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Full text of "Genealogical and biographical record of the Lewis and Grisell families : from the years 1751 and 1763 to the year 1903"

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RECORD OF THE 
LEWIS AND GRISELL FAMILIES 



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PRI N T ER 



C OOPE RSV 



GENEALOGICAL AND 
BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



OF THE 



LEWIS AND GRISELL FAMILIES 

FROM THE YEARS 1751 AND 1763 
TO THE YEAR 1903 




'^Biography is the only true history.^' 

— Emerson. 



COMPILED BY 

MORGAN MILTON LEWIS and MRS. JESSIE GREY EMMONS 

INTRODUCTION BY 

WILLIAM SCHOOLEY GRAY 



Published by 

MORGAN MILTON LEWIS, BATTLE CREEK, MICH. 

1903 



r-WxH 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRABY 

ASTUK, UNOX AND 
IILDEN KOUrDATIONS 

B 1951 L 



"Verily, 
I swear, 't is better to be lowly born. 
And range with humble livers in content. 
Than to be perked up in a glistering grief. 
And wear a golden sorrow.'^ 



- Shakespeare. 



TO THE DESCENDANTS 
OF THE 

LEWIS AND GRISELL FAMILIES 

THIS RECORD 

IS RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED 

BY THE COMPILERS 



tm ife-v 'V- 



^ 




WM. S. GRAY 



Born, Jane 10, IS2S 
Died, Jane 12, 1902 



Sntroductton 



'Ah visions of that olden time, 

Thy magic spell I feel, 
As down the dim aisles of the past 

The lengthening shadows steal." 



/^Wr^HK Lewis and Grisell families were representative families, dating back 

\^\ many generations. They were identified w'ith the Society of Friends, 

better known as "Onakers." The name "Qnaker" was given them 

for the reason that their ministers, almost invariably, experienced a nervous 

agitation just before they arose to speak. 

The Lewis family are descendants of the English and Welsh. Many of 
their forefathers came over from their •' mother country " and settled in the 
colonies, embracing the eastern portion of the United States, prior to the rev- 
olutionary war of 1776. The grandmother and greatgrandmother of the present 
generation is a descendant of the Morgan stock. Her father was a minister of 
the Church of England (Episcopal Church). Her husband was a stonemason 
and weaver by occupation. To them were born twelve children — nine boys and 
three girls. They all lived to a good old age except four. Three lived to mid- 
dle age and one died when but a child. The children all married except one 
son and one daughter. 

For the lack of a written recorci we are unable to give a connected link 
of our ancestors. We are forced to be content with traditions coming down to 
us through our ancestors, which is generally more or less imperfect. 

If there had been a record kept of the lives and characters of our fore- 
fathers, it would have been valuable as a history, showing the line of ascent 
down to the present time, making it interesting for those who care to have a 
reliable history of their characters. 

One great satisfaction to be gained by the perusal of a history of the 
Lewis and Grisell families, is that it will bring us in closer touch with each 
other. It may be the means by which we may find many a precious friend that 
we had lost track of. 

By the study of local and general history we are brought in touch with 
the intervening ages of the past — uniting the present with ami creating a fra- 
ternal feeling for the people of the past — that would have been unfelt but for a 
record of the sayings of the great minds, that have come down to us. through 
history. 



X INTRODUrrlON 

Were family records more general it would be of untold value to society. 
There are very few of us who are acquainted with the real lives of our own 
kinsmen, let alone those that are in no wav connecti-d with us. 

By a closer study of family records — of the lives and characters of their 
forefathers — it would give a wider range in selecting life companions. There 
wouKl be much less chance for nian\' of our young men and women to practice 
deception upon their victims. But with a knowledge that their lives and char- 
acters are made a record and read by the community at large, it would be a 
great protection to man\- an honest young man or woman. The parents, be- 
coming acquainted with the candidate's record, would be better prepared to 
advise and protect their children from an unhappy life union. The fact known 
that the lives and characters are made a matter of record, would inspire the 
parents with greater care in training their children. At all events, in the course 
of a few generations, it would have a marked effect for the betterment of society, 
ft is worthy of our best thoughts. 

This book will, in all probability, be read by a large number of people. 
Some will read it indifferently, but a greater number will peruse its pages with 
profound interest. The records of this book will be a valuable addition to the 
library. There will be no long, tiresome articles to read, but short and to the 
point. Reliable information is to be gained of the lives and characters of those 
of kin. Not from tradition or '■ Mother Grundy's" gossip, but every effort has 
been made to make the book reliable in every detail so far as possible. 

It would be of great value if all parents would give to souie one compe- 
tent a true and extended history of their lives, and in connection with their 
obituaries have it published in pamphlet form. Such a course would go a great 
way towards improving the lives and morals of societ}'. A compulsory law 
compelling, so far as possible, the life histor}- of every family, would be of 
greater worth to society than a large portion of the laws now upon our statute 
books. 

The Lewis and Grisell families were pioneers in the development of the 
country. They endured privations and hardships that their grandchildren of 
this day have but little conception of. Most of them came from the far East. 
They loaded their wagons with a few bed clothes and wearing apparel and a 
few crude cooking utensils, and with this little bit of furniture the family seated 
themselves in their wagons and started for the West, where the "red men" lived 
and hunted. After long, weary days of travel they landetl in an unbroken 
forest, with Indians for their neighbors. The first thing to be done was to 
clear a spot for a cabin. .\tlei tlieir cabins were up, tiie\' tlien commenced to 
grub up the underbrush and burn the logs and brush, preparatory to planting 
corn and other products. Then chopping down the trees and splitting rails to 
fence in their little fields. 

The woods abounded with wild game, such as bears, wolves, panthers, 
wildcats, deer, turkeys, and a host of smaller game. They lived on coarse, un- 
bolted corn meal hominy, pumpkins, wikl berries and the wild game of the 
forest. They had to go twenty to thii t\ miles to mill. They had no roads to 



INTRODUCTION XI 

giiidc thfin with their axe they cut out the iinderbrusli and blazed out roads. 

In those rude cabins their children were born and brought up to hard 
work, and hard grub, generally' composed of coarse, unbolted corn meal, pump- 
kins and the wild meats of the woods. These pioneers cleared away the forests 
that now have become the garden spots occupied by their children and grand- 
children. 

The present generation can form no idea of what their fathers and 
mothers have endured in providing pleasant homes for their children and grand- 
children. 

Such in part was the lives of the Lewis and (irisell families, with many 
others that lived and worked with them, in developing an unbroken forest. 
Remember them kindly. 

WILLIAM SCHOOLEY GRAY. 



Norton, Kansas, December 12. 1901. 



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"A people that take no pride in the noble achievements of remote 
ancestors will never achieve anything worthy to be remembered with 
pride by remote generations." — Macal'I.ay. 

TrjTN THE early settlement of Ohio, Indiana and the States farther west, we 
11 find those sturdy men and women who furnished the brains and the 

brawn that was necessary to cope with the tliificiilties presented in sub- 
duing a wilderness inhabited only by the red race. They overcame all ob- 
stacles, regardless of the many difficulties, and paved their way to success. 
We are glad to possess an ancestry with so noble a history, for no better 
specimens of physical manhood and womanhood can be found than came from 
the unions of the Lewis and Morgans, the Grisells and Dingees; families who 
met in the arena of the Nortliwest Territory and there battled with the problems 
that transformed its wilds into beautiful fields and pleasant homes. In point 
of morals, these families were not excelled. They were abolitionists and gave 
the evil of slavery manv sturdy blows that assisted in its downfall ; they also 
were zealous temperance reformers, and in religion they were of the Quaker 
faith. We of the younger generation of these families have reason to feel proud, 
and should do what we may do ; Perpetuate their memor\'. For this purpose 
these pages have been compiled, giving a record of them, a work that has been 
pleasing to the compilers, although the task was a long and tedious one. 

How many have regretted that in tlie earlier days they did not keep a 
record of the experiences and trials of the pioneer days. But as cousin Emily 
Regester has said, "When we consider fifty years or more struggle with the 
adversities of this life, it is sufficient to draw a veil over and almost ohiiterete 
many of the early memories, and it takes time and earnest thoiigiit to recover 
them again." To lift this veil has been one of the main objects in preparing 
this record. 

The compilers were anxious that each one should have justice done 
them, and while this is history and we do not wish to give anyone undue praise, 
we have aimed to give each one credit for what they deserve. Only tacts have 
been stated, so that in future years, when this record is referred to, it will serve 
as a guide and counselor, perpetuating the memory of the sweet, humble, 
unselfisli lives which our ancestors lived. 

In the early history of the new settlements, the educational advantages 
were very meagre and there was little opportunity for anyone to attend school. 



XIV PRF.^ATOR^ REMARKS 

However, nearly all received a public school education, and later on many have 
had the advantage of a college or normal course. 

In the records of the last generations, we have not stated the- nationality, 
but it will be found b)' referring to the family records of the ancestors, except 
in a few cases, where we were unable to procure it. 

That more history is given of certain members of the family tlian others, 
is simply because their immediate descendants gave the information asked for, 
while others declined or neglected to do so. 

No doubt seeming errors will be discovered, but many dates had to be 
changed, owing to the conflicting reports sent in. 

We are under obligations to hundreds of kinsfolk and others for assist- 
ance rendered, and to them we return our sincere thanks. To those who have 
not furnished the required information, we can only say we are sorry the\- were 
not willing to assist in making the work complete. 



MORG.\N MILTON LEWIS. 
MRS. JESSIE GREY EMMONS. 



IRccollcctioni^ 

By ^Morgan Mii/ion Lewis 



*' My heart 'mid all changes, wherever I roam, 

Ne'er loses its love for the old house at home." 

" For still in mv slumbers sweet vi'^ions will come 

Of the days that I passed in the old house at home." 



I 



N recalling thest- recolk-ctions I have derived much pleasure and hope that 
they may be the means of bringing the younger generation into closer 
knowledge of their ancestors. 



When I was a very small hoy living in the cabin which is shown on the 
next page, my fatiier built a high rail fence around the little enclosure which 
had been cleared before erecting a cabin. On the top of this fence there were 
slabs that had been split out of logs, placed so as to project inward and to pre- 
vent any one from climbing out. This was necessary because "\'oung Morgan" 
had a perfect mania for getting out into the woods (a desire which I have never 
been quite strong enough to overcome). Our dog '"Drive" was at that time my 
only companion and what a faitliful old fellow he was. In those davs a good 
dog was a very valuable addition to a home. I remember one little incident 
which occurred while' I was small. One evening in the fall of the year while we 
were eating our supper of mush and milk by the light of the big open fireplace, 
my father jumped up and ran to the door exclaiming: "Sara Ann, something 
is killing 'Drive'." He reached up and took down the old long rifle, but by 
this time mother had gotten to the door and grasping father's arm, said: "Svra, 
thee is not going out there." However, he stepped to the door and fired ofi the 
gun and succeeded in saving the brave dog's life. Previous to this time one of 
our hogs had died and was lying just outside of the yard fence ami -'Drive" was 
about to take his evening meal when he discovered his place occupied by a big 
black bear, who disputed his right, whereupon they got into a general "mixup," 
and "Drive" was getting the worst of it when father fired off the rifle, which 
so frightened Mr. Bruin that he took to the woods in short order and "Drixe" 
returned to the house in a pitiable condition a sadder if not a wiser dog. 



RECOLLECTIONS XVII 

One of the man}' inconveniences to the early settling of a new country is 
that the stock have to get their living in the woods, in whicii there are no fences 
to hmit their wanderings. In the earl}' spring \\ lien they are thin, the young 
stock, and especially sheep, are in great danger from the wolves. The sheep 
must be corralled every night and I have known the wolves to kill a whole flock 
in one night within a few rods of the cabin. 

It was no small task to get the cows in the evening at milking time; this 
was especially true if they were already a mile away ami inclined to a still wider 
range. I can easily recall one trip to mind when I was about eight years old, 
when my little brother Anson, who was two years my junior, and I went with 
father in search of the cows. When we had gone a (juarter of a mile in the 
wilderness, father was confronted with the fact that the cows were going away 
from home at a pace much faster than his little boys were able to go and he 
said: "Morgan, I will have to put thee up in a tree and put Anson on my back 
in order to catch the cows." So placing me comfortably in a tree he took little 
Anson upon his back and started off into the woods as rapidly as he could go. 
Notwithstanding the forests were full of wild animals at that time and the bark 
of the wolves echoed and re-echoed around me, I really enjoyed listening to the 
sounds that came to my ears. The croak of the frogs and the hoot of the owls 
were company for me. It was (juite dark when father returned, and when we 
got home where mother was an.xiously awaiting us he told her what he had done. 
Her motherly affection was thoroughly aroused and I well remember her saying: 
"Syra, those dear little bo\ s shall never go witli thee again after the cows." 

The early settlers had to depend entireh' upon hunting in the forests for 
their meat. There was an abundance, of game, of which the wild hog, during 
seasons when there were plenty of beech nuts and acorns, became very fat and 
lurnished quite good food. All a settkr had to do in order to get a claim on 
wild hogs in those days was to go to the county office and have an "ear mark" 
recorded. Then he could go into the woods and put his mark on any hog wjiich 
did not already have its ear marked or its tail cut off. The catching of these 
hogs in early winter was rare sport and was productive of some exciting inci- 
dents. Usually the neighbors all assembled at some previously appointed place 
and all went together. 

One time after they had so met at our house they all started out in search 
of each one's respective hogs. Uncle Hervy Lewis had his dog along, which 
was one of the best and was famous for its assistance in this particular work. 
He had caught a hog and while he was holding it for Uncle Hervy another hog 
made a dart at the dog and tore a piece of skin loose from his side which hung 
down disclosing the raw flesh over a place as large as the two hands of a man. 
It looked as if our day's work was at an end, but one of the men had a long 
towel in his lunch basket which they used for a bandage and after pinning it 
solidly around the dog with thorns for pins, he did good work for the balance 
of the day. 



XVIII RF.COLI.ECTIONS 

In the early settling of Penn Township, jay County, Indiana, Syra 
Lewis's cabin was the one farthest to the north; consequently when a party of 
land-lookers started out they usually congregated at our house before starting 
into the wilderness in (jiiest of wild game or perhaps the location of land on 
which to erect a cabin. The writer well remembers one particular circumstance. 
A party of men together with my father had gone in search of some land and as 
there was so much game in those days they each one carried a gun. The 
strangers in the party were, John Brown, who afterwards located in that 
country, and Moses Courtney and son. When tiit-y returned in the afternoon 
tired and hungry, they w^ere invited to remain and partake of the best the coun- 
try then afforded: corn bread, wild hog, winter squash, wild honey and hominy. 
There being ten or tweKr in the party it was no small task to prepare the even- 
ing meal with the small ad\antages which the women in those days had to do 
with. (You will find later on a list of kitchen utensils which mother had.) And 
as all of this work must be done over the coals in the big fireplace and with all 
those hungrv men sitting in that same room, you can imagine something of the 
disadvantages which mother had to work under. When the meal was ready, as 
we did not have enough benches and chairs to go around, father drew the 
curtain back and he and I sat on the bed. This being the most convenient 
place to put them, the guns were laid across the bed between father and I, with 
the muzzles to the wall. Among them was an old flint-lock musket which had 
been carried b\' young Courtney. This musket was laying with the breech 
against my father's leg. As it was a little different from anything that I had 
ever seen, I was examining it very closelv, and while thus engaged I put my 
finger on the trigger and as the flint-lock is usually carried at half-cock, \'Ou can 
imagine the result. One would have thought some internal volcano had burst 
fortli; it had been loaded for bear and the concussion was something terrific. As 
the breech came in contact with father's leg, he was sure he had been shot and 
surely his movements would have conveyed that idea to an on-looker. As I 
was a little boy at that time and very sensitive it would be hard to describe my 
feelings. I was almost paralyzed with terror and humiliation. When the smoke 
had cleared away and quiet had been restored, we found that there had been no 
serious damage done except a hole burned through the bedding beneath the 
firing-pan and the charge of buckshot had entered an elm log at the rear of the 
cabin. John Brown, then a j'oiing man, was anxious to see how far the charge 
had penetrated, so he inserted his forefinger in the hole and as a result, got his 
finger badly burned, as the toe-wad was still afire. 



It might be of interest to some of the present generation to know what 
constituted a woman's supply of cooking utensils. The tea-kettle was very 
large and made of cast-iron, except the bail, which was of wrought iron. This 
kettle was used to heat all of the water for crushed, or dried and ground pump- 
kin coffee, sassafras or spicewood tea and also for the dishwater. The baking 
ovens or kettles were of different sizes and three or four were reepiired to have 



RECOLLECTIONS 



XIX 



the necessary supply. Thu l)ottoiii of a bakiiif^r kettle was flat, slightly flaring at 
the side. The cover projected over the sides of the kettle and around the edge 
of this was a rim two inches wide, flaring upward. This was provided to hold 
the live coals and hot ashes so as to properly bake the top of bread or roast the 
top of meat. Both the big kettle for heating water and the baking pots, to- 
gether with the stew kettles, "skillets" or frying-pans and pancake baker were 
all provided with three cast-iron legs about two and one-half inches long. They 
were thus raised high enough for the live coals to be placed underneath. Each 
of these were also provided with heavy wrought iron bails so that they could be 




Log Barn built by Syra Lewis in Jay County. Indiana, in 1K50. wliich is still standing. 



hung on the old crane or set on the hearth. The crane was fastened to the jambs 
or side pieces of the fireplace in such a way that it conld swing out to receive its 
load of kettles and then swing back over the fire. 

The fireplace was a large, crude affair, being about six feet wide and three 
feet deep. We received all the light and heat that we had from this. The out- 
side was built up of logs and the inside, jambs, back and hearth were composed 
of clay thoroughly pounded into place. The mantel piece was of hewn log and 
the chimney was built of sticks split out by hand and laid up log-cabin fashion 
and plastered over with a preparation of wild grass and clay, called 
"cat and clay." 

* 

When we went to mill we had to carry our corn in sacks thrown over the 
horses' backs and ride on top of those-, to a horse-mill which was operated by 



XX REr;OI, LECTIONS 

Joshua Bond. This mill was a very criuk' affair, all built of wood except the 
one "run of stones" which was used to grind both wheat and corn. We had to 
furnish our own team and do the driving when having grinding done, and if we 
had wheat, which was seldom the case, we had to turn the crank to do our own 
bolting of the liour. Then we gave one-eightli of our production as toll or pay. 

When preparing for winter, the wool had to be carded by hand into 
rolls, then spun and wove. Then we had to await our turn at the weaver's be- 
fore we could have warm clothes. 

For footwear we used the hide of a cow or calf which had to be taken to 
the tanner's and you had to take your turn there also. When the leather was 
ready for the shoemaker the head of the family took the measure in this wax: 
He provided as many twigs as there were persons and then had them all stand 
up resting their heel ilatwaj' against the door jamb and their foot directh' over 
the twig. Then the twig was cut off at the proper distance in front of the great 
toe, thus giving the length of the shoe. The instep was then measured with a 
string or thong and this measure was placed with the twig, and both sent to the 
shoemaker who either marked 3'our turn by a notcii in his work bench or a mark 
in a book. Then as fast as the orders were filled the mark or notch was erased. 

Many times in the early life of the writer it has been late in the winter 
before we were all comfortablv shod, and I remember one quite cold da\' when 
one of the children came in barefooted, and as she stood warming her hands be- 
fore the fire-place, she said: "Mother, I wish you would knit me some mittens." 



Every one has heard of wood-choppings, corn-huskings, carpet-rag 
sewings and barn-raisings, but perhaps all have not attended such enjoyable 
affairs. For the benefit of those who have not had this opportunity, I will tell 
yon about a barn-raising \sliieli m\- fatiur had. For three davs previous to the 
important day he searched the woods tor a wild turkey and after several unsuc- 
cessful trips he had about given u]) in despair when he discovered a fine 
gobbler. He shot him but not successfullv. for the gobbler flew awav and 
started faster than fatfier could follow through the underbrush, in the direction 
of father's cabin. Father was so disgusted with himself that he decided to give 
up having a turkey and started iiome very much disappointed, but to his sur- 
prise, after walking (piite a distance, he came across the turkey he had previ- 
ously shot. it had fallen in his path after flying quite a distance and lay there 
dead. The next day was the dav for barn-raising and the neighbors and friends 
far and near were coming to help do the work and enjoy the festivities. Early 
in the morning they began to arrive. Those whom I can now remember are: 
Enos Lewis; Hervy and Elma (Grisell) Lewis; Enslev and Amy (Grisell) 
Lewis; Joseph Hlackledge, Jr.; John Mitchner; Wm. and Elihu Hilliss; Daniel 
Votaw; Abraham Smith; Wm. Dugdale; Dr. Jas. Sawyer; Jonah Ire\', Sr. : Jas. 
Hiiskins: Jolin Sumption, Sr. ; Jos. Paxson and sons Joshua and Phillip. There 
were a great nianv otiiers but I cannot call their names to mind. 



RECOLLECrroNS XXI 

Aunt Elma was one of the women wlio lielped to cook the turkey. This 
was done in a large iron kettle which was placed over a fire out of doors. 1 had 
just made a bow and had taken great pains to season and shape it properly and 
had promised myself many good times with my bow and arrow. But in search- 
ino' for a couple of sticks to serve as a support to the turkey in the kettle, Aunt 
Elma spied my bow and not knowing its great value (?), she snatched it up and 
chopped into it before I had time to say a word to save it: so I said nothing: 
but I was nearly heartbroken. That one lick of the a.xe chopped some of my 
fondest hopes in two. 

What a fine dinner they had tliat chi)-, and how they all relished it. Be- 
sides the big turkey, we had chicken, corn-bread and butter, gravy and potatoes 
and baked squash, and, for dessert, pumpkin butter and pumpkin and 
custard pie. 

After the dinner was over, the women all strove to do all they could to 
help mother get the dishes washed and everything in proper order again, and 
the men resumed their work until they hatl it comjileted. Tlien came the fun: 
several of them grabbed father and lifting Jiim to their shoulders, carried him 
around the barn. That was the custom in those days. Then they began their 
athletic sports such as high jumping, throwing mauls, etc. Uncle Ensley 
Lewis could jump the highest without the aid of a pole, but witli the aid of a 
pole. Uncle Hervy Lewis could jump the liighest. My father, while he \s as 
not considered a strong man, could throw the maul the farthest. Tiius they all 
enjoyed the day to its close, when they dej.iarted to their homes. 



tEftr Pump Kin 

"O fruit loved by boyhood! the' old days recalling: 
When wood-grapes were purpling and brown nuts were falling! 
When wild, ugly faces were carved in its skin. 
Glaring out through the dark with a candle within! 
When we laughed round the corn-heap, with hearts all in tune; 
Our chair a broad pumpkin, our lantern the moon, 
Telling tales of the fairy who traveled like steam 
In a pumpkin-shell coach, with two rats for her team! 
Then thanks for thy present! — none sweeter or better 
E'er smoked from an oven or circled a platter! 
Fairer hands never wrought at a pastry more fine, 
Brighter eyes never watched o'er its baking, than thine! 
And the prayer, which my mouth is too full to express, 
Swells ray heart that thy shadow may never be less. 
That the days of thy lot may be lengthened below, 
And the fame of thy worth like a pumpkin-vine grow. 
And thy life be as sweet, and its last sunset sky 
Golden-tinted and fair as thy own pumpkin-pie" 



-John Grkenlkak WiUTTU-:!;. 



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ENOS AND SUSANAH (WOODERT) LEWIS (D* 

UT very little is known of the history of Enos and Susanah (Woodert) 
Lewis, w'ho were really the father and the mother of the "Lewis family" 
which is recorded in this book. We know they were pioneers of "Old 
Virginia,'' and that the Lewises were of 'Welsh descent. One of the oldest living 
descendants. Mar\- Ann (Lewis) Brown, says she remembers hearing her 
jieople tell about three brothers coming over from Wales, and that Enos Lewis 
was one of the three. Until just a few years ago, there was a chest in her 
father's family, which one of the brothers ( undoubtedly Enos) had to carry his 
baggage in when the)' came from Wales. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

JVami: Birth. Death. 

Eli Lewis Novembt 

Mary Lewis October 

Thomas Lewis October 25, 1757 June 7, 1S45 

Ab Lewis December 

Susanah Lewis January 

Rachel Lewis February 

Ann Lewis December 

Evan Lewis February 

Ruth Lewis Apr. or Junt 

We have not the date of the birth or death of Enos and Susanah Lewis, 
but judging from the birth of their oldest child, we would say they were born 
about 1730 if not earlier. 

We have made no effort to carry out the family records of any but Thomas 
Lewis. We have received some information, however, relating to the de- 
scendants of the brothers and sisters of Tliomas Lewis, which we give, trusting 
their descendants will some time compile the history of each of the iiuinbt-rs of 
Enos and Susanah ( Woodert) Lewis's family. 

In the copy of the old records, which we liave given on page 25 will be 
found a short family history of Ab Lewis, that being all the knowledge we have 
of him or his descendants. 

*Tlie figures at tin- i-iul of tlic names indicati- "lirst ^funulaliim," 'Srciiml ffcncnition," i-lc. 



24. 


1751 


4- 


1755 


25. 


1757 


2, 


1759 


6, 


1762 


9. 


1764 


31. 


1765 


4- 


1769 


-• 5> 


1771 



24 KKCCIRD OF THF. I.EUIS FAMILY 

Ann Lewis, better known as "Aunt Nancy," married a man by name of 
Reece Davis, and the\- have descendants in Jay County, Indiana. Mary Ann 
(Lewis) Brown, says she remembers having seen her, and that she was a small 
woman. She also remembers having seen "Aunt Ruth Lewis," and says she 
never married. She lived with a widow lady, near Birmingham. Guernsey 
County, Ohio, during her last years. 

From this same authority, we are informetl that Evan Lewis, was the 
father of Eli Lewis, better known as Dock Lewis, and Susanaii Lewis. Susanah 
Lewis married John Sumption. She was better known as "Aunt Susie Sump- 
tion." They also have descendants living in Jay County, Indiana. 

Outside of the history of Thomas Lewis's descendants, this is all the 
knowledge we have of the other members of the "first Lewis family." 

During our correspondence witli the relatives we have gained the follow- 
ing information concerning other Lewis families, whose early ancestors came 
from Wales, and some of them near the same time that Enos Lewis must have 
come. We give a few extracts from the letters received, hoping that in the 
future it may be the means of us learning more of our ancestry across the water. 

J. M. Lewis, secretary of the Barnesville Glass Company and president 
of the First National Bank, of Barnesville, Ohio, writes: "Mv father's name 
was Abel Lewis, his father Jacob Lewis, his father Samuel Lewis, his father 
John Lewis, his father Henry Lewis, his father Henry Lewis, his father Evan 
Lewis, who came to this country from Wales in 1682. Evan Lewis was born 
1620. His son Henry Lewis, was a friend and companion of William Penn, 
and he settled near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Up to the present generation 
they have all been Friends, commonly called 'Quakers,' followers of George 
Fox." 

Lewis H. Machen, an attorney at law of Alexandria, Virginia, says: "I 
believe that thi_' mother of my grandfatlier, Lewis H. Machen, was Sarah 
Lewis, who was the daughter of James, who was the son of Mncent, who was 
the son of William, who was the son of William, who came from Wales. I 
think it likely that your ancestor ami mine were related, possibly brothers, that 
is William and Enos Lewis. I do not know the date of William's emigration 
from Wales." "William Lewis, settled in Northumberland County, Virginia." 

Mary B. C. Fox, of Chicago, Illinois, who is collecting genealogical 
records, writes: "My ancestor, Thomas Lewis, died in the year 1771 in Fairfax 
County, Virginia. He was born in 1688." She did not say whether Thomas 
Lewis, was a native of Virginia, or not. 

We do not know whether Evan, William or Thomas (the earliest an- 
cestors of these three families) were any relation to Enos Lewis, who came from 
Wales, or not. Future developments in genealogical work, will be apt to dis- 
close many interesting facts concerning the early history of the Lewis familj'. 
The "Lewisiana." a small paper jmblished monthly, by Carl A. Lewis, in 
Guilford. Connecticut, is also collecting a vast amount of data with reference 
to the Lewises of America. 



RFXORD ()V THE IJ'.WIS FAMILY 25 

Tliinking it might be of interest to tiie descendants of Enos and Susanah 
Lewis, we will give an exact copy of tlie old records as the_v were given to us by 
William Lewis: — 

"A copy of family record of Enos Lewis and Susanah his wife, as copied 
bv William Lewis (son of Morgan Lewis) from an old record in 1848, then in 
possession of Emery Lewis, who resided at that time in Monroe County, Ohio." 

[There seems to be no record of the births of either Enos Lewis or Su- 
sanah his wife, whose maitlen name was "Woodert." — William Lewis.] 

"Eli Lewis, the son of Enos Lewis and Susanah liis wife, born the 24th 
of the gth mo., 1751, at 11 o'clock, night, ist day of the week. 

"Marv Lewis, daughter of Enos Lewis and Susanah his wife. born 4th da}- 
loth mo., 1755. in the afternoon, tlie 7th day of the week. 

•'Thomas Lewis, the son of Enos Lewis and Susanah his wife, was born 
25th dav of the loth mo., 1757, at 6 o'clock in the morning the 3rd day of the 
week. 

"Ab Lewis, son of Enos Lewis and Susanah his wife, was born 2nd day 
of i2th mo., 1759, at 8 o'clock in the evening, ist day of the week. 

'•Susanah Lewis, daughter of Enos Lewis and Susanah his wife, born 
6th Jan., 1762. at half hour past 8 o'clock night, the 4th day of the week. 

••Rachel Lewis, daughter of Enos Lewis and Susanah his wife, born gth 
day Feb., 1764, at 6 o'clock in the evening, 5th day of the week. 

"Ann Lewis, daughter of Enos Lewis and Susanah his wife, was born 
31st day Dec, 1765, about midnight the 3rd day of the week. 

"Evan Lewis, son of Enos Lewis and Susanaii his wife, iiorn 4th day, 
2nd mo., 1769, at 8 o'clock in the morning, 7th day of the week. 

"Ruth Lewis, daughter of Enos Lewis and Susanah his wife, born 5th 
day (of either 4th or 6th mo.) 1771, at 3 o'clock afternoon, 6th day of the 
week. " 

Record of Ab Lewis and Hannah his wife: — 

"Hannah Lewis, the daughter of Ab Lewis and Hannah his wife, born 
13th day of Dec. 1781, half past 12 o'clock, 6th day of the week. 

"Ab Lewis, son of Ab Lewis antl Hannah his wife, born 13th da)' of 
Dec, 1781, at lialf jjast 12 o'clock, 6th day of the week. 

"Rachel Lewis, daughter of Ab Lewis and Elizabeth liis wife, born 21st 
day of Aug., 1786, 7 o'clock morning and 7tli day of week." 

[Elizabeth Lewis seems to have been his second wife.] 

Record of Thomas Lewis and Mary his wife: — 

"Thomas Lewis, married Mary Morgan in the thirty-first year of his age, 
2 1 St day of 8th mo., 1788. 

"Mary Morgan, daughter of Morgan Morgan and Mary his wife, whose 
maiden name was Gausset, born 28th day of gth mo., 1768, and was married to 
Thos. Lewis in the 20th year of her age. 

"Morgan Lewis, son of Thos. Lewis and Maiy his wife, born 25tli of 7th 
mo., 1789, the 7th day of the week in tlie morning. 



26 " RECORD 01" THE LEWIS FAMILY 

"Thomas Lewis, son of Thos. Lewis and Mary his wife, born 14th day 
of 6th nio., 1791, 3rd day of week in the morning. 

'■EH Lewis, son of Thos. Lewis and ^Nlarv his wife, born 7th day of gth 
mo., 1793, the 7th da}- of the week in the afternoon, and departed this life the 
23rd day of mo., 1793, the 7th day of the week, and was interred in Hope- 
well Graveyard. 

"Mar}' Lewis, daughter of Thos. Lewis and Mary his wife, born 5th day 
of 4th mo., 1795, 4th day of the week in the morning, and departed this life 2nd 
day of loth month, 1S42, at her father's house in Sunsberry Settlement, 
Monroe Co., Ohio. 

"Susanah Lewis, daughter of Thos. Lewis and ^lary his wife, born igth 
of 7th mo., 1796, morning of 3rd da}' of the week, and dijiarted this life 4th 
day of Sth mo., 1798; was interred in the Hopewell Graveyard. 

"Lyda Lewis, daughter of Thos. Lewis and Mary his wife, born nth 
day of nth mo., 1797. in the morning of the 7th day of the week. 

"Enos Lewis, son of Thos. Lewis and Mary his wife, born 9th dav of 
loth mo., 1799, 4th dav of the week in the afternoon. 

"Catherine Lewis, daughter of Thos. Lewis and Mary his wife, born 14th 
dav of 9th mo., 1801, in the afternoon of the 2nd day of the week. 

"Emery Lewis, son of Thos. Lewis and Mary his wife, born nth day of 
6th mo., 1803. 7th day of the week at night. 

"Hervy Lewis, son of Thos. Lewis and Mary his wife, born 26th dav 4th 
mo., 1806, in the evening. 

"Ira Lewis, son of Thos. Lewis and Mary his wife, born 8th dav 6th mo., 
1807, in the morning. 

"Atlantic O. Lewis, daughter of Thos. Lewis and Mary his wife, born 
1 2th day of 5th mo. , i8og, the 6th day of the week at two o'clock in the afternoon. 

"Syra Lewis, son of Thos. Lewis and Mary his wife, born 14th day of 
9th mo., i8n, 7th day of the week in the afternoon. 

"Ensley Lewis, son of Thos. Lewis and Mary his wife, born 13th day of 
gth mo.. 1814, about i o'clock in the afternoon." 

THOMAS AND MARY -MORGAN) LEWIS (2) 

Thomas Lewis, son of Enos and Susanah (W'oodert) Lewis, was born 
Oct. 25, 1757, in Frederick County, 'Virginia, as near as can be ascertained, and 
died June 7, 1845, in the " Sunsbury Settlement," Malaga Township, 
Monroe Count}', Ohio, and was interred in the Friends' Cemetery, near Suns- 
burv Meeting House. 

Mary Morgan, daugiiter of Morgan and Mary (^Gausset) Morgan, was 
born Sept. 28, 1768, near Hedgeville, near Morgantown, Monongalia County, 
Virginia, and died May 5, 1855, near West Grove, Penn Township. Jav 
County, Indiana. Her remains were interred in the West Grove Cemetery. 

Thomas Lewis and Mary Morgan were united in marriage, Aug. 21, 1788, 
in N'irginia. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 2/ 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name. Birth. Death. 

Morgan Lewis July 25, 1789 Sept. 11, 1840 

Thomas Lewis June 14, 1791 June 7. 1859 

Eli Lewis Sept. 7, 1793 23, 1793 

Maiy Lewis April 5, 1795 Oct. 2, 1842 

Susanah Lewis ]\\\y ig, 1796 Aug. 4, 1798 

Lyda Lewis Nov. 11, 1797 May 13, 1850 

Enos Lewis Oct. 9. 1799 Aug. 9, 1889 

Catherine Lewis Sept. 14, 1801 April 14. 1889 

Emery Lewis Jii''>e 1 1, 1803 Sept. 8. 1857 

Hervy Lewis April 26. 1806 Aug. 22, 1892 



14. 


180I 


I II 


1803 


26. 


1806 


s, 


1807 


12, 


1809 


14. 


IMII 


13. 


181 4 



Ira Lewis June S, 1807 1833 

Atlantic Ocean Lewis May 12, 1809 March 16, 1873 

Syra Lewis Sept. 14, iMii Sept. 29. 1855 

Ensley Lewis Sept. 13, 1814 Jan. 31, 1866 

Morgan, Thomas, Eli, Mary, Susanah, Lyda. Enos and Catherine were 
born in Frederick County, \'irginia, Emery near Redstone, Fayette County, 
Pennsylvania, and Hervy, Ira, Atlantic O., Syra and Ensley in Short Creek 
Township, Harrison County, Ohio. 

In the old records the month of Eli's death was not given. We are 
informed that he died from the result of sw^allowing a brass button, while they 
were living in Virginia. Susanah's death also occurred in Virginia, supposed to 
have been caused by "bold hives." They were both interred in the Hopewell 
Cemetery, in Frederick County, Virginia. 

Mary Lewis, better know as "Aunt Polly," died at the home of her 
parents, in the "Sunsbury Settlement," Monroe County, Ohio, and was interred 
in the Sunsbury Friends' Cemetery near the Friends' Meeting House of the 
same name. She is spoken of as a very beautiful character. Dr. William 
Schooley, who was also a minister in tlie Society of Friends, was her attending 
physician during her illness. She had been for many years a great sufferer and 
w-hen she realized that death was near, she asked him to be present at her 
funeral. He is said to have preached a powerful sermon, and spoke in the 
highest terms of "Aunt Polly." She was a member of the Friends' Society. 

We have collected a few items concerning the lives and characters of 
Thomas and Mary (Morgan) Lewis, which we will submit to the other de- 
scendants, thinking they too will be interested in the slightest knowledge of 
these grandh' noble people. 

"Grandfather" and "Grandmother" Lewis (as they are known among the 
relatives, while to some they are many times great-grandfather and grand- 
mother) located in Frederick County, Virginia, after their marriage, where they 
lived several years. "Grandfather" was a stone mason bv trade. He also did 



28 RECORD ()!■ THE LEWIS EAMILV 

some fanning and during the winter worked at the weaver's trade. The\' were 
both of Welsh descent. 

"Grandmother" Lewis's father was a minister in the ('hurcii of England 
(Episcopal Church) and before her marriage, "grandmother" sang in his choir. 
Some of the relatives think there was some dissatisfaction when "grandfather" 
and "grandmother" were married, but we hardly have enough knowledge of 
their early lives and circumstances to substantiate that conjecture. However, 
we can give the evidence that has led to that idea. The Morgans were wealthy 
and all of them slave owners (unless perhaps we can except Morgan Morgan, 
who some of the relatives think was opposed to slavery). Thomas Lewis was 
a strong abolitionist and had no sympathy whatever with slave owners. As we 
have said before, grandmother's father was a minister in the Church of England 
which was one of the most aristocratic of those days. Thomas Lewis, was a 
"Quaker." a religion to which the former church was very much opposed. 
Then we know that "grandfather" and "grandmother" began life in very humble 
surroundings. In after years "grandmother" used to often tell the grand- 
children: "The first place that grandfather and I lived was in a building that 
had once been used for a stable, and those were some of the happiest days of 
our lives." With this knowledge we might infer that "grandmother" was dis- 
inherited. 

We cannot help admiring the spirit with which she gave up her position 
and comfortable surroundings, and found joy in their humble home. In later 
years when through industry and natural ability, they had acquired home and 
friends, together with the distinction of being considered the wealthiest family 
in Harrison County, Ohio, she looked back njion the humble beginning as one 
of the happiest epochs of their lives. Truly, "those ties which link the poor 
man to his humble hearth, are of the true metal and bear the stamp of heaven." 

In 1802, with tjicir family of six children, they removed to Fayette County, 
Pennsylvania, and located near Redstone, living there about two years when 
they removed to Harrison County, Ohio, where they purchased land near 
Georgetown, in Short Creek township, (jrandfather owned a farm of two 
hundred acres here, and had a great many fine horses in which he took par- 
ticular pride. A short time before his death, they sold their property in Harri- 
son Count}', and removed to Monroe County, of the same State, locating in the 
"Sunsbury Settlement," near Malaga. (Malaga was the nearest town to their 
home, in those days, but Jerusalem is now the nearest to the old homestead.) 
Here is where "grandfather" Lewis died. 

"Grandfather" Lewis was tall and broad-shouldered, with an abundance 
of strength to carry out the tlictates of his heart, which was alive to all the 
interests of mankind. 1 le was a good counselor at law, and being a man of 
strong decision, true judgment and firmness (which almost amounted to stera- 
ness), he was appealed to by many for advice and supi)ort. After their removal 
to Ohio he was called as a juryman and was in demand to serve in that capacity 
as long as he was physically ablu to attend to business matters. He did not 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS i-AMIEY 2g 

■fear prejudice or custom, but with a mind which saw the justice and the injus- 
tice, set about to relieve all suffering as far as it was in his power. 

"Grandfather," "grandmother" and their family were all members of the 
Friends' Society, holding their membership in tlie West Grove Meeting, Short 
Creek Township, Harrison Count}-, Ohio. This Meeting was located near 
Georgetown, but no longer exists. 

One authority says "grandmother" witlidrew from the Cluirch of England 
quite awhile after her marriage, and with her children went into meeting to be 
taken in, all the same day. We think "grandfather" was a life-long and an 
active member of the Friends' Society. When the division was made, he was 
so displeased that the old Meeting could not hold together that he seldom ever 
attended either the Hicksite or the Orthodo.x Friends Meeting, but remained a 
member until his death. 

They were among the early supporters of the anti-slavery movement. The 
organized and systematic work hail not yet begun, but they belongetl to an 
Abolition Meeting. 

They left \'irginia on account of the prevailing custom of owning slaves in 
that State. After moving to Ohio, they united their strength to help all slaves 
to freedom that came their way, and more than one poor, trembling lugitive 
found shelter under their roof. 

They worked for the good of mankind all through their lives. "Grand- 
father" in his stern, decisive wav. which caused everyone, even his own chil- 
dren to stand in awe of him, while at the same time they admired his courage 
and strength, and "grandmother" in that gentle, svmpathetic manner which 
won the love of all. 

Of the loving kindness of "grantlmother" as she is remembered bv the 
grandchildren, there seems to be no words sufficiently expressive. In asking 
them about her life and character there is but one conclusion, and that is her 
wonderful goodness and sympathy. If we were to give all the praise and eulogy 
that has been w ritten us of her life, it would cover several pages. 

One of the grandchildren wdiom "grandmother" cared for after his father's 
death for several years, says: "She raised a family of sixteen children and I 
never heard her speak an impatient word." No amount of (]uestioning makes 
him waver on that statement. iJesides her own familv, she helped to care for 
some of her grandchildren. 

Another, who spent much of her childhood with ••granduu:)tlur." in speak- 
ing of her says: "Dear old grandmother Lewis. I low much can be said of 
her virtues. She has always seemed to me like the i)ersonification nl purity 
and kindness. She was naturally reticent, though nian\- of her wise savings 
were indicative of a mind rich in thought" 

She has no children living to tell of her swet-t niotherliness, which went so 
far toward making them a complete famih- of good, honest reformers. ISnt we 
cannot cite one who was not lo\al to tlu' wonderful teachings recei\ed fiom 
their parents. They all took an active pail in the emancipation of the 
slave, and were also active in other reforms which at their beginning were met 



30 RECORD OF THE LKWIS FAMILY 

with imicli opposition, but which have developed until today, any man could be 
proud of being among the early supporters of them. To say they all revered 
their mother is not expressing it in too strong terms, and she deserved their 
reverence. 

William Lewis wrote of a little incident in grandmother's life which por- 
trays her character in its true light, and no doubt her whole life was filled with 
such deeds. This occurred when they were living in Ohio, during the early 
settling of that State, and when there were but few conveniences for jiroviding 
food for the people, except as they hunted the game and such vegetables as 
they could raise. It was a very serious matter with them when they were out 
of flour, especially in the winter time. W'e give the story as written to us: — 

"James Adams told me when I was visiting in Ohio, that his family got 
out of breadstuff one terribly cold winter, and the water had frozen up at 
Lamb's grist mill so there could be no grinding done. Adams, having used the 
last of their bread that morning, went to grandfather's to borrow some flour. 
Grandfather was a great talker and did not give Adams an opportunity to make 
his wants known at once. Finally he told him his errand, and grandfather told 
him he believed they had baked up the last of their flour that morning also; 
turning to grandmother to see if it was not so, she said it was true, and they 
had just taken the bread out of the oven (a large adobe oven, located out of 
doors). Adams said, 'By jing, I thought I'd better be on the move, so I 
started toward the door, when I felt a light touch on my arm and turning round, 
grandmother gave me a nod and started toward the back porch and kitchen. 
There she had a danged big hot loaf of bread which she handed to me saying: 
"This will do j'ou for one more meal." By jing,' he said, 'there was some- 
thing came up in m\- throat and I could not say a word.' " 

James .\dams was rather rough in his manner, but a ver}' kind-hearted 
man. He said to me, "When Grandmother Lewis dies she will go straight to 
heaven." 

Of course, we of the present generation can hardly appreciate the mag- 
nanimous generosity of grandmother's deed. We cannot realize what it meant 
in the earh' settlements to be without bread in midwinter, when the mills were 
not in operation, and a large family to provide for. 

Of such was grandmother's life; she paved her way to heaven with good 
deeds. 

" I count this thing to be grandly true. 

That a noble deed is a step toward God — 
Lifting the soul from the common sod 
To purer air and broader view." 

The following is an exact copy of a letter written to William D. Hoff, by 
Ex-Governor F. H. Pierpont, of West Virginia, which gives us quite a clear 
idea of the Morgan ancestry : — 



RECORD OK THE I.KWIS KAMILY 3I 

Fairmont, W. Va. , Oct. i8, 1889. 
Wm. D. Hoi-k, Esq., 

St. ClaiisviUe, Ohio. 

Dear Sir: — Col. Morgan Morgan, the founder of this branch of the family 
in this country and as far as we can trace it, was born in Wales, England, edu- 
cated in London, during the reign of William the 3rd, and emigrated to the 
Colony of Delaware earl)' in the reign of Queen Ann. He married a Pennsyl- 
vania lady. His children were James, Ann, David,* Charles, Henry, Evan, 
Zack<]inll and Morgan.* 

David Morgan, third child, was born Mvc. 20, 1721. It was he that en- 
countered the two Indians. 

James Morgan, the eldest son and brother of David, removed to Indian 
Territory somewhere from 1765 to 1780. I could not get this date. He is 
spoken of as a restless pioneer, and after his marriage in Berkley Co., Virginia, 
he moved to Fayette Co., Pennsylvania, witii his brother Morgan.* They were 
not satisfied there and then removed to this county (Marion) W. Va., and in a 
short time removed to Indiana. His descendants went farther west; some of 
them are now in Wisconsin, Iowa and still farther west. 

Charles Morgan died in Berkle\' Co., \'irginia. 

Henry removed to South Carolina before the Revolutionary war. 

Zackquill Morgan was the founder of Morgantown (county seat of Monon- 
galia Co. ) W. Va. He was mv great-grandfather. My grandfather Pierpont, 
married his eldest daughter. Two of his sons. Morgan and Levi ( Morgan), 
were distinguished Indian spies. His youngest son, Capt. Zack., fell from 
overheat at the Battle of Bradenburg 

The other members of the familv lived and died of old age in tliis section 
of the country. 

I should have remarked that Morgan Morgan, the ancestor, emigrated to 
Berkley Co., Virginia, about 1722. 

The tradition of the family is, that David Morgan did not tlay those In- 
dians. He had only risen from a bed of sickness three or four days before, 
went to look after his children, and while talking to them the Indians made 
their appearance. After some skirmisiiing he shot one of them, the other en- 
countered him with a tomahawk, threw it. and in warding off the blow witli iiis 
gun Morgan lost two of his fingers. They then clinched and in the tussle Mor- 
gan got the Indian's thumb in his mouth and held it to the end of the battle. 
The Indian had on an apron he had gotten in the house. This was over his 
knife. Morgan was underneath (he was an old man) but he held onto tin- 
thumb and had both hands free. The Indian got to the handle of tiie knife. 
Morgan got the hand and snatched the knife, stabbed the Indian and left him, 
knowing he must die. He went to the Fort and went to bed. where he re- 

* Where \vc h:ive phiceil a cross it is to indicate eitlier Morgan tlic fatlier of Mary (Morijaiif Lewis, or 
David the uncle. 

Note— The raider jolin Morgan of the civil war was a lineal descendant of Col. Morgan Morgan. 



32 RECORD OF THr LEWIS EAMILY 

mained three or four da\s from the loss of blood. He told his friends what had 
taken place and four or five of them went and found the Indian not yet dead. 
They treated him roughly. He asked them to tomahawk liim. They did so. 
A man present whose brother had been killed a few days before flayed him. 
This the family claim is true. 

David Morgan was an Episcopalian, had a brother, a minister (Morgan 
Morgan). David was reputed a kind-iiearted, benevolent man, but a man of 
courage. He was a small man and by no means an athlete. His descendants 
have honored themselves by erecting a monument to his memory. 

The old Morga^ns say that Gen. Daniel Morgan (of the Revolution) was 
a relative colateral with Col. Morgan Morgan. 

1 am truly yours, 

F. H. PlERPONT. 

The story of David Morgan's Indian fight has been the topic of quite a 
little interest and discussion among the relatives. We have it as it was published 
in "Romance and Tragedy of Pioneer Life," by Augustus Lynch Mason, and as 
the older members of the family have related it to us. Several of them have 
heard Grandmother Mary (Morgan) Lewis, tell the story repeatedly. We also 
have a short sketch of it, which will be found in Gov. Pierpont's letter. We 
will trv to give the most correct version. 

During the early conflicts with tile Indians in West Virginia all of the 
white settlers were forced to go to the fort in order to protect themselves. 
David Morgan's cabin was on the Monongahela River, and quite a distance 
from the fort. He was getting to be quite old. but still braved the dangers of 
frontier life. There being some work that needed attention at their home, 
David Morgan's son and daughter started to attend to it, and while they were 
gone David went to sleep and dreamed that the Indians were near his children. 
He arose and told his wife he must go and see if they were in danger. He 
started immediately and found the children calndy working in the field with no 
indications of danger anywhere. Taking a seat on the top rail of the worm 
fence, he was giving some directions concerning the work, wlien he suddenly 
discovered two Indians standing in his cabin door. The Indians had taken 
possession and were parching corn in the cabin. On realizing their danger, he 
directed the ciiildreii to r\in for their lives, and lie did likewise, however in a 
different direction from which tile children took, with the hope of thus protect- 
ing them. The Indians were- in rapid pursuit, one following the children and 
one after the aged father. As soon as David reached the timber he turned and 
fired at his pursuer, killing liiui instantly. The other Indian turned when he 
saw his comrade fall and lea\iiig them started after the fatiier. As he neared 
iiim he threw his tomahawk, and to ward ofl the blow David threw up his gun 
and tile tomahawk struck his hand, cutting off two of his fingers. 

The Indian started to gel liis knife, but David instantly grappled with 
liim, hurling him to the ground. An aw tul struggle ensued, but the youth and 



RECORD OF THE I.I':\\IS FAMILY 33 

superior strength of the Indian availed to turn him. The savage planted liis 
knee on his opponent's breast, with the old man's arms pinioned. During the 
struggle David had succeeded in getting the.' Indian's thumb between his teeth, 
causing the Indian to howl with rage and to struggle furiously, but the old man 
held on with the grip of a steel vice. When the Indian again tried to get his 
knife, it was underneatli the apron, which he had stolen from the cabin and tied 
around his waist and with superhuman strength David gave a quick jerk, releas- 
ing his hands and still holding on to the Indian's finger, he grabbed for the 
knife himself. He succeeded in getting hold of the handle, and jerking it 
through the Indian's hand, quick as thought he plunged it into the Indian's 
side, then into his stomach; the latter fell over on his side, apparently dead. 

David arose, greatly exhausted by the exertion and excitement of the 
struggle, and feebly started for the fort, at the same time looking for his 
children. He discovered his little girl hidden behind a log. She believed her 
father dead, having seen him when the Indian had him down. 

The boy had swum the river and was hurrying to the fort for help. The 
men soon came to rescue David, but found he had overpowered his assailants 
and was trving to get home. After reaching the fort he was in bed several days 
from weakness and loss of blood. 

The rescue party started to hunt the Indian, but found on reaching the 
spot where the struggle had taken place that he was not there, but had drawn 
the knife out and stuck it in tlie ground. On searching a little farther, they 
found him near a clumj) of bushes. He raised his head and feebly uttered, 
"Brothers." The whites however failed to acknowledge the claim of relation- 
ship, and he was killed, scalped and skinned, the hide being tanned by the 
settlers for bullet pouches. 



MORGAN AND MARY (THORN) LEWIS (3) 

Morgan Lewis, son of Thomas and Mary ( Morgan) Lewis, was born, 
July 25, 1789, in Frederick Countv, Virginia, and died September 11, 1840, near 
West Grove, Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. His remains were interred 
in the West Grove cemetery of the same place. 

Mary Thorn, daughter of Isaac and Hannah- (Shotwell) Tliorn. was born 
December 13, 1792, near Rahway, Union County, New Jerse}', and died .August 
5, 1834, at the " old tan-yard home," near (Georgetown, Short Creek Tow nship, 
Harrison County, Ohio, and was interred in Ilic l''riends' cemetery, at West 
Grove, of the same township. 

Morgan Lewis and Mary Thorn were united in marriage (about 181 1, as 
near as can be ascertained) by the "Ouaker" eertuuony, in West Cjrove Meet- 
ing, Short Creek Townsliip. Harrison Countv, Ohio. 



34 



RECORD OF THK LEWIS EAMILV 



xVtlWf 



TO in I'M WKUI', HORN 



Death 

September 25, 1870 

December 25, 1876 

November 22, 1879 

October 20, 1886 



March 


31- 


1863 


August 


5. 


1899 


April 


6, 


1891 


August 


3. 


1834 


January- 


21, 


1897 



Isaac Lewis. November 19, 1812 

Thomas Lewis Januar\' 6, 1815 

Hannah Lewis September 27, 1817 

Sarah Lewis January 21, 1820 

Mary Ann Lewis August 28, 1822 

William Lewis December 11, 1824 

Parker Lewis March 4, 1827 

Rachel Lewis August 28. 1 829 

Narcissa Lewis October 15, 1832 

Tliey were all born at the "old tan-yard home," near Georgetown, Short 
Creek Township, Harrison County, Ohio. 

MORGAN AND SARAH iWlLSONj LEWIS LEWIS (3) 

After the death ot Mary (Thorn ) Lewis, Morgan Lewis was united in 
marriage to Sarah (Wilson) Lewis (widow of Ira Lewis), in 1835. in Short 
Creek Townsliip, Harrison County. Ohio (probabl\' in West Grove Friends 
Meeting). 

TO THEM WERE BORN 



N^ame Birth 

Katherine Lew'is Ma\' 24, 1836 

Jolm \\ilson Lewis November 8, 1838 



Death 



September 4, 1S60 



They were born at the •■old tan-vard home," in Short Creek Township, 
Harrison County, Ohio. 

John W. Lewis was considered a very fine and promising young man, 
and was about twenty-two years old when he died. 

Morgan and Mary (Thorn ) Lewis located on twenty acres of land ad- 
joining the Thomas Lewis homestead (probably given to him b}' his father). 
Here Mr. Lewis had established a tan-yard, after learning the tanner's trade in 
Harrisville. He was also engaged in farming to some extent. 

Mrs. Lewis was of English descent and a member of the Friends' Society. 
Her ])arents were married in Rahwa)', Union County, New Jersey, and lived 
there until about 1804 or 1806, when they emigrated to Ohio. They were both 
members of the Friends' Society. 

After Mr. Lewis' second marriage, they still lived on the same farm until 
in 1839, when during the Indiana settlement excitement the^^ took their family 
and removed to that State, locating about one mile east of West Grove, in 
Penn Township, Jay County. They had lived here hardl}' a j'ear when Mr. 
Lewis w-as taken ill and died. After his burial the family returned to the old 
home in Harrison Count)', Ohio. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 35 

Morgan Lewis was of Welsh descent. He was a fine looking man. with 
an intellect that combined with his physical strength, enabled him to do mucli 
good. He was a talented public speaker and was looked upon as a leader in 
the community in which he lived. He was a conscientious member of the 
Friends' Society and held the office of clerk of the Ohio Yearly Meeting of 
Friends. One of the men who has since filled that office said, "Morgan Lewis 
was the best and finest looking clerk I ever knew." 

After Mr. Lewis's death Mrs. Lewis raised the family of children with 
true motherly care. Her step-children loved her as devotedly as her own. She 
lived to be eighty-seven years old, and was brigiit and well preserved mentally 
and physically until the day of her death. She was raised a Friend, but later 
in life united with the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Henry Heberling, son of Henry and Hannah (Lewis) Heberling, one of 
the grandchildren of Morgan Lewis, sent the following tribute to the descend- 
ants of this trulv great and noble man, which we gladh' add to the family 
record : — 

" Having been associated with the sons and daughters of this noted par- 
entage all of my life, and for thirty years an observer of men and the passions 
and prejudices which too often control them. 1 would esteem it a privilege to 
lay upon the altar of this occasion a tribute to those sterling qualities of mind 
and heart which distinguished the members of the Morgan Lewis faniilv. They 
were all exceedingly fortunate in the selection of tlieir life companions, as these 
were all men and women of superior moral and intellectual attainments. I am 
familiar with their attitude upon all questions relating to the duties and re- 
sponsibilities of life. I have witnessed their ascent of the heights of moral and 
social grandeur and see them standing upon the summit of human possibilities, 
pointing 'the way and the life.' They were tolerant in all things religious; 
intolerant only upon intolerance. They loved their fellow man. Was he 
enhungered, they gave him meat; was he athirst, they gave him drink ; was he 
sick and in prison, they ministered unto him ; was he bleeding antl h(.'lpless by 
the wayside, they rose above the prejudices of race, nationality and cried, and 
healing his wounds, proclaimed him brother. 

"The Christian homes over which the\' presided were the epitome of all 
that is best in our civilization. I use the word Christian in no dogmatic sense, 
but as typified by the life and character of Jesus and as exemplified in the vir- 
tues which adorned these homes. Here, for many long years, the lights have 
burned undimmed ; here, the returning prodigal, whether flushed by success or 
humbled by defeat, has found appreciation and consolation ; here, the unfortu- 
nate whether deficient by nature, the victim of his own or of society's wrongs, 
has found an asylum. 

"The character of these homes will be perpetuated by the impetus which 
they have given to those who were nurtured within their folds, for they who go 
forth from their thresholds w-ill neither rise so high, neither will tlie\- sink so 
low, as not to be amenable to their influences. 



36 RECORD or THE LEWIS FAMILY 

" The lights are growing dim, but when they are all gone out and the 
ashes have grown cold, pilgrims will return to those Meccas and from the ashes 
of their hearthstones they will rekindle upon the altar of other homes their 
sacred fire. 

"To epitomize: Their lives were tempered by the principle of self-sac- 
rifice, which is the keystone in the arch of individual and social redemption." 

THOMAS AND LYDIA 1 MORRIS) LEWIS 3) 

Thomas Lewis, son of Thomas and Marj' (Morgan) Lewis, was born 
June 14, 1791, in Frederick County, \'irginia, and died June 7, 1859, in Wash- 
ington Township, Guernsej' County. Ohio. Interment at the same place. 

Lydia Morris, daughter of and ( ) 

Morris, was born December 14, 1791, at Harrisville, Harrison Count}', Ohio, 
and died about 1847 in Washington Township, Guernsey County, Ohio. Inter- 
ment at the same place. 

Thomas Lewis and Lydia Morris were united in marriage about 1821 in 
Ohio, by the Friends' ceremony. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Dcatli 

Hannah Lewis 1827 

Thomas Hervy Lewis J wt-' 26. 1830 

Edward Morris Lewis 1833 .... -About 1875 

Mary Elizabeth Lewis Died in infancy. 

They were all born in Wasliingtoii Township, Guernsey County, Ohio. 

Mary E. died and was buried at the place of her birth. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis purchased land in Washington Township, Guernsey 
County, Ohio, when that part of the country was new. Mr. Lewis begun the 
erection of his cabin at once, and as soon as that was completed built a log 
stable. While he was building his cabin and plastering in the chinks between 
the logs, he laid his plug of tobacco on a log and did not notice it until he was 
just ready to throw the mortar on the spot where it lay. He thought, "let it 
go," and plastered it in. He was a great lover of the weed, and many weeks 
afterward, on getting out of tobacco, became so hungr\' for it that he went and 
dug the mortar out, got his plug of tobacco and chewed it. Many of the earlv 
Settlers Were very fond of tobacco, and this little incident proves the power the 
habit can have over a strong man. 

.\nother incident is related which occurred during their earl}' settlement 
tliere in the woods. Mr. Lewis was just completing his log stable, and he was 
so homesick that when he began to put on the shingles he started at the comb, 
and had completed quite a little work when a Mr. Scott passed by, and seeing 
the mistake told him that the water would all nm into the stable with the shin- 
gles on that way, so Mr. Lewis had to begin his work over again. 



RECORD OK THE LEWIS FAMILY 37 

They planted a large number of fruit trees which grew into a fine orchard. 
Their children were all born in the old log cabin, but in 1845 Mr. Lewis burned 
the brick and built a large brick house with a brick wall through the center, 
dividing the three stories — cellar, first and second story into two large rooms. 

One of the neighbor's daughters, who afterward became Mr. Lewis's 
daughter-in-law, says: •• Everybody in that neighborhood called Mr. and Mrs. 
Lewis 'Uncle Tommy' and 'Aunt L)-dia. ' It was tiieir delight to have us all 
come in and spend the evening, and many a jolly evening we youngsters had 
around their fireplace. We would play school and Aunt Lvdia would be the 
teacher and would tell us stories: then go to the cellar and bring up a large pan 
of apples, and what fun we had eating apples and counting the seeds. 

" Uncle Tommy was very fond of hounds; he often said the baying of 
the hounds was the sweetest music in the world to him. I have seen him burn 
a bone, tie a string to it, and drag it around the fields, then put the dogs on the 
trail just to hear them ba\'. 

'•While they lived there they got enough coal off of their farm to supplv 
their own need, but in the last few years there have been great coal banks 
opened there." 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis were members of tile Friends' Society and were 
true Christians. 

Morgan M. Lewis says: ■•When Uncle Thomas Lewis visited in In- 
diana in the 50's I had an opportunity to see and learn something of the true 
man. He was a lover of children and knew how to entertain them. No task 
was too hard for him if it was going to give the boys some pleasure. He would 
go hunting, fishing or skating, it made no difference, and he was always a 
genial companion. He was quite an athlete; a little above the metlium in size, 
and in his day had no superiors as a wrestler. 

"His great warm heart seemed to radiate all around and his influence 
was always on the side of humanity and right doing. It would have been hard 
for one to have been profane or to have violated the golden rule in his 
presence." 

GEORGE AND LYDIA (LEWlSi FRAME (3) 

Lydia Lewis, daughter of Thomas and Mary (Morgan) Lewis, was born 
November 11, 1797, in Frederick County, \'irginia, and died May 13, 1850, near 
Jerusalem, Monroe County, Ohio. 

George Frame, son of Benjamin and Elizabeth ( ) Frame, was born 

in and died earl\- in the summer of 1820 

or 1821, near Georgetown, Short Creek Township, Harrison County, Oliio. 

George Frame and Lydia Lewis were united in marriage about the year 
1817, in West Grove Meeting, near Georgetown, Harrison County, Oliio, by tin- 
Friends' ceremony. 



38 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

TO THEiM WERE HORN 

A^iimr Birth Death 

Elizabeth Ann Frame August 13, 1818 .... May 5, 1852 

Thomas Lewis Frame January 4, 1820 

They were born near Georgetown, Short Creek Township, Harrison 
County. Ohio. 

Mrs. and Mrs. Frame located near Georgetown, Short Creek Township, 
Harrison County, Ohio, where Mr. Frame w-as engaged in farming. They were 
both members of the Hicksite Friends' Society, holding their membership in the 
West Grove Meeting, near Georgetown. Mr. Frame was of Irish, and Mrs. 
Frame of Welsh descent. After Mr. Frame's death Mrs. Frame took the chil- 
dren and lived with her parents about eight years, when she was again married. 

NATHAN P. AND LYDIA (LEWIS) (FRAME) GRISELL (3) 

Nathan Fennel Grisell, son of Edward and Hannah (Taylor) Grisell, was 

born , 1800, in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, and died in June, 

1870, in Loydsville, Belmont County, Ohio. 

Nathan P. Grisell and Lydia Lewis were united in marriage , , 

1828, in West Grove Friends' Meeting, near Georgetown, Short Creek Town- 
ship. Harrison County. Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 
Hannah Taylor Grisell February 24, 1830 

She was born near Somerton, Belmont County, Ohio. 

Mr. Grisell w-as of English descent and was a minister in the Friends' 
Society (Hicksite Branch). His father was a brother of Thomas Grisell, Sr. , 
and a son of Joseph and Margaret (Tolbert) Grisell. 

Mr, and Mrs. Grisell located near Somerton, Belmont County, Ohio, 
where they lived until the time of her death. Mr. Grisell was a "Recom- 
mended" minister of the Friends' Society for thirty years, during which time he 
traveled a great deal. He followed farming for his own and his family's sup- 
port, as the Friends were conscientiously opposed to a "hireling ministry." 

Through our correspondence we have learned something of the high esti- 
mate in which Mr. and Mrs. Grisell were held among those who knew them. 
The following brief sketches of their lives were sent to us by their daughter, 
Hannah Grisell Yocum: — 

" Mr. Grisell was very methodical and precise, honest and industrious 
and carried his religion into the every-day affairs of life. Being of a liappy, 
mirthful disposition he made home pleasant for all. 

" Mrs. Grisell was a woman of remarkable consciousness and kindness. 
She was a friend and reliance to the whole community in time of need. She 
was orderly and economical and possessed rare home-making qualities." 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 39 

In her letter to us she furtlier said : "The most beautiful picture that 
hangs on memory's walls is that of my dear fatlu^r and mother, as they wallstd 
hand in hand toward their high Christian ideal, thus exemplifying the teachings 
of our blessed Master in their daily lives. I retain these remembrances as valued 
treasures. They are so inseparably blended with the hope — j'es, the assurance 
of a reunion with all of the dear ones." 

ENOS AND MARGARET GRISELL) LEWIS (3) 

Enos Lewis, son of Thomas and Mary (Morgan) Lewis, was born Octo- 
ber g, 1799, in Frederick County, Virginia, and died August g, iS8g, near West 
Grove, Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. Interment in the West Grove 
cemetery. 

Margaret Grisell, daughter of Thomas and Martha (Dingee ) Grisell, was 
born April 11, 1802, near Brownsville, Washington County, Pennsylvania, and 
died August 20, 1882, near West Grove, Penn Township. Jay County, Indiana. 
Int rment in the West Grove cemetery. 

Enos Lewis and Margaret Grisell were united in marriage Februar\- 22, 
1829, in Friends' Meeting ntar New Garden. Columbiana County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE liOKN 

N'lii/n- Birth  n.uilh 

Emily Rakestraw Lewis October 21, 1830 

Martha Ann Lewis December 25, 1831 

Thomas Grisell Lewis October 16, 1833 .... June 11, 1895 

Morgan Berney Lewis .'\pril g, 1837 .... July 11, i8g8 

Joseph Dingee Lewis December 19, 1838 .... September 30, 1895 

Emery Hillis Lewis July 17, 1841 .... September 2, 1852 

James Monroe Lewis October 24, 1844 ... September 29, 1854 

Emily R., Martha A., Thomas G., and Morgan B. were born in the 
"Old Stone House," near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio; Joseph 1)., 
Emery H., and James M. near West Grove, Penn Township, )ay Count\', 
Indiana. 

Emery H. and James M. died at tlu- place of their birth and were in- 
terred in the West Grove cemetery. 

Mr. Lewis was of Welsh and Mrs. Lewis of English and Welsh disri'nt. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis lived with the latter's mother in the "Old Stone 
House," near New Garden, several years after their marriage. In 1837, accom- 
panied by their mother, Martha (Dingee) Grisell, they emigrated to Indiana 
and entered two hundred and forty acres (jf government land, in Section 13. 
Penn Township, Jay County. Mr. Lewis immediately began clearing liie trees 
and shrubbery away and erected a rude log cabin where he and his family lived 
for some time. 

One of the daughters wrote, " We lived \c r\' ha[")i)il\' in that wild 
wilderness. 1 think it was the happiest time of our lives. The cabin that 



RKCORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY ij 

father built had neither doors nor windows, just lo^s cut out so that wc i ould 
get in and out and a ([uilt hung up at the opening in place of a door. We iiad 
no floor and no fire-place. The fire was built on the ground in the middle of 
the house and a place left in the roof for the smoke to go out. I was very small 
then, but I can remember how the wolves howled around when father w'ould 
kill a deer and bring it home. The first winter he killed eighteen deer and the 
joists in the house were strung with venison rounds. Those were golden days 
to us and long to be remembered. At that time our nearest neighbor was at 
least three and one-half miles distant. 

'•A few years later father built a hewn log house which was considered in 
those days quite an improvement over the ordinary cabin. IJ}' this time we had 
several neighbors not more than a mile and a half or two miles away. While 
we children were all at home father raised a great many melons and he would 
gather them in while it was cool in the morning, then have all the neighbors 
come to help eat them. Oh. what good times we used to iiave: but we did not 
appreciate it, it seems to me. 

"I remember one time father was hunting and when he came in he had a 
fine large turkey. He said, 'Margaret, we must have a roast.' Mother an- 
swered, 'O, Enos, we can't, we haven't a bit of flour in the house.' Then 
father said, 'Margaret, take some of thy good corn bread and make dressing 
out of it.' Mother did so and they invited the neighbors to come and help eat 
it. Everyone pronounced it as good as it would have been had it been dressed 
with wheat bread. You better think father enjoyed it, and he made it pleasant 
for all the rest. 

•'I will tell you how they roasted the turkeys in those days. They drove a 
spike nail into the mantel piece and w^ould hang the turkey on that in front of 
the fire, and had a Dutch oven under it. Everyone that passed must give it a 
turn. In this manner the}' became nice and brow n and were very delicious, 
and we all did justice to them. 

"Father and mother were Friends during their early life and raised their 
children in that faith, l)ut later in life they accepted the religion of true Spirit- 
ualism, in which faith they died. They were always so generous and good at 
home and abroad. How distinctly I remember how father would talk to us 
children and admonish us to be charitable with everybody. He always set that 
example before us. If anyone felt discouraged he always cheered them by kind 
and encouraging words and made them feel like going on their way rejoicing. 
If it was necessary he would give money or provisions. 

"Several years before his death, Mr. Lewis had a large, three story frame 
house built near where the log house had stood. This house stands almost a 
quarter of a mile from the pid)lic road and is one of the land marks in |av 
County. 

"Mr. Lewis gave one acre of the ground where the old hjg church was 
built which was named West Grove. .\ trauic buihlmg has taken the place of 
the log church." 



42 RKCORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Another daughter says, " Father's sympathies were enlisted at an early 
age in behalf of the poor, down-trodden slave. I have heard him tell how, 
when they lived in Ohio, he aided the fugitives who were fleeing from bondage 
in quest of liberty, b\' hiding them in his father's barn until he could get a 
chance to help them on to a place of safety. On one occasion he had three or 
four of them secreted in a hav-mow. His brother Hervv (who was then too 
3'oung to share the secret, but who afterward became a strong supporter of the 
anti-slavery cause) went to the barn to hunt eggs and walked all around and 
over the fugitives, but did not happen to discover them, \^'hen night came, and 
the family were all in bed asleep, father took his father's horses and wagon and 
carried his charges toward the land of freedom to a place of safety, returning 
to his bed in time to not be detected. He continued in that work until slavery 
was abolished. He was always a support to those needing help and mother 
always sustained him in his good works. She was a good nurse and a faithful 
loving wife and mother. One little incident shows that she was not lacking in 
courage and bravery. It happened soon after we settled in the dense woods in 
Indiana where wolves and bears were not strangers to the settlers. Father had 
gone to an older portion of the State to lav in a supply of provisions which 
would necessitate his absence for a number of days. We had an extra good 
dog that would always come to the door and whine and bark when he had 
'treed' or 'holed' an}' animal. On this occasion he came to the door some time 
in the night and made such a plea for help that mother got up and came to mv 
bed and asked me to get up and go with her and the dog to see what he had. 
She prepared a torch of hickory bark and we followed the dog about a quarter 
of a mile into the dense forest to find he had an opossum holed under the roots 
of a large maple tree that was blown down. We helped him get it out and 
kill it; then wended our way back to the house feeling that we had been quite 
brave. 

■' Father had a large rifle which he called 'Old Salimonv.' and I well 
remember when we had been in our first log cabin in Indiana but a short time, 
a pack of wolves came and made an attack on about forty hogs that had taken 
up their night's lodging under a clump of beech trees only a few feet from our 
cabin. The noise that the two combined elements made sounded terrific, and 
father took down 'Old Salimonj^' and fired two or three shots, scaring the 
intruders away before the}' had done any harm to the swine.'' 

An incident which occurred during Mr. Lewis's early life speaks well for 
his spirit of bravery. When Eliza Ann Frame, who afterwards became the wife 
of Dr. James Sawyer, was a little girl, she went up-stairs and in some way her 
clothing got on fire. She started to run and on reaching the foot of the stairs, 
was enveloped in flames. Mr. Lewis seeing her, seized a quilt that was near b}- 
and succeeded in wrapping it around the terrified child, thus smothering out the 
flames. He burnt his hands quite severely and the little girl was badly burned, 
but recovered. 



RELORL) OF THI'. I.KWIS FAMILY AJ 

Morgan M. Lewis says: " Enos Lewis was what should be ternu-d a 
self-made man. He started out in life with only a very limited education. Not- 
withstanding this he was endowed with something far more valuable — a strong 
physique and manly bearing that made his presence felt wherever he chanced to 
be. He was a great reader of all the advanced topics of the day, and as a pub- 
lic speaker was one who studied his subject and gave it a convincing force, that 
was calculated to interest his hearers and leave on their minds lasting impres- 
sions. 

" He loved children and nothing iileascd him more than to teach tliem, 
and his lessons were of a high order. He believed in a future life and a just and 
impartial God who never created a soul to be lost. 

"He was one of the first to take a stand against American slavery and 
wielded a power that was felt both in his public speeches and through his finan- 
cial aid. The writer well remembers going to his house and seeing a company 
of splendid looking colored fugitives, some twentv-si.x in number, who were being 
sheltered and fed. Uncle Enos never seemed so happy as when doing some act 
of kindness to his fellow men. He abhorred intemperance and profanity and was 
a shining star to tliose who might look for the light and in him the\' could find 
an e.xample that would be safe to follow." 

We will copy a few paragraphs from the death notice of Enos Lewis 
which was entitled, "A Good Man's Death": — 

"Enos Lewis's life was one continued series of good deeds. He lived witii- 
out trouble with his fellow men and with age and honor upon him, peacefuly 
died without an enemy. Though his body was weak with his age and worn with 
honest toil, his habits of strict sobriety and morality had saved for him a pure 
physical system and a perfect mind, so that his last breath w^s like his first, the 
natural action of a pure body. 

"His counsels to his family were the work of wisdom, gatlieretl in pure 
channels and ministered in moderation to tliose whom he loved and who will 
best know his real worth since he has passed from them ; though they were 
faithful and obedient to him while living. 

"Mr. Lewis was liberal to a fault and honest without an effort. God made 
him honest and he remained so. He was the zealous supporter of every move- 
ment for reform among the people and hence an early and consistent supporti-r 
of the temperance cause, and spent much time and means in an honest effort 
to prevent the curse of intemperance. He was the friend of the oppressed and 
has given a long life in earnest proof of his devotion to truth and justice to his 
fellow men. 

"He was well read and his knowledge of men and of nations, past and 
present, was extensive. His own government he closely and honorably stiulii'd 
and well understood, and no citizen of the nation was more loyal, just or patri- 
otic. He was an early and active opponent of slavery. His parents having left 
their Virginia home on account of that curst- existing there, left a lasting i;iipres- 
sion on his mind that governed his whole life. He opposed slavery as a crime 



44 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

in itself and as a gross falst^hood upon tin- body politic. He honestly believed 
that under our constitution no slave could be held except by brute force ; and 
that brute force against humanity he resisted. He was resolutely and effectively 
engaged in aiding runaway slaves on their race for libertx' from their oppressors. 
He deepl\' deplored the condition of our countiy that protected slavery and 
made it necessary for slaves to flee from bondage in our Republic to gain their 
liberty in a neighboring Monarchy and he allowed himself no rest on that ques- 
tion until he could truthfully say, ' I have lived to see the shackles fall from the 
limbs of every slave in my country.' When this great work was accomplished 
he was in the sear and yellow leaf and with a conscience void of otfense before 
God and man he could say, with the good old man of old. ' Now lettest thou thy 
servant depart in peace,' and he peacefully passed away." 

There seems to be no end of praise and tribute *or this great, good man. 
but w'e will complete the sketch by adding a few words from tiie pen of Mary 
(Frame) Selby: — 

To Enos Lewis. 

I would that my pen could portray 

All the virtues so richly thine, 
That the world might know thee today 

With Jesus thy brother divine. 

A lover of truth from thy birth, 

And upright in every deed; 
Desiring to redeem the earth 

That all in green pastures might feed. 

When the slave in fetters was bound 

Thy heart felt the weight of his woe. 
And thy place could always be found 

With the race that needed thee so. 

Reformer, I call thee with pride. 

Whose heart was as large as the earth 
With all the brave souls glorified 

Since the human race had its birth. 

'Tis joy to have known souls like thine, 

It makes life seem grander today 
To have met a man so divine 

Whose thought was Justice all the way. 

— Makv P'rame Skluv. 

As we stood near the old log cabin, wliich was thi'U unoccupied, and 
Uncle Enos told lue of the wonderful story of how the slaves were hid there 
trembling during the day. and were fed by our people for whom the Lord pro- 
vided, I can never forget my feelings : especially as he told of their returning in 
the morning after taking a load of slaves to the ne.\t station and meeting the 



RECORD OF THr LEWIS FAJIILY 45 

masters. The wonderful part of it all was that there were voices in the air that 
directed them what to do, and a power that drew the slaves to them wherever 
they were. They used to sing a song while caring for the slaves; — 

"Be patient in your sorrow, 
Be mute in your despair, 
While your chains are grinding deeper 
There are voices in the air." 

Uncle Enos said, one dav as he was returning home from a trip, he 
was singing that song when he heard a voice say, "It is over now." He did not 
understand, but after that the slaves quit coming and Lincoln was elected. 
Then he understood. After the days of slavery were over they still felt the 
Spirit moving them to meet together on Sunday in the school house (West 
Grove), which they did, and where they experienced much that is deeply inter- 
esting now that so many intellectual people are investigating the spiritual side 
of life. 



THOMAS AND CATHERINE LEWIS GRAY (3) 

Catherine Lewis, daughter of Thomas and Mary (Morgan) Lewis, was 
born September 14. 1801, in Frederick County, Virginia, and died April 14, 
1889, in Oskaloosa, Iowa. Interment in the West Grove cemetery, of Penn 
Township, Ja\' County, Indiana. 

Thomas Gray, son of Elijah and Mary (Moore) Gray, was born May 31, 
1806, in Harrison County, Ohio, and died May 3, 1888, in Pennville. Jay 
County. Indiana. Interment in the West Grove cemetery, of Penn Township, 
Jay County. Indiana. 

Thohias Gray and Catherine Lewis were imited in marriage May 30. 1827, 
in West Grove Friends' Meeting, Short Creek Township. Harrison County, 
Ohio. 

TO THEM WKKK l;()KN 

N(Xm,' Bir//i Death 

William Schooley Gray June 10, 1828 .... June 12, iqo2 

Mary Elizabeth Gray December 25, 1829 

Atlantic Ocean Gray March 4. 1831 .... October 21, 1864 

Esther Gray |ul\ 4.1833 .... July 18.1833 

Sarah Catherine Gray 1 )eceuib<r 20, 1834 

Thomas Lewis Gray March 14, 1837 

Hervy Gray December i, 1840 .... December 25, 1840 

David Gray December 18, 1842 .... December 18, 1S42 

Morgan Lewis Gray J""'' i^- i''^43 ■■•• September 22, 1881 

William S., Mary E., Atlantic ()., Sarah C, Thomas L., Hervy, David 
and Morgan L. were born in Malaga Township, Monroe County, Ohio, and 
Esther in Harrisville, Harrison Count\\ ol the same .State. 



46 RECORD OF THE I.F.WIS FAMILY 

Atlantic O. died in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. She was 
buried in West Grove cemetery of the same township. Esther died and was 
buried in Harrisville, Harrison County, Ohio. IlL-rvy and l)a\id died and were 
buried in Malaga Township, Monroe County, Ohio. 

The following sketch of the life of Thomas and Catherine (Lewis) Gray 
was contributed by William S. Gray: — 

"Thomas Gray's father was a descendant of the Scotch and his mother a 
native of the north of Ireland. She was a descendant of the Moore family. 
When Thomas Gray was about twelve or fourteen years of age, his father died 
and he was -bound out' to a farmer until he became sixteen years old. He was 
then 'bound out' to Morgan Lewis, son of Thomas and Mary (Morgan) Lewis, 
to remain until he was of age as an apprentice to the tanner's trade. Morgan 
Lewis was also appointed his guardian. 

•'Catherine (Lewis) Gray was of Welsh descent. Her mother was of 
the Morgan stock, a daughter of a minister of the Church of England (Episco- 
pal Church). 

"Soon after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Gray moved to Monroe County, 
Ohio, locating on a piece of land covered with an unbroken forest, in Malaga 
Township. There he built a cabin and put in other improvements preparatory 
to carrying on the tanning business. After living there some three or four years 
they sold out and settled in Harrisville, Harrison Count}', Ohio, where, in com- 
pany with his brother-in-law, Ira Lewis, he established a tanning business. A 
short time after this his partner died and he then sold out his effects and re- 
turned to Monroe County, settling on eighty acres of land near where they first 
located. They lived there a number of years. After clearing up the farm he 
sold out to his father-in-law, Thomas Lewis, and bought a farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres cornering that which he sold. This being an improved farm he 
immediately erected a frame house, built a saw mill and put down a tanning 
yard, where he did quite an extensive business, for a new country. About the 
spring of 1847 he sold out to John Brown and in company with Da\id Black- 
ledge made a trip to Indiana for the purpose of finding a suitable location. He 
found antl purchased a tract of land covered with a heavy forest, in Penn 
Townshij), Jay County, Indiana, and the fall of the same year moved with 
his famih' and settled on that land. Thev lived there until some time in the 
sixties. In the course of time he sold his farm to his son Thomas L. (iray and 
removed to Pennville, Jay County, Indiana, where he bought a hotel and fol- 
lowed that business for some time. He finally sold the hotel and begun the 
manufacture of brooms, a trade which he follownl tjie greater jiart of his re- 
maining days. 

"Mr. Ciray's education was very limited; not ha\ing received a common 
school education even for those days. He was decidedly a self-made man. He 
was a great reader, keeping himself abreast with all the movements of his day; 
a deep reasoner and a critical observer of all that came to his notice. He was 
a man of decided opinions. He was not a politician; never sought or held anj' 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS l-AMILY 47 

office. Religiously he was a liberalist in all matters pertaining to the spiritual 
welfare of man. He early embraced the phenomena of Spiritualism, holding 
that the philosophy of modern Spiritualism and practical Christianity as taught 
b\' Jesus and the apostles, were one in fact and truth. 

"Mr. Gray was known as a 'Christian-Nonresistant,' discarding the tak- 
int' of life under any circumstances wliatever. He was decidedly opposed to 
the collection of debts by law or through the courts of law, and thought all 
debts and disputes arising should be settled by arbitration. He was a strong 
'garrisoning abolitionist,' believing that the constitution of the Unifed States 
was a pro-slayery document and unv\orthy of the patronage of Christian people, 
and with that belief refused to cast his vote until the pro-slavery clause was 
struck out and the colored race made citizens of the I'nited States. He was 
also a strong advocate of the temperance movement; also the rights of women 
put on the equalities of men in all the social and political relations of life. He 
was opposed to the government of children witii tlie rod, either in our schools 
or in the home circle. 

'■In his early days he was an advocate of close communionism, holding 
all things in common as in the days of the apostles. Under that conviction he 
with others attempted to put that tiieory into practice at two different times. 
Once in Monroe County, Ohio, and once in Jay County, Indiana, but the etiort 
proved a failure in both places. 

"At one time Mr. Gray was brought before tlie grand jury of Jay County, 
Indiana, where he was the main witness in the case pending; being conscientious 
against taking an oath or affirming and also opposed to our system of punish- 
ment he refused to take the oath or to affirm. Both parties in the dispute 
agreed to take his testimony without administering oath or affirmation. He 
then refused to give testimony on the grounds above stated. The court being 
in session he was turned over to the court and fined one dollar. This paid by 
a friend, the sheriff then took him back into the grand jury room, but as before 
he refused to testify. He said to the jurors, 'I will not testify. You have your 
jail, you can jnit me in there and let me lay until I rot, but to violate that 
which I believe to be the will of God, I will not do.' Again he was hanihd 
over to the court, but this time they e.xonorated him. 

"About tliis time he refused to ]ia\' his ta.xes, which he maintained for 
some two or three years, but finally changed his mind and complied with the 
law in that respect. He was not a man to be driven with threats or sophistry. 
The only question with him was, 'Am I right?' That settled, he met the con- 
sequences boldly and fearlessly. 

"Along in the latter part of the thirties he attended the Wiieeling, West 
Virginia, market every two weeks. (West Virginia was at that time a slave 
State.) It became known in the city of Wheeling that he was publicly advo- 
cating the abolition of the slave trade. The citizens of Wheeling offered the 
sum of one thousand dollars for the apprehension of him and two of his asso- 
ciates, Dr. William Schooley and Elihu Bailey. Notwithstanding the ransom 



48 Rl'.rOKl) OF JMK I. i:\VIS I'A.Mll.V 

offered, he continued lo attend the market as before. He was never arrested. 
About this time he delivered a lecture on the slavery question in a school house 
some eight miles distant from Wheeling. y\t the close of his lecture he made 
an appointment to speak there again in two weeks. Before the time arrived for 
him to speak there, he was notified by a German friend not to go, as the citizens 
of that place had declared that if he attempted to speak there they would burn 
him at the stake. His wife and many of his friends tried to prevail on him not 
to go, but he went and delivered the lecture and came home unmolested. Such 
was his undaunted courage, ever ready to meet his foe, regardless of conse- 
quences. 

"He was a forcible speaker and an ardent and fearless debator. He was 
bitter against the monopolies and the unjust discrimination between the money 
power and the people. He never used the rod in the government of his chil- 
dren, but appealed to their better feeling; a word from him was sufficient. 

"At one time he was a member of the Good Templars. He was respected 
and honored by all who knew liim. 

"Catherine Gray was a woman oi considerable ability: she was kind, 
affectionate and a considerate mother. Along with her husband she was awake 
to all the reforms of the dav, supporting hiin in his work of reforms. TheY 
were both raised Quakers, but in due time withdrew from that society and 
accepted a broader and more liberal conception of Christian ethics. In the 
early part of the fifties Mrs. Gray became a convert to the phenomena of Modern 
Spiritualism and was soon an active worker as a trance speaker. She was very 
conscientious in her private and public life. No person ever came to her in 
need but their wants were freely supplied, if it was in her power to give the 
needed assistance. She was a hard worker and brought her girls up to work in 
the kitchen as well as the parlor. 

"For about twenty years Ixfore her death she was totally blind, caused 
b\' a cataract which was removed by a doctor in Kiclimond. Indiana. She was 
then turned over to Dr. Mary Thomas for treatment, wiio paid but little atten- 
tion to her charge. Inllammation set in, causing total blindness for life. Mrs. 
Gray had a large aciiuaintance and was highly respected by all who knew her- 
Such is a brief sketch of the life of Thomas and Catherine (Lewis) Gray." 



W'u siionld leel that this work was incomplete without a tribute to the 
memory ol Atlantic-. Ocean (irav. In her deatli tlie people of Penn Township 
lost a most influential and useful assistant in iheir fight against the disadvan- 
tages of an early i>ioueer countr\'. She was without e.xception the most success- 
ful teacher in the public schools of I'enn Township, and won for herself the 
admiration and conlidence of both parent and pupil. She did not believe in 
governing with the roil, but appealed to tile honor and pride of her jjupils and 
made tiieui feel their responsibilit\' in helping her to have a well-governed 
school. Her pupils were interested in her work and were truly co-laborers with 
her in improving and advancing the standard of good government in the school. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 45 

Atlantic O. Gray was a liandsome woman and possessed a gi'ntlc- yet 
forceful character which, together with a charitable tlisposition toward all, made 
her successful in her life work, and when she was taken away from the people of 
that community, there was not one who did not feel the loss keenly. They missed 
her gentle influence, her self-sacrificing spirit of kindness to them all and her 
pleasant words of cheer. Now, after many years have passed by, her scholars, 
friends and neighbors cherish her memory and feel that though the light of her 
life has gone out her influence still lives and is still an inspiration to many, who 
will always remember her. 

EMREY AND RACHEL (THOMAS) LEWIS (3) 

Emrey Lewis, son of Thomas and Mary (Morgan) Lewis, was born May 
II, 1803, near Red Stone, Fayette County, Pennsyhania. and died .September 
8, 1857, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Rachel Thomas, daughter of Peter and Marv (Tiiompson) Thomas, was 
born April 27, i8oy. in Siiort Creek Township. Harrison County, Ohio, and died 
March 23, 1861, in Penn Township, Jay Count\-, Indiana. 

Emrey Lewis and Rachel Thomas were united in marriage May 31, 1S26, 
before a meeting of the Society of Friends at West Grove Church, Siiort Creek 
Township, Harrison Countv, Oiiio. ( A cop\ of their marriage certificate is 
given on page 50). 

TO IHEM WERE HORN 

A^awe Birtli DcatJi 

Mar}' Ann Lewis March g, 1827 

Lorenzo Dow Lewis October 28, 1828 .... May i, 1878 

Atlantic Ocean Lewis March 6, 1S31 .... September 13, 1840 

Tacy Thompson Lewis October 6, 1834 ... October 12, i860 

Lydia Elizabeth Lewis November 5, 1842 

Rachel Jane Lewis. May 2, 184S .... June 21, 1867 

Mary A., Lorenzo D. and Tacy T. were i)orn near Georgetown, Short 
Creek Township, Harrison County; .\tlantic O. near Birmingham, (juernsey 
County ; Lydia E. near Wrightstown, Belmont Countw and Rachel J. near 
Malaga, Monroe Count\-, all in Ohio. 

Atlantic O. died in Jackson Township. [a\- County, Indiana, and Rachel 
J. died in Penn Township. They were buried in the West Grove Cemetery, of 
Penn Township. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis also took ISenjamin DeWees into their hoine, when 
he was a small boy and cared for him until their death. 

Mr. Lewis was of Welsh and Mrs. Lewis of English descent. Alter their 
marriage they located on a farm near Georgetown, Short Creek Township, llar- 
rison County, Ohio, where they lived three years. In the spring of iiSiy they 
moved to Guernsey County, Ohio, locating near Birmingham, remaining there a 
few years when they returned to their former home in Harrison Countv. 

4 



a (iRualirr iflardagr (^rvttftcatt 



31111)1 



*► ^ *► ^ • ■^ Emry Lewis of Shortcreek Township Harris- 

=on County State of OHIO. Son of Thomas Lewis of the affordsaid, & Mary his wife, 

and Rachel Thomas Daughter of Peter Thomas of the Township County and State aff- 

=oresaid, & Mary his wife, haveing declared their Intentions of Marriage with each 

other, before a Monthly meeting of the religious Society of friends held at Shortcreek 

according to the order used among them,, and having Consent of Parents, their said 

proposals of Marriage, were allowed of by said Meeting -lliin> tlicsc arc to ccrtifij 

whom it may concern,, that for the full accomplishment of their said intentions, this 

thirty-first Day of the fifth Month in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred 

& twenty-six,, they the said Emry Lewis & Rachel Thomas appeared in a public Meeting 

of the said people held at Westgrove, & the said Emry Lewis taking the said Rachel Thom- 

=as by the hand did declare that he took her the said Rachel Thomas to be his wife promis- 

=-ing with divine assistence, to be unto her a loving & faithful husband until death should 

Separate them,, & then the said Rachel Thomas did in like manner declare that she took 

him the said Emry Lewis to be her husband promising with divine assistance, to be unto him 

a Loving and faithful wife until death Should separate them «i.«,3Vn^ iilnrcniu-r they the 

said Emry Lewis & Rachel Thomas 'She according to the custom of marringe adopting the 

the name of her husband) did as a further confirmation thereof, then & there to 

these presents set their hands .^p>. 

^-» ^ 3 . » \ Emrey Le^vis 

^ItD tUlC Whose names are also hereunto Subscribed being) 

present at the Solemnization of said marriage have as Rachel Lewis 

witnesseth,, thereto set our hands the day & year above written /~ _ _ , - ^_^ '3p'_ 



Robert Wood 
Mary Wood 
kaac Cope 
Ire Lewis 
Elisha Gray 



Benjamin Wordall 
Sarah C Dungan 
Thomas Gray 
Anne Barber 
Ann Pugh 
Susanna Michener 
Rachel Adie 
Charles Dungan 
John Cope 
Wm E Lukens 
Warner Spurrer 
James Cope 



Ezra Thompson 
Aaron Frame 
Sarah T Gibbons 
Sarah Thomas 
Joseph McMillan 
Lydia Frame 
Ann Thomas 
Bradw^ay Thomas 
Ann Barber 
Abigail Michener 
Benjamin Michener 
Catherine Lew^is 
Thomas Lewis Jr 



Thos Lew^is 
Marey Lewis 
Peter Thomas 
Mary Thomas 
Ann Thompson 
Morgan Lewis 
Samuel Thompson 
Mary Thompson 
Rachel T Matson 
Atlantic O. Lewis 
Isaac Thomas 
Enos Lewis 
Susanna Rigel 
Ruannah Frame 
Hervy Lewis 
Syra Lewis 



AN "exact" COl'V OK KMKKV AND KAfllEI. M-:\VIS*S MAKRKVOK CERTIFICATli, 

The original was written on unruled paper \2}i x 15 inches with a "goose quill" pen. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 5I 

In the spring of 1836 Emrev Lewis, in company with others, went on 
horseback to Jay County, Indiana, where they lioped to enter land for them- 
selves, also for Mr. Lewis's brothers, Hervy. Syra and Ensley. 

Samuel Grisell, an early settler of Jay Count}', assisted the party in mak- 
ing selections ; and that Mr. Grisell might accompany them to the Government 
Land Office at Ft. Wayne, Indiana, Emrey Lewis remained and worked "at 
grubbing" in Mr. Grisell's clearing until their return. 

The land entered by Emrey Lewis, May 13, 1836, consisted of one hun- 
dred and seventy-eight acres in Section 18, Jackson Township. lie and his 
family moved to this land, then a dense forest, in the spring of 1839. They 
were accompanied by Ensley Lewis and family, who settled on land in Penn 
Township. 

Emrey Lewis also secured eighty acres of land in Nottingham Township, 
Wells County. He engaged in clearing and improving his farm, but on account 
of ill health returned October, 1842, with his family to Ohio. The\' located on 
a farm of sixty-seven acres about five miles south of Wrightstown, Belmont 
County. Remaining until the fall of 1846, they removed to Malaga Township, 
Monroe County, in order to care for his aged and widowed mother. 

In the fall of 1854, in compaiu' with thi- families of Elisiia and Atlantic 
Ocean (^Lewis) Ciray, John and Mary Ann (Lewis) Brown, Lorenzo Dow and 
Elizabeth Tomlinson (Haines) Lewis, and his motlier Mary (Morgan) Lewis, 
he and his faniilv again removed to Jay County, Indiana. His motlier made 
her home with him until her death, which occurred the next spring. All mov- 
ing in those days was accomplished witli farm wagons and two-horse teams. 

Mr. Lewis and familv settled on a farm in Section 12, Penn Township, 
where he and Mrs. Lewis passed tjie remainder of their life. Almost their 
entire lives were spent on a farm, and besides being successfully engaged in 
farming Mr. Lewis followed the weaver's trade during the winter, and at the 
time of his death owned two hundred acres of land. Both were strong advo- 
cates for the abolition of slavery. During their early life they were members 
of the Friends' Society; later in life they adopted the religion of Spiritualism 
and were earnest and faithful members of that societv. They were laid to rest 
at West Grove in Penn Township. 

HERVY AND ELMA (GRISELL) LEWIS (3) 

Hervy Lewis, son of Thomas and Mar\' (Morgan) Lewis, was horn Jan- 
uary 26, 1806, in Short Creek Township. Harrison County, Ohio, and ilied 
August 22, 1892, in Battle Creek, Michigan. 

Elma Grisell, daughter of Joseph and Letitia (^Whitacre) Grisell, was 
born November II, 1810, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio, and 
died November 18, 1853, near West Grove, Penn Township. Jay County, 
Indiana. 




llKkV\ LEWIS 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 53 

Hervy Lewis and Elma Grisell were united in marriage June g, 1S31, 
near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE I'.OKN 

Name Birtli Death 

Caroline Elizabeth Lewis June 4, 1832 

Mary Letitia Lewis May 31. 1833 .... May 15, 1S81 

Lydia Catherine Lewis October 21, 1835 .... July 4, 1895 

Amanda Malvina Lewis April 25, 1839 .... May g, 1880 

Tacy Elma Lewis September 15, 1841 .... March 27, 1881 

Hannah Atlantic Lewis March 10, 1843 

Lorenzo Garrison Lewis December 31, 1846 .... April 7, 1855 

Joseph Lundy Lewis October 27, 1849 .... November 23, 1S61 

Caroline E., Mary L. and Lydia C. were born in Short Creek Township. 
Harrison County, Ohio, and Amanda M., Tacy E., Hannah A., Lorenzo G. 
and Josejih L. in Penn Township. Jav County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis located in Short Creek Township, Harrison County, 
Ohio, and lived there until 1839, when they emigrated to Jaj' County, Indiana, 
and entered a half section of land near West Grove, Penn Township. Mr. 
Lewis was of Welsh and Mrs. Lewis of English and Welsh descent. 

M. M. Lewis adtls the following tribute to tlie memory of Uncle Hervy: — 

"Uncle Herv}' possessed a genial warmtli of disposition, wiiich made 
everyone feel at ease when sheltered under his roof, and many a colored fugitive 
was secreted in his cabin and shared with the family in the best the country 
then afforded. He was noted for his strength and activity. If a neighbor was 
in distress there was none more ready to assist than Uncle Hervy, The writer 
well remembers one incident. When 1 was a small bo)' I was suffering the 
agony produced by a gathering in the head. Alother was alone with uk', and 
during one of tlie paro.\\'sms of pain became so tiioroughly friglitened that she 
took the dinner horn and blew a hard blast on it. Uncle Hervy's cabin was a 
mile and a quarter away and he was in tlie field working, but wiien he heard 
the horn at that unusual hour he started on a run and did not slacken his speed 
until he entered our house, with the e.xclamation, 'Sarah Ann, what is the 
matter?' This is only one of the incidents that show his true character. 
All who knew him, feel that the world is much better for his ha\ing lived in it." 

The following is part of his death notice: — 

"Passed to higher life August 22, 1892, Hervy Lewis, aged 86 years and 
7 months. He was a resident of Jay County, Indiana, over forty years, but at 
the time of his death was living with his daughter, Lydia C. Farrington, in 
Battle Creek, Michigan, where he had lived about ten years. His mortal re- 
mains were taken by his son-in-law, Jesse h'arrington, back to Indiana, and 
laid to rest beside his wife in the cemetery of West Grove. Though an old 
man and quite deaf, he was still very ac:tive and had been to visit his grand- 
daughter Efifie (Farrington) Cook in the soutli sidi' of town, and on his return 



54 RKCORD OF THE I.KWIS lAMILV 

home, while crossing the raihoad track, was struck by the engine in the back of 
his head. He was thrown off the track and one foot was severed at the ankle. 
Kind hands soon carried him home, but he only lived fifteen minutes and never 
regained consciousness. He was the last child of a family of fourteen children, 
nine boys and five girls; twelve of whom lived to be grown men and women. 

"In 1839 he, in company with his wife and four children, came to Jaj' 
County, Indiana, and in the dense wilderness he erected a log cabin and with 
his strong body and willing hands soon had a comfortable home. Here they 
lived happily together until i^ijS, when his wife died leaving him a family of 
eight children." 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis were birthright members of the Friends' Society 
but later in life adopted the religion of Modern Spiritualism, to which faith 
they were always loyal and true. 

"Aunt Elma" was a quiet and gentle woman and remembered without 
ceasing her work of faith and labor of love. 

IRA AND SARAH (WILSON) LEWIS (3) 

Ira Lewis, son of Thomas and Mary (Morgan) Lewis, was born June 8, 
1807, in Short Creek Township, Harrison County, Ohio, and died in the sum- 
mer of 1833, in Harrisville, Harrison County, Ohio. His remains were interred 
in the cemeterj' of that place. 

Sarah Wilson, daughter of John and Sarah (.Atkinson) Wilson, was born 
August 22, i8og, near Philadelphia. Pennsylvania, and died November 9, 1889, 
in New Pliilatlelphia, Tuscarawas Count\% Ohio. 

Ira Lewis and Sarah Wilson were united in marriage late in the stimmer 
of 1832, in Harrisville, Harrison County, Ohio. 

TO rHKM WKRE HORN 

Nawe Birtli Dialli 
Emily Atkinson Lewis October 7, 1833 

She was born near Georgetown, Short Creek Township, Harrison 
Countv, Oiiio. 

Of the life and character of Ira Lewis we have but little knowledge. 
His career was really just begun when death came and destroyed what we feel 
would have been another useful and worth\- life. 

He was of Welsh descent. 

Ale.xander Wilson, the grandfather of Saraii Wilson, came to America 
from Ireland when a small boy, and his wife, Nancy Kennan, was a native of 
the State of New Jersey, and of English parentage. The Wilsons were all 
Quakers. 

[See the recoril of Morgan Lewis, page 34, for more of tlir life of Sarah 
(Wilson) Lewis.] 



RECORD OF THE I.F.WIS FAMHA' 55 

ELISHA AND ATLANTIC O. (LEWIS) GRAY (3) 

Atlantic Oct-an Lewis, dausjhtt-r of Thomas and Mary (Morgan) Lewis, 
'was born May 12, 1809, in Short Creek, Harrison County, Ohio, and died 
March 16. 1873, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Ehsha Gray, son of Elijah and Mary (Moore) Gray was born January 12, 
1808, at Short Creek, Harrison County, Ohio, and died January 23, 1856, in 
Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Elisha Gray and Atlantic O. Lewis were united in marriage June — , 
1837, at Short Creek, Harrison County, (Jhio. 

TO THI:M WI'.kK HORN 

Name Birth Dnrlh 

Thomas Ira Gray March 16, 1838 .... August 8, 1894 

Mary Elma Gray September 16, 1839 

Catharine Jennings Gray March 3, 1841 .... April 14, 1S41 

Linley William Grav March 27, 1842 .... September I, i86o 

Lydia Jane Gray June 29. 1844 ... August 24, i860 

Tacy Ann Gray September 25, 1845 .... September 14, 1849 

Atlantic Tacy Gray December 10, 1850 .... j\ugust 13, 1899 

Lorenzo Dow Gray April 20, 1854 .... July 26, 1854 

They were born in Malaga Township, Monroe County, Ohio. 

Catharine J., Tacy A. and Lorenzo D. died in Malaga Township, Monroe 
County, Ohio. Linley W. and Lydia J. died in Penn Township, Jay County, 
Indiana, and were buried in the West Grove cemetery of the same townsliip. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gray located in Monroe County, Ohio, soon after tlieir 
marriage and lived there until October 3, 1854, when with their famil)' of five 
children they removed to Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. Tliis trip was 
made in a wagon and was a very tiresome one, as they were eleven days on the 
road and had many obstacles to surmount. Soon after reaching their tlestina- 
tion Mr. Gray bought one hundred and sixty acres of land in Penn Township 
for which he paid $400. He purcliased the land of Samuel Adams. 

During their early life Mr. and Mrs. Gray were members of the Society 
of Friends ( Hicksite Branch), holding tlieir membership in the West Grove 
Friends' Meeting in Short Creek Township, Harrison County, Ohio. Wiien 
they located in Malaga Township, Monroe County, Ohio, they attended the 
Sunsbury Friends' Meeting. Later in life tiiey adopted the religion of Spirit- 
ualism, in which faith tiiey continued until their death. 

Mr. Gray was of English and Scotch and Mrs. Gray of Welsh descent. 
Mr. Gray was a cooper by trade and followed that occupation in connection with 
his farming. His fatlier, Elijah Gray, ' was a minister in the Society of 
Friends. He and Mary Moore were married in Friends Meeting, at New Gar- 
den, Chester County, Pennsylvania. About 1801 they moved to Fayette 
County, Pennsylvania, and from their shortly to Harrison County, Ohio, wlu're 
Elijah Gray died. Mary ( Moore) Grav died in Monroe Count\, Ohio. 




MRS. SVRA LEWIS 



RECORD OF 'IIIK LEWIS FAMILY 57 

SYRA AND SARAH A. (GRISELL) LEWIS (3) 

Syra Lewis, son of Thomas and Mary (Morgan) Lewis, was born Sep- 
tember 14, 181 1, in Harrison County, Ohio, and died September 29, 1855, in 
Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. Liturment in the West Grove cemetery 
of the same county. 

Sarah Ann Grisell, daughter of JosLi>h and Letitia (Whitacre) Grisell, 
was born November 12, 1819, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio, 
and died August 22, 1891, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. Intennrnt 
in the West Grove cemetery. 

Syra Lewis and Sarah A. Grisell were united in marriage March 14, 
1839, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

10 THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Dralh 

Morgan Milton Lewis - . - August 9, 1840 

Anson Ehvodd Lewis April 11, 1842 .... August 16, 1855 

Granville Sharp Lewis October 8, 1845 .... February 2, I1S81 

Letitia Grisell Lewis January 4, 1847 

Hannah Maria Lewis ] August 17, i<'^49 ■-.. August 24, 1855 

Mary Catharine Lewis " -"^ '"'''" ^ August 17, 1849 .... January 28, 1877 

Oscar Wright Lewis Mav 14, 1852 

Syra Elmore Lewis August 10, 1854 .... September 6, 1855 

Thev were born in Penn Township, Ja\- ('ount\', Indiana. 

Syra Lewis entered a quarter section of land in Section 11, Penn Town- 
ship, Jay County. Iniliana, in 1837 (see fac-simile of deed on page 12), and in 
the summer of 1839 he and his young wife, in compau}' with his oliler brother, 
Hervy Lewis and family, and John Sumption and family, started from (Colum- 
biana County, Ohio, to what was to be their new home in the then " far west." 

They came overland in covered wagons; a long, tedious trip; but with 
stern resolution and light hearts they were able to surmount all difficulties. 
After arriving at tlieir destination, Syra Lewis cleared a space in the forest 
large enough to erect a cabin and began work with a strong determination to 
make a home for himself and wife. The latter was a frail girl and had been sur- 
rounded by nearly every comfort in her father's home that that part of the 
country afforded, and the change to a home in the wilderness witii her nearest 
neighbor one and one-half miles away, must have been a trying experience. 
Notwithstanding this, all the privations and hardships were surmounted and 
everything was going well, when in 1855 her companion and three of her ciiil- 
dren were taken away by sickness, leaving the motlier witli five children to 
care for. 

At tliis time it is fitting to say that a more devoted husband and l;Uher 
would be hard to find. In true morality and just dealings with his fellow men 
he was an example. The writer has often heard him say, 'Tf I have an enemy 
in the world. 1 do not know it." He was endowed with a strong personality 
and force, wliich would be felt wherever he happened to be. His sense of jus- 



58 RECORD OK IHK LliWIS I'AMILV 

tice between man and man was one of his chaiacteristics. While he did not 
rule his children "with a rod," it would have been hard for one of them to dis- 
obey him, and usually a look or twitch of the head was enough to maintain 
order. He was possessed of a genial warmth which was calculated to draw one 
to him, and his children rejoiced in his company and were never happier than 
when father joineil them in their work or play. He abhorred profanity, intem- 
perance and slavery and did all in his power to protect the fugitive slave and to 
help him on his way to the North. Many a night he took his team and covered 
wagon and drove all night with some poor colored man and perhaps his family, 
to the next station where they would be secreted until the opportunity came to 
"move on." 

After the father, who was so worthy of the name, was taken, it seemed 
like the burden was more than mother could bear, but her courage did not for- 
sake her and with her five children she remained on the farm and with their 
help managed to live ver}' comfortably. Thirtj'-six years after her husband's 
death she too was called away. 

In expressing our admiration and praise for her good judgment and fine 
c]ualities as a mother and neighbor we can hardly do her justice. I5ut as I look 
back over the many years that she had to bear the responsibility of her little 
family, it seems remarkable the amount of tenderness, love and patience which 
she maintained towards us. 

ENSLEY AND AMY GRISELL) LEWIS (3) 

Ensley. son of Thomas and Mary (Morgan) Lewis, was born September 
13, 1814, in Harrison County, Ohio, and died January 31. 1866, in Penn Town- 
ship, Jay County, Indiana. 

Amy Grisell, daughter of Joseph and Letitia (W'hitacre) Grisell, was 
born April 27, 1817, near New Garden, Columbiana Count\-, Ohio, and died 
January 31, 1866, in Penn Township, Jay Count\'. Indiana. 

Ensley Lewis and .\mv (jrisell were united in marriage February 2, 1837, 
in Ohio. 

■JO THK.M WERE KORN 

Namt- Birth Death 

Ira Morgan Lewis November 7, 1837 

Joseph Grisell Lewis July 6, 1839 .... August 27, 1855 

Thomas E. Lewis April 27, 1841 

Letitia Ann Lewis November 16, 1843 .... August 22, i860 

Ensley Garrison Lewis I'ebruary 13, 1846 ... October 26, 1867 

Milo M. Lewis January 21, 1848 .... December 2, 1867 

Mary Alice Lewis April 20, 1850 .... October 20, 1895 

Amy Atlantic Lewis September 2, 1853 .... September i, 1855 

Elma A. Lewis ) April 18, 1856 .... April 18, 1856 

Elmore A. Lewis j- 1 wms _^pj.j| 18,1856 ... April 18,1856 

Syra E. Lewis March 14, i860 

Anson F. Lewis .Xugust 10, 1862 




MR. AND iMKS. ENSLEV LEWIS 



6o RECORIl OF IHE I,1.\VI> 1 A,M11.\ 

They were all born in Penn Township. Jay County, Indiana, except Ira 
M., who was born in Harrison Count}-, Ohio. 

Joseph G., Letitia A., Ensley G., Milo M.. Amy A., Elma A. and 
Elmore A. died in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, and were buried in 
the West Grove cemetery of the same township. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis located in Harrison County, Ohio, where they lived 
a short time after their marriage. About 1838 or 1839 they removed to Penn 
Township, Jay County, Indiana, where thev entered a section of land, erected 
a cabin and they begun to battle with the difficulties which have been described 
in the history of other early settlers. 

I\lr. Lewis was a carpenter and cabinetmaker by trade and became a 
contractor and builder of marked ability. He was a natural born mechanic and 
possessed rare mathematical powers. He received but a limited common school 
education but was endowed with a strong personality and force of character 
which was the motive power so essential in the earh' settling of a new countr\'. 

Along in the fore part of the 50's he decided to quit work at his trade 
and go to farming, so the next two years were spent attending to his farm, at 
the end of which time he concluded he was not a successful farmer and re- 
turned to his former trade. About 1862 he sold his propert}' in Penn Township 
and purchased land in Harmonia, a college town five miles west of Battle 
Creek, Mich., to which place he removed his famih'. Remaining there a few 
years and being dissatisfied with the country, largely the people, he again sold 
out, returned to Indiana and purchased a farm a mile and a quarter east of 
Pennville, Jay County, where he remained until his and Mrs. Lewis's death. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis were both birthright members of the Friends' 
Society, but on account of being married out of Meeting they were disowned. 
On the breaking out of the spiritual rappings at H3'desvi!le, New York, they 
became interested in the spiritual manifestations and were soon converted to 
the philosophy of Spiritualism. They lived and died staunch Spiritualists. 
Mrs. Lewis became a medium for spirit manifestations and was honest and 
sincere in her belief and in her mediumship. She was an extensive and 
enthusiastic reader for that age, and her Bible, which is in possession of her 
granddaughter, bears the marks of much handling and deep study. Different 
passages of scripture which she especially liked are marked. She was very 
much devoted to her family, was highh- respected by all who became acquainted 
with her, and was ready at all times to help the need\', irrespective of who they 
were. She was a woman of true moral character in all respects, and in the 
earl}' daj's did the spinning and weaving for all of her family. 

Ensley Lewis was a man of decided opinion. He was liberal in his re- 
ligion and ignored church dogmas and creeds. He regarded the Bible as a 
history and did not think it was any more the word of God or of divine inspira- 
tion than any other book of modern times. This he taught in public, and died 
unchanged in Jiis belief. Some of his orthodox friends considered him an in- 
fidel, but he was a strong believer in the great ruling power of the universe and 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 6l 

thought man was created on this earth to prepare himself for the higher life. 
His was a religion of doing good and helping all people to reach their highest 
and best ideals. 

Mr. Lewis was a man of marked character, was honest and upright in 
all dealings with his fellow men; was an advanced thinker and an active worker 
in all the reforms of the day. He was a garrisoning abolitionist, believing that 
the constitution of the United States was a pro-slavery compact, and refused to 
make a bargain with the slave power by agreeing to abide bv the majority rule 
where human rights were placed in jeopardy. He taught immediate emanci- 
pation or dissolution of the I'nion. No union with slave owners in their 
nefarious traffic. 

Mr. Lewis did not believe in wars with his fellow men, but thought man 
should rise to a higher standard and settle all difficulties with justice to all con- 
cerned, simply following the golden rule as a basis. He publicly advocated the 
equal rights of women with men in all spheres of life and was a strong temper- 
ance advocate, both practically and theoreticalh', and being a strong debater 
and impressive talker he helped to advance all of these rapidly progressing 
reforms. 

He never belonged to any secret organization except the "Underground 
Railway" or the "Know-Nothing Lodge," organized to help runaway slaves to 
Canada. Summing it all up, he was a gentleman, a practical man and an hon- 
ored citizen. 

William S. Gray, who contributed a part of this article, sa^'s, " To give 
a complete record of such a man as Ensley Lewis was, would take too much 
space, so I have cut down and left out many things that should be told. Society 
needs the sayings and lives of such independent thinkers." 

Ensley Lewis was taken sick with typhoid fever about the first of De- 
cember. 1865. and four weeks later Mrs. Li-wis was taken with the same dis- 
ease. 

Morgan M. Lewis, who wrote ji-art of tliis sketch, says: "Mother and I 
helped to wait on them throiighout tlieir long illness, which lasted four weeks 
after Aunt Amy took down. Uncle Ensley was conscious the entire eight weeks 
of his suffering and was ever solicitous of his wife's condition. During the 
closing hours of his life he conversed with friends and neighbors concerning his 
strong faith in a future life, and when asked by one of them, Ambrose Hopkins 
(with whom he had often talked on the same subject), if he still believed in 
Spiritualism, he said, 'Ambrose, it is a good faith to live by, and I now have 
stronger faith than ever that it is good to die by.' And shortly before his 
death he said, 'The way is clear.' He tokl the children that their mother would 
not live, and directed them to have a casket made large enough that they might 
be buried side by side, with their arms locked as on their wedding day. Just 
before he died he said, 'Morgan, I wish thee would raise me up.' 1 did as he 
requested and held him until to all outward appearances his spirit had gone, but 
when I laid hini down he revived and said, 'Morgan, what difference does it 



62 



KKCORD OF THK I.F.UIS lAMII.V 



make if I do die in thy arms?' I then raised him up again and held him until 
his spirit had extricated itself, as he wished. During these sad hours his wife 
lay in the next room, unconscious of the great sadness which had come to their 
home and children, but immediately after her husband's death she seemed to 
rapidly grow weaker and in just fiftv-five minutes she too had severed her 
earthly ties and joined her companion in the spirit world, and we earnestly be- 
lieve that two grand and good souls went together to learn of the realities of a 
future life.'; 

They were buried, as desired, in the cemetery of West Grove. 

Syra E. is unmarried. He has traveled extensively' and at present re- 
sides on his ranch in California. 

ISAAC AND LYDIA 'GUMMERE^ LEWIS '4) 

Isaac Lewis, son of Morgan and Mary (Thorn) Lewis, was born Nov. ig, 
1812, at the "old tan-yard home" near Georgetown, Short Creek Township, 
Harrison County, Ohio, and died July 25, 1870. in Georgetown, of the same 
coimty and State. His remains were interred in the Short Creek Township cem- 
etery, near Georgetown. 

Lydia Gummere, daughter of Joim and Elizabeth ( Thomas") Gummere, 
was born March 27, 1814, near West Grove, Short Creek Township. Harrison 
Count)', Ohio, and died Jan. 12, 1880, in Georgetown, the same county and 
State. Her remains were interred in the Short Creek cemetery. 

Isaac Lewis and Lydia Gummere were united in marriage Nov. 16, 1836, 
in Harrisville, Harrison County, Ohio 

TO THEJI WERE KORN 

Name. Birth. Death. 

Henry Heberling Lewis September 11, 1837 .... October 21, 1845 

John Gummere Lewis August 27, 1839 .... April 12, 1891 

Mary Elizabeth Lewis December 5, 1841 

Louisa Lewis May 30, 1844 .... June 16, 1892 

Morgan Thomas L.ewis January 9, 1847 .... October 9, 1861 

Roselia Philothea Lewis October 31, 1849 

Isaac Parker Lewis October 25, 1852 .... July 25, 1880 

Lydia .\nne Lewis J"ne 10, 1855 .... December 23, 1888 

They Were all born in Georgetown, Short Creik Township, Harrison 
County, Ohio. 

Henry H. and Morgan T. died in Georgetown and were buried in the 
Friends' cemetery of West Grove, in the same township and county. 

Mr. Lewis was of English and Welsh and Mrs. Lewis was of English 
and French descent. 

The following sketch of the lives of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis was written by 
their daughter, Mary E. (Lewis) Hoff: — 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 63 

"Isaac Lewis was as strong and vigorous as any boy until he was ten 
years old. One day, while fishing on Middle Fork, in Short Creek Township, 
Ohio, he contracted a cold, resulting in rheumatism, which disabled him for the 
rest of his life. The writer has heard him say, that with good medical treat- 
ment he might not have been such a cripple. The country was new and physi- 
cians scarce. Dr. Parker, of Mt. Pleasant, Ohio, saw him at intervals and 
treated him according to the knowledge he possessed regarding the case. 
Everyone felt sympathy for the suffering child and various cures were sug- 
gested. One was to make a tight bo.\ with aperture for his head to remain out- 
side, then smoke his body. This was tried without thought as to how he could 
be removed from the box, and he came near being suffocated in the operation. 
It was months before he could go out doors and he was then wheeled in a home- 
made wagon or cart. The question of an education was not to be ignored, so, 
with his swinging bed for a school room, a speller, reader, arithmetic and Mur- 
ray's Grammar for text books, and himself for teacher he went to work. In the 
meantime he read all the histories and other good books that he could get use 
of. When a man grown his spelling was correct. English faultless, writing 
good and he had mastered enough arithmetic to enable him to carry on an 
extensive and varied business for years. 

" In tlie early 30's he was taken as a partner into the dry goods business 
by Isaac Vail (his mother's nephew), in Georgetown, Harrison County, Ohio. 
After a few years Mr. Vail sold his interest to Isaac's brother Thomas, and the 
firm's name was -Isaac & Thomas Lewis.' Thev were not satisfied to buy and 
sell goods alone; they bought meat and cured it, also bought timothy and 
clover seed and all kinds of marketable produce. In fifteen or twenty years 
Thomas withdrew, and it was 'Isaac Lewis, Merchant.' Mr. Lewis enlarged 
his facilities for pork packing, bought hogs on foot, had them slaughtered, 
cured and shipped to Baltimore, Maryland. 

'•His business life covered a period of thirty-one years (except one 
year), all spent in the Georgetown store. The year mentioned he and his fam- 
ily lived at Centre Belpre, "V\^ashington County, Ohio, where he and his brother 
Thomas started a store, to be run later by their younger brothers, William and 
Parker Lewis. 

"In the earlier years all produce had to be hauled by wagons over the 
mountains to Cumberland, Maryland, before it could be freighted by boat or 
rail to its destination. His store goods were brought by the returning wagons. 
Later he bought large quantities of wool for Eastern firms on commission. 
Once or twice a year he made trips to Baltimore and Philadelphia to buy goods. 
I have heard iiim tell of perilous rides down the rough mountain roads, how liis 
hair ' stood on end ' when the coach appeared to poise on two wheels as sharp 
curves were made at break-neck speed. Once the coach did go over with its 
nine passengers and, of course, the frailest was underneatli, but he escaped 
without serious injury. 

"Once when he was descending the Ohio river the boat was caugiit in 
the closing ice of winter; planks were thrown out to shore near Marietta, but in 



64 RECORD OK THE LEWIS FAMILY 

his crippkd condition in- could not walk them. Two obliging deck hands see- 
ing the ditlicidty soon sit him on shore. The remaining twelve miles of his 
journey were made in a sleigh, which in his condition was a very hard and pain- 
ful ride. 

"On another occasion the night was so dark that the j)ilot passed the 
home landing and Isaac was taken ashore in a skiff a mile from home. He 
walked the distance on his crutches, over drift wood and rocks, and in immi- 
nent danger of getting into hidden holes. 

"The same industry and indomitable will with which his ancestors 
cleared the wilderness and set up homes, he bore his daily bodily sufferings, 
worked for and earned a competency for himself and family. He did not live 
for himself alone, but was ready to help with advice or means as he could. No 
one went to him for help but felt they had been received as by a father or 
brother, as the case might be. 

"We can conve\' in no better way his inherent philanthropy than bj' 
relating the story of the old colored woman, whose heart had been cheered 
many times by his thoughtfulness of her, who prayed that the Lord would take 
her before he did Isaac Lewis. She felt that she could not live without his 
assistance. Her prayer was granted. 

"His home was a station on the 'Underground Railway,' and he the 
agent, risking personal liberty and property to help the slaves to freedom. He 
took an active interest in politics, having been a Whig and later a Republican, 
and often discussed the issues of the day over the counter with his customers; 
but in such a kindly earnest way that no offense was given. He served as 
Township Treasurer for ten or twelve 3'ears. 

" Mr. Lewis was a member of the Hicksite branch of the Friends' Society, 
and when a young man walked a mile on his crutches to attend First Day 
Meeting at West Grove. Ohio, going from there to dine with his parents, to 
whom he was devotedly attached. His religious views were very liberal, hold- 
ing to the belief that finite man could not fathom infinite love or bound the 
mercy of the Heavenh' Fatlier. 

"Being anxious to get his business in good shape, he arranged to turn 
the store over to his half brother, John W. Lewis, and his son, John G. Lewis, 
on September 4, i860. It was most sadly decreed otherwise. The verj' day 
set for the transfer John W. Lewis was buried, so on this account he and the 
son named continued the business. 

"It was remarkable the speed with whicii he could get arouiul: Iniiind 
tile counters, resting one hand on the counter and the other on the side shelves, 
he swung from place to place if there was need to hurry. 

"In April, 1865, they sold the store. After this he carefully looked to 
settling his business in order that he might be ready for the summons home. 
He was not old in years, but so much suffering and work had been crowded 
into those years that he was spoken of as old. 




< 




RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 65 

"In July, 1870, he found his aihnents had cuhninated in the fatal 
Bright's disease. One evening, feeling the hour was near, he walked to a win- 
dow, looked up and down tile village streets and across the way to his former 
place of business, as if taking a final farewell, and without a word he walked to 
his bed. in another room, never to rise again. He died July 25, 1870. To this 
day he is affectionately remembered and his name kindlv spoken in his native 
place. His children revere the memory of his loving kindness in the home. 

"In Lydia Gummere's youth education was to be sought under great 
difficulties, but she so improved her opportunities that she was a good speller 
and reader, and had mastered aritiiraetic as far as the -rule of three,' and was 
considered competent to teach others, which she did in a little log cabin in the 
wilderness. Her early married life was a very busy one and crowded witli 
cares. Her husband's extended business made it necessary to entertain many 
at meals and over night. A large family was made larger by the number of 
workmen employed in tile various dei)artments of business, but she was never 
too busy to look carefully after her invalid husband's comfort or minister to the 
wants of iier children, and yet had time for the needs of sick neighbors. 

"In tile newly settled country most of the clothing was made at home 
and spinning was quite a needed accomplishment, and Mrs. Lewis was quite an 
expert. Her children loved to sit by the early autumn fires and listen to the 
hum of her busy wheel — no music sweeter to them. 

"She was a home woman and there she did her duties without thought 
of self. In fact, looking back, her life seems like one of continued self-sacri- 
fice. She was most charitable in thought as well as deed. She taught her chil- 
dren to be honest in spirit as well as in actions. 

"Being a member of the Hicksite branch of the Friends' Society, when 
opportunity permitted, she most gladly attended meeting and so believed in the 
direct and spiritual communion and worship that the writer, though a child, 
could not but notice the look of devotion \\ itii wliicli she joined the assembled 
worshipers. 

" After her husband's death she devoted mucii time to reading and was 
well informed as to current events. Her children having married and set up 
homes for themselves, no one was so gladly welcomed as ' Mother,' and she was 
especially ready to go in time of sickness. It was in answer to the summons of 
a sick child that she left her home January 12, 1880, but before she passed the 
village limits the earthly journey was abandoned and the heavenly one begun. 
"Like her husband, she is most kindlv remembered in the village home 
and her name spoken w^ith appreciation b\- all." 

THOMAS AND REBECCA HEBERLING) LEWIS (4^ 

Thomas Lewis, son of Morgan and Mary (Thorn) Lewis, was born Jan- 
uary 5, 181 5, in the "old tan-yard home," near Georgetown, Short Creek 
Township, Harrison County, Ohio, and died December 25, 1876, in Ata- 
lissa, Iowa. 



66 RF.CORD OF THE I.IWIS FAMILY 

Rebecca Hebeiliug, daughter of John and Mary (Crumley) Heberling, 
was born February 2, 1820, at Winchester, Virginia, and died May g, 1901, in 
Dubuque, Iowa. 

Thomas Lewis and Rebecca Heberling were united in marriage March 
17, 1837, at the home of the bride's parents in Georgetown, Short Creek Town- 
ship, Harrison County. Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name. Birth. Death. 

Junius Heberling Lewis January 27, 1840 .... January 17. 1884 

Mary Amanda Lewis March 2, 1843 .... June 30, 1870 

Mathilda Heberling Lewis January 7, 1848 

Narcissa Rebecca Lewis May 2, 1850 

Emma Hortense Lewis 

Cassius Morgan Lewis November 16, 1855 

Anna Laura Lewis January 13, 1861 

They were born in Georgetown, Harrison County, Ohio. 

The following sketch of the life of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis, who were of 
Welsh and German descent, was contributed: — 

"Thomas Lewis was a type of that sterling manhood which furnished 
the motive power for the wonderful development of the W'est during the first 
decade after the close of the civil war. His business career began in the tan- 
nery business with his father on the old farm in Short Creek, Harrison Count)', 
Ohio. Subsequently he became a partner with his brother Isaac in the general 
merchandise business at Georgetown, Ohio. But the opportunities of the great 
West appealed to his ambitious spirit, and in 1855 he visited Iowa. Enroute 
there, he bought a considerable tract of land in what is now one of the most 
populous districts of Chicago. He also made numerous investments in Iowa 
land and moved his family to Atalissa, Muscatine County, Iowa, in the fall of 
1864, having previously purchased the beautiful farm adjoining the village on 
the west. As merchant and dealer in live stock and farm products of that rich 
agricultural section he became the leading business factor of the community. 
Of tireless energy and commanding intellect, his daily life radiated honesty, 
integrity, morality and love of humanity. He was a great reader, an ardent 
patriot and a life-long Whig and Republican. For a man of prodigious activ- 
ity he had acquired a remarkable knowledge of men and events of his time. 
While generous to a fault, he was extremely economical in little things, abhor- 
ring waste in anything. He would save every old crooked nail and lose thous- 
ands of dollars by trusting to other people's honesty. He cared little for 
bookkeeping and the transactions of a day, involving thousands of dollars, were 
often recorded on the backs of envelopes he carried in his pockets. His absent- 
mindedness furnished many amusing incidents, and his beloved wife, whose 
gentle spirit went to join him only a year ago, delighted to tell, to his discom- 
fiture, how at one time she found a roll of money, and upon his return home 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 6? 

that night she said: 'Tommy, have you lost anything lately?' ' No, I believe 
not,' he replied. 'Well,' she rejoined, 'here is six hundred dollars I found in a 
sugar bowl in the china cupboard.' Upon seeing which, with a foolish expres- 
sion on his face, he exclaimed, 'Thunderation; I remember now of hiding that 
money where the burglars wouldn't find it, and soon after that I wondered why 
my cash didn't quite pan out.' Broad and liberal-minded in all human affairs, 
he was tender as a child in his affection and his only religious creed was love 
and goodness. 

"The old Thomas Lewis homestead still stands upon the hill-top, over- 
looking the village and the broad, fertile valley of the Red Cedar river. A 
quarter of a century has passed since his noble spirit went out from its hallowed 
roof into the great beyond. By nature's environment and the union of strong 
manhood and pure womanhood, it was an ideal home. The entertainment of 
relatives and friends was one of its greatest joys, and all who knew the radiance 
of its hearthstone have felt the warmth and glow and inspiration of its love and 
kindness. Who can tell how far down through the generations of men the in- 
fluence of such a home extends? 

"Rebecca Heberling was the youngest of a family of eight sous and two 
daughters. She acquired a common school education and grew to womanhood 
on the home farm in Harrison County, Ohio, under the severe old-fashioned 
discipline of which her father was an exacting exponent. Possessed of I'are 
qualities of mind, one of the happiest dispositions and of the sweetest womanly 
graces, her long life was an unbroken chain of tireless industry, tender love and 
usefulness. All language seems poor in adjectives when we try to write of our 
mothers. The most beautiful and alluring thought of Heaven is in the remem- 
brance of how many dear, old-fashioned mothers are there. She was a great 
lover of music and especially fond of Cliauncey Alcotfs pathetic little ballad, 
which ends with the refrain: — 

" 'For she was an old-fashioned mother, 
One such as God would design; 
So why should I say any more about her, 
For you all have mothers like mine.' " 

Emma Hortense. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis, graduated from the 
liigh school of Atalissa, Iowa, afterward taking a two-years' special course in the 
Iowa State University. A few years later she took up art work in oil and water 
colors, studied under the best local teachers and has taken several special 
courses under the best masters in the Chicago art schools. 

Her studio is in Dubuque, where for some years past she has had a large 
class of students. Her work in both oil and water colors gives her a prominent 
place among Iowa artists. 



68 RECORD OF THE LKWIS FAMILY 



HENRY AND HANNAH (LEWIS) HEBERLING (4) 

Hannah Lewis, daughter of Morgan and Mary (Thorn) Lewis, was born 
July 27, 1817, in the •■old tan-yard home" near Georgetown, Short Creek 
Township, Harrison County, Ohio, and died November 22, 1879, in Mt. Pleas- 
ant, Jefferson County, Ohio. 

Henry Heberling, son of John and Mary (Crumley) Heberling was born 
July 10. 1807, in Gerardstown, Berkley County, Virginia, and died June 6, 1888, 
in Mt. Pleasant, Jefferson County, Ohio. 

Henry Heberling and Hannah Lewis were united in marriage June 2, 
1835, in Harrisville, Harrison County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

JViime Birth Death 

Warren Heberling February 3, 1839 .... October 29, igoo 

Lineaus Heberling January 8, 1842 .... March 5, 1844 

John Heberling November 16, 1844 

William Lewis Heberling February i, 1847 

Henry Heberling August 30, 1849 

Mary Heberling November 8, 1851 .... March 30, 1852 

Irene Morgan Heberling May 13, 1853 

Lettie Anne Heberling February 9, 1S56 

Warren, Lineaus and John were born in Short Creek P. O., Harrison 
County, Ohio; William L. Henr\'. Mary, Irene and Lettie A. in Martin's Ferry, 
Belmont County, of the same State. 

Warren died and was buried at Bath, Illinois. Lineaus died at Sliort 
Creek P. O., and was interred in the West Grove Friends' Cemetery, near that 
place. Mary died and was buried at Martin's Ferry, Belmont County, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Heberling located in Short Creek Township, Harrison 
County, Ohio, after their marriage, where he was to some extent engaged in 
the manufacture of farm implements, having made the first threshing machine 
built in Ohio. In 1845 they moved to Martin's Ferry where he continued in 
the manufacture of the Ralston threshing machines and other implements until 
1856-57, when he returned to Short Creek P. O. and added to his former busi- 
ness of manufacturing, farming (as a side issue for his boj's), having left Mar- 
tin's Ferry in order to surround his growing family with conditions more favor- 
able to the development of manhood and womanhood than was possible to do 
in a manufacturing river town. In the spring of 1862 he moved with his 
family to the farm known as the "Berry P'arm," near Morristown, Belmont 
County, Ohio, and engaged in sheep husbandry. Here they were very success- 
ful. In the fall of 1866 thej' removed to the "Gill Farm," comprising seven 
hundred acres, near Mt. Pleasant, Jefferson County, Ohio, taking "the pick 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 6g 

of their flock" with them and continuing in the sheep business on this farm 
until the spring of 1871. They then purchased a store room and dvveUing in 
Mt. Pleasant. Ohio, where they opened up a shoe store and afterward expand- 
ing the business until they carried a general stock. This was their final place 
of residence. 

Mrs. Heberling had a birthright in the Society of Friends, and as she 
was not of age when the division was made, she was claimed by both the ortho- 
do,x and Hicksite denominations. Having been married "out of the church'' 
before she was eighteen, she was "disowned" by both branches of the Society. 
Later in life she became a member of the Methodist Protestant Church. 

Mr. Heberling's grandfather, Andrew Heberling, emigrated from Ger- 
many to this country during the Revolutionary war. His mother, Mary Crum- 
ley, was of English and Scotch parentage. When Henry was sixteen years old 
he came with his parents to Harrison County, Ohio, where a few years later he 
became a teacher in the public schools, and about four years later, though not 
a member of any religious society, he began preaching in Friends' Meeting. 
Later he united with the Methodist Protestant Church, and subsequently be- 
came an ordained minister of this denomination and a member cf the Musk- 
ingum Conference. 

Mr. Heberling had doubtless imbibed some of the principles advocated 
by the Friends, who formed so large a part of the excellent community in which 
the years of his early manhood were spent. He was a liberal supporter of the 
ministry in his own church, but only preached one year for a salary. While 
manufacturing agricultural implements and following his favorite occupation of 
farming, he very frequently preached as a local preacher until age and failing 
health disabled him. 

Their uprightness of character, genuine piety, liberality and kintlness to 
the poor and suffering, gave Mr. and Mrs. Heberling a wide influence. The 
sweet memory of the mother's righteous life and her absolutely unselfish devo- 
tion to her family, is a living inspiration to more noble manhood and woman- 
hood. The story of their humanity, their duty to industry, society and the home 
is written on the hearts of their children in characters which can never be 
effaced and yet which cannot be translated into words. 

Irene M. Heberling, daughter of Mr. ami Mrs. Heberling, graduated 
from the high school of Mt. Pleasant, Ohio, then took up the profession of 
teaching, which she followed with gratifying success for fifteen years. She is 
at present living witli her sister, Mrs. Martin L. Jennings, of Castle Shannon, 
Pennsylvania, where she is engaged as first assistant in tin.' office of Mr. 
Jennings, who is editor of the Methodist Recorder. She is a member of the 
Methodist Protestant Church, and is spoken of as "one of God's noble 
workers." 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 71 



WILLIAM AND SARAH (LEWIS) MARTIN (4) 

Sarah Lewis, daughter of Morgan and Mary (Thorn) Lewis, was born 
January 21, 1820, in the "old tan-yard home," near Georgetown, Short Creek 
Township, Harrison County, Oliio, and died October 20, 1886, near Winfield, 
Cowley County, Kansas. 

William Martin, son of Peter and Elizabeth ( ) Martin, was born 

April 10, 1813, in Jefferson County, West Virginia (supposed near Harper's 
Ferry), and died January 19, 1883, near Winfield, Cowley County, Kansas. 

William Martin and Sarah Lewis were united in marriage August ( — ) 
1835, near Georgetown, Short Creek Township, Harrison County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE EORN 

Name Birth Di-ath 

Isaac Arthur Martin May 18, 1836 

Mary Ann Martin April 14, 1839 

Sarah Elizabeth Martin December 26, 1841 

Hartzel Hayden Martin September 23, 1844 .... November 14, 1899 

Morgan Lewis Martin March g, 1848 

Elery Channing Martin March 2, 1851 

William Emerson Martin September 24, 1853 

Emma Laura Martin April 5, 1857 

Minerva Celestine Martin September 5, 1858 

Alice Jane Martin April 1 8, 1 862 

Parker Wellman Martin September 5, 1866 

Isaac A. and Mary A. were born on a farm in Short Creek Township, 
Sarah E. and Hartzel H. in the "old tan-yard home," near Georgetown of the 
same township, both of Harrison County; Morgan L. and Elery C. near Hope- 
dale of the same county; William E. near Uniontown, Belmont County; Emma 
L. and Minerva C. near Morristown, of the same county, all in the State of 
Ohio; Alice J. near Wilton Junction, Cedar County, and Parker W. near 
Salem, Henry County, in Iowa. 

Mr. Martin was of German and Mrs. Martin of English and Welsh 
descent. The latter was a birthright member of the Friends' Society, until her 
marriage, when she was disowned for marrying out of Friends' Meeting. She 
had formerly attended the West Grove Meeting near Georgetown, and also the 
Mt. Pleasant Yearly Meeting, witli her parents. 

The following sketch of Mr. and Mrs. Martin was contributed by their 
daughter, Emma L. (Martin) Hawkins, who prepared it with the aid of her 
brothers and sisters; — 

"F"ather came from West Virginia to Eastern Oliio with some relatives 
when he was twelve years of age, where he remained until his marriage. After 
their marriage father and motlier located on a rented farm in Harrison C!otint\-, 
near the "old tan-yard home," and lived there about tour years, when fathi'r 



72 RECORD OF THE I.F.WIS FAMILY 

purchased the "old tan-yard home" of graiidfatlier Morgan Lewis, who had 
taken his family and moved to the new settlement in Jay County, Indiana. 

"This was the same home where mother was born, and her two oldest 
children attended the same old log school house, on Short Creek, where she 
had previously attended. It was in this old home where father organized the 
first congregation of Disciples (as the Church of Christ or Christian Church is 
sometimes called). Sister 'Mollie' (Mary Ann) says, 'I remember that home 
well. The old house stood in the timber close to the creek, a beautiful clear 
stream, in which I have seen father baptize many persons. I am not positive, 
but think Cyrus McNeely baptized father and Sutton Hayden baptized mother. 
I was about one year old when father and mother went on horseback to 
Wheeling, West Virginia, a distance of twenty miles, to attend a protracted 
meeting, held by Alexander Campbell. Father carried Isaac, who was then 
about four years old, and I was carried in mother's arms.' 

"In a few years father and mother moved from that home to a farm near 
Hopedale, of the same county, and father was there associated with Cyrus 
McNeely in the church work for many years. He also worked on the farm, for 
he believed that a minister should labor with his hands as well as his brain, 
and in those days many Disciples believed the gospel should be preached 'with- 
out money and without price.' It was owing to this fact that the family often 
had but little more than the bare necessities of life. Father would labor hard 
all week on the farm until Saturday night, when he would ride many miles and 
preach that night, the next morning and Sunday night, and sometimes he was 
persuaded to stay through the week or part of it, when he could ill afford to do it. 

"In company with 'Uncle' Cyrus McNeely (as we were taught to call 
him) father often went to preach at Steubenville, Smithfield and Cadiz. Other 
places where he often went were Chestnutlevel, Deerfield, Woodfield, Barnes- 
ville, Belmont and Mount Olivet. He also helped establish churches at some 
of these places. Thomas and Alexander Campbell were often entertained at 
our home by father and mother while they were assisting in the protracted 
meetings in the neighborhood. 

"About 1852 the family moved to Belmont County and settled on the 
McCortne}' farm of over three hundred acres, near Uniontown, where father 
engaged extensively in farming and sheep raising. While living there they at- 
tended church at Flushing, a distance of six miles, where there was an organ- 
ization of Disciples, but for more than a year father preached every Sunday 
evening in his own home. At the time they moved there was but one other 
family of Disciples in the neighborhood, but soon there was great interest 
manifested and many times persons came to father during the week for baptism. 
It was no uncommon occurrence to go to the water after the Sunday evening 
meetings and baptize one or more persons, after which father would often 
furnish dry clothing for the candidate. 

"It \vas while living on tjie McCortney farm tiiat .Alexander Campbell 
held protracted meetings in father's barn. The barn was over one hundred feet 
long and would accommodate more people than the house. 



RECORD OK THE LEWIS FAMILY 73 

"It was also during father and mother's residence here tliat our honored 
'Father in the Gospel' Jonas Hartzel, held a very successful meeting in the 
M. E. church building, in Uniontown. 

"A few years later father purciiased property about four miles west of 
where they had been living, and they moved to their new home. The Dis- 
ciples leased a piece of ground about one mile from our home here and built a 
small house for worship. They organized and established a congregation of 
about twenty-five members, and those who had joined at Uniontown, putting 
their membership with them, a goodly number was gathered together in the 
few years that father lived there. Among those who held meetings at 'Old 
Auburn' (as the little church was called), were A. E. Myers, Joseph Dunn, Ely 
Regal. F. J. Newcomb, Adam Cordner, and others. 

"About the time father sold his property and prepared to move to Iowa, 
the Disciples church at Stillwater, about three miles west of Morristown, 
wanted the Auburn congregation to unite with them in town, which they did, 
thus making a stronger organization and relieving father of the great an.xiety 
he would have felt at leaving 'the little band' without a leader. 

"My first recollection of attending church and the first person I ever saw 
baptized was at dear 'Old Auburn.' A short time before we left there father 
wrote to Alexander Campbell, requesting him to come and preach a few sermons 
in Morristown. He answered, 'I will come as desired. You know, William, 
I always come if it is possible when \on call me, but I expect this will be the 
last time, as I am getting old and it is quite a task for me to travel by stage, 
overland.' He came and preached Sunday, at eleven in the morning and also 
at niglit, in the Presbyterian church, to immense crowds. That was the last 
time father ever saw him. I do not know who heljied father to continue the 
meeting, but think it was Adam Cordner. 

"About March, 1S62, father and mother took their family and moved 
to Cedar County, Iowa, locating four miles north ot Wilton Junction. This 
country was at that time quite new. Father engaged in farming and sheep 
raising, which was very profitable then owing to the civil war. Part of the time 
he kept sheep on shares for Samuel Siemens, of Cadiz, Ohio, and had at dif- 
ferent times from one to two thousand sheep to care for. 

"Having a large family to send to school, and poor school privileges and 
no church advantages here, father and mother decided to move to Salem, Henry 
County, of the same State, where they had learned there were good school ad- 
vantages, and that it was a good fruit country. So during the winter of 1865, 
leaving brother Hartzel and sister Mollie's husband, Rudolph \\\-llman, farm- 
ing in partnership, we moved to the quiet little town of Salem. VVliile on our 
way we passed through Atalissa and Muscatine, visiting Uncles Thomas and 
William Lewis and families. We took the boat at Muscatine and went as far 
as we could that way, then took the stage to Salem. Here, to our disappoint- 
ment, we were without church advantages for a while, but during one of father's 
trips back to Cedar County to see the children and look after some business 



74 RECORD OK THE LEWIS EAMILY 

interests, he made the acquaintance of Bro. Henry Hawkins, at Columbus Cit\', 
Louisa County, who was also a member of the Disciples Church, and who de- 
cided to take his family, most of whom were members of the Disciples Church, 
and move to Salem. Consequently after their arrival the two families united 
their efforts and held several meetings in different houses with some immediate 
success. They soon rented a room and used it for church purposes as long as 
we lived there. Among those who held meetings there were Jonas Hartzel, of 
Davenport, Iowa (of whom w'e have previously spoken), J. K. Cornell, of Oska- 
loosa, Iowa, N. E. Cory and others. It was while living here that brothers 
Emerson and Elery were converted and baptized. 

"In the spring of i86g they moved to Van Buren County, about ten 
miles from our former home, and located near Hillsborough. Here again father 
was disappointed in finding no church and learning that there were a number 
of church members scattered throughout the country, he visited most of them 
personally, and in 1870 they decided to build a house of worship at Big Mound, 
a town a few miles distant. As long as we lived here father helped other min- 
isters in their labors and many times did the work himself. While living here 
and during a meeting held bv J. K. Cornell, I became obedient to the gospel 
and was baptized. 

"In July, 1870, the Osage Indian Lands, of Kansas, were opened up for 
settlement, and the following fall father and Henry Hawkins made a trip to 
Southern Kansas to e.xplore the new country. Being delighted with the pros- 
pect, they returned, and the following January, 1871, during the earh- part of 
the month, brother Elery and Morgan, in company with two other voung men 
of the neighborhood, started overland to look up suitable locations for the 
different families, for by this time several had almost decided to venture into 
the unknown lands. The 3'oung men reached their destination safely, landing 
in Cowley Count\', Kansas, February 3, 1871, and after selecting such land as 
suited each, they begun the improvements that were most needed and which 
the law required. Father went down there b}' rail in April and returned in the 
summer, after whicli he made preparations to move, and in the fall he and his 
family, Henry Hawkins, John W'orden and J. \V. Millspaugh, with their fam- 
ilies, moved to their new homes in the Osage Lands. These families together 
with brother Isaac and family and a few scattered members, had constituted 
the churcii organization at Salem, consequently the 'little band' dismissed at a 
previous meeting held at Salem, to meet and reorganize in Cowle}^ County, 
Kansas. For a few months they met at private houses, but on the 27th of 
June, 1871, Vernon Township was organized and the Vernon Center school 
house was built J\ily 14, 1872, after which this was used by the people of the 
'Church of Christ' or Christian Church as a house of worship for many \ears. 

"In the new settlement we underwent many hardships, privations and 
difficulties, and made many sacrifices of which those who never settled a new- 
country have but a very imperfect idea. Father hauled most of the lumber for 
his house a distance of si.Kty miles, grain for his horses one hundred miles, and 
their first wheat crop was hauled forty miles to market. Brother Emerson 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 75 

hauled apples from the State of Arkansas. He also made very venturesome 
trips into what is now known as the western counties of Kansas to obtain buf- 
falo meat. At one tiin<_- he had his clothing nearly torn off of him by an injured 
and furious buffalo. The storms, which were so terrible and dangerous on the 
plains, in those days were among the greatest obstacles to our happiness and 
progress. 

"Here and in the surrounding country father did his last work, religious 
political and financial. In almost all of the surrounding country he labored 
successfully in the cause of the Master, preaching and organizing congregations, 
many of which today could testifs' to his earnest life work. 

'■Father was what would be termed a self-made, self-educated man, 
having acquired most of his education through hard study of books, papers and 
life examples of great and good men. He was a great admirer of Lincoln, 
Greeley and Garfield, and men of whom he loved to read were Franklin and 
Channing. Of religious writers he often went to Thomas and Ale.\ander Camp- 
bell, Franklin, Daniel Sommers and such for counsel. 

'■Father and mother united their efforts in behalf of the slaves and I 
have often heard them tell, while living in Ohio, that they not only sheltered 
but assisted runaway slaves to make their escape through that section of the 
country. 

"In 1873 father took an active interest in politics, and at the November 
election of that year he was elected Representative of the Seventy-fifth District 
of Cowley County, and at the end of that term an e.xtra session was called for the 
purpose of devising ways and means of providing for the utterly devastated sec- 
tions of Kansas, and he served during that term. The following winter he was 
sent as a delegate from this section to Ohio and Iowa to solicit aid for the Kan- 
sas sufferers from droutli. It was during this fall and winter that I was enabled, 
through the kindness of father's brother, John Martin, to make a trip to East- 
ern Ohio, having gone with another uncle, George Martin, who was returning 
from a visit with us. I returned to Kansas with father, by way of Iowa, visit- 
ing many friends and relatives there. 

" Here in the old homestead, in Kansas, we witnessed much happiness 
and also much sorrow. We stood by the side of dear ones in sickness and 
death, supporting one another in their grief, and then by the side of, may we 
not say, the dearest of all yet, our patient, suffering. Christian father. As one 
family, except brother Isaac (who was in Iowa), did we stand around his bed- 
side to minister to his comfort and, if possible, to lighten in some way his suf- 
ferings on the night of January 19, 1883, when he breathed his last, and on the 
2ist he was laid to rest in the \'ernon cemetery, where, by his side, we so soon 
placed our dearly beloved, sacrificing. Christian mother, whose health gradually 
failed after father's death. On October 20, 1886, at the home of sister Mollie, 
she passed from eartji to the great beyond, toward which we are all hastening. 

"After father's death mother sold the home place and with brother 
Elery, as administrator, settled all of father's accounts, and then bought eighty 
acres of land near the old home place and built a new house, where she lived 



76 RFXORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

until shortly before her death. Then, her children all beinf;; married, she went 
to live with her eldest daughter, Mollie. 

"Of our father and mother it might truly be said, 'Their children rise up 
and call tliem blessed.'" 

AMBROSE AND MARY ANN LEWIS) READ (4) 

Mary Ann Lewis, daughter of Morgan and Mary (Thorn) Lewis, was 
born August 28. 1822, in the "old tan-vard home," near Georgetown, Harrison 
County, Ohio, and died March 30, 1863. near Durant, Scott County, Iowa. 
Her remains were interred in the cemetery three miles nortli of Wilton, Musca- 
tine County, Iowa. 

Ambrose Read, son of John and Eleanor (Cimningham) Read, was born 
near Winchester, Guernsey Connt\', Ohio, Februar\- 5, 1820, and died June 8, 
1884, in Des Moines, Iowa. 

Ambrose Read and Mary Ann Lewis were united in marriage Ma)' 10, 
1848, at the home of the bride's oldest brother, Isaac Lewis, in Georgetown, 
Harrison County, Ohio, the uncle of the bride, Rev. Henry Heberling, minister 
of the M. P. church, officiating. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Nam,' Birth Death 

Albert Read April 14, 1849 .... June 25, 1874 

William Lewis Read May 15, 1851 

George Read May 5, 1854 

Henry Heberling Read December 10, 1856 

John Morgan Read August 9, 1859 

They were all born near Georgetown except John M., who was born in 
Hopedale, of the same county and State. 

Albert died near Altoona, Polk County, Iowa. 

In Mav. 1864, when he was but fifteen years of age, Albert enlisted in 
the Forty-fourth Iowa \'olunteer Infantry. The regiment was enlisted for 
ninety days, and as it was near the close of the war he remained with the regi- 
ment until mustered out in October, 1864. 

Mr. and Mrs. Read located near Georgetown, Harrison County, Ohio, 
soon after their marriage, where they lived until the autumn of 1857, when they 
moved to Centre Bel pre, Washington County. Remaining there but one 
year they went to Hopedale, Harrison County, where they lived until i86i_ 
They then moved to Scott County, Iowa, and located on a farm three miles 
north of Durant, where the mother died. In 1867 the family settled in Polk 
Couut\, Iowa, near the town of Altoona. 

Mr. Read taught in the public school for some time previous to his mar- 
riage. His father was of English and his mother of Scotch and Irish descent. 
He was a mend)er ot tlie Presbyterian church. Mrs. Read was of English and 
W'elsh descent and a birthright member of the Friends' Society. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 77 

George and Henry H. Read located in Des Moines, Iowa, in 1884, and 
engaged in business as real estate brokers, under the firm name of Geo. & H. 
H. Read. 

John M. Read graduated from tlic Law Department of the State Univer- 
sity of Iowa, where he also completed his education and immediately entered 
into a professional partnership with his brother, William L. Read, whicli they 
conducted with the most gratifying and satisfactory results. 

William L., George, Henry H. and John M. have all taught in tiie |miIi- 
lic schools to some extent. 



WILLIAM AND SELINA (THOMPSON) LEWIS (4) 

William Lewis, son of Morgan and Mary (Thorn) Lewis, was born 
December 11, 1824, in the ''old tan-yard home," near Georgetown, Short 
Creek Township, Harrison County, Ohio, and die 1 August 5, i8gg, near Elm- 
wood, Cass Count}', Nebraska. 

Selina Thompson, daughter of Robert Thomas and Barbara (Ebberts) 
Thompson, was born January 3, 1828, in Cadiz, Harrison County, Ohio, and 
died January 20, 1875, near West Liberty, Muscatine County, Iowa. 

William Lewis and Selina Thompson were united in marriage February 
12, 1846, at New Athens, Harrison County, Ohio, a Presbyterian minister 
officiating. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Robert Thompson Lewis November 4, 1846 

Mary Barbara Lewis December 3, 1848 

Lineaus Morgan Lewis June 22, 1850 

Catherina Ida Lewis July 1 1. i'^56 



They were all born in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio, excejjt 
Catherina, who was born near West Liberty, Muscatine County, Iowa. 

The following sketch was written by Robert T. Lewis: — 

" After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Lewis removed to Centre Belpre, 
Washington County, Ohio, where Mr. Lewis was engaged in mercantile pur- 
suits for five years. He then concluded, as he was the more robust of tile 
brothers, to try his fortune in the West. Hence in the fall of 1851 he fitted out 
a team and spring wagon and with his wife and family, Robert, Mary and 
Lineaus, started overland for Iowa. The journey was long and tedious, but 
not without some very interesting and trying experiences, two of which I dis- 
tinctly remember, though not quite five years of age. 

"On reaching the Illinois river we found it far beyond its banks and 
passengers and teams had to wait and take their turn in getting ferried over. 
While We were thus waiting the water raised up around our wagon so high that 




WILLIAM LEWIS 



RECORD OF THK LEWIS EAMILV 79 

father was obliged to earn- mother and us children, one at a time, on his back 
from the wagon to a skiff, which rowed out through the woods as near as possi- 
ble to us and then transferred us to the ferryboat. Father followed with the 
team and wagon over the graded road, which was outlined by stakes, and with 
the aid of a man to guide, by wading ahead of the team, he reached the other 
side in safety. Upon reaching the Mississippi river, opposite Burlington, 
Iowa, we found this stream also greatly swollen and were obliged to ferry six 
miles in order to reach the opposite shore. 

"Continuing our journey westward we arrived in the village of Columbus 
Citv, Louisa County, Iowa, about the middle of October, where we remained 
until the following spring, when in March we went on as far as Muscatine 
County, where father purchased a farm near West Liberty. He immediately 
engaged in improving his land, general farming and stock-raising. Here we 
lived thirty years. During his residence there mother was called away after a 
short illness of only four days. She was truly a loving and affectionate wife 
and mother. She was a member of the Presbyterian church and was of Cier- 
man descent. Her remains were interred in the Timberlake cemetery, a short 
distance from their home. After her death her father, Robert T. Thompson, 
who had been living with us, preferably made his home with father and family 
until his death, October 12, 1876. His remains were taken by William Lewis 
to Ohio for interment. 

" In the fall of 1857, several years before mother's death, father took her 
and the children and started on a visit back to the old home in Ohio. They 
also visited friends and relatives in West Virginia. This journey by rail was 
accomplished in a much more rapid and comfortable manner than their journey 
westward in 1851. 

" During the summer of 1880 father met with what for sometime appeared 
to be a fatal accident. While engaged in hauling lumber in West Liberty, 
Iowa, he was kicked and severely injured by a young horse which he was driv- 
ing. He lay unconscious for sometime, but after long and untiring efforts on 
the part of the doctors of that place he was restored to consciousness, but was 
confined to his bed and to the house for several weeks; afterward. 

"As an instance of his unselfish and benevolent nature I will relate one 
or two of his deeds of love and charity: During his early residence in Iowa 
there was a family in the neighborhood who were very severely afflicted (the 
father having committed suicide and the mother and oldest son having died of 
typhoid fever, leaving two sons and two daughters with the same sickness). 
Father had the two boys moved into his own home, while another neighbor 
took the two girls into his home, and they and their equally charitable wives 
cared for and nursed their patients through a very severe illness, after which 
their own families suffered from the same maladies. 

" During the civil war father furnished the families of soldiers who were 
serving in the Union army many comforts. He often had rails from his fences 
sawed into stove wood and delivered at the doors of the war widows in order 
that they might not suffer from tile cold, wintry blasts. And often lu' hauled 



RECORD OF 'IHE LEWIS FAMILY 8l 

wood several miles, through deep snow and heavy drifts, unloaded it at the 
doors of those soldiers' families who were in need, and then chopped or caused 
it to be cut into stove wood for them. In fact, he was a friend to all who were 
in need. He was a birthright member of the Friends' Society, in which faith 
and religion he was raised. Politically he was a life-long and ardent member 
of the Republican party. He was of English and Welsh descent. 

■' In 1882 he sold his property in Iowa and bought a farm near Elmwood, 
Cass County, Nebraska, to which he moved March i, 1882, exactly thirty years 
from the time that he moved to his farm in Iowa, though an unintentional coin- 
cidence. 

"He died at his late residence near Elmwood, from which place his 
funeral occurred, the services being conducted by the Rev. Cyrus Alton, 
assisted by Rev. John Lewis, both of the Church of Christ, August 7, 1899. 
His remains were taken to Iowa and interred by the side of his wife as he had 
requested." 

We feel that we must add a few words of tribute to the memory of this 
noble Christian character. In the letters from relatives who were acquainted 
with his life there are none who liave not attested to his zealous works of char- 
ity. One of the cousins says, "He was the kindest man I ever knew. I shall 
never forget that noble countenance, written all over with kindness." 

In one of his letters written to M. M. Lewis after the death of Uncle 
Hervy Lewis (the last of "grandfather" and "grandmother" Lewis's family) 
he said, "According to the hopes and wishes of the human family, what a won- 
derful reunion that of Uncle Herv3''s must have been in that mysterious and 
unknown country from which no traveler returns. Father, mother, wife, broth- 
ers and sisters, and the hosts of other relatives and friends; not one missing. 
Wonderful to think of!" 

Being a man of good health and sunny temperament, he enjoyed all of 
God's gifts, and his piety being of the bright and happy type it was appreciated. 
Few men have lived more useful lives and left a more inspiring example. 



PARKER AND ELIZABETH (PICKERING) LEWIS (4) 

Parker Lewis, son of Morgan and Mary (Thorn) Lewis, was born March 
4, 1827, in the "old tan-yard home," near Georgetown, Short Creek Township, 
Harrison County, Ohio, and died April 6. 1891, in Dwight, Illinois. His 
remains were brought home and interred in the Belpre cemetery of Washington 
County, Ohio. 

Elizabeth Pickering, daughter of Evan and Nancy (Lewis) Pickering, 
was born February 12, 1828, near Cadiz, Harrison County, Ohio. 

Parker Lewis and Elizabeth Pickering were united in marriage February 
20, 1846, at Wheeling, West Virginia. 
6 



82 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Morgan Evan Lewis February 22, 1847 

Leora Lewis August 20, 1849 

Leni L. Lewis June 10, 1851 

S3dvanus Pickering Lewis September 14, 1853 .... Januar\' ig, i860 

Lizzie Pickering Lewis Ju^v 28, 1855 .... March 15, 1883 

Isaac Thomas Lewis June 29, 18^9 

Lilly Mabel Lewis March 19, 1862 

William Parker Lewis. December 2, 1863 

Lincoln Grant Lewis September 29, 1865 

Lethe Estelle Lewis Januarj^ 12, i858 

They were all born at Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. 

Sylvanus P. and Lizzie P. died at the same place of their birth and were 
interred in the Belpre cemetery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis located in Centre Belpre soon after their marriage, 
where he was for several years engaged in the mercantile business. He also 
manufactured a very superior quality of grape wine. For fourteen years he 
served as treasurer of Belpre Township, and held the position of postmaster of 
Centre Belpre nearly sixteen years. In all of his business dealings he won the 
admiration and respect of the people for his honesty and upright character. 
Mr. Lewis was a cripple and a great sufferer all of his life, having injured his 
knee while "coasting" when he was but fours years of age. He never recov- 
ered from the injurj^, but several years after his marriage had the leg ampu- 
tated, and still the suffering was not relieved. He continued to suffer the most 
intense pain, and it seemed to be in the foot and leg that was gone, so there 
could be no aid given. Notwithstanding this, he was a man of great energy 
and successfully carried on business until his death. 

Mrs. Lewis was a model wife and mother. Indeed, the children feel that 
the)' were blessed with kind and generous parents. 

Mr. Lewis was of English and Welsh and Mrs. Lewis of English descent. 

LYSANDER AND NARCISSA (LEWIS) MAY (4) 

Narcissa Lewis, daughter of Morgan and Mary (Thorn) Lewis, v. as born 
October 15, 1832, in the "old tan-yard home," near Georgetown, Short Creek 
Township, Harrison County, Ohio, and died January 21, 1897, in Jackson- 
Jackson County, Ohio. Her remains were interred in the cemetery of that place. 

Lysander May, son of Isaac and Assenath (Browning) May, was born 
October 27, 1830, near Elderville, Brooks County, West Virginia. 

Lysander May and Narcissa Lewis were united in marriage October 15. 
1851, on the banks of the Ohio river, opposite Wheeling, West Virginia, by a 
Methodist Protestant minister and with the authorized ceremony of that denom- 
ination. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 83 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Carrie May. June 6, 1853 .... February 20, igoo 

William Lewis May June 25, 1855 

Henry Heberling May January 28, 1858 

Thomas Lewis May September 18, i860 

Mary May . November 28, 1 863 

Weltha Zears May September 9, 1865 .... May 31, 1884 

Albert May May 9, 1869 .... March — , igoi 

Frank May September i, 1873 

Carrie, Whl L., Henry H. and Thos. L. were born in Tuscarawas 
County, Ohio; Mary in Seneca County; Weltha Z. in Holmes County, and 
Albert and Frank in Jackson, Jackson County, all of the same State. 

Carrie died and was buried in Jackson, Ohio. Albert died and was 
buried in Dent County, Missouri. 

Mr. May is of English descent. His mother was a native of Maryland. 
Mrs. May's mother was of English and her father of Welsh descent. 

The following sketch of the life and works of Mr. and Mrs. May were 
contributed by Mr. May: — 

"After our marriage we repaired to my home in Tuscarawas County, 
Ohio, where I owned a half interest in a woolen factory and a farm of one hun- 
dred acres. We remained there about four years, when I rented the property 
to my brother-in-law, Philip Paul, and joined the Conference of the Methodist 
Protestant church, and being ordained to preach I traveled several circuits and 
stations for eight years, moving my family from place to place. At the end of 
that time, having sold my property and spent about one thousand dollars for 
our own support, my family being large, I concluded it must be 'more money 
or no preach.' So we located in Jackson, Jackson County, Ohio, where I 
turned my hand to contracting and building, and am still (igo2) to some extent 
engaged in that business. After coming to this place, the Methodist Society 
having died out, I joined the Presbyterian church as a layman, of which I still 
remain a member. 

"As to my experiences in the ministry, there are many pleasant and 
many sad ones, but scarcely w^orth note in history. However, I will give one 
or two which I recall to memory: — 

"While working in a northern circuit I met with a condition somewhat 
peculiar to me. I often visited a family of whom two or three were members of 
the church, and when we engaged in praj'er the rest of the family would go on 
with their several occupations as deliberately as if nothing else was going on. 
It was while here that 1 had some trouble with the male part of my congrega- 
tion going to sleep. It was the custom of the older men of that place on Sat- 
urday afternoon to go to ' The Corners ' and drink whiske}'. There was a large 
distillery close by. After the men had had their regular Saturday's drink and 
then got settled in the warm school house, they became so sleepy that it was 



84 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

very hard for them to keep awake, and generally several of them did not suc- 
ceed notwithstanding my best endeavors. This was rather annoying. One 
night some one in the back corner of the building kept grumbling in an under- 
tone continually. At last I stopped talking and asked him what the matter 
was. He answered in a stupefied and sleepy manner that they wouldn't let him 
sleep. I advised him to wake up and sit up, and told him he would not be dis- 
turbed, and then went on with m}- sermon with no more annoyance. 

"After leaving this place I was sent to a circuit near the center of the 
State, where I removed w'ith my family; but found it hard work to get a stop- 
ping place, as the people of that vicinity were engaged in a rebellion against the 
government (it being during the war), and every stranger was suspected of be- 
ing a spy sent to arrest them. However, I succeeded in satisfying them as to 
my mission and they let me stay. I preached there two years and we became 
very much attached. One winter while there 1 taught school, and the ne.xt 
spring the young people of our church asked me to teach them vocal music. I 
agreed to do so if they would furnish the books and sing, when taught, for the 
church. This they agreed to do, and the summer was spent very pleasantly. 
At the end of my second year at this place, I was asked to return and intended 
to do so, but the Conference over-persuaded me to go to Jackson and I finally 
consented. Upon the people learning of the change made they were very much 
disappointed, and the morning that we left the young people assembled at the 
church and presented me an album containing all of their pictures. As they 
filed past to bid us goodbye every one was cr3'ing. This was a tr^'ing ordeal 
for me, being a mingling of sadness at the separation and 3'et gladness for the 
mutual respect and love. Many of those whose pictures I have are gone to 
their long home, whilst I linger on until the Lord calls me to meet them with 
others in that new life for which 1 am patiently waiting. 

"As to my departed companion who walked life's pathway with me for 
fort3'-eight years, I must sa\' she was a good wife, who looked well to her house- 
hold, and an exceedingly kind mother. She died esteemed and loved by all 
who knew her. Together we have reared a family who from every outward ap- 
pearance are highly respected in this community." 

Thomas and Henry May are both single and are cigarmakers by trade. 
They are living in their own rural home in Dent County, Missouri, where the)^ 
are engaged in agricultural pursuits on a small scale, largely for their health. 
They conducted a cigar manufacturing establishment in Jackson, Ohio, about 
twenty years previous to their removal to Missouri. 



JOHN C. AND KATHERINE (LEWIS) GOURLAY (4) 

Katherine Lewis, daughter of Morgan and Sarah (^Wilson) Lewis, was 
born May 24, 1836, in the "old tan-yard home," near Georgetown, Short Creek 
Township, Harrison County, Ohio. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 85 

John Chambers Gourla}', son of George and Margaret (Chambers) Gour- 
lay. was born Jnly 25, 1825, near York, Jefferson County, Ohio, and died June 
4, 1871, at his birthplace. 

John C. Gourlay and Katherine Lewis were united in marriage January i, 
1857, in Hopedaie, Harrison County, Ohio. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gourlay lived near York, Ohio, where Mr. Gourlay was 
engaged in farming until his death. He was a member of the Presbyterian 
church and was a Christian in all tliat word implies. 

Mrs. Gourlay is of Irish, Welsh and English descent. Mr. Gourlay was 
of Scotch and Irish descent. 

After his death Mrs. Gourlay bought property in Cadiz, Harrison County, 
Ohio, where she and her mother lived until in the fall of 1874, when she was 
again married. 

HUGH K. AND KATHERINE (LEWIS) (GOURLAY) MITCHEL (4) 

Hugh Kuntz Mitchel, son of Jolm and Isabelle (Orr) Mitchel, was born 
January 10, 1827, in New Hagerstown, Carroll County, Ohio. 

Hugh K. Mitchel and Katherine (Lewis) Gourlay were united in mar- 
riage October 11, 1874, in New Philadelphia, Tuscarawas County, Ohio. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mitchel located in New Philadelphia after their marriage, 
where the\' have lived over twenty-eight years. They have won the respect and 
esteem of all who know them. Mr. Mitchel is engaged in contracting and 
building. They are both members of the M. E. Church. 

Mr. Mitchel is of Irish descent. 

"Aunt Kate" is spoken of as most charitable in disposition, and a noble, 
unselfish character. 

CHARLES AND HANNAH (LEWIS) VERMILLION (4) 

Hannah Lewis, daughter of Thomas and Lydia (Morris) Lewis, was 
born 1827, in Washington Township, Guernsey County, Ohio. 

Charles Vermillion, son of and ( ) Vermil- 
lion, was born , in , and died in defense of his country 

during the civil war. 

Charles Vermillion and Hannah Lewis were united in marriage 

, in , Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name JUrlh Death 

Jesse Vermillion 

Sarah Jane Vermillion Deceased. 

They were born in Guernsey County, Ohio. 

Mrs. Lewis resides at Birmingham, Guernsey County, Ohio. 

Further information concerning tliis family could not be obtained. 



86 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

THOMAS H. AND ELIZA J. (HOOVER) LEWIS (4) 

Thomas Hervy Lewis, son of Thomas and Lydia (Morris) Lewis, was 
born June 26, 1830, in Washington Township, Guernsey County, Ohio. 

Eliza Jane Hoover, daughter of John and Jane (Caldwell) Hoover, was 
born February 18, 1833, at Hubbard, Trumbull County, Ohio. 

Thomas H. Lewis and Eliza J. Hoover were united in marriage Decem- 
ber 5, 1852, in Washington Township, Guernsej' County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Lydia Alice Lewis December 15,1852 March 14,1854 

Orlando Granville Lewis May 15, 1855 

Sylvia Loana Lewis December 30, 1856 .... January 17, 1859 

Thomas Edward Lewis \ „ . April 4. 1867 

' Twins 



John Hoover Lewis. . . j" April 4. 1867 

They were born in Washington Township, Guernsey County, Ohio, 
except S\'lvia L. , who was born in Cannon City, Rice County, Minnesota. 

Lydia A. and Sylvia L. died and were buried in Washington Township, 
Guernsey County, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis also adopted Minnie Sward, who was born July 10, 
1878, in Hyllingsund, Sumnersbergs Prestgard Lidkoping, Sweden, and came 
with her parents to America when she was a baby. 

Minnie Sward Lewis graduated from the High School in Faribault. Rice 
County, Minnesota, June 2, 1899, since which time she has been teaching in 
the public schools of Cannon City, Rice County, Minnesota. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis located in Washington Township, Guernsey County, 
Ohio, soon after their marriage, where they lived several years. In 1856 they 
moved to Rice County, Minnesota. In making this trip they traveled by rail 
as far as the Mississippi River, when they took the boat, " War Eagle," just 
across the river from Dubuque, Iowa, and went up the river to Hastings, 
Dakota County, Minnesota, and rode the rest of the distance, fiftj^ miles, in a 
wagon. The country and the roads were new and the traveling was very rough. 
When they arrived in Rice County they purchased a farm of one hundred and 
twenty acres, one mile west of Cannon City. At that time there were a great 
many Indians in Minnesota, and a few days after their arrival several hundred 
Sioux Indians went by on their way home after being at war with the Chippewa 
Indians. They carried several scalps with them and that night had a big war 
danci-. J 

They lived in Minnesota three and one-half j'ears, when, on account of 
the death of Mr. Lewis's father, they returned to Ohio and Mr. Lewis and his 
brother Morris purchased their sister Hannah's share in the old home place. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis remained there eight years, then sold their share of the 
farm to Morris Lewis and again moved to Rice County, Minnescvfa. This time 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 87 

they purchased one hundred and thirty acres of land adjoining Cannon City, 
two blocks of which were inside the city limits, on which their home w^as built. 
There is a large creamery and blacksmith shop located near where the public 
roads cross and where the farmers come in from the surrounding country to do 
their trading. Their farm is on the edge of a beautiful lake which abounds 
with fish. This lake is known as Crystal Lake and also as Cannon City Lake. 
Mrs. Lewis's father was a native of Pennsylvania and of German descent, 
and her mother was born in Ohio, of Irish descent. Mr. Lewis is of Welsh 
descent. 

EDWARD M. AND MARY A. (VANCE^ LEWIS (4) 

Edward Morris Lewis, son of Thomas and Lydia (Morris) Lewis, was 

born , 1833, in Washington Township, Guernsey County, Ohio, 

and died about 1875, ^^ Birmingham, Guernsey County, Ohio. 

Mary Agnes Vance, daughter of John and Mary ( ) Vance, was born 

in 

Edward M. Lewis and Mary A. Vance were united in marriage 

in 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

JVamr Birth Drath 

Alveietta Lewis 

Thomas H. Lewis 

John I^ewis 

Benoni Lewis Deceased. 

Lydia Lewis 

Edward Lewis 

Mary A. Lewis 

They were all born in Ohio. 

Mr. Lewis was a farmer by occupation. 

Further information concerning this family could not be obtained. 

DR. JAMES AND ELIZABETH A. (FRAME) SAWYER (4) 

Elizabeth Ann Frame, daughter of George and Lydia (Lewis) Frame, 
was born August 13, 1818, in Short Creek Township, Harrison County, Ohio, 
and died May 5, 1852, near Nottingham, Wells County, Indiana. Interment 
in the West Grove cemetery of Penn Township, Jay County. Indiana. 

James Sawyer, son of Archibald and Mary (Donaghy) Sawyer, was born 
October *3i, 1815, at Beragh Postoffice, County Tyrone, Ireland, and died 
August 7, i8g8, in Western, Saline County, Nebraska. Interment in West 
Grove Cemetery, Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

James Sawyer and Elizabeth A. Frame were united in marriage in the 
fall of 1846, in Friends' Meeting, near Barnesville, Belmont County, Ohio. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 8g 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Nami- Birth Di-ath 

George Frame Sawyer August 20, 1847 

Thomas Sawyer February 24, 1849 

Mary Anne Sawyer 

George F. was born near Sonierton, Behuont County, Ohio, and Thomas 
and Mary A. were born near Nottingham, Wells County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sawyer located in Somerton, Belmont County, Ohio, soon 
after their marriage, living there until about October — ,.1847, when they moved 
to Jay County, Indiana, and shortly after settled near Nottingham, Wells 
County, Indiana, where they were engaged in farming. After the death of Mrs. 
Sawyer Mr. Sawyer moved to Nebraska, and at the time of his death was living 
with his son, George F., in Western, Saline County, Nebraska. 

Mrs. Sawyer was of Welsh, English and Irish, and Mr. Sawyer of Scotch 
descent. The latter's ancestors emigrated to Ireland from Scotland during 
some of the troublesome times in that country. Mr. Sawyer was educated and 
grew to manhood in the neighborhood of Beragh postoffice, Ireland, taught a 
term or two of school, after which he came to America. He landed at Vine 
Street Wharf, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in the summer of 1840. After travel- 
ing about through Pennsylvania for some time he finally settled near Somerton, 
Belmont County, Ohio, where he studied medicine w'ith Dr. Schooley, an 
eminent physician of that place. 

THOMAS L. AND ELIZABETH S. THOMAS) FRAME (4) 

Thomas Lewis Frame, son of George and Lydia (Lewis) Frame was 
born January 14, 1820, near West Grove, Short Creek Township, Harrison 
Count}', Ohio. 

Elizabeth S. Thomas, daughter of William and Rebecca (Outland) 
Thomas, was born May 27, 1821, near Barnesville, Belmont County, Ohio. 

Thomas L. Frame and Elizabeth S. Thomas were united in marriage 
November 28, 1844. near Barnesville, Belmont County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE l;ORN 

Nai)i<' Birth Death 

Mary A. Frame September 18, 1845 

Rebecca Jane Frame June 5, 1847 

Lydia Grisell Frame March 6, 1849 .... July i, 1883 

Hannah Taylor Frame March 30, 1851 .... August 26. 1870 

Margaret Hall Frame January 17, 1853 

Atlantic Lewis Frame September 6, 1854 .... August 12, 1870 

William Thomas Frame September 9, 1856 

Alice Phebe Frame September 23, 1859 

Georgiana Frame March 24, 1866 



go RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

They were all born near Jerusalem, iMonroe Coiintv, Ohio. 

Hannah T. and Atlantic O. died in Somerton, Belmont County, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frame first located on a farm on what was known as 
"Grisell Ridge," near Jerusalem, Monroe County. Ohio, where they lived 
twenty-two years, then moved to Somerton, Belmont County, and in 1880 to 
Waynesville, Warren Count}', but soon returned to Eastern Ohio, locating near 
Barnesville, Belmont Count}', where they lived until i8go, when they again 
moved to a farm near Waynesville, which is their present home. 

Mr. Frame is of Irish, Welsh and English, and Mrs. Frame of English, 
Welsh and Dutch descent. 

The following sketches were contributed by Mr. and Mrs. Frame's 
daughter Georgiana: — 

•'Thomas Lewis Frame was left fatherless at too early an age to realize 
the full meaning of his loss. His mother with his sister Elizabeth Ann and 
himself returned to the paternal home, where he spent a happy childhood 
among devoted uncles and aunts. His grandmother, Mary (Morgan) Lewis, 
has ever remained with him, a type of ideal womanhood. After the marriage 
of his mother, Lj'dia (Lewis) Frame, to Nathan Grisell about the 3'ear 1828, 
the family moved to Monroe Count)', Ohio, and it was a delight to the young 
lad to return on an occasional visit to the home of his earliest recollections. 

"He was married by the Friends' ceremony to Elizabeth S. Thomas, at 
their home near Barnesville, Ohio. Nine children, eight daughters and one 
son, were born to this union, all of whom lived to the years of maturit}'. Three 
daughters at the time of this writing have departed this life with the clearest 
evidence of having made their 'calling and election sure.' 

"At different times in his life Thomas felt it his duty and made the 
attempt to free himself from the tobacco habit, which he had acquired at the 
age of six years. During his early married life, one attempt, which proved 
almost successful, is worthy of mention. While passing through a woods one 
da}', the conviction became very strong that he should quit using tobacco, so 
taking the plug from his pocket he placed it in a hollow tree. For almost a 
year he was free from the craving for it. One day when passing that way 
again, the thought came to him that he would examine and see if the tobacco 
was still there. He found it and it looked all right, he then smelled it and it 
smelled all right, and finally in a moment of weakness he tasted it to see if it 
tasted all right, and decided to chew that plug and then quit. But by the time 
it was gone the habit was fastened upon him more strongly than ever, and he 
seemed unable to even make another effort in that direction until at the age of 
sixty years he resolved to be free or die in the attempt. At this time he was in 
poor health, but after a severe battle he was redeemed from all craving for the 
weed, and to this day has never faltered but lives as a monument of the Lord's 
power to 'deliver us from e\il. ' From that time his health improved and at 
the age of eighty-two years he quietly waits the summons to meet those gone 
before and whom he so dearly loved. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 9I 

"Thomas Frame was a farmer by occupation, and while he was physic- 
ally poorl}' equipped for the hard labor required in those early days, when 
machinery was scarce, yet for his time he was rather a progressive farmer. He 
has been a man of very refined and sensitive nature and generous almost to a 
fault. His own honesty and faith in humanit)- sometimes led him into being 
deceived by those of the human race who correspond to vultures in the feath- 
ered tribe. He was true to his friends, and in conversation with congenial 
companions was fluent and witty, ever ready for a joke and never at a loss for 
a quick reply. He was a man of unusual spiritual discernment, having had a 
number of experiences that demonstrate the spirit's power to lead." 

"The parents of Elizabeth S. Thomas were Friends, her father being a 
minister in that society. They were pioneers of eastern Ohio, where they came 
from Georgia and Carolina because of slavery. She was descended on the 
maternal side from Sir Robert Peel, of England, and the present Lord Peel, 
with a Puritan spirit that knows no defeat. 

"From her pioneer ancestry she inherited a character of more than ordi- 
nary force. Being extremely practical, energetic and conscientious she acted 
as a balance wheel to her less practical husband. 

"They were faithful attendants of Friends' Meeting and it was with 
pleasure that they extended their hospitalities to many of the traveling minis- 
ters, who then frequently visited their Meeting. 

"At the age of eighty-one years, Elizabeth is a woman of unusual energy 
of body and mind and denies herself that rest from freedom and care which by 
her busy life she has so richly merited. Her hands that have labored so un- 
ceasingly in the interests of her home and family are ever ready to lighten the 
cares of others, and her heart turns more and more to meditation and the cul- 
tivation of those graces wherein alone old age can be a blessing and a comfort. " 

Mary (Frame) Selby says, in speaking of her father and mother: — 

"Just paint father the loveliest man, and mother, as George Elliott said 
of one of her characters, 'a woman of such fine material made, that were all 
virtue and religion dead, she would make them newly, being what she is.' 
Father was the most loving and tender spirit to help the suffering and make 
people happy. He inherited his social nature from his mother, Lydia (Lewis), 
who, I am told, welcomed all who came so sweetly and bade them goodby so 
lovingly, that they loved to visit her and be made happy." 

Hannah T. Frame taught in the public schools of Somerton, Belmont 
County, and Atlantic L. taught the Pultney Ridge school, near Quaker City, 
Guernsey County, Ohio, and had just finished her first term, when she was 
taken sick with typhoid fever and died in a short time. Hannah T. took it 
soon after and she, too, was called away. Three others of the family suffered 
from the same sickness, but recovered. 

Georgiana taught in the public schools of Barnesville, Belmont County, 
Ohio, two terms, but has since been engaged in dressmaking, having her estab- 
lishment at home, where she can help care for her aged parents. 



92 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Alice is also at home, and it is through her loving kindness and pleasant 
nature that many happy days have been enjoyed by father and mother as they 
are nearing the top of the hill of life. 

Alice and Georgiana are members of the Friends' Society. 



JOHN D. AND HANNAH T. (GRISELL) YOCUM (4) 

Hannah Taylor Grisell, daughter of Nathan P. and Lydia (Lewis) 
(Frame) Grisell, was born February 24, 1830. near Somerton, Belmont County, 
Ohio. 

John Deweese Yocum, son of Samuel and Jane (Deweese) Yocum, was 
born September 28, 1832. in Belmont County, Ohio. 

John D. Yocum and Hannah T. Grisell were united in marriage June 24, 
1857, by the Friends' ceremony in Somerton, Belmont County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE P.ORN 

Name Birth Death 

Nathan Grisell Yocum November 4, 1862 .... August — , 1889 

He was born in Somerton, Belmont County, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Yocum reside at Somerton, Arizona, where Mr. Yocum is 
engaged helping develop the water systems in that semi-desert region where 
they hope to utilize the waters of the Colorado river. 

Mr. Yocum saj's: "By dint of persistent, assiduous effort I acquired 
enough education to enter my chosen field of labor, school teaching. I taught 
my first school when eighteen years of age and followed that profession with 
very little vacation continually for about thirty years. During that time I 
graduated from Franklin College, Ohio, in 1876. My mother was of Welsh 
and Scotch-Irish descent. She was a minister of the Society of Friends, a worthy 
woman, nobly blest. My father was a native of Pennsylvania and of German 
descent." 

Mr. and Mrs. Yocum are members of the Hicksite branch of the Friends' 
Society. 

THOMAS AND EMILY R. (LEWIS) SUMPTION (4) 

Emily Rakestraw Lewis, daughter of Enos and Margaret (Grisell) Lewis, 
was born October 21, 1830, in tlu- ''old stone house," near New Garden, 
Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Thomas Sumption, son of John and Susannah (Lewis) Sumption, was 
born April 23, 1828, in Old Virginia, and died September 2, 1859, near West 
Grove, Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. His remains were interred in 
the West Grove cemetery. 

Thomas Sumption and Emily R. Lewis were united in marriage April 22, 
1853, near West Grove, Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 93 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Clifton Howard Sumption April 23,1858 .... September 25, i860 

He was born and died near West Grove, Peon Township, Jay County, 
Indiana, and his remains were interred in the cemetery of West Grove. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sumption located near West Grove, where they lived until 
the time of his death. 

Thomas Sumption's father was a native of Berkley County, West Vir- 
ginia, and his mother of Frederick County, Virginia. Perhaps we should men- 
tion the fact here that Mr. Sumption's mother — Susannah (Lewis) Sumption — 
was the daughter of Evan Lewis, who was a son of Enos and Susannah (Wood- 
ert) Lewis, and a brother of Thomas Lewis. (See record of the first Lewis 
family, page 23.) 

Mr. Sumption was a shoemaker by trade. He was strictly honest, and 
generous and sympathetic in nature. He was of Welsh descent. 

Mrs. Sumption was named for a 3'oung lady school teacher, who was a 
great favorite with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis, by name of Emily Rake- 
straw. When Emily was four years of age she was sent to board with and go 
to school with Miss Rakestraw, who then lived four miles away from the Lewis 
home. 

When Mrs. Sumption was seven years of age her parents emigrated to 
Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, in company with her grandmother, Mar- 
tha (Dingee) Grisell, and she is one of the few now living, who have any per- 
sonal recollection of "Grandmother Grisell." We give some of her remem- 
brances in the sketch of Thomas and Martha (Dingee) Grisell's lives. 

After Mr. Sumption's death, Mrs. Sumption was again married. 

AARON B. AND EMILY (LEWIS) (SUMPTION) REGESTER (4) 

Aaron Baker Regester, son of Robert and Abigail (Rigby) Regester, was 
born November 30, 1820, in Columbiana County, Ohio, about ten miles south 
of the "old stone house," near New Garden. 

Aaron B. Regester and Emily (Lewis) Sumption were united in marriage 
August 12, i860, near West Grove, Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Estella Margaretha Regester. . March 16, 1862 .... October 6, 1865 

She was born near Cherry Grove, Fillmore County, Minnesota, and died 
about a mile from her birtliplace. Her remains were interred in the "Etna" 
cemetery near that place. 

Mr. and Mrs. Regester went to his home in Forestville Township, Fillmore 
County, Minnesota, soon after their marriage, where he had lived over three 



94 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMLIY 

\ears previous to that time. In the winter of 1869 they moved to Minneapolis, 
Hennepin County, and the next summer to Union Lakes, Rice County, and 
again in 1871 to Granite Falls, Chippewa County, all of the same State. At the 
latter place they purchased property, where they still reside. He has been 
engaged in farming for the last forty years. 

Mr. Regester was teacher in the public schools before his marriage, having 
taught about five three-month terms in all, two of which were taught at West 
Grove, one about two miles south of there (now the Paxon school house), part 
of a term in Pennville, and part of a term one mile east of Pennville (now 
known as the Junction school house), all in Penn township, Ja\' County, India- 
na, and the last term in Forestville Township, Fillmore County, Minnesota. 

He was a very successful teacher, having inherited a disposition for that 
profession, his father having been a competent school teacher for twenty years. 

Mr. Regester's father and uncle were the builders of the "old stone 
house," in which so very many of us are interested. 

His parents, together with all of their minor children (of which he was 
one) joined the Friends' Society w-hen he was quite young. 

Mr. Regester was another of those brave honest men, who was born 
when the United States was so much in need of men so qualified. Through 
his unyielding integrity he helped advance the emancipation of the slave in 
various w'ays. In disposition he is kind and generous, and of irreproachable 
character. 

November 30, 1901, the friends and neighbors celebrated Mr. Regester's 
eightj'-first birthday, at which about twentj'-seven persons were present. In his 
own words: "We had a ]oll\' good time, and a good supper furnished from the 
outside. W'e played no games and had no music (only the rattle of tongues) 
but just visited until about eleven o'clock, when handshaking was in order, and 
in a few minutes we were alone again." 

Mrs. Regester was a birthright member of the Quaker or Friends' Socie- 
ty', as it is now more commonly and properly called. She also taught in the 
public schools of Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, having assisted Atlan- 
tic Ocean Gray, one term at West Grove, and one term by herself at the same 
place. West Grove was then a log building. 

Mr. and Mrs. Regester have not allowed advancing years to circumvent 
their intellectual abilities. They are both well posted in current events as well 
as possessing an abundance of knowledge of the history of the last century. 

In religion they are both loyal and firm believers in Modern Spiritualism 
for over fiftj' years. 



AARON B. AND MARTHA A. (LEWIS) RIGBY U) 

Martha Ann Lewis, daughter of Enos and Margaret (Grisell) Lewis, was 
born December 25, 1831, in the "old stone house" near New Garden, Colum- 
biana County, Indiana. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 95 

Aaron Baker Rigby, son of Seth and Delilah (Gilbert) Rigby, was born 
April 15, 1832, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio, and died April 12, 
1879, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. Interment in the West Grove 
cemetery of the same township. 

Aaron B. Rigby and Martha A. Lewis were united in marriage January 
23, 1852, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Naiiif Birth Death 

Emery Gilbert Rigby November 6, 1852 

James Lilburn Rigby July 9. 1854 

Enos Lewis Rigby May 16, 1861 May 16, 1861 

Emily Jane Rigby Februarv 7, 1862 

Mary Adeline Rigby January 10, 1870 October i. 1879 

They were all born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Rigby lived in Penn Township until 
18 — , when they moved to Guthrie County, Iowa, where they lived one year, 
then returned to their former home. Mr. Rigby erected a new house on their 
property near West Grove and they lived there until his death. 

Mr. Rigby was of Irish and Scotch descent. He was a shoemaker and 
followed that trade to some extent in connection with farm work. He was but 
seven years of age when he came with his father and mother to Penn Town- 
ship, Jay County, Indiana, in 1839. They entered one hundred and sixty acres 
of land, which was covered by a dense forest, but the}' soon cleared enough land 
to build a cabin and for farming purposes. After the death of his parents Aaron 
B. went to live with his brother-in-law, Levi Johnson, in Jackson Township, of 
the sanit- county, where he lived until his marriage. 

Mr. Rigby was loyal and kind to his family and friends, and was sadly 
missed when he was called away. 

Mrs. Rigby or "Aunt Martha," as she is better known, lives among her 
children near her own home and is a true helpmate to them all, in spite of rheu- 
matic afflictions. She is a woman possessed with patience, strong affection, 
and endurance. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rigby were members of the Society of ]\Iodern Spiritualists. 



THOMAS G. AND RACHEL E. (HUNT) LEWIS (4) 

Tliomas Grisell Lewis, son of Enos and Margaret (Grisell) Lewis, was 
born October 16, 1833, in the "old stone house" near New Garden, Columbi- 
ana County, Ohio, and died June 11, 1895, near West Grove, Penn Township, 
Jay County, Indiana. 

Rachel Ellen Hunt, daughter of Mahlon and Deborah Y. (Smith) Hum, 
was born May 13, 1864, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 



96 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Thomas G. Lewis and Ella R. Hunt were united in marriage December 
25, 1881, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Lake Monroe Lewis January 10, 1883 

Donloe Enos Lewis August 13, 1887 

Sedalia Margaret Lewis Jwwe 28, 1889 

They were all born near West Grove, Penn Township, Jay Count}-, In- 
diana. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Lewis located at the "old homestead" 
which Enos Lewis entered in 1837. They lived here until after Mr. Lewis's 
death, when on account of poor health Mrs. Lewis took her family and went 
West, locating in Delta, Delta County, Colorado, where they still reside. 

Mrs. Lewis is a member of the United Brethren Church, and is of 
English descent. 

Lake M. has adopted his father's trade as carpenter and builder, and the 
two youngest children are attending school in the city schools of Delta. 

The following sketch of the life of Thomas G. Lewis was written b}' 
William S. Gray; — 

'•Tliomas G. Lewis was four years of age when he came to Jay County, 
Indiana, with his parents in the fall of 1837, consequently he has been inti- 
mately acquainted with the settling up of Jay County. The land, upon which 
his parents settled, was covered with foi-est trees, and nearly all of Jay and 
surrounding counties was one vast wilderness. Wild game of all kinds were in 
abundance. They had but few neighbors, and they w'ere far apart. For some 
years after settling here they had to depend upon the wild game of the woods 
for their meat, such as deer, bear, turkey, and other small game, with which 
the woods were bountifully supplied. 

"On this farm he lived with his parents until he was about fifteen years 
of age, assisting his father in clearing up the land preparatory to the growing 
of corn, potatoes, and other products of the soil. Their principal diet w^as 
corn bread, potatoes, pumpkins and wild meats, with an occasional luxury of 
wild fruits, such as gooseberries, cranberries and other small fruits. Apples, 
pears, peaches and cherries were something hoped for in the future. 

"At the age of fifteen years he left the home of his childhood and went 
to live with his uncle, Ensley Lewis (who was also one of Jay County's earliest 
settlers) to learn the carpenter's trade. He remained with his uncle two years, 
for which apprenticeship he received his board, clothes, and five dollars in 
money. 

"In 1851 he went to Henry County, Iowa, and stayed about eight 
months. From there he went to Muscatine County, Iowa, where he remained 
two years, working at his trade. .After working two years as a journeyman he 
formed a co-partnership witli Henry Ady, as contractor and builder. They con- 



RECORD OF llll', LEWIS FAMILY 97 

tinned in business until the rebellion broke out in the South, when they enlisted 
on the 14th day of October, 1861, in defense of the Union and Liberty. They 
were assigned to Company H, Eleventh Iowa Infantry, Army of the Tennessee. 
They participated in the battle of Shiloh where, on April 6, 1862, Henry Ady 
was killed; and at the same battle Tom received a wound in the shoulder, which 
troubled him through life. He was sent to the new House of Refuge in St. 
Louis, Mo., and remained three months. He then returned to his regiment, then 
at Boliver, Tenn., and participated in the battle of Corinth, where on account of 
disability, the result of his wound, he was honorably discharged November 26, 
1862. After being discharged from the army, he returned to Muscatine County, 
Iowa, where he stayed for a short time and then returned to his home in Jay 
Count}'. For three years after his return home, he was unable to attend to any 
kind of business on account of the wound received at Shiloh. During the sum- 
mer of 1865 he worked some at his trade, and in September, in company with 
his brother, Joseph Lewis, started for Kansas and Missouri, looking for a place 
to locate. On their way they stopped with their cousin William Lewis, of Mus- 
catine County, Iowa, with whom Tom had previously lived for about seven 
years. While there they visited William Ady, brother to Henry Ady, who was 
killed at the battle of Shiloh at the same time Tom was wounded. After spend- 
ing some ten days there, visiting old friends, they went to Muscatine City and 
took boat for Kansas City, Mo., where they spent a few days taking in the 
sights of the city, and then boarded a train for Topeka. Kansas, where they 
stopped with one of Jay County's venerable sires, Joseph Wilson, who in the 
early history of Jay County was elected County Auditor, which office he sur- 
rendered to his successor with honor to himself and constituents, He was ever 
afterward known as "Honest Joe Wilson." After spending some ten days with 
him and his son William Wilson and family, they bid them a cordial good-bye 
and started for Bates County, Mo., where they pitched tent in an old log cabin, 
minus doors and windows, in a deep forest belonging to an ex-rebel soldier. 
This forest was some fifteen miles in e.xtent, laying between the Osage and Lit- 
tle Miami rivers. Here they found an abundance of game. In this forest they 
spent the winter of 1865-6, hunting, trapping and fishing. During their stay 
there they killed about forty deer and three hundred turkeys, besides trapping 
a great number of otter, mink, muskrat, opossum, wildcat and coon. They 
also caught some very fine fish out of the Osage and Little Miami rivers. 

"One Sunday morning the owner of the cabin that they were occupying 
made them a call, and took dinner with tliem. He treated them very kindly 
and told them that they could occupy the cabin as long as they wished, without 
rent for the use of it. One day, while there, they were much surprised by see- 
ing their old friend, Joseph Wilson, drive up to their cabin door. He stayed 
with them a week or ten days. During his stay they had the good luck to kill 
three or four deer, which seemed to please the old man wonderfuUv. After a 
pleasant visit with the boys he batle them adieu, and left for his home in 
Kansas. 



gS RECORD OF THE LEWIS KAMI. IV 

"The boys had an old mule and a one-horse wagon, which they used for 
bringing in the game and hauling the same to Fort Scott, Kansas, where they 
sold their furs and wild game. Fort Scott was about twenty-seven miles south- 
west of the cabin occupied by them. Joseph says that he and Tom have fre- 
quently talked over the days spent in hunting, trapping and fishing, and pro- 
nounced it one of the most pleasant times during their trip in the Great West. 
They broke camp in the spring of 1866 and went to Butler City, same county, 
where Tom commenced working at his trade, but owing to an attack of rheu- 
matism he soon abandoned work and engaged in the grocery business, in which 
he continued for over one year. At the same time Joseph bought out a livery 
stable and run that until the latter part of July, 1866. His health failing him 
he sold out and returned home, leaving Tom at Butler City. Late in the fall of 
1867 Tom sold out his stock of goods and returned home. On his way home 
he stopped a few days with William Lewis, in Muscatine County, Iowa, visiting 
friends and relatives. While there he received a letter from Thomas E. Lewis, 
who was at that time building the West Grove Hall in Penn Township, Jay 
County, Indiana, stating he was unable to complete it, and requested him to 
come and take charge of the work on the hall. On receipt of this letter he at 
once bid his friends a pleasant good-bve and started for home, bringing Jennie 
Lewis (a cousin of his) home with him. On his arrival home he at once com- 
menced work on said hall, which he soon after completed. He remained home 
for a few months. His health being poor, he decided on another western trip. 
So in June, 1869, he left his father's house for Minnesota, stopping at Minne- 
apolis, where he remained for about two years, working at his trade. After his 
two years sojourn there he again returned to his home in Jay County, Indiana, 
where he at once engaged in contracting and building, which he continued until 
about 1891. He owned a fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres, well im- 
proved, which he looked after while engaged in contracting. He was a man of 
economic and industrial habits. 

"Coming to this country when but a child, and brought up in the woods, 
while wild game of various kinds were plentiful, it is but natural that he should 
become attached to his dog and gun. He loved the woods and was a successful 
hunter. He had no superiors, if any equals, among his associates in running 
down and bringing in the wild game of the woods. He made the peculiar 
habits of the wild animals his study. He knew at what hour the deer where 
feeding. It was no uncommon thing for his parents to be wakened up in the 
small hours of the night by him, preparing for a hunt. Long before day he 
was in the woods, where the deer were feeding. He was at home in the woods. 
The woods were his principal school house and teacher. There was but little 
affinity between him and the school house, hence his education was very lim- 
ited. He could read and write, and had some little knowledge of mathematics. 
In early spring he would be up and out in the woods, near where the turke}^ 
gobbler would be promenading the branch of some forest tree, and man}' an old 
gobbler came to the ground by the invitation of a bullet from his trusty rifle. 



RECORD OF- THE LEWIS lAMILV gg 

"During the years between 1871 and 1894 he made a number of hunting 
excursions into Michigan, Arkansas, and other places, which were generally, if 
not always, attended with success- lb- was frequently accompanied on those 
excursions by Dick Mendenhall and others, who always spoke of him as a genial 
and sociable companion and a successful hunter. But as much as he loved 
these hunting excursions, he never allowed his business to suffer to gratify his 
love for them. In the forepart of November, 1894, i" company with Dick 
Mendenhall, Randolph Hopkins, Emery Rigby, Louis Edmundson and Irvin 
Gray, he took a hunting excursion up into Michigan, it being his last. They 
killed six deer during their stay there. 

■'He had two brothers, Morgan B. and Joseph Lewis, who were also 
good hunters. Two sisters, Emily R. Regester and Martha A. Rigby also sur- 
vive him. 

"Tom was one of those good, genial, whole-souled men with a sympa- 
thetic heart, ready to relief the distress at all times. Hospitality was a marked 
trait of his character. He was a brave soldier, ever at his post of duty. 

"In i8gi his army afflictions became so severe that he had to abandon 
working at his trade. After a time he partially recovered, but in F"ebruary, 
1895, a new form of disease appeared which slowly but surely did its fatal work. 
He was during his last sickness the same 'brave, honest Tom.' His greatest 
desire seemed to be to arrange all for tlie future welfare of his family, and at 
the same time he grew more and more anxious for the end to come. He seemed 
to give up earth and embrace a fond hope of relief of a new life, and when the 
time did come lie seemed to but fall asleep, with good w ill toward all and en- 
joying peace with God and men. 

"He received a soldier's burial by James B. Cartwright Post, No. 358, 
of which he was a member. The following named comrades from Alex. Trim- 
hall Post. No. 213, of Redkey, were present; Dr. Geo. Shepherd, M. V. B. 
Coons, T. J. Dragoo, J. H. Blackburn, John W. Hill, Geo. Fertig. From 
Portland were: Dr. C. S. Arthur, Charles and Alonzo Hughes. There were 
fifty-two comrades in line of march to the cemetery. There were a number of 
comrades present but unable to come in line. 

"Thomas G. Lewis passed to a higher life June 11, 1895, at about 4:30 
o'clock p. m. A few days before his death his wife asked him if he had any 
choice as to where his body should be laid away. After a few moments of 
silence he said that he wished to be laid near his father and mother. So in 
compliance with his request his body was laid to rest June 13, 1895. in the cem- 
etery at West Grove. 

"The J. B. Cartwright Post, No. 35S, ordered the following resolutions 
of respect to be put on file in their Post and a copy sent to the bereaved 
family: — 

"To the memory of Thos. G. Lewis, late member of J. B. Cartwright 
Post, No. 358, Department Indiana G. A. R. 

"Whereas, It has pleased our Heavenly Father to call from our ranks 
our brother and comrade, Thomas G. Lewis, and 



€nr^_. 





lOO RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

"Whereas, Comrade Lewis was a faithful soldier, good citizen, and an 
earl}' member of our Order, therefore, be it 

"Resolved, That our Order has lost a faithful comrade, the community 
a good neighbor and citizen. 

"Resolved, That we have met with an irreparable loss, and deeply 
regret his absence from our Post room and camp fires. Yet we still have the 
influence of his life, and know that he has served his country well. 

"Resolved, That we tender our heartfelt sympath}' to the bereaved fam- 
ily and share with them the hope that we shall meet in the grand reunion when 
the general roll is called. 

"Resolved, That these resolutions be placed on the Adjutant's records, 
a copy sent to the family and one to the Gazette for publication. 

"A. T. Place, 

"L. J. GiBBLE, 

"T. J. Cartwright, 

"Committee. 
"The W. C. T. U., of Pennville, also tendered to his grief-stricken wife 
and children the following letter of s^'mpathy: — 

"Pennville, June i8, 1895. 
"Whereas, Our dear Sister, Rachel Ellen Lewis, has been called upon 
to mourn the loss of her husband by the hand of death, the W'. C. T. U. of 
Pennville hereby extend their heartfelt sympath)' in this hour of bereavement, 
and would prayerfully commend her to a throne of grace from which alone the 
healing waters flow. 

"May strength be given her, to guide aright the footsteps of the dear 
children left to her keeping, until they reach the heavenly mansion of the Dear 
Father, and companions gone before. "Bertha Cory. 

"Sarah Mason. 
"Lavina Heller." 

MORGAN B. AND HATTIE (HOOVER) LEWIS (4) 

Morgan Berney Lewis, son of Enos and Margaret (Grisell) Lewis, was 
born April g, 1837, in the "old stone house" near New Garden, Columbiana 
County, Ohio, and died June 27, i8g8, in Dunkirk, Indiana. Interment in the 
Friends' Cemetery of l^ennville. Jay County, Indiana. 

Hattie Hoover, daughter of John Y. and Rhoda (Wright) Hoover, was 
born August 8, 1845, in Ja\' County, Indiana. 

Morgan B. Lewis and Hattie Hoover were united in marriage September 
20, 1865, near West Grove, Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO them were born 
A^ame Birth Death 

Mary Josephine Lewis October 21, 1866 

Edna Isora Lewis March 30, 1870 

Leela Edith Lewis April 9, 1876 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY IQI 

They were born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mrs. Lewis is of German descent. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Lewis lived in Penn Township until 
1881, after which they removed to Grand Traverse County, Michigan, where 
Mr. Lewis purchased a farm. In 1888 they returned to Indiana and at the time 
of his death were living in Dunkirk, Jay County, Indiana. His funeral services 
were conducted in the Friends' Church at Pennville, of which he was a birth- 
right member. 

Knowing no better way to convey an idea of the character of Mr. Lewis 
to the relatives who had not the benefit and pleasure of his acquaintance, we 
give a few extracts from the pen of some who knew and loved him: — 

"Morgan B. Lewis was a peaceable, quiet, law-abiding citizen. He was, 
in his early life, taught to live in the light of that holy principle, 'As ye 
would that others should do unto you, do ye even so unto them.' His religion 
consisted in doing good to his fellowmen, and the world is the better for his 
having lived in it. We confidently believe that he has heard that welcome call, 
'Well done thou good and faithful servant, thou hast been faithful over a few 
things, come up higher and I w'ill make thee ruler over many.' " 

"One of his strong characteristics was his love for birds and animals. 
Raised in the forest where these abounded and being of a very reserved nature, 
he made the lives and habits of Iiis forest friends a close study and with the aid 
of an inherent understanding of them he gained an extensive and useful knowl- 
edge of natural history. 

" 'For hearts grow holier as they trace 
The beauty of the world below.' " 



JOSEPH D. AND MARY J. (HOPKINS) LEWIS (4) 

Joseph Dingee Lewis, son of Enos and Margaret (Grisell) Lewis, was 
born December 19, 1838, near West Grove, Penn Township, Jay Count}-, Indi- 
ana, and died Septeinber 30, 1895, at his home about one mile northeast of his 
birthplace. Interment in West Grove cemetery. 

Mary Jane Hopkins, daughter of Ambrose and Eliza (Gardner) Hopkins, 
was born September 9, 1850, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana, and died 
August 27, 1884, near West Grove, Penn Township. Jay County, Indiana. In- 
terment in West Grove cemetery. 

Joseph D. Lewis and Mary J. Hopkins were united in marriage October 
I, 1868, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

ATame Birth Death 



Linens Q. Lewis J"ly 

Carrie Fay Lewis J une 

Fred Garfield Lewis April 



12, 


1869 


7- 


1872 


14. 


1880 



I02 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Lineas Q. was born in Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana, and 
Carrie F. and Fred G. near West Grove, Penn Township, of the same county 
and state. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Lewis located on the N'otaw farm in 
Jackson Township, where they lived a few years, and later bought the farm 
near West Grove, to which they moved, and where they lived until their death. 

Mrs. Lewis was of English descent. She was a student in Liber College, 
near Portland, Jay County, Indiana, before her marriage. 

After finishing his school education Fred G. Lewis went to Elmwood, 
Lincoln County, Nebraska, in i8g8, and the following year to Aneta, Nelson 
County, North Dakota. He is at present employed as foreman for the Burgess 
Grain Company, of Binford, North Dakota. Politically he is a Republican. 

After Mrs. Lewis's death Mr. Lewis was again married. 



JOSEPH D. AND LEAH M. NUDING) LEWIS (4) 

Leah Magdalene Nuding, daughter of John Frederick and Barbara 
(Engle) Nuding, was born June 24, 1853, near Celina, Mercer Count)', Ohio. 

Joseph D. Lewis and Leah M. Nuding were united in marriage October 
8, 1888, at the home of the bride's sister, in Portland, Jay County, Indiana, 
Rev. Disbro officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 
Paul Joy Lewis August 3, 1889 

He was born near West Grove, Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Lewis located on his farm near \\"est 
Grove, where they lived until Mr. Lewis's death. Mrs. Lewis then took her 
son and returned to her former home in Ohio. Their present home being 
Early, Mercer County, Ohio. 

Mrs. Lewis is of German descent. She was a teacher in the public 
schools before her marriage, having taught eight winter and three summer 
terms. 

The following we copy from Mr. Lewis's death notice: — 

"He was reared in his native country and in his vouth, wliich was 
spent on a frontier farm, acquired habits of industry and economy, and these 
added to his good business qualifications, have made him one of the pros- 
perous farmers of his neighborhood. He remained at home until after the 
breaking out of the civil war and July 2, 1862, enlisted in Compan\- F, 57th 
Infantry aAd was immediately sent to the front and assigned to the Army of the 
Cumberland. He participated in many hard fought battles, including Chick- 
amauga, Mission Ridge, Atlanta, Sherman's march to the sea, and was present 
at the surrender of Johnson's army. He then went to Richmond, and thence 
to Washington, where he was in line at the Grand Review of the army. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY IO3 

"He enlisted as a private and was promoted to Third Sergeant, then 
Orderly Sergeant and January 28, 1863, was commissioned Second Lieutenant, 
and September i, 1864, was promoted to Captain of his company. 

"After the war he took a trip through the western states, being absent 
about one year, before his return to Jay County. In 1868 he settled on the 
Daniel Votaw farm, which he rented for two years, and then returned to the 
'old homestead.' In 1871 he purchased the farm where he lived until his 
death. 

"Joseph Lewis was a man of temperate and industrial habits. He was 
liberal in his views on all questions of the age. He believed in doing right, 
because it is an inherent element in man's nature; not for fear of any future 
punishment, nor the hope of any future reward, except that which follows a 
well spent life in doing good to his fellowmen. When the time came he 
yielded up his life peacefully, with a living faith in a lirighter and better life 
in the Father's divine kingdom." 

WILLIAM S. AND MARY (LEWIS) GRAY C4) 

William Schooley Gray, son of Thomas and Catherine (Lewis) Gray, 
was born June 10, 1828, near Malaga, Monroe County, Ohio, and died June 12, 
1902, in Norton, Kansas. His jsurtrait will be found on page 8. 

Mary Letitia Lewis, daughter of Hervy and Elma ( Grisell) Lewis, was 
born May 31, 1834, in Short Creek Township, Harrison County, Ohio, and died 
May I, 1882, in Battle Cieek, Michigan. Her remains were interred in the 
cemetery of Harmonia, about five miles west of Battle Creek. 

William S. Gray and Mary L. Lewis were united in marriage October ( — ), 
1850, at the home of Syra and Sarah Ann (Grisell) Lewis, in Penn Township, 
Jay County, Indiana, Ellis Davis. J. P., officiating. 

TO THE.M WERE l;ORN 

Name Birth Death 

Alonzo Preston Gray November 29, 1853 

Arthur Denton Gray Jimt: 2, 1858 

Otto Lineaus Gray March 2, 1861 April 14, 1861 

Mary Lilian Gray July 3, 1868 August 15, 1868 

Alonzo P. and Arthur D. were born in Penn Township, Jay County, In- 
diana, Otto L. in Harmonia and Mar\ L. in Battle Creek, Calhoun County, 
Michigan. 

Otto L. died in Harmonia and Mary L. in Battle Creek. They were both 
interred in the cemetery at Harmonia. 

The following is an autobiography of the life of Wm. S. Gray: — 

"I emigrated from Monroe County, Ohio, to Penn Township, Jay County, 
Indiana, with my parents in the fall of 1847. After my marriage in 1850, I 
erected a house and begun housekeeping in Penn Township, where we lived 



I04 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

about ten years. During this time I was identified with the 'Underground Rail- 
way' for concealing the runawaj' slaves, and to help them to a land of freedom. 

"About i860, owing to the fact that we were so badly afflicted with fever 
and ague, I decided to go to Michigan and prepare a home for my family there, 
so in March of that year I started for Harmonia, Calhoun County, Michigan, a 
distance of one hundred and fifty miles, and made the trip on foot. In the lat- 
ter part of the next month my father brought my family to Harmonia. We lived 
there three years, where I was engaged in the carpenter trade. During this 
time I joined the Good Templars Lodge. In 1864 we moved to the city of 
Battle Creek, in the same county, and remained there until after Mrs. Gray's 
death. Here I worked at my trade most of the time. In the spring of 1882 I 
was instrumental in establishing the first order of the Knights of Labor in 
Battle Creek, and in January of 1884 was elected a delegate to the state con- 
vention of the Knights of Labor, held in Detroit, which I attended. This 
same year the New Era, a labor organization similar to the Knights of Labor, 
was organized in Battle Creek, in which I was a charter member. In Jul}% 1884, 
I was elected a delegate to the national convention of that order, held at 
Indianapolis, Indiana, which I attended and was there elected an organizer. 
The New Era being so similar to the Knights of Labor, they finally disbanded 
The following fall I was commissioned an organizer for the Knights of Labor, 
in which capacity I served for about ten years. 

"In October, 1884, I went to Lenora, Kansas, where I soon found work 
at my trade. In the spring of 1886 I was a delegate to the state convention of 
the Knights of Labor held at Topeka, Kansas, which I attended. In the win- 
ter of 1885 1 bought a local paper at Lenora, Kansas, and published that for 
about two years, when I sold the paper and again went to work at my trade. 
During this time I was threatened to be hung by a railroad agent and some of 
his chums, upon a charge that 1 had stated that the Knights of Labor were 
strong enough to blow up this government, which was utterly false. I replied 
that they had better try it and that if the}' attempted that, that it would make 
a hundred Knights where I could make one. That I had friends both in the 
order and of those not members, and that they had better let that job out, as 
it w^as a game that two could play at. I stayed there and kept organizing 
lodges unmolested. From all that I could learn I have reason to believe that 
in part they meant to carry the threat into execution, and partly as a bluff. 
I knew the character of those that made the threat and of their hatred of me, 
because of the work that I was in. I was warned by my friends to keep a close 
look out. 

"In 1890 the country was visited by hot winds, which devastated almost 
the entire corn crop, paralyzing business. I was then thrown out of work for 
the season. That fall I received the nomination for the office of Probate Judge 
and w'as elected at the general election. I held the office for four j'ears, two 
terms. I took the judge's seat January 12, 1891. I gave bonds in the sum of 
?3,ooo. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY I05 

"I organized in Norton and adjoining counties some thirty or forty 
lodges of the Knights of Labor. In the fall of 1888 I was elected a delegate 
to the General Assembly of the Knights of Labor held in Indianapolis, Indiana, 
and in 1890 to Denver, Colorado, and in 1891 to Toledo, Ohio, all of which I 
attended. I was elected District Master Workman for the Knights of Labor 
of the sixth congressional district of the State of Kansas, which office I held 
for seven years. 

"I had a birthright in the Society of Friends, or Quakers, which I 
retained until after my marriage, w'hen for marrying outside of the Friends' rule 
I was turned out of the society. 

"Along about 1848 I had drifted into materialism, discarding a belief in 
a God or in the divinity of the Bible or in the immortality of life. This was a 
sad picture to look upon, for I am a great lover of life. About this time the 
spiritual rapping broke out at Hydesville, New York, giving evidence of life 
beyond this life. This gave to me new life, and drove dark materialism away. 
I investigated its claims and soon became a convert, and in the course of time 
I became partially developed as a medium of several phases, inspirational, 
clairvoyant and healing. I made the science and philosophy a study and I 
never lost my interest in its phenomena or philosophy'. 

''In the course of time I became interested in Christian Science, Mental 
Science, and its theories, which I regard as the growth and prints of modern 
Spiritualism. It is Spiritualism practically demonstrated. It is the voice of 
God manifested in man. 

"I believe that man is as a finite being, eternal with God of infinite life. 
That there is an inherent power or life in man or God, or somewhere, when 
understood and complied with, sufficient to heal and protect men from all forms 
of sickness. I have faith in this inner power as the only salvation." 

After his wife's death Wm. S. Gray was again married. 



WILLIAM S. AND LUCINDA (RAY) (DEW) GRAY (4) 

Lucinda (Ray) Dew, daughter of James and Eunice (Keeper) Ray, was 
born May 30, 1849, near Kenton, Hardin County, Ohio. 

Wm. S. Gray and Lucinda (Ray) Dew were united in marriage January 
18, 1894, in Marikate, Jewel County, Kansas. 

No children. 

After the close of Mr. Gray's second term of office as Probate Judge, Mr. 
and Mrs. Gray started on an extended visit to Michigan and eastern Indiana, 
where thev remained three or four years, most of their time being spent in 
Pennville, Jay County, Indiana, where Gray followed his trade, to some extent. 
About 1899 they returned to their home in Norton, Norton County, Kansas. 

"Mrs. Gray is of Irish and German parentage. She was brought up in 
the Methodist Church, but at present is not connected witii any denomination. 
She is quite liberal in her religious views, but very reserved in her views on all 



io6 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 



religious and social questions. She is a woman exceptionally honest in her 
relation with her associates and is greatly attached to her home and endeavors 
to make it pleasant for her family and friends. She is highly respected by all 
who are acquainted with her, and truly worthy of their esteem." 

The introduction of this Record was written by Mr. Gray a few months 
previous to his death. 



Death 



October 23, 1883 



HENRY P. AND MARY E. (GRAY) NINDE (4) 

Mary Elizabeth Gray, daughter of Thomas and Katherine (Lewis) Gray, 
was born December 25, 1829, in Malaga Township, Monroe County, Ohio. 

Henry Prior Ninde, son of Benjamin and Jane (Whitacre) Ninde, was 
born August i, 1827, in \\'arren County, Ohio, and died October 24, 1884, in 
Pasadena, California. Interment in the Forest Cemetery at Oskaloosa, Iowa. 

Henry P. Ninde and Mary E. Gray were united in marriage September 
27, 1850, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth 

Katherine jane Ninde September i, 1851 . 

Hylindia Atlantic Ninde April 13, 1853 . 

Benjamin Elvyn Ninde April — , 1856 . 

Linden Thomas Ninde November 27, i860 . 

Rachel Ninde March 2, 1863 

Mary Estella Ninde August ig, 1869 

Rlioda Trixy Ninde Ma}' 3, 1871 

Katherine J., Hylindia A., Benjamin E. and Linden T. were born in 
Whitley County, Indiana: Rachel in Ft. Wayne, Indiana, and Mary E. and 
Rhoda T. in Oskaloosa, Iowa. 

Linden T. died in Boerne, Kendall Countv, Texas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ninde located in Whitley County, Indiana, where they 
engaged in farming. 

Mr. Ninde's father was the son of James and Melvina Ninde and was 
born January 3, 1790, in Teroksbury, England, and his mother was the daugh- 
ter of Robert and Patience (Cadwallader ) Whitacre and was born September 
21, 1799, in Frederick County, \'irginia. 

JOHN AND SARAH C. (GRAY) SUMPTION (4) 

Sarah Catherine Gray, daughter of Thomas and Catherine (Lewis) Gray, 
was born December 20, 1834, in Malaga Township, Monroe County, Oliio. 

John Sumption, son of John and Susannah (Lewis) Sumption, was born 
October 12, 1829, in Harrison County, Ohio, and died December 21, 1865, in 
Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. Interment in the West Grove Cemetery of 
Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 1 07 

John Sumption and Sarah C. Gray were united in marriage September 
25, 1853, at the home of the bride's parents in Penn Township, Jay County, 
Indiana, David Bowman officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Mary Eudora Sumption December 15, 1854 ■••■ February 29, 1888 

Eva Izora Sumption December 1 1, 1857 

Marcia Ann Sumption October 31, i860 

They were born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sumption located in Penn Township, where they were 
engaged in farming until the time of his death. 

Mr. Sumption's parents were natives of Old Virginia. His father, John 
Sumption was born in 1799 in Berkeley County, West Virginia, and died Feb- 
ruary II, 1851, in Jay County, Indiana. His mother was born February 18, 
1800, in Frederick County, Virginia, and died August 6, 1871, at Pennville, Jay 
County, Indiana. They were married May 18, 1826, in Virginia. Mrs. Sump- 
tion was better known in Jay County as "Aunt Susie Sumption." 

After John Sumption's death Mrs. Sumption was again married. 

ROBERT AND SARAH C. (GRAY) (SUMPTION) REGESTER (4) 

Robert Regester, son of Robert and Abigal (Rigby) Regester, was born 
October 2, 1825, in Columbiana County, Ohio, and died September 16, 1880, in 
Pennville, Indiana. Interment in the Cemetery of West Grove, Penn Town- 
ship, Jay County, Indiana. 

Robert Regester and Sarah C. (Gray) Sumption were united in marriage 
Nov. 12, 1869, in Pennville, Jay Count}', Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 
John Franklin Regester August 8, 1870 

He was born in Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Regester lived in Jay County during their married life and 
at the time of the former's death they lived in Pennville, where they were 
engaged in the hotel business. 

After Mr. Regester's death Mrs. Regester was again married. 

AARON AND SARAH C. GRAY) (SUMPTION) (REGESTER) ST. 

JOHN (4) 

Aaron St. John, son of and ( ) St. John, 

was born , in , Ohio, and died November 17, 1896, in 

Bloomington Township, Monroe County. Indiana. 



Io8 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Aaron St. John and Sarah C. (Gray) (Sumption) Kegester were united 
in marriage May 15, i8gi, in Baker Township, Morgan County, Indiana. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. St. John located in Bloomington, Monroe Count\", Indiana, 
where he was engaged in stockraising until the time of liis death. 

Mrs. St. John resides in Bloomington, Indiana, where she is assisting 
her son, John F. Regester, in his restaurant. 

THOMAS L. AND MATILDA A. ^ RIGBY GRAY (4) 

Thomas Lewis Gray, son of Thomas and Catherine ( Lewis) Gray, was 
born March 14, i!~>37. in Malaga Township, Monroe County, Ohio. 

Matilda Ann Rigby, daughter of Seth and Delilah (Gilbert) Rigby, 
was born January 28, 1840, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Thomas L. Gray and Matilda A. Rigby were united in marriage March 
20, 1859, in Penn Township. Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birtli Death 

Linley Otis Gray October 16. i860 

Lyonel Harlington Gray July 27, 1862 

Louella Delilah Gray August 12, 1864 

Frances Elva Gray ) „ . Tune 4, 1870 Tulv 26, 1888 

- 1 wins . J ^ 
Francis Elvin Gray ( June 4, 1870 

They were all born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

''Fannie" died in Penn Township and was buried in the West Grove 
Cemetery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gray lived several years after their marriage on their farm 
(wliicii was the old homestead entered by Mr. Gray's father) in Penn Town- 
ship, Ja\' County, Indiana. Subsequently they moved to Highland Township, 
Norton County, Kansas, where Mr. Gra\' filed a timber claim and proved upon 
it. They then returned to their farm in Indiana, where thej' live at the present 
time. 

Mr. Gray participated in the civil w'ar, having enlisted at Pennville, Indi- 
ana, February 7, 1865. They went from there to Wabash, Indiana, where they 
were examined and received their army uniforms, and proceeded from there to 
Indianapolis, where they were formed into Company G, One Hundred and Fifty- 
Third Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, under Captain John A. Howard 
and Col. Carey. The regiment \\as scattered over Kentucky, all doing guard 
duty. Company G was stationed on the Cumberland river and afterward did 
guard duty at Louisville, Kentucky. They were mustered out at Louisville, 
September 4, 1865, and received their final discharge at Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Mr. Gray early embraced Modern Spiritualism and remains firm in that 
belief. He is liberal in all his religious ideas and awake to all the reforms of 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY lOQ 

the day. A great reader and thinker and while he is a quiet man in his life 
work he is steady, firm and fearless, strictly honest and good. He is an ardent 
temperance worker and extends to woman equal rights with man in all relations 
of life. 

Mrs. Gray is also a follower of Modern Spiritualism, believing that 
which brings the most happiness in this world is the safest religion for mankind. 
She is an industrial and economical housewife. In disposition she is kind and 
loving, generous and true-hearted. She is of Irish and Scotch descent. 



MORGAN L. AND PHOEBE (HUGHES) GRAY (4) 

Morgan Lewis Gray, son of Thomas and Catherine (Lewis) Gray, was 
born June i6, 1843, in Malaga Township, Monroe County, Ohio, and died Sep- 
tember 22, 1881, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. Interment in the Friends' 
Cemetery of Pennville. 

Phoebe Eleanor Hughes, daughter of Charles and Catherine White 
(Thayer) Hughes, was born May 12, i(S4S, in Springboro, Warren County, 
Ohio. 

Morgan L. and Phoebe Hughes were united in marriage December 22, 
1870, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Minnie Isidore Gray December 5, 1871 

Jessie May Gray September 28, 1874 

Charles Pierson Gray March 11, 1876 



Minnie L. was born in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana, and Jtssie M. 
and Charles P. were born in Domestic, Wells County, of the same State. 

Soon after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Gray located in Nottingham 
Township, Wells County, Indiana. The next fall, after raising a large broom- 
corn crop, they removed to Pennville, remaining there about two years. About 
1873 they moved to Domestic, Wells County, Indiana, and established a mer- 
canttile business, in connection with whii.li Mr. Gray bought and sold live stock, 
Mrs. Gray attending the store during Inr husband's absence. 

In the year of 1877 they returned to their former home of Pennville, 
where Mrs. Gray still resides in their beautiful and comfortable home. 

Mrs. Gray is of Irish and Welsh descent. Her father was a native of 
Ohio and her mother of Rhode Island. Her father participated in the civil 
war, having enlisted in Company F, Seventy-Fifth Indiana Infantry, July 10, 
1862. During his term of service he was in seventeen hard fought battles, was 
one of the number who "marclied to the sea" and was in the Grand Review at 



no RECORD OF THE LEWIS lAMII.Y 

Washington at the close of the war. He was honorably discharged at Indiana- 
polis, June, 1865. He was member of the Hicksite Branch of the Society of 
Friends, and a worthy and respected citizen of Penn Township. 

Mrs. Gray is a member of the Christian Church and also of tht- Eastern 
Star Lodge. She enjoys the respect and love of many friends. 

Mrs. Gray enlisted in Company E, Seventh Indiana Cavalry, in Portland, 
Jay County, Indiana, under Captain David Skinner, of Jay County. The com- 
pany was ordered to Indianapolis, Indiana, where they formed into the One 
Hundred and Nineteenth Regiment, under Col. J. P. C. Shanks, also of Jay 
County, September 3, 1863. 

They were all through the south with Gen. Custer, having done duty in 
Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Arkansas, Missouri, Louisiana and Texas. 
The regiment was mustered out on the eighteenth of February, 1866. at Camp 
"Seiders Springs," near Austin. Texas. They then proceeded to Indianapolis, 
Indiana, where they received their final discharge. Mr. Gray was a member of 
the Friends' Societ}', also of the Masonic fraternity. 

Charles P. Gray finished the course of the common public school of 
Pennville, then entered the Portland High School, from which he graduated 
the spring of i8g6. The following two years he was employed in the Indiana 
oil fields, at the end of which he began reading law in Joseph H. Sell's law 
office at Pennville. In the spring of i8g8 he entered the Indiana law school, 
from which he graduated in the spring of igoo. He opened up an office and 
soon established a good law practice, in connection with which he was com- 
missioned a Notary Public and established a profitable business in that line. 
In September, igoi, he closed his law office and went to Ann Arbor, Michigan, 
where he took a special course in law. Completing that in the spring of igo2 
he returned home, and a little later located in South Bend, Indiana. 

Mr. Gray is a member of the Masonic fraternity, No. 212, of Pennville, 
Indiana. In his political views he is a Republican. 



JOHN AND MARY ANN LEWIS (BROWN) (4) 

Mary Ann Lewis, daughter of Emrey and Rachel (Thomas) Lewis, was 
born March g, 1827, near Georgetown, Short Creek Towmship, Harrison County, 
Ohio. 

John Brown, son of Stephen and Achsah (Warner) Brown, was born 
October i, 1819, in Harford County, Maryland, and died September 16, 1872, 
in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. Interment in the West Grove Ceme- 
tery of the same township. 

John Brown and Mary A. Lewis were united in marriage January 20, 
1847, before a Friend's meeting at the home of the bride's parents near Malaga, 
Monroe Couiit\-, Ohio. 



RECORD OK THK LEWIS FAMILY III 

TO THKM WERE HORN 

Name. Birth. Death. 

Rachel Ann Brown December 24,1847 .... October 21,1849 

Jehu Alonzo Brown July 16, 1849 December 15, 1876 

Emery Lewis Brown October 24. 1851 ... August 13, 1827 

Agnes Jane Brown January 9, 1854 September 3, i860 

Lydia Ruanna Brown April 4, 1857 .... September 5, i860 

Viola Campsadell Brown November 13, 1862 .... November 21, 1894 

Orlando J. Brown October 31, 1867 

Oscar Leander Brown November 20, 1870 .... February 15, 1872 

Rachel A. and Jehu A. were born in Monroe County, Ohio; Emery L. 
and Agnes J. near Somerton, Belmont County, of the same state; Lydia R.. 
Viola C, Orlando J. and Oscar L. in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Rachel A. died near Malaga, Monroe County, Ohio, and was buried in 
the Sunsbury Cemetery, of Malaga Township, Monroe County, Ohio. 

Jehu A., Emery L., Agnes J., Lydia R., Viola C, and Oscar L. died in 
Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, and were buried at the West Grove Cem- 
etery, of the same township. 

John Brown accompanied his parents when they moved from Maryland 
to Monroe County, in 1832. He was of English descent. After their marriage 
Mr. and Mrs. Brown located in Malaga Township, Monroe County, Ohio, 
where they lived a few years, then removed to a farm near Somerton, Belmont 
County, of the same state. In the fall of 1894 Mr. Brown, accompanied by his 
brother Stephen, made a trip on horseback to Jay County, Indiana, antl pur- 
chased one hundred and si.xty acres, in section 6, Jackson Township. On his 
return he learned of the death of his eldest daughter, Rachel Ann Brown, which 
occurred about two weeks before he reached home. 

In the fall of 1854 he moved with his family to Jay County, and in June, 
1856, settled on a farm of one hundred and si.xty acres in section 2, Penn 
Township, which he cleared and improved, making it a pleasant and comforta- 
ble home, where he lived until his death. 

On the thirteenth day of August, 1872, while driving home in a wagon 
with his family, having spent the day in helping a neighbor thresh grain, a dead 
tree uprooted and fell across the wagon, breaking the wagon in twain and in- 
stantly killing the son, Emery Lewis Brown, then a young man of twenty-one, 
and severely injuring Mr. Brown and mashing and breaking the limbs of 
another son, Orlando J., who was about five years of age. Mr. Brown's death 
was caused from the effects of this accident, a little over a month later. 

John Brown was a strong abolitionist, having assisted the colored peo- 
ple in their travel along the "Underground Railway." He was an earnest mem- 
ber of the Society of Spiritualists, at the time of his death, having adopted 
that religion several years before. 



112 RECORD OF THE LEWIS lAMILY 

After Mr. Brown's death his son Jehu A. took charge of the farm for two 
years. In October, 1874, he entered a partnership with Benj. L. DeWees and 
Benj. F. Blackledge, in the mercantile business. Mr. Blackledge soon after 
retired, leaving the firm of "Brown & DeWees," who continued in this business 
until the former's death, in 1876. Jehu A. was a student in Liber College, near 
Portland, Indiana, two terms. He was a Spiritualist. 

Mary Ann (Lewis) Brow'n lives on the "old farm, " her son Orlando J. 
living with her and conducting the management of the same. Her grandson, 
Orlando Floyd Swaney, also makes his home with her since his mother's death 
in 1894. Their post office is Fiat, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mrs. Brown is a member of the Spiritual Society at West Grove, Penn 
Township, Jay County, Indiana, and also a member of the Indiana State Asso- 
ciation of Spiritualists at Chesterfield, Indiana. "Aunt Mary Anne Brown," 
as she is known among her many friends, is one of the most lovable and inspir- 
ing characters, chastened by sorrow and deep grief. Her sj'mpathies are with 
all in adversity and her strength is always given to those in need. 

Orlando J. Brown, youngest and only surviving son of Mary Ann and 
John Brown, is a man who commands unusual admiration and respect. Rare 
ability, unswerving integrity and of sterling moral worth, he lives up to an 
ideal, that is above reproach. 



LORENZO D. AND ELIZABETH (HAINES) LEWIS (4) 

Lorenzo Dow Lewis, son of Emory and Rachel (Thomas) Lewis, was 
born October 28, 1828, in Harrison County, Ohio, and died May 1, 1878, in 
Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. Interment in the West Grove Ceme- 
tery of the same township. 

Elizabeth Haines, daughter of Timothv and Hannah (Tomlinson) 
Haines, was born July 4, 1829, in Ohio, and died April 4, 1870. in Penn Town- 
ship, Jay County, Indiana. Interment in the West Grove Cemetery. 

Lorenzo D. Lewis and Elizabeth Haines were united in marriage Decem- 
ber 18, 1849, in Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

N'ami- Birtli Death 

Mary Adaline Lewis September 24. 1850 

Hannah Emaline Lewis Januaiy 6, 1852 

Tacy Jane Lewis May 8, 1856 

Emery Timothy Lewis November 15, 1857 

Hilinda Ellen Lewis January 23, 1862 

Edwin W'illmer Lewis January 24, 1869 



Mary yV. and Hannah E. were born in Ohio, and Tacy J., Emery T., 
Hilinda E. and Edwin W. were born in Penn Township. Jay County, Indiana. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY II3 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis located in Harrison County, Ohio, where they lived 
nearly five years. In the fall of 1854, in company with several other families, 
they moved overland to Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, settling on the 
farm which is now owned by their son, Emery Lewis. 

After the death of his wife, Mr. Lewis with the assistance of his mother- 
in-law, "Aunt Hannah Haines," kept house and raised his family. After 
Lorenzo's death "Aunt Hannah" made her home with her son Joseph Haines 
for a number of years. In 1894 her son Isaac built a new house, in which he 
furnished a room for his old mother and she lived with them until her death in 
the spring of 1902. 



JEHU AND TACY T. (LEWIS) BROWN (4) 

Tacy Thompson Lewis, daughter of Enirey and Rachel (Thomas) Lewis, 
was born October 6, 1834, near Georgetown, Short Creek Township, Harrison 
County, Ohio, and died October 12, i860, in Penn Township, Jay County, 
Indiana. Interment in the West Grove Cemetery. 

Jehu Brown, son of Stephen and Achsah (Warner) Brown, was born 
August 29, 1828, in Harford County, Maryland, and died June 20, 1884, near 
Baders, Schuyler County, Illinois. Interment in the Johnson Cemetery near 
Baders. 

Jehu Brown and Tacy T. Lewis were united in marriage June 26, 1851, 
at the residence of John and Mary Ann (Lewis) Brown, near Somerton, Bel- 
mont County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Biitli Death 

Lorenzo Harvey Brown July 8, 1853 

Mary Jane Brown July 17, 1855 October 17, i860 

John William Brown September 17. 1857 

They were born near Malaga, Monroe Coimty, Ohio. 

Mary J. died in Penn Township, Jav County, Indiana, and was buried 
in the West Grove Cemetery of the same Township. 

John W. Brown is unmarried and lives at the home of Mary Ann Brown 
near Fiat, Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brown located near Malaga, Monroe County, Ohio, where 
they lived until November, 1857, when they removed to Jay County, Indiana, 
locating in Penn Township, where they remained until after Mrs. Brown's 
death. 

Mr. Brown was but a child wlien he came to Monroe County with his 
parents in 1832. He received a liberal education and was a teacher in the dis- 
trict schools a part of his life, the rest of his time being spent in farming. He 
was a member of the Christian Church at the time of his death. He was of 
English descent. 



114 RECORD OF THE LEWIS I AMILY 

JOSEPH A. AND LYDIA E. (LEWIS) FARRINGTON (4) 

Lydia Elizabeth Lewis, daughter of Emrey and Rachel (Thomas) Lewis, 
was born November 5, 1842, in Behnont County, Ohio. 

Joseph Abraham Farrington, son of WiUiam and Maria (Bowersock) 
Farrington, was born August 25, 1836, in Cohimbiana County. Ohio. 

Joseph A. Farrington and Lydia E. Lewis were united in marriage 
December 23. i860, at the home of the bride's parents near Pennville, Jay 
County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Fernando Frank Farrington . . . October 17, 1861 ... 

Cora Atlantic Farrington December 18, 1866 

Lorenzo Lewis Farrington .... October 19, i86g 

Otis Eugene Farrington December 12, 1875 

Fernando F. was born in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana, Cora A. and 
Lorenzo L. near Springdale, Cedar County, Iowa, and Otis E. near Boxelder, 
Mills County, of the same state. After the death of their son Lorenzo's wife, 
they took his little daughter Bessie into their home and have since cared for 
her as their child. 

Mr. and Mrs. Farrington lived in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, 
a few years after their marriage. In i(S65 they moved to Springdale, Cedar 
County, Iowa, and in 1871 to Mills County. Iowa, locating on a farm eight 
miles from Silver City, where they have since resided. 

Mr. Farrington is of Dutch and English descent. 

BENJAMIN L. AND ELIZABETH (SCOTT) DE WEES (4) 

Benjamin Lewis De Wees, son of John and Sarah (Street) De Wees, 
was born January 8, 1845, near Malta, Morgan County, Ohio. Adopted by 
Emrey and Rachel (Thomas) Lewis when four years of age. 

Elizabeth Scott, daughter of Stanton and Esther (Edmundson) Scott, 
was born July 19, 1844, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Benjamin L. De Wees and Elizabeth Scott were united in marriage Sep- 
tember 26, 1871, near Spencer Station, Guernsey County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Roy Emerson De Wees July 9,1872 

Ivan Kent De Wees April 21,1874 August 15, 1874 

Wendell A. De Wees December 8, 1875 

Tina Esther De Wees June 3, 1879 

Mina .\. De Wees July 31,1880 February 1 1, 1881 

Mark Macy De Wees July 9,1882 

Sara Elizabeth De Wees November 6, 1885 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY II5 

They were all born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

The following sketch was contributed for the Record: — 

"The father of Benjamin L. De Wees was born in Pennsylvania, No- 
vember II, 1814, and died in Morgan County, Ohio, August lo, 1845. He was 
a farmer and mechanic, combining the two vocations as the circumstances 
required. He was a blacksmith and as a worker in iron and steel was very 
ingenious. He was but a small boy when his parents located in Belmount 
County, Ohio, in the early pioneer days of that section of the state. His 
wife, Sarah (Street) De Wees, was of English descent and was born December 
16, 1816, and died May 15, 1847. They were both members of the Society of 
Friends or Quakers. 

"Benjamin L. De Wees was left an orphan at the tender age of two 
years. He was taken into the family of Emrey Lewis two years later and was 
treated like their own children, although not legally adopted. He came with 
them to Indiana in the autumn of 1854. At the age of twelve years his foster- 
father died and three years later his foster-mother died, hence he was twice 
doubly orphaned within the space of fourteen years. Since reaching the age of 
sixteen he has been entirely self-dependent, but with characteristic zeal he 
made the best of his opportunities, always keeping in mind the advantages of 
education and bending all his energies toward the acquirement of knowledge. 
While with his foster parents he attended the public schools as opportunity 
permitted, usually about three montlis out of each year. In 1864 he entered 
Liber College near Portland. Indiana, and while pursuing his studies there 
became imbued with the idea that the country needed his service in the sup- 
pression of the rebellion, then in full progress. He enlisted as a member of 
Company E, One Hundred and Thirty-ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and 
went to the front. The regiment was assigned to duty with the Army of Ten- 
nessee, their principal duties being to guard supplies and intercept raiders and 
guerrillas along the Ohio river. He was honorably discharged at the expira- 
tion of his term of enlistment in October, 1864. 

"During the winter of 1864-65 Mr. De Wees taught in the public schools 
in the district which he called his home. In the spring of 1865 he took up the 
trade of carpenter and joiner, working at this business or any other vocation 
which promised honorable employment and a fair recompense. In the fall of 
1866 he again took up his studies for a short time at Liber College, following 
which he again taught a four mouths' term in Penn Township, Jay County, 
Indiana. In the summer of 1867 he was employed in tile making, this being 
the first effort to manufacture drainage tile in Jay County. In the fall of i86g 
he accepted a position in a lamp factory at Cleveland, Ohio, remaining with 
them until October, 1870, when he was sent by his employers to New York 
City, remaining there until June, 1871. 

"A few months later he was married to Miss Elizabeth Scott. She 
is of Scotch, Irish and English descent. Her father was born of Scotch ances- 
tors June 26, 1807, and died August 24, 1855. He was a farmer, abolitionist 
and a Quaker, and withal a most exemplary citizen. In later years Mr. and 



Il6 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Mrs. De Wees have learned that their fathers attended the same Quaker meet- 
ing in their boyhood days. 

"Mrs. De Wees's mother, Esther (Edmundson) Scott, was a native of 
Pennsylvania and a daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Morsel) Edmundson. 
She was born May ii, 1810. and died July 4, 1896. Her father's family were of 
English ancestry. The Edmundsons came to Jay County from their former 
home in Clark County, Ohio, in 1837, and located in Penn Township. Five 
years later, 1842, Stanton Scott and family came and settled on an adjoining 
farm, but later removed to Wells County. 

"Mr. and Mrs. De Wees began their sojourn together on a little twenty- 
acre farm just east of Pennville and in 1874 Mr. De Wees became engaged in 
general merchandising in Balbec, Penn Township, Jay Count}', Indiana, where 
be continued successfully sixteen years. He is a gentleman well known for his 
uprightness in character and business integrity. He is a man devoted to prin- 
ciple and whatever measure, whether social, political or religious, engages his 
attention, receives his whole energy. In political views he is a staunch Repub- 
lican and followed the varying fortunes of that time-honored party with earnest 
zeal since casting his first vote for Gen. Grant. He has represented his town- 
ship in various conventions of the party. Mrs. De Wees was a teacher for 
some years before her marriage. She was educated in the common schools and 
at Liber College. 

"The tradition of the De Wees family is as follows: Four generations 
prior to Benjamin De Wees, three brothers, who were religious refugees, left 
France and emigrated to Holland, thence to America in the early colonial days. 
They settled in the Mohawk Valley and the genealogy of Mr. De Wees is trace- 
able to one of three brothers. It is known that one of them was a soldier of 
the Revolutionary war." 

Tina E. De Wees is a graduate of the Pennville High School, class of 
1898, and is at home with her parents. 

Mark Macy is at home and assists his father on the farm. 

Sara E. is also at home, devoting part of her time to music. 

They are a most exemplary and highly esteemed family. 



DAVID AND CAROLINE E. (LEWIS) BLACKLEDGE U) 

Caroline Elizabeth Lewis, daughter of Hervy and Elma (Grisell) Lew-is, 
was born June 4, 1832, in Short Creek Township, Harrison County, Ohio. 

David IJlackledge, son of Samuel and Hannah (Forest) Blackledge, was 
born August 31, 1824, in Monroe County, Ohio, and died August 9, 1893, at 
Bloouiington, Franklin County, Nebraska. 

David Blackledge and Caroline E. Lewis were united in marriage May 3, 
1850, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY II7 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Hannah Elma Blackledge February 17,1852 ... September 25, 1862 

Asa Blackledge September 27, 1854 

Syra Blackledge May 19,1857 ... October 30,1858 

Anna Blackledge May 4, 1864 . . . May 22, 1889 

Lewis Blackledge January 10, 1868 

Hannah E., Asa and Syra were born in Jay County, Indiana, and Anna 
and Lewis near Jerusalem, Monroe County, Ohio. 

Hannah E. died in Ozark, Monroe County, Ohio, Syra in Jay County, 
Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Blackledge lived in Jay County, Indiana, about nine years 
after their marriage, when they moved to Ozark, Monroe County, Ohio, where 
Mr. Blackledge purchased a grocery and shoe store, in which he was engaged 
for about two years. He then sold his grocery, but continued in the shoe busi- 
ness and also held the office of postmaster during this time. In 1863 he sold 
out his business here and moved to a small farm near Jerusalem, where he was 
engaged in farming and shoe making until the spring of 1881, when they again 
sold tlieir property and moved to Bloomington, Franklin County, Nebraska, 
where he engaged in harness making as long as he was able to work. In 1886 
Mr. and Mrs. Blackledge took an extended trip through the east visiting friends 
and relatives in Michigan, Indiana and Ohio, having been gone one year. 

Since Mr. Blackledge's death, Mrs. Blackledge has made her home with 
her son .\sa, who now resides in Alma, Harlan County, Nebraska. 

Mr. Blackledge was of English and Dutch and Mrs. Blackledge of En- 
glish and Welsh descent. Mrs. Blackledge is a member of the Congregational 
Church. 

Mr. Blackledge's ancestry is traceable to the same family by name of 
Van Ludy, as that of Joseph Blackledge, which is given in this Record. 

MARY LETITIA (LEWIS) GRAY (4) 

See William S. Gray's record on page 103. 

JESSE AND LYDIA C. (LEWIS) FARRINGTON (4) 

Lydia Catherine Lewis, daughter of Hervy and Elma (Grisell) Lewis, 
was born October 22, 1835, in Short Creek Township, Harrison County, Ohio, 
and died July 4, 1895, in Battle Creek. Michigan. 

Jesse Farrington, son of William and Maria (Bowersock) Farrington, 
was born November 9, 1831, in Columbiana County, Ohio, and died October 
12, 1894, i'l Battle Creek, Michigan. 

Jesse Farrington and Lydia C. Lewis were united in marriage February 
II, 1855, at the home of the britle's parents, in Penn Township, Jay County, 
Indiana. 




z 

o 




z 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY Ilg 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

William Hervy Farrington December 29, 1855 

Myrvin L. Farrington May 25, 1859 

Etta May Farrington September 22,1862 

Mary Inis Farrington September 8, 1864 

Emma Farrington November 10,1868 ... October 31,1872 

Jesse Elwyn Farrington October 31, 1875 

William H., Myrvin L., Etta M. and Mary I. were born in Penn Town- 
ship, Jay County, Indiana, and Emma and Jesse E. in Battle Creek, Michigan. 

Emma died in Battle Creek, and was interred in the Oak Hill Cemetery, 
near there. 

J. Elwyn is unmarried. He is a traveling salesman for the General Fire 
Extinguisher Company. 

Mr. and Mrs. Farrington lived in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, 
several years after their marriage, where Mr. Farrington was engaged in farm- 
ing. In 1864 they moved to Harmonia, Calhoun County, Michigan, where they 
remained a short time and then moved to Battle Creek, Michigan. 

The following we copy from the death notice of Mr. and Mrs. Farring- 
ton: — 

"Mr. Farrington came to Jay County, Indiana, with his parents when he 
was a small boy. His father died when Jesse was twelve years old, and as the 
eldest of seven children he was soon thrown on his own resources for a living, 
and was thus deprived of many advantages in early life. 

"After he and his family moved to Battle Creek, Michigan, he commenced 
work for the Nichols & Shepard Threshing Machine Company, where he was 
alwa)s found at his post, when able. No man could be more faithful in the 
discharge of his duties. He worked there twenty-eight years. 

"He was a consistent member of the Congregational Church, and an 
earnest worker in the cause of temperance; honest and upright in his dealings, 
generous and obliging. 

"He was a member of the A. O. U. W. and of the Royal Templars of 
Temperance. His funeral was held under the auspices of the former order." 

Mr. Farrington was of Dutch descent. 

"It is with sad hearts that we chronicle the death of a loved and mucli 
esteemed resident of our city, Lydia C. P'arrington. 

"Mrs. Farrington had been in poor health for several years, but since the 
death of her husband last October had gradually failed and seemed anxious for 
the time to come when she could go to meet the ones she so dearly lo\'ed on the 
other side. During her last illness she showed such patience and resignation, 
that those who saw her and talked with her, could but wonder at it, even amid 
her suffering, sending out words of love and kindness to all her friends and 
neighbors, with her last goodby. Her words to her children were full of wise 
counsel and tender guidance, she thinking of their comfort to the last." 



I20 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Mr. and Mrs. Farrington's wedded life was an unusally happy one. They 
were both laid to rest in the Oak Hill Cemeterj', near Battle Creek, Michigan. 

During her life-time Lydia Farrington wrote several beautiful poems, 
but she never had them published, and was verj' reserved about having any one 
read them. However those who were granted that privilege say they came 
from a gifted mind. 

We have one, which we give a copy of below, but were unable to find 
any more. This was written on the occasion of the Seventh Wedding Day An- 
niversary of Wm. H. and Minnie Farrington. 

Ah me, how the years are fleeting, 

How we are hurried in line 
And carried along with the current. 

Not a moment rests Father Time. 

It seems but a few short years 

Since your father and I could say: 
"It is seven years on the morrow 

Since it was your wedding day." 

Seven years ! How the time goes by, 

On wings so quick and fast, 
We scarcely know in this busy life 

How swiftly the time has passed. 

Until we are both reminded 

By the gray streaks in our hair 
And the wrinkles and furrows in the face 

That once was free from care. 

You've both had sorrows and trials, 

For in this earthly way- 
There are many thorny bypaths, 

And many a cloudy day. 

Two little ones have been given you 

To fill your hearts with love. 
But the loving little daughter 

Now dwells with God above. 

And the youngest, the little prattler. 

Your darling baby Roy, 
God grant he may live to a ripe old age. 

And fill your hearts with joy. 

I pray each day for my children, 

And their little ones so dear, 
That God in his gracious mercj', 

Will keep you ever near. 

Thank God for every blessing, 

Keep ever in the right. 
And do not be discouraged, 

Though clouds may dim the light. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 121 

PETER T. AND AMANDA M. (LEWIS) GRAY (4) 

Amanda Malvina Lewis, daughter of Hervy and Elma (Grisell) Lewis, 
was born April 25, 1839, in Short Creek Township, Harrison County, Ohio, and 
died May 9, 1880, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. Her remains were 
interred in the cemetery of West Grove, in the same township. 

Peter Thomas Gray, son of EHsha and Ann (Thomas) Gray, was born 
January 7, 1832. in Short Creek Township, Harrison County, Ohio. 

Peter T. Gray and Amanda M. Lewis were united in marriage, by the 
Spiritual ceremony, April 13, 1856, at the home of Thomas and Catherine 
(Lewis) Gray, Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. [A copy of their mar- 
riage ceremony will be found at the close of this article.] 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Na/iir Birth Death 

Morris Lundy Gray May 21, 1857 

Ellesworth R. Gray December 13, 1862 



They were born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gray also took Clara Ellen Allen into their home as their 
daughter and raised her to womanhood. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Gray located in Penn Township, Jay 
County, Indiana, where they lived until after the death of the latter, in 1880, 
after which Mr. Gray took a trip West, locating at Lenora, Norton County, 
Kansas, where he remained a few years, but returned to Jav County. Indiana, 
and at present resides in Winchester, Randolph County, Indiana. In his polit- 
ical views he is is a Republican and religiously a Spiritualist. During his life 
he has farmed to some extent, but is a carpenter by trade, and has been engaged 
in that work most of the time. He is of Scotch and English descent. 

Mr. Gray is a good honest man, and true to his highest convictions of 
truth and morality. 

FORM OF MARRIAGE CEREMONY USED BY THEM. 

Whereas, It appears that Peter T. (iray and Amanda M. Lewis, both of 
Jay County, Indiana, having given pnblick notice heretofore of their intentions 
of marriage with each other, and whereas it appears that according to their 
sense of right they have this day made their appearance in a publick meeting of 
Spiritual Friends, held at Thomas Gray's, for the purpose of fulfilling their 
intentions, which they did by rising to their feet and taking each other by the 
hand and saying in the presence of God and the Angels and before this Assem- 
bly: "We take each other to be husband and wife," and in further confirma- 
tion of the aforesaid, they, the said Peter T. Gray and Amanda M. Lewis, and 
she adopting the name of her husband, do hereunto subscribe their names. 

Peter T. Gray. 
Amanda M. Lewis. 



122 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Done on the thirteenth day of the fourth niontli, 1856, and in the presence 
of us that subscribe our names as witnesses: — 

Hervy Lewis Thos. Gray Joseph T. Haines 

Wilham S. Gray Catherine Gray Elihu Hilles 

Mary L. Gray Enos Lewis John T. Adams 

Jessie Farrington Margaret Lewis Patience Adams 

Lydia C. Farrington Atlantic O. Gray Rebecca H. Irey 

Tacy A. Lewis Rachel Lewis Lydia J. Gray 

Hannah A. Lewis Sarah Ann Lewis Ira Morgan Lewis 

Mary Elma Gray Isaac T. Haines Lydia E. Lewis 

Thomas L. Gray 

[The original had no punctuation.] 



ELIHU AND TACY E. (LEWIS 1 FARRINGTON (4j 

Elihu Farrington, son of William and Maria (Bowersock) Farrington, 
was born September 22, 1842, in Jay County, Indiana. 

Tacy Elma Lewis, daughter of Hervy and Elma (Grisell) Lewis, was 
born September 15, 1841, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, and died 
March 27, 1881, in Battle Creek, Michigan. She was interred in the Oak Hill 
Cemetery. 

Elihu Farrington and Tacy E. Lewis were united in marriage December 
23, i860, at the home of the bride's parents, in Penn Township, Jay County, 
Indiana, Levi Johnson, J. P., ofificiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Nattie Birth Death 

Otto Lineas Farrington September i, 1862 ... March 3, 1880 

Loren Ulyses Farrington November 16, 1866 ... Februar)- 26, 1880 

Efifie May Farrington July ii 1870 

All were born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana; Otto L. and 
Loren U. died and were buried in the West Grove Cemetery of the same town- 
ship. 

Mr. Farrington fought in the civil war, having enlisted in Compan}' G, 
153d Indiana Infantry, in February, 1864, under Capt. John Howard of Marion, 
Indiana, and Col. Carey, and remained until its close in the latter part of the 
year 1865. He was mustered out at Louisville, Kentucky, and received his final 
discharge at Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Farrington lived in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, 
about twenty years, afterwards moving to Battle Creek, Michigan, where he 
follows the carpenter's trade. 

Mr. Farrington is of Dutch and English descent. 

Mr. Farrington's mother, "Aunt Maria," as she is so well known in Jay 
County, Indiana, cannot be passed by without words of deep appreciation. The 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 1 23 

Grisells and Lewises, of whom there were representative families in Jay County, 
Indiana, know to what a great extent "Aunt Maria" was a ministering angel. 
During the early settlements, when physicians were scarce, she having a natural 
knowledge of medicine and nursing, was the one called for in sickness, and her 
whole-hearted unselfishness and cheerful assistance gave health and happiness 
to many people. 

Two other sons, Joseph and Jesse Farrington, are also represented in 
this history. 

Maria Bowersock, daughter of Jacob and Mary Bowersock, was born 
May 2, 1813, in Adams County, Pennsylvania. When eighteen years of age she 
was united in marriage to William Farrington and in 1838 they moved to Jay 
County. Indiana. Mr. Farrington died in 1843, leaving her a widow with seven 
children. Subsequently she was united in marriage to William Mendenhall, 
who died several years ago. At present she is in her ninetieth year and makes 
her home with her son William Mendenhall. She is still an active and useful 
woman and enjoys the deserved love and esteem of the whole community in 
wliich she lives. 



THOMAS L. AND HANNAH A. (LEWIS) TIPTON (4) 

Hannah Atlantic Lewis, daugliter of Hervy and Elma (Grisell) Lewis, 
was born March 10, 1843, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Thomas Luke Tipton, son of John and Hannah Ann (Grisell) Tipton, 
was born December i, 1843, in Jerusalem, Monroe County, Ohio. 

Thomas L. Tipton and Hannah A. Lewis were united in marriage July 
25, 1868, at the liome of the bride's sister, Mrs. Caroline Blackledge, on 
"Quaker Ridge," near Jerusalem, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Clifton Lewis Tipton July 18, 1S69 

James Bert Tipton August 6, 1872 

Joseph Linley Tipton ... June 16, 1876 



Clifton L. was born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, and James 
B. and Joseph L. in Jerusalem, Ohio. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Tipton went to her former home in 
Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, remaining there almost two years. They 
then returned to Jerusalem, Ohio, where they reside at the present time. Mr. 
Tipton is an inventor and a mechanic. 

Mr. Tipton's parents came to Ohio from Harford County, Maryland. 
His parental ancestors were descended from the William Burgess, who was 
with William Penn under the "Elm" when the famous treaty was made. His 
maternal ancestors were of the same familv of Grisells as that of Mrs. Tipton's 
maternal ancestors on her mother's side, his great-grandfather, Edward Grisell, 



124 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 



being a brother of Mrs. Tipton's great-grandfather, Thomas Grisell. A brief 
history of Edward Grisell will be found in the record of the early ancestry of 
the Grisells, in this book. 

Mr. Tipton volunteered for service in the civil war in Company C, One 
Hundred and Sixteenth Regiment of Ohio Volunteer Infantry and was honor- 
ably discharged February 25, 1863, having been disabled by sickness. 

James B. is not married. He has chosen to staj^ at home and smooth the 
path for his father and mother in their declining years. 

Joseph L. is also unmarried. He is employed bv the Deering Harvester 
Company, having his headquarters in Indianapolis, Indiana. He is spoken of 
as a musician of ability. 



ROBERT T. AND EMILY A. (LEWIS) THOMPSON (4) 

Emily Atkinson Lewis, daughter of Ira and Sarah (Wilson) Lewis, was 
born October 7, 1833, near Georgetown, Short Creek Township, Harrison 
County, Ohio. 

Robert Thomas Thompson, son of Robert Thomas and Barbara (Eb- 
berts) Thompson, was born February 17, 1830, at Cadiz, Harrison County, 
Ohio, and died February i, i8go, in Muscatine, Muscatine County, Iowa. 

Robert T. Thompson and Emily A. Lewis were united in marriage March 
25, 185 1, in Georgetown, Harrison County, Ohio. 



Name 



TO THEM WERE BORN 

Birth 



25. 1852 
22, 1853 

1855 
1857 
1 860 
1862 
1864 
1866 



Death 
November 3 



15 

4 
31 
15 



1862 

October 19, 1862 
July 12, 1862 

September 23, 1865 



Ira Lewis Thompson January 

Theron Thompson September 

Selina Thompson J"ly 

Barbara Ella Thompson December 

John Edwin Thompson April 

William Lewis Thompson March 

Isaac Gourley Thompson May 

Robert Lincoln Thompson October 

The oldest son, Ira L., was born in Georgetown, Harrison County, Ohio; 
Theron, Selina and Barbara E. in York, Jefferson County, of the same State; 
John E., Wm. L. and Isaac G. in Atalissa, Muscatine County, Iowa, and Rob- 
ert L. in Muscatine, of the same county and state. 

The four children, Ira L., Selina, John E. and Isaac G. died in Atalissa, 
Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thompson located in York, Jefferson County, Ohio, soon 
after their marriage, where they lived about six years, afterward removing 
to Atalissa, Muscatine County, Iowa, where they remained several years. In 
i860 they moved to Muscatine, of the same county, which they made their per- 
manent home. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 125 

Mrs. Thompson was of Welsh and English descent. She was a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Thompson's father was a native of New York and his mother was 
born in Wellsbaugh, West Virginia. 

The following beautiful sketch of the life and character of Emily A. 
(Lewis) Thompson was written by Hon. G. M. Titus, State Senator of Iowa: — 

'•The many friends of Mrs. Emily A. Thompson are ever ready to testify 
to the beauty of her life and character. Indeed, her sole purpose in life seems 
to be to contribute to the happiness of others. 

"The example of her unselfish and sympathetic conduct is an inspiration 
to all those who knew her. It falls to the lot of but few women to be called to 
walk down into the valley of suffering and death as often as she has done. One 
after another of the loved ones of her own family have been taken from her by 
death; a less noble character would have been overcome by the great burden of 
sorrow. 

'•As she has traveled the uneven journey of life, she has scatterred sun- 
shine in the paths of all those who have been so fortunate as to come in contact 
with her. Bearing her own burdens of sorrow without complaint she has risen 
higher and higher in the estimation of tliose who have come within the shadow 
of her influence. 

"A consistent member of the M. E. Church for many years, she has ever 
been faithful to the tenets of the holy religion. 

"In many years of quite intimate acquaintance with Mrs. Thompson I 
never remember of hearing her utter an adverse criticism of anv one. Her time 
seems to be largely occupied in studying how she can contribute to the pleas- 
ure of her family, who are very dear to her, and her friends in whom she never 
loses interest. Is it any wonder that 'Mother Thompson' is an ever welcome 
visitor in the homes of Muscatine, that she finds time to visit? 

"As she approaches the evening of life she must have the blessed con- 
sciousness that her pure and noble life is not without its earthly rewards. The 
four living children (three sons and one daughter) are models of devotion. 
They or their families seem never to be happier than when they are with 
'Grandma Thompson.' 

"In Mrs. Thompson, it always seems to me, we have an exemplification 
of the beauty of Love, the charm of Friendship and the nobility of Self-sacri- 
fice. When life's journey shall have ended for her and the golden clouds rest 
sweetly and invitingly upon the golden mountains and the light of heaven 
streams down through the gathering mists of death, I predict for her a most 
triumphant entrance into the world of blessedness. 

"Her many virtues will not be written upon her tomb, but thev will be 
written deep in the hearts of friends, of children, of kindred, in the great book 
of accounts and in the everlasting influence upon those who know her now. I 
would that there were more like her." 

The following is copied from the death notice of Robert T. Thompson: — 



126 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

"He passed awa}' at 2:10 this afternoon, after a very brief illness. 'Rob- 
ert T. Thompson is dead.' Such were the words that spread almost like wild- 
fire this afternoon along the streets. His friends were not even aware of his 
illness and these tidings fell like a shock upon them. He was seized with the 
la grippe, which developed into bronchitis of the most acute form. Even his 
family did not realize his precarious condition until noon of the day of his 
death. 

"Mr. Thompson entered on his business career in the capacity of a mer- 
chant's clerk. In 1852 he engaged in business in York, Jefferson County, Ohio. 
In 1858 he located in Atalissa, Muscatine County, Iowa. In i85o he moved to 
the City of Muscatine, and accepted the position as Deputy County Treasurer, 
which he held for three years. He was then elected County Treasurer, which 
office he held two terms. In 1875 he opened up a hardware store in Muscatine, 
but retired from this in about five years, and his sons William and Theron con- 
tinued the business in the same place, under the firm name of Thompson Bros. 
Robert Thompson then served three years as Deputy Postmaster, after which 
he was elected cashier of the Muscatine Savings Bank, but on account of poor 
health he had to resign this position. In 1882 he opened up the Island Seed 
Store (so named on account of the island near, in the Mississippi river, where 
the wonderful watermelons and sweet potatoes are raised, which are sent to all 
parts of the world). This business he carried on until tlie time of his death in 
1890. 

"Mf. Thompson was widely known throughout this and adjoining coun- 
ties and was respected by all. Politicallv he was a Republican, from the time 
of the birth of the party. In business he was always straightforward and ener- 
getic and he was held in the highest esteem by all who knew him." 

THOMAS I. AND ELIZA J. (WRIGHT) GRAY (4) 

■Thomas Ira Gray, son of Elisha and Atlantic O. (Lewis) Gray, was born 
March 16, 1838, in Malaga Township, Monroe Countv, Ohio, and died August 
8, 1894, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. Interment in West Grove 
Cemetery of Penn Township. 

Eliza Jane Wright, daughter of Jesse and Diana (Gardner) Wright, was 
born September 23, 1843, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Thomas I. Gray and Eliza J. Wright were united in marriage June 2, 
1866, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Na7ne Birth Death 

Gladys Delphine Gray November 30, 1867 

Clara Frances Gray March 7, 1872 



They were born in Penu Township, Jay County, Indiana. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 127 

Mr. and Mrs. Gray moved to Lee County, Illinois, soon after their mar- 
riage, but returned the following year to their former home in Indiana, purchas- 
ing land in Penn Township, where they lived for some time. Later they sold 
this property and bought the old home which had belonged to Mrs. Gray's 
parents, living there until after Mr. Gray's death. Subsequently, the children 
being married, Mrs. Gray bought a neat home in Pennville, Indiana, where she 
now resides. 

Mr. Gray was of Welsh and Scotch descent. He came with his parents 
to Jay County, Indiana, in the fall of 1854. His father having died soon after 
their arrival, he stayed at home and cared for his mother until after his mar- 
riage. He was a birthright member of the Society of Friends, but at a very 
early age became convinced of the truth of Spiritualism through the medium- 
ship of his sister Lydia, who was then but a child about eight years old. He 
lived and died in that faith. He always revered the teachings of the early 
Quakers and believed that the two "isms" were closely connected, as the early 
Friends urged us to listen to the "still small voice" and he often heard the 
"voices." 

Mr. Gray was always, in politics, a Republican. 

The following tribute to Mr. Gray came from one who loved him, and 
knowledge of the deep, true character of the writer, gives an added depth and 
beauty to the words: "He was a grand, good man; one of the truest and best 
of husbands and no man could be a better father. His whole life was one of 
physical suffering, yet his aim was always to do for those he loved. His home 
was his heaven." 

" 'Tis hope and joy and memory, give 
A home in which the heart may live. 
It is a presence undefined, 
O'ershadowing the conscious mind." 

Mrs. Gray is of English and Irish descent. Her maternal ancestors were 
all Quakers and came to Nantucket Island on account of the persecution of 
Quakers in England. Her great-grandfather Wright was a sea captain. Mrs. 
Gray finished her education at Liber College, south of Portland, Indiana, where 
she attended two years, after which she taught two terms of school near Etna, 
Huntington County, Indiana, and tliree terms in Jackson Township, Jay County, 
of the same state. 

Mrs. Gray is an extensive reader; a woman who thinks and studies 
earnestly over the deep and perplexing problems of this age, and her mind is a 
storehouse of good, pure and beautiful thoughts, which all feel the influence of 
who have had the privilege of knowing her. She was always a Spiritualist, and 
when the first word came to her people about the "Rochester Knockings" and 
the Little Fox girls who could do such wonders, it was a revelation which made 
clear manj' of the mysteries of her childhood, thus establishing her faith in 
early modern Spiritualism. 



128 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

ISAAC T. AND MARY E. (GRAY) HAINES U) 

Mary Elma Gray, daughter of Elisha and Atlantic O. (Lewis) Gray, was 
born September i6, 1839, in Malaga Township, Monroe County, Ohio. 

Isaac T. Haines, son of Timothy and Hannah (Tomlinson) Haines, was 
born August 15, 1835, near Trenton, Harrison County, Oliio. 

Isaac T. Haines and Mary E. Gray were united in marriage October 4, 
1857, at the home of the bride's parents, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indi- 
ana, Levi Johnson, J. P., officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birtli Dfath 

Rosella Haines April g, 1859 

Lydia Ellen Haines November 3, 1861 ... September 7, 1881 

Edwin Ellsworth Haines April 4, 1864 ... 

Halcyon Gertrude Haines..... September 22, 1S69 ... January i, 1879 

They were born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Lydia E. and Halcyon G. died in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, 
and were buried in the West Grove Cemetery of the same township. 

Mr. and Mrs. Haines reside in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, 
where they are successfully engaged in agricultural pursuits. Mr. Haines has 
served as road supervisor for his township. His mother died at his home March 
26, 1902, having reached her ninety-first year. She was remarkably strong and 
active until a few years before her death and was much beloved by friends and 
relatives. She was buried in the West Grove Cemetery. 

Mrs. Haines is a most excellent lady. Her life is full of usefulness and 
good deeds. 

Mr. and Mrs. Haines are faithful members of the Spiritualist Society. 
Mr. Haines is a member of the Grange. He is of Welsh and English descent. 

BENJAMIN F. AND ATLANTIC T. (GRAY) BLACKLEDGE (41 

Atlantic Tacy Gray, daughter of Elisha and Atlantic O. (Lewis) Gray, 
was born December 10, 1850, in Malaga Township, Monroe County, Ohio, and 
died August 13, 1899, in Newton, Jasper County, Iowa. Interment in the 
Mount Zion Cemetery in Buena Vista Township, of the same county. 

Benjamin Franklin lilackledge, son of Jason and Mary (Paxson) Black- 
ledge, was born January 20. 1850, in Nottingham Township, Wells County, 
Indiana, and died September 22, 1882, in Bloomington, Nebraska. 

Benjamin V . IjlackK-dge and Atlantic T. Gray were united in marriage 
October 11, 1873, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, Joel Birdsall, J. P., 
officiating. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY ISg 

TO THEM WEki; i;ORN 

Name Birth Death 

Bertha Lee Blackledge January 6,1875 ... January 8, 1875 

Ollie Elma Blackledge July 28, 1876 

Eola Everet Blackledge February g, 1880 

Ogle Lela Blackledge May 24,1883 

The birth and death of Bertha L. occurred in Jay County, Indiana, and 
she was buried in the West Grove Cemetery in Penn Township of the same 
county. Ollie E. was born in Newton, Jasper County, Iowa, and Eola E. and 
Ogle L. were born in Bloomington, Nebraska. 

Mr. and Mrs. Blackledge removed to Newton, Jasper County, Iowa, 
August 25, 1875, but returned to their former home in Indiana the next year. 
In the fall of 1877 tliey went to Bloomington, Nebraska, where they remained 
until Mr. Blackledge's death. Mr. Blackledge was engaged in general mer- 
chandising a greater part of his life, but at the time of his death he held an 
interest in a harness shop. He was of Dutch descent. 

Eola E. Blackledge resides at Reasnor, Iowa, where he is engaged in 
farming. 

Mrs. Blackledge returned to her former home and was again married. 



EUGENE S. AND ATLANTIC T. (GRAY) (BLACKLEDGE^ 

BLACKLEDGE (4) 

Eugene Sue Blackledge, son of Jason and Mary (Paxson) Blackledge, 
was born April g, 1858, near Galesburg, Marion County, Iowa. 

Eugene S. Blackledge and Atlantic T. (Gray) Blackledge were united in 
marriage February 2, 1884, near Kiliduft, Jasper County, Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Melvin Eugene Blackledge. .. . December 7, 1884 



Jesse Burns Blackledge i _, . , „ , , ,o„„ 

:^,,., " -Twins. June i, i8go ... June i, 1890 

Wilbur Cecil Blackledge \ ^ . ^ J 

Reed Blacklegde January 15, i8g2 ... January 20, 1892 

They were born near Killduff, Jasper County, Iowa. 

Jesse B., Wilbur C. and Reed died near Killduff, Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Blackledge located near Killduff after their marriage, where 
they were engaged in farming. Mr. Blackledge served as road sujiervisor in 
Buena Vista Township, Jasper County, two years. 

Melvin E. Blackledge resides near Killduff and is engaged in farming. 

Mrs. Blackledge was a member of the Congregational Church. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY I3I 

MORGAN M. AND HARRIET A. (PRATT) LEWIS (4) 

Morgan Milton Lewis, son of Syra and Sarah Ann (Grisell) Lewis, was 
born August g, 1840, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Harriet Ackland Pratt, daughter of Edward and Elizabeth M. (Hatha- 
way) Pratt, was born July 31, 1848, near Battle Creek, Michigan. 

Morgan M. Lewis and Harriet A. Pratt were united in marriage Decem- 
ber 23. i86g, at the home of the bride's sister, Mrs. F. S. Graves, Battle Creek, 
Michigan, Rev. George Willard officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Harry Pratt Lewis October 15, 1870 

Maude Harriet Lewis August g, 1873 

Syra Edward Lewis March 27, 1875 

They were all born in Battle Creek, Michigan. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis reside in Battle Creek, Michigan, where Mr. Lewis 
is the head of the firm of M. M. Lewis & Sons, contractors and builders. 

Mrs. Lewis's mother, Elizabeth Mills (Hathaway) Pratt was born Decem- 
ber 2, 1828, in Turin, Lewis Count}', New York. Her parents were natives of 
New York and were of Dutch and Welsh descent. Mrs. Lewis's father, Edward 
Hicks Pratt, was born December 4, i8ig, in Schenectady County, New York. 
His parents were natives of Massachusetts and of English and French descent. 
Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Pratt were united in marriage March 12, 1845, in Alamo, 
Kalamazoo County, Michigan. At present they reside in Dallas. Texas. Nine 
children have been born to them, all of whom are living, and out of their 
twenty-nine grandchildren, twenty-seven are living: also eleven great grand- 
children living. Mr. Pratt is eighty-three years of age and Mrs. Pratt seventy- 
four and both enjoy the best of health and are remarkably active and happy for 
their age. A few years ago they celebrated their golden wedding anniversary, 
children and grandchildren all uniting to make it a joyful event. 

Mrs. Lewis is optimistic and cheerful in disposition, devoted to her fam- 
ily and friends and has the happy faculty of making and retaining a large circle 
of warmly devoted friends. She has always been prominently identified with 
the charitable organizations of the city and is at present a member of the board 
of managers of the Nichols Hospital. 

Mr. Lewis may properly be termed a selfmade man, having worked his 
way to success by means of his industry and natural ability. As a contractor 
and builder he is widely and favorably known in Battle Creek and surrounding 
country, and is justly regarded as one of the most able members of that profes- 
sion. His boyhood days were spent on his father's farm in Jay County, Indiana, 
and it was there he first began to use the tools of his future occupation. He 
came to Battle Creek, Michigan, in 1868, and in 1872 formed a co-jjartnership 
with Henry Halladay. Under the firm name of Halladay & Lewis a substantial 




GRANVILLE S. LEWIS 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 1 33 

and successful contracting business was conducted until January i, 1894, when 
the partnership was dissolved by mutual consent and Morgan M. Lewis con- 
tinued in the business. January i, 1901, Harry P. and Syra E. Lewis, sons of 
Mr. Lewis, were admitted to the firm as partners under the firm name of M. 
M. Lewis & Sons. 

In his business he is methodic, polite and sagacious. His word is im- 
plicitly relied upon and his courteous treatment of his business associates and 
customers has won for him a large circle of friends. 

Mr. Lewis served as alderman of his ward two terms and is a member of 
the Board of Trustees of the Independent Congregational Church, which office 
he has held for a number of years. Politically he is independent. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis are not members of any denomination, but they and 
their family are regular attendants of the Independent Congregational Church. 

They have lived in Battle Creek since their marriage and through their 
honesty, kindness and hospitality have gained the confidence and esteem of the 
entire community. 

GRANVILLE S. AND REBECCA E. (SULLIVAN) LEWIS (4) 

Granville Sharp I^ewis, son of Syra and Sarah Ann (Grisell) Lewis, was 
born October 8, 1845, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, and died Febru- 
ary 2, 1881, in Antelope County, Nebraska. Interment in the same place. 

Rebecca E. Sullivan, daughter of William and Mary (Coffin) Sullivan, was 
born July 8, 1856, in Jay County, Indiana, and died June i, 1889, in Ft. Wayne, 
Indiana. Interment in the cemetery of the same place. 

Granville S. Lewis and Rebecca E. Sullivan were united in marriage 
April 24, 1875, near Union School House, Blackford County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name- Birth Death 

Orie Lewis — , 1876 . . . March — , 1877 

Frank Lester Lewis November 16, 1879 

They were born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis located in Penn Township, where they were engaged 
in farming until the spring of 1876, when they removed to Battle Creek, Michi- 
gan. They remained here a little over a year, Mr. Lewis being engaged in the 
carpenter trade, then returned to their former home in Penn Township, Indiana. 
Subsequently they removed to Antelope County, Nebraska, where they lived 
until after Mr. Lewis's death. Mrs. Lewis then returned with her son to Indiana 
and was living in Ft. Wayne at the time of her death. 

Mr. Lewis was educated in the common sciiools and attended Liber Col- 
lege near Portland, Indiana, one term. He was a good carpenter and farmer. 




MRS. WM. MtKURAS 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY I35 



WILLIAM H. AND MARY C. (LEWIS) McKURAS (4) 

Mar}' Catherine Lewis, daughter of Syra and Sarah Ann ( Grisell) 
Lewis, was born August 17, 1849, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, and 
died January 28, 1877, at the place of her birth. Interment in the West Grove 
Cemetery of Penn Township. 

William Hugh McKuras, son of Hugh and Margaret Ann ( ) 

McKuras, was born May 13, 1849, near Circleville, Pickway County, Ohio. 

William H. McKuras and Mary C. Lewis were united in marriage Decem- 
ber 4, 1875, at the home of the bride's mother in Penn Township, Jay County, 
Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Naini- Birth f Death 
Leonidas Lewis McKuras December 15, 1876 



He was born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. McKuras located in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, 
where the former still resides, engaged in farming. Mrs. McKuras was a student 
in Liber College, where she finished her school education. 

Mr. McKuras came to Jay County, Indiana, in 1870. He is of English 
and Scotch descent. 

William H McKuras enlisted as a private in the United States Army, 
Company D, One Hundred and Seventy-fourth Regiment of Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry, at Athens, Ohio, August 13, 1864. They were sent from Athens to 
Marietta, Ohio, where they were examined and drew their army uniform. Then 
went from tlitre to Camp Chase, four miles from Columbus, Ohio, where they 
were formed into a company under James W. Combes as captain and their com- 
pany became a part of the One Hundred and Seventy-fourth Regiment under 
Col. J. P. Jones. They proceeded to Murfreesboro, where they were formed 
into a brigade under Gen. Thomas. Tlie One Hundred and Seventy-fourth 
Regiment was sent to Athens, Alabama, to prevent Gen. Hood from crossing 
the river. They failed in their attempt ant! returned to Murfreesboro, and from 
there to Overall Creek, Tennessee, where they were in a battle, and from tliere 
proceeded to Nashville and participated in a battle there. They were then 
ordered to Washington, D. C, to take transports and sail down the James River 
through the Chesapeake Bay out into the Atlantic Ocean; landing at Morehead 
City, they marched from there to Kingston, where they helped to win a liard 
fought battle, proceeded from there to Goldsboro, North Carolina, whire they 
joined Sherman's army, then went to Raleigh and from there to Charlotte, 
North Carolina, where they were mustered out June 28, 1865. and received llieir 
final discharge at Columbus, Ohio. 

During his service Mr. McKuras traveled about seven thousand mili s all 
together, a good many miles being traversed on the marches on foot. He was 




OSCAR W. LEWIS 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 1 37 

in several hard-fought battles and many skirmishes, and was with Gen. Sher- 
man's army at the Grand Review at Washington, D. C. 

Leonidas L. McKuras was a student in the Normal College at Angola, 
Indiana, when the Spanish-American war broke out, and enlisted in Company 
H, part of Third Regiment Infantry. Indiana National Guards, under Captain 
Newton W. Gilbert, April 23, 1898. They went from Angola to Indianapolis, 
Indiana, April 26, where they became a part of the One Hundred and Fifty- 
seventh Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry under Col. George M. Stude- 
baker. They arrived at Camp Mount April 26, 1898, under orders from Gov. 
Mount, for the purpose of being mustered into the United States service. The 
work of preparation was necessarily slow, as all officers and men had to pass 
physical examination and be accepted by the surgeons before they would be 
accepted by the United States officers. The One Hundred and Fifty-seventh 
Regiment was mustered into volunteer service May lo, 1898, and left for Camp 
Thomas, Chickamauga Park, Georgia, on Sunday, May 15. On arriving there 
May 17 they went into camp, left Camp Thomas June i for Port Tampa City 
Florida, and July 19 they proceeded to Fernandina, Florida, arriving there July 
30; remained at Fernandina one month, when the regiment was ordered to Indi- 
anapolis to be mustered out. They arrived there September 2, and September 
10 they were furloughed for thirty days, mustered out and received tlieir final 
discharge November i, 1898. 



OSCAR W. AND ELLA N. (GARDNER) LEWIS (4) 

Oscar Wright Lewis, son of Syra and Sarah Ann (Grisell) Lewis, was 
born May 14, 1852, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Ella N. Gardner, daughter of William and Malaha J. (Hunt) (ianlner, 
was horn October 6, 1856, in Penn Township, Jav County, Indiana. 

Oscar W. Lewis and Ella N. Gardner were united in marriage December 
27, 1873, at the home of the bride's parents, in Penn Township, Jay County, 
Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Dratii 

James G. Lewis J>ily 26, 1877 

Walter O. Lewis Octobi-r 24, 1887 

James G. was horn in Penn Fownship, |ay County, Indiana, and Walter 
O. in Battle Creek, Michigan. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis located in Penn Township. Jay County, Indiana, 
where they were engaged in farming untd 1881. They then removed to Battle 
Creek, Michigan, where they purchased property and remained there several 
years. Here he followc'd the carpenter's trade for some tiuii' in which he 
became very efficient. He then took up the trade of brick mason, and as suixr- 
intendent and mechanic he stands at the head of his profession. 



138 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

In 1895 they returned to Indiana and purchased a home in Pennville, Jay 
County, where they reside at the present time. Mr. Lewis still follows his 
trades and also attends to their farm. 

Mr. Lewis is considered a very successful hunter, and his several hunt- 
ing trips have been rewarded by very gratifying results. At one time he killed 
nineteen quail on the wing without missing the shot. 

Mrs. Lewis's ancestors were natives of Guilford County, North Carolina. 



IRA M. AND SARAH J. (SPAYD; LEWIS C4) 

Ira Morgan Lewis, son of Ensley and Amy ^Grisell) Lewis, was born 
November 7, 1837, in Short Creek Township, Harrison County, Ohio. 

Sarah Jane Spayd, daughter of Reuben and Mary (Hart) Spayd, was 
born December 25, 1840, in Greenville, Darke County, Ohio. 

Ira M. Lewis and Sarah J. Spayd were united in marriage August 11, 
1861, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name BiriJi Death 

Estella Jane Lewis August 2, 1862 ... December 11, 1895 

Linley Ira Lewis May 16, 1864 

Ensley Morton Lewis September 17, 1865 

Anna Mary Lewis November 25, 1867 

John Warren Lewis March 21, 1870 

They were all born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

After the death of their daughter Estella, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis took her 
eldest son, Ray Morgan Adams, into their home, where he has since lived. 

Linlej' I. and John W. are both farmers by occupation; Ensley M. fol- 
lows the blacksmith trade. 

Mr. Lewis is of English and Welsh and Mrs. Lewis of German descent. 
She is a birthright member of the Lutheran Church. 

Mr. Lewis came to Jay County, Indiana, with his parents in the spring 
of 1838, were most of his boyhood was spent. The school facilities in those 
days were very limited, consequently he did not get very much help from them. 
Eortunately his parents were extensive readers, and had the abiliti\- and incli- 
nation to teach their children much useful knowledge. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Lewis lived in Penn Township, Jay 
County, Indiana, until March 18, 1872, when they removed to Washington 
Township, Carroll Count\. Iowa. They were the second family to build a house 
and settle in that township, but during the ne.xt summer following it was all 
settled by Germans. While living here Mr. Lewis was president of the town- 
ship school board three years. 

February 22, 1877, tluy removed to Ryan Township, Sumner County, Kan- 
sas, where they pre-empted one hundred and sixty acres of lantl and a little later 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 139 

bought one hundred and sixty acres more. When they first located here the 
country was comparatively new and they had but few neighbors, there being 
but two houses in sight of their home. Mr. Lewis was soon recognized as a 
strong supporter and an able leader in all educational matters, and besides 
much other beneficial aid which he gave the people of that place he served as 
treasurer of the school board twelve years and as township treasurer two terms. 

In 1900 Mr. Lewis sold his property in Kansas and bought one hundred 
and sixty acres of land near Milan, Woods County, Oklahoma Territory, where 
he and his family live at the present time. His three sons and his son-in-law, 
John Miller, own land in the same county. 

Mr. Lewis is a man whose honesty and good will toward humanity has 
made him a leader and an advisor among the early settlers of the different 
places where he has lived, and he and his family have gained many friends who 
remember them most kindly for their many generous deeds. 



THOMAS E. AND DR. EMMA L. (BROOKS) LEWIS (4) 

Thomas E. Lewis, son of Ensley and Amy (Grisell) Lewis, was born 
April 27, 1841, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Emma L. Brooks, daughter of Lincoln and Emaline L. (Putnam ) 
Brooks, was born March 30, 1841, at Walpole, Cheshire County, New Hamp- 
shire. 

Thomas E. Lewis and Emma L. Brooks were united in marriage Decem- 
ber 24, 1868, in Adrian, Michigan. 

No children. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Lewis located on the home farm near 
Pennville, Jay County, Indiana, where they lived some time. Previous to her 
marriage Mrs. Lewis had had about twelve years experience in nursing and 
during that time had read medicine every idle moment. She did not like farm 
life, so proposed to her husband that she take a medical course and follow that 
profession. He being a woman's rights man, immediately set about making 
preparations to help fulfill her desire. He rented the farm and procured a home 
for his two little brothers. Mrs. Lewis attended the Woman's College of Phila- 
delphia, one year, and the Penn Medical College of Philadelphia, Pennsylva- 
nia, two years, graduating from the latter in 1874. She immediately begun the 
practice of her profession in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, where she 
soon gained a large practice and many friends. 

Some of her experiences were very trying and discouraging, as many 
difficulties confronted the lady physicians of that day, which have since been 
overcome, but her courage was such that she bravely overcame all obstacles 
and established a practice which was both a satisfactory and gratifying success. 

Subsequently she was a physician in the Home of the Friendless in 
Richmond and was a member of the Regular Medical Society of Richmond. 



140 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Later she went to San Diego, California, where she established a practice and 
followed her profession for some time. 

Mrs. Lewis's mother was a relative of General Putnam, her father was 
a thorough New England farmer and a raiser of fine bred stock. He owned 
and managed two farms at the time of his marriage. 

At present Dr. Emma Lewis has retired from active work in her profes- 
sion and she and Mr. Lewis live in Santa Barbara, California, where he owns a 
large ranch. Mr. Lewis is highly spoken of as a man of high ideals and true 
moral character. 



SAMUEL L AND MARY A. (LEWIS) GREY '4) 

Mary Alice Lewis, daughter of Ensley and Amy (Grisell) Lewis, was 
born April 20, 1850, in Penn Township. Jay County, Indiana, and died October 
20, 1895, near Pennville, Indiana. Interment in the Friends' Cemetery of 
Pennville. 

Samuel I. Grej', son of Jesse and Keziah (Swallow) Grey, was born 
October 10, 1847, at Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Samuel I. Grey and Mary A. Lewis were united in marriage September 
g, 1872. in Portland, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Navie Birth Death 

Orley Lewis Grey September i, 1874 . . . December 13, 1897 

Jessie Maj- Grey October 11, 1876 

They were born in Pennville, Jav Countv, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grey located in Pennville, Indiana, where they lived several 
years, afterward removing to their farm one mile and a quarter northeast of 
Pennville. 

Mr. Gre}" was a grandson of Jesse Grey, whose courage and industrv did 
so much to protect the white people in the earh" settlement of Indiana. For 
the history of Jesse Gre)' see "Reminiscences of Ridgeville and the Mississi- 
newa Country, " by Samuel Ginger, or the "History of Jay County." 

Jesse Grey's father was a native of England, hence the name is spelled 
Grey. The Scotch spell the name with an "a," as do also the Germans, but 
the latter pronounce it Grau. 

Samuel Grey enlisted in Compan}' E, Seventh Indiana Cavalry, in Port- 
land, Indiana, under Capt. David Skinner, of Jaj' Count}^ The Company was 
ordered to Indianapolis, Indiana, where the\' were formed into the One Hundred 
and Nineteenth Regiment under Col. J. P. C. Shanks, also of Jav County, Sep- 
tember 3, 1863. 

They were all through the south with Gen. Custer, having done dutj- in 
Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Arkansas, Missouri, Louisiana and Texas. 
The regiment was mustered out on the i8th of February, 1866, at "Camp 



RF.CORD OF THF, LEWIS FAMILY I4I 

Seider's Springs," near Austin, Texas. They then proceeded to Indianapolis, 
Indiana, where they received their final discharge. 

Mr. Grey enlisted when thirteen years of age and his fourteenth birthday 
was spent in a hospital in Indianapolis. He served about two years and nine 
months and his last year's service was as Private Orderly for Gen. Custer. Mrs. 
Custer always attended the general when on the march and on account of Mr. 
Grey's age she was a mother to him. He often rode by her side while on the 
march. As Private Orderly he had to carry dispatches to the other generals, often 
five, ten and fifteen miles to be traversed alone under more or less danger, but the 
general imparted bravery to the boy's heart by his kindness and confidence in 
him. One very dark night he sent for him and by the time Mr. Grey arrived 
there it was raining a perfect deluge and so dark you could only see the tent 
light. (They were on the march but had struck camp just before dark.) When 
Mr. Grey reached the general's tent he invited him in and kept him there about 
two hours, thinking the rain might cease, but it did not. He wanted the dis- 
patch taken to a general in command of the rear division. At last he turned on 
his heel and said, "Orderly, this dispatch is of vital importance, but I cannot 
send you out in this storm. Go to your tent and get some sleep; if it slacks I 
will have my guard call you." 

Mr. Grey says, "Gen. Custer was a very stern man, but I thoroughly 
admired him and his wife. Both had big hearts, but both were soldiers." 

After Mr. Grev returned home at the close of the war he again entered 
school, and attended Liber College near Portland, Indiana, from 1868 to 1870. 
He then commenced a collegiate course at Ridgeville College, Ridgeville. Indi- 
ana. Being dependent upon himself for finances to carry him through, in 1871 
he accepted a position as intermediate teacher in the High School, then being 
taught in the College. He held that position eighteen months, at the end of 
which time he was married. Discontinuing his studies he soon after accepted 
a position in the graded schools at Pennville, Indiana, holding that position 
two years. At present he resides in California, where he is connected with 
an Alaska mining business. 

He is prominently identified in Masonic circles, having been a member 
of that fraternit}' for a number of years. 

Mrs. Grey was a member of the Methodist Church and of the W. C. T. U. 
Previous to her marriage she was a student in Liber College, near Portland, 
Indiana. She was a woman of most gentle disposition and possessing rare 
energy and industry. To her children she was always an indulgent and loving 
mother. 

ANSON F. AND LIZZIE STEPHENS) LEWIS (4) 

Anson F. Lewis, son of Ensley and Amy (Grisell) Lewis was born March 
14, i860, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Lizzie Stephens, daughter of Capt. Hugh and Artie ( ) Stephens 

was born in 



142 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Anson F. Lew is and Lizzie Stephens were united in marriage — 
at the home of the bride's parents in Portland, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 
Raymond Lewis 



He was born in Portland. Indiana. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Lewis located on a farm near Penn- 
ville, Jay County, Indiana, where they lived a short time. They removed to 
Battle Creek, Michigan, living there several years, where Mr. Lewis followed 
the mason's trade. Subsequently they returned to their former home in Port- 
land, Indiana, and a few 3'ears later removed to Santa Barbara, California, 
where they reside at the present time. 

Mrs. Lewis's father was a captain in the civil war. 

Prior to his marriage Mr. Lewis was one of the firm of Clapp & Lewis, 
photographers, in Portland, Indiana. 

JOHN G. AND EMMA (MATSON ) LEWIS (5) 

John Gnmmere Lewis, son of Isaac and Lydia (Gummere) Lewis, was 
born August 27, 1839, in Georgetown, Short Creek Township, Harrison County, 
Ohio, and died April 12, i8gi, in Harrisville, Harrison County, Ohio. He was 
interred in the Harrisville Cemetery. 

Emma Matson, daughter of Thomas and Loretta (Close) Matson, was 
born January 14, 1854, near Georgetown, Short Creek Township, Harrison 
County, Ohio. 

John Gummere Lewis and Emma Matson were united in marriage May 
17, 1877, at the home of the bride's parents, near Georgetown, Harrison Coun- 
ty, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN" 

Name Birth Death 
Loretta Matson Lewis August 30, 1879 



She was born in Georgetown, Harrison Coimty. Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis located in Georgetown soon after their marriage, 
where they resided several years. Later thej- removed to Cadiz. Remaining 
there but a short time they went to Harrisville, where they lived until Mr. 
Lewis's death. During these migrations Mr. Lewis was engaged in the mercan- 
tile business most of the time. He served as Township Treasurer several years 
in Short Creek Townshiji. 

Mr. Lewis was a birthright member of the Hicksite branch of the 
Friends' Society. After attending the village school he entered the Hopedale 
Normal, located in Harrison County, Ohio, and finished his school education 
there. 

Mrs. Lewis still resides at Harrisville, Ohio. 

Mrs. Lewis was of German descent. 



I, 


I 87 I 


24- 


i«73 


12, 


i«75 


30, 


1877 


17, 


1881 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY I43 

MARY D. AND WILLIAM E. (LEWIS) HOFF (5) 

Mary Elizabeth Lewis, daughter of Isaac and L^'dia ((himmere) Lewis, 
was born December 5, 1841, in Georgetown, Short Creek Township. Harrison 
Count}', Ohio. 

WilHani Davidson Hoff, son of Hensen Lewis and Anne ( I^ightineyer) 
Hoff, was born May i, 1839, near Phillipi, Barbour County, West Virginia. 

William D. Hoff and Mary E. Lewis were united in marriage February 
3, 1870, in Georgetown. Harrison County, Ohio, by Rev. Henry Heberling, an 
uncle of the bride and a Methodist Protestant minister. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

A/'amf Birth Death 

Hensen Lewis Hoff June 1,1871 ... December 1,1890 

Eldridge Gourley Hoff April 

Lydia Anne Hoff January 12,1875 • • October 8.1877 

Louella Davidson Hoff August 

Carl Porter Hoff July 

They were all born in Stockton, Missouri, except the youngest, who was 
born in Cadiz, Harrison County, Ohio. Hensen L. died in St. Clairsville, Bel- 
mont County, Ohio, and was interred in the Union Cemetery of that place. 
Lydia died in Stockton, Missouri, and was interred in the Stockton Cemetery. 

Hensen L. had entered as an apprentice to the carpenter trade, with the 
intention of attending the School of Designs in Cincinnati, Ohio, when through 
an accident he lost his fingers. But he was so desirous of making that line of 
work his vocation that he decided to be an architect or designer, but did not live 
to complete his plans. 

Carl P. is a student in the State University, at Columbia, Missouri, at the 
present time ( 1901 ) with the intention of being a civil engineer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hoff have spent most of their life in Stockton, Missouri, 
having located there after their marriage, where Mr. Hoff followed the profes- 
sion of law, until about 1879, when on account of the latter's poor health and 
in order to give their children better opportunities for an education they 
returned to Ohio. Here Mr. Hoff practiced law until 1895, when they returned- 
to their home in Stockton, and have since resided there. 

Mr. Hoff received his education from the Hopedale, Ohio Normal, and 
Hiram College. During Mr. Hoff's attendance at the latter named place, James 
A. Garfield, later president of the United States, was Professor of the College. 

In 1861 and 1862 he taught school in Kentucky, after which h(^ volun- 
teered for the civil war and enlisted in Company F, 15th Regiment West \'irgi- 
nia Volunteer Infantry. He served as Lieutenant of Company D, 15th Regi- 
ment, and was captured at the battle of Cedar Creek, \irginia, at the time of 
the noted Sheridan's Raid. He was an inmate of Libby Prison forty-hve days. 
He was mustered out of the service June 14, 1865, at Wheeling, West Virginia. 



144 Rl^CORD OK IHE LEWIS FAMILY 

After returning from the war he began the study of law under Wm. 
Brown, of Kingwood. Preston County, West Virginia, and was admitted to the 
bar in PhilHpi, Barbour County, West Virginia, in 1866. Here he practiced 
law for some time. 

Mr. Hoff has been very successful in his profession and possesses an 
extensive fund of information on all subjects. Except two or three years at 
college and a few months under Mr. Brown studying law, he is self-taught. 

He served as County Attorney of Cedar County, Missouri, one term, and 
as Probate Judge of the same county two terms. 

Mr. Hoff is of German, Irish and English descent. 

Mrs. Hoff is a member of the Hicksite branch of tlie Friends' Society, 
holding her membership in the Plainfield Monthlv. Still Water Quarter, Ohio 
Yearly Meeting. 

She clerked in her father's mercantile establishment, nearly three years 
before her marriage, and is the one who so kindly added a sketch of the life 
and character of her parents. 

Mrs. Hoff is a woman of superior natural ability and the sweetness of 
her character is crowned by the higher graces of a Christian life. 

JAMES M. AND LOUISA (LEWIS' ADAMS (S) 

Louisa Lewis, daughter of Isaac and Lydia (Gummere) Lewis, was born 
May 30, 1844, in Georgetown, Short Creek Township, Harrison County, Ohio, 
and died Julv 17, 1892, in Harrisville, Harrison County, Ohio. 

James Madison Adams, son of Joshua and Jane (Brown) Adams was born 
April 21, 1842, in Georgetown, Short Creek Township, Harrison County, Ohio. 

James M. Adams and Louisa Lewis were united in marriage October 18, 
1877, in Georgetown, Harrison County, Ohio, b\' Rev. Henry Heberling, an 
uncle of the bride and a Methodist Protestant minister. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birtit Death 
Paul Lewis Adams October 13, 1884 



He was born in Harrisville, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Adams located in Harrisville after their marriage, which 
they made their permanent home. 

Mr. Adams was a birthright member of the Hicksite branch of the 
Friends' Society, and was "a most estimable woman of noble principles." 

Mr. Adams began his business career in 1862 as a merchant's clerk in the 
dry goods store of Isaac Lew-is, in Georgetown. In 1867 he and John G. Lewis 
bought the firm of Thompson Bros, (successors of Isaac Lewis") and con- 
tinued in that business until 1872, when J. M. Adams sold out his business in 
Georgetown and went to Harrisville, and went into business with Jacob Moore, 
merchant, and the firm was then J. Moore & Co. The}- continued this partner- 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY I45 

ship until 1878 when Mr. Adams resigned and purchased the dry goods establish- 
ment of C. A. McCleary of the same city. This business he carried on alone, 
under the firm name of J. M. Adams, until in i8gi, when in the morning of 
November 16 the entire building and stock of goods were consumed by fire. 
The loss was complete, books and all being destroyed. It was supposed to 
have been set on fire to conceal a robbery. 

Since that time Mr. Adams did no regular business of any kind until the 
fall of 1891, when he bought the mercantile business of E. V. Bone & Co., 
whose establishment was located in the same rooms that Mr. Adams first begun 
business in, in Harrisville, in 1872. 

Mr. Adams was a member of the Ohio National Guards, Co. F, 170th Regi- 
ment, and was in the engagements of Snicker's Ford, Maryland Heights, Mar- 
tinsburgh and Winchester, Va. He was out in 1864 in the one himdred day 
service, and most of the time was in the Shenandoah Valley, in Virginia. 

Through our correspondence with others of this branch of the Lewis 
family we have received many expressions of praise of his life. He is active 
and zealous in doing works of charity. He is of English and Irish descent. 

Paul Lewis Adams is a student in the Harrisville High School, from 
which he expects to graduate in the coming year. He is also engaged much of 
the time in assisting his father. 



JOSEPH S. AND ROSELLA P. (LEWIS) HARRISON (S) 

Rosella Philothea Lewis, daughter of Isaac and Lydia Gummere (Lewis) 
was born October 31, 1849, in Georgetown, Short Creek Township, Harrison 
County. Ohio. 

Joseph S. Harrison, son of Richard and Sarah (Rigby) Harrison, was 
born August 9, 1847, in Martin's Ferry, Belmont County, Ohio. 

Joseph S. Harrison and Rosella P. Lewis were united in marriage June 
13, 1872, in Georgetown, Harrison County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Frank Lewis Harrison March 7, 1873 

George Leroy Harrison November 8, 1875 

Earl Gummere Harrison October 6, 1880 

Walter Feuben Harrison May 16,1887 

They were all born in Martin's Ferry, Belmont County, Ohio, except the 
oldest, Frank L. , who was born in Colerain of the same county. 

Earl G. finished the second year of the Barnesville High School, and 
then entered the Washington and Jefferson College of Washington, Washing- 
ton County, Pennsylvania, in 1896. In 1897 he returned home and was em- 
ployed as salesman in his father's mercantile establishment until 1901, when he 
entered a business college in New York City. 
10 



146 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

He is a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

Walter R. is a Junior in the Barnesville High School and is also a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harrison both attended the Hopedale, Ohio, Normal, be- 
fore their marriage. 

When seven years old Mr. Harrison removed with his parents to Harri- 
son County, where he remained until the latter part of the civil war, when in 
the spring of 1864 he enlisted in the 170th Regiment of Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 
He was assigned to the Army of the Potomac in the Shenandoah Valley, which 
was commanded by General Sigel, and participated in the engagements of Win- 
chester, Martinsburgh, Snicker's Gap and Halltown. Gen. Sigel was super- 
seded by Gen. Phil Sheridan, who made the famous ride and won a great 
victory. 

J. S. Harrison was mustered out in the autiunn of 1864. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Harrison lived in Colerain, Belmont 
County, Ohio, for about three years, when they removed to Martin's Ferry, of 
the same county, and engaged in mercantile pursuits. In i8go Mr. Harrison 
helped to organize the People's Savings Bank and was elected its president. A 
year later they removed to Barnesville, Belmont County, where he is still fol- 
lowing his former business successfully and prosperously. He is also connected 
with the management of the Martin's Ferry Savings Bank. 

Mr. Harrison is of English descent. They are both members of the 
Presbyterian Church. 



ISAAC P. AND NANCY V. (LEMMON) LEWIS (5) 

Isaac Parker Lewis, son of Isaac and Lydia (Gummere) Lew^s, was born 
October 25, 1852, in Georgetown, Short Creek Township, Harrison County, 
Ohio, and died July 25, 1880, at the "old home" in Georgetown. His remains 
were interred in the Short Creek Township Cemetery. 

Nancy Virginia Lemmon, daughter of Griffith and Rebecca (Pogue) 
Lemmon, was born May 27, 1859, near Harrisville, Harrison Count}', Ohio. 

Isaac P. Lewis and Nancy V. Lemmon were united in marriage October 
i6, 1877, at the home of the bride's parents near Plarrisville, Harrison County, 
Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Na7ne Birth Death 

Leora Pogue Lewis October 11,1878 

Isaac Parker Lewis January 22, 1881 



Leora P. was born in Georgetown, Harrison County, Ohio, and Isaac P. 
at his grandfather Lemmon's home, near Harrisville, in the same county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis located at the "old homestead" in Georgetown after 
their marriage, where they resided until Mr. Lewis's death. He was engaged 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY I47 

in the mercantile business several years, being a partner with his brother John 
G. Lewis. About 1878 he was forced to give up his share of the business on 
account of poor health, but assisted in the store whenever his health would 
permit. He is spoken of as "a man of kind and very gentle nature." He was 
a birthright member of the Hicksite branch of the Friends' Society. 

Mrs. Lewis is a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

Isaac P. Lewis is single and is at present engaged in farming near Cadiz, 
Harrison County, Ohio. 



THOMAS A. AND LYDIA A. (LEWIS) SCOTT C5) 

Lydia Anne Lewis, daughter of Isaac and Lydia (Gummere) Lewis, was 
born June 10, 1855, in Georgetown, Shori Creek Township, Harrison County, 
Ohio, and died December 23, 1888, in Martin's Ferry, Belmont County, Ohio. 
Her remains were interred in the Short Creek Township Cemetery. 

Thomas Albert Scott, son of George and Anne (Hoopes) Scott, was born 
September 22, 1846, near West Grove, Short Creek Township, Harrison Coun- 
ty, Ohio. 

Thomas A. Scott and Lydia A. Lewis were united in marriage December 
24, 1874, in Georgetown, Harrison County, Ohio, by an ancle of the bride. Rev. 
Henry Heberling, a Methodist Protestant minister. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Nellie Alcyone Scott January 4, 1876 

Mary Gertrude Scott January 16, 1878 

Lydia Mabel Scott January 7, 1880 

Georgiana Scott June 17, 1883 

Chester Hoopes Scott April 7, 1888 ... July 14, 1888 

The three oldest children were born in Camp Chase, Franklin County, 
Ohio, Georgiana in Martin's Ferry, Belmont County, and Chester H. in Morn- 
ing View, same county and state. Chester H. died at Morning View, and was 
interred in the Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, Jefferson County, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Scott lived in Camp Chase several years after their mar- 
riage, where he taught in the public schools, and was also engaged in farming. 
Later they removed to Martin's Ferry, Belmont County, of the same state, 
where he engaged in the mercantile business. At the present time he is an 
experimental farmer and small fruit grower at Westerville, Franklin County, 
Ohio, having his home in Westerville, and his farm near there. He is a mem- 
ber of the Guerney branch of the Friends' Society. 

Mrs. Scott was a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

Their children were all educated in the public schools of Martin's Ferry 
and in the Otterbein College of Westerville, Ohio, where the two oldest gradu- 
ated. 



148 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Mary G. Scott is employed as a teacher in the Westerville, Ohio, High 
School. 

Nellie A. is a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

JUNIUS H. AND JANE (DALLAS: LEWIS (5) 

Junius Heberling Lewis, son of Thomas and Rebecca (Heberling) Lewis, 
was born January 27, 1840, in Georgetown. Harrison County, Ohio, and died 
January 17, 1884, in LoDgwood. Florida. 

Jane Dallas, daughter of Peter and ( ) Dallas, was born 

, — , 1847. 

Junius H. Lewis and Jane Dallas were united in marriage September 11, 
1867, at the home of the bride's parents in Atalissa, Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Najtte Birth Death 

Carrie Dallas Lewis June — , 1868 . . . December — , 1868 

Clara Emma Lewis '. .... — . 1870 

Willard Cassius Lewis August 2, 1876 

Mabel Lewis June 8,1882 

Carrie D. and Clara E. were born in Atalissa, low^a, and Willard C. and 
Mabel in Muscatine, Iowa. 

Mr. Lewis acquired a very thorough common school education in his 
native town, supplemented by a course at Hopedale (Ohio) Academy. He 
taught school for a few years in Ohio and served in the civil war with the Har- 
rison County, Ohio, Volunteer Militia, in 1863. Came west in 1865 and engaged 
in the merchandise business in Atalissa, Iowa, and later in dry goods at Musca- 
tine, Iowa. Moved to Florida in the fall of 1883, where he died the following 
January. 

He was a man of marked mental ability and refinement, strong in his 
love of home and friends. A lover of wit and humor he looked at the sunny 
side of every perplexity and made warm friends of all who knew him. He died 
in the full prime of manhood, loved and honored for his e.xalted character and 
purity of his life. Welsh-German descent. 

Mrs. Lewis was educated in Alleghany City, Pennsylvania. Received a 
thorough musical training and became an accomplished pianist. Her life has 
been one of exceptional self-denial and devotion to her three children, who 
were left fatherless at an early age. She now resides with two daughters in 
Denver, Colorado. Scotch parentage. 

Clara E. graduated from the Muscatine, Iowa, High School. Subse- 
(piently took a special business course. Now resides in Denver, Colorado. 

Mabel resides w-ith her mother in Denver, Colorado. 

Willard C. was a student in the high school of ^luscatine, Iowa. Was 
married May, 1900, at Keithsburg. Illinois. To them was born one son, Leon 
Junius Lewis, 1901. No further iuforniation could be gained of this family. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 



149 



NICHOLAS D. AND MARY A. (LEWIS) DYER C5) 

Mary Amanda Lewis, daughter of Thomas and Rebecca (Heberlmgl 
Lewis, was born March 2, 1843, in Georgetown, Harrison County, Ohio, and 
died June 30, 1870, near Atalissa, Iowa. 

Nicholas Daniel Dyer, son of Daniel tlarris and Phila (Beaverstock) 
Dyer, was born January 14, 1841, in Lexington, Richland County, Ohio. 

Nicholas D. Dyer and Mary A. Lewis were united m marriage September 
12, 1867, at the home of the bride's parents, Atalissa, Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

George Lewis Dyer October 9, 1868 

He was born in St. Louis, Missouri. 

Mary A. (Lewis) Dyer removed with her parents to Atalissa, Iowa, in 
1864. She was one of the most lovable characters, possessing a mind and 
disposition of rare attractiveness. Her sweet personality left its impress of 
purity and refinement upon ail who came within the charmed circle of her 
friendship. She was of Welsh- German descent. 

Nicholas D. Dyer entered the army in July, 1862, and was commissioned 
Second Lieutenant September 6, 1862, and Captain of Company C, 29th Mis- 
souri Volunteer Infantry January 14, 1863; mustered out September 6, 1864. 
He was a member of the mercantile firm of Lewis & Dyer, in Atalissa, Iowa, 
afterwards moving to Joliet, Illinois, where, for a number of years past he has 
been prominently identified with the mercantile and real estate business of that 
city. He is of English descent. 

CHARLES H. AND MATHILDA H. (LEWIS) HAMILTON (5) 

Mathilda Ileberling Lewis, daughter of Thomas and Rebecca (Heber- 
ling) Lewis, was born January 7. 1848, in (jeorgetown, Harrison County, Ohio. 

Charles Henry Hamilton, son of Henry C. and Mary (Keller) Hamilton, 
was born December 7, 1842, in Montgomery Coujity, New York. 

Charles H. Hamilton and Mathilda H. Lewis were united in marriage 
June 12, 1873. This marriage, at the request of the bride's fatlier, was solem- 
nized at their beautiful home, in the presence of a large circle of friends, by the 
ceremony of the Quakers, legalized by the assistance of a minister of the Chris- 
tian Church. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Frederic Lewis Hamilton September 27, 1874 ... April 20. 1875 

Florence Hamilton March 2,1877 ••• January 19,1887 

Gayle Hamilton January 20, 1880 

Hazel Evangeline Hamilton .. . April 12,1884 

Carl Lewis Hamilton February 23, 1888 



150 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Frederick L. and Florence were born in Garnaville, Iowa. 

Gayle and Hazel E. in Monona, Iowa, and Carl in Dubuque, same state. 

Frederick L. died in Garnaville, Iowa. 

Florence died in Dubuque, Iowa. An ideal child of ten years, whose 
beautiful spirit is still a living force in the Hamilton home, where it is an inspi- 
ration to all who knew and loved "little Floy." 

Mathilda H. (Lewis) Hamilton moved to Iowa with her parents in 1864. 
She graduated from the high school of Atalissa, and took a special course in 
the high school in Davenport, Iowa, and the Academy of Music in Iowa City, 
Iowa. She is an active member of the Dubuque Ladies' Literary Association 
She is of Welsh-German descent. 

Charles H. Hamilton received an academic education in his native state. 
Removed to Iowa in 1864. Took a special classical course in the Iowa State 
University and graduated at Rush Medical College, Chicago, class of 1873. He 
began practicing medicine at Garnaville, Clayton County, Iowa, removed to 
Monona, Clayton County, Iowa, in 1877, and to Dubuque in 1884. He is a 
member of the Dubuque County Medical Societ}', Iowa State Medical and 
American Medical Association, member of hospital staffs of Finlej- Hospital 
and Mercy Hospital, Dubuque, Iowa. 

Gayle Hamilton graduated from Dubuque High School, class of 1899, 
took a preparatory course under private tutors and a two years' course in mod- 
ern languages in Germany and France. Student at the University of Berlin 
one year. Present address 20 Rue des Belles, Paris, France, Fenilles Chez, 
Madame Fritche. 

Hazel E. is a student of Dubuque High School, class of 1904, and Du- 
buque Acadamy of Music, class of 1905. 

Carl L. is a student in the Dubucjue High School, class of 1906. 

JAMES E. AND NARCISSA R. (LEWIS) BROWN C5) 

Narcissa Rebecca Lewis, daughter of Thomas and Rebecca (Heberling) 
Lewis, was born May 2, 1850, in Georgetown, Harrison County, Ohio. 

James Emmet Brown, son of Alonzo and Maria (Crosby) Brown, was 
born July 25, 1850, in Chautauqua County, New York. 

James E. Brown and Narcissa R. Lewis were united in marriage June 7, 
1877, Rev. Dr. Sturtevant, of Boston, Mass., officiating. The ceremony was 
especially impressive to a large company of friends and relatives, being the 
only marriage at the old homestead after the death of the bride's father. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Genevieve Brown September 23,1878 ... January 19,1881 

Genevra Lewis Brown May 31, 188 1 

Geraldine Bishop Brown February 22, 1886 

Thomas Alonzo Brown September 1,1889 ... April 17,1891 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY I5I 

Genevieve was born in Tampico, Illinois, Genevra L. in Quincy of the 
same state; Geraldine B. and Thomas A. in Council Bluffs, Iowa. 

Genevieve died in Muscatine, Iowa, and Thomas A. in Dubuque, Iowa. 

Narcissa R. (Lewis) Brown removed to Iowa with her parents in 1864. 
She is a graduate of the high school of Atalissa, Iowa, and a student of the 
Academy of Music in Iowa City, Iowa, in voice culture. She is of Welsh-Ger- 
man descent. 

James E. Brown is a lineal descendant of Peter Brown, who came over 
in the Mayflower in 1620. He moved with his parents to Iowa, during his early 
youth. He took a special course in the Iowa State College at Ames. Coming 
from a family of teachers on both sides, he readily gained the principalship of 
a high school before he was nineteen. Later he made civil engineering a pro- 
fession and was elected county surveyor of Clayton County, Iowa, at the age of 
twenty-three. He has been identified with railroad surveying and the Brooks' 
Locomotive Works, Dunkirk, New York. 

Mr. Brown gave up his professional work and returned to McGregor, 
Iowa, to accept the position of assistant cashier of the First National Bank of 
McGregor. He is of English descent. 

Genevra L. is a student in the Dubu(iue High School and of Madam 
Caroline Tens, Dubuque School of Vocal Art. 

Geraldine B. is a student of the Dubuque High School. 



CASSIUS M. AND AGNES S. (TEMPLE) LEWIS (5) 

Cassius Morgan Lewis, son of Thomas and Rebecca (Heberling) Lewis, 
was born November 16, i<S55, in Georgetown, Harrison Countv, Ohio. 

Agnes Sarah Temple, daughter of William and Mildred Elizabeth 
(Parke) Temple, was born February 25, 1862, at Bloomington, Illinois. 

Cassius M. Lewis and Agnes S. Temple were united in marriage October 
24, 1883, at the home of the bride's sister, Mrs. Warner Smeenk, in Chicago, 
Bishop Charles Edwin Cheney officiating. 

No children. 

Agnes S. (Temple) Lewis, was a graduate of Conover's Private Academy, 
Bloomington, Illinois. 

Cassius M. Lewis graduated from the Atalissa, Iowa, High School, class 
of 1872. Attended the Iowa State University from 1873 to 1876 inclusive, 
taking a special course in sciences and languages, standing at the head of his 
class in final examinations, with average of 98 per cent. Engaged in the dry 
goods business in Muscatine, Iowa, with his brother, from 1879 to 1884. From 
1885 to the present time engaged in the dry goods commission business, now 
occupying an important position as Chicago representative for the importing 
and manufacturing firm of Brown, Durrell & Co., Boston, Mass. 

Mr. Lewis inherits many of his fatlu'r's personal characteristics. The 
following beautiful words of praise were written by one who knows and appre- 




m 

CASSIUS M. LEWIS. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY I53 

dates him: "Cassius M. Lewis combines all the beautiful Quaker traits of 
character of the Lewis family — force of character, gentleness, and above all, 
charity — which was his father's sweetest quality — charity for the erring." 

GEORGE H. AND ANNA L. (LEWIS) KILLEN (5) 

Anna Laura Lewis, daughter of Thomas and Rebecca (Heberling) Lewis, 
was born January 13, 1861, in Georgetown, Harrison County, Ohio. 

George H. Killen, son of Robert and Margaret (ConoUy) Killen, was 
born January 6, 1855, at Monona, Clayton County, Iowa. 

George H. Killen and Anna L. Lewis were united in marriage Septem- 
ber 25, 1883, at Muscatine, Iowa, Rev. Dr. Barnard of the Presbyterian Church 
officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Marie Hortense Killen June 19, 1884 ... 

Robert Lewis Killen November 15,1885 

P'rederic Hamilton Killen Julv 18, 1888 

Mildred Lorraine Killen Se])teml)er ^o, 1897 



Marie H. and Robert L. were born in Monona, Iowa, and Frederic H. 
and Mildred L. in Dubuque, Iowa. 

Anna L. (Lewis) Killen removed with her parents to Iowa in 1S64. She 
was a student of the Muscatine High School and Conservatorv of Music. She 
is of Welsh-German descent. 

George H. Killen was a student in the high school of Monona, Iowa. 
Engaged in mercantile business in his native town. Removed to LeRoy, Minn., 
October, 1885, and located in Dubuque, Iowa, March, 1888, where he became 
associated witji the firm of H. B. Glover cS: Co. of that city, and still occupies a 
prominent position with the firm. Mr. Killen's parents were natives of the 
north of Ireland and emigrated to America in 1846, having been reared in the 
Church of England. He is of Irish descent. 

Marie H. is a student in the Dubuque High School, class of 1904. and 
Dubuque, Iowa, Musical Academy. 

Robert L. is a student in the Dubu(pu- High School, class of 1904. 

Frederick H. is a student in the Dubiujue High School, class of 1905. 

Mildred L. is a student in the Dubuque Kindergarten. 



WARREN AND SARAH J. (VAIL) HEBERLING (5) 

Warren Heberling, son of Henry and Hannah (Lewis") Heberling, was 
born February 3, 1839, at Short Creek, Harrison County, Ohio, and died Octo- 
ber 29, 1900, in Havana, Illinois. Internunt in the Cemetery of Bath. Illinois. 



154 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Sarah J. Vail, daughter of Isaac and IMary ( Fulton ) \'ail, was born April 
3, 1835, in Gt'orgetown, Harrison County, Ohio, and died August 6, i8go, in 
Havana, Illinois. Interment in the Cemetery of Bath, Illinois. 

Warren Heberling and Sarah J. Vail were united in marriage July 31, 
i860, in Bath, Mason County, Illinois. 

TO THEM WERE KORN 

Name Birth Death 

Leora May Heberling July 13, 1861 

Laura Alda Heberling.. July 23, 1862 ... November 6, 1892 

Charles Warren Heberling ... . February 11, 1864 ... November 27, 1879 

Annie Drusilla Heberling May 26, 1868 

Leora M. and Laura A. were born in Quaker City, Guernsey County, 
Ohio, and Charles W. and Annie D. in Bath, Illinois. 

The following biographies were contributed for the Record: — 

"Mr. Heberling removed with his parents to Martin's Ferry, Belmont 
County, Ohio, when he was eleven years of age, and there attended high school, 
afterward graduating from the college at Hopedale, Harrison County, Ohio. 

"When he was about twenty-three years of age he went west and located 
in Mason County, Illinois, where he was married a short time after and returned 
with his wife to Georgetown, Harrison County, Ohio. For a short time he 
taught the district school, then became interested in a mercantile business in 
Quaker City, Guernsey County, Ohio, which he carried on successfully several 
years. Subse(]uently they removed to Bath, Mason County, Illinois, and for a 
number of years Mr. Heberling continued in the general implement business, 
but in 1884 he transferred his location to Havana, Illinois, and became a part- 
ner in the firm of Rice & Heberling, corner of Market and Orange Streets, 
where they conducted a successful business up to the time of his death. 

"Mr. Heberling was well born. He possessed a rare fortune in his noble 
father and saintly mother, and inherited from them many excellent traits of 
character and qualities of heart which were interwoven with the texture of his 
soul. He was sympathetic in his feelings, thoughtful for others and a friend to 
the needy." 

"Sarah (Vail) Heberling's youth was spent on a farm near Lloydsville, 
Ohio, where she lived with her grandparents after the death of her mother and 
this home was ever fraught for her with manifold, tender and beautiful recol- 
lections. The untrammeled country life with its healthful exercise and ample 
leisure tended to expand and vivify a mind and imagination naturally strong 
and keen. Outdoor sports were her passion, and the fearlessness and efficiency 
of her horsemanship is still a family tradition. 

"Her education was effected mainly at Franklin College, of Athens, 
Ohio. As a student she evinced exceptional ability, taking a strong and steady 
hold on what w-as placed before her and bringing the power of an intellect at 
once bright and clear to bear upon the vexed problems with which, like others, 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 155 

she was often confronted. The versatile character of her mind is shown in this, 
that while she reveled in mathematics she yet read poetry with unusual avidity. 
A soft and flexible voice made her an exquisite reader, the more so as her com- 
prehensive grasp of any subject gave force and significance to her expression. 

"She had a clearly defined sense of the humorous and her sunny dispo- 
sition and bright cheerful temperament made it all but impossible for her to 
interpret the darker phases of life, even in face of the most discouraging 
experience. Perhaps she possessed no characteristic more marked and striking 
than the breadth and depth of her judgment. In all things her opinion 
was firmly grounded and of rare excellence. A woman of unwavering convic- 
tions, she had yet charity for all men. Her tastes were simple. She had been 
reared in the Society of Friends, and retained many of their beautiful tenets to 
the last. She needed not the adornment of gold and jewels. These must have 
been an impertinence to her. Her chief ornament was that of a meek and quiet 
spirit, and how well it became her, all who knew her best can bear glad and 
grateful witness. 

"Hers was a broad creed. It embraced her kind. To comfort those 
who mourn, to minister to those in trouble, to relieve the necessities of the 
destitute and to do good to all men — this was her religion, and it was the 
religion of Jesus Christ, in whom she believed and whom she devoutly served. 
Her death was no less beautiful than her life. Having done that which she 
could, she was not afraid to put her hand into the Master's and go forth to his 
future." 

Leora M. was united in marriage to Mr. L). Smith and resides at present 
in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Territory. 

Annie D. was united in marriage to Mr. Nischwitz and they reside in 
Havana, Illinois. 



WARREN AND ADELAIDE (CLARK) (EADS) HEBERLING (S) 

After Mrs. Sarah Heberling's death Mr. Heberling was again married in 
1894 to Mrs. Adelaide (Clark) Eads, who effectionately shared the toils of life 
with him to the hour of his sad demise. 



JOHN AND ELIZABETH (DUNLEVY) HEBERLING (5) 

John Heberling, son of Henry and Hannah i Lewis) Heberling, was born 
November i6, 1844, in Georgetown, Short Creek Township, Harrison County, 
Ohio. 

Elizabeth Dunlevy, daughter of and ( ) 

and widow of Elwood Dunlevy, was born in . 

John Heberling and Elizabeth Dunlevy were united in marriage March 
4, 1882, in Wheeling, West Virginia. 




JOHN HEIiERLING 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 157 

TO THEM WERE I'.OKN 

Name. Birth. Death. 

Helen Irene Heberling December 22, 1882 . . . December 30, i8go 

She was bom in Mount l^k-asant, Ohio, and died in Rochester, New 
York. IntL-rmL-nt in the Mount Hope Cemetery, of Rochester. 

The following sketch of John Heberling was contributed for the 
Record :-- 

"John Heberling, son of Henrj' and Hannah Lewis Heberling, was born 
at Georgetown, Harrison County, Ohio, November 16, 1844. He is of German, 
Welsh, English and Irish descent, and has attained some distinction as an 
inventor and patentee. John Heberling and Elizabeth Dunlevy, widow of 
Elwood Dunlevy, were united in marriage at Wheeling, West Virginia, March 
4, 1882. To them was born at Mount Pleasant, Ohio, December 22, 1882, 
Helen Irene Heberling. She died at Rochester, N. Y., December 30, i8go, 
and was buried at Mount Hope Cemetery in that city. 

"Mr. Heberling gave early evidence of possessing more than ordinary 
mechanical and inventive ability, and has attained some distinction as an 
inventor and patentee. He received only a common school education, which 
was obtained by working on the farm during the summer and attending school 
during the winter. After becoming of age he took a course in Commercial Law 
at the Oberlin Business College, Oberlin, Ohio, and without the benefit of a 
technical education, or practical mechanical training, he has successfully solved 
some of the difficult mechanical problems of the day. As an example of one 
such achievement, we maj' mention the Heberling Running Stitch Sewing 
Machine, manufactured by the Heberling Running Stitch Sewing Machine 
Company, of Mount Pleasant, Ohio. This was the first and only successful 
device ever produced for that kind of work, but as its use was limited to a cer- 
tain class of stitching, it was never brought prominently before the general 
public. It soon, however, found its way into all large cities of the world, and 
was quite extensively used and manufactured in both England and Germany. 
Owing, however, to his failure to comply with all the requirements of the patent 
laws of these countries, he received but little royalty or benefit from that 
source. Several of the leading sewing machine companies are now manufac- 
turing machines or attachments which embody modifications of devices, first 
produced or patented by him, the latest and one of the most important being 
the rotary take-up, now applied to the well-known high speed standard sewing 
machine for power manufacturing purposes, and on which he now receives a 
royalty. 

"In performing the important function of taking up the thread and 
tightening the stitch, this device makes two revolutions to each reciprocation ot 
the needle bar. Mach'nes embodying this improvement have been successfully 
operated at a speed exceeding fifty stitches per second. An examination of the 
records in the patent office show it to be an entirely new and original device. 



158 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

"Mr. Heberling has made a creditable record as a traveling salesman and 
general manager both on his own account and when employed in the interests 
of the corporations with which he has been connected, having in every instance 
enjoyed the fullest confidence and respect. 

"He is not a member of any church, but has tliat broad humanity and 
deep religious sentiment so characteristic of the Lewis and Heberling fami- 
lies." 



WILLIAM L. AND EMMA (HAVIGHORST) HEBERLING (5) 

William Lewis Heberling, son of Henry and Hannah (Lewis) Heberling 
was born February i, 1847. in Martin's Ferry, Belmont County, Ohio. 

Emma Havighorst, daughter of Gerhard Henry and Catherine J. (Horst- 
man) Havighorst, was born January i, 1857, in Bath, Mason County, Illinois. 

William L. Heberling and Emma Havighorst were united in marriage 
July II, 1876, in Bath, Mason County, Illinois. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Aurora Horstman Heberling. . . December i, 1877 

Robitine Lewis Heberling April 25, 1879 

Ralph Havighorst Heberling. . . May 9,1884 

William Howard Heberling. .. . March 4,1886 ... July 3,1887 

They were all born in Bath, Mason Count)', Illinois, and '•little Howard" 
was interred in the beautiful cemetery of that place. 

William L. Heberling emigrated from Ohio to Cowley County, Kansas, 
in 1872, and after pre-empting land sought a more healthful climate in Atalissa, 
Muscatine Count}', Iowa, in 1873. The following year he went to Bath, Illinois, 
where he was married. 

Mrs. Heberling's parents were natives of the province of Hanover, Ger- 
many. They emigrated and settled in Illinois, the former in 1846 and the latter 
in 1839, and were married in Matanzas, Illinois, June 7, 1850. Mrs. Heberling 
was a student in the Female Seminary of Jacksonville, Morgan County, Illinois. 
Afterward she taught in the public school. 

In the fall of 1880 Mr. Heberling and family moved to Mt. Pleasant, 
Jefferson County, Ohio, where he joined his brother Henry in general merchan- 
dising. A few years later both brothers and their families moved west, and 
engaged in the manufacture of metal roofing, under their own patents, in the 
city of Havana, Mason County, Illinois, where the latter still resides. 

In 1894 Mr. Heberling became the candidate of the People's party for 
Congress in the fourteenth congressional district. 

Mr. and Mrs. Heberling and family have never united with any denomi- 
nation, but have always made it a practice to assist with the music in any 
church, usually dividing their attendance among them. Mr. Heberling says: 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 159 

"We believe that the daily life most truly expresses the religious nature, and 
value it in proportion as it impels us to earnestly seek right relationship in life." 

Aurora H. finished her education in the Havana High school. 

Robitine L. graduated from the Havana High school in 1899 and is now 
(igoi ) teaching in the Havana public schools. 

Ralph H. is a student in the High school of the same place. 

Mr. Heberling is a Socialist in politics. 

HENRY AND ARABELLA (GATTON) HEBERLING (5) 

Henry Heberling. son of Henry and Hannah (Lewis) Heberling, was 
born August 30, 1849, in Martin's Ferry, Belmont County, Ohio, 

Arabella Gatton, daughter of Benjamin Hillary and Mary Ann (Friend) 
Gatton, was born March 14, 1857, in Bath, Mason County, Illinois. 

Henry Heberling and Arabella Gatton were united in marriage March 14, 
1877, in Bath, Mason County, Illinois. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Lilian Heberling September 27, 1878 ,,, August 6, 1880 

Harold Gatton Heberling April 15, 188 1 

Julian Henry Heberling June 30, 1885 

Raymond Warren Heberling . . . May 20, 1897 

Lilian, Harold G. and Julian H. were born in Mt. Pleasant, Jefferson 
County, Ohio, and Raymond W. in Havana, Mason County, Illinois. 

Lilian died in Mt. Pleasant, Ohio, and was interred in the cemetery of 
that place. 

Mrs. Heberling was educated in the young ladies Atheneum in Jackson- 
ville, Illinois. Her father was a native of Kentucky and of Scotch and Irish 
descent and her mother was born in Pennsylvania, of English and German 
parentage. 

Mr. Heberling spent his boyhood days in Martin's Ferry, Belmont Coun- 
ty, Ohio, where his father was engaged in the manufacture of the Ralston 
threshing machines. Subsequently when his father had changed residence and 
was engaged in sheep husbandry near Mt. Pleasant. Ohio, Mr, Heberling 
entered the Mt, Pleasant High school, then under the management of Profes- 
sors James A. and William H. White. His schooling terminated at Hopedale, 
Harrison County, Ohio, in the spring of 1871. 

In 1874 Mr. Heberling engaged in business in Mt. Pleasant, where he 
lived after his marriage until about 1878, having been associated with his father 
most of that time. Since the latter date, until recently, he and his faiiiil\- have 
resided in Havana, Illinois, where he was engaged in business with his brother 
Wm. L. Heberling. For two years past Mr. Heberling has served as deputy 
county treasurer of Mason County, Illinois, and at tlie present time (1901) he 
occupies a position of assistent cashier and bookkeeper in the McFadden Corn 



l6o RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Exchange Bank, of Easton, Mason County, Illinois, to which place he removed 
with his family October 2, 1901. 

Mr. Heberling and family are not connected with any church, but have 
been active assistants in the Methodist Episcopal church choir and Sunday 
school work. In Mr. Heberling's own words: "We look upon creeds as bar- 
riers to progress, as obstructions to unity and brotherhood, as husks, obscuring 
the life principle. We believe true Christianity has progressed in the past and 
will continue to do so in the future, just in proportion as these relics of a former 
age are ignored or swept awa}'. They savor of intolerance. Would we expect 
to see the Saviour of the world, at the head of the invading army in South 
Africa, killing the husbands and fathers, destroying the homes and starving the 
women and children of this most unhappy country? And why not, would it 
not fit his mission and character? It is now being done by a nation of creed 
worshippers calling themselves Christians. Let us mimimize our creeds and 
emphasize Character, Love and Brotherhood." 

Mr. Heberling says regarding his political views: "I am Socialistic, 
belieying in industrial democracy." 

Harold G. and Julian H. Heberling were both students of the Havana 
HiglsSschool and are at present with their parents in Easton, Illinois. 

aIaRTIN L. and LETTIE a. (HEBERLING t JENNINGS (5) 

M 

S Lettie Anne Heberling, daughter of Henry and Hannah i^Lewis) Heber- 
lingSwas born February g, 1856, in Martin's Ferr)', Belmont County, Ohio. 

I Martin Luther Jennings, son of Abraham Miley and Louisa (Foreman) 
Jeni^ngs, was born July 10, 1847, in Noble County, Ohio. Of English and 
Dutch descent. 

Martin L. Jennings and Lettie A. Heberling were united in marriage 
May 18, 1893, in Mt. Pleasant, Ohio, Rev. Joel Thrapp, D. D., of Adrian, 
Michigan, officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Irene Heberling Jennings January 16,1895 

William Lewis Jennings January 29, 1896 .. August 29, i8g6 

They Were born in Adrian, Michigan. 

William L. died and was buried at Adrian. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jennings at present live in Castle Shannon, a suburb of 
Pittsburg, Pa., where Mr. Jennings is and has been editor of the Methodist 
Recorder, the official organ of the Methodist Protestant church, since 1896. 

Mrs. Jennings btgun teaching in the public schools when she was nine- 
teen years old. and followed the profession eighteen years, her work for the 
most part being in the High schools. In 1886 she accepted a position as pre- 
ceptress in Adrian College, Adrian, Lenawee County, Michigan, which place 
she filled four years. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY l6l 

She is a member of the Methodist Protestant church. 

Mr. Jennings received a very extensive and liberal education, having 
attended Sharon College, Ohio University and Adrian College. He graduated 
from the last named institution in 1871 and soon after accepted a position as 
instructor in Greek and Latin in the same college. He held this position until 
1874 when he was ordained to the ministry of the Methodist Protestant church. 
In the same year he entered Yale University and studied the languages there 
one year, at the end of which time he was appointed Professor of Latin and 
Greek in the Adrian College. In 1882 he took a pastorate. Adrian College 
conferred on him the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1892. Subsequently he 
was elected editor of the Methodist Recorder, and was sent as a delegate to the 
Ecumenical Conference of Methodism which met in London, England, in Sep- 
tember, igoi. 

Dr. Jennings's mother claims royal Dutch blood and was a kinswoman 
of Anne Carter, mother of Gen. Robert E. Lee. His father was of English 
descent. 



ISAAC A. AND ANNIE E. (ATKINSON) MARTIN (5) 

Isaac Arthur Martin, son of William and Sarah (Lewis) Martin, was 
born May 18, 1836, near Georgetown, Short Creek Township, Harrison County, 
Ohio. 

Annie E. Atkinson, daughter of Richard and Elizabeth (Bowman) 
Atkinson, was born February 19, 1837, near Morristown, Belmont County, 
Ohio. 

Isaac A. Martin and Annie E. Atkinson were united in marriage October 
12, 1856, in Martin's Ferry, Belmont County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

IVaiiu- Birth Death 

Henry Bryant Martin November 3, 1857 . . . December 18, 1859 

William Arthur Martin July 27, 1859 ... December 23, 1859 

Junius Moreland Martin December 28, i860 

Ella Florence Martin February 20, 1863 

Catherine Delia Martin July 23, 1865 

Charles Howard Martin September 4, 1871 

Henry B.was born in Georgetown, Harrison County, Ohio; William A., 
Junius M. and Ella F. in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio: Catherine 
D. in Cedar County, Iowa, near Wilton Junction, and Charles H. in Salem, 
Henry County, Iowa. 

Henry B. and William A. died in Centre Belpre, Washington County, 
Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin located in Georgetown, Harrison County, Oliio, 
after their marriage, where he clerked in a dry goods store for an uncle, Isaac 
II 



l62 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 



Lewis, about one year, after which they removed to Centre Belpre, Washington 
County, Ohio, where he clerked for another uncle, Parker Lewis, over seven years. 
Then in the spring of 1865 they removed to Cedar County, Iowa, and in the 
fall of the same year to Salem, Henry County, Iowa, where they have since 
lived, he having been engaged a greater part of the time in the store business. 

Mrs. Martin's parents were both natives of Pennsxlvania, but removed 
to Ohio soon after their marriage in 1834. 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin and their two sons are members of the Congrega- 
tional church, Salem, Iowa. 

Junius M. and Charles H. own a general merchandise establishment in 
Salem. They are unmarried. 



RUDOLPH AND MARY A. (MARTIN) WELLMAN (5) 



Mary Ann Martin, daughter of William and Sarah (Lewis) Martin, was 
born April 14, 1839, near Georgetown, Short Creek Township, Harrison Coun- 
ty, Ohio. 

Rudolph Wellman, son of James and Sarah (Palmer) Wellman, was 
born December 14, 1831, near Cameron, Marshall County, West Virginia. 

Rudolph Wellman and Mary A. Martin were united in marriage Novem- 
ber 3, 1859, at the home of the bride's parents near Morristown, Belmont 
County, Ohio, Rev. Adam Cordner, of the Disciple church, officiating. 



TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth 

Lena May Wellman October 23, 1861 

Edwin Regal Wellman July ig, 1864 

William Parker Wellman September 12, i856 

James Francis Wellman October 6, 1868 

John Gourley Wellman January ig, 1871 

George Archer Wellman March 6, 1872 

Laura Etta Wellman August 28, 1873 

Sarah Alma Wellman June 4, 1875 

Jessie Wellman July 28, 1877 



Death 



September 17, 1872 



October 28. 1873 
October 11, 1875 
-■Vugust II, 1877 



Lena M. was born near Morristown, Belmont County, Ohio; Edwin R., 
William P. and James F. near Wilton Junction, Cedar County, Iowa; John G. 
and George A. near Newton, Jasper County, Iowa; Laura E., Sarah A. and 
Jessie near Winfield, Cowley County, Kansas. 

William P., Laura E., Sarah A. and Jessie died near Winfield, Kansas, 
and were interred in the Mount Vernon Cemetery, near that place. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wellman lived near Morristown, Belmoat County, Ohio, a 
short time after their marriage, when they removed to Iowa and located near 
Davenport, Scott County, in the spring of 1862; the next fall they went to Cedar 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 163 

County, of the same state, and purchased a farm near Wilton Junction, where 
Mr. WeUman was engaged in farming several years. In the fall of 1868 they 
removed to Jasper County, Iowa, and settled near Newton, where they lived 
until 1872. They then sold their Newton farm in Iowa, and removed to Cowley 
County, Kansas, and bought a farm near Winfield, living there until 1894, 
when in the fall they went to Grant County, Oklahama Territory, and entered 
land near Lamont, where they reside at the present time. Their two youngest 
sons are at home. The father and mother say "it is through their labor and 
industry that we have such a beautiful and comfortable country home." 

John G. graduated from the Winfield, Kansas, International Business 
College, April 8, 1892. 

Mrs. Wellman was a student in the McNeely ( Hopedale ) Normal, at 
Hopedale, Harrison County, three or four terms before her marriage. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wellman and family are all members of the Church of 
Christ. 

Mr. Wellman's mother was of English and his father of German descent. 
His grandfather, John Palmer, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. He 
lived to be ninety-seven years old. His home in an early day was in Winches- 
ter, Frederick County, Virginia. He died in 1848, in Holmes County, Ohio. 
The last visit he made his daughter Sarah (Palmer) Wellman, he was ninety- 
two years of age, and rode horseback, the distance being a little over seventy 
miles. 

Mr. Wellman's grandfather, Rudolph Wellman, was a soldier in the war 
of 181 2. The following is a copy of a letter written by George Wellman, 
Treasurer of Wabash County, Indiana, to Rudolph Wellman (subject of this 
sketch) which gives some facts concerning the life of his grandfather, Rudolph 
Wellman, who fought in the war of 1812: — 



"Wabash, Indiana, Jan. 18, 1895. 

"Brother Rowe: — I would like to tell you, if I could only snatch a few 
moments of time from the cares and responsibilities of this office, of a little 
'flying trip' (as you sometimes regale us with) of only ten days' absence, 
along with two of my dear cousins, Robert and William Stuart of La Fountaine, 
in our count}'. 

"We visited in Coshocton County, where we lived some fifteen years be- 
fore emigrating to Indiana. From Coshocton we ran up the Big Still Water 
Valley, and got off at Lafayette station in 'old Belmont,' within a mile or so 
of Uniontown, where I was born and where I first went to school. My grand- 
father, Rudolph Wellman, settled here in 1804 and he and grandmother were 
immersed by Alexander Campbell. We visited their last resting place, over in 
the Crab Apple Cemetery, distant about three miles from Uniontown. They 
died in 1834 ^nd 1836. Grandfather, when in the twenty-fourth year of his age, 
went out from the border along with Col. William Crawford's four hundred and 
eighty mounted men, to fight the Wyandotte and Shawnee Indians, at the San- 



164 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

diiskv Plains, and in that disastrous retreat lost his mare, saddle and bridle, 
and ran on foot nearly a mile before he was overtaken b}' a mounted volunteer, 
who took him up behind him. He held on to his long range rifle, which carried 
an ounce ball and brought it back safe to Brook County, West Virginia, where 
he then lived. I distinctly remember the old rifle barrel minus the stock, 
standing up in the loft in the corner of the old hewed log dwelling, in Belmont 
County, when a little boy. Whatever became of it we never knew; seems to 
me that it would be a precious relic now and worth more than a thousand dol- 
lars, in my estimation. Col. Crawford was burned at the stake. On what a 
slender thread hangs the destinjr of whole generations of children of men. In 
all probability grandfather could never have traveled the nine days weary march 
oti foot, through a pathless wilderness, in safety back to the Ohio River, without 
meeting hordes of redskins and being tomahawked and scalped or burned at 
the stake. 

"In hastily glancing over these reminiscences of the far awa^' past it is a 
consolation to know that his life was spared, and yet a greater one to know 
that after that disastrous campaign he became obedient to the faith of the 
gospel of Christ, and his humble dwelling in Wheeling Township, Belmont 
County, became the pulpit of such renowned and able ministers of the new 
covenant as Alexander Campbell, George W. Luc}' and others. 

"We stood on the remains of the old dwelling (for a neighbor and an old 
schoolmate had lately removed it, converting it into a stable) and gathered up 
a few relics, such as nails, which had been made b}^ an old blacksmith, which 
had fastened the floor to the sleepers of the old mansion wherein I was born 
and where these eloquent ministers had so often discoursed on the themes of the 
gospel. I felt like putting the shoes from off my feet, for the place wherein I 
stood seemed like holy ground. We bade adieu to the sacred spot, with all its 
hallowed associations and memories, and arrived home safely, finding all well. 

"M3? son Samuel Rudolph and daughter Maggie M. had charge of the 
office during my absence and I found everj'thing in first class order. 

"Your brother in Christ, George A. Wellman." 



WILLIAM W. AND SARAH E. (MARTIN) PAINTER i5) 

Sarah Elizabeth Martir, daughter of William and Sarah (Lewis) Martin, 
was born December 26, 1841, on "Old Tan Yard Place" near Georgetown, 
Short Creek Township. Harrison County, Ohio. 

William Wayne Painter, son of and ( ) 

Painter, was born — — in 

William W. Painter and Sarah E. Martin were united in marriage about 
1864 at the home of the bride's parents near Wilton Junction, Cedar County, 
Iowa, Rev. Jonas Hartzel, minister of the Church of Christ, officiating. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 165 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Buth Death 

Florence Irene Painter April 7, 1866 

Willie Ermina Painter 

Harrison William Painter ... . January i, 1871 

Ferdinand Morgan Painter 

Effie May Painter 

Mabel Painter 

Glenn Painter 

Warren Painter 

Maude Painter 

Mr. and Mrs. Painter reside in Lawton, Oklahoma, at the present time. 
Previously they lived in Cowley County, Kansas, and Grant County, Okla- 
homa. Mr. Painter is a plasterer by trade, but has spent much of his life in 
agricultural pursuits. He was sheriff of Grant County two terms and is at 
present (1902) sheriff at Lawton, Oklahoma. He spent one year prospecting 
and mining in the Klondike. 

Mr. and Mrs. Painter and most of their family are members of the Chris- 
tian church. 

After diligent inquiry we have been unable to gain further knowledge of 
this family. 



HARTZEL H. AND PHARABA J. (HARLAN) MARTIN (5) 

Hartzel Hayden Martin, son of William and Sarah E. (Lewis) Martin, 
was born September 23, 1844, near Georgetown, .Siiort Creek Township, Harri- 
son County, Ohio, and died November 14, 1899, in Winfield, Cowley County, 
Kansas. 

Pharaba Jane Harlan, daugliter of Jacob and Pharaba (Horn) Harlan, 
was born November 9, 1849, in Darke County, Ohio, and died January 20, 1902, 
in Winfield, Kansas. 

Hartzel H. Martin and Pharaba J. Harlan were united in marriage Janu- 
ary 18, 1872, at the home of the bride's father, in Parsons, Labette County, 
Kansas. 

TO THEM WKRF, HORN 

Name lurtli Death 

Cora Belle Martin January 12, 1873 . . . November 15, 1885 

Mary Josephine Martin .\ugust 22, 1875 

Eva Estelle Martin May 7, 1878 

Georgia Elvira Martin February 3, i88o 

Sadie Martin March 6,1884 ••■ J"'.v 13.1884 

Blanche Lucile Martin June 18, 1885 



1 66 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

They wtre all born near Winfield, Vernon Township, Cowley County, 
Kansas, where Cora B. and Sadie died, and they were interred in the cemetery 
of that place. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Martin went to Newton, Jasper Coun- 
ty, Iowa, where Mr. Martin and Rudolph Wellman were engaged in partnership 
farming. In the fall of the following year Mr. and Mrs. Martin returned to 
their former home, near Winfield, and engaged in farming and stock raising 
until i88g, when they removed to Winfield and remained there until their death. 

Mr. Martin was a student in the Normal School of Cadiz, Harrison 
County, Ohio, but left there one year short of graduation. He was a student 
by nature, and for many years diligently and painstakingly pursued various 
branches of study, until he was a well educated but self-taught man. He took 
especial interest in the study of astronomy and the accompan3'ing mathematical 
branches. His interest in astronomy finally culminated in building by subscrip- 
tion an observatory in his late home in Winfield. He died, however, before 
his work was completed, leaving only the building prepared for the instrument, 
which it has never yet received. 

Mr. Martin was for several years an mstructor in the schools of Cowley 
County, Kansas. 

Mrs. Martin attended the Bonaparte Academy, in Bonaparte, Van Buren 
County, Iowa, and taught school several years in that state before her marriage. 
She was of English descent. 

We give herewith an extract from her death notice, which show s the high 
esteem in which she was held by her friends: — 

"Jennie F. Martin had been an invalid four or five years and suffered 
much during the last few months, but in her unselfishness complained but little 
and was not a burden to any one. 

"She was a faithful Christian, having united with the Church of Christ 
at the age of fourteen years. During her greatest trials of suffering, when all 
human aid failed to give relief, the hope of a Christian and her Bible were 
great comforts to her. 

"The last hour of her life was spent in listening to the reading of the 
Bible by her youngest daughter, Blanche. The last chapter she called for was 
the fourteenth chapter of John. She loved those words of the Master and they 
gave her much comfort in her afflictions." 

Mary J., Eva E. and Georgia are all graduates of the Winfield High 
schools, in which Blanche L. is a Junior at the present time (1902). 

Mary J. graduated in the spring of 1894, and has since been emplo3'ed as 
a teacher in the public schools of Kansas, having taught the last five terms in 
Winfield, Kansas. In 1901 she attended the State Normal at Emporia. Lyon 
County, Kansas. 

Eva E. and Georgia E. graduated in the spring of 1896, since which Eva 
has been employed in one of the best mercantile establishments of Winfield. 

Georgia is teaching her second term of public school near Winfield. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 167 

MORGAN L. AND ANNA (OLMSTEAD) MARTIN (5) 

Morgan Lewis Martin, son of William and Sarah (^ Lewis) Martin, was 
born March g, 1848, near Georgetown, Short Creek Township, Harrison Coun- 
ty, Ohio. 

Anna Olmstead, daughter of Jeddiah and Mariah (Connan) Olmstead, 
was born July 21, 1856, near Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, Kansas. Of 
German and Dutch descent. 

Morgan L. Martin and Anna Olmstead were united in marriage January 
17, 1876, at the home of the bride's parents, near Winfield, Cowley County, 
Kansas, by William Martin, father of the groom, who was a minister in the 
Christian church. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Elery Pearl Martin October 30, 1876 

Fred Lewis Martin May 3, 1878 

Archer Olmstead Martin December 6, 1879 

Gertrude Effie Martin April 18, i8gi 

Carl Merwin Martin January ig, 1894 

Elery P., Fred L. and Archer O. were born near Winfield, Cowley 
County, Kansas; Gertrude E. and Carl M. near Cottonwood, Idaho County, 
Idaho. 

The following is a history of the life of Morgan L. Martin: — 

"Morgan Lewis Martin was born in a little log cabin in 'Possum Hollow,' 
just above grandfather Morgan Lewis's 'old tan-yard home.' His early life was 
spent helping his father on the farm and watching his father's herds of sheep in 
Ohio, and afterward on the then beautiful prairies of Iowa. In the winter he 
attended the district school. He also attended two winter terms of school in 
Salem, Henry County, Ohio. 

"In August, 1868, Morgan L. Martin took a steamboat on the Missis- 
sippi river, down to St. Louis, Missouri, where he transferred to a steamboat 
on the Missouri river, going up to Kansas City, Missouri. Having but two and 
one-half dollars left he footed it out to Olathe, the county seat of Johnson 
County, Kansas, after four o'clock that evening. 

"During that fall he was employed in various ways, working most of the 
time and doing whatever he could find to do. In the spring of i86g he went to 
Osage County, Kansas, and rented Hiram Heberling's farm for the season on 
shares and the next fall purchased eighty acres of land. In the spring and 
summer of 1870 he was employed on a farm seven miles west of Kansas City, 
Missouri, returning to Osage County the next fall, after which he made a visit 
to the home of his parents, going by the way of Council Bluffs and Des Moines, 
Iowa. The next February he and his brother Elery, accompanied by two 
neighbor's boys, Hamilton Hawkins and William Worden, fitted out a team 



l68 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

with a stove and tent, and with snow fifteen inches deep, mercury fourteen 
degrees below zero, they started for Cowley County, Kansas, to take up claims 
in the Osage Indian lands, where their fathers had gone the fall before. On this 
memorable trip man}' hardships were endured, yet there were laughable inci- 
dents and when quartered in their tents, with a good roaring fire, they were 
very happy with the hope of homes in the new beautiful land. In Osage County, 
Kansas, George Heberling joined the company and at Emporia, Ljon County, 
Kansas, Mr. Millspaugh and Miss Anna Chapman came by rail and joined the 
company of homeseekers. 

"Here in this fine climate and beautiful country many happy years were 
spent. Here Morgan L. Martin met and wed Miss Anna Olmstead, and while 
living here the three oldest children w-ere born. 

"Morgan L. Martin took a deep interest in church and Sunday school 
work, in temperance and literary societies, having been chairman of the first 
literary society organized in Cowlej' County. He planted some thirty or forty 
varieties of rose and flowering shrubs, the very first planted in Cowley County 
soil, thus helping to make the wilderness bud and bloom. He also took an 
active interest in school matters. 

"In the spring of 1886 he sold out and with his familj^ removed to Idaho 
County, Idaho, where, surrounded by nature's 'sentinels,' he is content with 
his mountain home, 'The Quarter Circle Diamond Stock Creek Ranch' of si.x 
hundred and forty acres, located near Cottonwood. 

"He lives within one-fourth of a mile of the line of the Mez Perces Re- 
servation, which was thrown open to settlement six years ago last November. 
He has been on very friendly terms with the Indians for sixteen years. The 
most of them are Presbyterians, and the fourth of July, 1900, he spent with 
them in their religious services. It was one of the happiest fourths he ever 
spent. About three hundred white people were present and celebrated with 
them. 

"Mr. Martin is still deeply interested in church and school work. He 
was instrumental in building the finest country school house in his district that 
there is in the districts of Idaho County at the present time." 

June 15, 1901, Mr. and Mrs. Martin started on an eastern tour of visiting 
and sight seeing, visiting relatives in Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Iowa, and 
Illinois, having passed through twenty-three states and Ontario. They also 
stopped at Niagara Falls, took in the Pan-American Exposition at Buffalo, New 
York, and such cities as New York, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Washington, D. C, 
Cliicago and Kansas City. 

The following is a copy of the life and experiences of E. Pearl Martin: — 

"I entered the preparatory school of the University of Idaho, located at 
Moscow in September, 1895, where I was able to complete two years work 
before the breaking out of the Spanish-American war, remaining out of school 
one year in order to attend the next. At the beginning of the war with Spain I 
enlisted with a company of cadets from the University and was mustered into 
Company D, First Regiment of Idaho Volunteer Infantry, on the 12th day of 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 169 

May, 1898, at Boise City, Idaho. The regiment was sent to San Francisco, 
California, where they remained until June 27, 1898. They then sailed for Ma- 
nila, P. I., on the 'Morgan City,' with a fleet of five vessels under command of 
Gen. MacArthur of the U. S. Army. The fleet stopped at Honolulu, Hawaiian 
Islands for coal, then sailed straight for Manila, dropping anchor in Manila 
Bay on the 31st day of July, 1898, and on the 6th day of August the regiment 
was landed at Paranaque, a few miles south of Manila, and went into camp at 
Camp Dewey. 

"I was in the engagement of Manila August 13, 1898, Santa Anna Feb- 
ruary 5, 1899, Calacoon February 10. 1S99, Guadaloupe February 16, 17 and 
18, 1899, Santa Cruz April 10, 1899, Laguna de Bay Expedition April S to 18, 
1899, and was in the trenches from February 19 to July 12, 1899. 

"I sailed for home by the way of Nagasaki and Yokohomo, Japan, on 
the 31st of July, 1899, arriving in San Francisco on the 31st of August and was 
mustered out of service the 25th of the following month. I then returned to 
the University of Idaho and completed the preparatory course to College in the 
spring of 1900 and since that time have been teaching in the district schools 
of Idaho County, Idaho." 

Fred Lewis Martin was working at Pomeroy, Garfield County, Washing- 
ton, when the Spanish-American war broke out, and enlisted with the First 
Independent Battalion of Washington Volunteers at Pomeroy. He was sent 
with his company to the Vancouver Barracks at Vancouver, Clarke County, 
Washington. After remaining there some time he took the typhoid fever, and 
lay for weeks in the military hospital, after his battalion was mustered out of 
service at the close of the war with Spain. He recovered, however, and is now 
engaged as a farm hand near Cottonwood, Idaho County, Idaho. 

Archer Olmstead Martin has lived with his parents at Cottonwood since 
their removal to that place, when he was but six years old. He has spent four 
months in the preparatory school in the University of Idaho and one year in 
the State Normal school at Lewiston, Idaho. At present he is engaged in run- 
ning his father's stock ranch near Cottonwood. 



ELERY C. AND MAGGIE (WINSLOW) MARTIN (5) 

Elery Channing Martin, son of William and Sarah (Lewis) Martin, was 
born March 2, 1851, near Cadiz, Harrison County, Ohio. 

Maggie Winslow, daughter of John and Mary (Sraithson) Winslow, was 
born March 31, 1848, near Greenfield, Hancock County, Indiana, and died 
October 13, 1891, near Kellogg, Cowley County, Kansas. 

Elery C. Martin and Maggie Winslow were united in marriage August 
13, 1872, at the home of the bride's parents near Salem, Henry County, Iowa, 
by Rev. Rogers, a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

No children. 



lyo RECORD OK THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin started to their home, near Winfield, Vernon 
Township, Cowley County, Kansas, soon after their marriage, where they were 
engaged in farming for several years. 

Mrs. Martin's parents lived with her at the time of her death. Her 
father was of English and her mother of Scotch descent. 

After Mrs. Martin's death Mr. Martin was married the second time. 



ELERY C. AND MAGGIE W. (FOSTER) MARTIN (5) 

Maggie Welsh Foster, daughter of James Castle and Etheline (Wellman) 
Foster, was born January 21, 1869, near Beeler Station, Marshall County, West 
Virginia. 

Elery C. Martin and Maggie W. Foster were united in marriage March 
14, 1894, at the residence of the officiating clergyman, Rev. S. L. Bristor, of 
Beeler Station. Marshall County, West \'irginia. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Roy Foster Martin March 31, 1S95 

Ralph Lew'is Martin September 4, 1897 

Helen Lucile Martin September 13, 1901 

They were all born near Kellogg, Cowley County, Kansas. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Martin went to his former home in 
Cowley County, where they have since resided. 

Mrs. Martin's parents were both natives of Marshall County, West Vir- 
ginia. Her father was of Irish and Scotch descent. 

The following is a sketch of the life of Elery C. Martin: — 

"It will be unnecessary to speak of his boj'hood and early home life, as 
that has already been given in his father's and mother's life sketch. During 
these early days he was generally engaged in helping his father with the farm 
work and in 'tending' the sheep on the prairies. He attended the district 
school in the winter after the farm work was finished and he could be spared, 
but at the age of eighteen years, desiring a better education than the country 
schools afforded, he entered Whittier College, a Quaker institution at Salem, 
Henry County, Iowa. After two terms in the college he had the misfortune to 
get one of his eyes so badly injured that he was forced to give up his school 
studies, that being the last school he attended. 

"It was while living at Salem that he was converted under the preaching 
of J. K. Cornell, and obeying the gospel became a inember of the Church of 
Christ or Christian Church, and was a charter member of the church which was 
organized Mav 24, 1868. 

"About 1871, as will be found in the sketch previouslv spoken of, he and 
his brother Morgan, together with two neighbor boys, started to Cowley Coun- 
ty, Kansas, to take up land in the Osage Indian lands. They traveled over- 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY I7I 

land, and had a tent under which they slept at night. A small stove served to 
cook their meals, and also to keep them warm. They were all young unmar- 
ried men, and were members of the Church of Christ. In the evening after 
the day's journey was over, the team provided for and supper over, they would 
spend the evening talking over the 'haps and mishaps' of the day, and before 
retiring for the night a portion of scripture was read, and kneeling in prayer 
they thanked God for the blessings of the day. 

"They arrived in the Osage lands in the early part of the next month, 
where they pitched their tent on the banks of the Walnut river, three miles 
north of Winfield, and camped until they could make arrangements to take 
possession of claims. 

"Perhaps a word of explanation might be appreciated right here. This 
Osage land was purchased from the Indians by the Government and was opened 
up for settlement July 15, 1870. It was then one vast unbroken prairie where 
the buffalo, deer and wolves roamed at will. The land was all taken up inside 
of a year. At that time their nearest railroad was one hundred and thirty miles 
away. Flour was $4 per cwt. , corn meal $4 per cwt. , corn $2 per bushel, pota- 
toes $2 per bushel, but good buffalo meat could be had for one or two cents a 
pound. 

"Morgan L. and Elery C. Martin had taken up adjoining claims, and 
having no homes on them they stretched their tent across the line, so they could 
live on both claims, and thus meet the requirements of the law. 

"In the spring of 1872 Elery Martin returned on a visit to his former 
home in Iowa, where he and Maggie Winslow were united in marriage the fol- 
lowing August. She had been raised on a farm near Salem and was a mem- 
ber of the Church of Christ. The next month they started for their future 
home in Kansas, accompanied by Mr. Martin's brother, Hartzel H. Martin and 
his wife. They made the trip overland, arriving at their home in October, 
where Elery had previously erected a small house (12 by 15 feet) on his claim, 
so he and his wife went to housekeeping at once. They lived on this farm ten 
years, when they sold it and purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land 
three miles from the former home and two uiiks north of Kellogg, Kansas. 
Mr. Martin still owns this property (igo2). 

"After his second marriage, which occurred in West Virginia, he and his 
wife returned to his former home near Kellogg, where they have since resided. 
Maggie Foster Martin is also a member of the Church of Christ at Kellogg. 
This church was organized in 1872 and Elery Martin was appointed at that time 
as one of the deacons, in which place he served over five years, having resigned 
in order to take a position as one of the eiders. He served in that office over 
twenty years, resigning in 1901. 

"Mr. Martin has traveled quite extensively in the United States. He 
and his brother Emerson attended the Exposition at New Orleans in the winter 
of 1884-85, also visited St. Louis and Memphis, spending one month in the 
trip. The features of interest on this trip were the great pine forests of Missis- 
sippi, the groves of the live oak and the large swamps near New Orleans, Wj^, 



172 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

cypress trees festooned with Spanish moss. The ground was covered with 
verdure and flowers bloomed everywhere and presented quite a contrast to the 
snow-covered prairie, which they had left at home. The immense piles of baled 
cotton on the wharfs, ready for shipping, also the large number of colored 
people inhabiting the South, were interesting to one who was unused to such 
sights. 

"In the spring of 1886 he rented the farm and in company with his wife 
and brother Emerson Martin and family started on the tenth of May to visit the 
northwest coast country of the United States. They went by rail to San Fran- 
cisco, making short stops in Colorado and Utah. After spending one week in 
San Francisco, they took an ocean steamer for Tacoma, Washington, stopping 
at Victoria, British Columbia, Port Townsend and Seattle. From Tacoma they 
went by rail to Portland, Oregon: remaining there one week they resumed their 
journey to Riparia, Washington, their destination being Camas Prairie, Idaho. 
This was as far as they could go by rail, so the}^ took the boat on the Snake 
river as far as Lewiston, Idaho, where they took the stage and traveled sixty 
miles over the mountains in that manner. They arrived at their brother, M. L. 
Martin, June 13, i8g6. After visiting a few days they rented a house about ten 
miles up the mountains, near Rustic P. O., where they remained two months, 
during which time they were engaged in hunting elk, deer and such other game 
as could be found, fishing in the mountain streams and enjoying the mountain 
life with its beautiful scenery and bracing atmosphere. 

"They took this trip with the expectation of locating in the northwest, 
but failing to find a desirable location they started for home about the middle 
of August, by way of Iowa, where they visited friends and relatives, arriving 
home about October ist. 

"In the year 1888, accompanied by his sister, Sarah Elizabetli Painter, 
they attended the State Centennial at Columbus, Ohio, and also the Soldiers' 
National Encampment, which was held there the same 3'ear. Also visited 
friends and relatives in Ohio and West Virginia at this time. 

"In the fall of 1891, being in poor health and through the advice of his 
family phj'sician, he started for Santiago, California. He stopped three weeks 
in Colorado Springs, visiting Pike's Peak, Garden of the Gods, and the man\' 
places of interest in the vicinit)', and drank from the mineral springs of Manitou. 
He then resumed his journej', passing through the Grand Canon, also the Black 
Canon of the Gunnison, and was at Salt Lake during the Utah State Fair, also 
the yearly convention of the Mormon Church. He visited the Mormon Temple, 
also the suliihur and hot springs, remaining in the citj' ten days. Then went 
farther west, through San Francisco, and south through Los Angeles, passing 
through the immense wheat fields of California and the i)icturesque San Joa- 
(]uin Valle}'. On his arrival in Santiago he found a telegram awaiting him, 
telling of the unexpected sickness and sudden death of his wife. He immedi- 
ately returned home. 

"In 1892 he attended the Soldiers' National Encampment at Washing- 
ton, D. C, and while there visited many places of interest in the city; also 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 173 

Mount Vernon and the historic battlefield of Gettysburg, and spent some time 
at Baltimore and Harper's Ferry. 

"In 1893 he spent three weeks at the World's Fair in Chicago. He says = 
'It is needless for me to write anything in description of this great exposition, 
which has gone down in history as the finest the world has ever seen, and has 
been abundantly described by able writers.' While in Chicago he visited many 
points of interest in and around the city. 

"In 1898, accompanied by his wife, Maggie Welsh Martin, and two chil- 
dren, Roy and Ralph, they attended the Trans-Mississippi Exposition at 
Omaha, Nebraska, which was a fine exhibition of the progress and development 
of the western states, in mineral and agricultural resources. They also visited 
relatives in Central Nebraska at this time. 

"In October, igoi, in company with his brother M. L. Martin and wife, 
of Idaho, he attended the Pan-American Exposition at Buffalo, New York. 
They spent two days at the exposition, the leading feature of which was the 
electrical display. It was said to be the finest the world ever saw. After 
spending two days at Niagara Falls, which in magnitude and grandeur are un- 
surpassed, they went to New York city over the West Shore railroad, which 
runs for some distance along the banks of the beautiful Mohawk and Hudson 
rivers. They spent one week in New York city, visiting places of interest, 
such as Brooklyn Bridge, Central Park, Greenwood Cemetery and Brighton 
Beach on Coney Island, and many other places of note. They then returned 
to their home, by wa}' of Philadelphia and Washington, spending five days in 
the National Capitol, visiting a sister in Chicago and a brother in Salem, Iowa, 
on the return trip." 



WILLIAM E. AND FLORA E. (HOBSON) MARTIN (5) 

William Emerson Martin, son of William and Sarah ('Lewis) Martin, 
was born September 24, 1853. near Uniontown, Belmont County, Ohio, and 
died in Colorado Springs, Colorado, February 26, 1903. 

Flora Ellen Hobson, daughter of Edwin and Mar\' (Winslow ) Hobson, 
was born November 13, 1857, near Salem, Henry County. Iowa, and died 



William E. Martin and ITora E. Hobson were united in marriage June 
19, 1875, at the home of Isaac A. Martin, oldest brother of the bridegroom, 
near Salem, Henrv County, Iowa, by Dr. Rogers, minister of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Theron Hartzel Martin November 16, 1878 

Orville E. Martin April 20, 1881 ... January 20, 18S2 

Mary Ethel Martin March 7, 1886 

Minnie Leota Martin April 6, 1889 



174 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Theron H., Orville E. and Minnie L. were born near Winfield, and Mary 
E. in Winlield, Cowley Count\^. Kansas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin lived in and near Winfield, Cowley County, Kan- 
sas, several years. Mrs. Martin's parents were both natives of North Carolina. 

After Mrs. Martin's death Mr. Martin married the second time. 

WILLIAM E. AND CORA B. (RINBERGER) MARTIN (5) 

Cora Bcrdina Rinberger, daughter of Pleasant and Mary Alice (Elam) 
Rinberger, was born April 4, 1873, at Bentonville, Benton County, Arkansas. 

William E. Martin and Cora B. Rinberger were united in marriage 
March 8, 1897, in Dodge Cit\-, Ford County, Kansas. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Flavin Crystal Martin November i, 1898 ... February 26, 1903 

He was born in Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Mrs. Martin's father was born in 1833 while his parents were crossing 
the Atlantic Ocean, on their way to America from Germany. They were both 
natives of Germany. Mrs. Martin was given her middle name in honor to her 
great-grandfather Otten, who owned the "Berdina — Queen of the Sea," a sail- 
ing (passenger) vessel, which sailed between Germany and some foreign port. 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin located in Colorado Springs, Colorado, immediately 
after their marriage, where they have since resided. Mr. Martin was a partner in 
the firm of Martin & Aldrich, proprietors of "The Colorado Monumental 
Works," and was a stockholder in the "Crystal" marble and granite mines near 
Aspen, Pitkin County, Colorado. He has traveled much during his life and was 
considered a very successful hunter, that being his favorite amusement. 

In politics he was a Socialist. He was a profound student of phrenology. 

Mr. Martin and his four-year-old son were the victims of a terrible explo- 
sion February 26, 1903, which resulted in their death. The following notice 
describing the accident was clipped from the Evening Telegraph, published in 
Colorado Springs, Colorado, dated February 27, 1903: — 

"Remaining conscious to the very end, and to the very last breath ex- 
horting his stricken wife, who sat with their four-months-old babe in her arms 
looking into the face of her dying husband, to be brave under the trying ordeal, 
W. E. Martin passed away shortly before 6 o'clock last night, but two hours 
after his four-year-old son had died. 

"Both were the victims of a horrible accident, the details of which were 
substantially related in the Telegraph extra last night. An unexpected explo- 
sion of potash and sulphur brought death to father and son. The bodies of 
both were mangled almost beyond recognition, the latter dying a few minutes 
after the explosion occurred. The father lived a little over two hours, bearing 
his pain with fortitude and giving good counsel to his heart-broken wife. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 175 

"The city ambulance conveyed the bleeding, mangled forms of Martin 
and his baby boy to the hospital immediately after the awful explosion, but 
before the destination could be reached death claimed the child. The father, 
realizing that life would last but a little while, besought the doctors in attend- 
ance to tell him how long he would live in order that he might tell his wife of 
his business affairs and offer her words of advice. 

"When told that he could not live more than two hours, he asked for his 
wife, to whom he made known all of his business affairs, not forgetting to ask 
repeatedly about his little boy who had already passed to the great beyond. He 
was not told of the lad's death, however, until the very last, upon which he 
asked that the little one be laid in his arms for the grave. 

"Martin told his wife that he had about Si.ooo in the El Paso National 
bank and a small amount of money on his person. He e.^plained that the title 
to the property where they lived, 506 West Huerfano, was clear, and that his 
only indebtedness was to a local lumber company, to whom he owed $5. He 
told of a car load of granite, which he had recently ordered from the east for 
tombstone making, and requested that the order be countermanded by telegraph. 
After this explanation Martin said to his wife: 'Go to as little expense as pos- 
sible for the funeral, for you will need your money. You must keep your money 
as long as you can, for when that is gone your friends are gone.' 

"Martin was a Socialist, and this remark is said to have been very char- 
acteristic of him. 

"W. E. Martin was, until recently, a member of the firm of Martin & 
Aldrich, of the Colorado Monumental Works of this city. A short time ago he 
withdrew from that firm and moved to 506 West Huerfano street, where he was 
preparing to open up a similar business under the name of the Colorado Springs 
Monumental Works. His first order for granite and other working material had 
just been placed. In connection with his work Martin was accustomed to taking 
pictures of his designs for publication in pamphlet form for advertising pur- 
poses. The presence of a quantity of photographing material in the room in 
which the explosion occurred led to the published report that Martin was a 
photographer. 

"Mr. Martin was preparing a mixture ol potash and sulphur to be used 
as an explosive at a celebration which the Socialists of the city were to have 
held next Monday night in a vacant building immediately across Huerfano 
street from the Martin home. Yesterday afternoon he asked Mayor Robinson 
and Chief of Police King if the authorities would object to the explosion of this 
compound during the celebration, obtaining from both the privilege of doing 
so, providing the explosives would be set off on the vacant property some dis- 
tance from the street. He is said to have made the explosive many times before 
and it is the theory that an accidental jar must have caused the explosion. It 
was his custom to place the mixture in a home-made anvil and then explode it 
with a blow from a sledge. The noise is equal to that of a small cannon. 



176 RFX'ORD OF THE LF,WIS FAMILY 

"It is an interesting fact that Martin had just completed the design of 
his own tombstone, and had placed a drawing of the monument in the hands of 
an engraver for the purpose of having two half-tone engravings made which 
were to be used in his advertising booklet. The monument is very handsome 
and shows much taste on the part of the designer. 

"Besides the wife and baby, Martin left a son, Theron Martin, 25 years 
of age, who is fireman at the Colorado college heating plant, and two married 
daughters in Kansas. He would have been 50 years old upon his next birthday. 
The Socialists, of which party Martin was a leader, will have charge of the 
funeral services tomorrow. A memorial srevice will also be held by the Social- 
ists in Laundry Workers' hall Sunday evening." 



ALBERT H. AND EMMA L. (MARTIN) HAWKINS (5) 

Emma Laura Martin, daughter of William and Sarah E. (Lewis) Mar- 
tin, was born April 5, 1857, near Morristown, Belmont County, Ohio. 

Albert Henry Hawkins, son of Henry and Margaret Ann (Capper) Haw- 
kins, was born November 8, 1857, near Columbia City, Louisa County, Iowa. 

Albert H. Hawkins and Emma L. Martin were united in marriage 
November i, 1877, at the home of the bride's parents, near Winfield, Cowley 
County, Kansas, William Martin, father of the bride and minister of the Church 
of Christ, officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Eugene Archer Hawkins January 29, 1879 

Gertrude Irene Hawkins August 7, 1881 

Clyde Emerson Hawkins December 24, 1884 



They were all born near Winfield, Cowley County, Kansas. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Hawkins, located on a farm near Win- 
field, where they lived ten years, Mr. Hawkins being engaged in farming. In 
January, 1887, they removed to Kearney County, Kansas, when that part of the 
country was first being settled. Here Mr. Hawkins was engaged in farming and 
also followed the carinnter trade to some extent. They returned to their former 
home the next fall and in 1889 went to Colorado and located near Durango, 
La Plata County, in search of a beneficial climate for Mr. Hawkins, who was in 
very poor health at that time. In 1890 they removed to W^infield, Kansas, 
where Mr. Hawkins was employed as traveling salesman for Ira P. Russell, 
dealer in pianos and organs. At the end of four years work in that capacity 
they returned to the farm near Winfield and have since resided there. 

Mr. and Mr. Hawkins and family are members of the "Church of Christ." 

Clyde E. is assisting his father at present on the farm. He expects to 
take a course in Business College the coming year (1902). 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 177 



JOHN Q. AND MINERVA C. (MARTIN) GARNER (5) 

Minerva Celestine Martin, daughter of William and Sarah (Lewis) Mar- 
tin, was born September 5, 1858, near Morristown, Belmont County, Ohio. 

John Quincy Garner, son of John and Elizabeth ( Quincy) Garner, was 
born , , in , England. 

John Q. Garner and Minerva C. Martin were united in marriage August 
29, 1886, at the home of the bride's oldest sister, Mary A. (Martin) Wellman, 
near Winfield, Cowley County, Kansas, Elder H. Ganes officiating. 

TO THEM WERE P.ORN 

Nam,:. Birth. Death. 

John Herbert Garner November 7,1887 ... October 17, 1888 

Clarence Lewis Garner April 6, 1 88g 

Harry Lambert Garner February ly, 1891 ... December 21, 1896 

John H. was born in Ness County, Kansas, and died in Winfield, Cowley 
County, Kansas, his remains being interred in the Vernon Cemetery of that 
place. 

Clarence L. was born in Chicago, Illinois, and Harry L. in Perry, Pike 
County, Illinois. The latter died in Chicago and was interred in the Oakwoods 
Cemetery of that place. 

Mr. Garner was a student in the Bible College of Le.\ington, Kentucky, 
and was a minister in the Christian Church or Church of Christ for several 
years. Later he entered the Homeopathic Medical College of Chicago, Illinois, 
and is at present a practicing physician. His parents were natives of England. 

Mrs. Garner is a trained nurse and follows that profession in Chicago, 
Illinois. 

Mr. and Mrs. Garner lived for some time in Kansas and afterward 
removed to Chicago, where they lived several years. 



GUSTAVUS F. AND ALICE J. ^ MARTIN) MENARD 15) 

Alice Jane Martin, daughter of William and Sarah (Lewis) Martin, was 
born April 18, 1862, near Wilton, Cedar County, Iowa. 

Gustavus Francis Menard, son of Francis Augustus and Marie (Peigne) 
Menard, was born July 2, 1858, in Nantes, France. 

Gustavus F. Menard and Alice J. Martin were united in marriage June 
13, 1885, at the home of the bride's sister, Mrs. (Sarah) E. Martin Painter, 
near Kellogg, Cowley County, Kansas, by Joseph E. Cain, minister of the 
Christian Church or Church of Christ. 



lyS , RECORD or THE LEWIS FAMILY 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Natne ' Birth Death 



Joseph Walton Menard March 31, 1886 

Catherine Myrtle Menard June 25,1888 

Eva Rachel Menard April 14, i8gi 

Tracy Irvin Menard August 30, 1893 

Mary Naomi Menard March 3, 1896 



The two oldest children were born in Kellogg, Cowley County, Kansas, 
and the three youngest in Winfield, of the same county and state. 

Mr. Menard's father, Francis Augustus Menard, and his mother, Marie 
Peigne, were peasants, born and raised in the Department of Loire Inferieure. 
His father was a machinist by trade and studied carefully the Socialist doctrines 
taught in France during the first half of the last century by Saint Simon, 
Fourier and Ettienne Cabet. He adopted the views of Cabet and September 
II, 1859, soon after the death of his wife, he took his little son, who was then 
but little past one year old, and set sail from Havre, France, on the "Wittem" 
berg," bound for New Orleans, Louisiana, with eight others, to join a colony at 
Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois, which was founded by Cabet. They called 
the people of the Colonj' "Communists," and they were settled on the land 
which was vacated by the Mormons when they went to Utah. 

The "Wittemberg" reached New Orleans safely November 18, 1859, after 
a tedious and stormy voyage. The}' then ascended the Mississippi river, by 
steamboat, until they reached St. Louis, where they learned that since leaving 
France a new schism had taken place in the colony, the leader had been expelled 
and with a few followers had settled in Cheltenham, a suburb of St. Louis, 
where he had died a few days before their arrival. 

The newcomers cast their lot with the few at Cheltenham. 

When the civil war broke out the men of the colony enlisted in the Mis- 
souri Home Guards, in a regiment commanded by B. Gratz Brown, afterwards 
Governor of Missouri. They participated in the capture of Camp Jackson, at 
St. Louis, and in the building of camps and forts at Pilot Knob and at Rolla, 
Missouri. After the men enlisted in the civil war the Cheltenham colony dis- 
banded. 

During the four years that Francis Augustus Menard was in the war, his 
son, the subject of this sketch, was in a charitable home on Seventh street, 
between Morgan and h'ranklin avenues, St. Louis, his father paj^ing for his 
clothes and five dollars a month to the institution. While here Gustavus 
learned to read and speak the English language. 

After his fatlier A\as discharged they went to Pilot Knob, Iron County, 
Missouri, to live and it was here that Gustavus Menard was raised. In 1878 he 
started west, and spent two years in Cowley County, Kansas. In 1880 he went 
to Kentucky and early in the year following entered the "College of the Bible" 
in Lexington, of the same state, from which he graduated in June, 1885. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY , 1 79 

A friend of Mr. Menard writes us that he was one of the finest Bible 
students in the State of Kansas. 

For several years after their marriage Mr. Menard followed the ministry 
and taught in the public schools in Cowley, Sumner and Chautauqua Counties, 
Kansas, but throat trouble compelled him to give up his chosen vocation and 
he and his family settled in Winfield, Cowley County, Kansas, where he was 
employed as warehouse foreman in the flour mills until the trouble with his 
throat became so severe that the doctors ordered a change of employment and 
climate. In August, 1900, they removed to Colorado Springs, Colorado, where 
he is employed in the post office. 

Mr. and Mrs. Menard and their two oldest children are members of the 
Church of Christ or Christian Church. 

Joseph W. Menard, their oldest son, is employed in the mailing depart- 
ment of the Gazette, at Colorado Springs. 

PARKER W. AND CLARA A. (CASE) MARTIN (5) 

Parker Wellman Martin, son of William and Sarah (Lewis) Martin, was 
born September 5, 1866, near Salem, Henry County, Iowa. 

Clara Ann Case, daughter of Samuel P. and Sarah Jane (Eckert) Case 
was born October 15, 1862, near Wooster, Wayne County, Ohio. 

Parker W. Martin and Clara A. Case were united in marriage November 
15, 1888, at the home of the bride's parents, near Kellogg, Cowley County, 
Kansas, Rev. Joseph E. Cain, minister of the Church of Christ, officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 
Name Birih Death 

Alma Lunetta Martin May 16, 189 1 

Lena Irene Martin April 11, 1893 

Lola Maude Martin August 8, i8g6 ... 

William Lee Martin July 4, i8g8 

Frank Martin April 8, 1900 

Alma L. and Lena I. were born near Winfield, Cowley County, Kansas, 
and Lola M. and Wm. L. and Frank near Blackwell, Oklahoma Territory. 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin located near Winfield, after their marriage, where 
he was engaged in farming. Later they removed to a farm near Blackwell, Kay 
County, Oklahoma, and lived there until 1901, when they returned to Cowley 
County, Kansas, and purchased a farm near Kellogg, wliere they reside at the 
present time. 

Mrs. Martin is of Scotch, Irish and German descent. Her father and 
mother were horn near Wooster, Wayne County, Ohio, the former in May 28, 
1833, and the latter October 13, 1837. They were married April 10. 1855, at 
the place of their birth. Subsequently they removed to Kellogg, Cowley Coun- 
ty, Kansas, and recently to Oxford, Sumner C^ounty, Kansas. 




WILLIAM LEWIS READ 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY l8l 

WILLIAM L. AND JULIET E. (McMURRAY) READ (5) 

William Lewis Read, son of Ambrose and Mary A. (Lewis) Read, was 
born May 15, 1851, near Georgetown, Harrison County, Ohio. 

Juliet Elvira McMurray, daughter of Hiram and Mary Ann (Foust) 
McMurray, was born November 25, 1857, i" Buena Vista, Monroe County, 
Indiana. 

William L. Read and Juliet E. McMurray were united in marriage Sep- 
tember 28, 1882, in Des Moines, Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Ralph Lewis Read June 13,1883 

Helen Read January 25, 1885 

They were born in Des Moines, Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Read reside in Des Moines, Iowa. 

Mr. Read graduated from the Law Department of the State University 
of Iowa in June, 1857, and located in Des Moines, Iowa, where he engaged in 
the practice of his profession in 1876. He may be properly termed a self-made 
man. He earned his way through school, and through indomitable energy and 
unswerving integrity has climbed the ladder of success. In 1885 his brother 
John M. and he formed a partnership, which has since been firmly established, 
they having held a prominent place among the law3ers of Des Moines and of 
the state of Iowa. 

Mrs. Read's mother was of German and her father of Scotch-Irish 
descent. 



ROBERT T. AND ANNETTE M. (HUTCHINSON) LEWIS (5) 

Robert Thompson Lewis, son of William and Selina (Thompson) Lewis, 
was born November 4, 1846, in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. 

Annette M. Hutchinson, daughter of John Watt and Mariah (McConnell) 
Hutchinson, was born October 8, 1856, near Bellaire, Belmont County, Ohio. 

Robert T. Lewis and Annette M. Hutchinson were united in marriage 
March 13, 1883, in Muscatine, Iowa, by Rev. J. H. Barnard, a minister of the 
Presbyterian church. 

No children. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Lewis went to their country home in 
Cass County, Nebraska, and located near Eagle, where they lived until 1900, 
when they purchased property in Lincoln, Lancaster County, Nebraska, and 
renting their farm they removed to their new home, where they now reside. 

Mrs. Lewis is of Scotch descent. When she was nine years of age her 
parents moved to Grand View, Louisa County, Iowa. She attended the public 



l82 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

schools of Washington and the Grand View Academy; in 1870 attended the 
State Agricultural College of Ames, Story County, Iowa, and in 1873 graduated 
from the Eastern Iowa Normal School. She then commenced teaching in the 
public schools, which profession she followed for several years, having taught 
two years in Lettsville, Louisa County, two years in Atalissa and one in Musca- 
tine City, Muscatine County, and one in the "Model Schools" of the Eastern 
Ohio Normal, and the last three years as principal of Grand View, Iowa, schools. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis are not members of any denomination, but their 
preference is for the Presb\terian church. They are both members of the fra- 
ternal order "Royal Highlanders," and Mrs. Lewis is also a member of the 
"Royal Neighbors." Politicall}- Mr. Lewis is a Republican. 

The following life and character sketch of Robert T. Lewis was contrib- 
uted bj' one of his friends: — 

"Robert Lewis went to Iowa with his parents when he was five years old, 
where his early life was spent on a farm. In 1876, while in Muscatine, he in- 
vented and secured a U. S. patent for the 'Noiseless Wagon Brake Lever,' 
which was sold and used by a number of leading manufacturing establishments 
and was both a novelty and a success in its line. 

"The same year he spent in Muscatine, learning the tinner's trade, with 
a view of engaging in the hardware business, but at the close of the year his 
father (having met with financial reverses) offered him a partnership as an 
inducement to return to the farm, which was accepted. He remained here, 
where he was engaged in farming and stock raising until 1882, when he went 
to Cass County, Nebraska, and purchased land near Eagle. The year follow- 
ing he was married, after which they went to their new home. In 1888 he be- 
came a charter member of the Knights of Pythias Lodge of Eagle, Nebraska, 
of which he is still an active member. 

"From earliest childhood Robert T. Lewis was remarkable for honestj', 
truth and sincerity. These traits have always and still continue to influence his 
life, and being combined with a natural reticence have sometimes tended to his 
own (temporary) material disadvantage, but added to untiring industry and 
unfailing energy he has amassed a modest competence. Being of a genial, 
social nature and having marked musical ability, he is ever popular as a guest 
and comrade. 

"Mr. Lewis is regarded by all as perfectl}' trustworth}' and reliable. The 
true character of the man may best be comprehended in these few words: 'he is 
an honest man.' " 



ALBA W. AND MARY B. (LEWIS) WOODARD i5) 

Mary Barbara Lewis, daughter of William and Selina (Thompson) 
Lewis was born December 3, 1848, in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. 

Alba William Woodard, son of William and Mary (Latham) Woodard, 
was born December 8, 1850, in Calais, Washington County, Vermont. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 183 

Alba W. Woodard and Mary B. Lewis were united in marriage August 
24, 1880, at the home of the bride's father, near West Liberty, Muscatine 
County, Iowa, by Rev. Thornton, a minister of the Methodist church. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Kate Permela Woodard June 12, 1881 

Clara Mary \\'oodard December 12, 1SS3 

Lucy Lee Woodard June 2, 1887 

Emily Thompson Woodard... September 10, 1889 

Kate P. was born near Papillion, Sarpy County, Nebraska, and Clara 
M., Lucy L. and Emil}' T. were born near Eagle, Cass County, of the same 
state. 

Mr. and Mrs. Woodard have lived near Eagle, Cass County, Nebraska, 
since their marriage, except a short time spent in Sarpy County, of the same 
state. He is a farmer and stock raiser. Politically he is a Republican. 

Their eldest daughter, Kate P., graduated from the Lincoln High schools 
in 1901, and is teaching district schools in Lancaster County, Nebraska, at 
present (1902). 

Clara, Lucy and Emily are all attending school in Lincoln. 



LINEAUS M. AND HANNAH S. (DICKERSON) LEWIS (5) 

Lineaus Morgan Lewis, son of William and Selina (Thompson) Lewis, 
was born June 22, 1850, in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. 

Hannah Samantha Dickerson, daughter of Isaac and Sarah (Barracklow) 
Dickerson, was born April 5, 1854, near West Bedford. Coshocton County, 
Ohio. 

Lineaus M. Lewis and Hannah S. Dickvrson were united in marriage 
October 28. 1873, at the home of the bride's parents near West Liberty, Mus- 
catine County, Iowa, Rev. Morrey, a minister of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, officiating. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birtli Death 

Selina Tacy Lewis Decemlxr 26, 1874 

Theron Isaac Lewis January 21, 1878 

Sarah Irene Lewis March 6, iSgo 

They were all born near vVtalissa, Muscatine County, Iowa. 

Mr. Lewis lived on the farm with his parents in Iowa until after his mar- 
riage, when he purchased a farm near Atalissa, Muscatine county, of the same 
state. They lived there until 1892, when they sold their property and purchased 
and moved to a farm near Rising City, Butler County, Nebraska, where they 
lived until 1900. They then sold the property and returned to their former 



184 RI-XORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

home in Muscatine Count_v, Iowa, this time buying land near West Liberty. 
Recently they rented their country home and removed to West Liberty. 

Mrs. Lewis came from Ohio to Iowa with her parents when she was 
twelve years of age. She is of German descent. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and also of the Modern Brotherhood of America fraternity. Mr. Lewis is a 
member of the A. O. U. W. Politically he is a Republican. For several years 
he served as sciiool director. 

A friend says, "Mr. Lewis is temperate in all of his habits, honest in his 
dealings, of a jovial disposition, and is well liked by his friends, who are num- 
berless." 



WILLIAM AND CATHERINE I. (LEWIS) ATCHISON (5) 

Catherine Ida Lewis, daughter of William and Selina (Thompson) Lewis, 
was born July ii, 1856, near West Liberty, Muscatine County, Iowa. 

William Atchison, son of Thomas and Fanny ( ) Atchison, was 

born , 1862, in , England. 

William Atchison and Catherine I. Lewis were united in marriage March 
II, 1S84, in Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Naiiu- Birth Death 



William Lewis Atchison October 28, 1885 

Ella Fanny Atchison January 20, 1890 

Glenn Atchison February 18, i^ 



They were all born near Elmwood, Cass County, Nebraska. 

Mr. and Mrs. Atchison located near Elmwood soon after their marriage, 
where he is engaged in agricultural pursuits. Mr. Atchison is of English and 
Irish descent. His parents emigrated to this countrj' when he was very young. 
Politically he is a Republican. He is a member of the A. O. U. W. lodge, of 
Elmwood, Nebraska. 

Mrs. Atchison was a teacher in the public schools of Muscatine County, 
Iowa, before her marriage. 

William L. is a student in the Elmwood High School at the present 
time (1902). . 

MORGAN E. AND LAURA A. tWOLCOTT) LEWIS IS) 

Morgan Evan Lewis, son of Parker and Elizabeth (Pickering) Lewis, 
was born February 22, 1847, in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. 

Laura Arabella Wolcott, daughter of Augustus Stone and Susan Hall 
(Byard) Wolcott, was bom May 4, 1851, in Guyandotte. Cabell County, West 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 1 85 

Virginia, and died March 15, 1878, in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. 
Interment in the Belpre Cemetery. 

Morgan E. Lewis and Laura A. Wolcott were united in marriage Novem- 
ber 23, 1872, at Centre Belpre, Ohio. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis located in Centre Belpre, where he was engaged in 
his father's mercantile establishment about twenty years. 

Mrs. Lewis was of English and German descent. 

After Mrs. Lewis's death Mr. Lewis was married the second time. 



MORGAN E. AND ADDIE A. (WOLCOTT) LEWIS (5) 

Addie Albina Wolcott, daughter of Augustus Stone and Susan Hall 
(Byard) Wolcott, was born May 5, 1858, in Guyandotte, Cabell County, West 
Virginia. 

Morgan E. Lewis and Addie A. Wolcott were united in marriage June 
13, 1880, in Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

George Morgan Lewis May 18, 1882 

Parker Augustus Lewis May 27,1888 ... February 27,1889 

Alfred Evan Lewis January 7, 1890 

They were all born in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Oliio. 

Parker A. died at his birthplace and was interred in the Belpre Cemetery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis have lived in Centre Belpre since their marriage. 

Mrs. Lewis's parents were married in Marietta, Ohio, in 1840. Her 
father was of English descent and in religion was a Universalist. Her mother 
was of German descent and a member of the Metliodist church. 



JOHN M. AND LEORA (LEWIS MITCHEL (5) 

Leora Lewis, daughter of Parker and i-lizabeth (Pickeringl Lewis, was 
born August 30, 1849, in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. 

John Martin Mitchel, son of John anl Hannah (Morrison) Mitchel, was 
born April 17, 1843, in Cadiz, Harrison County, Ohio. 

John M. Mitchel and Leora Lewis were united in marriage January 7, 
1869, in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mitciiel reside in Parkersburg, West Virginia, where lie is 
engaged in the real estate and insurance business. 

The following sketch was contributed for the Record: — 

"Mr. Mitchel, at the age of nineteen years, enlisted in Companv I ol the 
One Hundred and Si.xteenth Ohio Vohmteer Infantry. He went through cam- 



1 86 RF.CORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

paigns in the Shenandoah Valley with Milroy, Sigel, Hunter, Crooks and Sher- 
idan, participating in all the battles in Shenandoah fought by these generals, 
and never received a scratch or a hospital record; went through the memorable 
Hunter Raid to Lynchburg, in which many of the residents of Wood County 
participated on 'both sides of the fence;' at the battle of Piedmont, West Vir- 
ginia, he was the only one of eight color guards and two color bearers not 
wounded. In that engagement his regiment lost one hundred and eights'-six 
men, killed and wounded, having gone into battle with less than five hundred 
men. They were brave boys and never flinched dut}'. 

"In 1865 he re-enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Eighty-Sixth 
Ohio \'olunteers, and remained until the close of the war. During his last 
enlistment he held the office of First Lieutenant. He was honorably discharged 
in Columbus, Ohio, October, 1865. Some of the engagements in which he 
participated during the rebellion were: Winchester, Va., Snicker's Ford, Va., 
Berry ville, Va. , Cedar Creek, Va. , Fishers Hill, Va. , Strasburg, Va., New 
Market, Va., Kernstown, Va. , Opequon, Va., Martinsburg, W. Va., Bunker 
Hill, W. Va., and about twelve or fifteen other skirmishes. 

"In 1875 Mr. Mitchel settled in Parkersburg, West Virginia, buying out 
Paxton & Shilling on Market street and opening a retail grocery, in connection 
with which he established a wholesale produce business. He also helped to 
establish one of the largest wholesale grocery houses in the State of West Vir- 
ginia, under the name of Shattuck, Mitchel & Jackson. He was one of the firm 
of Muncey & Mitchel, who started what is now the Smith & Woodford livery 
stable, the largest in the city. 

"Mr. Mitchel also spent over two years in Slate district, cutting lumber. 
Staves and ties, giving employment to from fift\' to one hundred men, many of 
whom are still living and bear witness to the fair, honest, courteous treatment 
they received at his hands, for all men with whom Mr. Mitchel has had dealings 
concede him to be a 'prince of good fellows,' genial, jolly, obliging, kind, 
capable and always doing business fair and square with his fellowmen. His 
experience in real estate business, necessitating the handling of deeds and rec- 
ords, makes his judgment on legal matters equal to first-class lawyers. He has 
also been instrumental in establishing, on the banks of the Ohio river, an 
immense steel plant, the largest industry that has come to Parkersburg in fifty 
years." 

ARCHIBALD E. AND LENI L. LEWIS) BRECKENRIDGE t5) 

Leni L. Lewis, daugjiter of Parker and Elizabeth ( Pickering) Lewis, 
was born June 10, 1851, in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. 

Archibald E. Breckenredge, son of Andrew and Jean (McKay; Brecken- 
ridge, was born I'ebruary 16, 1851, in Centre Belpre, Washington County, 
Ohio. 

Archibald K. Bri ckenritlge and Leiii L. Lewis were united in marriage 
February 5, 1880, in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 1 87 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Parker Lewis Breckenridge .... January 3, 1881 

Don Lewis Breckenridge June 13, 1884 

Laura Lewis Breckenridge February ig, 1886 

They were all born in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Breckenridge located in Centre Belpre after their marriage, 
where he was engaged in farming for a number of years, but is now located at 
Shepard, Ohio. 

Mr. Breckenridge's father and mother were born in Argyle Shire, Scot- 
land, the former in 181 2, the latter in 181 4. They were married at the South 
End in that Shire, March i, 1836, and came to Centre Belpre, Washington 
County, Ohio, in the summer of the same year. Andrew Breckenridge died 

June 16, 1876, in and Jean (McKay) Breckenridge September 17, 

1884, in Centre Belpre, Ohio. They were both interred in the Belpre Ceme- 
ter}', Washington County, Ohio. 



JOHN L. AND LIZZIE P. (LEWIS) PARSON (5) 

Lizzie Pickering Lewis, daughter of Parker and Elizabeth (Pickering") 
Lewis, was born July 28, 1855, in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio, 
and died March 15, 1883, at her home, near her birthplace. 

"-" John Lafayette Parson, son of Joseph M. and Catherine (Stagg) Farson, 
was born October 27, 1856, at Parkersburg, West Virginia. 

John L. Farson and Lizzie P. Lewis were united in marriage November 
28, 1878, at the home of the bride's parents in Centre Belpre, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Carl Lewis Farson February 2y, 1880 

John Pickering Farson March 7, 1883 

They were born near Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. F"arson located near Centre Belpre soon after their mar- 
riage, where he was engaged in market gardening. 

It has been truly and beautifully said of Mrs. Farson, "She was especially 
noted for her amiable disposition and even temperament. At all times and 
under all circumstances she looked upon the bright side of life. A modi-1 
woman in every respect. Loved by all who knew her, is the record she leaves 
behind." 

She was a member of the First Universalist Clmrch in Belpre, Ohio. 

Mr. F"arson, while not a member of any church accei)ts the Universalist 
faith. 



l88 RKCORI) OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Mr. Farson came to Ohio with his parents when he was nine years of 
age. They located on a farm near Centre Belpre, w'here he was engaged in 
farming during the early part of his life. At the present time he is in the em- 
ploy of the McCormick Harvester Company and his residence is at Belpre, 
Ohio. 

Mr. Parson's father, Joseph Mann Farson, was a son of Henry Farson 
and was born May 9, 1824, in what is now Wood County, West Virginia (it was 
then a part of Old Virginia). He died November 30, 1S89, at his home near 
Rockland, Washington County, Ohio, and was interred in the Belpre Cemetery. 

Mr. Parson's mother was also a native of Wood County. She was a 
daughter of William and Catherine Stagg and was born April 6, 1825. She 
died in 1861 and was buried at Murphy town. West Virginia. They were mar- 
ried Februarj' 27, 1849, at the home of the bride's parents. 

Carl L. and John P. Parson are both attending the college in Marietta, 
Ohio, where Carl is in the Senior and John in the Freshman class. The former 
graduated in the spring of 1902. They are spoken of as very promising \oung 
men, inheriting largely of their mother's elegant qualities. 



ISAAC T. AND VESTA L. (MILLER) LEWIS (5) 

Isaac Thomas Lewis, son of Parker and Elizabeth (Pickering) Lewis, 
was born June 29, 1858, in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. 

\'esta Lone Miller, daughter of Austin D. and Mary E. (Goddard) Mil- 
ler, was born May 2, 1862, in Wesley Township. Washington County, Ohio. 

Isaac T. Lewis and Vesta L. Miller were united in marriage December 
21, 1881, in Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

N^ame Birth Death 

Clyde Austin Lewis September 20, 1882 

Leon Darlton Lewis February 28, i886 

Charles Harold Lewis June 2, 1895 ... January 5, 1900 

They were born near Centre Belpre, Ohio, and Charles H. died at his 
birthplace and was interred in the cemetery of Belpre, in the same county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis reside near Centre Belpre, Ohio. 

Mr. Lewis graduated from the Ohio N'alley Business College at Parkers- 
burg, West Virginia, March 1. 1881, and has since been engaged in farming. 
In religion he is a Spiritualist. 

Mrs. Lewis is of Welsli, English and German descent. She is a member 
of the Universalist church. Her parents were married November 16, 1858, in 
Wesley Township, Washington County, Ohio. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 1 89 

ALFRED NESMITH AND LILLY M. (LEWIS) FRAME (5) 

Lilly Mabel Lewis, daughter of Parker and Elizabeth (Pickering) Lewis, 
was born March ig, 1862, in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. 

Alfred Nesmith Frame, son of John and Mary (Nesmith) Frame, was 
born December 28, 1852, in Coolville, Athens County, Ohio. 

Alfred N. Frame and Lilly M. Lewis were united in marriage January 
22, 1885, at the home of the bride's parents in Centre Belpre, Washington 
County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE liOKN 

Name Birtit Death 

Adeline Elizabeth Frame September 11, 1886 

Florence Lewis Frame August 12, 1888 

Mary Pauline Frame October 10, 1890 

They were born in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. 

Mr. and Mrs. F"rame live in Parkersburg, West Virginia, where they 
located soon after their marriage. 

Mr. Frame graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 
Indianapolis. Indiana, in 1878, and from the Medical College of Indiana, De- 
partment of Butler University, in 1879. He was connected with the National 
Surgical Institute of Indianapolis for six years. For the past four years he has 
been a member of the State Board of Health of West Virginia, and health 
officer in the city of Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, where he has 
been a successful practitioner for twenty years. 

Mr. Frame is a member of the local Lodge of Elks No. 198, Knights of 
Pythias, Royal Arcanum, and the O. R. R. Surgeon. He is of Scotch-Irish 
descent. 

WILLIAM P. AND LOIS E. (ERWIN) LEWIS (5) 

William Parker Lewis, son of Parker aii<l Elizabeth (Pickering) Lewis, 
was born December 2, 1863, in Centre Belpre. Washington County, Ohio. 

Lois E. Erwin, daughter of John B. and Esther M. (Knowles) Erwin, 
was born November 17, 1867, in Newberry, Washington County, Ohio. 

William P. Lewis and Lois E. Erwin were united in marriage P\'bniary 
9, 1887, in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Frank C. Lewis October 30, 1887 

Clair Lewis .... August 23, 1892 

They were born in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. 



igO RECORD OF THE LEWIS FACTORY 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis located in Centre Belpre, Ohio, soon after their mar- 
riage, where they lived a number of years. Later the}- removed to Plain City, 
Madison Count}', Ohio, where they live at the present time. 

Mrs. Lewis's parents were married in Little Hocking. Washington Coun- 
ty, Ohio, February — , 1867. Her father is of Scotch and Irish and her mother 
of Scotch descent. 



LINCOLN G. AND LEONA ( SHIVELY LEWIS (5) 

Lincoln Grant Lewis, son of Parker and Elizabeth (Pickering) Lewis, 
was born September 29, 1865, in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. 

Leona Shively, daughter of Philip and Mary (Wright) Shively, was born 
March 6, 1866, in Mercer's Bottom, Mason County, West Virginia. 

Lincoln G. Lewis and Leona Shively were united in marriage March 6, 
i88g, in Apple Grove, Mason County, West Virginia. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Btrth Death 

Leona Lucile Lewis March 22, 1893 

Lila Mary Lewis March 20, 1896 ... 

Lawrence Earl S. Lewis February 18, 1899 

Laura Elizabeth Lewis April 2, 1901 

They were all born in Edgewood, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 
except the oldest child who was born in Pittsburg of the same county and state. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis have lived in and near Pittsburg since their mar- 
riage, where he has been employed as train director in the Pittsburg yards. At 
present they reside in Edgewood, Penns^'lvania. 

Mrs. Lewis is of German and Irish descent. In religion she is a Metho- 
dist. 



JOSEPH A. AND LETHE E. (LEWIS) COE f5) 

Lethe Estelle Lewis, daughter of Parker and Elizabeth ( Pickering) 
Lewis, was born January 12, 1868, in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. 

Joseph Alexander Coe, son of Silas and Emily (Porterfield) Coe, was 
born November 17, 1854. in Lee, Athens County, Ohio. 

Joseph A. Coe and Lethe E. Lewis were united in marriage June 6, i88g, 
in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

^'amc Birth Death 

Maude Lewis Coe August 17,1891 

Joseph Dean Coe September 25, 1897 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAjriLY IQI 

Maude L. was born in Centre Belpre, Washington County, Ohio, and 
Joseph D. in Qualey, of the same county and state. 

Mr. and Mrs. Coe hve in Parkersburg, West Virginia, where he is con- 
ducting a furniture store at present { 1902). 

Mr. Coe's father was born 1813 in Behnont County, Ohio, of English 
parents, and his mother was born in the same county in i8ig. Her fatlier was 
a native of Ireland, and her mother of New England stock. 



WILLIAM L. AND MINERVA A. (STEAGALL) MAY (5) 

William Lewis May, son of L\'sander and Narcissa (Lewis) May, was 
born June 25, 1855, in Tuscarawas Count)', Ohio. 

Minerva Alice Steagall, daughter of and ( ) 

Steagall, was born , , in Jackson County, Ohio, and died May 

24, 1889, in Jackson, Jackson County, Ohio. 

William L. May and Minerva Steagall were united in marriage May 24. 
1881, in Jackson, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Louis Browning May 

Mabel Grace May February 5, 1883 

They were born in Jackson. Ohio. 

Mr. May and his two children reside in Cleveland, Ohio. 



JAMES E. AND MARY (MAY) FRY (5) 

Mary May, daughter of Lysander and Narcissa (Lewis) May, w^as born 
November 28, 1863, in Seneca County, Ohio. 

James Ellyton Fry, son of and ( ) Fry, was 

born , , in , . 

James E. Fry and Mary May were united in marriage , 1887, in 

Hancock County, Ohio. 

TO THEM \\i:KE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Bernard Fry 

Grace Fry 

Herbert Fry 

No further information could be obtained. 



ig2 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

JAMES E. AND WELTJ-IA Z. (MAY FRY (5) 

Weltha Zears May. daughter of Lysander and Narcissa (Lewis) May, 
was born September 9, 1865, in Holmes County, Ohio, and died May 31, 1884, 
in Jackson, Ohio. Interment in the Jackson Cemeterj'. 

James EUyton Fry, son of and (Fry,) was 

born , in , . 

James E. Fry and Weltha Z. May were united in marriage September 
II, 1883, in Jackson, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Weltha May Fry May 31,1884 

She was born in Jackson, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fry lived in Jackson, Ohio, at the time of the latter's death. 



FRANK AND MINNIE (HENDERSON MAY (5) 

Frank May, son of Lysander and Narcissa (Lewis) May, was born Sep- 
tember I, 1873. at Jackson. Ohio. 

Minnie Henderson, daughter of Ale.xander and Elizabeth (Douglas) 
Henderson, was born December 15, 1865, in \'inton County, Ohio. 

Frank May and Minnie Henderson were united in marriage December 
2g, 1892, in \'inton County, Ohio. 

lO THEM WERE BORN 

N'aiiie Birth Death 



Henry Aries May . 
Forest Elroy May. 



They were born in Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. May reside in Ohio, where he is engaged in carpenter work. 
He is considered a very skillful and competent workman. 
Mrs. May is of direct German descent. 



ORLANDO G. AND MARY S. (GOODMAN) LEWIS (5) 

Orlando Granville Lewis, son of Thomas and Eliza J. (Hoover) Lewis, 
was born May 18, 1855, in Washington Township, Guernsey County, Ohio. 

Mar\^ Susan Goodman, daughter of Edward and Sarah Ann (Tuke) 
Goodman, was born August 18, 1856, at Smith, England. 

Orlando G. Lewis and Mary S. Goodman were united in marriage No- 
vember 28, 1878, at Faribault, Rice County, Minnesota. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 193 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Harris Arthur Lewis January 4, 1881 

Edith Loana Lewis June 27, 1884 

Lydia Belle Lewis December 18, 1887 

Nellie Mary Lewis February 10, 1895 . . . March 17, 1896 

They were all born in Cannon City, Rice County, Minnesota. 

Nellie M. died in Cannon City, Rice County, Minnesota. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis reside in Cannon Cit}', where he is engaged in 
farming. 

Mrs. Lewis is of English parentage and came with her parents to Amer- 
ica in 1857. They settled in Rice County, Minnesota. 

THOMAS E. AND EMMA (COWELSi LEWIS (5) 

Thomas Edward Lewis, son of Thomas H. and Eliza J. ( Hoover 1 Lewis, 
was born April 4, 1867, in Washington Township, Guernsey Count\-, Ohio. 

Emma Cowles, daughter of and ( ) Cowels, 

was born , , in , . 

Thomas E. Lewis and Emma Cowels were united in marriage October 
15, 1891, in Cannon City, Rice County, Minnesota. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Georgia Vienna Lewis February 26, 1893 

Harold Lewis F"ebruarv 21, i8gg ... 

They were born at Cannon City, Rice County, Minnesota. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis reside at Cannon City, 'where they are engaged in 
farming. 

JOHN H. AND JESSIE (COWELS) LEWIS (5) 

John Hoover Lewis, son of Thomas H. and Eliza J. (Hoover) Lewis, 
was born April 4, 1867, in Washington Township, Guernsey County, Ohio. 

Jessie Cowels, daughter of and ( ) Cowels, 

was born , , in , . 

John H. Lewis and Jessie Cowels were united in marriage July 7, 1888, 
in Faribault, Rice County, Minnesota. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 



Donald Hoover Lewis June 27, i88g 

Lowell Cowels Lewis February 12, igoi 



«3 



194 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Donald H. was born in Hawley, Clay County, Minnesota, and Lowell C. 
in Staples, Todd County, of the same state. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis reside at Staples, Minnesota. 

Mr. Lewis graduated from the Fairbault High School June i, 1890. He 
then entered the State University at Minneapolis, from which he graduated 
June 4, 1896. He begun his chosen profession as instructor in the public 
schools at Cloquet, Carlton County, Minnesota, where he taught one year. The 
next two years were spent in teaching at Hawley, Clay County, and in i8gg he 
accepted a position as Principal of the High School at Staples, Todd County, 
Minnesota, which position he is still holding. 



JOSEPH E. AND MARY A. (FRAME) SELBY (5) 

Mary Ann Frame, daughter of Thomas L. and Elizabeth S. (Thomas) 
Frame, was born September 18, 1845, near Jerusalem, Monroe Count}', Ohio. 

Joseph E. Selby, son of William and Sarah (Davis) Selby, was born 
, 1843, near Somerton, Belmont County, Ohio. 

Joseph E. Selb}' and Mary A. Frame were united in marriage December 
12, 1868, in Woodsfield, Monroe County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 



Raymond Frame Selby September 21, i86g 

Albert D. Selby June 27, 1871 



Raymond F. was born in Somerton, Belmont County, and Albert D. in 
Quaker Cit}-, Guernsey County, Ohio. 

Mr. Selby was a stone mason by trade. 

Mrs. Selby taught in the public schools of Belmont County, Ohio, three 
terms, and one select school in Somerton of the same county and state. 

1-iaymond F. is employed in the Postal Telegraph of Dayton, Ohio, and 
Albert D. in the Western Union office of Richmond, Indiana, where he makes 
his home with his mother. 

The following sketch of Mary Frame Selb\' was contributed b}- Judge 
L. C. Abbot: — 

"Mary Frame Selby, the subject of this sketch, acquired a taste for read- 
ing in early life, and although in her girlhood books were not so plentiful as at 
the present time, she read with great avidity and pleasure such as came within 
her reach. The books which gave her the most pleasure and made the deepest 
impression on her young mind where the poems of John G. Whittier, the 
Quaker poet. She also had a great admiration for the poems of Lowell, Long- 
fellow, Tennyson, and such other works as could be found in country libraries, 
including the descriptive works of Bayard Taylor. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 195 

"Being of good old Quaker stock, the stirring poems of Whittier seemed 
like clarion calls to work for the oppressed and downtrodden. She was always 
ready in her girlhood days with essays, when they were required in school, and 
she never hesitated in debate to advocate and defend her convictions upon any 
question or subject which might come up for discussion, and she is ready now 
with tongue or pen to discuss or defend the convictions of her mind. 

"As well might be prophesied, after her school days were over she glided 
easily and naturally into the pleasures and duties of a writer for the press. Her 
varied contributions, if gathered together, would make volumes. I'rom her 
early days to the present her brain and pen have not been idle. One of her 
contributions, 'A visit to the home of Whitelaw Reid,' attracted much attention 
and her opinions then of the great qualities of the man have since been won- 
derfully verified as true in his subsequent career. 

"Her letters and contributions both in poetry and prose cover a wide 
range of subjects. 

"Like all of her ancestral line slie has all her life felt a deep interest in 
the welfare of the colored race, and for some time after the rebellion she was 
engaged in teaching a colored school near Somerton, Belmont County, Ohio, 
when it was not at all popular to do so, but with the most gratifying results. 

"For some time she was an esteemed contributor to different papers in 
Ohio, upon various subjects, and her letters speedily attracted the attention of 
the reading public. She contributed her articles under the nom de plume of 
'Muriel,' and from some of the many complimentary notices of her articles 
received we cull tlie following: — 

"'The beautifully written articles by Muriel in the Quaker City Inde- 
pendent are true literary gems. They possess more merit than many of the 
magazine and periodical productions of the day.' — Gi/rr/iuy Tiiiu-s. 

"The Bellaire Tribune, of which the gifted Colonel Poorman was the 
editor, says: 'We have a correspondent whose articles appear on the first page 
over the pseudonym of 'Muriel,' that deserve a careful reading. Her article 
this week entitled 'Unfinished' is a very excellent production and will be read 
■with interest. Mrs. Mary Frame Selby, the writer, lives in Somerton, Ohio, 
and she is making considerable reputation as a writer, furnishing articles for a 
number of different publications.' 

"With this kind notice came the first money she ever received for her 
literary work, and at a time when she was sorely in need of means, and she 
counts Col. Poorman among her most valued friends. 

"As an exponent of the New Thought, Mrs. Selby has recently been ap- 
pointed Vice President of the International Metaphysical League of Indiana, 
and her work in that direction has met with marked success. Much might be 
said of her teaching and healing in this great field. 

"From a great number of her poems the writer selects the following, en- 
titled 'More Light,' as showing the trend of her religious thought;— 



1 96 Rl',( l.)RI) OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

*' 'With Wiermar's dying sage I pray; 
'More light, more light,' give me. 
That all old things may pass away 
And Christ have victory. 

"'More light, more light. Oh Lord, I crave 
Above all earthly things. 
That I may overcome the grave 
And reign with priests and kings. 

" 'I know that Jesus paid it all, 
And I am free to-day 
From foes that came through Adam's fall, 
Christ made a living way. 

" 'And now I want Thee, Lord of grace. 
To give me light and life 
That I may see Thee face to face 
And rest from all earth's strife. 

" 'I know that glory is my right, 
The gospel makes it clear. 
And so I pray more light, more light 
Until Thou dost appear. 

"She says of herself: 'It seems to me that mj' best -work has been in 
mothers' meetings and literary exercises with the colored people. There are 
many of them so eager to learn and to do that they are responsive, and when I 
happen to meet any of the colored women with whom I have been associated in 
such work, they seem so grateful that the memory of my work is a constant 
pleasure, a healthy stimulus to further effort in behalf of the race which is com- 
ing up from the depths, surging with the i)athetic and plaintive melody of their 
music, the songs of freedom.' 

"The writer will close this sketch with words spoken concerning Mrs. 
Selby, by a ver\' distinguished and highly honored citizen of this city. 'If I 
had ten thousand dollars which I could devote to charitable purposes, I would 
be willing to place it in the hands of Mary Frame Selby without bond, for dis- 
tribution, and 1 would know that every dollar of it would be rightly e.xpended 
by placing it where it would do the greatest good. She is a whole charity 
organization in herself.' " 



EMAN AND REBECCA (FRAME) BEARDMORE 5) 

Ui'becca Jane I'rame. daughter of Thomas L. and Elizabetli S. 
(Thomas) l'"rame, was born June 5, 1847, near Jerusalem. Monroe County, 
Ohio. 

Email Beardmore, adopted son of Isaac and Ellen ( ) Beardmore, 

was born September 14, 1S42, in Malaga. Monroe County, Ohio. 

liinan Beardmore and Rebecca J. Frame were united in marriage Octo- 
ber 3, 1865, in Woodlield, Monroe County, Ohio. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 197 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Frederick Overton Beardmore.. March i8, 1868 

John Frame Beardmore August 23, 1874 

Frederick O. was born near Jerusalem, Monroe County, Ohio, and John 
F. in Cloud County, Kansas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Beardmore lived a short time near Jerusalem, Monroe 
County, Ohio, when they removed to Kansas and located on a farm near Half- 
way, Cloud County, Kansas, where they reside at the present time. 

They are both members of the Christian or Disciples church. 



JOHN P. AND LYDIA G. (FRAME) SPENCER (5) 

Lydia Grisell Frame, daughter of Thomas L. and Elizabeth S. (Thomas) 
Frame, was born March 6, 1849, near Jerusalem, Monroe County, Ohio, and 
died July i, 1883, in Springdale, Cedar County, Iowa. She was interred in the 
Friends' Cemetery of that place. 

John P. Spencer, son of Asa and Phebe (Piggott) Spencer, was born 
March 27, 1845, at Spencer Station, Guernsey County, Ohio. 

John P. Spencer and Lydia G. Frame were united in marriage February 
20, 1872, in Atalissa, Muscatine County, Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 
Name Birth Death 

Pearl Spencer December 19, 1875 ••• December i, 1877 

Maude Angle Spencer June 10, 1880 ... August 11, 1S80 

Mary Elizabeth Spencer May 27, 1S82 

They were all born in Springdale, Cedar County, Iowa. 

Pearl and Maude A. died at the place of their birth, and were interred in 
the cemetery of that place. 

Mr. and Mrs. Spencer lived in Springdal' until the time of Mrs. Spen- 
cer's death, where they were engaged in farming. 

Mary E. graduated from the Oskaloosa, Iowa, High School, June 6, 1901, 
and is now attending Penn College, of Oskaloosa. 

DANIEL C. AND MARGARET H. (FRAME) MARTIN (S) 

Margaret Hall Frame, daughter of Thomas L. and Elizabeth S. (Tliomas) 
Frame, was born January 17, 1853, near Jerusalem, Monroe County, Ohio. 

Daniel Carter Martin, son of Samuel and Drusilla (Finley) Martin, was 
born July i, 1851, near Somerton, Belmont County, Ohio. 

Daniel C. Martin and Margaret H. Frame were united in marriage by 
the Friends' ceremony, October 3, 1878, in Somerton, Belmont County, Ohio. 



198 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Ernest D. Martin May 27,1882 

Evelyn Finley Martin October 14, 1889 

Ernest D. was born in Barnesville, Behiiont Count}', and Evelyn F. in 
Daj'ton, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin lived in Barnesville, Belmont County, Ohio, a few 
years after their marriage, when they removed to Dayton, where Mr. Martin 
was associated with another physician in preparing and using a medicine for 
cancer cure for several years and until mental disease incapacitated him for 
doing any kind of business. He is at present in the Sanitarium at Toledo, Ohio. 

Ernest D. IVfartin is attending Earlham College of I^ichmond, Indiana, 
where he expects to graduate in 1903 and then anticipates taking up the surgical 
profession. 

Mrs. Martin is post mistress of Earlham College. 



WILLIAM T. AND MARY (FURNAS) FRAME (5) 

William Thomas Frame, son of Thomas L. and Elizabeth S. (Thomas) 
Frame, was born September 19, 1856, near Jerusalem, Monroe County, Ohio. 

Mary Furnas, daughter of Robert and Bethia (Mosher) Furnas, was 
born April 16, 1855, in Waynesville, Warren County, Ohio. 

William T. Frame and Mary Furnas were united in marriage September 
10, 1879, in Waynesville, Warren County, Ohio. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frame adojited a daughter, Katherine (Webster) Frame, 
April 14, 1885, who was born .April 13, 1881, and also took a son into their 
home, James (Thomas) Frame, when he was seven years of age, who was born 
April 20, 1882. He was never legally adopted, but is a member of their family 
and bears their name. At present he is attending Earlham College, Richmond, 
Indiana, from which he will graduate in 1903. 

Katherine Frame graduated from the Corwin, Ohio, High schools May 
12, 1899. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frame live on a farm near Corwin, Warren County, Ohio, 
their home being located on "Diamond Hill," where they have a fine view of 
the surrounding country. 



NATHAN G. AND ELIZA (HINCHMAN) YOCUM (5) 

Nathan Grisell Vocum, son of John D. and Hannah T. (Cirisell) Yocum, 
was born November 4, 1862, in Somerton, Belmont County, Ohio. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 199 

Eliza Hinchman, daughter of Barclay and Louisa (Cox) Hinchnian, was 
born April 27, 1S59, near Grinnell, Poweshiek County, Iowa. 

Nathan G. Yocum and Eliza Hinchman were united in marriage May 7, 
1884, near Grinnell, Poweshiek County, Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Arthur Morgan Yocum March 31, 1885 

Hannah Louise Yocum November 7, 1887 

Maurice Nathan Yocum June 6, 1889 

Arthur M. and Hannah L. were born near Pasedena, California, and 
Maurice N. near Falls City, Polk County, Oregon. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Yocum located near Pasedena, Cali- 
fornia, where he was engaged in real estate, which was a side issue at first, from 
his main work, law. Subsequently they removed to Falls City, Polk County, 
Oregon, where Mr. Yocum still followed his profession. 

He was held in high esteem wherever he was known. In August, 1889, 
while away from home, he disappeared mysteriously and has never been heard 
from since. The family have every reason to believe that he was foully dealt 
with. 

Mrs. Yocum then took her children and returned to her parents near 
Grinnell, Iowa. Before her marriage she had received a liberal education, hav- 
ing graduated from the classical course in Penn College, Oskaloosa, Iowa. 
During her college years she taught all the while, either in district school in 
"terms off" or in the preparatory department of Penn College. After her grad- 
uation in 1883 she taught private school one year at home. 

In the fall of 1890 Mrs. Yocum took her children and went to Chicago 
and took work in the Free Kindergarten Association, which she was forced to 
give up on account of sickness the January following. Later she took four or 
five courses of lectures under Profs. Moulten and Dewey of the U. of C. Ex- 
tension courses, on literature and psychology. 

In 1892 she took primary work at River Forrest, Cook County, Illinois, 
where she taught four years, then became a member of the faculty in Berea 
College, Berea, Madison County, Kentucky, liaving been a teacher there now, 
six years. In 1897 she took her second det;ree from Penn College, Iowa. Mrs. 
Yocum is of English and Scotch descent. 

Mr. Yocum, after receiving a good public school education, entered Penn 
College, Oskaloosa, Iowa, where he graduated in 1882. He was a member of 
Hicksite Friends' Society. 

GEORGE F. AND MARTHA L. (KILMER) SAWYER (5) 

George Frame Sawyer, son ot Dr. James and Elizabeth A. (Frame) 
Sawyer, was born August 20, 1847, near Somerton, Belmont County, Ohio. 



200 RF.CORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Martha Luella (Kilmer), daughter of George and Hannah (Batten) 
Kilmer, was born October i8, 1845, at Shunk Post Office, Sullivan Count}% 
Pennsylvania. 

George F. Sawyer and Martha L. Kilmer were united in marriage Novem- 
ber 5, 1870, near Western, Saline County, Nebraska. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Bertha D. Sawyer April 29, 1873 

Lula D. Sawyer January 3, 1875 

Eldora F. Sawyer December 8, 1876 

Eva E. Sawyer January 30, 1879 

James G. Sawyer June 7, 1883 

Homer B. Sawyer July 6, 1885 

Bertha D. was born near Western, Saline County, Nebraska, Lula D. 
and Eldora F. in Dorchester, Eva E. and James G. in Friend, and Homer B. 
in Western, all of the same County and State. 

Mr. and Mrs. Saw\'er located on a "homestead" which Mr. Sawyer had 
pre-empted near Western, Saline County, Nebraska. They lived there several 
years, then removed to Friend and afterwards to Western, where Mr. Sawyer 
has been in the banking business nearly twenty years and is and has been the 
president ana active manager of the Saline County Bank since its organization 
June 15, 1885. 

Mr. Sawyer was raised on a farm in Wells County, Indiana. When 
eighteen years of age he went to Jasper County, Iowa, where he taught and 
went to school until the spring of 1870. He then went to Saline County, Ne- 
braska, where he has since been a continuous resident. Mrs. Saw\er is of 
German descent and taught in the public schools of Saline County some time 
after her marriage. 

Lula D. spent her girlhood daj's going to school and teaching. She 
graduated in the Scientific Course from Doane College, Crete, Nebraska, in 
1899, and is now living with her parents at Western, Nebraska. 

James G. and Homer B. are attending high school in Lincoln, Nebraska. 



THOM.AS A. AND MARY A. HAINES) SAWYER (5) 

Thomas .\. Sawyer, son of Dr. James and Elizabeth (Frame) Sawyer, 
was born February 24, 1849, in Jay County, Indiana. 

Mary Adaline Haines, daughter of Edwin and Rebecca (Hale) Haines, 
was born January 12, 1851, near Nottingham, Wells County, Indiana. 

Thomas A. Sawyer and Mary A. Haines were united in marriage October 
9, 1870, at the home of the bride's parents, near Kellogg, Jasper Countj', Iowa, 
A. J. McCollum officiating. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 201 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

William Henry Sawyer August 7, 1871 

Charles H. Sawyer June 10, 1874 

Alice Luetta Sawyer September 23,1877 

Franklin Clyde Sawyer June 22, 1880 ... February 23, 1881 

Thomas Archibald Sawyer July 15. 1887 

Mildred May Sawyer July 27, 1892 

Clark Sawyer September 25, 1894 

They were all born in Saline County, Nebraska, except William H., who 
was born in Jasper County, Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sawyer, accompanied by the former's sister Mary Ann, 
removed to Saline County, Nebraska, soon after their marriage, where they 
have since resided. Their first home was a "dugout," eight by ten feet. Mr. 
Sawyer says, "It was rather small, but as it was the first home we could call 
our own, we were very proud of it. Our furniture consisted of two stools, cook 
stove and one bedstead, the latter being made by driving poles into the wall. 
In May, 1876, we moved to Dorchester, of the same county, where three years 
later I went into the drug business, having spent the ten years prior to this time 
in teaching in the public schools. A little later I traded my drug business for 
a half interest in a general merchandising store, and soon sold that and 
resumed my former occupation, teaching. In April, 1883, we removed to a farm, 
remaining there until 1900. I had been nominated for sheriff in our county in 
August, 1899, by the fusion party and gained the election by one hundred and 
eighty-three votes, after a long, hard fought campaign. Not a very great ma- 
jority, but sufficient to entitle me to hold the office two years, so I made prepar- 
ations to leave the farm and moved my family to Wilber, county seat of Saline 
County, a place of one thousand three hundred inhabitants. At the expiration 
of my term of office I was renominated and elected by six hundred majority. 
I have always been blessed with the best of health. 

"Prior to my marriage I lived in Indiana, until past fifteen years of age, 
when I enlisted in Company G, Eighth Indiana Cavalry, for one year. At the 
close of the war I returned home in August. 1865, and in the latter part of the 
same month, in company with my brother George, went to Jasper County, Iowa. 
I remained there almost two years, during which time I attended college at 
Pella, Iowa. In September, 1867, I returned to Indiana, remaining there until 
1869 and during that time had made a visit to my mother's only brother. Uncle 
Thomas Frame's home in Ohio, that being the only time I ever saw him. In 
February, i86g, 1 returned to Jasper County. Iowa, and was engaged in farming 
for some time." 

Mrs. Sawyer's motlier was of Dutch descent. Her father was born near 
Steubenville, Ohio. 

William H. is married and lives on a cattle ranch near Bird Citv, Kansas. 



202 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

EMERY G. AND THETURAH C. GARDNER) RIGBY k5) 

Emery Gilbert Rigby, son of Aaron B. and Martha A. (Lewis) Rigby, 
was born November 6, 1852, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Theturah Catherine Gardner, daughter of William and i\Ialaha Jane 
(Hunt) Gardner, was born May 13, 1854, at the "Twin Hills," Penn Township, 
Ja}' County, Indiana. 

Emer}' G. Rigby and Theturah C. Gardner were united in marriage De- 
cember 27, 1874, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, Joel Birdsall officia- 
ting. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

JVame Birth Death 

Eva Letta Rigby March 26. 1877 

Enos Lewis Rigby October 7, 1878 

Chella Maud Rigb\' November 15, 1886 

Nena Ellen Rigby April 18, 1893 

Eva L. and Enos L. were born at the "Twin Hills," in Penn Township, 
Chella M. in Jackson Township, and Nena E. at Balbec, Penn Township, all 
of Jav County, Indiana. 

Mrs. Rigby is of English and Scotch descent. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rigby lived in Penn Township some time after their mar- 
riage. They then purchased propert}' in Jackson Township, where they were 
engaged in agricultural pursuits several years, when they rented their farm and 
removed to Balbec, Jay Count)', Indiana. Here Mr. Rigby has been engaged 
in the blacksmith business for several years. 

**Week in, week out, from morn to night 

You can hear the bellows blow. 
You can hear him swing his heavy sledge, 

With measured beat and slow. 
Like a se.ston ringing the village bell. 

When the evening sun is low. 
And children coming home from school 

Look in at the open door, 
They love to see the flaming forge 

And hear the bellows roar, 
.\nd catch the burning sparks that fly 

Like chafi from a threshing floor." 

— Longfellow. 

JAMES L. AND SUSAN P. (BOND) RIGBY (5) 

James Lilburn Rigby, son of Aaron B. and Martlia .\. (Lewis) Rigby, 
was born July 9, 1854, in Penn Township. Jay County, Indiana. 

Susan Palenah Bond, daughter of Abijah and Mary Ann (Perry) Bond, 
was born April 23, 1858, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 203 

James L. Rigby and Susan P. Bond were united in marriage September 
2, 1876, in Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana, A. Bronson officiating. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rigby located on the "Old Bond Place" where they lived 
a few years. Subsequentl}' they purchased property in Penn Township, Jay 
County, Indiana, where they reside at the present time. 

Mrs. Rigby's ancestors were so closely connected with the early settling 
of Jay County, Indiana, that we will give a short sketch of their lives, most of 
which Mrs. Rigby contributed for the Record. 

Susan (Bond) Rigby's great great grandfather and mother, Joseph and 
Martha (Rogers) Bond came from England. The)' either became acquainted 
during the voyage or after they arrived in America, as they were not married 
until after landing in the United States. Their son Edward, great grandfather 
of Mrs. Rigby, married Anna Mills, daughter of Sarah (Bales) Mills. They 
were married in North Carolina, afterward moving to Virginia, where their fam- 
ily was raised. Their son Joshua Bond, who was born November 28, 1781, in 
North Carolina, married Ruth Coffin, daughter of Libini and Hepsibeth (Star- 
buck) Coffin, who was born on Nantucket Island and afterward came to North 
Carolina. They were married in Virginia. In 1812 Edward Bond and family 
and son Joshua Bond and family, removed to Wayne County, Indiana, and settled 
near Richmond where Edward Bond died at the age of eighty-four years. He 
furnished a part of the ground for the Quaker church and graveyard at Rich- 
mond, Indiana, and gave the land (three acres) for the Goshen church and 
graveyard, north of Richmond. All of the Bonds were Quakers. 

The Jay County history says: "About 1835 three new settlers came to 
the 'Camden Settlement,' Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. They were 
Joshua Bond, William Swallow and Elihu Hamilton. Mr. Bond had for a 
few years previous lived with his family on a farm which he had purchased at 
Winchester, Randolph County, on which part of that town is now situated. 
He entered land in Penn Township, a mile and a quarter east and a quarter of a 
mile north of Pennville, and then returned to his former home. His son Abijah, 
twenty-seven years of age, then went to Pen 11 Township and got logs ready 
to raise a cabin on his father's land. When he had the material in readiness, 
he sent for his father and one or two other men to come from Winchester to 
help raise the house, as there were not enough men in that vicinity to do the 
work. Joshua Bond was fifty-four years old the day he started for Penn Town- 
ship, but he walked all the way from Winchester that day, and the next day, 
November 29, 1835 he helped raise the house. This was only a temporary 
cabin, having nothing but a dirt floor and quilts hung up to the openings 
for doors and window^s. Joshua Bond and family moved the next spring — 1836 
— to their new home. A few years later they erected a large substantial house 
of hewn logs, consisting of six large rooms and a lower porch running the whole 
length of the house. 



204 



RFXORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 



"One of the rooms was used as a weaving room. At the foot of the hill 
there was a fresh water spring. Here, in 1836, the 'Old Mill,' that was so 
much appreciated by the early settlers, was built. Abijah Bond helped to build 
the mill. Here people could go and get their work done for a small trifle in 
return, usually giving a part of their grist for the use of the mill. All earh' 
histories pay tribute to the Old Bond Mill." 

The following paragraph was copied from an early Jay County History-: — 

"The prudent forethought of Joshua Bond led him to bring a pair of 
hand mill stones when he came to Jay County. These he made into a hand 
grist mill, in the spring of 1836, which was the first mill in that county. There 
was much rejoicing in the vicinity when this successor to the 'Hominy Block' 
was put into operation. It was constantly thronged, each man grinding his 
own grist, no toll being charged. But it would by no means supply the de- 
mand. Mr. Bond soon fixed it to run by horse power. This contrivance also 
failed to supply the wants of the region, and in 1837 Mr. Bond built a good mill 
which was run by from four to eight horses. Tliat was the most celebrated 
mill ever erected in Jay County. To it the settlers flocked from far and near, 
some coming twenty miles. No public improvement was ever more welcome to 
the needy settlers. Sometimes so many would be at the mill over night that 
there was not room on the floor of Mr. Bond's house for them all to lie down. 
This mill was in the basement of the log barn, where afterward the threshing 
machine was built. That was the first threshing machine in the country. The 
customers then brought their grain to the mill in sheaves and took it away in 
flour. What modern mill can excel this pioneer establishment ? " 

A little to the east of the "Old Bond House" was the kiln where Abijah 
Bond and Levi Johnson burned the first brick that were made in Jay County. 

Joshua Bond made the coffin for the first man who died in Jackson 
Township, Jay County. Aaron Rigby died September, 1837, and there being 
no lumber, his coffin was made of "puncheons" (boards split out of logs and 
hewed instead of being sawed) by Mr. Bond. Thus we can see the philan- 
thropy of this man, who did so much toward the advancement of the earh' 
settling of Jay County. He died September 16, 1876, on the " Old Home- 
stead " in Penn Township, Indiana, aged ninety-four years, nine months and 
eighteen days, and he was buried in the Friends' Cemeter}', of Pennville. 

Abijah Bond was characterized by the same qualities of mind and heart 
as those of his father. He was born February 12, 1808, in Virginia, and at the 
age of four years came with his parents and grandparents to Wayne County, 
Indiana, where lie lived until twentj'-seven years of age. 

He often told about riding with his grandfather Edward Bond to mill at 
Richmond, when the town was first being built. They went on horseback, 
carrying a sack of corn on the horse in front of them. 

While living there near Richmond, he run a flaxseed oil mill. He would 
get about thirty barrels of the oil ready and sell it, making the balance of the 
flaxweed into cakes, which was sold as food for stock. 



RFCORD OF THE LEWIS I-AMII.Y 205 

After removing to Jay County he often prepared and drew to Richmond 
a wagon load of bacon, which required a fotir-horse team, and then it would 
only sell for about sixteen dollars. 

Just to give an idea of the strength and perseverance of our subject we 
will relate one of his feats. He and one of his cousins, who were going to 
make the trip to Winchester, a distance of about 30 miles, on foot, decided to 
test their endurance and see how quickly they could make the trip. About 
sunrise they started on a slow trot, wdiich they maintained the whole distance, 
arriving in Winchester about half past one that afternoon. It will be remem- 
bered that the paths were rough, their guide posts blazed trees, and they got 
off from the track once, but soon resumed the lost trail, never hesitating in their 
gait until they reached their destination. 

It was Abijah Bond who built the threshing machine. He had been in 
Winchester, and a man who had seen a threshing machine gave Mr. Bond a 
description of it, telling him as near as possible how it was built. Mr. Bond 
returned home and immediately begun the construction of a machine like that 
of which he had heard. When completed people came from far and near to 
see it as well as to use it. They hailed Its coming with delight. It was a great 
success for the people, but not much of a financial success for its owner, as he, 
with characteristic generosity, charged no toll for its use. 

Mr. Bond was a very successful hunter and in those days there was an 
abundance and variety of game. Sometimes he killed as many as five deer in 
one day. 

He helped to survey and cut out many of the roads in that county. In 
1850 Mr. Bond was married to Mary Ann Perry, by Ellis Davis, on the "Old 
Homestead " of Joshua Bond, in Penn Township. He then purchased pro- 
perty, the first land he owned being two or three miles south and a little east of 
his father's farm, but on account of failure of crops two 3'ears he lost this pro- 
perty. He had about one thousand hogs of which tiie greater share starved to 
death. He hauled them out by the sled load at a time. Some of the settlers 
came very near starving during these hard times. Mr. Bond got corn for bread 
of his father, thus preventing the family suffering. 

Mrs. Bond was the daughter of Nathan and Lydia (Thomas) Perry. 
She was born in 1830 and died August 13. 1867, in Green Township, Jay 
County, Indiana, and was buried in the Friends' Cemetery, of Pennville. 

Abijah Bond was a member of the Friends' Society, and his daughter, 
Mrs. Rigby, says: "He dearly loved his Quaker friends, and often talked 
about the old friend (Quakers. He always tried to be good and have the good 
will of the people. After grandfather's death, father got possession of the old 
farm by buying out tlie other heirs. During his life he owned several farms, 
but on account of a generous heart he died a poor man." Industry and per- 
severance, generosity and charity were his strongest characteristics. 

" He hath a tear for pily, and a hand 
Open as day for melting charity.'' 



2o6 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Abijah Bond died at the home of his daughter, Susan (Bond) Rigby, 
December 26, 1899, and was buried at the Friends' Cemeter)-, of Pennville. 



JOHN J. AND EMILY J. (RIGBY) PAXSON (5) 

Emily Jane Rigby. daughter of Aaron B. and Martha A. (Lewis) Rigby, 
was born February 7, 1862, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

John J. Paxson, son of Philip L and Anna J. (Peacock) Paxson, was 
born October 5. 1865, in Penn Township, Jay Count}', Indiana. 

John J. Paxson, and Emily J. Rigby were united in marriage August 29, 
1877, in Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana, A. Brunson officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Leila Fay Paxson March 8, 1887 

Lela May Paxson September i, 1890 

They were born in Penn Township, Jav County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paxson located in Penn Township, Ja}^ County, Indiana, 
where they lived several years. At the present time they reside in Jackson 
Township, of the same county and state, where they are engaged in farming. 

Mr. Paxson's early ancestors came over from England in 1682. 



STEPHEN M. AND MARY J. (LEWIS) STARBUCK (5) 

Mary Josephine Lewis, daughter of Morgan B. and Hattie (Hoover) 
Lewis, was born October 21, 1866, near West Grove, Jay Count}', Indiana. 

Stephen Millard Starbuck, son of Isaac and Sarah Ann (Dutterow) 
Starbuck. was born May 11, 1857, in Wayne County, Indiana. 

Mary J. Lewis and Stephen M. Starbuck were united in marriage 
December 23, 1883, near Grawn, Traverse County, Michigan. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Julius C. Starbuck May 12, 1885 

P'rancis Perry Starbuck June 29, 1887 

Oliver Morton Starbuck April 20, 1889 

Harry Starbuck February 28, 1892 

Blanche Starbuck September i, 1894 

Neal Starbuck September 7, 1896 .... August 6, 1898 

All were born near Grawn, Michigan. 

Neal died and was buried near Grawn, Michigan. 

Mr. and Mrs. Starbuck reside on a farm near Grawn, ^Michigan, where 
they are engaged in agricultural pursuits. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 207 

BANDOLA P. AND EDNA I. (LEWIS) HUNT (5) 

Edna Isora Lewis, daughter of Morgan B. and Hattie (Hoover) Lewis, 
was born March 30, 1870, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Bandola Pedrick Hunt, son of Mahlon and Deborah (Smith) Hunt, was 
born April 8, 1862, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Edna I. Lewis and Bandola P. Hunt were united in marriage May 3, 
1888, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Biith Death 
Hazel Margaret Hunt April 10, 1S93 

She was born in Dunkirk, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hunt moved to Dunkirk, Blackford County, Indiana, soon 
after their marriage, where he was employed as telegraph operator until 1894, 
when he was elected city treasurer of Dunkirk, for a term of four years. In 
1898 he was re-elected for another term of four years but on account of failing 
health he was forced to give up his work, and in 1899 he went to Colorado, 
leaving his wife to attend to his business as his deputy. She faithfully and 
successfully filled this office until 1901, when Mr. Hunt resigned his position 
and they moved to Montrose, Colorado, where Mr. Hunt is at present in the 
sheep business. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hunt are members of the Plymouth Congregational Church 
of Dunkirk, Indiana. 

WILLIAM C. AND LEELA E. (LEWIS) LeMASTER (5) 

Leela Edith Lewis, daughter of Morgan B. and Hattie (Hoover) Lewis, 
was born April 9, 1876, near West Grove, Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

William Clifford LeMaster, son of Luman Walker and Mary K. (Chew) 
LeMaster, was born September i, 1870, at Rose Hill, Darke County, Ohio. 

Leela E. Lewis and William C. LeMaster were united in marriage Aug- 
ust 20, 1892, in Penn Township, [ay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WEKl: HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Gladys Armoral LeMaster October 20, 1893 

Leela Lewis LeMaster March 20, 1897 

Gladys A. was born in Jay Coiint\, Indiana, and Leela at Elyria, Loraine 
County, Ohio. 

A short time after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. LeMaster moved to 
Elyria, Loraine County, Ohio, where Mr. LeMaster accepted a position in the 
Old Savings Deposit Bank, which office he held until 1901, when he resigned 
and became cashier for the Elyria Savings and Banking Company. 



2o8 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Mrs. LeMaster is a graduate from the common schools of Penn Town- 
ship. She is a member of the First Congregational Church, of Elyria, Ohio. 

Mr. LeMaster is of French and English descent. His father comes of a 
Methodist family of French descent, from Loraine, France. The name was 
originally LeMaitre. His mother was from New Jersey and is of English 
descent. After a common school education Mr. LeMaster attended the Normal 
College at Portland, Indiana, two terms, after which he taught in the public 
schools of Madison Township. Jay County, Indiana, one year. He then went 
to Oberlin, Ohio, where he graduated from the business college, Januar\', 1892. 



LINEAS Q. AND CHRISTINA L. (PAXSON) LEWIS (5) 

Lineas Q. Lewis, son of Joseph D. and Mary J. (Hopkins) Lewis, was 
born July 12, 1869, in Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Christina Leona Paxson, daughter of Joseph M. and Delilah B. (Manley) 
Pa.xson, was born November 20, 1870, near the Friends' Meeting House, called 
"Jericho," Whiteriver Township, Randolph County, Indiana, and died October 
26, 1898, near West Grove, Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. Interment 
in the Friends' Cemetery, of Pennville. 

Lineas Q. Lewis and Christina L. Paxson were united in marriage June 
4, 1892, in Portland, Jay County, Indiana, Rev. Elkanah Beard, a minister of 
the Friends' Society, officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name. Birth. Death. 

Joseph Leland Lewis April 14, 1893 

Waldo McKinley Lewis August 2, 1896 



They were born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis lived in Penn Tow-nship, Jav County, Indiana, until 
her death, after which, on account of the poor health of the two boys, Mr- 
Lewis took them and located on the western slope of Colorado, and they are 
at present living at Delta, Delta County, Colorado. 

Mr. Lewis is a graduate of the National Normal Business College, of 
Lebanon, Ohio, and taught in the public schools of Penn Township for seven 
years. In 1894 he was elected tow-nship assessor, and served in that capacity 
six years. Politically he is a Republican. 

Mrs. Lewis was a graduate of the Penn Township common scliools, and 
was a student in the Eastern Indiana Normal, of Portland, Jay County, Indiana, 
after which she taught in the public schools of Penn Township two years. 
She was of English and Irish descent. 

The following we copy from her death notice: "Her influence was 
singularly pure and sweet. In her quiet way she was always ready to say a 
kind word or do a good deed. In the home, in the Sunday school, in the 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 209 

Church and in the neighborhood she will be sadly missed, and long and tenderly 
remembered." 

She was a member of the United Brethren Church, of Gilead, near 
Balbec, Jay County, Indiana. 



CHARLES W. AND CARRIE F. (LEWIS) SMITH (5) 

Carrie Fay Lewis, daughter of Joseph D. and Mary J. ( Hopkins) Lewis, 
was born June 7, 1872, near West Grove, Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Charles William Smith, son of Dillwyn Parish and Sarali Elizabeth 
(Dugdale) Smith, was born December 25, 1870, in Penn Township, Jav County, 
Indiana. 

Carrie F. Lewis and Charles W. Smith were united in marriage January 
18, 1890, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Smith located in Fort Wayne, Indiana, soon after their 
marriage, where he was engaged as train dispatcher for the Grand Rapids & 
Indiana Railroad Company nine years. November, igoi, Mr. Smith resigned 
his position with the G. R. & I. R. R. Co. to accept a similar one with the 
Santa Fe Pacific Railroad Company, locating at Needles, San Bernardino, 
California. 



CHESTER P. AND HYLINDIA A. (NINDE) DORLAND (5) 

Hylindia Atlantic Ninde, daughter of Henry P. and Mary E. (Gray) 
Ninde, was born April 13, 1853, in Whitley County, Indiana. 

Chester P. Borland, son of and ( ) 

Borland, was born , in 

Chester P. Borland and Hylindia A. Ninde were united in marriage July 
12, 1876, in Oskaloosa, Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Natrw Birth Death 

Mary Cosette Borland June 3, 1882 

She was born in Algona, Kossuth County, Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Borland reside in Los Angeles, California, where he is 
engaged in the ministry. 



FRANK W. AND RACHEL (NINDE) HIATT (5j 

Rachel Ninde, daughter of Henry P. and Mary E. (Gray) Ninde, was 
born March 2, 1863, in Ft. Wayne, Indiana. 



2IO RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Frank W. Hiatt. son of Ehvood and Mar)' B. (Moorman) Hiatt, was 
born December 3, 1856, in Martinsville, Clinton County, Ohio. 

Frank W. Hiatt and Rachel Ninde were united in marriage June 8, 1889, 
in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Katherine Hiatt March 18, i8gi 

Doroth)' Hiatt September 8, 1894 

Josephine Hiatt April 14, i8g6 

Elvyn Ninde Hiatt Januar\' i, 1902 

Katherine was born in Oskaloosa, Iowa, Dorothy and Josephine in 
Boone, Iowa, and Elvyn N. in Eldorado Springs, Missouri. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hiatt reside in Eldorado Springs, Missouri, where he is 
engaged in the electric light and telephone business. 



CLARENCE A. AND RHODA T. (NINDE) ROSS (5) 

Rhoda Trixy Ninde, daughter of Henry P. and Mary E. (Gray) Ninde, 
was born May 3, 1871, in Oskaloosa, Iowa. 

Clarence Allen Ross, son of William A. and Louisa ( ) Ross, 

was born November 26, 1864, in St. Louis, Missouri. 

Clarence A. Ross and Rhoda T. Ninde were united in marriage Septem- 
ber 29, 1892, in Oskaloosa, Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Leila Louise Ross February 22, 1894 

Linden Ninde Ross March 23, 1895 

Clarence Allen Ross June 3, 1898 

Leila L. and Linden N. were born in Kansas City, Missouri, and Clar- 
ence A. in Austin, Illinois. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ross reside in Evanston, Illinois, where he is engaged in 
the electric light business. 



EVI A. AND MARY E. (SUMPTION ROBBINS 1 5) 

Mary Eudora Sumption, daughter of John and Sarah C. (Gra\) Sump- 
tion, was born December 15, 1854, in Penn Township, Jay Count)', Indiana, 
and died February 29, 1888, in Portland, Indiana. 

Evi A. Robbins, son of Amos and Mary (Adams) Robbins, was born 
in , 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 211 

Evi A. Robbins and Mary E. Sumption were united in marriage Septem- 
ber i6, 1878, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Minnie Izora Robbins 

John Ames Robbins 

Frederick Robbins 

They were born in Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robbins located in Portland, where he was engaged in 
Cartwright & Headington's mercantile establishment a number of years. 



LOGAN AND EVA I. (SUMPTION) CANADA (5) 

Eva Izora Sumption, daughter of John and Sarah C. (Gray) Sumption, 
was born December ii, 1857, in Penn Township, Jay Count}^ Indiana. 

Logan Canada, son of Oliver and Martha A. (Martin) Canada, was born 
in . 

Logan Canada and Eva I. Sumption were united in marriage September 
12, 1885, in Baker Township, Morgan County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 
Flossie May Canada May 30, 1886 

She was born in Paragon, Ray Township, Morgan County, Indiana. 
Mr. and Mrs. Canada reside in Bloomington, Indiana, where Mr. 
Canada is engaged in the blacksmith business. 



CHARLES E. S. AND MARCIA A. SUMPTION) RICE (5) 

Marcia Ann Sumption, daughter of Jolm and Sarah C. (Gray) Sumption, 
was born October 31, i860, in Penn Townsliip. Jay County, Indiana. 

Charles Edgar Smeltzer Rice, son of Edward and Marcia (Smeltzer) 

Rice, was born December i, 1855, in Maryland, and died April 

22, 1888, in Baker Township, Morgan County, Indiana. 

Charles E. S. Rice and Marcia Sumption were united in marriage No- 
vember 18, 1881, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 
Irma Ethlyn Rice February 27, 1883 



Alta Pearl Rice August 7.1, 1885 



212 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Inna E. was born in Portland, Jay County, and Alta P. in Baker Tow-n- 
ship, Morgan County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rice located near Martinsville, Morgan County, Indiana, 
where Mr. Rice was engaged in the nursery business. 

Irma E. attended the Bloomington schools several years, and began 
teaching in tlic public schools when she was seventeen years of age. After 
teaching two terms she decided to take a course in stenography, and entered 
Miss Little's School for Shorthand and Typewriting in Bloomington, Indiana, 
in igoi. The following spring she graduated, and immediately after her gradu- 
ation the Remington Typewriter Company, of Indianapolis, Indiana, secured a 
position for her Vvith the D. M. Parry Manufacturing Company, in Indianapolis. 
They are the largest manufacturers of buggies in the world. 

Alta P. is still attending high school in Bloomington, Indiana, 

After Mr. Rice's death Mrs. Rice was again married. 



THOMAS AND MARCIA A. (SUMPTION) > RICE) GOODMON (5) 

Thomas Goodmon, son of Jackson and Julia Ann (Farr) Goodmon, was 
born September 26, 1856, in Monroe County Indiana, and died April 20, 1900, 
in Baker Township, Morgan County. Indiana. Interment in the Union Cem- 
etery, of the same township. 

Thomas Goodmon and Marcia (Sumption) Rice were united in marriage 
November 17, i88g, in Baker Township, Morgan County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Paul Ray Goodmon January 11, 1890 

He was born in Baker Township, Morgan County, Indiana. 



Mr. and Mrs. Goodmon located in Baker Township, w'here he was 
engaged in farming. Mr. Goodmon served two terms as trustee for Baker 
township. 

JOHN F. AND ALICE (FARR) REGESTER (5) 

John Franklin Regester son of Robert and Sarah C. (Gray") (Sumption) 
Regester, was born August 8, 1870, in Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Alice Farr. daughter of James Barker and Nancy Elizabeth (Burton) 
Farr, was born November 16, 1869, in Baker Township, Morgan County, 
Indiana. 

John F. Regester and Alice Farr were united in marriage September 6, 
1891, in Baker Township, Morgan County Indiana. 



kKLORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 2l3 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Ethel Atlantic Regester August 5, 1892 ...July 20, 1895 

Edith Eudora Regester February 19, 1894 

Elvyn Austin Regester November 8, 1897 

John Franklin Regester September 11, 1900 . . . .July 9, 1901 

Ethel A. and Edith E. were born in Baker Township, and Elvyn and 
John F. in Bloomington, Morgan County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Regester reside in Bloomington, Indiana, where he is 
manager and proprietor of a restaurant. Mr. Regester was formerly engaged in 
farming and is the owner of two farms, also one or two barber shops. 



LINLEY O. AND EMMA (BOND) GRAY (5) 

Linley Otis Cray, son of Thomas and Matilda A. (Rigby) Gray, was 
born October 16, i86o, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Emma Bond, daughter of Edward and Margaret ( ) Bond was 

born in . 

Linley O. Gray and Emma Bond were united in marriage 

m , Norton County, Kansas. 



TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Guy H. Gray August 1899 

Zoe D. Gray 

They were born near Lenora, Norton County, Kansas. 

Guy H. died in Kansas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gray located on a farm near Lenora, Kansas, where they 
lived several years and were engaged in farming. Subsequently they removed 
to Baxter Springs, Kansas, where Mr. Gray is proprietor and manager of a 
grocery and restaurant. 



LYONEL H. AND CARRIE (MOORE) GRAY (5) 

Lyonel Harlington Gray, son of Thouias .L. and Matilda A. ( Rigb)) 
Gray, was born July 27, 1862, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Carrie Moore, daughter of Charles B. and Louisa M. (James) Moore, 
was born April 7, 1863, in Rushville, Schuyler County, Illinois. 

Lyonel H. Gray and Carrie Moore were united in marriage March 25, 
1888, in Alma, Harlan County, Nebraska, Elder C. \V. Anthony, of the livan- 
gelical church, officiating. 



214 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 
Elva Grace Gray April 13, 1890 



Hazel D. Gra}- December 23, i8gi 

Elva G. was born in McCook, Nebraska, and Hazel in Salt Lake City, 
Utah. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gray lived in Nebraska a few years after their marriage, 
then removed to Salt Lake City where they reside at the present time. Mr. 
Gray is a land and mining attorney, authorized to represent land and mining 
claimants before the U. S. Land Office and the General Land Office and the 
Secretary of the Interior. 

From I1S85 to 1897 he was a government employe in the U. S. Land 
Office, at Bloomington and McCook, Nebraska, and Salt Lake City, Utah. 

WILLIAM F. AND LOUELLA D. (GRAY) ROUNTREE (5) 

Louella Delilah Gray, daughter of Thomas L. and Matilda A. (Rigby) 
Gray, was born August 12, 1864, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

William Frances Rountree, son of E. D. and Mary E. (Friend) Roun- 
tree, W'as born May 21, 1866, in Perry County, Illinois. 

William F. Rountree and Louella D. Gray, were united in marriage May 
18, 1892, in Norton, Kansas, William S. Gray, Probate Judge, officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Narne Birth Death 

Leo G. Rountree January 9, 1893 

Edith Joyce Rountree March 15, 1897 

They were born in Norton County, Kansas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rountree reside near Norton, where they are engaged in 
farming. They are members of the Christian church. 

Mrs. Rountree was educated in the Penn Township public schools and 
the Pennville Normal school, after which she taught in the public schools of 
Wells County, Indiana, one term, and of the Norton County, Kansas, schools 
five terms. 

Mr. Rountree is of Irish descent. 

FRANCIS E. AND ANGELINE (UPTYGRAPH) GRAY (S) 

Francis Elvin Gray, son of Thomas L. and Matilda A. (Rigby) Gray, 
was born June 4, 1870, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Angeline Uptygraph, daughter of William and Emaline (Albertson) 
Uptygraph, was born February 28, 1876, near Domestic, Wells County, Indiana. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY iI5 

Francis E. Gray and Angeline Uptygraph were united in marriage No- 
vember 27, 1894, in Portland, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Erma Icle Gray November 22, 1895 

Lloyd Harley Gray May 28, i8g8 

Orma Ivolene Gray February 20, 1901 .... 

Erma I. and Lloyd H. were born in Penn Township, Jay County, 
Indiana, and Orma I. in Baxter Springs, Kansas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gray lived in Penn Township, Jay County, hidiana, sev- 
eral years after their marriage, where they were engaged in farming. In i8g8 
they removed to Baxter Springs, Kansas, where they purchased a grocery and 
were successfully engaged in that business until 1901, when their grocery was 
destroyed by fire. They then returned to their former home in Indiana, where 
they purchased a farm and are engaged in farming. 

Mr. Gray taught in the public schools of Norton County, Kansas, prior 
to his marriage. 



CHARLES C. AND MINNIE I. (GRAY) WINGET (5) 

Minnie Isidore Gray, daughter of Morgan L. and Phoebe (Hughes) 
Gray, was born December 5, 1871, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Charles Clarence Winget, son of Francis and Sarah (Somers) Winget, 
was born June 30, 1865, in Knox Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Charles C. Winget and Minnie I. Gray were united in marriage June 2, 
1897, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Mary Cosette Winget March 30, \i 



le 



Eleanor Winget August 10, 1899 

Morgan Hughes Winget October 31, igoi 

They were born in Pennville, Jay County Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Winget reside near Pennville, where he is employed in t 
oil department of the Portland Natural Gas & Oil Company, in which capacity 
he has worked ten years. Previous to that time he was a teacher in the public 
schools of Jay County three years. Politically he is a Republican. 

Mrs. Winget was educated in the Pennville Public Schools, from which 
she graduated in i88g, and the Portland Normal College. She then took up 
the profession of teaching, which she followed seven years, having taiigiit in 
the common schools of Penn Township and the city schools of Portland and 
Dunkirk, all in Jay County, Indiana. 



2l6 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 



GEORGE AND JESSIE M. (GRAY) VAN DALL C5) 

Jessie M. Gray, daughter of Morgan L. and Phoebe E. (Hughes) Gray, 
was born September 28, 1874, i^ Domestic, Wells County, Indiana. 

George \"an Dall, son of Edward and Caroline ( Hill) \'an Dall, was born 
July 23, 1868, near Marietta, Ohio. 

George Van Dall and Jessie M. Gray were united in marriage November 
5, 1895, in Pennville, Jay Count}', Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 
Oral Kathleen Van Dall September 3. i8g6 

She was born in Pennville, Jaj" County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Van Dall reside in Marietta, Ohio, Mr. Van Dall being 
engaged in contracting and operating in the oil fields of Ohio. 

Mrs. Van Dall is a member of the Eastern Star lodge. 

Mr. Van Dall is a member of the Masonic lodge, of Pennville, the 
Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen. Politically he is a Democrat. 



GEORGE W. AND VIOLA C. (BROWN) SWANEY (5) 

\'iola Campsadell Brown, daughter of John and Mary A. (Lewis) Brown, 
was born November 13. 1862, near Fiat, Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, 
and died November 21, 1894, at the place of her birth. Interment at West 
Grove, in Penn Township. 

George Wesley Swaney, son of William and Barbara (Christian) Swaney, 
was born April 14, i860, near New Corydon, Wabash Township, Jay County, 
Indiana, and died August 4, 1895, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 
IntL-rment at West Grove. 

George W . Swane\' and Viola C. Brown were united in marriage August 
30, 1884, at the home of Albert Brunson, Justice of the Peace, in Jackson 
Township, Jay Count}-, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Natne Birth Death 
Orlando Floyd Swaney May 15, 1888 

He was born near Fiat, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mrs. Swaney was a firm believer in the truth of Spiritualism, and 
departed earth life in that faith. 

Mr. and Mrs. Swaney lived in Penn Township, where they were engaged 
in farming until the spring of 1892, when Mr. Swaney accepted a position as oil 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILV 2l7 

pumper, pumping the wells on his own and one adjoining farm in Jackson 
Township, Jay County, Indiana, where they moved the following spring. 



JEROME B. AND MARY A. (LEWIS) HOPKINS (5) 

Mary Adaline Lewis, daughter of Lorenzo D. and Elizabeth ( Haines) 
Lewis, was born September 24, 1850, in Monroe County, Ohio. 

Jerome B. Hopkins, son of Ambrose and Eliza (Gardner) Hopkins, was 
born December 25, 1849, at the "Twin Hills," Penn Township, Jay County, 
Indiana. 

Jerome B. Hopkins and Mary A. Lewis were united in marriage Decem- 
ber 24, 1870, in Jay County, Indiana, Joel Birdsall, Esq., officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Eliza Elizabeth Hopkins January 24, 1872 

Oleta Oceola Hopkins February 21, 1873 ...June 11, 1897 

Cora Evaline Hopkins August 7, 1874 

Jennie May Hopkins May 1 1, 1876 

Nellie Blanche Hopkins November 7, 1877 

Jessie Delphine Hopkins March 16, 1881 

Charlie Monroe Hopkins June 29, 1887 

Alva Lewis Hopkins November 4, 1888 ....February 13, 1889 

Harry Alonzo Hopkins November 26, 1892 ....October 16, 1893 

Eliza E., Oleta O., Cora E., Jennie M. and Nellie B. were born in Jackson 
Township, Jay County, Indiana, and Jessie D., Charlie M. Alva L. and Harry 
A. were born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Alva L. and Harry A. died in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Soon after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins located on eighty 
acres of land which the former's father had deeded to them. Mr. Hopkins soon 
erected a log house and barn, and by their united efforts they soon had a com- 
fortable home there in the woods. During the seven years in which they lived 
there they did much toward clearing and improving that land. In 1879 they 
moved to the "Lorenzo Lewis Farm" where they lived three years, at the end 
of which time they purchased the "Old Home Farm," of Embrose Hopkins, 
sold their home in Jackson Township, and removed to their new home, where 
they still reside. Many improvements liave been made since their residence 
there, the result of united industry. 

Mr. Hopkins's early life was spent in assisting his father on the farm until 
he was seventeen years of age. While helping his father cut wood he acciden- 
tally cut his knee with an a.\ and was confined to his bed most of the time dur- 
ing the following three years. This left the knee joint stiff, thus making him a 
cripple for life. After lie had recovered from this sad accident he entered 



2l8 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

school in Liber College in 1868, where he finished his education, afterward 
teaching one term of school in Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. Hopkins is a Republican and has always been active and interested 
in political work. He owns one of the best gravel pits in Jay County, and has 
managed and overseen a great deal of the pike building in the county. His 
father was born in Maryland, and was of English descent. 

Jennie M., having completed her school education, is living at home 
where she assists her parents. 

Jessie D., having received a good common school education accepted a 
position in the Lion Store, at Anderson, Indiana, where she has been employed 
two years. She makes her home with Rev. and Mrs. Willmore, a United 
Brethren minister. 

Charlie M. is living at home, where he spends his time attending school 
and assisting his father on the farm. 



AMOS M. AND HANNAH E. (LEWIS) REGESTER (5) 

Hannah Emaline Lewis, daughter of Lorenzo D. and Elizabeth (Haines) 
Lewis, was born January 6, 1S52, in Harrison County, Ohio. 

Amos Martin Regester, son of Thomas and Mary (Williams) Regester, 
was born July 21, 1852, in Indiana. 

Amos M. Regester and Hannah E. Lewis were united in marriage 
October 11, 1873, at the home of the bride's parents, in Penn Township, Jay 
County Indiana, Joel Birdsall, Esq., officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Ora Anna Regester July 14, 1875 ....September 10, 1900 

Mary Ethel Regester March 21, 1880 

Lulu May Regester January 13, 1885 

Elota Fay Regester April 21, 1891 

They were born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. After their 
oldest daughter's death they took her little son, Elmer L. , to raise. 

Mr. and Mrs. Regester own a farm in Penn Township, Jay County, 
Indiana, where they are engaged in agricultural pursuits. Mr. Regester is also 
a good blacksmith and carpenter, and for the past two years has been engaged 
in rig building for the oil companies in Indiana. 



NATHAN AND TACY J. (LEWIS SCOTT (5) 

Tacy Jane Lewis, daughti-r of Loreuiio D. and Eli/.abeth (^Haines") Lewis, 
was born May 8, 1855, in IVnn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY SIQ 

Nathan Scott, son of Stanton and Esther (Edmundson ) Scott, was born 
February 21, 1842, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Nathan Scott and Tacy J. Lewis were united in marriage October 11, 
1873, at the home of the bride's parents, in Penn Township, Jay County, 
Indiana, Joel Birdsall, Esq., officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Na?ne Birth Death 

Elva Retta Scott February 5, 1875 

Tarleton Scott August 13, 1878 

They were born near Keystone, Wells County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Scott located on land near Keystone, Wells County, soon 
after their marriage, where they have since been engaged in farming. Their 
land lies in an oil district, and several valuable wells have been drilled on it. 
They are members of the Friends' Society. 

Mr. Scott is a finely educated man and was a teacher in the public 
schools several years prior to his marriage. He has always taken an active 
interest in the education and upbuilding of his country. Politically he is a 
Republican. He is of Scotch and English descent. 

Elva R. graduated from the Pennville high school, in the spring of 1897, 
and has since made her home with her parents. 

Tarleton hnished his course in the common school and afterward took a 
course in the business college at Muncie, Indiana, and at present is engaged in 
farming his father's land, in Weils County. 

EMERY T. AND MARY E. (LETTS) LEWIS l5) 

Emery Timothy Lewis, son of Lorenzo D. and PZlizabeth ( Haines) 
Lewis, was born November 15, 1857. in Penn Township, Jay Count)', Indiana. 

Mary Emaline Letts, daughter of William and Adaline (Hopkins) Letts, 
was born February 11, 1863, in Jay County, Indiana. 

Emery T. Lewis and Mary E. Letts were united in marriage 

, in Jay County, Indiana, Albert Ihunson, Esq., officiating. 

TO IHEM WKKh; HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Minnie Lewis February 8, 1885 

William Adelnia Lewis March 3, 1887 

They were born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis located on the "Old Homestead" formerly owned 
by his fatlier. Mr. Lewis purchased this property and has since made many 
improvements on it. In the place of the -'old log cabin" he has erected a large 
frame house and other buildings that are necessary where farming is carried on 
sucessfuUy. 



220 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Minnie has graduated in the common school and is now attending high 
school at Kennville. 



SOLOMON AND HILINDA E. LEWIS) GRABLE (5) 

Hilinda Ellen Lewis, daughter of Lorenzo D. and Elizabeth (Haines) 
Lewis, was born January 23, 1862, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Solomon Grable, son of Jason and Hulda (Miller) Grable, was born 
August 24, 1861, in Crawford County, Kansas, and died June 15, 1895, in Penn 
Township, Jav County. Indiana. 

Solomon (irable and Hilinda E. Lewis were united in marriage at the 
home of the bride's aunt, Lydia E. Farrington, February 21, 1884, near Box- 
elder, Mills County, Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE ISORN 

Name Birth Dfath 

Roscoe Lewis Grable March 31, 1885 

Raymond Arthur Cirable May 4, 1886 

Bessie May Grable December 14, 1887 

Worlie Lavelle Grable February 17, 1890 

Erma Laverne Grable March 4, 1895 

Roscoe D. and Raymond A. were born near Henderson, Mills County, 
Iowa, Bessie M. near Howarden, Sioux County, Iowa, Worlie L. and Erma L. 
in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grable lived in Mills and Sioux County, Iowa, for some 
time after their marriage. In 1892 they removed to the state of Washington, 
locating near Ilwaco, in Pacific County, where he was engaged in fishing. 
Four years later they removed to Indiana and purchased a farm in Penn Town- 
ship, Jay County, where they lived until Mr. Grable's death. Mrs. Grable 
then rented the farm and purchased a pleasant and comfortable home near 
Balbec, where she is raising and educating her children. They expect to 
return to the farm as soon as the boys are old enough to attend to the farm 
work. 

Mr. Grable was of English and Dutch descent. 



EDWIN W. AND MARTHA A. (ENGLE) LEWIS (5) 

Edwin Wilmer Lewis, son of Lorenzo D. and Elizabeth (Haines) Lewis, 
was born January 24, i86g, in Penn Township, Jay Count}', Indiana. 

Martha A. Engle, daughter of Isaac and Ann (Hopkins) Engle, was born 
October 22, 1871, in Jay County, Indiana. 

Edwin W. Lewis and Martha A. Engle were united in marriage Februaiy 
9, i88g, in Jay County, Indiana. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 221 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Guy Elmer Lewis January 25, 1890 

Milo Clifton Lewis February 27, 1892 

Blanche Maurea Lewis December 21, 1894 

Mildred Elo Lewis October 22, 1897 

Walter Lorenzo Lewis October 14, igoo 

They were all born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, except Guy, 
who was born in Wells County, of the same state. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis located on a farm in Penn Township in 1890 where 
they have since resided. 

Mr. Lewis was but nine years of age when his father died and he was 
left in the care of his grandmother, Hannah (Tomlinson) Haines, who kept 
house for his father a number of years. 



LORENZO H. AND ELIZABETH (COOVER) BROWN (5) 

Lorenzo Harvey Brown, son of Jehu and Tacy T. (Lewis) Brown, was 
born July 8, 1853, near Malaga, Monroe County, Ohio. 

Elizabeth Coover, daughter of Samuel and Mary Ann (Guslar) Coover, 
was born January 26, 1856, in Darke County, Ohio. 

Lorenzo H. Brown and Elizabeth Coover were united in marriage March 
14, 1875, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana, George W. Falkner officiating- 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Oelo Pearl Brown January 30, 1876 

Ida Myrtle Brown August 14, 1878 

John Lester Brown August i , 1 88 1 ... 

Jehu Arett Brown July 31, 1883 ... September 3, 1899 

Beulah Lea Brown March 8, 1 886 

Roscoe Casper Brown November 14, 1889 

Theo Othwell Brown July 11, 1892 

Mary Ople Brown August 20, 1895 

Samuel Clifford Brown February 13, 1899 

Oelo P. and John L. were born near Pennville, Jay County, Ida M. and 
Jehu A. near Balbec, Beulah L. Roscoe C. and Theo O. near Fiat, Samuel 
C. in Dunkirk, all of the same county, and Mary O. near Cowan, Delaware 
County, all in the state of Indiana. 

Jehu A. died and was buried at Alliany, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brown are also raising their little granddaughter, Nellie 
Francis Brown, who was born November 30, 1894, near Cowan, Delaware 
County, Indiana. 



222 RECORD OK THK LKWIS KAMII.Y 

Mr. and Mrs. Brown reside in Alban3^ Delaware Count}', Indiana, at the 
present time, where he engaged in "cleaning glass" in tne bottle factory. 
Most of his life has been spent in farming, but since 1897 he has been employed 
in the glass factories of Dunkirk and Albany, Indiana. 

Mrs. Brown is of Dutch descent. 

They are members of the Friends' Society. 



FERNANDO F. AND ALICE M. (REAPE) FARRINGTON (5) 

Fernando Frank Farrington, son of Joseph and Lydia E. (Lewis) Far- 
rington, was born October 17, 1861, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Alice May Reape, daughter of Thomas A. and Marietta (Gregory) Reape, 
was born May 12, 1873, in Cedar Falls, Black Hawk County, Iowa. 

Fernando F. Farrington and Alice M. Reape were united in marriage 
April 30, 1891, in Sioux City, Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Hazel Vernie Farrington February 3, 1894 

Raymond Lyle Farrington December 24, 1897 

Harold Joy Farrington April 13, 1900 

Hazel V. was born at Belford, South Dakota, Raymond L. near Box- 
elder, Mills County, Iowa, and Harold J. near Bossko, Roberts County, South 
Dakota. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Farrington located in South Dakota. 
In 1900 they sold the "homestead" and are now located on Indian Land, under 
a three years' lease, where he is extensively engaged in farming and raising 
cattle. Their present address is Sunny Side or Sisseton Agency, Roberts 
County, South Dakota. 

Mr. Farrington was educated in the public schools and in the high school 
of Malvern, Mills County, Iowa, after which he taught penmanship for some 
time. He is a member of the Baptist Church. While living at Bossko he was 
elected Justice of the Peace, serving in that oflice four years, with honor to 
himself and credit to his friends. 

Mrs. Farrington is of Irish and Dutch descent. Her father was born 
in Ireland and emigrated to this country before his marriage. 

NEWTON L. AND CORA A. (FARRINGTON) JACKSON (5) 

Cora Atlantic I'arrington. daughter of Josipii \. and Lydia E. (Lewis) 
Farrington, was born December i S, r866, at Pedee, Cedar County, Iowa. 

Newton Loyd Jackson, son of John George and Celina (Norman) Jackson, 
was born August 6, 1861, in Johnson County, near Kansas City, Kansas. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 223 

Newton L. Jackson and Cora A. Farrington were united in marriage 
July 20, 1887, in Eden, South Dakota. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Lulu Zatho Jackson June 12, 1888 

Golda Hazel Jackson September 22, 1889 . . . .July 20, 1890 

Homer Howard Jackson December 25, 1890 

Lulu Z. and Golda H. were born near Howarden, Sioux County, Iowa, 
and Homer H. in Boxelder, Mills County, of the same state. 

Golda H. died near Howarden, Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jackson located near Howarden, Iowa, soon after their 
marriage, where they were engaged in farming. About i8go they removed to 
Mills County, Iowa. 

Mrs. Jackson was educated in the public schools, Malvern High School 
and the Shenandoah Normal College, the former in Mills County and the latter 
in Page County, Iowa. After finishing her education she taught music four 
years. She is a member of the Christian Church. 

Mr. Jackson is of Irish and English descent. 

Cora A. (Farrington) Jackson was married the second time. 

JOHN R. AND CORA A. (FARRINGTON) (JACKSON) MAYNES (5) 

John Reithford Maynes, son of William and Levina (Reithford) Maynes, 
was born November 2, 1854, at Liberty, Union County, Indiana. 

John R. Maynes and Cora A. (Farrington) Jackson were united in mar- 
riage August 24, 1895, at Boxelder, Mills County, Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

John Verne Maynes May iS, i8g6 

Joe William Maynes August 12, 1897 

They were born near Macedonia, Pottawattamie County, Iowa. 
Mr. and Mrs. Maynes reside near Macedonia, Iowa, where he is engaged 
in dealing in live stock. Mr. Maynes is of Scotch and Irish descent. 

LORENZO L. AND ALICE E. iBOICOURT) FARRINGTON (5^ 

Lorenzo Lewis Farrington, son of Joseph A. and Lydia E. (Ltwis) I'ar- 
rington, was born October 19, 1869, at Pedee, Cedar County, Iowa. 

Alice Elziada Boicourt, daughter of Elihu and Nancy Jane (Blouse) 
Boicourt, was born December 29, 1869, in Decatur County, Indiana, and died 
July 8, 1897 at Meadow Grove, Madison County, Nebraska. 



2 24 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Lorenzo L. Farrington and Alice E. Boicourt were united in marriage 
February 20, 1895, near Macedonia, Pottawattamie County, Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 
Elizabeth Jane Farrington March 28, 1897 

She was born at Meadow Grove, Nebraska. 

Mr. and Mrs. Farrington located in Harrison County, Iowa, where they 
were engaged in farming for a short time. In 1897 they removed to Madison 
County Nebraska, locating on a farm near Meadow Grove. They had only 
lived here a short time when the dreadful accident which caused the death of 
Mrs. Farrington occurred. She and her sister and the baby were alone in the 
house, her husband having gone to the field to work, when in some way her 
clothes got on fire and in her terror she ran out doors and around the house, 
and in spite of the brave efforts of her sister and the best of medical aid, was so 
badly burned that her life could not be saved. She was laid to rest in the 
McCoy Cemetery, after which Mr. Farrington and little daughter "Bessie" 
returned to his father's home near Silver City, Mills County, Iowa, when 
little "Bessie" was received into the home of Grandpa and Grandma Farrington, 
who have since given her the kindest and best of care. 

Mr. and Mrs. Farrington were members of the Christian Church. The 
latter was of French and Dutch descent. 



OTIS E. AND IDA M. i BRYANT) FARRINGTON (5) 

Otis Eugene Farrington, son of Joseph A. and Lydia E. (Lewis) Far- 
rington, was born December 12, 1875, at Boxelder, Mills Count}', Iowa. 

Ida Marrinda Bryant, daughter of Lyman and Sarah Catherine (Blair) 
Bryant, was born November 30, 1875, at New Windsor, Mercer County, Illinois. 

Otis E. Farrington and Ida M. Bryant were united in marriage February 
26, 1896, near Silver City, Mills County, Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Otis Roy Farrington October 4, 1898 

Velna Pearl Farrington March 24, 1902 

Otis K. was born near Mariaville, Rock County, Nebraska, and Velna P. 
near Silver City, Mills County, Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Farrington moved to Rock County, Nebraska, in 1897, 
living there two years, and then returned to their former home near Silver City, 
where they live at the present time, and are engaged in farming. 

Mr. Farrington is a member of the Christian Church, and Mrs. Farring- 
ton of the Methodist Church. She is of Scotch and Canadian descent. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 225 

ROY E. AND MARY E. (WINSETT. DE WEES < 5) 

Roy Emerson DeWees, son of Benjamin L. and Elizabeth (Scott) 
DeWees, was born July g, 1872, in Penn Township, Jay Count)', Indiana. 

Mary Edna Winsett, daughter of Laban and Anna R. ( Buckheadj Win- 
sett, was born October 12, 1875, in Le Grand, Lama County, Iowa. 

Roy E. DeWees, and Mary E. Winsett were united in marriage Novem- 
ber 4, 1897, ii Parker City, Indiana, Rev. George Green officiating. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name ' Birth Di-allt 
Benjamin Laban DeWees April 22, 1899 

He was born in Keystone, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. DeWees reside in Keystone, Indiana, where Mr. DeW'ees 
is a successful practicing physician and surgeon. 

Dr. DeW'ees, physician and surgeon, attended the common schools of 
Penn Township, and taught in the public schools for some time. Subsequently 
he entered the Physio Medical College, of Marion, Indiana, from which he 
graduated in 1897, then took a post graduate course in the Chicago Clinical 
Institute, during the summer of 1901. 

Mrs. DeWees is of Scotch-Irish descent. 



WENDELL AND LILIAN E. (HELLER) DE WEES (5) 

Wendell DeWees, son of Benjamin L. and Elizabeth (Scott) DeWees, 
was born December 8, 1875, in Balbec, Jay County, Indiana. 

Lilian E. Heller, daughter of Hamilton and Lovina ( Hiatt) Heller, was 
born August 5, 1878, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Wendell DeWees, and Lilian E. Heller were united in marriage Sep- 
tember 27, 1899, at the home of the bride's parents, near Pennville, Jay County, 
Indiana, by Rev. James E. Ferris, a minister of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

TO THEM WKKi: I'.OKN 

Name 1-tirtli Dtatli 
Merle Wendell DeW'ees May 15, 1901 



He was born in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. DeWees located in Pennville, after their marriage, where 
they remained two years. Later they removed to Richmond, W^ayne County, 
Indiana, where Mr. DeWees is employed as city salesman by the Adam M. Bar- 
tell Company, importers and jobbers of notions and furnishing goods, and 
manufacturers of men's clothing. 

15 



226 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Mr. and Mrs. DeWees graduated from the high school of Pennville, in 
the spring of 1897, after which the former attended the Purdue University, of 
Lafavette, Indiana, and the latter entered the Normal School of Valparaiso, 
Indiana, from which she graduated in the Kindergarten course. She is of 
German descent. 



ASA AND DELLA (DEARY) BLACKLEDGE (5) 

Asa Blackledge, son of David and Caroline E. (Lewis) Blackledge, was 
born September 27, 1854, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Delia Deary, daughter of John William and Eliza (Banks) Deary, was 
born January 12, 1864, in Astoria, Fulton County, Illinois. 

Asa Blackledge and Delia Deary were united in marriage October 6, 
1891, in Bloomington, Franklin County, Nebraska. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 



Edna Fern Blackledge October 20, 1895 

Ora Elma Blackledge September 28, 1897 

Ruth Leola Blackledge December 6, 1899 



They were all born near Bloomington, Franklin County, Nebraska. 

Mr. Blackledge learned the harnessmaker's and shoemaker's trade w'hile 
young, and also received a good public school education. At the age of nine- 
teen he began teaching, and two years later went to Jav County, Indiana, on a 
visit, and while there accepted a position in the school and taught three and 
one-half years. In 1880 he went to Franklin County. Nebraska, and was 
engaged as deputy postmaster in Bloomington two 3'ears, having also estab- 
lished a harness and shoe shop during that time, in which he continued until 
1888. He then begun farming, near Bloomington. and was thus engaged until 
1900, when he removed with his family to Alma, Harlan County, Nebraska, 
and again established a harness shop. 



WARREN D. AND ANNA (BLACKLEDGE) CHAPMAN (5) 

Anna Blackledge. daughter of David and Caroline I£. (Lewis) Blackledge, 
was born May 4, 1864, near Jerusalem. Monroe County, Ohio, and died May 22, 
1889, in Franklin County, Nebraska. 

Warren D, Chapman, son of Samuel W. and Helen Jane (Warren) Chap- 
man, was born December 10. 1857, in Richmond, \\'a\'ne County, Indiana. 

Warren D. Chapman and Anna Blackledge were united in marriage 
December 25, 1888, in Bloomington, Franklin County, Nebraska. 

No children. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 227 

Mrs. Chapman was a student of the Bloomington high school, after 
which she taught in the public schools several terms. About 1885 she joined 
the Seventh-Day Adventist Church and was a very zealous worker in that cause, 
in various places in this state as long as her health would permit. 

Mr. Chapman, who was also a member of the Seventh-Day Adventist 
Church, became a missionary for that society in England, where he spent 
several years, but his health failing in that climate they transferred him to the 
eastern part of the United States. His headquarters was Charleston, South 
Carolina, but the field of his labors covered part of Florida and Georgia, be- 
sides South Carolina. In the summer of igoo he was sent to Portsmouth, 
Virginia, to recuperate his failing health, and he is there at the present time. 
He works in the Adventist cause when able. 

LEWIS H. AND MARGARET E. (LAWRENCE) BLACKLEDGE (5) 

Lewis H. Blackledge, son of David and Caroline E. (Lewis) Blackledge, 
was born January 10, 1868, near Jerusalem, Monroe County, Ohio. 

Margaret Elizabeth Lawrence, daughter of Lyman W. and Elizabeth 
(Kennerson) Lawrence, was born March 26, 1872, in Sonberry, La Salle County, 
Illinois. 

Lewis H. Blackledge and Margaret E. Lawrence were united in marriage 
September 16, 1891, in McCook, Red Willow County, Nebraska. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

MzOTc Birth Death 

Gertrude Adaline Blackledge. . October 29, 1892 

Allan Douglas Blackledge July 30, 1896 

Hobart Lee Blackledge August 8, 1900 

Gertrude A. and Allan D. were born in , Hitchcock County, 

Nebraska, and Hobart L. in Red Cloud, Webster County, of the same state. 

Mr. Blackledge graduated from the Bloomington high school and tlien 
studied law under the firm of Shephard & Black. He was admitted to the bar 
m 1888, and to practice in the supreme couit in 1900. He was County Attor- 
ney in Hitchcock County four years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Blackledge reside in Red Cloud, Webster County. Ne- 
braska, where he has established a good practice, and is fast coming to the 
front in his profession. 

WILLIAM H. AND MINNIE B. (CAMP) FARRINGTON (5) 

William Hervy Farrington, son of Jesse and Lydia C. (Lewis) f'^uring- 
ton, was born December 29, 1855, in Penn Township, Jay Count}', Indiana. 

Minnie Brackett Camp, daughter of George and Catherine (Moore) Camp, 
was born November 8, 1862, in Marshall Township, Calhoun County Michigan, 



220 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

William H. Farrington and Minnie B. Camp were united in marriage 
March 17, 1881, in Kalamazoo, Michigan. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birlh Death 

Flora May Farrington August 31. 1883 ... April 22,1887 

William Roy Farrington September 25, i886 



Flora M. was born in Battle Creek, Michigan, and died in Trowbridge, 
Allegan County, Michigan. She was interred in Oak Hill Cemetery, of Battle 
Creek. 

William R. was born in Cheshire, Allegan County, Michigan. 

Mr. and Mrs. Farrington lived in Cheshire, Allegan County, Michigan, 
several years after their marriage, afterwards moving to Battle Creek, Michigan, 
where they still reside. Mr. Farrington worked several years at his trade. About 
1891 he was elected a member of the police force, a position which he filled so 
successfully that at the expiration of five years' service, he was elected chief of 
police. He has held the latter office almost five years. 

Mr. Farrington came to Battle Creek, Michigan, with his parents in 1864 
and during his early manhood followed the painter's trade. 



MYRVIN AND LILLY J. (WILSON) FARRINGTON (5) 

Mj'rvin Farrington, son of Jesse and Lydia C. (Lewis) Farrington. was 
born May 25, 1859, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Lilly Jane Wilson, daughter of William and Martha Gordon (Wilson,) 
was born June 4, 1866, in Wells County, Indiana. 

Myrvin Farrington and Lill}'. J. Wilson were united in marriage Novem- 
ber 18, 1889, in Battle Creek, Michigan. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birtii Deaih 
Undine Edna Farrington January 27. 1891 



She was born in Battle Creek, Michigan. 

Since their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Farrington have made their home 
in Battle Creek, Michigan, where he is employed as stock keeper at the Nichols 
& Shepard Threshing Machine Works, a position which he has faithfully filled 
for the past twelve years. 

Mr. Farrington came to Battle Creek, Michigan, with his parents when 
he was five years of age. During his earlj' manhood he worked at the carpen- 
ter's trade. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 229 

JOHN T. AND ETTA M. (FARRINGTON) OLDHAM {.5) 

Etta May Farrington, daughter of Jesse and Lydia C. (Lewis) Farring- 
ton, was born September 22, 1862, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

John Thomas Oldham, son of Henry and Lucinda (EUiot) Oldham, was 
born November 1856, in Orleans, Orange County, Indiana. 

Jolm T. Oldham and Etta M. Farrington were united in marriage March 
2, 1887, at the home of the bride's parents m Battle Creek, Michigan. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

JVa//u- Birth Dcatli 
John Eugene Oldham August 14, 1900 



He was born in Seattle, Washington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oldham lived in Battle Creek ten years after their mar- 
riage, where lie was employed most of the time on the Chicago l% Grand Trunk 
Railroad. In i8y8 they removed to Seattle, Washington, where he has followed 
the carpenter's trade. He is a member of the Building Trades Council, of 
Seattle, and is Business Agent for the Carpenter's Union of that place. He 
is of English decent. 



EDWIN J. AND MARY I. (FARRINGTON) SCOTT (5) 

Mary Inis Farrington, daughter of Jesse and Lydia C. (Lewis) Farring- 
ton, was born September 8, 1864, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Edwin Jerome Scott, son of and ( ) 

Scott, was born , , in , Ohio. 

Edwin J. Scott and Mary I. Farrington were united in marriage March 
26, 1884, at the home of the bride's parents in Battle Creek, Michigan. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Bii tli Death 

Edwin Lyle Scott February 4, 1885 ... April 11, 1889 

Laura Katherine Scott J uly 20, 1 888 

Edwin L. was born in Cheshire, Allegan County, Michigan, and died in 
Battle Creek, Michigan. 

Laura K. was born in Allegan, Allegan County, Michigan. 

Mr. and Mrs. Scott lived for several years after their marriage in Mich- 
igan, jjart of the time in Cheshire, Allegan County, and part in Battle Creek, 
Calhoun County. Subsequently they removed to Syracuse, New York, where 
they have since resided. Mr. Scott is employed as salesman and traveling 
agent. 



230 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

"Katy" Scott is now (1902) but fourteen years of age and is almost a 
prodigy as an impersonator and elocutionist. She commits and recites with 
wonderful ease and grace. This little girl is very bright and doubtless has a 
brilliant future before her. 

MORRIS L. AND MARY L. (WILLIAMS) GRAY (5) 

Morris Lundy Gray, son of Peter T. and Amanda M. (Lewis) Gray, was 
born May 21, 1B57, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mary Lovanda Williams, daughter of James and Hannah ( Rigby) Wil- 
liams, was born September 22, 1864, in Jackson Township. Jay County, Indiana. 

Morris L. Gray and Mary L. Williams were united in marriage June 5, 
1880, in Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name. Birth. Death. 



Ivalena Malvina Gray February 13, 1883 

Verlie Uldean Gray June 22, 1888 

Icie Male Gray April 13,1898 



Ivelena M. and Verlie U. were born in Jackson Township, Jay County, 
Indiana, and Icie Male in Pennville, of the same county and state. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Gray lived in Jay County, Jackson 
Township, Indiana, live years, where Mr. Gray was engaged in farming. In 
the spring of 1885 the}' removed to Lenora, Norton County, Kansas, where 
they remained three years, when in the fall of 1888 they returned to Jay County, 
Indiana, making the trip overland in a little over two months. 

At present they reside in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana, where they 
own a neat home. 

Mr. Gray is a dealer in live stock. 

Mrs. Gray is a member of the Meredith Rebekah Lodge, of Pennville. 
She is of Irish and Dutch descent. Her father was a Union soldier in the 
civil war, having enlisted October 22, 1864, in Company A., Twenty-third Regi- 
ment, Indiana Volunteers. He was honorably discharged at Detroit, Michigan, 
July 23, 1S65. by special order of Gen. Matthews. 



ELLESWORTH AND LAURA J. iDISBROW) GRAY (5) 

Ellesworth Gray, son of Peter T. and Amanda M. (Lewis) Gray, was 
born December 13. 1862. in l\nn Townsliip, Jay County, Indiana. 

Laura Jane Disbrow, daughter of Edward J. and Emma (Yarangton) 
Disbrow, was born April 29, 1867, in Bangor Township, Van Buren County, 

Michigan. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 23I 

Ellesworth Gray and Laura J. Disbrow were united in marriage Novem- 
ber 3, 1883, in Marshall, Calhoun County, Michigan, Rev. E. Cooley, of the 
M. E. Church, officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Claude Loe Gray August i6, 1884 

Thirsel Louise Gray July 16, 1886 

Claude L. was born in Bangor, VanBuren County, Michigan, and Thirsel 
L. in Norton, Norton County, Kansas. 

Soon after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Gray went to Pennville, Jay 
County, Indiana, where they lived until April, 1884. when they removed to 
Battle Creek, Michigan, where Mr. Gray followed the carpenter's and painter's 
trade. In 1885 they removed to Norton County. Kansas, and entered one 
hundred and sixty acres of land, and the next few )'ears they lived part of the 
time in Norton and part on the homestead, where "their mansion was built of 
sod." In 1889 they sold their homestead and Mrs. Gray and Mrs. Morris 
Gray started east on a visit, and Mr. Gray went to Colorado prospecting, 
where he remained several months, having seen many of the places of interest 
in the state, such as Manitou, Garden of the Gods, Pike's Peak and several 
others. He says: — 

"I enjoyed the trip to Pike's Peak the best of all. I went up the 
mountain on foot, in company with a German, by the name of Fritz, and a 
stranger, during which trip we had lots of fun. At timber line we stopped and 
ate our lunch, then from there we had to climb. Two miles from the top we 
had to go over rocks most of the way. It is there that so many give out, the 
air gets too light. Fritz begun to get weak, and at last sank to the ground. I 
got behind him and pushed him, but he would fall every little while. I said: 
'Get up, Fritz, you must reach the top now if I have to carry you.' 1 never 
shall forget tile expression on his face, when he looked up at me and said, 
'Mine Got, Gray, let me die.' After awakening him by a good snow-balling, 
which was continued until he rose from the ground, I again assisted him until 
we reached the top. But after our arrival I began to think I would never get 
him down. He threw himself into a chair and just hung over it like a coat 
and said he was going to die. After tr}iug many plans I got him mad and he 
then started down. After about three miles he began to feel allright again and 
his good German nature came back and he was Fritz again. We had a jolly 
good time the rest of the trip. I would like to know where he is to-day. It 
required seven hours and fifty minutes to climb Pike's Peak and three hours and 
twenty minutes to descend. 

"In September, 1889, I started Ikhii Denver to Kansas, overland, a dis- 
tance of three hundred miles. 1 luul tine .■ horses and a buggy. The loute I 
took was one vast prairie, with nothing in sight for miles but thousands of 
cattle. My first night I picketed the horses and then rolled myself up in a 



232 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

blanket and went to sleep. Two or three times I was awakened by the howl- 
ing of wolves and had to get up and scare them away, but aside from that I 
was unmolested. During the second day's trip I stopped at a ranch to water 
my horses and the owner of the ranch wanted to run a horse race with me, so 
to pass the time away 1 gave my consent. When they brought their horse out 
a girl fourteen or fifteen years old came out to ride it. We started, but I could 
not see her on account of the dust. She had a fine horse. I should liked to 
have had a picture of her as she sat on her noble horse; her hair was hanging 
loose, the picture of health. She rode astride and was a typical cowboy, for 
that was her share of the work on the ranch, riding over the prairie after the 
stray cattle. After that nothing occurred to break the monotony for a day or 
two. The fourth day of my journey, as I was riding along, about one o'clock 
1 noticed a dark object in the distance but could not make out what it was. In 
about one-half hour I discovered it w-as two horsemen. They rode straight up 
to me, as fast as they could ride, and one of them jumped off his horse and 
said with an oath, "I'm tired," and climbed right into the buggy with me. 
They were pretty drunk. They wanted to know where my six shooters w-ere, 
I told them they were safe. At last one man wanted to trade horses. I told 
him 1 would give him an even trade. He answered if I would take his saddle 
off and put it on my horse he would do it. Seeing it was a good bargain I did 
so. But in the evening, when he had sobered up, he said, 'W'hat is my saddle 
doing on your horse?' I explained to him, whereupon he became very angry 
and demanded his horse back, and at last offered me five dollars if I would 
trade back, but I refused. He then threatened me, said he had a six shooter 
he would use on me. I told him to go ahead, there were others who could play 
at that game, so he quieted down and said no more about it until we came to a 
small railroad station about nine o'clock that night. This was the first settle- 
ment I had seen in two days. We stopped here for supper, and while eating 
at the hotel, he looked across the table and said, 'Say, I'll give you ten dollars 
to change that saddle.' I told him if he ever got that horse he would have to 
steal it, and that when I was not looking. He never said any more about it. 
They stayed with me all the next daj' and got sobered up, when they bid nie a 
heart}' good-by and rode off. In three more days I landed at my destination in 
Norton County, Kansas. Then, in company with my brother and father, we 
prepared to go east overland, and traveled in a wagon to Hartford, Van Buren 
County, iMichigan, where I joined my family, and we settled in Benton Harbor, 
Michigan. Here we lived until 1895, when we removed to Penn Township, Jay 
County, Indiana, and in the spring of 1897 located in Winchester, Randolph 
County, of the same state, where we reside at tlie present time (1902; where I 
am engaged in contracting and painting." 

Mr. Gray has traveled over a great deal of the United States, having 
made a trip through the south recently. He is a very appreciative traveler and 
relates his experiences in a very pleasing and interesting manner.. 

Mrs. Gray is of French and German descent. Her father, Edward J. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 233 

Disbrow, was a soldier in the civil war, having enlisted November 12, 1862. in 
Company D, Sixty-sixth Illinois Western Sharp Shooters. He participated in 
the following engagements: Komer Cross Roads (Alton Hills,) Dallas and 
Kenesaw Mountains, Atlanta and Dt-catur, Front of Atlanta, Jonesboro and 
Bentonville and Sherman's March to the Sea. Then after being in the Grand 
Review at Washington, was discharged July 7, 1865, in Springfield, Illinois. 

Claude L. and Thirsel L. Gray are both attending the high schools of 
Winchester, Indiana, where the former is in the third and the latter in the first 
year. Claude L. has written quite a little poetry. 



LESLEY AND CLARA E. (ALLEN) BRINK (5) 

Clara Ellen Allen, adopted daughter of Peter and Amanda M. (Lewis) 
Gray, was born January 26, 1872, in Ohio. 

Lesley Brink, son of and ( ) Brink, 

was born , , in . 

Lesle}' Brink and Clara E. Allen were united in marriage in Oberlin, 
Nebraska. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Francis May Brink October 13, 1888 

Grover Brink August 19, i8gi 

Geneva Brink April 4, 1 893 

Jaunita Belle Brink January 23, 1894 . . . 

Una Etta Brink January 30, 1896 

Leona Angelme Brink February 1 1, i8g8 

Millie Marguerit Brink August 9, 1901 ... July 3, 1902 

They w'erc born in Nebraska. 

Millie M. died in Guide Rock, Nebraska, and was interred in the Guide 
Rock Cemetery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brink reside in Guidr Kock, Nebraska, where they are en- 
gaged in mercantile business. 



ROLLA B. AND EFFIE M. (FARRINGTON) COOK (5) 

Effie May Farrington, daughter of Elihu and Tacy E. (Lewis) Farriug- 
ton, was born July i, 1870. in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Rolla B. Cook, son of Miles and Jennie (Storring) Cook, was born 
December 13, 1867, at Climax, Calhoun County, Michigan. 

Effie May Farrington and Rolla B. Cook were united in marriage Sep- 
tember 22, i8gi, in Battle Creek, Michigan. 



2 34 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Otto L. Cook July 12, 1893 

Lewis Cook May 29, 1894 .... September 21, 1894 

Daisy Myrrel Cook June 12, i8g6 

Ernest Cook July 29, 1 898   •  - 

All were born in Battle Creek, Michigan, and Lewis Cook died and was 
buried at the same place. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cook have lived in Battle Creek, Michigan, since their 
marriage, where they own a pretty home and where Mr. Cook is engaged in 
the carpenter's trade. 

CLIFTON L. AND ETHELINDA C. EDMANDSi TIPTON (5) 

Clifton Lewis Tipton, son of Thomas L. and Hannah A. (Lewis) Tipton, 
was born July 18, 1869, in Penn Township, Jay Count)^, Indiana. 

Ethelinda Cutter Edmands, daughter of Charles Henry and Marry Ellen 
(Cooke) Edmands, was born January 2, 1879, in Springfield, Illinois. 

Clifton L. Tipton and Ethelinda C. Edmands, were united in marriage 
December 6, 1899, '" Springfield, Illinois. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 
Gladys Ethelyn Tipton February 25, 1901 

She was born in Springfield, Illinois. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tipton have resided in Springfield since their marriage 
where he is engaged as manager of the book dejiartment of Simmon's Book and 
Stationery Store. 

Mr. Tipton taught in the public schools a short time after finishing his 
education, then entered the Spencerian Business College, of Washington. D. 
C, from which he graduated, and in which he was afterward an instructor. He 
soon took up the profession of book selling, and has been engaged in his 
chosen field of work several years. 

Mrs. Tipton is of Welsh and English descent. Her parents came to 
Illinois from Massachusetts in the early fifties and have since resided there, 
where Mrs. Tipton was raised ami tducated in the Bettic Stuart School for 
Young Wonun. 

THERON AND JULIA C. (MOREHOUSE > THOMPSON (5) 

Therou Thompson, sou of Robert T. and limily A. (Lewis) Thompson, 
was born September 22, 1853, in York, Jefferson County, Oliio. 

Julia Cornelia Morehouse, daughter of Le Grand and Julia (^Loomis) 
Mor< house, was bom May 25, 1857, near Buffalo, Scott County, Iowa. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 235 

Theron Thompson and Julia C. Morehouse were united in marriage 
March 9, 1882, in Buffalo, Scott County, Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name JUrth Death 

Maynard Le Grand Thompson.. June 2,1883 

Leila Elsia Thompson August 22, 1888 

Gail Marie Thompson August 18, 1893 

They were all born in Muscatine, Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thompson, located in Muscatine, Iowa, after their mar- 
riage, where they have since resided, he being a partner in the firm of Thomp- 
son Bros., dealers in hardware and seeds. 

At the death of Robert T. Thompson in 1890, his sons, William and 
Theron Thompson, moved their father's stock of the Island Seed Store to 
their hardware business rooms, uniting them under tlie firm name of Thompson 
Bros. 

Mrs. Thompson's parents were natives of New York. 

WILLIAM L. AND HARRIET C. (STOCKDALE) THOMPSON (5) 

William Lewis Thompson, son of Robert T. and Emily A. (Lewis) 
Thompson, was born March 4, 1862, in Attalissa, Muscatine County, Iowa. 

Harriet Caroline Stockdale, daughter of John and Maria C. ( Currow) 
Stockdale, was born February i, 1866, in Muscatine, Iowa. 

William L. Thompson and Harriet C. Stockdale were united in mar- 
riage October 22, 1890, in Muscatine, Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 
Mary Gladys Thompson J"lv lO) i<^97 

She was born in Muscatine, Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thompson make their home most of the time in Las 
Vegas, New Mexico, on account of tlie poor health of the former, but he is a 
partner in the firm of Thompson Bros., ilomg business in Muscatine, Iowa, 
and makes frecjuent trips to and from tlial place, attending to his business in- 
terest. 

Mrs. Thompson's father was born in Hornsea, Yorkshire, England, and 
her mother in Ballyhannis, Mayo County, Ireland. 

ROBERT L. AND CARRIE E. iMOREHOUSE) THOMPSON (5 » 

Robert Lincoln Thompson, sou of Robert and Emily A. ( Lewis) 
Thompson, was born October 15. 1.S66, in Muscatine, Muscatine Counl\. Iowa. 

Carrie Edwina Morehouse, daugiiter of Le Grand and Julia (Loomis) 
Morehouse, was born November 28, 1867, near Buffalo, Scott County, Iowa. 



236 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Robert L. Thompson and Carrie E. Morehouse were united in marriage 
November 20, 1890, in Muscatine, Iowa. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thompson have hved in Muscatine. Iowa, since their 
marriage, where Mr. Tliompson is successfully engaged in the book and 
stationery business. 

Mrs. Thompson's parents were natives of the state of New York. 



FRANK M. AND GLADYS D. GRAY) DANFORTH (5) 

Gladys Delphine Gray, daughter of Thomas 1. and Eliza J. (Wright) 
Gray, was born November 30, 1867, in Penn Township, Ja\' County, Indiana. 

Frank M. Danforth, son of Troup Barney and Julia M. (Littibrant) 
Danforth, was born August 8, 1870, near Richmond, Crawford County, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Frank M. Danforth and Gladys D. Gray were united in marriage Sep- 
tember 26, 1894, ^t Portland, Jay Count}', Indiana, Indiana. 

■|() THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Ruby Glad3's Danforth July 8, 1895 

She was born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana 



Mr. and Mrs. Danforth lived in Penn Township four years after their 
m.irriage. They then moved to Curtice. Ohio, where they live at the present 
time. Mr. Danforth is Superintendent of the Eastern Oil Company's leases, 
near Curtice. 

Mrs. Danforth graduated from the schools of Penn Township, then at- 
tended the Normal College in Pennville and afterward the Eastern Normal 
College at Portland, Indiana, where she finished her preparation for public 
school teaching, after which she taught in the public schools of Penn Town- 
ship three years. She is a follower of Modern Spiritualism. 

Mr. Danforth is of English, Frencli and German descent. His grand- 
father Danforth came to this country from England. Mr. Danforth is a mem- 
ber of the M. E. Church. 



J. WILBUR AND CLARA F. GRAY) JONES (5) 

Clara Frances Gray, daughter of Thomas I. and EHza J. (^Wright) Gray, 
was born March 7, 1872, in Penn Township, Jay Countj% Indiana. 

Josiah Wilbur Jones, son of Josiah and Elmira (^Beedy) Jones, was born 
November 19, 1868, near Hagerstown, Wayne County, Indiana. 

J. Wilbur Jones and Clara F. Gray were united in marriage March 6, 
1897, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 237 

TO THKM WKKE HORN 

Name Birth Death 
Gladys K. Jones January 15, i8g8 ... 



Shi.' was born in Penn Township. Jav County, Indiana. 

Soon after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Jones located on the farm where 
Mr. Jones's parents had formerly lived (they haying bought property in Penn- 
ville, Jay County, Indiana), where they are engaged in agricultural pursuits. 

Mrs. Jones graduated from tile public schools of Penn Township, and 
afterward attended Normal College in Pennyille two terms. She is a follower 
of Modern Spiritualism. 

Mr. Jones was about six years of age when his parents removed from 
Hagerstown to Penn Township. Jay County, Indiana, where he spent his boy- 
hood attending school and assisting his father on a farm. He is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. 



MILES M. AND ROSELLA (HAINES) WILLIAMS (5) 

Rosella Haines, daughter of Isaac T. and Mary E. (Gray) Haines, was 
born April g, 1859, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Miles M. Williams, son of James and Hannah (Rigby) Williams, was 
born September g, 1852, in Jay County, Indiana. 

Miles M. Williams and Rosella Haines were united in marriage January 
8, 1876, in the public highway on horseback in Penn Township, Jay County, 
Indiana, Albert Brunson officiating. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Charles Albertis Williams October 27, 1877 

Myrtle Elma Williams July 4,1881 ... July 4, 1881 

Roy Elden Williams August 13, 1884 . . . March 13. 1885 

Althea Wyland Williams .... January 24, 1891 

They were all born in Jay Count\. Indiana, except Roy E., whose birth 
and death occurred in Trenton, Hitchcock County, Nebraska. 

Myrtle E. died in Jay County and was buried in the West Grove Ceme- 
tery, in Penn Township, of the same count)'. 

Mr. and Mrs. Williams moved to Hitchcock County, Nebraska, Septem- 
ber 10, 1878, where they lived eight years. They then returned to Jay County, 
Indiana, and purchased land, where they have since resided, being engaged in 
farming. They are believers of Modern Spiritualism, and are both members of 
the Grange. 



238 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

EDWIN E. AND JEMIMA A. - HOLLOWAY ) HAINES (5) 

Edwin Ellesworth Haines, son of Isaac T. and Mary E. (Gray) Haines, 
was born April 4, 1864, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Jemima Ann Halloway, daughter of John Clerr}- and Liivica (Cox) Hal- 
loway. was born October 28, 1863, in Wells County, Indiana. 

Edwin E. Haines and Jemima A. Halloway were united in marriage 
April 28, 1883. in Nottingham Township, Wells Count}-, Indiana, Squire Ander- 
son officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Fred Leustel Haines April 26, 1885 

Grace Opal Haines February i, 1887 

Roy Delbert Haines May 7, 1889 

Donloe Arba Haines January 21, 1893 ... Januar}' 10, 1897 

They were born in Jay County, Indiana. 

Donloe A. died in Jay County and was buried in the West Grove Ceme- 
tery, in Penn Township of the same county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Haines reside in Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana, 
where they own 200 acres of land and are engaged in farming. Mr. Haines 
also follows rig building. They are followers of Modern Spiritualism and are 
members of the Grange. 

Mrs. Haines's father, John C. Halloway, was born February 4, 181 7, in 
Ohio, and died February 15, 189.S, in Wells County, Indiana. Her mother, 
Luvica (Cox) Halloway, was born April 7, 1826, in Randolph County, Indiana, 
and died November 26, 1900, in Wells County of the same state. 

Fred L. and Grace O. graduated from the common schools of Penn 
Township June 21, 1902. The commencement exercises were held in Portland, 
Jay County, Indiana. 

EMAL L. AND OLLIE E. (BLACKLEDGE) WARING (5) 

Ollie Elma Blackledge, daughter of Benjamin F. and Atlantic T. (Gray) 
Blackledge, was born Jul}' 28, 1876, at Newton, Jasper County, Iowa. 

Emal Loraine Waring, son of John and Martha (McCrea) Waring, was 
born March 3. 1876, near Reasnor, Jasper County, Iowa. 

Emal L. Waring and Ollie E. Blackledge were united in marriage No- 
vember 23, 1898, near Reasnor, Jasper County, Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Roland Twern Waring \ugust 24, 1899 ... August 26. 1899 

Thelma Waring March 31, 190 1 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 239 

They were born on the "Old Lufkin Place," near Reasnor, Jasper C'oun- 
ty, Iowa. 

Roland T. died and was buried near Reasnor. Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Waring reside near Reasnor, Iowa, where he is engaged 
in farming. 

Mrs. Waring was a public school teacher for two years previous to her 
marriage. She is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



CLYDE C. AND OGLE L. (BLACKLEDGE) WARING (5) 

Ogle Leia Blackledge, daughter of Benjamin F. and Atlantic T. (Gray) 
Blackledge, was born Ma\- 24, 1883, at Bloomington, Franklin County, Ne- 
braska. 

Clyde Cassius Waring, son of John and Martha (McCrea) \N'aring, was 
born August 23, 1878, near Reasnor, Jasper Count)-, Iowa. 

Clyde C. Waring and Ogle L. Blackledge were united in marriage Octo- 
ber 3, 1899, at Newton, Jasper County, Iowa. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Waring reside in Reasnor, Iowa, where he is in the grain 
and lumber business. They are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



HARRY P. AND MINNIE (KLAWITER) LEWIS (5 



Harry Pratt Lewis, son of Morgan L. and Harriet A. (Pratt) Lewis, was 
born October 15, 1870, in Battle Creek, Michigan. 

Minnie Klawiter, daughter of William and Katherine (Hilbert ) Klawiter, 
was born March 19, 1871, in Detroit, Michigan. 

Harry P. Lewis and Minnie Klawiter were united in marriage December 
25. 1894, at the home of the bride's mother. Battle Creek, Michigan, Rev. Win. 
S. Potter, minister of the Presbyterian Church, officiating. 

TO THEM WERK HORN 

Name Birth D.atli 
Helen Katherine Lewis August i5, 1896 

Harriet Madeline Lewis ) ^^  November 2, 1899 

T^ 1 ^  I Twins 

Dorothy Caroline Lewis ( November 2, 1899 

Morgan Milton Lewis Februar\' 6, 1902 

They were all born in Battle Creek, Michigan. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis reside in Battle Creek, Michigan, where Mr. Ltwis 
is a member of the firm of M. M. Lewis lV- Sons. 

Mrs. Lewis graduated from the Battle Creek High School in June, 1892. 
She is of German parentage. Her father William Klawiter, son of Michael 
and Sophia Klawiter, was born December 11, 1837, in Prussia, Germany, and 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 24I 

came with his parents to this country in 1852. Her mother, Katherine (Hilbert) 
Klawiter, daughter of Johan and Margaret Hilbert, was born November 20, 
1840, in Bavaria, Germany, and came to this country with her parents in April, 
1852. They came over in sail boats, not having any steamers in that day, and 
were thirty-two days on the water, during which time they experienced some 
very severe storms. One hundred and fifty passengers were on board. Mr. 
and Mrs. Klawiter met several years after landing in this country and were 
married November 27, 1863, in Detroit, Michigan, At the time of his death 
Mr. Klawiter was a member of the firm of John Brennan & Co., Battle Creek, 
Mich., manufacturers of boilers. 

Mr. Lewis graduafed from the Battle Creek High School in June, 1890, 
after which he entered the State University at Ann Arbor, Michigan, gradua- 
ting from the Law Course in June, 1894. He begun the practice of law at once 
and followed that profession four years, during which time he served as Justice 
of the Peace all the time and also two years of that time he served as Circuit 
Court Commissioner. 



ARTHUR L. AND MAUDE H. (LEWIS) STEPHENSON (5) 

Maude Harriet Lewis, daughter of Morgan M. and Harriet A. (Pratt) 
Lewis, was born August 9, 1873, in Battle Creek, Michigan. 

Arthur Lee Stephenson, son of Reese Benton and Katherine (Oury) 
Stephenson, was born June 29, 1877, in Marion, Smyth County, Virginia. 

Arthur L. Stephenson and Maude H. Lewis were united in marriage 
July 20, 1902, at the home of the bride's parents, in Battle Creek, Mich., Rev. 
W. S. Potter, of the Presbyterian Church, officiating. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephenson reside in Battle Creek, Michigan, where Mr. 
Stephenson is employed as bookkeeper for the hrm of M. M. Lewis & Sons. 

Mrs. Stephenson is accomplished in both instrumental and vocal music, 
having devoted much time and study to the art. She has been a regular mem- 
ber of the Independent Congregational Church choir for ten years. 

Mr. Stephenson graduated from the Morgan Park High School, Morgan 
Park, Illinois, in 1895, and then entered the University of Chicago Academy, 
where he attended three years. During thi fust term he, by hard study, earned 
a half scholarship for the following year. He was also very successful in school 
athletics, holding the championship in the hundred yard dash three years, time 
being ten and one-fifth seconds. Also held the championship in the two hun- 
dred and twenty yard dash two years, time being twenty-one and two-fifth 
seconds. He has a valuable collection of handsome medals as a reward for his 
athletic efforts in various ways, running, jumping, hammer throwing, shot put- 
ting and rifle shooting. 

After finishing his course in the Academy he accepted a position in the 
Continental National Bank of Chicago, where he was a trusted emplo\ t c for 
three and one-half years. 
16 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 243 

Mr. Stephenson's grandfather Oury was a colonel in the Confederate 
Army of the Rebellion, having been promoted from captain of Company K to 
colonel of the Twenty-Seventh Regiment Virginia Volunteer Infantry. He was 
wounded in the battle of Chickaniauga and disabled for further service 

Politically Mr. Stephenson affiiliates with the Democratic party. He is 
a member of the Baptist church and of the Royal Arcanum. He was a member 
of Company B, Illinois National Guards, and in February, igoi, represented 
his company in a heavy marching order half mile foot race, in which he won 
the silver cup, presented by Mayor Carter Harrison of Chicago. 

He is of Scotch-Irish descent. 



SYRA E. AND GERTRUDE G. (.KIPP) LEWIS (5) 

Syra Edward Lewis, son of Morgan M. and Harriet A. (Pratt) Lewis, 
was born March 27, 1875, in Battle Creek, Michigan. 

Gertrude Gladys Kipp, daughter of Ezra and Margaret (Reynolds) Kipp, 
was born February 2, 1877, in Maple Grove, Barry County, Michigan. 

Syra E. Lewis and Gertrude G. Kipp were united in marriage December 
14, i8g8, at the home of the bride's mother in Battle Creek, Michigan, Rev. 
Brown, minister of the St. Thomas Episcopal church, officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 
Frances Allene Lewis February 25,1900 



She was born in Battle Creek, Michigan. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis reside in Battle Creek, Michigan, where Mr. Lewis 
is a member of the firm of M. M. Lewis & Sons. 

Mrs. Lewis graduated from the Battle Creek High School June iS, i8yfa, 
after which she taught in the Battle Creek schools two years. She is of Irish 
and Dutch descent and is a. member of the St. Thomas iipiscopal church of 
Battle Creek. 

Mr. Lewis is also a graduate of th. i;attle Creek High School, having 
finished the course June 21, 1894. He enlisted in the State National Guards 
September 14, 1896, in which he .served until April. 1898, and when the call 
was made for volunteers for the Spanish-American war and Coiupany D, imder 
Capt. William M. Hatch, was mustered into the United States service at Island 
Lake, near Lansing, Michigan, May 11, 1898, Mr. Lewis was commissioned 
Quartermaster Sargeant of the company', which office he filled successfully 
throughout his service. 

About the middle of May Company I), Thirty-Second Regiment of Mich- 
igan Volunteer Infantry, under Col. V\'illiam T. McGurrin, was orti.i.d to 
Tampa, BTorida, where they were brigaded with Gen. Shafter. They n-ceived 
orders to board transports for Santiago, Cuba, but the transport intended for 




< 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 245 

their use was disabled in a collision witli another boat, so the Thirty-Second 
Regiment was left behind. By order, they proceeded to Fernandina, Florida, 
to await their order to Cuba, where they were to do garrison duty. Here their 
army corps was changed again and in September they were ordered to Hunts- 
ville, Alabama, and were finalh' ordered to Island Lake, Michigan, where their 
equipments were turned in and Company D was sent to Battle Creek on a three 
months furlough and the war being over they were mustered out November 3, 
1898, in Battle Creek. 

FRANK L. AND ETHEL E. (ASTON) LEWIS (5) 

Frank Lester Lewis, son of Granville S. and Rebecca E. (Sullivan) 
Lewis, was born November 16, 1879, at Fiat, Penn Township, Jay County, 
Indiana. 

Ethel Eliza Aston, daughter of Joseph and Mary (Johnstone) Aston, was 
born in Newcastle on Tyne, in Northumberland, England, February 24, 1879. 

Frank L. Lewis and Ethel E. Aston were united in marriage January 6, 
1902, in Santa Barbara, California. 

Mr. and Mr. Lewis located in Los Angeles, California, where they reside 
at the present time. 

Mr. Lewis participated in the late war. He enlisted with the Indiana 
volunteers at Blufton, Indiana, April 26, 1898, in Company E, under Charles 
F. Brown, part of the Fourth Regiment of Infantry Indiana National Guards. 
They went to Indianapolis, where they became a company' of the One Hundred 
and Sixtieth Regiment, Indiana \'olunteer Infantry, under Col. George W. 
Gunder. 

The regiment arrived at Camp Mount April 26, i8g8, under orders of 
Gov. Mount, for the jnupose of being mustered into the service of the United 
States, and after a most rigid physical examination of both ofTicers and men, 
the regiment was mustered into the volunteer service of the United States on 
May 12, 1898. Left Camp Mount May 16, and proceeded by rail to Camp 
Thomas, Chickamauga Park, Georgia, arriving there on May 18. Under order 
to proceed to Porto Rico the regiment left Camp Thomas on July 28 and arrived 
at Newport News, Virginia, July 30. The urders for tlie regiment to proceed to 
Porto Rico having been countermanded, the regiment left Newport News on 
August 21, and proceeded to Camp Hamilton, Lexington, Kentucky, where it 
arrived on August 23. Left Camp Hamilton November 9 and arrived at Colum- 
bus, Georgia, November 11, 1898. On January 15, 1899, the regiment was 
ordered to proceed, in three sections, to Matanizas, Cuba, where they were 
united on January 27 and went into camp. The regiment remained in Cuba 
until March 27, when they were ordered to proceed to Savannah, Georgia, to 
prepare for the muster out. They arrived in Savannah March 29 and were mus- 
tered out and discharged April 25. 1899. 

Mr. Lewis was very sick and lay in the hospital at Ft. Thomas, Ken- 
tucky, several weeks. 



246 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

JAMES G. AND JANETTE ( HOPKINS) LEWIS (5) 

James G. Ltwis, son of Oscar W. and Ella N. (Gardner) Lewis, was 
born July 26, 1877, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Janette Hopkins, daughter of Theodore M. and Addie (Brighton) Hop- 
kins, was born September 6, 1881, in Penn Township, Jay County. Indiana. 

James G. Lewis and Janette Hopkins were united in marriage August 8, 
1900, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis located in Battle Creek. Michigan, soon after their 
marriage, where Mr. Lewis was engaged in painting and decorating. In the 
fall ot igoi they returned to their former home, Pennville, Jay County, Indiana, 
where they reside at the present time. 



WILLIAM A. AND ESTELLA J. (LEWIS) ADAMS (S) 

Estella Jane Lewis, daughter of Ira M. and Sarah J. ( Spayd) Lewis, 
was born August 2, 1862, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, and died 
December 11, 1895, in Ryan Township, Sumner County, Kansas. 

William Albert Adams, son of Elmer and Ella (Adams) Adams, was born 
March 23, 1862, near Pittsburgh, Beaver County, Pennsylvania. 

William A. Adams and Estella J. Lewis were united in marriage Septem- 
ber 8, 18S5, in Wellington, Kansas. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Ray Morgan Adams June 3, 1886 

Roy Elmer Adams April 13, 1888 

John (,)uincy Adams December 22, i88g 

Louis Moore Adams February 20, 1892 

Estella Jane Adams December 1 1, 1895 

They were all born in Ryan Township, Sumner County, Kansas. 

Mrs. Adams was a teacher in the public schools, before her marriage, for 
two years. She was a member of the Christian church. 

After their marriage they lived on a farm in Ryan Township, Sumner 
County, Kansas, until her death. Subsequently Mr. Adams engaged in the 
mercantile business. He is of Scotch descent. 



JOHN AND ANNIE M. (LEWIS) MILLER (.5) 

Annie Mary Lewis, daughter of Ira M. and Sarah J. (Spayd) Lewis, was 
born Noveudier 25, 1S67, in Penn Township, Jay C'ounty, Indiana. 



RF.CORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 247 

John Miller, son of James and Sarah (Locard) Miller, was born March 
6, 1855, near Pittsburg, Beaver County, Pennsylvania. 

John Miller and Annie M. Lewis were united in marriage April 11, 1886, 
near Milan, Sumner County, Kansas. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

John Morgan Miller December 5,1887 ... June 18,1888 

Belzarah Jane Miller August 28,1889 

Linley Ensley Miller July 18, i8g8 ... July 18,1899 

John M. and Belzarah J. were born in Ryan Township, Sumner County, 
Kansas, where the former died and was buried. 

Linley's birth and death occurred in Saline Township, Woods County, 
Oklahoma. 

At the death of her sister Estella J. (Lewis) Adams, Mrs. Miller took her 
infant daughter Estella Jane to raise and has since cared for her. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Miller lived in Sumner Township, 
Sumner County, Kansas, several years. Afterwards they located in Saline 
Township, Woods County, Oklahoma, where they own one hundred and sixty 
acres of well improved land, on which they have built a large, comfortable 
house and other buildings necessary to make a country home pleasant. 

Mr. Miller is of Irish and German descent. 

Mrs. Miller is a member of the Christian church. 



ORLEY L. AND MAUDE E. (BRADY) GREY (5) 

Orley Lewis Grey, son of Samuel L and Mary A. (Lewis) Grey, was 
born September i, 1874, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana, and died December 
13, 1897, near Mattington, West Virginia. 

Maude Emma Brady, daughter of Thomas Jefferson and Mary (Slack) 
Brady, was born t)ctober 9, 1877, near Bueiia \ista, Randolph County, Indiana. 

Orley L. Grey and Maude E. Brady were united in marriage March 8, 
1897, in Pennville, Indiana. 

TO THEM WKKK liOKN 

Name Birth Death 
Orley Lewis Grey December 16,1897 

He was born in Pennville, Indiana. 

Soon after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. (irey located near Mannington, 
West Virginia, where Mr. Grey was employed by the Standard Oil Company. 
They had lived there but a few months wiien he met with the sad at cideiit 
which caused his death. 

The following was copied from his (ibituary notice: — 



248 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

"On Monday morning, December 13, 1897, word was received at this 
place that Orley L. Grey, one of Pennville's most popular young men, had met 
his death in West Virginia recently. No particulars could be given or none 
could be learned until the arrival of the body of the unfortunate young man, 
when the following was learned from E. W. Christy, who with his wife accom- 
panied Mrs. Grey and the body of her husband to this place. 

"He was helping to pull the tubing. The wells in that section are up- 
ward of 3,000 feet in depth, consequently the machinery is much heavier than 
that in use here. Instead of using a single pull rope as here, they are com- 
pelled to use a double one on account of the e.xtra weight of the tools and tub- 
ing. It was while engaged in shifting this rope that the young man slipped and 
fell on the rope, which drew him into the big wheel, killing him instantly. 

"Orley was well liked by all, as was evidenced by the goodness of the 
kind people of Mannington, who spared neither money nor pains to make this 
sad blow as easy as human hands could possibly make it for the sorrowing 
young widow, and those many kindnesses will always live in the hearts and 
memory of her and surviving relatives. 

"Mr. Grey was just entering the prime of life and seemed so hopeful of 
the prospects before him, when all vanished as nothing before the grim Reaper 
Death. His cheerful ways in life won for him a host of friends, who shall 
remember him as a true and generous friend. Though our sorrow- is great let 
us take heart in these words: — 

"Let us be patient, these severe afflictions 

Not from the ground arise. 

But often times Celestial Benedictions 

Assume this dark disguise. 

"We see but dimly through the mist and vapors 
Amid these earthly damps. 
What seems to us but sad funeral tapers 
May be Heaven's distant lamps. 

"There is no death, what seems so is transition; 
This life of mortal breath 
Is but a suburb of the life Elysian 
Whose portal we call Death. 

"And though at times impetuous with emotion, 
And anguish long suppressed, 
The swelling heart heaves like the moaning ocean 
That cannot be at rest. 

"We will be patient and assuage the feeling, 
We may not wholly stay, 
By silence sanctifying not concealing 
The grief that must have way. 

"Mr. Grey was a member of the Relief Lodge, No. 145 1. O. O. F., and 
that order had charge of the luneral services, which occurred in the M. E. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 249 

church, conducted by Rev. E. W. Polly, after which the remains were laid to 
rest beside his mother in the Friends' Cemetery of Pennville." 

Mrs. Grey is of Dutch and Irish descent. She is a member of the Chris- 
tian church and of the Meredith Rebekah Lodge of Pennville. 



OSCAR O. AND JESSIE M. (GREYi EMMONS (5) 

Jessie May Grey, daughter of Samuel I. and Mary A. (Lewis) Grey, was 
born October ii, 1876, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Oscar Orlando Emmons, son of John S. and Lucy Jane (McDaniel) 
Emmons, was born June 13, 1876, in Nottingham, Wells County, Indiana. 

Oscar O. Emmons and Jessie M. Grey were united in marriage December 
27, 1894, in Battle Creek, Michigan, Rev. W. S. Potter officiating. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 
Frances Helen Emmons J^ily 24, 1896 



She was born in Nottingham, Wells County, Indiana. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Emmons lived for a short time in 
Ridgeville, Indiana, where the former attended college. They then located in 
Pennville, Jay County, Indiana, and a little later removed to Nottingham, 
Wells County, of the same state, but in the fall of 1896 returned to their former 
home in Pennville. They are both members of the Christian Church. Mr. 
Emmons is a member of the I. O. O. F. Lodge and Mrs. Emmons of the Mer- 
edith Rebekah Lodge of Pennville. 

Mr. Emmons graduated from the Pennville High School in 1893, after 
which he followed teaching seven years, the last two years being spent as prin- 
cipal of the Pennville High School. During the summer of 1898 and 1900 lie 
attended the State University, Bloomington, Indiana. Mr. Emmons was an 
excellent student and a musician of considerable ability. He is of Scotch 
descent. 

Mrs. Emmons finished her education in the schools of Battle Creek, 
Michigan. Her portrait appears on the ne.xt page. 

WALTER N. AND LORETTA M. (LEWIS) HALL (6) 

Loretta Matson Lewis, daughter of Jolin G. and Emma (Matson) Lewis, 
was born August 30, 1879, in Georgetown, llarrison County, Ohio. 

Walter N. Hall, son of Josiah aii<l Deborah (Wilson) Hall, was born 
September 6, 1874, near Harrisville, Harrison County, Ohio. 

Walter N. Hall and Loretta M. Lewis were united in marriage |;;i-y-§7 
190^, in Harrisville, Harrison County, Ohio. 1 . 1/ 

l^children. ^ c/^'^^-^^ jf''^ ' '' A .</ "" 




MRS. JESSIE M. EM.MIJNS AND DAUGHTER 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 25I 

Mr. and Mrs. Hall located near Harrisville, on a beautiful and well cul- 
tivated farm, where they have since been engaged in farming. 

Mrs. Hall is a graduate of the Harrisville high schools and Mr. Hall was 
educated in the schools of Westtown, Chester County, Pennsylvania. 



ELDRIDGE G. AND MARGARET M. (BLARNEY) HOFF (6) 

Eldridge Gourlay Hoff, son of William D. and Mary E. (Lewis) Hoff, 
was born April 24, 1873, in Stockton, Missouri. 

Margaret May Blarney, daughter of William and Sarah (Jones) Blarney, 
was born January ig, 1875, near Bellaire, Belmont County, Ohio. 

Eldridge G. Hoff and Margaret M. Blarney were united in marriage June 
15, 1898, in the Episcopal church of Bellaire, Belmont County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 
William Chester Hoff March 3.1899 



He was born in Stockton, Missouri. 

Mr. Hoff received his education in the Cadiz and St. Clairsville schools 
of Harrison County, Ohio. 

Mrs. Hoff was a student of Bellaire high school. She is a member of 
the Episcopal church, and is of English and Welsh descent. 

They have made their home in Stockton, Missouri, since their marriage, 
where Mr. Hoff is editor of the Cedar County Repiihlican, of which he has been 
proprietor for several years. 



CHARLES C. AND LOUELLA D. (HOFF) ROBERTS (6) 

Louella Davidson Hoff, daughter of William D. and Mary E. (Lewis) 
Hoff, was born August 30, 1877, in Stockton, Missouri. 

Charles Christopher Roberts, son of Milton Young and Margaret Eliza- 
beth (Fox) Roberts, was born March 5, 1871, near Knoxville, Tennessee. 

Charles C. Roberts and Louella D. Hoff were united in marriage Octo- 
ber 9, 1901, at the home of the bride's parents, by Rev. David Simmons of the 
M. E. Church. 

Mrs. Roberts was a compositor in the office of the Cedar County Republican. 

Mr. Roberts was a student in the St. Louis Medical College for some 
time. He is of Scotch and Irish descent. 

After their marriage they located in Red Rock, Noble County, Okhilioma 
Territory, where he is employed in the Lidian Agency store. 

They are both members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



252 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

FRANK L. AND STELLA M. (BRADFIELD) HARRISON (6) 

Frank Lewis Harrison, son of Joseph S. and Rosella P. (Lewis ) Harri- 
son, was born March 7, 1873, in Colerain, Behnont County, Ohio. 

Stella Marie Bradtield, daughter of John William and Sarah (Clark) 
Bradfield, was born December 8, 1877, in Barnesville, Belmont County, Ohio. 

Frank L. Harrison and Stella M. Bradfield were united in marriage Oc- 
tober 16, 1901, in Barnesville, Belmont County, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harrison live in Barnesville, where Mr. Harrison is em- 
ployed in the People's Bank. 

Mrs. Harrison was a graduate of the Barnesville high schools, having 
finished the course there in 1895, after which she entered Wilsons College of 
Music in Chambersburgh, Franklin Count\', Pennsylvania, finishing a three 
years' course there in June, i8g8. 

Mr. Harrison finished his high school course at Martin's Ferry in the 
spring of 1891 and then entered Duff's Commercial College in Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, from which he graduated in 1893. He returned home and took a 
position as teller in the People's Bank, with which he is still connected. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harrison are both members of the Presbyterian church. 



GEORGE L. AND FRANCIS C. (JUDKINS) HARRISON (6) 

George Leroy Harrison, son of Joseph S. and Rosella P. (Lewis) Har- 
rison, was born November 8, 1875, in Martin's Ferry, Belmont County, Ohio. 

Frances Cole Judkins, daughter of John William and Anne (Cole) Jud- 
kins, was born March 4, 1877, in Barnesville, Belmont County, Ohio. 

George L. Harrison and P'rances C. Judkins were united in marriage 
June ig, 1901, in Barnesville, Belmont County, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harrison have lived in Barnesville since their marriage, 
where he is engaged in mercantile pursuits in connection with his father. 

Mrs. Harrison was a graduate of the Barnesville high schools, having 
finished the last term there in May, 1895. She is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

Mr. Harrison graduated from the Martin's Ferry high school in the 
spring of 1894, after which he entered the Washington and Jefferson College at 
Washington, Pennsylvania, attending there one j'ear. He then returned home 
and began his present work with his father. He is a member of the Presbyte- 
rian church. 

FRANK L. AND LEORA P. vLEWISi ADAMS (6) 

Leora Pogue Lewis, daughter of Isaac P. and Nanc)^ \'. (Lemon) Lewis, 
was born October 11, 1878, in Georgetown, Harrison County, Ohio. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 253 

Frank Adams, son of Joseph William and Nora (Watson) Adams, was 
born April 29, 1877, in Harrisville, Harrison County, Ohio. 

Frank Adams and Leora P. Lewis were united in marriage August 15, 
1901, in New Athens, Harrison County, Ohio, by a minister of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Adams located near Cadiz, Harrison County, Ohio, and he 
is engaged in the mercantile business in Cadiz. 

Mr. Adams is of Irish and English descent. He graduated from a com- 
mercial college before entering upon his business career. 

Mrs. Adams graduated from the Harrisville High School and later 
attended the Mt. Vernon College. 



GEORGE L. AND EVA (PETIT) DYER '6) 

George Lewis Dyer, son of Nicholas D. and Mary A. (Lewis) Dyer, was 
born October g, 1868, in St. Louis, Missouri. 

Eva Petit, daughter of Herbert and Lenore (Joubert) Petit, was born 
August 28, 1876, at Bourbonnais, Illinois. 

George L. Dyer and Eva Petit were united in marriage September 6, 
i8g8, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

No children. 

Eva (Petit) Dyer is a graduate of St. Joseph's Notre Dame, Indiana, 
and is of French parentage. 

George L. Dyer was educated in the schools of Muscatine, Iowa, and 
evinced a precocious talent for literary work and became associated at an earh' 
age with the Chicago Times and several leading periodicals. He is the author 
of a number of beautiful poems and prose sketches. Turning his literary 
ability to practical purposes some years ago, he took up the work of advertising 
large commercial industries and is now foremost in this new profession. 

He is a critical, artistic connisseur — an agnostic, epicurean Bohemian; a 
royal good fellow and a prime favorite with a host of friends. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dyer reside in New York State. 



MACY S. AND ELLA F. (MARTIN' DAVIS (6) 

Ella Florence Martin, daughter of Isaac A. and Anna E. (Atkinson) 
Martin, was born February 20, 1863, in Centre Belpre, Washington County, 
Ohio. 

Macy S. Davis, son of William and Beulah (Gray) Davis, was horn 
October 12, 1863, near Salem, Henry County, Iowa. 

Macy S. Davis and Ella F. Martin were itnited in marriage Sei>tember 
3, 1885, at the home of the bride's parents near Salem, Henry County, Iowa. 



254 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birtli Death 

Anna Beulah Davis September 8, 1 886 

Lawrence Paul Davis December 8, 1894 

Anna B. was born in Salem. Henry County, Iowa, and Lawrence P. near 
El Modena, Orange County, California. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Davis lived near Salem, Henry 
County, Iowa, for several years. They then removed to California, stopping a 
short time in Ventura County, and at Whittier, Los Angeles County, and set- 
tled near El Modena, Orange County. In 1898 they removed to the city of 
El Modena, where they reside at the present time. 

Mr. Davis is of Welsh, Irish and English descent. His mother was a 
daughter of Absalom and Mary (Pickett) Gray. For several years Mr. Davis 
has followed the profession of teaching. During their residence in Iowa he 
was township clerk for some time, and since their removal to California has 
been president of the annual meeting of the Christian Endeavor Society. 

Mr. Davis was a birthright member of the Progressive Friends' Society, 
and after their marriage, having located in a Friends' community, Mrs. Davis, 
who had previously been associated with the Baptists, became a member of the 
Friends' Society in order to co-operate with her husband in his work. During 
their connection with the Friends they held many responsible positions, such 
as clerk of the monthly and quarterly meeting, Sunday School superintendent, 
president of Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, and almost constantly as 
Sunday School teachers. 

After their removal to California, in 1899, they severed their connection 
with the Friends' Society on account of the conviction of truth, as taught in a 
series of Bible Commentaries, known as "The Plan of the Ages," or "Millenial 
Dawn" series. 

Mr. and Mrs. Davis were both teachers in Whittier College before their 
marriage. 

Mr. Davis has alwa\'S been interested in educational matters, and is 
at present a candidate for County Superintendent, of Orange County. He is 
spoken of as being thoroughly competent and as peculiarly fitted in every way 
for the office. 

Anna B., their oldest daughter, graduated from the common branches in 
igoi. and is at present attending the high schools of Santa Anna, the county 
seat of Orange County. California. 

W. SCOTT AND CATHERINE D. 1 MARTIN) WATSON (6) 

Catherine Delia Martin, daughter of Isaac \. and .\nna E. (.\tkinson) 
Martin, was born July 23, 1865, near Wilton Junction, Cedar County, Iowa. 

W. Scott Watson, son of James Long and Cynthia (Hammans) Watson, 
was born September 25, 1856, in Eugene City, Lane County, Oregon. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 255 

W. Scott Watson and Catherine D. Martin were united in marriage 
January 4, 1887, at the home of the bride's parents, Salem, Henry County, 
Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE liOKN 

Name Ihi III Death 

Fannie Mabel Watson December 7, 1887 ....October 11, i8go 

Winona Alcene Watson September 10, i88g 

Junius Leslie Watson January 8, 1892 

Fannie M. was born in Salem, Henry County, Winona A. in Iowa City, 
Johnson Count}', and Junius L. m Ilillshoro, Henrv County, all in the state of 
Iowa. 

Fannie M. died near Hillsboro. Iowa. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Watson lived in Salem, Iowa, for a 
short tiine, where Mr. Watson was engaged as principal in the school. 

Mr. Watson was a public school teacher several years before his mar- 
riage and a few years afterward, having taught in all about eleven years. 

The following year they removed to Iowa City, where Mr. Watson took 
a course in law at the State University, and in 1890 they removed to Ft. Madi- 
son, of the same state, where he begun the practice of law. Two years later 
they moved to Cedar Rapids, where he was still engaged in the same profession. 
In 1895 they removed to Orange Count\-, California, and located in an orange 
grove near El Modena. 

Mr. Watson says: "While we accept our siiare of life's toil and hard- 
ships, we are enjoying life in the 'land of sunshine and flowers.' " 

Mrs. Watson was a Missionary Baptist for several years, but has lately 
accepted the Millennial Dawn faith. 



DANIEL G. AND LENA M. (WELLMAN. HAWKINS (6) 

Lena May Wellman, daughter of Rudolpli and Mary A. (Martin) \\ell- 
man, was born October 23, 1861, near Morristown, Belmont County, Ohio. 

Daniel Gilbert Hawkins, son of Henry and Margaret Ann (Capper) 
Hawkins, was born May 19, i860, near Columbus City, Louisa County, Iowa. 

Daniel G. Hawkins and Lena M. Wellman were united in marriage 
November 24, 1881, at tlie home of the bride's parents, near Winfield, Cowley 
County, Kansas, Joseph E. Cain, minister of the Christian church, officiating. 

'I'O THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birlh Death 
Jessie Dean Hawkins October 25, 1882 



She was born at the home of her grandfather and grandmother Hawkins, 
near Winfield, Kansas. There was railier an unusual incident at the time 



256 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

of this little girl's birth. She was the fortunate possessor of five living grand- 
mothers — two own grandmothers, Mary Ann Wellman and Margaret Ann Haw- 
kins: two great grandmothers, Susannah Capper and Sarah (Lewis) Martin, 
and one great great grandmother, Sarah (Wilson ) (Lewis ) Lewis. 

Jessie D. has received a good education, and attended the College of 
Music, in Winfield, Kansas. 

Mr. and Mrs Hawkins located on Mr. Hawkins's father's farm, near Win- 
field, where they lived until after the latter's death in 1895, when they removed 
to a farm near the old homestead, and lived there until 1901. Mr. Hawkins 
then purchased a farm in Grant County, Oklahoma Territory, near Lamont, 
where they reside at the present time. 

Mr. Hawkins's father was born September 28, 1817, in Wavne County, 
Indiana, and was of English descent. His mother, Margaret A. (Capper) 
Hawkins, was born January' 21, 1823, in Franklin County, Indiana, and was of 
Irish and German descent. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hawkins and daughter, Jessie Dean, are members of the 
Christian Church. 

EDWIN R. AND ELIZABETH (TESTER) WELLMAN (6) 

Edwin Regal Wellman, son of Rudolph and Mary A. (Martin) Wellman, 
was born July 19, 1894, near W^ilton Junction, Cedar County, Iowa. 

Elizabeth Tester, daughter of Henry and Lucretia V. (Hefley) Tester, 
was born September 30, 1870, near Hillsborough. Montgomery County, Illinois. 

Edwin R. Wellman and Elizabeth Tester were united in marriage 
November 12, 1891, at the home of the groom's parents, near Winfield, Cowley 
Countv, Kansas, Rev. P. W. Shick officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Glenn Melvin Wellman November 27, 1893 

William Rudolph Wellman . . . November 27, 1895 

Guy Edwin Wellman November 2, 1897 

Encil Virgil Wellman December 31, 1901 

Glenn M. was born near Oxford, Sumner County, Kansas, William R. 
near Winfield, Cowley County, of the same state, Guy E. and Encil V. near 
Blackwcll, Kay County, Oklahoma Territory. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wellman lived near Winfield, Cowley County, Kansas, two 
years after their marriage, when they removed to a farm near Oxford, Sumner 
County, of the same state. In 1895 they returned to Cowley County and settled 
near Winfield, and the ne.xt year removed to Kay County, Oklahoma Territory, 
where they live on a farm near Hlackwell. 

Mr. and Mrs Wellman are members of the Christian Church. 

;\Irs. Wellmans motlui was of German, and her father of English 
descent. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 257 



JAMES F. AND JESSIE S. (WOOD) WELLMAN (6) 

James Francis Wellman, son of Rudolph and Mary A. ( Martin ) Well- 
man, was liorn October 6, iS68, near Wilton Junction, Cedar County, Iowa. 

Jessie Sophia Wood, daughter of Isaac and Catherine (Bradbury) Wood, 
was born February 13, 1870, near Greenville, P'loyd County, Indiana. 

James F. Wellman and Jessie S. Wood were united in marriage October 
6, 1892, at the home of the bride's parents near Oxford, Cowley County, Kan- 
sas, Rev. P. W. Shick officiating. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Forest George Wellman August 9, 1893 

Paul Francis Wellman March 12, 1898 .... 

Isaac Clair Wellman January 8, 1 900 

Forest G. was born near O.xford, Cowley County, Kansas, and Paul F. 
and Isaac C. near Medford, Grant County, Oklahoma Territory. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wellman lived near Oxford, Cowlej' County, Kansas, two 
years after their marriage, when they removed to Grant County, Oklahoma 
Territory and settled near Medford, where Mr. Wellman is engaged in farming. 
They are both members of the Church of Christ. 

Mrs. Wellman's father and mother were natives of Flo\'d County, Indi- 
ana. The former was born January 24, 1846, of Scotch-Irish descent, and the 
latter June 10, 1850, of English descent. They were married September 6, 
1868, and lived in Floyd County many years. Subsequently they removed to 
Kansas and located in Cowley County. 



THOMAS AND FLORENCE I. (PAINTER) MOCK (6) 

Florence Irene Painter, daughter of William and Sarah E. (Martin) 
Painter, was born April 7, 1866. 

Thomas Mock, son of William H. and Mary Ellen ( Beaman ) Mock, was 
born 1H74. 

Thomas Mock and Florence I. Painter were united in marriage Novem- 
ber 15, 1888. at the home of the bride's parents near Lawton, Cowley County, 
Kansas, Rev. Joseph E. Cain officiating. 

TO THEM WERi: HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Howard Mock Deceased 

Maude Mock Ajjril — , 1893 

17 



258 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

The}' were born near Winfield, Cowley County, Kansas. 
Mr. Mock's parents are natives of Adair County, Ohio. 
Mr. Mock and dan,i;hter reside near Kellogg, Kansas. 



RICHARD E. AND WILLIE E. (PAINTER) ROGERS (6) 

Willie Ermina Painter, daughter of William and Sarah E. (Martin) 
Painter, was born December 17, i86<S, in Olathe, Johnson County, Kansas. 

Richard Ernest Rogers, son of Richard Jerome and Harriet Maria 
(Rogers) Rogers, was born October 9, 1865, in Montville, New London County, 
Connecticut. 

Richard E. Rogers and Willie E. Painter were united in marriage April 
2, i88g, near Winfield, Cowley Count}-, Kansas. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Richard William Rogers August 18, i8gi 

Blanche Joan Rogers May 22, 1893 

Kenneth Painter Rogers May 7, 1899 

They were born near Winfield, Kansas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rogers located near Winfield, Kansas, soon after their 
marriage, where they are engaged in agricultural pursuits. 

Mr. Rogers graduated from an eastern business college and traveled as 
salesman for the Brainard Armstrong Silk Company for some time. 

Mr. Rogers's parents were native.s of Connecticut and were of English 
descent. 



HARRISON W. AND FLORA FINCH 1 PAINTER (6) 

Harrison William Painter, son of William and Sarah E. (Martin) Pain- 
ter, was born January i, 1871, in Van Buren County, Iowa. 

Flora Finch, daughter of Payton Robb and Levina (Drysdale) Finch, 
was born October 17, 1878, in Posey County, Indiana. 

Harrison W. Painter and Flora Finch were united in marriage October 
17, 1897, at the home of the bride's parents in Guthrie, Logan County, Okla- 
homa. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

William Wayne Painter October 15, 1899 

He was born in Guthrie, Oklahoma. 

Mr. and Mrs. Painter reside in Guthrie, Oklahoma, where he is casliier 
of the Bank of Indian Territorv. 



RECORD OF THK LEWIS FAMILY 259 

After Mr. Painter completed his school work in ilSgo he was connected 
with the Riley-Wilson Wholesale Grocery Company of Kansas City, Missouri, 
until 1893, when he removed to Guthrie, Oklahoma, and was under-sheriff 
under his father until 1897. He then became connected with the W. H. Coyle 
Wholesale Grocery Company and the following year was elected cashier of the 
Bank of Indian Territory, in which capacity he still serves. 

Mr. Painter is a Republican and a member of the Christian Church. 

Mrs. Painter's mother was born in 1843 in Posey County, Indiana, and 

her father in 1S44 in . They were married in 1861 in Posey County- 

Indiana. Subsequently they removed to Guthrie, Oklahoma, where Mrs. Finch 
died January 28, 1901. Mr. Finch still resides in Guthrie. 



WILLIAM A. AND EFFIE M. PAINTER) FARRINGER (6) 

Effie May Painter, daughter of William and Sarah E. (Martin) Painter, 
was born March 11, 1876, near Olathe, Johnson County, Kansas. 

William Auber Farringer, son of Charles and Fannie (Foster) Farrin- 
ger, was born January 5, 1869, in Boonville, Cooper County, Missouri. 

William A. Farringer and Effie M. Painter were united in marriage 
August 19, 1895, in the Christian Cliurch of Guthrie, Logan County, Oklahoma, 
by Rev. Clark Braden. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 
Ursula Farringer October 27, 1896 

She was born in Winfield, Cowley County, Kansas. 

Mrs. Farringer graduated from the College of Music, Winfield, Kansas, 
before her marriage. 

Mr. Farringer's father, president of the Ontario Music College, of 
Toronto, Canada, was a native of Sax Wymer, German}-. His mother was 
born in the state of New York. 

Mr. and Mrs. Farringer are residents of Winfield, Kansas, where the 
former is engaged in pharmacy. 



EUGENE A. AND MAYME D. ROBINSON) HASKINS (6) 

Eugene Archer Hawkins, son of AUxrt II. and Emma L. (Martin) Haw- 
kins, was born January 29, 1879, near Wiiilield, Cowley County, Kansas. 

Mayine DeLora Robinson, daught> 1 of William Baldwin and Sarah Vir- 
gin (Munnell) Robinson, was born Octob.r 2, 1877, in Beeler Station, Mar- 
shall County, West Virginia. 



26o RECORD OF IHE LEWIS FAMILY 

Eugene A. Hawkins and Mayme D. Robinson were united in marriage 
August 21, igoi, at the home of the bride's parents in Beeler Station, Virginia, 
Ira C. Mose, a minister of the Christian Church, officiating. 

Mr. and Mrs Hawkins located near Winfield. Kansas, where they are 
engaged in farming. 

Mrs. Hawkins parents are both natives of Marshall County, West \'ir- 
ginia, and Mr. Robinson is postmaster at Beeler Station at present. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hawkins are both members of the Christian Church. 



CHARLES W. AND GERTRUDE I. (HAWKINS) GEER (6) 

Gertrude Irene Hawkins, daughter of Albert H. and Emma L. (Martin) 
Hawkins, was born August 7, 1881, near Winfield, Cowley County. Kansas. 

Charles Willard Geer, son of James Henry and Sophia A. (Palmer) 
Geer, was born April 2, 1869, in Winfield, Cowley County, Kansas. 

Charles W. Geer and Gertrude I. Hawkins were united in marriage June 
4, igoi, in the Christian Church of Kellogg, Cowley County, Kansas, Elder D. 
T. Broadus, of Belle Plaine, Kansas, performing the ceremony. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geer started to California soon after their marriage, where 
he had been making his home for some time, and located at San Bernandino, 
where Mr. Geer is employed in the railway mail service. His route runs from 
San Bernandino to San Diego, through the most beautiful part of the orange belt. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geer are members of the Church of Christ. 

Mr. Geer's father was a native of New York, of Scotch-Irish descent, 
and his mother was born in Connecticut, of English descent. His parents hav- 
ing died in 1873 and 1874, when he was but four years of age, he was raised by 
foster-parents, William L. and Mary E. (Johnston) Jones. His earlj' life was 
spent on d farm and attending the district schools. His life, from seventeen to 
twenty-two years of age, was spent alternately attending school and teaching. 
The following year, 1892, he went west and spent seven j'ears in Arizona and 
California, teaching, clerking, bookkeeping, mining and running a general mer- 
cantile business. In 1899 he accepted a government position as railway postal 
clerk, which he still holds. 



VERNON R. AND SELINA T. (LEWIS) LANE (6) 

Selina Tacy Lewis, daughter of Lineaus M- and Hannah S. (Dickerson) 
Lewis, was born December 26, 1874, near Atalissa, Muscatine County, Iowa. 

Vernon Robert Lane, son of Jacob and Mary E. (Williams) Lane, was 
born January i, 1868, lU'ar Catskill, Greene County, New York. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 261 

Vernon R. Lane and Selina T. Lewis were united in marriage May 24, 
1893, near Rising City, Butler County, Nebraska. 

No children. 

Mrs. Lane graduated from the West Liberty, Iowa, high school in June, 
1891, and taught in the public schools of Muscatine County, Iowa, one term, 
when she removed with her parents to Rising City, Butler County, Nebraska. 
She is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Lane lived two years in Rising City, 
Nebraska. They then removed to West Liberty, Iowa, where Mr. Lane is the 
leading photographer of the city. 

Mr. Lane is of French and German descent. 



FREDERICK O. AND CORA (LEWIS) BEARDMORE (6) 

Frederick Overton Beardmore, son of Eman and Rebecca J. (Frame) 
Beardmore, was born March 18, 1868, near Jerusalem, Monroe County, Ohio. 

Cora Lewis, daughter of Richard and Mary Ann (Harwood") Lewis, was 
born February 25, 1870, near , Missouri. 

Frederick O. Beardmore and Cora Lewis were united in marriage 

, in , Kansas. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Dcaili 

Earl Beardmore ) „ . 

^ 1 T-, " ^ Wins. 

Carl Beardmore ) 

Lois Beardmore 

Mead Beardmore 

Raymond A. Beardmore October 27, 1900 

Earl and Carl were born in Oregon, and Lois, Mead and Ray- 
mond A. in Cloud County, Kansas. 

Mr. Beardmore is a member of the Christian or Disciples Church. 

Mrs. Beardmoi'e's father was born January S, 1.S33, and her mother 
August 9, 1839. 



JOHN F. AND MARIE L. (ALLEN) BEARDMORE (6) 

John F"rame Beardmore, son of Eman and Rebecca J. (Frame) Beard- 
more, was born August 23, 1874, in Cloud County, Kansas. 

Marie Louise Allen, daughter of Cabel J. and Marie (Himes) Alien, was 
born F\-bruary 22, 1876, in Concordia, Cloud County, Kansas. 

John F. Beardmore and Marie L. Allen were united in marriage I >ecem- 
ber 16, 1896, in , Kansas. 



262 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

N'aiiic Birlli Death 

Dean Allen Beardmore November 6, 1897 

Keith W. Buardinore December 22, i8gg 

They were born near Halfway, Cloud County, Kansas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Beardmore reside near Halfway, Cloud County, Kansas, 
where they are engaged in farming. 

Mrs. Beardmore is of English and Scotch descent. Her father was born 
May 15, 1838, and her mother in 1841. 



COL. FRANK D. AND BERTHA D. (SAWYER) EAGER (6) 

Bertha D. Sawyer, daughter of George F. and Martha L. (Kilmerj Saw- 
yer, was born April 29, 1873, near Western, Saline County, Nebraska. 

Frank D. Eager, son of and ( ) Eager, was born 

, in . 

Col. Frank D. Eager and Bertha D. Sawyer were united in marriage 
October 4, 1901, in Western, Saline Count)', Nebraska. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eager reside in Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Mrs. Eager was a teacher in the public schools for some time. In 1898 
she graduated from Doane College, Crete, Nebraska, after which she took up a 
position as cashier and bookkeeper with the Armstrong Clothing Company, the 
largest clothing house in Lincoln, Nebraska, with whom she stayed nearly 
three years. 

Col. Eager was a soldier in the Spanish -American war, having enlisted 
in First Nebraska Regiment, at Lincoln, Nebraska. He was promoted and 
took Col. Stotsenburg's place in battle the daj' Stotsenburg was killed. He w'as 
honorably discharged after meritorious service. 

Col. Eager is editor and manager of the Nebraska Independent. 



JOHN M. AND ELDORA F. SAWYER VAN AUKEN (6) 

Eldora F. Sawyer, daughter of George F. and Martlia L. (Kilmer) Saw- 
yer, was born December 8, 1876, in Dorchester, Nebraska, 

John M. Van Auken, son of James and Esther (McDuffy) \'an Auken, 
was born Sept( mber 28, 1862, in Ames, Iowa. 

Eldora F. Sawyer and John M. \'an Auken were united in marriage 
March 31, , in Western, Nebraska. 

ID IHEM WERE HCJRN 

Name Birth Death 
John M. Van .Auken, Jr.. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 263 

Mr. and Mrs. Van Auken reside in Western, Saline County, Nebraska. 
Mr. Van Auken is traveling agent for tlie J. I. Case Threshing Machine. 



ALBERT J. AND EVA E. (SAWYER) STORMS (6) 

Eva E. Sawyer, daughter of George F. and Martha (Kilmer) Sawyer, 
was born January 30, 1879, in Friend, Saline County, Nebraska. 

Albert J. Storms, son of Willard H. and Elizabeth (King) Storms, was 
born June 15, 1870, in Lowden, Cedar County, Iowa. 

Albert J. Storms and Eva E. Sawyer were united in marriage September 
II, 1895, in Western, Nebraska. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Helen E. Storms September 6, 1897 

Willis H. Storms May 26, 1901 

They were born near Western, Saline Count}', Nebraska. 
Mr. and Mrs. Storms reside near Western, where they are engaged in 
farming and stockraising. 



WILLIAM H. AND ANNIE (WEIGERS) SAWYER (6) 

William Henry Sawyer, son of Thomas A. and Mary A. (Haines) Saw- 
yer, was born August 7, 1871, in Jasper County, Iowa. 

Annie Weigers, daughter of Henry and Annie ( Beckman) Weigers, was 
born February 17, 1874, near Petersburg, Illinois. 

William H. Sawyer and Annie Weigers were united in marriage January 
23, 1895, at the home of the bride's mother, near Western. Saline County, Ne- 
braska, Rev. W. J. Scott officiating. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Chester Thomas Sawyer October 17, 1895 

Cecil Henry Sawyer May 31, i'^i)7 

Cora Elizabeth Sawyer Ajn'il 13, 1.^99 

They were born near Western, Saline County, Nebraska. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sawyer lived several years near Western, Saline County, 
Nebraska. Subsequently they removed to Kansas and reside on a cattle ranch, 
near Bird City. 

Mrs. Sawyer is of German parentage. 



264 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 



CHARLES H. AND MARY (KASSABAUM) SAWYER (6) 

Charles H. Sawyer, son of Thomas A. and Mary A. (Haines) Sawyer, 
was born June lo, 1874, in Saline County, Nebraska. 

Mary Kassabaum, daughter of William and Catharina (Krahl) Kassa- 
baum, was born June 12, 1878, near Tobias, Saline County, Nebraska. 

Charles H. Sawyer and Mary Kassabaum were united in marriage Febru- 
ary 22, 1898, in Wilber, Saline County, Nebraska, Judge Hasmer H. Hendee 
officiating. 

TO THEW WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Clyde Oliver Sawyer December 21, 1898 

Blanche Sawyer February 18, igoo 

Claude Archibald Saw\'er September 22, 1901 

They were born near Western, Saline County, Nebraska. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sawyer reside near Western, Saline County, Nebraska, 
where Mr. Sawyer is engaged in raising cattle and hogs. 

Mrs. Sawyer's father was of German and her mother of Bohemian 
descent. 

FRANK AND EVA L. (RIGBY) BATTEN (6) 

Eva Leota Rigby, daughter of Emery G. and Theturah C. (Gardner) 
Rigby, was born March 26, 1877, at the "Twin Hills," Penn Township, Jaj' 
County, Indiana. 

Frank K. Batten, son of Frank K. and ^Mary Ellen (Seaphman) Batten, 
was born January 18, 1875, in Jackson Township, Blackford County, Indiana. 

l-'rank K. Batten and Eva L. Rigby were united in marriage August 26, 
i8g6, at I-'ortiand, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Mary Edith Batten April 6, i8g8 

William Waldo Batten November 10, 1900 

Mary E. was born in Jackson Township and William W. in Penn Town- 
shi]), both of Jay Countv, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Batten located on a farm in Jackson Township, Jay Coun- 
ty, Indiana, and later removed to the "Enos Lewis Place" in Penn Township, 
of the same county and state, where they were very successfully engaged in 
farming. In the spring of igo2 they purchased property in Balbec, Penn 
Township, where they reside at the present time. 

Mr. Batten is of Irisfi parentage. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 265 



ENOS L. AND ADDIE P. (GARROT) RIGBY (6) 

Enos Lewis Kigby, son of Emery G. and Theturah C. (Gardner) Rigby, 
was born October 7, 1878, at the "Twin Hills," Penn Township, Jay County, 
Indiana. 

Addie Pearl Garrot, daughter of Isaac N. and Ethelean (Arnold) Garrot, 
was born October 17, 1882, in Henry County, Indiana. 

Enos L. Rigby and Addie P. Garrot were united in marriage April 29, 
1900, near Balbec, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEiM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Emery Myrle Rigby October 8, 1900 

Isaac Marvin Rigby February 16, 1902 

They were born in Balbec, Jay County, Indiana 

Mr. and Mrs. Rigby have lived in Balbec, Jay County, Indiana, since 
their marriage, where Mr. Rigby has been engaged in the blacksmith business. 

Mrs. Rigby is of Irish descent. 



CHARLES E. AND ELIZA K. (HOPKINS) GRISELL (6) 

Charles Elmer Grisell, son of Hiram B. and Lydia J. ^ Paxson) Grisell, 
was born May 7, 1870, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Eliza Elizabeth Hopkins, daughter of Jerome B. and M. Adaline (Lewis) 
Hopkins, was born January 24, 1872, in Jackson Township, Jay County, In- 
diana. 

Charles E. Grisell and Eliza E. Hopkins were united in marriage Jan- 
uary 24, 1895, at the M. E. parsonage, Pennville, Indiana, Rev. J. D. Croan 
officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Edra lona Grisell September 26, 1898 ... November, r, 1901 

Her birth and death occurred near Balbec, Jay County, Indiana. 

In 1895 Mr. and Mrs. Grisell took Howard W. Strait, orphan son of 
John E. and Mary J. (Grisell) Strait, into tluir home and have since cared for 
him as their child. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell have lived in Peiin Township, Jay County, Indiana, 
since their marriage, where Mr. Grisell was engaged three years in rig ImiUling 
and teaming for the Northern Indiana Oil Company. Subsequently he has 
been engaged in farming and stockraising. In 1895 Mr. Grisell purcliased the 
"old homestead" formerly owned by his parents. 



266 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Mrs. Grisell was a teacher in the public schools pruvious to her marriage, 
having received her education in the public schools, the Normal College of 
Portland, and the State Normal of Terra Haute, Indiana. She taught three 
terms in Jay County and two in Wells County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church of 
Pennville, Indiana. Mr. Grisell is a Republican. He is English and Scotch 
descent. 

The following is a copy of part of the obituary of Mr. and Mrs. Grisell's 
little daughter: — 

"Her short stay with us was the happiest of our lives. She was always 
and everywhere loving and happy. We now trust her to God's care and look- 
forward to a time when we shall meet our dear little happy Edra in heaven. 

"There's a Reaper, whose name is Death, 
And with his sickle keen. 
He reaps the bearded grain at breath, 
And the flowers that grow between. 

"They shall all bloom in fields of light. 
Transplanted by thy care; 
And saints upon their garments white. 
These sacred blossoms wear. 

"O, not in cruelty, not in wrath, 

The Reaper came that day; 
'Twas an angel visited the green earth 

And took our flower away. 

"The funeral services were held on Sunday, in the M. E. Church at 
Pennville, conducted by Rev. M. F. Dawson of the United Brethren Church. 
Interment in the Odd Fellows' beautiful cemetery. At the grave side was a 
lovel}' and appropriate symbol, a pillow of white flowers, presented by the 
Woman's Christian Temperance Union, of which society Mrs. Grisell is the 
worthy president." 



WILBUR D. AND OLETA O. (HOPKINS) HUNT (6) 

Oleta Oceola, daughter of Jerome B. and M. Adaline (Lewis) Hopkins, 
was born February 21, 1873, '"^ Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana, and 
died June 11, 1896, at Van Buren, Grant County. Iniliana. Interment in the 
Friends' Cemetery, Pennville, fay Count\', Indiana. 

Wilbur Daunton Hunt, son of Mahlon and I3el)orah ( Smitii) Hunt, was 
born , , in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Wilbur D. Hunt and Oleta O. Hopkins were united in marriage Decem- 
ber 21, 1895, in PeiiuvlUe, Jay County, Indiana, at tlie M. IC. parsonage, Rev. 
Croan officiating. 

No cliildren. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 267 

Mr. and Mrs. Hunt located in Van Biiren, Indiana, where they Hved at 
the time of her death. Mr. Hunt was engaged in the oil fields. 

Mr. Hunt's mother was a native of Columbiana County, Ohio, daughter of 
Abraham Smith, who was among the early settlers of Jay County. His grand- 
father Hunt was a native of Gilford County, North Carolina, and his grand- 
mother Hunt, of New Jersey. 

Mrs. Hunt was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

The following was copied from her obituary: — 

"There is no flock, however watched and tended 
But one dead lamb is there; 
There is no fireside howsoe'er defended, 
But has one vacant chair. 

Ocie was always kind and pleasant, never giving father and luother un- 
becoming words and ever ready to help others in need. For many years during 
her childhood she was a constant care to her parents on account of her rheu- 
matic afflictions. 

"The light of her young Hfe went down, 
As sinks behind a hill 
The glory of a setting star — 
Clear, suddenly and still. 

"There seems a shadow on the day, 
Her smile no longer cheers; 
A dimness on the stars of night 
Like eyes that look through tears. 

"Alone unto our Father's will 
One thought hath reconciled: 
That He whose love exceedeth ours 
Hath taken home His child. 

"Fold her, O Father! in Thine arms, 
And let her henceforth be 
A messenger of love between 
Our human hearts and Thee." 



JOHN AND CORA E. (HOPKINS) BLACK (6) 

Cora Evaline Hopkins, daughter of Jerome B. and M. Adaline ( Lt'wis) 
Hopkins, was born August 7, 1874, in Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

John Black, son of 'Wilson and Sarah ( ) Black, was !)()rn 

• in Jay County, Indiana. 

John Black and Cora E. Hopkins were united in marriage Match 15, 
1899, at the home of the bride's parents, near Pennville, Jay Coiintx, Indiana, 
Rev. "Willmore, of the United Brethren Church, officiating. 



268 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birtli Death 
Everette Ambrose Black April lo, 1900 

He was born in Penn Township, Ja}' County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Black reside rear Portland, Indiana, where they are 
engaged in farming. 

Mrs. Black learned the millinery trade and held a position in Wieler 
Bros, mercantile establishment in Portland for some time previous to her mar- 
riage. 

Mr. Black is of English and German descent. 



THOMAS AND NELLIE B. (HOPKINS) MILES C6) 

Nellie Blanche Hopkins, daughter of Jerome B. and M. Adaline (Lewis) 
Hopkins, w'as born November 7, 1877, in Jackson Township, Jaj- County, In- 
diana. 

Thomas Miles, son of Samuel and Libbie (Irey) Miles, was born in Jay 
Coantv. Indiana. 

Thomas Miles and Nellie B. Hopkins were united in marriage October 
8, 1899, in Jay County. Indiana, W'm. Eberly officiating. 

TO THE.M WERE BORN' 

Name. Birth. Death. 
Mary Athelma Miles December 17, 1901 

She was born in Warren. Huntington County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Miles located in Fiat, Jay Count}-, Indiana. Remaining there a 
short time they removed to Warren, Huntington Cotmty, Indiana, and later to 
Marion, of the same state, where thej- reside at the present. Mr. Miles is 
engaged in rig building. 



WILLIAM AND ORA A. (REGESTER) AVRA (6) 

Ora Anna Kegester, daughter of Amos M. and Hannah E. (Lewis) 
Regester, was born Juh- 14, 1875, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, and 
died September 10, 1900, in Ja\ County, Indiana. Interment in the West Grove 
Cemetery of Penn Township. 

William Avra, son of and ( ) Avra. was born 

in . 

William .^Xvra and Ora A. Regester were united in marriage Januarj' 10, 
1899, in Jay County, Indiana. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILV 26g 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 
Elmer Lawrence Avra September lo, igoo 

He was born in Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Avra first located on Mrs. Avra's father's farm, where they 
were engaged in agricultural pursuits one year. They then removed to the 
northern part of Jay County, where Mr. Avra was employed in the oil fields. 
They had lived here but a short time when Mrs. Avra's death occurred. Their 
little son was then received into Mrs. Avra's parents home, where he is being 
cared for as their own child. 

JOSEPH E. AND MARY E. (REGESTER) ENGLE (6) 

Mary Ethel Kegester. daughter of Amos M. and Hannah E. (Lewis) 
Regester, was born March 21, 1880, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Joseph E. Engle, son of Isaac and Ann (Hopkins) Engle, was born 
August 2, 1878, in Jay Count}', Indiana. 

Joseph E. Engle and Mary E. Regester were united in marriage Novem- 
ber 19, 1897, at the home of the bride's parents in Penn Township, Jay County, 
Indiana. 

TO THEftf WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Chella Engle Died in infancy . 

Orlando Clifton Engle April 5, 1899 

Isaac Clayton Engle June 8, 1901 

They were born in Jay County, Indiana. 

Chella died in Jay County and was buried in the cemetery of Pennville, 
in the same county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Engle reside on a farm in Jay County, where they are 
engaged in farming. 

CLARENCE C. AND OLEO P ( BROWN 1 BROWN (6) 

Oelo I'earle Brown, daughter of Lorenzo H. and Elizabeth (Coover) 
Brown, was born January 30, 1876, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Clarence Conway Brown, son of Levi P. and Alice (Taylor) Brown, was 
born September 27, 1869, in Wood County, Ohio. 

Clarence C. Brown and Oelo P. Brown were united in marriage April 13, 
igoi, in North Baltimore, Wood County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 
Clarence Ellsworth Brown .... June 11,1902 



2/0 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Clarence C. and Oelo P. (Brown) Brown are engaged in fanning near 
Oniemee, Bottineau County, North Dakota. Their child was born there also. 

Clarence C. is a nicinberof Valentine Lodge, No. 378, Knights of Pythias, 
of Albany, Delaware County, Indiana. Oelo P. is a member of the Christian 
Church at Albany. 

Mr. Brown's parents were both natives of Ohio. His mother was born 
November 26, 1850, in Greensburg, Summit County, Ohio, and his father May 
6, 1849, in Lexington, Perry County, Ohio, and died March 15, 1898, in Albany, 
Indiana. They were married November 29, 1868, in Bowling Green, Wood 
County, Ohio, and removed to Indiana in 1896, locating in Albany, where Mrs. 
Brown still resides. 



JARRETT AND IDA M. (BROWN) NIXON (6) 

Ida Myrtle Brown, daughter of Lorenzo H. and Elizabeth (Coover) 
Brown, was born August 14, 1878, near Balbec, Jay County, Indiana. 

Jarrett Nixon, son of Azriah and Elizabeth ( Covalt) Nixon, was born 
December 22, 1872, in Henry County, Indiana. 

Jarrett Nixon and Ida M. Brown were united in marriage August 17, 
1895, near Sulphur Springs, Henry Count\', Indiana, D. Hoover, a minister of 
the Dunkard Church, officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Edith May Nixon February 26, 1896 

Gladys Marie Nixon May 24, 1902 

They were born near Cowan, Delaware County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nixon reside on a farm near Cowan, where they are en- 
gaged in farming and stockraising. Their address is Muncie, Indiana, R. F. D. 
No. 5. 

Mr. Nixon is of English descent. He is a mt-mber of Energy Lodge, 
No. 410, Knights of Pythias. 

They are both members of the Friends' Church, at Cowan, Indiana. 



JOHN L. AND ROSE C. (DE VOE) BROWN (6) 

John Lester Brown, sou of Lorenzo II. and Elizabeth (Coover) Brown, 
was born .August i, 1881, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Rose Clugh DeVoe, daughter of Rape and Emily (Clugh) DeVoe, was 
born September 14, 1883, in Miles Township, Delaware County, Indiana. 

John L. Brown and Rose C. DeVoe were united in marriage April 20, 
1 901, in Albany, Delaware County, Indiana. 



RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 27I 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Dcatli 
Jewell Elizabeth Brown March 12, 1902 

She was born at Albany, Delaware Count)', Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brown reside in Albany, where the former is engaged in 
assorting in the bottle factory. 

Mrs. Brown is of Dutch and Irish descent. She is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church of Albany, Indiana. 



HARRY AND IVALEAN M. (GRAY) Mc DORMAN (6) 

Ivalean Malvina Gray, daughter of Morris L. and Mary L. (Williams) 
Gray, was born February 13, 1883. in Jackson Township. Jay County. Indiana. 

Harry McDorman, son of Albert and Lydia (Bear) McDorman, was 
born September 26, 1879, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Harry McDorman and Ivalean M. Gray were united in nianiage Septem- 
ber 3, i8gg, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana, Rev. Enos Polly, minister of 
the Christian Church, officiating. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. McDorman located in Pennville, Indiana, after their mar- 
riage, where they still reside. Mr. McDorman is a stone mason by trade. He 
is of Dutch and Irish descent. His father, Albert McDorman, was a soldier in 
the civil war, having enlisted January 3, 1864, at the age of fifteen years. He 
participated in the following battles: Atlanta, Peach Tree Creek, Nashville 
and Franklin, Cedar Creek and Kingston. Was under Gen. Sherman and was 
honorably ilischarged at the close of the war, December 2, 1S65. 



CHARLES A. AND GOLDY G. (HUNT) WILLIAMS (6) 

Charles Albertis Williams, son of Miles and Rosella (Haines) Williams, 
was born October 27, 1877, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Goldy Geneva Hunt, daughter of Warner L. and Hattie (Tucker) Hunt, 
was born December 19, 1880, in Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Charles A. Williams and Goldy G. Hunt were united in marriage No- 
vember 5, 1898, in Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO IHEM WEKE HORN 

Namr Birth Drath 

Isma Violet Williams August 25, i8gg 

She was born in Jackson Township. Jay County, Indiana. 



272 RECORD OF THE LEWIS FAMILY 

Mr. and Mrs. Williams reside in Jackson Township, Jay Count\', In- 
diana, where he is engaged in agricultural pursuits. 

Mr. Williams graduated from the high schools of Pennville, Jay County. 
Indiana, March 11, i8g8. 



THE GREEN LANES OF THE PAST. 

BY J.\MES NEWTON MATTHEWS. 

I care not to gaze at the }'ears coming on, 

Thick-mantled in mist and with doubts overcast. 
But would rather stray back to the days that are gone, 

Along the green lanes of the past — 
Across the cool meadows of memory, where 

The birds ever sing, and the wild waters fall, 
And the laughter of children is borne on the air, 

And love shineth over it all. 

The painter may picture the future in dyes 

That rival the rose and the rainbow, and still 
It may leave him at last but a guerdon af sighs, 

And a hope that it failed to fulfill; 
The poet may sing of the splendors supreme 

Of the opulent ages, far-coming and vast — 
I question him not, yet I ask but to dream 

On the old quiet hills of the past. 

The past is my own — there is nothing uncertain 

In all its wide range, and my title is clear — 
While the future, at best, is a face on the curtain. 

That fades as my feet draweth near; 
Then give me the blossoms, the birds and the bowers, 

And every loved scene where my soul clingeth fast, 
Like an evergreen ivy that mantles the towers 

And feeds on the dews of the past. 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 



iRecord of t\)t d^ri^ell jFamtlp 



JOSEPH AND MARGARET (TALBERT) GRISELL (1) 

/^J^HE history we have of this family is very brief, but we will give the little 
\^\ , information we have been able to collect from reliable authority. 

There has been quite a difference of opinion concerning the early 
ancestry of the Grisells. The fact that Joseph and Margaret (Talbert) Grisell 
lived and died near Wilmington, New Castle County, Delaware, and that Joseph 
Grisell's father was Thomas Grisell, seems to be as far as we are able to pene- 
trate the mists, which surround the early Grisell ancestry. However, the weight 
of evidence points to English ancestry. 

We will give some of the diversified opinions sent in. One authority 
has been informed that the Grisells were traceable to Alsace, a small province 
of the German Empire now, but formerly of France. Another authority says, 
"Three brothers came over from Scotland and settled in Jamestown, Virginia. 
One of those brothers was Thomas Grisell, father of Joseph Grisell (the sub- 
ject of this sketch). In igoo there was an old gentleman whose name was 
Grisell living at Glasgow, Scotland, and another who bears the name by adop- 
tion lives two and one-half miles up the river Clyde, from Castle Navar, Scot- 
land." Another gives a tradition which has been handed down from the earlier 
generations. It is that "several brothers came over from England and settled 
in Connecticut, and the name was then 'Griswold.' As they came toward New 
Amsterdam the Dutch could not get the last syllable just right and gradually 
they changed the name first in speaking, then in writing to 'Griz-ell,' with the 
accent on the first syllable. Later, New England custom and culture again 
changed the name to 'Gri-sell,' with the accent on the last syllable." This 
same authority, also tells of a member of Parliament in England whose name 
was Charles Grisell, pronounced as we pronounce the name, with the accent on 
the last syllable. 

As the majority of the relatives believe the nationality to be English, we 
will give it as such throughout the Record and trust that future develojimeiits 
along this line of research will determine for a certainty our foreign ancestry. 

Margaret Talbert was of Welsh parentage. She was married to Josepii 
Grisell in or near Wilmington, Delaware, where they lived until their decease, 
having raised a family of twelve children. Their children were: Edward, 
Joseph, Thomas, Ann, Sarah, Elizabeth, Mary, Martha, Hannah, Rachel, 
Lydia and Agnes. 



276 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

After the death of Joseph Grisell, John Talbert, a brother of Margaret 
(Talbert) Grisell, who had no children of his own, took Thomas and three of 
his brothers and sisters into his home and gave them as liberal an education as 
was considered necessary in those days, which must have been quite good as 
Thomas Grisell was an accepted minister in the Society of Friends, and taught 
his own children and the children of his neighbors during part of his life. 

John Talbert was considered the wealthiest man, but one, in the state of 
Delaware, and it is said, was wise and good. At his death he willed to each 
of his twenty-eight nieces and nephews, three thousand dollars, the half of his 
property to his wife, several thousand dollars to his brother Jacob and others 
of the family besides a large sum for benevolent purposes. 

Perhaps we ought to explain here our authority for spelling the name 
"Talbert" as we do. Benjamin Johnson, who had the privilege of looking up 
the old records in Wilmington, Delaware, says he found the names spelled 
"Talbert." 

We have not made any attempt to trace out the descendants of the 
children of Joseph and Margaret (Talbert) Grisell, except our direct ancestors, 
Thomas Grisell, but will gi\e the information concerning each of them which 
has come into our possession while compiling this Record. 

Edward Grisell, their oldest son, was considered a great athlete. He 
was a stout, broad-shouldered man and a pugilist. He did some fighting but 
not professionally. He had given up the work when a man came from a long 
distance "to try him." He thought no one could knock him down. After 
much persuasion he induced Edward to combat, in which Edward nearh' used 
him up in the first round. After that the man was sick in bed and Edward 
went to see him, but the man's wife would not allow Edward to enter the house 
so he went around to the window and spoke to the man, who said, "You were 
not to blame: it was a fair fight and 1 brought it about." 

Edward Grisell was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. During our cor- 
respondence with A.W. Grisell, superintendent of the Rock Rapids, Iowa, High 
School, we learned that he was a descendant of Edward Grisell. He says, "My 
great grandfather, Edward Grisell, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war and 
was of English descent. We had many relatives in Fayette County, Pennsyl- 
vania, and in Columbiana County, Ohio." 

Edward Grisell married Hannah Taylor and some of their descendants 
are represented in this Record. Their son, Nathan Grisell, who was con- 
sidered a very fine Quaker minister, married Lydia (Lewis) Frame and their 
daughter, Hannah (Grisell) Yocura, lives at Somerton, Arizona. 

Another son, Thomas Grisell, married Eliza Adams and their grandson, 
Thomas Luke Tipton, lives in Jerusalem, Ohio. He married Hannah A. 
Lewis, daughter of Hervy and Elna (Grisell) Lewis. Their daughter, Eliza- 
beth Grisell, married Samuel Vail, this being his second marriage. And their 
daughter, Margaret Grisell, married Duncan Cadwallader. 

Joseph Grisell was married and had a daughter Agnes, who married 



RECORD OF THE ORISELL FAMILY 277 

Samuel Vail, and their daughter, Margaret, married a man by the name of 
McGrew, whose daughter, Agnes Vail (McGrew) Hutton, lives on McKinley 
Avenue, Salem, Ohio. 

Thomas Grisell — See page 278. 

Ann Grisell, who is supposed to have been the oldest daughter, was 
united in marriage to Sedocia Courtney. They removed from Wilmington, 
Delaware, to Columbiana County, Ohio, two years after Thomas Grisell, who 
located there in 1804. They purchased a farm of one hundred and sixty acres 
near New Garden, eighty acres of which is still held by the family. Any in- 
formation concerning this family could be obtained from Mrs. Mary W. Court- 
ney, widow of Moses Courtney, who lives at 502 McKinley Avenue, Salem, Ohio. 

Sarah Grisell was united in marriage to Mr. Rummens. 

Elizabeth Grisell was united in marriage to Isaac Hughes and their 
granddaughter, Mary Brackney, married Moses Courtney, son of Ann and 
Sedocia Courtney, of whom we have previously spoken. 

Mary Grisell was united in marriage to a Mr. Bromell, and the}' lived in 
or near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Dr. Anna Bromell, who lives in Phila- 
delphia, would probably be able to give information concerning this family. 
She is one of the professors in the Woman's Medical College on Girard Avenue, 
Philadelphia. 

Martha Grisell was imited in marriage to Charles Dingee (brother of 
Martha (Dingee) Grisell). Their daughters were Rachel, Martha, Hannah and 
Ann. Hannah Dingee was united in marriage to David Hillis and Martha 
Dingee to Enos Catell and their son, Jonas Catell, lived in Salem, Ohio. 

Hannah Grisell was united in marriage to Mr. Mendenhall. We know 
nothing of their descendants. 

Rachel Grisell was united in marriage to a Mr. MacConahay, of whose 
history we have no knowledge. 

Lydia Grisell was united in marriage to a Mr. Conner and they lived in 
or near Philadelphia. 

Agnes Grisell — Record unknown. 

We do not know whether we have these names in tlie right order or not. 

Martha (Dingee) Grisell's parents were Jacob and Rachel (Reynolds) 
Dingee and her grandmother, Martha Reynolds, was married the second time 
to a Mr. Morton. Martha Dingee had a sister, Rachel, who married Samuel 
Carpenter and they lived in or near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Charles E. Reynolds, of Indianapolis, Indiana, recalls a little incident of 
the Revolutionary times in which "Grandmother" Martha (Dingee) Grisell took 
part. He says, "Our great grandparents, Jacob and Rachel (Reynolds) Dingee. 
lived within sound of the guns of the Battle of Brandywine, just before Phila- 
delphia was taken by the British, and their daughter, Martha (then a child, after- 
ward the wife of Thomas Grisell) often related how after the battle was over 
many poor stragglers passed their house on the road leading to Philadelphia. 
1 hey looked with pity on their sufferings. C'otfee was made and, without refer- 



278 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

ence to party feeling, botli British and Continental were cared for alike in the 
distribution of good things at their command. This battle was fought Sep- 
tember II, 1777." 

This is the extent of our information concerning the parents, brothers 
and sisters of Thomas and Martha (^Dingee) Grisell. 

There were other relatives by the name of Cake, Townsend, Sharpless, 
Temples, Richardsons, Pennell and Hewitts, but we have not learned just how 
they were related. 

We hope the descendants of each family will take up the thread of 
ancestry and compile a history of their ancestors, thus we may through united 
efforts be enabled to learn something about the ancestors across the water. 



THOMAS AND MARTHA (DINGEE) GRISELL (2) 

Thomas Grisell, son of Joseph and Margaret (Talbert) Grisell, was born 
March 9, 1763, near Wilmington, New Castle County, Delaware, and died June 
9, 1827, in "the old stone house," near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 
His remains were interred in the Woodsdale Cemetery near New Garden. 

Martha Dingee, daughter of Jacob and Rachel (Reynolds) Dingee, was 
born March 8, 1764, near Wilmington, New Castle County, Delaware, and died 
May II, 1843, near West Grove, Penn Township, Ja}' Count}', Indiana. Her 
remains were interred in the West Grove Cemetery. 

Thomas Grisell and Martha Dingee were united in marriage (about 1782 
or 1783) by Friends' ceremony, in Wilmington, New Castle County, Delaware. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

jVi!!//,' Birth Dtalh 

Joseph Grisell ... March g, 1786 December 10, 1867 

Rachel Grisell October 26, 1787 About 1859 

Ann Grisell — , 1789 

Samuel Grisell August 22, 1790 August 8, 1864 

Jacob Grisell — , 1793 — , 1793 

Thomas Grisell December — , 1794 September 29, 1866 

Martha Grisell October 26, 1797 November 7, 1864 

Hannaii Grisell — , 1798 — , 1798 

Cliarles Grisell July 14, 1800 January 8, 1877 

Margaret Grisell April 11, 1802 August 20, 1882 

Hannah Grisell August 8, 1803 December 24, 1881 

As to the birthplace of the five oldest children there has been some dis- 
cussion as some of the relatives think Thomas and Martha Grisell lived in 
Delaware until about 1793, when they removed to Pennsylvania, but Thomas 
IClwood Grisell, son of Joseph Grisell, the oldest child of the family, said he 
tliought liis father was born in Loudoun Count}', Virginia, and Elizabeth 



RECORD OF THE ORISELL FAMILY 279 

(Reynolds) Perry says her mother, Hannah (Grisell") Reynolds, told her that 
"Little Jacob" died in Virginia, but as she also said that he was buried under 
a "pine tree," it impressed her that they were moving when his death occurred. 
If Joseph and Jacob were born in Virginia, then Rachel, Ann and Samuel 
must have been born there also. We will leave this to the relatives to make 
their own decisions. 

Thomas, Martha and Hannah were born in Chester County, Pennsyl- 
vania, and Charles, Margaret and Hannah near Brownsville, Washington 
County, of the same state. 

We cannot state exactly where Thomas and Martha (Dingee) Grisell first 
settled, as we have already said there has been a difference of opinion concern- 
ing their early residence. However, we know they removed to Chester County, 
Pennsylvania, about 1793, and afterward removed to Washington County, same 
state, settling near Brownville, where "Grandfather" Grisell followed his chosen 
occupation, farming. While living there their Quarterly and Monthly Meetings 
were Westland and Redstone. In 1804, in order to obtain more and better 
farming land, they removed to Columbiana County, Ohio, that being one year 
after the state was admitted into the Union, and purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres of land on the State Road about three quarters of a mile east of the town 
of New Garden. Here they built a rude log cabin in which they lived until 
about 1814, when "Grandfather" received his "legacy" of three thousand 
dollars from his Uncle John Talbert. With this money he had erected on his 
property a large stone house which was standing and in good state of preser- 
vation in 1900, but on accoimt of being old-fashioned and too near the road 
its present owner tore it down a few years ago. A large stone in the gable 
showed the inscription, "T. G. 1815." Here they kept "Entertainment" 
(tavern or inn) where "Grandmother" became famous for her excellent cooking. 
They also kept post office twenty 3'ears or more. At this time they owned the 
first family carriage in that part of Ohio, having purchased it in Philadelphia. 

We have tried to procure a picture of this old honie but have failed in 
every attempt, so we will give a brief description of the house and grounds, 
knowing that all of the Grisell descendants are interested. 

In the history of the "Old Stone House," which was the witness to so 
much of the early Grisell history, many who are yet living have pleasant rec- 
ollections of it, either through their own personal experiences there or stories 
related to them by their parents. 

Dr. Elizabeth Grisselle says, " Evidently the reason tor building in tiiat 
locality, was that a spring of delicious water gushed out from under the hillside. 
The house stood in a valley between two gently rising hills, close to the State 
Road. A broad meadow, across which runs a large stream of never-failing 
water, and beyond that heavily wooded hills arose, making a beautiful view 
from the house. In those days the woods were full of game, bear, deer, fox, 
wild turkey, and much other game, which furnished amusement for the hunter 
and food for the table. The ground back of the house contained the' orchard 
and gradually arose almost as high as the house, thus making a beaulilul back- 



28o RECORD OF THE GRISEI.L FAMILY 

ground for the old house which was also surrounded bj' shade trees. The front 
part of the old house was plain except for the windows and the one front door 
with the narrow panel window on each side." 

The stone house and the barn which " grandfather " had built, the trees 
which he planted, of which a few still stand, the stream and especially the spring 
with its constant supply of fresh cool water, are all closely linked with the hap- 
piness and home life of Thomas and Margaret Grisell and their family. Here 
their children were reared to manhood and womanhood, and through the care- 
ful training which they received, became studious, religiously inclined, and the 
Grisell descendants are noted for their religious and moral influences. 

Grandfather Grisell was quiet, unobtrusive, gentle and loving and an un- 
commoiil}^ good man. He was a large man, weighing about two hundred and 
thirty pounds. He was alwa}'s on friendly terms with the Indians, as is proven 
by the Indians having placed a feather over the cabin door of Rachel (Grisell) 
Blackledge, to warn marauding bands that they must not disturb her for she was 
" Tom's daughter." 

In 1861 he was made a traveling minister for the Friends' Society. The 
following is a copy of the minutes granted him in 1816: — 

"Thomas Grisell, in a solid manner laid before this meeting, a concern 
that has for some time impressed his mind to pay a religious visit to some of the 
meetings in Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, and Pennsylvania; also a few meet- 
ings amongst those not professing with us, as truth may open the way. The 
meeting after a time of solid deliberation leaves him at libert\' to pursue his 
prospect, he being a minister in good esteem amongst us. The clerk is directed 
to furnish him with a copy of this minute. 

" Extracted from the minutes of New Garden Monthh' Meeting in the 
State of Ohio, held the 18th of the 4th mo.. i8i6. 

By Gideon Hughes, Clerk." 

'•At Salem Quarterly Meeting in the State of Ohio the loth of the 6th 
mo., 1816. 

" Our beloved friend Thomas Grisell produced the within certificate and 
opened his concern as therein expressed and he left at libert\' to pursue his 
prospect accordingly. 

"Extracted from the minutes of the quarterly meeting. 

" By John Street, Clerk. 

Of the life of Grandmother Grisell many beautiful things have been said, 
she was not only a beautiful and lovely character, but a woman of uncommon 
business abilities. For a great man)' 3'ears she provided not only for the 
welfare of lier own large family, but for those who stopped at her house for a 
night's lodging or for meals. She was said to be an extra fine cook, and a very 
methodical housekeeper. 

Emily (Lewis) Regester, who was born in the "Old Stone House," 
where her father and mother lived with grandmother after grandfather's death 
says, "Grandmother was admired for her beautiful character and genuine kind- 
ness. She was a verj- efficient midwife, and used her knowledge with a loving 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 281 

charity which was one of her characteristics. She was always so very good to 
the children and gave us much wholesome advice, often repeating the not un- 
common saying, ' You must learn to make vour head save your heels.' Her e.xit 
to a higher life, was my first great sorrow, and it made a lasting impression on 
my mind, which time cannot erase. 

" I do not remember liow the rooms in the house were situated, except 
the room that grandmother occupied. It was upstairs and, I think, off the west 
part of the house. It was very cozy, with a nice little brick fireplace in it. She 
slept in that room and I slept with her. They used to take me up to her room, 
put me to bed and give me grandmother's snuff box, and leave me alone with 
only that for company, long before the rest were ready to retire. I remember 
hearing grandmother tell about grandfather having a pet bear in the earlv da\'S, 
and when he would go out to work in the clearing, he would take the bear with 
him, and chain it to a tree. When he got real tired and wanted a little amuse- 
ment and fun, he would watch his opportunity and slip behind a tree or brush 
heap and when the bear came to realize that he was alone, he would sit up and 
cry pitifully, until his master put in an appearance, when he was immediately 
reconciled. 

" Once, after they had settled in Ohio, they took a trip back to their for- 
mer home in Pennsylvania. The journey was made on horseback, all the way, 
over the mountains and through the valleys, they being absent from home about 
eight weeks. On their return home, during their last day's travel, they were 
very anxious to reach home that night and in order to do so, it was necessary 
for them to travel some distance after nightfall. As they were riding quietly 
along they heard a sound that they took for a woman's voice. It sounded like 
she was halloing for help, as one lost in the woods would call. Grandfather 
answered the call: each time the voice answered and he likewise, so that she 
might be directed to them. Soon they noticed the object of their attraction was 
coming nearer to them at each call, until, to their horror, they discovered they 
were pursued by a panther, which was so near that thev could hear it pounding 
its tail on the ground, as they do when about ready to spring onto their prey. 
They laid whip to their horses and sped away from tlieir would-be destroyer as 
fast as possible. A little later they arrived safeh' in tlieir home, where the chil- 
dren were very anxiously awaiting their return." 

Soon after Grandfather Grisell's death the daughter Margaret was mar- 
ried to Enos Lewis and they lived in the "Old Stone House'' with grandmother 
until 1837, when they removed to Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 
Grandmother accompanied them and remained there until her death. 



JOSEPH AND LETITIA (WHITACRE) GRISELL (3) 

Joseph Grisell, son of Thomas and Martha (Dingee) Grisell. was born 
March g, 1786, in r)ld \'irginia, or near Wilmington, Delaware- (the former is 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 283 

supposed to be correct), and died December lo, 1867, near Pennville, jay 
County, Indiana. His remains were interred in the Friends' Cemetery of 
Pennville. 

Letitia Whitacre, daughter of Joseph and Jane (Wilson) Whitacre, was 
born March 17, 17B7, in Loudoun County', Virginia, and died January — , 1855, 
near New Garden, Columbiana County. Ohio. Interment in the Woodsdale 
Cemetery. 

Josepli Grisell and Letitia Whitacre were united in marriage about iSog, 
in New Garden. Friends' Meeting, Columbiana County. Ohio. 

11) THEM WERE HORN 

Name  Birth Dcatli 

Elma Grisell November 11, 1810 November 18, 1853 

Milo Grisell August 5, 1S12 March 7,1878 

Lydia Grisell. May 20, 1815 i^'ebruary 19, 1824 

Amy Grisell April 27, 1817 January 31, 1866 

Sarah Ann Grisell November 12, i8ig August 22, iSgi 

Hannah Grisell November 17, 1821 December g, 1895 

Thomas Elwood Grisell October 27, 1823 October 2, i8g8 

Joseph Whitacre Grisell October 21, 1825 November i, 1856 

Milton Grisell September 6, 1827 September g, 1827 

Anson Grisell June 26, i82g March 6, 1851 

They were all born near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Lydia, Milton and Anson died near New Garden and their remains were 
interred in the Woodsdale Cemetery of that place. 

Anson was a young man of fine attainments, intelligent and accomplished 
in many ways. He had graduated in medicine and practiced a short time before 
his death. He was a fluent and impressive talker and was much in demand 
among the young people in exhibitions and entertainments. 

Mr. and Mrs Grisell located near New Garden, Ohio, after their mar- 
riage, where they lived until after Mrs. Grisell's death. They owned a large 
farm on which they had built a brick house, where they had more than the usual 
amount of comforts in a newly settled country. Their home was not far from 
the "Old Stone House" but lias been torn down recently and a new one taken 
its place. 

Mr. Grisell was of English and Welsh and Mrs. Grisell oi English de- 
scent. They were both members of the Friends' Society and are highly spoken 
of. Mrs. Grisell attended tile Goose Creek Monthly Meeting with her parents 
in Loudoun County, Virginia, before she removed to Ohio. 

Joseph Grisell, or " Squire Grisell, " as he was better known, was a man 
who was widely and favorably known throughout the country. Few men had 
more influence in the neighborhood, than "Squire Grisell," a man of energy, 
business tact, honesty and morality. He was Justice cjf the Peace many years 
and was very frequently calkd upon to i>crform marriage ceremonies. He also 



284 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 



served as Township Trustee of Hanover Township, Cohimbiana County, Ohio, 
two years, and always took an active interest in temperance work. Being of a 
J0II3' and social nature he had man\r friends. Politically, he was alwa\'s a Re- 
publican. We are informed that "Joseph Grisell was a great reader and knew 
a great part of the Bible by heart." 

During the early settling of Jay County, Indiana, Joseph Grisell went 
there and entered two hundred and fortj' acres of land, which he afterward sold, 
one eighty to his son Joseph, one eighty to his son Milo and the other eighty to 
a man bs' the name of Jehu Saffle. 

After his wife's death and the death of his son Joseph, he took his 
daughter-in-law, Alice (Ritchey) Grisell, and her little daughter, Hannah 
Elizabeth, and renipved to Indiana, locating on the eighty acres of land pur- 
chased by his son Joseph, in Penn Township, Jay County, near Pennville. 
Here he remained until his death, which occurred ver}' suddenly. He was sit- 
ting under the shade trees in the front vard when he was first attacked bv par- 
alysis and lived but a few hours afterward. 

We might add that he had his family buried on the home farm in Ohio, 
but by his request his brother Charles, after Josephs death, removed their 
bodies to the Woodsdale Cemetery beside '-grandfather" Thomas Grisell. 

JOSEPH AND RACHEL (GRISELL) BLACKLEDGE *3) 



Rachel Grisell, daughter of Thomas and Martha (Dingee) Grisell, was 
born October 26. 1787 (supposed near Wilmington, Delaware, or Loudoun 
County, Virginia), and died about 1859 near Marshalltown, Marshall County. 
Iowa. 

Joseph Blackledge, son of Robert and Joanna (Van Ludy) Blackledge, 
was born January 13, 1776, in Buckingham Township, Bucks County, Pennsjd- 
vania, and died November 4, 1853, near Nottingham, Wells Count}-, Indiana. 
Interment in the Nottingham Cemeter}-. 

Joseph Blackledge and Rachel Grisell were united in marriage about 
i8o8, b}- Friends' Ceremony (supposed at New Garden Meeting, Columbiana 
County, Ohio). 



iVnwt- 



TO THE.M WERE BORN 

Birth 



Drath 



Thomas Grisell Blackledge.... January 

Martha Blackledge . February 

Hiram Blackledge October 

Mary Blackledge. November 

Charles Blackledge November 

Hannah Blackledge January 

Anna Wilson Blackledge September 

Joseph Blackledge June 

Jas(m Ricjiardson Blackledge.. Jul}' 



i8og 
1810 
1811 

7. 1813 
18, 1815 
1818 
1819 
1821 
1824 



23 

27: 

9 



16 
20, 

19; 



October 
June 
|une 
Mav 



i8, 1884 
15, 1819 
14, 18S1 
19, 1866 



I, I go I 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 285 

They were all born near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Martha died near New Garden when she was nine years old. 

Mr. and Mrs. Blackledge settled in Columbiana County, Ohio, near New 
Garden, remaining there until they had raised their children. About 1838 they 
removed to Wells County, Indiana, purchasing land near Nottingham. This 
country was then a wilderness. The children all came with them except Thomas 
and Hiram, who were married, one a practicing physician and tlie other a 
lawyer. 

They were very exemplary people and consistent members of the Society 
of Friends. They were very strict in their religious belief and taught their chil- 
dren to be sober minded and serious in thought. 

After Mr. Blackledge's death Mrs. Blackledge remained a short time in 
Indiana, then in March, 1857, she went with her daughter Ann W. Johnson and 
husband, to Marshall County, Iowa, where she lived until her death, a few 
years later. 

Rachel Ann (Michener) Soule says, she remembers hearing her grand- 
mother tell many stories of their pioneer life in Columbiana County, Ohio, when 
most of the inhabitants were wild beasts and savages. Grandmother said the 
Indians stuck an eagle's feather over her door, to indicate to the marauding 
bands, that she was not to be molested, for she was one of "Tom's daughters." 

She also tells of hearing her grandfather tell that he remembered hearing 
the guns when the Battle of Brand^'wine, or Chad's Ford, was fought. He was 
then seven years of age. 

About the year 1770, a wealthy family by the name of Van Ludy started 
from the city of Hanover, Holland, to emigrate to America. During the voyage 
the father and mother died on shipboard. The children were adopted by an 
English Quaker family in Philadelphia. The boy died young, but the girl 
Joanna grew to womanhood and married an Englishman, by the name of Robert 
Blackledge. They had a large family of children, and their son Joseph was the 
father of this family, which we are recording. 

Hiram Blackledge was married twice, and lived in Missouri at the time 
of his death. He had one daughter by his first marriage, and three daughters 
and one son by the second. He was an attorney and owned large interests in 
the Iron Mountain district at St. Genevieve, Missouri. 

Charles Blackledge married Hannah Beard and they had several chil- 
dren, some of whom were, Hiram, Philander, John, Joseph and also a girl. 

Ann Blackledge was united in marriage to Elijah B. Johnson in Salem, 
Henry County, Iowa. They had several children, Elva, Luther, Laura |ane, 
Susan and Josephine M. The latter was united in marriage to a man by name 
of Hemstreet, and she now resides at No. 946 Soutii Hill Street, Los Angeles, 
California. Elijah B. and Ann (Blackledge) Johnson lived in Marshall County, 
Iowa, a number of years. The latter died while enroute to Idaho in I1S59 of 
typhoid fever. 

Hannah Blackledge was united in marriage to Louis Hill, and tliey had 
several children, Joseph, Melissa Ann, John Madison, Sarah. Racliel and Leroy. 



286 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

Joseph Blackledge was united in marriage to Susan Crispin and to them 
were born, Frances Ann, Mary, Emily, Martha and Elizabeth. Mrs. Blackledge 
now resides near her daughter, Emily (Blackledge) Pickering, in Cameron, 
Missouri. Her daughter Frances Ann, was united in marriage to a man by the 
name of Lockwood, and they live near Petroleum, Wells County, Indiana, 
where they are engaged in farming. They have a family, some of whom are 
married. 

After diligent inquiry, we could gain no further information. 



JACOB AND ANN GRISELL) WILSON (3) 

After diligent inquiry we have procured but little knowledge of Ann Gri- 
sell, daughter of Thomas and Margaret (Dingee) Grisell. She was united in 
marriage to Jacob Wilson. A few years later she died near New Garden, Col- 
umbiana County, Ohio, leaving a family of three children whose names were 
Charles, Tolbert and Martha Ann. Martha Ann was united in marriage to 
James Bruce and they lived for a short time in Cincinnati, Ohio, about fifty 
years ago. Since that time we have no knowledge of their whereabouts. They 
had a small family of two or three children. 

Tolbert Wilson married Hannah Jones, daughter of John and Lydia 
(Vore) Jones. We understand their son, Edmond Howard Wilson, lives in 
Roseland, Nebraska, John L.Wilson in Tarama, Nebraska, and their daughter, 
Harriet (Wilson) McDonald, lives in Ayre, Nebraska. There was also one 
other daughter by the name of Ann G. Wilson. We sent letters of inquiry to 
all of these addresses but received no replies. 

Charles Wilson was the eldest son of Jacob and Ann (Grisell) Wilson. 
He is said to have been an e.\tra fine boy and much loved by his people, espe- 
cially his grandmother Grisell with whom he lived for some time. When about 
eighteen y ars of age, he became discontented with his surroundings and bor- 
rowing his grandmother's old gray horse went away from home. The horse re- 
turned but he never returned. Some time afterward they heard of a vessel sink- 
ing on the Ohio River and some reports decided that he was one of the 
unfortunate passengers of tliat ship. 



SAMUEL AND ANN (WHITACRE) GRISELL (3) 

Samuel (Irisell. son of Thomas and Martlia (Dingee) Grisell, was born 

August 22, lygo, in , Virginia, as near as can be ascertained, and died 

August 8, 1864, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Ann Whitacre, dar.ghter of Joseph and Jane (Wilson) Whitacre, was 
born July 26, 1793, in Loudoun County, Virginia, and died December 10, 1869, 
near Pennville, Jay Count\, Indiana. 



288 RECORD OF THE GRISELI, l-AMII.V 

Samuel Grisell and Ann W'hitacre were united in marriagi- July <S 1813, 
near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

TO THliM WERE HORN 

Name- Birth Death 

Sabina Grisell March 2h, 1814 December 26, 1856 

Martha Grisell September 8,1815 March 7. i^^Si 

Amos Grisell December 18, 1817 June 21, 1856 

Hiram Grisell December g, i8ig May 13, 1855 

Maria Grisell October 1 1, 1821 

Sarah Grisell September 29, 1823 December 2, i8gi 

Ann Grisell June 25, 1825 April i, 1847 

Lydia Grisell February 2, 1827 February 21, 1895 

Nathan Grisell March 20, 1829 December 23, i84g 

Albert Grisell July 10, 183 1 

Mary Jane Grisell August 5, 1833 December 14, 1859 

Lewis Grisell August 27, 1835 

They were all born near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio, e.xcept 
Lewis, who was born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

While Mr. Grisell was yet quite young his parents moved to Columbiana 
County, Ohio, and settled near New Garden, where his boyhood was spent in 
helping his father in clearing and improving a frontier farm. He was of Welsh 
and English descent. 

Mrs. Grisell's parents were natives of Virginia, but removed to Colum- 
biana County, Ohio, when the coantr\' was yet new. [There is a history of the 
Whitacre ancestry being written, which will be published in the near future.] 
She was of English descent. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell were members of the Friends' Society. Thej^ 
located near New Garden after their marriage, where they remained until about 
1834, when Mr. Grisell decided to take his family and locate farther west. With 
this in view he and a friend, Moses Hamilton (who was also seeking a home in 
the west, as it was then called), started about the first of Ma^', with the aid of 
one horse, to explore the country in western Ohio and eastern Indiana. They 
had traveled but a short distance when finding the horse to be more trouble 
than help they sold it. After many days of walking over a very rough country, 
they arrived at the home of Thomas Shaylor, in Jay County, Indiana. He lived 
on the place recently owned by William Vie. This cabin was without floor or 
chinking, and the ground had been swept so much that there was quite a hole 
in the middle of the room. It rained hard during the night and the ground on 
wliich they sKpt bfcaiiu- very wet and the hole fnll of water. It would seem 
that such conditions would have discouraged the bravest, but they possessed 
much courage and perseverance and were not to be balked in their undertaking 
by such disadvantages. They made a careful examination of the surrounding 
country and soon selected their land; that of Mr. Grisell's being the farm owned 
by his son Lewis Grisell at the present time. 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 289 

Aftur making thtir selections, they started to Fort Wayne, where they 
entered one hundred and sixty acres each. Having walked the whole distance 
from Pennville, they were a little fatigued, so when they left Fort Wayne they 
purchased a canoe and paddled down the Mauniee River until they reached 
Perrysburgh, Woods County, Ohio, having been three days on the water. Here 
they sold their canoe and started once more on foot, reaching home in a few 
days. 

Mr. Hamilton made his sale in the month of August following and with 
his family moved to Jay County, Indiana, being the first permanent settlers in 
the township which was not at that time named. 

Mr. Grisell made his sale the next October and started with his family on 
the eighteenth of the same month to his home in Jay County. They stopped at 
the home of Jonathan Hiatt, in Winchester, Indiana. (See reminiscences 
of Maria (Grisell) Meredith). They were the second permanent family to 
settle in the township which Mr. Grisell afterward named Penn in honor of 
the noted founder of Pennsylvania, William Penn, who liad so many followers 
in the newly settled country. This was. the first township organized in Jay 
County. 

The town of Pennville was laid out March 27, 1836, by Jeremiah Smith, 
surveyor, and Samuel Grisell, proprietor. It was then named New Lisbon. In 
1837 Mr. Grisell changed the named to Camden; subsequently it was ascer- 
tained that there was a post office named Camden in Carroll County, the same 
state, so this post office was changed to Penn; but as this, in ordinary writing, 
was often taken for Peru, the department was persuaded to change the name 
again and this time, finally, to Pennville. Early in the history of this town 
there was a Friends' Meeting established and the first building used for a meet- 
ing house was a log one located on the farm which is now owned by Arthur 
Grisell. It was a little to the nortii and east of his present residence. 

Samuel Grisell's house was twenty by twenty-five feet and the fireplace 
was eleven feet wide. They often drew back logs into the house with a horse, 
who Jiad to go across the room and put his head out of tile opposite window in 
order to get the log into the house. That horse lived to be very old and many 
now living (1902) remember the "old white horse." 

Being one of the first settlers and a man of keen perception, Mr. Grisell 
soon became familiar with every part of Jay County and was of great assistance 
to the newcomers who desired to locate land. Many, after selecting land, would 
leave their money with him and he would go to the land office at Fort Wayne 
and make their entries. His faithfulness in the discharge of these trusts gained 
for him a reputation for honesty and integrity that became firmly established 
throughout the country. There being DO roads at that time, these trips were 
often very tedious, over an Indian trail forty-two miles. But his endeavors were 
rewarded by seeing an intelligent class of people locate in Penn Township and 
it is now in the front rank in the county, its farms and villages sliowing thrift 
and enterprise. 
19 



RECORD OF THE GRISEI-L FAMILY 29I 

The nearest milling and trading posts for a number of years were New- 
port and Winchester, and sometimes he was obliged to go to Richmond. At 
one time he was fourteen days in making the trip to and from Winchester, on 
account of the high water in the creeks and rivers. There were no public roads 
in those days and they had to go through the dense forest with the blazed trees 
as a guide. 

About 1838 Samuel Grisell started a saw mill on the Salamonie river, 
and in 1844 he put into operation a water grist mill. About the year 1850 he 
and Lukens Griffith built a steam saw mill and the same year built the steam 
grist mill, which was subsequently owned by Samuel Shoaf. It burned down 
about the year 1897, having long been unoccupied. 

"In the death of Mr. and Mrs. Grisell the county lost some of its most 
worthy citizens, whose aim had alwa3's been to elevate society and advance all 
moral and religious interests." They were laid to rest in the Friends' cemetery 
of Pennville. 

Lewis Grisell was educated in the public schools of Penn Township. 
He assisted his father in the work of the farm and in the grist mill until he was 
grown, when he took charge of the homestead where his parents lived until 
their death. He never married. After his mother's death he lived with his 
sister, Lydia (Grisell) Walling, until her death in 1895. He then had a large 
and handsome home built on his property in Pennville, where he has since 
lived a retired life. He was a birthright member of the Friends' Society. 



THOMAS AND ALMIRA (WHITE) GRISELL (3) 

Thomas Grisell, son of Thomas and Martha (Dingee) Grisell, was born 
December — , 1794, in Chester County, Pennsylvania, and died September 29, 
1866, at Shaw Creek, Morrow County, Ohio. Interment in the cemetery near 
Cardington, of Morrow County, Ohio. 

Almira White, daughter of Benjamin and Mariam (Ensign) White, was 
born January 22, 1797, in New Haven, Connecticut, and died March 5, 1843, 
at Alum Creek, Delaware County, Ohio. Interment in the Friends' Cemetery 
of the same place. 

Thomas Grisell and Almira White were united in marriage about the 
spring of 1816, supposed in Penns\lvania. 

TO THEM WKKE HORN 

Name Hirtli DcatJi 

William Grisell March 27, 181 7 August 9, 1853 

Nathan Grisell January 19, i8ig November 7. 1844 

Benjamin Grisell September 24, 1820 May 14, 1870 

Joseph Grisell August 4, 1822 August — , 1850 

Martha Grisell August 2, 1825 February 11, 1853 



292 RECORD OF THE ORISELL FAMILY 

Name Birth Death 

Mariam Grisell November 27, 1827 September 24, 1847 

Ahnira Grisell 1 May 17, 1830 

Thomas Grisell \ Ma\' 17, 1830 July 10, 1830 

Rachel (irisell March 29, 1832 November 17, 1880 

Simeon Grisell May 21, 1839 March 15, 1863 

William, Nathan, Uenjamin and Joseph were born at Butler, Columbiana 
County, Martha, Mariam, Thomas Jr., Almira and Rachel at Jefferson, Richland 
County and Simeon in Delaware County, Ohio. 

Martha died in Cardington, Morrow County, and was buried by the side 
of her mother, at Alum Creek, Delaware County, Ohio. 

Mariam died and was buried at Alum Creek, Delaware County, Thomas 
at Jefferson. Richland County, Ohio, and Simeon near Nottingham, Wells 
County, Indiana. Interment in the Friends' Cenieterw of Jay Count)', of the 
same state. 

Martha and Mariam, are both spoken of as girls of a pleasant and loving 
nature. Martha was an invalid several years before her death. She was a good 
writer and loved books, especially poetical works. She was a Christian girl 
whom her friends loved dearly. She was a birthright member of the Friends' 
Society but became a member of the Baptist Church before her death, which 
occurred at the home of friends named Grandy, with whom she had lived two 
or three years. 

Simeon Grisell lived in Ohio until a few 3'ears after his mother's death, 
when lie went to Indiana and lived with his brother, Benjamin, near Notting- 
ham, Wells County, until his death. lie had gained nianv friends in the new 
settlement and his death came as a loss to them all. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell located on a farm near New Garden. Columbiana 
County, Ohio, after their marriage, where they lived some time. Later they 
removed to Richmond County of the same state, living there a number of years, 
then to Fredericktown, Kno.x Count)', and finally to a farm near Alum Creek, 
Delaware County, where they remained until after Mrs. Grisell's death. The 
boundary line between Morrow and Delaware has been changed since then, 
thus that farm is now in Morrow County. 

The following sketch was contributed tor the Record by Mrs. i^. A. 
Rogers: — 

"Mrs. Grisell was a native of New Haven, Connecticut, and her father, 
Benjanun White, was a native of Massachusetts. 

"Of the early life of Thomas Grisell we have hut little account. He 
and his family removed from Richland County, Ohio, to Delaware County, 
about i<S33 or 1S34 and settled in the Alum Creek vicinity. When the family 
drove into the ucighborhuod they stopped at the iarm house of John Benedict 
whose wife, Aui\, (with a large family of her own) hurrieil around and got up a 



RKCORD OK THE CRISELL FAMILY 2g3 

substantial meal for the ten people. Mr. (irisell jjurchased a farm a mile or so 
from the Friends' Meeting house. He was a member of the Guerney division 
of Friends. He was very strict, even eccentric in his Quaker faith. He was a 
firm believer in the religion which he professed and which was held by luany of 
the people of that time, while not claiming to outward observances, yet the 
strict plainness of dress and address was insisted upon. In their zeal to con- 
form to the letter and law of discipline they almost crushed the spirit of kind- 
ness and love in some of the rising generation. 

"A writer in an old book speaking of the early Quakers says, 'Indeed I 
do not know of a prouder people to this day than the Quakers, their very 
simplicity of life is founded on pride and no Quaker can marry a dissenter with- 
out being liable to be read "out of meeting." ' 

"Mr. Grisell's pride and self importance kept him from forming many 
intimacies. He was naturall\ kind hearted, yet his mistaken zeal made him at 
times very severe. His children were instructed 'in the straight and narrow- 
way.' It was a grief to him when some of them took up other views of religion. 
The oldest son was of a progressive nature and accepted what would lead liim 
out to broader views. The feelings of the father were shared by the second son 
who conscientiously tried to persuade his brother to abide by the father's 
counsels, but his leading was along another line and to fuliill his mission the 
remaining years of his life were devoted to tiie uplifting of humanity in a 
clerical and educational way. Whether his father's scruples were overcome in 
regard to him is not known, although tlnv visited each other some he could 
not indorse the ways of Methodism. It was of the world. 

"A few years later his faithful Christian wife, whom everybody loved, and 
tiieir oldest daughter, Mariam, also their second son, Nathan, who had been 
Settled with his family about five years, were all taken away by death. The 
third son soon married and Joseph went away from the farm to seek some other 
situation. The three girls took care of the little brother while the father 
traveled some througli tiie state with his botanic remedies for various ills. He 
was well read and acquainted to some extent with the science of medicine. I 
can remember of his returning from a long trip, having on a new suit of clothes 
and looking very business-like. I'siially after the first greeting he would ask 
in a cheery voice if we had churned. His little granddaughter knew what that 
meant and usually found the bowl of buttermilk for iiim. Once he came when 
mother was out, I was at the churning, and he sitting on the kitchen bencii 
wiping the sweat from his face with his 'kerchief,' entertained me with incidents 
of his last journey while I finished the churning. Perhaps I related some of 
my school days to him. In later years he wrote my mother not to keep me in 
school too steady as it would injure my health. 

'Tn regard to his strict notions, a friend who knew liiiu wrote in \'\b- 
ruary, 1902: 'I understood better than some what he meant, as my fatiu-r was 
very strict with us. It is because we do not understand sometimes that we blame.' 
One of his granddaughters who had reason to feel kienlyhis severity toward her 
father w.ote in April, 1902: 'He was exceedingly strict, with regard to all the 



294 RECORD OF THE GRISELI. FAMILY 

outward observances of the early Friends' religion, never deviating from the 
plain language, would not wear a hat band or a necktie and thought it almost 
an unpardonable sin to attend a Methodist meeting. I suppose he was con- 
scientious in these things and doubtless if he had lived to see the great revival 
of experimental religion, that swept over the Friends' Society a few years latter, 
it might have softened his asperities and given him a clearer view of the power 
of Christ to save from sin, and shed abroad the love of God in the believers 
hearts.' 

"She visited him when a young woman teaching school and was some- 
what gratified when he remarked, referring to a wide linen collar she w'ore, the 
prevailing style then, 'I am mightily pleased with thy plain collar.' " 

Mr. Grisell was again married in 1848. 



THOMAS AND SUSANNAH fSHAW) BENEDICT) GRISELL (3) 

Susannah (Shaw) Benedict, daughter of and ( ) 

Shaw, was born in and died October 5, 1876. 

Thomas Grisell and Susannah (Shaw) Benedict were united in marriage 
December 30, 1848, by Friends' ceremony in the Weston Meeting house near 
Cardington, Morrow County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 
Thomas J. Grisell. October 3, 1851 

He was born at Shaw Creek, near Cardington, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell located near Cardington, which they made their 
permanent residence. Mrs. Grisell had four sons and two daughters b)^ her for- 
mer marriage and one of the daughters was an invalid many years and Thomas 
Grisell was kind and good, assisting in her care while she lived. The oldest 
step-son wore a beard and Mr Grisell's strict notion of propriety led him to 
refuse to sit at the table with him, for a time at least. One of his step-sons 
wrote, December 17, 1901: "Thomas Grisell was a \&xy strait Quaker. He had 
many noble qualities, was a good, honest, honorable citizen, notwithstanding 
his peculiarities." 

A few years after his last marriage a son was born to them of whom he 
was justly proud. 

One of his mottos to his children and grandchildren was, " Alwaj's talk 
loud and plain." 

In igo2 Thoma;- Grisell's living descendants were, one daughter, one son, 
fourteen grandchildren, thirt}'-two great grandchildren and eleven great great 
grandchildren. 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 2g5 



BENJAMIN AND MARTHA (GRISELL) JOHNSON (3) 

Martha Grisell, daughter of Thomas and Martha (Dingee) Grisell, was 
born October 26, 1797, in Chester Coimty, Pennsylvania, and died November 7, 
1864, near New Garden, Cohimbiana Coanty, Ohio. 

Benjamin Johnson, son ot John and Dorothy (Crew) Johnson, was born 
December 15, 1797, near Crew's Mill, Hanover County. \'irginia, and died Feb- 
ruary 7, 1888, in Damascus, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Benjamin Johnson and Martha Grisell were united in marriage July 29, 
i8ig, in New Garden Friend's Meeting, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birih Drath 

Margaret Johnson June 13, 1820 

John Hart Johnson October 29, 1821 July 24, 1846 

Sarah Ann Johnson November 21, 1823 January 29, 1888 

Thomas Johnson November 17, 1825 

Mary Johnson November 11, 1827 

Elizabeth Meader [ohnson August 1,1830 

Benjamin Johnson January 26, 1833 

Charles Johnson January 1 1, 1835 

Joseph G. Johnson January 2, 1837 

Martha G. Johnson Jwlv 3o> 1^39 

They were all born near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Johnson located on his father's farm 
and the next year on Mrs. Johnson's father's farm. He was a traveling minis- 
ter of the Friend's Society, and thev cared for his farm two years, at the end of 
which time thev purchased fifty acres of land about two miles north of where the 
New Garden Friends' Meeting house then stood and where the Woodsdale Cem- 
etery now is, most of their family being born lure. 

In 1837 they sold this land and purchased one hundred antl si.\ty acres 
two and one half miles northwest of New Garden town, Butler Township, Col- 
umbiana County. They resided on this farm until the death of Mrs. Johnson 
in 1864, her burial occurring from New Garden Friends' Meeting house adjoin- 
ing the town of Winona, Columbiana County, Ohio, and where their son, John 
H. Johnson was also buried. 

All of the children having married, the farm was sold, Benjamin Johnson 
making his home with his children the remainder of his life. His death occurred 
at the home of his daughter, Mary J. French, near Damascus, Columbiana 
County, Ohio, and he was buried in the cemetery of Damascus. 

Mr. and Mrs. Johnson were birthright members of the Friends' Society, 
and were always regular attendants of IMeeting, taking an active part in the 




o 






< 



RECORD OF lUK CRISELL FAMILY 2g7 

affairs of the Society. They were industrious and prosperous farmers and very 
honest, moral people. 

Benjamin Johnson's mother was of French descent and his father was born 
in Bedford County, Virginia, and was a son of James Jolinson, a descendant of 
Lord Ashley, of England. They lived about twenty-five miles northwest of 
Richmond, Hanover County, Virginia, at the time of Benjamin's birth, but re- 
moved to Columbiana County, Ohio, in the fall of 1811 and purchased land 
where the New Garden Meeting house now stands. They lived thereuntil then- 
death and were buried in the New Garden Cemetery. They were both members 
of the Orthodox Friends' Society, holding their membership in the Cedar Creek 
Meeting of Virginia. 

The following beautiful tribute, is written of the life of Martha (Griselh 
Johnson, by her daughter, Martha Green : — 

"I have the most pleasing remembrance of my mother, as one who ruled 
by love, and who was most amiable antl self-sacriiicing, ever reaily to minister 
to her loved ones in word and deed. I was quite young when the subject of 
slavery was being agitated and ways and means were being used to help many 
slaves to freedom, and father and mother were among its early supporters- 
Mother was very conscientious in those days about using the product of slave 
labor and would obtain whenever possible, the free labor goods, although at a 
sacrifice. It was but a little, but that little 7iias rli^lit, and the right grew and 
prevailed until the oppressed were all set free. 

" Mother's life was one of noble deeds and when the silent messenger 
came she was ready to go and many expressed the thought that a good woman 
had gone home. It was true of her as of many another sweet soul: — 

" 'She spoke of Justice, Truth and Love, 
How soft her words distilled, 
She spoke of God, and all the place. 
Was with htr presence filled.' " 



CHARLES D. AND MARY H. (SMITH) GRISELLE * (3) 

Charles Dingee Griselle, son of Thomas and Martha (Diiigee) Griseil, 
was born July 14, 1800, near Brownsville, Washington County, I'ennsylvania. 
and died January 8, 1877, at Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Mary Hunt Smith, daughter of Joseph Bedonie and Frances (Shewcll) 
Smith, was born January 10, 1808, in l^hiladelphia, Pennsylvania, and tlied De- 
cember 12, 1894, in Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Charles D. Griselle and Mary H. Smith, weie united in marriage Septem- 
ber — , 1827, by the Friends' ceremony, in New Garden, Columbiana County, 
Ohio. 

* It will bf notiiccl lliat tin- (imily (if Chilrlis 1). GriMlli-, spell tin ir ii;iiiil- witli iiii "e" inl.lu(l to ijive thi 
accent, ■rhe name is conn ly known in that part of (lliio, spclli '1 in that way. 



298 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Caroline E. Griselle August 4, 1828 

Elizabeth Griselle October i, 1830 

Almira Griselle March 30, 1833 

Emil}' Griselle November 9, 1835 

Annie Griselle February 16, 1838 

Josephine Griselle December 15, 1843 July 7, 1861 

Fannie Griselle January g, 1848 

They were all born near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Mr. Griselle was of English and Welsh and Mrs. Griselle of English 
descent. 

Mr. and Mrs. Griselle owned one hundred and eighty acres of land, near 
New Garden, where they were engaged in farming several years. While living 
there they had erected a large barn and fine, roomy house. It was a hospitable 
home and they had many friends to entertain. In 1855 they sold that property 
and purchased a home on Lincoln Avenue, in Salem. Ohio, where they lived 
until their death. 

A sketch of the part that Mr. and Mrs. Griselle took in anti-slavery fol- 
lows this record. 

Mrs. Griselle was a descendant of Sir William Bickley, of Buckingham, 
England, whose coat of arms was three half moons with three wheat sheaves 
added, in reward of some gallant achievement performed in cutting off a convoy 
of provision to the King's advantage. 

Sir William Bickley's daughter married Stephen Shewell and they were 
the parents of Mary Hunt (Smith) Griselle's mother, Frances Shewell. 

Stephen Shewell came from London, England, in 1699, with William 
Penn, who presented a fine clock to him. This clock is still in the family, but 
another branch, as an older sister thought she had the better right to its pos- 
session. Stephen Shewell was a merchant and shipowner who settled in Phila- 
delphia. He had ships trading in England, Holland, West Indies, etc. His 
relatives and many of his interests were in England and he was at heart a Tory 
and wished to be neutral in the revolutionary contest. He was a neighbor and 
friend of Benjamin Franklin and Stephen Girard, on Front Street, Philadelphia. 

Stephen Shewell's sister Elizabetli (^better known as "Betty") married 
Benjamin West. They became engaged against the wishes of the family and 
probably her parents were in England, for Stephen considered himself her 
guardian and locked her in an upper room for fear she might marry W'est and 
sail with him for England. BLiijamin Franklin, Frances Hopkinson and Mr. 
White (afterward Bishop White) took the matter into their own hands and with 
the aid of a rope ladder conveyed " Betty" from the window to the sailing ves- 
sel bound for ICngland (under the care of Benjamin West's father) where she 
was met by Benjamin West and they were married. Thus Stephen Shewell's 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 299 

sister married Banjainin West and the}' were most happy during their whole 
hfe. 

Leigh Hunt married Stephen Shewell's daughter Mary, so Mary Hunt 
(Smith) Griselle, was a first cousin to Leigh Hunt by marriage and Benjamin 
West was her great uncle by marriage. 

Most all encyclopaedias give an account of the life of Benjamin West and 
also Leigh Hunt. However we will give a few extracts from Chambers' Ency- 
clopaedia : — 

" Benjamin West, Anglo-American painter, was born at Springfield 
Pennsylvania, October lo, 1738, of Quaker parentage, and with lack of oppor- 
tunity or encouragement, surprised his friends by his skill in drawing at the age 
of seven years and at nine painted a picture in water-colors which, in some 
points, he declared in after life he had never surpassed. His first colors were 
made from leaves, berries, etc., and his brushes stolen from a cat's tail. 

"Thus, self-taught, at the age of sixteen he practiced portrait painting in 
the villages near Philadelphia and painted for a gunsmith his first historical 
picture, ' The death of Socrates. ' While the Society of Friends were discuss- 
ing the propriety of his becoming a painter, he shocked their principles still 
more by volunteering in a military expedition to search for the remains of Brad- 
dock's Army. At eighteen he was painting portraits in Philadelphia and later 
at New York where, in 1760, he was aided by some generous merchants to go 
and pursue his studies in Italy. At Rome he was patronized by Lord Grant- 
ham, whose portrait he painted; became the friend of Mengs and, as the first 
American artist ever seen in Italy, attracted much attention. He painted his 
' Cimon and Iphigenia,' and ' Angelica and Medora ' and was elected member of 
the Academies of Florence, Bologna and Parma. In 1763, visiting England on 
his way to America, he was induced to remain in London and in 1765 married 
Eliza Shewell, to whom he had been engaged before leaving America. 

"His ' Agrippa Landing with the Ashes of Gernianicus,' attracted tlie 
attention of George III., who was his steady friend and patron for forty years, 
during which time he sketched or painted four hundred pictures. 

"His 'Death of (ieneral Wulf,' painted in the costume of the period, 
against the advice of all the most distinguished paintt is, affected a revolution in 
historic art. For the King he painted a series of twenty-eight religious pictures 
for Windsor Castle. His best-known works are, 'Christ Healing the Sick,' 
' Death on the Pale Horse,' and the 'Battle of La Hague.' In 1792 he sue 
ceeded Sir Joshua Re\nolds as President of the Royal Academy, but declined 
the honor of knighthood. Through his whole career he was the generous 
friend, adviser and patron of young artists. The 'Life and Studies of Iniija- 
minWest,' were compiled from materials furnished by himself, by John Gait, 
in two parts (London 1816-1820), and a biography of him is also given in Cun- 
ningham's 'Lives of Eminent British Painli is.' Hr died in London, March ti, 
1820, and was buried with great pomp at Sl^ Paul's Cathedral. His Aifc died 
in 1817. Two sons survived them." 



300 RECORD OF THE CRISELL FAMILY 

Before Frances (Shewell) Smith and family moved to Ohio from Phila- 
delphia, Benjamin West painted his family firoup, including himself, and sent 
it to her. He had painted himself in the group with the aid of a mirror. When 
they prepared to move, the picture was so large that they thought it too much 
trouble to take it and so gave it to a charitable institution. A few years ago 
this same picture was spoken of in the magazines as being in some charitable 
institution in Pennsylvania. 

The following sketch of Leigh Hunt's life is taken from Chambers' En- 
cj'clopaedia : — 

" James Henry Leigh Hunt, poet and essayist, was born in London, 
England, October ig, 1784, educated at Christ's Hospital and first attracted no- 
tice as a writer of theatrical and literary criticisms for the Examiner, a news- 
paper which was started in 1805 by his elder brother, John. At the age of 
twenty-four he became joint editor and proprietor of the Examiner. He was a 
Liberal in politics before liberalism had become fashionable; and for one of his 
articles reflecting on the obesity of a Prince Regent — 'a fat Adonis of fifty,' 
Hunt had called him — he was sentenced to pay a fine of five hundred pounds, 
and to undergo two j'ears' imprisonment. Hunt was happy enough in his con- 
finement; he hid the prison bars with flowers and received visits from Bj'ron. 
Shelly and Keats. On his release he published 'The Story of Rimini,' which 
he had written in prison and which gave him a place among the poets of the 
day. ' Foliage' appeared in 1818 and about the same time he started the Indi- 
cator, a serial suggested by the Spectator and Tattler. In 1828 he published 
'Lord Bj'ron and His Contemporaries,' the record of a brief and not very pleas- 
ant companionship in Italy with his lordship, which gave great offence to Bvron's 
friends. In the same year he started the Companion, a sequel to the Indica- 
tor, both of which were republished as one book in 1834. In 1833 he published 
a collected addition to his poetical works. In 1S34 he started the London Jour- 
nal, which he edited for two years. His principal works besides those already 
mentioned are, 'Captain Sword and Captain Pen,' (1835); 'Legend of Flor- 
ence,' (1840); 'The Seer,' a publication similar to the 'Indicator': 'The Pal- 
frey,' (1842); 'Sir Ralph Escher,' a novel, (1844); 'Imagination and Fancy,' 
(1844); ' Wit and Humor,' (1846): 'Stories of the Italian Poets with Lives,' 
(1846); 'Men, Women and Books.' (1847); 'A Jar of Honey from Mount 
Hybla,' (1848); 'His Autobiography,' (1850); ' The Religion of the Heart,' 
(1853); and the 'Old Court Suburb,' (1855). In 1847 he received from the 
crown a pension of two hundred pounds. He died at Highgate, August 28, 
1859. A St lection from his 'Letters and Correspondence,' was publislied by 
his son, Mr. lliornldu Hunt, in 1862. 

■Hunt's reputation rests upon his poems and essa\'s. The 'Story of 
Rimini ' is, on the whole, perhaps the finest narrative which has appeared since 
Dryden, and his ' Palfrey ' is delightful from its good spirits and bright sunny 
glimpses of landscape and character. As an essayist he is always cheerful and 
fanciful and he looks determinedly at the bright side of tilings. The sky may be 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 30I 

gloomy, bat if there is a bit of bhie in it he, with an admirable practical philos- 
ophy, constantly turns his eyes to that. He delights to wreath the porch of the 
human dwelling with roses and honeysuckles. Among his poems are to be 
found several translations, which are the best things of the kind we possess. He 
transports the wine of Greece and Italy to England and its color and flavor are 
rather improved than otherwise liy the voyage." 



a ^f)ort autobiography of tbc ILifr of 
Dr. €U^atictf) iSriscllc 



I have not much to say of the beginning of the study and practice of 
medicine. A woman physician had then to blaze her way through a forest of 
prejudice, where trials lurked on every side. The record of the practice of 
medicine by women covers but a brief period, Elizabeth Blackwell being the 
first graduate, in 1849. 

Taking the advice of our family phj'sician, and following my own in- 
clinations, about 1853 I studied medicine under the instruction of Dr. Thomas, 
who was one of the jMofessors in the Woman's Medical College, of Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania, where I attended my first course of lectures. I graduated 
from the Cleveland, Ohio, Medical College in 1856, and afterward attended 
another course in the College of Philadelphia where the instruction and ad- 
vantages were greater than in Cleveland. 

Previous to my study of medicine I attended school at the Seminary, 
Delaware, Ohio. The principal at that time was Rev. William Grisell. son of 
Thomas Grisell (son of Thomas,) afterward teaching in the public school of 
Salem and Lisbon, Columbiana County, of the same state. 

I first practiced in Cleveland, Ohio, but the severity of the winters there 
compelled me to leave on account of an affection of the throat. 

While following my profession in Salem I was appointed assistant physi- 
cian for the Woman's Hospital in Philadelphia, and afterward spent between 
two and three years in San Francisco, California. During that time I was one 
of the attending ph^'sicians at the Hospital for Women and Children. 

Dr. Ida Clark, of Youngstown, Ohio, was asked to write something for a 
Woman's Journal on the subject of women physicians. She said, "The women 
who were pioneers, both in this country and Europe, met with every kind ol 
discouragement and rebuff and in many cases with open insult from luen of 
good position and from those who had no influence in their profession. This 
treatment. I am happy to say, has now given place to such full courtesy' and 
cordiality that in the many Niars of mv i)ractice of medicine I ha\e been treated 
with the politeness which thi most exacting could desire. When asked to write 
for the Woman's Paper I thought it might be of interest to record some of 



302 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

the experiences of the women who were among the first to practice medicine 
in this part of the country, I wrote to ray preceptor, Dr. Elizabeth Griselle, now 
practicing in Salem, Ohio. She has for many years held high rank in her pro- 
fession and has enjoyed a very large practice." 

Dr. Elizabeth Griselle is a member of the Episcopal Church. 



a ^kctcf) of tt)c ©latjcrp Daps, tip 
2Dr. (Clnabctb ©riscllc 



Looking back over si.\ty-five years of life, one may recall much that is 
unknown to the present generation, but which aided in shaping the destination 
of our nation. 

My parents, Charles D. and iMary H. (Smith ) Grisell, were Friends, 
when I was a child, and were deeply interested in the freedom of the colored 
people of the South. I was born about the time William Lloyd Garrison 
started the publication of the Liberator, and was taught to read from that paper, 
as it was a welcome visitor in our family and mv mother a valued correspondent 
for it. 

No fear of harm ever deterred them from following the dictates of their 
own conscience. When an act of Congress imposed a fine of five hundred dol- 
lars upon any one harboring or aiding a slave to escape, and these slaves were 
always received kindly, refreshed with food and often furnished clothing, after 
which they had a rapid nigjit's transfer to the next underground station. I can- 
not venture to say how many were helped on their way to Canada, generally 
managing to elude the slave hunters. 

Father and mother never addressed anti-slavery meetings, but believed 
that those who did, would not refuse to shelter anyone appealing to them for 
help. Anv faith of that kind was rndelv shaken bv a night call for refuge when 
the slave owners were in close pursuit. About this time father built two secret 
rooms adjoining the cellar of both barn and house, where a number could be 
safely hidden without the possibility of detection. Often while the master was 
sitting in the parlor his slaves were safe a few feet away underground. 

Judge George, who lived near the Ohio river, usually brought the slaves 
to a merchant living south of us, who carried them to us. He gave a peculiar 
signal, which was silentl)' and speedily answered, when he would bring in from 
one to eighteen, of all ages and conditions. If the kidnappers were not in too 
close pursuit they were often kept over a da\^ for rest and after dark a large 
wagon or, sometimes in winter, a sled was filled with straw and blankets or 
quilts were piled on for comfort. The musical accompaniment of sleigh bells 
was omitted. 

One time a young woman, as white as any of our fair girls, was brought to 
our house quite ill, and it was decided that she should stay awhile. Her 3-oung 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 3O3 

mistress was her half sister and her father a brother of one of Ohio's distin- 
guished governors. Her mistress seeing she was in great peril on account of 
her beaut\', resolved to help her gain her freedom and. asking that her maid 
should accompany her on a visit to her relatives in Ohio, it was not difficult to 
find a way for her escape. 

She stayed with us a year and no one who saw her could suspect that she 
had any colored blood in Her veins. Her departure was of such a kind as to 
leave a lasting impression on my memory. I was walking near her one summer 
day, through a cornfield near the road, when she instantly dropped on her face, 
as if she had been struck: she whispered to me that her young master was rid- 
ing along the road and she feared he had seen her. She crawled on her hands 
and knees for some distance and then secreted herself until I could return to the 
house, where her master was asking for a night's lodging. He was entertained 
until her clothing could be carried to her at the house of a neighbor, who under- 
took to secrete her until we thought her master would have returned. His osten- 
sible object in coming to Ohio was to inspect country homes and, as we had just 
finished what was then thought to be a very attractive house, he desired to see the 
rooms, which he did, from attic to cellar — e.xcept the little room hidden under 
the closet and reached by a trap door, under the carpet. Having satisfied him- 
self that his slave was not there, he changed his mind and went further north 
that evening. The girl was so terrified at the thought that he might have seen 
her that we took her ou to Canada where she felt safe and as happy as one could 
be separated from all their friends. 

Another incident I shall never forget, occurred while father had gone to 
Jay County, Indiana, to look after some property there, leaving us in care of a 
powerful and faithful watch dog and a timid servant girl. 

One dark night during his absence, shortly after nine o'clock, the dog 
began a furious barking about the barn, coming frequently to the house to at- 
tract our attention. Father had taught mother to use a gun and, having seen 
that it was loaded, she took us into an upper room, locked the door and opened 
the window, through the shutters of which we could hear. The lights were out 
and a terrified group of women and ciiildren were expecting every moment that 
the house would be attacked. We knew there were men at the barn in some 
mischief; but what could we do? We were too far from neighbors to go for 
help. Presently we heard the sound of horses' feet, the front yard gate was 
quietly opened and we imagined the stealthy steps which approached the house 
belonged to burglars. A light knock on the front door was followed by the 
name of Michael Arter's signal, when there was a sudden and joyful rush down 
stairs. The situation was explained and he brought two powerful colored men. 
They quickly armed themselves in addition to the weapons they already carried 
and with concealed lanterns went to the barn. Evidently some one on the 
lookout iiad discovered our reinforcements and they had departed, leaving a 
hole in the granary floor irom which they had been filling their grain bags. 

The colored men ' atched the barn the remainder of the night, which was 



304 KECORD OF THE GUISEI.L FAMILY 

a great satisfaction to the family as well as to the dog- When the men left for 
Canada in the care of a neighbor one of them gave me a dollar bill, telling me 
it was a counterfeit, but asked us to keep it, and when we should hear of some 
great thing done to help free the slaves to think of him whose name was Madi- 
son Washington Jefferson. 

Within a few years the papers published an account of a mutiny on board 
a coast steamer, when a lot of runaway slaves who had been captured were on 
their way to New Orleans to be sold. Madison Washington Jefferson was the 
leader in the mutiny and after he and the other slaves had possession of the 
ship, they sailed to Nassau, which is a British possession, and there the)' left 
the vesst.'l, having provided for the release of the imprisoned captain and crew, 
they departed for the interior of the island where they were free from capture. 

A spotted yellow man was often emploj'ed to hunt up fugitive slaves, who 
was evidently informed of the various underground stations and frequently came 
to our house in quest of them. It was off the public road but there was a pri- 
vate drive through our farm. Two slaves who had remained for several months 
to help work on the farm, hearing that the "spotted man" was on his way to 
the place, prepared themselves to give him a warm reception. They took ropes 
and some knives for cutting switches and surprised him in a woods, through 
which he was passing on horseback. It is safe to say that his interview with 
them was not of the most agreeable kind for he never appeared in that neigh- 
borhood afterward. 

We had a neighbor, an Irish Democrat, who frequently threatened father 
with the law if he continued harboring runaway slaves. During a very severe 
thunder storm a woman with a babe in her arms, came to their door asking for 
shelter. Her terror and distressed condition appealed to their sympathy and she 
was warmed, fed and dry clothing given her. No one looking at her face would 
suspect that she was a slave, but feeling their kindness she confided to them her 
story. She knew her pursuers were after her, but their sympathy for her dis- 
tress overcame their hatred for her race and she left grateful for the help given 
her, to find our home, near theirs, for which she had been looking. 

Father never afterward heard anything from them about harboring slaves. 

This same Irishman had a small distillery secreted in a ravine in the 
woods on his farm and father discovered it. Once when he had threatened to 
arrest father for violating the " Fugitive Slave Law," father answered him, "Go 
ahead, I have a little matter for the law to deal with when thee is ready." After 
the woman was sheltered by them, father never was threatened. 

These "passengers of the night" must be carried on frequently without 
delay and every precaution must be taken to evade pursuit. Sometimes even 
this was not possible and the secret cellars were provisioned and there they were 
safe until the dangers were over. 

I have mentioned but a few of the incidents in connection with the fugi- 
tive slave law, but Salem and its neighborhood became known as a hotbed of 
abolitionism where (iarrison, Wendell Phillips, Fredric Douglas, Abby Kelly 
Foster and other distinguished persons lectured. 



RECORD OF 'JHE GRISELL FAMILY 305 

Mrs. Foster, after delivering a powerful anti-slavery address, was fol- 
lowed by a pro-slavery speaker, who requested her to answer his arguments. 
She said she was reminded of the story of a couple whose puny, little baby cried 
to the great discomfort of the father, who declared it ought to be spanked. 
"Well, husband, you spank him." The father took the little mite, turned it 
around and said, " Why, wife, there's nothing to spank." 



SAMUEL AND HANNAH (GRISELL) REYNOLDS (3) 

Hannah Grisell, daughter of Thomas and Martha ( Dingee) Grisell, was 
born August 8, 1803, near Brownsville, Washington County, Pennsylvania, and 
died December 24, 1881, in Richmond, Indiana. Interment in the Crown Hill 
Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Samuel Reynolds, son of Levi and Mary (Kirk) Reynolds, was born 
January 16, 1806, at Short Creek, near Mt. Pleasant, Ohio, and died June 17, 
1876, in Indianapolis, Indiana. Interment in Crown Hill Cemetery, of the 
same place. 

Samuel Reynolds and Hannah Grisell were united in marriage April 2, 
1829, by the Friends' Ceremony in New Garden Meeting, Columbiana County, 
Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BOKN 

NiUHC Birth Death 

Ezra Reynolds January 28, 1830 February 23, 1833 

Elizabeth Emily Reynolds December 12, 1831 

Martha Grisell Reynolds April 11, 1833 September 3, 1857 

"Little Jane" Reynolds 

Franklin Reynolds August 8, 1836 October 11, igoi 

William Reynolds February 10, 1838 

Margaretta Reynolds April 12, 1839 

Mary Cornelia Reynolds February 20, 1 842 

Samuel Clarkson Reynolds . . . November 14, 1844 

Charles Ernest Reynolds April 16, 1848 

Ezra, Elizabeth E. and Martlia were born in New Garden, Columbiana 
County, Ohio, "Little Jane," Franklin, William, Margaretta and Mary C. in 
Salem, of the same county and state, and Samuel C. and Charles E. in Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. 

Ezra died and was buried at New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio, 
and "Little Jane" died in Salem and was interred in the cemetery of that place. 

William Reynolds never married. He lives at the present time near 
Morristown, Shelby Countv, Indiana. For many years he was engaged in the 
railroad business, in Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Reynolds, lived in New Garden, Columbiana 
County, Ohio, several \ears after their marriage and then removed to Salem 



306 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

of the same county and state. About 1843 they removed to Cincinnati, where 
they lived many years. A few years before Mr. Reynolds' death they went to 
Indianapolis, Indiana, to live. 

The following sketch was contributed by Mrs. Elizabeth E. R. Perry: — 

"Samuel Reynolds was a self educated, intelligent man. His parents 
were of English descent, and were members of the Friends' Society. He was 
by trade an architect and builder and at one time a manufacturer of fine 
furniture. 

"Mr. Re^'Dolds was for many years an earnest worker in the anti-slavery 
cause, and much, both interesting and thrilling, might be written of his ad- 
ventures in aiding the unfortunate slave on the road to freedom. Before 
Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote her great work, 'Uncle Tom's Cabin,' she worked 
up one of the incidents in which he figured is a short story called, 'Immediate 
Emancipation,' to which she alludes in the Concluding Remarks of that famous 
book, the Quaker there mentioned in connection with Nathan, being Mr. 
Reynolds. 

"A copy of this sketch, 'Immediate Emancipation,' was possessed by the 
Reynolds family, but through lending it to friends it was finally lost, much to 
their regret. Several years ago Charles E. Reynolds wrote to Mrs. Stowe to 
know where he could find the story and received the following answer: — 

" 'Ferry Park, Saco, Maine, July 24, 1882. 
" 'Dear Sir: — The incident you inquire about I remember; also, that I 
wrote (I think for the New York Evangelist) a sketch of the scene, but my 
memory is treacherous as to names and dates. Yesterday, while looking over 
my husband's old letters, I came across a passage which 1 now cut out for you. 
It was evidentU' the same man, who in my sketch I introduced under the name 
of Simmons. The letter is dated December 7, 1846. 

" 'We have all reasons to congratulate ourselves, that the great evil that 
we and ours struggled with so many years, has passed away. He (Christ) shall 
not fail nor be discouraged till He has set judgment in the earth. 
" 'If we wait we shall see this more and more. 

" -Yours truly, 

" 'H. B. Stowe.' 

"The extract from Professor Stowe's letter referred to is as follows: — 
" 'Coming out of town (Cincinnati) with the Governor, a nice Quaker 
gentleman asked me to ride. So he got in and as I was talking he caught the 
words 'Governor Slade,' and immediately said, 'What, is this Governor Slade 
that I have heard so much of ?' 'I presume so,' said I, 'there is no other.' He 
raised his head with great earnestness saying, 'God bless thee: I am rejoiced 
to see thee.' 'Who are you ?' said I, 'I don't know you.' 'Not know me ? 1 
am the Quaker Simmons thy wife tells about.' Then the mystery was all 
solved. We three had a right hearty, jolly, loving time together. He told the 
story all over about Nathan and his } oung master with such infinite naivete I 
quite think that the Governor was highly delighted. 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 307 

" 'He was taken to the little white house below the post office, where he 
lives with his wife and seven children, and is longing for you to come and see 
them.' 

"Samuel Reynolds and family then lived on Walnut Hills, a beautiful 
suburb of Cincinnati. 

"His appeals in behalf of the downtrodden and oppressed race, when 
the occasion demanded, were fair and convincing, directed to the understand- 
ing, rather than to the imagination, and the heart unhesitatingly yielded to the 
kind persuasive justness of his arguments. His heart and home were ever 
open to the call of suffering humanity. He rejoiced to labor in his quiet way 
without the stimulus of praise, accorded to many far less deserving. His 
name will ever be especially identified with those exertions which by the bless- 
ings of God prepared the way for the abolition of slavery. He lived to see 
that great curse abolished, and would have craved no prouder inscription for 
his tomb than 'Here lies a Friend of the Oppressed.' 



IN MEMORY OF MOTHER. 

"Mother, thy name is music to mine ear, 

'Tis like the fragrance of the sweetest flower, 
Like all things beautiful, love counteth dear, 
It thrills my soul with a restless power. 

'I, who am least of all the singing throng. 
Not worthy e'en to touch the poorest harp, 

May never crown thee — though I've craved it long 
Nor tell thee half how dear to me thou art. 

'Words are too poor thy meed of worth to sing. 
Meek, patient, gentle mother, kind and true, 
Thy precious memory 'round our hearts wilt cling — 
Fadeless and tender as thine eyes of blue." 

— E. E. R. P. 



The following is one of several slavery reminiscences which was written 
by Samuel Reynolds, July 31, 1874, and later published by him: — 

" What I am going to relate, happened while living in Salem, Ohio, in the 
year 1840. Two slaves came to my house one evening from Virginia. They 
had traveled hard to elude their pursuers who were urged on by the large reward 
offered for their capture. I took them in. They gave their names as Thomas 
Jefferson and Madison Washington. The last named was a large, powerful 
man. Both were earnest, intelligent looking men. I kept them several weeks, 
and in that time my little daughter Martha taught them the alphabet. During 
their stay 1 learned their histories. 

" That of Madison Washington is the story I wish to tell. He ran away 
because of the cruel treatment of the overseer on the plantation to which he be- 



308 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

longed. His sister had been severely flogged for not being able to complete her 
task and he himself had been told that the same punishment was in store for 
him for interference in her behalf. He thought of his wife, of his sister, of the 
cruel lot before them. Nothing but a life of servitude if they remained in bond- 
age, and he determined at once to make a desperate effort to obtain his free- 
dom, thinking thus to rescue his loved ones and help them to a land of liberty. 
" We lived too near the borders of the slave states to insure their safety, 
as there were always slave-catchers prowling about ready to carry back into 
slavery, not only the escaped fugitive but many who were born free or had 
bought their liberty. So, after things had quieted down a little, it was thought 
best that Thomas Jefferson and Madison Washington should be helped onward 
toward their destination and they were finally safeh' landed in Canada. Once 
there, they lost no time in learning to read and write. We heard from them oc- 
casionally through their teacher, who often wrote of them with praise and ad- 
miration. They soon procured work and made the most of their time and 
money. It was not long before I heard from Madison direct, and of his deter- 
mination to go back for his wife and sister. His teacher tried to dissuade him 
from so dangei'ous an undertaking, telling him that he would certainly be 
reduced to bondage if he made the venture. But nothing could induce him to 
forego the attempt. Arriving in the ' Old Dominion ' he proceeded cautiously, 
lying by in the day and traveling bj' night, reaching at last the neighborhood of 
his old master. It was the fall of the year and the time when the corn crop is 
being gathered. He lay in ambush until the darkness was on, when he soon 
heard the familiar songs of slaves on their way to one of the many huskings or 
'shuckings ' which occur at that season in Virginia. He judged by the voices 
that quite a crowd was coming and took his station near the road, intending to 
join them as they came along, which he did. It being dark he was not noticed 
by them. He soon discovered a familiar voice and drawing the possessor to one 
side, made himself known. Obtaining the desired information about his wife, 
that she was still at the place he had left her, he went immediately to where she 
was. Their joy was unbounded but of short duration, as he was soon discov- 
ered. Preparations were at once made to capture him, which were successful 
and the brave man was again reduced to the condition of a slave but not con- 
quered as the sequel will prove. He was sold to a trader, taken to Richmond, 
Virginia, to be shipped with a cargo then about to be sent to New Orleans. 
After a short stay at Richmond he was put on board a vessel called the ' Creole ' 
with a company of one hundred and thirty-five other slaves for the market. The 
slaves were kept on the lower deck with the hatchway closed, making it very op- 
pressive for those below. The men and women were in different apartments. 
Madison, after they were fairly at sea, managed to obtain the confidence of the 
crew and was allowed to come on the upper deck, making himself useful and 
feigning to be happy. He was allowed many privileges denied the other slaves. 
He sought interviews with a few of the chosen ones and laid his plans to take 
possession of the vessel. He selected fourteen of the most trusty slaves, gave 
them the watchword ' Liberty or death,' which would call them into action. 



RECORD OF THE ORISELL FAMILY 309 

Soon after his plans were consummated and while passing from the lower to the 
upper deck, he was discovered by the captain and mate. They wished to know 
what he was doing among the slaves. He replied that he had been down to see 
how they were getting on. They told him it was contrary to the rules of the 
vessel and that they should shut the hatchway on him, which they started to do. 
But this sealed their own doom for in an instant he sprang on deck, gave the 
watchword and soon the officers were struggling for life. He had by his well- 
aimed blows felled them both and as others came to their assistance they shai'ed 
the same fate. By this time his comrades made their appearance and Madison 
Washington had possession of the vessel. He told the crew if they gave them- 
selves up their lives would be spared, that he did not wisli to shed blood; his 
liberty and that of his fellow slaves was all that he asked and this he was going 
to have if it cost the life of the whole crew. Seeing that resistance was in vain, 
they yielded and suffered themselves to be made powerless for defense. The 
slaves, on learning the condition of affairs, were for killing the crew, but Madi- 
son forbade any further violence, telling them that any one who offered any vio- 
lence to the crew would be severely punished. Thus we see the magnanimit\' 
of this great man. After he had gotten things arranged to his mind, he took his 
position near the pilot and told him to steer for Nassau in the British Island of 
New Providence. After they were well on their way Madison gave his colored 
officers their orders, directing them what to do and how to act. He then or- 
dered the steward of the vessel to prepare a good repast for all on board and 
then gave orders for all the slaves to prepare to come on deck, where they could 
breathe air and be ready to partake of a good meal. Madison was not yet aware 
of the great joy in store for him, for on that vessel was the young wife for whom 
he had risked so much. After his capture she had been charged with complic- 
ity in his escape and was sold and shipped on the same vessel, without his 
knowledge, and was there making ready to partake of the meal being provided 
by the man she loved. We can imagine the joyful meeting on beholding each 
other at that supper table. Their joy must have been unbounded. I<"rom that 
time until they arrived at their destination the course of the vessel was closely 
watched and when they came within quarantine distance of Nassau tlieir situa- 
tion was made known to the British authorities, who immediately repaired to 
where the vessel was anchored and, upon investigation, the slaves were all set 
free and landed on the island. 

"The slave traders, being greatly exasperated, issued a protest and 
claimed of the United States government pay for the loss of their slaves. That 
claim was brought into Congress, as all conversant with the liistor\' of our coun- 
try will remember, and there the slave holders did all they could to have the 
government pay that unrighteous claim. Then Joshua R. Giddings, in one of 
his master speeches, spoiled their fun, for which the slave holders and their ad- 
vocates, passed a vote of censure on Mr. Giddings, expelling him from the 
House. He went home but was soon sent back by his constituents and was one 
of the oldest members of the House when he retired from public life. He left 
a record of which a nation of free people have cause to be proud." 



3IO RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

MILO AND MARY (JOHNSON) GRISELL (4) 

Mile Grisell, son of Joseph and Letitia (Wliitacre) Grisell, was born 
August 5, 1812, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio, and died March 
7, 1877, near PennviUe, Jay County, Indiana. Interment in the Friends' Ceme- 
tery of PennviUe. 

Mary Johnson, daughter of David and EHzabeth (Johnsonj Johnson, was 
born October 24. 1809, in Columbiana County, Ohio, and died April 9, 1894, 
near PennviUe, Jay County, Indiana. Interment in the Friends' Cemetery of 
PennviUe. 

Milo Grisell and Mary Johnson were united in marriage October 24, 1833, 
near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name BirtJi Death 

Morgan Grisell February 24, 1835 February 24, 1835 

Hiram B. Grisell August 30, 1836 June 25, 1889 

Elizabeth Ann Grisell August 10, 1839 

Letitia Grisell September 3, 1841 September 13, 1843 

Theodore F. Grisell February 5, 1845 

Joseph O. Grisell August 18, 1848 February 17, 1863 

They were all born in Harrisville, Harrison Count}', Ohio. 

Morgan and Letitia died and were buried in Harrisville, Ohio, and 
Joseph O. died m Penn Township, Jay Count\-, Indiana. Interment in the 
Friends' Cemetery of PennviUe. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell located in Harrisville, Ohio, soon after their mar- 
riage where Mr. Grisell followed the carpenter's trade. About 1850 they re- 
moved to Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, having made the trip overland. 
Theodore Grisell, who was then between five and six years of age, says he well 
remembers their arrival in Penn Township. They drove right to Ensley 
Lewis's home and when "Uncle Ensley" saw them coming up the lane he 
hurried out to open the gate and hallooed, "Hurrah for Indiana." The}' lived 
in a little cabin on Uncle Ensley's farm one year. Theodore says, "All of 
that year we ate off of father's large tool chest. We children would gather 
around it sitting sideways and we enjoyed our meals hugely. When the wolves 
howled around outside we were glad enough to 'huddle up' in a corner together." 

The next year Milo Grisell purchased eighty acres of land of his father, 
Joseph Grisell, and erected a cabin on it, they were soon estabished in their 
own home where they lived until his death. Mr. Grisell held the ofttce of 
town trustee in Penn Township about nine years. He was a man universally 
liked and of pronounced benefit to the community in wliich lie lived. Mrs. 
Grisell was of Dutch descent. 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 31 I 

JOHN C. AND HANNAH (GRISELL) SMOCK (4) 

Hannah Grisell, daughter of Joseph and Letitia (Whitacre) Grisell, was 
born November 17, 1821, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio, and 
died December g, 1895, near Monroe, Green County, Wisconsin. 

John C. Smock, son. of Peter and Elizabeth (Teeple) Smock, was born 
December 28, 1821, near Richmond, Jefferson County, Ohio, and died July 21, 
1889, near Monroe, Green County, Wisconsin. 

John C. Snock and Hannah Grisell were united in marriage June 10, 
1847, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birtli Death 

Frank Homer Smock July 12, 1848 

Letitia Ann Smock January 2,1850 September 13,1889 

Douglas Smock January 5.1852 March 25,1881 

Elizabeth Elma Smock October 9, 1854 

Joseph Lincoln Smock November 2, i860 October 30, 1861 

John G. Smock. November 15,1865 March 4. 1891 

Frank H. and Letitia A. were born near New Garden, Columbiana 
County, Ohio, Douglas and Elizabeth E. in Logan County of the same state 
and Joseph L. and John G. near Monroe, Green County, Wisconsin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Smock lived in Columbiana County, Ohio, four years after 
their marriage, afterwards moving to Logan County of the same state, where 
Mr. Smock was engaged running a saw mill. They removed from there to 
Green County, Wisconsin, in 1854, where they purchased a farm near Monroe. 
In 1869 they removed to Story County, Iowa, remaining there until 1872, when 
they returned to their former home near Monroe, Wisconsin. Here the}' re- 
sided until their death, both having gained the respect and love due to generous 
and moral lives. 

Mr. Smock's parents were early settlers in Coluiubiana County, Ohio. 
In the days of slavery his father was a strong abolitionist and did all in his 
power to forward the anti-slavery cause. He was a firm advocate of the 
temperance cause, and a member of and one of the most active workers in the 
state temperance organization. 

John C. Smock was a farmer in the fullest sense, depending upon the 
results of his efforts on the farm for his living and these efforts were crowned 
with success as he always had the neccessaries and many of the comforts of 
life. He was an enthusiastic advocate of freedom, temperance and reform. 
He was industrious and generous and was ever ready to raise his voice in the 
interests of oppressed humanity. The highest tribute that can be paid to a 
man is to truthfully say, "He was honest," and this tribute he justly merited. 
He was of German descent. 



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RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 31 3 

Mrs. Smock was a noble Christian woman, devotedly attached to her 
home and family. Being happy, hopeful and cheerful she was the life and joy 
of the home circle. In all of life's varied relations and trials she did her every 
duty faithfully and well and has gone to receive the reward for a long and use- 
ful life well spent. She was of English and Welsh descent. 

Mr. and Mrs. Smock were both interred in the Greenwood Cemetery 
near Monroe. 

THOMAS E. AND MARY A. (WIREMAN) GRISELL (4) 

Thomas Elwood Grisell, son of Joseph and Letitia (Whitacre) Grisell, 
was born October 27, 1823, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio, and 
died October 2, 1898, in Upper Sandusky, Ohio. 

Mary Alexander Wireman, daughter of Alexander and Mary ( ) 

Wireman, was born June 6, 1824, in Adams County, Pennsylvania, and died 
May 12, 1855, in Upper Sandusky, Ohio. Interment in cemetery at the same 
place. 

Thomas E. Grisell and Mary A. Wireman were united in marriage April 
27, 1847, in New Garden Friends' Meeting, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Alexander Hartwell Grisell June 18, 1848 

Anson Grisell July 1,1851 March 14,1875 

Myra Griffith Grisell August 4, 1853 October 6, 1854 

Alexander H. and Anson were born in Hanover, Ohio, and Mjra G. in 
Upper Sandusky of the same state. 

Anson and Myra G. died and were buried at Upper Sandusky. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell located in Hanover where Mr. Grisell first begun 
the practice of law. In 1852 they removed to Upper Sandusky living there 
until their death. Mrs. Grisell was of English and German and Mr. Grisell of 
English and Welsh descent. 

After Mrs. Grisell's death Mr. Grisell was again married. 

THOMAS E. AND ANNA C. (McKELLY) GRISELL (4) 

Anna C. McKelly, daughter of Matlu w and Henrietta (Michael) Mc- 
Kelly, was born October 28, 1826, in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 

Thomas E. Grisell and Anna C. McKelly were united in marriage Jan- 
uary I, 1857, in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 
Name Birth Death 

Ida Mary Grisell December 27, 1857 June 30, 1884 

Joseph Whitacre Grisell October 21, i860 



^■%^ 




'rHO\rAS EI.WOOD GRISEI.I. 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 315 

They were born in Upper Sandusky, Ohio. 

Ida M. died and was buried in Upper Sandusky. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell located at Upper Sandusky where Mrs. Grisell 
still resides. 

Mrs. Grisell's father was of Scotch-Irish descent and her mother was a 
native of Lancaster of German and English parentage. 

The following obituary notice of Thomas E. Grisell was published in one 
of the papers of Upper Sandusky, Ohio: — 

" Thy day has come, not gone; 
Thy sun has risen, not set; 
Thy life is now beyond 
The reach of death or change. 
Not ended — but begun. 
O noble soul, O gentle heart! Hail, and farewell! " 

"Thomas Elwood Grisell is dead! 

"Like evening's sighing zephyr, a grand and noble spirit passed to the 
great beyond, and Upper Sandusky loses a valued and respected citizen, who 
was identified with the village's growth and welfare for nearly a half century. 

"In Columbiana County, this state, near the little town of New Garden, 
Thomas E. Grisell was born on the 2jd day of October, 1823, nearly seventy- 
five years ago. During his early life he worked his way through the country 
schools, and as he approached manhood's years entered Oberlin College. Al- 
ways a hard student, with a literary tendency and an ambition for the practice 
of law, he worked with diligence until he accomplished the desires mapped out 
in early life. In 1848 he was admitted to the bar at New Lisbon, Columbiana 
County, and first practiced at Hanover, in the same county. In 1852 he came 
to Upper Sandusky. Four years later he was elected on the Republican ticket 
as clerk of the courts of this county, which position he filled honorably anti 
faithfully for three years. 

"Mr. Grisell was a perfect type of jilTysical manhood. Tall of statue 
with massive frame and commanding appearance, yet he possessed a heart as 
simple as a child's and had a strong aversion against pushing himself forward. 
He loved the practice of law, and cases entrusted to him were always fought 
with tenacity and marked ability, never once, however, forgetting the dignity of 
his profession nor the courtesy due his opponents. But, after his work was 
performed, his library and his home were to him the dearest spots on earth. 
His earlier years were busy ones. For a long time he was a member of our 
Board of Education, and was also one of the first trustees of the Oak Hill Cem- 
etery Association. In 1870 and a number of years later he conducted a brick 
and tile mill on Front street, this city, in addition to his practice of law. 

"While Mr. Grisell always had pronounced opinions on the political 
questions of the day, yet in later years he did not take active part. One of the 
characteristics of Mr. Grisell was his striking resemblance to the late Hon. 
James G. Blaine, and the two gentlemen were personal friends. It is related 



3l6 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

of Mr. Grisell that some- years ago while walking the streets of Washington, 
the capitol city, he was on a number of occasions mistaken for Mr. Blaine bj' 
politicians who stepped up and shook him by the hand. While riding on the 
railroad trains he was also taken for Mr. Blaine, and these instances he occa- 
sionally referred to while in conversation with his friends. 

"Mr. Grisell practiced law for fifty years, but six months ago was com- 
pelled to forsake his profession owing to alarming symptoms of heart trouble, 
which gradually and surely grew worse. That it was only a question of time 
for the disease to complete its fatal work, he was fully conscious, and the poor 
man waited for the end with a calmness and peaceful submission that was truly 
pitiful, for he never once offered a word of complaint, and his pain was borne 
in utter silence. Last Saturday he had a bad afternoon, which continued into 
the night. Shortly before midnight Dr. R. N. McConnell was summoned, and 
Mr. Grisell told the physician he believed he was nearing the end of the road, 
showing that he fully realized the near approach of final dissolution. After the 
midnight hour had passed, Mr. Grisell gradually quieted down from his siege 
of restlessness and pain and passed into a comatose condition in which he re- 
mained until the clock struck the hour of one, Sunday morning, when the silent 
messenger bade him come, and life on this earth to a loving husband and father 
and a most respected resident was no more." 

The following action was taken by the Wyandot County Bar Association 
on the death of Thomas E. Grisell; — 

"The members of the Wyandot County Bar Association met in the court 
room this morning at nine o'clock, just before the opening of a session of the 
common pleas court. Judge Allen Smalley had just taken his seat upon the 
bench, and Judge Joel W. Gibson was made secretary of the meeting, when 
Major John D. Sears, the veteran jurist, arose and announced the death of one 
of their fellow members, Thomas £. Grisell, which occurred at an early hour 
Sunday morning. Major Sears spoke something like five minutes, but in that 
brief space of time he paid a high tribute to the dead man as a citizen, a lawyer 
and a friend, as well as to the high moral worth in which he had been esteemed 
by everyone. Mr. Sears closed his remarks by suggesting the appointment of 
a committee on resolutions. Acting upon the suggestion Judge Smalley named 
Major John D. Sears, Elza Carter and Judge D. D. Clayton as the committee 
to draft suitable resolutions, to report the same to the court room next Satur- 
day morning at nine o'clock, when the Bar Association will hold a meeting 
of sorrow, and where eulogies will be spoken by different members of the or- 
ganization. 

"Judge Smalley also named Judge D. D. Clayton; Judge Londes M. 
Bowers, W. R. Hare, H. H. Newell, Austin M. Brown and Judge T. D. Lanker 
as a committee on floral tribute and also to call on the bereaved family and ten- 
der them the services of the members of the Bar Association. The committee 
later met and selected a sub-committee of H. H. Newell, Austin M. Brown and 
W. R. Hare to secure a suitable floral offering. 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 317 

"Members of the Bar Association were also requested to meet in a body 
at the court room to-morrow afternoon at one o'clock to attend the funeral. 
The meetinj^ then adjourned until next Saturday morning at nine o'clock." 



JOSEPH W. AND ALICE (RITCHEY) GRISELL i4) 

Joseph Whitacre Grisell, son of Joseph and Letitia (Whitacre) Grisell, 
was born October 21, 1825, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio, and 
died November i, 1856, on the farm where he was born. His remains were 
interred in the Woodsdale Cemetery near New Garden. 

Alice Ritchey, daughter of William and Hannah (Smith ) Ritchey, was 
born February 6, 1826, near Hanover, Hanover Township, Columbiana County, 
Ohio. 

Joseph W. Grisell and Alice Ritchey, were united in marriage April 15, 
1847, at the home of the bride's parents near Hanover, Columbiana County, 
Ohio, Squire William Yates officiating. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Milo Alven Grisell April 7, 1848 November 2, 1853 

Hannah Elizabeth Grisell February 11, 185 1 

Josephine Grisell January 3, 1854 June 23, 1854 

Josephine Grisell March 17, 1856 March 9, 1858 

They were all born near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Milo A. and the two youngest children died near New Garden, and are 
interred in the Woodsdale Cemetery near the same place. 

Owing to the age of his parents Joseph W. Grisell built a frame cottage 
by the side of his father's brick house and lived there until his death. He 
looked after the farm for his father, who was getting too old for such work and 
was also crippled with the rheumatism. Joseph W. was a strong advocate of the 
temperance cause. In politics he was a staunch Republican, and was trustee 
of Hanover Township at the time of his deatii. He also worked at the 
carpenter's trade. 

The following is a paragra])li from his obituary: — 

"Joseph W. Grisell left a wife and two children to mourn his untimely 
and unexpected death. His high moral character had endeared him to a large 
circle of friends and neighbors, wiio feel deeply the loss of a true man, cut 
down in the prime of life. In his death the slave too, has lost a friend." 

Mrs. Lizzie G. Hopkins says: "A short time before his death his 
mother, Letitia Grisell, died, thus leaving grandfather alone and so after the 
death of Joseph W. his wife and two children moved into the brick house with 
grandfather where they lived until 1S66. During this time 'Little Josephine' 
was laid to rest beside her father. 



3l8 RECORD OF THE GRISEI.L FAMILY 

"In 1866 they sold their property in Columbiana County and removed to 
Jay County, Indiana, and located in Penn Township on the eighty acres of land 
which Joseph W. Grisell had purchased of his father previous to the former's 
death. Only ten acres of this land was cleared when they moved there. They 
rented the land out as they had previously done in Ohio, grandfather being too 
old to do any work. He only lived about one year after they settled in Indiana. 

"In 1887 Mrs. Grisell, in company with her daughter and husband, 
Albert H. Hopkins, removed to Pennville, of the same township, where they 
live at the present time. Mrs. Grisell's father was a native of Pennsylvania, 
and of Scotch descent, and her mother was born in Loudoun County, Virginia, 
and of English ancestr}'. Mrs. Grisell, or 'Aunt Alice,' as she is better known, 
has spent a long and peaceful life, useful in the community and loved by a 
large circle of friends." 

Mrs. Lizzie (Grisell) Hopkins relates a pleasant episode of the early 
days: — 

"While we were living in Ohio, Aunt Hannah Smock (Hannah Grisell 
Smock), her husband and four children, who lived in Wisconsin, came to In- 
diana on a visit overland, and their outfit was two horses and a covered wagon. 
They spent the winter in Penn Township with relatives, and the next spring, 
accompanied by Aunt Sarah Ann, Aunt Amy and little son Anson (Sarah Ann 
and Amy Grisell Lewis) they came on to Ohio. Uncle Thomas E. Grisell, 
wife and four children came then and stayed three or four weeks and such a 
good time as we had is seldom experienced. It was just a jsicnic all the time. 
So many of the relatives and neighbors came in to see them and then we would 
all go and visit them. Thus we had a happy and jolly time long to be remem- 
bered. There were so many children and we just pla3'ed from morning until 
night and was sorry when bed time came; seemingly we never grew tired. Dur- 
ing the day we played out doors until noon came when our mothers would call, 
' Children, come to dinner.' That soon over we flew to our play again and the 
hours went all too quickly until we were called to supper, but after that meal 
there was still a little time before the call, 'Children, it is getting damp now, 
come in on the porch.' Then we would play on the big, wide porch until 
time for bed. That was one of the purely happy times in life of which those 
who participated never forget. We were all at grandfather's and his five young- 
est children were all at home. Such reunions, in those days were not often 
witnessed." 

DR. THOMAS G. AND HANNAH (CHALFANT) BLACKLEDGE (4) 

Thomas Grisell Blackleilfrc. son of Joseph and Rachel (Grisell) Black- 
ledge, was born January 23, 1809, in the "Old Stone House," near New Garden, 
Columbiana County, Ohio, and died October 18, 1884, in Indianapolis, Indiana. 
Interment in the Crown Hill cemetery of the same place. 

Hannah Chalfant, daughter of Chads and Mary (Caster) Chalfant, was 
born June 21, 181 1. in Maryland, and died about 1S50 in Salem. Ohio. 



RFXORD OK THE CKISELL I'AMILY 3^9 

Dr. Thoinas G. iJlackk-dgc and Hannah Chalfant were united in marriage 
in 1835, in Brownsville, Pennsylvania. 

TO THEM WERE l!l)RN 

Naiiu- Biith Dcalh 

Mary Ann Blackledge.. . ._ 

Elizabeth M. C. Blackledge. .. . December 26,1836 

Joseph Parish Blackledge — , 1840 August 4, 1863 

Louise Blackledge. .. . June 5, 1845 — , 1872 

Benjamin Stanton Blackledge. . May 22, 1850 

They were all born in Ohio. 

Louise died in Ft. Wayne, Indiana. 

Joseph P. was a soldier in the civil war and died while in the service of 
his country at Murfreesboro, Tennessee. 

Mr. and Mrs. Blackledge lived in Ohio during their married life, having 
changed residence several times. They lived in Upper Lowell, Salem and 
Marietta. After Mrs. Blackledge's death Mr. Blackledge lived in Bluffton, 
Indiana, until after his second marriage. 

DR. THOMAS G. AND SUSAN (KENEGA) (GOUDY) 
BLACKLEDGE (4) 

Susan (Kenega) Goud\ , daugliter of Samuel and Mary ( ) Kenega, 

was born December 25, 1829, in Shippenburgh, Cumberland County, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Dr. Thomas G. Blackledge and Susan (Kenega) Goudy were united in 
marriage November 29, 1855, in Bluffton, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Dnitli 

Frank Harris Blackledge November 21, 1856 

Albert S. Blackledge May 21, 1859 

John W. Blackledge February 7, 1863 

Irene L. Blackledge 1 )eceniber 2, 1868 



Frank H. was born in Blullton, Indiana, Albert S. in Dallas, Illinois, 
John W. in Kockville, Indiana, and Irene L. in Franklin, of the same state. 

Mr. and Mrs. Blackledge removed to a farm in Illinois soon after their 
marriage, then to Dallas of the same state, where they lived five years. Sub- 
sequently they removed to Rockville, Indiana, and from there to Franklin and 
finally to Indianapolis, where they remained during Dr. Blackledge's life and 
where Mrs. Blackledge still resides. 



320 RECORD OK THE GRISELL FAMILY 

Dr. Blackledge was raised a Quaker but afterward became a member of 
the Orthodox Methodist Church, of which his wife and children are aiso mem- 
bers. Politically he was a Republican. 

Albert S. and John W. are manufacturers of catsups, canned meat, etc., 
in Indianapolis. 

Irene L. after receiving her education became a teacher in the public 
schools of Indianapolis, in which capacity she is now employed. 



JOHN L. AND MARY BLACKLEDGE) MICHENER (4) 

Mary Blackledge, daughter of Joseph and Rachel (^Grisell) Blackledge, 
was born November 7, 181 3, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio, and 
died May ig, 1866, near Etna, Fihnore County, Minnesota. 

John Longstreth Michener, son of Daniel and Anne (Kinsey) Michener, 
was born January 14, i8ig, in Mt. Pleasant, Jefferson County, Ohio, and died 
December 9, 1896, near Etna, Filmore County, Minnesota. 

John L. Michener and Mary Blackledge, were united in marriage Sep- 
tember — , 1840, in White River Friends' Meeting, Richmond, Wayne County, 
Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE MORN 

Name Birtli Death 

Rachel Ann Michener June 3, 1841 

Charles Remond Michener July 3- i'^44 June 8, 1898 

Daniel Kinsey Michener September 5, 1846 

Joseph Otis Michener June 2, 1854 August — , 1867 

They were all born near Nottingham, Wells County, Indiana. 

Joseph died near Etna, Filmore County, Minnesota. 

Mr. Michener's mother was of English and his father of German descent. 

The following sketch was contributed by Rachel Ann (Michener) Soule: — 

"Father and mother lived for a short time with motiier's parents, near 
Nottingham, Wells County, Indiana, then removed to what was known as the 
'Morgan Lewis place,' near West Grove, Penn Township, Jay County, of the 
same state, but on account of the poor health of mother's parents the}' returned 
to the old homestead and stayed there with them ten years when they bought a 
farm adjoining the old home and lived there five years. On account of sick- 
ness about this time they decided to move to the Territory of Minnesota, so in 
the fall of 1856 they started, in companv with a number of other families, driving 
through to Iowa where they spent the winter in the neighborhood of relatives 
and friends, about ten miles east of Iowa City. Early the ne.xt spring (1857) 
tiiey started on north to Minnesota. After weeks of hardship caused by bad 
roads, high water and inclement weather, they arrived at and located on a farm 
where they lived until their death. A family had previously settled on the land 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 321 

and had built a log cabin 12 by 12 fuct and broken ten acres of land. Part of 
the homestead was smooth prairie and part had one year's growth of oak brush. 
The Root river run across one corner where there was a little small timber. 
Father bought this property and commenced to make improvements. We were 
sixty miles from market and it was slow work getting ahead much, but with the 
aid of his sons he was able after five years to build a stone house 28 by 30 feet, 
one and one-half stories high with a basement. A stone in the gable shows the 
inscription '1861.' The site where he built the house was bare, not a brush or 
tree for shade. He began planting trees, both for shade and fruit, right away, 
and now, 1901, there are many fine large shade trees, pines, balsams, white and 
red cedar, elms and maples. Just north of the house is an immense cotton- 
wood, which was planted in 1861. There is a twelve-acre orchard, one of the 
oldest and best in the state. The early settlers thought it was useless to try 
to raise apples so far north but father thought there was nothing like trying and 
he experimented for years at a great expense before he succeeded in getting a 
paying orchard. 

'Tn 1866 our first affliction befell us, in the death of our mother, who had 
taken cold when ministering to an afflicted family. One year later the youngest 
of the family, Joseph Otis, was killed by a runaway team of horses. He was 
in his thirteenth year. 

"Father and mother were people of strong personality and their influence 
was felt for good wherever they were. They were always in the forefront of the 
battle when the fight was against the wrong. 

'Tn the old days when 'West Grove' meant anti-slavery, temperance, 
woman's rights, and later when Spiritualism had its birth and West Grove be- 
came the stronghold for the new ' ism,' they were identified with it all. Mother 
was a good trance speaker and for several years held meetings here doing an 
immense amount of good." 

JASON R. AND MARY (PAXSON) BLACKLEDGE (4) 

Jason Richardson Blackledge, son of Joseph and Rachel (^Grisell ) Black- 
ledge, was born July ig, 1824, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio, 
and died July i, 1901, in Mount Pleasant, Henry County, Iowa. Interment in 
the Mount Zion Cemetery, near Newton, Jasper County, Iowa. 

Mary Paxson, daughter of IJenjamin and Sarah (Mitchel) Paxson, was 
horn November 27, 1830, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Jason R. Blackledge and Marv Paxson were united in marriage February 
18, 1849, at the home of the bride's parents in Penn Township, Jay County, 
Iniliana, Ellis Davis ofliciating. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Naiiii- Biitli Dciith 

ISenjamiii I'raiiklin Blackledge. January 20, 1850 September 21. 1882 

|oseph Oliver Blackledge Jiil\ 15,1852 

Lindley Ninde Blackledge .... Deecniber 22, 1854 



9^ 
9. 


1858 
1858 


November 


2, 


1858 


21, 


1859 


June 


14, 


1883 


11, 


1862 


October 


28, 


1883 




1865 
1868 








iS 








«, 


1870 


April 


14. 


1870 


21, 


1872 









322 RKClJkD or THE GRISELL FAMILY 

Name Birtli Death 

Eugene Sue Blackledge ) „ . April 

'-iwins 
Clarence May Blackledge I April 

Ralph Waldo Blackledge July 

Charles I'remont Blackledge. .. March 

Owen Summer Blackledge .... September 

Gertrude M. Blackledge May 

Hiram Blackledge April 

Mattie Rachel Blackledge February 

Benjamin F. , Joseph O. and Lindley N. were born in Nottingham Town- 
ship, Weils County, Indiana, Eugene S., Clarence M., Ralph W. , Charles F. 
and Owen S. near Galesburg, Jasper County, Iowa, and Gertrude M., Hiram 
and Mattie R. near Newton, of the same county and state. 

Clarence F. died near Galesburg, Jasper County, Iowa, and was interred 
in the Mount Zion Cemetery about eight miles from Newton. 

Charles F. died near Balbec, Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, and 
was interred in the West Grove Cemetery of the same township. 

Hiram died in Buena Vista Township, Jasper County, Iowa, and was in- 
terred in Mount Zion Cemetery. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Blackledge located on a farm in Not- 
tingham Township, Wells County, Indiana, where they lived eight years. 
March 4, 1857, they fitted out covered wagons and removed to Iowa, overland, 
locating in Jasper County. About 1893 they sold their farm and purchased 
property in Newton, where Mrs. Blackledge resides at the present tiiBe. 

Dr. L. N. Blackledge says, "Father was a radical abolitionist during 
and prior to the civil war. Many times have I seen him shoot at the head of 
prairie chickens and targets to keep in practice for shooting the negro drivers 
in case they should molest them when aiding the fugitive slaves to Canada." 

Mr. Blackledge was of Dutch, English and Welsh descent. He was 
partially paralyzed several years and was being treated at a sanitarium at 
Mount Pleasant, Iowa, at the time of his death. 

Mrs. Blackledge is of Scotch and Irish descent. 

Ralph W. was a civil engineer, and while running a survey from Boise 
City, Idaho, to Portland. Oregon, for the Oregon Short Line Company, he was 
drowned in the rapids of Box Canon, of Snake River, by the boat breaking its 
anchor rope. One other man also was drowned at the same time. The bodj' 
of Mr. Blackledge was not recovered for over two months. He was intefred at 
the mouth of Wolf Creek, where the county erected a monument. 

The following autobiography was contributed for the Record: — 

"Owen S. Blackledge was raised on a farm in Buena N'ista Township, 
about nine miles from Newton, the county seat of Jasper County, Iowa. During 
the winter months he attended school at 'Buncombe' District, No. 9, and by 
diligent application to his studies and close reading in the summer he secured a 
common school education, having graduated from the country schools in 1886. 



RECORD Of THE URISELL FAMILY 323 

He then rented his father's farm for two years and in the winter attended Hazel 
Dell academy. In i8go-gi he attended Dexter Normal College at Dexter, Iowa, 
where he took quite an interest in politics, being about the only 'greenbacker' 
in school. 

"For several years he was compositor and reporter for two or more 
newspapers in Newton and in the spring of 1893 went to Jay County, Indiana, 
where he and Ed. Murtha" edited the 'Inlander' at Portland, Indiana. This 
was a People's Party sheet. They continued it for about three months for a 
stock company and failing to meet expenses, gave it up. 

"Owing to poor health he returned to Newton, Iowa, where he was 
dangerously ill for several weeks but finally rallied and the next spring rented 
a part of his father's farm in hopes of benefiting his health thereby. The 
following winter he was employed by Engle & Burney, editors of the Newton 
Herald. 

"Owen S. and his father, Jason R. Blackledge, carried on a new and 
second hand store in Newton until the latter's health failed when they sold out 
and Owen returned to farm work in which he continued until the fall of i8g8. 
Then in company with his father, mother and sister-in-law, Atlantic Blackledge, 
went on a visit to Jay County, Indiana^ Atlantic returned to Iowa the same 
fall but the others remained until May 1, of the following year. Owen S. then 
accepted a position on a farm near Newton where he worked until his father's 
health failing, he returned home and helped care for him until his death. The 
following September he and his mother went to Denver, Colorado, where they 
remained several months, returning home in the spring of 1902. 

"Mr. Blackledge is not a member of any denomination but believes in 
true religion, in doing right to his fellowmen, and is a firm believer in true 
Spiritualism. He is strictly temperate, never having drank liquors or used 
tobacco in any form. Politically he was a Bryan Democrat, having voted for 
Bryan twice, but at the present time, seeing so much of the evils of intemper- 
ance, while still a Bryan Democrat, he believes that the liijuor evil is a greater 
issue than the principle of Bryanism. He is determined to cast his influence 
and vote to that party pledged to the destruction ol the accursted rum traffic." 

JOSEPH AND SABINA iGRISELL) WILSON (4) 

Sabina Grisell, daughter of Samuel and Ann (Whitacre) Grisell, was 
born March 26, 1814, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Oliio, and died 
December 26, 1856, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. She was interred in 
the Friends' Cemetery of the same place. 

Joseph Wilson, son of Samuel and Hannah (Willis) Wilson, was born 
November 6, 1796, in York, York County, Pennsylvania, and died Deceuil)er 
13, 1867, near Mound City, Linn County, Kansas. His remains were interred 
in the cemetery of that place. 

Joseph Wilson and Sabina Grisell were united in marriage September 9, 
1838, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 



Auf^ust 


13. 


1842 


November 


9. 


1850 


July 


6, 


1850 


J une 


30. 


i«53 


March 


24, 


i«57 


June 


21, 


1855 



324 KELORD OV TIIK CKlSliLL I'AMILV 

Tl) IIIF.M WKKK HORN 

j\\i//ic Birth D,-atli 

William Wright Wilson August 27, 1839 

Samuel (jrisell Wilson October 17, 1841 

Hannah Ann Wilson December 21, 1842 

Maria Meredith Wilson March 10, 1844 

Calvin Searl Wilson October 30, 1847 

Julia Searl Wilson March 30, 1849 

Florence Jenette Wilson September 12, 1851 

Lydia Jane Wilson December 12, 1853 

Sarah Elizabeth Wilson March 17, 1855 

Joseph Adison Wilson December 13, 1856 

They were all born near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana, except Calvin 
S. and Julia S. who were born in Portland of the same county and state. 

Samuel G. , Calvin S., Julia S., Florence J. and Sarah E. died near Penn- 
ville and were buried in the Friends' Cemetery of that place. 

In the Ja}- County History, written by M. W. Montgomery, and pub- 
lished in 1864, the author says: — 

"In April, 1836, Joseph Wilson, afterward County Auditor of Jay County, 
selected land near Samuel Grisell, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, 
who accompanied him to Fort Wayne to make the entry. They struck the 
Wabash river at Adam Miller's and went down stream to Henry Miller's, where 
Bluffton now stands. Here they met John Conner carrying the mail, an oc- 
currence familiar to all northward travelers for twenty-five years afterward. 
The next morning, crossing the river in a canoe and swimming their horses, they 
proceeded on their journey. Everywhere the streams were overflowing and 
several times the water ran over the horses backs. At the St. Mary's river they 
left their horses, and crossing in a canoe, walked to the Land Office. Early in 
the month of July following, Mr. Wilson brought his family from Champaign 
County, Ohio, to his home in Penn Township." 

The death of Mrs. Wilson occurred soon after they had settled in their 
new home, and in 1838, as before stated, Mr. Wilson was united in marriage 
to Sabina Grisell. 

'I'hrough the high esteem in which he was held the citizens elected him 
scliool cummissioner, and soon afterward he was ^ lected to the office of Count}' 
Auditor wliich position he held four years. The people of Jay County never 
had a more trustworthy official. He so faithfully and loyally performed his 
duties that he was ever afterward known as "Honest Joe Wilson." 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Wilson li\id near Pennville until about 
1846 when they removed to Portland on account of his official duties at that 
place. When he was released from the office which he so successfully filled 
Ihey returned to their former home, residing there until after Mrs. Wilson's 
death. Subsequently Mr. Wilson moved to Salem, Henry Coimt\-, Iowa, re- 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 325 

maining tliure about eighteen months. He then went to Kansas, and entered 
land near Mound City, Linn County, where he lived until his death. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilson were both loyal members of the Hicksite branch 
of the Friends' Society. She was of English and Welsh and he of Scotch and 
Irish descent. 

Joseph A. Wilson is married and lives in Spokane, Washington. They 
have two daughters, Beulah-and Ruth Wilson. Further information concern- 
ing this family we were unable to gather. 

Mr. Wilson is a contractor and painter. 

MARTIN AND MARTHA (GRISELL) HIATT (4) 

Martha Grisell, daughter of Samuel and Ann t^Whitacre) Grisell, was 
born September 8, 1815, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio, and died 
March 7, 1851, near Pennville, Ja}' County, Indiana. Her remains were in- 
terred in the Friends' Cemetery of Pennville. 

Martin Hiatt, son of Jonathan and Rachel (Edwards) Hiatt, was born 
July 17, 1S17, near Winchester, Randolph County, Indiana, and died Novem- 
ber 4, 1866, near Milo, Warren County, Iowa. 

Martin Hiatt and Martha Grisell were united in marriage about 1836 in 
Winchester, Randolph County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE liOkN 

Name Piitli Dralli 

Samuel Hiatt August 10, 1837 August — , 1863 

Anson Luther Hiatt November 27, 1838 

Sarah Ann Hiatt March 1 2. 18 — 

Hiram Grisell Hiatt July 19, 1844 August 18. 1870 

Maria Meredith Hiatt Februar\ 23, 1849 

They were all born near Pennville, jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. llialt lived near Pennville where Mr. Hiatt was engaged 
in farming until after Mrs. Hiatt's death. A few years later he nmoved to 
Iowa, locating near Milo, Warren County. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hiatt were members of the Friends' Society. The former 
was of German antl the latter of English and Welsh descent. For the Hiatt 
ancestry see Gilbert Hiatt's family record. 

Samuel Hiatt enlisted in the civil war in the spring of 1862 in Company 
C, 34th Regiment, Iowa Volunteer Infantry. He was wounded at the battlr oi 
Prairie Landing (on White river, Arkansas) and was taken aboard the hospital 
boat "latan," which conveyed tlie wounded soldiers to the general hospital 
located at Memphis, Tennessee, but died before reaching there and was buried 
in Memphis. 

"He sleeps on the enemy's soil and when the linal shout of spiritual 
victory shall swell land and sea may his noble spirit, and the many others who 
have died for human liberty, receive the blessing of Him who died for the 
spiritual liberty of mankind." 



326 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

AMOS AND ELIZABETH M. (LUPTON) GRISELL (4) 

Amos GrisL-11, son of Samuel and Ann ( Whitacre) Grisell, was born 
December 18, 1817, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio, and died June 
21, 1866, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Elizabeth Mc Pherson Lupton, daughter of Solomon and Rachel (Wood) 
Lupton, was born June 23, 1819, near Leesburgh, Highland County, Ohio, and 
died December 3, 1891, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Amos Grisell and Elizabeth M. Lupton were united in marriage Feb- 
ruary II. 1841, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Rachel Ann Grisell January 1 1, 1842 

Margaret Deaver Grisell March ig, 1844 .... 

Sabina Wilson Grisell September 13, 1846 November 29, 1889 

Lukens Griffith Grisell April 19, 1849 April 19, 1854 

Abigal Lupton Grisell June 6, 1851 May i, 1892 

Nathan Amos Grisell March 9, 1856 

They were all born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. Grisell is of English and Welsh descent. He came with his parents 
to Penn Township in 1834 when he was seventeen years of age, thus at an early 
age he began pioneer work. 

Mrs. Grisell also emigrated from Ohio to Indiana, coming with her 
parents in 1840 they settled in Penn Township. She is of English descent. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Grisell located on a farm near Penn- 
ville where they remained until Mr. Grisell's death. They did much to improve 
the country and advance society. Both were members of the Friends' Society 
and were interred in the Friends' Cemetery of Pennville. 

Rachel A. is a member of the Society of Friends. Since the death of 
her parents she has made her home with her sister Margaret D. (Grisell) Allen. 
Siie is an industrious and Ljood woman. 



HIRAM AND SARAH A. (SPENCER) GRISELL (4) 

Iliram Grisell, son of Samuel and Ann (Whitacre) Grisell, was born 
December 9, 1819, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio, and died May 
13, 1853, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Sarah Ann Spencer, daughter of James and Sarah King (McDonald) 
Spencer, was born April 13, 1830, in Piqua, Miami County, Ohio, and died July 
17. 1855, in Ft. Wayne, Indiana. 

Hiram Grisell and Sarah Ann Spencer were united in marriage June 3, 
1847, in Tennville, Jay Count}'. Indiana. 



RF.CORD (.)F THE GRISELL FAMILY 



327 



Name 
Hiram Lawrence Grisell 



TO THEM WERE BORN 

Birth Death 
September 22, 1848 

He was born in Pennville. Jay Count\-, Indiana. 

Mr. Grisell came with his parents to Indiana when he was thirteen years 
old where, in spite ol meager educational facilities, he tiirough diligent study 
and the advantages of a fertile mind, became a competent instructor in the 
public scliools of that settlement. He was of Welsh and English descent. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Grisell located in Pennville where 
they lived imtil the latter's death. He was a birthright member of the Friends' 
Society to which faith he was loyal liiroughout his entire life. Mrs. Grisell was 
a member of -.he Methodist Episcopal Church. While her life help and train- 
ing to her son was limited to a few short years lie treasures her memory as one 
of the brightest spots in his life. She was a devoted Christian woman. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell were both interred in the Friends' Cemetery of 
Pennville. 



PETER S. AND MARIA (GRISELL) MEREDITH (4) 



Maria Grisell, daughter of Samuel and Ann (Whitacre) Grisell, was born 
October ii, 1821, near New Garden, Columbiana County Ohio. 

Peter Shumaker Meredith, son of David and Rachel (Shumaker) Mere- 
dith, was born November 5, 1808, in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and died 
October 4, 1876, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Peter S. Meredith and Maria Grisell were united in marriage September 
7, 1843, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO 'in EM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

I'lsther Malsby Meredith Maich 26,1845 November 9,1865 

Hiram Grisell Meredith October 30. 1846 April 23, 1848 

Samuel Grisell Meredith May 2y, 1849 January 11, 1873 

Eva Jane Meredith August 13,1863 June 13,1864 

Esther M. and Hiram G. wire born in Richmond, Indiana, and Samuel 
G. and E\a J. were born m Pennville, Indiana. Hiram died in Richmond 
and Esther M., Samuel G. and Eva J. near Peninille, Indiana. They were 
interred in the Friends' Cemetery (if that place. 

Mr. and Mrs. Meredith moved to Richmond, Indiana, soon after their 
marriage where Mr. Meredith was superintendent of the Newman grist mills 
which was located on the Whitewater river. They lived there until 1S4.S when 
they returned to their former home and located on a farm one quarter ol a mile 
east of Pennville whic-.h Mrs. Meredith's father liad preempted when he first 



RECORD OF THE GRISELI. FAMILY 329 

settled in Jay County. Here Mr. Meredith followed agricultural luirsuits 
several years during whicii time he served as Township Assessor two terms. In 
1873 they bought a pleasant home in Pennville and removed to that place, Mr. 
Meredith's death occurring soon after. 

Mr. Meredith received a good common school education and then studieti 
surveying for some time. He then left home to learn the miller's trade and 
after serving his apprenticeship worked as a journeymen-miller until 1835 when 
he came to Richmond, Indiana, with his parents. His father purchased land 
three miles south of Centreville, in Wayne County, where they resided for some 
time when he sold out and removed to Richmond. Previous to this time Peter 
S. Meredith had been engaged in the milling business and a short time before 
his father settled in Richmond he had gone to Jay County of the same state. 

He was a charter member of the I. O. C). F. Lodge, No. 145, of Penn- 
ville and Mrs. Meredith is an enthusiastic member of the Meredith Rebekah 
Lodge, No. 513, of Pennville, which was named in her honor. 

They were both active members of the Friends' Societ}^ 

Mrs. Meredith was of English and Welsii and Mr. Meredith of German 
and Welsh descen*". 

Mrs. Meredith recently celebrated her eightieth birthday and subse- 
([uently took an extended trip ihrongii Iowa. Siie is remarkabh- bright and 
iiealthv for one who has braved so many liardsliips. 



pioneer Ucminisrcnccs 

By Maria (Grisell) Mkkedith 

We left Columbiana County, Ohio, October 18, 1836. After two weeks 
of hard travel, we arrived at tlie residence of Jonathan Hiatt, who, at that 
time, resided near Winchester, Randolph County, Indiana. Here we maile 
our first halt. My father, brother Amos. Jonathan Hiatt, Mart Hiatt, 
Joseph Hiatt, David Canada and myself packed provisions and clothing, 
and started to Ja)- County to locate our future home. We built a log cabin on 
the farm now owned bj- Lewis Gnsell. After buiiiling the cabin we returned to 
Winchester, taking a new route. 1 sat in the wagon while the men cut a road 
and hunted along in the surrounding forest. If they remained away from the 
wagon over a specified time, I woukl blow the horn for them to return. One day 
we had halted to eat dinner and feed the horses. The men were roasting the 
meat by holding it over the fire on sticks. While we were thus employed a big 
Indian came to us. He seemed amused to see the men holding the meat. He 
cut a forked stick and sliowed us iiow to cook the meat without holding it over 
the fire. 

After returning to Winchester, we made prejjarations for moving to our 
new home. Our family was divided. Father and mother and the little ones 
Were to remain at Winchester until spring. We older children returned to our 



330 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

new home. It was a novel experiment for us to be alone in the woods without 
father or mother. As the evening shadows fell around our cabin and the setting 
sun gave token of the slowl\- waning day. the hoot of the owl, the bark of the 
fo.\, and the howl of the wolf would fill our lives with a strange reverie. 

There were no settlers in the neighborhood except two or three trappers. 
The foxes and wolves were the nearest neighbors we had. Our big dog disliked 
the Indians and wolves, so he could tell when the}' w-ere near our home, and 
kept up a continuous barking. 

With the coming of spring the remainder of our family joined us. And 
every one of us that was able to handle a grub, hoe, axe, or make a brush heap 
was set at work to clear away the surrounding forest. 

When winter came -we quit the clearing to weave and spin our clothing. 
The boys made and mended our boots and shoes. How happy we felt that we 
could be of use to our parents in their endeavors to make for us a future home. 
When we gathered around the fire of evenings, each one had their work to do, 
sewing, knitting, working the hominy block or preparing meal for our bread for 
the following day. 

When a supply of venison, pork or wild turkey was needed, brother Amos 
was detailed to do the hunting, as he was the best marksman. He was never 
better pleased than when at night he returned with a load of game. 

An old Indian trail ran close to where our cabin stood. The Indians in 
passing, would stop to warm and take a view of our surroundings. Quite a 
number of them stayed over night with us one time. There was one squaw 
among them. 1 remember that we children thought they took her along to wait 
on them and to taki? care of whatever they could beg. We had quite a lot of 
pumpkins laying around. The Indians seemed to fancy these and when they 
started to leave, we gave some to them. The Indians got on their ponies and 
rode off, and the squaw took the pumpkins on her pony and followed tliem. 

Fifty-four years have run their cytles of time since then. The forest under 
whose shade the redman wooed his dusk}' mate have faded away. The wild 
game live only in our natural history. Of the mighty tribes that at that time 
roamed over the middle and western states, there exists but a handful who have 
been pushed by the trend of civilization to the far West. The remaining old 
settlers have journeyed far down life's eastern slope and sit in the evening's 
purpk- twilight, waiting for death to push back the mystic curtain and reveal to 
them 111' realities of a liigher life. 

* * 

* 

During an interview with "Aunt Maria," she told the following interesting 
story of the Indians which we consider worthy of being added to her Remini- 
scences: — 

"As has been stated before, Samuel Grisell's home was close to an old 
Indian trail. The Indians passing along this trail seldom missed stopping at 
the settler's cabin. They were especially interested in the first crops raised by 
the white men. Tins providing for their needs no doubt seemed (|uite strange 



RECORD OF THE ORISELL FAMILY 33 1 

to the redmen who had been used to living on what the forest provided without 
any thought of the morrow. They also enjoyed the liospitality of the early 
settlers and sometimes took advantage of it, to the disadvantage of the families 
themselves. However, they were not refused favors when it was possible to 
grant them. 

"The next fall after coming to the new country, they were visited b)' a 
band of seven Indians who wished to stay all night. They were given the 
desired privilege and slept on the floor around the lireplace. They had made 
all of their wishes known by signs and motions, pretending that they could not 
speak the English language. However, they seemed to quite readily under- 
stand all that was said by the (irisell family. In the morning when the family 
awakened, Mr. Grisell (who, with his wife and baby had slept downstairs also) 
could not find one of his stockings, and was searching everywhere for it. The 
Indians were very much excited over the loss and exhibited fear of being 
accused of theft. They looked around as anxiously as any of the family and 
when the missing stocking was found, in the corner behind the Dutch oven, 
they were rejoiced, laughing and dancing in tlie greatest glee. They were 
cleared of suspicion. 

"They soon arranged themselves in a circle around the fireplace, sitting 
on the floor as it is the custom of the Indians to do. This proved a barricade 
to Mrs. Grisell, who wanted to get breakfast, and siie said to her liusband, 
'Samuel, can't thee get them to go out and help thee build a log heap, so I 
can get breakfast?' Before she had finished her reipiest. they began to file 
out of the door, evidently understanding her desire. She went to work im- 
mediately and soon had a big pot of mush prepared for them. Not having 
enough small dishes for all of them, she filled two or three large ones and put 
them along the center of the table. Then having furnished a cup of milk and a 
spoon for each one she calk;d them to their breakfast. It could be clearly seen 
that hot mush was a new dish to them, for they began putting it right into tlu'ir 
mouths, without mixing it with the milk and judging from the maneuvers which 
they went through, it must have burned them severely. Seeing that they were 
not accustomed to liaving tlieir victuals steaming from the stove, Mr. Grisell 
said, ' Mother, give me a cup of milk and a spoon and I will show them how to 
eat it.' He went to work to prepare his mush in the cup of milk, the Indians 
eyeing him intently during the oj)eration. They were quick to adopt the much 
improved method. 

"After finishing their breakfast, which they seemed to enjov thoroughly, 
they proceeded on their way up the trail, no doubt feeling grateful to the 'white 
man' for his kindness to them." 

LUKENS AND SARAH (GRISELL) GRIFFITH (4) 



was horn 



Sarah Grisell, diiughter of Samuel and .Ann (Whitacre) (jrisel 
September 29, 1823, "^■^'' New Garden, (Ohimbiana County. Ohio, and died 
December 2, 1891, in Pennville, Jay Counl\. Indiana. 



332 RECORD OF THE CRISEI.L FAMILY 

Lukens Griffith, son of Isaac and Elizabeth (Lukens) Griffith, was born 
March 27, 1810, in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and died March 20, 1873, in 
Pennville, Jaj' County, Indiana. 

Lukens Griffith and Sarah Grisell were united in marriage February' 18, 
1845, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Isaac Griffith November g, 1S45 January 6, 1886 

Charles Griffith May 11, 1847 November 26, 1847 

Lewis Grisell Griffith March 18, 1849 July 5. 1850 

Jennie Griffith June 8,1852 June 25,1880 

Anna Louisa Griffith July 12, 1854 September 2, 1895 

Florence Griffith May 3,1858 August — ,1876 

They were all born at Pennville, Jay County, Indiana, e.Kcept Isaac and 
Charles, who were born near Waynesville, Warren Count}', Ohio. Charles 
died and was buried near Waynesville, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Griffith lived in and near Pennville until his death, Mr. 
Griffith having been engaged in farming to some extent, but most of the time 
in the mill and tannery. The latter he owned and operated several j'ears. In 
the year of 1850 he and his father-in-law, Samuel Grisell, built a steam saw 
mill and the same year built the steam grist mill, spoken of in the familv 
history of Samuel Grisell. Mr. Griffith was an active and energetic business 
man and is spoken of as "very honest and upright in his dealings. He was 
well read and quite literary, having composed poetry and prose to some extent." 
He was a Republican and was raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Ciriffith was of Scotch and Welsh and Mrs. Griffith of English and 
Welsh descent. The\' had both been members of the Friends' Society but 
were turned out for marrying outside of Friends' Meeting. 

Jennie Griffith married Josepli Stapleton whose present address is As- 
sumption, Illinois. 

Anna L. Griffith married Joseph Lambert whose present address is also 
Assumption, Illinois. 

Of these two families we are unable to collect an\- further information. 



JAMES L. AND ANN GRISELL) LAFAVOUR i4) 

Ann Grisell, daughter of Samuel and Ann (Whitacre) Grisell, was born 
June 25, 1825, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio, and died April i. 
1847, in Pennville, |ay County. Indiana. 

James Lawrence Lafavour, son of and ( — ■_ ) 

Lafavour, was born in . 



KP;CORD OF THK CklSELL FAMILY 333 

Jamtjs L. Latavoiir and Ann Grisell were united in marriage (as near as 
we can learn) November i, 1S46, in I'ennville, Jay County. Indiana. 

No children. 

IMr. and Mrs. Lafavour located m PennviUe, Jay County, Indiana, where 
Mr. Lafavour was engaged in the saddle and harness making business. 

Mrs. Lafavour was a birthright member of the Friends' Society and is of 
English and Welsh descent. 

After diligent in(Hiiry we have failed to gain further information of this 
family. 



HENRY V. AND LYDIA (GRISELL) WALLING '4) 

Lydia Grisell, daughter of Samuel and Ann (Whitacre) Grisell, was born 
l<"ebruary 2, 1827, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio, and died Feb- 
ruary 21, 1895, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Henry Vary Walling, son of Reuben and Polly ( Taf t) Walling, was born 
May 31, 1842, in Burrillville, Providence County, Rhode Island, and died Sep- 
tember 13, 1875, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Henry V. Walling and Lydia Grisell were united in marriage September 
27, 1865, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

10 111 KM WERF HORN 

Name Birth Dcilh 

Lewis Grisell Walling January 24, 1867 

Jennie May Walling May 30, 1872 

They were born in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. Walling was raised a farmer, his youth having been spent assisting 
his father with his farm work until the year 1861 when he emigrated to Jay 
County, Indiana. In July of the year following lie went in defense of his 
country, enlisting in Company F, Seventy-fifth Indiana Infantry. He was with 
Sherman's army during his memorable "march to the sea." While in Sher- 
man's army at Kenesaw Mountain he was wounded by the explosion of a shell 
which was probably the cause of his death. However, he remained in the 
service until the close of the war when he was honorably discharged. 

He then returned to Jay County. Indiana, and re-engaged in farming 
and a few months later he and Lydia Grisell were married. They first settled 
on the "old homestead" in Jay County where they remained until 1875 when 
Mr. Walling purchased property adjoining Pennville. He lived but a short 
time after they moved to their new home. Subse(iuentl\ Mrs. Walling erected 
a fine substantial residence on their estate where she lived until iier death 
Mrs. Walling was a member of the Society of Friends. She was of Welsh and 
English descent. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walling were both interred in the Friends' Cemetery of 
Pennville. 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 335 

ALBERT AND RACHEL A. (STARBUCK) GRISELL (4) 

Albert Grisell. son of Samuel and Nancy (Whitacre) Grisell, was boin 
|uly lo, 1831, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Rachel Ann Starbuck, daughter of Joseph and Grace ( Lupton ) Starbuck, 
was born February 23, i835_, in Rushsylvania, Logan County, Ohio. 

Albert Grisell and Rachel A. Starbuck, were united in marriage July 7, 
1853, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO I'HEM WERE liORN 

i\uu/i,' Birth D.ath 
Anne Grisell July 13, 1855 



Grace Starbuck Grisell April 1 2, 1857 

Arthur Albert Grisell March 18. 1859 

Mary Hartley Grisell | ^  August i s. 1861 

^ ■' - i wins ^ 

Martha Hiatt Grisell I August 15, 1861 August 18. 1863 

James Starbuck Grisell November 17, 1865 February 16, 1873 

Emma Elizabeth Grisell July 20, 1870 August 22, 1871 

They were all born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. Grisell is of English and Welsh and Mrs. Grisell of Welsh descent. 

Mrs. Grisell's parents were born in the year 181 1 and were both of (Quaker 

parentage. Joseph Starbuck's great grandfather emigrated from Wales in the 

early part of 1700 and settled on Nantucket Island to escape the prosecution of 

the Quakers. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Grisell settled on an unimproved farm 
which was a present from Mr. Grisell's father, and later he gave Mr. Grisell 
another tract of twenty acres which he cleared and improved, living on it until 
1871. He then sold it and purchased one hundred and twenty-eight acres of 
partially improved land in section 35, Penn Township, which he developed into 
one of the best farms in the township. He resided on this farm until 1884 when 
he sold this land and bought his present home in the suburbs of Pennville 
where he is still extensively engaged in farming and stock raising. 

Mr. Grisell, though young when his parents settled in Penn Township, 
has very distinct recollection of the condition of the country at that time. He 
says. -'I remember the first wheat we raised, mother pounded some of it in the 
hcjuiiny block and made some cake. I know I have never eaten cake tliat 
tasted any better than that." They had used corn so long that the change 
to wheat made the cake doubly apiirt-ciated. 

Mrs. Grisell, to whom we are indebted for tlie greater part of tliis family 
history, gave us a good description of the "hominy block" which is well worth 
recording as it is a household article that is seldom heard of in the twentieth 
century. She said, --This was a block sawed from the trunk of a tr( !■ and set 
upon the ground or floor and t\\v. end dug out so as to form a deep hollow in 
the middle. Then they used a pestle or stick of timber with which they pounded 



336 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

the- corn tor hnad." Wc might add that after thu hnest was sifted out it was 
used for bread, tire next grade was used for musli while the coarsest was used 
for honiinx'. What mill of uiodern invention can produce more of a variety from 
one hopper ? 

Mr. Grisell also remembers, as many of the old settlers do, what was 
called the "squirrel year." Before they had gathered their corn, or before it 
was ripe, the squirrels passed through the country towards the Ohio river by the 
thousands and gathered all the corn and everything they could find to eat. 
The settlers killed as many as they could but they could not diminish the 
number enough to even frighten them, and they finished their work completely 
before they went on their way. That was a very discouraging condition to 
battle against for they depended on the corn for their bread. 

In the fall of 1876 Mr. Grisell was elected to the office of County Treas- 
urer and served as such until 1878. In 1890 he was elected School Trustee in 
which capacity' he served five years. These offices were filled with the dignity 
and honesty which has always been characteristic of him. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell are active members of the Friends' Society, and as 
citizens of Penii Township they have deserved and received the highest degree 
of respect. It has been truly said, "If every man would help to improve and 
advance the town as Albert Grisell has it would soon be a city." As it is he 
has the satisfaction of enjoying most all of the modern improvements and a 
rapidly advancing town of nearly one thousand inhabitants, and he must feel a 
certain pleasure in the fact that he has been instrumental in transforming what 
was a vast wilderness when he first landed there to a splendid inland town 
which has no superior among others of the same population, in business facili- 
ties and beauty of location. 

Grace Grisell lives with her parents in Pennville. Beside her coinmon 
school education she attended college at Liber and was a student of the Port- 
land and Dublin, Indiana, high schools. She lias also studied music and is 
spoken of as a very capable and accomplished woman. She is a member of the 
Christian Church. 



WILLIAM W. AND MARY J. (GRISELL) HARTLEY (4) 

Mary Jane Grisell, daughter of Samuel and Ann (Whitacre) Grisell, was 
born AuL;ust 6, 1833, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio, and died 
December 14, 1.S59, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

William W. Hartley, son of Samuel and Deborah (Borden) Hartley, was 
born January 8, 1832, in Montgomery County, Ohio, and died April 17, igoi, 
near Pennville, |ay County, Indiana. 

William W. Hartley and Mary J. Grisell were united 111 marriage June 
II. 1857, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hartle)- lived in Pennville, Jay Count), Indiana, at the 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 337 

time of her death. She was a birthright member of the Friends' Society and 
was interred in the Friends' Cemetery of Pennville. She was of Welsh and 
English descent. 

Mr. Hartley lived in Ohio during his boyhood where he received a good 
education and when he was not in school he assisted his father in the black- 
smith shop. When sixteen years of age he came to Jay County and a little later 
began to learn the wagonmaker's trade at which he worked as an apprentice 
six years. 

After he purchased land and was engaged in farming he followed the 
carpenter's trade to some extent. 

Mr. Hartley was a very successful business man and enjoyed the deepest 
respect of every one who knew him. He was a member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity. He was of Irish descent. 



WILLIAM AND PRISCILLA (OSBORN) GRISELL (4) 

William Grisell, son of Thomas and Almira (White) Grisell. was born 
March 27, 1817, at Butler, Columbiana County, Ohio, and died August 9, 1853, 
in Granville, Licking County, Ohio. His remains were interred in the Gran- 
ville Cemetery. 

Priscilla Osborn, daughter of Daniel and Lydia (Wood) Osborn, was 
born March 23, 1821, in Morrow County, Ohio, and died February 11, 1893, in 
Toledo, Ohio. Interment in the Friends' Cemetery near Ashley, Delaware 
County, same state. 

William Grisell and Priscilla Osborn were united in marriage March 25, 
1839, in Morrow County, Ohio, Barton Whipple officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Lydia Grisell January 7, 1841 



Milo Pettibone Grisell August 9, 1843 April 13, 1869 

Mary Grisell October 19, 1845 February 10, 1899 

Eliza Amanda Grisell December 4, 1848 

Anna Grisell December 18, 1851 

Lydia was born at South Woodbury, Morrow County, Milo near Ashley, 
Delaware County, Mary (unknown), Eliza, West Bedford, Coshocton County, 
and Anna in Delaware, Delaware County, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell lived in various places in Ohio, he being an itiner- 
ant Methodist Episcopal minister. Some of the places where they lived were 
Keene, Dresden, West ISedford, Martinsburgh, Granville and Delaware, all in 
the state of Ohio. 

Mr. Grisell is very highly spoken of. He was not only truly good, but 
well educated. A man true to his convictions and loyal to his religious belief. 
22 




REV. WILLIAM GRISELL 



RECORD' OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 339 

His was a religion full of pure, sweet goodness and faith in the divine power of 
Christ. During a revival meeting, where he and another minister were holding 
the services, his companion retired after meeting, alone, and he said afterward, 
"Bro. Grisell did not come in until toward day and I found out later that he 
had prayed on nearly every doorstep in the town." 

About 1850, owing to an increased demand for a suitable girls' school in 
Delaware, Ohio, Rev. William Grisell bought an academy building and opened 
a Ladies' Seminary, September, 1850, which he carried on successfully two 
years, when on account of poor health, he sold to an organization effected under 
the name of "The Delaware Female College." A printed card was sent to us, 
which contained the prayer used by Rev. Grisell in concert or otherwise, in his 
school at Delaware, while he was principal instructor as well as pastor. It 
reads as follows: — 

" 'O Lord, most holy! deeply impressed with a sense of my utter help- 
lessness, and my entire dependence on Thy all sufficient grace, I now make a 
full and entire dedication of myself, with all my interests for time and eternity, 
to Thee. My soul, and body, and spirit, I resign without any reserve to Thee, 
my Saviour and my God! To be Thine forever I now most cheerfully take 
Thee, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, to be the portion of my soul, committing 
alike to Thee, and fully trusting all with Thee; relying only and wholly ui)on 
Thy promises. And now from this hour, I esteem myself the Lord's forever- 
O Lord, Thou wilt aid me to keep this covenant, and I will trust in Thee, 
through Jesus Christ, my Redeemer. Amen!' " 

Soon after giving up his school, in Delaware, he lost his voice, and went 
to Granville, Licking County, Ohio, to a water cure establishment, but received 
no benefit, the fatal disease, consumption, having fastened itself upon him. 

Lydia A. (Grisell) Rogers relates a visit she made at the home of her 
Uncle William's after he lost his voice. She said: "The family learned the 
deaf and dumb language, in order to talk freely with Uncle William. It was in 
the summer of 1853, the older members of the family were away, and Lida 
Grisell, thinking to entertain me, took the milk pail and said, 'Let us go and 
see the cows.' She was just milking her favorite cow, and I looking on (we 
were about thirteen or fourteen), when I noticed Uncle William coming down 
the path; with his kindly look and a nod to me, he leaned over the fence and 
began the silent hand talk to his daughter, then turned toward the house. I 
asked her what he said, and she quickly replied, ' He says, I should not come 
out to milk, when I have company.' I felt honored by this attention to me, and 
watched his straight, tall figure and firm step, as he returned to the house. He 
wore a lounging coat and cap, which he had donned on his return from town. 
When we entered the house, he was lying on the sofa, eagerly relating to his 
wife, Priscilla (with the hand language) some pleasing incidents of the day, 
to which she was silently replying, and they were laughing together over ihcm. 
That was the last time I ever saw him." 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell's daughter Eliza says: "In mother's journal, about 
the time of father's death, I find the following: 'On this page I begin a new 



340 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

era in my journal. I have been' called to part with my loved husband. While 
he tunes his harp in glory I sorrow alone. He was an example of patience 
under affliction, of meekness, of quiet submission to the will of God, and the 
season of his sickness seemed peculiarly sweet to us. There was such a hal. 
lowed sweetness about his bed that I could not bear to leave it.'" 

Thus we see the fortitude and sweet obedience in which she accepted the 
divine will of the Master. With her five children, the youngest a baby, she 
Went to work and through sewing and teaching a class of neighbors' children 
provided for her little family until they reached manhood and womanhood. 
She also had time for the temperance cause for which she was an enthusiastic 
worker. Later in life she exercised an acceptable gift in the ministry and was 
acknowledged as a minister in the Friends' Society, providing herself "a work- 
man that needeth not be ashamed." 

She was living at the home of her youngest daughter, Annie (Grisell) 
Donnan, in Toledo, Ohio, at the time of her death. 

NATHAN AND CYNTHIA (BENEDICT) GRISELL (4) 

Nathan Grisell, son of Thomas and Almira (White) Grisell, was born 
January ig, i8ig, near Butler, Columbiana County, Ohio, and died November 7, 
1844, in Fitchville, Huron County, Ohio. Interment in the Friends' Cemetery 
at Greenwich, Huron County, Ohio. 

Cynthia Benedict, daughter of Aden S. and Sarah (Gidley) Benedict, was 
born August 26, 1821, at Alum Creek, Delaware County, Ohio, and died August 
10, 1863, in Alum Creek, Delaware County. Ohio. Interment in cemeterj- of 
that place. 

Nathan Grisell and Cynthia Benedict were united in marriage January 31, 
1839, in Friends' Meeting, at Alum Creek, Delaware County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Lydia Ann Grisell January 10, 1840 

Harvey Grisell October 12, 1842 November 7, 1850 

They were born in Woodburv, near Bennington P. O., Morrow County, 
Ohio, 

Harvey died at Alum Creek, Ohio, and was buried in Friends' Cemetery 
of Alum Creek. 

The following sketch of the life of Mr. and Mrs. Grisell was contributed 
by their daughter, Lydia A. (Grisell) Rogers: — 

"Nathan Grisell, after obtaining what education he could at that time, 
apprenticed himself to learn the cabinet maker's trade not far from his father's 
liome near Alum Creek, Delaware Count}', Ohio. He was a read}' hand with 
tools and had an artist's eye for measurement. At nineteen years of age his 
employer said some of his work was better than he himself had done. The 
only machine tluy used was a small turning lathe. Many of his pieces of 



RKCORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 34I 

furniture are in use in tlu' vicinity of the old home at the present time (1901). 

"Mr. Grisell was a member of the Society of Friends, as were all his 
father's family, and was devoted to their interests. His writings show much 
affection toward them. In his religious and moral views he was very strict, yet 
he was generally liked by all who knew him. 

"His affection and love was early centered on Cynthia Benedict. She 
was of a modest and retiring disposition, returning his attention with full ap- 
preciation. His expressions of thankfulness at her recovery from a serious 
illness show his trust in the Divine power, also his confession to her of way- 
wardness in thought and joy that the right way had been shown him. 

"The following extracts are from letters written to her: — 

" '6th mo. 3rd, 1838. I feel free to pen a few lines for thy perusal, 
hoping it may be useful to our seeking after that pure love which comes from 
the Father of Mercies. First let me tell thee that however short I may be of 
strict adherence to the Light of life, yet it is my joy to feel the consoling 
presence of a Savior and his holy, harmonious influence inspiring the mani- 
festations of His peace in my soul.' 

" 'nth mo. 23d, 1838. [after asking her hand] My Dear Cynthia: 
Recollect it is an engagement which is to last during life and should be seriously 
considered and entered into without the least shadow of an objection in the 
mind. It is evident that where this is the case, and the parties keep to the 
spirit of love, it certainly must be the sole consummation of their earthly happi- 
ness. If thou hast anything to write I would receive it with a thankful, 
joyful heart. Thy loving and faithful friend, Nathan Grisell.' 

"After their marriage, they located in Woodbury not far from Alum 
Creek, Delaware County, Ohio, where he built a workshop and with his as- 
sistants kept the sound of hammer, plane, lathe and chisel going, turning out 
many finely finished pieces of furniture. 

"While their oldest child was a baby the shop took fire and nothing 
could save it, and it was only through the persistent efforts of friends and 
neighbors holding drenched blankets from the roof that the little home was 
saved. This was a serious loss to the young man, but the same friends with 
others rallied around him and he soon had another shop on the ground. 

"I well remember going from the shop with shavings in my apron across 
the sitting room floor and tossing them into the fireplace, which resulted in 
burning both of my hands, and of sitting on the bed, looking into the faces of 
father and mother as each one wrapped a hand with soothing remedies. 
Some of the scars show yet. 

"During his attendance at Friends' Yearly Meeting, which was held one 
week, and to which he had gone overland, taking four days to make the journey, 
lie wrote the following letter to his wife: — 

" 'ist of loth mo., 1842, Richmond, Indiana. 

" 'To My Dear Wife: Knowing that thee will be interested in having a 
small detail of our journey I will write a few lines. 4tli day morning we wen' 
'nto the city and to the meeting house where were six thousand people or mo 



342 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

assembled. 5th day commenced the meeting of the Y. M. The meetings are 
attended all day by many friends. 7th day Henry Clay is in Richmond. There 
are more people gathered than I ever saw before, without any exception. There 
are to be two public meetings tomorrow. Henry Clay will be there we expect. 

I should be glad to know how you are and more than willing to 

see those three which are most dear to me. My dear, if thee could only be here 
to attend this Y. M. ; it is an interesting time. Parents are admonished to be 
careful and bring up their children in the nurture and admonition of the Lord. 
Tell, my dear little Lydia Ann, that papa has got the little book that he told 
her he would when he started away, and if I live to get home I will bring it to 

her Today the subject of establishing a manual labor school 

here, instead of a boarding, was brought up The subject of 

abolition was brought up; some members were set aside who were considered 
as no longer suitable for responsible stations on account of their anti-slavery 
movements, the reading of which produced a stir, which lasted one hour, many 
speaking at once. It was a trying time to feel the spirit that was manifested. 
Third day morning. We are all well; our meeting will come to a close today. 
We will go to Jay County for a short visit. Tell the tailor's wife that her father 
and mother are well Time forbids that I should write more; have got to shave 
and grease the wagon before meeting. No more at present, but desires for thy 
present and eternal welfare and also of the dear little ones, which are com- 
mitted to our care.' 

"In the year of 1843, Nathan Grisell removed his family to Fitchville, 
Huron County, Ohio, and located his shop there, where there was a greater de- 
mand for his work. He was very busy and perhaps worked too hard, yet he 
did not neglect attending divine worship or reading his Bible, and would sit on 
Sabbath afternoons with his little daughter on one knee and his large Bible on 
the other, reading aloud, while she tried to understand. He also went with his 
wife to attend a course of phrenological lectures, by a man from Oberlin 
College, Ohio. 

"Mr. Grisell was very successful in his sales of furniture in the new 
place, and all went well, until by exposure he was taken with chills, and a good 
nurse, his mother-in-law, was sent for and the best of medical skill was em- 
ployed, yet he continued to grow worse, and they had to give up hope of his 
recovery. He gave Harvey Benedict charge of his affairs and was very sensible 
of his situation. His hardest trial was Cynthia and the children, what would 
become of them? But he commended them all in prayer to the divine hand. 
Shortly before his death, while in great pain, he recited the following lines: — 

" 'Jesus, my all, I know his name, 

His name is all my trust, 
He will not put my soul to shame, 

Nor let my soul be lost. 
Jesus can make a dying bed 

Feel soft as downy pillows are, 
While on his breast I lean my head 

And breathe my life out sweetly there.' 



RECORD OF THE GRISRLL FAMILY 343 

"Soon after this he fell asleep, never to waken more. His daughter, 
five years old, saw the white draped form in the morning. 'Twas all so 
strange — papa gone! She had sat under his bench, he had covered her with 
white shavings, and had shown her in the great carding machine how the wool 
was made into rolls; he had taken her hand and little brother's, walking in the 
meadow, stopping to examine a bright striped snake, and tell them it would not 
bite but some snakes would.- In short, he made companions of his children 
and his influence was not lost. 

"His wife was overcome with grief with the feeling of loneliness, which 
is best expressed in the following lines, written by an intimate friend, and 
treasured by her throughout her life: — 

" 'Desist, ye warbling songsters gay, 
Ye tulips bloom no more, 
Ye green leaves wither and decay, 
The days of joy are o'er. 

Sing on, sad plaintive turtle dove, 

Ye murmuring streamlets roar; 
Flow on, ye streams of sorrow, fiow. 

My Nathan breathes no more.' 

"After her husband's death Cynthia Grisell returned to her mother, who 
was then also a widow (Cynthia's father having been stricken down by the 
measles). There, in the old cabin on the farm and in the little home by the 
mill, she spent the years of her widowhood in company with her children until 
1850, when the scarlet fever took her eight year old boy, and he was laid away 
at Alum Creek. 

"Cynthia Benedict's mother was a daughter of Wm. Gidley, a Quaker, 
who brought his family to Ohio in its early settlement from Saratoga Springs, 
New York, having located at Alum Creek, Delaware County, Ohio, where she 
was born and raised almost to womanhood, amidst a large family of sisters and 
three brothers. Cynthia's father was a son of Reuben Benedict who also came 
to Ohio from the east with his family of three daughters and several sons, three 
of whom married Wm. Gidley's daughters. Both families were of English 
parentage." 



BENJAMIN AND ANGELINE (MARSH) GRISELL (4) 

Benjamin Grisell, son of Thomas and Almira (White) Grisell, was born 
September 25, 1820, in Butler, Columbiana County, Ohio, and died May i \. 
1870, near Nottingham, Wells County, Indiana. His remains were interred 111 
the Friends' Cemetery of Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Angelina Marsh, daughter of Nathan and I'oJIn ( Bishop) Marsh, was 
born March 7, 1831, in Broome County, New \ork, and died September 22, 
1884, in Washington County, Illinois. 



344 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

Benjamin Grisell and Angeline Marsh were united in marriage about 
1848, at Bennington, Morrow County, Ohio. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell hved in Ohio a few years, but removed to Indiana 
sonic time in the late hfties and purchased a farm near Nottingham, Wells 
County, where they lived until after the death of the former. 

Mrs. Grisell was of French descent. Her father was a native of Boston, 
Massachusetts, and her mother of Connecticut. 

Benjamin Grisell was a wheelwright and also farmed to some extent. 
He was truly magnanimous and lived "for the good that he might do." Gen- 
erosity was his most marked characteristic. 

Mr. Grisell was a birthright member of the Friends' Society, and Mrs. 
Grisell a member of the Methodist Church. While they lived near Pagetown, 
Ohio, they attended meeting regularly, and often drove several miles to the 
Red Brick Quaker meeting house at Alum Creek, Ohio. 

The following pleasant account of the life and nature of Benjamin Grisell 
was contributed by a friend, Viola Johnson: — 

"Benjamin Grisell was one of the few people who seem to have no 
trouble. When others laid awake at night to keep the boys from destroj'ing 
their melon patches and peach orchards, 'Uncle Bennie' (as he was known) 
slept undisturbed. He liked all of the boys that he knew, and the boys all 
thought 'Uncle Bennie' one of the best men living. When he planted his 
melons in the spring he always told the boys where the patch was and invited 
tliem to come and eat melons with him as soon as the melons were ripe, and 
the bo)'s knew they would get all they wanted and some to carry home, for 
'Uncle Bennie' always had plenty of melons for all. 

"He was a wheelwright and had an old fashioned turning lathe, with 
which he made chairs, spinning wheels, reels and many other useful house- 
hold articles. One time he made enough wooden toys to present one to each 
of the school children at the home school, then called the Grisell school. He 
took these toys in sacks to the school building and what e.xcitement and hap- 
piness they did cause! There were dolls, rolling pins, potato mashers, tops, 
balls, climbing monkeys, knives and forks, spoons and ladles, all made pretty 
with bright paints of many colors. Each scholar carried home some pretty 
token of 'Uncle Bennie's' love that night, and that day will long be remembered 
by those children, whose hearts were made glad by his kind thoughtfulness of 
them. 

"There was a time, however, when 'Uncle Bennie' did not sleep. In the 
spring when his peach trees — of which he had an abundance — were budding or 
blooming, and the evening bid fair for frost, he would gather the chunks from 
burned log heaps and arrange them in small piles among his trees, and when 
the frosty night came he would set them on fire and watch them all night. 
This together with the precaution of planting them where they w'ould best be 
protected by tlie buildings and the other trees from the cold winds, resulted in 



RECORD OF THE CRISELL FAMILY 345 

a good peach crop every year. He always had peaches, and the children 
always had their share too. 

"He thoroughly enjoyed hunting for game, of which there was an abun- 
dance in that day. Deer, coon, opossum and other wild game were plentiful. 

"At one time Benjamin G. did the work for a man who thought he 
had perfected a patent for a perpetual motion machine. Mr. Grisell worked on 
this according to the man's instruction a long time and it was as large as an 
ordinary sized room. It would run for a while to the man's exceeding gratifica- 
tion and pleasure, then it would stop. He made improvements and changes 
but all were in vain, and at last he gave up the ambition of years." 

While living in Ohio "Uncle Bennie" made a strong little wagon for 
the two small children of his deceased brother Nathan, so they could draw 
wood and chips, of which there was a plentiful supply in the maple woods 
near by, for their mother This wagon would hold almost a bushel of chips, 
and with its help the children, aged four and six years, could supply much 
of the needed fuel for their home. 

Such was his life, always considerate and mindful of the welfare of 
others. 



JOSEPH AND BARBARA A. (QUEEN) GRISELL (4) 

Joseph Grisell, son of Thomas and Almira (White) Grisell, was born 
August 4, 1822, in Butler, Columbiana County, Ohio, and died August — , 1^50, 
in Cincinnati, Ohio. Interment in the cemetery of that place. 

Barbara A. Queen, daughter of William C. and Elizabeth ( ) 

Queen, was born April 2, 1832, in Harrison County, West Virginia. 

Joseph Grisell and Barbara A. Queen were united in marriage November 
— , 1849. at the home of the bride's parents near Cardington, Morrow County, 
Ohio. 

No children. 

After their marriage they lived near Cardington until the next spring 
when they took their horse and buggy and started to Cincinnati, stopping at 
the different towns on their way and giving lectures, thus taking in quite a sum 
of money. On arriving in Cincinnati they went to Mr. Grisell's Aunt Hannah 
Reynolds' home, who received them with the kindest of hospitality. They 
boarded there for some time; also traveled in Kentucky, stopping in the town 
of Maysville, Ohio, where Mr. Grisell gave lectures. He was a very able and 
fluent speaker and lectured on various topics, but the subject of temperance 
claimed most of his attention. He is spoken of as "a nice looking man and a 
conscientious Christian." He was a birthright member of the Friends' Society 
and was gifted with a fine musical voice, which he often used in spite of the 
Friends' scruples concerning music. Later he became a member of the Meth- 
odist Church and had accepted a ministerial charge in Cincinnati and he and 
Mrs. Grisell were preparing to locate there when he was taken sick. 






 


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RFX'ORD OF THE ORISELL FAMILY 347 

After Mr. Grisell's death Mrs. Grisell entered the Delaware school where 
she attended one term. Her present address is Barbara A. Tarr, Los Angeles, 
California. 

JOHN F. AND ALMIRA (GRISELL) MILLER 4) 

Almira Grisell, daughter of Thomas and Almira (White) Grisell, was 
born May 17, 1830, at Jefferson, Richland County, Ohio. 

John Ford Miller, son of John A. and Eliza (Firmyu) Miller, was born 
July 16, 1830, in Ithaca, New York. 

John F. Miller and Almira Grisell were united in marriage August 7, 
1854, in Cardington, Morrow Count}', Ohio. 

TO THEII WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Ida Miller. August 20, 1855 

Kate Miller April 30, 1858 April 22, 1859 

Harry Irving Miller January 12, 1862 

Grace Miller September 12, 1864 July 26, 1894 

Rush Button Miller December 29, 1870 

Ida was born in Zanesville, Muskingum County, Kate and Grace in 
Columbus, Harry I. in Cleveland, Ohio, and Rush D. in Richmond, Indiana. 

Kate died in Columbus, Ohio, and is interred at Richmond, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Miller reside in their handsome and magnificent home, 
surrounded by the beautiful grounds of "Miller's Rhue," in Richmond, Wayne 
County, Indiana. 

Mr. Miller finished his education at Mt. Hesper, Alum Creek, Morrow 
County, Ohio. Mrs. Miller was also a student there, and afterward entered 
West Bedford Academy, Coshocton County, and finished in the Delaware 
Female Seminary, Delaware County, Ohio, where her Uncle William was prin- 
cipal and pastor. 

Mr. Miller is of German Irish descent. Mrs. Miller's mother was a 
native of New Haven, Connecticut, and her father was born in Columbiana 
County, Ohio, of Welsh and English descent. 

They are both members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Miller has held many high and responsible railroad positions, and is 
at present Vice President of the Cleveland, Akron & Columbus Railroad. 

Mr. Miller began his railroad career as a brakeman; he was soon pro- 
moted and became conductor on the C. C. & C. Railroad and since that time 
he has gradually advanced until he held one of the highest positions. At the 
time of the Johnstown flood Mr. Miller and his son Harry, who was a civil 
engineer, personally superintended the reconstruction of the washed out roads 
and bridges, both of them remaining in camp with the workmen until the work 
was completed, which they accomplished in twelve days. 



348 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

During the many absences of her husband, as oftentimes his office was 
necessaril)' many miles away, Mrs. Miller presided over their home, looking 
after its best interests, and Mr, Miller's weekly home coming was a source of 
joy to the family. Their beautiful home, "Miller's Rhue," was the scene of 
man}' pleasant events, in which Mrs. Miller's presence and cheerfulness were 
manifest. Mr. and Mrs. T^liller have given their family the bust of advantages 
of travel and education. About 1882 they sent their daughter Ida on an ocean 
voyage with a friend to benefit her health and complete her studies in Germany. 
She remained in Germany most of the time. In 1883 Mrs. Miller and her two 
youngest children took a trip to Europe, Mr. Miller accompanying them as far 
as New York City. During their stay in Europe their youngest daughter, 
Grace, studied the French language under a private teacher. 

"Miller's Rhue" is well known in and around Richmond, Indiana. It is 
like one beautiful park of several acres and is divided by the Whitewater river, 
which adds to the magnificence of the grounds. Mr. Miller had a little rustic 
log cabin built and fitted up where he has a vahiable collection of curiosities of 
art and nature. 

Rush D. Miller finished his education in the college at Crawfordsville, 
Indiana. He was united in marriage to Nellie King. He was manager of a 
hotel at Atlantic City, New Jerse}^ for some time, but their present address is 
Buffalo, New York. After diligent effort we were unable to gather any more 
information concerning this family. 

HUGH H. AND RACHEL (GRISELL) IREY (4) 

Rachel Grisell, daughter of Thomas and Almira (White) Grisell, was 
born March 29, 1832, in Richland County, Ohio, and died November 17, 1880, 
in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Interment at Dansville, Ingham County, Michi- 
gan. 

Hugh Hilles Ire}', son of Jonah and Rebecca (Hilles) Irey. was born 
September 28, 1830, in Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Hugh H. Irey and Rachel Grisell were united in marriage April 6, 1854, 
at the home of the bride's grandfather White, near Pennville, Jay County, 
Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

AYaiiii- Birtli Dtatli 

Volney Francois Irey January 4, 1855 

Viola Fordham Ire}' November 19. 1856 

William Chalkley Irey* November 13. 1858 

Ralph Grisell lrL\- October g, i860 

They were all born near Pennville, Jay County. Indiana. 
Mr. and Mrs. Irey located near Pennville. Ja\- County. Indiana, after 
their marriage. 

♦Afterward chiinj^fil to Charles W. 



S50 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

Mr. Irey is of German descent. His great grandfather emigrated from 
Germany and the name Irey was formerly spelled E3'erich. 

The following sketch of the life of Rachel (Grisell) Irey was kindly con- 
tributed for the Record: — 

"Rachel Grisell was the youngest daughter of Thomas and Elmira 
Grisell, whose family moved to Delaware County, Ohio, and settled on a farm 
near Alum Creek. She was quite young when deprived of a mother's care, 
yet, with the help of her father, brothers and sisters, she received an educa- 
tion in the district school and taught for some time in the public schools. 
Later on, through the help of her brother William, she was enabled to enter 
Oberlin College as a pupil, where she was under the influence of President 
Fairchild, who has made Oberlin what it is today. Leaving there she took up 
teaching again in Ohio, and later went to Jay Count}', Indiana, making her 
home with her grandfather White's family and teaching until her marriage. 

•'Mr. Irey was just improving a new farm in the woods near Pennville, 
and they were happy in their cabin home. There their four children were born 
and Mrs. Irey devoted herself to the care of the house and best interests of 
the little family, trying to make the most of life in love and cheerfulness." 

Soine notes from her diary, now in possession of her daughter, Viola F. 
Beall, may not be amiss: — 

March 31, 1857. — Hilles and I had a happy evening together. How 
much cheerfulness and smiles smooth the rugged pathway of life. 

April I. — I have been impatient today, was irritated at the children's 
mischief. O, the patience and calnmess a mother needs. 

April 4. — How glad I was today to get sister Elmira's letter. 

April 5. — This evening I read a good piece about, "How to make home 
attractive and pleasant to children." Enter into their little plays, giving them 
privileges so far as right, and get interesting books for them to read when thej' 
are large enough 

April 7. — O, how much I want to be a good example to my children. 
This must now be the warfare of my life. Far from it, I have been. 

October 14. — Hilles and I have been to Father Irey's to gather our win- 
ter apples. They have given them to us. O, how kind they are. 

November i. — I would be happy had I not said something this morning 
for which I am sorry. O, when will I learn to guard my speech? 

November 4. — Today I feel discouraged; some of the trials of life seem 
hard to endure. I nearly wonder sometimes if the enjoyments of eternity will 
reward; then the echo comes, "it will be as we please to make it." 

November 5. — Yes, I am glad to live, though there are thorns there are 
sweet roses too. 

November 15. — We have been on a visit to Father Irey's. They were 
glad to see us all. O! what nice bread and butter, honey and baked apples. 
We had a good visit. On the way home we stopped to see cousins Emily and 
Martha Lewis. How good it seems to be at home. "Be it ever so humble, 
there is no place like home." 



RECORD OF THE (;RISELL FAMILY 351 

December 6. — I felt disappointed today; father and mother Irey did not 
come. It was too stormy. 

December 7. — The children and 1 are alone. How great is the demand 
for sympathy, kindness and forbearance toward them. Their active limbs are 
always busy, therefore they should be supplied with entertainment suitable for 
their active minds. 

"Give it play and never fear it, 

Active life is no defect. 
Never, never break its spirit, 
Curb it only to direct. 

December 15. — It would be a relief to me if I could unbosom my thoughts 
on paper or if I had the gift to scatter them in oratory to the inhabitants of the 
earth. I long to see truth prevail, mankind purified for a higher life. Joyful 
thought, that we are to live forever, near to the fountain of all living truth. I 
can say with one of old, "O Lord, cleanse thou me from secret faults." O that 
my life and example may be also pure. 

December 25. — Christmas, Brother Benjamin and wife were here, they 
stayed the evening; we had a good time. We ate apples, read and talked about 
Women's Rights. 

January i, 1858. — Mother Irey is sick, I am with her. Hilles is at home 
alone; I am anxious about him. 

Januaiy 4. — Hilles came after me Sunday. I did not like to leave mother. 

January 26. — Our little daughter came very near getting choked on a 
chicken bone. We were very much alarmed. 

February 2. — A deep snow is on the ground, everything is carpeted with 
its white drapery. 

January 14. — Father and inotlier have not 'come yet. Hilles has gone 
down. 

January 15. — Hilles and mother came at noon, and ()! we were so glad. 
I wish father would come and they would stay with us. The children are full 
of mischief, but as pretty as ever. What beautiful Howers they are; how could 
we live without them? 

January 17. — Mother is still with us and we are liaving a pleasant time. 

January 24. — How natural for people to despond at times when the 
brightest paths seem darkened. I want to resist such feelings. It is right to 
be thoughtful and sober, but not sad and gloomy, for that causes others to be 
unhappy. We should try to be cheerful, not only for our own happiness, but 
those with whom we associate. 

June 13. — The clouds are dispelled, the orb of light appears, the birds 
sing their sweetest songs, the green trees seem to wave a gentle welcome as 
their foliage spreads above the dripping earth. 

March 29, 1862. — Five years ago I attempted to keep a diar\', but in- 
creasing care prevented after two years. 1 am now thirty years of age and the 
mother of four darling children. 



352 RECORD OF THE GRISEI.I, FAMILY 

This much of her own thought has been selected, that her family devo- 
tion, love for children and friends might be apparent as well as her poetic 
nature and longings for better and higher living. 

Her children lived to call her blest. Her influence extends through 
them to their children. 

Soon after the last date Hilles Irey enlisted in the civil war. [Some of 
us were familiar with those days of anxiety.] She managed the farm, with the 
help of neighbors, saving the money which he sent home and adding it to the 
sale of stock until Mr. Irey was mustered out at the close of the war. The 
next year they sold the farm and opened a store in Pennville, where they lived 
several years. 

Mrs. Irey's health being poor, she hoped for an improvement by remov- 
ing to Michigan, which proved beneficial, but did not last, as in a few years 
she passed away. Her daughter and two sons were with her at the time of 
her death. 

Mrs. Irey was an advocate of women's suffrage, and had embraced Spirit- 
ualism for several years, still the Quaker teachings and Baptist principles were 
dear to her heart. 

Mr. Irey lives at Salina, Kansas, at the present time, igo2. 

THOMAS J. AND MARY J. (MERRIT> GRISELL (4) 

Thomas J. Grisell, son of Thomas and Susannah (Shaw) (Benedict) 
Grisell, was born October 3, 1851, at Shaw Creek, near Cardington, Morrow- 
County, Ohio. 

Mary Jane Merrit. daughter of and ( ) Merrit, w^as 

born February- , 1852, in Mobile, Alabama, and died April — , 1889, in Find- 
laj-, Ohio. Interment in Maple Grove Cemetery of the same place. 

Thomas J. Grisell and Mar)' J. Merrit were united in marriage , 

1871, near Cardington, Morrow County, Ohio. 

TO THEJNI WERE BORN 

Name Birfh Death 

Lulu May Grisell November 10, 1874 

Olive Cordelia Grisell May 28, 1876 

The}' were born near Cardington. Morrow Count\', Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell located near Cardington, Ohio, where they lived 
several years. Later they removed to Findla}' of the same state, where they 
lived until the latter's death. 

Mrs. Grisell was but two vears of age when her parents moved from 
Mobile, Alabama, to Galveston. Texas. Her father enlisted in the civil war, 
during which he lost his life, no trace of him ever having been found. Her 
mother died when Mary Jane was young, and she came north and was adopted 
by Mrs. Eliza (Firmyu) Miller, who lived on a farm near Cardington, Ohio. 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 353 

Mr. Grisell has followed the railroad business most of his life. After 
Mary J. Grisell's death he was again married. 

THOMAS J. AND MARY L. (GERTH) GRISELL (4) 

Mar\' L. Gerth, daught-er of and ( ) Gerth, was 

born , , in Gallon, Ohio. 

Thomas J. Grisell and Mar}' L. Gerth were united in marriage February 
22, 1894, in Gallon, Crawford County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Diatli 

Amy Louise Grisell August 3, 1895 

She was born in Gallon, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell reside in Gabon, Ohio, and own a large farm near 
that city. 



HOWARD AND MARGARET (JOHNSON) CADWALLADER (4) 

Margaret Johnson, daughter of Benjamin and Martha (Grisell) Johnson, 
was born June 13, 1820, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Howard Cadwallader, son of Reese and Hannah (Dillin) Cadwallader, 
was born April 22, 1818, at Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio, and died 
August 3, 1895, in Richmond, Wayne County. Indiana. Interment in Earlham 
Cemetery. 

Howard Cadwallader and Margaret Johnson were united in marriage 
September 30, 1841, in the New Garden Friends' Meeting, Columbiana County, 
Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Reese Johnson Cadwallader. . . . June 27, 1842 

Edwin Charles Cadwallader. .. . February 13, 1844 February 26, 1865 

John Howard Cadwallader. ... January 20, 1846 May 18, 1874 

Charles Cadwallader July 3, 1849 July 10, 1849 

Benjamin Perry Cadwallader. . . August 6, 1851 November 2, 1851 

Mary Emma Cadwallader April 6, 1854 

Martha Elma Cadwallader August 10, 1858 

The four oldest children were born in Salem, Columbiana County, Oliio, 
and the three youngest in Richmond. Wayne County, Indiana. 

Charles died and was buried at Salem, Ohio, and Edwin C. , Jolin II. 
and Benjamin P. died in Richmond, Indiana, and w<,re buried in Earlliam 
Cemetery. 

23 



354 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

Edwin was a student in the Salem Academy, and John H. attended the 
Richmond high school and Earlham College. 

Mary E. finished her education in the high schools of Richmond and has 
been a faithful and loving daughter, caring for her mother many years. She is 
a member of the Society of Friends (orthodox branch). 

Mr. and Mrs. Cadwallader lived in Salem, Ohio, several years, where 
he was engaged in contracting and building. In 1849 they removed to Rich- 
mond, Indiana, where Mrs. Cadwallader still resides. She is now eighty-two 
years of age and an exceptionally bright and sweet lady. Her pleasant manner 
invites approach and manifests her Quaker origin. 

She taught school in the neighborhood of New Garden three terms in 
the "early days." She is a member of the Orthodox Friends' Society, as were 
all her people. They were strict in their religious belief and allowed no "music 
and finery." 

Mr. Cadwallader was a member of the Orthodox Friends' Society. He 
lived at Zanesville, the place of his birth, until 1839, when he went to Salem, 
Ohio. He was of Welsh descent, and in his political views he was a Republican. 



BENJAMIN AND SARAH A. (JOHNSON, HOBSON (4) 

Sarah Ann Johnson, daughter of Benjamin and Martha (Grisell) John- 
son, was born November 21, 1823, near New Garden, Columbiana Count}-, 
Ohio, and died January 29, 1888, in Pasadena, California. Interment near the 
same place. 

Benjamin Hobson, son of Joseph and Rebecca (Talbot) Hobson, was 
born May 13, 1823, in Stark County, Ohio, and died January 31, 1863, near 
Richmond, Jefferson Count}', Ohio. 

Benjamin Hobson and Sarah A. Johnson were united in marriage April 
26, 1850, in Friends' Meeting at New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Edwin T. Hobson April 5, 1851 February 11, 1897 

Thomas Chalkley Hobson January 24, 1853 July 24, 1872 

Martha Ann Hobson November 28, 1854 Deceased 

John A. Hobson November 6, 1859 

They were born in Richmond, Jefferson County. Ohio. 

Thomas died near Damascus, Columbiana County, and Martha Ann near 
Richmond, Jefferson County, Ohio. 

Mr. Hobson's parents were married in Friends' Meeting, March 18, 1813, 
in Frederick County, Maryland. His grandmother Hobson was of Scotch de- 
scent. Mr. Hobson was a good Christian man, 



RECORD OF THE ORISELL FAMILY 355 

Mr. and Mrs. Hobson were members of the Society of Friends. The 
latter is spoken of as a fine woman. She was left a widow when her children 
were young, but was a brave spirit and always faithful in her duties to her 
family. She was faithful to her God in all ways as far as light and knowledge 
were hers. 



THOMAS AND MARTHA (BINFORD) JOHNSON (4) 

Thomas Johnson, son of Benjamin and Martha (Grisell) Johnson, was 
born November 17, 1825, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Martha Binford, daughter of Aquilla and Mariam ( ) Binford, waS 

born October 3, 1826. 

Thomas Johnson and Martha Binford were united in marriage 



TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

William B. Johnson Deceased 

John H. Johnson 

Emma Johnson Deceased 

Aquilla Johnson 

William B. and Emma J. died in and were interred in the 

cemetery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Johnson located in soon after their marriage, 

where they were engaged in farming and stockraising. 

At present Mr. Johnson is engaged in stock buying at Manhattan, 
Kansas. 

John H. Johnson lives in Alliance. Stark County, Ohio, and Aquilla in 
Sebring, Mahoning County, Ohio. 

After diligent inquiry, no further information could be obtained. 



EZRA AND MARY (JOHNSON) FRENCH (4) 

Mary Johnson, daughter of Benjamin and Martha (Grisell) Johnson, 
was born November 11, 1827, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Ezra French, son of Barzillai and Mary (Yates) French, was born 
November 22, 1820, in Damascus, Columbiana County, Ohio, and died Septem- 
ber 22, iSgg, at the place of his birth. His remains were interred in the 
Friends' Cemetery of that place. 

Ezra French and Mary Johnson were united in marriage September 30, 
1863, in New Garden, Friends' Meeting, Columbiana County, Ohio, 



356 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

A'ntnc Birth Death 

Benjamin J. French July 1 1, 1866 

Mary Isabella French Ngvember 18, i86g 

The}' were born near Damascus, Columbiana County. Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. French were located on the "old French homestead" after 
their marriage, where Mr. French was engaged in farming many j'ears. In i8g8, 
on account of his failing health, he sold the farm and purchased a home in the 
village of Damascus, and a short time afterwards '-he was taken to his eternal 
home," leaving a testimony of a good, practical Christian life. 

Mr. French's father was a native of New Jersey and his mother of Vir- 
ginia, of English descent. They settled near Damascus in i8ro. They were 
members of the Orthodox Friends' Society, were given to hospitalit}', and true 
friends to the negroes, often aiding them in escaping from slavery. 

Mr. French was alwaj's on the side of the oppressed, using his influence 
against the legalized liquor traffic and in every way endeavoring to elevate 
humanity. 

Mr. and Mrs. French were both members of the Orthodox Friends' Society. 



SAMUEL A. AND ELIZABETH M. JOHNSON) BINFORD (4) 

Elizabeth Meader Johnson, daughter of Benjamin and Martha (Grisell) 
Johnson, was born August i, 1830, near New Garden, Columbiana Count}', 
Ohio. 

Samuel .Alfred Binford, son of Joseph and Margaret (Ladd) Binford, was 
born January 13, 1829, near Richmond, Charles City County, Virginia. 

Samuel A. Binford and Elizabeth M. Johnson were united in marriage 
October i, 1856, in Friends' Meeting at New Garden, Columbiana County, 
Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Albert Judson Binford August 5,1857 

Parker Willis Binford August 10, 1858 June 8, 1861 

Oliver Clarkson Binford Januarj' 8, 1861 August 29, 1863 

Benjamin Johnson Binford.... November 5, 1863 

Martha Josephine Binford July 27, 1865 

Howard Alfred Binford April 17. 187 1 

They were all born near Damascus, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Parker W. and Oliver C. died near Damascus, Columbiana County, 
Ohio, and were interred in the cemetery of that place. 

Mr. and Mrs. Binford settled on a farm near Damascus, Ohio, after their 
marriage, where they were engaged in farniing many years, and where they still 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 357 

reside. They are both loyal members of the Friends' Society. Mrs. Binford 
says, "I am thankful for godly parents, and a home of peace and plenty; also 
a happy married life, with good and loving children." 

Mr. Binford's parents settled in Columbiana County, Ohio, in 1830. Mr. 
Binford is and has been a great sufferer for many years. 

Howard A. was a student in the Damascus, Ohio, Academy and after- 
ward attended Elliott's Business College, in Burlington, Iowa, one year. How- 
ard A. Binford was united in marriage to Carla Cole, March 14, 1900, at the 
home of the bride's parents in Pierre, Hughes County, South Dakota. She is 
of English descent. 

BENJAMIN AND ELIZABETH (BARKER) JOHNSON (4) 

Benjamin Johnson, son of Benjamin and Martha (GriseD) Johnson, 
was born January 26, 1833, in Columbiana County, Ohio, two miles north of 
where the New Garden Friends' Meeting House then stood. 

Elizabeth Barker, daughter of Matthew and Ruth (Anthony) Barker, 
was born January 9, 1827, on the Island of Nantucket, and died September 10, 
1887, in Richmond, Wayne County, Indiana. Interment in the Earlham Cem- 
etery. 

Benjamin Johnson and Elizabeth Barker were united in marriage 



November 4, 1857, in the Friends' Yearly Meeting House, north of the railroac', 
in Richmond, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birtli Death 

Thomas Edward Johnson August 9, 1859 September g, 1859 

Benjamin Franklin Johnson. . .. June 21, 1864 P'ebruary 27, J865 

John Howard Johnson August 2, 1866 . . 

Mary Amy Johnson January 28, 1869 

They were born in Richmond, Indiana. Thomas E. and Benjamin F. 
died at their birthplace, and were buried in Earlham Cemetery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Johnson located in Richmond, where they made their per- 
manent home, most of the time living in their handsome residence on Eleventh 
Street, where Mr. Johnson resides at the present time. 

Mrs. Johnson's parents were born and reared at Newport, Rhode Island, 
where they were married in Friends' Meeting. Subsequently they removed to 
Richmond, Indiana, where they lived until their death. They were buried in llie 
Earlham Cemetery. 

Benjamin Johnson remained witii his parents on the farm until 1854, as- 
sisting with the farm work and attending school during the winter months, tiie 
last four years being spent in a private school, conducted by Prof. (Calvin 
Moore, at Salem, Ohio. 

In September, 1854, he came to Richmond, Indiana, the first time, and 
was so well pleased with the town that he resolved to make it his future homt>. 



358 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

He had little capital, but soon arranged to go into the lumber business on a 
small scale, which enterprise he has since developed into larfi;e proportions. 

In 1858, in connection with B. P. Perry, he established a lumber yard 
and saw mill, and a few years later purchased his partner's interest, continuing 
in the general retail lumber trade in connection with furnishing lumber and 
ties to the railroad company. In 1874, however, he disposed of his retail inter- 
est and continued to furnish material to the railroad company, for this branch 
of liis business has become very large. 

In 1893 he admitted his son, John H. Johnson, to partnership in the 
business, which is now conducted under the firm name of B. Johnson & Son, 
and their business has increased until now they furnish from one million to one 
and half million ties and three to four million feet of lumber annually, principal- 
ly to the Pennsylvania lines west of Pittsburg. 

Although Mr. Johnson has led an active business life, he has also found 
time to promote the interests of the Society of P'riends, of which he was a birth- 
right member. He has held important offices, being an overseer and elder for 
many years in the South Eighth Street Friends' Meeting. In addition to this he 
has been an active worker in other lines, having been a member of the Board of 
Trustees of Earlham College since 1892, also a member of the Foreign Mission 
Committee of Indiana Yearly Meeting since 1890. 

Mr. Johnson is an extensive traveler, having traveled over most of the 
United States, besides trips across the ocean where he enjoyed the scenery and 
climate of the Old World. 

CHARLES AND ELIZA M. (MARLOW) JOHNSON (4) 

Charles Johnson, son of Benjamin and Martha (Griscll) Johnson, was 
born January 11, 1835, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Eliza M. Marlow, daughter of and ( ) 

Marlovv, was born , , in and 

died , , 1900, near Salem, Columbiana Count}', Ohio. 

Charles Johnson and Eliza M. Marlow were united in marriage Septem- 
ber 22, 1858, near \'alley, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birtli Death 

Cassius Johnson 

Curtis Johnson 

Rosella Johnson 

Martha Johnson 

Benjamin Johnson 

Edgar Johnson 

Florence Johnson 

I'' rank Johnson Deceased 

All born in Columbiana County, Ohio. 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 359 

Mr. and Mrs. Johnson first located near New Garden, Columbiana Coun- 
ty, Ohio. Mr. Johnson is a veterinary surgeon, and has resided on a small farm 
near Salem, Ohio, for several years. 

Of this family all are married except Edgar. 

Further information concerning this family could not be obtained. 



JOSEPH G. AND SARAH (PENROSE) JOHNSON (4) 

Joseph Grisell Johnson, son of Benjamin and Martha (Grisell) Johnson, 
was born January 2, 1837, at New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Sarah Penrose, daughter of James and Rebecca (Farmer) Penrose, was 
born July 8, 1838, in Pennsville, Morgan County, Ohio. 

Joseph G. Johnson and Sarah Penrose were united in marriage October 
29, 1862, in Friends' Meeting at New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 
Rebecca P. Johnson March g, 1866 



She was born at New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Johnson located at New Garden, where they lived until 
1874, when on the first of April they removed to Grinnell, Poweshiek, County, 
Iowa, and have since been engaged in the book and drug business. 

Mrs. Johnson says, "We were both raised Friends, but since we lived in 
Iowa, having no meeting here, we became members of the Congregational 
Church, by letter, but in feeling the early education stands close by." 

Mrs. Johnson's father, James Penrose, son of Thomas and Sarah Penrose, 
was born July 2, 1803, at Catawissa, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. 
Later her parents moved to Jefferson County, Ohio. 

Her mother, Rebecca Farmer, daughter of John and Mary Farmer, was 
born June 3, 1805, in Augusta, Georgia. Her parents left the South on account 
of their opposition to slavery. Rebecca Farmer was united in marriage to James 
Penrose, August, 1833, in Friends' Meeting near Hanover, Columbiana County, 
Ohio. They settled at Pennsville, Morgan County, Ohio, moved from there to 
Salineville, Columbiana County, Ohio, in 1839, where James Penrose engaged 
in making salt and shipping coal. 



JACOB A. AND MARTHA (JOHNSON) GREEN (4) 

Martha G. Johnson, daughter of Benjamin and Martha (Grisell ) Johnson, 
was born July 20, 1839, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Jacob A. Green, son of John and Mary (Hole) Green, was born Sep- 
tember 24, 1836, near Freeport, Harrison County, Ohio. 



360 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

Jacob A. Green and Martha G. Johnson were united in marriage Feb- 
ruary 29, 1869, in Friends' Meeting, at Damascus, Cohimbiana County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

John Edward Green ^larch 31, 1869 

Benjamin Johnson Green December 18, 1870 

Mary Green . . April 19, 1875 

Elizabeth Green October 20, 1876 

They were born near Freeport, Harrison County, Ohio. 

Benjamin J. is unmarried. He was a student of Mt. Union College, and 
was for Several \ears a civil engineer at Cadiz, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Green have lived in Freeport since their marriage, where 
they were engaged in farming and fruit raising They have a pleasant and 
suburban home overlooking the village, and have now retired from active busi- 
ness life, however, they are much interested in all that is of benefit to humanity. 
Mrs. Green is an active temperance worker, having served several j'ears as pres- 
idint of thi local and district W. C. T. U. She says, "My greatest work 
and chief concern was to train the four children God has given me, to be useful 
men and women. Three of them are happily married and have pleasant homes, 
and all are active in social, business or religious affairs." 

Politicall}-, Mr. Green is a Prohibition-Republican. They are both mem- 
bers of the Orthodo.x Friends' Church. 



JOSEPH A. AND CAROLINE E. (GRISELLE) KERR (4) 

Caroline E. Griselle, daughter of Charles D. and Mary H. (Smith) 
Griselle, was born August 4, 1828, near New Garden, Columbiana County, 
Ohio. 

Joseph A. Kerr, son ol Aaron and Margaret (Nevins) Kerr, was born 

— , , in CaroUton, Carroll County, Ohio, and died August 31, 

190C, in Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Joseph A. Kerr and Caroline E. Griselle were united in marriage April 
17, 1S60. in Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Willis Whittier Kerr August 15,1862 

Joseph Frank Kerr Januarj' 21, 1866 

They were born in Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kerr located in Salem after their marriage, where Mr. Kerr 
was engaged as teller in the Farmers' Bank. He continued in this business un- 
til his death, having been faithful and honest in the discharge of his duties forty 
)'ears. At the time the bank was organized, Joseph Brooks was its president. 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 361 

Mr. Hampson, cashier, and Mr. Kerr, teller. Later the bank changed into the 
Farmers' National Bank, but there were no changes in the forty years of officers, 
except when Mr. Brooks died his son, J. T. Brooks, became president. Mr. 
Kerr had assistants many times, but there could be no promotion for him in that 
bank as long as Mr. Hampson lived and served well. Their salaries were 
raised from time to time, but that was the only recognition of faithful service. 
Mr. Kerr's death was the result of a railway accident. 

"At his death there were universal expressions of regret. He was a per- 
fect gentleman, and just as courteous to the poorest man or woman as to those 
of high standing." 

Politically, Mr. Kerr was a Republican. He was a member of the 
Knights Templars order. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kerr were members of the Presbyterian church. 



CHARLES R. AND ALMIRA (GRISELLE) TABER (4) 

Almira Griselle, daughter of Charles D. and Mary H. (Smith) Griselle, 
was born March 30, 1833, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Charles R. Taber, son of Hon. Moses and Phebe P. ^Swett) Taber, was 

born , , in Vassalboro, Kennebec County, Maine, and 

died November 7, 1868, in Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Charles R. Taber and Almira Grisell were united in marriage July 8, 
1858, in Salem, Columbiana Count}', Ohio. 

TO THE.M WERE BORN 

JVamr Birth Death 
Josephine Taber 



She was born in Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Taber, located in Salem, Ohio, where Mr. Taber was en- 
gaged in the manufacture of mowers and reapers. Politically, Mr. Taber was 
a Republican. He was a member of the Knights Templar order. 

He is spoken of as "talented, well educated, a gentleman in every sense 
of the word. He was public spirited, generous, and kind hearted, hating shams 
and loving the truth. His death was a calamity to his family and a loss to the 
community." 

Mrs. Taber and Josephine are members of the Presbyterian Church. 

Josephine has received a very good education, having graduated from the 
Salem High School, after which she entered the Wellesley College, besides re- 
ceiving the best instruction in music. She is a good pianist and a skillful per- 
former on the pipe organ. At present Cigoi) she is receiving instruction for pub- 
lic library work in Albany, New York, from which she will soon graduate, and 
has an assured and lucrative position offered her as soon as she is ready to ac- 
cept. 



362 RECORD OF THE GRISEU. FAMILY 

CHARLES W. AND ANNIE (GRISELLE) FAUTS U) 

Annie Griselle, daughter of diaries D. and Mary H. (^Smith) Griselle, 
was born February 16, 1838, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Charles W. Fauts, son of Stephen and Eliza Fauts, was born in Hones- 
dale, Pennsylvania. 

Charles W. Fauts and Annie Griselle were united in marriage July 25, 
1864, in Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Subsequently they were legally divorced and she had her maiden name 
restored to herself and children, Paul H. Griselle, born June 3, 1865, and 
Maude E. Griselle, born July 27, 1867. Since that time Annie Griselle has 
lived in Salem, Columbiana Count>', Ohio. She is a member of the Presby- 
terian church. 



ROBERT P. AND FANNIE (GRISELLE) TRIMBLE (4) 

Fannie Griselle, daughter of Charles D. and Mary H. (Smith) Griselle, 
was born June 9, 1848, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Robert Peebles Trimble, son of George and Jane (Peebles) Trimble, 
was born April 24, 1847, in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Robert P. Trimble and Fannie Griselle were united in marriage June 7, 
1 87 1, in Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

TO THKM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Mary Frances Trimble August 17, 1875 January 23, 18S9 

She was born and died in Salem, Ohio. Her remains were interred in 
Hope Cemetery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Trimble have lived in Salem since their marriage where he 
and his brother are proprietors of a large drug establishment. Fie is a Re- 
publican. 

Mr. Trimble's mothi'r, Jane ( Peebles) Trimble, belonged to one of the 
most distinguished families of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. They were people of 
wealth and influence and owned a great deal of the land over which the city 
was built. 

Mr. and Mrs. Trimble are members of the Presbvterian church. 



BENJAMIN P. AND ELIZABETH E. (REYNOLDS) PERRY (4) 

Elizabeth Emily Reynolds, daughter of Samuel and Hannah (Grisell) 
Reynolds, was born December 12, 1831, in New Garden, Columbiana County, 
Ohio. 



RECORD OF THE GRISELI, FAMILY 363 

Benjamin Paddack Perry, son of Joshua Huddy and Lydia (Paddack) 
Perry, was born July 6, 1821, in Cincinnati, Ohio, and died May 2g, 1896, in 
Avon lale, Cincinnati, Ohio. He was interred in the Spring Grove Cemetery, 
near Cincinnati. 

Benjamin P. Perry and Elizabeth E. Reynolds were united in marriage 
June 26, 1850, in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name BirtJi Deciih 
Anna Elizabeth Perry December 5, 1851 

She was born in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Perry located in Cincinnati, where they lived several 
years, afterward moving to Richmond, Indiana, where they remained until 
about 1893, when Mr. Perry having retired from active business they removed 
to Cincinnati to reside with their children, Dr. and Mrs. Fletcher in Avondale, 
one of the beautiful suburbs of that city. 

Mr. Perry was president of the Richmond Machine Works for many 
years. His ancestors were among the early settlers in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

JOHN W. AND MARTHA G. (REYNOLDS) JONES (4) 

Martha Grisell Reynolds, daughter of Samuel and Hannah ((irisell) 
Reynolds, was born April 11, 1833, in New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio, 
and died September 3, 1857, in Indianapolis, Indiana, and was buried in Ciown 
Hill Cemetery of Indianapolis. 

John William Jones, son of William and Catherine (Hamilton) Jones, 
was born February 22, 1833, in , Virginia. 

John W. Jones and Martha G. Reynolds were united in marriage No- 
vember I, 185 1, in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

■rO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth DeatJi 

William Edwin Jones ... , August 17, 1852 June 17, 1876 

Martha Elizabeth Jones December 2, 1853 

They were born in Indianapolis, Indiana. 

William E. died in St. Louis, Missouri, and was interred in the Crown 
Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jones lived in St. "Louis, Missouri, where Mr. |ones was 
engaged in the railroad business. 

FRANKLIN AND LUCINDA (ROCKWELL) REYNOLDS (4) 

Franklin Reynolds, son of Samuel and Hannali (Grisell) K'l \nolds, was 
born August 8, 1836, in Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio, and died October 11, 
1901, in Indianapolis, Indiana. Interment in Crown Hill Cemetery. 



364 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

Lucinda Rockwell, of Terre Haute, Indiana, daughter of and 

( ) Rockwell, was born in . 

Franklin Rt-^'nolds and Lucinda Rockwell were united in marriage 
, iS57- 



TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 



W. E. Reynolds 

Frank R. Reynolds. 



Delia May Reynolds 
Josephine Reynolds. 



They were born in . 

Mr. Reynolds was a Republican in his political views. 

The following sketch ot Mr. Reynolds's life was copied from his death 
notice: — 

"Mr. Reynolds was the oldest active railway official in the city of Indi- 
anapolis and had been in the railroad service in various capacities and with two 
different roads for the last fortj'-si.v years. 

"When little more than a boy he came to this city and obtained a posi- 
tion in the yards of the old Bellefontaine railroad, now the Indianapolis division 
of the Big Four. By natural ability and careful attention to his work he worked 
his way up from one position to the next until he attracted the attention of the 
management of the V'andalia and went into their employ. 

"For the last twenty-one years he had tilled the position of general live 
stock agent of the Pennsylvania and Vandalia for the territory west of Pitts- 
burg. During his railroad service he made numerous fi lends through his gen- 
erous and kind acts, no one who was worthy having ever appealed to him in 
vain. 

"He was one of the charter members of the Indianapolis Board of Trade 
and a member of the Ancient Landmark Lodge, F. and A. M., and the Friends' 
C'hurcii. 

"The immediate relatives who survive him are his wife, si.K children, W. 
E. Reynolds, manager of the Interstate stockyards; Frank R. Reynolds, as- 
sistant general live stock agent of the Pennsylvania: Mrs. Frank Woclier, Miss 
Delia May Reynold.-;, Josephine Reynolds, all of this city, and Mrs. Elizabeth 
Hedges, of Plainlield, Indiana, and three brothers, C. E. Reynolds, of Indian- 
apolis, William Reynolds, of Morristown, and Clark Reynolds, of Irvington; 
also three sisters, Elizabeth E. R. Perry and Mrs. Margaretta Tice, both of 
Cincinnati, and Mrs. M. Cornelia Mendenha, of Morristown, Indiana. 

"The funeral services were held at the home, Rev. A. J. Brown of the 
I'riends' ("hurch officiating." 



RECORD OF THK CRISELL FAMILY 365 

ORCENETH P. AND MARGARETTA (REYNOLDS i TICE (4) 

Margaretta Reynolds, daughter of Samuel and Hannah (Grisell) Rey- 
nolds was born April 12, 1839, in Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Orceneth Fisher Tice, son of John and Caroline (Taulman) Tice, was 
born February 20, 1834, in Rising Sun, Ohio County, Indiana. 

Orceneth F. Tice and Margaretta Reynolds were united in marriage 
February 23, 1864, in Richmond, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name . Birth Dt-ath 

William Fisher Tice March 8, 1865 

Anna Gertrude Tice August 16, 1866 

Arthur Reynolds Tice November 8,1868 , 

Clara Stanton Tice January 20,1871 May 9,1880 

They were all born in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Clara S. died in Cincinnati and was buried in the Spring Grove Ceme- 
tery, of Cincinnati. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tice live at Mt. Auburn, a beautiful suburb of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, that being their residence since their marriage. Mr. Tice is engaged in 
the mercantile business. 

Arthur R. is in the real estate business in Cincinnati. He is unmarried. 



HENRY W. AND MARY C. (REYNOLDS) MENDENHALL (4) 

Mary Cornelia Reynolds, daughter of Samuel and Hannah (Grisell) 
Reynolds, was born P'ebruary 20, 1842, in Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Henry Webster Mendenhall, son of Dr. James Rich and Sarah Terrel 
(Williams) Mendenhall, was born March 9, 1830, in Richmond, Indiana, and 
died August 14, 1891, in Richmond, Indiana. Interment in the Earlham Ceme- 
tery of that place. 

Henry W. Mendenhall and Mary C. Reynolds were united in marriage 
June 2, 1874, in Indianapolis, Indiana. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mendenhall lived in Washington, D. C, eight years where 
the former held a position in the Treasury Department. He was forced to give 
up his position on account of failing health and they returned to their former 
home at Richmond, where they lived until his death. Mrs. Mendenhall has 
since resided with her unmarried brother, William Reynolds, near Morristown, 
Shelby County, Indiana. 



366 RF.CORD OF THF, GRISEI.L FAMILY 

SAMUEL C. AND MARY A. (ASTON) REYNOLDS (4) 

Samuel Clarkson Rejnolds, son of Samuel and Hannali (Grisell) Rey- 
nolds, was born November 14, 1844, in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Mary Alice Aston, daughter of Joseph and Cassandra (Sullivan) Aston, 
was born September 24, 1857, in Indianapolis, Indiana, and died March 20, 
1898, in Irvington, Indianapolis, Indiana. Interment in the Crown Hill Ceme- 
tery of that city. 

Samuel C. Reynolds and Mary A. Aston were united in marriage April i, 
1878, in Indianapolis, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Nciwf Birth Death 

Cassandra Hannah Reynolds. . . January' 6, 1879 

Francis Aston Reynolds August 8, 1880 

Marguerite Cornelia Re\'nolds. . November 11, 1882 

Edith Martha Reynolds October 5, 1885 

Arthur Ernest Reynolds November 8, i8go June 2, i8gi 

They were all born in Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Arthur E. died in Irvington, Indianapolis, and was interred in the Crown 
Hill Cemetery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Re3'nolds located in Irvington, a beatitiful suburb of In- 
dianapolis, where the former still lives with his family. He was for a number 
of years engaged in the railroad business at Indianapolis. Politically he is a 
Republican. 

They attend the Methodist Church. 

CHARLES E. AND MARY A. (GOUDY) REYNOLDS (4) 

Charles Ernest Reynolds, son of Samuel and Hannah (Grisell) Rey- 
nolds, was born April 16, 1848, in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Mary Alice Goudy, daughter of Samuel and Susan (Kenaga) Goudy, was 
born July 4, 1848, in West Lebanon, Wayne County, Ohio. 

Charles E. Reynolds and Mary A. Goudy were united in marriage Jan- 
uary 4, 1874, at the home of the bride's mother in Indianapolis, Indiana, a min- 
ister of the M. E. Church officiating. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 



Hannah (irisell Reynolds. / . November 15, 1879 

Ulela Harris Reynolds.   \ November 15, 1879 

Alice Marie Reynolds November 21, i8go 

They were all born in Indianapolis, Indiana. 



RECORD OF THE C:RISELL FAMILY 367 

Mr. and Mrs. Rej-nolds reside in Indianapolis where he has been engaged 
in business for the past thirtj'-five years. At present he is engaged in manu- 
facturing electrical machinery and appliances. 

Mr. Reynolds participated in the civil war, having enlisted in the One 
Hundred and Thirty-Third Regiment, Indiana Volunteers, at the age of fifteen 
years, serving through the Sherman campaign and until the close of the war. 

Politically he is a Republican. 

Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

HIRAM B. AND LYDIA J. (PAXSON) GRISELL (5) 

Hiram B. Grisell. son of Milo and Mary (Johnson) Grisell, was born 
August 30, 1836, in Harrisville, Harrison County, Ohio, and died June 25, 1889, 
near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Lydia Jane Pa.xson, daughter of Benjamin and Abigal (McNeily) Paxson, 
was born November 22, 1842, near Winona, Columbiana County, Ohio, and 
died October 20, 1889, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Hiram B. Grisell and Lydia J. Paxson were united in marriage Feb- 
ruary 3, 1862, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

NiDiw Birth Death 

Lowell Paxson Grisell April 3,1862 



Atlantic Ocean Grisell June 3, 1863 February 12, 1888 

Mary Josephine Grisell February 21, 1865 February i, 1895 

Albert Thurston Grisell July 26,1866 February 22,1896 

Joseph Arthur Grisell November 23, 1868 June 9, 1900 

Charles Elmer Grisell . . . , May 7, 1870 

Elpha B. Grisell \ August 29,1872 

Elva E. Grisell \. Triplets August 29, 1872 January 15, 1873 

Ethel D. Grisell . j August 29, 1872 April 30, 1891 

Abbie M. Grisell November 26,1873 December 27,1891 

They were all born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Elva E., Ethel D., Abbie M and Albert T. died in Penn Township, Jay 
County, Indiana, and Joseph A. in Muncie, Indiana. They were all interred in 
the Friends' Cemetery of Pennville, of the same state. 

Elpha B. is unmarried. He is employed as clerk in the Columbia Hotel 
of Montpelier, Blackford County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell always lived in Penn Township, Jay County, In- 
diana, and were residing on the "Milo Grisell Farm" at the time of their death, 
having moved to that place March i, 1887. 

Mrs. Grisell was a member of the United Brethren Church. 

We give a few extracts from the beautiful words written for Mr. and Mrs. 
Grisell and their family who have passed to higher life: — 



368 RECORD OF THE GRISEl.I. FAMILY 

"Hiram Grisell, one of Penn Township's noblest sons, died about seven 
o'clock Tuesday evening. He was highly respected by all who knew him. A 
brief funeral service was held at the home after which his remains were followed 
to the Friends' Cemetery of Pennville by one of the largest funeral processions 
we have ever beheld. 

" 'Leaf by leaf the roses fall, 

Drop by drop the spring runs dry, 
One by one beyond recall, 
We are called to sink and die.' " 

"Sister Lydia Jane Grisell departed this life at her home on Sunday last 
after a short but painful illness which she bore with true Christian fortitude. 
She was a true wife, a kind and loving mother and a bright Christian jewel in 
society. 

"The funeral services were conducted at her home by John Branstetter 
from the text, 'And there shall be no night there.' 

"May a kind. Heavenly Father bless and keep by divine power, the dear 
children, and may they meet mother where there is no parting. 

"Mrs. Grisell was laid to rest beside her husband in the Friends' Ceme- 
tery, of Pennville." 

"Abbie M., the youngest child of Hiram and Lydia J. Grisell, passed 
away December 27, i8gi During her last illness she had many words of love 
and kindness for her many friends and brothers and sisters, having been con- 
scious and able to converse with them to the last. 

"It was a consolation to her and to her brothers and sisters that they 
could all be present to bid her the last goodby. Though friends were kind and 
the words of the minister. Rev. Branstetter, full of sympathy, yet dearer than 
all. Mill be the memory of the press of her hand and her request, 'Don't leave 
me.' Man}' times in the lonely hours of those left behind the memory of her 
last words will come unbidden, 'Meet me in Heaven.' 

" '.\nother hand is beckoning us, 
Another call is given; 
And glows once more with angel steps 
The path which reaches Heaven. 

" '/Mone unto our Father's will 

One thought hath reconciled; 
That He whose love exceedeth ours 
Hath taken home His child.' 



"Albert T.. son of Hiram and Lydia J. GrisiU. died February 22, 1896. 
He was a member of the United Brethren Church at the time of his death. A 
short service was held at the home of his brother Charley, and regular sen'ices 
at the Gilead Church, near Balb;ic, after wliich his remains were laid to rest 
beside liis father and mother, who had so recently preceded him. 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 369 

'How joyful is the hope that lingers, 

When loved ones cross death's sea; 
That we, when all earth's toils are ended, 

With Thee, shall ever be.' " 



"Joseph A Grisell, perhaps as well known as any hotel clerk in Eastern 
Indiana, died very suddenly of heart trouble, in his room at the Kirby House, 
in Muncie, Indiana, May g, igoo. 

"Few people were more popular with all classes than Joe Grisell. The 
traveling public from all parts of the United States were his friends. As day 
clerk at the Kirby House, he has held his position steadily under several 
changes of proprietors for about eight years. The whole Kirby House force 
from the proprietors down to the servants, are grief stricken. Joe's unfailing 
good humor and ever pleasant manners, will be greatly missed by the guests of 
the house. 

"Mr. Grisell was an Elk and a Knight of Pythias. Services were held 
in the Elks' rooms, the night after his death, and the body was then sent to 
Montpelier, and from there to his brother Lowell Grisell's. The funeral ser- 
vices were held in the M. E. Church of Pennville, and his remains were interred 
in the Odd Fellows' Cemetery near Pennville." 



SIMON P. AND ELIZABETH A. (GRISELL) MORROW (5) 

Elizabeth Ann Grisell, daughter of Milo and Mary (Johnson) Grisell, 
was born August lo, i83g, in Harrisville, Harrison County, Ohio. 

Simon Peter Morrow, son of Eli and Eliza (Hock) Morrow, was born 
December i, 1842, near New Paris, Preble County, Ohio. 

Simon P. Morrow and Elizabeth A. Grisell were united in marriage De- 
cember 22, 1870, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Orville Leslie Morrow November 4, 1871 

Orris Leroy Morrow May i, 1873 

Othel Leston Morrow June 2, 1876 

Ortwell Linden Morrow February 13, 1878 

Orena Luella Morrow March 21, 1886 



They were all born in Penn Township, Jay Count}', Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs Morrow own a nice home northwest of Pennville, where 
they enjoy the comforts of an industrious and well spent life and the res])ect of 
many friends. 

Mr. Morrow is of Scotch and Dutch descent. He came with his parents 

24 



370 RECORD OK I'HE GRISKI.I. I-AMILY 

to Penn Township in the fall of 1850 when he was eight years of age and set- 
tled on eighty acres of land in the w^oods, two miles east of Pennville, where he 
worked on his father's farm in the summer and attended school in the winter 
during his boyhood. 

He was a soldier and participated in a number of engagements, of which, 
by request, w-e give a brief account: — 

"At the time the civil war broke out Mr. Morrow was at 'Shawnee 
Prairie,' Tippecanoe County, Indiana. He went to Lafayette at once and en- 
listed in tlie three months' service, in Captain Templeton's company, which 
afterward became the Fifteenth Regiment of the Indiana Volunteer Infantry, 
commanded by Col. George B. Wagner. They were sent to Indianapolis at 
the end of the three months, where Mr. Morrow was taken down with the 
measles and discharged. After being at home about three weeks he re-enlisted 
in Captain J. W. Camel's company, which became Company B of the Thirty- 
fourtli Indiana Volunteer Infantry, commanded by Col. Ashbury Steel. This 
regiment was organized at Anderson. Indiana, and mustered into the United 
States service by Major Wood, September 21, 1861. They were ordered to 
Jeffersonville, Indiana, where they remained about two weeks, then went to 
New Haven, Kentucky, and from there to Camp Wickliffe of the same state, 
where they were organized into a division under Gen. Nelson. They camped 
there all winter and early the foUow^ing spring proceeded to the mouth of the 
Salt river (a branch of the Ohio), and took transports that night down the Ohio 
river to Cairo, then up the Mississippi river to Point Commerce, Missouri; then 
began the hardest march that the subject of this sketch ever had to endure. 
They marched many miles over low, swampy land, bordering on the Mississippi 
river. Every night there would have to be a detail to go back and pull the 
mules and wagons out. They continued this march out across the countr\' till 
they struck the Mississippi river in the rear of New Madrid, Missouri, which 
was then in possession of the Rebels under Gen. Cowan, who had two forts, 
one at New Madrid and one farther down the river about one-half mile. 

"The Union soldiers immediately began to prepare for an attack and 
laid siege to the place, which the Rebels soon evacuated, so the Union soldiers 
took possession of their forts. They marched from there to Riddle's Point, 
taking with them heavy siege guns, and forced the Rebels to evacuate Tipton- 
ville, on the Kentucky side of the river, then went back to New Madrid and 
went into camp. A few days later they took transports and went down the 
river to Fort Pillow, where finding the place too well fortified for the force thej' 
had, they returned and in a short time went to Memphis, Tennessee. While 
there Col. Fitch organized an expedition and w-ent up the White river in Arkan- 
sas, driving tiie Rebels out of Duval's Bluff and then returned to Helena, 
Arkansas. From there they marched to Milligan's Bend, where they became 
the First Brigade, Twelfth Division, under Gen. A. P. Hovey (afterward Gov- 
ernor of Indiana), Thirteenth Corps, commanded by Gen. McClelland, of 
Illinois. Young's Point and Milligan's Bend was where Grant organized his 
army for the Vicksburg campaign. 



RECORD OF THE GRISEI.L FAMILY 371 

"They were ordered to march from there around in front of Vicksburg, 
on the Louisiana side, and struck tlie river at Grand Gulf where the Black river 
empties into the Mississippi. They found Grand Gulf strongly fortified with 
a large force of Rebel soldiers which the Union gun boats failed to dislodge, so 
they proceeded on the Louisiana side and struck the river at Hard Times 
Landing, below Grand Gulf. There they were conveyed across the river on 
gun boats to the Mississippi side, where they drew rations and immediately 
started on their all niglit march, meeting the Rebels the next morning at Point 
Gibson. Here, tired and worn from their all night's march, with not a moment 
to rest, they had just twenty minutes to prepare something for breakfast. 
When their coffee had just begun to boil they were ordered to fall in rank and 
each man grabbed his 'little bucket' and drank the coffee as they obeyed orders. 
They went up into an open field, threw aside their luggage, and were ordered 
forward and took position to the left of Magnolia Church. They were then or- 
dered by General Hovey to take a Virginia battery, which stood in an open 
field. A severe battle ensued in which both sides lost valuable men, but finally 
the Rebels started to run, thus giving the Union boys the victory. 

"They camped near there that night, burying the dead and caring for the 
wounded, starting early the ne.\t morning to follow the Rebels. They caught 
up with them at Clinton and gave them a 'thrashing,' after which they followed 
them and caught them again at Raymond, 'whipped' them again; followed them 
and caught up with them again at Champion Hills or Baker's Creek, May i6, 
1863, where Gen. Pemberton had moved his whole force with the expectation 
of defeating Grant's purpose. The battle began immediately, in which the 
ground was fiercely contested on both sides, nearly i,6oo men being lost out of 
Hovey's division, about twenty-one out of company B in which Mr. Morrow 
belonged. The remnant of Hovey's division were left there to bury the dead, 
and on the nineteenth of May went to Vicksburg and took their position west 
of the Jackson road. They were there forty-two days and forty-two nights 
under fire all the time (many being killed) and until the final surrender of 
Vicksburg. This disastrous battle is too well known to need any further details 
given. All people who read history know of the many lives lost and of the 
fierce struggle on both sides, in which at last the Union boys came out victo- 
rious. 

"July 5 following they went under General Sherman to Jackson, which 
was strongly fortified In' the Rebels under Gen. Joseph E. Johnson, but the 
Union soldiers routed Gen. Johnson and his forces out and destroyed the 
beautiful little city, thus keeping the vow which an Illinois regiment had niadi. 
They had previously been taken prisoners at Shiloh and put in the Jackson 
state prison. While marching to the prison they had been insulted in every 
way by men, women and children who spit upon them and jeered at them, 
throwing insults at them in every conceivable way. The Illinois regiment then 
took an oath that 'if they ever had an opportunity they would lay that town in 
ashes,' and they did. All of those handsome southern homes were burned to the 
ground. 



372 KECORD 01' THIC (iRISELL lAMILY 

"From there they returned to Vicksburg where they took boats for 
Natchez, Mississippi, camping there a few days and then proceeding to New 
Orleans, where they started on the Tache Expedition under Gen. Franklin. 
They went to Brasher City, Louisiana, then to Ospoloosas Jjaj'ou, where they 
were ordered back to New Orleans. Remaining there a short time they pro- 
ceeded on the steamer 'Continental' to Brazos Island (at the mouth of the Col- 
orado river), Texas, where they were camped about two months, then returned 
to New Orleans, and most of the regiment veteranized and went home. Mr. 
Morrow did not veteranize, his three years being nearly up. Tliu non-veterans 
were organized into a batallion and did guard duty at New Orleans. When the 
regiment returned they rejoined their companies and the regiment sent to 
Poncha Train (a summer resort), where they were on guard duty until their 
time expired. They then returned to Indianapolis. Indiana, and were dis- 
charged September 21, i(S64." 

Mr. Morrow returned to his home in Jay County, and in 1868 he in com- 
pany with Morgan Gray went to Iowa, where they were employed by the Rock- 
Island & Western Union Railway Co., near Sioux City and other places, about 
two years. They then returned to Jay County, where Mr. Morrow has since 
resided. 

Mr. and Mrs. Morrow's son Ortwell L. was a student in the high school 
of Pennville, after which he taught in the public schot)ls of Penn Township one 
term. At present he is a tonsorial artist and is located in Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. 

Luella O. is attending the high school ot Pennville, from wliich she will 
graduate in 1904. 



THEODORE F. AND LOUISA (VORE) GRISELL (5) 

Theodore F. Grisell, son of Milo and Mary (Johnson) Grisell, was born 
February 5, 1845, in Harrisville, Harrison County, Ohio. 

Louisa Vore, daughter of Josiah and Deborah (Underwood ) Vore, was 
born May ig, 1846, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, and died October 
31, 1881, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. Her remains were interred in 
the Friends' Cemetery of Pennville. 

Theodore F. Grisell and Louisa Vore were united in marriage February 
29, 1866, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE liORN 

Name Birth Death 

Gertrude W. Grisell December 22,1866 November 24,1881 

Milo Grisell August 9,1868 October 3,1881 

Gahana Grisell August 8, 1870 November 2, 1881 

Austin O. Grisell November 23,1874 October 4,1885 

Matthias (irisell December 16,1878 August 4,1883 



RECORD OF THK CRIHELL FAMILY 373 

They were all born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, and died in 
the same township. They were interred in the Friends' Cemetery of Penn- 
ville. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell located on a farm in Penn Township, where they 
were engaged in farming several years. 

Mrs. Grisell was of Welsh and Dutch descent. 

After Mrs. Grisell's death Mr. Grisell was again married. 



THEODORE F. AND EMMA (HOUCK) GRISELL (5) 

Emma Houck, daughter of Samuel and Minerva ( Aulderman) Houck, 
was born May i8, 1862, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Theodore F. Grisell and Emma Houck were united in marriage July 5, 
1882, in Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THKiM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Dratli 

Herman Theodore Grisell September 22,1884 September 17,1895 

Thomas Olen Grisell July 13, 1887 

Mary Elizabeth Grisell March 31,1889 September 1,1890 

Floyd Grisell. September 11, i8gi September 13.1895 

Marie Grisell October 11,1893 September 8,1895 

'I hey were all born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, except 
Floyd and Marie, who were born in Montpelier, Blackford County, of the 
same state. 

Herman T., Mary E. , Floyd and Marie, died in Montpelier, Blackford 
County, Indiana, and were interred in the Friends' Cemetery, of Pennville. 

Thomas O. is atteniiing jiigh school in Montpelier, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell reside in Montpelier where he is proprietor of a 
general mercantile business. 

Mrs. Grisell is of German descent. 

Mr. Grisell participated in the civil war. He enlisted in Pennville, 
Indiana (after making three previous attempts and being refused on account of a 
crippled hand), in Company H, One Hundred and Thirty-eighth Regiment Vol- 
unteer Infantry under Captain James L. Gore, May 8, 1864. He was honor- 
ably discharged September 22, 1S64, at Indianapolis, Indiana, having done 
guard duty as far south as Alabama. 



FRANK H. AND BELLE (McHOSE) SMOCK (5) 

Frank Homer Smock, son of John C. and llann.ih (Grisell) S:uock, was 
born July 12, 1848, near New Garden, (Ohimbiana County, Ohio. 




MR. AND MRS. I RANK H. SMOCK AND DAUGHTER ALICE JOSEPHINE 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 375 

Belle McHose, daughter of Samuel and Mary Frances (Dillin) McHose, 
was born April 6, 1853, a-t Green River, Illinois. 

Frank H. Smock and Belle McHose were united in marriage September 
2, 1872, at Nevada, Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE liORN 

Name  BirtJt Death 

Eva May Smock May 6, 1874 

Elma Libbie Smock November 21, 1875 

Fannie Smock November 22, 1877 January 24, 1881 

Ida Dora Smock February 6, 1880 

Emma Letitia Smock April 17, 1885 

Alice Josephine Smock May 6, 1887 Jul}' 27, 1902 

They were all born near Monroe, Wisconsin, except Elma, who was born 
in Lafa3'ette County of the same state. 

Mr. and Mrs. Smock located on a farm near Monroe, Wisconsin, soon 
after their marriage. At present they reside in Monroe but Mr. Smock is still 
proprietor of the "Brookdale Stock Farm." 

The following few lines are from the pen of one of his friends: — 

"Frank Smock has always been a prominent citizen and large factor in 
the community. As a neighbor and friend he commands the confidence and 
respect of all to an eminent degree. He has done a great deal for the improve- 
ment of all kinds of stock and is one of the very best of farmers, his farm show- 
ing the results of intelligence, industry and first-class executive ability. 

"Mr. Smock has frequently been a candidate for the Legislature, both 
Senate and House, and has held several public offices, among which are: Sec- 
retary of Clarno Insurance Company; Secretary and Treasurer of an Agricul- 
tural Society; member of School Board; County, State and National President 
of Patrons of Industry; member of City and County Board. In every case he 
has proven himself worthy of the confidence of the people. 

"While he is a man of more intelligence than education, more hard 
sound sense than polish, yet he is a forcible and able public speaker. His true 
worth is best appreciated by those who have known him longest." 

Mrs. Smock's parents were natives of New York, her father being of 
Pennsylvania- German descent. Her parents moved to Geneseo, Illinois, when 
she was two years of age, where she spent the rest of her childhood. In 1871 
having prepared herself for teaching she went to Nevada, Iowa, where she fol- 
lowed her chosen profession until she was married. 

Mrs. Smock is an active member of the W. C. T. U. She is one of those 
rarely gifted mothers who seem to have an inherent power of making ever\ one 
liappy, and truly she made the home a sacred place to lier family. 

" There are three words that .sweetly bleiul, 
That on the heart are graven; 
A precious soothing lialm they lend — 
They're mother, iKime aii<l lieaven." 



376 RECORD OF THE GRISELI, FAMILY 

Eva M., Elma L. and Ida D. are graduates of the Monroe high school. 
Elma L. also graduated from the Rockford Business College in 1898, and is 
now employed as cashier in Brown & Brown's bank at Genoa, Illinois. Ida D. 
is a graduate of the Wisconsin State Normal and is a teacher by profession. 



FELIX D. AND ELIZABETH E. (SMOCK) JEFFERY (5) 

Elizabeth Elma Smock, daughter of John C. and Hannah (Grisell) 
Smock, was horn October g, 1854, near Monroe, Green County, Wisconsin. 

Felix D. Jeffery, son of Edward C. and Ann (Mitchel) Jeffery, was born 
March 9, 1859, in Mineral Point, Iowa County, Wisconsin. 

Felix D. Jeffery and Elizabeth E. Smock, were united in marriage Octo- 
ber 18, 1887, in Monroe County, Wisconsin. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

iVainc Birth Death 

Stella Marie Jeffery July 6.1888 

Frank Jeffery March 6, i8go April 22, i8gi 

Bertha May Jeffery October 8, 1891 

Stella M. and Frank were born near St. Lawrence, Hand County, South 
Dakota, and Bertha M. near Monroe, Wisconsin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jeffery located near St. Lawrence, Hand Countj^, South 
Dakota, where they were engaged in farming and stockraising. The}' passed 
through the severe blizzard of Januarv 12, 18S8, but, fortunateh', suffered no 
loss from it; also a ver}' disastrous prairie fire on April 2, 1889, in which many 
people lost their homes. In November, 1890, they moved to Monroe, Green 
County, Wisconsin, and located on a farm which is known as "Maple Ridge 
Stock Farm" and of which Mr. Jeffery is proprietor. This farm is Mrs. Smock's 
"old home," having belonged to her parents before their death. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jeffery attended the World's Fair at Chicago in 1893. 

Mrs. Smock's childhood was spent on the farm where she lives at the 
present time. After gaining what knowledge she could in the common schools 
she entered the high school in Nevada, Story County, Iowa, i86g, where she 
lived with her parents until 1872, when they returned to their farm near Mon- 
roe, Wisconsin, and she continued her education at a select school in Monroe. 

In April, 1873, she commenced teaching school and taught her first term 
in Warren Township, Stor\' Count\', Iowa. In September she returned to her 
home near Monroe, where she was employed in teaching in the common school 
of Green County fourteen 3'ears. She was considered a ver}' successful teacher. 

Mrs. Smock is a member of the W. C. T. U. and is much interested in 
temperance w-ork and education. 

Felix D. Jellery is of direct English j)arentage. His father was born at 
Bodmin Parish, of i,anletherick, hZngland, and his motiier in Oxford County, 




MR. AND MRS. FELIX U. JEFI'ER\- ANll FAMILY 



378 RECORn OF THE GRISEEL KAMILY 

of Suinniersetshire, England. They were married in 1844 at Tywerdreath, 
England, and came to America in 1845. 

Mr. Jeffery has spent almost his entire life on the farm. At the age of 
twenty he spent some time in traveling through the West, Nevada, California 
and Colorado, afterward returning to his old home in Wisconsin, where he re- 
mained until the fall of 1882 when he went to Hand County, Dakota Territory, 
now South Dakota, where he located on a homestead of one hundred and sixty 
acres, and the following year moved onto the same and broke up the virgin 
prairie and lived the life of a pioneer bachelor until the fall of [887. He then 
returned to Wisconsin and was united in marriage to Elizabeth E. Smock. 

Mr. Jeffery had always been an admirer of good stock and for several 
years had been engaged in raising pure bred hogs and sheep. 

Stella M. and Bertha M. attend school. Stella is finishing the course of 
study for common schools, and will then enter high school. She is also taking 
music lessons. 



ALEXANDER H. AND CLARA A. (FREES) GRISELL (5) 

Alexander Hartwell Grisell, son of Thomas E. and Mary (Wireman ) 
Grisell, was born June 18, 1848, at Hanover, Ohio. 

Clara Amanda Frees, daughter of George T. and Jane Freelove (Hamlin) 
Frees, was born July 11, 1S50, at Upper Sandusky, Ohio. 

Alexander H. Grisell and Clara A. Frees were united in marriage Octo- 
ber 13, 1 87 1, at Upper Sandusky, Ohio. 

10 THE.M WERE I'.OKN 

Nam,- Birtli D,;i//i 

Blanche Abigail Grisell April 25, 1874 

Grace Georgiana Grisell February ig, 1876 January i, i8gg 

Thomas Elwood Grisell December 5, i87g 

George Nace Grisell October 13, 1881 

Helen Hortense Grisell August 20, 1888 

Blanche A., Grace G. and Thomas E. were born in Upper Sandusk\', 
Ohio, and George N. and Helen H. in Menlo, Iowa. 

Grace G. died and was buried in Menlo, Guthrie County, Iowa. 

Mr and Mrs. Grisell lived in upper Sandusky several years after their 
marriage, where Mr. Grisell was engaged in the manufacture of brick and tile, 
and farming. In 1880 they removed to Menlo, Guthrie County, Iowa, where 
Mr. Grisell first begun his newspaper career. He owned and published the 
Menlo Gazelle and also engaged in stock raising. While living in Menlo he 
was elected major and also appointed postmaster imder President Harrison in 
1889. He served as postmaster four years and was again appointed by Presi- 
dent McKinley in 1897. Atter serving the latter appointment two years he 
resigned and purchased the (riil/iriaii, the leading Republican paper \n Guthrie 




ALEXANDER H. ( ; R 1 S K IJ. 



380 RECORD OF THE GRISKLL FAMILY 

County, at Guthrie Center, Iowa, in 1899. He removed with his family to that 
place in 1899. His son, Thomas E. Grisell, continued the Menlo Gazette until 
1900, when they sold it and lie associated himself with his father in his work at 
Guthrie Center. Mr. Grisell has also been a member of the Iowa State Board 
of Agriculture. 

Mrs. Grisell is of German and English descent and a descendant of Major 
Danforth, an officer of the Continental Army in the Revolution. 

Blanche A. is a graduate of both the Menlo high school and the High- 
land Park College and has been a teacher in the city schools of Stuart, Iowa, 
five years. 

Thomas E. graduated from both the Menlo high school and Guthrie 
Connt\' liigh school, after which he engaged in newspaper work as a partner in 
the firm of A. H. Grisell & Son. 

George N. received a good public school education and is at present em- 
ployed in the mechanical department of the firm of A. H. Grisell & Son. 

Helen H. is still a school girl. 

The following beautiful lines we copy from the obituary of Grace G. 
Grisell: — 

"Just as the morning of the last day of the old year was ushered in, the 
pure soul of our daughter passed into the world beyond. It has been our lot to 
chronicle the passing away of friends, neighbors and strangers, and w'e have 
striven with sympathetic words to assuage the grief of sorrowing friends, but in 
the calamitous loss of our dearly loved daughter, we realize as never before 
the emptiness of words as a balm to bruised and bleeding hearts. In our deep 
sorrow we are grateful for the condolence and S} mpathy which has been ex- 
tended to us hy our friends. Their kind consideration has been a solace to us 
and will be kept b\' us in grateful remembrance. Grace was the second daugh- 
ter of Alexander H. and Clara A. Grisell. She was born at Upper Sandusky, 
Ohio, February 19, 1876, coming to Iowa with her parents, at the age of four 
years, where she has since resided. At the age of 17 years she cpiit the public 
schools and went to teaching in the rural schools of this count}'. In the fall of 
1894 she took up her studies again in the high school, graduating in May, 1895. 
That night, filled with high hopes and aspirations for the future, gratified and 
happy over the congratulations of friends, when to her life was being realized 
and gave promise of future possibilities, when ambition would be satisfied, it 
was tlun that a chill passed over her body and planted the seed that ended three 
and a half years later in her death. The ravages of that insidious disease, con- 
sumption, was slow at first and she took up her vocation of teaching, but she 
was obliged to quit after a year. In the spring of i8g8 her physician advised her 
to take a trip o\erland to the mountains of Colorado. A team and camp outfit 
were procured and in company with her two younger brothers and elder sister 
the journey was commenced. Slie bore the long tetlious drives and the discom- 
forts of camp life without a murmur of complaint. Hope elusive bore her over 
the wide-spreading i)lain to the mountains, where there was balm and healing 
in the air; but alas it was not for her. In th<- shadow of Pike's Peak and Man- 



RECORD OF THE (;KISEI,I, FAMILY i^ i 

itou her brothers and sister left her, with many fears and misgivings; but she, 
filled with that hope which springs eternal from every living breast, bore the 
parting bravely. It was not long until the longing for mother could not be 
stifled, and the mother went out to help her battle against the dread disease, 
but it was a hopeless fight and in October she came to the home she loved so 
well, where all that could be done by loving hands to alleviate her sufferings 
was done. She was uncomplaining and uniforiul)' cheerful and was only con- 
fined to her bed a week before the summons came. The obsequies were con- 
ducted at the famil)' residence by her pastor, Rev. L. E. Keith of the Presby- 
terian church, Sunday, January i, 1899, at half past two o'clock. Interment in 
the Menlo cemetery. The following acted as pall bearers; W. F. Galbreath, 
A. C. Curtis, E. R. Cox, W. E. Bond, Frank Taylor and J. E. McClary— the 
three latter being schoolmates and graduates of the same class with the de- 
ceased." 



JOSEPH W. AND GRACE E. (BRUNNER) GRISELL (S) 

Joseph Whitacre Grisell, son of Thomas E. and Anna C. (McKelly) 
Grisell, was born October 21, i860, at Upper Sandusky, Ohio. 

Grace Elizabeth Bninner, daughter of the late Hon. Lewis A. and Jane 
E. i^Sherman) Brunner, was born January 14, 1865, at Upper Sandusky, Ohio. 

Joseph W. Grisell and Grace E. Brunner were united in marriage June 
16, 1886, at Tiffin, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

JVa/zir Birtli Death 

Lewis Brunner Grisell May 8, 1889 September 12, 1889 

Thomas Elwood Grisell January 10, 1891 

Sherman Whitacre Grisell May 13, 1895 

Lewis B. and Tliomas E. were born in Upper Sandusky, Ohio, and 
Sherman W. was born at Lenoir, Tennessee. 

Lewis B. died and was buried at Upper Sandusky. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell located in Upper Sandusky where they lived until 
1891. They then removed to Lenoir, Tennessee, where for six years Mr. 
Grisell represented the Lenoir City Land Company as manager. In 1896 he 
returned w'ith his family to their former home in Upper Sandusky and has since 
been engaged in the abstract, real estate and loan business. 

Mr. Grisell graduated from the public schools of Upper Sandusk\ m 
1879, then entered Wooster University, of Wooster, Ohio, where he attended 
school two years. In 1883 he engaged in the manufacture of drain tile, carry- 
ing on this business successfully until 1889. 

Mrs. Grisell's father was a native of Frederic County, Maryland, and of 
German descent and iier mother was born in the state of New York, of English 
descent. 



382 RKCORD OF THE CRISELI, FAMILY 



ALBERT H. AND HANNAH E. (GRISELL) HOPKINS (5) 

Hannah Elizabeth Grisell, daughter of Joseph W. and Alice (Ritchey) 
Giisel), was born February 11, 1851, near New Garden, Columbiana County, 
Ohio. 

Albert Haddon Hopkins, son of Hezekiah Haddon and Elizabeth 
(Dawson) Hopkins, was born May 2, 1850, in Penn Township, Jay County, 
Indiana. 

Albert H. Hopkins and Hannah E. Grisell were united in marriage May 
26, 1870, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana, Rev. Curwood of the M. E. 
Church officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Ariaennetta Hopkins ]u\y ig, 1871 

Harry Haddon Hopkins March 23, 1873 November 6, 1888 

Elmer Eugene Hopkins July 27, 1879 

They were all born near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Harry H. died in Pennville and was buried in the Friends' Cemetery of 
the same place, but has since been removed to the Odd Fellows Twin Hill 
Cemetery. Harry was an excellent student and in every way a worthy young 
man. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins located on a farm on Section 23, after their mar- 
riage, where they lived until 1887, when in company with Mrs. Hopkins's 
mother they removed to Pennville, where Mr. Hopkins has since been engaged 
as superintendent of the Pennville Natural Gas and Oil Company. 

Mr. Hopkins's father was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, December 
14, 1816. He was the son of Hezekiah and Martha (Griffith) Hopkins, the 
former born October 3, 1770, who were married in 1789. Hezekiah Hopkins 
was a son of Haddon Hopkins, who was born in London, England, April 3, 
1743, a son of Ebenezer Hopkins, who was a son of Benjamin and Sarah 
(Lord) Hopkins, the latter born August 30, 171 7, a daughter of James and 
Elizabeth Lord, who were also natives of London, England. 

Albert H. Hopkins's mother, Elizabeth (Dawson) Hopkins, was born in 
Beaver County, Pennsylvania, December 13, 1820, and was a daughter of John 
and Jane Dawson. Her father was born April 27, 1793, and was a soldier in 
the war of 1812. His father was a native of Ireland where he was educated for 
a priest, but i ame to America when a young man and gave up that calling. 
The Hopkins and Dawson families settled in Ohio in an early day. They sub- 
sequently moveil to Jay County, Indiana, where they were among the early 
settlers. The Dawson family was one of the first families to settle in Notting- 
ham Township, Wells County, of the same state. 

Mr. Hopkins's father was a tailor and followed that trade until 1856, when 
he engaged in mercantile pursuits in Pennville, which he followed until his 



RECORD OK THE CRISEI.I. FAMILY 383 

death. He was born and reared in the Society of Friends, lint was disowned 
on account of his marriage outside of tlie church, afterwards uniting with the 
Methodist Episcopal Church of whic h his wife was a member. He was a man 
of strict integrity and by his honorable dealings gained the confidence and re- 
spect of all who knew him. 

Albert H. Hopkins was reared in Pennville, his youth being spent in at- 
tending school and assisting his father in the store. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins were both students in Liber College, Portland, 
Indiana, the former having attended five and the latter two terms. Politically 
Mr. Hopkins is a Pepublican. They are both active lodge workers, Mr. Hop- 
kins being a member of the I. O. O. F., the K. of P. and the Meredith Re- 
bekah Lodge, No. 513, the latter of which Mrs. Hopkins is also a member. 
They have both held responsible positions in these lodges. Mrs. Hopkins is 
also a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

In 11^95 they had erected on their property a large and modern house 
where, with its beautiful surroundings of flowers and lawn and the genial hos- 
pitality ol its occupants, many friends and relatives are entertained. Here a 
few years ago Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins, together with their many friends, cele- 
brated their twenty-fifth wedding anniversary. 

Elmer E. Hopkins is a telegraph operator. He has received a good 
musical education, having attended Dana's Musical Institute at Warren, Ohio. 
In his political views lie is a Republican. 

ELIJAH A. AND ELIZABETH M. C. (BLACKLEDGE) HORTON (5) 

Elizabeth Margaret Chandler Blackledge, daughter of Thomas and Han- 
nah (Chalfant) Blackledge, was born December 26, 1836, in Sahnii, Colum- 
biana County, Ohio. 

Elijah A. Horton, son of and ( ) Horton, was born 

December 15, 1833, in West Almond, Allegany County, New York, and died 
May 13, 1876, in Ft. Wayne, Indiana. 

Elijah A. Horton and Elizabeth M. C. Blackledge were united in mar- 
riage January 20, 1857, in Bluffton, Wells County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

N'limc lu) III Death 

Sarah Rose Horton January g, 1859 January 9, 1S59 

Mabel Horton June 19, 186 1 

Louise Horton November 1 2, 1863 

Henrietta Rose Horton April 17, 1871 

Sarah Rose, Mabel and Louise were born in Blulfton, Indiana; lb nrietta 
R. in Ft. Wayne, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Horton lived in BluKton until 1871, when tin \ moved to 
Ft. Wayne. He was a politician and tor a number of vcars was business man- 



384 RKCORI) OF lllli i;RISEI,I, FAMILY 

ager ot the Ft. Wayne Si/i/iiii-L He was also clerk in the senate when Oliver 
P. Morton was governor of Indiana. 

In politics Mr. H.orton affiliated with the Democrats and was a Univer- 
salist in religious belief. He was also a Knight Templar. 

Mrs. Horton received her early education in Marietta. (Jhio, and at the 
age of 17 years moved to Ft. Wayne, Indiana, and there attended the Meth- 
odist College for two years. 

After Mr. Horton's death Mrs. Horton was again niarrii-d. 



FREDERICK F. AND ELIZABETH M. C. tBLACKLEDGE) 
1 HORTON 1 NINDE (5) 

Frederick Folgier Ninde, son of and ( ) Ninde, was 

born March 24, 1835. in Warren County, Ohio, and died September 22, 1891. 

I-'rederick F. Ninde and Elizabeth M. C. (Blackledge) Horton were 
united in marriage April 5, 1883, in Ft. Wayne, Indiana. 

No children. 

.\t the age of two years Frederick F". Ninde moved with his parents to 
Jay County, Indiana, where he was reared on his father's farm. He graduated 
from Liber College (near Portland) and afterwards graduated from the Law 
Department of the Ann Arbor, Michigan, University. He practiced his chosen 
profession in Ft. Wayne until failing health compelled him to move to the old 
farm in Jay County, Indiana, which he owned, where he spent the remainder 
of his days. He was a member of the Hicksite F'riends' Society and an ardent 
Republican. 



FRANK H. AND MARY \. (ELDER) BLACKLEDGE (5) 

Frank Harris Blackledge, son of Dr. Thomas and Susan (Kenaga) 
Blackledge, was born November 21, 1856, in Bluffton, Indiana. 

Mary L Elder, daughter of John and Mary ( ) Elder, was born 



Frank H. Blackledge and Mary Elder, were united in marriage October 
17, 1888, in Indianapolis, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

y<iiii,- Birth Diath 

Elder Blaeklrdu;!' 1891 

Frank Harris IHackledge 1896 

They were born in Indianajjolis, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Blackledge reside in Indianapolis, Indiana. Mr. Black- 
ledge is an attornex . He received his education in the schools of Indianapolis. 



RF.CORD OF THK GRISEI.L FAMILY 385 



JESSE H. AND RACHEL A. (MICHENER) SOULE (5) 

Rachel Ann Michener, daughter of John L. and Mary (Blackledge) 
Michener, was born June 3, 1841, near Nottingham, Wells County, Indiana. 

Jesse Hardy Soule,' son of William and Rebecca (Hardy) Soule, was 
born March 31, 1823, in Avon, Franklin County, Maine, and died March 30, 
1893. near Withrow, Washington County, Minnesota. 

Jesse H. Soule and Rachel A. Michener were united in marriage Decem- 
ber 24, 1871, at the home of the bride's parents near Etna, Fillmore County, 
Minnesota. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Na}iie Birth Death 

Alice Mary Soule September 23, 1872 

Olive Myrtle Soule July 17, 1876 

Reuel Jesse Soule December 16, 1878 

Evelyn Rachel Soule March 11, 1884 

They were born in Grant Township, Washington County, Minnesota. 

Rachel A. (Michener) Soule was one of the early residents of Wells and 
Jay Counties, Indiana, and says: "My earliest and most pleasant recollections 
are of the visits to West Grove with my parents. We lived near Nottingham, 
Wells County, Indiana. We left there when I was a little past fifteen years of 
age and located on a farm near Etna, Fillmore County, Minnesota, where father 
and mother remained until their death." 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Soule located on a farm near With- 
row, Grant Township, Washington County, Minnesota, where they lived until 
after Mr. Soule's death. Mr. Soule was of pure English ancestry and was a 
direct lineal descendant of George Soule, who came over in the "Mayflower," 
and Mary Beckel, who came over in the "Anne." Bishop Soule, of the Meth- 
odist Church, was his great uncle. 

The following notes are taken from Mr. Soule's death notice: — 

"Jesse H. Soule, one of the leading citizens of Grant Township and one 
of the early settlers of this section, died at his home in what is called the 
'Soule Settlement' yesterday afternoon, of kidney disease. 

"Mr. Soule came west in 1854 and took up a farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres of land in Grant Township, Washington County, Minnesota, where 
he has since resided. He has always been a prominent and enterprising man, 
entertaining profound opinions on every public (juestion and never for a mo- 
ment did he hesitate to express them. These opinions were his own, and if 
others entertained views at variance with his, it made no difference lo iiim. 
And to his credit it may be said with truth that his ideas were invariably of tin- 
advance kind. He believed in tlie utmost freedom to every human being, and 
the right of ev(.-ry man to speak his own words in his own way. 

25 



386 UKCORD OF THK GRISELL FAMILY 

"Mr. Soule held man\- positions of trust and responsibility, having offi- 
ciated as Town Clerk twentv-two years, and also served as Justice of the Peace, 
Assessor, Superintendent of Schools and County Commissioner. He was also 
one of the Representatives in the Legislature of 1864." 

.•\ftcr Mr. Soule's death Mrs. Soule remained on the home farm five 
years: part of the time all of the children were with her, l)ut most of the time 
just lieuel, who attended the farm, and Evelyn the youngest daughter. 

Alice M. began teaching when she was seventeen years of age and has 
not missed a term since. She taught five years near Breckenridge, Wilkin 
County, Minnesota, where she had a great deal of pioneer experience. She 
then returned home, much against the wishes of the people where she had 
taught so long with such gratifying results, and taught in the home district 
school three years. She then accepted a position as principal teacher in a 
graded school in the village of Hugo, Washingtcjn County, Minnesota, which 
she has successfully filled since. She has attended teachers training school 
every summer for eleven years. 

Reuel J. Soule, after finishing his studies in a district school, attended 
three terms at the Agricultural School at St. Anthony Park, midway between 
St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minnesota. He then went to Fillmore County of 
the same state, and after being engaged in farming for different persons he pur- 
chased a farm four and one-half miles north of Spring Valley, where in compan}' 
with his mother and sister he lived one year. About this time Daniel Mich- 
ener, who w'ith his family lived on the "old homestead," decided to move to 
Spring Valley in order to give his children better school advantages, and he 
rented the homestead to Reuel J. Soule for a period of three years, conse- 
quentl}' he with his mother and sister removed to the place where Mrs. Soule 
had first lived when she came to the state when a child. The undertaking was 
quite a responsible one for so young a man, but he has proved himself fully 
equal to the task. 

There is quite a striking contrast between the log cabin {12 by 12 feet) 
of 1857 and the handsome home of ten rooms, not including hall, pantrj', closets 
and bathroom of the present time ugoi). Then the}' had a postoffice six miles 
away with mail once a week, now the rural free delivery brings the mail every 
morning with a daily paper from St. Paul. A telephone in the dining room con- 
nects them with their neighbors and the surrounding towns. A hot air furnace 
in the basement heats all of the house except the kitchen. 

Mrs. Soule's youngest daughter Evelyn is a dressmaker by trade. She 
inherited mechanical skill from her father and has an artistic temperament. 



CHARLIiS R. AND LIZZIE B. (HASKINS^ MICHENER (5» 

Charles Remond Michener, son of Joiin L. and Mary (Blackledge) 
Michener, was born July 3, 1844, near Nottingham, Wells County, Indiana, and 
died June 8, 1898, near Cherry Grove, Fillmore County, Minnesota, 



RECORD OF THE GRISEI.L FAMILY 387 

Lizzie Brown Haskins, daughter of Orin and Marion ( Woodard ) Brown, 
was born October 4, 1841, in Melbourne, Canada. 

Charles R. Michener and Lizzie Brown Haskins, were united in marriage 
February 11, 1877, in Cherry Grove, Fillmore County, Minnesota, 

TO THK.M WKRE HORN 

Name ' Birth Death 

John Charles Michener November 1 1, 1877 

Mabel Rachel Michener August 21, 1880 

Nellie Lizzie Michener November 6, 1886 

They were born near Cherry Grove. Fillmore County, Minnesota. 

Mr. and Mrs. Michener located on a farm near Cherry Grove after their 
marriage and Mrs. Michener still resides there. 

Mr. Michener was a public-spirited citizen of a kindly nature whose in- 
spirations Were all for the best. To his neighbors he was ever readv to do a 
kindness and a call from the needy or afflicted always met with a ready 
response. 

Mrs. Michener is an energetic business woman, who has kept her famil)' 
together on the home farm. Her parents were natives of Vermont and of F^ng- 
lish ancestry. They removed to Canada after their marriage. 



DANIEL K. AND IDA L. (BLAKESLEE) MICHENER (5) 

Daniel Kinsey Michener. son of John L. and Mary (Blackledge) 
Michener. was born September 5, 1846, near Nottingham, Wells Count}', 
Indiana. 

Ida Lena Blakeslee, daughter of Samuel L. and Ellinore (Huston) 
Blakeslee, was born July 28, 1864, in Pleasant Grove Township, I*~illuiore 
County, Minnesota. 

Daniel K. Michener and Ida L. Blakeslee were united in marriage 
July 20, 1884, at the home of the bride's parents in Pleasant (irove, I'illmore 
County, Minnesota. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birttt Death 

Carroll Kinsey .Miciiener \ugust 11, 1885 

Clarice Kvelyn Michener September 3, i88g 

Laura Ellinore Michener January 14, 1893 

Lucile Alice Michener January 6, 1895 

AUene Michener April 5, 1899 

They were all born near Spring Valley, Fillmore ('ounty, Minnesota. 
Mr. and Mrs. Michener lived on the "homestead" with Mr. Michener's 
father several years after their marriage. In i8g6 Daniel Micluiur had thr 



388 RECORD OK IHE GRISELL EAMILY 

Stone house remodeled, adding quite a little to it in frame, and having it all 
finished in modern style. After the children grew old enough to require ad- 
vantages for education the family removed to Spring Valle\', where they live 
at the present time. 

Mr. Michener was educated in the public school with a few terms at a 
private school and also in Winona Normal, of Winona County, Minnesota. He 
taught in the winter for a few years but always stuck to the home farm, and its 
present state of high cultivation speaks well for his diligence. He has served 
his town in the various offices of Justice of the Peace, Town Supervisor, Town 
Treasurer, and was Assessor fourteen years, has taken the United States census 
three times and served his district in the State Legislature of 1885. At the 
present time (1901 ) he is Count}' Commissioner and secretary of two insurance 
companies. He is recognized as one of the substantial men of the county, 
respected and honored by all who know him. 

Mrs. Michener is highly spoken of, an estimable woman and judicious 
motlier. She is of Irish descent. 

Carroll K. is attending the high school of Spring Valley at present and 
will graduate in 1903, having gained one year by his diligence. When eleven 
years of age he edited and printed a weeklv paper, doing all the work, mental 
and mechanical, without assistance, never missing a number for one year. He 
is very musical, is talented in both instrumental and vocal music. 

OLIVER J. AND ERNIE TURCK) BLACKLEDGE (5) 

Oliver Joseph Blackledge, son of Jason K. and Mary (Paxson ) Black- 
ledge, was born July 15, 1852, in Nottingham Township, Wells County, In- 
diana. 

Ernie Turck, daughter of and ( ) Turck, was born 

, , in and died October 11, 1875, in Jasper Count)', Iowa. 

Oliver J. Blackledge and Ernie Turck were married October — , 1874, in 
Jasper Count}', Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Virgil Blackledge 

He was boru in Jasper County, Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Blackledge lived in Iowa. 

After Mrs. Blackledge's death Mr. Blackledge was again married. 



OLIVER J. AND LIZZIE E. (MOLER) BLACKLEDGE (5) 

Lizzie E. Moler, daughter of John and Lydia A. (Crouds) Moler, was 
born January 16, 1S57, in Story Countv, Iowa. 



RFXORD OK THK CRISKl.L FAiriLY 389 

Oliver J. Blackledge and Lizzie E. Moler were united in marriage March 
8, 1877, in Jasper County, Iowa. 

TO THKM WEKK HORN 

Na?nc- Birth Death 

Zeller O. Blackledge June 17, 1878 April 12, 1899 

Thad L. Blackledge 

Janet A. Blackledge 

They were born in Jasper County, Iowa. 

Zeller C). died in Jasper County and was buried in the Mt. Zion Ciiurch 
Yard in the same count}'. 

Mr. and Mrs. Blackledge located in Jasper County, Iowa, where they 
lived until 1899, when, on account of failing health, they left their farm of two 
hundred acres and January 4, igoo, started for Corvallis, Benton County, Ore- 
gon, "the land of fruit and flowers," where they reside at the present time, Mr. 
Blackledge being one of the firm of J. D. Mann & Company, dealers in furni- 
furniture, carpets, wall paper and stoves, one of the largest establishments of 
its kind in that part of the Williamette Valley. 

At the age of four years Mr. Blackledge went with his father and family 
to Jasper County, Iowa, where most of his boyhood was spent. After he had 
completed the common school education he entered Hazel Dell Academy in 
Newton, Iowa, where he worked his way through school two years; afterward 
he taught in the public schools two years, then accepted a position as clerk in 
a mercantile establishment in Newton, where he remained for some time. 

Mrs. Blackledge's father was a teacher of music during his life and she 
commenced the same profession when she was seventeen years of age and fol- 
lowed it for a number of years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Blackledge are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

Mr. Blackledge served as superintendent of the Mt. Zion Sunday School 
several years and as president of the Township Sunday School Association two 
years. He has served his township in various offices and was also trustee of 
Palo Alto Township three years. After removing to Oregon he served as As- 
sistant Deputy County Clerk of Benton County for some time. 



LINDLEY N. AND AMANDA J. (BROWN) BLACKLEDGE (5) 

Lindley Ninde Blackledge, son of Jason R. and Mary (Paxson 1 I'-lack- 
ledge, was born December 22, 1854, in Nottingiiam 'fDunship, Wells County, 
Indiana. 

Amanda J. Brown, daughter of Isaac and Sarah jane (Brennan) Brown, 
was born April 4, 185a. in Jerusalem, Monroe County. ( Miio. 



3go RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

Lindlej' N. Blackledge and Amanda J. Brown were united in marriage 
March i, 1879, near Balbec, Jay County, Indiana, Albert Brunson, Justice of 
the Peace, officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Na»ir Birth Dca/h 

Theo Brennan Bbickledge December 10, 1879 August 6, 1880 

Cleola Mabel Blackledge August 4, 1881 

Ina Gaily Blackledge July 29, 1883 

Lude Brennan Blackledge January 5, 18S8 

Theo B. was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Cleola M., Ina G. and 
Lude B. in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Theo died in Newton, Jasper County, Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Blackledge are both graduates of the Penn Medical 
College, of Philadelphia, the latter having graduated in 1874 and the former 
in 1879. 

Dr. L. N. Blackledge says, ''I was a little past two j-ears of age when 
my parents moved to Jasper County, Iowa. At the age of nineteen I decided 
to go to Indiana and did so, remaining there about five months. After re- 
turning to Iowa I attended Hazel Dell Academy at Newton, Jasper Count\\ 
and three years later returned to Indiana where I studied one year in prepara- 
tion for my medical college course. At the end of that year I went to Phila- 
delphia and entered the Penn Medical College. After the first year's work 
there, in which I had kept myself on very limited means, I returned to Indiana. 
The following spring I was married to Miss Amanda Brown, whom I had met 
and become acquainted with during my first trip to Jay Count}', Indiana. In 
the fall we. returned to Philadelphia where I continued my studies and received 
my degree of M. D. in 1879. Then in company with my wife and baby, Theo 
B., we located in Newton, Jasper County, Iowa, and it was there that we met 
with our first great sorrow, the death of little Theo. Soon after we went to 
Indiana and located in Pennville, Ja\' County, where we lived twenty years, 
being engaged most of the time in the practice of our profession. In 1888-89 I 
attended the Indiana Dental College at Indianapolis, from which I received 
the degree of D. D. S. 

"Subse(iuently Mrs. Blackledge's health being very poor I took her to 
Colorado where we spent si,\ weeks. We then returned home and a few jears 
later I sold my property and in coinpanv with my family started, August 29, 
1899, on a trip through the west, with the expectation of locating pernianentl}'. 
We stopped in Co(]uille, Coos County, Oregon, remaining there about five 
weeks. We started to Pomona, California; after arriving in San Francisco we 
took the boat the rest of the way and during our voyage had the pleasure of 
seeing over fifty whales. We located in Pomona where I practiced medicine 
until the spring of 1900 when we removed to I-ong Beach of the same state. 
A little later I accepted an opening in the oil location at Pirn, where we reside 
at the present time, being engaged in the piactice of my profession." - 



1 



\ 



RECORD OF THE C.RISELI. FAMILY 39' 

Mrs. Blackledge's mother is of Irish and her father of English and 
Scotch descent. 

Mr. and Mrs. Blackledge are Liberalists in their religious views. He 
was President of the Indiana State Association of Spiritualists one year and 
has often conducted Spiritualist and Liberalist funerals. He is a very active 
and successful business man, and Mrs. Blackledge is a woman of superior 
natural abilities. Although of delicate constitution, by strong will and indomit- 
able energy, she has overcome many obstacles and gained much success in her 
profession. 

Ina G. Blackledge was a student in the high school of Pomona, Cali- 
fornia, from which she graduated in the spring of 1903. 



FRED AND GERTRUDE M. (BLACKLEDGE) COLBORN (5) 

Gertrude M. Blackledge, daughter of Jason R. and Mary (Pa.xson) 
Blackledge, was born Mav 28, 1868. near Newton, Jasper County, Iowa. 

Fred Colborn son of Wells and Lucy (Jones) Colborn, was born May 3, 
1861, in Geneva, Ontario County, New York. 

Fred Colborn and Gertrude M. Blackledge were united in marriage 
March 25, igoi, in Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Colborn reside in Denver, Colorado. Mr. Colborn is a 
carpenter by trade. 

Mr. Colborn's parents were both natives of New York. 

Gertrude M. Blackledge's early life was spent on a farm. She graduated 
from the district school about 1886 then entered the college at Grinnell, Iowa, 
taking such branches as would fit her for teaching in the public schools. At 
the age of eighteen years she taught her first year of school, when on account 
of poor health she was forced to give it up and went to Newton and learned 
dressmaking. She followed this trade for some time near home then went to 
Lincoln, Nebraska, where she was employed in two large dressmaking es- 
tablishments. 

The following autobiography of Mrs. Colborn was contributed for the 
Record: — 

"At the age of fourteen years I had been converted in the M. E. Church 
and had a desire for doing good. Shortly before going to Lincoln, Nebraska, 
after moving to Newton, Iowa, from the farm, I had become interested in the- 
Salvation Army and felt a call in that direction, but partly on account of not 
being willing to obey this call I went to Lincoln to get away from the inlluence 
the call of God had upon me. After a few months, knowing I was meded at 
home, I returned. At that time my only sister, Mattie, went into the Army 
work and I tried to feel it my duty to stay at home, but I again became 
interested in the Army and its nol)le work of saving souls and the call came 
back plainer than before. I left the church and became a member of the Army 



392 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

but the 'still small voice of God' called me into greater fields of labor and it 
meant for me to leave my home where it seemed I was needed and go into an 
unfriendly world alone for our Saviour. I tried to disobey the call and reason 
with myself that I could do as much good at home as away, but God did not 
will it so and still plead for me. I was very timid about taking such a step but 
at last after being a member of the Army one and one-half years I paid the 
price, left my friends and followed Jesus. Then it was that the real light of 
God's love filled my soul and prepared me for the work. 

•'I went to the Salvation Army Training Home in Des Moines, Iowa, where 
for nine weeks I had special training under our officers, Adjutant McAbee and 
Captain Long, who were consecrated women and full of the Holy Ghost. Our 
work was planned in such a wa}' as to give us special time for each duty. We 
had hours for studying the Bible, thus preparing ourselves for standing before 
great crowds of people and telling them of the love of God; days for visiting the 
saloons and introducing ourselves by taking those people our weekly paper, 
thus giving us the opportunit}^ of talking to them of purer and nobler lives: 
a special time for calling on the poor and rich in their homes and talking to 
them of their souls; days of housework, etc. Ever}' night we had an open air 
meeting and a meeting in our hall where we had the pleasure of seeing many- 
souls saved. 

"After leaving the Training Home I was sent to several towns in Iowa 
where I generally stayed about four months each place and assisted a lad}' each 
time who was the captain in command while I was given the rank of lieu- 
tenant. Later I was sent to Nebraska to work for some time, and from there 
to Colorado to assist my sister Mattie. After being with her for several months 
I was given the promotion to that of captain and sent in charge of our work to 
several towns in Colorado, two years of my time being spent in the high 
altitude towns, such as Central City, Leadville and Cripple Creek. I spent six 
and one-half years in their service when on account of poor health I had to* 
give up the grand work. For several months I lived with the officers in charge 
of the social work of the Army and did what I was able to do there. While 
with them I met the one who afterwards became my husband. 

"Mr. Colborn and I were married by Major Peebles who had full charge 
of the Army work of Colorado. We had a public wedding in Colorado Springs, 
on Monday night. March 25, igoi." 



FREDRICK AND MATTIE RAY (BLACKLEDGE) YOUNG (5) 

Mattie Ray Blackledge, daughter of Jason R. and Mary (Paxson) Black- 
ledge, was born February 21, 1872, near Newton, Jasper County, Iowa. 

Fredrick \'oung, son of Alfred and Eliza (Scott) Young, was born Octo- 
ber 8, 1868, in Sittingbourne, Kent County, England. 

Fredrick Young and Mattie R. Blackledge were united in marriage May 
9, i8g8, in Flint, Miciiigan. 



RE(;ORD OF THE GRISRLL FAjriLY 393 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 
Burnice Wilbur Young DecemlK-r 29, 1899 , 

He was born in Denver, Colorado. 

Mr. and Mrs. Young reside in Denvt-r, Colorado, he being engaged as 
engineer for the Denver & Rio Grande R. R. Company since 1892. 

Mr. Young is of English parentage. 

Mr. and Mrs. Young, not being able to resume Army work, have united 
with the First Congregational Church of Denver. 

Mattie K. Blackledge remained with her parents and attended the coun- 
try schools until her sixteenth year, when she entered De.xter Norinal College, 
Dexter, Iowa, which she attended one year. Later she entered the Hazel Dell 
Academy of Newton, Iowa. 

The following autobiography was contributed for the Record : — 

'Tn my nineteenth year, for the first time, I met the Salvation Army and 
united with it in April of the same year, leaving Newton in September for the 
Training Home at Omaha, Nebraska, where 1 was prepared for the Army work 
as an officer. In the Training Home we did our own work, visited among the 
rich and poor alike three days per week, sold the army papers two days per 
week, attended ineeting every night, both indoor and out, and had four meet- 
ings every Sunday, besides conducting jail and saloon meetings. We sat up 
with the sick and in every way made ourselves useful. After four months of 
study I was sent out as an officer, my first appointment being Oskaloosa, Iowa. 

"I have worked in the following states: Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri, Col- 
orado, Ohio, Indiana, New York, Illinois and Michigan, being engaged in 
various branches of the work during my six and one-half years service — corps 
work — where we held nightly meetings, visiting poor and needy, finding em- 
ployment for our converts and teaching them industry. We visited dives and 
saloons for the purpose of uplifting the fallen and discouraged, endeavoring to 
point them to a higher life and tried to keep in touch with all so as to maki' the 
world better by aiding the individuals. 

"The work is very interesting and helpful, for one sees the results of 
their labors. It is a life of hard trials and self-denial, but when you realize it 
is a chosen work and one blessed of God, it makes hard trials easy and dark 
days bright. It often means to be misunderstood by those whom you love, but 
when you know your place it is easy to remain at your post of duty. 

"Some of my time was spent in Cleveland, Ohio, in the Rescue Work. 
This comprises work among fallen women and girls. It is such sad but \ery 
needful work. W'e visited dives, wine rooms, jails, and in fact every place of 
sin where women congregate. We tried to persuade them to leave tiieir lives 
of wickedness and enter the paths of virtue and right. We offered all w ho were 
willing to leave such surroundings a home, with the promise to remain at least 
three months. It requires such patience, such knowledge of character, such 
leaning on the Everlasting Arm to be enabled to make .i success ot this branch 



394 



RK.C'ORI) OF THE GRISEI.I. FAMILY 



of the work. No one but those who have studied on this problem and seen 
with their own eyes have any idea to what depths of darkness some of our fair 
sisters of this land sink to — such crimes, such vileness, such degradation. We 
find them all the way from nine years old to grey-haired women. You can 
search the slums of 3'our cities — they are there; you can visit the wealthy — they 
are there also. In every stage of life we find them. What a pity! It requires 
with our help the God of Heaven and all his hosts to keep such women good 
when once they have fallen. 

"In the Rescue Home where we invite them, we teach and train them to 
do all kinds of work, housework, fine needle work, dressmaking, book-binding, 
etc., in order to prepare them to fill a position by which they may earn an 
honest living, free from shame. We find that about seventy per cent of those 
who enter the home turn out satisfactory. They are kept in the home until 
they are converted and show by their lives a true, repentant and sincere desire 
to live right, and also until they have made a success of some branch of work 
so they are enabled to enter some good home or accept some honest position. 

"One incident will give an idea of the hardness or difficulties en- 
countered to handle this class of people, for this work is considered the hardest 
of all branches. While in Cleveland we had, at one time, over thirty inmates 
in the Home. We also had five women officers and needed more to look after 
such a lot of unmanageable persons. There was an American girl, Mary, who 
had married a Chinese doctor. He taught her the use of opium, beer, morphine, 
in fact all drugs. After entering the Home one morning she failed to come down 
stairs for breakfast. I coa.xed, I plead and did most everything I cound think 
of to get her started, but 'not until she had a glass of beer,' she informed me, 
would she stir. I was firm and told her she could not have it, whereupon she 
sprang at me like a tigress, and as I am a very small woman I was at her mercy. 
She was so angry she pushed or threw me backwards down a flight of long 
winding stairs and I received an injury from which I will never recover. I landed 
on the dining room floor where all the girls were at breakfast. I saw an old 
woman who had served thirty-two years behind the prison bars reaching for a 
long butcher-knife and start toward my pursuer, but one of the officers 
happened to be present and pushed the infuriated Mar}^ into a closet at the 
foot of the stairs and locked the door just in time to prevent a murder. 

"\'ery seldom more than one person is in such a frame of mind at one 
time, so there is always someone to take our part in the greatest hour of need. 
The girls always show us the deepest of respect when not angry Mary proved 
to be too hard a case for us to handle and at last we had to turn her over to 
the police officers. But man\' similar cases have turned out remarkabl}' well, 
afti-r much patience and hard work. 

"From the Rescue Work I was transferred to the Training Home De- 
partment in Cincinnati, Ohio, where 1 had charge of all studies given to those 
being trained for officership. I enjo3'ed this work e.Ktremely well. It was a 
treat to be once more among congenial surroundings and people of your own 
standing socially and in everj' way, but we love to be able to do all kinds of 



RECORD OF THE GRISEEL FAMILY 395 

work and understand each branch so we can be familiar with all the Army 
work. 

'■From the Training Home I did church work in Indiana for a sliort time, 
that is explaining our work in the dilferent churches where we had no Army 
operating. 

"I spent some time at the national headquarters in New York City, as 
bookkeeper in the financial department. 

"After serving over six years, my health being greatly impaired, 1 found 
it impossible to continue in the work longer. I was married to Fredrick ^'ou^g 
by the Public Army ceremony, conducted by Lieutenant Colonel French of 
Chicago, Illinois. After the ceremony and reception we left for our future home 
in Denver, Colorado." 



WILLIAM AND ELIZABETH E. (SOWDERS) WILSON (5) 

William Wright Wilson, son of Joseph and Sabina (Grisell) Wilson, 
was born August 27, 1839, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Elizabeth Ellen Sowders, daughter of Michael and Margaret (Cannon) 
Sowders, was born October 22, 1838, near Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

William W. Wilson and Elizabeth E. Sowders were united in marriage 
October 22, i860, near Mound City. Linn County, Kansas, Rev. Thomas 
Swaggerty, minister of the M. E. Church, officiating. 

TO I 11 I'M WERE HORN 

Nam,- Biitli D,alh 

Joseph William Wilson November 15, 1861 

He was born near Mound Cit}-, Linu County, Kansas. 

In March, 1856, William W. Wilson went with his father and other 
members of the family to Lee County, Iowa. From thence they went to Linn 
County, Kansas, August 1858. There they joined other early settlers of that 
historic country in the battle for life and liberty. John Brown, James Mont- 
gomery and James H. Lane were frequent visitors at their humble cabin home. 
While Mr. Wilson did not play any conspicuous part in the bloody drama en- 
acted in that country in the early years of their battle for freedom, yet he 
promptly responded to every call for his services with such weapons as lie had 
in the repelling of invasion, and did all he could to bring Kansas into the 
glorious union of commonwealths as a fiee state, where all created in (iod's 
mage, regardless of race or color, stand equal before the law. 

He says: "My avocation, since my earliest remembrance, has hi. n as a 
tiller of the soil. Since setting up my 'tabernacle' in Kansas I ha\c had my 
'ups and downs.' Sometimes the meal and meat have all been out. and even 
the rabbits were hard to catch, and thv future was dark enough, b\it an abiciing 
faith in tiie goodness of a divinity that shapes our ends, we have been sustained 



396 KICCORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

and have surmounted every adversity and the clouds have ever passed away. 
Now, in our advanced age, we are surrounded with a sufficiency of worldly 
goods that assures comfort for the years yet allotted us. 

"The allurements of the glorious climate of far-off California induced us 
to go there in the year 1888, but we found that 'all is not gold that glitters,' 
and returned to our 'Jayhawker' home the following year." 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are both members in good standing in the Congre- 
gational Church, and yet as, he says, "we have not lost sight of the cardinal 
principles, nor greatly departed from the faith and life of our good old fore- 
fathers in the (Quaker faith. Grand old men and women were our foreparents." 

Mrs. Wilson's father, Micheal Sowders, was a native of Columbiana 
County, Ohio, and died in Warrensburgh, Johnson County, Missouri, in 1880. 
Her mother, Margaret (Cannon) Sowders, was also a native of Ohio, and now 
at the advanced age of eigiity-nine she is living in Garfield County, Oklahoma. 

Mr. Wilson has always maintained a reputation for integrity and mor- 
ality that entitles him to a just recognition as one of our best citizens. His 
present home is near Mound City, Linn County, Kansas. 

Written by one who has lieen an intimate friend of the family for the past 
forty 3'ears and is glad to speak honest words of praise for one who truly merits 
tiiem. 



DAVID F. AND HANNAH A. (WILSON) HOOVER (5) 

Hannah Ann Wilson, daughter of Joseph and Sabina (Grisell) Wilson, 
was born December 21, 1842, in Penn Township. Jay County, Indiana. 

David Frederick Hoover, son of John V. and Rhoda (Wright) Hoover, 
was born July 25, 1841, in Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

David F. Hoover and Hannah A. W'ilson were united in marriage .Vpril 
7, 1864, in l\-nn Township, Jay ("ounty, Indiana. 

TO iUKM WEKK l;OKN 

Nirm,- Birth Death 

Lewis W. Hoover Jnne 12, 1865 

Frederick Hoover April 15, 1866 May 4, 1874 

Emma Alict- Hoover March 3, 1869 

Wilbur Curtis Hoover January 12, 1871 

Florence Fay Hoover November 18, 1872 May 7, 1883 

Cora Leona Hoover April 10, 1875 

Edgar Hoover February 10, 1877 

Grace Grisell Hoover August 9, 1880 

Lydia Eleanor Hoover October 4, 1882 

Mary H. Hoover August 2, 1884 October i, 1884 

David Nt'il Hoover. November i, 1886 



RECORD OF THK GRISELL FAMILY 397 

They were all born in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, except 
David N. who was born in New Corydon in the same state and county. 

Frederick, Florence F. and Mary II. died near Pennville and were 
buried in the Friends' Cemetery of that place. 

Wilbur graduated from the Portland high school in tile spring of i8go 
and subsequently accepted a position as bookkeeper in the large mercantile 
establishment of Cartwright & Headington, located in Portland, Indiana. 

Edgar and Grace graduated from the high school of Pennville in 1898. 
Since then Grace has taken up teaching as a profession and Edgar took a busi- 
ness course in Cleveland, Ohio. 

Eydia E. graduated from the Pennville high school in igoi and has since 
taught in the public schools of Penn Township. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hoover located in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, 
after their marriage, where Mr. Hoover was engaged in agricultural pursuits. 
In 1884 he came into possession of a saw mill at New Corydon of the same 
county and state, which he operated successfully for two years. After being 
elected County Treasurer he removed to the county seat, Portland, where he 
served in this position two terms with honor to himself and supporters. At the 
expiration of the second term he with his family removed to their country home 
near Pennville, where they have since resided. In 1899 Mr. Hoover was ap- 
pointed a member of the Jay County Council by Governor Mount, and in 1900 
was elected to that ofhce for a term of two years. He is of German and Irish 
descent. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hoover started out in life with very little financial aid, and 
through their continued energy and industry they have acquired as nice a rural 
home as is often found, and above that, they have the satisfaction of well lived 
lives, with the respect of many friends and a family of whom they may well 
be proud. 

They are both members of the Hicksite brancli of the Friends' Society 
of Pennville. 

Emma A. was united in marriage to Josepii Lambert of Assumption. 
Illinois. They have one child, a boy. Further information could not be 
gained. 



EZEKIEL M. AND MARIA M. (WILSON) HIATT (5) 

Maria Meredith Wilson, daughter of Joseph and Sabina ( Grisell ) Wil- 
son, was born March 10, 1844, nt-ar Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Ezekiel Marmaduke Hiatt, son of John and Eleanor (Shelly) Hiatt, was 
born July 24, 1838, near Fountain City, Wayne County, Indiana, and (hi d Feb- 
ruary 10, 1899, near Critzer, Linn County, Kansas. 

Ezekiel M. Hiatt and Maria M. Wilson were united in marriagr October 
4, 1866, in Portland, |a\ County, Indiana, by Rev. Stovenour, minister of the 
Free Will l!ai)tist Church of that place. 



3g8 RKCOKD OF IHK GRISEI.I, FAMILY 

10 THlvM WERE HORN 

JVamr Birth Dratli 

Albert Samuel Hiatt September 28, 1867 

Marian Eleanor Hiatt September ig, i86g 

E^chvard Warren Hiatt February 23, 1874 

Ora Grace Hiatt August 25, 1875 

Chester Arthur Hiatt April i, 1880 

They were all born in Penn Township, Jay County. Indiana, I'xcepting 
Chester A., who was born near Critzer, Linn County, Kansas. 

Mr. Hiatt was of Scotch and English descent. His parents were natives 
of \orth Carolina but removed to Wayne County, Indiana, a few years before 
his birth. 

At an early age Mr. Hiatt acquired more than an ordinary education for 
that time, in his native state, having finished his school work in Liber College, 
near Portland. Indiana. For a number of years he was a well known and suc- 
cessful teacher in the public schools of Jay County, Indiana, and afterward 
taught for some time in Linn County. Kansas. Later in life he began farming 
and continued in that pursuit until his death. 

Mr. Hiatt enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Fifty-Third Regi- 
ment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry, February 10, 1865, in Pennville, Jay 
County, Indiana, and was honorably discharged September 4, 1865, at Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, having served as First Orderly Sergeant in the Arm)' of the 
C^uuiberland. 

Mrs. Hiatt is a birthright member of the Society of Friends. After the 
death of her mother, which occurred when she was about twelve years of age, 
she lived with her grandfather, Samuel Grisell, until her marriage. She was 
considered a very fine penman and taught several classes in penmanship. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Hiatt located near Pennville, Jay 
County, Indiana, where they lived several years. In the fall of 1878 they de- 
cided to go west and fitted out two teams and wagons and Mr. Hiatt and eldest 
son took the household goods and traveled overland, arriving five weeks later 
in Linn County, Kansas. Mrs. Hiatt and three youngest children went by rail. 
They located on a farm near Critzer, where they have since lived. 

.'Mbert S. Hiatt attended the Kansas Normal College at Fort Scott, Kan- 
sas, one term, after receiving a good public school education. He then took 
the teachers examination and secured a certificate but failed to get a school, so 
he went with his uncle, \Vm. Wilson, and family, to California in i88g. He 
spent his first summer tliere in the wildest part of the Sierra Nevada Moun- 
tains with a dairyman, and part of the two following winters in the Placerville 
Grammar Schools. In i8gi lie entered the preparatory department of Napa 
College, a branch of the University of the Pacific, the oldest University on the 
Pacific coast. He graduated from here the next year as president of the class 
The following year he matriculated as a student in the Classical Course of the 
College Department and graduated four years later as President of the Class of 



RECORD OF THK ORISEI.L KAMIl.N' 399 

'g6 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. The next year he entered the Leland 
Stanford, Jr., University at Palo Alto, California, and graduated with the class 
of '97 with the degree of Bachelor of .Arts in liconomics and Sociology. 

Soon after finishing his studies at the University he sailed for the Alas- 
kan gold fields, spending more than two years in and around the Klondike dis- 
trict prospecting and mining. He returned to San Francisco in 1900, and 
thence to his old home in Linn County, Kansas, where he has since been em- 
ployed in farming and teaching. At present (1902) he is employed as in- 
structor in the Blue Mound High Schools. 

Grace Hiatt, without the opportunity that many have for fitting theni- 
selvt:s for professional work, by perseverance has risen to be one of Linn 
County's most successful teachers. She began teaching when she was sixteen 
years of age and has taught almost every winter since that time. She holds a 
first grade certificate. 

Chester Hiatt is also a successful public school teacher. He began 
teaching in his eighteenth year and has taught consecutively the last four years. 



ANSON L. AND REBECCA L. (IREY) HIATT (5) 

Anson Luther Hiatt, son of Martin and Martha (Grisell) Hiatt, was born 
November 27, 1838, in Penn Township, Jay County. Indiana. 

Rebecca Lewis Irey, daughter of Jonah and Ann (Wilkins) Irey, was 
born May 20, 1846, in Wabash County, Indiana. 

Anson L. Hiatt and Rebecca L. Irey were united in marriage March ly, 
1864, in Huntington, Huntington County, Indiana. 

TO IHEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth • Death 

Meredith Hiatt August 22, iS6g August 6, 1898 

Jesse Hiatt November 25, 1878 

Wilmer J. Hiatt September 17,1883 

Meredith was born in IVnnville, Jay County, and Jesse and Wilmer J. 
in Nottingham Township, Wells County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hiatt lived a short time in Pennville and then removed to 
Nottingham Township, Wells County, where they lived several years. .\t 
present they reside in Marion, Grant County. Indiana. 

Mrs. Hiatt is of English and Irish descent. They are both members ol 
the Hicksite Friends' Society. 

Mr. Hiatt is a mechanic. He is a lover of good literature, and while 
not having the best advantages for an education in the early days, has added so 
much to his primary learning through his reading that he now possesses an ex- 
tensive knowledge of all past and current events. He was a soldier in the civil 
war and participated in a number of engagements, and at the expiration of his 
term returned with an honorable discharge. 



400 



I UK liKISF.I.L FAMILY 



DAVID AND SARAH A. (HIATT) HODGINS (5) 

Sarah Ann Hiatt, daugliter of Martin and Martha (Grisell) Hiatt, was 
born March 12. 1840. near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

David Hodgins, son of Joel and ( ) Ilodgins, was born 

, , in . 

David Hodgins and Sarah A. Hiatt were nnited in marriage August 21, 
1H59, in Behiiont Township, Warren County, Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Charles Hodgins Jw"'-' 4> i860 

William Hodgins December 14, 1861 

Cora M. Hodgins April i, 1864 

Ella J. Hodgins September 21, 1867 

Minnie E. Hodgins August 24, 1868 

Harry E. Hodgins November 30, 1873 

They were all born in Belmont Township, Warren County-. Iowa. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hodgins' present address is Milo, Warren County, Iowa. 
Cora M. married a Mr. Ralph, and Ella J. married a Mr. Shepherd, and 
Minnie married a Mr. Breese. 

After careful inquiry we could get no further knowledge of this famih'. 

HIRAM G. AND CARRIE (ROOKER) HIATT (5) 

Hiram Grisell Hiatt, son of Martin and Martha (Grisell) Hiatt, was born 
July 17, 1844, near Pennville, and died August 18. 1870, near Pennville, Jay 
County, Indiana. His remains are interred in the Friends' Cemetery at Penn- 
ville. 

Carrie Kooker, daughter of and ( ) Rooker, was born 



Hiram G. Hiatt and Carrie Rooker were united in marriage October 18 
1865, in Belmont Township, Warren County, Iowa. 

II) THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Charles IMeredith Hiatt September 17. 1866 March 14, 1894 

He w;is born near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hiatt lived near Pennville where Mr. Iliatt was engaged 
in farming until tlie time of his death. 

We have been informed by friends of Charles M. Hiatt that he was an 
exct ptionally brilli:int young man. After graduating from the iiublic schools 
he entered the Beloit, Wisconsin, College, wliere he graduated in law. Sub- 



RECORD OF THK C Rl S K 1,1, FAMILY 4OI 

sequently he was admitted to the bar and practiced in Clarion, Wright Connty, 
Iowa, but on account of poor heaUh he was forced to go to Colorado, where he 
practiced law in Pueblo. His fine success only continued long enough for his 
friends and relatives to realize their bright anticipation of his rare ability, when 
the dread disease consumption claimed him for its victim. 

"We mourn for those whose laurels fade, 
Whose greatness in the grave is laid." 

His funeral was conducted b\' the I. O. O. F. Lodge of which he was a 
member. 



JAMES B. AND MARIA M. (HIATT) DUNN (5) 

Maria Meredith Hiatt, daugiiter of Martin and Martha (Grisell) Hiatt, 
was born February 23, 1849, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

James B. Dunn, son of and ( ) Dunn, was born 

March 5, 1844, in . 

James B. Dunn and Mariah M. Hiatt were united in marriage about 1865. 

TO THEM WV.UV I!(1RN 

JVamc lUilli Death 

William Martin Dunn January 12,1867 

Martha Hester Dunn July 15,1868 



Hiram Wesley Dunn August 21, 1870 

Francis Elmer Dunn November il, 1872 

Samuel Louis Dunn September 7, 1874 September 2, 1898 

Charles Wilbur Dunn September 17, 1876 

James Albert Dunn March 24, 1879 

Clarence Lester Dunn April 24, 1887 

Lawrence Chester Dunn March 17, 1889 

They were born in Iowa. 

Samuel L. Dunn's death occurred in San I'rancisco, California, where he 
had gone with Company L Fifty-First Regiment of the Iowa \'olunteers, in the 
Spanish-American War. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dunn reside in Leiio.x, Taylor County, Iowa. 

After careful incphry we havi- l)een unabk' to complete this family recoid. 



WILLIAM AND MARGARET D. (GRISELL) ALLEN (S) 

Margaret Deaver Grisell, daughl^c r of Amos and b'.li/abeth M. ( Lupton) 
Ciriscll, was born March 19, 1844, mar I 'iiunilli-, Jay County, Indiana. 

2O 



402 KKCOKD OF THE GRISELl. FAMILY 

William Allen, son of William and Jane (Weeks) Allen, was born Feb- 
ruar)' 28, 1840, in Williamsport, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania. 

William Allen and Margaret D. Grisell were united in marriage April 2, 
1872, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Eva June Allen June 11,1877 August 2,1877 

She was born in Pennville, Jay Count}', Indiana. 

In April, 1881, Mr. and Mrs. Allen took Julia May Rowe into their home 
and cared for her as their cliild until her marriage. 

Mrs. Allen was a student of Liber College, where she finished her 
preparation for school teaching, afterwards following that profession for four- 
teen years. 

A minister from the Netherlands has said, "The Dntcli mother-country 
is proud of the history of her sons in the land of the West." 

William Allen, a descendant of the Dutch ancestry, was one of the 
"sons" who helped the Union to win their well-deserved victory a few years 
ago. We will add a brief account of his service as he has given it to us. 

William AlKn enlisted as a private in the civil war at Williamsport, 
Penns)lvania, and was enrolled in Company E, Third Regiment Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Artillery, February 25, 1864, being mustered into the service 
of the United States as sucii for the period of three years. By order the regi- 
ment started to Washington, D. C, and passing through Baltimore arrived at 
the Capital, and from there crossed the Potomac river to Alexandria. Virginia, 
where they remained about four days. From there they were ordered to Fort- 
ress Monroe, Virginia, headquarters of the Pennsylvania Third Artillery, where 
they did guard duty and light ship service. After about nine months service 
there they were detailed to the front of Petersburg, \'irginia, and from there 
they passed to the city front and up the Appomatta.x river to Fort Spring Hill. 
Here they remained until Lee had surrendered Richmond and retreated; then 
they were ordered back to Fortress Monroe to their regiment, and the Fourth 
U. S. Artillery was sent to relieve them, and they were mustered out of the 
U. S. service at Fortress Monroe, Virginia, and received their final discharges 
in Pliiladelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Subsequent to his discharge from the army Mr. Allen emigrated to Jay 
County. Indiana, where he has made his permanent home. He is of Dutch 
descent. 

Mr. and Mrs. .VUen have been engaged in the mercantile business in 
Pennville, Ja\ ("ounty, Indiana, for more than fifteen years. They are both 
numbers of thi Methodist Episcopal Church and are quite prominent in lodge 
circles, Mr. Allen being a member of the I. O. O. F. and the Masonic fraterni- 
ties and subordinate lodges, while Mrs. Allen belongs to the Eastern Star and 
Meredith Rebekah Lodges. 



RECORD UK iHK i:KISK[,L FAMILY 403 



CHALKLEY AND SABINA W. (GRISELL) MEREDITH '5) 

Sabina Wilson Grisell, daughter of Amos and Elizabetli M. (Lupton) 
Grisell, was born September 13, i!S46, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana, 
and died November 29, 1889, in Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Chalkley Meredith, son of James and Mary (Malsby) Mereditli, was 
born November 10, 1844, near Centervillu, Wavae County, Indiana, and died 
February 10, 1902, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Chalkley Meredith and Sabina W. Grisell were united in marriage April 
2, 1867, near Pennville, Jay County. Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Bir/Ji Death 

Maggie Grisell Meredith. , March 31,1868 

John Malsby Meredith February 27,1870 May 10,1895 

Arthur Lukens Meredith July 11,1872 

Rachel Vanzant Meredith J"ly 10, 1876 

Grace Lupton Meredith July 17, 1880 

Maggie G., John M. and Arthur L. were all born in Penn Township, 
and Rachel V. and Grace L. in Jackson Township of Jay County, Indiana. 

Jolm M. died in Arizona, where he had gone to recuperate iiis failing 
health. 

Rachel V. has been in Lordsburg, Los Angeles County, California, for 
the past four or five years, where she is making her home with her uncle Lewis 
Meredith. She had endeared herself to many at her former home by her nat- 
ural sweetness of character and sympathetic disposition. 

She is a member of the Meredith Rebekah Lodge, No. 513, of Pennville, 
Jay County, Indiana, and is a birthright member of the Friends' Society. 

Mr. and Mrs. Meredith first lived on a farm in Penn Township, where 
they remained several years, afterward moving to Jackson Township of the 
same county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Meredith were both students at Liber College of Jay 
County before their marriage, after which the former attended the Friends' 
School in Richmond and the latter taught in the public schools of Jay County 
one year. He was of Welsh descent. 

After Mrs. Meredith's death Mr. Meredith removed to Pennville where 
he remained until his death. He served as Justice of the Peace for nearly 
eight years. 

We copy the following extracts from his death notice: — 

"Chalkley Meredith, Justice of the Peace of Penn Township and well 
known to almost all the people of this locality, died on Mondav last at 1:30 
o'clock after an illness of only one day. He had been on our streets the day 



404 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

before his death, and returning to his home after noon on Sunday was immedi- 
ately prostrated by an attack of acute pneumonia, and though every available 
remedy was resorted to and the best of medical attention was given, all was of 
no avail; the end came quickly and almost without warning. 

"Mr. Meredith came with his parents to Jay County about 1855 and has 
been a resident of Pennville and vicinity since that time. His parents were 
both members of the Society of Friends. 

"Mr. Meredith commanded the respect of all who knew him because of 
his innate goodness and upright charact'-r. He was always honorable and just 
in his dealings, and the writer of this who knew him intimately from boyhood 
can truthful!}' say he never had an enemy who had cause of offense. 

"He became an Odd Fellow in 1895 and was an active member of the 
subordinate and Rebekah Lodges and the Encampment until his death. In 
both private and public circles he will be sadly missed. He was in every way 
a useful citizen and his death has caused the keenest sorrow in the hearts of all 
who knew him." 

The funeral took place from the M. E. Church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Meredith were both members of the Society of Friends 
and their remains were interred in the Friends' Cemetery of that place. 



JEPTH./Si AND ABIG.4L L. GRISELL) GAYNO *S) 

Abigal Lupton Grisell, daughter of .\mos and Elizabeth M. (Lupton) 
Grisell, was born June 6, 1851, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana, and died 
Maj' I. 1892. at the place of her birth. She was interred in the Friends' Cem- 
eter\' of Pennville. 

Jeptha Gayno, son of Thomas and Sarilda (MuUin") Gayno, was born 
August 19, 1854, in Washington C. H., Fayette County, Ohio, and died Sep- 
tember 16, 1880, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. He was interred in the 
cemetery of that place. 

Abigal L. Grisell and Jeptha Gayno were united in marriage February 
13, 1879, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

No children. 

After their marriage they moved to his former home in Washington C. H., 
Fayette County, Ohio, where they remained a short time, Mr. Gayno follow ing 
his trade as butcher in which he was considered very efficient. Thev returned 
to Pennville a short time before his deatli. He was of F'rench and Irish de- 
scent. 

Mrs. Gayno was a student in Liber College after receiving a good public 
school education. She was a member of the Friends' Society. After Mr. 
Gayno's death Mrs. Gayno was again married. 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 4O5 

GILBERT AND ABIGAL (GRISELL) (GAYNO) HIATT (5) 

Gilbert Hiatt, son of Jonathan and Kiith (Hiatt) Iliatt, was born August 
24. 1835, near Winchester, Randolph County, Indiana, and died July i, 1886, 
in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. His remains were interred in the Friends' 
Cemetery of the same place. 

Gilbert Hiatt and Abigal (Grisell) Gayno were united in marriage De- 
cember 3, 1884, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hiatt located in Pennville where they lived until their 
death. Mr. Hiatt devoted most of his life to farming. 

Gilbert Hiatt was of German descent. The following is a brief sketch 
of his ancestry: — 

■■John Van Hyatt, a German, came from England to America with Wil- 
liam Penn in i6rfi, settling in what is now known as Pennsylvania. On arriv- 
ing in this country he left off the 'Van,' thus dropping the German title to his 
name. 

John (Van) Hyatt had three sons, two of whom settled in Carolina and 
changed the spelling of their name to Hiatt, instead of Hyatt. The Indiana 
Hiatts descended from the families. 

The other brother remained near Philadelphia and still spelled the name 
Hyatt, consequently these are sometimes called the German Hyatts but they 
are originally all of the same family. 



NATHAN A. AND JENNIE (SOMERS) GRISELL (5) 

Nathan Amos Grisell, son of Amos and Elizabeth M. (Luptoii) Grisell, 
was born March 19, 1856, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Jennie Somers, daughter of Aaron L. and Margaret (Fields) Somers, 
was born July 12, 1862, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Nathan A. Grisell and Jennie Somers were united in marriage December 
15, 1881, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE ISGRN 

Name Birth Death 

Raymond Allen Grisell December 12, 1884 

Frank Grisell February 10, i88g 

They were both born in Penn Township, Ja}' Count\, Indiana, tin- former 
near Fiat and the latter near Pennville. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell have always lived in Penn Township and at present 
reside near Pennville where they are successfully engaged in farming. Mr. 
(irisell is another of the many students (jf Liber College, which in the early 



4o6 KliCORl) OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

establishment of schools in Jay County was considered an excellent educational 
institution, and all of the young people of that county who could attended there 
after they had acquired instruction from the then scattered schools. 

Mrs. Grisell's father was born in Gloucester Count}^, New Jersey, and 
her mother was a native of Pickaway County, Ohio. Mr. Somers was a soldier 
in the civil war. He enlisted in Company B, Eleventh Indiana Cavalry, in 
1863: he served principally in the state of Alabama. While going to Louisville, 
Kentucky, he was taken sick and died at Munfordville, Kentucky, November 
5, 1864. 

Mrs. Grisell is of English and Dutch descent. 

Raj-mond is now ( 1902) a student in the second year of the high school 
in Pennville, and Frank is attending the common grades. 



HIRAM L. AND LYDIA J. GRAY) GRISELL (5) 

Hiram Lawrence Grisell, son of Hiram and Sarah A. (Spencer) Grisell, 
was born September 22, 1848, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Lydia Jane Gray, daughter of Elijah and Charlotte (Davidson) Gray, 
was born May 3, 1842, near Jerusalem, Monroe County, Ohio. 

Hiram L. Grisell and Lydia J. Gray were united in marriage August 15, 
1865, near Portland, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

A'lime Birth Death 



Martin Luther Grisell September 4, i85g 

Alta May Grisell October 23, 1871 

Carrie Ellen Grisell March 25, 1878 December 12, 1881 

Harry Lewis Grisell June 12, 1880 

Martin L. was born in J^'rusalem, Monroe County, Ohio; Alta M. and 
Carrie E. in PennvilK-, Jay County, Indiana, and Harry L. in Hastings, Ne- 
braska. 

Carrie L. died in Hastings, Nebraska, and was interred in the cemeterj' 
of that place. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell removed to Ohio soon after their marriage and 
located in Jerusalem, Monroe County, where they lived until about 1870. They 
then retunii d to their former home in Pennville, Indiana, where Mr. Grisell 
was engagLcl some time in the mercantile business. While living here a patent 
was granted him for a meritorious invention in the form of a "self-calculating 
scales" for weif^liing and conijjuting the amount given at an}' given price per 
pound. Owing to lack of financial aid to introduce the invention it availed him 
nothing and has since become public property' by expiration of time granted. 

Late in the winter of 1879 Mr. Grisell and family removeil to Hastings, 
Nebraska, where hi- was engaged as watchmaker and jeweler for the firm of Hirsh 



RECORD OF THE GRISKI.L FAMILY 4O7 

& Co. In 1884 he received an appointment of Chief of Police, in which capacity- 
he served two years with credit and honor to himself and the city. 

Jn 1886 there was a new country being opened up in the state of Col- 
orado, and with his family he started to explore it, and settled in Yuma, Yuma 
Count}', of that state, where the}* lived nine years. In 1895, in search of 
warmer climate, Mr. Grisell and familv again removed and this time located at 
Lawing, Christian County, Missouri, where they own a beautiful home of 160 
acres in the valley of the Ozark Mountains. Mr. Grisell is engaged in caring 
for the mining j)roperty of which James Stanley Brown is president. The latter 
is a resident of Glasgow, Scotland. 

Mr. Grisell was a union soldier in the civil war, having enlisted in Com- 
pany G, One Hundred and Thirty-eighth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, 
under Captain I. N. Wherrett. He enlisted at the age of fifteen years, toward 
the close of the war, after having made many fruitless attempts. At the ex- 
piration of his service the war was over. 

Mrs. Grisell is one of the descendants of Reece and Ann (Lewis) Davis. 



ANDREW K. AND ESTHER M. (MEREDITH) NUCKLES (5) 

Esther Malsby Meredith, daughter of Peter S. and Maria (Grisell) 
Meredith, was born March 26, 1845, in Richmond, Wayne County, Indiana, 
and died November 9, 1865, near F'ennvilk-, Jay County Indiana. 

Andrew K. Nuckles, son of Robert and Frances (Wilkinson) Nuckles, 
was born January 23, 1838, in Fayette County, Ohio, and died December — , 
1892, in Appleton, Cape Girardeau County, Missouri. 

Andrew K. Nuckles and Esther M. Mereiiith were united in marriage [uly 
27, 1865, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

No children. 

During their short married life Mr. and Mrs. Nuckles lived at the home 
of Mrs. Nuckles' parents near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana, where they were 
engaged in farming. Mr. Nuckles was of Scotch and English descent. 



SAMUEL G. AND CARRIE L. (SMITH. MEREDITH (5) 

Samuel Grisell Meredith, son of Peter and Maria (Grisell) Meredith, was 
born May 29, 1849, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana, and died January ii, 
1873, at the same place, his body being intt'rred in the Friends' Cemetery of 
Pennville. 

Carrie Lavina Smith, daughter of Abraham and |ane (Hiatt) Smith, was 
born November 17, 1851, in Pennville, jay County. Indiana, and dud June i, 
1895, in West Liberty, Muscatine County. Iowa. 

Samuel G. Meredith and Carru' I'l Smith were united in maniage May 
18, 1S71, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 4O9 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Dialh 
Wilbcr Lea Meredith December 20, 187 1 

He was born near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Meredith located near Pennville, Indiana, where they lived 
until his death. 

Mr. Mereditli was a birtlirif;ht member of the Friends' Society and also a 
member of the I. O. O. F. Lodge of Pennville. He was educated in the public 
schools and Liber College, Portland, Indiana, where he attended two terms. 

Mrs. Meredith was a member of the Methodist Church and when she 
w^ent to West Liberty, Iowa, she took her letter and entered the church there, 
in which she remained a member until her death. She is spoken of as a kind 
and loving wife and mother who, after the death of her husband, devoted much 
of her life and energy to the education of her son, who attributes his success to 
her teaching. 

Mrs. Meredith was of German and Welsh descent. 



ISAAC AND LOURA A. (TAYLOR) GRIFFITH (5) 

Isaac Griffith, son of Lukens and Sarah (Grisell) Griffith, was born No- 
vember 9, 1845, near Waynesville, Warren County, Ohio, and died January 6, 
1886, near Colby, Thomas County, Kansas. His remains were interred in the 
cemetery near Colby. 

Loiira Apaline Taylor, daughter of James and Elizabeth (Letley) Taylor, 
was born May 24, 1845, in Columbiana County, Ohio, and died December 3, 
1882, near Mound City, Linn County, Kansas. Interment near that jslace. 

Isaac Griffith and Loura A. Taylor wire united in marriage September 
12, 1867, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Dcatli 

Charles William Griffith February 

Loura Amber Griffith November 

Eva Pearl Griffith February 

Earl Garfield Griffith April 

Charles W. and Eva P. were born near Pennville, Jay Count}', Indiana. 
Loura A. in Assumption, Illinois, and Earl G. near Mound City, Linn County, 
Kansas. 

Eva P. is a graduate of the Pennville higii school, having finishctl the 
course in the spring of 1897. Subsecjuently she lias iieen engaged in a dress- 
making and millinery establishment in Pennville. 

Earl G. was a soldier in the Spanish-American war. A sketch of his 
travels and war record is given on page 411. 



5. 


1 87 1 


3- 


1874 


I, 


1877 


5. 


1 88 1 



4IO 



RECORD OF THE GRISEI.L FAMILY 



Mr. and Mrs. Griffith lived near Pennville for some time after their mar- 
riage, then removed to Assumption, Illinois. About 1876 they returned to 
Pennville and a few days later removed to Thomas County, Kansas, locating 
near Colby. Mr. Griffith was engaged in farming most of this time. 

Mrs. Griffith was of German descent. 

After Mrs. Griffith's death Mr. Griffith was again married. 



ISAAC AND ANNA S. (GRIFFITH GRIFFITH (5) 

Anna S. Griffith, daughter of William H. and Susan (Rose) Griffith, was 
born July 31, 1866, in Ashton, Lee County, Illinois. 

Isaac Griffith and Anna S. Griffith were united in marriage March 17, 
1884, in Hastings, Nebraska. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Xame Birth Daiih 
Frank Lukens Griffith November 1 1, 1885 

He was born near Colby, Thomas Coimty, Kansas. 

Mrs. Griffith was of Irish descent. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Griffith and family lived in Hastings, 
Nebraska, for a short time, when they removed to a farm near Colby, Thomas 
County, Kansas. They were living there at the time of his death, which was 
particularly sad. 

He had gone to a town a few miles distant, and while there a blizzard 
arose. In spite of demonstrations against his starting home in such a storm 
Mr. Griffith's anxiet\' for his family prompted him to make the attempt, and in 
company with a friend who lived near him started through the blinding snow 
and cutting winds to their home. They progressed as well as could be ex- 
pected until they reached the friend's house, when Mr. Griffith proceeded on 
his journe}' alone. 

Those at home waited for him until their anxiety became unbearable, 
and with the aid of neighbors they started to search for him. He and the team 
were found buried in the snow and frozen to death. Ever\- thing within human 
power was done to recall his life, but all efforts were in vain. 

Isaac Griffith enlisted in Company E, Seventh Indiana Cavalr}*, at Port- 
land, Jay County, Indiana, under Captain David T. Skinner, of Jay County. 
The Company was ordered to Indianapolis, Indiana, where they were formed 
into the One Hundred and Nineteenth Regiment under Col. J. P. C. Shanks 
(also of Jay County), September 3, 1863. 

They were all through tiie South with Gen. Custer, having done duty in 
Kentucky, Tennessee. Mississippi, Arkansas, Missouri, Louisiana and Texas. 
The regiment was mustered out of service on the i8th of February, 1866, at 
Camp "Seider's Springs," near Austin, Texas. They then proceeded to In- 
dianapolis, Indiana, where they received their final discharge. 



RKCORD OF THE GRIKEI.L FAMILY 4II 

A Story is told of Isaac Griffith's "going to war," which we will repeat 
here: — 

He was quite young when the war broke out, but had an irresistible de- 
sire to join the army. He was never able to get the consent of his parents on 
account of his age, so when the Seventh Indiana Cavalry was being organized, 
he, as usual, went for the cows one evening, but did not return until the war 
was over. Incidentally he came home just at dusk and seeing the cows in the 
field he drove them home. How long he had been "getting the cows" perhaps 
no one but his father and mother realized. 

Charles W. Griffith is married and lives in Illinois. Further information 
could not be obtained. 

EARL G. Griffith's war record. 

Earl G. Griffith enlisted in Co. L. , Thirty-first U. S. V. Infantr}', under 
Col. James S. Pettit. at Muncie, Indiana, July 27, i8gg. He w-as sent to Ft. 
Thomas, Kentucky, where the regiment was recruited. He was transferred to 
the Regimental Band the following da}' and served with the same during his 
entire enlistment of two years. 

After about si.x weeks' service at Ft. Thomas the regiment was ordered 
to San Francisco, California. They were in camp at the "Presidio," San Fran- 
cisco, three weeks when they were quarantined on Angel Island on account of 
smallpox. They remained in quarantine six weeks. 

The regiment sailed for the Philippine Islands on the transport " Citv of 
Pekin" October 28, 1899, and reached Honolulu, after seven days' sail, arriving 
in Manila, P. I., November 28, 1899, and were ordered to Zamboanga, Island 
of Mindanao, to which place they proceeded after a five days' stop at Manila, 
arriving at their destination December g, 1899. 

Mr. Griffith described their location and some of the customs of tht_' na- 
tives of the Philippine Islands, in a letter to the editor of tiie home paper, from 
which we take a few extracts: — 

"The Island of Mindanao is the second in size of the group. It is about 
seven hundred miles south of Manila and about half that distance from the 
equator, so you can imagine how warm the weather is at present; yet we will 
have warmer weather in June and July. 

"We have a good situation on the Basilan Straits. This was one day a 
very pretty town, but a greater part of it was destroyed by the Spaniards when 
they left. Tile lMli()inos must have made things pretty warm for the Dons, for 
from all appearances they left in a hurry. 

"Four miles to the rear of the town are some of the prettiest mountains 1 
ever saw. I have never ascended them but have been w ithin a half mile of 
them. There looks to be a very dense growth of timber. Several parties of 
our boys have been up the mountains camping and tluv say they had to cut 
their way through the underbrush as they went. 1 intend going up in a few 
days. 



i).I2 RECORD OF THE GRlSEl.l, FAMILY 

"One battalion of our regiment and headquarters are stationed here. 
The rest of the regiment is scattered along the coast at different points. We 
have never had any trouble with the people and expect none. 

"We are very comfortably quartered in what was formerly a Spanish 
brigade hospital. The band occupies the part that once belonged to the Span- 
ish officers. The barracks are enclosed by a fence twelve feet high, which rests 
on a brick foundation, and tiie pickets in it are of an inferior grade of ma- 
hogany. Inside the enclosure are all kinds of tropical plants and flowers. Two 
large cocoanut trees stand directly in front of our window and occasionally we 
get a couple of native boys to go up and throw down the cocoanuts. The water 
from the cocoanut is fine. The natives drink the water when the cocoanut is 
green and won't touch it after it ripens. We have followed their e.xample and 
find the water to be a very tine drink. 

"Maj. Gen. McArthur and staff were here yesterday on an inspection 
tour. lie is going around to all of the posts in the southern islands. I did not 
see him but suppose 1 will have another opportunity before we leave. 

"Gen. Lawton's death was quite a surprise to us, as well as sad news. 
I don't believe there was a soldier in the islands but what mourned his death. 
Every one here realizes that in the death of Lawton the United States loses one 
of its best generals, if not the best. 

"One thing that has interested me greatly is a native funeral. The body 
is put in a very plain casket and carried on the shoulders of four natives. The 
procession is generally headed by a native band. The rear is brought up by 
the relatives and friends and last of all come two or three natives with pick 
and shovel. The band plays quickstep music all the time and keeps step to 
the music about like a herd of sheep. Probably one fellow will be playing 
with one hand and carrying an umbrella in the other. When the procession 
reaches the cemetery the casket is taken to a small room in the rear of the cem- 
etery and placed upon a table. They then go througli some ceremony before 
depositing the body. They certainly believe in economy for they always use 
the same casket. The body is taken out of tjie casket and buried that way. 
Then the casket is taki-n back and saved for the next one. A certain amount 
of rent is required from the person who buries a friend or relative there, and if 
at a certain time he has not paid his rent the body is taken up and thrown on 
the bone pile. 

"I'^rom all reports that we hear there is very little fighting on Luzon now. 
We don't get very accurate reports of what happens at Manila and vicinity. 
The people in the States often get the report of an engagement two weeks before 
We do. and get kits of news that we know nothing of." 

After ser\ing eighteen montjis in the Philippine Islands they were ordered 
home, and sailed by the way of Manila and Nagasaki, Japan, May 14, 1901, 
arriving in San Francisco on the evening of June 10, 1901. They were mustered 
out of service June iS, igoi. 



RF.COKD OF THE GRISF,!.!, FAMILY 4I3 



LEWIS G. AND JOSEPHINE (UNDERWOOD) WALLING (5) 

Lewis GrisL-U Walling, son of Henry V. and Lydia (Grisell) Walling, 
was born January 24, 1867, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Josephine Underwood, daughter of Isaac and Martha J. (Taylor) Under- 
wood, was horn August 16, 1872, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Lewis G. Walling and Josephine Underwood were united in marriage 
March 30, i8y2, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THKM WERK KORN 

Name Birlli Death 



Lola Lydia Walling December 20, 1892 

Kenneth Vary Walling September 25, igoo 

They were both born in Pennville, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walling have always made their home in Pennville, where 
Mr. Walling conducts a drug and book store. 

Mr. Walling graduated in pharmacy at the State Lhiiversity of Michigan, 
Ann Arbor. 

Mrs. Walling is of Welsh and German descent. Besides having a good 
public school education, she has received a very thorough musical education. 
She is a birthright member of the Friends' Society. 

(TRUMAN O. AND JENNIE M. (WALLING) BOYD (5) 

Jennie May Walling, d;iiighter of Henr\' \'. and Lydia ( Grisell ) Walling, 
was born January 24, 1867. in Pennville, [a}' County, Indiana. 

Truman Osborn Bovd, son of James and Margaret (Boyd) Boyd, was 
horn September 26, i86g, near Canal Lewisville, Coshocton County, Ohio. 

Truman (3. Boyd and Jennie M. Walling were united in marriage. Feb- 
ruary 4, 1891, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

lO THEM WERE HORN 

Nam,- lUith Dralh 



Lydia Grisell Boyd , ... [anuary 7, 1892 

Walter Harrington Boyd March 31, 1893 

Truman Osborn Boyd \ugust 13. i8g6 ". . 

They were all born in Pennville, Ja_v County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bo\'d located in Pennville, where they resided until Mr. 
Boyd's official duties necessitated tlieir removal to the county seat, i'ortland. 

Mr. Boyd's father was a farmer and a coal producer in Coshocton ('ounty. 
Ohio, where he was extensively and successfully engaged for man\' years. In 
1879 he removed with his family to Jay County, and died there the lollowing year. 



414 RFaoRii OF iiii': (;riski,i, family 

Mr. lJo\d became a student of Fostoria, Ohio, Normal School, where he 
fitted himself for teaching, following that profession for about five years. He 
then took a course in the Collegiate Preparatory School at Lawrenceville, New 
Jersey, and afterward took a course in medicine at Ft. Wayne, Indiana. At the 
close of the third year there he was elected County Auditor of Jay County, and 
entered upon the duties of that office November i, 1899. The term of office 
being four years it necessarily interfered with his further progress in medical 
studies, for the time being, although he holds a state license to practice medicine, 
which was granted by the Medical Board of Tennessee, on examination. 

Mr. Bo\-d is an active working Republican, and has been honored with 
various political appointments, the last being a member of Jay County executive 
committee, during the last presidential campaign of igoo. 

Mrs. Bo3'd was a student of the Westminster Seminary, of Ft. Wayne, 
Indiana, two 3'ears, and attended Oxford College, Oxford, Ohio, one year. These 
were both Presbyterian institutions. She was also educated in music. 

Mr. and Mrs. Boyd are not connected with any religious organization, 
but are attendants of the Presbyterian church. He is a member of the Knights 
of Pythias and the Elks. 



DR. WM. C. AND ANNA (GRISELL) HASTINGS (5) 

Anna Grisell, daughter of Albert and Rachel A. (Starhuck) Grisell, was 
born July 13, 1855, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

William Clarkson Hastings, son of William and Jane (Reece) Hastings, 
was born November 20, 1852, near New Castle, Henry County, Indiana. 

Dr. Wm. C. Hastings and Anna Grisell were united in marriage 
.'\ugust 26, 1874, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

•|0 THEM WERE I'.ORN 

N'ame Birth Death 

Albert Carroll Hastings December 26,1879 

Frederic William Hastings October 18,1882 

They were born in Van Wert, Ohio. 

Mrs. Hastings finished her education in Liber College, near Portland. 
Indiana, and afterward taught in the public schools one winter. 

Mr. Hastings graduateil from Earlham College, Richmond. Indiana, in 
1873, with !;. S. degree, afterward attending the Medical College of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, from which he graduated in 18S0. The following winter they lived in 
Winchester, Randolph County, Indiana, where Dr. Hastings followed his pro- 
fession, but changed his location to Van Wert. Oiiio. the next year. Here they 
remained twenty years. In February. 1901, they removed to Seattle, Washington, 
and reside there at the present time. Dr. Hastings is engaged in the practice 
of medicine, and is also Lecturer in Materia Medica and Microscopy in tlie State 
University of Washington. 



kKcokD OF run (;riskll fAMii-V 415 

Dr. and Mrs. Hastings are members of the Presbyterian church. 

Albert C. and Frederic W. graduated from the Van Wert High School, 
the former in 1898 and the latter in 1900. Tiiey then entered Earlham College, 
bat on removing to Seattle, Washington, they entered the State University, 
where they expect to graduate, Albert C. in June of 1902, and Frederic W. in 
1904, with B. S. degree. They are members of the Washington Alpha Chapter^ 
Phi Delta Theta Fraternity. 



ARTHUR A. AND MARY E. (SOMERS) GRISELL (5) 

Arthur Albert Grisell, son of Albert and Rachel A. ( Starbuck) Grisell, was 
born March 18, 1859, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mary Eliza Somers, daughter of Aaron and Margaret (Fields) Somers, was 
born August 27, 1858, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Arthur A. Grisell and Mary E. Somers were united in marriage March 
17, 1881, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WKRE HORN 

N'timi' Birlh DeatJi 

Elbert Lynn Grisell January 26, 1884 

Edward Rene Grisell March 27, 1888 

They were both born near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell located near Pennville after their marriage, where 
by industry and economy they have provided themselves witli a beautiful and 
comfortable country home. 

Mrs. Grisell was a teacher in the public schools of Penn Township for 
six years before her marriage. 

Her father, Aaron Somers, was another of our loyal soldiers who gave his 
life while serving his country- during the civil war. 

Mr. Grisell is a recognized good citizen, quiet, unobtrusive and univer- 
sally respected throughout the neighborhood. 

They are both loyal and consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. Mr. Grisell served as the superintendent of the M. E. Sunday School 
for many years. Their children are both attending the public schools of Penn- 
ville, where the oldest expects to graduate this year (1902). 

MARVIN G. AND MARY H. (GRISELL) WOODRUFF (5) 

Mary Hartley Grisell, daughter of Albert and Rachel A. (Starbuck) 
Grisell, was born August 15, 1861, in Penn Township, Jay County. Indiana. 

Marvin G. Woodruff, son of George and Mar\ (Wilcox) Woodruff, was 
born May 8, 1847, in Bloomfield, Truiid)ull County, ()|iio. 

Marvin G. Woodruff and Mary II. Grisell, were united in marriage 
March 6, 1890, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 



4l6 KKUORll OK IHK GRISIil.L FAMILY 

TO IHF.M WERE HORN 

K„„ic Birth Diuth 
Lucile Woodruff Jannary 31,1895 

Sill- was boni in \'an Wert, Van Wert Connty, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Woodruff liave lived in Van Wert since their marriage 
where Mr. Woodruff is engaged as broker. 

Mr. Woodruff's father was a native of Connecticut and his mother of 
Summerset, England. PoHtically he is a Republican. 

Mrs. Woodruff finished her education in the high school of Portland, Jay 
County, Indiana. 

WM. E. AND LIDA (GRISELL) ROMICK (5) 

Lida ("irisell, daughter of William and Priscilla ( Osborn ) (irisell, was 
born January 7, 1841, in Woodbury, Morrow County, Ohio. 

William Eugene Romick, son of John and Martha Ann ( ) Romick, 

was born in Harrisville, Plarrison County, Ohio, and died Sep- 
tember 8, i86g, in Morrow County, Ohio. 

William E. Romick and Lida Grisell were united in marriage January 7, 
i860, in Woodbury, Morrow County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE KORN 

Nam,- Birth Death 



Carrie Romick November 2, 1862 

Annie Ivomitk March 1,1864 



They were born in Harrisville, Harrison Count}', Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Romick located in Harrisville, where they lived for some 
time, Romick being engaged in the mercantile business. Subsequently they 
removed to Morrow County where he died verj- suddenly after a few days ill- 
ness. He was of Dutch descent. He is spoken of as a most noble man. 

Mrs. Romick is a valuable Uiinister in the Friends' Society, to which she 
has devoted the last twenty-five years of her life. The following is what she 
says of h(-r life and work: — 

"It was when 1 was nine \ears old and residing \Mth my father and 
mother at West Bedford, Ohio, that 1 gave my heart to Clirist and was truly 
converted. .\ revival meeting was in progress in the M. E. Church. I re- 
mained that iiiijht at home w ith mother and the younger children. The fire 
burned brightly in the open grate, the baby was sleeping in the cradle and the 
other little ones in their cot, when, after a tender mother talk, we knelt down 
together and she taught me how to seek and trust the dear Saviour. 

"At ten years of age I united with the M. E. Church, but my life as a 
Christian was somewhat vacillating until after the death of my husband, when 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 417 

I was led to make an entire consecration of myself to God, and trnsting his 
promise that 'the altar sanctifieth the gift,' the Comforter came to abide in my 
heart and to give a deep settled peace to my weary, lonely soul. 

"While teaching and laboring in other ways for the support of my chil- 
dren I found many opportunities for service for the Master, often going with 
other Christian workers to hold meetings in school houses in neglected locali- 
ties. This was the beginning of an evangelism that continued with little in- 
termission for over twenty years and extended into fourteen States, and 
different places in the province of Ontario. In later years, health not being 
sufficient for the strain of evangelistic work, the way has opened for work as a 
pastor in Ohio, Michigan and Oregon. 

"Whatever success has attended these years of service, all the praise is 
due to Him who said, 'Lo, I am with you alway.' 

"In 1879 I united with the Friends' Church at Alum Creek, Ohio, and 
was by them acknowledged as a minister about 18.S0 or 1881." 



MILO P. AND MARTHA J. (TABER) GRISELL (5) 

Milo Pettibone Grisell, son of William and Priscilla (Osborn) Grisell, 
■as born August 19, 1843, near Ashley, Delaware County, Ohio, and died April 
13, 1869, near Adrian, Michigan. Interment in the Friends' Cemetery between 
Adrian and Palmyra, Michigan. 

Martha Jane Taber, daughter of Allen and Abigal ( ) Taber, was 

born , . 



w 



Milo P. Grisell and Martha [. Taber were united in marriage November 
20, 1866, in , County, Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Dr.Uh 

Mary Grisell January 30,1869 June — , i86g 

She was born in Adrian, Lenawee County, Michigan. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell located in Michigan where Mr. Grisell was engaged 
in farming and making brooms when able to work. He was always in delicate 
health and died at the age of twenty-six of consumption. He was a true ('hris- 
tian and greatly loved. He was a member of the Friends' Society. 

Mrs. Grisell resides in Laporte, Indiana. 



JAMES A. AND MARY (GRISELL) CROSS (5) 

Mary Grisell, daughter of William and Priscilla (Osborn) Grisell, was 

born October 19, 1847, in County, Ohio, and died February 10, 1899, 

near Ypsilanti, Michigan. Interment in lligliland Cemetery of ^'i)^ilanti. 
27 



AI,S RK('(.)Rli OF IHI'. (;RISK1.L FAM11,Y 

|ason Alonzo Cross, son of Alviu and Elona (Rogers) Cross, was born 
Jnly 19, 1H43, near Ypsilanti, Michigan. 

Jason A. Cross and Mary Grisell were united in marriage March 27, 1S67, 
near Adrian, Michigan. 

10 Til KM WF.KK IIOKN 

Name Birth Dratli 

Carrie Alice Cross February 18, i86g 

Arthur Clarence Cross December 28, 1873 

Emma Uuthanna Cross March 23, 1879 

They were born near Ypsilanti, Michigan. 

Emma R. Cross cared for her father's home and was educated in the 
Ypsilanti Normal College. The following sketch was contributed by her : — 

" My mother was the third in a family of five children whose home was 
in the central part of Ohio. Her father, William Grisell, who was a Methodist 
minister, died while she was yet young. She was a follower of the Divine 
teacher at the early age of four years. She inherited a strong taste for reading 
and much of her childhood was spent in this way. Before she was old enough 
to go to school she could read very well, and missed nothing within her reach 
and ability. Her first school was her home, and her first teacher her mother, 
who had a class of neighborhood children, and in that way, together with sew- 
ing, provided for her little family. After school hours mother helped take care 
of the younger children and shared the household work. After a few years she 
was enabled to enter Oberlin College, but had not attended there long when her 
health failed and she was forced to end her school days. She then went to 
Southern Michigan and ke])! house for iier brother Milo. Here she found a 
school and taught when lur health would permit. In this profession she was 
very successful and continued the work until she was married. 

"Everyone loved her for her cheerful and useful disposition. She w^as 
the companion and teacher of her children and alwaj'S interested in their school 
work. One of my earliest recollections is of seeing her with her books of 
anatomy before her, learning the technical terms, wath hopes of sometime 
doing a little work in medicine, because she liked that work so well. But poor 
health prevented tlic realization of lur hopes. For many years she was an 
invalid, suffering pain most of the time and oftentimes agon}-, which we were 
powerless to relieve. Though it was hard to part with mother, we were thank- 
ful that iier great suffering was over. 

" ' — Hut 'twere wrong to deplore thee, 
When God was thy ransom, thy guardian, thy guide ; 
He gave thee, and took thee, and soon will restore thee. 
Where death lialli no sting, since tlie Savior haih died.' 

"Father was born near Ypsilanti, of Scotch and Dutch descent, being 
among the first settlers in that part of the country. He had a peculiar charac- 
teristic when a boy — his great dislike for cold -weather. He never played out 



RECORD OF THE GRISKI.L FAMILY 4X9 

With his brothers and sisters or other playmates in winter time, and wonld not 
go out of doors only when work required him to do so. As a young man lie 
was very fond of travel and music and through his own ability and persever- 
ance became quite a skillful performer on the violin and organ. He was 
blessed with a fine voice and led the temperance choir in Yjisiianti several 
years. He finished his school education in the high school of Vpsilanti. After 
the death of his father he was the only one to take charge of the farm, which 
he did, although he had no taste for farm work. He still resides on the farm. 
Father is very fond of reading and spends all of his spare time with his reading 
and music. " 

MORDECAI J. AND ELIZA A. (GRISELL) BENEDICT (5) 

Eliza Amanda Grisell, daughter of William and Priscilla (Osborn) 
Grisell, was born December 4, 1S48, in West Bedford, Coshocton County, Ohio. 

Mordecai J. Benedict, son of Daniel and Grace ( IMichener) Benedict, was 
born June 26, 1845, near Stantontown, Morrow County, Ohio. 

Mordecai J. Benedict and Eliza A. Grisell were united in marriage April 
I, 1871, in Adrian, Lenawee County, Michigan, Rev. McCarty of the M. E. 
Church officiating. 

TO THEM WF.RK I'.OKN 

Name Birth Dcalh 

Almira Priscilla Benedict September 14,1874 September 14,1901 

Grace Melora Benedict April 29, 1878 

Anna Rilla Benedict May 1,1881 

Mary Elnora Benedict January 16, 1889 

They were all born near Stantontown, Morrow County, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Benedict located near Stantontown, Ohio, soon after their 
marriage and have made that their permanent home. 

Besides being extensively engaged in farming Mr. Benedict is a veterin- 
ary surgeon and also fills the office of notary public. 

They are both members of the Society of Friends. Anna R. and Mar\- 
E. are also members of the Friends' Society. 



REV. JOHN W. AND ANNA GRISELL) DONNAN (5) 

Anna Grisell, daughter of William and Priscilla (Osborn) Grisell, was 
born December 18, 185 1, in Delaware, Delaware County, Ohio. 

John W. Donnan, son of Andrew and Joanna ( ) Donnan. was 

born , in . 

John W. Donnan and Annie Grisell were united in marriage December 
25> 1875, in Morrow County, Ohio. 



420 UKCOKIl OF THK i; KISKI.I, I'AMILV 

TO THEM WERE HOUN 

JVame Birth Death 

Milo Clark Donnan October 18,1876 February 26,1877 

Bessie Pearl Donnan ... September 15, 1878 

Florence Donnan September 29, 1880 

Ralpli Leroy Donnan February 2. 1884 

Walter Grisell Donnan April 4,1886 July — ,1886 

Ray Fisk Donnan May 4, 1890 

Milo C. and Bessie P. were born at Alum Creek, Delaware County; 
Florence, Ralph L. and Walter G. in Radner, of the same county, and Ray F. 
in Toledo, all in the State of Ohio. 

Milo died at Alum Creek and was buried in the Friends' cemetery of that 
place. 

Walter G. died and was buried in . 

Mr. and Mrs. Donnan first located four miles east of Ashley, Delaware 
County, Ohio, but afterward Mr. Donnan joined the Ohio Central Conference 
of the M. E. Church and they went from place to place as itinerants in the min- 
istr\'. At present they reside in Marion, Marion County, Ohio. 

Mr. Donnan is of Scotch descent. 

Bessie P. was educated in the public schools of Toledo and after teach- 
ing successfully for five years took a post-graduate course at Cornell Universit)' 
as a better prei)aration for her chosen profession of teaching. 

NATHAN AND LYDIA A. (GRISELL) ROGERS (5) 

Nathan Rogers, son of Ansel and Louisa (Raymond) Rogers was born 
June 14, 1836, near Rollin. Lenawee County, Michigan. 

Lydia Ann Grisell, daughter of Nathan and Cynthia (Benedict) Grisell, 
was born January 10, 1840. in Woodburj', Delaware County, Oliio. 

Nathan I-Jogers and Lydia Ann Grisell wx're united in marriage September 
9, 1857, in Friends' meeting, in Springwater, Winneshiek County, Iowa. 

■ro ITIKM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Minerva Fliza Rogers September 21, 1858 November 4.1858 

Harlan Albert Rogers September 17, 1859 

William Francis Rogers October 23, i86i 

Pxlward Elwyn Rogers June 12, 1865 ...January 23,1893 

Theodora Rogers January 22, 1868 . . . February 2, 1868 

Clarence Raymond Rogers June 2, 1869 

Minerva E., Harlan A., Edward E. and Theodora were born in Spring- 
water, Winneshiek County, Iowa ; William F. in Springdale, Leavenworth 
County, Kansas, and Clarence E. in La Crosse, Wisconsin. 



RKCORD OF THE GKISKLL FAMILY 42I 

Minerva E. and Thc-odora died and were buried at Springwater, Winne- 
shiek County, Iowa, and Edward E. died in Algona, Iowa, and was buried in 
Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rogers located in Springwater, Winneshiek County, Iowa, 
soon after their marriage. Later, they removed to La Crosse, Wisconsin, 
where Mr. Rogers was engaged at his trade as millwright. In 1874 they 
removed to Minneapolis where they reside at the present time. 

Mrs. Rogers is a woman of decided literary taste. She was a student at 
Mt, Hesper Friends' boarding school, taught by Jesse and Cynthia Harkness, 
at Alum Creek, Morrow County, Ohio. (These people are still there enjoying 
the best there is in life — a perfect faith.) In August, 1853, her mother and 
stepfather, Ansel Rogers, drove in a wagon from Michigan (where they had 
been living) to Alum Creek after her, previous to their moving to Iowa, to 
which State they drove in company with several other families. They located 
in Winneshiek County, Iowa, but removed to Kansas in 1859 and finally 
returned to Mrs. Rogers' former home in Ohio. In the meantime the daughter, 
Lydia Ann, had been married and remained in Iowa. 

Mrs. Rogers is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Churcli and an 
earnest supporter of the W. C. T. U. 

William F. and Clarence R. are unmarried and make their home with 
their mother in Minneapolis, where the former is engaged in the practice of 
law, and the latter is employed by the government as letter carrier. 

William F. was a student in Penn College, Oskaloosa, Iowa, tlien studied 
law in the State University of Minnesota. Politically, he is a Rei^ublican and 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

He enlisted with the Second Regiment, U. S. Volunteer (^Civil) Engineers 
in July, 1898, and was in Cuba when the United States took possession. They 
took care of the camp at Montauk Point from August 15th until October and 
were in Cuba from January 2, 1899, until they were mustered out, assisting in 
the repairs, etc. Part of their work was to remodel Weyler palace for occupa- 
tion of the U. S. officers. Subse(piently he was in Seattle at work in the navy 
yards for some time, working on repairs of the battle-ship Iowa. 

Clarence R. attendeil Archibald's Business College, then took a full 
course in Minneapolis Academy. He then entered Hamlin Universitj' M. E., 
St. Paul, from which he was transferred by his own request to the Minneapolis 
State University, graduating from there in 1895. He is a Prohibitionist in his 
political views and while not a member of any denomination he favors ihi- Con- 
gregational church. 

Edward E. early manifested a decided lo\e for the beautiful in art and 
nature. After leaving school he engaged in fresco work and later in scenic 
work. His spare time was devoted to the art schools and studies of rocks, min- 
erals, shells and curios, also in making many creditable paintings in oil and 
water colors and pen and ink and pencil sketches. A good judge visiting his 
studio, said: •• It is the linest private collection I ever knew so young a man 



422 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

to liave made." Edward was a student in the business colleges in Minneapolis, 
and later in the geology class in the State University, also in the Art School. 
He was a member of the M. E. Church. 



HENRY C. AND IDA M. T. (MILLER) STARR (5) 

Ida Mary Teresa Miller, daughter of John F. and Almira (Grisell) Miller, 
was born August 20, 1856, in Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio. 

Henry Clay Starr, son of Charles and Anna E. (Jones") Starr, was born 
September 13, 185 — . in Richmond, Wayne County Indiana. 

Henry C. Starr and Ida M. T. Miller were united in marriage at the 
home of the bride's parents, January 10, 1888, by Catholic ceremony, in Rich- 
mond, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birtit Death 

John F"ord Starr October 16, i88g 

Charles Paver Starr November 8, i8go 

Almira Grisell Starr September 16, i8gi 

Anna Mary Starr January 15, 1896 January 15, 1896 

They were all born in Richmond. Indiana. 

Anna M. died in Richmond and was interred in the cemetery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Starr located in Richmond, Indiana, after their marriage, 
where he is an attorney at law. 

Mr. Starr was a graduate of the Richmond High School and finished his 
education in Hanover College, Jefferson County, Indiana. He was a birthright 
member of the orthodox Friends' Society. He has been successful in his pro- 
fession and lias held the office of prosecuting attornej' two terms. His parents 
were early settlers of Wayne County, Indiana, and of Welsh descent. 

Mrs. Starr was educated in Ursuline Convent, Saint Martin's, Brown 
County, Ohio, and is a convert to the faith of the Roman Catholic Church. 



HARRY I. AND MAY (BURBANK) MILLER (5) 

Harry Irving Miller, son of (olm I'", and Almira (Grisell) Miller, was 
born January 12, 1862, in Cleveland, Ohio. 

May Burbank, daughter of John A. and Anne (Yates) Burbank, was born 



Harry 1. Miller and May Burbank were unitrd in marriage May 8, 1883, 
in Richmond, Indiana, the ceremony being performetl by Rev. J. B. Wakefield. 

TO THH.M WERE BORN 

Nam,- Birth Death 
Alvin Ford Miller December 14, 1888 



RECORD OF THK GRISELL FAMILY 4^3 

He was born in Richmond, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Miller reside in St. Louis, Missouri. Mr. Miller is general 
manager of the Vandalia S3'stem, his olfice being in the Century Building, St. 
Louis. 

Mr. Miller is a civil engineer. He was educated in Russell's Military 
Academy, New Haven, Connecticut, and finished at Cornell University, Ithaca, 
New York. 

Mrs. Miller is a descendant of Elizabeth Ball, half-sister of Mary Ball, 
mother of George Washington. 

WILLIAM W. AND GRACE (MILLER) GRUBBS (5) 

Grace Miller, daughter of John F. and Almira (Grisell) Miller, was born 
September 12, 1864, in Cohunbus, Ohio, and died July 26, 1894, '"^ Richmond, 
Wayne County, Indiana. Her remains were interred in the Earlham Cemetery 
of that place. 

William Warren Grubbs, son of John \V. and Margaret (Ramsey) 
Grubbs, was born January 10, 1858, in New Castle, Henry County, Indiana. 

William W. Grubbs and Grace Miller were united in marriage , 

, at tile home of the bride's parents, Richmond, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 
William Warren Grubbs September 13, l88g 

He was born in Richmond, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grubbs lived in Richmond, Indiana, where the former is a 
partner m the firm of J. W. Grubbs & Co., wholesale grocers. Mr. Grubbs is 
of Scotch and Irish descent. 

Mrs. Grubbs was educated in LJrsuline Convent, Saint Martins, Brown 
County, Ohio. 

At the time of their marriage the bride's father, John F. Miller, gave the 
superintendent's car with all its equipments and servants to the bridal party for 
a six weeks' trip to Florida. On tiieir return the young married couple settled 
in a cottage at "Miller's Rhue," where they lived vi-ry happily until a few years 
later when she passed from earth, leaving them all in mourning for her pres- 
ence. She was rightly named, her form and face revealing the word, Grace. 

VOLNEY F. AND ARMINDA F. (BROWN) IREY (5) 

Volney Francois Irey, son of Hugh H. and Rachel (Grisell) Irey, was 
born January 4, 1855, in Penn Township, Jay County. Indiana. 

Arminda Frances Brown, daujiiiter of Robeil P. and .\manda Jane 
(Moore) Brown, was born June 4, 1857, in New Palestine, Hancock County, 
Indiana. 



424 RF.CORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

V'olney F. Irey and Arniinda F. Brown wcru united in marriage April 4^ 
1878, in Indianapolis, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

iVam,- Birth Death 

Frances Viola Grisell Irey January 5, 1879 

Laura Ethel Irey December 30, 1880 

\'olney Francois Irey June 6, 1893 July 14, 1893 

Frances \'. G. was born in Bradford Junction, Ohio, and Laura E. and 
\'olney F. in Indianapolis, Indiana, and the latter died at the place of his birth. 

Mr. and Mrs. Irey reside in Indianapolis, Indiana, where Mr. Irey is 
engaged in gardening for himself. 

Mrs. Irey is of Dutch and Irish descent. 

Mr. and Mrs. Irey are both Spiritualists. 



PHILIP AND VIOLA F. (IREY) BEALL (5) 

Viola Fordhaui Irey, daughter of Hugh H. and Rachel (Grisell) Irey, 
was born November 19, 1856, in Penn Township, Ja\' County, Indiana. 

Philip Beall, son of Hiram Cameron and Minerva (Wilcoxson) Beall, 
was born November 29, 1865, in Hancock County, West Virginia. 

Philip Beall and Viola F. Irey were united in marriage January 30, 1893, 
in River Falls, Pierce County, Wisconsin. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Beall reside in Minneapolis, Minnesota, where Mr. Beall 
is engaged as commercial traveler for a wholesale grocery house. 

In politics Mr. Beall is independent. He is of Scotch-Irish descent, the 
name being Scotch and. pronounced "Bell," the "a" being silent. 

Mr. Beall is a Presb\'terian and Mrs. Beall an Episcopalian. 

Their portraits are shown on page 349. 



CHARLES W. AND ELIZABETH A. iSANDYS) IREY (5) 

Charles William Irey, son of Hugh H. and Rachel ('Grisell) Irey, was 
born November 13, 1858, in Penn Township, Jay Count}', Indiana. 

Elizabeth .\nn Sandys, daughter of Edwin Samuel and Elizabeth Jane 
(Cummings) Sandys, was born July 10, 1861. in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Charles W. Irey and Elizabeth A. Sandys, were united in marriage July 
21, 1879, in Salina, Saline County, Kansas. 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 425 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birtli Death 

Hugh Edwin Irey April 27, 1880 April 29, 1880 

Walter Clarence Ire}' April 5, 1881 

Martha Viola Irey October 4, 1883 

Edwin Sands Irey December i, 1885 

Elmer Lincoln Irey March 10, 1888 

Alice Mildred Irey April 8, 1890 

Maud Elizabeth Ire)- April 28, 1892 

Hugh Charles Irey October 15, 1897 

Hugh E. and Walter C. were born in Salina, Saline County, Kansas, and 
the former died at the same place. Martha V., Edwin S., Elmer L. and Alice 
M. were born in Kansas City, Missouri, and Maude E. and Hugh C. in Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Mr. and Mrs. Irey reside in Washington, D. C. , where Mr. Irey is 
engaged as proof reader in the government printing office. 

Mrs. Irey is of English descent. Politically, Mr. Irey is a Republican. 
They are both members of the Baptist church. 

Martha V. is a graduate from the Business High School, of Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

It will be observed in Charles W. 's parents' record his name is given as 
William Chalkley, the name being changed by him afterward. 
Mr. Irey's portrait is shown on page 349. 

RALPH G. AND RENA L. (JENNINGS) IREY (5) 

Ralph Grisell Irev, son of Hugh H. and Racliel (Grisell ) Irey, was born 
October 9, i85o, in Penn Township, Ja\' County, Indiana. 

Rena L. Jennings, daughter of Perry Lawrence and Martha Jane 
(Brown) Jennings, was born May 28, 1871, in Monon, White County, Indiana. 

Ralph G. Irey and Rena L. Jennings were united in marriage October 
22, 1889, in Chapman, Dickinson County, Kansas. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name l^iith Death 
Genevieve Edith Ire}' December 14, 1891 



She was born in Kansas City, Missouri. 

Mr. and Mrs. Irey reside in Abilene, Kansas, where he is engaged as 
commercial traveler for Loose Bros., of Kansas City, Missouri. 

Mrs. Irey is of English and South American descent. She is a member 
of the Lutheran Church. Mr. Irey is a Republican politically, ami Liberal 
religiously. 

Mr. Irey's portrait is shown on page 349. 



426 RECORD OF THE GRISELL I'AMILY 

FRED C. AND LULU M. (GRISELL) LAMB (5) 

Lulu May Giisell, daughter of Thomas J. and Mary J. (Merrit) Grisell, 
was horn November 10, 1874, in Cardington, Morrow County, Ohio. 

Fred Cory Lamb, son of Jacob and Kate (Mathason) Lamb, was born 
May 2, 1868, in Findlay, Ohio. 

Fred C. Lamhand Luhi M. Grisell were united in marriage July 10, 1892, 
in Findlay, Ohio. 

10 THEM WERE BORN 

JVa?iic Birlh Death 

Carl J. Victor Lamb July 6, 1895 

Scott Grisell Lamb February 18, 1897 

They were born in Findlay, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lamb own property and reside in Findla\', Ohio, where he 
IS engaged in business witli his father as contractors for countr\' stone and dirt 
work of all kinds. 

Mrs. I^amb finished her education in the high school of Findlaj', Ohio. 

Mr. Lamb's maternal ancestors were born in Scotland, and his mother 
was born in New York State. His father was born in Findlay, Ohio, and his 
parents were southern planters in Virginia. 

WALTER H. AND OLIVE C. (GRISELL) CHRISTY (5) 

Olive Cordilia Grisell, daughter of Thomas J. and Mar}' J. (Merrit) 
Grisell, was born May 28, 1876, at Cardington, Morrow County, Ohio. 

Walter Hayes Christy, son of William McConnell and .Vdella Matilda 
(Ashbaugh) Christy, was born November g, 1877, in Cardington, Morrow- 
County, Ohio. 

Walti;r IT. Christy and Olive C. Grisell were united in marriage June 29, 
1899, at Edison, Morrow County, Ohio. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Christy reside in Mansfield, Richland County, Ohio, where 
Mr. Christy is engaged as metal polisher in the Ba.xter Stove Works. In his 
political views Mr. Christy is a Republican. 

Mrs. Christy is a member of the Methodist Church. Slu- finished her 
education in tile iiigli school of I'indlay, Ohio. 

REESE J. AND SARAH A. (ELLIOTT) CADWALLADER (5) 

Reese Johnson Cadwallader, son ot Howard autl Margaret (Johnson) 
Cadwallader, was born June 27, 1842, in Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Sarah A. Elliott, daughter of Stephen and Anna (Cook) Elliott, was born 
February 22, 1848, in Washington, Wayne County, Indiana. 



KKCORIl OF THE GRISKI.I, FAMILY 427 

Reese J. Cadwalladur and Sarah A. liUiott were united in marriage 
February 21, 1867, at tliu home of the bride's parents, in Richmond, Wayne 
County, Indiana. 

TO THKM WERE I'.OKN 

Mrr//,- Bii III Death 

Anna Elliott Cadwallader October 29, i86g December i, 1891 

Mary Edna Cadwallader December 15, 1876 July 26, 1896 

Martha Elma Cadwallader November 6, 1879 

They were born in Richmond, Indiana. 

Mary E. died in Richmond ; interment in the Earlham cemetery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cadwallader have resided in and near Richmond, Indiana, 
since their marriage. They are both members of the Friends' Society. 

Mr. Cadwallader was a student in Salem Academy, Columbiana Cor.nty, 
Ohio. By occupation he is a mechanic and is at present employed as rural 
route mail carrier. In his political views he is a Republican. 



JOSEPH J. AND MARTHA E. (CADWALLADER) DICKINSON (5) 

Martha Elma Cadwallader, daughter of Howard and Margaret (johtison) 
Cadwallader, was bcjrn August 10, i85(S, in Richmond, Indiana. 

Joseph John Dickinson, son of Joseph and Esther (Hiatt) Dickinson, 
was born April 7, 1856, in Richmond, Indiana. 

Joseph J. Dickinson and Martha E. Cadwallader were united in marriage 
August 28, 1S79, at the bride's home in Richmond. Indiana, by Friends' 
ceremony. 

TO THEM WEKIC liOkN 

Nam,- Jiirlli />,;t/h 

Elma Mae Dickinson March 2. 1883 

Joseph Howard Dickinson November 12, 1886 

They were born in Richmond, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dickinson reside in Richmond where Mr. Dickinson is en- 
gaged as treasurer of the Dickinson Loan and Trust Company. 

They are active members of the Friends' Society, Mr. Dickinson being 
the Superintendent of the Friends' Sabbath School at the present time. He is 
of English descent. Mr. Dickinson was a student in Earlham College two 
years. 

Elma M. finished her education in Earlham College, having spent two 
years there. 

EDWIN T. AND ESTHER (STANLEY) HOBSON (5) 

Edwin T. Hobson, son of Benjamin and Sarah A. (Johnson) llobson. 
was born April 5, 1851, near Richmond, Jefferson County, Ohio, and died 
February 11, 1897, in Damascus, Columbiana Counl\-, Ohio. 



428 RECORD OF THE CRISELL FAMILY 

Esther Stanley, daughter of Osborne anil Margaret (Cobbs) Stanley, 
was born June 18, 1852, in Damascus, Columbiana Count)', Indiana. 

Edwin T. Ilobson and Esther Stanley were united in marriage Septem- 
ber 28, 1881, in Damascus, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE I;ORN 

Nami- Birth Dtath 



Laura Hobson ^ , . July 8, 1883 

Flora Hobson ^ ^"" July 8,1883 

Carl Hobson January 21, 1885 

Lee S. Hobson December 12, 1890 . . • April 23, 1894 

They were born near Damascus, Columbiana County, Ohio. 
Mrs. Hobson resides in Damascus, Ohio. 

JOHN A. AND MARGARET A. (BURNER) HOBSON (5) 

John A. Hobson, son of Benjamin and Sarah A. (Johnson) Hobson. was 
born , , near Richmond, Jefferson County, Ohio. 

Margaret A. Burner, daughter of Aaron and Margaret ( ) Burner, 

was born , 1879, in Nebraska. 

John A. Hobson and Margaret A. Burner were united in marriage June 
I, 1895. in W'hittier, Los Angeles County, California. 

TO IHEM WERE liORN 

Name Birth Death 

Florence Hobson March 7, 1896 

John Hobson — , 1898 

They were born in W'hittier. California. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hobson reside in Whittier, California, at the present time. 



BENJAMIN J. AND ELIZA A. (HEWITT) FRENCH (5) 

Benjamin J. !• rench, son of Ezra and Mary (Johnson ) French, was born 
July II, 1866, near Damascus, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Eliza Alma Hewitt, daughter of James T. and Almira (Creighton) Hew- 
itt, was born April 9, 1869, in Carroll County, Ohio. 

Benjamin J. Frencli and Eliza A. Hewitt wen- unitetl in marriage October 
21, 1896, in Wa\'nesburg, Stark ('ounty, Ohio. 

•I'O •rilEM WERI', noKN. 

Name Birth Death 

Albert Hewitt French July 9,1898 

Mary Almira French March 14, 1901 



klAJOKU OF i'HK CRISELL FAMILY 429 

They were born at Waynesburi^, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. French located at Wa\nishnr^h, Ohio, soon after their 
marriage, where they engaged in farming. 

Mr. French was associated with his uncle, Benjamin Johnson, in the 
railroad tie business for several 3'ears previous to his marriage. 

Mrs. French is of Irish parentage. She is a member of the Presbyterian 
Church. Previous to her marriage she was a music teacher for seven years. 

DR. GEORGE F. AND MARY I. (FRENCH) DeVOL (5) 

Mary Isabella French, daughter of Ezra and Mary (Johnson) French, 
was born November 18, iS6g, near Damascus, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

George Fox DeVol, son of William and Rosetta (Eddy) DeVol, was 
born March 8. 1871, on a southern plantation about thirty miles south ot Wash- 
ington, D. C, Charles County, Maryland. 

Dr. George F. DeVol and Mary I. French were united in marriage Jan- 
uary 17, 1900, in the Friends' Mission, Nanking, China, by Friends' ceremony. 

•|0 -I'HEM WERF. BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Mary Elizabeth DeX'ol January 13, 1902 

She was born at the Friends' Mission, Nanking, China. 

The following sketch of the education and experiences of Dr. and Mrs. 
DeVol were contributed by the latter's mother, Mary French: — 

"My daughter graduated from the Damascus Academy in the sjjring of 
1889, and taught school the following summer. That fall she entered Earlham 
College, Richmond, Indiana, taking the modern classical course, from which 
she graduated in 1893. The following year she taught in the Damascus Acad- 
emy, but previous to that she had intendetl to become a medical missionary in 
China, and before her school year was out she offered herst^lf to the Board of 
Ohio Yearly Meeting of Friends and was accepted. Soon arrangements were 
made for hur to take a course in medicine in the Clevelantl College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, of Ohio Wesleyan University, and accordingly she went to 
Cleveland in the fall of 1894 and entered the collegi', which she attended three 
years, graduating in the spring of 1897, and that summer took a post-graduate 
course in New York City, and November r8, 1897, she sailed from San Fran- 
cisco, California, for Nanking, China, where the Friends have a Mission. 

"On entering this new field lier first work was studying the langnai;i' and 
assisting in the medical work in the hospital. During the summer of the 
Boxers uprising, all foreigners had to leave Nanking, and Dr. autl Mrs. 
DeVol went to Japan but were allowed to return to their work th'- ne.xt fall. 
Through all her privations and trials that have come through her bt'ing sepa- 
rated from her home and loved ones and especially through the death of her 
father, she has never doubted the genuineness of her call, and thai has enabled 
her to go in trusting oliedience. 



430 RIX'ORI) OF THE CRISELL FAMILY 

"Dr. r^eVol's fatlier, William DeVol, was born June 30, 1828, in 
Schaghticoke, Rensselaer County, New York, and died in 1887 in the same 
State. His mother, Rosetta (Eddy) DeVol, was born February 26, 1831, in 
Glen Falls, New York, and died in 1888 in the same State. 

"The DeVols are direct descendants of the French Huguenots who were 
among the first settlers in America, having been persecuted in their own coun- 
try for tiieir strong religious principles. The Eddys trace their ancestry back 
to England. George Eddy with his three sons landed on American soil with 
the Pilgrim Fathers in the 'Mayflower.' 

"Dr. DeVol's parents removed from New York to Maryland a short time 
before his birth, where they lived until he was six 3'ears old. They then re- 
turned to New York, remaining there until their death, when the young man 
was thrown on his own resources. He iiad learned from whence his help must 
come, as he was beautifull)' converted when a child. At the age of eleven years 
he determined, cost what it would, God helping him, that he would be a doctor, 
and always studied and worked with that one idea in view. He found it did 
cost all and more than he had dreamed to work his own way as he did, first 
through the Friends' Seminary in New York State, from which he graduated 
in i8gi, then from Earlham College, Richmond, Indiana, in 1894, and from 
there he entered the New York Medical University, New York City, from which 
he graduated with honors in 1897. He then began the practice of his profes- 
sion in the New York City Hospital and the Nurses and Childrens Hospital, 
but in the fall of the same year he settled in Greater New York where he had 
a most successful practice for two years, at the end of which time he sold out 
and took up his chosen field of labor as a missionar\' in China, to which place 
he went in the fall of 1899. He was consecrated to the Lord's service when 
but a baby by his parents (his father was a minister among Friends) and felt 
called to the mission field when very young. When at the Friends' Seminary 
he consecrated his life to mission work, and when at Earlham College joined 
the Students \'olunteers; but it was after he began his practice of medicine be- 
fore the Lord opened the wa\- and he was called and accepted by his own 
meeting to join thr Ohio missionary band in Nanking, China." 



ALBERT J. AND RETTA M. (HAMILTON) BINFORD (5) 

Albert Judson IJintoril, son of Samuel A. and Elizabeth M. (Johnson) 
liinford, was born August 5. 1857, near Damascus, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Retta M.uiil ilaniilton. daughter of and ( ) 

Hamilton, was born May 31. iS6f). in . 

Albert J. liinford and Retta M. Hamilton were united in marriage April 
23, 1884, near Beaman, in Marshall, County, Iowa. 



KECOKll OF THK GRISKI.L FAMILY 431 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Edith J. Binford July 25,1886 August 1,1888 

Iva Marie Binford May 27, 1889 

Lelia Mabel Binfoid March 16, 1895 

Alfred Binford ■. . . . January 26, 1902 

They were boin in Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. ISinford located near or in Iowa, soon after 

their marriage. 

Mr. Binforil finished his pidilic school education and then entered Earl- 
ham College, where he attended one year. Subsetjuently, he went to 

Iowa, where he taught school in the winter and worked in the summer for 
several years. Mrs. Binford is of English descent. 

BENJAMIN J. AND AGNES (YOUNG) BINFORD (5) 

Benjamin Johnson liinford, son of Samuel A. and I"21i/.abeth M. (Johnson ) 
Binford, was born November 5. 1863, near Damascus, Columbiana County, 
Ohio. 

Agnes Young, daughter of and ( ) Young, 

was born January 12, 1869, near Lisbon, Linn County, Iowa. 

Benjamin J. Binford and Agnes Young were united in marriage Novem- 
ber 8, i8go, at the home of the bride's parents, Beaman, Grundy County, Iowa. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Helen Binford November 9, 1891 

Ruth Binford April 9, 1893 

They were born in , Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Binford reside in Pierre, Hughes County, South Dakota, 
where Mr. Binford is employed as cashier in the I'irst National Bank. Mrs. 
Binford is of German descent. 

JAMES R. AND MARTHA J. (BINFORD) PENROSE (5) 

Martha Josephine Binford, daughter of Samuel A. and Elizabeth M. 
(Johnson) Binford, was born Julv 27, 1865, near Damascus, Columbiana 
County, Ohio. 

James R. Penrose, son of James and Rebecca (.Farmer ) Penrose, was 
born July 12, 1858, near New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

James R. Penrose and Martha J. Binford were united in marriage 
October 2, 1889, at the home of the bride's parents mar Damascus, by Friends 
ceremony. 



432 RECORD OK IHK UKISF.I.L FAMILY 

TO THEM WERE I'.ORN 

Name Birth Death 

Elizabeth Earl Penrose August 5,1896 

She was born near Damascus. Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Penrose reside in Burlington, Iowa, where Mr. Penrose 
and his father are proprietors of a farm implement establishment. 

JOHN H. AND ELIZA NICHOLSON) JOHNSON (5) 

John Howard Johnson, son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Barker) John- 
son, was born August 2. 1866, in Richmond, Indiana. 

Eliza Nicholson, daughter of Timothy and Mar}- (White) Nicholson, was 
born March 28, 1871. in Richmond, Indiana. 

John H. Johnson and Eliza Nicholson were united in marriage June 14, 
1893, in East Main Street Friends' Meeting House, Richmond, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Benjamin Nicholson Johnson . . November i, 1894 

Mar3' Elizabeth Johnson March 27, 1896 

Robert Howard Johnson. December 3, 1898 

They were born in Richmond. Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have resided with the former's father on Eleventh 
street, in Richmond, Indiana, since their marriage. 

Mrs. Johnson is a graduate of Earlham College. She is of English an- 
cestry. Her parents were prominent members of the Society of Friends. 

Mr. Johnson was also a student in Earlham College, but chose a busi- 
ness career early in life and entered the Richmond National Bank in 1882, re- 
maining w-ith them about two years, at the end of which time he accepted a 
position in the Second National Bank, retiring in 1890 as corresponding clerk. 
He then entered his father's office and a little later became a partner in the 
Ijusiness. 

He is an active worker in the Friends' Church, having been superinten- 
ilent of the South Eighth Street Friends' Sabbath School several years and is 
now a member of the Hoard of Trustees of Indiana Yearly Meeting, also a 
member of Board of Trustees of White's Indiana Manual Labor Institute 
located near Wabash, Indiana. Some benevolent work has also claimed his 
attention, he ln'ing identified w ith St. Stephen's Hospital of Riclimond. as one 
of its trustees. 

DR. CHARLES AND MARY A. (JOHNSON) MARVEL (5) 

Mary Amy Johnson, daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Barker) 
Johnson was born January 28, 1869, in Richmond, Wayne County, Indiana. 



RECORD OF THE f;RISF,I.I, FAMILY 433 

Dr. Charles Marvel, son of Josiah Philip and Harriet Ann (Pepper) 
Marvel, was born at the homestead of his forefathers, near Georgetown, Sussex 
County, Delaware. 

Dr. Charles Marvel and Mary A. Jolinson were united in marriage 
October i8, 1893, in Friends' meeting house, on South Eighth Street, Rich- 
mond, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Josiah Philip Marvel April 17, 1896 

Elizabeth Johnson Marvel October 5, 1897 



They were born in Richmond. Indiana. 

After their marriage Dr. and Mrs. Marvel lived in Atlantic City, New 
Jersey, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, three years, where the former followed 
his profession. They then removed to Richmond, Indiana, where he is prac- 
ticing at 127 North Tenth street. They are both interested workers in the 
South Eighth street Friends' meeting. 

Mrs. Marvel was a student in Earlham College, and Dr. Marvel gradu- 
ated from the Jefferson Medical College, of Philadelphia, in 1891. He was also 
a student in St. Johns private school near Wilmington, and Conference Acad- 
emy, of Dover, Delaware. He is of English descent. 



ELI A. AND REBECCA P. (JOHNSON) MARSH (5) 

Rebecca P. Johnson, daughter of Joseph Cj. and Sarah (Penrose) John- 
son, was born March 9, 1866, at New Garden, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Eli A. Marsh, son of Orlando and Julia ( ) Marsh, was born 

— ) > in . 

Eli A. Marsh and Rebecca P. Johnson were united in marriage October 
29, 1887, at the home of the bride's parents, in Grinnell, Iowa, Dr. Maghom, 
President of the Iowa College and minister of the Congregational church offici- 
ating, the dav also being the twenty-fifth anniversary of the bride's parents' 
wedding. 

TO THEM WERE liORN. 

Name Birth Death 
Mildred R. Marsh August 12,1897 



She was born in Grinnell, Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Marsh reside in Grinnell, where Mr. Marsh is engaged in 
the jewelry business. 

Mrs. Marsh was educated in the public schools of Grinnell and in the 
Iowa College at Grinnell. 

28 



434 RECORD OF THE GRISELL KAMILY 



JOHN E. AND ALICE (PATTERSON- GREEN (5) 

John Edward Green, son of Jacob A. and Martha (Johnson) Green, was 
born March 31, i86g. in Freeport, Harrison County, Ohio. 

Alice Patterson, daughter of A. H. and Esther (Griffith) Patterson, was 
bom July 22, 1869. in Mount Pleasant, Ohio. 

John E. Green and Alice Patterson were united in marriage October 10, 
1894, by Friends' ceremony, at the bride's home near Mount Pleasant, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE KORN 

Name Birth Death 

John Jacob Green October 22, i8g8 

Robert Edward Green May 30, igoi 

They were born near Hartford Cit}-, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Green reside near Hartford City, Indiana, where Mr. 
Green is engaged as superintendent of the Renner Stock Farm, in which 
capacity he has served several years. They are both members of the Friends' 
Society. 



JAMES W. AND MARY (GREEN) GRIMES (5) 

Mary Green, daughter of Jacob A. and Martha (Johnson) Green, was 
born .\pril 19, 1875, in Freeport, Harrison County, Ohio. 

James Walter Grimes, son of James O. and Sarah (Davis) Grimes, was 
born October 20, i86g, in Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio. 

James W. Grimes and Mary Green were united in marriage May 11, i8g8, 
at the home of the bride's parents in Freeport, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 
Sara Grimes P'ebruary 10, igoo 

She was born in Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grimes reside in Cambridge where Mr. Grimes is engaged 
in the hardware business. They are both members of the Methodist Church. 

Mrs. Grimes finished her education at Mt. Union College, in Alliance, 
Ohio. 



HOWARD J. AND ELIZABETH (GREENE HOLLOWAY (5) 

Elizabeth Green, daughter of Jacob A. and Martha (Johnson) Green, 
was born October 20, 1876, in Freeport, Harrison County, Ohio. 



RECORD OF THE GRISEI.I, FAMILY 435 

Howard J. Holloway, son of Asa G. and H. Elma (Hoge) Holloway, 
was born April 21, 1875, '" Flushing, Belmont County, Ohio. 

Howard J. Holloway and Elizabeth Green were united in marriage March 
23, 1899, by the Friends' ceremony, at the home of the bride's parents in Free- 
port, Ohio. 

No children. 

Mr. Holloway is a commercial traveler, and they reside at Wellsburg, 
Brooke County, West Virginia. 

Mrs. Holloway finished her education at Mt. Union College, Alliance, 
Ohio. 



WILLIS W. AND FLORA (DALE) KERR (5) 

Willis Whittier Kerr, son of Joseph and Caroline E. (Grisell) Kerr, \vas 
born August 15, 1862, in Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Flora Dale, daughter of Jesse E. and Rachael (Clary) Dale, was born 
November 22, 1871, in DuBois, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania. 

Willis W. Kerr and Flora Dale were united in marriage June 9, 1891, in 
DuBois, Pennsylvania. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name B/'rt/i Death 

Rachel Margaretta Kerr September 26, 1892 

Marion Kerr June 25, 1898 

Rachel M. was born in Salem, Ohio, and Marion in New Castle, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kerr reside in Erie, Pennsylvania, where Mr. Kerr has 
charge of the Standard Oil plant of Erie. 

Politically, Mr. Kerr is a Republican. He is a member of the Knights 
Templar lodge. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kerr are members of the Presbyterian Church. 

Mr. Kerr was a student in Meadville College, Pennsylvania, before his 
marriage. 



J. FRANK AND JULIET (DURHAM) KERR (5) 

Joseph Frank Kerr, son of Joseph and Caroline E. (Griselle) Kerr, was 
born June 21, 1866, in Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Juliet Durham, daughter of Clinton and Mary ( Bearce) Durliam, was 
born September 14, 1867, in Attica, Harjicr County, Kansas. 

J. Frank Kerr, and Juliet Durham were united in marriage , 

, in Attica, Kansas, 



A^S RECORD OK THE GRISKLI. FAMILY 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Ntimr Birth Death 

Fannie KfiT May 17.1889 

Robert Trimble Kerr February 22, 1892 

They were born in Salem, Columbiana County. Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kerr reside in Salem, Ohio, where Mr. Kerr is engaged 
in private banking business. 

Mr. Kerr attended Hudson College, before his marriage, which is now 
Adelbert College, of Cleveland, Ohio. He is a Republican. At present he is 
serving as Justice of the Peace in Salem. 

Mrs. Kerr is a member of the Presb\'terian Cliurch. 

DR. PAUL H. AND BARBARA (KERMAN) GRISELLE (5) 

Barbara Kerman, daughter of and ( ) Kerman, 

was born , 1867, in La Crosse, La Crosse County, Wisconsin. 

Dr. Paul H. Griselle, son of Charles D. and Mary H. (Smith) Griselle, 
was born June 3, 1865, in Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Dr. Paul H. Griselle and Barbara Kerman were united in marriage 
September ig, 1890, in Billings, Yellowstone County, Montana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 
Frank Marsh Griselle December 20, 1891 

He was born in Miles Cit}', Custer County, Montana. 

Dr. Paul H. Griselle graduated from a dental college in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. One day when the students were rushing to their seats in the 
amphitheatre he was thrown violently against the steps, striking his chest. 
Within an hour he had a severe hemorrhage of the lungs. He is a first-class 
dentist, but has twice had to give up a good practice on account of trouble with 
his lungs. The last place he practiced was at Helena, Montana. He was 
forced to go further south, to a warmer climate, and went to Las Vegas, New 
Mexico, where he was employed as train dispatcher for some time, but prefer- 
ring to live in the north, he is returning in that direction. .\t present the)' are 
living in Pueblo, Colorado. 

Dr. Griselle is a Republican. He is a member of the Mystic Shriners. 
Mr. and Mrs. Griselle are members of the Presbyterian Cliurch. Mrs. Griselle 
is of German descent. 

STEPHEN N. AND MAUDE E. (GRISELLE) VAN BLARICON (5) 

Stephen Norton Van Blaricon, son of Levi and Sara (Johnson) Van 
Blaricon, was born April 4, 1869, in Waterville, Lesueur Countv, Minnesota, 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 437 

Maude E. Griselle, daughter of Charles D. and Mary H. (Smith) Gris- 
elle, was born July 27, 1867, in Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

Stephen N. Van Blaricon and Maude E. Griselle were united in marriage 
April 5, 1900, in Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 
Austin Paul Van Blaricon June 30, igoi 

He was born in Salem, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Van Blaricon reside in Salem, Ohio. 

Mr. Van Blaricon is a Republican and a member of the I. O. O. F. and 
Sons of Veterans. He was a locomotive engineer on the Northern Pacific rail- 
road until about 1899, when he went to Salem, where he was mechanical engi- 
neer for some time and is at present master mechanic. 

Mrs. Van Blaricon graduated from the high school of Salem before her 
marriage. 

Mrs. Van Blaricon is a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

DR. MORDECAI H. AND ANNA E. (PERRY) FLETCHER (5) 

Anna Elizabeth Perry, daughter of Benjamin P. and Elizabeth E. 
(Reynolds) Perry, was born December 5, 1851, in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Mordecai Hiatt Fletcher, son of Samuel Francis and Elizabeth (Hiatt) 
Fletcher, was born September 18, 1849, in Richmond, Indiana. 

Dr. Mordecai H. Fletcher and Anna E. Perry were unifed in marriage 
April 2, 1884. in Richmond, Wayne County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name lUrth Death 
Elizabeth Perry Fletcher October i g, 1 888 

She was born in Richmond, Indiana. 

Dr. and Mrs. Fletcher reside in Avondale, Cincinnati, where Dr. Fletcher 
is engaged in the practice of the medical profession. 

Dr. M. H. Fletcher, M. S., M. D., D. D. S., was educated at Earliiam 
College, Richmond, Indiana ; Miami Medical College, Cincinnati, Ohio, and 
Ohio Dental College, Cincinnati, Ohio. Politicall\', Dr. Fletcher is a Repub- 
lican. 

FREDERICK S. AND MARTHA E. (JONES) LeFEVRE (5) 

Martha Elizabeth Jones, daughter of John W. and Martha G. (Reynolds) 
Jones, was born December 2, 1853, in Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Frederick Smith LeFevre, son of William and Rebecca (Smith ) LeFevre, 

was born , , at Northville, near Ithaca, Tompkins County, 

New York. 



438 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

Frederick S. LeFevre and Martha E. Jones were united in marriage 
Fcbrnar}- 14, 1880, in Indianapolis, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 
Anna Mabel LeFevre March 18, 1885 

She was born in Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. LeFevre reside in , where Mr. LeFevre is 

engaged in the mercantile business. They are members of the Friends' 
Church. Politically, Mr. LeFevre is a Republican. 

Mr. LeFevre's parents were both natives of England, but lived in this 
country many years. They lived in Richmond at the time of their death, where 
they had lived several years. They were both members of the Friends' Society. 



WILLIAM F. AND ANTOINETTE (GURNSEY) TICE (5) 

William Fisher Tice, son of Orceneth F. and Margaretta (Reynolds) 
Tice, was born March 8, 1865, in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Antoinette Gurnsey, daughter of Henry Wells and Elizabeth (Curtis) 
Gurnse}', was born March 14, 1865, in Mansfield, Ohio. 

William F. Tice and Antoinette Gurnsey were united in marriage 
September i, 1887, in Elmira, Chemung County, New York. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Curtis Gurnsey Tice August 27, 1888 

He was born in Madisonville, Hamilton County, Ohio. 



Mr. and Mrs. Tice live in Wyncote, a suburb of Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. Mr. Tice is in the employ of Bailey, Bank & Biddle, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 



BENJAMIN S. AND ANNA G. (TICE) ALLISON (5) 

Anna Gertrude Tice, daughter of Orceneth F. and Margaretta (^Keynolds) 
Tice, was born August 16, 1866, in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Benjamin Stanton Allison, son of Charles William Brandon and Marj' 
(Stanton) Allison, was born December 18, 1854, ''i Bellefontaine, Logan 
County, Ohio. 

Benjamin S. Allison and Anna G. Tice were united in marriage June i, 
1893, at Mt. Auburn, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 439 

TO THE.M WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 



Marguerite Tice Allison March 5, 1895 

Stanton Tice Allison March 13, 1897 

They were born in Wheeling, West Virginia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allison, are living in Wheeling, West Virginia, at present, 
where Mr. Allison is engaged in the practice of law, being a member of the law 
firm of Erskine & Allison. He attended the public schools of Wheeling, grad- 
uated from the University of Wooster, Ohio, in 1876, and Albany Law School, 
New York, in 1878. In his political views he is a Republican. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allison are members of the Presbyterian Church. 



LOWELL P. AND MARY C. 'DAVENPORT) GRISELL (6) 

Lowell Paxson Grisell, son of Hiram B. and Lydia J. ( Paxson ) Grisell, 
was born April 3, 1862, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mary C. Davenport, daughter of William and Martha (Sedzwich) 
Davenport, was born May 12, 1S57, in Union County, Indiana. 

Lowell P. Grisell and Mary C. Davenport were united in marriage Janu- 
ary I, 1884, in Balbec, Jay County, Indiana, William Griest officiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

James Lester Grisell February 27, 1886 

Russell Leslie Grisell April 28, 1890 

Lowell Hobart Grisell May 24,1896 

They were all born near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell reside on the " Milo Grisell Farm" where Mr. 
Grisell has made many improvements. Besides being engaged in farming and 
stock raising he has attended to the pumping of the oil wells on his own and 
adjoining farms for seven years. 

Mr. Grisell is a member of the Knights of Pythias and I. O. O. F. fra- 
ternities. Politically, he is a Republican. 

JAMES H. AND ATLANTIC O. (GRISELL) CASH (6) 

Atlantic Ocean Grisell, daughter of Hiram B. and Lydia J. (Paxson) 
Grisell, was born June 3, 1863, near i\nnville, Jay County, Indiana, and died 
February 12, 1888, near Pennville, Imliana. Interment in Friends' Cemetery, 
of Pennville. 

James Hamilton Cash, son of John and Mary (Williamson) Cash, was 
born December 10, 1861, near Balbec, Jay County, Indiana. 



440 RECORD OF THE GRIHELL FAMILY 

James H. Casli and Atlantic O. Grisell were united in marriage March 
lo, 1883, in Balbec, Jay County, Indiana, William Griest officiating. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 

Charley 'I'hurston Cash February 1 1, 1884 

Harry Carson Cash January i, 1888 January 30, i88g 

Charle}' T. was born near Lawton, Van Buren County, Michigan, and 
Harry C. in Balbec, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cash lived on a farm northwest of Balbec, Jay County, 
Indiana, where Mr. Cash was engaged in farming. 

The following was copied from the death notice of Mrs. Cash : — 

"Died, on Sunday evening, after a long illness, Atlantic Cash, wife of 
Hamilton Cash, in the twenty-fifth year of her age. Only last week, little 
Harry, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Cash, aged thirteen months, was buried, and 
the death of the mother so soon is a bereavement which falls with great force 
upon the husband and parents. She leaves one son, little Charlie, four years 
of age. 

"The funeral services were held in the M. E. Church and the remains 
were interred in the Friends' Cemetery at Pennville. 

" ' Weep not that her toils are over, 
Weep not that her race is run, 
God grant we may rest as calmly 
When our work, like hers, is done. 

" ' Till then we would yield with gladness. 
Our treasure with Him to keep. 
And rejoice in the sweet assurance. 
He giveth His loved one sleep.' " 

Charley T. Cash lives with his father in Penn Township, Jay County, 
Indiana, where he assists with the farm work. Charley is an unusually brilliant 
scholar and his knowledge of history, both past and present, is extensive. 



JOHN E. AND MARY J. (GRISELL) STRAIT (,6) 

Mary Josephine (irisell, daughter of Hiram B. and Lydia J. (Paxson) 
Grisell, was born February 21, 1865, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, 
and died February i, 1895, in Jackson Township. Jay County, Indiana. Inter- 
ment in the Friends' Cemetery, of Pennville. 

John Edgar Strait, son of William and Eliza (Grey) Strait, was born 
Janiiary 16, 1863, in Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana, and died October 
3, 1892, in Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana. Interment in the Friends' 
Cemetery, of Pennville. 



RECORD OF THE OklSEI.I, FAMILY 44I 

John E. Strait and Mary J. Grisell were united in marriage September 15, 
1883, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, William Griest ofticiating. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Jessie Alberta Strait February 20, 1884 

Freddie Gol4smith Strait August 3, 1886 

Edna J. Strait October 26, 1888 

Mary Edith Strait December 15, i88g 

Howard Worthy Strait July 3, i8gi 

They were all born in Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Strait located on a farm in Jackson Township, where Mr. 
Strait was engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death. 

Mrs. Strait w-as a member of the Friends' Society. 

After Mr. and Mrs. Strait's deaths homes were provided for the children 
— Jessie lives with her uncle, James Ruple ; Freddie with his grandpa Strait ; 
Edna with Mrs. Sarah Jenkins, of Pennville ; Mary with Mr. Stults and family,, 
who live near Kit, Indiana, and Howard with Charles and Lizzie (Hopkins) 
Grisell, near Balbec, Indiana. 



ORVILLE L. AND LIZZIE (STANSBURY) MORROW (6) 

Orville Leslie Morrow, son of Simon P. and Elizabeth A. (Grisell) 
Morrow, was born November 4, 1871, in Fiat, Penn Township, Jay County, 
Indiana. 

Lizzie May Stansbury, daughter of George L. and Mary Ann (Samuels) 
Stansbury, was born October 30, 1868, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Orville L. Morrow and Lizzie M. Stansbury were united in marriage 
April 25, 1895, at the home of the bride's parents, near Pennville, Indiana. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Morrow have taken more than ordinary interest in educa- 
tional matters, both having received a good school education and afterward 
instructing in the public schools. Mrs. Marrow finished the common schools 
in 1887 and begun teaching in 1890. She attended the Indiana State Normal 
School at Terre Haute in the springs of 1891 and 1892, and the following spring 
attended the Valparaiso Normal. In 1894-95 she taught in Pennville, Jav 
County, Indiana. 

Mr. Morrow finished his public school education and begun teaching in 
the winter of 1892. He attended the summer Normals at Lebanon and Ada, 

Ohio. 

After their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Marrow went to Terre Haute, Indiana, 
and attended the State Normal where the former graduated in 1899, and the lat- 
ter attended two years. They then returned to Pennville, where Mr. Morrow 



442 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 



superintended the high school one 3'ear. At present they reside in McCords- 
ville, Indiana. Mr. Morrow being the successful and proficient principal of the 
high school there. 

Mr. and Mrs. Morrow are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Mrs. Morrow is of Dutch and Irish descent. 



ORRIS L. AND ETTA (BURKE 1 MORROW (6) 

Orris Leroy Morrow, son of Simon P. and Elizabeth A. (Grisell) Mor- 
row, was born May i, 1873, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Etta Burke, daughter of Edwin R. and Marie B. (Ray) Burke, was born 
May ig, 1874, in Portland, Jay Count}-, Indiana. 

O. Leroy Morrow and Etta Burke were united in marriage November 20, 
1895. in Portland, Indiana, Rev. Leroy Kridler officiating. 

No children. 

Mrs. Morrow was educated in the Portland, Indiana, public schools. 
She also received instruction in music of which she was a teacher for some 
time. Her parents were married January i, 1871, in Findlay, Ohio, but re- 
moved to Portland, Indiana, soon after their marriage. They were of Yankee, 
German and English descent. 

Mr. Morrow attended college at Ridgeville, Indiana, and afterward en- 
tered the college at Ada, Ohio, taking a four years' course and graduating at 
the end of the course in pharmacy. At present he is located in Chicago where 
he is employed as cashier in the freight office of the Michigan Central Railroad. 



OTHEL L. AND BERTHA A. 1 BENTLEY 1 MORROW 6) 

Othel Leston Morrow, son of Simon P. and Elizabeth A. (Grisell) Mor- 
row, was born June 2, 1876, in Penn Township, Jay County. Indiana. 

Bertha Allen Bentley, daughter of Edmond and Theoda (Sluyter) 
Bentley, was born May 3, 1884, near Emerald, St. Croix County, Wisconsin. 

Othel L. Morrow and Bertha A. Bentley were united in marriage Juh^ 9, 
1900, in Coeur d'Alene, Kootenai Count}', Idaho. 

No children. 

Mr. Morrow was educated in the public schools of Penn Township and 
the Normal School of Portland, Indiana, after which in the year i8g8 he took a 
trip through the west having stopped in Oregon and Washington and finally 
settled near Granite, Shoshone County, Idaho. After his marriage the}' located 
near Granite where Mr. Morrow was engaged in agricultural pursuits. Later 
the)' lived in Spokane, Washington, for some time, and November 23, 1901, 
started to his former iiome near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana, which they ex- 
pect to make their permanent home. 

Mrs. Morrow is of German descent. 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 443 



OTIS O. AND EVA M. iSMOCK) SHAFFER (6) 

Eva Ma}' Smock, daughter of Frank H. and Bt-Ue ( McHose) Smock, was 
born at Monroe, Wisconsin, May 6, 1874. 

Otis O. Shaffer, son of Van Buren and Endimiah Partlow (Bailey) 
Shaffer, was born at WaVerly, Iowa, May 27, 1872. 

Eva M. Smock and Otis O. Shaffer were united in n;arriage February 22, 
1894, at Monroe, Wisconsin. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Naiiu- Birth Death 

Josephine Mabel Shaffer August 11, 1895 

Clarence Hilton Shaffer July 4, 1898 

Byron Homer Shaffer February 1 1, igoi 

Grace Leotis Shaffer March 26, 1902 

All were born near Monroe, Wisconsin, except Grace L., who was born 
near Artesian, Sawborn County, South Dakota. 

Mr. and Mrs. Shaffer lived near Monroe, Wisconsin, several years. In 
October, 1901, they moved to Artesian, South Dakota, where they expect to 
make their future home, and where they are engaged in farming and stock 
raising. 

Mrs. Shaffer was a graduate of the Monroe High School and taught in the 
public schools fifteen months. 



JONATHAN A. AND ARIAANNETTA (HOPKINS) HIATT (6) 

"Daunt" A. Hiatt, son of Gilbert and Lydia Jane (Vore) Hiatt, was 
born August 4, 1868, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

"Etta" Hopkins, daughter of Albert H. and Hannah E. (Grisell) Hop- 
kins, was born July 19, 1871, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

"Daunt" A. Hiatt and "Etta" Hopkins were united in marriage October 
g, 1890, at the home of the bride's parents in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana, 
Rev. J. V. Terflinger of the M. E. Church officiating. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Death 
Albert Cyril Hiatt May 19,1892 

He was born in Pennville, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hiatt located in Pennville where they lived two years, then 
removed to Geneva, Adams County, Indiana, where by continued industry and 
honest effort they have gained a pleasant home and many friends. They are 
both members of the M. E. Church. 



4^^. RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

Mr. Hiiitt is eniployL-d by the Uecatur Gas Company as line superin- 
tendent. 

DR. THOMAS J. AND MABEL (HORTON) DILLS C6) 

Mabel Horton, daughter of Elijah A. and Elizabeth M. C. ( Blackledge) 
Horton, was born June — , 1861, in Bluffton, Wells County, Indiana. 

Dr. Thomas J. Dills, son of . and ( ) Dills, was born 

, , in . 

Dr. Thomas J. Dills and Mabel Horton were united in marriage June — , 
1883, at the home of the bride's mother in Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

10 THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth D.ath 

Clara Belle Dills 

Margaret Dills 

Thomas Horton Dills 



They were born in . 

No further information could be obtained about this famil}'. 



WILLIAM H. AND OLIVE M. (SOULE) CAREY (6) 

Olive Myrtle Soule, daughter of Jesse H. and Rachel A. (Michener) 
Soule, was born Julv 17, 1876, near Stillwater, Grant Township, Washington 
County, Minnesota. 

William Henry Care)', son of Joseph Moore and Mary Letitia (Sanders) 
Carey, was born December 17, 1864, in Fillmore Count}', Minnesota. 

William H. Carey and Olive M. Soule were united in marriage Septem- 
ber I, 1896, at her mother's home, near Withrow, Washington Count}', Minne- 
sota. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

A^aiiK Birlh Death 

Marguerite Carey . May 28, 1897 

Milton Soule Carey November 10, 1898 

They were born near Spring Valley, Fillmore County, Minnesota. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Carey started at once to their future 
home, a farm near Spring \ allev, where thev have since resided. Mr. Care}' is 
an energetic business man, and owns and runs a large lime kiln and e.xtensive 
stone quarries, besides a good farm. 

Mrs. Carey graduated from the public schools before her marriage and 
began teaching before she was eighteen years old, having taught one winter at 
Breckenridge, Wilkin C.ounty, Minnesota, anil two terms in Fillmore countv, of 
the same State. 



RECORD OF 'IHK CKISKI.I, FAMILY 445 



JOHN C. AND HATTIE (TAMMEL) MICHENER (6) 

John Charles Michener, son of Charles R. and Lizzie B. ( Haskins) 
Michener, was born November ii, 1877, near Spring Valley, Fillmore County, 
Minnesota. 

Hattie Tanimel. daughter of Jacob and Clara (.Bronink) Tainmel, was 
born , , in Fillmore County, Minnesota. 

John C. Michener and Hattie Tammel were united in marriage Novem- 
ber S, i8gg, at the home of the bride's parents in York, Fillmore County, 
Minnesota, Rev. Osterhaupt officiating. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Name Birth Drath 
Gerald Remond Michener January 15. 1901 

He was born in Greenleafton, Fillmore County, Minnesota. 

Mr. and Mrs. Michener located on the "old home place," where they 
still reside. 

Mrs. Michener is of Dutch descent. 

Mr. Michener attended Prof. Breckenridge's College at Decorah, Winne- 
shiek Count}', Iowa, two years, and then commenced a four years' course at 
Hopkinton College, Delaware County, Iowa, preparatory to taking a medical 
course at Rush College, Chicago, Illinois, but after attending one year the 
death of his father made it necessary for him to come home and take charge of 
the farm. 



JOSEPH W. AND ANNA (KROUSEi WILSON (6) 

Joseph William Wilson, son of William W. and Elizabeth E. ( Sowders) 
Wilson, was born November 15. 1861, near Mound City, Linn County, Kansas. 

Anna Krouse, daughter of Frederick and Francis ( Bollinger) Kronse, 
was born December 19, 1866, near Mound City, Linn County, Kansas. 

Joseph W. Wilson and Anna Krouse were united in marriage December 
2, i8gi, near Mound Cit\', Linn County, Kansas. 

TO THEM WERE liOkN 

Name Birth Diath 

Carlie May Wilson November 10, 1894 

Eula Fern Wilson November 9, 1897 

They were born mar Mound City, Linn County, Kansas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilson live on a farm near Mound Cit\-. wh.re they have 
gained many friends through their honesty and kindness toward all. Mr. W'il- 
son is spoken of as "an honest, hanhvorking man " 

Mrs. Wilson is of German, Swiss and Irish descent. 



446 RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 



LEWIS W. AND EMMA (WENTZ) HOOVER (6) 

Lewis W. Hoover, son of David F. and Hannah (Wilson) Hoover, was 
born July 12, 1865, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Emma Wentz, daughter of William and Hannah (Geiser) Wentz, was 
born January 5, 1868, near Mt. Pleasant, Jay County, Indiana. 

Louis W. Hoover and Emma W'enz were united in marriage April 20, 
i88g, in Portland, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Frederick Ivan Hoover January 23, iSgi 

Mabel R. Lou Hoover J"ne 4, 1893 August 8, 1894 

They were both born in Portland, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hoover located in Portland, after their marriage, where 
Mr. Hoover has since been employed as assistant cashier in the People's 
Bank. 

Mrs. Hoover was a graduate of the common schools of Jay County. 
Her father was a native of Pennsvlvania and her mother emigrated to this coun- 
try from Stuttgart, Germany, in 1842, with her parents, when she was but four 
years old. Her father and mother both died soon after their arrival, leaving 
four small children without homes, of which she was the youngest. She is 
spoken of as a most excellent woman. 

After receiving a good common school education Mr. Hoover took a 
business course in the Portland Normal, after which he taught in the public 
schools of Jay County three terms. Then he was engaged as assistant in the 
Treasurer's office. He is a birthright member of the Friends' Society. 



OTIS C. AND MARIAN E. (HIATT) ARMSTRONG (6) 

Marian Eleanor Hiatt, daughter of Ezekiel M. and Maria M. (Wilson) 
Hiatt, was born September 19, i86g, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Otis Chester Armstrong, son of John and Amanda (Souder) Armstrong, 
was born July 7, 1867, near Mound City, Linn County, Kansas. 

Otis C. Armstrong and Marian E. Hiatt were united in marriage No- 
vember 28, 1889, at the home of the bride's parents near Mound City, Linn 
County, Kansas. 

lO rilEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Jennie P^ay Armstrong P'ebruary 9, 1892 

Ola Grace .Armstrong |anuary i, i8g8 

Thi-y were born in Mound Cit\-, Linn County, Kansas. 



RECOKU OV THE CRISELL FAMILY  447 

Mr. and Mrs. Armstrong lived in Mound City until 1899, when they re- 
moved to Chandler, Lincoln County, Oklahoma Territory. Mr. Armstrong is 
a mechanic and at present has charge of the machinery at the Chandler Pressed 
Brick Plant, which is the largest plant in Oklahoma Territory. Mrs. Arm- 
strong is at the head of a dressmaking establishment and also teaches the 
Standard Tailor System ot dress cutting. 

They are members of the Presbyterian Church. 



EDWARD W. AND FLORENCE A. (STUMP) HIATT (6) 

Edward Warren Hiatt, sou of Ezekiel M. and Maria M. (Wilson) Hiatt, 
was born February 23, 1874, in Penn Township, jay County. Indiana. 

Florence Annie Stump, daughter of George B. and Mary B. (Shively) 
Stump, was born , , in Linn County, Kansas. 

Edward W. Pliatt and Florence A. Stump were united in marriage May 
3, 1895, in Nevada, Vernon County, Missouri. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

A^crmr Birth Death 

Charles Albert Hiatt J'lne 26, 1897 

Ezekiel Marmaduke Hiatt May 18, 1899 August 16, 1900 

George Edward Hiatt February 20, 1901 

They were all born near Blue Mound, Linn County, Kansas. 

Ezekiel M. died and was buried near Blue Mound, same county and 
State. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hiatt reside near Blue Mound, where tiiey are engaged in 
agricultural pursuits. 

Mrs. Hiatt is of (jerman descent. She tauglit very successfully in the 
public schools several years before her marriage and was also a student of 
music for some time. Politically, Mr. Hiatt is a Republican. 



MEREDITH AND IDA M. (McFARLAND^ HIATT (6) 

Meredith Hiatt, son of .Anson L. and Rebecca L. (Irey) Hialt, was born 
August 22, i86g, in Pennvillt;, Jay County, Indiana, and died August 6. iSijS. 
in Marion, Grant County, Indiana. 

Ida May McFarland, danglittr of William [asper and Maria ('atherine 
(Russell) McFarland, was born February 25, 1876, in Monit' an County, 
Missouri. 

Meredith Hiatt and Ida M. Mcl''arlaiid \\<i' united in marriage l'"cbruary 
25, 1895, in Montpelier, Blackford County, Indiana. 



448 RKCORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 

TO THF.M WERE BORN 

N'ciine BirtJi Death 

Clifford Hiatt November 30,1895 September 2,1897 

Vaughn lliatt April 21,1898 

They were born in Marion, Grant Count}', Indiana. 

Mr and Mrs. Hiatt were residing in Marion, Indiana, at the time of the 
former's death. He had been a carpenter by trade. 



EMRO AND JESSIE (HIATT) BRUCH 16) 

Jessie Hiatt, daughter of Anson L. and Rebecca L. (Irey) Hiatt was 
born November 25, 1878, in Nottingham Township, Wells County, Indiana. 

Emro Bruch, son of William and Mary Jane (Zellers) Bruch. was born 
— , , in Huntington. Huntington County, Indiana. 

Embro Bruch and Jessie Hiatt were united in marriage September 24, 
i8g8, in Marion, Grant Countv, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Willard Ray Bruch April 8, 1900 

He was born in Marion, Indiana. 



Mr. and Mrs. Bruch reside in Marion, Indiana, where he is at present 
employed as conductor for the street car company. He is by profession a 
photographer. 

Mr. Bruch is of German ancestry. 



JOHN C. AND JULIA M. (ROWE) GILES (6) 

Julia May Rowe, daughter of Jeptha and Hannah Elizabeth (Hethman) 
Rowe, was born November 8, 1876, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

John, Charles Giles, son of Charles and Alice (Jennings) Giles, was born 
March 15, 1870, at Bradley's Bend, Arstrong County, Pennsylvania. 

John C. Giles and Julia M. Rowe were united in marriage December 16, 
1896, at tlie honii- of the bride's foster parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Allen, 
in Pennville, Ja}' County, Indiana. 

No childnMi. 

Mrs. Giles was scarcely five years old when her mother died and she was 
taken into the home of Mr. and Mrs. William Allen as their child. She 
attended the public schools and afterward the Pennville Normal. She also 
received a good musical education, having been instructed by the local teachers 
and later taking a term of music in Portland, followed by one year in the Con- 



RECORD OF THE GRISELL FAMILY 449 

servator}- of Music in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Her mother was of German 
descent. 

After their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Giles located in Montpelier, Black- 
ford County, Indiana, where Mr. Giles is engaged in contracting and drilling in 
the Indiana oil fields. Mr. Giles is of English and Irish descent. 



EDGAR D. AND MAGGIE G. (MEREDITH) IRELAND (6) 

Maggie Grisell Meredith, daughter of Chalkley and Sabina (Grisell) 
Meredith, was born March 31, 1868, in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Edgar D. Ireland, son of Jacob and Martha (Decamp) Ireland, was born 
October i, 1866, near Allentown, Allen County, Ohio. 

Edgar D. Ireland and Maggie G. Meredith were united in marriage Oc- 
tober 13, 1888, in Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Name Birth D,-alh 

Fred Meredith Ireland July 13,1889 

Mary Sabina Ireland October 13, 1891 

Grace Martha Ireland February 27,1894 July 26,1895 

Clara Esther Ireland February 24, 1896 

Clarence Dewey Ireland November 17, i8g8 

Lewis Edgar Ireland March 6, 1901 

The four oldest children were born in Jackson Township where also 
Grace M. died, and the two youngest children were born in Penn Township, 
Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ireland have made their home in Jay County since their 
marriage, where he has been engaged in farming and stock raising. In the 
spring of 1902 they removed to Pennville, same county. 

Mrs. Ireland is a birthright member of the F-riends' Society. 

Mr. Ireland is of German and English descent. 



SAMUEL R. S. AND GRACE L. (MEREDITH) COOVER (6) 

Grace Lupton Meredith, daughter of Chalkley and Sabina W. (Grisell) 
Meredith, was born July 17, 1880, in Jackson Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Samuel Rodell Saxon Coover, son of Samuel and Mary (Guslar) Coover, 
was born October 25, 1871, in Knox Township, Jay County, Indiana. 

Samuel R. S. Coover and Grace L. Meredith were united in marriage 
December 4, 1901, at the home of the bride's fatlier. in Pennville, |,iy County, 
Indiana, by the Friends' ceremony, her father performing the ceremony. 

Mr. and Mrs. Coover have located in Penuville, their former home, 

29 



450 RECORD OF THE GRISEI.L FAMILY 

where ;\Ir. Coover is employed by Carlin Bros., contractors and drillers in the 
Indiana oil fields. 

Mrs. Coover is a birthright member of the Friends' Society. She is 
also a member of the Meredith Rebekah Lodge No. 513, of Pennville. 

Mr. Coover is a graduate of the common schools of Pennville. He is 
of Dutch descent. 



MARTIN L. AND IDA M. (TURPIN) GRISELL (6) 

Martin Luther Grisell, son of Hiram and Lydia J. (Gray) Grisell. was 
born September 4, 1869, in Jerusalem, Monroe County, Ohio. 

Ida Ma}' Turpin, daughter of John H. and Susan A. (Hutchison) Tur- 
pin, was born October 27, 1869, near , County, Wisconsin. 

Martin L. Grisell and Ida M. Turpin were united in marriage, March 19, 
1890, in Yuma, Yuma Countv, Colorado. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Auime Birth Death 
Walter Byron Grisell December 26, 1890 

He was born in Yuma, Colorado. 

Mr. and Mrs. Grisell have made their home in Yuma since their marriage, 
where he is engaged in the jewelry business, being a watchmaker by trade. 

Mrs. Grisell is of German descent. Her parents moved from Wiscon- 
sin to Carroll County, Illinois, when she was about one year old and remained 
there until 1888, when they removed to Yuma, Colorado. She was educated in 
the Northern Illinois College, at Fulton, Whiteside County, and in the Mount 
Carroll Seminary, at Mount Carroll, Carroll County, Illinois. 



LEWIS AND ALTA M. : GRISELL) BENGE (6) 

Alta Mae Grisell, daughter of Hiram L. and Lydia J. (Gra^•) Grisell, was 
born October 23, 1871. in Pennville. Jay County, Indiana. 

Lewis Benge, son of Samuel and Cordelia (Saxton) Benge, was born 
Ma}' 3, 1862, in Springport, Jackson Countv, Michigan. 

Lewis Benge and Alta M. Grisell were united in marriage May 20, 1888^ 
in Yuma. Yuma County, Colorado. 

TO THKM WERE BORN 

Name Birth Death 

Fred Benge April 22, 1889 

He was born in "\iima, Colorado. 

Mr. and Mrs. Benge located in Sterling, Logan County, Colorado, soon 
after their marriage, where he is engaged in the blacksmith business. He has 



RECORD OF IHK CklSEI.L FAMILY 451 

won the respect of the entire community for his honesty and fair dealings. Mr. 
Benge's father was a native of Kent County, England. 



WILBER L. AND GERTRUDE R. (PORTER) MEREDITH (6) 

Wilber Lee Meredith, son of Samuel G. and Carrie L. (Smith) Mere- 
dith, was born December 20, 1871, near Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Gertrude Kayburn Porter, daughter of John H. and Jennie (Rayburn) 
Porter, was born January 23, 1871, in Montezuma, Poweshiek County. Iowa. 

Wilber L. Meredith and Gertrude K. Porter were united in marriage 
January 11, 1893, in Montezuma, Iowa. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Meredith reside at present in Oskaloosa, Iowa. 

Mr. Meredith begun his business career at the age of si.xteen, when he 
commenced work for the B. C. R. & N. Ry. Co. as night operator at Elmira. 
Johnson County, Iowa. He worked there two years, when, desiring the bene- 
fits of a commercial course, he resigned his position and entered the Commer- 
cial College, of Iowa City. After graduating from the college, he resumed his 
work for the B. C. R. & N. Ry. Co., being located this time at West Libert}', 
Muscatine County, of the same State, and filling the position of day operator. 
Two years subsequent to that time he was promoted to the position of Relief 
Agent, in which capacity he worked until 1892. At this time he left the road in 
the telegraph operators strike. Soon afterward he commenced work as deputy 
to Grand Chief Ramsay, of the Order of Telegraph Operators. In December, 
1895, Mr. Meredith resigned his position with the O. R. T. antl accepted a posi- 
tion as telegraph operator for the Iowa Central Railway Co. at New Sharon, 
Mashaska County, Iowa, where he and his wife first located after their marriage. 
After working there about one year he was given the agency for the Iowa Cen- 
tral at Steamboat Rock, Hardin County, of the same State, where he remained 
two years and was then promoted to the agency at Gilman, Marshall County. 
He stayed there until igoo. when, on account of Mrs. Meredith's healtli, he 
resigned his position and sought a healthier climate. They settled in Colorado, 
where he soon secured a position, this time with the Union Pacific Railway Co. as 
Relief Agent. In the spring of 1901 he was specially requested by tlie Super- 
intendent of the Iowa Central to accept a position as cashier for tlie road at 
Hampton, Franklin County, Iowa. Mrs. Meredith's health being improved, 
they returned and located at the aforesaid place. The next fall he was again 
promoted and sent to Oskaloosa, Mahaska County, Iowa. This is a very 
important position, and since Oskaloosa is the headquarters for the Iowa Cen- 
tral Railway Co., it makes it doubly so. 

Mr. Meredith is a very competent and successtul railroad ofiu lal and has 
held many positions of trust. He has never been discharged and luis advanced 
from the position of niglit operator to one of the most trn^twon liy places on 
the road. 



452 RECORD OF THK GRISKLI. FAMILY 

Mrs. Meredith graduated from the Montezuma High School in 1887, after 
which she entered the Conservatory of Music at Grinnell, Iowa, graduating from 
there in i8go. Her father is a retired hardware merchant. He is of direct 
Irish descent, his father having come from Ireland when a small boy. Mrs. 
Porter is also of Irish parentage. 



EVI R. AND LOURA A. (GRIFFITH) SMITH (6) 

Loura Amber Griffith, daughter of Isaac and Loura A. (Taylor) Griffith, 
was born November 3, 1874, in Assumption, Christian County, Illinois. 

Evi Robbins Smith, son of Joseph D. and Rhoda ( Robbins) Smith, was 
born July 23, 1871, in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Evi R. Smith and Loura A. Griffith were united in marriage March 7, 
1895, in Portland, Jay County, Indiana. 

TO THEM WERE BORN 

Natiic Birth Dcallt 

Dwight Lewis Smith December 29, 1896 January i, 1897 

Hoyt Dorwin Smith November 26, 1897 

Marjorie Apaline Smith February 16, 1900 

They were all born in Pennville, Jay County, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Smith located in Pennville after their marriage, where he 
is a partner in the firm of J. D. Smith & Son, one of the largest and finest 
equipped hardware, furniture and undertaking establishments in Jay County. 

Mr. Smith was a student of \'alparaiso College, Valparaiso, Indiana, 
where he took two terms in the business course. He is of English descent. 

They are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 



J. HOWARD AND CARRIE (ROMICK) BALDWIN (6) 

Carrie Komick, daughter of W'illiam E. and Lida (Grisell) Romick, was 
born November 2, 1862, in Harrisville, Harrison County, Ohio. 

John Howard Baldwin son of and Martha ( ) Baldwin, 

was born August 3, 1857, in Richmond, Indiana. 

J. Howard Baldwin and Carrie Romick were united in marriage Decem- 
ber — , 1880, in Morrow C ounty. Ohio, Rev. Lida Romick, the bride's mother, 
officiating. 

TO THEM WERE HORN 

Naiiif Birth Death 

Edith II. Balilwin March 2, 1882 

Paul Romick Jialdwin August 18, 1883 

They were born in Ada, Hardin Countw Ohio. 



RECORD OF THE GRISELl. FAMILY 453 

Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin located in Ada, where he taught bookkeeping and 
penmanship in Ada Normal College. 

Mrs. Carrie Baldwin is a gifted elocutionist. 

Edith H. graduated from the high school of Bowling Green, Ohio, then 
entered the Business University, of Detroit, Michigan, where she graduated in 
stenography. 



NOAH AND ANNIE ^ ROMICK) ISAACS (6) 

Annie Romick, daughter of William E. and Lida (Grisell) Romick, was 
born March i, 1864, in Harrisville, Harrison County, Ohio, and died May 30, 
1886, in Collins, Huron Count\', Ohio. Interment in the Friends' Cemetery 
near Ashley, Morrow County, Ohio. 

Noah Isaacs, son of and ( ) Isaacs, was born 

, , in Delaware. 

Noah Isaacs and .\nnic Romick were united in marriage September g, 
1882. in Morrow Count}', Ohio, Rev. Lida G. Romick, mother of the bride, 
officiating. 

TO thi:m were born 

Name Birtli Death 

Ralph R. Isaacs January 4, 1884 

Frank R. Isaacs May 30, 1886 

They were born in Collins, Huron County, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Isaacs located in Mercer County, Ohio, and afterward re- 
moved to Collins, Huron County, of the same State. Mr. Isaacs is an engineer 
and machinist. 



WILLIAM AND CARRIE A. (CROSS) CROSS (6) 

Carrie Alice Cross, daughter of Jason A. and Mary (Grisell) Cioss, was 
born I'V-hruary 18. i86g, near Ypsilanti, Michigan. 

William Cross, son of Gustavus and Hattie (Gorham) Cross, was born 
Ma\- 27, 1872, in Steuben County, Indiana. 

William Cross and Carrie A. Cross were united in marriage December 25, 
i8g3, near Ypstlanti, Michigan. 

TO rilKM WERE liOKN 

Name /'"//i Death 
Dorothy Marguerite Cross December 18, i8(;b 

She was born near Ypsilanti, Michigan. 

Mr. Cross is of French, German and I^nglish descent. His lather was 
a merchant in Toledo, ( )hii). hut on account of lailii:; healll' he ri moved to a 
farm near Plymouth, Indiana. 



454 RIX'ORD OF THE CRISELL EA.MII.Y 

Mr. Cross was educated in the Ypsilanti State Normal College. He is a 
member of the Methodist Church. 

Mrs. Cross also received her education in the Ypsilanti Normal, gradu- 
ating June 5, 1S90, and afterward taught a kindergarten school in Champion. 
Marquette County, Michigan. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cross reside near Cherry Hill, Canton Township, Wayne 
Count)', Michigan, where the former is manager of a large skimming station. 

ARTHUR C. AND ANNA E. (WILCOX) CROSS (6) 

Arthur Clarence Cross, son of Jason A. and Mary (Grisell) Cross, was 
born Dectiiiber 28, 1873, near Ypsilanti, Michigan. 

Anna Elizabetli Wilcox, daughter of George and Polly (Martin) Wilco.x. 
was born November 5, 1874, near Belleville, Wayne County, Michigan. 

Arthur C. Cross and Anna E. Wilcox were united in marriage June 10, 
1896, at the home of the bride's parents near Belleville, Michigan. 

No children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cross reside on a farm near Ypsilanti, where they are en- 
gaged in farming, 

Mr. Cross was educated in the Ypsilanti schools, having finished in the 
Cleary Business Colk-ge. He is a member of the Baptist Church. 

Mrs. Cross is of English descent and was educated in the Belleville high 
school. 

HARRIS W. AND AL