immediate death from the vindictive 
spirit manifested by the lower Indians, made base from intemper- 
ance and jealousies. There are two traders mentioned in connec- 
tion with the traders of this section of the country, one of whom un- 
der an assumed name was supposed to have died very rich in the 
east. Cauhicdota, an excellent man, and Chief of the Onondagas, 
has left us more than one address to the pale face to desist from 
"spending their time" in making his people a dangerous "trap" 
to the white as well as to the Indian. The influence of Major Dan- 
forth and Comfort Tyler being sought to put an end to this infer- 
nal traffic, made enemies of them in the eyes of these villains, where- 
upon they offered the Indians a barrel of rum, and every Indian a 
new knife and tomahawk, if they would drive Ha-tec-ol-hot-was 
(Major Danforth, the man who ploughs the ground,) and his family 
away. This promise did not fail to get men desirous of obtaining 
those articles that make the Indian's eye glitter with his desire for 
" hell-fire." They assembled at the castle armed with rifles acd 
tomahawks, and burning brands, bent on destroying the family and 



50 ONONDAGA COUNTY. 



their habitation. Cau-hic-do-ta found means of informing this 
family of their danger, and interposed his authority in their behalf, 
and finally succeeded in quieting their rage and in inducing them to 
relinquish their unhallowed design. It would appear that this good 
natured Chief kept continual watch over this family, who are indebt- 
ed to him for saving them from the red savage and the pale-faced 
villain. 

.Amid such scenes of trial and suffering, Mrs. Danforth proposed 
to visit her friends east. Accordingly, in December, Mr. and Mrs. 
Danforth, with her baby, set out on a sled, with an axman before 
to clear the way. The first night they slept " on board," at Chit- 
tenango ; the next with Sken-an-do-a, at Oneida castle ; the third 
with Judge White, their nearest white neighbor, at Ladaquate. 
After a short delay, they proceeded to Brookfield, the home of their 
eai*ly days, in Massachusetts. In the middle of March they returned, 
after an absence of about three months. 

After the crops of 1789 had been sown, Tyler and Danforth Jr., 
thought they would follow the example of Mr. and Mrs. Danforth, 
and visit the home of their childhood, not only to see their old 
playmates, but to find for themselves wives, and as Mr. Clark re- 
marks, after the fashion of the wording of the Constitution, " in the 
course of events," Mr. and Mrs. Asa Danforth Jr. became the fath- 
er and mother of the first white child born in the County — the late 
Mrs. Amanda Phillips, wife of the late Col. Phillips, of Syracuse, 
and mother of Mrs. Outwater. She was born 14th October, 1789. 
In 1791 Mr. Danforth had become possessor of lot No. 81, town- 
ship of Manlius, (now De Witt,) and had moved there temporari- 
ly. In the spring of 1792, he erected the first saw mill in the 
County, on Butternut Creek, about a mile north of Jamesville, — 
(now Dunlap's Mills.) The mill was first covered with bark. No 
boards were used in the County until they were sawed in this mill, 
and Mr. Danforth carried the saw on his shoulder from Old Fort 
Schuyler. In 1793 he erected his grist mill near his saw mill. In 
the erection of these mills Mr. Danforth was helped by all the able 
bodied men of the settlement for twenty-five miles around, so 
anxious were the people to have the means of grinding their corn, 
and the advantage of turning their timber into boards. It was at 
the raising of these mills, when, in the absence of sugar or ai-ticles 
used in sweetening, that the first drink mixed with Indian corn was 
introduced. 

In closing this historical sketch, we would gladly give a record of 
the part the loyal citizens of this County took in the suppression 
of the Great Rebellion. It is very difficult to obtain a satisfacto- 
ry record of all who entered the army from this County ; and if 
we could, the space allotted in this work forbids any extended no- 
tice. We leave, therefore, to the future historian, this pleasing 



ONONDAGA COUNTY. 51 



duty. Let it suffice to say, they bore their full share in furnishing 
men and means, and those who left their homes to encounter the 
dangers and endure the hardships of the soldier, are entitled to the 
lasting gratitude of all patriotic citizens. 



52 GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 



GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 



CA31ILLJJS. — This was one of the original townships of 
the Military Tract, and was formed from Marcellus, March 8, 1799. 
A part of Onondaga was annexed in 1834. It is an interior town, 
lying a little north-west from the centre of the County. The sur- 
face is generally rolling, the ridges extending in a north and south 
direction. Although there is in the north-west corner a swamp 
covering several hundred acres, yet the soil is rich in fertile loam, 
and judging from the magnitude and multiplicity of its crops, the 
estimation of those who consider it second to none cannot be over- 
rated. In the hills south of the Turnpike, inexhaustible beds of 
plaster are quarried and sold in great quantities, and is unsurpassed 
in quality. 

It is said that the first gypsum found in the United States was 
taken from here by William Lindsay in 1792. De Witt Clinton, 
Samuel Young, and other distinguished individuals, visited the lo- 
cality in 1809, so great was the interest felt in its discovery, and 
about the same time a joint stock company commenced quarrying 
with great success, and continued for many years afterwards. This 
company was formed of 50 members, holding shares of 50 dollars 
each share, some, as Judge Foreman, holding largely of the one 
thousand shares until the whole was taken up. Judge Foreman 
was chosen President, and Josiah Buck, principal Manager. Some 
of the finest specimens of the foliated transparent selenite variety 
have been obtained at these beds, which, from its transparency, is 
often termed alabaster. Efforts have since been made in this town 
to explore what has long been considered by some a bed of coal. — 
About two miles south of the village of Camillus, a shaft was sunk; 
but without success, although detached pieces of Anthracite coal 



GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 53 



were found. Calcareous Tufa abounds in the hills, which makes 
excellent lime and is called " basswood limestone." In the Nine 
Mile Creek valley there are numerous calcareous deposits along 
the foot of the hills. 

Caiiiillus, (p. v.) situated on Nine Mile Creek, near the center of 
the town, was incorporated in 1852; it contains 3 churches and 
another one building, 1 flouring mill, a woolen factory, and has a pop- 
ulation of about 800 inhabitants. Amhoy, another village, in the 
north-east part of the town, contains a church, a saw and grist mill, 
and about 25 houses. Belle Isle, {p. v.) on the canal, one mile 
east of Amboy, contains one church, and has about 150 inhabitants. 
Fairmount is a p. o. near the east border. 

The first white settler of the town was Capt. Isaac Lindsay, 
about the year 1700, and directly after, his brothers James, Wil- 
liam and Elijah followed him and settled on lot 80, paying two 
shillings per acre. Nicholas Lamberson, William Reed, Selden 
Leonard and Mordecai Ellis, settled here about 1793. Amono-the 
early settlers were David Hinsdale, the Whites and Munroes, who 
have since been known throughout the County for their enterprise, 
industry, intelligence and wealth. The first church (Pres.) was 
formed in 1817. There are six churches in the town now. 

The population in 18G5, was 2,552. 



CICERO was formed from Lysander, Feb. 20. 1807. Clay 
w T as taken oft* in 1827. It lies upon Oneida Lake, in the north-east 
corner of the County. Its surface is level or very slightly undu- 
lating. An extensive swamp in the south-east part, occupies about 
one third of the entire surface of the town, and another extends 
along the lake shore, west of South Bay. The soil is a clayey and 
sandy loam. 

Cicero, (p. v.) in the west part of the town, has three churches, a 
large two story brick school house, and about 65 houses. There 
is also a large steam saw mill, with one upright and three circular 
saws. The first church (Pres.) was formed at Cicero Corners, in 
1819. Rev. James Shepard was the first preacher. 

Brewerton, {p. v.) on the outlet of Oneida Lake, contains two 
churches, a fine two story brick school house, a steam sawmill and 
stave machine, and several mechanic shops. The populati >n is 
about 600. South Bay and Frenchman's Island are places of re- 
sort for pleasure seekers. 

A Mr. Dexter, a blacksmith, was the first white person who set- 
tled in this town. He settled in 1790, opposite to Fort Brewerton, 
where he lived several years. Mr. Oliver Stevens settled on the 
north side of the river in 1789, and cultivated a garden in the town 
of Cicero. A few years after, he moved to the south side of the 



54 ONONDAGA COUNTY. 



river, where he died in 1813. Ryal Bingham settled at Fort 
Brewerton in 1791, and subsequently moved to Salina. Mr. Ste- 
vens kept what is called a boatman's tavern, furnishing provisions 
and other necessaries to those who passed that way. He carried 
on quite a trade with the Indians, in furs, peltry, &c, which at that 
early day was abundant in all the country. John Leach settled at 
Cicero Corners, and for several years kept a tavern in a small log 
cabin about 1802. The first settlers suffered very much from fever 
and ague and other diseases. Elijah Loomis was the first settler 
at South Bay, on the lake shore, in 1804. Martin Woodruff set- 
tled near him, the same year. Patrick McGee settled at Brewer- 
ton, in Cicero, in 1791, and that year erected the first frame house 
in this town, which was occupied as a tavern by him, and after- 
wards by Jonathan Emmons. It was located near where the 
Brewerton House now stands. In 1813, Jonathan Emmons was 
authorized by the Legislature to establish a ferry across the outlet 
of Oneida Lake at Fort Brewerton, in the town of Cicero. The 
notorious Tory Foster first settled in the east part of the town, 
where, from his continual boasting of the cruelties practiced on his 
countrymen during the Revolutionary war, provoked Judge Tous- 
ley to rid the country of him. The Judge was a blacksmith, and 
while at work in his shop, Foster as usual was relating his cruel- 
ties, when the Judge raised a bar of iron which he intended to bury 
in the head of Foster, but it fortunately struck a beam, saving the 
villain, who fled for parts unknown. 

The intercourse of the early settlers of this town with the In- 
dians was frequent and of the most friendly character. It was a 
place of great resort with the Oneidas and Onondagas, on account 
of hunting and fishing. 

The first school was kept at Brewerton in 1792. Isaac Cody 
was the first merchant in the town. The first town meeting was 
held at the house of Patrick McGee, at Three-River Point, in 1807. 
Moses Kinne was Moderator, Thomas Pool Supervisor, and 
Elijah Loomis, town clerk. 

There are no antiquities of note in this town, though frequently, 
along the shore of the river and lake, are found relics of war, such 
as arrow heads and axes of stone, and occasionally an Indian's 
grave. In one of these a brass kettle was found, in which was a 
bunch of grapes. When brought to light they were fresh and good 
looking, but on a little exposure, they soon crumbled away. 

Fort Brewerton, called by the Indians, Oh-saha-u-ny-tah-se-ugh- 
kah, "Where the water runs out of Oneida Lake," one of the line 
of English fortifications between Oswego and the Mohawk Valley, 
was situated in Oswego county, on the shore of Oneida outlet, op- 
posite the present village of Brewerton. During the old French 
war from 1755 to 1763, there was a great strife between the Eng- 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



55 



Bramer & Pierce's Agricultural Works 



AND 



Y01G WARRIOR MOWER 

MANUFACTORY, 

ESTABLISHED IN 1838. 

Manufacture as a Speciality the Celebrated 

Young WarrlorMower ; also <>i her \url« nil ural Implements, such 

as Horse Powers, Separators, Clover Hnllers, >;i \\ inn II u- 

chines, and all kinds ol" Castings to order. 

The Young Warrior Mower as patterned and manufactured by us, is the ne plus 
ultra of Mowers. After another year's trial of the Young Warrior, it is evident that it is 
fast working its way into public favor, and is acknowledged by all who are acquainted 
with it to be the very best Mower in use, lor the following reasons: 

It is the lightest draft of any machine made, average draft in heavy grass being only 
175 lbs.; it is simple, compact, neat and durable. No bearing down oa horses necks; no 
side draft. Has an easy seat to ride on, and is the easiest and most convenient machine 
to manage, manufactured. Iron frame, two driving wheels, planetary gearing entirely 
enclosed from grass, dirt, &c, flexible folding" cutting apparatus, closely guarded, 
made of the best material, in a good workmanlike manner, and fully warranted. 

The other articles of our manufacture are of the most approved kinds ; are built of 
the best material, and give universal satisfaction. We would call particular attention 
to our CLOVER HULLER, which is conceded by all who have used it to be the best and 
most durable Huller made, doing more and better work than any other. We respect- 
fully solicit orders for any article of our manufacture, and warrant satisfaction. 

Send for Circulars to 




PtEIICE. 



p 



FABIUS, 1ST. "5T. 



Extras for repairing the Young Warrior Mower can be found at GILES EVERSON 
& CO'S HARDWARE STORE, No. 8 S. SALINA ST., Syracuse. 

Agents for Onondaga County. 

D. B. LORD, Baldwinsville ; JOHN SHERWOOD, Caraillus ; AUSTIN WYCOFP, 
Navarino; PETER INGERSON, Vesper; HENRY CLARK, Lafayette ; H. W. PRA- 
DENBURGH, Jordan. 

SEE CUT, PAGE 38. 



56 



ONONDAOA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



ONONDAGA CHIEF MOWER AND REAPER 

COMBINED, WITH 

Hand & Self Raking Attachments. 

For Li<'ht Draught, ease of management and durability, unequalcd by auy in Market. 




-A. 3D "XT -A. KT T .A. G- 3E3 St . 

1. The knife operates Che same with the linger bar at any position. 

■I. The pitman is always in line. 

8. Open and clear -pace under the Machine, and no pitman across to bend, 
clog. 

t. Will mow, with light draught, in the heaviest of grass with slow gait 
without clogging. Manufactured and for sale by 

PRESTON, CHENEY & SNOOK, 



CD 

CT3 



CO 



CO 
Cl£ 
CO 



break or 
of team, 



GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 57 

lish and French for the mastery of the Mohawk Valley. The French 
were favorites with the Indians, and in the struggle always acted 
favorably to them. In 1758, General Stanwixhad erected a strong 
fortress, at what is now called Rome, to secure the key at that im- 
portant place ; and also a stockade enclosure, as a defense against the 
Indian, at the outlet of Oneida Lake. After the reduction of Fort 
Frontenac by Col. Broadstreet, in 1758, he retook possession of the 
forts at Oswego, which were again garrisoned. Mr. Oliver Stevens 
was induced to settle at Fort Brewerton in 1789, by the represen- 
tations of two brothers who had been in garrison there in 1756-7-8. 

During the exciting scenes of 1790, when the Indians were so 
troublesome on our western frontiers, and while the British held 
possession of Oswego, Mr. Stevens was commissioned by Gov. 
Clinton to erect a block house at this place, a portion of which is 
still standing in a dilapidated condition. It was afterwards occu- 
pied as a dwelling until the year 1811. Mr. Stevens found around 
the fort a variety of warlike implements. Upon one occasion, in- 
side the fort, the hogs rooted up a keg of nails. 

The population of the town in 1865 was 3,166, and its area 2,900 
acres. There are in the town sixteen school districts, employing 
thirty-two teachers. The whole number of pupils is 1,064 and the 
average attendance 364 ; the amount expended for school purposes 
in 1867 was $6,280.39. 



CLAY, named from the Hon. Henry Clay, was formed from 
Cicero, April 16, 1827. It is the central town upon the north line 
of the County. Its surface is very flat and but little elevated above 
the level of Oneida Lake. Seneca River forms its west, and 
Oneida River its north boundary. The soil is in part clayey, and 
in part a rich sandy loam. The swampy portions of the town are 
being drained and cultivated, and are among the most productive 
portions of the town. Hundreds of acres have been cleared off 
stumps and brought under cultivation the present year. Fruit,, 
grain and grass are largely produced. 

Belgium, ( Clay p. o.) is situated in the west part of the town, orx 
the Seneca River. It contains a school house, with a public hall in 
the upper part, a steam saw mill, and about 40 houses. The saw 
mill contains one upright and three circular saws. The river is, 
crossed at this place by a fine bridge. On the west side of the 
river is a church, a boat yard, and about a dozen houses. About 
half a mile below Belgium is a manufactory of drain tile. Center- 
ville, {Plank Road p. o.) situated in the east part of the town, con- 
tains two churches, one school, a steam saw mill and about 60 
houses. Euclid, [p. v.) in the north-west part of the town, contains 
two churches, two wagon shops, a steam saw mill, and about 35 

D 



58 GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 

houses. The saw mill is run by a 20 horse power engine, and is 
capable of cutting about 3000 feet of lumber daily. Three River 
Point, situated at the junction of the Oneida and Seneca Rivers, is 
a hamlet. 

The first white settler in this town, then Lysander, was- Patrick 
McGee, at Three River Point, in 1793. In 1798, Adam Coon set- 
tled in the north-east part of the town, and Simeon Baker on the 
Seneca River, in 1799. When Mr. McGee first visited this place, 
(Three River Point,) he was a prisoner with the English, on his 
way to Port Oswego. He says : at that time there was an exten- 
sive clearing there, handsomely laid in grass, without a shrub or a 
tree for a mile or more along the banks of each river. This spot 
was often used as the council grounds of the Iroquois Confederacy. 
Here too the French and English often met the chiefs and orators-, 
who were not unequal to themselves in all that pertains to sagacity, 
skill and diplomacy. Japheth Kinne afterwards settled in Cicero, 
which is now Clay, in 1809. 

The early settlers were compelled to go twelve or fourteen miles 
to mill, and carry their grists on their back, guided only by blazed 
trees. The trip usually occupied two or three days. After the 
roads were cut through, a neighbor would take the grists of a whole 
neighborhood upon an ox sled, and carry them to the mill. They 
received their letters from Onondaga Hollow post office. 

The first and most important article of trade was salt barrels, 
large quantities of which were manufactured and carried to the salt 
works. The first barrel made in the County, although not exactly in 
the town of Clay, was made by Mr. William VVhedon, grandfather of 
Ezra Whedon, who now resides at Fairmount, four miles from the 
city of Syracuse. His shop for many years lay between two, or, J 
might say, three little knolls, fronting to the north on the Genesee 
Turnpike. He had to prepare the staves with his own hands, and 
shave his hoops on the old fashion horse. Like many of the old 
pioneers, he depended more on his arms than his ideas for 
strength- There is still left the machinery he used, and although 
rough, w.e have not as yet improved much on them in the cooper 
shop. 

The first post-office was established about 1825, in the west part 
of the town, and called "West Cicero." Nathan Teall was appoint- 
ed post-m&ster. The first school house was erected at Clay Cor- 
,ners about, 1808, and a teacher named Hall taught the first school. 
At Clay, near the river, a log school house was erected in 1809, 
and a frame one in 1812. The first physician in the town was Dr. 
■■Olcott. The first town meeting for Clay was held in April, 1 827. 
Andrew Johnson was chosen the first supervisor. A post office 
•was afterwards established at Euclid, in 1827. Jefferson Freeman 
\was the first merchant at Euclid in 1831. Philo and Reuben Shef- 



GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 59 

fel, and George James, on lot 63 ; and David Moschell on lots 76 
and 77 ; Abram Morgan on lot 61, and David Hamlin on lot 63, 
were all among the first settlers upon the lots upon which they now 
reside, having lived there more than forty years. Mrs. David 
Hamlin has always spun and wove all the cloth, of wool, cotton and 
linen, worn and used by her family of eight children, since her mar- 
riage, more than forty years ago, except one coat for Mr. Hamlin. 
They have no other kind in use now, though they have been burned 
out twice, losing nearly everything. 

The first saw mill was erected by Abraham Young, on a small 
stream which afforded water to drive the mill only in the spring and 
fall. There are no streams in this town of sufficient capacity to be 
used to advantage for machinery of any kind. The only streams 
adjacent, of any power, are the Oneida River on the north, and the 
Seneca River on the west. The first house of worship was erected 
in the north-east part of the town, in what is called the Dutch Set- 
tlement, by a society of Dutch Reformed. 

This, like the other towns in the northern section of the County, 
is fast improving, and bids fair to take rank among the first. 

The census of 1865 gives a population of 3,060, and a*i area of 
29,500 acres. 



DE WITT, named from Moses De Witt, was formed from 
Manlius, April 12, 1835. A portion of Syracuse was annexed in 
1858. It is an interior town, lying north-east of the center of the 
County. The north half is level, and the south half broken and 
hilly. The declivities of the hills are usually steep, and their sum- 
'mits are 500 to 700 feet above the valleys. Butternut Creek, flow- 
ing north, divides the highlands into two nearly equal ridges. Upon 
this stream are several fine mill sights. In the south-west corner, 
about one mile north-west of Jamesville, is a small lake, occupying 
a deep chasm in the rocks. It is nearly circular in form and about 
80 rods in diameter, and is surrounded by banks nearly 200 feet 
high. Another lake of a similar character lies two miles north- 
east of Jamesville. The falls below Jamesville are somewhat inter- 
esting as a curiosity. The water falls about 30 feet perpendicularly ; 
the breadth of the creek at the falls, is about forty feet. Its rocky 
chasm and sublime scenery, connected with the immense and inex- 
haustible beds of gypsum and water lime, and the extensive works 
for their manufacture, render this a very desirable place for the 
researches of the geologist or the rambles of the tourist. Messina 
Spring, a strong sulphur spring, north-west from the center of the 
town, has considerable local notoriety for medicinal qualities. The 
soil is a sand and chty loam in the north, and a sandy and gravelly 
loam in the south. 



60 GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 

Jamesville, (p. v.) in the south part of the town, contains three 
churches and several manufactories. The Orville (navigable) feed- 
er of the Erie Canal, and the Syracuse, Binghamton and New York 
R. R., afford ample facilities for transportation. The manufactories 
are two flouring mills, four plaster mills, a sash and blind factory, a 
cotton batting factory, and a wool carding mill. There is also a 
mill for washing carpets, and a pearl barley mill. It has about 85 
houses. Orville, (Be Witt p. o.) contains a church and about SO 
houses. Collamer, (p. o.) known as "Britton's Settlement," has two 
churches, a wagon shop and about 30 houses. 

The first settler in the, town of DeWitt was Benjamin More- 
house, from Dutchess County. He arrived here 26th April, 1789, 
with a wife and three small children, settling a few rods west of 
the old church, three and a half miles west of Manlius village. — 
At that time it was called Kasoongkta Flats, afterwards Morehouse 
Flats. Moses DeWitt, from whom the town was named, was a 
descendant from an ancient, illustrious and honorable family of 
Holland, which at an early period emigrated to New York, a branch 
of it settling in Orange County. He was born October 15, 1766, 
in the town of Deer Park, formerly Peempack, on the bank of the 
Neversink, in the County of Orange. Although dying at the age 
of twenty-eight, he made his mark, and will be remembered forever 
in connection with the fortunes of the State of New York. For 
important services rendered the State, he received several thousand 
acres of land, and at his death was considered one of the largest 
landholders in Western New York. He was buried at Jam es- 
ville, where a marble slab marks his resting place. 

Among other early settlers were Daniel Keeler, Dr. Holbrook, 
Jeremiah Jackson, Stephen Angel, Stephen Hungerford, John- 
Young, Jeremiah and James Gould, William Bends, Roger Merrill, 
Caleb Northrup and Benjamin Sanford, all of whom located in the 
town between 1790 and 1800. The first child born was Sarah 
Morehouse, Feb. 16th, 1790, and the first death was that of Egbert 
De Witt, May 30, 1793. Polly Hibbard taught the first school, 
in 1795 ; Benjamin Morehouse kept the first inn, in 1790 ; Asa 
Danforth built the first saw mill, in 1792, and the first grist mill 
in 1793. 

The census of 1865 gives the town a population of 3,001, and an 
area of 23,400 acres. The number of school districts is 14 ; the 
whole number of teachers employed during the year, 27, and the 
number of pupils 1,035, with an average attendance of 364. The 
amount expended for school purposes in 1867 was $3,886.12. 



JELBR IJDGJE was formed from Camillus, March, 26, 1829. 
It is the central town on the west border of the County. Its surface 



GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 61 

is level in the north and rolling in the south. Seneca- River and 
Cross Lake form a part of the north boundary. Skaneateles Out- 
let flows north-west through the west part. Upon the banks of the 
Outlet, near the center, are found the peculiar tunnel-shaped cavities 
in the earth, characteristic of regions abounding in gypsum. Sev- 
eral week brine springs are found along Seneca River. The chan- 
nel of this river at Jack's Reefs has been deepened by the State, for 
the purpose of draining the Cayuga marshes. The work was com- 
menced in 1854, and finished in 1857, under the superintendence of 
Hon. George Geddes. More than 200,000 yards of rock cutting 
were removed, and the marshes were drained as far west as Mus- 
quito Point. 

Elbridge, (p. v.) on Skaneateles Outlet, in the south-west part of 
the town, was incorporated April 1, 1848. It contains the Munro 
Collegiate Institute, three churches, a bank, a tub and pail factory, 
a bedstead factory, a straw board factory, a pearl barley mill, two 
saw mills and a grist mill. The tub and pail factory is quite ex- 
tensive, using about 300,000 feet of lumber, and making about 
80,000 tubs, pails and half bushels annually. The straw-board 
establishment use about 600 tons of straw annually. The bedstead 
factory makes about 15,000 bedsteads, besides a large number of 
lounges and baby cribs. The flouring mill of J. Munro is doing a 
good business, with 21 runs of stones. The Munro Collegiate In- 
stitute, founded and endowed by the munificence of Nathan Munro, 
is in a flourishing condition, and has accommodations for 300 
students. Population in 1865, 776. 

Jordan, (p. v.,) situated on the Outlet, about three miles below 
Elbridge, has five churches, an academy, a bank, a printing office, 
several storehouses and manufactories. The wheelbarrow factory 
of Newell & Sperry is one of the largest in the country, making 
from 20,000 to 25,000 wheelbarrows, besides several thousand 
hand sleighs, annually. There is also a large coopering establish- 
ment here, and a foundry and machine shop, engaged chiefly in 
making pumps and threshing machines. The pearl barley mill, 
about half way between Elbridge and Jordan, uses about 40,000 
bushels annually. Situated upon the canal and the N. Y. C. R. R., 
Jordan has excellent facilities for shipping its manufactures. The 
population of the village in 1865 was 1,541. 

Peru (Jack's Reef p. o.,) has a church, a hotel and about a doz- 
en houses. Half Way is a station on the Auburn branch of the 
New York Central R. R. Junction, (Hart Lot p. o.,) is a wood 
station on the same road. California is a hamlet on the canal, 
two miles east of Jordan. 

Josiuh Buck, who surveyed the township of Camillus into lots in 
1791, came to this town with his family in 1793, in a large wagon, 
and settled on a lot now owned by Col. John. Munro. By order 



62 GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 

of Squire Munro, a large oak log was left without molestation for 
a number of years as a memorial of the place where the first set- 
tlement was made in the town. Mr. Buck and his family lived 
several weeks with no shelter but the forest, and the wagon served 
for kitchen, wardrobe, and sleeping apartments. Robert Fulton 
came into the town the same year, a little after, and James Strong 
in 1794. Col. Chandler and Dr. Pickard, an Indian root doctor, 
came soon after. A Mr. Potter was the first blacksmith in 1795, 
and James Weisner and Nicholas Mickles settled in the town in 
1796. Isaac Strong erected a saw mill in 1796, and a grist mill in 
1798. The inhabitants who first settled in this town had to go to 
Jamesville to mill. William Stevens located here in 1794, and 
built a saw mill about a mile west of Elbridge. He also built a 
store and set up Dr. John Frisbie in it, in 1797, the first in town. 

Mr. Levi Clark built the first frame school house in 1801. Jo- 
siah Buck kept the first tavern in town in 1793. Moses carpenter 
kept another soon after. William Stevens was the first justice of 
the peace, in 1794. The first church (Baptist,) was formed Dec. 
30,1816. Elder Craw was the first preacher. John Healy taught 
the first school, in 1801. 

The first settlers in the vicinity of Jordan were Zenas and Aaron 
Wright, in 1797 ; Martin Tickner, Reynolds Corey, Isaac Smith, 
Jonathan Rowley and Jonathan Babcock came on the following 
year or soon after. The first town meeting was held in 1829, at 
the house of Horace Dodge. 

The population of the town in 1865 was 4,318; and its area 
22,200 acres. 

FABIVS was formed from Pompey, March 9th, 1798. Tully 
was taken off in 1803, and a part of Truxton (Cortland Co.,) in 1808. 
It is the south-east corner town in the County. It has a general ele- 
vation of 1000 to 1200 feet above the level of the canal at Syra- 
cuse. The surface of the south half is broken by a series of ridges 
extending in a north and south direction, and separated by narrow 
valleys. South Hill, in the south-west corner, is the principal ele- 
vation. The central and northern parts are level or moderately 
hilly. The streams from the center flow south into the Tioughnioga, 
and those upon the east and west borders flow north into Limestone 
and Butternut Creeks. A small lake, known as " Labrador Pond," 
lies at the west foot of South Hill. The soil is generally a fine 
quality of gravelly loam, intermixed in places with clay and sand. 
Along the stream west of Fabius Village is considerable swamp 
land. From its elevation and the broken character of its surface, 
this town is best adapted to pasturage. Dairying is the principal 
occupation of the people, and in the amount of dairy products it is 
the first town in the State. 



GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 63 

Fabius (p. v. y ) is situated on a small stream, a little north-east 
of the center of the town, and contains four churches, two schools, two 
hotels, a furnace and machine shop, a tannery, a grist mill, two 
manufactories of agricultural implements, and several other me- 
chanic shops and stores. 

Among the manufactories of Fabius, the Agricultural Works of 
Bramer & Pierce, located in the east part of the village, deserve 
particular notice. In 1838, David Bramer, father of one of the 
present proprietors, built a small shop and commenced the manu- 
facture of horse powers, threshing machines, and agricultural im- 
plements generally. As his business increased he enlarged his 
works, and associated with him, at different times, all his sons, the 
old gentleman remaining at the head of the firm until 1861, when 
Frank Bramer bought out the business, stock, &c, and continued 
the manufacture until 1863, when he invented and built a mowing 
machine named the " Young Warrior," which has since become de- 
servedly popular. Many difficulties were encountered in perfect- 
ing and introducing to the public this mower, arising from the per- 
sistent and determined opposition of agents and others interested 
in the sale of other machines ; but notwithstanding their efforts, 
the " Young Warrior " has gradually worked its way into public 
favor, and now it is ranked as one of the best, if not the very best 
mower in use. In Dec. 1865, the old shop with all its additions 
was burned, and a new one built in 1866. The new shop is 78 feet 
by 30, and three stories high, with an L 24 by 40 feet, and the same 
height of the main building. During the past winter, quite exten- 
sive repairs and improvements have been made in the building and 
machinery, in order to meet the demand for the mower, which is 
the leading article of manufacture. The number of hands em- 
ployed in the establishment is from eighteen to twenty-five, and 
the value of the manufactures from 825,000 to $30,000 annually. — 
In the fall of 1867, Mr. E. D. Pierce purchased a half interest in 
the works, and the firm is now known as Bramer & Pierce. Both 
members of the firm are young men, who are determined to in- 
crease the reputation, already attained, of the "Young Warrior 
Mower," and of other articles of their manufacture, and also to en- 
large their works, as necessity may require to meet the ever in- 
creasing demand. 

Apulia, (p. v.,) situated in the western part, contains two 
churches, a school and about 35 houses. Apulia Station, (Summit 
Station, p. o.,) is a station on the S. B. & N. Y. R. R., containing 
two hotels, two wagon shops, a saw mill, a cheese box factory, and 
about a dozen houses. They are building a church. Gooseville is 
a hamlet in the north-east corner. 

The first settlers were Josiah Moore aud Timothy Jerome, from 
Stockbridge, Mass., who came in 1794. The first church (Pres.) 



64 GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 

was formed at Apulia in 1804. The first church edifice erected was 
a Baptist, at Fabius village, in 1806. Among other early settlers 
were Capt. Ebenezer Belden, Col. E. St. John, Thomas Miles, 
Jonathan Stanley, Abel Webster, James Harris, John Wallace 
and Abel Pixley. The first child born was Charles Moore, in 1798. 
The first marriages were that of Abel Webster and Lydia Keeney, 
and of Luther St. John and Polly Joy, in 1804 ; and the first 
death that of Josiah Moore, in 1802. A colored man, belonging to 
Simeon Keeney, died about the same time, from drinking too much 
maple syrup. The first school was taught by Miss Jerome, in the 
east part of the town ; she afterwards became the wife of Hon. 
James Geddes. Eunice Fowler taught a school near Apulia, in 1 SOS- 
OS. The first inn was kept by Josiah Tubbs, near Tully, in 1797, 
and by Capt. St. John in 1802. David Caldwell kept the first store, 
in 1804; Thomas Miles built the first saw mill in 1800, and John 
Meeker the first grist mill, in 1808. 

The census of 1865 gives the town a population of 2,201 and an 
area of 30,000 acres. There are nineteen school districts, and the 
whole number of teachers employed is thirty-two. The whole 
number of pupils is 680, and the average attendance 225. The 
amount expended for school purposes in 1867 was $2,734.47. 

G-JEDDES was named from the Hon. James Geddes, and was 
formed from Salina, March 18, 1848. It lies on the west bank of 
■ Onondaga Lake, a little north of the center of the County. Its sur- 
face is level in the north and rolling in the south. Seneca River 
forms the north boundary, and Onondaga Creek a part of the east. 
Nine Mile Creek flows east through near the center. The soil is a 
clayey and sandy loam. Near the south-west extremity of the 
lake are several salt wells. The first salt well was dug by James 
Geddes in 1796. The Indians claimed the springs west of the lake, 
and their laws did not permit a stranger to occupy or own them, 
but to get over the difficulty and receive the presents from Mr. 
Geddes, they adopted him into their tribe; thus bearing the Indian 
name of Don-da-dah-quah, which signifies " the place where canoes 
discharge their freight," he was entitled to own and use the salt. 

Geddes, (p. v.,) in the south-eastern part, was incorporated April 
20, 1832. It contains a church, an union school, and about seven 
hundred inhabitants. There are several manufacturing establish- 
ments worthy of special notice. The Syracuse Iron Works are lo- 
cated in this town. The business is carried on by a joint stock 
company, with a capital of $200,000. They manufacture all kinds 
of bar and hoop iron, railroad spikes, &c, employing about two 
hundred hands, and using 200 tons of coal per month. Stoneware 
is manufactured in this town to some extent ; it consists of butter 
jars, jugs, &c, of an excellent quality. 



GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 65 

The manufacture of crockery was commenced a few months ago, 
and is now carried on by the " Empire Crockery Manufacturing 
Company," with a capital of $75,000. They are at present mak- 
ing 61,600 worth of ware per month, but expect soon to enlarge 
their works so as to make the same amount per week. They make 
C. C. ware, and various kinds of granite ware, pearl white, corn 
colored and decorated, all of superior quality, and far surpassing 
the same grades of foreign manufacture. Rockingham ware is also 
made by the same company. 

The Onondaga Salt Company have an establishment for the 
manufacture of staves for salt barrels, making about 10,000 per 
day. 

The New York State Asylum for Idiots is located upon a beau- 
tiful site near the line of Syracuse. Its grounds contain about 
twenty acres, lying upon an eminence that overlooks the city. — 
The building is a beautiful brick structure, in the Italian style of 
architecture, and is one of the best arranged and most convenient 
buildings of the kind ever constructed. It is under the superin- 
tendence of Dr. H. B. Wilbur. The building was erected in 1853 
and 1854, at a cost of $70,000. The site and grounds were donated 
by the citizens of Syracuse. The enterprise has been highly suc- 
cessful, and has fully demonstrated the utility and necessity of 
schools of this description. 

James Lamb built the first frame house at Geddes, about 1803, 
and kept a tavern. The first school house was built of logs, near 
where the old church stands, in 1804, and afterward the present 
brick school house. The first physician was Dr. Thayer, and the 
first lawyers were E. W. Curtis and It. S. Orvis. The Apostolic 
Church, Geddes, was first organized January 1832, and the church 
edifice was erected the same year ; Rev. Richard Salmon and Rev. 
M. Whiting, clergymen. 

The census of 1865 gives the town a population of 3,246, and an 
area of 6,374 acres. There are four school districts, employing 
twelve teachers, and an average attendance of 533 pupils. The 
amount expended for school purposes in 1867 was §6,779.53. 



LAFAYETTE was formed from Pompey and Onondaga, 
April 15, 1825. It is an interior town, lying south-east from the 
center of the County. Its surface is hilly and broken. Butternut 
Creek flows through the east part, and Onondaga Creek through 
the west. The high ridge between the valleys of these streams has 
steep declivities, and its summit is from 300 to 600 feet high. — 
Conklings Brook, in the south-east part, flows from the east, and 
within the space of a mile it descends 500 feet. The soil is gener- 
ally a sandy and gravelly loam, and a portion is thickly covered 



qq i GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 

with large water worn pebbles. About one half of the Onondaga 
Indian Reservation lies in the north-west corner of this town. 

Lafayette, {p. v.,) on the ridge near the center of the town, 
contains one church, and another one building, one wagon shop, 
cradle shop, and 25 houses. Cardiff, (j). v.,) on Onondaga Creek, 
has a church, a grist mill, a carriage shop, and about 30 houses. 
Linn is a post office in the south-east part. 

The first settler was John Wilcox, who located upon lot 14, in 
1791. The first church (Cong.) was formed in 1809. Rev. Benj. 
Bell was the first preacher. Comfort Rounds and William Has- 
kins located in the town in 1792; Solomon Owen and James Sher- 
man in 1793 ; and John Houghtaling, Amziah Branch, James 
Pearce, Samuel Hyatt, Amasa Wright and Reuben Bryan, in 
1794. The first child born was Amy Wilcox, in 1791 ; and the first 
marriage that of Solomon Owens and Lois Rounds, in 1793. The 
first death was that of Moses DeWitt, in 1794. Rev. Amziah 
Branch taught the first school ; Mr. Cheney kept the first inn ; — 
Sloughton Morse the first store ; and James Sherman built the first 
saw mill, in 1795. 

The census of 1865 gives the town a population of 2,397, and 
an area of 22,200 acres. There are twelve school districts, em- 
ploying 21 teachers. The whole number of pupils is 660, and the 
average attendence 209. The expenses for schools in 1867 were 
$3,321.79. 



LYSANBBB was formed March 5, 1794. Hannibal (Os- 
wego Co.,) was taken off in 1806, and Cicero in 1807. It is the 
north-west corner town of the County. Its surface is level and 
somewhat swampy in the east, and gently rolling in the west. 
Seneca River forms its south and east boundaries. This stream 
takes the name of Oswego River below the mouth of the outlet of 
Oneida Lake. In the south-west part are rapids known as Jack's 
Rifts. At Baldwinsville is a fall of seven feet, affording a valuable 
water power. Mud Lake, a large pond, south-west of the center, 
covers an area of about 300 acres. The soil is a sandy and gravel- 
ly loam, with occasional patches of clay, formed by the disintegra- 
ture of the red shales. 

Baldwinsville, {p. v.) situated on both sides of the Seneca River, 
is a flourishing village. The part of the village in Lysander con- 
tains three churches, an academy, an union school, a printing office, 
a bank, and several manufactories. The Morris Axe and Tool Co., 
are doing a large business, making about 300 axes, besides 150 or 
200 other tools, daily. It is a joint stock company, with a capital 
of $80,000. The Woolen Mill Co. make plain and fancy cassi- 
meres, about 400 yards daily. The Otisco Fork Factory manu- 



GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 



67 



factures from 875,000 to $80,000 worth annually. J. Frazee & Co. 
are doing an extensive business in their flouring mill, saw mill, lime 
mill, &c. About 300,000 feet of lumber is also used in Fuller & 
Bliss' sash and blind factory. The population of the north side in 
1865 was 1,181. 

Betts Corners {Lysander p. o.) contains three churches and about 
40 nouses; also a foundry and carriage shop. Little Utica {p. v.) con- 
tains one church and about 30 houses. Plainville (p. v.) contains 
a church and about 25 houses. Jacksonville contains a carriage fac- 
torv, church, and about 25 houses. Lamsons {p. o.) is a rail road 
station. 

The first settler within the present limits of the town was Jona- 
than Palmer, a revolutionary soldier, who drew lot 36 and located 
upon it in 1793. The first church (Pres.) was formed in 1813. 
Among other early settlers were Benj. DePuy, Reuben Smith, 
Adam Emerick, Elijah and Solomon Toll, and Dr. Jonas C. Bald- 
win. Dr. Baldwin was the early proprietor and founder of Bald- 
winsville. He built the first saw and gristmill, in 1807, and opened 
the first store during the same year. By his energy the place soon 
became an important manufacturing village. Daniel Ayers kept 
the first inn. The first child born was John Toll. 

The population in 1865 was 4,813, and its area 38,000 acres. 



MA2TLITJS was formed March 5, 1794. A part of Onon- 
daga was taken off in 1798 ; a part of Salina in 1809, and DeWitt 
in 1835. It lies on the east border of the County, north of the 
center. The surface of the ^north half is level, and that of the 
south rolling and hilly. Limestone creek flows north through the 
town near the center. At the northern extremity it receives But- 
ternut Creek from the west, and the united streams flow into Chit- 
tenango Creek, which forms the north-east boundary of the town. 
A few rods south of the canal, near the»center of the town, are two 
small lakes, similar in character to those already described in De 
Witt, but somewhat larger. They are known as the Green Lakes. 
In the south-west corner of the town is another small pond of the 
same kind. The east branch of Limestone Creek, near the south 
border of the town, falls down a limestone precipice 100 feet, form- 
ing a beautiful cascade. Several sulphur and other mineral springs 
are found in the town, but none of any considerable note. Deep 
Spring, called by the Indians, Te-ungh-sat-a-yagh, is a spring 60 feet 
in diameter, on the east line of the town, near the old Seneca Turn- 
pike. In the west part are extensive quarries from which are ob- 
tained immense quantities of waterlime, quicklime and gypsum. — 
The soil is a deep fertile alluvium in the north, and a sandy and 
clayey loam in the south. 



68 GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 



Manlius, (p. v.) on Limestone Creek, near the south line of the 
town, was incorporated March 12, 1813. It contains four churches, 
an academy and union school, and several manufactories. Todd's 
mill manufactures stocking yarn, using about 30,000 pounds of 
wool annually. The paper mill runs two engines, and one ma- 
chine, making one ton a day of printing paper. The paper is made 
of rags, and is of excellent quality. Several varieties of mowing 
machines, water wheels and mill gearing, are made here. 

Fayetteville, (p. v.) on Limestone Creek, two miles north-west 
from Manlius, and one mile from the Erie Canal, with which it is 
connected by a navigable feeder, was incorporated May 6, 1844. 
It is finely situated on a gentle elevation, and has a number of valu- 
able water privileges formed by the Ledyard canal (which was built 
by the citizens at a cost of $35,000,) and Bishop Brook. , This 
canal is formed by dividing the waters of Limestone Creek, two 
miles south of the village, and that in connection with Bishop 
Brook, which runs parallel to it through the village, make 12 water 
powers, with an average fall of 20 feet each. It contains four 
churches, a graded school, a bank, a printing office and several 
manufactories. Among the latter are a large flouring mill, a foundry, 
a bedstead factory and a large paper mill, manufacturing news, book 
and wrapping paper. There are also mills from which are sent 
out an immense amount of water lime. The population of Fay- 
etteville in 1865 was 1,480. Manlius Center (^>. v.) is a canal vil- 
lage containing about 20 houses. Manlius Station (p. v.) and 
Kirkville (p. v.) are small villages and stations upon the Central 
Rail Road. The latter contains one church and about 40 houses. 
High Bridge, in the south-west part, contains a church, two plaster 
and lime mills, a saw mill and grist mill. An extensive water 
power is formed at this place by the construction of a hydraulic 
canal from Limestone Creek, and another from a brook flowing 
from the east. This power is used by all the manufactories in the 
village, and but a small portion of it is occupied. Matthews Mills, 
(North Manlius p. o.) Eagle Village and Hartsville, are hamlets. 

The first settlers were David Tripp, who located one mile north- 
west of the present site of Manlius village, and James Foster, who 
located on the present site of Eagle village, in 1790. The first 
child born was Baron Steuben Shaeffer, in 1794. It is related that 
on the night of his birth, Baron Steuben and a party of friends put 
up at Mr. Shaeffer's, who then kept an inn on the present site of 
Manlius. The Baron was much disturbed during the night, and in 
the morning severely reprimanded Mr. S. for allowing his guests 
to be so annoyed that they could not sleep. Upon seeing the in- 
fant, he apologized for his ebullition of temper, bestowed his own 
name upon the child, and gave him a deed of 250 acres of land. The 
first marriage was that of Nicholas Phillips and Katy Garlock, 



GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 69 

Jan. 1793, and the first death that of the father of David Tripp, in 
1792. The first church was formed in 1798. Samuel Edwards 
taught the first school in James Foster's barn. James Foster kept 
the first inn, in 1790, and Charles Mosely the first store, in 1793. 
Elijah Phillips and three others built the first saw mill, in 1792-93, 
and William Ward the first grist mill, in 1794. 

The population in 1865 was 6,276, and its area 30,300 acres. 
The number of school districts is 21, and the number of teachers 
employed 46. The whole number of pupils is 2,059, and the aver- 
age attendance 762. The amount expended for schools in 1867 
was $10,558.79. 

31 ABC ELL US was formed March 5, 1794. A part of On- 
ondaga was taken off in 1798; Camillus, in 1799; a part of Otisco 
in 1806 ; and Skaneateles in 1830. A part of Sempronius (Cay- 
uga County,) was annexed in 1804, and a part of Spatford in 1840. 
It is an interior town, lying south-west of the center of the Coun- 
ty. Its surface is a rolling upland, broken by the deep valley of 
Nine Mile Creek, which extends north and south through the cen- 
ter. The declivities which border upon the creek are steep, and 
from 200 to 500 feet high. Upon the creek are several falls, fur- 
nishing a large amount of water power. Lime and plaster abound. 
The soil is generally a deep black loam, formed by the decomposi- 
tion of the Marcellus shales, intermixed to some extent with clay. 
Manufacturing is carried on to a limited extent along the Nine 
Mile Creek. 

Marcellus, ( p. v.,) on the creek, near the center of the town, was 
incorporated April 29th, 1853. It contains two churches, a woolen 
factory, a grist mill with four runs of stones, and a saw mill. The 
population is about 400. Marcellus Falls ( p. v.,) has in its vicin- 
ity a plaster mill, three paper mills, a woolen factory, a grist mill, 
and about 30 houses. Marietta, {p. v.,) upon Nine Mile Creek, in 
the south part, contains a hotel, a grist mill, and about 20 houses. 
Clintonville is a hamlet. Thorn Hill (p. o.,) is a hamlet in the 
south-west part. 

The first settler was William Cobb, who located on the east hill, 
in 1794. The first church was built in 1803. Mr. Atwater was 
the first preacher. The town rapidly filled up with settlers, chiefly 
from Massachusetts. The first child born was a daughter of Wil- 
liam Cobb. Miss Aseneth Lawrence taught the first school, in 1796 ; 
Dea. Samuel Eice kept the first inn, in 1796, and Elnathan Beach 
the first store, in 1796. Daniel Bradley and Samuel Eice built 
the first saw mill, in 1795 — 96, and May and Sayle the first grist 
mill, in 1800. 

The census of 1865 gives the town a population of 2,577, and 
an area of 18,900 acres. There are thirteen school districts in the 



70 GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 



town, employing fourteen school teachers, with an average attend- 
ance of 328 pupils. The amount expended for school purposes in 
1867 was $4,652.98. 

ONOHTDA&A was formed from Marcellus, Pompey and 
Manlius, March 9th, 1798. A part of Salina was taken off in 
1809, and a part of Camillus in 1834. The surface is mostly a 
rolling and hilly upland, separated into two ridges by the valley 
of Onondaga Creek. The ridge is rocky and broken, and the west 
is generally smooth and rolling. A fine wide intervale extends 
along the creek, and is bordered by steep hillsides, the summits of 
which are 200 to 400 feet high. A valley, forming a natural pass 
between Onondaga and Nine Mile Creeks, extends south-west 
through the town. Along the north line, the highlands west of the 
valley descend abruptly to the north, presenting in some places 
the face of a nearly perpendicular precipice, 100 to 150 feet high. 
The declivity is known as Split Rock, in the ledge of which is an 
irregular crack or chasm, which is said to extend downward to the 
depth of 100 feet. Ice remains in it during the greater part of 
summer. The stone was obtained from these quarries for building 
the locks upon the canal and the aqueduct across the Genesee 
River ; and it is justly esteemed a building stone of superior qual- 
ity. It lies in the north-west corner of the town. About one half 
the Onondaga Indian Reservation lies in the south-east part of the 
town. For many years after the organization of Onondaga Coun- 
ty, the county seat was located at this village. 

Onondaga Rill, [Onondaga p. o.,) on the hill west of the creek, 
contains a church, a school with two teachers, two hotels and about 
50 houses. It is a summer resort. Onondaga Valley (p. v.,) con- 
tains 2 churches, the Onondaga Academy and union school combined, 
two hotels, a grist mill with three runs of stones, and many fine 
residences. South Onondaga (p. v.,) contains two churches, sev- 
eral mills, and a population of about 300. Navarino, {p. v.,) in 
the south-west corner, near the line of Marcellus, contains a church, 
a school, a foundry, and about 20 houses. Onondaga Castle is a 
post office near the Indian Reservation. Hoivlett Hill is a post 
office in the north-west corner. West Onondaga, a post office near 
the. west line. 

The population of the town in 1865 was 5,312, and its area 41,- 
100 acres. There are twenty-nine school districts, employing 
thirty teachers, with an average attendance of 662 pupils. The 
amount expended for school purposes in 1867 was $12,389.25. 

In a reminiscence of Onondaga there is a name so closely con- 
nected with the white man's history of the County, that it is and al- 
ways will be impossible to separate them. Ephraim Webster was a 
native of New Hampshire, and had served three years in the Revo- 



GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 71 

lutionary war. He afterwards became an Indian trader, and ac- 
quiring a good knowledge of the Indian language, became an inter- 
preter between the red man and the white. In 1786, he erected a 
trading house on the banks of the Onondaga Creek, near its mouth, 
which, for a long time, bore the name of Webster's Landing ; here 
he continued his traffic for many years. He married an Indian wo- 
man, and, becoming a great favorite with the tribe, they made him 
a present of a square mile of land upon Onondaga Creek, a little 
south of the present village of Onondaga Valley. The Indians also 
granted him 300 acres near the north-west corner of the present 
Reservation. He afterwards married a white won.an, by whom he 
had a large family of children. He was employed by the Govern- 
ment as a spy, interpreter and counselor, during the Indian wars 
that followed the Revolution, and he was in active service during 
the last war with Great Britain. He died in 1825. One of the 
Indian children, Harry Webster, was for a long time Chief of the 
Onondaga nation. 

In 1788, Mr. Asa Danforth, through the influence of Webster, 
settled in Onondaga ; also Comfort Tyler. In 1789, the young 
men, Danforth and Tyler, after having visited the land of their 
birth, returned with wives, together with a family named Brown. 
Of the Danforths a child was born, considered to be the first born 
in the County. She was married to Col. Phillips of Syracuse, and 
was the mother of Mrs. Cutwater. The birth of this first child is 
given as occurring in October, 1789, and the family name appears 
to have been very prominent since their locating in the County. 
Next in the order of prominent men who are connected with our 
history, is Thaddeus M. Wood, " a traveling lawyer," from Massa- 
chusetts, who found rest for the sole of his foot in Onondaga, where 
he afterwards became identified with the fortunes- of the land of 
his adoption. The firm of Wood & Hall who were Democrats, 
and Foreman & Sabin who were Federalists, did the principal 
business of the County at that time. In the war of 1812, he was 
made a Colonel, and within twenty-four hours after notice of the 
threatened descent of the British at Oswego, he with his regiment 
was under way. He was celebrated for his wit and the quickness 
and severity of his retort. As a neighbor he was kind and obliging, 
ready at all times to render a service. 

In the summer of 1796, John Cantine, assisted by Gideon Seely, 
under the direction of the Surveyor General, surveyed the Onon- 
daga Reservation, and in the fall of that year, Gideon Seely and 
Comfort Tyler bid off, at the sales in Albany, twenty-one lots of 
two hundred and fifty acres each, at two dollars per acre. Mr. 
Seely made the road from Samuel A.Beebe's to the south line of the 
town, including a bridge across the west branch of Onondaga Creek. 
The first saw mill built in the town was by Turner Fenncr, on the 



72 GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 



west branch of Onondaga Creek, in 1793. Gen. Danforth erected a 
saw and grist mill, in 1794, on what is now called the Kirk Farm. 

The first town meeting for Onondaga was held at the house of 
Asa Danforth, who presided, April 1798. Ephraim Webster was 
chosen supervisor, and Jabez Webb, town clerk ; Samuel Searing, 
Daniel Earll and Sier Curtis, assessors; and Elisha Alvord, Nehe- 
miah Earll Jr., and Elijah Lawrence, commissioners of roads. At 
this meeting swine were permitted to run at large, provided they 
were yoked and rung. George Hall, Esq., opened the first law of- 
fice, in 1802. Dr. William Needham located at the Hollow as a 
physician in 1793, and his brother in 1795. He opened the first 
school at the Hollow in 1796. Rev. Samuel Kirkland is believed 
to be the first Reformed minister who ever preached in the County 
of Onondaga. A post office was established at Onondaga Hollow 
in the year 1794, and Comfort Tyler appointed post master. This 
was the first post office established in the County. One however 
was opened at Cayuga, then in Onondaga County, the same year. 
So late as 1812, letters were distributed from the post office at 
Onondaga Valley to people living in the towns of Camillus, Pom- 
pey, Marcellus, Otisco, Spafford, Lysander and Manlius. George 
Kibbe was the first regular merchant in the town of Onondaga, in 
1800. 

Onondaga Academy was incorporated and organized in 1813, 
and the building erected in 1814. It was endowed by the State, by 
a sift of land (lot No. 9,) in the town of Lysander, belonging to 
the Literature Fund. The Rev. Caleb Alexander was its first Prin- 
cipal. In 1808 an act was passed authorizing the Governor of the 
State to deposit five hundred stand of arms at Onondaga, for the 
defense of the frontier, and such quantities of ammunition and mili- 
tary stores as would be necessary in case of an invasion. The 
Governor was also authorized to provide a suitable place for the 
keeping of said arms and stores. Accordingly, in 1812, was built 
under the direction of the Governor, the Arsenal, on the hill east 
of the Hollow, it has long sirce been abandoned. A newspaper 
was started in the Hollow, December, 1811, by Thomas Critten- 
den Fay. It was called the Lynx, having for its motto, " Liberty 
and my Native Country," published every Wednesday, and deliv- 
ered to subscribers in the village of Onondaga Valley at two dol- 
lars per annum. In his prospectus he says : " I shall endeavor to 
promote the nation's interest with the industry of a Beaver, while 
I watch its enemies with the eyes of a Lynx." It was in the office 
of the Lynx that the celebrated Thurlow Weed first made his de- 
but. In the short space of twelve months he was devil, printer, 
journeyman, editor and proprietor. We might well suppose that 
he was able to keep time with his friend Horace of the Tribune. 
The first tavern on the Hill was in a log building, kept by William 



GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 73 

Laird. He committed suicide by hanging in October 1802. The 
first agricultural society formed in the County was held at Onon- 
daga Hill in 1819. Rattlesnakes were everywhere numerous at the 
time of the first settlement of the County, and were subjects of 
continual dread. They were often found in the corner of fire 
places, and wrapped in the covering of the beds. There are abun- 
dance of petrifactions in the north part of the town, and along 
the Onondaga Valley, and several deposits of Calcareous Tufa. 



OTISCO was formed from Pompey, Marcellus and Tully, 
March 21st, 1806. It is an interior town, lying south-west of the 
center of the County. Its surface is principally occupied by the 
high ridge between the valleys of Onondaga Creek and Otisco Lake. 
The lake is 772 feet above tide, and lies upon the west border of 
the town, in a valley 1000 feet below the summits of the hills. 
Bear Mountain, (called from the number of these animals infesting 
it in early times) in the north-west part of the town, overhangs the 
valley of Onondaga Creek, and is the principal elevation. The soil 
is generally a sandy or gravelly loam, mixed with clay, and well 
adapted to grazing. The town is about five miles long and a little 
over four wide. 

Otisco, (p. v.) situated upon the high ridge near the center of the 
town, contains a fine church, a school, and several stores and shops. 

Amber, (p. v.,) at the foot of Otisco Lake, where there is also a 
small weak salt spring, has a church and about 30 houses. The lake 
was called by the Indians, Otskah, also Kaioongk. It is about 5 
miles long and one wide. 

It was here that the Rust family, from Northampton, Mass., 
settled in 1801. A large number of settlers, principally from the 
same place of Mr. Rust, came shortly afterwards. Many literary 
men of great reputation were born in this town. The settlements 
were commenced in 1801, five years before its organization, while 
its territory was comprised in the townships of Tully, Pompey and 
Marcellus. The first settler in the town was Chauncey Rust, of 
Massachusetts. His son Timothy was the first white child born in 
the town. Other settlers soon followed, all of whom were from the 
New England States. Among them were Rufus Clapp, Ebenezen 
and Luther French, Otis Baker, Josiah Clark, Lemon Gaylord with, 
his famous son Wyllys, Charles J. Merriman, Benj. and Amos 
Cowles, Daniel Bennet, Elias and Jared Thayer, Henry Elsthrop, 
J. and N. Parsons, &c. The first settlement of the town was very 
rapid. The first tavern kept in the town was by Benoni Merriman, 
in a log house near Otisco Center, in 1 804. Michael Johnson suc- 
ceeded him. In 1808, Jesse Swan became the first merchant. A 
post office was established in 1814, with Dr. French for post mas- 

E 



74 GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 

ter. Their market town was Albany, and their milling was 
done at Jamesville and Manlius, until a grist mill was built in 1806, 
by Esquire Merriman. Elias Thayer built the first frame house, in 
1805, and Oliver Tuttle the next. It is a curious fact that the air 
of Otisco has a very forbidding odor in the nostrils of lawyers. 
Mr. John Thomas was the only one who tried his luck there, and 
after remaining but a short time, he left for Cortland, disgusted. 

The 'first school was established in a log house, in 1804, but was 
shortly afterwards replaced by a frame. The first physician, Dr. 
J. S. Judd, came in 1806, and Dr. French in 1818. The " Wash- 
ington Religious Congregational Society of Otisco," at Otisco Cen- 
ter, was organized in 1804, by the Rev. Hugh Wallace. A house 
of worship was put up but not completed in 1807. 

In connection with the town of Otisco, we must not forget a word 
to the memory of Wyllys Gaylord, the valuable contributor to the 
many scientific journals of the day, in this country, and to "some of 
the most popular magazines of Europe. When he came with his 
father to Otisco, he was but nine years of age, having been born in 
1792, in Bristol, Connecticut. His contributions to the newspaper 
press of the country for over twenty years, gave every variety of 
topic, literary, scientific, religious, miscellaneous, and occasionally 
poetry, all of which was of the highest order. He was the author 
of several prize essays, and it is thought that he never failed in gain- 
ing the ascendency in an attempt with a rival. He composed with 
great facility and correctness. From a drawing in an Encyclope- 
dia, he constructed an organ, which proved that besides having a 
correct idea of music, he must have had also a considerable amount 
of mechanical genius. He was connected with the old Genesee Far- 
mer and Albany Cultivator, from 1833 to 1844. Let us hope that 
some one capable of doing justice to his memory, will yet come 
forward as his historiographer and do justice to his name. He died 
at Howlett Hill, town of Camillus, Lime Rock Farm, March 27th, 
1844, in the fifty-first year of his age. 

In 1865 the town contained a population of 1,696 and an area 
of 15,500 acres. There are 12 school districts, employing 12 teach- 
ers, with an average attendance of 222 pupils. The amount ex- 
pended for school purposes in 1867 was $2,7 19.02. 



jPOMPEY was formed in January, 1789. Fabius and apart 
or Onondaga were taken off in 1798, and Lafayette in I82f. — 
It lies upon the east border of the County, south of the center. 
Its surface is principally occupied by the high rolling ridge which 
lies between the east branch of Limestone Creek and Butternut 
Creek. The highest summit is 906 feet above the surface of But- 
ternut Creek, near the Lafayette R. R. Station, 1,343 above the 



GAZETTEER OF T01YNS. 75 

canal at Syracuse, and 1 ,748 feet above tide. The general ridge is 
subdivided into three ridges by the valleys of the two west branches 
of Limestone Creek. These valleys are 900 or 300 feet below the 
summits, and are bordered by steep hillsides. The streams that 
drain the south part of the town, flow in a southerly direction. — 
Pratt's Falls, upon the west branch of Limestone Creek, are 137 
feet high, and within a few rods of them are several other fine cas- 
cades. Near the north line, upon the same creek, is a cascade of 
100 feet. Just east of the county line, near Delphi, on the east 
branch of the same stream, are two other fine cascades. Carpen- 
ter's Pond, in the south-east part, covers an area of about 30 acres. 
The soil is a strong clayey loam. The Indian name of Pompey, 
or rather of that part known as Pompey Hill, was Ote-qe-qaja-ke, 
a place of much grass, openings, or prairies. Another name given 
to this locality, about which there is much superstitious reserve, is 
Ote-queh-sah-he-eh, — the field of blood, or bloody ground, a place 
where many have been slain. It is said that no Indian ever visits 
this neighborhood. 

Pompey Hill, (p. v.) on the summit of the ridge, contains four 
churches, the Pompey Academy, and a population of about 300. 
Water from one side of the roof of the hotel at this place, finds its 
way into the St. Lawrence, and from the other into the Chesapeake 
Bay. Delphi, (p. v.) upon Limestone Creek, in the south-east cor- 
ner, contains three churches and about 250 inhabitants. Water- 
vale, {p.v.) upon Limestone Creek, north of the center, contains a 
grist and saw mill, and 20 houses. Oran, {p.v.) in the north-east 
corner, contains a church and about 100 inhabitants. Pompey Cen- 
ter (p. o.) (locally known as Green's Corners,) is a hamlet in the 
east part of the town. It has two edge tool factories and four grist 
mills. 

The early history of Pompey, as a part of the great whole, con- 
tributed well to the incidents so full of interest to the present gen- 
eration of the County. It was formerly one of the original divisions 
of the County when it was divided into townships. At that period 
it contained Fabius, Tully, and that part of the Onondaga Reser- 
vation lying south of the Great Genesee Road, and east of Onondaga 
Creek. It formerly included one hundred of the original lots, of 
which it has now only sixty-eight. The New England emigrant 
appears to have discovered its value, for most of the early seUiers 
came from that section. Mr. John Wilcox was the first white set- 
tler in the township, who came out in the spring of 1789, with an 
Indian chief, from Oneida, for the purpose of exploring the country. 
He made selection of the lot on which he settled, known as the Has- 
kins farm, two miles north of Lafayette village. Here was an ex- 
tensive Indian orchard. Abel Olcutt came out the same spring, 
and made arrangements for pruning it. He spent the nights at the 



76 GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 

Onondaga Castle, three miles distant, there being no white people 
nearer than Danforth's or Morehouse's. He lodged in the cabin of 
Caw-hic-do-ta. Mr. Olcutt, in pruning the orchard, was a little 
amused at finding in each tree a collection of small brush, about the 
size of a bushel basket. Enquiring of his Indian friend if he could 
tell him something in relation to it, he said that after the Revolu- 
tionary war, the Indian settlement at that place was abandoned in 
consequence of the destruction of the corn fields, and a part of the 
Great Orchard, by Col. Van Schaick, in 1779 ; consequently the 
Indians, since the war, had not occupied or cultivated any of their 
land in that quarter, and the brush he found collected in the apple 
trees, was the work of bears, that, ascending the trees in Autumn, 
gathered in the slender branches loaded with apples, leisurely de- 
voured the fruit, while at the same time they deposited the branches 
under them. Sometime after Mr. Wilcox had settled on his place 
and had gathered his harvest, which was abundant in hay and wheat, 
it was set on fire and the whole consumed in one night. He awoke 
in the morning to find out his desolation amid the smoking ruins. 
He suspected the Indians, and made a complaint to the principal 
Chief of the Onondagas, who, upon investigation, remarked to Mr. 
Wilcox with great nonchalance : " You dig up no more dead In- 
dian, no more will your stacks be burned." Indian graves, so often 
desecrated, were ever afterwards respected by the white settlers. 

Among the first settlers were Ebenezer and Jesse Butler, from 
Harrington, Conn., who located on lot 65 in 1792. Jacob Hoar 
came the following spring. Sally Hoar was the first white child 
born in the town. The first town meeting held for Pompey was at 
the house of Ebenezer Butler, April 1st, 1794. Moses DeWitt 
was chosen Supervisor, and Hezekiah Olcott, Town Clerk. The 
first religious society in the town of Pompey, and in the County of 
Onondaga, when it comprised the whole Military Tract, was or- 
ganized 16th June, 1794. Ebenezer Butler Jr. and Allen Beach 
presided at the meeting, which was held at Butler's tavern. The 
first lawyer who settled in this town was Samuel Miles Hopkins, 
who made but a short stay. Dr. Samuel Beach was the first phy- 
sician in town, in 1798. The first school teacher was J. Gould. — 
In 1811 the academy at Pompey Hill was erected. The first mills 
erected in this town were at Pratt's Falls, a grist mill in 1798, and 
a saw mill a year or two earlier. There are several stone quarries 
in the town, used for building purposes, mostly dark shale, which 
are not considered of a very durable kind. 

The township of Pompey is noted for the many distinguished 
personages born here ; prominent among whom are Sarah J. Clark, 
(now Mrs. Sarah J. Lippincott, better known as Grace Green- 
wood,) Ex. Gov. Horatio Seymour, Charles Mason, formerly Com- 
missioner of Patents, and Erastus D. Palmer, the sculptor. The 



GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 



77 



antiquities of the town of Pompey consist of forts and defences, 
mural remains, traces of villages, trading establishments, burying 
places, and sundry articles found scattered among them. 

The census of 1865 gives the town a population of 3,502, and an 
area of 39,000 acres. The number of school districts is 26, 
the number of teachers employed 46, and the whole expense of 
the schools in 1867 was $4,930.57. The whole number of pupils is 
1,197, and the average attendance 438. 



SAJjTNA.. — The old town of Salina may be ranked among the 
most important towns of the County. The name was given by the 
Commissioners of the Land Office, and means a place where salt is 
made. In 1797, a law was passed authorizing the Surveyor Gener- 
al to lay out a portion of the Salt Springs Reservation for the pur- 
pose of making provision for the manufacture of salt. A portion 
of the marsh and upland was laid out on a map and named Salina. 

At a very early period the territory embraced in the town of 
Salina attracted the attention of travelers, on account of the antici- 
pated value of the salt springs, and as the County advanced in re- 
sources and population, the predictions of the most sanguine were 
more than realized. At the organization of the County, in 1794, 
the town of Salina was comprehended in the original town of Man- 
lius and Marcellus, and after Onondaga was set off in 1798, and 
the township of Camillus was organized as a town, that portion of 
the Reservation not included in Onondaga, on the west side of the 
lake and creek, was attached to Camillus. At the organization of 
the town in 1809, a triangular piece of ground, containing nine and 
a half lots, was taken from the north-west corner of the township 
of Manlius, which, with the Salt Springs Reservation, made the 
town of Salina. 

In 1790, many families came from Westmoreland, and settled 
at Salt Point. In 1792 and 1793, the settlers in the County suf- 
fered much for want of provisions, and on several occasions boats 
were sent from Salt Point to Kingston, by way of Oswego, to pro- 
cure provisions. Capt. Canute, trading from Salt Point to Albany 
by boat, brought provisions, groceries, &c, receiving for his pay 
young bears, wolves, coons, foxes, fawns, &c, all of which, at the 
time, were plenty in and around the swamps. Wild animals fre- 
quently visited the habitations and made themselves at home with 
the domestic animals. The country about Onondaga Lake, pre- 
vious to 1800, during the summer season, was extremely unhealthy. 
Fevers began early in July, and followed each other in such quick 
succession, that oftentimes there were scarcely well persons enough 
to minister to the wanfs of the sick. In 1793, there were but thirty 
persons at Salt Point, and nearly every one sick at the same time, 



78 GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 

except a man named Patrick Riley, a generous hearted fellow, who 
carried on Mr. Van Vleck's salt works. He drew all his own wood 
for a salt block, boiled salt every day and half the nights, and every 
alternate night watched with the sick, for a period of two months, 
without a single intermission. During the sickly season the In- 
dians were exceedingly kind and attentive, and furnished liberally to 
every family a supply of venison and fish, which added greatly to 
their comfort. 

Abraham Van Vleck is supposed to be the first male child born 
in the County of Onondaga. About the time of his birth, 1792, an 
Indian had been drowned at the Oswego Falls by the upsetting of 
his canoe, and the event bore so heavily on the friends of the deceased, 
that the son of Mr. Van Vleck was named by the Indians, Ne-un- 
hoo-tah, meaning " sorrow for one departed," and by this name he 
was known among the Indians, who always entertained for him a 
remarkable friendship, and gave to his father, in trust for him, a 
mile square of land at the outlet of the lake. The title was not re- 
cognized by the State. 

It was customary in those days for the Indians to call all the prin- 
cipal families by their own names. Mr. Van Vleck was called Ka- 
hu7ik-a-ta-wah, meaning one " spry enough to skip over waters." 
Mrs. Van Vleck was called Con-o-soo-quah, "one of pleasant dis- 
position," and a daughter of Mr. Van Vleck (Mrs. O'Blennis,) was 
named Jo-an-le-no. Other members of the family also had their 
peculiar names, as well as 'others of the settlers. 

The town of Salina was incorporated in 1809, and the first town 
meeting held at the house of Cornelius Schoutens, March 11, of the 
same year. In 1798, the Surveyor General was directed to lay out 
the village of Salina, the act reading as follows: "Be it enacted, 
that the Superintendent shall, on the ground adjoining to the south- 
east side of Free street, so named on the map of the Salt Springs 
made by the Surveyor General, lay out a square for a village, con- 
sisting of sixteen blocks, each six chains square, (24 rods,) with 
intermediate streets, conforming to the streets laid down on the 
said map made by the Surveyor General, and divide each lot into 
four house lots, and deliver a map and description thereof to the 
Surveyor General, who, having approved thereof, shall thereupon 
proceed to advertise and sell, not exceeding thirty of said lots, in 
the manner prescribed by law for the sale of lots laid out at Oswo- 
go. Provided that none of the said lots shall be sold for a less 
sum than forty dollars, and provided also, that no lot on which 
there is a building of the value of fifty dollars, shall be liable to be 
sold, if the owner or occupant thereof shall agree to secure a deed 
therefor, and pay for the same at the averag% price of the lots sold 
as aforesaid." 



GAZETTEER OF TOWXS. 79 

The village was laid out in 1799, and sold on credit, and those 
who had not paid in 1801, had the time extended by law. It be- 
came an incorporated village, May 12th, 1824. At the election un- 
der the village charter, Fisher Curtis, Henry C. Rossiter, James 
Shankland and Jonathan R. Beach, were elected trustees. 

The Presbyterian society of Salina was organized March 20, 1810. 
There were but nine members at the time. The next religious so- 
ciety was the Methodist, which was organized at an early day, but 
did not erect a house of worship, until 1829. St. John's Roman 
Catholic church, in the village of Salina, now Syracuse, was com- 
menced and enclosed in 1829,by the exertions of Thomas McCarthy, 
James Lynch, and a few Roman Catholics, aided by the liberal do- 
nations of their Protestant fellow citizens. They also procured col- 
lections from friends in Utica, Albany and New York. The first 
resident priest was Father O'Donoghue, who was pastor for about 
six years; he was succeeded by the Rev. James O'Donnell, who 
remained in charge for about four years; after him came the Rev. 
Mr. Haes. St. Mary's German Catholic church was erected during 
the winter of 184-4-5; clergymen, Rev. Messrs. Adelbert, Inama, 
Xavier, Roth and Theo. Nocthen. 

About a mile north of Green Point, were formerly the remains 
of a fortification, probably erected by the French in some of their 
visits to the Onondaga Valley. In the account given by the Jesuit 
Fathers of the location of the French fortification and the colony 
and mission establishment at the same time, it is probably the fort 
erected by Mons. Dablon, in 16G5. "The spring of fresh water, 
and the salt fountain eighty or a hundred feet distant," would seem 
to properly locate it. Although there is no salt spring " issuing 
from the same hill," yet half a century ago there was one there, and 
we may safely point to where Mons. Dablon established his fort in 
1065. The prospect described by the several missionaries as being 
surpassingly beautiful, is still entitled to the same praise. The 
" spring of pure, fresh water," bubbles up with the same freshness 
now that it did two hundred years ago, and is as useful in slaking 
the thirst of the evening rambler, as it was to cool the lips of the 
tented soldier, the pilgrim priest, or the wandering savage. When 
the white people came to settle in the neighborhood of Salina, this 
ground was covered with small trees of a uniform size, indicating 
that at no very distant day it had been destitute of timber. 

Liverpool, {p. v.) on the east bank of Onondaga Lake, on the 
west line of the town, was incorporated April 20, 1830. It con- 
tains four churches, a graded school with five teachers, a steam saw 
mill and stave factory, and a large number of salt works. The 
steam saw mill of the Onondaga Salt Company contains one up- 
right, saw, capable of cutting 3,500 feet of lumber daily, one cross 
cut and three circular saws. The stave machine cuts about 15,000 



80 GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 

feet per day. There are several cooper shops in the village that 
employ from 50 to 60 men in the salt making season. The popu- 
lation of the village in 1865 was 1,526. The amount of salt made 
on the whole Reservation in 1867 was 7,595,565 bushels. Liver- 
pool was laid out as a village by the Surveyor General, and named 
Liverpool by the Commissioners of the Land Office. Previous to 
this it was called Little Ireland. The first settler at Liverpool was 
Jonathan Danforth, in 1794. He was soon followed by Patrick 
Riley, Joseph Gordon, James Armstrong and Charles Morgan. 
John O'Blennis at this time (1794) was making salt at Green Point. 

The first school kept at Liverpool was by a man named Conner, 
who met his scholars in his own salt house, who, like Archimedes, 
taught while he carried on the business of making salt. His school 
was then considered the best in the County, and was denominated 
the "High School;" it was patronized by the inhabitants of Salina, 
and Onondaga Hollow. " Ascension church," Liverpool, was or- 
ganized in 1840, and their church edifice erected in 1841 ; Messrs. 
Gillespie, Appleton and Goodale, clergymen. 

The first licensed tavern keeper we find in the town of Salina, 
was Mr. Gilchrist, whose house stood near where the inspector's 
office is now ; others of the same business soon followed, and Sa- 
lina became noted for the excellency of its taverns. Mr. Ryal 
Bingham was the first justice of the peace at Salt Point. In 1796 
or 1797, he moved there from Three River Point. It is related of 
this squire that a man was once brought before him for stealing, 
when he adjudged him 50 lashes, and failing to find an officer who 
was willing to carry out his mandate, executed it himself. 

The census of 1865 gives the town a population of 2,754, and an 
area of 8,446 acres. 



SKANEATELES, an Indian name, signifying "beautiful 
squaw," was formed from Marcellus, Feb. 25, 1830. A part of 
Spafford was annexed in 1840. It is the south town of the west line 
of the County. The surface is rolling or moderately hilly. — 
Skaneateles Lake divides the south half of the town into two nearly 
equal parts. From the lake the land slopes beautifully upward to 
a height of from 200 to 500 feet. The highlands upon both bor- 
ders overlooking the lake, furnish a great number of sites for 
country residences, which in beauty of situation have no superior 
in the State. Many of these are occupied by fine cottages and ' 
villages. Skaneateles Outlet, flowing north, is the principal stream. 
Upon it are numerous falls, furnishing an abundance of water pow- 
er. The soil is principally a clay loam. 

Skaneateles, (p. v.) was incorporated April 19, 1833. It is situ- 
ated at the outlet of the lake of the same name, and is one of the 



GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 81 

most beautiful villages in the State. It contains six churches, 
three graded schools, two banks, a newspaper office and several 
manufactories. The carriage factory of John Packwood is a large 
establishment. There is also a large distillery and flouring mill in 
the village. About a year ago a railroad was constructed from the 
village to the "Junction," on the N. Y. C. R. R., and is now in suc- 
cessful operation, adding greatly to the convenience of manufac- 
turers along the line, and to the citizens generally. Manda- 
na [p. o.) is a hamlet in the south-west part of the town. 
Mottville (/>. v.) is situated on the outlet, two miles below 
the lake, and contains one church, a hotel, a school house, a 
wagon shop, and several manufactories. The Mottville Woolen 
Mill is 100 by 40 feet, and three stories high. It contains twelve 
Crompton looms, and manufactures shawls. There is also a large 
flouring mill, a distillery, and, a short distance above, on the outlet, 
is a paper mill, running four engines and making about 3000 pounds 
a day. Kellogg' 's Mills is a little village about one and a half miles be- 
low Skaneateles. It/ contains a factory and about twenty houses. 
The factory turns out about 700 yards of cassimere daily. The 
flouring mill of Joel Thayer & Co., opposite the depot, grinds 
about 500 bushels a day. 

The manufacturing of Skaneateles is extended along the outlet 
from the village to the Junction, and cannot well be described in 
connection with either of the villages without the liability of giving 
one village more than its due, or another less. The " Skaneateles 
Iron Works" is a joint stock company, with a capital of 8100,000, 
located near the railroad, and is doing a large business. The prin- 
cipal business is the manufacture of bolts, rivets, washers, spikes, 
&rc, from scrap iron. The Company have also a large rolling mill, 
and a forging shop for fifty fires. The Cement Mill of G. H. Earll 
& Co. has five kilns for burning the stone, and is capable of grind- 
ing 200 barrels per day. Among other manufactories, we may 
mention the Marysville woolen factory, several paper mills, chair 
factories, sash and blind factories, &c, all in a flourishing condi- 
tion. 

The first settler was John Thompson, a Scotchman, who located 
upon lot 18, in 1793. Among other early settlers were Mr. 
Robinson, James Watson, Lovel Gibbs, Jonathan Hall and Win- 
ston Day, in 1796. Warren Hecox, James and Samuel Por- 
ter, Dr. Munger, Elnathan Andrews, John Legg, Moses Loss, John 
Brigffs, Nathan Kelsey, William J. Vredenburgh, Isaac Sherwood, 
Dr. Benedict, and families by the name of Kellogg and Earll, came 
soon after. Captain Wm. Thomas came in 1796, and Hezekiah 
Earll and Samuel Greenman in 1797. The first child born was 
Richard P. Watson, June I, 1796, and the first death that of Ne- 
hemiah Earll, in 180S. James Porter kept the first inn, and Win- 



82 GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 

ston Day the first store, in 1797. Judge Jeclediah Sawyer built 
the first saw and grist mills, in 1796. 

The census of 1865 gives the town a population of 4,128, and an 
area of 23,600 acres. The town is divided into twenty school dis- 
tricts, employing twenty-two teachers, with an average attendance 
of 450 pupils. The amount expended for school purposes in 1867 
was -$6,960.46. 

SPAFFORD was formed from Tully, April 8th, 1811. 
Parts of Skaneateles were taken off in 1840. It lies upon the east 
bank of Skaneateles Lake, and is the west town on the south line 
of the County. Its surface consists principally of a high ridge 
between Skaneateles and Otisco Lakes, abruptly descending to the 
valleys on each side, and gradually declining toward the north. 
The highest summit, Ripley Hill, is 1,122 feet above Skaneateles 
Lake, and 1,982 above tide. Otisco Inlet is a small stream flow- 
ing through the valley, which extends south from Otisco Lake. The 
soil is a sandy and gravelly loam. 

Borodino, (j).v.) in the north part of the town, contains two 
churches, several mechanic shops and about 30 houses. Stafford, 
(p. v.) near the center, contains two churches and about 35 houses. 
Axvest of the village is a valuable stone quarry. Spafford Hollow 
rs a post office. 

The first settlers were Gilbert Palmer and his son John, who lo- 
cated on lot 76, in 1794. Among the other early settlers were 
Jonathan Berry, Archibald Farr, Warren Kneeland, M. Harvey, 
Isaac Hall, Elisha Sabins, John Babcock, Peter Knapp, Samuel 
Smith, Otis and Moses Legg, Jethro Bailey, Elias Davis,Abel Ama- 
don, Job Lewis, Daniel Tinkham, John Hullibut, Levi Foster, Benj. 
Horner, James and Cornelius Williamson, Benj. Stanton, John 
Woodward, James Bacon and Asahel Roundy. The town was 
called after Horatio Gates Spafford, author of the first Gazetteer of 
New York. 

The first child born in the town was Alvah Palmer; the first 
marriage that of Elisha Freeman and Phcebe Smith ; and the first 
death that of Benjamin Chaffee, in August, 1801. Sally Packard 
taught the first school, in 1803 ; Jared Babcock kept the first store, 
in 1809; Archibald Farr kept the first irn, and built the first grist 
mill, in 1808; and Josiah Walker built the first saw mill, in 1810. 
The first church was formed at an early day. Elder Harmon was 
the first preacher. A post office was first established at Spafford 
Corners, in 1814. Asahel Roundy was the first post master. Ja- 
cob Babcock was the first merchant, in 1809. Dr. Farr was the 
first physician in town, and also kept the first tavern, on lot No. 11, 
Tully, in 1808. 

The population in 1865 was 1,566, and its area 18,500 acres. — 
The town is divided into eleven school districts, employing eleven 



GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 83 

teachers, with an average attendance of 171 pupils. The whole 
amount expended for school purposes in 18G7 was 61,914.16. 

SYRACUSE. — The ground upon which the city of Syracuse 
now stands was originally a part of the Salt Springs Reservation. — 
When the County was organized, in 1794, all that part of the Res- 
ervation east of Onondaga Creek and Lake, was included in the town 
of Manlius. Ephraim Webster, who kept a few goods for the Indian 
trade, was the first who lent his name to any locality in the vicinity 
of the city. It was called Webster's Landing. Benjamin Newkirk, in 
1793, succeeded Webster, at which time there was quite a number 
of Indian cabins ranging along the west bank of the creek, enough 
to form a respectable Indian village. The dark, gloomy, and al- 
most impenetrable swamp, now occupied by the city, was then a 
favorite resort for wolves, bears, wild cats, mud-turtles and swamp 
rattle snakes. The western portion of the valley about Syracuse 
was originally timbered with hemlock, birch and soft maple ; the 
eastern portion with cedar and pine. Near the west bank of the 
creek was an extensive Indian burying ground, where skeletons 
are occasionally disinterred. In 1843, one of extraordinary size 
was disinterred, the owner of which, when living, must have been 
at least eight feet high. The skull was large, and the jaw bones 
were furnished with double teeth all round. They were perfectly 
sound, and covered with a beautiful enamel of the most perfect 
whiteness. Such occurrences are not uncommon at the several In- 
dian burying grounds throughout the country. In one grave was 
found a large skeleton, on each side of which was a gun with flints 
in the locks, having the appearance of being loaded at the time 
they were buried. In this grave there was also found a brass ket- 
tle, two pair of shoes, three razors, a tomahawk and a number of 
bullets. A large pine tree had grown over the grave. The last 
who fell in the feud between the Onondagas and Cayugas was the 
Handsome Harry, who, finding his pursuers hard upon him, turned, 
and baring his breast, received his death wound from an arrow, 
and was buried where he fell, in the sand bank, not far from the 
Syracuse Pump House. Two of his sisters for many years visited 
the spot and mourned the death of their brother with the deepest 
sorrow. 

In 1804, an act was passed directing the sale of two hundred and 
fifty acres of land of the Salt Springs Reservation, for the purpose of 
laying out and improving a road from Manlius to Onondaga. This 
tract was bought by Abraham Walton for six thousand five hun- 
dred and fifty dollars. Although the avails of this sale were to be 
appropriated towards laying out and improving a road, there was 
astipulation in the terms of sale, that the purchaser should, within a 
specified time, erect or cause to be erected, a suitable building for a 
tavern, or house of entertainment for the accommodation of trav- 



84 GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 

elers. The same season Mr. Walton laid out lots for a village, and, 
agreeably to the stipulation, sold to Henry Bogardus, for the con- 
sideration of three hundred dollars, half an acre of ground, binding 
him to erect within a reasonable time, a suitable house for a tavern, 
and to keep or cause one to be kept. His house was erected in 
1806. It was two stories high and thirty-five by forty-five feet on 
the ground, and stood on the site of the present Empire Block. 
Mr. Bogardus was succeeded by Mr. Burlingham in 1808 ; Joseph 
Langdon in 1810; James Ingalls in 1812; and by Sterling Cossit 
in 1815. This tavern was called the "South Salina Hotel." Mr. 
Merrill, Mr. Hopkins and Mr. Butler, were residents here at this 
time, and were located a little west of the Oswego bridge, conve- 
nient to a spring of water. In 1800, Mr. Calvin Jackson lived in a 
small log house, a little south of where the railroad crosses Gene- 
see street, where was born Albion Jackson, on the 28th of Decem- 
ber, 1800, supposed to be the first white child born within the city 
limits of Syracuse, out of that part known as Salina. Dr. Swan 
put up a small frame house in 1807. Jonathan Fay settled near 
the Court House in 1808. Rufus Stanton kept a tavern near the 
Salina bridge in 1811. 

When the last survey of the Walton Tract was made, making the 
said Tract into village lots, there was but a small clearing in the 
village. The extent of it was from the canal, near Clinton street, 
south to Fayette street, and east to Warren street. On the north 
side of the canal, the clearing extended as far back as Church street, 
and east to Warren street. The rest of the dry ground was a pine 
grove, interspersed with oak bushes. The first burying ground in 
Syracuse was on Fayette street, a little west of Clinton street. The 
old burying ground near the west railroad depot, was laid out at 
the time the village was located. In 1819, there were but two 
frame buildings in the city, beside the tavern. Log houses and 
plank and slab cabins were scattered over the dry ground, most of 
which latter had been tenanted by laborers on the canal. Where 
the Syracuse House now stands, was the entrance, by bars, into a 
lot of 20 acres. Rufus Stanton, in 1816, raised on this ground, an 
abundant crop of rye. It was afterwards occupied as a pasture. 
Sidney Dole and Milan C. Taylor owned and occupied the mill, 
and kept a store, next west of where William Malcolm first kept. 
They were the first merchants in the city. In 1821, General Amos 
P. Granger came down from Onondaga Hill and setup a dry goods 
store on the north-east corner, by the present Salina street bridge. 
There was at that time no other store in Syracuse, except two or 
three small groceries. Before 1824 they could be counted by the 
dozen. Messrs Buell & Safford bought the lot where the Syra- 
cuse House now stands, and commenced the erection of the Syra- 
cuse Hotel. While the building was being erected, Mr. Safford 



GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 85 



fell from a scaffold and was killed, after which the property passed 
into the hands of Mr. Eckford, who completed the building in 1822. 
It was three stories high, and the only brick building of any consid- 
erable dimensions erected in town at the time. It was kept sev- 
eral years by Mr. James Mann. After the Syracuse Company 
came in possession of it, the house was rebuilt, and has since been 
enlarged and improved to its present ample dimensions. In 1822, 
Syracuse had not more than two hundred and fifty inhabitants, and 
no place of worship. It had two taverns and no school house. 
John Wilkinson was the first lawyer who settled in Syracuse. He 
erected an office on the corner, where the Globe Buildings now stand, 
and was heartily ridiculed for locating his office out in the fields. 
Mr. John Durnford established the first printing press at Syracuse. 
He issued the first number of the Onondaga Gazette, April 2d, 1823. 
Among the advertisements in it were Pomeroy's Razor Strop, 
Clark's Commentary and Morse's Geography. 

The first religious society organized in Syracuse w r as the Baptist. 
St. James church (Protestant Episcopal,) was organized in 1848, 
by the Rev. H. Gregory. The church of the Messiah was organ- 
ized September 3, 1838. The first Roman Catholic church at Sy- 
racuse was organized Christmas day, 1842. It was purchased from 
the Protestant Episcopal Society, and fitted up for the Roman Cath- 
olics. In 1848 it was enlarged and improved; Rev. Michael 
Haes, priest, The first house of worship was built in 1824, at a 
cost of two thousand three hundred dollars, and enlarged in 1839 
at a cost of two thousand three hundred dollars. In the spring of 
1848, the society made an exchange with Capt. Joel Cody, of their 
house and lot, for a lot more eligible, situated a few rods east of 
their old location, and erected on their new site a brick edifice after 
the Roman Ionic order of architecture. This building was one 
hundred and thirty-two feet long (including the porch in front and 
lecture room in the rear,) by seventy feet in width, estimated to 
cost about fifteen thousand dollars, making the whole property 
worth twenty thousand dollars. In 1825, the Syracuse Company 
gave the Episcopal society a lot of ground for a church, and in Sep- 
tember the frame was raised ; it was covered during the autumn 
of that year, and in 1827 it was completed. It stood on the ground 
formerly occupied by what is now known as the Granger Block. — 
The church building was subsequently sold to the Roman Catholic 
society, who removed it. On the 12th of July, 1841, the corner 
stone of the present St. Paul's Church was laid, and the building 
was completed early the following year. St. James Church (Pro- 
testant Episcopal,) was organized in August, 1848. The Church 
of the Messiah (First Unitarian Congregational Society of Syra- 
cuse,) was organized September 3, 1838. A " Dutch Reformed 
Society" was organized in 1848. One African church and several 
German societies were organized about this time. 



gg GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 



The first packet boat on the canal arrived at Syracuse on the 21st 
of April, 1820. It was built and fitted up by a company of gen- 
tlemen at Montezuma, (by which name she was known,) from a 
model furnished by Comfort Tyler. It was seventy-six feet long 
and fourteen feet wide. Its arrival created great excitement; hun- 
dreds of anxious spectators lined the bank of the canal to witness 
the wonder of the age. This practical illustration of the benefits 
of canal navigation was not without its effect. It hushed the hos- 
tility of canal opponents, and subdued the fears of the timorous. — 
Visionary theories yielded to simple fact, and wild speculation to 
the test of experiment. The canal was now navigable from Mon- 
tezuma to Utica, ninety-four miles, and at once business received a 
new and vigorous impulse. 

The 4th of July, 1820, was a memorable day for Syracuse. The 
canal was in practical operation. The prospects of the future city 
began to brighten; a most brilliant day dawned upon a land here- 
tofore a swamp and a bog. It was hailed as a day of joy, festivity 
and rejoicing. Invitations had been extended to the friends of the 
canal, throughout the State, particularly in the western district. 
Thousands of guests from the surrounding counties came in to wit- 
ness the novelty of canal navigation and to celebrate the day. 
Some of the most distinguished men in the State were present; 
among them, Gov. Clinton. It was the first celebration of our na- 
tional day of independence, at Syracuse, and those who were pres- 
ent number it among her proudest days. The celebration was 
held in a pine grove, directly in the rear of the Townsend Block. 
The Declaration was read by N. P. Randall, Esq., and the Oration 
delivered by Samuel Miles Hopkins, Esq. 

A post office was established at Syracuse in February, 1820, and 
was thus announced in the Onondaga Register : " A new post 
office has been established at Syracuse, (formerly Corinth,) in the 
town of Salina, and John Wilkinson, Esq., appointed post master." 
The name of this village was necessarily changed, there being a 
post office by the name of Corinth previously established in the 
State. The advertising list, in 1823, on the first appearance of the 
Onondaga Gazette, had increased to eight. The post office for a 
time was kept in the store of Gen. Granger ; but for the greater 
convenience of the inhabitants of the village, it was thought ad- 
visable to move it to the printing office of John Durnford, Lsq. — 
He at first objected, on account of lack of room, but finally con- 
sented. In due time Mr. Wilkinson came on with the whole con- 
tents of the post office, mail matter, letter bags, boxes — the whole 
concern on his shoulders, without having any occasion to go for a 
second load ; upon which Mr. Durnford concluded he had plenty of 
room to accommodate all the requisite wants of the department at 
Syracuse. On the 9th of June, 1825, La Fayette visited Syra- 



GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 87 



euse. He was escorted from Onondaga Hill by a largo body of 
citizens on horseback, (by way of the Hollow,) to the Mansion 
House, which stood on the ground now occupied by the Baslable 
Block, and was afterwards transferred to the ground now occupied 
by the New York Central Rail Road Co's Freight House, 
and subsequently to its present location on Fayette street, 
where he received the cordial greeting of "his fellow citi- 
zens." During the delivery of Judge Forman's address, in front 
of the Mansion House, the illustrious Frenchman stood, with his 
hat in his hands, leaning on his cane, and with the other on his hip, 
giving his undivided attention to what was said. The gallant gen- 
eral responded in the following words: "The names of Onondaga 
and Syracuse, in behalf of whose population you are pleased so 
kindly to welcome me, recalls to my mind at the same time, the 
wilderness that, since the time I commanded on the northern frontier, 
has been transferred into one of the most populous, well cultivated 
and enlightened parts of the Untted States; and the ancient Sicili- 
an city, once the seat of republican institutions, much inferior how- 
ever to those which in American Syracuse are founded upon the 
unalloyed establishment of the rights of men, and upon the best 
representative forms of government. No doubt, sir, but that 
among the co-operators of the Revolution, the most sanguine of us 
could not anticipate the rapidity of the improvements which, on a 
journey of many thousand miles, (the last tour alone, from Wash- 
ington to this place, amounting to five thousand miles,) have de- 
lighted me, and of which this part of the country offers a bright 
example. Be pleased to accept my personal thanks, and in behalf 
of the people of Onondaga and Syracuse, to receive the tribute 
of my sincere thanks and respectful acknowledgements." It is 
needless to say how the old warrior's address was received. Shortly 
after a repast was furnished from the Mansion House to over 2,000 
guests. After breakfast, the General and suit, together with the 
Onondaga committee of escort, left Syracuse in the boat Rochester, 
for Utica, to which place the committee accompanied him. 

In 1835, the bounds of the original village were considerably en- 
larged. In 1839 and '41, the charter was again amended, so as to 
enable the Trustees to hold real estate for the purposes of a village 
cemetery, which was subsequently purchased and laid out. In 1843 
and in 1845, the charter was again amended for improvement of 
water works, to empower the Trustees to borrow money on the 
credit of the Corporation, to purchase a lot for a market and other 
public buildings, and for other purposes. 

The first meeting for the election of officers of the village of Sy- 
racuse, was held at the school house in said village, May 3, 1825. 
The Trustees proceeded at once to lay out road districts, to organ- 
ize a fire department, and to purchase engines and apparatus, and 



gg GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 



other things, for the welfare of the village. The second board o 
trustees was elected May 3d, 1826. Only 56 votes were polled. 

August 20th, 1841, occurred the ever memorable explosion, at 
which 26 human beings were launched into eternity, and ten others 
dangerously and 43 severely wounded. A fire originated in a join- 
er's shop, on the tow path side of the Oswego canal. Here had 
been stored 25 kegs of powder, which exploded with the most ter- 
rible consequences. A gloom was cast over the village and coun- 
ty, which betokened sorrow and mourning in every countenance. 
Sadness prevailed every dwelling, and melancholy every heart. 
The effects of this explosion were felt for twenty miles around. A 
man on the deck of a packet boat at Fulton, 26 miles distant, heard 
the report. At DeWitt and Jamesville, five miles off, persons were 
startled from their sleep, supposing their chimnies had fallen down. 
At Manlius, ten miles distant, the earth trembled, and crockery 
upon merchants' shelves rattled for the space of several seconds, 
like the shock from a clap of thunder. At Camillus, it was com- 
pared to the crash of falling timber. At Onondaga it was supposed 
to be an earthquake. Although the concussion was tremendous at 
Syracuse, the report was not so loud as might have been supposed. 
Glass in the windows a hundred rods distant was broken to frag- 
ments. Papers in the County Clerk's office were thrown from their 
places to the floor, and several buildings were more or less injured. 
The explosion extinguished every particle of fire, and nothing but 
the carbon of a charred mass was found to remain. Let us try to 
forget the scene at this moment, when men, women and children 
ran screaming with horror, making frightful that fatal night, which 
will be long remembered by the older citizens of Syracuse and Coun- 
ty of Onondaga. For many days the stores were closed and 
business suspended. The following Sunday the unfortunate vic- 
tims were consigned to the tomb, amidst the sympathies and tears 
of an afflicted community. The clergy, who are always with 
us in misfortune, forgot their sectarian differences, and united in 
giving comfort to those who were living and friendless, and in offer- 
ing a solemn requiem to the dead. 

Through the exertions of Messrs. Harvey Baldwin, Oliver Teall, 
Aaron Burt, and some others friendly to the cause of education, a 
charter was obtained for the Syracuse Academy. Mr. Baldwin gave 
the lot and, under many discouragements, the building now occupied 
as the Orphan Asylum, was erected and completed for an academy, 
which was supplied with competent teachers, and supported by the 
benefactions of the before named individuals and a few others. 

During the year 1846, Syracuse had so wonderfully increased in 
size and population, that the subject of securing for it a city char- 
ter began seriously to be discussed. Meetings were held during 
that and the following year, without coming to a definite conclusion, 



GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 89 

till, in the winter of 1847 and 8, the matter was brought before the 
Legislature. There was considerable difference of opinion among 
the inhabitants as to the extent of territory which should be em- 
braced. Some were for including the whole original Salt Springs 
Reservation ; others only the village of Syracuse. Some for 
more territory and others for less. Several spirited meetings were 
held in reference to the subject, which finally resulted in the grant 
of a charter, including the villages of Syracuse and Salina, with the 
name of Syracuse. At the first election of city officers, in May 
1848, Harvey Baldwin, Esq., was elected mayor; James Lynch 
and Elizur Clark, aldermen for the first ward; Alexander McKin- 
strv and John B. Burnet, for the second; W. II. Alexander and 
Gardner Lawrence for the third; and Henry W. Durnford and Ro- 
bert Furman for the fourth. From the returns of a census made 
for the city of Syracuse in January 1849, it contained little short of 
10,000 inhabitants. 

The opening of the canal, in 1820, may be set down as the real 
commencement of the city of Syracuse. From this time it began 
to be looked upon as a place inevitably destined to become the grand 
emporium of the County. There was however one continual draw- 
back. During the building of the canal, from 1817 to 1820, the 
sickness had been terrible. No estimate can be made of the fatali- 
ty of disease at that time. In 1821-22, Judge Forman succeeded 
in having a law passed in connection with the lowering of Onondaga 
Lake, by which the Commissioners of the Land Office were to draw 
a map of the swamp and marsh about the village of Salina and Sy- 
racuse. This map was to designate the route of several ditches or 
drains through the swamp and marsh lands, with an accompanying 
estimate of the sum necessary to be raised to effect such object.. 
The Judges of the County Courts were authorized to appoint three 
discreet freeholders of the County, who should assess the amount of 
money necessary to be raised on the owners of the lands contigu- 
ous to the drains, in proportion as they were supposed to be bene- 
fited. In case of the non-payment of any assessment, the lands 
could be sold, after being advertised four weeks, for the payment ; 
and if not reclaimed within six months, with interest at ten per 
cent., and costs, the sale was valid and unchangeable. Soon af- 
ter this system of drainage had been executed, the place assumedan 
air of healthfulness; disease and sickness kept at a distance; confi- 
dence was placed in the future, and the past was quickly forgotten. 
The change was like a vision, an enchantment, to the many who 
have lived to witness in so short a time the wonderful transition. 
In less than a quarter of a century, a city had sprung up from a 
loathsome swamp, where least of all the traveler would dream of 
such an event. Through all periods of pecuniary adversity, it has 



90 GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 

passed its onward career with a greater demand for dwellings. Its 
business, from year to year, has increased with great regularity. As 
new stores were opened, customers increased, and as trade extend- 
ed itself, the country became more dependent upon Syracuse as a 
market. Although this has been the course, and consequent in- 
crease of business and population for nearly twenty-five years, the 
same characteristics still exist, and it is no unreasonable prediction 
to remark, that the growth may be even more rapid for the suc- 
ceeding time than it has been in the past. 

■Syracuse was incorporated as a city, December 14th, 1847. It 
was known from 1806 to 1809, as Bogardus Corners; from 1809 
to 1812, as Milan; from 1812 to 1814, as South Salina; from 1814 
to 1817, as Cossitts Corners ; from 1817 to 1820,. as Corinth ; and 
.from that time called Syracuse, a name given by John Wilkinson, 
its first postmaster. It was incorporated as a village in the town 
ofSalina, April 13th, 1825. It was taken from Salina March 18th, 
1848, and a portion of it afterwards added to the town of De Witt. 
The village of Salina, now known as the First Ward of the city, 
-continued an independent corporation until 1847, when it was unit- 
ed as a part of , the city. It was sometimes called Salt Point. The 
eiby of Syracuse lies in.a basin, extending south of the head of On- 
osidaga Lake, and upon the ridges immediately east, A low por- 
tion, partly eaarshy, containing more than a square mile, lies upon 
the lake. Upon the marshy plat are situated the salt springs. It 
is bordered directly by ,an abrupt declivity, from 10 to 30 feet high. 
From the summit of this declivity the surface spreads out into an 
almost perfect plat, on which is built-the more thickly settled por- 
tions of the.eity. A ridge, 100 to 200 feet high, extends through 
the eastern part, which, nature appeared to have purposely divided 
to admit the Erie Canal. Upon it, a short distance east of the head 
of the lake, very often , at. high aseents, are found what are termed 
the "salt holes.," which are continually forming, and it not unfre- 
quently happens that a tract of 20 feet in diameter will suddenly 
fall to a depth .of from 10 to 30 feet. . Upon these highlands that 
surround the city, are some of the most beautiful sites for country 
residences to be found in the State. From the central location of 
the city, and its facilities for accommodation, it has become a favor- 
ite resort for the holding of conventions, political, religious, civil 
and miscellaneous. The several canals and railroads that pass 
through or terminate in the city, give to it important commercial 
advantages. A large trade is carried on with the surrounding coun- 
try for wood and barrels for the salt, and with Pennsylvania to fur- 
nish them coal. The city is supplied with water by the Syracuse 
Water Company, from springs, and brooks which have their sources 
in the hills south-west >of the city. Several foundries and machine 



GAZETTEEB OF TOWNS. 91 

shops give employment to many hands. Greenway's brewery, one 
of the largest in the State, manufactures annually 40,000 bis. of 
beer. The Central Rail Road shops give employment to several 
hundred hands. The city also contains large manufactories of 
reapers and other agricultural implements. There are five sad- 
dlery hardware manufactories here on an extensive scale, two man- 
ufactories of silver ware, a large glass factory, a wind mill manu- 
facturing company, rolling mills, one for the manufacture of rail- 
road iron, nine banks, and over 30 churches, with several in pro- 
cess of erection. The Onondaga Co. Savings Bank is erecting a 
fine stone building on the corner of South Salina and East Genesee 
streets, which will be an ornament to the city and an honor to the 
architect. There are six street railroads running to as many differ- 
ent parts of the city and suburbs. The New York State Life Insu- 
rance Co. has its home office here. The schools of the city are un- 
der the control of the Board of Education, consisting of one mem- 
ber from each ward. The whole number of pupils attending school 
during the last year was 7,206, and the average attendance 5,319. 
The whole number in the city between 5 and 21 years of age 14,267. 
The amount expended for salaries of teachers was $48,871.45, and 
the whole amount expended for school purposes $80,362.08. The 
number of teachers employed is 143. 

The Syracuse Home Association, incorporated in 1853, is an asso- 
ciation of ladies for the purpose of systematically visiting the poor, 
and furnishing a home for indigent and friendless females. It is lo- 
cated temporarily at the corner of South Salina and Onondaga 
streets. Great good has been accomplished by the benevolent and 
self-sacrificing ladies of the Association. The report for 1867 shows 
that 137 were received and enjoyed a temporary home during the 
year. It is proposed to erect a fine building upon the corner of 
Burnet, James and Townsend streets, as a permanent home. Maj. 
Moses D. Burnet has generously offered to donate the lot, worth 
$12,000, on condition that the citizens increase the amount to 
$50,000. The citizens are subscribing liberally, and there is very 
little doubt the amount will be raised and a permanent home estab- 
lished. 

There are several cemeteries in the city, the largest of which is 
Oakwood, situated on the south line of the city, a part being in the 
Eighth Ward, and a part in the town of Onondaga. It contains 
many fine monuments, and other improvements, which are not sur- 
passed by any other rural cemetery in this part of the State. The 
South Salina street cars run to the entrance of the cemetery. 

A new building for the High School is in process of erection. 
It is expected to be completed for the fall term. The following 



92 GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 

description of it is taken from the Annual Report of the Board of 
Education : — 

"The building is located in a pleasant part of the city, not far 
from the center, away from the noise of business, on the corner of 
West Genesee and Wallace streets. Its length is 123 feet, and its 
width is 96 feet. The rooms are large, well ventilate'd and well 
lighted ; and the wardrobes on each floor are to be furnished with 
cold and hot water, and all other conveniences ; so that it will not 
be necessary to go down the stairs, after entering the school, till 
the labors of the day are completed. The entire building is to be 
heated with steam by the latest and most improved system. The 
basement is to be used for heating the building, storing fuel, &c. 
One room is intended for a laboratory, for chemicals and chemical 
experiments, and a large room, 37 by 70 feet, for a gymnasium. 

" The first floor is devoted to the Central Library rooms and of- 
fices for the Board of Education, a reception room and a cabinet. 
The second and third floors are school rooms, with recitation rooms 
sufficient to accommodate all the pupils that can be seated, and 
each floor will furnish suitable conveniences for 400 pupils. AVhen 
fully seated, the school will require from 16 to 18 teachers. 

" The Board of Education intend to make this school equal, at 
least, to any similar school in the country, and to spare no pains in 
furnishing proper conveniences for the pursuit of all the higher 
English studies, the modern languages, and a course for fitting 
young men for college." 

Erom the report of the Librarian we learn that the number of 
volumes in the Central Library is 5,870, six hundred and ninety 
volumes having been added the past year. 



TUJjLY was formed from Fabius, April 4, 1803. A part of 
Otisco was taken off in 1806, and Spaffbrd in 1811. It is the cen- 
ter town upon the south line of the County. Its surface is an up- 
land, level in the center, but hilly on the east and west borders. In 
the south part of the central valley are several small lakes, known 
as the Tully lakes. Two of these lakes lie but a few rods apart. 
The smaller is 800 feet above the canal at Syracuse, and gives rise 
to Onondaga Creek, flowing north ; the larger, a few feet lower, 
gives rise to Tioughnioga river, flowing south. In the immediate 
vicinity of those lakes is considerable swamp land. The soil is a 
sandy and clayey loam. 

Tilly, {p. v.) in the south-east part of the town, contains three 
churches, a school, a grist mill, a newspaper office and about one 
hundred houses. Vesper, (p. v.) on the line of* Otisco, contains two 



GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 93 

churches, a butter tub factory, a grist mill, saw mill and thirty 
houses. Tully Valley is a post office. 

The first settler was David Owen, who came into town in 1795. 
Immediately after came James Cravath, Wm. Trowbridge, Phineas 
Howell, Phineas Henderson and Michael Christian. The first child 
born was Peter Henderson, in 1796; the first marriage was that 
of Timothy Walker and Esther Trowbridge, and the first death that 
of Timothy Walker. Ruth Thorp taught the first school, in 1801; 
Nicholas Lewis kept the first inn, in 1802 ; Moses Nash kept the 
first store, and Peter Van Camp built the first grist and saw mill, 
in 1810. The first church (Baptist,) was formed in 1818 ; Mr. 
Hurd was the first preacher. Amos Skeel was the first justice of 
the peace, in 1803. 

The population in 18G5 was 1,583, and its area 15,600 acres. — 
There are nine school districts in the town, employing nine teachers, 
with an average attendance of 1 86 pupils. The amount expended 
for school purposes in 1865 was $2,333.86. 

VAN BTJRENwdiS formed from Camillus, March 26, 1829. 
It is an interior town, lying north-west of the center of the Coun- 
ty. Its surface is level, or gently undulating. Seneca river forms 
its north boundary. The soil is a clayey, sandy and gravelly 
loam. It was named from the Hon. Martin Van Buren, then new- 
ly elected Governor of the State of New York. 

Memphis, ( p. v.) (formerly Canton,) on the Erie canal, in the 
south-west corner of the town, contains a church and about two 
hundred inhabitants. Van Buren Center, (p. v.) Warner's Station, 
on the New York Central R. R., near the south line, contains a 
church and about a dozen houses. Van Buren (p. o.) and Ionia 
are hamlets. Baldwinsville {p. v.) lies upon the Seneca river. — 
That part in the town of Van Buren contains a marble factory, a 
paper mill, a large flouring mill and another one building, and a 
population in 1 865 of 646. Manilla, straw and printing paper are 
made here. W. S. White's carriage factory turns out about 100 
annually. In the same building is a shop for the manufacture of 
pumps. 

The first settlement in this town approaching to anything like a 
village, was at what is now called Ionia, where the first post office 
was established, in 1816. Charles H. Tull was the first postmaster. 
The first lawyer who established himself in this town was Theo- 
dore Popell, in 1818. The first physician was Jonathan S. Buell, 
in 1815, at Ionia. The first at Canton, and the second lawyer in 
town, was William Laughlin, in 1812. The first town meeting for 



94 GAZETTEER OF TOWNS. 

Van Buren was held at the house of Ebenezer Dunham, 26th of 
March, 1829. 

There is not much water power in this town except on the Sene- 
ca River; the streams being small and the surface level. Dead 
Creek is the largest and is a sluggish stream. On the banks of the 
streams of this town is an abundance of marl and calcareous tufa. 

The population in 1865 was 3,031, and its area 21,600 acres. 






THE STATES, THEIR SETTLEMEXT, ETC. 95 



THE STATES, 

THEIR SETTLEMENT, ADMITTANCE TO THE UNION, POPULATION, 

SUFFRAGE LAWS, ETC. 



aLLfjL'BjLMJ&. was settled near Mobile, in 1702, by the French; was 
formed into a Territory by act of Congress, approved March 3, 1817, 
from the eastern portion of the Territory of Mississippi ; framed a Con- 
stitution August 2, 1819, and was admitted into the Union December 
14 of the same year. Area 50,722 square miles, or 32,402,080 acres. — 
Population in 1860, 964,201, of whom 435,080 were slaves. It is the chief 
cotton growing State of the UnioiL White male citizens who have re- 
sided one year in the State and three months in the county, are entitled 
to vote. An election for a Convention was held December 24, 1860, 
and a majority of over 50,000 votes cast for secession ; the Convention 
met January 7, 1861, and on the 11th passed the ordinance of secession, by 
a vote of 61 to 39, which was followed on the 21st by the resignation of 
its members of Congress. 

jIZZJS'jLA'SjIS was settled at Arkansas Post in 1685, by the French, 
and was part of the Louisiana purchase ceded by France to the United 
States, April 30, 1803. It was formed into a Territory by act of Congress, 
March 2, 1819, from the southern part of the Territory of Missouri ; its 
western boundary was settled May 26, 1824, and its southern, May 19, 
1828. Having adopted a Constitution, a memorial was presented in 
Congress, March 1, 1836, and an act for its admission into the Union 
passed June 15 of the same year. Area 52,198 square miles, or 33,406,- 
720 acres. In 1860 its population was 435,450, of whom 111,115 were 
slaves. It is an agricultural State, its staples being corn and cotton. — 
Citizenship and residence in the State for six months, qualify voters in the 
county and district where they reside. January 16, 1861, its Legislature 
ordered a State Convention, which assembled, and on May 6, voted to 
secede, 69 to 1. January 4, 1864, a Convention assembled in Little 
Rock, which adopted a new Constitution, the principle feature of which 
consisted in a clause abolishing slavery. The Convention adjourned 
January 22. This body also inaugurated a Provisional Government. 
The Constitution was submitted to the people, and 12,177 votes cast for it, 
to 226 against it. The State was re-organized under the plan contained 
in the Amnesty Proclamation of President Lincoln, in pursuance of 
which an election was held March 14, 1864. The vote required under the 
Proclamation was 5,405. About 16,000 votes were cast. 



96 THE STATES, THEIB SETTLEMENT, ETC. 

Cji.LIFOffiJVIji- was settled at Diego in 1768, by Spaniards, and was 
part of the territory ceded to the United States by Mexico, by the treaty 
concluded at Guadaloupe Hidalgo, February 23, 1848. After several inef- 
fectual attempts to organize it as a Territory or admit it as a State, a 
law was passed by Congress for the latter purpose, which was approved 
September 9, 1850. Area 188,981 square miles, or 120,947,784 acres. 
Population in I860, 305,439. It is the most productive gold mining re- 
gion on the continent, and also abounds in many other minerals. — 
White male citizens of the United States, and those of Mexico who may 
choose to comply with the provisions of the treaty of Queretaro, of May 30, 
1848, who have resided in the State six months and in the county or dis- 
trict thirty days, are entitled to vote. 

COJVJVBCTICUT was settled at Windsor, in 1633, by English Puri- 
tans from Massachusetts, and continued under the jurisdiction of that Prov- 
ince until April 23, 1662, when a separate cbarter was granted, which con- 
tinued in force until a Constitution was formed, September 15, 1818. It was 
one of the original thirteen States, and ratified the United States Con- 
stitution, January 9, 1788. Area 4,674 square miles, or 2,991,360 acres. 
Population in 1860, 460,147. It is one of the most densely populated 
and principal manufacturing States in the Union. Residence for six 
months, or military duty for a year, or payment of State tax, or a free- 
hold of the yearly value of seven dollars, gives the right to vote. 

2>EZj± JfcdftJfwsiS settled at Wilmington, early in 1638, by Swedes 
and Finns; was granted to William Penn, in 1682, and continued under 
the government of Pennsylvania until the adoption of a Constitution, 
September 20, 1776 ; a new one was formed June 12, 1792. It was one 
of the original thirteen States, and ratified the United States Constitu- 
tion, December 7,1787. Area 2,120 square miles, or 1,356,800 acres. — 
Population, in 1860, 112,216, of whom 1,798 were slaves. It is a grain and 
fruit growing State, with some extensive manufactories. Residence in 
the State one year, and ten days in the election district, with payment 
of a State or county tax assessed ten days prior to an election, gives the 
right to vote, except that citizens between twenty-one and twenty-two 
years of age need not have paid the tax. 

JF 1 I,0'RI3)A. was settled at St. Augustine, in 1565, by Spaniards ; was 
formed from part of the territory ceded by Spain to the United States 
by treaty of February 22, 1819; an act to authorize the President to 
establish a temporary government was passed March 3, 1819; articles 
of surrender of East "Florida were framed July 10, and of West Florida, 
July 17, 1821, and it was then taken possession of by General Jackson 
as Governor. An act for the establishment of a Territorial Govern- 
ment was passed March 30, 1822, and by act of March 3, 1823, East and 
West Florida were constituted one Territory. Acts to establish its 
boundary line between Georgia and Alabama were passed May 4, 1826, 
and March 2, 1831. After several ineffectual attempts to organize it 
into two Territories, or into a State and Territory, an act for its admis- 
sion into the Union was passed March 3, 1845. Area 59,268 square 
miles, or 37,930,520 acres. Population, in 1860, 140,425, of whom 
61,745 were slaves. It is an agricultural State, tropical in its climate and 
products. Every free white male citizen, who has resided in the State 
two years and in the county six months, and has been enrolled in the 
militia (unless exempt by law,) is qualified to vote ; but no soldier, seaman 



THE STATES, THEIR SETTLEMENT, ETC. 97 

or marine can vote unless qualified before enlistment. Its Legislature 
called a Convention, December 1, 1860, which met January 3, 1861, and 
passed a secession ordinance on the 10th by a vote of 62 to 7. 



GBO'RGI^L was settled at Savannah, in 1733, by the English under 
General Oglethorpe. It was chartered June 9, 1732; formed a Con- 
stitution February 5, 1777; a second in 1785 and a third May 30, 1798. — 
It was one of the original thirteen States, and ratified the United States 
Constitution January 2, 1788. Area 58,000 square miles, or 37,120,000 
acres. Population, in 1860, 1,057,286, of whom 462,198 were slaves. It is 
a large cotton and rice growing State. Citizens of the State, six months 
resident of the county where voting, who have paid taxes the year pre- 
ceding the election, are entitled to vote. November 18, 1860, its Legis- 
lature ordered an election for a State Convention, which assembled and 
passed a secession ordinance January 19, 1861, by a vote of 208 to 89, and 
on the 23d of the same month its members of Congress resigned. 

IZ,Z,IJYOJS was settled at Kaskaskia, in 1683, by the French, and 
formed part of the northwestern territory ceded by Virginia to the 
United States. An act for dividing the Indiana Territory and organizing 
the Territory of Illinois, was passed by Congress, February 3, 1809 ; and 
an act to enable it to form a State Constitution, Government, &c, was 
passed April 18, 1818; a Constitution was framed August 26, and it was 
admitted into the Union December 23 of the same year. Area 54,405 
square miles, or 64,819,200 acres. Population, in 1860, 1,711,951. It is the 
chief " prairie" State, and the largest grain growing and second largest 
cattle raising State in the Union. All white male inhabitants, who have 
resided in the State one year and election district sixty days, can vote in 
the district where actually residing. 

IJVDIjiJVji was settled at Vincennes, in 1690, by the French, and 
formed part of the northwestern territory ceded by Virginia to the United 
States. It was organized into a Territory May 7, 1800, from which the 
Territory of Michigan was set off in 1805, and Illinois in 1809. An act 
was passed to empower it to form a State Constitution, Government, &c, 
April 19, 1816, and it was admitted into the Union December 11 of the 
same year. Area 33,809 square miles, or 21,637,760 acres. Population, in 
1860, 1,350,428. It is an agricultural State, chiefly devoted to grain grow- 
ing and cattle raising. A residence of one year in the State entitles males 
of 21 years of age to vote in the county of their residence. 



10 JKd was first settled at Burlington by emigrants from the Northern 
and Eastern States. It was part of the region "purchased from France ; 
was set off from the Territory of Wisconsin and organized as a separate 
Territory June 12, 1838 ; an act for its admission as a State was passed 
and approved March 3, 1845, to which the assent of its inhabitants was to 
be given to be announced by Proclamation of the President, and on De- 
cember 28, 1846, another act for its admission was passed. Area 50,914 
square miles or 32,584,960 acres. Population, in 1860, 674,913. It is an 
agricultural State, resembling Illinois, and contains important lead mines. 
White male citizens of the United States, having resided in the State six 
months and county twenty days, are entitled to vote. 



gg TEE STATES, TEEIB SETTLEMENT, ETC. 



JljIjVSjIS was formed out of the original Louisiana purchase, and or- 
ganized into a Territory by act of Congress, May 30, 1854, and after several 
ineffectual attempts was finally admitted into the Union in January, 1861. 
Area 78,418 square miles, or 50,187,520 acres. Population, in 1860, 107,- 
206. It' is an agricultural State, with a soil of rich and deep black loam, 
except the central portion, which is partly a desert. The western portion 
is a fine grazing country, well wooded. Residence in the State six months, 
and in the township or ward thirty days, confers the right of suffrage on 
white male citizens. It also abounds in minerals. 

J££JJVTU'CJ£Y was settled in 1775, by Virginians ; formed into a 
Territory by act of the Virginia Legislature, December 18, 1789, and ad- 
mitted into the Union June 1, 1792, by virtue of an act of Congress pass- 
ed February 4, 1791. Area 37,680 square miles, or 24,115,200 acres.—- 
Population in 1860, 1,155,684, of whom 225,483 were slaves. It is an agri- 
cultural State, raising more flax and hemp than any other. Loyalty, a 
residence of two years in the State and one in the county are the require- 
ments to vote. " Any citizen of this State who shall enter the service of 
the so-called Confederate States, in either a civil or military capacity; or 
into the service of the so-called Provisional Government of Kentucky, in 
either a civil or military capacity ; or having heretofore entered such ser- 
vice of either the Confederate States or Provisional Government, shall 
continue in such service after this act takes effect, (March 11, 1862,) or 
shall take up or continue in arms against the military forces of the United 
States or State of Kentucky, or shall give voluntary aid and assistance to 
those in arms against said forces, shall be deemed to have expatriated him- 
self, and shall no longer be a citizen, except by permission of the Legisla- 
ture by a general or special statute." 

LOUISIANA was settled at Iberville, in 1699, by the French, and 
comprised a part of the territory ceded by France to the United States, by 
treaty of April 30, 1803, which purchase was erected into two Territories 
by act of Congress March 26, 1804, one called the Territory of Orleans, the 
other the District of Louisiana, afterwards changed to that of Missouri. — 
Congress, March 2, 1806, authorized the inhabitants of Orleans Territory 
to form a State Constitution and Government when their population 
should amount to 60,000 ; a Constitution was adopted January 22, 1812, 
and the State admitted into the Union April 8 of the same year, 
under the name of Louisiana. Area 41,255 square miles, or 26,403,200 
acres. Population in 1860, 708,002, of whom 331,726 were slaves. It is 
the chief sugar producing State of the Union. Two years' residence in 
the State and one in the parish are the qualifications of voters. Decem- 
ber 10, 1860, the Legislature ordered a State Convention to be held, which 
assembled and passed an ordinance of secession January 26, 1861, by a 
vote of 113 to 17. The people voted on the question, and on March 28 
the following was announced as the result : For, 20,448 ; against, 17,296 ; a 
majority of 3,152. The Convention ratified the 'Confederate' Constitution 
March 11, 1861, by avote of 107 to 7, and refused to submit it to the peo- 
ple by 94 to 10. On the 11th day of January, 1864, Maj. Gen. Banks 
issued a Proclamation for an election of State officers and delegates to a 
Constitutional Convention, for the purpose of affecting a reconstruction of 
the State Government under the plan suggested in the Amnesty Proclama- 
tion of President Lincoln. The election was held on the 22d day of Feb- 
ruary, 1864. The officers thus elected were installed March 4. The total 
vote cast was 10,725. The vote requisite under the Proclamation was 
5,051. The Convention amended the Constitution so as to abolish slavery. 
The new Constitution was adopted by the people by a vote of 6,836 for, to 
1,566 against. 



THE STATES, THEIR SETTLEMENT, ETC. 99 

MAINE was settled at York, in 1623, by the English, and was for- 
merly under the jurisdiction of Massachusetts. October 29, 1819, the in- 
habitants of the District of Maine framed a Constitution ; applied for ad- 
missii >n December 8, 1819. Congress passed an act March 3, 1820, and it 
was admitted as a State March 15, of the same year. Area 31,766 square 
miles, or 20,330,240 acres. Population, in 1860, 628,279. It is largely en- 
gaged in the lumber trade and ship building. Citizens of the United 
States, except paupers and persons under guardianship, who have resided 
in the State for three months next preceding the election, are entitled to 
vote. 



MA'RYZAWD was settled at St. Mary, in 1634, by Irish Roman 
Catholics, having been chartered June 20, 1632. It was one of the origin- 
al thirteen States ; formed a Constitution August 14, 1776, and ratified the 
Constitution of the United States April 28, 1788. Area 11,124 square 
miles, or 7,119,260 acres. Population in 1860, 687,049, of whom 87,189 
were slaves. It is mainly an agricultural State, producing grain and to- 
aacco. A residence of one year in the State, and six months in the coun- 
y, gives the right to vote to every white male citizen who takes the oath 
Df allegiance prescribed in the Constitution. January 28, 1864, a bill pass- 
ed the Legislature submitting to the people the question of a Convention 
;o revise the Constitution of the State. The popular vote on the question 
was as follows : For Convention, 32,203 ; against, 18,337. The Convention 
issemuled and adopted a Constitution abolishing slavery, which was sub- 
nitted to and adopted by the people ; and in accordance with its provis- 
ons, on the 29th of October, 1864, the Governor issued his Proclamation 
leclaring the slaves in that State free from the 1st day of November. 



MASScLCEZTSBTTS was settled at Plymouth, November 3, 1620, 
sy English Puritans, and Charters were granted March 4, 1629, January 
i'S, 1630, August 20, 1726, and October 7, 1731. It was one of the original 
L3 States ; adopted a Constitution March 2, 1780, which was amended No- 
vember 3, 1820, and ratified the Constitution of the United States Febru- 
iry 6, 1788. Area 7,800 square miles, or 4,992,000 acres. Population in 
1860, 1,231,066. It is a largely commercial, the chief manufacturing and 
nost densely populated State in the Union. A residence of one year in 
he State, and payment of State or county tax, gives the right to vote to 
nale citizens of 21 years and upward, except paupers and persons under 
ruardianship. 

JflCSIGAJV was settled at Detroit in 1670, by the French, and was 
Jfcrt of the territory ceded to the United States by Virginia. It was set 
)ff from the territory of Indiana, and erected into a separate Territory 
January 11, 1805; an act to attach to it all the territory of the United 
States west of the Mississippi river, and north of the State of Missouri, 
vas passed June 28, 1834. Wisconsin was organized from it April 30, 
183(3. In June of the same year an act was passed to provide for the ad- 
nission of the State of Michigan into the Union, and a Constitution having 
>een adopted, it was admitted January 26, 1837. Area 56,243 square 
niles, or 35,995,552 acres. Population in 1860, 749,113. It is a grain 
growing and cattle rearing State, with rich and extensive mines of copper 
ind iron in the Northern Peninsula. A residence in the State of six 
nonths preceding the election, entitles white male citizens to vote. 



100 THE STATES, THEIR SETTLEMENT, ETC. 



MINNESOTA was settled about 1846, chiefly by emigrants from 
the Northern and Western States. It was organized as a Territory by 
act of Congress approved March 3, 1849, and admitted into the Union 
February 26, 1857. Area 95,274 square miles, or 60,975,536 acres. Pop- 
ulation in 1860, 172,123 whites, and about 25,000 Indians, many of the 
tribes being of a warlike character. It is an agricultural State, chiefly 
devoted to Northern grains. The right to vote is extended to male per- 
sons of 21 years of age, of the following classes, if they have resided in 
the United States one year, the State four months, and the election dis- 
trict ten days: White citizens of the United States, and those of foreign 
birth who have declared their intention to become citizens ; persons of 
mixed white and Indian blood who have adopted the customs of civiliza- 
tion, and those of pure Indian blood who have been pronounced capable 
by any district court of the State. 



MISSISSIPPI was settled at Natchez, in 1716, by the French, and 
was formed out of part of the territory ceded to the United States by 
South Carolina in 1787, and Georgia in 1802. It was organized as a Ter- 
ritory by act of Congress, April 7, 1789, and enlarged on the north March 
27, 1804, and on the south May 14, 1812. After several unsuccessful at- 
tempts to enter the Union, Congress finally passed an act March 1, 1817, 
enabling the people of the western part of the Territory to form a State 
Constitution and Government, which being complied with August 15, it 
was admitted December 10 of the same year. Area 47,156 square miles, 
or 30,179,840 acres. Population in 1860, 791,305, of whom 436,631 were 
slaves. It is the second cotton growing State of the Union. Citizens 
who have resided one year in the State, and four months in the county, 
and having performed military duty or paid taxes, are entitled to vote. A 
Convention met January 7, 1861, and on the 9th passed an ordinance of 
secession by a vote of 84 to 15. 



MISSOURI was settled at Genevieve in 1763, by the French, and 
was part of the territory ceded by France by treaty of April 30, 1803. 
It was created under the name of the District of Louisiana, by an act 
approved March 26, 1804, and placed under the direction of the officers 
a ^Indiana Territory, aw was organized into a separate Territory June 
4 1812 its name being changed to that of Missouri; and was divided 
March 2, 1819, the Territory of Arkansas being then created. An act au- 
thorizing it to form a State Constitution and Government was passed 
Marcb j>'l° 2 Mnd it was admitted int0 the Uni °a December 14, 1821. 
fTeomo' <? u quare miles ' or 43.123,200 acres. Population in 1860, 
i,ia«,ui4, ol whom 114,931 were slaves. An act of gradual emancipation 
was passed July 1, 1863, by a vote of 51 to 30. On the 6th of January, 
iooo, a Constitutional Convention assembled in St. Louis, and on the 8th 
ot April adopted a new Constitution, declaring the State free, prohibiting 
nTrn DSi V ? n for , slaves > and adopting many other radical changes. On 
4-frTo \ a\ Toao the Constitution was adopted by the people by a vote of 
w «, n 41 '° 08 \ and Pursuant to a Proclamation issued on the 1st of Ju- 
fimi m- • L^ tl0n ~ ent into effect Jul y 4, 1865. It is an agricultural 
S™' n S State - J Citizens of the United States who have resided in the 
mm*a hl y i? ar V an ? , count y thr ee months, are entitled to vote. By an act 

JSSJ^jSSitKiSSd. of 1863, voting by ballot was adopted ' and the 



THE STATES, THEIR SETTLEMENT, ETC. 



101 



A / '.E22'Rc±Sl£A. was settled by emigrants from the Northern and 
Western States, and was formed out of a part of the territory ceded by 
France, April 30, 1803. Attempts to organize it were made in 1844 and 
1848, but it was not accomplished until May 30, 1854. Area 75,955 square 
miles, or 44,796,160 acres. Population 28,841, besides a few roving tribes 
of Indians. A Convention adopted a State Constitution February 9, 1866, 
which was submitted to the people on the 22d of June, and adopted by a 
vote of 3,938 for, to 3,838 against, and State officers were elected. A bill 
was passed by Congress, July 27th, admitting the State, but the President 
withheld his signature. In February, 1867, Congress passed an act im- 
posing certain conditions to admission, which were promptly accepted, and 
the territory became a State. It is an agricultural region, its prairies af- 
fording boundless pasture lands. 

W-Ey&IDA. was organized as a Territory March 2, 1861. Its name 
signifies snowy, and is derived from the Spanish word nieve (snow.) It 
comprises 81,539 square miles, or 52,184,960 acres, lying mostly within the 
Great Basin of the Pacific coast. Congress, at its session in 1864, passed 
an act which was approved March 21, to enable the people of the Terri- 
tory to form a Constitution and State Government, in pursuance of which 
a Government was organized and the Territory admitted as a State by 
Proclamation of the President, October 31, 1864. At the time of its or- 
ganization the Territory possessed a population of 6,857 white settlers. 
The development of her mineral resources was rapid and almost without 
parallel, and attracted a constant stream of immigration to the Territory. 
As the population has not been subject to the fluctuations from which 
other Territories have suffered, the growth of Nevada has been rapid and 
steady. At the general convention election of 1863, 10,934 votes were cast. 
During 1864 great accessions to the population were made. It is probably 
the richest State in the Union in respect to mineral resources. No region 
in the world is richer in argentiferous leads. It also contains an immense 
basin of salt, five miles sqimre. Quartz mills area very important feature 
in mining operations. The State is barren for agricultural purposes, and 
is remarkably healthy. 

JV'BW HAMTSUIftB was settled at Dover, in 1623, by English 
Puritans, and continued under the jurisdiction of Massachusetts until 
September 18, 1679, when a separate charter was granted. It was one 
of the original thirteen States, and ratified the United States Constitution 
June 21, 1788; its State Constitution was framed January 5, 1776, and 
amended in 1784 and 1792. Area 9,280 square miles, or 5,939,200 acres. 
Population in 1860, 326,073. It is a grazing and manufacturing State. 
All male citizens, except paupers, are allowed to vote. 



JVJS1V JEltSET-xm settled at Bergen, in 1624, by the Dutch and 
Danes ; was conquered by the Dutch in 1655, and submitted to the English 
in 1664, being held thereafter under the same grants as New York, until it 
was surrendered to the Crown in 1702. It was one of the original thirteen 
States, adopted a State Constitution July 2, 1776, and ratified the United 
States Constitution December 18, 1787. Area 8,320 square miles, or 5-, 
324,800 acres. Population in 1860, 672,035. It is a grain and fruit grow- 
ing region, its orchard and market products being relatively greater than 
those "of any other State. A residence of one year in the State gives the 
right to vote, except to paupers, &c. 



102 THE STATES, THEIR SETTLEMENT, ETC. 



, NEW YORK was settled at Manhattan, in 1614, by the Dutch ; was 
ceded to the English by grants to the Duke of York, March 20, April 26 
and June 24, 1664 ; was retaken by the Dutch in 1673, and surrendered! 
again by them to the English, February 9, 1674. It was one of the orig 
inal thirteen States ; ratified the United States Constitution July 26, 1788 
framed a Constitution April 20, 1777, which was amended October 27 
1801, and November 10, 1821 ; a new one was adopted November 3 
1846. Area 47,000 square miles, or 30,080,000 acres. Population ii 
1865, 3,831,777. It is the most populous, wealthy and commercial oi 
the States. White male citizens of the United States, who have resided 
in the State one year, in the county four months, and election district 
thirty days, are entitled to vole ; and all men of color who have resided; 
in the State three years, and own and pay taxes on a freehold assessedj 
at $250. 

NORTH CAROLINA was settled at Albemarle, in 1650, by thej 
English, and was chartered March 20, 1663. It was one of the original 
thirteen States, and ratified the United States Constitution, November 21, 
17b!) ; its State Constitution was adopted December 18, 1776, and amended 
in 1835. Area 50,704 square miles, or 32,450,560 acres. Population in 
1860, 992,622, of whom 331,059 were slaves. It is an agricultural State, 
with some mines and extensive pine forests. Every freeman of 21 years 
of age, having resided one year in any county in the State, may vote for 
a member of the House of Commons, but must own fifty acres of land to 
vote for a Senator. A State Convention passed an ordinance of secession 
May 21, 1861. An election for delegates to a State Convention look place, 
September 21, 1865. The Convention assembled October 2. On the 2d of: 
October it passed an ordinance forever prohibiting slavery. The Legisla- ; 
ture ratified the Constitutional amendment December 1. An election was | 
held on the first Thursday of November, for Governor, Members of Con- , 
gress and the Legislature. 



OHIO was settled at Marietta, in 1788, by emigrants from Virginia and 
New England; was ceded by Virginia to the United States October 20, 
1783; accepted by the latter March 1, 1784, and admitted into the Union 
April 30, 1802. Area 39,964 square miles, or 25,576,960 acres. Popula- 
tion in 1860, 2,339,511. It is the most populous and wealthy of the agri : 
cultural States, devoted principally to wool growing, grain and live 
stock. A male of 21 years of age, who has resided in the State one year, 
and has paid or been charged with a State or county tax, is eligible to 
vote. 

OREGON, although it had previously been seen by various naviga- 
tors, was first taken possession of by Capt. Robert Gray, who entered the 
mouth of its principal river May 7, 1792, naming it after his vessel, the 
Columbia, of Boston. Exploring expeditions soon followed, and fur com- 
panies sent their trappers and traders into the region. In 1811 a trading 
post was established at the mouth of the Columbia river by the American 
Fur Company, who named it Astoria. For some time a Provisional Ter- 
ritorial Government existed, but the boundary remained unsettled until 
the treaty with Great Britain in 1846, when the 49th parallel was adopted. 
It was formally organized as a Territory August 14, 1848 ; was divided 
March 2, 1853, on the 46th parallel, the northern portion being called 
Washington and the southern Oregon. November 9, 1857, a State Con- 
stitution was adopted, under which it was admitted February 14, 1859, 



THE STATES, THEIR SETTLEMENT, ETC. 1 03 

about one-third of it on the east bein^ added to "Washington Territory, 
its northern boundary following the Columbia river until its intersection 
With latitude 46° north. Area 102,606 square miles, or 65,667,840 
acres. Population in 1860, 52,465. It is an agricultural State, pos- 
sessed of a fertile soil, extensive pastures, genial climate, and is well 
Wooded. Gold and other precious metals are found in considerable abun- 
dance. 

TEJVJVSYZ TAJVJA was settled at Philadelphia, in 1681, by Eng- 
lish Quakers, and was chartered February 28 of the same year. It was 
one of the original thirteen States, ratifying the United States Constitution 
December 12, ITS? ; adopted a State Constitution September 28, 1776, and 
amended it September 2, 1790. Area 46,000 square miles, or 29,440,000 
acres. Population in I860, 2,906,115. It is the second State in wealth 
and population, and the principal coal and iron mining region in the 
Union, ivesiueuce in the State one year, and ten days in the election 
•district, with payment of a State or county tax assessed ten days prior to 
an election, gives the right to vote; except that citizens between 21 and 22 
years of age need not. have paid the tax. 

ftHO&E ISZAJVD was settled at Providence in 1636, by the Eng- 
lish from Massachusetts, under Roger Williams. It was under the juris- 
diction of Massachusetts until July 8, 1662, when a separate charter was 
granttd, which continued in force until the formation of a Constitution in 
September, 1842. It was one of the original thirteen States, ratifying the 
Dnited States Constitution May 29, lf~90. Area 1,306 square miles, or 
835,840 acres. Population in I860, 174,620. It is largely engaged in 
manufactures. A freehold possession of $13; or, if in reversion, renting 
for $7, together with a residence of one year in the State and six months 
in the town ; or, if no freehold, then a resideuce of two years in the State 
and six months in the town, and payment of §1 tax or military service in- 
stead, are the qualifications of voters. 

SOUTJZ CA'ROLI.YA. was settled at Port Royal, in 1670, by the 
English, and continued under the charter of Carolina, or North Carolina, 
until they were separated in 1729. It was one of the original thirieen 
States, ratifying the United States Constitution May 23, 1798 ; it framed a 
State Constitution March 26, 1776, which was amended March 19, 1778, 
and June 3, 1790. Area 29,385 square miles, or 18,806,400 acres. Popula . on 
in 1860, 703,708, of whom 402,406 were slaves, an excess of 101,27u over 
the whites. It is the principal rice-growing State. Whites, who have re- 
sided in the State two years and district six months, and have a fret-hold 
of fifty acres of land, or have paid a State tax, are entitled to vote. De- 
cember 17, 1860, a Convention assembled in Columbia, adjourned to 
Charleston, and on the 24th unanimously adopted an ordinance of seces- 
sion, which was followed the next day by a Declaration of Causes claimed 
to be sufficient to justily the act. An election tor delegates to a State Con- 
vention was held September 4, 1865. The Convention assembled Sep- 
tember 13, and adjoui ned on the 28th. It repealed the ordinance of seces- 
sion, abolished slavery, equalized the representation of the Senate and 
taxation throughout the Stare, giving the election of Governor and Presi- 
dential electors to the pe iple, ordered voting in the Legislature \>\ viva 
roce, endorsed the Administration unanimously, and directed a commis- 
sion to submit a code lo the Legislature for the protection of the colored 
population. The Legislature ratified the Constitutional Amendment No- 
vember 13, 1865. 



104 THE STATES, THEIR SETTLEMENT, ETC. 

TBJYJYJESSEB was settled at Fort Donelson, in 1756, by emigrants 
from Virginia and North Carolina ; was ceded to the United States by 
North Carolina, December, 1789, conveyed by the Senators of that State 
February 25, 1790, and accepted by act bf Congress April 2 of the same 
year; it adopted a Constitution Feb. 6, 1796, and was admitted into the 
Union the 1st of June following. Area 45,600 square miles, or 29,184,000 
acres. Population in 1860, 1,109,001, of whom 275,179 Avere slaves. It 
is a mining and agricultural State, and is largely productive of live stock. 
Citizens of the United States who have resided six months in the county 
are entitled to vote. A military league was formed between the Governor, 
Isham G. Harris, and the rebel States, May 7, 1861, ratified the same day 
by the Senate by a vote of 14 to 6, and a Declaration of Independence 
submitted to the people, the election to be held June 8, the result of which 
was declared by the Governor, June 24, to be 104,913 for, and 47,238 
against. This movement not being acceptable to the people of East Ten- 
nessee, which had declared against separation by a vote of 32,923 to 14,780, 
they, in a Convention held at Greenville, June 18-21, repudiated it. An- 
drew Johnson, Provisional Governor of the State, called a State Conven- 
tion to be held in Nashville the second Monday in January. Delegates 
were elected, the Convention met, declared slavery forever abolished, pro- 
hibited compensation to owners of slaves, and abrogated the secession or- 
dinances. These amendments of the Constitution were submitted to the 
people 22d of Februaiy, 18(55, with the following result: For ratification^ 
22,197 ; rejection, 63. The United States Constitutional Amendment was 
ratified April 5, 1865. 



TIZXA. S was first settled at Bexar, in 1694, by Spaniards; formed a 
part of Mexico until 1836, when she revolted from that Republic and in- 
stituted a separate Government, under which she existed until admitted 
into the Union by a joint resolution approved March 1st, 1845, imposing 
certain conditions, which were accepted, and a Constitution formed July 
4 of the same year, and another joint resolution adopted by Congress, 
consummating the annexation, was approved December 29, 1845. Area 
237,504 square miles' or 152,002,500 acres. Population in 1860,604,215, of 
whom 182,566 were slaves. It is an agricultural region, principally devo- 
ted to grain, cotton and tropical fruits. Free white male citizens of 21 
years of age, w T ho have resided in the State one j r ear and district six 
months are entitled to vote. A Convention assembled at Galveston Jan- 
uary 28,1861, and on February 1 parsed an ordinance of secession, by a 
vote of 166 to 7, to be submitted to the people February 23, and on March 
4 thej r declared the State out of the Union, and Gov. Houston issued a 
Proclamation to that effect. 



VJSjtZMOJYT 'was settled in 1724, by Englishmen from Connecticut, 
chiefly under grants from New Hampshire ; was formed from a part of 
the territory of New York, by act of its Legislature March 6, 1709 ; framed 
a Constitution December 25, 1777, and was admitted into the Union 
March 4, 1791, by virtue of an act of Congress passed February 18 of the 
same year. Area 10,212 square miles, or 6,535,680 acres. Population in 
I860, 315,098. It is a grazing region, producing more wool, live stock, 
maple sugar, butter, cheese and hay, in proportion to its population, than 
any other State. Any citizen of the United States who has resided in the 
State one year, and will take the oath of allegiance, is entitled to vote. 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 105 



Commission House 



-+--+- 



BYRON MIDLER, 

IVo. 18 James 8t,, Syracuse, JV. Y., 

Wholesale Produce and Commission Merchant, 



DEALER IN 



Flour, Meal, Feed, Oats, Butter, Cheese, Poul- 
try, Eggs, Pork, Beef, Hams, Lard, Po- 
tatoes, Beans, Onions, Vinegar, 



AND ALL KINDS OF 



DOUNTRY PRODUCE. 

Also PenfleW, Lyon & Go's .Brands Oswego Flour. 

URE CIDER 





5 



FROM CLIFFORD & STRONG, BUFFALO. 

Cash. Paid for all kinds of Farm Produce. 
ZST Consignments Solicited. 



106 ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIBECTORY. 



Clockville, June 1, 1868. 

Dear Sir:— The subscriber would call your attention to his 9th Circular, and list 
of Cloths and prices for manufacturing for the year 1S68. 

At Old Lenox Furnace, Madison County, N. Y., 

ONE MILE SOUTH OF WAMPSVILLE, ON THE N. Y. C. R. R. 

All Wool Cassimeres and Flannels made from your own Wool, or exchmged to suit 

Customers. 

No Flocks or Shoddy Used. f 

PRICE PER YARD FOR MANUFACTURING. 

All styles of Plain and Cassimere Full Cloth, from Coarse or Medium Wools, in Steel 
Mixes, Brown Mixes, Sheeps Grey, Canada Grey, Cadets, and Colored Twilled Cassi- 
meres 20 oz Wool and 40 Cents. 

For making Double Milled Cassimeres 32 oz Wool and 50 Cents. 

For making Fine Meltons 20 oz Wool and 50 Cents. 

For making Fine Scotch Tweeds 20 oz Wool and 50 Cents. 

For making Fine Black Cassimeres 20 oz Wool and GO Cents. 

For making Fine Heavy Doeskin 24 oz Wool and 60 Cents. 

For making Fine Double and Twist 24 oz Wool and 00 Cents. 

For making Fine Fancy Cassimeres . 24 oz Wool and 00 Cents. 

For making Fine Heavy Beavers 32 oz Wool and 75 Cents. 

For making Fine Black Tricot 32 oz Wool and 75 Cents. 

For making 1 yard wide Heavy Twilled Scarlet Flannels 10 oz Wool and 40 Cents. 

For making lU yard wide Plain Scarlet Flannels Mi oz Wool and 40 Cents. 

For making 1M yard wide Plain White Flannels 10 oz Wool and 25 Cents. 

For making 1 yard wide Twilled White Flannels 16 oz Wool and 25 Cents. 

For making 1 yard wide Fine Check Flannels 18 oz Wool and 35 Cents. 

For making 1 yard wide Medium Check Flannels 16 oz Wool and 35 Cents. 

For making 1 yard wide Heavy Check Flannels 16 oz Wool and 35 Cents. 

Or on Shares, Full Cloths, Check and Colored Flannels For one-half. 

Or on Shares, White Flannels For one-third. 

To My Customers. 

Owing to the largely increased facilities for manufacturing, (WITH ENTIRE NEW 
MACHINERY throughout the whole Factory.) and with 'he most competent workmen 
in all departments, with steam fixtures for coloring and finishing only to be equaled by a 
few first-class Fancy Mills in the State, the subscriber offers advantages to those desir- 
ing their own Wool Manufactured, such as can be had at no other Custom Mill in the 
Country. With a large capital invested in Custom manufacturing, the subscriber is en- 
abled to offer an assortment of Goods to his customers such as can be found at but few 
first-class Jobbing Houses in our cities, consisting of 

THIRTY THOUSAND YARDS OF CLOTHS AND FLANNELS, 

Of all grades, styles and colors. Thanking his customers for former favors, the subscrib- 
er will endeavor to increase and keep good his reputation as a first-class DOMESTIC 
WOOLEN MANUFACTURER. 

Knowing that it costs no more to trim and make a good quality of cloths into gar- 
ments than it does a poor shoddy article, the subscriber appreciates the necessity for 
furnishing his customers none but the best of cloths, and is more anxious for his repu- 
tation with his customers than for mere dollars and cents. Those wishing cloths froni 
their own wool can have it manufactured. 

Come with your wool to the Factory, where Cloths can b e had at first hands, and no 
Freight, Commission or Storage charged. 

Wool sent in Bales of 100 pounds or more, by R. R., to Canastota, N. Y., at my ex- 
pense for freight, and Cloths or Flannels returned with as little delay as possible on 
your order. Yours truly, 

OEO. B. CADY. 

Post Office, Clockville, N. Y. 



THE STATES, THEIR SETTLEMENT, ETC. 107 

"KTfR4rIJYlJ& was settled at Jamestown, in 1607. by the English, and 
was chartered April 10, 1600, May 2'S, 1609, and March 12, 1612. It was 
one of the original thirteen States, ratifying the United States Constitution 
June 25, 1788 ; it framed a State Constitution July 5, 1776, which was 
amended January 15, 1830. The State was divided in 1863. Present 
area 37,352 square miles. Population in I860, 1,314,532, of whom 481,- 
410 were slaves. It is a large corn producing, and the chief tobacco grow- 
ing State. Every white male citizen of the age of 21 years, who has been 
a resident of the State for one year, and of the county, city or town where 
he offers to vote for six months next preceding an election, and has paid 
all taxes assessed to him, after the adoption of the Constitution, under the 
laws of the Commonwealth after the re-organization of the county, city 
or town where he offers to vote, is qualified to vote for members of the 
General Assembly and all officers elective by the people. A Convention 
sitting in Richmond on the 17th of April, 1861, passed an ordinance of 
secession, by a vote of S8 to 55, which was submitted to the people at an 
election held May 23, the result of which was announced June 25 to be 
£28,824 for, and 32,134 against. The State Government was re-orgaiiized 
by a Convention which met at Wheeling, May 11, 1861. Upon the divi- 
sion of the State in 1863, the seat of Government was removed to Alexan- 
dria. A State Constitutional Convention, March 10, 1864, adopted a sec- 
tion abolishing slavery. 



WJEST VIRGINIA.— On the passage of the ordinance of se- 
cession by the Virginia Convention, a Convention of the western and other 
loyal counties of the State was held at Wheeling, which assembled May 
11, 1861, and on the 17th unanimously deposed the then State officers and 
organized a Provisional Government. On the 26th of November, 1861, a 
Convention representing the western counties assembled in Wheeling and 
framed a Constitution for West Virginia, which was submitted to the 
people on the 3d of May, 1862, and adopted by them by a nearly unani- 
mous vote. The division of the State was sanctioned by the Legislature 
May 13, 1862, and ratified by Congress by an act approved December 31 r 
1862, conditioned on the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution 
providing for the gradual abolition of slavery, which was done on the 24th 
of March, 1863, by a vote of the qualified electors of the proposed State, 
28,318 voting in favor of the amendment, and 572 against it.. In pursu- 
ance of the act of Congress, the President issued a Proclamation, April 
20, 1863, admitting the State sixty days from the date thereof, and on the 
1 20th of June the new State Government was formally inaugurated: Area 
; 24,000 square miles. Population in 1860, 350,599, of whom 12,754 wen- 
slaves. It is a large corn producing State, and abounds in coal and other 
jminerals. The Alexandria Legislature adopted the United States Consti- 
tutional Amendment February 9, 1865. White male citizens, residents of 
(the State one year and county thirty days, unless disqualified by rebellion, 
jare entitled to vote. 



WISCONSIN was settled at Green Bay, in 1669, by the French; 
Lwas a part of the territory ceded by Virginia, and was set off from Mich- 
igan December 24, 1834, and was organized into a Territory April 30, 
11836. Iowa was set off from it June 12, 1838, and acts were passed at 
various times setting its boundaries. March 3, 1847, an act for its- admis- 
Ision into the Unionwas passed, to take effect on the issuing of a Procla- 
G 



108 THE TERRITORIES, THEIR BOUNDARIES, ETC. 

mation by the President, and by act of May 29, 1848, it was admitted into 
the Union. Area 53,924 square miles, or 34,511,360 acres. Population in 
1860, 775,881. It is an agricultural State, chiefly engaged in grain raising 
and wool growing. Both white and colored citizens" of the United States, 
or white foreigners who have declared their intention to become citizens,, 
are entitled to vote. Colored citizens were admitted to the franchise, by a 
decision of the Supreme Court, rendered the 27th day of March, 1866,. 
holding that, whereas an election was held in 1849, under the provisions 
of chapter 137, of that year, at which election 5,265 votes were cast in 
favor of the extension of the right of suffrage to colored men, and 4,075 
against such extension, therefore, the section of said law conferring such 
right had been constitutionally adopted and is the law of the land. 



THE TERRITORIES, 

THEIR BOUNDARIES, AREA, PHYSICAL FEATURES, ETC. 



j11/j1SJL~A, our new territory, recently purchased of Russia, compre- 
hends all the north-west coast on the Pacific, and the adjacent islands north 
of the parallel of 50 degrees 40 minutes north, and the portion of the main- 
land west of the meridian (about 140" west) of Mount St. Elias. The area 
is computed at-481,276 square miles. The climate, although warmer than j 
in the same latitude on the eastern coast, is too rigorous to admit of sue 
cessful agricuhural operations, and the chief value of the country and ad 
jacent seasis derived from their fisheries and hunting grounds. The south- ; 
ern and central portions are mountainous ; the northern portion along the 
Arctic oeean is quite flat, nowhere rising more than fifteen or twenty feet 
above the sea. The population is estimated at about 80,000, mostly Esqui- 
meaux. 

jLllZZONvi w T as organized by the Thirty-Seventh Congress, in the win- 
ter of 1863, out of the western half of New Mexico, the boundary between 
the two Territories being the 109th meridian (32d west from Washington,) 
and includes the greater portions of the valleys of Colorado and Gila, 
which two rivers drain its entire surface, with parts of Utah, New Mexico 
and Nevada, and yet convey, it is reported, a lest- volume of water to the 
sea than the Hudson at Albany. The fertile Messilla Valley was left with 
New Mexico. The Territory forms a block nearly square, and contains 
126,141 square mih s, or 80,730,240 acres. Its white population is probably 
considerably less than 10,000. For agricultural purposes it is probably 
the most worthless on the Continent, owing to the absence of rains, but it 
is reputed to abound in silver mines. 

COLO'MA.jDO was organized March 2, 1861, from parts of Kansas, 
Nebraska and Utah, and is situated on each side of the Rocky Mountains, 
between latitude 37° and 41°, and longitude 25° and 82° west from Wash- 



THE TERRITORIES. THEIR BOUNDARIES, ETC. 109 

ington. Area 104,500 square miles, or 60,880,000 acres. Population 50,- 
000, besides numerous tribes of Indians. By an enabling act passed March 
21, 18G4, the people of the Territory were authorized to frame a State Con- 
stitution and organize a State Government, and a Convention accordingly 
met in 1865, and on the 12th of August adopted a Constitution, which was 
submitted to and adopted by the people September 5, and State officers 
elected November 14. A bill to admit the Territory as a State passed 
Congress, but was vetoed May 25, 1866. It is said to be a superior graz- 
ing and cattle producing region, with a healthy climate and rich soil. 
An extensive coal bed, and also gold, iron and other minerals abound. 

2)jLH*0 ¥A was first settled by emyloyees of the Hudson Bay Com- 
pany, but is now being peopled by emigrants from the Northern and Wes- 
tern States. It was set off from the western portion of Minnesota when 
that Territory became a State in 1857, and was organized March 2, 1861. 
Area 148,932 square miles, or 95,316,480 acres. Population 2.576 whites, 
and 2,261 Indians, besides the roving tribes. 

IIDjLIZO was organized by the Thirty-Seventh Congress, at its second 
session, in the winter of 1863. Its name means 'Bead of the Mountains,' 
and it embraces the whole breadth of the Rocky Mountain region, and has 
within its bounds the head waters of nearly all the great rivers that flow 
down its either slope, but the greater portion lies east of the mountains. 
Its southern boundary is the 41st, its northern the 46th parallel of latitude. 
It extends from the 104th meridian on the east to the 110th on the west. 
Area 326,373 square miles, or 208,870,720 acres. For agricultural purposes 
it is comparatively worthless, but abounds in gold and other valuable 
mines. 

MOJVTj&vA..vi%s> settled by emigrants from the Northern and West- 
ern States. Organized in 1864, with the following boundaries: Com- 
mencing at a point formed by the intersection of the 27° L. W. from Wash- 
ington with the 45 a N. L. ; thence due west on said 45th degree to a point 
formed by its intersection with the 34th degree W. from Washington ; 
thence due south along said 34th degree of longitude to its intersection 
with the 44th degree and 30 minutes of N. L. ; thence clue west along said 
44th degree and 30 minutes of N. L. to a point formed by its intersection 
with the crest of the Rocky Mountains; thence following the crest of the 
Rocky Mountains northward till its intersection with the Bitter Root 
Mountains ; thence northward along the crest of said Bitter Root Moun- 
tains- to its intersection with the 39th degree of longitude W. from Wash- 
ington ; thence along said 39th degree of longitude northward to the 
boundary line of the British possessions; thence eastward along said 
boundary to the 27th degree of longitude W. from Washington; thence 
southward along said 27th degree to the place of beginning. This makes 
it the northermost Territory next the States east of the Missouri Valley. It 
is a good mining and agricultural region. The total population is put 
down at 15,822. Large accessions have been made since the census was 
taken. 

JVjEJV ' MHJXICO was formed from a part of the territory ceded to 
the United States by Mexico, by the treaty of Guadaloupe Hidalgo, Feb- 
ruary 2, 1848, and was organized into a Territory September 9, 1850. — 
Area 121,201 square miles, or 77,568,640 acres. Population 83,000, besides 
large tribes of warlike Indians. The principal resource of the country is 
its minerals. 



110 



STAMP DUTIES. 



ZTTji-Hvw$> settled by the Mormons, and was formed from a part of 
the territory ceded to the United States by Mexico, by the treaty of Guada- 
loupe Hidalgo, February 2, 1848, and was organized into a Territory, Sep- 
tember 9, 1850. Area, 106,382 square miles, or 68,084,480 acres. Popula- 
ton, 40,273, of whom 29 were slaves. Brine, sulphureous and chalybeate 
springs abound ; limestone, granite, sandstone and marble are found in 
large quantities; iron is abundant, and gold, silver, copper, lead and zinc 
have been found. Not one-fiftieth part of the soil is fit for tillage, but on 
that which is, abundant crops of grain and considerable cotton are raised. 
A Convention was held at Great Salt Lake City, January 22, 1862, and a 
State Constitution formed, but it has not been acted on by Congress. 

WASHING TOJV "was settled by emigrants from the Northern and 
"Western States, and was organized into a Territory, March 2, 1853, from the 
northern portion of Oregon, to which was added another portion from the 
eastern part when the latter Territory was admitted as a State, February 
14, 1859. Area 69,994 square miles, or 48,636,800 acres. Population 
11,168, besides numerous tribes of Indians. 



STAMP DUTIES. 



SCHEDULE OF DUTIES ON AND AFTER MARCH 1, 1S67. 



Stamp Duty. 

Accidental injuries to persons,tick- 
ets, or contracts lor insurance 
against, exempt. 

Affidavits, exempt. 

Agreement or contract not other- 
wise specified : 
For every sheet or piece of paper 
upon which either of the same 
shall be written, $0 5 

Agreement, renewal of,same stamp 
as original instrument. 

Appraisement of value or damage, 
or for any other purpose : For 
each sheet of paper on which it 
is written, 5 

Assignment of a lease, same stamp 
as original, and additional 
stamp upon the value or con- 
sideration of transfer, accord- 
ing to the rates of stamps on 
deeds. (See Conveyance.) 

Assignment of policy of insurance, 
same stamp as original instru- 
ment. (See Insurance.) 

Assignment of mortgage, same 
stamp as that required upon a 
mortgage for the amount re- 
maining unpaid. (See Mort- 
gage.) 

Bank check, draft or order for any 
sum of money drawn upon any 



Stamp Duty, 
hank, banker or trust compa- 
ny at sight or on demand, 2 

When drawn upon any other per- 
son or persons, companies or 
corporations, for any sum ex- 
ceeding $10, at sight or on de- 
mand, 2 
Bill of exchange, (inland,) draft or 
order for the payment of any 
sum of money not exceeding 
$100, otherwise than at sight or 
on demand, or any promissory 
note, or any memorandum, 
check, receipt, or other writ- 
ten or printed evidence of an 
amount of money to be paid on 
demand or at a time designa- 
ted : For a sum not exceeding 
$100, 5 

And for every additional $100 or 
fractional part thereof in ex- 
cess of $100, 5 
Bill of exchange, (foreign,) or let- 
ter of credit drawn in, but pay- 
able out of, the United States : 
If drawn singly, same rates of 
duty as inland bills of exchange 
or promissory notes. 

If drawn in sets of three or more, 
for every bill of each set, where 
the sum made payable shall not 



STAMP DUTIES. 



Ill 



Stamp Duty. 



exceed $100 or the equivalent 
thereof in any foreign currency 
And for every additional $100, or 
fractional part thereof in excess 
of $100, 

Bill of lading or receipt (other than 
charter party) for any goods, 
merchandise, or effects to be 
exported from a port or place 
in the United States to any for- 
eign port or place, 

Bill of lading to any port in Brit- 
ish North America, 

Bill of lading, domestic or inland, 

Bill of sale by which any ship or 

vessel, or any part thereof,shall 

be conveyed to or vested in any 

other person or persons : 

When the consideration shall not 

exceed $300, 
Exceeding $500, and not exceed- 
ing $1,000, 
Exceeding $1,000, for every ad- 
ditional$500, or fractional part 
thereof, 

Bond for indemnifying any person 
for the payment of any sum ot 
money : When the money ulti- 
mately recoverable thereupon 
is $1,000 or less, 
When in excess of $1,000, for 
each $1,000 or fraction, 

Bond-administrator or guardian, 
when the value of the estate 
and effects, real and personal, 
does not exceed $1,000, 
Exceeding $1,000, 

Bond for due execution or per- 
formance of duties of office, 

Bond, personal, for security for 
the payment of money. (See 
Mortgage.) 

Bond of anydescription, other than 
such as may be required in le- 
gal proceedings, or used in con- 
nection with mortgage deeds, 
and not otherwise charged in 
this schedule, 

Broker's notes. (See Contract.) 

Certificates of measurement or 
weight of animals, wood, coal 
or hay, 

Certificates of measurement of oth- 
er articles, 

Certificates of stock in any incor- 
porated company, 

Certificates of profits, or any certi- 
ficate or memorandum showing 
an interest in the property 
or accumulations of any incor- 
porated company : If for a sum 
not less than $10 and not ex- 
ceeding $50, 
Exceeding; $50 and not exceed- 
ing $1,000, 

Exceeding $1,000, for every ad- 
ditional $1,000 or fractional 
part thereof, 

Certificate. Any certificate of dam- 
age or otherwise, and all other 
certificates or documents is- 
sued by any port warden, ma- 



2 
2 

10 

exempt, 
exempt. 

50 
1 00 

50 

50 
50 



exempt. 
1 00 

1 00 



25 

exempt. 

5 

25 



10 
25 

25 



Stamp Duty. 

rine surveyor, or other person 

acting as such, 25 

Certificate of deposit of any sum of 
money in any bank or trust 
company, or with any banker 
or person acting as such : I_ffor 
a sum not exceeding $100, 2 

For a sum exceeding $100. 5 

Certificate of any other descrip- 
tion than those specified, 5 

Charter, renewal of, same stamp as 
an original instrument. 

Charter party for the charter of any 
ship or vessel, or steamer, or 
any letter, memorandum, or 
other writing relating to the 
charter, or any renewal or 
transfer thereof: K the regis- 
tered tonnage of such ship, 
vessel, or steamer does not ex- 
ceed 150 tons, 1 CO 
Exceeding 150 tons, and not ex- 
ceeding 300 tons, 3 00 
Exceeding 300 tons, and not ex- 
ceeding 600 tons, 5 00 
Exceeding 600 tons, 10 00 

Check. Bank check, 2 

Contract. Broker's note, or mem- 
orandum of sale of any goods 
or merchandise, exchange, real 
estate, or property of any kind 
or description issued by brok- 
ers or persons acting as such : 
For each note or memorandum 
of sale, 10 

Bill or memorandum of the sale 
or contract for the sale of 
stocks, bonds, gold or silver 
bullion, coin, promissory notes, 
or other securities made by 
brokers, banks, or bankers, 
either for the benefit of others 
or on their own account : For 
each hundred dollars, or frac- 
tional part thereof, of the 
amount of such sale or con- 
tract, 1 
Bill or memorandum of the sale 
or contract for the sale of 
stocks, bonds, gold or silver 
bullion, coin, promissory notes, 
or other securities, not his or 
their own property, made by 
any person, firm, or company 
not paying a special tax as bro- 
ker, bank or banker : For each 
hundred dollars, or fractional 
part thereof, of the amount of 
such sale or contract, 5 

Contract. (See Agreement.) 

Contract, renewalof, same stamp 
as-original instrument. 

Conveyance, deed, instrument or 
writing, whereby any lands, 
tenements, or other realty sold 
shall be granted, assigned, 
transferred, or otherwise con- 
veyed to or vested in the pur- 
chaser or purchasers, or any 
other person or persons, by his, 
her or their direction, when the 
consideration or value does not 
exceed $500, 50 



112 



STAMP DUTIES. 



Stamp Duty. 
When the consideration exceeds 
$500, and does not exceed 
$1,000, 1 00 

And for every additional $500, or 
fractional part thereof, in ex- 
cess of $1,001), 50 

Conveyance. The acknowledg- 
ment of a deed, or proof by a 
witness, exempt. 

Conve3'ance. Certificate of record 

of a deed, exempt. 

Credit, letter of. Same as foreign 
bill of exchange. 

Custom-house entry. (See En- 
try.) 

Custom-house withdrawals. (See 
Entry.) 

Deed. (See Conveyance — Trust 
deed.) 

Draft. Same as inland bill of ex- 
change 

Endorsement of any negotiable in- 
strument, exempt. 

Entry of any goods, wares or mer- 
chandise at any custom-house, 
either forconsumption or ware- 
housing: Not exceeding $100 
in value, 25 

Exceeding $100, and not exceed- 
ing $500 in value, 50 
Exceeding $500 in value, 1 00 

Entry for the withdrawal of any 
goods or merchandise from 
bonded warehouse, 50 

Gauger's returns, exempt. 

Indorsement upon a stamped obli- 
gation in acknowledgment of 
its fulfillment, exempt. 

Insurance (life) policy : When the 
amount insured shall not ex- 
ceed $1,000, 25 
Exceeding $1,000, and not ex- 
ceeding $\o00, 50 
Exceeding $5,000, 1 00 

Insurance (marine, inland, and 
fire,) policies, or renewal of the 
same : If the premium does not 
exceed $10, 10 

Exceeding $10, and not exceed- 
ing $50, 25 
Exceeding $50, 50 

Insurance contracts or tickets 
against accidental injuries to 
persons, .exempt. 

Lease, agreement, memorandum, 
or contract for the hire, use, or 
rent of any land, tenement, or 
portion thereof: Where the 
rent or rental value is $300 per 
annum or less, 50 

Where the rent or rental value 
exceeds the sum of $300 per 
annum, for each additional 
$200, or fractional part thereof 
in excess of $300, 50 

Legal documents : 
Writ, or other original process, 
by which any suit, either crim- 
inal or civil, is commenced in 
any court, either of law or equi- 
_ tv j . exempt. 

Confession of judgment or cog- 
TTT n ? vit ' exempt. 

Writs or other process on ap- 



Stamp Duty, 
peals from justice courts or 
other courts of inferior juris- 
diction to a court of record. exempt. 

Warrant of distress. exempt. 

Letters of administration. (See 
Probate of will.) 

Letters testamentary, when the 
value of the estate and effects, 
real and personal, does not ex- 
ceed $1,000, Exempt. 
Exceeding $1,000, 5 

Letters of credit. Same as bill of 
exchange, (foreign.) 

Manifest for custom-house entry or 
clearance of the cargo of any 
ship, vessel, or steamer, for a 
foreign port : 
If the registered tonnage of such 
ship, vessel, or steamer does 
not exceed 300 tons, 1 00 

Exceeding 300 tons, and not ex- 
ceeding 600 tons, 3 00 
Exceeding 600 tons, 5 00 
[These provisions do not ap- 
ply to vessels or steamboats 
plying between ports of the 
United States and British 
North America.] 

Measurers' returns, exempt. 

Memorandum of sale, or broker's 
note. (See Contract.) 

Mortgage of lands, estate, or pro- 
perty, real or personal, herita- 
ble or movable, whatsoever, a 
trust deed in the nature of a 
mortgage, or any personal bond 
given as security for the pay- 
ment of any definite or certain 
sum of money; exceeding $100, 
and not exceeding $500, 50 

Exceeding $500, and not exceed- 
ing $1,000, 1 00 
And for every additional $500, or 
fractional part thereof, in ex- 
cess of $1,000, 50 

Order for payment of money, if the 

amount is $10, or over, 2 

Passage ticket on any vessel from 
a port in the United States to a 
foreign port, not exceeding 
$35, 50 

Exceeding $35, and not exceed- 
ing $50, 1 00 
And for every additonal $50, or 
fractional part thereof, in ex- 
cess of $50, 1 00 
Passage tickets to ports in Brit- 
ish North America, exempt. 

Pawner's checks, 5 

Power of attorney for the sale or 
transfer of any stock, bonds or 
scrip, or for the collection of 
any dividends or interest there- 
on, 25 

Power of attorney, or proxy, for 
voting at any election for offi- 
cers of any incorporated com- , 
pany or society, except reli- 
gious, charitable, or literary 
societies, or public cemeteries, 10 

Power of attorney to receive or col- 
lect rent, 25 

Power of attorney to sell and con- 
vey real estate, or to rent or 



STAMP DUTIES. 



113 



Stamp Duty, 
lease the game, 1 (XJ 

Power of attorney for any other 

purpose, 50 

Probate of will, or letters of admin • 
istration ; where the estate and 
effects fororin respect, of which 
sach probate or letters of ad- 
ministration applied for shall 
be sworn or declared not to ex- 
ceed the value of $1.0> 0, exempt. 
Exceeding $1,000, and not ex- 
ceeding $2,000, 1 00 
Exceeding $2,000, for every ad- 
ditional $1,000, or fractional 
part thereof, in excess of 
$2,i 00, 50 

Promissory note. (See Bill of ex- 
change, inland.) 
Deposit note to mutual insurance 
companies, when policy is sub- 
ject to duty, exempt. 
Renewal of a note, subject to the 
same duty as an original note. 

Protest of note, bill of exchange, 
acceptance, check, or draft, or 
any marine protest, 25 

Quit-claim deed to be stamped as a 
conveyance, except when giv- 
en as a release of a mortgage 
by the mortgagee to the mort- 
gagor, in which case it is ex- 
empt ; bnt if it contains cove- 
nants may be subject as an 
agreement or contract. 

.Receipts for satisfaction of any 
mortgage or judgment or de- 
cree of any court, exempt. 

Receipts for any sum of money or 
debt due, or for a draft or "oth- 
er instrument given for the 
payment ot money ; exceeding 
$20, not being for satisfaction 
of any mortgage or judgment 
or decree of court, 2 

(See Indorsement.) 

Receipts for the delivery of pro- 
perty, exempt. 

Renewal of agreement, contract or 
charter, by letter or otherwise, 
same stamp as original instru- 
ment. 

Sheriffs return on writ or other 

process, exempt. 

Trust deed, made to secure a debt, 
to be stamped as a mortgage. 

Warehouse receipts, exempt. 

Warrant of attorney accompany- 
ing a bond or note, if the bond 
or note is stamped, exempt. 

Weigher's returns, exempt. 

Official documents, instruments, 
and papers issued by officers 
of the United States Govern- 
ment, exempt. 
Official instruments, documents, 
and papers issued by the offi- 
cers of any State, county, town, 
orother municipal corporation, 
in the exercise of functions 
strictly belonging to them in 
their ordinary governmental or 
municipal capacity, exempt. 
Papers necessary to be used for 



Stamp Duty, 
the collection from the United 
States Government of claims 
by soldiers, or their legal rep- 
resentatives, for pensions, 
back pay, bounty, or for prop- 
arty lost in the service, exempt. 

CANCELLATION. 



In all cases where an adhesive stamp is 
used for denoting the stamp duty upon an 
instrument, the person using or affixing the 
same must write or imprint thereupon in 
ink the initials of his name, and the date 
(the year, month, and day) on which the 
same is attached or used. Each stamp 
should be separately cancelled. When 
stamps are printed upon checks, &c, so 
that infilling up the instrument, the face of 
the stamp is and must necessarily be writ- 
ten across, no other cancellation will be re- 
quired. 

All cancellation must be distinct and legi- 
ble, and except in the case of proprietary 
stamps from private dies, no method of 
cancellation which differs from that above 
described can be recognized as legal and 
sufficient. 

PENALTIES. 

A penalty of fifty dollars is imposed upon 
every person who makes, signs, or issues, 
or who causes to be made, signed, or issu- 
ed, any paper of any kind or description 
whatever, or who accepts, negotiates, or 
pays, or causes to be accepted, negotiated, 
or paid, any bill of exchange, draft, or or- 
der, or promissory note, for the payment of 
money, without the same bein^ duly stamp- 
ed, or having thereupon an adhesive stamp 
for denoting the tax chargeable thereon, 
cancelled in the manner required by law, 
with intent to evade the provisions of the 
revenue act. 

A penalty of two hundred dollars is im- 
posed upon every person who pays, nego- 
tiates, or offers in payment, or receives or 
takes in payment, any bill of exchange or 
order for the payment of any sum of money 
drawn or purporting to be drawn in a for- 
eign country, but payable in the United 
States, until the proper stamp has been af- 
fixed thereto. 

A penalty of fifty dollars is imposed upon 
every person who fraudulently makes use 
of an adhesive stamp to denote the duty re- 
quired by the revenue act, without effectu- 
ally cancelling and obliterating the same in 
the manner required by law. 

Attention is particularly called to the fol- 
lowing extract from section 155, of the act 
of June 30, 1S64, as amended by the act of 
Jnly 13, 1866 : 

"If any person shall wilfully remove or 
cause to be removed, alter or cause to be al- 
tered, the cancelling or defacing marks on 
any adhesive stamp, with intent to use the 
same, or to cause the use of the same, after 
it shall have been used once, or shall know- 
ingly or wilfully sell or buy such washed 
or restored stamps, or offer the same for 
sale, or give or expose the same to any per- 



- 1 



114 



STAMP DUTIES. 



son lor use, or knowingly use the same or 
prepare the same with intent for the fur- 
ther use thereof, or if any person shall 
knowingly and without lawful excuse (the 
proof whereof shall lie on the person accus- 
ed) have in his possession any washed, re- 
stored, or altered stamps, which have heen 
removed from any vellum, parchment, pa- 
per, instrument or writing ; then, and in 
every such case, every person so offending, 
and every person knowingly and wilfully 
aiding, abetting, or assisting in committing 
any such offence as aforesaid, shall, on con- 
viction thereof, * * * be punished by 
a fine not exceeding one thousand dollars, 
or by imprisonment and confinement to 
hard labor not exceeding five years, or both, 
at the discretion of the court." 

It is not lawful to record any instrument, 
document, or paper required by law to be 
stamped, or any copy thereof, unless a 
stamp or stamps of the proper amount have 
been affixed and cancelled in the manner 
required by law ; and such instrument or 
copy and the record thereof are utterly null 
and void, and cannot be used or admitted as 
evidence in any court until the defect has 
been cured as provided in section 158. 

All willful violations of the law should be 
reported to the United States District Attor- 
ney within and for the district where they 
are committed. 

GENERAL REMARKS. 

Revenue stamps may be used indiscrimi- 
nately upon any of the matters or things 
enumerated in Schedule B, except proprie- 
tary and playing card stamps, for which a 
special use has heen provided. 

Postage stamps cannot be used in pay- 
ment of the duty chargeable on instru- 
ments. 

The law does not designate which of the 
parties to an instrument shall furnish the 
necessary stamp, nor does the Commission- 
er of Internal Revenue assume to determine 
that it shall be supplied by one party rather 
than by another ; but if an instrument sub- 
ject to stamp duty is issued without having 
the necessary stamps affixed thereto, it can- 
not be recorded, or admitted, or used in ev- 
idence, in any court, until a legal stamp or 
stamps, denoting the amount of tax, shall 
have been affixed as prescribed by law, and 
the person who thus issues it is liable to a 
penalty, if he omits the stamps with an in- 
tent to evade the provisions of the internal 
revenue act. 

The first act imposing a stamp tax upon 
certain specified instruments took effect, so 
far as said tax is concerned, October 1, 1862. 
The impression which seems to prevail to 
some extent, that no stamps are required 
upon any instruments issued in the States 
lately in insurrection, prior to the surren- 
der, or prior to the establishment of collec- 
tion districts there, is erroneous. 

Instruments issued in those States since 
October 1, 1862. are subject to the same tax- 
es as similar ones issued at the same time 
m the other States. 

No stamp is necessary upon an instrument 
executed prior to October 1, 1862, to make 



it admissible in evidence, or to entitle it to 
record. 

Certificates of loan in which there shall 
appear any written or printed evidence of 
an amount of money to be paid on demand, 
or at a time designated, are subject to stanjp 
duty as "promissory notes." 

When two or more persons join in the ex- 
ecution of an instrument, the stamp to which 
the instrument is liable under the law, may 
be affixed and cancelled by either of them ; 
and "when more than one signature is affix- 
ed to the same paper, one or more stamps 
may be affixed thereto, representing the 
whole amount of the stamp required for 
such signatures." 

No stamp is required on any warrant of 
attorney accompanying a fcond or note, 
when such bond or note has affixed thereto 
the stamp or stamps denoting the duty re- 
quired ; and, whenever any bond or note is 
secured by mortgage, but one stamp duty is 
required on such papers— such stamp duty 
being the highest rate required for such in- 
struments, or either of them. In such case 
a note or memorandum of the value or de- 
nomination of the stamp affixed should be 
made upon the margin or in the acknowl- 
edgement of the instrument which is not 
stamped. 

Particular attention is called to the 
change in section 154, by striking out the 
words "or used ;" the exemption thereun- 
der is thus restricted to documents, &c, 
issued by the officers therein named. Also 
to the changes in sections 152 and 158, by 
inserting the words "and cancelled in the 
manner required by law." 

The acceptor or acceptors of any bill of 
exchange, or order for the payment of any 
sum of money, drawn or purporting to be 
drawn in any foreign country, but payable 
in the United States, must, before paying or 
accepting the same, place thereupon a 
stamp indicating the duty. 

It is only upon conveyances of realty sold 
that conveyance stamps are necessary. A 
deed of real estate made without valuable 
consideration need not be stamped as a 
conveyance; but if it contains covenants, 
such, for instance, as a covenant to warrant 
and defend the title, it should be stamped 
as an agreement or contract. 

When a deed purporting to be a convey- 
ance of realty sold, and stamped according- 
ly, is inoperative, a deed of confirmation, 
made simply to cure the defect, requires no 
stamp. In such case, the second deed 
should contain a recital of the facts, and 
should show the reasons for its execution. 

Partition deeds between tenants in com- 
mon, need not be stamped as conveyances, 
iuasmuch as there is no sale of realty, but 
merely a marking out, or a defining, of the 
boundaries of the part belonging "to each ; 
but where money or other valuable consid- 
eration is paid by one co-tenant to another 
for equality of partition, there is a sale to 
the extent of such consideration, and the 
conveyance, by the party receiving it, 
should be stamped accordingly. 

A conveyance of lands sold for unpaid 
taxes, issued since August 1, 1866, by the 
officers of any county, town, or other mu- 



STAMP DUTIES. 



115 



nicipal corporation in the discharge of their 
strictly official duties, is exempt from 
stamp" tax. 

A conveyance of realty sold, subject to a 
mortgage, should be stamped according to 
the consideration, or the value of the prop- 
erty unencumbered. The consideration in 
such case is to be found by adding the 
amount paid for the equity of redemption 
to the mortgage debt. The fact that one 
part of the consideration is paid to the 
mortgagor and the other part to the mort- 
gagee does not change the liability ot the 
conveyance. 

The" stamp tax upon a mortgage is based 
upon the amount it is given to secure. The 
fact that the value of the property mortgag- 
ed is less than that amount, and that conse- 
quently the security is only partial, does 
not change the liability of the instrument. 
When, therefore, a second mortgage is giv- 
en to secure the payment of a sum of mon- 
ey partially secured by a prior mortgage up- 
on other property, or when two mortgages 
upon separate property are given at the 
same time to secure the payment of the 
same sum, each should be stamped as 
though it were the only one. 

A mortgage given to secure a surety from 
loss, or given for any purpose whatever, 
other than as security for the payment of a 
definite and certain sum of money, is taxa- 
able only as an agreement or contract. 

The stamp duty upon a lease, agreement, 
memorandum, or contract for thehire, use, 
or rent of any land, tenement, or portion 
thereof, is based upon the annual rent or 
rental value of the property leased, and the 
duty is the same whether "the lease be for 
one year, for a term of years, or for the 
fractional part of a year only. 

Upon every assignment or transfer of a 
mortgage, a stamp tax is required equal to 
that imposed upon a mortgage for the 
amount remaining unpaid ; this tax is re- 
quired upon every such transfer in writing, 
whether there is a sale of the mortgage or 
not ; but no stamp is necessary upon the 
endorsement of a negotiable instrument, 
even though the legal effect of such indorse- 
ment is to transfer a mortgage by which 
the instrument is secured. 

An assignment of a lease within the mean- 
ing and intent of Schedule B, is an assign- 
ment of the leasehold, or of some portion 
thereof, by the lessee, or by some person 
claiming by, from, or under him ; such an 
assignment as subrogates the assignee to 
the rights, or some portion of the rights, of 
the lessee, or of the person standing in his 
place. A transfer by the lessor of his part 
of a lease, neither giving nor purporting 
to give a claim to the leasehold, or to any 
part thereof, but simply a right to the rents, 
«fec, is subject to stamp tax as a contract 
or agreement only. 

The stamp tax upon a fire insurance 
policy is based upon the premium. 

Deposit notes taken by a mutual fire in- 
surance company, not as payment of pre- 
mium nor as evidence of indebtedness 
therefor, but to be used simply as a basis 
upon which to make rateable assessments to 
meet the losses incurred by the company, 



should not be reckoned as premium in de- 
termining the amount of stamp taxes upon 
the policies. 

When a policy of insurance properly 
stamped has been issued and lost, no stamp 
is necessary upon another issued by the 
same company to the same party, covering 
the same property, time, &c, and designed 
simply to supply the loss. The second 
policy should recite the loss of the first. 

An instrument which operates as the re- 
newal of a policy of insurance, is subject to 
the same stamp tax as the policy. 

When a policy of insurance is issued for 
a certain time, whether it be for one year 
only or for a term of years, a receipt for 
premium, or any other instrument which 
has the legal effect to continue the contract 
and extend its operation beyond that time, re- 
quires the same amount of revenue stamps 
as the policy itself; but such a receipt as 
is usually given for the payment of the 
monthly, quarterly, or annual premium, is 
not a renewal within the meaning of the 
statute. The payment simply prevents the 
policy from expiring, by reason of non-per- 
formance of its conditions ; a receipt given 
for such a payment requires a two-cent 
stamp, if the amount received exceeds 
twenty dollars, and a two-cent stamp only. 
When, however, the time of payment has 
passed, and a tender of the premium is not 
sufficient to bind the company, but a new 
policy or a new contract in some form, with 
the mutuality essential to every contract, 
becomes necessary between the insurer and 
the insured, the same amount of stamps 
should be used as that required upon the 
original policy. 

A permit issued by a life insurance com- 
pany changing the terms of a policy as to 
travel, residence, occupation, &c, should 
be stamped as a contractor agreement. 

A bill single or a bill obligatory, i. e., an 
instrument in the form of a promissory 
note, under seal, is subject to stamp duty 
as written or printed evidence of an amount 
of money to be paid on demand or at a 
time designated, at the rate of five cents 
for each one hundred dollars or fractional 
part thereof. 

A waiver of protest, or of demand and 
notice, written upon negotiable paper and 
signed by the indorser, is an agreement, 
and requires a five-cent stamp. 

A stamp duty of twenty-five cents is im- 
posed upon the "protest of every note, bill 
of exchange, check or draft," and upon 
every marine protest. If several notes, 
bills of exchange, drafts, &c, are protest- 
ed at the same time and all attached to one 
and the same certificate, stamps should be 
affixed to the amount of twenty-five cents 
for each note, bill, draft, &c, thus protest- 
ed. 

When, as is generally the case, the cap- 
tion to a deposition contains other certifi- 
cates in addition to the jurat to the affida- 
vit of the deponent, such as a certificate 
that the parties were or were not notified, 
that they did or did not appear, that they 
did or did not object, &c, it is subject to 
a stamp duty of five cents. 

When an attested copy of a writ or other 



116 



STAMP DUTIES. 



process is used by a sheriff or other person 
in making personal service, or in attaching 
property, a five-cent stamp should be affix- 
ed to the certificate of attestation. 

A marriage certificate issued by the offi- 
ciating clergyman or magistrate, to be re- 
turned to any officer of a State, county, city, 
town, or other municipal corporation, to 
constitute part of a public record, requires 
no stamp; but if it is to be retained by 
the parties, a five-cent stamp should be af- 
fixed. 

The stamp tax upon a bill of sale, by 
which any ship or vessel, or any part there- 
of, is conveyed to or vested in any other 
person or persons, is at the same rate as 
that imposed upon conveyances of realty 
sold ; a bill of sale of any other personal 
property should be stamped as a contract 
or agreement. 

An assignment of real or personal prop- 
erty, or of both, for the benefit of creditors, 
should be stamped as an agreement or con- 
tract. 

Written or printed assignments of agree- 
ments, bonds, notes not negotiable, and 
of all other instruments the assignments 
of which are not particularly specified in 
the foregoing schedule, should be stamped 
as agreements. 

No stamp is necessary upon the registry 
of a judgment, even though the registry is 
such in its legal effect as to create a lien 
which operates as a mortgage upon the 
property of the judgment debtor. 

When a "power of attorney or proxy for 
voting at any election for officers of any 
incorporated company or society, except 
religious, charitable, or literary societies, 
or public cemeteries," is signed by sever- 
al stockholders, owning separate and dis- 
tinct shares, it is, in its legal effect, the 
separate instrument of each, and requires 
stamps to the amount of ten cents for each 
and every signature ; one or more stamps 
may be used representing the whole amount 
required. 



A notice from landlord to tenant to 
quit possession of premises requires no 
stamp. 

A stamp tax is imposed upon every 
"manifest for custom-house entry or clear- 
ance of the cargo of any ship, vessel, or 
steamer for a foreign port." The amount 
of this tax in each case depends upon the 
registered tonnage of the vessel. 

If a vessel clears in ballast and has no 
cargo whatever, no stamp is necessary; 
but if she has any, however small the amount 
— a stamp should be used. 

A bond to convey real estate requires 
stamps to the amount of twenty-five cents. 

The stamp duty upon the probate of a 
will, or upon letters of administration, is 
based upon the sworn or declared value of 
all the estate and effects, real, personal, 
and mixed, undiminished by the debts of 
the estate for or in respect of which such 
probate or letters are applied for. 

When the property belonging to the es- 
tate of a person deceased, lies under dif- 
ferent jurisdictions and it becomes neces- 
sary to take out letters in two or more 
places, the- letters should be stamped ac- 
cording to the value of all the property, real, 
personal, and mixed, for or in respect of 
which the particular letters in each case 
are issued. 

Letters de bonis non should be stamped 
according to the amount of property re- 
maining to be administered upon thereun- 
der, regardless of the stamps upon the orig- 
inal letters. 

A mere copy of an instrument is not sub- 
ject to stamp duty unless it is a certified 
one, in which case a five-cent stamp should 
be affixed to the certificate of the person 
attesting it ; but when an instrument is 
executed and issued in duplicate, triplicate, 
&c, as in the case of a lease of two or more 
parts, each part has the same legal effect as 
the other, and each should be stamped as 
an original. 



POSTAL RATES AND REGULATIONS. 



117 



POSTAL RATES AND REGULATIONS. 



Letters.— The law requires postage on 
all letters (including those to foreign coun- 
tries when prepaid), excepting those writ- 
tea to the President or Vice President, or 
members of Congress, or (on official busi- 
ness) to the chiefs of the executive depart- 
ments of the Government, and the heads of 
bureaux and chief clerks, and others invest- 
ed with the franking privilege, to be pre- 
paid by stamps or stamped envelopes, pre- 
payment in money being prohibited. 

All drop-letters must be prepaid. The 
rate of postage on drop-letters, at offices 
where free delivery by carrier is establish- 
ed, is two cents per half ounce or fraction 
of a half ounce ; at offices where such free 
delivery is not established the rate is one 
cent. 

The single rate of postage on all domes- 
tic mail letters throughout the United 
State.-', is three cents per half ounce, with 
an additional rate of three cents for each 
additional half ounce or fraction of a half 
ounce. The ten cent (Pacific) rate is abol- 
ished. 

Newspapers, etc. — Letter postage is to 
be charged on all handbills, circulars, or 
other printed matter which shall contain 
any manuscript writing whatever. 

Daguerreotypes, when sent in the mail, 
are to be charged with letter postage by 
weight. 

Photographs on cards, paper, and other 
flexible material, (not in cases), can be sent 
at the same rate as miscellaneous printed 
matter, viz., two cents for each four ounces 
or fraction thereof. 

Photograph Albums are chargeable with 
book postage — four cents for each four 
ounces or fraction thereof. 

Newspaper Postage.— Postage on daily 
papers to subscribers when prepaid quar- 
terly or yearly in advance, either at the 
mailing office or office of delivery, per 
quarter (three months), 35 cts. ; six times 
per week, per quarter 30 cts. ; for tri-week- 
ly, per quarter 15 cts. ; for semi-weekly, per 
quarter 10 cts, ; for weekly, per quarter 5 
cents. 

Weekly newspapers (one copy only) sent 
by the publisher to actual subscribers with- 
in the county where printed and published, 
tree. 



Postage per quarter (to be paid quarterly 
or yearly in advance) on newspapers and 
periodicals issued less frequently than once 
a week, sent to actual subscribers in any 
part of the United States: Semi-monthly, 
not over 4 oz., 6 cts. ; over 4 oz. and not 
over 8 oz., 13 cts. ; over 8 oz. and not over 
12 oz., 18 cts. ; monthly, not over 4 oz., 3 cts ; 
over 4 oz. and not over 8 oz., 6 cts. : over 8 
oz. and not over 12 oz., 9 cts. ; quarterly, 
not over 4 oz., lcent; over4oz. and not 
over 8 oz., 2 cts. ; over S oz. and not over 
12 oz., 3 cts. 

Transient Matter.— Books not over 4 
oz. in weight, to one address, 4 cts. ; over 4 
oz. and not over 8 oz., 8 cts. ; over S oz. and 
not over 12 oz., 12 cts. ; over 12 oz. and not 
over 16 oz., 16 cts. 

Circulars not exceeding three in number 
to one address, 2 cts. ; over 3 and not over 
6, 4 cts. ; over 6 and not over 9, 6 cts. ; over 
9 and not exceeding 12, 8 cts. 

On miscellaneous mailable matter, (em- 
bracing all pamphlets, occasional publica- 
tions, transient newspapers, hand-bills and 
posters, book manuscripts and proof-sheets, 
whether corrected or not, maps, prints, en- 
gravings, sheet music, blanks, flexible pat- 
terns, samples, and sample cards, phono- 
graphic paper, letter envelopes, postal en- 
velopes or wrappers, cards, paper, plain or 
ornamental, photographic representations 
of different types, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, 
roots and scions,) the postage to be pre-paid 
by stamps, is on one package, to one ad- 
dress, not over 4 oz. in weight, 2 cts. ; over 
4 oz. and not over 8 oz., 4 cts. ; over 8 oz. 
and not over 12 oz., 6 cts.; over 12 oz. and 
not over 16 oz., 8 cts. The weight of pack- 
ages of seeds, cuttings, roots and scions, 
to be franked, is limited to thirty-two 
ounces. 

[All printed matter (except single cop- 
ies of newspapers, magazines, and periodi- 
cals to regular subscribers) sent via over- 
land mail, is to be charged at letter post- 
age rates.] 

Any word or communication, whether by 
printing, writing, marks or signs, upon the 
cover or wrapper of a newspaper, pamphlet, 
magazine, or" other printed matter, other 
than the name or address of the person to 
whom it is to be sent, and the date when 
the subscription expires, subjects the pack- 
age to letter postage. 



POSTAL RATES AND REGULATIONS. 



S 
o 

a 




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V 


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a 

03 


is 


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10 


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03 
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rC 0*J tn 

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Sj: .2 






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03 



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03 t> £._S O 

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03 03 H 



POSTAL RATES AND REGULATIONS. 



119 



Additional Table of Foreign Postage. 

The * indicates that, unless the letter is registered, pre-payment is optional; in all 
other ca*es it s required. § Pamphlets and Periodicals, ten cents per four ounces or 
fraction thereof ' Tfamphlets, Magazines, &c.,two cents per four ounces or fraction 
thereof. 



COUNTRIES. 



Acapulco • "•• vy Vr* 

Argentine Republic, 23d eachmonth from Is. Y. 

Aspinwall • • 

Australia, British Mail, via Panama. . . ... . . 

Bahamas, by direct steamer from New York. .. 
Bogota, New Granada 



Letters. 



Koz %oz 



IS 



Bolivia. . 

Brazils. 22d each month from New York. . .. . . . . 

Buenos Ayres, 22d each month from:New York. 
Canada, any distance, (if not prepaid, 10 cts.).. . 
Central America, Pacific Slope, via Panama .... 

Chili, British Mail, via Panama 

China, via San Francisco 

Costa Rica 



Cuba • ■ 

Ecuador, British Mail, via Panama. 
Guatemala 



18 



Havana . 



Honduras 

Hong Kong, via San Francisco 

Japan, via San Francisco 

Mexico • •• ■ i-r^- 

Montevideo, 22d each month from N. Y. . ... ... . 

Nassau, N. Prov., by direct steamer from N. Y.. 

New Brunswick •••• •••■■• 

Newfoundland, (15 c. if over 8,000 miles) 

New Granada, (except Aspinwalland Panama).. 
Nicaragua, Pacific Slope, via Panama 

do Gulf Coast of • - • • 

Novia Scotia (* 15 cts. if over 3.000 miles) 

Panama 

Peru, British Mail, via Panama 

Porto Rico, Bri'sh Mail, via Havana or San Juan. 

Prince Edward's Island, [under 3,000 miles] 

Sandwich Islands, by mail to San Francisco 

Turk's Island • ■ • ■ ■ • • • • - • • • • 

Uruguay, by Am. pkt. 22d each month from N. 1 . . 

Vancouver's Island ■ • 

Venezuela, British Mail, via Aspmwall 

do by American Ven. packet 



18 



k 5 " a, 



18 



10 

25 

10 

32 

5 
18 

34 

*10 
25 

* 6 
10 
34 
10 
10 
10 
34 
10 
10 
34 
10 
10 
10 
25 
5 

no 

10 
18 
10 

u 

=10 

10 
34 
18 
*10 
10 
10 
25 
10 
18 
10 



packets — 

1. Must contain no writing. 

2. Must be fully prepaid (6 cents per 4 ounces from the U. S., or 3 pence sterling from 
Great Britain.) 

3 Must be open at the ends to allow inspection. 

Samples of merchandise must not be of intrinsic value. 

-r, ■ -ui -*-.i„ = k™t.-= mnair &c sent from Great Britain to the United States, 

muS^^goTl«'^^*S^X ^^^^ a ^° n b0 ° kS aDd 
engravings, 25 per cent.; music and photographs, X) per cenr. 

f i™ „„r,t tr. Ttiiiv are not prepaid, or are insufficiently paid, they will 
be'chS SdSSASS^S M C fine, on arrival at their destination. < 



120 RVLES FOB DETECTING CO UNTEEFEIT BANK NO TES. 



Infallible Rules for Detecting Counterfeit or 
Spurious Bank Notes. 



Rule 1st.— Examine the shading of the 
letters in title of Bank called lathewobk, 
which in genuine notes presents an even, 
straight, light and silky appearance, gen- 
erally so flue and smooth as to appear to be 
all in one solid, pale body. In the counter- 
feit the lines are coarse and irregular, and 
in many of the longer lines breaks will be 
perceived, thus presenting a very inferior 
finish in comparison to genuine work. 

2d.— Observe the dies, circles and ovals 
in the genuine; they are composed of a 
network of lines, which, by crossing each 
other at certain angles, produce an endless 
variety of figures ; see thk one cent stamp 
attached. The fine line alone is the 
unit which enables you to detect spurious 
work. In the counterfeit, the represented 
white lines are coarse, irregular, and cross 
each other in a confused, irregular manner, 
thus producing blurred and imperfect 
figures. 

3d.— Examine the form and features of 
all human figures on the note. In the gen- 
uine, the texture of the skin is represented 
by fine dots and lines intermixed. In the 
eyes, the pupil is distinctly visible, and the 
white clearly seen ; the nose, mouth and 
chin, well formed, natural and expressive ; 
the lips are slightly pouting, and the chin 
well thrown out ; and the delicate shading 
of the'neck perfectly harmonizes with the 
rest of the figure. Observe the fingers and 
toes ; they should be clearly and accurately 
defined. The hair of the head should show 
the fine strands and present a natural ap- 
pearance. The folds of the drapery of hu- 
man figures should lay natural and present 
a tine, finished appearance. In the counter- 
feit the female figure does not bear the 
natural prominence in outlines ; observe, 
the eyes and shading surrounding does not 
present the lifelike appearance it should. 
The finders and toes are not properly and 
proportionately defined ; the hair does not 
hear that soft and finished appearance as in 
the genuine. 

4th. — Examine the imprint or engraver's 
names in the evenness and shape of the 



fine letters. Counterfeits never bear the 
imprint perfect. This rule should be strict- 
ly observed, as it is infallible in detecting 
counterfeits. 

5th.— In the genuine note the landscapes 
are well finished • trees and shrubs are 
neatly drawn ; the limbs well proportioned, 
and the foliage presenting a fine natural 
appearance ; clear sky is formed of fine 
parallel lines, and when clouds or heavy 
skies appear, they cross each other, and 
bear a soft, smooth and natural appear- 
ance. The perspective, showing a view of 
the surrounding, country, is always clear 
and distinct. The small figures in the 
background are always plainly seen, and 
their outlines and general character re- 
cognized. Ships are well defined and the 
canvass has a clear texture ; railroad cars 
are very accurately delineated : in examin- 
ing a train observe carefully the car most 
distant. In the counterfeit the landscape 
is usually poorly executed ; the leaves of 
trees poorly and unnaturally defined. — 
The lines representing still water are 
scratchy rather than parallel, the sky is 
represented generally in like manner, and 
where rolling clouds are to be seen, the 
unnatural effect is obvious. Domestic 
animals are generally poorly executed, 
particularly the head and limbs ; the eyes 
are seldom clearly defined. Ships are 
poorly drawn, the texture of the canvass 
coarse and inferior in style of workman- 
ship, thus giving an artificial appearance. 
Railroad cars are also poorly executed ; the 
car farthest from the eye is usually the 
most imperfect. The perspective is always 
imperfect, the figures in the background 
can seldom be recognized. 

6th.— Bills altered from a smaller to a 
higher denomination, can readily be de- 
tected by a close observer, in consequence 
of the striking difference between the parts 
which have been extracted and the rest of 
the note. This difference is readily per- 
ceived in the lack of color, body and'finish 
of the dye; we have seen bills where the 
surrounding shading in altered dies waB 



HOW TO SUCCEED IN BUSINESS. 



121 



too dark, but from the back or finish of the 
white hues you have a sure test. Again 
observe particularly the words "Five" or 
■• Ten Dollars " as the case may be, denot- 
in" the denomination of the note ; the 
parallel outlines and shading (if any) are 
coarse and imperfect. Alterations are fre- 
quently made by pasting a greater denomi- 
nation over a smaller, but by holding the 
bill up to the light, the fraud will be per- 
ceived Another method resorted to is to 
cut out the figures in the dies as well as 
the words one "dollar, or the words two or 
three as the case may be, and with a sharp 
eraser, scrape down the ends and also the 
ed^es of the pieces to be inserted ; when 
the pieces thus prepared are affixed they 
are hardly perceivable ; but by passing 
the note through the hand, so as to feel 
the die both with the finger and thumb 
at the same time, the fraud will be de- 
tected by the stiffness of the outer 
ed"es " occasioned by the gum or method 
adopted" in affixing the parts. The letter 
S should always be examined, as m many 
alterations it is pasted or stamped at the 
end of the word ft dollar;" and even when 
stamped there, the carrying out of the out- 
lines for its shading will readily show the 
fraud Bills of broken banks are frequent- 
ly altered by extracting the name of bank, 
state and town ; they may readily be de- 



tected by observing first the state, second 
the title or name of the bank, third the 
town or location. 

General Remarks in Reference to 
Counterfeits.— The paper on which they 
are printed is generally of a very inferior 
quality, with less body, finish and tough- 
ness than bank note paper has. The ink 
o-enerally lacks the rich luster of the gen- 
uine ; the red letters and figures are gen- 
erally imperfect, and the ink does not pre- 
sent the vermillion hue as it should. The 
printing is generally inferior, usually ex- 
hibiting specks of white in the most promi- 
nent letters. The date and filling up, and 
the President's and Cashier's names are 
o-enerally written by the same person, 
although in many instances they present 
a different appearance. There are bills in 
circulation bearing either genuine dies or 
vignettes ; but upon close examination 
you will be enabled to detect any spurious 
bill, whether counterfeit or altered, by the 
instructions here given, if persevered in tor 
a short time. We beg to suggest, it time 
will admit, the learner should examine 
minutely every bill he receives. A pow- 
erful pocket magnifying glass, which can 
be purchased for from fifty cents to one dol- 
lar at any of the opticians, will greatly en- 
able you to see and comprehend the differ- 
ence between genuine and spurious work. 



-♦-►-*- 



HOW TO SUCCEED IK BUSINESS. 



What will my readers give to know how 
to o-et rich ? Now, I will not vouch that 
the" following rules will enable every per- 
son who may read them to acquire wealth ; 
but this I will answer for, that if ever a 
man does grow rich by honest means, and 
retains his wealth for any length of time 
he must practice upon the principles laid 
down in the following essay. The re- 
marks are not original with me, but l 
strongly commend them to the attention 
of every young man, at least as atlordtng 
the true secret of success in attaining 
wealth ^ single perusal of such an essay 
at an impressible moment, has sometimes 
a very wonderful effect upon the disposi- 
tion and character. ,. 
Fortune, they say, is a fickle dame-lWi 
of her freaks and caprices ; who blindly 
distributes her favors without the slisrntesi 
discrimination. So inconstant, so waver- 
ing is she represented, that her most faith- 
ful votaries can place no reliance on her 
promises. Disappointment they tell us 
is the lot of those who make oftenngs at 



her shrine. Now, all this is a vile slander 
upon the dear blind lady. 

Although wealth often appears the result 
of mere accident, or a fortunate concur- 
rence of favorable circumstances without 
any exertion of skill or foresight, yet any 
man of souud health and unimpaired mmd 
may become wealthy, if he takes the prop- 

GT ^tGDS 

Foremost in the list of requisites are 
honesty and strict integrity in every trans- 
action of life. Let a man have the reputa- 
tion of being fair and upright in his deal- 
ings and he will possess the confidence of 
alf who know him. Without these qualities 
every other merit will prove unavailing. 
Ask concerning a man, " Is he active and 
capable ? " Yes. " Industrious, temper- 
ate and regular in his habits ? "-Oh yes. 
"Is he honest? Is he trustworthy?" 
Why as to that, I am sorry to say that he 
is not to be trusted ; he needs v atehing ; 
he is a little tricky, and will take an undue 
advantage, if he can. "Then I will h;,ve 
nothing to do with him," will be the in- 



122 



HOW TO SUCCEED IN BUSINESS. 



variable reply. Why, then, is honesty the 
best policy ? Because, without it, you will 
get a bad name, and everybody will shun 
you. 

A character for knavery will prove an in- 
surmountable obstacle to success in al- 
most every undertaking. It will be found 
that the straight line is, in business, as in 
geometry, the shortest. In a word, it is 
almost impossible for a dishonest man to 
acquire wealth by a regular process of bus- 
iness, because he is shunned as a depreda- 
tor upon society. 

Needy men are apt to deviate from the 
rule of integrity, under the plea that ne- 
cessity knows no law ; they rnii*ht as well 
add that it knows no shame. The course 
is suicidal, and by destroying all confidence, 
ever keeps them immured in poverty, 
although they may possess every other 
quality for success in the world. 

Punctuality, which is said to be the soul 
of business, is another important element 
in the art of money getting. The man 
known to be scrupulously exact in the ful- 
fillment of his engagements, gains the 
confidence of all, and may command all 
the means he can use with advantage ; 
whereas, a man careless and regardless of 
his promises in money matters will have 
every purse closed against him. Therefore 
be prompt in your payments. 

Next, let us consider the advantages of 
a cautious circumspection in our inter- 
course with the world. Slowness of be- 
lief and a proper distrust are essential to 
success. The credulous and confiding are 
ever the dupes of knaves and impostors. 
Ask those who have lost their property 
how it happened, and you will find in 
most cases that it has been owing to mis- 
placed confidence. One has lost by en- 
dorsing, another by crediting, another 
by false representations ; all of which a 
little more foresight and a little more dis- 
trust would have prevented. In the af- 
fairs of this world men are not saved by 
faith, but by the want of it. 

Judge of men by what they do, not by 
what they say. Believe in looks rather 
than words. Observe all their movements. 
Ascertain their motives and their ends. 
Notice what they say or do in their un- 
guarded moments, wSien under the influ- 
ence of excitement. The passions have 
been compared to tortures which force men 
to reveal Their secrets. Before trusting a 
man, before putting it in his power to 
cause you a loss, possess yourself of every 
available information relative to him. 
Learn his history, his habits, inclinations 
and propensities ; his reputation for honor, 
industry, frugality and punctuality; his 
prospects, resources, supports, advantages 
and disadvantages ; his intentions and mo- 
tives of action; who are his friends and 
enemies, and what are his good or bad qual- 
ities. You may learn a man's good qualities 
and advantages from his friends— his bad 
qualities and disadvantages from his ene- 
mies. Make due allowance for exaggeration 
m both. Finally, examine carefully before 
engaging m anything, and act with energy 
afterwards. Have the hundred eyes of 



Argus beforehand, and the hundred hands 
of Briarius afterwards. 

Order and system in the management of 
business must not be neglected. Nothing 
contributes more to dispatch. Have a 
place for everything and everything in its 
place ; a time for everything, and every- 
thing in its time. Do first what presses 
most, and having determined what is to be 
done, and how it is to be done, lose no 
time in doing it. Without this method all 
is hurry and confusion, little or nothing is 
accomplished, and business is attended to 
with neither pleasure nor profit. 

A polite, affable deportment is recom- 
mended. Agreeable manners contribute 
powerfully to a man's success. Take two 
men, possessing equal advantages in every 
other respect, but let one be gentlemanly, 
kind, obliging and conciliating in his man- 
ners ; the other harsh, rude ana disobliging; 
and the one will become rich, while the 
other will starve. 

We are now to consider a very important 
principle in the business of money-getting, 
namely — Industry — persevering, indefati- 
gable attention to business. Persevering 
diligence is the Philosopher's stone, which 
turns everything to gold. Constant, regu- 
lar, habitual and systematic application to 
business, must in time, it properly directed, 
produce great results. It must lead to 
wealth, with the same certainty that pov- 
erty follows in the train of idleness and 
inattention. It has been truly remarked 
that he who follows his amusements in- 
stead of his business, will, in a short time, 
have no business to follow. 

The art of money-saving is an important 
part of the art of money-getting. Without 
frugality no one can become rich ; with it, 
few would be poor. Those who consume 
as fast as they produce, are on the road to 
ruin. As most of the poverty we meet 
with grows out of idleness and extrava- 
gance, so most large fortunes have been 
the result of habitual industry and frugali- 
ty. The practice of economy is as neces- 
sary in the expenditure of time as of 
money. They say if " we take care of the 
pence the pounds will take care of them- 
selves." So. if we take care of the 
minutes, the days will take care of them- 
selves. 

The acquisition of wealth demands as 
much self-denial, and as many sacrifices 
of present gratification, as the practice of 
virtue itselfT Vice and poverty proceed, in 
some degree, from the same sources, 
namely — the disposition to sacrifice the 
future to the present ; the inability to fore- 
go a small present pleasure for great future 
advantages. Men fail of fortune in this 
world, as they fail of happiness in the 
world to come, simply because they are un- 
willing to deny themselves momentary en- 
joyments for the sake of permanent future 
happiness. 

Every large city is filled with persons, 
who, in order to support the appearance of 
wealth, constantly live beyond their in- 
come, and make up the deficiency by 
contracting debts which are never paid. 
Others, there are, the mere drones of so- 



OXOXDA OA CO UNTY B VSINESS DIRECTOR Y. 



123 









TTJLLY, 1ST. Y 





% 



Manufacturer of 



TIN, COPPER 

And Sheet Iron Ware. 



DEALER IN 



COOK k PARLOR STOVES, 

Of the most approved patterns, for Coal or Wood. 

Nails, Shelf Hardware. House Furnishing Goods, Clocks, Looking Glasses, Window 

Glass, Table Gla-s Ware, Lamps. Fruit Jars, and 1647 Rogers 

Brothers A 1 Silver Plated ware. 

Yankee Notions in Great Variety, 

AT WHOLESALE OR RETAIL. Exclusive agent for the sale of the 

celebrated 

Ventilator & Empire Gas Burner Heating Stoves, 




AND THE 







Olive Branch 

COOKINCtSTQVE 



This Stove has taken 
the First Premium at the 
New York State Fair, and 
First Premium, a Silver 
Medal, at the Illinois State 
Fair; and also Premiums * 
at several County Fairs 
throughout the country. 

Agent* for the Binghamton Scale Co's Scales. 
Price Lists of Tin Ware sent to Mer- 
chants on application. 



124 ONONDA OA CO UNTT B UaiNESS BISECTOR Y. 



Edwin A. Bennett, 

Would most respectfully inform his friends, and all others throughout the city and coun- 
ty, who are in want, of boots and shoes at a bargain, that he still continues the Boot and 
Shoe Business at his widely known and popular staad, 

64 South Salina Street, 

Where he is resolved to maintain the advanced position which he holds in the Trade 
above all competing Houses, lie is determined 

NOT TO BE UNDERSOLD, 

And at the present crisis has reduced the price of goods to the lowest possible figure,— 
offering CHOICE GOODS, fresh from the best Manufacturers, 

At Prices Current in I860. 

HIS GENTLEMEN'S DEPARTMENT 

CONSISTS OF 

Genii Fine French Calf Boots and Shoes. 
Gents' Serge Congress and Oxford Ties. 
Gents' Patent Leather Boots and Pump Strap Tie. 
Gents' Slippers of all kinds. 
Gents' Calf Box Toe Boots and Shoes. 
Bogs' Calf Kip and Stoga Boots and Shoes. 
Bogs mid Vot'th's Calf Foxed Box Toe Balmoral and Congress. 
Bogs' and Youth's Patent Leather Pump Strap Ties and Slip- 
pers. 
Bogs' and Youth's Patent Leather Boots and Opera Slips. 
Ladies' Goat Button Polish, in colors. 
Ladies' Oil Goat Button and Lace Polish. 
Ladies' Calf Kid. Button and Lace Polish. 
Ladies' Serge Button and Lace Polish. 
Ladies' Serge Congress and Side Lace Gaiters. 
Ladies' White Kid and Satin, Side Lace Gaiters and Slippers. 
Ladies' Red, Blue and Bronze Goat Slippers. 
Also Misses, in Colors. 

Mr. Bennett pays particular attention to the Children's Department, and keeps con- 
stantly on hand a very large assortment of Children's aud Infants' shoes of all kinds,— 
black and in colors. 

His compliments to all, inviting them to call and examine his stock, and purchase 
ol him, thereby saving 26 per cent." REMEMBER 

O-Jt S. 8ALINA STREET, 

SYRACUSE, 1ST. Y. 



HOW TO SECURE THE PUBLIC LANDS. 



125 



ciety, who pass their days in idleness, and 
subsist by pirating on the hives of the in- 
dustrious. Many who run a short-lived 
career of splendid beggary, could they be 
but persuaded to adopt a system of rigid 
economy for a few years, mi^ht pass the 
remainder of their days in affluence. But 
no ! They must keep up appearances, 
they must live like other folks. 

Their debt9 accumulate; their credit 
fails; they are harassed by duns, and be- 
sieged by constables and sheriff. In this 
extremity, as a last resort, they submit to 
a shameful dependence, or engage in crim- 
inal practices which entail hopeless wretch- 
edness and infamy on themselves and 
families. 



Stick to the business in which you are 
regularly employed. Let speculators make 
thousands in a year or a day ; mind your 
own regular trade, never turning from it 
to the right hand or to the left. If you are 
a merchant, a professional man, or a me- 
chanic, never buy lots or stocks, unless 
you have surplus money which you wish 
to invest. Your own business you under- 
stand as well as other men ; but other peo- 
ple's business you do not understand. 
Let your business be some one which is 
useful to the community. All such occu- 
pations possess the elements of profit in 
themselves. 



How to Secure the Public Lands, 

OR THE ENTRY OF THE SAME UNDER THE PRE-EMPTION AND HOMESTEAD 

LAWS. 



The following circular gives all necessary 
information as to the procedure necessary 
in purchasing and securing the public 
lands : 

Department op the Interior, ) 

Ges'i Land Office, July 19, 1863. ) 

Numerous questions having arisen as to 
the mode of procedure to purchase public 
lands, or acquire title to the same by bounty 
land locations, by pre-emptions or by home- 
stead, this circular is communicated for the 
information of all concerned. 

In order to acquire title to public lands 
the following steps must be taken : 

1. Application must be made to the Reg- 
ister of the district land office in which the 
land desired may be situated. 

A list of all the land offices in the United 
States is furnished by the Department, 
with the seats of the different offices, 
where it is the duty of the Register and 
Receiver to be in attendance, and give 
proper facilities and information to persons 
desirous of obtaining lands. 

The minimum price of ordinary public 
lands is $1,35 per acre. The even or re- 
served sections falling within railroad 
grants are increased to double the minimum 
price, being §3,50 per acre. 

Lands once offered at public sale, and not 
afterwards kept out of market by reserva- 
tion, or otherwise, so as to prevent free 
competition, may be entered or located. 

3. By the applicant filing with the Regis- 
ter his written application describing the 
H 



tract, with its area ; the Register will then 
certify to the receiver whether the land is 
vacant, with its price; and when found to. 
be so, the applicant must pay that price- 
per acre, or may locate the same with land 
warrant, and thereafter the Receiver will 
give him a " duplicate receipt," which he 
is required to surrender previous to the 
delivery to him of the patent, which may 
be had either by application for it to the 
Register or to the General Land Office. 

3. If the tract has not been offered at 
public sale it is not liable to ordinary pri- 
vate entry, but may be secured by a party 
legally qualified, upon his compliance with 
the requirements of the pre-emption laws 
of 4th September, 1S41, and 3d March, 1843; 
and after such party shall have made ac- 
tual settlement for such a length of time 
as will show he designs it for his perma- 
nent home, and is acting in good faith, 
building a house and residing therein, he 
may proceed to the district land office, es- 
tablish his pre-emption claim according to 
law, by proving his actual residence, and 
cultivation, and showing that he is other- 
wise within the purview of these acts. — 
Then he can enter the land at $1,35, either 
in cash or with bounty land warrant, unless 
the premises should be $3,50 acre lands. 
In that case the whole purchase-money can 
be paid in cash, or one-half in cash, the 
residue with a bounty land warrant. 

4. But if parties legally qualified desire 
to obtain title under the Homestead Act 
of 30th May, 1863, they can do so on com- 



126 



LAW MAXIMS. 



plying with the Department Circular, dated 
30th October, 1862. 

5 The law confines Homestead entries 
to surveyed lands ; and although, in cer- 
tain States and Territories noted in the sub- 
joined list, pre-emptors may go on land be- 
fore survey, yet they can only establish their 
claim after return of survey, but must file 
their pre-emption declaration within three 
months after receipt of official plat, at the 
local land-office where the settlement was 
made before survey. Where, however, it 
was made after survey, the claimant must 
file within three months after date of set- 
tlement; and where actual residence and 
cultivation have been long enough to show 



that the claimant has made the land his 
permanent home, he can establish his 
claim and pay for the same at any time 
before the date of the public sale of lands 
within the range in which his settlement 
may fall. 

6. All unoffered surveyed lands not ac- 
quired under pre-emption, homestead, or 
otherwise, under express legal sanction, 
must be offered at public sale under the 
President's Proclamation, and struck off to 
the highest bidder, as required by act of 
April 24, 1820. 

J. M. EDMUNDS. 
Commissioner General Land Office. 



LAW MAXIMS. 



1. A promise of a debtor to give "satis- 
factory security" for the payment of a por- 
tion of his debt, is a sufficient considera- 
tion for a release of the residue by his 
creditor. 

2. Administrators are liable to account 
for interest on funds in their hands, al- 
though no profit shall have been made 
upon them, unless the exigencies of the 
estate rendered it prudent that they should 
hold the funds thus uninvested. 

3. Any person who voluntarily becomes 
an agent for another, and in that capacity 
obtains information to which as a stranger 
he could have had no access, is bound in 
subsequent dealing with his principal, as 
purchaser of the property that formed the 
subject of his agency, to communicate such 
information. 

4. When a house is rendered untenanta- 
ble in consequence of improvements made 
on the adjoining lot, the owner of such 
cannot recover damages, because it is pre- 
sumed that he had knowledge of the ap- 
proaching danger in time to protect him- 
self from it. 

5. When a merchant ship is abandoned 
by order of the master, for the purpose of 
saving life, and a part of the crew subse- 
quently meet the vessel so abandoned and 
bring her safe into port, they will be enti- 
tled to salvage. 

6. A person who has been led to sell 
goods by means of false pretenses, cannot 
recover them from one who has purchased 
them in good faith from the fraudulent 
vendor. 



7. An agreement by the holder of a note 
to give the principal debtor time for pay- 
ment, without depriving himself of the 
right to sue, does not discharge the surety. 

8. A seller of goods who accepts, at the 
time of sale, the note of a third party, not 
endorsed by the buyer, in payment, can- 
not in case the note is not paid, hold the 
buyer responsible for the value of the 
goods. 

9. A day-book copied from a "blotter" 
in which charges are first made, will not 
be received kfevidence as a book of origi- 
nal entries. 

10. Common carriers are not liable for 
extraordinary results of negligence that 
could not have been foreseen by ordinary 
skill and foresight. 

11. A bidder at a Sheriff's sale may re- 
tract his bid at any time before the prop- 
erty is knocked down to him, whatever 
may be the conditions of the sale. 

12. Acknowledgment of debt to a stran- 
ger does not preclude the operation of the 
statute. 

13. The fruits and grass on the farm 
or garden of an intestate descend to the 
heir. 

14. Agents are solely liable to their prin- 
cipals. 

15. A deposit of money in bank by a hus- 
band, in the name of his wife, survives to 
her. 



LA W MAXIMS. 



127 



16. Money paid on Sunday contracts may 
be recovered. 

17. A debtor may give preference to one 
creditor overanother, unless fraud or special 
legislation can be proved. 

18. A court cannot give judgment for a 
larger sum than that specified in the ver- 
dict. 

19. Imbecility on the part of either 
husband or wife, invalidates the mar- 
riage. 

20. An action for malicious prosecution 
will lie, though nothing further was done 
than suing out warrants. 

21. An agreement not to continue the 
practice of a profession or business in any 
specified town, if the party so agreeing has 
received a consideration for the same, is 
valid. 

22. When A consigns goods to B to sell 
on commission, and B delivers them to C, 
in payment of his own antecedent debts, A 
can recover their value. 

23. A finder of property is compelled to 
make diligent inquiry for the owner there- 
of, and to restore the same. If, on finding 
Buch property, he attempts to conceal such 
fact, he may be prosecuted for larceny. 

24. A private person may obtain an in- 
junction to prevent a public mischief by 
which he is affected in common with others. 

23. Any person interested may obtain an 
injunction to restrain the State or a munici- 
pal corporation from maintaining a nuisance 
on its lands. 

26. A discharge under the insolvent laws 
of one State will not discharge the insol- 
vent from a contract made with a citizen of 
another State. 

27. To prosecute a party with any other 
motive than to bring him to justice, is 
malicious prosecution, and actionable as 
such. 

28. Ministers of the gospel, residing in 
any incorporated town, are not exempt 
from jury, military, or fire service. 

29. When a person contracts to build a 
house, and is prevented by sickness from 
finishing it, he can recover for the part per- 
formed, if such part is beneficial to the 
other party. 

30. In a suit for enticing away a man's 
wife, actual proof ofthe marriage is not ne- 
cessary. Cohabitation, reputation, and the 
admission of marriage by the parties, are 
sufficient. 

31. Permanent erections and fixtures, 
made by a mortgagor after the execution of 
the mortgage upon land conveyed by it, be- 
come a part of the mortgaged premises. 

32. When a marriage is denied, and plain- 
tiff has given sufficient evidence to estab- 
lish it, the defendant cannot examine the 
wife to disprove the marriage. 



33. The amount of an express debt can- 
not be enlarged by application. 

34. Contracts for advertisements in Sun- 
day newspapers cannot be enforced. 

33. A seller of goods, chattels, or other 
property, commits no fraud, in law, when 
he neglects to tell the purchaser of any 
flaws, defects, or unsoundness in the same. 

36. The opinions of witnesses, as to the 
value of a dog that has been killed, are not 
admissible in evidence. The value of the 
animal is to be decided by the jury. 

37. If any person puts a fence on or plows 
the land of another, he is liable for trespass 
whether the owner has sustained injury or 
not. 

38. If a person, who is unable from ill- 
ness to sign his will, has his hand guided 
in making his mark, the signature is valid. 

39. When land trespassed upon is occu- 
pied by a tenant, he alone can bring the 
action. 

40. To say of a person, "If he does not 
come and make terms with me, I will make 
a bankrupt of him and ruin him," or any 
such threatening: language, is actionable, 
without proof of special damage. 

41. In an action for slander, the party 
making the complaint must prove the words 
alleged; other words of like meaning will 
not suffice. 

42. In a suit of damages for seduction, 
proof of pregnancy, and the birth of a child, 
is not essential. It is sufficient if the ill- 
ness of the girl, whereby she was unable to 
labor, was produced by shame for the seduc- 
tion ; and this is such a loss of service as 
will sustain the action. 

43. Addressing to a wife a letter contain- 
ing matter defamatory to the character of 
her husband is a publication, and renders 
the writer amenable to damages. 

44. A parent cannot sustain an action for 
any wrong done to a child, unless he has in- 
curred some direct pecuniary injury there- 
from in consequence of some loss of ser- 
vice or expenses necessarily consequent 
thereupon. 

45. A master is responsible for an injury 
resulting from the negligence of his ser- 
vant, whilst driving his cart or carriage, 
provided the servant is at the time engaged 
in his master's business, even though the 
accident happens in a place to which his 
master's business does not call him ; but if 
the journey of a servant be solely for a pur- 
pose of his own, and undertaken without 
the knowledge and consent of his master, 
the latter is hot responsible. i 

46. An emigrant depot is not a nuisance 
in law. 

47. A railroad track through the streets is 
not a nuisance in law. 



128 



LA W MAXIMS. 



48 In an action for libel against a news- 
naDer extracts from such newspaper may 
Even to show its circulation, and the 
extent to which the libel has been published. 
The jury, in estimating the damages, are 
to look at the character of the libel, and 
whether the defendant is rich or poor. 1 he 
plaintiff is entitled, in all cases, to his ac- 
tual damages, and should be compensated 
for the mental sufferings endured, the pub- 
lic disgrace inflicted, and all actual discom- 
fort produced. 

40 Delivery of a husband's goods by a 
wife to her adulterer, he having knowledge 
that she has taken them without her hus- 
band's authority, is sufficient to sustain an 
indictment for larceny against the adul- 
terer. 

50 The fact that the insurer was not in- 
formed of the existence of impending liti- 
gation, affecting the premises insured, at 
the time the insurance was effected, does 
not vitiate the policy. 

51. The liability of an innkeeper is not 
confined to personal baggage, but extends 
to all the property of the guest that he con- 
sents to receive. 

52. When a minor executes a contract, 
and pays money, or delivers property on the 
same, he cannot afterwards disaffirm such 
contract and recover the money, or prop- 
erty, unless he restores to the other party 
the consideration received from him for 
such money or property. 

53. When a person has, by legal inquisi- 
tion been found an habitual drunkard, he 
cannot, even in his sober- intervals, make 
contracts to bind himself or his property, 
until the inquisition is removed. 

54. Any person dealing with the repre- 
sentative of a deceased person, is presumed, 
in law, to be fully apprized of the extent of 
such representative's authority to act in 
behalf of such estate. 

55. In an action against a railroad com- 
pany, by a passenger, to recover damages 
for injuries sustained on the road, it is not 
compulsory upon the plaintiff to prove ac- 
tual negligence m the defendants ; but it 
is obligatory on the part of the latter to 
prove that the injury was not owing to any 
fault or negligence of theirs. 

56. A guest is a competent witness, in an 
action between himself and an inn-keeper, 
to prove the character and value of lost 
personal baggage. Money in a trunk, not 
exceeding the amount reasonably required 
by the traveler to defray the expenses of 
the journey which he has undertaken, is a 
part of his baggage ; and in case of its loss, 
while at any inn, the plaintiff may prove its 
amount by his own testimony. 

57. The deed of a minor is not absolutely 
void. The court is authorized to judge, 
from the instrument, whether it is void or 
not, according to its terms being favorable 
or unfavorable to the interests of the minor. 



58. A married woman can neither sue nor 
be sued on any contract made by her dur- 
ing her marriage, except in an action relat- 
ing to her individual property. The action 
must be commenced either by or against 
her husband. It is only when an action 
is brought on a contract made by her be- 
fore her marriage, that she is to be joined 
as a co-plaintiff; or defendant, with her hus- 
band. 

50. Any contract made with a person ju- 
dicially declared a lunatic is void. 

60. Money paid voluntarily in any trans- 
action, with a knowledge of the facts, can- 
not be recovered. 

61. In all cases of special contract for ser- 
vices, except in the case of a minor, the 
plaintiff can recover only the amount stip- 
ulated in the contract. 

62. A wife is a competent witness with 
her husband, to prove the contents of a lost 
trunk, or when a party. 

63. A wife cannot be convicted of receiv- 
ing stolen goods when she received them 
oflier husband. 

64. Insurance against fire, by lightning or 
otherwise, does not cover loss by lightning 
when there is no combustion. 

65. Failure to prove plea of justification, 
in a case of slander, aggravates the offence. 

66. It is the agreement of the parties to 
sell by sample "that constitutes a sale by 
sample, not the mere exhibition of a speci- 
men of the goods. 

67. An agent is liable to his principals 
for loss caused by his misstatements, tho' 
unintentional. 

68. Makers of promissory notes given in 
advance for premiums on policies of insur- 
ance, thereafter to be taken, are liable there- 
on. 

69. An agreement to pay for procuring an 
appointment to office is void. 

70. An attorney may plead the statute of 
limitations, when sued by a client for mon- 
ey which he has collected and failed to pay 
over. 



71 Testimony given by a deceased wit- 
ness on first trial, is not required to be re- 
peated verbatim on the second. 

72 A person entitling himself to a reward 
offered for lost property, has a lien upon the 
property for the reward ; but only when a 
definite reward is offered. 

73 Confession by a prisoner must be vol- 
untarily made,to constitute evidence against 
him. 

74 The defendant in a suit must be serv- 
ed with process ; but service of such pro- 
cess upon his wife, even in his absence from 
the State, is not, in the absence of statuto- 
ry provisions, sufficient. 



LAW MAXIMS. 



129 



75. The measure of damages in trespass 
for cutting timber, is its value as a chattel 
on the land where it was felled, and not the 
market price of the lumber manufactured. 

76. To support an indictment for mali- 
cious mischief in killing an animal, mal- 
ice towards its owner must be shown, not 
merely passion excited against the animal 
iteelf. 

77. No action can be maintained against 
a sheriff for omitting to account for money 
obtained upon an execution within a reas- 
onable time. He has till the return day to 
render such account. 

78. An interest in the profits of an enter- 
prise, as profits, renders the party hold- 
in,' it a partner in the enterprise, and 
ma*kes him presumptively liable to share 
any loss. 

79. Males can marry at fourteen, and fe- 
males at twelve years of age. 

80. All cattle found at large upon any pub- 
lic road, can be driven by any person to the 
public pound. 

81. Any dog chasing, barking, or other- 
wise threatening a passer-by in any street, 
lane, road, or other public thoroughfare, 
may be lawfully killed for the same. 

82. A written promise for the payment 
of such amount as may come into the hands 
of the promisor, is held to be an instru- 
ment in writing for the payment of money. 

83. The declaration of an agent is not ad- 
missible to establish the fact of agency. — 
But when other proper evidence is given, 
tending to establish the fact of agency, it 
is not error to admit the declarations of the 
agent, accompanying acts, though tend- 
ing to show the capacity in which he act- 
ed. When evidence is competent in one 
respect and incompetent in another, it ie 
the duty of the court to admit it, and con- 
trol its effects by suitable instructions to 
the jury. 

84. The court has a general power to re- 
move or suspend an attorney for such im- 
moral conduct as rendered him unworthy 
of confidence in his official capacity. 

85. Bankruptcy is pleadable in bar to all 
actions and in all courts, and this bar may 
be avoided whenever it is interposed, by 
showing fraud in the procurement of the 
discharge, or a violation of any of the pro- 
visions of the bankrupt act. 

86. An instrument in the form of a deed, 
but limited to take effect at the termination 
of the grantor's natural life, is held to be a 
deed, not a will. 

87. A sale will not be set aside as fraud- 
ulent, simply because the buyer was at the 
time unable to make the payment agreed 
upon, and knew his inability, and did not 
intend to pay. 

88. No man is under an obligation to 
make known his circumstances when he is 
buying goods. 



89. Contracting parties are bound to dis- 
close material facts known to each, but of 
which either supposes the other to be igno- 
rant, only when they Btand in some special 
relation of trust and confidence in relation 
to the subject matter of the contract. But 
neither will be protected if he does any- 
thing, however slight, to mislead or deceive 
the other. 

90. A contract negotiated by mail is 
formed when notice of acceptance of the of- 
fer is duly deposited in the post-office, pro- 
perly addressed. This rule applies, although 
the party making the offer expressly re- 
quires that if it k> accepted, speedy notice 
of acceptance shall be given him. 

91. The date of an instrument is so far a 
material part of it, that an alteration of 
the date by the holder after execution, 
makes the instrument void. 

92. A corporation may maintain an action 
for libel, for words published of them and 
relating to its trade or business, by which 
it has incurred special damages. 

93. It is unprofessional for a lawyer who 
has abandoned his case without trying it, 
a term or two before trial, to claim a fee 
conditional upon the success of his client, 
although his client was successful. 

94. Although a party obtaining damages 
for injuries received through the default of 
another, was himself guilty of negligence, 
yet that will not defeat his recovery, unless 
his negligence contributed to cause the in- 
JUJ7- 

95. A person may contract to labor for an- 
other during life, in consideration of receiv- 
ing his support ; but his creditors have the 
right to inquire into the intention with 
which such arrangement is made, and it will 
be set aside if entered into to deprive them 
of his future earnings. 

96. A grantor may by express terms ex- 
clude the bed of a river, or a highway, 
mentioned as boundary; but if without 
language of exclusion a line is described as 
' along,' or ' upon,' or as ' running to ' the 
highway or river, or as ' by,' or ' running to 
the bank of the river; these expressions 
carry the grantee to the center of the high- 
way or river. 

97. The court will take pains to construe 
the words used in a deed in such a way as 
to effect the intention of the parties, how- 
ever unskillfully the instrument may be 
drawn . Butacourtof law cannot exchange 
an intelligible word plainly employed in a 
deed for another, however evident it may 
be that the word used was used by mistake 
for another. 

98. One who has lost his memory and 
understanding is entitled to legal protec- 
tion, whether such loss is occasioned by 
his own misconduct or by an act of Provi- 
dence. 



130 



LAW MAXIMS. 



99. When a wife leaves her husband vol- 
untarily, it must he shown, in order to 
make him liable for necessaries furnished 
to her, that she could not stay with safety. 
Personal violence, either threatened or in- 
flicted, will be sufficient cause for such sep- 
aration. 

100. Necessaries of dress furnished to a 
discarded wife muBt correspond with the 
pecuniary circumstances ot the husband, 
and be such articles as the wife, if prudent 
would expect, and the husband should 
furnish, if the parties lived harmoniously 
together. 

101. A fugitive from justice from one of the 
United States to another, may be arrested 
and detained in order to his surrender by 
authority of the latter, without a previous 
demand for his surrender by the executive 
of the State whence he fled. 

102. A watch will not pass under a be- 
quest of " wearing apparel," nor of 
" household furniture and articles for fami- 
ly use." 

103. Money paid for the purpose of set- 
tling or compounding a prosecution for a 
supposed felony, cannot be recovered back 
by a party paying it. 

104. An innkeeper is liable for the death 
of an animal in his possession, but may free 
himself from liability by showing that the 
death was not occasioned by negligence on 
his part. 

105. Notice to the agent of a company is 
notice to the company. 

106. An employer is not liable to one of 
his employees for an injury sustained by the 
latter in consequence of the neglect of oth- 
ers of his employees engaged in the same 
general business. 

107. Where a purchaser at a Sheriff's sale 
has bid the full price of property under 
the erroneous belief that the sale would di- 
vest the property of all liens, it is the duty 
of the court to give relief by setting aside 
the sale. 

108. When notice of protest is properly 
sent by mail, it may be sent by the mail of 
the day of the dishonor ; if not, it must be 
mailed for the mail of the next day ; ex- 
cept that if there is none, or it closes at an 
unseasonably early hour, then notice must 
be mailed in season for the next possible 
mail. 

109. A powder-house located in a populous 
part of a city, and containing large quanti- 
ties of gunpowder, is a nuisance. 

110. When the seller of goods accepts at 
the time of the sale, the note of a third per- 
son, unindorsed by the purchaser, in pay- 
ment, the presumption is that the pay- 
ment was intended to be absolute ; and 
though the note should be dishonored, the 
purchaser will not be liable for the value of 
the goods. 



111. A man charged with crime before a 
committing magistrate, but discharged on 
his own recognizance, is not privileged 
from arrest on civil process while returning 
from the magistrate's office. 

112. When one has been induced to sell 
goods by meanB of false pretences, he can- 
not recover them from one who has bona 
fide purchased and obtained possession of 
them from the fraudulent vendor. 

113. If the circumstances attendant upon 
a sale and delivery of personal property are 
such as usually and naturally accompany 
such a transaction, it cannot be declared a 
legal fraud upon creditors. 

114. A stamp impressed upon an instru- 
ment by way of seal, is good as a seal, if it 
creates a durable impression in the texture 
of the paper. 

115. If a party bound to make a payment 
use due diligence to make a tender, but 
through the payee's absence from home is 
unable to find him or any agent authorized 
to take payment for him, no forfeiture will 
be incurred through his failure to make a 
tender. 



Government Land Measure. 

A township, 36 sections, each a mile 
square. 

A section, 640 acres. 

A quarter section, half a mile square, 
160 acres. 

An eighth section, half a mile long, north 
and south, and a quarter of a mile wide, 80 
acres. 

A sixteenth section, a quarter of a mile 
square, 40 acres. 

The sections are numbered from one to 
thirty-six, commencing at the northeast 
corner, thus : 



6 


5 


4 


3 


2 


n w 


n e 


s w 


s e 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


18 


17 


16 


15 


14 


13 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


30 


29 


28 


27 


26 


25 


31 


32 


33 


34 


35 


36 



The sections are all divided in quarters, 
which are named by the cardinal points, 
as in section one. The quarters are divi- 
ded in the same way. The description of 
a 40 acre lot would read : The south half 
of the west half of the southwest quarter 
of section 1 in township 24, north of range 
7 west, or as the case might be ; and some- 
times will fall short, and sometimes overrun 
the number of acres it is supposed to con- 
tain. 



DECIMAL SYSTEM OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 131 



THE DECIMAL SYSTEM 



OF 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

As Authorized by Act of Congress-Approved Inly 28, 1866. 



STANDARDS. 

In every system of Weights and Measures 
it is necessary to have what are called 
" Standards" as the pound, yard, gallon, 
&c, to be divided and multiplied into 
smaller and larger parts and denominations. 
The definition and construction of these 
Standards involve philosophical and scien- 
tific principles of a somewhat abstruse 
character, and are made and procured by 
the legislative department of the govern- 
ment. The nominal Standards in the new 
system are the Metke, the Abe, the Liter, 
and the Gram. , The only real Standard, the 
one by which all the other standards are 
measured, and from which the system de- 
rives its name of " Metric," is the Meter. 

THE METER 

Is used for all measures of length, distance, 
breadth, depth, heighth, &c, and was in- 
tended to be, and is very nearly, one ten- 
millionth of the distance on the earth's 
surface from the equator to the pole. It is 
about 39% inches, or 3 feet, 3 inches and 
3 eighths, and is to be substituted for the 
yard. 

THE ARE 

Is a surface whose side is ten Meters, and 
is equal to 100 square Meters or about 4 
square rods. 

THE LITER 

Is the unit for measuring solids and capa- 
ity, and is equal to the contents of a cube 
whose edge is one-tenth of a meter. It is 
about equal to 1 quart, and is a standard in 
cubic, dry and liquid measures. 



A cubic Meter (or Kiloliter) is called 
a stsre, and is also used as a standard in cer- 
tain cubic measures. 

THE GRAM 

Is the Unit of weight, and is the weight of 
a cube of pure water, each edge of the cube 
being one one-hundredth of a Meter. It is 
about equal to 15% grains. It is intended 
as the Standard in alt weights, and with its 
divisions and multiples, to supersede the 
use of what are now called Avoirdupois, 
Apothecaries and Troy Weights. 

Each of the foregoing Standards is divi- 
ded decimally, and larger units are also 
formed by multiples of 10, 100, &c. The 
successive subordinate parts are designa- 
ted by the prefixes Deci, Centi andMilli; 
the successive multiples by Deka, Hecto, 
Kilo and Myria ; each having its own nu- 
merical signification, as will De more clear- 
ly seen in the tables hereinafter given. 

The terms used may, at first sight, have 
a formidable appearance, seem difficult to 
pronounce, and to retain in memory, and to 
be, therefore, objectionable ; but with a lit- 
tle'attention and use, the apprehended dif- 
ficulty will be found more apparent than 
real, as has been abundantly proved by ex- 
perience. The importance, also, of con- 
formity in the use of commercial terms, on 
the part of the United States, with the 
practice of the many, nations in which the 
system, with, its present nomenclature, has 
already been adopted, must greatly over- 
balance the comparatively slight objection 
alluded to. 



132 DECIMAL SYSTEM OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 



Old. 

4 farthing make 1 penny. 
12 pence " 1 shilling. 
20 shillings " 1 pound. 



TABLES 
MONEY. 



New. 

10 mills make 1 cent. 
10 cents " 1 dime. 
10 dimes " 1 dollar. 



LONG AND CLOTH MEASURE.— Nsw, 

10 millimeters make 1 centimeter. 

10 centimeters " 1 decimeter. 

10 decimeters " 1 meter. 

10 meters " 1 dekameter. 

10 dekameters " 1 hectometer. 

10 hectometers " 1 kilometer. 

10 kilometers " 1 myriameter. 

SQUARE MEASURE.-New. 



100 square millimeters make 
100 square centimeters 
100 square decimeters 
100 centares 
100 ares 



square centimeter, 
square decimeter, 
square meter or centare. 
are. 
hectare. 



£3F" The denominations less than the Are, including the Meter, are used in specifying 
the contents of surfaces of small extent ; the terms Centare, Are and Hectare, in expres- 
sing quantities of land surveyed or measured. 

The above table may, however, be continued beyond the Meter, thus : 



100 
100 
100 
100 



square meters make 1 

square dekameters " 1 

square hectometers " 1 

square kilometers " 1 



square dekameter. 
square hectometer, 
square kilometer, 
square myriameter. 



CUBIC MEASURE.— New. 
For Solids. 



1000 
1000 
1000 
1000 
1000 
1000 
1000 



cubic millimeters make 1 

cubic centimeters " 1 

cubic decimeters " 1 

cubic meters " 1 

cubic dekameters " 1 

cubic hectometers " 1 

cubic kilometers " 1 



cubic centimeter, 
cubic decimeter or liter, 
cubic meter or stere. 
cubic dekameter. 
cubic hectometer, 
cubic kilometer, 
cubic myriameter. 



For Dry and Liquid Measures. 



10 milliliters 

10 centiliters 

10 deciliters 

10 liters 

10 dekaliters 

10 hectoliters 

10 kiloliters 



make 



centiliter, 
deciliter. 

LITER. 

dekaliter, 
hectoliter, 
kiloliter. 
myrialiter. 



[£3P"A Liter, the standard of Measures of Capacity, usually in a cylindrical form, is 
equivalent to a cubic Decimeter, or the one-thousandth part of a cubic Meter, the contents 
of which are about one quart.] 

The Kiloliter, or Stere, is a cubic Meter, and is used as a unit in measuring firewood 
and lumber. 

10 decisteres make 1 stere. 

10 steres " 1 dekastere. 



10 milligrams 
10 centigrams 
decigrams 

frams 
ekagrams 
10 hectograms 
10 kilograms 
10 mynagrams 
10 quintals 



ALL WEIGHTS, 
make 



10 

10 
10 



—New. 

centigram, 
decigram. 

GRAM. 

dekagram. 

hectogram. 

kilogram. 

mynaaram. 

quintal. 

millier or tonneau. 



DECIMAL SYSTEM OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 



133 



TERMS. 

Meter, 

Millimeter. 

Centimeter, 

Decimeter, 

Dekameter, 

Hectometer, 

Kilometer, 

Myriameter, 

Liter, 

Milliliter, 

Centiliter, 

Deciliter, 

Dekaliter, 

Hectoliter, 

Kiloliter, 

Myrialiter, 



PRONUNCIATION OF TERMS. 



ENGLISH. 

Mee-ter. 

Mill-e-mee-ter. 

Seut-e-mee-ter. 

Des-e-rnee-ter. 

Dek-a-mee-ter. 

Hec-to-mee-ter. 

Kill-o-mee-ter. 

Mir-e-a-mee-ter. 

Li-ter. 

Mill-e-li-ter. 

Sent-e-li-ter. 

Des-e-li-ter. 

Dek-a-li-ter. 

Hec-to-li-ter. 

Kill-o-li-ter. 

Mir-e-a-li-ter. 



TERMS. 

Stere, 

Are, 

Cen tare, 

Hectare, 

Gram, 

Milligram, 

Centigram, 

Decigram, 

Dekagram, 

Hectogram, 

Kilogram, 

Myrfagrain, 

Quintal, 

Millier, 

Touneau, 



ENGLISH. 

Stare. 

Are. 

Sent-are. 

Hect-are. 

Gram, 

Mill-e-gram. 

Sent-e-gram. 

Des-e-gram. 

Dek-a-gram, 

Hec-to-gram. 

Kill-o-gram. 

Mir-e-a-gram. 

Quin-tal. 

Mill-i-er. 

Tun-no. 



Acts and Resolutions of Congress. 

PUBLIC -No. 183. 

AN ACT to authorize the use of the metric 
system of weights and measures. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of 
Representatives of the United States of Ameri- 
ca in Congress assembled, That from and af- 
ter the passage of this act, it shall be law- 
ful throughout the United States of Ameri- 
ca to employ the weights and measures of 
the metric system ; and no contract or deal- 
ing, or pleading in any court, shall be 
deemed invalid or liable to objection, be- 



cause the weights or measures expressed or 
referred to therein are weights or measures 
of the metric system. 

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That 
the tables in the schedule hereto annexed, 
shall be recognized in the construction of 
contracts, and in all legal proceedings, as 
establishing, in terms of the weights and 
measures now in use in the United States, 
the equivalents of the weights and meas- 
ures expressed therein in terms of the me- 
tric system ; and said tables may be lawful- 
ly used for computing, determining and ex- 
pressing, in customary weights aiid meas- 
ures, the weights and measures of the metric 
system. 



MEASURES OP LENGTH. 



Metric Denominations and Values. 

Myriametre, 10,000 metres, 

Kilometre, 1,000 metres, 

Hectometre, 100 metres, 

Dekametre, 10 metres, 

Metre, 1 metre, 

Decimetre, l-10th of a metre, 

Centimetre, l-100th of a metre, 

Millimetre, .... l-1000th of a metre. 



Equivalents in Denominations in Use. 



6.2137 miles. , _ ...... 

0.62137 mile, or 2,280 feet and 10 inches. 

328 feet and one inch. 

393.7 inches. 

39.37 inches. 

3.937 inches. 

0.3937 inch. 

0.0394 inch. 



MEASURES OF SURFACE. 



Metric Denominations and Values. 



Hectare, . 

Are, 

Centare, . 



10,000 square metres, 

100 square metres, 

1 square metre, 



Equivalents in Denominations in Use. 



2.471 acres. 

119.6 square yards. 

1.550 square inches. 



134 



DECIMAL SYSTEM OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 







a> 










¥* 










S 










m 










S3 








02 
P 


4) 

M 


5 ai ai Eu 






to 


► 


;allor 

allon 

allon 

uart. 

11. 

id oi 

cl dra 






CO 


O 


-; "* f m tc rei- 






o 


tJ 






<1 


'3 


3 to *; ° °° re °* 






C 


<?* « ei t-I o o o 






to 


3 








H 










9 










o 










to 


















R 


















% 


• 






















> 


to 




















H 


00 

EH 






^ : 


.. 








H 


to 


CD 




o , 


o ;. 






Q 

< 

< 


B 


3 
m 
si 

s 
>> 

p 


8 cubic yard, 
IB. and 3.35 p 

8 ouart 


22 cubic inch 
92 cubic inch 
1 cubic inch, 




Q 






Q H X = Ot-i ^ 








CC^OOJiHXO 








Hwaocco 




k 
* 










V 

ffi 






















3 












<o 








S 


02 

p 


5 

en 
S3 
0) 

o 

d 
O 


- 
a 

£ 


if a cubic metre, . 
ubic decimetres, . 
ubic decimetre. . . 


fa cubic decimctr 
ubic centimetres, 
ubic centimetre, . 




S 






5 O O O O O o 




R 


OS 




rlHOHTHCH 






to 
o 




■lH '-iH 
















O /- 


tHOO 






**l 


X *> 


OOOi-lOO© 


*' 




to 


to- 


SQn 




9 

o 


























to 










: . 










i 




















p 




















o 






















03 
O 


of 














H 


s 
















H 


S3 


EC 




i 










9 


to 


litre or 
tolitre . 
alitre, . 


ilitre,.. 
tilitrc, . 
ilitre, . 




















K 


= 


Ph 


F 


)C 


< 







INTEREST TABLE. 



135 



WEIGHTS. 



Metric Denominations and Values. 


Equivalents in De- 
nominations in Use. 


Names. 


No. of 
grams. 


Weight of what quantity of 
water at maximum density. 


Avoirdupois weight. 


Millier or tonneau,. 
Quintal, 


1000000 

100000 

10000 

1000 

100 

10 

1 

1-10 

1-100 

1-1000 


1 cubic metre, 

1 hectolitre, 

10 litres, 


2204.6 pounds. 
220.46 pounds. 
22.046 pounds. 
2.2046 pounds. 
3.5274 ounces. 




Kilogram, or kilo,.. .. 


1 litre 


Hectogram, 




Dekagram, 


1 cubic centimetre, 


0.3527 ounce. 


Grani, 


15.432 grains. 
0.5432 grain. 


Decigram, 


10 cubic millimetres, 


Centigram, 


0.1543 grain. 
0.0154 grain. 




1 cubic millimetre 



INTEREST TABLE. 



At Seven per Cent, in Dollars and Cents, from $1 to $10,000. 



am'ht. 


1 day. 


7 days. 


15 days. 


1 mo. 


3 mos. 


6 mos. 


12 mos. 


$ 


$ C. 


$ C. 


$ C. 


$ C. 


$ C. 


$ C. 


$ C. 


1 


00 


00 


00% 


00% 


01% 


03% 


07 


2 


00 


00% 


00% 


01% 


03% 


07 


14 


3 


00 


00% 


00% 


01% 


05% 


10% 


21 


4 


00 


00% 


01 


02% 


07 


14 


28 


5 


00 


00% 


01% 


03 


08% 


17% 


35 


6 


00 


00% 


01% 


03% 


10% 


21 


42 


7 


00 


01 


02 


04 


12% 


24% 


49 


8 


00 


01 


02% 


04% 


14 


28 


56 


9 


00 


01 % 


02% 


05% 


15% 


31% 


63 


10 


oo% 


01% 


03 


05% 


17% 


a5 


70 


20 


00% 


02% 


06 


11% 


35 


70 


1 40 


30 


oo% 


04 


09 


17% 


52% 


1 05 


2 10 


40 


00% 


05% 


12 


23% 


70 


1 40 


2 80 


50 


01 


06% 


15 


29% 


87% 


1 75 


3 50 


100 


02 


13% 


29 


58% 


1 75 


3 50 


7 00 


200 


04 


27% 


58 


116% 


3 50 


7 00 


14 00 


300 


06 


40% 


87% 


1 75 


5 25 


10 50 


21 00 


400 


08 


54% 


1 17 


2 33% 


7 00 


14 00 


28 00 


500 


10 


68 


1 46 


2 91% 


8 75 


17 50 


35 00 


1000 


19% 


1 36 


2 92 


5 83% 


17 50 


35 00 


70 00 


2000 


39 


2 72% 


5 83 


11 66% 


35 00 


70 00 


140 00 


3000 


58 


4 08% 


8 75 


17 50 


52 50 


105 00 


210 00 


4000 


78 


5 44% 


11 67 


23 33% 


70 00 


140 00 


280 00 


5000 


97 


6 80% 


14 58 


29 16% 


87 50 


175 00 


350 00 


10000 


1 94 


13 61 


29 17 


58 33 


175 00 


350 00 


700 00 



136 



MI8CELLANE0 US. 



Discount and Premium. 

When a person buys an article for $1,00— 
20 per cent off, (or discount,) and sells it 
again for $1,00, he makes a profit of 25 per 
cent, on his investment. Thus : He pays 
80 cents and sells for $1,00— a gain of 20 
cents, or 25 per cent of 80 cents. And for 
any transaction where the sale or purchase 
of gold, silver, or currency is concerned, 
the following rules will apply in all cases. 

Rule 1st.— To find premium when dis- 
count is given : Multiply 100 by rate of 
discount and divide by 100, less rate of dis- 
count. 

Rule 2d.— To find discount when pre- 
mium is given. Multiply the rate of interest 
by 100, and divide by 100, plus the rate of 
premium. 

Suppose A has $140 in currency, which 
he wishes to exchange for gold, when gold 
is 27 per cent, premium, how much gold 
should he receive f In this case the pre- 
mium is given, consequently we must find 
the discount on A's currency and subtract 
it from the $140, as per rule 2d, showing 
the discount to be a trifle more than 21 per 
cent, and that he should receive $110.60 in 
gold. 
5 pr ct. Dis. allows t5)£ pr ct. Pre. or profit 



10" 


" til 


44 44 .4 


15" " 


" nix 


44 44 44 


20" 


" 25 


14 44 44 


25" " 


" 33* 


44 44 44 


30" 


" *43 


44 44 44 


40" 


" 69% 


44 44 44 


50 " 


" 100 


44 44 44 


!£©~ A dagger (t) denotes the profits to 


be a fraction 


more than specified. A (*) 


denotes profits to be a 


fraction less than 


specified. 







Table of Weights of Grain, 
Seeds, &c. 

ACCORDING TO THE LAWS OP NEW YOBK. 

Barley weighs 48 lb. per bushel. 

Beans " 62 " " 

Buckwheat" 48 " " 

Clover Seed 60 " " 

Corn weighs 58 " " 

PlaxSeed*" 55 " " 

Oats " 32 " " 

Peas " 60 " " 

Potatoes " 80 " " 

Rye " 56 " 

TimothySeed 44 " " 

Wheat (J0 " " 

*Flax Seed by cust'm weighs 56 lb. per bush. 



Facts on Advertising. 

The advertisements in an ordinary num- 
ber of the London Times exceed 2,500. The 
annual advertising bills of one London firm 
are said to amount to $200,000 ; and three 
others are mentioned who each annually 
expend for the purpose $50,000. The ex- 
Pi! 118 ?. i or advertising the eight editions of 
the Encyclopaedia Britannia" is said to 
have been $15,000. 



In large cities nothing is more common 
than to see large business establishments, 
which seem tohave an immense advantage 
over all competitors, by the wealth, expe- 
rience, and prestige they have acquired, 
drop gradually out of public view, and be 
succeeded by firms of a smaller capital, 
more energy, and more determined to have 
the fact that they sell such and such com- 
modities known from one end of the land to 
the other. In other words, the establish- 
ments advertise ; the old die of dignity.— 
The former are ravenous to pass out of ob- 
scurity into publicity ; the latter believe 
that their publicity is so obvious that it 
cannot be obscured. The first understand 
that they must thrust themselves upon 
public attention, or be disregarded ; the 
second, having once obtained public atten- 
tion, suppose they have arrested it perma- 
nently; while, in fact, nothing is more char- 
acteristic of the world than the ease with 
which it forgets. 

Stephen Girard, than whom no shrewder 
business man ever lived, used to say : I 
have always considered advertising liber- 
ally and long to be the great medium of 
success in business, and the prelude to 
wealth. And I have made it an invariable 
rule too, to advertise in the dullest times 
as well as the busiest ; long experience 
having taught me that money thus spent is 
well laid out ; as by keeping my business 
continually before the public it has secured 
me many sales that I would otherwise have 
lost. 



Capacity of Cisterns or Wells. 

Tabular view of the number of gallons 
contained in the clear, between the brick 
work for each ten inches of depth : 



Diameter 




Gallons 


2 feet 


equals 


19 


2* 


44 


30 


3 


44 


44 


3* 


44 


60 


4 


44 


78 


4* 


44 


97 


5 


44 


122 


5* 


" 


148 


6 


44 


170 


6* 


44 


207 


7 


44 


240 


IX 


44 


275 


8 


" 


313 


m 


44 


353 


9 


" 


396 


9* 


44 


461 


10 


" 


489 


11 


44 


592 


12 


44 


705 


13 


44 


827 


14 


44 


959 


15 


44 


1101 


20 


«4 


1958 


25 


44 


3059 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



137 



Brilliant Whitewash. 



Many have heard of the brilliant stucco 
whitewash on the east end of the Presi- 
dent's house at Washington. The follow- 
ing is a recipe for it ; it is gleaned from the 
National Intelligencer, with some addi- 
tional improvements learned by experi- 
ments : Take half a bushel of nice un- 
Blacked lime, slack it with boiling water, 
cover it during the process to keep in the 
steam. Strain the liquid through a fine 
sieve or strainer, and add to it a peck ol 
salt, previously well dissolved in warm wa- 
ter three pounds of ground rice, boiled to 
a thin paste, and stirred in boiling hot ; half 
a pound of powdered Spanish whiting, and 
a pound of clean glue, which has been pre- 
viously dissolved by soaking it well, and 
then hanging it over a slow hre, in a small 
kettle within a large one filled with water. 
Add five gallons of hot water to the mixture, 
stir it weft, and let it stand a few days cov- 
ered from the dirt. 

It should be put on right hot ; for this 
purpose it can be kept in a kettle on a 
portable furnace. It is said that about a 
pint of thismixtnre will cover a square 
yard upon the outside of a house if proper- 
ly applied. Brushes more or less small may 
be used according to the neatness of the job 
reouired. It answers as well as oil paint 
fur wood, brick or scone, and is cheaper. 
It retains its brilliancy for many years 
There is nothing of the kind that will 
compare with it, either for inside or outside 

Coloring matter may be put in and made 
, of any shade you like. Spanish brown 
i stirred in will make red pink, more or less 
deep according to the quantity. A delicate 
tinge of this is very pretty, for inside walls 
Finely pulverized common clay, well mixed 
with Spanish brown, makes a reddish stone 
color Yellow-ochre stirred in makes yel- 
low wash, but chrome goes further and 
makes a color generally esteemed prettier. 
In all these cases the darkness of the shades 
of course is determined by the quantity of 
coloring used. It is difficult to make rales, 
because tastes are different. It would be 
best to try experiments on a shingle and let 
it dry We have been told that green must 
not be mixed with lime. The lime de- 
stroys the color, and the color has an effect 
on the whitewash, which makes it crack 
and peel. When walls have been badly 
smoked, and you wish to have them a clean 
white, it is well to squeeze indigo plenti- 
fully through a bag into the water you use, 
before it is stirred in the whole mixture. 
If a larger quantity than five gallons be 
war.ted,lhe same proportion should be ob- 
served. 

How to get a Horse out of a 
Fire. 

The °Teat difficulty of getting horses from 
a stable where surrounding buildings are m 
a state of conflagation, is well mown.— 
The plan of covering their eyes with a blan- 
ket will not always succeed. 

A -entleman whose horses have been in 
great peril from such a cause, having tried 



in vain to save them, hit upon the expedi- 
ent of having them harnessed as though go- 
ino- to their usual work; when, to his aston- 
ishment, they were led from the stable 
without difficulty. 



The Chemical Barometer. 

Take a long narrow bottle, such as an old- 
fashioned Eau-de-Cologne bottle, and put 
into it two and a half drachms of camphor, 
and eleven drachms of spirits of wine; 
when the camphor is dissolved, which it 
will readily do by slight agitation, add the 
following mixture: Take water, nine 
drachms; nitrate of potash (saltpetre) 
thirty-eight grains; and muriate of am- 
monia (sal ammoniac) thirty-eight grains. 
Dissolve these salts in the water prior to 
mixin" with the camphorated spirit ; then 
shake "the whole well together. Cork the 
bottle well, and wax the top, but_ after- 
wards make a very small aperture in the 
cork with a red-hot needle. The bottle may 
then be hung up, or placed in any stationa- 
ry position. By observing the different 
appearances which the materials assume, 
as the weather changes, it becomes an ex- 
cellent prognosticator of a coming storm or 
of a sunny sky. 



Leech Barometer. 

Take an eight ounce phial, and put in it 
three fills of water, and place in it a healthy 
leech "chanoino- the water in summer once 
a week, and' inwinter once in a fortnight, 
and it will most accurately prognosticate 
the weather. If the weather is to he fine 
the leech lies motionless at the bottom ot 
the "lass and coiled together in a spiral 
form; if rain may be expected, it will creep 
up to the top of its lodgings and remain 
there till the weather is settled ; if we are 
to have wind, it will move through its habi- 
tation with amazing swiftness, and seldom 
<roes to rest till it begins to blow hard ; if a 
remarkable storm of thunder and rain is to 
succeed, it will lodge for some days before 
almost continually ont of the water and 
discover <*reat uneasiness in violent throes 
and convulsive-like motions ; in frost as in 
clear summer-like weather it lies constantly 
at the bottom; and in snow as in rainy 
weather it pitches its dwelling in the very 
month of the phial. The top should be cov- 
ered over with a piece of muslin. 

To Measure Gkain in a Bm.— Find the 
number of cubic feet, from which deduct 
one-fifth. The remainder is the number of 
bushels— allowing, however, one bushel 
extra to every 224. Thus in a remainder of 
224 there would be 225 bushels. In a re- 
mainder of 448 there would be 450 bushels, 
&c. 



138 



VALUABLE RECIPES. 



VALUABLE RECIPES. 



[The following recipes are vouched for by 
several who have tried them and proven 
their virtues. Many of them have been sold 
singly for more than the price of this 
book.— Pub.] 

HORSES. 

Ring Bone and Spavtn.— 2 oz. each of 
Spanish flies and Venice turpentine; 1 oz. 
each of aqua ammonia and euphorbium ; X 
oz. red precipitate ; U oz. corrosive subli- 
mate ; 1 % lbs. lard. When thoroughly pul- 
verized and mixed, heat carefully so as not 
to burn, and pour off free from sediment. 

For ring-bone, rub in thoroughly, after 
removing hair, once in 48 hours. For spav- 
in, once in 24 hours. Cleanse and press 
out the matter on each application. 

Poll-Evil.— Gum arabic H oz ; common 
potash }i oz ; extract of belladonna % dr. 
Put the gum in just enough water to dis- 
solve it. Pulverize the potash and mix 
with the dissolved gum, and then put in the 
extract of belladonna,and it will be ready for 
use. Use with a syringe after having 
cleansed with soap suds, and repeat once 
in two days till a cure is affected. 

Scours.— Powdered tormentil root, giv- 
en in milk, from 3 to 5. times daily till cured. 

Grease-Heel and Scratches.— Sweet 
oil U ozs.; borax 2 ozs.; sugar of lead 2 ozs. 
\V ash off with dish water, and, after it is 
dry, apply the mixture twice a day. 

Cholic in Horses.— To X pt. of warm 
water add 1 oz. laudanum and 3 ozs. spirits 
ot turpentine, and repeat the dose in about 
X of an hour, adding % oz. powdered aloes, 
if not relieved. 

BoTs-Three doses. 1st. 2 qts milk and 
1 oi molasses. 2d. 15 minutes after, 2 ots 
W r% m 8 *S« tea. 3d. After the expiration 
Never fail's ' Sufflcieut lard to physic- 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Piles— Perfectly Cured.— Take flour of 
sulphur 1 oz», rosin 3 ozs., pulverize and mix 
well together. (Color with carmine or 
cochineal, if you like.) Lose— What will 
lie on a five cent piece, night and morning, 
washing the parts freely in cold water once 
or twice a day. This is a remedy of great 
value. 

The cure will be materially hastened by 
taking a table-spoon of sulphur in a half 
pint of milk, daily, until the cure is affected. 

Sure Cure for Corns, Warts and 
Chilblains.— Take of nitric and muriatic 
acids, blue vitriol and salts of tartar, 1 oz. 
each. Add the blue vitriol, pulverized, to 
either of the acids; add the salts of tartar 
in the same way ; when done foaming, add 
the other acid, and in a few days it will be 
ready for use. For chilblains and corns 
apply it very lightly with a swab, and re- 
peat in a day or two until cured. For warts, 
once a week, until they disappear. 

Hoof- Ail in Sheep.— Mix 2 ozs. each of 
butter of antimony and muriatic acid with 
1 oz. cf pulverized white vitriol, and apply 
once or twice a week to the bottom of the 
foot. 

Common Rheumatism.— Kerosene oil 2 
ozs.; neats-foot oil 1 oz.; oil of organum % 
oz. Shake when used, and rub and heat in 
twice daily. 

Very Fine Soap, Quickly and Cheap- 
ly Made.— Fourteen pounds of bar soap 
in a half a boiler of hot water ; cut up fine ; 
add three pounds of sal-soda made fine; 
one ounce of pulverized rosin ; stir it often 
till all is dissolved ; just as you take it off 
the fire, put in two table-spoonfuls of spirits 
of turpentine and one of ammonia ; pour it 
in a barrel, and fill up with cold soft water; 
let it stand three or four days before using. 
It is an excellent soap for washing clothes, 
extracting the dirt readily, and not fading 
colored articles. 



VAL UABLE RECIPES. 



139 



Water Proof for Leather.— Take lin- 
seed oil 1 pint, yellow wax and white tur- 
pentine each 2 ozs. Burgundy pitch 1 oz., 
melt and color with lampDlack. 

To Keep Cider Sweet.— Put into each 
barrel, immediately after making, % lb. 
ground mustard, 2oz. salt and 2 oz. pulver- 
ized chalk. Stir them in a little eider, pour 
them into the barrel, and shake up well. 

Ague Cure.— Procure \% table-spoons of 
fresh mandrake root juice, (by pounding) 
and mis with the same quantity of molas- 
ses, and take in three equal doses, 2 hours 
a part, the whole to be taken 1 hour before 
the chill comes on. Take a swallow of 
some good bitters before meals, fora couple 
of weeks after the chills are broken, and the 
cure will be permanent. 

Cure for Salt Rheum or Scurvt. — 
Take of the pokeweed, any time in sum- 
mer ; pound it ; press out the juice ; strain 
it into a pewter dish; set it in the sun till it 
becomes a salve — then put it into an earth- 
en mug ; add to it fresh water and bees' 
was sufficient to make an ointment of com- 
mon consistency ; simmer the whole over 
a fire till thoroughly mixed. When cold, 
rub the part affected. The patient will al- 
most immediately experience its good ef- 
fects, and the most obstinate cases will be 
cured in three or four months. Tested. — 
The juice of the ripe berries may be pie- 
pa red in the same way. 

Superior Paint— for Brick Houses.— 
To lime whitewash, add for a fastener, sul- 
phate of zinc, and shade with any color you 
choose, as yellow ochre, Venetian red, etc. 
It outlasts oil paint. 



Felons.— Stir 1 oz. of Venice turpentine 
with % tea-spoonful of water, till it looks 
like candied honey, and apply by spreading 
upon cloth and wrapping around the finger. 
If not too long delayed will cure in 6 hours. 

A poke root poultice is also said to be a 
sure remedy. 

Water-Proof Blacking and Harness 
Polish.— Take two and a half ounces gum 
shellac and half a pint of alcohol, and set 
in a warm place until dissolved ; then add 
two and a half ounces Venice turpentine 
to neutralize the alcohol ; add a tablespoon- 
ful of lampblack. Apply with a fine sponge. 
It will give a good polish over oil or grease. 

Mosquitos. — To get rid of these tormen- 
tors, take a few hot coals on a shovel, or a 
chafing dish, and burn upon them some 
brown sugar in your bed-rooms and parlors, 
and you effectually banish or destroy every 
mosquito for the night. 

Cheap Outside Paint. — Take two parts 
(in bulk) of water lime ground fine, one part 
(in bulk) of white lead ground in oil. Mix 
them thoroughly, by adding best boiled lin- 
seed oil, enough to prepare it to pass through 
a paint mill, after which temper with oil 
till it can be applied with a common paint 
brush. Make any color to suit. It will last 
three times as long as lead paint, and cost 
not one-fourth as much. It is Superior. 

Cure for a Cough.— A strong decoction 
of the leaves of the pine, sweetened with 
loaf sugar. Take a wine-glass warm on go- 
ing to bed, and half an hour before eating, 
three times a day. The above is sold as a 
cough syrup, and is doing wonderful cures, 
and it is sold at a great profit to the manu- 
facturers. 



Mow to Judge a Horse. 

A correspondent, contrary to old maxims, 
undertakes to judge the character of a horse 
by outward appearances, and offers the fol- 
low insr suggestions, the result of his close 
observation and long experience: 

If the color be light sorrell, or chestnut, 
his feet, legs and face white, these are 
marks of kindness. If he is broad and full 
between the eyes, he may be depended on 
as a horse of good sense, and capable of be- 
ing trained to anything. 

As respects such horses, the more kindly 
you treat them the better you will be treat- 
ed in return. Nor will a horse of this de- 
scription stand a whip, if well fed. 

If you want a safe horse, avoid one that 
is dish-faced. He may be so far gentle as 
not to scare ; but he will have too much go- 
ahead in him to be safe with everybody. 

If you want a fool, but a horse of great 
bottom, get a deep bay, with not a white 
hair ahout him. If his face is a little dish- 
ed, so much the worse. Let no man ride 
such a horse that is not an adept in riding 
—they are always tricky and unsafe. 



If you want one that will never give out, 
never buy a large, overgrown one. 

A black horse cannot stand heat, nor a 
white one cold. 

If you want a gentle horse, get one with 
more or less white about the head ; the 
more the better. Many persons suppose 
the parti-colored horses belonging to the 
circuses, shows, &c, are selected for their 
oddity. But the selections thus made are 
on account of th«ir great docility and gen- 
tleness. 



Measurement of Hay in the 
Mow or Stack. — It is often desirable, 
where conveniences for weighing are not at 
hand, to purchase and sell hay by measure- 
ment. It is evident that no fixed rule will 
answer in all cases, as it would require 
more cubic feet at the top of a mow than at 
the bottom. The general rule adopted by 
those who have tested it, is 7>£ cubic feet of 
solid Timothy hay, as taken from mow or 
bottom of stack. The rule may be varied 
lor upper part of mow or stack according 
to pressure. 



140 



TWENTY TEAR CALENDAR. 



.Almanac or Calendar for 20 Years. 



CB 


A 


G 


F 


ED 


C 


B 


A 


GF 


E 


1804 


1805 


1800 


1807 


18G8 


1809 


1870 


1871 


1872 


1873 


D 


C 


BA 


G 


F 


E 


D C 


F 


E 


D 


1874 


1875 


1870 1877 


1878 


1879 


1880 


1881 


1882 


1883 



8!15 



910 



o 



10 



1! 



512 



17 
18 



19 



13 20 

71421 



•22 



23 



24 



25 



20 



27 



28 



29 



30 



31 



Jan. and Oct. 



Sun. 



Mon. 



Tues. 



Wed. 



Thurs. 



Frid'y 



Sat. 



Sat. 



Sun. 



Mon. 



Tues. 



Wed. 



Tl 



turs, 



Frid' 



Frid' 



}'■ 



Sat. 



Sun. 



Mon. 



Tues. 



Wed. 



Thu 



rs, 



May 



August. 



Feb., Mar., 

Nov. 



June. 



Sept. & Dec, 



April & July, 



B 



C 



D 



E 



G 



B 



C 



D 



E 



F 



G 



A 



C 



D 



Thurs 



Frid'y. 



Sat. 



Sun. 



Mon. 



Tues. 



Wed. 



D 



Wed. 



Thurs. 



Frid'y. 



Sat. 



Sun. 



Mon. 



Tues. 



E 



Tues 



Wed. 



Thurs. 



Frid'y. 



Sat. 



Sun. 



Mon. 



E 



E 



F 



G 



A 



B 



F 



G 



A 



B 



C 



G 



A 



B 



C 



F 



Mon. 



Tues. 



Wed. 



Thurs. 



Frid'y. 



Sat. 



Sun. 



G 



A 



B 



D 



D 



E 



G 



A 



B 



C 



D 



E 



Explanation.— Find the Year and observe the Letter above it ; then look for the 
„ iViT « Iid in a line with it: find the Letter of the Year; above the Letter find the Day ; 
ana the figures on the left, in the same line, are the days of the same name in the month. 

j,^' a Pj ears have two letters; the first is used till the end of February, the second 
crarin- the remainder of the year. 



■■I I, . •■ II 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 141 

ONE PRICE ONLY! 



New Store, New Goods, New Prices, 



AT 



C. B. GAY' 




% 



THE ONLY ONE PRICE RETAIL 



BOOT k SHOE STORE 

IN CENTRAL NEW YORK, 

65 SOUTH SALINA STREET, 

Washington Stores, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Where may be found at all times a large stock of 

CUSTOM-MADE BOOTS & SHOES, 

Direct from the best manufacturing establishments, which I will offer to the public at 
the LOWEST MARKET PRICES. 

My stock i's manufactured expressly for the Spring, Summer and Pall trade, em- 
bracing every article kept in a first-class Boot and Shoe Establishment. Having decid- 
ed to adopt the 



It 



PilOE SYSTEM," 



My Goods are all MARKED IN PLAIN FIGURES, so that the most inexperienced mav 
not be deceived, and we will not misrepresent their quality to any customer. I respect- 
fully invite attention to my stock and prices. Remember the place, 

Cs 13- GrJLY 

65 South Salina Street, (Washington Stores,) Syracuse, N. Y. 
h# 



142 



ON ON DA GA CO UNTY B USINESS DIRECTOR Y. 



\° 



^StND, GRANT « 



DEALERS 




Mechanics' Tools, Machinists 7 Supplies, 

Hails, Sash, Glass, Paints, Oils and Puttv, Farming Implements, Tinmen's Stock, &c. — 
Agents for HERRING'S CHAMPION FIRE & BURGLAR PROOF SAFES, AND 
AMERICAN SCALE CO'S SCALES. 



26 E. Genesee St., Franklin Buildings, 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



EDWARD TOWNSEND, 
ALEX. GRANT. JR., 
HENRY H. MUNGER. 



Iffffl 



fflMK'fl 



GENERAL, 



Insurance Agency, 

The Largest, Oldest & Strongest 



IN WESTERN NEW YORK. 



FIRE, LIFE, CANAL & ACCIDENT, 

On the Most Favorable Terms, tosses 
Promptly Paid. 

1 Malcolm Block, 22 S. SalinaSt., 

Syracuse, 1ST. Y. 



CAMILLUS. 



143 



T 



ONONDAGA COUNTY 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



EXPLANATIONS TO DIRECTORY. 

Directory is arranged as follows : 1. Name of individual or Arm. 2. Post office ad- 
dress in parenthesis. 3. If a farmer, the lot number indicates his residence. 4. Business 
or occupation. 

A Star (*) placed before a name, indicates an advertiser in this work. For such ad- 
vertisement see Index. 

Figures placed after the occupation of farmers, indicate the number of acres of land 
owned or leased by the parties. 

Names set in CAPITALS indicate subscribers to this work. 

The word street is implied as regards directory for Syracuse. 

Sattna Post Office is in the First Ward of the city of Syracuse. If parties, in address- 
ing letters to residents of Syracuse, will add the number of the street, it will insure their 
free delivery by the carrier. 

For additions and corrections, see Errata, following the -Intro- 
duction. 



(Post Office Addresses in Parentheses.) 



Abbott. George, (Camillus,) lot 64, farmer 

40. 
ABRAMS, D. H., (Camillus,) lot 80, farmer 

120. 
ALLEN, JOHN, (Camillus.) lot 87, laborer. 
Armstrong, Adam C, (Belle Isle,) lot 55, 

farmer 137. 
ARMSTRONG, HENRY, (Belle Isle,) lot 

56, boatman and farmer 7. 
Armstrong, Marvin, (Belle Isle.) lot 68, 

farmer 18. 
ARMSTRONG, WATSON, (Belle Isle,) lot 

56, farmer 150. 
ARMSTRONG, WILLARD G., (Belle Isle,) 

lot 50, farmer 121. 
Armstrong, William G., (Belle Isle,) prop. 

Belle Isle Hotel. 
I 



ASHBY, ANANIAS, (Camillus,) lot 65", 

farmer 96X- 
AUSTIN, SHEDRACH, (Marcellus Falls-,) 

lot 98, farmer. 
Auyer, James, (Memphis,) lot 63, farmer 

100. 
BACON, JOHN S. REV.,(Belle Isle,)Pres. 

clergyman. 
Baker, George S., (Camillus,) lot 99, farmer 

80. 
Baker, Henry J., (Camillus,) lot 89, farmer 

96. 
Barnard, Asa, (Camillus,) lot 52, farmer 100. 
Barnard, James, (Camillus,) lot 77, farmer 

12. 
Barnard, S. D., (Camillus,) lot 78, farmer 

117. 



144 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



HAMILTON & WffiBURl, 



tear 





ire; 



AND JOBBERS IN 




I.a 30 WARREN SRREET, 



(ST. CHARLES BLOCK,) 



WM. H. -HAMILTON, I 
T. BARTON WILBURN. f 



SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

N. B -Tie Highest Cash Price Paid for Leaf Totoo. 




@@t <& If @^@ii 



i 



INSURANCE AGENTS 



No. 4 TOWPiSEND BLOCK, 



Z. C. FOOT, I 

B. D. NOXON, JR. f 



SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



Agents fin* .the following Companies: 

Hartford Fire Ins. Co., of Hartford, Conn., Capital, $1,000,000 

Howard Ins. Co., New York, Capital, 500,000 

City Fire Ins. Co., of Hartford, Conn., Capital, 300,000 

Putnam Fire Ins. Co., of Hartford, Conn., Capital, 500,000 
Nortli American Fire In«. Co., of Hartford, Ct., Capital, 300,000 

National Ins. Co., Boston, Mass., 300,000 

Schenectady Ins. Co., N. Y., 200,000 



CAMILLUS. 



145 



Bartlett, Alfred, (Camillus,) lot S8, farmer 
leases 138. 

Bennett, Daniel, (Camillus,) lot 87. 

Bennett, James 0., (Belle Isle,) lot 4, far- 
mer 204. 

BENNETT, JAMES O. JR., (Belle Isle,) 
lots 3. 4 and 22, farmer 204. 

Bennett, Joel B., (Camillus,) (L. B. & J. B. 
Bennett.) 

Bennett, L. B. & J. B., (Camillus,) (Lewis 
B. and Joel B.,) lots 89, 75 and 76, far- 
mers 550. 

Bennett, Lewis B., (Camillus,) (L. B. & J. 
B. Bennett.) 

Billings, Win. A., (Camillus,) lot 87, black- 
smith. 

Bingham, Aea, (HowlettHill,) lot 100, far- 
mer 85. 

Bishop, Henry, (Camillus,) lot 65, farmer 
leases 115. 

Brewer, Orin, (Memphis,) lot 63, farmer 
150. 

Bridges, John, (Memphis,) lot 51, farmer 55. 

BROWN, BENJAMIN, (Camillus,) tailor 
and town clerk. 

Bucklin, Benjamin, (Camillus,) nianuf. of 
sheet iron and tin ware. 

Bnrch, Daniel B., (Camillus,) lot 97. 

Burch, Geo. S., (Camillus,) lot 88, shoe- 
maker. 

BURDICK & BRO., (Belle Isle,) (Lafayette 
and Delos,) props. Amboy saw, cider 
and flour mills. 

BURDICK, DELOft, (Belle Isle,) (Burdick 
& Bro.) justice of the peace. 

BURDICK, LAFAYETTE, (Belle Isle,) 
(Burdick <& Bro.) 

Burliugton, Benjamin, (Camillus,) lot 98, 
farmer leases 70. 

Calkins, W. R., (Camillus,) lot 98, farmer 
12. 

Camillus Hotel, (Camillus,) Cornelius Kort- 
right, prop. 

Campbell, Wm. B., (Memphis,) lot 63, farm- 
er 100. 

Carroll, William Rev., (Camillus,) Catholic 
clergyman. 

Casler, George, (Camillus,) lot 88, farmer 
83. 

Casler, Geo. H., (Van Buren Center,) lot 53, 
farmer 83}£. 

Casler, Henry U., (Camillus,) lot 78, farmer 
63. 

Casler, Milton H., (Camillus,) lot 89, farm- 
er 50. 

Chapman, John, (Belle Isle,) lot 44, farmer 
40. 

Chapman, Thomas, (Belle l6le,) lot 44, 
farmer 25. 

CLARK, ERASTUS W., (Camillus,) lots 35 
and 21, farmer 135. 

Clark, Isaac R., (Camillus,) carriage and 
wagon manuf. 

Coakley, James, (Baldwinsville,) lot 44, 
farmer 29. 

Colburn, Horace D., (Belle Isle,) mill- 
wright. 

Coleman, Hollin, (Marcellus Falls,) lot 97, 
blacksmith. 

COLEMAN, WM. R.. (Memphis,) lot 51, 
laborer. 

Conklin, James G., (Camillus.) shoe maker. 

Conley, Winfield S., (Belle Isle,) station 
keeper, Buffalo and Troy Towing Co. 



Connelly, Jeremiah. (Camillus,) shoemaker. 
Cook & Bro., (Camillus,) (Orange L. and 

Sidney H. Jr.) grocers, 
Cook, Orange L., (Camillus,) (Cook & Bro.) 
Cook, Sidney H., (Camillus,) justice of the 

peace and justice of sessions. 
Cook, Sidney H. Jr., (Camillus,) (Cook & 

Bro.) 
COX, JAMES, (Belle Isle,) lot 68, farmer 

158. 
Coyne, Patrick, (Camillus,) lot 99, farmer 

45. 
CROSS, JOHN, (Camillus,) lot 66, farmer 

220. 
Curtis, Augustus, (Camillus,) lot 20, farmer 

CURTIS, AUGUSTUS G., (Camillus,) lot 

20, farmer 35. 
DARROW, GEORGE W., (Baldwinsville,) 

lot 55, farmer leases 56. 
Darrow, John W., (Baldwinsville,) lot 55, 

boatman and farmer 56. 
Davis, Reuben, (Camillus,) retired farmer. 
Delaney, James, (Memphis,) lot 63, farmer 

87. 
DEVOE, GEORGE W., (Camillus,) lot 66, 

farmer 118. 
DILL, ROBERT L., (Camillus,) lot 79, far- 

mer 2,700. 
Dixon, D., (Camillus,) lot 64, farmer 27. 
Dixon, George, (Camillus,) lot 78, farmer 

140. 
Dixon, John, (Camillus,) lot 77, farmer 220. 
Dow, John, (Belle Isle,) lot 56, carpenter 

and farmer 28. 
Doyle, Hosannah, (Camillus,) farmer 17. 
Doyle, R. Mrs., (CamUlus,) lot 20, farmer 

18. 
Driscoll, Michael, (Fairmount,) lot 51, far- 
mer 30. 
DWYER, THOMAS, (Camillus,) lot 97, 

plaster manuf. 
ECKER, JESSE, (Belle Isle,) lot 56, farmer 

78. 
ELDERKIN, C. S. & SON, (Camillus,) 

(Chauncey 8. and George!).,) apiarians 

and patent right dealers in Langstroth 

1)66 I1IV68 

ELDERKIN, CHAUNCEY S., (Camillus,) 

(C. S. Elderkin & Son,)\otWja.xmer 40. 
ELDERKIN, GEORGE D., (Camillus.) (C. 

8. Elderkin & Son.) 
Farley, Patrick, (Van Buren Center,) lot 53, 

farmer 27. 
Felter, William, (Belle Isle,) lumberer and 

shoe maker. 
Fergus, James G., (Camillus,) carriage, 

wagon and blacksmith shop. 
Field, James, (Belle Isle,) lots 24 and 23, 

farmer 45. 
Finkham, Gove C, (Camillus,) lot 77, far- 
mer 88. 
Fish, George B., (Belle Isle,) grain dealer 
FISK& KELLY, (Camillus,) (Thomas A. 

Fisk and John Kelly,) blacksmiths. 
FISK, THOMAS A., (Camillus,) (Fisk & 

Kelly.) 
Freeman, Elijah, (Camillus.) retired farmer. 
Garrison, Chauncey, (Camillus,) cooper. 
Gates, Stephen M., (Camillus,) carpenter 
Gaylord, Grenville M., (Fairmount,) lot 51, 

small fruit raiser and farmer 12 
GAYLORD, HUBBARD M., (Fairmount,) 

lot 37, small fruit raiser and farmer 42. 



146 



ONONDA GA CO UNTY B USINESS DIRECTOR Y. 



To Cash Buyers 



OF 






Before making your purchases we would respectfully ask you to call and look through 
our very large and Superior Stock of 



DRESS GOODS, SILKS, 

CLOTHS & CASSIMERES, 
Domestic Goods, Hosiery, Yankee Notions, White Goods, 



HOUSEKEEPING LINENS, SHAWLS, k, &c. 



Our assortment in every department is more complete than usual, and we are offer- 
ing extraordinary inducements both to the jobbing and retail buyers for cash. 

P. R. Brewster & Co., 

56 South Salina Street, Syracuse, N. Y. 

N.B.— We are continually receiving large lots of Dress Goods, Silks, Linens, &c, 
from Auctions, which we will sell at prices that defy competition. 

P. R. B. & CO. 



CAMILLUS. 



147 



Geddes, Geo., (Fairmount,) supt. of salt 

springs and civil engineer. 
GEDDES. JAMES, (Fairniount,) lot 38, 

farmer 340. 
Gere. Isaac W., (Belle Isle,) brick manuf. 
GERE, JAMES M. COL., (Belle Isle,) lot 
69, salt manuf., commissioner of high- 
ways and farmer 70. 
Gilson, Edward G., (Camillas,) lot 98, farm- 
er 87. 
Glass, Oliver, (Memphis,) lot 51, farmer 112. 
Glover, John, (Marcellus Falls,) lot 97, 

stoD6 cutter 
GOODFELLOW, AZARIAH S., (Belle Isle,) 

lot 44, farmer 30. 
Goodfellow, Stephen, (Belle Isle,) lot 56, 

farmer 3. 
Graves, Albert, (Marcellus Falls,) lot 99, 

farmer 60. 
Green, Joash S., (Memphis,) lot 64, wagon 

shop and cider mill. 
GREENE, SAMUEL, (Camillas,) lot 88, 

laborer. 
GREGORY, JAMES, (Belle Isle,) carpen- 
ter and blacksmith. 
Griffin, Patrick, (Belle Isle,) lot 50, farmer 

6. 
Haley, Michael, (Camillus,) lot 65, farmer 

70. 
Hardigan, Patrick, (Belle Isle,) lot 56, fann- 
er 2. 
HARMON, ALBERT, (Camillus,) insur- 
ance and claim agent and postmaster. 
HARMON, E. R.. (Camillus,) (Munro & 
Harmon,) lot 80, supervisor, dealer in 
grain and tobacco and farmer 55. 
HARPER, MICHAEL H., (Memphis,) lot 

51, fanner. 
Harrington, Benjamin S., (Camillus,) shoe 

maker. 
Harvey, Darwin, (Belle Isle,) boat builder 

and butcher. 
Hatter, John C, (Belle Isle,) lot 55, house 

painter and farmer 90. 
HAY, JAMES T., (Belle Isle.) lots 23 and 

5, farmer 90. 
HAY, LUTHER. (Belle Isle,) lot 67, farmer 

150. 
HEMMINGWAY, JAMES M., (Memphis,) 

lot 76, laborer. 
Henley, Charles, (Memphis,) lot 64, farmer 

53. 
Hess, Solomon, (Camillus,) lot 89, farmer 

85. 
Hickey, Patrick, (Marcellus Falls,) lot 97, 

stone cutter. 
HINSDALE, AARON Y., (Belle Isle,) lot 

68, farmer 72. 
HINSDALE, ALFRED L., (Belle Isle,) lot 

68, farmer 120. 
Hitchcock, Jacob H., (Camillus,) carpenter. 
Holcomb, Wi„ (Memphis,) lot 63, sawyer. 
HOPKINS, ANSON, (Belle Isle,) lot 67, 

farmer 186. 
Hopkins, Harlow W., (Belle Isle,) lot 67, 

HOPKINS, ORRLN, (Belle Isle,) lot 67, far- 
mer 105. 

HOPKINS, SAMUEL L., (Belle Isle,) lot 67, 
farmer 172. 

Horan, Thomas, (Belle Isle,) lot 5, farmer 
157. 

HUBBARD, MARTIN H., (Camillus,) lots 
36 and 22, farmer 136. 



Hughes, Henry C, (Fairmount,) lots 38 and 

24, farmer 210. 
Hughs, Harry C. (Belle Isle,) lot 27, farmer 

212. 
Hatchings, N., (Camillus,) lot 89, carpen- 
ter and farmer 12. 
ISHAM, ASHER, (Belle Isle,) lots 5 and 6, 

farmer 13. 
JACOBSON, EVERETT, (Belle Isle,) 

blacksmith. 
Jacot, Julia Miss, (Camillus,) (with. Kale 

-J/'.,) milliner and dress maker. 
Jacot, Kate Miss, (Camillas,) {with Julia,) 

milliner and dress maker. 
Johnson, Abraham, (Belle Isle,) lots 24 and 

6, farmer 119. 
JOHNSON, ALEXANDER, (Camillus,)car- 

riage and wagon manuf. 
Johnson, Joseph, (Belle Isle,) lots 6 and 7, 

farmer 77. 
JOHNSON, JULIUS R., (Belle Isle,) lots 5 

and 6, farmer 43. 
Johnson, William H., (Camillus,) black- 
smith. 
Kasson, J. W., (Camillus,) lots 64 and 65, 

farmer 100. 
Kasson, O. V., (Camillus,) lots 88 and 98, 

farmer 150. 
KELLY, JOHN, (Camillus,) (Fisk & Kel- 
ly-) 
Kelley, John, (Belle Isle,) lot 69, farmer 67. 
Kelly, Thomas, (Camillus,) cooper. 
Kennar, Edward, (Camillus,) lot 97, plaster 

manuf. 
Kennedy, Samuel, (Camillus,) blacksmith. 
KENYON, CATHERINE MRS., (Camil- 
lus,) lot 77, farmer 100. 
Ketcham, Stephen, (Fairmount,) lot 87, 

farmer 82. 
Kille, John, (Fairmount.) lot 51, farmer 30. 
Kinnally, James E., (Camillus,) lot 66, 

farmer 160. 
Knowles, Courtland W., (Camillus,) lot 20, 

farmer 53. 
Kortright, Cornelius, (Camillus,) prop, of 

Camillus Hotel. 
LaDu, Brinkerhoff, (Van Buren Center,) 

lot 64, farmer 130. 
Land, Charles, (Camillus,) saddler, har- 
ness maker and carriage trimmer. 
Larkin, Albion J., (Van Buren Center,) 

(with Reuben,) lot 53, farmer 143. 
Larkin, John, (Camillus,) lot 89, farmer 12. 
Larkin, Reuben, (Van Buren Center,) {with 

Albion J.,) lot 53, farmer 143. 
Lawless, David, (Howlett Hill,) lot 100, far- 
mer 106. 
Lawton, Howard, (Belle Isle,) lot 44, far- 
mer 5. 
Lawton, William H. H., (Belle Isle,) lot 56, 

farmer 6. 
LEDDY, JOHN, (Fairmount.) let 37, far- 
mer 106. 
Lilley, James F., (Belle Isle.) cigar maker. 
Linder, Stephen, (Camillus,) lot 22, farmer 

62. 
Lindsey, Lorenzo, (Belle Isle,) grocer. 
LONG, DANIEL, (Van Buren Center,) lot 

54, farmer 23. 
Longstreet, Joseph B. Rev., (Camillus,) 
Methodist clergyman. 

Losey, Abram, (Memphis,) lot 63, farmer 
leases 160. 



148 



ONONDA GA CO TJNTY B USINESS DIRECTOR Y. 



HXGrGXItTS & SAHTWALD, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 




Carriages 

Bniies & Sleighs. 



We are doing repairing on the shortest notice, and on reasonable terms. Particular 
attention paid to painting and trimming. Shop— Corner Water & Montgome- 
ry si*., (Opposite City Hall,) Syracuse, N . If. Please give us a call. 

Who Wants to Patronize^ a Temperance House ? 

At the old Onondaga House, up stairs, 
opposite diagonal corner from Co. Clerk's 
Office, may be found a quiet place, clean 
beds invariably, and good wholesome 
fare, at moderate prices. Bonta cares for 
teams at the old barn. No liquor sold. 

r. B. M. Genung, 




PHYSICIAN & SURGEON 

BREWERTON, ONONDACA CO., N. Y. 



3JUE. 



xi&, 



REPAIRER AND DEALER IN 



WATCHES, GfcQGKS & JET/TORY. 



Silver & Plated Ware & Spectacles. 

Also, Glasses Refitted in old frames, 
work done promptly, and warranted. 

CAMILLUS, IV. Y. 



All 



CAMILLUS. 



149 



Lyboutt, David, (Camillus,) lot 65, farmer 
115. 

Lyon. Martin, (Camillas,) lots 34 and 48, 
farmer 138. 

Machan, Conner & Co., (Belle Isle,) (Thom- 
as Machan, John Conner and John Ma- 
chan,') blacksmiths. 

Machan, John, (Belle Isle,) {Machan, Con- 
ner & Co.,) carriage and wagon maker. 

MACHAN, THOMAS, (Belle Isle, )(Machan, 
Conner & Co.,) postmaster, carriage 
and wagon maker, boot and shoe 
dealer. 

MAHAR, TIMOTHY, (Camillus,) lot 99, 
farmer 72. 

MAIN, MILTON J., (Belle Isle.) lot 2, far- 
mer leases 90. 

Main, Susan Mrs., (Belle Isle,) lot 2, farmer 
90. 

Maloney, Stephen, (Belle Isle,) lot 6, farm- 
er 86. 

MALTBY. JACOB, (Baldwinsville,) (with 
James.) lot 66, farmer leases 111. 

MALTBY, JAMES, (Baldwinsville,) (with 
Jacob,) lot 66, farmer leasee 111. 

*MANWARING, MYRON B., (Camillus,) 
repairer and dealer in jewelry. 

MARTIN, R. B., (Camillus,) lot 80, farmer 
20. 

McCarty, Ira, (Camillus,) lot 21, farmer 50. 

McCarty, Mortimer, (Camillus,) lot 21, 
farmer 50. 

Mccracken, hollan j., (Belie isle,) 

lot 3, farmer leases 125. 

McCracken, William T., (Belle Isle,) lot 3, 
farmer 125. 

McGraht, James, (Camillus,) lot 64, farmer 
10. 

McNAMARA, GEORGE, (Belle Isle,) lot 
56, farmer 26. 

Melligan, Thomas, (Camillus.) harness 
maker. 

Merriman, C. J., (Camillus,) lot 76, farmer 
200. 

Mills, John W., (Van Buren Center,) lot 54, 
farmer 13)£. 

Mitchell, Aaron, (Memphis,) lot 51, farmer 
leases 130. 

Mitchell, Truman, (Memphis,) lot 51, far- 
mer 130. 

Mooney, Wm. W., (Memphis,) lot 64, miller 
and farmer 16. 

Morton, C. Mrs., (Belle Isle,) lot 56, farmer 
18. 

Morton, Robert, (Belle Isle,) lot 56, carpen- 
ter, sawmill and farmer 10. 

Muloy, Mary Mrs., (Camillus.) lot 23, farm- 
er 12. 

MUNRO, DAVID A., (Camillus,) lot 80, 
farmer 500. 

MUNRO & HARMON, (Camillus,) (./. M. 
Munro and E. R. Harmon,) dealers in 
grain and lumber. 

MUNRO. HENRY, (Belle Isle,) lot 68, farm- 
er 28. 

MUNRO, JAMES M., (Camillus.) (Munro 
& Harmon,) lot 90, farmer 650. 

MUNRO, JOHN C, (Belle Isle,) lots 68, 69 
and 44. farmer 300. 

Murphy, Thomas B., (Marcellus Falls,) lot 
97, farmer 160. 

NEARING, GUY, (Van Buren Center,) lot 
54, farmer 16. 

NEEDOM, STEPHEN, (Camillus,) lot 98, 
laborer. 



Nobles, Heathcot, (Camillus,) livery stable. 
NOBLE. JULIUS A., (Camillus,) teamster. 
Olmstead, Silas R., (Camillus, )lot 20, farmer 

leases 18. 
Osmond, William, (Camillus,') miller. 
Otman, Abram, (Camillus,) lot 64, grocer 

and farmer 100. 
Owens, Thompkin, (Belle Isle,) boatman. 
Paddock, Cynthia Mrs., (Belle Isle,) lot 68, 

fanner 14. 
PADDOCK, DANIEL B., (Belle Isle,) tan- 
ner and currier. 
Paddock, Isaac, (Memphis,) lot 52, farmer 

98. 
Paddock, J., (Camillus,) lot 87, farmer 200. 
Paddock, John H., (Camillus,) lot 76, farm- 
er 112. 
PADDOCK, NATHANIEL B., (Belle Isle.) 

lot 68, farmer 50. 
Parker, Isaac G., (Memphis,) lot 63, farmer 

160. 
Parsons, Edwin C, (Fairmount,) lot 52, 

farmer 180. 
Parsons, Justin E., (Camillus,) (Parsons & 

Son.) 
PARSONS, PERRIN P., (Camillus,) (Par- 
sons & Son.) 
PARSONS, SAMUEL, (Belle Isle.) lot 55, 

wholesale butcher and farmer 28. 
PARSONS & SON, (Camillus,) (Justin E. 

and Perrin P.,) lots 35 and 49, farmer 

148. 
Patten, JameSj (Camillus,) dealer in drugs 

and medicines. 
PECK, AARON H., (Van Buren Center,) 

lot 54, farmer 196. 
Peck, Edwin, (Van Buren Center,) lot 54, 

farmer 90. 
Peck, Enos, (Van Buren Center,) lot 54, 

farmer 21. 
Peck, Isaac M., (Van Buren Center,) lots 

54 and 55, farmer 115. 
Peck, Lyman, (Belle Isle,) cooper. 
Plumb, George, (Fairmount,) lot 23, farmer 

140. 
Plumb, Horatio, (Fairmount.) lots 22 and 

23, farmer 41. 
POTTER, FRANCIS M., (Belle Isle,) stone 

layer. 
Preslow, Wm. B., (Camillus,) lot 89, farmer 

28. 
Quinby, Aaron, (Van Buren Center,) lot 53, 

farmer 95. 
Quinby, D. F., (Van Buren Center,) lot 53, 

farmer 6%. 
RAYMOND, ALES., (Memphis,) lot 64, 

laborer. 
Reynolds, G. D., (Camillus,) lot 88, farmer 

96. 
Rhodes, J. J., (Camillus,) lot 89, farmer 100. 
Rhodes, William, (Camillus,) lot 77, farmer 

100. 
Richmond, Loren, (Camillus,) lot 77, farmer 

37. 
ROCKWELL, D. E., (Van Buren Center,) 

lot 64, farmer 106. 
Rosa, William, (Belle Isle,) lot 55, manuf. 

of axe and pick handles and farmer 1. 
R owe, Samuel B., (Camillus,) speculator. 
ROWE, S. B. JR., (Camillus,) lot 80, farmer 

130. 
Safford, Clarence S., (Camillus,) dealer in 

drugs and medicines. 
Safford, Ira, (Camillus,) cabinet maker and 

undertaker. 



150 



0N0NDA GA CO UNTT B U8INESS DIRECTOR Y. 



II 



S 




i] 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 





Swedes Hammered and English Iron 



5 



Spring, German and Cast Steel, Horse Shoe Iron, Nail and Spike 

Rods, Blacksmiths' Bellows, Anvils and Vices, Cut and 

Wrought Nails, Brads and Spikes, Manilla Rope, 

Yarn Packing, Wool, Twine, 

Seeds & Agricultural Implements, 

PAINTS, OIL, VARNISH. 

Sash, Blinds, Doors, Glass and Putty, Rubber and Leather Belting, Packing, &c, Fair- 
banks' Platform and Counter Scales, 



COOK & 

GLLES EVERSON. 



PARLOR 

RALPH FRISSELLE. 



STOVES. 
W. W. BISSELL. 




H 




H 






I 






DEALER IN 



II 



W 



fimu, FEE© 





Woofa & Willow fare, Stone Ware, Fruit Jars, k, 
No. lOI East Genesee Street, 

STRAOUSB, 3ST- Y. 

Goods Delivered to any part of the City Free of Charge. 



CAMILLUS. 



151 



SAFFORD, JOHN D., (Belle Isle,) dealer in 
leaf tobacco. 

Schrader, Martin, (Camillus,) lot 65, far- 
mer 74. 

Scott, Silas, (Belle Isle,) lot 44, farmer 75. 

Shearer, Alexander, (Camillas,) lot 05, far- 
mer 125. 

Shearer. David, (Van Buren Center,) lot 52, 
farmer 80. 

SHERWOOD, EDWARD D., (Camillas,) 
general merchant. 

Sherwood, Gaylord N., (Camillus,) retired 
merchant. 

Sherwood, Isaac, (Camillus.) lot 35, farmer 
177. 

Sherwood, John, (Camillus.) lots 36 and 50, 
farmer 241. 

Sherwood, Matthew, (Camillus,) lots 34 and 
48, farmer 179. 

SHOENS, THOMAS H.,(Belle Isle,)grocer. 

SIMS. JACOB, (Camillus,) lot 20, farmer 
140. 

Sims, John, (Belle Isle,) lot 3, grocer and 
farmer 100. 

Sims, Luther, (Belle Isle,) lot 68, conetable 
and farmer 10. 

SKINNER. LEWIS C, M. D., (Belle Isle,) 
physician. 

Slocum, John O., M. D., (Camillus,) phy- 
sician. 

Smith, A. E., (Camillus,) lot 89, farmer 98. 

Smith. Harry, (Geddes,) grocer. 

SMITH. JULIUS W., (Pairmount,) lots 6 
and 7. farmer 48. 

Smith. William, (Belle Isle,) sawyer. 

Spafford, Luther, (Howlett Hill,) lot 100, 
farmer 130. 

Spanlding, Urial, (Camillus,) lot SS, farmer 
CO. 

Stack, William, (Camillus,) wagon maker. 

Stebbins, Harmon, (Camillus, )meat market. 

Steves, Reuben, (Van Buren Center,) lot 
53. farmer 141. 

STEVES, CALEB T., (Geddes,) lot 69, far- 
mer 61. 

Steves. Levi M., (Geddes,) lot 69, farmer 31. 

STICKLE, C. H., (Memphis,) lot 76, farmer 
105. 

Stickle, George A., (Memphis,) lot 51, far- 
mer 234. 

Stone, Anson, (Camillus.) lot 88, thresher. 

SULLIVAN, WILLIAM, (Belle Isle,) lot 
44, farmer 146. 

SWEET, CYRUS, (Camillus,) attorney at 
law. 

Sweet, Cyrus T., (Camillus,) lot 88, farmer 
160. 

SWEETING, AUGUSTINE M., (Camillus,) 
lots 35 and 49, farmer 101. 

Sweetin<r, Charles D., (Camillus,) (if. A. 
Sweeting & Son.) 

SWEETING, FRANKLIN C, (Camillus,) 
butcher. 

Sweeting, Lewis C, (Camillus.) retired far- 
mer. 

Sweeting, M. A. & Son, (Camillas,) (Charlet 
J)..) butchers. 

Taylor, Abner, (Camillus,) lot 97, farmer 210. 



Taylor, G. H., (Camillus.) lot 97, farmer. 
Taylor, Wm. E., (Camillus.) lot 88, farmer 

100. 
Thompson, Ebenezer.(Camillus,)farmer 1J£. 
THOMPSON, JOSEPH F., (Camillus,) lot 

1, farmer 170. 
Thorpe, Wm. C, (Camillus,) lot 89, farmer 

100. 
Tinkham, Anson, (Camillus,) lots S9 and 

98, farmer 88. 
Tuckerman, Frederick, (Belle Isle,) lots 22 

and 23, farmer 9. 
Tuttle, Henry, (Belle Isle,) sawyer. 
Tyler, Lorron, (Camillus,) lot 87, gardener 7. 
VANALSTINE, C, (with P. Vanalstine,) 

(Van Buren Center,) farmer 200. 
Vanallstine, Edward A.,(VanBureu Center,) 

(with Jacob,) lot 54, farmer 23. 
Vanallstine, Jacob, (Van Buren Center,) 

(with Edward A.,) lot 54, farmer 23. 
Vanallstine, James P., (Van Buren Center,) 

lot 54, farmer 146. 
VANALSTINE, MARCIA,(Van Buren Cen- 
ter,) farmer. 
VANALSTINE, P., (Van Buren Center,) 

(tvith C. Vanalstine,) farmer 200. 
Veeder. E. E., (Camillus.) cooper. 
Vosseller, Jacob, (Belle Isle,) lot 44, farmer 

33. 
Watkins, Emily Mrs., (Camillus,) milliner 

and dress maker. 
Way, Cornelius, (Camillas,) miller. 
Wheaton, Victory B., (Camillus,) lots 34 and 

48, farmer leases 138. 
Whedon, Denison, (Camillus,) lots 35 and 

21, farmer 86. 
WHEDON, EZRA, (Fairmount,) lot 51, 

small fruit raiser and farmer 68. 
Whedon, Hiram J., (Camillus,) lots 22 and 

21, farmer 46. 
Whedon, Sylvester, (Camillus,) lot 30, farm- 
er 47. 
Whedon, William, (Fairmount,) lot 52, 

farmer 150. 
WHITE, J. B., (Belle Isle,) lots 3 and 22, 

farmer 85. 
White, John. (Belle Isle,) lot 44, farmer 23. 
White, Michael, (Belle Isle,) lot 56, farmer 

2. 
Whitman, Luther, (Belle Isle,) lot 44, farm- 
er 56. 
Wightman, Elias B., (Belle Isle,) lot 55, 

fruit raiser and farmer 30. 
Wilber, Clark, (Belle Isle,) carpenter. 
Wilber, David, (Belle Isle,) lot 55, farmer 

5#. 

Wilcox, Isaiah, (Camillus,) lot 35, farmer 
50. 

WILLIAMS, CHAS., (Camillus.) 

Winchell, David, (Belle Isle,) lot 44, farmer 
38 

Winchell, Harvey, (Belle Isle,) lot 44, farm- 
er 25. 

WINCHELL, HENRY, (Belle Isle,) lot 44, 
farmer 144. 

Winchell, William, (Belle Isle,) lot 44, farm- 
er 23. 

Woodrun', Ezra, (Belle Isle,) cooper. 



152 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 






AND 



FRAME STORE. 



i Hendrl 



it 



* 



Manufacturer and Dealer in 



MIRROR, PHOTOGRAPH & PORTRAIT 



F 








Photograph Albums, 

STIiE©S0©P»© VIEWS, 

MOULDINGS, LOOKING GLASS PLATES, &C, 

All of which will be eold at low prices and quality guaranteed. 

Pictures and Wreaths framed to order. Re- 
member the place, 

No. 33 WARREN STREET, 



CICERO. 



153 



(Post Office Addresses in Parentheses.) 

Boyington, Enoch, (Brewerton,) lot 10 

asiiery. 



,bbey, Andrews, (Plank Road,) lot 67, far- 
mer 50. 

wBBEY, CHARLES W., (Cicero,) farmer. 

0>bey, Conrad R., (Cicero,) farmer 50. 

dexander, Arthur, (Cicero,) lot 30, farmer 
50. 

iLLEN, CHARLES D., (Cicero,) lot 4d, 
farmer 100. 

Ut, Jacob, (Plank Road,) lot 69, farmer 50. 

Unes, Acil, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) lot 
73, farmer 68. 

Andrews, Garnsey, (Cicero,) lot 66, farmer 
100. 

ANDREWS, NOAH, (Cicero,) lot 54, far- 
mer 133. „„_ 

Vndrews, Titus, (Cicero,) lot 42, farmer 108. 

intes, Evert, (Cicero,) lot 46, farmer 128. 

\ntis,John, (Plank Road,) lot 80, farmer 
10. 

SUBORN, ISAAC S., (Cicero,) lots 54 and 
66, salt manuf. and farmer 78. 

Baker, Hiram W., (Plank Road,) lot 93, far- 
mer 40. 

Ball, David, (Cicero,) lot 57, commissioner 
of highways, building mover and far- 
mer 50. 

BALL, DAVID A., (Cicero,) lot 58, farmer 
leases of Calvin McNeal, 68. 

Ball, Jerry, (Cicero,) lot 58, carpenter and 
builder and farmer 1M- 

Ball, Philander, (Cicero,) lots 56 and 68, far- 
mer 53%. 

Ball, Walter, (Cicero,) lot 55, farmer 60. 

Bankey, Charles, (Plank Road,) lot 94, far- 
mer 30. 

Bardeen, Melvin, (Brewerton,) lot 10, far- 
mer 18. 

Barrette, Jesse, (Cicero.) lot 57, farmer 5. 

Batchelder, Francis H., (Cicero,) lot 55, far- 
mer 50. 

Baum, Alonzo, (Cicero,) retired farmer. 

Baum, Charles, (Cicero,) lot 44, farmer 100. 

Baum, Clark, (Brewerton,) (with Robert 
AlcChesney,) wagon maker. 

Baum, Franklin, (Cicero,) lots 43 and 32, 
farmer 98. 

Beagle, Nicholas, (Brewerton,) lot 10, far- 
mer 74^. 

Beebe, Uriah,, (Plank Road,) lot 81, fanner 
60. 

Bennett, Martin, (Plank Road,) lot 94, far- 
mer 1. 

Betolph, Elisha, (Plank Road,) lot 81, far- 
mer 40. 

Billington, Philip, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) (with Webster,) lot 87, farmer 90. 

BLINN, EDWARD E., (Brewerton,) tea, 
coffee and spice agent. 

BLYNN, MARTIN H., (Cicero,) alio, phy- 
sician and surgeon. 

Borst, David, (Plank Road,) lot 52, farmer 



Bort ,~Simon, (Cicero,) lot 67, farmer 50. 

Bortles, Phillip A., (Brewerton,) shoe- 
maker. , 

Bowering, William R., (Cicero,) lots 66 and 
65, farmer leases 60. 



Boyington, Enoch, (Brewerton,) lot 11, far- 
mer 90. 
BOYINGTON, PATRICK, (Brewerton,) 

lot 9, farmer 135. 
Bradt, Jacob, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 
lot 59, constable and farmer 18. 

Bratt, Peter, (Plank Road,) lot 80, carpenter 
and joiner. 

Briggs, Austin P., (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 87, farmer 115. 

Brooks, Eliza Mrs., (Collamer,) lot 95, far- 
mer 13X. 

Brown, Lorenzo D., (Cicero,) lot 42, general 
merchant. 

Brown, Nathan G., (Cicero,) lot 59, farmer 
25. 

BROWN, PALMER, (Cicero,) lots 59, 58 
and 70, farmer 210. 

Brunt, John, (Cicero,) lot 55, farmer 47X- 

BRUNT, SYLVESTER, (Cicero,) retired 
merchant. 

Bunker, Atwood, (Cicero,) lot 54, wagon 
maker and farmer 5. 

Burnell, William, (Cicero,) lot 55, farmer 
leases of Mrs. Bowering 15. 

Bush, Edward, (Plank Road,) lot 80, far- 
mer 10. 

BUSING, JAMES, (Plank Road,) lot 68, 
farmer 50. 

Butler, George, (Cicero,) lot 43, farmer 51. 

Button, Martin L., (Cicero,) lot 43, carpen- 
ter and builder, farmer 20 and leases 10. 

Button, Sylvester K., (Cicero,) lot 57, far- 
mer 72. 

Carter, Wm. H., (Brewerton,) steamboat 
agent, office in Masonic Hall. 

Cary, Dewain, (North Manlius,) lot 100, far- 
mer leases 33. 

Castleman, Chancia, (Plank Road,) lot 94, 

farmer 13X- . „ 

Cates, Thomas, (Salina.) lot 94, farmer 60. 

Chamberlain, David, (Cicero,) lot 57, far- 
mer 25. __ , ^ . . , . 

Chamberlain, Edwin P., (Plank Road,) lot 
92, farmer 52. 

Chandler, Frank G., (Cicero,) carriage 
maker. , .' .. , 

Chandler, George, (Cicero,) lot 44, farmer 

57 

Chandler, Rodney N., (Cicero,) lot 44, car- 
riage maker, blacksmith and farmer 7. 

Chapman, William, (Plank Road,) lot 66, 
brick and stone mason and farmer 11%. 

Chesbro, James H., (Plank Road,) lot 80, 
farmer leases 25. 

Churchill, William, (Brewerton,) lot 20, far- 
Disr. 

Clark, Jerome, (Brewerton,) lot 10, farmer 
leases 101. 

Clock, Abram, (Brewerton,) cooper. 

Clock, George, (Brewerton,) cooper. 

Coleman, Clinton Mrs., (Plank Road,) lot 
81, farmer 10. 

Collins, A lonzo, (Plank Road,) lot 81, far- 
mer 6%. 



154 



ONONDA GA CO UNTT B USINESS DIRECTOR T. 



PHILLIPS, BENTLEY & CO., 



al Leather Dote 




ALSO DEALERS IN 



WiiL, UliES, PELTS, !©. f 

17 EAST WATER ST., 



Syracuse: 



INT. Y. 



fcj ® |^ 



<£> 








No. 43 E. GENESEE ST., SYRACUSE, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 




TOBAGO 




CIGAES, 

PIPES, FANCY GOODS, 

NEWS AND STATIONERY, 

P. S.--AII orders by mail promptly filled. 



CICERO. 



155 



Bolton, Henry H., (Cicero,) lot 54, tin shop. 

lonkliu, Timothy, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 47, farmer 25. 

Conway, John S., (Salina,) lot 94, farmer 
30 

Conway, Mary Mrs., (Plank Road,) lot 80, 
seamstress and farmer 10.&. 

CONWAY, SAMUEL, (Salina,) lot 94, town 
assessor and farmer 100. 

Conway, William, (Plank Road,) lot 94, far- 
mer 68. 

Cook, Hartley J., (Cicero,) lot 30, farmer 

Cook, Robert, (Cicero,) lot 31, farmer 100. 

Cook, William, (Cicero,) lot 55, farmer 6. 

Coon, John, (Brewerton,) lot 20, farmer 28. 

Coonley, Daniel, (Cicero,) lots 30 and 31, 
farmer 105. 

♦COONLEY, IRVING, (Cicero,) general 
merchant and deputy post master. 

COONLEY, ISAAC, (Cicero,) lot 30, super- 
visor, propagator of small fruit,and far- 
mer 12. 

Cowen, Sarah Mrs., (Plank Road,) lot 81, 
farmer 1. 

CRAMPTON, JAMES, (Cicero,) lot 54, far- 
mer 2. 

CRAMPTON, TnOM AS, (Cicero,) cooper, 
constable and collector. 

Crans, John, (Cicero,) lot 59, farmer 82. 

Crans, Merrit J., (Cicero,) lot 58, farmer 62. 

Cranse, Moses, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 
lot 47, farmer 31. 

Cranse, Oliver, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 
lot 47, farmer '75. 

Cronkhite, Eliza Mrs., (Cicero,) lot 55, far- 
mer 18. 

Crosbey, Orlando, (Cicero,) lot 44, farmer 

23. . ,, , 

CROWELL, EDWIN, (Cicero,) lot 41, far- 
mer 100. 

Crowell, Elisha, (Cicero,) lot 58, farmer 8. 

Crowell, Henry A., (Cicero,) lot 69, farmer 
27. 

Crowell, Horace, (Cicero,) lot 44, farmer 50. 

Cummings, Alvin, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 87, farmer 4>£. 

Cushing & Co., (Brewerton,) (Q. F. and 
8. B.,) general merchants. 

Cushing, Q. F., (Brewerton,) (Cushing & 

CUSHING, SAMUEL R., (Cicero,) lot 68, 
(Cushing & Co. of Bvewerton,) far- 
mer 100. ' ,. 

DANIELS, JESSE, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 58, farmer 64. 

Daniels, Lorenzo, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 59, farmer 27 

Daniels, Newton, (Plank Road,) (with Ster- 
ling,) lots 81 and 82, farmer leases 197. 

Daniels, Sterling, (Plank Road,) (with New- 
ton,) lota 81 and 82, farmer leases 197. 

Day, Horace, (Cicero,) lot 55, farmer 30. 

Day, Mrs. Lucy C, (Cicero,) lot 66, farmer 2. 

DeBardo, Francis, (Plank Road,) lot 80, far- 
mer 30. 

Deming, John, (Collamer,) lot 96, cheese 
maker. 

Deming, Nicholas, (Collamer,) lot 9o, far- 
mer 60. _ , 

Denis, Marvin, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 
lot 72, farmer 27. 

Dennis, George, (Cicero,) lot 56, farmer 
leases 40. 



Dennis, John A., (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 

lot 59, farmer 14M- ,, ,. 

Dennis, William W., (Bridgeport, Madison 

Co.,) lot 60, farmer 10. 
Deyo, Jonathan, (Bridgeport, Madison 

Co.,) lot 47, farmer 67. 
Deyo, Nathaniel, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 

lot 47, farmer 73. 
DD3BLE, LUMAN B., (Cicero,) harness 

maker and farmer. 
Dickson, Archibald, (Brewerton,) machin- 
ist. 
Dickson, John M., (Brewerton,) general 

merchant. : 

Dickson, Joseph, (Brewerton,) machinist. 
DICKSON, WILLIAM J., (Brewerton,) lot 

10, machinist. 
Diffin, John, (Cicero,) lot 42, farmer 67^. 
Diffln, William Mrs., (Cicero,) lot 55, farm- 
er 17. 
Dockstat'er, Levi, (Cicero,) lots 43 and 32, 

farmer 57>£. 
Domenick, Abraham, (Brewerton,) lot 9, 

farmer 75. „ , 

Douglass, Joseph, (Cicero,) lot 29, farmer 

Downs, Edward, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 
lot 86, farmer 7. ,,,„,, 

Driesbach, James C, (Cicero,) lot 31, farm- 
er 70 

Driesbach, James C, (Cicero,) lot 33, farm- 
er 06%. , „ ,. 

Dunham, Edward G„ (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 98, farmer 187. 

Dunham, Valentine, (Cicero,) lot 33, farm- 
er 24X- 

Dyre, Levi, (Cicero.) lot 58, farmer 40. 

EASTWOOD, BENJAMIN, (Bridgeport, 
Madison Co.,) lots 60 and 47, justice of 
the peace, justice of sessions and farm- 
er 86. 



Eastwood, Emma Mrs., (Brewerton,) lot 
10, farmer 12. ,, ,. 

Eastwood, Erastus, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 60, farmer 47# . 

Eastwood, Nilcon P., (Cicero,) lot 33, far- 
mcr 56 

Eastwood/Samuel A., (Cicero,) lots 33 and 

46, farmer 50. 
Eaton, Daniel, (Brewerton,) cooper 
Eaton, Ephraim, (Plank Road,) lot 81, far- 

TTipr 20 
Eaton, Getta Mrs., (Cicero,) lot 43, farmer 

Eatonf Reuben, (Brewerton,) lot 10, farmer 

Eb Peter, (North Manlius,) lot 98, farmer 1. 
Edmonds; Isaac S., (Cicero,) lot 66, farmer 

Edwards, Dewitt C, (Cicero,) lots 43 and 
32 carpenter and farmer 35. 

Edwards, Lyman, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 86, farmer 167>£. 

Eo-gleston, John H., (Cicero,) lot 54, fore- 
man at steam saw mill, and farmer 1. 

EMMONS, EDWARD N., (Brewerton,) 
general merchant and farmer 4. 

Emmons, John W., (Brewerton,) lot 10, 
carpenter. 

Emmons, Jonston, (Brewerton,) lot 9, far- 
mer 20. , ._ , 

Emmons, Samuel, (Brewerton,) lot 10, far- 
mer %}i. 




T^^Ea 



IMPROVED FAMILY 




I 








Triumphant over Eighty-two Competitors 
AT THE WORLD'S FAIR OF 18( 



Machine Needles, Twist, Linen and Cotton- Thread, Oil, 



ON XL AND j^r ALL TIMES. 



E. P. BARBER & CO., 

68 S. SALINA STREET, SYRACUSE, N. 



CICERO. 



157 



Evans, Albert, (Cicero.) cooper. 

Evans, Elijah, (Cicero,) lot 43. farmer 4. 

Evens, Samuel, (Cicero,) lot 32, farmer 15. 

Evens, Henry, (Cicero,) lot 31, farmer 5. 

Evens, Rousil, (Cicero.) lot 31, farmer 9#. 

Eveison, Abram N., (Brewerton.) lot 9, far* 
mer 126. 

Fairfteld, William, (Plank Road,) lot 93, 
firmer 60. 

Farley, Bernard, (Plank Road,) lot SO, farm- 
er 5. 

FAY, JOHN, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 
lot 59, farmer 20. 

FAY, PAUL, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 
lot 59, farmer 85. 

Fistar, John. (Bridgeport, Madison Co.) 
lot 86, wagon maker and farmer 83. 

Flint. George A., (.Cicero,) lot 56, farmer 
75. 

Flint. Thomas, (Brewerton,) lot 11, farmer 
65. 

Flint, William, (Cicero,) lots 56 and 24, 
farmer 89. 

Fonda, Jackson, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 
cooper. 

Foster, D, H. & Co., (Brewerton,) lot 10, 
steam saw mill. 

Foster, John C, (Brewerton,) lot 10, lum- 
berman. 

Frank, Charles, (Cicero,) gate keeper on 
Salina and Central Square Plank Road. 

Frank, George, (Plank Road,) lot 81. farm- 
er 6. 

Fritcher, Coonrod, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co..) lot 73, farmer 30. 

Fritcher, Jacob, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 59, farmer 37. 

Fritcher, Michael, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 73, farmer 100. 

Fuller, Roland S., (Cicero,) lot 59, farmer 
18. 

Fuller, ShubaeL, (Cicero.) lot 45, farmer 43. 

Fulmer, John, (Cicero.) lot 21, farmer 65. 

Garrett, Jesse E., (Plank Road,) lot 97, jus- 
tice of the peace and farmer 110. 

Gasbecker, Elias, (Plank Road,) lot 69, 
farmer 128. 

*GENUNG, BENJAMIN M., (Brewerton,) 
physician, 

Gigon, Barney, (Plank Road,) lot 81, farm- 
er 9. 

GILLETT, ALBERT B., (Cicero,) lot 55, 
carpenter and builder, cooper and far- 
mer 20. 

Gillett. Charles, (Cicero.') lot 54, teamster. 

GILLETT, EDWARD P., (Cicero,) lot 55, 
cooper. 

GILLETT, JAMES R., (Cicero,) school 
teacher. 

Gillett, Jason, (Cicero.) lots 55 and 67, far- 
mer 100. 

Gillett, Lotus, (Flank Road,) lot SO, farmer 
44. 

Gillett, Watson. (Cicero.) lots 55 and 67, far- 
mer 100. 

Gilpin. EdwaTd, (Cicero.) lot 5S, farmer 50. 

GOODFELLOW, WESLEY, (Cicero,) lot 
53, farmer leases 52. 

Graves, Ashley, (Cicero.) lot 16. farmer 50. 

Greenleaf, Carlos T.,(Brewerton.)physician. 

GRIFFIN, GAYLORD, (Bridgeport, Madi- 
son Co.,) lot 72, farmer 6'J. 

Gromaer, Benjamin F., (Plank Road.) lots 
95 and 94, farmer 105. 



Gross, Lewis, (Salina,) lot 92, farmer 55. 

Grousbeck, Alonzo, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co..) lot 73, farmer 180. 

Hackett, Baruch B., (Cicero,) lot 43, farmer 
55. 

Hackett, Burr Col., (Cicero,) lot 42, farmer 
130. 

Hackett, George J., (Cicero,) lot 57, far- 
mer 40. 

Hackett, Martin, (Collamer,) lot 96, farmer 
42. 

Hakes, Lebbeus, (Cicero,) brick and stone 
mason. 

HALL, JOHN C, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co ,) (with Franlin Pardee,) lot 60, far- 
mer 308. 

HALL, SETH, (Cicero.) lot 57, farmer 70. 

Hanks, Phisk, (Plank Road,) lot 45, farmer 
113. 

Hart, Cahin, (Cicero,) lot 30, farmer 50. 

Hart, Daniel, (Cicero,) lot 56, farmer 80. 

Hart, James G., (Cicero,) farmer and coop- 
er. 

Hart, Peter, (Cicero.) carriage maker. 

Hart, William, (Cicero,) lot*57, farmer 74. 

Haskell, John B., (Cicero,) lot 57, farmer 
59. 

Hatch, Frederick, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 72, farmer 144. 

Hclvie, Henry, (Bridgeport, Madison Co..) 
lot 87, farmer leases 90. 

Hepp, Franklin. (Cicero.) lot 21, farmer 47. 

Hepp, Joseph, (Cicero,) lot 30, farmer 37. 

HERRICK, LESTER C, (Cicero,) lot 41, 
prop. Herrick's Hotel, formerly known 
as Cicero House, and farmer 21. 

Herrick, William, (Cicero,) lot 54, farmer 
73. 

HESELDEN, GEORGE, (Brewerton,) car- 
penter. 

Hicks, JohnF., (Plank Road,) lot SO, jus- 
tice of the peace. 

Hicks, Russell F., (Plank Road,) lot SO, far- 
mer 100. 

Hildreth, Luther, (Collamer,) lot 97, farmer 
leases 100. 

Hill, Edward, (Brewerton.) lot 10, farmer 
29>£. 

Hillock, Thomas, (Cicero.) lots 56 and 69, 
farmer 213. 

Hiserodt, Henry. (Cicero,) harness maker. 

Hoadley, Leonard, (Cicero,) lot 33, farmer 

2#. 

Hoatland, Archie, (Collamer.) (with Henri/, 
Henri/ Jr., and George.) lot 95, farmer 
1C8. . „ 

Hoatland, George, (Collamer,) (with Henry, 
Henry Jr. and Archie,) lot 95, farmer 
108. „, „ 

Hoatland, Henrv, (Collamer.) (with Henry 
Jr. Archied/id George.) lot 95, farmer 
108. 

Hoatland, Henry Jr., (Collamer,) (with 
Henry, Archie and George,) lot 95, far- 
mer 108. 

Hoatland, Joseph, (Plank Road,) lot 95, far- 
mer 75. 

Hoatland, Thomas, (Plank Road,) lot 94, 
farmer 60. 

Hodge, Austin P., (Cicero,) lot 55, farmer 
3S%. 

Hodge, Lotan, (Cicero.) lot 55, farmer 43. 

Hodge, Solomon, (Cicero,) lot 44, retired 
farmer ]J£. 



15S ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 




I 



I 



Manufacturer of 



French Yoke 




i 





f 



And Dealer in 



Men's Furnishing Goods, 

23 S. Salina St.. 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



A Large Assortment of Canes and Umbrel- 
las, Trunks, Traveling Bags, <&c. 
Collars washed and done up at S© cts. per doz. 



W 



€4?J 



1 




WHOLESALE & RETAIL DEALERS IN 




J 



Also Manufacturers of all kinds of 




CRACKERS, 

AND CONFECTIONERY, 

EATELES, N. Y. 



ONONDA GA CO UXTY B USINE8S DIRECT OB Y. 



159 



CCS 

OO 



GO 



Q3 
CCJ 

ca 

oo 




Having had an experience of over 10 years in this particular Branch of Coloring, I 
can offer great inducements to persous wishing Photographs worked up both in Water 
Colors and India Ink. 



From the card size up to full iife. Persous having 

Daguerreotypes, Ambrotypes, Cartes de Visile, 

And all kinds of Camera Pictures, copied to any size, and worked up at prices to suit 
customers The new and elegant PORCELAIN e lored at low rates. A liberal percent- 
age to the trade. Tlie A.rt of Color taxiglit oy 

GEO. II- PERRIOR, 

45 1-2 E. Washington St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



i# 



ALL LETTERS WILL MEET WITH A PROMPT REPLY. 



160 ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Phoenix Mutual 

LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

Established in 1851, in Hartford, Conn. 

E. FESSENDEN, President. JAMES F. BURNS, Secretary. 

This OLD, ZARGE and PROSPEROUS Company, 
ORGANIZE® and CONDUCTED solely for lite benefit 
of the INSURED, w?io receive the 

mmn net twm> 

Annual Dividends 

Having averaged 50 per cent, each yea?\ 

POLICIES ARE ALL NON-FORFEITING 

Our Policy contains no odious Restrictions. 

Benefits of all other Companies Combin- 
ed in the Phoenix Mutual. 

Secure a Policy before it is too late, that the wife and little ones may not be unpro- 
tected. 

EDWARD NEWELL, Gen'lAg't, 
19 Yates Block, 

(Agents Wanted.) Syracuse, N. Y. 



CICERO. 



161 



Hogaboom, John, (Brewerton,) axe helve 
maker. 

Hogan, Isaac, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 
lot 73, fanner 43>£. 

Hogan, Jacob, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 
lot 72, farmer 32X- 

Hollenbeck, Isaac, (.Cicero,) lot 66, cooper 
and farmer 4. 

Hose, John, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) lot 
87, farmer 5. 

Hotaling, Mrs. Sarah J., (Cicero,) lot 59, 
farmer 6>£. 

HOUGHTALING, GABRIEL, (Cicero,) far- 
mer. 

Houghtaling, Jonathan, (Cicero,) lots 58 and 
70, farmer 291. 

House, Ira, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) lot 
87, farmer 35#. 

Howard, John A., (Plank Road,) lot 80, car- 
penter and joiner. 

Hoyt, Charles, (Cicero,) lots 43 and 32, far- 
mer 36. 

Hoyt, David H., (Cicero,) lots 32, 31 and 44, 
farmer 168. 

Hoyt, Jacob, (Cicero,) lots 33 and 32, farmer 
100. 

HUGHES, THOMAS, (Brewerton,) agent 
for patent cheese hoop. 

Hnnt, David, (Cicero,) lot 32, farmer 4. 

Hurst, Robert, (Brewerton,) lot 21, farmer 
46. 

Jackson, Elias, (Cicero,) lot 29, farmer 25. 

Jackson, John W., (Cicero,) lot 30, farmer 
35. 

James, Daniel, (Brewerton,) machinist, 

•JOHNSON, GARRISON B., (Brewerton.) 
lot 20, agent for Buckeye mower and 
reaper, patent right dealer and farmer 
98. 

JOHNSON. GEORGE, (Collamer,) lot 96, 
farmer 55. 

Johnson, Harvey H., (Cicero,) lot 46, coop- 
er and farmer 55. 

Johnson, Hiram, (Brewerton,) lot 11, far- 
mer 12. 

Johnson. Orsamus, (Brewerton.) lots 10 and 
9, postmaster and farmer 237. 

Johnson, Seth W., (Salina,) lot 95, farmer 
13&. 

Jones, Thomas, (Collamer,) lot 99, farmer 
21. 

Kathern, George L., (Brewerton,) farmer. 

Kathern, John B., (Brewerton,) lots 10, 11 
and 12, lumberman and farmer 114. 

Heeler, Polly Mrs., (Plank Road,) lot 81, 
farmer 1. 

Kellogg, Rufu6, (Brewerton,) lot 20, farmer 
€8. 

Kinne, Ethil, (Brewerton,) teamster. 

Kinne, Levi, (Brewerton,) lot 10, cooper 
and farmer 18. 

Kinne, Person, (Brewerton,) lot 10, tress 
hoop maker and farmer 7. 

Kinney, George, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 
lot 72, farmer 4. 

Kinyon, Charles, (Brewerton,) painter. 
Kinyon, Noel, (Brewerton,) blacksmith. 
Kirkland. John, (Cicero.) lot 66, farmer 130. 
KIRKLAND, JOHN, (Plank Road,) lots 06 

and 54, farmer 111. 
Kirshenbea^m, Adam, (Cicero,) lot 54, 

blacksmith and farmer \}i. 
Kirshenbeaum, John, (Cicero,) blacksmith. 
J 



Last, William, (Plank Road,) lot 81, farmer 

LAWLESS, CHARLES, (Brewerton,) lot 
10, farmer 2S£. 

LEACH, ALLEN, (Cicero,) lot 66, carpen- 
ter and builder and farmer 32. 

Leach, William, (North Manlius,) lot 100. 
farmer 50. 

Lewis, Lyman Mrs., (Brewerton.) milliner. 

Lewis, Margaret Mrs., (Cicero,) lot 54, far- 
mer 17. 

Lienhart, George, (CoUamer,) lot 95, farmer 
78. 

Lillie, Eben, (Plank Road,) lot 66, farmer 5. 

Lillie, Stephen, (Plank Road,) lots 78 and 80, 
supt. of Salina and Central Square 
Plank Road and farmer 55. 

Livingstone, James E., (Brewerton,) black- 
smith. 

Livingstone, Samuel, (Brewerton,) tailor. 

LLOYD, ANDREW, (North Manlins,) lot 
K»0, farmer 50. 

LOOMIS, ADDISON J., (Cicero,) lot 41, 
prop, of Cicero Cheese Factorv. 

Loomis, Henry H, (Cicero,) lot 29, farmer 
147. 

Loomis, Maria Mrs., (Cicero,) lot 33, farmer 
25. 

Lotton, John, (Cicero,) lot 54, farmer. 

Lower, Robert, (Cicero,) lot 54, shoemaker 
and farmer 1%. 

Luce, Freeman, (Plank Road,) lot 81, far- 
mer 5. 

Luce, Joseph, (Cicero,) lot 43, farmer 30. 

Lynch, Oren, (Brewerton,) cooper. 

Lynn, Lyman, (Brewerton,) lot 9, farmer 21. 

Markham, Edwin M., (Brewerton,) cheese 
manuf. and farmer. 

Marks, Albert H., (Brewerton,) homeop. 
physician. 

Mathews, John, (Plank Road,) lot 82, far- 
mer 52. 

Maxwell, Archibald, (North Manlius,) lot 
100, farmer 17. 

Maxwell, Christopher, (Collamer,) lots 95 
and 81, farmer 185. 

Maxwell, David, (Collamer,) lot 97, farmer 
leases 100. 

Maxwell, John, (Collamer,) lot 97, farmer 
50. 

Maxwell, Thomas, (Collamer,) lot 95 r for- 
mer 45. 

Mayo, Elisha, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 
lot 87, farmer 100. 

McCall, William M., (Cicero,) lot 20, farmer 
19#. 

McChesney, John, (Plank Road,) lot 92, 
farmer 1J4- 

McCHESNEY, ROBERT, (Brewerton,) 
{McChesney & Stokes.) 

*McCHESNEY & STOKES, (Brewerton,) 
(Robert McChesney and Chas. Stokes,) 
carriage makers, undertakers, black- 
smiths, &c. 

McGuire, Dennis, (Cicero,) lot 54, tin ped- 
ier and farmer 6. 

McKinley, Frank, (Cicero,) lot 20, farmer 

102. 
McKinley, Gilbert, (Cicero,) lot 30, farmer 

40J£. 
McKinley, Hays, (Brewerton,) farmer leasee- 

60. 
McKinley, Hugh, (Brewc-aton,) lot 12 and 
21, farmer 146. 



162 ONONDA GA CO TTNTY B USINESS DIRECTOR Y. 





STITUTE, 

A T ©. ©1 SOUTH SAUQSA STREET, 

Established for the cure of 

Scrofula, Consumption, Catarrh, Bronchitis, Asthma, Neuralgia, 
Dyspepsia and Iiiver Complaints. 

Personal attention will be given to the treatment of the preceding and other dis- 
eases, administering " Oxygenized Air," " Medical Inhalations," "Local Treatment," 
and the best Therapeutical Agents. 

The OXYGEN (the vital principle of air,) is breathed directly into 3he Lungs, 
and through them is carried into the blood, thus reaching all parts of the system at 
once, vitalizing the blood, decomposing the impure matter, and expelling it through the 
pores. The results from this mode of treatment are immediate. Patients do not have 
to experiment with it for months to learn whether they are being benefited. But 
few inhalations are necessary to satisfy any one of its efficacy. 
From KEV. A. J. FROST, Pastor of East Genesee Baptist Church. 

Syracuse, April 0, 1868. 
DR. BROWER— Dear Sir: — Allow me to say that I have reeeived more benefit from 
ysxEr treatment of Catarrh and Throat difficulties by the use of "Oxygenized Air," than 
from all other sources combined. I have been suffering with these diseases for several 
years, and am better now from a two months' treatment, (my throat giving me no trou- 
ble, being apparently perfectly well) than I have been for six years. I would cheerfully 
recommend your treatment to all who are suffering from Bronchitis or Catarrhal dis- 
eases. Gratefully, yours, A. J. FROST. 
From J. F. WING, Kirk Block, Syracuse. 

Syracuse, April 8, 1868. 
February If t, when I put myself under Dr. Brower's treatment, I was going fast 
with the quick consumption. I had all the signs of the last stage. My friends felt and 
said I would not live six months. To-day I consider myself a well man, strong, hale 
and hearty. My lungs are large, apparently sound, and elastic. Thanks to " Oxygen- 
ized Air, v as administered by Dr. J. P. Brower. Truly, yours, J. F. WING. 
From Rev. S. R. DLMMOCK, Pastor of Plymouth Church, Congregational. 

Syracuse, May 4, 1868. 
DR. BROWER — Dear Sir :— For more than six years I have been afflicted with a 
form of Catarrh by which the mucous membrane was so thickened as to nearly close the 
nasal passage^ For the past year I had all the attendants of that dreadful disease, lan- 
guor, low spirits, with such a repugnance to society, and mental and physical labor, 
that I well nigh determined to give up my profession. I have suffered many things, of 
many physicians, without benefit; and I tried the remedy " Oxygenized Air" with but 
little faith. But after a trial of a month and a half, I am fully satisfied it is the method 
of treating Catarrh and Asthma.* I am so nearly recovered as to call myself well. I 
cheerfully commend your practice, not for your sake, but for the sake of those afflicted 
as I have been, Yours, truly, S. R. DIMMOCK. 

*Mr. Dimmock inherited a tendency to Asthma, which would be brought on by any 
extra exercise. Has not had a single attack since he commenced treatment, although he 
says he has done what would have surely brought an attack before. 
JOSEPH F. SABINE, Treasurer of Syracuse Savings Bank, says : 

"Doctor, you can refer to me, for I am now feeling perfectly well and stout, weigh 
more than I ever did, and have got a powerful appetite." 

Mr. Sabine's was a case of Anasarca, the feet and limbs swelling, with a tendency 
to consumption, feeling generally languid and debilitated. 

From WM. SUMMERS, (Firm of Summers & Co., Proprietors of Syracuse Daily 
Standard): Syracuse, May 6, 1868. 

My daughter's spine was badly curved, caused by Scrofula, the general health poor, 
and rapidly growing worse, the extremities cold and torpid. After a six week's treat- 
ment by "Oxygenized Air," the child's health is greatly improved, the spine much 
straighter, the general figure good, and the extremities warm, showing a good circula- 
tion. The child is rapidly improving at the present time. 

Respectfully, yours WILLIAM SUMMERS. 

If persons that are unable to visit the office personally, will write out a brief de- 
scription of their symptoms, and forward to me, a candid opinion will be given, and if 
desired, remedies will be sent to their homes. Address, DR, J. P. BEOWEB, 
91 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. Consultations free. 



.1 



CICERO. 



163 



Mc Kinley, John, (Cicero,) lor 55. farmerll. 

McKinley, Thomas, (Cicero,) lot 67, farmer 
99. 

McKinley, William, (Cicero,) lot 67, farmer 
50. 

McKyes, Edson, (Cicero.) tin pedler. 

McNEAL, CALVIN, (Cicero,) lot 58, car- 
penter and builder and farmer 69. 

McNEAL, JOHN, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lots 60 and 47, farmer 140. 

McNeal, William, (Cicero,) lot 46, farmer 
leases 73. 

McViccor, George, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 47, farmer 106. 

Means, James R., (Brewerton,) lot 10, far- 
mer 7. 

Mede, John, (Plank Road,) lot 67, farmer 
49. 

Meriam, Nathan, (Cicero.) lot 43, farmer 20j 

Merrian, Noah, (Cicero,) lot 66, farmer 13. 

Merritt, Merchant, (Brewerton,) lot 10, 
cooper. 

Merritt, William H., (Brewerton,) cooper. 

Mickle, Peter, (Collamer,) lot 96, farmer 100. 

Millen, Charles M., (Cicero,) cheese maker 
and school teacher. 

Miller, Abner, (Plank Road,) lot 80, car- 
riage maker, blacksmith and farmer 12. 

Miller, Abram, (Brewerton,) stone cutter. 

Miller, Milton, (Brewerton,) stone and 
brick mason. 

Millis, Henry, (Brewerton.) painter. 

Millis, Henry Mrs., (Brewerton,) milliner 
and dress maker. 

Monhat, Francis, (Salina,) lot 21, farmer 

37?£. 
Monhat, George, (Cicero,) lot 21, farmer 

37%. 
Monhat, Paul J., (Cicero.) lot 21, farmer 59. 
Montgomery, Worthy, (Plank Road,) lot 

80, farmer 8. 
Moore, John, (Plank Road,) lot 81, farmer 

MORRIS, EDGAR F., (Cicero,) lot 44, car- 

E enter and builder, patentee of horse 
oe and potato digger combined, and 
farmer 20. 

Morris, Edward, (Cicero,) lot 44, farmer 20. 

MOSS, JOHN, (Cicero,) lot 45, farmer 25. 

Moulton, Catharine Mrs., (Brewerton,) lot 
20, farmer 89. 

Moulton, Emery, (Cicero,) lot 29, fanner 100. 

Moulton, John, (Cicero,) lot 41, farmer 88. 

Moulton, Joseph M., (Cicero,) lot 20, farmer 
200. 

Muckey, Henry A., (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 60, farmer 48}£. 

Munger, E. H. Rev., (Plank Road,) pastor 
of M. E. church of Centerville. 

Myers, John V., (Cicero,) lot 42, cooper and 
farmer 7X- 

Nearing, Mars, (Cicero.) lot 66, surveyor 
and farmer leases 6. 

Nelson, Thomas W., (Cicero,) lot 56, far- 
mer 122. 

Neumann, Charles, (Cicero,) lot 32, farmer 
38^. 

Neumire, Paul. (Collamer,) lot 97, farmer 80. 

Newcomb, George W., (Plank Road,) lot 
68, farmer 113. 

Newton, Hutchins E., (Bridgeport, Madi- 
son Co.,) cooper. 

Nichols, Charles, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 86, farmer 100. 



Nolan, Thomas, (Plank Road,) lot 80, far- 
mer 95. 

Olt, Andrew, (Plank Road,) lot 82, fanner 
50. 

Osborn, Milton K., (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 72, farmer 64. 

Ostrander, William H., (Plank Road,) lot 
66, manuf. of lime and farmer 106. 

Otman, George, (Brewerton,) lot 10, fanner 
31. 

Ottman, Charles H., (Brewerton,) lot 20, 
farmer 25. 

Ottman, Jacob, (Brewerton,) lot 20, farmer 
120. 

Overdriver, John, (Plank Road,) lot 82, far- 
mer 8. 

Overhiser, John, (North Manlius,) lot 100, 
farmer leases 160. 

Palmer, Joshua, (Brewerton,) lot 10, farmer 
20. 

Palmer, Spencer,(Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 
lot 87, farmer 12. 

Palmer, William W., (Plank Road,) lot 82, 
farmer 52. 

PARDEE, FRANKLIN. (Bridgeport, Madi- 
son Co.,) (with John Hall,) lot 60, far- 
mer 308. 

Parker, Hamilton, (Brewerton,) lots 9 and 
8, farmer leases 53. 

Parmenter, Chancey, (Cicero,) lot 69, far- 
mer 50. 

Patten, Joseph, (Salina.) lot 94, farmer 30. 

Pearson, John, (Cicero,) lot 41, saddle and 
harness maker and farmer \%. 

PETTIEBONE, JACOB, (Cicero,) lot 33, 
prop, of the South Bay House and far- 
mer 5. 

Phelps, Henry N., (Brewerton,) lot 11, far- 
mer 76. 

Phillips, Alexander, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 87, cooper and farmer. 

Phillips, John, (Brewerton,) gardener. 

Phillips, Joseph Sen., (Bridgeport, Madi- 
son Co.,) lot 86, farmer 104. 

Pierce, Jonathan E., (Cicero,) lot 66, coop- 
er and farmer 21. 

Piggar, Franklin, (Cicero,) lot 32, cooper 
and farmer 60^. 

Piggie, Anthony, (Cicero.) cooper. 

Piggie, Peter, (Cicero,) lot 31, farmer 57. 

Pinder, Albertis L., (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 47, farmer leases 60^. 

Plant, Byron, (Cicero,) lot 54, butcher, coop- 
er and farmer 2M- 

PLANT, LAURIN, (Cicero,) carpenter and 
builder. 

POUTRY, DENNIS, (Cicero,) lot 41, auc- 
tioneer and farmer 1. 

Powell, Mason, (Plank Road,) lot 81, far- 
mer 31. 

Quackenbush, James, (Brewerton,) lot 10, 
farmer 30. 

Randall, Francis, (Plank Road,) lot 93, far- 
mer 40. 

RANDALL, JACOB H., (Plank Road,) far- 
mer. 

Randell, Cornelius, (Plank Road,) lot 92, 
farmer 42. 

Randell, Gideon, (Plank Road,) lot 93, far- 
mer 50. 

Randle, Archibald S., (Plank Road,) lot 92, 
farmer 75. 

Randle, Isaac, (Plank Road,) lot 80, farmer 
160. 




164 ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

MILLER BROTHERS, 

Marble and Lime Stone Works, 

Lock corner Canal Street, 

Opposite Alvord's Water Lime Mill, and next to D. McCarthy's Lumber 
Yard, Syracuse. All kinds of Monuments, Head Stones, Table 
Beds, Huilding Stones, &c», promptly made to order and delivered 
and warranted as represented. Cheap as can be done in the city. 

C. MILLEE. P. MILLER. 



F. H. GILLMORE, 

l©lllf BLHAOHHR, 

No. 49 Warren St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Also Manufacturer of 

x=»:l.-a.&t:e3:fl blocks. 

Bonnets and Hats Altered, Bleached, Pressed or Colored, in the best possible manner. 

rapp&hirsh| 

Manufacturers and Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Tobacco & Cigars, Snuff, Pipes, &c, 

93 SOUTH SALINA STREET, 

?^i APP } SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

FRANK A. TROENDLE^ 

23 Wolf St., (1st Ward,) Syracuse, 

DEALER IN 

t 



Of every description. Custom Work made to order from the best quality of Stock, by 
experienced workmen. 

FRANK A. TROENDLE. 



CICERO. 



165 



Ransey, Thomas, (Brewerton,) lot 10, retired 
farmer. 

Ransom, Ezekiel, (Cicero,) lot 54, farmer 1. 

RANSOM, POLLY M. MISS, (Cicero,) 
tailoress. 

Raymond, Charles, (Plank Road,) lot 82, 
farmer 200. 

Rich, George, (North Manlius,) lot 100, far- 
mer 30%. 

Richmond, John, (Salina,)lot 92, farmer 70. 

Rings, Nicholas, (North Manlius,) lot 100, 
farmer 39. 

Ringwood, James, (Salina,) lot 94, farmer 14. 

Robbins, Ebenezer, (Cicero,) lot 65, fanner 
21. 

Roberts, George, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 72, farmer 46. 

Roberts, Rensselaer, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 87, farmer 57. 

Robinson, Thomas, (Cicero,) lot 59, farmer 
30. 

Robison, Elisha, (Cicero,) lot 58, farmer 16. 

Robison, Lvman, (Cicero,) lot 57, farmer 22. 

Robison, Willard A., (Cicero,) lot 69, far- 
mer 27. 

Rocktasle, Augustus, (Salina,) lot 94, far- 
mer 41^. 

Rolla, Barney J., (Cicero,) lot 29, farmer 20. 

ROLLER, JOHN G., (Cicero,) lot 30, far- 
mer 75. 

Roller, Martin, (Cicero,) lot 30, farmer 35^. 

Rose, Moses P., (Cicero.) lot 45, farmer 48. 

Rose, Phillip, (North Manlius,) lot 100, far- 

IHGr 16&869 40 

SADLER, AMBROSE, (Cicero,) lot 54, far- 
mer 56. 

Sadler, Erwin, (Cicero,) lot 32, farmer leas- 
es 5. 

Sadler, Freeman, (Brewerton,) lots 20 and 
10. farmer 37. 

Salg, Jacob, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) lot 
73, tanner. 

Salg, Nathaniel, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 
shoemaker. 

Saunders, Asahel, (Cicero,) lot 54, house 
painter and farmer 1. 

Sayles, Brown, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 
lot 71, farmer 600. 

Sayles, Oney, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 
lot 73, saw mills, grist mill and farmer 
320. 

Sconton, Mercy Mrs., (Cicero,) lot 42, far- 
mer 3. 

Shaw, John C, (Cicero,) lots 42 and 43, 
town clerk and farmer 10. 

Sheld, George, (Cicero,) lot 30, farmer 43. 

Shepard, Nelson, (Cicero,) lots 43 and 32, 
farmer 60. 

Shephard, Harvey, (Cicero,) lot 32, farmer 
77. 

Shepherd, Sarah Mrs., (Cicero,) lot 43, far- 
mer 15. 

Sherwood, Hanford, (Plank Road,) lot 81, 
farmer 40. 

SHERWOOD, WILLIAM H., (Brewerton,) 
lots 10, 11 and 12, farmer 95. 

SHUE, GEORGE, (Brewerton,) lot 10, far- 
mer \l%. 

Shumaker, Robert, (Manlius Station,) lot 
99, farmer 50. 

Shute, William C, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 59, butcher and farmer 21#. 

Simmons, Christey, (North Manlius,) lot 
99, farmer 25. 



Simmons, Nicholas, (Plank Road,) lot 82, 
farmer 25. 

SrVvER, JOHN, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 
lot 72, farmer 60. 

Siver, Stephen, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 
lot 59, farmer 52. 

Sivers, Steven, (Bridgeport, Madison Co..) 
lot 47, farmer 50. 

Sizer, Samuel, (Cicero,) lot 59, farmer 14. 

SKIFF, SEYMOUR, (Cicero,) lots 54, 55 
and 56, farmer 62. 

Sleeth, Samuel, (Plank Road,) lot 81, far- 
mer 22>£. 

Slosson, Reuben, (Plank Road,) lot 80, far- 
mer 1. 

Slosson, Washington C, (Cicero,) lot 47, 
femier 60. 

Smiley, Alfred, (Brewerton,) cooper. 

Smith, Almiron, (Plank Road,) school teach- 
er and farmer. 

Smith, Almon J., (Plank Road,) lot 81, far- 
mer 60. 

Smith, Dennis, (Plank Road,) lot 80, cooper 
and farmer 2. 

Smith, Eli, (Cicero,) lot 56, farmer 20. 

Smith, Elijah, (Cicero,) lot 33, farmer 16. 

Smith, Francis, (Cicero,) lot 43, farmer 55. 

SMITH, HARVEY, (Cicero,) lots 69 and 70, 
farmer 265^. 

Smith, James A., (Cicero,) eclectic phy- 
sician. 

Smith, James D., (Cicero,) lot 69, farmer 30. 

Smith, James H., (Cicero,) lot 43, farmer 2^. 

Smith, Jane Mrs., (Plank Road,) lot 81, 
farmer 40. 

Smith, Stephen, (North Manlius,) lot 99, 
farmer 19. 

Smith, William, (Plank Road,) lot 81, far- 
mer 9. 

Snellor, Jacob, (Cicero,) lot 29, farmer 75. 

Snider, August, (Plank Road,) lot 81, far- 
mer 3. 

Snyder, John, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 
lot 72, farmer 50. 

Snyder, Jacob, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 
lots 73 and 72, farmer 1S7. 

Sommer, Henry, (Cicero,) lot 54, farmer 100. 

Spear, Edward, (Cicero,) lot 43, farmer 20. 

Spire, Richard, (Brewerton,) lot 10, farmer 
37. 

Spirse, John A., (Brewerton,) carpenter. 

Spuse, John, (Cicero.) lot 31, farmer 16. 

Stafford, Elias, (Cicero,) lot 54, stave cutter 
and farmer 1. 

Steiner, Catherine Mrs., (Bridgeport, Madi- 
son Co.,) lot 60, farmer Z%. 

Sternberg, Jonathan, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co..) lot 47, farmer 34. 

Sternberg, William, (Cicero,) prop. Cicero 
Center Cheese Factory. 

Stevens, George W., (Cicero,) carriage 
maker. 

Stevens, John L. Sen., (Brewerton,) lot 10, 
justice of the peace and farmer 10. 

STEVENSON, THOMAS, (Collamer,) lot 
96, farmer 80. 

STEVENSON, DAVID, (Plank Road,) lot 
81, farmer 75^. 

Stewart, William, (Salina,) lot 92, shoe- 
maker. 

STOKES, CHARLES, (Brewerton,) (Mc- 
Chesney & Stokes.) 

Stone, Paul. (Cicero,) lot 31, farmer 66#. 

Strail, Abraham, (Cicero,) lot 55, farmer 54, 



166 



ONONDA GA CO UNTY B TJSINESS DIRECTOR Y. 



Thos. Jenkins & Co. 

MANUFACTURERS & DEALERS IN FIRST-CLASS 

onfeetioroi, Fine dale, 

SUPERIOR CRACKERS, 

Flavoring Extracts, Nuts & Baltimore Ice Cream, 

Families, Weddings and Parties supplied promptly. Charges rea- 
sonable. Also agent* for Kocliester Aerated Dread and Crackers. 

Cold Soda from the Polar Fountain on draft 
during the season. 

6 Yates Block.. 

THOMAS JENKINS, | Q VT? A /^TTQI? TVT V 

WM. GEO. JENKINS, f OX XVZXO U OHl, H . X . 



HENRY LOFT! 



! f 



DEALER IN 



HUMAN HAIR GOODS, PERFUMERY, ML 



AND MANUFACTURER OF 



LADIES' & GENTS' WIGS, 

Switches, Bands, Brails, Carls, Hair Jewelry & Hair Wort, 

Of every description. My assortment of Hair Goods is very large, and all goods are 
made of the best imported human hair. All goods warranted. My store is the largest 
in the State. I have the faculty to get up work so as to defy competition. 

I also have Ladies' Hair Dressing Rooms attached, which are superintended by one 
oi the best Lady hair dressers of New York City. Remember the place, 

No. 41 South Salina Street, Syracuse, 

Opposite Globe Hotel, over E. F. Rice's Dry Goods Store. 

HENRY LOFTIE. 
Orders by mail promptly attended to. 



CICEEO. 



167 



Strail. Milo P., (Cicero.) lot 42, cooper. 

Straits. Henry, (Brewerton,) lot 10, farmer 
9. 

Straits, Sydney C, (Brewerton,) wagon 
maker. 

Streetematter, John, (Plank Road,) lot 69, 
farmer 28. 

Strobeek. David A., (Brewerton,) lot 10. 
farmer 8. 

STRONG. FRANKLIN A., (Brewerton,) 
physician. 

Strong, Jacob, (Cicero.) lot 46, farmer 50. 

Strong, Selah, (Cicero,) lot 44, farmer 116. 

Suits, Levi W., (Cicero,) lot 43, carpenter 
and farmer 52. 

Sweet, Benjamin F,, (Cicero,) lots 41 and 
42, notary public, lawyer, surveyor 
and farmer 7%. 

Taft, John. (Plank Road,) lot 92, farmer 89. 

Taft. Lonson, (Plank Road,) lot 92, farmer 
30. 

Taylor, George, (Cicero,) lot 55, farmer 100. 

Telford, George, (Brewerton.) lot 11, car- 
penter and builder and farmer 40. 

Telford. John, (Brewerton,) lots 11, 12 and 
21, farmer 190. 

Telford, William, (Brewerton,) lot 12, far- 
mer 11>£. 

Terpenny, George, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co..)"lots 46 and 47, farmer 153. 

Terpenny. Matilda, (Cicero,) lot 33, farmer 
15. 

Terpeny. Sophia, (Cicero,) lot 33, farmer 63. 

Thomas. Wilson, (Cicero,) lot 21, farmer 30. 

Thompson, Levi, (Cicero,) lots 32 and 33, 
farmer 145. 

Tompkins, Caleb, (Plank Road,) lot 93, far- 
mer 115. 

Tompkins, Henry, (Plank Road,) lot 93, 
farmer 80. 

Tompkins, Luther L., (Plank Road,) lot 93, 
farmer 70. 

Tousey, Benjamin, (Cicero,) lot 33, farmer 
52. 

Town, Benjamin, (Salina,) lot 94, farmer 8. 

Townsend, Mary Mrs., (Cicero,) lot 53, far- 
mer 17. 

Tripp. Daniel, (Cicero,) lot 44, cooper and 
farmer leases 47}£. 

VanAlstine, Cornelius, (Cicero,) lot 41, far- 
mer 80. t 

VAN ALSTLNE, DANIEL, (Cicero,) lot 41, 

farmer 135. 
Van Alstine, Daniel Jr., (Cicero,) lot 14, 

farmer 100. 
Van Alstine, George N., (Cicero,) stave 

jointer. 
Van Alstine, Joseph, (Cicero,) stave cutter. 
Van Antwerp, Nathan C, (Cicero,) lot 46, 

farmer 102. 

VAN BRAMER, WILLIAM, (Cicero,) lots 
66 and 67, cheese dealer and farmer 114. 

VanHoesen, Lambert, (Cicero,) lot 42, far- 
mers. 

Van Housen, David, (Brewerton.) lot 10, 
shoemaker. 

Van Housen, Steven, (Plank Road,) lot 81, 
farmer 49>£. 

Van Olinda, James, (Brewerton,) lot 11, 
fanner 47. 

Van Olinda, John, (Brewerton,) farmer. 

VAN OLINDA, NICHOLAS V., (Brewer- 
ton,) lot 11, farmer 47>£. 



Van Wagner, Garret, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co,,) lot 47, farmer leases 32. 

VAN WORMER, CLARA MISS, (Brewer- 
ton,) school teacher. 

Van Wormer, Henry, (Brewerton.) carpen- 
ter. 

Van Wormer, Peter, (Brewerton,) lot 10, 
carpenter. 

Vedder, Daniel, (Cicero,) lot 56, brick and 
stone mason and farmer 25. 

VEDDER, DAVID H., (Cicero,) lot 56, far- 
mer 50. 

VEDDER, GEORGE A., (Cicero,) lot 56, 
cooper and farmer 25. 

Virbo, Benjamin, (Plank Road,) lot 81, 
cooper and farmer 1. 

Vroman, Cornelius, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 72, farmer 26. 

VROMAN, JACOB C, (Bridgeport, Madi- 
son Co.,) lot 60, farmer 48. 

WALKER, ALBERT, (Brewerton.) grocer. 

Walker, Alinder, (Brewerton,) lot 12, far- 
mer 87. 

Walker, James, (Brewerton,) lot 12, farmer 
57. 

Walrath, Marcus, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) farmer. 

Walter, John,(Collamer,)lot95, farmer51^. 

Washburn, Charles E., (Brewerton,) lot 10, 
hotel prop, and farmer 38%- 

Waterbury, Thaddeus Sen., (Plank Road.) 
lot 80, farmer IX- 

Waterbury, David H., (Brewerton,) drug- 
gist and jeweler. 

Webb, Orson, (Cicero,) lot 44, farmer 21. 

WELCH, WILLIAM L., (Cicero,) lot 45, 
inspector of election and farmer 92#. 

WELLS, HARRISON, (Plank Road,) lot 68, 
farmer 145. 

Wells, John, (Brewerton,) lot 10, farmer 40. 

Wheeler, Ezra, (Cicero,) lot 41, farmer 99. 

Wheeler, Solomon Jr., (Bridgeport, Madi- 
son Co.,) lot 72, farmer 10. 

Wheeler, Solomon, (Bridgeport, Madison 
Co.,) lot 47, carpenter and builder and 
farmer 60#. 

Whiting, Nathan, (Cicero,) lot 45, farmer 
288. 

Wilcox, Albert, (Brewerton,) machinist. 

Wilcox, John, (Cicero,) lot 46, farmer 50. 

Wileman, Susan, (Collamer,) lot 95, farmer 
17. 

WTLLSON, DANIEL B., (Cicero,) lot 45, 
farmer 52. 

Wilson, Amos, (Cicero,) lot 21, farmer 36. 

Witschi, Samuel, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 
lot 73, farmer 124. 

Wood, Cornell J., (Brewerton,) tailor. 

WRIGHT, ADOLPHUS, (Cicero,) (John R. 
Wright & Sons.) 

Wright, Charles & Son, (Cicero,) (Charles 

and Henry,) lot 20, farmer 140. 
Wright, Henry, (Cicero,) (Charles Wright 

arid Son.) 
Wright, Hiram, (Brewerton,) lot 20, farmer 

50. 
WRIGHT, JOHN R. & SONS, (Cicero,) 

(John R., Adolphus and Warren H.,) 

lot 29, farmer 200. 
Wright, Lyman, (Bridgeport, Madison Co.,) 

lot 73, farmer 72. 
WRIGHT, WARREN M., (John R. Wright 

& Sons.) 



168 



ONONDA CA CO UNTT B USINE8S DIRECTOR Y. 



SYRACUSE MARBLE WORKS. 



-*+*—*- 



FRANCIS & DUFFY, 

Successors to G. W. SK, Lewis, 

WEST ONONDAGA STEEET, 

Opposite Binghamton R. R. Depot. Also successors to ROB'T SPALDING, 
No. 6 WEST JEFFERSON STREET. 



Special attention given 
to 



Granite 




AND 



Cemetery 




Italian & Ameri- 



MANTL1 



Of different patterns on 
hand. Also SLATE 
MANTLES, in imita- 
tion of Egyptian, Sienna 
and other Marbles. 

Marble, Freestone & Granite Monuments, Head 

STONES, MARBLE TOPS, &c„ &C, 

On hand and made to order. All work warranted as represented. 

^P°° We have now the most extensive Marble Works in Central New York, and 
we will not be undersold. 




X 




BREWERTON, IEW YORK, 

GENERAL DEALER IN 







T 




AND AGENT FOR THE 



Buckeye Mower & Reaper, 

E? r j tlxo nor t«ern part of Onondaga County. Also owner and dealer in 
Kiodgett's Improved Harpoon Horse Hay Fork, and A. W. Pratt's 
improvement in Fencing, for tlie town of Cicero. 



CICERO— CLAY. 



169 



Wright. William W., (Plank Road,) lot 80, 
farmer 2. 

Young. James A., (Cicero,) lot 32, cooper 
and farmer 20. 

♦YOUNG. JOSIAH II., (Cicero,) lot 54, 
prop. steam sawing and stave mill, jus- 
tice of the peace, post master and far- 
mer 9. 



YOUNG, EMILY A. MISS, (Cicero,) school 

teacher. 
Young, Theodore, (Cicero,) lot 58, farmer 

52. 
Young, William II., (Plank Road,) lot 80, 

dealer in dry goods and Yankee notions. 



oxj^SLT&r. 



(Post Office Addresses in Parentheses.) 

_ The residents of Clay, living at Three River Point, desire their mail directed to that 
point, although there is no Post Office there. Their mail will be brought over from 
Clay P. O., or Phoenix P. O., Oswego Co. 



Abbott, Asa H., (Euclid,) lot 38, farmer 

leases 9. 
ABBOTT, ELISHA, (Euclid,) lot 36, farmer 

100. 
Abbott, Hiram, (Brewerton,) lot 6, farmer 

leases 53. 
Abbott, J., (Euclid,) lot 36, farmer 6. 
Abbott, Johnson, (Clay,) lot 22, farmer 

leases 75. 
Abbott, William, (Euclid,) lot 37, farmer 100. 
Adams, Chapman, (Plank Road,) lot 91, 

farmer 7. 
AINSLIE, JOHN, (Euclid,) lots 35 and 36, 

farmer 55. 
Allen, Isaac M., (Liverpool,) lot 74, farmer 

leases 12. 
Allen, J. E., (Plank Road.) lot 90, farmer 60. 
Allen, Monroe, (Euclid,) farmer. 
Anderson, Calvin, (Euclid,) lot 24, farmer 

90. 
ANDERSON, JACOB, (Cicero,) lot 40, far- 
mer 38. 
ANDERSON, JAMES, (Cicero,) lots 39 and 

40, farmer. 
Anderson, William, (Cicero,) lots 39 and 40, 

farmer 160. 
Andrews, Edwin, (Plank Road,) lot 90, 

farmer 58. 
Antes, Francis,(PlankRoad,) lot 52, farmer, 

life interest in 100. 
Antes, John J., (Plank Road,) traveling 

agent. 
Antes. Peter, (Plank Road,) lot 52, farmer 

100. 
Anthony, Adam, (Brewerton,) lots 5 and 6, 

farmer 145. 
ANTHONY, CHARLES S., (Brewerton,) 

lot 6, farmer 77. 
Anthony, Martin, (Brewerton,) let 6, far- 
mer, life interest in 77. 
Aurisger, Abner F., (Brewerton,) lot 8, far- 
mer 50. 

Babcock, Abram Dr., (Brewerton,) lot 19, 
phvsician and farmer 116. 

BABCOCK, ANSON, (Salina,) lot 91, far- 
mer and gardener 8. 



Bailey, Chauncey R., (Plank Road,) lot 39, 

farmer 69. 
Bailey, Martin J., (Plank Road,) lots 39 and 

52, farmer 63. 
BAILEY, OSCAR M., (Plank Road,) lot 52, 

farmer 51. 
BAILEY, WILLIAM R., (Cicero,) lot 53, 

carpenter and farmer 50. 
BALL, ARZA, (Clay,) lot 49, farmer 250. 
Barker, Leonard O., (Clay,) lot 14, farmer 

50. 
Barnes, Orris, (Clay,) harness maker and 

postmaster. 
Barnes, Francis, (Plank Road,) painter. 
Barnum, , (Plank Road,) (Rhoads & 

Barnum.) 
BARRUS, E. & M., (Liverpool,) lots 61 and 

62, farmer 100. 
Barrus, James H., (Euclid, )lot 37, farmer 41. 
BARTH, KONRAD, (Euclid,) lot 38, mason 

and farmer 10. 
BAUM, AMENZO, (Plank Road,) {Isaac 

Baum & Sons,) lot 79, farmer leases 50. 
Baum, Artemus, (Plank Road,) lots 78 and 

90, farmer 279. 
BAUM, GRANVILLE, (Plank Road,) (Isaac 

Baum & Sons.) postmaster. 
BAUM, ISAAC, (Plank Road,) (Isaac Baum 

& Sons,) lots 78 and 91, agent for light- 
ning rod Co., and farmer 49. 
BAUM, ISAAC & SONS, (Plank Road,) 

(Granville and Amenzo,) general mer- 
chants. 
BECKER, ADAM, (Euclid,) lot 62, gardener 

and farmer. 

Becker, Adam F., (Caughdenoy, Oswego 
Co.,) lot 2, farmer 100. 

Becker, Andrew, (Brewerton,) lots 5 and 7, 
farmer, life interest in 100. 

Becker, David H., (Brewerton,) (with John,) 
lots 5 and 7, farmer 100. 

BECKER, JACOB H., (Brewerton,) lot 5, 

farmer. 
Becker, John, (Brewerton, )(with David H. ,) 

lots 5 and 7, farmer 100. 



17 ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 




Wax Bleacher and Manufacturer of 

WAX & SPERM CANDLES, 

Tapers In all Colors, Plain and Ornamental. White 
or colored wax for all uses at wholesale or retail.— 
Also, cash paid for raw wax. 

171 & 113 McBride St,, Syracuse, H, Y, 



1STO. 25 MALCOLM BLOCK, 

Sotitli Salina Street, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Models Made for Patent Ofllce. Steam Engines and all kinds of 
light machinery made and repaired. Special attention given to 
repairing Printing Presses and Sewing Machines. 

3ST. METERS <3z> BRO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Clothing, Groceries, Crockery 

FLOUR, FEED, &c, 
Corner ILodi & Pond Sts., Syracuse, US. T. 



MRS. IVIARY A. SWEET. 

PROPRIETRESS OF 



Dr. Sweet's Celebrated Sulphur Bath. 

Cures Neuralgia, Rheumatism, Scrofula, Salt Rheum, and all 

diseases of the skin. 

140 East Washington St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



WILLIA.M HEATH, 



Builder of all kinds of 



STAIRS* STAIR RAILINGS. 

Also all kinds of Joiner "Work. Address or call at 22 JASPER, 
near Park St. Grove, 4th Ward, Syracuse. 



CLA Y. 



171 



Becker, John H., (Euclid,) lot 62, gardener 
j and farmer. 

Becker, Joseph, (Cicero,) lot 2S, farmer 
leases 200. 

Becker, Martin, (Brewerton,) lots 7 and 18, 
farmer 86. 

Becker, Philip F., (Brewerton,) lot 5, far- 
mer 90. 

BEEBE, ABBOTT, (Plank Road,) mason, 
Chestnut. 

Bennett, Alpheus. (Clay.) stone mason. 

Bennett, Amos, (Three River Point,) lot 14, 
farmer 50. 

BENNETT, ETHAN A., (Plank Road,) lot 
70, gardener 7. 

Bettinger, Aaron, (Clay,) lot 48, farmer 105. 

BETTINGER, ABRAHAM, (Clay,) lots 48 
and 61, farmer 190. 

BETTINGER, JAMES, (Clay,) lot 48, far- 
mer 96. 

BETTINGER. JANEM. MRS., (Liverpool,) 
lot 61, farmer 86. 

Bettinger, Martin J., (Clay,) lot 48, farmer 
93. 

Betts, Ledger, (Plank Road.) shoe maker. 

BINNING, JOHN, (Clay,) lot 35, farmer 100. 

Blanchard, Alexander, (Euclid,) lot 37, far- 
mer 55. 

Blowers, Daniel, (Plank Road,) lot 91, black- 
smith and carriage maker. 

Borst, William H., (Caughdenoy, Oswego 
Co.,) lot 1. farmer 175. 

BORTLES, EZRA, (Euclid,) sawyer in 
steam mill. 

Bosler, Charles, (Plank Road.) cigar maker. 

Botsford, Adolphus H., (Euclid,) lot 51, 
butcher and farmer 53. 

BOUGHTON, PETER, (Brewerton,) lot 2, 
farmer 47. 

Bouton, Henry C, (Brewerton,) lots 2 and 
5, shoemaker and farmer 7. 

BO WEN, GEORGE , (Clay,) lot 14, farmer 
41. 

Bowley, John. (Clay,) hotel proprietor. 

Brackenbury, E., (Plank Road,) lot 78, far- 
mer 56. 

Brackenberry, William, (Liverpool,) lot 63, 
farmer leases 60. 

Bradley, James, (Clay,) lot 22, farmer leas- 
es 1. 

BRAGDON, GEORGE, (Plank Road,) lot 
79, farmer 1, and leases 20, Chestnut. 

Brand, Adam, (Plank Road,) lot 53, farmer 

lcft8€^ 50 ' 

Breed, Dudley, (Clay,) lot 22, brick and tile 
manuf. and farmer 30. 

Bronner, John, (Euclid,) shoe maker. 

Brott, Isaac, (Plank Road,) lot 79, farmer 1. 

BROWN, GEORGE W., (Plank Road,) lot 
53, farmer 50. 

Brown, Henry, (Euclid,) lot 38, farmer 53. 

BROWN, LUCIUS C, (Plank Road,) lot 
77, farmer 110. 

BROWN, L. HARRIS, (Plank Road,) lots 
78 and 90, farmer leases 279. 

Brownell, Jonathan J., (Euclid,) lot 15, far- 
mer 30. 

Bruce, Aisa, (Clay,) tailoress. 

Bruce, Robert, (Liverpool,) lot 89, boat- 
man. 

Bruckenbury, William, (Plank Road,) lot 
63, farmer leases 4. 

Bucknar, Godfrey, (Liverpool,) lot S9, far- 
mer 26. 



Bunzey, Nicholas, (Euclid,) lots 36 and 37, 
wason maker and farmer 20. 

Burch, Henry, (Plank Road,) lot 78, farmer 
leases 4. 

BURDICK, GEORGE K., (Plank Road,) 
lot 78, farmer 32. 

Bur^e, Benton, (Euclid,) lot 38, farmer 15. 

Burleigh, Franklin J., (Clay,) lots 13 and 14, 
farmer 120. 

Burleigh, Samuel N., (Clay,) lots 13 and 14, 
farmer 74. 

Burrell, Thomas, (Plank Road,) lot 78, far- 
mer 11. 

Cady, George, (Brewerton,) lot 7, farmer 57. 

Campbell, Joseph, (Brewerton,) lot 1, far- 
mer 51, and life interest in 48. 

Carlisle, James, (Euclid,) carpenter. 

Carner, Alonzo, (Euclid,) lot 62, boatman 
and farmer leases \%. 

Carpenter, Charles H., (Plank Road,) col- 
lector of internal revenue, North Caro- 
lina. 

CARTER, DANIEL, (Euclid,) lots 15 and 16, 
farmer. 

CARTER, ELIJAH, (Euclid,) lot 16, farmer 
68. 

Carter, Francis, (Euclid,) lots 15 and 16, 
farmer 71. 

Carter, Henry L., (Euclid,) lot 16, farmer 1. 

Chamberlain, Jonathan, (Three River 
Point,) lot 15, farmer 20. 

CHAPIN, CATHERINE MRS., (Plank 
Road,) lot 65, farmer 14. 

Chesbro, Electa, (Plank Road,) lot 90, far- 
mer 48. 

Childs, Philander, (Clay,) lot 14, farmer 
lenses 50 

Chrisler, Ta'bitha, (Plank Road,) lot 90, 
farmer 14. 

CHURCH, HENRY S., (Phoenix, Oswego 
Co.,) lot 3, boatman and farmer 100. 

CHURCH, JAMES A., (Phoenix, Oswego 
Co.,) lot 3, farmer 100. 

Clark, Myron, (Plank Road,) lot 90, farmer 
28. 

Clary, Thomas (Euclid,) lots 37 and 43, far- 
mer leases \%. 

CLAY, WILLIAM, (Liverpool,) lot 49, far- 
mer 156. 

Cohoon, C W., (Euclid,) lot 38, farmer 37. 

COLE, JOHN, (Clay,) lot 48, mason and 
farmer \%. 

Cole, John A., (Brewerton,) lot 4, boatman 
and farmer 25. 

COLLINS. WM. H., (Plank Road,) saw 
mill and farmer 51. 

Coonrod, John, (Clay,) lot 23, farmer leases 
4. 

Cooper, Andrew, (Liverpool,) lot 49, far- 
mer leases 106. 

COOPER, CORNELIUS, (Liverpool.) (with 
Milton B.,) lots 61 and 62, farmer 132#. 

Cooper, Cornelius Mrs., (Euclid,) lot 49, 
farmer 106. 

COOPER, MILTON B., (Liverpool,) (with 
Cornelius,) lots 61 and 62, farmer 132X. 

CORNING, EDWIN, (Cicero,) lot 53, far- 
mer 108. 

Corn well, John, (Euclid,) lot 51, farmer 3. 

Coughtry, J. W., (Euclid,) lot 39, cigar 
manuf. and farmer 64. 

COVILLE, OSCAR, (Euclid,) lots 23 and 
35, farmer leases 200. 

Crain, M. & M., (Euclid,) lot 27, farmer 75. 



172 



ONONDA OA CO UNTT B TJ8INESS DIRECTOR Y. 



silk m i mmm hni^m* 

HENRY GJ-OSS, 

(Successor to C. A. Chadeayne,) 

14 & 14 1-2 Wieting Block, up stairs, 

©YIiA.C;XJSE, TV. Y., 

Manufacturer of the celebrated 

$5 SILK HAT. 

Makes the beet Hat. in the city for $5.— 
Old style Silk Hats remodeled to the pre- 
sent fashion with new trimmings, on 
very short notice. Gents purchasing 
hats from my manufactory pay only one 
profit. Hats after passing the hands ofl 
the manufacturer, commission asrent, 
wholesale dealer, and retailer, will be 
worth from $7 to $8. All these profits 
are saved, and the purchaser will receive 
his hat, fitting the head in the most per- 
fect manner, and of the best material, 
for 







@w 





AND 





Journal Bnili, 23 & 24 E. Waslin&ton Street, 

SYRACUSE, IV. Y., 

A fex f ^ te P 8 east of N « Y « C. Depot, makes to order every descrip- 
H on . ° f Models, Patterns, Gages, Moulds, &c. Dealer in Patent 
lURjits. Those wishing models for the Patent Office will find it for their advantage to 
give him a call. Good work and reasonable prices. 

Also every description of Sewing Machines and light machinery re- 
paired in a good and workmanlike manner. 



CLA T, 



173 



:RANDALL, CHARLES, (Euclid,) lot 36, 
farmer leases 1(55, and {with Nicholas 
Harden and A. J. Soide,) prop, of cheese 
factory. 
ramlall, Hial, (Clay,) retired. 

>andall, Hosea, (Euclid, )lot 36, farmer 165. 
ranu, Isaac, (Salina,) lot 90, farmer 29. 
rary, Dennison B., (Liverpool,) lot 88, far- 
mer 18. 

Crawford, John A., (Clay,) lot 34, sawyer. 

Jronkhite, Cornelius, (Euclid,) lot 50, far- 
mer 33. 

Jronkhite, Henry, (Liverpool,) lots 74 and 
39, farmer 412J£. 

Dronkhite, Henry, (Euclid,) lot 50, farmer 
55. 

Jrook, Billshazer, (Plank Road,) lot 52, 
farmer 50. 

Crowfoot, S. M. Rev., (Euclid,) pastor of 
M. E. church. 

3nllings, William, (Plank Road,) lot 64, far- 
mer 30. 

JTJRT1S, ERWTN, (Caughdenoy, Oswego 
Co.,) (with Byron,) lof 1, farmer 82}£. 

:URTISS, BYRON, (Caughdenoy, Oswego 
Co.,) (with Erwin,) lot 1, farmer 82^. 

Dagwell, William H., (Euclid,) blacksmith. 

DANFORTH, MELISSA MRS., (Clay.) 

Davis, Nelson, (Plank Road,) lot 79, farmer 

71, 

Davison, John H., (Brewerton,) lot 19, far- 
mer 75. 

DECKER, JAMES L., (Clay,) (with John 
8.,) lots 14 and 22, farmer 140. 

DECKER, JOHN S., (Clay,) (with James 
L.,) lots 14 and 22, farmer 140. 

Dennis, Henry, (Liverpool,) lot 89, farmer 
11. 

Dense, John, (Brewerton,) lot 8, farmer 46. 

DEWEY, EDWIN W., (Liverpool,) lot 61, 
farmer 100. 

DEWEY, GEORGE W., (Liverpool,) lot 61, 
fanner 75. 

DICKSON, JOHN, (Plank Road,) lot 79, 
farmer 15. 

Diefendorf, Ann Mrs., (Clay,) lot 15, fanner 
55. 

Diefendorf, Benjamin Rev., (Euclid,) lot 
37, Evangelical Lutheran Church cler- 
gyman. 

Diefendorf, Henry, (Clay,) lot 15, life inter- 
est in 55. 

Diefendorf, Jeremiah, (Euclid,) lots 22 and 
24, farmer 100 and leases 22. 

Diefendorff, Moyer, (Euclid,) lots 14, 22 and 
23, farmer 124. 

DIEFENDORFF, NORMAN, (Euclid,) lot 
23, farmer 50. 

Diffin, George, (Cicero,) lot 40, butcher and 

DIFFIN, JAMES, (Cicero,) lot 40, manuf. 

of liniment for family uses, and farmer 
' 87*?. 

DODD, A. W., (Liverpool,) lot 76, farmer 30. 
Dodman, David, (Liverpool,) lot 74, farmer 

14. 

Dorchug, John, (Plank Road,) lot 39, black- 
smith and farmer 28. 

,DOUD, HIRAM H., (Euclid,) lot 15, farmer 
leases 127. 

DRAPER, GEORGE W., (Euclid,) alio. 

physician and surgeon. 
Drohen, Edward, (Clay,) farmer 1. 



Duffany, Edgar, (Plank Road,) lot 52, far- 
mer 10. 

Duffany, Elias, (Plank Road,) lot 65, farmer 
50. 

Duffany, Henry J., (Plank Road,) lot 51, 
farmer 41. 

DUFFANY, HIRAM, (Plank Road,) lot 65, 
farmer 111. 

DUFFANY, MARTIN, (Plank Road,) lots 
52 and 65, farmer 80. 

Dummy, William, (Euclid,) lot 24, farmer 
51#. 

Dunbar, Mary Miss, (Euclid,) school teach- 
er. 

Dunham, Homer, (Liverpool, )(wi<A Horace,) 
lot 89, farmer leases 234. 

Dunham, Horace, (Liverpool, )(with Homer,) 
lot 89, farmer leases 234. 

DUNHAM, MOSELEY, (Liverpool,) lot 89, 
farmer 234. 

Dunn, Mortimer M., (Euclid,) lot 51, gar- 
dener and farmer 25. 

Dutcher. Leron, (Liverpool,) farmer. 

DUTCHER, LESTER, (Liverpool,) lot 48, 
farmer 66. 

Eaton, Cadnial, (Liverpool,) lot 62, farmer 
26. 

EATON, HARRISON H., (Plank Road,) lot 
76, farmer 37. 

Eaton, Simon, (Plank Road,) lots 63 and 78, 
farmer 57. 

Eaton, Thomas J., (Euclid,) lot 62, farmer 
10. 

Eaton, William, (Plank Road,) lot 78, far- 
mer 19. 

Eckert, Alfred, (Clay,) lot 15, farmer leases 
55. 

Eckert, Alfred, (Euclid,) lot 16, farmer 26. 

Eckert, Alvin, (Euclid,) lot 15, farmer leas- 
es 50. 

Eckert, William H., (Euclid,) lot 15, farmer 
53. 

Edden, Harriet Mrs., (Plank Road,) lot 79, 
farmer 56, 

EDDEN, THOMAS W., (Plank Road,) lot 
79, farmer leases 56. 

EGLESTON, HIRAM, (Liverpool,) lots 50 
and 62, farmer 63. 

Eldred, T. C. & Co., (Clay,) (Thomas C. El- 
dred, John Houghtaling and Jacob 
Strickland,) general merchants. 

Eldred, Thomas C, (Clay,) (T. C. Eldred 
& Co.) 

Eno, Albert H., (Euclid,) lots 36 and 37, 
boatman and farmer 28. 

Eno, Ann Mrs., (Euclid,) lot 15, farmer 50. 

Eno, Esther Mrs., (Clay,) lot 22, farmer 81. 

Eno, Myron, (Clay,) lot 22, farmer 44. 

Eno, Thomas, (Clay,) lot 34, farmer 52^. 

Fail, Thomas, (Brewerton,) lot 71, farmer 
70. 

Fairchild, French, (Liverpool,) lots 74 and 

75, farmer 220. 
Fairchild, Ransom, (Liverpool,) lot 75, 

farmer 60. 

Fancher, Ambarvalia, (Brewerton,) lot 5, 

carpenter and farmer 13. 
Fancher, Ira, (Brewerton,) lots 4 and 5, 

farmer 70. 
Fancher, Ira Jr., (Brewerton,) lots 4 and 5, 

farmer 50^. 
Fancher, Lewis, (Brewerton,) lot 5, farmer 

84. 



174 



ONONDA OA CO UNTT B USINESS DIRECTOR Y. 




L. A. HEARING, 

DENTIST 

May be found at 

No. 10 Malcolm Block, 



Corner Salina and Kailroad streets, opposite the Globe Hotel, Syracuse, N. T. Al 
operations entrusted to his care will be performed in the very best manner. Teeth ex 
tracted without pain, in some cases. 



ALFRED THj-ST, 

fflnmtmig, to & <ftcam fitting, 

Lead, Sheet Lead, Block Tin, (Lined,) Cast, Wrought and Galvan« 

ized Pipe, Plumbers' Brass Work, Steam Goods and 

Gas Fixtures in great variety. 

No. 89 East Crenesee St.. Syracuse, N. Y. 



LEHNE 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 



9 



QBUGS, MEDICINES, CHEMICALS, 

Perfumery, Fauci/ Goods, Vines and Liquors, Paints, Oils, Kerosene, 

Brewer Pitch, Varnishes, Glass, Putty and Bye Stuffs. 

Also in Brushes and Feather Busters. 

NO. 48 NORTH SALINA ST., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



HALL <Sz> MORSE, 

iONNET BLEACHERS, PRESSERS, 



AND 



BONNET BLOCK MANUFACTURERS, 

27 EAST RAILROAD STREET, UP STAIRS, SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



Every variety of Straw and Fancy Bonnets altered to the latest fashion, and 
Cleaned and Pressed in the best possible manner. Gents' and Boys' Straw Hats cleaned 
and pressed. Also, Felt and Silk Hats Stamped Out. 






CLA Y. 



175 



Fancher, Winfield S., (Brewerton,) lot 5, 
farmer 25. 

Feal, George W., (Clay.) lot 22. farmer 30. 

FELLOWS, ORSON W., (Clay,) lots 3-1 and 
96, steam saw mill and farmer 7. 

Ferguson, Samuel, (Plank Road,) lots 79 and 
80, farmer 140. 

Ferrill, Jerome D., (Plank Road,) lot 77, 
farmer 53. 

FIELD, CALVIN F., (Liverpool,) lot 88, 
farmer 30. 

Field, William E., (Liverpool,) lot 88, farm- 
ci* 95 

Fielding," William, (Clay,) lot 22, farmer 
leases 110. 

Filkins, Henry, (Liverpool,) lot 01, farmer 
28. 

Flanklin, William. (Plank Road,) painter, 
Chestnut. 

Fleury, Francis, (Cicero,) lot 28, farmer 12. 

Forncook, Isaac, (Euclid,) lot 15, farmer 
68. 

Prayer, Charles E., (Plank Road,) lot 65, 
farmer 8. 

Frayer, James C, (Liverpool,) lot 88, farm- 
er 50. 

Frayer. Russel, (Liverpool,) lot 76, boat 
builder and farmer 20. 

Frayer, Simon, (Liverpool,) lots 74 and 76, 
farmer 192. 

FREEMAN, JOHN, (Euclid,) lot 26, farm- 
er 182. 

Fritcher, Martin, (Brewerton,) lot 18, farm- 
er life lease 75. 

Fugett, Joseph M., (Clay,) blacksmith. 

Funk, Baruet, (Euclid,) lot 26, farmer 15. 

Gallup, Christopher, (Cicero,) lot 53, shingle 
maker and farmer. 

GARRY, JOHN, (Euclid,) lot 48, farmer 1. 

Gay, Laura Mrs., (Euclid,) lot 15, farmer 30. 

Gillett, Harriet Mrs., (Cicero,) lot 55, far- 
mer 50. 

Gillis, Duncan, (Liverpool,) lot 88, farmer 
25. 

Gool, Henry, (Caughdenoy, Oswego Co.,) 
brick maker. 

Graham, Anson Rev., (Plank Road,) lot 79, 
farmer and gardener leases 5, Chestnut. 

Graham, Thomas, (Clay,) farmer 2. 

Green, Albert L., (Clay,) dentist. 

Greig, Ella Miss, (Euclid,) school teacher. 

Griffin, Joseph A., (Liverpool,) boat builder 
and carpenter. 

Grinnell, George F., (Plank Road,) retired 
farmer. 

Griswood, James, (Cicero,) lot 39, farmer 

Groon, A., (Plank Road,) lot 90, farmer 1. 

Grover, Lorin, (Cicero,) lot 40, farmer 10. 

Hacker, Daniel P., (Clay,) brick maker. 

Hackett, Jerome, (Euclid,) lot 37, farmer. 

Hall, Anthony, (Caughdenoy, Oswego Co.,) 
lot 2, boatman and farmer 150. 

Hail, Daniel, (Euclid,) lots 24 and 25, farmer 
125. 

HALL, SAMUEL S.,(Caughdenoy, Oswego 
Co.,) lot 1, farmer 80. 

Hallock, Benjamin, (Liverpool,) lot 77, far- 
mer 26. 

Halsted, John, (Euclid,) farmer 104. 

HAMLIN, DAVID, (Liverpool,) lot 63, 
farmer 100. 

HAMLIN, GEORGE, (Liverpool,) lot 75, 
farmer 90. 



Hamlin, Henry O, (Liverpool,) lots 50, 51 
and 62, farmer leases 50. 

Hamlin, John, (Euclid,) lot 50, farmer 05. 

HAMLIN, P., (Plank Road,) lot 79, farmer 
leases 50. 

Hamlin, Robert, (Liverpool,) lot 71, farmer 
64. 

HAMLIN, SAMUEL, (Liverpool,) lot 74, 
farmer 64. 

Hamlin, Thomas, (Liverpool,) lota 74 and 
75, farmer 104. 

Hamlin, William, (Liverpool,) lot 75, farm- 
er 64. 

Hammon, Mrs., (Plank Road,) lot 90, farmer 
2#. 

HANER, ANDREW, (Euclid,) lot 36, farm- 
er 120. 

Hanks, Fisk, (Plank Road,) lot 91, farmer 
60. 

Hanley, Michael, (Plank Road,) lot 90, 
farmer 8>£. 

Harden, Nicholas, (Euclid,) (with Andrew 
J. Soule and Charles Orandall,) props, 
cheese factory. 

Harder, Silas J., (Euclid,) lots 24 and 25, 
farmer 65. 

HARRISON, THOMAS J., (Clay,) lot 13, 
farmer 103. 

Hartwood, James, (Euclid,) lots 30 and 37, 
farmer 3>£. 

Harwood. James, (Euclid.) lots 36 and 37, 
farmer 3>£. 

HAWN, D. O, (Euclid,) (with George H.,) 
lot 37, broom manuf. and farmer leases 
24 

HAWN, GEORGE H., (Euclid,) (with D. 
6'.,) lot 37, broom manuf. aud farmer 
leases 24. 

Hayden, Sarah J. Mrs., (Euclid.) tailoress. 

Hehdle, Godfrey, (Cicero,) lot 28, farmer 24. 

HESILDEN, WILLIAM, (Brewerton,) lot 
19, farmer 70. 

Hess, Frederick, (Brewerton,) lot 4, farmer 
leases'42. 

Hess, Solomon, (Clay,) lot 4, farmer 26. 

Hewes, Joseph A., (Euclid,) wagOD maker. 

Hewes, Levant, (Euclid,) prop, of stage 
route between Euclid and Syracuse. 

Hewes, Peter, (Euclid,) carpenter. 

Hiller, John R., (Euclid,) lot 24, farmer leas- 
es \)4. 

Hills, Walter W., (Liverpool,) lot 61, far- 
mer 1. 

Hines, Benjamin, (Brewerton,) lot 6, far- 
mer leases 50. 

Hootselsether, Casper, (Cicero,) lot 28, far- 
mer 7. 

Horton, Purdy, (Phoenix, Oswego Co.,) lot 
3, farmer 99. 

Houghtaling, John, (Clay,) (?'. C. Eldred 
& Co.) 

Hubbard, Walter, (Cicero,) well digger. 

HUNT, THOMAS, (Saliua,) lot 90, farmer 
17^. 

Hutzelsedar, Jacob, (Cicero,) lot 28, farmer 
leases 1. 

Ingerson, Barney, (Brewerton,) lot 2, den- 
tist and farmer leases 50. 

Ingerson, Hiram, (Brewerton,) lots 5 and 7, 
farmer 152. 

Ives, Omrl, (Brewerton,) lot 4, carpenter 
and wagon maker. 

Jackson, Joseph, (Three River Point,) lot 
13, farmer leases 50. 



176 ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



m « f wtftflMl 
















. 27 East Rai 



(Six doors East ol* Yanderbilt House, up 

stairs.) 

WtfftSBff* ( SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



CLA Y. 



177 



Jewel, J. D., (Euclid,) lots 50 and 64, far- 
mer 50. 

Johnson. James F., (Euclid,) alio, physician 
and surgeon. 

Johnson, Orton, (Liverpool,) lot 74, farmer 
65. 

Jones, Gideon P. Rev., (Euclid,) retired M. 
E. miuister. 

Justice, Margaret, (Plank Road,) lot 78, far- 
mer 4. 

Keeler, E. R., (Brewerton.) lot 5, farmer 35. 

Keeler, James, (Liverpool,) farmer. 

KEELER. WILLIAM C, (Liverpool,) lot 
63, farmer 50, 

Keith. James W., (Euclid.) lot 13, farmer 
50. 

Keller, Joseph, (Plank Road,) lot 91, far- 
mer 60. 

Ketcham, Lofta, (Brewerton.) lot 5, farmer 
2. 

King, Alanson, (Euclid,) lot 14, farmer leas- 
es 1. 

Kingsley, David W., (Euclid,) lot 49, far- 
mer 20. . 

Kinne, A. B., (Salina,) lot 76, farmer 20. 

Kinue, A. J., (Salina,) lot 76, farmer 20. 

KIRKLAND, JOHN, (Plank Road,) lot 65, 
farmer 111. 

Kittle, James, (Liverpool.) lot 61, farmer 25. 

Kittle, Philo, (Liverpool,) lot 61, farmer 
leases 25. 

Knapp, Elmanson C, (Plank Road,) lot 91. 
farmer leases 112. 

KNAPP, ROBERT, (Liverpool,) lot 76, far- 
mer leases 53. 

Knight. Horatio, (Euclid,) lot 24, farmer 1. 

Laird. Nelson, (Liverpool,) farmer. 

LAMB, JOSEPH C, (Liverpool,) lot 50, 
farmer leases 30>£. 

Lane, Aim E. Mrs., (Euclid,) seamstress. 

Lanning, George, (Euclid,) lot 37, farmer 

Lathrop, Philemon, (Plank Road,) lot 91, 
farmer 2. 

Lawivn, A. H. (Plank Road,) lot 91, farmer 
64. 

Lawrence, Horace, (Euclid,) lot 15, farmer 
60. 

Lawrence. J. Warren, (Salina,) lot 90, far- 
mer 56>£. 

Lawrence, Libbie Miss, (Plank Road,) 
school teacher. 

Lawson, Durance, (Brewerton,) (with Du- 
rance Jr. and Henry,) lot 18, farmer 

Lawson, Durance Jr., (Brewerton,) {with 
Durance and Henry,) lot 18, farmer 773^. 

Lawson, Henrv, (Brewerton,) (with Du- 
rance and Durance Jr.,) lot IS, farmer 
77X- 

LEE, J. OLIVER, (Three River Point,) 
grocer. 

Leonard, Hiram D., (Euclid,) blacksmith. 

Lewis, G. W., (Euclid,) lot 37, dealer in 
stock and farmer 62.^. 

Lewis, George, (Brewerton,) school teach- 
er. 

LEWIS. GEORGE W., (Euclid,) lot 37, far- 
mer 62. 

Lewis, Herman H., (Plank Road,) lot 90, 
farmer 32. 

Lewis, Smith, (Euclid,) lot 38, farmer 80. 

LILLIE, WILLIAM, (Plank Road,) lot 79, 
farmer 60. 
K 



Ling, Charles, (Clay,) lot 35, farmer 12. 

Lints, Adelbert A., (Euclid.) blacksmith. 

Lints, John, (Euclid,) (Lints & March.) 

Lints & March, (Euclid,) (John Lints and 
Charles J. March,) carriage making and 
blacksmithing. 

Little, James, (Clay,) justice of the peace. 

Little, Mary J. Mrs., (Plank Road.) lot 91, 
farmer 10^- 

Little, William D., (Plank Road,) lot 79, 
farmer 3. 

Littleboy, John, (Plank Road,) lot 79, far- 
mer 15. 

Livingston, Alonzo, (Three River Point.) 
carpenter and boatman. 

LOOK, JUDSON W., (Plank Road,) lots 
90 and 80, farmer and gardener 6 and 
leases 20. 

Look, Moab, (Plank Road,) Dunham road, 
farmer leases 16. 

Look, Noah, (Plank Road,) lot 91, farmer 
and gardener 1 and leases 5. 

Loomis, J. E. Rev., (Cicero,) lot 40, retired 
minister and farmer 45. 

Loomis, Jennie Miss, (Cicero,) school teach- 
er. 

Loop, George, (Plank Road,) harness mak- 
er, Chestnut. 

Loop, Martin, (Liverpool,) lot 63, farmer 
leases 4. 

Loveless, Alonzo, (Cicero,) lot 40, farmer 
leases 16. 

LuClair, Lewis, (Caughdenoy, Oswego Co.,) 
lot 2, farmer leases 150. 

Lynch, Cornelius, (Liverpool,) lot 75, far- 
mer leases 40. 

Lynn, Elizabeth Mrs., (Plank Road,) lot 51, 
farmer 25. 

LYNN, FRANKLIN, (Euclid,) lot 38, 
thresher and farmer 37. 

LYNN, H. H., (Cicero.) farmer. 

LYNN, H. H., (Plank Road,) farmer 75. 

Linn, Hezckiah A.,(PlankRoad,)lots91 and 
70, farmer 12. 

Lynn, Isaac, (Euclid,) lot 51, farmer 26. 

Lynn, James, (Euclid,) lot 51, farmer 89. 

Lynn, James R., (Euclid,) hotel proprietor. 

Lynn, Jane Mrs., (Euclid,) lots 37 and 38, 
life interest in 92. 

LYNN, REUEL, (Euclid,) lot 38, farmer 56. 

March, Charles'J.,(Enclid,)(£2?ite & March.) 

MARSH, H. W., (Euclid,) lot 15, farmer 30. 

Marsh, Melvina, (Clay.) tailoress. 

Marsh, Spencer, (Plank Road,) lot 65, car- 
penter and farmer leases 14. 

MARSHALL, JOEL M., (Euclid,) lots 35 
and 37, farmer 81. 

MARTIN, ALONZO, (Euclid,) lot 36, far- 
mer leases 50. 

MASON, WILLIAM, (Plank Road,) lot 52, 
carpenter and farmer 7. 

Mathews, Barnett, (Plank Road,) clock re- 
pairer. 

McAlister, Archibald, (Brewerton,) lot 4, 
farmer 75. 

McALISTER, CURTIS, (Brewerton,) lot 4, 
farmer leases. 

McArdell, Barnard, (Liverpool,) lot 62, far- 
mer 3. 
McARDELL, PATRICK, (Liverpool,) lot 

76, farmer leases 20. 
M«ARTHUR, ADAM, (Euclid,) lot 16, 

grocer and farmer 29. 
McCloock, John, (Cicero,) lot 53, farmer 50. 



178 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



9 $5 



CELEBRATED 





-+■■»-+- 



Be wise for yourself. If yon want Health, Purify your Blood, for that is the Seat of 
iafc. If you have the Salt Rhenm, or Erysipelas, get rid of it ; it lead* to 

Scrofula, Can cers,Tu mors and 
Consumption. 

This celebrated medicine is circulated throughout the United States, and also in 
Europe. It is used by the Crowned heads, and is doing wonderful cures. What we call 
Scrofula here they call Scurvy there. 

I challenge .the world to produce a medicine that will cure Scrofula, cr 

Any Disease of tfee Blood or Skin, 

More thoroughly, or in a shorter time than I can with Marvin's Indian Syrup. And I 
do not hesitate in the least to assert that I will pay 

ill HUNDRED DOLLAR 

TO ANY PHYSICIAN 

WhQ will cure a case of Scrofula in as short a time as I can whh this Syrup and 

Marvin's Scrofula Ointment, 

COMBINED. 

It can be had, at wholesale 2Bd retail, from 

C. MARVIN, 

SOLE PROPRIETOR, 
46 Jefferson street, Syracuse, N. Y. 
For sale, retail, at Bausinger's Drug Store, No. 3 Yates Block ; W. B. Tobey & Co's, 
No. 3E. Genesee street, Syracuse, N. Y.; Bradway & Co's, No. 4 First street, Fulton, 
N. Y.; Dr. H. Hemmingway, Whitney's Point, N. Y. ; Gregory & Co., Fort Plain ; Cur- 
ren & Galer, 96 Buffalo street, Rochester, N. Y.; A. A. Erskin, Eaton, N. Y. 






ex a r. 



179 



McCue, Cornelius, (Three Kiver Point,) far- 
mer leases 2. 

McGlath, Patrick, (Plank Road,) black- 
smith. 

McKoyes, Horace, (Euclid,) lot 27, farmer 

McMullen, John, (Plank Road,) lot 91, ma- 
son and farmer 5%. 

McQUEEN, JOSIAH, (Liverpool,) lots 88 
and 89. farmer. 

McQueen. Robert, (Liverpool,) lots 88 and 
89, farmer 8. 

MELVIN, CARRIE MISS, (Plank Road,) 
lot 63. 

Melvin, Jenett, (Plank Road,) lot 63, far- 
mer 50. 

Melvin, Jewit. (Liverpool.) lot 63, farmer 50. 

Melvin, Merritt W., (Plank Road,) lot 77, 
farmer 94. 

Merritt, Ebenezer, (Brewerton,) lot 6, far- 
mer 93. 

Mickles, Peter, (Brewerton,) lots 19 and 28, 
farmer 125. 

Millard. Lewis, (Plank Road,) lot 91, far- 
mer 31. 

Millen, Jerome, (Plank Road,) (with Thom- 
as.) lot 91, firmer 74. 

Millen, Thomas, (Plank Road,) {with Je- 
rome,) lot 91. farmer 74. 

MILLER. JEROME, (Liverpool,) lot 75, 
Oswego road, farmer leases 55. 

Miller, Peter, (Clay,) blacksmith. 

Milligan, Thaddeus, (Clay,) lots 34 and 35, 
farmer leases 6. 

MOGG, AARON, (Caughdenoy, Oswego 
Co..) lots 2 and 4, carpenter and farmer 
187. 

MOGG, CORNELIUS, (Euclid,) lot 25, jus- 
tice of the peace and farmer 82. 

Mogg. John, (Euclid,) lot 37, farmer 75. 

Mologhney, Patrick, (Plank Road,) lot 78, 
farmer 15. 

MOONEY, MICHAEL, (Plank Road,) wag- 
on maker. Chestnut. 

MORELL, FREDERICK, (Plank Road,) lot 
53, farmer 100. 

Morgan, AbrahamRev., (Liverpool,) retired 
M. E. clergyman. 

Morgan, Abraham Jr., (Liverpool,) lot 49, 
farmer 60. 

MORGAN, CALVIN, (Plank Road,) lot 78, 
farmer 6. 

Morgan, Charles H., (Liverpool,) lot 62, far- 
mer 49. 

Morgan, William, (Liverpool,) lot 61, far- 
mer 28. 

Morrison. John G., (Liverpool,) lot 77, far- 
mer 34. 

| Moschill, Daniel, (Liverpool,) lot 76, far- 
mer 70. 

MOSCHELL, J. F., (Liverpool,) lot 76, far- 
mer leases 170. 
1 Mosher, Ephraim P., (Clay,) farmer. 

Moyer, Abram, (Clay,) lots 22 and 34, far- 
mer 72. 

Moyer, Jacob H., (Euclid,) lots 23 and 35, 
farmer 205. 

Moyer, Oliver, (Euclid,) cheese maker. 

Murgillroyd, De Los, (Euclid,) lot 16, far- 
mer 87. 

Murphy, Richard, (Plank Road,) lot 90, far- 
mer 8%. 

Mustagh, James, (Salina,) lot 90, farmer 37. 



Myers, Charles M., (Liverpool and Syra- 
cuse,) lot 62, trader, and has an interest 
in 100 acres. 

Myers, David, (Liverpool,) lot 62, farmer 
100. 

NASH, G. W., (Plank Road,) lot 64, farmer 
65. 

Nash, Henry A., (Cicero,) lots 39 and 64, 
farmer 5. 

OEHSNER, MICHAEL, (Cicero,) lot 40. 
farmer 44. 

Ogden, V. R., (Euclid,) lot 76, farmer 6. 

Osborn, Hobert, (Plank Road,) lot 90, far- 
mer 20. 

Oshoe, Thomas, (Cicero,) lot 27, farmer 15. 

Ottman, William Rev., (Plank Road.) lot 
39, Lutheran minister and farmer 53. 

Packard, John, (Phoenix, Oswego Co.,) lot 
3, farmer leases 104. 

Palm, Ann E. Miss, (Plank Road,) school 
teacher. 

Palm, John, (Plank Road,) lot 90, farmer 
leases 48. 

PALMER, GIDEON M., (Euclid,) lot 24, 
farmer 160. 

PALMER, JOSEPH, (Plank Road,) lot 91, 
justice of the peace and farmer 17. 

Parker, Hamilton, (Brewerton,) lot 8, far- 
mer leases 52. 

Patchen, Hezekiah J., (Euclid,) lot 27, far- 
mer 13. 

Patchen, Lorenzo, (Euclid,) lots 26, 27 and 
38, farmer 54. 

Patchet, John, (Clay,) lot 22, farmer leases 
81. 

Patchett, William, (Three River Point,) 
lot 13, farmer leases 50. 

PATRIE, ANDREW, (Euclid,) lot 23, far- 
mer 150. 

Patrie, John, (Euclid,) lots 23 and 35, far- 
mer 158. 

Patten, Levi C, (Brewerton,) lot 4, farmer 
leases 50. 

Patten, Levi C. Jr., (Brewerton,) lots 4 and 
7, farmer 59. 

PATTENDEN, HENRY, (Plank Road,) 
lots 53 and 19, farmer 99. 

Paulk, Arthur, (Plank Road,) lot 79, farmer 
14. 

Paulk, Noah, (Plank Road,) carpenter, 
Chestnut. 

Paulk, R. Mrs., (Plank Road,) lot 91, far- 
mer 1. 

Peacock, Robert, (Plank Road,) lot 77, far- 
mer 41. 

PHILLIPS, JOHN, (Liverpool,) lots 77 and 
89, farmer 100. 

Phillips, William C. Rev., (Plank Road,) 

lot 91, pastor of Baptist church. 
Pierce, John, (Euclid,) lot 18, farmer 75. 
PIESTER, JAMES D., (Liverpool,) lot 75, 

Oswego road, farmer 50. 
Piester, John J., (Liverpool,) lota 64, 75 

and 80, Oswego road, farmer 90. 
Piester, Thomas S., (Liverpool,) lots 64 and 

75, Oswego road, farmer 65. 
Piak, Jacob, (Cicero,) lot 40, farmer 71. 
PITCHER, NICHOLAS, (Cicero,) lot 28, 
farmer 45. 

Pitcher, Peter, (Liverpool,) lot 76, farmer 
21. 

Plaisted, Daniel, (Brewerton,) lot 6, far- 
mer 52. 



180 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



A« ©Map ©it PI 

In SYRACUSE to buy 

WI10WSHADES.PICTUREFRAMES 

Looking Classes, 

Pictures of all kinds, Stereoscopes, Views, 
Decalcomanies, Cord, Tassels, &c, is at 

Tholens Brothers, 

68 East Genesee Street, Myers Block. 

Store Shades and first-class Signs to Order. 





6 



mwwmw\ 



'i 



(LATE FIRM HODGE & STEVENS,) 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 



LAD1 





% 



9 ^p 





OF EVERY DESCRIPTION", 



BUFFALO & FANCY 



S 



HATS, CAPS, STRAW GOODS, &c. 

Furs Altered and. Repaired in Latest Style. 

16 S. Salina Street, Syracuse, N. Y. 

CASH PAH) FOR ALL KINDS OF SHIPPING FURS. 



CLAY. 



181 



Plaisted, Oscar, (Brewerton,) lot S, farmer 

209. 
Plaisted, Richard, (Brewerton,) lot 6, far- 
mer. 
PLATT, RICHARD, (Euclid,) {with, Daniel 

Pool,) general merchant and postmas- 
ter. 
PLUMMER, ERASTDS L., (Clay,) lot 49, 

carpenter. 
Plummer, John W., (Clay,) lot 49, farmer 

60. 
Plower, Thomas, (Clay,) shoe maker. 
POOL, DANIEL, (Euclid,) {with Richard 

Piatt,) general merchant. 
Pool, Freeman, (Liverpool,) lot 77, farmer 

80. 
Pool, RusBel L., (Liverpool,) lot 87, farmer 

51. 
Poiter, Hawley, (Clay,) lot 18, farmer leases 

28. 
Porter, Monroe P., (Euclid,) lot 17, farmer 

73. 
Potter, Thomas, (Clay,) carpenter and 

bt idge builder. 
Potvin, Steven, (Euclid,) blacksmith. 
Powell, Orsamus, (Clay,) general merchant 

and farmer 125. 
Price, Edward, (Liverpool,) lot 89, farmer 

53. 
Price, George T., (Liverpool,) lot 89, far- 
mer 30. 
Pridmore, Lydia Mrs., (Plank Road,) lot 

79, farmer 2. 
PROUTY, HAMILTON, (Phoenix, Oswego 

Co.,) lot 3, farmer 97. 
Quackenbush, Jonas, (Clay,) lots 22 and 35, 

farmer leases 136. 
Quackenbush, Richard, (Clay,) lots 22 and 

35, farmer 136. 
QUICK, S. JASPER, (Brewerton,) lot 1, 

boatman and farmer 1. 
Quinlen, Dennis , (Salina,) lots 62 and 63, 

prop, of cheese factory and farmer 254. 
Ransom, John W., (Plank Road,) lot 79, 

farmer 10. 
Rauf, Jacob, (Caughdenoy, Oswego Co.,) 

cooper. 
Raymond, Adolph, (Liverpool,) joiner and 

builder. 
REDHEAD, JOHN, (Plank Road,) lots 79 

and 65, farmer 108. 
Redhead, William, (Plank Road,) lot 78, 

farmer 30. 
Reed, John, (Liverpool,) lot 87, farmer 

leases 60. 
REESE, EVIN F., (Plank Road,) lots 77 

and 90, farmer leases 38. 
Remington, Sheldon, (Clay,) trader. 
Rhoads & Barnum, (Plank Road,) props 

Centerville Hotel. 
Rice, John W., (Euclid,) lots 36 and 37, far 

mer leases 28. 
RICE, JOSIAH C, (Euclid,) boot and shoe 

manuf. 

Rich, Edward, (Cicero,) lot 53, farmer 50. 
Rich, Mary Miss, (Cicero,) school teacher. 
Richards, James H., (Clay,) lot 13, farmer 
70. 

Richards, Nettie, (Euclid,) school teacher. 
Richardson, George W. Mrs., (Liverpool,) 

lot 74, farmer 20. 
Rickard, Hezekiah, (Euclid,) lot 23, farmer 

leases 1. 



RIGHTER, WALTER, (Euclid,) lots 25 and 
17, farmer 15^. 

Roberts, Henry T., (Plank Road,) lot 64, 
gardener and farmer 9>£. 

Robertson, Chas. H., (Clay,) school teacher. 

Robinson, J. S. Rev., (Clay,) retired cler- 
gyman. 

Robinson, Willard, (Plank Road,) lot 91, 
farmer 3. 

Rogers, Frederick A., (Plank Road,) lot 90, 
farmer 12. 

Rogers, Zenas, (Plank Road,) lot 52, far- 
mer 153. 

Roof, Richard, (Euclid,) farmer leases 6. 

*ROONEY, SAMUEL, (Liverpool,) lot 88, 
importer and dealer in English Thorn 
Quicks, for hedging or fencing, and far- 
mer 80. 

Ross, Abner, (Brewerton,) {with Alexan- 
der,) lots 5 and 8, thresher and farmer 
80. 

ROSS, ALEXANDER, (Brewerton,) {with 
Abner,) lots 5 and 8, thresher and far- 
mer 80. 

Rowley, A. L., (Plank Road,) lot 65, farmer 
223. 

Rumsey, Loami, (Plank Road,) lot 52, far- 
mer 53. 

Russell, Henry, (Clay,) lot 34, blacksmith 
and farmer 24. 

Russell, L. S., agent, (Plank Road,) lot 91, 
boots and shoes. 

Saddlemire, Eli, (Brewerton,) lots 7 and 8, 
farmer 80. 

Saddlemire, Paul,(Euclid,)lotl6, farmer 64. 

Schell, Elizabeth Mrs., (Brewerton,) lots 
18 and 19, farmer 75. 

SCHELL, HIRAM, (Brewerton,) lot 18, far- 
mer 31 and leases 22. 

SCHELL, IRAH., (Brewerton,) lot 18, car- 
penter and farmer 40. 

Schell, John, (Brewerton,) lot 7, farmer 66. 

SCHELL, PETER W., (Brewerton,) lot 19, 
farmer 15. 

Schell, Thomas J., (Brewerton,) lot 19, far- 
mer 13. 

Schell, William H., (Brewerton,) lot 19, 
farmer 14. 

Schoolcraft, Charles, (Plank Road,) farmer 
25. 

Schulz, John, (Clay,) lot 22, mason. 

SCOTT, DANIEL, (Euclid,) {with James,) 
lots 16 and 17, farmer leases 65. 

SCOTT, JAMES, "(Euclid,) {with Daniel,) 
lots 16 and 17, "farmer leases 65. 

SCOTT, THOMAS H., (Euclid,) lots 25 and 
26, farmer 72. 

Sears, Rollin, (Liverpool,) lot 74, farmer, 
life lease 60. 

Sears, Warren J., (Liverpool,) lot 74, far- 
mer 60. 

SELLENS, THOMAS, (Euclid,) lot 39, far- 
mer 69. 

Seymour, Mary Miss, (Euclid,) tailoress. 

Share, Abrani F., (Three River Point,) 
teacher. 

Share, Moses, (Three River Point,) lot 14, 
farmer 10. 

Shares, Waterman P., (Clay,) lot 14, farmer 
26. 

Sharp, Milo, (Euclid,) lot 15, farmer 50. 
Shaver, Sidney C, (Liverpool,) lot 88, far- 
mer 50. 



182 ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



W. & F. BAUMGRAS, 

Practical Painters, 

AND DEALERS IN 
Paints, Oils, Glass & Putty, Varnlslies, Brushes, &c. 

NO. 56 NORTH SAEOJA ST., 

WILLIAM BAUMGRAS, > Sk'WW JLlfcfciflLIB W W 

FREDERICK BAUMGRAS. f & &&&®4®JSglM9 ila i» 

FRENCH PLATE & ORNAMENTAL GLASS FURNISHED TO ORDER. 



BELL HANGEE. 

MANUFACTURER AND REPAIRER OF 

Door, Safe, Trunk, and all kinds of Locks and 

Keys. Brass Founder. Manufacturer 

and dealer in H. C. B rower's 

Anti-Friction Metal, for Journals and Machinery. Sign of the liig Key, 

79 East Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

CASH PAID FOR OLD METAL. 

a. "W. BUEHANS, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Sash, Blinds, Doors & Broom Handles, 

AlT WHOLESALE &. RETAIL. 

PIANINC & SAWING DONE TO ORDER. 



JAMESVILLE, N". Y. 



McChesney & Stokes, 

Carriage Makers & Blacksmiths, 

BIREWERTOX, W. Y. 

Only first-class workmen and the best of materials employed in our Manufactures.— 
We also keep a general assortment of 

READY-MADE COFFINS, AND UNDERTAKERS' GOODS. 

All our Goods will be sold at reasonable prices. 



CLAY. 



183 



SHAVER, TOBIAS, (Euclid,) lots 25 and 

165. blacksmith and farmer 60. 
Shaw, Frank. (Cicero,) lot 28, farmer 11. 
Shaw, Martha Miss, (Liverpool,) sciiool 

teacher. 
SheffeL Ira W., (Liverpool,) lot 63, farmer 

leases 800. 
SHEFFEL. PHILO, (Liverpool.)(M)«/i. Ben- 
ben,) lot 63, farmer 80. 

Sheffel, Reuben, (Liverpool,) (with Philo,) 
lot 63, farmer 80. 

Shepard, Daniel, (Euclid,) lot 26, farmer 40. 

Shepard, Wesley, (Euclid,) lot 26, farmer 
leases 15. 

Shoemaker, Andrew, (Euclid,) lot 26, far- 
mer 5. 

Shufelt, George A., (Plank Road,) lot 91, 
farmer leases 130. 

Shnte, Henry, (Plank Road,) hotel prop. 

Sidmore, John, (Clay,) lot 13, farmer 28 
and leases 90. 

Sisson, Richard, (Euclid.) carpenter. 

Bitterly, Peter, (Plank Road,) lot 91, car- 
penter and farmer 35. 

SITTERLY. SOLOMON, (Euclid,) lot 24, 
farmer 164. 

Sitterlv. Tunis, (Euclid.) lot 16. farmer 113. 

Siver, David H., (Euclid,) lot 51, dealer in 
fctock and farmer 22. 

Sixberry, Steven, (Phoenix, Oswego Co.,) 
lot 3, farmer 80. 

Skinner, Henry E., (Plank Road,) cigar 
manuf. 

Skinner, Levi B., (Plank Road,) lot 91, phy- 
sician and farmer 13. 

Slosson, John, (Plank Road,) lot 91, cooper 
and farmer 2. 

Slossen, Warren. (Plank Road.) cooper. 

Slough, John, (Cicero,) lot 40, farmer 30. 

Smiley, Jane Miss, (Plank Road,) seam- 
stress. Chestnut. 

Smiley, Mrs., (Plank Road,) seamstress, 
Chestnut, 

SMITH, ADELBERT, (Liverpool,) lot 89, 
farmer leases 100. 

Smith, Albert, (Liverpool,) (tvith Anthony,) 
lot 76, farmer 106. 

Smiih, Anthony, (Liverpool,) (tvith Albert,) 
lot 76. farmer 106. 

Smith. Eliza Miss, (Central Square, Oswe- 
go Co..1 school teacher. 

Smith, Hiram, (Plank Road,) lot 79, farmer 
81. 

Smith, Joshua, (Liverpool,) lot 89, farmer 
100. 

Smith, Robert E., (Liverpool,) lot 88, far 
mer 38. 

Smith, Silas J., (Liverpool,) lot 89, farmer 
8 and leases 50. 

Smith, Thomas, (Plank Road,) lot 91, far- 
mer 113. 

SMITH, THOMAS W., (Plank Road,) lot 
65, farmer 71. 

Smith, William, (Liverpool,) lot 89, farmer 
17. 

Snow, John C, (Plank Road.) lot 91, far- 
mer 38. 

Snyder, Allen V., (Euclid,) homoepathic 
physician. 

Snyder, John P., (Clay,) lot 48, farmer 1. 

Sohm, Simon, (Plank Road,) lot 78, farmer 
19. 

Somers, Joseph M., (Clay,) lot 34, farmer 
250. 



SOMMERS, HENRY C, (Brewerton,) lots 
5 and 8, farmer 40. 

Sommers, Marcus, (Brewerton,) lot 6, far- 
mer 53. 

Sotherden, James, (Plank Road.) lot 52, 
farmer 56. 

Sotherden, James H., (Plank Road,) lot 53, 
farmer leases 4. 

Soule, Andrew J., (Euclid.) lot 36, (with 
Nicholas Harden and Chat. Crandall.) 
prop, of cheese factory ; individually 
farmer 220. 

Soule, Harvey L., (Euclid,) lot 25, farmer 
30. 

SOULE, JOHN, (Euclid,) lots 36 and 37, 
farmer 100. 

SOULE, N. R., (Euclid,) lots 36 and 37, far- 
mer. 

Southard, Lester, (Brewerton,) lot 4, far- 
mer 80. 

Souther, Anthony, (Balina,) lot 90, farmer 
37. 

Spire, Alida Mrs., (Brewerton,) lot 19, far- 
mer 50. 

Spire, James, (Brewerton,) lot 19, farmer 
50. 

Springer, Alexander, (Plank Road,) lot 79, 
fanner 4. 

Springer, Frederick, (Liverpool,) lot 88, 
farmer 845. 

STEBBINS, JULIUS A., (Plank Road,) 
blacksmith. 

STERNS, CHARLES L., (Plank Road,) lot 
53, farmer 100. 

Sterns, Parley, (Plank Road,) lot 65, far- 
mer 27. 

STREVER, AARON, (Euclid,) lots 37 and 
38, surveyor and farmer 71, and leases 
92. 

Strickland, Jacob, (Clay,) (T. C. Eldred & 
Co.) 

Strickland, Samuel, (Euclid,) lot 49, far- 
mer 1. 

Studear, William, (Salina,) lots 88 and 89, 
fsrniGr losses 60. 

Summers, Jacob, (Euclid,) lot 27, farmer 
125. 

Summers, John J., (Liverpool,) lot 61, far- 
mer 61. 

SUMNER, ROBERT T., (Brewerton,) lots 
1, 2 and 5, farmer 260. 

Surpeck, Jacob, (Cicero,) lot 40, farmer 
1 1 "i *■ * j s fiO 

Teall, George Washington, (Clay,) lot 34, 
farmer leases 30. 

TEALL, NATHAN, (Clay,) lot 34, farmer 
65. 

Teall, William N., (Clay,) lot 34, farmer 

Tenbrook, Peter, (Euclid,) thresher and 
farmer leases 6. 

Terwilliger, John, (Plank Road,) lot 91, far- 
mer 3. 

Thompson, William, (Euclid,) lot 49, far- 
mer 5. 

Thomson, Jane Mrs., (Three River Point,) 
weaver. 

Tinkham, George A., (Euclid,) lot 48, far- 
mer 72^. 

TRIPP, LEWIS E„ (Cicero,) lot 20, fanner 
50. 

Truman, Isaac, (Euclid,) lot 27, farmer 62. 

Tuttle, Joshua, (Plank Road,) lot 79, farmer 
13. 



1 84 ONONDA GA CO UNTT B USINESS DIRECTOR Y. 



E. F. STEINGREBE^ 




154 North &alina Street, 

SYRACUSE, - NEW YORK 

Balls, Theaters, &c., supplied with all varieties at short notice and reasonable rates. 
ORDERS SOLICITED BY MAIL OR OTHERWISE. 



THE EGYPTIAN ROOFING CO., 

W. B. Hatch, Manufacturer, 

CORNER SPRUCE AND E. WATER STREETS, 
Syracuse, Onondaga Co., N. Y. 



©i& m##jfEir, 



Farmer and Importer and 

Dealer ii Eilisli Thorn Quiets, for Hedpi or Fencina:. 

Farm % mile north of Liverpool, on Liverpool and Clay Road. Trade solicited. 
Address, or call as above. P. O. Liverpool, Onondaga Co., N. Y. 

^wTlliam harlowT 



DEALER IN 



WATCHES AND JEWELRY, 

SILVER AND PLATED WARE, FINE CUTLERY, CLOCKS, SPECTACLES, 
Thimbles &c, &c. Gold Pens Repaired and Repointed. 

No. 27 Warren Street, (Yanderbilt Block,) Syracuse, K Y. 

Silver Plated Door Plates engraved to order. Watches, Clocks and Jewelry Repaired. 

k. C. 60TTSCHALK, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Fringe, Braid, Cords, Tassels 

&c, of every variety and style, on reasonable terms and short notice. 
^° Particular attention paid to orders at all times. 
Remember the place, 

375 NORTH SALINA STREET, SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



CLA Y. 



185 



VanAuken, Jauies, (Caughdenoy, Oswego 
Co.,) lot 2, farmer 116. 

YanDerwerkin, Margaret Mies, (Euclid,) 
seamstress. 

VAN EPPS, JAMES M., (Euclid,) lots 25 
and 96, farmer 68. 

VAN EPPS, ROBERT, (Euclid,) lot 16, far- 
mer 71. 

VANHOESEN, GEORGE W., (Brewer- 
ton,) lot 10, farmer 122. 

Van Horn, Fidelia P. Mrs., (Brewerton,) lot 
4, farmer 50. 

Van Vleck, Isaac, (Euclid,) lot 27, farmer 
100. 

VERPLANCK, WILLIAM, (Euclid,) lot 25, 
tanner 168. 

Vickery, Edgar S., (Three River Point,) lot 
14, farmer leases 20. 

Vickery, Steveu Mrs., (Three River Point,) 
lot 14, farmer 80. 

Wadsworth, Almond, (Plank Road,) (ivith 
Franklin,) lot 91, gardener 17. 

Wadsworth, Alvin, (Plank Road,) lot 79, 
farmer 20. 

Wadsworth, Franklin, (Plank Road,) (with 
Almond,) lot 91, gardener 17. 

Wagoner, Henry, (Euclid,) lot38, farmer 11. 

WALDRON, AARON, (Brewerton.) lot 19, 
farmer leases 50. 

Walter, Jacob, (Euclid,) lot 55, farmer 75. 

WALTER, JOHN R., (Euclid,) lot 38, 
thresher and farmer 49. 

Walter, Martin A., (Euclid,) lots 26 and 17, 
town assessor and farmer 173. 

Walter, Valentine, (Cicero,) cigar maker. 

Walter, Wesley, (Brewerton,) lot 7, farmer 
94. 

Walters, WinneldC'.,(Euclid,)lot 23, farmer 
67. 

Ward, William, (Euclid,) lot 50, farmer 98. 

WARNER, DAVID S., (Euclid,) lot 16, far- 
mer 50. 

Warner, Harriet Mrs., (Euclid.) tailoress. 

Waterberry, Thaddeus J., (Plank Road,) 
lot 90, farmer 22. 

Waterbury, David, (Liverpool,) lot 88, far- 
mer 50. 

Waterbury, Jacob, (Salina,) lot 90, farmer 
40. 

Waterbury, Marvin, (Liverpool,) lot 49, far- 
mer 50. 

WATERBURY, SHERMAN, (Liverpool,) 
lot 76, farmer leases 24. 

Waterhouse, Edwin R., (Euclid,) farmer. 

Waterhouse, Manning, (Euclid,) lot 50, gar- 
dener and farmer 31. 

Waterhouse, William R., (Liverpool,) lot 
89, carpenter, building mover and far- 
mer 26. 

Waterman, William L., (Liverpool,) lot 76, 
cooper. 

Watkins, John H., (Plank Road,) butcher, 
Chestnut. 

Watts, Henry, (Clay,) mason, 

WATTS, SIDNEY, (Clay,) lot 22, mason, 
boatman and farmer 1. 

WELLER, AMOS, (Euclid,) lot 26, farmer 
86. 

WELLER, JAMES, (Cicero,) lot 40, farmer 
75. 

Weller, Jeremiah, (Euclid,) lot 38, farmer 
10. 

WELLER, JOHN, (Plank Road,) lots 63, 
64 and 77, farmer 110. 



Weller, Robert, (Euclid,) lots 18 and 26, 
farmer 55. 

Weller, Robert A., (Euclid,) lot 26, carpen- 
ter and farmer 43. 

Weller, Robert T., (Liverpool,) lot 89, far- 
mer 20. 

WELLER, WILLIAM, (Plank Road,) lot 
77, farmer 129. 

WELLS, SHELDON, (Plank Road,) lots 79 
and 91, farmer 84 and leases 60. 

Wescot, C, (Salina,) school teacher. 

West, Daniel, (Euclid,) lot 37, farmer 25. 

West, Elin E., (Brewerton,) schoolteacher. 

West, James, (Brewerton,) lot 7, farmer 

WEST, LORENZO D., (Liverpool,) lot 62, 
blacksmith and farmer 35. 

West, Mary Mrs., (Euclid,) tailoress. 

West, Orin, (Euclid,) lots 37 and 51, farmer 
115. 

West, Stephen B., (Brewerton,) lot 7, far- 
mer 50. 

WEST, WILLIAM, (Euclid,) farmer. 

Western, James, (Euclid,) lot 17, farmer 73. 

Wetsel, Christopher, (Euclid,) lot 26, far- 
mer 63. 

Wetsel, Daniel, (Euclid,) lot 38, farmer 12. 

Wheeler, Oscar, (Euclid,) lot 24, farmer 
leases 75. 

White, Robert, (Liverpool,) lot 76, farmer 
leases 1. 

WIGENT, ENDORA MISS, (Euclid,)school 
teacher. 

Willen, William, (Liverpool,) lot 89, farmer 
56. 

Williams, , Rev., (Clay,) pastor of M. 

E, Church. 

Wilson, Lucus, (Clay,) shoemaker. 

Wise, Adam, (Euclid,) blacksmith. 

Wood, George, (Plank Road,) lot 7S, farmer 

Wood, George W., (Euclid,) lot 62, farmer 

Woodard, Sarah A., (Plank Road,) lot 78, 

farmer 10. 
Woods, Edwin, (Clay,) boat builder. 
Woodward, Charles, (Plank Road,) lot 78, 

farmer 59. 
WOODWARD, D., (Plank Road,) lot 78, 

farmer. 
Woodward, Emerson, (Plank Road,) lot 79, 

farmer 10. 
Woodward, Nathaniel, (Plank Road,) mill 

wright and wagon maker. 
Woodworth, Daniel B., (Clay,) blacksmith. 
Wormer, Frank Miss, (Euclid,) school 

teacher. 
Wormuth, Henry, (Clay,) (with Rvfus,) lot 

22, farmer leases 75. 
Wormuth, Rufus, (Clay,) (with Henry,) lot 

22, farmer leases 75. 
Wormuth William, (Clay,) lot 22, farmer 75. 
WRIGHT, A. J., (Plank Road,) hotel prop. 
Young, Addison, (Euclid,) lot 15, farmer 3. 
Young David, (Euclid,) lots 17 and 18, far- 
mer 66. 
YOUNG, DAVID A., (Euclid,) (with John 

J.,) lots,17 and 26, farmer 93. 
Young, George, (Clay,) lots 22 and 34, far- 
mer 11. 
Young, Hiram, (Euclid,) lots 37 and 38, 

cooper and farmer 15. 
Young, Isaac, (Euclid,) lot 26, cooper and 

farmer 15. 



186 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 







Is a German Weekly Newspaper, devoted to Democratic principles; a Journal of large 
circulation and a desirable advertising medium. 

Terms $2,50 per Annum, in Advance. 



j 




ii hi ii u i mm* i* j 

PUBLISHER AND PROPRIETOR, 



No. 225 North. Salina Street, Syracuse, N. Y. 



SHOW BILLS, POSTERS, 

Programmes, Bill -Heads, Cards, 

AND ALL KINDS OF JOB PEINTING, 

In both Languages, (German & English,) 

Neatly and expeditiously executed, and on the most favorable terms. 

mtm A* HOFMANlT 

AGENT OF THE 

HAMBURG MAIL STEAMSHIP LINE, 

Sells Passenger Tickets to and from Hamburg, and on all the railroad stations in Ger- 
many, Austria, France and Switzerland ; gives Drafts on all the principal cities of Ger- 
many, France and Switzerland ; draws up Powers of Attorneys for collecting monies in 
Germany, and 

Transfers Packages to all parts of Europe, 

With safety, and at lowest rates. 
KsF~ For further instructions inquire at our office, 

No. 225 North Salina Street, 

Syracuse, 1ST. Y. 



CLAY-BE WITT. 



187 



Young, John, (Plank Road,) lot 79, farmer 

15. 
Young, John, (Brewerton,) lot 6, farmer 

180. 

Young, John G., (Brewerton,) lots 17 and 
18, farmer 76. 

YOUNG. JOHN J., (Euclid,) (with David 
A.,) lots 17 and 26, farmer 93. 



Young, Levi, (Euclid,) lots 24 and 23, far- 
mer 15#. 
Young, Norman, (Euclid,) lot 38, farmer 

Igua C 8 5 ^4> 

YOUNG, PETER, (Euclid,) lot 38, farmer 

36. 
YOUNG. P. J., (Euclid,) lot 27, farmer 175. 
Young, William A., (Brewerton,) lot 18, 

farmer 61. 



(Post Office Addresses in Parentheses.) 



Abbott, Harrison S., (Syracuse,) lot 30, 
milkman and farmer 186. 

Adcook, Edward B., (Fayetteville,) black- 
smith. 

Adcook, George, (Fayetteville,) lot 73, far- 
mer 55. 

Ainslie, Luther, (Jamesville,) lot 81, far- 
mer 360. 

Alexander, Geo. H., (Jamesville,) lot 72, 
farmer 46. 

ALLEN, FRANCIS F., (Syracuse,) lot 31, 
carriage maker, manuf. of Union Fan- 
ning Mill, Ogden's patent, blacksmith 
and farmer 50. 

Allen, Levi, (Collamer,) lot 33, farmer 35. 

Alletchausar, Gottlip, (Syracuse,) lot 4, far- 
mer 50. 

Alsop, Geo., (DeWitt.) lot 42, farmer 106. 

Amos, Jacob, (Syracuse,) Empire State 
Mills, 43, 45, 47, 49, 51, W. Water, Sy- 
racuse. 

ANDERSON, PATRICK, (Jamesville,) 
{with Michael Warre,) lot 94, farmer 78. 

Annable, Charles, (Syracuse,) lot 30, far- 
mer 25. 

Armstrong, John, (Jamesville,) (Lockwood 
& Coj 

Ashby, Samuel, (DeWitt,) prop. DeWitt 
Hotel. 

AVERY, CHAPMAN W., (Jamesville,) lot 
91, coal dealer and manuf. of water lime, 
plaster and cigars, also farmer 93. 

Avery, H., (Syracuse,) director of Spring 
Brook cheese factory. 

AVERY, LESTER, (DeWilt,) lot 62, far- 
mer 50. 

Avery, Wm. H., (Syracuse,) lots 29 and 30, 
farmer 140. 

Babcock, Henry C, (Fayetteville,) lot 73, 
farmer 51. 

Badgley, Jacob R., (Collamer,) lot 11, far- 
mer 100. 

Baker, Benj. P., (Collamer,) lot 33, farmer 
70. 

BALL, ANTHONY, (Syracuse,) lot 32, far- 
mcr Ic&sgb 45 

Ball, George, (Syracuse,) lot 31, farmer 16Ji\ 

Balsley, Elihu, (Fayetteville,) lot 74, dealer 
in nlaster and farmer 65. 

BALSLEY, LUCIUS, (Fayeiteville,) dealer, 
in plaster. 



Barton, James M., (Collamer,) lot 21, far- 
mer 10. 

BARTON, LAMBERT W., (Collamer,) lot 
21, farmer 55. 

Barton, Wm. H., (Collamer,) lot 21, farmer 
70. 

BATES, JOHN, (Collamer,) lot 21, mechan- 
ic and farmer 24. 

Bates, Larkin, (Collamer,) lot 21, farmer 
120. 

Benedict, Caleb, (DeWitt,) lot 51, farmer 
55. 

Benedict, Joseph B., (DeWitt,) lot 51, far- 
mer 65. 

BLACK, ABRAM M., (DeWitt,) lot 50, far- 
mer 104. 

Black, Jerome C, (DeWitt,) (with Munroe 
M.,) lot 50, farmer 34. 

Black, Munroe M.. (DeWitt,) (with Jerome 
C.,) lot 50, farmer 34. 

Blanchard, John, (Fayetteville,) lot 63, far- 
mer 30. 

Blodget, Charles H., (Collamer,) clerk for 
Jacob Blodger. 

Blodget, Jacob, (Collamer,) general mer- 
chant, (li ye8 in Syracuse.) 

BLODGET, JOHN S., (Collamer,) lots 5 
and 6, farmer 100. 

Bockenstrop, John, (Collamer,) lot 32, far- 
mer 30. 

BOGARDUS, EUGENE, (Syracuse,) (with 
Henry,) lot 42, farmer 150. 

BOGARDUS, HENRY, (Syracuse,) (with 
Eugene,) lot 42, farmer 150. 

Bort, Adam, (DeWitt.) shoemaker. 

BOSTWICK, HARRY, (Fayetteville,) lot 
73, farmer 3. 

BOSTWICK, J. WHEATON, (Collamer,) 
lot 21, farmer 25. 

Breed, J., (Syracuse,) director of Spring 
Brook cheese factory. 

Breed, Joseph, (Syracuse,) lot 30, farmer 50. 

BREER, DIEDRICH, (Syracuse,) lot 41, 
prop, of bone yard and farmer 78. 

Brintnall, Thomas, (Syracuse,) lot 00, far- 
mer 33. 

Brooks, Charles, (DeWitt,) lot 51, farmer 
leases 200. 

Brooks, George, (DeWitt,) lot 61, farmer 
200. 



188 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



C. Spencer & Co., 



Manufacturers, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 



'I 



ig 



Hosiery, Gloves, Collars, Suspenders, Wrap- 
pers and Drawers, Trunks, Traveling 
Bags, Umbrellas, Canes. Manu- 
facturers of* the 

CelelDrated. J7 1 . "ST. 

23 WARREN ST., VANDERBILT HOUSE BLOCK, SYRACUSE. 



Young America Clothing Emporium. 



The Subscribers wish to call the attention of the citizens of SYRACUSE and 
the surrounding vicinity to one of the largest Stocks of Custom 




READY-MADE 




To be found in this city, and we wish it distinctly un- 
derstood that all garments sold at this establishment, not 
found as represented, can be returned. All we ask 
is a continuance of our customers, and as many new ones 
as may give us a share of their patronage. Our Stock 
consists of 



GENTS 1 & BOYS' CLOTHING & FURNISHING GOODS 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. DON'T FORGET THE PLACE, 

18 N. Salina Street, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Moses Bloom. Israel Isaac Goldsmith. 



BE WITT. 



189 



♦BRYANT, HARLOW, (Jamesville,) Em- 
pire plaster and cider mills. 

BURGER, SILAS A., (Collamer,) lot 33, 
gardener 7. 

♦BUhHANS, GORDON W., (Jamesville,) 
manuf. of sash, blinds and broom 
handles. 

Bnrke, Addison M., (Fayetteville,) (L. 
Burke c6 Son.) 

Burke, L. & Son, (Fayetteville.) (Lyman 
and Addison M.,) dealers in stone plas- 
ter. 

Barke, Lyman, (Favetteville,) (L. Burke & 
Son,) lot 83, farmer 150. 

Burke, Millington, (Fayetteville,) lot T3, 
farmer 208, working for Wm. Candee of 
Pompey. 

Burns, Lawrence, (Jamesville,) lot 80, far- 
mer 240. 

Butler, Eben, (Syracuse,) lawyer, office No. 
8 Clinton Block, Syracuse. 

Butolph, Nathaniel, (Collamer,) lot 20, far- 
mer 13. 

Butts, Charles W.. (Jamesville,) resident. 

Butts, George H., (Jamesville,) lots 91 and 
92, farmer 126. 

Butts, Nelson, (Jamesville,) farmer 300. 

Cable, Charles, (Jamesville,) lot 93, farmer 
70. 

Cadogan, Henry D., (Jamesville,) prop. 
Cadogan House. 

Campbell, Amos F., (DeWitt,) lot 4, farmer 
46. 

Campbell, Andrew B., (Fayetteville,) lot 63, 
farmer 30. 

CAREY, EDWARD L., (Collamer,) lot 29, 
grocer. 

Carpenter, Vliet, (Syracuse,) lot 42, farmer 
50. 

Chapman, Carlton E., (Jamesville,) lot 94, 
farmer 117. 

CHEDZOY. JOHN R., (Syracuse,) lot 30, 
farmer 32. 

Cheney, James, (Salina,) lot 20, farmer39}£. 

Chesebrough, Charles W., (Syracuse,) lot 
41, and 235 Onondaga salt reservation, 
farmer 24. 

Chesebrough, Thos. W., (Syracuse,) lot 40, 
farmer 24. 

Clark, Charles,(DeWitt,) lot 72, farmer 120. 

COBB. EDMUND D., (DeWitt,) lot 62, far- 
mer 97. 

Collamer Cheese Factory, (Collamer,) John 
Hopper of Onondaga Valley, prop. 

Combs, Peter, (Collamer,) lot 12, farmer 45 

Conklin, Charles A., (Syracuse,) lot 41, far 
mer 70. 

Conklin, Jessie B., (Jamesville,) lot 92, far 
mer 65. 

Conklin, Mathew, (Syracuse,) lot40, farmer 
80. 

Conklin, Mathew M., (Jamesville,) lot 92, 
farmer 86. 

Coonley, E. Bronck, (Jamesville,) lot 92, 
farmer'75. 

Corrier, Maria Mrs., (Collamer,) lot 23, far- 
mer 100. 

CRAIG, JAMES H., (Syracuse,) lot 40, car- 
penter and farmer 13. 

Crandall, Levi, (Collamer,) lot 11, farmer 29. 

Croly, Thomas, (Syracuse,) lot 49, farmer 

Cronun, Edward, (DeWitt,) lot 61, farmer 
29. 



Crorin, Timothy W., (Fayetteville,) lot 84, 

farmer 40. 
Cummings, Daniel, (Salina,) lot 5, farmer 

Curtiss, Leonard, (Syracuse,) lot 41, farmer 
85. 

Curtis, Thomas, (Collamer,) lot 43, farmer 
65. 

Daggett, David, (DeWitt,) lot 43, farmer 
leases 40. 

Dale, William, (Jamesville,) tailor. 

DANSMAN, PHILIP, (Collamer,) lot 32, 
farmer 31. 

DANSMAN, HENRY, (Syracuse,) lot 43, 
farmer leases 73. 

DARLING, DENNIS, (Collamer,) lot 11, 
farmer 22. 

Davis, Benjamin, (Collamer,) lot 33, farmer 
56. 

DAVIS, EDWARD, (Collamer,) lot 33, far- 
mer 72, 

Day, Chauncey, (Collamer,) lot 12, farmer 
leases 160. 

DeLong, Dennison P., (Jamesville,) black- 
smith. 

Dennis, , (Syracuse,) director Spring 

Brook cheese factorv. 

Dibble, Colby, (Jamesville,) chain maker. 

Dixon, Thomas, (Jamesville,) butcher. 

Doharty, Joseph, (Fayetteville,) lot 84, far- 
mer 40. 

DRUMM, ADAM, (Collamer,) lot 33, far- 
mer 59. 

DUNLOP, ROBERT, (Jamesville,) lots 81 
and 82, farmer. 

Dwire, Patrick, (Jamesville,) lot 91, farmer 
34. 

Dwyer, Dennis, (Syracuse,) lot 91, farmer 
64. 

EDWARDS, HIRAM K., (Fayetteville,) lot 
63, cigar inspector and farmer 75. 

Edwards, Susan Mrs., (Fayetteville,) lot 63, 
farmer 65. 

Elliott, Henry A., (Collamer,) lot 21, farmer 
21. 

Eyguer, Benjamin, (Collamer,) lot 10, far- 
mer 5. 

Ferris, Frederick A., (DeWitt,) lot 61, far- 
mer 100. 

FERRIS, GEOEON C, (DeWitt,) lot 61, 
farmer 110. 

Fisher, William, (Collamer,) lot 44, farmer 
leases 25. 

Fitsimons, Anna M. Mrs., (Syracuse,) lot 
49, farmer 6S. 

Fitzsimons, Cornelius M., (Syracnse,)(wi/A 
William ./.,) lot 49, farmer leases 68. 

Fitzsimons, Wm. J., (Syracuse,) (with Cor- 
nelius M.,) lot 49, farmer leases 68. 

Fowler, Smith T., (Syracuse,) lot 51, far- 
mer 36. 

Fuller, Andrew, (Collamer,) lot 10, farmer 
50. 

Furbeck, James R., (Collamer,) carriage 
maker and hop grower. 

FURBECK, JOHN I., (Collamer,) lot 12, 
post master, justice of the peace, and 
farmer 100. 

GANNETT, GEORGE O., (Salina,) lot 9, 
milkman and fanner 140. 

Gardner, Frederick R., (Syracuse,) engin- 
eer 

GARRETT, LORENZO D„ (Collamer,) lot 
22, farmer 85. 



190 



0N0NBA O A CO VNTT B U8INESS DIRECTOR Y. 



Jti§§ Smlin,®!! 



}> 



AND 



M 




T 



No. IO E. Fayette St., Syracuse, N. Y v 

(Between Warren and Salina Streets.) 

CONSIGNMENTS SOIJCITED. 

SALES MADE IN THE CITY AND COUNTRY. 



Regular Auction Sales at our Sale Rooms Mondays. Wednpsdnvs ».i.i 
Saturdays. Goods sold at private sale at auction pric^ * Pe^foi " wishlL tb p U * 
chase goods of any kind will do well by calling at our Auction Store wlBmu S lD P ur 




BUY YOUR 

Boots & Slioes 




PHILLIP PAPWOETH, 

BOOT & SHOE STORE, 



Mo, 88 E, Genesee Street 



SYRACUSE, IV. Y., 

Where may be found at all times a large stock of 

CUSTOM BOOTS & SHOES, 

Of all kinds, which I will sell as cheap as any Store in 
the city. Call and see. 



. N. B.— Special attention paid to Custom Work of all 
kinds and repairing. Remember the place, . 

P. PAPWORTH, 

88 E. Genesee St. 

Also a large assortment of Men's, Wo- 
men's and children's Rubbers. 



BE WITT. 



191 



Gay, Samuel, (Collamer,) lot 22, farmer 12. 

GETMAN, GEORGE H., (Syracuse,) lot 
31, milkman and farmer 92. 

Getman, Jeremiah, (Syracuse,) lot 31, milk- 
man and farmer 92. 

Gilbert, Robert, (Syracuse,) lot 31, farmer 
leases 26. 

Gleason, Michael, (Syracuse,) lot 9, farmer 
12. 

Goodell, Henry C, (DeWitt,) lot 62, post 
master, grocer and farmer 18. 

Goodfellow, Nathaniel S., (Collamer,) lot 
11, farmer 50. 

Gove, Perry B., (James ville.) {Gove & Wes- 
ton.) 

*GOVE & WESTON, (Jamesville,) (Perry 
B. Gove and Russell F. Weston,) mer- 
chant millers, dealers in water lime and 
plaster. 

Gower, E. Mrs., (Collamer,) lot 11 farmer 
30. 

Green, Emilus F., (Jamesville,) wagon 

GREEN, ERASMUS S., (JameBville,) wag- 
on maker. 

GREEN, IRA, (Jamesville,) lot 95, hop rais- 
er and farmer 108. 

GREGORY, BENJAMIN S„ (Jamesville.) 
lawyer, insurance agent and notary 
public. 

GREGORY, CHARLES M., (Jamesville,) 
carpenter. 

Hamilton, Geo. W., (Jamesville,) lot 92, 
jeweler and gardener 10. 

Hamilton, Rev. Berdette W., (Jamesville,) 
pastor M. E. church. 

Hamilton, Washington, (Jamesville,) prop. 
Hamilton House. 

Hare, Alva, (Collamer,) lot 11, farmer leases 
53. 

Hare, Isaac (Collamer,) lot 11, fanner 10. 

HARROWER, PETER W., (Syracuse,) lot 
40, fanner 50. 

Harter, Wm. J., (Syracuse,) lot 40, farmer 

16J1S63 4S. 

Harwood, Andrew, (Plank Road,) lot 4, far- 
mer 32. 

Haw, Geo., (Collamer,) works D. S. Mil- 
ler's farm. 

HEADSON, STEPHEN, (Syracuse.) grocer 
and dealer in boots, shoes and feed. 

Hellaron, Francis, (Jamesville,) track mas- 
ter. S. B. &N. Y. R. R. 

HENDERSON, ROBERT, (Collamer.) lot 
96. farmer 81 in Cicero, also works J. 
Hopper's farm 522, lot 6. 

Hewit, Samuel, (Syracuse,) prop, ashery. 

Hibbard, Franklin, (Manlius,) lot 95, farmer 
116. 

Higbee, E. B. Mrs., (Syracuse,) lot 49, far- 
mer 10. 

Hill, Samuel, (Jamesville,) postmaster. 

HISCOCK, HORACE, (Jamesville,) (Reed 
& Hiscock.) 

Holbrook, Josiah E., (Fayetteville,) lot 63, 
farmer 12. 

HOLBROOK, JOSIAH G., (Jamesville,) 
asst. assessor internal revenue. 

Hookway, Enoch, (Salina,) lot 9, farmer 
42 % 

'Horton/Allson W., (Syracuse,) lot 70, far- 
mer 60. 



Horton, George D. Rev., (Jamesville,) pas- 
tor Congregational church of Manlius 
and Pompey. 
HOTALING, GARRET H, (Jamesville,) 
prop, flouring and custom mill, lime 
and plaster mills. 
Hotaling, Jonathan, (Jamesville,) lot 93, 

farmer 150. 
HOTALING, OLIVER G., (Jamesville,) 

cut stone, lime and plaster manuf. 
Hotaling, Wm. H., (Jamesville,) lot 92, far- 
mer 8. 
Hotchkin, Addison, (Collamer,) lot 10, far- 
mer 60. 
Hotchkin, Jerome, (Syracuse,) lot 30, far- 
mer 70. 
Huber, Adam, (Salina,) lot 20, farmer 65. 
Hull, Daniel, (DeWitt,) lot 72, farmer 129. 
Hungerford, Charles J., (Jamesville,) butch- 
er. 
Hunt, Charles, (DeWitt,) lot 61, farmer 70, 

works farm for Mrs. Hunt. 
Hunt, Thomas, (DeWitt,) lot 51, farmer 47. 
Huntington, Horace G., (Jamesville,) lot 

93, farmer 197. 
Huntley, Lyman, (DeWitt,) lot 51, farmer 

14. 
Jackson, Polly A. 8. Mrs., (Jamesville,) 

lot 72, farmer 50. 
Jones, John, (Syracuse,) lot 31, farmer 82. 
Jones, John, (Jamesville,) lot 70, farmer 45. 
Jones, Philip, (Syracuse,) lot 21, farmer 37. 
Jones, Solomon, (Fayetteville,) lot 63, deal- 
er in plaster and farmer 75. 
Killmar, AbramB., (Collamer,) lot 33, far- 
mer 10. 
Kiniber, George, (Syracuse,) lot 31, farmer 

200. 
KING, AMOS B., (DeWitt,) lot 62, miller, 

manuf. and farmer 8. 
King, Hyram, (DeWitt,) lot 62, farmer 137. 
King, James E., (Syracuse,) lot 70, farmer 

50. 
King. James H., (DeWitt,) miller, flour and 

plaster dealer. 
KING, PHILLIP, (Collamer,) lot 33, fanner 

44. 
KING, SIDNEY J., (Jamesville,) dealer in 

stone plaster. 
KINNE, EDMOND D., (DeWitt.) painter. 
Kinne, Elbridge, (DeWitt,) lot 50, farmer 

50. 
Kinne, Emerson, (DeWitt,) lot 51, farmer 

75. 
KINNE, IRA, (DeWitt,) lot 50, farmer 85. 
Kinne, Mason P., (DeWitt,) lot 50, larmer 

50. 
Kinne, Prentice, (DeWt«t,) carpenter. 
Kinney, Rufus it,., (Syracuse,) lot 42, far- 
mer 100. 
Knapp, Edwin A., (Jamesville,) allopathic 

physician and surgeon. 
Knapp, John O,, (DeWitt,) lot 49, milk- 
man and farmer 75. 
Knapp, Wm. L., (Fayetteville,) lot 72, far- 
mer 160. 
KORTRIGHT'S HOTEL, (Jamesville,) Ja- 
cob L. Kortright, prop. 
KORTRIGHT, JACOB L., (Jamesville,) 

prop. Kortright's Hotel. 
Landers, Benj., (DeWitt,) lot 43, farmer 7. 
Laumeister, Franc, (Jamesvifle,) foreman 

barley mills. 
Lewis, Daniel L., (Jamesville,) thresher. 



192 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 




URTISS, 

114k #fc\ w&\ 

9lMWK 




Having secured the services of a first-class Poser from one of the leading Galleries 
in New York City, we are prepared to make sittings quicker and do better work than 
ever. 

We have introduced "SARONY'S LATEST PATTERN PATENT POSING AP- 
PARATUS AND CHAIR," which renders perfect stillness, ease and comfort to the 
sitter, thus doing away with those old standard head rests, so offensive to many, while 
sitting for a picture. 

Also, we present to our patrons several other novelties, just out, for the making up 
of first-class 




And New Style Pictures. Attention given to 

COPYING OfcD DAdCERREOTPES,&C. 

And Finishing up in Colors or Ink. 

Embossed Vignettes, Porcelain Pictures, IVew Cabinet Size and 

Solar Prints, produced on short notice. Strangers in 

town will tind our Gallery the place to get their 

work done promptly. Keiuember 

the location, 

No. 4 Franklin Buildings, E. Genesee St., 

SYRACUSE. 

BONTA & CIJRTISS. 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIBECTORY. 193 



THE FLORENCE 

SEWING MACHINE, 

Is a Do* Thread, Loci Stitch, Shuttle Machine. 

It makes FOUR DIFFERENT KINDS OF STITCHES; it sews to the RIGHT 
or LEFT at option, by means of the 

Reversible Feed. It Gathers a Ruffle, 

AND 

Sews it on at the Same 
Time. 

There, is no trouble with the 
TENSION, it adjust* and ar- 
ranges itself. It is the 




FAMILY 




MACHINE 



And is giving everywhere it is shown, the best kind of SATISFACTION. 

W. C. ORCUTT, 

General Agent for Central New York, 

No. 2 Yates' Block, E. Genesee Street, 

SYRACUSE, HT. Y. 



K# 



194 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

kJ x if* i * i* 1% *i II *l iflj 

iolan 5 Syrg@on f 

Office and Residence East of Tally, N. Y. 

Especial Attention given to all Chronic 

Complaints. 




o 



Also Patentee and Manufacturer of 






A beautiful and durable WATER PROOF OIL POLISH, for all kinds 
of leather work, such as boots and shoes, harness, carriage tops, &c, &c, 
containing all that is desirable in a Polish, and perfectly harmless. 

Manufactured at - - - TULLY, N. Y. 

Dr. C. F. Merrill, 

No. 9 National Hotel, 



Skaneateles, 



New York, 



Pays particular attention to the treatment of 

Chronic Diseases & the Diseases of 

WOMEN «£ CHILDREN. 

And all Private Diseases Treated by Letter 
or otherwise, confidentially. 



DE WITT. 



195 



Lewis, Sidney, (Syracuse,) lot 70, farmer 

125. 
Leydan, Roger, (Syracuse,) lot 43, farmer 4. 
Leyden, John, (Collamer.) lot 21, farmer 70. 
Livingston, Joseph, (Collamer,) wagon ma- 
ker. 
Lockwood & Co.. (Jamesville,) (Stnith Lock- 
wood and John Armstrong,) woolen and 

cotton batting mill. 
Lockwood, Smith, (Jamesville,) (Lockwood 

& Co.) 
Loomie, George S., (DeWitt,) allopathic 

physician. 
Loucks, Hugh, (Collamer,) lot 22, farmer 

25. 
Loucks, Win., (Collamer,) lot 22, farmer 

54. 
LUDDINGTON, JARED, (Syracuse,) lot 

41, farmer 95. 
Lndinsrton, Liberty G., (DeWitt,) lots 71 

and 72, farmer 97. 
Lvnch, James, (Salina,) lot 4, farmer 100. 
Marre, Michael, (Jamesville,) (with Patrick 

Anderson,) lot 94, farmer 78. 
Marsh, Daniel, (Jamesville,) (with James,) 

lot 94, farmer 130. 
Marsh, James, (Jamesville,) (with Daniel,) 

lot 94. farmer 130. 
Marten, Rogers, (Collamer,) lot 33, cabinet 

maker. 
Masuemer, Joseph, (Syracuse,) dealer in 

building stone and water lime. 
Mason. Zepheniah B., (Jamesville,) black- 
smith. 
Maxfield, David, (Collamer,) lot 6, farmer 

50. 
Mead, George H., (Collamer,) lot 21, farmer 

leases 50. 
Medler, P., (Syracuse,) director of Spring 

Brook cheese factory. 
Meelige, Adam F., (Collamer,) shoemaker. 
Mengle, Philip, (Collamer,) lot 10, manuf. 

of salt, blocks 13 and 14, Syracuse, and 

farmer 70. 
Merritt, Chas., (Syracuse,) (with Luther,) 

brick maker. 
Merritt, Luther, (Syracuse,) (with Charles,) 

brick maker, yard on lot 3. 
Michael, Joseph, (Salina,) lot 29, butcher 

and farmer 30. 
MIDDLETON, HENRY, (Jamesville,) lot 

80, farmer 18. 
Midler, Philip P., (Syracuse,) lot 30, canal 

superintendent and farmer 105. 
MILES, HENRY, (Jamesville,) laborer. 
Miller, Alvin, (Collamer,) lot 21, farmer 

46. 

Miller, Clark, (Collamer,) lot 12, farmer 27. 
Miller, David S., (Collamer,) lot 10, farmer 

70. 
Miller, George, (Collamer,) lot 10, farmer 

13. 
Miller, John. (Salina,) lot 31, farmer 32. 
MILLER, JOSEPH Y., (DeWitt.) lot 62, 

farmer 52. 
Miller. Samuel. (Collamer,) lot 10, farmer 

18. 
Miller, Stephen, (Collamer,) lot 33, farmer 

30. 

MILLER, VICTOR, (Salina,) lot 23, car- 
penter and farmer 25. 

MINGERS, PETER C. E., (DeWitt,) black- 
smith. 
L 



Mix, Walter, (Fayetteville,) lot 73, farmer 
3. 

Moor, John C, (Collamer,) lot 33, gardener 
20. 

Morgan, Nelson, (DeWitt,) lot 61, farmer 
54. 

Morris, Philip, (Syracuse,) lot 21, farmer 
25. 

Morris, Thomas W., (Syracuse,) lot 21, far- 
mer leases 25. 

Morse, Lewis, (Jamesville.) lot 91, farmer 
75. 

Mosher, Peter, (Collamer,) lot 22, farmer 
75. 

Moulter, Charles J., (DeWitt,) dealer in 
leaf tobacco. 

MOULTER, JAMES, (DeWitt,) lot 61, far- 
mer 50. 

Monnig, Henry, (DeWitt.) lot 51, farmer 
13. 

MOYXIHAM, ANDREW, (Jamesville.) 
boot and shoe maker. 

Murray, David, (Collamer,) lot 11, farmer 
29. 

MURRAY. JOHN, (Collamer,) lot 21, far- 
mer leases 63. 

Murray, Thomas, (Collamer,) lot 22, farmer 
3. 

NEWCOMB, CHRISTOPHER C, (Salina,) 
lot 9, farmer 50. 

XEY, JOSEPH W., (DeWitt,) carpenter. 

Nichols, Charles, (Syracuse,) lot 41, presi- 
dent and superintendent of Lodi roll- 
ing mill, and farmer 120. 

NOTTINGHAM, GARTON, (Syracuse,) lot 
70, milk dairy and farmer 84. 

NOTTINGHAM, VANVLECK, (Syracuse,) 
lot 70, milk dairy and farmer 100. 

Osborn, Julia A. Mrs., (Fayetteville,) lot 
63, farmer 26. 

Overton, Thomas, (Collamer,) lot 10, farmer 
20. 

PADBURY, JOHN, (Collamer,) lot 10, far- 
mer 95. 

Palmeter, Harry, (Jamesville,) lot 94, far- 
mer 64. 

Palmiter, Seth G., (Syracuse,) lot 30, far- 
mer 50. 

PANKHURST, THOMAS, (DeWitt,) lot 
63, farmer leases of H. K. Edwards 75. 

Pease, Wm. H., (Collamer,) lot 12, cooper 
and farmer 10X- 

PECK. DEWITT C, (DeWitt,) lot 71, far- 
mer 133. 

Perrett, John, (Jamesville,) blacksmith. 

POWLESLAND, CHARLES E., (Colla- 
mer,) lot 50, farmer 21. 

Powlesland, Geo., (Collamer,) lot 23, farmer 
134. 

Powlesland, George W., (Collamer,) lot 22^ 
farmer 60. 

Powlesland, John, (Collamer,) lot 12, far- 
mer 77. 

Powlesland, Wm. H., (Collamer,) lot 23, 
farmer 60. 

Puffett, Charles, (Jamesville,) lot 93, farmer 
70. 

PUTNAM, WILLIAM M., (DeWitt,) miller. 

Quintard, I. Edwin, (Syracuse.) farmer 50. 

Rail, Abraham, (Syracuse,) lot 9, farmer 40. 

REALS, ALBERT (Jamesville,) (with John 
Reals.) 

Reals, Jacob, (Jamesville,) lot 82, dealer- in 
plaster stone and farmer 137. 



196 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



TN*t*t 



CASKETS, 
COFFINS, 
PLATES, 
HANDLES 




WWWB* 

v_^ ■*& y $ 

ff*|ttf« 

HEARSES, 
CARRIAGES, 
SHROUDS, 
CAPS, &c. 



Also, a General Assortment of Shuler's Wrought, Galvanized, Air-Tight 



STOil CASKS AN» tUUHEIM. 

farcins No. 82 Mb Salina St, Syracuse, N. Y, 

Per.onal Service, at all Honr., Pay and NlgM. Older, received for Pre.ervlog Flowers. 

SYRACUSE RLE WORKS, 

(OO WEST FA.YETTE ST.,) 

SYRACUSE, iv. Y., 

Manufacturers of 

Superior Hand Cut Files and Rasps, 

FROOT THE I1FST ENGLISH CAST STEEL. 

Save your Old Files. Files Re-cut i si the 
best manner. 

SEND FOR PRICE LISTS. 
IRELAXD & CO., Prop'rs. 



New York Hoop Skirt Manufactory. 

*~-+ 



WHOLESALE & RETAIL 



MANUFACTURER, 

38 N. Salina St., (Onondaga House,) Syracuse, N. Y. 

Bhap S ed a 6 9 ^w e Sffl^jJK l° tic /- r^' 80 ' old sldrt9 ^paired, altered and 
BOUT cheaper than g £fSE?$ESf$£Sfc. ^ Merc * ant8 ™PP»ed cheap. Goods 



BE WITT. 



197 



Real?, John, (Jamesville,) lot 82, dealer in 

plaster and farmer 14. 
Reed, Burton T., (Janiesville.) mason. 
Reed, Euos K., (Jamesville,) lot 81, farmer 

134. 

REED & HISCOCK, (Jamesville,) (Isaac K. 
Reed and Horace Hiscock,) general mer- 
chants. 

REED, ISAAC K., (Jamesville,) (Reed & 
Hiscock.) 

Reen, Frank, (Collamer,) lot 10, farmer 49. 

RILEY, EDWARD, (Collamer,) lot 11, far- 
mer 8. 

Riley, Patrick, (Collamer,) farmer 50. 

Ritson, Richard, (Syracuse,) lot 31, farmer 
46. 

Roberts, John, (Syracuse.) lot 43, farmer 18. 

Ross, Andrew, (Collamer,) lot 11, farmer 49. 

ROSSE. FREDERICK, (DeWitt,) lot 49, 
carpenter and farmer 6. 

Rotnor, Henry H., (Collamer,) lot 22, farmer 
65. 

Rowley, Charles, (DeWitt,) lot 61, farmer 
65. 

Sawyer, Geo. P., (Syracuse,) lot 42, mason. 

SCHERMERHORN, STEPHEN, (Colla- 
mer,) lot 11, berryman. 

Schuyler, Edwin D., (Collamer,) lot 11, far- 
mer 82. 

SCHWENDNER, JOHN M., (Collamer,) 
lot 32, farmer 50. 

Scott, Benjamin F., (Syracuse,) lot 49, far- 
mer 140. 

SCOTT, RICHARD Jr., (Collamer,) lot 21, 
farmer leases 91. 

Seely, George B., (Syracuse,) lot 49, fruit 
grower and nurservman. 

Seggall, John, (Fayetteville,) lot 74, dealer 
in plaster stone and farmer 80. 

SHERWOOD, ADDISON B., (DeWitt,) lot 
61, farmer 92. 

Sherwood, Jacob L., (Jamesville,) harness, 
boot and shoe maker. 

Sherwood, J. Welles, (Collamer,) carpen- 
ter. 

Sherwood, Samuel A., (Jamesville,) lots 92 
and 93, farmer 240. 

Shondy, Henry, (DeWitt,) lot 63, farmer 
20. 

Simons, Henry, (Collamer,) lot 33, farmer 
17. 

Simons, John, (Collamer,) lot 32, farmer 21 
and leases 10. 

SIMONS, URIAH, (Collamer,) (ivith 7. Si- 
mons.) 

Simons, Valentine, (Collamer,) lot 32, far- 
mer 30. 

Slocomb, Win. J., (Syracuse,) lot 30, fanner 
75. 

Smith, Adam, (Collamer,) (toith Martin B. 
Smith,) lot 22, farmer 188, 

Smith, Allen, (Collamer,) (with Royal 17.,) 
lot 33, farmer 77. 

Smith, Ambrose, (Fayetteville,) lot 73, far- 
mer 150. 

Smith, Charles E., (DeWitt,) stone mason. 

Smith, Henry J., (Salina,) lot 20, farmer 100. 

Smith, James, (Syracuse, )(with John Smith 
Jr.,) lot 60, farmer 155. 

SMITH, J. HENRY, (Fayetteville,) dealer 
in stone plaster and farmer. 

Smith, John, (Syracuse,) lot 60, farmer 75. 

Smith, John Jr., (Syracuse,) (with James 
Smith,) lot 60, farmer 155. 



Smith, Lewis, (Syracuse,) prop, of Messina 
House, DeWitt. 

Smith, Margus Rev., (Collamer,) pastor of 
Presbyterian church. 

Smith, Martin B., (Collamer,) (with Adam,) 
lot 22, farmer 188. 

SMITH, ROYAL W., (Collamer,) (with Al- 
len,) lot 33, farmer 77. 

Smith, William S., (Manlius,) lot 95, farmer 
100. 

Soule, Frederick C, (Collamer,) lot 11, far- 
mer 34}tf . 

Sparling, Luther, (Collamer,) lot 11, farmer 
18. 

SPENCER, CHARLES, (DeWitt,) lot 52, 
farmer 140. 

Spencer, Orlando P., (Collamer,) lot 6, far- 
mer 30. 

Spring Brook Cheese Factory, (Syracuse,) 
lot 30, J. Breed, S, Swaney, P. Medler, 
Dennis, and H. Avery, directors. 

STACEY, CHARLES, (Syracuse,) lot 32, 
farmer leasts 50. 

Steele, Wm. M., (DeWitt,) lot 71, farmer 
leases of Geo. Rivenburg 114. 

STEGGALL, ASA, (Fayetteville,) boatman. 

STEGGALL, JONATHAN, (Fayetteville,) 
lot 74, boatman and farmer 16. 

STEGGALL, WM., (Jamesville,) lot 82, 
dealer in plaster stone and farmer 125. 

Stevenson, Archibald M., (Collamer,) phy- 
sician. 

Stilwell, Chas. A., (Collamer,) (with Chas. 
17.,) lot 22, farmer 75. 

Stilwell, Chas. W., (Collamer,) (with Chas. 
A.,) lot 22, farmer 75. 

Stilwell, Frank, (Fayetteville,) lot 63, deal- 
er in leaf tobacco and farmer 56. 

Stokes, James, (Collamer,) blacksmith. 

Swaney, S., (Syracuse,) director of Spring 
Brook Cheese factory. 

Swaney, Sheldon, (Syracuse,) lot 40, far- 
mer 43. 

Swaney, Sheldon, (Salina,) lot 9, manuf. of 
salt and farmer 100. 

Swaney, Wm. S.. (Salina,") lot 20, farmer 53. 

SWAVLEY, OLIVER, (Syracuse,) lot 32, 
farmer 74. 

Tallman; James C, (Collamer,) lot 23, far- 
mer 80. 

Tallman, James H., (Collamer,) lot 33, 
butcher and farmer 10. 

Tallman, Thomas, (Collamer,) lot 23, far- 
mer 50. 

Temple, Orson, (Collamer,) lot 10, farmer 20. 

Thompson, Albert, (Collamer,) thresher. 

THOMPSON, ELIZABETH MRS., (De- 
Witt,) lot 42, farmer 45. 

Thompson, Warren D., (Syracuse,) lot 30, 
carpenter and joiner and farmer 3. 

Thornsdill, Charles, (Syracuse,) brick layer. 

Thornsdill, George, (Syracuse.) brick layer. 

TITUS, I. J., (Syracuse,) lot 42, farmer 125. 

Torry, Harvey, (DeWitt,) lot 49, farmer 50. 

TRA VERS, THOMAS, (DeWitt,) farmer 10. 

Tyrell, George, (DeWitt,) lots 61 and 62, 
farmer 149. 

Van Cott, Samuel, (Collamer,) lot 11, dairy 
and farmer 170. 

Vandenburg, John, (Jamesville,) lot 95, far- 
mer 20. 

VANSLYKE, JAMES, (DeWitt,) harness 
maker and auctioneer. 



198 ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



,40 VIKKLT RECOR^ 

" We do not know of any better or handsomer country 
newspaper in the State."— Syracuse Daily Standard. 

Is Published every 

THUKSMY MORNING, AT FATETTEVILLE, 

ONONDAGA CO., IN". Y., BY 

F. A. DARLING, 

EDITOR & PROPRIETOR. 



TERMS— $1.50 per Annum, in Advance, or 

$9.00 if not paid before the close 

of the year. 



The RECORDER is a seven column paper, 24 x 36 inches, devoted to home interests, 
neutral in politics, and claims the largest circulation of any country paper in the 
County. 

AS AN ADVERTISING MEDIUM 

It is superior, circulating among the business men, and large class of wealthy farmers, 
and is taken in nearly every family in the Empire Town of Onondaga County— Manlins. 

Recorder Job Department 

Is replete with every facility for doing all kinds of Job Work, from a book, poster or 
programme, to the finest card, employing two Power Presses of the best patents. 
Fayetteville, N. Y., July 1, 1868. 

F. A. DARLING, Prop'r. 



BE WITT-ELBRIDGE. 



199 



VAN VALKENBUEGH, LAWRENCE, 
(Salina,) lot 29, farmer 75. 

Van Valkenburgh, Nicholas, (Salina,) lot 
10, farmer 4. 

VanVleck, Chauncey B., (Syracuse,) lot 30, 
physician and farmer 17. 

VanVrankin, Mathew, (Jamesville,) lot 94, 
farmer 60. 

WAGONER, THEODORE, (Salina,) lot 9, 
farmer 50. 

Walker, Samuel O., (Collamer,) lot 12, far- 
mer 70, 

Walsh, John, (DeWitt,) lot 61, farmer 24. 

Wands, Hiram, (Collamer,) lot 11, raiser of 
small fruit and farmer 9#. 

Wands, Robt. H., (Collamer,) lot 23, far- 
mer 60. 

Wands, Thomas H., (Collamer,) lot 10, far- 
mer 150. 

WARD, ROBERT,(DeWitt,) lots 50 and 51, 
farmer 125. 

WATKINS, STEPHEN, (Jamesville,) far- 
mer. 

Welch, George, (Plank Road,) farmer 12. 

Wellington, Charles K., (Syracuse,) lot 41, 
farmer 64. 

Weston, Alva, (Jamesville,) lot 94, farmer 
68. 

Weston, Russell F., (Jamesville,) (Gove & 
Weston.) 

Wheeler, J. Barnum, (Collamer,) lot 21, far- 
mer 40. 

Wheeler, Wm., (Salina,) lot 29, farmer 146. 

Whouhart, Marx, (Syracuse,) lot 32, farmer 
35. 



Wiborn, Albert M., (DeWitt,) lot 49, farmer 
30. 

Wiborn, Bevil S., (DeWitt,) lot 49, farmer 
114. 

Wiborn, Henry H., (DeWitt,) lot 49, far- 
mer 33. 

WILCOX, A, P., (Payetteville,) lot 83, 
breeder of thorough-bred American 
Merino sheep and blooded horses, and 
farmer 250. 

Wilcox, Geo. W., (DeWitt,) (with Orlando 
.fiT.,) lot 63, farmer 53. 

Wilcox, Orlando K., (DeWitt,) (with Geo. 
W. Wilcox,) lot 63, farmer 53. 

WILCOXEN, ALFRED L., (Jamesville,) 
carpenter and joiner. 

Williams, Nelson L., (Syracuse,) lot 42, 
rail road contractor and farmer 40. 

Williams, Wm. R., (Salina,) lot 9, farmer 70. 

Winne, Henry, (Syracuse,) lot 42, shoe 
maker. 

Wood, Nathan N., (Syracuse,) lot 21, farmer 
50. 

Word en, Munroe P., (Fayetteville,) lot 63, 

farmer 85. 
WRIGHT, ABRAM A., (Jamesville,) lots 

91 and 92, general merchant and farmer 

134. 

Wright, EzekielB., (Jamesville,) lot 93, far- 
mer leases 136. 
Wright, John, (Syracuse,) lot 30, brick 

Wright, Thomas J., (Jamesville,) butcher. 



(Post Offioe Addresses in Parentheses.) 



Abbott, Alexander W., (Jordan,) lot 45, far- 
mer 10. 

Abbott, Daniel, (Elbridge,) mason and 
shoe maker. 

Adams, Richard, (Jordan,) wheelbarrow 
maker. 

Allen, A., (Jordan,) miller. 

Allen, Charles G., (Elbridge,) manuf. of 
wooden ware. 

Allen, George W., (Elbridge,) shoe maker. 

Allen, Wm. T., (Elbridge,) chair factory. 

ANDERSON, JAMES, (Elbridge,) boot and 
shoe maker. 

Anderson, John, (Jordan.) bakery. 

ARNOLD, BENJAMIN, (Jordan,) lot 33, 
farmer 85. 

Arnold, James M., (Elbridge,) leases saw- 
mill. 

Arnold, J. Newton, M. D., (Elbridge,) alio, 
physician. 

ASHLT, JOSEPH O., (Elbridge,) consta- 
ble. 

Ashmore, George W., (Elbridge,) black- 
smith. 



Baker, Jonah, (Jordan,) miller. 

Baker, Wilber C, (Jordan,) cooper. 

Barker & Fowler, (Jordan,) (J. R. Barker 
and W. H. Fowler,) groceries and pro- 
visions. 

Barker, J. R., (Jordan,) (Barker & Fowler.) 

BARNES, GEORGE »., (Jordan,) lot 34, 
fftrmpr 21.2 

BARR, EDGAR S., (Jordan,) saloon keeper. 

Barr, Harmon W., (Jordan,) saloon. 

BATES, DANIEL, (Jordan.) lot 32, farmer 
leases 64.. 

Bates, Oren D., (Jordan,) lot 32, house 
painter and farmer 64. 

Bell, Gabriel, (Jordan,) lot 31, farmer 200. 

Bell, George, (Jordan,) lot 45, farmer 90. 

Bent, Dowe C, (Elbridge,) retired farmer. 

Best, Charles E., (Jordan,) (VanValken- 
burgh & Best.) 

Bidwell, Charles, (Jack's Reef,) lot 35, far- 
mer 30. 

Blair, James H., (Jack's Reef,) lot36, farmer 
60. 

Blair, Robert, (Elbridge,) lot 60, farmer 15. 



200 



ONONDA GA CO TJNTY B USINE8S DIRECTOR Y. 



1868. 





1868. 







s> 



Corner Jordan & Genesee Sts., 

SKANEATELES, - _ IS". Y. 



■?♦»» 






very business r P nt^nf?h P, J ]ar Hou f? I 8 P ]easan «y and conveniently situated in the 
taTtvMd wntf^/ n ?5Sf,t tOWn ' an ^ 1B bn $ a few Btepa from tne Railroad Depot, where 
toe of charge P Way8 m readiue88 t0 con ™y baggage to the House 

readTnwfto thP RrrommnC ?en F f fltted and reftl mished throughout, and is now in 
moderate accommodation of summer guests and the traveling public. Charges 

E. WOOD KIDDER, Prop'r. 



W B & JF B W B W>m&zk 



Proprietors of 



5 J> 






MOTTVILLE, IV. Y., 

MANUFACTURE THE CHOICEST GRADES OF 

FAMILY AND BAKERS' FLOUR. 

Office and Warehouse, 81 & 83 E. Water St., 

Syracuse, HT. Y. 

FLOUR, FEED,~MEAL AND GRAIN 

Constantly on Hand. 

ORDERS PROMPTLY FILLED. 



E LB RIDGE. 



201 



Blak6lee, Arza, (Jordan,) shoe maker. 

Bond, Edwin II., (Jordan,) moulder. 

BONTA, DAVID, (Elbridge,) lot 72, tailor 
and farmer 12. 

BOOTH, R. N., (Jordan,) groceries and 
provisions. 

Bowe, John, (Elbridge.) lot 95, farmer 23. 

Bowes, Lawrence, (Elbridge,) lot 95, far- 
mer 260. 

BRACE, JEREMIAH W., (Jordan,) lot 45, 
mason and farmer 10. 

Brackett, C. W., (Jordan,) carpenter and 
joiner. 

Bramley, Alex. Rev., (Jordan,) pastor M. 
E. church. 

Brooks, Benjamin, (Jordan,) lot 35, farmer 5. 

Brooks, William, (Jordan,) lot 35, farmer 30. 

Broughton, Samuel R., (Jordan,) lot 30, 
farmer 188. 

BROWN, CALEB, (Elbridge,) lot 83, far- 
mer 160. 

BROWN, CORYDON H., (Elbridge,) lot 72, 
farmer 95. 

Brown, C. Mason, (Elbridge,) lot 83, far- 
mer 91. 

Brown Emilv Miss, (Elbridge,) (Misses E. 
& S. Brown.) 

Brown, E. & S. Misses, (Elbridge,) (Emily 
and Sarah,) milliners. 

BROWN, JAMES R., (Elbridge,) lot 73, 
farmer 180. 

BROWN, LEWIS, (Elbridge,) lot 70, far- 
mer 97. 

BROWN, SAMUEL A., (Elbridge,) lots 72 
and 83, farmer 142. 

Brown, Sarah Miss, (Elbridge,)(3fi*«e# E. & 
8. Brown.) 

BROWN, SQUIRE M., (Elbridge,) lot 73, 
assessor and farmer 160. 

BROWN, WARREN S., (Elbridge,) (W. 8. 
Brown <fc Co.) 

BROWN, WM. E., (Elbridge,) lot 71, far- 
mer 30. 

BROWN, W. S. & CO., (Elbridge,) (War- 
ren 8. Brown and Erastus R.Hunt,) 
feneral merchants. 
, George G., (Memphis,) lot 50, farmer 
leases 134. 

Buck, Harriet Mrs., (Memphitl lot 50, far- 
mer 75. 

Buck, John Mrs., (Jordan,) lo 32, farmer 
50. 

Bulah, Joseph. (Jordan,) barber. 

Bullock, Cromwell, (Elbridge, 1 carpenter. 

Burnett, John, (Jack's Reef,) lot 48, farmer 
6. 

Burton, Albert, (Jordan,) billiard rooms. 

Bush, Seymour J., (Elbridge,) lot 95, far- 

rnpr RPi 

Butler, Patrick, (Jack's Reef,) lot 36, far- 
mer 100. 

Cain, Lyman, (Elbridge,) lot 94, farmer 84. 

CAMPBELL, ALDEN A., (Elbridge,) lot 
85, plaster mill and farmer 300. 

Carey, Oren J., (Jordan,) teamster. 

CARPENTER, CHARLES L., (Elbridge,) 
prop, of Munroe House. 

CARR, JAMES E., (Jordan,) physician and 
surgeon. 

Carr, William, (Elbridge,) lot 72, farmer 14. 

CARR, WILLIAM N., (Elbridge,) lot 72, 
farmer 21. 

Carroll, Thomas, (Elbridge,) lot 82, farmer 
9. 



CARSON, DAVID, (Jordan,) prop. Clinton 
House. 

Carson, Garrett S., (Jordan,) lot 31, farmer 
leases 12. 

Carson, Jane Mrs., (Jordan,) lot 31, farmer 
12. 

Castler, John, (Jordan,) groceries and pro- 
visions. 

CAVENOR, THOMAS A., (Jack's Reef,) 
lot 36, blacksmith and farmer 10. 

CHAMBERLIN, CHARLES W., (El- 
bridge,) (with George M. and John N.,) 
lot 81, farmer 211. 

Chamberlin, George M., (Elbridge,) (with 
Charles IF. arid John N.,) lot 81, farmer 
211. 

Chamberlin, JohnN., (Elbridge,)(wii!/t Geo. 
M. and Charles W.,) lot 81, farmer 211. 

Chappell, Bethire Mrs., (Jack's Reef,) lot 
61, farmer 70. 

Chatfield, A. L. & Van Camp, (Hart Lot,) 
(Albert L. Chatfield and Chas. Van- 
Camp,) dealers in groceries. 

Chatfield, Albert. L., (Hart Lot,) (A. L. 
Chatfield and Van Camp,) lot 91, post 
master and farmer 40. 

CHATFIELD, BERLIN G., (Hart Lot,) lot 
92, farmer 80. 

Chatfield, Byron, (Hart Lot,) lot 92, farmer 

lCtlSBS SO 

Chatfield, Walter, (Hart Lot,) lot 92, farmer 
80. 

CHITTENDEN, WILLIAM W., (Jordan,) 
carpenter, 

CLAPP, WM. H., (Hart Lot,) cigar manuf. 

CLARK, ASHBEL W., (Elbridge,) lot 84, 
farmer 26. 

Clark, Ashley, (Elbridge,) harness maker. 

Clark, George F., (Elbridge,) lot 72, gar- 
dener 2. 

Clark, George P., (Elbridge,) lot 93, farmer 
17. 

Clark, Nathaniel, (Elbridge,) lot 93, farmer 
87. 

Clark, Orvill, (Elbridge,) lot 94, farmer 114. 

CLEMENTS, BENJAMIN, (Jordan,) lot 57, 
farmer 142. 

Clements, Nathan, (Jordan,) lot 57, farmer 
88. 

Cline, Patrick, (Elbridge,) lot 82, farmer 8. 

CLINTON HOUSE, (Jordan,) David Car- 
son, prop. 

Cobb, Flora S. Miss, (Jordan,) preceptress 
of Jordan Academy, 

Cole. Charles, (Elbridge,) butcher. 

COLE, EDSON, (Elbridge,) carpenter. 

COLE, ELISHA, (Elbridge,) lot 84, farmer 
42. 

Cole, Harmon B., (Elbridge,) farmer 45. 
COLE, JEFFERSON, (Elbridge,) wagon 

maker. 
Congdon & Merrill, (Jordan,) prop. Abrums 

House. 
Conger, Wm. W., (Jordan,) lot 34, farmer 

36. 
Converse, Marvin, (Jordan,) carpenter and 

joiner. 
Converse, Simon, (Jordan,) farmer 5. 
Conway, Godfrey, (Elbridge,) lot 60, farmer 

69. 
Cook, Chas. E., (Elbridge,) lot 84, farmer 

106. 
Cooper, Chas., (Jordan,) lot 34, fanner 12. 



202 



ONONDA OA CO UNTY B USINE8S DIRECTOR Y. 



ZiTMAlf HAXiZi 



I 




DEALER IN 



fii mm 

GOLD & SILVER 



Pwf« Silver Spoons, 

Plated Ware, Clocks, Fancy Goods 

AND CUTLERY. 

Agent for the AMERICAN WATCH. All the different styles constantly 
on hand. Also, agent for LAZARUS & MORRIS' CELEBRATED 

" PERFECTED SPECTACLES." Prices as low as the lowest. 

SKANEATELKS, IN". Y. 

GALL at the ~~ 

Sunbeam Gallery, 

In the Syracuse Savings Bank Building, 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

Ferrotypes, Ambrotypes, Gem Miniatures. 

Our Rooms are fitted up expressly for making 

I=L "FL O T ""ST 



We have the exclusive right of the PATENT MULTIPLYING CAMERA, for the 

city of Syracuse. From 

One to Twenty-Four Dozen 

hflvB l i eS f ta ^ en £* one 8it ting, and finished in FIFTEEN MINUTES. Persons who 
thom ) a ?f 5SP urs t0 8ta y in tne c %, can get a dozen nice pictures to take home with 

M;Vf- q * the best Photograph,) at prices ranging from 50 cents to $3.50 per doz. 
turps «n2 e8 u Be ^ l ? L °ckets, Pins and Rings, neat and cheap. Copying from old pic- 

a'ii Pictures enlarged, 

si^n «¥i r J»^ lr « e ™ a ^ en aa wel1 in cloudy ond ™ dear weather. Look for the large 

J lS 111 GALLERY, First Building N. of tlie Erie Canal. 

<>■ ^JORDAN. s H- A JORD AN. 



ELBRIDGE. 



203 



Cooper, Cornelius, (Jordan,) lot 34, farmer 
18. 

Copp, Carloman, (Jordan,) lot 45, farmer 
70. 

CORNISH, HEMAN, (Jordan,) lot 58, re- 
tired farmer. 

Cornish, Seymour, (Jordan,) lot 30, farmer 
55. 

Cornue, John P.. (Jordan,) grocer. 

Corv, John. (Jordan,) lot 59, farmer 100. 

CRANER, N., (Jordan,) merchant tailor. 

CRESMAN, CHARLES A., (Elbridge,) lot 
81, farmer leases 185. 

Croft, Samuel, (Jordan,) lot 46, farmer 52. 

Crofut, Fanny, (Jordan,) dress maker. 

Cronk, Frederick, (Elbridge,) lot 86, farmer 
5. 

Cronk, Simon P., (Elbridge,) lot 85, farmer 
5. 

Crosman, Nathan, (Elbridge,) lot 81, farmer 
185. 

CROSS, JOSEPH O., (Jordan,) wheelbar- 
row maker. 

CROSSETT, NEWMAN, (Elbridge,) lot 59, 
farmer 171. 

Curtiss, Alonzo M., (Elbridge,) lot 70, far- 
mer leases 150. 

Curtis, Chas. B., (Jordan,) merchant. 

Daggett, Calyin F., (Jordan,) general mer- 
chant. 

Daggett, R. P., (Jordan,) groceries and 
provisions. 

Dalton, James, (Elbridge,) lot 71, farmer 12. 

Dalton, Thomas, (Elbridge,) lot 71, farmer 5. 

Davis, Henry, (Elbridge,) lot 85, farmer 6. 

Dawley, Wm. W., (Jordan,) lot 57, farmer 
leases 154. 

Delany, John, (Jordan,) lot 47, farmer 30. 

DeWaters, Adelbert, (Elbridge,) cabinet 
maker. 

Dewaters, Samuel, (Hart Lot,) lot 91, far- 
mer leases 133. 

Dick, Sherman C, (Jordan,) patent walk 
manuf. 

Dixon, George, (Memphis,) lot 50, farmer 
27. 

Dodge, Laura Miss, (Jordan,) music teacher, 
Jordan Academy. 

Donovan, John, (Jordan,) tanner. 

Donovan, William, (Jordan,) tanner. 

Dove, Thomas, (Jordan,) shoe maker. 

Drake, Philip, (Jack's Reef,) lot 35, saw 
mill and farmer 140. 

DURLING, ROBERT, (Hart Lot,) lot 91, 
farmer leases 75. 

Dye, Joseph W., (Jordan,) general mer- 
chant. 

DYGERT, GEORGE H., (Jordan,) photo- 
graph artist, 

Earle, Ira, (Jack's Reef,) lot 36, farmer 65. 

Elliott, John K., (Jordan,) lot 34, farmer 45. 

Elliott, Laton B., (Jordan,) lot 34, farmer 
100. 

Ellis. James M., (Elbridge,) lot 93, farmer 
150. 

Emerick, A. C. Miss, (Jordan,) telegraph 
operator. 

Emerick, E. B. Mrs., (Jordan,) groceries, 
provisions and millinery. 

EVANS, HARRISON, (Jack's Reef,) car- 
penter and shoe maker. 

EVANS, WM. S., (Elbridge,) lot 94, farmer 
96. 



Farnham. Reuben G., (Elbridge,) deputy 
sheriff. 

FIKES, JAMES, (Memphis,) lot 61, farmer 
leases 86. 

Fikes, Peter, (Memphis,) prop, of Memphis 
hotel and farmer 86. 

Fitzgerald, John, (Jordan,) lot 46, black- 
smith and farmer 15. 

Foster, Elphonzo, (Elbridge,) lot 94, farmer 
36. 

Foster, John, (Elbridge,) lot 94, farmer 40. 

Fowler, Elbridge G., (Jack's Reef,) lot 61, 
farmer 16 and leases 70. 

Fowler, Fannie Mrs., (Jack's Reef,) lot 61, 
farmer 60. 

Fowler, Gary, (Jack's Reef,) lot 74, farmer, 
leases. 

Fowler, W. H., (Jordan,) (Barker & Foiv- 
ler.) 

Garrison, Edward H., (Elbridge,) black- 
smith. 

Garrison, Harrison W., (Elbridge,) black- 
smith. 

Garrison, William C, (Elbridge,) black- 
smith. 

George, Albert, (Elbridge,) tin ware man- 
ufacturer. 

GERNAND HOTEL, (Hart Lot,) Jacob 
Gernand, prop. 

GERNAND, JACOB, (Hart Lot,) prop, of 
Gernand Hotel. 

Gibbs, Thomas, (Jordan,) lot 4S, farmer 
57. 

Gilchrist, Thomas J., (Jordan,) carpenter 
and joiner. 

Gillett, Orris A., (Jordan,) lot 5S, farmer 
leases 100. 

Glass, Oliver, (Memphis,) lot 74, farmer 
100. 

Goff, Samuel, (Jordan,) groceries and pro- 
visions. 

GOODELL, MARYH. Mrs., (Elbridge,) lot 
71, farmer 75. 

Goodwin, Roderick, (Jordan,) machinist 
and cabinet maker. 

GORHAM. AARON, (Hart Lot,) {with Na- 
than,) lot 93, farmer 184. 

Gorham, David, (Elbridge,) lot 93, farmer 
137. 

GORHAM, JEWETT, (Elbridge,) lot 93, 
farmer 115. 

GORHAM, JOSEPH, (Elbridge,) lot 82, 
farmer 202. 

Gorham, Lucy Mrs., (Hart Lot,) lot 92, far- 
mer 125. 

Gorham, Moses, (Elbridge,) lot 83, farmer 
30. 

Gorham, Nathan, (Hart Lot,) (with Aaron,) 
lot 93, farmer 184. 

Gould, M. B., (Jordan,) tanner. 

GRIDLEY, WARREN, (Jordan,) hardware 
dealer. 

Griswold, Horatio, (Jordan,) lot 48, brick 
maker and farmer 100. 

Guilfoil, Daniel, (Jordan,) groceries and 
provisions. 

Guilfoil, Martin, (Jordan,) cooper. 

Hale, Elias, (Elbridge,) lot 82, farmer 93. 

Hale, Henry L., (Elbridge,) (Wiggins & 
Hale.) 

Hale, Seward, (Elbridge,) lot 74, farmer 
198 

HALL,' GILBERT, (Elbridge,) lot 74, far- 
mer 205. 



204 



0N0NDA OA CO UNTY B TJSINESS DIRECTOR T. 



0AKW00O MARBLE WORKS, 

88 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Marble, Freestone 

AND GRANITE 




Monuments 



^ND J-Iead J3TONES 

OF EVERY DESIGN, 

ON HAND OR MADE TO 
ORDER. 



Your Patronage Solicited. 

All Work Warranted as Represented. Q < LINIHAW 



PATENT OPFI 




IB 




case?bv roeriaf JZL obt T m £ Pat ? Dt8 are second to none. We guarantee doubtful 
We have an «ipl^ em ,f nt - V a T e ^?' K? i88l » e8 . Extensions, etc., promptly attended to. 
our cSInto ifniPSS. ?i C8d ag6nt f * w ?8Wngton, who is indefatigable in the interests of 
the Foreign PatPnt H i 8 1 °^° nn K ect f d 7 lth a ? ent8 in Lon don and Paris, and can obtain all 

imr MOELEY & CO., 
WIgTINGjLOCK, SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



ELB RIDGE. 



205 



HALL, GRATIA C. Mrs., (Jordan,) lot 83, 
farmer 106. 

HALSTED, HARRISON, (Elbridge,) lot 61, 
farmer 165. 

HALSTED, JACOB, (Jack's Reef,) lot 49, 
farmer 210. 

HALSTED, JAMES M., (Elbridge,) lot 85, 
farmer leases 183. 

Halsted, John C, (Elbridge,) lot 72, farmer 
183. 

Hamill, Erastns N., (Jack's Reef,) lot 36, 
farmer 109. 

Hamlin, Wm. A., (Jordan,) grocer. 

Hardy, Joel, (Jordan,) carpenter and join- 
er. 

Hardy, Marvin W., (Jordan,) lot 58, straw 
board mannf., saw mill and farmer 105. 

Harmon, Reuben B., (Hart Lot,) lot 92, 
farmer 136. 

Harrington, Levi, (Elbridge,) mason. 

Harris, Anna E. Mrs., (Elbridge,) milliner. 

HAYDEN, CHARLES, (Jordan,) {with 
John L. Putnam,) miller. 

HAYDEN, JOSEPH, (Jordan,) cooper. 

Healey, Timothy B., (Jordan,) lot 57, farmer 
111. 

Hewitt, Stephen, (Jordan,) miller. 

HILL, D. MONRO, (Elbridge,) lot 86, far- 
mer 100. 

HILL, THOMAS W., (Elbridge,) lot 74, 
commissioner of highways and farmer 
260. 

HILLIARD, CHARLES W., (Elbridge,) 
miller. 

Hinds, E. S. Mrs., (Elbridge,) dress maker. 

Hiserodt, Hiram, (Jordan,) lot 58, farmer 
24. 

Hobart, Peter, (Elbridge,) retired farmer. 

Holloway, Robert, (Jordan,) lot 47, farmer 
43. 

Hoolohen, Sylvester, (Elbridge,) lot 82, far- 
mer leases 100. 

Hopkins, Peter H., (Jordan,) barber. 

HOSKINS, HENRY L., (Jordan,) lot 30, 
farmer 120. 

Hovey, F. S., (Jordan,) harness maker. 

Howe, Asa B., (Jordan,) druggist and book- 
seller. 

HOWLAND, ALBERT, (Jordan,) lot 33, 
farmer 210. 

Howland, J. ~R.,(3ord.&n,)(Howland & Peck.) 

Howland & Peck, (Jordan,) (J. R. How- 
land and J. E. Peck,) meat market. 

Hoyt, George R., (Jordan,) wheelbarrow 

Hubbell, Samuel, (Jack's Reef,) lot 61, far- 
mer 75. 

Hubbell, Theron S., (Elbridge,) marble 
works and farmer 18 and leases 71. 

HUNT, ERASTUS R., (Elbridge,) (W. S. 
Brown & Co.) 

Hunt, James B., (Elbridge,) lot 86, farmer 
11. 

HUNTER, NATHANIEL, (Elbridge,) lot 
70, farmer 170. 

IRISH, C. F., (Jordan,) miller. 

Irish, George, (Jordan,) lot 35, farmer 23. 

Jacobs, George N., (Jordan,) shoe store. 

Jennings, Edward, (Hart Lot,) lot 91, far- 
mer 3. 

Jones, Abram H., (Jack's Reef,) lot 49, far- 
mer leases 213. 

Jones, Alexander, (Jordan,) lot 33, farmer 
leases 111. 



Jones, George H., (Jack's Reef,) lot 35 
farmer 34. 

Jones, John H. W., (Elbridge,) lot 85, far- 
mer 2. 

Jones, Mary J. Mrs., (Jordan,) lot 33, far- 
mer 111. 

Jordan Academy, (Jordan,) John G. Wil- 
liams, A. M., Principal ; Miss Flora S. 
Cobb, Preceptress ; Miss Laura Dodge, 
Music Teacher. Trustees — Wm. Por- 
ter, President; S. L. Rockwell, Vice 
President • A. Tracy, Secretary ; W. C. 
Rodgers, Treasurer ; A. VanVleck and 
A. B. Howe, M. D. 

♦JORDAN TRANSCRIPT, (weekly,) H. 
P. Winsor, prop. 

Keeler, Levi E., (Elbridge,) carpenter. 

Kelly, Charles, (Jordan,) lawyer. 

Kemp, Charles, (Elbridge,) boot and shoe 
maker. 

Kent, Asher, (Jordan,) lot 31, farmer 02. 

Kester, John, (Memphis,) lot 75, farmer 
400. 

KESTER, MICHAEL, (Elbridge,) lot 75, 
farmer 280. 

Killecut, Nathan, (Hart Lot,) lot 91, farmer 
leases 208. 

Knight, Thomas, (Jordan,) lot 48, farmer 
22. 

Laird, Chauncey B., (Memphis,) lot 61, far- 
mer 519. 

Laird, James A., (Memphis,) lot 61, farmer 
leases 100. 

Laird, Saxton A., (Memphis,) lot 49, farmer 
leases 100. 

Lamphear, Abram, (Jordan,) lot 30, farmer 
37. 

Lamson, Myron, (Elbridge,) carriage maker. 

Lankton, Alonzo, (Jordan,) lot 48, farmer 
137. 

LANKTON, CLARK, (Elbridge,) lot 84, 
farmer 118. 

Lankton, James, (Elbridge,) lot 74, farmer 
163. 

Lankton, John C, (Elbridge,) mason. 

Lawton, Levi, (Jack's Reef,) lot 48, axe 
helve manuf. and farmer 3. 

Lee, Henry, (Jack's Reef,) lot 36, farmer 10. 

LEWIS, JAMES G., (Jack's Reef,) lot 35, 
farmer 140. 

Lloyd, William L., (Jordan,) barber. 

LOCK, WM., (Elbridge,) blacksmith. 

LOMBARD, GEORGE, (Elbridge,) lot 73, 
farmer 100. 

Luce, Wm. O., M. D., (Elbridge.) alio, phy- 
sician. 

Ludington, A. M., (Jordan,) blacksmith. 

Lull, Cyrus, (Jordan,) boots and shoes. 

Lyon, Martin W., (Elbridge,) lot 83, farmer 
2. 

Mack, Henry, (Jordan,) wheelbarrow 
maker. 

Mann, Silas E., (Jordan,) (Silas Mann & 
Son.) 

Mann, Silas & Son, (Jortian,) (Silas and 
Silas E.,) hardware dealers. 

Maron, Norman, (Elbridge,) lot 71, farmer 
82. 

Martin, William ft, (Elbridge,) lot S5, far- 
mer 50. 

Marvin, D. D. N., (Jordan,) lot 46, farmer 
32#. 

Marvin, Norton F., (Jordan,) farmer. 

MARVIN, R. D., (Jordan,) lot 32, farmer 83. 



206 ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 




Itmrt©^ ®@^©i3L 



PRACTICAL 



BOOT AND SHOE MAKER, 

No. 128 S. SAIilNA ST., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

Gentlemen desiring perfect fitting boots made to order, from the best leather to be 
found in the market, at reasonable prices, can be accommodated here. 



PORTER & LUTHER; 

Iron Founders and Machinists. 

All kinds of Job Work and Machine Castings done with dispatch. 

Particular attention paid to Casting Salt Kettles and Castings for Salt 
Works. Sole manufacturers of Round's Patent Shaking Orate. 
Post Office address, SAUNA, N. Y. 

Nos. 354, 356 and 358 N. Salina St., 

SYRACUSE, 3>0-. TT. 

RAIffSOltf JOHNSON, 

Architect and Master Builder, 

Solicits all kinds of jobs in building and repairing buildings of every description. 

Plastering, Papering, Painting and Graining 

Done in the most approved style. Office, 

1 8 Mulberry St., Syracuse, ST. Y. 



m 




Im&M & ©@« 



i 

No. 355 IV. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in all kinds of 

PINE LUMBER, SHINGLES, LATH, &C. 

A full assortment of DRESSED LUMBER constantly on hand. 

P. O. Address, SALINA, N. Y. 

EL1ZUR CLARK. m0 _ S . CLA RK. 



ELB RIDGE. 



207 



McBumey, D. E., (Jordan,) harness maker. 

McBURNEY, JAMES, (Jordan,) miller. 

McCarty, Dennis, (Jack's Reef,) lot 61, far- 
mer 20. 

McCarty, Thomas, (Elbridge,) lot 60, far- 
mer 18. 

McClure, James, (Jordan,) dealer in crocke- 
ry and glassware. 

McCullum, John, (Jordan,) lot 59, farmer 
TO. 

McDonald, Hiram, (Jack's Reef,) lot 36, 
vine raiser and axe helve manuf. 

Mc Gee, Israel, (Jordan,) blacksmith. 

McGEE, LEWIS, (Jordan,) blacksmith. 

McGowan, Charles G., (Elbridge,) lot 86, 
justice of the peace, conveyancer &c, 
and farmer 92. 

McINTYRE, CALVIN, (Jack's Reef,) {with 
Calvin Jr.,) lot 48, farmer 150. 

McINTYRE, CALVIN JR., (Jack's Reef,) 
(with Calvin Sen.,) lot 48, farmer 150. 

Mclntyre, Josiah, (Jack's Reef,) lot 35, far- 
mer 13. 

McKissick, James, (Jordan,) lot 30, farmer 
206. 

McLANE, EDWARD, (Jordan,) groceries 
and provisions. 

Meker, John, (Jack's Reef,) lot 35, farmer 
25. 

Merrick, A. J., (Jordan,) miller, dealer in 
flour and feed. 

Merrill, , (Jordan,) (Congdon & Mer- 
rill.) 

Merriman, Howell C, (Elbridge,) lot 81, 
farmer 180. 

MILES, SWEETING, (Jordan,) lot 71, 
pearl barley manuf. (resides in New 
Jersey.) 

Mills, A. W., (Jordan,) machinist. 

MILLS, WM. S., (Memphis,) lot 50, car- 
penter and farmer 55. 

Mood, G. H., (Jordan,) machinist. 

Mooney, Patrick, (Elbridge,) lot 85, farmer 
15. 

Moore, James, (Elbridge,) lot 92, miller and 
farmer 7. 

Moore, Michael, (Elbridge,) manager of 
pearl barley mills. 

Morgan, D. & Son, (Jordan,) (D. <& Z. G.,) 
carriage makers. 

Morgan, Z. G., (Jordan,) (D. Morgan & 
Son.) 

Mulholland, James, (Elbridge,) lot 92, far- 
mer 3. 

MTJLLIEA, JOHN M., (Jordan,) miller. 

MUNRO COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE, (El- 
bridge,) Truman K. Wright, Principal. 

Munro, Daniel C, (Elbridge,) lot 81, farmer 
550. 

MTJNROE HOUSE, (Elbridge,) Chas. Car- 
penter, prop. 

Munro, James, (Elbridge,) President of 3d 
National Bank of Syracuse, and prop, 
of grist and saw mills. 

Munro, John, (Elbridge,) lot 82, supervisor 
and farmer 300. 

Munro, Nathan, (Elbridge,) lot 83, farmer 
304. 

Murphy, John, (Jordan,) blacksmith. 

Newell, A. P., (Jordan,) lot 47, wagon ma- 
ker and farmer 36. 

Newell, Asa, (Jordan,) blacksmith. 

NEWELL, JOSEPH A., (Jordan.) wheel- 
barrow manuf. 



NEWELL, CHARLES, (Jordan,) farmer. 

Newman, Nelson, (Jordan,) blacksmith. 

Nichols, Simon, (Jordan,) teamster. 

NICHOLSON, ENOCH C, (Jordan,) lot 
58, hop raiser and farmer 130. 

Nicolls, C. M., (Jordan,) painter. 

North, Dwight, (Hart Lot,) carriage man- 
ufacturer. 

North, Linus, (Jordan,) lot 58, farmer 30. 

Northrup, Homer W., (Elbridge,) prop, of 
Northrup Hotel. 

Norton, Louisa, (Jordan,) dressmaker. 

O'DONNELL, JOHN, (Memphis,) lot 62, 
farmer 180. 

Oliver, Evert R., (Elbridge,) lot 85, farmer 

O'Neil, John, (Hart Lot,) restanrant. 

Orcutt, W. O, (Jordan,) dentist. 

Owen, Morris, (Hart Lot,) lot 92, farmer 

PACK, WILLIAM M., (Jordan,) boot and 
shoe dealer. 

PADDOCK, IRA, (Jack's Reef,) lot 49, far- 
mer 112. 

Paddock, J. Nelson, (Elbridge,) (S. D. & J. 
N. Paddock.) 

Paddock, Simon D. jr., (Elbridge,) (S. D. 
& J. N. Paddock.) 

Paddock, S. D. & J. N., (Elbridge,) (Simon 
D. jr., and J. Nelson,) straw board 
manuf. 

Page, Gorham, (Hart Lot,) carpenter and 
jobber. 

Page, John, (Jack's Reef,) Indian physi- 
cian. 

Parks, Wm., (Jack's Reef,) lot 35, farmer 

Patterson, Daniel, (Elbridge,) lot 71, farmer 
leases 85. 

Peck, A. D., (Jordan,) machinist and iron 
founder. 

Peck, Bennett, (Jordan,) mason. 

PECK, DEWITT C, (Memphis,) lot 62, 
farmer 85. 

Peck, J. E., (Jordan,) (Howland & Peck.) 

Peck, Jay T., (Jordan,) stage prop. 

Peck, Seth, (Jordan,) mason. 

PECK, SMITH, (Jordan,) mason and butch- 
er. 

Perry, Anson B., (Memphis,) lot 62, farmer 
24. 

Perry, Israel K., (Elbridge,) lot 95, farmer 
155. 

PHILLIPS, C. S., (Jordan,) machinist. 

*PHILLIPS, THOMAS, (Jordan,) miller 
and smut machine manuf. 

Phippen, Hiram, (Jordan,) wheelbarrows. 

Pickard, Wm. K., (Jack's Reef,) lot 49, far- 
mer 50. 

Pierce, David, (Elbridge,) mason. 

Pierce, Henry M., (Elbridge,) retired far- 
mer. 

PEERSON, DAVID, (Jordan,) lot 57, far- 
mer 176. 

Piatt, Richard, (Elbridge,) mason. 

Porter, Anthony B., (Jordan,) (W. & A. B. 
Porter.) 

Porter, Wm n (Jordan.) (W. & A. B.Por- 
ter,) president of Board of Trustees of 
Jordan Academy. 

Porter, W. & A. B., (Jordan,) (William and 
Anthony B.,) attorneys at law. 

Preston, David, (Elbridge,) lot 72, farmer 
413. 



S08 



ONONDA GA CO VNTY B USINESS DIRECTOR Y. 



85 South Salina Street, 




STAFFORD'S 





The above Cut represents our portable Furnace, of 
which we have four sizes, and and two sizes for brick. 
They are not surpassed by any other Furnace or Heat- 
er, and will do more heating with less coal than any 
other Furnace in the United States. 

MANUFACTURED & SOLD BY 

STAFFORD & LEONARD, 

At 85 S. Salina St., 

SYRACUSE, N, Y. 



Stafforfl & Leonard, 

Manufacturers and Dealers 
in 

THE BEST 

PARLOR & COOK 

STOVES 

In the City, which we will sell 
cheap for cash. Call and see us 
before purchasing elsewhere, at 

85 South Sato Street, 

Syracuse, N. Y, 



ELBRIDGE. 



209 



PRESTON, HIRAM D., (Elbridge,) lot 86, 
farmer 174. 

Prior, William, (Jack's Reef,) lot 36, farmer 
79. 

PARCEL, ALANSON, (Jordan,) lot 30, far- 
mer 59. 

Putnam, George, (Jordan,) lot 71, farmer 

PUTNAM, JOnN L., (Jordan,) (with Chat, 
llayden,) miller. 

Radford, John Mrs., (Jordan,) lot 33, far- 
mer 12. 

Ranney, Luke, (Elbridge,) lot 83, surveyor 
and farmer 40. 

Redmond, Charity Mrs., (Memphis,) lot 62, 
farmer 94, 

Redmond, James W., (Jordan,) lot 30, far- 
mer leases 120. 

Redmond, William C, (Elbridge,) lot 73, 
farmer 180. 

Reed, Nathan C, (Hart Lot,) station agent. 

Rhoads, Amzi, (Elbridge,) lot 92, fanner 42. 

RHOADES, BENJAMIN F., (Elbridge,) 
lot 94, farmer 41. 

Rhoads, C. A., (Jordan,) shoe maker. 

RHOADES, EDMUND B., (Elbridge,) lot 
94, marble factory and farmer 31. 

Rhoades, Francis C, (Elbridge,) wagon 
maker. 

RHOADES, GEORGE W., (Mottville,) lot 
94, farmer leases 50. 

RHOADES, JOHN D., (Elbridge,) lot 83, 
farmer 77. 

Rhoades, Seth, (Elbridge,) lot 94, farmer 
65. 

RHOADES, SQDIRE M. B., (Elbridge,) 
lot 83, farmer 150. 

RICE, DAVID M., (Elbridge,) lot S4, far- 
mer 142. 

RICE, F. E., (Jordan,) cartman. 

Rice, H. E., (Jordan,) meat market. 

RICE, JOHN, (Elbridge,) lot 83, President 
of the Monroe Collegiate Institute and 
farmer 70. 

RICE, WILLIAM B., (Elbridge,) lot 74, 
farmer 136. 

Richards, George K., (Elbridge,) cabinet 
maker. 

Richards, John K., (Elbridge,) lot 83, far- 
mer 14. 

Rickard, Benjamin, (Jordan,) lot 32, farmer 
17. 

Rickard, John, (Jordan,) lot 33, farmer 94. 

RICKARD, WILLIAM, (Jordan,) lot 34, 
farmer 106. 

Rockwell, Stephen L., (Jordan,)( W. C.Rog- 
ers & Co.,) lumber and coal dealer and 
Vice-Pres. Board of Trustees of Jordan 
Academy. 

Roe, David, (Memphis,) lot 50, farmer 298. 

Rodgers, James & Son, (Jordan,) (James & 
»*'. C.,) flour and grain dealers and for- 
warders. 

Rodgers, W. C, (Jordan,) (James Rodgers 
&Son,)(W.C. Rodgers & Co,,) post- 
master, also treasurer board of trustees 
Jordan Academy. 

Rodgers, W. C. & Co., (Jordan,) (TF. C. 
Rodgers, Alex. Van Vleck and Stephen 
L. Rockwell,) lumber and coal dealers. 

Rogers, Thomas Rev., (Elbridge,) Baptist 
clergyman. 

Root, Horace D., (Elbridge,) house painter. 
Rose, William, (Jack's Reef,) shoe maker. 



Ryan, John, (Jordan,) lot 32, farmer 48. 

Sands, Daniel, (Jordan,) lot 32, farmer 57. 

Sands, George, (Jordan,) lot 32, farmer 20. 

SCHOONMAKER, STEPHEN, (Jordan,) 
cooper. 

Scott, Robert, (Jordan,) whetlbarrow ma- 
ker. 

Sellers, Abram, (Jordan,) general mechanic. 

SELLERS, WILLIAM H., (Jordan,) farmer. 

Senter, Lyman, (Jordan,) blacksmith. 

SESSIONS, EBENEZER ;A., (Elbridge,) 
harness maker. 

Shants, Jason, (Jordan,) lot 33, farmer 100. 

Shaw, John, (Elbridge,) wagon maker. 

SHAW, NATHAN, (Jack's Reef,) lot 48, 
farmer 140. 

Sherwood, Amos B., (Elbridge,) lot 86, far- 
mer 125. 

Shoff, Thomas J., (Jordan,) lot 30, farmer 65. 

SIMMONS, ALBERT W., (Elbridge,) lot 
96, farmer leases 50. 

SKINNER, EZEKIEL, (Elbridge,) retired 
mechanic. 

Skinner, J. W., (Memphis,) lot 62, farmer 
leases 94. 

Skinner & Tator, (Jack's Reef,) (William 
K. Skinner and Eli Talor,) grocers. 

Skinner, William K., (Jack's Reef.) (Skin- 
ner & Tator.) 

Smart, George, (Elbridge,) lot 32, farmer 
leases 50. 

Smith, George, (Jack's Reef,) lot 35, farmer 
48. 

Smith, Henry J., (Elbridge,) lot 74, wagon 
maker and farmer 11. 

Smith, Phillip E., (Elbridge,) carriage 
painter and trimmer. 

Smith, Roswell, (Jordan,) lot 48, farmer 95. 

SMITH, WILLIAM A., (Elbridge,) mill- 
wright. 

Smith, William H., (Jordan,) dealer in dry 
goods. 

Smith, Willis P., (Elbridge,) manuf. of fur- 
niture. 

STACEY, GEORGE, (Elbridge,) butcher. 

Star, William, (Jordan,) lot 34, farmer 5. 

Stevens, George, (Elbridge,) carpenter. 

STEVENS, JOHN A., (Elbridge,) lot 93, 
farmer 140. 

Stevens, Richard, (Jordan,) lot 33, farmer 
120. 

Stevens, Thomas, (Elbridge,) tanner and 
currier. 

Stevens, Thomas, (Jordan,) lot 32, farmer 
120. 

STEVENS, W. THACHER, (Jordan,) lot 
32, farmer leases 108. 

Steves, Jane J. Mrs., (Jordan,) lot 33, far- 
mer 47. 

Steves, Royal H., (Jordan,) lot 33, farmer 
leases 47. 

Still, James, (Jordan,) turner. 

Stocking, Solon C, (Jordan,) tobacconist. 

STONE, ROBERT, (Jordan,) lot 59, farmer 
46. 

Stone, Thomas, (Jordan,) lot 59, farmer 46. 
Strickland, Joseph, (Jordan,) teamster. 
Stroh, George, (Jordan,) cabinet maker and 

undertaker. 
Sweeting, Charles, (Elbridge,) lot 94, bop 

raiser and farmer 50. 
TANNER, D. H., (Jordan,) machinist and 

blacksmith. 



210 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



HOWE'S NEVER-FAILING AGUE CURE AND TONIC 




ITT 

Warranted to cure, permanently, Chills, Ague & Fever, and all Periodic Diseases. It 
cures Sciatic Rheumatism, Neuralgia, Paralysis, and all Weaknesses, &c, being won- 
derfully adapted to CURING Disease, restoring health and strength. 

This Preparation Is purely Vegetable, and entirely free from Quinine 
or Mineral Poison. N. B. Persons using this Medicine can commence working imme- 
diately, and without fear of the disease returning. 

awe's Concentrated Syrup. 




FOR TEE BLOOD, LIVER, SKIN, DIGESTIVE k UTERINE ORGANS, AND THE SYSTEM GENERALLY. 

It Restores XZealtlx "toy DEPvixrlfy-lxxs 

the Blood, Correcting the Liver, Cleansing the Skin, Strengthening and Restoring the 
Digestive and Uterine Organs, Regulating and Renovating the System. 

It cures Scrofula or Kings Evil, Cancers, Tumors, Goiter, all Swellings of the Throat 
or Glands, Salt Rheum, Scald Head, Camp Itch, Erysipelas, Carbuncles, Boils, Blotches, 
Pimples, Sores, Mercurial and Syphilitic diseases, Ulceration of the Mouth and Throat, 
Liver, Kidneys ; also Catarrh, Rheumatism, Piles, Gravel, Jaundice, Uterine and Female 
difficulties. 

C. B. HOWE, M. D., Prop'r, Seneca Falls, N. Y. 

Office on Fall St. Rooms over the P.O. Residence, Cayuga St. above R. R. 





OLD FAMILY 




16 E. Genesee St., 

MANUFACTURER OF 

CUSTOM WORK 

AND DEALER IN 

All Kinds of Boots, Shoes 

AND 



BUSBEi 



'« 



0X0 XD A GA CO UXTT B USIXESS DIRECTOR Y. 211 

BURKE, FITZSIMOtf S, HON i: & CO., 

Importers, Jobbers and Retailers 

OF 

DRY GOODS AND FA3VCF GOODS 






AND MANUFACTTTHEKS OF 



No. £53 Main Street, 



i 
i 

l 

'I 



AND 

Nos. 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 North St. Paul Street, 

ROCHESTER, - - IV. Y. 

Having established the most extensive Dry Goods House in the State outside of -New 
York City, we can offer advantages to buyers of Dry Goods unequalled by any other 
dealers in the country. We import directly and keep constantly on hand full lines of 

Broche and Paisley Shawls ; Pirn Bros. Genuine Irish Poplins, 

Black and Colored Silks ; Irish Linens and Lace Curtains ; 
Lupins' 1 Merinoes and Alpacas ; 

Hilgers' Celebrated Broadcloths and Doeskins. 

Our stock of the following goods is always full and complete: 

Cloaks, Sacques and Mantillas ; English, French and American Cassimeres ; 
Genesee Falls Cassimeres, "our own make;" Mohair and Cashmere Dress Goods ; 

Shaker and Ebenezer Flannels ; White. Scarlet and Opera Wool Flannels ; 
Damask Table Cloths and Towelings ; Napkins, Doylies and Wine Cloths ; 

Linen Sheetings and Pillow Casings; 
3-4. 4-4.5-4, (T-4, 7-4, 8-4, 9-4, 10-4. and 11-4 Cotton Sheetings; 
French, American & Scotch Ginghams ; English, French & American Calicoes 

Woolen and Cotton Yarns ; Blankets. Quilts and Counterpanes ; 
Real Laces and Embroideries ; Swiss Nainsook and Victoria Muslins; 

Fancy Goods and Yankee Notions ; Ribbons and Trimmings : Hosiery, 
Wrappers and Drawers ; Balmoral and Hoop Skirts; &c, &c, &c, &c, &c. 

Our Jobbing business, which now extends from the Eastern portion of the State to 
the "Far West," offers inducements to city and country Merchants equal to any house 
in the United States. In addition to our advantages as Manufacturers and direct Impor- 
ters, we have the sale of several makes of Brown Cottons and Woolen Mills in this 
locality. 

Price Lists and Samples furnished on application, and orders sent by mail or entrusted 
to our agents, will receive prompt attention, and Dealers can rely upon purchasing of us 
the year around 

At New York Jobbers' Prices. 



II 



If VUI 




a 



i 




K 



TRIIMABfSBliRCJ, TOMPKINS CO., ST. Y. 

CRECC, PLYER & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 




THAYER'S IRON MOWER 

It is all Iron, very strong and durable, warranted less draft than any other Mowei 
Will work the knives at any angle. The cutter-bar joint is around the Pitman 
Shaft, and is entirely different from other machines. See circulars giving 
full description of this Mower. 

Sharp's IPatent "Wheel Horse Rakes 

With cleaners between each tooth. 
SHARP'S IMPROVED REVOIiVEVG-AXLE RAKI 

The teeth of these Rakes are of the best Pittsburg Steel, work independent, 
dump easy, and done with the horse standing or walking. 

Grain Threshing Machines, Large Combined Clover Thresh 
ing Machines, Warranted the Best in Use, 

Horse Powers, Wood Planing Machines, Cir< ularWood Saws, Drag Saws,& 



ELBRIDGE. 



213 



Tanner, John F., (Jordan.) originator of 
Tanner's ointment. 

Tanner, M. W., (Jordan,) lot 46, fanner 3. 

Tator. Eli. (Jack's Reef.) (Skinner & Tu- 
tor.) poet master and justice of the 
peace. 

Taylor, Abram B., (Elbridge,) carpenter. 

Taylor, Channcey, (Jack's Reef,) wagon 

TAYLOR.' GEORGE H., (Jordan,) pattern 
maker. 

Taylor. Stephen, (Jack's Reef,) lot 61, saw 
mill. 

Templar, William, (Elbridge,) mechanic. 

Thomas, George, (Jordan,) phvsician. 

Thomas. John T., (Elbridge,) (J. T. Thomas 
& Sons.) 

Thomas, J. T. & Sons, (Elbridge,) (John T. 
Joseph F. and William,) cabinet mauufa. 

Thomas, Joseph F.,(Elbridge,)(/. T. Thom- 
as & Sons.) 

Thomas, William, (Elbridge,) (J. T. Thom- 
as <£ Sons.) 

Thompson, Emily Mrs., (Hart Lot,) dress 
maker. 

TIFFT, ORANGE A., (Memphis,) lot 62, 
farmer 58. 

Tillotson, Marshall, (Jordan,) cooper. 

TOMS. ALEXANDER, (Jordan,) restau- 
rant. 

Toms, George, (Jordan,) teamster. 

Toms, Robert, (Jordan,) millwright. 

Torrv, A. C, (Jordan,) patent rooting. 

TRACY, AXELLA, (Jordan,) goldsmith 
and justice of peace, secretary board of 
trustees of Jordan Academy. 

Tru, Albert Rev., (Elbridge,) Presbyterian 
clergyman. 

TUCKER, CHARLES H., (Jordan,) drug- 
gist. 

Turtle. Mary Mrs., (Jordan,) dressmaker. 

TYLER, JARED W., (Jordan,) lot 31. far- 
mer 100. 

Van Camp, Charles, (Hart Lot,) (A. L. 
Chatfleld & Van •Camp.) 

Van Dyke, Sanford, (Hart Lot,) blacksmith. 

Van Yalkenburgh & Best, (Jordan,) ( Wm. 
Van Valkenburgh and Charles E. Best,) 
gents' furnishing house. 

Van Yalkenburgh, William, (Jordan, )(Van- 
Yalkenburgh & Best.) 

VANVEOHTEN, CORNELIUS H., (El- 
bridge,) lot 72, farmer 115. 

Van Vechten, Walter P., (Elbridge,) post- 
master. 

VanVleck, Alexander, (Jordan,)( W. C.Rodg- 
ers cfc Confirm of Rodgers & VanVleck, 
boat builders and prop, dry dock.) 

VanVleck, J. E., (Jordan.) carpenter and 
joiner. 

VanVleit. John, (Elbridge,) retired farmer. 

VAN VLIET, H. EDGAR, (Elbridge,) lot 
96, commissioner of excise and farmer 
100. 

VanVranken, Derrick, (Elbridge.) house 
and sign painter and paper hanger. 

YanWormer C., (Jordan,) cooper. 

Voorhees, Peter, (Jordan,) lot 58, farmer 
262. 

Wagner, William W., (Jordan,) cooper. 

WALKER, PETER, (Elbridge,) millwright, 
leases saw mill. 

Wangman, John, (Jordan,) wheelbarrow 
maker. 
M 



Warner, Charles M., (Jack's Reef,) grocer. 

Washer, Georcre, (Jordan,) machinist. 

WASHER, JOHN F., (Elbridge,) butcher. 

Weaver, George D., (Jack's Reef,) lot 35, 
farmer 98. 

Webster, Samuel, (Elbridge.) carpenter. 

Weed, Harry, (Jordan.) lumber manuf. 

WEEKES, CHARLES, (Jordan,) lot 59, 
farmer 85. 

Westfall, J. N. & Co., (Jordan,) bankers. 

WHEELER, RUSSELL B., (Elbridge,) lot 
71, stationery agent and farmer 85. 

WHITE, DAMION, (Elbridge,) marble cut- 
ter. 

WHITING, HEMAN C, (Jordan,) lot 59, 
farmer 87. 

Whiting, Wilson, (Jordan,) butcher. 

Whitney, Jerome, (Memphis,) lot 50, far- 
mer 91. 

WHITNEY, SULLIVAN, (Memphis,) lot 
50, farmer 59. 

Wiggins & Hale, (Elbridge,) (James Wig- 
gins and Henry L. Hale,) general mer- 
chants. 

WIGGINS, HIRAM, M. D., (Elbridge.) 
alio, physician. 

Wiggins, James, (Elbridge,) (Wiggins & 
Hale.) 

Williams, Ann P. Mrs., (Elbridge,) dress 
maker. 

Williams, John G., A. M., (Jordan,) princi- 
pal of Jordan Academy. 

*WINSOR, H. P., (Jordan,) prop. Jordan 

Transcript. 
Wolcott, Erastus N., (Elbridge,) carriage 

maker. 
Wolcott, Henry E., (Elbridge,) tinsmith. 
WOOD, ALONZO, (Elbridge,) (A. Wood & 

Son.) 

WOOD, A. & SON, (Elbridge,) (Alonzoand 

Byron A.,) general merchants and pail 

manufacturers. 
WOOD, BYRON A., (Elbridge,) (A. Wood 

& Son.) 
WOOD. ISAAC, (Elbridge,) lot 91, farmer 

30 and leases 210. 

WOOD, SMITH, (Jordan,) lot 31, farmer 70j 
Woods, Edward O., (Elbridge,) lot 86, 

grocer. 
WORMER, WILLIAM, (Jordan,) lots 46 

and 58, farmer 17. 
Wright, Abram, (Elbridge,) lot 96, farmer 

230. 
Wright, Charles F.. (Jordan.) blacksmith. 
Wright, E. F., (Jordan,) lot 46, farmer 35. 
Wright, F. D., (Jordan,) carriage, sign and 

ornamental painter. 
Wright, Gideon S., (Jordan,) lot 33, farmer 

90. 

WRIGHT, JOSEPH O., (Elbridge,) attor- 
ney at law, notary public and school 
commissioner. 

WRIGHT, TRUMAN K., (Elbridge,) prin- 
cipal of Munro Collegiate Institute. 

Yates, Bernard F., (Jordan,) lot 48, grocer 
and farmer 18. 

Youngs, Tobias, (Jack's Reef,) lot 36, far- 
mer 105. 

ZEEVALK, ADOLPHUS, (Elbridge,) lot 
82, farmer leases 100. 



214 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



4*F* WOOD W0ftT8& SON, 

In the Old Brick Store, 

CORNER OF BRIDGE & GEXESEE STS., 

B^LD^WIjS'SVIL.IL.E, 1ST. Y., 

Keep constantly an hand a large assortment of 

Dry Goods, Groceries, Boots, Shoes, 

Hats, Caps, Crockery & Yankee Notions, 

All bought of manufacturers, or their New York Agents, for cash, which enables them 
to satisfy the closest buyers in regard to price and quality. Those in want of any goods 
in the above line will do well to call on them before purchasing elsewhere. 




W^Ii 



MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN 




I 



rl 




iture k moisten, 

PARLOR & CHAMBER SUITS, 

SOFAS, TETE-A-TETES, EASY AID 

'Parlor Chairs, Marble Top Tables, Mat Trees, 
What-JVots, Cottage Furniture, Cain Seat 

CHAIRS, Finished and in White, Sofa Springe, Spring Beds, Curled Hair, Tick- 
ing and Mattrasses, 

No. 75 South Salina St., 



FABIUS. 



215 



(Post Office Addresses in Parentheses.) 



Ackley, Afa, (Fabius,) lot 30, farmer 35. 

Adams, Mrs. Dr., (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer 
10. 

Albro, Albert, (Fabius,) lot 47, farmerjeas- 
es 275. 

Alexander, Solomon, (Apulia,) lot 3, far- 
mer 52, 

Allen, Britton, (Delphi,) lot 20, farmer 
162X- 

Allen, Spafford, (Fabius,) lot 16, shoe ma- 
ker and auctioneer. 

Andrews, Charles, (Fabius,) lot 16, hotel 
and stage prop, and farmer, leases of 
Mr. Palmeter 21. 

Andrews, Eleazar, (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer 
3. 

ANDREWS, ELIJAH, (Fabius,) lot 37, 
farmer 63. 

Andrews, Miss, (Fabius,) lot 48, dairy and 
farmer 150. 

Andrews, Omar, (Fabius,) lot 37, farmer. 

Andrews, Parker D., (Fabius,) lot 16, far- 
mer 97. 

Armstrong, Hiram, (Apulia,) saw mill, lot 
1, farmer 2. 

Aylworth, Orwan, (Fabius,) lot 16, carriage 
maker and farmer 1. 

Babcock, Benjamin, (Fabius,) lot 49, dairy 
and farmer 150. 

Babcock, Lecta, (Fabius,) lot 49, farmer 
150. 

Babcock, Warren, (Summit Station, )lot 31, 
dairyman and farmer leases of Hiram 
Babcock 116. 

Bacon, Albert G., (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer 
8. 

BAILEY, JOHN C, (Fabius,) lot 26, dairy 
and farmer 221. 

Bailey, Lewis, (Fabius,) lot 26, retired far- 
mer. 

Bailey, Nathan, (Delphi,) lot 19, farmer 7. 

Barber, Alpheus, (DeRuyter, Madison Co.,) 
lot 49, farmer 50. 

Barber, Frank M., (Fabius,) lot 16, machin- 
ist. 

Bard, George M., (Fabius,) lot 16, builder. 

BARNES, A., (Fabius,) (with W. Orson, 
0. Williams and H. Oscar,) lot 14, far- 
mer 64. 

BARNES, OSCAR A., (Fabius,) farmer. 

Beach, Calvin H., (Delphi,) lot 10, farmer 
126. 

BEACH, JOHN, (Delphi,) lot 10, dairy and 
farmer 95. 

Bean, Benjamin, (Apulia,) lot 22, farmer 1. 

Bean, James, (Fabius,) lot 18, dairy and 
farmer leases of H. Phillips 140. 

Bean, Nathaniel, (Fabius,) lot 29, dairy and 
farmer 255. 

Beardsley, Justus, (Apulia,) lot 22, allop. 
physician. 

Beden, Joanna, (with Mary A. Beden and 
Euphenia Nason,) (Apulia,) lot 34, far- 
mer 47#. 

Beden, Mary A., (with Joanna Beden and 
Euphenia Nason,) lot 34, farmer 47^. 

Beers, Eliza, (Delphi,) (with Etta and Ma- 
ria,) lot 9, farmer 87. 



Beers, Esta, (Delphi,) (with Eliza and 

Maria,) lot 91, farmer 87. 
Beers, Maria, (Delphi,) (with Esta and 

Eliza,) lot 91, farmer 87. 
Bender, Edwin, (Fabius,) lot 16, retired 

miller. 
Benson, Warren, (Fabius,) lot 4, farmer 35. 
Blaney, John, (Summit Station,) (John J. 

and John Blaney,) saw and grist mills, 

lot 21, farmer 140. 
Blaney, John J., (Summit Station,) (John 

J. and John Blaney,) post master, lot 

21, farmer 7. 
Blaney, John J. & John, (Summit Station.) 

general merchants. 
Bodfish, Oliver, (Fabius,) lot 28, farmer 82. 
Bovee, Abraham, (Summit Station,) lot 1, 

farmer 93. 
Bramer, Albert, (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer 87. 
BRAMER, FRANK, (Fabius,) (Bramer & 

Pierce.) 
Bramer, Lewis, (Fabius,) lot 16, carpenter, 

builder and farmer 1%. 
*BRAMER & PIERCE, (Frank Bramer 

and Egbert Pierce.) (Fabius,) manufs. 

Young Warrior Mowers and agricul- 
tural implements generally. 
BRANCH, JOHN H, (Fabius,) lot 16, car- 
penter and blacksmith. 
Briggs, George I., (Apulia,) lot 22, builder 

and farmer Z}£. 
Brink, Henry, (Fabius,) lot 19, farmer. 
BRINK, WM. A., (Summit Station,) lot 11, 

farmer 5. 
BROWN, JOHN L., (Fabius,) lot 45, dairy 

and farmer 312. 
Brown, Uriah, (Fabius,) lot 36, painter. 
Bumpiss, Hiram A., (Fabius,) lot 16, cabi- 
net maker and farmer 34. 
Burdick, Albert H., (Delphi,) lot 30, hop 

raiser and farmer 53. 
Burke, Thomas, (Fabius,) lot 16, ehoema- 

kcr 
BURROUGHS, HORATIO R., (Fabius,) 

blacksmith. 
Burton, Thomas, (Fabius,) harness maker. 
BUSH, WARREN S., (Fabius,) lot 16, 

butcher. 
BUSH, WILLIAM R., (Fabius,) lot 16, 

builder and butcher. 
BUTTON, MARVIN, (Fabiue,) lot 16, har- 
ness maker. 
Cadwell, Anson, (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer 

66#. 

Cadwell, John, (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer 7. 

CADWELL, JOHN E., (Fabius,) lot 16, 
farmer 44. 

Calkins, David, (Apulia,) lot 22, shoe ma- 
ker. 

CALL, CHARLES, (Fabius,) lot 36, farmer. 

CALL, CHARLES E., (Fabius,) (with Cy- 
rus B. and Homer £>.,) farmer leases 
220. 

CALL, CYRUS B., (Fabius,) (with Homer 
D. and Chas. E,) lot 36, assessor and 
farmer leases 220. 

Call, Eliza A., (Fabius,) lot 36, farmer 220. 



216 



ONONDA Q A CO UNTY B USINESS DIRECTOR Y. 



I B. FURMAFS 




Having: repaired my BILLIARD ROOM, I am now prepared with three first-class 
GRIFFITH'S TABLES, so that all may be accommodated who may choose to favor me 
with a call. WILLIAM GAMBLE will be on hand to attend to the wants of customers. 

N. B.— The best brands of Cigars constantly on hand. 

BILLIARD PARLOR opposite the Lake House. A resort for gentlemen. Open at 
all reasonable hours, Day and Evening. WM. GAMBLE, Assistant. 



, SEWARD & MILLER, 

Homeopathic Physicians & Surgeons, 

51 Warren Street, Syracuse. 

Dr. Seward's (Residence, A Madison St. 

3)r. Miller's, 53 Warren St. 

STEPHEN SEWARD. H. V. MILLER. 

JAMES H. SMITH, 



©ii 1% 



[AMI 



nn 



1 1 



&? 



Skaneateles, N. Y. 

DEALER IN 

Cloths, Clothing, Gents' Furnishing 



dso., tfcc. 



FITZGERALD & DIXON. 

To the people of Van Buren and Lysander. All you who wish to purchase 

Dry Goods, Groceries, Boots & Shoes, 

&c, OF GOOD QUALITY, at the LOWEST PRICES. Just give ub a single trial 
before purchasing elsewhere. Remember and call at the 

White Store adjoining the Cheese Factory, Saldwinsville, 

JVew York. 
Fitzgerald &. Dixon. 



FABIUS. 



217 



CALL, HOMER D., (Fabius,) {with Cyrus 
B. and Chas. E.,) lot 36, farmer leases 
220. 

Cameron, James, (Fabins,) lot. 16, engineer. 

CARDNER, EPHRAIM N., (Delphi,) (with 
William and Nelson,) lot 10, farmer 50. 

CARDNER, NELSON, (Delphi,) (with Wil- 
liam and Ephraim,) lot 10, farmer 50. 

CARDNER, WILLIAM H., (Delphi,) (with 
Ephraim and Nelson,) lot 10, farmer 50. 

Case, Isaac, (Fabius,) lot 37, dairy and far- 
mer 300. 

CASE, JAMES, (Fabius,) lot 37, dairy and 
farmer 100. 

Castle, Isaac H., (Fabius,) lot 6, builder. 

Castner, Jonathan, (Apulia,) farmer leases 
of David Hall 53. 

Chaffee, Cyrus, (Fabius,) lot 26, cheese box 
manuf. saw and grist mills and farmer 
36. 

Chaffee, Stephen, (Fabius,) lot 16, builder. 

CHASE, CHARLES, (Fabius,) lot 8, dairy 
and farmer 87. 

Chase, Darius, (De Ruyter, Madison Co.,) 
lot 40, dairy and farmer 300. 

Church, Levi S., (Fabius,) lot 15, farmer. 

Clarck, Ansel K., (Apulia.) lot 2, farmer 40. 

CLARK, DWIGHT D., (Summit Station,) 
lot 21, (Clark & Williams,) farmer 3. 

Clark, Eli, (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer. 

Clark, Erastus, (Summit Station,) lot 1, far- 
mer 150. 

Clark, Henry L., (Fabius,) lot 25, dairy and 
farmer leases of O. Hills 250. 

Clark, Isaiah, (Apulia,) lot 1, farmer 47. 

Clark, Lucius L., (Fabius,) lot 15, painter 
and farmer 1. 

CLARK, LYMAN W., (Summit Station,) 
lot 3, farmer 130. 

CLARK, WILLLAM, (Apulia,) lot 3, build- 
er and farmer 31%. 

*CLARK & WILLIAMS, (Summit Station,) 
(B-wight D. Clark and John Williams,) 
carriage makers. 

Cleveland, Artimns B., (Fabius,) lot 15, 
farmer 10. 

COLBY, JOHN T., (Summit Station,) lot 
21, hotel and livery and farmer 128. 

Colegrove, Z. P., (Fabius,) lot 16, tannery. 

Collins, Hiram, (Summit Station,) lot 22, 
retired farmer. 

Collins, Anson, (Apulia,) lot 23, farmer 105. 

Collins, Sylvenus P., (Summit Station,) lot 
21, express agent, station agent, S. B. 
& N. Y. R. R. feed store and farmer 60. 

Comstock, Albert, (Fabius,) lot 28, dairy 
and fanner 98. 

Connall, William, (Fabius,) farmer. 

Coon, Deborah, (Delphi,) lot 20, farmer 75. 

Corbin, Sherman H., (Fabius,) lot 16, gen- 
eral merchant and farmer 3. 

Corcoran, James, (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer. 

Corcoran, Michael, (Fabius,) lot 17, farmer. 

Corcoran, Patrick, (Fabius,) lot 16, black- 
smith. 

Cornn, Rensford W., (Fabius,) dairy and 
farmer leases of G. W. Kennedy, 336. 

Craw, Warren, (DeRuyter, Madison Co.,) 
lot 40, farmer 65. 

Curtis, Japheth, (Fabius,) lot 29, farmer 52. 

Curtis, William B., (Fabius,) lot 16, builder. 

Davidson, William, (Fabius,) lot 28, dairy 
and farmer 104. 



Davis, Julius, (Apulia,) lot 2, farmer 7. 

Davis, Lucian, (Apulia,) lot 3, farmer <*5. 

Davis, Philander, (Apulia,) lot 22, shoe- 
maker. 

Davis, Thomas, (Apulia,) lot 22, farmer 8%. 

Dean, M. K. Miss, (Fabius,) lot 16, milliner 
and farmer 1%. 

Dennison, Henry, (Fabius,) lot 4, farmer 
136. 

Denison, Hiram S., (Fabius,) lot 37, 
builder. 

DONNALLY, BARNEY, (Summit Station,) 
lot 21, trackman. 

Doty, Chancy, (Apulia,) lot 1, farmer 2. 

Doubleday, John, (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer 

IX- 

Doyle, Miss, (Fabius,) lot 15, farmer 1. 

Dye, Rouse S., (Delphi,) lot 19, farmer. 

Elcott, Epaphras, (Fabius,) lot 37, builder 
and farmer. 

ELLIS, ANSEL, (Fabius,) lot 16, wagon 
maker and blacksmith. 

Ellis, Hiram, (Fabius,) lot 6, farmer 70. 

Ellis, Orren, (Fabius,) lot 15, fanner. 

Ellis, Samuel, (Fabius,) lot 6, farmer 152. 

ESTES, MELVIN, (Fabius.) lot 16, general 
merchant and farmer 2. 

Evans, Harry, (with Calvin Slierwood,) (Fa- 
bius,) lot 13, farmer 73%. 

Fairbank, Thomas P., (Delphi,) lot 10, 
blacksmith, carriage maker and farmer 
24%. 

Fay, Seth W., (Fabius,) lot 16, painter and 
wagon maker. 

Fellows, Daniel, (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer 2%. 

Fellows, Erasmus, (Apulia,) lot 34, dairy 
and farmer 300. 

Field, Hannah, (Fabius,) lot 39, farmer 33%. 

Field, Hubbard H., (Fabius,) lot 46, farmer 
10 and leases 65. 

Field, Wallace, (Fabius,) farmer. 

Field, Warren E., (Fabius,) farmer. 

Fleming, Richard, (Tully,) lot 42, farmer 111. 

Fleming, Thomas, (Apulia,) lot 44, farmer 
64. 

Fosmer, Henry,(Keeney's Settlement, Cort- 
land Co.,) lot 47, millwright. 

Fosmer, Humphrey, (Fabius,) lot 27, farmer 
93. 

Fosmer, John, (Fabius,) lot 14, cooper and 
farmer 2. 

Fosmer, Lucy, (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer 1. 

Fosmer, Lyman, (Fabius,) lot 15, farmer 75. 

Foster, John, (Summit Station,) lot 42, far- 
mer 42%. 

Fox, Addison, (Fabius,) lot 4, farmer. 

Fox, Almon, (Delphi,) lot 20, dairy and far- 
mer 110J£. 

Fox, Ansel J., (Fabius,) lot 17, dairy and 
farmer 115. 

Fox, Denison, (Delphi,) lot 20, farmer 
leases 75. 

Fox, Edmund, (Keeney's Settlement, Cort- 
land Co.,) lot 47, retired farmer. 

Fox, Joseph, (Fabius,) lot 17, saw mill and 
farmer 100. 

Fox, William D., (Apulia,) lot 3, farmer 53. 
French. Hazen M., (Summit Station,) lot 
21, farmer 10. 

FRENCH, RU8SEL C, (Summit Station.) 

lot 11, farmer 100. 
FRENCH, STEPHEN, (Summit Station,) 

lot 1, overseer of poor and farmer 188. 



218 



ONONDA GA CO UNTT B TJSINESS DIRECTOR T. 



iliMwa: 





mniaii 



WHOLESALE & RETAIL 



Paper Warehouse, 

Sf Utxwm, §j \mk § 00K 

News, Book, Wrapping and Cover Papers. 

Constantly on hand a large stock of 

Manilla and other Wrapping 

Papers & Grocers' Bags. 

Also, Printers' Stock & Material of all Kinds. 

No. 26 East Washington Street, 

2 DOORS E. FROM THE JOURNAL OFFICE, SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



Dr. Chas. L. Chandler, 




No. 8 FRANKLIN BLOCK, 

E. GENESEE ST., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

Can still be found at his old stand, prepared to perform all operations in Dental Surge- 
ry with all the latest improvements. Particular attention paid to the preservation of 
tne natural organs, believing this to be the most important duty of the Dental Sur- 
geon, those in need of Dental substitutes can be supplied with vulcanized Rubber 
r latcs , or Continuous Gum on Platina. Nitrous Oxide Gas or Chloroform, administer- 
ed for the painless extraction of teeth. 



FABIUS. 



219 



FROST, CHARLES, (Fabius,) lot 38, dairy 
aud farmer. 

Frost, Orlando, (Fabius,) lot 37, dairy and 
farmer 482. 

Gallinger, Henry, (Fabius,) lot 15, farmer 
16. 

Gallinger, Noah W., (Fabius,) lot 15, car- 
penter and builder. 

GAY, STEPHEN, (Summit Station,) lot 
11, dairyman and farmer 377. 

Gilbert, Hiram, (Summit Station,) lot 31, 
farmer 1. 

Glass, Forrest, (Fabius,) speculator. 

Goodrich, Ezra, (Fabius,) lot 16, black- 
smith. 

Goodrich, Lewis, (Delphi,) lot 20, farmer 

Gowin, Smith, (Apulia,) lot 22, mason. 

Grady, Timothy, (Fabius,) lot 14, farmer 13. 

Gray, Newton, (Fabius,) lot 17, dairy and 
farmer 120. 

GREENE, Wit. H. S., (Summit Station,) 
saw mill, manuf. wood and paper cheese 
boxes. 

Greenleaf, Joseph, (Apulia,) lot 2, farmer 
23. 

*GREENMAN'S HOTEL, (Fabius,) SethS. 
Greenman, prop. 

*GREENMAN, SETH S., (Fabius,) lot 16, 
prop. Greenman'a Hotel and farmer 3. 

Griggs, Hiram, (Fabius,) lot 16, retired far- 
mer. 

Hackett, John, (Apulia,) lot 22, farmer 10. 

Hackett, Miles B., (Apulia,) lot 22, post- 
master and general merchant. 

Hall, Amos, (Fabius,) lot 5, farmer 56. 

Hall, David W., (Apulia,) lot 2, farmer 33. 

Hall, Warren R., (Delphi,) retired farmer. 

Hall, Wm. H., (Fabius,) lot 5, dairy and 
farmer 130. 

Hallinger, George, (Fabius,) lot 15, dairy 
and farmer 231. 

Hamilton, Mrs. Harrison, (Fabius,) lot 24, 
dairy and farmer 950. 

Handy, Loren, (Apulia,) lot 22, wagon ma- 
ker and farmer 2. 

Hanlinton, Hiram, (Fabius,) lot 18, dairy 
and farmer 186. 

Harris, Nelson, (Fabius,) lot 17, farmer 20. 

Harris, Wm., (Apulia,) lot 22, painter. 

HART, HENRY J., (Summit Station,) cab- 
inet maker. 

Hartnet, John, (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer 5^. 

HARTNETT, JOHN L., (Fabius,) lot 35, 
dairy aud farmer 35. 

Hartnett, Thomas, (Apulia,) lot 44, farmer 
235. 

Haskins, Major, (Fabius,) lot 47, farmer 40. 

Hassett, Naomi, (Delphi,) lot 10, farmer 

Haswell, Benjamin, (Fabius,) lot 34, farmer 
60. 

Haswell, Chester, (Fabius,) lot 16, machin- 
ist. 

Haswell, John, (Fabius,) lot 17, farmer 

113^ 

Heenney, Champion, (Fabius,) lot 16, far- 
mer 2. 

Heenney, Jeremiah, (Fabius,) lot 16, re- 
tired farmer. 

Heffernan, Daniel, (Fabius,) lot 15, farmer 1. 
Heffernan, Patrick, (Fabius,) lot 30, farmer 
45. 



HEFFRON, LORENZO, (Fabius,) lot 16, 

druggist, alio, physician and farmer 3. 
Hennessey, Mathew, (Summit Station,) lot 

31, farmer 130. 
Hills, Benjamin, (Fabius,) lot 39, farmer 44. 
HILLS, CHARLES E., (Fabius,) lot 16, 

eclectic physician. 
HILLS, EDWIN L., (Fabins,) farmer. 
Hills, Ira, (Fabius,) lot 6, dairy and farmer 

leases 320. 
Hills, John, (Fabius,) lot 8, farmer. 
Hills, Ormesus, (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer 420. 
Hills, Riley W., (Fabius,) lot 26, farmer 74. 
Hills, Salley, (Fabius,) lot 16, tailoress. 
Hills, Stephen G., (Fabius,) lot 5, saw mill 

and farmer 23. 
Hitchcock, Albert, (DeRuyter, Madison 

Co.,) lot 50, farmer 66. 
Hitchcock, Asa, (Fabius,) lot 15, retired 

farmer. 
Hitchcock, David, (Fabius,) lot 19, farmer 

36. 
Hitchcock, Roxenath, (Apulia,) lot 2, far- 
mer 83>£. 
Hitchcock, Shedrach, (DeRuyter, Madison 

Co..) lot 49, farmer 150. 
HOBART, SENECA, (Summit Station,) 

farmer. 
Hodes, Isaiah H., (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer 1. 

Hodges, Alanson, (Delphi,) lot 9, farmer 

114. 
Hodges, Clark, (Fabius,) lot 7, dairy and 

larmer 140. 
Hotaling, Henrietta, (Fabius,) lot 15, tail- 
oress. 
House, Seneca, (DeRuyter, Madison Co.,) 

lot 40, farmer 50. 
Howard, Major, (Fabius,) lot 14, farmer 40. 
Howd, Eli S., (Delphi,) lot 40, dairy and 

farmer 220. 
Howe, A., (Apulia,) lot 22, farmer 45. 
Howe, James W., (Delphi,) (with John,)]ot 

9, farmer 55 and leases 100. 
Howe, Joel, (Fabius,) farmer 100. 
HOWE, JOHN J., (Delphi,) (with James,) 

lot 9, farmer 55 and leases 100. 
Hnbbert, Otis, (Apulia,) lot 22, farmer 

leases 24. 
Hudson, Jerome, (Fabius,) lot 38, farmer 

102>£. 
Huffman, Joseph W., (Summit Station,) lot 

21, farmer. 

HUYES, ALMERON, (Apulia,) carpenter 
and builder. 

Jackson, Russel, (Fabius,) lot 5, farmer 1. 

Jacobs, Jacob, (Fabius,) lot 39, farmer 13#. 

Jenks, Isaac, (Fabius,) lot 16, allop. physi- 
cian and farmer 2. 

Jerome, Ira, (Fabius,) lot 5, dairy and far- 
mer leases 150. » 

Jerome, John, (Fabius,) lot 5, farmer 150. 

Jewett, Chester, (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer. 

Johnson, Burke S., (Fabius,) lot 14, farmer 
8. 

Johnson, Chester P., (Fabius,) lot 4, dairy 
and farmer 286. 

Johnson, Delos H., (Fabius,) (with Wm. A.,) 
lots 5 and 15, saw mill and farmer 10, 
and individually, lot 15, farmer 13^. 

JOHNSON, EMELIA H., (Fabius,) school 
teacher. 

Johnson, Ernest, (Fabius,) lot 16, team- 
ster. 



220 ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

THE WEEKLY SOUTHERN ONONDAGA, 

BOOK, CABO 

m mmtm mm, 

TULLY, - - KT. Y. 




FRANK HALE, EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR. 

Terms Strictly in Advance. 

FOR ONE YEAR, $2.00. 

The "SOUTHERN ONONDAGA" is a twenty-eight column paper, and hae a 
large circulation. It is the only independent family paper printed in Onondaga County, 
—strictly neutral in politics, giving the news of the day impartially. 

The best means for advertising in Southern Onondaga. For terms, see notice in 
paper. 



HAIR DRESSING & SHAJ1G ROOMS, 

Globe Hotel, S. Salina St., 
S3r:R..iA.OTJs:E3, ixr. 



First-class Operators in attendance. My Rooms are supplied with 

"Camps" Patent Rotatory Hair Brushing 

Apparatus, 

A new thing in this country, and the only one in Syracuse. By its use the scalp may be 
thoroughly cleaned. The operation is rather pleasant than otherwise. 

Call and Try It. 



FABIUS. 



221 



JOHNSON, MYRON C, (Fabius,) lot 8, 
former. 

Johnson, Wm. A., (Fabius,) (withDelosH.,) 
lots 5 and 15, saw mill and farmer 10. 

Johnson, William, (Fabius,) lot 15, carpen- 
ter and builder. 

Jones, Alvain, (Summit Station,) lot 21, 
former SIX'. 

Jones, Charles, (Fabius,) lot 16, builder. 

Joslin, Noah, (Fabius,) lot 15, farmer 41. 

June, Charles, (Summit Station,) lot 21, 
blacksmith and farmer 1. 

June, Jabez W., (Summit Station,) lot 11, 
farmer 138. 

June, Joel, (Summit Station,) lot 1, farmer 
75. 

Justis, Wolcott, (Fabius,) lot 15, harness 
maker and farmer 8. 

Keefe, Meckel, (Fabius,) lot 29, farmer 100. 

Kennedy, George W., (Fabius,) lot 25, 
dairy and farmer 340. 

Kenney, John, (Fabius,) lot 47, retired 
farmer. 

KENNEY, JOHN A., (Fabius,) lot 47, dairy 
and farmer 900. 

Kenyon, Oren S., (Delphi,) lot 10, farmer 
21. 

Kenyon, Washington, (Delphi,) lot 20, ho- 
tel keeper and farmer 50. 

Kinion, Lucy, (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer 2X- 

Kinney, Wm. D., (Fabius,) lot 16, general 
merchant. 

Knapp, Stephen C, (Fabius,) lot 29, farmer 
leases 50. 

Knapp, Thomas P., (Apulia,) lot 32, dairy 
and farmer 131X- 

Larnphear, Daniel, (Fabius,) lot 16, pedler. 

Lansing, Daniel B., (Delphi,) lot 20, former 
78. 

Lansing, Eugene, (Fabius,) lot 16, butcher. 

Larrabe, Leroy E., (Fabius,) lot 16, cigar 
manuf. 

Lawrence, George, (Fabius,) lot 16, carpen- 
ter and builder and former 15. 

Leahy, James, (Fabius,) lot 25, former. 

Leonard, James B., (Apulia,) lot 1, farmer 
80. 

Lewis, Henry H., (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer 10. 

Lewis, James D., (Fabius,) lot 17, farmer 
leases of J. Lewis 14. 

Lewis, Orrintton M., (Apulia,) lot 23, dairy 
and farmer leases 322. 

Lewis, William, (Fabius,) lot 16, former 
3X- 

Limon, Flavius H.. (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer. 

LOCKE, ALLEN F., (Fabius,) lot 7, black- 
smith. 

Locke, Henry F., (Fabius,) lot 7, black- 
smith. 

LOCKE, RTTFUS I., (Fabius,) lot 7, build- 
er and farmer 1 >£. 

LONERGON, MICHAEL, (Summit Sta- 
tion,) carpenter and builder, lot 21, for- 
mer 8. 

Long, Thos., (Summit Station,) lot 41, far- 
mer 25. 

Loomis, Lucius S., (Fabius,) lot 16, wagon 
maker. 

Mangune, John, (Fabius,) lot 15, black- 
smith. 

Mark, John, (Apulia,) mason. 

Mason, Hawley D., (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer. 

Mathews, Edwin F., (Apulia,) lot 12, far- 
mer 2#. 



Mathews, George W., (Apulia,) lot 12, far- 
mer 160. 
MAYERS, ALMERON, (Apulia,) builder. 
McCabe, Patrick, (Delphi,) lot 20, former 

McEvers, Alphonso, (Summit Station,) lot 

31, farmer 12. 
McEvers, James, (Summit Station,) lot 11, 

farmer 91>£. 
McEvers, Lucius, (Summit Station,) lot 31, 

dairyman and farmer 400. 
Meigs, Henry C, (Fabius,) lot27, farmer 32. 
MERRILL, WM. H., (Fabius,) lot 19, 

dairy and former 193. 
MILES, CHAS. W., (Summit Station,) lot 

31, dairyman and farmer 95. 
Miles, Garret S., (Summit Station.) lot 21, 

farmer leases 130. 
Miles, Smith, (Summit Station,) lor 21, far- 
mer 130. 
Miller, Abner, (Summit Station,) painter, 

lot 21, farmer 28. 
Millo, Paty, (Collingwood,) lot 1, farmer 

Missillier, Anthonet L., (Fabius.) lot 16, 
cabinet maker. 

Monfort, Daniel I., (Fabius,) lot 16, tanne- 
ry and former 1. 

Morgan, Albert, (Fabius,) lot 16, black- 
smith. 

Mosher, Freeman, (Apulia,) lot 3, farmer 
99X. 

Mosher, Thomas, (Summit Station,) lot 22, 
farmer 8. 

Muncy, Kenyon A., (Delphi,) lot 10, lime 
burner and farmer 27. 

Nason, Charles S., (Apulia,) lot 34, former 
leases 47}£. 

Nason, Euphenia, (with Joanna and Mary 
Beden,) lot 34, farmer 47X- 

Nason, John H. Rev., (Apulia,) lot 22, con- 
gregational clergyman and farmer 1%. 

Neal, Wallace, (Apulia,) lot 23, dairy and 
farmer 195. 

Nearing, George H., (Apulia,) lot 11, dairy- 
man and farmer 35. 

Negus, Fernando D., (Fabius,) lots, farmer 
130. 

Newville, Theodore A., (Fabius,) lot 27, 
saw mill and farmer 22X- 

NEY, SAMUEL D., (Fabius,) farmer. 

Nichols, Herrick, (Delphi,) lot 10, farmer. 

Nichols, Simon, (Delphi,) lot 10, farmer 5. 

Northroup, Anson, (Apulia,) lot 12, dairy- 
man and farmer 297. 

Nye, Chancy, (Fabius,) lot 45, farmer 
70X. 

Nye, Lot, (Fabius,) lot 45, farmer 30. 

Olney, Lafayette W. Rev., (Fabius,) lot 16, 
Baptist clergyman and farmer 2. 

Oothoudt, Aaron B., (Fabius,) lot 35, far- 
mer 40. 

ORRIN, W.,(¥a.\Am,)(with 0. Williams, H. 
Oscar and A. Barnes,) lot 14, farmer 64. 

Osborn, Lyman, (Fabius,) lot 27, farmer 
190. 

OSCAR, H., (Fabius,) (with W. Orrin, 0. 
Williams and A. Barnes,) lot 14, far- 
mer 64. 

Out, James, (Fabius,) lot 16, cheese manu- 
facturer. 

*OWEN, SYLVESTER, (Summit Station,) 
prop. Summit House, lot 21, farmer 7. 



222 ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



WILLCOX 




SEWING MACHINE COMPANY, 

Have Removed their office from West Railroad Street, to 

62 SOUTH SALINA STREET, 

f«™ W. & O. SEWl/o MACHINE. It i 8 f jS^a^cSrSSlf^hSfe 
iri™4^, eep °? hand *J aU a88 ortment of MACHINE THREAD, TWIST SILK 
MACHINE OIL, and everything pertaining to Sewing Machines Other machines tak 

tTke Ve W P |T?n^tW 7' \ * Mac& ? e ; P f tfes that want **£ SSffiS can 
take the W. & G. into their own homes and try them for themselves. What vou see 

wfclSorThe^^^a^T- No gaesiwork about the thing, we "know what 
W nt fi a !?„ °, .1 a & ?u l l & ?"£, Ever y machine sold warranted for ten years Do 
not fail to call and see the best FAMILY SEWING- MACHTNTT 

MacWne y 1t^ a n nrt s ea o r n d lf AU w V 8k 'J a - ,? evere ^atafe? trialof theW. &f. 
machine. It stands on its own merits, and will show for itself. Stitchinff of all kinds 
done to order with neatness and dispatch, and warranted. %3T Remember the place 

62 S. SALINA ST., SYRACUSE, 

W. W. Rainey & Co,, jffl Af ts Central N. Y . 

phiujps^^lbertT 
PAINTING 



IN ALL ITS BRANCHES, OP 



House, Plain & Ornamental Work, 

Also, Chambers' Patent Finish for Wood, 
the best article in use. 

Shop 43 James Street, Syracuse, N. Y., 

NEAR BOAT YARD. 

A. L. PHILLIPS. 

N. GILBERT. 



Palmer, Egbert, (Apulia,) lot 2, farmer 
leasee 83>f. 

Palmeter, Wm., (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer 2. 

Park, Joseph, (Apulia,) lot 1, farmer 14. 

Paul, Martha. (Apulia,) (with Mary J.,) lot 
3, farmer 122. 

Paul, Mary J.. (Apulia,) (with Martha,) lot 
3, farmer 122. 

Peck, Elisha, (Apulia,) lot 23, farmer 330. 

PECK, WILLIAM MITCHELL, (Fabius,) 
lot 15, dairy and farmer 200. 

Pendell, Oliver, (Fabius,) lot 7, farmer 28&. 

Penoyer, Addison, (Apulia,) lot 22, farmer 
232. 

Penoyer, Candace, (Apulia,) lot 22, farmer 5. 

Penoyer, Truman, (Apulia,) lot 34, dairy 
and farmer 203. 

Penover, Warren, (Apulia,) lot 44, farmer 
50. 

Petit. Jonathan E., (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer 
450. 

Phillips, Harlow C, (Fabius,) lot 16, agri- 
cultural machine manuf. and farmer 152. 

PHILLIPS, ISAAC, (Fabius,) lot 37, saw 
and grist mills and farmer 11. 

Pickett, Henry H., (Fabius.) lot 19, dairy 
and farmer 55. 

PIERCE, EGBERT,? (Fabius.) (Bramer & 
Pierce.) 

Pierce, Lyman, (Keeney's Settlement, Cort- 
land Co.,) lot 47, dairy and farmer 170. 

Pool, Henry, (DeRuyter, Madison Co.,) lot 
50, farmer 50. 

POPE. OREL, (Fabius,) lot 16, supervisor 
and farmer 280. 

Porter, Alvin, (Apulia,) lot 22, farmer 4. 

Porter, Amasa, (Apulia,) farmer. 

Porter. Daniel, (Keeney's Settlement, Cort- 
land Co.,) lot 47, dairy and farmer 50. 

Porter, David, (Fabius,) lot 16, shoemaker. 

Porter, David J., (Fabius,) lot 36, farmer. 

Porter, David, (Keeney's Settlement, Cort- 
land Co.,) lot 39, farmer in Madison 
Co. 87#. 

Porter, Lorenzo, (Fabius,) lot 38, dairy and 
farmer 71. 

Potter. Charles W., (Fabius,) lot 16, fanner 
14. 

Pratt. Morris, (Apulia,) lot 22, builder. 

Preston, Gardner, (Apulia,) lot 23, farmer. 

Preston, James, (Fabius,) lot 38, farmer 7. 

Preston, John, (Fabius,) lot 49, farmer 57>£. 

Preston, William, (Fabius,) lot 49, farmer 
60. 

Quinlan, Wm., (Apulia,) lot 23, dairy and 
farmer 175. 

Ransom, Seby L., (Summit Station,) build- 
ing mover, lot 21, farmer 1^. 

RAT, CHARLES, (Fabius,) lot 8, farmer 
92. 

REED. BURTON, (Delphi,) lot 40, farmer 

74 

Robbins, Abel C, (Fabius,) lot 6, hop rais- 
er and farmer 80. 

Robbins, Luther, (Fabius.) lot 15, farmer. 

Robinson, Eugene, (with Millard,) (Fa- 
bius,) lot 29, dairy and farmer 560. 

Robinson, Millard, (with Eugene,) (Fabius,) 
lot 29, dairy and farmer 560. 

Rogers, Enoch B., (Summit Station,) lot 31, 
carpenter and farmer 6. 

Rowley, Harvey, (Fabius,) lot 34, farmer 
100. 

Rowley, John, (Apulia,) lot 42, farmer 93. 



Rowley, Newell, (Fabius.) lot 44, farmer 
730. 

Rowlev, Samuel, (Fabius,) lot 35, fanner 
118. 

Ryan, John, (Fabius.) lot 14, farmer 125. 

SALISBURY, ARTHUR W., (Summit Sta- 
tion,) (S. tfe A. W. Salisbury.) 

SALISBURY, SAMUEL, (Summit Station.) 
(S. &A. W.Salisbury.) 

SALISBURY, S. & A. W., (Samuel and 
Arthur If.,) (Summit Station,) lot 21, 
cheese manuf. and farmer i%. 

Sculen. John, (Fabius,) lot 35, farmer leases 
of P. Curtis, 70. 

Scullen, Charles O., (Fabius,) lot 7, builder 
and farmer 13>f. 

Scullen, Myron, (Fabius.) lot 38, farmer. 

Sears, David, (Summit Station,) lot 21, far- 
mer 120. 

SEGAR, WTLLL\M, (Fabius.) lot 17, car- 
riage painter and farmer 2. 

Shankland, Jemima, (Fabius,) lot 16, far- 
mer 1. 

Shankland, Samuel H., (Apulia,) lot 22, 
painter and farmer 1. 

SHEA, EDMOND, (Fabius,) lot 18, dairy 
and farmer 25. 

Sheahan, Patrick, (Fabius,) lot 17, farmer 
16. 

Sheldon, Elias, (Fabius,) lot 16, retired 
merchant. 

Sherman, Henry, (Fabius,) lot 16, fanner. 

SHERWOOD, CALVIN, (with Ha?ry Ev- 
ans,) (Fabius,) lot 13, farmer 73>». 

Sherwood, George W., (Apulia,) lot 22, car- 
penter and farmer 8%. 

Simons, Adolphus, (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer. 

Simons, Almina Miss, (Fabius,) lot 16, far- 
mer %%. 

Skeel, Charles W., (Summit Station,) lot 
21, builder and farmer leases 4. 

Skeel, Samuel C, (Summit Station,) lot 21, 
farmer leases of W. Skeel 7. 

Slade, Joseph, (Apulia,) lot 22, mason and 
farmer 14. 

Smith. George, (Fabius,) lot 16, wagon 

SMITH, LRYTNG, (Fabius,) lot 16, miller 

and farmer 1. 
SMITH, LUTHER, (Fabius,) lot 37, far- 
mer. 
Smith, Matthias, (Fabius,) lot 15, farmer 

10. 
Smith, Warren, (Fabius,) lot 39, farmer 

40. 
SPRAGUE, DUPORTAL S., (Fabius,) lot 

5, surveyor, dairv and farmer 215. 
Sprague, Ira L., (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer 

leases 55. 
Sprague, Myra L., (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer 

55. 
Springer, George, (Delphi,) lot 10, farmer 

2#- 
Squire, Erskine, (Apulia,) dairyman and 

farmer leases of A. Penoyer 205. 
Squires, Jonathan, (Apulia,) lot 22, farmer 

215. 
SQUIRE, WARREN, (Apulia,) farmer. 
Stanard, Alonzo, (Fabius,) lot 30, farmer 

41. 
Stanard, George, (Apulia,) lot J2, farmer 

116#. 
Stanard, Jerome, (Fabius,) lot 15, farmer 

1. 



224 



ONONDA GA CO UNTY B USINESS DIRECTOR Y. 



u 



I 



t 



ONONDAGA COUNTY, NEW YORK, 
(Formerly Hodge House.) 

C. H- HALE, Proprietor, 

patro a nage. tUdymg "" ^ ° f the traVelin S P ublic > "*• «t a'shar^of 'publf ' 



3» 



OAlBirr HOTIK 



FREDERICK MOTSIFF, Prop'r. 
CARDIFF, ONONDAGA CO., N Y. 



agreeabl J r ° Priet0r WiU 8pare n0 painB to render the ™ ite of hia fiends pleasant and 
timeXfand dean* provided with the substantial of the season, and his rooms at all 

GOOD STABLING ATTACHED, 

CHARGES ALWAYS REASONABLE. 



FABIU3. 



225 



STANNARD, JESSE, jr., (Fabius,) lot 14, 
dairv and farmer 160. 

STANLEY, JOHN, (Fabius,) lot 16, shoe- 
maker. 

Stanton, George, (Fabius,) lot 16, tin- 
smith. 

Stebbins, Betsy, (Apulia,) lot 2, farmer 
80. 

St. JOHN, PHILO, (Apulia,) lot 13, farmer 
300. 

St. John, Pembroke, (Apulia,) lot 43, dairy 
and farmer 300. 

Stockham, Hamilton, (Fabius,) lot 16, re- 
tired farmer 16. 

Stockiue, Benjamin, (Fabius,) lot 16, far- 
mer 1%. 

STOCKING, GEORGE B., (Fabius,) lot 36, 
dairy and farmer 50. 

Stowell, Orlando H., (Fabius,) lot 9, dairy 
and farmer 73. 

Sturdevant, Andrew, (Apulia,) lot 22, far- 
mer 43>f . 

Sturdevent, Eliphalet C, (Summit Station,) 
cabinet maker, lot 11, farmer 8. 

STURDEVANT, SAMUEL W., (Apulia,) 
lot 22, builder and farmer 52. 

♦SUMMIT HOUSE, (Summit Station,) Syl- 
vester Owen, prop. 

Talbot, Rial W., (Fabius,) lot 16, cheese 
manuf. 

Thayer, Wm. D. Dr., (Fabius,) lot 16, eclec- 
tic physician, druggist and farmer 3. 

Thomas, Lorenzo, (Fabius,) lot 16, fanner 
6. 

Thompson, George B., (Fabius,) farmer. 

Thompson, Thaddeus, (Fabius,) lot 16, far- 
mer 24. 

Tibbitt, John C., (Apulia,) lot 12, farmer 

"SIX. 

Tobin, Patrick, (Fabius,) lot 7, farmer 16. 

Tucker, Aaron, (Delphi,) lot 20, farmer. 

Yandnsen, David, (DeRuyter, Madison 
Co.,) dairy and farmer 108. 

VINCENT, HOMERD., (Summit Station.) 

Vincent, P. V., (Fabius,) lot 18, farmer 25. 

Virgil, Benjamin W., (Fabius,) lot 16, den- 
tist. 

Virgil, James M., (Fabius,) lot 8, dairy and 
farmer 150. 

Walker, Lora, (Delphi,) lot 10, farmer 1H. 

Wallace, Benjamin, (Delphi,) lot 9, farmer 
93. 

WALLIS, GEORGE, (Fabius,) lot 8, far- 
mer 239. 

Wallace, Martin, (Fabius,) lot 8, farmer 91. 

WALLACE, SAMUEL C, (Fabius,) lot 19, 
road commissioner, dairy and farmer 
330. 

Warner, Charles, (Fabius,) lot 47, dairy and 
farmer leases 325. 



Waters, Amanda H., (Fabius,) lot 36, far- 
mer 73. 

Waters. Eli, (Fabius,) lot 30, farmer 81. 

WATERS, FRANK O, (Fabius,) lot 26, 
painter and farmer. 

Waters, Joseph, (Fabius,) lot 36, farmer 50. 

Waters, Orsan, (Delphi,) lot 39, dairy and 
farmer 252>£. 

Waters, Warren, (Fabius,) lot 28, farmer 70. 

Way, George W., (Fabius,) lot 16, black- 
smith. 

Way, Lorinda, (Fabius,) lot 16, weaver. 

Webster, Eli, (Keeney's Settlement, Cort- 
land Co.,) lot 47, retired farmer. 

WEBSTER, FRANCIS S., (Keeney's Set- 
tlement, Cortland Co,,) lot 47, dairy 
and farmer 382,J£. 

Webster, Lewis H., (Fabius,) lot 16, cheese 
factory and farmer 36. 

Webster, Martin, (Fabius,) lot 6, farmer 
120. 

Webster, Nathan, (Fabius,) lot 28, farmer 
40. 

Webster, Newton, (Summit Station,) lot 31, 
farmer 128. 

Wells, Cornelius, (Apulia,) lot 32, dairyman 
and farmer 300. 

West, Hubbard, (Fabius,) lot 4, farmer 55. 

Wheaton, Elmore, (Fabius,) lot 16, general 
merchant and tailor. 

Wheeler, Charles, (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer. 

Wheeler, Dennis, (Fabius,) lot 17, farmer 
6. 

Wheelock, James H., (Summit Station,) lot 
22, insurance agent and farmer 81#. 

White, James, (Fabius,) lot 16, miller and 
farmer 1. 

WILCOX, OWEN, (Apulia,) farmer. 

WILLIAMS, HORACE F., (Fabius,) lot 7, 
farmer 100. 

WILLIAMS, JOHN, (Summit Station,) lot 
21, (Clark & Williams.) 

WILLIAMS, O., (Fabius,) (with W. Orrin, 
H. Oscar and A. Barnes.) lot 14, farmer 
64. 

WILLIAMS, ORLAND, (Apulia,) lot 12, 
carpenter, builder and farmer 15. 

Winegar, Marcus, (Apulia,) lot 13, dairy 
and farmer 275. 

Winegar, Moses R., (Apulia,) lot 22, far- 
mer 14. 

Woodruff, Jerome J., (Keeney's Settle- 
ment, Cortland Co.,) lot 47, dairy and 
farmer 46>£. 

Woodruff, Orin,(Keeney' Settlement, Cort- 
land Co.,) lot 47, dairy and farmer 140. 

Worth, William, (Fabius,) lot 16, farmer 4. 

YERE, JOHN, (Fabius,) farmer. 

Younglove, Ann, (Fabius,) lot 15, farmer 1. 

Youuglove, Eral, (Fabius,) lot 15, tanner. 



226 



ONONDA GA CO VNTT B U8INESS DIRECTOR Y. 




DEALERS IN 



! ©lw©13L 

Watches, Jewelry & Silver Ware 

DIAMONDS 

Reset and 

JEWElflY 

Made to Orier. 

Plated Ware trom the Gorham Manufactur- 
ing Co., Rogers Brothers and Meriden 
Britannia Co. French and 
American Clocks. 

8PECTAC1.E8 to suit all eyes, and everything usually found in a first- 
class Jewelry Store. Special attention paid to Repairing Watches 
and Jewelry at ■ ^*»^=» 

64 1-2 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 




R,. "WOOD 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN 

French, German, English & American 



:y 



ALSO, MANUFACTURER OP ALL KINDS OF 

CONFECTIONERY £ TOYS 

70 South Salina St., j 

SYRACUSE, 1ST. IT. 



GEDDES. 



227 



(Post Office Addresses in Parentheses.) 



Abell, Lavins H., (Geddes,) lot 137, farmer 

54. 
ABELL. LIONEL W., (Geddes,) lot 136, 

gardener and farmer 5. 
*AKIN, LEWIS M., (Geddes,) painter, 

G6 11 6 866 

ANDREWS,' THOMAS, (Geddes,) lot 162, 

dealer in meat and farmer 140. 
Andrews, William, (Geddes,) lot 88, farmer 

IN 1 *. 

Armstrong, Mumford, (Belle Isle,) lot 24, 
fanner 62. 

Babcock, Silas B., (Fairmount.) lot 154, 
farmer 60. 

BABCOCK, SULLIVAN, (Syracuse,) 83 
Warren. 

BAIRD. CHARLES M., Geddes,) grocery, 
Genesee. 

Barton. Orin, (Fairmount,) lot 152, wagon 
maker and farmer 1. 

BECKER, JACOB, (Geddes,) cooperage, 
Furnace. 

BECKER, JAMES, (Geddes,) hotel and 
livery. Genesee. 

BENNETT, JAMES TURNER, (Geddes,) 
lot 26. farmer 17J£. 

BLODGETT. RUFUS B. &CO., (Syracuse,) 
bakery. Furnace. 

BOYCE, G., (Geddes,) meat market, Fur- 
nace. 

BRAND, HENRY C, (Belle Isle,) lot 19, 
farmer 104. 

Brand, William G., (Geddes,) lot 12, far- 
mer 73. 

C AFFRAY, JOHN, (Geddes.) lot 52, far- 
mer 47X. 

Callahan, Dennis, (Geddes,) grocery and 
canal barn. 

CARROLL. WILLIAM, (Geddes,) lot 24, 
farmer 26. 

Case, Henry M., (Geddes,) (C. W. Coyken- 
dall & Co.) 

CAVERMAUGH, EDWARD, (Syracuse,) 
brick maker. 

Chafee, Joshua, (Fairmount,) lot 155, far- 
mer 49. 

.Chesebro, Denison S., (Geddes,) (Hubbel & 
Chesebro.) 

CLARK, FISHER W., (Geddes,) (Man- 
chester <& Clark.) 

CLARK, JOSEPH HENRY, (Syracuse,) 
( W. Brown, Smith & Clark.) 

Clark, Lyman W., (Geddes,) (C. W. Coy- 
kendall & Co.) 

Clark, Milo, (Geddes,) farmer leases 160. 

Cowan, Benjamin, (Geddes,) lot 12, farmer 

82#. 
COWAN, JOHN, (Belle Isle,) lot 15, farmer 

196. 
Cowan, Katharine Mrs., (Geddes,) lot 24, 

farmer 40. 
Cowan, Philip H., (Geddes,) lot 22, fanner 

100. 
Coykendall, Chas. W., (Geddes,) (C.W.Coy- 

kendall & Co.) 
Coykendall, C. W. & Co., (Geddes,) (Chas. 
W. Coykendall, Wm. D. CoykendaU, 
Lyman W. Clark and Henry M. Case,) 
props. Empire Pottery. 



Coykendall, Wm. D., (Geddes,) (C. W. Coy- 
kendall & Co.) 

Cramer, N. J. Mrs., (Geddes.) milliner and 
dealer in fancy goods, Furnace. 

CRYSLER, GEORGE, (Geddes.) lumber 
dealer and house builder, cor. Bridge 
and Furnace. 

Darrow, Amos, (Geddes,) lots 130 and 137, 
hop grower and farmer 36 \i- 

DARROW, MYRON C, (Geddes,) lot 136, 
farmer 50>£. 

DENNIS, HENRY H., (Syracuse,) lot 6, 
farmer 213. 

DIGNAY, PETER, (Geddes,) lot 41, farmer 
leases 95. 

Draper & Porter, (Geddes,) (Simeon Dra- 
per and Wilfred W. Porter,) manuf. of 
coarse salt. 

Draper, Simeon, (Geddes,) (Draper & Port- 
er,) lots 331 and 150, farmer 110. 

Egau, James P., (Geddes,) blacksmith, 
Bridge. 

ENDRES, JACOB, (Geddes,) lot 29, farmer 
41 and leases 100. 

ENDRES, NICHOLAS, (Geddes,) lot 30, 
farmer leases 160. 

ERWIN, JOSEPH, (Syracuse,) foreman of 
brick yard. 

FARLEY, JAMES, (Geddes,) lot 331, far- 
mer 30. 

Fay, Merrit, (Fairmount,) lot 160, fanner 
45. 

Frey, John, (Geddes,) lot 9, farmer 50. 

FROST, HENRY, 'Syracuse,) (G. Sniper 
& Co.) 

FOSTER, HENRY A., (Syracuse,) brick 

FULLER,' AMOS, (Fairmount.) lots 144 
and 145, dairy and farmer 105. 

Fuller, David C, (Fairmount,) blacksmith. 

GERE, CHARLES, (Geddes,) lots 141, 142, 
330 and 135 in Geddes, and 202 Onon- 
daga, farmer 337. 

GERErOEORGE C, (Geddes,) salt manuf. 

GIVEN, THOMAS, (Belle Isle,) lot 11, far- 
mer 140. 

GRIFFIN, JAMES, (Geddes,) (Griffin & 
White.) 

GRIFFIN & WHITE, (Geddes,) (James 
Griffin and Philander P. White,) car- 
penters and builders. 

Harris, S., M. D., (Geddes,) (Porter & Har- 
ris.) 

HASE, JOHN G., (Syracuse,) lots 294 and 
295, gardener 10>£. 

HECKER, JOSEPH, (Syracuse,) saloon 
keeper. 

Holden, E. F., (Syracuse,) agent for D. L. 
& W. R. R. Co., wholesale and retail 
dealer in anthracite coal. 

HOOPER, JAMES W., (Geddes,) princi- 
pal of the Union Free School, No. 3, of 
Geddes, G ene see. 

HOURIGAN, WILLIAM, (Geddes,) lot 27, 
farmer leases 117. 

Howlett, Merrit C, (Geddes,) lot 149, far- 
mer 77. 

Hubbel, Charles, (Geddes,) (Hubbel & 
Chesebro.) 







APULIA STATION, ONONDAGA CO. 

have T op e eneci e a 8igBed res P ectf " n y announces to the citizens of Apulia and country at large, that w 

CARRIAGE & GUTTER FACTORY 

better 6 ^ ffi n e any Kta&c^^ja^;^fflr ,rknen We ^ mflkC a8 g °° d ' if no ' 

We will not be Undersold by any Shop in the Co 

D. D frr.A-nw 



D- D. CLARK. 



JOHN WILLIAMS. 



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No. 4 West Fayette St., 
[Syracuse, "fi y., $ept. l, 1868. 



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- HEMEMBEIi, 
. I employ as good 

</ Workman as can be 
had, and they are all 

} Practical WORKING 
Men, I do not keep a 

} half soora of C larks, 
Collectors and Run- 
ners, consequently am 

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Type, ate, and it will 



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be kept so. As fast as, . ^ 
NEW and Durable I 
Styles are issued .hey " 
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; thereby enabling me, 
to excel such other 
Offices as buy New 
Type only when .'/V 
they are forced tok 

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Cards, (Bill Heads, Circulars, In* 
vitation, Wedding &* Visiting Cards, i 
■ ? promptly and neatly (Printed to order. 



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of Printing done at No. 4 W. Fayette St. 



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GEDDES. 



229 



Hubbel & Chesebro, (Geddes,) (Charles 
Hubbel and Denison S. Chesebro, )ma.n\if a. 
and dealers in stone ware, Genesee. 

Hubbell, Ferris, (Geddes,) prop, of Hub- 
bell block. 

HUDSON, FRANCIS MARION, (Geddes,) 
lot 20, farmer 2. 

HUDSON, WILLIAM H., (Geddes,) lot 16, 
farmer 12^. 

Jerome, George, (Fairmount,) lot 145, far- 
mer 74. 

JEROME, HENRY, (Fairmount,) lots 146 
and 138, farmer 86. 

♦JOHNSON, RANSON, (Syracuse,) carpen- 
ter and builder, cor. of Geddes and Fay- 
ette. 

Kanada, F. H. & Brothers, (Syracuse,) 
(James V. and George,) props, of brick 
yard, Geddes. 

Kanada, George, (Syracuse,) (F. H. Kanada 
d- Brothers.) 

Kanada, James V., (Syracuse,) (F.H.Kana- 
da & Brothers.) 

♦KENNETT, J. R., (Geddes,) blacksmith 
and manufacturer of carriages, salt 
pans and ladles. 

KLOCK, EDWARD M., (Geddes,) (Sweet 
<£ Klock.) 

KNAPP, JAMES W., (Geddes,) lots 157 
and 158, farmer 90. 

LANGE, JOHNE., (Syracuse,) lot 9, far- 
mer 25. 

LATHROP, ABNER, (Geddes,) lot 158, far- 
mer 100. 

LEO, BROTHER, (Syracuse,) director of 
St. Joseph's school and Orphan Asy- 
lum. 

MANCHESTER, CHARLES W., (Geddes,) 
(Manchester & Clark.) 

MANCHESTER & CLARK, (Geddes,) 
(Charles W. Manchester and Fisher W. 
Clark,) Rockingham and yellow ware 
pottery, Exchange. 

Manzer, David, (Geddes,) blacksmith, 
Bridge. 

MANZER, HUBBARD, (Geddes,) (Moray 
& Manzer,) post master. 

Martin, William, (Fairmount,) lot 147, far- 
mer and gardener 22}£. 

MATHEWSON, DAVLO R., (Geddes,) lot 
10, farmer 37^. 

Michel, Francis, (Geddes,) meat market, 
Genesee. 

MOREY, ADAM C, (Geddes,) (Morey & 
Manzer.) 

MOREY & MANZER, (Geddes,) (Adam C. 
Morey and Hubbard Manzer,} grocers, 
Bridge and Furnace. 

N. Y. ASYLUM FOR IDIOTS, (Syracuse,) 
Dr. H. B. Wilbur, superintendent. 

ORMSBY, OLIVER, (Geddes,) lot 70, far- 
mer 67. 

Phillips, Harriet, (Belle Isle,) lot 14, farmer 

10. 
Plumb, Wm., (Fairmount,) lot 152, farmer 

108. 
POOL, NELSON, (Liverpool,) lot 8, farmer 

164. 
Porter & Harris, (Geddes,) (Wilfred W. 

Porter and Samuel Harris,) physicians, 

Furnace. 
Porter, Wilfred W., (Geddes,) (Draper and 

Porter,) (Porter & Harris.) 
N 



REMMLNGTON, STEPHEN, (Geddes,) lot 
14, farmer 13. 

Schuyler, Philip I, (Fairmount,) lots 147 
and 155, farmer 106. 

SHEHAN, DANIEL, (Geddes,) grocer, Nel- 
son. 

SLADE, HIRAM, (Geddes,) grocery, 
Bridge. 

Smith, E. R., (Geddes,) tailor, village and 
town clerk. 

Smith, Farnum, (Syracuse,) lot 166, far- 
mer 57. 

SNIPER, G. & CO., (Syracuse,) (Henry 
Frost and G. Sniper,) props. Rock 
Spring Brewery. 

Spaulding, Simeon, (Geddes,) grocer, drug- 
gist and justice of the peace, corner 
Bridge and Furnace. 

Stevens, Henry W., (Fairmount,) lot 159, 
farmer 90. 

STEVES, CHARLES W., (Geddes,) lot 25, 

ffl Fin pt* ^i^tl 

St. JOSEPH'S SCHOOL AND ORPHAN 
ASYLUM, (Syracuse,) Brother Leo, 
Director. 

Stocking, Jirah, (Fairmount,) lot 146, far- 
mer 16}£. 

Sullivan, William, (Syracuse,) lot 176, far- 
mer 15. 

SWEET, GILBERT, (Geddes,) (Sweet & 
Klock.) 

SWEET & KLOCK, (Geddes,) (Gilbert 
Siveet and Edward M. Klock,) lumber 
yard and planing mill, Furnace. 

Terry, Charles, (Fairmount,) lot 148, far- 
mer 40. 

Terry, Guy, (Fairmount,) lot 153, farmer93. 

Thomson, John, (Geddes,) physician, Gene- 

866 

Townsend, Albert G., (Geddes,) lot 14, far- 
mer 18. 

Vanalstine, Martin, (Geddes,) lot 138, far- 
mer 1. 

VANALSTINE, PETER, (Geddes,) lot 138, 
farmer 55. 

VanVranken, Richard, (Geddes,) harness 
maker, Bridge. 

VEEDER, JOHN Q., (Geddes,) lot 138, car- 
penter and farmer 10. 

Wall, James, (Geddes,) lot 170, farmer 

1 P fl ft P ft SO 

Ward, Byron", (Geddes,) lot 149, farmer 39. 
Westphal, Constantine, (Geddes,) shoe- 

Til fl It A T* 

WHEDON, A. L., (Geddes,) physician, 

G6Q6866 

WHITE, PHILANDER P., (Geddes,) 

(Griffin & White.) 
WLDGER, HENRY H., (Syracuse,) lot 165, 

farmer 9. 
WILBUR, H. B. DR., (Syracuse,) supt. of 

the N. Y. Asylum for Idiots. 
Wilber, J. T. Miss, (Geddes,) dress and 

cloak maker, Furnace. 

WINCHELL, JOEL, (Geddes,) lot 27, far- 
mer 2X- 

Winchell, Stephen, (Belle Isle,) lot 13, far- 
mer 81. 

WOLF, CHARLES J., (Syracuse,) harness - 

maker and station keeper. 
Youngs, John, (Syracuse,) lot 117, butcher, 

brick maker and farmers. 



230 



LAFA YETTE. 



(Post Office Addresses in Parentheses.) 



Abbot, Hiram, (Lafayette,) lot 74, farmer 18. 
Abbot, James, (Lafayette,) lot 16, farmer 82. 
Abbot, Jesse B., (Cardiff,) lot 10, farmer 

100. 
Abbot, JohnJB., (Cardiff) lot 72, farmer 50. 
Abbot, John H., (Lafayette,) lot 74, farmer 

ACKLES, OVIL, (Tully Velley,) lot 10, far- 
mer 130^". 
Accles, Sylvenus, (Cardiff,) lot 57, farmer 

Adams, Edwin E., (Collingwood,) lot 92. 

ALEXANDER, FRANCIS, (Lalayette,) lot 
61, farmer 60. 

Alexander, John, (Collingwood,) lot 75, 
farmer 100. 

Alexander, Lucius, (Lafayette,) lot 74, far- 
mer 84. 

ALEXANDER, WILLIS, (Lafayette,) far- 
mer. 

Andrews, Charles C, (Lafayette,) specu- 
lator. 

Andrews, Robert, (Jamesville.) lot 14, saw 
mill and farmer 4. 

Avery, Harvey, (Jamesville,) lot 3, farmer 
150. 

Avery, Miles E., (Jamesville,) lot 2, farmer 
62^-. 

Bailey, Andrew, (Cardiff,) lot 57, farmer 2. 

Bailey, Caleb, (Cardiff) lot 72, farmer .46. 

Bailey, William, (Cardiff,) lot 59, farmer 60. 

BAKER, ALEXANDER S., (Lafayette,) 
lots 58 and 59, farmer 61. 

BAKER, AT WELL, (Jamesville,) (with 
Valentine,) lot 1, fanner 103. 

Baker, Benjamin K., (Lafayette,) lots 58 
and 59, farmer 45. 

•Baker, Charles, (Lafayette,) lot 24, farmer 
85. 

Baker, Chauncy W., (Lafayette,) lot 59, far- 
mer 16. 

Baker, Chester, (Lafayette,) lot 59, farmer 
160. 

Baker, Daniel, (Lafayette,) lot 34, farmer 

BAKER, LEROY S., (Lafayette,) lot 59, 

farmer 24. 
Baker, Lewis, (Lafayette,) lot 58, farmer 75. 
Baker, Morris, (Lafayette,) lot 59, farmer 

BAKER, NELSON M., (Lafayette.) lawyer. 

Baker, Thomas W., (Lafayette,) lot 60, far- 
mer 20. 

BAKER, VALENTINE, (Jamesvilie,) (with 
Atwell,) lot 1, farmer 103. 

BARRETT, LEONARD F., (Tully Valley,) 
lot 58, farmer 151. 

BENEDICT, JAMES A., (Collingwood,) 

lot 77, farmer 57#. 
Benjamin, Lyman N., (Tully Valley,) lot 58, 

farmer 151. 

Bishop, Artemus C, (Lafayette,) lot 45, far- 
mer 47. 

Bishop, Thomas, (Jamesville,) lot 24, far- 
mer 75. ' 

Bknchard,. David, (Lafayette,) lot 22, far- 



Blanding, William, (Lafayette,) lot 22, far- 
mer leases 63. 

Bronson, Selden, (Onondaga Castle,) lot 13, 
farmer 62. 

BURKE, MATHEW, (Lafayette,) lot 61, 
farmer 85. 

Burns, John, (Jamesville,) lot 3, farmer 6#. 

BUSH, , Lafayette,) (Peters & Bush.) 

Bush, Charles, (Pompey,) lots 36 and 46, 
farmer 172. 

Bush, Conrad, (Jamesville,) lot 25, farmer 

loO. 

Bush, Edwin S. Rev., (Cardiff,) pastor M. 
E. church. 

BUSH, FERDINAND E., (Lafayette,) far- 
mer. 

Bush, Lyman. (Lafayette,) lot 61, farmer 73. 

BLSH, SILAS E., (Jamesville,) farmer. 

BUTLER, THOMAS E., (Lafayette,) lot 59, 
farmer 16. 

Butts, Warner, (Pompey,) saw mill. 

BYRNE, PATRICK, (Pompey,) lot 46, far- 
mer 36. 

Card, Edwin R., (Cardiff) lot 57, cheese 
factory and farmer 20. 

Camoody, Michael, (Jamesville,) lot 24, far- 
mer 30. "1 

Carroll, Anthony, (Pompey,) lot 62, farmer 

Cary, John, (Lafayette,) lot 81, farmer 10. 

Case, Hannibal, (Lafayette,) lot 61, farmer 
40. 

Chapman, Samuel, (Lafayette,) lot 20, far- 
mers. 

< aapp, Morris, (Lafayette,) lot 59, farmer 68. 

Clark, Edwin, (Onondaga Castle,) lot 13, 
farmer 65. 

Clark, Harry, (Lafayette,) lot 59, farmer 150. 

Clark, Henry E., (Lafayette,) lots 59 and 60, 
farmer 1-20. 

Clark, Jerome, (Lafayette,) lot 81, farmer 
186. 

Clover, Olive Mrs., (Cardiff,) lot 72, farmer 
64. 

Cole, Harriet Mrs., (Lafayette,) lot 60, far- 
mer 12. 

Cole, Hollister S., (Lafayette,) lot 60, far- 
mer 50. 

COLE, JOSEPH S., (Lafayette,) agent for 
Wood's rnowere, &c. 

COLE, LUTHER, (Collingwood,) lots 75 
and 76. scythe manufacturer, post-mas- 
ter and farmer 50. 

Cole, Vashtia Mrs., (Lafayette,) lot 74, far- 
mer 58. 

Coleman, Brasil L., (Cardiff,) lot 56, farmer 
180. 

CONKLIN BROTHERS, (Pompey,) lots 91 
and 92, flouring mill and farmers 120. 

CONKLIN, ISAAC, (Pompey,) lot 92, far- 
mer 86. 

CONKLIN, JOSIAH D., (Pompey,) lot 92, 

farmer 130. 
Connell, Jerry (Lafayette,) Lot 45, farmer 12. 
Cook, George W., (Jamesville,) lot 3, stone 

cutter and farmer 3. 
Coulter, Francis, .(Cpllingwood,) grocery 

store. 



ONONDA GA CO UNTT B U8INESS DIRECTOR I . 



231 



CITY HOSIERY STORE ! 

inrrJTrmw ESTABLISHED IN 1855. 

S. H. STAEIN, 

Successor to JOHN K. STARIN, Wholesale 
and Retail Dealer in 

LADIES', GENTS' &. CHILDREN'S 



!!''(':»'iiii«iiiiiiiiiiii!"', | '|!!!fffl^ 
ittn*miniowKi" , ''i*'.fSf 

^WiiliHsillllliliHIfftf 



Gloves & Handkerchiefs, 

GENTS' FURNISHING 

Goods, Zephyr Worsted, 

Embroidery Patterns, SHAKER 
TARN, Knitting Cotton, <kc. 

At the Sign of the Large Striped Stocking, 

No. 68 S, Salina St., Syracuse, I. Y, 







J, 




Manufacturer of all Kinds of 



I 



'# 



LIGHT & HEAVY WAS 

Also all kinds of Salt IPans and ladles, front the best of 
Iron. Also_ all kinds of Coal and Salt Carts. 

GEDDES, ONONDAGA CO., N. Y. 
Small Profits are not to be Despised. Time Taken and all WorK Done fell. 

Hi. TSJL. J^JE^TJST, 

House, Boat, Sign & Banner Painter. 

All kinds of Graining, Calsomining, Paper 

Hanging, &c. Particular attention 

paid to Panne! ing Papering. 

GENESEE STREET, GEDDES. 



232 



LAFA YETTE. 



Cox, William, (Jamesville,) lot 2, farmer 72. 

Cramer, Henry V., (Lafayette,) lot 35, far- 
mer 160. 

Cramer, John, (Lafayette,) lot 35, farmer 98. 

Crampton, Joseph A., (Jamesville, (with 
Lafayette A. Price,) lot 1, farmer 140. 

Crandal, John, (Pompey,) lot 62, farmer 64. 

Crandall, Lucius, (Pompey,) lot 62, farmer 
118. 

Craw, James, (Lafayette,) lot 45, farmer 100. 

Craw, Lyman, (Jamesville,) lot 25, farmer 
25. 

Curtin, James, (Lafayette,) lot 45, farmer 10. 

CURTIN, WILLIAM, (Lafayette,) lot 46, 
farmer 35. 

CUYKENDALL, E. V., M. D., (Lafayette,) 



physician. 



Cuyley, Patrick, (Cardiff,) lot 1, residence 
reservation, farmer 40. 

DANFORTH, THOMAS, (Lafayette,) lot 
59, farmer 50. 

DAVIS, ANNIE L. MISS, (Collingwood.) 

Davis, Charles J., (Lafayette,) lot 60, far- 
mer 20. 

Davis, Charles J. Jr., (Lafayette,) lot 60, 
farmer 82. 

DAVIS, GEORGE B., (Lafayette,) lot 45, 
farmer 52. 

Davis, Julius Jr., (Collingwood,) lot 92, 
farmer 96. 

De Long, Sally Mrs., (Jamesville,) lot 14, 
farmer 32. 

Dence, Thomas, (Jamesville,) lot 13, far- 
mer 68. 

DICKERSON, JOHN M. JR., (Lafayette,) 
farmer. 

Dodge. Daniel, (Pompey,) lot 62, farmer 75. 

Dodge, Harvey, (Lafayette,) lot 46, farmer 
49. 

Dodge, Harvey C, (Lafayette,) lot 61, far- 
mer 225. 

Dodge, Ira, (Lafayette,) lot 61, farmer 144. 

Downey, John, (Lafayette,) lot 45, farmer 
100. 

DUBOIS, WILLIAM A., (Lafayette,) flour 
mill. 

Duffy, Michael, (Lafayette,) lot 15, farmer 
3.3. 

Dunn, Peter, (Cardiff,) lot 39, farmer 10. 

Edger, George S., (Jamesville,) lot 3, far- 
"mer 45. 

Effingham, William, (Collingwood,) lot 91, 
farmer 251. 

Emmons, Oren, (Cardiff,) lot 72, farmer 17. 

Emmons, Orville, (Cardiff,) lot 10, farmer 
30. 

Fabey, John, (Lafayette.) lot 59, farmer 51. 

Farrington, Maj. F. J., (Cardiff,) lot 87, 
farmer 294. 

Fellows, Charles B., (Cardiff,) lot 73, far- 
mer 80. 

Felter, Adam, (Lafayette,) lot 90, farmer 
167. 

FELTER, GILBERT, (Lafayette,) lot 8, 
saw mill and farmer 26. 

Fitzpatrick, Roger, (Lafayette,) lot 61, far- 
mer 70. 

FOLEY, PATRICK, (Lafayette,) lot 61, 

farmer leases 110. 
FORBES, SILAS, (Cardiff,) lot 1, residence 

reservation, farmer 38. 
Foster, Charles, (Lafayette,) lot 14, farmer 



FRENCH, ELLEN C, (Lafayette.) 

French, William, (Cardiff,) lot 72, farmer 
70. 

Frink, Charles T., (Cardiff,) lot 56, farmer 
75. 

FRY, JEREMIAH, (Pompey,) lot 77, far- 
mer 125. 

Fuller, Joel, (Lafayette,) lot 58, farmer 155. 

FULLER, MARIA MRS., (Lafayette,) lot 
25, farmer 100. 

FULMER, THOMAS, (Cardiff,) blacksmith 
and carriage Bhop. 

Gage, Anne Mrs., (Cardiff,) lot 56, farmer 
30. 

GAGE, GEORGE W., (Cardiff,) lot 56, far- 
mer 9. 

GAGE, SARAH M., (Lafayette.) 

Gage, William M., (Lafayette,) lot 37, far- 
mer 50. 

Gardner, W., (Cardiff.) lot 10, farmer 49. 

GARFIELD, DANIEL, (Cardiff,) lot 56, 
farmer 120. 

Gates, Robert, (Lafayette,) dep. sheriff. 

GAYLORD, JOHN SPENCER, (Lafayette.) 
farmer. 

Gaylord, Leman R., (Lafayette,) lot 75, far- 
mer 236. 

German, Timothy O., (Lafayette,) lot 45, 
farmer 70. 

Gibbs, Edwin, (Lafayette,) lot 26, farmer 
80. 

Gilbert, Frederick M., (Jamesville,) lot 3, 
farmer 22. 

Gilbert, Hiram, (Jamesville ) lots 3 and 4, 
farmer 168. 

Gould, James F., (Jamesville,) lot 15, far- 
mer 148. 

Green, Charles M., (Lafayette,) lot 58, far- 
mer 42. 

Green, George H„ (Lafayette,) lot 59, far- 
mer 90. 

Green, Russel, (Cardiff,) lot 56, farmer 10. 

Hall, Caleb S., (Lafayette,) lot 58, farmer 
185. 

HALL, NELSON, (Lafayette,) lot 76, far- 
mer 100. 

HALL, PERRY S., (Lafayette,) lot 75, far- 
mer 151. 

HALL, ROSWELL P., (Lafayette,) lot 74, 
farmer 17. 

Hall, Sarah Mrs., (Jamesville,) lot 1, far- 
mer 85. 

Hamilton, Davina, (Collingwood,) lot 90, 
farmer 65. 

Handerhavan, Timothy, (Lafayette,) lot 24, 
farmer 15. 

Haynes, Marilla, Cardiff,) lot 73, farmer 80. 

Healy, Patrick, (Jamesville,) lot 24, farmer 
leases 92%. 

Healy, Patrick D., (Jamesville,) lot 24, far- 
mer leases 100. 

Hill, Lewis O., (Collingwood,) lot 76, far- 
mer 150. 

Hine, Leander, (Jamesville,) lot 14, notary 
public and farmer 119. 

HINE, NEWTON L., (Jamesville,) farmer. 

Hiscock, Charles, (Jamesville,) lot 15, far- 
mer 218. 

HISCOCK, WILLIAM, (Lafayette,) lot 46, 
constable and farmer 95. 

Holcomb, Burney, (Collingwood,) lot 75, 
farmer 18. 

Holcomb, James, (Collingwood,) lot 76, far- 
mer 108. 



LAEA TETTE. 



233 



Holden, Benjamin, (Cardiff,) lot 58, farmer 
80. 

Holsman, Christian, (Lafayette,) lot 46, far- 
mer 45. 

HOTALING, DENMARK, (Jamesville,) 
farmer. 

Hotaling, Dorcas Mrs., (Lafayette,) lot 45, 
farmer SO. 

Hotaling. Harlow, (Jamesville,) lot 15, far- 
mer 40. 

HOTALING, HENRY B., (Lafayette,) lot 
3C, farmer 13. 

Hotalintr. Henry, (Collingwood,) lota 63,(51 
and~45, farmer 38. 

HOTALING, HARRY, (Jamesville,) lot 36, 
farmer 60. 

HOTALING, STEPHEN, (Lafayette,) lots 
46 and 45, farmer 93. 

Hotaling. William, (Jamesville,) lime stone 
quarrv. 

HOUGHTON, WILLIAM S.. (Cardiff,) car- 
riage shop. 

Hoyt, Charles W., (Lafayette,) retired far- 
mer. 

Hoyt, Newton O., (Lafayette,) lot 75, far- 
mer 47. 

Hoyt. Philander, (Lafayette,) lot 24, farmer 
106. 

Humphrey, Radd, (Po.npey.) lot 77, farmer 
53. 

Hungerford, Henry S,, (Jamesville.) lot 15, 
farmer 240. 

Hungerford, Stephen R., (Jamesville,) lot 
15, farmer 97. 

Jackson, Caleb B., (Lafayette,) lot 59, far- 
mer 44. 

Jacobs, Charles C, (Lafayette,) lot 34, far- 
mer 66. 

Johnson, Abram, (Jamesville,) lot 35, far- 
mer 30. 

Johnson, Amos, (Lafayette,) lot 90, farmer 
10. 

Johnson, Charles, (Collingwood,) lot 91, 
blacksmith and farmer 2^. 

Johnson, Mark, (Collingwood,) lot 91, far- 
mer 65. 

Jones, Charles J., (Lafayette,) lot 75, far- 
mer 25. 

Jones, Marcia Mrs., (Lafayette,) lot 75, far- 
mer 30. 

Jones, William. (Cardiff.) lot 56, farmer 160. 

Jones. William H., (Lafayette,) lots 74 and 
75, farmer 120. 

June, Franklin, (.Lafayette,) lot 81, farmer 
70. 

KEELER. ELMER F., (Lafayette,)carpen- 
ter and joiner. 

Keen, John, (Cardiff.) lot 56. farmer 110. 

Keough, James, (Collingwood,) lot 75, far- 
mer 28. 

King, Asahel Jr.. (Cardiff,) lot 56. farmer 14. 

King. Asahel Albertus, (Cardiff.) lot 37, 
farmer 147>f . 

Kine. Russell G., (Cardiff,) lot 37, farmer 
154. 

Kinney, Joel, (Jamesville,) lot 3, farmer 120. 

KinneV, Rufus, (Lafayette.) lot 81, farmer 
110. 

Klock, Hezekiah, (Cardiff,) lot 73, farmer 
110. 

Knapp, George H., (Jamesville,) lot 25, far- 
mer leases 80. 

Knapp, Thomas, (Jamesville,) lot 25, far- 
mer 80. 



Lane, Patrick, (Lafayette,) lot 90, farmer 

17. 
Loomis. Franklin, (Tully Valley,) flouring 

and saw mills. 
Loomis, Roswell, (Cardiff,) lot 88, farmer 

110. 
Luce, Jerome, (Cardiff.) lot 57, farmer 40. 
Maher, James, (Jamesville,) lot 14, farmer 

Mason, David, (Lafayette,) lot 45, farmer60. 

Mayhew, Levi S., (Lafayette,) lot 22, farmer 
80. 

McClarry. Geo. H., (Onondaga Castle,) lot 
13, farmer 49. 

McDermot, Luke, (Jamesville,) lot 36, far- 
mer 37X- 

McGrath. Mathew, (Lafayette,) lot 45, far- 
mer 35. 

McINTYRE, GEORGE W., (Cardiff,) gen- 
eral merchant. 

McMannis, Thomas, (Lafayette,) lot 23, 
farmer 54. 

McMILLEN. EUGENE, (Cardiff,) farmer. 

Merriman, Peter, (Cardiff) lot 10, farmer 
15. 

Miller, Addison, (Lafayette,) lot 17, farmer 
60. 

Miller, James W., (Lafayette,) lot 24, far- 
mer il. 

Miller, John D., (Lafayette,) lots 14, 17 and 
18, farmer 171. 

Miller, M. V., (Pompey,) lot 77, farmer 80. 

Miller, Oscar, (Onondaga Castle,) lot 14, 
farmer 51. 

Mills, Almond, (Collingwood,) lot 75, far- 
mer 115. 

Moore, Martin, (Lafayette,) lot 46, farmer 
17#. 

Moran, John, (Jamesville,) lot 36, farmer 
16. 

Morgan, Ann Mrs., (Jamesville,) lot 36, 
farmer 63. 

Morgan, Carter, (Lafayette,) lot 75, farmer 
62. 

Morgan, Charles, (Cardiff.) boot and shoe 
dealer. 

Morgan, Willard. (Lafayette,) lot 81, far- 
iher 48. 

Morris, Edwin, (Jamesville,) lot 36, saw 
mill and farmer 62)tf. 

MORRIS, HENRY N., (Jamesville,) saw 
mill. 

MORRIS, THOMAS N. Jr., (Jamesville,) 
farmer. 

Morse, Amasa, (Jamesville,) lot 14, farmer 
44. 

Morse, Henry C, (Pompey,) lot 46. 

Morse. John, (Lafayette,) lot 26, farmer 64. 

Morse, Lloyd Mrs., (Jamesville,) lot 2, far- 
mer 90. 

Morton, Joel S., (Jamesville,) lot 13, far- 
mer 100. 

Morton. Lonisa M.. (Jamesville,) lots 13 
and 14, farmer 50. 

Morton, Amity Mrs., (Jamesville,) lot 14, 
farmer 34. 

Moss, Horace, (Jamesville,) lot 25, farmer 
13. 

*MOTSIFF, FREDERICK, (Cardiff,) hotel 
keeper and farmer 3. 

Murphy, John, (Jamesville,) lot 24, farmer 
85. 

NEWELL, DANIEL, (Tully Valley,) lot 
88, farmer SS. 



234 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRE C TOBY. 





©V© 



1 



MEHCMAIVT MILLERS, 



PI 







LWd 










L^VTsTA.RK MILLS. 

ALSO MANUFACTURERS OF 

Hyfalic Cement, Water Lime, 

Lime & Land Plaster, 




JAJOBTIUUL H. ¥, 



A Constant Supply on hand, and all Orders promptly attended to. 



SYRACUSE STEAM JOINER SHOP. 



-*•*- 



p 

.. u 



ANING AND I0ULDING MILL, 

■No. 40 West Genesee St., 
SYPL^OUSE, 1ST . Y. 

Inside Trimmings of every Description. 

Brackets, Trusses and all kinds of Scroll and 

Straight Sawing - , Window and Door 

Frames, Cornices, Cisterns, Doors, 

«kc, worked to order. 



i 



& GJLLETT. 



LAFAYETTE. 



235 



Newell, E., (Collingwood,) lot 77, farmer 
100. 

Newell, Thomas, (Lafayette,) lot 35, farmer 
102. 

Newell, Timothy Jr., (Collingwood,) lot 76, 
farmer 160. 

Newell, William, (Cardiff,) lot 72, farmer 
53, 

NORTH WAT, HAMBLIN G., (Cardiff,) lot 
56, farmer 110. 

NORTHWAY, JOHN H. JR., (Lafayette,) 
farmer. 

Northway, Truman, (Cardiff,) lot 57, farmer 
24. 

NORTHWAY, TRUMAN D., (Cardiff,) far- 
mer. 

O'Brien, James, (Jamesville,) {with Rich- 
ard,) lot 1, farmer 233. 

O'Brien, Richard, (Jamesville.) (u.'i<A James,) 
lot 1, farmer 233. 

O'Donell, Richard, (Jamesville,) lot 1, far- 
mer 27. 

Olcoot, Sophronia, (Lafayette,) lot 61, far- 
mer 60. 

O'Shea, Bartholomew, (Cardiff,) lot 57, far- 
mer 47. 

Owens, Franklin, (Cardiff,) harness shop. 

Palmer, Avery, (Cardiff,) lot 10, farrier and 
farmer 100. 

PALMER, AVERY R. REV., (Colling- 
wood,) flour and saw mills, and Bap- 
tist clergyman. 

Palmeter, Amos, (Jamesville,) lot 13, far- 
mer 49. 

Papworth, James, (Lafayette,) butcher. 

PARK, ELIJAH, M. D., (Lafayette,) phy- 
sician. 

Park, George S., (Collingwood,) lot 92, far- 
mer 89. 

Park, Nathan, (Cardiff,) lot 57, farmer 19. 

Park, Ransom H., (Lafayette,) lot 81, far- 
mer 36. 

PARK, ROBERT 8., (Cardiff,) general 
merchant and post master. 

Parker, John, (Cardiff,)) lot 72, farmer 40. 

Payne, Arby A., (Cardiff,) lot 73, farmer 33. 

PETERS & BUSH, (Lafayette,) {Mark N. 
Peters and Bush,) saw mill and bed- 
stead factory. 

Peters, John C, (Jamesville,) lot 36, farmer 
60. 

PETERS, MARK W., (Lafayette,) (Peters 
& Bush,) lot 46, justice of the peace and 
farmer 22. 

Phelps, Geo. W., (Lafayette,) lot 81, farmer 
24.)*. 

PRICE, JOHN W., (Jamesville,) lots 1 and 

6, farmer 106#. 
Price, Lafayette, M., (Jamesville,) (with 

Joseph A. Crampton,) lot 1, farmer 140. 
Quinn, John, (Lafayette,) lot 24, farmer 4. 
Ray, Mrs. Marietta, (Lafayette,) lot 61, far-> 

mer 44. 
Reddy, Michael, (Lafayette,) lot 45, farmer 

80. 
Reed, Milo, (Jamesville,) lot 2, farmer 95. 
RICHARDSON, RENSSELLAER D. L., 

(Cardiff,) lot 1, residence reservation, 

farmer 14. 
Richardson, Thomas, (Collingwood,) lot 

77, farmer 32. 
Riley, Dennis, (Lafayette,) lot 24, farmer 

54#. 



Riley, Patrick, (Tully Valley,) lot 10, farmer 
100. 

ROMER, HIRAM, (Jamesville,) lot 25, far- 
mer 97. 

Rose, Peter, (Cardiff,) lot 72, firmer 25. 

Rounds, Asahel, (Lafayette.) lot 45, farmer 
160. 

Rounds, Mrs. Cornelia H., (Layfayette,) lot 
24, farmer 70. 

Rounds, Daniel, (Lafayette,) lot 24, farmer 
112. 

Rowland, Harlow O., (Cardiff,) lot 72, far- 
mer 90. 

Rowland, Joseph T., (Cardiff,) lot 57, far- 
mer 80. 

RUSSELL, GEORGE, (Jamesville.) lot 25, 
farmer 63. 

Ryan, Stephen, (Lafayette,) lot 46, farmer 
44. 

Ryder, Wesly, (Cardiff,) lot 73, farmer 45. 

Salman, Henry B., (Jamesville,) lots 13 and 
14, farmer 200. 

Savage, Roland, (Lafayette,) lot 90, farmer 
25. 

Scamell, Caroline Mrs., (Lafayette,) lot 81, 
farmer 116. 

Scammell, Harrison O., (Lafayette,) lot 75, 
farmer 97. 

SCAMMELL, HERMAN JR., (Lafayette,) 
farmer. 

SCAMMELL, HIRAM, (Lafayette,) lot 90, 
farmer 157. 

SCAMMELL, LA VOSIER, (Lafayette,) 
farmer. 

Scamel, Rufus, (Lafayette,) lot 90, farmer 
28. 

Scamell, William, (Lafayette,) lot 81, farmer 
4#. 

Searls, Allen, (Jamesville,) lot 85, farmer 
85. 

SHARE, JEREMIAH D., (Lafayette,) lot 
60. 

Shaw, George H., (Jamesville,) lot 14, far- 
mer leases 32. 

Shaw, Henry, (Lafayette,) iOt 20, farmer 80. 

Shepardson, LovisaMrs., (Cardiff,) lot 56, 
farmer 4. 

Sherman, James, (Collingwood,) lot 76, 
farmer 100. 

Sherman, Joseph S., (Collingwood,) lot 91, 
saw mill and farmer 80. 

Sherman, Justice H., (Lafayette,) lot 24, 
saw mill and farmer 3. 

Shue, Avery P., (Tully Valley,) lot 88, post- 
master and farmer 85. 

Shue, John, (Cardiff,) lot 72, farmer 30. 

Siddell, Moses, (Lafayette,) lot 59, farmer 
121. 

Smith, Lorin L., (Jamesville,) lot 25, farmer 
96. 

SMITH, REVILOL., (Jamesville,) lot 36, 
farmer 45. 

Sniffin, James H., (Cardiff,) lot 72, farmer 
75. 

Snow, Daniel L., (Jamesville,) lot 14, car- 
penter and joiner and 25. 

SNOW, DAVID C, (Lafayette,) farmer. 

Stannard, Roswell, (Jamesville,) lot 3, 
farmer 118. 

Stanton, Benjamin, (Jamesville,) lot 3, far- 
mer 49. 

STAVIL, MRS. MARGARET, (Cardiff,) 
lot 72, farmer 33. 



236 ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



T HE E 



Skaneateles Democrat 

(3SSTAB3LIS3K3S30 IN 4840,) 

IS PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY, 

AT SKANEATELES, NEW YORK, 



BY 



H. B. DO 





TERMS, ■ $1.50 PER ANNUM. 

THE DEMOCRAT has the largest circulation of any paper in Western and South- 
western Onondaga County. 



Our Jobbing Department 



IS COMPLETE, HAVING 



HOE'S CYLINDER 



AND 



GORDON POWER PR: 



'9 



Sill Heads, Circulars, Handbills, ^Programmes, Sank 

Checks, and in fact everything from a Wedding Card 

to a mammoth ^Poster, done in the best 

possible style, and on 

REASONABLE TERMS. 

Particular Attention Given to Printing in Colors, 



LAFA TETTE-L YSANDER. 



237 



Stearns, Benjamin A., (Cardiff,) lot 57, far- 
mer 65. 

STT ARNS, EDSON J., (Lafavette,) farmer. 

STEARNS, GARY, (Cardiff,) lot 6, resident 
reservation, farmer 36, 

Stea jns, Jabez T., (Cardiff,) lot 6, residence 
reservation, farmer 119. 

Stearns, Timothy R., (Cardiff.) lot 6, resi- 
de nee reservation, farmer 60. 

Tha\ r, William E., (Cardiff,) lot 72, far- 
i rl6. 

Thou, -s, Albert, (Lafayette,) lot 20, farmer 
80. 

Thomas, Asahel K, (Lafayette,) lot 17, 
farmer 90. 

Thomr s, Harrison, (Lafayette,) lot 20, far- 
mer 82. 

Thomas, Mrs. Helen S., (Lafayette,) lot 16, 
farmer 107. 

Thomas, Oren, (Lafayette,) lot 20, farmer 
82, 

Thomas, Owen, (Cardiff.) lot 58, farmer 85. 

Tobin, J^tnes, (Jamesville,) lot 1, farmer 

VAN BU^KIRK, JOHN, (Cardiff,) lot 57, 
cattlo broker and farmer 32. 

Vanderbi g, M., (Jamesville,) lot 24, far- 
mer 1 I. 

Vanderwa'ker, Martin, (Cardiff,) lot 72, 
farmer 173. 

VanPatten, Abram, (Pompey,) lot 62, far- 
mer 84. 

VANPATTEN, ALBERT, (Pompey,) lot 
62, farmer leases 84. 

VanPatten, Andrew, (Lafayette,) lot 35, far- 
mer 223. 

VanPatten, Maria Mrs., (Pompey,) lot 62, 
farmer 75. 

VOIGT, EDWARD, (Cardiff,) flouring 
mill. 

Walberger, John, (Lafayette,) lot 45, far- 
mer 47. 

Watkins, Oliver M., (Jamesville,) lot 3, 
farmer 166. 

Way, Andrew, (Pompey,) lot 77, farmer 77. 

WEBB, CYRUS O., (Lafayette,) carpenter. 

WEBB, GEORGE E., (Lafayette,) lot 22, 
saw mill and farmer 5. 

WEBB, LEVI L., (Lafayette,) lot 22, far- 
mer 52. 

Webb, Rachel Mrs., (Lafayette,) lot 22, far- 
mer 16. 



Welch, James, (Jamesville,) lot 3, farmer 4. 

Welch, Thomas, (Pompey,) lot 62, farmer 
75. 

Weller, Edward, (Jamesville,) lot 14, far- 
mer 145. 

WELLER, JOHN, (Jamesville,) lot 1, far- 
mer 140. 

Weller, Stephen, (Lafayette,) lot 20, farmer 
42. 

Weller, William, (Lafayette,) lots 35 and 
36, farmarl53. 

WE8TCOTT, ARTHUR G., (Lafayette,) 
blacksmith. 

Westcott, Morris. (Collingwood,) lot 77, 
farmer 10. 

Whitford, Alonzo, (Jamesville,) lot 14, far- 
mer 109. 

WHITFORD, NOAH, (Lafayette,) lot 15, 
farmer 35. 

Wilcox, Mrs. Emily, (Lafayette,) lot 43, far- 
mer 65. 

Wilcox, Jacob, (Collingwood,) lot 91, far- 
mer 74. 

Wilder, Titus, (Cardiff,) blacksmith. 

Winchell, Joseph, (Tully Valley,) lot 10, 
farmer 110. 

Woodard, Chauncey, (Cardiff,) lot 72, far- 
mer 16. 

WOODARD, HARRISON, (Lafayette.) 

WOODFORD, ANSEL, (Pompey,) lot 77, 
farmer 108. 

Woodward, Jesse, (Lafayette,) lot 59, far- 
mer 5%- 

Woolsey, Henry O., (Cardiff,) lot 10, farmer 
155 

WRIGHT, BAXTER, (Cardiff,) patent 
right dealer. 

WRIGHT, BYRON A., (Jamesville,) lot 25, 
saw mill and fanner 10. 

Wright, Charles B.. (Cardiff,) lot 72, saw 
mill and farmer 8. 

WRIGHT, EBENEZER C, (Cardiff,) lot 
73, farmer 90M. 

Wright, Rossiter O., (Jamesville,) lot 2, 
saw mill and farmer 30. 

Wright, Samuel, (Lafayette,) lot 13, farmer 
17. 

Wright, Silaa W., (Lafayette,) lot 59, far- 
mer 102. 

Young, John, (Pompey,) lot 46. farmer 72. 

YOUNGBLOOD, JOSIAH, (Jamesville) 
lot 14, farmer 35. 



(Post Office Addresses in Parentheses.) 

Note.— The incorporated village of Baldwinsville, lying partly in the town of Ly- 
sander, and partly in the town of Van Buren, makes it necessary to give a list of the 
village, independent of the towns. See Baldwixsville List, following Lysakder. 



ABBOTT, ASA M., (Baldwinsville,) lot 89, 

farmer 158. 
Abbott, George, (Plainville,) lot 65, farmer 

Abbott, Moses, (Baldwinsville,) lot 94, far- 
mer 160. . ,„ . , . 

ABBOTT, SOLOMON, (Baldwinsville,) lot 
97, farmer 116. 



Acker, Peter, (Lysander,) lot 44, specula- 
tor. 

Adams, Charlora, (Plainville,) farmer. 
ADAMS, W. IRVING, (Plainville,) lot 96, 

farmer 68. 
ADAMS, JAMES A., (Ptainville,) lot 96, 

farmer 101. 



238 ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Be"-8 leave of telling the people of Syracuse and vicinity, that he is still to be found at 
the old stand of ISAAC LYONS, where he iB prepared to pay the highest price for 

CAST OFF CLOTHING. 

Having the experience of many years in 

deamnff & Coloring Mies' & Gents' CloUg, 

he would beg the patronage of those wishing their clothing cleaned and repaired or 
clothing colored, promising at the same time good workmanship and low charges. Re- 
member the place, 



No. 9 Yates Block, Montgomery Street, 

ag your clothing, or leave your ord 



The old stand of Isaac G. Lyons, and bring your clothing, or leave your orders, and I 
will call for them. 



ABRAHAM STERN & CO., 



IMPORTEES AND DEALERS IN 



WATCHES, JEWELRY, SILVER WARE, 

Clocks, Cutlery & Fancy Goods. 

Also, Rogers & Bro's Celebrated Plated Ware. 

31 East Genesee St., 

2 DOOBS WEST OF THE POST OFFICE. 

Particular attention paid to Repairing Fine 
Watches and Jewelry. 

ABRAMAM STERN. JACOB STRAUS. 



LYSANDER. 



239 



ADSIT. FRANKLIN, (Baldwinsville,) lot 
77, farmer 238. 

Adsit, James L., (Baldwinsville,) (with 
Theodcre,) lot 67, farmer 00. 

ADSIT. JOHN, (Baldwinsville.) lot 76. far- 
mer 226. 

Adsit, Theodore, (Baldwinsville,) (with 
James L.,) lot 67. farmer 90. 

Alden. Samuel II., (Baldwinsville,) lot 77, 
farmer 70. 

ALLEN, EBENEZER, (Plainville,) wagon 
maker. 

Allen. Richard, (Baldwinsville.) lot 75, far- 
mer 17. 

Anthony, John, (Lvsander.) lot 43, sexton. 

Augire, Geo. M., baldwinsville,) lot 82, 
farmer 70. 

AUYER, VALENTINE. (Jack's Reef,) lot 
90. farmer leases 180. 

AVERY. EDWARD N., (Lvsander,) lot 43, 
carriage maker. 

Babcock, Edwin, (Baldwinsville,) lot 56, 
farmer 200. 

Babcock, Harvey D., (Baldwinsville,) lot 
55. farmer 50". 

Bacon. Amos, (Lamsons,) lot 40, farmer 
leases 170. 

BAIRD, ABRAHAM, (Lysander,) lot 43, 
farmer 29. 

BAIRD, ANDREW W., (Lysander,) lot 35, 
farmer 100. 

BAIRD, JAMES, (Lvsander,) lot 43, farmer 
47. 

Baker, Erastus E., (Little Utica,) lot 37, 
carpenter and shoe maker. 

Baker, Ezra. (Lamsons.) lot4S, farmer 36. 

BAKER. JAMES, (Little Utica,) lot 45, far- 
mer 84. 

Ballard, Leander, (Lysander,) lot 43, tan- 
ner and currier. 

Ballard. Wm. S., (Lysander,) lot 43, specu- 
lator. 

Ballard, St. John, (Lysander,) lot 43, specu- 
lator. 

Barber, Solomon, (Baldwinsville,) lot 67, 
farmer 34. 

Barlow, John, (Lysander,) lot 44, specula- 
tor. 

BARNEY, HERMAN D., (Lysander,) lot 
52, farmer 56. 

Barnes, Ira. (Lysander,) lot 43, shoe maker. 

BEACH, WILLARD C, (Lysander,) lot 43, 
drv goods clerk. 

Beebe, Preston, (Lysander,) lot 43, carpen- 
ter and joiner. 

BEEBE, THEOPHILUS J., (Lysander,) lot 
52. farmer 43. 

BELDEN. WARREN, (Baldwinsville,) lot 
70, farmer 172. 

Bellnap, Almarion, (Little Utica,) lot 46, 
preacher and farmer 35, 

BELLOWS, JOHN, (Lamsons,) lot 56. far- 
mer SO. 

BELLOWS, JOHN, (Lamsons,) lot 57, far- 
mer 80. 

Benedict. Solomon, (Lysander,) lot 54, far- 
mer 82. 

BENTLEY*, EDWARD, (Little Utica,) lot 
36, farmer 170. ' 

Bentley, James, (Baldwinsville,) lot 67, 
farmer. 

BERRY*, CLARK, (Lvsander,) lot 34, wag- 
on maker and builder of Wbitcomb's 
hay rake. 



BETTS. HIRAM, (Baldwinsville,) lot 75, 

farmer 50. 
Betts, James, (Baldwinsville,) lot 64, farmer 

69. 
Biggs, Wm. O, (Lysander,) lot 44, tanner 

and currier. 
Billings, James, (Clay.) lot 82, blacksmith. 
BLAKEMAN, SIMEON, (Lysander,) lot 

62, farmer leases 92. 
Bogardus, Alexander, (Little Utica,) lot 36 

farmer 85. 
Bogardus. John. (Little Utica,) lot 37, far 

mer 120. 
Bogardus, William W., (Lamsons,) lot 38 

farmer 50. 
BOUTON, REUBEN C, (Lysander,) lot 44 

farmer 60. 
BOWEN, C. C, (Plainville,) (Bowen & 

Smith.) 
Bowen, Nicholas, (Little Utica,) lot 55, far 

mer 30. 
BOWEN & SMITH, (Plainville.) (C. C. 

Bowen and Phi/teat: Smith.) lot 74, saw 

and cider mill. 
Boyd. John H., (Lamsons.) lot 39, farmer 

129. 
BOYD, WILLIAM, (Lamsons,) lot 39, far- 
mer 53. 
Bradt, Isaac, (Plainville,) (ivith Wm. H.,) 

lot 72, farmer leases 155. 
BRADT, WM. H., (Plainville,) (with Isaac,) 

lot 72, farmer leases 155. 
Brainard, David, (Baldwinsville,) lot 86, 

farmer. 

BRATT. JOHN, (Plainville,) lot 73, car- 
penter and joiner. 

Bratt. Peter, (Plainville.) lot 98. farmer 125. 

DRINK, GARRETT, (Baldwinsville,) lot 67, 
farmer 102. 

BRITTON, MECKLIN, (Lysander,) (Brit- 
ton & WoosUr.) 

BRITTON & WOOSTER, (Lysander,) 
(Mecklin Britton and Barday Wooeterj 
grocers and fin ware dealers. 

BROOKS, WILLIAM, (Baldwinsville,) lot 
69. farmer 74. 

BROTHERS. ROBERT, (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 95, farmer 17. 

Brown. George W., (Lysander,) lot 44, far- 
mer 99. 

Brown, Hamilton, (Baldwinsville,) lot 60, 
farmer 62. 

BROWN, OVID O., (Lysander,) (Peck & 
Brown.) 

Brown, Wm., (Plainville,) lot 92, farmer 
leases 112. 

BUELL, GROVER, (Lysander,) lot 43, far- 
mer 400. 

Buell, Simon F., (Lysander,) lot 43, farmer. 

Burdick. Walter, (Little Utica,) lot 47, far- 
mer 3. 

DURGESS, E. E., (Little Utica,) lot 36, far- 
mer 101. 

Burns, Henry, (Baldwinsville,) lot 90, far- 
mer 25. 

BURR, MARY' A., (Lysander,) lot 62, far- 
mer. 

BURR, ROBERT, (Lysander,) lot 62, far- 
mer 50. 

Burt. Warner. (Lysander,) lot 34, farmer 10. 
BUSSING, PHILIP, (Lysander,) lot 35, far- 
mer 1. 



240 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 






MST> & H@ W 





I 



25 Warren Street, Vanderbilt Block, 



WHOLESALE & EETAIL DEALERS IN 



SCHOOL BOOKS. CHURCH BOOKS, 

BLANK BOOKS, 

Miscellaneous Books & Law Blanks, 



PENS, 
PENCILS, 
SLATES, 
CRAYONS, 
Pocket Knives. 



Mucilage, 



BILLET, 
NOTE, 



Pocket Books. 



LETTER, 
FOOLS CAP, 
Legal Cap, 
Bill Cap, 
Pocket Slates. 



Also, Sole Agent for Stafford's Celebrated Ink, 



The Best in the Market. 



SYRACUSE, IV. Y. 

E. B. KNAPP. E. P. HOWE. 



LYSANDER. 



241 



Butler, Harvey, (Lamsons,) lot 40, switch 
tender. 

BUTLER, HORACE, (Lamsons,) lot 39, far- 
mer 124. 

Calkins, Lewis, (Baldwin sville,) lot 89, far- 
mer 119. 

Camp, William J., (Little Utica,) lot 54, 
farmer leases 100. 

CANDEE, LUMAN L., (Phoenix, Oswego 
Co.,) lot 42, farmer 70. 

Carrier, Egbert N., (Phoenix, Oswego Co.,) 
lot 42, farmer 190. 

Caster, Phedrus. (Phoenix, Oswego Co.,) 
lot 42, farmer. 

CHAFFEE, A. C. MRS., (Little Utica,) 
(icith Mrs. Susan N. Conghnet,) lot 37, 
farmer 200. 

Chase, Hiram, (Lamsons,) lot 40, farmer 
117. 

Chase, Laura, (Lamsons,) lot 40, farmer 
100. 

CHASE, STEPHEN, (Lamsons,) lot 40, 
farmer 30. 

Clark, Alexander, (Baldwinsville,) lot 56, 
farmer 34. 

Clark, Elijah, (Baldwinsville,) lot 66, far- 
mer 112. 

Clark, James B., (Phcenix, Oswego Co.,) 
lot 50, farmer leases 150. 

CLARK, JUDSON G., (Baldwinsville,) lot 
66, farmer. 

CLARK, NAPOLEON B., (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 66, farmer 165. 

Clough, Albert, (Baldwinsville,) lot 71, far- 
mer 32. 

Cline. John, (Plainville.) lot 73, carpenter. 

Coffin, Alexander, (Little Utica,) lot 38, 
farmer 60. 

COFFIN, ROBERT, (Little Utica,) lot 37, 
farmer 40. 

COLE, JONATHAN, (Baldwinsville,) lot 
90, farmer 19. 

COLLINS, J. STANTON, (Clay,) lot 88, 
farmer. 

Collins, Luke, (Clay,) lot 88, farmer 410. 

CONGDON, ERAS*TUS, (Lamsons,) lot 40, 
hotel prop'r. 

Conklin, Daniel, (Lamsons,) lot 48, farmer. 

Connell, Catharine, (Lamsons,) lot 48, far- 
mer 26. 

CONNELL, E. & CO., (Lysander,) {E. & 
L..) dealer in dry goods, groceries, 
boots and shoes. 

CONNELL, W. H., (Little Utica,) dealer in 
dry goods, groceries, boot and shoes, 
cfcc. 

Corry, Edwin A., (Lysander,) lot 44, far- 
mer 15. 

Cook, Eli P., (Little Utica,) lot 46, farmer 
12. 

Cook, Stephen, (Lamsons,) lot 33, preacher 
and farmer 74. 

Cooper, Edward, (Baldwinsville,) lot 66, 
farmer 72. 

Cooper, Nelson, (Lamsons,) lot 48, boat- 
man. 

Coppernole, John, (Lysander,) lot 34, far- 
mer 10. 

COPPERNOLL, NANCY, (Lysander,) lot 
34, farmer 14. 

Costello, John, (Lamsons,) lot 48, R. R. 
track man. 



COUGHNET, SUSAN M. MRS., (Little 
Utica,) (with Mrs. A. C. Chaffee,) lot 
37, farmer 200. 

Cox, Charles E., (Baldwinsvilte,) lot 67, 
farmer 53. 

COX, ELIAS, (Baldwinsville,) lot 67, far- 
mer 57. 

CRAMER, DAVID, (Baldwinsville,) lot 79, 
farmer 172. 

CRANE, ALFRED E., (Baldwinsville,) lot 
66, farmer 72. 

Crippen, Silas, (Plainville,) lot 84, farmer 
80. 

CUDDEBACK, LAFAYETTE, (Baldwins- 
ville,) lot 81, farmer 119. 

Cunningham, Timothy, (Phoenix, Oswego 
Co.,) lot 71, farmer 70. 

Darak, Doolittle, (Baldwinsville,) lot 89, 
farmer 50. 

Davis, Albert, (Lamsons,) lot 40, botaman. 

Davis, Benjamin F., (Plainville,) lot 92, 
farmer 100. 

DAVIS, DWIGHT H., Plainville,) lot 92, 
farmer 50. 

Davis, John, (Baldwinsville,) lot 58, farmer 
340. 

Davis, Ross, (Baldwinsville,) lot 57, saw 
mill and farmer 20. 

Davis, Win,, (Plainville,) lot 74, farmer 

lG&BCS 197 

Day, Hezekiah, (Little Utica,) lot 46, far- 
mer 50. 

Dean, Samuel, (Phoenix, Oswego Co.,) lot 
42, farmer 50. 

Decker, De Witt C, (Lysander,) lot 43, far- 
mer 124. 

Decker, James, (Lysander,) lot 43, farmer. 

Deline, Benjamin, (Baldwinsville,) lot 59, 
farmer 100. 

DENNIE, DAVID K., (Plainville,) lot 73, 
blacksmith. 

DINGMAN, PETER, (Baldwinsville,) lot 
100, farmer 125. 

DIXON, CHARLES, (Baldwinsville,) lot 
89, farmer 116. 

Dixon, George, (Baldwinsville,) lot S7, far- 
mer 120. 

Dixon, John F., (Baldwinsville,) lot 90, 
farmer 25. 

Dodge, Orvin, (Plainville,) lot 73, mill- 
wright. 

Donohue, Michael, (Baldwinsville,) lot 76, 

Douglas, Charles P., (Baldwinsville,) lot 90, 

DUNHAM, HARVEY, (Baldwinsville,) lot 

75, farmer 104. ,,»««# 
Dunham, Harvey A., (Lamsons,) lot 39, far- 

Dunham, Jeremiah, (Baldwinsville,) lot 64, 

farmer 175. 
Dunham, Loren, (Little Utica,) post mas- 

tcr 
DUNHAM, SARDI8, (Baldwinsville,) lot 

76, farmer 123, 

Dunning, Horace E., (Lysander,) lot 35, 

farmer 50. _ ,,.„„, 

Durston, John, (Little Utica,) lot 36, farmer 

Durston, Wm, (Little Utica,) lot 36, farmer. 

Duziel, Isaac P., (Plainvilie,) lot 73, car- 
penter. 

Dykeman, Peter, (Baldwinsville,) lot 89, 
farmer 11. 



242 



ONONDA GA CO VNTT B U8WESS DIRECTOR T. 



■■ 



HARRIS, ROBINSON & CO., 



GENERAL AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED 




11 



IT 



AND WHOLESALE & RETAIL DEALERS IN 

Silk, Twist, Cotton & Linen Thread, 

Needles, Oil, and Machine Fixtures Generally. 
Repairs Done with Promptness. 

Stitching of Ail Kinds Done to 

Order. 

48 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



FULTON FOUNDRY. 



t-i! B N FOUNDER, M A C H I N I S t,^&? 

snT^X .'--;■■'..-:* ND MANUFACTURER OF <^ l T?S 

STEAM ENGINES & GENERAL MACHINERY, 

^SYRACUSE, NY. >£ ^ 



LYSAXDER. 



243 



ELLIOTT, FRANKLIN M., (Little Utica,) 

lot 46. farmer 12. 
Elliott, James, (Plainville,) lot 13, shoe 

tit fl k (*r 

Ellieon, David, (Little Utica,) lot 47, far- 
mer 108. 

ELL**, HORACE, (Lysander,) lot 44, Ehoe 
maker. 

Elms. Washington, (Phoenix, Oswego Co.) 
lot 42, merchant. 

EMERICK, CHARLES F., (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 78, farmer 160. 

EMERICK, MARTIN H., (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 77, farmer 75. 

Endres, Henry J. Rev., (Lysander,) lot 44, 
minister of Reformed Church. 

ENO, MORTIMER H„ (Clay,) lot 61, far- 
mer 140. 

ENO, NATHAN P., (Phoenix. Oswego 
Co.,) lot 42, farmer 102. 

EVANS-, DAVID, (Baldwinsville,) lot 95, 
farmer 133. 

Evens, Jacob L., (Baldwinsville,) lot 95, 
farmer 150. 

FAIRCHILD, WM., (Clay,) lot 87, farmer 
50. 

Fancher, Alanson, (Little Utica,) lot 47, 
farmer. 

FANCHER, JOHN C, (Little Utica,) lot 47, 
carriage maker and farmer. 

Farrell, Anthony, (Plaiuville,) lot 91, far- 
mer. 

FARRELL, PATRICK, (Plainville,) lot 91, 
farmer 64. 

Fator, Abby, (Little Utica,) lot 47, farmer 
25. 

FELLOWS, ALFRED C, (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 81, farmer 53. 

FELLOWS, GEORGE R., (Baldwinsville,) 

rn.lot 70, farmer 53. 

Fenner, Frederick W., (Little Utica,) lot 
55, farmer 145. 

Fenner, Geo. M., (Lysander,) (with Steph- 
en,) lot 54, farmer 86. 

Fenner, John, (Lysander.) lot 54. farmer 91. 

Fenner, Mary M., (Lysander,) lot 64, farmer 
79. 

Fenner. Step-hen H., (Lysander,) (with Geo. 
M.,) lot 54, farmer 86. 

FENNER, ZILPHAH., (Lysander,) lot 54, 
farmer. 

FERGUSON, ENOCH, (Baldwin*ville,) lot 
55, farmer 100. 

FERGUSON, NATHAN, (Little Utica,) lot 
37, wagon maker. 

Field, James, (Plainville,) lot 72, fanner 
227. 

Field, Thomas, (Plainville,) lot 64, farmer 
52. 

Finch, Charles F., (Lysander,) lot 44, car- 
penter and joiner. 

Finch, Lewis, (Lysander.) lot 35, farmer 19. 

Fleming, David, (Baldwinsville,) lot 68, far- 
mer 24. 

FORNCROOK, CHRISTOPHER H., (Ly- 
sander,) lot 36, farmer 80. 

FORT, STEPHEN V., (Lysander,) lot 34, 
farmer 61. 

FOSTER, ARTEMAS, (Lamsons,) lot 49, 
farmer 50. 

FOSTER, DELANSON, (Lysander,) lot 53, 
farmer 117. 

Foster, Jacob, (Lamsons,) lot 40, farmer 
83. 



Frazee, James, (Baldwinsville,) lot 89, far- 
mer 160. 

Frazee, Jesse, (Baldwinsville,) lot 89, far- 
mer 130. 

FRAZEE, JOHN C, (Baldwinsville,) lot 
89, farmer. 

FRISBIE, J. BARKER, (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 81, farmer 56. 

Fry, Wm. H., (Phoenix, Oswego Co..) lot 
42, farmer 27. 

Fuller, Amasa, (Little Utica,) lot 54, farmer 
90. 

FULLER. JOHN M., (Lysander,) lot 52, 
school teacher and farmer. 

Fuller, Sarah, (Little Utica,) lot 55, farmer 7. 

GANNETT, JOSEPH C, (Baldwinsville.) 
lot 58, farmer 109. 

Gannet, Stephen, (Lamsons,) lot 39, far- 
mer 30. 

GANNETT, I. WARREN, (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 55, farmer 100. 

GATES, ALLEN C, lot 9S, (with Alton and 
Ansel FT.,) (Jordan,) farmer 210. 

GATES, ALSON, (with Ansel W. and Al- 
len C.) (Jordan,) lot 98, farmer 240. 

GATES, ANSEL W., (with Alsan and Al- 
len C.,) (Jordan,) lot 98, farmer 240. 

Giddings, D. Burr, (Baldwinsville,) lot 6S, 
farmer 108. 

GILBEBT, ADAM W., (Lysander,) lot 44, 
carpenter. 

Gillett, Horace, (Baldwinsville,) lot 79, far- 
mer leases 214. 

Gillett, Truman, (Baldwinsville.) lot 79, 
life insurance agent. 

Gordon, James, (Lysander.) lot 55, boat- 
man. 

Gould, Ira, {Phoenix, Oswego Co.,) lot 42, 
farmer 464. 

Gramps, Jacob S., (Lysander.) lot 34, far- 
mer 95. 

HAIGHT, GORDON A., (Clay,) lot 61, far- 
mer 90. 

Harkes, Alanson, (Clay,) lot 71. farmer 95. 

Hall, Edward B., (Little Utica,) lot 46, far- 
mer 50. 

Halsted, Herman, (Lysander.) lot 35, mil- 
ler. 

Halsted, John, (Lysander,) lot 53, money 
lender and farmer 50. 

Hammond, George, (with Thomas,) (Ly- 
sander,) lot 43, lime mauuf. 

Hammond, Thomas, (with George,) (Ly- 
sander,) lot 43, lime manuf. 

Hanlon, Edward, (Phoenix, Oswego Co.,) 
lot 41, farmer 45. 

Hart, Noadiah, (Lysander,) lot 43, farmer 4. 

Harwood, A, W., (Plainville,) (Loveless & 
Harwood.) 

Hayden, Parker W., (Phoenix. Oswego Co.,) 
lot 42, farmer 55. 

HAYDEN, ZORA, (Lysander,) lot 53, far- 
mer 112. 

HEYDON, P. A. MRS., (Phoenix, Oswego 
Co.,) lot 42. 

Haynes, James, (Clay,) lot 82, farmer 108. 

Hazzard, Benj., (Little Ulica,) lot 47, shoe 
maker and farmer. 

HERRINGTON, M. B., (Little Utica,) lot 
46, hotel proprietor. 

Hickey, John, (Lamsons.) lot 39, farmer 50. 

Hickey, John, (Baldwinsville, lot 75, far- 
mer 35. 



244 



LYSANDER. 



HICKEY, OWEN, (Lamsons.) lot 39, far- 
mer 80. 

Hilldebrandt, Wendell, (Plainvllle,) lot 83, 
farmer 84. 

Holland, Stephen, (Baldwinsville,) lot 60, 
farmer 60. 

Holland, Timothy, (Clay,) lot 71, farmer. 

Hopkins, Ebin N., (Lysander,) lot 34, far- 
mer. 

HORTON, EDMUND, (Baldwinsville,) lot 
56. farmer 44. 

HOUGHTALING, PETER M., (Lysander,) 
lot 52, farmer 117. 

HOUSER, LEROY, (Lysander,) lot 43, 
blacksmith. 

Howard, James, (Little Utica,) lot 46, far- 
mer 3. 

HUBBARD, CHAUNCEY, (Plainville,) lot 
73, shoe maker. 

Hubbard, Lucius, (Little Utica,) lot 45, far- 
mer 58. 

Hudson, Almira, (Baldwinsville,) lot 86, 
farmer 50. 

Huggine, Alonzo H., (Little Utica,) lot 45, 
farmer 8. 

HUGGINS, GEO. A., (Little Utica,) lot 
45, farmer. 

Humphrey, Morris, (Baldwinsville,) lot 58, 
farmer 84. 

Humphrey, Thomas, (Baldwinsville,) lot 97, 
farmer 50. 

Huntley, Amos A., (Phoenix, Oswego Co.,) 
lot 42, carpenter. 

HUNTLEY, SARAH D., (Phoenix, Oswego 
Co.,) lot 42. 

HUYCK, ANTHONY, (Lysander,) lot 34, 
wagon maker and painter. 

Huyck, John, (Lyeander,) lot 52, farmer 1. 

Huyck, Peter, (Lysander,) lot 34, farmer 20. 

Ingersoll, Benjamin D., (Lysander,) lot 44, 
moulder. 

Irvine, John, (Lysander,) lot 43, harness 
maker. 

JAYCOX, ORLIN R., (Plainville,) lot 74, 
farmer 375. 

Johnson, James, (Little Utica,) lot 46, far- 
mer. 

Johnson, James, (Lamsons,) lot 48, farmer 
56. 

Johnson, Stephen, (Phoenix, Oswego Co.,) 
lot 42, boatman. 

JOHNSON, WM. J., (Liitle Utica,) lot 47, 
farmer 108. 

Jones, Jeremiah, (Lamsons,) lot 40, farmer 
25. 

Jones, Wm. P., (Plainville,) lot 93, farmer 
112. 

Keeler, Almon, (Lamsons,) lot 49, farmer 
23. 

KEELER, HERNAN N., (Lysander,) lot 
54, farmer 52. 

Keller, James H. , (Lysander,) lot 65, far- 
mer 60. 

Kelley, Charles, (Baldwinsville,) lot 77, far- 
mer 108. 

KELLY, DANIEL J., (Baldwinsville,) lot 

67, farmer 68. 
Kelley, Edward, (Phoenix, Oswego Co.,) 

lot 41, farmer. 
Kelley, Gennette, (Baldwinsville,) lot 67, 

farmer 60. 
KELLEY, URIAH M., (Baldwinsville,) lot 

75, farmer 75. 



KELLY, WM. W., (Little Utica,) lot 46, 
farmer 60. 

Kellogg, Ambrose, (Lamsons,) lot 48, far- 
mer. 

KELLOGG, CHARLES, (Lamsons,) lot 48, 
farmer 74. 

KENT, JOHN, (Lamsons,) lot 40, farmer 
leases 45. 

Kibbe, Johr. M., (Lysander,) lot 35, farmer 
200. 

King, Patrick, (Baldwinsville,) lot 71, far- 
mer 13. 

Knapp, John, (Lysander,) lot 45, farmer 47. 

Krense, John J., (Lysander,) lot 52, farmer 1. 

LAKE, ELIJAH, (Lysander,) lot 44, hotel 
proprietor. 

Lamson, David A., (Lamsons,) lot 48, root 
doctor. 

LEE, GEORGE, (Baldwinsville,) lot 89, far- 
mer leases 128. 

Lee, Truman, (Plainville,) lot 96, farmer 87. 

Leggett, William, (Lamsons, ) lot 48, farmer 
32 

LEMONIER, TRUMAN, (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 69, farmer 8. 

LEROY, WM., (Baldwinsville,) lot 67, car- 
penter and joiner. 

Lewis, Elsie, Mrs., (Plainville,) lot 98, far- 
mer 140. 

Little, Harvey, (Baldwinsville,) lot 57, far- 
mer leases 192. 

LITTLE, JAMES H., (BaldwinBville,) lot 
81, farmer 67. 

Lockwood, Stephen D., (Lysander,) lot 43, 
carpenter and joiner. 

Longbottom, Orrin, (Lysander,) lot 43, far- 
mer 3. 

LOVELESS, DANIEL D., (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 90, farmer 35. 

Loveless & Harwood, (Plainville,) (Sidney 
Loveless and A. W. Harwood,) lot 96, 
farmers leases 135. 

Loveles*, John, (Clay,) lot 87, farmer 20. 

Loveless, Sidney, (Plainville,) {Loveless <fc 
Harwood.) 

Lukenteller, John, (Baldwinsville,) lot 68, 
farmer 75. 

MACKAY, L. D., (Clay,) lot 82. 

Mackay, Polly Mrs., (Clay,) lot 82, farmer 
54 

MAINARD, LUCIUS B., (Lysander,) lot 
35 farmer 122 

MALONE, ALFRED JUN., (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 81, farmer 25. 

Mangun, Timothy, (Phoenix, Oswego Co.,) 
lot 71. farmer 70. 

Mann, Whitney, (Baldwinsville,) lot 65, 
farmer 2. 

Marshall, John, (Baldwinsville,) lot 97, far- 
mer 112. 

MARTIN, ABRAM, (Lysander,) lot 53, far- 
mer. 

MARTIN, BARNET, (Lysander,) lot 53, 

MARTIN, LESLIE, (Lyeander,) physician 
and surgeon, lot 43. 

MARTIN, THOMAS, (Lysander.) lot 53, 
farmer 100. 

MARVIN, BEN J., (Lysander,) lot 53, far- 
mer 150. 

Marvin, Dennieon, (Baldwinsville,) lot 66, 
farmer 107. 

MARVIN, DIGHTON R., (Jack's Reef,) 
lot 99, farmer leases 200. 



OXOXDAGA COUNTY BUSIXESS DIRECTORY. 



245 




m 




© 



Y 





I 



MANUFACTURER OF 



Tin, Copper and Sheet Iron Ware, 



AND DEALER IN 




Agricultural Mjleients, 

STOVES, 

HARDWABE, 

Wooden and Stone 

Ware, Pump§, 

Glass, Pntty, 



m) 



WRINGERS 

Kerosene Lamps 

And Fixtures, Table 
and Pocket Cut- HBj^Pru 
. lery, Yankee «**«(»- 
Notions, 

Railroad Street, Tully, N. Y. 

N^ — — -=Z^ZZZ. 




246 



ONONDA OA CO TJNTY B VSINESS DIRECT OB Y. 



m 



k CLOAK MAKING 



§ 



. A. N. AVERY 



Would respectfully inform the Ladies of Syracuse that she is prepared to 
supply to order the Latest and most fashionable styles of Ladies', Misses' 
and Children's Gored Dresses and Sacques, Basques &c, with promptness, 
and in the neatest manner. 

Employing the Best Service in the Art, she feels con- 
fident she can Equal if not Excel any other 
Establishment in the city. 

Particular attention devoted to 

MOURNING AND BRIDAL TROMAUS, 

&T The Latest Fashions received direct from Paris. 

MRS. A. N. AVERY, 

66 S. Salina Street, Syracuse, N. Y. 



GEO. W. SILCOX, 

Engraver, Lithographer & Letter Press 





; 



67 South Salina Street, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Wedding and Visiting 
Cards and Paper, 

Of the latest styles, gotten up on short notice.— 
Also, 

Checks, Drafts, notes, Receipts, Statements, Bill Heads, 
Letter & Note Headings, Business Cards, 

Labels, Circulars. «fcc. 

WD ENGRAVING IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. 

When in the city, call and see samples, or sent by mail on application. Also, orders 
and estimates furnished promptly by mail or otherwise. 




L YSAKDER. 



247 



Mastin, John, (Plainville,) lot 84, farmer 
150. 

Mastin, Wm. Edward, (Plaiuville,) lot 63, 
carpenter and farmer 114. 

MAYNARD. DENNIs H., (Lysander,) far- 
mer 23, in Granby, Oswego Co. 

MAYNARD, L. B., (Lysander,) lot 43. 

McCABE, JEFFERSON, (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 66, farmer 97. 

McCarthy, Patrick, (Baldwinsville.) lot 60, 
fanner 100. 

McCARTY, GEORGE, (Lysander,) lot 43, 
phvaician and surgeon. 

NcDOXALD JAY C, (Plainville,) lot 96, 
farmer 90. 

McEntyre, Louiza, (Baldwinsville,) lot 65, 
farmer 6. 

McGan, Wm., (Phoenix, Oswego Co.,) lot 
TO, farmer 10. 

McHuren. Lewis L., (Baldwinsville.) lot 
89, farmer 67. 

McHURON, LYMAN, (Baldwinsville,) lot 
89, farmer 84. 

McKeon, William, (Baldwinsville.) lot 90, 
farmer. 

McKIERNAN, HUGH, (Little Utica,) car- 
riage trimmer and farmer 12. 

McMachan, Isaac V. V., (Clay,) lot 82, far- 
mer 110. 

McNamara, Daniel, (Baldwinsville,) lot 89, 
farmer 50. 

MELOLING. AUGUSTUS, (Baldwinsville,) 
l<>t 68, laborer. 

MERRIFELD, ALFRED J., (Lysander,) 
lot 35, cooper and farmer. 

Merrifickl, Amos, (Lysander,) lot 35, far- 
mer 4,%. 

MERPJFIELD, HASTINGS, (Little Utica,) 
lot 46. farmer 70. 

Merrill, Elder, (Lysander,) lot 43, Presby- 
terian minister and farmer 50. 

Merrill, George, (Little Utica,) lot 46, far- 
mer 4. 

Miles, Daniel, (Baldwinsville,) lot 66, far- 
mer 36. 

MILES. PHEBE A., (Lamsons,) lot 40. 

Miles, Wm. H., (Lamsons,) lot 40, farmer 3. 

Miller, James, (Lamsons,) lot 41, farmer 
20. 

Milliman, Augustus, (Clay,) lot S3, farmer 
105. 

MILLIMAN, MYRON O, (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 89, farmer 105. 
'.ILLIMAN, OSCAR R., (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 87, farmer. 

Milliman, Samuel, (Baldwinsville,) lot 94, 
farmer 22. 

MILLIMAN, WAIT, (Baldwinsville,) lot 
86. farmer 122. 

MILLS, CULLEN C, (Baldwinsville,) lot 
76, farmer 32. 

Mills, Edmond, (Plainville,) lot 74, farmer 
leases 140. 

MILLS, HARVEY, (Plainville,) fanner 106. 

MORLEY, ELI K., (Lysander,) lot 4S, far- 
mers. 

MORLEY, MARSHALL W., (Baldwins- 
ville,) lot 76, farmer 36. 

MOREY, MOSES, (Lamsons,) lot 56, far- 
mer 100. 

Moul, Garrett, (Baldwinsville,) lot 77, far- 
mer 88. 

MOUNT, HENRY B., (Lysander,) lot 35, 
farmer 90. 
O 






MOYER, DANIEL D., (Baldwinsville,) lot 
95, farmer 140. 

MOYER, OLIVER, (Baldwinsville,) lot 89, 
farmer 40. 

Mulharan, Patrick, (Baldwinsville,) lot "A, 
farmer 50. 

Muncy, John, (Baldwinsville,) lot 90, far- 
mer. 

Munger, Curtis, (Little Utica,) lot 38, black- 
smith. 

Murphy, Margaret, (Baldwinsville.) lot 60, 
farmer 7. 

Myres, Philip, (Lamsons,) lot 48, farmer 43. 

Neal, Harrison, (Plainville,) lot 73, farmer 
6. 

NORTHROP.JACOB AUGUsTUS*(Lysan- 
der,) lot 52, farmer 90. 

Northrop, Rufus R., .Lysander,) lot 52, far- 
mer 16. 

NORTON, JABEZH., (Plainville,) lot 73, 
merchant and attorney at law. 

NORTON, J. V., (Plainville,) lot 83, farmer 
130. 

Norton, Lyman, (Plainville,) lot 73, capital- 
ist. 

O'Brien, Thomas, (Phcenix, Oswego Co.,) 
lot 70, farmer 36. 

O'Donal, James, (Phcenix, Oswego Co.,) lot 
71, farmer 20. 

Onderkirk, Benjamin, (Little Utica,) lot 46, 
farmer 18. 

Onderkirk, Elizabeth, (Little Utica,) lot 46, 
farmer 30. 

ONDERKIRK, PONTA, (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 76, farmer 50. 

OSBORN, ADOLPHUS B., (Plainville,) 
lot 91, farmer 113. 

OSBORN, ALBERT I., (Lysander.) black- 
smith. 

OSBORN, DAVID, (Plainville,) lot 92, 
farmer 100. 

Osborn, James, (Baldwinsville,) lot 69, far- 
mer 2. 

OSBORNE, MARY JANE, (Plainville,) lot 
91. farmer. 

PALMER, BEHM, (Lysander,) lot 57, far- 
mer 115. 

Palmer, Charles H., (Little Utica,) lot 46, 
farmer 3. 

Palmer, Jesse, (Little Utica,) lot 45, farmer 
21. 

PALMER, JESSE B., (Baldwinsville,) lot 
57, farmer 168. 

PALMER, LEVI, (Lamsons,) lot 38, farmer 
175. 

PALMER, MELVIN P., (Lysander,) lot 36, 
farmer 116. 

PALMER, NATHANIEL, (Little Utica,) 
lot 46, stone mason and farmer 44. 

Palmer, Onias L., (Lamsons,) lot 57, far- 
mer 28. 

Palmer, Peter, (Little Utica,) lot 36, farmer 
26. 

Pardee, John. (Lysander,) lot-54, farmer 50. 

PARISH, SHELDON M., (Baldwiusvile,) 
lot 90, farmer 55. 

PARK, CURTIS, (Baldwinsville,) lot 90, 

farmer leases 530. 
Parlin, George, (Baldwinsville,) lot 68, far- 
mer leases 100. 
Patchett, John, (Baldwinsville,) lot 58, far- 
mer 78. 
Patterson, John W., (Lysander,) lot 43, far- 
mer. 



248 



ONONDA OA CO UNTY B USINESS DIRECTOR Y. 




% 




% 




o. 1 Kimber Block, 



On Warren Street, Syracuse, N. Y., 



Keeps constantly on hand a full assortment of 





RUBBERS AND GAITERS, 

For Gentlemen's, Ladies' and Children's Wear, 

adapted to the wants of the city and 

country trade. 



Boots and Shoes of all descriptions manufactured to order or from measure by com- 
petent workmen, and satisfaction guaranteed in all cases. 

Repairing Promptly Done, at Reasonable 
Prices. Remember the Location, 



No. 1 WARREN STREET, 



Three Doors North of the Post Office, across the Canal. 



W. C. SILLIMAN 



LYSANDER. 



249 



Paul, Jaber L., (Plainville,) lot 73, tavern 

keeper. 
Peacock, John, (Baldwinsville,) lot 90, far- 
mer 40. 
Peck, Almon, (Lvsander,) lot 44, farmer 3. 
PECK & BROWN, (Lysander,) (Truman 

Peck and Ovid 0. Brown,) lot 43, plow 

dealers and iron founders. 
PECK, TRUMAN, (Lysander,) (Peck & 

Brown.) 
Peckham, Wm. II., (Baldwinsville,) lot 60, 

farmer 82. 
PEDLEY, JOHN, (Baldwinsville,) lot 81, 

farmer 30. 
PELLETT, ABEL, (Baldwinsville,) lot 67, 

farmer 47. 
PENDERGAST, STEPHEN, (Phoenix, 

Oswego Co.,) lot 61, farmer 1100. 
PERKINS, ERASTUS B., (Little Utica,) 

lot 45, farmer 47. 
Perkins, J. Edward, (Baldwinsville,) lot 68, 

farmer. 
Perkins, Lewis F., (Little Utica,) lot 45, 

carpenter and farmer. 
PETERSON, JOHN, (Plainville,) lot 92, 

farmer leases 100. 
Pettit, Louisa R., (Baldwinsville,) lot 100, 

farmer 100. 
PETTIT, THOMAS H.,(Baldwinsville,) lot 

100, farmer. 
PIERCE, STEPHEN V., (Lamsons,) lot 39, 

farmer 55. 
Pitcher, David, (Baldwinsville,) lot 65, far- 
mer. 
Pitcher, Joseph, (Baldwinsville,) lot 67, 

farmer. 
Pooler, John, (Lysander,) lot 52, farmer 50. 
Porter, David, (Clay,) lot 71, farmer 283. 
PORTER, HENRY W., (Baldwinsville,) 

lot 65, fanner. 
Porter, John, (Phcenix, Oswego Co.,) lot 

42, farmer 20. 
PORTER, LYDIA H., (Clay,) lot 71. 
Porter, William, (Baldwinsville,) lot 65, 

farmer 110. 
Post, Elry K., (Baldwinsville,) lot 70, far- 
mer 125. 
POTTER, ELIHU, (Clay,) lot 61, farmer 39. 
POTTER, GEORGE B., (Baldwinsville,) 

lot 81, farmer 7. 
Potter, Hiram K., (Clay,) lot 82, carpenter. 
Powell, Orsamus. (Clay,) lot 82, farmer 50. 
Pritchard, Daniel S., (Lamsons,) lot 49, 

farmer 25. 
Pyrie, James, (Clay,) lot 82, boatman. 
Rathbon, Wm. R., (Lamsons,) lot 48, far- 
mer 30. 
Redfield, Henry S. Rev., (Phoenix, Oswego 

Co.,) lot 42, Presbyterian clergyman. 
Reed, Alfred, (Phoenix, Oswego Co.,) lot 42, 

farmer. 
REED, WM. H., (Phoenix, Oswego Co.,) 

lot 50, farmer 40. 
Remington, Wm., (Baldwinsville,) lot 59, 

farmer 5. 
RICE, AUGUSTUS M., (Little Utica,) lot 

47, laborer. 
Rice, Dennis P., (Little Utica,) lot 47, far- 
mer 65. 
Roach, Thomas, (Phoenix, Oswego Co.,) 

lot 42, farmer leases 342. 
Robinson, Alvin, (Baldwinsville,) lot 69, 

farmer 10. 
ROBINSON, HOSEA, (Baldwinsville,) lot 

94, farmer 149. 



Root, George, (Baldwinsville,) lot 68, far- 
mer 32. 

Root, Isaiah, (Baldwinsville,) lot 68, farmer 
90. 

Root, Josiah Jr., (Baldwinsville,) lot 68, 
farmer 33. 

Root, Luther, (Lamsons,) lot 49, farmer 61. 

ROWELL, MAJOR E., (Plainville.) lot 65, 
farmer 101. 

Ruff, Thomas, (Plainville,) lot 83, farmer 
leases 116. 

Rubs, Harvey H., (Little Utica,) lot 54, far- 
mer 100. 

RUSSELL, ALLEN, (Baldwinsville,) lot 
89, farmer 20. 

Russell, Norman, (Baldwinsville,) lot 82, 
farmer 65. 

Ryan, James, (Phcenix, Oswego Co.,) lot 
50, farmer 10. 

Salone, John, (Baldwinsville,) lot 59, far- 
mer 50. 

Salone, Patrick, (Baldwinsville,) lot 69, 
farmer 96. 

Sayles, Darius, (Plainville,) lot 96, farmer. 

SCHENCK, BENJ. B„ (Plainville.) lot 73, 
post master, physician and surgeon. 

SCHENCK, H. L., (withlrvin V. Schenck,) 
(Plainville,) lot 73, farmer 160. 

SCHENCK, IRVIN Y.,(withH. L.Schenck,) 
(Plainville,) lot 73, farmer 160. 

Schenck, James, (Plainville,) lot 73, farmer 
96. 

SCHENCK, JOHN, (Plainville,) lot 73, far- 
mer 258. 

Schenck, John S., (Plainville,) lot 83, far- 
mer leases 180. 

SCHENCK, RULEF, (Plainville,) lot 72, 
farmer 130. 

SCHERMERHORN.CATHARINE, (Lysan- 
der,) lot 34. 

Schermerhorn, Henry G., (Lysander,) lot 34, 
farmer 90. 

Scofield, Manassa B., (Plainville,) lot 73, 
farmer 95. 

Scott, Frederick, (Plainville,) lot 73, stone 
mason. 

Scott, James, (Plainville,) lot 73, shoe 
maker. 

Scott, John, (Plainville,) lot 73, stone 
mason. 

Seager, William, (Plainville,) lot 73, house 
painter. 

Sellick, James, (Baldwinsville,) lot S9, far- 
mer 30. 

Sennet, Michael, (Baldwinsville,) lot 65, 
farmer 2. 

Seward, James C, (Clay,) lot 88, farmer 43. 

SHARP, HENRY, (Lamsons,) lot 38, farmer 
160. 

Shay, Thomas, (Baldwinsville,) lot 60, far- 
mer 30. 

SHELDON,ALBERT S. CAPT., (Baldwins- 
ville,) lot 65, farmer 50. 

Shonltz, John, (Lysander,) lot 44, farmer 2. 

Shrubb, Edward. (Plainville,) lot 98, farmer. 

Shrubb, John, (Plainville,) lot 98, farmer 
70. 

SHRUBB, JOHN JR., (Plainville,) lot 96, 
farmer 104. 

Silkworth, John, (Clay,) lot 82, boatman. 

SIMMONS, MARY M., (Lysander,) lot 64, 
farmer. 

Slado, Charles, (Phcenix, Oswego Co.,) lot 
70, farmer 6. 



250 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



COBB, HERRICK * CO., 

Phoenix Foundry & Machine Works, 



MANUFACTURE 




Stationary and Portable, 

MACHINERY FOR WOOD, 

FLOUR & SALT MILLS, CASTINGS AND 
GENERAL JOBBING, 

117 to 123 East Water Street, 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



2*!*if»i # 




#> 





Tlie Best Styles or Forms of Letters, 

H ; L 



IID« 





A 



Ul 




f 



WITH EMBLEMS OF ANY KIND, 



Or Letters in Gold or Colors, with beautiful Borders, or LAND- 
SCAPE and FIGURES. GRAINING in Imitation of WOOD 
OR MARBLE. PHOTOGRAPHS Painted in Oil 
or Water Colors, by 

Wm. S. Segar, Artist, 

No. 71 East Genesee St., 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



LYSAXDER. 



251 



Slauson, Darius, (Baldwinsville,) lot 69, 
farmer 28. 

Slauson, Harvey, (Lysander,) lot 44, farmer 
92. 

Slauson, John, (Lysander,) lot 44, farmer 
70. 

Slauson, Stephen D., (Baldwinsville,) lot 
89, farmer 31. 

Slocnm, Stephen, (Lysander,) lot 44, far- 
mer 37. 

SMALLEY, PERRY J., (Lamsons,) lot 47, 
butcher and farmer 80. 

SMITH, ALFORD, (Lysander,) lot 44, far- 
mer 14. 

Smith, Bunj., (Lysander,) lot 44, farmer 
150. 

SMITH, CHARLES, (Lysander,) lot 44, 
farmer 150. 

SMITH, DANIEL G., (Plainville,) lot 83, 
farmer 150. 

SMITH, EDWIN M., (Lysander,) lot 35, 
farmer 130. 

SMITH, JOHN, (Baldwinsville,) lot 97, far- 
mer 200. 

SMITH, L. L., (Baldwinsville,) lot 81, far- 
mer leases 150. 

SMITH, PHLNEAS, (Plainville,) (Bowen, & 
Smith.) 

SMITH, RICHARD L., (Lysander,) (Smith 
c6 Sutfin,) supervisor, justice of peace 
and post master. 

SMITH & SUTFIN, (Lysander,) (Richard 
L. Smith and David Sutfln,) lot 44, 
tanners. 

SMITH, THOMAS D., (Little Utica,) lot 
45, farmer 83. 

Snow, Thomas, (Baldwinsville,) lot 60, far- 
mer 100. 

Snyder. Robert C, (Little Utica,) lot 46, 
farmer 70. 

Soule, Joseph, (Little Utica,) lot 46, mail 
carrier. 

Southard, Harvey, (Lysander.) lot 44, far- 
mer 61 . 

SPRAGUE, BENJ. D., (Plainville,) lot 92, 
farmer 75. 

Spratt, John, (Lvsander,) farmer. 

Start, Irvin, (Baldwinsville,) lot 60, far- 
mer 100. 

Start, Isaiah, (Baldwinsville,) lot 70, farmer 
100. 

Stevens, Andrew, (Little Utica,) lot 37, far- 
mer 64. 

STEVENS, ELIZUR E., (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 59, farmer 83. 

Stone. D. D., (Plainville,) farmer. 

STONE, MINNIE, (Plainville,) lot 91, far- 
mer 160. 

Stone. Oliver, (Lvsander,) lot 52, farmer 4S. 
SUTFIN, DAVID, (Lysander,) (Smith & 

Sutfin.) speculator. 
Sulivari, Richard Capt., (Plainville,) lot 73, 

farmer 7. 
Swatman, John, (Baldwinsville,) lot 66, 

farmer 7. 
' Tator. James, (Plainville,) lot 91, farmer 

280. 
TEALL, CHARLES, (Lysander,) lot 34, 

farmer 48. 
xEALL, COMBS A., (Lysander,) lot 34, 

farmer 50. 
TEMPLE, HENRY, (Lysander,) lot 34. 
Temple, Nancy, (Lysander,) lot 34, farmer 3. 



Thompson, Henry R., (Lamsons.) lot 48, 
farmer 20. 

Thompson, M. S., (Lamsons,) station keep- 
er, merchant and post master. 

TILLOTSON, COLLINS H., (Lysander.) 
lot 44, farmer. 

TILLOTSON, SANFORD P., (Plainville.) 
lot 92, farmer 100. 

Town, David G., (Lysander,) lot 35, black- 
smith. 

TOWN, JAMES W., (Plainville,) lot 73, 
hotel prop, and farmer. 

Town, Orrin S., (Plainville,) lot 72, farmer 
177. 

Trapp, Uriah, (Lamsons.) lot 49, farmer 50. 

Tucker, Edward, (Baldwinsville,) lot 89, 
farmer 70. 

Tucker, Frank, (Baldwinsville,) lot 89, far- 
mer. 

TUCKER, SEMUN, (Baldwinsville,) lot 89, 
farmer 66. 

TURNER, SAMUEL, (Plainville,) lot 84, 
farmer leases 140. 

TWINAM, GEORGE, (Baldwinsville,) lot 
82, farmer 107. 

UPSON, BENAJAH C, (Plainville,) lot 73, 
farmer 140. 

Upson, Geo. W., (Plainville,) lot 63, farmer 
129. 

Upson, Linus P., (Plainville,) lot 62, farmer 
123. 

Upson, Miles, (Plainville,) lot 73, farmer 63. 

Upson, Orlando, (Plainville,) lot 62, farmer 
163. 

Vanderveer, Electa, (Lysander,) lot 62. far- 
mer 150. 

Vanderveer, Shuler, (Lysander,) lot 52, far- 
mer 56. 

Van Dorn, Lewis, (Little Utica,) lot 37, far- 
mer 56. 

Van Dosen, Edward C, (Lysander,) lot 44, 
farmer 60. 

Van Dusen. Charles, (Baldwinsville,) lot 59, 
farmer 9. 

Van Dusen, Geo. H., (Baldwinsville,) lot 
70, farmer 88. 

Van Liew, John P., (Lysander.) lot 44, far- 
mer 95 . 

Vannatten, Aaron, (Phcenix, Oswego Co.,) 
lot 42, farmer 108. 

Van Wie, Peter, (Little Utica,) lot 46, shoe- 
maker. 

Veder, Lucius, (Plainville,) lot S3, farmer 
leases 114. 

VINCENT, WILLIAM, (Baldwinsville.) 
lot 93, farmer 68. 

Voorhees, James, (Plainville,) lot 74, farmer 
197. 

Voorhees, Malon D., (Baldwinsville.) lot 
59, farmer 75. 

Wagoner, Jacob, (Plainville,) lot 64, farmer 
18. 

WALKER, WILLIS PARRY, (Baldwins- 
ville.) lot 87, farmer 50. 

Wall, John Jr., (Phoenix, (Oswego Co.,) 
lot 42, lumberman and farmer. 

Ward, Hiram, (Plainville.) lot 84, farmer 73. 

Ware, Calvin. (Little Utica,) lot 46, farmer 2. 

WATKINS, THOMAS M., (Baldwinsville.) 
lot 81, farmer 63. 

WEED, HENRY. (Lysander,) lot 44, farmer 

WELLS. WARNER D., (Baldwinsville.) 
lot 79, farmer 118. 



252 



L YSANDER—BALD WINSVILLE. 



Wheeler, Alvin, (Little Utica,) lot 36, far- 
mer 60. 

Whitbeck, George W., (Baldwins ville,) lot 
66, farmer 10. 

"Wilcox, Cheney, (Lamsons,) lot 41, farmer 
50. 

WILCOX, ISAAC, (Baldwinsville,) lot 59, 
farmer 50. 

WILCOX, ROXY, (Lamsons,) lot 41, far- 
mer. 

WILES, D. MONROE, (Baldwinsville,) lot 
76, farmer 100. 

Williams, Codington B., (Lamsons,) lot 49, 
farmer 170. 

Williams, Eliza, (Baldwinsville,) lot 68, far- 
mer 43. 

WILSON, DAVID, :(Plainville,) lot 91, far- 
mer 100. 

Wilson, David D., (Lamsons,) lot 48, far- 
mer 40. 

Wilson, John S., (Baldwinsville,) lot 68, 
farmer 30. 

WILSON, WM., (Plainville,) lot 84, farmer 
132. 

Wilson, Wm. L., (Baldwinsville,) lot 68, 
farmer 70. 

Wilton, Abner Rev., (Plainville,) lot 73, 
Christian minister. 

Winchell, Erastus, (Lysander,) lot 52, far- 
mer 28. 

Winchell, Hezekiah, (Lysander,) lot 44, 
painter and paper hanger. 

Winchell, W. C, (Lysander,) lot 44, general 
merchant. 

WOOD,PETER F.,(Lamsons,)lot 40,farmer 
40. 

Woodroff, John, (Little Utica,) lot 45, far- 
mer 4. 

WOODROFF, MERRIT N., (Clay,) lot 82, 
farmer 101. 

WOODS, CHARLES, (Clay,) lot 82, farmer 
222 

WOOSTER, BARCLAY, (Lysander,) {Brit- 
ton & Wooster.) 

Wooster, Darius, (Lysander,) lot 44, far- 
mer. 

Worden, Leander, (Lamsons,) lot 49, far- 
mer 51. 

Worden, Liberty, (Lamsons,) lot 41, far- 
mer 211. 

WORMTJTH, SOLOMON, (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 77, farmer 105. 

WORTZ, CONRAD, (Plainville,) lot 99, 
painter. 

Wright, Lewis, (Lamsons,) lot 49, farmer 

Yeomans, Calvin, (Phoenix, Oswego Co.,) 
lot 42, boat builder. 

Yoset, Peter, (Baldwinsville,) lot 59, far- 
mer 19. 

Yoset, Simon, (Baldwinsville,) lot 86, far- 
mer. 

Yosit, Florance, (Clay,) lot 82, farmer 50. 

Youngs, James, (Little Utica,) lot 45, shoe- 
maker. 



BALDWINSVILLE. 
(VILLAGE.) 

£P£IS S v£; A -' cloth ing merchant. 
ALDEN, GEO. D., (Tappan, Tucker & Co.) 



Allen, H. Y. Major, prop, of flour mill. 
AMERICAN HOTEL, Andrew Coborn, 

prop. 
Amos, Jacob, pearl barley manuf. (P. O. 

address Syracuse.) 
AVERY, FRANKLIN P., wagon maker 

and farmer 100. 
Baker, Henry, miller. 
Baker, James, tin ware and stove dealer. 
Baldwin, F. T., agent for Kelley's patent 

cultivator. 
Baldwin, I. M., hardware dealer. 
Baldwin, Sylvester, gardener. 
Barnes, Jerome, iron moulder. 
Beaucamp, W. M. Rev., pastor Episcopal 

church. 
Betts, S. W., (Heald, Siseo <& Co.) 
BIGELOW, GUSTAVUS A., capitalist and 

farmer. 
BIGELOW, PAYNE, capitalist and farmer. 
Bisdee, Edward, (Bisdee & Strahl.) 
Bisdee, Samuel, speculator and farmer 150. 
Bisdee, Sidney, retired butcher. 
Bisdee & Strahl, (Edward Bisdee and 

Phillip Strahl,) butchers. 
BLISS, C. N., (Fuller & Bliss.) 
Boley, John, gardener. 
Bolton, James, shoe maker and collector of 

village taxes. 
BOLTON, JAMES H., printer. 
Bowman, Laura E., milliner. 
Brown, Seth, cabinet maker. 
Buck, Lafayette, carriage painter. 
Buck, Nathan, carriage painter. 
Burdick, Isaac, carpenter and joiner. 
BURDICK, ISAAC K. E., carpenter and 

joiner and school teacher. 
Bush, Lewis, retired farmer. 
Bush, R. D., (James Frazee & Co.) 
Candee, Asa, cooper. 

CARPENTER, W. L., proprietor of Rail- 
road House. 
CARTER, WARNER J., carpenter and 

joiner. (P. O. address Clay.) 
Casson, O. H., blacksmith. 
CHASE, G. T., marble works. 
Cheney, L. H., principal of Baldwinsville 

Academy. 
Chittenden, D. D., patent right agent. 
Chittenden, Samuel M., carnage maker and 

trimmer. 
Church, H. M. Rev., pastor of M.E. church. 
Church, Marcus M., boarding house. 
Clany, Andrew, cooper. 
*CLARK, JAMES M., editor and publisher 

of Onondaga Gazette. 
CLEVELAND, HARVEY, prop, of Globe 

Hotel. 
Clough, Adam, millwright. 
COBORN, ANDREW, prop, of American 

Hotel. 
Cook, James, railroad baggageman. 
Coon, Emma Mrs., (with Mrs. Nellie Mc- 

Cabe,) milliner. 
CORNELL, HIRAM, Oswego & Syracuse 

railroad agent. 
CROSS, OTIS, farmer. 
CUSHNO, SAMUEL A., millwright. 
Davis, Joshua B. Major, assistant keeper 

of State prison, Auburn. 
DENIO, E., agent for Otsego fork mills. 
DIXON, ISAAC, (Fitzgerald & Dixon.) 
Dodge, Charles, carpenter and joiner. 
Donavan, Denis, shoe maker. 



BALD WINS YILLE. 



253 



DONOVAN, MICHAEL, dry goods clerk. 
Douglas, Norton, axe temperer at Morris 

Axe and Tool Co. 
Downer & Co., (W. W. Downer and J. E. 

Downer,) general merchants. 
Downer, J. E., {Downer & Co.) 
Downer, W. W., {Downer & Co.) 
Dunbar, Seth, tinner, retired from business. 
Earll, Artemas, retired farmer. 
Eaton, Nelson, blacksmith. 
EGLESTON, LEWIS, {Hilton & Egleston.) 
Elliott, George, miller. 
Ellison, George, sash, door and blind maker. 
Emerich, Abram, retired farmer. 
EMERICK, CORNELIUS M., laborer. 
Esmel, John, cartman. 
EXCHANGE HOTEL, Stephen C. Fan- 

cher, prop. 
Fairbanks, Irvin, repair foreman at Otsego 

Fork Mills. 
FANCHER, ALANSON, (Fancher & Ham- 
ill.) 
FANCHER & HAMILL, (Alanson Fancher 

and Alexander Hamill,) druggists. 
FANCHER, RANSON J., carriage maker. 
FANCHER, STEPHEN C, prop, of Ex- 
change Hotel. 
Fancher, William, mason. 
FEEK, A. J., horse dealer and proprietor 

of saloon. 
Feeny, Patrick, pedler. 
FINK, JEREMIAH, blacksmith. 
First National Bank of Baldwinsville, Jas. 
Frazee, President; D. C. Greenfield, 
Vice President; P. L. Perine, Cashier. 
Fitzgerald, Andrew, shoemaker. 
FITZGERALD, DANIEL J., {Fitzgerald 

& Dixon.) 
♦FITZGERALD & DIXON, (DanielJ. Fitz- 
gerald and Isaac Dixon,) general mer- 
chants. 
Flint, L. V., homceop. physician and sur- 
geon. 
FRAZEE, B. C. & Co., (B. C. Frazee and 
James Yorhees,) groceries and provis- 
ions. 
FRAZEE, BENJ. C, {B. C. Frazee & Co.) 
Frazee, D. W. & Co., {David TT\, John 0. 

and James,) flour mill proprietors. 
Frazee, David W., {D. W. Frazee & Co.) 
Frazee. Horace J., book-keeper at woolen 

mill. 
Frazee, James & Co., {James Frazee, Kiroy 
West and R. D. Bush,) props, of Union 
Mills. 
FRAZEE, JAMES, (D. W. Frazee & Co.,) 
prop, woolen mills, and President of 
let National Bank of Baldwinsville. 
Frazee. John O., {D. W. Frazee & Co.) 
FULLER & BLISS, {Wm. Fuller and C.N. 

Bliss,) sash, door and blind manuf. 
FULLER, WM., {Fuller & Bliss.) 
GLOBE HOTEL, Harvey Cleveland, prop. 
Goble, Milton, carpenter and joiner. 
Godard, A. W., house painter. 
Goit, Norman, retiredfarmer . 
GREENFIELD, DEWITT C, (Greenfield 
& White,) vice president 1st National 
Bank of Bald winsyme. 
♦GREENFIELD & WHITE, {Dewitt C. 
Greenfield and N. M. White,) attorneys 
and counselors at law. 
Gridley, James, house painter. 
Hall, George, justice of the peace. 



Ham, Reuben, house painter. 

♦HAMILL, A. P. & CO., {Alex. P. and 

Eugene.) lumber dealers. 
HAMILL, ALEXANDER P., {A. P. Hamill 

& Co.) 
HAMILL, ALEXANDER, {Fancher & 

Hamill.) 
HAMILL, EUGENE, {A. P. HamiU & Co.) 
Hand, Parley, carriage painter. 
HARDER, NICHOLAS, retired farmer. 
Hasler, Anthony, pensioner. 
HAWLEY, HARVEY, (Hawley & Quivey.) 
HAWLEY & QUIVEY, {Harvey Haivley 
and Stephen S. Quivey,) general mer- 
chants. 
HAX, JOHN, grocer, baker and prop, of 

brick vard, owns 4 acres. 
HEALD, GEO. W., (Heald, Sisco & Co.) 
HEALD, SISCO & CO., {Geo. W. Heald, 
L. D. Sisco and S. W. Betts,) machinists 
and pump makers. 
Hess, Mathias, carpenter and joiner. 
HICKOK, ELISHA, owns farm 80. 
HIGHRITER, D. H., shoe maker. 
HILTON & EGLESTON, {Richard Hilton 

and Lewis Egleston,) blacksmiths. 
HILTON, RICHARD, {Hilton & Egleston.) 
Hosier, Alexander, sawyer. 
Howard, Oscas S., flour mill prop. 
Howe, Wm., wagon maker. 
Hubbard, Isaac, cooper. 
Hurley, Patrick, farmer 5. 
Husted, Wm., miller. 
JESSUP, BERTRAND D., harness maker 

and prop, of livery stable. 
JONES, BYRON W., tailor. 
♦JONES, EDWIN A, prop, of livery sta- 
ble. 
Jones, James, cartman. 
EAULBACH, JOHN J. & Co., prop, of 

tannery. 
Kaulbach, Wm., tanner and currier. 
KENDALL, J. V., allop. physician and 
surgeon. __, 

KENYON, CHARLES G., {Eenyon & Tl d- 

liams.) (Kenyan <& Co.) 
Kenyon & Co., (Chat. G. Eenyon, John S. 
Eenyon, Peter Mumford and J. P. 
Shumway,) paper mill company. 
Kenyon, John S., (Kenyon <t Co.) 
KENYON & WILLIAMS, (Chas. G. Ken- 
yon and Irvin Williams,) prop*, of 
stone mill. 
Kimberly, Oliver, book-keeper. 
Kinney, Delos, cooper. 
KINNEY, PATRICK, shoemaker. 
Lee, Wm., butcher. 
Lindsday, Wm., mason. 
Lockwood, Edward P., carpenter and join- 
er. 
LUC KEY, GEO. N., jeweler. 
Lusk. George, blacksmith. 
LUSK, WILLIAM, deputy sheriff and con- 
stable. 
Lynn, Isaac, cooper. 
Many, Wm. A., fork drawer. 
Martin, Charles, wagon maker. 
MARVIN, FRED. A., attorney at law and 

claim agent. 
Man-in, Henry, poor master, constable and 

owns farm 80. 
McCabe, Nellie Mrs., {with Mrs. Emma 

Coon,) milliner. 
McCLENTHEN, M. N., barber. 



254 



ONONDA GA CO UNTY B VSINE88 DIRECTOR T. 






U 









Ti 







DEALER IN 



Rosewood, Mahogany & Black Walnut, 

Parlor Furniture, 

ALSO, FEATHERS & FEATHER BEDS, 



6 Washington Block, Syracuse, N. Y. 



BALDWINSYILLE. 



255 



McColloff, Michael, track master. 

McDonald, E., carriage and ornamental 
painter. 

McGAHEN, E. A., printer. 

Merrill. S. P. Rev., pastor Baptist church. 

Molumby, Michael, cooper. 

Montague, Martin, carpenter and joiner. 

Morris Axe & Tool Co., capital stock, $80,- 
000 ; president, Geo. F. Comstock, Sy- 
racuse ; vice president, Thos. D. Green, 
Syracuse ; treasurer, W. P. Morris ; 
trustees, J. M. Jaycox, Thos. D. Green, 
Geo. P. Comstock, H. D. Morris and 
George Hawley ; superintendent, H. D. 
Morns ; selling agent, H. A. Hatch. 

Morris, Daniel, miller. 

Morris, H. D.. trustee and supt. of Morris 
Axe and Tool Co. 

Morris, James W., (nom de plume, " K. N. 
Pepper,") author and contributor. 

Morris, W. F., secretary and treasurer of 
Morris Axe and Tool Co. 

Mosher, Lyman, carpenter and joiner. 

Muraford. Peter, (Kenyon & Co.) 

MUNROE, KIRBY C, farmer. 

Myneer, Frank, cooper. 

NEWCOMB, DANIEL W., commercial 
traveler, owns farm 190. 

Norden, Amaziah, tanner and currier. 

Norton, Dudley D., capitalist. 

Nunencamp, Christian, farmer 2. 

O'Brien, James, trackman. 

♦ONONDAGA GAZETTE, (weekly,) Jas. 
M. Clark, editor and proprietor. 

Orvis, Artimas, miller. 

OTSEGO FORK MILLS, E. Denio, agent. 

Papworth, Amos, butcher. 

Parks, Horace, carpenter and joiner. 

PARSONS, DANIEL, retired farmer. 

PEET, JOSHUA, cooperage foreman for 
James Frazee & Co. 

Penn, John, iron molder. 

PERINE, P. L., cashier of 1st National 
Bank. 

PERKINS, J. W., (White * Perkins.) 

PERKINS, W. W. Dr., dentist. 

PERRY, F. H., superintendent of woolen 
mill company. 

Perry, Homer, machinist. 

Pettitt, Rufus D. Capt., inventor and com- 
mander of Pettit's battery during the 
Rebellion. 

Porter, Sealon, clock repairer. 

Presley, Frank, shoemaker. 

Presley, Frank, Mrs. milliner. 

Prouty, Horace, axe grinder. 

Pyer, Truman, temperer at Otsego Fork 
Mills. 

QUACKENBUSH, PETER I., groceries 
and provisions. 

Quinlan P.. .(Quinlan & Young.) 

Quinlan & Young, (P. Quinlan and D. M. 
Young,) saloon keepers. 

Quivey, Stephen S., (Hawley & Quivey.) 

RAIL ROAD HOUSE, W. L. Carpenter, 
prop. 

Reed. Peter, groceries and provisions. 

REMINGTON, JOHN, lumber dealer, (P. 
O. address Oswego, Oswego Co.) 

Richardson, R., tailor. 

Rightson, John, miller. 

Ringe, Charles, sash, door and blind maker. 

Robertson, John, axe grinder, (foreman.) 

RODGERS, HENRY, wood turner. 



Ruggles, Shephard, mason. 

Sanborn, Wallace, miller. 

Scoville, Charles, sawyer. 

SCOVILLE, JOHN M., gents fumit-. 1 
goods and confectionery. 

SEAMONS, J. C, (Seamotis & St. Peters.) 

SEAMONS & ST. PETEKS, (./. C. Sea- 
mom and Henry St. Peters,) barbers. 

Sharp. P. H., retired farmer. 

SHUMWAY, J. P., (Kenyon & Co.) allop. 
physician and surgeon. 

Sims, John W., farmer 150. 

SISCO, L. D., (Heald, Sisco & Co.) 

SKINNER, JOHN T. & JAMES A., gen- 
eral merchants. 

Slauson, Joseph, retired farmer. 

Smith, George, house painter. 

Smith, Hyatt, wagon maker. 

Smith, Isaac, carpenter and joiner. 

SMITH, JAMES G., dealer in groceries, 
provisions, boots and shoes. 

SMITH, MILES, millwright. 

Smith, Nathan, retired farmer. 

S PAULDING, BURNS, house painter. 

STOCKTON, THOMAS A., manuf. and 
dealer in boots and shoes. 

Storer, N. B., carpenter and joiner. 

ST. PETERS, HENRY, (Seamons & St. 

Strahl, Phillip, (Bisdee & Strahl.) 
Sulivau, H. P., book keeper at OtBegO 

Fork Mills. 
Sydam. S. C, druggist. 
Tabor, Charles, carpenter and joiner. 
Taggart, Niram, horse trainer. 
Taggart, O. N., prop, of Faro Bank 
TAGGART, SANFORD D.. laborer. 
Talmage, Isaac, retired farmer. 
TAPPAN, HARVEY, farmer 43. 
TAPPAN. TUCKER & CO.. (Wallace 7 '..■/>- 

pan, Edward W. Tucker and George 7). 

Alden,) dealers in leaf tobacco, lime, 

coal and produce. 
TAPPAN, WALLACE, (Tappan. Tucker 

& Co.) 
Tappan, Wm., iron moulder. 
Taylor, W. H., harness maker. 
Taylor, William, tanner and currier. 
Thayer, Stephen B.. blacksmith. 
TOLL, DE WITT C, livery stable prop. 

and sheriff of Onondaga Co. 
TUCKER, EDWARD W., (Tappan, Tuck, r 

& Co.) 
Turner, DeWitt, sash, door and blind ma- 
ker. 

Virginia, Daniel, blacksmith. 
VORHEES, JAMES, (B. C. Frazee <t Co.) 
Vosburgh, Lagrange, carpenter and Joiner. 
Walker. Addie Mrs., milliner. 
WALLACE, JONAS C. B., physician and 

surgeon. 
Wallace, Linens A., farmer 80. 
WARNER, LEWIS E., cabinet maker and 

dealer. 
Weaver, Marshall, carpenter and ioimr. 
Weller, Chester B., carpenter and joiner. 
Wells, Allen T., farmer 58)*. 
Wells, James B., millwright. 
Wells, James F., physician and surgeon. 
West, Kirby, (James Frazee A Co.) 
Westfall, Henry, retired farmer. 
Wetherbv, Heber, prop, of flour mill. 
WETHERBY, THEODORE.retired farmer. 



256 



ONONDA GA CO UNTY B USINESS DIRECT OB Y. 



EDWIN A.. JONES, 

LIVERY STABLE, 

North Side of the River, 




N, I 

Keeps the best of Horses and Carriages. Will furnish good Horses and Carriages for 
Funerals and Excursion Parties, at reasonable prices. 

JOHNSON BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Fresh Fish, Oysters, Lobsters, Clams, 

Salt, Pickled and Smoked Fish, Ac, 

Store, No. 4 James Street, anfl 65 & 67 E, Genesee Street, 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



®^JklWW@^Jk 



e 



-♦♦-♦- 



Cor. Washington & Clinton Streets, 

Entrance on Clinton, Syracuse, IT. Y., pays 
particular attention to the Treatment of 
Chronic Diseases & Diseases of Wo- 
men & Children. 



CARVER AND DESIGNER 

Carving of Every Description, Scroll Sawing, Decorations for 

Churches and other buildings. Also, all kinds of Rich 

Furniture made to Order. 

Cor. Butternut & Townsend Sts., Syracuse, N. Y. 



BALD WINSVILLE-MANL1VS. 



257 



•WHITE, N. M., {Greenfield A White,) law- 

WHITE & PERKINS, (Warren S. White 
and J. W. Perkins,) iron founders, car- 
riage makers, manufacturers of plows 
and cultivators. 

WHITE, WARREN S., (White & Perkins ) 
WHITNEY, C. H., photograph artist, 
WIDRIG, DAVID P., groceries and pro- 
visions. 

Widrig, Horace W., saloon keeper. 
Widrig, Jonathan, retired blacksmith. 
Wilcox, Harmon, miller. 
WILDMAN, G. & C, dealers in stoves and 
tinware. 



WTLDMAN, WATSON, confectionery and 

news dealer. 
Wilkins, D. S., clothing merchant andpoBt 

master. 
Wilkins, William L., prop, of flour mill. 
Williams, Horace, farmer 17. 
WILLIAMS, IRVIN, (Kenyan & Williams.) 
WILSON, GEO. W., tinware and stove 

dealer. 
Woodford, Charles, axe temperer. 
WOODWORTH, F., (J. F. Woodworth A 

Son.) 
*WOODWORTH, J. F. & SON, general 

merchants. 
Young, D. M., (Quinlan & Young.) 
Youngs, Smith, traveling agent. 



(Post Office Addresses in Parentheses.) 



Abbott, James L., (Manlius,) groceries and 

provisions. 
ADAMS, H. T., (North Manlius,) lot 16, 

school teacher and farmer 18. 
ALBERT, GILBERT, (Manlius,) lot 100, 

farmer 112. 
Allen, F. H., (Fayetteville,) hair dresser, 

Beard Hotel. 
Allen, N. D. , (Kirkville,) lots 57 and 59, 

farmer leases 265. 
Anguish, Eliza, (Chittenango, Madison Co.,) 

lot 69, farmer 112. 
APPLEGATE, EDWIN, (Fayetteville,) 

manuf. of bedsteads in the white, Man- 
lius. 
Argetsinger, Michael, (Chittenango, Madi- 
(with Margaret Ellis, ) lot 89, 



(Manlius Center,) 



son Co.,) 

farmer 68 
Armstrong, Charles L, 

lot 54, farmer 76. 
Armstrong, Ethan, (Fayetteville,) lots 55, 

56 and 65, produce broker and farmer 

209. 
Auringer, Harrison A., (Collamer,) general 

merchant. 
AUSTIN, WM., (Fayetteville,) (Wells & 

Austin.) 

AVERY, ALLEN H., (Manlius,) lot 96, far- 
mer 205. 
Babcock, Hersey, (Fayetteville,) tobacco 

and cigars, Beard block. 
Baird, Charles, (Manlius Station,) engineer 

N. Y. C. R.R. 
Baird, Henry L., (Manlius Station,) engin- 
eer N. Y.C. R. R. 
BAKER, CHAS., (Fayetteville,) homeop. 

physician and surgeon, Genesee. 
BAKER, JOSEPH, (Manlius,) justice of 

the peace and general merchant. 
Baldwin, Allen,(Chittenango, Madison Co.,) 

lots 69 and 79, farmer. 
Baldwin, Otis, (Chittenango, Madison Co.,) 

lots 69 and 79, farmer. 



Ball, M. Rev., (Kirkville,) pastor of 1st M.E. 
church. 

BALL, SILAS, Rev., (Manlius Station,) 
clergyman of 1st M. E. church, also 
Grand Worthy Chief Templar. 

Ballou, A., (Kirkville,) harness maker. 

BALSLEY, ADDISON, (Fayetteville,) lot 
85, farmer 30. 

BALSLEY, EDWIN R., (Fayetteville,) 
(with Eugene,) lot 76, musician and 
farmer. 

BALSLEY, EUGENE, (Fayetteville.) (with 
Edwin R.,) lot 76, musician and farmer. 

Balsley, Wm., (Fayetteville,) lot 85, farmer 
30. . . , 

Bangs, C. L. Miss, (Fayetteville,) principal 
of Fayetteville Seminary. 

BANGS, ELI T., (Fayetteville,) lot 64, far- 
mer 96. 

Bangs & Gaynor, (Favetteville,) (Reuben 
H. Bangs and Edward Gaynor,) props, 
of lime and plaster mill. 

Bangs, Myron, (Fayetteville,) lot 74, far- 
mer. 

Bangs, Reuben, (Fayetteville,) (Bangs A 
Gaynor.) 

Barnes, Russel, (Kirkville,) lot 49, props, 
of grocery and provision store and la r- 

Barney, George, (Fayetteville,) watches 
and jewelry, agent for sewing machines, 
Genesee. 

BARNUM, MARTIN T., (Manlius,) har- 
ness and trunks. 

Bartlett, David & Son, (Kirkville,) (Lor- 
ance,) lot 36, fanners 38. 

BARTLETT, DELANCEY, (Fayetteville.) 
(Bartlett & Eaton) ) 

BARTLETT & EATON, (FayetteTille. 
(DeLancey Bartlett and Hervey Eaton.) 
druggists, dealers in clothing, books 
&c, Genesee. 



258 



MANLIUS. 



Bartlett, Lorance, (Kirkville,) (David Bart- 
lett & Son.) 

Basley, Joseph, (Manilas Station,) lot 34, 
trackman and farmer 16. 

BEARD, B. C. & H., (Fayetteville,) (Beech 
C. and Huntington,) general merchants 
and props. Spring Flouring Mill, Gene- 
sec 

BEARD, BEECH C, (Fayetteville,) (B. C. 
& H. Beard,) (Beard & Penfield.) 

BEARD & CROUSE, (Fayetteville,) (Henry 
L. Beard and Robert Crowe,) manuf. 
of paper, mill. 

BEARD, DAVID, (Manlius,) lot 98, farmer 
27. 

BEARD, HENRY L., (Fayetteville,) (Beard 
& Grouse.) 

BEARD, HUNTINGTON, (Fayetteville,) 
(B. 0. & H. Beard.) 

BEARD & PENFIELD, (Fayetteville,) 
(Beech C. Beard and JohnN. Penfield,) 
foundry and machine shop. 

Beard, Spencer, (Fayetteville,) lot 97, far- 
mer 64. 

Bell, Ashbel, (North Manlius,) farmer 117. 

Bell, Jasper, (Kirkville,) lot 57, farmer 31. 

BELL, LUCIUS, (North Manlius,) farmer 
leases 49. 

Bell, Silas, (Kirkville,) lot 48, farmer 159. 

Bender, John & Son, (Fayetteville,) (John 
Jr.,) lots 67 and 77, farmer 100. 

Bender, John Jr., (Fayetteville,) (John Ben- 
der & Son.) 

Bender, Julius, (Manlius,) lot 89, farmer 
125. 

Bender, Lester, (Fayetteville,) lot 53, far- 
mer leases 50. 

Bcrgin, John, (Manlius Center,) lot 24, far- 
mer 13%. 

BETTINGER, JOHND., (Manlius,) (Rus- 
sel & Bettinger.) 

Black, Joseph, (Manlius Station,) lot 35, 
farmer 28. 

BLANCH ARD, IRA L., (Fayetteville,) lot 
64, fanner leases 200. 

BLANCHARD,LEWIS,(Fayetteville,)clerk 
and musician. 

BLANCHARD, ORLOWD., (Fayetteville,) 

(Burhans, Blanchard & Co.) 
BLANCHARD, WM. F., (Manlius,) lot 87, 

farmer 151. 
Bliss, Aaron, (Manlius Station,) lot 25, far- 
mer 26. 
Bloomfield, Joseph, (Fayetteville,) storage 

and forwarding. 
BLOSS, SOLOMON, (Manlius,) lot 78, far- 

nier lenses 134. 
BOYD, JAMES, (Fayetteville,) mason. 
BOYD, JAMES, (Collamer,) lot 13, farmer 

85. 
Boylston, Edward, (Fayetteville,) lot 97, 

farmer 50. 
Boynton, I. L., (Manlius Station,) (Boynton 

& Worden.) 

Boynton & Worden, (Manlius Station,) (I. 
L. Boynton and C. A. Worden,) props, 
of marble works. 

BREED, MARY A., (Fayetteville,) lot 77, 
farmer 70. 

Bristol, Justice, (Kirkville,) lot 38, farmer 
110. 

Bristol, Robert S., (Kirkville,) lot 49, far- 
mer 29. 



BROOKS, CASPER, (North Manlius,) lo 

16, farmer 40. 
Brosseau, McEl, (Manlius,) blacksmith. 
Brown, George, (Kirkville,) (with Jas. A., 

lots 37 and 38, general merchant an< 

farmer 127. 
Brown, Helen, (Kirkville,) teacher. 
Brown, Henry, (Fayetteville,) cooper shop 

Genesee. 
Brown, Jacob H., (Kirkville,) lots 48 anc 

57, fanner 56 
Brown, James A., (Kirkville,) (withGeorge, 

lots 37 and 38, general merchant anc 

farmer 127. 
Brown, J. L., (Kirkville,) lot 57, farmer 20( 

and leases 115. 
BROWN, JOHN, (Fayetteville,) steair 

bending and spoke manuf., carpentei 

and builder. 
Brown, Lucinda Mrs., (Fayetteville,) lot 

64, dress and cloak maker. 
Brown, T. W., (Kirkville,) blacksmith. 
Bullion, George, (Manlius Station,) lot 14 

farmer 38. 
Burgan, Philip, (Manlius Station,) lot 14.' 

farmer 60. 
♦BURHANS, BLANCHARD & CO., (Fay-, 

etteville,) (Daniel Burhans, Orloio D\ 

Blanchard and Henry iV. Burhans A 

lumber dealers, props, saw mill, manu4 

facturers of sash, blinds and doors, 

mill. 1 

BURHANS, DANIEL, (Fayetteville,) (Bur\ 

hans, Blanchard <& Co.) 
BURHANS, HENRY N., (Fayetteville,) 

(Burhans, Blanchard & Co.) 
Burnett, Luther, (Manlius,) lot 89, farmer 

122. 
Burney, J. L., (Fayetteville,) stone mason. 
Burney, John, (Fayetteville,) lot 75, mason 

and farmer 4. 
Burr, Benjamin, (Manlius Centre,) lot 45, 

boatman and farmer 150. 
Bush, Alonzo F., (Manlius Centre,) agent 

for Western Transportation Co. 
Buss, Wm., (Kirkville,) lot 59, prop, of saw 

mill and farmer 3. 
Buss, Wm. E., (Chittenango, Madison Co.,) 

sawyer. 
Butcher, Adam, jr., ("Manlius Station,) lot 

34, engineer N. Y. C. R. R. and farmer 

75. 
Butcher, Adam, (Manlius Station,) baggage 

man N.Y.C.R.R. 
Butcher, Adam, (Manlius Station,) lot 34, 

farmer 75. 
Butcher, Joseph, (Manlius Center,) lot 26, 

farmer 25. 
BUTTS, GEO., (Manlius,) lot 99, farmer 

100. 
BUZZELL, N. M., (Manlius,) lot 87, far- 
mer 3. 
BYINGTON, FRANCIS M., (Fayetteville,) 

physician and surgeon. 
Cachert, Augustus, (Manlius Station,) lot 

33, farmer 24. 

CADWELL, ROWLAND, (Manlius,) lot 

97, farmer 94. 
Call, Dennis, (Fayetteville,) lot 78, farmer 

12. 
Carhart, Nicholas, (Manlius Station,) lot 

34, farmer 26. 

Carhart, Peter S., (Collamer.) manuf. of 
Carhart's Cultivators and farmer 88. 



MANL1US. 



259 



CARR. CLINTON T.. (Manlius Station.) 
ticket agent and telegraph operator. 

Carr. Parker S., (Fayetteville,) (Gardner & 
Carr.) 

Carr, T. W., (Kirkville.) hotel keeper and 
dealer in groceries and provisions. 

Carter, Birney, (Collamer,) lot 6, farmer 20. 

Casler. Frederick, (Fayetteville,) lot 97, far- 
mer 60. 

CASS, HEZEKIAH, (Chittenango, Madi- 
son Co.,) lot 89, farmer 85. 

Castle. Peter, (Manlius Center,) hotel keep- 
er and carpenter. 

♦CENTRAL NEW YORKER, (Fayette- 
ville.) editor and prop. F. A. Darling. 

Ceou, Angeline, (North Manlius,) lot 15, 
fanner 37. 

Ceon, George, (North Manlius,) lot 15, far- 
mer 79. 

Champlin. Geo. J., (Manlius.) prop. Syra- 
cuse, Fayetteville, Manlius aud Caze- 
novia Stage line, daily, leaving Syra- 
cuse (Candee hotel,) 3 p. m. and Caze- 
novia 7 a. m. 

Champlin & Moulter. (Manlius,) (Hiram 

ihmtter and, Champlin,) props of 

stage line. 

Chandler, Simeon, (Fayetteville,) butcher. 

Chapman, Eliza Mrs., (Fayetteville,) tailor- 
ess, Genesee. 

CHAPMAN, JOHN F. & CO., (Fayette- 
ville,) (John F. and Thomas D.,) lot 37, 
nurserymen, fruit growers and farmers 
150. 

CHAPMAN, NATHAN R., (Fayetteville,) 
lawyer, Genesee. 

CHAPMAN, THOMAS D., (Fayetteville,) 
(John F. Chapman & Co.) 

Chase. Amasa, (Fayetteville.) lot 64, mason. 

CHASE, AMOS W., (Fayetteville,) fore- 
man at Scoville & Eaton's dry dock. 

CHASE, MARVLN, (Fayetteville,) ship 
carpenter. 

CHENEY, STEPHEN, (Manlius,) (Preston 
Cheney & Snook.) 

Chiler, Sebastian, (Manlius Station,) lot 23, 
farmer 3. 

Chipp, Nicholas, (Kirkville.) lot 35, far- 
mer 60. 

CLARK. AMBROSE. (Fayetteville,) lots 
64. 66 and 76. farmer 415. 

CLARK. JAMES H., (Fayetteville,) lot 74, 
farmer 40. 

Clark, O. L., (Fayetteville,) lot 68, farmer 
53. 

Clement, Ozias, (Manlius Center,) lot 45, 
farmer 205. 

CLOCK, CHRISTIAN, (Manlius,) lot 100, 
farmer 30. 

Coburn, Byron, (Kirkville,) lot 48, grocery 
and provision store and farmer 4, 

COE, E. A., (Kitkville,) lots 48 and 49, far- 
mer 116. 

Cole.Chas. M., (Kirkville,) lot 38, mason 
and farmer 121. 

Cole, C. E. Miss, (Fayetteville,) music 
teacher, Genesee. 

Cole, G. & Bro., (Manlius.) (George and 
Oscar,) stoves and tin ware. 

Cole, Geo., (Manlius,) (G. Cote & Bro.) 

Cole, Oscar, (Manlius,) (G. Cole d-Bro.) 

COLLIN, DAVID, Jr., (Fayetteville.) lots 
55. 66 and 76, prop, of saw mill and 
shingle machine, and farmer 410. 



(Manlius,) (Conk- 



Commane, Bridget Mrs., (Manlius.) lot 98, 
farmer 6. 

Comstock. Marcia Miss, 
lin & Comstock.) 

Conklin & Comstock Misses, (Manlius.) 
(Jane Conklin, Marcia Comstock,) mil- 
linery and dress making. 

Conklin, Jane Miss, (Manlius.) (Conklin & 
Comstock.) 

Conway, Richard, (Fayetteville,) black- 
smith, Genesee. 

Cook, Duane, (Manlius,) lot 88, farmer 77. 

Cook, Frank, (Manlius Center,) lot 24, far- 
mer 29. 

Cook, George A., (Kirkville.) lot 48, farmer 
80. 

Cook, Helen, (North Manlius,) school 
teacher. 

Cook, P. D., (Kirkville,) wholesale dealer 
in Yankee notions and cigars. 

Cook, Peter, (North Manlius, ) lot 15, far- 
mer 14. 

COOK, WM. G., (North Manlius,) lot 16, 
stock grower and farmer 223, 

Coonrad, George, (Manlius Station.) lot 35, 
farmer 45. 

Coonrood, Maggie A., (Manlius Station,) 
school teacher. 

Cornish, Barnard, (Manlius Center.) lot 33, 
blacksmith and farmer 8. 

CORNISH, HENRY, (Manlius.) (Iladley <(• 
Cornish.) 

CORNUE, DANIEL L., (Fayetteville,) lot 
85, farmer 70. 

Corson, Romelia, (Manlius Station,) school 
teacher. 

Costello, James. (Oran.) lot 100, farmer .VS. 

COSTEiXO, JOHN, (Manlius,) Bpringgrist 
mill. 

Coulter, John, (Manlius.) lot 88, farmer 

Countryman, Paul, (Manlius Centre.) (Ler- 
den. & Co.) 

Cramer, Jacob, (Manlius Station.) engineer 
N. Y. C. R. R. 

Critendon, Albert. (Manlius Centre, i lot 1.1, 
station agent Buffalo aud Troy Towing 
Companv, and farmer 50. 

Cropsey, Smith D., (Kirkville.) lots 57 and 
58, farmer 165. 

CROSS. EARTHER. (Kirkville.) farmer. 

Cross, Ebenezer, (Kirkville.) lot K farmer 

CROSS, J. C, (Fayetteville.) groceries and 

provisions, cor. Genesee and Mill. 
CROUSE, ROBERT, (Fayettei ille.) [fitord 

& Crouse.) ,„ , 

Comings, Chas. C. Mrs., (Fayetteville.) lot 

97, ""farmer 12X- 
Cumings, Delos, (Collamer.) lot b, teamster 

and farmer 15. 
Cumings, M., (Manlius,) lot 90, fanner U»8- 

Curtis, John, (Fayetteville.) prop, of Tem- 
perance House, Genesee. 

Curtiss, Joshua C, (Fayetteville.) gate 

keeper Manlius plank road. 
Curtis, Palmer H, (Manlius,) lot 97, farmer 

Daharsii. Peter, (Manlius Centre,) dealer in 

o-roceries and provteioi 
DAMON. J. H.. (Manlius Centre.' general 

merchant and deputy post master. 
Darlhi". Aaron. (North Manlius,) lot 15, 

mauuf. of butter tubs and farmer 40. 



260 ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Chas. Tremain & Co., 



MANUFACTURERS OP 



RAG - BOOK, NEWS, TEA AND! 



WRAPPING 








Ordinary Sizes constantly on Hand. 



DEALERS IN 



COTTON& WOOLEN RAGS 



iSSBSffil MAKIIUS, V. y. 



MANLIUS. 



261 



♦DARLING, F. A., (Fayetteville,) editor 
and prop, of Fayetteville Recorder and 
Central New Yorker. 

DARLING, M. Z., (North Manlius,) lot 15, 
farmer 10. 

Davidson, James, (Manlius Center,) lot 54, 
boatman and farmer 3. 

Davis, Rolland, (Fayetteville,) lot 53, far- 
mer 50. 

Davharsh, John, (Kirkville,) lot 50, farmer 
226. 

Dean, David B., (Kirkville,) lot 37, farmer 
2$ 

DECKER, DAVID H., (Fayetteville,) (J. 
t fi D. H. Decker.) 

DECKER, J. & D. H., (Fayetteville,) (Jtre- 
7niah and David H.,) cabinet makers 
and undertakers. 

DECKER, JEREMIAH, (Fayetteville,) (/. 
<fc D. H. Decktr.) 

Delany, Andrew, (North Manlius,) lot 16, 
farmer 20. 

Delany, James H., (North Manlius,) lot 36, 
farmer 29. 

Delany, Martin, (Kirkville,) lot 37, farmer 2. 

Delany, Sarah E., (Kirkville,) school teach- 
er. 

Delany, Wilber, (Kirkville,) lot 37, hotel 
keeper and farmer 60. 

Deshwav, John, (Manlius,) lot 88, farmer 45. 

DEVENDORF, NELSON, (Fayetteville,) 
lot 97, farmer 96. 

Dewey, D. J., (North Manlius,) post mas- 
ter and general merchant. 

Dively, John, (Manlius,) lot 88, farmer 8. 

Doble, Nicholas, (Manlius Center,) lot 2, 
farmer 18. 

DOMINICK, ALVAH, (Kirkville,) (David 
Dominick & Sons.) 

DOMINICK, DAVID & SONS, (Kirkville,) 
(Geo. F. and Alvah,) lot 37, cheese 
manuf., breeders of Morgan and Dragon 
horses and farmers 250. 

DOMINICK, GEORGE F., (Kirkville,) (Da- 
vid Dominbck & Sons.) 

Drum, Catherine, (Collamer,) lot 24, farmer 

74. 
Duel, Abner, (Fayetteville,) lot 85, farmer 

8. 
Duell, E., (Manlius,) post master and cabi- 
net maker. 
Duffey, James P., (Kirkville,) broom maker. 
DUNHAM, RUFUS Jr., (Manlius,) lots 68 

and 99, farmer 60. 
Duplessis, Louis, (Manlius,) boot and shoe 

Eastman, Nelson, (Manlius,) lot 97, farmer 
3. 

Eaton, Aaron, (Manlius Centre,) carpenter. 

Eaton, D. H., (Fayetteville,) lot 74, farmer. 

EATON, H., (Fayetteville,) cashier of the 
National Bank of Fayetteville. 

EATON, HERVEY, (Fayetteville,) (Bart- 
lett & Eaton.) ■ . 

EATON, L. H., (Fayetteville,) (Scomllf & 
Eaton.) 

Eaton, Ward, (Manlius Centre,) lot 54, far- 
mer 37. , 

Eaton, Wm., (Fayetteville,) prop, of gro- 
cery and provision store. 

Eb, Peter, (Manlius Station,) lot 2o, farmer 
28 

Ecker,' Ezeriah, (Manlius Center,) lot 26, 
farmer 25. 



Ecker, Henry, (Fayetteville.) merchant tail- 
or and post master, Beard Block, Gen- 

ECKER' JOHN A., (Fayetteville.) tele- 
graph operator W. U. Telegraph, in 
Post office. 
EDDIN, EDWARD, (Fayetteville.) farmer. 
Eddy, Seneca, (Manlius Center,) lot 46, far- 
mer 190. 
EDWARDS, H., (Fayetteville.) president 
of the National Bank of Fayetteville. 

Edwards, Samuel L., (Manlius,) lot 98, law- 
yer (not practising,) prop, of 2 saw 
mills and cider mill, manuf. of English 
cheese and farmer 200. 

Edwards, Wm., (Fayetteville,) boots and 
shoes, Mill. 

ELDREDGE, HARRIET M. MISS, (Fay- 
etteville,) milliner. 

ELDREDGE, MARY A. MRS., (Fayette- 
ville.) lot 96, farmer 6. 

Ellis, Margaret, (Chittenango, Madison 
Co.,) (with Michael Argetainger,) lot 89, 
farmer 68. 

Enders, Balthuo, (Manlius,) lot 88, farmer 
55. 

Erkenbeck, F., (Fayetteville,) lot 49, far- 
mer 54. 

Estes, Alexander, (Manlius,) lot 96, farmer 
150. 

Estes, Daniel, (Manlius.) lot 96, farmer 6. 

Evans, Arad, (Fayetteville,) lot 64, farmer 
65. 

EVERINGHAM, GEO., (Fayetteville.) 
plaster and lime miller. 

EVERINGHAM, WALTER, (Fayetteville,) 
blacksmith. 

EverBon, David, (Kirkville.) lot 59, farmer 
11. 

Everson, David J., (Manlius,) lot 89, far- 
mer 125. 

Everson, Henry, (Manlius.) farmer leases 2. 

Evinson, Wm., (Manlius,) lot 88, fanner 
160. 

Fabing, Casper, (Manlius Station,) lot 25, 
blacksmith and farmer 77. 

Fabing, John,(Manlius Station,)blacksmith. 

Fargo, Daniel, (Manlius,) machinist.. 

FAUTH, IGNATIUS, (Manlius Station.) 
prop. Fauth's Hotel and supervisor of 
2d Ward, Syracuse. 

Fay, Laybolt, (Manlius Station,) baggage 
man N.Y.C.R.R. „_ m 

FAYETTEVILLE OOTTAOB, (Fayette- 
ville,) Wilson J. Merritt. prop. 

♦FAYETTEVILLE REL't I EIDER, i Fayette- 
ville,) F. A. Darling, editor and proprl- 

Feasenmyre, Peter C, (North Manlius.) lot 

16, carpenter and joiner and tanner 17. 
Field, Charles, (Manlius,) lot 97, gardener 

4. 
File, Andrew, (Kirkville.) shoemaker. 
Fillmore, Henry C, (Manlius.) fanner 111 
Filinore, William, (Manlius Centre.) retired 

farmer. , , 

Fischer, Christopher, (Manlius Station.) lot 

25, farmer 8. 
Fisher, Eugene, (Manlius Station,), lot 34. 

butcher and farmer 3. 
FISHER, GEO. E., (Fayetteville,) (Fisher 

(t Palz.) tannery. 
FISHER, J. E., (Manlius Station.) farmer 

leases 75. 



26! 



ONONDA GA COUNTY B USIXESS DIRECTOR Y, 



AVIS & VEDDER, 

HARDWARE 




HOUSE FURNISHING 

GOODS, 

Agents for Amer- 
ican Hot-Air Cook 
Stove, Stewart's 
Oven Parlor Stove 

and ILawson's Im- 
proved Furnace. 

77 South Salina St., Washington Block, 

Syx-sto'U.ise, 3NT. "ST. 



Sash & Blinds, 



MANUFACTURED BY 




URHANS, BLANCH ARD& CO, 

Fayetteville, N. Y. 



, ^T pressed Matched Flooring, Ceiling. Skiing and Seasoned Pine Lumber, Lath 
and Shingles, constantly on hand, at a small advance from Oswego prices. Planing, 
Sawing and Job Work done with dispatch. Hemlock Lumber on hand or Sawed to Or- 
der. CASH paid for Saw Logs. 

E"?f° All orders promptly attended to. A liberal discount made to Wholesale Deal- 
ers and Master Builders. 



D. BURIIANS. 



O. D. BLANCHARD. 



H. N. BURHANS. 



OX OX DA GA COUXTY BVSIXESS DIRECTORY. 



363 



WM.S.MOORHEAD'S 

FIRE AND LIFE 



Insurance Agency 

No. 3 Wieting Block, Syracuse, N. Y. 



} 




Agent for the following well known and reliable Fire Insurance Com- 
panies : 

FULTON, of N. Y., - - Capital $300,000 

LORILLARD, of N. Y.,Capital $1,000,000 

Liverpool, London and Globe, 

Capital $16,000,000 

All kinds of Farm Property insured in the LORILLARD Insurance I .-. for 

three or five years, at the lowest rates. 

Also Afent for the old 

MANHATTAN LIFE INSTJKANCE CO., 

CAPITAL OVER $4,000,000. 

fW Policies issued by this sound Company on the Life, Endowment, or Ten Year 
plan, at reduced rates. 



CAfcMAGS MANWACTOfcY, 




lyUMISIER, WAGONS of all sizes and of the best quality kept constantly o 
hand. Those wishing a first rate, durable and easy running wagon, will find it for their interest t 
call and see them. All orders for wagons will be filled as low as if attended to personally. 

Buggies, Platform Spring Wagons and Cutters 

MADE BY 

J±. CATELY <fc CO.. 

And Warranted all Right. 



Fisher, Jobst F., (Manlius Station,) lot 26, 
farmer 75. 

Fisher. J. H., (Manlius Station,') merchant 
tailor and dealer in general merchan- 
dise. 

FISHER & PALZ, (Fayetteville,) (George 
E. Fisher and John Palz,) boots and 
ehoee, Genesee. 

Fister, John, (Manlius Centre,) wagon ma- 
ker and farmer 83. 

Fitch, Bell, (Fayetteville,) school teacher. 

Fitzgerald, John, (Manlius,) lot 89, farmer 
35. 

FLATTERY & MORGAN, (Fayetteville,) 
(Thomas Flattery and Andrew Mor- 
gan,) meat market. 

FLATTERY, THOMAS, (Fayetteville,) 
(Flattery & Morgan.) 

Flics, Joseph, (North Manlius,) lot 47, far- 
mer 80. 

Folley, Mike, (Fayetteville,) lot 53, farmer 
50. 

FONDA, ELMIRA Mrs., (Fayetteville,) lot 
85, farmer 5. 

Fonda, Peter C, (Fayetteville,) lot 96, far- 
mer 3. 

Fout, Chas., (Manlius Station,) lot 42, sub 
station agent and farmer ZJ4. 

Franz. Joseph, (Manlius Center,) lot 24, 
farmer 4 . 

French, Edward, (Kirkville,) lots 48 and 
57, farmer 157. 

Frese. Jacob, (Manlins Station,) lot 14, far- 
mer 80. 

Frey, James, (Manlius Station.) lot 25, far- 
mer 3. 

Fricss, Jacob, (Manlius Station,) lot 25, 
farmer 70. 

Fngh, Fohn, (Kirkville,) carpenter and 
joiner. 

FULFORD, ROBERT, (Fayetteville,) lot 
75, farmer 14. 

Fulmer, William, (Manlius Station,) lot 35, 
farmer 40. 

GAGE, HENRY H., (Fayetteville,) general 
merchant, Genesee. 

Gale, Josephine G., (Fayetteville,) school 
teacher. 

Gardner & Carr, (Fayetteville,) (Lyman C. 
Gardner and Farter S. Carr,) law- 
yers and insurance agents, Beard block. 

Gardner, Lyman C, (Fayetteville,) (Gard- 
ner & Carr.) 

Gardner, Sylvester C, (Fayetteville,) lots 
56, 57 and 67, farmer 400. 

Garien,, Christian, (Manlius Station,) lot 35, 
farmer 35. 

Gatover, John, (Manlius Station,) lot 36, 
fanner 12. 

Gaylord, Patrick, (Fayetteville,) farmer 10. 

Gaynor, Edward, (Fayetteville,) (Bangs & 
Gay nor.) 

GAYRLNG, JOHN, (Manlius Station,) car- 
penter. 

Geutter, Martin, (Manlius Station,) tailor. 

Gerthover, Oliver, (Manlius Station,) lot 33, 
farmer 132. 

Gillett, Nathaniel M., (Fayetteville,) lot 74, 
farmer. 

GILLETT, NORMAN, (Ma nlm8 -). cheese 
box manuf., prop, planing mill, and 
brick and tile manuf. 

Gillson, Frank E., (Manlius,) prop, of Man- 
lius Hotel. 
P 



Gilmor, Andrew T., (Fayetteville,) justice 
of the peace, Genesee. 

Goatfoot, Nicholas, (Manlius Center.) lot 
35, farmer 18. 

GOODFELLO W, CHAS. C, (Fayetteville,) 
lot 85, farmer 150. 

GOODFELLO W,ICHABOD, (Fayetteville.) 
lot 75, cider mill, lime kiln and farmer 
20. 

GOODFELLOW, JOHN, (Fayetteville,) 
lot 75. farmer leases 70. 

Goodfellow, Win., (Fayetteville,) lot 33, 
farmer 27. 

Goodrich, Susan A., (Fayetteville,) confec- 
tionery, fruits &c. 

Gott, Austin, (North Manlius,) lot 14, far- 
mer 22&. 

GRAHAM, DAYID H., (Fayetteville,) (D. 
H. <ft X. Graham. ) 

GRAHAM, D. H. & M., (Fayetteville,) (Da- 
vid H. and Miles,) carriage makers,. 
Genesee, 

GRAHAM, MILES, (Fayetteville,) (D. H. 
<fc M. Graham.) 

Graley, Alfred A. Rev., (Manlius,) Presby- 
terian minister. 

GTaves, J. H., (Manlius Station,) allop. phy- 
sician. 

Gray, Henry, (Collamer,) lot 24, farmer 50. 

Green, Geo. S., (Fayetteville,) prop, of saw 
ac d plaster mill. 

Green, Jarib, (Kirkville,) carpenter. 

Gridley, Daniel W., (Kirkville,) lots 57 and 
68. farmer 300. 

GROVE, HORACE, (Fayetteville,) billiard 
room, Genesee. 

Gulick, Samuel F., (Fayetteville,) lot 75, far- 
mer leases 32. 
GUNN, WINSOR W., (Manlius,) carriage 

maker. 
Haas,. Casper, (Manlius Station,) lot 25, 

farmer 24X . 
HADLEY & CORNISH, (Maiilius,) i Theo- 
dore D. Hadley and Henry Cornish.) 
general merchants. 
HADLEY, THEODORE D., (Manlius.) 

(Hadtty & Cornish.) 
♦HALE, CHANCEY H., (Fayetteville.) 

prop. Hale's Hotel. 
HALE. CHANCEY H.,Mrs., (Fayetteville,) 

millinery, Genesee- 
Hale, Mark, (Manlius.) lot 89. farmer 181. 
♦HALE'S HOTEL, (Fayetteville,) Chancey 

H. Hale, proprietor. 
Halstead, Parsons, (Kirkvillo.) lot 36, shoe- 

maker and farmer 12. 
Hamblln, Richard, (Manlius,) let 88, farmer 

6. 
Hamilton, James, (Collamer,) lot 24, farmer 

12. 
HAMLIN, JEROME B., (Manlius.) (J.Ham- 
lin <k Son.) 
HAMLIN, JOSHUA, (Manlius,) (J. Hamlin 

<f- Son.) 
HAMLIN, J. & SON, (Manlius.) (Jyhua 
& Jerome B.,) grist and flouring mills. 
Harr, Jacob, (Manlius Station,) lot 25, far- 
mer 40. 
Harrington, Chauncy. (North Manilas,) lot 
26. assessor and farmer 150, and leases 
100. 
HARRIS, THOMAS, (Manlius,) (Wood- 
work, WMttuy <t- Harris.) 



■ ■"■■""•* — -- 



266 



MANLIUS. 



HART, CHAS., (Manlius,) lot 76, farmer 90. 

Hart, Joseph, (Manilas,) ,prop. of stage 

ronte between Manlius ,.fend Manilas 

Station. 

HARTER, DARIUS, (Manlius Station,) 

agent and prop, of Scott's Mower and 

Reaper Grinders. 

Harter, James, (Manlius Center,) lot 64, 

farmer 22. 
Harter, Patrick, (Kirkville,) lot .36,- farmer 

40. 
Hatch, Revillo C, (Fayetteville,) (Hatch & 

Wells.) 
Hatch & Wells, (Fayetteville,) (Revillo O. 
Hatch and Justus Wells,) grist and 
pearl barley mills. 
Hauser, Wm., (Manlius Center,) lot 55, far- 
mer 70. 
Hazard, Theodore, (Manlius Station,) lot 

13, farmer 2. 
Hazard, Timothy, (North Manlius,) farmer 

leases 9. 
Heefer; Catherine Mrs., (Manlius Station,) 

lot &5, farmer 58. 
Heifer, Joseph, (Manlius Station,) saloon 

keeper. 
Helmer, John, (Manlius,) blacksmith and 

farmer 60. 
Hemens, Thomas, (Fayetteville,) lot 96, 

farmer 18. 
Hendricks, Chas., (Manlius,) lot 93, farmer 

>0. 
Herbener, Joseph, <Manlius Center,) lot 26, 

farmer 115. 
Herbert, Michael, {Kirkville,) lot 36, far- 
mer 7. 
HIBBARD, JAMES MRS., (Fayetteville,) 

tailoress. 
HICKSON, CHAS. S., (Fayetteville,) groce- 
ry and provision dealer, eclectic phy- 
sician and surgeon. 
HILDRETH, DAVID, (Fayetteville,) lot 67, 

farmer 25. 
Hill, George M., (Manlius Centre,) lot 45, 

farmer leases 56. 
Hinds, Ellen Mrs., (Kirkville,) farmer 8. 
HINSDELL, HENRY D., (Manlius,) (Ro- 

tenbu?-y & HinsdeU.) 
HOAG, ABRAM, (Fayetteville,) harness 

and trunks. 
Hoag, Alonzo, (Kirkville,) shoemaker. 
Hoag, Charles, (Kirkville,) shoemaker and 

flour dealer. 
Hoag, Joseph, (Kirkville,) post master and 

justice of the peace. 
HOAG, R. N., (Kirkville.) (Kinne & Hoag.) 
HODGE, JOHN C, (Fayetteville,) (Hodge 

& Tibbitts.) 
HODGE & TIBBITTS, (Fayetteville,) (John 
C. Hodge and Walden A. Tibbitts,) gen- 
eral merchants, Genesee. 
Hodgman, Harrison, (Manlius Station,) lot 

33, farmer leases 75. 
Hodgman, Mary, (Manlius Center,) lot 33, 

farmer 75. 
Hoffenden, Emma A„ (Syracuse,) school 

teacher. 
Holly, Jrhn, (Manlius Centre,) lot 48, far- 
mer 28. 

HOPKINS, BENJAMIN F., (Manlius,) (H. 
Hopkins & Son.) 

HOPKINS, HIRAM, (Manlius,) (H. Hop- 
kins & Son.) 



HOPKINS, H. & SON, (Manlius,) (Hiram 
and Benjamin P. ,) carriage manufactur- 
ers. 

Houghton, J. F., (CoHttmer,) lot 33, farmer 
137. 

House, Rufus, jr., (North Manlius,) lot 14, 
wholesale and retail dealer in three 
thorn locust hedge plauts, also farmer 
135. 

House, W. A., (Fayetteville,) lots 76 and 
87, farmer 141. 

Howe, D., (Coilamer,) lot 24, farmer 48. 

Hoyt, Wm. M., (Manlius Station,) lot 46, 
farmer 50. 

Hubble, Levi, (Chittenango, Madison Co.,) 
lots 69 and 79, farmer. 

Hudson, Mahlon A., (North Manlius,) pro- 
duce dealer. 

Hughes, John B., (Kirkville,) carpenter. 

Hughes, Rowland, (Kirkville,) carpenter. 

HULBURT, JULIUS K., (North Manlius,) 
lot 36, farmer 50 and leases 135. 

Hullar, George, (Manlius Station,) lot 25, 
farmer 40. 

Huntley, Enoch, (Fayetteville,) lot 54, far- 
mer 50. 

HUTCHINS, JAMES N., (Fayetteville,) 
lot 65, hop grower and farmer 58. 

Jackson, Nelson H., (Manlius,) blacksmith. 

Johnson, Byron C, (Kirkville,) patent right 
agent and farmer 47. 

JOHNSON, EDWARD, (Fayetteville,) 
(Northup <fe Johnson.) 

Johnson, James M., (Manlius,) lot 8j, far- 
mer 90. 

Johnson, Peter, (Fayetteville,) lot 65, far- 
mer 21. 

Jones, Ira, (Manlius Center,) constable. 

Jones, John R., (Fayetteville,) lot 64, 
machinist, owns Z%. 

Joslin, Harvey, (Chittenai.go, Madison 
Co.,) butcher. 

JUNE, SEYMOUR A., (Fayetteville,) car- 
riage manuf. 

Jurden, Benjamin W., (Kirkville,) mason. 

Karker, David, (Manlius Station.) wood 
sawyer on N. Y, C. R. R. 

Karker, Eliza Mrs., (Manlius Station,) lot 
35, farmer 25. 

Karker, Hannah, (Manlius Station,) lot 35, 
farmer 40. 

KELLER, JOHN, (North Manlius,) lot 16, 
retired farmer 10. 

KELLOGG, SAMUEL, (Fayetteville,) har- 
ness maker, Genesee. 

Remington, I., (Fayetteville,) lot 97, retired 
farmer and gardener 6. 

Kenelly, John, (Fayetteville,) lot 76 -farmer 
9. 

Kennady, Rody, (Fayetteville.) lot 75, pro- 
duce dealer and farmer 17. 

Kent, N. B., (Manlius Station,) dealer in 
flour and feed. 

Kimbal, Addison, (Manlius Centre,) lot 54, 
fanner 35. „ ,. 

Kimball, Clinton, (Chittenango, Madison 
Co.,) (with Harrison,) lots 69 and 79, 
farmer 150. . 

Kimball, Erastus, (Fayetteville,) retired 
farmer. 

Kimball, Harrison, (Chittenango, Mauison 
Co.,) (with Clinton,) lots 69 and 79, far- 
mer 150. 



MANLIUS. 



267 



Kimball, Luther, (Manlius Centre,) lot 45, 
farmer 38. 

KINNE, CHAUNCY B., (Collamer,) lot 6, 
farmer 18. 

KINNE & HO AG, (Kirkville,) (P. Z. Kinne 
and R. N. Hoag,) props, of the Brook 
mills. 

KINNE, P. Z., (Kirkville,) (Kinne & Hoag.) 

Kipple, Andrew, (Manlius Station,) lot 23, 
farmer 58. 

Kipple, Anthony, (Manlius Centre,) (John 
Kipple & Son.) 

Kipple, John & Son, (Manlius Centre,) 
(John and Anthony,) lot 26, farmer 40. 

Kipplen, Chas., (North Manlius,) lot 26, 
farmer 23. 

Kipplen, Oliver, (North Manlius,) lot 26, 
carpenter and farmer 4. 

Klock, Norman, (Kirkville,) lot 48, fanner 
40. 

Knobloh, F., (Manlius Centre,) lot 47, far- 
mer 26. 

Kraft, Anthony, (Manlius Centre,) lot 46, 
farmer 10. 

LADE, DAVID, (North Manlius,) (H. & D. 
Lade.) 

LADE, HERBERT, (North Manlius,) (H. 
& D. Lade,) veterinary surgeon. 

LADE, H. & D., (North Manlius.) (Herbert 
and David,) lot 26, farmer 90. 

Lamb, Admiral B., (Fayetteville,) carpen- 
ter. 

Laubach, Clara, (Manlius Station,) lot 35, 
farmer 27. 

Leach. Martin, (North Manlius,) lot 15, far- 
mer 75. 

LEACH, MORTIMER W., (Fayetteville,) 
fruit grower. 

Lerden & Co., (Manlius Centre,) (Nathan 
Lerden and Paul Countryman,) black- 
smiths. 

Lerden, Nathan, (Manlius Centre,) (Lerden 
& Co.) 

Lewis, Chas. N., (Manlius Station,) lot 45, 
farmer 19. 

LEWIS, GOULD N., (Manlius,) drugget. 

Lewis, Jabez, (Manlius Station,) lot 45, 
freight agent for N. Y. C. R. R. and far- 
mer 72X- 

Lighton, Domino, (Manliu6 Station,) lot 
oq farmer S 

Lloyd,' John, (North Manlius,) lot 14, far- 
mer 60. 

Long, John, (Collamer,) lot 24, farmer 40. 

Losey, Lewis, ("Manlius,) lot 86, farmer 25. 

Losey, Stephen, (Manlius,) lot 86, farmer 
25. 

LOUER, HENRY, (Fayetteville,) lot 85, 
farmer 75. 

LOVEJOY, HARTEY, (Manlius,) lot 88, 
wagon maker. 

Loveland, Andrew I., (Fayetteville,) fore- 
man at Scoville and Eaton's saw mill. 

LOWE, JOHN, (Fayetteville,) lot 75, mil- 
ler and farmer 16. 

Mabee, A. S., (Chittenango, Madison Co.,) 
lots 58 and 69, farmer 150. 

MABLE, ANNE, (Kirkville,) lots 57 and 59, 
farmer 327. „ . ,. 

Mabie, Oliver, (Kirkville,) lots 39 and 49, 
farmer 240. .„ ... „ 

MAHON PATRICK, (Fayetteville,) lot 65, 

farmer 32. _, ... »,_»«_ 

Manchester, Albert L., (Manlius,) lot 90, 
farmer 2. 



MANCHESTER, EDWIN, (Fayetteville) 

lot 77. farmer 22 and leases 57. 
Mann. John, (Manlius,) lot 90, farmer 50. 
MARCY. HIRAM L., (Manlius Center,) lot 

44, boatman and farmer 114. 
Mathews, Chas. W., (Manlius Station.) 

blacksmith. 
Mathews, George W., (North Manlius,) lot 

16. blacksmith and farmer 8. 
MATHEWS, JAMES H., (Fayetteville,) 

livery stable. 
MATHEWS, JOSEPH L., (Fayetteville,) 

carriage muker and blacksmith. 
Maurus, P., (Manlius Station,) pastor of 

St Mary's (Roman Catholic; Church. 
Maxwell, Archable, (North Manlius,) lot 13, 

farmer 15. 
Maxwell, J. Rev., (Fayetteville,) pastor M. 

E. church. 
McClenthen, A. B., (Manlius,) tailor. 
McClenthen, D. C, (Manlius.) lot 87, farm- 

cr lcii86s 3*2 
McCLENTHEN, JOHN B., (Manlius,) lot 

88, farmer leases 88. 
McDermit, Mike, (Manlius,) lot 88, fanner 

1*. 

McKarick, John, (Fayetteville,) lot 67, 

farmer 75. 
McLyman, Nathan, (Fayetteville,) lot 67, 

farmer 74. 
McNALLY, PATRICK, (Chittenango,Madi- 

son Co. ,) lot 96. farmer 60. 
McNeil, D. D., (Syracuse,) ()\alrath & Mc- 
Neil.) 
Mead, George, (Fayetteville,) lot 66, farm- 
er leases 150. 
MEAD, JAMES, (Fayetteville,) marble 

works. 
MEAD, O. B., (Manlius Station,) agent for 

the American Express Co. and post 

master. 
Mead William, (Manlius,) lot 90, farmer I 
MERRIMAN, W. F., (Fayetteville,) Teller 

of the National Bank of Fayetteville. 
MERRITT, WILSON J., (Fayetteville.) 

proprietor of Fayetteville Cottage. 
Miller, August, (Manlius Station,) lot 23, 

farmer 50. 
Miller, Frederick, (Manlius,) lot 99, farmer 

leases 88 
MILLS, ASHER, (Manlius,) lot 88, farmer 

2"^ 
MILLS, NELSON, (Manlius,) lot 88, fanner 

28. 
Moloney, Patrick, (Fayetteville,) lot 80, 

farmer 10. 
Monyhau, Jeremiah, ^Fayetteville,) boots 

& shoes, Beard Block. 
Moore, Henry, (North Manlius,) lot 36, 

farmer 2. 
Moore, Jerome, (Manlins,) teamster. 
MOORE, LAFAYETTE T., (Manlius,) 

(White & Moore.) 
Morehouse, Andrew, (Manlius,) lot 99, 

farmer 64. 
MOREHOUSE, BET1IUELC, (Manlius.) 

(Morehouse Brof.) 
MOREHOUSE BROS (Manlius.) (Duight, 

Bethuel C. and Frank,) lot 97, iron 

founders, machinists and farmers 2S. 

MOREHOUSE, DWIGHT, (Manlius,) 

(Morehouse Bros.) 
MOREHOUSE FRANK, (Manlius,) (More- 

hom« Bros.) 



268 



ONONDA GA CO UNTT B USINESS DIRECTOR Y. 






9y 

Fo. 95 East Genesee Street, 

SYRACUSE, ]V. Y., 

Agenis for the Celebrated 



! 



in 



jiiu. 



d 



it Cook S 




AND THE (NEW) FAVORITE 



:^ 



Leading Stoves in the Market, 

Solicit your patronage if you dec-ire a Stove for Parlor cr Kitchen, CHEAP, ECONOM- 
ICAL AND PERFECT. 

ALSO DEALERS IN 

HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS, 

Stamped, Japanned and French Wares, Cis- 
tern, Well and Force Punips, &c, &c, 
Tin, Copper and Sheet Iron 
Work execnted promptly, 

By the best of Mechanics and at the Lowest Rates. 

Remember the place, 

lo. 95 East Cenesee St. 



J. D. SILCOX. 



C. J. FOOTE. 



ST. B.— Tin Roofing done on short notice any 
where in the Connty. 



MANLIUS. 



269 



Morehouse, Wallace, (Manlius,) lot 97, 
moulder and farmer 3. 

MORGAN. ALEXANDER H., (Manlius ) 
lot 86, farmer 140. 

MORGAN, ANDREW, (Fayetteville,) 
[Flattery & Morgan.) 

Morgan, R. & Co., (Fayetteville,) (Russell 
Morgan and Levi Snell,) manufacturers 
of grain cradles. 

MORSE. G. MRS., (Fayetteville,) millinery, 
Genesee. 

Morse, Harvey, (Fayetteville,) lot 76, farm- 
er 10. 

Morse, Levi A., (Manlius,) lot 90, farmer 
140. 

Moses, A. D., (Kirkville,) (N. S. Moses & 
Son.) 

Moses, Legrand O., (Kirkville,) miller and 
wagon maker. 

Moses. Nathan S., (Kirkville,) (N. S. Moses 
& Son.) 

Moses, N. 8. & Son, (Kirkville,)(iVa^a?i 8. 
& A. D..) wagon makers. 

Moulter, George, (Fayetteville,) lot 77, 
farmer 53. 

Moulter, H. G., (Fayetteville,) lot 77, farm- 
er 60. 

MOULTER, JOHN W., (Manlius,) hard- 
ware dealers, tobacco and cigar manu- 
facturers. 

MULVANY, THOMAS, (Chittenango, 
Madison Co.,) lot 90, farmer 200. 

Munroe, Austin, (Kirkville,) farmer leases 

Murray. George W., (Collamer,) lot 13, 
farmer 100. 

Murray, Martin, (Collamer,) lot 13, wood 
contractor and farmer 162. 

Murray Wm., (Collamer,) lot 13, farmer 
50. 

Myres, Jacob, (Manlius Station,) lot 64, 
farmer 25. 

Myres, Mary A. Mrs. (North Manlius,) lot 
17, farmer 12. 

Myres. Peter, (North Manlius,) lot 17, far- 
mer 40. 

Nahstoll, George, (Manlius Station,) Ger- 
man school teacher. 

NICHOLS, V. H., (Fayetteville,) (Snell, 
Smith & Co.) 

NICOLLS, JOHN H., (Fayetteville,) paint- 
er, h^uee and sign. 

Nixon, James, (Manlius.) lot 88, farmer 65. 

Noble, Edmund, (Kirkville.) bee keeper. 

Noltv, William, (Kirkville,) lot 36, farmer 
36. 

NORTHUP, ALBERT B., (Fayetteville,) 
(Northup & Johnson,) supervisor. 

NORTHUP, JEROME, (Fayetteville,) law- 
yer. 

NORTHUP & JOHNSON. (Fayetteville.) 
(Albert B. Northup and Edward John- 
son,) props, grist and flouring mills, 
Mill. 

Olney, O. G., (Kirkville,) lot 38, farmer 25. 

O'Niel, Timothy, (Fayetteville,) lot 76, far- 
mer 6. 

Oot, Christian, (North Manlius,) lot 26. far- 
mer 60. 

OOT, JOHN N., (Manlius Station,) lot 34. 

farmer 26. »,*.«* 

Oot. Joseph, (Manlius Station,) lot 34, 
farmer 67. 



OOT, NICHOLAS. (TV.otteville,) lot 64, 
farmer leases SO. 

Our, William, (Manlius Center,) lot 55, far- 
mer 30. 

OXNER, CONRAD, (Fayetteville,) lot 74, 
hop grower and farmer 15. 

PADBURY, JOHN, (Manlius.) lots 89 and 
90, farmer 100. 

Palmer, Geo. W., (Kirkville,) all op. phy- 
sician. 

PALMER, JEROME B., (Fayetteville,) lot 
64, farmer 140. 

Palmer, Jessie, (Manlius Centre,) lot 26 
sawyer and farmer 6. 

Palmer, Luther M., (Fayetteville,) whole- 
sale grocer, (Albany,) lot 64. farmer M). 

Palz, Coonrod, (Manlius Station,) shoe- 
maker. 

PALZ, JOHN, (FayeUeville,) (Fisher <k 
Palz.) 

PAMERS, THOMAS, (FayettevilleO black- 
smith, Gpnesee. 

PARRY, JOHN, (Manlius.) lot 98, farmer 
84. 

Parsons, Horace, (Kirkville,) lot 36, farmer 
40. 

Patterson, Grove, (Manlius,) stone mason. 

Pease, Harvey C, (Cc^anier,) lot 13, farmer 
120. 

Peck, Charles, (North Manlius.) lot 16, far- 
mer 360. 

Peck, Emily, Miss, (Manlius,) schoolteach- 
er. 

PECKHAM, GEORGE H., (Manlius Cen- 
tre.) grocery and provision store and 
canal barn. 

Peifer, Charles, (Kirkville,) lot 35, farmer 
40. 

PENFIELD, JOHN N., (Fayetteville,) 
(Beard & Fen/U 

Perine, Jacob, (Kirkville.) lot 38, fanner 
115. 

Perkins, Jeremiah, (Caienovia, Madison 
Co..) lot 100, farmer 50. 

PERRY, GECRGE M., (Manlius,) Burner. 

Pfeifer, Peter, (Collamer.) lot 13, farmer 

Phillips, Courtland, (Manilas Centre,) lot 
45, farmer leases 150. 

Phillips, Mary Ann, (Sorth Manlius,) lot 
17, farmer 3. 

Pierce, P. Wells, (Manlius Centre,) lot 44, 
carpenter and farmer 20. 

Plank, Lawrence, (Manlius Station,) lot 46, 
farmer 25. 

PLATTO, ALEXANDER F., (Manliu- Sta- 
tion.) justice of the peace and convey- 
ancer. 

Platz, Andrew, (Manlius Station,) mii- 
and plasterer. 

Plopper, Hybert, (Kirkville,) cheese manu- 
facturer. 

PORTER. D.. (Fayetteville,) tailoi 

POST, GILES F., (North Manilas.) lot n, 

wholesale and retail dealer In three 

thorn locust hedge plants, also farmer 

80. 

Post John E.. Fayetteville,) blacksmith. 

POTTER. ANSON, (Fayetteville,) lot 86, 

fanner leases 39. 
Potter, David, (Fayetteville,) lot 85, farmer 

39. 
POWERS. THOMAS, (Fayetteville.) 
Pratt, Eugene B., (Fayetteville,) lot 75, far- 
mer 07. 



270 



MANL1US. 



Prescott, Moses, (Fayettevllle,) toll gate 
kcGDGr 

♦PRESTON, CHENEY & SNOOK, (Man- 
lius,) (King H. C. Preston, Stephen Che- 
ney and Marcellus B. Snook,) manufac- 
turers of Onondaga Chief mower and 
reaper. 

PRESTON, KING H. C, (Manlius,) (Pres- 
ton, Cheney & Snook.) 

PRESTON, N. D.. (Fayetteville,) dealer in 
burned and manufactured water lime 
and gray plaster, and proprietor of Fay- 
etteville plaster and lime mills. 

PUGSLEY, ALBERT, (Collamer,) farmer. 

Randall, Wm. H., (Manilas,) farmer leases 
121. 

Ransier, Chas., (Chittenango, Madison Co.,) 
lot 69, farmer 44. 

Ransier, Eliza, (Mar.liuB,) lot 79, farmer 6. 

Reals, Frederick, (Manlius Centre,) lot 55, 
farmer 70. 

Reals, George, (Manliua Centre,) lot 65, 
farmer 40. 

Reals. Wm. (North Manlius,) lot 15, far- 
mer 80. 

Reels, Henry, (North Minlius,) lot 13, far- 
mer 10. 

Reels, Peter, (Manlius Center,) lot 33, far- 
mer 100. 

REMINGTON, J., (Fayetteville,) farmer. 

Remington, Loyd, (Manlius,) lot 98, farmer 
leases 40. 

Remlinger, Nicholas, (Manlius Center,) lot 
54, manuf. of cheese and farmer leases 
100. 

Renz, Gregor, (Manliua Station,) shoe 

RICE. FRANK, (Manlius Station,) bar 
tender, Fauth's hotel. 

Rice, Frederick W., (Collamer,) lot 24, far- 
mer leases 15. 

RICE, SIMEON W., (Manlius,) lot 95, far- 
mer 170, 

Rivenburg, Alonzo, (Fayetteville,) lot 63, 
farmer 63. 

ROBINSON, THOMAS B., (Fayetteville,) 
groceries and provisions, cor. Genesee 
and Mill. 

Rood, S . A. Mrs., (North Manlius,) lot 15, 
farmer 135. 

Root, Erastus, (Manlius,) groceries and 
provisions. 

ROOT, JAMES, (Fayetteville,) (J. & R. 
Root.) 

ROOT, J. & R., (Fayetteville,) (James and 
Rufus,) undertakers and dealers in 
furniture, junction of Genesee and Man- 
lius. 

ROOT, RUFUS, (Fayetteville,) (J. & R. 
Root.) 

ROTENBURY& HINSDELL, (Manlius,) 
(Richard Rotenbury and Henry D. 
Hinsdell,) merchant tailors. 

ROTENBURY, RICHARD, (Manlius,) (Ro- 
tenbury & Hinsdell) 

ROTNOR, DANIEL, (Fayetteville,) lot 64, 
farmer 270. 

Rotnour, Isaac, (Manlius Center,) lot 43, 
farmer 13. 

Rowell, Wm., (Collamer,) lot 6, farmer 20. 

Rowland, U. Q., (Manlius,) lot 90, farmer 

ROWLEY, JOHN W., (Fayetteville,) plas- 
ter mill. 



RUSSELL & BETTINGER, Manlius,) 
(Webster Russell and John D. Bellin- 
ger,) manuf. of tobacco and cigars. 

RUSSELL. WEBSTER, (Manlius,) (Russell 
& Bettinger.) 

Salisbury, Joseph, (Kirkville,) tanner and 
currier. 

Sanbom, Willoby, (Oran,) lot 99, farmer 
149. 

SANDERSON, JOHN, (Fayetteville,) stone 
yard, Manlius. 

Saster, Sebastian, (Manlius Station,) lot 

34, farmer 6. 

Scouton, Abram, (Fayetteville,) prop, of 
grocery and provision store. 

SCOVILLE, CHARLES E., (Manlius,) lot 
85, farmer 90. 

SCOVlLLE & EATON, (Fayetteville,) (Jo- 
seph A. Scoville and L. H. Eaton,) props, 
dry dock, boat builders, props, saw 
mill and dealers in lumber. 

Scoville, Elijah U., (Manlius,)lot 90, farmer 
80. 

SCOVILLE, JOSEPH A., (Fayetteville,) 
(Scoville & Eaton.) 

Seon, C, (Manlius Station,) lot 13, farmer 
33 

SEWARD, N., (Fayetteville,) Vice Presi- 
dent of the National Bank of Fayette- 
ville. 

Seymour, Endon, (Manlius Station,) lot 35, 
farmer 10. 

Shandef, John, (Manlius Station,) team- 
ster. 

SHANDORF, JACOB, (Manlius Station,) 
lot 26, engineer on N.Y.C.R.R. and far- 
mer 42. 

Shaver, Joseph, (Kirkville,) lot 159, farmer 
leases 130. 

Shaver, Peter, (North Manlius,) lot 15, far- 
mer 16. 

Shendorf, Anna Magdaline, (Manlius Sta- 
tion,) lot 25, farmer 22. 

SHOEMAKER, ABRAM, (Manlius Sta- 
ti- n,) engineer of N. Y. C. R. R. 

SHOEMAKER, C, (Manlius Station,) lot 

35, contractor on N. Y. C. R. R. and 
farmer 265. 

SHOEMAKER, ROBT., (Manlius Station,) 
lot 35, farmer 175. 

Shultz, I. B., (Fayetteville,) lots 67 and 77, 
farmer 66. 

Shutt, Mark, (North Manlius,) lot 15, far- 
mer 100. 

Sivan, Thomes, (Manlius,) mason. 

Slater, Belinda Miss, (Fayetteville,) dress 
maker and tailoress, Genesee. 

Smith, Alonzo P., (Fayetteville,) lot 65, far- 
mer 07. 

Smith, Alvin, (Manlius Center,) lot 45, far- 
mer 50. 

SMITH, ANSON, (Manlius Center,) far- 
mer. 

Smith, Bartlett, (Fayetteville,) house and 
sign paiuter. 

Smith, David J., (Manlius Center,) lot 44, 
farmer 28. 

Smith, Eliakim, (Kirkville,) lot 56, farmer 
87 

SMITH, ELIJAH E., (Manlius,) , (E. E. 
Smith <& Son.) 

SMITH E. E. & SON, (Manlius,) (Elijah 
E. and Geo. E.,) groceries and meat 
market. 



SMITH, GEO. E., (ManlniB,) (E. E. Smith 

<£ Son.) 
SMITH, HIRAM, (Manlius,) boots and 

shoes. 
Smith, I. W., (Fayetteville,) manuf. of 

water lime. 
SMITH, JAMES H., (Manilas Center,) lot 

43, farmer 4. 
Smith, John, (Collamer,) lot 24, farmer 00. 
Smith, Orrison, (Manlins Centre,) lot 57, 

farmer 220. 
SMITH, OSCAR J., (Fayetteville,) photo- 
grapher. 
SMITH, P. H., (Fayetteville,) (SmU, Smith 

d- Co.) 
SMITH, WM. MANLIUS, (Manlins,) phy- 
sician and surgeon, chemist, manuf. of 

writingfluid and £anner 12. 
SNELL. LEVI, (Fayetteville,) (Snell, Smith 

A Co..) owns 10. 
SNELL. SMITH & CO., (Fayetteville.) 

(Levi Snell, P. H. Smith and V. H. 

Xichols.) general merchants, Genesee. 
Snook, Clark, (Fayetteville,) lot 85. farmer 

150 
SNOOK, MARCELLTJS B., (Manlius,)(.Ptw- 

ton, Cheney & Snook.) 
Snook, Seley, (North Manlius.) painter. 
Snook, Theodore, (Fayetteville,) lot 53, 

farmer 90. 
Snow, Samuel, (Fayetteville,) lot 75, car- 
penter and builder, and farmer 3. 
Snyder. Anthony, (Manlius Station,) lot 25, 

farmer 60. 
SNYDER, JACOB. (North Manlins,) lot 36, 

manuf. of cradle stuff and hoops, and 

farmer 15. 
Snyder, Jacob, (Manlius Station,) lot 14, 

farmer 40. 
Snyder, Mary, (Manlius Station,) lot 35, 

fanner 15. 
Snyder, Nicholas, (Manlins Btation,) lot 35, 

farmer 40. 
Snyder, Peter, (Manlins Station,) lot 25, 

farmer 50. 
SNYDER, PETER J., (Manlius Station,) 

lot 25, prop, of saw mill and farmer 31. 

Spencer, Harvey, (Collamer,) lot 12, farmer 

38. 
Spencer, Headly, (North Manlius,) lot 15, 

basket maker and farmer 3. 
Spicer, Henry, (Manlins,) lot 98, farmer 40 
Squier , Sarah E. Mrs., (Kirkville,) dress 

maker. 
Stafford, Anson K., (Manlius,) lot 98, farm- 
er 20 and leases 60. 
STARING BENJAMIN F., (Kirkville.) 

agent for Cheese Manufacturing Co. of 

Manlius. 
STEARNS, WM. G., (Manlius Center,) lot 

54, farmer 150. 
Stewart, A. C, (Manlius Center,) malster. 
Stillwell, Leonard W., (Manlius,) tannery. 
Stillwell, Melanthon, (Manlius,) (with Van 

Vechton,) lot 89, fanner 90. 
Stillwell, Porter, (Manlius,) lot 89, farmer 

64 
Stillwell, Van Vechton, (Manlins,) (with 

Melanthon,) lot 89, farmer 90. . 
Stoddard, Erastus, (Manlius Station,) lot 

46, farmer 84. 
Stoughtenger, Perry, (Manlins Center,) lot 

35, farmer 18. 



Stoup, Michael, (North Manlius,) lot 16, 
farmer 10. 

Strong, Joseph B., (Manlius,) lot 88, farmer 
86. 

Strong, Marcns Mrs., (Manlins,) dress and 
cloak maker. 

Strong, Wm. M.. (Manlius,) lot 89, farmer 
67. 

Suiter, George, (Manlius Station,) lot 35, 
farmer 85. 

Suiter, Mathias, (Manlius Center,) lot 47, 
farmer 90. 

Sullivan Dennis, (Fayetteville,) lot 87, 
farmer 23. 

Sullivan, Mark, (Manlius,) lot 88, fanner 3. 

Swan, Levi P., (Fayetteville,) carpenter. 

Sweet. James B., (Fayetteville,) prop, of 
Beard Hotel. 

Taffany. Jacob jr., (North Manlins,) car- 
penter and joiner. 

Taffner, Jacob, (North Manlins,) carpenter. 

Taffner, John, (Manlius Station,) lot 14, 
farmer 60. 

TAGUE, HENRY, (Fayetteville,) carpenter 
and millwright. 

Taylor, Diantha, (Fayetteville,) lot 44, far- 
mer 49. 

TAYLOR, GEORGE L., (Fayetteville,) lot 
67, farmer 55. 

Taylor, George N., (Kirkville,) lot 49, far- 
mer 90. 

Taylor, Oliver L., (Fayetteville,) lot 67, 
fanner 55. 

Taylor, Wm. L., (Chittenango, Madison 
Co.,) lot 58, thresher and fanner C'J, and 
leases 80. 

Tehand, Malica, (Fayetteville,) lot 63, far- 
mer leases 14 

TERPENING, PETER I., (North Manlins,) 
lot 15, farmer 193. 

THE NATIONAL BANK OF FAYETTE- 
VILLE, (Favetteville,) H. Edwards, 
President; «. Seward, Vice President ; 
H. Eaton. Cashier; N. F. Merriman, 
Teller; Mill St. 

Thomas, Edmund, (Manlins,) lot 100, far- 
mer 121. 

Thomson, Wm.,( Fayetteville,) druggie and 
grocer. 

Thorn, James R, (Kirkville,) agent for 
Scott's mower and reaper knife, grind- 
er. 

TD3BITTS, FRANK G., (Fayetteville,) den- 
tist, 2d door south of Bank. 

TIBBITTS, WALDEN A., (Fayetteville,) 

(Hodge <t Tibbittf.) 
Todd, R. J., (Fayetteville,) lot 76, prop, of 

plaster mill and farmer 100. 
TOWNSEND, LEMUEL, (FayettevMle.) 

lot 68, farmer 110. 
Townsend, 8., (Kirkville,) lot 49, fann. r 8. 
Travis, P. H., (Manlius Station,) wugon 

maker. 

TREMA IN, CHARLES, (Manlius,) (Chat. 

Tremain & Co.) 
♦TREMAIN. CHA9. & CO.. (Manilas,) 

(Chat. T remain and PorUr Tnmain 

jr.,) paper manufacturers. 
TREMAIN, PORTER JR.. (Manlius,) 

(Cha*. Tremain <t Co.) 
TRIPP, ALFRED A., (Manlins,) lot 87, 

farmer 69. 



272 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 




. M. White, 

ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW, 



iMm, m 



9 Sea ^a 



Respectfully announce to their friends and the public in general, that they are prepared 

to manufacture all kinds of 

CARRIAGES, WAGONS & SLEIGHS, 

Of the best material and workmanship, on short notice, as cheap as any manufactory in 
Western New York. Particular attention paid to all kinds of Repairing. Remember 
the place, 

3 West Onondaga St., near Jiinghamton Deqpot, Syracuse. 

JACOB HURST. EDWARD LEAMY 



Dry 



Bouttelle lOrotlieirjB, 

TXJLLY, 1ST. "ST., DEALERS IN 

Goods & Groceries, Books, News- 

l»a&>ers, Magazines, Periodicals, SeliooE 

Books, Sheet Music, Stationery, 

Picture Frames, &c. 

{^~ All kinds of Books, Music, &c, procured to order. 

SYLVESTER BRUNT, 

DEALER IN 

LilBEB, STAVES.. HE IB III, il 



Mills f-&- Mile £Jast of Serrick's Hotel, Cicero, JV. T. 

Custom Sawing done on short notice. Those wishing anything in this line will do well 
to call on me before purchasing elsewhere. 

Empire 2E*lf*sto:r 3VC111. 



JTamesville, 1ST- "V. 9 
Manufacturer and Dealer in 

PLASTER, STONE PLASTER & GROUND SAN®. 

Also Proprietor of CIDER MILL. All orders promptly attended to. 



MANLIUS. 



273 



Tucker, James A., (North Manlius,) clerk 
and deputy post master. 

TUTTLE. P. H., (Favetteville.) farmer. 

TWITCHELL, CURTISS, (Manlius,) lot 98, 
farmer 60. 

Van Alstine, Darvin, (Fayetteville.) lot 54, 
farmer 50. 

Van Alstine, Elizabeth Mrs., (Kirkville,) 
lot 69, farmer 28. 

VAN ALSTINE, MELVTN, (Kirkville,) 
proprietor of Hartsville Hotel, also 
dealer in groceries and provisions. 

Van Alstine, Wm., (Kirkville,) lot 48, agent 
for Hadley's mowers and reapers and 
farmer 60. 

Van Antwerp, Conrad W., (Manlius Cen- 
ter,) carpenter. 

VAN BCSKIRK, ISAAC D., (Eayetteville,) 
lot 64, millwright and constable. 

VAN DEMARK, JACOB, (Fayetteville,) 
lot 95, farmer 130. 

Van Epps, Henry, (Kirkville,) lot 59, boat- 
man and farmer 2. 

Van Epps, Jacob, (Kirkville,) carpenter. 

Van Epps, James, (Kirkville,) lot 59, car- 
penter and farmer 2. 

Van Schaik, P. W., (Manlius Center,) lot 
45, hop grower and fanner 30. 

Van Slyke, John, (Fayetteville,) lot 64, far- 
mer 3. 

Van Tassell. Isaac, (Manlius Centre,) lot 33, 
farmer 40. 

Vincent, John, (Collamer.) lot 6, fanner 
100. 

Voorns, Andrew, (Manlius,) lot 78, farmer 
204. 

VOORUS, PHILIP. (Manlius,) lot 78, thresh- 
er, prop, of stallion Young America, and 
farmer 47. 
Vorheese, Eliezur, (Manlius,) lot 91, fanner 
284. 

Wagoner, Fred., (Fayetteville,) lot 76, far- 
mer 2. 

Walk. Andrew, (Kirkville,) lot 69, carpen- 
ter and farmer 3. 

Walrath, M. C, (Syracuse,) (Walrath & 
McNeil.) „. , 

Walrath & McNeil, (Syracuse,) (M. C. Wal- 
rath and D. D. McNeil,) props, of Kirk- 
ville brick yard. 

Walrath. Peter L, (Manlius Centre,) car- 
penter. 

Walrath, Wm., (Manlius Centre,) lot 44, 
carpenter and farmer 3, and leases 10. 

WALTER & BRO., (Manlius,) (Hiram E. 
and Byron.) props, livery stables. 

WALTER, BYRON, (Manlius,) (Halter <£ 
Bro.) 

WALTER, HIRAM E., (Manlius,) ( IT 'alter 
& Bro.) „ . 

Walter, Oliver T., (Manlius,) lot 9., fanner 
253^ 

Walter, William, (Manlius,) lot 68, farmer 
144. 

WARNER, JOSEPH, (Collamer,) lot 24. 
farmer 58. _ , t •n a \ 

Watson, Sarah M. Miss, (Fayetteville,) 

music teacher. w^,... 

Weaver, Albert, (Chittenango, Madison 
Co 1 sewin^ machine agent. 

Weaver, Perr^O., (Manlius Station,) gen- 
eral merchant and post master. 



WELLS & AUSTIN, (Fayetteville,) (Sam- 
uel J. Wells and W?h. Austin.) hard- 
ware dealers and props, coal yard, Gen- 
Wells, Justus, (Fayetteville,) (Hatch & 

Wells.) 
WELLS, SAMUEL J..(Fnvetteville,)(Tr«#« 

&■ Austin,) lot 76, farmer 225. 
WHEELER, CHAS., (Fayetteville.) 
WHEELER, HORACE, (Fayetteville,) lot 
76. hop grower, milk dealer and fanner 
172. 

Wheeler, J. H„ (North Manlius.) painter. 
Wheeler, Samuel, (North Manlius,) pulnter 

and grainer. 
WHITE, HORACE C, (Manlius,) (White 
& Moore.) 

WHITE & MOORE, (Manlius.) (Horace C. 
White and Lafayette T. Moore,) black- 
smiths. 

Whitney, Henry. (Manlius,) (Woodicorth, 
Whitney & Harris.) 

WILCOX. JOHN, (Kirkville.) fanner. 

Wilcox, N. E., (Kirkville,) lot 50. farmer 
87. 

Wilcox, S. D., (Kirkville.) lot 36, overseer 
of the poor and farmer 38#. 

Wilkee, John, (Manlius,) lot 97. farmer 00. 

WILLIAMS, ELIJAH, (Oran,) lot 99, (far- 
mer 95. , , 

WILLL\MS, J. R., (Manlins.) lot 99, dealer 
in grain, Ohio and Buckeye mowing 
machines, and farmer leases 145. 

Williams, Malcolm E., (.Manlius.) engineer 
and surveyor. 

Wisebaar, Jacob, (Manlius Station,) lot 2o, 
farmer 35. ,, ,. 

WITHEY, ERASTTJS, (Chittenango, Madi- 
son Co..) lots 59 and 69, hop raiser and 
farmer 140. 

Wolcott, 0. C, (Fayetteville.) ship carpen- 
ter and foreman for Scoville & Eaton. 

Wood, Albert A., (Manlius.) i Woo* 

Wood Bros., (Manlius,) (Chat. U . //• ""■' 
Albert A.,) manufacturer of water 
wheels. _ . 

Wood, Chas.W.H.,fManliu«.vn<y.'/ Tiros.) 

Woodford, Samuel F., (Fayetteville.) lot 
96, farmer 30. 

Woods, H. C. Rev, (Fayetteville,) pastor 
Baptist church. 

WOODWARD, ELDRIDGE W., i Manlius.) 
hotel proprietor. 

Woodworth, Alw. (HanHnsO (Woodworth, 
Whitney & Harris.) 

Woodworth. Whitney 4 ir.m- Mmhus.} 
(Alvy Woodworth, Hi nru WMtnM 
Thmnas Harris,) machinists and plow 
manufacturers. 

Woolaver, Julia Mrs., (Manlius Station,) 
dress maker. 

Wooworth, George W., (North afanline,) 
lessee of North Manlius Cheese tactory, 
(resides in Fenner, Madison <'o.) 

WORDEN, AMERICA, (Kirkville.) lot 36, 
fanner 4 1 . 

Worden, C. A., (Manlius Station,) (Boyn- 
ton & Worden.) 

Worden, George W., (Kirkville.) lot 49, 
farmer 100. _ . 

Worden, Hannah. rFayetterille,) groceries. 

Worden, V., (Fayetteville,) lot 96, larni.T 
13. 



274 



MANLIUS— MAR CELL US. 



Wright, George H., (Manlius,) wholesale 

and retail butcher. 
Wright James, (Collanier,) lot 6, farmer 

202. 



Wright, Nathan Rev., (Manlius,) pastor 

Baptist church. 
YORDEN, NATHAN, (Manlius Center,) 

blacksmith. 



(Post Offioe Addresses in Parentheses.) 



Ager, Addison, (Marcellus,) wagon maker. 

AGER, SAMUEL, (Marcellus,) farmer. 

AIRS, CHAPMAN, (Marcellus,) lot 47, far- 
mer 50. 

ALVORD BROTHERS, (Marcellus,) (Rich- 
ard W. and Chat. T.,) hotel and livery. 

Alvord, Chas. «\, (Marcellus,) (Alvord 
Bros.) 

Alvord, Richard W., (Marcellus,) (Alvord 
Bros.) 

AMESBURY, JAMES, (Marcellus,) lot 23, 
farmer 88. 

Amidon, Caleb, (Amber,) lot 64, farmer 82. 

AMIDON, PHILLIP V. C, (Marcellus,) lot 
43, farmer 197. 

AMIDON, WM., (Marietta,) lot 55, farmer 
140. 

Amidon, Wm. H., (Amber,) lot 64, stone 
mason and farmer 20. 

Amos, Stephen, (Skaneatelet,) lot 53, far- 
mer 50. 

Armstrong, Addison H., (Marcellus,) lot 33, 
farmer 143. 

ARMSTRONG, HENRY L., (Marcellus,) 
lot 31, farmer 107. 

Austin, Charles, (Marcellus Falls,) lot 7, 
farmer 21. 

AUSTIN, EDWARD G., (Marcellus,) lot 
16, farmer 180. 

Axten, James, (Marcellus,) lot 25, farmer 
55. 

Babcock, Dennis J., (Marietta,) black- 
smith, lot 63, farmer 35. 

Baker, Anson, (Navarino,) lot 48, farmer 
71. 

Baker, Benjamin R., {Marcellus Falls,) lot 
8, farmer 60. 

Baker, Brayton, (Marcellus,) lot 48, farmer 
31, 

Baker, Davis, (Navarino,) lot 48, farmer 70. 

Baker, Edward V., (Marcellus,) (Garnet & 
Baker.) 

Baker, Elijah H., (Marcellus,) blacksmith. 

BAKER, EZEKIEL & SON, (Navarino,) 

lot 64, farmer 92. 
Baker, George B., (Marcellus,) blacksmith. 
Baker, George D., (Navarino,) lot 49, far- 
mer 60. 
Baker, Hiram tt., (Navarino,) lot 48, farmer 

Oo, 

Baker, Jonathan, (Navai-ino,) lot 49, farmer 
68^. 

Baker, Lewis, (Marcellus Falls.) lot 8, far- 
mer 133. 



Baker, Lewis E., (Navarino,) wagon maker. 

BAKER, MARQUIS, (Marietta,) boot and 
shoe maker. 

Baker, Roland S., (Marcellus,) lot 42, far- 
mer 10. 

BAKER, WARREN, (Marcellus Falls,) lot 
6, farmer 110. 

Bangs, Franklin H., (Marcellus,) physician 
and surgeon. 

BARBER, BENJAMIN F., (Navarino,) boot 
and shoe maker. 

BEACH, A. WILSON, (Marcellus,) collect- 
or and constable. 

Beach, Lauren, (Marcellus,) lot 24, retired 
farmer 6. 

BEACH, ORLANDO, (Marcellus,) lot 23, 
farmer 16. 

Beebe, Arba, (Navarino,) lots 48 and 49, 
farmer 225. 

Beebe, Oscar E, (Navarino,) lot 49, farmer 
lollops Trt 

BENNETT, JOSEPH G., (Marcellus Falls,) 
paper maker. 

Bessey, Albert, (Marcellus Falls,) lot 7, 
farmer 3. 

BESSEY, JOSEPH, (Marcellus Falls,) la- 
borer. 

Bishop, Edwin, (Thorn Hill,) lot 53, farmer 
30. 

Bishop, Ira, (Marcellus,) retired from busi- 
ness. 

Bishop, Julius A., (Marietta,) lot 63, farmer 
35. 

BISHOP, WM., (MarcelluB,) lot 24, farmer 
115. 

BLANCHARD, CLARK, (Marcellus,) lot 
41, fanner 45. 

Bodley, Wm., (Thorn Hill,) retired farmer. 

BO WEN, ALONZO, (Marcellus,) miller 
and lawyer. 

BO WEN, EDGAR, (Marietta,) lot 55, far- 
mer 26. 

Bradley, Isaac, (Marcellus,) lot 24, insur- 
ance agent and farmer 12. 

Briggs, George E., (Marrietta,) lot 63, farm- 
er 91. 

Bright, William J., (Marcellus Falls,) wool 

Brinkerhoff, Abraham L., (Marcellus,) lr 

26, farmer 97. 
BRINKERHOFF, BROS., (Marcellus,) lo 

17, farmer 176)£. 
BRINKERHOFF JOHN, (Marcellus,) 

farmer. 



MAR CELL US. 



275 



Brooks, Wm., (Marcellus,) lot 42, fanner 
20. 

BROOMA, WM., (Marcellus,) lot 82, farmer 
60. 

BROOME, EDWARD A., (Marcellus,) 
farmer. 

Brown, Allen, (Thorn Hill,) lot 62, post 
master and farmer 75. 

Bryant Edwin R., (Marcellus Falls,) master 
mechanic and machinist. 

BURLETON, JAMES, (Thorn Hill,) lot 62, 
farmer 172. 

Burlington, Mary, (Marcellus,) lot 23, farm- 
er 4. 

BURNS, FRANCIS E., (Thorn Hill,) lot 
53, farmer 150. 

Burrell, Wm. B., (Marcellus,) lot 43, farmer 
30 

Burtis, Jerome, (Marietta,) lot 63, •farmer 
95. 

Cady. Mary, (Marcellus,) lot 24, farmer 150. 

Calender, Richard,(Marietta,) lot 63, farmer 
71. 

Carpenter, Charles C, (Marcellus,) teamster. 

Case, B. Humphrey, (Howlett Hill,) lot 9, 
farmer 111. 

CASE, GEORGE W., (Marcellus,) lot 43, 
farmer 50. 

Case, Hiram, (Marcellus,) lot 41, farmer 70. 

Case, John J., (Marcellus,) lot 25, farmer 3. 

Case, Mary E., (Marcellus,) general mer- 
chant. 

Case, Reuben, (Marcellus,) lot 24, carpen- 
ter and joiner and farmer 12. 

CASE, SUSAN MRS., (Marcellus.) 

Casler, Myron, (Marcellus Falls,) lot 7, far- 
mer 47>£. 

Casein, Michael, (Marcellus,) lot 32, farmer 
11%. 

Chafee, David, (Marcellus,) lot 24, super- 
visor and farmer 21. 

Chatfield, William M., (Marcellus,) custom 
tailor. 

Chester, Moses & Co., (Marcellus,) (James 
C. Sayre, Lucius Motes,) woolen mills. 

Chrisler, Jonathan, (Marietta,) lot 55, far- 
mer 133. 

CHRISLER, MARQUIS D. L., (Navarino,) 
laborer. 

CHURCH, DAVID S., (Thorn Hill,) lot 61, 
farmer 103. 

Clark, Benjamin, {Moses & Clark.) 

Clark, Amos, (Marcellus,) lot 14, fanner 
121. 

Clark, Fayette, (Marcellus,) lot 6, farmer 
40. 

Clark, Timothy, (Marcellus,) lot 41, farmer 
27. 

CLEMENTS, THOMAS R., (Marcellus,) 
lot 47, farmer 115. 

Clements, Wm., (Marcellus,) lot 40, farmer 
29. 

Clift, Hiram, (Marcellus,) fanner, retired 

from business. . . 

COBB. BELU8 8., (Marcellus,) physician 

and surgeon. . . 

Cobb, Stephen, (Marcellus,) lot 24, farmer 

20. 
3ole, Benjamin, (Marcellus,) lot 32, farmer 

4 
Collins, John, (Navarino,) lot 43, farmer 78. 
Colton, Luther, (Marcellus,) lot 15, farmer 

5. 



Colton, Sarah C. Mrs., (Marcellus,) board- 
in ghouse. 

COMSTOCK, GEORGE J., (Navarino.) lot 
48, farmer 140. 

Coon, Albon, (Thorn Hill,) lot 53, farmer 
35. 

Coon, Daniel G., (Marcellus,) lot 38, farmer 

Cornell, John, (Marcellus,) fanner leases. 
Cornell, Patrick, (Marcellus,) lot 25, farmer 

Cornish, Joel, (Marcellus,) lot 17, farmer 

CORNWELL, ARNOLD G., (Marcellus,) 

lot 32. farmer 120. 
CORNWELL, JOHN, (Marcellus,) lot 17, 

farmer 54. 
Cowles, E. Corning, (Thorn Hill,) lot 62, 

farmer 90. 
Cowles, John H., (Marcellus,) physician 

and surgeon. 
Cox, John, (Marcellus,) lot 32, farmer 41. 
Coyne, Patrick, (Marcellus,) lot 25, farmer 

6. 
CREGO, STEPHEN V., (Marcellus Falls.) 

lot 7. farmer 51. 
CRISSEY, ISAAC B., (Marcellus Falls,) 

paper maker. 
Crysler, David, (Navarino,) lot 56, farmer 

150. 
Crysler, E. Mrs., (Navarino,) lot 56, farmer 

10. 
CRYSLER. FRANK, (Navarino,) lot 64, 

farmer 92. 
CRYSLER, PHILIP, (Navarino,) wagon 

maker. 
Cunniflf, Patrick, (Marcellus,) lot 34, fanner 

30. 
Curtain, Michael, (Marcellus,) lot 21, fanner 

10. 
CURTLN, JEREMIAH, (Marcellus.) lot 34, 

farmer 130. 
CURTIS, CHANDLER, (Navarino,) lot 43, 

mason and fanner 40. 
Curtis, James L., (Marcellus,) lot 42, farmer 

8V. 
Dady^ Samuel, (Marcellus,)poor master and 

soap and candle maker. 
Davis, Charles H., (Marietta,) lot 63, far- 
mer 50. 
Davis, John A., (Marietta,) lot 63, farmer 

50. 
De Coudres, Thomas, (Marcellus.) drug- 
gist, post master and town clerk. 
Devlin, Barney, (Marcellus,) lot 34, far- 
mer 106. 
De Witt, Dan, (Thorn Hill.) farmer. 
DE WITT, JAMES. (Marietta,) lot 62, 

wagon maker and farmer -Jo. 
Dolan, Win., (Marcellus.) l<>t IB, fanners. 
DORCHESTER. ROBERT E., (Marcellus,) 

lot 15, farmer 50. 
Dunbar, Joel, (Marcellus,) lot 8, farmer 106. 
Dunlop, James M., (Marcellus.) lot 31, far- 

mer 100. 
EARLL, WM. & SON, (Thorn Hill,) lot 53, 

fanner US. 
Eastman, J. Russell, (Marietta,) lot 63, far- 
mer 50. 

EASTON, SAMUEL H.. (Thorn Hill,) lot 

62, termer 15. 
Edds, Polly, (Marcellus.) seamstress. 
EDDS, THOMAS, (Marcellus,) factory 

hand. 



276 ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

FRED. H. GRAY, 

ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW, 

No. 1 COLLINS BLOCK, 

SYRACUSE, - 1ST. Y. 

GEAFF <fc NIES, 

Cor. Jefferson & Franklin Sts, 

(North of Armory Paris;,) Syracuse, IS". "ST., 
Dealers in and Manufacturers of all kinds of 

GRAY LIMESTONE, ORNAMENTAL BASES, CAPS, 

Cornices, Sec. All orders promptly attended to. 




D. D. SMITH'S 

NTAL RO 





3 

No. 1 Pike Block, Syracuse, N. Y. 

All Branches of the Profession Executed in the hest and most approved Modern 
Style. 

Teeth Filled and Inserted on Gold, Platina, Rubber and Silver Plates. 

House, 90 Warren Street, 



BALDWINSVILLE LUMBER YARD. 



A. P. HAMILL & CO., 



DEALERS IN 



ALL KINDS OF DRESSED & UNDRESSED PINE & 
Hemlock Lumber. 

Lath, Shingles, Pickets, Cedar Posts, Ladders, Eave Troughs & Tobacco Cases, 
Cor. Gascon and Salina Sts., near R. ». Depot. 

A. P. HAMILL. EUGENE HAMILL. 



MARCELLUS. 



277 



EDWARDS, JOHN, (Marcellus,) lot 24 
farmer 35. ' 

EGLESTON DUANE, (Marcellus Falls ) 
paper maker. 

Eggleston, George A. (Marcellus Falls,) 
carpenter and joiner. 

Eg^leston John, (Skaueateles,) lot 61, 
farmer 63. 

Eggleston, John, (Marcellus Falls,) carpen- 
ter and joiner. 

Egleston Jonathan, (Marcellus Falls,) 
mechanic. 

Egleston, Truman A., (Marcellus Falls,) 
blacksmith end machinist. 

Eggleston, Winlock, (Marcellus Falls,) 
farmer. 

Elson, Thomas, (Skaneateles,) lot 46, fann- 
er 10. 

Emmons, Samuel, (Thorn Hill,) lot 63, farm- 
er 9. 

Enos, George W., (Marcellus,) lot 14, farm- 
er 240. 

Evans, Charles, (Skaneateles,) lot 40, farm- 
er 110. 

EVAN'S, JOHN, (Marcellus.) spinner. 

Evans, Wheeler C, (Marcellus,) lot 9, farm- 
er 75. 

Farnham, Sarah, (Marcellus,) boarding 
house. 

Fellows, Cyrus P., (Marcellus,) lot 26, farm- 
er 100. 

FELLOWS GEORGE C, (Marcellus,) lot 
9, farmer 110. 

FLERO. NELSON, (Marcellus Falls,) paper 
maker. 

Fish, David D., (Marietta,) lot 64, farmer 83. 

Fish, John D., (Amber,) lot 64, fanner 115. 

FISHER, RICHARD, (Marcellus Falls,) 
flouring mill. 

Flaherty, Anthony, (Marcellus,) lot 15, far- 
mer 7. 

Former, Hiram, (Marietta,) laborer. 

Franklin, William S. Rev., (Marcellus,) 
Presbyterian minister. 

FROST, EDWARD W., (Marcellus,) car- 
penter and joiner. 

Fulmer, John Wrn., (Marcellus,) black- 
smith. 

GALLUP, GEORGE, (Marcellus,) lot 23, 
farmer 38. 

Garnett & Baker, tMarcellus,) (Tim. Oar- 
nett, Edward F. Baker,) blacksmiths. 

Garnett, Wm., (Marcellus,) {Garnett & Bar 
ker.) 

GAY, FRANCIS, (Marcellus Falls,) lot 17, 
farmer 75. 

Gaylord, Carlos, (Marcellus,) lot 23, farmer 
90. 

GLFFORD, H. A., (Skaneateles,) lot 46, far- 
mer 167. 

Gilbert, Appollos, (Marcellus Falls,) lot 7, 
farmer 114. 

GILBERT, 8ETH D., (Marcellus Falls,) 
lot 8, fanner 22. 

Giles, Wm. P., (Marcellus Falls,) lot 7, far- 
mer 5. 

Gleason, Lawrence, (Navarino,) lot 56, far- 

mer 102. _ . , . _. 

Goodwin, Joseph M., (Marcellus,) lot 24, 

farmer 17. , , 

Gray. Robert, (Marcellus,) blacksmith. 
Gregory, James, (Marcellus,) lot 47, farmer 

48. 



Griflln, Arphaxad, (Marcellus,) meat mark- 
et. 
GRIFFIN, JESSE B., (Marcellus,) lot 25. 

farmer 15. 
Griffin, Wm. P., (Navarino,) painter. 
Grimes, John, (Marcellus,) boot and shoe 

maker. 
Hackett, Wm., (Navarino,) farmer 60V. 
HACKFORD, PHIXIP, (Marcellus,) lot 42, 

farmer 61. 
HACKFORD, THOMAS, (Marcellus,) lot 

42, farmer 60. 
Hackford, Wm., (Marcellus,) lot 41, farmer 

60. 
Hall, Geo. H., (Marietta,) hotel keeper. 
Hall, Jeremiah, (Navarino,) lot 60, fanner 

150. 
Hall, Merritt, (Marietta,) carpenter and 

joiner. 
Hall, Samuel D., (Marietta,) cabinet maker. 
HAMILTON, JOHN, (Marcellus,) lot 43, 

farmer 102X- 
HANLEY, JOHN C, (Marcellus,) lot 6, 

farmer 70. 
Harris, Wm., (Skaneateles,) lot 61, farmer 

60. 
Hart, Andrew, (Marietta,) lot 54, farmer 14. 
Hart, Patrick, (Marietta.) lot 54, fanner 15. 
Raster, Patrick, (Marcellus,) lot 25, farmer 

55. 
HASBROOK, ISAAC B., (Sknaeateles.) lot 

53, farmer 120. 
Hatch, Rev. E. B., (Thorn Hill,) Baptist 

minister. 
HAWKINS, ROBERT, (Marcellus,) stone 

and brick mason. 
Haylor, Benjamin, (Marcellus,) lot 25, far- 
mer 12. 
HAYLOR, HUGH, (Marcellus,) lot 24, far- 
mer 14. 
HENDERSON, GEORGE W., (Marcellus,) 

lot 17, farmer 84, 
HERRLNG, THOMAS J., (Marcellus Falls,) 

general merchant. 
Hewett, Henry, (Marcellus,) lot 8, farmer 

15. 
Hickok, Wm. C, (Marcellus,) lot 17, farmer 

100. 

Hicks. Alanson, (Marietta,) (Maton d Co.,) 
lot 54, farmer 100. 

Hicks, Walter, (Marietta.) lot 64, farmer U. 

Hill, Timothy, (Marietta,) lot OS, black- 
smith and farmer 30. 

Hillyer, Chester, (Marcellus.) lot 16, farmer 
75. 

HOLCOMB BROS., (Marcellus,) lots 33 and 
25, farmer 290. 

Holcomb, Dorastus L., (Marcellus Falls.) 
lot 6, farmer 88. 

HOLMES, PLATT, (Marietta.) lot 47, far- 
mer 196. 

Hooper, Samuel C, (Marcellus,) cabinet 
ware and undertaking. 

Howe, Elhanau W., (Marollus,) lot 31, far- 
mer 25#. 

Howe, P. Dean, (Marcellu 9 .) lpt 31, fanner 
73tf. 

Howlett, Morton S., (Marcellus,) lot 17, far- 
mer 98. 

nOXIK, JOHN A., (Thorn Hill,) lot 61, fir- 
mer 108. 

Hunt, Jasper, (Marcellus,) lot 34, fanner 
102. 



278 



MARCELLJJS. 



Hunt, Seneca, (Marcellus,) lot 26, fanner 

150 
JACKSON, ANDREW, (Marietta,) lot 65, 

Jackson, James M., (Marcellus,) lot 33, far- 
ni6r 48. 

Jackson, John, (Navarino,) lots 49 and 33, 
farmer 300. »„*,.« 

James, Henry, (Skaneateles,) lot 46, farmer 
146. 

Johnson, Franklin, (Marcellus,) lot 32, far- 
nicr 21. 

Johnson, Samuel W., (Navarino,) lot 56, 
farmer 40. . , , „ 

JOHNSTON, JAMES, (Marcellus,) lot 9, 
farmer 60 „ „ , 

JONES, GEORGE F., (Marcellus Falls,) 
paper maker. 

JONES, HENRY, (Marcellus,) lot 14, far- 
mer 47. 

JONES, JOHN C, (Marcellus,) lot 6, far- 
mer leases 150. 

JONES, JOHN F., (Marcellus Falls,) paper 
manufacturer. 

JONES, THOMAS A., (Marietta,) lot 47, 
farmer 56. 

Jones, William E., (Marcellus Falls,) book- 
keeper at Jones' paper mill. 

JUDD, CHANCEY M., (Marcellus,) lot 6, 
farmer 150. 

Kelly, Edward, (Marcellus,) lot 24, farmer 
45. 

Kelley, Mathew.fMarcellus,) lot 24, farmer 6. 

KELLY, THOMAS, (Marcellus,) {Thom- 
son & Kelly.) 

Kellogg, Christopher C, (Marietta,) car- 
penter and joiner. 

Kellogg, Wm. J., (Marrietta,) lot 63, turner 
and farmer 6. 

Kenyon, Joseph C, (Marcellus,) carpenter 
and joiner. 

Kenyon, Robert, (Navarino,) lot 56, farmer 
115. 

Kenyon, Shubael, (Navarino,) lot 56, farm- 
er 33. 

Kerwin, John, (Marcellus,) lot 34, farmer 
40. 

King, Patrick, (Marcellus,) lot 82, farmer 
11. 

King, Thomas, (Marcellus,) lot 15, farmer 
20. 

KINYON & DORRANCE, (Marcellus,) lot 
41, saw and grist, turning and planing 
mills. 

KNOWLES, ROBERT W., (Marcellus,) lot 
20, farmer 50. 

Kyne, Thomas, (Marcellus,) lot 15, farmer 8. 

Lamb, Nancy, (Marcellus,) lot 41, farmer 
6. 

Lamphere, Lemon F., (Marcellus,) lot 16, far- 
mer 5. 

LAWLESS, MICHAEL J., (Marcellus 
Falls.) lot 7, farmer 144. 

LAWRANCE, JEPTHA, (Marcellus,) lot 16, 
farmer 2}tf . 

Leach, James, (Marcellus,) lot 17, farmer 

35*?. 
LEE, DANIEL, (Marietta,) farm laborer. 
Lee, Gilbert, (Marietta,) lot 62, farmer 18. 
Lewis. Thomas, (Thorn Hill,) blacksmith. 
Loftus, Michael, (Marcellus,) lot 25, farmer 

Loomis, Erastus, (Marcellus,) lot 16, far- 
mer 131. 



LOTHRIDGE, REUBEN, (Marcellus,) lot 

9, farmer 120. 
Lothridge, Robert, (Marcellus,) lot 9, far- 
mer 120. 
Lyman, Frederick A., (Marcellus.) attorney 
at law, notary public and asst. assessor 
int. rev. 

Machan, Wm. J., (Marcellus,) retired from 
business. 

Malroy, John, (Marcellus,) lot 9, farmer 21. 

Maroy, Pat, (Marcellus,) lot 23, farmer 12. 

Mason & Co., (Marietta,) (James R. and 
Darius S. Mason and Alanson Hicks,) 
grist and saw mill. 

Mason, Darius S., (Marietta,) (Mason & 
Co.) 

Mason, James R., (Marietta,) (Mason & 
Co.) 

Mather, Alexander, (Marcellus,) boot and 
shoe maker. 

Mather, James D., (Marcellus,) lot 6, farmer 
102. 

May, Wm. H., (Marcellus,) lot 16, farmer 
115. 

McDead, Joseph, (Marcellus,) lot 32, far- 
mer 15. 

McDonald, John, (Marcellus,) lot 14, farmer 
44#, 

McDonald, Martin, (Marcellus,) lot 25, far- 
mer 10. 

McHale, John, (Marcellus,) lot 32, farmer 
22. 

Mclntyre, Frederick D., (Marcellus,) lot 
40, farmer 89. 

McKail, Robert, (Marcellus,) farmer 12. 

McLaughlin, Patrick, (Marcellus,) farmer 
115. 

McNally, John, (Navarino.) blacksmith. 

McNelly, Edward, (Marcellus Falls, ) team- 
ster. 

Mead, Joshua, (Marcellus,) lot 47, farmer 
80. 

MERRILL, JASON A., (Marcellus,) lot 43, 
farmer 100. 

Merrill, Watson, (Marcellus,) lot 42, farmer 
96. 

MILLS, GEO. C, (Thorn Hill,) lot 61, far- 
mer 84. 

Mills, Myrick, (Skaneateles,) lot 61, farmer 
50. 

Mills, Timothy, (Skaneateles,) lot 61, far- 
mer 107#. 

MORGAN, EDWIN R., (Marcellus,) lot 42, 
farmer 27. 

Morris, John, (Marcellus,) lot 16, farmer 41. 

Moses, Benjamin F., (Moses & Clark.) 

Moses & Clark, (Marcellus,) (Irving Moses, 
Benjamin F. Moses, Benjamin Clark,) 
general merchants. 

Moses, Irving, (Moses dt Clark.) 

Moses, Lucius, (Chester Moses & Co.) 

Moses, Job, (Marcellus,) lot 23, farmer 40. 

MOSIER, DANIEL, (Marcellus,) clover and 
grain thresher. 

Murphy, Patrick, (Marcellus,) lot 32, farmer 
14. 

NEWTON, ADOLPHUS, (Marcellus Falls,) 
lot 8, farmer 70. 

NEWTON, ELI A., (Marcellus Falls,) lot 9, 
farmer 73. 

NIGHTINGALE, WM., (Marcellus,) lot 47, 
saw mill and farmer 8. 

North, -Corydon F., (Marcellus,) lot S3, far- 
mer 68. 



MARCELLUS. 



279 



North, John, (Marcellus,) wagon maker. 

North, Justus, (Marcellus,) lot 6, farmer 
150. 

NORTH, ROBERT F., (Marcellus,) lot 15, 
farmer 57. 

Northway, James, (Skaneateles,) lot 76, far- 
mer ii7. 

OAKLEY, WM. J., (Marcellus,) lot 26, far- 
mer 130. 

O'Donal, Roger, (Marcellus,) lot 34, far- 
mer 12. 

Oliver, John, (Marcellus Falls,) lot 8, far- 
mer 128. 

Olmsted, E. F., (Thorn Hill,) lot 62, farmer 
95. 

Olney, N. C. (Navarino,) lot 49, farmer 100. 

Owen, Paul P., (Marcellus Falls,) lot 9, far- 
mer leases 111. 

Parsons, Bishop N., (Marcellus,) retired 
from business. 

Parsons, Israel, (Marcellus,) physician and 
surgeon. 

Payne, Sarah Mies, (Marcellus,) tailoress. 

Phillips, Betsey, (Marcellus,) lot 14, farmer 
15. 

Phillips, Joseph, (Marcellus,) lot 24, retired 
farmer 6. 

Phillips, Thomas, (Marcellus,) lot 16, far- 
mer 133. 

Plant, Wm. A., (Marcellus,) lot 25, farmer 
170. 

Piatt. Isaac R., (Marcellus,) lot 40, fanner 
125. 

Pople, George, (Marietta,) lot 55, farmer 
63. 

Powell, James, (Marcellus,) lot 33, farmer 
15. 

Randall, George, (Marcellus,) lot 33, fanner 
50. 

Randall, Levi, (Marcellus,) lot 33, farmer 
50. 

Rathbun, George, (Marietta,) lot 54, farmer 
133. 

Rathbun. Roxana E., (Marietta,) lot 47, 
farmer 130. 

RAYMOND, LUCRETIA Mrs., (Marcel- 
lus,) farmer. 

Reed, Hiram, (Marcellus,) lot 15, farmer 70. 

Reed, Jonathan, (Marcellus,) farmer 70. 

Reymond, Anthony, (Marcellus,) carpenter 
and joiner. 

Rhodes, Robert D., (Marcellus,) homoeo- 
pathic physician. 

RHODES. THOMAS, (Marcellus,) lot 24, 
farmer 50. 

RHODES, WM. J., (Ma'rcellus Falls,) lot 
7, fanner 65. 

RICE, ELISHA H., (Marcellus,) lot 34, far- 
mer 100. 

RICH, CURTIS L., (Marcellus,) farmer. 

RICHARDS, ISAAC, (Skaueateles,) lot 46, 
farmer 12. 

RICHARDS, ORRIN M., (Marcellus,) leas- 
es far a. , 

Richards, Wm. G., (Marcellus,) lot 40, farm- 
er 52. 

ROCKWELL, ALFRED, (Marcellus,) lot 
33, farmer 57. 

Role, John R., (Marcellus,) lot 32, farmer 90 

Rosier, Worthy, (Marcellus,) carpenter and 
farmer 6. , , 

Rosser, George, (Marcellus,) boot and shoe 
maker. 



Rowley, Solomon, (Marcellus,) lot 17, farm- 
er 12. 

Royce. Mary, (Marcellus,) milliner. 

RUSSELL, JAMES, (Marcellus.) lot 32, 
farmer 12. 

RUSSELL, WM., (Marcellus,) lot 32, farm- 
er 35. 

RYAN, JAMES, (Marcellus,) laborer. 

SALISBURY, RICHARD, (Marietta,) gen- 
al merchant and post-master. 

SARR, BYRON D., (Marcellus Falls,) 
paper maker, 

SARR, JAMES, (Marcellus,) carpenter and 
joiner. 

Savidge, Alisha, (Marcellus,) lot 16, farmer 
23. 

Sayre, James O, (ChesUr, Motes A Co.) 

SEARLE, WM. HENRY, (Marcellus,) lot 
4S, farmer 25. 

Seeley, George T., (Marcellus,) lot 14, far- 
mer 76 is'. 

SEYMOUR, ADDISON M., (Marcellus,) 
tobacconist. 

Seymour Brothers, (Marcellus,) (E Iv-in M. 
and Frank .1/.,) lot 47, fanner 75. 

SEYMOUR, EDWIN M., (.Marcellus,) (Sey- 
mour Brother*.) 

SEYMOUR, FRANK M., (Marcellus,) 
(Seymour Brothers,) tobacconist. 

Seymour, John, (Marcellus,) lot 51, fanner 
50. 

Sharp, James, (Marietta,) lots 63 and 62, 
farmer 100. 

Shean, Cornelius, (Marcellus,) lot 15, far- 
mer 85. 

Shepard, Hezekiah, (Marcellus. 1 farm.riio. 

Shepard, Nason R., (Marcellus,) lot 7, far- 
mer leases 140. 

SHERMAN BROTHERS. (MareeUni 
Falls,) (Lorenzo D. Sherman, Isaac A'. 
Sherman,) paper mill. 

SHERMAN, ISAAC N.. (Marcellus Falls,) 

(Sherman Brothers.) 
SHERMAN, LORENZO D., (Marcellus 

Falls.) (Sherman Broth- 
Shove. Rev. Benj., (Marcellus.) pastor M. 

E. Church. 
smith, James, (Marcellus,) brewer. 
Smith, John, (Marcellus, i bre.WOr, 
Smith, John D., ( WhUt <f- Smith.) 
Smith, Lyman, (Navarino,) lot 66, saw and 

cider mills, farmer 80. 
Smith. Surren S.. iMurcelluR.) carpenter 

and joiner and farmer 10. 
Spafford, Luther, (Hewlett Hill,) lot 9, far- 
mer 55. 
Spaulding, Selah W., (Marcellus,) lot 31, 

farmer 126. 
Spinks, John, (Marcellus,) lot 16, (inner 

Spinks, John C, (Marcellus.) lot 23, farmer 
137 V. 

SPRAGUE, II.MiVKY, (Marcellus.) flour- 
ing and t$m rnills^ 

Stanley. Joseph S., (Marcellus.) lot 17, far- 
mer 1. 

Steele. Edwin, (Marcellus FalN.i , 
master. 

Stock. James, (Marcellus,) lot 31, farmer 
lease? so. 

Stone, Benjamin F., (Marcellus Falls,) lot 
7, farmer ISO. 




To Harness Makers, Farmers, Teamsters, & others using Team Harness 



a 



The annexed. Engraving Represents the 

Cole Patent Wedge Tongue Trace Buckle," 

Which was Patented Oct. 10, 1865. It hasbeen fully and practical- 
ly tested, and wherever introduced has met with the hearty approval of all parties using it. 
The following are a few of its advantages. 

1. It allows the trace to be drawn PERFECTLY STRAIGHT without any Cramping. 

2. There is no draught on a tongue as in nearly every other trace buckle in use, which is 
liable to cut and break the trace ; but the strain comes directly on an iron wedge, and the hard- 
er the pull on the trace the firmer the wedge holds it. 

3. It is more easily adjusted than any other buckle in use. No hammers, sticks, stones or 
levers being needed to assist in lengthening or shortening the trace. 

4. The saving in wear of traces, will, in a very short time, more than pay the slight dif- 
ference in cost between it and the ordinary buckle. 

5. Any thickness of trace can be used that is desired, as there are rivet holes cast in the 
tinder side of the buckle for the purpose of fastening in layers of leather which will vary the 
space under the wedge as may be required. 

We only ask a fair trial, being confident that it will prove the truth of the above statement. 
For sale by all Saddlery Hardware Dealers and Harness Makers in the United States and 
Canadas. 

Manufactured Exclusively by 

IIARRELL «& 8ARGEANT, SYRACUSE, IV. Y., 

Manufacturers of Saddlery Hardware. 



General Furnishing Undertaker and Furniture Dealer^ 

TXJLLY, 3V. Y. 

COFFINS AND CASKETS 

Constantly on hand, which will be trimmed in any style desir- 
ed. Funerals attended with Hearse on liberal terms. 

Also a good assortment of FURNITURE, which I 
will sell cheaper than the cheapest. Warerooms and Shop, 

ONE DOOR SOUTH OF THE MEAT MARKET, 

On the Livermore Place. 




H. IsT. WHITE, 

ARCHITECT 

'* No. 12 WIETING- BLOCK, 



sy:f*.a.otjs:e3, txt. 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTOR}. 



38] 



E. J. STORY, 

DEALER IN 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS, 

29 N. Salina St, 




r^* 



: YOUNG 1 

I hyson \ 



SYRACUSE, N. Y„ 

Where you will find a large and - 

rtmeni of 



I ^ Choice Family Groceries 

"3==^== \ Call and yon will i i that 

-rzz: ' we are bound to sustain the n 




=5 • of the Houe 

■US" A 



CHEAPEST 

IV THE CITY. 



THE SYRACUSE NURSERIES, 

ESTABLISHED I> T 1 £*:{«>„ 

OFFER ALL KINDS OF 






C T A P F 
O X U U JX 



INCLUDING 



J 



FRUIT & ORNAMENTAL TREES 

Shrubs, Hoses, Bedding: out Plants, Bulbous 
Hoots, &c, at Low Prices. 

Special Attention Paid to the Floral Department, and Bou- 
quets, Wreaths and Cut Flowers fur nisi ed on call. 



SMITH, CLARK & POWELL, 

l'ropi'nt ore. 



r% 



282 ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIEECTOliY. 



T H E ORIGINAL 



Travelers Iiisuranc 




OF HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT. 



Cash. Capital 8500,000.00 

.Assets May 1, 1868 • • SI, 010,^58. 68 



Is the Pioneer Accident Company of this country, organized in 1864, and continues to 
insure from $500 to $1 linst accidental death, and $3 to $50 weekly indemnity. 

for total disability caused by accident, at an annual cost of $3 to $25 per $1000, accord- 
ing to occupation. 

Over 128,000 Accident Policies Issued. 

Three Quarters of a Million Paid in Losses, 

Of which $313,000 was paid for $2000 received. 



This Company also grants all forms of Lin- Polities, with indemnity for accidental 
y. if desired, thus uniting life and accident insurance under one policy and pre- 
mium, at stock rates, less than any other Company. By this reduction in rate, a DIVI- 
DEND IS PAID TO THE POLICY-HOLDER IN ADVANCE. 

Life policies issued also upon Participating plans, at usual rates, whereon 

Dividends are Declared Annually, 

And available on payment of second annual premium. Also at " whole world tates" 
w ith no restrictions on, or extra rates for, travel or occupation. 

All Life Policies and Dividends Non-Forfeitable. 

For rates, or further information, add] 

CEO. C. SAWYER, Syracuse, N. Y., 

General Agent for state of New York. 

J. L. WILLARD, Ass't General Agent, 
II. G. LEE, Special Agent. 
I. N. BO WEN, - 

Office 63 and 65 S. Saliua street. Syrai 11 e, N. Y. 



MARCELLUS. 



283 



Stone, Horace M., (Marcellus,) lot 15, far- 
mer 160. 

STREETER, EDWARD H., (Marietta,) 
boot and shoe maker. 

STUCKEY, GEORGE, (Marcellus,) lot 41, 
farmer 71. 

Stuckey, Wm., (Marcellus,) lot 23, farmer 
14. 

SULLIVAN, JOHN, (Marcellus,) lot 40, 
farmer 70. 

SWEET, A. W., (Skaneateles,) lot 46, far- 
mer ] 40. 

SWOFFER, GEORGE, (Marcellus,) gar- 
dener. 

Taylor, John O., (Marietta,) miller. 

Thacker, Alonao B., (Marcellus,) lot 48, far- 
mer 70. 

THOMAS, JAMES E„ (Marcellus Falls,) 
miller. 

THOMSON & KELLY, (Marcellus,) (Thos. 
Kelly, Polydore Seymour Thomson,) 
harness making and carriage trimming. 

THOMSON, POLYDORE SEYMOUR, 
(Thomson & Kelly.) 

THOMPSON, SYLVESTER, (Marietta,) 
stone mason. 

THOMPSON, THOMAS, (Marietta,) lot 
63, farmer 11#. 

Thornton, Philo S., (Marcellus,) lot 23, 
farmer 244. 

Tierney, Dennis, (Marcellus Falls,) engin- 
eer. 

Tucker, Patrick, (Marietta,) lot 63, farmer 
10*f. 

Turner, Orrin, (Marietta,) lot 63, farmer 
120. 

V»nBuskirk, James, (Navarino,) lot 49, 
fanner 99#- 

VanDreson, Adam, (Marcellus,) boot and 
shoe maker. 

Vanetten, Samuel, (Marcellus,) carpenter 
and joiner. 

Vanson, Anson, (MarceJlus,) lot 26, farmer 

97K- 
VanVranken, John B., (Marcellus,) town 

assessor. 
VEEDER, MYRON, (Marcellus Falls,) lot 

7, blacksmith and fanner 19. 
Vinal, Loron N., (Marcellus,) blacksmith. 
Vile, John, (Skaneateles,) lot 53, farmer 

18#. 
Waldron, Ephraim, (Marcellus Falls,) car- 
penter and joiner. 
Walker, Thomas, (Marcellus,) boot and 

shoe maker and justice of the peace. 
WALKER, WARREN S., (Marcellus Falls,) 

plaster and lime manuf. 
WALTERS, PIERSON, (Marietta,) farmer. 
Warren, Wm. H., (Marcellus,) farmer. 
WEBBER, GEORGE D., (Navarino,) lot 

48, farmer 68. , 

Webber, Guy, (Marcellus,) carpenter and 

joiner. I 



Webber, Wm. M., (Marcellus,) cooper. 

Weeks, Frederick, (Marietta,) lot 30, far- 
mer 43. 

Welch, Stephen, (Marcellus,) lot 31, farmer 
80. 

Wells, Warren, (Amber,) lot 64, farmer 35. 

Wheadon, Martin, (Marcellus,) lot 32, far- 
mer 80. 

White, Jeremiah G. B., (Marcellus,) retired 
from business. 

WHITE, R. B., (Marcellus,) principal Mar- 
cellus Union School. 

WHITE, SAMUEL L., (Marcellus,) lot 41, 
farmer 77. 

White & Smith, (Marcellus,) (William B. 
White and John D. Smith,) tinsmiths. 

White, William B., (White & Smith.) 

Whiting, Myron, (Marcellus,) lot 70, far- 
mer 100. 

Whitlock, Harvey, (Marcellus,) lot 43, far- 
mer 95. 

Whitmore, Elias, (Marcellne,) lot 25, build- 
ing mover and farmer 4. 

Whitmore, Wm. D., (Marcellus,) lot 25, far- 
mer 24. 

WICKS, C. H., (Marcellus,) farmer. 

WICKS, THOMAS T., (Marcellus,) lot 40, 
farmer 110. 

WILLIAMS, JAMES, (Skancatcles.) (with 
John,) lot 46, farmer 96. 

Williams, Jesse, (Marietta,) lot 54, farmer 
15. 

Williams, John, (Skaneateles,) (with 
James,) lot 46, farmer 96. 

Williams, Thomas, (Skaneateles,) lot 46, 
farmer 90- 

Wilsie, Edwin D., (Navarino,) lot 56, far- 
mer 100. 

WILTSIE, FRANK A., (Skancatcles,) lot 
53, farmer 170. 

WILTSIE, JOHN, (Navarino.) lot 49,. 
farmer 280. 

Wood, Charles S., (Amber,) lot 6-1, Tanner 
leases of Lewis Wells. 

Wood, James, (Marcellus Falls,) lots, fann- 
er 15. 

Wood, Stephen C, (Navarino,) lot 56, ff«m> 
er60. 

WOODBRLDGE, GEORGE, (Marctilas,; 
painter and paper hanger. 

Woodbridge, Joseph, (Marcellus,) lot 11. 
farmer 70. 

WOODFORD, J. M., (Marccllns,) lot 42; 
farmer 183. 

WRIGHT, FRANCIS C, (Marcellus,) lot 
14, farmer as#. 

WRIGHT, SILAS A., (Thorn Hill.) lot :>3, 
farmer 105. 

Wylie, Benjamin J., (Marcellus,) lot 33, 
farmer leases l'i">. 

Wylie, P. Joseph, (Marcellus} lot 38, fann- 
er leases 100. 



Q 



284 



ONONDA GA CO TTNTY B USINESS DIRECT OE Y. 




B 




m 



E 




LLIA 




DEALER IN 



WARRE 

SYRACUSE, IV. Y. 




Meiodeons, Organs, Music Books, 

Sheet Music, Stools, Spreads, &c, 

o. 25 



COUNTRY MERCHANTS ATTENTION. 



York, Smith & Hinmair, 



W 



And Brokers in General Merchandise. 

At 92 East Genesee Street, Syracuse. 

We always have on hand job lots of Dry Goods and other merchandise, at much 
less than regular prices, and no buyer should visit this city without calling on us before 
purchasing. 

Our retail stock is always full of bargains, and all classes of buyers are invited to 
call and examine our way of doing business. 



ONONDAGA. 



285 



(.Post Office Addresses in Parentheses.) 



ABBE, HART, (Geddes,) lot 71, cider mill 
and farmer 177%. 

ABBEY, JOSEPH F., (South Onondaga,) 
lot 187. farmer 30. 

ABBEY, WM., (South Onondaga,) farmer. 

Adams. Ellen Mrs., (Onondaga.) lot 127, 
farmer 15. 

Adam?. Hiram, (Howie tt Hill,) lot 124, far- 
mer 36. 

Adams, Norman, (Onondaga.) lot 128, far- 
mer 126. 

Agan. James, (Onondaga,) lot 178, farmer 
47. 

AGAN, PATRICK, (Marcellus,) lot 150, far- 
mer 40. 

AINSLIE, MORRIS D., (Onondaga Valley,) 
lot 121, farmer 94. 

Aldridge, Benjamin F., (Onondaga,) lot 154, 
farmer lltJ. 

ALDRIDGE, ROBERT E.. (Onondaga,) lot 
154, farmer 75. 

ALEXANDER. CHARLES, (South Onon- 
daga,) lot 184, farmer 22%. 

Allen, Asahel, (Syracuse,) lot 77, carpenter 
and farmer 1. 

Amidon, Abel, (South Onondaga,) lot 194, 
farmer 69%. 

Amidon, Alfred L., (Onondaga Valley,) lot 
90, farmer 25. 

Amidon, Fannie O. Miss, (Onondaga Val 
ley,) preceptress of Onondaga Valley 
Academy. 

AMIDON, A. FAYETTE, (South Onon- 
daga,) carpenter and joiner. 

Amidon, Henry P., (South Onondaga,) 
stone and brick mason. 

Amidon, Jacob, (Navarino,) lot 19S, farmer 
80. 

AMIDON, LEWIS, (South Onondaga,) lots 
175 and 153, farmer 159. 

AMIDON. MADISON, (NavarinoJ lots 199 
and 198, farmer 95. 

AMIDON, OUTERBRIGE H., (South On 
oudaga.) lot 180, farmer 86. 

Amidon, Polly Mrs., (South Onondaga,) lot 
194, farmer 20. 

Amidon, Samuel, (South Onondaga,) lot 
185, farmer 20. 

ANDERSON, ELI, (Navarino,) lot 199, far- 
mer 153. 

Anderson, George, (South Onondaga,) lot 
193. farmer 190. 

ANDERSON, GEO. W., (South Onondaga,) 
lots 192, 200 and 201, farmer 135. 

ANDERSON. JAMES H., (Onondaga Val- 
ley,) lot 108, farmer 47. 

ANDERSON, STEPHEN. (South Onon- 
daga.) lots 200 and 201, farmer 93. 

ANGELL, NEHEMIAH, (Onondaga Gal- 
ley,) botanic physician. 

Annable, B., (Onondaga,) lots 142 and 144, 
farmer 178. .„,, 

Arnold, Ebenezer Rev., (Syracuse,) lot 91, 
Methodist clergyman and farmer 12#. 

Ashley, Asa, heirs of, (Howlett Hill,) lots 
111 and 123, farmers 33. .,*,-, 

Austin, Cadwelleder, (Onondaga,) lot 153, 
farmer 199^- 



AUSTIN, OSCAR, (Onondaga.) farmer. 

Babcock, Lucena 0. Mrs., (Onondaga Val- 
ley,) lot 140, farmer 6. 

Bakeman, Benjamin, (South Onondaga,) lot 
194, farmer 47. 

Bakeman, Oliver, (South Onondaga,) lot 
178, farmer 16. 

Baker, Isaac, (Onondaga Valley,) allopathic 
phvsician. 

BAKER, JAS. S. Rev., (South Onondaga.) 
lot 202, Congregational clergyman and 
farmer 5. 

Baker, Win. S., (Navarino,) lot 182, farmer 
40. 

BALCOMB, JOHN, (Onondaga.) lot 153, 
grist and saw mill and farnit-r 8. 

Ball, Hezekiah, (Onondaga,) lots 138 and 
152, farmer 82. 

BALLARD, WM„ (Syracuse,) lot 92, gar- 
dener and farmer 10, 

BARKER, CIUERO,(Onondaga Valley,) lots 
122 and 135, farmer 173. 

Barker, John S., (Onondaga Valley,) lot 135, 
farmer 130. 

BARKER, SAMUEL G., (Onondaga Val- 
ley,) lot 121, farmer 24%. 

BARNES, HETTY MBS., (Howlett Hill.) 
(zcith Mrs. Mary Ann Secor,) lot v:l, 
farmer 138. 

Barnes, Isaac, (Onondaga.) lot 129, farmer 
60. 

BARRUS, GEO. B., (Navarino,) all. physi- 
cian. 

BEACH, MERTON L., (Onondaga,) lot 
129, farmer 115. 

Beak, Charles, (Navarino,) lot 216, farmer 
120. 

Bedell, James, (Navarino.) lot 217, farmer 
74. 

Beebe, Janthy Mrs., (Onondaga Vail' 
Websters Grant, farmer 62^- 

Belding, Rex, (South Onondaga.) lots 194, 
185, 201, 184 and 193. farmer SS 

Berry, Caroline Mrs., (Howlett Hill,) lots 
97 and 81, farmer 50. 

BINGHAM, W. R., (Navarino.) farmer. 

Bishop, George, (Onondaga Castle,) lot 1J. 
farmer 1)£. 

Bissell, Byron, (Syracuse,) lot 90, farmer 

BISSELL. FREDERICK D., (Syracuse,) 

lot 90, farmer SO. 
BOGGESS, ALMERON, (Onondaga,) lot 

13S, farmer 47. 
Bocgs, Thomas, (Onondaga,) lot lib, farmer 

e 100 
BOSTWICK, NATHAMKI.. OnoadSM 

Valley,) Webster's Mile Square, | 

dent Onondaga Valley Academy and 

farmer 100. 
Bowler, John, (Onondaga Valley.) lot 163, 

farmer 6. . . , , , 

BOYLE, JOHN, (Onondac^O blacksmith. 
Bradley, Phebe Mrs., (South Onondaga,) 

lot 202, farmer 2 M ■ 
BRAYTON, T. F., (Syracuse, 1 ) miller. 
Brinkerhoff, Isaac A., (Marcellns,) lot 113, 

farmer 94. 



286 



ONONBA GA. 



Britton, Almon, heirs of, (Syracuse,) lot 84, 

farmers 99. 
BRITTON. MATTHIAS & SON.(Syracuse,) 

lot 109, proprietors lime kiln, stone 

quarry and ^and bed, and farmers 53. 
BRONSON. HIRAM, (Navarino,) lots 181 

and 182 larmer 77>£. 
BRONSON LAFAYETTE, (Onondaga,) lot 

152, farmer 77. 
BRONSON, MARCUS E., (Onondaga,) lot 

172, farmer 115. 
BRONSON, MERRITT, (Onondaga,) lot 

172, farmer 60. 
BRONSON, WILLIAM, (OnondagaValley,) 

lots 9 and 6, farmer 70. 
Brown. James, (South Onondaga,) lots 166 

and 167. former 16. 
BROWN, MILTON, (Onondaga Valley,) 

carpentc r and joiner, 
Browning, Alexander, (Onondaga,) lot 177, 

farmer 61. 
Browning, Welcome, (Onondaga,) lot 177, 

farmer 90. 
BUCKLEY, THOMAS, (Syracuse,) lot 74, 

farmer 7. 
BUDLONG, HOLDEN, (South Onondaga,) 

lots 204, 196 and 188, farmer 445. 
BUDLONG, W. H., (South Onondaga,) 

termer, 
BULL. JAMES J., (Onondaga Castle,) lot 

7, farmer 50. 
BVRDICK, ANN M. MRS., (Syracuse,) lot 

91, farmer 7%. 
Burnet, James G., (Syracuse,) lot 93, farm- 
er 13. 
BURNS, CHAS., (Jamesvilla,) lot 149, 

farmer 168. 
BURNS, LAWRENCE, (Jamesville,) lot 

135, farmer 240. 
BURR, JAMES H., (South Onondaga,) 

blacksmith. 
BURT, SAMUEL W., (Onondaga Valley,) 

lot 121, gardener leases 10,Y- 
Busu, Edwin U. Rev., M. D., (South On- 
ondaga,) Methodist clergyman. 
BUTLER. JOHN, (Marcellus,) lot 150, far- 
mer 75. 
Byrne, Patrick, (Onondaga,) lot 131, farmer 

7. 
CADD, JESSE, (Howlett Hill,) farmer. 
Callagher, James, (Howlett Hill,) lot 97, 

farmer 12. 
CALLAHAN, TIMOTHY, (Howlett Hill,) 

farmer. 
Cameron, Addison G., (Syracuse,) carpen- 
ter. 
Cannon, Wm., (Onondaga Valley,) lot 93, 

gardener and farmer 10. 
Card, Samuel, (Onondaga,) lot 126, farmer 

86. 
Card, Wm. H., (Onondaga Valley,) hotel 

proprietor. 
Carl, John, (Onondaga,) lot 125, farmer 185. 
Carlee, David, (Onondaga,) lot 88, farmer 

36. 

Carlen, John, (Navarino,) lot 173, farmer 

75. 
Crpenter, Charles, (Onondaga,) farmer 2. 
Carpenter, Silas, (Onondaga,) lots 144, 131 

and 145, farmer 53. 

Carr, Morris, (Syracuse,) lot 95, farmer 114. 
Case. Alanson, (Onondaga.) harness maker 
and farmer %%. 



CASE, ANNA Mrs., (OnondagaValley.) lot 

120, farmer 4*. 
CASE, CHESTER A., (Navarino.) lot 164, 

farmer 4%. 
CASE, DORCAS Mrs., (Howlett Hill,) lots 

61 and 81, farmer 31. 
CASE, HOMER, (Onondaga,) lots 104, 117, 

128 and 129, farmer 166. 
Case, Wm., (Navarino,) lot 199, farmer 53. 
Catt, Thomas, (Jamesville,) lot 163, farmer 

75. 
CHAPEE, COMFORT T., (Navarino,) lot 

208, farmer 64. 
Chafee, John, (Onondaga Valley,) farmer 

Chafee, Ralph (Onondaga Valley,)Webster's 
Mile Square, cradle maker and farmer 
36. 

Champlain, Paul, (Syracuse,) lot 82, black- 
smith and farmer 71. 

CHAMPLAIN, WM. M., (Navarino,) lot 
188, farmer 59. 

CHAPMAN, ALFRED B., (Navarino,)stone 
and brick mason. 

Chapmau, Hiram, (Syracuse,) lot 76, farmer 
1%. 

CHRYSLER, AMOS, (Navarino,) lots 197 
and 198, insurance agent and farmer 10. 

Chrysler, George, (Navarino,) lot 189, far- 
mer 9. 

Chrysley, Wesley, (Navarino,) lot 107, far- 
mer 45. 

Church, Ambrose H., (Onondaga Valley,) 
lot 120, farmer 12>4. 

CLARK, AUGUSTUS R., (Onondaga Val- 
ley,) lot 147, farmer 40. 

Clark, Barney, (Howlett Hill,) lot 69, farmer 
2. 

CLARK, CHARLES, (Onondaga Castle,) 
*lot 1, farmer 59. 

Claik, Eliza A. Mrs., (Onondaga Valley,) 
lot 107, farmer 1. 

CLARK, GEORGE B., (OnondagaValley.) 
lot 12 i, secretary of Onondaga Valley 
Academy, post master and farmer 45. 

CLARK, GEORGE T., (South Onondaga,) 
lot 119, farmer 70. 

CLARK, JOHN F., (Onondaga Valley,) lot 
120, farmer 60. 

CLARK, LEMUEL G., (Onondaga Valley,) 
Webster's Mile Square, farmer 75. 

Clark, Samuel, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 159, 
farmer 26. 

Clarke, Wm. M., (Syracuse,) lot 91, fanner 
14;*. 

Clary, Adelbert D., (Navarino.) carpenter 
and joiner. 

Clary, George, (Navarino,) carpenter and 
joiner. 

Clear, Samuel.(Syracuse,) lot 74, farmer fi%. 

CLEAVELAND, LEWIS S., (Onondaga,) 
(C. G. Nye & Co.) 

CLEMONS, J. MORSE, (Navarino,) lots 
189 and 197, carriage maker and farmer 
3. 

CLIFT, HENRY, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 
146, farmer 123^. 

Cloney, Patrick, (Onondaga Valley,) farmer 
5)4 . 

Closs, Abram, (Navarino,) lot 197. farmer 1. 

Colliugs, Thomas, (Navarino,) lot 188, far- 
mer 23. 

COMSTOCK, ALASCO, (Navarino,) lot 
183, farmer 10. 



■ ONONDAGA. 



287 



Comstock, Elathan, (Navarino,) lots 174 
and 165, farmer 100. 

COMSTOCK, GASTIN, (South Onondaga,) 
tanner. 

COMSTOCK, JONATHAN, (South Onon- 
daga.) lot 167, farmer 170. 

COMSTOCK, JOSHUA K., (South Onon- 
daga,) general merchant. 

CONKLIN, HENRY, (Onondaga Castle,) 
lot 102, farmer 62,^. ■ 

CONKLIN, JOHN, (Onondaga Castle,) lot 
1, fanner 48. 

Couley, James, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 121, 
farmer 4. 

Conley, Michael, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 
121, farmer 4. 

Conner, Mary Mrs., (Onondaga Valley,) lot 
103, farmer 10. 

Conners, John, (Howlett Hill,) lot 09, far- 
mer 7. 

Connolly, John, (Howlett Hill,) lot 67, far- 
mer 4. 

Cook. Chester, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 120, 
farmer 4. 

COOK, JAMES J., (Onondaga Castle,) lot 
4, farmer 55. 

COOK. LEWIS, (Onondaga Castle,) lot 7, 
farmer 50. 

COOK, MARCUS G., (Onondaga Valley,) 
lot 148, farmer 75. 

Coon, Cyrus, (South Onondaga,) lot 167, 
farmer 4.3. 

Coouey, Margaret, (Onondaga,) lot 131, far- 
mer 16. 

Cornish, Chaneey P., (Howlett Hill,) lots 
112 and 113, farmer 178. 

CORNISH, CHARLES, (Onondaga,) lot 
113, farmer 60. 

Cornish, Susan, (Onondaga.) lot 120, farmer 
100. 

CORN WELL, CHAS., (Onondaga,) (with 
Isaac,) lots 137 and 124, cider mill and 
fanner 2173^. 

Coruwell, George, (Onondaga,) lot 136, far- 
mer 90. 

CORNWELL, ISAAC, (Onondaga,) {with 
Charles,) lots 137 and 124, cider mill 
and farmer 217K- 

COSSITT, DAVIS, (Onondaga,) lots 118 
and 119, farmer 259. 

Cossit, Rufus, (Onondaga,) lot 119, farmer 
22^. 

Coville, Nathan, (Marcellus,) lot 123, far- 
mer 110. 

COVILLE, NELSON, (Howlett Hill,) lots 
82 and 83, farmer 92. 

COWLES, THERON, (Syracuse,) lot 75, 
farmer 90. 

COX, MORRIS, (Onondaga Valley,) farmer. 

Cox, Thomas, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 121, 
farmer 3%. 

Coyne, John, (Onondaga,) lot 119, farmer 
lOtf. 

Craddoek, George, (Onondaga,) lot 104, far- 
mer 29. 

Craddoek, John, (Onondaga,) lot 136, far- 
mer 35. 

Craddoc, Richard jr., (Onondaga,) lot 130, 
farmer 50. 

Craher, John, (Onondaga,) farmer 15. 

CRAMER, GEORGE E., (Onondaga Val- 
ley,) lot 12, farmer 50. , 

CHITTENDEN, JOSEPH, (Onondaga,) lot 
138, farmer 56. 



Crosby, Wallace, (Onondaga Valley,) far- 
mer 1. ■" 

CROSS, LUCIEN, (Syracuse,) lot 92, far- 
nier 2V 

CUMMINGS, CHARLES, (Navarino,) lot 
208, farmer 112. 

Cummings, Cynes, (Navarino,) lot 197, far- 
mer 28^. 

Cummings,* Dennis, (Onondaga,) lot 118. 

farmer 7>£\ 
Curtis, Eward, (Onondaga,) boot find shoe 

maker. 

Curtis, Rona Mrs., (Navarino,) lot 190, far- 
mer 6. 

CURTIS, SOLOMON, 'Syracuse,) lot 89, 

farmer leases of Joel G. Nor 1 r 6 
Curtis, Stephen, (Onondaga,) lot IOT, far- 
mer 3. 
Dady, Stephen, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 120, 

farmer 3. 
Dady, William, (Onondaga, Valley,) lot 120, 

fanner 10. 
DAVIS. EDSONS., (Howlett Hill,) lot 9T, 

cattle broker and tanner 50. 
DAVIS, JOHN, (Nf -ariuo,) lot 211, farmer 

125. 
DAVIS, VAN BURiiN, (South Onondaga,) 

harness maker. 
DAY, DANIEL, (South Onondaga,) lot 

185, farmer 112. 
DAY, D. E., (South Onondaga,) farmer. 
Day, James W., (Onondaga,') lot 155, far- 
mer 70. 
Day, Josiah, (Navarino,) lots 189 and 190, 

farmer 2. 
DAY, LORENZO, (South Onondaga,) lot 

185, farmer 15. 
Day, Peter I., (South Onondaga.) lot 108, 

farmer 1. 
Denick, Jacob, (Onondaga ) '■arpenter and 

joiner. 
Devinne, Ned, (Navarino.) t 10, farmer 

43. 
DICK, ZELOTUS, (Onondaga Valli 

158 and 160, farmer 145 and leaei - 10. 
DICKINSON, OBEDIAII. (Onondaga Val- 
ley,) lots 106 and 107. tanner 
Dighton, Scbvl, ( ieddes.t lot 71 fanner (It. 
DODGE, CURTIS, (Howlett Mil!.! lot 

farmer 200. 
Dodge, Eber, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 100, 

farmer \%. 
DODGE, JOHN. (Onondaga,) tanner. 
Doherty, Edward,, (Onondaga Valley., lot 

58, farmer 53. 
Dolan, Martin, (Marcellus,) lot 150, fanner 

62. 
Donaldson, Highland, i >nondaga.) fan 

36. 
DONALDSON. R013EI P, (Syrams..) lot 

93, farmer 10. 
Donellev, John, (Onondaga,) lot 189 

84. 
Douohue, Cornelius, tSouth Ononda :i. l"t 

169, fanner 9. 
Donohue. Janus, (Howlett Mill ) lot 91, 

farmer 1 

DONOHUE. MICHAEL, (MarcellnaJ lota 
150 and 160, Durmei 

DOUWIN, JOHN A.. (Onondaga Valley.) 
lot lUi. fanner 

Doud, Truman, (Onondaga,) lot 1 11, Bui .or 

56. 



288 



ONONDAGA. 



Dougall, Isabella Mrs., (Syracuse,) lot 99, 

farmer 3X- 
Downing, John, (Syracuse,) lot 190, fanner 

leases of Mrs. Hastings S3X. 
Doyle, Patrick B., (Syracuse,) lot 74, farmer 

16. 
Drake, Ellis, (Syracuse,) stone cutter. 
Drake, James, (Syracuse,) carpenter and 

joiner. 
Dubois, Peter H., (Onondaga Castle,) lot 11, 

DUBOIS, STEPHEN V., (Onondaga Castle,) 

lot 10, farmer 88. 
Dunlap, George, (Navarino,) lot 107, farmer 

DUNLAP, JOHN A., (South Onondaga,) 

hotel keeper and farmer IX- 
Dunn, John. (Onondaga,) farmer 18. 
DURANT, GEORGEf (Onondaga,) lot 138, 

farmer 76. 
Dwyar, Thomas, (Navarino,) lot 189, farm- 
er 6. 
EAGER, ELBERT T., (Jamesville,) lot 11, 

farmer leases 55. 
Eastman, Olive Mrs., (Navarino,) lot 197, 

farmer 1)4. 
EASTON, CHARLES D., (Onondaga,) 

druggist and dry goods merchant. 
EATON CHARLES, (Onondaga Valley,) 

lot 90, farmer 10. 
EATON. NATHAN P., (Onondaga,) lots 

104, 105 and 95, hotel keeper and farmer 

262. 
EDDY, EDWIN, (Onondaga Valley,) 

Webster's Grant, fanner 40. 
Ellis, Albert, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 120, 

farmer 10. 
Ellis, Elijah, (South Onondaga, )blacksmith. 
Emmons, William A., (Onondaga Valley,) 

lot 133, farmer 30. 
ENNEY, ANTHONY, (Navarino,) hotel 

keeper. 
ENNEY, JOSEPH, (Navarino,) lot 198, 

farmer 110. 
Estus, Gideon, (South Onondaga,) (G. Estus 

& Son,) lot;202, farmer 13.M. 
Estus, G. & Son, (South Onondaga,) (Gideon 

<fc Martin W.,) grist and saw mill. 
Estus, Martin W., (South Onondaga,) (G. 

Estus & Son.,) lot 192, farmer 16. 
Eustis, James, (Howlett Hill,) lot 67, farm- 
er 25. 
Evans, John C, (South Onondaga,) lot 175, 

farmer 77#. 
Evans, Wm., (Navarino,) lot 197, black- 
smith and farmer 1%. 
EVERINGHAM, A., (Cardiff,) farmer. 
Everingham, Enoc, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 

147, farmer 37. 
Everingham, Jeremiah, (Cardiff,) lot 213, 

farmer 196. 
Fairbanks, Emma C. Miss, (Onondaga 

Valley,) teacher of primary department 

Onondaga Valley Academy. 
FAIRBANK, HARLAN H., (Onondaga,) 

lots 85 and 86, lime kiln and farmer 108. 
Farrington, Luther E., (Syracuse,) lot 92, 

gardener and farmer 25. 
FAY, ORRIN, (Syracuse,) lot 72, farmer 

3%. 
Fay, Oris P., (Syracuse,) lot 70, farmer 93. 
FAY, RICHARD, (Onondaga,) farmer. 
FAY, WM. A., (Onondaga J lots 85, 86 and 

102, farmer 107. 



Fellows, Cyrus, (Navarino,) lots 165 and 
174, farmer 86^. 

FELLOWS, GAD, (Navarino,) lot 107, far- 
mer 105X- 

Fellows, Henry, (Navarino,) lot 174, farmer 
64. 

FELLOWS, HEZEKIAH K., (Onondaga,) 
lot 170, farmer 98X- 

FELLOWS, JOHN Q., (Onondaga,) lots 
170 and 179, farmer 142. 

Fellows, Pulaski, (Navarino,) lot 173, far- 
mer 150. 

FENNER, ABBOT, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 
195, farmer 15. 

FENNER, ABBOT H., (South Onondaga,) 
lot 187, farmor 15. 

Fenner, Almeron, (South Onondaga,) lot 
195. carriage maker and farmer 15. 

FENNER, JAMES, (South Onondaga,) car- 
penter and joiner. 

Fenner, Truman, (South Onondaga,) lot 
187, farmer IK- 

Ferris, Nathaniel H., (Syracuse,) lot 93, far- 
mer leases of Henry Clark 102. 

FIELD, LEONARD P., (South Onondaga,) 
lots 194, 195, 186 and 187, farmer 191. 

FIELD, SILAS C, (South Onondaga,) far- 
mer. 

Field, Waterman, (South Onondaga,) far- 
mer 32. 

FISK, WILLIAM L., (South Onondaga,) 
lot 202, carriage maker and farmer 3X- 

Fitzpatrick, Edmond, (Navarino,) lot 174, 
farmer 2. 

Flanagan, John, (Navarino,) lot 110, far- 
mer 33. 

Forman, William P., (Syracuse,) attorney 
and counsellor at law. 

FOWLER, MAXWELL T., (South Onon- 
daga,) lots 202, 203 and 205, farmer 182%. 

FOWLER, MOSES, (South Onondaga,) lot 
186, farmer 132X- 

Fox, James, (Navarino,) lot 216, farmer 35. 

FRIEND, WM., (Onondaga Valley,) lot 92, 
gardener and farmer 10. 

Frisbie, Warham, (Onondaga,) lots 130 and 
131, farmer 83. 

Frizelle, Charles, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 
107, farmer 5. 

Fuller, Edward, (Onondaga Valley,) cattle 
broker and farmer 53. 

Fuller, Harlow T., (Onondaga Valley,) 
grocer and farmer 2X- 

Fullerton, William, (Onondaga,) lot 128, 
farmer leases 154. 

Fulmer, David M., (Navarino,) lot 200, far- 
mer 125. 

Fulmer, George, (Navarino,) lot 208, prop, 
saw mill, tjlacksmith and farmer 30. 

Furge, John, (Howlett Hill,) lot 68, farmer 
30. 

Fyler, Alfred, (Onondaga,) lot 84, farmer 

lpflfiPH 10^ 

FYLER, BYRON, (Onondaga,) lot 84, farm- 
er 249. 

Gardner, Ariel L., (Onondaga Valley,) lot 
133, farmer 8. 

Gardner, Lyman, (Navarino,) lots 216 and 
217, farmer 147. 

GARDNER, MARTIN L., (Navarino,) lot 
197, general merchant and post master, 
secretary and treasurer of cheese facto- 
ry and farmer 4. 



ONONDAGA. 



289 



Gates, Horace B., (Syracuse,) lot 90, farmer 

3D and leases of Thaddeus M. Wood, 

40. 
GILBERT, FREDERICK, (Onondaga,) lot 

151, farmer 130. 
GILBERT, RTJFUS, (Onondaga,) farmer 

14G. 
Gilson, Elizabeth S. Mrs., (Onondaga,) lot 

119, farmer 3. 
GILSON, OLIVER O., (Onondaga Valley,) 

lot 120, manuf. vinegar and farmer 6J£. 
Glasheen, William, (Onondaga,) lot 104, 

farmer 3X • 
Golden. John, (Onondaga,) lot 123, farmer 

GRELN, ANDREW M., (Onondaga,) (with 

Norman,) lot 140, farmer 26. 
GREEN, LUTHER B., (Onondaga,) farmer. 
Green, Norman, (Onondaga,) (with Andrew 

M.,) lot 140, farmer 26. 
Green, Oren, (Onondaga,) lot 140, farmer 

67. 
Griffin, Amos, (South Onondaga,) lot 167, 

farmer 1. 
Gwilt, Francis, (Onondaga Valley,) fanner 

2. 
HAIGHT, JOSEPH, (Onondaga,) carpenter 

and joiner. 
HALL, AZARIAH L., (Navarino,) (with 

Jesse.) lot 197, farmer 36. 
HALL, DENNIS, (Navarino,) (with Samuel 

E.,) carpenter and joiner. 
HALL, GEORGE, (Navarino,) lots 206 and 

and 214, farmer 92. 
nail, George M., (Navarino,) lot 197, farmer 

10. 
Hall, Jesse, (Navarino,) lot 197, farmer 1, 

and (with Azariah,) farmer 36. 
Hall, Mary Mrs., (South Onondaga,) lot 167, 

farmer 27. 
nail, Oren, (Navarino,) lot 197, farmer 70. 
Hall, Samuel E., (Navarino,) (with Dennis,) 

carpenter and joiner. 
Hall. Shubel, (Navarino,) lot 206, farmer 

69#. 
HALL, THEOPHILUS, (Navarino,) lot 197, 

farmer 75. 
Hamilton, Francis W., (Onondaga,) lot 163, 

farmer 39.5tf. 
Hamilton, James, (Onondaga,) lots 151, 152 

and 155, farmer 95X- 
Hamilton, Susan E. Mrs., (Onondaga Val- 
ley,) lot 107, farmer 2%. 
HAMMOND, BENJAMIN P. , (Onondaga,) 

lot 140, farmer 30. 
HAMMOND, GEO. W., (Onondaga Valley,) 

lot 134, farmer 81%. 
Hand, James, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 121, 

blacksmith and farmer 2. 
HARDIE, JAMES, (Onondaga,) lot 105, 

farmer 35. 
Harring, John, (Onondaga,) carpenter and 

joiner. , , 

Harroun, Alexander, (South Onondaga,) 

carpenter and joiner. 

HART, ALBERT W., (Howlett Hill,) steam 

saw mill. . . , , nno 

HASKINS, WM. H., (Navarino,) lot 208, 

farmer 1, 
HASTINGS, JOHN, (Onondaga Valley,) 

lot 107, farmer 24. ' ' 

Hastings, John, (Syracuse,) lot <1, farmer 

8. 



HAYS, ARCHIBALD, (Syracuse,) lot 70, 
farmer 131. 

HAYS, FINLEY, (Syracuse,) lot 70, farmer 
1%. 

Hayes, Frederick V., (Syracuse,) lot 92, 
gardener and farmer 15. 

HAYS, ROBERT, (Syracuse,) lot 85, far- 
mer 11. 

Hazzard, John, (Onondaga Valley,) car- 
riage maker and farmer lj^. 

HEMINGS, ALFRED, (Onondaga,) lot 131, 
farmer 14>£. 

Hemmings, Isaac, (Onondaga,) lot 131, far- 
mer 8. 

Hemmings, William, (Onondaga,) lot 118, 
farmer 153. 

HENSBERGER JACOB, (Onondaga,) lot 
74, farmer 10. 

HEWITT, GORDON A., (Howlett Hill,) 
lot 81, farmer 119tf. 

HEWITT, JEFFERSON S., (Navarino,) 
lots 186 and 184, farmer 96. 

Hicks, George, (.Onondaga,) lot 88, fanner 
2. 

HIGBEE, DAVID C, (Onondaga Valley,) 
lot 133, farmer 12. 

Higgins, Morgan, (Onondaga,) lot 127, far- 
mer 8. 

Higgins, Owen, (Onondaga,) lot 127, far- 
mer 70. 

HIGGINS, RUSSELL S., (South Ononda- 
ga,) lot 94, fanner 4#. 

Higgins, Thomas, (Onondaga,) lot 115, far- 
mer SO. 

HINE, JOSIAH, (Onondaga Valley.) lot 
147, farmer 47. 

HISCOCK, JOHN, (Syracuse,) lot 95, fur- 
mer 100. 

HODGKINS, CHARLES H., (South Onon- 
daga,) lot 194, carpenter and joiner and 
farmer 12. 

HODGKINS, LEONARD, (South Onon- 
daga,) lot 202, undertaker, painter and 
farmer 5. 

Hodgkins, Thomas. (Onondaga,) lot '05, 
carpenter and joiner and fanner lo\. 

Hogan, John, (Onondaga.) lot 86. hraer 2. 

Ho^an, Martin, (Marcellus,) lot 150, Dram 
39. 

Hogan, Mary, (Howlett Hill,) lot 67, farmer 
4. 

Hogan, Mat., (Onondaga,) lot lis, farmer 

Hogan, Patrick, (Onondaga.) lot 155, farmer 

Hogan, Thomas, (Onondaga,) lot 86, farmer 

2 
Holden, Wm., (Onondaga,) lot 101. farmer 

Holmes. Burroughs, (Onondaga.) lot 

farmer 21. 
Hone, Josiah, (Onondaga Valley.* lot 

farmer 47. 

HOPPER, JOHN J.. (Onondaera Valley,] 

lots 106 and 91. Webtter'l Oram ami 

Mile Square, farmer 886. 
Horagsn, Michael, (Syracuse.) lot 91. far- 
inn leasee •'■. 

HORTON, AVKRY A., (Onondaga \ all. \ .i 

lot 188, farmer 22. 
Horton, Benjamin, (Syracuse,) lot ,.'. tar 

mer 18tf . . _ , , 

Hotchkiss, Anna Mrs., (Onondaga Cnstle.) 

lot 11, farmer 21. 



290 ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Agent for the following First-Class 






Commerce, of Albany, Capital, - - $500,000 

Capital City, of Albany, .... 250,000 

Charter Oak, of Hartford, Ct., - - 175,000 

Merchants', of Providence, R. I., - 250,000 

Narragansett, of Providence, R. I., - - 500,000 

Office No. 9 Clinton Block, 



I. B. EARLL, 

PHYSICIAN & SURGE© 

SYRACUSE, TV. Y. 

Office, Rooms 1 & 3 Barnes Block, Cor. Warren 4c Fayette Sts. 
Office open at all Hours Day and Night. 

Residence, 149 South "West St., two Boors West of Onondaga St. 

E^~ N. B.— Especial attention given to Surgery and all Private and Chronic Dis- 
eases, of long or short duration. Also, all Diseases of Women and Children. 



Plain &Ornamental Stencil Plate&Brand 

Cutter. Alphabets and Figures of all Sizes and Styles. Particular 

attention Paid to Cutting Mill and Factory Brands, Key 

and Baggage Checks, with Name and Number. 

P. S.— Orders received for Steel Stamps, Figures and Alphabets. 

2 Townsend Block, 28 West Water St., 

SYRACUSE, IV. Y. 



ONONDAGA. 



291 



Hotchkiss, Charles, (South Onondaga,) lot 

203, farmer 13. 
HOTCHKISS, JONATHAN H., (Onondaga 

Castle,) lots 8 and 11, farmer 100. 
Honghtaling, Peter, (.Syracuse,) lot 109, far- 
mer 6. 
House. Hamilton, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 

120. farmer 5. 
HOUSE, NEWELL, (Onondaga Valley,) 
lots 131 and 134, lime burner and far- 
mer 60. 
nOWD, SAMUEL, (Onondaga,) lot 5, gro- 
cer and farmer 13. 
HOYT, AARON, (Onondaga Valley,) house 

plasterer. 
HUDSON, CHAS. N., (Onondaga Castle,) 

lot 61, farmer 114. 
HULBERT, BENJAMIN F., (South Onon- 
daga,) lot 193, carpenter and joiner and 
farmer 3. 
HULBERT, WALTER, (Navarino,) lot 182, 

farmer 81. 
HULET, THOMAS, (Navarino,) lot 182, 

farmer 62X. 
HULL, DANIEL, (South Onondaga,) 

fanner. 
HULL. EDWARD, (South Onondaga,) saw 
mill, cider mill, turning lathe and car- 
penter andjoiner. 
HULL, JEHIAL, (South Onondaga,)lot 175, 

farmer 133. 
HULL, SAMUEL P., (South Onondaga,) 

lot 175, farmer 60. 
HULL, SARAH MRS., (Navarino,) lot 175, 

farmer 80. 
HULL, SYLVESTER, (South Onondaga,) 
lot 166, farmer 1^. „ . v 

Hunt, David, (Howlett Hill,) (with Hugh,) 

lots 111 and 113, farmer 111. 
HUNT, DAVID, (Navarino.) lot 107, farm- 
er 98J$. . Hrm 
HUNT, EDMUND, (Onondaga,) lots 179 

and ISO, farmer leases 100. 
Hunt, Franklin, (Navarino,) lot 191, farmer 

HUNT; GEORGE, (Syracuse,) lot 90, farm- 

cr 41 . 
Hunt, George W., (Onondaga Valley,) 

Webster's Grant, farmer 90. 
Hunt, Hugh, (Howlett Hill,) (with David,) 

lots 111 and 112, farmer 111. 
Hunt, James, (Howlett Hill,) lot 81, farmer 

HUNT, JERATHMAEL, (Syracuse,) lots 

90 and 91, farmer 35. 
Hunt, John, (Onondaga,) lot 84, farmer 

Hunt, Stephen, (Navarino,) lot 190, farmer 

nUNTER, BARNEY, (South Onondaga,) 

farmer. . T t„h„„ \ 

HUNTER, JAMES, (Onondaga \ alley,) 
carpenter and joiner and fe™ e * "L— 

Huntington, Asa, (Onondaga,) lot 151, tann- 
er 58. 

Huntington, Daniel, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 
147. farmer 104. j„„„ \ int 171 

Huntington, Edward, (Onondaga,) lot 171, 

HunUngSeremiah G., (Onondaga,) lot 
Hurl5S e (Syr 3 ac„se.)lot75,f | rme^ 
HUTCHINGS, FREDERICK H., (Onon 
daga,) harness maker. 



Hutchings, Horace, (South Onondaga,) lots 

212, 213, 220 and 221. termer 275. 
Hutchings, Isaac A., (Cardiff,) lot 221, far- 
mer 100. 
Hutton , Robert, (Syracuse,) boot and shoe 

maker. 
Irvin, Samuel, (Syracuse,) lot 92, farmer 2. 
Irving, Samuel, (Syracuse,) lot 94, farmer 3. 
Isbcll, Benjamin, (Onondaga,) lot 115, far- 
mer 10. 
Isbell, Charles, (Onondaga,) lot 115, farmer 

40. 
ISBELL, WILLIAM, (Onondaga.) lot 138, 

farmer 22. 
Isbell, William, (Onondaga,) lot 117, far- 
mer 43. 
Jackson, Amos, (Onondaga,) lot 104, far- 
mer 5%. 
Jackson, John G., (Onondaga Castle,) lot 

161, post master and farmer 70. 
James, Isaac, (Onondaga.) lot. 88, farmer 30. 
James, Job, (Onondaga, i lot 88, Burner 15. 
JENKS, JOSEPH, (Onondaga Valley,) far- 
mer. 
JOHNSON, DAVID, (Onondaga,) lot 142, 

farmer 50. 
Joyce, John, (Syracuse,) lot 109. farmer 10. 
JOYCE, THOMAS H., (South Onondaga.) 

lots 150 and 150, farmer 117. 
Keeler, John A., (Onondaga Valley,) boot 

and shoe maker. 
Keeler, Margaret Mrs., (Syracuse,) lot 109, 

farmer 5. 
Kelley, Patrick, (Navarino,) lot 189, farmer 

Kelley, Thomas, (Navarino,) lot 161, far- 
mer?. , . , . «.„ 

Kenyon, Clark W., (Onondaga.) lot 102, 
farmer 50. . . 

Kenyon, Curtis, (Onondaga,) lot 80, farmer 

Kenyon, Daniel, (Navarino,) lot 197, laui 

2° 
KENYON, ENOCH, (South Onondaga,) 

lots 106 andl07, farmer 100 
Kenvon, Enoch G., (Onondaga \ all.-y.) 

(with Lotrip,) lot 134, farmer leases 

116. 
KENYON, JAMES D., (South Onondaga,) 

Kenyo^Lotrip, (Onondaga Valley., .with 

j&0.,) lot 184, fennei -leaaei .116. 
Kenyon, Richard 6., (OnondagaJ M 108, 

KENYON. ROBERT, (Navarino., M Mt, 

KENYON, 7 ROSWELL S.. ,Sn«il, Onon- 

daga) lot 170, farmer 115. 
K«nyon, Samuel, (South OuondagtOlot 184, 

farmer ltf- 
KENYON, THOMAS C. iNi\arino,) lot 

105 termer 980. , ,. , 

KIMBKK. KKi'.i'KKlcK. (Onondaga \ > 

lev iWebeter'a lUla Bquaw, ferroer m 
KimlHT. Mary Mru., (Onondag* \ ■IhyO '"' 

107 farmer 5. , , . _. 

KIMBER, THOMAS, (Syracuse.) lot 79, 

farmer lit. 
KINO. JAMES, (Onondaga Castle,) lot 7, 

farmer 57#. 
KINO VOLNEY, (South Onondaga.) lot 

163, farmer 88. 



292 



ONONDAGA. 



Kingsley, Samuel, (South Onondaga,) lot 
202, allopathic physician and farmer 
40. 
RTNYON, ANSON, (Navarino.) lot 209, 
grist mill, trunk and box factory, and 
farmer 24. 
Knapp, Noah, (Onondaga,) lot 104, farmer 

21. 
KNEELAND, JONATHAN, (South Onon- 
daga,) allopathic physician and farmer 1 
KNOWLES, GEORGE R., (Howlett Hill,) 

{with Horace,) lot 96, farmer 154%. 
Knowles, Horace, (Howlett Hill,) (with 

Geo. i?.,) lot 96, farmer 154ȣ. 
Lamson, Sterling, (Onondaga,) lot 165, far- 
mer 2. 
Langworthy, Henry, (Onondaga,) lot 154, 

iarmer 48. 
Langworthy, Jonathan D., (Syracuse,) lot 

92, gardener \%. 
Lathrop, Charles, (Onondaga,) lot 170, far- 
mer 12. 
Lawless, James, (Onondaga,) lot 100, far- 
mer 104. 
Lawrence, Edgar A., (South Onondaga,) lots 

210 and 211, farmer 87^. 
Lawrence, Horatio G., (Syracuse,) lot 92, 

farmer 100. 
Lawrence, Porter It., (Onondaga,) lot 127, 

fanner 160. 
LAWRENCE, THOMAS, (South Ononda- 
ga,) lot 194, farmer 35#. 
LEE, AMOS O., (Marcellus,) blacksmith. 
Leonard, Joseph M., (South Onondaga,) 

lot 155, farmer 30. 
Lester, Murray B., (South Onondaga,) lot 

177, farmer 13. 
LINCOLN, REUBEN W., (Syracuse,) lot 

73, farmer 100. 
Linsky, John, (Syracuse,) lot 74, farmer 20. 
LODER, WILLIAM, (Onondaga Castle,) 

lot 1, farmer 48. 
Longstreet, Cornelius, (Onondaga Valley,) 
lot 107, sawing, planing and turning, 
and farmer 3. 
Longstreet, James, (Syracuse,) lots 134 and 

106, farmer 134. 
LOOK, RODOLPHTJS, (Onondaga,) lots 

104 and 105, farmer 70. 
Loomis, George, (Syracuse,) lots 73 and 84, 

farmer 80. 
Lord, Polly Mrs., (Navarino,) lot 218, far- 
mer 33.^. 
LORD, THEODORE, (Navarino,) (with 

John B.,) lot 218, farmer 100. 
Lounsbury, Ezra F., (Onondaga,) lot 152, 
farmer 83. 

LUCE, NORMAN, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 
6, farmer 70. 

Luther, Edward P., (Onondaga,) lot 105, 
farmer 30. 

Lynch, Michael, (Onondaga,) lot 104. far- 
mer 224. 

MABEE, HARMON P., (Onondaga (Val- 
ley,) lot 107, agent for Syracuse Min- 
eral Springs, collector and farmer 2. 

MADIGAN, MICHAEL, (Howlett Hill,) 
farmer. 



MAKYES, EDWIN, (Onondaga,) lot 157, 
farmer 178. 

MANN, ENOCH, (Onondaga,) lot 105, far- 
mer 6. 

Mann, Levi, (Onondaga,) lot 105, farmer 40. 



Markham, Milo R., (Onondaga Valley,) far- 
mer 15. 

Marlette, Cornelius C, (Onondaga Vallev ) 
lot 107, farmer 75. 

^n™\Po A ,l! RIS0N ' (Onondaga,) farmer. 
MATHEWSON, JAMES M., (buondaga,) 

lots 102 and 86, farmer 65. 
May, John, (Onondaga,) lot 155, farmer 70>£. 
McAuley, James, (Onondaga Castle,) lot 1, 

farmer 2. 
McCarne, William, (Onondaga,) lot 157. 

farmer 55X- 
McCarthy, Michael, (Onondaga Vallev ) 

butcher. 
McCay, John, (Navarino,) lot 188, farmer 5. 
McCLARY, JOHN H., (Onondaga Castle,) 

lot 10, farmer 70. 
McCLURE, JAMES, (Syracuse,) lot 94, 

gardener 15. 
McCLURE, JOHN, (Syracuse,) lot 92, gar- 
dener 8. 
McClure, Robert, (Syracuse,) lot 94, far- 
mer %%. 
McDonald, James, (Onondaga,) lots 88 and 

89, gardener and farmer 48. 
McDONALD, JAMES W., (Onondaga Val- 
ley,) carriage maker. 
McGovern, Bridget, (Howlett Hill,) lot 69, 

farmer 4. 
McLaughlin, Thomas, (Syracuse,) lot 74, 

farmer 24. 
McMANUS, JAMES, (South Onondaga,) 

lots i83 and 184, farmer 110^. 
McNulty, Michael, (Onondaga,) lots 144 

and 145, farmer 130. 
MERCER, STEPHEN, (Onondaga Valley ) 

grist mill and farmer 5. 
Merril, Jason, (Navarino,) president of 

cheese factory. 
Merritt, Nehemiah, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 

120, farmer 5. 
Millant, Mahala Mrs., (Navarino,) lot 218, 

farmer 1. 
Miller, Henry, (Cardiff,) lot 205, farmer 138. 
Milks, John L., (Syracuse,) carpenter. 
MITCHELL, CHAS., (Howlett Hill,) far- 
mer. 
MONTGOMERY, GEORGE, (Onondaga,) 

lot 153, farmer 140. 
MOORE, GEORGE, (Syracuse,) gardener. 
MOORE, JOHN, (Syracuse,) lot 94, farmer 

8. 
Moore, Wm., (Syracuse,) lot 94, farmer 24. 
MORAN, FRANCIS, (Onondaga,) lots 183 

and 184, farmer 111. 
MORRISSEY, WILLIAM, (South Onon- 
daga,) (with Daniel Ryan,) lot 119, far- 
mer 135. 



MORTON, JOHN L., (Jamesville,) lots 9 
and 12, farmer 158. 

Morton, Perry F., (Onondaga Castle,) lot 8, 
farmer 52. 

Moseley, Chas. W., (Onondaga,) lots 142 and 
143, farmer 130. 

MOSELEY, HORTON J., (South Onon- 
daga,) lot 219, farmer 75. 

Moseley, John, (South Onondaga,) lot 202, 
farmer 18. 

MOSELEY, WILLIAM T., (Onondaga) 
lots 119, 130, 131 and 70, grocer and 
farmer 82. 

MUMPORD, KILBERN, (Onondaga Val- 
ley,) farmer 34#. 



ONONDAGA. 



293 



MURPHY, MICHAEL, (Howlett Hill,) lot 
84, farmer 103. 

Nasdall, Philip, (Howlett Hill,) lot C9, far- 
mer 1. 

Newell, Justis, (Onondaga Castle,) lot 4, 
fanner 105. 

Newell, Justus, lot 93, farmer 170. 

Newman, William W., (South Onondaga,) 
lots 202, 212, 219 and 220, farmer 204. 

NICHOLS, GEO. C, (South Onondaga,) 
lots 202, 200 and 185, farmer 154. 

NICHOLS, JAMES, (Onondaga,) lot 85, 
farmer 2. 

Norris, Robert, (Syracuse,) lot 92, gardener 
and farmer 10. 

North, Eben, (South Onondaga,) postmas- 
ter. 

NORTHWAY, JOSIAH T., (Onondaga 
Valley,) lot 5. farmer 95. 

Norton, Borritt, (Onondaga,) lot 155, far- 
mer 96. 

Norton, Edward L., (Onondaga,) lot 169, 
farmer 100. 

Norton, Owen, (Onondaga,) lot 168, farmer 
100. 

Nye, Charles G., (Onondaga,) (C. G. Nye 
& Co.,) lot 104, farmer 2. 

Nye, C. G. & Co., (Onondaga,) (Charles G. 
Nye, George F. Walters and Lewis S. 
Chaveland,)c&TTinge makers and black- 
smiths. 

O'Brien, James, (Navarlno,) lot 188, farmer 
41. 

O'Brien, John, (Navarino,) lot 188, farmer 

O'BRIEN, JOHN, (Howlett Hill,) lot 69, 
farmer 27. 

O'Brian, Mathew, (Howlett Hill,) lot 97, 
farmer 134. 

O'Brien, Patrick, (Onondaga,) lot 139, far- 
mer 68. 

O'Brien, Patrick, (Howlett Hill,) lot 69, far- 
mer 6. 

O'Connor, John, (Howlett Hill,) lot 97, 
farmer 10. 

O'Donnel, John,(Marcellus,) lot 150, farmer 
25. 

O'Donnell, Mortimer, (Howlett Hill,) lot 
84, farmer 162. 

Olvard, Earl B.. (Syracuse,) lime kiln. 

O'Neil, John, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 108, 
farmer 1. 

Onondaga A'alley Academy, (Onondaga 
Vallev,) Wheaton A. Welch, principal; 
Miss Fanny O. Amidon, preceptress; 
Miss Sarah L. Skinner, music teacher; 
Miss Jane M. Patterson, drawing 
teacher; Miss Emma C. Fairbanks, 
primary dept. ; Nathaniel Bostwick, 
president ; George B. Clark, secretary. 

ORR, JAMES, (Syracuse,) lot 94, farmer 

ORR, JOHN, (Syracuse,) lot 92, gardener 1. 
Orton, Pardon C, (Syracuse,) lot 92, iarni- 

OWEn/jOSEPH, (Onondaga Valley,) ho- 
tel keeper and farmer 3. ,,-„„„ •> 

OWEN, THOMPSON, lOnondaga \ alley,) 
butcher. . . _ Q - 

Paine, Richard D., (Syracuse,) lot ,8, farm- 

Park. Caleb, (Navarino,) lot 173, farmer 10 
Parker, John B., (South Onondaga lot 

187, brick and stone mason and farmer 

20.' 



Parker, Nelson, (Navarino,) lot 189, fanner 

PARSONS, JARED W„ (South Onondaga,) 
lots 184 and li>5, farmer 300. 

Patchen, LovinierMiss, (Onondaga Valley,) 
lot 107, farmer 3. 

Patrick, Mary H. Mrs., (Onondaga,) lot 119, 
farmer %%, 

Patterson, Arthur, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 
107, farmer 5>£. 

Patterson, Jane M Miss, (Onondaga Val- 
ley,) drawing teacher, Onondaga Valley 
Academy. 

Peck, Eliezur, (Onondaga,) lots 104 and 119, 
farmer 7. 

PHILLIPS, ABEL K., (Syracuse,) lot 74, 
farmer 48. 

Phillips, ErastusB., (Onondaga,! allopathic 
phvsician. 

PICKIT, LEWIS, (South Onondaga,) lot 
220, farmer 160. 

PIKE, CHARLES, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 
122, farmer leases 126. 

Pike, John A., (Onondaga,) lot 108, farmer 
leases 50. 

Pinckney, Alpheus, (South Onondaga,) lots 
178 and 179, farmer 219. 

PINCKNEY, ALPHEUS M., (Navarino,) 
lot 107, fanner 106. 

PINCKNEY, DANIEL, (South Ouondaga,) 
lot 195, farmer 14. 

PLNCKNEY, GILBERT, (South Ononda- 
ga,) lot 194, farmer 50. 

Pinckney, Gilbert, (South Onondaga,) lot 
166, farmer 14%. 

Plunkatt, Andrew, (Onondaga,) lot 133, 
farmer 7. 

Pomroy, George, (Onondaga,) lot 103, lime 
kiln and farmer 42. 

Post, George, (Jamesvllle,) lot 3, farmer 00. 

Pratt, Morris, (Onondaga ValU. v.i lot ISO, 
farmer 5. 

Presley, Frank, (South Onondaga,) black- 
smith. 

Pufflt, Ann Mrs., (Navarino,) lot IOC, far- 
mer 20. 

Purdy, Nathaniel Mrs., (Syracuse,) lot 72. 
farmer 74%. 

Quick, Charles, (South Onondaga,) boot 
and shoe maker. 

Quick, James, (South Onondaga,) (O. A J. 
Quick.) . . . _ 

Quick, Olmsted, (South Onondaga,) (O. A 
J. Quick,) lot 'M% fanurr 7 

Quick,!). & J.. (South Onondaga,) (Ofen- 
sted andJamet,) grocer UiMNW 
shoe dealers. 

Randall, Hewitt S., (Onondaga,) lot 131, far- 
mer OQK. . .,»,.« 

Randall, Jonathan, (Onondaga,) lot 155, 
farmer 55. , 

RANDALL. MARTIN, (Onondaga.) lot 1 ,1, 

farmer 200. 

Rann, William R., (Onondaga,) lot 12f,. far- 
mer 160. „ . 

RAY, GBOBGE B., (Syracuse.,) lot 95, far- 
mer 50. 

Ray Madison, (Navarino,) lot MP, farmer 1. 

Ray! Samantha B. Mrs., (Syracuse.' l"t '.'.'. 
tailoress and farmer 2. 

RAYNON JOHN, (Onondaga \ alley,) lota 
i:V>andl45, Banner 106. 

Rayuor, Emmet, (Onondaga,) lot 10h, far- 
mer 12. 



294 



ONONDAGA. 



RAYNOR, HEXRY, (Onondaga.) lot 115, 

farmer 54. 
Raynor, William, (Onondaga,) lot 16, far- 
mer 16. 
Reeman, Seth, (Syracuse.) lot 92, farmer 3 
REESE, HENRY R., (Onondaga Valley ) 

blacksmith. 
Reynolds, James, (Kavarino,) lot 173, far- 
mer 5. 
RICH, JOHN, (South Onondaga,) lots 187 

and 188, farmer 162. 
RILEY, WILLIAM. (South Onondaga ) lot 

169, pedler and farmer 1. 
ROBERTS, SIMON S., (Syracuse.) lot 74 

stone and brick mason and farmer 9 
ROBINSON, E. DENISON, (Howlett Hill ) 

lot 82, farmer 100. 
Robinson, Helen C. Mrs., (Howlett Hill ) 

lot 84, post-mistress and farmer 50 
Robinson, John P., (Howlett Hill,) lots 81 

and 67, farmer 64. 
ROBINSON, LUCIUS D., (Howlett Hill ) 

lot 81, farmer 35. 
ROBINSON, THOMAS, (Howlett Hill,) lot 

81, farmer 50. 
Rockefeller, David, (Syracuse,) lot 79, far- 
mer 92. 
Rood, Martha Mrs., (Onondaga Valley ) lot 

107, farmer \y t . 
Rose Gordon N., heirs of, (Syracuse,) lot 

78, farmer 16. 
Rose, J. Nathan, (Syracuse,) lot 78, garden- 
er and farmer 6J$\ 
Rose Nathan W., (Syracuse,) lot 78, farmer 
60. 

Rose, Sarah B. Mrs., (Syracuse,) lot 75, far- 
mer 60. 
Rose^ William, (Syracuse,) lot 78, farmer 



ROUSE, HIRAM, (Navarino,) lots 183, 189 

and 191, farmer 215. 
Rowe, James, (Navarino,) lot 110, farmer 

ROWE, TRYPHOSA MRS., (Navarino,) 
lots 209 and 218, fanner 100. 

Rozencrance, Eliza Mrs., (Onondaea Val- 

^ t ley.) lot 107, farmer IX- 

RUSSELL, JOHN, (South Onondaga,) lots 
200 and 209, farmer 133. ° 

Ryan ;-,P aniel < (South Onondaga,) (with 
William Morrissey,) lot 119, farmer 135. 

Kyan, Helen Mrs., (Navarino,) lot 215, far- 
mer 21. 

RYAN, HENRY, (Onondaga,) lot 125, far- 
mer 28X. 

Ryan Michael, (Onondaga,) lot 118, farmer 

Ryan Michael, (Navarino,) lot 216, farmer 

SA ^' E ^ S F A D ' howlett Hill,) lots 
67 and 97, farmer 131. 

far' William '(° nonda g a Valley,) lot 107, 
Savage, John, (Onondaga,) lot 106, farmer 

SE ^FiJ?J DAVID, (Onondaga Valley,) far- 
SCO d T ener G 6 E ° RGE ' (S ^ &mB ^ lo * *>, gar- 

TAr^ iot 92 < garden - 

SCOTT, JOHN, (Syracuse,) lot 94, farmer 



Searle Ashabel, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 
107, allopathic physician and farmer 
^* - 

Searle, Nathaniel B., (Onondaga Valley) 
lot 133, farmer 27. 

Searl , Samuel B., (Onondaga Valley,) lot 

133, gardener and farmer 40 
Searles, Richard, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 

134, farmer 3. 

t^IVr E i ija 5^ jrracnse - ) lot 94 - fa ™er 1. 
SEAVER, SETH H., (Onondaga Valley,) 

lot 9, farmer 25#. 
SECOR, MARY ANN Mrs., (Howlett Hill ) 

(rvith Mrs. Hetlit Barnes,) lot 124. far- 
mer 138. 
S«ch, Andrew, (Onondaga,) farmer 68. 
SEELY, JAMES O., (Onondaga,) lot 140 

- farmer 57. 
SEELY, J. OWEN, (South Onondaga,) lot 

220, farmer 108. 
Seeley, Thaddeus, (South Onondaga,) lot 

220, farmer \y£. 
Shanahan, Margaret, (Howlett Hill,) lot 68, 

farmer 162. 
Share, Aaron A. Rev., (Syracuse,) lot 75, 

Universalist clergyman and farmer 37 
Share, Jeremiah, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 12 

farmer 37. 
Sharp, Garret, (Navarino,) lot 197, farmer 

SHARP, JEHUL, (Onondaga Valley,) far- 
mer. 

SHARP, JOHN, (South Onondaga,) lot 
200, farmer 53. 

SHAW, WM., (Syracuse,) lot 109, farmer 
leases of John Darling 15. 

Shearon, Margaret, (Syracuse,) lot 71, farm- 
er 3#. 

Sheehan, Daniel, (Onondaga,) lot 119, farm- 
er 12. 
SHEPHERD, CHARLES, (Onondaga,) lot 

83, farmer leases 280. 
SHEPHERD, JOHN A., (Onondaga,) lot 

85, farmer leases 284. 
SHERWOOD. DANIEL, (Onondaga Val- 

ley,) lots 148 and 162, farmer 185. 
SHERWOOD, LYMAN, (Onondaga Castle,) 

lot 2, farmer 50. 
SHERWOOD, MARY MRS., (Onondaga 

Castle,) lot 2, farmer 56. 
SHOT WELL, GEORGE W., (South 

Onondaga,) lot 177, farmer 200. 
SHUERT, JOHN, (Onondaga,) lot 101, 

farmer 100. 
Sizer, Henry A., (Navarino,) lot 209, farmer 

65^. 
Skallenger, Mathew P., (Syracuse,) (Veil, 

Skallenger & Brother.) 
Skallinger, Wm. L., (Syracuse,) (Veil, Skal- 

linger & Brother.) 
SKELLINGER, MATHEW, (Onondaga 

Valley,) lot 133, farmer 22. 
Skinner, Sarah L. Miss., (Onondaga Val- 
ley,) music teacher, Onondaga Valley 

Academy. 

SLOCUM, EDWARD T., (Onondaga Val- 
ley,) lot 120, farmer 3. 

Slocum, Richard R., (Onondaga Valley ) 
lot 120, farmer 35. 

SMITH, CHAUNCEY D., (Syracuse,) lot 72 
farmer 24^. 

SMITH, L. WHEELER, (Syracuse,) lot 74, 
carpenter and joiner, and farmer 12^. 



ONONDAGA. 



a Do 



Smith, Samuel Rev., (Navarino,) Baptist 

clergyman. 
SPARKS, ABEL, (South Onondaga,) lot 

803, farmer 10X- 
Spaulding, George W., (Onondaga Valley,) 

lot 149, farmer 95. 
8PAULDING, JONATHAN, (Onondaga 

Valley,) lot 133, farmer '26. 
SPEERS, SOLOMON, (Syracuse,) lotB 91 

and 92, farmer 4%. 
Spencer, Miles D., (South Onondaga,) lot 

195, farmer 9. 
STACKHOUSE, JOHN W., (Onondaga,) 

hotel keeper and farmer 1. 
STANTON, JOHN, (Navarino,) lot 189, 

produce broker and farmer 2X- 
Steel, Alexander C, (South Onondaga,) lot 

220, farmer 85. 
STEENBURG, JAMES E., (Onondaga Cas- 
tle,) lot 6, farmer 4J£. 
Steenburg, JohnE., (Onondaga Castle,) lot 

6, farmer 4. 
STIVERS, ELIZA MRS., (Navarino,) lot 

182, farmer 41 #. 
STOLP, GEORGE W., (Syracuse,) lot 74, 

farmer 95. 
STOLP, JOHN, (Syracuse,) lot 74, farmer 

90. 
STRAIL, DAVID,(OnondagaValley ,)black- 

6tnith. 
Streby, Christopher, (Onondaga,) farmer 26. 
Street, A.Dwight, (Syracuse,) carpenter. 
STRONG, C. A., (Onondaga Valley,) far- 
mer. 
Strong, Francis, (Onondaga,) lot 86, farmer 

90. 
Strong, John, (Onondaga,) lot 102, farmer 

43. 
Strong, John M., (Onondaga,) lot 106, far- 
mer 30 and leases 15. 
Strong, Phineas, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 

133, farmer 83%. 
Switser, Frank, (Syracuse,) lot 94, farmer 

10M- 

Taft't, Nathan R., (Onondaga,) lot 119. alio, 
physician and farmer 2^. 

Talbot, Absalom, (South Onondaga,) lot 
178, farmer 40. 

TALLMADGE, JAMES, (Onondaga Val- 
ley,) lot 107, farmer 3. 

Taylor, Patrick, (Howlett Hill,) boot and 
shoe maker. 

THOMPSON, HELIM, (Syracuse,) farmer 
leases 4. „ „ 

THOMPSON, WM., (Onondaga Valley,) 
farmer. _ , 

TILDEN, CHARLES L., (Onondaga \ al- 
ley,) lots 149 and 163, farmer 53. 

TILDEN, ELIHU, (Onondaga Valley,) far- 

Tilden, Willet H., (Onondaga Valley,) lots 
163 and 149, farmer 97. ^ 

Tilton, Martha Mrs., (South Onondaga,) 
milliner and dress maker. ...,„„ 

Todd, Caleb, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 166, 

lit rm (W 1 Q 

Tolman, Harvey P., (Onondaga Valley,) lot 

133, alio, physician and farmer 12 
Torreyi Thomas J., (Onondaga,) lot 85, far- 

TROWBRIDGE. MARTIN L., (Onondaga 
Castle,) hotel proprietor. , 

Tucker, Peter, (Onondaga,) lots 104 and 
118, farmer 10. 



Tnttle, Alfred, (Syracuse,) lot 78, farmer 24. 

UNDERIIILL, JAS. K., (Onondaga,) far- 
mer. 

Underbill, Joseph, (Onondaga,) lots 180, 
172 and 179, farmer 103><f. 

VANHOOSEN, JOHN, (Onondaga,) lot 
126, farmer 80. 

Van Schoick, Abraham, (Jamesville,) lot 
3, farmer 50. 

VAN SCHOICK, ISAAC, (Jamesville,) lot 
163, farmer 51. 

Van Waggoner, Wessel B., (Syracuse,) lot 
110, farmer 154. 

Veil, Skallengcr & Brother, (Syracuse,) 
(Oeorge W. Veil, Miithew P. and Wm. 
L. Skallenger,) grist and saw mills. 

Vine, Henry, (Onondaga,) farmer u. 

VINTON, SAMUEL, (Navarino,) lot 214, 
farmer 62. 

Vinton, Thomas J., (Navarino,) lot 197, 
farmer 14. 

Vosburgh, Mathow, (South Onondaga,) lot 
202, farmer 50. 

Vrooman, Henry R., (Syracuse,) lot 92, 
prop. Brighton Hotel and tanner 2. 

WADSWORTH, JOHN H., (Syracuse,) lot 
89, farmer 136. 

WADSWORTH,. WM. II., (Syracuse,) far- 
mer. 

WALKER, ANDREW, (South Onondaga,) 
lot 187, farmer 8. 

WALL, JOHN, (Onondaga Valley.) lot 13 >, 
boot and shoo maker and lurnier %){. 

WALLACE, GEORGE, (Navarino,) lot 194, 
farmer 17. 

Walters, George F., (Onondaga,) (C. O. 
Nye & Co.) 

WALTER, WILLIAM W., (Onondaga Cas- 
tle,) lot 163, farmer 52. 

Wardsworth, Ambrose S., (Onondaga,) lot 
104, farmer 6. 

Wardsworth, George, (Onondaga,) lot 74, 
farmer 9. 

Wardsworth, Subrana, (Onondaga,) lot 74, 
farmer 97. 

Warner, Cyrus C, (Onondaga.) keeper of 
poor house. 

Warner, Joshua, (Onondaga Valley,) far- 
mer 10. , 

Warner, Samuel E., (Onondaga,) lot 168, 
farmer 35. 

Warner, Wallace, (Onondaga \ alley,) far- 
mer 18. . _ . 

WARNER, WM. W., (South Onondaga,) 
lot 180, farmer 26. 

Way Amasa. (Xavarino,) lot 197. farmer 6. 

WEBBER, WM. I., ^avarluo.) lot IN, 

farmer 82. 1 ,'. „ _ „ , „ . 

Webster, Alonzo, (Onondaga \ alley,) \\ l I 

ster's Grant, fanner 20. 
WEBSTER, L. H., (Onondaga Valley,) far- 

Wclc!i er Jame8, (Howlett Hill.) lot 112, far- 
mer 117. 

Welch, Patrick, (Marcellus,) lot 180, far- 
mer 39. 

Welch, Wheaton A., (Onondaga \ alley,) 
principal of Onondaga Valley Academy. 

WELLER, JOSEPH, eOnoudnga Castle.) 
lot 9, farmer 29. 

WELLINGTON, GEORGE, (Marcellus.) 
lot 125, farmer 2. 

Wells, C. H. A., (Onondaga,) farmer 2V 



296 



ONONDAGA— OTISCO. 



Wells, Lovina, (Onondaga,) lot 127, farmer 
33 

WELLS, LUKE, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 
147, farmer 20. 

Wescot, William, (Syracuse,) boot and 
shoe maker. 

West, Alanson, (South Onondaga,) lots 195, 
196, 203 and 204, farmer 240. 

WEST, CORODON R., (South Onondaga,) 
lot 204, farmer 100. 

Weston. Daniel, (Onondaga,) lot 104, stone 
and brick mason and farmer 2. 

Whedon, James D., (Onondaga,) allop. 
physician. 

Whitbread, Thomas, (Syracuse,) lot 95, far- 
mer 97. 

Whitbread, William, (Onondaga,) black- 
smith. 

Whitcoms, Loren, (Onondaga,) lot 142, far- 
mer 136. 

White, Albert G.. (Onondaga,) lot 99, far- 
mer 62. 

White, George A., (Onondaga,) lot 84, far- 
mer 38. 

White, Henry L., (Onondaga,) lot 99, far- 
mer 54. 

White, Laura A. Mrs., (Onondaga,) lot 136, 
farmer 70. 

White, Sherburn, (Onondaga,) lot 114, far- 
mer 100. 

Whitford, Joseph, (James ville,) lot 12, far- 
mer 41. 

WHITING, SUSAN MISS, (Howlett Hill,) 
lot 97, farmer 1%. 

Whitmon, Elbert E., (Onondaga Valley,) 
lot 106, farmer 12. 

Wiard, Newell, (Onondaga,) lot 141, farmer 
20. 

Wilber, Amos, (Navarino,) lot 215, farmer 
09 X. 

Wilcox, Betsev Mrs., (South Onondaga,) 
lot 202, farmer 40. 

WILCOX, MYRON, (South Onondaga,) 
farmer. 

Wilcox, Steedeley, (South Onondaga,) lot 
202, farmer Z%. 



WILKINSON, GEORGE, (Navarino,) lot 

208, farmer 8. 
Wilkinson, Harriet Mrs., (Navarino,) lot 

216, farmer 1. 
WILLIAMS, DYER, (Syracuse.) lot 93, 

manuf. mowing machines and farmer 

20. 
WILLS, EDWIN, (Navarino,) lot 214, 

farmer 100. 
Wills, William A., (Navarino,) lot 215, 

farmer 140. 
Wilson, Joseph, (Geddes,) lot 71, farmer 

17, 
WILSON, WILLIAM A., (Onondaga,) lot 

139, farmer 36>^. 
Withey, Lorenzo M., (Onondaga Valley,) 

lot 108, farmer 7. 
Wood, Aurillee Mrs., (Navarino,) lot 199, 

farmer 1. 
Wood, Benjamin, (Navarino,) lot 209, farm- 
er 35. 
Wood, Louisa Mrs., (Navarino,) lot 199, 

farmer 6. 
WOODRUFF GEORGE, (Onondaga,) lot 

126, farmer 100. 
WORDEN, SAMUEL C, "-Onondaga 

Castle,) lots 159, 160 and 161, farmer 

leases 150. 
Worthworth, Sidney, (Onondaga,) lot 104, 

farmer 6. 
Wright, Elijah B., (Navarino,) lots 110 and 

118, farmer 170. 
WRIGHT, GEORGE, (Onondaga,) lot 142, 

farmer 58!^. 
WRIGHT, ISAAC, (Onondaga Castle,) lot 

5, farmer 55>£. 
Wright. John, (Onondaga,) farmer 3. 
WRIGHT, H. L., (Onondaga Castle,) far- 
mer. 
WYCKOFF, AUSTIN G., (Navarino,) lot 

189, farmer 109. 
YIELDING, STEPHEN, (Onondaga,) post- 
master, shoemaker and farmer 1%. 
Yoran, Jacob, (Onondaga,) lot 131, farmer 

54. 
Yorker, Mathias, (Onondaga Valley,) lot 93, 

farmer h\. 



-4-^-*- 



OTISOO- 



<Post Office Addresses in Parentheses.) 



ABBOTT, MRS. SOPHIA, (Otisco,} lot 55, 
farmer 150. 

ABBOTT, MYRON W., (Otisco,) lot 100, 
farmer 100. 

ABBOTT, WARNER C, (Otisco,) lot 95, 
farmer 20. 

Ackles, James, (Otisco,) lot 86, farmer 26. 

Adams, A., (Amber,) lot 72, general mer- 
chant. 

Atkins, Benjamin, (Otisco,) lot 14, farmer 
leases 50. 

Aungair, Christopher, (Otisco,)(wi^ John,) 
lot 14, farmer 113. 



Aungair, John, (Otisco,) (with Christopher,) 
lot 14, farmer 113. 

Bailev, Corodon, (Otisco,) lot 80, farmer 
160. 

Bailey, Foster Rev.. (Otisco,) lot4, Reform- 
ed Methodist clergyman and farmer 1 7. 

Bailey, Jaster, (Otisco,) lot 4, farmer 10. 

Bailey. Leonard, (Otisco.) lot 81, farmer 100. 

BAILEY, WARREN N., (Otisco,) lot 99, 
wagon maker. 

BAKER, EDWIN C, (Otisco.) lot 99, gen- 
eral merchant, justice of the peace and 
insurance agent. 



OTIS CO. 



297 



Baker. John W., (Otisco,) lot 82, farmer 

330. 
Baker. William, (Otisco,) lot 55, farmer 

leases 150. 
Bardwell, Lycurgus, (Otisco,) lot 99, farmer 

116. 
BARPWELL, ORREN E., (Otisco.,) lot 99, 

farmer 90. 
Barker, Adelbert E., (Otisco,) lot 99, farmer 

30. 
BARKER, BENJAMIN, (Otisco,) lot 82, 

fanner 92 J£. 
Barker. Harvey, (Otisco,) lot 100, farmer 30. 
BARKER, LORENZO, (Otisco,) lot 100, 

farmer 85. 
Barker, Luther, (Otisco,) farmer. 
Barrows, Alfred, (Amber,) lot 72, carpenter 

and joiner. 
Bay, William, (Otisco,) lot 3, farmer 40. 
Benilev', Mary Mrs., (Otisco,) (ivith Miss 

Emily Clark,) lot 98, farmer 93. 
Billings, Widow, (Vesper,) lot 15, farmer 

48. 
Bishop. George D., (Amber,) lot 79, farmer 

138. 
Bishop, John, (Amber,) lot 78, fanner 114. 
Bolz. Adam, (Vesper,) lot 6, farmer 65. 
Bosse, Jacob, (Otisco,) lot 100, farmer 35. 
Bracken, Richard, (Otisco,) lot 71, farmer 

34#. 
Bradley, Henry, (Otisco,) lot 95, farmer 11#. 
Breed, Aca, (Otisco,) lot 71, farmer 90. 
BREED, WESLEY, (Otisco,) lot 71, farm- 
er 76. 
BURRO ITOHS, SEYMOUR H.,(vesper,) lot 

6, fanner 180. 
BURT. CHARLES M., (Otisco,) lot 55, 

f *i T*XY\ (T Q T 

Burt, Royal, (Otisco,) lot 55, farmer 121. 

Cain, James, (Otisco,) lot 99, stone mason 
and farmer 14. 

Canada, Minerva Mrs., (Amber,) lot 71, 
farmer 5. 

Card, George W., (Amber,) lot 80, farmer 
100. 

Card, Joseph K., (Otisco,) lot 93, farmer 
125. 

Case, Byron E., (Amber,) lot 72, cooper. 

Case, Iris Mrs., (Amber,) lot 71, farmer 42. 

Case, John C, (OtUco,) lot 83, farmer 112. 

Case, P^rez, (Otisco,) lot 83, farmer 40. 

Cassity, Mary Mrs., (Vesper,) lot 100, far- 
mer 2. 

Cato^. Patrick, (Otisco,) lot 14, farmer 14. 

CHRISTIAN, JOSEPH, (Otisco,) lot 81, 
farmer 50. 

CLARK. CHARLES, (Otisco,) lot 100, saw 
mill and farmer 170. 

Clark, Emily Miss, (Otisco,) (with Mrs. 
Mira Bentley,) lot 98, farmer 93. 

CLARK, JACOB P., (Otisco,) lot 100, far- 
mer 306. „ . 

Clark, Philetus, (Otisco,) lot 99, farmer 
200. . „ 

Clay. Charles, (Vesper,) lot 4, farmer 2o 

Cok, William, (Otisco,) lot 71, farmer 8*. 

Cowies, Benjamin J., (Otisco,) lot 93, far- 
mer 140. , , . „., <., 

COWLES, ELISHA, (Otisco,) lot 92, for- 

Cummings, 'John, (Otisco,) lot 93, farmer 

CUNNINGHAM, LORENZO S., (Otisco,) 
lot 71, farmer 76. 



Cunningham, Lucius T., (Otisco,) lot 71, 
farmer leases 75. 

DARROW, D. BRAINARD, (Otisco,) lot 
97, manuf. of clothes wringers and 
fanning mills and farmer 130. 

Darrow, Samuel, (Vesper,) lot 15, farmer 
72. 

Davis, Frank B., (Amber,) lot 72, eclectic 
physician and surgeon. 

DEGOLZER. ANTHONY, (Otisco,) lot 71, 
farmer 61 }£. 

Dewey, Ebenezer, (Amber.) lot 72, gun- 
smith and clock and watch repairer. 

Divelle, Horatio N., (Otisco,) lot 86, fanner 
2^. 

Dorrance, Zenos W., (Otieco.) lot 96. works 
Mrs. E. Peck's farm. 

DORWARD, JAMES, (Otisco,) lot 09, ullo. 
physician and surgeon. 

Dowding. John, (Otisco,) lot 99, farmer 10. 

DOWNEY, DANIEL D., (Otisco,) lot 97, 
saw mill and farmer 4. 

DRAKE, DANIEL W., (Otisco,) lot 93, hop 
grower and farmer 160. 

Earl, Samuel, (Otisco,) lot 94. Burner 86. 

Eastman, J. Russell, (Amber,) lot 96, far- 
mer 114. 

Eddy, Sylvanus, (Amber,) lot 96, fanner 
473!*. 

EDINUER, CHARLES, (Otieco.) lot 6. far- 
mer 104. 

Edinger. Peter, (Vesper,) lot 5. forme 

EDINGER, GEORGE,"(Otisco.) lot «.s, far- 
mer lflo. 

FAIRCHILD, ELBERT W., (Amber,) lot 
79, farmer leases 85. 

Fairchild, John. (Amber,) lot TO. Bin let 

FANCHER, ABRAM, (Otieco.! lot 71, far- 
mer 132. 

FARNAM, ISAAC, (Otisco.) lot 5, farmer 
67X. 

FELLERS. STEPHEN M., (Of ■■>. lot ■>: 
farmer 76. 

Fergeson, Lydia Mrs., (Otisco,) lot 93, for- 
. mer 10. 

Fish, Willis C, (Navarino.) lot TO, firmer 
150. 

FISHER, CHARLES C, (Cardiff.) lot 71, 
farmer 148. 

Fitzgerald, George, (Amber,) (tcUA Murtln 
King,) lot TO, farmer 97. 

Flanagan, William, (Otisco,) lot 93, former 
65. 

French, Asbel, (Otisco.) lot 1, retired for- 
mer. 

French, Asbel Jr., (Vesper.) lot 4, finn.-r 
55. 

French, Gilbert R.. lOtifco.) painter. 

FRISBIE, I. TYLER, (Otisco. i lot 3, for- 
mer 187. 

Gale, Tlieodore, (Otisco,) lot 97. former 

109X- 
Galpiu. Warehfim A.. (Vesper, i lot 18, for- 

mer lenses of O. Qoodeli 
Gatnbi'll. Sqtliro. (Otisco. I lot 97. fmner 16. 

Gambell, William, (Otisco,) lot 9T, custom 
grist mill. 

Gantley. Timothy, (Otisco,) lot 93. former 
leases 10. 

Gantley, William, (Otisco',) lot si, farmer 
leases 50. , . 

GARDNER. JAMES C„ (Otisco.) lot 09, 
general merchant, post master and for- 
mer ox. 



298 ONONDA OA CO UNTT B USINESS DIRECTOR Y. 

SYRACUSE DAILY STANDARD 

BOOK & JOB PRINTING OFFICE. 

22 E. RAILROAD ST., SYRACUSE, N, Y. 



THE DAiLY STANDARD 

Is published every morning, (except Sunday,) at Eight Dollars per Annum, in advance, 

or Twenty Cents per Week. 

THE ONONDAGA STANDARD, 

(We:e::k:jl.y,) 

The Oldest and Largest Paper in Central New York, is Published every Wednesday at 
Two Dollars per Annum in Advance. 

THE STANDARD 

Job Printing House 

Is Prepared with a New and Complete Outfit of 

f HI 1AT1SI & BISl if TK1S 

Of TYPES, PRESSES AND PRINTING MATERIALS. Our facilities are unequaled 
for Printing 

CARDS, CIRCULARS, 
PAMPHLETS, LAW POINTS, 

BILL HEADS, POSTERS, 

CATALOGUES, PROGRAMMES, 

HAND BILLS, WEDDING CARDS, &c, 

AND EVERY VARIETY OP 

In the most approved Style, on the shortest notice and upon reasonable terms. Orders 
solicited and promptly executed. 

SUMMEES & COMPANY, Prop'rs. 



ONONDA GA CO UNTY IS I T SJNESS D1BEI TOM Y. 



299 




Citizens of Onondaga Co. will here find nn Artist of 

LONG & SUCCESSFUL EXPERIENCE 

In thoir own county. Mr. Wooster having fitted up rooms superior to hi- i. 
gai)1 gallery, is prepared to execute orders lor his old friends, and 1 
patronage of many new ones. 

Gallery over C. W. Gardner's Store, Tully, N. Y. 



I 3NT JS "CJ FL Jk. 1ST O E! ! 



*"<■•- -fTro-*- Sr- 




hJ 



Twmm m i 




y 



< 




TUl 



Agency Established in 1851. 

CAPITAL, - - $20,000,000 

INSURANCE IN ALL BRANCHES. 

HALF JIILLIO.V DOLLARS paid lor lo**c* 
in the last seventeen years. Louse* ad- 
justed <fc paid at tlii* office, 

20 S, Salifia SI, 2d floor, Syracuse, N, If, 



300 ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

Cancers Cured ! 

OH NO CHARGE. 

DR. KllfGSLEY, 

OF DFLOIVEIES, 1ST. "ST., 

Has discovered a perfect cure for Cancers without the use of the knife. Thousands of 
cases cured can testify to the efficacy of this plan of treatment. This preparation will 
destroy the specific nature of most ( iancers, in from ten to sixty minutes. Even in those 
large Cancerous affections of the breast, from which so many females die annually, my 
specific is equally as effectual ;>* in those smaller surface Cancers. Ninety-nine out of a 

hundred of all those persons who have died from Cancer. COllld easily have been cured. 

Cancer has been considered from time immemorial the greatest scourge of the human 
rare: lint the time will come when all shall see that it is as remediable as any other dis- 
ease. At the same time remedies are given to purify the blood and fortify the system 
against a renewed attack, in all case-, if the Cancer is not too far ad\ anced, a perfect 
cure is warranted, or no charge. 

Most persons are greatly deceived in regard to the first symptoms and appearance of 
Cancer, considering it very painful from the commencement. Tins i> a sad mistake. 

(causing the death of thousands.) there being hill little or no pain until the Cancer is far 
advanced. The only symptoms for months, and in some cases even for years, is occa- 
sionally either a stinging, itching, smarting, burning, creeping or shooting sensation, 
and in some ca-es not even any of these. Nearly all of those kernels or lumps that occur 
in the female breast, and also those unnatural appearances in the form of crusts or warty 
ice, which appear in either sex on rhe face. lips. nose, eye lids, or any other part 
of the surface, are cancers. Career is very easily cured in its early stage, consequently 
it is of the very greatest importance that all thus afflicted should have immediate treat- 
ment; as thousands of very valuable lives have been lost from pure neglect, having b> 
misguided by physicians having no knowledge of the disease, who, by calling it Scrofula. 
Erysipelas, salt Rheum or some other uon-terrifying disease, lull this unfortunate class 
in the cradle of ignorance, until upon the very verge of death, when, to hide such ignor- 
ance, tic physician tells the patient that it has finally turned to Cancer, and cannot be 
cured. There is no such thing as turning to Cancer. ' Whatever ends in Cancer, began 
in cancel-. Be no longer deceived. If you have th picion of trouble, «i 

immediate relief and thereby preserve life. 

Consumption, Bronchitis, Catarrh. Asthma. Hear! Disease, Dyspepsia, Liver Com- 
plaint, Fits. st. Vitus' Dance. Neuralgia, Scald Head, Piles, all Diseases of the Skin, 
Pimples. Scrofula or Kind's Evil, Fever Sores. Spinal Diseases. Rheumatism. Gout . 
Dropsy, Diabetes; Kidney Diseases, Gravel, and all Diseases peculiar to .Males or Fe- 
males, successfully treated. 

Warts, Corns. Bunions. Moles, Wens, Birth-Marks, Tumors S:c. removed. Especial 
attention given to the treatment of Crooked Feet, Legs, Arms, Spine. Neck, and all other 
deformities. ( ross Eyes straightened, Hare-Lips cured by an entirely new plan of, oper- 
ating. Operations for Stone in the Bladder, Polypus, Strangulated Hernia, Fistula, or 
the cure of False and Crooked Joints, and all deformities or the Eye Lids. Nose,-Lips, 
Neck &c, resulting from Burns or Wounds, performed upon the ientific princi- 

ples. All Diseases of the Eye and Ear treated with very greal success. 

Especial attention given to the treatment of all diseases originating from the errors of 
misguided Youth. 

Patients from a distance, except in Surgical and Cancer cases, by sending a full des- 
cription of their symptoms, can have medicines -.cut by Mail or Express, and be treated 
at. home. 

All letters promptly answered, and medicines ordered, immediately forwarded. 

The Doctor is a gradnftte with an experience of over fourteen years in the practice of 
medicine, twelve of which have been spent in Rome. 

N. B.— All persons troubled with Asthma should send for Dr. Kijagsley's ASTHMA 
SPECIFIC, which will relieve any case immediately. 

After reading this circular, please preserve, and send it to the afflicted, ami all who 
call upon the Doctor are requested to bring the circular with them. 

For Further Particulars, Write the Doctor. 



oris co. 



301 



Gardner, Agnes Mrs., (Otisco,) lot 100, far- 
mer 5. 

GAY, NATHANIEL, (Vesper,) lot 5, far- 
mer 22. 

Gav, William, (Otisco,) lot 86, farmer 16#. 

Gay, William M., (Otisco,) lot 4, farmer 9. 

Gladding, Joshua, (Otisco,) lot 98, farmer 
54. 

Goodwin, Erastus L., (Otisco,) lot 82, far- 
mer 81. 

GOODWIN, HARVEY, (Otisco,) lot 82, 
farmer 75. 

Goodwin, Marcus, (Otisco,) lot 82, farmer 

nx. 

Goff, Samuel, (Otisco,) boot and shoe mak- 
er. 

GOFF, STEPHEN, (Otisco,) lot 55, farmer 
87. 

Goff, Thomas E., (Otisco,) lot 55, farmer 25. 

GRAVES, LEWIS, (Otisco,) lot 98, consta- 
ble and deputy sheriff. 

Graves, Lucius, (Otisco,) lot 98, farmer 22. 

Griffin, Elizabeth, (Amber,) (with George,) 
lot 97, farmer 114. 

Griffin, Frank D., (Amber,) (with Morton 
M.,) lot 96, farmer 107. 

Griffin, George, (Amber,) (with Elizabeth,) 
lot 97, farmer 114. 

Griffin, Isaac, (Amber,) lot 72, retired far- 
mer. 

Griffin, Morton M., (Amber,) (with Frank 
Z).,) lot 96, farmer 107. 

Griffin, Orin E., (Amber,) lot 72, farmer 28. 

Grott, Mrs. Maria, (South Onondaga,) lot 
83, fanner 50&. 

Hale, Francis H., (Otisco,) lot 83, farmer 
294. 

Hanle, John, (Otisco,) lot 95, farmer 93. 

HARTER, ISAAC, (Otisco,) lot 93, farmer 
91. 

Hays, James, (Otisco,) lot 100. farmer 30. 

Heilah, Jasper, (Otisco,) lot 86, farmer 8. 

Henderson, Andrew P., (Otisco,) carpenter 
and joiner. 

HENDERSON, JAMES, (Otisco,) lot 99. 
supervisor of town, merchant tailor 
and sewing machine agent, owns 2 
acres. 

Henderson, James E, (Otisco,) tinsmith. 

HENDERSON, LYMAN K., (Otisco,) lot 
99, prop. Center House. 

Henderson, William, (Otisco,) lot 99, auc- 
tioneer. 

Henderson, William T., (Otisco,) lot 99, 
school teacher and farmer 1. 

Herring, Jacob, (Vesper,) lot 5, farmer 130. 

HILL, EDWARD, (Otisco,) lot 13, farmer 
75 

HILL,' GEORGE W., (Otisco,) lot 99, 
blacksmith. . , , ... 

Hill, Henry J.. (Otisco,) lot 99, blacksmith 

Hill, Joseph, (Otisco,) blacksmith, lot 99, 
farmer 28. 

HILLYER, MYRON, (Amber,) lot 72, har- 
ness maker and farmer 30. 

Hoegslie, Jacob R., (Amber,) lot 96, farmer 
28 

HOTCHKIFF, HIRAM B., (Otisco,) lot 100, 

farmer 64. _ ,. . . . ... 

HOTCHKTSS, HENRY W.. (Amber,) (with 
M. W.,) lot 79, farmer 154. 

HOTCHKISS, M. W., (Amber,) (with Hen- 
ry W.,) lot 79, farmer 154. 
R 



HOYT, EBENEZER S., (Otisco,) lot 99, 

farmer 9. 
Hughson, Sylvester, (Amber,) lot 72, fanner 

Huntley, Ezra, (Otisco,) lot 100, carpenter 
and joiner. 

HURLBUT, HIRAM S., (Otisco,) lot 93, 
farmer 130. 

Hurlbut, William S., (Otisco,) lot 93, far- 
mer 75. 

Hutchings, Henry, (Otisco,) lot 80, farmer 
104. 

JENKS, ANDREW, (South Onondaga.) lot 
83, farmer 21. 

Judson, Lester, (Otisco,) lot 99, town 
clerk. 

Keher, John, (Vesper,) lot 6, farmer 88. 

Kelley, John, (Otisco,) lot 4, farmer ML 

Kennedy, James, (Vesper,) lot 15, farmer 
47. 

Kennv, John, (Otisco.) lot 94 farmer ML 

KENYON, JOHN H., (Amber,) lot 92, far- 
mer 50. 

King, Chauncey J., (Otisco,) lot 4, farmer 
77. 

King, Evander W., (Vesper,) lot 15, farmer 
100. 

KING, GEO. T., (Otisco,) lot 83, fanner 
102. 

King, Hanson C, (Vesper,) lot 15, farmer 
68. 

King, Martin, (Amber,) (with George Fitz- 
gerald,) lot 7S, farmer 97. 

King, Mrs. Hannah, (Vesper,) lot 15, farmer 
141. 

KING, V. LE ROY, (Otisco.) lot 55. far- 
mer 104. 

KINGSLEY, OLIVER H., (Otisco,) lot »5, 
farmer 230. 

KINNEY, WARREN, (Amber,) lot 72. 
farmer 60. 

Kinney, W. J., (Otisco,) lot 93, farmer 
leases 100. 

Kinyon, Aca B., (Amber,) lot 80, farmer 
130. 

Kinvon, Anthony, (Amber,) lot 81, farmer 

100. _ • 

Kinvon, Benjamin, (Amber,) lot 81, farmer 

109. 
Kinyon. Jonathan S., (Amber,) lot SI, farm- 
er 63. 
KINYON, SAMUEL, (Otisco,) lot 87, farmer 

52 - 
Krakan, Frederick, (Otisco,) lot 55, farmer 

25. 

LAMB. CHARLES, (Amber,) lot 72, black- 
smith. 

Lamy, Daniel, (Otisco,) lot W, farmer 17. 

Lanriing, Henrv. (OttBCO,) l"t 'I, fanner 11 I. 

LARKLN, EDWARD, ^Otisco.) lot 10* 
farmer BO. 

LARKIN, THOMAS, (Otisco,) lot 88, farm- 
er 105. 

Lewis, Clement. (Otisco.) lot s-.\ farmer 14. 

Lewis. Hiram. (Otisco. | l<>t 56, hnn< i 

LEWIS, WILLIAM, it rttoOO, Mot 71. farm- 
er leases of A. Degnlzer, tV>. 

Long, John, tOtisoO 1"' '•'■">. fanner I-. 

Loomis. Harvey, (Otisco,) lot W. «qg« 
maker. m _ 

LUCID. MICHAEL, (Otisco.) lot 100, farm- 
er 10 ° 

Lutz, Jacob, (Otisco,) lot 5, farmer 



302 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



ONONDAGA GAZETTE 



AND 




J^lS. M. CLARK, 



BALDWINSVILLE, N. Y. 



AZETTE 



Is published every WEDNESDAY, devoted to choice reading, Miscellaneous and 
Local News, and advertising. Independent in all things. Is a first-class advertising 
medium, having a large circulation thrqughont the County. 

The Job Department is well stocked with first-class material, adapted to all kinds of 
Job Work. 



Terms as Low as the Lowest. 



OTIS CO. 



303 



LYON, DANIEL, (Otisco,) lot 99, farmer 
47. 

Mr Away, Robert, (Otisco,) lot 98, fanner 35. 

McCarthy, John O, (Otisco,) farmer 66. 

McCarthy, Timothy, (Otisco,) lot 98, farmer 
74>*. 

McVoy, Deno, (Otisco,) lot 4, farmer 9. 

Merrills. Andrew,(Otisco,) lot 94, farmer 41. 

Merrit, Austin, (Otisco,) lot 99, boot and 
shoe maker and farmer 9. 

Miles, Mrs. Sophia A., (Otisco,) lot 99, 
niauuf. of English cheese and farmer 
14. 

MILLER, DAVID S., (Otisco,) lot 99, car- 
penter and joiner. 

Miller, Eber, (Otisco Center,) lot 99, far- 
mer 13. 

Monk, Almerian, (Otisco.) lot 4, farmer 12. 

Morgan, John, (Amber,) lot 79, farmer 39,^. 

Morrassey, Danis, (Otisco,) lot 10U, farmer 

in. 

Munson, Alfred, (Otisco.) lot 97, fanner 50. 

Munson, J., (Otisco.) lot 14, farmer 114. 

Murphy, Edward, (Otisco,) lot 13, farmer 
107. 

NEWMAN, RUFUS, (Amber,) lot 72, saw 
mill and farmer 19. 

Niles, A. Jerome, (Otisco,) lot 99, harness 
shop. 

NILES, ALFRED J., (Amber,) lot 72, post- 
master and general merchant. 

NILES, CHARLES E., (Amber,) lot 78, far- 
mer 66. 

Niles, Ira A., (Otisco,) harness maker. 

Niles, James, (Amber,) lot 72. farmer 120. 

Nolan. James, (Otisco,) lot 14, farmer 70. 

Oakden, William B., (Otisco,) lot 99, far- 
mer 30. 

OUTT, HENRY, (Otisco,) lot 4, farmer 65. 

Outt, Theodore, (Otisco,) lot 98, farmer 104. 

PALMER, PRENTICE B., (Otisco,) lot 86, 
farmer 72. 

Park, Thomas P., (Otisco,) lot 94, farmer 
140. 

Parsons, Anna Mrs., (Otisco,) lot 82, far- 
mer 85. 

PATTERSON, GEORGE, (Amber,) lot 80, 
farmer 100. 

Peck, Elizabeth Mrs., (Otisco,) lot 98, far- 
merll. 

Penny, Peter, (Otisco,) lot 83, farmer 32. 

Pomeroy, Byron L., (Otisco,) lot 4, farmer 
22. 

Realman, Peter, (Vesper.) lot 6, fanner loO. 

Realman, Peter Jr., (Vesper,) lot 6, farmer 

45- 
REDWAY, J. H., (Amber.) (with Thomas 

Redway,) lot 72, farmer 120. 
REDWAY, THOMAS, (Amber.) (with J. 

H. Redway,) lot 72, farmer 120. 
Redway, W. S., (estate,) (Amber,) lot J9, 

REED, SAMUEL S., (Otisco,) peddler and 
manuf. of American leather preserver 

Reynolds, Benjamin, (Otisco,) lot 4, blacK- 
smith and wagon maker. 

Rhyn, James, (Otisco.) lot 100 farmer 20 

Rice, Augustus, (Otisco ) lot ! 97 former 125. 

Rice Deforest, (Amber.) lot 79, farmer 130. 

Rice, Edwin, (Otisco,) lot 3 farmer 8b. 

RICE, LEVI, (Otisco,) lot 2 farmer 145 

RICE LEVI O., (Otisco, lot 4, farmei 88. 

RTCE LUTHER, (Otisco.) lot 2, farmer 47 

licl; ORRIN, (Otisco,) (with Stephen,) lot 
4, farmer 205. 



RICE, STEPHEN, (Otisco,) (with Orrin,) 
lot 4, farmer 205. 

ROBERTS, MARTIN, (Otisco,) lot 92, 
farmer 30. 

Robinson, Caleb M., (Otisco,) lot 71, farm- 
er 17. 

Robinson, Orville O, (Otisco,) lot 60, farmer 
125. 

ROOT, AROOT, (Otisco,) lot 97, farmer 
95. 

Root, Hezekiah. (Otisco,) lot 3, farmer 18. 

ROSS, SARAH MISS, (Otisco,) lot 95, far- 
mer 88. 

ROWLAND, HORACE, (Vesper,) lot 16, 
farmer leases KU. 

Rowland, Mary Ann Mrs., (Vesper,) lot 16, 
farmer 80. 

Russell, Joseph, (South Onou(Iaj.'u.) lot 55, 
farmer 75. 

Ryan, James R., (Otisco,) lot 18, fanner 64. 

Ryan, Michael, (Otisco,) lot 99, boot and 
shoe maker. 

Schmidt, John, (Vesper,) lot 10. Burner 110. 

Shaul, Aaron, (Otisco,) lot 94, farmer In-. 

Shaver, Jacob, (Otisco,) lot 100, farmer 106. 

Shay, John, (Otisco,) lot 99, Burner 19. 

Sherman, Chester, (Vesper,) lot 16, farmer 
12. 

Sheroben, William, (Otisco,) lot 13, farmer 
37. 

Sill, Andrew, (Otisco,) lot 100, form* 

Smith, Franklin, (Vesper,) lot 15, farmer 

lf'HBOS 140 

Smith, John N., (Otisco,) lot 82. farmer 100. 

Smith, Mary Mrs., (Otisco,) lot 99, farmer 
38 

Sparks, Lansing. (Otisco.Hot 13. farmer:,:. 

Squires, Richard. (Preble, Cortland Co.,) 
lot 13, farmer 75. 

STONE, JOHN W., (Otisco,) lot 86, hop 
grower and farmer 160. 

Sulivan, John, (Otisco.) lot si. form. 

Sweetland, Henry B., (Otisco, i lot 91, far- 
mer leases 108. 

Thompson, Miles, (Otisco,) lot 96. Burner M 

TOBIN, JOHN, (Otisco. i lot 71. firmer I3.V 

Traub, Gabriel, (OtiBCOU lot B8, Burner 67. 

TUFFLEY, HENRY, (01 -■ o J lot 5, batch- 
er and former 42. 

TUTTLE, JOHN R, (Otisco,) lot 98. farmer 
181. 

TUTTLE, WILLIAM N.. (VeBperJ lot 15, 
fanner 116. 

Ulmsted. Edwin J., (Otisco,) lot 71, miwuiHI 
and farmer 85. 

Vagelein, George, (Veeperj l"t B, former 
105. 

Van Antwerp. Preston. (OoMOj lot M, 
farmer Leaaea B8. 

Van Antwerp, Aaron, (OtWOOj l"t :.. t. inner 

VAN BKNTHUY8KN, JOHN, .Amber.) 

lot 71. former 17.Y 

Ward. Andrew H.. (Ottacojlol 18, pomp 

peddler. 
Webber. Joel J., (dtirco,) lot 82, farmer 

leaaea 7i#. 

Webster, Edward, I OtiaooJ lot 18, irruor 
50. 

WEBSTER, ROBERT K.. (Otisco. i lot IS, 
mail agent and fanner 15. 

Webster, William H., cOtisro.) lot 97. farm- 
er 76. . , . 

Wells, Charles, (Amber,) prop, of Amber 

House. 



304 



OTISCO— POMPEY. 



Wkaley, Francis E., (Amber,) lot 72, gen- 
eral merchant. 

Wheaton, Orange, (Amber,) lot 92, fanner 
61. 

WHEELER, SOLOMON, (Amber,) lot 78, 
farmer 260. 

White, Wheeler H., (Amber,) lot 72, carpen- 
ter and joiner. 

Wisrd, Alva, (Otisco,) lot 2, farmer 20. 

WiTber, Stephen, (Otisco,) lot 80, farmer 
98. 

Wilder, Abel H., (Otisco,) lot 87, farmer 
110. 



V. ox, A. H., (Otisco,) lot 14, farmer 145. 
WILLCOX, CHARLES, (Otisco,) lot 98, 
farmer 72. 

Williams, Samuel, (Amber,) lot 97, farmer 
44. 

Williams, Vildman, (Otisco,) lot 98, cattle 
broker and farmer 5. 

Wilson, John J., (Otisco,) lot 71, black- 
smith. 

Worthington, Theodore, (Otisco,) lot 82, 
farmer 87. 



POMPSY. 



(Post Office Addresses in Parentheses.) 



Ackerman, Matthias, (Jamesville,) lot 5, 
carpenter and farmer 56. 

ACKEKMAN. WESLEY E., (Jamesville,) 
lot 5, bree er of Spanish Merim sheep 
and farmer leases 180. 

Ackley, Asa B., (Delphi,) lot 100, miller. 

ADSIT, GEORGE L., (Watervale,) lot 30, 
farmer 47. 

ADSIT HAMILTON, (Manlius,) lot 8, far- 
mer leases 120. 

Adsit, Lewis P., (Watervale,) farmer leases. 

Ander-on, Benjamin, (Pompey,) lot 27, far- 
mer 100. 

Anderson, Helen, (Pompey,) lot 48, farmer 
60. 

Anderson, Ira, (Pompey,) lot 64, farmer 80. 

ANDERSON, JOSIAH, (Pompey,) lot 38, 
f .i mer 110. 

ATWLLL, GEO. H., (Delphi,) lot 54. vet- 
erinary surgeon, breeder of thorough 
bred American Merino sheep and far- 
mer 256. 

Avery, Egbert I., (Manlius,) lot 8, dealer in 
flue wool and uraded sheep, and farmer 
208. 

Babcock, Timothy P., (Fabius,) lots 98 and 
07. farmer 79. 

Bagg, Thomas A., (Oran,) lot 12, dairyman 
and farmer 130. 

Bak?; , Samuel. (Pompey.) lot 64, farmer 125. 

BALL. ALVIN M., (Pompey,) {with Fred. 
A. M.,) lot 39, carpenter and farmer 70. 

Ball Calvin S. .(Pompey,) repairer of clocks, 
watches and jewelrv, and town clerk. 

BALL, FRKL). A. M., (Pompev,) (with Al- 
t' .V.,) lot 39. carpenter and farmer 70. 

BVLS ,Y, JAMES M., (Oran,) {with Peter 
I).,) lot 2-„>. farmer 73. 

BALSLEY, PETER D., (Oran,) {with Jas. 
J/..) lot 22, farmer 78. 

BARBER, DAVID, (Delphi,) lot 84, dealer 
in live stock, dairyman and farmer 140. 

BARBER, HARVEY, (Delphi,) lot 84, far- 
mer 80. 

Barber, Hattie Miss, (Delphi,; lot 100, dress- 
maker. 



BARBER, M. HINSDALE, (Delphi,) lots 
69 and 84, dairyman and farmer 225. 

Bardon, Dennis, (Pompey Center.) (with 
Thomas,) lot 30, farther leases 350. 

Bardon, Thomas, (Pompey Center,) (with 
Dennis,) lot 30, fanner leases 350. 

Barnes, Duane D., (Oran,) (with Elias,) 
lots 10 and 11, farmer 112. 

Barnes, Elias, (Oran.) (with Duane 2?.,) lots 
10 and 11, farmer 112. 

Barragar, John, (Manlius,) lot 10, stone ma- 
son and dealer in iron. 

Barry, Matthias, (Pompey,) lots 65 and 66, 
builder and farmer 144. 

BATES, BLOWENS & Co., (Delphi,) (Wm. 
A. Bates, Newman Btowens and James 
R. Fenner,) general merchants. 

BATES, WM. A., (Delphi,) (Bates, Blowem 
<{• Co.,) post master. 

BEACH. HFNRY S., (Pompey,) carpenter. 

Beard, Moms, (Pompey.) lots 38, 39 and 48, 
dealer in wool and farmer 220. 

Beard, Randolph, (Pompey,) lots 48 and 49, 
farmer 160. 

BECKER, EDWARD, (Oran,) lot 21, far- 
mer. 

Belding, Levina, (Pompev.) lot 95, farmer 
30. 

BELLINGER, JACOB, (Watervale,) lot 30, 
farmer 72 

Benedict, George, (Delphi,) ot 99, farmer 
91. 

Benedict, Horace P., (Delphi.) (Cook and 
Benedict.) 

BENEDICT, JEROME, (Fabius,) lot 98, 
farmer 87. 

Benson, Alanson P., (Delphi.) lots 68 and 
83. surveyor, dairyman and farmer 190. 

BENSON, NATHAN, (Watervale,) lot 30, 
farmer 40. 

Benson, Robert S., (Manlius,) lot 10, farm- 
er 115. 

Berry, John C, (Pompey.) lots 77 and 78, 
farmer 96. 

Billings, Homer A., (Fabius,) lot 96, teach- 
er and farmer 26. 



POMPEY. 



305 



Birdseye, A. Franklin, (Pompey,) lot 64, 
farmer 25. 

Birdseye, Victory J., (Pompey,) lot 67, 
breeder of thorough bred cattle and 
farmer 38 s ?. 

BISHOP, ORRIN, (Pompey,) lots 50 and 
66, farmer 126>£. 

Blanchard, Albert, (Pompey,) (with Wm.) 
lot 40, mechanic and farmer 14. 

Blanchard, Wm., (Pompey,) (with Albert,) 
lot 40, mechanic and farmer 14. 

Bliss, Chester H., (Pompey,) architect and 
builder. 

BLOWENS, NEWMAN, (Delphi,) (Bates, 
Blowens & Co.,) school commissioner, 
3d district. 

BOARDMAN, JOHN, (Pompey,) lot 79, 
farmer 16X. 

BORDEN, PARKER, (Ponpey,) lots 37 
and 47, farmer 125. 

Bowen, Hudson B., (Oi - an,) (with Luther 
B.,) lots 33 and 44, ra'ser of tobacco, 
dairyman and farmer 143. 

Bowen, Luther B., (Oran,) (roith Hudson 
B.,) lots 33 and 44, raiser of tobacco, 
dairyman and farmer 143. 

BREED, GEORGE W., (Delphi,) (Breed & 
Palmer.) 

BREED & PALMER, (Delphi,) (George W. 
Breed and Edwin A. Palmer,) lot 
100, blacksmiths. 

BREEN, MICHAEL, (Pompey,) lot 80, far- 
mer 61>£. 

Brockway, Ossian A., (Pompey,) lots 26 and 
37, farmer 160. 

Broderick, Frank, (Pompey,) lot 47, farmer 
30. 

BROOKER, EDWARD, (Manlius,) lot 21, 
farmer 60>$. 

BROWN, CHAS. D., (Watervale,) lots 20, 
29 and 30, fanner 60. 

Brown, Harvey, (Manlius,) lot 10, carpen- 
ter. 

Brown, Ira, (Manlius,) lot 10, carpenter. 

BROWN, JOHN C, (Manlius,) lot Slat- 
tern maker and farmer 5. 

Brown, John G., (Delphi.) lot 70, carpenter. 

Buell, Chas. Mrs., (Manlius,) lot 10, mil- 
liner. 

BUELL, CHAS. W., (Manlius,) lot 10, saw- 
yer. 

BUELL, WILLARDB., (Manlius,) lot 10, 
prop, of lime plaster, saw and cider 
mills, surveyor ar d farmer 25. 

BURDICK, HUBBARD S., (Manlius,) lot 
21, breeder ef thorough bred Leicester- 
shire sheep and farmer 75. 

BURDICK, RUSSELL W., (Delphi,) prop, 
of Delphi Hotel, alsoeonrlable. 

Burdick, Spalding, (Pompey.) lot 6i, far- 
mer 20. 

Burgess, Jabez, (Jamesville,) lot 16, far- 
mer 117. . m __ 

Bush, Isaac, (Watervale.) lot 41, farmer 1 5. 

Bush, Jacob, (Pompey,) lots 38 and 43, far- 
mer 275. , . ; > 

BUSH, MORRIS, (Pompey,) lot 39, farmer 

Bush. Thomas B., (Pompey,) lots 26 and 27, 

Bush, Thomas G., (Jamesville.) lots 26 and 
27, carpenter and fanner 50. .... 

BUTLER, DWIGHT, (Jamesville,) lot 4, 
farmer 100. 



BUTTERFIELD, ALBERT H., (Pompey,) 

lots 66 and 67, farmer 100. 
liuttertield, Chas. o.. (Pompey Center,) lot 
53, dairyman, hop raiser and f 
144. 

? U ^ 8 ' U iram ' (Pompey^ lot 61. fanner 80. 

Butts, Homer J., (Pompey.) lot 93. farm, r 
46. 

But.s, Stephen, (Manlius,) lots 7 and 8, 
farmer 111). 

BUZZELL, JOHN P., (Manlius.) (Buss A 
Buzzell.) 

Byrne, R., (Pompey.) lot 63, farmer 4. 

CABLE, DAVID, (Pompey.) carriage ma- 
ker. 

Call, Thomas, (Pompey,) lot 64. farmer 4. 

Cameron, Robert, (Jamesville,) lot 4, far- 
mer 51. 

CAMPBELL, ALFRED E., (Pompey,) cab- 
inet maker, joiner and painter. 

CAMPBELL, SYLVENUS, (Manlius.) lot 
20, farmer leasee 36. 

Candee, Henry, (Pompey Center.) lot 31, 
assistant assessor internal revenue and 
farmer 104. 

Candee, Julius, (Oran,) lot 11, grocer and 
post master. 

Candee, Ralph, (Oran,) lot 11, pedler. 

CANDEE, SAMUEL, (Pompey Center,) lot 
52. dealer in live stock and farmei 51). 

CANDEE, JUDSON, (Pompey Center 

52, physician and surgeon, post master 
and fanner 70. 

Carall, John, (Pompey Center.) lot 43. far- 
mer 63. 

Carey, Daniel, (Pompey.') lot 17. farmer 93. 

Carpenter, Alexander, "(Watervale. | lot 99, 
farmer 108. 

Carpenter, Major, (Delphi,) lot 53, mechan- 
ic and farmer 25. 

Carpenter, Nelson D., (Delphi.) lot 54, far- 
mer 56. 

Carr, Alva H., (Jamesville,) lot 1(1, farmer 

61#. 

Carr, Charles, (Watervale.) lot 29, far: 

140. 
Carr, J., (Pompey,) (with Lurian L.,) lot 

41. 
Carr, James, (Watervale.) lot 41, fanner 

100. 
Carr, Lucian L., (Pompey,) (with J. C'</rr. > 

lot 41. 
Carroll, Owen, (Ponipc r.) lot 63. farmer s2. 
Cashen, John, (Oran.) lot 98, farmer 6. 
CASLER, EZRA, (Waterviil.-.. lot* 99 and 

30, farmer 60. 
Castolo, David, (Pompey,) lot 17, farn.er 

CHAMBERLAIN, EDWARD 8., (Water- 

vale,) lot is, raiser of line wool ► 
and farmer 181. 

Chapin, Hiram, (Pompey,) lot 80, Winer 
26. 

Chase, Hamilton C, (Delphi,) lot 100, far- 
mer 31. 

Christopher, John, < Manilas, t lot G, farmer 
leases 115. 

Clancy, Thomas, (Pompey.) lots (16 and 67, 
farmer 30. 

CLAIM', addisox II . (Manilas 

breeder of thorough bred American 
Merino »\v epand thorough bred horses. 
Hunter. Tippo, Roiieh and Ready and 
Hamiltouian, and fanner 17'.). 



306 



POMPEY. 



Clapp, Carlton, (Pompey,) lots IT and 28, 
farmer 120. 

CLAPP, EDMUND O., (Manllus,) lot 5, far- 
mer 237. 

Clapp, Guilford C, (Pompey,) lot 17, far- 
mer 238. 

Clark, Branson, (Oran,) lot 33, town asses- 
sor and farmer 100. 

Clark, John H., (Pompey,) lot 66, farmer 
300. 

CLEAR, LAWRENCE, (Pompey,) lots 39 
and 49, farmer 65. 

Clear, Martin, (Pompey,) lot 49, farmer 
leases 1S8K- 

CLEMENT, HIRAM, (Pompey,) lot 17 and 
18, farmer 220. 

CLOUGH, WM. A., (Pompey,) lot 82, far- 
mer 200. 

Coats, Benjamin L., (Delphi,) lots 69 and 
70, dairyman and farmer 87. 

Coats, Benjamin, (Delphi,) lot 85, farmer 
8K. 

Coats, Edward S., (Fabius,) lot 82, farmer 
leases 155. 

Coleman, Andrew, (Pompey,) grocer. 

Coleman, T., (Pompey,) lot 26, farmer 90. 

Coleman, T. jr., (Pompey,) lot 26, farmer 
leases 90. 

Conen, James, (Pompey,) lot 63, farmer 
111. 

Conway, Patrick, (Pompey,) lot 63, farmer 
116. 

Cook, A. A., (Delphi,) (Cook & Benedict,) 
(1. A. Cook & Co.) 

Cook, A. A., (Delphi,) (1. A. Cook & Co.) 

Cook & Benedict, (Delphi,) (Horace P. Ben- 
edict and A. A. Cook,) lot 69, proprie- 
tors of Delphi cheese factory. 

COOK, CHAS. W., (Watervale,) lot 28, 
farmer 120. 

COOK, I. A. & Co., (1. A. & A. A.,) (Del- 
phi,) dealers in drugs, medicines,paints, 
oils, groceries and provisions. 

Cook, Seward S., (Apulia,) lot 93, farmer 
138. 

Cook, Wm. R., (Oran,) lot 21, farmer 87. 

Cool, Chas. H., (Jamesville,) lot 26, farmer 
38. 

Cooper, Jerry, (Manlius,) lot 10, stone ma- 
son. 

CORWIN, PHINEAS P., (Oran,) lot 32, 
farmer 127. 

Costalo, John, (Watervale,) lot 19, farmer 
80. 

COSTELLO, MICHAEL, (Manlius,) lot 10, 
farmer 100. 

Costolo, Michael, (Pompey,) lot 18, farmer 
80. 

Cowman, Thomas, (Pompey,) lot 50, fanner 
16. 

Cox, Thomas, (Pompey,) lot 50, farmer 130. 

Crandall, Homer J., (Pompey,) undertaker 
and manufacturer of tin and sheet iron 
ware. 

Cross, Rufus, (Pompey,) lot 80, farmer 42. 

Curtis, Abel. (Delphi,) lot 100, sawyer. 

CURTIS, LEVERETT B., (Pompey,) lot 
65, farmer 46. 

Curtis, Sandford M., (Pompey Center,) lots 
41 and 51, breeder of blooded horses 
and farmer 103. 

Curtis, Wm. J., (Pompey,) lot 65, farmer 
25. 

Dady, John, (Manlius,) lot 22, farmer 47. 



Davis, Alpheus, (Oran,) lot 11, farmer leases 
118. 

Davis, Orson D., (Pompey Center,) lot 68, 
farmer 54, 

Day. John, (Delphi,) lot 70, dairyman and 
farmer 80. 

DE GRUNDY, JOHN, (Manlius,) lot 7, far- 
mer 30. 

Dennison, Daniel D., (Oran,) lot 11, dealer 
in patent rights and farmer 35. 

DEYO, JOSEPH T., (Watervale,) wagon 
maker. 

Dickerson, Andrew, (Manlius,) (with Jo- 
seph,) lot 9, farmer 70. 

DICKERSON, JAMES, (Manlius,) lots 7 and 
8, farmer 79. 

Dickerson, Joseph, (Manlius,) (with An- 
drew,) lot 9, farmer 70. 

Donegan, John, (Oran,) lot 32, farmer 30. 

Doolett, Geo., (Pompey,) (with Henry 3.,) 
lot 64. farmer 200. 

Doolett, Henry S., (Pompey,) (ivith George,) 
lot 64, farmer 200. 

Downs, Chas. A., (Pompey,) lot 80, black- 
smith and farmer 52. 

Doxtater, Andrew, (Manlius,) lot 21, car- 
penter and farmer 57. 

Doxtater, Peter, (Watervale,) lots 19 and 
20, farmer 94>£. 

Duguid, Russel, (Pompey Center,) lot 43, 
drover, dairyman and farmer 200. 

Dunn, Corev, (Pompey,) lot 80, farmer 17X- 

DYER, MARSHALL R., (Pompey,) lot 65, 
raiser of fine wooled sheep and farmer 
175. 

Dygert, Asa B., (Pompey Center,) lot 41, 
farmer 64. 

EATON, HENRY A., (Delphi,) lot 85, me- 
chanic and farmer. 

Edgerton, Freeman B., (Jamesville,) black- 
smith. 

Edgerton, James M., (Oran,) lot 33, raiser 
of tobacco, dairvman and fanner 100. 

EDGERTON, LEWIS O., (Watervale,) 
blacksmith. 

Edgerton, Mary Ann Mrs., (Jamesville,) lot 
26, farmer 13. 

Edgerton, Reuben, (Delphi,) lot 100, farmer 
90. 

Egleston, R. S. Rev., (Pompey,) pastor 
Presb. church. 

ELDRIDGE, JOHN, (Watervale,) lots 40 
and 41, farmer 145. 

Ellis, Chas. H., (Pompey Center,) lot 68, 
dairyman and farmer 100. 

Ellis, Elijah B., (Oran,) lot 12, pedler. 

Ellis, Ira, (Pompey,) lot 80, farmer 105. 

Ellis, Myron, (Oran,) lot 11, farmer 120. 

Ellis, Robert, (Pompey,) lot 65. farmer 14. 

Ellis, Stephen, (Pompey,) lot 38, farmer 95. 

Estes, Wm. B., (Pompey,) lot 67, farmer 
60. 

Farnam, Edwin S., (Delphi,) lot 53, dairy- 
man and farmer 90. 

FENNER, JAMES R., (Delphi,) (Bates, 
Blowens & Co.) 

Fisher, Jane M. Mies, (Delphi,) lot 100, 
dress maker. 

FISHER, LUCIANB., (Delphi,) (Fisher & 
Pratt.) 

FISHER & PRATT, (Delphi,) (Lucian B. 
Fisher and Edgar A. Pratt,) lot 100, 
millers and proprietors of grist, saw 
and planing mills. 



POMPEY. 



307 



FITCH, LUKE, (Watervale,) lot 19, farmer 

liO. 
Fitch. Samuel, (Manlius,) lot 6, farmer 

50%. 
Fitzgerald, Patrick, (Oran.) lot 22, farmer 

-4. 

Fletcher, Joseph, (Jamesvllle,) lot 20, far- 
mer 14. 

FLINN, MICHAEL, (Pompey,) lot 51, far- 
mer 270. 

Foot. Alonzo J., (Pompey,) (with David,) 
lots 79 and 80, farmer 30. 

Foot, David, (Pompey,) (with Alonzo J.,) 
lots 79 and 80, farmer 30. 

Fosmer, Marcus, (Pompey,) lot 80, farmer 
30. 

Fowler, Hubbard I., (Pompey Center,) lots 
52 and (58, dairyman and farmer 114. 

FOX, LYMAN, (Delphi,) lot 70, painter. 

FROST, CALVIN, (Pompey,) (with Mer- 
rick D..) lot 37, farmer 110. 

Frost, John R., (Pompey,) lot 94, farmer 
97. 

FROST, MERRICK D., (Pompey,) (with 
Calvin,) lot 37, farmer 110. 

FUGGLE, STEPHEN, (Delphi,) lot 84, 
dairyman and farmer 165. 

Furlonj.', James, (Delphi,) (Furlong &Beed 
Bros.) 

Furlong & Reed Bros., (Delphi,) (James 
Furlong, Harmon E. and Horace C. 
Reed,) lot 100, wagon making and 
black smithing. 

Galloway, Burnett, (Delphi,) lot 53, farmer 
75. 

Galloway, Henry, (Delphi.) lot 85, farmer 
70. 

GALLOWAY, JAMES C, (Delphi,) (Potter 
& Galloway .) 

GARDINIER, EUGENE, (Pompey,) (/. & 
E. Gardinier.) 

GARDINIER, J. & E., 0?ompey,) (John 
and Eugene.) lot 40, mechanics and pro- 
prietors grist and saw mill. 

GARDINIER, JOHN, (Pompey,) (J. & E. 
Gardinier.) 

Garrett, Albert, (Pompey,) lot 27, farmer 
100. 

Garrett, Joseph W., (Pompey,) lot 28, far- 
mer 117. 

Gates, Charles W., (Manlins,) lot 8, farmer 
leases 180. 

GATES, JUSTIN F., (Jamesville,) lots 4 
and 5, breeder of American Merino 
sheep and Durham cattle, and farmer 
230. 

GEARY, JOHN D., (Watervale,) lot 30, 
student. 

Godfrey, Alanson N., (Delphi,) lot 100, re- 
tired miller and farmer 6. 

Godfrey, Alanson, (Manlius,) carpenter and 
farmer with C. G. Lewis. 

Goouwin, Albert T., (Pompey,) lot .8, lar- 
mer 63. 

GORDON, MICHAEL, (Pompey,) black- 
Gorman, Patrick, (Jamesville,) lot 37, far- 
mer 90. . . „ , .„ 

Grady, Michael, (Oran ) lot 12, farmer 4 

Gradvi Patrick, (Manlius,) lot 21, farmer 

20 
GRAY, JOHN, (Manlius,) lot 21, farmer 

49. 



Gw3 K?J Geor S e > (Pompey,) lot 80, farmer 

Gwynn John, (Pompey,) lot 80, stone, 
brick and plaster mason. 

Haight, Andrew A., (Pompey Center,) lot 
31, farmer 50. 

Hale, A. Sidney Rev., (Pompey,) pastor of 
the Church of the Disciples. 

Hale, Ebenezer, (Oran,) lot 11, farmer 34. 

Hale, I. Albert, (Manlius,) lot 10, mason 
and tobacco dealer. 

HALL, HARVEY L., (Watervale,) farmer 
with U. S. Hall. 

Hall, W. K., (Oran,) lot 33, farmer 11. 

Hall, Upson S., (Watervale,) lot6 39 and 40, 
carpenter and farmer 22. 

Hanchett, Isaac P., (Pompey,) lot 96, far- 
mer 60. 

Hanchett, Nelson, (Pompey,) lot 37, farmer 
87. 

Hanliu, Patrick, (Pompey Center,) lot G2, 
farmer 33. 

Hart, George W., (Delphi,) lot 86, carpen- 
ter and farmer 16. 

Hartnett, Daniel J., (Fabius,) lots 95 and 
96, farmer 138. 

Harvey, H. Rev., D. D., (Manlius,) lot 8, 
farmer 100. 

HASKIN9, ALONZO O, (Watervale,) lot 
40, farmer 93%. 

HATCH, JOHN, (Manlius,) lot 20, farmer 
100. 

Hayden, Carmi, (Pompey,) lot 64, carpen- 
ter and farmer 10. 

Hayden, Daniel E., (Pompey,) post master 
and insurance agent. 

Hayden, Michael, (Watervale,) lot 2!), far- 
mer 50. 

HAYDEN, SAMUEL P., (Pompey,) pa 
merchant and prest. Pompey Acad/ 

Hayden, Willard, (Pompey,) lot 81, fanm r 
27. 

Haydn, David E., (Pompey,) lot 48, far- 
mer 60. 

Hayes, Caroline Mies, (Delphi.) millim r. 

HAYES, EPHRAIM D., (Delphi,) lot », 
raiser of hops and fanner 6M^. 

Hayes, Sandford, (Delphi,) lot 100, itioe- 
maker. 

Hayes, Wm., (Delphi,) lot 100, harness 
maker. 

HIBBARD, CHAS. H., (Manlius.) lot 8, 
breeder of thorough bred UK I 
Merino sheep and farmer 1 10. 

HIBBARD, DAVID, (Manlius,) lota 9 and 
6, farmer 234. 

HIBBARD, ISAAC B. V.. (Manlius.) ncith 
Samuel J/.,) lot 6, dairymau and farm, r 

180. 
HIBBABD, SAMUEL M.. (Kaolins,) nrith 

Isaac D. F.,)lot6, dairyman »'"' i" 

merlSO. „ . 

Hi^gins. John, (Pompey.) lot 39, farmer Is. 

Ilifl, Charles R.. (DelphiJ lota n tad • 
tobacco raiser, dairyman BM funn.i 
200 

HILL. CHAS. R. K., (Delphi,) lot 100. far- 
mer 123. 

mil, Ttnrign W.. .Delphi,) lot 100, dnlry- 
man and farmer 53. 

Hill. Franklin B.,l Pompey Center,) lot 81, 
farmer lease* 

niLL, HENRY C, (Delphi.) lot 54, farmer 
90. 



308 ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

Syracuse Daily and Weekly 

COURIER AND U 



». J. HALSTED, Proprietor. 



. 



TERMS OF THE DAILY: 

'Per Year, in advance, - $8.0' 

Six Mont/is, " - - - f.Ot 

2 hree Months, " - - - 2.00 



-*—-+- 



TERMS OF THE WEEKLY: 

fPer Tear, in advance, - - $2.00 

Six Months, " - - -7.00 



To Advertisers. 

The DAILY COURIER AND UNION being the only Democratic Daily Journal in this 

vicinity, and having a large and increasing circulation, its value as an advertising 

medium should be fully appreciated by the business community. 

tek.m:s reasonable. 



Jobbing Department. 

>M>fe, f oh, dtort & ©wattwwtat % tMnjj, 

Of Every Description, executed in a prompt and accurate manner, and in a style 
which will compare favorably with the best. 



OFFICE, 

fe 57, 59 & 61 Courier Bniln&, East Genesee Street, 

SYItACCrSB, M. Y. 



POMPEY. 



309 






Kill , Joseph, (Delphi,) lot 70, farmer 34. 
UILL, ORANGE E„ (Delphi,) lot 100, dairy- 
man and farmer 100. 

(ill, Orange, (Delphi,) lot 100, farmer 11. 

ill, Philo, (Pompey Center,) lot 41, farmer 

\ T8. 

Jlfc, Hiram A., (Delphi,) lot 85, farmer 

.iiecock, David A., (Pompey,) (with Luther,) 

lot 27, farmer 110. 
-iiBcock, Lather, (Pompey,) (with David 

A.,) lot 27, farmer 110. 
tchcock, Gideon C, (Manlius,) lot 10, 

farmer 67 . 
-dges, Isaac, (Pompey,) lot 80, farmer 55. 
^lodges, Jesse, (Pompey,) lot 63, farmer 

119. 
lodges, Jonathan, (Pompey,) lot SO, far- 
mer 26. 
xlges, Samuel, (Pompey,) lots 62 and 63, 

farmer 85. 
Wtlbrook, Chapin M., (Pompey Center,) 

(with Oscar D. F.,) lot 43, dairyman 
| and farmer 100. 
HOLBROOK, FRANKLIN B., (Pompey 

Center,) (with Silas L.,) lot 43, farmer 

97. 
HOLBROOK, HENRY H„ (Pompey,) lot 

65, speculator and farmer 4. 
Holbrook, Oscar D. F., (Pompey Center,) 

(with Chapin M.,) lot 43, dairyman and 

farmer 100. 
HOLBROOK, SILAS L., (Pompey Center,) 

(with Franklin B.,) lot 43, dairyman 

and farmer 97. 
Holbrook, Thomas, (Delphi,) lots 69 and 

70, dairyman and farmer 143. 
Holliday, Wm. D., (Pompey,) lot 78, farmer 

160. 
Holmes, John jr., (Fabius,) lot 98, farmer 

120. 
HOPKINS, GEORGE, (Watervale,) lots 19 

20 and 29, farmer 134. 
Hotaling, Cortwright, ( James ville,) lot 26, 

farmer leases 160. 
HOTALING, HENRY B., (Jamesville,) lot 

6, farmer 15. 
Hotaling, Joel, (Pompey,) lot 64, farmer 

40 
HOWE, ALBERT, (Delphi,) lots 98 and 99, 

farmer 100. 
Howe, Milo, (Delphi,) lots 98 and 99, farmer 

100 
Hovt, Nelson, (Manlius,) lot 21, farmer 36. 
Hoyt, Joseph R., (Jamesville,) lot 16, far- 
mer 25. „ . 
HUBBARD, GILBERT S.,(PompeyCenter,) 

lots 31 and 42, farmer 141. 
Humphrey, Daniel, (Jamesville,) lot 2o, far- 

mer ^1) 
Humphrey] Eden, (Jamesville,) lot 26, far- 
mer 80. , . , 
Hunt, John, (Delphi,) lot 54, dairyman and 

farmer 200. _ . , . CQ 

Jennings, Ira P., (Pompey Center,) lot 68, 

dairyman and farmer 99. 
Jennings, Orrin, (Pompey Center,) lot 31, 

farmer 90. . -,_. _, «____ 

! Jennings, Wm., (Pompey,) lot 81, farmer 

75 
Jerome, Frank, (Pompey,) lot 95, farmer 

Jerome, John C, (Pompey,) (with Samuel 
If'.,) lot 95, farmer 225. 



Jerome, Samuel W., (Pompey,) (with John 

C.,) lot 95. farmer 2-35. 
Johnson, Butler, (Pompey,) lot 94, farmer 

38. 
Johnson, Chas., (Pompey,) lot 80, farmer 20. 
Johnson, Cramer, (Pompey,) lot 48, farmer 

80. 
Johnson, Norman B., (Pompey,) lot 65, 

speculator aud farmer 50. 
JONES, ANSEL, (Pompey,) harness maker. 
JONES, CORNELIUS, (Jamesville,) lot 4, 

farmer 60. 
Jones, Luther M., (Delphi,) lot 54, dairy- 
man and farmer 62. 
Jones, Marcus L., (Delphi.) (Jones <£ Rey- 
nolds,) lot 100, dealer in live stuck. 
Jones & Reynolds, (Delphi,) (Marcus L. 
Jones and Henry Reynolds,) lot 100, 
butchers. 
Jones, Zenas A., (Oran.) lot 11, justice of 

the peace and farmer 58)$. 
Kanan, James, (Delphi,) lot 70, farmer 13. 
KEAN, JOHN, (Pompey,) shoemaker. 
Keeler, Ephraim, (Pompey,) lot 93, farmer 

22. 
Keene, Ebenezer H., (Manlius,) lot 7, far- 
mer 20. 
Keller, Gilbert A., (Manlius,) lot 9, farmer 

117. 
Kelly, Wm., (Pompey,) lot 78, farmer 1.".. 
Kendall, Isaac B., (Manlius,) lot 21, farmer 

8. 
Kennedy, Thomas, (Delphi,) lot 99, farmer 

10. 
Kenyon, George, (Pompey,) lots 39 and 49, 

farmer 100. 
Kenyon, James W., (Delphi.) lot 44, dairy- 
man and farmer leases M& 
KERSHAW, JAMES D., (Pompey Center,) 

lot 43, dairyman and farmer 121. 
Ketchum, R. H., (Delphi,) pastor of N. 8. 

Baptist Church. 
King, John. (Fabius.) lot 96, farmer IT.' 
Kinuy, John, (Jamesville,) lot 4, liirmer 

16H- 
Knapp, Baxter, (Pompey,) lot 48, farmer 

60. , . „. 

Knapp, Harry, (Pompey,) lots N) and 95, 
manufacturer of essential oils and far- 
mer 120. 

Knapp, Jeremiah, (Jamesville.) lot 16, far- 
mer 55. 

Knapp, Morris, (Jamesville,) lot 16, furmcr 
40. 

KNAPP, RAWSON II., (Pompey.) lota 81 
and 96, farmer 97. 

KNIGHT, S. H.. (Pompey,) lot 64, tanner 
and farmer 46. 

Lamb, Admiral P., (Manlius.) lot 10, car- 
penter and farmer 4. 

Lartre. Wm.. (Delphi.) lot S3, fanner 6. 

LARKABEE, CLARK M., (Delphi., lot 100. 
cooper. 

Leonard. John H., (Pompey.) rarp.-nt.-r. 

Lewis, ChauucyG., (Man lino,' l"t H, far- 
mer 70. 

Lewis, James R., (Oran.) carp-nt-r. 

Lewis, Morgan M., (Pompey Ci-nt.-r.i untn 
Sanford C.) lots 22 nnd 32. farmer HO. 

Lewis, Sanford C, (Oran.) (with Morga* 
M.,) lots 22 and 32, farmer 260. 

LilHc, John, (Oran,) lot 13, dairyman and 
farmer 91. 



310 



POMPEY. 



Long, Richard, (Pompey,) lot 16, farmer 

160. 
LOOMIS, ISAAC N., (Manlius,) (with 

Isaac V. Jr.,) lot 9, farmer 00. 
LOOMIS, ISAAC N. Jr., (Manlius,) (with 

Isaac N..) lot 9, farmer 90. 
Losey, Archibald, (Delphi,) lot £3, farmer 

124. 
LOWRIE, EDWARD P., (Manlius,) (with 

John B.,) lots 9 and 10, farmer 112 
LOWRIE, JOHN B., (Manlius,) (with Ed- 
ward P.,) lots 9 and 10, farmer 112. 
Marble, Buckley W., (Delphi,) (M. Marble 

& Bro.) 
Marble, Marcus, (Delphi,) (M. Marble & 

Bro.) 
Marble, M. & Bro., (Delphi,) (Marcus and 

Buckley W.,) general merchants. 
Marsh, Daniel, (Pompey,) lot 62, farmer 

500, (resides at Pompey Hill.) 
Marshall, Seleucia, (Delphi,) lot 100, far- 
mer 54. 
Martin, Merritt D., (Pompey,) lot 65, far- 
mer 80. 
Martin, Nathan H., (Oran,) lot 33, farmer 

25. 
Mason, Julius, (Watervale,) lot 41, carpen- 
ter and joiner. 
MASON, WM. J., (Watervale,) lots 29 and 

30, farmer 120. 
MAXWELL, ALEXANDER, (Delphi,) lot 

100, prop, of Union Mills. 
McAULIFFE, JOHN, (Pompey,) (with 

Thomas.) lots 49 and 50, farmer 163. 
McAULIFFE, THOMAS, (Pompey,) (with 

John.) lots 49 and 50, farmer 163. 
McClintock, George, (Pompey,) lot 38, far- 
mer 50. 
McCLURE, DAVID, (Delphi,) lot 70, dairy- 
man and farmer 154. 
McClure, Hiram, (Delphi,) lot 54, dairy- 
man and farmer 80. 
McCorrniek, John, (Pompey Center,) lot 42, 

farmer 150. 

McGee, Michael, (Delphi,) lot 85, farmer 40. 

Mead, John W., (Pompey Center,) lot 52, 

breeder of thorough bred horses and 

farmer 50. 

Mead, Richard, (Pompey Center,) lot 52, 

shoe maker and dairyman. 
MERCHANT, HIRAM B., (Pompey Center,) 
. lot 31, farmer 135. ' v ^ J « 

MERRELL, DAVID J., (Manlius,) lot 7, far- 
mer 138. 
Midler, Columbus C, (Oran,) lot 22, farmer 

160. 
Miller, Chas.W., (Manlius,) lot 7, farmer 

141. 
Moore, Robt., (Pompey Center,) lot 43, far- 
mer leases 200. 
Moore, Robert, (Pompey Center,) wagon 

maker. 
MORGAN, THOMAS E., (Manlius,) lot 7, 
farmer 85. ' 

Morley, Janus H., (Pompey,) lot 37, far- 
mer 20. 
MORRISON, WILLIAM, (Pompey,) lot 94, 

farmer 93. 
Morse, Stoten, (Manlius,) lot 6, farmer 

leases 50. 
Moseley, Susan D., (Delphi,) lot 70, farmer 

Mulliner, James, (Pompey,) lot 80, shoe- 
maker. 



MURPHY, SIMON, (Watervale,) lot 30. 
farmer 74. ' 

Murray, Frederick, (Watervale,) (with Mi- 
*, n0r ^,f lnd Reuben,) lot 28, farmer 175. 
Murray Minor B., (Watervale,) (ivith Fred- 

erickand Reuben,) lot 28, farmer 175. 
Murray, Reuben, (Watervale,) (with Minor 
a™ a ™1t£ Fredrick,) lot 28, farmer 175. 
NEARING, GEORGE, (Pompey,) lot 78, 

farmer 64. 
Ne ^e^ Zorah H., (Pompey,) lot 68, farmer 

Newman Amos, (Delphi,) (ivith Isaac,) lots 
82 and 83, farmer 226. 

NEWMAN,. CARLETONB., (Fabius,) lot 

„,„ 82 > dairyman and farmer 170. 

NEWMAN, ORACE, (Pompey Center,) lot 
52, farmer 180. 

NORTHRUP, CLARK L., (Pompey,) (with 

„£° renz o<) lot 51, farmer 130. 

NORTHRUP: LORENZO. (PomDey,) (with 
Clark L.,) lot 51, farmer 130." 

NORTHRUP, RENSSALAER A., (Pom- 
pey,) lot 51, farmer 127. 

Nottingham, Henry D., (Manlius,) lot 8, 
farmer leases 208. 

OLCOTT, GEO. W.. (Jamesville,) lot 16, 
farmer 50. 

Olcott, Jehial, (Pompey,) lot 68, farmer 84. 

P. C0 H' °J. rln < CDe'Phi,) lot 68, farmer 76. 

Olcott, Willis, (Jamesville,) lot 16, farmer 

Oley Charles, (Pompey,) (with John,) lot 

26, farmer 186. 
Oley, James, (Pompey,) lot 66, farmer 62#. 
Oley John, (Pompey,) (withChas.,) lot 26, 

farmer 186. 
Osborn, Josiah N., (Pompey,) lot 81, farmer 

OSTRANDER, GEORGE R., (Watervale,) 
lot 30, farmer 40. 

PALMER, EDWIN A., (Delphi,) (Breed 
& Palmer.) 

PALMER, NOAH, (Oran,) lots 23 and 12, 
dairyman and fanner 326. 

Palmer, Noah L., (Oran,) lot 12. farmer. 

Parry, James K., (Manlius,) lot 8, farmer 
leases 50. 

PARSLOW, PETER, (Pompey,) prop. 
Union hotel, Pompey Hill. 

Partridge, James A., (Pompey,) lots 78 and 
79, farmer 183. 

Partridge, Wm. B., (Delphi,) lot 100, saw- 
yer. 

PARTRIDGE, WILLIE C, (Pompey,) lives 

with J. A. Partridge. 
Pease, Wm., (Delphi,) (with Wm. G„) lot 

54, tobacco raiser, dairyman and farmer 

230. 



Pease Wm. G., (Delphi,) (withWm.,) lot 54, 
tobacco raiser, dairyman and farmer 230. 

Perry, C, (Delphi,) lot 100, artist. 

Perry, George M., (Manlius,) lot 10, farmer 
74. 

Perry, Hiram, (Manlius,) lot 9, farmer 100. 

Pollock, Jno. R., (Fabius,) (with John,) lot 
81, farmer 112. 

Pollock, John, (Fabius,) (with Jno. P.,) lot 
81, farmer 112. . 

Pompey Academy, (Pompey,) S. P. Hay- 
den, prest. 

PORTER, FRANK L., (Pompey,) black- 
smith. 



POMPEY. 



311 



Porter, Wm.. P., (Pompev.) lot 93, farmer 

30. 
Potter, Elery, (Oran.) lot 44, farmer 38. 
POTTER & GALLOWAY, (Delphi,) (Nor- 
man F. Potter and James ft Galloway,) 
dealers in agricultural instruments, tin- 
ware, hardware &c. 
Potter, Harvey, (Manlius,) lot 21, farmer 82. 
POTTER, J. DENSMORE, (Delphi,) lot 

100, physician and surgeon. 
POTTER, L. ALBERT, (Manlius,) lot 21, 

farmer 80. 
POTTER, NORMAN F., (Delphi,) {Potter 

& Galloway.) 
Povle, Thos., (Delphi,) lot 70, farmer 8. 
PRATT, EDGAR A., (Delphi,) (Fisher & 

Pratt.) 
PRATT, ELI N., (Pompey,) lots 80 and 79, 

farmer 90. 
PRATT, HENRY D., (Pompey Center,) 

grocer and deputy post master. 
Pratt, Homer, (Pompey,) lot 51, farmer 

leases 200. 
Pratt, Joseph, (Pompey,) lot 39, farmer 64. 
PRATT, LEWIS, (Pompey,) lots 49, 50 and 

65, farmer 150. 
Purington, Malanet J., (Pompey Center,) 

lot 53, farmer 56. 
Quirk, Murty, (Pompey Center,) lot 53, 

farmer 50. 
Ray, John, (Fabius,) lot 97, farmer 48. 
Reed, Harmon E., (Delphi,) (Furlong 

& Reed Bros.) 
REED, HOLLISTER S., (Watervale,) lot 

19, farmer 103. 
Reed, Horace C, (Delphi,) (Furlong & Reed 

Bros.) 
Reynolds, Henry, (Delphi,) (Jones & Rey- 
nolds,) carpenter. 
Rice, Eliezer, (Oran,) lot 22, farmer 60. 
ROBERTS, THOMAS H., (Manlius,) lot 9, 

farmer 100. 
Robinson, Chancelor G., (Pompey,) lot 67, 
breeder of thorough bred Durham cat- 
tle and farmer 98K- 
Robinson, Fidelia, (Pompey,) lot 96, farmer 

96 
ROBINSON, JOHN P., (Pompey,) lot 82, 

farmer 44. , 

Robinson, Lewis H., (Fabius,) lot 81, far- 
mer 127%. , . „* a 
Robinson, Moses T., (Pompey,) lot 65, ped- 
lar 
ROBINSON, WM. H., (Pompey,) lot 67, 

farmer 50. An 

Rogers, Pat., (Delphi,) lot 99. farmer 10. 
Rogers, Plina, (Delphi,) lot 85, farmer lb. 
Rowley, Orson S., (Pompey,) lot 94, larmer 

102. 
RUSS & BUZZELL, (Manlius) (Henry 
Russ and John F. Buzzelt,) lot 8, car- 
penters and props, saw mill. .. . 
RUSS, HENRY, (Manlius,) (Rms & BuzzeJL) 
Ryan, Martin, (Pompey,) lot to, farmer^ 13.). 
Ryder, Henry D., (Delphi,) lot 100, harness 
maker and farmer 177. 9 
Safford, Alonzo T.,(Pompey Center,) lot 52, 

farmer 26. , . „. -„__„_ on 

Safford. Silas B., (Oran,) lot 2 farmer 80 
SALISBURY, JOHN, (Delphi,) lot 100, 

manuf. of edge tools. 
Savage, George E., (Delphi,) lot 84, farmer 
65. 



Savage, Wm. H., (Delphi.) lot 100, in-ur- 
auce agent and farmer 35, and l( 
52. 

Sayles, Jennie Miss, (Delphi,; lot 100, music 

Sayles, Wm. B., (Delphi,) lot 100, cabinet 

maker and undertaker. 
Schuyler, Chas. M., (Watervale.) lot 30, 

farmer 102. 
Schuyler, David M., (Manlius,) lot 21, far- 
mer 103. 
SCO VILLE, CLINTON L., (Oran,) lot 12, 

dairyman and farmer 126. 
Scoville, Joseph A., (Oran,) lots 10 and 11, 

contractor and farmer 145. 
SCOVILLE. WILFRED M., (Oran.) lots 10 

and 11, farmer with J. A. Scoville. 
Seeley, James O., (Delphi.) lot 64, tobacco 

raiser, dairyman and fanner Leases -12. 
Severance, Chas., (Oran,) lots 11 aud 22. 

dairyman and farmer 87, 
Seymour, Elizur, (Pompey,) lots 65 and 90, 

farmer 25. 
Shanahan, James, (Oran,) lot 32, fanne 
SHARP, ELBERT M., (PabtosJ (wM 

John,) lot 97, farmer 90. 
SHARP, JOHN, (Fabius,) (with Elbert 31.,) 

lot 97, farmer 90. 
Sharp Myron, (Fabius,) lot 97, fiumei 
SHATTUCK, STEPHEN, (Pompey.) ll,t 

27, farmer 71. 
ftheldon, Rums, (Delphi,) lot 69, miller and 

farmer 7. 
Sheldon, Sarah A. Mrs., (Delphi,) !"t 

farmer 180. 
SHERWOOD, JOHN B.. (Pompey,) lots 

47 and 48, farmer least's Ini. 
Sloan, Allen. (Pompey,) lot 88, fanner 130 
SLOAN, DANIEL W., (Watervale. i lot! 
and 30, farmer 103. 

Slosson, Orville ML, (Pompey.) yiiitk Reu- 
ben D.,) lots 27 and 38, farmei 

Slosson, Reuben D., (Pompey,) (wi» Or- 
ville M.,) lots 27 ami 88, fanner 133. 

Smith, Edwin, (Delphi,) lot 53. farmer 50 

Smith, Jared, (Pompey.) lot 40. farmer 80. 

SMITH, JOHN B., (Pompey, > lol m, far- 
mer 50. . ._,. ... 

smith, John, (Pompey.) lot 65. farmer 5*. 

Smith; J. P. Rev., (Delphi.) lot 100, pastor 
of O. S. Baptist church. 

SMITH, ORRIN, (Manlius,) lot ., farmer 
32 

Smith, Seneca, (Pompey.) lots 7s aud ?.', 

farmer 94. 
Smith, Wm. J., (Delphi.) lot 53, carpenter, 

dairyman and farmer 08. 
Snow, D. Robert, (Oran.i tot U, la«>eraud 

hotel proprietor. 
Snow, Harvey. (Oran.) lot 22. farmer tl 
Sonic. John, (Pompey,) lol <■ ISO 

SOUTHARD. DA\ 1DO ,(tapt] 

lot 42, farmer 300 
Southard, Wm. G., (Pompey lot 

49 daimnan and farmer lea.-e- .too. 
SOI'TIIKHLAND. ANSON, .nran.i lot 11, 

tobacco raiser aud fanner 118 
Stanton. Thomas E., (JamearlfleJ tote 4 

and 5, farmer 151. 
Stanton, Truman B., (Jamcsville.i lol \, «ar- 

uierSO. 
Steadman, Levi. .Oran.) lot 11, wagon 

maker and farmer 30. 



312 



POMPEY. 



Steenburgh, Daniel, (Watervale,) lot 19, far- 
mer 62. 

Steenburgh, Nathan B., (Watervale,) lot 19, 
farmer 105. 

STEENBERGH, WARREN, (Watervale,) 
lot 19, farmer. 

Sterling, Lafayette, (Delphi,) lot 70, dairy- 
man and farmer 86. 

STOCKING, ALBERT D., (Fabius,) lot 97, 
farmer 67. 

STOCKING, I. CHAUNCEY, (Fabius,) lots 
95 and 96. farmer 115. 

Strickland, Chas. W., (Oran,) lot 23, farmer 
51. 

Strickland, Russell. (Delphi,) {with Sheldon,) 
lot 99, farmer 104. 

Strickland, Sheldon, (Delphi,) {with Bus- 
sell,) lot 99, farmer 104. 

Sullivan, Dennis, (Pompey Center,) black- 
smith. 

SUTHERLAND, CHAS. H., (Manlius,) lot 
21, musician and musical instrument 
maker. 

Sutherland, Elijah, (Manlius,) lot 10, far- 
mer 54. 

Sutherland, Hiram, (Watervale.) lot 31, far- 
mer 178. 

SUTHERLAND, WALLACE E., (Water- 
vale,) lot 20, musician and farmer 178. 

SWEET, H. D. L., (Pompey,) {with Whea- 
lon B. Sweet,) lot 28, breeder of thorough 
bred American Merino sheep and blood- 
ed horses, and farmer 165. 

SWEET, WHEATON B., (Pompey,) {with 
H. D. L. t ) lot 28, breeder of thorough 
bred American Merino sheep and blood- 
ed horses, and farmer 165. 

Swift, Alonzo P., (Pompey,) lot 94, farmer 
75. 

Taber, Darius, (Pompey,) {with Warren,) 
lot 37, farmer 90. 

Taber, Warren, (Pompey,) {with Darius,) 
lot 37, farmer 90. 

Tackabury, Samuel, (Delphi,) lot 83, min- 
ister of M. E. church, dairyman and 
farmer 138. 

TAYLOR, ISAAC, (Delphi,) lot 70, hop 
raiser, dairyman and farmer 122>£. 

Taylor, John J., (Pompey,) grocer, 

Taylor, V. R., (Watervale,) breeder of 
blooded horses. 

TAYLOR. WM., M. D., (Pompey,) allop. 
physician. 

THOMPSON, EDWARD M., (Watervale,) 
post master and proprietor of flouring 
and grist mill, capable of flouring 50 
barrels per day. 

Thompson, Egbert V., (Delphi,) lot 100, 
cooper. 

Tibbits, Elijah, (Oran,) lot 12, farmer 50. 

Tibbits, Ehranson, (Oran.) lot 11, farmer 44. 

Tift, Benjamin, (Jamesville,) lot 16, farmer 
50. 

Tobey, John F., (Delphi,) lot 85, breeder of 
thorough Burmah blood hogs and far- 
mer 63. 

Tobin, Sylvester, (Pompey,) lot 79, farmer 

Tollon, Edward, (Pompey,) (with William,) 

lot 40, farmer 200. 
Tollon, Michael, (Pompey,) lot 50, farmer 

100. 
Tollon, Wm., (Pompey,) (with Edward,)\ot 

40, farmer 200. 



Tolman, Josiah H., (Pompey,) lot 39, far- 
mer 55^. 

Tolman, Rial, (Pompey,) lot 37, farmer 250. 

Tolmon, Spencer, (Manlius,) lot 10, dairy- 
man and farmer 131. 

Tracy, Hiel H., (Delphi,) lot 85, dairyman 
and farmer 106. 

UNION HOTEL, (Pompey,)Peter Parslow, 
proprietor. 

Vail, George R., (Pompey Center,) lot 52, 
dairyman and farmer 130. 

Vail, Simmer L., (Fabius,) lot 98, prop'r of 
cheese factory and farmer 150. 

Vanauken, Geo., (Oran,) (with John,) lot 
12, farmer 134. 

Vanauken, John, (Oran,) (with Geo.,) lot 12, 
farmer 134. 

Van Brocklin, John, (Pompey,) (with Nich- 
olas,) lot 82, farmer 170. 

Van Brocklin, Nicholas, (Pompey,) (with 
John,) lot 82, farmer 170. 

Van Brocklin, Wm. W., (Pompey,) lot 67, 
lawyer. 

Van Brockton, James, (Pompey,) lot 48, 
carpenter and farmer 100. 

Van Hovenburgh, Wm,, (Oran,) lot 23, far- 
mer 29#. 

VAN PATTEN, NICHOLAS, (Pompey,) 
lot 63, farmer 100. 

Vincent, Owen, (Pompey,) lot 78, farmer 
45. 

Viwall, Ansel, (Manlius,) lot 8, farmer 20. 

Walker, Wm., (Pompey Center,) lot 31, lar- 
mer 88. 

Wallace, Henry, (Oran,) lot 11, pedler. 

WALLACE, WARREN, (Delphi,) lot 85, 
hop raiser and farmer 126. 

WALLEY, ASA F., (Delphi,) lot 100, flour, 
feed and grocery store, and butcher. 

Walley, Stephen S., (Delphi,) lot 85, drug- 
gist, justice of the peace and farmer 
27. 

Wallis, Joseph, (Pompey,) lot 40, farmer 
200. 

Waters, Nathaniel C, (Oran,) lot 23, dairy- 
man and farmer 140. 

Watkins, Watson, (Pompey,) lot 38, farmer 
83. 

Way, Cornelius, (Pompey,) lot 79, farmer 
56tf. 

WEBB, CHAS. E., (Pompey,) carriage 

maker. 
Welch, John, (Pompey,) lot 48, farmer 80. 
Welch, Wm., (Oran,) lot 10, farmer 13#. 
WELLS, ASA H., (Pompey ,)(with Geo. E.,) 

lots 49 and 65, farmer 148. 
Wells, Geo., (Pompey,) lot 64, farmer 30. 
WELLS, GEO. E., (Pompey,) (with Asa 

H.,) lots 49 and 65, farmer 148. 

Wells, Levi, (Pompey,) surveyor, justice of 

the peace and supervisor. 
WESTON, DAVID E., (Jamesville,) lots 4 

and 5, farmer 138. 
Weston, Elijah, (Jamesville,) lot 5, farmer 

6. 

WHEATON, DANIEL G., (Pompey,) lot 

65, farmer 50. 
Wheeler, Benjamin F., (Watervale,) lot 

29, dealer in fine wool sheep and farmer 

90. 
Wheeler, Chas. A., (Oran,) (with Melinda 

L.,) lot 33, farmer 164. 



POMPET-SALINA. 



313 



Wheeler, Edwin A., (Watervale,) lot 18, 

raiser of fine wool sheep and farmer 

100. 
Wheeler, Henry, (Pompey Center,) {with 

Jewit,) lot 52. farmer leases 102&. 
WHEELER, JAMES, (Watervale,) lot 29, 

miller and farmer 160. 
Wheeler, Jewit, (Pompey Center,) {with 

Henry,) lot 52, farmer leases 102#. 
Wheeler, John B., (Pompey Center,) lot 52, 

dairyman and farmer 102>£. 
Wheeler, Melinda L., (Oran,) {with Chas. 

A.,) lot 33, fanner 164. 
Wheelock, Gershum B., (Watervale,) lot 

30, farmer 120. 
WHEELOCK, RALPH R., (Watervale,) lot 

30, farmer leases 120. 
White, Erastus T., (Oran,) lot 22, farmer 4. 
White, Hiram D., (Oran,) lot 11, black- 
smith. 
White, John, (Oran,) lots 22 and 23, farmer 

35. 
White, John W., (Oran,) lot 22, wagon 

maker and fanner 25. 
Whitford, John, (Manlius,) {with Win.) lot 

6, farmer leases 114. 
Whitford, Milton, (Oran,) lot 22, farmer 30. 
Whitford, Wm., (Manlius,) {with John,) lot 

6, farmer leases 114. 
WHITMARSH, NELSON H., (Watervale,) 

physician, hotel prop, and grocer. 
Wilkins, John, (Pompey,) lot 50, farmer 8. 
Willby, Sophronia A., (Pompey,) tailoress. 
Williams, Autha Mrs., (Manlius,) lot 8, far- 
mer 50. 
Williams, David, (Manlius,) lot 19, farmer 

40. 
Williams, G. K., (Oran.) lot 11, peddler. 
WILLIAMS. HIRAM D., (Manlius,) lot 19, 

fanner leases 40. 
Williams, Taber D., (Pompey,) lot 51, wagon 

m a. k f r 

Wills, Chas. H., (Pompey,) lot 65, farmer 

40. 
Wills, Francis A., (Manlius,) lot 21, farmer 

14 and leases 35. 
Wills, Samuel, (Pompey,) prop, boot and 

shoe store. 
Wilson, Uriel, (Pompey,) carpenter and 

joiner. 



(Post Office Addresses in Parentheses.) 



ADAMS, MILES, (Salina,) lot 3, farmer 2. 

Adams, Richard, (Salina,) lot 18, farmer 90. 

Allen, John B., (Salina,) gate tender BucU- 

ley road, 3 m. from Salina, and farmer 

ALVORD, DERRICK L., (Salina,) lot 1, 

cider manuf. and fanner 94. 
ANNABLE, CHARLES J., (Salina,) lot 2, 

farmer leases 22. 



APPLIN, GEOKUK, (Salina. i 1..1 

dener 8. 
Averv. M. U. A II. A.. (Liverpool.) lots Si, 

815, S", and >(i, fanner 103. 
BACIIELDKH.IIAHVKY.. Liverpool. Umt. 1 

prop. 1st cor. Tulip. 
BAHN. VALENTINE. (Liverpool,) nrM. 

barrel inspector. 



Wood, A. A., (Manlius,) (Wood Brothers.) 

Wood Brothers, (Manlius.) (C. W. J J. and 
A. A.,) manuf. of the Journal turbine 
water wheel. 

Wood, C. W. U., (Manlius,) {Wood Broth- 
erg.) 

Wood, Ira P., (Manlius,) lot 8, blacksmith 
and farmer 21. 

Woodford, A. W., (Pompey,) lot 93, farmer 
55. 

Woodford, Daniel, (Pompey,) lot 93, black- 
smith and farmer 38. 

Woodford, Hervey M., (Pompey,) lot 93, 
farmer 180. 

Woodford, Israel, (Pompey,) lot 93, thresh- 
er and farmer 50. 

Woodford, Israel L., (Pompey,) lot 93, far- 
mer 80. 

Woodford, Pnblius V., (Pompey,) lots 78 
and 93, farmer SO. 

Woodford, Rollin L., (Pompey,) farmer 
with A. W. Woodford. 

Woodford, Romanta, (Pompey,) lot 93, far- 
mer 120. 

Woodford, Truman, (Pompey,) lot 80, far- 
mer 96. 

WOODWARD, LEANDER, (Delphi,) lot 
70, dairyman and fanner 218. 

Woodward, Marvin W., (Jamesville,) lot 
20, farmer leasee 15. 

WRIGHT, CALVIN A., (Pompey I 
lots 51 and 52. farmer 87. 

WRIGHT, DENNIS, (Oran,) lot 88, breed- 
er of thorough bred Spanish Merino 
sheep and Durham cattle and fanner 
130. 

Wright, Henry J., (Delphi,) lot 85, b 

and farmer 6. 
Wright, Ira S., (Oran,) lot 23, dairyman and 

farmer 125. 
Wright, Lewis, (Pompey.) lot 85, fanner 11. 
Tale, Horace N., (Delphi,) lot B9, fanner 

43. 

Yale, John S., (Delphi,) lot 98, dairyman 
and farmer 106. 

YALE, SHERMAN, (Delphi,) lot 84, far- 
mer 60. 



314 



SAL1NA. 



Baigne, Thomas, (Salina,) farmer leases 30, 
Buckley road. 

Bailey, Charles, (Salina,) lot 3, farmer 18. 

Baker, Jacob, (Liverpool,) salt packer. 

Baker, Martin, (Liverpool,) salt boiler and 
basket manuf. Oswego. 

Baltzhauser, Henry, (Liverpool.)saloon, 1st. 

Barnes, Henry, (Liverpool,) boat builder, 
cor. Birch and 2d. 

BABRUS, JOHN J., (Liverpool,) boarding 
house, 2d, next door west Good Tem- 
plar's Hall. 

Bates, Jolm, (Liverpool,) farmer and cattle 
dealer. 

BAUSINGER, JOHN G., (Salina.) wax 
bleacher and manuf. and dealer in bees- 
wax, lirewcrton plank road, 3 miles n. 
Syracuse. 

BECKER. ERNST, (Salina,) gardener. 

Becker, Jacob, (Liverpool,) salt packer, 
mason and farmer 2}£, 3d. 

BEEBE, ANDREW, (Liverpool,) lots 57 
and 58, farmer 101, W. new bridge road, 
N. W. cor. town Salina. 

BEEBE, W M. H., (Liverpool,) farmer. 

Berisher, Frank A., (Liverpool,) black- 
smith, 1st, n. Tulip. 

Betterle, August, (Salina,) lot 3, fanner 
7%. 

BLACK, EDWARD P., (Liverpool,) farmer 
38#, Cold Spring road, 2 miles west of 
Liverpool. 

Bohn, Valentine, (Liverpool,) barrel in- 
spector, State salt office. 

BOULTON, THOMAS, (Salina,) lot 4, far- 
mer and gardener 15. 

Boyden, Johii, (Liverpool,) carriage maker, 
1st. n. Tulip. 

Bramer, Mrs. C. K., (Liverpool,) lot 95, far- 
mer 15. 

Brand, Frederick, (Liverpool,) barber and 
liair dresser, 1st. 

Brenn, Morton, (Liverpool,) cooper. 

Brewster Brothers, (Liverpool,) omnibus 
and livery props., Tulip. 

Brewster, Timothy, (Liverpool.) milk deal- 
er and farmer leases 140, on Liverpool 
road, % mile E. of Liverpool. 

Britzer, Valentine, (Liverpool,) salt boiler. 

Brver. J. M., (Liverpool,) cooper. 

BURGHARD, WM., (Salina,) gardener, 
Richnu nd road. 

Burke, Christian, (Salina,) lot 3, butcher 
and farmer 3. 

Burke, John, (Salina,) gardener 3, Brewer- 
ton plank road, 3 miles N. Salina. 

Burtch, A. P., (Liverpool,) justice of the 
peace and farmer 18, 2d, cor. Birch, 
office Gleason Block, 1st, cor. Tulip. 

Cable. Benj., (Liverpool,) salt packer. 

Campbell, Andrew, (Syracuse,) lot 17, far- 
mer 5,J£. 

Carey. Geo. A., (Liverpool,) brick maker. 

Carr, Miss, (Liverpool,) teacher district 
school, Liverpool plank road. 

Carroll, Michael, (Liverpool,) salt boiler. 

CARSON., RANDOLPH, (Liverpool,) far- 
mer leases 17, 1 mile west of Liverpool. 

Case, Hosea, (Liverpool,) lots 70 and part 
of 80, farmer 64, Cold Spring road, one 
mile west of Liverpool. 

Chansy, E. T., (Liverpool,) eclectic physi- 
cian and surgeon, 4th cor. Oswego. 

Chillin^worth, Frank, (Liverpool,) carpen- 
ter. 



CHILLINGWORTH, JOSEPH, (Liver- 
pool,) farmer 50, Cold Spring road, \% 
miles west of Liverpool. 

CHILLINGWORTH, RICHARD, (Liver- 
pool,) farmer 20, Oswego road, one 
mile north of Liverpool. 

Clapp, Byron G., (Liverpool,) principal 
Union school. 

Clapp, Mrs., (Liverpool,) teacher 2nd dep't 
Union school. 

Clapper, Hily A. Mrs., (Salina,) lot 3, far- 
mer 1%. 

Clark, Elizur, (Salina,) lot 17, lumber deal- 
er, salt manufacturer and farmer 28. 

Clark, O. W., (Salina,) salt manuf., blocks 
133 and 134, district 2, Green Point. 

Claxton, Richard B., (Liverpool,) boat 
builder, 2d. 

COCKINGS, GEO., (Liverpool,) (Larington 
& Co.,) shoe and harness manuf., 1st. 

Collins, Joseph, (Liverpool,) (with Thom- 
as,) lot 38, farmer 50, north Cold Spring 
road. 2 miles northwest of Liverpool. 

COLLINS, THOMAS, (with Joseph,) (Liv- 
erpool,) lot 38, farmer 50, north Cold 
Spring road, 2 miles northwest of Liv- 
erpool. 

CONDE, C. S., (Liverpool,) painter, 2d, 
rear Good Templars' Hall. 

Congden, Albert, (Salina,) lot 1, farmer 62. 

Cook, Matthias, (Salina,) lot 3, farmer 5}£. 

Corbin, J., (Liverpool,) merchant, salt man- 
ufacturer and farmer 15. 

CORKING, PHILIP, (Salina,) salt manu- 
facturer, Liverpool road. 

Corkins, Philip, (Salina,) foreman for canal 
contractors, residence on Liverpool 
plank road, 2 acres. 

Cornue, C. W., (Liverpool,) agent Liverpool 
stave and barrel manuf. 

Coulby, John & Co., (Salina,) salt manu- 
facturers, blocks 126 and 127, district 2, 
Liverpool road, Green Point. 

Coville, Austin C, (Syracuse,) lot 17, far- 
mer leases 6. 

CRAWFORD, E. H., (Liverpool,) operator of 
Western Union Telegraph office. 

CRAWFORD, J.T.,(Liverpool,)post master, 
fire, life and accident insurance agent, 
receiver and inspector at State salt 
office, 1st, cor. Tulip. 

Crawford, Jasper S., (Liverpool,) receiver 
and inspector Onondaga Salt Springs. 

Crippin, Alonzo, (Salina,) salt manufactur- 
er, blocks 130 and 131, district 2, Liver- 
pool road, Green Point. 

Cronkhite, James, (Liverpool,) wagon ma- 
ker and undertaker, 1st, n. Tulip. 

Davan, John, (Liverpool,) salt manufactur- 
er and farmer leases 5. 

DAY, JOHN, (Salina,) lot 2, farmer 43 and 
leases 17. 

Dear, Ira, (Liverpool.) lock tender, mud 
lock, Oswego canal, 3 miles W. of Liv- 
erpool. 

Degil!, Wm., (Liverpool,) boat builder, 1st. 

Devin, John, (Liverpool,) farmer leases 6, 
Oswego, Green Point road. 

Dewyn, Thomas, (Salina,) lot 3, gardener 
and farmer 15X- 

Dickinson, Coville, (Syracuse,) lot 17, far- 
mer. 

Dings, Steven, (Liverpool.) farmer 102, 
Baldwinsville road, 2 miles N. W. Liv- 
erpool. 



SALINA. 



315 



DOUD. G. B., (Liverpool,) joiuerand build- 
er. E. Cedar, 3d door west of Irving. 

DUNN, MARTIN, (Salina,) lot IT, farmer 
43. 

EARLL. DAVID S„ (Salina,) farmer and 
solar salt mauuf. 8 acres, lot 198, and 
5S acres, lots 111, 112. 113 and 115, on 
Liverpool plank road, also 22 acres salt 
land leased of State, lots 117 and 118, 
and 723 covers. 

EARLL, EDWARD A., (Salina,) solar salt 
inanuf. residence on Liverpool plank 
road, 2 acres. 

Easterly, Frederick, (Salina,) (with George,) 
brewers and brick manuf. Brewerton 
plank road, 3 miles n. Syracuse. 

Easterly, George, (Salina,) (with Frederick,) 
brewers and brick niauuf. Brewerton 
plank road, 3 miles n. city. 

Enderlo, John, (Liverpool.) farmer leases 
35, Cold Spring road, % mile w. of Liv- 
erpool. 

Eno, Sarah Miss, (Liverpool,) principal of 
district school, Liverpool plank road. 

ERWIN, SAMUEL J., (Salina,) lot 2, far- 
mer 40. 

FARGO, C. A. & L. C, (Liverpool.) sash, 
door and blind manuf. 2d, cor. Vine. 

FARGO. L. C, (Liverpool,) (G. A. & L. G. 
Fargo.) 

Fisher, John, (Liverpool,) willow basket 
manuf. n. junction 1st and 2d. 

Fitzinger, John A. Rev., (Liverpool,) pas- 
tor of German Methodist church, Oswe- 
go. 

Flech, John, (Salina,) butcher, Lock. 

Foley. Thomas, (Salina,) lot 8, farmer 3. 

FORGER, JOHN S., (Liverpool,) boat 
builder, salt and brick manufacturer 
and farmer 20, head of 1st, W. village. 

Fosmer. Hiram, (Salina,) lot 3, farmer. 

FOSTER, BENJAMIN E., (Salina,)(.5fcAwi- 
zer <fe Foster.) 

Frick. Jacob, (Salina,) lot 3, farmer 6. 

GALE, THOMAS, (Salina.) solar salt man- 
ufacturer, salt lands 90, leases of State 
3500 covers, Liverpool plank road, near 
Green Point, also canal contractor and 
tanner 30. 

Gannett, Warren Mrs., (Salina,) farmer 13, 
Brewerton plank road, 2# miles N. 
city. 

Garrason, Lavalett, (Salina.) lot 27, farmer 
61. 

Garret, James C, <Salina,) lot 17, farmer 
110. 

Garrit, Jonathan M., (Salina,) lot 8, farmer 
125. , . 

GEANDROT, JANE F. Mrs., (Liverpool,) 
lot 1, farmer 29. , . 

German Lutheran Church, (Liverpool.) 
pastor. Rev. Edward Warner, Oswego, 
cor. Willow. _. , . 

German Methodist Church, (Liverpool.) 
Rev. John A. Fitzinger, pastor, Oswe- 

Getter, John, (Salina.) lot 18, farmer 2*. 

Gibbs, Thomas, (Salina,) farmer leases 4, 
Brewerton plank road. 

GILBERT, JAMES B., (Salina,) lot 17, far- 
mer 102. ,. . , . an r... 

GILLCHRES, IRA A., (Salina,) lot K, far- 
mer 20. 



Giltrap, John, (Salina,) lot 3, nurservman 

and farmer 14. 
Gleason Brothers, (E. and K.) (Liverpool,) 

general merchants, 1st, cor. Tulip! 
Gleason, Isaac G., (Liverpool,) butcher, 

teacher of vocal music and farmer 10, 

Oswego, cor. 4th. 
Gleason, Lucius, (Liverpool.) salt manu- 

facturer, district 3, office Tulip, n. 1st. 
Gleason, Willard, (Liverpool,) overeeer of 

salt manuf. Oswego. 
Goddard, L., (Liverpool,) boatman and far- 
mer 31, cor. Ilickorv and Fourth. 
GOODWILL, LORENZO, (Liverpool,) lota 

61 and 62, farmer 135, Cold Spring road. 

2^ miles w. of Liverpool. 
Hair. Chester, (Salina,) lot 3. fanner leases 

35. 
HAND, CHRISTOPHER, (Sa.ma,) lot 2, 

farmer leases 88. 
HART, SYLVESTER A., (Liverpool.) boat 

builder, 3d, near Church. 
HAUCK, JACOB F., (Salina,) {Hawk & 

Knapp.) 
HAUCK <fc KNAPP, (Salina. i (Jncob F. 

Eauck and Jacob Knapp,) bi i fc m nmf*. 
Haufe, Gottlieb, (Salina,) lot 3, Damn r 1"V 
Hawley, James, (Salina.) farmer 1'J, old 

State road, 1 mile n. Salina. 
HAWLET, HIRAM L., (Salina.i farmer 

andsolarsalt manuf. lot- 99, 101, 108, 

103, 105. pasture lot 17, 108. 108, 109, 

110, 111, 112, 113 and 115. Ball Borings 

reservation, 300 acres, - 

acres, Highland Coarse Salt Works Co., 

Liverpool plank road. 
Hawley, L. T., (Salina.) far: lolai 

salt manuf. 30, on Liverpool jisank rond, 

and salt land leased of B 
Hayward, William. (Salina,) lots 2 and 17, 

farmer leases 4-1. 
Heil, Caleb, (Salina,) lot 3, painter atid far- 
mer 12. 
Iloil, Christian, (Salina. ) lot I. fanner 17. 
Hemmer, John. (Salina.) carpenter and far- 
mer 8, Brewerton plank road, X mile 

u. Salina, 
Hibbard, Joseph N., (Salina,) lot I, farmer 

and gardener 88. 

Hill, Elisha. (Liverpool. - mle- 

sioner and farmer 1. Oswego, cor. Ith. 

Hiller, John. (Salina,) milkman and fanner 

51 ?i, Bridgeport plank road, 
ninsdell, P. II., (Salina. > lol 3. (aimer I 

HOPKINS, SAMUEL I.. (Sal • lot a. 
justice of the peace and (aimer 1 I • 

Hoyt, John W., (Salina,) lots 2 and 17, far- 
mer 102. 

novt. Joseph O., (Salina,) lot 17. fanner 
88. 

Hunt, Edmund, (SallnaO farm r I 
iluntlev. a. w., (Salina.) lol it. farmer 00. 
Ingersoll. Arthur. | Li\ erpool mud 

lock. 3 miles w. of ftverp 
Ingersoll, G. P., (Liverpool, i hotel prop 

tor, 1st. 
Johnson, Ella M-s, (Liverpool.) teacher 

4th department Union School. 
Keith James, (Liverpool,) fanner 108, Cold 

Spring road, h. 2d, cor. Hickory. 



316 



ON NBA GA CO UNTY B USINESS BISECT OB T. 





Have Removed to 



J 



79 South Salina Street, Syracuse, N. T., 

Where you are invited to call and see the newest and latest styles of 




PARLOR, CHAMBER & DIM ROOM 

F , XJ^=LT^rX B Z B XJS=LE3, 

Which cannot be surpassed in price. Call and see us, we will treat you well. 



K 




AND 












IiV THE 

Eimber Block, James Street, Up Stairs, 

SYRACUSE, KT. Y. 9 

GOLD AND SILVER PLATING 

Steel Knives & ail kinds of 

TABIiE WARE REPEATED 
***$gr H. DURSTON, Agent. 



5 



ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



317 



mmz hov$e, 



NEAR THE DEPOT, 




m 




- ,- - 




; ! »; : ; 



Ml , 1 1. 







!/ _H 




BENNETT 



' 



FREE OMNIBUS TO AND FROM THE CARS. 

»_._ ..-■-:; iflLssssssase - * " 

modem conveniences, and win o<- wuuu i 

A Good Livery Attached. 

R x ______ ■ — -—____ 



318 



ONONDA GA CO UNTY B VSINESS DIRECTOR Y. 





mutt Hiiiii, 



SYLVESTER OWEN, Prop'r, 

SUMMIT STATION, N. Y. 

I have lately pnreliased tlie Hotel formerly 
owned by V. XV. Skeel, and nave 

Thoroiifflily Renovated and. Miirnislietl the Same, 



And w ill spare no pain* to make the stay of* 
guests pleasant and agreeable. 



The Best Stabling in the County, 



AND GOOD 



LIVERY ATTACHED TO THE PREMISES. 



SALLVA. 



319 



KEITH, LEWIS, (Liverpool,) farmer leasee 
108, Cold Spring road, 1^ miles w. of 
Liverpool. 

KERWIN, RICHARD, (Salina,) farmer 10, 
Vickery road, \% miles n. w. Green 
Point. 

Kirsh, Michael, (Salina,) lot 4, farmer 30. 

KILLMER, CHAS., (Salina,) lot 1, farmer 
leases 53. 

King, John, (Liverpool,) gait boiler. 

King, Nathaniel, (Liverpool,) counselor at 
law. 

Klassen, Katie Mrs., (Salina,) lot 4, farmer 
2 v. 

KNAPP, JACOB, (Salina,) (Eauck & 
Knapp.) 

Koring, Wm., (Salina,) lot 8, farmer 70. 

Kush, Michael Ben., (Salina,) lot 4, farmer 
20. 

Lacy, A. S., (Liverpool,) justice of peace 
and shipping clerk of Onondaga Salt 
Company, Tulip, n. 1st. 

LAMB, H., (Liverpool,) boat captain. 

LANGLEY, GEORGE, (Salina,) lot 2, far- 
mer 50. 

Larkin, L., (Liverpool,) salt manuf. 

LAVINGTON, CHARLES C, (Salina,) lot 
17, (Lavington & Co.,) farmer 40. 

♦LAVINGTON & CO., (Salina,) (Chas. C. 
Lavington and George Cookings,) 
poudrette manuf. at Green Point. 

LAWRENCE, GEORGE H., (Salina,) lot 4, 
farmer 50. 

Learned. J. M., (Liverpool,) lots 21 and 33, 
3d dist. Liverpool, salt manuf. 

LeDear, Maria Mrs., (Liverpool,) toy shop 
and news room, 1st. 

LEE, W. F., (Liverpool,) meat market, 
Tulip. 

Lewis, Isaac, (Syracuse,) farmer 27, Bridge- 
port plank road. 

LODDER, JOHN, (Salina,) lots 2 and 17, 
farmer 44. 

Loop, Lewis, (Salina,) lot 115, carpenter 
and farmer 17. 

Lougnet, Charles, (Salina,) lot 3, farmer 7. 

Love, W. P., (Liverpool,) hotel prop. 1st. 

Ludweck, Nicholas, (Syracuse,) lot 4, tailor 
and farmer 5. 

Lyke, Andrew, (Liverpool.) farmer 6, Os- 
wego road, 1 mile n. Liverpool. 

Lynch, Daniel, (Salina,) farmer 110, Rich- 
mond road. 

LYNCH, PATRICK, (Salina,) lot 129, salt 
manuf. and farmer 19. 

Lyon, Charles, (Liverpool,) captain boat 
"Edward Gleason." 

Lyon, Jonathan A., (Liverpool,) asst. salt 
inspector. 

Lyon, M., (Liverpool,) boatman for Onon- 
daga Salt Co., cor. 4th and Tulip. 

Manley, William, (Liverpool,) grocer and 
salt manuf. 1st. 

Mansv, John H., (Geddes,) carpenter. 

Mantz, Max, (Salina,) farmer 4, Bridge- 
port plank road. , , 

Market, Nicholas, (Salina,) brick maker, 
Brewerton plank road, 3 miles n. Sy- 
racuse. . , . 

Mason, Amos, (Salina,) salt manufacturer, 
blocks 132 and 135, district 2, Green 

Mathews," Dan, (Liverpool,) retired farmer, 
Tulip, cor. 3d. 
S 



McDonald, Philip, (Liverpool,) blacksmith, 

1st. 
McQr/i w. Thomas, (Salina.) lot 2, farmer 3 
McUUSON, GEORGE HENRY, (Salina.) 

lot 2, farmer 80. 
McKinley, Jesse, (Liverpool,) salt manuf. 
McMullen, Daniel, (Salina,) farmer 9#, 

Vickery road, 1# miles n. w. Greta 

Point. 
McNeal, G., (Salina,) farmer 584, D. Alvord 

farm, Bridgeport plank road. 
Melouey, Francis, (Liverpool,) boat build- 
er, 3d. 
Mench, Matthias. (Salina,) lot 4, farmer 12 
MERRIMAN, ELISHAG., (Liverpool,) lot* 

1 and 2, farmer 105. 
Methodist Episcopal Church, (Liverpool,) 

Oswego, pastor, Rev. F. H. Btanton. 
Metzen, John, (Syracuse,) lot 4. farmer 20. 
Michels, Herman, (Salina.) butcher. Brant 

erton plank road, 3 mile- n. Byracaae. 
Michles, Mike, (Salina,) lot 2, farmer 10 .. 
Miller, George, (Liverpool,) cooper, Osw e- 

go- 
Miller, Henry, (Salina,) lot 1, farmer leasee 

56. 
Miller, Henry, (Salina,) lot 1, farmer HV 
Miller, John H., (Liverpool,) Oawsgo road, 

Liverpool, n. boundary, fanner •'(->. 
Molley, Patrick, (Salina,) salt manufacturer 

and farmer 330. 
MOREHOUSE, CARLOSS, (Liverpool,) lot 

81, farmer 90, \ mile w. of Liverpool. 
Morehouse, Ilulbert, (Salina,) lot 17, fanner 

1 P A S H R fiO 

MOREY. BENEDICT, (Salina,) lot 3, far- 
mer 23. 

Mourer, George, (Liverpool,) lot 98, farmer 
10. 

MUNN, THOMAS, (Liverpool.) farmer 10, 
Cold Spring road, \% W. of Liverpool. 

Murphy, Timothy, (Salina,) farmer. 

Myer, Edom, (Salina.) fanner IflUM 2S- 
old State road, IK miles n. Sulina. 

Myres, Franklin, (Liverpool.) boatman 
and farmer 9, n. boundary LLwpool, 
Oswego road. 

My res, Peter, (Liverpool.) lots 10, 11, 1» 
and 13, n. boundary Liverpool, fanner 
23. 

Nearing, A. J., (Liverpool.) overseer of 
Liverpool steam saw mill, 1st 

Nearing, Jackson .Mrs., (Liverpool,) milli- 
ner, Vine, n. 1st. 

Nelson, Cobb, (Liverpool,) farmer 2.S. ('"Id 
Spring road. 1 mile wt «t <>f Llvei 

Nelson, John w., (Liverpool,) fcrn 

Nelson, John. (Liverpool,) fanner 160, < old 
Spring road, 2 miles n. v> . \.\s atpCOL 

Newhouse, Frederick, (Salina. . far- 

mer, Buckle; road. 

Newman, John, (Liverpool,) cu 

Nickerson, G. N., (.Liverpool,) boat boild- 
er, 1st. 

Oaks, Edward, (Salina.) lot 18. famur leas- 
er 200. 

O'Blanes, George W., (Salina, I lot 3, farmer 
leases 70. 

O'Brian, Michael, (Salina,) farmer US, old 
State road. 

O'Brien, Michael, iSallna,) farmer leu-es 1. 
Odell, Miss, (Liverpool,) teacher primary 
department Union school. 



320 



0N0NBA GA GO UNTY B USINESS DIRECTOR Y. 



THE 



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TERMS, STRICTLY m ADVANCE. 

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frEMJ-WEEKLY JOURNAL— $4M0 per year ; $2.00 for six months. 

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SALINA. 



321 



O'Donnell, John, (Salina,) fanner leases 10 
Buckley road. 

Olmsted, Jabez, (Liverpool,) salt manuf 

O'Neill, Henry, (Liverpool,) cooper. 

O'Neil. James A., (Liverpool,) boat calker. 

Overacre, Solomon, (Salina,) lot 18, milk- 
man and farmer 1-45. 

PADDOCK, JOHN, (Liverpool,) farmer 
150. Tulip, cor. 2nd. 

Paler, Martin, (Salina,) lot 27, farmer 3. 

Parker, T. C, (Liverpool.) boatman. 

Passmore, William, (Liverpool,) black- 
smith, 1st. 

Patten, Isaac R., (Salina,) gate tender 
and assist. U. S. Assessor, 3 miles 
north of Syracuse. 

Pennock, Oliver, (Liverpool,) boat builder, 
1st. 

Petit, Ferdinand, (Liverpool,) asst. salt in- 
spector. 

Petit, N., (Liverpool,) salt packer. 

Pettit. E., (Liverpool,) salt boiler. 

PHILLIPS, NELSON, (Salina,) lot 8, 
blacksmith, justice of the peace and 
farmer 30. 

PITCHER. LEMAN B., (Salina,) lot 3, 
(Pitcher & Hingdett,) patent motive 
manuf. and farmer 80. 

Presbyterian Church, (Liverpool,) head of 
Tulip, pastorate vacant. 

Price, Joshua T., (Liverpool,) lot 1, farmer 
59. 

Pritzeus, Henry, (Liverpool,) carpenter, 
Vine. 

Rabee, William, (Liverpool,) farmer, 1 mile 
n. of Liverpool. 

Radbourn, Thomas, (Salina,) farmer leases 
110, Buckley road. 

Ragen, Patrick, (Syracuse,) lot 124, farmer 
30, salt reservation, Buckley road. 

REID, BRIDGET MISS, (Syracuse,) milk 
dealer and farmer 133, Buckley road. 

Resler. Valentine, (Liverpool,) cooper. 

Rett, Xavier, (Syracuse.) farmer 40, Vicke- 
ry road, 2 miles n. w. Green Point. 

Riggs, James, (Liverpool,) 3d, leases farm 
on New Bridge road. 

Ross, Benjamin C., (Syracuse,) lot 17, far- 
mer 33. 

Roy, Frank, (Liverpool,) salt boiler. 

Ryan, Chas., (Geddes,) carpenter. 

Savage, Michael, (Liverpool,) salt boiler. 

SAX, HENRY, (Salina,) farmer, Bridge- 
port plank road. 

Scherrer, John, (Liverpool,) cooper. 

Schllus, Valentine, (Liverpool,) cooper. 

SCHWIZER, JACOB, (Salina,) (Schwizer 
& Fotter.) 

SCHWIZER & FOSTER, (Jacob Schwiz«r 
and Edward E. Foster,) (Salina,) half 
mile north of Salina, rope and twine 
manuf. 

Scott, James, (Salina,) salt manuf. blocks 
144 and 145, district 2, Green Point. 

Secor, Halstead, (Liverpool,) Cold Spring 
road, w. bound corporation, farmer 30. 

Shannon, John, (Salina,) lot 18, farmer 
leases 90. 

Sheldon, E. B., (Liverpool,) boat builder, 

Shell, Lawrence, (Liverpool ) farmer 10, 
Cold Spring road, 1% miles w. of Liv- 
erpool. 



Siddens, Joseph, (Syracuse,) lot 4, mach- 
inist and farmer 25. 
SITTS C. M. MRS., (Liverpool,) milliner, 

2nd, w. of Tulip. 
Slatterly, James,(Salina,) lot 18, Bait manuf 

and farmer 15. 
Smith, Jacob & Peter, (Liverpool,) drutr-^ 

medicines and groceries, lnt, Liver- 
pool, also salt and barrel manuf. blocks 

31 and 32, dint. 3. 
Smith, Newberry, (Liverpool,) Oswego. 

farmer l,w. 
Smith, Phillip. (Liverpool.)lot 64, farmer:.:! 

Cold Spring road, 2 miles w. of I i 

pool. 
SMITH, S. A. MISS, (Liverpool,) tailoress, 

Oswego st. 
Soule, Oscar P., (Salina,) solar salt manuf. 
Spencer, James. (Salina,) salt maimf 

blocks 128, 155, 156, 149, 157. district 

No. 2, Liverpool road. u. Qrei i I tint 
Spoor, Francis, (Syracuse,) farmer SO, vick- 

ery road, 1> 4 ' miles n. w. Green l\ int. 
Spring, John, (Salina.) lot 8, nurseryman 

and farmer 5. 
Stanton, F. U. Rev., (Liverpool. I | - r or 

M. E. Church, Oswego st. 
Stanton, William B., (Suliua,) lot 2. .'urmer 

8. 
State Salt Office, (Liverpool.) .1, T Craw- 
ford, receiver and inspector ; \ alentine 

Bohu, barrel inspector ; 1st cor. Tulip. 
Steadman, William H., (Salina ner 

and farmer 20. 
Stencel, William, (Salina,) lot 3, carpenter 

and farmer 6. 
STERLING, CHARLES S.. I ■ -, .. l.i 

allop. physician and surgeon, 1- 

door w. of Stone Hotel. 
Sterngraver, Henrv, (Syracuse.) farmer 

leases 16. Bucklev road. 
Stevens, Simon, (Salina.) solar salt inautif, 

Green Point, salt field 11 and farmer 84. 
Stoddard, John C, (Salina,) farmer lenses 

30, Buckley road. 
Swartz, A., (Liverpool,) salt packer. 
Sweney, John, (Salina.) lot 4, farmer 
Terry, Frank M., (I.i ..-t: ■ - 97, 98, 

and 99, former 110, \ toe. 
Thomas. John, (Liverpool,) fam ■.■. 

8, Cold Spring road, 1 \ mi. 

Liverpool. 
Thompson, Joseph, (Salina,) lot IS, f ruirr 

1. 
Tiffany, Edward, (Liverpool,) meat market, 

1st. 
Timmons, Nicholas, (Lirerpo< "an 

and farmer 10, Cold Spring roM, \ mile 
w. of Liverpool. 
Union School, (Liverpool,) Tulip, 
Byron G. Clapp, principal ; V 
2d department ; M ■ 
department; Hiss Kiln Johnson, ith 
department; M.sb Udell, prima 
partment. 
Vickery, Abner, (Liverpool.) lot 1, fa; 

66. 

WALKER, E. 8., (Liverpool.) farmer II. 

Oswego st. 
Warner. Christian, (Liverpool,) foreman of 

Onondaga I onntj Ball I 

cooper shop, on plank road at 1 
pool, residence % mile mile E. of Liv- 
erpool, farmer 7. 



322 



SALINA—SKANEA TELES. 



Warner, Edward Rev., (Liverpool,) pastor 
of German Lutheran Church, Oswego, 
cor. Willow. 

Waterberry, Joseph, (Salina,) carpenter 
and farmer 123£, Avery's Creek. 

Weatherby, Miss, (Liverpool,) teacher 3d 
department Union School. 

WEBB, ALVLN A., (Liverpool,) joiner and 
builder, 2d, under Good Templars' 
Hall. 

WELLER, CAPT. WM. F., (Liverpool,) lot 
1, farmer 35. 

Wells, A.B., (Liverpool,) blacksmith, 1st, 
n. Tulip. 

Wentworth, Morris M., (Liverpool,) boot 
and shoe manuf., 1st. 

Wescott, C. N., (Salina,) saloon, canal 
stabling, fishing and pleasure party 
boats on Onondaga Lake, from Green 
Point. 

West, John, (Liverpool,) well digger. 

Western Union Telegraph Office, (Liver- 
pool,) post office buildings, E. H. Craw- 
ford, operator. 

Wheeler, Josiah P., (Salina,) lot 28, farmer 
23. 



WHITING, MALCOLM, (Liverpool,) boat- 
man and farmer 16, Cold Spring road, 
% mile w. Liverpool. 

Wickham, Geo., (Liverpool,) stave mill. 

Wicks, S., (Salina,) lot 28, farmer. 

Wieland, John, (Salina,) lot 4, tailor, steam 
saw mill and farmer 5. 

Willworth, Peter, (Liverpool,) cooper. 

Wilson, Lansing B., (Salina,) lot 4, farmer 
50. 

WILSON, SHELDON,(Salina,)lot 2, farmer 
50. 

Winworts, Peter,(Liverpool,) cooper, Vine. 

WRIGHT, MARTIN V., (Salina,) lot 3, far- 
mer leases 200. 

WRIGHT, R. P., (Liverpool,) farmer 100, 
New Bridge road, 1 mile n. Liverpool. 

WRIGHT, ZENAS P., (Liverpool,) farmer 
100, Oswego road, 1 mile n. of Liver- 
pool. 

Wyker, Henry, (Liverpool,) counselor, 
boat builder and salt manuf. 

Young, Adolph, (Liverpool,) carpenter. 

Young, Michael, (Liverpool,) cooper. 

Zeigler, John, (Liverpool,) salt packer. 



(Post Office Addresses in Parentheses.) 



Adams, Emerson H., (Skaneateles,) lot 
27, farmer 100. 

Agard, Charles H., (Skaneateles,) lot 44, 
carpenter and joiner and farmer 27. 

Aldridge, Robert, (Elbridge,) lot 4, shoe 
maker and farmer 8. 

Allen, Jacob H., (Skaneateles,) lot 29, far- 
mer 188. 

ALLEN, JOSEPH, (Skaneateles,) (Welling 
& Allen.) 

ALLIS, CALEB W., (Skaneateles,) (Allis, 
Rhoades & Hall.) 

ALLIS, RHOADES & HALL,(Skaneateles,) 
( Caleb W. Allis, Wm. P. Rhoades and 
John C. Hall,) dry goods, groceries and 
crockery, Genesee. 

AMERMAN, I. S. & CO., (Skaneateles,) 
(Isaac 8. Amerman^Wilson J. Amer- 
man and Henry C. Welling,) dry goods, 
groceries and crockery. 

AMERMAN, ISAAC S., (Skaneateles,) (I. 
8. Amerman <& Co.) 

AMERMAN, PETER J., (Owasco, Cayuga 
Co.,) lot 84, farmer 12%. 

AMERMAN, WILSON J., (Skaneateles,) 
(/. S. Amerman & Co.) 

Austin, Anthony, (Mandana,) lot 73, far- 
mer 170>£. 

Austin, Dor, (Skaneateles,) lot 66, farmer 
128. 

Austin, George, (Skaneateles,) lot 35, far- 
mer 95. 



Austin, Henry, (Owasco, Cayuga Co.,) lot 
84, farmer 195. 

Austin & Lawton, (Owasco, Cayuga Co.,) 
(Warren Austin and Edwin E. Law- 
ton,) lot 84, farmer 185. 

Austin, Sarah Mrs., (Skaneateles,) lot 27, 
farmer 110. 

Austin, Warren, (Owasco, Cayuga Co.,) 
(Austin & Lawton.) 

Ayres, J. E., (Skaneateles,) boots and shoes, 
Genesee, Legg Block. 

BABER, JANEJHRS., (Skaneateles,) lot 
28, farmer 45. 

BADGER, GEORGE, (Hart Lot,) lot 2, far- 
mer leases 109. 

Badman, George, (Mapdana,) lot 86, farmer 
36. 

BADMAN, WM., (Skaneateles,) lot 67, far- 
mer leases 50. 

Baker, Simeon, (Skaneateles,) proprietor 
of Railroad House, corner Jordan and 
Railroad. 

Banker, Francis P., (Owasco, Cayuga Co.,) 
lot 86, farmer 60. 

BANNISTER, MELZAR B., (Hart Lot,) 
(Bannister & Weeks.) 

BANNISTER & WEEKS, (Hart Lot,) 
(Melzar B. Bannister and Forest 6. 
Weeks,) proprietors Community Paper 
Mill. 

Barbert, Samuel, (Mottville,) lot 10, farmer 
105. 



SKANEATELES. 



323 



*BAKNS, W. & J. W., (Mottville,) propri- 
etors Cataract flouring mills. 

BARROW, GEO., (Skaneateles,) lawyer, 
Genesee. 

Bassett, .loseph, (Skaneateles,) lot 50, far- 
mer 95. 

Bean, E., (Mottville,) (G. H. Earll & Co.) 
secretary and treasurer Skaneateles 
Iron Works. 

Bench, James, (Skaneateles,) hardware, 
stoves and tinware, Genesee. 

BENEDICT BROS. & HALL, (Mottville,) 
(Harmon B. Benedict, Sidney L. Bene- 
dict and David Hall,) general mer- 
chants. 

BENEDICT, HARMON B., (Mottville,) 
(Benedict Bros:. & Hall.) 

Benedict, S. E., (Mottville,) manufacturer 
and dealer in harness, trunks, whips 
&c. 

BENEDICT, SIDNEY L., (Mottville,)(Be»- 
edict Bros. & Hall.) 

Benedict, Thomas A., (Mottville,) (Wheeler, 
Benedict & Co.) 

BENSON, P. OSCAR C, M. D., (Skaneate- 
les,) homreopathic physician, Syracuse 

St. 

Bentley, George H., (Skaneateles,) lot 57, 

farmer 150. 
Benton, Chester, (Mottville,) meat market. 
BERRY, JOSEPH, (Skaneateles,) lot 12, 

farmer 80. 
Blodgett, Andrew, (Mottville,) chair facto- 
ry- 
Bradford, Gilbert C, (Skaneateles,) lot 66, 

farmer 73. 
Bradford, Thomas C, (Skaneateles,) lot 44, 

farmer 75. 
Bradley, Horace, (Skaneateles,) (Earll, 

Thayer & Co.) 
Brady, Charles, (Skaneateles,) lot 27, far- 
mer 22. 
Briggs, Ann C. Mrs., (Skaneateles,) lot 27, 

farmer 91. 
BRIGGS, WM. S., (Skaneateles,) lot 60, 

farmer 320. 
Brock, Wm., (Skaneateles,) lot 38, farmer 

70. 
BROWN, EMMETT J., (Skaneateles,) (J. 

C. Brown & Son.) 
BROWN, J. C. & SON, (Skaneateles,) 

(John C. and Emmett J.,) lot 58, farmer 

170. 

BROWN, JOHN C, (Skaneateles,) (J. C. 
Brown & Son.) 

BULKLET, ALMON, (Skaneateles,) lot 58, 
farmer 64. 

Burch, Charley, (Mandana,) lot 87, farmer 
60. 

Burch, Warren, (Mandana,) lot 73, farmer 
63. 

BURGESS, EDWIN, (Mottville,) lot 18. 

Burgess, Herbert, (Mottville,) lot 18, farm- 
er leases 71. 

Burget, John, (Owasco, Cayuga Co.,) lot 
65, farmer 104. _ 

BURGHARDT, GEORGE W., (Skaneate- 
les,) lot 52, farmer 110. 

Burns, Thomas, (Mottville,) wagon maker. 

Burroughs, Alvin, (Skaneateles,) lot 11, 

farmer 67. , »...,,,'. u 

BUSH, SILAS, (Skaneateles,) lot 12, justice 
of the peace and farmer 103. 



Butler, Harriet G., (Skaneateles,) dress and 
cloak maker, Genesee. 

Butler, Martin S., (Skaneateles,) tailor, 
Genesee. 

CADY, PLATT, (Skaneateles,) groceries 
and provisions, also agent tor Mer- 
chant's Union Express, <, 

CAMPBELL, GEO. T., M. D.. (Skaneate- 
les,) drugs and medicines, Genesee. 

Carr, Robert, (Skaneateles,) lot 27, farmer 
40. 

Carrigan, P., (Mottville,) (0. H. Earll <£ 
Co.) 

Carver, Edward, (Skaneateles,) lot 35, far- 
mer 11. 

Chapman, James S., (Mottville,) lot 12, far- 
mer 30. 

CHATFIELD, JOEL, (Marcellus,) lot 13. 
farmer 24. 

Chatfield, Marietta, (Elbridge,) lot 4, far- 
mer 75. 

Chatfield, Pierpont E., (Elbridge,) lot 4, far- 
mer 70. 

Chave, Charles, (Skaneateles,) lot 28, far- 
mer 16. 

Church, Benjamin F., (Owasco, Cayuga 
Co.,) machinist. 

Church, James W., (Owasco, Cayuga Co.,) 
lot 84, farmer 105. 

CLAPP, MAT1IEW, (Mottville,) lot 3, far- 
mer 86. 

Clark, Chester, (Marcellus,) lot 12, fanner 
125. 

Clark, Edwin, (Skaneateles,) lot 18, fanner 
72. 

Clark, Foster, (Skaneateles,) lot 35, farmer 
60. 

CLARK, GEO. II., (Skaneateles,) lot 41, 
farmer 110 and leases ;.u. 

Clark, John, (Skaneateles,) lot 36. forme - 

Clark, Perry W., (Marcellus,) lot .">, farmer 
40. 

Clark, Wm. E., (Skaneateles,) lot 29, far- 
mer 97. 

Clary, Michael, (Mottville,) lot 8, fanner IB. 

Cleaveland, Hubbard \V\, (SkaneftU 
(with LewU \V.,) lot 38, farmer U0. 

CLEAVELAND, LEWIS W. Akamai. 
(with Hubbard FT.J lot 88, Ourou 

CLEMENTS, THOMAS. (Skaneateles, > lot 
52, farmer 85. 

CLIFT, JOAB, (Skaneateles,) president 
Skaneateles Savin.-- Hank. 

CLIFT, WILLS, (Skaneateles. i lot IT, far- 
mer 100. 

Coe, E. B., (Mottville,) I 9. H. Wan •' I 

Cole, Elijah, (Blbridge,) lot i. Burnet 100. 

Cole, Win. M., (Mottrille,) lot 3, fanner 
40#. 

Community Paper Mill, (Hart Lot,) Itannls- 
ter ,t \Veeks, proprietor-*. 

Compton, John, (Skaneateles,) lot 51, far- 
mer 20. 

CONOYER. SUTLER D..iSkane»tele-.t lot 
39, farmer 188. 

Converse, Henry 11., iSkan. 
verte <f- Brut.) 

Converse A Hunt. (Skaneateles,) (Htmnj II. 
Convent </>«* Chartet 8. Hvtt,) dry 

is and crockery, O e n e eoe, 3 Legg 

Block. 

COOK, JACOB M., (Marcellus.) lot M. far- 
mer 600. 



324 



8KANEATELES. 



Coon, Helen M. Miss, (Mottville,) milliner 

and dress maker. 
COON, THOMAS, (Skaneateles,) lot 51, 

farmer 83. 
Coon, Wm., (Skaneateles,) lot 59, farmer 

80. 
CORNELL, HORACE, (Skaneateles,) liv- 
ery and boarding stable, Jordan. 
CONWAY, JAMES, (Mottville,) lot 19, 

laborer. 
CROSIER, WM. H. H., (Skaneateles,) (W. 

Crosier & Son.) 
CROSIER, W. & SON, (Skaneateles,)(IFm. 

and Wm. H. H.,) cabinet makers and 

undertakers, Jordan. 
Cross, James J., (Skaneateles,) lot 65, far- 
mer 11. 
Cross, Salen, (Skaneateles,) lot 65, farmer 

9*. 
Cuddeback, Alfred, (Skaneateles,) lot 65, 

farmer 88. 
Cuddeback, David, (Skaneateles,) lot 37, 

farmer 150. 
CUDDEBACK, EGBERT G., (Skaneateles,) 

lot 50, farmer 31. 
Cuddeback, Isaiah, (Skaneateles,) lot 58, 

farmer 100. 
Cuddeback, Peter, (Skaneateles,) lot 37, 

farmer 100. 
Cuddeback, Simeon, (Skaneateles,) lot 37, 

farmer 50. 
Cullin, Francis, (Mottville,) blacksmith. 
CURTIS, JOHN P., (Marcellus,) lots 22 and 

30, farmer 160. 
Cuykendall, Elias C, (Owasco, Cayuga Co.,) 

lot 73, farmer 100. 
Daniels, Ammon, (Mottville,) lot 18, farmer 

32. 
Davey, John, (Marcellus,) lot 13, farmer 

162. 
Davis, Jacob, (Niles, Cayuga Co.,) farmer 

28. 
Day, John, (Skaneateles,) clothing, Gene- 
see. 
Decker, Anthony, (Skaneateles,) lot 84, 

109*. 
Defendorf, George E., (Niles, Cayuga Co.,) 

lot 87, farmer 50. 
Defendorf, Peter, (Niles, Cayuga Co.,) lot 

87, farmer 64. 
Deland, Jasper, (Skaneateles,) (Deland & 

Sandford.) 
DELAND & SANDFORD, (Skaneateles,) 

(Jasper Deland and W. Holmes Sand- 
ford,) meat market, Genesee. 
Dewitt, Andrus, (Owasco, Cayuga Co.,) lot 

85, farmer 76. 
Dewitt, Isaac, (Owasco, Cayuga Co.,) lot 85, 

farmer 30. 
Dewitt, Daniel, (Mandana,) lot 86, farmer 

115. 

DeWitt, Hiram, (Skaneateles,) lot 36, far- 
mer 52. 

Dewitt, James, (Owasco, Cayuga Co.,) lot 
85, farmer 100. 

DEWITT, MARTIN C, (Skaneateles,) lot 
45, farmer 60. 

DEWITT, MARTIN V., (Skaneateles,) 
(Wheeler, Benedict & Co. of Mottville.) 
Bheriff of county, Exchange block, up 
stairs. 

Dewitt, Stephen, (Niles, Cayuga Co.,) lot 
87, farmer 25. 



DIX, JOHN, (Skaneateles,) lot 45, farmer 
91. 

*DODGE, HARRISON B., (Skaneateles,) 
editor Skaneateles Democrat, and asst. 
assessor int. rev. 

Doherty, John, (Skaneateles,) lot 66, far- 
mer 51. 

DOHERTY, JOHN H., (Skaneateles,) 
boots and shoes, Genesee. 

DOVE, THOMAS G., (Skaneateles,) insu- 
rance agent. 

Dowling, S. F. & D., (Skaneateles,) lot 37, 
farmer 164. 

Downey, Geo. D., (Skaneateles,) (Patterson 
<fc Downey.) 

Doyle, Timothy, (Marcellus,) lot 4, farmer 
15. 

Dunn, John, (Mottville,) lot 18, farmer 5. 

Durston, Edward, (Skaneateles,) lot 18, 
farmer 54. 

Dye, Charles H., (Skaneateles,) lot 11, far- 
mer 33. 

EARLL, ANDREW J., (Mottville,) prop'r 
saw mill. 

Earll, Augustus P., (Skaneateles,) (Earlls 
& Tallman,) (Earlls, Thayer & Co,) 

EARLL, DANIEL, (Skaneateles,) lot 19, 
farmer 260. 

Earll, Geo. H., (Hart Lot,) (J. & O. H. 
Earll & Co.) 

Earll, G. H., (Mottville,) (G. H. Earll & 
Co,) 

Earll, G. H. & Co., (Mottville,) (G. H. Earll, 
E. Bean, P. Carrigan and E. B. Coe,) 
manuf. of water and quick lime. 

Earll J. & G. H. & Co., (Hart Lot,) (Julius 
Earll, Geo. H. Earll and John M. Nye,) 
paper manuf. 

EARLL, J. MURRAY, (Mottville,) lot 10, 
farmer 45. 

Earll, Julius, (Hart Lot,) (J. & G. H. Earll 
& Co.) 

Earll, Leonard H., (Skaneateles,) (Earlls, 
Thayer & Co.,) (Earlls & Tallman,) lot 
19, farmer 9. 

Earlls & Tallman, (Skaneateles,) (Augustus 
P. Earll, Leonard H. Earll and Charles 
Tallman;) distillers. 

Earlls, Thayer & Co., (Skaneateles,) (Leon- 
ard H. Earll, Augustus P. Earll, Joel 
Thayer, A. Newton Palmer, F. V. D. 
llorton and Horace Bradley,) paper 
manuf. 

Edick, Michael H., (Mandana,) lot S6, far- 
mer 72. 

EDWARDS, J. AUGUSTUS,(Skaneateles,) 
lot 44, farmer 97*. 

EDWARDS, JONATHAN, (Skaneateles,) 
photographer, Genesee. 

Eggleston, Theodore, (Skaneateles,) lot 52, 
farmer 90. 

Escott, Thomas, (Skaneateles,) lot 28, far- 
mer 10. 

Farnham, Hiram, (Marcellus,) lot 12, farmer 
75. 

Field, Sereno, (Skaneateles,) harness mak- 
er, Field's block, Genesee. 

Fisher, Isaac, (Mandana,) lot 73, farmer 7*. 

Fisher, John, (Mandana,) lot 67, farmer 50. 

FISHER, JOSEPH, (Skaneateles,) lot 67, 
farmer 16. 

Fisher, Thomas, (Skaneateles,) lot 65, far- 
mer 65. 



SKANEATELE8. 



325 



Fitzgerald, Thomas, (Mottville,) lot 21, far- 
mer 58. 

Flood, Thomas, (Mottville,) lot 11, farmer 20. 

Folts, Harvey, (Mandana,) lot 73, post- 
master and farmer 65. 

FOOTE, ASA, (Skaneateles,) lot 57, farmer 
90. 

Foote, Chauncey, (Skaneateles,) lot 65, far- 
mer 103. 

FOOTE, PERRY, (Skaneateles,) lot 28, far- 
mer 234. 

Ford, Alexander, (Skaneateles,) lot 57, far- 
mer 100. 

Foster, John A., (Mottville,) lot 11, farmer 
11. 

Fowler, Silas, (Mandana,) lot 86, farmer 
140. 

FRANCIS, GEORGE, (Skaneateles,) hats, 
caps aril furs, Genesee. 

FULLER, SUMNEE, (Skaneateles,) lot 36, 
farmer 100. 

FULTON, HEMAN D., (Skaneateles,) lot 
50, farmer 117X- 

*FURMAN, ZALMON B., (Skaneateles,) 
billiard parlor, opposite Lake House. 

Gale, Richard, (skaneateles,) lot 38, farmer 
160. 

GAMBLE, JOHN, (Mottville,) proprietor 
Mottvil'e House. 

GANE, JOSEPH, (Skaneateles,) lot 39, 
farmer 72. 

Gardner, James, (Skaneateles,) lot 66, far- 
mer 97. 

GARLOCK, JOSIAS, (Skaneateles,) Treas- 
urer Skaneateles Savings Bank. 

Gibbons, Worthy, (Skaneateles,) boots and 

"■lli >i'~- G6I16SG6 

GJFFORD, JAS. H., (Mandana,) lot 73, 
surveyor and farmer 32. 

GILES, WM. P., (Skaneateles,) lot 67, far- 
mer 124. 

Glass, Daniel, (Mottville,) lot 10, farmer 
60. 

GLOVER, MICHAEL,. (Marcellus,) lot 5, 
farmer 97. 

Goodwin, Lyman B., (Skaneateles,) propri- 
etor of Skaneateles and Auburn stage 

Grant, B., (Skaneateles,) lot 66, farmer 68. 
Gravit, Isaac D., (Mandana,) lot S6, farmer 

75. 
Greenway, Wm., (Mandana,) lot 86, farmer 

35 
GREGORY, GEORGE, (Skaneateles,) lot 

35, farmer 67. . , , . 

GREGORY, GEORGE C, (Skaneateles,) lot 

67, farmer 110. , 

GREGORY, JOHN H., (Skaneateles,) lot 

38, teasel dealer and farmer 77#. 
Gregory, John T., (Skaneateles,) lot 52, 

farmer 80. „ . 

Griswold, Phebe, (Mottville,) lot 2, farmer 

200 
GUPPY,WM., (Mottville,) lot 21, farmer 

150 
Haight,' John S., (Skaneateles,) lot 65, far- 

Haight, Wm., (Skaneateles,) lot 65, farmer 

1°0 
Hait, I.* & J., (Skaneateles,) lot 21, farmer 

Hakes, Warren, (Elbridge,) lot 4, farmer 45. 
HALL, DAVID, (Mottville,) (Benedict Bros. 
& Hall.) 



g 8 ' 1 - Dyer, (Marcellus,) lot 5, farmer 75. 

HALL JOHN O, (Skaueatulos,) (Allit 
Rhoades dk Hall.) 

*HALL, LYMAN, (Skaneateles,) watches, 
jewelry and fancv goods, Genesee. 

HARDWICH, JAMES, (Skaneateles,) lot 
39, farmer 138. 

nares, Joseph, (Mottville,) lot 12, farmer 2. 

Harper, Joseph, (Mottville,) blacksmith. 

HARRIS, PHILLIP DR., (Skaneateles.) 
surgeon dentist, 1 Pardee block, Gene- 
Bee. 

Harvey, Isaac, (Skaneateles,) lot 97, toll 
gate keeper. 

HARVEY, MARY, (Mandana,) lot 73, far- 
mer 7. 

HARWOOD & RAWLINS, (Skaneateles.) 
dealers in harness, trunks, whips &c, 
Genesee. 

Hatch, Asa W., (Skaneateles,) lot 37, far- 
mer 113. 

Hazen, Horace, (Skaneateles,) post master, 
Jordan st. 

Helmar, Frederick, (Mandana,) lot M, far- 
mer 7. 

Higginbottom, Patrick, (Mottville,) lot 10, 
farmer 7. 

Hill, Charles, (Skaneateles,) lot 87, farmer 
10. 

Hoag, Wellington, (Skaneateles,) lot GO. far- 
mer 105. 

HOAGLAND, JACOB, (Skaneateles,) lot 
38, farmer 20. 

Hodskin, Albert A., (Skaneatelei,) lot 61, 
farmer 65. 

Hodskius, Damon H., (Skaneateles,) hit 5'i, 
farmer 80. 

Holven, Joseph, (Skaneateles,) lot 51, far- 
mer 82. 

Hopkins, George W., (Mottville,) lot 18, 
farmer 12. 

HORLE BROS., (Skaneateles,) [Job md 
George,) lot 58, proprietors saw mill, 
farmers 10. 

HORLE, GEORGE, (Skaneateles,) (HorU 
Bro«.) 

nORLE, JOB, (Skaneateles,) (ff-W< Bros) 

Horsington, Arthur, (Marcellus.) lot 81. 
farmer 130. 

Horsington, John R., (Marcclluf.) lot 13, 
farmer leases 154. 

Horton, F. V. D., (Skaneat. -!U, 

Thayer <£ Co.) 

Hough, Thomas P.. (Skaneateles,) hit M, 
farmer 115. 

nOYT, EZEKIKL B.. i Mottville. i Miehin 
iflt and iron founder. 

Hoyt, Rufus K., (Skaneateles,) lot 61, fur 
mer 80. 

Hubbard. Daniel. (Mottville,) manufacturer 
of sash, doors and Hinds. 

HUBBARD, HENRY .1.. (SkBOWttl 
(V. Pardte it Co..) cashier of banku g 
house of C. Pardee & Co. ; aWo notary 
public. 

Hudson, John, (Skaneateles.) lot 35, farmer 

20. 
HUMrHRYES, JOTIN, (Skaneatelee,) sn 

periutendent of Packwood's carriage 

shop. 
HUNSIKKR, HENRY, (MottvilhO post 

muster. ..»«««. 

Hunt, Henry, (Skaneateles,) lot 3*. firm, r 

4. 



\<? 



326 



ONONDA OA CO UNTT B USINESS DIRECTOR T. 



JERRY SHALLISH 



DEALER IN 



wT 



And Builders' Hardware, 
IRON, STEEL & NAILS. 



^XjS< 



COOK, PARLOR 



AND 



LAT 



STOVES 




AMONG WHICH IS THE CELEBKATED 

Sterling Improved Hot Air Cooking Stove 

THE BEST STOVE IN AMERICA. 

Manufacturer of every description of Tin, Copper and Sheet Iron Ware. All kinds of 
Job Work pertaining to the Business promptly done by experienced workmen. 

Silver Plating, Gas and Steam Fitting and Plumbing done at the 

lowest living rates. Old Brass, Copper and Lead taken 

at the market price. Don't forget the place, 

No. 1 Furman Block, Main Street, 



SKANEATELES. 



327 



Irish, Jedediah, (Mandana,) lot 86, farmer 

92. 
James, Robert, (Skaneateles,) lot 37, far- 
mer 10. 
JEWETT. FREEEORN G., (Skaneateles,) 
banker and notary public, No. 1 Legg 
Block. 
Jones, Eli, (Mandana,) lot 73, farmer 50. 

JOYCE. JOHN, (Skaneateles,) lot 20, far- 
mer 250. 

Keef. Patrick, (Mottville,) lot 27, farmer 38. 

Keegan, John, (Marcellus,) lot 13, farmer 
60. 

KELLEY, THOMAS, (Skaneateles,) horse 
shoeing and wagon repairing. 

♦KIDDER, E. WOODWORTH, (Skaneate- 
les,) prop, of Lake House, cor. Genesee 
and Jordan. 

KIDDER, FRED. A., (Skaneateles,) lot 75, 
farmer 100. 

Kilcoyne, Patrick, (Marcellus,) lot 13, far- 
mer 56. 

Knapp, Chae. F., (Skaneateles,) lot 51, far- 
mer 84. 

KREBS, CHARLES, (Skaneateles,) hair- 
dresser and leader of Skaneateles Cor- 
net Band, opposite the Lake House. 

♦LAKE HOUSE, (Skaneateles,) cor. Gene- 
see and Jordan, E. Woodworth Kidder, 
prop. 

Lamb, Alfred, (Skaneateles,) lot 35, farmer 
20. 

Lapham, Anson, (Skaneateles,) lot 57, far- 
mer 115. 

Lawrence, Elpha Mrs., (Skaneateles,) lot 
29, farmer 150. 

Lawton, Abram A., (Skaneateles,) lot 58, 
farmer 100. 

Lawton, Edwin F.,' (Owasco, Cayuga Co.,) 
(Austin <& Lawton.) 

Lawton, Wm. B., (Skaneateles,) lot 58, far- 
mer 104. 

Leach, Valentine, (Marcellus,) lot 13, far- 
mer leases 65. 

LEE, BENONI, (Skaneateles,) lawyer. 

Lee, Seth, (Skaneateles,) lot 28, farmer 5. 

Lefever, Adam, (Owasco, Cayuga Co.,) lot 
85, farmer 65. 

Lefever, John, (Niles, Cayuga Co.,) lot 85, 
farmer 125. 

LEFEVER, NATHANIEL J., (Niles, Cay- 
uga Co.,) lot 87, farmer 50. 

Lewis, John, (Mottville.) lot 11, farmer 92. 

Lewis, John, F., (Mottville,) lot 19, farmer 

Lewis, Leonard, (Mottville,) lot 3, farmer 
100. 

Lewis, Sanford, (Mottville,) lot 4, fanner 
108. 

Lockwood, Absalom, (Mandana,) lot 87, 
farmer 160. _ „, .„ 

LOCKWOOD, HORATIO G., (Skaneate- 
les,) (Marshall & Lockwood) 

LOSS, SAMUEL E., (Skaneateles,) cabinet 
maker, Genesee. 

LUCKINS, JAMES, (Skaneateles,) lot 38, 

Main, James, (Skaneateles,) lot 59, farmer 

88 
MANDANA HOTEL, (Mandana,) Stephen 

R. Parish, prop. 
Manley, Samuel E., (Skaneateles,) lot 60, 
farmer 254. 



MARSHALL, JOHN B., (Skaneateles,) 

(Wheaion & Marshall.) 
♦MARSHALL & LOCKWOOD, (Skaneate- 
les,) (Pierre H. Marshall and II 

G. Lockwood,) produce commission 

merchants, Genesee. 
MARSHALL, PIERKE H., (Skaneateles,) 

(Marshall and Lockwood. \ 
Mason, Rishworth, (Skaneateles,) grocer, 

Genesee. 
McDowell, James, (Owasco, Cayuga Co.,) 

lot S5, farmer 198. 
Mclntyre, Wm., (Mottville,) lot 19, farmor 

7. 
Merrill, Chas. C, (Skaneateles,) lot 38, 

physician and farmer 6. 
♦MERRILL, C. F., (Skaneateles.) physician, 

9 National Hotel. 
More, Eliza,( Skaneateles,) lot B0, burner 25. 
Moreland, Parley, (Mottville.) carpenter 

and joiner. 
MORSE, JAMES T., (Skaneateles,) lot 52, 

farmer 110. 
MORTON, THOMAS, (Mottville,) manuf. 

of woolen shawls and cloth. 
Mosel, Ashbel Mrs., (Skaneateles,) l"t 28, 

farmer 112. 
MOSES, HENRY, (Elbridge,) lot 2S, far- 
mer 88. 
Mosher, Wm., (Skaneateles,) lot 60, farmer 

97. 
Mulroy, Michael, (Marcellus,) lot 22, farmer 

15. 
NATIONAL HOTEL, (Skaneateles,) John 

Packwood, prop. 
Newell, Abijah, (Marcellus,) lot 4, farmer 

38 
Newell, Eli, (Marcellus,) lot 5. farmer 74. 
Newell, Monson, (Elbridge.) lot 4, farmer 

30. 
NEWELL, ROSWELL, (Marcellus,) lot 1, 

farmer 40. 
NORTHROP, BUKRB., (Mottville,) 1 

and 10. farmer 187. 
NORTHROP, ELMORE B., (Skaneateles,) 

lot 67, farmer leases 200. 
Northrop, Heman, (Owuscu, Cayuga Co..) 

lot 73, farmer H hi. 

NORTHROP, HOMER A., (Mottville.) lot 

10, farmer 10. 
Nye, Harriet, (Skaneateles,) lot 5'.i, farmer 

25 
Nye, Jane E. Mies, (Skan • ircssand 

cloak maker, Gew ■ 

NYE, JOHN M., (Skaneal "• 

Earll A- Co.) vice president Bkani etelM 

Savings Bank. 
O'Brien, Margaret, (Hart LotJ lot 2. Bl I 

3. 
ODELL, DWIOHT. On :- ' . 

hit ST>. fariiH-r H«i. 
O'nara John. (Mottville,) lot 18, farmer ». 
Urr Wm , (Skaneateles,) lot 87, lann< I 
PACKWi »OD, JOHN, (SkaneaU les. im inur. 

of carriages and sleigha, nlr<o prop, of 

National Hot. 1, livery Btted 

Palmer. A. Newton, (StaMntalSSjJ vh'irlU, 

Palnur.'^amuelB., (Mottville.) lot 10, far- 
mer 15. 

Pardee, Amos R.. (Skaneateles.) lot 36, hr- 
mer 75. 



328 



SKANEATELES. 



PARDEE, C. & CO., (Skaneateles,) bank- 
ers, successors to First National Bank 
of Skaneateles, capital $50,000, Charles 
Pardee, president ; Henry J. Hubbard, 
cashier. 

PARDEE, CHARLES, (Skaneateles,) (C. 
Pardee & Co.,) president of bankin" 
house of C. Pardee & Co. 

Parish, John, (Skaneateles,) lot 6T, farmer 
56. 

PARISH, STEPHEN R., (Mandana,) pro- 
prietor Mandana Hotel. 

PARSONS, JOHN D., (Skaneateles,) lot 
57, farmer 100. 

Parsons, Moses, (Skaneateles,) lot 57 far- 
mer 73. 

Parsons, Thomas, (Skaneateles,) lot 67 
farmer 39. 

Patten, Edwin, (Skaneateles,) lot 59, far- 
mer leases 15. 

Patterson & Downey, (Skaneateles,) ( Wm. 
II. Patterson and George D. Downey ) 
hardware, paints, oils &c, Morgan's 
block. 

Patterson, Wm. H., (Skaneateles,) (Patter- 
son <& Downey.) 

Paul, George, (Skaneateles,) lot 28, farmer 

Peak, Thomas M., (Hart Lot,) farmer 5# 

Peck, Holcomb, (Skaneateles,) lot 58, far- 
mer 142. 

Perrigo, Chas. M., (Skaneateles,) telegraph 
operator. 

Piereon, John, (Skaneateles,) lot 37, farmer 

Piatt, Daniel, (Skaneateles,) lot 39, farmer 
65. 

PLATT, WILLIS, (Skaneateles,) lot 29 
farmer 119. 

POLLEY, HENRY 8., (Skaneateles,) wag- 
on maker. 

Pollock, George, (Skaneateles,) lot 38, far- 
mer 10. 

Porter, Evelyn H., M. D., (Skaneateles,) 
physician, State st. 

PRENTICE, SUMNER, (Owasco, Cayuga 
Co.,) lot 84, farmer 125. 

Price, Daniel P., (Owasco, Cayuga Co.,) lot 
84, prop, woolen mill. 

Ragan, Patrick, (Skaneateles,) lot 57 far- 
mer 9. 

RAWLINGS, MOSES, (Mottville,) lot 3, 
farmer 80. 

Reed, Joseph, (Skaneateles,) lot 67, farmer 
108. 

RHOADES, JOSEPH F., (Mottville,) lot 3 
farmer 70. 

Rhoades, Lewis H., (Skaneateles,) lot 20 
farmer 72. 

Rhoades, S. Porter, (Skaneateles,) lot 20 
farmer 150. 

RHOADES, WM. P., (Skaneateles,) {AUis, 
Rhoades & Hall.) 

RICHARD, ALEXANDER C, (Skaneate- 
les,) lot 39, farmer 182#. 

Roberts, James, (Skaneateles,) lot 65, far- 
mer 104. 

Roberts, Thomas, (Skaneateles,) lot 58, far- 
mer leases 9. 

ROCHENBURGER, HENRY, (Skaneate- 
les,) cigar manuf. and tobacconist, Jor- 
dan st. 

RUSSELL, CHARLES, (Skaneateles,) lot 
59, tarmej leases 142. 



Rust, Charles 8., (Skaneateles,) (Converse 
& Rust.) 

§^ a 4 \T J ^ n TvC? kaneatele8 -) lot 2S . far mer 4. 

RYAN, JOHN O., (Hart Lot,) lot 1, far- 
mer 30. 

Ryan, Maliack, (Skaneateles,) lot 37, far- 
mer 18. 

Sandford W.Holmes, (Skaneateles,) (De- 
land & Sanford.) 

Scriven, Wm., (Skaneateles,) lot 37, farmer 
leases 120. 

Seeley, Anson G., (Marcellus,) lot 22, farm- 
er 69. 

*SHALLISH, JERRY, (Skaneateles,) 
stoves, hardware, &c. 

Shaw, Orren S., (Elbridge,) lot 4, farmer 

SHEPARD, EDWARD, (Marcellus,) lot 13, 
farmer 117. 

Shepard, Isaac N., (Marcellus,) lot 5, farm- 
er 140. 

Sheppard, Wm., (Skaneateles,) lot 27, car- 
penter and joiner and farmer 3. 

Sherman, H., (Mottville,) lot 19, farmer 50. 

Sherwood, AsaL., (Skaneateles,) machinist 
and iron founder. 

SHOTWELL, GEORGE F., (Skaneateles,) 
lot 44, farmer 200. 

Signer, Eleazer, (Mottville,) lot 18, farmer 
62. 

Simmons, Henry, (Mandana,) lot 67, farmer 
14. 

Simmons, James, (Skaneateles,) lot 28, far- 
mer 12. 

Simmons, Jessie, (Skaneateles.) lot 28, far- 
mer 70. 

♦SINCLAIR, FRANK A., (Mottville,) Un- 
ion Chair Works. 

♦SKANEATELES DEMOCRAT, (Skane- 
ateles,) Harrison B. Dodge, Editor. 

Skaneateles Iron Works, (Mottville,) Henry 
Vary, president; E. Bean, secretary 
and treasurer; manuf. of merchants' 
iron, Norway refined iron, carriage and 
fire bolts, cold and hot pressed nuts, 
washers, rivets, <fcc. 

SKANEATELES SAVINGS BANK, (Skan- 
eateles,) Joab Clift, president; John 
M.Nye, vice president; Josias Garlock, 
treasurer. 
SMITH, CHARLES, (Skaneateles,) lot 58, 

farmer 60. 
Smith, Charles M., (Skaneateles,) lot 45, 

farmer 96. 
SMITH, FRANK, (Skaneateles,) lot 39, far- 
mer 107. 
Smith, George, (Skaneateles,) lot 28, far- 

IU6rl6ft8G8 31 

♦SMITH, JAMES H., (Skaneateles,) mer- 
chant tailoring, Petheram block. 

Smith, Jedediah, (Skaneateles,) lot 38, far- 
mer 157. 

SMITH, JOHN H., (Skaneateles,) lot 50, 
supervisor and farmer 85. 

Smith, Joseph Mrs., (Mottville,) lot 18, far- 
mer b%. 

Smith, Patrick J., (Mottville,) sawyer. 

SNOOK, JOHN, (Skaneateles,) town clerk 
and insurance agent, west end Legg 
Hall block, up stairs. 

Snow, Mary, (Skaneateles,) lot 50, farmer 14 

Spalding, George, (Skaneateles,) lot 38, far- 
mer 34. 



SKANEATELES. 



329" 



Springsted, George, (Elbridge,) lot 4, far- 
mer 9. 
Springsted, Wm. H.. (Marcellus,) lot 13, 

farmer 10. 
STACEY BROTHERS, (Skaueateles,) 
(Richard M. and James,) meat market, 
Jordan Bt. 

STACEY, JAMES, (Skaneateles,) (Stacey 
Brothers.) 

STACEY, RICHARD M., (Skaneatelea,) 
(Stacey Brothers.) 

Stacey, Wm.. (Skaneateles,) mamif. of car- 
riages and sleighs, Genesee. 

STARR, CHAS. F., (Skaneateles.) lot 73, 
farmer. 

Stephenson, John, (Mottville,) lot 18, far- 
mer 66. 

Stock, James, (Skaneateles,) lot 28, farmer 
60. 

Stocking, E. B., (Skaneateles,) druggist and 
apothecary, Genesee. 

Stone, Peleg A., (Skaneatetes,) lot 67, far- 
mer 4. 

STONER, MARCUS H., (Skaneateles,) lot 
37, farmer 115. 

Stoner, Wm., (Skaneateles,) lot 58, farmer 
10. 

Sunderlin, J. G. & J. H., (Mottville,) lot 12, 
farmer 165. 

Swartz, Patience, (Skaneateles,) lot 37, far- 
mer 2. 

Swee;, Lorenzo A., (Skaneateles,) lot 45, 
farmer 147. 

Talbot, Charles E., (Skaneateles,) lot 59, 
teasel dealer. 

Tallcot, Joseph, (Skaneateles,) lot 44, far- 
mer 115. 

Tallman, Charles, (Skaneateles,) (Earlls & 
Tollman.) 

TAYLOR, LUCLEN A., (Skaneateles,) lot 
12, farmer 75. 

Thayer, J. & Co., (Skaneateles,) (Joel Thay- 
er and Henry T. Webb,) props, of Skan- 
eateles flouring mills. 

Thayer, Joel, (Skaneateles,) (J. Thayer & 
Co.) (Earlls, Thayer & Co.) 

Thomas, David P., (Skaneateles,) lot 11, 
farmer 130. , 

THOMPSON, LEVI N., (Skaneateles,) lot 
20, farmer 48. 

Thompson, Selah, (Mottville,) lot 3, farmer 

Thorpe, Monson Jr., (Skaneateles,) tobac- 
co and cigars, Jordan st., Exchange 

block. „ . . . 

THORNE, CHAUNCEYB., (Skaneateles,) 

lot 44, firmer 80. ,.,»«, *•„ 

Thome, Obediah, (Skaneateles,) lot 30, far- 
mer 300. , . , . „ ,„„ 
Thorn, Robert B., (Skaneateles,) lot 3o, far- 

niGr 29 
THORNTON, JAMES M., (Skaneateles,) 

lot 50, farmer 205. ± n _ , 

Thornton, D. C, (Mandana,) lot 87, farmer 

Thurlow, Henry, (Skaneateles,) teasel deal- 

Thuriow? James, (Mottville.) lot 19, farmer 

TOWNSEND, WM. J-, (Skaneateles,) lot 

44, farmer 100. . , . „. far 

TUCKER, JOSEPH, (Mandana,) lot 66, rar- 

Tucker?Samuel, (Skaneateles,) lot 19, far- 
mer leases 6. 



Tuohey, Michael, (Mottville,) lot 3, farmer 

90. 
TURNER, NEWELL, (Skaneateles,) boots 
and shoes, Hitchcock block. (Jenesce. 
UNCKLESS, WM., (Skaneateles.) lot 

farmer leases 38. 
Vancamp, Henry, (Marcellus,) lot 13, far- 
mer 5. 
Vancamp, Ransom, (Elbridge,) lot 4, far- 
mer 15. 
Vancamp, William, (Skaneateles,) lot 12, 

farmer 100. 
Vary, Henry, (Mottville,) president Skan- 
eateles Iron Works. 
VARY, HENRY H., (Skaneateles,) lot 19, 

farmer 90. 
Voke, Robert, (Skaneateles,) lot 45, farmer 

25. 
Voke, Thomas, (Skaneateles,) lot 29, far- 
mer 60. 
Wart, Lucien D., (Skaneateles,) watch re- 
pairer, Jordan st. 
Waldrou, David, (.Skaneateles.) lot 44, far- 
mer 50. 
Walter, Wendel, (Mottville,) lot 11, farmer 

37. 
Warner, Vine S., (Skaneateles.) lot 19, far- 
mer 36. 
Watson, Hull, (Skaneateles.) lot 19, farmer 

70. 
Watts, George, (Mottville,) lot 20, farmer 

5. 
Watts, George, (Skaneateles,) lot 52, far- 
mer 5>£. 
Weaver, Joseph, (Skaneateles,) lot 1- tu- 
rner 81. „ __ 
Webb, Henry T., (Skaneateles) {J. Thayer 

cfe Co.) 
Week, Emanuel, (Skaneateles'.) lot 86, nr- 
mer5. , . , . 

WEEKS, FOREST G., (Skaneateles,) lot 

27, dealer in teasels and torn 
WEEKS, FOREST G., (Hart Lot.wflnn- 
nister .(■ WeduJ , . . _ 

WEEKS, JOHN C, (8kaneatcle-.> lot 30, 

farmer 57. . 

Weeks, Wm., (Skaneateles.) lot 30. furmer 

99 
Weinerth, Jacob, (Mottville,) lot 10, farmer 

Weinerth, Jacob Jr., (MottrffleJ krt 1". 

carpenter and joiner and tanner ». 
Weller. Mary Mr-., (8kaneatele8,) Lot W, 

farmer v ". _ w r 

WELLING & ALLEN. (Skam 

A. Welling and Joseph I pne- 

tors lumber vard. Railroad. 

WELLlX(i. HENRY C . (Bkaneal 

8. Amerman & OO-) 

Welling. Jumos A.. (Bk»tt • "'.ling 

Wellington, Lewis, (SkaneatclefO lot 80, 

tanner :,: ' „ _ r>„ \ 

Westfall. John V.. (Owasco, Cayuga < 
lot 84, termer 80, , . , . 

WHEAD&N, EDWARD D., B MJ 

i Wheadont.) . , _ » 

WHEADON, .IAMES P.. (Ska 

( Whtadau.) , . 

WIIE\I)«'N \ M UiMlALL, (Skaneateles.) 
(Orlando D. Wktadm ana 
MorthaBJ grocery and pro\i-.n mer- 
chants. Genesee. , . 

WHEADON, ORLANDO D., (SkmeaUletJ 
( 11 tteadon tfe Marshall.) 



330 



SKANEA TELES— SP AFFORD. 



WHEADON, SAMUEL C, (Skaneateles,) 

( IVheadons.) 
WHEADONS, (Skaneateles,) (Samuel C, 
Edivard D. and James P.,) groceries, 
books and paper hangings, Genesee. 
Wheeler, Benedict & Co., (Mottville,)(JbAn 
It heeler, Thos. A. Benedict and Martin 
V. Be Witt,) wood work and machinery 
planing and moulding. 
Wheeler, John, (Mottville,) (Wheeler, Bene- 
dict & Co.) 
Wheeler, Mrs. D., (Skaneateles,) millinery 
and fancy goods, Genesee, No. 4 Legg 
Hall. ° & 

Wildey, Ornendo H., (Skaneateles,) photo- 
graph artist, Pardee Block, Genesee. 

Wilkinson. Alfred, (Skaneateles,) lot 36, 
farmer 100. 

Wilkinson, Sarah Miss, (Skaneateles ) 
teacher of select school. 



WI 5rSi? R ' (8kaM ^^ 

Wll fermer 52° 8eph ' ( Skaneatele s.) lot 31, 
Wilson, Robert, (Hart Lot,) lot 1, farmer 

WI 5Sme^ S - H -' ( Sk -ate,es,) lot 
Winter, John A., (Mandana,) lot 73, farmer 

W °mer d 73 Chl0e H- ' (Mandana ') lot 73, far- 

WYCKOFF CHRISTOPHER C, (Skane- 
ateles,) lot 39, farmer 145. ^«- au « 

Youngs Abram, (Niles. Cayuga Co.,) lot 
86, farmer leases 27#. 

YOUNG, LEVI S., (Skaneateles,) lot 67, 
farmer 6. ' 

YOUNG ORSON, (Skaneateles,) marble 
works. Genesee. 



(Post Office Addresses in Parentheses.) 



Ac ,kles, John, (Otieco,) lot 2, farmer 50. 
Ackles Samuel, (Borodino,) lot 70, farmer 

114. 
ADLAM, RICHARD, (Otisco,) lot 24, far- 

Anderson, John, (Borodino,) lot 88, car- 
penter and farmer 21. 

^famler 70 e ° rge H '' (Spafford '> lot 44 < 
Applebee, Albert A., (Borodino,) lot 13 

carpenter. ' 

Babcock Orlando, (Scott, Cortland Co.,) 

lot 32, farmer 50. 
BABCOCK, WILLIAM A., (Borodino,) lot 

90, farmer 4#, in Sempronius, Cayuga 

Bacon, Harrison, (Scott, Cortland Co.,) lot 

43, farmer 76. 
Bacon Wm., (Spafford,) lot 23, flax dresser 

and farmer 95, in Sempronius, Cayuga 

Baker, Josiah, (Borodino,) (Baker & 

Vanorman.) 
Baker & Vanorman, (Borodino,) (Josiah 

Baker and Dewitt Vanorman,) shoe 

makers. 
Barber, Charles R., (Spafford,) lot 23, far- 
•d ^ nei 'J 5 ' ln Sempronius, Cayuga Co 
Barber, Rathburn, (Spafford,) lot 32, farmer 
twiT' ^Sempronius, Cayuga Co. 

merS " (Spafford ') lot *». far " 

Ban ?ne 8 r35 dWin P " (Borodino ') lot 89. *& 
Barnes, Harvey, (Borodino,) lot 88, farmer 

, *2&jaj2a?« iot »• iawyer 



BARTLETT, CHARLES, (Borodino,) lot 

75, farmer 51. 
Bearse Ward, (Borodino,) lot 12, farmer 55, 

in Sempronius, Cayuga Co. 
BECKER, ALEXANDER, (Borodino,) lot 

25, farmer 118j£. 
BECKER, JOHN, (Borodino,) lot 12, far- 

mer 80, Sempronius, Cayuga Co. 

BECKER. PETtfR. (Borodino,) lot 12. far- 

mer 125, in Sempronius, Cayuga Co 
BECKER, WILLIAM, (Borodino,) lot 76 

farmer 134>£. 
BELL, PHIDELIA, (Spafford,) lot 21, tai- 

loress. 
Bell, William, (Otisco,) lot 34, farmer 73. 
Berry, Nelson, (Spafford,) lot 1, farmer 100. 
Berry, Zara, (Borodino,) lot 89, retired 

merchant and farmer 10. 
I^ e ^^ llen ' (Spafford,) lot 11. farmer 150. 
BREEDE, GEORGE, (Borodino,) lot 88, 

farmer 105^. 
Breed, Nathaniel, (Spafford,) lot 21, farmer 

Breed, Reuben T., (Borodino,) lot 88, far- 
mer 10. " 

Briggs, George W., (Borodino,) lot 1, far- 
mer 119. 

Brown, Henry, (Otisco,) lot 24, farmer 9j^. 

Bryant, Thomas, (Borodino,) lot 90, farmer 

Burdick, Charles C, (Spafford,) lot 32, far- 
mer 90. 

Burns, Francis, (Borodino,) lot 10, farmer 
96, in Sempronius, Cayuga Co. 

Burns, Phillip, (Borodino,) lot 12, in Sem- 
pronius, Cayuga Co., farmer 160. 

Burns, Thomas W. (Borodino,) lot 10, far- 
mer 66, in Sempronius, Cayuga Co.' 



SPAFFORD. 



331 



BURROUGHS, JOHN P., (Spafford,) lot 22, 
farmer. 

Cain, Michael, (Spafford,) lot 14, farmer 50, 
in Sempronius, Cayuga Co. 

Carr, George S., (Spafford,) lot 42, farmer 
97. 

Case, Aaron G., (Borodino,) lot 76, sawyer. 

Case, George W., (Borodino,) lot 10, far- 
mer 73, in Sempronius, Cayuga Co. 

Case, Hulda, (Spafford,) lot 24, farmer 100. 

Case. Reuben K., (Otisco,) lot 24, farmer 
5S. 

Causey, Charles, (Borodino,) lot 1, farmer 
114. 

Churchill, Alexander M., (Borodino,) lot 11, 
farmer 45. 

Churchill, George, (Otisco,) lot 1, black- 
smith and farmer 77. 

Churchill, James, (Spafford,) lot 21, mer- 
chant. 

Churchill, Peter, (Otisco,) lot 1, farmer 88. 

Churchill, Samuel, (Spafford,) lot 12, farmer 
54. 

Churchill. Ward. (Otisco,) lot 2. farmer 20. 

CHURCHILL, WTLLLAM, (Otisco,) lot 2, 
farmer 200. 

Clark, Amasa P., (Borodino,) lot 77, farmer 
100. 

CLARK, AJRTHUR H., (Borodino,) lot 69, 
farmer. 

Clark, George, (Borodino,) lot 77, farmer 83. 

Clark, Joseph, (Otisco,) lot 24, farmer 70. 

Clark, Milton O., (Spafford,) lot 21, farmer 
84. 

Clark. William H., (Borodino,) lot 89, farmer 
115. 

Cleveland, John, (Spafford,) lot 21, wagon 
maker and farmer 32. 

Cole, Joseph L.. (Spafford,) lot 21, fanner 52 

Colton, Alanson E., (Thorn Hill,) lot 70, 
farmer 140. 

COLTON, FRANK, (Borodino,) lot 89, far- 
mer 92. 

COLTON, HIRAM A., (Borodino,) lot 89, 
general merchant. 

CONGDON, BENJAMIN F., (Otisco,) lot 
23, farmer 110. 

Coope, Thomas, (East Scott, Cortland Co.,) 
lot 33, farmer 133. 

Corker, Abijah, (Spafford,) lot 23, farmer 

COWANS, DAVID H., (Spafford,) lot 23, 
flax dresser and farmer 95, in Sempro- 
nius, Cayuga Co. 
Craig, William H., (Spafford,) lot 22, farmer 

63. 
Crane, George, (Borodino,) lot 13, farmer 

180, in Sempronius, Cayuga Co. 
CRANE, SAMUEL, (Spafford,) lot 1, far- 
mer 106. , , . „. , 
Crofoot, Ebenezer, (Otisco,) lot 34, far- 
Cross, Otis, (Borodino,) lot 89 farmer 100. 
CRYSLER, ALFRED, (Borodino,) lot 90, 

farmer leases %■ „ _ . . .^*«t «.. 

Daniels, Benjamin, (Spafford,) lot 21, far- 
mer 10. 
Darling, Hiram L., (Borodino,) lot 89, dent- 

DABLLNG. JOSEPH, (Borodino,) lot 76, 

DAVI»rPERRT, (Spafford,) lot 14, farmer 
56, in Sempronius, Cayuga Co. 



DEXBER, STEPHEN, (Borodino,) lot I 
grape grower and farmer IX, in Sem- 
pronius, Cavu^a Co. 

DEDRICK, WILLIAM J., (Borodino,) lot 
13, farmer 52, in Sempronius, Cayuga 

Dibble, Leroy, (Borodino,) lot 77, farmer 
100. 

Donavan. William, (Spafford.) lot 12, far- 
mer 52. 

DOOLITTLE, WARREN, (Borodino,) lot 
76, farmer 111). 

Doty, Warren, (Spafford.) lot .'13, farmer 
103. 

Dotv, Williard, (Spafford,) lot 21, fanner 

Dumphry, Richard, (Borodino,) lot 70, far- 
mer leases 30. 

Dunn, John, (Spafford,) lot 14, farmer 53, 
in Sempronius, Cavuga Co. 

DUNNE, PETER, (Skaneateles,) lot 6(S, 
farmer 64. 

DUBBIN, EDWIN, (Borodino.) lot 10, In 
Sempronius, Cayuga Co., firmer. 

DURBIN, WM., (Borodino.) lot 10, in Sem- 
pronius, Cavuira Co., turner. 

Dyke. Ralph, (Stafford.) lot ."2. farm. 

DYKEMAN, HENRY E.. iSpaflbrd,) lot U, 
physician and surgeon and farimr 2. 

Eadie, James, (Spafford.) lot 11. burner 

Eadie, John W., (Spafford.) lot 23, farimr 
96, in Sempronius. CayUf 

EDDY, OREN, (Borodino.) lot ss, black- 
smith. 

Eddy, Richard M., (Borodino,) lot 1, fanner 
51. 

Edwards, Edwin, (Spafford,) lot 22, fanmr 
96. 

EDWARDS, SAMUEL, (Otisco,) lot .. 
fanner leases '.>~. 

EGLIN, ISAAC, (Borodino,) lot 90, farmer 
113. 

Elliot, Andrew J., (Spafford,) lot 31. fanner 
146. 

Emmons, Lewis. (Borodino.) lot n, burner 
87. in Semiironius. Ceyutra Co. 

EMMONS. WM. A., (Borodino,) lot 1 1, far- 
mer 96, in Sempronios, Cayiu ■ 

Eneans, Richard. (Skaneatelea, i lot f.-. far- 
mer 2. 

ENOS, JOSEPH H., (SkaneateleaJ lot 6», 
farmer 88. 

FAIRBANKS. PI1TNKAS W. -, iflbrdj 
lot 21, blacksmith. 

Fav, Andrew. fSpaffordJ krt S, carpenter. 

FELLOW'S, t IIAS.T., .Itnro.liiin.i lot t)0, 
farmer leases V 

FERRY. AMKKIi US V.. (Borodino.) lot 
76, farmer 60. 

Ferry. Chester, (Borodino,) lot 76, farmer 
leases 2. 

Fisher. Edgar, (Spafford,) lot 12. firmer 
56..V. 

Fisher, Oeorge, (Spaffbrd.) lot 0, fanner <B. 

Fisher, Isaac, ■< >tfs< o.) lol tt, (am* 

Fisher, Oscar F., (Spaffurd, I lot 32, farmer 

oa 

Fiaher. Otis L., (Spafford.) lot 22, farmer 

150. 
Fo«ter Albert, (Spafford.llot 33. farm-" 
Fredrick, Rachel. (SpaaTbrdJ '>>t ai, fanucr 

15 
FULTON, ALBERT E., (Borodino,) lot 88, 

farmor 115. 



332 



SPAFFOBD. 



GAY, BARNETT A., (Spafford,) lot 32, far- 
mer 170, in Sempronius, Cayuga Co. 

Geer, Morris, (Borodino,) lot 75, farmer 10. 

Gifford, Elihn, (Otisco,) lot 12, farmer 100. 

Gifford, Nichols, (East Scott, Cortland Co.) 
lot 43, farmer 100. 

Gordon, Alexander, (Spafford,) lot 11, far- 
mer 90. 

Green, Albert G., (Spafford,) lot 21, car- 
penter and farmer 3X- 

GREEN, GEO., (Borodino,) lot 21, far- 
mer 10, in Sempronius, Cayuga Co. 

Green, Henry, (Spafford,) lot 11, carpenter 
and farmer 80. 

GRINNELL, ANSEL, (Borodino,) lot 88, 
farmer 186. 

GRINNELL, SEYMOUR, (Borodino,) lot 
12, farmer 300, in Sempronius, Cayuga 
Co. 

Grout, John, (Spafford,) lot SI, farmer 100. 

Hacker, Richard, (Borodino,) lot 75, farmer 
94. 

Haight, Titus, (Skaneateles,) (estate,) lot 
69, farmer 130. 

HILL, WILLIAM, (Borodino,) lot 10, far- 
mer 7, in Sempronius, Cayuga Co. 

Harmon, Joseph, (Spafford,) lot 3, farmer 
47. 

HARRINGTON, JENKS, (Spafford,) lot 
31, farmer 12. 

Harvey, Job, (Borodino,) lot 70, farmer 150. 

HARVEY, MARK, (Borodino,) lot 69, far- 
mer 260. 

Havens, Ebenezer Jr., (Spafford,) (with 
lciabod Wallace,) lot 32, farmer 103, in 
Sempronius, Cayuga Co. 

Hayford, Benjamin, (Borodino,) lot 77, far- 
mer 125. 

Herrington, Cary, (Spafford,) lot 41, far- 
mer 75. 

Hill, James, (Spafford,) lot 21, farmer 12. 

Hill, Wm., (Borodino,) lot 75, farmer 90. 

HOLMES, JOHN, (Spafford,) lot 23, farmer 
75, in Sompionius, Cayuga Co. 

HOWE, GEORGE, (Borodino,) lot 71, far- 
mer leases 144. 

HUICE, OINERW., (Borodino,) lot 88, 
farmer ^. 

Hunt, Henry, (Skaneateles,) lot 79, farmer 
45^. 

HUNT, JAMES, (Thorn Hill,) lot 68, far- 
mer 75. 

Hutchms, Phineas, (Spafford,) lot 22, far- 
mer 129. 

Ide, Henry jr., (Borodino,) lot 77, farmer 
133. 

Johuson, Jonathan, (Spafford,) lot 31, law- 
yer and farmer 104. 

Keeaban, John, (Spafford,) lot 82, farmer 
57. 

KELSEY, JOHN B., (Spafford,) lot 43, den- 
tist. 

Knapp, Emeline, (Spafford,) lot 21, milli- 
ner. 

KNAPP, JUSTUS N., (Spafford,) lot 43, 
firmer 175. 

Kne Land, Samuel S., (Borodino,) lot 70, 
farmer 57. 

LADER, PAUL, (Skaneateles,) lot 74, far- 
mer 29. 
Landphior, John G., (Spafford,) lot 14, far- 
mer 6U, in Sempronius, Cayuga Co. 
Lav/rence, Wm. A., (Spafford,) lot 43, far- 
mer 117. 



LEGG, WM. W., (Spafford,) lot 21, hotel 

keeper, post master and farmer 73. 
LEWIS, JOHN J., (Skaneateles,) lot 74, 

farmer 142. 
Lieber, Oliver, (Spafford,) lot 8, cooper and 

farmer 88%. 
Lyon, Chas. B., (Spafford,) lot 21, boot and 

shoe store and farmer 53. 
Lyon, Henry, (Spafford,) lot 21, farmer \%. 
Mabie, Martin, (Spafford,) lot 43, farmer 25. 
MANLEY, ALAN SON, (Borodino,) lot 88, 

Manley, Russell, (Thorn Hill,) lot 68, far- 
mer 75. 

MARSHALL, SIMEON R., (Borodino,) lot 
89, wagon maker. 

MASON, DARIUS S., (with James S.,) 
(Skaneateles,) lot 68, farmer 193. 

Mason, Elbridge, (Scott, Cortland Co.,) 
lot 22, farmer 122. 

MASON, JAMES R., (with Darius S.,) 
(Skaneateles,) lot 68, farmer 193. 

Mason, Jerome, (Scott, Cortland Co.,) lot 
42, farmer 80. 

Mason, John L., (Skaneateles,) lot 68, far- 
mer 105. 

Mason, Martin, (Thorn Hill,) lot 70, farmer 
150 

MASON, MORTIMER, (Borodino,) lot 74, 
farmer 108. 

MASTER, GEORGE, (Otisco,) lot 23, far- 
mer 7. 

Masters, Stephens, (Otisco,) lot 28, farmer 
75. 

MAX60N, GAYLORD L., (Scott, Cortland 
Co.,) lot 32, farmer 58. 

Maxson, Henry, (Borodino,) lot 76, cooper. 

MAXSON, JOHN, (Scott, Cortland Co.,) 
lot 48, farmer 250. 

MAXSON, REUBEN, (Borodino,) lot 98, 
pedler, 

Maxson, Thomas J., (East Scott, Cortland 
Co.,) lot 35, sawyer and farmer 35. 

MAYNARD, JOHN A., (Borodino,) lot 89, 
cigar manuf. 

McCaulliffe, John,(Otisco,) lot 12, farmer 50. 

Mcdonald, Alexander, (Otisco,) lot 

34, farmer 30. 

McDonald, John, (Otisco,)lot 24, farmer 50. 

McKay, Frederick, (Spafford,) lot 21, farmer 
96. 

Melvin, Melinda Miss, (Borodino,) lot 88, 
farmer 3. 

MONK, BENJAMIN F., (Borodino,) lot 76, 
farmer 100. 

Moon, Alanson, (East Scott, Cortland Co.,) 
lot 43, farmer leases 1. 

MORGAN, MERRITT P., (Scott, Cortland 
Co.,) lot 42, farmer 88. 

Morris, Uriah, (Spafford,) lot 31, farmer 97. 

MORTON, ORSON B., (Borodino,) lot 74, 
farmer 112. 

Moss, William, (Otisco,) lot 23, farmer 90. 

Moule, Moses P., (Skaneateles,) lot 74, far- 
mer 182X- 

Nesbit, James, (Borodino,) lot 10, farmer 
100, in Sempronius, Cayuga Co. 

NESBIT, WM., (Borodino,) lot 10, in Sem- 
pronius, Cayuga Co., cooper. 

Newvill, Alexander C, (Borodino,) lot 76, 
farmer 371. 

NICHOLS, CHARLES, (Borodino,) lot 
89, wagon maker and farmer 1. 



SPAFFORD. 



333 



NICHOLS, JOHN W., (Borodino,) lot 89, 
hotel keeper. 

NODINE, JEREMIAH JR., (Spafford,) lot 
23, farmer 30. 

NODINE, JEREMIAH W., (Spafford,) lot 
38, farmer 50. 

Norris, Wm., (Skaneateles,) lot 68, farmer 
04. 

Norton, Erastus, (Spafford,) lot 21, carpen- 
ter and farmer 6%. 

Norton, James H., (.Scott, Cortland Co..) 
lot 43, farmer 136. 

O'Farrell, David McD., (Otisco,) lot 23, far- 
mer 68^. 

Olmsted, Isaac, (Borodino,) lot 89, farmer 
92. 

Olmsted, Jeremiah, (Borodino,) lot 89, far- 
mer 100. 

Olmsted, Jerry, (Borodino,) lot 89, farmer 

100. 

Olmsted, Timothy H., (Borodino,) lot 77, 

farmer leases 1. 
Owens, Timothy, (Borodino,) lot 89, far- 
mer ll*tf. 
PALMER, REUBENS., (Spafford.) lot 23, 

miller and farmer 43, in Sempronius, 

Cayuga Co. 
PATERSON, CHESTER, (Borodino,) lot 

10, farmer 130, la Sempronius, Cayuga 

Co. 
Patterson, Francis, (Borodino,) lot 10, far- 
mer 130, in Sempronius, Cayuga Co. 
PATERSON, MISS LAURA, (Borodino,) 

lot 89, farmer 1. 
Peck, Madi6on, (Borodino,) lot 88, mason 

and farmer 21. 
PHIPPEN, MEREGRET N., (Borodino,) 

lot 88, farmer 31. 
Pindergrass, Edmond, (Spafford,) lot 11, 

farmer 03. 
Potter, John Jr., (Otisco,) lot 34. farmer 52. 
Powers, Albert, (Spafford,) lot 22, farmer 

80. 
Prmdle, Horace, (Spafford,) lot 41, farmer 

170. 
Prindle, Oscar, (Spafford,) lot 21, farmer 

65 
PRINDLE, RENSELLAER, (Spafford,) lot 

41, farmer 125. 

Purchase, Samuel, (Borodino,) lot 12, far- 
mer 115, in Sempronius, Cayuga Co. 

PURDY, HIRAM, (Borodino,) lot 90, far- 
ui6r 15';i* 

Quick, Wm.' M., (Borodino,) lot 89, tailor 
and farmer 60. 

Randall, Nathan, (Spafford,) lot 31, farmer 
67. 

Randall, Robert, (Spafford,) lot 31, farmer 
63#. , , 

Randall. Silas, (Spafford,) lot 31, farmer 
200. 

RANDOLPH, DAVISON F., (Borodino,) 
lot 88. lawyer and land agent. 

RICH, CHAS. M., (Borodino.) lot 88, post 
master and dealer in hardware, tin, 
glass &c. 

RIPLEY, DAVID L., (Spafford.) lot 32 far- 
mer 97^, in Sempronius, Cayuga Co. 

Ripley, George W., (Spafford,) lot 31, far- 
mer 110. _ ,,,.„,«. 

RIPLEY, JOHN L., (Spafford,) lot 32, far- 
mer 78, in Sempronius, Cayuga Co. 



RIPLEY, JONATHAN D., (Spafford,) lot 
23, farmer 70, in Sempronius, Cayuga 

ROBINSON, EDMOND, (Borodino,) lot 13, 
farmer 63X, in Sempronius, Cayuga 

ROBINSON, WM. C, (Borodino,) lot 91, 
farmer 200. 

ROLLO, RANDOLPH, (Borodino,) lot 78, 
farmer 114%. 

Roundy, Uriah, (Spafford,) lot 21. supervi- 
sor and farmer 13. 

Ryan, Andrew, (Borodino.) lot 12, fanner 
25, in Sempronius. Cayuga I 

Ryan, Michael, (Spaffordj lot 11, firmer 
bo. 

Ryan, Patrick, (Scott, Cortland Co.,) lot ; :, 
farmer 50. 

Sceley, Hiram,(Spafford.) lot 12, fanner 11.1. 

Seeley, Marcus, (Spafford,) lot 12. far 
60. 

Seymour, Henry, (with Jamu B.,) (Otisco,) 
lot 23, farmer 50. 

Seymour, James B., (icitfi Eenrt/,) (Otisco,) 
lot 23, farmer 50. 

Seymour, Norton, (Spafford.) lot 2T, farmer 
50. 

SHELDON, LANSING, (Borodino,) lot 88, 
farmer 12. 

SMITH, BENJAMIN F., (Borodino.) lot 
89, blacksmith. 

Smith, Frank A., (Borodino,) lot 89, black- 
smith. 

SMITH, JESSE S., (Borodino,) lot 89, far- 
mer and mechanic. 

SMITH, SIDNEY, (Borodino,) lot 74, far- 
mer 130. 

SMITH, THOMAS A., (Borodino,) lot 75, 
mechanic and farmer 1 10. 

Stanton, Allen J., (Borodino. > 1"'. 1 1, farmer 
18, in Sempronius. Caynga t'o. 

Stanton, Samuel H, (Borodino,) lot 14, far- 
mer 300, in Semproniii- 

Steuben, Lyman, (Spafford.) lot 32, fanner 

Streeter, Calvin, (Borodino, i lot 10, farmer 

60, in Sempronius, Cavuira < 
Streeter, Cyrus, (Borodino. | lot h 1 farmer 

31, in Sempronius, Cavuga I 
Streeter. Jane A. Mies, (B diuo.) lot 80, 

milliner and dress maker. 

STEETER, NELSON K.. .Borodino,) lot 

89, boot and shoo dealer. 
Sweet, Clark H., (East Scott, Cortland Co.) 

lot 33. farmer 89. 
Sweet. Henry, (East Scott, Cortland I 

lot 33, farmer 93. 
Sweet, Robt. B., (Spaffordj lot 33. farmer 

leases 59. 
Sweet, Russell, (Spafford,) lot S3, farmer 

29#. 
Talt. Bczeleel W., (Scott, Cortland i 

lot 43. farmer a*- 
TAFT, JOHN P., (Kiel Scott, Cortland 

Co..) lot 44. fanner 75. 
Taft. Thomas J., (Spaflord,) lot 33. farmer 

55. 
TAYLOR, GEORGE, (Borodino.) lot 90, 

farmer 117. 
Thorn. Ilinchman, (Skaneutili *.> lot 68, 

farmer 7. 
Tinkham. Lafayette, (SpatTcrd.) lot 43. far- 
mer 105. 



334 ONONDAGA COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

BEACH & MARBLE, 

ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELORS, 

No. 18 SOUTM SALINA STREET, 

} SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



WM. A. BEACH, 
HENRY E. MARBLE 



THE OLD ESTABLISHMENT. 



W. E. LOFTIE, 

Manufacturer, Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Imported Human Hair, 

Wigs, Scalps, Toupees, Braids, Curls, 
and every description of 

Ornamental Hair Work, 

5 Franklin Buildings, 26 E. Genesee St., up Stairs, Syracuse, N. Y. 




LAVINGTOIST & CO'S 

POUDRETTE WORKS, 

GREEN POINT, SAEINA, 

The Best and Cheapest Fertilizer of the Day. 
Price, $10.00 per Ton. 

C. C. LAVTNGTON. GEO. COCKINGS. 



9 
Agent for "Warren's Fire and Water Proof 

Fell, Cement & Gravel Eoefii, Slate Rooni anil 

Roofing Materials, such as Felt, Cement, White Gravel 
Coal Tar, Slate, Ac, 

No. 61 W. WATER ST., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

N. B — Roofs Applied in City or Country in the Best Manner. 



ONONDAGA COVNTY BUSINESS DISEt TORT. 



335 



mCKQUS8QWtt£$$CD., 



DEALEKS IX 




P 

c 



=£3 



Pi 



H 



4 



pxq 



Rain Water Filters, Refrigerators and 

General House Furnishing Goods, 

No. 35 Warren Street, 

m.d.mccanna, , ) Syracuse, N. Y . 

NICHOLAS DOWNES, ►Jj A (lUUOU ) 

O. S. NEARY. ) 



336 ONONDAGA COUNT! BUSINESS BIBEGTOBT. 

S. C. HAYDEN & CO^ 



Furniture Warerooms 

69 S. Salina Street, Syracuse, N, Y., 

Manufacturers and Wholesale and Retail Dealers in every Variety and Style of 

Cabinet Furniture, 



comprising; 



ELEGANT CHAMBER SETS, 

RICH PARLOR AND LIBRARY SUITS, 



AND AN ENDLESS VARIETY OF 



Dining Room and Kitchen Furniture, Hat- 
trasses, Pillows, Spring Beds, &c, &c. 

Having Removed to our New Warerooms, we arc now prepared to offer our custom- 
erg a choice from the largest and best selected stock of Furniture in town, and at reduc- 
ed prices. Our 

Wholesale Department is Well Stocked. 

Furniture made to Order in the Best Style 
and at the Lowest Price. 

S. C. HAYDEN. E. BEARD. 



SPAFFORD-TULL T. 



337 



Tinkham, Lovinne, Spafford,) lot 31. far- 
mer 35. 

Tripp. Van Dyke, (Borodino,) lot 88, phy- 
sician and surgeon. 

Tncker, Henry. (Otisco,) lot 12, farmer 6 

UNCKLESS, JOHN, Borodino,) lot 12 
farmer 110, in Sempronius, Cavutra Co' 

VANORMAN, DEWITT, (Borodino.) (Ba- 
ker & Vanorman.) 

Wallace, Ichabod J., (Spafford,) {with Eb- 
enezer Harris Jr.,) lot 32, farmer 103, in 
Sempronius, Cayuga Co. 

Wallis, Daniel, (Borodino,) lot 88, farmer 
120. 

Werden, Walter, (Borodino.) lot 21, farmer 
34, in Sempronius, Cayuga Co. 

WESTON, EDMON C, (Borodino,) lot 21, 
farmer 85, in Semproniue, Cayuga Co. 

Weston, Daniel W., (Borodino,) lot 74, far- 
mer 15. 

WESTON, HENRY, (Borodino,) lot 12. 
farmer 110, in Semproniue, Cayuga Co. 



Wilber, William T., (Borodino.) lot 12 

thresher and farmer 30, in Sempronius' 

Cavuga Co. 
WILKiNB, THOS., (Borodino,) lot 30 

blacksmith. 
WILLIAMS, SALMON, (Spafford,) lot 23 

farmer 30. 
Wilson, Samuel, (Otisco,) lot 12, fanner 

„ wy. 

WINCHESTER, GEO. W., (Borodino,) lot 
89, farmer leases 1. 

Woodworth, Joel C, (Spafford,) lot 14, far- 
mer 86, in Sempronius, Cayuga Co 

Woodworth, Perry F., (Borodino.) lot 53 
farmer 112, in Sempronius, Cayuga « '■• 

Worden, Walter, (Borodino,) lot 21, farmer 
34, in Sempronius, Cayuga Co. 

Wordworth, Cyrenius, (Spafford,) lot 23, 
farmer 62, in Sempronius, Cayugn Oo 

York, John, (Otisco,) lot 23, farmer 77. 

York, Win., (Otisco,) lot 23, farmer 87. 



(Post Office Addresses in Parentheses.) 



Abbott, Hiram H., (Tully,) lot 38, (with 
Thomas C. Peters,) farmer 50, and 
(with Richard Strati. 2d,) 161. 

ADAMS, WILLIAM Rey., (Tully,) pastor 
M. E. Church. 

AMES, ANSON, (Tully,) lot 38, traveling 
agent. Yankee notion goods. 

Arnold, Henry V. B., (Tully,) tailor. 

Arnold. John M., (Vesper,) (J. M. Arnold 
<& Co.) 

Arnold, J. M. & Co., (Vesper,) (John M. 
and Eirtland C.,) general merchants. 

Arnold, Kirtland C, (Vesper,) (/. M. Ar- 
nold & Co.,) poet master. 

BABCOCK, GEO. W., (Tully,) lot 27, rake 
manufacturer. 

Babcock, George W., (Vesper,) lot 26, far- 
mer 3tf . 

Bacon. Clarissa A., (Tully,) milliner, dress 
and cloak maker. 

Bailev, Eliza, (Tulley Valley,) lot 8, farmer 
2V '. 

Bailey,' Orry, (Tully,) lot 8, farmer leases 
53. 

Bailey, Wm., (Vesper,) lot 46, farmer 50. 

Barker, Joshua, (Vesper,) lot 26, carpenter 
and joiner. 

Barrett, Leonard P., (Tully Valley,) lot 8, 
farmer 97. 

Barrett, Wm., (Tully,) fanner 3. 

Beeman, John, (Tully,) lot 18, fanner leases 
220. 

BELL, MATTHIAS, (Vesper,) lot 26, car- 
penter and joiner. ' 

Bennett, Anna Mrs., (Preble, Cortland Co.,) 
lot 35, farmer 95. 
T 



Bennett, Francis G., (Preble, Cortland Co.,) 

lot 85, farmer leases 95. 
♦BENNETT, MINOR G., (Tally,) proprie- 
tor of Empire House, cor. Main and 
Railroad. 
BIRNEY, SUSANNAH MRS., (TuUr,) lot 

39, farmer 302. 
Blaney, Lewis, (Tully,) lot 19, fanner 90. 
BLANEY, SEWARD, (Tully. ) lot l'J. far- 
mer. 
*BOUTTELLE BROTHERS. (Tully. > 
(Samuel C. and Martin J.) general 
merchants and denlers in books and 
stationery. 
Bouttell, David B., (Tully,) lot 47, farmer 

95. 
Bouttelle, Martini., (Tully,)(BOTifM/< Broth- 

ers.) 
Boutelle, Samuel, (Tully,) lot 4, retired far- 
mer. 
Bouttelle, Samuel C, (Tully,) (BoutteiU 

Brothers. ) 
Boutwell, Elijah, (Tully,) (BoututU <r 

ters.) 
Boutwell & WaterMTolly.l (fX(>ah Ikmt- 
well and David Waters,) props, of Tully 
mills. 
Brewer, Almon, (Tully ,) lot 40, farmer 18. 
Brown, Eliphalot S., (Tully,) lot 37, far- 
mer leases 100. 
Brown, Mirou, (Tully.) tailor. 
Brown, William, (Tully,) lot 39, clock and 

watch repairer. 
Bryant, E., (Tully.) lot 49, farmer 20. 
BRYANT, STEPHEN, (Tully,) ( Trow- 
bridge <t Bryant.) 



338 



ONONDA GA CO JJNTT B USINESS DIRECTOR Y. 





FOR 




1 Lies k Gen 




This Institution is situated in the village of Dryden, Tompkins County, New York; 
one mite from the Dryden Sulphur Springs and Water Cure, and on the line of the Rail- 
road now in course of construction from Auburn to Owego. It was founded in 1862, 
and has been gradually increasing in numbers and influence ever since. 

It has always been under the charge of the same Principal and Preceptress, Kho de- 
vote their entire time to its interests. 

There are two courses of studies, English and Classical. The former embraces four 
years, and the latter three. Students graduating from either of these receive a diploma. 
Young men completing the Classical Course have entered our best colleges with very 
creditable commendations; and young ladies have entered the Junior Class of Vassar 
College. 

Pupils eent here from abroad are under the .immediate care and direction of the 
Principal, becoming at once members of his household. 

Pupils are not allowed to use tobacco or intoxicating drinks. 

Tuition expenses from $4 to $8 per term for day scholars. 

Board, tuition, washing, lights and fuel, $70 per term. 

There is a good Library from which students draw books. 

A cabinet asd apparatus sufficient for illustrating the pmMjjpies of science. 



Spring Term opens March 23, closes June 26, 1868. 
Fall " " Aug. 10, " Nov. 13, " 

Winter «* " Nov. 30, " OTarch 5, 1869. 



FOR PARTICULARS ADDRESS 



JACKSON GRAVES, PRINCIPAL, 




Burroughs', Ira, (Vesper,) lot 7, farmer 103 
BURROUGHS, SMiTH, (Vesper,) lot &i[ 

assessor of Western division Tully and 

fa-mer 176^. 
BUTLER, AZARIAH, (Tully,) lot 49, far- 
mer 112. 
Butler, James N., (Tully,) (Farnham d 

Butler.) 
Camp, Jared, (Tully,) lot 40, farmer leases 

101. 
Camp, Nelson, (Tully,) lot 40, agent for 

Meridian Fire Insurance Co., and far- 
mer 1U0. 
CARR, ALMOST, (Vesper,) lot 26, farmer 

85. 
Carr, Jaman, (Vesper,) lot 37, farmer 88. 
Carr, Leonard, (Preble, Cortland Co.,) lot 

45, stone and brick mason and farmer 

7. 
Carr,Merrit, (Preble, Cortland Go.,) lot 45, 

stone mason. 
Carter, Sophronia Mrs., (Summit Station,) 

lot 30, farmer 70. 
OATELY, ANDREW, (Tully,) {A. & S. 

TV. Cately.) 
CATELY, A. & S. W., (Tully,) {Andrew 

and Shepard W.,) carriage manufs. 
*CATELY, SHEPARD W., (Tully,) (A- <£ 

S. W. Cately.) farmer 6. 
CATLIN, ALBERT R., (Vesper,) lot 26, 

saw mi'l and farmer 38. 
Catlin, Malissa M. Miss, (Tully,) dress 

maker. 
Caughey, Samuel C, (Tully,) lot 9, farmer 

50. 
Cavin, John, (Tully,) lot 50, farmer 37. 
Chapin, Hiram, (Tully,) post master. 
CHASE, CYRUS A., (Tully,) lot 19, farmer 

176. 
Chase, Hamilton A., (Tully,) retired farmer 

3. 
CHASE, RUSSEL F., (Tully,) lot 29, saw- 
mill and farmer 160. 
Clark, Erastus, (Tully,) lot 29, farmer 106. 
Coalagshan, Cornelius, (Tully,) lot 10, farmer 

10. 
Comstock, Sylvanus, (Tully,) lot 38, far- 
mer 1. 
*COOK, EDWARD H., (Tully,) furniture 

dealer and undertaker. 
Cotter, Nicholas, (Vesper,) lot 26, boot and 

shot* m.3.kf i* 
COWLES, SEDGWICK, (Tully,) lot 29, 

farmer 80. 
Cowles, Theodore S., (Tully,) lot 29, farmer 

75. 
Crumb, Burritt L., (Vesper,) lot 26, travel- 
ing agent for agricultural implements. 
Cummings, Byron, (Tully,) allop. physician 

and surgeon. 
Cummings, John, (Tully,) grocer. 
CUMMINGS, WM. (Tully,) lot 48, farmer 

59. 
Dakin, Albert, (Tully,) lot 28, farmer 17. 
Dakin, Hannah, (Tully,) lot 28, farmer 20. 
DAKIN, HARMON, (Tully,) lot 18, farmer 

2. 
DAKIN, JOHN, (Tully.) lot 28, farmer 75. 
DAKIN, THOMAS H., (Tully,) lot 28, 

painter. ... . 

Dana, Henry, (Tully,) allop. physician and 

surgeon. , , , „_ . 

Daniels^ Alfred B., (Vesper,) lot 26, farmer 

67. 



Daniels, Elijah, (Vesper,) lot 26, carpenter. 
100 Josiah R -' t Vet, P cr >) lot 26, farmer 

Daniels, Widow, (Vesper,) lot 26, farmer 5 
Davis, George W, (Tully,) lot i,\ tanner 

Donell, Barnard, (Tully,) lot 37, saw mill 

and farmer 66. 
Doud, Stephen A., (Tully,) lot 19, farmer 

♦DRYER, AMBROSE G., (Tully,) tin cop- 
per and sheet iron ware, hardware and 
stoves. 

Egbertson, A. Mrs., (Tully,) lot 48, farmer 

Egbertson, Cornelius, (Tully,) lot 48, far- 
mer 60. 

Egbertson, Philetus, (Tully,) lot 47, farmer 
85. 

ELLIS, EDMUND. (Tully,) late propri 
Tully Hotel and livery. 

Elson, William, (Tullv.) carriage maker. 

Emerson, Charles, (Tully,) lot a., farmer B6. 

ESTEY, CHARLES S., (Tully,) (with Enoch 
H..) lot 18. farmer 25. 

ESTEY, CLARK. (Vesper,) (with Utter.) 
lot 27, farmer 143. 

Estey, Eliphas, (Tully,) lot 2S, farmer 4. 

ESTEY, ENOCH II.," (Tully,) (with Uharitt 
8.,) lot 18, farmer 25. 

ESTEY, LESTER, (Vesper,) (with Clark.) 
lot 27, farmer 143. 

FARNHAM & BUTLER, (Tiilly.i (Bamud 
M. Farnham and Jamtt -\. H 
manufs. of Orio oil polish. 

♦FARNHAM, SAMUEL M.. iTully.) Farn- 
ham & Butler,) allop. physician and 
Burgeon. 

Fellows, Avery, (Tullv.) (Vail <t Fel/oict.) 

Fellows, Miles R., (Tiillv.) lot 60, fann-r 
140. 

Fenlon, Timothy, (Tully.) lot 10. farmer 100. 

Fletcher, Joseph Jr., ( 1 ully,) general DM* 
chant. 

Fletcher, Libbie Miss, (Tully.) mtlllntr. 

Foley. Edmond, (Vesper, ) lot 17. farmer 100. 

FOWLER, LEVIN., (Tully. > ll " >*• Burnt* 
82 

FULLER, FRANCIS M., (Treble, Cortland 
Co.,) lot 45, laborer. 

Fuller, Martin G., (Tullv,) lot 17. fennel 

Fuller, Mathew, (Telly,) lot 47, fern ■ ■ 

Gardner, George W., (Tully I in 

drugs, dry goods ami groceries. 

Gilbert, John, (Tullv.) lot :i'J. farmer Hi". 

Gilbert, OsCU F . (tullv. i lol 40, QUTOl - 

GOODELL, AARON, (Tully \ alley,) lot 8, 
farmer 200. 

Goodel, Amos, (Veiperjlol 26, retired far- 
mer. 

GOODELL, GEORGE, (Vesper.) lot M, 
farmer 186. 

Gorman, John, (Tully.) lot 46. farmer 88. 

Gowing, Lavisier, (Tully,) grocery and pro- 
vision store. 

♦HALE, BRANCH P.. (Tully.'* attorney 
and connaeHor at law, editor and pro- 
prietor of Southern Onondaga, weelly.) 
and agent for the Putnam Fire lntmr- 
ance Company. 

HALL, JOHN 11. , (Tullv, t.- I for 

S. &. B. R. R.. U. S. Express agent and 
produce dealer. 



340 



TULLY. 



Hanes, Augustus, (Preble, Cortland Co.,) 
lot 45, farmer 120. 

Hawck, Garret, (Tully,) (with John,) lot 18, 
farmer 100. 

Hawck, John, (Tully,) (with Garret,) lot 18, 
farmer 1U0. 

*HAYFORD, MYRON W., (Tully,) dealer 
iu tin, copper, sheet iron ware and 
heavy hardware, and farmer 3. 

Haynes, Robert, (Tully,) lot 8, farmer 70. 

HITCHCOCK, THERON S., (Tully,) sur- 
geon dentist. 

Hobert, Leticia, Mrs., (Preble, Cortland 
Co.,) lot 45, farmer 114. 

Hodge, Chas. A., (Tully,) shoemaker and 
farmer 5X. 

Hodge, Henry A., (Vesper,) lot 26, shoe 
maker. 

Hodge, Isaac, (Vesper,) lot 26, shoemaker. 

Hoffman, Stephen, (Vesper,) lot 26, propri- 
etor Vesper House. 

HOLENBECK, ISAAC, (Tally,) lot 37, 
farmer 200. 

Hollenbeck, Jennie Miss, (Tully,) milliner. 

HOWARD, JOEL, (Preble, Cortland Co.,) 
lot 45, farmer 107. 

Howell, Nelson A., (Tully,) lot 38, farmer 
55%. 

noyt, Chauncey, (Tully,) undertaker. 

Hoyt, Daniel R., (Tulley,) lot 38, constable. 

Hudson, A., (Tully,) lot 28, farmer 68. 

HUGHES, WILLIAM W., (Summit Sta- 
tion,) lot 20, farmer 170. 

Hurley, John M., (Tully,) carriage maker. 

HUTCHINGS, ALBERT, (Tully,) butcher. 

Hutchings, Laura Mrs., (Tully,) lot 50, far- 
mer 73. 

JAMES, AVERY C, (Tully,) lot 29, farmer 
35. 

Johnson, Elias, (Tully,) (with Merrit,) lot 
20, farmer 100. 

Johnson, Merrit, (Tully,) (with Elias,) lot 
20, farmer 100. 

Johnson, Richard F., (Tally,) barber. 

Jones, Edmund G., (Tully,) lot 40, farmer 
215. 

June, Joel, (Tully,) lot 9, farmer 83. 

Kellogg, Clarissa, (Vesper,) lot 26, farmer 1. 

KING, CHARLES B., (Tully,) general 
merchant. 

King, Elizabeth Mrs., (Vesper,) lot 35, far- 
mer 166. 

King, Horace. (Tully,) notary public. 

King, Schuyler, (Tully,) lot 17, farmer 87. 

Kingsley, Alonzo, (Tully,) lot 9, farmer 190. 

Knapp, Stephen D., (Tully,) lot 28, farmer 
176. 

Lahan, John, (Tully,) lot 48, farmer 46. 

LAKE, SETH, (Tully,) lot 40, farmer leases 

Lake, Wilmot, (Tully,) lot 40, farmer 111. 
Litz, Joseph, (Vesper,) lot 26, tailor and 
farmer 1. 

LLOYD, WILLIAM H., (Preble, Cortland 
Co.,) lot 45, sawmill and lumberyard. 

Locke, Edwin E., (Tully,) carriage maker. 

LONG, HENRY, (Preble, Cortland Co.,) lot 
45, farmer leases 120. 

LONG, JOHN B., (Tully,) lot 46, farmer 133. 
McCarthy, Michael, (Tully,) lot 50, farmer 

203. 
Meeker, Franklin, (Tully,) lot 19, farmer 

leases 120. 



MILES, JAMES M., (Summit Station,) lot 
30, farmer 181. 

Millard, Ira, (Tully,) (with Nelson,) lot 44, 
farmer. 

Millard, Nelson, (Tully,) (with Ira,) lot 44, 
farmer. 

Miller, Edward, (Tully,) (Tollman & Miller,) 
farmer 208. 

Minor, T. S. Mrs., (Tully,) lot 20, farmer 304. 

MOON, SANFORD, (Vesper,) lot 26, black- 
smith and (with Sylvester,) farmer 67, 

MOON, SYLVESTER, (Vesper,) (with San- 
ford.) lot 26, farmer 67. 

MOORE, JOHN J., (Tully,) lot 18, wagon 
maker and farmer 22X- 

Moore, Samuel D.,(Tully Valley, ) lot 8, far- 
mer 94. 

MORGAN, NANCY MRS., (Vesper,) lot 26, 
milliner. 

Morgan, Willard, (Tully,) lot 10, farmer 20. 

Morse, Elder Rev., (Vesper,) lot 25, farmer 
180. 

Morse, John, (Tully,) lot 10, farmer 5. 

Morse, Roswell C, (Tully,) carriage trim- 
mer. 

Murphy, Michael, (Tally,) lot 36, farmer 180. 

Nichols, Asa N, (Vesper,) lot 26, farmer 94. 

Northrop, Lewis, (Preble, Cortland Co.,) 
lot 45, farmer 176. 

Oult, Nelson,' (Tully,) lot 38, farmer 90. 

OUSBY, JOHN, (Tully,) lot 50, farmer 123. 

Palmer, Allen, (Vesper,) lot 26, justice of 
the peace. 

Parkerson, Wm., (Vesper,) lot 36, farmer 
116. 

Parkes, Silas, (Tully,) lot 10, farmer 110. 

Pearsall, Isaac, (Vesper,) lot 26, farmer 70. 

Perce, Alfred, (Vesper,) (with Nathan jr.,) 
lot 46, farmer 82. 

Perce, Nathan jr., (Vesper,) (with Alfred,) 
lot 46, farmer 82. 

Peters, Thomas C, (Tully,) lot 38, farmer 
223, and (with Hiram H. Abbott,) 50. 

PICKETT, ANDRE W,(Vesper,) lot 26, far- 
mer 6. 

Picket, Magdelina, (Vesper,) lot 26, farmer 
8. 

Picket, Samuel, (Vesper,) lot 26, farmer 60. 

Pimm, , (Tully,) lot 20, farmer 170. 

Potter, Knight, (Tully,) carriage maker. 

Remington, John, (Tully,) lumber dealer. 

Robinson, Pliny, (Vesper,) let 26, allopath- 
ic physician and surgeon. 

RODGERS, JOSEPH D., (Tully,) lot 38, 
farmer leases 149. 

ROGERS, THOMAS, (Vesper,) lot 35, far- 
mer 115. 

Rowland, David, (Vesper,) lot 35, farmer 
116. 

ROWLAND, MERRIMAN, (Vesper,) lot 
16, farmer 6. 

Rugbee, Elvize Mrs., (Tully,) lot 40, far- 
mer 50. 

RUSSELL, HORACE, (Vesper,) lot 26, 
boot and shoe maker. 

Russell, Leonard, (Vesper,) cattle broker. 
RUSSELL, OLIVER, (Tally,) lot 28, farmer 

leases 300 
Ryan, Dan, (fully,) carriage maker. 
Scammel, Galutia, (Tully,) lot 10, farmer 

Scamanel, Haskel B., (Tully,) justice of the 
peace. 



TDLLT. 



341 



SCHOONMAKEK, MOSES, (Tally,) lot 33, 

farmer 75>^. 
Scullen, John, (Tally,) lot 9, farmer 110. 
Scullen, Norman, (Tally,) lot 9, farmer 44. 
f?*™ 8 "^ Joshua, (Tully,) lot 33, farmer 15. 
SEEIA, GIDEON, (Tully,) lot 18, farmer 

Shea. William, (Vesper,) lot 26, fanner 17. 
SHELL, DAVID, (Tully,) lot 37, farmer 100. 
Shell, Jacob, (Tully,) lot 49, farmer 57. 
Sherwood, L. Annie Mrs., (Tully,) milliner. 
Smith. Alfred J., (Vesper,) lot 25, farmer 

150. 
SMITH, ARMEMTJS. (Tullv,) harness and 

trunk mannf. and farmer 5. 
SMITH, CATHERINE MRS., (Vesper,) 

farmer. 
Smith, D. C, (Tally,) lot 39, dealer in 

watches and jewelry. 
Smith. George, (Vesper,) lot 35, farmer 46. 
SMITH, JOSHUA, (Vesper,) lot 37, farmer 

Smith. Lyman, (Tally,) agent for John 
Remington. 

Smith, Mrs., (Tully.) lot 48. farmer 70. 

Smith, M. O., (Tully,) lot 39, dealer in sil- 
ver and silver plated ware, also engrav- 
er on silver. 

Smith, Thomas, (Vesper,) lot 37, farmer 
65#. 

Smith, Urial, (Vesper,) lot 26, farmer 90. 

Steele, David, (Tally,) lot 27, wood taming 
and carding machine. 

Strail, Andrew, (Tully,) blacksmith. 

Strail, Charles, (Vesper.) lot 26, farmer 4. 

Strail, Myron, (Vesper,) lot 26, blacksmith. 

Strail, Richard, (Tully,) shoe maker and 
farmer 5. 

Strail. Richard 2d, (Tully,) (with Hiram H, 
Abbott,) lot 33, farmer 161. 

Strail, Stephen, (Vesper,) lot 25, farmer 15. 

Strong, Carlos, (Vesper,) lot 25, farmer 
leases 140. 

Strong, Wm. W., (Vesper,) lot 25, farmer 
140. 

Tallman, Fred., (Tully,) (Tollman & Mil- 
ler.) 

Tallman, Henry C, (Tully,) attorney and 
counsellor at law. and town clerk. 

Tallman, Lewis E., (Tully,) produce dealer, 
insurance agent and farmer 50. 

Tallman & Miller, (Tullv,) (Fred. Tallman 
and Edward Miller,) general mer- 
chants. 

Tickner. Elijah. (Vesper,) lot 26. farmer 2. 

♦TROWBRIDGE & BRYANT, (Tully,) 
(Samuel C. Trowbridge and Stephen 
Bryant,) general merchants. 

Trowbridge, Lorenzo D., (Tully,) lots 39 
and 49, farmer 30. 

Trowbridge, Newton, (Tully,) allopathic 
physician and surgeon, and patentee of 
Trowbridge's American roofing. 

Trowbridge, t)ren, (Tally,) lot 49, farmer 

Trowbridge, Philerus, (Tally,) lot 49, far- 

Trowbridge, Robert C, (Tully,) farmer 138. 
TROWBRIDGE, SAMUEL C, (Tully,) 

(Trowbridge & Bryant.) 
Tully Cheese Factory, (Tully,) proprietors 

Cha* B King, Edward Miller, Samuel 

Willis, Horace K. King, Ellis V. King 

and Thomas C. Peters. 



Vail David P., (Tully,) lot 17, saw mill and 
farmer 68. 

£ a -!'£°o hl ]; ~ d < ( Tu "y.) (Vail & fellows.) 
\ail & Fellows, (Tully,) (John Vail -id. gad 
Avery Fellows,) proprietors Tull 

VAIL, WM. A., (Summit Station,) lot 30, 

larmer 246. 
Vale, Daniel, (Tally.) justice of the p. 
Vale, Martin C. (Tully.) farmer :J0 
Valentine, Charles, (Tully, ) lot 2a, fanner 

VanBergan, Abram, (Tully.) lot 48, fanner 
175. 

VanBergen, Robert L., (Tullv,) lot 17, far- 
mer 116. 

VanBuskirk, John C, (Tully.) lot 47, far- 
mer 40. 

VanCamp, Alanson, (Tully,) [with SmmmtL) 
lot 47, farmer 50. 

Van Camp, John, (Tully.) lot 46, farmer I 

VanCamp, Samuel, (Tullv,) (wUA Alan- 
lot 47, farmer 50. 

Van Camp, William, (Tally,) lot 47, farmer 
50. 

VANDENBURGH, CORTDON. 
Cortland Co..) lot 45, farmer If.:- 

VanDenburgh, William, i Preble, Cortland 
Co.,) lot 45, farmer ins. 

VanWormer, Frank, (Tully.) lot 28, farmer 
8. 

VanWormer, Isaac, (Tully.) lot is, fen • 

VanWormer, Lawrence, (Tully,) lot I 
mer4. 

Vincent, Wallace, (Tully,) lot 30, fanner 
100. 

Wallace, Cicero M.. (Tullv.> cooper. 

Waters, David, (Tully,) (BoutxceU * Wa- 
ters.) 

Watson, George. (Tully. ) cooper, 

Watson, John. iTullv. i tt! rator, 

W. U. line. 

Webster, James D. Rev., ^Tully,) pastor of 
Baptist church. 

*WEEKLY SOUTHERN oNoV 

(Tolly,) Francis P. Hale, editor ai.il 
proprietor. 

Wickham. William. (Tally.) lot 27. carpen- 
ter and joiner. 

Williams. James S., (Tullv.) bUckamlth. 

WILLIAMS, JEERED C., (TuHyJ owner 
of Empire House, 

Willie, George, (TuUtJ lot 19. fnmi-r 37.V 

WILLIS, JOHN, (Tull\.> lot U, farmer 
120. 

WILLIS, LEWIS, (Tally,) lot 88, fanner 
147. 

WILLIS, SAMUEL, (Tully,) lot 29, farmer 

120. 
Winchell, Ezra. (Tullv Valley,) loi 7,1*1 

(;:.. 
Winohell, Martin, (Tulley Talley.) lot 7. 

farmer HI 
WOOD, E. D., (Tullv.) lot 37, fannor ( I. 
Woodmanaee, Jary M , (VeajMrJ lot 7, 

Busier 250. 
Woodmansee, Jo« ph, I \> BperJ loi 17, far- 
mer 900, 
Wooster, fjheeter, (Tully,) lot V. retired 

fanner. 
♦WOOSTER. MILO T., (Tully,) photo- 
grapher. 

Worden, Hiram, (Tully.) lot 29, farmer 60. 



342 



PUBLISHERS NOTICES. 



PUBLISHER'S NOTICES. 



Hamilton & "Wllburn. Cigar man- 
ufacturers and Jobbers in Tobaccos, may- 
be found at No. 30 Warren St., Syracuse. — 
This enterprising firm enjoys an extensive 
trade, and, we believe, give general satisfac- 
tion, to their customers. They will at all 
times pay the highest price for leaf tobacco. 
See card, page 144. 

Foote Sc Noxon.— The card of this 
well known Insurance firm may be fonnd 
on page 144. They represent a large num- 
ber of first class and popular companies. — 
We would recommend those wishing to 
effect an insurance to call at their office, No. 
4 Townsend Block, West Water Street, Sy- 
racuse. 

P. It. Brewster Sc Co., Dry Goods 
Merchants, are offering customers rare bar- 
gains, at their store, No. 56 South Salina 
St., Syracuse. Their goods are purchased 
close, and from first hands, thereby insur- 
ing to their patrons the latest styles, as 
they make their appearance in market. 

Gentlemanly salesmen are ever ready to 
attend to the wants of those who call. See 
card, page 146. 

Higglns Sc Sanwald, Carriage mak- 
ers, publish a card on 148. They are ex- 
pert workmen, and will do repairing on 
short notice, at their shop, cor. Montgome- 
ry and Water Sts., Syracuse. 

The Onondaga Temperance 
House, North Salina St., is well kept, 
and offers an acceptable resting place for 
those who desire to patronize a " Tempe- 
ance House." 

The rooms are neat and clean and the 
tables will at all times be furnished with 
the substantial s and delicacies of the sea- 
son. See card, page 148. 

Dr. B. M. Genung, Eclectic Physi- 
cian and Surgeon, at Brewerton, advertises 
on page 148. The Dr. is skillful, and has 
gained a host of friends among his patients. 

OT. B. IVanwarlng, Repairer and 
dealer in Watches, Clocks and Jewelry, at 
Camillus, keeps a good supply of excellent 
and fashionable goods in his line, at reason- 
able prices. See card, page 148. 

Giles Kverson Sc Co., Hardware 
dealers, at No. 8 South Salina St., Syra- 
cuse, are at all times rally stocked in every 
department. Those in want of anything 
in their line will undoubtedly be fairly dealt 
with at this well known house. See card, 
page 150. 

C. G. Robinson, the obliging Grocer 
and Provision Dealer, at No. 101 East Gen- 
esee St., Syracuse, takes especial pains to 
select the nicest goods in his line for those 
who patronize him. Farmers and garden- 
ers who have choice vegetables or fruits, 
good butter or cheese, may find a ready 
market here. See card, page 150. 



Francis Hendricks, Manufacturer 
of Looking Glass and Picture Frames, at 
No. 33 Warren St., Syracuse. Also deals 
extensively in Photograph and Portrait 
Frames, Albums, Stereoscopic Views, &c. 
His establishment is quite extensive, and 
his workmen are experts at their art. — 
Those who have engravings or paintings to 
frame, can have it done here in a superior 
manner on reasonable terms. See adver- 
tisement, page 152. 

Phillips, Bentley Sc Co. are ex- 
tensive Tanners and Leather Dealers, at 
Syracuse. At their store, No. 17 East Water 
St., may be found complete outfits for Har- 
ness makers or Shoe makers. They are 
also heavy dealers in Wool, for which they 
will pay the highest market price. See 
card, page 154. 

J. C. Baker, Tobacconist, at 43 East 
Genesee St., keeps a fine store well sup- 

E lied with good goods. In connection with 
is other business he has added that of 
News and Stationery. See card, page 154. 

E. P. Barber «fc Co., of 68 South Sa- 
lina Street, publish an advertisement on 
page 156, setting forth the merits of the 
" Howe Sewing Machine." This machine 
has gained an enviable reputation all over 
the world, and many thousands of them are 
now in use. Messrs. Barber & Co. also 
keep thread, needles, oil, &c, for their 
customers. 

P. J. Brumelkamp, dealer in 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, publishes an 
attractive card on page 158. To gentlemen 
who desire nice fitting shirts, we say, go 
to his store, No. 23 South Salina St., and 
leave your measure for a " French Yoke ;" 
or, if in a hurry, you can be supplied from 
his large assortment of ready made goods. 

The Oxygenized Air Institute, 

located on South Salina St., Syracuse, is 
comparatively a new establishment in the 
city ; yet the numerous cases of remarkable 
cures effected there has brought it promi- 
nently to the notice of many suffering ones. 
Read the testimonials on page 162, and if 
yourself or any of your friends are suffer- 
ing from any of the diseases for which the 
treatment is applicable, lose as little time 
as possible in calling on Dr. Brower. 

Miller Brothers, Marble Workers 
and dealers in Lime Stone, have recently 
opened a shop on Canal St., corner Lock. 
They will attend promptly to all calls. See 
card, page 164. 

F. H. Gillmore, Bonnet Bleacher 
and Manufacturer of Plaster Blocks, pub- 
lishes a card on page 164. He attends to 
the pressing of Bonnets, Hats, &c, to the 
entire satisfaction of customers. Find 
him at 49 Warren St., Syracuse. 









TVLL Y-VAN B UREN. 



343 



Wright, John, W., (Tully,) (J. W. Wright 

a- Son.) 
Wright. Judson S., (Tully,) (/. J*. Wright 

<& Son.) 



Wright, J. W. & Son, (Tully,) (John W. 
and Judson <S.,) drugs, groceries and 
provisions. 



(Post Office Addresses in Parentheses.) 



Note.— The incorporated village of Baldwinsville, king partly in the town of Van 
Buren and partly in the town of Lysander, makes it nesessary to give a list of the vil- 
lage, independent of the towns. See Baldwinsville List, following Lysandek. 



Auyer, Betsey M., (Jordan,) lot 16, farmer 

150. 
AUYER, FOSTER J., (Memphis,) lot 16, 

farmer leases 48. 
Auyer, Jacob P., (Memphis,) lot 16, farmer 

48. 
Auyer, Romaine, (Memphis,) lot 9, farmer 

%X. 

Baragan, Patrick, (Belle Isle,) lot 42, farmer 
132 

BARNES, ALANSON, (Van Buren Center,) 
lot 40, retired farmer. 

Barnes, Asa, (Van Buren Center,) lot 28. 
resident. 

Barnes, Damon A., (Memphis,) lot 18, far- 
mer 111. 

Barnes, Elias, (Van Buren Center,) lot 28, 
farmer 120. 

Barnes, Eliza, (Baldwinsville,) lot 13, far- 
mer 25. 

BARNES, FRIEND B., (Van Buren Cen- 
ter,) lot 28, farmer 129. 

BARNES, HORACE P., (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 13, farmer. 

Barnet, John, (Memphis,) lot 25, farmer 15. 

Bates, Theodore Mrs., (Memphis,) lot 37, 
farmer 10. 

Behling, Henry L., (Baldwinsville,) lot 22, 
farmer 44. 

Bennett, Charles, (Memphis,) lot 18, resi- 
dent. 

Bentley, Alfred, (Memphis,) lot 38, former- 
ly justice of the peace. 

BENTLEY, ISAAC, (Van Buren Center,) 
lot 39, farmer 102. 

BENTLEY, RUSSELL D., (Van Buren 
Center,) lot 39, farmer 143. 

BETTS, A. J., (Van Buren Center,) car- 
penter and joiner. 

Betts, Alanson, (Memphis,) lot 38, former. 

BETTS, CALVIN, (Memphis,) lot 24, far- 
mer 30. ,.,,... , 

Betts, Colonel A.. (Memphis,) lot 25, far- 
mer 101. , .jl . nr 

Betts, Ira, (Memphis,) lot 38, farmer 95. 
Betts Ira, (Memphis,) lot 39 farmer 72 
Betts Stephen W., (\an Buren Center,) 

lot 40, tobacco dealer and post master. 
Betts, Seth, (Baldwinsville.) lot 5, farmer 

5#. 



Betts, Stephen, (Van Buren Center,) lot UK 
shoemaker. 

BIDWELL, WILLIAMS, (Memphis,) lot 17. 
farmer 50X- 

BINGHAM, A. W., (Van Buren,) lot tt, 
justice of the peace and farmer 130. 

BLANCHARD, SIDNEY 8., (Van Buren 
Center,) lot 23. farmer 115. 

BLANDING, FREEMAN D., (Baldwins- 
ville,) lot 43, farmer 87. 

Bort, Christian C, (Baldwinsville,) lol 
farmer 51. 

Bort, Christopher, (Baldwinsville,) lot 13, 
farmer. 

Bort, John C, (Baldwinsville,) lot IS, fur- 
mer 1. 

Bowman, Ezra, (Baldwinsville,) lot 0, far- 
mer 70. 

BOWMAN, HIRAM, (Baldwinsville.i lot 
14, surveyor and fanner 880. 

Bowman, John, (Baldwinsville, I lot 11, r 
dent. 

BREED, BARNET M., (Baldwinsville,) lot 
2, farmer 49. 

Breed, Palmer, (Baldwinsville,) lot 4, far- 
mer. 

BUCK, NELSON, (Memphis,) lot 18, black- 
smith and farmer 35. 

BULLARD, CHAUNCY, (Meniplii-.i 1 
farmer 95. 

BUNICE, WILLIAM, (Memphis,) lot 17. 
farm laborer. 

Burch, Irvin R., (Memphis,) lot 37. IBM 
maker. 

Button, Alhain, (Memphis,) lot is, cor; 
ter and joiner. 

Button, Jadial, (BaldwiuBvillc.) lot 8, far- 
mer 66. 

Cahough, John, (Baldwinsville, i lot 1.'.. H 

R. trackman. 
Campbell. Ktlmii. (XmphMj lot 38, re- 
tired Burner. 

Campbell, Harmon <;.. (Memphis.* lot 17, 

millwright, harness maker ami runner 

10. 
CANDEE, DANIEL, (McmphiiO lot 

BBSi internal Hovenue aHMOr and 

former 48. 
Carpenter, Abel, (Memphis,) lot 17, fanner 

851. 



344 



ONONDA O A COUNTY B USINESS DIRECTOR Y. 



m 



s 




n 



Jill Cf 



AND 



Pi 



Davison's Thornless Raspberries. 

Waterloo, N. Y., May 1, 1868. 

On and after May 15, 1868, the firm of DOOLITTLE & WIGHT will no longer exist. 
The undersigned who is the one who first introduced the Seneca Raspberry to the pub- 
lic, will now De prepared to furnish No. One First Class Plants, of Senecas and Davi- 
son's Thornless, which are to be the leading Raspberries and should go together. 

The THORNLESS is early, ripens a trifle earlier than the Doolittle ; the SENECA 
ripens about two weeks later than THORNLESS, which makes the season complete in 
the berry line. 

All wishing good, first-class plants of these two valuable berries, can rely on me for 
them, as I will send out no poor plants. 

Send stamp and get my prices, when issued next fall. 

My soil enables me to grow plants equal to any grown in the country, and they are 
pronounced No. One, by reliable dealers. Yours Truly, 

WARREN WIGHT, 

Waterloo, Seneca Co., N. Y. 

P. S.— Write your name very plain, that there may be no mistake, and send early. 



AUBURN FILE WORK 




XJDBXJ 



3XT, PvT. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



J5 XT 



BRIO 




-CUT FILES k HASPS 



from: the best 

WARRANTED ENGLISH CAST STEEL 



Files Re-Cut in the Best Manner. 



VAN BUREN. 



345 



CARROLL, DAVID, (Memphis,) lot 16, far- 
mer 11). 
Carselo, Patrick, (Memphis,) lot 9, farmer 

CHAPMAN, MOSES H., (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 19, farmer 50. 

Chase, Bradford, (Baldwinsville,) lot 7, far- 
mer 62. 

CHASE, WALLACE S., (Van Buren Cen- 
tre,) lot 40, section master on N. Y. C. 
R. R. 

Clark, Aaron P., (Baldwinsville,) lot 7, far- 
mer. 

CLARK, ASAHEL, (Baldwinsville,) lot 7, 
farmer 160. 

Clark, Joseph, (Memphis,) lot 37, station 
agent N. Y. C. R. R. 

CLARK, JOSHUA W., (Baldwinsville,) lot 
8, farmer 80. 

Clark, Leander H., (Memphis,) lot 37, pa- 
tent right agent. 

Clifton, Charles, (Memphis,) lot 19, farmer 
12* 

CLIFTON, WILLIAM, (Baldwinsville,) lot 
12, farmer 50. 

Cole, Hervey, (Memphis,) lot 37, shoemaker. 

Cole, Mathew, (Memphis,) farmer. 

Coleman, Gurdon, (Memphis,) lot 37, car- 
penter and joiner and farmer 35. 

Coleman, Martin, (Memphis,) lot 26, farmer 
10. 

Coleman, Samuel, (Memphis,) lot 37, car- 
penter and joiner. 

Comerford, John, (Baldwinsville,) lot 15, 
farmer 42*. 

Conant, John, (Memphis,) lot 38, black- 
smith. 

Conant, John, (Memphis,) lot 25, shoe- 

Conover, Wm., (Memphis,) lot 38, farmer. 

Cook, John, (Memphis,) lot 38, farmer 4. 

COOK, JOHN J., (Belle Isle,) lot 42, far- 
mer 52. 

Cornell, Abner, (Baldwinsville,) lot 4, far- 
mer 167. 

CORNELL, ABRAM, (Memphis,) {with 
Samuel Goldsmith,) lot 9, carpenter and 
joiner and farmer 12. . 

CORNELL, ELAM, (Van Buren Center,) 
lot 28, farmer 96. , „ 

CORNELL, ELIJAH, (Van Buren,) lot 23, 
farmer 46. . .„ . 

CORNELL, NATHANIEL, (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 22, farmer 100. , . „ 

CORNELL, WM., (Baldwinsville,) lot 3, 
farmer 164. , . 

Cornell, William P., (Baldwinsville,) lot 4, 
farmer leases 52. » , , . 

Craver, Andrew, (Van Buren Center,; lot 
39, blacksmith. 

Craver, Christopher, (Baldwinsville,) lot 6, 
farmer 10. , , 4M «,__„ 

Crawford, Ziba, (Memphis,) lot 17, farmer 

Q 

Crego, Charlotte Mrs., (Baldwinsville,) lot 

6. 
Crego, John H., (Van Buren,) lot 22, far- 

CROUSE, 'HENRY, (M em P hi8,) . J , 1 3?' 
dealer in dry goods, groceries, boots 

CRUMB! h ALEXANDER, (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 20, farmer 238*. 



Crumb, Daniel, (Van Buren,) lot 15, farmer 

170. 
DABOLL, HENRY, (Memphis.) lot 17, 

notary public, president of Farmers' 

Joint Stock Insurance Co. of Meridian, 

Cayuga Co., and farmer 157. 
DANKS, DANIEL E., (Baldwinsville.) lot 

22, farmer 88. 
DARROW, E. S., (Baldwinsville,) (J. Dar- 

row & Sont.) 
DARROW, J. & SONS, (Baldwinsville,) 

(John,L. S. & E. A'.,) lot 14, manufs. of 

stone ware, stove thimbles, green house 

pots and sewer tile, own 80. 
DARROW, JOHN, (Baldwinsville,) (J. Dar- 

rmv it Sorts.) 
DARROW. L. S., (Baldwinsville,) (J. Dar- 

row & Sons.) 
DAVIDSON, EDWARD, (Belle Isle.) lot 

42, farmer 100. 
Davis, Warren, (Van Buren Center.) lot 28, 

farmer 86. 
Davis, Wm. T., (Van Buren Center.) lot II. 

physician and farmer 88. 
Davis, Wm. V., (Van Buren Center,) lot 40, 

farmer 66. 
Davison, Emmett R., (Baldwinsville,) lot 

4, farmer. 
Dewey, Clarissa, (Van Buren Centre.i lot 

39, farmer 3. 
Dewey, John, (Van Buren,) lot 22. farmer 

103. 
Dibble, Henry, (Baldwinsville,) lot 4, far- 
mer 10. 
DINGMAN, ELIZA M. MRS., (Memphis,) 

lot 37, farmer 80. 

DIXON, WILLIAM H, (Memphis.) lot 
26, farmer 135. 

Donohue, John, (Van Buren Centre,) lot 28, 
farmer. 

Doran, Peter, (Baldwinsville.) lot 15, fanner 
leases 160. 

DOW. HEZEKIAH R.. (Van Buren. > lot 
dealer in leaf tobacco and fanner 110. 

Driscoll, Dennis, (Baldwinsville.) lot 15, 
farmer 30. 

Dunham, Martha. (Memphis.) lot 87. 

EARLL, MARCUS, (Van Buren.) lot 22, far- 
iiicr 94 

ECKER, GEORGE, (Belle Isle.) lot 43, far- 
mer 157. , 

Elliot, James W., (Baldwinsville.) lot 14, 
fanner 150. , - 

Falling, Elijah, (Baldwinsville,) lot 11, far- 
mer 209. 

Faulkner, Daniel, (Memphis.) lot 18, farmer 
2 and leases 35. 

Fav Lcwis,(Baldwinsville.i lot 90, fani 

Fellows, David G., (Baldwin-Mil..' lot 6, 
farmer 30. 

FIKES PF.TKK. iMemphi-.> lot 37. prop. 

of Fike's Hotel and livery -mMr. 
Fikes Thomas < Memphis. > lot 87, botcbor. 
FILKINS, CHARLES, tM.-mpln-.i l..t », 

fanner 75. , _ , 

Filkins, Derick, (Memphis,) lot 37. fa:: 

44. 
Ford. Calvin, (Van Buren Center.) lot 89, 

farmer 38*. 
Ford, diaries H. (Van Buren ( enter.) lot 

80, farmer 32*. 
Ford. Nathau IV. iVan Bona I ■ liter,) lot 
39, carpenter and joiner. 



346 



VAN BUREN. 



Foster, Delanson, (Van Buren Center,) lot 
40, resident. 

FOSTER, GEORGE G., (Van Buren,) 
(Willi Isaac &.,) lot 29, farmer 115. 

FOSTER, ISAAC H., (Van Buren,) (with 
George G.,) lot 29. farmer 115. 

Foster, Leonard, (Van Buren Center,) lot 
40, farmer 45. 

FOSTER, RUFUS, (Van Buren,) lot 29, 
post master and farmer 93. 

FOSTER, RUSSELL, (Memphis,) lot 24, 
farmer 120. 

FOSTER, WESLEY L., (Van Buren Cen- 
ter,) lot 40, farmer leases 75. 

Fowler, Charles T., (Memphis,) lot 19, ma- 
son. 

Fowler, Daniel T., (Memphis,) lot 26, ma- 
son and farmer 25. 

Franklin, Mortimer, (Memphis,) lot 37, 
groceries and provisions. 

FRANKLIN, NORMAN D., (Van Buren 
Center,) lot 40, merchant and depot 
agent for N. Y. C. R. R. 

Fredeuburgh, James, (Memphis,) lot 19, 
farmer leases. 

Frickert, George, (Van Buren Center,) lot 
40, farmer leases 103. 

Furbush, Andrew, (Van Buren Center,) lot 
40, blacksmith. 

Garry, Paulina Mrs., (Van Buren Center,) 
lot 40. 

GATES, HALBERT E., (Memphis,) lot 9, 
farmer 20. 

Gibson, John J., (Memphis,) lot 18, car- 
penter and farmer 97. 

Gibson, Wm. T., (Memphis,) lot 18, carpen- 
ter and joiner. 

GILLEY, SAMUEL, (Memphis,) (Shapley 
& Gilley.) 

GISH, GEORGE W, (Memphis,) lot 24, 

GOLDSMITH, SAMUEL, (Memphis,) (with 
Abram Cornell.) lot 9, carpenter and 
joiner and farmer 12. 

Green, Henry P., (Baldwinsville,) lot 6, 
farmer 10. 

Green, James B., (Baldwinsville,) lot 6, 
farmer 6. 

GRIDLEY, JOHN, (Memphis,) lot 17, far- 
mer 163. 

Grub, Jacob, (Van Buren,) lot 23, butcher 
and farmer 12K. 

GUFFIN, ISRAEL, (Memphis,) lot 17, far- 
mer 75. 

HALL, ALFRED, (Memphis,) (Eelley <& 
Ball.) 

HALL, GEORGE W., (Memphis,) lot 27, 
farmer 95. 

HALL, HORACE G.. (Baldwinsville,) lot 
21, farmer 143. 

HALL, SAMUEL D., (Baldwinsville,) lot 
20, fanner 125. 

Hanlev, Thomas, (Memphis,) lot 9, farmer 
56'. 

Hannabal, Charles, (Baldwinsville,) lot 22, 
farmer. 

HANSON, JOHN, (Memphis,) lot 26, far- 
mer 40. 

Harrington, David C, (Van Buren Centre,) 
lot 40, shoemaker. 

Harrington, Henry B., (Van Buren Centre,) 
lot 40, mason. 

HARRINGTON, ISAAC, (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 5, farmer 186. 



HARRINGTON, ISAIAH, (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 20, farmer 70. 

HARRINGTON, MARTIN, (Baldwins- 
ville,) lot 12, farmer 76. 

Harrington, Oscar A., (Baldwinsville,) lot 
20, farmer 25. 

Harris, Harriet S. Mrs., (Van Buren Centre,) 
lot 40. 

Harris, Orris, (Baldwinsville,) lot 15, ped- 
ler. 

Hart, Eber, (Memphis,) lot 24. resident. 

Hart, James, (Memphis,) lot 38, grocer. 

Harvey, John, (Baldwinsville,) lot 21, far- 
mer 91. 

Hatch, Harriet L., (Baldwinsville,) lot 8, 
farmer 66. 

Hatch, L. W., (Baldwinsville.) lot 8, farmer. 

HATCH, W. H., (Baldwinsville,) lot 8, far- 
mer. 

Hawley, George jr., (Van Buren Centre,) 
lot 40, farmer 100. 

HAY, LUTHER, (Baldwinsville,) lot 5, far- 
mer 20. 

Haynes, Alonzo K., (Baldwinsville,) lot 12, 
farmer. 

Haynes, Horace W., (Baldwinsville,) lot 12, 
carpenter and joiner. 

Haynes, John, (Baldwinsville,) lot 12, far- 
mer 80. 

HAYNES, THADDEU8, (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 12, farmer 260. 

Haynes, William, (Baldwinsville,) lot 12, 
farmer 56. 

Hays, John, (Memphis,) lot 25, farmer 119. 

Hefferman, Morris, (Baldwinsville,) lot 21, 
farmer 85. 

Herman, John, (Van Buren,) lot 42, farmer 
and shoemaker. 

HERRICK, GEO. H., (Memphis,) lot 18, 
dealer in patent washing machines, 

Herrick, Hiram, (Memphis,) lot 18, dealer 
in patent washing machines. 

HERRICK, JEROME, (Memphis,) lot 38, 
speculator and boatman. 

HERRICK, O. B., (Baldwinsville,) lot 7, 
wire screen and sieve manuf. prop, 
Herrick's Hall, Baldwinsville, and far- 
mer 50. 

Herrick, Phoebe Mrs., (Memphis,) lot 18, 
farmer 2. 

HIGGINS, S. M., (Memphis,) lot 37, phy- 
sician, surgeon and coroner. 

Higgins, Wm., (Van Buren Center,) lot 40, 
farmer 28. 

HOULEHAN, MICHAEL, (Van Buren,) 
lot 22, blacksmith. 

Howe, Horatio N., (Van Buren,) lot 22, 
mechanic and farmer. 

HUNGERFORD, NATHANIEL S., (Mem- 
phis,) lot 25, farmer 108. 

HUNGERFORD, SAMUEL H., (Memphis,) 
lot 26, farmer 55. 

INGOLDSBY, J. WARREN, (Memphis,) 
lot 18, manuf. of agricultural imple- 
ments, prop, of saw mill, cider mill, and 
farmer 18. 

INGOLDSBY, MAYNARD, (Van Buren 
Center,) lot 27, farmer 415. 

JOHNSON, ALONZO W., (Belle Isle,) lot 
42, farmer 110. 

Johnson, George, (Van Buren,) lot 22, far- 
mer. 

JOHNSON, STEPHEN G., (Memphis,) lot 
8, farmer 94. 



van buren: 



347 



Jones, Betsey, (Baldwinsville.) lot 15, far- 
mer 3, 

Jones, John, (Baldwinsville,) lot 23, farmer 
200. 

Jones, William A., (Baldwinsville,) lot 15, 
painter. 

Kahoe, John, (Baldwinsville,) lot 22, far- 
mer 70. 

KELLER, AUGUSTUS, (Van Buren,) lot 
22. 

KELLER, EMELLNEMrs., (Van Buren.) 
lot 22, farmer 1. 

KELLER, JAMES 0., (Van Buren,) lot 22. 

Kelley, D. W., (Memphis,) (Kelley & Hall.) 

Kelley & Hall, (Memphis,) (D. W. Kelly and 
Alfred Hall,) lot 37, carriage makers. 

Kenney, James, (Baldwinsville,) lot 18, far- 
mer 10. 

KINGSLEY, CYRUS H., (Van Buren,) lot 
22, farmer 138. 

Kinyon, Asa, (Memphis,) lot 10, farmer 75. 

KINYON, JOHN, (Memphis,) lot 11, far- 
mer 37X- 

Kittams, Thomas, (Van Buren Centre,) lot 
39, farmer 7. 

Lacy, Dennis, (Memphis,) lot 19, farmer 50. 

Lakin, John, (Memphis,) lot 38, farmer. 

LAMERSON, SARAH L., (Van Buren Cen- 
tre,) lot 42, farmer 104. 

LAMERSON, WAYNE, (Van Buren Cen- 
tre,) lot 42, farmer 107. 

Lamphier, Leonard, (Memphis,) lot 25, far- 
mer 2. 

Land, Charles, (Van Buren Centre,) lot 40, 
harness maker. 

Lanfare, Elias, (Memphis,) lot 18, farmer 
70. 

LARKIN, ANDREW J., (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 11, farmer. 

LARKIN, HIRAM S., (Baldwinsville,) lot 
10, farmer 75. 

LARKIN, ROSWELL H., (Van Buren Cen- 
tre,) lot 40. dealer in leaf tobacco and 
farmer. 

Lauehlin, Wm. Mrs., (Memphis,) lot 37. 

Lester, Harrison, (Baldwinsville,) lot 19, 
farmer 125. 

LINSDAY, DANIEL S., (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 6, farmer 110. 

Linsday, Owen, (Baldwinsville,) lot 6, far- 
mer. 

Loche. John, (Memphis,) lot 38, butcher 
and justice of the peace. 

Lockwood, James G., (Memphis,) lot 19, 
shoemaker. 

Loomis. Francis,(Memphis,) carpenter and 
joiner. ., .„ 

LOVELESS, DANIEL, (Van Buren,) lot 23, 
farmer 176. . 

Loveless, Lewis,(Van Buren,) lot 22, farmer 

Loveiesa, Peter R., (Van Buren,) lot 23, 

farmer. .,, . , . _ 

Loveridge, David, (Baldwinsville,) lot 9, 

LOVERLDGE, SMITH, J., (Baldwinsville,) 
lot 9, farmer 23. „,__ -, .. x 

MALTBY, CLARISSA E.MRS., (Memphis,) 
lot 19. farmer 44. . 

MALTBY, LYMAN, (Baldwinsville,) lot 11, 

Mann' DanS'CBelle Isle,) lot 42 farmer 49. 
Mann, Henry, (Baldwinsville,) lot 11, car- 
penter and joiner. 



Marlet, Charles H., (BaldwinevU'e.i lot 8, 

farmer. 
MARVIN, ASHER T., (Baldwinsville,) lot 

8, farmer 121. 
Marvin, Geo. W., (Van Buren Centre,) lot 

40, farmer 139. 
MARVIN, GEO. W. JR., (Van Buren Cen- 
tre,) lot 40, farmer. 
Marvin, Henry, (Van Buren Centre,) lot 40, 

farmer. 
Marvin, Horace H., (Baldwinsville,) lot 1, 

farmer leases 101 
Marvin, Sylvanus, (Memphis,) loi 9, farmer 

173. 
Mathews, Hannah, (Van Buren Centre.) lot 

39. farmer 1. 

McCann, James, (Baldwinsvilk-,) lot 15, 
cooper. 

McCarty, , (Memphis,) lot 3*. farmer. 

McDonald, Hiram, (Jack's Reef,) lot M, 
farmer 3. 

McDonald, Sterry, (Memphis,) lot 19. far- 
mer 11. 

Mcdowell, edwin. (Memphis,) i°t n, 

assessor and farmer 93. 
McDOWELL, HENRY, (Mempbi-.i tol 17. 

farmer. 
McGann, Bryan, (Baldwinsville. i lot 13, 

farmer ll". 
MEIGS, MALDEN, (Baldwinsville.' lot 80, 

farmer. 
Meigs, Phineas Capt., (Baldwinavi !!•■.> lot 

20, farmer 73. 
MEIGS, RUEL, (Baldwinsvill.-.i lot 12, 

farmer leases 28. 
MILLER, GEORGE R., (Baldwin* ville.) lot 

10, farmer. 
Miller, Henry, (Baldwinsville.) lot C. farmer 

25. 
Miller, John, (Baldwinsville.) lot 11, far- 
mer. 
MILLER. JOHN R. <Bnldwinsv:il.-.i lot 

14, carpenter and joiner. 
Miller, Lewis Mrs., (Van Burer. I 

lot 40. 
Mills. Fordyce, (Van Buren Centre,) lot 39, 

shoemaker. 
Mills. Joseph, (Memphis,) lot 37. pat.-nt 

right agent. 
Mills/Nathan, (Memphis,) lot 37, dealer In 

patent churn. 
Mills. R. Bruce, (Van Bufen < lot 

40, farmer 2X- . „.,. 

Moron e v. Wm.. (Baldwlnei 'n Tho*. 

0" Conors.) lot SO. (fennel 
MORRIS, GEopt.K. (Baldwini lot 

12. farmer 56. ... 

Mosier, William, (Memphis.) OMC 

MUNRO. JOHNH., (Baldwins ille.i lot 5, 

frtrfuci* 90. 
Murphy, Phillip, (Baldwinsvilk-.. lot 

farmer 30X. 

NEWPORT. KfCHARn P . v ' lot 

25 blacksmith and far.ixr ' • 
Nichols. Alma Mrs., (Van Borer. 

NICHOLS. ERWIN F.. (Van B. 

ter,> lot 39, farmer 67. 
Nobles. Fred.. (Memphis.) loi I r. 

Nobles, Sherli. (Van Pir rj lot 40, 

trackman N. Y. 0. H R 
Nostrand. Ja:' '"'' 

cbuuic and prop, cider BID. 




NOSTRANT, GEORGE W., (Memphis) 

lot 24, farmer 57. 
Nostrant, John, (Memphis,) lot 24, farmer 

69. 

O'Brien, Daniel, (Baldwinsville,) lot 22 

farmer 70. ' 

O'Brien, John, (Baldwinsville,) lot 22, far- 

O'Conors Thomas, (Baldwinsville,) (with 
Wm. Moroney,) lot 20, farmer 72 
me?212 ainin ' (Baldwin8vme >).l°t 2, far- 

ODELL, BENJ. B., (Baldwinsville,) lot 2 

farmer. " ' 

OdeU, Harvey, (Baldwinsville,) lot 2, far- 

°^?fc RK ' *° RACE - (Baldwinsville,) 
Jot 1, farmer 103. ' 

PARKER, THEODORE H., (Van Baren 
Centre,) lot 28, farmer leases 120 
me amin L '' (Mem P hiB .) J ot 17, far- 

PA ^eT21 E 5 LIHU ' (JaCk ' 8 Reef,) l0t 9 ' far - 

7>AV r L ' EL ? [EJl H > ^an Bl "-en,) lot 29 

farmer leases 11. ' 

PECK, ASA B., (Van Baren Centre,) lot 42 
fanner leases 90. i/«"-», 

PeC right h dea e rer (Memphi8 ' ) Iot 37 ' P atent 

PE w'<S ANiEL P -'^ an Baren Centre,) 
lot 29, assessor and farmer 140 

meY m MER ' (V8n Bure "> loi 42, &r. 

PeC res P 3e^' ^ BUreU Centre ' ) lot 29 ' 
P& P WM^ n B ?, ren ' ) lot 42 < far mer. 

fLSb.^ an uren Centre ' ) lot 29 ' 

PeC mer m 4 Jo8epn ' (Memphis,) lot 30, far- 
Peet_s, Ne'hemiah, (Memphis,) lot 18, farmer 
Pelton, Isaac, (Baldwinsville,) lot 5, farmer 
^iS™' (Baldwinsville,) lot 3, 
Pelt farm?r C 23? E " (Ba,dwin8vi11 ^) lot 5, 
PIC fa™ e ?•37 J0 ^ N • ^ Bald ^ i ^ville,) lot 3, 
PRE lf f^met?6 A NCIS ' ^--iUe,) ** 
^ ?o e t 39^ J- Mr8 -' (Van Baren Centre - ) 
PUl fa?mE dm ° nd ' (Baldwinevil le,) lot 11, 

^feS^f 1 Wm (8yracuse ') lot "- 

n^ffiSm?r50 MRS -' <■&*"- 

^mSo^'' ^^ille,) ^t 
RES 37 E Sr ^ LLIAM ' CMemphl^) lot 



Resseguie, Avery, (Baldwinsville ) lot 11 
RFS car P' J T ?ter and farmer. n8VUle '> Iot ". 
SeS N0AH ' (Memphis,) lot 16, 



1 EES fXS J M -' ^winsville,) lot 11, 
R ° b make D r R ° bert ' Wemphi*,) lot 18, wagon 

ROe Roe's kt5 faapM, ' ) l0t *• P r °P- of 
R0 YXr^S ^ ^^^,, lot 
R ° U mer^0 Iliam ' (BaldwInsyiUe ') lo t 6- &*- 

^^SliU? 8 ' <™^5 lot 19, 

SEA f R L R YoT S ' f^^-vUle,) lot 20, 

Semgerland, Storm. (Van Buren ) lot 22 

carpenter and joiner. '' 22 ' 

lHAPfFY r! ?i'A^ m 9£ iB ' ) lot ", miller. 
bHAPLEY, DAVID, (Memphis,) (Sfiaplev 
c6 Gilley,) postmaster. \°>W*y 

Shapley & Gilley, (Memphis.) (David Shav- 
mlrchfntr^ **» ** "PS-Si 
^iarrnerT' (Mem P hiB ') lo * 37, retired 

SHO faimIrm HNk ' (Mem P hi9 ')^ 2 5. 
Sig merl3 enryC01 -' ^^J lot 9 - "*■ 
8im Fot°S, Sr' <*" BDren C -t--) 

^e^eM" BDren Centre ') Iot «• 

8LA £ E ; 8Y LVESTER P., (Van Buren ) lot 
29, farmer leases 104 ,KyauDaren ">t 

i n f^Av L - Eev -' (Van Buren Centred 
.lot 40, Methodist minister oentre ') 

farmlrloo 1 * 18 ' (BaldwiD8vil le,) lot 13, 

SMITH MAYNARD, (Baldwinsville,) lot 

13, saw mill and farmer 20 
SNOW, CHARLES M., (Memphis,) lot 25 ' 

commissioner of highways and farmfr 

Snow, Eunice M., (Memnhis 1 W <?r 
8O Ser J 5°0 SE P "- (Mem^5- lot 16, 

80 TaSS?S niel ' (Jacks Reef -> lot 

Spa mer n |d A1Vah L " (M^P* 116 ') lot «, &r- 
Spa farm g '' Cbannc y- (Memphis,) lot 37, 

^K^S ™* B - ^P"".) 
SPAULDING, HARRISON, (Van Buren 
00 »9r?M lot 27 ' farme r 105. 

£ L Kq' f H0RAC E, (Van Buren Cen- 

tre,) lot 39, farmer 42 

Spaulding, James, (Van Buren Center ) lot 

40, farmer leases 75. 
Spaulding Reub