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Full text of "Gems of the ocean;"

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2locIUan(T, pXainc 
1914 



OPINION PRINT 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



I FULLER -COBB CO. | 

OT Did you know that we have ^ 

^ added a .^ e^ ^ 

§ Bargain Basement Department ^ 

^ Bargains from each department of our ^ 

^ Stote found here S 

i FULLER -COBB CO. | 

^ ROCLLAND, MAINE ^ 






Established 1863 Incorporated 1893 

W. H. GLOVER CO. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



DEALERS IN 



All Kinds of Lumber and Building Materials 

DOORS, WINDOWS AND FRAMES, 
AND ALL INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR FINISH MADE AT OUR MILL 



Office and Yard 453 Main St. Mill 18 Sea Street 

ROCKLAND, MAINE 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Not a 

COAT, SUiT, WAIST 
i Set of Furs or Pair of CorseLs 

K BUT HOLDS ITS PLACE HERE 

Because 
^ Ot Particluar Excellence ^ 

Customers Save Time, Money ami [1111/ PPIPITQ 
Trouble by taking advantage of our Lv if I IIIULO 

Uesper K Ceaich Specialty Store 

366 MAIN STREET ROCKLAND, ME. 

B. Iv. SEGAL 

DEALER IN 

i CLDTHING and GENTS' FURNISHINGS ! 

BOOTS AND SHOES FOR MEN AND BOYS 



SEND MAIL ORDERS HERE 

We give mail orders careful and prompt attention 
All goods sent by parcel post prepaid to your door 



BT Ctr/^AT ^71 ^^ain Street 
. JU. i3r>VTrV1^5 %)/ 1 Rockland 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



H. H. CRIE & CO. 

HARDWARE 

456 Main St. Rockland, Me. 

OREL E. DA VIES 

Jeweler— ^g^^ -Optometrist 

District Watch Inspector M. C. R. R. 
Standard Time by Wireless 

301 Main Street, Rockland 



FRED R. SPEAR 

WHOLESALE and RETAIL 
Dealer In 

Coal, Wood, Hay, Brick, Hair 
Lime, Sand, Cement 

SEWER PIPE, FIRE CLAY CHIMNEY PIPE 

5 Park Street Rockland, Maine 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



FRED T. VEAZIE J. A. BLACKMAN 

Veazie Hardware Co. 

HARDWARE 
and STOVES 

433 MAIN ST. Telephone 268 ROCKLAND, ME. 

LEVI SEAVEV 

^\^ DEALER IN@\§) 

BOOTS and SHOES 

Clothing and Men's Furnishings 

TRADE CEIN^TER 



,^vCEAT-|i-EAT :i/^, 



.A.T 



PERRY'S COFFEE HOUSE 

HORACE PERRY, Proprietor 

Try Our 25c Dinner 

2 MINUTES WALK FROM MAIN STREET 
LUNCHES TO TAKE OUT 

Oysters Lobsters 
^And Home Made Pastry^ 

Tillson Avenue Telephone 525M 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




BURGESS 

O p t o m et ri st 

mmm MAINE 

Telephone 142X 




NEXT DOOR 
TO THORNDIKE 



Pillsbury's Studio 

EVERYTHING IN 

THE PHOTOGRAPHIC LINE 

Willoughby Block Rockland, Maine 

WE CHALLENGE THE WORLD 

to produce a medicine that has performed such wonderful cures as "Analep- 
tic" Maine's Marvelous Medicine has done and is doing every day. 

Thousands of persons in Maine have used "Analeptic" for stomach, 
heart, liver, kidney and bladder troubles; dyspepsia, indigestion, bilious- 
ness, catarrh, constipation, piles, rheumatism and as a blood purifier. 

Women suffering from general debility, female weakness, nervousness, 
dizziness, fainting spells, sick headache, ba^ka^he and other ailments peculiar 
to their sex find "Analeptic" A God-send. 

' ' x\naleptic " does not contain any kind of mineral. It is purely vegetable, 
put up in powdeieJ form. Each package makes one quart of medicine, by 
simply adding cold water. Full particulars on each package. Price only 25c. 
Sold through agents or sent postpaid on receipt of price. To advertise "Ana- 
leptic" we will send YOU one regular 25c package free if you will send us your 
address and enclose ten cents in stamps or coin to cover cost of postage and 
o.^ce work. 

(Agents Wanted) Address 

RICHARDS CO-OPERATIVE COMPANY 

16 School St., Rockland, Maine. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




O. E. BLACKINGTON & SON 

ROCKLAND, ME. 

KUPPENHEIMER CLOTHES 

Ground Gripper Shoes 

BOOTS. SHOES and RUBBERS OF ALL KINDS 



CRAWFORD RANGES 



S. W. PAINTS 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 
THOMASTON, MAINE 



HARDWARE 



STOVES 



TINWARE 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Don't you tire of reading the ridiculous 
assertions you see in some of the News- 
paper ads these days ? 

While some stores are advertising ''Un- 
paralleled inducements," ''Stupendous 
bargains," "Clothes at heart breaking 
prices," etc., etc., we keep right on giv- 
ing our patrons the best of Clothing, 
Hats and Toggery at fair, honest, live 
and let live prices. 

We've no ''Clothes for a song" or $20 Suits for 
$1.98. 

We have got the best $10, $12, $15 or $25 
Suits and Overcoats in town or out of town 

People believe in this store and our business grows 

and grows 

J. F. Gregory Sons Co. 

THE CLOTHIERS 



WvdiKft 



This little book contains historical and biographical sketches, 
together with genealogies of some of the most prominent families, 
also the names of all the inhabitants of Matinicus and Crie- 
haven. It is illustrated with nine beautiful half tone engrav- 
ings and two fine portraits. 

We have also included a few pages of advertising, which 
are worth the reader's careful attention. To all those who have 
in any way contributed toward making this work a success, I 
am sincerely grateful. 

ROBERT B. FILLMORE. 






icT^ 



ht 























































Vg 








:\IATIXICUS LIGHT 

SiiUc (boocl ffiavc of the giolxt 



Request of the dying lighthouse keeper 
to his daughter 

BY REV. E. S. UFFORD 



: out of the sea, 
care of the Ught, 



The ship« arc rising 

Take good 
The sun has set and no stars I see, 

Take good care of the light; 
Tlie freighted ships with their cargo dear, 
Are drawing on to the harbor near, 
And lest they from their course should steer, 

Take good care of the light. 

The wind is rising out of the sea. 

Take good care of the light, 
The breakers dash on the rocky lea, 

Take good care of the light; 
The rushing tide is inward bound. 
The rising gale has a moaning sound, 
O, some gallant ship may go aground, — 
Take good care of the light. 



Trim the wick in the lighthouse high. 

Take good care of the light. 

Lest its life-beams wane and die. 

Take good care of the light; 

A wakeful eye scans the waters o'er 

For the welcome beacon on the shore; 

My child, the tower Til climb no more. 
Take good care of the light. 

Rise and watch till the break of day. 

Take good care of the light, 
Souls like ships may drift away. 

Take good care of the light; 
The oil of grace in the heart must shine, 
Like a beacon bright with a boon divine. 
For the love of Christ whose work is thine. 
Take good care of the light. 
Copyright by E. S. Ufford. 




Oiems of the (Bcmn 




CT, 



atiixiats HocTi 



C^ AILORS on approaching the Maine coast from the south, on 
C^ or near the entrance to Penobscot Bay, will observe a pic- 
turesque group of islands, the smallest of which, and the farthest 
outside of any on the coast of Maine, is nothing more than a 
huge barren ledge of about thirty-two acres. On this rock are 
two light-house towers, two fog-w^histles and several comfortable 
dwellings to accommodate the four light-house keepers and their 
families w^ho appear happ}^ and contented notwithstanding their 
environments. 

The original Matinicus Rock light-station, erected in 
1827, was a cobblestone dwelling with a wooden tow^er at each 
end. In 1847 these towers were removed, and a granite dwelling 
with semicircular towers was built. Since then it has developed 
into an establishment of considerable dimensions, requiring the 
services of a keeper and three assistants. The granite dwelling 
still stands, but the present station has two graj^ granite towers 
one hundred and eighty feet apart, and connected by a low 
covered passage; for in high winter storms it would be a hard 
scramble for the keepers to make their way from tower to tower 
in the open, not only on account of the wdnd, which often blows 
a hurricane, but also because of the heavy seas which break 
over the rock. Then there are the keepers' dwellings, a brick 
house with engines for operating two fog-whistles (one held in 
reserve, in case of accident to that in use) and, as a further pre- 
caution, a fog-bell swinging from a wooden pyramidal skeleton 
stand, a brick storehouse for oil, and the boat-house with, a 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



tiinber-wa}" slanting into the water, up which the boats are 
hoisted by a Avinch. The towers are ninety-five feet above the 
sea. The Ughts, classed as of the third order, are seen fifteen 
miles away. The rock where the towers stand is fifty feet 
above the sea and presents what seems to be a precipitous 
front to the ocean. 

Following are the names of the light-house keepers : 

Principal Keepers — William Young, Samuel Abbott, Sam- 
uel Burgess, John Grant, William Grant, James E. Hall, Mer- 
ton E. Tolman, Charles G. Dyer. 

Assistant Keepers — Isaac Grant, John Grant, jr., Jarvis 
Grant, Mary Grant, N. Perry, E. Abbott, William Stanley, 
T. A. Wallace, L. Norwood, A. A. Norton, George A. Lewis, 
Charles Burgess, Elmer Holbrook, Harold Hutchins, G. C. 
Wallace, J. H. Upton, A. M. Mitchell, G. W. C. Studley, George 
D. Lee, Frank O. Hilt. 

Many deeds of heroism and adventure could be written of 
the keepers of the Rock and their families since the light was 
first established. The following incident taken from the Cen- 
tury Magazine of June, 1897, is among the most interesting: 

''Several of the storms that have whirled over Matinicus 
Rock have tried the fortitude of the little band of faithful watch- 
ers upon it. One of these watchers, Abby Burgess, has become 
famous in our light-house annals, not only for long service, but 
also for bravery displayed on various occasions. Her father 
was keeper of the Rock from 1853 to 1861. In January, 1856, 
when she was seventeen years old, he left her in charge of the lights 
while he crossed to Matinicus Island. His wife was an invalid, 
his son was away on a cruise, and his other four children were 
little girls. The following day it began to ''breeze up;" the 
wind increased to a gale, and soon developed into a storm almost 
as furious as that which carried away the tower on Minot's 
Ledge in 1851. Before long the seas were sweeping over the 
rock. Down among the boulders was a chicken-coop which 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



Abby feared might be carried away. On a lonely ocean out- 
post like Matinicus Rock, a chicken is regarded with affectionate 
interest, and Abby, solicitous for the safety of the little coop, 
waited her chance, and when the seas fell off a little, rushed 
knee-deep through the swirling water, and rescued all but one 
of the chickens. She had hardly closed the door of the dwelling 
behind her when a sea, breaking over the rock, brought down 
the old cobblestone house with a crash. 

''While the storm was at its height, the waves threatened the 
granite dwelling, so that the family had to take refuge in the 
towers for safety; and here they remained, with no sound to 
greet them from without but the roaring of the wind around the 
lanterns, and no sight but the sea sheeting over the rock. Yet 
through it all the lamps were trimmed and lighted. Even after 
the storm abated, the reach between the rock and Matinicus 
Island was so rough that Capt. Burgess could not return until 
four weeks later. 

"In 1861 Capt. Burgess retired from Matinicus, Capt. Grant 
and his family succeeding him. And now the grim old Avave- 
rent rock became the scene of as pretty a romance as could 
be devised. A son of Capt. Grant had been appointed assistant 
to his father, and Capt. Burgess had left Abby on the rock to 
instruct the new comers. Young Grant proved a very apt 
pupil — so apt that he was soon able not only to take care of the 
lights, buc also to persuade his instructress to let him take care 
of her. She became his wife and his helpmate in a double 
sense, for not long after their marriage she was appointed an 
assistant keeper. When she was married she had lived on the 
rock eight years, and she remained there until 1875 when her 
husband was appointed keeper and she assistant keeper, of 
the hght on White Head, an island separated from the main- 
land only by a narrow channel. Isaac H. Grant, who married 
Abby Burgess, holds a silver medal from the United States gov- 
ernment for rescuing two men from drowning while he was 
keeper at White Head." 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 




CRIEHAVEN WATERFRONT 



Olvichaiicu 



^"T^ HE nearest land to the Rock is Criehaven, a much larger 
^ I island, formerly known as Ragged Island on account of 
Si^/ its rugged appearance. Until 1896 it was a part of Matin- 
icus, when it was incorporated as a separate plantation. In this 
same year a steamer began making semi-weekly trips and a 
postoffice was established with Horatio Crie as Postmaster, 
who was succeeded by his brother Eben Crie, the present post- 
master. The island was formerly owned by Henry Brook- 
man, a native of Sweden, who purchased it from the Indians, 
and the late Robert F. Crie bought it of him in 1879. It com- 
prises about three hundred acres — one-fifth of which is owned 
by Mrs. Fred Rhodes, a daughter of Mr. Crie. The resident 
population during the winter is about fifty, in the summer time 
it is much larger, as Criehaven is fast becoming a popular sum- 
mer resort. 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 




HILJ.,<IDE FARM 



One of the chief attractions of the place is "Hillside Farm" 
owned b}^ Fred S. Rhodes, who with his brothers is engaged in an 
extensive grocery l)usiness in Boston where they now run 
four large stores. In 1914 Mr. Rhodes will retire from business 
and devote his entire time to making Criehaven one of the most 
attractive summer resorts in this section. He has already 
erected several fine cottages which are equipped with all the 
modern con^'^eniences, and has completed one of the most ap- 
proved artesian w^ells to be found in this vicinity. It is 216 
feet deep, of six-inch bore in the solid ledge, and with the large 
wind-mill and tank which holds 10,000 gallons is capable of 
supplying the whole island with never failing pure water. The 
drilling of the well alone cost $1300, the work being done by 
Turner & Savage and the tanking and piping by E. E. Jame- 
son of Warren. The grounds about "Hillside Farm" are laid 
out in a charming manner, the walks being beautified on either 
side bv flowers of choice varieties. 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



On the bluff looking toward Matinicus is the Haines cottage, 
which is certainly a novel site for an artist. It is attractively 
constructed commanding a fine view of the ocean and many 
other points of interest. 

There is a neat little school-house on the island in which 
religious services are held every Sunday. 

Among the industries are farming, poultry and sheep- 
raising. About three hundred sheep are owned by Eben W. 
Crie who is also proprietor of the general store. The chief 
industry is fishing. The fishermen are prosperous and make a 
good living, most of them owning their own homes which are 
in attractive locations. They are also of the most ingenious 
nature many of them building their own motor boats, which 
are handsomely modeled. Peter Mitchell, a Dane, is a skillful 
boat builder. He has followed the fishing business on this 
island for the past twenty years. Before settling on Criehaven 
he was with the Red Star Line for three years, having crossed 
the Atlantic forty-five times. 

The steamer "W. O. Butman," commanded by Captain 




STEAMER W. G. BLTMAN 



Butman, makes three round trips per week from Rockland to 
Matinicus & Criehaven between May 1 and November 1, and 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



two trips per week during the winter. Efforts are now being 
made to secure appropriations from the government for building 
a breakwater to protect the boats and wharves along the shore 
from the violence of the sea. 

On February 2, 1908, a great storm occurred which carried 
away the steamboat w^harf and did much damage to the fisher- 
men, destroying nearly all their lobster traps and fishing gear. 
The following season a substantail steamboat wharf was built. 

Dr. Edwin W. Gould, who remained at Criehaven several 
months during the winter of 1900, on locating in Rockland to 
practice his profession established a carrier pigeon service be- 
tween the Island of Criehaven and his office. This was the 
pioneer attempt to utilize carrier pigeons for the relief of the 
sick, and attracted world wide attention as inquiries relating 
to this novel service were received by Dr. Gould from many 
different points, one from far away New Zealand. The carrier 
pigeons were cared for at Criehaven by Mr. Horatio D. Crie's, 
family and at the time of Capt. Robert Crie's last sicknesss 
when a fierce storm was raging in consequence of which all 
communication with the Main was cut off, a carrier pigeon was 
sent on its sad mission arriving at the home loft in about one 
hour from time of liberation; a tiny note, brought by the ex- 
hausted bird gave the world the news of the Grey Angel's visit 
to the Crie family. 

With the dangerous calling of the inhabitants, all being 
fishermen, there have been very few deaths by drowning. 

About the time of Robert Crie's demise, Capt. Albert Hall 
started in his sloop boat for the Main and nothing was ever 
seen or heard from him again and a few years later Ed. Hig- 
gins went to pull his lobster traps and failed to return and noth- 
ing was given up by the waters to give a clue to his fate. 



10 GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



I (Captain ^Vbcvt JtaU | 



CAPT. Albert Hall went to Tenants Harbor from Criehaven 
October 3, 1900, in his sloop boat "Wild Rose ' 'and left Ten- 
ants Harbor on the return trip about 8:30 a. m. Friday, October 
5, with six bushels of clams on board and was never heard from. 
While it was foggy and somewhat stormy, and he had no com- 
pass in his boat, it seems probable that his death was more 
likely due to sickness and subsequent shipwreck resulting from 
inability to manage his boat, rather than to stormy weather, 
as he complained about trouble with his head before leaving 

Tenants Harbor. He had no small boat with him and the 
sloop might have struck on one of the sunken ledges and he lost 
his life by drowning, but this would not seem probable unless 
he had become unconscious or weak from illness or unless there 
was a thick fog, as he knew the coast well. 

On June 17, 1901 when Judson Young of Matinicus was haul- 
ing his lobster traps some of them got caught in the rigging of 
Capt. Hall's sloop and the mast and main boom were hauled 
up by Matinicus fishermen. This was near the 'TJoombs Spot" 
about two miles west southwest of Ragged Island. Afterwards 
about eight feet of the boat's hull, her stem, bow sprit, gaff and 
rigging were hauled up and as there is about twenty fathoms 
of water at the place where these portions of the craft were 
found it was thought that the boat must have gone to pieces 
somewheres else, in shoaler water, and this much of her been 
carried out into deeper water. 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 11 



Capt. Albert Hall was l^orn in Hope, Maine, April 4, 1831. 
His i^arents were Ezekial Hall and Jane (Kendall) Hall. While 
he was quite young they moved to Rockland. He commenced 
following the sea in early manhood and had the command of 
several vessels. He married in 1853, Frances, daughter of 
Dodge Bowers, of Camden. They had three children, William 
Herbert (who became a successful business man) of Providence, 
Rhode Island, Mary Frances (who died young) and Miss Alice 
J. Hall (who resides in Boston). After retiring from the sea 
Capt. Hall was in business in East Boston, Mass., for some 
years. On March 29, 1892, he purchased a farm at West Rock- 
port, November 2, 1896, preferring a life near the ocean to one 
in the country, he sold his farm and engaged in the fishing busi- 
ness at Criehaven. He built two cottages and continued to re- 
side there until his death, in October, 1900, (elsewhere men- 
tioned). He was a member of the Baptist church in Rockport 
and was much interested in Sunday school and religious services. 
Through his generosity the Sunday school at Criehaven was 
given the use of a nice organ. 

Capt. Hall was much respected by all who knew him, was 
tax collector of Criehaven at the time of his death, and of con- 
siderable business ability. He was a good, honest man and 
respectable citizen. 




12 GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



^__. M^^ 

W. ^ 
-... ^ 



qr> OBERT F. Crie was bom at Matinicus, January 11, 1826, 

/ \ the son of John Crie and SaUy (Emery) his wife. He 

married Harriet A. Hall, November 23, 1848. She was the 

daughte-i of George Washington Hall, and was born at Camden, 

October 30, 1829, her mother's name being Elizabeth Burgess. 

Five children were born to them as follows: John Emery, 
born May 12, 1857, married Nancy Dunton; Eben William, 
born December 24, 1854, unmarried; Charlotte Jameson, born 
March 23, 1858, married Fred S. Rhodes; Frank Leslie, born 
July 17, 1862, married Madge Remy; Horatio Dunton, born 
July 9, 1870, married Mabel Packard. These children are all 
living, as is their mother, but Mr. Crie died June 25, 1901. 

In the winter of 1848 Robert Frank Crie and wife, nee Har- 
riet A. Hall, went to Ragged Island and started housekeeping 
in a log camp. Through the winter he cut and hewed the tim- 
ber for a house and in the spring of '49 erected the Crie homestead 
Several additions have been made to the house since then. 

They lived together there fifty-three years, all of their 
married life. Five children were born to them. 

They were a contented, prosperous family; in 1879 he owned 
the whole island. In 1896, all of the children with their wives 
and husbands and their children, lived there too. 

Mr. Crie was a conscientious, kind hearted gentleman, honest 
in all his dealings and always thoughtful for the welfare of others. 
Besides being engaged in fishing, sheepraising and farming, 
Mr. Crie for many years kept a general store at Criehaven. 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



13 





ROBERT F. CRIE 



14 GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



Irtlxalritants of CrielxaxTsn 



Names and ages of the inhabitants of Criehaven, October, 

1911. 

Anderson — Carl A., born April 25, 1857; Annie E., born March 
27, 1858: Charhe F., born August 28, 1893; Raymond 
L., born June 9, 1891; John W., born November 27, 
1885; Zella M., (Hupper) ; Helen E., born 1906; Ken- 
neth W., born 1908; Nicholas J., born 1911. 

Alves— J. G., born May 12, 1847; Mary (Morris) ])orn March 
9, 1875. 

Crie — John E., born May 12, 1851; Nancy A., born October 24, 
1846; Eben W., born December 24, 1854; Harriet Hall, 
born October 30, 1829; Robert F., January 11, 1826. 

Dorr — Ralph E., born March 7, 1877; Nora (Byrns) born Feb- 
ruary 28, 1880; Warren B., born September 28, 1904; 
Madeline, born July 20, 1910 

Enickson — John, born August 23, 1867; Frederika Safstrom, 
born June 4, 1865; Fredrick Bernhard, born July 7, 

1887. 

Mitchell — Peter C, born October 15, 1 871; Helen (Swenson) 
born October 22, 1883; Cecilia A., born November 16, 
1908. 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



15 



McClure— Herbert J., born May 29, 1868; Annie M. (Burns), 
born November 29, 1872, died April 23, 1910; Harry 
v., born October 24, 1893; Gladys May, born January 
31, 1902. 

Rhodes — Fred S., born April 23, 1855; Lottie (Crie), born 
March 23, 1858; Edith M., born July 6 1887; Olive C, 
born May 21, 1899. 

Simpson — A. L., born 1856; Lena, born 1861; Guy L., born 
May 6, 1900; Fred, born August 22, 1860; Lizzie (Cole), 
born August 4, 1867; Ellis G., born September 1, 1890; 
Ruby L., born May 14, 1895; Roy V., born December 
19, 1897; Margaret E., born September 14, 1901; Lottie 
W., l)orn September 1, 1903; William Ernest, born Sep- 
tember 7, 1905. 




VIEW FROM MOUNT ARARAT OF 

HENRY YOUNG GO'S. STORE AND WHARF 

MATINICUS 



16 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



llHativucus 



r^^HE largest and most important of this group of islands is 
Matinicus, situated 18 miles south bj^ east from Rockland, 
and 60 miles east from Portland. It is nearly two and one-half 



Z 




MATINICUS HARBOR 



miles long and about a mile wide. On the western side the land 
is low with beautiful, sloping green fields and would remind 
one somewhat, on approaching, of the out-lying islands which 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 17 

are called '^keys", along the Wast India coast. The eastern 
shore is rugged and bold, with a picturesque little harbor — 
Wheaton's Island forming the southeastern side — a shallow 
passage separating it from the main island. The shore is lined 
with cottages, fish houses and wharves. The breakwater is 
on the northern side. This part of the island is quite well wooded 
with evergreen trees. 

At this time there are about 50 families scattered all over 
the island, comprising a population of nearh' 200. The natives 
are thrifty and industrious and own pleasant and comfortable 
homes, which are well kept and furnished with the modern con- 
veniences. 

Most of the inhabitants are engaged in lobster fishing but 
considerable attention is paid to farming. There is also some 
commercial business and boat-building. A large store owned 
by Henry Young & Co. is well stocked with supplies to meet the 
general needs of the people. The present proprietor is W. Scott 
Young, the genial postmaster. The Gorton-Pew Co. of Glouces- 
ter, Mass., carries on an extensive business in buying and ship- 
ping fish. Bradbury Young and Edwin H. Ripley are boat- 
builders and mechanics. Herbert Libby, formerly of Rockland, 
barber. Thomas Hall, manufacturer of oil clothes, has a fine 
little building where he furnishes oil suits and other supplies for 
lobster fishermen. George Belcher, machinist, former resident 
of Lynn, Mass., is kept busy most of the time repairing gasoline 
engines and other machiner3^ Marshall Ripley is cooper, farmer 
and lobster-fisherman, always busy and ready to assist all who 
come his way. ^ 



18 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



The Government has recently built a breakwater at a cost 
of $13,000, which is a great protection for the many fine boats in 
the harbor. As fine a fleet of boats as can be found in any har- 
bor is owned by Matinicus fishermen, the aggregate worth of 




THE BREAKWATER 



which is doubtless not less than $30,000. The staunch little 
steamer W. G. Butman carries the mail, passengers and freight, 
making the round trips on the same days as at Criehaven. 

The first regular mail service was established in 1852, by 
Lewis Ames, schooner Leader, who ran mail one year — dis- 
continued because route did not pay. Re-established in 1874 
by Capt. Henry Philbrook, schooner Everett, ran five years. 
Schooner Julia Fairbanks for ten years, followed by Capt H. 
Smith, F. S. Young and W. G. Butman. 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 19 



It has a fine school building, a new church and K. P. hall. 
The Knights of Pythias and Good Templars are flourishing 
societies. 



K. of P. HALL, ALITINICUS 



Very little has been written concerning the early history 
of the island. The first records show that in 1728, William 
Vaughn, one of the most prominent merchants of New England, 
then residng at Damariscotta, came to Matinicus and established 
a fishing station, employing several vessels. There are still 
landmarks on the island, said to be the place where his build- 
ings once stood, also the remains of an old wharf, the scene of 
the early activities. These fishing stations were abandoned 
and we can learn nothing more relating to the local history until 
the year when Ebenezer Hall, the first settler, removed from 
Portland to Matinicus. Following is the full account of his 
massacre by the Indians, with genealogy of the family. 



20 GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



^arly ^latinicus history 



glxc gslcxncVs ijivgt .^cttXcv and Bis I'vaciic S^^^uui 

oft by tlxc Jnrtians 

/^BENEZER Hall lived at what is called the Back Cove, Port- 
^-^ land, Me. There he raised three childrn, two daughters and 
one son Ebenezer by name. The girls married. One wedded a 
man by the name of Proctor, the other a man by the name of 
Allen and moved back into the country in the town of Fal- 
mouth. 

Shortly after this the mother died and Mr. Hall married a 
wddow by the name of Green. She had three children, one 
son by the name of Daniel and two daughters. The boy was 14 
years of age and the girls 9 and 7. Mr Hall then with his family 
moved to the Island of Matinicus, it being at the close of the 
French and English war, at which time the English took the 
Canadas and Nova Scotia from the French. He then built a 
stone house which he could use as a fort for protection from the 
Indians. The French, who were aUied with the Indians, of- 
fered a bounty for the scalp of every white man they killed, 
whereupon a band of six Indians went to the Island and camped 
about thirty feet south of the house between two granite ledges, 
on a plat of grass about eight feet wide. 

Then they besieged the dwelling. Mr Hall barred the door 
to keep them out and was obliged to stay there nearly a week, 
surrounded l^y them. In their determination to capture him 
and his family, they sent fire arrows into the roof and burned 
it. As fast as it took fire Mr. Hall would take a pole and push 
off the burning rafters so they would not fall within the walls of 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 21 



the house and at the same time his son shooting with a gun 
whenever an opportunity offered. At last the amunition of 
the Indians was nearly exhausted and in their desire to lengthen 
out their supply, they cut their lead bullets in two and as a decoy 
one of the Indians, who had in his gun the last half bullet, went 
up back of the house and took a position overlooking it and 
prepared to discharge his gun at Mr. Hall whenever he should 
show his head above the wall of the house. The other IncUans 
made what noise they could, walking over the pebbly shore and 
hauling their canoe after them. Mr. Hall hearing the noise 
that they were making and thinking that they had given up 
their hope and were leaving the island, climbed up and looked 
over the side of the house facing the shore, when the Indian 
back of the house brought his gun to his shoulder and shot him 
through the head and he fell back into the room dead. When 
his wife reahzed that he was killed and she left without a pro- 
tector, she screamed for quarter and the Indians hearing her, 
rushed up from the beach and said "Your Sannah (being in- 
terpreted husband) will not give any quarter." She said ''my 
husband is dead." They immecUately broke in the door and 
proceeded to bind the mother and the two girls, removing the 
scalp of Mr. Hall. The boy Daniel had escaped by the back 
window and hidden in the woods back of the house in the under- 
brush. The Indians took the mother and the two girls in their 
canoes and after sinking one of the fishing boats that lay in the 
harbor proceeded to Canada. The boy after remaining hidden 
several hours and feeling satisfied that the IncUans had given 
up the hunt for him and had gone emerged from his hiding place 
and looking around upon the situation, espied a fishing vessel 
lying at anchor ofi" in the bay. Finding half a canoe he paddled 
off from the shore and when he had proceeded a proper distance 
from the shore, he took his paddle and placing his coat upon it, 
signalled to the vessel. Seeing him they came to his aid and 
ascertaining his wants, came on shore and helped him bury his 



22 GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



father. He then returned to the schooner and sailed to the 
Fox Islands, where the schooner belonged. 

The evening previous to the final attack the Indians Ijuilt 
a fire just below the house and proceeded to get their supper. 
They took some corn and pounded it in a mortar and then 
cooked it. They then emptied it out of the kettle into a large 
dish and seated themselves around it and with their spoons all 
ate from the dish. Mr. Hall seeing them all busy eating, wanted 
to take Daniel and three good guns they had loaded and creed 
out of the back window to where he could get in range of them. 
There he thought he could kill them all, but his wife in terror 
seized him and would not let him go. At the first opportunity 
Mrs. Hall made her escape from the Indians and returned to 
the Island and later married in Boston. Her two daughters 
were still held by the Indians but years afterwards were seen 
with them in one of their visits to the island and being recognized 
by their brother, he sought an interview, but they had become 
so accustomed to the wild life of the forest they declined to take 
but little notice of him. The next day he went to have a second 
talk with them, hoping to induce them to return to civilized 
life but it was of no avail. 

In subsequent years Daniel took up and settled on what 
is now known as Green Island, lying south of Carver's Harbor. 
He married a Miss Young of Old York, a sister of Susannah 
Young of the same place. At the time of this murder and the 
committing of these outrages by the Indians, Mr. Hall's son 
Ebenezer, was aAvay fishing in one of his father's boats 
in the vicinity of Halifax, N. S. When he returned he found 
his father was dead and the island forsaken. He then proceeded 
to Boston with his fare of fish and on the passage up he put 
into Old York for a harbor. There he formed the acquaintance 
of Susannah Young, whom he afterwards married. They came 
to Pemaquid and lived in the block house instead of returning 
to Matinicus on account of the French and Indian war and the 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 23 



hostilities against the whites. While there Mrs. Hall and 
another woman while driving cows from the pasture were fol- 
lowed by the Indians and barely escaped death from the bullets. 

After peace was declared Mr. Hall and wife returned to 
Matinicus and lived there many years and raised fifteen children 
their names being: Hannah, born September 11, 1759; Mary, 
born August 25, 1761; Susannah, born May 10, 1763; Jane, born 
March 4, 1765; Ebenezer, born February 15, 1767; Margret, 
born March 9, 1769; Patience, born February 14, 1771; Sally, 
born February 9, 1773; Charity, born December 1, 1775; James, 
born January 26, 1777; John, born December 25, 1778; Abagail, 
born March 6, 1781; George, born May 3, 1783; David, born 
January 30, 1786; Betsey, born May 30, 1788. Ebenezer HaU, 
3d, born March 19, 1735, died February 14, 1813, buried on 
Matinicus; Susannah Young Hall, his wife, born March 9, 
1724, died December 9, 1831. After the death of her husband 
she came to live with her son John Hall and is buried in the old 
cemetery at the ''Head of the Bay" South Thomaston. 

Capt. Hiram Hall is the owner of an iron kettle that was 
left on Matinicus in 1757 by his great great grandfather Ebene- 
zer Hall, who was killed by the Indians. 

Ebenezer Hall, 3d, died February 14, 1814, age 78 years, 
11 months, 9 days. His father Ebenzer, 2d, was killed by the 
Indians on Matinicus in 1757. His wife, Mrs. Hall, a lady of 
remarkable beauty and many accomplishments, was captured 
with her two daughters, after her husband had been killed. They 
were carried to Canada, where they were separated. Mrs. Hall 
was eventually ransomed. But this unhappy woman, notwith- 
standing her life long endeavors, could never obtain the least 
knowledge of her children or their fate. The father of the above 
Ebenezer was probably one of three brothers that came from 
England. He was a lieutenant in the English army and was 
present in the battle of Mines at the siege of Louisburg and was 
wounded and died at Annapolis, Nova Scotia. 

The above was taken from Abbott's History of Maine. 



24 GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



^ novcX WSiciUmo, 



When Ebenezer Hall lived on Matinicus, a great many 
years ago, there lived in the family a girl by the name of Dorcas 
Young, a sister to Hall's wife. Joseph Greene was paying his 
addresses to Dorcas at the time. One night Hall invited some 
fishermen up to the house, so he said to Greene, '^ Joe, don't you 
and Dorcas want to get married?" ''I don't know," says Joe. 
He started for the cow yard where Dorcas was milking the cows, 
and asked her if she thought they had better get married, that 
night. ''Why Joe," says Dorcas, ''I have not got any wed- 
ding gown." ''Never mind the gown," says Joe, so they went 
into the house, Dorcas washed herself, put on a clean apron, 
stood up, and they were married, there being a justice of the 
peace among the crowd. 



The descendants of Ebenezer Hall, who was killed by the 
Indians, formed a reunion association in 1906 and have raised 
mcney and purchased a bronze tablet, which will be set in the 
rock at or near the spot where Mr. Hall was killed, near what 
is now Henry Young and Company's store. The stone which 
formed the base of the chimney of Hall's house is located in 
front of the store and the ledge behind which the Indians were 
concealed is l)ut a few yards distant. 

The tablet bears the following inscription: 

''Ebenezer HaU. The first white settler on Matinicus Isle, 
Maine, killed by the Indians, June 6, 1757." 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 25 



Matinicus was a part of Vinalhaven until October 22, 1840, 
when it was legally incorporated as a plantation. The follow- 
ing officers were chosen: Clerk, Freeman Hall; 1st Assessor, 
Freeman Hall, 2nd Assessor, Tolman Young; 3d Assessor, John 
Burgess. 

The present town officials, elected March 3, 1913, are — 
Clerk, F. R. E. Philbrook; Assessors, W. Scott Young, C. H. Ring 
and Y. Ames. 

In the election of 1911, when the question of retaining the 
constitutional amendment was submitted to the people, Matini- 
cus stood 38 to 2, in favor of prohibition. 

Many of the young people of the island have taken high 
rank both as students and teachers. Those who are attending 
school out of town at present are: Milton Philbrook, Harold 
and Katherine Ames, who will graduate next year from Hebron 
Academy, and Miss Hazel Young, who is a student at North- 
field Seminary. 

The names of the veterans who nobly responded to their 
country's call at the beginning of the Civil War are given below: 

In 2nd Maine Battery — R. Fred Crie, Henry E. Hall, 
Edril Smith, Nathaniel Condon. In the Navy: Trafton Abbott, 
William G. Grant, Lewis Burgess, Edril Smith. The only sur- 
vivor of this little company of brave men who went forth to 
help defend the flag, is Lewis Burgess, now 73 years of age. 
His sons are, Charles Burgess, keeper of Brown's Head Light, 
and Orrin Burgess of Matinicus. 

Several small islands form a part of the group, the largest 
of which is Wooden Ball, about three miles east from Matinicus, 
a low barren island of about 40 acres. Ten Pound island and 
Norman's land, an island of 15 acres, one mile from Matinicus. 
This island is inhabited by thousands of gulls, which may be 
seen and heard for a long distance as they circle about the rocks, 
where they make their nests. 



26 GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



atiniais OTIiurcIt 



ON the opposite page is printed a picture of the beautiful 
Uttle church, which was built in 1905 and dedicated in June, 
1906. The following account of the dedicatory service and 

history of the growth of the church during the past century is 
taken in part from the Courier-Gazette: 

The exercises of dedication consisted of an invocation by 
Rev. E. M. Cousins of Thomaston; responsive reading, led by 
Rev. I. A. Flint of Warren; sermon by W. B. Hague, text John 
11 :16, '^ And they shall become one flock, one shepherd. " Theme, 
''Christian Unity"; dedicatory prayer. Rev. L. D. Evans of 
Camden; historical and financial statements; addresses by 
Rev. Charles Harbutt of Portland, secretary of the Maine 
Missionary Society; Rev. J. H. Quint of Rockland, and each of 
the ministers named above. These parts of the services were 
interspersed with hearty singing and all closed with singing 
''God be with you till we meet again"; and the benediction by 
Secretar}^ Harbutt. The house and equipment seem to be 
complete for every use of people and church even to the beautiful 
aluminum individual communion set, a gift from a member of 
the Eliot church of Lowell, Mass. 

Matinicus has no traceable written record of an early 
church. In the memory of her oldest inhabitants such a church 
exists as a more or less vague reality and in the record of the 
Baptist church of Rockland it appears that a branch of that 
church was organized on Matinicus Island in the year 1808. 
Nor do we know of any resident pastor up to about the year 
1850, when the Methodist Home Missionary Society sent one 
Abram Plummer, who lived and preached here several years, 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



27 



honored and loved. He was succeeded by one Joel Adams, who 
served acceptably for a numl)er of years, and he in turn by one 
John Plummer, a son of Abram Plumnier. 

Then again for many years the island was pastorless and 
without preaching, save as from time to time some journeying 
pastor might take his way thither. 

But during none of these years was God left without wit- 
nesses in Matinicus — her ''Deacon Crie" and her ''Deacon 
Burgess" ar^ familiar and respected names, and to a later 
generation the faithfulness of "Uncle Lewis" Ames and Mrs. 




FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH OF MATINICUS 



Amanda Howard, particularly in the Sunday School stands out 
as a holy and saving influence. Who shall say they are not 
all present with us rejoicing as with clear vision they see the 
full import of this day? 



28 GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



In the year 1889 was organized on Matinicus a Christian 
Endeavor society, which with the Sunday school held together 
the religious life of the island up to the time of the organization 
of this present church in May, 1904. 

In the year 1897 the M. M. S. took up the work and sent 
student preachers for several summers to all of whom the island 
is indebted for much earnest labor. At about this time, several 
services were held by an evangeUst of the Advent Christian 
church, Mrs. Clapp, now Mrs. Quinn of Gray, Maine, and the 
good work accomplished through her efforts made a deep and 
lasting impression on the communit3^ Then came a time 
when there was felt a need of work of a more aggressive charac- 
ter. The M. M. S. was acquainted with this felt need and, 
alert to supply it, sent its general missionary. Rev. W. B. Hague, 
to whose coming under God we largely owe all that we are and 
have as a church to-day. He first came to the island March, 22, 
1904. On May 8th was completed the organization of the 
church; on May 16 it was constituted a body corporate under 
the laws of the state; was given formal recognition by a council 
of the neighboring churches on June 2; and on June 8 was re- 
ceived into the fellowship of Lincoln conference. 

The church entered upon its second year bright with hope 
and promise when Dr. J. M. Greene of Lowell, Mass., volun- 
teering his services to the M. M. S. was assigned to Matinicus. 
But in a brief space of time, just when all Matinicus had come 
to reverence him and when the church recognized the possibili- 
ties before it under his leadership, God in His mysterious provi- 
dence said 'Hhis work among you is done." Now we wait for 
him whom God shall send to continue his work. 

Simultaneous with a movement toward church organiza- 
tion was a movement toward a church building and in the au- 
tumn of the same year was begun the soliciting of financial aid 
for this purpose. So heartily came the responses that July 
11th of the following year saw begun the foundation of the 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



29 



church buildmg which at the beginning of the new year stood 
complete and which with grateful hearts we dedicate to-day. 

Since the above church history was written, Rev. Wm. H. 
McBride has been called as pastor, serving the church faithfully 
for several years. His successor was Rev. James H. Peardon, a 
talented and popular preacher. He resigned the pastorate in 
the fall of 1912. The church is hoping to call a pastor soon. A 
great opportunity for Christian work is presented in this worthy 
parish. 




SCHOOL HOUSE MATINICUS 



Above is a picture of the Alatinicus Schoolhouse, which 
was probably built about 1850. In 1903 the interior was re- 
modelled making an attractive schoolroom with up to date im- 
provements. It is now classed with the schools of Thomaston 
and Camden, under the charge of Supt. Packard, who is careful 
in his selection of teachers usually employing Normal school 
graduates. 



30 



GEMvS OF THE OCEAN 




HENRY YOUNG, ESQ. 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 31 



W: 



TlENRY Young, esq., a prominent citizen of Knox county, 
who has been for some years a resident cf Rockland, spent 
most of his life in Matinicus. Mr. Young was born at Camden, 
Me., December 28, 1822, the son of Rufus and Sally (Carver) 
Young. He was married January 25, 1854, to Julia F. Fairbanks, 
born April 7, 1831, daughter of Benjamin F. and Mary (Kendall) 
Fairbanks of Hope, Maine. The children of Mr. Young are as 
follows: 

Mary F., born January 1, 1855, married John J. Dunbar, 
resides at Winslow, Maine. 

Harriet P., born November 22, 1856, married Herbert J. 
Keith, resides in Somerville, Mass. 

Helen M., born October 23, 1858, married John F. Howard, 
resides in Winslow, Maine. 

Caroline F., born October 22, 1859, died March 23, 1897. 

Lincoln H., born October 13, 1860, resides in Glencove, 
Me. 

Ernest A., born March 11, 1862, resides at Matinicus, Maine. 

Winfield S., born October 3, 1863, resides at Matinicus, 
Maine. 

Jennie P., born October 28, 1864, married Leonard H. 
Rhodes, Boston, Mass. 



32 GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



Lenora D., born December 25, 1865, died October 24, 1880. 

Ada B., born May 19, 1867, resides in Rockland, Me. 

Harry W., born October 6, 1871, resides in Southboro, 
Mass. 

Alena L., born July 23, 1874, resides in Rockland, Maine. 

Mr. Young was educated in Camden and was a successful 
school teacher for a number of years previous to his marriage. 
After his marriage he settled at Matinicus, the home of his 
parents, where he was engaged in farming, curing fish, and 
trading. He was very successful in all his business under- 
takings. Energetic, straightforward, honest in all his dealings, 
he built up a thriving trade at the place of business now occu- 
pied by his son W. Scott Young. 

A large stone wharf that is now used as a steamboat land- 
ing, and occupied in the summer season by a Gloucester fish 
company, who are doing an extensive business, was built b}^ 
Mr. Young. 

He served as Post Master for a great many years and got for 
Matinicus its present mail service. He has always been for 
building up his town and has taken a deep interest in the wel- 
fare of its citizens. Although he has reached the advanced age of 
90, he still takes great pleasure in travelling back and forth 
from the main — a distance of 18 miles — to visit his old home 
and many friends. 

Esquire Young has held the commission of Justice of the 
Peace for 45 years. In that period, sixty-five couples have been 
united in marriage by him, none of which have ever been sepa- 
rated except by death. 

Mr. Young has held the office of Dedimus Justice since 
1857. He was a member of the Maine Legislature in ^51-2. 
Voted for the first Neal Dow Maine Law, and has always been a 
staunch supporter of the temperance cause. 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 33 






Reuben Fred Crie was born at Matinicus June 5, 1841, a son 
of Reuben L. and Mercy (Young) Crie. When a young man he 
came to Rockland and clerked in H. H. Crie's hardware store. 
When the Civil War broke out he returned to the island, where 
he was married August 10, 1862, to Floretta Tolman. Three 
days later he enlisted as private in the 2d Maine battery and 
went directly to the front. He went into an engagement on the 
morning after his arrival and was with the battery in all its 
fighting until June 16, 1865, when he was discharged with the 
rank of 2d lieutenant. He was a brave soldier and never shirked 
a duty no matter how arduous or unpleasant it might be. When 
the war was over Lieut. Crie resumed his duties as clerk in H. 
H. Crie's store, where he was admitted to partnership one year 
later. The firm subsequently received another addition in 
the person of R. Y. Crie. The subject of this sketch sold his 
interest in the store about 1873 and for the ensuing two years was 
again a resident of Matinicus. When he once more returned 
to the mainland it was to establish a grocery and fishermen's 
supplies store in Jones block. J. T. Hall of Matinicus was 
taken into partnership sometime after and the firm removed to 
the store in Glover block now occupied by the W. H. Glover 
Co. The firm at this time was known as R. Fred Crie & Co. 
Mr. Hall retired in the early 90s and Mr. Crie himself bade fare- 
well to mercantile life in 1894. That year he was appointed 
inspector of the Rockland breakwater job, which was then less 



34 GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



than one-quarter done. For several seasons he was inspector of 
the Bar Harbor breakwater job, but was again transferred to 
Rockland. He had oversight, also, of dredging operations in 
the harbors of Rockland, Thomaston, Camden and New Harbor. 
His last active work was in the summer and fall of 1907 when 
he inspected the Bar Harbor and Newburyport breakwater 
jobs. It was while at New Harbor in 1906 that he was critically 
ill with heart trouble, and he had looked forward to an early 
death from that cause. About a week before his death Mr. 
Crie was taken ill with what seemed to be an attack of pleurisy. 
It developed into pneumonia, which was the primary cause of 
his death, March 12, 1908. 

He was a most excellent citizen, brave and loyal in his 
defense of his country during its darkest hours, upright and 
square dealing in all his business transactions, and capable and 
conscientious in the discharge of the high trust which the govern- 
ment imposed upon him. ^'You cannot say anything too good 
about him,'' is the way one of his old Grand Army comrades 
put it, and the friends who knew and loved him will say amen 
to that sentiment. 

Mrs. Crie was born September 10, 1842, at Matinicus, she 
being the daughter of Isaac Tolman and Susan (Crie) his wife. 
She now lives with her son Edwin Hall Crie, who was born in 
Rockland, May 20, 1870, and married Margaret Smith January 
2, 1893. 

Names and ages of the inhabitants of Matinicus : 
Abbott — John F.,born November 25, 1879; Otis H., born Septem- 
ber 1, 1849; Emeline H., born August 28, 1855. 
Ames — Henrietta H.,born June 16, 1862; Walter B., born August 
14, 1886; Carrie E. (Ring) born April 8, 1884; Louise 
A., born February 23, 1908; Frank W., born July 18, 
1868; Adella A. (Philbrook) born November 8, 1875; 
Catherine G., born August 13, 1894; Harold E., born 
April 18, 1896; Edwin L., born May 27, 1899; Austin 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN S5 



Ames — M., born May 17, 1905; Oscar F., born November 11, 
1887; Grace E. (Trask) born September 26, 1885; 
Henry J., born April 24, 1856; Etta W., born March 5, 
1862; Julia E., born March 30, 1903; Weston G., born 
December 13, 1864; Hattie M. (Ryder) born October 
3, 1871; Stuart T., born February 9, 1890; Alice L., 
born February 6, 1892; Lyford E., born November 6, 
1899; George A., born November 20, 1888; Esther 
(Shapleigh), born December 2, 1889; Fred J., born 

November 20, ; Flora (Berry), born October 23, 

; Orren W., born September 19, 1905; Crosby B., 

born September 8, 1911; Wilmer, born June 28, 1853; 
Isabel F. (Smith), born December 29, 1854; Weston 
L., born May 18, 1887; Evelyn L., born September 15, 
1895; Lavon S., born February 27, 1899; Everett E.. 
born October 5, 1883; Virginia D. (Thompson), born 
January 18, 1887; Madeline G., born March 18, 1904; 
Roland W., ])orn July 6, 1907; Elmer E., born October 
24, 1890. 

Belcher— George H., born July 20, 1870; Nellie J., (Patch) born 
February 12, 1877; Evelyn G., born April 1, 1903; 

Belcher — Sarah F., (Kincaid), born February 24, 1838. 

Burgess — OrrinF., age 40; Lulu (Thompson), age 28; Esther M., 
age 9; Lena G., age 5; Lewis A., born August 20, 1840. 

Babson — Lizetta A. (Burgess), born May 12, 1845. 

Conery— John E., born 1848; M. A. (Smith), born 1855. 

Cooper — Edgar P., born June 5, 1879; Augusta N. (Ames) born 
October 7, 1875; Dorothy A., born May 19, 1904. 

Condon — Henry J., born March 9, 1825. 

Freeman— Char he I., born May 19, 1888; Mildred L. (Young), 
born June 24, 1894; Earl R., born September 21, 1909. 

Howard — Harvey L., born November 11, 1860; Anna T , born 
January 22, 1856; Fred G., born May 11, 1887. 

Hall — Celestia E. (Tolman), born January 16, 1895. 



36 GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



Long — Charles A. E., bom April 8, 1870. 

Martelock — John F., born June 21^ 1858; Lizzie, born Febru- 
ary 25, 1876. 

Miller — Rufus, born May 27, 1856; Lyciia J. (Ames) born June 
6, 1863. 

Norton — Fred A., born June 9, 1843; Laurette (Abbott), born 
December 6, 1847. 

Philbrook— Adelbert Tolman, January 2, 1882; Ethel L. 
(Marsh) born January 23, 1886; Hanson T., born 
May, 1828: Leroy Miller, born November 22, 1879; 
Flora E., (Ames) born September 11, 1880; George 
L., born March 26, 1901; Lila H., born April 13, 1902; 
Orris L., born December 16, 1904; Henry Alexander 
born January 6, 1830; Fred N., born September 12, 
1869; Jessie M (Ames) born July 7, 1873; Milton, 
Alvah, born July 31, 1894; Isaac E., born February 7, 
1860; Alice E. (Rackliffe), born March 13, 1863; 
Ralph E., born September 20, 1884; Arthur A., born 
February 19, 1887. 

Peardon — James H., born September 10, 1876; Nora V., born 
January 19, 1881; Francis B., born December 31, 
1904. 

Perr}^ — Alex. L., born October 7, 1855. 

Ripley— Marshall A., born April 28, 1860; Ida B (Ring) born 
October 10, 1861; Ibra L., born December 14, 1900; 
Edwin H.,born March 3, 1881; Carrie E. (Abbott), 
born September 10, 1883; Stanley A., born April 7, 
1906; Frank M., born February 17, 1909; Albert M., 
born March 7, 1884; Isabelle (Ames) born October 17, 
1882. 

Ring — Charles H., born April, 1860; Amanda E. (Marshall) 
born August 4, 1859; George L., born January 20, 
1892; Hanson O., born July 27, 1895. 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 37 



Smith — Hiram, born April 25, 1857; Ava, born October 5, 1861. 

Tolman — Sally S. (Ames), born November 27, 1827; Charles 
L., born May 28, 1848; Edith E. (Turner), born 
March 4, 1865; Raymond L., born April 28, 1898. 

Trask— Kenneth, born March 4, 1907. 

Thompson— Frank A., born April 25, 1882; Eva W. (Holbrook) 
born May 19, 1886; Norman J., born January 1, 1901; 
Lermon F., born August 20, 1902; Russell M., born 
July 19, 1904; Charlie A., born March 7, 1907; Weston 
E., born April 27, 1908; James B., born February 18, 
1858; Jennie A. (Philbrook), born September 17, 1864; 
Eugenia A., born January 25, 1886; Lydia K., born 
September 6, 1905. 

Teele— Herbert, born November 30, 1876; Etta (Thompson), 
born January 8, 1891; Helen, born February 8, 1908. 

Wallace — Ellen A. (Tolman), born November 7, 1860; Burton 
Tolman, born January 30, 1895; Grover C, born No- 
vember 26, 1884; Maud W., (Parker) born March 4, 
1880. 

Young— Henry W., born October 6, 1871; Helen P., (True) 
born July 5, 1897; Roger K., born July 5, 1901; Clar- 
ence L., born April 7, 1858; Adellma L., born July 27, 
1877; Addie May, born July 28, 1895.; W. Scott, born 
October 3, 1863; Marian, born May 9, 1876; Julia F.; 
E. A., born March 11, 1862; Grace C, born December 
23, 1874; Horace R., born September 24, 1892; Clif- 
ford B., born August 31, 1894; Hazel M., born August 
21, 1896; M. Hanscom, born July 17, 1898; Karl Henry, 
born October 28, 1900; Jennie Rhodes, born October 
21, 1904; Lincoln M., born June 21, 1906; N. B., born 
May 4, 1846; Druscila (Philbrook), born July 30, 
1842; Fred Leroy, born December 15, 1859; Arvesta 
Jane (Condon), born November 8, 1861; Judson Hen- 
drick, born October ; Ellen Lizzie (Hall), 



GEMS OF THE OCEAN 



Young — born January 4, 1875; Gladys Evelyn, born February 
18, 1911; Addie M., born June 18, 1858; LaForest G., 
born March 24, 1883; May (Howard), born June 22, 
1884; Leon L., born August 29, 1878; Cora (Ames) 
born July 4, 1884; Clyde S., born September 20, 1904, 
Ruthetta, born October 11, 1905; Merrill C, born 
April 5, 1907; Maxwell, born May 27, 1908; F. S., born 
June 17, 1873; Harriet E. (Robbins), born Novembor 
18, 1841; John T., born September 18, 1868. 




ADVERTISEMENTS 



O. p. LYONS 

Jteiuicler 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWELRY 
FINE SILVERWARE 

Musical Merchandise 

VINALHAVEN, ME. 



Littlefield-Mills Company 

SUCCESSORS TO LANE-LIBBY FISHERIES CO.'S 
RETAIL DEPARTMENT 

Fishermen's Outfits, Groceries and Provisions 

^^ GENERAL MERCHANDISE^^ 
Coal, Wood, Lumber, Lime, Cement and Sand 

VINALHAVEN, MAINE 



H. W. FIFIELD&CO. 
gry Oio0cls 

AND DEALERS IN 

BOOTS, SHOES, DRESS GOODS, LADIES' MUSLIN 

Underwear, Hosiery, Ribbons, Corsets, Raincoats 
Small Wares, Carpets, &c, &c. 

Agents Forest City Dye House, Portland, Me., First Class Work Guaranteed 

E. G. CARVER 

T)TrAT ER T"'^T nM^iiilif^^ 

FRESH and SALT FISH, FLOUR, GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS 

r^AIi^TS AND OILS 

Corned Beef a Specialty 
Curer of "CARVER BRAND" Finnan Haddie 

VINALHAVEN, MAINE 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



North National Bank 




Foot of Limerock St. 

^ On Main Street ^ 

ROCKLAND, MAINE 



Sporting Goods Leather Goods 



E. R. Spear & Co. 

Wall Papers 

Pictures and Picture Framing 



stationery, Blank Books 408 Main Street 

Office Supplies ROCKLAND, MAINE 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



DR. W. J. JAMESON 
Surgeon Dentist 

THOMASTON, MAINE 



JONATHAN P. CILLEY 

Counsellor-at-Law 
Over Rockland National Bank 



EDWARD K. GOULD 

Attorney at Law 

ROCKLAND. MAINE 



JOSEPH E. MOORE 

Counsellor at Law 

THOMASTON, MAINE 
OFFICE ROCKLAND, MAINE 



FRANK B. MILLER 

Attorney at Law 
ROCKLAND, MAINE 



Dr. Edwin W. Gould 

24 SCHOOL STREET 
ROCKLAND, M E' 

Office Hours: 9 to 12 A. M. 2 to 4 P.M. 
7 to 9 Evening 



M. A. JOHNSON 

Attorney at Law 
ROCKLAND, MAINE 

Telephone 

S. E. WELT 

Dealer in 

New and Old 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 

Violins Made and Repaired 

362 Main Street 
ROCKLAND, MAINE 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



^ Maine Music Company ^ 

EVERYTHING IN MUSIC 
Best Pianos at Lowest Prices 

Ji ^ VICTOR TALKING MACHINES J* ^ 

MAIN STREET ROCKLAND, MAINE 

^Rockland Commercial Colleger 

ROCKLAND, MAINE 

Maine's Leading School of Business 
and Shorthand : : : : : : : 

CATALOG AND COLLEGE JOURN/IL FREE 

Howard & Brown, Proprietors 

Ijbar tX ciX; ^ li to cjr <tp Tx er 

Portraits, Views 

Commercial Work, Etc. 

ROCKLAND, MAINE 

MISS D. L. PERRY 
^inz IHilXttJcrij 

578 Main Street Telephone 108-W 

ROCKLAND 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



014 042 714 



I