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Full text of "Gems for the kitchen"

Author 



Title 



Imprint 



16—47372-3 OPO 



■THE- 



First National Bank 

OF TOWANDA, PA. 

Capital, - - - - '$12£,000 
Surplus {Fuqd, - - - §100,000 

Offers its services for .any of the following' purposes : 

First — As a safe depository for money in large or small 
amounts. Its system of saving deposits has become very 
popular. 

Second. — For the purchase or sale of any kind of Govern- 
ment Bonds. It will also negotiate the purchase or sale 
of Railroad Bonds, Stocks or Municipal Securities. 

Third. — It issues drafts payable at par in nearly all the 
cities and towns of England, Ireland, Scotland and Con- 
tinental Europe. 

Fourth. — It has at all times for sale passage tickets to or 
from the old country, by the best English or German 
Steamship lines. 

Fifth. — It is always in condition to render its customers 
any needful accommodations in the way of loans or pur- 
chase of business paper. 

Sixth. — Any information its officers may have in regard to 
investments, or relating to any financial business, is at the 
service of the public. 



JOSEPH POWELL, President, CHAS. L. TRACY, Vice-Pres't. 
N, N, BETTS, Cashier, 



TOWANDA, PENNA, 



DEALERS IN 



Hardware,StovesandTinware 

Tools and Cutlery, Glass, Oils, Paints, House 
Furnishing Goods, &c. 

&@L THE DOCK ASH RANGE, P^ 

The Best in the World for Cooking and Baking ! 

HEATING STOVES — ALL STYLES AND SIZES. 
THE PERFECTION CARPET SWEEPER— Noiseless and Durable ! 

ALABASTINE, 

The best substitute for paint or kalsomine. Can be applied by 
any person. 

S. P. Whiteomb, 

— —DEALER IN 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, WALL PAPER, 

310 MAIN STREET, TOWANDA, PA. 

StieveFtS &t Li©Rg, 

GENERAL DEALERS IN 

Groceries, Provisions & Country Produce, 

Corner Main and Pine Sts., Towanda, Pa. 

«3r* We invite attention to our complete assortment and very large stock of choice goods 

Which we have always on hand. 

49*Esi>ccial attention given to the Produce Trade, and cash paid fordesirahle kinds. 

GEO. STEVENS, 
M. J. LONG. 



§1,41 j| 1, 

-He DRUGGIST *-«- 

SOUTH END WARD HOUSE TOWANDA, PA., 

AND DEALER IX 

Jzirkishs ' uf^ake rials. 

Fine Brushes, Canvas, Academy Board, Panels. Plates, 

Plaques and Tiles, Lustra Colors, — Winsor & Newton's, 

and DeVoe'sTube Paints, — Lacroix's China Colors, 

Winsor & Newton's Moist Water Colors, Sheet 

Wax, Moulds, Cutters, Steel Pins, Wire 

and Moss Crayons, Pencils, Tracing 

Cloth, Bristol Board, Watman 

& Harding's Drawing Paper, 

French Tissue. Transfer, Impression, Charcoal anl Tracing Paper, — Frames, Easel*. 
Banner Rods, \e., &e. 

EVANS & HILDRETH 



INVITE INSPECTION OF THEIR 



New Spring Silks and Satins, 

Wool Dress Goods, Chambrays, Ginghams, 
Seersuckers and other Wash Goods. 

WHITE GOODS, EMBROIDERIES and LACES, 

in White, Cream and Colors. 
Hosiery and Gloves, Neckwear, Dress Trimmings, Notions, 

Matting, Oil Cloths, Rugs, Mats. Best Makes, New De- 
signs, Lowest Prices. 

EVANS & HILDRETH. 



M. BEfiDEXlVIAN, 



+ + si 



T *T 



DEALER IN 



DIAMONDS, FINE JEWELRY, GOLD AND SILVER 
WATCHES, STERLING SILVERWARE, 



321 Main Street, 



Towanda, Penna. 



; & top f. mmt 

Southeast Corner Main and Bridge Streets, Towanda, Pa., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

GROCERIES & PROVISIONS, 

CHOICE FLOUR A SPECIALTY. 
Highest Market Price for Country Produce. 



Wallace Sisters, 

DEALERS IN 

Fruits and Nuts. 
Ice Cream a Specialty 

No. j oo Main St., 

TO WANDA, PA. 



Buy your poods for cash of 

E. F. Dittrich&Co. 



DEALERS IN 



Provisions, 
Teas, 

Coffees, 
Spices,&c. 

Choice Flour a Specialty. 



G. M, Clark, 

DEALER IN 

B©©ts, Sh©eS, 

AND 

Rubbers. 



All goods warranted as rep- 
resented. 



Fine Shoes a Specialty. 



M. E. ROSENFIELD, 

THE LEADING DEALER 

READY-MADE CLOTHING 



LEADER, TN ALL THE 

LEADING STYLES IN HATS, CAPS & SILK HATS. 

' Leader in Styles ! Leader in Quality ! Leader in Prices ! 
407 MAIN STREET, EAST. 



t 



DEALER IN GENERAL 



Dry Goods, Notions and Carpets. 



Please bear in mind that I have everything in the line 
of Dry Goods, such as Silks, Satins, Velvets, plain and bro- 
cade. An immense line of Cashmeres of all shades and 
colors. 

We always have the latest styles in Buttons, Braids, 
Laces, Ribbons and Hosiery. 

Also, a full line of Wash Goods. 

W. H. D. GREEN, 
Codding & Russell Block, Towanda, Pa. 



IF-Il^IEI SHOIES. 



giilgtey & Whales 

Have the Finest Assortment of 

FINEiilSHOES 

—EVER SHOWN IN TOWANDA^ 

At their New Store, Cor. Main & Bridge Sts. 

BEST GOODS AT LOWEST LIVING PRICES. 



>n 



^iddtie: shoes. 



I I i 



GRANITE 



MONUMENTS 



(ALL (IN 

H. S. GRISWOLD, 

TOWANDA, PA., 

who is Special Agent for some 
of die best quarries in the 
country, and can give i" il torn 
prices tor good work. 

Designs shown, and infor" 
matton willingly given. 



Ed.Mouillesseaux 

For your work on 

WATCHES & JEWELRY. 

II- i very pleasantly ritu- 

ated in hia new store in 

Mcintosh Block, 

502 Main Street. 

Hi' keeps everything in his 
line, from a Collar Button to 
Diamonds. 

Engraving a Specialty. 



Dr.T. B. Johnson, 

PHYSICIAX 

and 
SURGEON . 



( >FFICEOVKR H. ('. Por 
ter's Dru<; Store. 



'te^ 



TO"sA7--^-3nTID^., IE=^.. 



Ladies' Collars, Cuffs and Neckwear, Laces and Corsefs 



IN GREAT VARIETY. 



Our Assortment of DRESS GOODS and SILKS 

is worthy your inspection. Full Lines of Hosiery and Gloves. 



erryLDecker A, N.Nelson, 



DEALER IN 



Fine Groceries, 

Teas, Coffees, 
Cigars, Tobaccos, 
Confections, &c. 
317 Main Street, 

TOWANDA. PA. 



DEALER IN 



Clocks & Jewelry. 

All Kinds of Repairing 
Neatly Done. 

Monlan ve's Corner. 



C, F. Dayton, 

Manufacturer of 

and Dealer in 




Saddles, Bridles, Col- 
lars, Whips, Robes, 
Blankets, &c., 

TOWANDA, PENNA. 



BURCHILL BROS, 



Main Street, 



Towanda, Pa., 



Manufacturers of and Dealers in 



MARBLE AND GRANITE 



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ALL EIHDS OF CEMETEEY WQK& 



_V3 1ft Ml 



r >3^ 



3 



■DEALERS INjc 



General t Hardware, 



^ MN 



>> 



fiat iff, plumbing, |a& ani |team fitting, 

PAINTS, OILS, FARMING IMPLEMENTS, ETC., 

Main Street, Towanda, Penna. 

SUPPORT UQ2YEE5 IHDUS1RY. 



IT IS THE BEST. 



DAYTON'S FLOUR. 



BUY IT! TRY IT! 



THE BRANDS ARE 



"PATENT," "PREMIUM/FAVORITE," "STAR." 

Every Sack Guaranteed. See that the name G. A. DAYTON is on 

each sack. If your grocer does not have it order it direct 

from the mill. All orders promptly delivered. 

TELEPHONE CONNECTION. 



uiiiii]iiiliiuifiiiciiutiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiUDiiiiiiiiMiiiiusriiiaicEi»iiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiii.(iii»iimiiini*iiiiiiii 

^»Gr ^ L l^ E RY^ 

■■■IIIIIIIIIIIIIMI3IIIIIIIIllllIilllllllllllllDllllllllllli::illllillllllillUIIIIIIMIIIIllllllllIlli:illlllllllllllillklllllilMlllilli 

PATTON'S BLOCK, TOWANDA. PA. 

We make a 8]iecialty of copying from any kind of picture to any size. Work in Ink or 
Crayon or Water Colors, and plain work without any Ink. We do nice work and prices are 
very low. Give us a trial. We keep a good stock of 8x10, 10x12 and larger frames. Prices 
for them : — You cannot do better elsewhere. 

We like to take pictures of babies— it's fan with the new kind of plates. Bring them ail 

to Wood's Nu extra charge for groups. We get them so quick von cannot wink. 

GliU. II. WOOD. 



W. NORTON LAC BY. 



It. L. SCHEUFLER. 





n 

J 



EUFLER 



(Successors to Jas. McCabe,) 

DEALERS IN 



MARBLE AND GRANITE 



ENTS, 



§eadst©r]G3, 

CURBING, MARBLE & SLATE MANTELS, &c. 

Special designs and estimates for any desired work furnished on ap- 
plication. Scotch Granite Monuments furnished to order. 

Office & Works: No. 617 Main Street, Towanda, Pa. 



Towanda, Pa., 

DEALER IN 



J, 2§u Mamville, 

TOWANDA, PA., 

GENERAL AGENT FOR THE 

Stoves & Tinware |' 'otmacker" "ftm n 

Steam and Gas Fittinir. , 

roofdw s spouting STERLING" & "McEWIN" 

A SPECIALTY 

Second-hand Pianos taken in exchange. 



ANOS 



Gold Coin and Gold Medal 
STOVES. 

Jobbing Done on ShortNotice 



Pianos Timed and Repaired, 



GENERAL MERCHANTS, 

Have at all seasons of the year a Full Stock of Goods in 
each department of their business : 

CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, MATTINGS, 

WALL PAPERS AND WINDOW SHADES, 

CLOAKS AND SHAWLS, 

DRESS GOODS, WHITE GOODS, 

TABLE LINENS, TOWELLINGS, TOWELS, ETC. 

DOMESTIC COTTON GOODS OF ALL KINDS AND 

A LARGE STOCK OF HOSIERY, GLOVES, 

LACES, CORSETS & SMALL WARES. 

ALSO, A FULL LINE OF CHOICE GROCERIES. 

-*§& POWELL & CO. -££*- 



J.H.&J.W.CODDING 


SMWm. Little, 


Davies & Hall, 


Attorneys-at-Law, 


Attorneys-at-Law, 


Attorneys-at-Law. 


Towanda, Pa, 


Towanda, Pa. 


Towanda, Pa, 

Offices Cor. Main & State Bts. 



RODNEY A. MERCUR, 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW, 

TOWANDA, PENNA. 

Particular attention paid to business in the Orphans' 
Court, and to the settlement of estates. 



-HNINE REASONS*- 

WHY 




THE TAILOR. 

Does the Largest Business in the City : 

i — Because he has the Largest Stock ever brought to this 
city. 

2 — Because he sells 20 per cent, lower than any other house. 

3 — Because he renders BETTER satisfaction. 

4 — Because he employs the ONLY real tailors in the city. 

5 — Because he has an experienced cutter. 

6 — Because he always does exactly as he represents. 

7 — Because he conducts a business on sound mercantile 
principles. 

8 — Because he gives the best of everything, with small profit. 

9 — Because he bids for public patronage on the ground of 
Merit and Fair dealing, practices no tricks on cus- 
tomers, and never tells who he makes garments for, 
and never has visitors in his work-room. 

Everything is done in a business-like manner and ac- 
cording to contract and for CASH ONLY. 

d. Mcdonald. 

BERT FLEMING, Cutter and Manager. 

-^->J-^5 302 IkSaiaa. St. fl^-^^-** 



"While you mix your jelly cake 
Cure your baby's stomach ache! 1 

CPORTER'S I NFAN 

THE BEST AND SAFEST 

Article in the market for Fretful and Crying Babies. Contains no 

narcotic or noxious ingredient. Prescribed by the lead' 

ing physicians and recommended by the best 

nurses of the county. 



PRICE FOR LARGE BOTTLE, TWENTY-FIVE CENTS. 

Be sure to get the genuine. 



PREPARED ONLY BY 



Br. H. G. PORTER & SON, 

AT THE 

Old Reliable Drug Store, 

ESTABLISHED 1848, 

Corner Main & Pine Streets, - - TOWANDA, PA. 

WM. M. MALLORY, 

Miner and Shipper of 



COALS. 



GANG-SAWED LUMBER, 



SHINGLES, LATH AND BARK. 



MAIN STREET, 



TOWANDA, PA. 



C. P. WELLES' 

Crockery and 99 ct. Store. 

Tarine Moth Pads ami Bagvs for Furs, &c, a sure prevention of moths. 

O. P. CHINA— A Reliable Fine Article for Table Ware ; also for Paint- 
ing; lire.s ae well as Haviland China. STAPLE AND 
FANCY GOODS of every description. Picture 
Framing a specialty ; large line of Mouldings. 



-S-3JC 



[ITH JN- 



DEALERS IN 



STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES AND BAKE STUFFS, 

Nos. 214, 216 Main Street, First door north of Ward House, 

Telephone connection. T0WAXDA, PENNA. 

Established 1S39. 

WM. A. CHAMBERLIN, 



DEALETi IN 



DIAMONDS, GOLD and SILVER WATCHES and EINE GOLD JEWELRY. 

Also, a large assortment of Silver Jewelry, Opera Glasses. Solid 
Sterling Silver Spoons, Forks, &c, and one of the largest stocks of 
Rogers Bros.' Triple-Plated Silver Forks, Spoons and Knives I have- 
ever had, and for prices lower than I ever sold before. All goods war- 
ranted as represented and satisfaction guaranteed. 

WM. A. CHAMBERLIN. 

TURNER & GORDON, 

TOWANDA, PA., 

dealers %m wwmm igiii, medicines, 

Perfumery, Toilet and Fancy Articlea, Choice Wines and Liquors for Medicinal use, 

and all Druggists' Sundries. Fine Imported and Domestic Cigars. 

Physicians' Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 



wmimm acbomec 



ISfew Goods. 
Look at 'em, 
©n Main Street, 
2gast side, 
''l^'hatever you want, 
TJFnapproachable in price, 
53 1 vie and excellence. 



Tins Acrostic is so very hard that I 
make the following splendid offer : I will 
give any one who can read it, more and 
better goods for the money — new goods, 
too, just from the city — than any other 
store in town. I have Dry Goods, Dress 
Goods, Notions — everything, almost. Call 
and see at 

Five Cent Stoic. 



N. LOEWUS. 



<X: 




1 

u 







"Came, goad husband, please thy wife, 
Rnd buy a bank, 
That she may conk, 

Without a toilsome life." 



r\ 



KJ 



1 

J 



FN 



A CHOICl 



, r G©lIeQtii©n ©f Receipts 

ISSUED BY THE 

Young Ladies Society of Christ Churc 



TO WAN DA, PA. 

hted, L8«6. ^^cOPVRiG^ 



TOWANDA, PA. 
B Joi EtM \i. Printing Compani 
1886. 








(a 

- ^ 




s 



1/ yfl-v 



ISyl 



<f> 



<\ 



vy 






Breakfast I Wishes 



( Iake 



40 



Confectionery 54 

Drinks 57 

Desserts 'A 

Fish 13 

For the Sick 59 



Meats 



Miscellaneous 
Pies 



-11 



Puddings 

Preserves and Pickles 
Soups 



Salads 

Vegetables 

Yeast, Bread, Muffins, &c. 



4<s 
10 



GEMS^jslKITCHEN 



Yeast, Bread, Muffins, &c. 



POTATO YEAST. 
Peel and boil six good sized potatoes, one quart of water, one small 
handful of hops. Sift through a colander, (after steeping the hops) 
then add one tablespoon of salt, half a teacup of sugar, stirred togeth- 
er. — Keep in a cool place. One cup of yeast. Mrs. A. M. M. 

YEAST. 

Grate six large potatoes, four quarts of water, put two quarts on the 
potatoes, one cup of sugar, and one of salt, one tablespoonful of 
powdered alum. Boil a handful of hops in the remaining two 
quarts of water, and when cool enough, add the yeast. Use a coffee 
cup full of the yeast for three loaves of bread. Mrs. H. C H. 

YEAST. 

Put one handful of hops and two quarts of boiling water on the 
stove. Beat together four good sized potatoes, grated raw, one cup of 
flour, one cup of brown sugar, and two tablespoonfuls of salt. Strain 
hop- water into this mixture, and cook until it is pasty. When cold, 
add one cup of yeast. Place uncovered in a warm place for two days, 
then bottle. Mise M. I. W. 

CORN MEAL BREAD. 

One pint of corn meal, one cup of flour, two eggs, a little salt and 
sugar, one even tablespoon of baking powder, one tablespoon of lard 
or butter. Mix baking powder, flour and meal together, then break 
in eggs. Mix quite thin with milk. Mrs. M. M. S. 



GEMS OF THE KITCHEN. 



BREAD. 
One quart potato water, two good sized potatoes mashed through a 
colander, mix one-half cup of yeast with this, and thicken with flour. 
Before the first moulding add two tablespoonful of sugar, one tea- 
spoonful of salt, lard the size of an egg, and one pint of luke-warm 

water. Miss M. I. W. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

One pint Graham flour, one pint corn meal, one pint sour milk, one 

teaspoonful salt, one teaspoonful soda, one teacup molasses. Beat 

all together, steam two and a half hours then put into oven and bake 

a nice brown. Mrs. W. K. M. 

INDIAN BREAD. 

One pint sweet milk, one pint sour milk, one teacup molasses, one 
quart meal, one pint flour, one tablespoon saleratus. Mrs. 0. M. S. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 
To a small bowl of bread sponge put one quart of milk and water, 
half of*»each, one large spoon of molasses and one of sugar, one small 
teaspoon of soda, and one tablespoon of salt. Mix this together and 
stiffen with Graham flour a little stiffer than cake, let rise like other 
loaves and bake. Some soft sponge can be saved until next morning 
by keeping quite cold — if sour add a little soda. Mrs. G. S. 

ROLLS. 
One loaf of dough, mix with it one tablespoon lard, one tablespoon 
sugar, one egg, a little salt. When light roll out, butter them, fold 
up, and let stand till very light. Bake in a quick oven. 

Key to the Cupboard. 

RAISED ROLLS. 
One and a half pints warm milk, one cup of butter, one yeast cake, 
two tablespoons white sugar, two quarts flour, a little salt. Mix in 
all the ingredients to make a sponge, set in a warm place to rise. 
When quite light, work in all the flour and set again to rise. When 
well risen work a little more and roll out. Cut with a biscuit cutter, 
moistening edge with melted butter and fold together like rolls. Set 
to rise for half an hour, when quite light, bake in a quick oven, allow- 
ing from 15 to 20 minutes. Mrs. L. B. R. 

BAKING POWDER BISCUIT. 
One quart of flour, butter size of an egg mixed with a spoon 
through the flour, a little salt, two teaspoons baking powder also 
rubbed through with a spoon, then a pint of sweet milk and finish 
with your hands. Bake in a hot oven. Mrs. E. O. M. 



YEAST, BREAD, MUFFIN'S AND GRIDDLE CAKE8. 



CREAM BISCUIT. 

One quart of flour, three heaping teaspoons Royal Baking Powder, 
one-fourth teaspoon salt, mix ivell ; sweet cream sufficient to make a 
soft dough. Stir with a spoon until well mixed, then turn out on 
moulding board and mould lightly until smooth enough to cut out. 
Bake in a quick oven. Mrs. W. R. S. 

FRENCH BISCUIT. 

One quart of flour, one egg, one tablespoon butter, one tablespoon 
sugar, three tablespoons yeast, a little salt, and sweet milk enough to 
make a soft dough. Mrs. H. C. H. 

BISCUIT. 

Take as much bread dough as you would use for an ordinary sized 
loaf of bread. Add one-half cup sugar, and butter the size of a wal- 
nut, whites of two eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Mould up stiff and let 
stand to rise. Then mould into small biscuit and let rise once more 
before baking. Mrs. W. H. D. G. 

WHEAT GEMS. • * 

Two eggs,'one pint sweet milk (eggs beaten separately) four table- 
spoons melted butter, two and a half cups flour, two and a half tea- 
spoons baking powder. Put in cold tins. Bake about twenty min- 
utes in quick oven. Mrs. P. C. E. 

GRAHAM GEMS. 

One pint water and milk mixed half and half (all water will do 
but not as rich) one teaspoon salt, one tablespoon sugar, three tea- 
spoonful baking powder, two eggs. Stiffen enough with flour to drop 
off spoon into hot gem irons. Bake twenty minutes. Mrs. L. E. 
GOOD FRIDAY BUNS. 

Set a sponge consisting of a pint of milk, one-half pound brown sugar , 
warmed together, half a pint of yeast, make a soft batter. Set a little 
more than luke-warm about noon. The sponge will probably be 
light about 6 o'clock. Then take one quart of milk and one and a half 
pounds sugar, three-fourths pound butter one-fourth pound lard, 
warm it all together, three eggs, one ounce pure ground cinnamon. 
Put in the last two articles when the dough is partly kneaded, (make 
the buns the size of a doughnut). Keep the dough in a warm place 
until morning. Mrs. Jas. H. H. 

SALLY LUNN. 

Three cups flour, one cup milk, one-half cup melted butter, one egg, 
one even teaspoon baking powder, one teaspoon salt. Bake in gem 
tins about twenty minuteB. ' Mrs. L. E. 



6 GEMS OP THE KITCHEN. 

BREAKFAST PUFFS. 
Two eggs, two cups of milk, two cups of flour. Beat milk, yolks of 
eggs and flour together, add the whites beaten stiff. Bake in quick 
oven, in gem irons. Mrs. E. T. F. 

POP OVERS. 
Three eggs, three cups full milk, three cups full flour, one teaspoon - 
ful salt. Butter the gem pans, have them very hot and fill only half 
full. Bake in quick oven. Miss S. E. R. 

GOLDEN MUFFINS. 
One pint flour, one cup milk, two eggs, two teaspoons baking pow- 
der, butter size of an egg, beat the yolks of the eggs with the butter, 
then add the whites well beaten. Sift baking powder with the flour 
and mix all together into a batter. Bake in rings. Mrs. H. M. 

MUFFINS. 
One quart of milk, three eggs, a pinch of salt, three teaspoons bak- 
ing powder, butter size of a walnut (melted). Flour enough to make 
batter as thick as pound cake. Mrs. L. B. R. 

WHEAT OR GRAHAM MUFFINS. 
Two coffee cups of sifted flour, two full teaspoons of baking pow- 
der, well mixed through the flour, one-half cup of butter rubbed into 
the flour and two eggs thoroughly beaten, one coffee cup of milk 
added at the last, with a little salt and sugar. Mrs. H. C. P. 

LAPLANDERS. 
One pint of flour, one pint of sweet milk, two eggs beaten very 
light, one tablespoon butter and a little salt. Warm milk with butter 
in, beat yolks very light and add milk and flour gradually, putting in 
the whites last. Have pans very hot when batter is put in and bake 
at once. Mrs. M. E. S. 

WAFFLES— SWEET MILK. 
Two cups sweet milk, four eggs beaten separately, three large 
tablespoons melted butter, three even teaspoons baking powder and 
a little salt. Flour to make batter rather stiffer than for griddle cakes. 

Mrs. L. E. 
" OWEN-DAH." 
A Tennesee dish. — Boil one cup of corn meal grits (or crushed Indi- 
an) in water till dry and very tender. Let cool a little and then add a 
bit of butter, size of a hickory nut, one or two eggs, a little salt and 
milk enough to make a thick batter. Butter a stone-ware pudding- 
dish, pour in the mixture and bake about half an hour or until it is 
of a nice brown color. Eat hot for breakfast or tea. Miss A. M. G. 



YEAST, BREAD, MUFFINS AND GRIDDLE CAKES. 



WAFFLES. 
One pint sour milk, three eggs, melted batter size of an egg, one 
teaspoonful of soda. Mix about as thick as griddle cakes. 

Mrs. C. M. P. 
CRUMB GRIDDLE CAKES. 
Soak one pint of dry bread crumbs in sweet milk over night. In 
the morning, take one cup and a half of sour milk, half a teaspoon 
of soda, a little salt, and wheat flour to make a thin batter. 
FLANNEL CAKES. 
One quart sour milk, sifted flour enough to make a pretty stiff bat- 
ter, two eggs, a little salt. Just before baking add a small teaspoonful 
of soda. Mrs. R. A. M. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES. 
Half a cup of soft yeast, or one cake of bakers' yeast (soaked soft) , 
equal parts of sweet milk and hot water, salt, make a thick batter. 
Keep in a cool place. Scald the jar once a week. Every night use 
equal parts of boiling water and sweet milk, salt and flour. Beat well 
at night, but do not stir them in the morning. Mrs. A. M. M. 

CORN MEAL GRIDDLE CAKES. 
Two tablespoons ot corn meal mixed up in milk enough to moisten, 
stand over night. In the morning take one cup of buttermilk, a 
t.mall half-teaspoon of soda, a little salt, and wheat flour to thicken. 

Mrs. A. M. M. 
RICE GRIDDLE CAKES. 
One cup boiled rice, one pint of flour, one teaspoonful salt, two 
eggs beaten light, milk to make an ordinarily thick batter. 

Mrs. A. A. J. 




Breakfast Dishes. 



CODFISH BALLS. 

One teacup fish' picked fine, two teacups potatoes boiled and mash- 
ed, scald the fish, drain dry, add potato, two eggs beaten separately. 
Drop with tablespoon into kettle of hot lard. Mrs. J. M. W. 

MEAT BALLS. 

Chop cold beef or , any kind of cooked meat, pepper, salt, and a very 
little flour, mix all together with an egg, and sometimes a little milk, 
form into balls or flat cakes, and fry in butter or lard. 

Mrs. M. M. S. 

BEEF HASH, BAKED. 

Chop one pound cold beef very fine, season with pepper and salt, a 
piece of butter the size of an egg, and a teacup of water. Stew all 
together for five minutes, stir in seven rolled crackers, roll the 
crackers very fine or you can use grated bread crumbs. Pour all in a 
buttered dish and bake twenty minutes in a hot oven. Lamb or veal 
is very nice prepared this way. Mrs. J. F. M. 

A GOOD BREAKFAST DISH. 
Cut eight or nine slices of liver quite thin and soak in salt and 
water an hour, drain and broil over a clear fire till well done and cut 
up in pieces about an inch square. To a lump of butter the 
size of an egg, add four tablespoons of hot water and plenty of pep- 
per and salt to thoroughly season the liver, boil up and turn over the 
liver. Put in a covered dish to steam before serving. Mrs. H. C. P. 

FRIED BREAD. 

Four eggs beaten light, one tablespoon flour, half pint of sweet 
milk. Dip bread in the batter and eat hot. 

COLD HAM SERVED WITH EG< 

(hop ham quite fine and put in the spider with scrambled eggs just 
before taking up. Dried beef can be used instead of ham. 



BREAKFAST DISHES. 



OMELET. 
Six eggs beaten separately, yolks with pepper and salt, add eight 
tablespoottfuls of milk. Then whites beaten stiff. Put on fire and 
cook just four minutes, then put in oven anl cook five minutes. 

Mrs. G. E. F. 
FRENCH OMELET. 

Beat six eggs with three tablespoons of cream, a little salt and pep- 
per. Butter a hot spider, cook quickly, loosen at the edge often, and 
draw towards the centre, but do not turn the omelet until done and 
ready to turn on a hot plate. Serve quickly, as it becomes tough if 
it stands. Beat well. Mrs. A. M. M. 

OMELET WITH RUM. 

This is a most delicious omelet. Add a little sugar to the eggs, 
say a sherry glassful to six eggs, and make the omelet as a plain 
omelet. When turned on to the dish, sprinkle a little handful of 
sugar over the top, and pour over five or six tablespoonfuls of rum . 
Set it on fire, and serve it at the table burning. 

Mrs. Henderson. 
POACHED EGGS. 

Drop them in boiling water and cook until the white is entirely 
done. After they are on the platter, season with butter, pepper and 
salt. 

SHIRRED EGGS. 

Break eggs into a dish without injuring or crowding them. Drop 
on them some warm butter, salt and pepper, stew bread crumb on 
lightly and bake. Mrs. G. E. F. 

BOILED EGGS. 

Use a wire basket and put in boiling water for three minutes to 
have them very soft. By removing the kettle at once to back of 
stove and letting eggs remain in water until it cools, the white will 
be of a custard-like consistency. 

SCRAMBLED EGGS. 
Have saucepan hot, with plenty of malted butter in it, beat eggs, 
adding pepper and salt to taste. Turn into saucepan, stirring quickly 
until thickened. 

STUFFED EGGS. 
Boil the eggs hard, and cut them in two, take out the yolks care- 
fully, then mash well, add chopped parsley, pepper, salt, and a little 
chopped ham, tongue or veal. Stuff the whites with this mixture, so 
that each half has the appearance of containing a whole yolk. 



Soups. 



SOUP STOCK. 

Boil a soup bone the day before wanted. Boil gently from five to 
six hours, strain and cool in an earthen dish, skim the grease off the 
next day, keep in a stone jar in a cool place. In order to prepare 
soup, it is only necessary to heat some of the jelly. One can have a 
change of soup each day by adding different flavorings, such as toma- 
toes, onions, vermicelli, tapioca, spring vegetables, fried bread, celery, 
etc. The Key to the Cupboard. 

BOUILLON. 

A shin of beef, five or six pounds, quart of water to each pound ; 
place over the fire with a little salt, and stew gently until scum rises ; 
skim it and boil slowly four hours, then add two heads of celery, a 
browned onion, parsley and thyme, a few cloves, boil an hour. When 
done, strain and put to cool, take off the grease that rises, return to 
soup pot, brown a crust of bread quite dark, put in with a little 
French mustard and pepper or curry powder if preferred; but must be 
used sparingly. Mrs. J. P. 

TOMATO SOUP. 
Take of soup-stock three or four quarts, cook two quarts tomatoes 
and put through a sieve, put into stock, thicken with four or five table- 
spoonfuls flour stirred in cold water. Season with salt, pepper and 
sugar to taste. Add a little butter before serving. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

One quart of tomatoes, one quart of cold water, four sticks of mac- 
aroni broken fine, a little onion, one tablespoonful of rice. Let thi6 
simmer for an hour then add butter, pepper and salt and serve. 

Mrs. E. D. R. 
TOMATO SOUP. 

Four tomatoes, one quart of boiling water, salt, pepper and butter, 
one pint of milk, one small teaspoon of soda, put in just before the 
milk. Mrs. M. M. S. 



II 



POTATO SOUP. 

Nine good sized potatoes and one onion, boiled in two quarts of 
water. When soft, strain and rub through a sieve, let it come to a 
boil, put one cup of sweet cream in the soup tureen, salt, pour over 
this the hot liquid, rerve immediately. Nice, flavored with extract 
of celery, or celery salt. Mrs. M. M. S. 

BLACK BEAN SOUP. 

One pint of black beans soaked over night in a gallon of water, 
add half a pound of beef, quarter pound of salt pork cut in slices, 
pepper, salt and grated carrot, two onions cut fine. Let it boil four or 
five hours, put through a colander and add two hard boiled eggs cut 
in slices, and sliced lemon with a little wine or brandy added just 
before serving. It is nice to boil the pork by itself and put the 
water it has boiled in with the soup and then fry the pork and send 
to the table in the soup, cut in small pieces. All soup stock should 
be strained through a thin cloth so as to get all the part which forms 
the jelly, and add a red onion two hours before the soup is finished, 
as it imparts a nice color as well as flavors the soup. If you have not 
red onions, roast in the oven the kind you may have before putting in 
the stock. Mrs. W. M. M. 

NOODLE SOUP. 

Use same stock as for any other soup, and drop in noodles slowly, 
and let cook five or ten minutes. Season with onion if preferred. 

Mrs. G. L. S. 
DELMONICO SOUP. 

Boil a soup bone until thoroughly done, when cool skim off the 
grease. The next day add to this stock one potato, one quart of 
tomatoes, one onion, a few stalks of celery, eight or ten cloves, salt 
and pepper (red preferred). Let it cook until the vegetables are 
done. Just before taking from the fire add three tablespoonfuls flour 
mixed with a little cold water, let it boil to cook the flour, then strain 
through a coarse sieve. When served put a tablespoonful Worcester- 
shire sauce in the tureen. Mrs. T. C. D. 

OYSTER SOUP. 

In one quart of water put one quart of oysters and when they come 
to a boil skim them out, let the liquor boil until scum rises which 
take off, and add six small crackers made very fine, butter size of an 
egg, one cup of cream, and pepper and salt. When ready to serve, 
add oysters and let come to a boil. 



12 



CLAM CHOWDER. 

Six large potatoes pared and sliced thin, one large or two small 
onions chopped fine. Three or four small slices of salt pork chopped 
fine, soup plate heaping lull of oyster crackers split in two, cover with 
boiling water and boil about three-quarters of an hour, being careful 
not to scorch. Buy twenty -five large, or fifty little neck clams, wash 
carefully and open with a knife, saving the liquor, drain from the 
liquor and chop, add when the rest is done, only letting it come to a 
boil, as boiling toughens the clams. The liquor improves it and may 
be added at first or at any time'. Season to taste with salt and pepper. 
These quantities make a good sized soup tureen full. Mrs. T. B. J. 

MULLIGATAWNEY SOUP. 

Fry four sliced onions in three tablespoons of melted butter, then 
add four tablespoons of flour and stir until a rich brown. (If neces- 
sary to make it brown add more butter.) Use good beef stock and 
add this mixture with one tablespoon of curry powder, boiled up in 
the stock, and strain all together. Add a pint of sherry wine just be- 
fore serving. Mrs. W. M. M. 

OX- TAIL SOUP. 

Have the ox-tail cut up small, wash thoroughly, put on the stove 
in a kettle of cold water and let come to a boil, then takeout and dry 
in a towel, fry brown in a tablespoon of butter or drippings in a 
saucepan over the fire, add a tablespoon of flour and stir through it ; 
cover with water, cut a carrot, a turnip and a potato in dice, stick 
six or eight cloves in a whole onion, put all of the vegetables together 
with a bunch of herbs into the soup, season palatably and cook slowly 
two hours, take out the onion and herbs and serve. 

Mrs. Owens' Cook Book. 

CROUTONS. 

Small pieces of bread nicely browned, to be used in soups. 

Mrs. T. B. J. 



Fish. 



BOILED FISH. 
Wipe the fish carefully, fill with dressing of dry breadcrumbs highly 
seasoned with pepper, salt, butter and a little sage, wrap in a floured 
cloth and tie closely, boil in salt water, allowing ten minutes to the 
pound for cooking. Serve with sauce. 

BAKED WHITE FISH. 

When the fish has been scalded and cleansed, cutout the back bone 
from the head to within two inches of the tail, and stuff, one small 
onion chopped fine and fried in a tablespoonful of butter, when turn- 
ing yellow add some soaked bread and chopped parsley, lastly the 
yolk of one egg and a little pepper and salt, stir all together until it 
has cooked. After stuffing the fish, tie it together with twine and 
pour over it melted butter and salt, and cover with a buttered paper 
and cook. Bake a fish weighing five pounds about an hour. After 
laying the fish on the platter, make the gravy in the dripping pan as 
you would for roast meat, and serve with the fish. Baste while bak- 
ing with a little melted butter. Mrs. C. M. P. 

ESCALLOPED FISH. 

Take a large whitefish, steam until tender, take out the bones and 
sprinkle with pepper and salt. Heat one pint of milk and thicken with 
four tablespoons of flour, wet the flour with one-half cup cold milk, 
when cool add two eggs and a piece of butter about the size of an 
egg, put in the baking dish a layer offish and a layer of sauce until full . 
Season with onions, parsley and thyme ; cover the top with grated 
bread crumbs and bake half an hour. Mrs. J. F. M. 

SCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

Butter a deep dish, cover the bottom with cracker crumbs, add a 
layer of oysters, with butter, salt and pepper ; fill the dish alternately 
with oysters, crumbs and seasoning, having the top layer of crumbs 
sprinkled over with small bits of butter. Pour over all rich milk or 
thin cream, and hake. Mrs. M. A. T. 



14 FISH. 

SALMON AU GRATIN. 

Drain one can of salmon through a colander, one pint of milk, one- 
half teaspoonful minced onion, one of chopped parsley, one of corn- 
starch, a lump of hutter half the size of an egg, pepper and salt. Let 
the milk and the other ingredients boil till nearly as thick as drawn 
butter and set to cool. Butter a baking dish and put a layer of the 
mixture, and a layer of the salmon interspersed with a few fine bread 
crumbs ; put bread crumbs and tiny bits of butter over the last layer 
of salmon ; bake one-half hour, and garnish with parsley. Very nice. 

Miss L. E. 0. 
SALMON CROQUETTES. 

Oue pound cooked salmon (about a pint and one-half when chop- 
ped), one cup full of cream, two tablespoons butter, one of flour, 
three eggs, one pint of crumbs, pepper and salt. Chop the salmon 
fine, mix the flour and butter together, let the cream come to a boil, 
stir in the flour, butter, salmon and seasoning. Boil for one minute. 
Stir into it one well-beaten egg, and remove from the fire. When 
cold, shape, and proceed as for other croquettes. Miss Parloa. 

ROASTED OYSTERS ON TOAST. 

Eighteen large oysters or thirty small ones, one teaspoonful of flour, 
one teaspoonful of butter, salt and pepper, thin slices of toast, have 
toast buttered and in a hot dish ; put butter in a saucepan, when hot 
add dry flour, stir until smooth, but not brown, then add the cream 
and let it boil up once. Put the oysters (in their own liquor) into a 
hot oven for three minutes, then add to the cream, season, and pour 
over the toast. Garnish the dish with slices of lemon and serve very 
hot. Mrs. C. P. W. 

BROILED MACKEREL. 

Soak for a day, putting flesh side down and changing water once or 
twice, wipe dry and broil until nicely browned and put a little butter 
on after it is on platter. 

BROTL^D OYSTERS. 

Wipe oysters dry, have broiler hot and well buttered, put on oys- 
ters, brown on both sides. Serve on toast, adding pepper, salt and 
plenty of butter. Mrs. M. W. M. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

Take large sized oysters, drain and dry ; dip in fine cracker dust 
seasoned with salt and pepper, then in beaten egg, then again in 
cracker dust. Drop in boiling hot lard or fry in butter. 

Mrs. T. B. J. 



15 



OYSTER PIE. 
Make two rich crusts, bake them with a cloth between to hold up 
the upper crust. Stew the oysters, lastly, beat in two eggs, and a 
spoonful of cracker crumbs. Lift the top crust and pour oysters in. 

LITTLE PIGS IN BLANKETS. 

Take large oysters, wrap each one in a slice of bacon, cut very thin, 
fasten with little wooden skewers, fry quickly in a hot spider. 

The Key to the Cupboard. 

LOBSTER CHOPS. 

Cut half a pound of the flesh of a boiled lobster into small dice, 
put two ounces of butter in a stewpan, and when it bubbles sprinkle 
in one tablespoon of flour. Cook it, then pour in a cup of boiling 
cream, and the lobster dice, stir it until scalding hot, t ke it from the 
fire, and when slightly cooled, stir in the beaten yolks of three eggs, 
a little cayenne pepper and salt. Return to the fire, and stir long 
enough to well set the eggs, butter a platter on which spread the lob- 
ster mixture half an inch deep. When cold, form into the shape of 
chops, pointed at one end ; bread crumb, egg and crumb them again, 
and fry in boiling lard. Stick a claw into the end of each lobster 
chop after it is cooked ; place chops in a circle overlapping each other 
on a napkin. Decorate dish by putting the tail of lobster in the cen- 
tre, and its head, with the long horns, on the tail. Around the out- 
side of the circle of chops, arrange the legs, cut an inch each side of 
the middle joints, and form two equal sides of a triangle. 

Mrs. S. O. G. 
WHITE SAUCE FOR FISH. 

Take a tablespoonful of butter and a tablespoonful of flour, mix in 
a saucepan over the fire, add either milk or water till a pint has been 
used. Season with salt and pepper. 



Meats. 



ROAST BEEF. 

Have the oven very hot and before putting in the meat sprinkle 
over pepper and salt. Pour a little boiling water into the dripping 
pan, and baste frequently. 

TURKEY DRESSED WITH OYSTERS. 

For a 10-pound turkey take two pints of bread crumbs, half a cup 
of butter cut in bits (not melted), one teaspoonful of powdered 
thyme or summer savory, pepper, salt, and mix thoroughly. Rub 
turkey well inside and out with salt and pepper, then fill with first a 
spoonful of crumbs, then a few well drained oysters (using a pint of 
oysters for a turkey). Strain the oyster liquor and use to baste the 
turkey. Cook the giblets in the pan and chop fine for the gravy. 
This sized turkey ought to be at least three hours in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. D. M. T. 
BOILED MUTTON. 

A moderate sized leg of mutton should boil slowly two hours. Skim 
well at first, and add salt. Serve with drawn butter or caper sauce. 

To boil ham and tongue, put in cold water and boil till tender (two 
or three hours). 

CHICKEN PIE. 

Make a crust like baking powder biscuits, take the bones out of the 
chicken, add gravy and butter, season well, then put on the top crust, 
and wet the edges of the lower crust with cold water, then press the 
upper crust on it. This prevents the gravy from oozing out. 

Mrs. A. M. M. 

VEAL SWEETBREADS. 

Parboil in water ten minutes, then drop in cold salted water for 
five or ten minutes, remove stringy parts, wipe dry and dip in egg 
and cracker crumbs, fry in butter ; cut the sweetbreads up about the 
size of an oyster before dipping them in the egg and cracker. Fry 
the same as oysters. Mrs. J. F. M. 



17 



STEAMED CHICKEN. 



Make a stuffing of bread crumbs, seasoned with pepper and salt 
and butter, then mix with one dozen oysters, and prepare chicken as 
for roasting. Cook in steamer two hours or more ; strain the gravy 
from chicken after done into a saucepan, stir in two tablespoons but- 
ter, four spoons of oyster liquor (also strained), a tablespoon of flour 
mixed in three tablespoons of cream, and if you have it a tablespoon 
of chopped parsley ; bring to a boil, stir in a beaten egg, season to 
taste, and pour part over the chicken, rest in tureen. Miss E. E. 
PRESSED BEEF. 

Two pounds of round beef steak, chopped fine, one cup of sweet 
milk, two tablespoons of salt, one tablespoon of black pepper, two 
soda crackers rolled fine, one egg ; mix all well together with the 
hands, make into a loaf, and bake one hour and a balf. Cut in slices 
when cold. Mrs. A. A. J. 

VEAL CUTLETS. 

Dip the veal in a well beaten egg, then in rolled cracker crumbs, 
fry in a hot spider, slowly, add salt and pepper, turn when fried a 
light brown. Mrs. A. M. M. 

LIVER. 

Fry trro or three onions slowly until soft ; when done, take them 
out and put liver in pan and cook until done. Take this out and 
make a common gravy with a little flour and water, and put onion 
in it to heat, and pour over the meat. 

VEAL POT-PIE. 

Boil veal one hour and a half. Half an hour before dinner make a 
dough, like biscuits, and drop into the kettle with a spoon, salt. 
Thicken gravy with flour. 

BROILED BEEFSTEAK. 

Lay it on a broiler over a bright fire, and turn frequently ; season 
after it is put on a hot platter, with salt, pepper and butter. Place in 
the oven a moment. 

SWEETBREAD PATTIES. 

Make small shells of rich puff paste, boil the sweetbreads until ten- 
der, and when cool enough to handle ; cut in small pieces and put 
them into a saucepau with enough cream to cover, add butter, pepper 
and salt to taste and flour enough to thicken ; let all come to 
a boil, then fill the shells and serve hot. Oysters may be used in- 
stead of sweetbreads. Miss L. E. O. 



18 MEATS. 

TO COOK A DUCK. 

Stuff with bread and celery, then steam till tender ; when the duck 
is tender, roast like a turkey. Season the dressing with butter, pep- 
per and salt, and moisten with a little hot water. If you choose, add 
a littie onion instead of celery. 

BEEF ROLL. 

Two and a half pounds round steak, one half pound bacon, two 
eggs, salt, pepper, parsley and nutmeg to taste; two-thirds cup 
browned bread crumbs. Chop meat line and mix all well together, 
roll in buttered brown paper, put in pan with a little water, bake two- 
and half hours. When done, place on platter with tomato sauce 
poured over, garnish with parsley. Mrs. M. J. L. 

YEAL LOAF. 

Two pounds veal cutlet, one-fourth pound salt pork or butter, one 
cup rolled crackers, (two cups improve it), two eggs, one-half cup 
warm water, salt and pepper to taste, meat chopped raw, packed into 
a loaf and baked one hour. When cold slice it, and you will find it 
very nice for lunch or supper. Mrs. E. O. M. 

CHICKEN TERRAPIN. 

To one chicken take one-half pint of cream, one- fourth pound but- 
ter, one tablespoonful flour, three hard boiled egg, rub flour and 
butter together, pour into cream and boil to a custard, season with 
cayenne pepper and sa'.t, add a little wine. Prepare chicken as for 
salad, and add to the mixture long enough to heat through. 

Mrs. C. F. C. 
PORK AND BEANS. 

One quart beans, piece of pork six or seven inches square. Soak 
beans over night and boil in morning until the skin just loosens, no 
more. Wash pork and put in middle of bean dish, filling all around 
with beans ; scar pork in even squares and fill up even with water in 
which has been dissolved one tablespoon molasses and some soda. 
Cover pot and let cook all day, keeping sufficient water on. 

FRIZZLED BEEF. 

Cut in thin slices, place in a spider, and pour boiling water on it to 
freshen it, let it stand a few moments, drain off the water, then sea- 
son with a little butter, salt and pepper, a sprinkle of flour, and one 
or two well beaten eggs ; stir well. This is nice, also, poured over 
warm biscuits cut in halves, or on crackers. 



19 



BEEF A LA MODE. 

Take a tenderloin roast, make several incisions in the meat and 
press into them bits of salt pork. When the bone comes out stuff 
with bread crumbs, onion, any herbs, parsley, thyme or summer 
savory, a little egg, pepper, salt and cloves. Press the beef into shape 
and tie it securely, put into a pan, or pot, (with a few slices of pork); 
when hot brown it by turning on all sides ; next, sprinkle over a 
little flour and brown that also. Put in a steamer, close tight, and 
keep the water boiling three or four hours ; carrots, turnips, etc., can 
be boiled in the water under the meat. When done, make a gravy, 
add two tablespoons port or sherry wine, pour this over the meat and 
vegetables. 

TO BROIL VENISON STEAKS. 

Have the gridiron hot, broil, put on a hot dish, rub over butter, 
pepper, salt, a tablespoon of Madeira, Sherry or Port. < Tarnish the 
dish with currant jelly or lemon slices. Mrs. J. H. H. 

LAMB CROQUETTES. 

Half as much crumbs as meat, pepper and salt, one-half cup milk, 
almost boil milk, mix meat and crumbs together and add to milk, 
one egg, when cold roll in balls, fry in hot lard and butter. 

Mrs. H. F. D. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

One large roasted chicken, or two small ones, chopped fine, a piece 
of fresh butter (two ounces) melt, "stir in it two full tablespoonfuls 
flour, one pint cream, season to taste with pepper and salt. Let this 
boil until thick as custard, take off the fire and stir into it as much 
chicken as will make it thick enough when cold to form into balls ; 
stir the yolk of an egg into it, and put in a dish to cool ; when cold, 
shape and dip each croquette into a batter of two or three beaten 
eggs, roll in bread crumbs and fry in hot lard ; leave enough' of the 
chicken to add to the batter, if not thick enough when cold. They 
are very nice to use some sweetbreads instead of all chicken. 

Mrs. U. M. 
GRAVY FOR ROAST OR FRIED MEAT. 

After taking out meat, put in two tablespoons flour which has been 
dissolved in cold water ; stir well, and keep stirring while you pour 
in hot water until it is thin enough. If gravy is very fat pour some 
of the fat off first, and the flour can then be put in dry. Have gravy 
and. pan quite hot before putting in flour. 



20 GEMS FOR THE KITCHEN. 



CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

Take the meat from one boiled chicken, chop half a small onion 
very tine and fry in two tablepoonfuls of butter, as soon as it begins 
to brown add two tablespoonfuls of flour and a cup of the chicken 
broth ; then add the meat, beat two epgs light, and add them, sea- 
son with salt and pepper. Let it boil briskly for ten minutes, then 
set it away on the ice till it is thoroughly cooled. Make into cro- 
quettes, with egg and cracker crumbs, and fry in boiling lard or Olive 
oil. Mrs. H. C. H. 

PHEASANTS. 

Cut through back and cook in oven, basting often ; lay a piece of 
pork across the breast, to keep them from being dry. Chop giblets 
to put in gravy, put little pieces of currant jelly on pheasants when 
done and turn gravy over them. Mrs. R. A.M. 

FROGS. 

Only the hind quarters are cooked. Wash and wipe them, flour 
them, and fry a light brown in butter. Key to the Cupboard. 

DRAWN BUTTER. 

Heat one-half pint of milk, mix thoroughly one heaping tablespoon- 
ful flour, two tablespoonfuls butter, and a saltspoonful of salt, then 
pour into it, stirring all the time, one-half pint boiling water ; when 
smooth, stir into the boiling milk ; let simmer about five minutes. 

MINT SAUCE. 

Pick mint up fine and put in bowl, heat one-half cup vinegar, (if 
very strong vinegar use some water) one tablespoonful sugar. Turn 
over mint just before serving. 



-^ 




Vegetables. 



BAKED WHITE POTATOES. 

Boil the potatoes about twenty minutes, then have a tin well 

greased with lard, and some pieces ef butter, put in the potatoes and 

bake till a nice brown. Sweet potatoes are nice cooked in the same 

way. 

ESCALLOPED POTATOES. 

Slice as many raw potatoes as will fill your dish; first a layer of 
potatoes, then salt, cayenne pepper and a little milk ; repeat this till 
the dish is full. Use about one cup of milk to a medium sized dish, 
cover closely, put in oven and bake till tender (usually about one 
and a half-hour) then brown quickly. Add butter and cream. 

SARATOGA POTATOES. 

Cut potatoes very thin on cabbage cutter and let stand in ice water 
an hour or two, then dry thoroughly and drop in hot lard and fry a 
light brown. Salt while hot. 

POTATO PUFF. 

Two cups of mashed potatoes, two tablespoons of melted butter ; 
beat to a cream, then add two eggs, one teacup of cream or milk, salt 
to taste. Put in a deep dish and bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. J. F. R. 
POTATO CROQUETTES. 

Beat well into hot mashed potato a raw egg, some butter, milk, and 
pepper and salt. When quite cold shape into croquettes, roll in 
cracker crumbs and fry in hot lard. 

TOMATOES WITH CREAM SAUCE. 

Cut ripe tomatoes in rather thick slices, but do not skin them, pep- 
per and salt them, sprinkle a very little sugar on one side, dredge 
with flour and fry in hot butter. Remove to a hot platter, pour into 
the frying pan in which they were cooked one-half pint very rich 
milk or cream, stir in a small teaspoonful of flour, season and pour 
over the tomatoes. A nice supper dish. Miss L. E. O. 



22 GEMS FOE THE KITCHEN. 



FRIED POTATOES. 

Fry potatoes until brown, not brittle ; when nearly ready to take 
from the fire break an egg in and stir thoroughly. Very nice for 
breakfast. Mies A. D. 

CREAM POTATOES. 

Cut cold boiled potatoes into rather thin slices, season well with 
salt, pepper and a liberal' allowance of butter, dredge with flour 
lightly, pour over rich milk and let boil five minutes. 

BAKED STUFFED TOMATOES. 

Take smooth large tomatoes, cut out the stem, cut off a thin slice 
from stem end and remove seeds and pulp ; make a bread crumb 
dressing, season with butter, onion and pepper and salt, and fill toma- 
toes, cover with the slice, put a piece of butter on each one and bake 
one hour. 

ESCALLOPED TOMATOES. 

Take the skin off nice, smooth tomatoes, lay in a dish, sprinkle 
bread crumbs, pepper, salt and butter between and over them, and 
bake until nicely browned. Miss. A. D. 

MACARONI WITH TOMATOES. 

Boil a cup of macaroni (broken in inch pieces) in salt and water, 
when tender, add one cup of strained cooked tomatoes, one table- 
spoonful flour (wet with cold water) and a little butter. After mix- 
ing let it boil enough to cook the flour. Mrs. T. C. D. 

LOUISVILLE SWEET POTATOES. 

Boil sweet potatoes, cake off the skin and slice lengthwise ; put in 
a baking dish a layer of potatoes, then sprinkle sugar over them and 
a little butter, then another layer, and so on until the dish is filled , 
add a little water, put in the oven and bake a light brown. This is 
very good and a nice way to use cold sweet potatoes. 

Miss A. M. G. 
CHEESE OMELET. 
Butter the sides of a deep dish, cover the bottom with thin slices 
of cheese, put upon this very thin slices of bread, well buttered, a 
little red pepper and mustard, another layer of cheese, and just be • 
fore putting in the oven, beat the yolk of an egg in a cup of cream 
. and pour into the dish. Bake half an hour, or until it is nicely 
browned. Miss A. M. G. 



VEGETABLES. 23 

ONIONS WITH CREAM. 
Boil the onions, putting them into boiling salted water, with a little 
milk added, until tender ; drain and put them into a stewpan, then 
add a little cream, pepper, a few sprinkles of flour and a little butter 

WELSH RAREBIT. 

Put a little milk in a saucepan and set over a moderate tire, into 
this put thin slices of cheese, and stir until the cheese is melted. 
Then spread on buttered toast and serve hot. Miss A. D. 

TURNIP A LA BLOT. 

Pare and slice, half an inch thick, cut in dice pieces, boil in salted 
water till tender ; drain off the water, make a cream of a gill of milk, 
one teaspoon of flour, one tablespoon of butter, salt; mix the butter 
and flour together till smooth, stir it in the milk, nourit over the 
turnip, and let it boil up once. Bixghamton Cook Cook. 

NOODLES TO EAT AS A VEGETABLE. 

Make and cut fine the same as for soup, put them in boiling water 
with salt for ten or fifteen minutes. When done, drain thoroughly, 
put them in vegetable dish and cover with very fine bread crumbs 
nicely browned in butter. 

HOMINY CROQUETTES. 

Rub a cup of cold boiled hominy smooth, with a tablespoon of soft 
butter. When you have worked them well together, add a beaten 
egg, one teaspoon of sugar, and a little salt. Beat well, flour your 
hands, and make croquettes, rolling each over and over in a floured 
dish. Set in a cold place for a while, and fry in hot lard. 

Marion Hakland. 
RICE CROQUETTES— MARYLAND STYLE. 

To a pint of hot boiled rice add one beaten egg, three-fourths cup 
sugar, one-half lemon, juice and rind, a pinch of salt, a small piece of 
butter. When cool enough mould in a sherry glass and fry in very 
hot deep fat. Miss L. E. 0. 

MACARONI A LA ITALIAN. 

Break and wash one-fourth pound macaroni and boil until quite 
tender; put one-half pint milk in double boiler, mix two tablespoons 
of butter and one of flour together and stir in boiling milk, add salt, 
pepper (cayenne) and one-fourth pound cheese. Drain macarDni 
and pour in the dressing and put in oven and brown. Miss E. E. 



24 GEMS FOK THE KITCHEN". 



CORN OMELET. 

Eight ears grated corn, four eggs beaten separately, one-half coffee- 
cup rich milk or cream, salt. Put a large piece of butter in the spider, 
when hot, add the ingredients, let it cook a few minutes and then 
brown it in the oven, slide on to a platter. Mrs. A. H. M. 

GREEN CORN FRITTERS. 

Grate one dozen ears of corn, add three eggs, whites and yolks 
beaten separately, season highly with salt and pepper, and add a 
large tablespoon of flour Drop by spoonfuls in hot lard or butter 
(half and half is best) and fry quickly. Mrs. H. C. P. 

SALMI OF CHEESE. 

Salmi of cheese is made by placing a pint of milk upon the fire 
and adding to it two tablespoont'uls of finely crumbled cheese. After 
this ha* boiled a full minute stir into it a tablespoonful of flour that 
has been wet in milk ; add a saltspoon of salt and the same quantity 
of made mustard, as soon as it boils up thick remove ; add a table- 
spoon butter, and serve with toast nicely browned; serve hot so that 
the salmi of cheese may be eaten with it or be turned upon it by those 
who choose. Mrs. C. E. P. 

ASPARAGUS. 

Tie in bunches and boil until tender in plenty of water. Have 
bottom of dish covered with dry toast, lay asparagus on and pour 
over it a rich drawn butter made of milk. 
BAKED CORN. 
Cut longwise through kernels of corn and then scrape the cob, 
leaving skin on cob. Put corn in baking dfsh with milk, butter, pep- 
per and salt. Bake about an hour. 

SALSIFY OR OYSTER PLANT FRITTERS. 

Scrape the root well, cut in pieces and boil until tender; mash fine 
and add three eggs well beaten, salt and pepper to season, two spoon- 
fuls of butter, one-half cup of milk, a little flour, and dip a spoonful 
at a time and fry brown in lard. Mrs. L. M. A. 

Boil peas in very little water. Boil string-beans two hours, in a 
good deal of water. Boil spinach twenty minutes. Boil beet-tops 
one hour. Boil potatoes twenty or thirty minutes. Boil turnips sixty 
or eighty minutes. Boil asparagus twenty-five minutes. Boil green 
corn fifteen minutes. Boil Lima beans half an hour. Boil cauli- 
flower three-quarters of an hour. 



Salads. 



In adding hot vinegar to eggs it is best to pour the vinegar on the 
eggs, as they will not curdle so easily. 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING. 

Put the uncooked yolk of an egg into a cold bowl, beat it well 
with a silver fork, then add two salt-spoonfuls of salt and one of 
ground mustard ; work them well a minute before adding the oil, 
pour in the oil very slowly alternated with a few drops of vinegar. 
When the sauce begins to have the consisteucy of jelly alternate a 
few drups of lemon juice with the oil. When the egg has absorbed a 
gill of oil, finish by adding a very little pinch of cayenne pepper and 
two teaspoonfuls of good vinegar. The process of making this dress - 
iDg is greatly facilitated by placing the oil and egg on ice before using . 
If it curdles, beat another yolk in slowly. 

Tomatoes, salmon, shrimps, and lobster can be used with any salad 
dressing using lettuce. 

CHICKEN SALAD— WITHOUT OIL. 

One cold boiled chicken, three-fourths the quantity of celery, three 
hard boiled eggs, one raw egg well beaten, one teaspoonful of salt, 
one teaspoonful of pepper, one teaspoonful mustard, three teaspoon- 
fuls of melted butter or chicken fat, one-half cup of vinegar. Cut 
the chicken and celery into small pieces, sprinkle over them a little 
salt ; rub the yolks of the eggs to a fine powder, add the salt, pep- 
per, mustard, and gradually the butter ; turn over this the beaten egg 
and whip until thoroughly mixed; finally add the vinegar, a spoon- 
ful at a time. With a silver fork mix lightly through the chicken 
until it is well moistened. Garnish with hard boiled eggs. 

Mrs. H. S. G. 
CABBAGE DRESSING. 

One egg beaten very light, one hot potato mashed and beaten with 
egg, butter large as walnut, salt, pepper, celery seed, mustard, table- 
spoon sugar, two tablespoons cream, one-half teacup vinegar. Heat 
this together. Mrs. E. T. F. 



26 GEMS FOE THE KITCHEN. 



LEMON SALAD DRESSING. 
Into three well beaten eggs stir one tablespoonful salt, one table- 
spoonful prepared mustard, three tablespoonful s melted butter, juice 
of two large lemons, one coffee-cupful sweet cream. After mixing 
well put in a stew-pan and place in a kettle of boiling water. Let it 
cook until just ready to boil. Set away to cool. 

SALAD DRESSING— WITHOUT OIL. 

One and a half tablespoonfuls of vinegar, one and a half table- 
spoonfuls of water, butter size of an egg, yolks of two egsjs, a little 
mustard, pepper, salt, and half a cup of cream. Add the butter to 
the vinegar and water, when it boils take from the fire and pour in 
the eggs, well beaten, then the mustard, first making smooth with 
water. After egg is put in, place on the tire again, stir until thick, 
putting one teaspoonful of corn starch, wet with a little milk to 
thicken it, and beat it well. Mrs. C. F. C. 

POTATO SALAD. 

ONE PINT. 

Cut cold boiled potatoes in pieces the size of dice into a deep bowl, 
mix very gradually two tablespoonfuls vinegar with three table- 
spoonfuls of best table oil ; mix one teaspoonful chopped parsley and 
one-half teaspoonful minced onion with the potato, adding salt and 
pepper to taste. Last stir in the oil and vinegar with a silver fork . 
Serve in a salad bowl lined with fresh lettuce leaves, and garnish the 
top with sprigs of parsley. 

WHITE SALAD DRESSING. 

One cup of sweet cream, one tablespoon of corn starch or flour , 
whites of two eggs, beaten stiff, three tablespoons of vinegar, two 
tablespoons of salad oil, two teaspoons of sugar, one teaspoon of salt, 
half a teaspoon of pepper, one teaspoon of made mustard. Heat 
cream almost to boiling, stir in flour, previously wet with cold milk, 
boil two minutes, stirring all the time ; add sugar. When nearly 
cold beat in whites of eggs; when quite cold, add the oil, pepper, 
mustard and salt. When salad is ready, add the vinegar and pour 
over at once. Nice for lettuce, or chicken salad. 



Puddings. 



CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

One quart of milk, six tablespoonfuls of chocolate, six tablespoonfuls 
of suijar, four tablespoonfuls of corn starch. Cook the milk, let it come 
to a boil, then stir in the other ingredients and let it thicken, 

Mrs. II. M. 
LAYER PUDDING. 

One egg, one and a half cups milk, butter the size of a hickory nut, 
one teaspoonful baking powder. Put a lictle butter in your frying- 
pan, on the stuve, and let it melt ; when the bottom of the pan is cov- 
ered, put in about half the above recipe. When it is a light brown, 
turn over with a pancake shovel. When done take out of the pan, 
spread with butter and any kind of preserves you like, then put in the 
rest, doing the same as before, putting preserves on the top. Eat hot 
without sauce. Mrs. J. J. G. 

HUCKLEBERRY PUDDING. 
One quart of huckleberries, one pint of molasses, one cup of cold 
water, one heaping teaspoon of soda, one teaspoonful of cloves, one 
teaspoonful of cinnamon, flour to make it stiff as cup cake. Steam it 
three hours. Sauce — One cuu of sugar, one-half cup of butter, yolks 
of two eggs. Stir to a cream. Beat whites of the eggs and stir in 
lightly. Flavor to taste. Mrs. G. E. F. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

One-half teacup tapioca that has been soaked in water for several 
hours. Stir into this a small piece of butter, and one-half teaspoon of 
salt, yolks of two eggs, one quart milk, three-fourths teacup sugar. 
Bake. When done beat whites of two eggs to a stiff froth, sweeten 
and flavor to taste. Put in oven to brown. Mas. D. M. T. 

SPONGE PUDDING. 

The weight of six e2:gs in butter, sugar and Hour. Cream butter, 
add yolks well beaten, then whites and lastly Hour. Fill cups half 
full and serve one to each person with wine sauce. 



28 GEMS FOR THE KITCHEN. 



COCOANUT PUDDING. 

Two cups of rolled crackers, one cup of cocoauut, three eggs well 
beaten, one quart of milk. If dessicated cocoanut is used, soak it 
about two hours in the milk before putting together. Bake about 
thiee-fourths of au hour in not too hot. oven. Sauce — One-half cup 
of butter, one cup of sugar well creamed. Brandy or wine for season- 
ing to suit the taste. Mrs. L. M. A. 
FLOATING ISLAND. 

One quart milk, two-thirds cup sugar, yolks of five eegs beaten with 
the sugar, then added to milk. Put into farina kettle and cook till 
thickens. Beat whites stiff, adding two tablespoons sugar ; drop by 
tablespoons into kettle of boiling water and turn. Put on top of cus- 
tard when cold. Flavor to taste. 

PRUNE PUDDING. 

Put as many prunes as you wish to use on to cook slowly, and as 
much water, so that when well done it will be thickened some ; then 
sweeteu and pit them and put in your pudding dish. On this spread 
six whites of eggs with a small cup of sugar (less if you like) and brown 
in oven, and it is ready for table. Eat with whipped or plain cream, 
either hot or cold. 

FIG PUDDING. 

One pound of figs chopped fine, two cups fine bread crumbs, three 
eggs beaten very light, one cup suet, powdered, two small cups of milk, 
one-half cup of sugar. Mix thoroughly and put in buttered tin mould 
with tight cover, and boil three hours. To be eaten hot with wine 
sauce. Mrs. J. P. 

APPLE MERINGUE. 

One quart of apple sauce, one pint of bread crumbs, three eggs and 
small piece of butter. Beat yolks, butter, bread crumbs and apple 
sauce and brown on top. Then beat whites with sugar to taste and 
brown again. 

LEMON PUDDING. 

One pint of fine bread crumbs to a quart of rich milk, one cup of 
sugar, the yolks of four eggs well beaten, a piece of butter the size of 
an egg, the grated rind of one lemon. Bake till done but not watery. 
Whip the whites until stiff, add a cup of sugar and the juice of the 
lemon, spread over the top of the pudding and brown lightly in the 
oven. Mrs. O. D. G. 



29 



HASTINGS PUDDING. 



One cup molasses, one cup sweet milk, one-half cup butter, four cups 
flour, two teaspoons cinnamon, one teaspoon cloves, one pint hickory- 
nut meats chopped, one coffee cup raisins, four even teaspoons baking 
powder. Steam two hours. Suet may be used instead of butter, if 
preferred. Mrs. M. J. L. 

BOILED PUDDING. 

Five ounces flour, five ounces sugar, five ounces butter, nine eggs 
rather less than one pint of milk. Boil the milk and scald the flour 
carefully, that it may be free from lumps and perfectly smooth. Mix 
into the scalded flour one yolk at a time, until all are added. Beat 
the butter and sugar together to a cream, and stir into the scalded 
flour after the yolks have been added. Then have whites of eggs 
ready beaten to a stiff froth, and add just before putting into the 
mould. Boil one hour or more. To be kept boiling until served, and 
not to be taken out of water until sent to table. Eaten with wine 
sauce or sugar and cream. Excellent. Miss E. E. 

RICE PUDDING. 

One teacup rice boiled soft in milk, piece of butter size of an egg, 
one pint milk, yolks of five eggs, rind of two lemons, grated. Bake 
one-half to three-quarters of an hour. Beat whites stiff with one 
pound sugar, add juice of lemons. Spread over top and set back in 
the oven to harden and brown. Eat with sauce. 

Pudding Sauce. — One cup fine sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half 
wine glass wine, one egg. Beat white separately, and beat whole 
three-quarters of an hour. Let scald, but not boil. Mrs. W. M. M. 

BREAD PUDDING. 

Put bread crumbs in a dish nicely covered with sweet milk, when 
thoroughly soaked add one well beaten egg to one cup of bread 
crumbs, a little salt ; bake until brown. Eat with hard sauce. 

Miss A. D. 
BAKED INDIAN PUDDING. 

For a two quart pudding use two teacups meal, moisten the meal 
with cold water, then pour over it one pint of boiling water, add one 
tablespoonful of butter, two teacups of sugar, one cup of raisins, three 
eggs well beaten before adding, and fill up with sweet milk ; season 
with whatever spice is preferred, bake slowly half an hour or more. 

Mrs. M. D. S. 



30 GEMS FOR THE KITCHEN. 

APPLE PUDDING. 

Two cups milk, two cups flour into which sift three even teaspoon- 
fula baking powder, two eggs beaten into the batter. Slice half a 
dish full of apples, pour over this the batter ; steam or bake one hour. 

Mrs. L. E. 

COTTAGE PUDDING WITH APPLES. 

Grease your pudding dish well, line with a layer of good sour ap- 
ples, then make a batter as follows : One egi?, one cup sweet milk, 
one pint of flour, one tablespoon of butter, half a teacup of sugar k 
three teaspoons baking powder; spread this over the apples and bake 
in a moderately hot oven. Mrs. E. D. R. 

HICKORY-NUT PUDDING. 

One quart bread or cake crumbs, four eggs, half cupful flour, one 
cupful milk, one orange grated (rind and juice), half cupful suet, half 
cupful molasses, one tablespoonful baking powder, nutmeg and cin- 
namon to taste, quarter of pound chopped raisins, one pint hickory 
nuts; steam two hours. Eat with wine sauce. Mrs. S. O. G. 

SPONGE PUDDING. 

One cup of sugar, four egas, one cup of flour, one small teaspoon of 
so la, two teaspoons of cream tartar. Steam steadily half an hour. 

Sauce for Sponge Pudding. — One cup of sugar, half a cup of but- 
ter, beaten together, add the yolk of two eggs ; pour over this half a 
pint of boiling water, and the juice of one lemon, or orange, then add 
the whites of eggs well beaten. 

PLUM PUDDING. 

One cup of molasses, one cup of sweet milk, half a cup of suet, chop- 
ped fine, one pound of raisins, chopped fine, one teaspoon of soda, a 
little nutmeg and cinnamon. Put in the soda the last thing, dissolved 
in a little milk, after adding flour enough to make it the consistency 
of pound cake. Boil four hours in a pudding bag. Eat with liquid 
wine sauce. Mbs. A. A. J. 

CREAM FLUMMERY. 

One pint of cream, two eggs, one tablespoonful of flour, one teaspoon - 
ful of vanilla, sugar to suit taste. Cook in boiling water and stir until 
it thickens. Pour in a dish and put on ice to cool. When cool put 
ladyfingers, kisses and macaroons all through it. Ice the top and or- 
nament with kisses. Must be made in the morning so as to be cold 
before using. Mrs. G. E. F. 



31 



CHERRY PUDDING. 



Two eggs, one cup inilk, three teaspoons baking powder; thicken 
with enough flour to make as thick as cake, and lastly put in a bowl 
of cherries. 

ORANGE PUDDING. 

Peel and cut up lour oranges, sprinkle with sugar. Let stand two 
hours. Boil three-fourths pint milk, add yolks two eggs, two table- 
spoonfuls sugar, and one large tablespoonful corn starch. Stir in milk 
while boiling. When thick let cool and pour over oranges. Make 
frosting of whites of eggs and one-fourth cup sugar. Spread over top, 
and set in oven in pan of cold water until a light brown. 

Mrs. E. T. N. 
BANANA PUDDING. 

One box gelatine, one pint cream to whip, one quart of milk, two 
cups sugar, five bananas. Dissolve gelatine in a cup of water ; add 
sugar to the milk, let it &cald ; take some of the hot milk and thin the 
gelatine, strain and stir in the milk, let it simmer ten minutes; pour 
into a bowl to cool, but not stiff. Serve with whipped cream flavored 
with vanilla. Mrs. H. L. B. 

STEAMED GRAHAM PUDDING. 

Half a cup molasses, half a cup sugar, one cup sweet milk, one tea- 
spoon soda, one cup raisins. Stir stiff with flour and steam two hours. 

Sauce. — One cup sugar, one cup water, one tablespoon butter, one 
tablespoon vinegar, one tablespoon flour, half teaspoon lemon or a 
little wine is nice. 

PINEAPPLE PUDDING. 

Two cups sugar, half cup butter, one pineapple, or one can, chop- 
ped, yolk of six eggs, two tablespoonfuls bread crumbs. Mix butter, 
sugar and eggs well together, then chopped pineapple, add bread 
crumbs with juice of pineapple last. Bake in a quick oven half an 
hour, use whites of eggs for meringue. Good either hot or cold. 

Mrs. J. M. \Y. 

CORN STARCH. 

One pint heated milk, stir into it a heaping tablespoon of the 
starch, boil in vessel which sits in another of hot water, after well 
cooked stir in the whites of three well beaten eggs, pour in to mould . 

Sauce.— Heat half pint milk, beat yolks, stir them into the hot 
milk, sugar, flavoring, also a little cream. Mrs. E. T. F. 



32 GEMS FOR THE KITCHEN. 



APPLE DUMPLINGS. 

Pare, core and halve apples, keeping each apple by itself; make a 
biscuit dough with baking powder and cover each apple quite thin 
and steam one hour. Eat with cream and sugar. Mrs. G. S. 

STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE. 

One egg. one cup milk, two cups flour, two tablespoons melted but- 
ter, three teaspoons baking powder. Makes one square tin, do not 
split out cut cake in half. Mrs. G. S. 

WINE SAUCE. 

Seven tablespoons sugar, three tablespoons butter, rub to a cream ; 
three eggs beaten separately, put yolks into the butter and sugar ; one 
wine glass of wine ; then add the whites of eggs. Put into a farina 
kettle and scald. Serve at once. 

PUDDING SAUCE. 

The white of one egg, well beaten, add sugar to taste, then add fruit, 
fresh or canned, stir well. Peaches, strawberries, pineapples, oranges 
and red raspberries are very fine. Nice with boiled rice. 

" The Key to the Cupboard." 

DRESSING FOR PUDDING. 

• One small cup of boiling milk, yolks of two eggs beaten very light, 
one cup of sugar. Beat the eggs and sugar well together and stir in 
the milk. Just before taking to the table beat the whites of the eggs 
and stir in one-half cup of sherry wine in the custard. 

Mrs. C. F. C. 

HARD SAUCE. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, beaten to a smooth cream, 
Flavor to suit the taste. Miss A. D. 

CREAMY SAUCE. 

One-half cup butter, one cup powdered sugar, one-fourth cup cream 
or milk, four tablespoons of wine, or one teaspoon of vanilla or lemon 
extract. If lemon or vanilla is used, add four tablespoonfuls of cream. 
Beat the butter to a cream. Add the sugar gradually, beating all the 
while. When light and creamy gradually add the wine, then the 
cream, a little at a time. When all is beaten smooth, place the bowl 
».n a basin of hot water and stir until the sauce is smooth and creamy 
— no longer. This is a delicious sauce, and if well beaten and not 
kept in the hot water long enough to melt the sugar, will be white 
and foamy all through. Miss Parloa. 



33 



LEMON DRESSING. 



One large cupful sugar, nearly one-half cupful butter, one egg, grated 
rind and juice of one lemon, three tablespoonfuls boiling water. 
Cream the butter and sugar and beat in the egg whipped light, then 
add the lemon. Beat hard for ten minutes. Add the boiling water 
a spoonful at a time. Put in a tin pail and set on top of tea kettle ; 
stir constantly. Heat very hot but do not boil. 




Desserts. 



ICE CREAM. 

Three pints of cream, half pint new milk ; put milk on stove 
adding five tablespoons sugar and one tablespoon flour, stirred with 
some of the cream, put into the milk when it boils ; strain while hot 
and mix with the cream. Beat well when cold with egg beater or 
syllabut churn, flavor to taste and freeze. 
ICE CREAM. 

Two quarts cream, three pints new milk. Put the milk over the fire 
with two tablespoons of flour dissolved in it, one tablespoon of gela- 
tine and one-third a tablespoon of a vanilla bean cut up. Cook two 
hours ; take from the fire, add the yolks of three eggs, while hot, 
strain through a thin cloth ; whip the cream, add the whites of three 
eggs whipped to it, and add to the milk, which must be cold. Sweeten 
to taste. Mrs. C. L. T. 

Bananas, peaches or other fruits can be frozen with cream. Make 
cream as directed above. Prepare fruit by mashing or cutting in 
small pieces, and sweetening to taste. After cream begins to freeze 
put in fruit and finish freezing. 

APRICOT ICE. 

Take one can of California apricots, press them a little, add one 
quart of sugar and one quart of water and freeze hard. 

Mrs. A. A. J. 
ROMAN PUNCH. 

Three quarts water, one pint rum, three pounds pulverized sugar, 

twelve or fourteen lemons and oranges, whites of two eggs. Strain, 
then freeze. Mrs. R. A. M. 

PINEAPPLE ICE. 

Grate the fruit, take out the eyes, weigh it, and to one pound of 
grated pineapple use one-half pound of pulverized sugar ; measure 
this and to every quart of this mixture take almost as much water. 
When it begins to freeze, stir in the whites of two eggs, beaten light 

Mrs. R. A. M. 



LEMON SHERBET. 
One quart water, one pound sugar, juice of four lemons; strain 
the mixture, and just before freezing add the beaten whites of two 
eggs. Miss S. E. R. 

STRAWBERRY SHERBET. 

One pint sugar, one quart of water, one tablespoon gelatine, two 
quarts of strawberries. Mash the berries and sugar together, add 
the water and strain them. Soak the gelatine in a little of the water, 
boil one cup of the water and dissolve the gelatine in it; mix together 
the sugar, water, gelatine and strawberries, turn into the can and 
freeze the same as ice cream. Mrs. J. F. M. 

ORANGE JELLY. 

Prepare one dozen fine oranges by taking off the skins and remov- 
ing the seeds ; be sure to leave none of the tough fibre. Cut into 
small pieces (not slices), soak one two-ounce package of Coxe's gela- 
tine in as little water as will thoroughly dissolve it; make a syrup of 
one quart water and two and a half pounds sugar, stir the gelatine into 
the syrup, then strain over the prepared orange. There should be 
about a quart of the orange. Set in a cool place to stiffen. 

Mrs. A. A. J. 
SPANISH CREAM. 

Onedialf box Coxe's gelatine, one quart of milk, yolks of three eggs, 
one small cup of sugar. Soak the gelatine an hour in the milk, put 
on the fire and stir well as it warms. Beat the yolks very light with 
the sugar, add to the scalding milk, and heat to boiling point, stirring 
all the while. Strain through thin muslin or a fine strainer. Dip a 
mould in cold water, pour in the mixture and set on the ice, or in a 
cool place to form. To be eaten with whipped cream, or plain sweet- 
ened cream. Mrs. A. A. J. 
LEMON SPONGE. 

The juice of four lemons, four eggs, two cups sugar, one-half pack- 
age gelatine, one good pint cold water. Soak gelatine two hours in 
one-half cup of the water ; strain juice of lemons in the sugar; beat 
the yolks of eggs and mix them with remainder of the water; add 
sugar and lemons to this and cook until it begins to thicken, then add 
gelatine. Strain this mixture and place in ice water ; when it begins 
to set, add the whites of the eggs. Beat all the time until it begins to 
thicken. Pour in moulds. Eat cold with cream and sugar or custard. 

Mrs. J. F. M. 



36 GEMS FOR THE KITCHEN. 



WINE JELLY. 



One package of gelatine, one pint of cold water, juice of three lem- 
ons. Let stand one hour, then add three pints of boiling water, one 
pint of wine, two pounds of white sugar. Many add a gill of brandy. 

Mrs. M. A. M. 
VELVET CREAM. 

One pint cream (whipped), one teacup white wine, one teacup sugar, 
one ounce gelatine dissolved in a little milk. Stir into this the sugar 
when nearly cold, then the cream, and lastly the wine. Put in mould 
and put on ice. Mrs. L\ M. T. 

PEACH BLANC MANGE. 

Dissolve two-thirds of a box gelatine in one-half pint milk over the 
fire. Peel and seed eight or ten large ripe peaches and press them 
through a sieve, and beat into them very gradually a quart of cream 
with a coffee-cup powdered sugar. When the gelatine is dissolved, 
stir it into the peaches and cream and pour into moulds and set on 
ice. If canned peaches are used, take a pint can with their syrup. 
Eat with sugar and cream. This is excellent. Mrs. J. F. M. 




Pies. 



A NICE RULE FOR PASTRY. 
Three cups flour, one cup lard, little salt, two-thirds cup ice- water, 
makes two pies. 

LEMON PIE. 

Yolks of two eggs, one cup sugar, the juice and grated rind of one 
lemon, one and a half cups cold water, two and a half tablespoonfuls 
of flour, and five tablespoonfuls of water for thickening. Bake until 
done, but not watery. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth and 
stir in three-fourths of a cup sugar, spread over the top and brown in 
the oven. Mrs. J. J. G. 

CREAM PIE. 

One pint of good rich cream, sugar to taste, one tablespoonful of 
vanilla; bake crust first and cool, and beat cream stiff and add sugar 
and vanilla, set on ice to cool ; spread on crust just before ready to 
use. This quantity will make three pies. Mks. It. A. B. 

MOCK CREAM PIE. 

One pint of milk, two eggs, four tablespoons of sugar, two table- 
spoons of flour, a small piece of butter. Flavor to taste. Boil this, 
and pour into a crust already baked ; grate cocoanut (about half an 
inch thick) over the top. Mrs. M. M. S. 

CHARLOTTE RTJSSE. 

One pint cream, flavor and sweeten, using powdered sugar. If the 
cream is not rich enough to whip well, add two tablespoons of gela- 
tine dissolved in a little heated cream. Should the gelatine be used, 
let it stand until cool before adding. Then turn into mould, after 
lining with ladyfingers, or sponge cake. Miss C. W. K. 

DATE PIE. 

One pound of dates, one quart of milk and a little salt. Put dates 
on back of the stove in a little of the milk, and when soft pat through 
colander, and add rest of milk, and bake as custard. This makes two 
pies. Mrs. (}. 8. 



38 GEMS FOR THE KITCHEN. 

* 

MINCE MEAT FOR PIES. 

One bowl finely chopped boiled beef, one bowl chopped suet, two 
bowls apples, one bowl raisins, currants, citron, equal parts (more 
fruit can be added if desired), one third pint brandy, two-thirds pint 
wine, one and one-third pints sugar, one-half pint molasses, one-third 
pint boiled cider, one and a half quarts sour cider, one tablespoonful 
salt, two-thirds tablespoon cloves, one tablespoon cinnamon, two- 
thirds teaspoon mace, half of a nutmeg. Add one bowl full of 
the water the beef was boiled in, as it improves the flavor, the juice 
of one orange, and half of the rind grated. Mix thoroughly, cook 
till the apples are done. Mrs. L. E. 

MOCK MINCE PIE. 

Six soda crackers, rolled fine, two cups cold water, one of molasses, 
one of sugar, one of sour cider, half cup melted butter, one cup raisins, 
chopped, one cup currants, one tablespoon cinnamon, cloves and nut- 
meg, and salt and pepper, two eggs, a wine-glass of brandy. 

Mrs. R. E. S. 
PUMPKIN PIE. 

One cup of stewed pumpkin, one egg, a pint of milk, sugar to taste, 
salt and nutmeg, butter the size of a hickory-nut. This will make one 
pie. Use cinnamon in place of nutmeg, if one likes. 

COCOANUT PIE. 

One-half cocoa nut grated, yolks four eggs, one-half cup sugar, one- 
half tablespoon flour. Then add milk enough to fill your dish, and 
beat all together. When done add beaten whites. Return to oven 

and brown. 

BANANA PIE. 

One banana, grated, one tablespoon corn starch, one coffee-cup rich 
milk, one-half teacup sugar, yolks three eggs. Put on stove and let 
boil. Bake crust first, then put in above, with meringue of the whites 
of the eggs sweetened. Brown. 

MARLBOROUGH PIE. 

Take apple sauce, one egg for each pie, butter and sugar to taste, and 

one cup of milk. Stir well together. Bake without an upper crust. 

Mrs. M. M. S. 
CUSTARD PIE. 

Three eggs, well beaten, piece of butter size of a walnut, enough 
milk to fill an earthen pie-plate (richer the better). Sweeten to taste. 
Flavor with nutmeg. Mrs. J. R. R. 



39 



Fruit pies are made by filling pie with fruit, and sugar to taste. 
Flour dredged over it will prevent juice from running out, Some 
fruits, such as apples or peaches, are improved by putting a little but- 
ter in. Make with top crust, 

Flour dredged on pie tins before putting crust on, will cause pie to 
slip off easily. 

Wet, crust before putting in pie mixture, to prevent juice soaking 
through, with beaten white of an egg. If put on top crust it will give 
it a beautiful brown. 




Cake. 



If oven is too hot for cake, it can be cooled by putting a pan of cold 
water on top rack. It improves sponge cake, as it makes it more 
moist. 

TABLES OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Wheat flour 1 pound of 16 ounces is 1 quart 

Indian meal 1 pound 2 ounces is '" !; 

Butter, when soft 1 pound is " " 

Loaf sugar, broken 1 pound 2 ounces is " " 

Powdered sugar 1 pound is " " 

Best brown sugar 1 pound 2 ounces is " " 

Ten eggs weigh 1 pound 

One pint weighs 8 ounces 

Half a pint " 4 " 

One gill ■ • " 2 

A common tumbler holds £ pint 

Four large tablespoonfuls equal 1 ounce or j gill 

Eight large tablespoonfuls equal 2 ounces or 1 gill 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Ten eggs, one pound of sugar, half pound of flour, rind and juice 
of one lemon. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, four eggs, two cups flour, three-fourths cup boiling 
water ; mix yolks with sugar, add boiling water, then add flour with 
two teaspoonfuls baking powder, lastly whites of eggs. 

Mrs. A. A. B. 
WHITE SPONGE CAKE. 

Whites of eight eggs, one cup flour, one and a half cups sugar, one 
teaspoon cream of tartar, one teaspoon flavoring. Mrs. J. H. C. 

MOLASSES CAKE. 
One cup lard, one cup hot coffee or water, six small cups of flour, 
two cups molasses, one cup sugar, two teaspoons soda, one teaspoon 
salt. ' Miss L. M. 



41 



CREAM CAKE. 
One cup sugar, one tablespoon butter, one egg, one cup sweet milk, 
one large coffeecup flour with two teaspoons baking powder mixed 
in. Flavor to suit taste. This recipe is also nice for layer cake. 

Mrs. O. D. G. 
H ! CKORY-NUT CAKE. 

One and a half cups sugar, one-half cup butter, two and a half cups 
flour, three-fourths cup sweet milk, two teaspoons baking powder, 
whites of four eggs, one cup of hickory nut meats. Always rub flour 
over the meats to prevent their going to the bottom of the dish. 

Mrs. T. C. D. 
MINNEHAHA CAKE. 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup corn starch, two cups flour, 
one cup milk, whites of six e^gs, one-half teaspoon fill soda, one tea- 
spoonful cream tartar, one cup of English walnuts chopped line, one- 
half pound raisins. 

Icing. — White of one egg, one cup of sugar, wet sugar with four 
tablespoonfuls water and boil until like syrup, p >ur on beaten white 
of egg and beat until smooth ; flavor with vanilla. Put the raisins 
and nuts in batter and icing, bake in four layers. Mrs. R. A. B. 

MARBLE CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, three cups flour, one cup butter, one-half cup milk, 
three teaspoonfuls baking powder, whites of seven eggs- 

FOE THE DARK PART. 

One cup butter, one cup molasses, two cups brown sugar, one cup 
sour cream, five cups flour, two tablespoons cinnamon, two tablespoons 
cloves, part of a grated nutmeg, one teaspoon soda in the sour milk. 
Bake in loaves, dip a spoonful white, then dark. Mrs. T. C. D. 

DOLLY VARDEN CAKE. 

One cup sugar, one third cup butter, one-quarter cup milk, one cup 
flour (before sifting), whites of six eggs, quarter of teaspoon soda, 
three-quarters teaspoon cream tartar. Flavor with rosewater. Bake 
half of this plain white, other half, color with quarter teaspoon con- 
fectioner's cochineal. For another layer, use yolks of eggs and flavor. 

Mrs. J. L. B. 
WHITE FRUIT CAKE. 

Whites often eggs, one cup butter, one cup milk, two teaspoonfuis 
baking powder, one pound raisins, one pound citron, one grated 
orange, two cups sugar, two and one half cups flour, one-half cup corn 
starch. Flavor with vanilla. Mrs. U. M.' 



42 GEMS FOR THE KITCHEN. 



DELICATE AND FRUIT CAKE. 

Take four eggs (do not beat whites separately), two cups of sugar, 
one half cup of butter. Beat these together for haif an hour ; add one 
cup of sweet milk, three cups sifted flour, one teaspoon of cream tar- 
tar, half teaspoon ful soda. Divide the batter in halves; add to one 
half of batter, one cup of seeded raisins, one-half cup of currants, one 
teaspoon cinnamon, one grated nutmeg. B.ike in layers. Put togeth- 
er with frosting, alternating the light and dark layers. Flavor the 
the white batter with lemon. Mas. M. D. S. 

ALMOND CREAM CAKE. 

Two cupfuls sugar, one-half cupful butter, three-fourths cupful sweet 
milk, three cupfuls flour, one teaspoonful baking powder, whites of 
six eggs — three layers. 

Cream. — Two eggs, one half cupful sugar, one pint milk, three table- 
spoonfuls corn starch ; boil over teakettle. One-half pound almonds 
blanched and chopped, mixed in cream. Miss S. E. R. 

FRUIT CAKE, OR MRS. JONES'S WEDDING CAKE. 

One and one-fourth pounds batter, one and one-fourth pounds brown 
sugar, one and one-fourth pounds flour, fourteen eggs, one-half pint 
brandy, one-half pint molasses, a little vanilla and rosewater, spices 
of all kinds, six pounds raisins, four pounds currants (three will do), 
three pounds citron, two pounds figs, two pounds almonds, two oranges, 
juice and grated rind, one lemon, juice and grated rind. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

Eighteen eggs, one and one-half pounds sugar, one and one-half pounds 
butter, one and onedialf pounds flour, one and one-half pounds citron, 
four and one-half pounds raisins (or two and one-half pounds raisins and 
two pounds figs), four andone-half pounds currants (ortwoandone half 
pounds currants and two pounds dates), one and one-half cups mo- 
lasses, one and one-half teaspoons soda, one quart brandy, spices to 
taste. Very nice. Mrs. D. M. T. 

ORANGE CAKE. 

One and one-half cups sugar, two cupsflour, one-half cup cold water, 
yolks of five eggs and the whites of two, the rind and juice of one 
orange, two level teaspoonfuls of baking powder. For frosting to put 
between the layers, use the whites of two eggs, juice and grated rind 
of one orange, and sugar to make it stiff. It is necessary to use con- 
siderable sugar because of the sourness of the orange. Mrs. J. S. B. 



CAKE. 4:'. 

IMPERIAL CAKE. 

One pound butter, one pound sugar, one pound flour, twelve eggs, 
one pound stoned raisins, three-fourths pounds citron, one pound 
blanched almonds, one nutmeg, wineglass of wine. Miss S. E. R. 

LITTLE POUND CAKES, 

One and one-fourth cups flour, one cup sugar, one-half cup butter, 
four eggs, one teaspoonful baking powder, two teaspoontuls cream. 

Mrs. U. M. 
WHITE CAKE. 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup sweet milk, two cups flour, 
one cup corn starch, three teaspoons baking powder, whites of seven 
eggs well beaten. Flavor with lemon or bitter almonds. Mix flour, 
corn starch and baking powder thoroughly together. Mrs. D. M. T. 

WHITE CAKE. 

One cup of sugar, half cup of butter, two-thirds cup of sweet milk, 
two cups flour, whites of four eggs, two teaspoons baking powder, sift 
flour and baking powder four times, stir long as possible. 

Mrs. R. E. S. 
MOLASSES CAKES. 

Four cups flour, three-fourths cup sugar, one cup molasses, one cup 
sour milk, one-half cup butter, two eggs, one tablespoon saleratus, 
one teaspoon each ginger, cinnamon, cloves. If you have sour cream 
use one and a half cups instead of sour milk and butter ; in this case 
use a little more saleratus and a little salt. Mrs. O. M. S. 

SPICE CAKE. 

One cup butter, two cups brown sugar, one-half cup molasses, four 
e<,'gs. one cup buttermilk and one teaspoon soda ; (sweet milk may 
be used instead of buttermilk, in which case use two teaspoons cream 
tartar in flour) three cups flour, one cup raisins, one-half cup 
currants, spices to taste, cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg. 

Mrs. M. A. T. 

CHOCOLATE LOAF CAKE. 

One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, two and one-half cups of flour, 
one cup of sour milk, one teaspoon of soda dissolved in a little boiling 
water, rive eggs beaten separately, grate one-half cake of baker's 
chocolate and stir in just before the flour. Bake also in layers if de- 
sired, and put together with boiled frosting. 



4-i GEMS FOR THE KITCHEN. 



POUND CAKE. 
One pound of sugar, one pound of butter, one pound of flour, 
eight eggs; beat yolks and whites separately, until very light ; half 
a cup of sweet milk, one teaspoon of baking powder. Flavor to taste. 

Mrs. J. O. F. 
CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

One cup of sugar, two and one-half cups of flour, three-fourth cup 
of milk, one-half cup of butter, two eggs, three teaspoons of baking 
powder. One-half cup of milk, one-half cake of chocolate, one cup of 
sugar, yolk of one egg. Boil this until it thickens; then stand till 
cool, after making cake, stir this in the last thing and bake. Bake in 
lour layers and put together with frosting. Mrs. M. D. S. 

FEDERAL CAKE. 

One pound butter, one and one-half pounds sugar, one and one-half 
pounds flour, eight eggs, one coffee-cup of sour cream, one teaspoon of 
soda, one wine-glass of wine, two nutmegs, rind and juice of one 
lemon, fruit as you like. Mrs. M. J. L. 

LOAF CAKE. 

Four cups of light raised dough, two cups of sugar, three eggs, one 
cup of butter, nutmeg and raisins. Let it get light before baking. 

Miss L. S. 
COFFEE CAKE. 

Two cups of sugar, one of butter, four eggs, one cup of molasses, 
one cup of strong cold coffee, one teaspoon soda in coffee, five cups of 
flour, one teaspoon each of cloves and cinnamon, one nutmeg, one 
pound of raisins. Miss L. S. 

COCOANUT LOAF CAKE. 

One-half coffee-cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three tea-cups of 
flour, three even teaspoons of baking powder, one tea-cup of milk, 
whites of four eggs,one cocoanut grated — save one handful to sprinkle 
over outside with frosting or powdered sugar ; add the rest to the 
cake, first adding to the cocoanut one-half cup of the flour and two 
tablespoonfuls of the beaten whites of eggs. Stir the cake as little as 
possible after adding the cocoanuts. Mrs. L. E. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

Three eggs, two cups sugar, one pint sweet milk, about four quarts 
flour, and one heaping teaspoon of Royal Baking Powder, or two even 
teaspoons to one quart of flour. Mrs. W. R. S. 



45 



WEDGE CAKE. 

Whites of five egg?, two cups of sugar, two and one-half of flour, 
one cup of sweet milk, three-fourths cup of butter, three teaspoons of 
baking powder, flavor with vanilla; bake in layers; put icing, al- 
monds, raisins, and cocoanut between layers; one-half pound of 
shelled almonds split and laid close in icing, one full cup of raisins, 
and one cocoanut , make the right proportions. Mrs. W. M. M. 

TIT-TAT-TOE CAKE. 

Beat four eggs very light, then add a cream made by beating two 
cups and a half of sugar and half a cup of butter, one cup of sweet 
milk, a large pinch of salt, three teaspoonfuls baking powder stirred 
in with two cups and a half of flour; divide the dough thus made in 
three parts ; to one part add half a cup of raisins, stoned and chopped, 
and half a cup of currants; grate half a teaspoonful of nutmeg and 
mix with half a teaspoonful of cinnamon. This is for one layer of the 
cake. To the next part add two tablespoonfuls grated chocolate and 
a teaspoonful vanilla. The one light colored layer should be flavored 
with lemon. When baked put the chocolate layer on the bottom, the 
one with fruit next, and the light layer on top. Put together with 
icing and frost the top. Miss H. M. K. 

LEMON JELLY CAKE. 

Two tablespoonfuls butter, two cups of sugar, half cup of water, two 
cups of flour, two teaspoonfuls baking powder, four eggs, white of one 
for icing. For the jelly use grated rind and juice of a lemon, one cup 
of sugar, one cup of hot water, two spoons corn starch, small piece of 
butter. Mrs. R. E. S. 

ICE CREAM CAKE. 

One cupful butter, two cupfuls sugar, one cupful milk, two and one- 
half cupfuls Dayton's flour, one-half cupful corn starch, two teaspoon- 
fuls baking powder, whites of eight eggs. 

Icing. — Pour three-fourths cupful cold water on three cupfulsgranu- 
lated sugar ; boil until of a consistency to drop from a spoon ; then 
pour slowly into the beaten whites of three eg^s. Beat continually 
until cold ; should then be thick so that it will not run when spread 
on cake. Add one teaspoonful of dissolved citric acid during the 
beating. Miss S. E. R. 

The same cake and icing can be used for Orange, Cocoanut, Choco- 
late, Banana and Fig cake, by spreading these fruits with the icing. 
Figs should be boiled in a little water before using. 



46 GEMS FOK THE KITCHEN. 



RAISED DOUGHNUTS. 

One pint milk, scalded and let cool, one- half cup of butter, one cup 
of sugar, one egg, one-half cup of yeast. Stir in flour enough to make 
a sponge like bread sponge; let it stand all night. In the morning 
mix the same as bread. Let it stand in a warm place about an bour, 
then roll in a sheet and cut in small pieces. Let it stand near the 
tire a little while, then fry in hot lard. Mbs. T. C. D. 

GINGER SNAPS. 
Three eggs, two cups butter, or one lard and one butter, two cups 
brown sugar, two teaspoons ginger, one teaspoon cloves, cinnamon 
and allspice, two cups molasses, two tablespoons vinegar, two heaping 
teaspoons t-aleratus. Miss M. E. S. 

GINGER SNAPS. 
Two coffee-cups molasses, one coffee-cup sour cream, twelve table- 
spoons of butter (melted), twelve tablespoons of lard (melted), ten 
tablespoons brown sugar, two tablespoons of soda, two tablespoons of 
ginger, half a cup of cinnamon, quarter of a cup cloves, one nutmeg. 
Flour not to exceed five and one half cups, as the mixture must be 
oft and very thin to be an improvement on the ordinary ginger 
snaps. If properly made they will keep like fruit cake. Very rich. 

Mrs. W. M. M. 
GINGER SNAPS. 

Three eggs, one cup sugar, three cups molasses, two cups shortening 
two tablespoonfuls soda, one tablespoonful ginger. Mrs. W. K. M. 

SUGAR COOKIES. 

The yolks of four eggs, one cup of butter, two cups of sugar, half a 
cup of sour cream, one teaspoon of soda. Roll in sugar, and bake. 
Very good with sour milk, instead of cream. 

LEMON SNAPS. 

Beat to a cream one cup of butter with two of sugar, add two eggs> 
the grated rind and juice of a lemon, a scant teaspoonful of soda dis- 
solved in two tablespoonfuls of sweet milk. Knead very stiff with 
flour, and roll thin. Miss H. S. M. 

CINNAMON COOKIES. 

One half pound of butter, one pound of flour, one pound of light 
brown sugar, two eggs, one tablespoonful of cinnamon. Mix butter 
and sugar together, then the eggs, lastly the flour with cinnamon in 
it. Do not roll, but take piece of dough, flatten with the hand quite 
thin, and cut the size you wish. Miss A. M. G. 



47 



IIICKORY-XUT MACAROONS. 



One cup hickory-nut meats, one eerg, oue cup of brown sugar, one 
cup (scant) of flour. Mix thoroughly, and drop in spoonfuls on tins 
and bake carefully as they scorch easily. Mrs. A. A. J. 

CRULLERS. 

Four etrgs, four tablespoons of butter, four tablespoons of sugar, 
Hour to thicken, a very little nutmeg. Cut in fancy shapes, and fry 
in hot lard. Mrs. A. M. M. 

(REAM PUFFS. 

Six ounces of flour, four ounces of butter, one-half pint of water, 
five eggs. Boil butter and water together, while boiling stir in the 
flour. Beat yolks of the eggs very light, whites very stiff; then when 
the flour, butter and water are milk warm, beat the eggs into it and 
bake in dripping pan, three inches apart. Bake slowly, but have the 
oven rather tiot. Bake until they sound hollow. 

Custard for the Above. —One and one half pint of rich milk, three 
eggs, one-half tea-cup of flour, one tea cup of sugar, grated rind of one 
lemon. Save out one tea-cup of milk, in which put the beaten eggs 
flour, sugar and lemon. Stir this in the boiling milk. 

Mrs. A. H. M. 
CHOCOLATE MACAROONS. 

Two cups grated chocolate, whites of five eegs, two cups pulverized 
sugar, two tablespoons of ground cinnamon. Mrs. A. A. B. 

DROP CAKES. 

One cup of butter, three cups of sugar, Ave cups of flour, three egi'S, 
beaten light, one cup of sweet milk, one teaspoon of soda, two tea- 
spoons of cream tartar ; drop on tins and bake quickly. Very nice. 

Mrs. C. E. P. 
JUMBLES. 

One cup of butter, a small piece of lard, two cups of sugar, four 
eggs, separate and beat well, one-half cup of sour cream, one small 
teaspoon of soda in cream, one full teaspoon of cream tartar in flour. 
After they are cut ready to bake, dip them in powdered sugar, a little 
nutmeg. Miss 0. M. 



Preserves and Pickles. 



CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

Wash and pour boiling water over the cucumbers, and a tablespoon 
of salt. Nt'X.t day, boil the same water, and pour over again. Third 
day, soak them in fresh warm water two hours, then put them where 
they will dry slowly, then in weak vinegar four or five days, then in 
spiced vinegar. Mks. A. M. M. 

YELLOW PICKLES. 

Two gallons of vinegar, one-half pound of ground mustard, one- 
quarter pound of cloves, one-quarter pound of allspice, one- 
quarter pound of tumeric, two ounces of mace, two ounces of nutmeg, 
five pounds of sugar, two ounces of red pepper, one-quarter pound of 
celery seed, one pound of black mustard seed, one pound of white 
mustard seed, one pound of white ginger ; small white onions and 
garlic to taste. Brine them the same as any pickles. M. A. M. 

MUSTARD PICKLES. 

Take equal quantities of small cucumbers, sliced green tomatoes, 
cauliflowers and small button onions, cover with brine for twenty-four 
hours. Pour off the brine and scald, dissolve in it a bit of alum the 
size of a nutmeg, ana pour the boiling brine ov*>r the pickles ; when 
cold drain thoroughly, and prepare as much vinegar as there were 
quarts of brine. To one quart of vinegar, one cup of brown sugar, 
half a cup of flour, and one-fourth pound of ground mustard, mix 
these with the boiling vinegar, and stir until smooth, then pour over 
the pickles. H. S. M. 

REGENT PICKLE. 

Eight quarts of chopped cabbage, four quarts of tomatoes, four large 
onions, one tea-cup of celery, one large red pepper, three tablespoons 
of ground mustard, three tablespoons of black pepper, one handful of 
allspice whole, one handful of salt, one gill of mustard seed, three 
pints of vinegar, one pound of sugar. Let it come to a boil. Pack in 
jars, and let it stand some time before using. Mrs. J. F. K. 



PEESERVES AND PICKLES. 4'.' 



CUCUMBER SWEET PICKLES. 

Take ripe cucumbers, pare, seed, and cut in strips lengthwise. Soak 
over night in salt and water, drain, and put into weak vinegar fur 
twenty-four hours. Drain well and boii until clear in a syrup made 
of equal parts of sugar and vinegar, with spices to taste. 

Mrs. D. M. T. 

GREEN TOMATO PICKLES. 

Slice tomatoes at night. Put in colander, with salt between each 
layer, and drain until morning. Then heat vinegar and sugar. Put 
in the tomatoes, and cook till done. Can hot, and put a '>ag of spices 
in each can. Mrs. A. M. M. 

CHOW CHOW. 

One quart large cucumbers peeled and cut into slices hall' an inch 
thick, one quart small cucumbers, one quart small onions (silver), one 
quart green tomatoes, sliced, one large cauliflower, six green peppers, 
quartered. Put in a weak brine for twenty-four hours, scald in same, 
water and drain. 

Mcstard. — Six tablespoonfuls mustard, one tablespoonful tumeric 
one and one-half cupfuls brown sugar, one cupful flour. Mix, and add 
two quarts vinegar. Scald a few moments, stirring constantly. Turn 
over pickles. Mrs. E. W. H. 

PEICALILLI. 

One peck green tomatoes, chopped fine and put in a jar with salt for 
twelve hours. Press in a bag for twelve hours. Add after pressing 
one quarter pound of black and one-quarter pound of white whole 
mustard, some celery seed, tw T o ounces of whole black pepper, one- 
quarter pound allspice, one-half box of mustard mixed in vinegar, one 
dozen green peppers put in the last thing. Put all, well covered with 
vinegar, in a stone jar. A little horseradish is some improvement. 

Mrs. C. M. P. 
PICKLED BUTTERNUTS. 

Gather the butternuts while they are tender enough to be easily 
pierced by a pin, which is generally not later than the 4th of July. 
Select those that are perfect, free from stings of insects and other de- 
fects, and pour over them some weak lye, boiling hot, and let them 
remain in the same a half an hour. Wash them thoroughly, and put 
into weak brine for three or four days. Then put them in the best 
cider vinegar with plenty of spices, where they must remain for some 
time before fit for use. Mrs D'A. (>. 



50 GEMS FOR THE KITCHEN. 



MADE MUSTARD. 

One tablespounful of mustard, one tablespoonful of sugar, one tea- 
spoonful of salt, one and one half wineglasses of vinegar, one egg. Let 
come to a boil. Miss L. M. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

Boil one bushel ripe tomatoes until perfectly soft (I always cut them 
into small piece*), squeeze them through a fine wire sieve (the flour 
sifter will answer), scrape all the pulp from the under side of the sieve 
(keeping out the seeds), add one-half gallon vinegar, one pint of salt, 
two ounces of cloves, one quarter pound allspice, a little cinnamon 
(just a few sticks), a lew blades of mace, one scant tablespoon red 
pepper, a handful of black pepper (whole), one onion chopped fine, 
or two, if you like the taste (or garlic, if you prefer it); add a little 
celery seed. Boil until reduced one half; take out the spice before 
bottling, as it gives the catsup a bitter taste if left in. Bottle when 
entirely cold. Put in uholc spices, because the ground makes the cat- 
sup very dark. Mrs. P. A. (■}. 
TOMATO SAUCE. 

One quart of ripe tomatoes (fresh or canned) thoroughly cooked 
and highly seasoned, with butter, pepper, salt, cloves, allspice, and if 
you have it, parsley. When cooked, strain through a sieve, and just 
before using add a little flour w^t with cold water; boil once. A very 
nice sauce for chops or beef steak. Miss A. D. 

TOMATO MUSTARD (FROM TORONTO). 

One bushel ripe tomatoes, peeled, four large onions; boil two hours 
and strain through a colander; salt to suit taste. One-quarter pound 
white mustard seed (washed), four large red peppers. Tie in a mus- 
lin cloth one ounce ground cloves, three grated nutmegs, one ounoe 
ground ginger. Boil four or five hours until quite thick. When dune 
add one-quarter pound of ground mustard, mixed with one cup of 
vinegar. Bottle while hot in heated bottles. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

One peck of ripe tomatoes, measured by the quart, after they are 
peeled and cut up. Stew an hour, then add three pints of vinegar, 
one pound of brown sugar, one ounce of cloves, one of cinnamon, one 
of allspice, one quart of onions, one red pepper, chopped fine, horse- 
radish to taste, one teacup of salt, one teaspoon of ground mustard, 
one teaspoon black pepper, one ounce of celery seed. Boil one hour, 
and cork tight. Mrs. J. F. K. 



PRESERVES AND PICKLES. 51 



HIG-DUM. 

One half bushel of green tomatoes, <>ne dozen onions, six grenn or 
red peppers, one pint of horse-radish, grated, one cabbage, chopped 

fine, one pint of salt sprinkled over and let stand over night. Then 
draw off the brine, cover with vinegar, and cook two hours. Then 
pour off and put on fresh vinegar with this mixture : Two pounds of 
brown sugar, one tablespoonful of cloves, two tablespoonfuls of cinna- 
mon, one-half cup of ground mustard. When this is boiling hot pour 
over the whole. Pack in a jar; cover tight. Mks. T. C. D. 

PRESERVED CITRON. 

Pare and cut citron into one half inch cubes, picking out all seed. 1 -. 
To one pound of citron, two fresh lemons, and sugar equal to weight 
of lemons and citron. Boil the citron in clear water until very tender, 
skim out, and to same water add sugar, then boil till thick syrup. Cut 
the lemons in halves and boil in a very little water twenty minutes, 
then squeeze and strain the juice and water. Add the citron to the 
syrup and only let boil fifteen minutes ; also add the lemon- water ten 
minutes before taking off. The citron toughens if cooked longer. 

Mrs. J. J. G. 
APPLE JAM. 

Weigh equal quantities of brown sugar and sour apples, pare, core, 
and chop fine. Make a good clear syrup of the sugar, add the apples, 
the juice and grated rind of three lemons and a few pieces of white 
ginger. Boil until the apples are clear and yellow. This resembles 
foreign sweetmeats. Miss C. M. 

FOR SPICING FRUIT. 

Prepare fruit as for canning. Weigh and put in stone crock. To 
seven pounds fruit take three pounds suyar and one pint vinegar, also 
spices preferred. Scald and turn over fruit seven mornings ; the last 
time heat fruit and all, and put in jars. 

PIGS' FOOT JELLY. 

Thoroughly singe, scrape and wash the pig's feet. Put in a kettle 
to boil ; boilintr until the meat will leave the bones. Take the meat 
and bones from the kettle leaving the liquid. Separate the bones from 
the meat and chop it fine. Return the meat to the liquid, season with 
pepper and salt, and if you like a little vinegar. Put into moulds and 
the jelly will be ready for use the next day, after taking off the fat 
that will come to the top. This must be kept in a cool place. 

Mrs. A. D. A. 



52 GEMS FOR THE KITCHEN. 



FOR PRESERVING PLUMS. 

Prick fruit with fork and lay in a .stone jar. Make a rich syrup of 
three-fourths pound sugar to one pound plums and pour over fruit 
while hot. Let stand in a cool place until next morning, drain off 
syrup and heat again, pouring back over plums. Repeat this for three 
mornings. The fourth morning heat plums and syrup to boiling point, 
and can. This manner of canning preserves the fruit whole. 

Mrs. D. M. T. 
SPICED CURRANTS. 

Five pounds currants, four pounds sugar, one pint vinegar, two ta- 
blespoonfuls cloves, two tablespoonfuls cinnamon. Boil together, after 
stripping the currants, until quite thick, or two or three hours. 

Mrs. R. A. M. 

RED CURRANTS PUT UP WITH ORANGES AND RAISINS. 

Three fourths pound sugar to one pound currants. Allow two pounds 
of raisins and six oranges to ten pounds currants. Let currants cook 
for twenty minutes, then add raisins (use best raisins), cook a little 
longer and add sugar. Let it come to a boil, and just before taking 
off stove add oranges. Peel the oranges and separate into parts, taking 
care to remove all the seeds. Mrs. D. M. T. 

CURRANT JELLY. 

Jam the currants and put in a pan on the stove until heated through, 
then strain and measure the juice and boil just five minutes ; have 
the sugar in the oven at the same time, heating (one pound of sugar 
to a pound of juice), then put the sugar in the juice and boil just one 
minute. Make only a small quantity at a time. Mrs. M. D. S. 

STEWED CRANBERRIES. 

One pound of cranberries, w T asbed and picked over, one pound of 
granulated sugar, half a pint of water. Put the water and sugar on 
the stove to boil, stir constantly ; when boiling hot put in the cran- 
berries, stir until well cooked, which will be about ten minutes after 
all commences to boil. Mrs. B. M. 

TO CAN TOMATOES WHOLE. 

Scald and peel smooth even sized tomatoes, and put as many as jar 
will hold in kettle with enough water to keep from burning. Cover 
kettle that they may steam. Turn each tomato over when partly 
heated through, and when thoroughly heated, place carefully in can 
and fill up with stewed tomatoes. These can be eaten cold as raw 
tomatoes. Mrs. G. S. 



PRESERVES AND TICKLES. 53 

QUINCE HONEY. 

One grated quince, one pound sugar, and one half pint water. Have 
quince grated and put all in at once, and be careful not to boil long 
enough to thicken too much. Do but one quince at a time. 

Mrs. G. S. 

BRANDY PEACHES. 

Leave fruit whole and do them same as canned peaches, leaving 
enough room at top of jar for several spoons of brandy or white wine. 
They can be filled up entirely with brandy instead of syrup, if wanted 
so strong. 

GRAPE CATSUP. 

Five pounds of ripe grapes, boil and strain through a colander, two 
and one-half pounds of brown sugar, one pint of vinegar, one table- 
spoon of cloves, one tablespoon of pepper, one tablespoon of cinna- 
mon, one tablespoon of allspice, one-half tablespoon of salt. Boil 
until thick as ordinary catsup. Mrs. T. C. D. 



*^¥^ 



Confectionery. 



CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

One cup of chocolate, three cups of sugar, one cup of molasses, one 
cup of milk, one tablespoon of cinnamon, butter size of an egg. Stir 
often while cooking, and after it is done, beat well. It is cooked when 
it is a little crisp in water. 

OLD FASHIONED CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

One cupful of chocolate, one cupful of sugar, one cupful of molasses 
one-half cup of milk, piece of butter size of a walnut. Try in water 
the same as molasses candy. 

CREAM CARAMELS. 

One-half pound baker's chocolate, one and one-half pounds of 
sugar, tablespoonful of butter, one teacupful of rich cream. Cook all 
together until the mixture candies, boiling hard twenty minutes ; stir 
all the time ; flavor with vanilla. Put half of this in a buttered bread 
tin and set away to harden. For next layer : Three cupfuls of sugar, 
one cupful of cream, mix and boil twenty minutes, taking great care 
not to scorch. Flavor with juice and rind of a lemon. Beat con- 
stantly until cold and almost stiff. Put on layer of chocolate. Then 
moisten with milk the chocolate left in stew pan and warm up, pour 
over the rest for a top layer. Miss S. E. R. 

COCOA NUT CREAM CANDY. 

Or.ecocoanut grated, one and one-half pounds granulated sugar. 
Put the milk of the cocoanut and sugar together and heat slowly until 
the sugar is melted ; then boil for five minutes slowly ; add the cocoa- 
nut and boil for ten minutes longer, stirring constantly to keep from 
burning. Then stir until quite cool and pour on butter plates and cut 
in squares. Mrs. R. E. S. 

CREAM WALNUTS. . 

Make cream as directed into balls, and place a half nut on either 
side of the ball. 



CONFECTIONERY. 



55 



BUTTER SCOTCH. 

Nine tablespoons of brown sugar, five tablespoons of water, three 
t iblespoons of molasses, two tablespoons of vinegar, one tablespoon 
of butter. Boil until brittle in water, and just before taking from the 
stove stir in a little soda. Flavor with vanilla or lemon. 

Mrs. A. A. B. 

BUTTER SCOTCH. 

Two cups of sugar, two tablespoonfuis of water, piece of butter size 
of an egg. Boil without stirring until it hardens on a spoon. Pour 
out on buttered plates to cool. Mrs. M. D. S. 

CREAM CANDY. 

One pound white sugar, three tablespoonfuis vinegar, one teaspoon- 
ful Royal Extract Lemon, one teaspoonful cream tartar. Add little 
water to moisten sugar, boil until brittle. Put in extract, then turn 
quickly out on buttered plates. When cool, pull until white, and cut. 
in squares. Mrs. M. D. S. 

MOLASSES CANDY. 

Two cups New Orleans molasses and one cup sugar. Grease a ket- 
tle well ; put molasses and sugar in this over the Ere, stir constantly 
for about twenty minutes— it should boil twenty minutes. When done 
add small one-half teaspoon soda. While still foaming pour into tins 
and set away to cool. Pull or not, as you choose. This candy is very 
nice poured over hickory-nut meats. 

FRENCH VANILLA CREAM. 

Break into a bowl the white of one or more eggs, as the quantity 
you wish to make may require ; add to it an equal quantity of cold 
water, then stir in XXX powdered or confectioner's sugar until you 
have it stiff enough to mold with the fingers. Flavor with vanilla to 
taste. After it is formed into balls, lay them upon plates or waxed 
paper and set them aside to dry. This cream is the foundation of all 
French creams. Miss A. M. G. 

CREAM FIGS. 

Wash and dry figs. Open each half and till with paste. 

EVERETT TAFFY. 

Four pounds A sugar, one teaspoonful cream tartar, three-quarters 
pound butter, two grated lemons, and molasses enough to color. Boil 
to a very hard wax. Mrs. W. F. D. 



•">() GEMS FOR THE KITCHEN. 



PEPPERMINT DROPS. 

Boil sugar to wax, and then grain in dipper by beating; add oil of 
peppermint, then add sugar to thicken. Drop on tin. 

Mrs. W. F. D. 
WHITE CREAM CHEWING CANDY. 

To five pounds A sugar, ODe teaspoonful cream tartar, one-half tea- 
cupful water. Boil high, so as to break with fingers. When cold enough, 
pull until white, then add flavoring. Mrs. W. F. D. 



Drinks. 



COFFEE. 

Two heaping tablespoons of coffee to a pint of water. Mix the coffee 
with half an egg and little cold water. Put in coffee-pot, pour boiling 
water over it, let. boil a few minutes, pour in a little cold water, and 
let stand on back of stove a few moments. 

CHOCOLATE. 

Six tablespoons baker's chocolate, scraped ; pour one pint of cold 
water on, let it come to a boil, add milk to make as thick as you wish, 
and let it come to a boil again. Use whites of eggs, beaten stiff, or 
whipped cream, as you serve. 

GEAPE WINE. 

Pick the grapes over and jam them ; do not break the seeds, for 
they make the wine bitter. Let them stand, covered with a woolen 
cloth, for a week or ten days, or until they begin to ferment. Stir 
every day. Then strain, and to four quarts of juice add one quart of 
water and three pounds sugar. In November, to about thirty gallons 
of wine add the whites of two dozen eggs, well beaten. Bottle before 
the March winds. Mks. M. D. S. 

BLACKBERRY WINE. 

Measure the berries, and bruise them to every gallon adding one 
quart of boiling water. Let the mixture stand twenty-four hours, stir- 
ring it occasionally, then strain off the liquor into a cask or jug, adding 
to every gallon two pounds of sugar. Leave open to work, and when 
through, bottle, and seal. Six quarts of berries make three and a 
half quarts of juice. 

• RASPBERRY VINEGAR. 

To every four quarts raspberries, allow one pint of good vinegar ; 
let them stand over night. The next day strain and allow one pound 
of sugar to every pint of the juice. Boil about half an hour, skim 
well, bottle and cork tight. This will keep for years. Bins. P. A. G. 



58 



ELDERBERRY BLOSSOM WINE. 



One quart elderberry blossoms picked from the stem, one gallon 
water, three pounds sugar. When cold, add juice of a large lemon 
and one tablespoonful of yeast well stirred in. Ferment three days 
in a stone jar covered with a woolen cloth ; strain and add one ounce 
of isinglass to every six gallons. Put in the cask one pound of raisins 
(cat in half) to every gallon wine. Bottle in six months. When com- 
pleted it costs about ninety cents per gallon, and is the best home- 
made wine one can make. Miss S. E. R. 

EGG-NOG. 

Six eggs, one-half pound sugar, one-half pint brandy or whisky, 
three pints cream, whipped to a froth. Beat yolks eggs and sugar 
light ; add liquor ; next whites of eggs, beaten ; then cream. 

Mrs. R. A. M. 

SYRUP FOR SODA WATER. 

Five pounds white sugar, whites of five eggs, one-quarter pound tar- 
taric acid, one-half ounce wintergreen or lemon, two quarts boiling 
water. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, mix them with the 
sugar, add the acid, then the boiling water. When cool flavor. Two 
tablespoonfuls in a glass of water, and a little soda, make a very 
pleasant drink. Mrs. T. C. D. 



For the Sick. 



PANADA. 

Put into a bowl one tablespoon of sugar, one small salt-spoon of salt a 
very small bit of butter, a bint of nutmeg, a small handful of little 
crackers, or little squares of toast. Pour over this about one-half pint 
of boiling water and add enough whisky to flavor nicely. 

Mrs. D. M. T. 
MEAT BALLS FOR INVALIDS. 
Scrape fibers of raw beef, uiix with an egg, and fry quickly, in a 
greased spider. Salt and pepper. Mks. A. M. M. 

BLACKBERRY CORDIAL. 

To sixteen quarts of blackberries well mashed, add four ounces of 
allspice, two ounces of cinnamon, two ounces of cloves. Mix and 
boil slowly until properly done. Strain and to each pint of the syrup 
add one pound of loaf sugar. Boil again for ten or fifteen minutes, 
and when cold add two quarts of good brandy. Mrs. O. M. S. 

MILK PUNCH. 

A glass of new milk, two or three teaspoons of brandy, and a little 
sugar. 

FOR BOWEL COMPLAINT. 

Two ounces syrup of rhubarb, one-half ounce of laudanum, one- 
quarter ounce of camphor, six drops of turpentine. Ten or twelve 
drops every two hours in sweetened water until improvement is 
noticeable and decrease gradually. For a child a year old 

Mrs. C. P. W. 

WINE WHEY. 

One pint of milk, let it come to a boil, then add a wineglass of wine 
and a little salt. When it thickens, strain it through a cloth, and 
sweeten to taste. 

CHICKEN BROTH. 

Boil a chicken till tender, take out the broth, season with salt and 
pepper. 



60 OEMS FOR THE KITCHEN. 



BEEF TEA. 

Take one pound of lean beef (round stake) and mince it. Put it 
with its juice into au earthen vessel, or glass can, in a kettle of water. 
Let it stand for an hour on the back of the stove, strain well, squeez- 
ing all the juice from the meat. Place en the fire and let it come to 
a boil, stirring briskly all the time, then salt and pepper. Stir before 
using. Miss M. A. D. 

CORN MEAL GRUEL. 

Two tablespoons of meal, wet up with a little cold water, pour over 
it a pint of boiling water ; boil fifteen or twenty minutes, stirring con- 
stantly. Salt to taste. 

EGG-NOG. 

Two eggs, yolks and sugar, beaten together. Add the brandy (four 
teaspoonsful) to the yolks and sugar ; then add the stiffly beaten 
whites, and two cups of milk. This will make two glasses. 

Mrs. A. M. M. 
FOR A COUGH. 

A cup of water on half a cup of gum arabic, melt, then sweeten 
and bottle it. When needed, take part of a wine glass and fill it up 
with rum. 



Miscellaneous. 



HELPS FOR MOTHERS. 

TO CUKE EARACHE. 

Sweet oil and laudanum heated quickly in a spoon over a gas jet or 
lamp and put on a little piece of cotton and inserted in the ear, will 
soon cure a sudden earache. Always cover the cotton with a fine, thin 
piece of linen or muslin, as the fuzz will get in the ear, and if applied 
often, will cause deafness. If the pain continues, a small dose of syrup 
of ipecac will relieve it. From ten to twenty drops— not enough to 
be an emetic. 

FOR A TEETHING CHILD. 

Do not forget to give it at least one teaspoonful of water every day. 
When restless at night a few swallows of water may be just what is 
needed, and he will soon drop to sleep. If his skin is hot and dry, 
sponge him off with warm water containing a little soda, and it will 
have a soothing effect. 

FOR COLD IN CHEST AND WHEEZING OF THE BRONCHIAL TUBES. 

Cut a piece of old soft muslin in the shape of a bih and haste cotton 
on this and let the child wear it next the skin over the cbest, pinning 
it to the undergarment with nursery pins. Make a number of these , 
and when one is soiled replace with a clean one. When warmer 
weather comes and you wish to remove them, do so gradually by cut- 
ting a little off each day. Goose grease on chest is also good, but I 
never knew anything work so like a charm as the cotton batting did 
after a month of whooping-cough and severe colds. Mrs. E. 0. M. 

WASHING FLUID. 

One-half ounce salts of tartar, one-half ounce of ammonia, one half 
ounce of borax, one box of concentrated lye. Pour over this mixture 
one gallon of boiling water. (Keep it in a jug.) To three pails of hot 
water use one-half teacup of this fluid. Let the clothes boil twenty 
minutes in this, after having stood a few minutes in cold water. Rub 
through one water, and rinse them. This fluid will not injure the 
clothes. Miss C. W. K. 



62 GEMS FOR THE KITCHEN. 



CAMPHOR ICE. 

A cake of white wax melted with camphor gum (as much as will 
dissolve) and a few drops sweet oil. When melted together mould iu 
dishes. When it is cold, it is ready to use, and is a very pure, nice ice 
for many purposes. Mrs. T. C. D. 

TO TAKK OUT MILDEW. 

Dissolve two ounces chloride of lime in one quart of boiling water, 
then add three quarts cold water, strain this through cloth. Soak mil- 
dewed spots four or five hours, and rinse thoroughly. 

TO SET BLACK DYE IN STOCKINGS. 

One tablespoon turpentine to one quart water; soak in mixture 
for about three hours ; rinse thoroughly. 

TO GET RID OF ANTS. 

Charred eggshells laid on shelves (or wherever ants are) will ex- 
terminate the ants in a short time. Camphor will answer same pur- 
pose. Miss A. D. 
GLOVE CLEANER. 

One quart of deodorized benzine, one dram of sulphuric ether, one 
dram of chloroform, one dram of oil of wintergreen, two drams of 
alcohol. 

PICKLE FOR HAM. 

Rub the hams well with salt, then pack in tub. To one hundred 
pounds take four gallons of water, seven pounds of salt ; boil well and 
skim, when cold, add four ounces of saltpetre, one pint of molasses, 
and one pound of brown sugar, boil and skim. When cold put over 
the meat, and if not enough, add water to cover. Weight them heavy 
enough to keep them under the brine from four to six weeks. 

TO PREVENT THE SMELL OF BOILED CABBAGE. 

Take a piece of bread, tie it up in a cloth, and place on top of the 
cabbage, while it is boiling. 



I 




— r-~ FACTS == 
i JO you will always find goods as 
recommended, one price to all, 
and that price the lowest; agree- 




able clerks, and to sum it up, Dyer's is the place to buy 
DRY GOODS and MILLINERY in Towanda. 

No. 2 Pattons Block. M. E. DYER. 



Artists' Materials 




L. B. COBURN, 



DEALER IN 



*&i iW^ 



'U 



HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS, &c, 

425 MAIN ST, TO WANDA, PA. 

THE BEST PLACE TO BUY YOUR 

BOOTS and SHOES 






Codding and Russell Block, - Towanda, Pa. 



*W>mM M. ?M< 



m ft! 



IS NOW LOCATED IN HIS NEW QUARTERS, OP- 
POSITE POWELL & CO., WITH A LULL LINE OE 

is is \ is 

Also, a Full Line of Infants' Wardrobe. 



E. M. STONE, 



Agent, 
DEALER IN 



KiUiury${taoy (titty 



Wholesale and Retail. 



MYER'S MARKET, 

No. g Bridge Street. 



Fish and Vegetables. 

Telephone No. 94. 



J. R. McKEEBY, 



DEALER IN 



m m wi 

Specialties in Ladies' Hand 
Turned Shoes. 



506 Mcintosh Block. 




GEO. H. COX, 



CUT FLOWERS A SPECIALTY. 

i Funeral Designs 

MADE ON SHORT 

NOTICE. 

Telephone. 

North Main Street. 

w 

TOWANDA. 



Open Tuesdays from 2.30 to 4.30 p. m. 

Saturdays from 10 A. m. to 12 m. 



iY SUMCMIIIPira©!^ - 



Any resident of Towanda can draw a book upon the 
payment of 10 cents to the Librarian. 



ni© mm mmmmmsu 



To obtain the most satisfactory results from the within receipts it 
is necessary to use the best ingredients. We take especial pains in 
procuring ami Belling only the 

BEST and PUREST WHOLE and GROUND SPICES, 
BAKING SODA, CREAM OF TARTAR, and. 
FLA VORING MA TERIALS of ALL KINDS. 
CHOICE VANILLA BEANS, &c. 

We call particular attention to our brand of 

LATOUR OXjIATS OIL, 

for which we are the SOLE AGENTS for the Importer for this vicin- 
ity. It is a perfectly pure and superior article, well-known and favor- 
ably recommended by a majority of the ladies of this place. 

Dr. H. C. PORTER & SON, 

TI3:E] OI-.3D RELIiLBLE HDI^TJO- STORE, 

(Established 1848,) 

Corner Main & Pine Sts., — — Towanda, Pa. 



OF TOT7v7--A-3STID-A.. 



CAPITAL, .-.-- $150,000 

SURPLUS, - - - - - $23,000 



Offers its services in the transaction of a general bank- 
ing business. Deals with its patrons as liberally 
as is consistent with safe banking. Sells drafts 
on Great Britain and Continental Europe. 



E. T. FOX, President. GEO. IV. BUCK, Cashier. 



AIX KI 



DEALERS IN 



UNDERTAKING A SPECIALTY. 

MAIN STREET, TOWANDA, PA. 



vmm 



DEALER IN 



BOOKS, STATIONERY, PICTURES, 

WALL PAPER AMD BORDERS. 
ONLY NEWS-ROOM IN TO WAN DA. 

MERCUR BLOCK. 



Dr. C. S. ROGERS, 
Surgeon Dentist, 

Treatment of Diseased Teeth 
a Speeialty. 

Office hours from 8 a ni. till 6 p. m 
Office over Dr. Pratt's, State Street, 

TOWANDA, PA. 



CODDING & DODGE, 



Fire, Life and Accident 




TOWANDA, PA. 



-*Glinten §>. BifeQh 



«*. 



MANUFACTURER OF CONFECTIONERY. 

A FULL SUPPLY OF CHOKE 

Bananas, Cocoanuts, Oranges, Almond Pits, 

Lemons, Chocolate, Pine Apples, Table Nuts, 

CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 

Ice Cream and Ices made in quantity at reduced rates. 

No. 304 Main St., opposite Court House Park, Towanda, Pa.